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THE 



TIMES 


No 62,533 


TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


25o 


Detention law 


illegal, rules 


H Durban court 


From Michael Hornsby, Durban 


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Thousands of people de- 
tained by the South African 
authorities are expected to 
apply for release after a full 
three-judge bench of the Dur- 
ban Supreme Court yesterday 
declared invalid two key State 
of Emergency regulations 
providing for summary arrest 
and detention. 

The ruling, though tech- 
nically only binding in Natal, 
sets a precedent likely to be 
followed by courts ihroughoai 
the country. Already requests 
have been made for the release 
of scores of detainees. 

The court, in a ruling read 
out by Mr Justice John Milne, 
the Judge President of Natal, 
found President P.W. Botha 
had exceeded his powers un- 
der the Public Safety Act of 
1953 when issuing the two 
regulations, and that accord- 
ingly they were unlawful. 

Mr Botha, and the Minister 
of Law and Order. Mr Louis 
Le Grange, and the Minister 
of Justice, Mr Kobie Coeisee, 
the two other respondents in 
the case, were ordered to pay 
all costs. 

In the light of this findings 
the court also ordered the 
release from prison of Mr 
Lechesa TsenolL the Natal 
publicity secretary of the 
United Democratic Front 
-fUDFL a broad-based alliance 
of anti -apartheid organiza- 
tions. on whose behalf the 
court action was brought. 

Mr TsenolL who was set 
free yesterday afternoon, was 
arrested by armed men- at his 
home in the Lamoniville 


black township outside Dur- 
ban before dawn on June 12, 
the day on which the State of 
Emergency was declared, un- 
der regulations which have 
now been proclaimed unlaw- 
ful. 

in a brief interview with 
journalists outside the court- 
room. Mr Tsenoli said he 
intended to resume his politi- 
cal activity after consulting 
with UDF colleagues. “Of 


Angola's Defence Ministry 
yesterday accused South Af- 
rican troops of attacking the 
town of Cnito Cnanavale. 185 
miles insMe south-east An- 
gola. The official Angolan 
news agency said the South 
African 32 “Buffalo" battal- 
ion, backed by heavy artillery, 
attacked Angolan forces and 
shelled the town. Uoita rebels 


said they had attacked the 
on Sal 


town on Saturday. 

Details, page 14 


course, l realize it is posable I 
could be re-arrested.” 


Up to 500 other people are 
thought to be in prison in 
Natal under these same emer- 
gency regulations, while es- 
timates of toe number of 
emergency detainees in the 
country as a whole go as high 
as 10.000, though this may 
include people held and later 
released^ 

The Government itself refu- 
ses to divulge any information 
about the number of de- 
tainees. Mr Le Grange's office 


declined last night to make 
any comment on the Supreme 
Court ruling, aiguing that the 
matter was sub judice until the 
slate's appeal had been heard. 

By releasing MrTsenoli. the 
stale has accepted that the 
court's ruling is effective even 
while toe appeal is pending 
and this means, according to 
legal sources here, that all 
emergency detainees can now 
apply to be set free on toe 
grounds that their continued 
imprisonment is unlawfriL 

The legal firm representing 
Mr Tsenoli said it had sent 
telex messages to toe Minister 
of Law and Order and toe 
Commissioner of Police 
requesting the immediate re- 
lease of 77 other clients in 
detention. If there was no 
response, application for their 
release, would be made to toe 
courts.' 

The ruling of toe Durban 
Supreme Court is binding 
throughout Natal and, legal 
sources here said yesterday, 
would have “persuasive 
authority” in toe three other 
provinces of toe country if 
applications for release of 
detainees were brought in 
courts there. 

The first of toe two regula- 
tions found unlawful by the 
Durban Supreme Court per- 
mits any member of toe police 
or army to arrest without 
warrant, and detain without 
trial for up to 14 days, any 
person who “in the opinion of 
such member” is a threat to 

Continued on page 14. col 5 


Tomorrow 


Wedding 

belle 



4 I can’t live alone 
— I need 
companionship’: 

Zsa Zsa Gabor looks 
forward to her 
eighth marriage 


Treasury hits back 
over TSB assets 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 



—^cld 


• There is £4,000 to 
be won today in the 
Times Portfolio Gold 
daily competition. 

• Yesterday’s prize 

of £4,000 was shared by 
three people. Details, 
page 3. 

• Portfolio list, page 
20; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 14. 


Rights pledge 

Liberal and Social Democrat 
leaders pledged that an Alli- 
ance government would incor- 
porate the European 
Convention on Human Rights 
in British law 


Gurkha anger 

Gurkhas dismissed and sent 
home after a brawl in Hawau 
say they have been badly 
treated by toe British Array 
and accuse it of racial 
discrimination P'age 6 


Lome arrests 


Nine people were arrested in 
Lome after the discovery of 
explosives from Libya appar- 
ently intended to destroy the 
US embassy in Togo. 


Activist freed 


Adam Michnik. the Solidarity 
activist jailed last year for 
planning a national strike, has 
been freed under Poland’s 
selective clemency measure. 


Hcr.t Nm 

2-4 

Dim 

10 

Overseas 

5-7 

Eras 

14 

Awns , 

12 

Features 

U-10 

Arts- 1 

13 

Lair Report 

25 

Birthsjduths 


Leaden 

11 

marriages 

12 

Letters 

11 

Bridee 

12 

Obitnnr 

12 

Business 15-20 

Science 

12 

loess 

Church 

2 

12 

Sport 26-30 

TMatreutc 29 

Corn 

12 

TV A Radio 

29 

Cro&S* ftrds 8.14 

Weather 

14 


V if. ^ q $ jf. 


The Government last night 
denied -that it owned-The 
£800 million surplus assets of 
toe Trustee Savings Bank or 
that it was taxpayers’ money. 

After criticism of its plan to 
sell toe bank, which has been 
growing since a House of 
Lords judgement last week 
that the assets “belong to the 
state”, toe Treasury tot night 
drew a distinction between toe 
Government and toe state. 

Mr Ian Stewart, Economic 
Secretary to toe Treasury, who 
is under mounting political 
pressure to delay next month's 
proposed sale in toe wake of 
toe doubts raised by toe 
judgement, said that none of 
his critics had explained why 
they thought toe bank’s assets 
were the Government's prop- 
erty, when the last 
Government’s TSB Act ex- 
pressly staled the opposite: 

The Labour Party, which 
voiced dissatisfaction with Mr 
Stewart's explanation last 
night, is determined to press 
toe issue throughout toe par- 
liamentary recess, with its aim 
being a delay in September's 
expected flotation. 

Sir Michael Havers, toe 
Attorney GeneraL is expected 
shortly to issue the 
Government’s interpretation 
of toe ruling. That is in 
response to a demand from 
Mr John Morris, Labour’s 
legal affairs spokesman, that 
he explain toe Treasury's 
distinction between toe prop- 
erty of toe government and 
that of the slate. 


depositors' associations, said 
that toe 1976 Act had said that 
toe bank's central board “shall 
not be regarded as the servant 
or agent of toe Crown or as 
enjoying any status, privilege 
or immunity of the Crown: 
and toe property of toe board 
shall not be regarded as prop- 
erty of or property held on 
behalf of toe Crown”. 

Lord Templeman had not 
said that toe TSB belonged to 
the Government He had said: 
“Statutory trustee savings 
banks and their assets belong 
to toe Slate subject to the 
contractual rights of depos- 
itors to toe return of their 
deposits and interest 

Mr Stewart said that there 
was an important legal distino 



Mr Stewart, who wrote to 
depositors' associations 


Mr Morris said that there 
was a strong argument for not 
implementing the 1985 
Trustee Savings Bank, which 
gave the Government toe 
right to transfer TSB assets to 
a new public limited com- 
pany. because it had been 
passed by Parliament on a 
prospectus which turned out 
to be false. 

But Mr Stewart, in a letter to 
the heads of the two 


lion between the Government 
or Crown and toe State. 

When the Government was 
drawing up its White Paper in 
1984 it was aware of toe 
unique background of trustee 
savings banks and concluded 
it was essential they be given a 
new ' structure with clear 
ownership and accountabilinr- 
That remained toe“ right 
course for the future of toe 
TSB movement*’. 



The Queen gives a hearty wave to members of the royal entourage from an outside balcony 
after her long climb to the top of the Ardnamnrchan Point lighthouse. 


Lighthouse 
climb ends 
health fear 
for Queen 


By JiU Sherman 


The Queen's nimble climb 
up 152 stairs to toe top of a 
lighthouse in Scotland 
terday has dispelled 
about her health. 

A leading cardiologist said 
after toe climb that it would be 
highly unusual for someone 
with a heart problem to have 
negotiated the steps with such 
apparent ease. 

“I think that shows what an 
excellent cardiovascular sys- 
tem she has,” said Dr Jane 
Somerville, consultant phy- 
sician at toe National Heart 
Hospital, London, where toe 
Queen underwent routine 
tests last week. 1 
“It would be unusual for a 
normal person to climb 152 
steps without any problems.” 

Mr Jim Handie. the prin- 
cipal ligblkceper, said that toe. 
Queen had not been out of 
breath during her climb, and 
had managed the feat with 
ease. 

The Queen was the first 
member of the Royal family 
to climb 1 1 4ft to the top of the 
Ardnamurchan Point light- 
house. She walked around an 
outside balcony twice before 
waving to toe Duke and 
Duchess of York, Prince Ed- 
ward and other members of 
toe royal entourage waiting at 
toe fool of toe building. 

The Duke and Duchess then 
had their turn, and climbed 
the steps while toe Queen 
waited below. 

After inspecting the light- 
house and toe surrounding 
buildings, the Queen had tea 
with Mrs Nan Hardie. the 
lightkeeper's wife. 

Minutes later toe Queen 
was deluged with flowers from 
children during a walkabout at 
Mingary Pier. 

Rhoda Mclnnes, aged nine, 
from toe island of Mull, who 
questioned toe Queen on her 
health, said: “I asked her how 
she was keeping and she said, 
•Very well thank you' 
Buckingham Palace con- 
firmed at toe weekend that toe 
Queen had a check up at toe 
National Heart Hospital last 
Tuesday. But a palace spokes- 
man said that the tests were 
“routine and insignificant”. 

The Queen resumed a busy 
schedule after the tests, and on 
Wednesday boarded the 
Royal Yacht Brittania, for her 
annual cruise en route to 
holidaying at Balmoral. 

The Palace said that there 
had been no changes at all to 
toe Queen's programme, and 
maintained that she was in 
excellent health. 


Pound higher as 
shares recover 
and gold soars 


By Richard Thomson 

Good news on several eco- ing toe day after a lacklustre 

The FT all share 


nomic fronts yesterday sent 
toe pound higher against most 
leading currencies, while toe 
slock market regained much 
of toe ground lost last week as 
share prices moved ahead in 
toe afternoon. 

The price of 'gold surged 
during toe day, pushing it up 
to it highest point in more 
than two years. 

Fears that South Africa 
would retaliate against eco- 
nomic sanctions by cutting off 
exports of gold sent its price 
soaring in London. 

At the afternoon fixing, 
when toe gold price is set by a 
group of five City banks, toe 
metal reached $394.50 after 
opening at $383. It was toe 
highest level since March 
1984. but profit taking later 
pushed toe price down again 
to close at $387. In New York, 
however, gold opened firmer 
and look set to continue its 
rise. 

The move prompted some 
analysts to predict that gold 
was heading for toe psycho- 
logically important $400 leveL 
but others said the price rise 
would only be temporary. 
Platinum followed gold to 
higher levels, reaching a five- 
year high in London of 
$544.50. an increase of more 
than $59 on toe day. 

Share prices also rose dur- 


opemng. 

Index finished up 11.3 at 
1228.7, after a steady rise in 
most share prices during the 
afternoon. Stocks related to 
gold did particularly well such 
as a 25p rise in Johnson 
Mattoey shares to 21 5p. 

The stock market was 
helped by a rise in sterling 
after news that Kuwait would 
not be selling spot oil in 
September and October. The 
pound benefited more than 
other leading currencies from 
this announcement, rising by 
one cent against the dollar to 
finish in London at $1.4845. 

It rose less sharply against 
other currencies, rising to 
DM3.0545 against the mark 
from an opening of 
DM3.051 8. The sterling effec- 
tive index, measured against a 
basket of currencies ended up 
0.2 at 71.1. 

Uncertainty remained on 
currency markets, however. 
News that the price of raw 
materials used by manufac- 
turing industry had fallen 
sharply last month, with a 
year-on-year drop of 9.8 per 
cent, helped to strengthen 
sterling. But toe price of 
manufactured goods contin- 
ued to rise in July, largely 
because of rising unit labour 
costs. 

Gold price leaps, page 15 


Shell puts 
7p a gallon 
on petrol 


By David Young 

Energy Corespondent 

Shell which last week an- 
nounced a 16 per cent fall in 
profits, last night raised its 
petrol prices by 7p a gallon in 
an effort to force them back to 
£1.65 a gallon. 

But motorists should still be 
filling their tanks with cheaper 
petrol over toe Bank holiday - 
many at Shell stations. 

Fierce competition on the 
forecourts will keep prices 
down and a concerted rise in 


prices Jby toe big five — Esso. 


ell, BP. Texaco and Mobil — 
would infuriate the 
Government. 

The House of Commons 
Energy Select Committee is 
already looking at toe relation- 
ship between crude oil prices 
and retail petrol prices. 


Miss Marple on TV 
for 300m Chinese 


By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


An estimated 300 million 
viewers in China will be able 
io watch toe television series 
Miss Marple . paid_ for by 
accompanying advertisements 
for British’products. 

The deal with China Central 
Television was concluded by 
toe BBC in association with 


mes will 
Otter, just after 


The first 
be shown in 
a visit by toe Queen. Apart 
from the Agatha Christie tales, 
they will include The Living 
Isles, a natural history series 
about Britain, and Greai River 
Journeys, a documentary 


behind toe “bamboo curtain”. 


senes. 

China is one of the fastest 
growing markets for television 
programmes and advertising. 


A BBC spokesman said: 
“The main idea is to help 
promote British products in 
an important market At the 
same time China can enjoy 


There are presently 65 million 
I sales are 


high-quality programmes 
without delving into foreign 


currency reserves, and we earn 
revenue for our productions.” 


sets and sales are running at 15 
million annually. 

The BBC said that similar 
arrangements had been made 
in toe past to transmit cover- 
age of sports events. In terms 
of potential viewers, however, 
it was by far toe biggest of its 
kind. 


Police issue photos of 
man accused of murder 


Scotland Yard last night 
took toe unusual step of 
issuing two photographs of 
Kenneth Erskine. who has 
been charged with six mur- 
ders. in an appeal for informa- 
tion from anyone who knows 
where he has been living. 

Erskine. aged 23. was re- 
manded in custody by South 
Western magistrates in Lon- 
don on August 6, accused of 
four murders in Stock-well 
one in Putney and one in 
Islington. 

He is also accused of at- 
tempted murder in StockwelL 
AD involved elderly people. 

In issuing toe photographs, 
after consultation with toe 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions. Scotland Yard said: 
"There arc two pictures, one 
with dreadlocks, toe other 


one. and a younger one, with 
much shorter hair.” 


Anyone who wishes to pro- 
vide anonymous information 
should telephone 01-3262180. 



An earlier 

accused. Kei 


of the 

Erskine. 


Party coup 
denied 
by Paisley 


By Richard Ford 

Within minutes of arriving 
back in Ulster yesterday the 
Rev lan Paisley sought to 
dispel suggestions that a 
“coup d’etat" against his 
leadership of the Democratic 
Unionist Party had been ar- 
ranged in his absence by his 
deputy, Mr Peter Robinson. 

He said on his return from 
toe United States: “I am not 
old. decrepit, looking for a 
batochair, demoralized, or 
anything else.” 

Mr Paisley, who is 60, said 
he resented being described as 
old. and added: “When I'm in 
office, I run toe office. I am toe 
leader of toe DUP.” 

The two men sat side-by- 
side at a press conference held 
at Aidergrove Airport, 
describing each other as 
“friends and colleagues", with 
Mr Paisley alleging that the 
Northern Ireland Office was 
behind toe spate of specula- 
tion that Mr Robinson, aged 
37. was to “put the knife in my 
back." 

However Mr Paisley sought 
in his opening remarks to end 
toe damaging speculation 
about his position, and toe 
motives of his deputy. 

He denied that he had cut 
short his attendance at a 
fundamentalist religious con- 
gress in the United States to 
return home. 

Mr Robinson said he found 
it offensive that there was any 


suggestion that he ^as hying 


to lake over toe leadership 


the party, and added: “Any- 
one I dc 


thing I do behind his back is 
giving him support.” 

Although it is unlikely that 


Mr Robinson is planning a 
iaer- 


challenge for the DUP leai 
ship, he is certainly 
strengthening his position 
within toe party at a time 
Continued on page 14, col 3 


r 


Yard in secret 


swoop on Kent 
police stations 


By Michael McCarthy 


Detectives from Scotland 
Yard, investigating allegations 
that police officers in Kent 
have been falsifying crime 
statistics with bogus confes- 
sions, made an unprecedented 
series of surprise raids on 13 
Kent police stations yesterday. 

It was the son of operation 
usually directed against lead- 
ing criminals or terrorist cells, 
complete with a 6 am briefing 
at the Yard and a simulta- 
neous swoop on target stations 
at 10 am. 

Teams of officers from the 
Yard's Serious Crimes Branch 
examined CID records and 
documentation at toe stations 
and in some cases removed 
accounts of prison interviews. 

They are investigating 
claims that Kent detectives 
have been systematically and 
fraudulently improving their 
crime clear- up rates by ascrib- 
ing unsolved crimes to con- 
victed criminals who make 
false confessions in return for 
favours in prison. 

The allegations were made 
early this year by PC Ron 
Walker, a serving Kent police 
officer. The Metropolitan Po- 
lice was asked to investigate 
by Mr Frank Jordan, Kent's 
Chief Constable. 

Mr Jordan vesicnday de- 
clined to comment on toe 
raids on his stations, as did 
Scotland Yard. The Kent force 
was at pains to point out that 
it had instigated the inquiry 
and that it was co-operating 
fully. 

the raids were suggested by’ 
Mr Vernon Clements of the 
Independent Police Com- 
plaints Authority, which is 
supervising toe inquiry, after 
consultation with Com- 
mander Ron Dowling, head of 


the Serious Crimes Branch, 
who is leading iL 

Mr Clements said yes- 
terday: “There have been 
rumours of evidence being 
destroyed or going missing 
and vve fell that an element of 
surprise was essential.” He 
added that the inquiry had 
“considerably broadened” 
since PC Walker's original 
allegations and was nou con- 
cerned with all the Kent police 
divisions. 

“Scotland Yard now have to 
go through such ne» ev idence 
as they may have with a fine- 
tooth comb and it will be some 
lime before they can evaluate 
it. but we would hope that the 
inquiry' would finish before 
the end of toe year.” Mr 
Clements said. 

Police officers in Kent were 
taken aback by the scale and 
nature of the raids, which the 
force officially preferred to 
term "visits”. One senior 
officer said : “I have never 
heard of anything like it in 
more than 20 years as a 
policeman, and I'll het the old 
station officer got a hell of a 
shock when the gentlemen 
from the Yard waltzed up to 
his front counter.” 

The Scotland Yard officers 
did not have search warrants, 
retying merely on their identi- 
fication. 

PC Walker has alleged that 
the spurious “writing off' of 
unsolved crimes was in some 
areas boosting the clcar-up 
figures by as much as 50 per 
cent Hc also claimed that in 
return for making the false 
confessions, criminals were 
sometimes being given a li- 
cence to commit other crimes 
on their release. 


English clubs face 
longer Europe ban 


By John Goodbody, Sports News Correspondent 


English clubs face an exten- 
sion of the ban on playing in 
toe three European competi- 
tions because of the latest out- 
break of football hooliganism. 

UEFA, toe European gov- 
erning body, will consider 
what action to take at its 
executive meeting in Prague 
on September 11. A UEFA 
spokesman said yesterday that 
they might consider imposing 
new penalties on English 
clubs, which could include a 
ban on friendly matches with 
European clubs or an exten- 
sion of toe ban from toe three 
competitions, or both. 

The move follows toe most 
disastrous weekend for toe 
game since toe 1985 European 
Cup Final in Brussels when 39 
people died which caused 
English clubs to be suspended 
indefinitely. 

After Friday's battle on toe 
cross-Channel ferry there was 
violence in Plymouth and 


Chesterfield on Saturday and 
a riot in Amsterdam on Sun- 
day involving Manchester 
United fans. English dubs had 
hoped to return to Europe 
after a maximum of three 
years exile, provided there 
were no more incidents of 
hoologanism. 

A spokesman for toe FA 
said yesterday that with toe 
start of toe League season only 


1 1 days away, there was now 
iful of matches to 


only a handf 
be played abroad. But the FA 
was considering banning fu- 
ture friendlv matches. 


Mr Richard Tracey, toe 
Minister of Sport, has already 
railed for reports on the 
incidents involving fans trav- 
elling abroad and the issue will 
be discussed at next week’s 
emergency meeting of govern- 
ment ministries, the FA and 
toe Football League. 


Trail of destruction, page 14 







Ill 


no IViC iNevvo 


THE TiMfcS TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


Alliance promises laws 
to protect human 




mm 


rights of individuals 


Action call 
on trawler 
dispute 
with Spain 


Cash call 
to Games 


boycott 

countries 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


An Alliance government 
would legislate to incorporate 
into British law the protec- 
tions given to individuals by 
the European Convention on 
Human Rights, ns leaders 
promised yesterday. 

The promise was made as 
Mrs Shirley Williams, the 
Social Democratic Party presi- 
dent and Mr Des W'ilson. who 
becomes Liberal president 
next month, launched a cam- 
paign for constitutional re- 
form. which will include a 
month-long tour of big cities, 
universities and polytechnics 
aimed at encouraging the pres- 
sure for reform. 

in order to break down the 
walls "of our increasingly 
authoritarian, centralized ana 
secreiive system” the Alliance 
committed itself yesterday to: 

• The introduction of a “fair 
votes" proportional 
representation system for all 
local, national and European 
Parliament elections in 
Britain. 

• A freedom of information 
Act 10 sinp away much of the 
secrecy surrounding the way 
Britain is governed. 

• Devolution of centralized 
decision-making to Scottish 
and Welsh assemblies and to 
the regions. 

• A new Bill of rights includ- 
ing the provisions of the 
European Convention. 

The decision of the leaders 
to go oui into the country' and 
campaign is designed to give 
added vigour to a cause which 
they admit docs not excite as 
much public interest as they 
would wish. 

Local members of the two 
parties, who will be briefed by 
the presidents at their annual 
conferences next month, will 
be involved m the campaign, 
organizing public meetings 
and press conferences in the 
cities to be visited by Mrs 
Williams and Mr Wilson. 


SNP to hold 


policy drive 


The Scottish National Party 
is launching a big consultation 
drive to help decide its policies 
in the event of a hung 
Parliament. 

The party chairman, Mr 
Cordon Wilson, MP for Dnn- 
dee East, told a press con- 
ference in Edinburgh 
yesterday that a Parliament 
Where no single party had an 
overall majority after tbe next 
general election was. “an 
increasingly likely 

possibility”. 

The SNP and Plaid Cymru 
intended to drive through a 
package of key demands for 
Scotland and Wales, he said. 

The consultation among in- 
stitutions and organizations 
covering the whole of Scottish 
society would help determine 
what those demands would be. 

Scottish self-government 
was a prereq oisite for the 
SNP, Mr Wilson said. Bat the 
party was seeking public com- 
ment on its plans for an elected 
Scottish convention. 


A 5.000-word statement is- 
sued yesterday by Mrs Wil- 
liams and Mr Wilson said that 
it was humiliating that “we 
cannot seek protection of our 
rights in our own courts with 
the bene lit of our own laws”. 

It pointed to the many 
rights, including restrictions 
against telephone-tapping and 
the ability of prisoners to 
correspond with MPs, which 
had been established in Brit- 
ain only by appeals from 
individuals to the European 
Commission on Human 
Rights. 

“Rights arc next to worth- 
less if we cannot enforce them. 
Many people have travelled 


hundreds of miles to Stras- 
bourg to do just that. About 
800 provisional United King- 
dom files are opened by the 
Commission eveiy year. No 
other State sends so many. No 
other State has had so many 
cases declared admissible by 
the Commission, nor lost so 
many cases before the court,'’ i 
it said. 

Mrs Williams said at a press 1 
conference yesterday that | 
more than a quarter of the 
civil liberties cases before the 
European Court came from 
Britain. Civil liberties in Brit- 
ain were less protected than in 
other countries. 

The incorporation of the 
European convention into 
British law would give real 
meaning to the claim “it is my 
right", and form a bulwark 
against measures increasingly 
being taken to belittle ana 
reduce rights. 

In the section on propor- 
tional representation, the 
statement recommends a sin- 
gle transferable vote system 
based on multi-member 
constituencies. 

The Alliance system would 
allow voters to express their 
preferences between can- 
didates. Everyone's vote 
would be of equal value. 
Instead of more than half the 
votes being tossed away, as 
they were with the present 
system, virtually every vote 
cast would help lo elect 
someone. 

The Alliance would repeal 
section two of the OfRcals 
Secrets Act. replacing it with a 
freedom of information Act, 
which would make all 
information, barring a few 
exemptions, available to the 
public. 

Britain had become the 
most secretive of all demo- 
cratic countries, the statement 
said. 




Tbe Duke and Duchess of York, going walkabout yesterday on the Andnamurchan peninsu- 
la of Scotland, the most westerly point on the British mainland. 


Prince to follow in royal footsteps 


The Prince of Wales hopes 
Prince William will soon be 
learning his future “job”, even 
though he is only aged fonr. 

In a television documentary, 
to be broadcast later this 
month. Prince Charles says he 
hopes his son will learn from 
him the duties of the dukedom 
when he becomes the Duke of 
CornwalL 

He says: “I hope that like a 
fanner's son following his 
father around the farm and 
picking things up, he will do 
the same.” 

Prince William will be seen 
counting sheep as he walks 
around Higbgrove House. 
Gloucestershire, on a Decem- 
ber day with his father. 

The rare glimpse of private 
moments will be screened in a 


BBC documentary. The Ducky 
of Cornwall, on August 19. 


The Prince of Wales is seen 
milking cows and putting up 
fences on one of the farms in 
the Duchy. 


He tells the interviewer, 
Jenni Murray, how he loves to 
spend time away from every- 
thing on the farm. 


Prince Charles feels that 
being the Duke of Cornwall 
and administering the estate, 
which mm from the SdDy 
Isles to parts of Cornwall and 
op into parts of London, is his 
only “real job”. 


He says: “I find it extremely 
therapeutic. I find it marvel- 
lous to actually get down to 
mocking Out, milicing cows, 
delivering calves and mending 
stone walls. 


It provides him with his only 
source of income and he makes 
a voluntary 25 per cent 
contribution to tbe Treasury. 


“It’s certainly a change 
from the kind of existence I 
live, and somehow it 
straightens out yoor whole 
attitude to life.” 


During the past few years 
tbe Prince, who has worked on 
three Gums in the Duchy, has 
learned about his tenant's 
problems “from the sharp 
end”. 


But he admits during the 
programme that he does not 
think he wonid make a good 
farmer. 


By Mark Dowd 

A renewal of trawler hostil-i 
ittes in the Atlantic has led to 
calls for diplomatic action by 
the Irish Government against 
Spain. 

The Irish defence forces 
yesterday confirmed reports 
of a weekend clash 150 miles 
west of Galway Bay involving 
the trawler Cupel l Ban and the 
Spanish fishing vessel. Sierra 
tie Ancones. 

Trouble flared when the 
Spanish trawler cut the lines of 
the 40ft Irish vessel causing an 
estimated £5,000 worth of 
damage. 

However reports that 16 
Spanish crew had boarded the 
Irish trawler, cut its lines and 
smashed its radio were denied 
yesterday by the Irish fisheries 
protection service. 

An Irish defence forces 
spokesman said yesterday: 
“The Spanish vessel has gone 
missing, presumably to the 
high seas to off-load its catch 
to a factory ship (or process- 
ing. The Spaniards apparently 
deliberately cut across the 
bows of the Irish vessel and 
cut its nets.” 

Mr Frank Doyle, general 
secretary of the Irish 
Fishermen’s Organization, 
said yesterday that it was the 
policy of the Spanish in that 
area “to be as dirty and 
aggressive as possible”. 

He said that pending a full 
report of the incident from Mr 
Patrick O’Malley, the skipper 
of the Capall Ban, the Spanish 
ambassador should be sum- 
moned to receive a strong 
protest- 

The incident comes in the 
wake of several collisions 
between vessels from the two 
countries. Of 67 trawlers ar- 
rested last year off the Irish 
coast for illegal fishing. 53 
were of Spanish origin* 

So far in 1986, 27 fishing 
vessels have been detained by 
the Irish authorities, of which 
16 are Spanish. 


Countries which boycotted 
the Commonwealth Games 
over Britain's policy on South 
Africa will be presented with a 
bill towards the cost of staging 
the event, which left a £3.5 
million debt. 

The Commonwealth 
Games Organizing Commit- 
tee, which met in Edinburgh 
yesterday, agreed to approach 
the 32 boycotting nations fora 
contribution as well as those 
which participated. 

Mr Robert Maxwell, co- 
chairman of the committee, 
was said last night lo be 
“deadlv serious” about the 
moves! even though it is 
believed they would be met 
with blunt refusals. 


eminent aid and was also 
seeking help from sporting 
bodies, creditors and a 
foundation set up by Mr 
Ryoichi Sasakawa, a Japanese 


entrepreneur. 


Apology fails 
in race dispute 


Mr Bob Cosh, president of 
Oxford Central Conservative 
Cub, has apologized to five 
Chinese people for the pub- 
licity that followed the rejec- 
tion of their applications for 
membership. But the move 
has further angered commu- 
nity relations officials who are 
referring the matter to the 
Commission for Racial 
Equality. 

Mr Cosh apologized after 
the club committee 
blackballed Mr Timmy Tsang. 
a restaurant owner, and four 
of his employees, but chose 
seven new white members. 


Charge over 
airport death 


Stephen Bold, aged 20, ap- 
peared at Crawley 
Magistrates' Court yesterday 
charged with the murder of 
Zoe T ucker, aged 20, who was 


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__ T stabbed to death early on 

Patients may get where she worked at Gatwick 

1 • ^ • Mr Bold, of Bayliss Walk. 

iTiriC! I/* GPFITIPPG Broadfield, Crawley, Sussex, 

^V'JI t was also charged with the 

By jm Sherman attempted murder of another 

Patients waiting i for treat- proposals. Some would ip- SKlyhii? on a 

tent ut National Health Ser- evttably mean changes m 3 

ice hospitals could pass the legislation, which the Govern- _ . 

me watching video record- menl was anxious to avoid. VlbrilllOnS Dllt 

igs and eating chocolates “We are looking at ways of 


By JQ1 Sherman 


ment ut National Health Ser- 
vice hospitals could pass the 
time watching video record- 
ings and eating chocolates 


under proposals being consid- generating additional income , 
ered by the Department of to spend on patient services] 


Vibrations put 
up water bill 


Health. 


within the .bounds of legal 


A draft circular, expected to constraints and recognizing 1 
be issued soon, will ask health the fact that prime respon- 


m S' «:K,- 

r- ruffe. 


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authorities to consider a num- ability of the NHS is to 
ber of proposals, including provide health care," he said. 


allowing newsagents, confec- The proposals include 


tioners, dry cleaners and flo- allowing advertising on 
lists to tender for space in hoardings in hospital grounds, 
hospital foyers. introducing feature films and 


A total of 36 proposals have soap operas on television 
so far been drawn up as a video screens in waiting 


result of scrutinies, com mis- rooms, and allowing firms to 
sioned last December, into sell food on hospital trolleys. 


maximizing 

income. 


The services would be paid 
for by firms advertising their 


The scrutinies, conducted goods on the video screens, 
by Mr John Sargent, deputy Mr Whitney said that the 


A retired fanner, who 
blamed heavy lorries going 
past his home for pushing up 
his water rates, has won his 
battle with the Anglian Water 
Authority over a bill for £300. 

Mr Frederick Dix, aged 77. 
said the bill was 10 tiroes as 
high as it should have been for 
his semi-detached house at 
Molton Marsh, . near 
Holbeach. Lincolnshire, and 
claimed that traffic vibrations 
had jolted his water meter. 
Tests showed that tbe meter 
was faulty. 


district treasurer at Wigan latter proposals would mainly 
health authority, examined benefit visitors and out- 


suggestions put forward by patients. 


Touche Ross, the manage- He suggested that busi- 
ment consultants, last nesses could tender to sell 


Heat hunt for 
missing family 


September. 


Police brought in an RAF 
licopter with heat-seeking 


hospital 


Mr Ray Whitney, Under premises under similar proce- 
Secretary of State for Health dures to the competitive 
snd Social Security, said tendering for ancillary ser- 


yesterday that the Govern- vices, but under a shorter Lime 
ment was considering the span. 


Moves to 
cut crime 
at carnival 


helicopter with heat-seeking 
equipment to search the 
Prestatyn area of North Wales 
yesterday, where Mr Robert 
Healey, aged 37, left a suicide 
note almost two weeks ago. 

Detectives believe that his 
wife, Greeba. aged 40, and bis 
stepdaughter, Marie, aged 13. 
are dead. 


1 stepaaugnter. Mane, aged 1 3. 

Couple see aredead 
home come Bullion char 8 e 

VACUUMS? Three men. one of them a 
J security guard, were charged 

111 IWil with robbery yesterday after 

police swooped on a gold bul- 


By Angella Johnson 

The Notting Hill Carnival 
comes of age this year and 
plans lo celebrate 'its 21st 
birthday with a record one 


wortanep stated demolishing ££ "**0. Btakrogham- 


their £60,000 house at the end ilIX **525 

•fa 12-year ptamungtanle. Maples 




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Name(s) . 


Yesterday, the Metropoli- 
tan Police launched a crime- 
prevention campaign in an 
effort to cut down on pick- 
pockets and petty thefts, by 
asking people to leave valu- 
ables and large sums of money 
at home. 

Mr John Newing. the Dep- 
uty Assistant Commissioner, 
said at a press conference at 
Kensington and Chelsea 
Town Hall: “The message is to 
travel light, come early, and 
leave eany.” 

Although recorded crime 
last year was reduced by 23 per 
•on 1 984, the after-dusk figures 
for reported knife incidents 
increased by 61 percent.- 
Tbe police will have more! 
than 4.000 officers on standby 
The carnival, one of the 


birthday with a record one The three-bedroom house, _ _ _ 

million revellers over the bank at Woodleigh, south Devon, Kd nv ChSTffG 
holiday weekend of August had been threatened with _ , , 

24-25. demolition since it was buQt „ ul,e Lesley Williams, aged 

Yesterday, the Metro poll- without planning permission. of Silver End. Brierley 
tan Police launched a crime- .Mr Colin Gavashan and his ”'^ sl . Midlands, was 

prevention campaign in an wife, Anne, lived in a caravan remanded m custody for 
effort to cut down on pick- on the site while they con- sev ® n days yesterday, charged 
pockets and petty thefts, by ducted their lengthy fight with w ~. the a bducuon of a girl. 

asking people to leave valu- Sooth Hams CounriL , one day, 

Wolverhamolon’s New rvnss 


ICV y.. 


Address. 


largest street events in Europe, 
is being funded by a £50,000 
gram from Kensington and 
Chelsea council. £50.000 from 
the Loudon Boroughs Grams 
Unit. 

This year’s route has been 
extended and wflJ include 




■%‘S. . 


Postcode. 


Two planning appeals and 
the High Court all ruled 
"against the Gavaghans, who 
are due to move info a year-old 
council hon& in Kingsbridge 
near by later this week. 

Mr Gavagban, aged 60, 
said: “It has all gone on so 
long that I don't fed bitter any 
more, just disappointed at the 
vindictiveness of the coancil. 

"Any reasonable council 
would have done what we 
asked and given ns planning 
permission retrospectively. 

The council said: “We are 
determined to maintain strict 
control over development in 
the country-side.*' 


Wolverhampton’s New Cross 
Hospital on Saturday. 

Strike ends 


A six-day; strike which para- 
lysed mail deliveries at 
Slough, Berkshire, ended Iasi 
night when a peace formula 
for a return to work was 
agreed. 


nUnd MMc 9.00; Franc* FY* 800: 

Gibraltar 6 Qk 


•awsss 


m-- - O w umla nd « 

DUl 80.00: USA 
**‘•8. Yugoslavia Otn V 


Computers compete 


By Hany Golombek, Chess Correspondent 


The Commonwealth Chess 


Signature^). 


Kcnsa I Road, Ladbroke Gar- Championships opened ves- 
dens. West bourne Grove and terday in London. The fidd 
Chepstow Road, all west which includes competitor 


FOR INVESTMENTS OF £10,000 OR MORE. 


London. 

The Prince of Wales has 


from all Commonwealth na- 
tions except Malaysia, corn- 


sent a goodwill message prises 95 competitors, indud- 
congratulating the organizers ing iu-q computers, 
on putting together an annual The games were opened bv 
event which “brings a very the chairman .of the Thames 


\ — t \ • 

WOOLWICH 

I EQUITABLE BUILDING SOCIETY A 


real sense of the community, 
and plays an important role in 


Water Authority, Mr Rov 
Watts, who said FIDE would 


cementing cultural harmony be ofitred accommodation for 


in our society. 


its headquarters in London's 


docklands if the United King- 
dom and Brazil are successful 
in tiie diess ruling body’s 
presidential election later this 
year. 

Five grand masters — Johann 
Hjartrason, Iceland; Seraey 
Kudrin, US: Nick de Firmian. 
US: Jim Plaskeu, England; 
and Leonid ShamkovicLUS 
— .are favoured to take first 
prize, but many strong inter- 
national masters may cause 
upsets. 

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Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec- 
retary of State for Education 
and Science, is likely to an- 
nounce shortly, probably in 
the autumn, that an indepen- 
dent inquiry is needed into the 
teaching of the English lan- 
guage in schools. 

His concern about English' 
leaching is a direct result of 
responses to a document from 
the Schools Inspectors (HMI) 
which showed that teachers 
were hostile to children being 
taught formal grammatical 
analysis. ' Teachers believed 
that children should learn 
something about their lan- 

fhatshould be. 

Moreover, teachers were 
against the notion of children 
being taught a specific list of 
objectives about their lan- 
guage. As a result, the inspec- 
tors dropped their original 
suggestion that children 
should be given a list of 
objectives which they should 
know by the age of 11. 

Tn the face of opposition 
front the teaching profession, 
the inspectors dropped aS 
mention that pupils aged II 
should know the difference 
between vowels and con- 
sonants, that a sentence has a 
subject and a verb and that 
verbs have differing tenses. 

The inspectors suggested 
that a national inquiry into 
English teaching might be the 
answer, and that is what Mr 
Baker is now considering. 
Many pupils are taught noth- 
ing about bow our language 
works as a system.' 


m 


At a world con 
Reading recently. Mr Baker 
said: "Over the past 20 years 
or so. schools have progres- 
sively erased to teach the rules 
of English gr ammar as my 
generation were taught them. 

-There is widespread agree- 
ment that some better, more 
effective way needs to be 
found of enabling people to 
tbink about how they use 
language, and to talk about it 
Unlike the French, the Brit- 
ish have devoted little atten- 
tion' to their language, apart 
from some academics at 
university level in recent years 
who have become interested 
in its structure. 

Since formal grammatical 
analysis was abolished in die 
1950s, school teachers have 
tended to ignore language and* 
to concentrate on creative 
writing. 

Any inquiry would have to 
carry authority and command 
the support of the teaching 
profession. It would therefore 
have to contain practising 
teachers and academics with 
their feet on the ground. The 
Treasury would have to agree 
to extra spending on the 
investigation. 

Before any decision is 
reached about whether to have 
an inquiry, Mr Baker will have 
to. settle those issues as well as 
the scope of the investigation. 
Would h simply look at what 
children should learn in En- 
glish language or should it take 
a broader look ai the way 
language is used in society? 


Five years’ jail 
for £20 mugging 


Two men were jailed for 
five years yesterday for rob- 
bing a bus conductress of £20. 

Judge Paiba at Southwark 
Crown Court said: “Offences 
of this nature are growing in 
London like weeds on the 
street after die rain. Citizens 
must be allowed to walk the 
streets in peace and everyone 
is getting fed lip with this 
growing violence. 

“Before you two were -born 
a certain judge put a stop to a 
certain type of offence by 
suddenly givij&g- strong 
sentences. t . J 

“I hope someone takes no- 
tice of what has happened to 
you two today. Violence has 
got to be crushed.” 

He added: “Lopdbh Trans- 
port staff are almost in a panic 
about their lives at night They 
are being attacked on and off 
the buses. They are being 
terrorized.” 


Stephen Larter and Alan 
Edwards, both aged 22 and 
from Walworth, south Lon- 
don, had denied robbing Miss 
Shiriey Waugh, aged 49, as she 
relumed to night duty on her 
bus in Brixton, south-west 
London, after a meal break. 

The court was told that she 
was grabbed by the throat 
thrown against railings and 
robbed of coins worth £20. - 

She had gone back to work a 
few weeks after the attack but 
was so terrified that the same 
. thing might happen- again that 
she handed in her notice nfter 
one day. : 

Mr Carl Scholz, for the 
defence, said that the offence 
happened “after a consid- 
erable amount of alcohol had 
been drunk in a local pub”. 

. He added: “The attack was 
on the spur of the moment In 
no way was it planned.” 


Sugar Puffs 
bear bites 
off boy’s arm 


Dundee Council officials 
were yesterday investigating 
an incident in which a boy 
aged 10 had his arm bitten off 
below the elbow by a bear in 
the local municipal wildlife 
park. 

Ross Prendergast was re- 
covering in hospital after 12 
boys climbed through a hole 
in the 6ft high, barbed wire 
topped perimeter fence 
around the closed park on 
Sunday night 


The boy had stuck his arm 
through the chain link wire of 
a cage containing Jeremy. -a 
2 1 -year-old female European 
brown bear, which when 
younger featured in Sugar 
Puffs advertisements. 


The boys had crossed a 
safety barrier and appeared to 
have been poking the animal 
with a stick. Mr Allan Booth, 
Dundee's director of 
recreation, said. 


Mr Amgad Taha, a park 
keeper who lives near by. saw 
some of the boys inside the 
compound and pulled the 
injured boy away from the 
cage. The war was on display 
yesterday. 


A hospital spokesman said 
the boy's condition was 
satisfactory after an operation. 


Man jailed for 
death of Nobel 
Prizewinner 


Robert Gardner, aged 40, a 
computer expert, was jailed 
for 21 months yesterday after 
pleading guilty to causing the 
death by reckless driving of 
Professor Rodney Porter, aged 
68, the 1972 Nobel Prize win- 
ner for medicine. 

Judge Lewis McCreery pass- 
ed the sentence at Winchester 
Crown Court after being told 
how Gardner, of Peartree 
Lane. Newbury, caused a four- 
car collision in a race to beat 
other cars at the end of a dual 
carriageway near his home. 

A traffic sign, flung into the 
air during the crash, speared 
Mr David Busby, of North- 
ampton. who was driving 
behind Professor Porter's car. 
Mr Busby is now paralysed 
and speechless. Gardner bad 
previous motoring offences. 


Attack on 
friend 
denied by 
teacher 


Jayne Scon emphatically 
denied yesterday to the Cen- 
tral Criminal Court that she 
had bludgeoned her alleged 
rival in love. 

Miss Scott, aged 30, a games 
teacher, was asked by Mr 
Richard Cherriil. for the de- 
fence: “Did you strike Susan 
Craker with a hammer?” Miss 
Scott replied: “No 1 did not.” 

Miss Scott, of Farnham 
Royal. Buckinghamshire, de- 
nies allegations by the 
prosecution that she repeat- 
edly hit Miss Craker, a deputy 
headmistress, over the head 
with a two- pound hammer in 
a fit of jealousy because Mrs 
Debbie Fox. her friend, had 
slept with Miss Craker eight 
days previously. 

, Miss Craker, aged 35, who 
worked at the same school as 
Miss Scott, is now brain 
damaged and paralysed in a 
wheelchair. 

Miss Scott told the jury that 
she had had a sexual relation- 
ship with Miss Fox. It was ber 
only lesbian relationship. 

Miss Scott told the court 
that she had learnt of the 
liaison between Miss Craker 
and Mts Fox on her return 
from a visit to her family 
home. 

Asked to describe things at 
Miss Crater's home in Barnet, 
north London, Miss Scon 
said: “We were all a little bit 
nervous when we first arrived 
because of what had happened 
and since we were all last 
together, but we were soon 
laughing and joking,” 

On the Tuesday morning, 
the three had breakfast and 
Mrs Fox went to get dressed. 
Miss Scon said that Lhe mood 
between herself and Miss 
Craker was quite jo viaL 
Miss Scon said that Mrs 
Fox was going to the news- 
agents. The trip there and back 
would have taken about seven 
minutes. 

Miss Scon had told Miss 
Craker she was going for a 
bath. Miss Craker was sitting 
cross-legged by the patio door 
with a newspaper. 

Miss Scon said that she had 
heard some lawnmowers go- 
ing outside. In the bath she 
heard the mowing noise had 
slopped. “I heard a door 
bang — it seemed to come 
from somewhere in the house. 


After bathing she wrapped a 
towel round herself “I beard a 
groaning, moaning sound 
from downstairs”, when she 
went down she heard it again 
and went into lhe lounge. 

“I saw Sue lying oh her 
back, her brad, arms and legs 
were moving. Her legs -were 
bent, her head was over to one 
side. She was making a groan- 
ing noise. ■ 

“By her right hand was a 
hammer. She was covered in 
blood, her face was covered in 
blood. I lifted the hammer out 
of the way to get dose to her. 
Blood was flowing out from 
behind her ear. 1 touched 
where it was coming out and 
then I just panicked. I felt 
dizzy and rick.” 

“1 ran back upstairs to the 
bathroom. 1 leant against the 


bath feeling dizzy, i steadied 
myself with my 


left band 
while I shook my right hand 
into the bath. I switched on 
the taps and used my nightie 
to wipe the blood. 

“I was shaking and tried to 
scream but no screams would 
come out. 1 swilled my uighiie 
round in water and used it to 
clean blood in the bath.” 

Then she heard a door bang 
downstairs. “I shot straight 
down. Debbie had just come 
in. I was shaking. 

“I said: *It is Sue. it is Sue'.” 
She asked where she was and I 
pointed to the lounge. She 
went in. I did not go back into 
the room. Debbie was quite 
calm and went to phone for an 
ambulance." 

Miss Scott said it had not 
crossed her mind to cal) an 
ambulance. “I just wanted to 
get the blood off my hands.” 

The trial continues today. 


Pupils leave hospital 


All the. children who be- 
came ill during a. schools' 
canoeing holiday in southern 
France have been released 
from hospital: 

The last 10 have been 
allowed to rejoin their col- 
leagues. About 60 members of 
a party of 120 became ill with 
suspected gastroenteritis soon 
after arriving at the weekend. 

Mr Roger Pierce,. aged 22, 


tor. from Bangor, North 
Wales, was also released from 
hospital yesterday. 

The children, aged 12 to 15. 
suffered ' severe stomach 
cramps and vomiting. Food 
poisoning or a virus infection 
was suspected. 

Mr Ron Veiicta, director of 
the company at Haywards 
Healh. West Sussex, which 
organized the tour, travelled 


an outdoor pursuits instruc- lo France yesterday. 



The Anaconda, played by Andrew van der Beek, outmanoeuvring a traffic warden in Conduit Street, London, vesterday 

(Photograph: Graham Wood). 


Exhibition revives the serpent’s call 


The world's only known contra-bass 
serpent, lovingly carved by two York- 
shire hand-loom weavers more than a 
century ago, is one of the rarest items at 
an exhibition of historical musical 
instruments, which opened at Sotheby's 
Conduit Street galleries in central 
London yesterday. 

The elaborate piece, known as the 
Anaconda, is a large-scale version of the 
type of brasswind instrument, using 
woodwind keys, that was used in 
England during the first half of the 
nineteenth century. 


ByTrudi McIntosh 
Like its namesake, a large snake that 
crushes its prey, the Anaconda boasts an 
extraordinary length, 1 5ft 7in, and 
diameter; 7.5in at the bell end, twice the 
normal size. 


Joseph and Richard Wood made the 
instrument about 1840 in Upper 
Heaton, West Yorkshire, and played it 
at concerts in Almondbury church for 
more than 20 years. 


The Anaconda was played recently in 
performances by the London Serpent 


Trio, and is still owned by a descendant 
of the Wood brothers. 

The exhibition. Made For Music, was 
organized by the Gal pin Society to mark 
its fortieth anniversary. 

Other rare and curious items on 
display include a lira da braccio, a 
predecessor of the modern violin de- 
signed to be played in the crook of the 
arm. made bv Francesco Linarola in 
Venice in 1 563: a bass viola da gamba 
by Giuseppe Filius Andrea Guameri; 
and a violin case by Antonio Stradivari. 

The exhibition runs until August 22. 


Shinwell’s 


bequest to 
doormen 


By Michael HorsneD 


Doormen and attendants of 
both Houses of Parliament, 
who helped look after Lord 
Shin well from 1922, when he 
entered the Commons as La- 
bour MP for Linlithgow, were 
remembered in the will of the 
late elder statesman of the 
Labour Party. 

Two sums of £400 were left 
to the House of Parliament 
and House of Lords sports and 
social dubs, stipulating that 
the money should be used for 
the benefit of doormen and 
attendants. 

Lord ShimreU, who died in 
[ay. wed 101, left more than 
£30,000 to charity from his 
estate of £265398. His private 
and political papers will go to 
the London School of Econom- 
ics. He left op to £2,000 for the 
provision of a memorial plaque 
to him at Golders Green 
crematorium in London, where 
he was cremated. 


The . biggest single char- 
itable beneficiary of his will is 
the Royal Free Hospital in 
London, which is to receive 
£4,000. The Jewish Blind 
Society and the Jewish Deaf 
Association will each receive 
£3300 and £2,000 each will go 
the Imperial Cancer Re- 
search Fund, the Jewish Wel- 
fare Board, the Leukaemia Re- 
search Fund and the Norwood 
Homes for Jewish Children. 

Lord ShinwelL, whose three 
wives died before him, is 
survived by his son, Ernest. 

A sum of £43,000 and an 
annuity to various relatives is 
left in the will, while the resi- 
due of his estate goes to his son 
and charitable purposes to be 
determined by his trustees. 

Lord ShinweU's papers were 
left to the London School of 
Economics after requests by 
its librarians during his de- 
clining years, although be spe- 
cified that a number of docn 
ments should not be publicly 
displayed for a period of time. 

The LSE said yesterday: 
“We have a policy of contact- 
ing prominent politicians to 
express an interest in then- 
papers and we are of coarse 
delighted to acquire Lord 
ShinweU's. It wQI be some 
time, while we are sorting 
them out, before they will be 
available in the special read- 
ing room at the library.” 


Storm chaos 


Freak injuries by telephone 


Violent thunderstorms, 
which have caused fire, floods, 
road accidents and wide- 
spread damage, should dimin- 
ish today and sunshine should 
return tomorrow, the Meteo- 
rological Office said last night. 

The storms swept across 
southern England on Sunday 
night and in the early hours of 
yesterday morning, causing 
damage estimated at up to 
£250,000. 

Two men suffered freak 
injuries when lightning struck 
while they were using the 
telephone. Police Seigeani 
Keith Hughes suffered an ear 
injury after using the tele- 
hone at Edmonton police 


station, north London, when 
the building was struck and a 
12-foot communications ae- 
rial cut in half. 

Two constables who were 
near try were taken to hospital 
for treatment for shock. 


By Robin Young 

In Greatworth. North- 
amptonshire. Mr David 
Wilcox, a gardener, was struck 
while using the telephone. He 
suffered burns on his arm and 
was detained overnight at 
hospitaL 

British Telecom said yes- 
terday: “It is almost impos- 
sible for anyone to be struck 
by lightning through the tele- 
phone system. 

“The handsets are encased 
in plastic which is a good 
electrical insulator, and the 
unductance in our wiring is so 
great that even if lightning 
does strike the wires, the 
voltage will usually burst out 
again to find a more direct 
route to earth. 

“If overhead cables are 
struck while the phone is in 
use. though, the bang might be 
sufficient to cause ear injury". 

The thunderstorms ranged 
from Dorset and east Wales to 


Kent, with most damage 
caused by an hour-long storm 
in Berkshire. Houses were set 
on fire at Tidmarsh near 
Pangboume and Tilehurst, 
near Reading. 

More than 20 cars were 
involved in a pile-up on the 
London-bound section of the 
M4 between Newbury and 
Theale. One person was in- 
jured. 

More than 5,000 homes 
were blacked out in west 
Berkshire. Three hundred 
were still without electricity 


Residents near the 
Greenham Common missile 
base said they would be 
seeking compensation from 
the military authorities after 
flood water washed away cars 
and wrecked a house. They 
claimed that construction 
work on the base had blocked 
drains. Forecast, page 14 


Part-time job 
offer was sex 
discrimination 


A mother who was told that 
she could not return to work 
on a job-share basis was a 
victim of sex discrimination, a 
tribunal ruled yesterday. 

Mrs Marie Carey, aged 31. 
of Arranthrus Crescent, Ren- 
frew, Strathclyde, told a Glas- 
gow industrial tribunal that 
after having her baby she had 
asked to work as a visitor for 
Greater Glasgow Health 
Board for two-and-a-half days 
a week on a job-share basis. 

But the board had offered 
her a part-time post of five 
half days a week, which she 
had rejected because it would 
have meant additional 
organization. 

The board said that it had 
rejected her request because it 
was important that visitors 
should be available to clients 
five days a week. 


Sales manager 
loses unfair 
dismissal case 


A sales representative who 
was lured to her manager’s 
hotel room had to fight off his 
advances, an industrial tri- 
bunal was told yesterday. 

The Manchester hearing 
was told that the incident, 
which resulted in the dis- 
missal of Mr Paul lssawi, sales 
manager for PSG Chemicals, 
was one of several. 

Miss Gilliam Marshall, 
aged 28, said thai after luring 
her to the room, hestaned 
making advances. 

WTien interviewed by his 
employer, Mr lssawi said: 
“Does it matter, they ail fancy 
me anyway.” 

Mr lssawi. of Stetchworth 
Road. Warrington, who said 
that he had never sexually 
harassed her or anyone else, 
lost his claim for unfair 
dismissal. 


Man on drugs 
charge banned 
from London 


The heir to the DunhiU 
tobacco fortune was banned 
from London yesterday as a 
condition of his £200.000 bail 
on a charge of supplying 
cocaine. 

Magistrates at Marylcbone, 
north London, ordered Chris- 
topher Dun hill, aged 31. to 
live at his parents home at 
Chalfont St Giles. 
Buckinghamshire, and not to 
come to London except to see 
his solicitor or appear in court. 

His father, Mr Richard 
Dunhill. stood £100.000 
surety, 

John Wood, aged 29, who is 
jointly charged with supplying 
cocaine, was also released on 
£ 1 4.000 bail, ordered to live at 
Monkham's HalL Waltham 
Abbey, and not to come to 
London. 



‘Joke’ that 


brought 
luck 


good 


A family joke bronght good 
fortune to Mrs Syliia 
McQuire, of Farnham. Surrey, 
yesterday when her Portfolio 
Gold card won her a shore in 
the daily £4,000 prize. 

“M> husband jokes about 
me looking at the column at 
breakfast time**. Mrs 
McQuire said. 

Sne plans to spend some of 
the money on a holiday in 
Britain for her two grand- 
children. Rosanna, aged 7. and 
Sebastian, aged 6, who Ii*e in 
Mexico City. Some of the win 
will also be spent on the 
McQnire's son, who is handi- 
capped. 

Mrs McQnire started play- 
ing Portfolio 18 months ago 
when the family changed its 
daily paper to The Times. 

Other winners yesterday 
were Mrs D. R. Kingdun, of 
Boydell Court, St John's 
Wood, north-west London, 
and Mr Derek Bland, of 
Wakefield, West Yorkshire. 

Readers who have difficulty 
obtaining a gold card should 
send a stamped addressed 
envelope to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 



Mrs McQnirke, holiday for 
grandchildren. 


Crossing open 


A level crossing at 
Lockington, near Beverley. 
Humberside, where nine peo- 
ple died after a train hit a van 
on July 26, will be restored 
today to unmanned, red-light 
operation by British Rail. 


Death charge 


A youth charged with the 
murder of Dawn Ashworth, 
aged 15. appeared in court 
yesterday. Richard BucKland. 
aged 17, of Lime Tree Road. 
Narhorough, near Leicester, 
was remanded in custody for 
72 hours by the city's 
magistrates. 

Disease victim 

Another case of meningitis 
has been confirmed In Glou- 
cestershire, about a mile from 
the Prince of Wales’s home at 
Highgrove. The latest victim is 
a youth aged 19 from Tetbury. 

Theft charges 

Two Heathrow baggage 
handlers, accused of conspir- 
ing to steal from airline 
passengers* bags, were 
committed for trial on bail at 
Islewonh Crown Court by 
magistrates at Uxbridge yes- 
terday. They are Robert Fran- 
cis, of Raleigh Road. Feltham, 
south-west London, and 
James Rutdiffe, of Chester 
Road. Hounslow West. 


Victim named 


A rock music fan, wbo was 
stabbed to death at the Queen 
concert at Knebworth Park, 
near Stevenage, on Saturday, 
has been named as Thomas 
McGnigan, aged 21. of Pork 
Street. Airdrie, Lanarkshire. 
Four men are being questioned 
by the police. 


Fire death 


Mrs Rose Talbot, aged 81, 
died in her wheelchair when 
fire swept throngh her home in 
Stoneyford Street, Sutton-in- 
Ash field. Nottinghamshire, 
yesterday. 


Gloom surrounds Glorious Twelfth 


The Glorious Twelfth is 
unlikely to lhe up. to its name 
today as sportsmen fake to the 
moors in En gland and Scot- 
land to shoot depleted, dis- 
eased or dedining stocks of 
grouse. 

Prospects range from 
patchy in the north, of England 
to gloomy in Scotland, where 
the red - grouse, which 
normally inhabits moorlands 
1,000ft or more above sea 
level, has suffered the greatest 
population drop. 

Some shoots, where mainly 
rich foremn tourists pay more 
than £80Q a day for the 
privilege of baggu^ grouse 
driven towards. tliseir wafting 
guns, have had to cancel . 

Even the Duke of West- 
minster could not ^guarantee a 


supply of grouse from his 
Lancashire moors for a race to 
lunch tables , at the Savoy 
Hotel in London. 

Instead, the Savoy is relying 
on teams from the first, second 
and third battalions of The 
Parachute Regiment to fly the 
earliest bagged birds from 
various shoots on the York- 
shire moors to London for a 
boat ran with paratroopers up 
the Thames for a final march 
to the hotel by page boys. 

Away from the pomp and 
ceremony, sportsmen on the 
misty moors would probably 
be bracing themselves for a 
disappointing day's shooting, 
particularly in Scotland where 
grouse numbers are estimated 
to be 20 per cent down on the 
mid-1970s: ■ 

3 


By Mark Ellis 


Major Neil Ramsay, a Scot- 
tish sporting agent, said: “I 
think yon are going to find 
very different conditions 
applying in parts of Scotland 
as quite a few moors no longer 
have viable shoots. 


“By the end of July people 
fry to get intelligent assess- 
ments td see what they have 
got and some have cancelled or 
reduced their programmes on 
that basis as forecasts have 
varied from restrained - op- 
timism, to gloomy.” 

The Country Landowners’ 
Association • said that estate 
managers had indicated that 
sport was likely to be patchy, 
but better in the eastern 
Pennines ami North York- 
shire than elsewhere. 


The Minispy of Agriculture 
is investigating two diseases 
affecting the grouse popula- 
tion, one a tick passed by 
sheep and theothera parasitic 
worm which can kill or en- 
feeble hen birds. 

It has also tested radiation 
levels in the wake of tbe 
Chernobyl disaster, but they 
have been found to be so low as 
to give no cause for concern, a 
spokesman said. 

Mr David Newborn, of the 
Game Conservancy Council's 
North of- England Grouse 
Research Project said: "It is 
not a particularly' good year for 
the grouse and the real prob- 
lem was the wet summer in 
conjunction with the hard 
winter, which led to losses in 
breeding.'’ 



*< 


%r- 


r 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


Hauliers claim I Thre ? t to 


bridge weight 
curbs will cost 


rare bam 


allayed 
by judge 


£44m a year 


Tighter weight restrictions 
on road bridges expected as a 
result of a new safety code 
would cost industry an extra 
£44 million a year by forcing 
lorries to use alternative 
routes, according to a survey 
by the British Road Federa- 
tion (BRF), published 
yesterday. 

There are about 50.000 
bridges on trunk and minor 
roads built before the 1920s 
which will need repairs before 
lorries can use them, the BRF 
said. 

The number of bridges with 
weight restrictions -is likely to 
double as a result The BRF 
urged the Government to 
embark on a £400 million 10- 


year repair programme, or 
force firms to foot even 
heavier haulage bills. 

The survey was conducted 
in June, when questionnaires 
were sent to local authorities 
in England and Wales, who 
are responsible for all roads 
other than trunk roads and 
motorways. 

Bridges built before na- 
tional loading standards were 
introduced in 1922 were de- 
signed for only a small 
amount of traffic. According 
to Department of Transport 
figures, traffic volumes have 
doubled since the early 1970s, 
the last time an extensive 
bridge strengthening pro- 
gramme was carried out. 

“The fact that these older 
bridges have survived so long 


is a tribute to how strongly 
they were built, but the time 
has come, in the light of the 
new weight restriction code, 
when money has got got to be 
spent on repairing them." Mr 
Andrew Street, a BRF econo- 
mist who organized the sur- 
vey. said. 

“We’ve concluded that if 
the Government were to fund 
a £400 million repair pro- 
gramme it would pay for itself 
because of cost savings to 
industry. 

“The alternative would be 
to put weight restrictions on 
bridges, and lorries would 
have to divert elsewhere, 
which would cost money." 

The department, which has 
responsibility for trunk roads 
and motorways, has ordered 
safety checks on 200 concrete 
motorway bridges built in the 
past 20 years after the discov- 
ery of problems on 36 bridges, 
mainly in the Midlands and 
the South-west, caused by the 
corrosive effects of road salt 


The whereabouts of a rare 
hisioric bam threatened with 
export to the United States 
remained unknown yesterday, 
in spite of a High Court ban on 
it leaving the country. 


In an action brought by 
Leominster District Council, 
injunctions were granted 
against British Historic Build- 
ings and SPS Shipping, 
exporters, who gave undertak- 
ings to disclose the where- 
abouts of the timbers, valued 
at £100.000. and to allow the 
council to inspect them. 

The grade two listed build- 
ing stood for 500 years at 
Stagbatch Farm, near Leom- 
inster, and is said to be the 
finest example of 12 remain- 
ing crack-framed bams in 
Hereford and Worcester. 

Last week, when the council 
discovered it had been taken 
down without permission 
prior to export it was granted 
a temporary injunction. 

Yesterday, Mr Justice Hoff- 
mann said that the injunction 
should continue, pending a 
High Court action later this 

a about the future of the 
ing. 

The council has issued an 
enforcement notice requiring 
die bam to be rebuilt 
The judge said that the 
council had an arguable case 
for the granting of temporary 
injunctions, pending a de- 
cision by the department or 
the courts. If the bam was 
allowed to be exported and the 
council was subsequently 
found to be entitled to injunc- 
tions, "part of the architec- 
tural heritage of Herefordshire 
will have been irretrievably 
lost" he said. 


used for de-icing or by certain 
combinations of building 


combinations of building 
materials which can cause a 
chemical reaction leading to 
decay. 

“It's not critical in the sense i 
that they are going to fail 
down tomorrow, but we're 
aware of a problem on a 1 
number of concrete bridges 
and the checks will enable us 
to see its extent" a spokesman 
for the Department of Trans- 
port said. 



“The Rev Martin’ Reynolds, vicar of Pontydnn and Talygarn , examines the Byzantine 
mosaic with Miss Louise Mumford, conservator at the National Museum of Wales. 


Byzantine mosaic found in church 


The accidental discovery of 
a Byzantine mosaic promises 
solvency and salvation for the 
Welsh church where it has 
hung for almost a century. 

Conservation experts will 
today begin removing the oval 
gold and died saint’s bead 
from the wall of St Anne’s in 
Talygarn so that it can be 
taken to the National Museum 
of Wales in Cardiff for 
safekeeping and public display 
later this year. The mosaic has 
not been valued but is being 
insured for £30,000. 

It has been identified as a 
piece missuig from the vast 


eleventh century depiction of 
the Last Judgement in the 
cathedral of St Maria As- 
sunta. the .old cathedral of 
Venice. 

Dr Robin Corraack. reader 
in the history of art at London 
University Conrtanld In- 
stitute, and experts from the. 
National Museum of Wales 
were called in by the vicar of 
Pontydnn and Talygarn, the 
Rev Martin Reynolds, after he 
noticed the mosaic while 
compiling photographs of the 
church. 

The head, believed to be St 
Thomas or St Philip, had been 


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i;.Thr against asthma:2 

Public awareness 
and more research 
helps to find cure 


For most asthmatics, the 


They suffer in education, 
within the community. In 
Thomson Prentice looks at 
developing a cure. 


quality of life is restricted 
in occupation and in life 


the second of two articles, 
the progress heitig made in 


moan ted in concrete 12 feet 
above the family pew of die, 
founder of the church, Mr G T 
Clarice, a Victorian engineer 
with a passion for Italian art. , 

“It has always been re-' 
gaided as attractive, but be- 
cause it was so high it never 
attracted the attention it 
deserved," Mr Reynolds said. 

He admits that the joy of 
discover}- is matched by bis 
desire for St Anne’s, which he 
describes as “a typical Victo- 
rian country church with uo 
architectural features to re- 
commend it", to reap the bene- 
fits of the windfall. 


Progress in understanding 
the causes of asthma and 
developing pathways towards 
a cure has advanced signifi- 
cantly in the past two years. 

Greater public awareness of 
the condition has led to a 
doubling of the number of 
branches in Britain of the 
Asthma Society, which offers 
help and advice to sufferers 
and their families. 

■ That increased perception 
has in turn led to twice as 
much money being raised for 
research by the Asthma Re- 
search Council, the society's 
parent body. Other projects 
are being funded by the British 
Lung Foundation. 

‘Much of the work investi- 
gates the reasons why the 
muscle surrounding the bron- 
chial lubes tighten, constrict- 
ing the breathing passages. 

Contraction of airway mus- 
cles is controlled by the 
amount of calcium ions free 
inside the muscle cells. During 
an asthmatic attack, many 
different chemicals that are 
usually safely stored in the 
lung tissues are liberated, 
causing an increase in the 
amount of calcium within pie 
muscle cells. This action 
forces ceils to contract, caus- 
ing bronchospasm. 

Researchers at Strathclyde 
University's department of 
physiology and pharma- 
cology, have discovered that 
some of the chemicals, includ- 
ing substances known as 
leukotrienes. can induce the 
release of calcium from stores 
within the airway muscle cells. 

“They appear to do this by 
reducing levels of another 
chemical, called cyclic AMP, 
whose role is to keep calcium 
under control." Dr Ian 
Rodger, the department head, 
said. “If a fall in cyclic AMP 
triggers an attack, logically 
drugs which boost levels of 
this chemical should provide 
protection." 

Other research teams are 


studying the relationships be- 
tween sleep and asthma. A 
study at Edinburgh Gty 
Hospital’s department of 
respiratory medicine • has 
shown that airways narrowed 
less at night when patients 
were kepi awake than when 


they slept. 

The unit is investigating 
hormonal and biochemical 
changes in relation to noo- 
luma! asthma. Scientists at 
the Cardiothoradc ‘ Institute 
and Brampton Hospital Lon- 
don. are testing the hypothesis 
that night attacks affect the 
secretion of hormones which 
influence growth in chil- 
dren — asthmatic children 
tend to be shorter than 


Child health specialists, at 
Bristol University are examin- 
ing the role of house dust 
mites in children's asthma. 
Allergens produced by the* 
mites cause attacks when in- 
haled, and the Bristol group is 
trying to understand why and - 
how. 

The hereditary factor is 
being investigated by doctors 
at the Osier chest unit at the 
Churchill Hospital, Oxford. 

The doctors are seeking 
large families of asthmatics to 
help their research. The work 
involves simple tests that 
would take about 20 minutes 
for each person. 

Mr Haugh Faulkner, direc- 
tor of the Asthma Research 
Council, says: “For the major- 
in' of asthmatics, their quality 
oflife is restricted. 

“We must campaign, to find 
a cure, and not be daunted by 
the demands such -an ap- 
proach requires." 1 

The headquarters of the 
Asthma Research Council and 
Asthma Society are at 300 
Upper Street, London N1 
2XX_ Telephone 01-226 226a 
The British Lung Foundation 
is at 12A Onslow Gardens, 
London SW7 3 AP. Telephone 
01-581-0226 

Concluded. 


Remand in 


stamps 
theft case 


Better pay 
for some 
trainees 


The curator of the National 
Postal Museum in King Ed- 
ward Street, central London, 
appeared at Guildhall 
Magistrates' Court yesterday 
charged with stealing rare 
stamps worth £8,300 from the 
Post Office. 

Mr William Raife Well- 
stead, aged 56. of Ben Johnson 
House, the Barbican, who was 


A breakthrough in obtain- 
ing the "rate for the job" for 
youth training schemes train- 
ees has been claimed by the 
Union of Shop, Distributive •! 
and Allied Workers (Usdaw). 


remanded until September 24, 
also feces two charges of 


also feces two charges of 
obtaining £1.500 from the 
Post Office by deception. 

He provided a £10,000 
surety. 

He is charged that between 
January 1, 1983 and April 29, 
1983, at the National Postal 
Museum, he stole four 4l6d 
(old penny) postal stamps 
overprinted with “Gout 
Parcels" arid “Specimens”, 
four 6d (old penny) stamps 
similarly overprinted and 
worth together £300; that on 
or about August 15. 1985, he 
stole a specially prepared 
imperforate miniature sheet of 
four King George V 
commemorative £1 stamps 
(Postal Union Congress), 
worth £8,000: on or about 
November 4. 1983, at the 
National Postal Museum, he 
used a false instrument — a 
Postal History Society invoice 
— knowing and believing it to 
be false, and causing the Post 
Office to pay out £800; and on 
or about December 16, 1983, 
he used a similar invoice, 
causingrthe Post Office to pay 
out £700. 


Under the two-year Youth >, 
Training Scheme, -yoilng peo- ■ 
pie can expect to be paid 
£2730 a. week for their first 
year, rising to £35 a week in 
their second year - jay levds 
which some trade union lead- 


ers have deplored as “cheap - 
labour". t 


.Agreements just signed with 
Usdaw ensure that trainees in . 
three areas of commerce - “ 
retailing, mail order and the : 
milk industry - get a better 
deal. . 


Foster Men swear has guar- := 
anteed that all trainees who 
successfully complete their ■ 
first 12 months on youth 
training will continue with the ■ 
second half of their training as 
employees, earning £65 a - 
week. 


The mail order firm. Em- 
pire Stores, has agreed to 
increase the first-year allow- 


ance by £3.70 to pay a straight 
£31 a week instead of £2730, 
and in the second year the 
trainees, aged 17. will get the 
full rate of £64.40. 


The Milk Marketing Board 
has gone one better all train- 


ees will be treated as employ- 
ees from the start and will be 


ees from the start and will b< 
paid the full rate for the job. 


Endangered little tern 
gains new lease oflife 


By Mark Dowd 


THE WORLD'S 


■FAX 

ILD*S N°! 


1NTEMST IS COMPOUNDED TWICE -YEAULT CMNG THECOMPOUKDED ANNUAL RATE (CAS.) ALL INTEHESTRATESQUOTED AM VARIABLE. HALIFAX WlLDINGSOam.UUNfTT ROAD. HALIFAX KX1 2KG 


The little tern, one of 
Britain’s rarest seabirds, has a 
more secure future than at any 
time in the past 20 years 
because of a special warden 
scheme Introduced by the 
Royal Society for the Protec- 
tion of Birds (RSPB). 

The preferred habitat of the 
little tern is on shingle beaches 
or sand bars, which make its 
nests vulnerable to human 
disturbance associated with 
the rapidly expanding tourist 
industry, as well as a more 
traditional threat from natural 
predators. 

Parts of popular 
regions, such as near Great 
Yarmouth, Norfolk, are being 
roped off durum the breeding 
season from mid-May to early 
August 

Figures from the society 
show that there were 2^00 
little tern pairs in Britain in 
1985, compared with 1.427 in 
1967. 

“Since wardening schemes 
were introduced in various 
parts of tire country eight to 10 
years ago, little tern popula- 
tions have been maintained In 
some areas and increased in 
.others," Mr Graham Elliot, an 


RSPB species protection effi- ’ 
cer. said. 

Protection schemes range ■ 
from string and wooden posts, . 
to fence off the most isolated ;* 
colonies, to electric fences and ’ » 
patrol officers to ward off v . 
foxes and other predators in ■ 
the more endangered areas. * 
Specially-recruited wardens “ 
are paid about £1,000 for a ; ■ 
three-month temporary ;* 
position. 

Great Yarmouth, where the ‘ ; 
warden scheme was launched - 
earlier this year, has proved to 
be one of the biggest success ; ’ 
stories for the society. \ 

With no protection plan in f 
operation last year, 27 pairs of u 
little terns- nested on the.” 
beach, producing just one/' 
offspring. Under the new;' 
scheme. 55 pairs hare so' far " 
produced 94 chicks this year, 
with another week of the 
breeding season still to run. 

. However, tbe overall picture. 

«s marred by reports from the ^ 
west coast of Britain, where * 
colonies have beep affected by £ 
poor weather and both natural > ; 
and human predators. Two; 
Welsh sites have so for foiled - 
10 produce any offspring. -Jr 


i#". 1 


pin 


irael si 


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rsh 


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s talks 


inner u a. \ 

iMoscom 


Ifo 


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* against a 



lcaw ^% 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 19S6 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


(lore 


_ re se 


24 -hour ‘gangland’ battle halted 


£Ss3 


*MfJu ' f.-’j 

<¥ /. >, S < 

ft' 


Syrian hopes of seizing 
control of militias hit 


Political 
recluse 
fined in 


l v " fi. 


by Phalangist ceasefire 1X22® 


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Syria's hopes of seizing 
control' of the Christian mi- 
litias of ‘east Beirut appeared 


-i, . n litiasr ot east Beirut appeared 

■' i nj aJS to have been crushed last 
,i\ night when rival Phalangist 

Jv ParjnLt commanders- agreed .to., a 
I." «w^. ceasefire after 34 hours of 
_ ' ** ; fieree-streflt fighting. 

Indeed, -what was gleefully 
.! Ifc pubfidzed'by Damascus as a 


From Robert Fisk, Beirut 

life early yesterday morning 
when he and his militia escort 
were ambushed by gunmen in 
the east Beirut suburb of Dora. 

Dr Foua d Abu Nader re- 
ceived three bullet wounds m 
the leg and ten of his body- 
guards were wounded, three 
seriously, in what appeared to 


i Michael Binyon 
Washington 



British 
firms to 


plan new 
metro 


pro-Syrian Phalangist . officer 
who was also blamed by the 
Israelis for the 1 982 Sabra and 
Chatila Palestinian camp 
massacres. 

Commander Hobeika was 
in turn overthrown by Com- 
mander Geagea last January, 1 
in a brutal series of street 


« Publk5zed;by Damascus as a be a last effort by Commander battles that cost at 

pohucal pbweir smiggle has Geagea's men to restore the lives. 


least 350 


U4 WLfc-, ... 

Y tJiu-d :• -i 

IMflOM Kf 

V nxnrii x 
*• p»t»w.:* 
* the 


turned -but -to -be little more 
than a gangland baule be- 


power of their leader. 

This is the second rime that 


"‘Pi-n hi; objected 10 the way in which 
r ibe Phalangist Cbmmander 

" •*£ Samiii'Geagea loaded his mi- 

•" hnrm fib 2 hierarchy -with men from 


his own home (own and 


vl. nufj!,. 
' W|l4 the 
£ the hi 

t r 

;n*4V K»t:s. 
d tu |h. 
H ii*fis ![:-.■ 

rils l>v. lnf 
■Wfc. rs:,ii,k 
A tlU! .U.- 
red jjj ;v. 

IvC ji; ;u. 
withm 
hi\ a. 
ir act. w.Kj-, 


-Mhir,., * - forced 'others to undergo three 

l 1 ^ ri i' mnnflie 1 milifaru rniniiu a* 


} f i fei; months’ military naming at 

’‘nir*? hie nriuaic harrark* 


Sli0r «e^ his private barrages. 

^ The . man ■ who led the 

g.^^, Pbalangist mutiny against 
Commander Geagea almost 


r. l|f k ^ UXim/JL 

h!ij, {, paid-for his-rebellion with his 


.‘ .ViUks Z} 


town of Bsharre, has been 
ousted from his post as com- 
mander of the “Lebanese 
Forces", the notional Chris- 
tian militia coalition that runs 
east Beirut and the swathe of 
coastal territory to the north. 

. Commander Geagea is pro- 
Isradi in sentiment and was 
originally driven from the 
capita] m May last year by 
Commander Hie Hobeika, the 


. ,:or *>iiiar. l 
iho-j .3 


'Wiial (L ? 
arr 

l ' 


Stij-.hiUd- 

irtmcrt 
Pharr:., 
Hoif.J 
sris. i:n!«u: 

known ” 

<nd:>ic ff.i 

•rdtn 

■uiw Is- . 
< vjii th;-. 

w;jj. W- 
Vp HU . . 1 - 
Pr !. ■ 

■vi- Wj 


V 
■ r 

; 

i*.i »n ^ 


"Frtriht^ 

fe.v 

■ ' Nr 

, Ut |, a 

‘’-JsJjnfis • 



Dr Abu Nader recover! 
the leg received in the 1 




ospital from bullet wounds to 
an militia fi ghting in Beirut. 


The Syrians have since kept 
Commander Hobeika on ice, 
allowing him to travel freely 
between Damascus and the 
Christian town of Zahle, in the 
Bekaa Valley, in the hope that 
he could one day return to 
Beirut as Phalangist comman- 
der. 

But this week's mutiny in 
the Phalange was prompted, it 
seems, not by any desire for a 
return of Syrian influence but 
by the antagonism of Mr 
Maroun Mashalaani, a local 
Beirut Phalangist com- 
mander. who found that Com- 
mander Geagea had arrested 
some of his own men on 
suspicion of planting car 
bombs in east Beirut. 

Dr Abu Nader and Mr 
Mashalaani. both admittedly 
sympathetic to Syria, decided 
that Commander Geagea 
should be cut down and 
proceeded to set about this 
project with customary 
ruthlessness. 

For their part, the Syrians | 
would be happy to see Com- 
mander Geagea out of the 
way. But after fleeing the 
Phalangist barracks in Beirut 
by motor boat on Sunday, he 
was able to return to his office 
yesterday for truce negotia- 
tions. Pbalangist political 
leaders have been set the task 
of consolidating the ceasefire, 
watched with, interest, of 
course, by both Syria and 
IsraeL 



Mr Lyndon LajRonche, the 
maverick political extremist, 
was fined $2,000 (£1300) by a 
court in Alexandria, outside 
Washington, at the weekend, 
for failing to answer queries 
about his personal finances 
from NBC Television. The 
broadcasting organization is 
seeking to collect a $202,000 
judgement against him. 

, A magistrate imposed the 
fine after NBC described as 
“inherently nn believable" ass- 
ertions by Mr LaRoocbe that 
he did not know who has paid 
for his food, clothing, rent, 
transport bodyguards, or law- 
yers since 1973. 

litis is not the first legal 
action taken or threatened 
against the shadowy figure 
who wants to be President, and 
whose supporters have tried to 
wreak havoc on state Demo- 
cratic Parties around the coun- 
try. Investigators in the state 
of Washington and a grand 
jury in Boston are looking into 
charges of fraud, and that 
supporters improperly ob- 
tained money from con- 
tributors' credit card accoants. 

Mr Laftooche, aged 63, who 
has set np his headquarters on 
a heavily-guarded $13 million 
country estate in Leesburg, 

Virginia, is an eccentric re- 
el nse. He refused to appear in 
conrL In an affidavit, he 
compared himself to an 
“impecunious uncle” who 

travelled from place to place, A police officer intervening to stop a policeman from beating a protester with his rifle bntt in 
wilful Ji! DdW yesterday, when tear gas and baton charges were used to break up a demonstration 

ba ~- to outside the Chinese Embassy against a reported incursion into Indian territory. 



Athens — A scven-membci 
British consortium signed a £2 
million agreement with the 
Greek Government yesterday 
to plan the long-delayed £750 
million expansion of the be- 
leaguered Athens under- 
ground railway (A 
Correspondent writes). 

The British firms are to 
provide architectural, con- 
struction and operational ad- 
vice for the project, which 
calls for the addition of two 8- 
milc long lines to the single 
existing track that runs 
through the Greek capital. 

Athenians view the expan- 
sion. talked about for almost 
40 years, as an answer to the 
inadequate bus service and 
worsening traffic conditions. 

The British consortium, 
which outbid 21 other firms, 
comprises London Transport 
International. Freeman Fox 
Limited. Halcrow- Fox & 
Associates, Kennedy Donkin. 
Divine Research Unit, 
Charles Hasucll & Partners, 
and Sir William Halcrow & 
Partners. 


Jailbreakers 

recaptured 


v j-r r ; 
s ■ ' VI I ,-nr.r • 


‘ /“I’ ■' 

' t .1 


•' vl Unar 

' Pfc.'Cl II|.*X*. 


Israel strikes again at PLO bases 


Beirut — ' The latest offen- 


sive by Israel ; 
ian guerrillas 


ipst Palestm- 
Lebanon was 


id in 
ps 

ase 


Better p 
for soi 


trainee; 




*\ "• l ■' 

MV'7 Pw. 


directed yesterday at bases 
inside Syrian-controlled- terri- 
tory near the eastern city of 
Baalbek (Robert Fisk, writes). 

Israeli jets bombed build- 
ings at two locations near the 
ancient Roman dty early in 
the afternoon, less than 24 
hoars after. Israeli helicopters 
raided two Palestinian camps 
outside Sidoo. - -• r • - 

Local police in Baa fee k - said 
that three people, including a 
Palestinian woman, were' kil- 
led in the latest Israeli raid. 
The- dead woman’s year-old 


According to die Israelis, 
their planes bombed buildings 
used by Abu Monssa's pro- 
Syrian Palestine Liberation 
Organization (PLO) faction. 

The sudden renewal of air 
attacks against the Pal- 
estinians is believed to have 
been prompted by growing 
rmnours that Palestinian gue- 
rrillas have been returning to 
Lebanon id ever greater nmn- 
bers from the Arab countries 
to which they were exiled after 
the Israelliiivasiovof 1982: 

Sunday's air raids on Sid on, 
in which the Israelis scored 
direct hits on buildings used 
by guerrillas of- Mr Yassir 


building np its forces around 
the southern dty. 

Mr Arafat's men have been 
moving sonth from Beirut and 
now practically control the Em 
Hehve and Mieh Mieh camps, 
to the virtual exclusion of 
groups which are pro-Syrian. 

After yesterday's raids, the 
Israelis said they scored “good 
hits" against guerrilla bares in 
the Bekaa valley. _ 


baby was among the seven Arafat's PLO as well as Abn 
wounded, they said. Four air- Monssa's Palestinian group. 


craft were involved in the 
attaek.- 


appeared to reflect Israeli 
concern that the PLO was 


• JERUSALEM: A spok- 
esman for the' Israeli Defence 
Force (IDF) -said that the 
policy behind the second raid 
into Lebanon in consecutive 
days was that u the IDF strikes 
whenever it wants to at any 
terrorist organization when it 
knows where it is” (Ian Mur- 
ray writes). 


Arms talks Israel to consider 


under way 
in Moscow 


frontier formula 


Moscow (Reuter) — US and 
Soviet arms control experts 
met at ‘a government villa 
outride Moscow yesterday for 
talks aimed at speeding up the 
Geneva negotations on nuc- 
lear and space weapons. 

Both sides imposed a black- 
out on details of the talks. 

The seven-member Ameri- 
can team. Jed by Mr Paul 
Nilze, President Reagan's spe- 
cial adviser on arms control is 
expected to leave Moscow 
today after a second day of 
discussions, the spokeswoman 
said. 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 

The Israeli Cabinet will be would be pai< 
asked tomorrow to approve a those who had 
1 fr^page document spelling out by an Egyptiai 
in minute detail how to re- man in Sinai 1 
solve the four-year-old border One of th< 
quarrel with Egypl which has concerns the 
blocked progress towards three intemaii 
peace in the Middle East who are to join 

President Mubarak of Egypt nominated by 
has already promised that rael. They will 
once the document is signed 30 names dre 
by both countries, he will United States, 
return an ambassador to Tel The other ga 
Aviv, arrange a summit with to present aen 
the Israeli Prime Minister, of the dispute 
honour trade and tourism crosses mark 


would be paid to families of 
those who had .relatives killed 
by an Egyptian border police- 
man in Sinai last October. 


bills. He was given 20 days to 
answer the questions fully. 

NBC is trying to collect 
money won in a counter-claim 
after Mr LaRonche failed to 
win a libel suit against the 
network. A court also found 
that be had attempted to 
interfere with other NBC busi- 
ness by sabotaging an inter- 
view, and awarded die network 
$3 million in damages. 

Mr LaRonche, once a mem- 
ber of the Trofskyite Socialist 
Workers' Party, is an extreme 
right-winger, who has several 
times run for President. His 
supporters who, like religions 
cult members, solicit support 
and funds at airports, have 
attempted to infiltrate the 
Democratic Party. 

In minois,they succeeded in 
getting two candidates elected 
to the party slate, causing the 
temporary withdrawal of Mr 
Adlai Stevenson, the can- 
didate ter Governor, and 
throwing the party into 
disarray. 

* LaRonche organizations are 
also active in Europe, es- 
pecially In West Ger- 
many.where supporters fre- 
^®»tly disrupt press con- 
ferences. 

Mr LaRonche, Utterly hos- 
tile to Britain, maintains that 
the Queen is head of an 
international drug-smuggling 
ring, and that Dr Kissinger is a 
Communist agent Slogans 
during his 1984 election cam- 
paign included: “Nuclear pow- 
er is safer than sex,” and 
“Feed Jane Fonda to the 
whales.” 

He is hostile to any press 
coverage of his various linked 
organizations, and appears 
particularly fearful of 


Lisbon (Reuter) — Portu- 
guese police have recaptured 
two convicts who took pan in 
a spectacular jailhreak two 
weeks ago in which three 
warders were killed. 

Gcrmano Raposinho. aged 
34. a convicted murderer and 
the suspected ringleader of the 
bloody break-out, and Carlos 
Ferreira Pereira. 3S. were 
caught in a building in an 
industrial suburb of Lisbon. 


i • j i • a • industrial suburb of L 

Splits bring Strain Peru near AU change 


to Aquino Cabinet ’'isASR 

From Keith Italton. Manila Willi iMJb 


One of the two “holes”! assassination attempts. 


agreements and generally nor- 


Mr Viktor Karpov, the. malize relations. 


gereo 
lew lease « 


»”8 


iv:' 

ks.-a f *!■» 
'•X i.3'' 


- i «• ■■■ 
fs ft..*- 


<ol 


Kremlin's chief negotiator at 
Geneva, heads the Soviet 
delegation. 

The official reason for the 
talks, which were due to last 
two days, was to' add impetus 
to -the Geneva negotiations 
and prepare for a meeting 
between Mr George Shultz, 
the Secretary of State, and Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze. - the 
Foreign Minister. 

Thai meeting is in turn due 
to set the stage for a second 
summit between Mr Reagan 
and Mr Gorbachov, the Soviet 
leader. Moscow takes the view 
that a new summit would be 
poindess without reaching 
substantive agreements on 
arms control- 

The US .delegation con- 
sisted of Mr hfitze. the three 
chief negotiators at Geneva, 
Mr Max Kampciman, Mr 
Ronald' Lehman and Mr May- 
nard Oilman, and Mr Rich- 
ard iPerie, the Assistant 
Secretary of Defence, Mr Rob- 
ert Lihhani, a Pentagon expert 
and Mr Edward Rowny, a 
presidential adviser on arms 
control. 

Western diplomats said the 
seven represented a spectrum 
of views within the Admin- 
istration, from those who 
advocate an arms accord with 
Moscow, to those, especially 
Mr Perie,. who have voiced 
more sceptical attitudes. 


Mr Shimon Peres, who 
must hand over as Prime 
Minister to Mr Yitzhak 
Shamir on October 7, now 
hopes the summit can be 
arranged before then. He will 
be urging the Cabinet to 
accept the document, even 
though it still has two signifi- 
cant “holes” in it. 

Mr Shamir, however, said 
yesterday that it was far from 
certain that the document 
would be agreed by Cabinet 
because .several issues re- 
mained to be resolved. 

The text is being kept secret, 
and it is as important for what 
it leaves out as for what it 
includes. It will serve as the 
instructions for five ar- 
bitrators who are expected to 
spend between 18 months and 


two years deciding exactly 
where to draw the border at IS 


where to draw the border at IS 
disputed points, including the 
Sinai seaside resort of Tata. 

One significant omissioh-is 
any reference to the 1906 
border between Egypl and the 
Ottoman Empire, which Israel 
claims is the last international 
line made in the area. In 
agreeing, under US pressure, 
to leave this out. Israeli nego- 
tiators made the crucial con- 
cession needed to produce the 
document 

At the same time Egypt 
conceded that compensation 


concerns the names of the 
three international arbitrators 
who are to join the two already 
nominated by Egypt and Is- 
rael. They will be chosen from 
30 names drawn up by the 
United States. 

The other gap concerns how 
to present aenal photographs 
of the disputed area. Plastic 
crosses marking the rival 
claims on the ground are to be 
photographed by a helicopter 
supplied by the Multinational 
Force and Observers (MFO), 
with a camera the make of 
which is being kept secret. 

Shin Bet men 
seek pardon 

Seven more Shin Bet 
counter-intelligence agents 
asked yesterday fora presiden- 
tial pardon for their part in the 
killing of two Palestinians and 
the subsequent cover-up of 
their deaths (lan Murray 
writes). 

The seven have asked Presi- 
dent Herzog for immunity 
from prosecution after the 
decision of the High Court of 
Justice last week that pardons 
already granted to four other 
senior Shin Bel officials were 
legal. 

Names of the seven, who 
are still working for the secret 
agency, are not being released 
for security reasons. Their 
individual files are now to be 
studied by Mr Avraham 
Sharir, the stand-in Justice 
Minister, before he advises 
President Herzog on what 
action to take. 

The seven are understood to 
have carried out the killings, 
acting on the orders of Mr 
Avraham Shalom, the Shin 
Bet chief who has already 
received a pardon. 


Local residents near his 
headquarters have expressed 
fears for their safety, saying 
LaRonche supporters have 
physically attacked anyone 
critic izin g their presence in the 
sleepy country town. 


President Aquino's five- 
month-old Government is 
facing dissension led by Mr 
Salvador Laurel, the am- 
bitious Vice-President. 

Openly critical of some 
senior Cabinet ministers, Mr 
Laurel at the weekend threat- 
ened to ‘replace ail un- 
desirable Cabinet members" if 
he became caretaker during 
Mrs Aquino's visit next 
month to the United States. 

The presidential palace re- 
torted quickly that Mr Laurel 
must have been misquoted, 
but cut down his presidential 
aspirations just as swiftly by- 
announcing that there would 
be no presidential stand-in for 
Mrs Aquino during her eight- 
day US trip. 

Mr Laurel has also dis- 
missed any possibility of his 
pony, Unido, merging into a 
single party with PDP-Laban, 
the other Aquino Govern- 
ment coalition member. 

Instead, he has openly ad- 
vocated a coalition with the 
opposition Nacionalisia party 
to fight next year's local 
government elections. 

The Nacionalisia party, at 
present making a nationwide 
drive for new members, is led 
by a former pro-Marcos mem- 
ber of the defunct National 
Assembly, Mr Reynato Cay- 
etano. 

Because Mr Cayetano is the 
best-known ally of Mr Juan 
Ponce Enrile, the Defence 
Minister - without doubt the 
most outspoken member of 


the Aquino Cabinet — the 
revival of the dormant 
Nacionalisia party is believed 
widely to be the brainchild of 
Mr Enrile. who is apparently 
determined to create a strong 
power base in order to pursue 
his own presidential am- 
bitions. 

Mr Laurel's weekend pledge 
to dismiss “undesirable" Cab- 
inet ministers is the most 
glaring evidence yet of the 
divisions within the 27-mem- 
ber Aquino Cabinet. 

He and Mr Enrile head the 
conservative block, while Mr 
AquOino Pimentel the Local 
Government Minister, and 
Mr Augusto Sanchez, the La- 
bour Minister, are leaders of 
the moderate faction. 

Flying to the central city of 
Cebu late last week, Mr Laurel 
called on his supporters to 
“work guerrilla-style” to re- 
organize the party. 

Hinting broadly at a realign- 
ment of parties, Mr Laurel 
likened his party's coalition 
with PDP-Laban to a “live-in” 
arrangement “There has ne- 
ver been a formal wedding. , 
The continuation of the co- 
alition depends on the com- 
patibility of the partners.” 

Mr Pimentel, the PDP- 
Laban leadev. seemingly con- 
vinced that the five-momh 
alliance is close to breaking 
up. said: “The PDP-Laban 
coalition can coalesce with 
Unido. but there can never be 
a merger between the two 
parties." 


Willoch may step down 



From Tony Samstag. Oslo 

A chance remark lay Mr The occasion, poignantly 


Mr LaRonche: sees himself 
as an impecunious node* 


Kaare Willoch, the Conser- 
vative who was Prime Min- 
ister of Norway from 1981 
until his unprecedented resig- 
nation in April has provoked 
speculation that he is leaving 
politics. 

Mr Willoch, who resigned 
after Parliament failed to ap- 
prove a budget package in- 
tended to compensate for the 
loss of oil revenue, was appar- 
ently overheard to say at a 
party last week that he had no 
wish to be Prime Minister 
again. He has since refused to 


confirm or deny having made 
any such remark. 


enough, was the 50th birthday 
of Mr Rolf Presihus, the 
tough-minded but popular 
former Conservative Finance 
Minister who replaced Mr 
Willoch as party chairman 
shortly after his resignation. 

The incident coincided with 
interviews quoting Mr Wil- 
loch as having spent “my best 
summer for years” since be- 
ing freed from the pressure of 
national and party leadership. 

Some who know him well as 
a political animal with a dry 
wit have surmised that he may 
have been talking about the 
weather. 


From A Correspondent 

l.ima 

Pern reaches an important 
watershed in its financial 
skirmishing with the inter- 
national banking system on 
Augnst 15, when it must make 
a payment of 5180 million in 
senice arrears to the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. Pern 
owes the Fund about $300 
million, lolling due this year. 

Once declared “ineligible”, 
a country is unable to make 
further use of Fond credit 
lines, and other concessionary 
and banking loans become 
hard to obtain. 

Peruvian finance officials 
have been trying to work out a 
face-saving formula, which 
would permit Peru to make a 
goodwill payment of $35 mil- 
lion, and reschedule other : 
payments. Bat the IMF board 
is playing it strictly by the 
book, diplomatic sources In 
Lima say. 

“We are assuming that we 
are declared ineligible,” says a 
presidential economic adviser. 

Pern would then join the 
ranks of Sndan, Liberia and 
Guyana, except that it has 
51.2 billion in international 
reserves. President Garcia has 
called these "strategic 
resources” to defend the coun- 
try against economic hardship 
in the coming years. 

In an important speech last 
month, Senor Garcia said that 
the Peruvian Government 
would not spend more than 10 
per cent of its annual export 
earnings (roughly 5330 mil- 
lion) on servicing the $12 
billion foreign public debt 

Meanwhile, (he Govern- 
ment has been taking mea- 
sures to limit further debt 
servicing, by restricting pay- 
ments on the medium- and 
long-term private debt, which 
totals about $1.2 bDlion. 

Finance officials say that 
Peru wfl] continue to service 
short-term trade credit lines, 
which currently stand at about 
S250 minion. 

The Government has also 
banned remittances of profits, 
royalties and depreciation by 
foreign investors to (beir head 
offices For tbe next 48 months. 
Finance officials say that for- 
eign investors may hand over 
their profit remittances to the 
Central Bank, which will issue 
bonds, or reinvest the money 
in Peru. 


Nicosia (Reuter) - The 
coalition Government of the 
breakaway Turkish Republic 
of North Cyprus has resigned 
after splitting over plans to 
streamline the economy. 

The Prime Minister. Mr 
Dervis Eroglu, will stay on as a 
caretaker until a successor is 
named. 


Shining light 


Heligoland (Reuter) — The 
Heligoland lighthouse, which 
has guided German sailors 
home from the North Sea for 
centuries, will acquire modem 
automated gadgetry later this 
month when Herr Wflii 


Kraus, the last lighthouse- 
keeper. retires after 30 years’ 
service. 


Post filled 


Addis Ababa (AFP) — 
Ethiopia's ruling military 
council has appointed Mr 
Berhanu Jem here, a former 
ambassador to East Germany, 
as the country’s new Commis- 
sioner for Relief and 
Rehabiliation, to succeed Mr 
Berhanu Dawii Wolde- 
Giorgis, who defected to the 
US early this year. 


Bar reopens 


Rome (Reuter) — The 
Fiumicino airport bar, scene 
of a Palestinian machine-gun 
and grenade attack last 
December in which 17 people 
were killed, will reopen today 
with a bullet-proof screen 
round the bar. 


In command 


East Berlin (Reuter) — East 
Germany has identified the 
new commander of Russia’s 
400.000 front-line troops in 
the country as General Valery 
Alexandrovich Belikov, re- 
placing General Pyotr Lushev. 
who held the post for only I) 
months. 


Soldiers die 


Colombo (Reuter) — Six 
soldiers were killed when a 
Tamil separatist mine ex- 
ploded under their jeep in 
eastern Sri Lanka. 


Bear search 


Belgrade (Reuter) - About 
250 Yugoslav hunters are out 
with their rifles in Ljubovija, 
western Serbia, on the trail a 
bear which in four years has 
killed about 600 sheep. 


300 protest against Basque refugee crackdown 


From Susan MacDonald 
Paris 


ft. 

i » 


Hawke attacks US grain subsidy 


* f 


Washington — Australians 
found it astonishing that the 
Reagan Administration was 
prepared to subsidize US 
wheat sales- to the Soviet 


Prime Minister, said yesterday 
(Mohsin Ali writes). 

His criticism coincided with 
two days of talks between Mr 
George Shultz and Mr Bill 


Union at the expense of Hayden, the US and Austra- 
Am erica n taxpayers and ef- [ian foreign ministers, in San 


(idem Australian farmers, Mr 
Bob Hawke, the Australian 


Francisco on the crisis in the 
Anzus (Australia, New Zea- 


land and US) Padfic defence 
alliance. 

In an article in The Wash- 
ington Post. Mr Hawke said 
the extension of the US Export 
Enha ncement Programme 
(EEP) to the Soviet Union 
amounted to the US subsidiz- 
ing a Communist regime. 


An Illegal demonstration by 
300 supporters of Spanish 
Basque refugees in tbe French 
Basque country was broken np 
in Bayonne at the weekend by 
police using tear-gas and 
truncheons. 

Two hundred demonstrates 
were chased on to the dty 
walls, where they were cor- 
nered and held for several 
hours. This was tbe second 
demonstration by Basque rad- 
icals since a crackdown on 
Spanish Basque refugees in 
France. 

It is not only the more 
radical who are angry. Fifty 
local Basque councillors from 
different political parties met 
in Bayonne last Tuesday to 
voice disapproval of the recent 
expulsion to Spate of five 
Spanish toques living in 
France. 

They are worried by legal 
questions posed by the expul- 
sions. and by the effect on 
tourism — one of the French 
toque country's main in- 


dustries - that reprisals by the 
French radical Basque 
organization, Iparretak^ould 
have. 

Referring to the Interior 
Ministry's assertion that the 
men were expelled because 
they were planning terrorist 
acts, tbe councillors said it was 
a matter for French justice if 
these acts were to be carried 
out on French sofi. 

Urey added that if the 
expulsions were in response to 
Spanish information, it should 
be remembered that two years 
age Spanish police had to 
release two men expelled from 
France under similar con- 
ditions, for lack of evidence. 
Spanish police have not yet 
charged the five men recently 
expelled. 

A statement by the Prime 
Minister, M Jacques Chirac, 
that the Spanish have every 
right to expect tell French co- 
operation in dealing with their 
terrorist problem, and the 
recent visit to Madrid by the 
Foreign Minister, M Jean- 
Bernard Raimond, and the 


Security Minister, M Robert 
Pandrand, can be seen not only 
in the context of the Eta 
terrorist situation, but also as 
part of the general crackdown 
on terrorism, and presumed 
terrorists, in France which the 
right-wing Government began 
oo coming to power. 

Traditionally, Spanish Bas- 
que refugees have been left at 
peace in France, provided they 
do not cause trouble. 

Daring the Franco era it was 
more a question of human 
rights. France has encouraged 
the Basque language in the 
French Basque country and 
maintained a low profile to 
avoid extremist attitudes by 
French Basques. 

However, over the past 10 
years Spain has become a 
democracy, a Socialist Gov- 
ernment h«c come to power, 
and it hnc joined the Common 
Market. Under these dream- 
stances it is difficult to con- 
tinue to turn a blind eye. 

So tbe French authorities, in 
fits and starts, have begun 10 
make life more difficult for 


Spanish Basque refugees al- 
though, from a Spanish view- 
point, they have not gone far 
enough. 

Spain would like to see 
France hand over some of tbe 
important suspected leaders of 
Eta, who have gone to ground 
since the crackdown. There is 
a feeling in Spain, too, that 
perhaps there will be a price to 
pay for France's willingness to 
help. The so-called anti-ter- 
rorist organization. Gal, has 
been strangely silent since the 
bloody Eta bombings in Ma- 
drid recently. 

This group, which surfaced 
in France three years ago, was 
dedicated to picking off Span- 
ish Basque refugees on French 
soil and to carrying out repri- 
sals In the French Basque 
country for Eta attacks in 
Spain. Eye-witnesses speak of 
Gal members as Spaniards 
operating in cars with Spanish 
number-plates. A recent 
television programme in Fran- 
ce showed evidence of links 
with certain elements of the 
Spanish police. 


The appearance of Gal 
could have been a sign of 
Spanish frustration at the 
haven for presumed Eta ter- 
rorists over the border. Its 
present silence could be a sign 
of diminished frustration. 

The French Socialists' pol- 
icy, begun two years ago, of 
expelling presumed Eta terror- 
ists to a third country, usually 
in Africa or South America, 
could have been a way of side- 
stepping the situation. 

There have been numerous 
incidents of increased French- 
Span ish co-operation over the 
past eight years, but despite 
French press reports during 
that time of people bring 
arrested as leaders of Eta, no 
top men have been handed 
over to Spain. 

It remains to be seen, with 
the proposed French laws on 
illegal immigration across the 
borders and the hardening 
French attitude towards Span- 
ish Basque refugees, whether 
the French Basque country 
will cease to be a haven for 
suspected Eta terrorists. 


fuT“ i4} 

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ti***' £ 

|. J 









OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


East Germany accused 
by Bonn of promoting 
Third World ‘invasion’ 


The West German Minister 
for Imer-German Relations. 
Herr Heinrich Windden, has 
accused East Germany of 
acting in an "unfriendly 
Ijshion” In continuing lo 
allow mainly Third World 
refugees into West Berlin from 
the eastern half of the city. 

"The toleration and promo- 
tion of a stream of people 
seeking asylum through the 
East German Sehonefcld air- 
port cannot be reconciled with 
good ncighbourliness." he told 
a press conference in Bonn 
\cstcrday. 

Tt was a “m.*' ere burden" for 
relations between the two 

countries. 

Herr Windelcn rejected a 


From A Correspondent Bonn 
statement bv the East German 
Foreign Ministry at the week- 
end which said it had no 
grounds to refuse transit to 
foreigners "only because they 
want to go to Berlin (West).” If 
East Germany used “only a 
fraction of the attention" it 
demoted to keeping its own 
citizens in. “the problem 
would be easily solved.” he 
said. 

The Foreign Ministry state- 
ment pointed out that for- 
eigners could enter West 
Berlin without a visa and 
continued: "We arc not so far 
aware that the three Western 
allies, who have the say there, 
want to change the situation at 
all.” Border officials could not 
decide if foreigners in transit 


Close atom plants call 


Bonn — An “interim report” 
h> West Germany's oppo- 
sition Social Democratic Party 
(SPD) says all nuclear power 
stations in the country can be 
closed within 10 years (A 
Correspondent writes ). 

Henr Volker Hauff. a former 
SPD Minister for Research 
and Technology, told a press 
conference in Bonn yesterday 
that after the Chernobyl 
disaster the continued use of 
nuclear energy was “ethically 
unacceptable.” The first 


plants coaid be dosed within 
two years. 

A precondition was a 
greater emphasis on energy 
saving. The supply gap could 
be filled by increased use of 
coal-fired power stations. A 
period of increased air pollu- 
tion must be accepted, but the 
problems could be solved. 

The report will be debated 
at the SPD's congress in 
Nuremberg the week after 
next. 


were pseudo-political or eco- 
nomic refugees. 

The Bonn Government has 
tried lor more than a year to 
persuade East Berlin to stop 
letting through people who are 
seeking the political asylum 
guaranteed by the West Ger- 
man constitution. 

About 50.000 refugees have 
applied for asylum so far this 
year, more than half of them 
coming through West Berlin 
after flying into East Ger- 
many. 

The Bonn Interior Ministry 
expects about 100.000 by the 
end of the year. 

An official spokesman in 
Bonn said East Germany 
sought to make the demarca- 
tion line between the western 
and eastern sectors of Berlin 
into an international border. 

However. Herr Windelen 
said earlier that the weekend 
statement coutd indicate a 
readiness by the East German 
Government to negotiate if 
the allies — Britain, the United 
States and France — ap- ■ 
proached it directly. 

• Barracks bomb: A bomb 
caused slight damage to a 
barracks of the federal border 
protection police (BGS) at 
Swjssial-Heimerzheim. near 
Bonn, early yesterday. The 
BGS is responsible for the 
initial processing of people 
seeking asylum. 


Sitting in front of a picture of his Angust 1961 escape, Herr Conrad Schu m a nn , right the 
first East German border guard to flee while the Berlin Wall was being built, tells a West 
Berlin press conference he had been ordered to detain anyone trying to escape from East 
Berlin. With him is Herr Andreas Bratke, who fled from East Germany in January. 


That the picture above might become 
reality doesn't bear thinking about. 

But it won't happen, thanks largely to 
the efficiency of today's farming. 

We have around S million more people 
to iced now than in 1945. Yet rather than gobble 
Uj) more land to feed them, we in fact use 
thousands of acres less for food production. 
S«> thanks to fertilizers, and associated 
advances, wv now not only produce virtually 
all l he food we need, hut can also conserve 
more* land lor leisure and other uses. 

Producing food and enriching 
the environment. 

Concern for our environment is vital: 
farmers themselves play as important a part 
as anyone in protecting it. 

They live and work on the land: their 
livelihood depends on it. 

Tlie unpublicised majority of them are- 


more and more actively seeking positive ways 
to enrich it. planting more trees and enlarging 
existing wildlife habitats. Around 7 million 
new trees were planted on English and Welsh 
farms last year. 

In fact. FWAG (The Farming and Wild- 
life Advisory' Group) was invited by a further 
3.000 farmers in 1985 to visit their farms and 
provide conservation advice. 

.And while they're caring for the land, 
they're growing enuugh food for all the rest of 
us. and others too. In 1 9S4. our exports of 
livestock and other food produce amounted 
lo something like £4 billion, putting farming 
high in the top league of exporters. 

The important role play ed 
b y fertilizers. 

The proper use of fertilizers benefits 
the coil, returning natural elements vital for 
healthy crop growth. 


They help maintain an ample food 
supply to sustain our population, and play 
their part in allowing the landscape to be 
conserved. 

That's why IC! Agricultural Division 
takes pride in being Britain's leading manu- 
facturer of fertilizers. 

ft's also why the picture above won’t 
become a reality. 

You are invited to write to us for more 
information on the issues raised in this 
advertisement 

Please contact Mrs. Diane York at ICI 
Agricultural Division. PO Box 1, Billingham, 
Cleveland TS23 1LB. 


FERTILIZERS 

Helping nature - 
and Britain - to grow 


.1.1 a major supplier tv agricult u re. ICI Agricultural Division is running this series of advertisements, designed to increase public awareness both of the 
role nfjertihzen in modemfarming nd of other keg issues m wived in the production of British food. Many of the facts presented here will be familiar to the 
farming community, but ive believe ire have a responsibility to help keep the general public fully informed on these major and complex issues. 


F fliUnnHs veterans hit out 

Angry Gurkhas 
accuse Army of 
discrimination 

From Michael Hamlyn. Dharan, Nepal 


Gurkha troops sent back in 
disgrace to this British canton- 
ment town after an attack on 
their officers while on a visit to 
Hawaii are bitterly angry with 
the British Army, which they 
accuse of racial discrim- 
ination. 

“There were 12 or 13 Brit- 
ish soldiers with os tbe whole 
time that evening,” said a 
von rig former rifleman sitting 
in one of the town’s fly-blown 
bars. . 

"They were with ns at the 
party, they were with ns when 
we returned to Tent City- 
which is what the camp was 
known as. They saw as much 
as we did. But they have not 
been discharged.” 

The Gurkhas have been 
given an administrative dis- 
charge. "It’s not the same as 
dismissal.” said an Army 
spokesman, flown specially 
from Hong Kong to Kath- 
mandu to try to prevent further 
news from being disseminated 
about the incident/Tfaey have 
simply been told their services 
are no longer required.” 

Mr Alan Graham, the 
spokesman, denied the dismis- 
sals were in any way racially 
based, or that tbe Gurkha 
troops had been treated any 
differently to British troops in 
similar incidents. 

British officers are, how- 
ever, known to be relieved that 
the officers injured in the 
incident, which followed a 
party at the end of a strenuous 
period of training, included a 
Gurkha officer, so that it could 
not be presented as the white 
establishment reacting to an 
attack on itself. 

The Gurkhas themselves 
deny that the Gurkha officer 
was as badly injured as was 
reported. “He was training 
and jogging again immediately 
afterwards,” said the yonng 
men in Dharan, “and how 
could he have done that if he 
had two broken ribs. Like they 

said?” 

The men are particularly 
bitter about their treatment 
since as many as 80 of the 
approximately 110 men dis- 
charged fought in the Falk- 
lands war. Three Falklands 
veterans who spoke to The 
Times came from the mortar 
platoon of tbe company in 
tumble, a support company of 
tbe 7th Duke of Edinburgh’s 
Own Gurkha Rifles. 

“We gave support to the 
Scots Guards and to the 
Welsh Guards in the final 
attack of the Falkland war,” 
one recalled. “Even when en- 
emy shells came into our 
positions, even then we gave 
support when they called for it. 
Two or three of our 81mm 
mortars were damaged in the 
shelling.” 

He added, smiling at the 
remembrance: “We liked the 
fighting. We joined for the 
fighting. We heard so many 
stories from our grandfathers 
in oar villages about fighting 
in tbe Second World War. how 
they did this to the Japanese 
or that to the Germans. Tbe 
Falklands gave ns something 
to tell the next generation, yon 
know.” 

He sighed. “I think 7tfa 
Gurkhas is finished now.” 

A local association of Brit- 


Indian city 
mourns 
for general 

From Kuldip Nayar 
Delhi 

Pune suspended work and 
business yesterday in protest 
at the assassination of General 
A. S. Vaidya. the former Chief 
of Army Staff. 

Some cases of arson and 
stone-throwring were reported 
by police, and 20 buses were 
damaged. 

The general's body was 
cremated with full military 
honours.. 

Despite alerts across the 
country and checks ' at air- 
ports, railway stations and bus 
slops, none of the four assail- 
ants has been arrested. 

Mr Bhaskar Maisar. the 

Police Commissioner of Pune, 
admitted there had been a 
security failure. 

Both houses of Parliament 
were adjourned as a mark of 
respect. 

Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the In- 
dian Prime Minister, who 
.to Delhi from 
terrorism could 
not be wiped out easily. He 
said that a single incident 

1 either as showing 

I either deterioration or im- 
! provement. 

Mr Gandhi said terrorism 
couW be tackled by finding a 
political solution and havine 
ihc police forces deal severely 
with the problem. y 


Pakistan 
political 
rallies ban 


Islamabad (Reuter) - Tbe 
Pakistan Government, led by 
the Prime Minister, MS’ 
Muhammad Khan Junejo. has 
decided to ban political rallies 
on Independence Day on Fri- 
day. to avoid a confrontation 
with opposition parties, 
authoritative sources said 
\esterday. 

The Cabinet took the de- 
cision because it feared dashes 
w-Hen the main opposition 
alliance and the ruling Pakir 
sian Muslim League (PML) 
hold rival rallies in the Punjab 
pro\incial capital of Lahore. 
Opposition rallies were, also 
planned for other important 
towns. * 

The PML and the lG-party 
Movement for the Restore; 
tion of Democracy fMRD) 
planned the rallies its a shouf 
of strength in their dispute 
about Pakistan's political 
future. 

The MRD. which demands 
fresh party-based national 
elections by the end of this 
year, has turned down sugges- 
tions by the Government tha| 
it should hold its Lahore rally 
on another day. “ 

. The PML. which has re- 
jected demands for fresh elec- 
tions. had vowed to make its 
ra ll> the largest in ■ ihfc 
country's history. 1. 


i 


ish ex-sen icemen in Dharan 
has fired off messages protest- 
ing at the British treatment of 
the company, whose members 
discharged include the com- 
pany sergeant major and a 
staff-sergeant as well as other 
sergeants and corporals. The 
messages are being sent to 
Mrs Thatcher, King'Bireadra 
of Nepal and the Nepalese 
Defence Minister. 

Nepalese official reaction 
has been muted. When 
pressed. Mr Shailendra 
Kumar Upadhyaya. the For- 
eign Minister, would say only 
that it seemed a matter of 
internal discipline for the Brit- 
ish Army. But more vehement 
views hare been published in 
the left-wing press. 

The Chalphal Weekly, for 
example, said “informed sour- 
ces” regard the real reason for 
the discharges as the need to 
resolve what to do with the 
eight regiments of the British 
Gurkha Rifles after the trans- 
fer of Hong Kong to the 

Tour cut short 

No disciplinary action is to be 
taken against Major Corin 
Pearce, the officer involved in 
the brawl in Hawaii which led 
to the dismissal of the Gur- 
khas (Tim Jones writes). 

But Major Pearce, aged 31. 
has had his tour of duty with 
the Gurkhas cut short. 

He was to have served as a 
company commander with 
the 1st Battalion. 7th Duke of 
Edinburgh's Own Gurkha Ri- 
fles until October, but is now 
on leave before another post- 
ing with his own regiment, the 
Royal Anglians. 

Chinese. "Certain circles in 
Kathmandu,” the paper con- 
cludes, “regard this as 
disgraceful.” 

There is quite a strong view 
in Kathmandu that the country 
has changed since the agree- 
ment with Britain to maintain 
the Gurkha link. “There is a 
shortage of labour here now,” 
a Nepalese political observer 
told me, “and Indians are 
coming here to fill the gap. 

“People make a good deal 
more money than they can in 
tbe British Army, by going to 
work for the Arabs. Nepalese 
involvement in the Falklands 
war was a shame for the 
country, hot we expect the 
arrangement will continue. 
The King wants to have this 
link with Britain.” 

Reaction in Dharan has 
been mixed. A 'Gurkha on 
leave from the 10th Queen 
Mary's Own Gurkha Rifles 
said that anyone involved in an 
attack on his own officers 
deserved all he got. “When 
yon join the Army you have to 
accept the discipline.” he said. 

An ex-Gurkha from the 
10th GR, who had perhaps 
been longer in the bar, said 
that any British officer who 
showed, up in tbe town would 
be attacked. “1 will cut him 
myself,” be said. “IU go to jail 
for them. 1 don't mind.” 

The dismissed Gurkhas say 
reactions from their families 
have been mixed, but insisted 
they had been wrongly treated. 
The reason for their discharge 
was given officially as their 
refusal to co-operate fully with 
the inquiry into the attack on 
their company commander. 
Major Corin Pearce, seconded 
from the Royal Anglian 
Regiment. 

But they insist they told the 
special branch of the Military 
Police all they knew. “We did 
not see who attacked Major 
Pearce.” they said. 


'f ’ 









THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


T rit[ y w for South Pacific 


Lange resists activist pressure 


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From Richard Long 

Sank Ftp 

The Prime Minister of New 
'ii ss s * ' f N Zealand. Mr David Lange, 
l,r »i| , , r iNn ti . yesterday gave the thumbs 
"K .ir ,i '''nusTlj down to a call for a highly^- 
"■iiu' Rr 'tisii t politicized Souih Pacific Fo- 
rum which would consider 

inrhj^ recognition of Swapo and the . 

■% PLOand membership of lhc *P“ ™“‘ ty consenaB^ Ea. 

< Non-Aligned Movement ^ 10 ^ 3 

..X The oil for a more activist ratvBnd ‘ ro,e - 
Jf i- LlT ro Ie came from the Prime 
Minister of Vanuatu, Father 




;>« « 


tion of the Forum, which as a, 
group covers the vast reaches 
of the South Pacific, which 
became an issue at die closing 
ceremony. After a call from 
the Prime Minister of Fyi, 
Ratu $ir Kamisese Mara, at 
the opening ceremony for a 
return to the “Pacific way" of 


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.Walter Lini, as this grouping 
ofthe 13 independent states of 
the South Pacific wound up 
four days of xaLks here 
yesterday. . 

Bui Mr Lange, following 
Father Lini at a closing press 
conference, said the Forum 
was concerned primarily with 
the economic and social prob- 
lems of member states, lf.it 
became a "mini-United Nat- 
ions" it would lose its value 
and New Zealand would not 
bother to attend.. 

Father Lini is seen as a 
leading figure in- the Melane- 
sian block, which takes a 
strident activist role in con- 
trast to the more conservative 
Polynesian nations. 

. While the Melanesians took 
the rest of the Forum with 
them this year on the issue of 
independence for New Caled- 
onia, they did not budge on 
their attitude towards the 
South Pacific Nuclear Free 
Zone Treaty. 

Father Lini again spelt out 
his complaint yesterday, say- 
ing he believed the treaty 
should also ban visits by 
nuclear ships, the stationing of 
nuclear ships and aircraft and 
uranium mining. 

But it was the future direo- 


The Forum should not look 
back at its past but should 
identify ways of developing 


consider membership of the 
Non-Aligned Movement, al- 
though Vanuatu is the only 
individual Forum • member 
which is pan of The move- 
ment. • 

Mr Lange, tackled over 
these suggestions at his press 
conference immediately after 
Father Uni's, scoffed: “That’s 
not bad for openers — why the 
moderation?" 

Mr Lange backed Ratu Sir 
Kamisese and a return to the 
traditional way. ' “It is the 


Paris refuses to budge 


Paris — In reaction to the 
South Pacific Forum's de- 
rision to ask that New Caledo- 
nia be placed on die United 
Nations' list of territories to be 
decolonized, the Ministry of 
Overseas Departments and 
Territories has indicated that 
the French Government will 
continue to exercise fully its 
responsibilities there (Susan 
MacDonald writes). 

The ministry also stated 
that under the right-wing 
Govemmenf s New Caledonia 
law, passed In nrid-Jnly, a 
referendum should be held 
wi thin a year on the question 
of independence and approval 
of a new statute for New 
Caledonia. 


The Prime Minister, M 
Jacques Chirac, is due in New 
Caledonia at the end of this 
month for discussions on the 
new statute. 

Last year’s South Pacific 
Forma deferred a decision on 
New Caledonian independence 
in die light of foe then 
Socialist Government's law 
which gave a greater say in the 
bland's affairs to repre- 
sentatives of the Indigenous 
Melanesian population and 
opened the door to future 
Independence. 

The present Government’s 
modification of that law to the 
advantage of the settler 
community tipped the scales in 
favour of this year’s derision. 


further, he said. He suggested 
it should adopt a position by 
which it. could deal directly 
with other international in- 
stitutions and agencies, fight 
as a bloc ax the United Nations 
and consider recognizing such 
groups as Swapo and the PLO. 

He even suggested, partly 
tongue in cheek, that it could 


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Time limit for Deng 

Challenge to prove 
reforms can work 


Jn the second of two articles on 
■China's economic problems, 
Jlobert Grieves in Peking re- 
ports on the impact of the 
economic difficulties on the 
political leadership. 

Mr Deng Xiaoping, China’s 
paramount leader, ims staked 
the legitimacy of his regime on 
Ihe successful reform of the 
Chinese planned economy. 
But, according to Western 
diplomats and economists in 
Peking, be has only a few more 
years in which to prove that 
his open-door policies w91 
work. '• *i 

“If Mr Deng cannot show 
real results in foe current five- 
year plan that began this year, 
then the Peking leadership, 
will be forced to look for 
’alternatives — provided they 
can keep their jobs," says a 
.Western diplomat. 

Few outside observers would 
disagree, however, that during 
foe past seven years of foe 
Dengist regime foe lot of the 
ordinary Chinese has im- 
proved more dramatically than 
In foe previous 30 years. 

- Incomes are np, to 840 yuan 
(£I53)a year m foe cities, and 
so is consumption. Interest in 
foe arts, literature and science 
is blossoming. 

" At foe same time, vocational 
independence has soared in 
popularity. China today has 
3.5 million contract workers 
who have cast aside the “iron 
rice bowl" of fixed-income jobs 
that are assigned for life, in 
order to sign work contracts 
with government agencies that 
they negotiated on their- own 
behalf. While such jobs are 
bereft of social safety nets 
[Should the worker become 
-disabled, they often carry 


coptered" in Chinese), so that 
they can start working mi how 
to keep foe reforms afire. 

What the alternative might 
be should they fail Ins, to date, 
been embodied by Mr Chen 
Yun, an architect of China's 
Soviet-style planned economy 
in the 1950s. Last September 
Mr Chen, aged 82, was al- 
lowed publicly to criticize the 
Dengists for Jetting farmers 
stop fanning and go in for 
more lucrative rural in- 
dustries, thereby letting foe 
natron's grain production miss 
its projected target by 20 
million metric tons. 

So pressure .has intensified 
on the current regime to deve- 
lop the economy as quickly as 
posable. The slowdown in 
Weston investment and the. 
subsequent spate of Western 
reports outlining foe problems 

China’s 
economy 
Part 2 


, ifc" 


paki$ 

polite 


significant bonuses. 

The anecdotal evidence of a 
higher standard of firing is 
everywhere, from Fojian Prov- 
ince, where prosperous peas- 
ants are bonding single family, 
mo-storey stone houses, to 
Peking, where residents of 
modern apartments wear the 
latest Western fashions and 
own imported Japanese mo- 
torcycles. 

So it is not the goals of the 
reforms that are in question, 
say Western experts here. 
Rather, it is foe means of 
"attaining those goals that haye 
engendered controversy. To 
put it another way, the debate 
that has continued in China 
since 1978 centres on foe 
question of how much Com- 


pf doing business in China 
have therefore come at a most 
unwelcome time for the 
leadership. 

“Our problems are well 
publicized, but oar solutions 
are not so well publicized," 
complains Mr Roog Yireo, a 
former Shanghai capitals 
who is now chairman of the 
China International Trust and 
Investment Corporation. 

“We are making efforts to i 
solve oar problems gradually." 
Such solutions inclade the 
Bank of China selling US 
dollars at official exchange 
rates to hard-cnnency-starved 
joint ventures in Shanghai, 
including Shanghai Volks- 
wagen Automotive, Shanghai 
Befi Telephone Equipment 
Manufacturing, Shanghai- 
Foxboro, a Sin o- American 
joint venture, and 3M China, a 
venture entirely owned by foe 
3M company iff the US. 

That kind of help may be too 
little, too hue, say Western 
businessmen here. Nike, the 
US shoemaker, IBM, the 
computer maker, and Crocker 
Pacific Trading have already 
polled oat of Shanghai. And iff 
tbe 1,500 Japanese business- 
men who lived in foe city last 
year, fewer than 500 remain. 

Still, British businessmen 
and bankers seem ready to 
wait out tbe ament trough in 
foe Chinese economy, even if 


manist ideology to- keep and their American cousins do not. 
how much to throw away. “China is not the Middle 

1 Mr Deng’s great cootribn- East of foe 1980s, but than is 
tfon was to say, in effect “do potential here," says a British 
what works, not what Marx- businessman in Peking. 
i$m teaches" (summed up in Nevertheless, just about 
his famous aphorism, “seek everyone doing business in 
truth from facts"). Peking seems to feel that the 

Now bis proteges mast come Chinese must do more to ho- 
op with a viable programme to commodate Western investors. 
replace the past Chinese “The bottom line,” says a 
dependency on Communist Western diplomat in Peking, 
ideology. The competitive and “is that if tbe Chinese want to 
often fractious members of rely on foreign joint ventures 
China's “third generation" of to help them develop their 
leaders — including Mr U economy, then they are going 
Peng, Mr Hu QOi and Mr to have to change the rotes of 
Iran Jiytm — have been foe game." 
rapidly promoted (“heli- Concluded 

. Main trading partners in 1985 


% stars ol China's imports 


ST. 


. % share of China's exports 
Hung Kong — 28.2 

UfT 8.5 

a 

United Kingdom's trade within CMna (E mfflons) 
1983 1984 

UK exports K> China - 1S9.7 317.3 

UK imports from China 331-4 278-5 

Balance ■ -71.7 +38.8 


Hong Kong 
W Germany 
(UK - 


Pacific way to be able to talk 
and settle our differences. It is 
not pretending you are a 
whole row of Perez de 
Cuellars." he said in a ref- 
erence to the UN Secretary- 
General. 

This 17th meeting of foe 
South Pacific Forum ended 
with an 1 1 -page communique. 


which noted progress on ship- 
ping and fishing problems as 
well as on more controversial 
issues such as New Caledonia, 
the nuclear treaty protocols 
and an agreement on moves to 
oppose the dumping of 
nuclear waste. 

The main moves will be 
seen as the decision to take to 
the United Nations its com- 
plaints over French prevarica- 
tion on independence for New 
Caledonia, and the addition of 
foe so-called “opt-ouT da use 
to foe nuclear free zone treaty 
protocols. 

This is expected to attract 
agreement from London and 
Washington, as well as Grom 
Moscow and Peking, leaving 
France as tbe only nuclear 
power not willing to sign. 

Tbe Forum nations sup- 
ported by inference foe 
Commonwealth mini-summ- 
it's call for sanctions against 
South Africa, acknowledging 
that the London meeting had 
given a strong lead to tbe 
international community in 
its efforts to put pressure on 
foe Pretoria Government. 

In a move seen as differing 
from British Government pol- 
icy, foe Forum called on all 
countries, especially South 
Africa's main trading part- 
ners, to implement the mea- 
sures recommended by the 
Commonwealth. 

In foe communique the 
Forum leaders expressed deep 
concern at foe deteriorating 
situation m South Africa and 
their dismay that South Africa 
had shown no willingness to 
undertake fundamental re- 
forms or to initiate genuine 
negotiations with blacks about 
South Africa's future. 


New Foreign Minister for Malaysia 


From M. G. G. Filial 
Koala Lumpur 

A new Minister of Foreign 
Affairs was named in a Cabi- 
net reshuffle announced yes- 
terday by DatuJc Seri Dr 
Mahathir Mohamed. the 
Malaysian Prime Minister. 

Damk Rais Yaiim takes 
over the portfolio, in a swap 
with Tunku Ahmad Rifoau- 
deen. who moves to Informa- 
tion. In a similar exchange. 
Datuk Shahrir Samad moves 
from Federal Territories to 
take over Welfare Services 
from Datuk Abu Hassan 
Omar. 

Two ministers were drop- 
ped from foe Cabinet of 23, 
adding to the three who had 
not sought re-election. Datuk 
Seri Mahathir left one port- 
folio, Justice, unfilled, giving 
rise to speculation that foe 
post of Attorney-General may, 
once again, be a political 
appointment. 

The two who were dropped 
were Datuk Seri Adib A dam, 
Land and Regional Develop- 
ment and Datuk Paul Leong. 
Primary Industries. 

Datuk Seri Adib. who is on 
a pilgrimage to Mecca and was 
not around to learn of his 
dismissal, is expected to be 
given a diplomatic assign- 
ment while Datuk Leong is 
expected to be given a senior 
government appointment in 
his area of specialization, pri- 
mary commodities. 

Of foe new ministers. Datuk 
Urn Kheug Yaik takes foe 
Primary Industries portfolio, 
returning to the Cabinet after 
a 14-year absence. Datuk Seri 
Najib Razak. son of the late 
Prime Minister, Tun Abdul 
Razak. is foe new Culture, 
Youth and Sports Minister, 
while Datuk Ajib Ahmad and 
Mr Kasitah Gadam are Min- 
isters in the Prime Minister's 
Department. 



Damk Seri Dr Mahathir Mohamed. the Malaysian Prime 
Minister, announcing his new Cabinet yesterday. 

Datuk Seri Mahathir takes 


on the additional portfolio of 
Home Affairs, while Mr 
Ghafar Baba, the deputy 
Prime Minister, has two more 
— National and Rural Devel- 
opment and Housing and 
Local Government. 


Datuk Seri Mahathir said 
foe Housing and Local Gov- 
ernment Ministry had been 
reserved for the' Malaysian 
Chinese Association (MCA), 
which nominated only three 
of foe four portfolios tra- 
ditionally reserved for it. 


Political sources expect the 
portfolio to be taken by Mr 
Tan Koon Swan, foe MCA 
president, should he he acquit- 
ted of the charges of corporate 
fraud for which he is being 
tried in Singapore, beginning 
today. 

But the MCa's problems in 
filling the vacancies also have 
lo do with its poor showing in 
last week's general elections. 

The sources indicated yes- 
terday that the latest Cabinet 
appointments were more cau- 
tious than they should have 
been. This reflected the in- 
tense infighting that is devel- 
oping for next > car's party 
elections ofthe United Malays 
National Organization 
(UMNO), the leading party in 
foe ruling National Front 
coalition. 

The full Cabinet list Prim 
Minister and Home Affairs 
Datuk Seri Dr Mahathir 
Mohamed: Deputy Prime Min- 
ister, Housing and Local Gov- 
ernment. National mid Rural 
Development Mr Ghafar Baba; 
Labour Damk Lee Run Sat; 

Welfare Services Datuk Shahrir 
Abdul Samad: Culture. Youth 
and Sports Datuk Naiih Tun 
Razak: Land and Regional 
Development Datuk SuLuman 
Daud: Works Datuk S Samy 
Vellu: Health Duiuk Chan Siang 
Sun; Finance Mr Daim Zuin- 
uddin. Foreign Affairs Datuk 
Rais Vatim: Education Mr 
Anwar Ibrahim: Information 
Tunku Ahmad Ruhaudecn; 
Transport Duiuk Ling Liong 
Sik: Trade and Industry Tunku 
Razalcigh Hamzah: Defence 
Datuk Abdullah Ahmad Bod- 
awi; Agriculture Datuk Sen 
Sanusi Jumd; Public Enter- 
prises Datin Rafidah Aziz. Pri- 
mary Industries Datuk Lim 
Kheng Yaik: Science. Technol- 
ogy and Eofironmrnt Datuk 
Stephen Yong: Energy- Tele- 
communications and Posts Dat- 
uk Leo Moggie; Federal Ter- 
ritory Datuk Abu Hassan Omar, 
Ministers in Prime Minister’s 
Department Dituk Ajib Ahmad 
and Mr Rasitah Gadam. 


Wouldyou give up a 

secure office job 
walk the streets? 


Police service isn’t the first choice of 
career for everyone 

Many of our officers have abandoned 
all sorts of ^^apparently promising 
professions to join 
the Met 

If you were to ask 
them‘\vhy?,”they’d 
all give you diff- 
erent reasons. 
However, 
I there is one 
thing on 
ich they all seem 
to agree Being a PC in 
London scores very 
. highly indeed when it 
comes to job satisfaction. 


“I WANT A CAREER: NOT A DEAD END: 

If you are ambitious, there is plenty of opportunity. 

All senior police officers in the land started their careers as 
constables on the beat. And like them, you’ll be encouraged to 
go as far as your ability or inclination will take you. • 

You’ll find interest and challenge at all levels in die 
Meor>politan Police. Plus an enormous 
variety of different specialist departments. 

'Drugs squad, criminal intelligence, 
diplomatic protection, communications, 
training, traffic and crime prevention: 
the list goes on and on. 

Evenone should be able to find, 
a niche for themselves. 


SERGEANT HWT0M 
BSc Leeds Uravwsity Did research 
( for an international oil company 


i 


whatever your definition of the term may be 

“I WANTED A BIT MORE VARIETY" 

If you’re serving with the Met, the last thing you’re likely to 
getintoisarut. 

Yoifll find yourself involved with everything from accidents, 
robberies and rapes to lost tourists and people who just want to 
pass the time of day. 

You’ll have to cope with matrimonial disputes, noisy 
neighbours, con-merchants, drunks and drug-pushers. 

It’s not exactly a laugh a minute, but there is little 
opportunity for boredom to creep in. 

In fact, it can be a bit like having a different job even' 
day. And sometimes, like half a dozen jobs at once. 

“I WANTED TO MAKE IMPORTANT DECISIONS: 

Making vital decisions is an 
everyday occurrence for PC’s on the £ 
street You’ll often find yourself in 
situations where you’ll have to _ 
think quickly, then act Fast 

Talk a suicidal drug addict 
in from a ledge or make a grab 
to pull him in? Sort out a punch- 

up yourself: or call for assistance from your colleagues? Hand 
out a bit of advice to a careless driven or prosecute? 

The responsibility sometimes weighs heavily 

But if you can cope it's a bit more rewarding than silting 
around a conference table deciding what to do about the' 
company’s ailing sales figures. 


DETECTIVE 
CONSTABLE 
CHAMBERS 
A’ levels. Spent one 
year as a manage- 
ment trainee with one 
Ofthe clearing banks 
before joining the Met. 


fTTTSr- 


C.&- 






'wrs> 


POUCE CONSTABLE LOGAN 
BSc m Applied Biology Worked on research" 
of medical products and for four years in a 
leading London Hospital. 


"I JUST WASNT 
LEARNING ANYTHING: 

Of course, well give you a 
very thorough training. And it can be 
pretty’ tough at times. 

For a start, you’ll get 20 weeks at 
the Peel Centre in Hendon. Then a 
further 19 months on probation attached 
to a London police station. And training 
will continue throughout your career. 

As a police officer, you never stop 
learning. The more experienced you are, 
the better you do the job. 

“DO I FIT THE BILL?" 

Academically, we're looking for around five good ‘O’ levels. 
But if you’ve got A levels or a degree, so much the better. 

You cant l>e over-qualified for this job. Although 
your personal qualities are as important as your 
qualifications. 

You must be at least 5' 8" (I72cms) tall for a 
man, 5M" (162cms) tall for a woman, phvsicallv fit 
and mentally agile. You’ll need more than 
1 your fail- share of common sense and we find 
that on occasion, a sense of humour is a definite advantage. 

Oh, and don’t worry if we re not your first 
career. As a professional police officer, you 
never know when your previous experience 
is going to come in handy. 

For further information, phone (01) 725 -H 92 
(Ansaphone 725 4575). Or write to the Appoint- 
ments Officer, Careers Information Centre, Dept. London’s 

r METROPOLITAN 

MD6 1 S, New Scotland Yard. London SW1H 0BG. police 








THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


SPECTRUM 


*1 

Baby-boomers: second in a series on the impact of the post-war generation, 'now reaching middl e-age 

- 


From protest to participation 


: John Lennon said the Sixties had changed 
J nothing, but Steve Turner finds that many 
of the old ideals are being put into practice 


A lthough by no means 
even baby-boomer was 
a hippy, a’flower child, a 
student revolutionary or 
a swinging Londoner. 
■ the optimism and idealism amid 
' which they grew up during the 
Sixties was contagious. For a few 
years it seemed as though youth 
had both the power and the vision 
< to bring about lasting change. 

In America, the generation's 
marching and campaigning helped 
"to introduce racial integration to 
the South and contributed to the 
- ending of the war in Vietnam. In 
‘France, student protest brought 
Pans to a standstill and the French 
'government almost to its knees in 
the events of May 1 968. 

_ In Britain. baby-boomers saw 
laws passed between 1965 and 
■J970 which abolished capital 
^punishment and theatrical censor- 
ship. legalized abortion and homo- 
sexuality and made divorce more 
easily obtainable. 

Yet even by the early Seventies, 
■the realization was dawning that all 
rihis did not automatically con- 
stitute a return to the Garden of 
Eden. In the November 1970 issue 
of the underground magazine Oz. 
■editor Richard Neville bemoaned 
;itie fact that his counter-cultural 
■colleagues had become every bit as 
Violent, intolerant, greedy, devious 
and manipulative as the “straight" 
society they sought to change. “We 
blithely declare World War 111 on 
our parents and yet have already 
forgotten how to smile at our 
friends”, he concluded. 

At the same time John Lennon 
was saying (hat the Sixties had 
altered nothing. The same people 
were in control and the class 
system remained intacL “The 
dream is over.” he announced. 
“It's just the same except I’m 30 
and a lot of people have got long 
hair, that's all." 

Many baby-boomers here and in 
America concluded that the failure 
had come because they had taken 
on the world before they had dealt 
with themselves. The former 
American youth revolutionary 
leader Jerry Rubin said: “In the 
1 960s wc postponed all questions 
oh personal growth until after the 
revolution. But revolution is only 
as high as the people that make it." 

Rubin spent his Seventies im- 
mersed in "new consciousness" 
activities, trying out every therapy, 
health fad. inner-healing course 
and meditation method on offer. In 
1 976 he vvrotc: "We are headed for 
another *do it' period. Perhaps the 


1980s will sec the activism of the 
l%0s combined with the aware- 
ness of the 1970s. In the next flurry 
of activity wc will come from a 
deeper psychological and spiritual 
base." 

There are some- who believe that 
Rubin's prophecy has come true. 
Neil Spencer, aged 38. for 10 years 
the editor of .Vnr Musical Express. 
now- a freelance writer and an 
administrator of the Labour 
Party's Red Wedge campaign, 
which aims to use music to attract 
young people inio the parry, points 
io the existence of such movements 
as Greenpeace. Friends of the 
Earth and Artists Against Apart- 
heid as evidence of a resurgence. 

“There was a fight-back by the 
Establishment in the Seventies, but 
that doesn't mean that the Sixties 
generation lost all its beliefs”, he 
says. “I’ve lost none of my ideal- 
ism. 1 haven't changed at ail in that 
respect.” 

Others point to the amazing 
success of Live Aid. Two-thirds of 
the artists were from the baby- 
boom genera lion. Bob Geldof him- 
self is 33. the steering committee is 
made up of baby-boomers and the 
concerts in London and Philadel- 
phia were promoted by people who 
began in the Sixties. 

Those in the business of mon- 
itoring attitudes in British society 
agree that baby-boomers are still 
producing changes rooted in the 
thinking of their teenage years. 
Gerard O'Neill, a senior analyst at 
the Henley Centre for Forecasting. 


‘There’s been a move 
towards a more 
holistic view of life 9 



says: “An idea which helps us a lot 
in our analysis is that we're all 
•prisoners of youth*, that our 
experiences as teenagers shape our 
altitudes through life. Sometimes 
this is referred to as the 'sociology 
of nostalgia*. The classic example is 
the Sixties generation.” 

Sheila Moorcroft. a senior 
consultant with Taylor Nelson, a 
research company which analyses 
changing attitudes among British 
people for companies planning 
long-term investments, selects 
health, organizational structure 
and the family as three significant 
areas where baby-boomers con- 
tinue to have impact. “It's gone 
from protest to assimilation”, she 
says. “The people bom in the late 


Graham PWpot 



Forties and early Fillies can now 
actually implement their ideas in a 
wider sphere. Generally speaking 
they're more flexible, more open to 
change, and they're keen to move 
away from traditional structures.'' 

The back-lo-naiure call of the 
hippies has matured into a range of 
concerns, from environmentalism 
to healthy eating. Twenty years ago 
few people knew the meaning of 
the word “ecology”. Today an 
organization such as Greenpeace is 
a force for governments to reckon 
with. 

Twenty years ago. too. health- 
food stores were the province of a 
few suspected cranks, and “You 
Are What You Eat” was a radical 
slogan. Today the result of that 
consciousness can be seen on every 
British high street as supermarket 
chains such as Sainsbury's respond 
by offering a choice of food without 
colouring and preservatives, fruits 
tinned in natural juices, wholemeal 
bread, high-fibre cereals and low- 
fat goods. 

There has also been a mounting 
interest in alternative health care, 
an openness to the idea of the body 
as a finely-tuned instrument 
“There's been a move towards a 
more holistic view of life, a move 
towards the idea that if you eat 
junk food or get uplighL you're 
storing up problems for yourself'. 


Moorcroft says. “People are con- 
cerned about preventing illness by 
finding out what eating does to 
them and what chemicals do to 
them. They no longer accept the 
great god of the doctor.” 

' .As baby-boomers move into 
influential positions in the business 
world, they arc likely to be less 
fusty than the bowler-hat brigade 
they reviled in their youth. En- 
trepreneurs like Richard Branson 
(aged 35). head of the Virgin 
empire, and Tony Elliott (39). 
publisher of Time Out. started out 
in the rock culture of the Sixties, 
when to be thought a “bread-head” 
(someone concerned with making 
money) was the ultimate sin. 

“People like Richard and I 
became known as hip capitalists, 
and it was meant in a half- 
derogatory. half-respectful way”. 
Elliott says. “At that time anyone 
who was organized wertt against 
the grain, but 1 believed that if you 
wanted to defend certain values — 
the rights of women, gays and 
blacks, easier abortion, less repres- 
sive drug laws — you had to have 
ammunition, and the best way to 
do that was to have independent 
means.” 

Branson agrees that Virgin is 
"run slightly differently from older 
companies” because of its empha- 
sis on wearing what’s comfortable 


rather than obeying a dress code 
and getting the job done rather 
than keeping office hours. He also 
cues profit-sharing schemes and 
the possibility of becoming a 
millionaire entrepreneur from 
within the company. 

“Using Christian names makes 
sense because you are working with 


‘An extraordinary 
proliferation of 
liberal lifestyles 9 



friends”, he says. “We were teen- 
agers when we began it. which 
happened to be in the Sixties. 
That's the way wc were then and it 
seems the natural way to 
continue” 

Moorcroft says: “The people 
who favour .a new approach to 
work certainly do not want a 
hierarchical 'yes sir. no sir’ type of 
organization. They prefer working 
in teams which come together for 
specific purposes and then quite 
possibly dissolve.” 

She says families too are chang- 
ing. away from “familism” — the 
group, headed by a father, that does 
everything together — and towards 
“family autonomy” — the group 
that is close but whose individual 


members pursue personal growth. 
Babv-boomers ha'C also pioneered 
the acceptability of alternative 
sexual arrangements — the long- 
term live-in lover, the "open 
marriage", single parenthood, 
homosexual and lesbian 
partnerships. . . - , 

Miles (he never uses his first 
name), who founded and edited 
International Times. Britain's best- 
known alternative newspaper, in 
1966 says: “What happened in the 
Sixties did give rise to some very- 
useful things: (be women's move- 
ment. for one thing, and some 
liberalization of most attitudes, 
especially those affecting sex and 
soft drugs. I don't imagine you 
could have had the gay movement 
without the Sixties.” 

Many of those most active in 
London's alternative culture of the 
time are now pursuing business 
interests, mostly in publishing and 
television. Docs such upward 
mobility represent a betrayal oi 
earlier ideals? Miles thinks not. 

“They've just taken those ideals 
and developed them”, he says. 
“You have to remember that in the 
early Sixties there was no such 
thing as an independent record 
company or a boutique. If you 
wanted \o make programmes for 
television, you had to join the BBC. 
People who set up on their own 
were talked about as ’dropping out 
of the system* and it was seen as a 
deviant* gesture, but it was really 
just seizing control of your 
situation.” 

Even behind the dosed curtains 
of dreaded suburbia, things arc not 
quite as they were. Os Guinness, 
author in 1 973 of .1 Critique of the 
Counter Culture, warns against 
confusing fiscal conscrvaiivism 
with social conscrvaiivism. The 
one-time radical may have drifted 
to the right, but the indications are 
that in attitudes towards sexual 
morality, authority, work and rec- 
reational drugs he or she is still a 
child of the permissive age. 

“In the Sixties everyone saw a 
generation in ferment, although the 
poHs show that Tower than 25 per 
cent had actually taken pan in a 
demonstration”, he says. “But in 
1 972. the year everyone thought it 
was all back to normal, the 
pollsters picked up the most enor- 
mous changes in the bloodstream 
of the middle class. The things that 
the radicals had stood for five years 
earlier were now affecting the 
culture as a whole. Beneath the 
conservative trends in Western 
culture there is an extraordinary 
proliferation of liberal lifestyles.” 

©Times Newspapers Lid, 1986 

( TOMORROW ) 

Changing tastes of the 
baby-boomer consumer 


Caught 
out by 
drought 

While freak thunderstorms 
were flooding roads and set- 
ting fin: to homes in Britain 
xcsterdav. Americans in the 
south-eastern states were fac- 
ing the ravages of extreme 
drought - the kind of drought 
that evokes memories of the 
“dust bowl" years so graphi- 
cally described by John 
Steinbeck in The Grapes of 
Wrath. . , 

The great meteorological 
calamity that gripped the 
country between 1933 and 
1936 was caused by an un- 
paralleled combination of hot 
summers and drought, wors- 
ened by poor land use. It led 
to a plague of dust storms 
sweeping the Great Plains 
from Texas to the Dakotas. 
Palls of choking dust swept 
eastwards and in extreme 
cases blotted out the noonday 
sun in New York. 

Milages were buried across 
millions or acres, livestock 
and crops destroyed and 
machinery ruined. In the lac- 
onic humour of the day. it was 
reported that a farmer who 
fainted when struck by a 
raindrop needed two buckets 
of sand in the face to revive 
him. 

Droughts like that the one 
now afflicting Alabama, 
Georgia, the Carolinas and 
Virginia are not unknown on 
the eastern seaboard, despite 
its normally plentiful rainfall. 
But their causes are poorly 
understood. Great Plains 
weather records, taken back 
to 1600 by the examination of 
tree-ring series, suggest 
something like a 20-year 
cycle in drought intensity. 
Similar dust bowl years, for 
instance, occurred in periods 
of less extreme desiccation in 
the 1890s. 1910s. and 1950s. 

The physical significance 
of this behaviour and its 
explanation are the snbject of 
intense debate. The claimed 
period has been linked with 
both the 18.6 year lunar tidal 
cycle and the 22-year double- 
sunspot cycle. 

Wider analysis allows us to 
say that prolonged droughts 
are the product of small bnt 
persistent shifts in global 
weather patterns. They may- 
be due to natural variability in 
the global climate system, 
including the oceans, or, in 
part, the result of external 
iuflnences like sunspots. 
Whatever die reason, we are a 
long, way from predicting 
them. 

W J. Burroughs 

©Timas Newspapers Ltd, 1988 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1026 


ACROSS 

"I Garlic sausage c6l 

■5 Rape (4t 

R Vacant (5) 

9 Propriety (7) 

It Downgraded (8) 

13 Can:(4» 

15 Rail, road junction 
cS.Si 

17 Piccadi!l\ Circus god 
(4| 

18 Marvellous ($) 

21 Old Jewish quarters 
t‘» 

22 Sicilian criminal 
croup 1 51 

23 Minute tragnu-nt (4) 

24 Annual t61 


DOWN 

2 Meat jell> <5i 

3 One ul several i3t 

4 Diligently (13) 

5 Look ji (4) 

6 (.iin and vermouth 
O 



16 Fiercely physical (7) 

19 Refuse (f ) 

20 Mam axis 14) 


22 Flightless N Zealand 
bird i.i) 


7 Oldest German 
university ( 101 
10 Malagasy republic 
1 10) 

12 Wheels shaft (4) 

14 Secondhand c4) ' 

SOLUTION TO NO 1025 
ACROSS: I Colic 4 Traitor 8 Awash 9 Bizarre 10 Tungsten It 
Nnn-U 13 Chlorophyll 17 Posy 18 Inundate 21 Qucchua 22 Li- 
M 23 Elysian 24 Swear 

1X3VXN- I Chany 2 Learn 3 Cohesion 4 Table Mountain 5. Adze 6 
Turmoil 7 Rhesus 12 Shingles 14 Hosiery 15 Opaque 16 Cellar 19 
-XmMe 20 Thai 





i I 


If 


C-. , «.V'.‘T. -iv< 



QUALITY 
LEATHER 
FURNITURE 
AT OLD 
FASHIONED 
PRICES. 

Our furniture is so cheap, 
we can't blame you lor won- 
denne whether it's properly 
made. 

Thar's why we guaranwe 
ir lor two years and promise 
well collect it and refund 
your money if you're not 
delighted alter 3 weeks. j j 

All our furniture is made j j 
from rop quality materials j j 
with painstaking craftsman- 


ship 


I I 


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r.v.‘.v.v.‘.y.v I 


W hy so cheap, then? Ue | i 
onlv sell direct. And were i i 
not greedy. 

CUT OLTTHE COITON 
C UT OUT THE MI DDLE MAN 

l'l» i, vilj nV I'-.IT h. , . . -Uinr 
tr-’-hilT.-. 1.-jrh,-r ■-iinrk- jnJ jj. kV 
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TwTiis LL i d. .Av 5?4; i W 
7von:6i. It CW_’ 60L 

“S zrtj.'j 


Rich new goal for the fifth division 


* 


From small-town to 
big-time in nine 
years? Wimbledon 
did it — and other 
clubs now have a 
chance to follow suit 

T he biggest prize in 
English football in the 
season which gets 
fully under way next 
week will not be the £50.000 
which Liverpool won last 
season for taking the domestic 
game's greatest honour, the 
Football League 

championship. 

A lesser competition, in 
which none of the country's 
leading professional clubs 
play, is offering to its winners 
membership of one of the 
world's most exclusive loot- 
ball organizations and at least 
£60.000 every year for the 
foreseeable future. 

Thai prize is available to the 
champions of what was once 
called the Alliance Premier 
League, has been known in 
recent seasons as the Gola 
League, and is henceforth to 
be referred to as the GM- 
Vauxhall Conference. It com- 
prises the country 's best semi- 
professional dubs, such as 
Enfield. Altrincham and 
Telford United, and provided 
ground facilities and admin- 
istration arc up to standard, its 
winning leant will be auto- 
matically promoted into the 
Football League (whose bot- 
tom dub win be relegated to 
the Conference), thereafter to 
enjoy the huge benefits of 
League membership. 

A system of promotion and 
relegation already links 
leagues throughout the coun- 
try. and in theory it will now 
be possible to form a new club 
and take it into the Football 
League within a decade. 
Hardly less dramatically, the 
new system could mean the 
automatic replacement of a 
famous senior club fallen on 
hard times — Wolverhampton 
Wanderers, for example — by 
an ambitious small outfit such 


Conservation awards 

Architect Ken Worrall con- 
verted 3. Huskisson Street. 
Lixerpoql for Canning Hous- 
ing Cooperative Ltd. not Liv- 
erpool City Council, as stated 
on Friday's Spectrum page. 



David Needham: impressive stadium and a strong team 


KETTERING TOWN 
Founded: 1876. 

Major honours: Southern 
League champions: 1928, 
1957, 1973. 

Ground capacity: 1 1 ,000 
(1,900 seated). 

Average league 

attendance last season: 

1 ,062 (highest 1 ,255). 

Major sources of income: 
Tote competition, 
lottery, social dub, 
Sponsorship- 
Administrative staff: Full- 
time: Secretary, commercial 
manager, groundsmen. 
Football staff: Part-time 
manager; part-time 
assistant manager; 
four contract semi- 
professional players; 12 non- 
contract serru- 
professional players. 


Kettering's unrealized poten- 
tial is typical of many Con- 
ference dubs. Local interest 
is high. 

Debts which took the dub 
to the brink of closure three 
years ago have been cleared. 
The manager, David Need- 
ham, has assembled a strong 
team. 

“We’ve taken some finan- 
cial gambles strengthening 
the squad this summer and if 
we sustain a promotion chal- 
lenge we'll be ready to spend 
more”, Needham says. “Ten 
years ago Kettering were in 
the Southern League with 
Wimbledon and were prob- 
ably a bigger dub than them. 
What Wimbledon have ach- 
ieved is an example to us alL" 


as Kidderminster Harriers. 
Black Country neighbours of 
the once mighty Wolves. 

In the conservative world of 
English football the change is 
revolutionary, although 
progressive voices have ad- 
vocated it for years. The 
Conference has long been 
regarded as the game's fifth 
division, containing nearly all 
the biggest dubs outside the 
Football League's four di- 
visions. Most arc profitable, 
well-run and longing to prove 
themselves. 

However, clubs have been 
admtllcd only by invitation 
and election throughout the 
League's 98-ycar history, and 
in the last 36* years a mere six 
new- members have been al- 
lowed in. The fact that those 



Eddie McOuskey: successful night dnb provides cash 


ENFIELD 
Founded: 1900. 

Major honours: Alliance 
Premier/Gola League 
champions: 1983, 1986: 
seven times Isthmian League 
champions: FA Amateur 
Cup winners: 1967, 1970. 
Ground capacity: 8,500 
(800 seated). 

Average league 

attendance last season: 767 
[highest 1 , 112 ). 

Major sources of income: 
Night club, pools competition, 
sponsorships. 

Administrative staff 
(excluding night club): full- 
time: pools promoter: part- 
time: secretary, PR director, 
groundsman. 

Football s t a ff : Part-time 
manager: part-time coach; 17 
contract players. 


Consistently successful and 
with a reputation for enter- 
taining football and good 
wages, Enfield rarely have 
problems signing the players 
they want. However, manager 
Eddie McCluskey, a school- 
teacher, has played this 
summer's hectic transfer 
market carefully as he pre- 
pares to defend the dub's 
championship title. “1 find it 
hard to believe the money 
some clubs are spending”, be 
says. “We've remained finan- 
cially sound by knowing our 
limits and keeping to them.” 

Enfield's financial security 
is due largely to the success- 
ful night club (annual turn- 
over £750,000) which they 
own and local sponsorships. 


six clubs have since enjoyed 
considerable success — two of 
them. Oxford United and 
Wimbledon, will play in the 
first division this season. 

C hange finally came 
about Iasi season as a 
result of the threat by 
an elite group of big- 
city League dubs to form their 
own “super-league”, into 
which there would be no 
promotion. The third and 
fourth division clubs, which in 
the past had blocked proposals 
to open up the bottom of the 
fourth division, were des- 
perate not to have the door 
shut above them. Seeing the 
hypocrisy of their argument, 
they proposed automatic pro- 
motion into the fourth di- 


vision and. along with other 
concessions, that averted the 
super-league threat 

Graham Kelly, the Football 
League secretary, says: “It's 
understandable that League 
dubs have resisted automatic 
promotion in the past be- 
cause the financial rewards of 
League membership are 
considerable. We've cush- 
ioned the blow by arranging 
for promoted and relegated 
clubs to share their League 
payments for the first three 
years after swapping places.” 

Conference dubs, which 
can afford to employ only 
part-time players, last season 
received an average of £6.000 
each from their league's cen- 
tral funds (mainly pools and 
sponsorship money); Football 


League clubs, whose players 
are nearly all full-time, re- 
ceived an average of £100.000 
each from the pools com- 
panies. League sponsorship, 
television fees and shared gate 
receipts. 

Even though this' season's 
structural changes include a 
redistribution of wealth awav 
from the smaller dubs, those 
in the fourth division will still! 
receive at least £60.000 each 
from central funds ibis season, 
with the stakes so high, the 
Conference championship has 
developed into a desperate 
scramble even before the sea- 
son has -begun. Transfer fees 
and wages are spiralling as 
clubs compete with each other 
for the best players. 

Barry Fry of BameL one of 


the Conference's most experi- 
enced managers, says: “Some 
clubs are going mad. One 
player I wanted eventually 
accepted another club's offer 
of a £7.000 signing-on fee and 
a two-year contract worth 
£250 a week. Either chairmen 
and directors are putting up a 
lot of money or some clubs are 
bankrupting themselves,” 
Without the large yearly 
hand-outs that League clubs 
enjoy. Conference clubs have 
had to become highly com- 
petent and innovative fund- 
raisers. Boston United, for 
example, have run lotteries so 
profitably that they have spent 
£500,000 over the last decade 
improving their ground to a 
standard which is the envy of 
many League clubs. John 
Blackwell, their secretary, 
says: “With promotion avail- 
able, now is the time to 
improve the team and we've 
made more money available 
to the manager.” 

About two-thirds of the 
Conference's 22 clubs have 
facilities which would be 
acceptable to the Football 
League. The favourites to win 
promotion are Enfield; and 
Altrincham, who have both 
earned feme in recent years as 
FA Cup giant-killers. In the 
long term, however, their lack 
of support may preclude a 
lasting impact on the League. 

M ichael Fcrriday. 

the secretary of 
Telford, believes 
clubs like his own. 
from the larger provincial 
towns and smaller cities, have 
a better chance of success 
because of their potential sup- 
port: Telford took more than 
10.000 supporters io Evcrton 
for an FA C up match last vear. 
unlike Enfield and Al- 
trincham. wc don'l have to 
compeie with first division 
clubs just down the road” he 
saxs. 

-r^? ! IS rs ,hal fit into the 
icuord category include Bath 
kily. Boston. Cheltenham 
Town. Kcticnng Town. Maid- 
sione United. Nuneaton Bor- 
ough, Scarborough. Stafford 
Rangers. Weymouth and the 
aforementioned Kiddcr- 

IE2EI HarriL ’ rs - As English 
football continues the fight to 
restore us reputation and 
popularity, the regular 
transfusion of such new blood 
° r 

Paul Newman 







Lnc. times i u^spAy auglisi \± i*»t> 


FASHION 




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Scotland's national dress may seem 
traditional to town dwellers but it's 
just right iii a rural or formal setting 


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A * X v - A. classic, the kill 


- American visitors -to Britain 
. have . been - avoiding a tra- 
ditional uniform, tartan, in the 
nake of the Libyan bombing. 
-As the United Stares sends 

. (he Old World its energetic, its 
:• affluent, its Bnrberried 
: masses, these tourists are 
falling into line with the vast 
. majority of Scots, who never 
' wear tartan either. Even In a 
good year, tartan is th in on its 
borne ground. 

Formerly Highland dress, 
tartan has emerged relatively 
. recently as the national dress 

- of Scotland. It is basically a 
: check,. with its origins lost in 
■ the mists of antiquity. A few 
i “setts” or patterns can be 

- traced to the early 1700s, but 
most date from the early 19th 
century. 

- Many Scots regard the ltilt 
as costume rather than every- 

- day wear. There's a clear split 
between town and country, and 
even a mild Dorm of class 
distinction when it comes to 
the wearing of the check in 
-Scotland itself. Go to the 
..Royal Highland Show and yon 
will see the kilt worn naturally 
by members of the farming 
■community. At a smart wed- 
ding in St Giles Cathedra) in 

* Edinburgh, again the kilt is in 
.evidence. If yon dare, board a 
Scottish football special bound 
for Wembley to rub shoulders 
'with tbe Tartan Army. 

. . Tartan at home is polarized. 
The landed gentry wear it with 
-tovat green. It screams at yon 
loudly from punks, football 
fans. Billy Connolly and tbe 
Rod Stewart brigade. Bnt the 
silent majority is bard pot to 
And a single item of tartan in 
the wardrobe. 

As Edinburgh Festival 
packs tbe city, the few tartan 
wearers will not be locals. The 
average Glaswegian matron, if 
presented with £100 to spend 
on clothes, would head happily 
for Jaeger or Marks and 
Spencer with never a sideways 
glance at the kiltmaker's. If 
one of my Edinburgh friends 


The Sophisticate 

Ingrid Pehrson has always 
loved in nan. Her approach is 
that of the continental woman 
indulging in investment dress- 
ing. She goes for top-quality 
natural fibres in a timeless 
classic, the kilted skirt, known 
in Sweden as “Kiltkjol". 

. When she worked - in -an 
ad \ertising agency. Ingrid had 
jhrce or four killed, skirts*, 
which she found ideal for the 
Office. When her boss retired 
in 1975. she took the giant step 
pf opening her own shop. 


turned up for coffee m a kilted 
skirl, the rest of ns would 
assume that she was moon- 
lighting in some branch of the 
tourist industry. In Scotland, 
many an urban dweller re- 
gards tartan clothing 
unsophisticated. 

The Army and the Royal 
Family have done much to 
keep tartan in the public eye. 
Epaulettes and tbe elaborate 
cuff of the kilt jacket are 
survivors of military uniform. 
Qneeo Victoria's love of the 
Highlands made tartan popu- 
lar in tbe 1800s. Even today, 
while the older Royals wear 
traditionally-styled country 
tartans, the Princess of Wales 
and Duchess of York sport 
them in more youthful, 
fashionable versions. 

And. for tourist, countryman 
and patriot the kilt is alive and 
well. At John Morrison*, near 
Edinburgh Castle, a ladies* 
pure wooL, pleated tartan skirt 
can be made to order on the 
premises from a reasonable 
£29. The Scotch House offers 
a wide selection from £62J50 to 
£150. There are traditional 
Highland outfitters in Aber- 
deen and Inverness. Tartan 
shops abound in towns like 
Oban and Pitlochry. 

Of course, the very bright- 
ness of tartan lends itself to all 
sorts of abuses. A few years 
ago an exhibition at tbe Edin- 
burgh Festival. “Scotch 
Myths", highlighted its un- 
duly romantic, shortbread-tin, 
cheap and nasty aspect In The 
Tartans of the Clans and 
Families of Scotland, Sir 
Thomas lungs of Learney, 
father of the present Lord 
Lyon, wrote of tartan: “The 
whole subject has been re- 
garded as pertaining rather to 
the souvenir shop than to the 
scientist" 

Anne Cowan 

•John Morrison (, Highland Out- 
fitters). -Ml Lawhntarkct. Ediu- 
hurglK_Tfie Scott isfl Tartans 
Museum. Connie. -Perthshire 




Investment vestments: Swedish 
shop-owner Ingrid Pehrson 

Lady Tartan in the old town of 
Stockholm, hear The. Royal 
Patacc. 

The ancient (muted) tartans 
are popular and the range is 


adjusted by season, lighter 
colours appearing in spring, 
darker in autumn. Navy is m 
constant demand. The price 
for an imported kilted skin is 
£65 and sizes run from 12 to 
24. h is not only the kilt’s 
attractiveness but also its 
versatility which appeals so 
much. “After a day at school, 
the office, in court or the 
Riksdag (Parliament) these 
ladies often have further 
engagements for the evening", 
says Ingrid “If you wear a 
kilted skirt you can easily 
change your everyday clothes 
by putting on a silk blouse or 
sweater and a smart jacket." 


The Purist 


An exclusive 

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FROM HARRODS. 


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two or more purchases from the Dunhill Edition range. Offer ends Augusr 1 6th. 
(Pen shown not included). 



AT 




5 


Urdwiswr* 7XLOI 730 CM 


Malcolm Innes of Edingight, 
as Lord Lyon King of Arms, is 
the ultimate authority on tar- 
tan. He holds an office which 
can be traced back to pre- 
feudai Celtic Scotland. TTie 
importance of this can be 
gauged from the assurance of 
Miss Jean Brodie to her girls 
that "even if I were to receive 
a proposal of marriage tomor- 
row from the Lord Lyon King 
of Arms I would decline it". 

Mr Innes is concerned with 
heraldry, genealogy and cere- 
mony. When approached by a 
clan chief he will investigate 
and. if appropriate, authenti- 
cate a tartan. The Lyon Court 
has between 45 and 50 tartans 
currently registered. 

Malcolm Innes regards tar- 
tan. like fashion itself, as an 
evolving, almost a living 
thing. He sees it as no pan of 
his duty to put people off 
Scottish dress by being too 
strict. Rather, he seeks to offer 
guidance and to encourage the 
wearing of tartan. His only 
stipulation is that its use 
should be dignified 

Tartan is pan of Malcolm 
Innes's wardrobe as well as 
part of his job. he has three 
kilts, one of which was inher- 
ited. In the photograph he 
wears the Green Innes. re- 
corded 20 years ago. but taken 
from a portrait a century old 


The Tourists 

1 Jack and Ruth Gussman are 
on their first visit to Scotland 
They arc a retired couple from 
Harrisburg in Pennsylvania 
on a 2 1 -day tour of ihc'Briiish 
Isles. 

Until recently, many 
American tourists made 
conspicuous use of tartan 
about their persons and lug- 
gage. Fear of terrorism has 
changed or at least diluted all 
that. Most Americans in Brit- 
ain are keeping a low profile. 
Two and a half hours tartan- 
spouing at Edinburgh Castle 
came up with one lumberjack 
shin and a dress Sicwan scarf. 

It was therefore gratifying 
when Mr and Mrs Gussman 
came into view sporting what 
was. until recently, the mark 
of Americans abroad — a 
mixture of tartans. 

Jack Gussman wears a cap 
of McLeod tartan which he 
bought by mail order from 
Shannon Airport. His wife's 
jacket is in Lennox. It is not 
only as tourists that the 
Gussmnns wear tartan. Back 
home. Jack plays the bagpipes 
in the Shriner Highlanders' 
Pipe Band and Ruth is one of. 
the “lassies” or helpers. Both 
are of German descent. 

Suzy Menkes is on holiday 



* T, T v . "T”' * ■ WWU, Iiiiiumgui IUUC, Om I , 

• Seffndqes. Oxford Street, W1 . The Changing Room 
Tunbridge Wells and Marcus Price. Newcastle. Brown leather 
briefcase. £175 from Mulberry Company, 11-12 Gees Court 
W1- Black leather cuban-heefed shoes. £42.99 from Hobbs 
South Molton Street. W1. 

Photographs: Chris Edwick. Make-up: Karen Lockyer. 

Check out the new 
look for squares 

Punks parade down the Kings Road in iu the Princess 
of Wales has given it the royal fashion seal of approval 
- tartan is always in evidence, from the fashionable 
ankle-length kilts for the discerning to the pom-pom 
caps and mumsy wool shawls beloved by foreign 
visitors (Rebecca Tyrrel writes). 

Fashion designers have given tartan a new lease of 
life. Viyella are producing 28 different tartans for 
autumn from the familiar Black Watch to the more 
obscure Innes Hunting with weaves of red, blue, 
yellow and lovat green. 

Designer Ally Capellino has used Viyella tartan in 
her collections for the last three years, mixing 
different checks together for sailor-collared dresses 
and slim pleated skins. She has used the more 
subdued colours of the Strathpeffer tartan in dusky 
blue and grey for a smarter city image. Com me des 
Garconsand Joseph have pulled tartan down from the 
Highlands to the catwalk and Irish designer Paul 
Costelloe uses traditional Irish plaids for brightlv- 
coloured tweedy suits. 

The Scotch House is the main tourist hunting 
ground. Avoid the loud tartan trousers and leave the 
knee^length kilts for the punks. Look instead for 
longer skirts, and mix two tartans together with a light 
wool shawl for a versatile working outfit 


Tartan checker: Malcolm Innes, Lord Lyon King of Arms 



Tourist trappings: tartan-clad 
Gussmans with castle guard 



Party line*: Jenny Cameron 
prefers tartan to jeans 


The Expatriate 

Jenny Cameron of Palmerston 
North. New Zealand, likes 
wearing tartan “on dressing- 
up occasions”. Her best dress, 
in Black Watch tartan, was 
boughi in Mothcrcarc in Ayr 
when her family was visiting 
Scotland. She also has a 
Stewart tartan killed skirt 
from the Windsor branch of j 
the Edinburgh W'oollen Mill. 
Jenny, who is 10. considers 
herself a Scoitish New 
Zealander. 

Perhaps because they have 
lived overseas all of their 
married life. Jenny's Scottish 
parents are more conscious of 
tartan than arc the friends they 
left behind. Alan and Anne 
Cameron are both enthusias- 
tic about Scottish country 
dancing. 

During their year in Britain. 
Alan wore the kilt to the 
Country Dance Society in 
London, and Jenny took 
country dancing lessons. Anne 
Cameron has a kilted skin for 
day wear and a full-length 
version for evening. 

Jenny is very interested in 
fashion, admires the Princess 
of Wales's style and likes 
jeans. However, for panics she 
invariably chooses tanan. 


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10 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Valuable 

votes 

The Conservative Party is consid- 
ering desperate measures in its 
campaign to persuade expatriate 
Britons to sign on the electoral 
roll, in the confident expectation 
most will vote Tory. Of the 
1 00.000 contacted by a Norman 
Tebbit mailshot Iasi monih. only 
420 have agreed to enlist. Alarmed 
by the poor response. Tories 
have dreamed up an extraordinary 
scheme whereby a wealthy Tory 
supporter would offer pay each 
expat who enrolled £50. If this 
sounds far-fctched. lei me assure 
you that one of the country's best- 
known managing directors came 
near to agreeing to put his name to 
the idea. Doubtless aware of the 
furore it would arouse if it was 
made public, he pulled out. 
Canvassing for another backer, 
however, continues. 

Rights issue 

The United Nations has lost out to 
private initiative in the caring 
slakes. Outraged by the UN, 
human rights sub-commission's 
cancellation of this month's con- 
ference on human rights, the Anti- 
Slavery Society has raised £48.000 
to hold its own international 
forum. In the past, the sub- 
commission has won inter- 
national agreements on torture 
and brought to world attention 
child labour and slavery scandals 
but now. it seems, it cannot afford 
to niccu Organizations such as 
Amnesty and the International 
Commission of Jurists, who 
would have been at the UN 
meeting, will attend next month's 
ASS do instead. I cannot wait to 
hear what they say about the US. 
the Soviet Union and other major 
UN contributors, whose payment 
arrears forced the cancellation of 
the original conference. 

• Footnote: Inconveniently, with 
its budget slashed by 50 per cent 
the UN's British HQ is banned 
from making international calls. 

Common touch 

On Selina Scott's final morning as 
presenter of BBC s Breakfast Time 
last month. Ring Constantine of 
Greece, an enduring fan. was 
brought to the studio for the 
farewell party. Ushering Con- 
stantine to the gallery so that he 
could watch Miss Scott's final 
precious moments on the air, the 
BBC driver - with already leg- 
endary sang-froid - announced: 
"I've got here the cx-king 
of ; . . what did you say it wasT 

Post script 

In a desperate attempt to resusci- 
tate the an of letter-writing, the 
Post Office is advertising the 
Write Sow! letter pack on the back 
ofits stamp books. Designed as an 
aid to letter-writers it comprises a 
set of "quick-reference cards" con- 
taining hints and samples of letters 
on themes ranging from "job 
applications and consumer com- 
plaints” to "letters of the heart”. 
The letters editor of The Times is 
awaiting the results with trepida- 
tion. nav. terror. 

Mighty moths 

Barely a day passes without some 
raiionai explanation for the 
"paranormal” striking me. Take 
the case of the Salisbury man 
whose doorbell kept ringing one 
enchanted evening without any- 
one being there when he answered 
it. reficy magazine repons that 
UiCul officers, called to investigate, 
laid in wait outside. Sun.* enough, 
the bell rang. Two frenzied moths, 
so excited by the illuminated bell 
that they had hurled themselves at 
it. were released without charge. 

BARRY F ANTONI 



■Gel rid of the Jullv Roger. From now 
tin we're living West Ham's colours' 

Thatcher fallout 

Thatched house duellers will be 
concerned to learn that imported 
Pastern European reed could he 
contaminated b> radioactive fall- 
out from the Chernobyl disaster. 
Still, if you're worried about the 
prospect of your roof glowing in 
the dark, lake heart from the 
thoughtful action of the Thatching 
Advisory Service, a private 
I hatching firm. It normally uses 
English reed, but what ii docs 
import from the Eastern Bloc over 
the next 12 months will be put 
through a Geiger counter test. The 
Department of Health will not 
help because it is not a food or 
environmental health matter, so 
the company is footing the bill 
itself. Managing director Bob 
West says that so far no consign- 
ment has registered so much as a 
click, probably because it was all 
cut before the nuclear accident 
“But.” he adds, "a problem mighi 
arise next year il* then.’ was fallout 
on the mud when the reed was 
growing through.” PHS 


Three judges are better than one 

by John D. Jackson 


The publicity given over the 
weekend -to the government's next 
set of proposals for legal reforms 
in Northern Ireland has obscured 
a most serious legal issue which is 
at present being discussed by the 
Irish and British governments. 

Dublin has been pressing for 
some time for terrorist cases now 
heard by single judges in 
"Dipiock" courts to be tried by 
three judges. The British side has 
so far resisted this suggestion and 
there have been reports of strenu- 
ous opposition from the judiciary. 

The European Convention on 
Human Rights requires that 
defendants be tried by an indepen- 
dent and impartial tribunal, but 
not necessarily by a jury- The 
practice in all European coun- 
tries - including those of Eastern 
Europe — is that serious offences 
arc tried by a tribunal of more 
than one person, often a "mixed" 
tribunal consisting of professional 
and lay judges sitting together. In 
the common law world the prac- 
tice has likewise been that serious 
offences are tried by more than 
one person, usually a jury. In 
South Africa, where jury trial has 
been abolished, judges invariably 
sit with two legal assessors in 
capital cases. 

The principle of shared 
responsibility is therefore well 


established. Apart from relieving 
judges of the onerous burden of 
presiding alone, it is likely to 
improve the quality of decision- 
making on questions of fact and 
guarantee a fairer trial. 

This is illustrated by the de- 
cision by three judges of the Court 
of Appeal in Belfast, which 
quashed the convictions of 18 
men who had been found guilty by 
a single judge on the evidence of 
the IRA informer Christopher 
Black. The real lesson of the Black 
case is not that it discredits or 
vindicates the so-called "super- 
grass system”. It is that the 
Northern Ireland judiciary acting 
in the forum of a three-judge 
appeal court can be relied upon to 
review thoroughly the evidence 
against accused persons, and to 
have no hesitation in reversing the 
decision of the trial judge. But how 
much better it would be to provide 
for a collegiate court in the first 
instance, so that each of the three 
judges could hear the prosecution 
witnesses in person. 

In the Black case the Lord Chief 
Justice. Lord Lowry, is reported to 
have said that the trial judge had 
overestimated Black's honesty. 
“We do not know what conclusion 


would have been reached by a 
judge who assessed his evidence 
less favourably." he said. The 
merit of a three-judge court is that 
there arc three judges to assess 
honesty, rather than one. 

Three kinds of problems attend 
the introduction of three-judge 
courts in Northern Ireland* legal, 
political and practical. So far as 
legal difficulties arc concerned it 
may be asked what would happen 
when the three judges arc not 
unanimous. Provision Wbuld of 
course, have to be made for this, 
but there is a strong case for 
deciding that if any individual 
judge had a reasonable doubt 
about the guilt of any accused 
there ought to be an acquittal. 

Another difficulty mentioned in 
the original Dipiock Report was 
that the oral adversarial system of 
procedure is ill-adapted to the 
collegiate conduct of a trial of feet 
The report claimed that the flow of 
oral examination and cross- 
examination would be gravely 
impeded if a plurality of judges 
had to consult before each ruling. 

This has not been considered a 
problem in three-judge courts 
elsewhere. In the Irish Republic a 
Special Criminal Court consisting 


of three judges hears cases consid- 
ered unsuitable lor the ordinary 
courts. In practice the president of 
the court makes any necessary 
instant rulings, with the tacit 
approval of the two "wing” judges. 

A three-judge court is noL of 
course, going lo please everyone in 
Northern Ireland. This is not a 
grave objection as it is difficult to 
imagine any system of justice that 
will command the support of the 
entire population. The proposal 
may inept some of the criticism of 
the Dipiock courts that has come 
from the nationalist community. 
If implemented, there are likely to 
be allegations that the courts are 
being packed with particular 
combinations of judges. The ex- 
tent to which this criticism can be 
deflected will depend on the extent 
to which judges arc seen to share 
as equal a workload as is possible, 
on a rotating basis. 

Finally, there is the practical 
problem of finding enough judges 
to man a three-judge court. The 
senior Bar in Northern Ireland has 
been under the pressure of a 
considerable workload, and it will 
be difficult to find judges of the 
calibre to fill any extra posts. Lei 
us hope they can be found. 

The author is a lecturer in law at 
Queen's University. Belfast 


Peter Bender argues that Berlin’s division was necessary for detente 


When politicians from both sides 
deliver their memorial speeches 
on the 25ih anniversary of the 
Berlin wall, wc shall probably hear 
more complaints than questions, 
more self-righteousness than sclf- 
examination. Bui are we in ihe 
West entirely without guilt for this 
monstrosity? 

There is only one argument for 
the wall that can he taken seri- 
ously: without it the detente of the 
l Q 70s would not have been pos- 
sible. for it was only then that 
power relationships were clarified 
and consolidated. 

The date that Germans regard 
as the blackest in their postwar 
history was. for the outside world, 
a successful exercise in crisis 
management In June 1961 Nikita 
Khruschev was putting tremen- 
dous pressure on President Ken- 
nedy. He was intent on solving the 
Berlin problem, and his attitude 
was that if Kennedy wanted to go 
to war over it. then so be it. 

The president accepted the chal- 
lenge. He announced military’ 
mobilization, but at the same time 
he gave Khruschev a hint: he 
made a distinction between Berlin 
and West Berlin and extended 
American willingness to defend 
Berlin to West Berlin alone. 
Khruschev understood: the east- 
ern sector of the city had been left 
to the East, and the wall went up. 
When Kennedy heard the news on 
August 13 he was relieved. You 
don't built a wall if you want to 
possess the area beyond the wall. 

Politicians on both sides were 
disappointed. Walter Ulbricht. the 
East German head of state, had 
not only wanted to close the flood 
gates, he had wanted to gain all 
Berlin. The Mayor of W'est Berlin. 
Willy Brandt, had wanted to tie 
Berlin to the Federal Republic. 
With the building of the wall, the 
German question was effectively 
settled. The ambitions of both had 
been frustrated. 

Konrad Adenauer's Germany 
policy was in tatters. The elderly 
chancellor had told West Ger- 
mans: "The strength of the West 
will eventually force the East to 
reunification.” But the strength of 
the West had not even been 
sufficient to prevent the division 
being finalized. 

But the building of the wail also 
contained the origins of the new 
Ostpolitik. For the wall proved 
not only the weakness of ihe GDR 
but also its strength, by dem- 
onstrating the invincibility of any 
slate which had the Soviet nuclear 
superpower behind n. in Bonn, 
people were able to shout "the wall 
must come down” for a full 10 
years; in Berlin they could barely 
hold out fora year. Then the city's 
senate had to start thinking about 
how io make the wall porous. 

In December 1963 a pass regula- 
tion was introduced allowing West 
Berliners to visit relatives in the 
East for Christmas. It was the first 
success, albeit a modest one. It 
was also, though the negotiators 
were unaware of it at the Time, the 
model for a new- policy: what 
could not be forced out of the 
Cl DR had lo be bargained for. 
Thus it was that, with the pass 
regulation, the GDR obtained its 
first fragment of recognition, and 
Hie first fragment of normality . 

The wall also taught the West a 


The world 
held up 
by a wall 



lesson in realism. Before August 
13 German and Allied officials 
alike had given the impression 
that the guarantee of the Western 
powers extended over the whole 
city, and so protected freedom of 
movement between the Eastern 
and Western sectors. The Berlin 
senate also claimed the right to 
speak for the whole of Berlin, and 
delegates from East Berlin sat in 
Ihe Bundestag. The wail dem- 
onstrated this was a sham. 

No German politicians de- 
manded that tanks be used to 
smash the new wall. But even the 
gestures Brandt asked for came 
slowly. It was 20 hours later that 
the first allied military patrol 
appeared on the border. The 
inaction of the Americans. British 
and French proved to Brandi that 
the protector powers gave protec- 
tion. but German interests had to 
be looked after by Germans 
themselves. 

The wall also proved that this 
power could be used effectively to 


fortify a state, by contributing lo 
the consolidation of the GDR. 
How could a factory produce 
anything when it did not know 
how many workers were going to 
be missing the next morning? How 
could the sick be looked after 
when doctors were leaving? How 
could an army reach or maintain 
its desired strength when there 
were not enough volunteers? 

Bui more important was the 
struggle for the soul, and here the 
wall really did act as a protective 
shield: not against fascism, as the 
propagandists insisted, but against 
seduction by the free and rich 
West. After Augusts 1961 the 
Germans of both sides could meet 
only if relatives from West Berlin 
came to visit the wall kept West 
Berliners out. East Germans in. 

It was not until three years later 
that LMbricht allowed pensioners 
to travel, and not until 1972 that 
younger people were also allowed 
to travel, when family circum- 
stances were regarded as pressing. 


In time, the GDR came to be 
psychologically consolidated as 
well. Before August 13 almost 
anyone could escape through Ber- 
lin. Because there was a tiny 
measure of external freedom, 
inner freedom was easier to pre- 
serve. After August 1 3 there was 
literally no escape. The GDR 
regime had unlimited power over 
its people. Everyone suddenly had 
to reckon on spending his whole 
life in the GDR. All his hopes 
could only be realized in the 
communist-run GDR. People did 
not become communists, but they 
adapted. They had not sought out 
this country, but it was now their 
county. Their achievements be- 
came its achievements. Today it is 
little more than a semantic 
distinction whether you talk of 
national consciousness or a feeling 
of solidarity among the 1 7 million 
Germans whose history decreed 
them that particular fate. 

But was the wall really necessary 
to bring about detente, reasonable- 
ness and a reconciliation of in- 
terests? Unfortunately, yes. Before 
the wall was builL the two German 
regimes had been incapable of any 
of these. Ulbricht had imposed 
communism on the GDR by 
force. If he had been more 
temperate about it. his people 
might not have fled, and there 
would not have been the haired 
which made it so impossible for 
West German politicians to come 
to terms with the GDR. 

In Bonn. Adenauer had not 
been able to summon up the 
courage to follow his own insights 
and talk to the GDR. He had long 
since lost his belief in the feasibil- 
ity of reunification and had ac- 
cepted a plan recommending 
provisional recognition between 
the two German states. 

In fact. his position was not so 
very far from that of Khruschev, 
who was putting pressure on 
Berlin in an attempt to make 
permanent the status quo: two 
states, from which the super- 
powers would not have to with- 
draw their troops unconditionally, 
leading perhaps to a German 
confederation. That was the po- 
sition set out in a draft peace 
treaty in January 1959. 

The four victorious powers were 
agreed that everything in Ger- 
many should remain as it was - 
and 10 years later, that was 
virtually accepted. But if' Bonn 
had done in 1 959 what it had to do 
in 1969. is it conceivable that the 
wall would have been built while 
the superpowers were in agree- 
ment about Germany and the 
German governments were talk- 
ing about a confederation? 

No one can give a definite 
answer. But Adenauer was then 
reserving his realism for an emer- 
gency. In 1959. the situation was 
not grave enough for him. When, 
on 13 August 1961. it became 
grave enough, it was too late. 

Hitler can be blamed for the 
origins of the division of Ger- 
many. the superpowers can be 
blamed for its continuation. But 
for the wall Germans have only 
themselves to blame. It resulted 
from a failure of German policy, 
on both sides. 

The author is political editor and 
Berlin correspondent of West- 
deutscher Rundfunk 


Can Kinnock cast from the shadows? 


Attention is rightly being paid to 
the changing faces of Labour MPs 
after the next election, especially 
in the event of a Labour victory. A 
recent article in The Times an- 
alysed the prospective intake. Neil 
Kinnock has been receiving them 
in batches at the Commons on 
induction visits. It is a long task. 

Taking account of retirements 
and the number of scats Labour 
must gain, at least i 7| new Labour 
MPs are needed. This is twice the 
normal turnover and will bring its 
own consequences. The Tunes 
survey projected a 2:1 left-wing 
majority on the Labour benches. 

But that will not be Kinnock’s 
most pressing problem, in the first 
flush of victory. Picture him on his 
first day in 10 Downing Street. He 
has to form a government. The list 
of names before him is dominated 
by newcomers. Able as many of 
them arc. as parliamentary nov- 
ices they must be ruled out for the 
time being. 

The Labour administration will 
therefore have to consist almost 
entirely of MPs in the present 
House ofCommon5. This presents 
Kinnock with a dilemma that 
until now has been overlooked. 


yet the arithmetic is obvious. At 
ihe moment there are 210 Labour 
MPs. Of these. 50 are due to step 
down through retirement or de- 
selection. leaving 160 lo contest 
the next election. Inevitably a few 
will be casualties at the polls. 

Should he win even a bare 
overall majority of 326 scats, what 
will Kinnock find when he surveys 
his troops of the morrow of 
victory? The marshalled ranks on 
the government benches will com- 
prise no more than 155 seasoned 
MPs and 171 new faces. It is from 
the former that Kinnock will have 
to fashion a government. He will 
be looking for up lo 1 20 of them to 
hold office. 

Of that 1 55 there will be 30 or so 
who arc in some way unsuitable, 
being too old or too maverick. So 
from the start Kinnock will be 
faced with having to choose an 
administration from only 125 
MPs. a limitation encountered by 
no Labour leader since Attlee in 
1945. Wilson, for example, had 
about 250 experienced MPs to 
choose from in 1964. 

There will be some reserves 
Kinnock could draw upon, such as 


extra ministerial peers. And 
among the large intake of new 
MPs there will be some re-treads, 
bock from a spell in the wilder- 
ness, who could be iaken directly 
into government. Even so. 
Ktnnock's area of choice will be 
more restricted than he would 
wish, it means that four out of five 
of today’s Labour MPs who stand 
for re-election can confidently 
expect to be in his first govern- 
ment. Thai may not be an 
inspiring prospect, even to their 
leader. Such is the legacy of 1983 
that Labour is hardly spoiled for 
talent. Kinnock wilHlnd himself 
scraping barrels. 

The problems posed may be the 
problems of success, but they will 
have to be faced. For instance, 
docs- he restore Tony Bcnn to the 
from bench? This is highly im- 
probable. Been is once more 
engaged in mobilizing ihe hard left 
against the leadership's swing to 
the right Will Kinnock draft top 
graduates from local govern- 
ment — such as Ken Livingstone 
or Sheffield's David Blunkeu — 
who are likely to be in the wave of 
new MPs? It will cause resentment 
in the ranks if he docs. 


Or does he del iberatef y aim for a 
smaller-than -average administra- 
tion? Attlee managed with only 
82. including whips, but it is an 
objective which his eluded prime 
ministers ever since. Fortunately, 
almost half the MPs on whom 
Kinnock will have to depend have 
had some previous ministerial 
experience, however junior — 
which is more than can be said for 
ihe'lcader himself. 

Besides Kinnock. a third of a 
future Labour Cabinet will have 
held no office of any kind. This is 
certain to drive the Labour leader 
into the expediency of emphasiz- 
ing how his government would 
function "as a team”. The recent 
two-day Shadow Cabinet seminar 
at Bishops Stortford was pro- 
claimed as setting ihe pattern for a 
collective Labour government. 

As an election nears, however, 
these special constraints on 
Kinnock will .become more appar- 
ent and his daunting task will be 
to persuade the voters lo climb on 
board a ship whose captain and 
most of his crew have never been 
to sea before. 

John Warden 


Roger Scruton 

Paris’s most 
evil fashion 


During the late Sixties an intellec- 
tual movement arose in _ Parts 
whose main effect was to install 
anti-authoritarian rhetoric in ihe 
place that had been hitherto 
occupied by academic thought. 
The figureheads of that movement 
- Barthes. Althusser. Foucault. 
Lacan. Derrida and Kristeva — 
were mostly charlatans; neverthe- 
less. in the atmosphere of 1968. 
this defect was scarcely perceiv- 
able, and one by one the univer- 
sities of the Western world fell 
under their spell, relinquishing 
critical judgement for a kind ot 
intellectual alchemy. 

.As the Seventies wore on. 
however, the voices of “liber- 
ation” fell silent. Barthes, living 
out a fantasy of hedonistic detach- 
ment. died in a car crash; 
Althusser, in a fit of Stalinist 
paranoia, strangled his wife and 
retired to an asylum; Lacan con- 
fined his public utterances to 
opaque and muffled seminars, the 
texts of which were scarcely 
readable even to his mosi foment 
disciples; Derrida and Kristeva 
look off to America, there to enjoy 
the profitable accolades of the 
world's most gullible culture, 
while Foucault devoted bis spare 
time to a defence of the sexual 
practices which were soon — 
following an injudicious spree in 
San Francisco — to pul an end to 
his life. Only Derrida persisted in 
the old ways, each year placing a 
new set of inverted commas 
around the discourse of the year 
before. Nevertheless, despite his 
success in America, his reputation 
at home dwindled almost to the 
level which he deserves. 

The newspapers, anxious to 
maintain the balance of payments 
in favour of France, invented a 
new intellectual fashion with its 
roots in Paris: la Souvelle Droite. 
But the candidate members of this 
harlequinade were either too 
crusty or too slight to maintain the 
necessary impetus, and the fash- 
ion immediately died. For the past 
few years Parisians have enjoyed a 
period of fashionlessness, in which 
to look back on the Sixties and 
take stock of the disaster. 

A book has just been published 
by Grasset which may concentrate 
their minds. L'Esprit Post-Total - 
itaire is written by a Czech under 
the pseudonym of Petr FIdeltus, 
and offers a persuasive analysis of 
that literary idiom which the 
French cal! langue de hois (our 
nearest equivalent being 
"newspeak”). The language oT 
totalitarian power is, scientifically 
speaking, one of the most curious 
of human inventions. None of the 
devices which it employs is en- 
tirely new. Nevertheless, the 
achievement of communist propa- 
ganda. as Fidelius analyses it, goes 
for beyond anything that could be 
attributed to the stylistic habits of 
our times. Human beings are 
designated only by abstractions — 
“stale”, “vanguard”. w prolet- 
ariat”, “people — none of which 
is attached to any fixed Or definite 
meaning. Under the repeated 
assault of this terminology, the 
social world sinks away into 
irrelevance, lo be replaced by a 
phantasmagoric battlefield in 
which impersonal forces contend 


for victorv. but in which no 
human being plays a discernible 
part. Everything in this dream- 
world is polarized by Manichacan 
“struggles" - between progress 
.and reaction, liberation and 
oppression, proletariat and bour- 
geois. friend and enemy, us and 
them. Bui no words can capture 
the reality upon which the struggle 
is focused: wherever a window 
seems to open on to some actual 
human experience, the language at 
once closes over, becoming 
impregnable to sense. The logic of 
this discourse is dictated not by 
reality but by power. Terms shift 
their meaning as tyranny requires, 
and truth becomes strictly irrele- 
vant to the correctness of. any 
utterance. 

Fidelity's book was brought 
from Prague sous Ic mameau by 
Andre Glucksman. who provides 
a forceful introduction. The lan- 
guage of communism, he argues, 
which can neither be contradicted 
nor interrupted by those subject lo 
its self-cleansing murmur, has 
gone one stage further than Orwell 
predicted, it no longer needs to 
invent reality, since it has made 
reality irrelevant to discourse by- 
severing words completely from 
their referential function. 

But is not this the accusation 
that should be levelled against the 
"grand theorists" of the Sixties? 
ITie suspicion-laden rhetoric of 
Barthes. Lacan and Althusser, 
which seldom advances beyond its 
own technicalities, and yet which - 
contrives to divide the world into 
an us and a them, accomplishes 
precisely the aims of communist 
propaganda. It prizes language 
free from reality, and makes it into 
an instrument of power. Foucault 
insinuated, indeed, that language 
could have no other function, 
while Derrida, spiralling into the 
ether of tautology, mocked the 
very idea of reference, as an 
illusion of the unsophisticated. 

In another recent volume. Guy 
Hocquenghem delivers .an open 
letter to' those who abandoned the 
spirit of '68 and became, like 
Glucksman, cautious disciples of 
the actual. In his extraordinary 
polemic (published by Albin Mi- 
chel) Hocquenghem sets out to 
create the “unity of evil” which, . 
according to Fidelius. is the 
necessary preliminary of totalitar- 
ian discourse. The renegades of 
'68. gathered into a single fold, are 
smothered with annihilating la- 
bels. some (“reactionary”, 
“warmonger”, “neo-liberal”, etc) 
from the Novosti rule-book, oth- 
ers ("scientistic technocrat", “neo- 
conformist”) appearing for the.' 
first time. In Hocquenghem's 
pages we see how the language of 
the revolutionary — which prom- 
ises absolute “liberation” — in- 
stantly loses sight, of the. real 
human world, and becomes the . 
vigilant discourse of the para- 
noiac. ceaselessly working to 
“liquidate” an omnipresent-foe, - 
Perhaps Parisians will be taught - 
by these two books to understand 
the teal meaning of their recent ■ 
fash ions. and to see that the : 
“liberation” promised by the 
clowns of '68 was a liberation from , 
thought, and therefore the prelude 
to mental slavery. 


■ ! i 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Then everything 
went Blanc 


Can it be 200 years since Moot 
Blanc was first conquered, thus 
giving rise to the Guinness Book of 
Records as we know it today? Has 
this lump of ice. snow and rock 
really been climbed by more than 
5.000 Victorian clergymen. 3,000 
Edwardian ladies and a team from 
the Egon Ronay mountain cater- 
ing research department? Do St 
Bernard dogs really roam the 
upper slopes, intoxicated by die 
fumes from the little barrels round 
their necks? Does the tip of Mont 
Blanc really hold the record for 
most sunshine hours anywhere in 
Europe? 

The answers to these questions 
are. of course, yes, probably, 
certainly not, and who cares? Acid 
all this and much more can be 
found in the Moreover Book of 
Mont Blanc , j'ust rushed out to 
greet the bicentenary of the tallest 
mountain in Fiance. 

Did you know, for example that 
a tin of pate de foie gras, 
abandoned on the summit in 
1877. was opened nearly a hun- 
dred years later and found to have 
gone quite rotten? Did you know 
that Mont Blanc is known to the 
sherpas of Nepal as the little 
White Pimple? 

Only in the Moreover Book of 
Mont Blanc can you find such 
riveting facts. Only here will you 
find the true story of Edwina 
Pargeter. who in 1911 proposed to 
her sweetheart after they had 
scaled Mont Blanc together and 
was promptly turned down by him 
on the grounds that he was already 
married. 

Only here can you discover 
what really happened to the ill- 
fated 1973 Natwesi expedition to 
open a Cashpoint on the top of 
Mont Blanc. And only here will 
you find out for the first time just 
why Lhe attempt on Mont Blanc by 
Lord Lichfield and the Twelve 
Most Beautiful Girls In The 
World came to an ill-fated end in a 
bar in Chamonix. 

Now. of course, there is a 
supermarket, office complex and 
parking for 400 cars atop this 
fabled peak, but once upon a time 
Mont Blanc was a magnet that 
drew the daring from all nations 
and a number of remarkably 


stupid people from Great Britain. 

In 1893, the youngest son of the . 
Earl of Truro set out to trace the ; 
source of the Blue Nile to the top 
of Mont Blanc, and until 1950 the 
remnants of his elephants coukl 1 
still be seen on a very clear day. ' 
More recently, the Rag . Week- ‘ 
Committee of Exeter University - 
set out in 1959 to place a lawn- 
mower on top of Mont Blanc, and 
as far as we know they are still 
trying. 

And in the Moreover Book of - 
Mont Blanc you will also find a ’ 
complete set of all the records . 
achieved on the slopes of this - 
fearsome range, such as: I 

Slowest .Ascent Ever Mr and ' 
Mrs Thackeray of Bicester (1886- 
1888). 

. First Ascent from the Inside: The 
Potholing Club of Skipton. 

First .Ascent Backwards: Mrs 
Inge Thuling of Munich, who ; 
waltzed to the top with her, . 
husband in 1903, accompanied by ' 
a violin-playing guide. 

Highest Snooker Break Ever on. - 
Mont Blanc. Don Blackwell of • 
Leeds, with a final pink to make a ; 
total of 76. ... 

Most Unlikely Object . Ever . 
Found on Mont Blanc. An'unex- . 
plained launderette at 15.400 feet 
(1963). which is stilt in perfect 
working order. « 

Now. of course, there is a four- 
lane highway to the summit with : 
motorway service areas everv 400 ■ 
yards, but in 1786. when Jean- 
. u ’ nness an< * Maximilian 
MacWhirter first forced their way ' 
to the top, there was little to guide 
them except Keep Out signs. 

, r Jfr e thrilling story of the first : 
-.00 years of Mont Blanc is bound 
to turn the Moreover Book of Mont 
Blanc into a bestseller. So don’t be 
disappointed. Send now for your 
copy of this mountaineering das- ; 
sic. which comes with a genuine* 
pit of the mountain itself, FREE, 

IJ. a ,5 mali Plastic bag! (Please., 
allow tor meltage in transiL) 

••SPECIAL OFFER! If you : : 
this article, you will be ' 
one free drink at the * 
Mont Blanc Disco, at the very * 
summit. 

This offer expires Oct I . 


'e 



11 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


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Over the weekend, the North- . 
em Ireland Office minister Mr 
Nicholas Scott said that the- 
Government was preparing a 
package of. “substantial- mea- 
sures to reassure nationalist 
opinion in Northern Ireland.'’ 
Taken, individually they do 
not quite support this weighty 
description. Each may have hs 
merits but none of them are 
likely to have major effect on 
Nationalist opinion in the 
north nor make the Dublin 
Government fail over back- 
wards with gratitude. 

But the tuning was striking 
nevertheless. ' Governments 
need . something, preferably 
something positive, to say 
when the noise of disorder is 
rising but it has traditionally 
been placatory words for those 
who are succeeding in making 
the loudest noise at any given 
moment. If nothing else, the 
Government's announcement 
at a time of ' high level 
“loyalist” irresponsibility was 
welcome evidence that it .is 
prepared to take risks in 
pursuit of a consistent policy. 

Some of the measures are 
ones which any British govern- 
ment might have found itself 
taking whether or not it was 
discussing them with the 
Republic under the auspices of 
the Anglo-Irish Agreement. 
The repeal of the Flags and 
Emblems Act is the most 
purely symbolic* but no less 
important for that There has 
been no prosecution for a long 
time: there is a strong and clear 
case for its repeal, not so much 
on the grounds of irrelevance 
or antiquity, but on the more 
basic level of citizenship 
rights. 

We should not outlaw politi- 
cal beliefs (whatever their 
chosen non-violent form of 
expression) even if they are in 
dissent about the constitu- 
tional position of a part of the 


slate. Temporary exceptions 
may be made only if the state 
is under immediate external 
threat and that - despite what 
Mr Enoch PoweD may say - is 
not the case here and now. 

The remaining proposals are 
the strengthening of anti- 
discrimination legislation and 
government - supervision of 
marches, and the allowing of 
Gaelic street names where 
desired. They are unlikely to 
produce - large changes at 
speed. 

These measures ..will all 
cause offence m the Unionist 
community. It is, and has been 
for some time, impossible for 
‘ the Government to make 
many moves which to do not 
offend one community or the 
other in Northern Ireland. To 
do something as fundamental 
as attempting to restore im- 
balances (real and perceived) 
between the communities is to 
trespass on sensitive areas. 
The signing of the 
Hillsborough Agreement has 
not made it any less so. 

Unionists will reply that 
these are concessions not to 
political persuasion but to 
republican violence and that 
legal reforms are stalking 
horses for the removal of UK 
sovereignty. Real concessions 
to republican killing would be 
very different to tinkering with 
anti-discrimination legisla- 
tion. 

Sovereignty remains , where 
it always has been. And 
Unionists should ponder the 
implications of the moves Mr 
Scott was describing. In effect 
they enhance the central gov- 
ernment role in mediating 
between the two communities. 
If they wish for less interfer- 
ence of this kind, why is therea 
growing clamour for 
“integration” - a change which 
would raise that central gov- 


CUSTOMER POWER 


• * 


The Trades Union Congress is 
an organization of producers. 
In gas, or telecommunications, 
its members’ interests depend 
on the. big utilities “retaining 
their size and monopoly. 
When it advises on the future 
of these businesses: beware the 
seller. 

Yet the thoughts of the TUC 
in its new document Industries 
for People are a cogent re-' 
minder of public worries 
which the Government will 
ignore at its periL The 
privatization programme 
continues but a large gap has 
so far been left in both the 
rhetoric and the legislation. 
The gap concerns the power of 
customers against monopoly 
\ * : I ; iRgiOfl supplier. The gap was noticed 

“ * * ‘ - in the sale of British Telecom: 

it was glaring in the abortive 
discussion of water 
privatization. In preparing for 
the sale of British Gas, the 
Government actively quashed 
proposals for filling iL 

Privatization has been an 
acknowledged political suc- 
cess. But tiie momentum has 
to be kept up. That means that 
it must be palpably more than 
a mechanism for reducing the 
role of the state, for increasing 
efficiency and for solving the 
Government's fiscal problems. 

From the point of view of 
householders, it is not just a 
matter of the effectiveness of 
price control regimes inOftel 
or Ofgas. As well as the size of 
the bills, there are questions 
about quality of service, how 
product preferences can be 


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expressed and lastly, but often 
most tellingly, how abuse of 
power by a giant corporation 
can be redressed by the little 
man. 

The public’s longer term 
perception ofthe performance 
of privatized utilities will in- 
clude its disaggregated, local 
concerns. People may decide 
whether privatization is work- 
ing less on the basis of Stock 
Exchange movement than on 
their encounter with a bad- 
mannered BT engineer. Too 
many of those and the 
anecdotes grow. Too many 
anecdotes and the beginnings 
are laid of a process of 
disenchantment precisely par- 
allel to that, so wistfully re- 
counted by the TUC. in which 
the bright hopes of the 1940s 
were tarnished by years of 
public suffering at tiie hands of 
top-heavy and unresponsive 
organizations. 

There are mistakes in 
Labour’s present approach 
too. Its published plans for the 
formerly nationalized in- 
dustries rely on an over- 
identification between the 
customer, a real-life figure with 
real personal interests and the 
consumer : a more abstract 
creature who is a tireless 
attender at committees. Thus 
Labour proposes a prolifera- 
tion of consumer bodies which 
could rapidly be taken over by 
professional activists and their 
purposes corrupted. The or- 
ganized “consumer move- 
ment” makes the same mis- 
take. assuming that the 
interests of the consumer can 


be readily translated into 
political action. 

For this reason the con- 
sumer bodies representing 
householders against national- 
ized industries have so for 
lacked a dimension, popular- 
ity. That is in no way to 
demean their work nor to 
diminish the criticism, voiced 
most recently during the pas- 
sage of the Gas Bill, of the 
absence from the 
Government’s plans of some 
strong central voice for con- 
sumers. 

Yet fresh thought is ur- 
gently needed. The customer 
of a monopoly may sometimes 
be a plaintiff with a right to 
have his case investigated- He 
may be a regular buyer who 
considers himself to have been 
defrauded. The TUC docu- 
ment contains the intriguing 
suggestion of high street shops 
into which distressed or dis- 
satisfied customers of the big 
utilities might walk and seek 
redress. 

The staff of such shops 
would have to be empowered 
to investigate — like an 
Ombudsman — and make 
public recommendations for 
action. This would rest on a 
legal obligation on the utilities 
to open their doors on a case- 
by-case basis. Where the activ- 
ities of trade unions were 
found responsible for a 
customer's plight, the TUC 
would, of course, have to be 
ready and willing to take 
action against the producer 
interest. 


DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH 


Mass was said at the 
graveside in Birmingham yes- 
terday of John Henry Newman 
on the anniversary of his death 
in 1890. An annual remem- 
brance, this was the first since 
it was announced that the case 
for bis canonisation has now 
been formally referred to the 
Vatican and accepted for in- 
vestigation by the Congrega- 
tion for the Causes of Saims. It 
may yet take some time, but 
that hardly matters: Newman 
is one of the main formative 
influences, and some would 
claim the very chief formative 
influence, on contemporary 
Christianity already - not 
excluding a few of its current 
vices. 

He has been hailed as the 
"invisible father” of the Sec- 
ond Vatican Council; Thus his 
patrimony extends to the 
whole corpus of modem and 
renewed Catholicism. Few 
men had more effect on the 
Church of England. He was 
one of the rare writers of 
theology in the nineteenth 
century whose works are still 
widely analysed for their 


twentieth century meaning 
and message. 

The Oxford movement's 
continuing influence extends 
much wider than the present 
weight of the Anglo-Catholic 
party in the Church of England 
now, considerable though that 
is; there is hardly a bishop, 
clergyman or parish anywhere 
whose implicit assumptions 
about the church and forth owe 
Newman nothing. 

Part of the special interest of 
his story lies m the unbearably 
painful contrast between his 
success and adulation as an 
Oxford Anglican and the rejec- 
tion and neglect he suffered 
after his conversion to Rome, 
before Pope Leo XIII finally 
brought him in from the cold 
and made him Cardinal New- 
man. Lytton Strachey tells the 
moving story of a supposed 
visit Newman paid, long after 
leaving it and the church 
which owned iu to the vicarage 
at Littlemore. 

"At about this time the 
curate at Littlemore had a 
singular experience. As he was 
passing by the church he 
noticed an old ' man. very 


poorly dressed in an old grey 
coat with the collar turned up, 
leaning over the Jych gate, in 
floods of tears. He was appar- 
ently in great trouble, and his 
hat was pulled down over his 
eyes, as if he wished to hide his 
features. For a moment, how- 
ever. he turned towards the 
curate, who was suddenly 
struck by something familiar 
in the face. Could it be .J! A 
photograph hung over the 
curate's mantelpiece of the 
man who had made Littlemore 
famous by his sojourn there 
more than 20 years ago; he had 
never seen the original: but 
now. was it possible? He 
looked again, and could doubt 
no longer. It was Dr. 
Newman..”. 

Those who read the story 
now have the benefit of hind- 
sight that pathetic poor old 
man at the Littlemore gale can 
have had no, conception, as 
Stratchey himself did not, that 
posterity would elevate him to 
greatness, and later genera- 
tions of theologians come to 
regard him as an Einstein of 
their craft truly a Doctor of 
the Church. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


ernment profile still further. 

The Hillsborough Agree- 
ment is about building con- 
fidence. One of the most 
serious problems which the 
government faces is convinc- 
ing people that the Agreement 
is paying dividends in security 
cooperation across the border. 
Mr Robinson’s little excursion 
to Gontibret gave some spe- 
cious credibility to the idea 
that the Government's claims 
of improvements in this area 
are false. 

In the nature of things, 
much security information 
must remain secure. The most 
fruitful form of cooperation 
between the Garda Siochana 
and the Royal Ulster 
Constabulary - which can only 
be achieved by the slow 
accumulation of trust on less 
delicate matters - is the ex- 
change of sensitive intelli- 
gence. This is the last sort of 
materia] which can be used in 
defence of the Agreement. 

But government machines, 
as we know from arguments 
over less contemporary official 
secrets, are notoriously cau- 
tious when contemplating tak- 
ing risks in this field. The 
scanty evidence available is 
that both police forces are 
benefiting from new links. 

Mr Scott is trying to show 
nationalists and Dublin that 
the Government is making 
things happen. He is also 
trying to deflect the pressure 
from the South for three judges 
instead of only one m the 
“Diplock” courts trying terror- 
ist offences. 

He did not include this in 
his list of measures but it 
remains very much undecided 
between Dublin and London. 
It is likely to remain both at 
the top of the agenda and 
undecided until the arguments 
are more folly aired. 


Threat to study 
of philosophy 

From Professor Sir Alfred Ayer. 
FBA 

Sir. I am greatly disturbed by a 
report that following the destruc- 
tion of the very good philosophy 
department which had been devel- 
oped at the University of Surrey, 
the philosophy departments^ the 
Universities of Exeter. Leicester 
and Newcastle and the University 
College of Wales. Aberystwyth are 
now threatened with closure. 

The pre-eminence in Western 
philosophy which this country 
achieved m the course of this 
century has been passing since the 
1960s. like- much else, to the 
United States and the pressure to 
which the subject is succumbing in 
our universities wantonly accen- 
tuates its decline. 

I should have been happy to 
take my stand on the principle that 
formal logic, the theory of mean- 
ing. the theory of knowledge, the 
structure of the natural sciences, 
the nature of moral and political 
judgements, are matters worth 
studying for their own sake but I 
am well aware that such a course 
would not count for much in the 
prevailing cultural climate. 

My purpose will be belter 
served ifl simply call attention to 
the fallacy on which I believe that 
the current prejudice against the 
study of philosophy is mainly 
based. 

This fallacy consists in the belief 
that philosophical enquiry is a 
mere luxury of abstract thought 
which cannot be put to any 
practical use. In an era of comput- 
ers this belief is grotesque. The 
programming of computers is 
dependent on formal logic. But let 
that pass. The belief that pro- 
fessional philosophers have been 
rendered incompetent to deal with 
practical affairs is contradicted by 
the empirical evidence. 

More vice-chancellors and 
heads of colleges have been 
trained in philosophy than in any 
other branch of the humanities. 
Philosophers, of whom Bernard 
Williams and Mary Wamock are 
just two recent examples, have 
shown themselves to be well 
suited to preside over royal 
commissions. 1 myself have re- 
cently presided over the creation 
of a society and Journo! of Applied 
Philosophy, which has' already 
fostered valuable work on the 
question of medical ethics and 
other problems of urgent social 
interest 

It should be home in mind that 
there are few universities where 
undergraduates read philosophy 
and nothing else. Almost every- 
where the pursuit of it iscombined 
with- that of one or more subjects, 
drawn from the whole range ofthe 
humanities, and in some cases 
extending to mathematics, phys- 
ics. psychology or physiology. 
There is no doubt that the logical 
rigour which philosophy brings to 
these combinations greatly bene- 
fits those whose main concern is 
with its partners. 

Contemporary politicians are 
hardly conspicuous for their criti- 
cal acumen, ff many of their 
successors are going to be denied 
even the opportunity of learning 
philosophy, this is an instance in 
which less will mean worse. 

Yours faithfully. 

A J. AYER. 

51 York Street. Wl. 

August 7. . 

The housing jangle 

From Mrs David Bonham 
Sir, I have been involved recently 
in the sale of a house to people 
who seemed very keen to buy but 
would not actually exchange con- 
tracts; when pressed to do so they 
asked for a substantial discount 
(and when this was refused they 
withdrew from the transaction — 
is this “de-gazumping”?). 

As legal costs were incurred fo 
the vendors should not the Li* 
Commission (report, August 4) 
address itself to the simplification 
ofthe whole procedure of the sale 
ofhouses — perhaps on the lines of 
the Scottish system? 

A Rolls-Royce Comiche, for 
example, which is about the same 
price as a lot of bouses, is legally 
sold on the basis of the purchase 
price as agreed, a valid invoice and 
receipt and a logbook. 

Yours faithfully, 

D. J. BONHAM, 

Ruthlin Mill, 

Skenfrith, 

Nt Abergavenny, Gwent. 

August 4. 

Totally improper 

From Mr H. R. Wilkinson 
Sir. Our budding arithmeticians, 
who are sufficiently bemused by 
the normal range of fractions with 
which they have to become famil- 
iar. win be dismayed to find that 
yet another has been added to the 
list 

In addition to the usual vulgar 
fractions, improper fractions and 
the like we now have the jui I 
fraction (as in "a frill half of one 
per cent”) an unpleasant creature 
whose main function, it seems, is 
to convince us that we are getting 
more than we actually are: a 
creature much used by banks and 
building societies. 

Fortunately this creature has 
not yet intruded on our domestic 
scene. This morning I asked my 
wife for a full half-cup of tea. To 
my great relief she passed the 
teapot and said I had better pour it 
myself. 

Yours faithfully, 

H. R. WILKINSON. 

13 High Street. 

East Mailing. 

Maidstone, Kent. 

August 7. 


Control of monopolies in sport 

From the General Secretary ofthe 
Central Council of Physical 


Recreation 
Sir. The Senior Steward of ihe 
National Greyhound Racing Club 
and the Chairman of the British 
Greyhound Racing Board (August 
5) are right in drawing attention to 
a serious and. we believe, un- 
intended problem confronting not 
just their own bodies but other 
sports governing bodies. 

The Central Council of Physical 
Recreation does not believe that 
the Fair Trading Act 1973 (under 
which the greyhound monopoly 
reference was made) or the 
Restrictive Trade Practices Act 
1976 were intended to apply to 
governing bodies of spon. In this 
country we have a tradition 
second to none of independent 
and responsible governing bodies 
of sport whose officers give self- 
lessly and accountably long hours 
of service and expertise to their 
sports for the benefit of partici- 
pants, spectators and the public. 

The extra and. in our view, 
unnecessary burden placed on 
sports administrators by the tech- 
nical application to them of the 
restrictive trade practices and 
monopolies legislation brings no 
real benefit to the public. We trust 
the day will never come when a 
governing body is forced to divert 
time and costs on having to justify 
its arrangements before the 
Restrictive Trade Practices Court. 

We also trust the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission's report 
on greyhound racing will be the 
last time a sports governing body 
is subjected to a monopoly ref- 
erence. We think that report bears 
out the CCPR's evidence given to 
the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission that the best way of 
controlling a sport is through a 
voluntary body run by eminent 


and experienced people with no 
direct financial interest. 

Yours faithfully. 

PETER LAWSON. 

General Secretary. 

The Central Council of Physical 
Recreation. 

Francis House. 

Francis Street. SWl. 

August & 

From the Secretary of the Indepen- 
dent Track Promoters Association 
Sir. We are astonished bv the 
claim by your correspondents. 
Lord NewalJ and J. H. S. Majurv 
(August 5). that the Fair Trading 
Act 1973 was not intended to 
apply to the governing bodies of 
sporting activities. 

The National Greyhound Club 
limited has enforced rules which 
have favoured the commercial 
interests ofthe management ofthe 
44 greyhound tracks which apply 
its rules at the expense of the 56 
tracks which are independent of 
them by exploiting its position to 
deprive owners and trainers of 
basic liberties. 

The Monopolies Commission 
accepted evidence jointly from the 
NGRC Ltd and the Racecourse 
Promoters .Association (a trade 
organisation) because they were so 
closely connected it was not 
possible to distinguish between 
them. 

If the report of the eminent men 
who formed the commission re- 
sults in greater freedom for the 
participants and more trade com- 
petition then their efforts and the 
application of legislation to sport- 
ing organisations is fully justified. 
Yours faithfully. 

D. LEE Secretary. 

Independent Track Promoters 
Association. 

38-40 Albert Street. 

Slough. Berkshire. 


Minority status 

From Dr R.K. Kindersley 
Sir, When Yugoslav friends ask 
me what on earth is going on in 
Northern Ireland, I try to explain 
by pointing to an analogy with the 
province of Kosovo to which Dr 
Mark Wheeler refers today (Au- 
gust 4). Perhaps the same analogy 
may help British readers to under- 
stand the position in Kosova 

In each case there are two 
communities, each with an alter- 
native metropolis outside the area. 
Between these communities there 
are differences in religion 
(Protestant/Catholic: 
Orthodox/Muslim); in economic 
level (Protestant/Catholic; 
Serb/Albanian); until recently at 
least in political status (the same 
pairs). 

Most important, perhaps, is the 
difference in birth-rate, for the 
Albanians outbreed the Serbs at 
least as fast as the Catholics 
overtake the Protestants in North- 
ern Ireland. One could add a racial 
difference if the Northern Irish 
Protestants are regarded as Scots; 
and in each case the subordinate 
community regards the others as 
unwelcome colonisers. 

There is, of course, one major 
flaw in this analogy: unlike the 
Protestants, the Serbs are m a 
minority in the province. So, 
when the crunch comes, the Seths 
in Kosovo tend to scuttle, while 
the Protestant majority in Ulster 
digs in. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD KINDERSLEY, 

St Antony's College, 

August 4. 


Fatherless families 

From the Director of the National 
Council for One Parent Families 
Sir, Your article (August 4) headed 
“Fatherless families foster crime 
and violence, study finds”, 
misleadingly gives the impression 
lhat it is reporting new research, 
rather than, as is in fan the case, a 
collection of opinions from an 
organisation widely known for its 
right-wing views. 

There is, in fact, very little 
research done on the effects of 
fatherlessness on children, and 
there are no studies which prove 
that the absence of the father is a 
cause of delinquency. A Home 
Office study published in 1985 
says “there is no evidence that 
children from one-parent families 
grow up any more deprived, 
disturbed or delinquent than those 
from two-parent families.” 

There are nearly one million 
single-parent families in this coun- 
try and. as Penny Penick argues in 
the same issue of The Times, steps 
need to be taken to ensure that 
they and their children do not 
suffer discrimination as a result 

Clearly there is a real need for 
questions about the respective role 
of family. State and education in 
the upbringing of children to be 
discussed. But to present opinion 
under the guise of fan is both 
dangerous and inimical to such a 
dialogue. 

Yours faithfully. 

SUESLIPMAN, Director, 
National Council for One Parent 
Families, 

255 Kentish Town Road, NW5. 
August 5. 


Passport pictures 

From Mr Kenneth Pin nock 

Sir, The bewilderment of Mr Pugh 
(August 8) over the regulations 
concerning the signing of] passport 
photographs is understandable. 
When I last renewed my passport 
at Petty France a few years ago I 
found that a "publisher” (even the 
eminent one who had signed for 
me) was not considered by the 
passport authorities to be “a 
person of similar standing” to a 
bank officer, school teacher or 
police officer. 1 was told to delete 
the word “publisher" and sub- 
stitute "company director", and 
all would be well. 

Pondering this mystery, as I 
went out I asked the girl at the 
information desk just who was 
qualified to sign. 


“Oh. a professional person, 
such as a doctor” she replied. 

“Or a J. P.7", I suggested 
helpfully. 

“What is a J. P.7” she asked 
Yours etc, 

KENNETH PINNOCK. 

White House. 

St Martin’s Avenue, 

Canterbury. Kent. 

From Mr B. W. Smith 
Sir, Mr Pugh should not despair 
completely. The .current passport 
application form includes 
“engineer” under the heading of 
“a professionally qualified 
person" — and notably omits most 
of the “respectable” occupations 
from the same heading. 

Yours faithfully. 

B. W. SMITH. 

36 Durham Avenue. 

Bromley. Kent. 


Lost chords 

From the Dean of York 
Sir. I have some sympathy for Mr 
Meredith (August 5) in his wish 
for an atmosphere of prayerful 
quiet in cathedrals and churches. 
In mosu however, there is a place 
of quiet easily found. 

He seems to imply that the 
Dean and Chapter of St Paul's are 
somehow responsible for their 
large number of visitors. Visitors 
will come whether the Dean and 
Chapter and Mr Meredith like it 


or noL Surely it is better that 
visitors are well informed and 
enabled to contribute to the 
upkeep of this “jewel” than to 
leave them ignorant, 
unshepherded and disinterested. 

After all, God made people to be 
the crown of his creation. What is 
the "jewel” without the crown? 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN SOUTHGATE 
The Deane rv, 

York. 

August 5. 


Looking askance 

From the Chairman of the In- 
stitute of Commerce 

Sir. On a number of occasions 
recently I have taken lengthy train 
journeys in this country. It has 
frequently crossed my mind lhat 
British Rail could render its 
passengers a signal service were it 
to display station names aslant its 
platforms. 

At present, with the names 
parallel to the tracks, I rarely find 
sufficient lime to locate the board 
and to read what it says and I am 
sped on my way ignorant of my 
current whereabouts. 

Were station boards to be 
placed, at the right level, crossing 
the view ofthe inter-city traveller, 
they would. I consider, be assisted 


in a permanent way. 

Yours faithfully. 

E. G. PEARCE Chairman. 

The Institute of Commerce. 

79/82 Central Buildings. 

24 Southwark Street, SE1. 

Television time 

From Mr Ludovic Kennedy 
Sir. Mr G. L Lloyd (August 2) 
complains that it is unfair that the 
BBC should air two anli-Govern- 
ment voices (Labour and Alliance) 
to the Government's one. But if 
the opinion polls arc correct (and 
the do n't- knot's evenly distrib- 
uted) two-to-one roughly reflects 
political public opinion through- 
out the country. 

Yours etc. 

LUDOVIC KENNEDY. 

Ashdown House. Avebury. 

Marlborough. Wiltshire. 



AUGUST 12 1950 

Our Special Correspondent in 
Korea. Ian Morrison, was killed 
on the day this, his last dispatch, 
appeared. The car in. which he ~cs 
travelling. close to the front, ti er, 
up on a mine. He uas 37. The son 
of "Chinese" Morrison u hn had 
been Correspondent o/The Times 
from 1*97- I9J2 before becoming 
political adviser to the Chines 
Government, Ian uw bam m 
Pckinu and educated in England. 

In 1911 he became a u-ar 
correspondent for The Times 


POHANG IN 
HANDS OF 
NORTH KOREANS 

From Our Special Correspondent 

8th Army Headquarters, Aug II 
A serious situation has devel 
oped at Puhang on the east coast. 
North Korean forces who fur 
several days past were known to be 
working their way south through 
mountainous country inland from 
the coast, and who yesterday were 
reported at a point seven miles 
north-west of Pohang, attacked the 
town early this morning and are 
threatening the airfield five miles 
to the south-east. Fires are burning 
in the town and it may become 
necessary to evacuate the atrfiekl. 

For several weeks past the Skmth 
Korean forces based on Pohang 
have been fighting in and around 
Yongdok. a small town 25 miles 
north of Puhang. Their supply line 
has been the road which runs Blunt, 
the coast. The mountains to the 
west are some of the steepest in 
Korea, but they have not deterred 
the North Koreans from making 
the obvious outflanking muve 
menu The exact strength of the 
North Korean force is not known, 
Three days ago it was reported as 
two regiment*. Probably it consists 
of a nucleus of regular troops and 
several hundred guerrilla troops 
who have long been established in 
these mountains. 

The allied command apparently 
minimized their threat because it 
was only yesterday that reinforce 
ments were hurriedly rushed to 
this coastal sector. These consisted 
of South Korean infantry and a 
small American fade force 
equipped with light tanks. Exactly 
what happened is still obscure, but 
the American convoy was am 
bushed soon after midnight on the 
main road 15 miles south of 
Pohang and pinned down until 
dawn. Air support was called for 
which eventually drove off the 
North Koreans, believed to have 
been a small number of guerrilla 
troops, and permitted the convoy 
to continue after considerable 
delay. 

Mustangs were still using the 
airfield up to 5 o'clock this 
afternoon, and in some cases pilots 
were firing their guns only two or 
three minutes after talcing oft. The 
North Koreans had moved south of 1 
Yongdok. and pilots claimed to 
have destroyed two tanks, ID 
vehicles, and two ammunition cars; 
Transport aircraft also were still 
flying into the airfield this evening 
and bringing out certain unessen- 
tial staff such as ground engineers. 

According to these arrivals 
North Korean mortar shells were 
landing in the general area of the 
airfield, but it was not under small 
arms fire. American gunners who 
have been supporting South Kore- 
an infantry in this coastal sector 
were shelling North Korean posi- 
tions on the ridge about two miles 
north of the airfield between the 
airfield and the port. Large num- 
bers of Korean civilians who had 
evacuated the town had gathered 
round the airfield, which is situat- 
ed dose to the shore of the bay, and 
two ships were standing by off 
shore in case evacuation should 
become necessary — 

FAULTY INTELLIGENCE 

pohang is the only port un the 
east coast of Korea held by the 
allied forces capable of taking ships 
of any size. It was here that the 1 st 
Cavalr> r Division disembarked 
with edl its equipment early last 
month. More important than the 
port is the airfield known as K.3. 
the best natural airfield possessed 
by the allies in Korea. Mustangs 
based here have been giving con- 
stant support to ground troops in 
this coastal sector. Its loss would 
mean that aircraft hencefurth 
would have to operate either from 
Taegu, 45 miles to the west, or 
from Pursan. tkJ miles to the south. 

This Pohang affair, even if the 
situation is restored once again, 
shows up the whole weakness of 
the allied position in Korea. Intelli- 
gence must have been gravely at 
fault to permit such a situation to 
develop. Held on the coastal road 
between Yongdok and Pohang. the 
North Koreans simply worked 

their way round the flanks as they 
have done on many other occasions 
the campaign. Both strategically 
and tactically, the northern com- 
mand, exploiting the terrain and 
their superior man -power, have 
shown considerable skill in avoid- 
ing a full-scale frontal battle where 
superior American fire -power 
would tell, and in concentrating on' 
feeling out the weak point in the 
allies' flank and rear. 

The Naktong River line, which 
being held only with difficulty, 
guards the western flank of the 
allied bridgehead in Korea. Across 
the north there is no such natural 
barrier, only 50 miles of mountain 
ridges. Again one is obliged to 
wonder exactly how large a bridge.- 
head the allies can expect to hold 
with the forces at their disposal. 


No laughing matter 

From Miss F. Buttcrworth 
Sir. Have people who clap at jokes 
on radio and television anv sense 
of humour? 

Yours truly. ■ ■ 

F, BUTTERWORTH, 

Spinney Fold, 

Greenmoor Lane. Ribchesier, 
Preston, Lancashire. 

August I. 





12 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

HM YACHT BRITANNIA 
August II: The Queen 
accompanied by The Duke and 
Duchess of York. Earl and 
Countess of Inverness, and by 
The Prince Edward, visited 
Ardnamurchan Lighthouse to- 
day to mark the Bicentenary of 
the Northern Lighthouse Board. 

Having disembarked from 
HM Yacht Britannia by Royal 
Barge. The Queen and Their 
Royal Highnesses were received 
at * Mingary Pier by Her 
Majesty's Lord- Lieutenant for 
Inverness (Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Lachlan Mackintosh of 
Mackintosh. RN). 

The Queen and Their Royal 
Highnesses drove to 
Ardnamurchan Lighthouse 
(Principal Lightkeeper. Mr 
J.S. Handic) and. having been 
received by the Chairman. 
Northern Lighthouse Board 
(Sheriff Principal Sir Frederick 
O'Brien), toured the Lighthouse 
and met the Lighikerpers. 

Afterwards. Her Majesty and 
Their Royal Highnesses trav- 


elled by Royal Barge to the 
Motor Vessel Pharos (Master, 
Captain N.Morrison). met the 
Northern Lighthouse Board 
Commissioners and toured the 
vessel. 

The Queen and Their Royal 
Highnesses subsequently re- 
turned by Royal Barge to HM 
Yacht Britannia where Her Maj- 
esty gave a luncheon party for 
the Chairman and Commis- 
sioners of the Northern Light- 
house Board at which The Duke 
and Duchess of York were 
present. 

The Secretary of State for 
Scotland (the Right Honourable 
Malcolm RiflcincL MP. Min- 
ister-in-Attendance). the 
Honourable Mary Morrison. Mr 
Kenneth Scott and Major Hugh 
Lindsay were in attendance. 


The Prince of Wales has agreed 
to be Patron of the Civic Trust 

Princess Anne will attend one 
day of the Olympic Yachting on 
September 10, organised by the 
Royal Yachting Association at 
Weymouth. Dorset 

Prince Michael of Kent is to be 
President of the Carriage Driv- 
ing Supporters' Club. 


Birthdays today 

Sir Humphrey Atkins. MP, 64; 
Dame Frances Clode. 83; Air 
Marshal Sir Maurice Heath. 77; 
Lord Heycock. SI; General Sir 
Patrick Howard- Dobson. 63: Sir 
Anthony Jolliffe, 48; Mr Fulton 
Macka'y. 64; Mr Norris 
Me Whiner. 61; Sir Robin 
Nicholson. 52: Baroness Phil- 
lips. 76; Lord Renton. QC. 78; 
Lord Rhodes. 91; Mr Peter 
West 66. 


Latest wills 

Mr Victor Harry Featherstone. 
of Horiey. Surrey, left estate 
valued at £508.820 net 
Mrs Aileen Croft G rise wood, of 
Liphook. Hampshire, left estate 
valued at £798.288 net 
Freda Beatrice Violet Jones, of 
Wallisdown. Bournemouth, left 
estate valued at £53,825 net She 
left the entire amount to the 
Cats Protection League, towards 
its work in Dorset. 


Dartmouth parade 


Admiral Sir William Siaveley. 
the Chief of Naval Staff and 
First Sea Lord, took the salute at 
a passing-out parade held at the 
Britannia Royal Naval College, 
Dartmouth, on July 31. when 
the following officers under 
training passed out from the 
college: 


Hartoen ton awann lor bostognMnod 
professional and iurt-itr molts: 
General List: Sub Ueuienanl K w 
Seymour i Hearting School): _SuDpl*- 
‘ ' t: Muishii 


menlary List: 


llpman S D Mason 


■Royal Grammar School. High Wyc- 
ombe): Supple men urv Ltsl lAiri: 
Acting Sub Lteulenanl J D Hall (The 
Wulfnc school): Direct Graduate 
Enirv: Lieutenant A W Martyn 
■Dainel High School): instructor Offi- 
cers Lieutenant B D Robinson . 
iPlvmslock Com prehensile): Uniter- 
*41 y College Entry' Midshipman L J 
□owe rrne College. Marlborough): 
Special Dulles Lett (Acting Sub 
Ueuienanl B J Surtees iCien Eyre 
Comprehensive}; WHIMS; Proba- 


SuppkmMfitary Rif 
Lieutenant: a W Martyn. 

Acting Sub LWitmailc R P Casey: T 

W Cross. M J Elans: J R Freeman: R 

C Griffiths. P C Nelson: C A Roberts: 1 
A Sherman: P A Stebbmgs: C Terrel: 
G P wakerrley: G w Walton: D G 
Welh. 

MUtthtnmm c A) cock: A S Barber: C 
M Beech. D E Bence; D A Boddy: A H 
Boyd. J A Carruthers: G P Casey: N 
Chapman: S M Cheesley; B S 
Crawford: S J Deency: S P Draper: N 
J Dai is: P G Furse: P F Gardiner: T R 
Gars!: J Green: J R Ham: D B 
Hargrave: C G Harrington- Rutterford: 
R S Hatcher. P J HoUIngworth: C T 
Johnson: S D Mason; M R McCinley: 
M MrVey: D J Milner: R A Phillips. S 
C Powell: J N Ritchie: A J Row: M W 
Slade: G w Smith: S J Tllby: A P 
Watson: A J Welch: G S Waugh. 


C J Bell. M V Can-etla: J 


_ Amphlett: 

Carrel la: J D Hall 

, : J w Barker: s Barren: R 

A Carter: A J Co\: M W Finney: S J 
Foster. M W Han rattan: S P Ham way: 
S N Hunt: J Money: D M Oddy: IB 
~ “ ~ Randell: J R T: 


Phillis: G 

Thomas: D P Tllcomb: A 


Rrot 
Sawyer 


om prehensile}; W 
nonary Third Officer 
(Sheldon School). 

BnumathHul Sid) Ueonmanti' Course: 
Sub Lieutenant A K Hassan iBangia- 
dcsiu: imsmsTWutat MkUfitpraaa Course! 
Midshipman K C Cheong (Singapore): 
‘ 11 Arabian Offtoers: Ml* 


Weight 


tN. Burt: M J Greene: B N 

Haworth. J Howells: B D Robinson: D 
Seal: G K Smith. 


iMshipman O 
iylB Tr ‘ 


A ai Ghamdl: PauNtw Doyle Trophy Mr 
Parade TnUvt (WRNS): Probationary 
Third Officer N Sawyer iSheldon 
School). 

Collins: M J George: S V Goldsmith: T 
J Milt hell: J J Sutlon-Scall Tucker: A 
J Webb. A P Young. 

Mkmumnen: J I Asbrtdge. f D Barllett: 
J M Benwrk. S C Black: M J Blewetl: 

S J Bor chard R R Brown: D I Burns: 

J Chapman: □ H Cole: w E Collins: 
C W Costello: A J Course: D H 
Crop ley. L J Dawe: C J Dora: G R 
Dunn. D H Foster: P George: J A 
Comm: s Hall; N A Hanson : R M 
Han ey: S Hoti: If M Hood: N 
Howard, j R Jackson: S A Kitchen: N 
' dingham. □ A Loostey. S R Lynn: 

_ ■ T -) h M iller: 


Adtin Sid) Ueutenanta: P G Bevins: J L 
Bralsher: I C Coulton: M J Cox. A G 
Daniel: □ J Evans: S T Evans 
(Bahamas): J Francis: S J Gurtnln: N 
G Hill. T L Holloway.- S P Horrell; R 
Hutton: M F Jenrlck- J L 


Large 


St 


Llewellyn: C J Lloyd; A L Nolan. D A 
N ullail: P L Orchard: K V Had more: I 
T Roberts: W I Rolte (Bahamas 


Saxby: R J ScotL M J SMeboUian 
C Steel: B J Surtees: J I Swam 


Woman*! Royal Naval Service 
Second OHlcan: s L Dcomb: H L 

Profcitamary TDM Offiomc J E AmaJl: 
S E Barrett: S J Hamer-Phllip: V J 
Hardy; M H Printte: S Roots: K 
Sawyer. A E Wallom: D J 
Whitlmgham. 

hnemaoonal tufa ha id an e im M A 

Ashraf: B A Awang Zand: A K 
Hassan. 

Saudi Arabian («h 
Ghamdl. O M AI 


J Ledi ogham, d A Loosley. 

T E MditfOfi; R J Marshall: R 
M H Montgomery- J A Neesome: S J 
Nesiel. M w Pemble. S R Peltif: W A 
Polls P S Richardson: R E Smith: S B 
Smith: S J smith: P I Stoweii. N 
Tailor, s D Taylon M O Thompson: 

S Turner. D J Walls: A A Whlld: T M 
Winter 


N MAI Hwlly: S 
Ini* (-national ratdahtpm«rc 


«h Mm): N A AI 
Ghamdl. S K AI Quft: 
5 F AI Senanl. 


S H AI 


R 

omtHon: J 


A I AI Baluchi: T AI Barakam: NS Ai 

Haddabi: N W AI Jaber. N S A) 

Johani. S A AI Mert: M AI Oulafi; M E 
AI Qahlanl: H A A) Sahliany: M AI 
Sltehrl: M K AI SulafU: M N AI 
Wahibi: H M AI Zahranl: T H Bay; K 
C Cheong: N Dumran: M N Hassan: M 
M Mam: K KIIUsup: A H Muafa. 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr D.C. Gore Browne 
and Miss D J. Rees 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Sir 

Thomas and Lady Gore 

Browne, of 62 Mellon Court. 

London SW7. and Diana, 

daughter of Mr and Mrs J.N. 
Rees, of Johannesburg. South 
Africa. 

Captain AJ. Bradshaw 
and Miss S.A- Lucey 
The engagement is announced 
between Adrian Bradshaw. 
14lh/20lh King's Hussars, son 
of Mrs Philip Bradshaw, of 
Lower Brailes. Warwickshire. 

and the late Mr Philip 

Bradshaw, and Sally, daughter 
of Mrs Rosemary Lucey. of 
Welbum, York, and Mr Antony 
Lucey. of Stuiterheim. 

Mr S.C. Gwinnett 
and Miss RS. Vallance 
The engagement is announced 
between Stuart, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs J.P.C. Gwinnett, of 
Hadley, and Rosemary, elder 
daughter of Mr I.D. Vallance. of 
Totteridge. and Mrs J.R. 
Vallance. ofFriern Barnet. 

Mr I.M. Higgs 
and Miss A-LB. Grant 
The engagement is announced 
between tan Michael, only son 
of Mr and Mrs Cyril E. Higgs, of 
Adel. West Yorkshire, and Anne 
Imogen, younger daughter of Mr 
Peter Barron Grant and the late 
Mrs Jo Barron Grant, of 
Thomer. West Yorkshire. 

Mr J.M. HindJe 
and Miss JS. Snarth 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs R. H indie, of 
Sunningdale. Berkshire, and 
Jessica, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs J.S. Snailh. of Lions River. 
Natal. South Africa. 

Mr T. Jaggs 
and Miss S.C. Gott 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy, only son of 
Mr D.F.L Jaggs, of Kew Green. 
Richmond. Surrey, and Sarah 
Cathryn. eider daughter of Mr 
and Mrs G.P. Gott. of 
Downham House Farm. 
Wereham. Norfolk. 

Mr M.G. Notes 
and Miss EJ. Millie hap 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs G.G. Nokes, of 
Wanborough. Wiltshire, and 
Jill, younger daughter of Mr and 
Mrs K.A. Millichap. of Formby, 
Merseyside. 

Dr J.A. Oddy 
and Miss J.M. Owen 
The engagement is announced 
between John Arthur, son of the 
late Mr and Mrs A. Oddy. now 
of Stneaiham. London, and Jes- 
sie Marguerite, daughter of Mr 
B.CJ. Owen and the late Mrs J. 
Owen, also of Stneaiham. 

Dr S J. Wisdom 
and Miss L.G.V. Elliott 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, son of Mr 
Tom Wisdom, of Cambridge 
and Mrs Rod Allen, of West 
Norwood. London, and Louise, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Clifford Elliott, of Malton. 
North Yorkshire. 


Archaeology 


Shepherds following in the 
steps of Stone Age man 


British scientists exploring 

early Stone Age sites in Epirus, This series of three articles from Mario Modiano re- 

north-westem Greece, are port on the latest findings of archaeologists, presented 
studying evidence^ suggesting during an academic programme marking the cen- 
tenary of the British School ai Athens, to shed new tight 
on the puzzles surrounding the evolution of our 
ancestors in Europe. 

The first concerns research iruo palaeolithic sites in 
Greece. The second revises some romantic misconcep- 
tions about the Minoans of Crete. And the third reviews 
the contribution of modern technology in archaeologi- 


that the local Sarakatsani 
shepherds today may be tread- 
ing in the footsteps of 
palaeolithic hunters as they 
pursued migrating herds of 
red deer 100.000 yeas ago. 

The colourful Sarakatsani 
herdsmen of Epirus each year 


move their flocks of sheep and 
goats over long distances, 
from winter grazings in the 
coastal lowlands to summer 
pastures on the Pindus 
mountains. 

Deposits in two palaeolithic 
sites, at Asprochaliko and 
Kasiritsa on Jannena Lake, 
showed that these were sea- 
sonal sites used respectively in 
winter and in summer by the 
same small community who 
hunted red deer for subsis- 
tence. 

The assumption that this 
transit uman community fol- 
lowed seasonal movements of 
animals as the Sarakatsani do 
today, was developed by the 
late Eric Higgs who excavated 
these sites in the 1960s. 

An opportunity to test the 
theory emerged with the 
discovery further north of a 
natural rock shelter at KiidL, 
in the Vikos Gorge near 
Konitsa. Deposits containing 
more than 200,000 flint and 
bone specimens have so far 
been retrieved, indicating a 
human occupation between 
10.000 and 16.000 or more 
years ago. 

Dr Geoff Bailey, lecturer in 
the department of archaeology 
and anthropology at Cam- 
bridge University, who directs 
the excavations at Klidi. 
found that its seasonal occu- 
pants - IS to 20 people at a 
time - subsisted less on red 
deer than on ibex whose 
seasonal movements, unlike 
the red deers’ long treks, were 
local, between low and high 
grazing ground. 

Dr Bailey said; “We have 
come to the tentative conclu- 
sion that palaeolithic tribes 


cal research in Greece. 

used these and other sites in a 
complex system of migration 
over a much larger area. 

" The hunters at Klidi. in 
fan. may have gone after red 
deer during the winter, but 
concentrated on ibex for their 
immediate needs, using Klidi 
as a base." 

The deposits there included 
sharpened flints of many sizes 
and forms, some used to 
butcher the meat for cooking 
or storing. oLhers to cut the 
bones for the marrow. 

Dr Bailey, in his expose 
during celebrations to mark 
the centenary of the British 
School at Athens, gave an 
articulate explanation why the 
study of palaeolithic sites was 
so important and deplored 
the absence of systematic re- 
search in a period that repre- 
sented the longest in Greece’s 
past. 

He said; “This is the period 
when man became human, 
literally. It is a period in which 
we acquired our faculties of 
speech, of symbolic thought, 
of artistic sensibilities. The 
period in which we learnt how 
to manipulate the resources of 
the natural environment and 
to develop the techniques of 
domestication." 

Dr Bailey believes we can talk 
confidently today about a 
“lime depth" of human 
occupation in Greece of 

500.000 years or more. He 
mentioned three sites in 
Greece that cover different 
sequences of palaeolithic 
occupation: Peiralona cave in 
the north with evidence of 
human activity and fire dating 
back to between 500.000 and 

200.000 years ago. 


Asprochaliko in the west, with 
a span of human activity from 

100.000 years ago down to 
10.000. arid French thi cave in 
the south, from about 20.000 
ago to the end of the neolithic 
period about 3000 BC. 

Excavations at Klidi were 
resumed last month. “We 
want to understand what the 
site meant in terms of living 
space". Dr Bailey said. One 
way of finding out is to 
examine the location of 
hearths, the way in which 
materials were discarded 
around them, animal bones, 
and the stone tools and 
artefacts. 

Klidi has become an im- 
portant piece in the gigantic 
jig-saw of retracing the origins 
of man. Dr Bailey believes the 
first appearance of homo sapi- 
ens in Europe dates from 

40.000 to 30.000 years ago 
What is not known for certain 
is where they came from. 

“The evidence", he ex- 
plained, “points to Africa as 
the birthplace of modem man 
with two major waves of 
immigration and human 
colonization of Europe; the 
first involving homo erect us 
about 800.000 years ago. the 
second influx of anatomically 
modem man ( homo sapiens 
sapiens) at about 50.000- 

40.000 years." 

He added; “It is unclear 

whether these late-comers 
completely replaced the exist- 
ing Neanderthal populations 
or mingled and interacted on 
each other. If that is so, the 
meeting of these two peoples 
must have produced a very 
powerful stimulus for cultural 
development" 



Mr John Fawcett who has 
been appointed Ambassador 
to Bulgaria. 


Church news 


Appointments 

The Rev E J AbMi. vicar. St 
MirtueTs- South WcMoe. droewe of 
Durham, to be Vicar. Tlbstietf. diocese 
of Derby. 

The Rev J Barnard. Team Vicar, si 
Mark's. Hltchtn. diocese of St AJbans. 
to be Rector. Penrith, diocese of 
Carlisle. 

The Rev A R Billings. Vicar. St 
Mary's. Waikley. Sheffield, diocese of 
Sheffie' 


and 


Sheffield. __ _ -. 

Archbishop Of Canterbury's Commis- 
sion on Urban Priority Areas, to xxn 
the staff of moon College. Cuddesdon. 


member of the 


and to be Director of the Oxford 
Institute for Church and Society. 
diocese of Oxford. 

The Res H de Waal. Principal of 
Ridley Hall. Cambridge, diocese of 
Ely. lo be also an Honorary Canon Of 
Elv Cathedral, same diocese. 

The Rev G R Drake. Team vicar. 
Church of The Ascension In the 
Martbrook Team Ministry, diocese of 
Bath and wells, to be Pnest-tn -charge. 
Buxton with Oxnead and. Lammas 
with Little Hautbots. diocese of 
Norwich. 

The Rev J W F GafUng. Salisbury 
Diocesan Adviser on Continuing Min- 
isterial Education, and Assistant 
Priest. StraUgrd -5u»Castle. diocese of 
Salisbury . lo research fellowship. 

The Rev F Q Lawson, non- 
Mlpendiary minister. 

Emmanv 


I pen diary minister. Loughborough, 
mmanuel. diocese of Leicester, to be 


Prtesi-in -charge. Somerby. sanx 
ocese. 

The ven Dr H Locklev. Archdeacon 
of Loughborough, diocese of Leicester. 
■ lo post graduate research al Emman 
uet College. Cambridge 

The Rev J OwenT Vicar. Little si 
Mary's. Cambridge, diocese of Ely. lo 
be also an Honorary (Anon of Ety 
Cathedral, same diocese 

Canon G A Pearce. Canon Emeritus 
of Southwell. Reclor. Sigplesthorne 
and Rise with Nunkeeftng and 
Bew holme, diocese of York, lo be also 
Rural Dean of North Hoidernesa. same 
diocese. 

The Ro\ M PeWf to be Assistant 
Chaplain. HM Young Offenders Cen 
tre. Glen Pan a. Leicester. 

Resignations and retirements 
The Rev J W Beaumont. Rector. St 
Mary and AH Saints. Droxforn. and 
Mearatnke with Cortaampcon and 
Exien. diocese of Portsmouth, to retire 
an October 31. 

The Rev G V Davies. Rector. Rounton 
(West and East) and Wcttuy. diocese 
of York, to retire on October 21. 
The Rev D L Moore, team vicar, si 
Apaes and Si Shnoa with st 
Werburgti learn ndnMry. diocese of 
Bristol, resigned on Jane I to become 
a schools (nsDcctor. 

The Rev J F Riga. Rector. Bawdrip. 
diocese of Bath and Wens, u resign on 
September 3a 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS. MARRU6ES, 
DEATHS art IN MEMORfUM 
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o hen only I lo: Si-411 3021 

Announccntenu can he nxened by 
telephone bcimxn g.fhtam and 
? .Vlpm Monday lo Friday, on Satur- 
day henuccn KKbm and 13 noon. 
(•1-411 40M eatf). For poHicauon the 
billowing day by I 30pm. 

FORTHCOMING MARfQAGfS. WHIIXNGS 
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t our] and Social Page annouccmcms 
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Enquiries to: 01-B2Z 9953 
taller 1 ft. Warn l or send to: 

1 PeratatfM Strati. London El ON. 

ricasc jllnu at least 4» hours before 
puhiicalion. 


I ww I ptjv you. and nrar whai w thr 
word that romnh forth from thr Lord 
CivfcM S3 50 


BIRTHS 


AUCKLAM) - On 9lh August, lo Mary 
Ann <noc ommannev) and George, a 
daughter. Zoc Ann 
AUSTWICK On SIh AugusL at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital, lo Sarah (nee 
BetKioughi and Malcolm, a daughter. 
Charlotte. 

BIRCH RETTNARBSON ■ On 7Ui 

August, to Imogen Mary and 
Thomas, a daughter. Daisy Mary. 
■StOMICE - On August 9th. al St. 
Mary's Maternity Hospital. Ports- 
mouth. io Fiona inee Whitei and 
Tim. a son, James Patrick Gregory. 
CAM PS ELL- SMITH On 6th August 
IR86. at The Middlesex, lo Duncan 
and Annc-Cortwrtne a son. Charles 
Peter, a brother lor Henry. 
CftlflCKSHANH on August am I960, 
lo Liz i nee Andrew] and Kennedy, a 
son. Alastalr James Kennedy. 

CSAM on isl August. 1986. al 
MuvgrmePark Hospital. Taunton, lo 
John and Martheten. a boy. Thomas 
Edward. 

PURSER On August 10 th al Green 
wirh Distncl. lo Rosemary and 
James, a son Robert William 
Johnslon. 

HARE - On 7lh August, to Nick and 
Caroline inee Allan!, a son. Thomas. 
HUTTON - On August isl. at Queen 
Mary's. Roehampton. to Judith inee 
Osbornei and John, a son. Michael 
Leonard, a brother tor Robert. 
HYDE-SMnN - On Augtst 8th. lo Jane 
tnce Doddi and Christopher, a 
daughter. Ellen Diana. 

MANN - On August 9th to E/De fnee 
Hepplc) and James, a son. 

MARRM - On August 8. to Paqulta 
inee de Tuluetai and John, a 
daughter. Natalia Cayetana. 
McDOWEU. On 7th August 1986. at 
Queen Mary's Hospital. 
Roehampton. to Jennifer Jane inee 
Anderson) and Douglas, a son 
Alasdair Harry George. 

HERRICKS • MONTUSCW - On 10th 
August, to OUiia Moniuschl and 
Walter ivkmcta. a daughter. , 
Susannah Phoebe Memcks. a safer 
far Daniel and william. 


PHILLIPS ■ On August SIh. to Andrew 
and Carol inee Robson), a daughter. 
Rosanna. 

ROBEY - On llth AugusL 1986. to 
Caty inee Mai lender! and Philip, a 
son. Adam Thomas Henry. Thanks 
lo all al Colchester Maternity 
Hospital. 

ROE - On August 7th. at Victoria 
Maternity Hospital. Barnet, to Mary 
■nee Nowlanl and Stephen, a son. 
Richard Henry Alban. 

SALTER ■ On Augisl 8th. to Patience 
inee W healer of!) and Tony, a son. 
Sebastian Leo Douglas, a brother for 
Kelhem and Lucy. 

SCARBOROUGH - On August 7th. at 
Pnncess Margaret. Windsor, to 
Karen (nee Cot tins! and William, a 
son. Guy Frederick. 

THARP ■ On 10th AugusL at SL 
Richard's Hospital. Chichester, to 
Gillian into Block i and Lars, a 
daughter. Helena Charlotte. 


MARRIAGES 


COLLETT : JOBLB4G ■ On August 2nd. 
1986. al Hertford College Chapel. 
Oxford. John Collett of Harold Wood 
lo Antonia JobUng of Coodmayes. 

TAYLOR : HALTON - On 9th August 
1986. at Si Michael's Church. 
Chen ics. Peter James Taylor lo 
Elizabeth Julie Hallon. 

YOUNG : LOPEZ RUSS - On August 
9th. ai Si Michael's Church. Chester 
Square. London. Michael Young of 
Hong Kong and London and Palmira 
Lopez Russ of Madrid ana Granada. 
Spain. 


DEATHS 


ARDAGH-WALTER Suddenly on Au- 
gust 7lh 1 986 HazeL widow of Philip 
A rdagh- Walter & a much loved 
Mother X Grandmother. Funeral ser- 
vice al SI Marlin's Church. East 
Wood hay. Near Newbury on Friday 
August IGfh al 2.30 pm. 

ARDERN On August 8th at Norwich. 
Mary Ellen Widow of Venter 
Ardem. Funeral Service al Christ- 
church, Eaton. Norwich on 
Thursday August 14th ai 2.45 pm. 

Followed by Pniale Cremation at SL 
Fatih's. Flowers If desired lo Peier 
Taylor Funeral Services. 85 
Umhank Road. Norwich. NR2 2PE 

BARLOW - On AugtBl IOUl at home. 
C. N . (Donald) Of Taynton near 
Burfoni . Oxford. Late of the London 
Slock Exchange Dear husband of 
Sybil and steofaiher of Caroline 
Daws. Funeral Service to take place 
al Taynton Parish Church on Friday. 
August 15ih at 2 30 p.m. No letters 
please Family flowers only. Dona- 
tions. If desired, (or Taynton Church. 

BISHOP. Manm Dennington - On Au- 
gust 7lh. 1986 passed suddenly away 
al his home, 4Qa Friars Street. Sud- 
bury. Suffolk. Cremation, private. 

BISHOP ■ On 7th August, peacefully at 
Worthing. Madge Adeline inee Vausi 
aged 86. Beloved wife of the late Sir 
Harold Bishop, dear mother ot Mary 
and Hilary, and the late John. Loved 
and loung grandmother and great 
grandmotner. Funeral on Friday. 
15th August at worthing Cremator! 
urn al 12 noon. Family flowers only. 

CHICHESTER ■ On 8th August 1986. 
peacefully in hosmtaL Cecil cnanes 
aged SO years ot Lyme Regis. Dorsei. 
Father of John and Katherine, grand- 
father of Louisa and Elizabeth and 
husband of me laie Winifred. Futmt. 
al Sen ice will lake place ai Si 
Michael's Church. Lyme Regis today. 
Tuesday i2tn August al 2.30pm. En- 
quires lo AJ-Wakeiy & Sons. Lyme 
.Regis 383$ 


COLEMAN ■ on August eth 1986. 
peacefully al his home at Goudhum. 
Kent. Anthony beloved husband of 
Stephanie and father of Lisa. 
Marianne. Kale and Antonia. Funer- 
al. family only. Memorial Service at 
Saint Mary's Parish Church. 
Goudhurst on Monday. September 
1st at 11.30am. 

COLES ■ On 7th August 1986. peace- 
fully in hospnal and of Dldsbuiy. 
Manchester. Francis England. Barns- 
ter al Law. A.I.B. Dearly loved 
husband of Isabella, devoted father 
of Frances & dear father-in-law of 
Richard. Service and Committal al 
Manchester Crematorium on Tues- 
day. i2Ui August al 2.30 pm. Private 
funeral, no (lowers please. Dona- 
tions. if desired, to the Heart and 
Stroke AssocaUon. Tavistock 
Square. London. With all enquiries 
to William Peacock Ltd. TeJ 061 445 
3397/ 061 865 1320. 

COLUNGE ■ On 8U1 AugusL 1986. 
Brian Coiiinge. Professor of Physics. 
Liverpool university. Beloved hus- 
band of Betty and dear lather of 
David and John. Funeral on Wednes- 
day. )3Ui August al 12 noon at 
Southnon Crematorium. Enquiries 
to Broadbenis Lid. lei. 0704 36634. 
CUNYNMGHAM - On August 9th. 
1986. Mamr David Hard Inge 
Cunyn Ingham of Minster Lovell. 
Oxford. Dear husband of Mary. 
Funeral Service al SL Kenelm's 
Church. Minster Lovell on Friday. 
August 15th at 11.30 am. No 
flowers. 

FORMBY. Phyllis Mary mie Hotgatei. 
dearly beloved wire of Myles 
Landseer Formby. at home on Fri- 
day. 8th August. 1986 Cremation 
private. No flowers please but dona- 
tions may be sent lo SL Barnabas 
Home. Colu mbia Drive. Worthing. 
FORRESTER ■ On 8th AugusL Robert 
Desmond, aged 88. Dear husband of 
Edith. Service on 13Ui August al 
2.30 pm al Falkirk Crematorium. No 
flowers bul donations. If wished, to 
Commandant Erskine Hospital. 
Btshopton PA7 5PU. 

GAUSSEN - On 6th August. 1986. 

peacefully at Crowborough, Sussex. 
Renee Josephine, to her 95th year. 
Enquiries please to Paul BysouUi. 
Funeral Serv ices. Crowborough. lei. 
>08926) 5000. 

HALL ■ On August I Oth. peacefully. 
James Slew art. aged 96 years. Much 
loved and loving husband of the late 
'Bun', father of Dons and Moira, 
grandfather and great grandfather. 
Greatly respected and caring former 
G P of Croydon. Service ar Croydon 
Crematorium on Wednesday. August 
l3Ui al 1.00 pm. Family Dowers 
only. Donations to British Red Crass 
Society or The Medical Benevolent 
Fund. 

MCKUNG On August 9th 1986. hi 
Hove. Margaret Biounl aged 78 
years. Funeral Service. Downs Cre- 
matorium. Brighton on Thursday 
August 14th al 11.45 am. 

HILL - On August 8th. 1986. at home. 
Westfield House. Gargrave. Skip ton. 
North Yorks. John Boardman. Dear- 
ly loved by Audrey. Sarah and 
Patrick and by all who knew him. 
Funeral Service at Gargrave Parish 
Church on Wednesday. August 13th 
al 215 Dm. followed by pnvale cre- 
mation. No Dowers please and by 
John's wish, no mourning. He asks 
ihai your donations, at the Church or 
by post, should go to the Rev. Keith 
Grain. The vicarage Gargrave for 
the Airoaie cancer Support Group. 
NOTE On July 26Ui. 1986. suddenly 
m hospital. Mane Genevieve 
'Cmetlei nee Beauvoir, aged 86. in 
Mome Carlo. Monaco. 

TOT, The Honourable Anthony PauL 
peacefully at home on Friday. 
August 8th He has bequeathed h» 
body to mecucal research. 

) ANSON - on 9ih August, at me 
Nuffield Orthopaedic Hospital. Ox- 
ford. Nora, wife of I he lale wnirm 
Janson and loved mother of Chartes. 
Hugh and Josephine, in her 90Ui 
year. Funeral pjriialc. 


KEMP ■ At Edinburgh, on 8th August. 
1986. Dr Wendy Lilian Kemp inee 
Mllchener). Dearly loved wife of Ian 
and mother of Roddy and Hilary. 
Service al FairmUehead Pansh 
Church. Edinburgh, today Tuesday. 
I2lh August at 1.00 pm. followed by 
private cremation. No flowers please 
bul donations gratefully received by 
the Leukemia and Bone Marrow 
Transplant Fund fDr A.G Parker. 
Haematology Department Royal 
Infirmary of Edinburgh). 

LOGSDON - On August 8th. 1986. 
Horace Stewart Logsdon. F.R.I.C.S.. 
F.R.V.A.. formerly of Manor Drive. 
Taunton, passed peacefully away at 
Beauchamp House Nursing Home at 
Hatch. Beauchamp aged 94 years. 
Funeral Service lakes place at 
Taunton Deane Crematorium on 
Thursday. August I4lh al 1 1 .30 am. 
Family flowers only. Donations. If 
desired, are being received for Dr 
Barn ados' Homes by Leonard E. 
Smith. Funeral Directors. 1 Hay don 
Road. Taunion. 

O'CONNOR - On August toth. peace- 
fully. at Long MeHord. Frances 
Muriel, widow of Captain J.C.J. 
O'Connor. Funeral, family only. 
RIP. 

PEAT ■ On 8th August 1986. suddenly. 
Margaret (Peggy) Murray Carlyle of 
The Avenue. Taunion. Dearly loved 
mother of John, sister of Jenny and 
beloved wife of the tate George. Fu- 
neral service at SI Mary's Church. 
Taunton on Thursday lath August 
at 1 pm followed by Cremation. Fam- 
ily flowers only. Donations if desired 
lo The British Heart Foundation or to 
The Royal Institute for Ihe De af r/ o 
Halchers of Taunton. Tel: 72277 
SCHAEFER Gerhart Martin. O-B E - 
On Saturday. August 9lb. 1986. 
peacefully at home. Funeral Service 
ai L'mLed Reformed Church. 
Bramhall Lane South. Bramhall, 
Cheshire on Thursday. August ldlh 
at 12.30 pm. Family flowers only 
please. Donations, tf desired, to Sl 
A nn's Hostxce. 90 Deansgale. Man- 
chester. Enquiries to Ben Lloyd 
iF.D.1 Ltd. tel. 061 4853135. 
STEWART - On August 7th. In hospi- 
tal. Lieutenant-Colonel Duncan 
Stewart, lale The Black watch. 
Royal Highland RegimenL In lus 
78th year. Husband of Patricia and 
rather of Dugakl. Jane and Michael 
Cremation pnvale. 

WALL - On Monday, ftlh AugusL 
1986. Harry Oswald. Beloved hus- 
band of Anna, father and trusted 
friend of his son. Michael Wail and io 
Siegllno Fyffe. Helmut Von Oer 
Heyde and ail their families. Funeral 
Service on Friday. 15th August at 
200 pm at Bournemouth 
Crematorium. 

WEMKM On 9th A usual. 1986. sud- 
denly. aged 69. Dr Gunter william, 
beloved brother of Eva Kaempfer 
and ihe (ate David Wendon. and 
brother in- Jaw gf Eiinh wendon. 
Cremaiton al 3.00 pm on i2tn Au- 
gust at Colters Green Crematorium. 
WOLFE (NEE DEVIN) - On August 6th. 
peacefully in hosnliaL Hilda Mary. 
Deeply loved and treasured wife of 
Kenneth, much mused by her 
nephew. Roger. Greatly respected by 
retired colleagues of Burford School 
and highly regarded by many pas! 
pupils. Funeral Service at SI. Alban's 
Church. Broadmead Avenue. North- 
ampton at 2 00 pm. Wednesday 
August 13th. Donations to Talbot 
Butler Ward Fund. Northampton 
General Hospital. Enquiries t0604j 
34368. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


THEMAIN, Kenneth WlllUm - August 
1 2th. 1 984. Remembering you. miss- 
ing you every second, every minute, 
every hour. AD my love. Grace. 

WATERFtEUQ. vtvtan • In loving 
memory of a dear husband, and 
many thanks for everything, bom 
his wife Gwen. 


Convincing winners 


By a Bridge Correspondent 

The English Bridge Union’s 
Festival of Bridge ended at 
Brighton on Sunday evening 
with the finals of the champion- 
ship teams. 

After 14 rounds of qualifying 
matches. B. Rigai’s team were 
the winners by a huge margin of 
20 victory points in the premier 
final for the Four Stars Trophy 
from an original field of 270 
teams. 

H. Norman’s team won the 
secondary final by an even 
larger margin of 32 victory 
points. 

Four Stars: t . B RigaL P Czemkewskl. 


R Fleet. B J Callaghan, list: 3. D 
Shefc. A Caiderwood. S Ftsimooi. D 
Greenwood G N Breskal. W: 3. RJ 
winler.. A C Eastwood. P J Mawkes. S 
Wood. 77: 4. W P crook. Dr A F 
Sowter. R S Brock. J F Pottage. 73. 
Secondary teams: l. H Norman. G D 
Cronin. Mr & Mrs S Evans. 121: 2. M 
J M Blackburn. A M G Thompson. P 
ilnd on. R Kipling. 89: 3. A Macnalr. 
T R Rees. G D Homey. R Gibbons. 76, 
Brighton .Bowl: l. T j Allan. J Y 
Pottage. J R Lancaster. J Frosnega 
192: 2. E W Orowhum. D F Huggetl 
M R Pomfrey. J Auld. P J Sinews. P 
D Jourdaln. 186*: 3. A Letts. M 
camngion. G D Connell. R C Fedrick. 
185. 

England won both the friendly 
international matches played 
midweek against a Swedish 
team by 139-106 and 105-55. 

Teams- A R Forrester. R S Brock. D J 
Greenwood. S Fish pool. Sweden: P O 
FundeUn. J MeUstrom. T Gullberg. H 
Cotftf. 


Science report 


Reeds slim down to 
defeat parasites 


By Andrew Wiseman 


Reed-beds in marshes and 
lowland rivers, which are often 
attacked by plant-eating in- 
sects, have developed a 
remarkable selective form of 
pest control destroying the 
enemy without damaging the 
plants themselves. 

These are the findings of 
separate groups of Dutch and 
West German scientists who 
studied large stretches of 
marshland in their respective 
countries.Their conclusions 
are described by Dr M. Vogel 
of Marburg University, in the 
science magazine, DFG, pub- 
lished by the Association for 
Research in Germany . 

Reed-beds are used by a 
whole range of organisms as a 
larder and nursery. One of the 
most widespread parasites liv- 
ing in marshes is the moth, 
Archanara geminipuncta. 

Its eggs winter in this 
habitat and hatch in April or 
May, when the young caterpil- 
lars migrate to de newly 
sprouted leaf shoots by crawl- 
ing from plant to plant across 
the surface of the marsh. 

Having reached a reed, they 
drill a hole in its stalk, munch 
their way upwards, eatingthe 
stalk from the inside. This 
checks the plants growth and 
by June the majority of such 
leaves have turned yellow and 
withered. 

At this stage of the evolu- 
tionary' cycle, the caterpillar 
needs a dense concentration of 
stalks to provide a stable 
bridge of leaves from stalk to 
stalk. \Miat is more, when the 
caterpillar pupates, in Jnly or 
Aiigust .the cyde cannot con- 

: 1 


tinue and then re-start unless 
there is an adequate supply of 
leaf stems to promote hatching 
and the laying of eggs. This is 
where the plants take action. 

In marshlands infested by 
the archanara geminipuncta 
far as little as two consecutive 
years, the majority of yotmg 
reed stalks sprouting in 
springtime will be extremely 
thin, although there will be 
300 per cent more of them than 
before infestation by the 
insects. 

Because of this, the young 
caterpillars will not find 
enough appropriate stalks far 
their subsequent papal stage 
and die moth population in 
that particular area will per- 
ish. Bat, within two years the 
size and density of reeds revert 
to the original pattern, indicat- 
ing that the plants had devel- 
oped a specific mechanism to 
destroy the pest population. 

They did this by restricting 
damage to themselves: al- 
though the plants drastically 
reduced the diameter of in- 
dividual stalks, so that these 
were of no use to pests, there 
were enough reeds to sustain 
photosynthesis essential for 
their survival. 

This can be shown in any 
large area of reed-beds, where 
thick, sparsely spaced stalks 
alternate with thin stalks in 
dose proximity to each other. 

The remarkably structured 
habitat of the reed mono- 
culture is not thought to be 
unique: it is believed there are 
other plants which have 
evolved physiological defences 
against hostile insects. 


OBITUARY 

lord plant 

Trade union leader with an 
international outlook 


Lord Plant. CBE. who was 
general secretary of the Inland 
Revenue Staff Federation for 
16 years, and chairman ot the 
TUC in 1976. died on August 
9. aged 75. His chief concerns 
were the improvement of race 
relations in Britain ana the 
development of closer inier- 
national links for the trade 
union movement. 

Cyril Thomas Howe Plant 
was bom ai Ledc-Stafford- 
shire. on August 27. 1910. 
When he left ihe High School 

therein 1927 he began work m 

the Posi Office, and in 19 j 4 
joined ihe Inland Revenue. 

Through his activities with 
the Inland Revenue Staff Fed- 
eration. he met the young 
James Callaghan and they 
remained close friends and 
political allies. When Calla- 
ghan became Prime Minister 
Plant was in his first list of life 
peers. 

Plant became assistant sec- 
retary of the lRSFin_ 1944 and 
general secretary in I960, 
taking his predecessor’s place 
on the executive committee of 
Public Services International. 
At a time of growing unease 
about the public sector in 
Britain and in other industrial 
countries, he did a great deal 
to reactivate PSI. 

His unswerving constitu- 
tionalism was threatened in 
his own union on two fronts; 
by the attraction of his mem- 
bers to tax consultancy — 
many of them left the service 
altogether — and by the mili- 
tancy of members in reaction 
against administrative and 
technological change. Plant’s 
most decisive move in those 
years was. perhaps, to dissoci- 
ate himself from plans for a 
white-collar inter-union 
organization outside the TUC. 


He became a member of the 
TUC general council in l %4 
and a delegate to the Interna- 
tional Labour Organization i Q 
1965. He served for I0_years 
on the TUCs economic com- 
mittee and in 1976 was chair- 
man of the TUC. 

It was characteristic that in 
his presidential address he 
devoted even more time to the 
work of the International la- 
bour Organization than ta 
unemployment, which even at 
that time was a worrying issne^ 
He stressed the importance of 
seeing unemployment, like 
other social problems, in a 
global context 

He was a cautious, organiz- 
ing man. with an immense 
appetite for committee wort. 
Apart from his trade union 
activity, his varied public' 
service included. work on race, 
relations, human rights and;’ 
the role of the police. He also' 
served as chairman of the! 
governors of Ruskin College 
and successively as. treasurer; 
and vice-president of the 
WEA. He was made CBE in' 
1975. 

His serious approach to life; 
was offset by a pawky and 
perceptive sense of humour,' 
seldom displayed in public. 
Commenting on a famous' 
remark by Edward Heath as 
Prime Minister. Plant* 
observed:“My members know- 
all about the unacceptable face 
of capitalism, and a lot of 
them want part of it" 

Among trade union leaders' 
he was one of the most widely 
travelled He also enjoyed 
horse-racing and being among, 
racing crowds, although he- 
was never more than a token, 
punier. 

He is survived by his wife,. 
Gladys, and their daughter- 
and two sons. 


MRS EDITH MURRAY 


Mrs Edith Agnes Murray, 
mountaineer, explorer and 
music teacher, died on August 
6. She was 88. 

Bom on February. 16. 1898. 
the daughter of a Glasgow 
chartered accountant, W. D. 
Caimey, she attended the 
Girls' Park School in Glasgow 
before studying piano at the 
Royal Academy of Music in 
London, where she received 
her LRAM diploma in 1919. 

As a young woman, she 
climbed some of the toughest 
mountains in the Alps with 
her sister, Maud, and became 
a member of the Ladies’ 
Alpine Club in 1927. Two 
years later, she married 
George Murray, an equally 
ardent mountaineer, and they 
climbed the Matterhorn on 
their honeymoon. 

When, in 1932, he was 
appointed director of Desert 
Surveys (later the Topographi- 
cal Survey) in Egypt, she 
played a very active part in his 
work. Together they explored 
the Egyptian deserts, mapping 
nearly the whole of Egyptian 
territory apart from the Nile 
Valley, and climbing the 
mountains of Sinai and the 


LIEUTENANT-GENERAL 
ARUN VATOYA 


Lieutenant-General Arun 
Vaidya. the former chief of 
staff of the Indian Army who 
co-ordinated the attack on the 
Sikh Golden Temple at Am- 
ritsar in 1984. was assassinat- 
ed on August 10 at Poona He 
was 60. 

He was India’s most deco- 
rated soldier who, during 41 
years in the army, twice 
received one of India's highest 
military awards, the Manavir 
Chakra; the only army officer 
to have done so. 

Arun Kumar Vaidya was 
bom on January 27. 1 926. into 
a Maharashtran Brahmin fam- 
ily. He was commissioned in 
1945 in the Deccan Horse, and 
fought as a tank officer with 
the British Army in Burma. 

During India's war with 
China in 1962. he command- 
ed infantry in the Ladakh 
region, part of which was 
overrun by Chinese forces. In 
the I ndo- Pakistani war three 
years later, he commanded the 
Deccan Horse Brigade; and. in 
the 1971 war with Pakistan, 
his armoured division de- 
stroyed 86 enemy tanks dur- 
ing a 36-hour battle. 

In August. 1983. he was 
appointed chief of siaff of the 
Indian Army, and he held the 
post until his retirement in 
January of this year. Though 
his professional qualifications 
were impressive, his appoint- 
ment was though! to be due in 
part to Mrs Gandhi's confi- 
dence that he would be more 
accommodating politically 
than other candidates. 

In June. 1984. “Operation 
was launched 


Blue Star” 


against the Sikh fanatics, led 
by Sant Jarnail Singh 
Bhindranwale. who had taken 
over the Golden Temple at 
Amritsar. The forces there 
were ar first ordered to siontf 
the place by direct assault, bot 
successive infantry attacks, 
were beaten off. It" was then 
derided to use tanks, which 
devastated ihe Aka! TakhL 
one of the holiest of the holy, 
places, while also ploughing- 
up marble slabs inscribed with 
the names of Sikh devotees. ■ 

Al length the Temple was 
captured and Bhindranwale. 
killed. But the cost of the 
operation is still being couni: 
ed. and Vaidya himself is ihe- 
laiesi casualty. Though be 
cannot be blamed for the 
political folly oflaunching the 
attack on a day sacred to ibe 
memory of the man who built 
the Temple - still less for the 
many errors of policy that 
preceded it - he must bear 
considerable responsibility for 
the faulty intelligence that 
caused the operation to take* 
such a disastrous form. 

Faced with mutinies by 
some Sikhs in the army after 
the operation. Vaidya made? 
broadcast in which he said 
ihai the mutineers would be 
dealt with sternly. But in. fact 
he handled the situation with 
more moderation Lhan hi? 
words implied, and many of 
the mutineers were reinstated; 

He and his wife,. 
Bhanumati, who was wound' 
ed when he was killed had 
throe daughters. Two of theflh 
are married to armv officers^ . 


Luncheon 

HM Government 

JJ™ L r™J? Chalker. Minister of 

SSfihJS 1 T ’ gn and Comf non- 
wealih Affairs, was host yes- 

{frroay ai a luncheon held ai 
.^"f^House in honour of 
the Ambassador of Gabon 


University news 

London 

mSwS" Ho,pilal Sch001 01 

Grants 

5SP5HF 10 ^of«. 

drffcr<Tiiia(h7^ f ^ r ? r ^ l 1 ror stud..* ol 

nwi mood «lls wu "*m»c and nor- 

iK“» MEMS! 


Carpenters’ 

Company 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Carpenters’ Con* 
pany for ihe ensuing year 
Master. Mr Henry John. 0% 
borne; Senior Warden. Dr WU* 
liam Fowler Felton; Middle 
Warden. Mr Jasper Godwin. 
Ridley: Junior Warden. M r 
Peter Creasey Osborne. 


■it 


: !\ 


Red Sea coast For her share ip. 
his work she was later award- 
ed a life fellowship of the. 
Royal Geographical Society.; ^ 

During the war. Edith Mur- 
ray served for a time in the 
household of King Farouk.' 
leaching his three daughters 
the piano. She also did work in. 
the Censorship Department 
for which she was mentioned' 
in despatches. After 1945, stw 
was on the staff of the Higher! 
Institute of Music in Cairo. ' ; 

When she and her husband 
had to leave Egypt in 1951 - 
victims of revolutionary - na- 
tionalism - they went lo live in 
Aberdeen, where she became a 
music teacher at the High' 
School for Girls. 

After "retiring from the 
school, she continued to teach; 
the piano to many children m 
her neighbourhood. She also 
continued to dimb Scottish 
mountains, and bad gone up 
Craigendarroch at Ballater 
only a week before her death. 
Small and wiry, she retained 
all her faculties to the end. 

Her husband died, in 1966. 
There were no children of the 
marriage. 


•in 



auiM«Tinauon : 1 £ao6» L i,'’l8!’ “vif 
Johnston. ProftSSS- 




of Prenatal 


Appointments 

Laiesi appointments include: 

Mr E. Philip Eta Icom bo to 

Dim: tor of ihe Harrow School- 
Development TrusL 
Professor Berrick SaoL VhS% 
Chancellor of York UnlversiW- 
to be Chairman of ihe.Centifi; 
Council for Education 
Training in Social Work fa*-: 
October I - in succession w . 
J <wn Cooper. • ^ 

\ #* *. 





X)RI) 

union u - ;k1 . 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


13 


THE ARTS 


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practical 
living 

It may veil bare taken 1,000 
years for the use of bricks and 
oil- lamps to be rediscovered, 
as The English House (Tha- 
mes) pointed oat, but it wfll 
take a while yet for television 
to discover the best way of 
presenting architectural Infor- 
mation without either boring 

or bamboozling the viewer. 

In the regrettably perma- 
nent absence of Alec Clifton- 
Taylor. the subject desper- 
ately lacks a Raiding, personal 
intelligence. The English 
Hoax sometimes strays per- 
ilously dose to the hilarious 
vapidity of the Open Univer- 
sity; last night's episode. Tech- 
nical Developments., wasted 
entire minutes informing as 
that, whereas the modern 
house has double glazing, 
central beating and electrical 
appliances, the ancient house 
did not have these. things. It 
was difficult to imagine the 
series' target audience gazing 
round at their nser-friendly 
habitats with a new sense of 
wonderment. 

Once the potted essays on 
lighting, heating and sanita- 
tion got under way, however, 
(be pace stepped np briskly, 
and Julia Brown's resourceful 
picture research saved the 
evening. There- was also the 
incidental gain of demonstrat- 
ing bow dull, prim and well- 
nigh effaced the exemplary 
modern borne appears when 
compared with its Victorian 
counterpart. 

The profession which tra- 
ditionally makes the most 
money out of housing for the 
least work came under scru- 
tiny in Scales of Justice (YTV)- 
The partial removal of the 
solicitors* monopoly on con- 
veyancing has stirred. If not 
.. % actually shaken, the founda- 
. i,'J lions of their most lucrative 
form or business. Also feeling 
the pinch are their rather more 
. ' admirable colleagues engaged 
m ; in Legal Aid work in "problem 
areas". Only the fat cats of the 
", ' swish London firms are visibly 
' prospering. 

' When it comes to apportion- 
ing legal manpower in the 
, interests of justice, property 
rights will always take prece- 
dence over personal rights, as 
r "- ' the students at the College of 
- r:r ~ Law underlined by- opting for- 
careers in the big City firms. 
The political implications are 
*' obvious, and this sober and 
well-constructed report man- 
■ • ' aged to keep its soap-box ont 

• of sight. 

Martin Cropper 


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EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 
Galleries: John Russell Taylor 

Bellany wins a 
titanic battle 


The Edinburgh Festival could be 
the great international showcase 
for Scottish art. and it astonishing 
that it has not been so used in the 
whole 40 years of its existence. 
Certainly in previous years the 
main complaint of visitors to the 
festival seems to have been that, 
splendid as much of It was. they 
could have got it anywhere. And. at 
a time when Scottish painting 
especially is making its biggest 
mark for decades on the inter- 
national scene, it has been es- 
pecially odd not to be shown any 
noticeable amount of it in Scotland 
itself Welt, this year it is splendidly 
inescapable; virtually every major 
show concerns itself primarily or 
wholly with the local product. 1 will 
come on to the way thai this affects 
our view of Scotland’s artistic past 
next week, but for the moment 
there is more than enough to 
occupy us in what is happening 
right this very minute. 

The best place to start is prob* 
ably with John Bellany. He has 
been a major figure in Scottish art 
for some 20 years, and is now 44. It 
is a good time for a retrospective, 
and that is just whai the Scottish 
National Gallery of Modern Art 
has come up with (until September 
21 ). This showing is supplemented 
by a retrospective of Bellany’s 
prints. 1966-1986. at the Print- 
makers Workshop until September 
6. and a small show under a long ti- 
de. Celtic Reflections on an Auld 
Uhancc. at the Assembly Rooms 
until August 30. which concerns 
itself specifically with the drawings 
and watercolours he has made in 
France in the last year or so. The ef- 
fect- of all this visual information 
about Bellany and his work is. I 
find, to increase considerably one's 
respect for him as a consistently. 


continuously developing individ- 
ual. and to make one see him as 
typically Scottish primarily be- 
cause be has clearly and no doubt 
instinctively refused to be typical 
of anything but himself. 

The shows arc a thoroughly 
disturbing experience. Since the 
very beginning. Bellany has drawn 
strength and sustenance from the 
deployment of a very small range 
of motifs, which may or may not 
have some oven symbolical intent. 
They include, as well as recurrent 
images of himself and his large 
family, such elements as raw meat, 
dead fish and (mostly rather 
menacing) sea-birds, not to men- 
tion any of these turning into or 
changjng out of human shape. The 
meat in particular encourages im- 
mediate comparisons with Bacon, 
and these prove quite revealing. 

Why are so many of Bcllany's 
paintings nightmarish in a way that 
Bacon's are not? The answer seems 
to be that Bacon is essentially a 
classical painter, while Bellany is 
an Expressionist. They both appear 
to use symbols, but Bacon's paim- 
' ingis less symbolic than Symbolist, 
crystallizing its emotions into static 
form: one has to remember that 
classic Symbolists like Moreau or 
Khnoplf are really rather cold, 
deliberately holding naked emo- 
tion at arm's length. Bellany. like 
all true Expressionists, fights his 
own interior battles on canvas for 
all to see. and the excitements of 
his work arc the rather more 
unnerving ones ofbeing right in the 
firing-line. 

And there remains very little 
doubt, going round the main show 
in chronological order, that 
Bcllany’s battles have been titanic 



John Bellany's obsessions with family and grotesque food: My Father (1966) and Celtic Feast (1973) 


in the Sixties, when he first 
appeared, he was working in a 
thoroughly unfashionable way. 
though very much in a long- 
established Scottish tradition of 
mystic realism. Then gradually his 
works became more and more 
intense and disrupted, until around 
1979-80 they seem to be dissolving 
altogether into a wild welter of 
lurid colours and ill-defined but 
definitely menacing shapes, among 
which allusions to the fish and the 
birds can still he sinisterly distin- 
guished. Even the introductory 
notes to the exhibition tel! us that 
he underwent some kind of a 
breakdown around this lime, and 
so. though it is usually wise to be 
hesitant about finding any too 
direct autobiographical applica- 
tions in art. in Bellany's case it is al- 
most unavoidable. 

Fortunately the story - seems to 


have a relatively happy ending, in 
that, after the pictured crisis and 
dark night of the soul, he has come 
out on the other side with a series 
of much more controlled paintings 
and prints which apparently reflect 
in their light, bright colours and 
more precisely controlled looms a 
degree of equanimity and even 
happiness, ll would he unforgiv- 
ably ungracious not lo rejoice and 
enjoy, rather than regretting the 
anguished intensity of the earlier 
work. But. whichever way you look 
al it. it is unmistakably it distin- 
guished career. 

Bruce McLean belongs to the 
same generation as Bellany. but 
would seem to have led a much 
jollier life. Al any rate, that is what 
his work seems to be telling us. 
There is a strong element of 
irrepressible geniality in even his 
most sober paintings, with their 


scribbled figures and energetic 
splashes of pigment, And hi* recent 
ceramics carry the same feeling 
further as well as being on show 
with the new paintings at the 
Scottish Gallery until September 3. 
they were cheerfully put at risk by 
being actual I y used for a cele- 
bratory lunch at the gallery - on 
the insistence of the artist himself, 
who also weighed in with one of his 
inimitable performances at the 
Fruiimarket. using that gallery's 
rather thin festival show, The 
I/.tat and ///.■ Lamp, as an 
undistracting backdrup. 

David Michie, at the Mercury 
f iallerv until September b. is of an 
older generation: Finnna Carlisle, 
at the '3ti 9 Gallery until August 30. 
is decidedly younger. They are both 
showing the same as before, only 
perhaps more so: his flower-pieces 
and street-scenes are as decorative 


as ever, and worthily represent the 
tradition of the Scottish Colourists 
in our own day; her figure com- 
positions and landscapes show fter^ 
usual flair in the bold handling of 
paint on canvas or paper, with 
particular effect in a new self- 
portrait. 

And this year the 369 is not the 
only place where one can cheek out 
what the youngest generation of 
Scottish artists are doing. The 
( ollege of .Art has a demonstration, 
going on w hich seems likely to turn 
into a show immediately and is 
certainly designed to do so even- 
tually: Scottish Art Today gives a 
dozen artists work-space for the 
duration of the festival, in addition 
to the studios scattered around 
Edinburgh which they will be - 
occupying for the next year, work- 
ing towards a special show of the 
results for the 1987 festival. 


Theatre: Martin Cropper 


Crime and 
Punishment 

St Bride’s Centre 


Opera: Richard Morrison 


After the brass bands, bag- 
pipes. steel bands, more bag- 
pipes and fire engines of the 
weekend’s parade, the World 
Theatre Festival got under 
way with some real emotional 
noise, courtesy of the Stary 
Theatre of Krakov. The 
shame of it is that by the end 
of this week fewer than 1.000 
customcrs.will have been able 
to hear it. St Bride’s Centre. 
HaymarkcL is a homely 
community centre in which 
has been constructed a 


clausirophic. black-lincd the- 
atre displaying a cavalier use 
of space — the audience being 
shoe-horned into rump- 
numbing wooden forms which 
(in my experience) rival for 
discomfort the marble seating 
of Athens or Epidaurus. The 
stage, separated by a wooden 
balustrade, occupies an equal 
area in which the nine-strong 
company enjoy their qualified 
ease. 

The cITcci is to lend the 
players an exaggerated phys- 
ical grandeur in the scenes that, 
arc given stage-front, and to 
produce an almost uncanny 
depth of field when they move 
through the partitions of 
Krystyna Zachwaiowicz's cle- 
ver sets. which arc constructed 


from unglamorous conser- 
vatory screens. Petrovich 
closes his door on us when an 
informant arrives with a clue 
to the murder; Raskolnikov 
exits by the furthermost 
screen and stands al the door 
gazing silently at Sonia, whom 
wc can sec outside in the 
street. Some of the sightiincs 
arc vexing in the extreme, but 
the. cumulative impression of 
enclosed intimacy serves the 
production handsomely. 

Andrzej Wajda, best known 
here for his movies such as 
Man of Murb/e, directs his 
company as though he had 
dragooned them to a pilch of 
perfection on the set and then 
disappeared with the camera, 
leaving them to get on with it. 


1 IN \ 
AW N 


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Hilary Finch reports on the Savonlinna 
Festival at Finland’s Olavinlinna Castle 

Making the most 
of atmosphere 


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V * 1 .111 

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The last bronze rays of a sun 
which al midnight is still only 
pretending to set caught the 
huge burnished Horus em- 
blem of the King of Egypt in 
the castle of King Olav in 
Finland. It is the sort of 
moment which makes visitors 
willing to pay more than £100 
on the black market for a scat 
in the courtyard of the 
Olavinlinna during Savon- 
linna's annual opera festival. 
This time they certainly had 
their money's worth. 

Savonlinna has always had 
a close relationship with 
Verdi. Since 1968 and the 
revival of the festival in its 
present form Trormore. Bull a. 
Rigolelio and Don Carlos 
hqvc been played out in epic 
style against the stony back- 
drop of the casllc's huge inner 
courtyard. This year's new 
production. Aida, was an 
outstanding example of how 
lo work hard the atmospheric 
but aw'kward space, with its 
enormous width but virtually 
non-existent depth. With an 
unerring eye for bold, clean 
design. Scppo Nurmimaa did 
very little other than place the 
glowing Horus insignia slap in 
the middle of the massive 
stone wall and square oiT the 
rounded arches of its door- 
ways right and left. This 
concentrated the production's 
entire energy on movement 
arid grouping and. * in the 
hands of Andras Miko (chief 
producer at the Hungarian 
State Opera), this was most 
powerfully achieved. 

The long horizontals and 
diagonals of platform and 
stairways, to say nothing of 
side and centre aisles, teemed 
with members of the superbly 
Trained Festival Chorus. an3 
no end of soldier extras, culled 
from local villages and cos- 


tumed in the subtle unity of 
colour and design which, with 
Hcikki Vartsi's equally square 
choreography, was so much 
the glory of this production. 
Above all. Miko knew exactly 
how to activate space and 
relationship. Mara Zampicri. 
making her first entry as Aida 
with a scaring plangcncy in 
that unmistakable raw. gut 
soprano, had to hurl her voice 
up a sharp diagonal to Peter 
Lindroos's Radamcs. In Act 
111 there was nothing to 
distract from the intensity of 
their encounter: at the entry of 
Amonasro (Walter Gronroos). 
the three formed a tense 
horizontal, broken by the 
criss-crossing of entries and 
lances as Radamcs was taken. 

Zampicri virtually sang 
Lindroos and Ulla Sippola 
(Amncris) off the stage. The 
chill of Zampicri's “Numi 
picta" and her voice’s vibrant 
hugging of the line in “O 
pallia mia” were unfotgci- 
Uiblc. Marko Puthoncn (King) 
and Bcngl Rundgrcn (Ramfis) 
were both basses to be reck- 
oned with, encouraged by the 
briskly-paced conducting of 
Martin Tumovsky to exploit 
even’ shifting lin/a and inflex- 
ion of Verdi's line. 

Savonlinna's second and 
most enterprising new produc- 
tion was The Tempest, meta- 
morphosed into something 
not a little rich and strange by 
the use of Sibelius's complete 
incidental music, played en- 
thusiastically by the Festival 
Orchestra under Ulf Sodcr- 
blom. Lisboth landcfon, in a 
production more dramatically 
spectacular than tcxiualiy 
searching, took her cues en- 
tirely from the score, and 
provided a strong, unified 
licce of music-drama, dclighl- 
ully reinvigorated by the 



Seppo Nurmimaa' 's burnished, emblematic setting for Aida 


£ 


t IK ^ 




( 11 * 




MONTPELIER MODERN ART COURSES 

Our comprehensive 10-week course on the 

VISUAL ARTS OF THE 20TH CENTURY 

covens' Pointing, Sculpture, Architecture, Film, Design, 
Photography etc. 

ENROL NOW FOR SEPTEMBER 1986. 

information from the Principal, Mrs Helen Frayling MA (RCA), 
4 Montpelier Street, LONDON SW7. 

Tel: 01-584 0667. 


bouncing, rolling syllables of 
the Finnish language. Ariel, 
the mezzo Hdja Angcrvo. was 
a strange, dream princess in 
swirling dapple grey silk and 
long grey bain the court party 
a colour-fantasy of nicely 
timed coin media t/rlfanc en- 
sembles against Oiva Toikka's 
swirling blue batik backdrop 
and tubular-cubic Sixties pop- 
art design. 

Skilful production is the 
element " - by which Aulis 
Sallincn's The King Goes 
Forth to France, stands or 
falls. The opera, jointly 
commissioned by Savonlinna. 
Covcnt Garden and the BBC, 
has continued to stand 
proudly on home ground since 
its premiere two years ago. 
thanks to a visually spcctacu- 
- lar, if over-detailed, produc- 
tion by Kulle Holmberg. li 
took a tumblei though, in Kiel 
last year, and reports have yet 
to filter through from Santa 
Fc. where it has just opened. 
What Andrei Scrban will 
make of it al the Royal Opera 
next April remains to be seen. 
His challenge wilt be to break 
through ihcquasi-allcgoryand 
heavy-handed symbolism - in 
Paavo Haavikko's libretto to 
release the essentia! simplicity 
of this morality talc which its 
score projects with such a sure 
dramatic hand. 

The talc telescopes past, 
present and future as British 
King and Prime Minister, in a 
future Icc Age. relive the battle 
of Crccy and the siege of 
Calais in an inexorable escala- 
tion of public and private 
corruption. The music tele- 
scopes Shostakovich's savage 
and Prokofiev's sardonic hu- 
mour with purple Puccinian 
lyricism, in a kaleidoscopic 
orchestral virtuosity very 
much Sallincn's own. Paul 


Griffiths welcomed it only 
cautiously on this page in 
1984: this year's younger cast, 
under the baton of Markus 
Lchiincn. emphasized the 
tightrope progress of a work 
whose ambition too often 
overweighs and topples its 
substance. 

Since Ralf Goihoni took 
over as Savonlinna's director 
last year, the festival's support 
for new home-grown works in 
new venues increases apace. 
For me. more encouraging 
ihan The King was a perfor- 
mance of a new chamber 
opera. The Key-, by Kalcvi 
Aho. one of Finland's most 
exciting and prolific young 
composers of both large-scale 
symphonic and chamber 
works. It was given in the 
subterranean 1. 000-scal Rct- 
rcui conccn-half. a vast man- 
made cave hollowed out of the 
granite island of Punkahaiju. 
some 20 minutes by road and 
two hours by boat from 
Savonlinna. 

It was the ideal selling for 
Aho's claustrophobic dra- 
matic monologue for baritone 
and chamber orchestra. Juha 
■Manncrkopi's libretto is a 90- 
minuic drama of paranoia and 
urban anxiety as Johannes 
Ponuo. a 50-year-old bed- 
sitter solitary, searches for the 
“key" into and out of his life. 
Aho’s delicate score acts as 
brilliantly detailed and power- 
ful expressionist subtitles, 
forming his and our every 
response as the voice rises 
only occasionally out of 
speech into song. Maui 
Lchiincn gavd a virtuoso 
performance, directed by 
Hannu Hcikinhcvmo and with 
Hannu Bister conducting a 13- 
strong band of snarling bass 
woodwiqds. horns, strings and 
percussibn. 


The playing is mostly superb, 
with infinite subtleties of 
inflexion that might easily fly 
away in a larger venue. 

Jerzv Radziwilowicz plays 
the young student Raskol- 
nikov as a man hypnotized, 
creaking about on string-laced 
boots as if treading ihc water 
of dreams, convulsively swal- 
lowing down the nightmare 
that keeps rising in his gorge 
and succumbing to explosions 
of fury like a hiccuping vol- 
cano. When he pounds the 
table with his fist during his 
second interview with Sonia, 
he seems intent on reducing it 
to matchwood; elsewhere, he 
sits and stares with the distant 
smile of the insane. Jerzy 
Stuhr's Petrovich, the lawyer 
who plays cat to Raskol- 
nikov's mouse, is a magneti- 
cally compelling actor who 
slides persuasively from 
watchful curiosity through 
emotive oratory - to a kind of 
psychosis of his own which 
lakes the form of a sensational 
coughing fit. 

Not having a word of the 
passionately lugubrious lan- 
guage in which it is played. I 
cannot tell if this production 
enhances or diminishes Dost- 
oevsky. but it makes an 
awesome piece of theatre. 


Oberon 
Usher Hall 


The strain of magic and 
wistfulness running through 
the music of Weber’s Oberon 
sits as uncomfortably along- 
side the burlesque antics and 
doggerel of Planches English 
libretto today as the composer 
realized (too laic) that it did at 
Covcnt Garden in 1826. That 
is what makes it so difficult to 
stage convincingly, and it is 
the reason why one is more 
willing than usual to accept 
producers’ liberties. A prime 
virtue of Frank Dunlop's new 
production is that he firstly 
establishes that Olnron is 
really neither “producer's 
opera" nor “singer's opera", 
but orchestra's opera. Time 
and again an absurd stage 
action is given dramatic im- 
petus by Weber's original and 
atmospheric scoring. 

So Dunlop makes the or- 
chestra the centre of the 
action, deploying Cari Toms's 
sets — a scries of staircases and 
catwalks rather reminiscent of 
those that supported Busby 
Berkeley finales — round the 
players. It was a prominence 
that the Jungc Deutsche 


Philharmonic thoroughly de- 
served. because under Seiji 
Ozawa's direction these young 
professionals gave a vivid 
performance. There was 
plenty of top-rate solo playing 
— the “magic" horn domi- 
nant. of course - but more 
impressive still was the disci- 
plined ensemble work as the 
orchestra followed Ozawa’s 
generally light-footed 
interpretation. 

Having placed the orchestra 
so dearly in the middle. 
Dunlop then developed the 
pantomime aspects of this 
ludicrous plot, with its breezy 
flit across thipc continents: its 
abductions and shipwrecks; its 
hotchpotch of medieval ro- 
mance. oriental atmosphere 
and English country-garden 
fairies. 

Even before the celebrated 
overture had finished. Oberon 
and Titania had mimed a 
potted history of .4 Mid- 
summer .Wight’s Dream: later 
we had dances by rubber- 
dummy mermaids, kidnap by 
geriatric pirates, and recurring 
catchph rases shouted by cho- 
rus (the excellent Edinburgh 
Festival Chorus, silling in 
darkness at the back) and 
orchestra. Where the original 


audience would have enjoyed 
lavish spectacle. Dunlop sub- 
stituted wit, aided by Mark 
Henderson's ingenious light- 
ing. The glittering spotlight oii 
the solo horn was an inspired 
touch. 

In vocal terms the evening 
belonged to Elizabeth Con- 
nell, who traversed the proio- 
Wagnerian terrain of “Ocean! 
Thou mighty monster" more 
happily than she did the 
coloratura numbers, but con- 
sistently produced luscious, 
tone. Her knight in shining 
armour. Sir Huon of Bor-.' 
dcaux, was sung less success- 
fully by Paul Frey, the 
Canadian tenor. Ringing top 
notes sometimes added lustre 
to his chivalrous postures but 
elsewhere there was a ten- 
dency towards listlessness.' 
Benjamin Luxon and La 
Verne Williams had good, 
earthy fun as the “below the 
stairs" lovers (one of many 
intriguing parallels with The. 
Magic Flute), and Philip- 
Langridgc's Oberon was spir-' 
itediv characterized. With his 
infectious exuberance and 
clear enunciation, however,, 
the Puck of the treble James 
Robertson nearly stole the, 
show. 


Music in London 


Takacs Quartet 

Elizabeth Hall 

If ever there was a chasm 
between the letter of the 
program mc-n oi c and the spi- 
rit of the work it described 
then Zsoli Durko provided it 
for Sunday's performance of 
his Second Siring Quartet. I 
hope not loo many members 
of the audience fell in; for the 
unnecessarily obfuscaiory ver- 
bal analysis bore little relation 
to the lucid and refined art- 
istry of one of his most 
important works. 

Written in 1970. it docs for 
the car what kinetic art docs 
for the eye: it balances struc- 
tures of pilch and rhythm built 
on tiny cells into patterns 
which move one against the 
other, creating shifting illu- 
sions of speed and space. His 
word for those patterns which 
move in a determined order is 
“oiganismo": those which are 
free, functioning, he says. like 
a musical snapshot he calls 
"psicogramma". which prob- 
ably helps him rather more 
than it helps us. 

What the Takacs Quartet 
brought out. in a linglingly 
alert performance, was the 
sheer excitement of the work’s 
microscope vision: relics of 
lyrical melody showered by 
pizzicato, a tense fencing of 
bow against bow as argument 
is lengthened and phrases 
broaden into what becomes, at 
the work’s centre, an elegy for 
melody itself. 

The opportunity to hear this 
work, and the duality of the 
performance of Webern's Six 
Bagatelles, epitomized Sum- 
mcrscope's robust sense of 
exploration, particularly in 
this little scries of 20th-cen- 
tury quartets. The Takacs 
revealed, as any performance 
musL and so few really do. 
Webern's entire world in a 
grain of sand. Each liny crystal 
was heard, inflected and then 
re-created with an intensity 
which made one hold one's 


breath in vicarious concen- 
tration. 

Debussy and Banok (the 
Fifth Quartet) opened out the 
virtuosity of technique and 
insight which had been con- 
tained in their Durko and 
Webern. These were revela- 
tory performances in which an 
almost palpable generation of 
physical energy was constantly 
matched by finesse of aural 
discipline. 

Hilary Finch 


ASM F /Marriner 

Barbican 

Last week, while Summer- 
scope and the Proms domi- 
nated the music reviews, they 
were having their own lestival 
in the City, a “deliberately 
uncomplicated" affair called 
Summer in the City. It ended 
on Sunday, though, on a 

conspicuously high note, with 

Sir Neville Marriner, its direc- 
tor, conducting the Academy 
of Si Martin-in-ihe-Fields in 


Vivaldi's Gloria and Beel- 
ho\ en's Ninth Symphony. 

Sir Neville succeeded in the 
critical task of making the 
Beethoven sound freshly exci- 
ting. although without doing 
anything terribly eccentric. 
Like many another, he tended 
to drive ihc slow movement 
just a little too anxiously. 

One had some misgivings, 
particularly al the start, when 
the echoing woodwind persis- 
tently anticipated the beat. 
Bui Sir Neville's carefully 
shaped phrasing, his meticu- 
lous attention to details of 
balance, and the feeling that 
when the strings broke into 
their more ornate passages 
they were not snatching at the 
notes, meant that the music's 
searching grace survived. The 
occasional unhappy incident 
dissolved into insignificance 
in the face of the whole 
achievement. 

There were moments in the 
Scherzo, for example, when? 
the ensemble was not ab- 
solutely tight (and loo many 
repeats were ignored), while at 
the supreme climax of the first 


movement the timpani rolls' 
actually managed to drown 
the rest of the orchestra, at any 
rate as heard from mv seat.- 
But the Finale's magnificence 
was unequivocal. Its strength- 
lay not least in the quality of 
the singing. The Academy's; 
own chorus may not be' 
particularly large (around 7t£ 
voices) but here it made an- 
almighty, although well disci-* 
plined. noise. 

The quanei of Arlccn Au-‘ 
ger. Alfreda Hodgson. Keith. 
Lewis and John Tomlinson 
was scarcely less powerful. 
Tomlinson's huge voice made 
his opening declamation all 
the more effective, while the 
smoothness of Lew is's soaring 
tenor ensured that it com- 
bined well in the passage near 
the end where all the soloists 
sing together. Auger and 
Hodgson, effecting a miracu- 
lous change in style from the 
relative lightness of the 
crisply-done Vivaldi, com- 
plemented each other here. as. 
there, through their fascinat- 
ing contrasts of timbre. 

Stephen Pettitt 


F I T NEXT performances 


Xf 

NATIONAL 

THEATRE 

Olivier: 

-Box Office & 
Credit Cards 
01-9282252 


SUMMER STANDBY 

— any unsold sears 
■ , at low. prices from 
. • iOSm on'day: ■ 


BRECHT & WEILL’s 1928 SMASH HIT 



'*w 


THREEPENNY 





“The GREAT 
Mack the Knife show” ^ 

(Tim Curry plays him) ^ 

Tonight, tomor; Thurat 7.1S. Then Sept 5, 6(mflte). 






14 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


Football hooligans leave trail of destruction in their wake 



. From Robert Scfaoil 
Amsterdam 

Manchester United sup- 
porters returned to Britain 
yesterday from Amsterdam, 
leaving 'behind a trail of 
hooliganism which started last 
Thursday night on the ferry 
taking them from Harwich to 
the Hook of Holland. 

Throughout the weekend 
the soccer fans, in Amsterdam 
to attend a friendly match 
between Manchester United 
and the Dutch dub. Ajax, 
broke windows, brawled In 
bars, attacked cars and pass- 
ers-by and dashed with police 
who used batons and dogs to 
disperse the troublemakers. 

A 19-year-old man was still 
under arrest yesterday for 
having allegedly broken the 
window of a Chinese res- 
taurant. A police spokesman 
said it was undear whether he 
would be charged or expelled 
from the country as an un- 
desirable alien. 

.Another man arrested on 
Sunday night was released, as 
were two men arrested on 
Saturday after no one came 
forward to press charges. 

When the football ended on 
Sunday police had arranged 
for a rapid transfer of the 
British supporters to the Hook 
of Holland, but a group of 
about 60 supporters missed 
their bus and went on the 
rampage in the centre of 
Amsterdam. 

Trouble spots induded 
Amsterdam's red-light dis- 
trict Anticipating trouble, po- 
lice had kept enough cells free 
to accommodate 50 trouble- 
makers. 

• Police guard: The British 
fans were escorted by 10 
Dutch military policemen on 
their way home and had their 
passports taken from them as 
they boarded the Dutch ferTy, 
Koningin Beatrix, at the Hook 
of Holland (Our Foreign Staff 
writes). 

It was the same ship on 
which English fans fought a 
pitched battle last week on 
their way to The Netherlands. 

A Scalink spokesman said the 
crew had agreed “reluctantly" 
to let the supporters back on 
board. 



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British football Ians (above 

The spokesman said the 
ship was in constant contact 
with Seal ink in Harwich dur- 
ing yesterday's crossing and a 
“substantial number" of Brit- 
ish Transport Police were at 
the port to escort the support- 
ers on the boat train to 
Liverpool Street station in 
London. 

• Mr Giles Shaw, the Home 
Office Minister of State, ruled 
out emergency legislation to 
restore corporal punishment 
for football hooliganism. 


left) being rounded np by police in Amsterdam to be sent home on the ferry, while another supporter (right) is taken to a police station after a fight 


Paisley denies reports 
of leadership coup 


Detention law ruled illegal 


Cricket match arrests 


Soccer hooligans calling 
themselves the Derby Lunatic 
Fringe were blamed yesterday 
for violence at a John Player 
League cricket match between 
Derbyshire and Lancashire at 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 
Princess .Anne, Colonel-in- 
Chief, the Royal Corps of 
Signals, takes lunch with the 
Royal Signals Guard on duties 
in Central London, the Officers' 
Mess, St James's Palace. SWI, l. 
New exhibitions 
Gardens in Focus: photo- 
graphs by Heather Angel; ihe 
Ascreavie Watercolours; works 
by Margaret Stones; John Hope 
1725-1786; The Enlightenment 
of Scottish Botany, lnverleith 
House. Royal Botanic Garden, 
Edinburgh; Mon 10 Sat 10 to S, 
Sun 11 10 5 (ends Oct 31) 

Exhibitions in progress 

Claudette Johnson: artist at 
work; work by Jock McFayden 
and Stephen McKenna. City Art 
Gallery. Mosley St. Manchester: 


Buxton. Derbyshire have now 
banned alcohol at matches. 

Serious violence was only 
prevented by a large police 
presence. Four arrests were 
made. 


Mon to Sat 10 to 6. Sun 2 to 6 
(ends Aug 3!) 

Recent works by Neil Can- 
ning. Swan- Gallery, High St, 
Buford; Mon to Sat 9.30 to 5 JO 
(ends Aug 16) 

Papier Mach6 Sculpture by 
Michael Lord and Embroidery 
by Paddy Ramsay, Godfrey & 
Twatt, 7 Westminster Arcade, 
Parliament St, Harrogate; Mon 
to Sat 10 to 5.30 (ends August 
16) 

East German Graphics, Aber- 
deen JArt Gallery, SchoolhiU; 
Mon to Sal 10 to 5, Tburs 10 to 
8. Sun 2 to 5 (ends Aug 16) 

Portraits and Landscapes by 
Derek Hill, the Red BarnGal- 
lery. The Fermoy Centre. King's 
Lynn: Mon to Sat 10 to 5, closed 
i 1 Aug (ends Aug 16) 

Recent paintings by Noel 
Monks. Derby Museum and Art 
Gallery. The Strand; Tues to Sat 


Continued from page 1 
when Mr Paisley's reputation 
is being undermined. 

Mr Paisley was asserting his 
authority yesterday within the 
party and the wider loyalist 
community, with Mr James 
Molyneaux, leader of the Of- 
ficial Unionists, handing them 
an unexpected opportunity by 
announcing he was suspend- 
ing giving interviews and his 
party's weekly press 
conference. 

Mr Molyneaux criticized 
broadcasting authorities for 
showing a preference for mur- 
ders and street politics rather 
than those engaged in the 


electoral process, and he at- 
tacked the media for its atten- 
tion to the seizure by loyalists 
of the village of Clontibrei in 
Co Monaghan. 

Mr Paisley spoke again of 
the danger of civil war, and 
urged loyalists to mobilize. 

He added that if the police 
would not provide protection 
for Protestant leaders, loyal- 
ists would do it themselves. 

Civilian vigilantes were 
guarding Mr Robinson's 
home on the outskirts of 
Belfast last night, and the 
Royal Ulster Constabulary re- 
fused to comment on the 
removal of security from him. 


Continued from page 1 

public order or safety “or that 
person himself”. 

The second regulation per- 
mits the Minister of Law and 
Order, “without notice to any 
person and without hearing 
any person, by written notice 
signed by him and addressed 
to the head of the prison", to 
order any person detained 
under the first regulation to be 
held beyond 14 days for as 
long as the emergency lasts. 

In its ruling the court said 
these provisions were so broad 
that any “persons whose activ- 
ities, actual or potential, were 
in no way related to either the 
existence or the continuance 
of the State of Emeigency, 


might be subject not only to 
arrest but also to summary 
detention for as long as the 
State of Emergency exists”. 

“Thus, for example, every 
common criminal, at any rate 
those with a propensity for 
violence, might be considered 
a threat 10 the safety of the 
public and liable as such to be 
detained summarily for the 
duration of the State of Emer- 
gency, a result which does not 
seem to accord with the object 
of the Act insofar as the 
declaration of a State of 
Emergency is concerned.” 

It seems that the Govern- 
ment could now respond in a 
number of ways. One would 
be to re-draft the offending 


regulations. Altemativelv. it 
could re-arrest released de- 
tainees under permanent se- 
curity legislation which, as the 
result of amendments passed 
by Parliament earlier this 
year, is scarcely less severe 
than the emergency regula- 
tions. 

When the courts recently 
struck down emergency orders 
banning meetings by the UDF 
and other organisations. Presi- 
dent Botha simply re-worded 
them to meet the legal objec- 
tions. Brigadier Chns Swart, 
tbe Divisional Commissioner 
of Police for the Western 
Cape, yesterday used these re- 
drafted orders to ban a mass 
rally planned by the UDF in 
Cape Town for tomorrow. 


Angola 
accuses 
Pretoria 
of raid 

Lisbon (Reuter) — Angola's 
Defence Ministry said yes- 
terday that South African 
troops had attacked the town 
of Cuito Cuanavale in the 
south-east of the country. " 

A statement quoted by the 
official Angolan news agency 
said the South African 32 
“Buffalo” battalion, backed by 
heavy artillery, attacked 
Angolan forces yesterday and 
shelled Cuito Cuanavale, in' 
Cuando Cubango province, 
about 185 miles inside Angola. 
There were no details of 
casualties. 

The South African-backed 
Unite rebels said earlier tint 
their forces had attacked Cuito 
Cuanavale on Saturday night, 
destroying radar equipment, 
anti-aircraft weapons and 
artillery. They accused Ango- 
lan forces of preparing to 
launch a big drive against 
Unita's south-east bases. 

The Angolan statement 
quoted in the news agency 
report, which was monitored in 
Lisbon, said South African air 
and land reconnaissance pa- 
trols had also been detected m 
southern Cunene province over 
the last five days moving 
towards the towns of Cahanw. 
Mupa and Mnlondo. 

It added that South African 
planes and helicopters had 
also moved troops and equip- 
ment to north of Chiede in 
Cnnene province and motor- 
ized units were concentrated 
along the border of neigh- 
bouring Namibia. 

• JOHANNESBURG; A 
spokesman for the South Af- . 
rican Defence Force (SADF) 
said in Pretoria last night that 
it saw no point in commenting 
on Angola's claims “tearing in 
mind tint Unlta already made 
a statement claiming an attack 
on Cuito Cnanavale”(Rgy 
Kennedy writes). 

\ m angolT 

Cahama Cuartaval* [S § 

I _Mulondo • is 

• *«Mupa • If 3 
^ •CMede Mavtn 9* 

NAMIRIA 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,122 


r r r ■ 


MUM 


n i i i i i ii 


n 


10 to 5 (ends Aug 23) 

The Space Between: work by 
Sally Freshwater. Brigitte Gib- 
bon and John Newton, John 
Hansard Gallery, Tbe Univer- 
sity. Southampton; Mon to Sal 
10 to 6 (ends Aug 23) 

People and Places: Past and 
Present. New’ Gallery. Abele 
Tree House, 9 Fore St, Bndleigh 
Salterton; Tues to Sat 10 to 5 
(ends Aug 16) 

Music 

Concert by Concento Vocale, 
St Andrew and St George's, 
George St, Edinburgh, 1. 

Recital by Arlequinade, 
Christ Church, Stockton Lane, 
Heworth Without, 4. 

Recital by the Medici String 
Quartet and Friends, The Folk 
Hall. New Earswick, 8. 

Music by the Academy of St 
Manin-in-the-Fields. Royal i 
Hall. Harrogate, 8. 

Piano recital by Jeremy 
Menuhin. Westmorland Hall. 
Kendal. 8. 

Student concert: diamber 
music by students. Parish 
Church, Hawlcshead, 8. 

Organ recital by Gordon 
Stewart. St Martin's Church. 
Scarborough, 7.30. 

Concert by the Trcgye Festi- 
val Players, the Duchy Gram- 
mar School. Tregye, 8. 

Concert by the Choir of Leeds 
Parish Church. St Mary 
Redd i Re. Bristol, 7J0. 

Talks 

Birds of a Lakeland Valley, by 
Mike Madders. 1.30; Around 
the Lakes in 40 Minutes, by 
David Edmondson. Lake Dis- 
trict National Park Visitor Cen- 
tre. Broekbole, Windermere, 
3.30. 


TV top ten 


Roads 


National lop ion totovMon programmes in 
the wink ending August 3rd: 

BBC 1 

1 Eastondore (Thurs/Sun) l&SOm 

2 Eastandara (Tuos/Sun) 16.05m 

3 Nine O'clock News (Tues) 10.10m 

4 DaSas 9.85m 

5 AIo Aflo 9.80m 

6 Nine O'Ckxk News (Wed]9.4Sm 

7 News and Weather (Sui 2ft52) 
9.00m 

8 Hangar 18 850m 

9 Six OOock News (Mon) 630m 

9 xni Commonwealth Games (The# 
2129) 830m 


London and South - east: A30/ A3H/ 
A3044: Lane dosums at Crooked BUet 
roundabout, Staines. A24: Single ater- 
na» Hne traffic In DoiMng Rd, Epsom; 
temporary lights. A 2: Single tine working 
in Newington High St. Kent from 9am to 
430pm. 

MdffiiKte M& Contraflow E of Kr- 
ntingham twtwasnhjnctlons4A( M42) and 
junction 5 ( A452 Earntingftani East); allow 
extra joimey time. M& Lane closures on 
both carriageways between junction 4 ( 
A38 Beirtingham SW / Bromsgrove) and 
unction 5 ( AS8). Hereford and Worcoatar. 

Ml: Contraflow either side of junction 20 ( 

A427 / Lutterworth). 


nv 

1 Coronation Strom 

2 Coronation Street 

3 Crossroads (Wed) '1035m 

4 Return To Eden (Sun) 10.05m 

5 Crossroads (Thura) 9.85m 

6 EmmerdaJe Farm (T ues) 9.70m 

7 Crossroads (Tues) 9.60m 

8 “Wows at Ten (Mon) 9.50m 

; 9 EmmerdaJe Farm (Thure) 930m 
! 10 Winner Takes Ati 030m 

BBC2 

1 The Paul Darnels Magic Show 630m 

2 Shane 5.15m 

3 Jenmfa 4.60m 

4 George Washington (S 435m 

5 xni Commonwealth Games (M 
435m 

6 Moonlighting 4.15m 

7 The Travel Show 4.05m 

8 Fame (Wed) 330m 

9 George Washington (Tues) 3A5m 
10 Sunday Grandstand 3.45m 

Channel 4 

1 Brooksade (Mon/Sat) 830m 

2 Brooksrka (Tues/SaQ 5.75m 

3 The CosOy Show 390m 

4 American FbottwU 3.65m 

5 Golden Gals 2.95m 

6 St. Bsewhere 230m 

7 The Pnce (Thurs) 2.75m 

8 The Wt Curran Rado Show 2.70m 

9 The Pnce (Tues) 230m 
10 The Pnce (Wed) 230m 


Breakfast t at ev M cm The average 




Community aid 

Free copies of Community 
Enterprise . a booklet published 
by The Times and the CaJouste 
Gulbenkian Foundation, giving 
details of how local group 
initiative has transformed many 
inner - city areas, and hints on 
how the scheme can be ex- 
panded. are still available from 
Community Enterprise, Dept 
JD1. the Beacon Press, 33 CUfle 


who viewed far at least three mmujes): 

8BC1: BnnktMSt Time: Mon to Fri 
1.4m (7.7rrt) 

TV-am: Good Morning Britain Mon to Fri 
2.4m (10.4m) Sat 29m (53m) 

Sun 1.4m 1 123m) 

Broadcasters' Audence Research Board. 




North U Contraflow between juno 
tion 7{ RamnBjand Bcxtorwood Sendees. 
M6i: made lane ckmuraa on both 
carriageways at Btaoow Bridge, oration 
of Mol and MB, watton Summit A1& 
Lane closures on both car riagew a ys at 
junction with B1432 Murton stip road 

Scotland: A96e Road dosed W of 
Fomas: diversion. A77: Contraflow at 
Meems Cross. Glasgow, Strathclyde. 
KXfc New oomraflow between junctions 5 
and 6 nr Kinross. 

Information suppled by AA 

Anniversaries 

Births: Thomas Bewick, artist, 
wood engraver and naturalist. 
Newcastle, 1753; George IV 
(reigned Jan 29. 1 820 - June 26, 
1830). London, 1762; Robert 
Southey, Bristol, 1774. 

Deaths: WHfiam Blake, Lon- 
don. 1827; George Stephenson. 
Chesterfield, Derbyshire, 1848; 
Sir WBUam Jackson Hooker, , 
botanist. Kew, Surrey, 1865; 
James Lowed, poet, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, 1891: Nils Eric 
Nordenskjkrld, geologist and ex- 
plorer, Dalbyo, Sweden. 1901; 
Arthur Griffith, Irish, national- 
ist. Dublin. 1922; Leos Janfifefc, 
composer. Moravska Ostrava, 
Czechoslovakia. 1928; Thomas 
Mann, novelist, Zurich, 1955; 
Ian Fleming, Canterbury. 1964. 


Weather 

forecast 

The United Kingdom 
lies in an area of slack 
pressure. England and 
Wales and eastern Scot- 
land will have fog patches 
at first, with sunny peri- 
ods developing. Scattered 
showers in SE and south- 
ern central England. 

6 am to midnight 

London, SE, oantal S England, 
East AngRa, E, W MdtwKls, Chan- 
nel Islands: Fog patches at first, 
sunny periods and scattered show- 
ers developing; wind m ainly east- 
erly, light max temp 21 to 23c (70 to 

E.NE England, Borden: Cloudy, 
sunny intervals; wind easterly, tight, 
max temp 18 to 20C (64 to 6 BF) 
cooler on coasts. 

SW, NW, central N England, S, N 
Wales: Fog patches at first dry 
sunny periods developing; wind 
variable, light; max temp 2? to 23C 
(70to73R. 

Lake District We of Man, Edin- 
burgh, Dundee, Aberdeen, SW, NE 
Scotland, Glasgow, central High- 
lands, Moray Firth: Fog patches at 
first, dry sunny periods; wind vari- 
abfcUjght; max temp 18 to 20C (64 

Argyfl, Northern Ireland: Dry, 
sunny intervals at first cloud 
spreading from W; wind southerly, 
light max temp 17 to 19C (63 to 


NOON TODAY Pwm im i 


i hi mPtbnia HtONtt WnT cold A o&£d| 

1 MOIl » ■Oi.a mV j •4fall 






NOON TODAY 




High Tides 


NW Scotland: Cloudy to overcast 
perhaps some rain talar; wind 
southerly, I Wit or moderate; max 
temp 15 to 17C (59 to 63F). 

Orkney, Shetland: Dry. sunny 
periods: wind variable, felt; max 
temp 15 to f7C (59 to 63 F)T 
Outlook (or next 48 houra: Sunny 
periods and showers: near normal 
temperatures. 






u-uiue sky; bc-Uue sky and cloud: c 
dowdy; iwwasi: ( for- d-drtzde; h- 
ludi: mtsi-mtst: t rain: s-snow; m- 
ttiunderslorm: p-showen. 

Arrows Show wind direction, wtnd 
s p ee d (mpm circled Tem p er a ture 
centigrade. 


TODAY AM 

London Bridge 6.49 

Abenleea 6.09 

AvonmooBi 
Belfast 4.00 

Cardiff 1138 

Devorpott 1029 

□over 3.47 

Faknoulti 939 

Gteaoow 522 

HanMdi 4.48 

HoMwed 3j04 

Hnfl 11.13 

Utinco H iw 11.02 

LaHfi 739 

Uverpool 337 

Lowestoft 234 

Margate 435 

IHtodHmn 11.17 

Nowgtiay 10.13 

Oban 1039 

Psnzenoe 938 

Portland 1137 

PortsmoaBi 4.18 

Shorataoi 335 

So u t ham pton 338 

Swansea 11.17 

Tees 838 

WTton-on-N*» 4,43 

Tkfe tnsssurad kt met 


Around Britain 


SnniteM 


1 541 am ' 

830 pm 

iM A MooqvIms 

Moon asta 

First qoaner wnanoSF 


Lighting-up time 


Sun Rain 
hrs in 

EAST COAST 
ScwrtMTO 2.1 

BridUngton 33 

Cromar 43 

Lowutoft 6.8 

Ctacton 73 .01 

Margate 
soifm coast 
FMkeatoM 103 
Haanings 73 - 

Eaaffaoome 9.7 

Brighton 9.7 

Worthing S3 - 


18 61 cloudy 
17 83 doudy 
20 68 sunny 
20 68 sunny 

20 68 sunny 

21 70 bright 


Sun Rain 
hrs tn 

ntracaedw - 32 
Tenby - 31 

Colwyn Bay 9.1 

■4 —teaish ■ A O 

rauiP Cmm pti Clo - 

Douglas 1.1 


eiGLMJD AND WALES 
London 53 
Bliam Alrpt 13 .12 
Bristol (Ctri) 1.1 26 
CardflpM) 03 36 

U : 

N hw ic tt e sto r 03 - 

NoUDgtnn 0.7 .05 
hTcW-n-Tyna 9.9 
Ceffisie 12 j 


HT N HT 
85 630 63 

43 834 16 

- 12.11 113 
33 425 3.1 
103 

43 10.44 43 

6.0 4.08 61 

4.7 10.14 47 

4.9 631 43 

3.7 436 33 

5.3 3.36 49 

B.8 1131 83 

8.0 1121 83 

5.1 8.12 43 

83 427 83 

2.1 228 2 A 

4.4 435 43 

6.1 1138 62 

6.1 1035 62 . 

33 1036 3.4 
4.9 935 49 

1.6 

4.3 432 4A 
5.6 422 5.7 

4.1 4.13 42 

8.4 11.41 8-4 

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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


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r THE 



TIMES 


15 

SPORT 26 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 29 


TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


, 'nit* t 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


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STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 

1228.7 (+11.3) 

FT-SE 100 

1542.8 (+16.1) 

Bargains 

22908 

USM (Datastream) 

120.18 (+0.1) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 

1.4845 (+0.0100) 

W German marie 
3.0573 (+0.0051) 
Trade- weighted 
71.1 (+0J2) 


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Jobbers 
defect 

' Smith New Court, the stock 
market dealing arm of NM 
Rothschild, the merchant 
bank, has lost eight key 
employees to Morgan Gren- 
fell. which is building up an 
equity research team. 

The defections include Mr 
Richard Harwood. Smith 
New Court’s only top-ranked 
analyst, who was winner of 
both the Institutional Investor 
and Continental Illinois sur- 
veys of stockbrokers’ analysts 
for the office eq uipment sector 
last year. He took with him 
two "electronics analysts, Mr 
Ricbaid Goodwin and Mr 
Marlin Marbutt. 

In addition, five of Smith 
New Court's traded options 
team have gone, leaving only 
Mr Tony Grosz in place. 

These recruits are some 
compensation for the loss 
suffered last week by Morgan 
Grenfell when its 
pharmaceutical team left only 
months after being recruited 
from Quitter Gooaison, an- 
other stockbroking firm. 

I DG ahead 

Transport Development 
Group lifted interim pretax 
profits for the first half to June 
30 by 36 per cent to £15-5 
million. Turnover was up 8.7 
per cent to £249 million and 
the dividend was raised OJp 
to 2p- 

Tempus, page 16 

Stone lower 

Profits at Stone Inter- 
national. the systems, enh 
gineering company, fell from 
£734 million to £6.09 million 
before tax in the year to May 
31. Turnover rose from £78.7 
million to £100 million. The 
final dividend is up from 
192p to 3-22p. 

Tempos, page 16 

£4m deal 

Dataserv has begun its 
planned expansion into the 
British computer mainte- 
nance market by acquiring 
Compelgroup for £4-2 million 
through the issue of 2.6 mil- 
lion new shares, representing 
7.83 per cent of Dataserv’s 
enlarged capital. 

New security 

The Stock Exchange has 
agreed to consider listing 
property income certificates 
and to admit members of the 
PINCs Association to cor- 
porate Stock Exchange 
membership. Property in- 
come certificates are securities 
designed to provide investors 
with a readily tradeable 
investment in property. 

Share buy-in 

Kone (UK) intends to ac- 
quire compulsorily all 
outstanding Biddle Holdings 
shares after receiving accep- 
tances for 90.3 per cent of the 
ordinary shares and 92.1 per. 
cent of the preference shares. 


Tempos 1 6 Traded Opts 17 
Cmpoy News 16 Mooey Mrkts 17 
Weft Street 16 Unit Trusts 19 
Comment 17 Commodities 19 
Stock Market 17 USM Prices 19 
Foreign Exch 17 Share Pres 20 


Gold price leaps 
to highest level 
for 28 months 


Gold yesterday jumped to 
its highest fixing price in 
London since March, 1984 
amid fears that South Africa 
might retaliate against inter- 
national sanctions by cutting 
off the exports of precious 
metals. 

The price was set at $394.50 
an ounce in the morning after 
a dosing price of $36938 on 
Friday. The surge was led by a 
strong demand for platinum, 
the morning price of which 
was fixed at $562 an ounce, 
$59.75 higher than on Friday 
afternoon. 

Dealers reported worldwide 
demand for both metals, with 
hectic trading in the morning. 
South Africa accounts for half 
the western world's gold sup- 
plies and more than 80 per 
cent of its platinum. 

In Zurich, where there was 
heavy buying, gold was quoted 
at a high of around $398 an 


By Teresa Poole 
ounce while platinum, which a 
year ago cost $235 an ounce, 
reached $565. 

Analysts were divided over 
whether the gold "price would 
go through the psychologically 
important $400 level. 

But by the afternoon there 
had been some profit taking 
and gold was fixed at $388 an 
ounce, with -platinum at 
$5443. 

Gold dealers said that 
yesterday's sudden rise was 
mainly because of technical 
factors as speculators, who 
had been selling short, moved 
to cover their positions in a 
finning market. 

The gold price has strength- 
ened from around $336 over 
the past two months in re- 
action to a felling dollar, 
declining interest rates and 
fears of a downturn in equity 
markets. The recent surge 
began late last week. 


1 'ion ! 


Source: DATASTREAM 1 

. 

► 


GOLD 


380- 

Dollars per oz 

■ — - 



1 350 
|340 


N D J F M A M J J A 


Mr . Heinrich Looser, chief 
economist at Switzerland's 
Bank Julius Baer, said:' "The 
gains in precious metals signal 
a change in investor percep- 
tions. What we are seeing is 
people selling dollars and 
going into gold under the 'safe 
haven’ theory.” Gold is tra- 
ditionally seen as an invest- 
ment for times of 
international tension and 
crises. 

He added: "Gold could 
easily go over $400 and I don't 
rule out substantially higher 
levels." 

Mr Robert Weinberg, min- 
ing analyst at James Cdpel, the 
stockbrokers, predicted a trad- 
ing range of between $360 and 
5400 and said that the move- 
ment was technical although 
there was a firm underlying 
situation. 

“Resistances on the way up 
tend to become supports on 
the way down." 

But some dealers thought 
that gold and platinum prices 
had risen too quickly, and that 
the gains could soon be wiped 
out by further profit taking. 

Mr Hans Mast senior eco- 
nomic adviser at Credit Suisse 
First Boston, said prices 
would soon encounter resis- 
tance unless the threat of 
disruption to supplies from 
South Africa led to actual 
disruption. 

He added: “I don’t see any 
great advantages in investing 
m gold at the moment, apart 
from the South Africa factor. 


Maccess 
in £10m 
buy-out 

By Our City Staff 

The latest disposal by 
Burmah Oil of its non-main- 
stream businesses was an- 
nounced yesterday with the 
sale ofMaccess Limited.. . 

Britain's largest ' chain of 
automotive cash and carry 
wholesalers is being purchased 
by the Maccess management 
for more than £10 million. 

The team of 30 senior 
managers will have an initial 
20 per cent stake in the 
company, but this could rise 
significantly if the company 
meets the target of a stock 
market listing id two to three 
years' time. 

The west Yorkshire-based 
business is a wholesaler of 
motor parts and accessories to 
garages, accessory shops and 
large multiple retailers. It 
made trading profits of £13 
million on sales of £56 million 
in 1985. 

The sale includes the Stax 
hardware distribution busi- 
ness in Manchester which lost 
£300,000 in 1985, reduced 
from £13 million the previous 
year. It is likely to be sold on 
within six months. 

The Maccess management 
team plans to expand the eight 
cash and carry depots and to 
examine the potential of other 
forms of distribution to the 
automotive markeL 

Burmah has now virtually 
completed its programme of 
disposals, which has included 
the sale of its oil and gas 
interests, the Quinton Hazell 
automotive products division, 
the loss-making Bahamas 
terminal and Rawlplug. 

Its policy now is to continue 
to expand the company's cho- 
sen mainstream businesses — 
lubricants and speciality 
chemicals. 


HAT fights £89 
bid from BET 


By Alison Eadfe 

HAT. the painting, cleaning 
and plant hire group, yes- 
terday launched its defence 
document against BETs £89 
million bid and announced 
the sale of its glass division to 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 




New Yoik 

Dow Jones 1804.70 (+224)8) 

Tokyo 

Ndckei DOW 17479.11 (+43.58) 

Hong Kong: 

1927.04 (-4.25! 






v>'.. 

■_ j\ 

cr**\ 


: Gen 293.0 (+2. 

' Sydney: AO 1 153.9 (+0, 

Frankfurt 

"Commerzbank 2014.5 (+62,5) 

Brussels: 

General 787.24 (+8-02) 

■ Paris: CAC 380.4 (+23) 

"Zurich: 

_ SKA General n(a 

London dosing prices Page 20 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-month Interbank 9 Z8 3S- H S2% 
3-month eligible tjffls.-eH-8 ,a rc% 
buying rate 

Prime Rata 8% 

Federal Funds B*i«% 

, 3-month Treasury Bins 5.67-5.66% 

I 30-year bonds 98X-98 ,s i# 


CURRENCIES 


** . 


Loodon; 

E SI .4845 
£: DM3.0573 
& SwFr2-4568 

&FFr9J2e9 
£: Yan228.17 
fc Matin. 1 


NewYoric 
£.*$1.4870 
$: DM2.0605 
5: index: 110.6 

ECU £0.693453 

SDR £0.817133 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

Glaxo 

Lucas. 


980p 

525p 


ll Ins 814p 

W4R Jacobs 155p 

Norman Hay 185p 

Wace „ — — — .. 68p 

WPP Group 520p 

TCI 335p 


York Mount _ 

Stone Int 

Bartow Rand _ 
S A Breweries 

Unilever 

Manch Ship ... 
Saatehi 


— 75p 

- 164p 
■ 2S5p 


148p 

1770p 
- 670p 


383p 


Blue Arrow 

Gus 'A' 1025p 

Ladbroke 353p(+14p) 


+I2pl 

I+12P 

|SS 

+sp) 

:+j|| 

N 

+22p) 

+ 20 p) 


•m 


FALLS: 

Blue Circle. 


SW Farmer 


54lp(-12p; 


Cramphom 330p(-l5p; 


2*P -!§p 


GOLD 


London flxjng! „„ „ 

SS&SSS&W- 

28130) 

to!l«OT0.6(M91.10 


north sea oil 


Brent (Sept) pm $1330 
' Denotes latest trading 


3.45) 


Heywood Williams for . £10 
million. • 

. It also said it was bolding 
discussions about the sale of 
its merchaming division, 
which could only go ahead if 
HAT remained independent 

The glass sale, described as 
the first move in HATs 
strategy for growth, reduces its 
gearing to 15 per cent, which 
compares with a 
‘‘debilitating” 95 per cent 
gearing at BET, according to 
HATs calculations, which ex- 
cluded minorities and 
intangibles. 

BET calculated its year-end 
gearing at 65 per cent and said 
yesterday that gearing had 
now dropped below 60 per 
cent 

Mr David Telling, HATs 
chairman, attacked BET for 
its “history of- U-turns” in 
such areas as television and 
video rental, computers and 
cable TV. He criticised Mr 
Nicholas Wills. BETs chair- 
man, for selling 100,000 BET 
shares at 380p this year, when 


HAT shareholders are being 
asked to accept BET shares at 
more than 400p. 

HAT claims that BET is 
trying to buy its businesses, 
excluding . the cleaning and 
glass divisions, for only £58-2 
million, “representing a mi- 
serly historic p/e ratio of 8.8". 

BET pointed out that 
HATs share price dropped 
from I20p in 1983 to 94p a 
month ago, a period when 
BETs shares more than dou- 
bled, It also attacked HATs 
policy for growth as one of 
making poor investments. 

BETs agreed £29.3 million 
bid for Brengreen. the contract 
cleaning company, was further 
complicated yesterday when 
Hawley Group announced 
that it had raised its stake in 
Brengreen to 22 per cent. 
When BET launched its bid 
Hawley held just 10 per cent. 

Hawley directors were un- 
available for comment on the 
Brengreen stake or on ru- 
mours that Hawley had also 
acquired a stake in HAT. 

BET shares dosed yesterday 
down 5p at 403p, valuing 
HAT shares at J I5p (ex BETs 
final dividend) againsi a dos- 
ing HAT price ofl33p. 


Peat leads as receiver 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Peat Marwick leads the field 
among accountancy firms 
called in to act as receivers of 
failed enterprises, according to 
the latest survey conducted by 
Dun & Bradsireet, business 
information specialists. 

In the first half of th is year 
Coopers Lybrand/Cork Gully 
was left in second place and 
Gram Thornton slipped to 
third place from top position 
last year among the most 
sought-after accountancy 
firms for receivership 
appointments. 

Peat Marwick held third 


place in the same period last 
year. 

This year Touche Ross 
moved up from eighth to 
fourth place while Price 
Waterhouse jumped from 
tenth to fifth. 

The top five accountancy 
firms handled 44 per cent of 
S76 receivership appoint- 
ments made in the first half of 
this year, 6 per cent less than 
the same period last year. 

Deloitte Haskins & Sells 
dropped from fourth to eighth 
place 



Mr James Arnold, an 1G dealer, monitors the company's indexes (Photograph: Alan 

Weller) 

Odds narrow as City betting 
becomes a two-horse race 


Punters determined to lose 
their shirt in the City now have 
an easier choice about who to 
lose h with. Where there were 
three runners in the Financial 
Betting Stakes, there are now 
two, after the announcement 
that IG Index is to boy the 
financial betting division of 
Lad broke. leaving it in a head- 
to-head race with City Index. 

The financial betting world 
is where TattersalJs comes to 
Throgmorton Street, allowing 
hardened gamblers to swap 
the turf for the ticker tape 
while offering added excite- 
ment to City investors in case 
conventional stocks, futures, 
bonds and currencies start to 
pall. 

In essence, it allows a bet to 
be placed on a plethora of 
financial markets free from 
the tiresome chore of having to 
pay capital gains tax, or 
indeed any tax. Another 
advantage, according to Mr 
Stuart Wheeler, managing 
director of IG, is that it can 
often be far quicker and easier 
to place a bet than in one of the 
underlying markets. 

Indexes are quoted with a 
spread which investors can 
buy at the higher rate or sell at 


By Richard Lander 
the lower one, depending on 
their view of the market 

Yesterday morning, IG nas 
quoting the FT 30 share index 
at 1,236-1.243. A bullish 
punter would then buy the 
index for £5 a point or more, 
hoping that the stock market 
and therefore the index itself, 
rose sufficiently to allow him 
to sell at a profit. If the sell 
price increases to 1,282, he 
would make £185 — £5 limes 
the rise from the original 1,243 
buying rate. Should the mar- 
ket turn the wrong way. the 
reverse applies and a loss can 
easily outweigh the notional 
stake. 

The frightening size of these 
potential losses, especially in 
volatile markets, means that 
betters tend to be City pro- 
fessionals rather than 
racegoers, who are used ' to 
losing no more than their 
stake. 

Mr Chris Hales, joint 
managing director of City, is 
happy for things to stay that 
way. “If professionals lose, 
they lose, but an ordinary chap 
can get very upset if the stock 
market suddenly turns sour." 
Mr Wheeler, however, wel- 
comes his wide variety of 
customers, who he says range 


from doctors and dentists to 
retired civil servants. 

Apart frnra stocks, the 
financial bookmakers also of- 
fer indexes in gold, gilts, 
commodities, options and cur- 
rencies. They have also 
branched out into sport and 
politics, offering indexes on 
anything from the next elec- 
tion date (October IS to 
November 12 next year at IG) 
to the number of points scored 
in the home rugby onion 
championships. 

City has come np with 
perhaps the most ingenious 
bet short of punting on the 
number of pedestrians cross- 
ing Waterloo Bridge — the 
sum of the numbers or the 
winning horses at a race 
meeting. 

Perhaps the one safe bet is 
that the financial bookmakers 
themselves are making money 
— Mr Hales said City made 
about £750,000 in 1985. its 
second year of operation. 

Bnt like their counterparts 
in the silver ring, they have no 
recourse to the law should 
customers decide not to pay 
up. “Bad debts are otzr biggest 
problem,*' said Mr Hales. 
“We write them off but hope 
they might pay up one day". 


Addison’s 
bid offer 
in doubt 

By Cliff Feltham 

Takeover talks which 
sprang a leak put the future of 
a merger between Addison 
Consultancy, a public rela- 
tions group, and Aidcom 
international, the market re- 
search company, in the bal- 
ance yesterday. 

Mr Pratt Thompson, 
Aidcom ’s chairman, had con- 
firmed weekend reports that 
an approach had been made 
by Addison, the acquisitive 
group formed out of the 
merger of Addison Page and 
Cheiwynd Streets. 

“We told Addison we were 
planning to issue the state- 
ment. The approach came 
from them a week ago. Our 
share price has come down 
and 1 suppose this has not 
escaped their attention. Nego- 
tiations over price and other 
matters are jsiill going on.” he 
said. 

Addison, however, did not 
agree with Mr Thompson's 
version of events. Its chief 
executive. Mr Sieve Smith, 
said: “We were aware they 
intended to pul out a state- 
ment but we were not told 
they were going to mention us 
by name, which puts us in the 
position of having to explain 
our intentions. We have put 
an offer on the table and it is 
now up to them. We think ihe 
commercial logic of a get- 
together is overwhelming.” 


GT rescue 
for Berry 

GT Management has res- 
cued the Berry Trust whose 
funds it manages, by buying 
6.2 million shares in concert 
with five other institutions. 
The 19.6 per cent slake, 
acquired for £16.9 million, 
takes the concert party stake 
W27.4 percent 
Berry is fighting an £86 
million bid from Ensign Trust, 
which is 80 per cent-owed by 
the Merchant Navy Pension 
Fund. It holds an 1 1.7 per cent 
stake in GT. which it reduced 
from 28.2 per cent when GT 
came to the stock market last 
month. 

The other concert party 
members include: KJeinwon 
Benson. Baring Brothers. The 
Bank of Bermuda. The US 
Debenture Corporation and 
Assurance Groupe de Paris. 

Ensign has a 9 per cent stake 
in Berry, which with shares 
held by two Merchant Navy 
funds managed by Ensign, 
adds up.lo to 22 per cent. 


Gas survey tean 
going to Oman 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


The natural gas fields of 
Oman are to be surveyed by 
British Gas consultants, who 
will provide a . detailed en- 
gineering analysis of the 
equipment nsed in the 
Sultanate. 

British Gas engineers mon- 
itor the natural gas fields in 
the adjoining United Arab 
Emirates, where they also 
advise on equipment and 
working procednres. 

The new contract with 
Oman which, nnlike its Arab 
Gulf neighbours, is not a 
member of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Conn- 
tries, could lead to British 
manufacturers winning con- 
tracts to provide plant and 
equipment. 

‘ The Sultanate has discov- 
ered new oil and gas reserves. 


and it is preparing a five-year 
plan to use its gas reserves to 
improve power generation and 
water desalination plants. 

A British Gas team of 
engineers will provide exper- 
tise on new distribution sys- 
tems, including the setting np 
of estates for industries using 
gas. 

BritoiL the Glasgow-based 
company, is negotiating to 
acquire the production licence 
for a potential oil-bearing 
block in the western desert of 
Egypt from the state oil com- 
pany. the Eqyptian General 
Petroleum Corporation. 

Four blocks are under offer 
In the western desert by the 
Egyptian government, and 
Britoil will act os operator in 
collaboration with ICI and 
LASMO. 


Henry Ansbacher 
doubles profits 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


Henry Ansbacher, the mer- 
chant bank, yesterday sig- 
nalled its recovery from near- 
collapse two years ago by 
unveiling doubled pretax prof- 
its al the half-way stage this 
year and the likelihood of a 
reinstatement of dividends. 

The bank's profits to June 
30 rose from £ 1 .5 million to £3 
million, with the operating 
profit up from £1.3 million to 
£18 million. Ansbacher's 
shares rose 3p to 76p. 

Mr Richard Fenhalls. the 
chairman, said: "We have 
certainly been helped by 
favourable market conditions, 
but these results show clearly 
that Ansbacher has shaken off 
the past.” 

At the end of 1984. the bank 
suffered losses of £31.4 mil- 
lion before being rescued by 
the Belgian group. 
Pargesa/GBL. 

The pretax result does not 
include the £5.35 million 
profit from the sale of 


Ansbacher and Paigesa's 20 
per cent stake in Brown 
Shipln’, the merchant bank, in 
June for £23 million. 

Mr Fenhalls said that the 
profit from the deal would go a 
long way to helping Ansbacher 
reinstate dividend payments, 
which was almost certain to 
happen 31 the end of this year. 

The figure was also not 
included in the calculation of 
disclosed earnings per share, 
which rose from Ip to I.5p. 

Ansbacher ‘5 increase in 
profits derived mostly Prom an 
improved performance by the 
merchant bank, where operat- 
ing profits rose by £1.5 million 
10 £2.68 million. 

The insurance broking op- 
eration produced £675.000. 
compared with £1 million last 
time, while shipbroking broke 
even after a £620.000 loss at 
the same time last year. 

The bank's net tangible 
assets were £53 million, com- 
pared with £44.5 million last 
year. 


Price of 
materials 
plunges 
by 3.4% 

By Richard Thomson 

A sharp fall in the cost of 
essential raw materials used 
by manufacturing industry 
helped to limit the rise in the 

S irice of finished goods at 

aciory gates last month. 

The input cost of raw 
materials fell by 3.4 per cent 
during the month, the biggest 
one-month foil since June. 
1963 - but rising unit wage 
costs are continuing to push 
up the price of finished goods. 

The price of manufactured 
goods over the same period 
increased by 0.1 per cent. 
During the past 12 months, 
however, prices of manufac- 
tured goods increased by 4.4 
per cent, but this is still the 
smallest annualized increase 
since July N?2. according to 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry. 

The sharp drop in raw 
material prices was mainly 
because of a fall in petroleum^ 
prices and the lower cost of 
food materials. DTI officials 
said. 

July's monthly fall com- 
pares" with one of 1.3 per cent 
in June. Measured over 12 
months, input prices fell by 
9.8 per cent compared with 8.6 
per cent the previous month. 

The DTI said that raw 
material prices represented 
only about one third of manu- 
facturing costs. Rising wage 
costs were having a contrary 
effect, resulting in a slight rise 
in factory gate prices. 

The seasonally-adjusted 
monthly fall in input prices 
was 2.5 per cent compared 
with 0.9 per cent in June and a 
rise of 0.2 percent in May. 

Final retail sales figures for 
June, announced yesterday, 
showed a bigger-than-pre- 
dicted increase in sales vol- 
ume. Buoyant conditions on 
the high street led 10 a nse to 
122.4 in the retail sales index 
over the three months to June. 

It is a record figure for the 
index and represents a rise of 2 
per cent on the previous ihree 
months and of 4.5 per cent on 
the corresponding period last 
year. 

DTI officials attributed the 
increase to better weather and 
early June sales after a sluggish 
period for retailers earlier in 
the year. Household goods 
sold particularly welt, officials 
said. 

The seasonally-adjusted in- 
crease for June was 3.5 per 
cent, compared with pro- 
visional estimates of 3.2 per 
cent. In May the index fell by 
0.9 per cent. 

Consumer credit also re- 
ceived a boost in June, rising 
to £2.57 billion from £2.37 
billion in May. 

The June figure was still 
lower than the unusually large 
amount of £2.74 billion lent 
by banks, retailers and finance 
houses in April. 


Nigeria set to 
devalue naira 

Lagos (Reuter) - A foreign 
exchange market which 
should sha^ly devalue the 
Nigerian naira, could open as 
soon as October. 

It will do away with 
Nigeria's cumbersome import 
licensing system, criticized as 
open to abuse and corruption, 
and could help Nigeria to 
reach a debt rescheduling 
agreement with creditors. The 
World Bank is providing a 
$400 million loan for the new 
exchange market. 


} 

IENRY ANSBACHE 

R 

HOLDINGS P L ( 

1 

•j 


INTERIM RESULTS 


Profit before taxation 
Pmfit after taxation 
Extraordinary profit 
Profit attributable to shareholders 


HALF YEAR ENDED 

30June 

1986 

£’000 

30 September 
.loss 
JEUOO 

3,060 

1.485 

2,161 

1,158 

5.350 

— 

7,511 

1.158 


Earnings per share 

(calculated before extraordinary pmfil) 


I.5p 


J.Op 



lv J ££ 

HENRY ANSBACHER HOLDINGS PLC 


One Mitre Square. London EC5A SAN 






16 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


St- 


WALL STREET 


Early gain for Dow 

New York (Renter) — Wall Sunshine Mining led the 
Street shares moved higher in most active issues, up ft to 3Y*. 
early trading yesterday, NL Industries rase 4 7 s to 4& 
helped by the bond market and Mr Harold Simmons raised 
expectations that the sluggish his stake in NL to 51 per cent, 
economy will bring discount possibly ending the company's 
rate cuts. A rise in precious efforts to remain independent. 
meal prices boosted raining ^ transportation a ,eragc 

sh s s ‘r^_ , . a , iras op 2.75 points at 71543. 

The Dow Jooes radusmal added 0.60 points to 

average was ap 10.55 pome at rtach 204i60 and stocks were 

■iiMonshra " ° f 15 " p4 - 01 |wints * 69 1-45. 

Advancing issues led dedin- Elsewhere, the Standard 
ing issues by a margin of eight and Poors 100 index rase 14)7 
to three. points to show 223.74. 



7 

Aug 


7 

r 


7 

9* 

AMH 


51 

Firestone 

23% 

23% 

Pfaer 

66 % 

67% 

ASA 

3d 

31V, 

Fst Chicago 

29% 

29% 

PhetPsDge 

19* 

19 

AltadScnal 

39 

4(1% 

FstlntBncp 


62% 

map Mrs 

PhttpsP* 

89* 

69% 

Allied Sirs 


4ft 

FstPennC 

/% 

7% 

9* 

9* 


3 

3% 

Ford 

54% 

54% 

Potartud 

62* 

62* 


34V. 

34 

FTWachva 

41 

40% 

PPG Ind 


BO 


11 % 

17% 

GAP Carp 

31% 

31% 

PrctfGnw 

76* 

78 


16 % 

18% 

GTE Corp 

53V. 

53% 

PDSE4G 

42* 

43 

Am Brands 

92 

92% 

Gen Carp 

85% 

65% 

Raytheon 
RCA Cora 
RynldsMet 

61% 

61% 

Am Can 

Am Cynm’d 

B7’.« 

82 

85% 

80% 

GenDy'mcs 
Gen EVectnc 

71% 

73% 

71% 

73% 


nta 

40 


28* 

28% 


19% 

19% 

Rockwell Int 

47% 

42 

Am Express 
Am Home 

60 

89'4 

59% 

89V, 

Gen Mils 
Gen Motors 

86 % 

70% 

87 

71% 

Royal Dutch 
Safeways 

81 

65% 

81% 

65V. 


2 % 

2 % 

GnPbUtny 

22 

21 % 

Sara Lee 

66 % 

68 % 

AmSt'nrd 

37 V. 

37% 

Genesca 

3 

3% 

SFESopac 

30% 

30 

AmTeleph 

?3% 

23% 

Georgs Pac 

29% 

30% 

ScttRjerger 

29% 

30 


Kltt 

62 

GHIete 

44% 

43% 

Scot! Paper 

59 

58% 


7% 

7% 

Goodrich 

36% 

36% 

Seagram 

58* 

58* 


13 

12 % 

Goodyear 

31% 

31% 

Sears Rhck 

42% 

42% 


54% 

54% 

18% 

18% 

9w< Trans 

49* 

49% 

Al Richfield 

5?% 

51% 

Grace 

48% 

48% 

Sirar 

SnvrkkiBk 

51* 

52% 

Avon Prods 

32% 

33 

Gt AttSTac 

24% 

25 

90* 

91* 

SfvsTstNY 

47 '4 

47% 

Gfhnd 

30% 

31% 

Sony 

Sth Cal Ed 

19% 

19% 


13% 

13% 

Gruman Cor 

73V. 

24 

35% 

35% 


3944 

39% 

Gun 8 West 

63% 

63% 

Sperry Core 
StdOvOfeo 

75* 

75% 

Bank of NY 

65 

64% 

HanzHJ. 

45% 

45% 

45 

44* 

Bern steel 

8'4 

8 % 

Hercules 

50 

49% 

Sterling Org 
Stevens JP 

47% 

47% 


58% 

58% 

H'lett-Pkrd 

39 vs 

39% 

32* 

32* 

BseCascde 

51% 

SI* 

Honeywell 

Kinds 

62% 

B3% 

Sim Comp 

49% 

49% 

Brdert 

*5% 

45% 

73% 

23* 

Tetocfyne 

308% 

309 


m 

32 

litgersofl 

58% 

57% 

Tenneco 

37% 

38% 


78% 

79% 

18 V. 

18% 

Texaco 

30% 

30* 

BP 

34'/. 

35% 

IBM 

130 

131 

Texas ECor 

?fi% 

26 

BurTton Ind 

35% 

35% 

INCO 

11 % 

11 % 

Texas Inst 

110 

105* 

Buriton Ntn 

53% 

52% 

int Paper 

64% 

63% 

Texas UtUs 

34% 

34* 

Burroughs 

CmpbefiSp 

67% 

67% 

Tei Tel 

52% 

51 

Textron 

57% 

53% 

62% 

63 

Inn nq Bank 

50V. 

50% 

TravfrsCor 

44% 

44V. 

Can Pacific 

11 

10V. 

Jhnsn & Jhn 

b 8 % 

67% 

TRW me 

100 % 

100 * 

Caierpmer 

46% 

46% 

Kawer Alum 

14% 

13% 

UAL Inc 

49% 

50% 

Cetanese 

208% 

207% 

Kerr McGee 

25V. 

25% 

Uniiaver NV 

214% 

212 % 

Central SW 

34% 

33% 

KmO'ly Clrk 

84 

84% 

Un Carbide 

29% 

20 * 

Champion 

23% 

23% 

K Mari 

51 

51% 

Un Pac Cor 

54% 

54 

Chase Man 

3851 

■39% 

Kroger 

L.T.V. Corp 

62 

61% 

Utd Brands 

28% 

28% 

ChmBkNY 

46% 

46% 

2 % 

2 % 

US Steel 


"if* 

Chevron 

40 

40% 

Litton 

77 

75 

Utd Techno! 

41* 

Ctnyster 

37 

37% 

Lockheed 

47% 

47% 

Unocal 

19% 

19% 

Citicorp 

Clark Equip 

53 

53V, 

Lucky Sirs 
Man Hnver 

24% 

24% 

Jim Walter 

46 

45* 

17% 

16V. 

44% 

44% 

WmerLmW 

57% 

57% 

Coca Cota 

m 

38 

ManviUaCp 

2% 

2 % 

Uinflr Ctjvji 
WtHt 5 rdfgu 

WstghseS 

169% 

100 * 

sr 

40 

39V. 

Mapco 

45% 

44% 

54 

54 

134% 

132 

Marine Mid 

48% 

47% 

Weyerhser 

31% 

32% 

CTimbiaGas 

38% 

38". 

MrrManena 

42% 

42* 

Whirlpool 

70* 

70 

CmbtnEnq 

78% 

28% 

Masco 

28% 

78% 

Woofwonh 

40* 

42 

ComwtttiEd 

32% 

32 

McDonalds 

8 ? V. 

62 

Xerox Corp 

54% 

52% 

ConsEdis 

49% 

48". 

McDonnell 

78% 

79% 

Zflfmti 

23% 

23% 

Cn Nat Gas 

78% 

28% 

Mead 

49% 

49% 




Cons Power 

11 % 

11 % 

Merck 

107% 

108% 




Cntri Data 

21 % 

21 % 

Mmsa Mng 

108% 

109 




Coming Q 
CPC kill 

62% 

67% 

62 

68 '. 

Mot* 04 
Monsanto 

32% 

85% 

32% 

65% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

Crane 

79% 

29% 

Morgan JJ*. 

88 % 

87% 

Atotito 

22 

22 % 

Cm 2e(er 

38% 

36% 

Motorola 

39 

37% 

AlcnAlum 

41% 

41 

Dart & Kraft 

59% 

59% 

NCR Corp 

52% 

50% 

AJqoma Stl 

13% 

13% 

Deem 

21 % 

21 % 

NLlndstrs 

3% 

3% 

Can Pacific 

15% 

15% 

Deha Av 

41 % 

42% 

Nai Dsdrs 

35% 

33% 

Cominco 

12 * 

12 % 

Detroit Ed 

17 

17% 

Nat Med Em 

21 % 

21 % 

ConBathrst 

2 ?% 

22 % 

Digital Eq 

92% 

92% 

NatSmcndt 

9% 

9% 

HVr/SWCan 

27* 

28 

Disney 

DowChem 

44% 

45% 

Norfolk Sm 

75% 

76% 

HdsnBMtn 

28* 

28% 

49% 

49 

NWBancrp 

38 

38% 

Imasco 

36 

38* 

Dresser Ind 

15% 

15% 

OcodnrPet 

25% 

25* 

Imperial 08 

40% 

40 i 

Duke Power 

48% 

78% 

49 

Ogden 

OwiCorp 

Owens-ffl 

38 

37* 

In Pipe 

Ryf Trustee 

39* 

40 1 

DuPont 

77% 

44% 

43% 

31% 

31% 

Eastern Air 

B% 

8 J ; 

36 

36% 

Seagram 
Stew Co 

BO* 

80% < 

Estm Kodak 

54% 

55% 

Pac Gas □ 

24% 

25 

20V. 

20 % 

Eaton Corp 
Emerson El 

66 % 

66 % 

Pan Am 

5% 

5% 

Thmsn N 'A' 

30% 

30% 

79% 

79V. 

Penney JC. 

76% 

78 

VantyCorp 

265 

255 

Exxon Corp 

62% 

62% 

Penrudri 

52% 

53% 

Wfkr Hiram 


37% 

Fed Dot Sts 

80% 

79% 

P£E 52 

31% 

53% 

WCT 

12 % 

12 % 


• f iO<i iVM r l* nsirouaui hBc iMjkncten a New u**- Jim* W I Traded y IMuoMo 


C COMMODITIES REVIEW ) 

Slump in oil price lifts 
Third World prospects 


As annual economic re- 
views go. this week's report 
from the United NationsCon- 
ference on Trade and 
Development (Unctad) was a 
pretty gloomy one. 

Heavily skewed towards the 
problems of the Third World, 
it painted a grim picture of a 
global economy in which 
deflation has been successfully 
•engineered by the developed 
industrial powers. 

Looking at commodities, 
the report sadly contrasted the 
success with which Western 
countries have protected their 
farmers from the effects of 
tumbling world prices (and 
indeed Third World com- 
petition) through price-sup- 
port mechanisms with the 
absence of schemes for 
developing nations. 

The cost in lost commodity 
exports for the Third World 
between 1980 and 1984 was 
put at $38 billion (£25.6 
billion) even allowing for a 
$17 billion increase in export 
volume. 

Possible solutions to the 
plight of the developing coun- 
tries. such as currency deval- 
uations and commodity 
diversification, were tossed in 
the air by the report only to be 
quickly smashed down on the 
basis of Unctad's own empiri- 
cal evidence. 


EWART NEW NORTH- 
ERN: Final dividend Up, mak- 
ing l.6p(l .5). Results for year to 
April 30. Pretax profit £150,036 
3.5311. tax £20.562 


I TEX HOLDINGS: Contracts 
ave been exchanged for the 
rquisition of AK Precision 
loutdings for £1.0S million, 
rbjeci to approval by the 


Interim 


The long-winded observa- 
tion that thought be given to 
"an appropriate institutional 
framework within which a 
harmonization of the diversi- 
fication programmes of 
commodity-exporting coun- 
tries could be effectively 
negotiated" was mooted, but 
with little apparent enthus- 
iasm. 

However, if there is some 
comfort to be drawn by 
developing countries, at least 
the non-oil producing ones, it 
is that the major global eco- 
nomic indicators appear at 
last to be in some form of 
equilibrium. 

This has been achieved 
mainly by the sudden and 
dramatic fall in the price of oil, 
bringing it more closely into 
line with other -commodities. 

A year ago, oil was almost 
three times as expensive as * 
non-oil commodities relative 
to their respective long-term 
averages. Today that ratio is 
down to 1 .5. At the same time, 
there has been a gradual fall in 
dollar interest rates — 2 per 
cent over the last year. 

The result, according to a 
study by American Express 
Bank, is that non-oil develop- 
ing countries are now back to 
where they were before general 


todity prices started 
their steady decline, or are 
perhaps even a little better off. 

Looking at 13 countries 
from Argentina to Thailand, 
Amex calculated that a return 
to long-term average comm- 
odity prices would bring bene- 
fits of some $12.6 bill tort, 
while the recent fell in interest 
rates and oil prices has already 
reaped savings of $17.5 bil- 
lion. By contrast oQ exporting 
nations such as Indonesia and 
Ecuador are having a torrid 
lime. 

How long this equilibrium 
will last is difficult to predict. 
In particular, the international 
oil markets are fraught with 
uncertainly after last week's 
suiprising display of Opec 
unity.On the other hand, there 
does seem to be an inter- 
national willingness to pre- 
vent interest rates from 
rebounding up wands. 

However, there can be little 
hope of any radical rise in 
non-oil commodity prices. 
Even if Unctad's pleas for 
economic expansion were 
heeded in Bonn and Tokyo, it 
would be some time before the 
excess supplies overhanging 
the various commodity mar- 
kets were taken up. 

Richard Lander 


profit £172.000 


owns, or 


COMPANY NEWS 


changes taking place in the 
financial sector, and they look 
forward to the future with 
confidence. Dividend payable 
October 14. 

• RENOWN: Results for six 
months to June 30. Figures in 
millions of yen. Sales 105333 
(105.808), net profit 2,511 
(3.156). Earnings per share 
14.66 yen (2032). 

• HOME CHARM GROUP: 
The offer made on behalf of 
Ladbroke Group to acquire the 
whole of the issued ordinary 
share capital will close at I pm 
on August 25. Section 428 
notices nave been sent to Home 
Charm ordinary shareholders to 
acquire compulsorily the or- 
dinary shares of non-assenting 
shareholders. 

• ANDRE DE BRETT: Results 
for year to March 31. Final 
dividend 035p (nil). Figures in 
£000. Turnover 5,570 (5.407), 
pretax profit 168 (38), tax 31 
(samel. Earnings per share 1.7 1 p 


(0.09). The response to the 
summer catalogue was below 
expectations, trade having been 
adversely affected by the excep- 
tionally poor weather, but there 
are now signs of improvement. 
The recent performance of the 
British retail shops has been 
encouraging Dividend payable 
November 21. 

• MARKHEATH SECURI- 
TIES: The chairman, Mr Paul 
Bobroff says in his annual 
statement that the current year's 
trading is going as planned, and 
the directors are confident that 
profits ought to grow 
significantly. 

• INFRARED ASSOCIATES: 
The assets, inventory and tech- 
nology of Commsource, which 
manufactures infra-red detec- 
tors closely allied to those 
produced by I A, have been 
acquired. The price is $100,000 
(£68,000) in cash and 122.069 
shares. 



action... 



The HAT Group 


The HAT Group has created one of the 
largest painting and related services 
companies in ttie USA and the UK, created 
one of the largest and most profitable office 
cleaning services groups in the UK, 
established a major non-mechanical plant 
hiregroup operating nationally inthe UK and 
established a maintenance division which 
is the only multi-trade service organisation 
of its kind with a national network in the UK. 

The HAT Group is a multi-faceted 


service operation which depends on the 
skills of highly trained and experienced 
specialists. 

The HAT Group is taking care of 
hospitals, hotels and international 
headquarters; of oil rigs, power stations 
and refineries; of royal palaces, high 
street banks and building societies; of 
naval ships and aircraft hangars; of offices, 
shops and stores; of schools and 
supermarkets. 


People 

making 

better 

business 


HAT Group PLC 
Barley Wood 
Wrington 
Avon BS18 7SA 


TEMPUS 


3 


TDG speeds ahead with 
36 % rise in profits 


Road haulage, storage and 
plant hire. Transport 
Development Group's main 
businesses, have at least one 
tiling in common: high opera- 
tional gearing. 

As soon as there is enoi 
business for the group's 4,( 
trucks and drivers to break 
even, any extra loads carried 
flow straight through to the 
bottom line. The same goes 
for storage and equipment 
hire. 

Higher utilization of plant 
and equipment is the main 
reason why TDG was able to 
report a 36 per cent jump in 
interim pretax profits to 
£15.5 million when turnover 
rose only 8.7 per cent to £249 
million. British road haulage, 
for example, which com- 
prises 31 per cent of TDG's 
business, recorded a £4 mil- 
lion increase in turnover, of 
which nearly £2 million 
found its way into profit. 

This extra business helped 
the group to raise its margins 
to 6.7 percent in the first half 
of this year compared with 
4.9 per cent in the com- 
parable period last year. A 
better quality of business, low 
inflation and felling oil prices 
were also of assistance. 

Failing oil prices are of 
direct help in reducing costs. 
As oil prices went up, Derv 
went from I2*/> per cent of 
longdistance haulage costs to 
22 per cent It is now around 
17 per cent — but customers 
are also aware that oil prices 
have fallen and feel, not 
unjustly, that tariffs should 
come down. 

Perhaps of greater signifi- 
cance to the group will be the 
stimulus of low oil prices to 
the economy as a whole. This 
is expected to create greater 
demand for all services, 
including TDG's. 

Independent Express, the 
over-night parcels subsidiary, 
is still less-making, as ex- 
pected. Heavy marketing 
expenditure in the first half 
will, it is hoped, bear fruit in 
the second, taking the com- 
pany into profitability at last. 

It seems that, not- 
withstanding the excellent 
performance for the six 
months as a whole, there was 
a downturn in activity in the 
second quarter, and the group 
does not expect to maintain 
the same rate of growth in the 
second half as in the first. 
Nevertheless, given a reason- 
ably buoyant economy, there 
appears to be no reason why 
TDG should not make £36 
million in the full year to 
December 1986, a 21 percent 
rise on last year. 

This translates into earn- 
ings per share of 1 5.5p. At the 
current price of 169p, the 
shares are on a prospective 


multiple of just under H 
times. 

The shares have out- 
performed the market signifi- 
cantly since the beginning of 
the year, and, while they are 
not expensive at present lev- 
els. they look likely to pause 
for breath for the time being- 

Stone Int 

Stone International's profit 
downturn provides a timely 
warning for all those hopeful 
managers who believe that 
once they have bought out 
their company from the re- 
ceiver their problems will be 
over. 

At Stone International, 
which went down in 1982 as 
part of Stone Platt, all was 
well until last year when 
profits dropped from £7.34 
million to £6.09 million. 

The underlying fell was 
worse than this indicates as 
the reported total includes a 
£1.29 million exceptional 
credit, mainly a surplus on 
the company's American 
pension scheme. 

At the interim stage, when 
profits were barely lower, the 
company said the delayed 
liming of several contracts 
should help the second half. 
But this was not to be. 

A contract for Kawasaki 
went badly wrong. First the 
end customer required de- 
signs to be reworked and 
then, by its own admission. 
Stone International mis- 
handled the work. The cost 
was probably not far off £1 
million. 

The contract was won on 
thin matgins as part of the 
company's drive to fill its 
Crawley factory. In this re- 
spect it is now doing better 
after the acquisition of Peters, 
which makes doors for trains, 
buses and other vehicles. In 
addition. Stone has won new 
orders from Italy and British 
Rail. 

The company is confident 
about the current year, saying 
that both the Crawley factory 
and the American boiler 
company are doing better. It 
has raised the final dividend 
from 2.92p to 3.22p as tes- 
timony to its confidence. 

The market was dearly 
convinced by the company’s 
optimistic talk and added lOp 
to the shares, leaving them at 
164p. They have performed 
poorly since the initial excite- 
ment of the flotation in 1984 
and are unlikely to sparkle 
until the company's op- 
timism is justified. 

Cement 

The stock market loves 
variations on a theme and 
reports about cement imports 
have provided it with quite a 
selection in recent years. 


Since details emerged at 
the beginning of June that 
Greek cement was expected 
to arrive in London at any 
moment, shares in the two 
companies principally asso- 
ciated with cement making. 
Blue Circle Industries and 
Rugby Ponland Cement, 
have both underperformed 
by more than 10 per cent 
relative to market. 

Stories about imported ce- 
ment coming into the British 
Isles arc nothing new. The 
first significant one emerged 
in 1981 A surplus of cement 
on the world market, caused 
by Third World countries 
meeting their own require- 
ments. made the inter- 
national cement traders who 
had previously supplied them 
look for pastures new. 

They reckoned that the 
United Kingdom looked 
attractive. Prices were high as 
the producers there had the 
protection of a common pric- 
ing agreement. 

Although volumes of im- 
ports are still minimal, the 
cement majors have been 
severely hampered in putting 
up prices. Since the middle of 
1982 prices have risen only 
once, in 1985, by less than 5 
per cenu and the latest report 
coincided with an announce- 
ment that a price increase 
planned for the middle of this 
year was not now going to 
take place. The reasons given 
were lower operational costs 
and cheaper energy. 

Obviously other factors are 
affecting the share prices of 
Blue Circle and Rugby Port- 
land. but these cement im- 
port reports are still taking 
their toll. 

The longer-term outlook 
for Rugby Portland looks 
better as it is building up a 
complementary timber busi- 
ness. but Blue Circle in 
particular could do without 
bearish news at the moment. 
Its interim figures, due on 
August 27, are unlikely to 
buoy up the price. 

The company will be doing 
well to beat last year's £45 
million and analysts' pretax 
profits forecasts ror (he fit!! 
year are on the way down 
towards last year’s £116.9 
million. They are now hover- 
ing around the £120 million 
mark, having been as high as 
£135 million. 

Difficulties in South Af- 
rica. currency volatility in 
Mexico, and signs of harder 
times in the united States 
and Australia are no doubt 
responsible for this, so it 
looks like another year of 
marking time on the profits 
front. 

Blue Circle may be the 
share to trade in the account 
but its longer-term progress is 
hand to chart 


J 




N 

GENERAL! 


GENERALI 

Assicurazioni Generali 


1985 Highlights 

from the Report of the Board of Directors 


(000 US Dollars) 

1985 

1984 

Premiums written 

2,028,442 

1,592,439 

Premiums ceded 

-281,270 

-254,054 

Net premiums 

1,747,172 

1,338,385 

Net investment income 

402,288 

312,631 

Technical interest allocated to life funds 

-200,655 

— 145,230 

Insurance underwriting result 

- 76,312 

- 65,311 

Sundry income and expenditure 

- 10,034 

- 10,077 

Operating profit 

115,287 

92,013 

Profit on sale of properties and securities 

50,821 

19,576 

Unrealised capita! losses on securities 

- 6,307 

- 12,746 

Allocation to reserve for realised 

capital gains to be reinvested 

- 28,353 

- 6,565 

Taxes 

- 38,858 

- 23,623 - 

Total other items 

- 12,697 

- 23,358 

Profit for the year 

102,590 

68,655 

Per dure (Dollars) 

Profit 

0.821 

0.549 

Dividend 

0.358 

0.298 

Pay-out ratio (per cent) 

44 

54 


AH of above-listed figures have been convened at the rate of exchange of Lire 1,678 to the US Dollar. 


• Gross premiums written by the Company 
totalled $ 2,028.4 m of which $ 618.7 m 
for life and $ 1,409.7 id for Non Life. 

• Total investments reached S 4*242.4- m 
showing a growth of 20.3%. 

• Net investment income totalled 9 402U) m 
showing a growth of 28.7%. The average 
yield has grown to 9.7%. Realised capital 
gains generated from the sale of securities 
amounted to S 32.5 m and from the sale 
of properties to S 18.4 m which were 
allocated to the reserve for realized capital 
gains to be reinvested. 

• The year's profit, showing a growth of 
49.4% over the previous year, amounted 
to $ 102.6 m of which $ 58.4 m for Life 
and S 44-2 m for Non Life. 


• S 47.7 m from the year's profit were allo- 
cated to the extraordinary reserve. 

® shareholders' surplus including the 
year’s profit reached S 732.5 m showing 
an increase of S 92.7 m over the previous 

year. 

• The dividend amounts to % 0.358 per 
share, showing an increase of 20% over 
1984. 

• The General Meeting approved the in- 
crease of the capital from 250 to 350 bil- 
lion Lire through the issue of bonus shares 
— bearing dividends as from January 1. 
1986- to be aaaigned , 0 the. LmL 
in the proportion of 2 new shares for every 
5 shares held. 


Generali: insurance since 1831 


Head Office in Trieste (Italy) 


t 







THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


17 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


TSB 


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boosts the big four banks 


By Michael Clark 

There is just a month to go 


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before details of the proposed 
flotadon of the Trustee Sav- 
ings Bank are unveiled and 
already the marketmakers are 
jostling for position to see 
which of them will be allowed 
to deal m the shares. 

At least 17 firms of 

marketmakers have, so far. 


Lane 


is at London's Park 
Hold on September 3. 

Yesterday’s surge of enthu- 
siasm for the TSB also spilled 
over into the four big clearing 
banks, despite three of them 
opening in ex-dividend form. 
Barclays Bank rose 4p to 
459p, National ‘Westminster 
Bank 3p to 497p ex-div, after 



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shown interest in the issue and 
the market is taking the view 
that it could become a stag’s 
delight. 

The TSB, which also owns 
United Dominions Trust and 

Laura Ashley shares fell an- 
other 8p to I8lp yesterday — ' 
for a two day loss of I4p. The 
shares had been enjoying 
strong institutional support 
recently, but Smith New Court 
seems to think they look 
expensive boasting a p/e 50 
per cent higher than rival 
Next. The fen might have 
been worse; bnt for a large 
baying order from the 
company's broker Ktemwort 
Grieveson. 

Swan national Car Rental is 
expected to come to market 
with a price tag of about 
£1,200 millioiL Some analysts 
have already calculated that 
net assets after the issue, 
which will raise the company 
£1.000 million, will top £2,000 
million where the shares could 
boast a p/e of 6:6 and yield 5 J 
percent. 

The TSB's brokers Rowe & 
Pitman and Wood Mackenzie 
are determined that the issue 
will be a success. They have 
already arranged a number of 
meetings with the institutions 
for early next month. The first 


The rest of the equity 
market opened the new long 
three week August Bank holi- 
day account in a more con- 
fident mood after last week's 
bloodbath which wiped 
around £7,000 million from 
share values. Prices recovered 
from a hesitant start weighed 
down by an unusually large 
number of ex-dividends 
among top companies. 

The FT index of 30 shares, 
down 3.7 first thing, rallied to 
finish' the day 1123 up ax 
1,228.7 thanks to the appear- 
ance of a few bargain hunters 
and a firm start to trading on 
Wall Street after the weekend 
break. Its broader based 
counterpart the FT-SE 100 
rose 16.1 to 1,542.8. 

Once again the early spot- 
light fell on gold and precious 
metals producers. These are 



often regarded as a hedge by 
investors in times of un- 
certainty. The bullion price 
soared to S395 an ounce in the 
morning — its highest level 
since March 1984. It later 
dosed $17 up at S387 with 
dealers confident that ft would 
bit $400 an ounce soon. 
Consolidated Gold Fields led 
the way higher, but dosed 
below its best levels of the day. 
The shares rose 8p to 462p, 
after 474p. The other gold 
producers spent a quieter day 
after Friday's dramatic flurry 
of activity where gains ranged 
up to $7. 

Those companies with in- 
terests in precious metals also 
did well. Lonrho advanced 3p 
to 209p and Johnson Matthey 
25p to 21 5p. 

Leading shares showed dou- 


RECENT ISSUES 


hie figure gains after the recent 
shakeout and gilts scored rises 
of up to L'U on the stronger 
sterling. Shares of Petranol, 
the oil exploration group 
whose assets are all in the 
United States, firmed 3p to 
45p, after learning that Mr 
Cli ve Smith, former chairman 
and the man who brought the 
company to market, had been 
selling more of his holding. 

He has disposed of a further 
1 million shares for an un- 
disclosed price, reducing his 
holding to 5.4 million shares, 
or 20.8 per cent of the total 

Last month, Inoco, a Dallas 
oil and gas company, with 
interests in the US and 
Colombia, pulled out of a 
contested £25 million all- 
paper bid for Petranol after an 


EQUITIES 
Anglia Secs <ll5pl 

Beamrco (I45p) 

Borland <12Sp) 

Chelsea Man (iJSp) 
Coated Electrodes (B4p) 
Cofcne (HOP) 

Evans HaBshaw (I20p) 
Fletcher Dennys (70pl 
GT Management (21 Op) 
Guthrie Carp (150p) 
Harrison [(150p) 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Staring 

Sap 36 : 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

Sep 87 — 

Doc 87. 


Open 

9016 

90.49 

90/47 

9035 

NT 

NT 


9032 

9053 

90/47 


Low' 

90.16 

90/47 

90.47 

9045 


Previous day's total open mfarest 14417 


9023 

9052 

9054 
90.46 
9020 

9055 


139 +1 
Ml -8 
70+1 
150 
138 -1 
128 
88-2 
113 
117- 
73-1 
200-3 
160 
157+1 


EMVol 

1209 

395 


Hifle Ergonom (92p) 
Hughes Food (20p) 

Lon UnJ Inv (33Qp) 

M6 Cash & C pOOp) 
Marma Dev (iiOp) 
Morgan GrenfeB pOOp) 
Omnttech (33p) 

Shield (72p) 

Stentey Lets lire {1 lOp) 
TV-AM (130p) 

Tendy Inds (112p) 
Thames TV (190p) 
TibtxJt 6 Brrttan (120p) 
Treas 2H%i/1 2016 =97 
Undock (63p) 


93 

23 

61 +3 
84 
95+3 
433 
32 
145 +5 
120 
150 
144+4 
225+1 
130+3 
£41% 
68 


Windamoor p06p) 
Yetveiion (38p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 
Barker A Dobson N/P 
CityvcNon N/P 
Color OH F/P 
Expamffl F/P. 

Leigh Interests F/P 
Rock N/P 
Television Sth N/P 
Top Value F/P 
Wight Conms F/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


98-2 


34 
195-1 
156-4 
93-3 
2 '? 
21 
85-3 
440 +5 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


V 


' •: -aS- 

• • ■ aM.r.-- 

1 — m- ■ — 1 ' 

i riu# monm turaaonr 

9353 

Previous (Jay's total open interest 20040 
93.66 93.63 93.64 1294 

crl-,'1 

. ; « 

IWHR 

93.64 

93.68 

93.64 

9366 

1304 



■(•. ilj'r 

MIFR7 - 

83l55 

9258 

9355 

9356 

439 

i * “% • ’ 



.Iirtft7 - 

9354 

9338 

93.34 

93J35 

163 

>r -■ 

*-•*. • 

J ' 

f\vr. !'• • 

USTraamyBond 
fipp as . 

99-06 

Previous day's total open Merest 7131 
90.97 «-Of» 99-17. 6587 


" * • 

% 17 S.V 

rvcflfi 

98-19 

99-05 

96-19 

98-29' 

761 

* * 


■ i • 

Mnrft7 . 

NT 



0 


« 1 * 

* ,;l * 








• 

! [• 

Short Gat 

SnpflR 

100-54 

' NT.-. 

Previous day's total open Interest J045 
-inftS7 inruoi . . nc 



jf. r. 

• lb* 

•• • i- !>• 

Dec 86 . 

— — 


.10057 

0 



Mar 67 

-NT 

— r . 

— 

10057 

0 


1 ■ 

LongQflt 

Sep 86 

12001 

Previous day's toM open Merest 13188 ■ 
120-20 119-26 120-18 .6732 


' • ' * ' • 

•'■i Li. 


119-25 
KT ■ 

• i iT-au 

■ iircj 

itu-ie 

12007 

im 

0 

! 

'•i \ , • . * 



NT 



12007 

0 


J - 

• • m:i • 

. .r ti-L 

FT-SE 100 

tlopUfi 

15*90 

Previous dsy"# total open Marast 2664 
15850 15450 -15850 3T3 

• r- 



15895 

160.10 

15225 

16105 

5 

r : : 

iv. •• 

•> - -term 





TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


ERAU 

•joni Gfncrali 

liulitH 

[Join'd of i>ir« ‘ lnr> 


Last OacJarafion Par SetOamwit 
Nov 6 Nov 17 

Nov 20 Oecl 

Dec 4 Dec 15 

S/88 Sears. Engfisti TsL Holmes Protct, Endeavor. 

.Haw*. I Ml. Ryan im. Thennax, Lee A. Scanna. 

Lasma Dandson Pearce. NJtals. Sound Dm, Abaca. Marshal Uw. Graenbanfc. Nu- 
Swih. Hestair. Densitron. ParttakJ. Hawley. 

Put Gem SR. 

Put & Cafl: Camfortl. Raine. 


FM Deafingi Last Dealings 

Aug 4 Aug 15 

Aug 18 Sep 5 

Sep 8 Sep 19 

Cal apMona wan taken otd orc 11/ 
BT. Samuelsoa Amstrad. Aircafl. 


STERUNG SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market rate* 
day's rang* 
Aiim if 

N York T .471 5-1. 4850 
Montreal 2iM 13-2.0590 
Ams'daui3A135-3.4433 
Brussels 62.73-6351 
Cphgen 115586-11.4499 
Du On 10896-1.1036 
Framdun3.029D3.0566 
Lisbon 21355-216^7 
197.19-19655 
2083.60210354 
105240105140 
9.8413-99269 
102050102876 
226.02-22859 
2153-2153 
24361-24598 


Macmd 

Mtan 

Oslo 

Pans 

srwem 

Tokyo 

Vienna 

Zurich 


Auauatll 

148401.4850 

■ 2.055328590 

3.439034433 

63.12-6331 

114274-11.4499 

1.10131.1023 

3.05233.0566 

214.74-21637 

19827-19855 

2089.15210354 

108993105140 

9509395289 

102732-102878 

22851-22859 

21402153 

2455024588 


047-0.45prant 
05552Spram 
lO-IVpram 
lOiaprem 
1-kpram 
4prem-2dis 
lM%pram 
60l55dn 
35-70*8 
1-4«fis 
3V4K(flS 
2V2Kpnwn 
K-Xpram 
-iprem 


iK-lprem 
105V pram 
iK-lxpram 

startinB Inde x com par ed wWh 1875 a— np at 71.1 ( d ay 1 * r ange 7PT-71.1). 


3 monttis 

127-1 24pram 

0.69-054pram 

3V3Spram 

46-38txom 

IVKpram 

par-lida 

4K-3Nprem 

17-450ds 

113190ds 

37da 

IIK-mdis 
7-614 Orem 
IX-Kprem 
32Vprem 
26%23»pn»n 
315-314 pram 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austraT . 
Australia dodar — 
BahranOnar 
Brazil cruzado * u 


, 1573015781 
.24316-24362 
. 0554555585 
.2054-2048 


Ireland 


Cyprus pound. 
Fnanpi 


imarka. — 
Grsaca drachms _ 
Hong ICong dotar , 
mdn rupee 

Iraqdnar , 


Kuwait dmar KD — 

Msiaywooeai 

Mexico peso 

New Zealand dollar. 
Saudi Arabia riyal _. 
Singapore doHer — 
South Africa rand _ 

UAEtkrtiam 

UoydS Bank 


0.TI75-0.7Z75 

_ 7.25/072970 
„ 19810196 10 
115060115117 

18501850 

.n/p 


0.427004315 

,3559545851 

940990 

.257D8-25B49 

5514055540 

3.17803.1797 

3.7467-3.7684 

5588055280 


Australia 
Canada - 
Swoon 

Norway 

Denmark 

West Germany 
Switzerland — 
Netherlands — 

France 

Japan. 


ham 

BNgiunyComm) 


Hong Kong 
Portugal. 
Spam 


Austria , 


15465-1.3475 
2152521535 
. 2614526185 
0.6065-0.6072 
, 1385013855 
, 622006.9250 
. 734007 3450 
. 7.69507 7000 
. 2058520575 
, 1 .6525-1 .6535 
, 2317325182 
, 65775-6 .6825- 
, 153.6O1S3.70 
, 14135-14145 
_ 42554260 
. 7.7B6O7.7970 
1455014550 
. 13355-133.65 
— 14401446 


Rate* a uppiadby Barctaya Bank HOFEX and ErdaL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


o 







Series 

Oct 

am a 

Jan 

Apr 

Oct 

Puts 

Jan 

Apr 


Series Sept 

Sate 

Doc 

Mar 

Sep 

pm 

Dec 

Mar 

Allied Lyons 
(•305) 

300 

330 

380 

20 

9 

2 

" 30 
15 
8 

40 

23 

13 

10 

30 

57 

13 

33 

60 

15 

37 

63 

jaguar 

iW 

500 

550 

600 

45 

18 

3 

GO 

32 

15 

73 

47 

27 

12 

37 

72 

20 

43 

77 

27 

53 

83 

BP 

(-590) 

500 

550 

600 

95 

50 

18 

105 

65 

38 

80 

51 

IK 

8 

33 

5 

19 

40 

Z7 

48 

Thom EMI 
(*467) 

420 

460 

500 

60 

27 

7 

75 

42 

20 

85 

55 

37 

3 

20 

37 

10 

25 

40 

17 

27 

47 

Cons Gold 
(■462) 

420 

460 

500 

64 

40 

15 













B 

47 

25 

55 

30 

60 

44 

72 

52 

Tesoo ■ 

(*378) 

300 

330 

83 

53 

63 


2 

254 

5 


CourtflukJa 

C257) 

260 

280 

300 

330 

15 

9 

4 

2 

22 

32 

12 

14 

20 


390 

6 

18 

30 

16 

20 

25 

10 

5 


46 

76 

46 

78 



Sedes 

J3. 

Nov 

Feb Am 

Nov 

Feb 

Com Union 

C297) 

300 

330 

360 

13 

3 

1 

24 

14 

6 

33 

21 

15 

38 

67 

17 

40 

69 

21 

42 

Bnt Aero 

C48U) 

460 

500 

550 

35 

12 

116 

48 

30 

12 

68 

47 

25 

60 

16 

63 

13 

33 

68 

22 

35 

73 

CaUa & Wire 

r327) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

42 

23 

10 

4 

52 

55 

22 

11 

62 

47 

35 

7 

IS 

33 

55 

13 

26 

40 

57 

19 

30 

42 

BAT Inds 
(•386) 

360 
390 
. 420 
460 

30 

8 

1 

56 

43 

25 

11 

3 

55 

35 

17 

3 

8 

35 

75 

6 

20 

42 

80 

9 

25 

45 

Datrilers 

rsw) 

GOO 

650 

TOO 

105 

65 

27 

™ ’ 


4 

15 

35 

£ 

= 

Barclays 

C4S7) 

460 

500 

560 

ID 

2 

2 

35 

17 

6 

50 

30 

13 

15 

47 

97 

25 

55 

102 

30 

60 

102 

GEC 

C166) 

180 

200 

220 

16 

7 

3 

24 

13 

7 

30 

18 

6 

17 

38 

9 

19 

36 

11 

22 

Bnt Telecom 
(186) 

160 

200 

220 

11 

2 

1 

19 

ID 

4 

25* 

15 

7 

3 

16 

3* 

7 

16 

35 

10 

21 

36 

Grand Mel 

C368) 

327 

355 

360 

50 

25 

£ 

40 

2 

7 

16 

22 

Cadbwy Sehwpps 160 

ns5j iso 

200 

9 

2% 

1 

18 

10 

3 

23 

14 

7 

254 

1$ 

38 

7 

17 

36 

11 

20 

38 


382 

17 


— 


— 



300 

330 

360 


52 

28 

12 





JCJ 

f371) 

900 

950 

92 

54 

125 

87 

102 

10 

25 

18 

35 

42 

rSu 

15 

4 

— 

4 

25 

10 

28 

— 

1000 

1050 

35 

14 

57 

37 

57 

50 

85 

as 

97 

Ladbrahe 

300 

330 

360 

55 

62 

38 

17 

67 

1 

3 

5 

9 

Lend Sec 

300 

25 

33 

42 

5 

10 

21 

46 

11 

23 

46 


7 

22 

10 

20 

22 

(•315) 

330 

380 

9 

2 

16 

8 

24 

12 

46 

LASMO 

100 

18 

27 

35 

3 

. 6 

8 

12 

12 

17 

Marfcs&Spen 

180 

20 

26 

33 

3 

5 

7 


120 

4 

14 

18 

12 

18 

22 

P95) 

200 

220 

r 

2 

14 

7 

19 

12 

10 

26 

29 

30 

Midland Bank 

- 500 

40 

10 

2 

55 

22 

7 

70 

37 

18 

2 

10 

15 

37 . 

SheS Trans 

750 

97 

113 

125 

4 

14 

22 


600 

67 

70 

70 

r833) 

800 

850 

50 

25 

68 

40 

93 

58 

18 

45 

50 

37 

55 

PS O 

460 

35 

6 

2 

1 

43 

23 

9 

3 

62 

40 

18 

4 

20 

12 

33 

17 

37 

Trafalgar House 
("268) 

240 

260 

'38 

19 

44 

26 

52 

35 

3 

8 

7 

12 

23 

9 

16 


550 

600 

62 

112 

65 

112 

67 


280 

8 

16 

24 

21 

28 


160 

180 

200 

24 

8 

156 



2 

5 

0 


Series 

Sep Dee 

Mar 

Sep 

Dec 

Hair 

cm 

17 

ID 

24 

15 

7 

20 

12 

22 

15 

26 

Beecham 

P385) 

360 

390 

420 

460 

35 

20 

8 

45 

26 

17 

8 

55 

35 

25 

17 

7 

17 

38 

77 

13 

25 

45 

80 

18 

33 

48 

80 

RTZ 

fS52) 

500 

550 

GOO 

650 

62 

20 

3 

IK 

72 

40 

27 

12 

80 

54 

35 

17 

2 

13 

55 

104 

9 

23 

57 

105 

13 

32 

65 

110 

Boots 

(■*15) 

200 

220 

240 

21 

11 

5 

29 

16 

10 

36 

24 

16 

5 

13 

27 

9 

16 

Z7 

11 

18 

27 

vaal Reefs 

rs«) 

45 

50 

60 

1956 21K 
1456 IBM 

5 10 

24 

19 

12 

56 

1 

3 

1 

2 

4 

1« 

3K 

6 

BTR 

C2S5) 

280 

307 

333 

17 

6 

IK 

2b 
13 
_ 5 

3b 

TU 

25 

50 

17 

32 

50 

20 


Series 


NOV 

Mar 

Aug 

Nov 

Mar 

Bus 

(*730) 

700 

750 

800 

45 

15 

6 

66 

37 

20 

U) 

53 

33 

6 

30 

60 

1b 

43 

80 

25 

45 

80 

Lonrho 

rao8) 

200 

218 

10 

3 

1 

*T 

a 

18 

9 

4 

28 

4 

12 

28 

To 

17 

31 

13 

Blue Ode 
rS41) 

550 

600 

650 

15 

5 

7 

3? 

15 

7 

58 

35 

17 

62 

112 

26 

62 

112 

33 

63 

112 


340 

255 

10 

47 

49 

38 

Da Beers 
to 

560 

GOO 

95 

65 

xis 

as 

130 

95 

10 

18 

25 

45 

35 

60 


4* 1 

vcnra 

Aug 

Nov 

Feb Aug 

New 

Feb 

650 

700 

35 

17 

5B 

35 

10 

4b 

85 

60 

95 

& 

TT 1111% 1391 
(*£108) 

106 

108 

2 

’it 

2% 

IK 

IK 

Vi 

% 

% 

IK 

— 

Dixons 

300 

38 

46 

54 

3 

7 

10 ' 

110 


56 

'a, 8 

2 3 ,e 

» 

3V4 

(*332) 

330 

360 

14 

a 

24 

12 

32 

22 

12 

30 

14 

32 

IB 

36 

TV11S%03/07 

.114 

116 

4 

2% 

5% 

4 

*1* 

Hr 

1*18 

2 


GKN 
r27S) . 

280 

300 

330 

360 

13 

7 

2 

1 

2S 

14 

l 

35 

23 

13 

7 

18 

31 

58 

88 

21 

33 

56 

88 

23 

34 

58 

88 

11B 
• 120 
122 
124 

Vi* 

*NI 

56 

<<* 

3 

2»» 

Vie 

1'ia 

356 

3 

2K 

IX 

2®n 

“■■* 

6X 

ZK 

"w 

7 

3* 

4K 

8 

Glaxo 

(■960) 

900 

950 

80 

45 

'S 

110 

20 

35 

35 

55 

si 


Auase* 

oct 

Nov 

Awtept 

Od 

Nov 

1000 

1050 

25 

15 

60 

45 

85 

65 

65 

100 

80 

115 

90 

120 

FT-SE 1525 

42 65 

27 50 

78 

63 

95 

77 

10 

20 

18 

27 

28 

35 

35 

52 

Hansen 
ris5) • 

135 
• 150 
160 
180 
200 

32 

17 

8K 

3 

1* 

v«»l 1 

23 

13 

m 

1 

2 

3 

17 

36 

6 

20 

36 

iT 

22 

36 

(*1538) 1575 
1600 
1625 
1650 
1675 

7 37 

8 23 

3 17 

2 10 

1 4 

55 

38 

28 

25 

20 

83 

38 

65 

90 

115 

140 

42 

65 

90 

115 

1*0 

55 

65 

90 

115 

140 

67 


August 12 1986 . Total contracts 14530 . Cate 9471. Puts 5069. njndartyhg aacurity piua- 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


A slight improvement in senti- 
ment gave rates an easier look. 
At the short end the softer 
inclination percolated from 
expectations that money 
seems to be set for a cheaper 
day or two. Shortages are 
expected to remain light at 
least until the end of the week. 
At the longer end, Kuwait 
declarations of determination 
to support Opec production 
curbs gave the pound a tiny 
fillip. 

Bos* Rules % 

Cleanng Banks ID 
Franca House 10 
Dtscouni Market Loans % 

Overman! High; i(Hc Low 914 
vwehfbieo.S”*? 

Treasury Bite (Discount °*>) 

Buying Selling 

2 ninth 9N 2mnth 9S 

3mmh9'*» Snmtn 9 lb 
Prime Bank Bite (Dfscosit %> 

1 mom 9 u 1*4^ 2mrnh 9”r-9 ,, ii 
3 mnth 6 ninth 

Trade BJBs (Discount %) 

1 mmh lO'n 2mmh I0"n 

3 ninth 10K 6 mnth 10'w 

hiterbank (%) 

Overmghl: open ID dosa 10% 

1 week 9 ls, ie*-956 6 mrth 

1 mntti 10-97. 9 mnth 9V9% 

3 mmh 9 M B-9 in 'si I2itrti 9fi-9X 

Local Authority Depocit* (%J 

2 flays 9* 7 days 9H 

1 moth 9% 3 mnth 9% 

6 mmh W I2mth 9"w 

Local Authority Bonds (%) 
i 1051-ID 2mnth 


1 mnth . 

3 mnth 10U>10 
9mnm i0k*l0 


1 mnth 9'K . 

6 mmh 9H4H1 

DoBarCDc(%) 
imam 655-650 
6 mnth 655-650 


10U-10 
6 mnth 10 >4-9 ’A 
I2mth 9A-9A 

Smnth 9A-9H 
12rmh 9°.«-9"i» 

3mntti 635230 
12mtti 543655 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Dnter 

7 days 6U-e , w 
3 mmh BK-6K 
Oeuttehnmfc 
7 days 4%-4i4 
3 mnth 4%-4« 
French Franc 
7 days 7i.fr7'w 
3 mwh 7K-7K 
Swtwftenc 
7 days 1 V1% 
3fflntti4Kr41L 
Ten 

7 days <V4* 

3 mnth 4V4* 


call 7-6 
1 mndi 6 , iv6 , w 
6 mmh 6H^'4 
cafl 54 
1 mnth 4^4* 

6 ninth 4%-4% 
cal 

1 mnth T 1 !*-?'* 
Smntn 7 ,l '»-7 , w 
cal 3&-1K 
1 mnth 44wk 
8mwh45V4^ 
cal 5K-4K 
1 mnth 4V4i 
6mrth 4’ 1 ie/ l, 'i 


GOLD 


QoktS386.00-388.00 

|90XlcS2oA l SsM2.00 ) 
"Exauaes vat 


ECGD 


Fixed Rato Starting Expon Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference cot lor 
interest period July 2. 19B8 to 
1986 IndUaW 10.009 


investigation by the Takeover 
Panel. 

The Panel had been called 
in after complaints by 
Petranol. and decided that 
Inoco was acting in concert 
with Mr Smith, who had 
accepted the terms from Inoco 
for his 25 per cent stake in the 
company. 

The big insurance compos- 
ites continued 10 recover from 
nervousness before the in- 
terim dividend season starts 
tomorrow, with figures from 
Commercial Union, up 2p at 
297p„ and General Accident 
9p at 807p. 

Royal Insurance, up 17p at 
8I9p. is due to unveil its 
interim profits on Thursday. 

Analysis are looking for CU 


Speculative buying 
pushed the price of the print- 
ing group Wace to a peak 
of o9p yesterday, an lip rise 
on the day. The shares 
have been a firm market since 
featured here In June and 
the company recently reported 
a big jump in first-half 
profits. Prospects of Wace 
making some early ac- 
quisitions look like keeping 
the shares ahead. 


to return to the black with 
pretax profits of about £40 
million for the first six months 
of the year. 

This compares with a loss of 
£12.1 million for the 
corresponding period after US 
underwriting losses of £230 
million. The bulk of profits, 
are expected to come from the 
group s life business and the 
losses in America should be 
greatly reduced thanks to 
higher premiums. 

General Accident is also 
expected to turn in a positive 
performance, with estimates 
of between £35 million and 
£40 million, compared with a 
deficit last time of £12 
million. 

Royal, which also turned in 
an interim deficit of £l 7.8 
million last year, is expected 
to bounce brack with pretax 
profits of £90 million this 
time. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


Adam S Company. 
Bca__ 


Citibank Savings! . 
Conso&dated Crds. 
Contrental TmsL. 
Co-operative Balk. 


C. Howe & Co. 

Hong Kong & Shanghai. 
LLoyds Bank. 


Nat Westminster 

Royal Bank of Scotland — 

TS8 

Citibank HA 

t Mortga ge B*» R*te. 


. 10 . 00 % 
. 10 . 00 % 
. 10 . 00 % 
.10.75% 
. 10 . 00 % 
.10.00% 
. 10 . 00 % 
.1QjOO% 
. 10 . 00 % 
.10j00% 
. 10 . 00 % 
. 10 . 00 % 
.10 m 

.10J0% 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Japan and Germany 
rule as UK spends 


Yesterday morning the price of gold 
touched S400 before it was “fixed” at 
its highest price, S394.50, since March 
19S4. Paul Volcker. chairman of the 
US Federal Reserve Board, aware — 
none more so — that confidence in the 
dollar is reflected, inversely, in the 
price for gold, attended the mneral in 
West Germany of Otto Emminger, a 
former president of the Bundesbank 
and stern apostle of sound money. 

At the end of last week, two of the 
leading New York investment houses, 
Salamon Brothers and Goldman 
Sachs, bowed low to the powerful 
Japanese sun risen above the Ameri- 
can bond market. 

The latest cost and output figures 
demonstrate, yet again, that the 
potential benefit to British industry of 
lower input prices is promply taken 
out in higher earnings, aided and 
abetted by an easing of monetary 
policy. Today, should you be in any 
doubt after last week's bank lending 
figures, the latest building societies* 
statistics will prove beyond a per- 
ad venture that this country is riding 
the crest of a frightening credit and 
housing boom. Barclays, as Sir Tim 
Bevan confessed last week, believe 
that “long-term prudence” demands 
that the growth in lending to UK 
customers is restrained. 

Despite the forebodings of the 
chairman of Barclays it is manifestly 
not in the Government’s political 
interest to witness, let alone engineer, 
a collapse in the boom. The flooding 
tide of credit has to be financed, with 
the extra deposits required coming 
either out of higher earnings or the 
inflow of capital from abroad. Nor- 
mally, the banks and buildings soci- 
eties would also look to higher interest 
rates to attract more savings; but as in- 
terest rates, for the time being at least, 
seem set on a declining course, higher 
rates are not an option. 

This opinion is supported by the 
Bank of England's bold move late 
yesterday afternoon when it lopped 


houses in the May auction of US 
Treasury paper inflicted horrendous 
losses on the leading New York 
houses. To the point where Satamons 
admitted that “were are not as smart 
as we thought we were” and Goldman 
Sachs admitted Sumitomo Bank as a 
1 2 ! £ per cent partner in exchange for 
S500 million. The Who's Who of the 
Ndw York bond market is now being 
rewritten - in Japanese characters. 

TSB unexplained 

The Government owed the nation an 
explanation, and yesterday lan Stew- 
art, the Economic Secretary to the 
Treasury' tried to give one. He did not 
do it well. 

When Lord Templcman said re- 
cently that the Trustee Savings Bank 
in effect belonged to the crown, the 
Government was obliged to explain 
why it was going ahead with the TSB 
flotation as if the bank belonged to no 
one. In his letter to James Ross, the 
recalcitrant Scottish depositor who 
has already been such a thorn in the 
Government's side, Mr Stewart 
explained. 

No doubt it is a complex legal 
matter, but surely the country is 
entitled to know in detail — rather 
than in a few meagre and badly 
drafted paragraphs — what the 
Government's position is following 
the Templcman speech. The crucial 
distinction Mr Stewart makes is 
between Government and State. Lord 
Templcman said the TSB belonged to 
the State but, sa>s Mr Stewart, that 
does not mean it belongs to the 
Government. 

To a layman, the Treasury's po- 
sition would seem to be that the 
Government did not own the TSB but 
that parliament had the power to 
assign ownership to the Government 
if it chose (which, in the event, it did 
not). This was because of the bank's 
status as property of the “State”, a 
concept the Treasury has still not 
defined. The explanation goes no 
further than the one given a week ago 


1 x h points off the price of the Treasury just after Lord Tcmpleman's ruling. 
Vh per cent 2007 “tap” stock: a If the State is not the Government. 


calculated risk, but one that if it comes 
off should make the gilt-edged market 
sharply better. If the jobbers, armed 
with cheap Treasury stock proceed to 
drive the gilt-edged market higher, 
that should put some stiffening back 
in the equity market. 

Events on the international finan- 
cial scene are cosmic by comparison. 
The burial of Dr. Emminger does not 
mean the end of stria fiscal and 
financial orthodoxy. On the contrary. 
While German has cleverly avoided 
some of the hudge responsibilities that 
normally fall on an international 
currency, it has seen the mark 
elevated to a position where even the 
mighty dollar is tied to it for purposes 
of Federal Reserve exchange and 
interest rate strategy'. 

The other defeated nation Japan is 
also now in a dominating market 
postion. The powerful tactics kof the 
Japanese banks and investment 


then what is it? If it is the Government 
after all, then the nation is being 
deprived of an asset worth consid- 
erably more than £1 billion. Any 
lingering doubts will be seized upon 
by the opposition which is eager to 
squeeze out the maximum embarrass- 
ment value from the issue. 

Thai does not make the task of the 
opposition particularly easy. Par- 
liament is in recess, there are two 
previous TSB Acts apparently 
supporting the Government's case 
(one passed by a Labour Govern- 
ment), and the TSB's own employees 
arc strongly in favour of the flotation. 
But more important is the point that 
this is not a matter for madarins 
behind closed doors, ft is a question of 
importance to the country and one in 
which, to judge by the response to the 
TSB’s advertising, a very large num- 
ber of people are taking an active 
interest. 


August 5. 
cent. 


per 


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:■■■■■'■ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


i .■•vCv.i', 


other foreign fields. Our television film crew s hav e een 
working in such diverse places like die North Pole and 
South America. 

One film crew has fust completed the swash- 
buckling adventure 'West of Paradise' filmed entirely 
in the Seychelles. 

With such a commitment to more productions 
both at home and abroad, we aim to build on our success 
for the future. 

And with a little help from the stars like Dirk 
Bogarde and Sir John Gielgud, the world will hear and see 
a lot more of Yorkshire Television. 


AFTER A HARD DAY ON 42nd & 3rd 
WHAT BETTER WAY TO RELAX THAN WITH 
A PASTRAMI ON RYE WATCHING YOUR 
FAVOURITE YORKSHIRE TELEVISION PROGRAMME 


For example, the Sugdens from ‘Emmerdale Farm’ 
are not unfamiliar to the Svenssons in Sweden. 

When the amber nectar fails to refresh the parts in 
Alice Springs, Keith Barron will always raise a few laughs 
in the comedy 'Duty Free'. 

As well as picking up programme sales around the 
world, we've also been known to pick up a few awards 
along the way. Prestigious festivals in Berlin, New York. 
Monte Carlo and Tokyo have all honoured Yorkshire 
Television productions. 

The presence of YTV is very much in evidence in 


There's nothing our American cousins enjoy more 
than to sit down with a tasty morsel in the one hand and 
the remote control in the other, watching a good 
television programme. 

Such as a drama like ‘Romance on the Orient 
Express' or a comedy like The Bounder' made by 
Yorkshire Television. 

Our programmes also get a good reception in 
important markets like Canada and Japan, and the 
Yorkshire Television symbol is known in fifty seven 
other countries. 


YORKSHIRE 

TELEVISION 

Made in Yorkshire Enjoyed Around the World 
Issued by Baring Brothers & Co., Limited. 






V 







* * * * ft.* 6L 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


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ffemtnn H*jn Mt 573 515 *01568 

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Hernmn fell 5*y 400 5*1 +04 098 

ICNDCR50N AOMNSTRATOi 
*’’em*rUTA0mnsnat«n5 Rayfegn Ha. Kunon 
Brentwoca E«** 

0277-217238 

Sweat S*s me 1298 1384 IDS 

_ Do Actum 1821 19*0 -02 105 

Brewery Tlua 922 987c -03 310 

Caortal Grown fef 5 29 565 *02 150 

DOAcsun £07 648 +01 150 

McameAsseK 1030 1108c -01380 

FoanmiTiuU 1370 1413 -0*258 

income & Com me 13*1 14*2 +02 318 

Do Atom 3S24 2821 *04 31fl 

feewne ftuH 165* 177 0a -03 51* 
Exn femme 1561 16(0 -07 *K 

Soaaw Cos D» 1051 1125a -03 5 14 

Ref 8 GN 47 0 SOI 9*1 

Gm Traa *9? *&*a *0.1 93S 

Fntrt feMnct Trust 533 57.1 *0 1 930 

CfeWHtameare *** — * 

Q.3tai Taco 
Goto 


Amer & Gen fee T09 b X I 3a 

Do Attun 244 4 761 5 

*m#r Hecoueiy ■ 2*5 B 

Do Accum IWi 26' 9 

Am S*>+fer Cos 57 1 «.»• 
Oc Acaxn 58 1 61 $a 

*UM S Gwl fee 7C 6 755a 
0a Afsum 7’ 2 979 

Conn & Ger fee M?e 1579# 
Do Acokk IBS* -021 
Cemcoued Giomn 3866 )*6S 
Conrenan Guwnn 3Ms OH7 
Do fee 170a 1S4 SB 

DuWMO Fifed me 3925 <160 
Do Attun EI1SI I? JO 

CiKfwan £ Geenai 9076 325 la 
Do *cam !<8? 263 ie 

E-nj Virt me 2Ma 774 7 

do Irani <$S9 *B33 

Fa EJMrrn be 12P0 12* ea 


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FLEAMO (ROBERT) . 

6 Cmfe Sa London EC3A 6AN 
01-638 5858 

Amenctn E+emgt CSV 2 3619 


Am Property Tjj 
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£4232 *366 
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4431 
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2 Fore Seeet Lomfen BSZ* 5AO 
01-588 1815 

fen Fund 3979 -447 

Fr>*d tm 14*4 880 

OepoM 1000 OfO 

awvtms OFFICIAL BIVESTMEMT HMD 
2 Ft*« Street Unaon EC2 Y SaO 
01-588 ISIS 


CLERICAL MEDICAL war TRUTT 
MMWCEHS 

H*nom Pan Bnstal BS3 OJH 
0800 373383 

Amer Grown 725 2*0 190 

Equrfy Hwn fecoaw 404 *3 0 4 8C 

Eurooeen Orown 279 297 70D 

GeoflTBl Canny 3(9 393a 270 

Gfe « Fafed ba Gfe 2SB 31 «a 320 

Gffl 6 Fried fee 3*4 25 7 950 

(Oder Securaes 25 3 267 230 

Japan Grown 329 350 080 

COUNTV l/T MANAGERS LTD 
tai. Cmapada. Londoa EC3V ecu 
01725 1999 

Energy Tnai *37 *6*c *01309 


FRAMUNOTDN unit MANAOEMCMT 
3. u-won fee Bags. London «m London 
ECZM 5NO 
01-628 Slftl 

Ama 8 Gen Inc 2230 2377c -16 051 

Do Actum 2280 3424c *04 051 

Amv Turaarna Inc 2020 7148a *12 117 

DoAcewn 209 £ 2270a .12 117 

Casual Tm fee 201 £ 71** +04 199 

60 Aecum 2424 257 8 *04 199 

Com iUfe 860 W 4a *02 533 

Do Actum 1144 1216a *02 533 

EJtta fee Ts« fee 1536 l£32a +02 438 

Oft *ccom 1664 in 0a -03 438 

ferome Truss 1134 1206 *0 2 4 41 

Do Acam 1192 1268 *01 **1 

Mbowriraec issa i+oo -09 

Do Actum 177* 1886 *08 

Japan 6 Gen fee 900 956 *06 008 

Do Actum 910 966 *05 000 

Ucarty Income fa 78 6 836# *02 504 



14? a -04 ? SB 
14*2 +07 319 

3831 *0 4 316 

177 0a -0.3 514 
1W0 -07 486 

1125a -03 514 
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187 3 +1.1 001 

781 -0 2 0 77 

315a *05 270 
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106 5 +05 OS 

1235 +01 51? 

1210 +0* 119 

129* +29 120 

1673a +14 053 
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101.5 +02 001- 

1617 *01 202 


MLLSAMU8. UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
nla Tow. AAkKoreoe Rosa Croydon 
01-888 *3S5 01-628 801 1 


E-*M feed Inc 2i2o ;« 7 
Do Arayn <$59 jbjj 

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DO Accvn 1*67 1584# 

Fund 01 fey fee CJ6 3 253 5 
Do Act 711 03.* 

G*"*-* Income 584 4 51)5# 
Do Aawn Ei?39 13 n 
G4 £ Fwed hi 60 7 ti 7m 

Do Amsn 93* 96 1 

Gov fecifeie 350 3" *a 

Oa A— ifet 373 399# 

Mffe feeome fee W2?r39 
Dp Actum 8199 ST* 3 

fed Grown Inc 730 B 774 6a 
DoAteun £1176 1? 4.- 
fen fee me S73 607 

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Do Aecum 0674 90} 6 

JfeUfl Smaaer *cr 9? 1 98 1 
IMfenO 6 Gen fee 550 3 563 3 
Do Acun (1369 14 51 
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DD Actum *46 9 *62 7# 
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to Accun £1358 14 40 

an met Cos Inc 6322 6iC 0# 

0a Accun 997010768 

Times Fima Inc *A4Q 470 B 
DO Aecum £1260 1343 
CtaiUona fee Dt Mi 5 

to Accun r3l 3591 a 

Ountura Inc (21 3780 3(1 8* 

Do Atom Cl 999910099# 
Pfnsvn E-empt (11 4*3 S *63 5 
NAAOF fee (3l 37 5 a 

to Accun (31 *596 a 

UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
11 DMmlm 9d London EC7M , 
01 256 8760(8263 
Edwty Eaeapt 387 6 404 8 
Da Aecum *90 6 51? « 

UK Mamet Featun 7* 3 792 
to Accun 76* B15 

Japan Hertununce 14 1 0 \5a« 

Da Accun M16 imo 

UT Soeoa Featurs 65 5 706 
Ds Accun 681 713 

Gcaa £ Preoous uei *33 *69 

Do Accun 445 484 

US Speooi fee 57 3 61 7a 

Do Acam 62 0 669a 

Euapeen Pert fee 859 91 J 

Da Accua 060 91* 


*46 9 *82 7# 
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6322 682 B# 
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1092 
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NORWICH UT MANAGERS 
PC' Baa 4 Ufeucla *»1 3NG 
0603 V2200 

Gro vc T>uM £15 44 »?5S -0G1 3 88 , 

fell Iiu+A 128 0 134 7 -04 1 34 I 


OPFEfeCBiER TRUST Management 

65 Cannon 5 vb BL London EC-SN 6A£ 
rfeornr, 01-236 38856.'?, SVO 


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Qrjwn Fife3 Me 875 93 1 

Da acim U»5 1399 

fetufec Fong 1150 1223 

1101 Eauty fee 129? 13? « 

Ct A-run 1293 131 4 

UM lro-.l Inc t?l 6 1294 

Da Atafei 2106 22*0 


04 Otter Cnnj 10 


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33-35 GfACit+oi.-i -1 uaeoe EC3V QAV 


PERPETUAL UMfT TRUST 
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0491 f-76966 


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28 3 301 -M tub 
1184 1230 i.X'i 


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031-S66 91Ci 


PROLIFIC UNIT TRUSTS 

22? B-Afeme Lamar ECT 
01-247 -544.7 

btemaienai li?5 120 

"4« l»;.-fe» 587 63 

Qfev 8 uN 9ft 0 i£3 

F# Ej-Jt-n 1789 189 

North Amtfcjn 1»? 135 

Soonv '-os 621 72 

TpCW+CVJ, TD 88 117 

Eada fecorno 84 9 91 


PMIDKNT1AL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 

51 £9 ("Old MB. Boro EiMi IGt 2DL 


fell feCOW U'S 
Do ACDi-i 


1*65 15b9 
217 7 231 6 


SCOTTISH UFE INVESTMENTS 


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7389 7Sf.fi 


1170 

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SCOYTEH MUTUAL MVESTMCNT 


THORNTON UNO MANAGERS LID 

Pjtk note lb Ih+ji l»-us UfeiU"i [CJM 
?PJ 

01 MA »’<.! 

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<• JJ ftyy A aft (fein ‘,c )A BSP 

01 9203256 

GmwerCos ll j oJ 8 -1 4 1 CO 


T0UD4E REMNANT 

UprmaV HTuu ? Rjoj* D-itk L'jw LC* 

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01-248 1250 

Amrrrjn Growm 41 1 JJB fA( 

General &r*afe m> 1 tju# -8 s 2 <7 

GL-4UI Tscn 41 '} 44 3 —dr, 1) IJ 

fertBiB Grctalh ■:* til# -0J4h2 

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Japan Giowm :y -- >l 7 +0 1 (1 13 

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Litetol 0«n - ' u rad# +U 1 I 3? 


TYNDALL MANAGERS 
■R tJftyi^r HJ Un V 
IC72 71i'41 


01^78 3377 
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3193 *035 -?D 339 

998 1051 -2 4 C *6 

520 553# *23 064 
64 8 £87 .04 £43 

678 10*0# -0 6 0 83 
984 TO*? -OP nos 
7?9 77 5 -02 008 

616 655# -05 21’ 
769 018# -CS 229 
187 7 1968 -01 2 48 


MLA UNTT TRUST MANAGEMENT 

»MW S«*ng Ha Uutsione Kent fc*i« IXX 

0622 £7*751 


(HALTER MANAGEMENT COMPANY 

31 -45 G’wnam Si London EC2V tlh 
01-600 *177 


Recovery 1304 138 64 

DoAtOSO 1410 16084 

European me 61 2 850 

Do Accun 81? 850 

FRCNDSPfKMDENT MANAGERS 
P ur m n Ena. Dcnng Surrey 


1304 138 b* *04 1 £9 
141» 1S0B* .02 1» 
612 850 +12 085 


FP Eoxty Dm 
to Accun 
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Do Aecum 
Sm+anfch® Oar 
to Accum 


1875 1990 
3124 331-6 
113 7 1209 
IMS 1377 
1«*8 17* B 
170? 1000 


Energy Tnai *37 *8* 

Extra income 15*0 164 & 

FmanoH 1611 1713 

6*Stral00v 562 57 9 

GaoWMnveamanf 3601 Z7B7' 

team £ Grown 380 *0*1 

japfeme £ Peo5c 1778 ies r 

npi Amet Growdi 100.4 1060 

fed Recorory 107* 11*2i 

Smalcc CoS 3048 21701 

GMx# fee Tai 572 600 

specw So Ace 2885 2860 


FUNDS W COURT 

>U«c TitaMd KfeOMy WC2 

01-406*300 


15*0 1646# -07 570 
161 T 1713# *01 2*5 
562 579 -01 IJ* 

380 1 278 7# .-0.1 2 74 
380 *04# -02 *05 
1770 109 T -08 078 

100* 1068 +07 115 

107* 11*2# +06 191 
3048 2178c -0* IJ2 

572 60fl *06 520 

2889 3B60 -02 106 


C*pO» 
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Mgn Weld 


3610 3602 
1*8* 1*08 
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crown uwriRurrsatinces 
Con House. Wttwg GU2i 1XW 
0*86? 5033 

krone Trun 2272 2*30 *02 638 

Grown Trvsf 2004 S«0a wl5 321 

American Tna 1272 1360# +06 074 


GT UBT MANAGERS 
60> floor. 0. Oeranstxrft 
01-283 2575 OeUng Oi- 
UK Cap Fnd tec « 

to Accun IS 

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femne be a w 16; 

US 6 General 5! 

Teui 8 Gro+tn 6: 

Japan & General si 

Far Eafe 8 Gen IK 

European ftmd 251 

Germany Fifed « 


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01-626 9*31 

92 1 989# *07 310 
1327 1420 +10 310 

173 837 +0* 630 

1660 1730# +11 190 
1675 1792 +13 090 


Beaune Surer RH2 88L 
07372 <?*3* 


07372 OZ* 

UK income 
UK Grown Accun 
. Do Os 
European Grown 
Pacroc Grown 


US 6 General 55 7 596 *0 * 090 

Teui X Growth 6i.i El +0* 1» 

Japan ft General Si 3 2088 +43 020 

Far Eate 6 Gen 113* 1213 +10 0*0 

Eirapean Fifed 25*1 271.8 +59 a 30 

Germany Fifed £9 1 740 +24 050 

GAHTMQfC FUND MANAGERS 
2. Si Mary Axe. London EC3A 0BP 
01-623 1212 Deeing 01-623 5766 Oaaing 01 -6TC 


401 512 
477 MB 
47 7 50B 
53 8 578 
5*0. 57 5 


EFM UBT TRUST MANAGERS 
* Mamfe Crescent Eflrtxjrgh 
031-226 3*98 

Amnican FM 712 761 

CtKXtil Fund 910 07 r 

Drown £ Me Fifed 1202 123: 

wgn Dim Fifed 1030 HU 

Mem u on * ) Fund 1941 2C7; 

RecoucesFbre) 218 23: 


Soar Jap Goa Fnd 382 *09 


910 074 -02 175 

1203 1237# -02 *06 

1039 1112 -05 £.07 

19*1 2077# *07 IDS 
218 233 405 043 


Ameirooi Trofl 863 920 

Aussaton Trust TB2 195 

Small Tct Ac am 526 S6£a 
' OoDMI 480 492# 

CorfeTOtey SMn 515 56.1 
Europefet Trusi 514 55.1 

Lttj Incoro* Trust *57 49 0 
Far Eastern Trust 1370 1476 
Fmed taferesi Fifed 26.1 28JM 
Of Tiua 26 7 278 

GUd Fifed ACQfei 177 7 1861 
Do tot 1893 1802 

Odd Sn»e Trust 123 13 1 
Hanged American 297 310 


863 920 *03 000 

16? 165 *04 035 

526 56 £• *Oi 203 
*80 492# +1 7 203 
515 56.1 +12 154 

514 55 1 +1 * 004 

45 7 490 *05 5 47 

370 1476 *27 000 

26.1 280# -01 978 
36 7 27 6 8 48 

77 7 180 1 +22 020 

693 1802 +20 020 

123 131 +08 216 

29 7 31.8 0 10 


ToLpT Furd 
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1704 1823# +.15 000 

W3J.W84 aas 

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(Exl'SdMBw Jap N) 2222 2294 0 10 

EirakfeO 270 .239# +00 348 

EAGLE STAR WOT TRUST MANAGBB 
Bon Road attent io n. Gfeutt W r GL53 7LQ 
0342 571311 

UKBaancedfec 656 TOO +02 299 

Do Accun 885 710 +0.1 295 

W Grown Accun 78.4 6* 7 *0.1 150 

-GKHtUBCMc. (25 668 *02 520 

_ N Amencen Acnmt «*« 637# 111 . 

Far Eastern Accun 983 10*9# *02 000 ] Euopaan Grnwti 
Enrosan Accun 790 851# -2* 079 Go«* McSrae 
UK Gm 6 FI tec 5*2 578 +0 1 831 1 - - ** 

to ACCOM 55 0 596 +01 808 

ENBUHANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 
Attew Carve. Hexagon House. 2a We st ern 
Road Rooaord RM1 310 
070066088 

Enduanc e IK* 1138 314 

EQOTABLB UNUR ADBB Nlt I KA TION 
35 FeuntanSL Mfei c heswr 
061-238 568S 


Mgl> Income Tnai 1355 US 1# -05 597 

Hong Kong Trust 280 31 0 1 TO 

feaxne Fuad 70S 780# - - 3*1 

insurance Aganooe £*521 .48*7# 209 

Japan Tool t*95 169.1 *32 0 00 

Mwgw Exempt 2B5L6 273.6 -0.1 250 

OaBtnmqy TluS 31 I 334 *03 1.75 

Scaaal 58s Troat 905 97 1 +03 080 

UKSe# C* RfCTst 69 4 7*0 -O? 157 

CDVETTUOMI) UND MANAGEMENT 
Y^rnasia Hse. 77 London wu. London EC2N 


+02 299 1 ’DA 
+0.1 205 | 01-508 5020 
ins Grown 
American Oomti 
Amman Inc 


719 8*3 +07 183 

615 Ml# -01 094 
095 715 -0.1 5 80 

2201 2354 +41 025 

354 380# +10 178 
1653 176 7# 


GREUMT MANAGERS 
R^aggnge-ECBPaON 

G# 8 Famplnt 1215 ’ 
GnxxVl Epury 1826 : 


Etwtatta Pakan 


SmaSar Companms 2064 2195 


1215 1265 +01 879 

1«fi 2049 +02 208 

27l F 201 4c +07 29* 
057 1*44 -08 1 31 

2350 2501 +14 012 

251 B 2679# 140 


-03 338 I European Trust 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


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74 

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73 

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43 170 

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63 

204 

100 

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256 


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51 103 

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180 

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73 

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650 

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274 



MANAGERS 

105. bfece-1 ii C»\ *•+ G? LHN 
0*1 r*» (.i» 

L’K tax’s 1596 I ’00 

G*1 & T.xi-7 1171 124 5 

tP» SIW* CaMa 1 A? 6 151ft 

CwdOren Mi 1 214 0 

N *me-c*n 1i7Y? 1168 

Paced ire>7 iwo 

SCOTTISH IMIT TRUST 

29. Crmcn' is CfWp 
DJl-aii 43T 

PiW ft* 7 ID J 

wyua >S1 38* 

N Amend"* ..If JS6 

feccrnf Fund 47 9 459# 

turopran 4.’ b 456 

N Amet fee > 4 78 3 

UK Grown jyB J1 9 

Exoafes J06 376 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO to- *?.» EH'b 5BU 

031456 6LD7 

P«5 Ed bh * ?*6 -io J.V 

Co Accum .'aJj 7714 -17 J»V 

SENTINEL FUNDS MANAGEMENT 

30 Cey Lc+fl.-. L- I* 7AV 

01-638 60n 

AmvT*cnSCt« 1(1(10 107 0 .|lh ll.'i 

Pluhe wa 7H67 -08 1' £'.' 

5*:feromeFnJ l-;e 174 0# -06*i> 

special Sewbcx-. ;j? 0 7i6 1 i *n 

um Grown 371 343# -07 0i'- 

Araencftn Macm. 'J.( 75? +02 01 

Sm* Cox V * 403 -01 Hi 

Japan Teen 8 LV+* tu 1 i?i 0 -oi nw 

wet m aeuxu’ fertw sy» Y9D# -04 ! M 

Eiempf SI9) 555 7# Z7S 

UK Genwa* lift 338 1 Hi 

turo Grown Ui 368 +13 CV 

Euro Income 438 459c +09 4ID 


Air. we* 
P.< »cc 

IJDJ4 

to Actum 
[>™« 
to Ac film 

Ife lastt+n 
to Accun 
Int P« op 
to Aicxxti 

l‘r» C*MF 

to »CM*n 
on feeuwe 
to rerun 

Mijn txd 
to Ac.txn 
In me 

to Atrum 

ini> L'amngs 


.'■■7 u>. 5* 
- ’ -+■’ M 

.'«■ ICO 6# 
IJ* U 11*11 H# 
I--J I ■” 9 
1’Mi 1H0V 

m> • M7# 


1 14 I l.’l f 
77f - 1 '41 5 
■(hi 1 *67 

1 :-rd in?.’ 


UK moMDENTUT MANAGERS 

UK Hru*' C45U, '..1 .11 fvt S>'i 3 h 

I'W 11674? 

UK route It'.' -- 114 7# -01 

1-acJic CUin i.te'* t+8 M# ,7 I 

N Amp 1 1* u i?i la -a 1 

VANGUARD TRUST 

rr> Hpcxxn Vi+ttxl Ci’iA 7(U 
• — +w*J Efeju*—, 01 ?hi tVialm] lav c' 

. 3ft 7468 

Giimtn me tA. -i H»+ -0* 7 At 

to Acc.en ' .tel '# -d« 701 

iWfe \«k) I Bit. . M 4# -7* K?n 

to Aicum ,Y1|i .’tin! u4 5.‘4 

'•(«* 'W. 4i J J ' -i# *0 17 JH 


SI?) 555 7# 
Us 338 
M* 368 
J? 3 459c 


•0 1 7 JH 

• U I 7 Pi 
■ 0 1 4 IJ 
-04 4 U 

174 
1 74 
•OI? 7.w 
-01? 7 3* 


SMON A COATES 

1 London IV J a pro-. London EC7M 5PT 
01-5BB 35*4 Ext ^5’ 

Sceow S41 15) 493 5? 7 

ST AWARD LIFE 

3 George Si Ec-rtj'-.h C*C 2JC2 
031 275 7557 

Income Unas 74 0 75 7 

Do Accum Urw-. 76 5 78* 

STEWART. IVORY UMT TRUST 
MANAGER5 

*5. Cherwne So Ed^evrt 
031-726 3271 

Americ a n Find 7717 7356 -06 

Do ACum 7JR4 76*5 -06 

Da iNwtta+al is5 7 165* -04 

Auatraftan Fund «*3 10*7 -06 

OoACCun 999 1064 -07 

Brash Fifed -<>8 6 6376 +67. 

Do Accun BTcJ 0588 +90 

European Fifed 3U3 0 322 7 +67 

DO ACCun .'19 0 309 0 -711 

jaowi Find U? 7 359 7 -09 1 

Do Acam 3794 3615 -09 1 

Sans PPP IL94 1704 

SUN ALLIANCE 

Sife Awnoe nu> H.+srum Sussex 
OTO3 56293 

£ Hurry Tfusi act 371 8 3955 *2 ) I 

N Am Trust ACC 51 4 61 0 +01 

Far East Trim ACC 8*9 903 +03 1 

WomwM Bona 50 1 533 +03 ' 

168 WOT TRUSTS LTD 

Keen* House fcoofi Hams spid IPG 

0264 56709 Dealings 0264 63*32/3(4 


to Aicum 7iH (i 7ii. 7 

'•(«* 'j* - . L. J J ' -l# 

to Acr »X» 4H r. *'7 

Trustee l.’ji, 1.1 '-i 

to ALCifei h ' t. . I.' 1 

Anrt £ lien yj 7 -,j s 

to Actw -,i ' ms 

MrJm Pcxltebo l+.‘i 'Ll M le 
to Acifn Inn ;; *■’ • ’ 
Aftn.1 Rote ASH i'-i li.-a ll.it,# 

Dm Altun ll?-J ll-rr. 

T.e Cast 6 Ger* Inc Sdi. -O'* 

to Accjm Ml ti MH 


UTAROLE Y UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 

I’.jroey HiKiN, J Orv-miii rr 'jj London I 
L" 979 1532 

•nwican Tnni k) 5 i-8i# 

Fjr EjM £ Gon 10: 1 <110# >04 I 

mi Grown 7i .i i.. m *i3i 

tel "Pm Trust Bln B'5 *07' 

Jjpin Gnrwtr 17.* p l.hjn *15 1 

■man Ccxnpaiws io>6 iu ’ -i ? ; 

lr-rluv-pgf 374 .1*8 ( 

AnUtjkx 16? .18-1 -01 ; 

L'K Trusi 174 1 IL'I -0 7 : 

Imccean Grondl 5b 1 59 7# -1*| 

Hcmrj Kdng ?4J 7 5 .07 1 

WAVERLIV ASSET MANAGE MENT 

11 ChjrioRe Sq Eduanx-in 
031 775 1551 

Au-hahan Gold IB] i"l -07 

FkJk. Basn i.\5 1** -01 

Canadian ON Gm 5?n tl 5 -1 4 

.Gme Mae Fno «>0i B 1% 1 -0? 

WMTTHtQOALE UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
? Honey L3 EC2 801 


? Honey L3 EC 
Oi e06 908516 


Ammon fee 
Do Acrum 
Em to™ Inc 
DD ACOin 
General Une Inc 
Do Accun 
G*t 8 Fixed me 
Da A ccun 
home 
Aecum 
Pacdc be 

Oaecarm 

M me 
Do Accun 
Sewetad Opps he 
Do Accun 
Neiual Res 
Do Accun 


H3i 1204# +03 I 13 
1190 1285# +02 1 13 
1123 1195c +03 5*0 
131 2 1396c -O* 5*0 

1501 1597# +12 293 
7477 2610# +19 793 
*98 517# +01 8*0 
657 68 5# *01 0*0 
7055 ?I07 +13 *65 

3206 3*1 1 +20 *66 

(675 1729# +1 7 031 
167 0 1706 +10 031 

3i0* 3380 +30 176 

193? *10* *38 126 

614 654 *0* 180 

6?3 716 *04 180 

47 6 *5* *I2 2<0 

43 8 «6 7 *13 710 


TAR0GT TRUST MANAGERS 

Targowuse. G4MI04SU ltd Aytatwy Sucks 

AmerEatfe 711 767 *01 010 

AoMmsan 160 171 -0 1 0 10 

Commoorty FBI 730 *14 «73 

79 7 316# *01 235 

1701 1790 358 

European Spec Ses 1046 1110 +19 106 


:+t DM G4I Fun ft? n •«* ’ 000 

l<:> lievt Bond Fa *51' * '.1 0 +01 

WINDSOR TRUST MANAGE R$ LTD 

Amove* House 83 K4,.; «4. Imccn «C2B 

01405 8331 

Cunv « EauOy 47 (I j|i0 -01 7 94 

«w«N SI 7 SI 5# -02 6 38 

iiMii 48h 520 33* 


• Ex dWKMmL c Cum dwdend. k Cum 
stock spK. ■ Ex stock spW. m Cum aM 
(any two or more ol above). ■ Ex 80 (any 
two or more o( aoove). Dealing or 
valuation days: ft) Monday (2) Tuesday. 
(3) Wednesday. (*) Thursday (5) Friday. 
(20) 25th of month. (21) 2nd Tlnrsday ol 
month. IZ2) 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 
month. (23) 20th of month. (2*) 3rd 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday of month. (26) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (Z7> 1st Wednesday ot month. (28) 
Lest Thursday ol month (291 3rd workoig 
day of month. (30) iSihol month pi) Ut 
working day ol montn. (32) 20th of month. 
(33) 1st day of February. May, August 
November. (34) Lest working day of 
month. (35)15Ui of month. (36) I4tn of 
month. (3o 21st of month. (38) W 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesday ol month (d0) Vaiuod 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday of Stock 
Exchange account. (42) Last day of 
mdiuh (43) 2nd and M) Wednesday of 
month. (44) Quarterly (451 6th ol month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday oi month 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1986 

Hign Lon Company 


tocc Cnga DtncB 


EXCHANGE 

G W Joynsan and Co report 

SUGAR (FtwpC. Catnftow) 
FOB 

Oa . 151.8-SI .2 


160.0-57.0 

1 March - 

167.8-67.6 

May 

17&0-74.0 

1 o3U 

T79.0-78J) 

i Vok . 

3041 . 

00C0A 

Sep - 

_ 1384-83 ! 

Dec 

1*35-34 | 

May . 

_ 1495-94 ! 

Jly ... 

1513-12 

Sep 

1532-29 


... 1560-58 

VOfc . 

3355 

COFFH 


133.00- 32.00 

132.00- 2300 



SOYABEAN 

0a 

Dec 

Feb 

-- 

Jun 


Us - 


...... 100-27.0 

— lzaa-275 
127.7-275 

._. 130^-295 
13104)03 

— 1303-293 
1303-29.0 

118 


GASOIL 

Sep 

Oa 

Nov 

Dec 

Jan .... 


12230-Z22S 

12875-2625 

13030-2930 

132.00-3130 

13330-3130 


Apr 131.00-23.00 

kfiy 14030-25.00 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
IhwffieMI prtees 
OfficWTOmovef figures 

Price tas per metric tonne 
Skver in pence per tray owe* 

Rudolf WoN B Co. Ltd. report 

COPPER GRADEA 

Cash 8S6.00-6S7.00 

Three Morths. 90530-806.00 

Vd 1500 

Tone Easer 

STANDARD CATHODES 

C8Sh 866.00-867.00 

Three Months. 885.00-887.00 

VOl 1100 

Tone Barely Steady 

LEAD 

Cash 282.00-263.00 

Three Months . 263D0-264.00 

VOl 200 

Tone — — Oust 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 50200-612.00 

Vol N4 

Tone — ...... KSe 

ZMCHKDfORADE 

Cash 544.00-54500 

Three Months . 545-003*6.00 

Vot 750 

Tone Barely Steady 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 368JXK368000 

Hkbb Months . 37530-37730 

Vol SH 

Tone Idte 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash 366.00-368.00 


COMMODITIES 


Three Months . 3753037730 

Vol Nil 

Tone IcSB 


Cash 74830-74930 

Three Months 761.00-76130 

Vol 2250 

Tons Barefy Steady 


Cash 2590-2600 

Three Months — 2591-2595 

vai ns 

Tone Barely Steady 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COMMISSION 
Average taistock pctcas at 

representative markela oa 
11th August 

GR Carte. 95.63P per kg hv 
(+0.13) 

G& Sheep 158.04P per kg est 

cw (+2.121 __ 

G&FSp. 78.67p per kg fw 



LONDON ICATRJTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Pig Comma 
p. per kite 

□nth Open Close 


England end Wales 

Cattle nos down SO V aw. 

pnce.9S.d2p 1-0.19) 

Sheep nos. down 03 eve. 
price. 159 83p (+2.48) 

Pig nos. iro 1.1 “o. awe. 
,7837p 1-1.4“ 


Pig Mere vol: 0 

LONDON MEAT FUTUFtES 
EXCHANGE 
Live Cattle Cannes 
p. per luio 

Month Open Close 

Aug 98.50 

Sept 9830 

Oa 9830 

Now 9850 

Feb 0830 

Apri 9830 

June 99.00 


LONDON CRAIN FUTURES 
£ per tom# 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
Eper tonne 

Hi Open Close 
13100 13850 
144 SO 139.00 
214 00 208.00 
221.80 220 00 
8500 8500 
Vol. 1862 


UFFEX 

GJU. Freight Futures Ltd 
report $10 per Index point 
freight roder 

High/low Close 
Oct 86 687.0-6800 6860 

Jan 87 — - 707.5 

Apr 87 — 7500 

•M87 6975 

0ctS7 - 790.0 

Jan 86 780.0 

Apr 88 8850 

Jul88 790.0 

Vol: 13 lots 
Open (merest 1952 


TANKER REPORT 

Hqft/Low Close 
£ 1062-1062 10620 
56 1066.0 


Cattle nos. down 5.0 V aw. 
pnea. 95.79p (+1 .96) 

Sheep nos. up I45_^x aw. 
once. 147.B9p (+1-29) 

Pro MS. down 25.0 D ». aw. 
pnea I 7&47p{-030) 


Month 

Wheal 

Ona 

Barley 

Close 

Sept 

105JS 

10330 

Nov 

107.75 

105.15 

Jan 

110.65 

108.40 

March 

113.10 

110.75 

May 

115-55 

11230 

Volume- 

Wheat 

_ |M 

..... 671 

Barley 

— ~ 

— 123 


Aug Bfi 1062-1062 IQI 

Sen 66 1G 

Oct 85 101 

Dec 66 — - 1ft 

Mar 87 1ft 

JunB7 — + IO! 
VOL 15 bts 
Openmtere&tdO 

Spot market commentary. 

Tanker index; 

1144.0UP4.0 On 8/8)86 
Dry cargo mdex; 

5533 up 2.0 on B)8/86 


V“ 




















20 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 



— (Qcld' 


From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up, tu pnc urn your overall total. Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
nave min outright or a share of the toial 
daily pnze money staled. If you aa* a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


No. Company 


Gronp 


Gam or 
loss 


limn Nnvpopm Ltd. 


n 

Wu 


1IH ; 

h 

Mi'ktvhniu 

linTrlHrlihlMM 



BTF 

iiffiwww«ea 

l S 

n 

Houla,’ 

Banks. Ducouni 

E 

Laird 

■rrrwfM^ga 


D 

Br Triecwil 

Bertneah 

l 

O 

HOC 

■BKiwmaBai 

■i> 

rr 

Bihinions (Muv) 

lndusmals A-D 

_J 

H 

Ford Motor 


zf 

CD 

Lind SutfufTliiS 



n 

Pilkinpirm 

irwraiEi 


IB 

Frniront 



m 

Hickson 



IS 

Scwi Grounham 


,1 

IE 

Frupmow 

Pro pert v 


EC 

Prop Rr'V 

Propcnv 


IS 

Turjiull 


Bl 

■E 

1 HIT 

■iff.ro mmii 

— 1 

IB 

Tfvm EMI - 

BcL'inraik 

zj 

ES 

Luoicn 


ZJ 

ED 

Harm Qucciuwav 



E3 

Bice 

Ek\inols 


E 

3111,1] ln\h 

Hanks. Discount 

■■jl 

El 

Smilh, Inil 

Industrials S-Z 

■■-j 

E 

iTjiihury-SihwL'plks 

Foods 

i 

B 

Ertik-s, l.ishunf 

Benncals 


m 

\lwhaiHn 1 Henry | 

Banks. Discount 


ES 

Weir 

Indtninals S-Z 

N 

E 

Ko»cr 

IXIJIAlJWIrJr-M 


ES 

Lvntun 

Pmpem 


ta 

Amwiri’nj: 

Muiors. Aircraft 


ta 

Ttalalpr Huikc 

lndusmals S-Z 

B 

B3 

AB R«vJ 

Friodi 


B 

IMl 

Industrials E-K 

1 

ES 

Intp Hrvin Ind 

Onroiroals. Ptas 

9 

E2 

Waller h'AWi 

lodnsinnls S-Z 

1HI1 

B 

FlSIKU 

lndusmals E-K 

ZJ 

ES 

Hank Of Irviand 

Banks. Drsci’uni 


'ES 

Acth’rd 

Newspapers. Puh 


'ES 

W.’lvrhmpin i O 

Breweries 


ED 

VSPA-MFr 

Foods 


ES 

Coitk iftm) 

lndusmals A-D 


ES 

33 hiiecrort 

Industrials S-Z 


E 

S’uamurc 

Industrials S-Z 



Please be sure to take account 
of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 

Please make a note of your daily icials 
for ihc wceklv dividend of £J}.iXK) in 
Saturday's newspaper. 

i won 

IUI 

WE Cl 

IHU 


SAI 

WcT+l J 

□ 






□ 


BRITISH FUNDS 


i«« 

High Low SlOC* 


im Grot* 

orty Red 
Pnte cn-jo v«“ > y«”. 


SHORTS (Under Hve Years) 

96 94 E.U1 

102 ioo E-m 
KD 90' E.cn 

100 93 Tft-d'j 
9T. 9?'. Even 

101 9? E-di 
90 M-.fund 
101' 95 I'M! 

97 • 90 T»m* 

IW 9? ■ Thus 

99 9? Treay 

104 % Even 
10? 

94 
10? 
to: 

105 
104 
111 

66 
86 
1 07 
93 
IQS' 

103 
9? 

114 


86 Tun* 
93 freak 


93 £•«* 

94 -6.cn 
76 e.cn 
83 Irwi 
94 6»cn 
«4 Treat 
94 E.cti 


82 Treat 
103 Treji 


99 79 Treat, 

100- en Iw 

1 06 97 Treak 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

it? 


10? 

149 

134 


99 Tl+.l,. II . 

FU fin’d j 

9f Ewn ir. 
103 T'*« 1? 

SI lr»ft to-. 
95 T'.'.is CIO • 
KM E.cn i’ 

107 E«n 13 
94 Tier- iff- . 
- 103 Dei, 13 - 
"9 Fund *•.. 

nr- Tran 13 - v 
105 TftU* U • . 
9” E.cn 13 

110 L-cn i.i 

fl* Two* 9'. 
I«f Trr.i-i |3 , 
p 8‘ Oil 3 
II E«cn TO ' . 
1C4 Trea-. 13 

117 Tf|. 14*. 

B ' t'lM'. 9 1 - 
133 • 1 '*•■!. 15 ■ 

Ml' £..n i? 

?j Fumn- 

nil Ci*"* io . 
HO T*..r *j . 
91 E.cn T.1 
Trt Imn m '. 
137 C.cn !;• .. 
?J T -.i* n 
89 r«-:« ■■ . 
IT" lo'.r. 15 '■ 
105 . E.'*n IT" 

SM Tu-. -V 

IUJ firn i.’ 
tai Tip.r li’ -.. 
94 i’.wv 10 , 

111 Ikm-. 1) 


1991 
1987 91 
1991 
1993 
1993 
• '993 
1«7 
1993 
1993 
W91 
1993 

1993 
1954 

1994 
1994 

1994 

1995 
1190-95 

I #95 

1991 
19*5 
'»*: 96 
1998 
innr, 

■ 996 
1+95 
1+J7 


107. 
91 
106' 
113 
103' 1 
104' 
ill -1 
117'. 
183 v 
114' 

90 « 
131 

136 1 
115 1 
130 
97 . 
II] 
;8'- 
103 
US' 
135 
97* 

134 

137 
83 

107 - 
137 - 
105 « 


IwiJ 

1997 134 
I'lSiC* RJ 

1998 


103 9 467 
63 a 141 

104 9 470 

117 9586 

58 9409 
10 0 9514 

MO 9 661 
115 9753 

9 8 9 509 

ID 9 9 604 

87 7 844 

114 9 714 

US 9 596 
T08 9 76J 

>17 9 364 
9 3 9*71 
106 9 Ml 

36 6 343 

99 0675 
10 (f V 759 

113 937? 
9 7 9473 

114 9 5:0 

15 9 9 73? 

J 6 

9 9 96'7 

10 B 3 '73 

99 9 838 

9 = 9 611 

11 7 9 963 

8 I 9301 


HN8 

1996 

i+M 

1049 

l+rt 

IW 

30JU 


1. io- 
ns 
IOO - 
118 - 
106 
104 - 
134 


104 9 7sl 

99 96N 

9 8 9665 

10 4 9815 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 


i’i 'ii 

ti+.|. to- . com 

103 -•+ 

a r 

9 546 

vr- «+ 

■> . =ftji 

10= • 

90 

■3 574 

99 

C-'r. -1-. JOUO 

w •• 


9 407 

1=.' 117 

1 r.->- ;+ . I9S0-OI 

1=0 + 

10? 

9856 

III 44 

IiV.=i«J 

IW - ♦ 

96 

9 546 

i?4 un 

I. ten i?-.. |<W4E 

110 . . 

10 3 

9 7 74 

hta rxi 

T— .V. 9 200= 

10?- •• 

95 

9 5=1 

n? 

Tf.- 1 . it’ =XU 

104 • + 

9-> 

9 42* 

1?0 1l« 

J.r.r. i ■ . .lirKUn 

1*1 - 

10? 

9813 

1=1 HM 

Tr.-V.TI '..=001-04 

114 

ICO 

9 64= 

11= ’SI' 

T..-.,.. 10- . .'004 

104'. ♦ 

95 

9 4B= 

80 48 

Furv .1 ' 1994.04 

*> •- - 

6? 

8=21 

IOH . "D 

.V— v u -.. -jaa 

'00 + 

95 

9464 

HIM •». 

Cor-v ? ’COS 

to 0- + 

94 

9454 

105 AO 

Co+v ? =005 

IOO * 

94 

945= 

15- ..14 

E-en :0 . =005 

104 - - 

96 

9 433 

134 11=' 

Tt.rj-. |= '. 2pil].05 

1=4 » 

iao 

96011 

95 7? 

T'e.r, b - :oe=4» 

08 - + 

90 

9=93 

i07 in; 

h'. =0=6 

10= 

94 

9 449 

177 ■ 1(U 
=4 ?J 

Tr.si, r 1 , =Crrt-P7 

7r*.1* « *- .W* =!i 

117' • 

21 

100 
JS H 

9 STS 

B4 9= 

1’— ■' e . =007 

SO- + 

9 1 

9264 

U3 • MS 

T '++: IJ ' ■ 2004.00 

133 . . 

101 

9591 

is a: 

Tii'.v. fi . =009 

98 - 

9 1 

4=72 

72 57 

T'"V. 9 =000. 1 = 

t>6 •+' 

93 

BJsJ 

5) '6 

Tii-.’s 7'.'-=0i;.l> 

86- + 

90 

9 133 

136 113 

EfiJi IS-. 7013-17 

'16 + ♦ 

95 

9316 


UNDATED 


.W O’*'-. 4', 
J4 i'.jt In 1 - . 
14 C-'". J ■_ 

TV Ti.-.,-. 3- . 

Z4 iV.v^ n - 
34 - T.C4U 3 . 


INDEX 

13? m 
10: • 13 

>37 109 
10' 95 

107 9? 

no « 


94 

nr 


■no 65 


LINKED 

Ii«i II 3* 
Trart- IL 3 
T'- ui n. 3“ 
7«c,v H.= ■ 

7.P45 11 .: ■ 
Ti.m" i(. y* 

t-jt 1 
Tier. H3 . 
Ti-Hi «L3 ’ 
fc+itk <17 
Tv* n.: ■ 
Tj.ij'. U.7 ' 


1988 

1990 

1«W 

7001 

.’em 

3006 

3009 

.mu 
mu 
3516 
3016 A 
3030 


133' 
10 '- 
119 .• 
I0J. 
107 
105 

IQ! 

ion a 
S3 • 

97 • 

97 - 

95. 


9 J 

93 
"0 

94 
93 
93 


31 7703 
= 3 3 73' 

3 4 3«39 

30 3 573 
05 3627 

3.' 3 4?4 

34 2413 
30 3 »s 
10 3304 
3 I 3 753 
76 1734 
20 3*17 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


763 193 
Hi 66 
79« ’85 
13 - 8 
7611 1 ?9 
9 fi 
760 330 
4b9 364 
590 479 
46 37 
'40 410 
4JI 1 =86 
W 36 
17- - 31 
-7 33 
81? 4c 

117 90 

3'4 CIS 
717 144 
3'8 31’ 

m: 66 

*1 19> 
JOT 3J3 
74 oS> 
930 218 
TV? IJ6 
BSj 565 
4 SI 793 
653 319 
153 130 
599 417 
371 i?| 
501 176 
133 84 
448 7rf 


4llr»d Inyr 
'ir*ci.h v r 
Su5 No+ 3 
EMfiumiK*:] 

041* 01 Ir^jnd 
Bm* Lnuiru kiihI 
D-irii Lt-i-cii Un 
Pip* O’ -CJTUnl 

BJ’ClAC 

BerKimam 
E<o*n JirnpLiv 
CjTvt Aden 
C"*.-.. 

• Cniu> Mammaii 
Ouccro 

Com Dinh tvjies 

LOn»Tl<jr-ejnk 
OrUXT- e.ir* 
F,.*i K*| r.iunoo 
ij^lid itif 

Pe.ll 

H imfo' 

Hill iJmit-i 
Hie 

Jo**-rTi tt.n-^xfl 

poii: 1 Snuson 
KVmmcm B vnujn 
icin'- 

mu 

Ds t* \ * 

Midland 
lull All-4 
Val IA.<v.T 
Cn-iiiTMin 
w 'f 


740 

76 

197 

E9 

313 

n 

340 

394 

459 
J9 

4JD 
303 
57' 
EK'- 
E35 - 
€9 
no?' 

17?" 

394 

81 

ns 

383 

61 

460 
140 
770 
344 
335 
175 
533 
315 
407 
tnj 
315 


*2 9C as 69 
*3 04 4 

-1 ISO 78 

*3 in) so 

ISO 6 7 113 
-3 200 51 86 

*S 781 61 68 

-IS 136 S? ZTO 
28 8 9 9 38 0 
36 5010 

I - - 13) Si 

l-v 206 S 7 
-1 34 49 n j 

*4 6 0 5 1 

•J 3130 4 4 
>-I 66 30 10 4 

32 I 75 91 
*3 29 J6 129 

*11 10 3r> 30 &4 
.2 163 54 78 


-10 28 6 


STOCK EXCHANGE.!? FUGES . 




mf€iw 

Wa/d— 


ACCOUNT DAYS; Dealings began yesterday. Dealings end August 29. ^Contango day September I. Settlement day September S. 

§Forward bargains are perm i tied oc wo previous business days. 


2 '« 

1996 

98 

2 5 

7 0to 

191 

133 

ti- 

1986 

TOO- 

IJ 9 

9926 

136 

8' 

ll •+ 

1987 

1)11 - 

13 f 

9732 

84 

70 

CUT’ 

1987 

100- 

I0J 

9 766 

515 

342 


1987 

97' 

26 

7202 

3*8 

236 

i5' •' 

1987 

IOC- 

105 

9845 

180 

140 

6' •- 

198847 

98. 

69 

8352 

433 

328 

10*. 

1987 

’00'- 

10 0 

9748 

101 

75 

T 

1907 

96'. 

31 

7319 

105 

138 

ir. 

1987 

102 - 

11 7 

9 783 

346 

135 

'* • 

1985-88 

9 r. 

79 

9 361 

=90 

246 

to*. 

1988 

101 v 

10 4 

9698 

64 

58 

C9 

1988 

100. 

97 

95?7 

204 

17? 

V - 

1978-88 

9? '. - . 

32 

7157 

8? 

07 

9 *. 

1988 

99'. 

59 

9589 

154 

J’ 

11 

1989 

104 

no 

9 599 

281 

157 

IQ ». 

1989 

102'- 

103 

9 595 

216 

120 

Hf 

19B9 

ier 

99 

9 806 



10 

1909 

105'- 

97 

0 326 



2 'j 

1590 

83 

30 

7214 



3*. 

1991 

83 


r - 


II". 

792$ 

IW- 

106 

9S2? 



5*- 

190089 

91 

55 

8237 

L_ 

IMMM 

1I-+ 

1990 

104' • 

135 

9+41 



c? * 

1989 

99 

55 

9547 

*8 

■36 

3“> 

1989 

BS'. -' 

34 

7 426 

208 

160 

O. 

i?90 

no . 

118 

9.331 

415 

>5lT 

1 ? •+ 

1990 

109 - 

11 5 

9521 

=47 

140 

J', 

1990 

86 

35 

7M8 

158 

in 

106 

8 ■- 

1987-90 

97' -'• 

85 

9141 

76 

Iff*. 

1990 

101 . 

98 

9 450 

iJ? 

102 


1988 

H.jn Low Cempany 


eras 

i*» YKJ 

Pi c>> cn ge pore p/E 


80 58 Ru BnK 83 

135 102 RMTwmu f J1 HU 133 

380 2S0 Roy) 0m 0> Scot 302 

0 5 - Senroder* E5 . 

W4 4i3 Siana Cnarl 719 

818 6U union 658 

7r 43 - Welts FdfCO £68- 

320 220 Wimnisi 280 


• -fi 


0.8 1.0144 
71 58 96 

143 4 7 aa 
192 31 II 7 
500D 73 89 
52-3 80 663 


77 ZB 137 


BREWERIES 


38) 248 
040 820 
€7 38 

144 85 

530 375 

18? 144 
570 455 
515 410 
337 179 
2(M 186 
74} 183 
355 275 
514 40S 
91 89 

179 156 
288 its 
114 77 

753 217 
248 <31 
214 163 
540 J53 
316 zn 
I18 378 
351 188 
550 410 
130 195 


305 

730 

65 

12* 

510 

147 

S6S 

510 

320 

174 

311 

308 


ABed-Lyons 
Bass 
Bemaven 
Boo*pgio"5 
B>own 1 Mi mewl 

BuMWr iH pi 
B u>WiMMd 0<ew 

Curs lUinnewt 

Oevenen (J Ai 

Oreenan wnmoy 
Oeere Mig 
Gumneu 
Harovs 8 Hanson* 611 

HdTuanq Pea 75 

invemdon Dcd 155 

rush DoO 2? I 

Marston Thompson 108 

MWIand 753 

SR Brewenes 166 

Sco) 8 New 188 

Vain 37S 

WlttMMO 'A' 281 

Do B 280 

WTkta^sl tnv 313 

VWwmnoin (D 536 

lotng A* 335 


-3 

*5 


1-22 

3*3 

*2 

*3 


368 210 
213 
74 53 

17- 125 
550 331 
377 »l 

164 114 

37 22 

19? l-» 
81 61 
“'5 8?5 
7X Ml 
275 235 
9i 6> 

29 16 

73 37 

132 84 

158 154 
126 65 
123 40 

574 449 

488 2SS 

181 124 

104 CM 
117 7? 

104 61 

93 75 


71 
172 51 

68 54 

94 80 

131 106 
M5 254 
133 86 

24* 56 

7? 42 

252 149 
620 478 
190* 126 
433 765 
480 296 
484 286 
l?? '8 

91 71 

429 :=o 
1S6 126 
3Cf 178 
135 101 
156 161 
138 98 

444 384 

272 171 
10 23 
130 UK 
444 306 
920 798 
211 163 
234 IIS 
110 87 

395 285 
57? 440 
4A2 340 


Ahemeen Constr Z38 
Aitwc 2*1 

Amctfle 69 

ARMOOCS 1*7 

BPS IndusoiK 498 
Baggendge Bncfc 345 
Bacran De«s 136 

BaAayfBeni Cansti 28 
Brjmov 172 

Ban B>os 84 

BKXM0V5 920 

ew Circle 541 

BraeeonBOoud HA 280 
Sr Diecang 74 

Bttnm 6 JMiSOn 24 

Browrtoe 58 

Bnim <07 

Bio net! 3 Haum II 
Cakctxead Ftotwv <58 
Cemenl-floatJsione 112 
Conear Gro >23 
Capam 5<0 

Ccunirywe 486 

■>9ucn lOoieM ISO 
Dew i(Ved>-»l 
Douglas iHMi 
EMI 
Feb 
Do * 

FeiM-aied Hvj 
Prtjn Gp 
CaMora 
G«m 8 Dandy Ofd 121 
Cieason iMJ) 383 
HAT 133 

Hefcca’ Bar 225 

HewOMi-iiuan 69 
Haywood wiiiams 270 
Hictgs 8 Ha 610 

Osuc* Jonnsen 182 
Jan-’S uil 8 Sons 423 
Ldind kli 
Do A 

Lawrence iwanwi 112 
Liter fFJQ 
L'j.e« [VJ» 

Magnet 8 Soutn 
vianoets 
Money 


136 4.5 13 9 
21 7 30 155 

12 1.8 270 

4.6 3.7 IS 8 
200b 39 taa 
76 5J113 

15.4 2.7 16.1 
ia7 2.1 206 

7 9 45 124 
80 3 B 12.1 
103 33 11 7 

250 49132 

29 38 15 2 

88 44 95 
60 2J . 
32 3.0 154 

91 3 8 139 

100 53114 

164 44 145 
111 44 115 

11.1 4 4 II s 

IDS 60 272 
12.7 2.4 196 

10.4 32 22 4 


114 48230 

-4 157 65 141 

01 01 IDS 

61 32 142 

>-3 135 25147 

I 102 30 135 

*2 109 83) 

-1 e 56 

100 58 19 4 

» 44 69 1BO 

371 4 0 139 

-12 300 55 77 

-5 14.3 55 24 6 

4 3 52 138 

. 615 

1 3 0 6 6 29.4 

4 9 42 135 

12 


*1 


97 

128 

107 

88 

62 

140 

60 

89 


411 

409 


•108 

172 

788 

108 


Menials (Hatful 193 


Uav 8 Hasses 
McAnne | AI Iradl 
Meyer kv 
Miner [Stanley) 

Men* |A| 

Mcwtam (Jonnj 
Newarmai 
Fumngluni Buck 
Pwarmron 
Pnotmi rmp 
Poowrs 
BMC 
Remand 

Rutland 

Bugay Cemeni 
Sham 8 Fnner 
Sman ui 
Tarmac 

Taykit Woodrow 
Tdtwv Grow 
tra.n s Arnold 
Trem 
Tnnfl 
ViDrOpm 
Ward 

Waromaon fT) 

Wans Buve 
VW-iiem Bros 
Wiggins 
Wilson iConnoSyi ?56 
Wimpey (Genge) 201 


• ♦3 
*2 

• -I 


178 

775 

88 

355 

640 

406 

780 

144 

136 

80 

450 

311 

162 

417 

77 

188 

J46 

276 

81 

190 

76 

144 


40 36 
36 29 178 
2* 3D 48 95 
85 18 125 

05 5 7 109 

88 89 13 7 
35b 30 22 7 
47 40 190 

35 38 120 
25 40 84 

47 34 147 

5 4 9 0 234 

63 71 144 
2 6 2 1 335 

7 9 21 132 
5 4 41 125 
645 

24 35 131 
96 44 14 4 
194 32 15 7 

71 35 13 7 

250a 55 145 
100 24 11.6 

100 2.4 115 
52 40 05 

a 76 93 

2514.4 
7.4 4 3 151 

II 6 4 1 173 

54 55 207 

75 39 161 

01 01 
17.9 4 3 135 
82 35 137 

14 42 

93 79 159 
239 81114 
15.7 1 B 172 

93 52 133 
75 33 136 
4 3 45 33 
184 &2 79 
30 0 3.1 142 
185 4 1 125 
123 4.4 99 
91 63180 
33 24 205 
65b 85 165 
134 3.0 165 
123 4.0 138 
75 4.7 115 
122 29 163 

16 21 92 
100 60 29.8 
134 35 152 
10 4 38 15.6 

14 17 93 

68 36 135 
16 2 1 338 
07 05 168 
39 1 I 302 
54 27 194 


CHEMICALS PLASTICS 


AJCO NM Bearer W. 


169 II? 
1J0 $:• 

1» 8? 
30* ?a* 
12S 

no n? 
Ti 15 

1*3 127 
131 100 
34* 173 

133 in 

398 21* 

1*0 II) 

4W 330 
101 73 ■ 

10 734 
4if> 333 
MB 100 
1*5 119 
91 63 

IT* 129 
15? 31* 
71 J* 

r-i i.'0 

1C2 £7 


Atoed Cpdok» 
Anvnn*n 
Arena Cnemcai 
BTP 

B-iyer DM50 
BUguen 
Brom Chen’S 
Br BffiiOl 
■banning (W1 
■3<MI4e 
Ccaies Bros 
DO A 

Cory 'Horace) 

Crnm 
Do DU 

D*s 6 Evemrd 
Em ode 

FosecoAlinsep 
mislead Mamas) 
ho son 
He«nsi DM50 
nr & Cnem m a 
L.iC'nmB 
Legn 
n.Tjr 

R.jjBW Hwgs 
Rmrckii 
SNIA BPD 
*ulo>He ScejFman 
Wssierinome ivrs ers 
icmsiwe Cnem 137 


190 

400 

337 

141 

£94'. 

117 

135 

67 

no 

285 

■68 

151 

19 

146 

121 

206 

117 

230 

151 

383 

rea 

9:1 

360 

100 

154 

85 

137 

3*4 


♦V. 400 

• 36 

• *3 100 

01 

84 

•5'. 700 
103 
60 


-1 


■rl 
• *5 
»&' 
■ -6 
*9 


SI 
10 7 
66 
66 
09 
10.0 

93 

47 

129 

64 

214 

486 

118 

54 

28 

36 

35 


85 . 
19 195 

25 212 

26 13 9 
4 5 17.0 
74 

86 176 

44 156 
146 

4.6185 
35 107 
A9 106 
4 A 95 
4 7 64 
68 15 J 
125 
4 6 145 
4.0 126 
56 94 
42 11 7 
5.6 95 

SO 105 
33 149 
84 145 
17 196 
42 9 7 
26 172 

547 

45 288 
31 124 


CINEMAS AND TV 


=70 

176 

AngU TV A 

245 

-a 

139 

57 

129 

- - 

’= 

rjirtirO'jr 

44 


29 

86 

83 

=« 

i'6 

HPJ N»u 

2U 

+3 

11 4 

54 

97 

Jhi 

=53 

L1WT Mags 

3+3 

+3 

213 

62 

135 

=30 

<08 

Sect 7.' A 

3?n 


150 

47 

10 5 

=“ 

’49 

Tl'. NiV 

218 

r 

!*JD 

66 

107 

46 

Jr 

TSW 

45 


ze 

58 

124 

:.v 

225 

Thames TV 

2=5 

+1 



- 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


IMl «0 
9« *1 

99 79 

2'W 124 
I? ■> 
*50 387 
*7 40 

• 30 M5 
3;* 23* 

174 54 
S3 JO 

400 30i 
St- 4 ;« 
.>3 145 
1=2 11* 
286 210 
99 el 
— J0 2i* 
SI* 34* 
100 ~J 
8C0 
no 174 

;■ 1 iu4 
IK 39 
IT? )C5 
IJj 51 
.TO 193 
484 3IO 

175 67 
01 fa 

la-0 *9 

14 .4J0 
11 721 
■j07 -so 
1) 2S 

43 73 
1*7 102 

*3 76 

J* 24 
122 MU' 
22* IK 
A"0 6?* 
230 ’« 
2Ji 1*2 
JiU 7*3 
223 179 
635 523 
211 It? 
297 199 
35? W5 
?' E5 
512 I.,-.? 
I’l icf. 
273 270 
175 ’35 

44 jl 

It: ic: 

J 2; ? ;7 
9C *S 
'-S 74 

1-3 255 
34 1* 

a? 22 
s:i 41 j 
7f C3 
SO 5' 
ICO 170 
1« 133 
34? 2J5 
170 9h 
M 5 420 


4V..71 

A-:uJiMiu»r a 

Bt-.i^e iJamesi 
E-r^iec 

B jli-. LB'S 

e.cf, Sr^r 

Ei0iT4e 
F.OW-. |NI 
Budon 
Com:"', a 
CJ i-rr iS) 
Cnuich 

Corns vv.eiij 


162 

*4 

90 

'*1 

570 

52 

720 

734 

173 

40 

268 

460 


39 

31 

121 


Con’Sirwd Encnn 213 
Cions iFu-n A 12s 
DA'S :.w;son A iH] 


•Ui 


B? 


O-ocis Gro 

DuM1.ll 

EniS 4 '3aimir.r 
EWS iw.irciecari 
E"!S<e Srorcs 
EU"! 

E'ojxi domes 
Fme Ad Per 
Fcr-f lUamnj 
Form-irw 

F-i»jmans 

Gei'er iAji 
C<.m* SB 
Gaicaoro 1*1 
•joicsnuins -jp 
OUS 
Do A 

Huns Ouwnsnav 228 

Heiend 01 London 75 
Honas ->« 

h.^.- 4- 01 Le-csa 
J-:n«s tEmes:' 

LiOms Pvm 
LCB 

Li* Ccooef 

ie«dy 

LmciofT Kngour 
■Ma-.s a Saencar 

Ufinjaes tjenn. 

4.1.6* IK LB'Sura 
Moss Bros 
JjS'i Ncnsagcmg 

<!►»*! 1G1 
Pwhij 

P'oecy lAff-pfl 


332 

476 

00 

600 

180 

244 

115 

153 

*4 

HU 

426 

153 

74 

140 

190 

£13 

no . 


149 

7* 

33' 

150 
STS 
229 
195 
ICO 
210 
550 
208 
241 
325 

73 

108 


4 6 £5 106 

36 88 21 8 

38 42 126 

3 3 26 2*5 4 

30 05 589 

07 I J 388 
18! 22 25 3 
68 24 196 

75 329 
78 77 
31 14 8 
171 36 IO 

93 4 5-188 

67 54 73 

66 34 97 
13 16 173 

43 13 237 

79 17 160 
35 40 10 9 

136 2 3 232 

54 30 176 

61 2 5 174 

29 U St 
57 3 7 175 


Rameis Jaweiursi 185 
Re-M ' Au sun) 3413 

Cu A 141 

fill 3MK 


Si-’i-n ii’.'Hi a 

Do a 

*-an«. i*Gi 
j'eid 4 S-naon 
iia-oiacusc 
:}«5>n»64-i 
.aunrie Oc^es 
■jupe-d-uy Sloieo 

TiJIYM^PVAlla 
Tinv P/ocucra 
T.fi Tcp Drug 
Uncemocos 
W.''C Wnre 
Wir.l3«5 

ivoci'ACdh 


;i3 


TP 
t 96 
330 
:6 
34 

455 

45 

08 

■85 

17C 

3X 

150 

6M 


47 103 
£3 182 
5.0 137 

1 3 44.6 
41 17.* 
56 41J 
2S 184 
23 136 
29180 
as 88 

7 6 124 
61 109 
68 132 
3 3 24 B 

52 192 
30 86 

1.6 223 

4.7 15 7 
23 233 

I 9 144 

1.4 562 
15 28.0 

3 5 217 

2.4 281 
441 189 

14 190 
SI BIB 
?3 1 83 
=.3 296 
5.6 1=3 

IB 7 
43 14 5 

32 157 

32 15 4 

4 7 123 

53 182 

33 17 5 
180 


l»5 71 16251 

-5 9.9 

I =9 42 12 4 

*? M3 

-2 2 4 1 4 323 

*4 9 3 29 176 

30e ?3 

*15 2=9 36 144 


*3 


93 
100 
77 
14 
67 
10 7 

300 

300 
66 
23 
ai 
120 
80 
1 1 
64 
60 
11.1 
10.7 
66 
SB 
29 
82 
5 f 
5fln 
129 
10 
55 
43 
79 
79 

49 

86 

1 7n 

36 

5.1 

no 


electricals 


38 19* 

89 119 

J«.8 

:<U 

A0 E*C 

2=2 

-3 

37 II ? 

<01 

1=0 

7uhli11i)l« 

160 

• 

6 3 63 


36 

sir’ll - jc 

134 



y- « 

Acncfi" Oimpuiers 

45 

-3 


•* 

S’ 

AWM1 

90 


70 19 7 

300 =05 

aiuhic Ccmr 

=50 

-5 


f? 


Airtxr Fktexry 

55 

-= 

58 52 

7.'n i-ij 

fi-io See 

1*6 


54 86 

3 fl jin 

BiCG 

=:8 

-5 

J 9 li 1 

' 40 C j 

e..R 




114 34 24.B 
21 13 167 

03 02508 
Q5B 1 I 76 
31 4 
14 80 
17* 
I 3 121 
*9 1S1 
3 I 5? 


36 

33 
15 7 
2? 


1986 

►+))’ Lew Company 


Gross 
Orv YKJ 

Pncd Ch'ge pern P /E 


580 379 
280 177' 
112 75 

19 11' 

15? 64 
053 284 
JIB 710 
343 178 

57 37 

225 149 
352 203 
343 250 
256 140 

79 58 
190 147 
X 29' 
365 262 
SO 37 
213 162 
445 360 
85 46 
62 42 

337 237 
080 255 
253 140 
156 108 

53 25 

226 158 

100 90 

IW 80 
>63 50 
358 226 
24B 179 
290 85 

323 233 
219 124 
4?3 270 
178 12* 
4.J3 205 

0? 51’ 

250 B0 

58 33 

65 46 

313 Ml 1 ' 
108' 81 
49 13 

580 3U3 
32 18 

104. 11S 
17 13 

360 ISO 
190 120 
240 102 

24U 15', 

158 116 
45 22 

234 160 
4B8 158 
615 445 
1 52 74 

54 30’ 
168 96 
216 142 

134 78 
1G-. 13'. 

253 170 

135 44 

539 374 
2*0 170 
360 ?75 
310 TOG 
273 17B 
CSS 153 
190 118 
5(b 320 
323 22S 
10B 54 

103 75 

205 230 


Bontnorpa 515 

E* Toncom (88 

Bnjwn Bowen Ken) 101 


CA^ lAFl 
Carte S Wreten 
Camonoge EMC 
CAP Go 
□fend* 

Do 7' CPF 
Gomcap 
Cray Ewa 
Crysuuie 
Dale Bed 

Dadsonr 

DeMturai A 
Domno 

Dowdmg 8 Mi»5 

Dutefeer 


14 

B2 

334 

216 

17B 

44 

196 

3ii) 

305 

306 

so 

160 

34 

310 

38 

176 


f *8 

• . 

8-6 

4l 


•-5 


06 
13 6 


Beornmumens 373 a 


Etacn oroc Mach 
EIbcpot vc Ham BB 
Em« Lqhung 
Em«wni 
Fame? &ta 
Farranh 
Fcwrard Tedr 
GEC 

GuKrohor 
tahund EMa 
fflL 


63 

52 

268 

793 

T» 

>10 

36 

186 

120 

£0 

50 


I Sqnal A Control 235 


240 

235 

250 

194 

361 

171 

220 

56 

>00 

40 

46 

288 

Bfl'. 

IB 


Jones Stroud 
-kOOC 

Lee Hetngemon 
Logea 
MKBact 
Macro a 
Maniac 
Mere BS 
Micro Focin 
MuHione Bed 
Murray Bed 
Nemurli ILou«l 
NB 

□oaan«s 
O’UrJ U tV u m ant s 520 
Ptncom 26 

Pnwps fin 5’.*, d 17 
Pimps Lamps MV Ci5Vi 
Pita) 240 

Do A LM Vdhnu 185 
Piesser 192 

Do Aon ?5 ElSV 

Hawse 141 

Quasi Antomaten 
Racal Etea 

Hon fie- 
Saioies fGHj 
9iorrock 
£aunl TVfuvon 

sre 

Srone bm 

Dewgrors 


-a 

142 


^r 1 


29 
182 
483 
585 
135 
32 
146 
164 
04 

£13’ 

Teupnone Rentals 185 

Tetemetm 54 

Thom EMI 407 

Thorpe tFYVJ 250 

TunstaP 285 

U0 294 

Unmcti ISO 

Utd Leasng 153 

Utd Soemifc 160 

VG mstnimonts 481 

Votes 248 

Western Setecton 76 

wnowonn ana 9a 

Fining 255 


• ♦T'i 

• *IV 

4-10 

+2 


• ♦1'. 

• -25 

• -6 
-3 

• -1 


10JJ 19 1-8 
107 57 MO 

J 3 4 3 5* 
01 072TB 

0 7 69 
4 1 91 
10* 4 9 130 
21 Si 
10J 

2 1 07 154 

56 18*15 

6 5 3 2 13 5 

04 107 19 9 
10 06 

16 47 79 

ZB 09 309 
? 1 5 5 i? 1 

4 1 2 3 1? 9 

89 24 131 
ID 1 a 66 3 
4* 89 U4 
89b 33 W9 
63 2-3 i*0 

31 2 1 14 0 

24 22 16 8 
10b ?8 W6 
Si 33 11 6 
02e 68 100 

3 6 4 5 10= 

1 7 34 69 

10 04 

12 1 < 9 9 * 

17 1b 7 3 491 

17.9 7 2 9 7 
!4e 07 21 O 

154 44 120 

14 0 0 20 3 

43 20 170 

07 1.3 G 8 

01 0 J 30 1 

0 in 0=979 
19 3 6 7 13 1 

75 fl 5 12 7 
36 

26 05 225 

1.6 6 4 124 

575 45 

7 5 31 131 
75 45 90 

7.2 3 8 142 

ai 22 206 
139 

4 3 =4 19 3 

7 1 6 1 5 254 1 

314 54 112 

27 20251 

07 2J 80 
21 14 130 

6 5 4 D 103 

0 6 0 7 20.7 

100 51 153 I 

=5 4 6 11 

25 0 5 4 176 

&T 24 124 

25 09 196 

7.9 2 7 20 3 

93 S3 HO 
57 37 54 

81 51 132 

36 07 294 

129 52 62 
43 57 178 
=2 24 138 

98 38 130 


FINANCE AND LAND 


Abxrgwonii 

216 +1 18 

0B 


731 

162 

134 

■26 

AXken Hunts 

132 +4 32 

=.4 

5.6 



AmoOgasB 

1*5 a +1 



41 


Berkloy Teen 
CuiMHkx 

198 40-5 

£18'. 171 

09 

74 2 

49 

20 

GaiKWwrr 

250 5.7 

23 

395 



GentaHuiv 

32 





Equity 8 Gen 

27V 13 

47 

259 


11V 

hwry 8 3m« 

132 68 

S? 

18 7 



Moiedte 

183 +2 69b 

49 

762 


175 

Nat Home Loans 

68 






£84 -2 





Newmarket 

138 -2 





Temptation 

213 



231 

140 

— - 




261 

98 


Panadal Trass appear an Pace 19 


FOODS 


160 

128 

ASOA-MF1 


• +4 

4.5 

35 U2 

235 297 

37 

21 

(Jure Drafts 


-'2 

2S 

108 *80 

191 119 

361 

■wi 

Arov* 

AB Food 


11 3 

3J 134 

315 211 

366 

736 

300 

• +2 

87 

29 11 7 

295 250 

128 

95 

Assoc Fohenes 

95 

-l 

58 

5 3 283 

13* 96 

607 

522 

Avana 

522 

• .. 

171 

33 135 

6iS 473 


p*a 

Banks ISraney O 

t-1 

• -7 

18.4 

51 72 

216 133 

■trfl 

12 

Barker & DOCwn 

wm 

+'. 

131 

198 

44', 22 

pTjj 

230 

Barr (AGl 

El 

-fi 

39 95 

345 235 

201 

145 

Bassec Foods 

97 

5.4 1T3 

140 68 

1U8 

93 

Basteys 

93 

• . 

31 

33 10.7 

132 87 

Itta 

145 


161 

+3 

57 

35 192 

29 21 

150 

73 

Burma Coni 

mum 


7* 

&0 26 4 

38 25 

130 

54 

Br Vtvxrtnq IBVB 


♦2 

20 

16 228 

329 1B8 

IW 

14= 

Cadbury-SchweBOia 165 

H4 

5 1 19.4 


183 

145 

Cam M*ng 

M L 3 M 


Htr 

54 BJ 

268 250 

270 

IdU 

Otaoras Dames 



103 

*B 129 

2IS 123 

241 

=80 

1*2 

175 

Do A 

Ctftem 

|k| 

-s' 

1IU 

51 13 6 


290 220 
201 151 
316 238 
263 IBS 
147 126 
250 168 
323 181 
92 75 

567 *94 
392 220 
110 B5 
100 50 

*20 505 
760 124 
115 93 

216 150 
257 210 
82' 52 
300 258 
190 I 52 
165 127 
246 157 
532 366 
418 344 
163 122 
223 164 
558 520 
383 265 
310 218 
269 218 
161 136 


245 

169 

248 

190 

142 

171 

281 

90 

499 

2S2 

105 

95 

¥3 


Dee 

FiSIUP 1 Alberti 

F*ch Lowe 
Glass Glover 
HartKwg Od Foods 
I Wauls 

HOsdown Hugs 
Home Farm 
ICaUna Frozen 
Kars 5 m 
L ees (John J) 

Lpm« (GFl 

Low (Wmi _ 

Mwnews iBcmardi 2a3 
Meat Trade Supp 103 
Mormon IW) 203 
Moms UNl (Venal 225 
Nomuns 52 

Nmn Foods 266 
Nurdm & Peacock 170 
152 
235 
385 
366 
148 
221 
550 

270 
239 
151 


Park Foods 
HMM 

Rowmee Mac 

Saaisbury (J) 
Sahesen (Cltsm) 
Gomponai 
Tate a Lyta 
Tesco 
Ungxa 
Old Booths 
waison & Pnkp 


• ■*3 

*+2 

• v’r 
+1 
-2 
*5 
*2 


+5 


+Z 

m-2 
*3 
• .. 
*3 

r *12 
*2 


10J 42 15 3 

12 19 22B 

150 60 1=2 
58 J.1 14 5 
23 16204 
4.7 2 7 MG 
60 21 176 

4.6 519 3 

9 4 1 9 2=3 

74 19186 

29 28 1=9 
50 56 69 

T7.9 33 16.9 
89 16 219 

75 73 156 

19 09 208 

86 38 145 
27 52 W8 

11.4 48 132 
58 04 148 
6.0 09 125 
85 34 185 
174 45 10 7 
79 22 213 
45 02 105 

321 55 112 

83 22 21.7 

109 51 129 
135b 57 129 

6.7 58 189 


1355 

high L'D* Company 


Grous 
Ijrv YU 

Prre Chge pence P>E 


»L> 113 
143 9fi 
520 3^0 
216 141 
?D B. 
112 71 
66 76 

;» 74 
570 356 
80 22 
HI 63' 
« 33t 
5: CO 

174 in 

224 156 
2'6'. 1 12' 
48 32 

215 207 
JOS 208 
23 ! - 17’ 
90 48 

230 170 
132 S? 

10 658 

as? 16? 
275 188 
3'5 168 
19’ 17 
371 100 
IC2- 83 
110 98 
•23 95 
ISO 35 
97 81 

86 72 


Ciane -cwnemj 
d.'ivrcr’ pen 

Con<n 1A1 
C'j«)rol Go 
Cm’Sifiefl Ttai 
CohL-aninc 

Ccn SrarciKty 
Crsn inm 
c«*55n 
=7S , 4» |F) 

COSJ? 

C-:'jnre-. P^ie 
Ccrtar De Dicta 
Ciesi Wun 
Ci;mt Hsuse 
CiA-inwis 3 **« 
D?C 
DPCE 
Daigery 

Dana 

Drm-es 6 Met A 
Danes 6 Wnman 
Dam 

Ce La Hu) 

De>a 

Dwiend Siampmg 
L<es=uRei 
Ditlioc HC4I 

Ddwa 
Doav.’h Park 
Dcm 

Denwaon Hn 
D»l* 

in u6j) 


*2 

-2 

1+5 


D^an 


313 ?«0 
221 158 
27? 2u 
43' 29' 
15J 102' 
29 j 17V 
104 52 

2S-. 18’. 
381 2G2 
Stf* 19'; 
1*4 134 
ITT.nO'. 

142 112 
342 153 
214 124 
ail 31? 

55 22 
43 X 

143 106 

75 58 

620 409 
67 35 

124 84 
69 21' 

123 % 
41*. 17 
199 157 
67 40 

131 64 

385 2W 
310 2«0 
(Id 60 
157 100 
150 ’ll 
ir. 756'. 

344 194 
505 KO 
163 <07 
312 206 
IIP* 9'. 
92 59'. 


96 65 
142 122 
81 62 
106 68 
205 148 

120 91 
3M3 234 
ItS 88 


Eas-ern Prod 

EC3TO 

ElS 

EBWl 

EHKO 

Bear dun 1AEJ B 
Eked (Bl 
Emnart 

Enjasn Oana Cay 
EnCSMn ILMi B' 
erskwe House 
European Femes 
Do 5'i Prl 
Evered 
Evoamet un 
Ejuui 
F areon 

Fuedev A^uc InD 
Femw (JH) 

File indrrjr 

Fdpns 

fittwrton 

Fieieuo CAW 

Fooel 

Fogarty 

Fcpju Group N,V 
Frtieroi: & Haney 
French iTncmaii 
GEJ ini 
GhM 
OR 

Carol Eng 
Gevtemer 
tie res 
Graio 
Oynwad 
Goring Kerr 
Grampian Hldgs 
Granada 
Groaebef 
HaOC Precision 
Kan Eng 
Hal lU] 

Hjnce 

HarfiM 

Hamcson End 
Hanrnev 
Hansen 
Dc 8‘* Crnr 
Dp 5 '.“-l Pf 
GO 10". 
Haigrejies 
Ham iPbriipl 
Hawtutr b-dcHey 
Haw*/ 

Hay [Honranl 
Hepwonn Ceramic 
Hesiair 
Hewitt iJ) 

Wghgan- & Jc* 
Homs Bras 

Hod LIOVD 
Hop* arsons 
Howoen 

Hunnng ASSOC 

Hunting Group 
Hutensn Whampoa 
•Ml 

isotrtm 

Jaouons Boone 
Jaraare Main 
Jchrson Cteanars 
Jctwrson MMIMy 
Jonnson 8 FB 
Johnston 
jwto 6 Shaman 
JouKUn (Thomas) 
Kalamazoo 
Kaksi 
Kebev ind 
kenoedy Smatt 
Kersnaw |A) 
Ituen-E-Ze 


239 
138 
490 
195 

e- 

104 

63 

225 

4*1 

68 

95 

40* 

5S 

144 
<82 
£116 
X 
25? 
258 
£18. • 
M 
233 
119 
990 
170 
263 

240 
17'. 

203 

88'.- 

98 

110 

110 

03 

74 


265 

IBS 

228 

36 • 

135 
£29* 

91 •+> 

£22. 

319 *-2 

£21 '- 

140 -3 

136 +1 

136 +7 

202 

15S r -4 

385 +12 

38* 

34 -1 

13 ■ 

SB 

595 +4 

£4 •+? 

96 -4 

42’.- -V 

97 
34 

171 -I 

48 ■ 

95 -1 

278 +1 

295 

104 -2 

111 • -1 
115 

960 +12 

293 +1 

270 • 

138 

280 «+3 

7v • 

80'. -1 

162 

134 +2 

198 • 

275 • 

38 •+'• 

23 +1 

165 +1 

£165 
106 

£115'+ -•+ 

260 


65 =7 5*8 

100 72 S3 
154 31 

71 3.6 151 

$8 5 4 14? 


13 

64 


253 

491 

90 

190 

id* 

158 

S3 

135 

92 

223 

95 

270 

98 

2S2 

161 

220 

250 

134 

560 

215 

31V 

313 

124 

128 

28 

31 

300 

118 

273 

200 


-2 

+23 

-1 


• +2 

+2 
-10 
• -I 

-5 

+25 


100 
!B 1&2 
111 24 1=5 

?! J 1 39= 
4E 46153 
>:-9 32 130 

3 6 6 1 10 4 

68 47 11.7 

113 62 10.3 

J75 32 

0?C 13 
S3 09 386 

179 69 99 

12 67 

143 81 74 

69 58 92 

47 1 4 8 1?2 

91 52 86 

114 43 11= 
104 4J 100 

06 34 197 

75 37 126 

74 a 4 12.: 
7.1 72 10J 

79 72 122 

6 4 77 12.8 

64 06 11.4 


143 54 67 

107 57 1=3 

9 6 42 122 
= 7 75 111 

6 6n 4.9 13 5 

43 4 7 22.' 

139 63 .. 
10 1 59 12.7 

90 04 

050 04 110 

60 S.0 H)0 

7 1 52 

50 2-5 110 

9 Gb 62 132 

14 3 3.7 175 
07 12 859 

21 *2 89 

71 5 5 ED.1 

50 80 162 

7.9 (2 262 

10 1.6 

56 58 72 

06 1.4 50 

61 63 12.7 

20 59 79 

1=5 71126 

4.« as 64 1 

84 89 121 
17 9 8 4 92 

10.0 34 9.1 

50 4 9 76 

=1 1 B 100 

J7 40 13 S 
15.7 1 6 252 

129 4.4 14.7 
155 57 104 

5 7 4 1 119 
109 39 127 

05 6.7 139 
=6 32 169 

1=0 74 76 

64 4B101 

14 J 72 12.4 
=4 0 9 30 G 

IB 50 67 

57b 35 14.7 
800 4 6 

62 7 7 
0 86 

7 9 3 0 18.1 

112 53 1=0 
20 7 4 2 10B 

27 30 72 

54 2.7 368 
103 S3 155 

&ib 39 IB 4 
39 «2 82 
a 262 

4.J I . 

5 7 62 133 

107 4 5 88 

55 58 ir 

114 42 8 3 

86 88 78 


75 4 7 114 

1 3 0 8 408 
86 34 24.7 

293 52 152 
IS 17 14 5 
e . 156 

107 34 1=2 

SS 4* 82 

8 5 43 17.0 
9*10.4 94 
17 55 214 

11.4 39148 
20b T 7 20 J 
214 78 2=8 

88 4-3 179 


L-R 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


03 328 
280 206 
391 312 
50 447 
100 76' 

10S 67 

79 58 
«S 388 
0i 50 
209 141 


Grand Un . J68 

Kennedy Brookes 73d 
Ladbroke 355 

Lon Park HoK+s 530 
Mount Chancme B0'. 

Ana or W Haws 65 
. Queens Moat 65V 

Savoy Hows A 368 
SUM 63 

Tnmmou&a Fane 147 


• +2 

13 5 

37 

12=3 

+5 

2* 

10 

123 

+T8 

IB 1 

*3 

169 


1*3 

28 

159 

•+-*' 

21 

23 

14.9 

• -1 

21 

= 5 

153 

+V 

23 

35 

144 


5D 

1 4 

145 

• -» 

18 

29 

196 

■ +SV 

79 

5.« 

14 6 


INDUSTRIALS 
A-D 


250 178 
=39 I6C 
127 95 

671 553 
110 80 
258 173 
3*3 =07 

157 144 
275 130 
403 105 
47 32 

32 n 
*40 355 
91 39 

530 355 
63 37- 

373 =63 

89 43 
=99 138 
*55 3f 3 

95 6? 

386 277 
332 237 
JO? f-^8 
26 16 
4=3 ZW 
310 US 
210 1=8 
174 M2 
495 180 
57 40 
305 130 
3? 2' 

241 130 
69 47 

630 151 
443 3T8 

*9 1? 

349 229 
140 85 

148 65 
136 100 
542 214 
620 3)0 
J35 235 
205 1*0 

123 re 

153 84' 
WO 105 
I7J 147 
£56 178 

61 34 

147 |£ 
400 1» 
335 167 
385 =65 
263 206 
24' 8 

353 250 
22 16- 
lTO 76 
383 309 
. S7 *= 
47 33 

W 35 
199 110 
2U 139 
1 36 M5 
303 168 
143 97 

3=3 198 
Cl 296 
1*5 34 
34 15 

49 25 
190 152 
M 19 
73 48 

303 M0 
=62 1?6 
63 69 

106 56 
56 25 

90 56 

425 253 
120 56 
38 2* 

6 a 

25 13 

93 45 

88 *5 
105 59 
290 193 
6*C 510 
loB 2*3 

M 06 


AMI 2=0 

AGB Rasaaron 1*7 

AIM MB 

APV 55fi 

Aaronspn 83 

Apwesi 216 

Alexandra Wwear 295 


AAimase 
Amber tad 
Appiedore 
Aiensorr 
Arman 
Ash 6 Lacey 
AsNCv 

Ass Br Eng r. 
Aurora 
Awn Rubber 
re mcmi 


igv* 


163 

23D 

165 

39 

to 

41Q 

4| 

305 

61 

330 

403 

67 

313 

38S 

183 

17'. 

3S0 

=64 

1B0 

150 

*ta 

KC 

a 

1B5 

62 

216 

385 


BET Did 
BETEC 
BOC 
ETR 

R l X M ' IHh 

Baeev iCH) 

Bard (Mini 
Baker Pea ms 
Bamo Ind 
Barnam 
Barlow Rand 
Barrow Heoown 
Barron Transoan 
Baynes (Ouriasi 
Eleacen Clarke 
Baaul'rtio 
Beazer iQf) 

BMdum 
Besav Gpsmeocs 
Ben us* 

BeriStad ISiVJ) 
Berrstams 
Berietads 
Bospak 
Bestobed 
Beatwood 
Bony L J) 

Bs«m 
BJljm 1 J| 

Gemd QuaJcasj 
Brmoigyain Mm 
Black Arrow 
Black (Petaij 
BUCkviOOd HodBS 
Bfct 

Blue Arrow 
BMvtwe 
B00k=( 

Boots 

Bowror |Wm) 

BoerJUr 
Gfl+hta’ tas 
0ramnv»ia Grp 
Brammer 
Bra»«ay 
Biengmn 
Bnogena Go 
Bndan 

BuJOcnr-Gunarv 
Br Bldg 8 Eng Ado IH 
EiS& Grr - 





T3S 

674 

520 

88 

332 

1*0 

Peerless 

Per** Hanersley 
Pennine tao 

123 +3 9 0k 

819 2&6 

+10 1 1 

73 1E.G 
*8 13.2 
03 232 




14 

775 

PhnroMe 

E12V 75 

0 6 32.4 




483 

311 

Pnkxrgton 

415 40 +2 193 

4 7 n a 




96 

bl 

piasm; Constr 

73 «-l 41 

5.6 128 




365 

195 

Ponao 

285 105 

3 7 123 




323 

215 

Portw Cnacoum 

298 1 5 

03 




314 

238 

PowW DjHryn 

275 • +5 21 7 

7 9 19.9 

-2 



16* 

190 

95 

119 

ftastmcfi htgs 
RHP 

108 10 

169 6 4 

□ 921* 
38 125 





123 

Ftooant Ueia 

145 • 36 

25 95 




509 

*?l 

Ran* Orq 

477 +5 225 

4.7 ItB 





115 


158 7 1 





1=8 

90 

Raickrts IGI Bthtofll 125 3 6 

29 45 




900 

605 

Rkcun 5 Carman 

746 +9 229 

31 161 



37 

2+5 

(18 

Ftedtearo Ctess 

193 29 

15 IU 






Re« Oi-cuhvu 

3*3 +3 bA 

19 155 




J’- 

162' 

Been tm 

2*3 +5 


-4 




132 

FWwn 

171 *+10 69 

4.0 117 







85 +1 29 

45 9.1 




182 

W> 


« 57 

61 US 




51B 

3*6 


493 ft*1V 54 

1 1 377 





21 

Be. mr»e 

32 W-Z 14 

44 104 


B3 

29 199 

IW 

iio 

FLcarSO Eftg 

1*7 4 1 

20 160 


108 

6 0 13* 



FVcnarj rLoral 

80 4 3 

s* ae 





19 

Fkcha/ojcn West 

38 +'. 

173 





85 


■a 

ti 

* 

a 

42 SI 



« 1 9.7 


151 

IWw-m (Thcrmosl 333 

467 






Ftocknanr 

41 +2 

98 


29 




H«JW 

127 -2 93 

73 27 

+2* 

3.6 

OS <2.4 

3 

0'.- 

DO A 

Ftoraprml 

1 16 -1 93 

2'. +'• 

ao BO 
12 


25 7 8 303 77 

162 


Rott+k 

122 -1 SI 

6.8 92 


19b B0 

130 

93 

Russell i At 

93 • 23 

25 218 


244 

9l 

91 

134 

502 

588 

2*0 

190 

106 

136 

1M 

148 

Big 

41 

■33 

383 

3S0 

330 

J1S 

17' 

ns 

£16'. 

12S 

306 

85 

37 

156 

212 


.. iroup 
Br Swtaen 
Bi Vru 
Broken Hid 

Brontwoee m« 
Bronx Big 
BrOOkjp Tod 
Brawn 6 Tawse 
Brpw iJohnl 
Brum ans (Mus) 
Buoougn 
Burgees 
Bums- Anderson 
Camtora Eng 
Caparo tad 
Cape mo. 

Condo Eng 
Castings 
GukKUon 
omral 4 Sheer 
Germewoy tad 
Oi tad 

CnamDerun Pn 
Ch#7«d>n 6 HR 
"MWCOB 
Gnemnng 
Cnnencs tar 
Cftnsry Hum 


745 

108 

315 

326 

US 

I 

152 

26 

70 

262 

23* 

73 

H 

4§ 

104 

34 

5 

21 

90 

85 

96 

251 

510 

2M 

44 


-3 

10.7 

58 127 

+1 

39 

61 04 


80 

20 15 6 

• +10 

171 

44 160 

-3 

16 

35 J79 

+1 


75 

83 7 4 

•-'j 

75r 

82 74 

• 

bl 

4 9 276 



43 ’31 


85 

1 5 +3.B 


98 

4 0 74 6 


34 

1 6358 


50 

4 6 12 i 

• t2 

bl 

4 5 13.0 

• +? 

69 

56 93 

■ -2 

7 1 

*0 6.9 

• -2 

26 

1 1 168 

r 

l.4b 

3* 65 

• +12 

?D 

05 26.4 

+IU 

flb 

30 11 7 


173 

sr u 3 

•+l 

10.1 

< 7 14Q 

+8 

• 

102 

*5 ISO 

+5 


179 

60 126 

-1 

32 

38 SJ 

• 

21 


-2 

05 

1.4 2* 7 

+2 

71 

46 90 

+2 

74 

JS 16 6 

• 

14 

1 1 954 

-5 

11 1 

*S 10 5 


43 

40 11 5 


too 

32 13 4 

-3 


1-9 

1 7 IBB 


07 

27 271 


20 

63 £5 

-3 

103b 63 9.2 

♦3 

4 3D 

61 130 


12* 

*7 1=5 

*4 

36 

«5=23 


40 

6.5 159 

+i 

lit =6 16 7 


24 

4 0 41 J 


• -2 

+8 

-50 

-2 


Me 40 M2 
. 21 * 5 119 l 

43 41 90 

14 AI is? 
e ICO 
103 

1* 3? irj£ 

SB 6 8 1=4 

50 5= 105 
16* 65 138 
207 4 1111 

7 9 =9 1E 1 

e I? 4 


39 22 
158 V 120'. 
323 218 
75 42 
78V 41 
113 69 

08 84 

73 S3 
35 23 
230 179 
135 95 

77 59'r 

227 169 
2S3 134 
480 315 
410 306 
115 64 

49 31 

393 255 
160 121 
79 4J 
288 185 
125 78 


LDH 
Lop 
Lard 
Lawlex 
Lee I Arthur) 
LMsraD 
Unread 
Uoya 1FH1 
Locker (T) 

Lon fAviana 
Do DM 

Lon & Nmn 
Lon tap 
Longmn tad 
Low 8 Bonar 
ML Hogs 
MS Ml 
MV Hokkngs 
Macanhy* Riarm 
Msctarune 
UscUUn (PAW) 
MqKeawre 
Magncw 
Mancnent* 9 m 


33V 

123 

229 

78V 

’S 

64'j 
23 
188 
96 
69 '1 
200 
2S3 
*13 
395 

10a 

38'r 

323 

128 

50 

208 

115 

670 


•-8 

-5 

♦V 

a +5 
+3 
-3 


79 52 Manganese Bronze G6 

88 82 Mating 62 

143 05 Mars nan (Lovley) 124 

176 105 Metal Bov 158 

194 128 Meal Ocsuias 1*3 

91 55 Meu*a> 79 

78V 54'.- Mncnek Cons SS 

i?5 70 HUM Somers 111 

190 163 Mown 173 

310 212 Morgan CrucKM 2*0 

4? 20V Neeptena 26 

215 ISO N*rX (J| 163 

41 28 Newman tads 34 

153 92 Newman Tears 1*0 

133 08 Noo» A Luna 125 

65 43 Kotai 00 

269 186 Nororm 237 

250 2D3 Olkas Etea Madl 213 

*40 2*7 Parker Knon A J7B 

966 525 Parosn JT 940 

IBS 163 P-€ M 103 

G03 383 Pearson 505 

27 11 Peek 19 


+10 

+50 

+2 


• +2 
*3 


05 13 202 

39b 12 242 

8.6 38 92 
36b 56 6 7 
33 42 112 
32 31 199 

3.6 4 8 62 

54 84 74 

1.9 8J 8.4 

142 76 105 

7 4 106 12'l 
68 33 158 
5 7 =3 3=4 

152 3 5 13.4 

11 40 29 14 9 
22 =7 99 
1 BD 4 7 1=3 
108 51150 
2.M7.0 
54 03 
89 109 
42 105 
13 2=7 
65 77 
40 76 
42 9.8 
U .. 
67 214 
4.1 13 4 
81 11 1 58 

55 50 1=7 
0l5 90 
*7 145 
04 115 
61 59 
32 515 
72 123 
OB *03 
30 5l 7 

56 113 

57 67 
40 117 


28 162 
452 


35 

=7 

143 

48 

B.G 

43 

=5 

62 

58 

96 

32 


11J 
1=1 
01 
102 
1 1 
102 
10 
14 
133 
121 
ISO 


s-z 


38 

=1* 

99 

90 

*91 

141 

195 
170 
16* 
151 
164 
52 
136 
153 
990 

51 

303 

U9 

sm 

35 

133 

41 

3ft 

225 

194 
153 
<18 
W 

*10 

MO 

1’B 

2*3 

98 

=10 

224 

=48 

384 

4J 

221 

587 

196 
250 
535 
80 

8 
95 
l'.S 
11 = 
=4B 
133 
343 
=43 

195 


>7 SI 29 

21* Sate Tent* ss 1 

55 Sandhurst 71 

49 Sj* Gnnlnn | J) 82 

1® Seipa 2*8 

1IU Scon Greettaam 130 

120 Smi Hemaaih 163 

M * Robertson 151 


122 Seoxieor 
I0G Ob A 
99 SaGurdy 5*m 

29 Sniur Enq 
75 sn*m 

103 Wtaw 
703 SteK 
32 S*rnmv« 

IS) Sxnon Eng 
83' Si* Hundred 
388 S*.m:"tey 
26A SKF B 
94 Gxrvm 1 Neohew 

30 Smith vvnuwortn 

228 Snaths kvj 

183 Spear iJW) 

128 Spfi'-Sai-Xi 
71 SuBi^Pone'cs 
86 SOg runkfur* 

43 Slar Civnp 
145 Slave lev 
15* Steenev 

98 Sterling tao 
170 SltXSriake 
66 Sitrtkimi 
153 Sutaen A Pm 
183 Sun*** San. 

159 Son 

M $w«0 Pacdic A 
12 Sycamine 

160 SrAore 
3K9 TI 

115 TNT 
9* TSt Thcnrvil 
360 Tare 
3a TafuSa Oem 
5* t*hv 

44 TBNrt 

1 18 T<-. HkJ»;i 
91 Tmrd V+* 

69 Thomsen T-l*iq 
= 03 TOBIXVK iFHi 
=48 Traiaigxi H-uie 
=00 TraraiurnmynM 
i=* Traramcn Oev 
9' T-anwjna 
M Timlin 
78 Tnpka 


123 
107 
1CI 
*6 
126 
1=3 
905 

44 

223 

99 

461 

£33 

119 

JS 

25' 

198 

16= 

140 

104 

93 

MS 

475 

115 

343 

66 

195 

218 

233 

119 

32 

170 

■*67 

124 
100 
370 
E30 

6. 

87 

’*0 

US 

2M 

303 

208 

=» 

169 

IS' 

w 

115 


=3C 73 61 
0T 4 0138 

18 =5 59 7 

35 4 3 112 

T7 3 7 0 58 
4 T 38 130 
4 3 2GT42 

19 2.6 153 
14 1 1 3! 9 

■14 13 278 
28 26 200 
=4 32 139 

39 31 68 
129 105 76 
•+4V 193 21 15.8 
14 3 3 786 
*8 12.1 54 77 

U 64 117 
HO 54 178 


9+3 


+2 


+1 

• +» 
*1 
+3 


+10 

-7 


• -8 
+1 


3.5 

04 

63 

8.8 

78 
57 

79 

260 

186 

39 

171 

66 

f 

126 

&Q 


29 203 
1 1 216 
=7 195 
*3 15.0 

4 7 1=0 

39 90 
7 6 102 

41J 

40 1 = 
35 14 4 
3 4 272 
70 52 

130 89 
58 
5.3 110 
= 7213 


198? 

Hi ’ll l ’+ G'm-OJfly 


Piute Ctuje cenco 


•+l' 

•+a 


•+* 

+3 


141 B4 II 7 
20 0 4.3 154 
0 

43 4J 52 
108 £9 172 


4 0 4 e 1QJ 

64 4U1Z4 

61 29 134 

52b 17 251 
189 7| 13 

137 *2 105 

89 S3 145 
287 

01- -01 702 
3 9 7 I I* G 


2*1 75 
1ZS 75 
17 . IJ'- 
68 56' 

too 21! 
540 293 
1=0 13? 
195 1=0 

204 IJ4 
1S8 IM 

205 116 
165 Ift 
258 IS* 

6*’ =9 

144 60 

198 161 
375 239 
154 69 

231 174 
50' «• 

110 SS 

iiB 79 
295 210 
ir* 6= 
263 177 
IDS 137 
740 ^5 
160 1=0 
5*0 42* 
84 j* 
44 3* 

93 43' 

89 58 

176 135 


Turner 8 Nowall 

Umgroua 

Dwver 

L'ntovur |IW) 

Viler 

Vrcketa 

ineur Product. 

Vartan 

ViAmragen 

VSEL 

WSL 

wide Mwn 
Wygcn tag 
Wawcr (CAW) 
W-’iertord Grass 
W.nshpnr; 
Wedgwood 
IVtar 

vwncnme 

WAAntjli 

yveuttand 

Wtros 

Whatman Rw«e 

Whav-oe 
WlHlrdSall 
WiHnO (James) 
Wrtiama Hrogi 
we-, Gp 
woueiey 
wooo (Amur) 
Wood iSvn 
Woodnousp A Rut 
WynAam Em 
Yormg (H| 


IB? 

9J 

cir- 

£48 

=35 

393 

til? 

135 
£1*6 
1 58 
l2b 
120 
JIA 

6= 

IIS 

170 

371 

IDS 

ITS 

53 

71 

107 

272 

92 

IW 

629 

136 
505 
bS 
3? 
» 

58 

148 


*13 
♦ 3 


INSURANCE 


226 177 
36'- 22 
38- 23 
405 223 
917 80? 
336 ?28 
301 ??8 

4JI 23 
954 701 
954 720 
708 494 
349 267 
288 231 
2=« 173 
416 257 
*0-- 29' 
ftS 2=0 
348 223 

is*- r? 

94 2 710 
457 361 
957 768 
420 320 
474 346 
445 3£0 
771 5K 
9=7 7=2 
550 1=0 
474 394 


AEXMV Lie 
Alex 8 AM 
Am Gen 
Brads rack 
Bntamtc 
Com Uikon 
Eoxty A Law 
FAI 

Gen Acddod 
GRE 

kk-am C E 

Hoga Rotynson 

Leak 8 Gun 

Lmdon A Men 

Lon Utd Inv 

Marsh A McLen 

Vrnet 

PWS 

fVan 

Prudential 

Retugk 

Rc-vat 

Se.lgMKk Gp 
Sldwan Wr son 
Sr urge Hugs 

Sun Aftance 
Sun Lite 
Tmoo taoemmy 
•Vdlrt Faber 


177 

r=i 

£26 

J85 

83? 

299 

=58 

=80 

812 

8=9 

497 

10? 

253 

170 

393 

£44'- 

=45 

3C-S 

£14 

822 

391 

Pi9 

3S5 

432 

39-3 

G67 

BM 

?J0 

*09 


+13 314 
*12 41 I 


na 

1+6 137 

-8 11 7 

+= 85 

2*6 
I-'- 220 

114 
129 
6?9 
+13 371 
+6 156 

*17 35 8 
+i ’5 7 
+11 157 
I 10 On 

250 
339 
45 
129 


• 5 
+ 15 


loirvtmcat Tram appear on Pare 19 


LEISURE 


144 90 

220 128 
1’1 98 

58 M 
225 158 
410 323 
62'. 49 
81 65 

1=8 93 

131 94 

103 3? 

180 137 
1*9 130 
331 ?7I) 
393 326 
64 43 

228 134 
360 2=0 
72 51 

165 12£'. 


Barr A WA A 134 

Bgcmjv A HawUS ISO 
Brent vtfeur 163 

Cimoan 46 

Cnyute 188 

First Lsuta 3~0 

GRA 49 

Henturger Brooks 85 
Honan Travel iu 

tat Ltrame 
JiAurus Htdga 
Lev tab 
M+Onwiswr 
taeasurama 
Really UsekA 
Ritev Lunm 


112 

38 

153 

135 

313 

373 


Saga noways 
0*501 Gp 


<36 

225 


Sdimjei5«i l_, 

Tonenham Hotspo 69 
=eners 181 


• +5'. 
*2 

♦ I 

• +5 

• +2'. 


100 73 106 

225 

79 48 126 
ta 90 153 

80 43 121 
S3 25 19.0 

412 
. 425 
63 55 55 
7 1 6 3 10 4 

4 3 11.3 |4 8 

7 9n 55 9.1 
10 7 3.4 125 

<61 44 152 

. . 2*3 

66 45 115 

14 15 129 

5 7o 83 1=5 

7.1 35 1G5 


MINING 


13'- a 
10-630 
57'. 31 
58 33 

40 22 

41 22 
196 1=0 
425 238 
160 60 
ar« S'- 

358 226 
09 43 

S3* 4C9 
531 314 
200 105 
S'. 4’- 
I3S 7 
7 '. 2- 
255 ISO 
594 258 
205 129 
195 85 
390 2i0 

4*. 2‘. 

9 4 - 

nj si 

75 17 

0', 4' 

10 6 
'10'- 5. 
*78 313 

83 35 


4'. 


Ang Amor Cork 
Arp Am 
Am GOTO 
AA1T 
Armovaal 
DO A 
A«er mam 
Biwtxrs 
Bracken 
Budac. 

CRA 

CurT Boyd 
Cc*i 3 Gotftekto 
De Beers 
Deehraal 
Ooo(P(annM 
Dnetemtem 
DurtMd 
E D*»q 
B andstand 
El Ora 
Etaxjrg 
E Hand GoU 
E Rand Bnp 
FS Cons 
F5 Cm 
Gem:* T«i 
Ger*wi 
Gar Maw 
GFSA 

GM KWgoorli 

tiwano 

Grujtvfe 

Hampun Anus 

Harmony 

Karnes 

John rues 

Kinross 

Wool 

brtfce 

Ltbanon 

L'Pane 


375 165 
158 91 

»■ 

350 175 
81 47’. 

12V 5 
6>- J'. 

T60 -ft 
13'. 6" 

410 170 
157 64 

28 15 Mabysan Mnmg 

123 60 Manevate 

28 14' MyOK Exp 

26 5' Miungtva 

9 5* M-Wte WHs 

655 450 Mmcco 
V. 2'. New Wits 
143 73 Ntn Broken HA 

44 25' Mm KiKWTV 

22 • 10'. Change Free 
1=8 90 PeUfeng Tei 

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?*» 



THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


21 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


Edited by Matthew May 


> 

% 


-i'or 


Clips deal shakes Europe 


.•Hj 






/Mamsfaciureis in the computers and 
■electronics sectors in Europe have been 
drying to assess the impact of the deal just 
‘concluded Between die Japanese and the 
?Arnericaas over the price control of 
•'microchips. 

Last week, in the wake of the 
agreement concluded between the two 
countries, officials at the European 
Commission and European indus- 
trialists have been determining whether 
it could be defined as a cartel and if such 
a pact breaches the international rules of 
trade as governed by GATT (General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade). 

Two elements of the deal are particu- 
larly worrying for the Europeans whose 
computer industry is desperately trying 
to retain an identity of its own in the 
shadow of the large US-owned multi- 
nationals. 

First, the Europeans warn the freedom 
to negotiate with any supplier — includ- 
ing the Japanese - favourable terms for 
purchase and not to be constrained by 
Americans. 

* Second, the Europeans do not wish 
this agreement to be an extension of the 
extra-territorial powers which the US 
Department of Commerce has been 
trying to impose on Europe. On these 
occasions — which have been firmly 
opposed by most European governments 
and quite overtly by the British — the 
Americans have considered Bcences to 
be necessary when a product, containing 


Taking 
a cue 
from 
Darwin 

By Chris Naylor 

Richard Forsyth has a theory 
that, just possibly, Charles 
Darwin might have stumbled 
on something worthwhile with 
his theory of evolution. 

True, the presence of intelli- 
gent man on plant Earth 
would tend to convince some 
anyway, but Mr Forsyth is not 
so much concerned with 
intelligent man as with intelli- 
gent machines. Specifically, he 
is concerned with that branch 
ofartificial intelligence known 
as machine learning. 

Trying to sail against the 
common belief that you only 
get out of a computer what 
you put in, machine learning 
aims to present the computer 
with unassimilated data and 

S t out something new. And 
at can be new knowledge, 
new rules, new ways of look- 
ing at the raw data we started 
with. 

But how best to program a 
computer to do this? That’s 
where Charles Darwin and Mr 
Forsyth see eye to eye for they 
both maintain that the natural . 
way to learn is the evolu- 
tionary way based on muta- 
tion, mating, competition and 
survival of the fittest. Tree, 
the learning takes whole 
generations to produce results 
but, in the world of comput- 
ers. whole generations can 
pass in minutes. 

Originally developed by Mr 
Forsyth while at the North 
London Polytechnic, and now 
marketed by his own firm 
Warm Boot the machine 
learning program is called 
Beagle. A passing tribute to 
Darwin's ship. Beagle is an 
acronym for Bionic Evolu- 
tionary Algorithm Generating 
Logical Expressions which, 
while lacking snap, is a name 
that nicely describes what it 
does once you’ve worked out 
what it means. 

Like many a machine learn- 
ing program. Beagle is pre- 
sented with a set of example 
data and tries to work out the 
basic rules which underly it. It 
figures out what rules would 
characterize this set of data 
uniquely, identifying this 
particular set of circumstances 
from some other. 

Not an abstract matter. 
Beagle has already been set to 
work analysing test bore-hole 
data from the North Sea. 
forecasting horse race winners 
and predicting possible al- 
coholism from blood enzyme 
dam. 

In all of these examples the 


US technology, is exported from Europe. 

The agreement signed between the 
Japanese and the Americans will give the 
US licence to monitor and influence 
prices and the destination of semi- 
conductors. The agreement ailoap the 
US to monitor the countries which they 
consider are ideal back doors for the 
Japanese to bring their products, in 
semiconductor or possibly computer 
form, into the US. 


I 


THE WEEK 




By Bill Johnstone 

T echnology Correspondent 

The agreement is meant to protect the 
US market from semiconductors being 
dumped and destroying the basic fhbric 
.of one of ibe country’s most important 
industries. But it has gone for further 
than that and could easily allow in- 
fluence on price and design to be dictated 
to the rest of the worid by the partnership 
if it were left unchallenged. 

The five-year pact comes into effect 
this month and will last until July 31, 
1991. It means that the Japanese will 
increase the prices of their products sold 
in the US — and possibly other principal 
markets — because of the threat by the 
US authorities to impose a levy. 

The agreement is also supposed to 


allow the Americans easy access to the 
Japanese semiconductor market which 
has remained largely closed to them. 
This particular section of the agreement 
is also likely to be challenged. Other 
countries have found it equally difficult 
to penetrate a market which prefers to 
buy Japanese. 

Under the GATT rules America is not 
entitled to preferential treatment, so the 
-wording of the agreement is tailored to 
allay such fears. The US released the text 
of the agreement. Reading the small 
print doesn't dissipate those fears. 

It says: u The aim of the agreement is to 
enhance fire trade in semiconductors in 
the Japanese market. 

"The Japanese government will 
encourage Japanese producers and users 
of semiconductors to take advantage of 
the increased availability of foreign 
manufactured products in their market. 

"The Japanese government will estab- 
lish an organization to help foreign 
semiconductor producers increase sales 
in the Japanese markets. "The Japanese 
and US governments will see to it that 
there is full and equitable access for 
foreign companies to patents resulting 
from government sponsored research 
and development in this area." 

The Europeans wait with interest to 
see if foreign means American. If that is 
seen to be the case then the Japanese-US 
pact will undoubtedly trigger litigation 
and a European haeMa*!* 



prime feature is that data are 
available on the subject but 
mere man has not as yet 
managed to work out a set of 
rules which enable the ac- 
curate prediction of some 
unknown item from foe data. 
That is what the program tries 
to do. 

Beagle, on befog presented 
with data which is associated 
with some known outcome, 
kicks off by suggesting a rule 
which might, just might, pro- 
duce the required prediction. 
But, in all probability, this 
first rule will we but a pale 
shadow of generations of rules 
to come. 

This is hardly surprising. 
After alL nature didn't get it 
right first time so why should 
a computet? What nature 
needed wasa tittle evolution - 
and that's what Beagle uses 
too. 

So the program may mutate 
the first rule to see ifa mutated 
version gives a better result 
And, if it doesn’t it may male 
this mutated role with foe 
original rule to produce a new 
rule containing features of 
both to see how their offspring 
fores. 

Mutating and mating, new 
generations of rules are 
spawned at machine speeds 
and then, as in all families, the 
fighting begins for the survival 
of the fittest Each rule can be 
scared according to how ac- 
curate its predictions are on 
the test data and the fittest are 
those that do best As each 
new generation is spawned 
those least fit are mercilessly 
killed and the fittest are 
mutated and mated again to 
produce new generations of 
the super-fit 

And, like nature's evolu- 
tionary process, foe final out- 
come of any run of Beagle is 
usually unknown — which 
adds considerably to the in- 
terest when it is used. After all, 
It can happen that Beagle 
evolves new rules, new ways 
of looking at data, that no 
human had ever thought of 
before. When that happens the 
user isn’t simply getting from 
his computer a simple variant 
of what be put in. He's getting 
something extra — new, ma- 
chine-generated knowledge. 


Giants join up on custom chips 

Three multinational electron- Germany's Siemens wilt 


ics giants hare struck a trilat- 
eral agreement under which 
they will pool their talents in 
the development of senu-cns- 
tom integrated circuits. 

Japan’s Toshiba, America’s 
General Electric and West 


jointly develop standard “cell 
libraries’" to make semi- 
con doctors to customers' own 
requirements. 

The three companies ini- 
tially envision some 160 types 
of cell libraries. 


The ‘virus’ 
threat to 
defence 
secrets 

From Christopher Hanson 
in Washington 
American scientists are strug- 
gling to protea computer 
networks — vital in areas 
ranging from national defence 
to banking and air traffic 
control — against a potentially 
devastating weapon called a 
computer virus. 

Computer security experts 
in the US government say the 
“virus” is a higb-iechnology 
equivalent of germ warfare: a 
destructive electronic code 
that could be inserted into a 
computer’s program, possibly 
over a telephone line, by a 
secret agent, terrorist or white 
collar criminal. 

When a computer virus 
attacks it wipes out crucial 
memory data or otherwise 
causes high technology equip- 
ment to behave erratically, 
according to sources who 
spoke on condition they 
would not be identified. 

They said a computer virus 
attack might bring a major 
weapons system to a stand- 
still, throw a computer-guided 
missile off course or wipe out 
computer-stored intelligence. 
“The government is con- 
cerned and we are pursuing 
solutions,” one security of- 
ficial said. 

Computer security experts 
have created experimental vi- 
ruses in a bid to find defences, 
but there had been no 
breakthroughs. 

Both the military's com- 
puter nets and the highly- 
automated US banking 
system are vulnerable to 
"catastrophic collapse”, 
according to a recent George- 
town University report by a 
group of government and 
private counter-terror experts. 

Urging that the pace of 
defensive research be quick- 
ened, it said the computer 
virus threat was “a matter of 
great concern. . .There do not 
appear to be any quick and 
easy defences or overall solu- 
tions to the problem.” 

As to foe banking system, 
foe report warned: “The four 
major electronic funds-trans- 
fer networks alone carry the 
Continued on page 24 


A fee to stop the poachers? 

t 


■ A transfer fee to be paid to companies 
mat have high-technology staff poached is one 
of the drastic solutions suggested by a 
study from the National Computing Centre on 
me shortage of skilled computer staff. More 
man half or foe 342 computer users and 
aggUf^wtio responded to a survey by me 

transfer fee. thoughts difficult to see ¥tow 
mis could be enforced in practice. 

Sixty-seven regarded me poaching of staff 
to be crippling their operations and growth 
plans, while 10 companies believe it is 
actually threatening their survival. However, 
while nearly three-quarters of the 
companies said training was the responsibly 
of an employer, more man half admitted 
they had no wish to take on adult trainees, 
whether part trained or not 

Not such a secret 

■ Amstrad has finally set a date for me 
launch of its cheap IBM-compatible personal 
computer - September 2. The amount of 
information cm it that has already been 
published must qualify it for the "worst kept 
secret of the year" award, though if it puts 
customers off buying a competitor's 
machine, Amstrad can't be too unhappy. 

The new computer is expected to cost £460 
for a basic version with one disc drive and black 
and white monitor, rising to £750 for two 

disc drives and colour monitor. 

As well as being compatible with the IBM PC 
— a virtual industry standard now - it win 
include the fashionable picture-based 
software. Unlike Amstrad's earlier PCW 
computer — sold very succesfuily as a word 
processor — the new computer will not include 
a printer In the price, though Amstrad is 
expected to announce one as a separate option 
for £150. 



The ability to input typewritten documents 
directly into a personal computer without 
the need for time-consuming re-typing at a 
keyboard has been a fraught market despire 
a clear demand. Frequently the technology 
available has been far too expensive to he 
economic for general office use. One novel 
but ill-fated attempt at producing a highly 
simplified version for £500 foundered and 
the company went out of business. Now a 
£3,000 scanner for IBM PCs and 
compatibles is on the way from American 
manufacturer Dest, which says the nnit can 
read an A4 page of (ext into a personal com- 
puter within 30 seconds, handle all the 
common typefaces and put the text into the 
right format for some popular word process- 
ing programs* Further information from 
Lexis ou 0373 61446. 


f COMPUTER 
BRIEFING 




Violence, SAS style 

■ The fad for violent computer games 
shows little sign of fading as far as some 
software houses are concerned and it 
seems the closer they come to a computerized 
version of real life the better. Berkshire 
based Mikrogen is busy putting the finishing 
touches to its latest hopeful moneys pinner, 
SAS Strike Force, In time for the Personal 
Computer World Show at the beginning of 
September. 

It is planned to include several different 
examples of potential mayhem, with one, for 
example, set in an embassy taken over by 
terrorists. The company is claiming the game 
uses authentic SAS methods and routines 
through the assistance of a member of the SAS 
22nd Hereford Regiment who has been 
acting as an adviser. Computer games are 
largely played by seven to 14 year olds. 

Not so soothing 

■ Embarrassed housing officials in 
Sedgley, West Midlands, have removed a 
recording of Home Sweet Home from a 
computerized telephone switchboard in then- 
new offices. Callers complaining about their 
housing conditions became irate when they 
were put on hold and and had to listen to the 


taken out the microchip which caused the 
tune to be played. 

The £4,000 phone 

■ Those who feel that British Telecom's 
standard charge for installing a telephone line, 
around £70, is too high should be thankful 
they do not live in Brazil. The official pnee of a 
ohone line ordered from the government 
phone company is £650. but because of a 
chronic shortage there is a thriving black 
market selling existing lines. A common 
household telephone Une has become worth 
more than £4.000 and until last week there was 
nothing to prevent subscribers selling their 
phone line to somebody else at whatever price 
they could get - simply registering the 
transfer with the phone company. 

Now the Brazilian government has decided 
to prohibit such sales and has promised to 
increase the 1 1 miNion telephone lines to 
more than 15 million by 1989. 

Filtering Jaws 

■ The Victor Company of Japan, JVC, has 

. announced It will start selling the world's first 
three-dimensional videodiscs for home use 
in late September and will then release 
programmes at monthly intervals. A special 
adaptor will be needed for videodisc players 
along with specially-designed filter glasses ' 
which together will cost about 33,000 yen 
(£140), Two of the first three titles wifi be 
Jaws 3 and -Friday the 13th, Part 3 The discs 
are expected to cost £55. 


Events 

Personal Computer World 
Show, Olympia, London, 
September 3-7 (01-487 5831) 
Visit 86 Recruitment Fair, Inter- 
Continental Hotel, Hyde Park, 
London, September 5-6 (01- 
840 7117) 

Commodore Show, UM1ST, 
Manchester, September 12-14 
(061-456 6835) - 
Electron & BBC Micro Show, 
JJMIST, Manchester, Septem- 
ber 26-28 (061-456 8835) 

New Technologies in Training, 
Kensington Town Hail, London, 
September 30-October 2 {01- 
727 1929) 

IBM System User Show, Olym- 
pia 2, London, October 1-3 (01- 
6081161) 

Hampshire Computer Fair, 
Guildhall, Southampton, Octo- 
ber 30-31 (0703 31557) 

Com pec, Olympia, London. 
November 11-14 (01-821 5555) 

Overseas 

Comdex Australia, RAS 
Showground, Sydney, Septem- 
ber 2-5 (01-930 9740) 

EuroDec 86, Intercontinental 
Hotel, Fontenay, Hamburg, 
West Germany, September 23- 
25 (01-403 1473) 




IBM AT/E, 20mb, £2850! 

IBM Personal Computer AT/E, 512k RAM, 

IBM 20mb hard disk, 1.2mb floppy drive, 
monochrome display, mouo/printer adaptor, 
dock, UK keyboard, mnnnals and Basic. New 
XT/S/FD. 20mb complete, £3150- Reduced 
price on PC-G complete, £1050. 

Now in stock at Morse prices: IBM AT/X and Proprinter XL 

MlT>tan«U4Mlair.\AT 

MORSE COMPUTERS 78 Holbom, London WC1V OS. 

SSlIS yWwr« ■ ™ Telephone 01-831 0644. Telex 262546. 




Wright Air 
Conditioning 


— feyourcoDipji^rocm 

COMPUTER ROOM CONSTRUCTION. COUDHTONOfCi 
MAINTENANCE & CONSUHANCY 021-7738421 


BIRMINGHAM 

BRISTOL 

GLASGOW 

LEEDS 


NEWCASTLE 

WOKINGHAM 


Compaq: Portable II £2700! 

Special offer on the new smaller Portable 
II model 3, 80286 processor (Smbz), 

640k RAM, lOmb hard disk, 360k 
♦floppy disk drive, combined graphics 

' and text display. Compaq Portable 256k 

RAM, 2 360k drives, dual-mode display, £1350. Please phone 
for Morse prices on the Portable Pitas, Deskpro and Deskpro 

286 products. 

' Mprin iiv liju m lihVCT 

MORSE COMPUTERS 78 H & HoU)om - London WC1V 6LS - 

" vyWryiEn g Telephone 01-831 0644. Telex 262546, 



COMPUTER 

APPOINTMENTS 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON 

Database Systems 
Planner/Manager 

A computer professional Is required as a Database Planner, to be the second 
member of a small team, carrying out a 'FeasIbBty and Definition Study', over a 
period of eighteen months, of an Admirastrative Database for the College. Provided 
the study results. In software, hardware and management proposals which are 
accepted, the Database Planner would then become Database Systems Manager, 
with responsibly for Implementing the software recommended. The Database is 
Intended eventually to support all aspects of the administration and management of 
the College, inducing finance, student records, bufldings and plant, personnel, etc. 
The Database Planner wtfl be mainly concerned with the evaluation and 
benchmarking of commercially avaiable software - relational DBMSs and associated 
Data Dictionaries, Query Languages, Report Writers. Application Generators, eta, 
and of the hardware on which it could run. A MicrpVAX II Is available for tee duration 
of tee study, for which tee Database Systwms Planner would be responsible. 
Applications should have a good honours degree, a professional or postgraduate 
qualification, and substantial computing experience, including a responsible position 
(n a computing service application organisation. Experience of a database apptica- 
tion and of the VAX/VMS environment would be an advantage. 

Salary In the range E14JB70 to El 8, 625 p lus £1,297 London Allowance (April 1985 
salary scale, subject to revision). Applications, the the names of two referees to the 
Senior Assistant Secretary (Personnel), University College London, Gowbt Street, 
London WC1E 6BT, from whom filthier particulars may be obtained. 


WANTED 

THE BEST BUSINESS SOFTWARE TALENT 
IN THE UNITED KINGDOM 

Mjoe Dnz Base System* (MDBSLadevdaprrofKi»iLtabeMaii/lGiinL and MDBS III, tsopeniKa I'K 
Be pana UK idea group that wd anack the nuncoptace with an international industry leader. 

UK REGIONAL MANAGER 

EXCELLENT COMPENSATION, PLUS CAR AND BENEFITS 

faitiai is responsible for total nuagment of the United Kingdom office • inducting ales and 
saies/suppon son. 

Apptkani must have at least seven years' extensive wm aymail experience ra the comparer industry 
(preferably ronwareL Must bean eurilem administrator with p r o ven sale* management background. Win 
nsartrtiagand sales Irndgenaod ciKnh rating advertising and public rctauo»Miviiin for 
Ibe UK. Respooshfe far means atabmbed sales and revenue gods and adhering to budgeted expenses. 

SALES MANAGER 

EXCELLENT COMPENSATION PLUS CAR AND BENEFITS 

Must tac five, pats' experience m computer industry with proven trad record of sales management. 
Excdlmi sldb m recnuuM. nperamg. and motivating a professooal sales aiFuusatma. Knowledge of 
da t aba se and artificial mtdbgence software preferred. 

SALES REPRESENTATIVES 
EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITY 

Product and sroport representatives are needed for corporate accounts throughout the UK. Mud hive two 
>tanT SKtessTnl experience sefling database or nnilica) intelligence software and/or services. Excellent 
opportunity for top performers. 

MDBS is a dynamic 
opportunities for career 

If you we equipped to meet this exciting challenge, wise with CV and details of salary ux 

Human Resources Manager _ 

MDBS jgg) 

15 Crossways Court \07 

Windsor If 

Berkshire SL4 3EL 

Tel; 0753 852330 IlMiD 

Telex: 849462 TELFAC G ■ 5S55E5 


orgainsaimn it ibe leading edge of the software industry. H often outstanding 
t devetoparen! plus excellent salary and benefits package. 


BUILDING FOR YOUR FUTURE 

SYSTEMS ENGINEERS BERKSHIRE 


FOR SECURITIES MARKET - CHiTRAL LONDON H2-20K 

GRADUATE ANALYST/PROGRAMMERS + CAR 

t ow n : : Law subsidiary of International Banking Corporation abated In Central London, wtti 
mmmxit-mm. Far East and North America. Provides financial Wonraion services wortdunde via 
an abusive data network. 


c Several AnHyst/Programmero with good dewee or ugnalent are requbed to w«k in snag 
group or atone, within a young and vwy fnendiy environment to design i 


systems 


design and bnptament new financial 

the profession^ investment community. 

COBOL propammUiB. ‘C or ASSEMBLER coupled wfljt creative software devetop- 
medL Exposure to VM/CMS and financial systems would be a rfeUxt actvamage as the environment 
encom p ass es RnanriaL Investment. Eurobond/Seaebes applications. Hanfware: IBM/Amdafaf nan- 
frames. Tandems and nuoros with commumcaoon IMcl 

Be— n*. Wonderful opportunity to join a high cafihre org a n isa t i on at the forefront of the world's 
togertlnmnl databases. The exceUtrt salary is compSnramsd by notHamWatwy Denson, BUPA. 
bonus and company car scheme. N you respond weS In this tastmoring and dynamic environment, 
you can expect fast promotion and high fianrial rewards. 

REF: TM 1936 


TO S23K 
+ BENEFITS 

few Energetic young European company, involved m Sfcon Croat design Based m Berkslwe 
with offices in Munich aid Pats, there are hither plans to set up tbar own manufacturing plant m 
Europe tear ties year. 

FMfewc Engineers and Project Leaders are mound for the development at advanced CAD tods. 
Candidates wfl be working an SUN aid DEC hardware usmg “C". 

D —Ttee rre CandiMBS must have direct VLSI expenence. preferably gamed wtiun a Sion design 
enuronmeiit Successful applicants wiU have computer design expenence and ioowfedge of physical, 
structural and behamanafl design. Considerable merest w* be shm to candah ttcs wth area 
exposure to insuring products directly on rite sites. 

Cmn fc An mceflert opportunity to work far a company who. n the next ten years, am id be in Ihe 
roratrant td hriech afleen tfesron. Benefits ndude an excellent rerrameratnn package and stuck 
options for canfidatss at sector levels. REF: TX 1978 

☆☆☆☆☆ SALES ☆☆☆☆☆ 

BERKS BASE 


ICL PROGRAMMERS/SENIOR PROGRAMMERS 
- TO MOVE INTO ANALYSIS 


SW LONDON 
211-16K + 
BENEFITS 

One of tire larged zrt most successful computer senior tamparies deteug with most 
"(jroups and ainnuercial/business application areas, staffed urth cu mpete it and dynsnic 
professionals. 

Peril—: P i mum mer s and Senior Proorammeis to move fade an anteraiB rate and work on major 
pmjacts. playing an integral part ii a small team working from the Analysis singe through to 
rnpJemeroauaa. At the mare senior towel tiers writ be team leadership. Trailing wifi be gmn in 


MOVE TO SALES) 
DATAC0MS, NETWORKS 
SALES TRAINING 


£17,000 OTE 
BASE TO £14,000 


Eaeri—cc Prog ram i bs -18 months -2 years COBOL e xperience gained on ICL rr uMra nie s from a 
cornmerafl or finamal tacfcgromd. Senior Pro gramm er s - 3 ypare trius. preferably with BMS, TPMS 
and team leadership expenence. At the nun pnor level training win be green In HAAS, 
fie—nt These opportMidaes must be careftrily congderad by candMaas wtift harchrara/mpfication 
eroSSfee touted to one or even two users, as tin type of person has benefited conbdarrtty In the 
past. The variety of tardwatg employed aid (he scope of appfieatioos coup lad wh sad lent trading, 
can lead to let promotion, higher salaries mi a caiten prt a pcaa luhip. 

REE TF 230 

ANALYST PROGRAMMERS SURREY TO £16K + BENEFITS 

to— T- A dynamic tat moving software house, wed respected for its production of ftnanal 
rages hi the European market place. Based n Surrey with wort in Pans. 

Pftriiec Analyst frognuiMiws retired w wort m a team on the development of beepote systems, 
heft design to imptoiwreition. Work invokes regular travel to Pans - #fl expenses pad. 
iri—cg Upwards of 2 yeas COBOL prog ra mming within m IBM iranframe BHironmeaL 
care to CKS. D0S/VSE or MVS essential, life assurance or fitandal appl i cations experience 
would be of partreufer interest. . 

■at Unfimoad career opportunities within tins company, vttb benefits nduding BUPA, health 
insurance and He aasraance. 

R Eft TS 1915 


P a m eai y : Recognised throughout die UJt as a leader In data^ommcncations. networking and 
soBfiSr sides, tin TOgor ireuiufacturar Is currently instigating a pane sales programme for 
ambitious computing protesstonris. 

Pw«»— : bony working as a sates tedsoo repre se nt ativ e, you Ml be regdred to deal wrth al 
customer enquines and rrartet research worn two district marker sectors: r a Govemment/Loeal 
Authorities, and major accouas. Progression to ma mstreatn sales operation wfl inflow withm raw 
months of joeing the company. 

BtofltteKCl tesaatossfiiiatdidaaswacuffenttelwworinngmsatesitoPonwtochrtictestiPPOrt 
roles, in addition, exceflent oo mm un lcano n sfcflls and pood sates aptitude a essentnL An understand- 
tng o< datacommmteatons would iwnlly be advantageous although not essential, 
fianenh Voting and ambitious ndreUtals wi recognise this as an outstanding opportunity to mow 
uETBTsate arena, in KhKton to tin outsandng satey flw company 4 taking ted prefect and 
sates training conducted exteraaffy by a professtonaJ or ga e satin n. REF: TYB 1752 

SALES EXECS + SALES MGR$ LONDON £40,000 + OTE 

NETWORKED IBM PCS BASE TO £20,000 

TIMES TOP 1000 INCENTIVES SCHEME 

One of the bating dealers In the U.K. with a worldwide timover of E250 MRflon. is 
. nitergoing a major expansion programme. To help sustain their record of success, 
urerafehed within the mdustiy today, a nomtnr of vacancies are now avaiiabie. 

PetftaL Based at the company's new purpose tuft offices m West London, the briel w® be to sefi 
the above busimss spittoons mto corporate accounts m London and the Home Counties Current 
v ac an ow s ndude territory sales, aceourt nanagement. and sales management positions. 

* ' mac To qua«y for tires posters, afl mthdatts wfl need to demo nstra t e a sound ba*- 

n soUrr sales and si kvdeph knowledge d the mere tnattaptae. Fatwtatty veto targe 



£13-E21K 

+ BANKING BENBTTS 

user of IBM ranframes and 
are constantly bang attained 


SYSTEMS ANALYSTS/ CITY 

COMPUTER AUDIT 

Btototec Ona of tin Worid’s hading banking corporations, a i 
assotSESI computer hardware. Higher lerote d accedence in t 
and fortius to continue mote DP. professionals are sought. 

Ttoror Systems Analysis to wort on a variety of hnanod and iarfcinQ appfleations. partedarty In 
the Computer Audit area. Also Computer Auditors to wore withm the Bank 's Audit department, advsing 
on computer systems and basng between suft and D.P. 

toner Upwards of tine yean dab proeesang experience ki Systems Analysis, computer audit 
nitty assurance rota. It m be advantageous to have a background In finance or acc ounti ng . 
CanOnJates wdh upanents rt.wiy harthun - mavrtrama. mm of tom are asked to apply. 
Otwerob These are golden ooporome w s tor career advancement not only providing a way into 
tuntangbut aim to wotlt on me very latest IBM hardware. A very generous stey. mortgage subsidy, 
banking and a range of additional benefits should make these wen more attractive prospects. 

REF; ID 1990 


CENTRAL LONDON OR 
EASTERN HOME COUNTIES 


BASE TO E16K 
UNLIMITED 
EARNING 


I martreme sites is at particular interest Mwtuals washing to apply tor a management pastel 
should turn retavam expenence at ttis Icvri. 

C— ra t This company fimtfy behoves mat salary sited be mm n iensur m wtfh success and 
actKwmttL To thb end. an outecnfeig incentive scheme has been vnpfcmented nduding tiros 
abroad for Mgh adaevets. This together with the exceflem tamings potential and the' generous 
benefits periapt, now us a superb opportunity hi turtPer your career. TY i860 

SOFTWARE SALES 
INTERNATIONAL 
OPPORTUNITIES 
GOOD MNGMNT PROSPECTS 

(teMMvfnus International Software Consultancy fe pan of a tanp mritiaabonaf orgsasaOdfl. and is 
searomi tor two experienced cosritants to gw thor successful team. 

BaS® SeMap high value sokdMnfi software numg on IBM. DEC and other major hardware to 
existing Blue Cap companes end Mo new business areas in Central London or me Eastern Home 
Coutita. Opponun&es to devefop into European and US markets are on lifter acconteig to Mutual 
Success ut the UK. In addfoon. prospects tar promatei toto management ** anoapated. 
Experience CandUates should t» atria to dsmonenro a good uat* record « a relevant environment 
TSSHBWWh BM experience in financial or accounmg areas. Be capable of hitfi level negotiations 
ml possess outstanding commutation suits. 

Gnmt This company & already highly respected m the marketplace having been established fra 
ouerftlyttos. Hie generate range of benefits indude choice of car. BUM. pension and unarmed 
earnings potential and excetiem prospects lor promouu. REE: IB 1951 


Evening combers 
until 10pm> 

01-311 8444 
03727 22531 

M yoo do not ses a position that Is 
ideally suited to you, please can as 
«e have found saftablB positions tar 
previous candidates wttbin 2 weeks 
a them contacting us. Cal! cor sates 

Returning to Britain? 

We are spettaftta ta assisting Brit- 
« Nationals working overseas and 
wshreg to return ta the UK. 


6th Floor, Empire House, 175 Piccadilly, London W1Z 9DB Telephone: 01-409 2844, (24 hoars) 






22 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/2 


Helpful key 

• The most beneficial spin-off 
from the current interest in 
personal computers that use a 
mouse — a hand-held device 
which when roiled around a 
desktop moves the cursor 
around the screen — is that it 
allows specialized units for 
severely disabled people who 
cannot use computer key- 
boards to be developed much 
more easily. Pictured right is 
Andrew Crowe, almost com- 
pletely paralysed after falling 
from a roof, using an ultra- 
sonic headset which responds 
to slight head movements or 
pressure on a blow switch. 
Developed by Liverpool based 
Bit-32 the headset plugs into 
the mouse operating box for an 
Apple Macintosh computer 
which can also be tailored to 
accept a track ball which can 
be operated by various parts of 
the body. A complete system. 

including the computer, is 

likely to cost about £3.400. 
Further information can be 
obtained on 051-227 3232. 



Shopping for a new job at the fair 


Two weeks after attending 
Britain's first computer 
recruitment fair in April. Rus- 
sell A sco it sinned work as a 
senior programmer at a soft- 
ware house. 

The speed of that appoint- 
ment wasn't typical but high- 
lights one of the aims of such 
fairs to speed up the recruit- 
ment process for high-technol- 
ol*> jobs from the normal two 
or three-month cycle. 

Twenty -six software houses 
and computer users, largely 
banks and insurance com- 
panies. with jobs to fill, paid 
up to £3.750 for booths at the 
lair where job hunters in the 
computing field could wander 
round and apply on the spot, 
often complete with instant 
interview. 

Peter Woodhan. informa- 
tion technology director for 
Southern Electricity, says he 
found it a very cost effective 
method of generating serious 
job applications for data 
processing. Southern Electric- 
ity. like 16 other firms which 
attended in April, has 


rcbooked for another fair next 
month. Chris Boon, the or- 
ganizer of Intro UK. says he 
has already filled 30 of the 32 
stands which will be available. 
They include such companies 
as Abbey National. ICL Dix- 
ons and National 
Westminster. 


I 




i 


By Richard Sarson 

More than 4.000 hopefuls 
visited April's fair, though 
about half were graduates 
looking for their first job - loo 
many 'for some exhibitors, 
who "already recruited gradu- 
ates through the milk-round 
approach and wanted experi- 
enced staff. 

Intro no longer has the job 
fair market in Britain to itself. 
Another recruitment fair for 
computer specialists. Visit S6. 
is also planned to take place in 
Scpteniber.lt hopes to attract 
1 00 companies, not just those 


which can afford to take 
stands but firms that want to 
hire three or four staff who can 
rent displays and have en- 
quiries handled by the 
organizer's staff. 

Both Intro and Visit hope to 
expand with job fairs outside 
London next year, in Man- 
chester and Birmingham and 
belivcthe idea might spread to 
other professions as well. Intro 
will run its first fair in October 
for financial sialf. such as 
commodity, currency and bul- 
lion dealers, fund managers 
and management 

accountants. 

Recruitment consultants, 
widely used in the computer 
industry where the severe 
shortage of certain skilled staff 
ensures a healthy amount of 
job switching, are not worried 
that job fairs might affect 
business. 

Graham Francis, of con- 
sultancy Myriad, points out 
the lack of confidentiality at a 
fair. A data procesing manager 
could find his programmers 
doing the rounds and vice 


versa, he says. Mr Francis 
organizes open evenings for 
some of his clients, a similar 
recruiting method in some 
ways, and says they have had a 
mixed reception. 

Another consultant Basil 
Pearce of Scope, who says he 
has tried every possible 
recruitment method, also 
finds that open evenings are 
not entirely successful, be- 
cause people like keeping their 
working life and private life 
separate. He believes that 
traditional advertising in the 
press will remain the mainstay 
of the computer recruitment 
business. 

The next six months could 
show whether he is right, or 
whether recruitment fairs be- 
come as much a pan of the 
computing scene as computer 
exhibitions. 

Visit 86 Recruitment Fair. 
Inter-Continental Hotel. Hyde 
Park. London. September 5-6 
Intro UK Recruitment Fair, 
Sovotei, Hammersmith. 
September 12-13 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 



Superb career opportunity in fast-expanding company 
industry’s most comprehensive range 
PKGE c£23K + car N. Home Countries - S. Midlands 

Part of a leading multi-national group with a diverse product portfolio and world-wide R & D, 
manufacturing, ana marketing resources, our client now seeks an additional Sales Executive for its UK 
Computer Media Division. 

The position carries responsibility tor sales of the full product range to distributors & end users, and calls 
for a strong relationship builder, able to identify and take advantage of business development 
opportunities in a fast-moving environment 

Aged 24-34 and well-educated, you are alert, enthusiastic and possess a persuasive manner. You have 
c3 years successful sales experience, gained preferably in computer media or related fields, although 
other backgrounds will be considered. Additionally, you have first class presentation skills and are weU 
able to control major distributors and their sales persons, thus ensuring efficient sell through of your 
product range. 

The benefits package includes negotiable salary and open-ended commission scheme, car, pension, 
PHS, and relocation assistance where applicable. This is a very real opportunity to develop your career 
within a major multi-national. 

Please telephone John GaBacheron 01-6313780, 
or write quoting ref JG/951/T. 

IPG Sales & Marketing Interface 

Julco House. 26-28 Great Portland &. London WIN 5AD. Tel: 01 631 3780 (24 hrs) 

Professionals in Selection & Search 



r: 

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overseas with 
LA. recruitment. 


ATTENTION ALL 
DAIA COMMUNICATION 
SPECIALISTS 

If you are a data communications specialist with 
detailed knowledge within any of the following areas:- 

• DC INTERFACES AND PROTOCOLS 

- X21 AND X25 

— V24 AND RS232C 
— HDLC, SDLC, BSC 

• NETWORK PROCEDURES AND MANAGEMENT 
— WAN’s 

- LAN’S 

• IBM PROTOCOLS AND PROCEDURES 

- IBM D/C 

- 3270 

- SNA 

- DISSOS, DCA, DIA 

— EMULATOR PACKAGES 

Please call ANN ARUDGE on 0462 57141 immediately to discuss how 
your background matches the demanding requirements of our DUTCH 
client's new DC and NETWORKING development. Code NET. 


11 BANCROFT, HITCHIN, HERTFORDSHIRE, SCS 1JQ 

* et wsfcw at lodufu^l Anwi Imnett And member mtS 
An tmplaymeni Agenry jnd employment Balmess-DaC txence ho SdM|2tL*4 


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An implaymeni Agenry And O'ytioyment Balmess-DoC taxncc ho SaAi2&?* 


Japanese 
PCs hit 
Canadian 
markets 

From Geof Wheelwright 
in Vancouver 

The Far East is finally getting 
a foothold in the North 
American personal computer 
business. For years, major 
Japanese firms have hugely 
been shunned by both the 
home and business markets in 
Canada and the US. But the 
recent influx of cheap personal 
computers and the soft-ped- 
dling of Japan's own MSX 
standard for home computers 
have combined to make it a 
healthy imports market 

The major beneficiaries of 
this are not just Japanese 
companies - Korean. Tai- 
wanese and Hong Kong 
manufacturers have all seen a 
huge take-up of their low-cost 
IBM PC lookalike products in 
recent months. 

Two of the most successful 
are Epson, the large Japanese 
concern that originally made a 
name for itself in the com- 
puter business selling printers 
and Daewoo Telecom, which 
makes personal computers for 
the American Leading Edge 
computer company. 

The computers made by 
these companies both sell in 
their cheapest versions at 
about £650. Often such ma- 
chines also manage to come 
with certain features that 
aren't found on the IBM 
machine as well as a much 
cheaper price. 

Hundreds of companies 
now offer machines with simi- 
lar or superior specifications 
to IBM though few offer as 
much “bang for your buck", as 
the Americans say. than these A 
new Far East personal 7 
computers. Despite the low 
prices, however, not many 
cheap clones impress cor- 
porate America. 

IBM has been fighting back 
with a recent 33 per cent cut in 
its wholesale prices. But it is 
not necessarily corporate buy- 
ing habits that the suppliers of 
cheap clones are worried 
about. Basic personal comput- 
ers are now sufficiently cheap 
that it is home users and small 
businesses that are being at- 
tracted to them in large num- 
bers - in a way that they 
would not do for a largely 
games-playing home 
computer. 

This chain of events ironi- 
cally matches the predictions 
of many Japanese companies, 
but just comes later than they 
predicted. The Japanese fore- 
saw a standardization in the 
home computer market al- 
most four years ago and 
developed their MSX range of 
computers, with participation 
from 14 of the major Japanese 
consumer electronics firms, in 
an effort to make different 
brands of computer work with 
the same software and addi- 
tional computer equipmenL 

They were just a little early 
and realized to their cost that 
it was the IBM PC. not MSX, 
which would be the standard 
they needed to back to succeed 
even in (he borne markeL But 
who can blame them for 
believing that the PC would 
never make in-roads into the 
home market after the disaster 
that IBM suffered with its own 
PC Junior home market 
computer? 

The machine was with- 
drawn — not a word IBM uses 
often — after only two years. 


Sales hit hard times 
in the high street 


By Martin panics 
The retailing business for 
personal computers has been 
going through a bard time 
with many stores going out of 
business and some of the big 
chains suffering embarrassing 
reversals in business. 

Even a realization that busi- 
ness computers could not 
necessarily be sold over the 
counter like hi-fi, and a sub- 
sequent switch by some chains 
to other methods of selling, 
has not succeeded. 

The First Computer chain 
admits that its stores were 
originally launched “with an 
expectation that business 
would be substantially walk-in 
trade. This expectation was 
shown to be unfounded." 
There has now been a manage- 
ment buy-out from Heron 
which will retain a stake. 

Nine of the U branches will 
shut leaving a store in London 
and service facilities in 
Slough. 

The dealer chain. Interface, 
has recently gone into 
receivership while franchisers 
Ernie has heavily axed its staff 
in Britain and the US and 
recently closed one of its 
stores in Leeds. Others in the 
business are struggling. 

To some extent this is the 
inevitable result of the 
marketplace being over-sup- 
plied with suppliers. Back in 
the heady days of personal 
computing, sales easily dou- 
bled every year which gave all 
the retailers a chance to grab 
some market share. 

But now with sales still 
growing by more than 20 per 
cent this year, healthy by most 
industries' standards, it is ted 



Paul Helminger. A new 
trading pattern 

news for many working in the 
supply chain. A large propor- 
tion of personal computer 
sales to companies have al- 
ways been made direct avoid- 
ing computer stores 
completely. 

Paul Helminger. for exam- 
ple. is European manager of 
the franchise retail chain 
Computcrland and secs the 
present current hard times as 
pan or a cyclical boom-bust 
trading pattern in personal 
computers, mirroring that 
which characterizes the semi- 
conductor industry. 

“There is an instability in 
the market which is being led 
by the manufacturers." he 
claimed. The technology is 
now way ahead of what the 
average user requires.” he 
said, pointing out that many 
PC/ATs arc being used as 
simple word processors. 

“The manufacturers seem 
keen to introduce a new 
product every - three months, 
while at the same time cutting 
the price of the existing prod- 
ucts. This produces instability 
in the markeL** 

He feels that the next big 
market for personal comput- 


ers must be the vast number or 
small to medium-sized com- 
panies that are still reluctant 
to use computers. 

“These companies need 
convincing that the machine 
they buy is the right one for 
them and this cannot happen 
when new machines keep 
appearing every three 
months." he said. 

He would like to see the 
manufacturers and retail busi- 
ness coming together in some 
»a\ to bring that stability to 
the' market, pointing to IBM 
in this context as a company 
that kept its future plans close 
to its chest, even from the 
retail outlets which have the 
task of selling the products it 
produces. 

“IBM is not fully reconciled 
to dealing with independent 
resellers of its equipment and 
some of its policies mean that 
it is not conducive to having a 
healthy dealer network. It is 
pushing the dealers towards 
other suppliers.” 

Some of these may well be 
the new cheap clones that are 
appearing from the Far East, 
many or which, he suggests, 
are excellent machines. Their 
combination of current tech- 
nology and low price are what 
many users actually need. 

He agreed that such ma- 
chines can be susceptible to 
poor quality control in their 
manufacture and pointed to a 
scheme Computerland is now 
operating in the US. Here it 
buys in cheap clones and 
quality tests them itself. The 
result is then sold as a 
Computcrland branded prod- 
uct priced between the cheap 
and expensive options. 


Don’t blame the tools. 


By Martin Banks 

If having just installed a new and inordinately 
complicated local area network: for personal 
computers, yon find that it breaks down almost 
immediately, die **»■"«* are it is your own 
fault. 

That at least » the view of some computer 
maintenance companies which are finding a 
growing proportion of its business coming from 
nwiniwMiOT! and “recovery” work for local 
area networks. 

The problem, says Andy Mnllen of 
CompHteraid Services, is that too little thought 
is given to how the network is specified and in- 
stalled in the first place, and without that 
e ssential prep lanning all networks stare 
disaster in the face on a fairly permanent basis. 

The type of pre-planning that Mr Mullen 
considers important is not the type most 
potential network users will have thought 
about He has little concern for the number of 
workstations or what type of personal com- 
puter is chosen. Nor is he too concerned about 
whatever else goes to constitute the network so 
long as it can cope with the workload. Neither 
is be overly bothered about what applications 
software you care to select. 


His greatest concern is reserved for the 
operating system selected, because the subsid- 
iary capabilities can play an important part in 
finding a failure and getting the network hack 
up and running again. 

One problem is the plans, or of the lack of 
them, that cover the physical installation of the 
network. It is here, he suggests, that many 
potential failures are initially induced. 

“Personal computer networks are fraught 
with problems,” be said. “We have found 
network cables wired np to the mains supply 
before now." 

More commonly, the problems come from 
poorly specified cabling and connectors. High 
quality co-axial cable is expensive, though 
often essential if a network is to run at its maxi- 
mum capacity. Cheaper co-ax and poor quality 
connectors will often work well enough to 
commission a new network bat will breakdown 
under heavy working loads. 

Two potential sources of salvation suggested 
are to seek independent advice on the 
installation at the planning stage, and to 
ensure that there is one individual within the 
user company that acts as network controller, 
and knows what the network is all a boot 


‘Virus’ threat to defence secrets 


Continued from page 23 
equivalent of the federal bud- 
get every two to four hours. 

These almost incomprehen- 
sible sums of money are 
processed solely between the 
memories of computers, using 
communications systems that 
are vulnerable to physical 
disruption and electronic 
tampering.” 

Computer viruses are de- 
signed to replicate themselves 
like a living organism, spread- 
ing throughout a computer 


City 


Recruitment 
Consultants l| 


REAL TIME 
INFORMATION 
CITY 
GUARANTEED 


Exceptional opportunities exists in financial 
information, for new business and account executives 
who have knowledge of the City, Viewdata or 
computer related products with main player in equity i 
information. 

To find out more please contact Frances Mottram on . 

01-623 4688. 

rm enr recruitment consulebnts limited 

O MICRO COMPUTER DIVISION 
Bl 58 HOUNDSDITCH, LONDON EC3A 7DL 
TEL: 01-623 4688 

ITIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIITI 


network, government sci- 
entists said. Viruses can 
spread from one computer 
system to another during elec- 
tronic linkups and might lie 
dormant and . undetected for 
months or years before going 
on the attack at a predeter- 
mined time. 

Before it begins to disrupt a 
system, a computer viru$ 
would be inconspicuous, 
containing only a few hundred 
“bytes” in a program that 
might total hundreds of thou- 
sands. Even the most carefully 
designed computer security 
terriers can be vulnerable, the 
Georgetown report said. 

Another way the viruses 
could spread was through 
computer discs which com- 
puter users often copy and 
share. Scientists say the com- 
puter virus idea may have 


originated in a 1975 science 
fiction novel. The Shockwave 
Rider. Intrigued computer 
buffs began tinkering and by 
the early J980s had turned 
fiction into fact with experi- 
mental viruses. (Reuter) 



THE CITY UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND APPLIED PHYSICS 

COMPUTER MANAGER 

the School houses a PRIME 550 imdtKiMr rrtntctxnpunw as part of the SERC I m anm M wr 
Computing Facility. This is pnmarity a research treaty for the School and is used oomelmtk/ tor 
Computer Aided Design. Image Processing and Control Engtnmnng as wefl as lor omar rastarcft 
« the University. The machine is corrected to txxti toed and national networks. 

The Computer Managers* be nwponsBle tor an aspects o< the local o perat io n and snpport of tha 
sysram. induing system operation and administration and user support Tnairanc wfl be prodded 
and the Computer Manager wfl be supported by fun-funs staff locaRy and at UMB5T Manchester. 
Applicants should have a good honours depee or equivalent whh substantial exp erience o I 
programming ana computer ap p tamom, to s saentffle environment. 

Salary on Grade IB d tm scale for Research and Analogous Staff E8J3S2 to £10.782 pjL indusiva 
(currently under review), according to age. quaweafons and experience. 

Application toms and further particulars may be obtained from Ms Jane Cameron. Panomd 
Recruitment Assistant (T). The Oty Untverskty, No rt hamp ton square, London EClV 0HU. 
Closing data for appJtcaoons 3 1st August 1988. 


COMMUNICATIONS 
ENGINEERS 

Good engineers with all-round 
comms.' experience required for nu- 
merous contract and permanent 
positions in the City. Call David 
Houlihan on 437 1222. Rec Cons. 


CLIENT 

SERVICES 

REPRESENTATIVE 

£10,000 pa 

IDCs Leasing Planning Services has an imme- 
diate emry-level opening for a Client Services 
Representative. LP5 offers a challenging and 
fast-paced work environment and the opportu- 
nity to learn the computer industry in general 
and the computer leasing industry in particu- 
lar. Primary duties will include supporting the 
Account Manager in handling client enquiries, 
analysing industry announcements, and work- 
ing with numbers. The ideal candidate will 
posses strong analytical and writing skills. A 
degree in Business or Finance, and a European 
language preferred, but not required. 

Send resume to: 

Leasing Planning Service, 
international Data Corporation Enropa LhL, 

2 Bath Road, 

London, W4 1LN 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


23 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


AVON MAGIST RATE S* COURTS COMMITTEE 
BRISTOL PETTY SESSIONAL DIVISION 


TWO COURT CLERKS 

Court Clerk/Principal Admuristratto Division Points 3 - 7 
' £*8,880 - £10,302) 


Applications are invited- for the above appoint- 

meets from barristers, solicitors or other qualified in 

accordance with , the Justices* Clerics (Qualifications of Assis- 
tants ) Rules, 1979 who wish to pursue a career in the magisterial 
service with pl enty of opportunities for promotion within the 
court clerk structure. The. successful 'applicants for the post of 
court clerk wiD be called upon to to Ire a variety of courts in 
add iti on to . undertaking administrative duties. 


The appointments are subject to medical assessment and the 
J.N.C. Conditions of 'Service for Justices* Clerks’ Assistants. 
Assistance with removal and legal ft* p*m a cg will be in 
appropriate cases. 


Applications with full particulars of age, q nw R f y ^t j rmw 
experience, together with the names and addresses of two refer- 
ees, should reach the undersigned by 27th August, 1986. 
Envelopes should be marked “Strictly Private 
& Confidential”. 


Bristol Magistrates’ Court 
PO Box 107 
Nelson Street 
BRISTOL BS99 7BJ. 


GERARD SULLIVAN 
Cleric to the Magistrates 7 
Courts Committee 


Johnson Stokes and Master 


HONG 

KONG 


Require a corporate finance soficitnr and a general 
co mpa ny commercial soliaiorfqr their rapidly expanding 
international and domestic corpora t e practice. Ideally 
solicitors of 9-5 years post qualification experience are 
Sought but those wiih less experience will be ccnsidered. 
Long term prospects are good for the right candidate. The 
overall remuneration package is parti a l l ad y attractive, 
including excellent salary, rent allowance and generous 
bonus. In addhion there are substantial medical benefits 
and other fringe benefits mriraefing leave and travel 
allowances. 

Applications in confidence quotrag r eference AB/C218 
to Bfvffr Snwlnn Limited, 26-28 Bedford. Row, T 
WC1R 4HE to striv e by 19th August 1986. Telephone 
01-4056852. 


REUTER SIMKIN 


LONDON ■ LEEDS • WMCTCSTER 

I RECRUITMENT <c MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS! 


INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL 


Assistant Librarian LA\VYERS 


Herbert Smith, a large firm of City Solicitors, are 
expanding the services offered by their extensive library and 
wiih to recruit a librarian whose responsibilities will include: 

* Inquiry and information work ' 
ak Cataloguing and indexing 

♦ General library routines 

Applicants should either be chartered or newly qualified 
librarians and have experience in a legal or commercial 
library. 

An interest in electronic retrieval systems is desirable. 

The working environment is modern and friendly. Benefits 
are attractive and the salary will reflect qualifications and 
experience. 

Applications, with full curriculum vitae, should be sent to 
Mss. ELR. Tzew Personnel Manager at 


LONDON • BAHRAIN ■ SINGAPORE ■ HONG KONG 


Our international banking and capital markets practice 
is carried on in each of these important commercial and 
financial centres. We are looking for solicitors who wish 
to train in banking and capital markets work as well as 
those with relevant experience. 


If you are an able and an ambitious young lawyer with a 
good academic record, keen to become involved in the 
stimulating challenge of international financial law, we 
would like to hear from you. Successful applicants will 
join one of our banking groups in London and may 
subsequently have the opportunity to work in our 
overseas offices. 


Herbert Smith 


mum HOUSE, 35 CANNON STREET, LONDON EC4M 5SD. 
OVERSEAS OFFICES: NEW YORK, HONG KONG, PAHS. 


Apply with full curriculum vitae to David Stone. 
Coward Chance. Roy ex House, Aldermanbuty Square. 
London EC2V7LD. 


COWARD 

CHANCE 


Church Adams Tatham & Co 


have vacancies in their Reigate Office ion 

1. ASSISTANT SOLICITOR to take charge of Probate 
Trust and Tax Department Successful applicant will 
have had at least three years experience since admis- 
sion in a Probate and Trust Department and have a 
good knowledge of Income Tax, Capital Gains Tax 
and Inheritance Tax. Starting salary according to ex- 
perience £17,000 p.a. upwards with partnership 
prospects. 

2. ASSISTANT SOLICITOR to assist partner in the 
running of Litigation Department Successful appli- 
cant will have at least one yearns experience either 


HATTEN ASPLIN CHANNER 
AND GLENNY 


GRAYS THURROCK 

SEEK 


POTENTIAL PARTNER TO 
HEAD LITIGATION DEPARTMENT 

£20,000 p.a. for suitable applicant 


Please write with full GV. to:- 

The Staff Partner (Ref DF), 

Church Adams Tatham & Co., 

. 23 & 25 BeU Street, 

Reigate, Surrey. 

Interviews can be held in London or Reigate to suit 
applicant 


Experienced solicitor sought to head Litigation team at our 
busy Essex Office (dose to M25 and Dartford Tunnel). All 
aspects of litigation will come within the Applicant's control, 
with the emphasis upon Commerrial, Civil and Criminal 
Litigation. 


Advocacy skills essential. 


Apply to S E Rogers - 01 594 5469 daytime, 
and 0245 421304 evenings, or in writing to 
our Barking Office at Radial House, 3/5 Ripple Road, 
Barking, Essex, IG11 7NG 


TOWN PLANNING AND 

DEVELOPMENT 


Hughes-Gasfell Ltd 




Coward Chance are looking for a solicitor who has. or 
who wishes to develop, specialist town planning and 
related expertise in Its Property and Planning 
Department. 

The post will provide the successful applicant with 


interesting work in a stimulating environment. 

Please send full CV. to: W. J. Tnomas, Coward Chance, 
Rqyex House, Aldermanbuiy Square, London EC2V 7LD. 


COWARD 

CHANCE 


Your Career is Important to Us 
Hughes-Casteli is the recruitment consultancy 
exclusively for solicitors. Our emphasis is to give ail our 
candidates the personal commitment experienced 
guidance, and support that is vital when contemplating 
an important career move. 

We represent a large number of firms in private practice 
and industry, and from a wide range of vacancies both in 
the UK and Hong Kong, we can assist you to choose the 
right one. 

, Our service is free to candidates. Contact us now to 
discuss your future: 

HUGHES-CASTELL - 01-583 0232 
^TIBoltCourt FleetSreet London EC4A3DU ^ 


Surrey Magistrates’ Courts Committee 

COURT CLERK 

£10,266 - £12,387 (award pending) 
Godstone and. Reigate Petty Sessional Divisions 



Avon and Somerset Police Authority 

SOLICITOR to the CHIEF CONSTABLE 

£14,025 to £15,111 


Applicants must be qualified to be clerics in court. For banisters or solicitors 
without court experience, the scale -while under training commences 
at £8,491 


Further particulars and application form obtainable by telephoning | 
Bristol 290777 ext. 6263 (Mr. A Hudson). National conditions of 
service apply. Applications, marking envelope “Personal /SCO” to be 
sent to:- 


Further details and application form from Westgaie House, 51 High Street, 
Esher, Surrey KT10 9RQ (Telephone Esher 65454). Closing dale 1st 
September 1986. 


Clerk to the Police Authority, 

PO Box 11, Avon House, The Haymarket, 
Bristol BS99 7DE, 


| fay 23rd August, 1986. 




STONEHAM LANGTON 
& PASSMORE 


are seeking two 

ASSISTANT SOLICITORS 


THE FIRM: 


A 20-partner firm, founded in 1782, with Ihree branch offices 
and Hs 12-partner main office in the West End. The London 
office is expanding on alt fronts, and particularly fn the 
Corroany and Commercial and the Property Departments. 
The fi rm has good i n ternatio nal connections and particularly 
strong European contacts. The emphasis is on personal and 
high quality service to our clients, commercial and private. 


THE REQUIREMENT: 


In the Property Department: 
a two to four year qualified Solicitor with property/ 
conveyancing experience to take a share of the very varied 
workload and to handle it with minimum supervision but with 


the support of helpful colleagues. The department's clientele 
ranges from mayor public companies to private individuals 


and the Solicitor 
affonting very gc 


hj bite companies to private individuals 
xxnted wiQ deal with all of them, 
and varied experience. 


In the Company and Commercial Department 
an up to three year qualified Solicitor with good company 
and commercial experience and preferably with a City 
background or articles. Experience in corporate finance, 
insolvency and/or intellectual property would be an 
advantage. The successful applicant will work initially with 
the Head of Department dealing with international inward 
investment and private and public company work but would 
be encouraged to develop an emphasis on insolvency and/or 
intettectusi property work. Recent qualifiers will be 
considered. 


SALARY ANO PROSPECTS: 
CONTACTS: 


in both cases salary negotiable, with prospects in both 
departments for the right people. 

Please write with c.v. ta- 
in the Property Department - 
Grant Middleton or Robert Ewing, 
fn the Company and Commercial Department - 
Andrew Cherry or Christopher Shipley. 


01-499 8000 

Stoneham Langton & Passmore 
8 Bolton Street, London W1Y 8AU. 


INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING AND 
AIRCRAFT FINANCE 


Sinclair Roche & Temperley is a 27 partner practice with offices in the 
City, Hong Kong and Singapore. 

We are now seeking assistants for the aircraft and ship finance divisions 
within our expanding International Finance Department 
Both divisions generate a substantial and stimulating work load from 
international financial institutions and leasing companies, ship builders 
and owners, aircraft manufacturers and airlines. Successful candidates 
will be required to service and promote the firm’s existing client base 
with minimum supervision and will also be involved in structuring 
complex and innovative transactions. 

Candidates with one to four years’ shipping and/or aircraft and/or 
related finance experience with a first class professional background 
and strong academic record are invited to apply. 

Please write in the first instance with full C.V. to 
Mr J. Ritchie 

Sinclair Roche & Temperley 
Stone House 
128-140 Bishopsgate 
London EC2M 4JP 


SINCLAIR ROCHE & TEMPERLEY 


Badenoch & Clark 


PROPERTY LAWYERS 

A number of our diems, small, medium and large 
practices, seek to recruit young committed lawyers 
with up to five years relevant experience for their 


wttn up to live years relevant experience tor mar 
expanding property departments. The work offered 
ranges from domestic conveyancing to complex 


ranges from domestic conveyancing to complex 
commercial property transactions and planning 
work. Some positions cany early partnership 
prospects. 


CAPITAL MARKETS 

UK Merchant Bank seeks lawyer aged 27-32 to join 
Us transaction execution group. Candidates should 
have a top firm training and post admission 
experience in the Banking/Intemational Finance 
Division of a substantial City practice. There is scope 
for rapid progression into either a marketing or 
product development role. 


COMPANY/COMMERCIAL 

EC4 To £15,000 

This medium sized City firm is currently seeking to 
recruit a bright young Solicitor for Hs expanding 


FINANCIAL PLANNING 

CENTRAL LONDON To £25.000 

Our client, an internationally renowned firm of 
Chartered Accountants, seeks an experienced 
Solidtor/Barristei; aged 30 to 35, with a minimum 
of four years Private Client experience far their 


for a recently qualified candidate looking providing tax planning for individuals of high net 
to c^in broad experience of both private and pxibDc worth. Excellent client work and fust class 


company work. partnership equivalent prospects. 

For details of these and other positions, con tact John Cullen or Judith Fm 


Legal and Financial Recruitment Specialists 
16-18 New Bridge St, London EC4V 6AU Telephone: 01-583 0073 


FRERE CHOLMELEY 

PROPERTY LAWYERS 

Frere Cholmeley are looking for talented young property solicitors recently, or soon 
to be, qualified to work in their busy and expanding Property Department 


The work is varied and demanding with an emphasis on all aspects of commericai 
pnoeprty work. 


The successful apapficants will have a good academic background and be equal to 
the challenge of high quality work in a major London practice. 


An attractive salary will be paid. 

Applications should be made in writing with a full Curriculum Vitae to: 

The Administration Partner 
Frere Cholmeley 
28 Lincoln’s Inn Fields 
London, WC2A 3HH 








ill 


24 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Assistant Solicitors (2) 

Litigation 

£11,973 - £12,861 itic. 

Bromley is the largest of the London Bor- 
oughs and offers a wide range of 
professional work together with an extremely 
attractive working environment at the Civic 
Centre. Located in Central Bromley conve- 
nient for both bus and train routes. 

To work in the litigation section of the Legal 
and Committee Services Division. One of the 
posts has an emphasis on planning and com- 
mon law litigation and the other on child care 
and civil litigation. Bote posts will provide a 
varied workload involving frequent advocacy. 

You will need to show an ability to work under 
pressure and as a member of a new and. 
enthusiastic team. Relevant experience 
would be an advantage but recently qualified 
applicants wifi be considered. We have re- 
cently introduced a new management style to 
increase staff motivation and efficiency. The 
introduction of new technology is seen as a 
key element to achieve this. 

Relocation expenses scheme applies in cer- 
tain cases. 

For further information and application form 
please contact Chief Personnel Officer, 
Bromley Civic Centre, Rochester Avenue, 
Bromley BR1 3UH. Tel: 01-290 0324 (24 hour 

answering 
service) Ref 
A282/A283. 
Closing 
date 26th 
August 


’ StotnOey 


CORPORATE TAXATION TO £28K 

Quality workload at major London practice 
for calibre lawyer of up to 3 years PQE. Good 
prospects. 

PENSIONS TO £25K 

Opportunity for ambitious lawyer with previ- 
ous experience at major City practice. 
Excellent career development 

RESIDENTIAL CONVEYANCING TO £18K 

Able conveyancer of up to 4 years PQE for 
prestigious City practice. Top quality 
caseload. 

ENTERTAINMENT TO £25K 

Leading Central London practice seeks law- 
yer of up to 4 years PQE. Music business 
bias. Good prospects. 

^w'PersonneCafa 

Stall specialists to me legal profession worldwide 
95 Aidwych. London WC2B 4JF. Tel: 01-242 1281 
(ansaphone after office hours) 




LAKE DISTRICT 

Solicitor required to assist litigation part- 
ner in busy KENDAL practice having a 
wide variety of contentious work including 
commercial and personal civil litigation in 
the High Court and Counly Court, matri- 
monial property and divorce aid some 
crime. 

An attractive salary will be paid to the 
successful applicant who may be recently 
qualified with a wide experience of litiga- 
tion either during Articles or after 
Admission. 

Excellent prospects for the right person. 
Reply to Box No. A17. 


JANNERS 

PRIVATE CLIENT SOLICITOR 

Solicitor with not less than 2 years experience lo 
consolidate under one head existing probate trust 
and tax work. 

Attractive salary commensurate with age and 
experience and good prospects. 

Apply: Howard Oken 

Janners 

22 Upper Brook Street 

MAYFAIR 

London 

WlY 2HD 

TekOl-49 1-4484 


SW7 

EXPERIENCED 

SOLICITOR 

Required to take over existing work load 
of retiring conveyancing partner of an 
established firm and to assist the senior 
conveyancing partner in the develop- 
ment of existing and new connections. 
Not less than £18,000 pa and excellent 
prospects for successful applicant. 

Telephone 01-602 3474 ref IKL. 


CONVEYANQNG 
Covent Garden 

Newly qualified 
conveyancer required to 
take over residential and 
commercial caseload in 
medium sized practice. 
Informal atmosphere. 
Please send C.V. to: 
Charlotte Smith 
SenSe Executive 
Recruitment 
39 Floral Street 
London WC2. 

Telephone: 01 831 1463 

SENSE 


ASA LAW 


nmm 


Urgently 

Required in 
a(l areas 

01-248 1139 


HOLIDAY INTERVIEWS South 
Om-i * U.h,i (.nullin' firms 
.nlniillitfi'un.HUnill'M OP Of 
spi-fidii'l -kill" M.tri Mill* Ar 
Mird Privmivl OVSS8IMO* 

YOONS CONVEYANCES sum 

•••■*ii iinti iHh H.-wv Con- 
MUTjntJ 0**15 J5L 82 


DOMESTIC 

CONVEYANCERS 

needed for short 

term work NOW; 

01-455 9841 
LEGAL STAFF 
OFFICE (and many 
other jobs locum & 
permanent) 


LITIGATION 

Ealing solicitors have 
vacancy for ambitious 
assistant Top salary 
and prospects for right 
applicant Recently 
admitted person 
considered. CV to 
BOX All 


ASSISTANT SOLICITOR itftnll 
led B5/8to Chftnire tnup lo*vn 
I inn. General practice with rr 
wonsiMiiiy To CIO SK 
Wnm Communis OM6 
261 93 

CITY OF LONDON Sanctum for 
hni Country linn 
Commcrrlal/Oanusllr Came* 
.inrinqsaliciian admitted I lo 2 
vear. to CIS* i k Mary Mole Ac 
cord PermnndWK HISEOta 

AMBITIOUS SOLICITOR CoU 

wniife Young wanire Good 
pr«W«tt for Non-conlrnuoua 
.WKiilnl To £l3K Wenn 
Con ulunci 0036 25183 


LAND AUTHORITY FOR WALES 

LEGAL 

ADVISER 

£20-£27,000 

Applications are invited from experienced 
soidtors for the above post at the Authority's 
new modem offices in Cardiff, 

The posttioMer wSl be responsible to the 
Chief Executive for the provision of legal 
servk»s for the Authority and for advisirwtne 
Board of the Authority m all legal matters. 

In addition to managing the legal section 
he/she wS be directly involved in legal work 
and wfl be expected to contribute in a positive 
manner to achieving the Authority's role of 
making (and avatiabn for development in the 
PrtndpaBiy. 

The successful candidate wtfl need to demon- 
strate experience in afl aspects erf the law and 
practice of real property as wefl as in planning 
and compulsory purchase law. 

Please write for an application form and job 
description to: Personnel Officer. Land 
Authority for Wales. Custom House, Custom 
House Street; Cardiff. 

Completed appBcrtbn forms to be returned 

by rn September 1986. 

/y i LAND AUTHOfBTY FOR WALES 
AWDURDOO HR CYMRU 


COUNTY SECRETARY AND SOLICTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

SOLICITORS 

Grade P0(L) - P0(M) 
(£ 11,850 - £ 15 , 453 ). 

The Kent County Council seek 2 Solicitors who are able 
advocates and interested in the law id personal serial 
services especially of cMd care. 

These are new posts created specially within the lean of 
start in the Legal Division to work closely with file Soria) 
Services Department in the gromci and important sphere of 
child care work. Although tramg wifl be provided from time 
to time, experience ana knowteuge of this work and ot local 
government wifl be an advantage. 

An essential car user allowance Is payable or alternatively a 
car tray be provided in accordance with the County 
Council's Car Lose Scheme. 

Appfcafejn forms returnable by 29tfi August from the 
County Secretary and Solicitor. County HaH. Maidstone. 
KM HE14 1X0. Telephone Msdstaw 671411 ExL 3305. 
Reference No: C/0S 1/993. * 





HIGH-FLYER 

£ Negotiable 

Our clients are seeking a commercially^ 
minded lawyer with management 
potential and a keen desire to progress 
within an expanding and dynamic com- 
pany. Work includes both commercial, 
and corporate law inc. company acqui- 
sitions in the UK and overseas. 
(Recruitment Consultants.) 

74 Long Lane, London ECl Tel: 01-606 937 1 

CHAMBERS 


BEXLEY MAGISTRATES COURT 
TRAINEE COURT CLERK 

£6,021 - £7,446 (indnding London weighting) 

Applications arc invited fhxn prospective Barrister! or Sotiatms 
who have been successful in iheir final examinations and win 
wish to train for a professional career m (be Magistrates Chons 
Service. 

It any be possible to offer articles ofderiuhip to suitable candi- 
dates. A successful candidate who is professionally qualified 
would receive £7,446 per annum. 

Under our presen! Mining scheme all previous minces have 
made rapid progress and gamed promotion and have (bond the 
work both ctaSenging and interesting. 

Further details and application firms may be attained fim:- 
The Clerk to the Jnstices. 

Bexley Magistrates Omit, 

Albion Rond, 

BEXLEYHEATH. Kent DA6 7NB. 
Telephone 01 304 5211 ext 24. 

ADpfcatnns toms should be reoraetl by Wtratenlay 27tti August 1966 


SEARS TOOTH & CO 
LONDON W1 

Young conveyancing solicitor required for 
interesting mixed conimerexaJ/residerttiaJ 
caseload. Good negotiable salary with 
excellent prospects. 

Please apply In writing with full CV to 

Sears Tooth & Co 
14 Harley Street 
London WIN 2AH 
Ref NP 


LITIGATION 

SOLICITOR/CROYDON 

E15-E20.000 p.a.+ Company Car 
Excellent opportunities for 3 years PQE 
person. Write with full C.V. to 
Andersons 

11 George Street Croydon 
Ref CJ 



TOUNC LITIGATION Solicitor 
Weil Mid tenet. Nmn firm Ad . 
'ocary and emend Uwalxm. 
CIS 5K Wnm CMtuIbnb 
0955 36185 

assistant souemm Admit- 

IM HS/et Bediord and Luton 
10 £10 SK wetm consultants 
0955 36183 

ASSISTANT SOUCITOR adrral 
tod 2/3 yean. Coed nweNfa 
BnMWe firm To EI5K wn- 
Consultants 0955 25189 
CIVIL LfnCATIQN SOUCITOR 
A\on WiOi personal imury 
£1 SK Wmn Communis. OUS 
25195 

60NVEVAMCMC A PROBATE 
SOLICITOR Oxford fo £13lc 
Mmv Man* Attorn Personnel 
0936 815506 


Nationwide 

BuOcfing society 

Britain’s third largest Building Society 
invites applications for a new position created partly 
In anticipation of Budding Society legislation ex- 
pected in early 1987. it provides an excellent op- 
portunity tor a Solicitor with a strong commercial 
background gained either in private practice or a 
corporate Legal Department 

ASSISTANT CHIEF SOLICITOR (LONDON) 
c £20,000 -f- Car 

As a key member of the Legal team you wifl be 
involved in the whole range of financial and property 
related initiatives generated by the new legislation. A 
major part ofthe job wffl be to give advice to Senior 
Management as web as participate in research, 
development and impl ementation. The post cate for 
a degree of mental agitfty and the capacity to work 
under pressure. The successful candidate is likely to 
have at least 5 years post-qualification experience 
and proven abifity. 

The Society offers an attractive benefits package and 
assistance with relocation expenses will be avaflabte 
where appropriate. 

Candidates should send tun C.V. particulars, in-' 
duffing current earnings and describing the re- 
levance ot their experience to the address below 
to reach the Recruitment Manager no later than 
29th August 1988. 

R H Wharton 
Recrattneot Manager 
Ratio oahvMe BtriffSeg Society 
Hew Oxford Hoase 
▲ Mgb Helbora 

LONDON WG1V EPW 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 


DEPUTY EDITOR 

CROYDON £NEGOTlABLE 

Since 1927 Taxation magazine has been the leading 
weekly authority on the law practice and administration 
of all forms of personal and corporate lax. We now 
require an experienced taxation practitioner to complete 
oar editorial ream. He or She will probably be an ac- 


cotnnanL hamster, sol id lor or former Inspector of 
Taxes and will need lo have a good understanding of all 
the principal taxes, inducting the capital taxes ana value 
added tax. 

As well as the technical aspects of the work - writing 
articles and reviewing contributed material - the Deputy 
Editor will have a role to play in the planning of the 
magazine. However, no previous publishing experience 
is expected. Attending con fe rences and other out-o&bc 
office events will also be pari of the job. 

Applications, to mdude an outline curriculum vitae and 
ai least one example of the candidate’s written work, 
should be sent tix Simon Owen. Editor. Taxation. Tolley 
Publishing Ltd. 17 Scarbrook Road. Croydon. Surrey 
CRO ISO- Please mark the envelope “Staff -Application : 
all information received will, of course, be treated in the 
strictest confidence. Salary and other benefits will be by 
negotiation to reflect the importance of this key appoint- 
ment and will include S weeks annual holiday. 


TAXATION 

TWfcah|MboniyM ifccbv.paKBnwXaAaaMbaMaal uoNh 


WEST LONDON £20K+ 

Sdidtor/Bamster with Building Litigation experience. 

W1 £20K+ 

Company Commercial, 2-4 years qualified. 

SW1 £15K 

Legal Executive/Solicitor Probate Trust Tax. 

For these and many other challenging 
opportunities - contact the specialists. 

London Legal Executives 

23, Maddox Street, London W1. 01-493 1262 


ASSISTANT SOLICITOR/ 
LEGAL EXECUTIVE 
£15,000 AAE 

Our very busy Solicitor urgently needs an as- 
sistant, must have Conveyancing experience 
and be able fo work with a minimum of supervi- 
sion. Based in Fulham/Putney. Please 
telephone Marion Arama for an appoinement 
on 01-743 5757 PMJ Personnel Services. 


HONG KONG 
lo excess ef £20,000 PA 
(sterliog equivalent) 


experience. For more details contact: 
Law Placement Ltd 
107/111 Fleet Street 
LONDON EC4 
01-353 5498 
(24 hrs) Consultancy 


WHITSTABLE, KENT 

Furley Page Fielding and Pembrook of Can- 
terbury are looking for an assistant solicitor 
of partnership calibre for their busy, old es- 
tablished Whitstable office (EA. Barton). 
He will deal with all types of non-conten- 
tious work with a bias towards domestic 
conveyancing and probata 

Please write with a foil C.V. to Mr. VJG. 
Barton, Furley Page Fielding and 
Pembrook, 39 St Margaret’s Street, Canter- 
bury, Kent, CTl 2TX. 


Comp'Conwn, NQ - 1 yrs. PM, 
to £30.000 WC2. 

Comm U. NQ - 1 yre. PCS, to 
£17.000 WO. 

M to. m - 4 yrs. PQE. to 

mm wd 

Comp/Coirxn. NO ■ 2 yre. PIE. 
cOTiE® W1 

Pmate (Sent 3+ yrt PQE. 
c£25.000 W1 

Comm Cmv 3 - S yrs. POE, 

dzaooo m 

Potential Comp/Comm Ptnr., 
jome foBowig. c £30.000 W1 

Write or phone: 
London Legal Bureau, 
272 Penfeuroflle RtL, 
London HI. 

278 6897. 


CONVEY ANCmC « PRORATE 
ASSISTANT or 1. F SlIITCV lo 
ClOfc Mary Male. Accord Per 
MMtnN 0935 8IB606 
CONVEYANCES North Worrrv 
imsmre Lnqrr 5s To £1 IK 
wrswv Consul lanb 0936 

CONVEY ANCER wins Counirv 
(own firm Domestic and light 
Cwnmrrnal £13 SK Westn 
ConsulMnls 0935 25183 
EXCEPTIONAL LtnUTNM w 
Imuar Leilrr 2gj} Good 
PTMWYts C1SV Wnm Con 
uiJLanu 0935 25185 

CORAL nUCTICE SaUcKor 
Nonh London Lnol wl tw 
admiUM 85/85 To £1 IK Wo 
VX ComulUnlw 0938 28183 


BOREHAM WOOD Soltdlon rr- 
ouin? enlhuoastK and owe 
idixdir to vwaaUw In cnmi- 
nol worii m snwi ouay practice 
Orirto two years poo auaUfKx- 
non ecoerwocr wewrablr 
Saury negotubir Ol -9B3 0241 


POSITION WANTED « year ore 
South Ainran Attorney, 
partner in texting Jonannn- 
Dura firm iwks Poulion In 
London, miner la commerce or 
with firm at wM idlers with a 
mow lo roouaiKlng. 8 years ex- 
wnciwe general comtneroai 
and cwvoraie law. ereeniw m 
copywnie law. in-ungual 

i French. German*. Prawrcinr 

employer mud he prepared to 
wtOi ootaunng WIKIt res 
uems and wart, permit. 
AtdilaMv for inun-iews In Lon- 
don ig week October 
Enquiries to The Advertiser. PO 
Boh 48067. Hoometol Park. 
9134 south ATnra 

CLAPHAM COMMON SOLK3-* 
TORS mure Solualor 
niKiudlnq newly mwufiedi for 
General Leoal Aid Pracutrr lo 
deal wiltl dll Court work alto 
Corn ryanemg. Please a POO to 
BOX A26 

ritCK FLYCR render 55 notvenn 
tenuous with PP Ketu lo Li6k 
Manr Male Arcord Personnel 
0955 815606 

OPPORTUNITY FW TOUNC 

notMToniennous sancitor pp 
ipannrr rrurmg; Ason salary 
nco Mary Male Accord Per 
sonnel 0455 81SS06 

LITiaATlON EXECUTIVE under 
40 tHUUnnnl Dnon firm 
General <pr»al lo CUN Vtev 
Consulunis OMS 25182 

PRIVATE CLIENT SdHetMr VJ 
milted ua/85 lor Wag Counlry 
lirm li ik NW9C Consul 
lanls 045* 28185 


WEST DO Solicitors require en- 
ergetic AsHStam Solicitor 
admuied ai least 3 years lo han- 
dle all forms ol Q\ii Uiwntion, 
In rapidly expamnnq practice 
Starting salary £.15.040 Td 
Ol-d 34 1122 irrt MFl 


POSITION WANTED Souui Alrt- 
ran Lawyer with 35 yean 
experience in insurance iinga- 
imn and partmilar expertise in 
profrsaanaf todcnuniy worL. 1 
partner in leading Johannes 
PuTg firm, seeks pom non in 
London insurance martei or 
wire soHQIon Requires 
work/residmu permit. Please 
reply to The Advertiser. PO 
Box 48067. Bwjeieltu P,<rV 
2199 South Afrtra 

THE LAW In BnstoL Newcastle. 
Norwich. BlrmuighamT- Prac- 
lice Ip Country town*? 
Stimulalinq and rewarding 
odds (or calibre Lawyers at 
Law Personnel. Ol 242 1281 
I Are Oder Bus Hrv Call for AM 
and proven adult 

L E CAL EX ECUT IVE Comeyronc- 
mq wort Sum c £8X Mary 
Male Accord Personnel OUS 
61*506 

UTtCAIKM EXECUTIVE WM 

Mima ran emphasn Legal Aid. 
CIOs Wessex Consultant* 
0455 25183 

NEWLY ADMITTED or Autumn 
admission General Practice 
Kent 110k Mary Male Accord 
personnel 09S5 0165O6 

TOUNC UTWATOR Bourne 
mouth Mainly G* ii cia *k 
ttrwn .CsmtUlinll 0955 
25186 

LECAL EXECUTIVE Uliqalton 
inntltoM A fenaHC dent cqifcc 
Hon Kent to £U * -k Mary Male 
Acrord Personnel 0935 

SISSOn 


DISTRICT SECRETARY'S 
DEPARTMENT 

ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 

Salary P04 £12483 - 13823 
per annum inclusive. 

A vacancy exists for a keen energetic Sofidtor in 
the Legal Division of the Secretary's Department of 
Epptng Forest District Council. Newiy qualified 
soudtore considered Duties indude advocacy in 
the Magistrates’ and County Courts and Town and 
Country Planning. The office is located at Eppmg^a 
country market town on the outskirts of North 
London. 

Staff Benefits indude:- 

a) Housing accommodation if required,' 

b) Relocation expenses scheme up to a maximum 
of £2000; 

c) Casual user car allowance (not exceeding 
I450cck 

d) Commuter allowance scheme for staff Rvmg 
more than 25 miles away. 

Application form and Job Description may be ob- 
tained from the District Personnel Officer, Epping 
Fbrest District Council, 323 Hfah Street, Eppjng, 
Essex. CM16 4BZ. Tet Epping 77344, Extrc 2101. 

Ptease quote Ref: S/4A 
Closing date: 27th August 1986 

Epping Forest 
District Council 


I Company/ 

CommeraalLaw 

I BIRMINGHAM 

An opportunity now exists to develop a career 
as a Solicitor in our Company and Csmmerdal 
Law Department 

Thesuax&sful applicant, who IfflJ he at least 
three gears quaHffed. will be involved in public 
flotations, private plaebigs, sales and acquisitions 
of companies, finance agreements, shareholders' 
agreements and many other aspects of this field of 
lav.YouwiD be part of a hardworking and expand- 
ing team and the right applicant cm look forward 
to faming an integral part of the flrnfs future as 
one of the pne-emhteni practices outside London. 

Sahuy wfl! be In the region of £ 17,500 pun. 
and relocation expenses wiU be paid. 

Applications in writing with fuB career 
detaBs shotdd be marked ‘STRICTLY PRIVATE & 
CONFIDENTIAL’ and sent to Mr D M Jones. 

— — Edge & Ellison, r-J 

Hatwcfi Pritchett & Go. 

Sol ici t ors. 

RtttfonJ Hmw, f4g EAanwJ Stiwf. Bfnuii*6n B32JH. 021-2167032 


Legal Assistant 
£9,294 - £9,906 p.a. inc. 

(Pay award pending) 

We are seeking an energetic Legal Assistant to 
undertake a range of dudes including the sale ol Counca 
houses and associated conveyancing matters. 

The successfU candidate wf> be expoctod u ««ork under 
n u nut u xn supervision and demonstrate aMity to assume 
operational dudes soon after taking up the job. 
Membership ol die Institute of Legal executives would 
be an advantage. 

The posttioMer wfli be working as part of a smafl team, 
wittm easy reach ot shops sid ravtube connections to 
and from Central London. The area is wefl served with 
motorways; the Ml, M4, M4ti and M25 beng easiy 
accessMe. Generous financial ass ista nce towards 
relocation writ be avadabie in approved cases. 
Appfacabon forms and job 
description are avafetbie from the 
Pe r sonnel Department, Three 
Avers District Council. 17/23 High 
Street Rickmans worth, Herts. 

Telephone (0923) 776611 ext 36. 


THE INSURANCE OMBUDSMAN BUREAU 

LEGAL ASSISTANT 

The work of tee Bureau continues to grew 
and tee Insurance Ombudsman wishes u« aj> 
point an additional qualified lawyer io join his 

team. 

The successful applicant will be conducting 
in-depth investigations into complaints made by 
Ih^public against member insurance companies. 
He/she will also have the task of pulling com- 
plex legal and insurance matters into terms tea. 
a layman will understand. 

Qualifications: At least t»o years’ practical 
experience in contract law. agency and insur- 
ance. Consumer complaini-handling at a senior 
level would be an advantage. 

Preferred age range: -S - 45. 

Salary: Between £12.000 and £17.000 p.a, 

please contact Miss Daphne I ’undcrstcen for 
an application form. 

The Insurance Ombudsman Bureau, 

31 Southampton Row, 

Loudon WCJB 5HJ. 

Tel: 01-242 8613. 


JOHNSWOOD FARRER. 

Personnel Consultants 
- Specialist in Recruitment 
- for the Leqal Profession- 


1 PRIVATE CLIENT PARTNBttffl,080-£35 l 800 


_ Medflim azsti City Praaia! lootong for Prosoecwe Partnn wth a 
B backgnund ol Banana! Tax & Frannal Ptamano In atiKtatiai Pnvate 
B CbenK 

1 2 COMMERCIAL CONVEYANCERS 

3 COMPANY COMMERCIAL 

I SOLICITORS £12,080-£25,000 

Ne«fy exahfied or exuerwicad Soiotore requred for many wcanaes n 
Conrai London Practice*. 

4 THAMES VALLEY 
N0N-C0NTENT1OUS SOUCITORS 

£1Q,G0fl-£20,00a 


A number ol nosMona n SoUcflm Firms for CONVEYANCING. 
PRO BATE, -TRUSi & COMMERCIAL SaiotDfS m the THAMES VALLEY 
lor Newly Ouatfed or expanenced Soionrs. 


FOR THESE AND OTHER VACANCIES CONTACT 


Michael Fairer 


JOHNSWOOD FARRER 


Crass Street 


Hattoa Garden EC1N 8UH 


Meredith Scott 


Pensions Law 


To e. £30,000 


City firm. kadmgsperiaUsa m lhis field requires Solicitor with 
preferably ai teafl 2 yean experience. 

Commercial Property To c. £28,000 

Major EC3 practice seeks Solicnor. idcaHy minimum 2 yean 
qualified. 


Foreign Commercial 


c. £24,000 


Closing date for apptcatkms is 2Wi 
August 1986. 

An equal opponun i tei employer. 


Work it essentially international for this EC2 practice. Soil 
Solicitor I u 4 yean admitted. 

Newly /Recently Admitted c. £15,000 

TRUST/T AX/PROBATE for major ET4 practice. 
LITIGATION n wefl repuded EC2 practice. 
COMPANV/COMMTOCUL ai EC3 firm. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY for Inns praaice. 

For funher details concerning these and other 
opporiurehcs in private practice, both in and oul 
of London, ooniaci: 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 
17 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1AA - 
01-583 0055 or 01-541 3897 (after office hrs) f 


LEGAL LA 



BROOK STREET 


It’s time for a 

Brook Street Summer 

....if you have Legal 
Secretarial skills 

We have Permanent and Temporary placements 
available for 

LEGAL AUDIOS 
WPs (Wang, Rank 
Xerox) 

Conveyancing, Commericial/Domestic or 
Litigation experience essential. 

Contact Jane Stevenson, 

131-3 Cannon St 
TeE 623 3966 

Jenny Wright, 172 Bishopsgate. 

Tet 283 7935 

Lucinda Hands, 108 Fen church St 
Teh 481 8441 


LITIGATION 

flO, 250+ BONUS 

Senior partner of huge firm 
in EC4 needs an experienced 
legal shorthand secretary 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Various legal audio positions 
to £10.1X10 fur Solid ton to 
Showbiz Sure. 

Meridian R msi to M 
Coosofraats 
01-935 8474. 


FUMTUM SECS £1 1-000 + no.- 
nus witb good mtx*d baa (or 
City sob WP exp pm out rial 
irattuno ih«n Call Mftry 
Coin Bee Cons 01-657 5377 


SECRETARIES 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


STM AFRICAN aualtflM sounlor 
■Britbh SubieciJcmalei wrrfws 
PibMI'Mi as leqal rvcc/lmwl ad 
\»or with profnslonal / 
rommerclal firm Ol 486 0804 
■Einl 


CHALLEMGMQ POSITION In 

coflimn-aal/rtnanaal or Indus 
Irul omniulm lor 
pvpmoRCN commeraal Barra 
lor Malel BOX AOS 


B44 LUXi AulO A. roo Cuards 
rod 21 OOO mb FSH £13445 
Tol >0642] 722180 / 725031 


SdUUI'AMES ror ArdiRerts A 
Omanor* Pomnaoent it Ictmo- 
rary posihons AMSA Specialist 
Ror Cons Ol 734 0532 

SECRETARIES lor ArcWlOCB & 
Designers Permanent A terapo- 
rmy posIlKua AMSA Specially 
Ret Cons Ol 734 0632 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


•AMIS s or France. 
Naniu/Cmemovi KITOtnw 
Enfl Danish family in (Urn In- 
dustry Girt 5 Masses or 

travcfllnq. irenen useriu. 

driie. lovo sports, be happy 
SI art immcfl The Hampstead 
Au Pair A Nanny Agency Ot 
435 2572 


High (ourt judges. n< >. 
I cgal secretaries, yes 


LEGAL SECRETARIES 

TAKE YOUR PICK OF THE 
BEST IN THE CITY! 
£10,000 + + 

rife haw tern refrained by tow rrwpr firms of city sofotorc Ea 
recnat five experienced legal eecrehries. Ml are top level appmnt- 
ments worfong wtifi senior patners. 

You nil need good seaaaal skdls a welt a relevant tegy 
enpenence. 

AH vaca noes (tier excellent salary, bonus and benefits to the right 
person. 

if you are ready lor that move to mo top. w need you nowi 
C al Edel Webster or Gaft Davies on 01-353 3232 
Alfred Marks Recruitment Consultants 
64 Fleet Street 



ALFRED MARKS 


inrw person nousehou Central 
London No prls Cooking A 

drarano l 1 -- dsn off. Own 
room A bom in larqe fUt Sola- 
ry nwoUjMc 01-484 OI4S 
MMo hours 

■WEDER. Au Pair ASAP.Sumt 
Eng speaiunq tomilv Nr coasi 
S W4 7 i 10 OU3S 2672 

'UWOEV. Naiwij- ClOO-ClSOpw 
Baby Smths ^uper KM on l hr 
eoasl sun Sw Ol «S 367a 


MERCEDES 230 E. 1985. 12.000 
miln. ■nanaUir Vhrr/dlur cloth 
Sun rod Oecmc windoivs 
Ftvtio/rawne Elenrtc aorlal 
£13.350 0645 431600 


ROLLS ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 


SHADOW L P rco. 49.000 mllrti 
nart- Bmwn/cream ImUnt 
C 9 500. Tnl Mr Cardnrr officr 
hcnirs 01 9fi! 3931 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


LOTUS EXCEL 198J. lor Mur aur 
ron PAS. leather mlrtrtor. n**w 
117IS t>«qnaiEL FSH. 02 COO 
• mills. alMJuInlv ImmacalJlr 
CBOCO 0537 M9M 


STEWARD 

Circa £9,000 per annum. 

Executives or a company in Westminster are seeking a 
person 10 wait at tables, maintain wine and spirit 
stocks, receive guesis and generally assist in providing a 
service m the small executive building. 

hav ^ “i v er service experience and im- 
P««wc references. This is a pensionable position with 

^,0^“^'" a — 


LEGAL SECRETARY 

CENTRAL LONDON 

Go-ahead, informal, small Solicitors firm seek 
Audio Secretary to Conveyancing Partner. 
Salary up to £10,500. 

Phone Harvey Bratt 01-387 4244 


^PJJCational 
COURSES REVIEW 


8 St Matthews College Oxford 

A & 0 LEVEL RETAKE COURSES 

aram «<»n«*»oeraiu-. 

nfl :T^.MrrT WWll * to * ,Win| pwnotd » 


- 

S -wd. - 

5^ 

















































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25 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


PERSONAL 


All ctasincd advenaemenu 
can he accepted by idcptone 
(except Aanouncementsl The 
dead Roc it 500pm 2 day* prior 
10 publkanoa (k 5.00pm Man- 
day lor Wednesday). Should 
yon wish io send an advenho 
meal in writing please include 
yew day lime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. ir you have any 


Queries or muttons ithung to 
ft has 


your advertisement once 
appeared, please contact our 
Customer Services Department 
by telephone on 0*4*1 4100. 


BIRTHDAYS 


REGAN Manny 1801 BirtlxUV 
wiin k>\o front Moftter. Rot 
and Dunran 


SERVICES 


CAU8HK CVS Lid proi psvkitvjL 
rumnilimi Vilae documents 
Ortmls. 01 Oil SMS 
BREAKAWAY. Lo nd o n 's cluB for 
pra<<>ssMiiul una tUlittrd people 
?S4i.Oi<r no nmtt martin 
U 2J hr inlo lam-. 997 7994 
LONDON TV NETWORK tUK «u- 
dnn avalldOK rull itukr-u* 4 

OmsilKl la.-lllllr-.Ot OjS 3788 
■or orldds II -9pm Mon Fn 
CAPITAL CV« httniv high Quail 
fy rumtulun tiun 01-007 

7905 

FNENKHP. Loir or Mamw 
AH am. arr-ts Dateline. Deol 
•Ola. 25 APinonun Poart. Lon 
don V»M Trt. 01-958 lOll 
COMPANY GOLF Days organwd 
■or sun or nnlumcs Any to 
ration TH 0754 872722. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


-COHVEYANCtNC ns lUUv auali 
ln0 Onto iHw- LJ eO * \AT and 
sianrtarri dicourwrowps ring 
02-U 519598 

US VISA MATTERS E S Cudron 
is Mi- 1 <-r 17 RuMlrode St. 
London HI Dl 486 0813 


WANTED 


JtlOOO RAID lor China Cabinet^ 
-U'-o iaMr*. iWs. ward poors 
nr i.nmiili wanted dm al 
path i utgs. tuiframrd. lorn, we 
but ftirw Phunr Martin Dtqtot 
Ol -DoMOffi or »rile lo 561. 
Harrow Hoad. London V*9. All 
Cngland toured 
£20 prr or up lo paid lor Miser 
.irlirfrs L'P lo 1250 Per oi for 
wild Mr Han Ol «6Q 8030 or 
Whip Sol Harrow Road. Lon- 
don. H4 All Lngtand entered 


FOR SALE 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 


Wool mm Bates Iran E3 95 par 
50 yd -f- VAT BOS- wool Heavy 
Dompsuc Wilton f 13.85 per .sq yd 
+ VAT. Conaohst tees ES.75 per 
SC yd + VAT & many otter great 
reductions. 


5S8 Mbs m Rood. 
Parsons Green. SW6. 

Tel: 01-736 7551 

Free esUmfef'Eiparf Rttag. 


BRIGHTS OF NETtlEBED The 

ultimate rrtXn.t tuntllurr- spe- 

naifsii One at EhoGhkb largest 
dnpUl-ol l nil .in-l ldUicenlu- 
rs period Male lumiiure. 
IveitWird. near Henley on 
Thame* •04«*l' oil 1 IS. 
Bournemouth 1 02TCI 2956 HO. 
Topshant iOO*a>*7i 7445. 
Brrlelei Gins '04531 R109S2 
BEAUTIFUL MNMC TABLE wflti 
Rosewood centre ♦ 6 ctwilrv A 
one Mahogany Mdeboard. ste* 
5ft 9- reeenily purchased Irom 
Horrods Phone Mm Nath al 
629-7407 for appoutlment. 
FINEST quality is. ml Carpels. Al 
trade ore-!-, and under, atm 
available IPO's exlrp. Large 
room tor remnant, under hah- 
namtai price Chancery Carpels 
O! 408 CUS3 

THE TRUES 179S-19M. Other 
lilies a* all- Hand bound ready 
lor prrMfnUiion 


■■Sunday*" £12450. 
When 01 


668 6323 
TICKETS TOR ANY EVENT. CHS. 
Starlight Exp. Ctn*» L*S MIS. 
All theatre and sports 


Tel- B2I -6616/828-0496. 
' Vrg / Diners. 


A Ex / 

uamtOAT DUE T Gtse someone 
ail original Times Newspaper 
dated the very ow they were 
bom 112 50 0492-31305. 

0U> YORK FLAGSTONES. COO 
bk> setts cur NauonwMe 
diHiiertes. Tel. <05801 BSOD38 
'VS 11141 

SCATFtNDERS Any evetll Inc Les 
Mi*. Cot rtn Udn. SlarimM EXP. 
Oil iKMournr 01828 1078 
Mjkmt rredn cards 

CATS. CHESS, L« Me All the- 
jlre and sieirl Tel 4J9 1763 
All maK-r credit cds. 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECT* 


CABLES 


ROYAL DOULTON Toby Jugs 
FlgunnoJ animals. etc.. want- 
ed Ol bW 0324 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


BUrnWER Grand Ml. ir Ehnni . 
1890 9-1141 no 5:-W.6Uperb 
Hi-.: oiler Hrminil C3W0 T«H 
10742' 309777 


THE KANO WORKSHOP SALE. 

Ofiumr rtvJueimrr. on over 
(Oil nr* 6 ri--i'i:i-d Insliu- 
iiM-nl-. I nrn.llSxl after sales 
service free rafcutwuc iGa 
Hidfe.iafe R.1 NWS 01267 
7671 Free ctH-tl-mu.- 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 


THE SALISBURY 
REVIEW 


EHiM hv rkW Sauifl^. yrpm FW to 
unr "IK tdr 4 sm uo P" 'jnc vea 
Orient: -ae nyy- rjt T-tt '"ir- 6 nc 
unr 1 Ja<n av< nmeng ‘< r J V taoxfi- 
as A itn suDsaVTt fie <« 
£1£W Sene a a*t- 1 'war mr.saw 

la 

Sherwood Pres Ltd. 

88. Tjlney Rond. 
Lcndon E7 OL^. 


Cancer 


Together we can beat it 

V.« ftind ''iver on** third -if 
jll nriwcb ini<> »Ju- prt-ven- 
i.on and ware of oncer in 
die UK 

Hripust-'j wnd.rig tdi'iu- 
iron nr nuU-i i> • 


Cancer 

Research 

Campaign 


I '. .nil- 41 Hnuvrli'I'Uii 
(Tb'I'l T712/9.I -indt-n 5WI i A \R | 



FOR HIM 


fltaMtos Wofalng 


Dinner Suits. 
Evonmo T 3 A Suits. 
Black Jackets S 
Strlpod Trousers. 
Sorptua to 


ran sale 


lspwahsmre 

DEPT. 
22CHAPWG 
CROSS RO 
LONDON WC2 


(Nr U 

Tube! 

01-240 


2371 


SHORT LETS 


1 - Attractive. uunH. gun. 

ny mer-onenr 4 ueda ■ 1 double. 
3 Mitglei. 2 badly, recep. AIM 
kil. rtmiwauicr and wa&no- / 
drier To Hi unfit end of Sent. 
C525 pw Tel . Ol 553 7568 


HOLIDAY FLATS 4 homes Mall- 
abfr. C20rv&3£»Qpw. Personal 
Servin'. Ol -4&« 5660 or 0836- 
592824 anytime in. 


BARNES FuOv eawoed s&tctotB 

dU Iwd Hal. Ige recep. kit. 
Path LI40nw TH: OI 876 5964 


SERVICED APARTMENTS In 

Iveiranglofi Col T.V. 24 hr Sw 
Bd Telex CoUingham Apes. 01 
373 6306 

ST JAMES PLACE. Ml Luxury 
xerv H'ed 2 Bed aparimenL 
on me loralion next lo Pahk. Ol 
373 6306 iTL 

SAYSWATER xuaerb 1 bed flaL 
Fum. tudr. nr MrL 7<S mun 
C126PW Tel 01 724 8741 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
r-nirdl London Irom £3ZS pw 
Ring Town m» ApN 573 5433 


FLATSHARE 


CHELSEA /FULHAM 

JJr female IP share litre family 
tvnr-e with 2 others. Own sun 
ny double bedroom with 
balcony. Tube 3 mins £350 
prm 6rtume Phone 736 1014 
eves. 480 9327 days. 


CLAPMAM SOUTH Prof M/F. 25 
plus o/R. spado ir. hntae 
JLlWocm extf. TMOI 622 
7520 alter 7 00. pm 


KENSINGTON Prof I. 28+ mare 
rial, own large room. E 180 
PCM E_xd. TM 01-437 7061 
110 30 a.m. amor 01-957 0445 
i5 pm. an! 

BATTERSEA. M/F io dare naL 
Own bedroom and lull use o < 
(Tal. LloO pcin ncL 622 297S 
taller 6nmi. 

FIFTY POUNDS sw WI 2 Carden 
Flat la marc wiui 1 other Own 
large room. Near BBC. Tel Ol- 
724 5532/01-749 7506 
FLATMATES SelecUve Sharing. 
Well euao Uilrodurtorv wrvkr. 
Ptve lei (OF BPM: 01689 5491. 
51 5 Bromidon Road. SW3 
Z GIRLS REQURED to shr an - 
dons room in 19 c Banereca 
home. £115 pern each me. 360 
I5e8 Eves or 071 3338 Day 
ARMSTEAD HEATH lovely 
roum. own bathroom, m luxury 
hs.- xuil lady 30 *■ £55 PW inU. 
t«h 10580) 880300 after 6 pm. 
SWI7 ■ z prof f leek 3rd person lo 
mare xparmus Rat. Sra bedim. 
Close fuhe £130pcm fW Tel : 
Ol 675 0480 after 7pm 
5W11. Prof M/F. N/S. O/R 
snare one outer in lovely naL 
£200 pem ex cl 255 5411 od 
fbxu idayr 5SO 2368 pm. 
WEST DULWICH Prof per 10 shr 
ihjuso with 3 other. O/R. N/S 
Nr B R . £l5Spcm + IP Ha. TH: 
Ol 670 5524 6.304.00pm. 
HOMLET Prof n is share Me 
o/r £45 pw me * Return Depos- 
it Ol 464 5907 Eves A W Lends 
CLAFHAM JUNC O/R- N/S. CM. 
M/F prof. £146 pm exrt 407 
5522x7512 day. 870-5492 1 HI. 
Ell 20 mlim city, all ameniaeg. 
o/r. romf ortaMe hse £32.60 pw 
evrt OI 558 SlST after 6 PRL 
HAMPSTEAD. F W tor lux HaL 
£250 PCM. Tef Ol 222 4858 
idaysi. 01 372 6030 'Em. 
MON - FBI Ml. aose ary M/F. 
N/S O/R. £40 pw I Id. After 
6 pm Ol 241 5037 or 2492544. 
CES DMe Rnt Mi Lux Sunnf FU>. 
AU Sen.. IS imns Town. £66 
pw End 01-701-8677 Cves 
SHI BELGRAVIA £05 pw. Large 
dal Sturdy lor young Persona. 
Tef 7 30 2842 after 6 pm 
SW 2 Young prof r io share naf. 
O/R. au amenities £185 pom 
exrt 851-7765 o. 671 7239 It. 
SW11 n/s.o/r. UM brWhl CM flaL 
nr 8 R. Cleaner. CAO PW Esvcf. 
237 4388. Evas- 360 0461 
SW17 . Own rooms in altr mixed 
house with gdn 10 ndns lube. 
£55/38 pw excf. TH : 7676640 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 


£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair’s 
Super Apex. 
London toZurichor 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afle moon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 
Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday after arrival. 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 


01-4379573 

swissair 47 


ITS ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


More low-cost llights 
via more routes 
to mare destinations 
than any other agency 
PLUS 


- Fast expert, high-tech 
> ■ Free worldwide 


service 
hoteJ ft car hire pass 
• op to 60 % discounts 
Open 9-fi Mon-Set 
Qnihe-Spot 

Immunisation, insurance, 
Foreign Exchange, 
Map A Book Shop 


HU Haortltn Tfanf fate- 

62-48 Earts Court Read 
London W8 6EJ 
Long-Haul 01-603 1S15 
Europa/USA 01-937 5400 
lal/Businesi 01-038 3444 


un 


muHn 


BARGAIN FUGHTS 

Sydney r -155 E755 

Auckland C415 £745 

Jo 'Burg £306 £409 

Bangkok £209 £355 

Cano £135 £210 

New Yod £139 £320 

Los Angeles £216 £399 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


HOT TURKEY. Auennt mall 
Npr-ral j mwi, rruum al our 
ixii€fl» h-411 hong. Iwn « 
«*) < nihinq on <itir rtil /or 
L4» inr III. M/B. irre 
wApnrfx. I'lfwr rnmbuwuons 
pn«x 91 U« |«B Ol Ti7 
SX>)>74Mv ATOL 2091 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


102 Gloucester Place, 
London WIN 4DH. 




OOSTCUTTERS ON (HghM/MH 
hi Llinw. USA 8 mam dnOrB. 
(fore tMutomat Travrt. oi 730 
8201 ABTA IATA ATOL- 


..... AKCUUSTS, K*y 
Travfl. SO. OH Uoxi ST. WCI 
01 405 1495 ABTA/1ATA. 



CHEAPEST FUCHTS W/WDE - 

8CTI2 Travel TH 01 386 6 * 19 . 


CHEAP FLWirrS Worldwide 
HaynurkW 01-030 1366. 


DtSCOtlNTED A GROUP FARES. 

U T.C- Q pro Sal 0753 857038 


MALAGA. CAN AMES. Ol 441 

1111 Travel wise. AIM. Aim. 


IHK PW-tugoL Cnrtumt /area. 
Biggie*- Ol 735 8191 Aim. 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled nights 
Ol 734 SM 8 ABTA AT CH- 


ART * ARCHAEOLOGY TOUR 
OF SK3LV Exceptional value 
Uk«wni Grand Tour, sm- 
nady *mwd lo wusiy wide 
Win. won Kmbb uny mhe- 
w Dnuiturn Tu reday 30 
Srol. 7-14 6 21 OH £298 InH 
day (UnhLx GatwiHr. 7 radio 
H/8 m 5/4 xu hotels, atiport 
faxes, eturanre /*« Special of- 
fers also in TAORMINA, tod 
isi cat. hotel £268 h/b. beach 
hotel £218 H/B. pensMiw £171 
BA B. HI for 7 rogtus. samedep 
dam. ISLAND SUN 01-222 
7452 ABTA /ATOL 1907. 

AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £420 fin £760. Auckland 
o/w £420 nn £770. JoUvug 


o/w £306 rtn £499 Los Anpr- 
London 


fes o/w C216 nn £406 
night Onii* 01-570 6332. 
GREEK MLAMP S Algarve. 
Menorca. Tenenfe. Villas. AM 
Pennons Tavemas. Holidays 
/FJKjhtv Broriiure/ imam 
boo Kings Ventura Holidays. 
Tef Ol 250 1555. 

ONE CALL far some of me best 
deals in flights, apartments, ho- 
wls and car lure. Tel London Ol 
636 5000. Manchester 061 832 
2000 An- Travel Advisory 
Bureau. 

WOULD WIDE FthjMssoeclattstng 
in Ftrsi. Club Class. Economy to 
Australia. Far Cast. S. Africa. 
LMA. Logon, Faro 6 Geneva. 
Phone Travel Centre 01-666 
7025 ABTA 73196 
LATM A M E RI C A . Low tost 
flights f.9 Rfo £485. UiM 
1495 rtn. ANO Small Group 
HoUday Journeyx.ieg Peru 
from £3501 JLA 01-747 3108 
LOW FARES WORLDWIDE - 
L SA. S America. Mid and Far 
East. S Africa Trayvale. 48 
Margaret Street, wi. oi 580 
2928 (Visa Accepted) 

BARHAM HUNTERS. Ring now 
for AiBlmlav N2 Middle easL 
India. Far East ABTA. Club Air 
Travel 01 629 2684. 

EUROPE /WORLD WBNC lowest 
(ares on charter /scheduled nts. 
Pilot FTtQhl Ol 631 0167. Agl 
AUd 1893. 

GREECE. TURKEY, CAMARKS. 

Aug/SeM. avauaumiy <09231 
771266 Tunsway Holidays. 
ABTA ATOL 1107. 

LOW COST FLIGHTS. Most Euro- 
pean destinations vaiexander 
01-402 4262/0032 ABTA 

61004 ATOL I960 
MUM, JAMAICA. K.YORK. 
Worldwide chraprsl fares 
Rfcnmond Travel. 1 Duke Si 
Richmond ABTA oi 940 4073. 


Hotel reservauom an over Mo- 
rocco TM: Ol 734 5307 
ABTA/ ATOL 

TUNISIA. Perfect beaches for 
you- summer holiday. Can for 
our brochure now. Tunhtan 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 44ii. 

ALKANIC. Faro. M alaga eic. 
CHmond Travel ATOL 1785- 
01-581 4641. Horsham 68541 

BEST FARES. BEST FUSHTS.' 
Best holidays anywhere. Sky 
Travel. 01 834 7426. ABTA . 

HONG KONG £408. Bantfok. 
£369. Sing £457. Other FE Gi- 
les 01-584 6514. 

SPAM PORTUGAL GREXCCi 
FMUUS Faldor 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640. AcreWVna. 

SYD/MEL £618 Perth £546. AU 
irutor earner s lo A us A NZ. Ol- 
584 7571 ABTA. 

AMERICAN VACATIONS. Blue 
Ribbon Fares. TH: Ol 637 7853 

S. AFRICA From £466. 01-584 
7371 ABTA. 

ALL US CTTHCS. Lowest fares on 
motor scheduled carriers. 01- 
584 7371. ABTA 


n low punts womnwwE 


AMpn 

FftMOM 

Lagos 

Mnnxrta 

Amman 

BanqUk 

Bom /DH 

Cam 

QWmba 

DamKOH 


£400 Ouba 
£400 Istanbul 
£330 Jeddto 
WOm KaracN 
£260 KH/Sn 
£360 Kunf 
£345 N York 
£220 Seoul 


£3/0 

tiao 

£440 

£275 

£445 


075 


£415 SydAM 
Tokio 


£580 


£270 

SKYUmn THWffiL LTD 
2 DBMM STHBET. LONDON WI 
Tck B1-43S 9521 /BM7 

mbjne uma 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi, JoUrng. Guro. Dubai, 
laanbul. Singapore, K_L Ddbi. 
Bangkok. Horn Kong. Sydney, 
Europe. & The Amends. 

Flamingo TranL 
76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London W1V 7DG. 

01-439 0102 

Ofcb Stonntey 1089-1380 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
Mde inn 
£300 £490 

£ 2/5 mo 
ti5o mo 
£240 £360 

£250 £350 

020 £350 

£420 


jnbunj/ttu 
ton* 
Cara 




/Bom 

Bangkok 

OauHa 


Afro Asian Trairei Ltd 


IRIin to w el St Wi 

T& BW37 «2a/H/7/8 
3 Qnsc 
mkjL'v 


L to & QnMP BwkDVE Wdcomg 
■■/.YOA-DfiftS 


Pens 

Frgnrkai 

Lagw 

NaroH 

jo tug 

Caeo 

HeiiBom 


C275 


LOWEST FARES 
£69 » I YORK 
EM UWSF X33S 
£320 Wan i~cti 
EES SogapcTO t£M 
1460 eanekok £335 
£205 Katmandu CM) 
£335 Rangoon C350 
rung hong EVO Cacuna £425 
Ptaan cafl 
SW 8 SAND 
21 Sntoa SL I atom WI 

Q1-4JR WWjGf B5J7 

MAJOR CjCAROS AttBTED 


★AU FUCHTS BONDED* 

★ ★HUGE DISCOUNTS** 

★★TOURIST CLASS** 

★ ★CLUB CUSS** 

★ ★1ST CLASS** 

★ ★AROUND THE** 

★ ★WORLD FARES** 


* TiPHtf 

* W9Tm 

* HQ BAHT 

* JCiBWG 

* 4IJOU.AJWJ 

* FIJI 

0 BMOUIK 

* WPIK 

* GUbJi 

e WO EAST 

* IU«M 

* TOUCATIJ 

* L LV£1E5 

* CM®flBEA.’l 


* kSiBOUBW * 

* BRISBANE * 

* AflElAU* * 

* 5 * 

**5Li«C7a» * 
*F7 uofitar * 

* TOKYO * 
6 UCtoLA * 

* BAHRAIN * 

* N«aei * 

* HARARE * 

* VAU37UVE? * 

* MAM 0 

SFRAlfOjCO * 


** SOUTH AWETBCA ** 

* ISA * USA 6 USA *054 * 

Sl'NWORLD TRAVEL 

lExt'd 1969) 

J"5ouih Sl Epvmn . Stirro 
CLPm r5M>2»BP3‘ , IMi 
2j3l5;248.i:.'2KW1 


LEFKAS 

12.19JB AU E-SOT 
UnSDQiH GfWk isle. W/5. 
BnKnns. Boos A Bop 

DJERBA 

16ZLAUG-0CT 

Free w/5. tenrec. superti rood, 
U» we Chibs 2* or 4* kn- 
urv holes By undy beaches. 
Acnwe & reanmj itols lo singles, 
couales & taoMies 
LUNARSCAPE ATOL 1933 
01-441 0122 24 hrs 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


120" TradilMnal vailing VHonn 
10144" n UM W/Ml- 
en’r n mrtMiniernl wherever H 

m-iv appear ErrAurtupg jn *rwn 
JV BowMe on open ended Ex 
peirw-s viiared berth avuiUHe 

CresSs 0817. 

WWDSURF LEFHAS OJCHBJL 

IJ. 10 19 4ua U on a- 
reel Fils. .vTnr A. relaxing hoH. 
•m unspoilt Wei. ooai irom. 
BW.I S a, Bop For Soto s Cou- 

Dk-v A ramiMx LlUMTSTape Ol 
441 012? 


GENERAL 


TAKE TIME OFF Ip Pam. Am 
•imutm. BturvHv. Brum**- 
OihM a. Berne. Liiunnr. The 
Hague. D uMn. Bourn. Bcv 
kwnr & D".ppe Time Off 2*. 
Out Cm London. S'* IK 
7BO 01 235 8070 


RENTALS 


UPFRfEND 

XEWOQTON. Ornipng IM *e 
im use. s warms, sum mat, 
new kuary u & bnh. gde. Defcgm- 
M £300 gw- 

BEtSBE FK. Way preny mors 
hsa 3 beams. Ige non. 0 /nn. 
a art rear J* Ggg Close fl 4a 
£265 p w 

ERtawiCK Del Edm lee - 
cksaoer Beam lunv 4 dWe 
;. 3 tecetL 2 bafts. sn*r U, 


gdn fiK pw 
QUtPIUM. 


Aitraa 2 Iwfcm aS- 

fteoefL K ft B Era kxaBin. Ouse 
• - £130 nw 

01-499 5334 


QUEEHSGATE, SW7 

A Stamn 1st floor apamen ol 
am 2000 suit ktffnfcwa rooms 
wah fwjh ceAmgs & MWnea. 3/ 4 
bedreaan. 2 reewaons. ZH ■ 


nn. 2 rerenons. Zw m 
idubaheo nraugkouL 

Ifee'wBsfTrmd 

Partnenhlp. 

36. Janes ta WI. 
OT-635 3512. 


SWl clew SI dames'* Park. Ex 
ceftenf value 5 Bed Oaf in 
nuuKMXi Mock. Sunny Recep 
Ktt with all machines. Bath. 
£240pw Codes 828 8261 


LONG /SHORT LET propertle* 
from C100.U.000PW. Personal 
Service Ol -458 3680 or 0836 
693824 anytime ITL 


WANTED Superior properties for 
kmn/uwri Cn lets. Ol 458 5680 
or 0856 593824 anyttme m. 


BRYANSTON SQUARE. WI 

Stunnlnq m floor flal hi period 
Meek 3 «*■ Beds, s Baths, 

Dung Bm. hli Fealures amaz- 

ing SOU Perepogn with fuB 
length wmdows oVTrtaotdng 

Sgiurr Gdnv Musi be Seen) 

Price on appUcaUOiiL Ascot 
Properties 01-486 8741. 
qUCEMSGATC SW7. Brand new 

cOfiveraon. Large ratMbov 2 

douDle bedrooms. 2 Bathrooms. 

bnfurrushM excew lor carpets 

and curia ids. Cptratany/ Em- 

bow lei only. £290 per week 

Including C/H and C.H.W. Mt- 

James: Ol 588 1049 (Day). 
AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seeks 

lux nai/houve- to to caoapw. 

l-xual fees rro Phtnu» Kay A 

Lewis. South of Ihc Park. Ole) 

sea Ofllre. 01362 sill or 

North of the Park. Regent's 

Park office, oi SB6 9882. 

WI, excellent. 3/ 3. told/ 5ro 
floor marionette. Designer's 
spacious apartment. 2 large 
bedrooms with baths en tun. 
large reception with lovely, sun- 
ny terrace Excellent value. 
WTP 01 955 9512. 
rULMAM SMKL OutsCuuUng 4 
bMraamed house in Crantnu-y 
Rd. Newly decorated and 
model lined caooow for long 
Company let. Property Ser- 
vices: Ol 996 4176. 

CHELSEA SWX Elegant 3 bed 
flat in maann block in Tike SL 
near River £4O0pw. Long 
Company let. Property Sw- 
ifter Oi 995 4176. 

HARLEY HSE. Regents Park. Tg- 
uuy ref urn incl new KIL S 
Beds. 3 Recep*. 2 BoUu. Rent 
£15SOOpa. F6F. 499 9981. 
Eies 870 4703 fn. 

PH L l n r TWO Bed 1141 m period 
Use. Lgr Recep. Chad Kit 8 
Bam. Bair 6 Roof Terr. 
E37S0w. Benham 6 Reeves 
«ra 55 22. 

SWC Very soactous 1 Bed IN Rr 
tlat in Vk Hot OMe Recep. 
Good Kil A Bath Newty dee. 
EU3Spw Oueensgaic. Benham 
A Rareies 958 3622. 

VRITVIG LONDON /PAMS Alton 
Bates l Company have a large 
srieciion ol flats & houses avail- 
able for i week* irom £2O0pw. 
499 1665 

AMERICAN BANK urgently n . 
tarn luxury Hals and houses 
from £200 ■ £1.000 pw. Ring 
Burge's Estate Agents 581 6156 
AVAILABLE NOW Luxury flats A 
houses Chelsea. KflltfiBbridge. 
Betgravia. £200£2.000pw. 
Tel: Burgess 581 5156. 
CHISWICK, MM. Immaculate 2 
bed flat in rxreUenf der order. 
Lge recep. CsL “ash mach. 
£.140 pw. 727 9703 tTI 


FINCHLEY ML2L Nr Tube, ljjto 


bed. sunny rerep. kli. bath 
New IV firm Mr Shaer dqa 
0965. after 7pm 445 7408 
KENSINGTON Newty dec. hpRUyl 
gun flat, sun couple. £120 pw. 
Rtng Ol 606 6677. Ex 30061 
fOarrl. Ol 6 02 7559 (Evsk 



For tho best _ 
rental selection of 
QUALITY 
FLATS & HOUSES 

in prime London areas 
770 Esrts Coart NaaiSWS. 




BELGRAVIA super new Intcrinr 
drffgned Mews muse. 2 recep*. 
2 onto beds. 2 baihs * wr. while 
kit all machines, brick gge Co 
let C6S0 pw Goddard A Sndlh 
Ol 930 7321 


SW1 PIMLICO Exclusive 1 l owe 
bed roamed ground ftoor apart- 
mem Fuhy furnished lo a very 
high standard. Parking avail 
able rmn pw Exrl. TeL Ol 
750-1161 after 2ppi 


F.W. GAPP fMaaagemrol See 
v kri Ltd rrgiore progentps in 
Central. South and Weal Lon 
don areas for waning 
applicants. 01-221 8838. 


HAMPSTEAD HR HEATH. Lux 

rial, l dole bedVm. I nutty/ sm- 
gk- bed im. Ige lounge, dlnede. 
rounrty ML hamim/wr . Mu i 
let lyr. £29fipw. 01 794 27B9 


LONG LETS OuaHly 3 _ 
Houses. SW18 A SW19. £175- 
£55Qpw. Home from Home 
946 9447. 

NIG Luxury 2 Bed flaL fully fur- 
nished Available lo rani from 
25th August "86 for 1 year 
£4O0pcra. TCI: 249 0272. 
mri Studio Flat Prof Lady. CH. 
Entry Phone. Serviced. £IQO 
pw TCI: 01-4886873 10) or Ol- 
794-755* lEvgsl 
837 MSI The number lo remcm 
her when seeking best rental 
properties In central and pr u ne 

London areas £160/ JELOOOpw. 
WEST WIMBLEDON Fum 
unfum 4 Beo. 2 Bath house 
£500pw Co let. Home from 
Home 946 9447. 
WIMBLEDON PARK Lovely 
Dbte Bed use. SuU 2 couples or 
family. £140pw. Home from 
Home 946 9447. 
WIMBLEDON AREA 2 Bedroom 
flab. Company A non Company 
lets. £1 iO-£2QOpw. Home Irom 
Home 946 9447 


nr 


l/iweniiy A Brit Museum. Tel 
Helen Watson A Co. 880 6276. 

CABHAM A OA 5 ELE E Offer wide 
choic* of long Mb from 
CI50PW. Can 01-589 6461 

CAMDEN, ige bedstt. Phone, 
ommemtles. CMpw. Others. 
Express Rentals. Ol 883 6*67. 

CHELSEA Large studio, superbly 
lunumed fhrouWioui £120 pw. 
Tri Ol 363 0489. 

CHELSEA iramac tax balcony 
flal. light retrp. dble bedJtfE 
porier. Long ML 622 6823. 

CROYDON 3 bedim house, gar- 
den. parking. £120pw. Others 
Hemal Guide 01 68* 7S76. 

HOUDAY APARTMENTS from 1 
week to 3 MoMM from £500 to 
£5.000 pw. 01-937 9681. 

HOUSES, flats, bedsHsAU areas, 
prices & sues. For details call 
espeen Rentals. Ol 885 S4S7. 

EWJ bedim Me nr Tube, oar- 
den. £i40pw. Express Rentals. 
01 B83 6457. 

OWN ROOM wim phone, no WIN. 
narking Nr amenities. £ospw. 
others Rental Guide: *86 7576 

RENTAL CUBE Carry rentals 
throughout South London. De- 
tails Ol *86 7576. 

SOUTH LONDON. Lacgr flM. chil- 
dren wefenme. £90pw. Others 
Rental Guide: 01 686 7576. 

W. LONDON I bed flaL washer, 
phone. ClOSpw. Others. Ex- 
piry. Renta tv Ol 883 5487. 

WZ- z mire Hyde Par*. 3 bed 2 
bath man. OMe rec. kil. roof 
lerr L37S Dw 727 9703 <Tt 

WE LET FLATS AND HOUSES. 
Contact Rickard or MWl Davts.) 
Wdoife A CO 402 7381. 


SELF-CATEMNG 


Due to AmencBn amed- 
lattons. we base some of oor 
large luxury tit Has unJet Ule 
August -October. All have 
maid, bench or pool - some 
a cook. U you ore thinking of 
taking a party- but a) find U 
expensive or bl can’t find 
enough people, give us e ring 
or cell in. We can reduce the 
price and waive empty bed 
supplements. Villas In Italy. 
Portugal. Corfu. Ctete. Puxos, | 
fbd'nhnrVww SJeoiSiw 
Swvtom 
CV Travel rn 

43 CteBssn tmv Mn SW] *** 
oiMioninnHoi 
.1359 0132 - 34 am 
to IBM *1011179 


VILLAS WITH A MASK TOUCH. 

A villa, a pool and a neauUfui 
view What more cotdd you 
want? Choose Rom Tuscany. 
Sardinia or Ravtito ■ the lowli- 
er ports of Italy where Ute mass 
marvel oper a tors don't go. Or, 
combine a villa holiday with a 
slay in Venice. Florence or 
Rome. Free brochure from 
Magic of Italy. Dept T. 47 Shep- 
herds Burii cram. W12 BPS 
Tel: 01 749 7449 12* hrs,, 
servtcel 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARIC? 


Villas, some with 
poab. apartments tavemas. 
Most dales atari from £153. 
Critic HObdavs- Ol 509 7070 A 
0622 677071 or 0622 *77076 
■24 hrs! AMI 1772. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


MORGAT. BRITTANY. Hotktay 
house, steeps 9. avail for I week 

from 5th September ctosr to 

beautiful brae hrs and fobuhws 
muraunts Tel 0286 *8035 
Mon-Fn rnorrungs only 


7 bedroom villa with 

pool Available 23 4ug« SepL 
Details (ram Conunenial Viiiav 
Tel Ol 245 9181 


Lowest fares IT £99. 

Babies. 735 8193 Alol 1893. 


LAMCUDOC V i]ta9e toe nr Med. 2 
dine beds. canceflattore 
Srnt/Ori Fr CT5tw* inC. Eve» 
0359 70903/ 01629 6085 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


CORFU VILLAS Wr stin have 
avauatxUlv SUltdav »Jt Aug 
lor 2 wkv Beaunfui villas, nr the 
beach ex GatwKh. Pan World 
HolKtov Ol 734 2562 
MACK GREEK ISLANDS a 
magic pnr«. Flights A 
noixtays Freedom Hobdays 
01-741 4686 ATOL 432 
GREECE. L nspout Blands, cheap 
moms. Vina rrnlah err. Zeus 
Hots Ol 434 1647. Aid Alio. 


ISLANDS IN THE SUN 
kuau n i lEu x em t Oct ob e r 
FLY DiflECT TO CORFU. 
CEPHALONIA. ZAKYNTHOS. 
CRETE AND SKI ATHOS. 
BesfiMvfi$antiaDpaftmafB5. 
CaoseOgtonousDeeches. 
FREcwneostogmCr&e 


ILia«ilSUVD 

MOL1DW8 


■ TeiKroreWorilUri 

“ (0403)59708 


SIMPLY CRETE 

HERSONBSOS A CHAHA 

Aitgto Giesk Uerty utter OeauMU 
cnvais villas.' stuDos f/ary mtti 
poais Mira on the beach * awe 
tucked away m hny vmne Cretan 
allies OreC! fLsTTS B HeraWon 
& Charca 

AVAJUfflUTY 1STH AUGUST 
Bng tor smaW. -necfEy bmoture 
01-934 *462/5225 Alai 1922 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


TUSCANY lf.1 Loietv Milas. 
Stnsa/6 Marina di Piriraxanla. 
Rental from UV9* Fll* avail 
or fern. Ottox- itub-> a i Hire 

.nail Bewrt Villas ctol B33 

9093 4BT V/ATCIL 


ALGARVE 21/B. 2 Whs. Lovely 5 
bed villa, with pool, vuamourx. 
£549pp Other dales also avail. 
Resort Villas 061 853 9096 
ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. Vito 
Holidays of dbuneflon tor Uie 
very few. Tel: 01-491 0802. 73 
S*. James's Street. SW1. 
ALGARVE. Lux vtuaa wnh pools 
& Opts Avail Sept/OCL Ol 409 
2838. V 11 U World. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


COSTA DEL SOL 120 mtro Puerto 
Bonus Marbeltai Super hse on 
beach. 2 twin bednrns * 2 badd 
ensuffe. pauo. gdn. viech iw- 
lauranb. supermarket Award 
winning deveknxnent Maid 
verviri* from £200 Pw. Owner 
Ol 586 4559/883 2321. 

MARBELLA. Lux vtBas with 
pooh A ants. AugtoOcLOl 409 
2858 vniaWorid. 


IML HOLIDAYS 


to DEVON. Sea. Spactous family 
flal. Seal on tor 2/6. £84-£l54 
pw Ol 794 0237/01 074 6*50. 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


DEVON AT ITS BEST 

Madi 8d tm tkjrx auaiy Into 

raxtornttRunDcrintumria*. 
iqtlrAWe Vijey. SdftMniMr 
■vahUe. CmqtoL EdutodirAesb 
iaiadiifiBS 



Tefcl»K2M( 

wuaa 

5oattMateri.rf.DrCT EXK3RQ 


coimsES 


Greeawlcb 
Leisure Centre 


Decorative paint 
courses, rag noting, 
marOeOing. spongeing. 
dragging. Curtain 
making courses, 
giMng courses and 
many enhers available . 
1, 2 and 3 day courses 
hi Greanmcft, 4 miles 
from London. 

Other courses 
available 
01-6920961 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


TRAINEE 

BROKER 


Due to exoansHXt. | am look- 
ing far 2 very antttnus 

peopfe. They must lie aged 
25-35 la work mtttn leading 
West End Brokerage. Earn- 
ing above average income 
while training, rising steeply. 
Call Tom Horan 
on 01-403 1218 


Coathncd on pqe 24 


Law Report August 12 1986 


Import ban belief need not be specific 


Regma r Ellis and Street 
Regina v Smith (Gloria Mam) 

Before Lord Justice O'Connor, 
Mr Justice Michael Davies and 
Mr Justice Ognall 
[Judgment given July 31] 

A person migbt be convicted 

Ofbeing knowingly concerned in 
the fraudulent evasion of a 
prohibition on the importation 
of goods, contrary to section 
170(2) of the Customs and 
Excise (Management) Act 1979, 
where be believed that he was 
evading a prohibition upon the 
importation of goods arising 
under one enactment, but in feet 
had imported goods the im- 
portation of which was prohib- 
ited under another enactment. 

The Court of Appeal so bdd 
when dismissingthe appeals of 
lan Eli is and Edward James 
Street against their convictions 
on December 3, 1985 in Maid- 
stone Crown Court (Judge Da- 
vid Griffiths) of contravening 
section 170(2) of the 1979 Act 
by being knowingly concerned 
in the fraudulent evasion of the 
prohibition on importation of a 
controlled drug (cannabis), the 
prohibition being contained in 
section 3(1) of the Misuse of 
Drugs Act 1971. 

The court also dismissed the 
appoil of Gloria Marie Smith 
against her conviction of the 
seme offence on January 13, 
1986 in Cheimsfixd Crown 
Court (Judge Gower, QCV 

After pleas of not guilty at 
both trials, rulings were re- 
quested as to whether there was 
a defence in law if the facts were 
that the defendants knew that 
they were participating in the 
importation of prohibited 
goods, but believed that the 
goods were pornographic goods 
which they knew to be, and were 
in feet, subject to a prohibition. 

Upon the trial judges’ rulings 
that there was no defence in law 
on those assumed facts, the 
defendants all changed their 
pleas to guilty. 

Mr Anthony Shaw, assigned 
by the Registrar of Criminal 
Appeals, for the appellants; Mr 
Timothy Nash for the Crown. 

LORD JUSTICE 

O'CONNOR said that the trial 
judges had held themselves 
bound by the decision of the 
Court of Appeal m i? » 
Hennessey (Timothy) ((1979) 68 
Cr App R 419) and these 
appellants accepted that xbtir 
cases could not be distinguished 
from that case. 

However, it was submitted 
that Hennessy was no longer 
good law because it could not 
stand with subsequent decisions 
in the House of Lords. 

Consideration of the law 
started with R v Hussain (11969] 
2 QB 567). which had been 
expressly approved in two de- 
risions in the House of Lords in 
the fast two years. 

It concerned a seaman in 


whose cabia had been bidden, in 
his presence, sealed packages by 
fellow crew members; ms de- 
fence was that he did not know 
what they contained. 

In ilw Court of Appeal, Lord 
Justice Wittany gave 
statement ofthc law i 
section 304 of the Customs ; 
Excise Act 1952, and said at 
pp571-2: 


created separate of- 


statuie 
fences. ’ 

If that ruling applied to the 
Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 it was 
plain that dinerem maximum 
penalties for offences related to 
different categories of drugs 

would appear to create separate 
offences. 

The effect of the 1979 Act 
together with the 1971 Act was 
that the sentence maxima be- 
came life imprisonment for 
importation of class A drugs. 14 


“It seems perfectly dear that 
the word ’’knowingly' in section 

?04 (h) is concerned with know- ye^ for class B drugs, five years 
mg that a fiaudtdent evasion of „ r 

The maximum tor importing 
/as 10 


a prohibition in respect of goods 
is taking place ... it is not 
necessary that he should know 


the importation of wl 
been prohibited.** 


has 


The Customs and Excise 
(Management) Act 1979 was a 
consolidating statute, and in 

AliA-'ro T otMlrileTLat* * - - - - -« 


their Lordships* judgment there - 
was no difference tore made in 


construing section 170 of that 
Act- 

In Hennessey the defendant, 
when a large quantity of can- 
nabis was found concealed in his 
car, raised what could be called 
the “blue 61m** defence (exactly 
the same as raised in these 
appeals), that he thought he was 
bringing in obscene material. 

The Cbun of Appeal applied 
Hussain and Lord Justice Law- 
ton said at p422: ~lt matters not 
for the purposes of the convic- 
tion what the goods were as kwg 
as he knew that he was bringing 
into the United Kingdom goods 
which he should not have been 
bringing in.” 

R v Toaffe ([19841 AC 539) 
was different hi that the defen- 
dant, when found to have 
cannabis in his car and more 
cannabis attached to his body, 
said that be thought he was 
bringing currency into this 
country, which he thought was 
prohibited although it was not 

The case went to the House of 
Lords, and a passage from Lord 
Scannan’s speech was the 
foundation of the appellants’ 
submission in the present case. 
He said at p547: “While there 
can be no doubt that Hussain 
was comedy decided, h may be 
that Hennessey wiD have to be 
reconsidered in the light of foe 
House’s decision today in R p 
Courtie ([1984] AC 463).** 

Courtie was concerned with 
an entirely different matter, foe 
int er pret a tion of the Sexual 
Offences Act 1967. Until then 
there had been a single offence 
of buggery, but that Act pro- 
vided oiflerent maximum pen- 
alties for the offence of buggery 
with another man. depending 
upon a number of foctors. 

The Court of Appeal held that 
there was stDI only one offence 
although Parliament had pro- 
vided different penalties. On 
that issue tbs case went to the 
House of Lords, which held in 
the dearest terms that the 


counterfeit coinage 
years, and two. years for any 
other roods (for example those 
prohibited under the En- 
dangered Species Act 1976). 

So it was said that once it was 
recognized that there were those 
different maxima, applying 
Courtie separate offences bad 
been created. 

R v Shivpuri ([1986] 2 WLR 
988) again differed on the facts 

g ie defendant having been 
und carrying a package 
containing a powdered sub- 
stance which be said be believed 
to be heroin but which in fact 
was vegetable material akin to 
snuff). 

In foe House of Lords foe real 
question related to the law on 


attempt. 

Afthoi 


the 

ai 


ough foe topic raised by 
present appeal did not 
to be relevant to their 
on, foe House invited 
argument upon it and Lord 
Bnilge ofHarwich, who gave the 
major speech, dealt -with 
Hussain . Hennessey and 
Courtie. Toaffe was among foe 
cases cited to their Lordships, 
although not referred to in Lord 
Bridge's speech. ' 

After referring to the pro- 
vision in section 28(3) of foe 
1971 Act [relating to foe neces- 
sity of proving, on a charge of 
possession, not only foe fact of 
possession of a drug of foe 
relevant class, but also knowl- 
edge that the drug was of that 
class) Lord Bridge said at p996: 

“Irrespective of the different 
penalties attached to offences in 
connection with the importa- 
tion of different categories of 


Hennessey ought to be over- 
ruled was m a sense academic 
“in that the prosecution’s rase 
against the appellant depended, 
not on the actual character of 
foe goods in for importation of 
which the appellant had been 
concerned, but on wbat Uie 
appellant believed foe character 
of those goods to be." 

If matters had stood there, in 
their Lordships* judgment, 
Shivpuri would have raised no 
difficulty. Lord Bridge was 
clearly there approving Hussain 
in the light of Cdurtkr. he was 
dealing with the “separate 
offence" argument, and was 
saying in terms that in foe light 
of that argument Hussain re- 
mained good law. 

But Lord Bridge then went on 
to consider the second limb of 
foe criticism of foe judge's 
summing-up and that part of his 
speech created great difficulty. 

He said at p997: . . foe 

submission continues, that it 
was a misdirection to tell the 
jury that they should convict foe 
appellant if they were sure ‘that 
be knew or believed the sub- 
stance was heroin or, in his own 
expression, dried hash or can- 
nabis (which is also prohibited) 
or some other prohibited drug.’ 
1 think this submission is strictly 
correct and that the words ‘or 
some other prohibited drug’ 
amounted to a technical 
misdirection.*' 

It was difficult to see why 


Lord Bridge thought that it was 
misdirect! c 


_ technical misdirection, be- 
cause class C drugs were just as 
surely prohibited as class A or B 
drugs. 

But in foe fight of the earlier 
passages in Lord Bridge’s speech 
their Lordships had to proceed 
on foe basis that Hussain was. 
good law, and it seemed that 
since Toaffe had. been cited in 
Shivpuri and the House of Lords 
then did not take the opportu- 
nity of deciding whether 
Hennessey remained good law. 
it was not for iheir Lordships in 
the Court of Appeal to entertain 
that argument. 

Hussain really covered the 
situation, unless it was accepted 
that in applying Courtie foe 
court should at lrast stick to the 


prohibited goods. R v Hussain ‘same prohibition; offences aris- 
established that the only mens ing from the same prohibition 
rea necessary for proof of any might provide the mens rea for 
sm* offence was knowledge that each other, but offences against 
the goods were subject to a one prohibition might not be 
prohibition on importation. supported by the mens rea of a 
a decided other- different prohibition. 


“Had it been 


wise ... it is surely inconceiv- 
able that Parliament, in the Act 
of 1971, would not have made 
provision such as that which we 
see in section 28(3) applicable to 
dnig-related offences connected 
with importation. 

“It follows, in my opinion, 
that the derision in R v Hussain 
has effectively been adopted and 
endorsed by the legislature and 
thus remains good law.** 

Lord Bridge then said that the 
submission that Hussain and 


The difficulty about that was 
that the arguments addressed to 
foe House of Lords and the 
derision in Taaffe. coupled with 
the derision in Shivpuri, seemed 
to say that Hussain and the 
subsequent cases plainly 
contemplated just that; 
Hennessey expressly said so. 
Their Lordships were dear that 
they remained bound by 
Hennessey. 

Solicitors: Solicitor, Customs 
and Excise. 


Broker’s security not illegal deposit 


SCF Finance Co Ltd r Masri 
and Another 

Before Lord Justice Slade, Lord 
Justice Ralph Gibson and Sir 
John Megaw 
[Judgment given July 16] 

If sums of money received by 
a broker in commodity and 
financial futures from his diem 
were referable to foe giving of 
security for the provision of 
property or services by foe 
broker, then his acceptance of 
such sums did not constitute a 
“deposit” within section 1(1) of 
the Banking Act 1979 and was 
thus not illegal under that Act 
The Court of Appeal, in a 
reserved judgment, dismissed 
an appeal by Mr Khalil Said 
Masri from Mr Justice Leggatt 
dated July 4, 1985. {The Times 
July 20. 1985; [1986] 1 All E R 
40) who ordered foal judgment 
be entered for foe plaintiffs, SCF 
Finance Co Ltd, and Mr Masri 
should pay SCF foe sum of 
US$910,031 together with in- 
terest thereon from January 30, 
1984 to July 4, 1 985 al 2 per cent 
above foe middle rate from time 
to time applied by foe Trade 
Development Bank Ltd. 

Mr Stanley Brodic, QC and 
Mr Christopher Moger for Mr 
Masri; Mr Nicholas LyeU, QC 
Mr Richard Aikens and Mr 
Richard Lord for SCF. 


extensively in those various 
items. In the course of carrying 
out their duties or functions for 
Mr Masri over that period, SCF 
had themselves incurred further 
liabilities or losses in the market 

amounting to $910,031, which 
were not covered by foe' sums 
paid to them by Mr Masri SCF 
brought these proceedings to 
recover that sum. 

Among the various defences 
put forward on Mr Masri’s 
behalf was a plea that ax all 
material times foe intention and 
purpose of SCF, unknown to Mr 
Masri, was that the agreement 
between SCF and Mr Masri 
should be performed in an 
illegal manner, contrary lo sec- 
tion 1 of foe Banking Act 1979. 

That illegality was said to 
involve a two-fold con- 
sequences first, that SCF could 
not recover all or any pan of the 
sura due; and, second, that Mr 
Masri could recover the sums 
which be hod {mid to SCF. 

The judge rejected the plea of 
illegality no less derisively than 
he had rejected foe other pleas 


advanced for Mr Masri. Before 
the Court of Appeal, however, 
Mr Masri’s ground of appeal 
was confined exclusively to the 
illegality point- 

Section 1 of foe 1979 Act did 
not render unlawful foe carrying 
on of **a deposit-taking 
business" as such. It rendered 
unlawful a specific act, namely, 
the acceptance of “a deposit m 
the course of carrying an a 
business which is a deposit- 
talcing business for the purpose 
of this Act". . 

It therefore, the transactions 
between SCF and Mr Masri had 
not involved the acceptance of 
any “deposit” in foe relevant 
sense by SCF, it mattered not 
whether the business of SCF 
-was, or was not, a “deposit- 
taking business" within the 
relevant meaning. 

In view of section l(4Xb), a 
sum of money paid to SCF on 
terms which were referable to 
tire provision of property or 
services or to foe giving of 
security was incapable of 


constituting a “deposit" in the 
relevant sense. 

In view of section K6KhL a 
sum of money “paid by way of 
security for payment for the 
provision of property or services 
of any kind provided or to be 
provided by the person by 
whom or on whose behalf the 
money is accepted" was in- 
capable of constituting a 
“deposit" within foe meaning of 
the section. 

In his Lordship's judgment 
SCF were right in submitting 
that the moneys in question 
were paid by way of security for 
payment for the provision of 
property or services to be pro- 
vided by SCF within foe mean- 
ing of section l(6Kb) of the Ad 

Accordingly, the moneys in 
question were not deposits 
within the definition in section 
1(4). On that ground Mr Masri’s 
drience to foe proceedings 
based on section 1(1) of the 1979 
Act failed. 

Solicitors; Herbert Oppen- 
hexmer, Nathan & Vandyk; 
Elborne Mitchell & CO. 


Garnishee within the jurisdiction 


LORD JUSTICE SLADE, 
giving the judgment of the court, 
said that SCF were licensed 
dealers under the Prevention of 
Fraud (Investments) Act 1958. 
The carried on business in 
London as brokers dealing in 
commodity and financial fu- 
tures. bullion and foreign ex- 
change. 

Between April 6, 1983, and 
January 27, 1984, Mr Masri, a 
Jordanian investor, was a client 
of SCF and through them traded 


SCF Finance Co Ltd v Masri 
and Another (No 2) 

Having regard to foe proce- 
dure in Order 49, rule 2 of the 
Rules of tire Supreme Court for 
applying for an order under 
Order 49, rule 1(1), it was 
enough for the garnishee (who 
was indebted to a judgment 
debtor) to be within foe jurisdic- 
tion _ of the court when a 
garnishee order nisi was made 
by the court on the judgment 
creditor's application. 


Megaw) so stated in a reserved 
judgment on July 16 dismissing 
an appeal by the second defen- 
dant, Mrs Ina'am Masri, from 
Mr Justice Leggatt who on July 
4, 1985. gave judgment for the 
plain lifts, SCF Finance Co Ltd, 
for USS910.031, with interest, 
as due from the first defendant, 
Mr Khalil Said Masri, and 
arising out of transactions con- 
ducted for Mr Masri by SCF 
under SCFs customer agree- 
ment as brokers for commodity 
and financial futures. 


The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Slade, Lord Justice 
Ralph Gibson and Sir John 


LORD JUSTICE RALPH 
GIBSON said that the merely 
temporary physical presence of 


ice within the lerri- 
limits of England and 
Wales at the relevant time 
sufficed to render him “within 
the jurisdiction" under Order 
49, rule 1(1). 

There was no doubt dial his 
physical presence within the 
country at the time of the 
mak ing of the order nisi was 
sufficient to found jurisdiction 
which would not be lost by his 
subsequent departure. The 
procedure from order nisi to 
final order was lo be treated as 
one procedure, and jurisdiction 
at the start was intended to 
endure until the end. 


No costs from legal aid for second defendant 


Lan dan and Another v Purvis 
Before Mr Gerald Godfrey, QC 
[Judgment given July 23] 

Where In an action a legally 
aided first defendant who had 
lost the action was ordered to 
pav the costs or a second 
defendant who was not legally 
aided, the court had no power to 
order that the second 
defendant’s costs be paid out of 
the legal aid fond under section 
13 of the Leg^l Aid Act 1974. 

Mr Gerald Godfrey. QC sit- 
ting as a deputy judge of the 
Chancery Division, so held in a 
reserved judgment dismissing 
the application of Henry 
Charles Warrener to be awarded 
his costs out of the legal aid fond 
as an unassisted party under 
section 13 of the 1974 Act. 

Mr Michael Pearson for Mr 
Warrener; Mr Duncan 
Maiheson for the Law Society. 


HIS LORDSHIP said that Mr 
Warrener was the third defen- 
dant in two actions in the first of 
which Raymond and. Susan 
Landau were the plaintiffs and 
in the second of which Terence 
Maddams was foe plaintiff. 

Both actions, which were 
heard together, arose out of the 
sale by Mr and Mrs Purvis of 
different parts of an estaie 
agency business to the Landaus 
and Mr Maddams, in each case 
allegedly misrepresenting to the 
intending purchasers the attrac- 
tions of the businesses they were 
purchasing. 

Mr Warrener was an accoun- 


tant who had been asked by Mr 
and Mrs Purvis to prepare 
certain accounts for submission 
to the Inland Revenue which 
were shown, without his knowl- 
edge. to the landacs and Mr 
Maddams. 

The alteration in each action 
against Mr warrener was that he 
owed a duty to the intending 
purchasers properly to prepare 
those accounts and that he had. 
failed to discharge that duty. 

Mr und Mrs Parvis lost both 
actions and substantial damages 
were awarded to foe La n daus 
and Mr Maddams but foe 
claims made against Mr War- 
rener were dismissed. The Lan- 
daus and Mr Maddams and Mr 
and Mrs Purvis received legal 
aid in connection with those 
actions but Mr Warrener did 
not. 

Although the proceedings in- 
stituted by the Landaus and Mr 
Maddams against Mr Warrener 
had been finally derided in his 
favour (to borrow the la n gua g e 
of section l3ofthe 1974Act)the 
court considered that no order 
for costs in favour of Mr 
Warrener should be. made 
against the Landaus and Mr 
Maddams. 

But it considered that his 
costs should be paid by Mr and 
Mrs Purvis and made an order 
“that the first and second defen- 
dants do pay to IMr Warrener 
his costs] provided that no steps 
be taken to recover the said 
costs until alter- the first and 
second defendants' liability 


therefor shall have been deter- 
mined in accordance with the 
provisions of the Legal Aid Act 
J974 . . . and that the applica- 
tion of the third defendant for 
the payment of the said costs out 
of the legal aid fond be ad- 
journed to foe master for in- 
quiry and report.” 

The master found that Mr 
Warrener had suffered severe 
financial hardship, but that in 
order to come nothin section 13 
the costs had to have been 
awarded against foe ' legally 
aided party wbo instituted the 
proceedings. 

Jn this case they had not been. 
They had been awarded against 
legally aided defendants to the 
actions. It was true that the 


plaintiffs who did institute the 
proceedings also happened to be 
legally aided but that was irrele- 
vant. 


- Although it was dear and 
admitted by the Law Society 
that it would be just and 
equitable to gram the costs to 
Mr Warrener who would other- 
wise suffer severe financial 
hardship, his Lordship felt him- 
self constrained to agree with 
the master that the court had no 
jurisdiction under section 13 of 
the 1974 Act so lo do and 
reluctantly dismissed Mr 
Warrener’s application. 


Solicitors: Godfrey Davis & 
Baldwin, Mitcham; Law Soci- 
ety. 


Assessing lump sum 


CoOuk v Colfins 
On an application for a lamp 
sum under section 23(1 Xc) of 
the Matrimonial Causes Act 
1973. the court in assessing the 

S im of the lump sura 
take account only of the 
factors set out in section 25( I ) of 
that Act. as amended by the 
Matrimonial and Family 
Prooredings Act 1984. 


aid costs had been unnecessarily 


increased by foe paying spouse's 
.conceal his 


assets 


It was wrong for the court to 
increase The sum m order that 
the Law Society might recover 
more by means of its statutory 
charge under section 9(6) of the 
Legm Aid Act .1974 than It 
would - otherwise have , done, 
even though the applicant's legal 


attem pts to 

from foe court . 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice May and Lord Justice 
Lloyd) so held on July 31, 
allowing an appeal by the bus- 
band, Mr Joseph Collins, from 
an order of Judge Gill man, who, 
sitting as a High Court judge on 
February 2, had ordered him to 
pay his former wife, Mrs Kath- 
leen Rose Collins, a tump sum . 
of£lOJ»a 

The Court of Appeal reduced 
the aim to £7,500. bring one 
half of the assets which the court 
wasenthled to infer foe husband 




f 



* 


* ^ 


* 


4 

«# 

I 

I • 





1 '« J J 


\ 



Britain’s world champion 1,500 metres runner voices his criticisms of Coe and Ovett 





cuts across the tracks of cynicism 


in the first of three 


articles. Steve Cram 


explains to Pat Butcher, 


Athletics Correspondent, 


why he chose to break 


the Coe-Ovett syndrome 


of non-confrontation 


The shadows of his un forgotten prede- 
cessors siill lie uncomfortably across the 
path nt Sieve Cram. Sebastian Coe and 
Steve Ovett were always going to be a 
hard act to follow. Alter all. they 
xirtualU remoulded world middle dis- 
tance running and stamped a Union lack 
on it in the process. But Cram did not 
just follow them. He has bettered them. 
He has won five major titles so far. that is 
to sav as many gold medals as Coe and 
Ovett put together. 

He has beaten them in competition, 
broken their world records, and largely 
contributed to Ovett's moving up to 
5.001) metres. Yet Cram still sees himself 
being seconded to their collective myth. 
“No'maturr how well and how Iasi I run. 
if Seb were to sneeze or Sieve were to trip 
up. it would still be bigger news.” he says. 
It ma> show a certain naiyity about how 
some sections of the media view ‘news' 
but. even as he said this. Cram still 
looked relatively unperturbed, relaxing 
at the lunch table of the discreet hotel 
near his home outside Newcastle. 

It is not Cram's style to get hei up. 
When he is not winning gold medals, or 
collecting gongs at the Palace. Cram is a 
fairlv undemonstrative character. He 
dues not collapse in Olympic finals, run 
into church railings, or refuse to talk to 
the media for half a dozen years like 
Ovett. Nor does he. like Coe. fall ill on 
the eve of major championships or 
pursue posts as athlcies* representative 
to the International Olympic Committee 
and v rce-chairman of the Sports Council. 

But Cram should not worry too much. 
In addition to appreciating the way he 
won those five gold medals, those who 
care about athletics will be eternally 
eraieful to Cram for restoring confronta- 
tion to competition. After Coc and Ovett 
had avoided each other for so long that 
manv people must have found middle 
distance running about as exciting as 
postal chess. Cram cut across the 
cvmcism. and agreed on a crucial 
meeting with Ovett. 

It was the end of the 1983 season. 
Cram had followed his Commonwealth 
and European victories the previous year 
bi w inning the 1.500 metres title at the 
inaugural world championships in Hel- 
sinki. Ovett had finished fourth, but 
gone on to break his own 1.500 metres 
world record. He asked to run in Cram's 
mile at Crystal Palace. Cram, as cham- 
pion. could have followed the example 
laid dow n by Coe and Ovett, by refusing 
to let Ovett in. Or Cram could choose 
not to run at all. 

“At first. I wasn’t that interested. I 
thought, well. I've beaten him and don't 
have anything to prove. But then I 
thought, what the hell, if I'm sitting at 
home thinking of not running against 
him because I'm afraid of gelling beaten, 
then Helsinki didn’t prove anything to 
me. I had to go and proveto myself that 1 



Cram on his two great rivals from the world stage, Coe (left) and Ovett (right): “I was always a big Steve Ovett fan and not a fan of Seb Coe's’ 


knew I could beat him." And beat him 
Cram did. in a race that gave the lie to all 
Coe and Ovett's paced world records. It 
was five seconds outside Coe's world 
record. But it was the most exciting 
competition ever seen at Crystal Palace 
as Cram won by a foot 

Cram was injured in 1984, and almost 
missed the Olympic Games ("a month 
before. 1 didn't think I'd even get 
through the heats") but he was still good 
enough to beat everyone except a 
revitalized Coe. who created history in 
becoming the only man successfully to 
defend the Olympic 1.300 metres title. 

Bui Cram, aged 23 and five years 
younger, erased both Coe and Ovett 


Two great athletes with 
no reason why they 
shouldn't race each other 9 


from the 1.500 metres and mile world 
record lists the following year. And again 
it was the willingness to accept 
confrontation, first against his contem- 
porary rival. Said Aouita, the Moroccan 
Olympic 5,000 metres champion, and 
secondly against Coe. which inspired 
Cram to the feat. In a finale even more 
exciting than the race against Ovett, 
Cram beat Aouita in Nice, and broke 
Ovett's 1.500 metres world record. Two 


weeks later in Oslo, Cram beat both Coe 
and Coe's world mile record. 

No one is more aware than Cram that 
it should have been harder. “If they had 
raced each other when they were good, 
things would have been so much 
different. It looks worse because I've 
come along, saving I don't care if I race 
him. or I race him etc. Ultimately all the 
blame has got to lie with them. No 
matter how much the system created that 
situation, there were two great athletes 
.with no reason why they shouldn't race 
each other. 

“Both tried to maintain the situation; 
it was better for half of the population to 
think you were the best than for all the 
population to know you were second- 
best Neither of them had the guts, or the 
confidence, shall we say, to think they 
were so much better than the other guy 
that they would say, right I'll race him 
next week. They might have brought the 
mile and 1.500 metres times down to 
God knows what 


“It was great drama as it was. But to 

g :t the two of them together, say at 
urich or Oslo, would have been 
fantastic. I don't think the money was 
what worried them. Certainly not then, 
and whoever came out second was still 
good enough to go out and command big 
sums in Europe. It's like somebody 
coming to you and saying: I'll give you a 
hundred grand to finish second. You’d 


never do il You'd rather take ten grand 
to finish first. Anyone would, well . . , 
most people." 

Such strong comments are reminiscent 
of the equally unusual outburst against 
Coe and Ovett for missing the .Amateur 
Athletic Association championships and 
an international match six weeks ago. 
around selection time for the Common- 
wealth Games. “I'd been selected and. to 
be perfectly honest, I was trying to make 
things a little more difficult for them, 
maybe even get them forced into a run- 
off’ race which they wouldn’t have 
planned. 

“ We sometimes use the Press, and to 
be perfectly honest, I was trying to exert 
some pressure in their direction. I wasn’t 
saying things that 1 didn't believe, but f 
could have easily left them unsaid. I was 
just trying to use the situation to my 
advantage, which we all do from time to 
time, well, all the time." 

That g a m esmanship is a new side to 
Cram, and 'shows him verging on a 
hardness which used to be associated 
with Ovett. Admittedly, there had to be 
another dimension to Cram, which has 
helped make him a champion. “That side 
of it is a game, it gives you a couple of 
points advantage. Races can be won and 
lost before you even run them. like 
Edinburgh, for example. When I tried to 
race Seb a week before the Common- 
wealth. ft was a wind-up. 


“I knew I was running well, I knew he 
was running well, and the odds were 1 
might get beaten. But I thought if I get 
beat so what it doesn't matter. I'm still 
getting myself right for the Common- 
wealth. If I win. great But if he doesn't 
compete against me? And I’ve been the 
one who’s said 1 want to race Seb, and he 
doesn't compete, that's another little 
notch." 

In the eventuality. Coe caught a throat 
infection and pulled out of the Common- 
wealth Games on the day of the 800 
metres final, the third time he has had to 
withdraw just before or during a major 
championship. “The pressure of trying 
to win an 800 metres title is not helping 


‘I thought I couldn't 
compete at the 
same level as those gays' 


him. Maybe the. virus is partly, brought 
on by that pressure. Seb is a little more ■ 
vulnerable in that sense He is the best /r - 
guy in the world when everything is r 
goi ng well for him. But 1 couldn't believe . >» 
he didn’t run the eight. He’s had a couple 
of days rest. If he's run and got beaten, 
everyone would say, fine, he ran and he 
wasn’t fit If he’d won or run a good race. . 
he'd have been a hero " 

A hero was what Ovett originally was 


for Cram, seemingly from an anmciio.n 
of opposites. "It was lhc European 
Cup 800 or something, where he noted 
people aside to get through the middle. I 
liked that at the time because I would 
never do anything like il. I d rather step 
aside and say, you go first. At that stage, 
for two or three years. Steve was.the star 
and Seb was someone you would 
occasionally hear about. Then Seb broke 
through in I97S, but I was always a big. 
Sieve Ovcu fan. and not a fan of Seb 
Coe’s. 

"When I got selected for the Common- 
wealth Games in 1978. 1 felt they were a 
world apart, because they were going to 
the Europeans. And even when t went 
with them to the Olympics in 1980, i 
came awav thinking I'm never going to 
win the Olympic 1.500 metresTm never 
going to win anything at 1.500 metres, 
5.000 is the event for me. I ll give it 
another year, and then thjnk about 
moving up. I just thought I couldn't 
compete at the same level as those guys." 

The transition began in 1981. when 
Cram finished 0.3sec behind Ovcu in a 

1.500 metres at Crystal Palace. “I 
actually came on to his shoulder and was 
scared to go past. I remember thinking at 
the time: what the hell's this, you can't go 
past Steve Ovett. That was the first time 
1 actually competed with him." 

With Coe ill and Ovett injured in 
1982. Cram seized bis opportunity, and 
won the Commonwealth and European 

1.500 metres titles. Cram had never 
known Coe very well, and still does not 
But Cram and Ovett had been on lour in 
Australia with their wives. Karen and 
Rachel, and got on well. But now Cram 
had become a threat to Ovcu. who 
sought to gain a pschyological advantage 
by entering one of Cram's races at the 
last moment in The Netherlands in early 
1981 Cram switched races and re- 
sponded to Ovett's gamesmanship by 
saying: "OK. 1 wasn't ready for him here, 
but wait until three weeks time." which 
is when Cram won the world title, with 
Ovett fourth. 

"The relationship changed. It was 
never animosity, but I went through this 
same thing with John Walker (Olympic 

1.500 metres champion m 1976). He was 

first very friendly, then when 1 started to 
beat him. he was a bit stand-offish. And 
now he accepts I'm better than him, it's 
all done and dusted, and we're very, 
friendly again. But Ovett's very stand- 
offish. We hardly say hello to each other 
at the moment." - ; 

But the revision of the middle distance 
world records by Cram and Aouita has 
forced Ovett up to 5,000 metres, where 
he won the Commonwealth title: Yes- 
terday. he was selected for the European 
5.000 roctrek m Stuttgart in two weeks 
time. Cram has a slight injury, which 
should clear up by next week, and Coe 
has recovered from his infection and 
races 1.500 metres in Zurich tomorrow 
night. Both have been selected for 800 
and 1.500 metres in Stuttgart If Cram 
wins both, that will mean more gold 
medals than Coc and Ovett put together, 
and a larger lease on history. And even, 
perhaps, the occasional headline or two. 

©Copyright Pit Betchet. 1386. - 


TOMORROW ) 


The private man 
behind the 
public personality 


ROWING 


Cambridge are 
sunk by half 
a Yale length 


S>> -Jim Raitton 
Aiandciicu La Napoule 


y .ili- heal Cambridge Univer- 
m!\ i. ■ win tin.* third intcr- 
u.iiiiMul Kuumg Regatta on the 
Mryiu - 1 anal tn hereon ihel’oie 
.1 A.-iiu- on Sunday evening. 

ale loot, l am bridge with Kith 
r.icmu .il j very high rale lo win 
by ium hull' a length in ihe last 
Ziii* nn-ues. The American 
nnoersin eight received ( I he 
KeSJv challenge Trophy from 
I’riiKC Mheri of Monaco, whose 
eraudlalher. Jack Kelly, was an 
Olympic gold medal winner. 

The racing was over approxi- 
mately l . metres on a course 
•mil a bend m it. making a 
staggered start of one length 
neiVsv.ti y The first rounds were 
( tvlord l : niverMi\ ' Cambridge 
and Vale ' Cornell, with the 
respective winners and losers 
meet mg in the Anglic American 
Grand Tiiial and consolation 
races 

c.tni budge wore down 
Oxford's stagger and charged 
home with a length to spare in 
ihe heal. Oxford's crow could 
have ii.id three presidents on 
hoard - lira ham Jones. Bruce 
1’i'ilp and [Vnald MacDonald. 
Km for vintc odd reason. Philp 

was dropped and Koli'Mimding. 
who I ms iicv cr attended a course 
at 0 \h*rd University, stopped in 

■is iic Old bst year. Rut it had nn 
el! V! 

\ .lie won therr first round 
race over i ornell hv one length, 
i lie iin.il v\ js something of a 

mii prise when the luvoumcv 
jmbriJiie. dosed the stagger 
mi ale and drew level with 200 
nicu.-s to go. But in front at an 


enthusiastic crowd Vale surged 
or Ov!.»r.i heat Cornell in the 


consolation final by three-quar- 
vrs of a length and everybody 
seemed happy and received a 
pnre. 

MamMieu La Napoule isonlv 
R’kn (dhtml 6 miles) from 
k unties, and must anxious 
through us mayor. Louise Mo- 
reau. jo keep with the fashion- 
able rote d‘ A /ii re resorts. So if 
• j ones has a film festival, the 
thinking is that Mandeiieu 
■•lion Id have j rowing festival, 

U Me there is only one Boat 
Race front Putney id Mori lake*, 
it scents almost everybody 
wants j b*»at race with Oxford 
and Cambridge present. So tar 
during vacation. Oxford and 
Cambridge have been in Dub- 
lin Vancouver. Istanbul, the 
South ol France, with the 
possibility of a trip to mainland 
China in September. It is really a 
ease of joining Ihe Oxford "or 
Can-hrid-ie boat clubs and see- 
ing Ihe world. 


MOTOR RACING 


Hungarian ‘experiment 9 is 
given a vote of confidence 


By John Blunsden 


There was a relaxed, almost 
party atmosphere in the pad- 
dock of the Hungaroring on 
Sunday evening as Grand Pnx 
racing's fleet of car transporters 
and meunrhomes were loaded in 
preparation for the next Grand 
Prix in a week's time. One 
reason was that the teams were 
faced with little more than a 
“trip down ihe road" across the 
border into Austria and on to 
the next venue at Zcltwcg. The 
other was the sense of relief that 
the Hungarian Grand Prix — 
motor racing's boldest experi- 
ment lor many years — had 
proved such a resounding 
success. 


There were a few niggles 
about the circuit, on which a 
couple of the comers were 
almost certainly likely to be 
eased before next year's race, 
and about the slippery track 
surface, which gave ihe tyre 
companies and their teams 
some anxious times. Bui the 
overall quality of the facilities 
and the keenness of the or- 
ganizers to listen to advice and 

aei on it quickly drew wide 
respect. If topJgradc inter- 
national sport can contribute to 
improving East- West relations, 
then both sides made a major 
contribution in Hungary over 
the past few days. 


A statement alter the race frv 


the sport's governing body. 
FISA, announced the Sunday 
crowd as no fewer than 200.000. 
Thai may have been a slight 
exaggeration, but certainly not a 
significant one to judge from the 
terraces which provide such 
magnificent vantage points 
around the two-and-a-half-mile 
circuit. They were jam-packed 
and the race-day crowd repre- 
sented only the Up of the total 
who watched the Grand Prix. 
We were told that television was 
beamed from the circuit 
throughout the Eastern Bloc 
countries, which meant that this 
particular Grand Prix reached 
no fewer than 180 million 
viewers throughout the world. 

The race brought out the best 
of Nelson Piquet and Ayrton 
•Senna in the most testing of 
conditions as they balanced care 
of their lyres with their natural 
instinct to drive their cars on the 
limit: at least it made a change 
from having to constantly watch 
the fuel consumption monitor. 

It was most unfortunate that 
an olT-form car prevented Nigel 
Mansell from playing a prom- 
inent role for more than a 
handful of laps at the start of the 
race. Also that Alain Prost — 
whose Marlboro McLaren, had 
looked so impressive during the 
race morning warm-up — should 
be sidelined by trouble with the 
electronic system of his spare 


car. to which he had had to 
switch at the last moment before 
the race. Senna, too. had been in 
pre-race difficulties and had to 
make do with one of the earlier 
Renault engines when his in- 
tended race unit misbehaved in 
the warm-up. 

Walter Hayes, the vice-chair- 
man of Ford of Europe, who was 
responsible for his company’s 
first involvement in Grand Prix 
racing way back in ] 967. flew in 
lo see the latest Ford turbo in 
action with the Haas Lola team, 
and he came dose to seeing the 
cars earn their first champion- 
ship points. 

Despite having to make do 
with small radiators (because of 
delays in the supply of the 
correct sized units from France) 
and hence having to run the 
engines with marginal cooling, 
they performed encouragingly 
in the intense heat, which 
suggested that significant 
progress had been made in their 
development since they were 
first tested in race conditions 
less than four months ago. 
Those larger radiators will be 
desperately needed in Austria 
this week, however, where the 
weather is likely to at least 
match the 92 de grees in which 
the race started in Hungary, but 
where the average lap speed will 
probablv be something like 50 
mph foster. 


Quiet American bids for third world motor-cycling title 


Missing Spencer paves the 
way for Lawson assault 


Eddie Lawson, second time 
SOOcc champion of the world, is 
a typically qofet American- He is 
not exactly shy, nor yet quite a 
man of mystery, but his soft 
voice and wry, wise-cracking 
style set him apart from the 
brash image fostered by many of 
his predecessors. 

This is dear from bis pride at 
bis anonymity. He woo four 
national titles in the United 
States before coming to Europe 
in 1985; . his fast world 
champions hip came in 1984. But 
be is pleased to inform ns that 
“my next door neighbour hasn't 
got a due who I am". 

Another doe to the Yamaha 
team leader’s retiring . nature 
comes in the matter of his age. 
He is 28. but is, in many official 
documents, described as 27. ft is 
because when be came to Europe 
his sponsors, Marlboro, trans- 
posed the day and month of his 
birthday (March II). It is one of 
many matters upon which, if 
pressed, he will comment: "It 
doesn't bother me.” 

Unmarried, Lawson lives in 
Upland, a ■ w*nii Californian 
town conveniently placed be- 
tween the great western play- 
grounds of desert and ocean. 

American riders have domi- 
nated motor cyde grand prix 
raring since Kenny Roberts 
deposed Barry Sheene in 1978. 
In nine years, European riders 
have won only twice. Lawson 
does not agree that it is mastery 



Lawson: happiest at home 


of the tall-sliding technique — 
learned on their Miptsw dirt 
tracks — that has given them 
this superiority. “It might help a 
little when you drift a bike oa 
tarmac, but there’s guys who go 
fast who've never ridden the 
dirt." He believes it is more a 
matter of competitive attitude. 

Like his pre-eminent country- 
men — people like Kenny Rob- 
erts, Randy Mamola, Mike 
Baldwin, and the 1985 cham- 
pion, Freddie Spencer — he does 
have a motor-cycling back- 
ground stretching back to early 
schooldays. He first rode at 7, 
and first raced at 12. 


His performance this year has 
marked him a worthy champion 
who is riding better than in 
1985, when be lost to Freddie 
Spencer. His rival perfected a 
technique of palling oat an 
invinceable lead on cold tyres. 
This year. Lawson has shown 
mastery of the same technique, 
bat has been denied the chance 
to measure his skill against the 
Honda riding . rival whom be 
beat in the States in 1982 and ia 
the world championship in 1984. 
“People said I'd won only 
because Freddie missed several 
races. This year, he's missed the 
whole season. Bat I can't make 
him wdL or decide for him when 
his injuries are too bad.” It is a 
major source of frustration for 
the man who won in France a 
week after dislocating his collar- 
bone. riding against doctors 
orders. 


“Freddie and I would have 
some good races, if he hadn't 
stayed home," he said ruefully. 


Lawson intends to retain next 
season, and will probably ride a 
Yamaha once again. “If l can 
agree favourable terms." Bat the 
thing he looks forward to most is 
clashing with Spencer. “Until 
now. he's beta a year ahead of 

me in grand prix racing and I 

Know how ranch I've learned 

each year. Now we are equal 
again." 


Michael Scott 



FOOTBALL 


Wednesday capture Hirst for £250,000 fee 


Birds of a feather: Marc Bolton gets to grips with Jemima, a 
tawny eagle, at Crystal Palace, nicknamed the Eagles 


Sheffield Wednesday signed 
David Hirst from Barnsley for 
£250.000 yesterday, although 
Allan Clarke, the Oak well man- 
ager. had hoped to keep the 
forward who scored 10 goals in 
eight games in his first season. 

Clarke was forced into a deal 
because of Barnsley's cash prob- 
lems. "I know our fans will be 
disappointed, but this was a 
chance to solve our financial 
problems and give the chance to 
a young player to move lo the 
first division." Howard Wil- 
kinson. the Wednesday man- 
ager. said: "Hina possesses 
remarkable gifts and he'll fit into 
out team pattern." 

• Billy Hamilton, the Northern 
Ireland forward, missed Oxford 
United's photo call yesterday, 
but Maurice Evans, the man- 
ager. dismissed speculation that 
his playing career may be over 
as “ill-founded". Hamilton. 


aged 29. has undergone two 
canilage operations in the Iasi 
18 months and trained on only 
two days in the last month. He 
has missed all Oxford’s pre- 
season matches. 


• Ally Robertson, West Brom- 
wich Albion's former captain, is 
leaving the Hawthorns after 
having his contract cancelled at 
the start of his testimonial 
season. Ron Saunders, the man- 
ager. has made it dear to 
Robertson, aged 33. that he docs 
not figure in his plans after 
signing Martin Dickinson, from 
Leeds, and Paul' Dyson, from 
Stoke, and the Scot will now 
almost certainly lose his tes- 
timonial. "I'll be looking for a 
new dub," Robertson said. 


• Brentford have signed Paul 
Canoville. aged 24. the Chelsea 
wing, at a fee to be derided by an 
independent tribunal. 


• Sheffield United have signed 
Peter Beagrie and - offered 
£10.000 for. the Middlesbrough 
wing, but the fire could be 
decided by a tribunal. 

• Bob Bolder, the Sunderland 
goalkeeper, had talks yesterday 
with Charlton Athletic; the first 
division newcomers. Charlton 
are believed to have offered 
£20.000 for his transfer. Nicky 
Johns, the present goalkeeper, 
has asked for a transfer follow- 
ing the club's refusal to extend 
his present contract which still 
has a year' to run. 

• Queen’s- Park Rangers have, 
called off a friendly at We- 
aid stone, the Gola League dub. 
tonight because of injuries. 

• tom Cowie. the Sunderland 
chairman, has resigned and sold 
all his shares at race value to 
Bob Murray, the vice-chairman, 
but will stay as an advisory 


director for at least a vear. A 
deal with Barry Baiev, the 
director who has waged a board- 
room battle with Cowie; fell 
through and Cowie then derided 
to bnng forward his plans to 
retire. 

• Milan AC and Argentinos 
Juniors dash tonight in the 
Columbus Cup tournament in 
Genoa as part of the city's 

.celebrations for the navigator 
who discovered America in 
1492. Sampdoria and Genoa are 
also taking part in the quadran- 
gular tournament that will con- 
tinue until the 500th anni- 
versary-celebrations in 1991 

• GoaJs by Bebeio and Julio 
Cesar gave Fla men go a 2 -q 
victory over Vasco da Gama 2-0 
an Sunday to win the Rio de 
Janeiro championship — their 
first li tie since 1 98 1 - lo spark a. 
massive celebration b\ 1 30.000 
fens in the Maracana Stadium. 


MODERN 


PENTATHLON 


Suspicions 


remain of 


drag misuse 


From Michael Coleman 
Montecatmi Terme, Italy 


One of the reasons the 
UIPMB. die world governing 
body, gave for rejecting the 
British offer to test all compet- 
itors after the shooting at the 
world championships was that ix 
would attract bad publicity. 
“We lest more people in our 
events than other sports, so why 
give the impression that drug- 
taking is growing?" was the 
kernel of the argumenL 


Only 36 urine samples, and 
many fewer than the British- 
were prepared to check in 
London at their own expense, 
went instead t6 Cologne in the 
care of Dieter Krikow. one of 
the sport's administrators. The 
samples will be tested today and 
Thor Henning, the general sec- 
retary. will be told the results at 
the sport's headquarters in 
Stockholm. A game of pretence. 


Yei the suspicions remain: 
What were those East Europe- 
ans doing putting up-their noses' 
before Ihe shooting? An inhalant 
that instantly steadies the heart- 
beat before taking aim and 
which does not register in urine 
samples? Who knows? . . . 


Suspicions apart, h was a 
brilliant week for modem 
pentathalon done in the grand 
Italian manner, of spectacle, 
confusion, but great bravura. 
Grumbles were widespread and 
also rather nasty asides on -the. 
Italian character but. after all, it 
was their $750,000 and they 
were doing all the work. 


Anatoly Siarostin stayed cool ; 
and won as did Irina Upeyeva 
and the Soviet women and 
junior, men. No sun-batiiing for ■ 
them: They are committed. The, • 
Russians lost 1 , 100 points' m the ‘ _ 
riding when Avdeyev was dis- . 
qualified, but they still managed 
to finish 492 ahead of. the 
British, who won both runs, 
team and individual. Peter Hart 
showing promise from his first 
world outing and Wendy' Nor- 
man displaying form in at least 
one department 


be.* 

.mini 


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"The revelation for most was *. 
Dominic Mahoney — “at last an . 
English |sic] who can fence.", 
raid a Hungarian — and run; for".-..- 
5- S *'T?' n **0sec effort hoisted- *■-- 
mm 10 places to 2 1st place. ; 
Britain's best position. With... . 
Teresa Purton also passing her- 
exams with flying colours. 'they 
can concentrate on Seoul 1988- - ••'. J 











THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


SPORT 


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RACING: BALLOT SYSTEM FOR NOMINATION OF STALLIONS TO END IN DRIVE TO IMPROVE STANDARDS 


Bronze Opal 
to be another 
Balding gem 


By Mandarin 


: .-r-ap' 

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Toby Balding, ihe affable 
Fyfield trainer, who recently 
landed one of the biggest 
winners of his training career 
on the Flat with Green Ruby 
in the GOodwood Stewards’ 
Cop. has ihe opportunity to 
continue his run of success 
with Bronze Opal at Folke- 
stone this afternoon. Balding's 
big gest winner canje in the 
1 969 Grand National with 
Highland Wedding. 

Bronze Opal, like Green 
Ruby, was formerly trained by 
Alan Jarvis, and both horses 
have now found thdr form 
since joining Balding. Last 
time out Bronze Opal won 
very easily at Goodwood beat- 
ing a good field. Codices was 
among his victims being more 
than II lengths behind m 
seventh place, and again today 
be looks held. Bronze Opal on 
that occasion returned a 20-1 
shot. Today's . main threat 
looks likely to come from Sir 
Arnold, who won well over six 
furlongs on this course, and 
possibly has some improve- 
ment in him. 

As a two-year-okt Bronze 
Opal ran with promise against 
some top class performers, 
notably at Goodwood where 
he finished a close third to the 
useful New Trojan - and 
Mashkour, the latter finished 
third in the Epsom Derby. 
Codices on that occassion was 
again behind him in fourth 
place and with these creden- 
tials Bronze Opal is napped to 
win the Dym church Slakes. 

Sarihah does not look over 
burdened with top weight in 
the Prix Du Touquet Nursery, 
and can regain winning form. 
The Tom Jones trained colt 


tW came up against two 
tl candidates. 


recent! 
useful 

Wiganthorpe. who ran so well 
in foe Heinz “57” at Phoenix 
Parle on Sunday, and the 
highly rated Just A Flutter, 
when he was foe ranoewrp cm 
both occasions. 

Pat Eddery looks in line to 
ride a treble at Folkestone for 
three different trainers. 
Nelson's lady in foe Sandling 
Selling Stakes, Con Horgan, 
(Meat Line. Richard Hannon 
and Longstop, Peter MakuL 

Barry Hills, foe Lam bourn 
trainer, does not send many 
runners to Beverley, but the 
nip looks worthwhile with 
The Lfonheart. his only run- 
ner at. the Yorkshire course. 
This well bred colt put in a 
promising run at Newmarket 
where be finished second to 
foe highly, rated Arabian 
Sheik. 

Also in that race was Alpen- 
born. who finished half a 
length behind, but improve- 
ment is expected to come from 
The Lionheart, -who can land 
foe odds in foe Minster 
Moorgate Stakes. 

Dancuta Bede, who beat the 
Michael Stonte trained Aid 
And Abet last time out, can 
land the Woodhall Way 
Stakes. Aid And Abet won 
well at Pontefract on Thurs- 
day. Pat Rohan's Upland 
Goose looks capable of win- 
ning the Ladygate Selling 
Stakes. The five-year old re- 
lumed Jo foe- trade after 
missing the 1985 season at 
Wolverhampton where she 
finished second to Action 
Time in a seller. On her recent 
outing she ran in a handicap, 



Eligible breeders 
to be favoured 
by National Stud 


By Michel Seely 


The National Stud has de- 
cided to discontinue the ballot 
system for nomination for stal- 
lions under its control- From 
I9S7 onwards they intend to 
give priority and preferential 
treatment to "eligible breeders”. 
This term wilt comprise all 
those studs whose operations 
are permanently based in Great 
Britain. 

Those qualifying will be given 
priority for foe period Septem- 
ber 1 to October 31. Those 
applying at this time will be 
allowed more fiivountde pay- 
ment terms, such as being 
responsible for foe first instal- 
ment in October when mares 
have been tested as being in foal 
and the second not until Decem- 
ber, only two months before foe 
start of the breeding season. 

More usual terms are for the 
first payment to be made in July 
and the second in October. “We 
understand breeders* cash flow 
problems and we want to do all 
we can to help them," Chris- 
topher Collins, chairman of foe 
National Stud. said. 

The new board took effective 
control of May 1. Yesterday its 
four members. Mr Collins. Da- 
W ildic * . v vid Gibson. Bruce Hobbs and 
; .* V Peter Willett, flew to Ireland on 
t*. -- " • ■ a feci -finding mission- They 

. „ . ., . ■ o _ J . /> «. r e-* S ‘ — ’ ■ intend to visit the Irish National 

Allez MilOrd, nearside, who runs tn Saturday’s Geoffrey Freer Stakes Stud and the Coolmore and 

Airlie studs. 

Among foe board's many 


and win appreciate today's 
drop in class. 

Reg Hollinshead and Steve 
Perks can gain consolation in 
foe Stretton Automatics with 
Pentbmd Hawk, which was 
disqualified from first place at 
Ripon last Monday. On that 
occassion he finished three- 
quarters of length in from of 
Sohai). but lost foe race in the 
stewards room after it was 


at Newbury for Guy Harwood 

found that he had taken foe 
runner-up's ground. 

Ardent Partner makes a 
quick reapearance after win- 
ning well at Brighton on 
Thursday, and looks to be well 
handicapped in the Lambley 
Handicap. Dollar Seeker, 
owned by Terry Ramsden, is a 
well bred newcomer in foe 
EBF Nottinghamshire Maiden 
Slakes 


challenging tasks as they stride 
to make foe National Stud a 
centre of excellence will be to fix 
stallion fees for I9S7 by 
endeavouring io strike a balance 
between what is commercially 
> iable and whai can be consid- 
ered reasonable under current 
market conditions. 

The six stallions under foe 
National Stud's management 
air Rousillon, Final Straw, 
Blakeney, Homing. Jalmood 
and Star Appeal. It is also 
intended to stand Petoski. the 
winner of the 1985 King George 
VJ and Queen Elizabeth Di- 
amond Stakes at Newmarket, 
but arrangements hu\e yet to be 
made final. 

Blinkered first time 

FOLKESTONE: 2.1S Csfliaq. Blairs 
Wmntt. 2.45 Kuns Wet 3 is Portv. 
415 W«tt« Palace. Jarue-O. WranqNoon. 
BEVERLEY: 3.30 GodKvd 4 0 TroBEO, 
Lone Gate*. Waienaun SO Mon 
CM* 

NOTTINGHAM: 545 Websiare Feast 
Foundry Flyer, Lsurw s Troian. CnotM 
Park. 715 tests Of Tune 


Eddery double 

Pat Eddery, in top form after a 
weekend double in Ireland, took 
his score to 127 wuh a 17-1 
double at Windsor yesterday on 
Strafoblane and Boon Point. He 
made all the running on both 
these John Dunlop-trained 
runners. 


FOLKESTONE 


f, low numbers best 

2.15 SAN DUNG SELLING HANDICAP (£704: 1m 2f) (11 runners) 

LjEtaraAQAVnson44-10 sboomtT 

IflScUMlHOTMISOa PCoefca 4 


1 000033 JUSTCANDD 

2 030/1 DO- FULLOP : 

3 310-004 NELSON'S LADYfBF) [Mrs J Jackson] C Horgoi 5-tM) MEMmvIO 

7 40-3000 VIA SATELUIE (8 MunroWtaxi) R Siropsoo 4-04 KRatfdMefos 

8 400000 HOKUSANffllMlB Stems 44-2 NOeyO 

084000 GflAMD CSLEBItA'nON (USA) (T Satkxd} R Simpson 4-4-13 S WMtaortb It 

0004)00 CSIUJWS TO (L*Jy Sato) P Baley 3-8-10 JWtant 

003320 Rem0Emsn2(mrCEnn«ADr<tan»M RFC* 5 

200000 BLACK SPOUT (Mrs E Rttinrds) H ONg* 54-7 SCatffcan* 

000000 BLASTS ¥HMWE TO CC-O1^4reDBotto0j PM Mfcftol 4-8-4 — PWatfiMlS 
000004 SOLENT DAWN (Ms M Saunders) WGM Turner 3-7-11 AMoCHoael 


5-2 Pteteorrs Lady, 10MO Just Cacxfcl, 4-1 FuO Of Spaed. 13-2 Grand CaWndon. 
8-1 Fleur da Ttustte, 12-1 Hokusan. 14-1 oOiere. 


Folkestone selections 

By Mandarip 

2 . 1 5 Nelson’s Lady. 2.45 Orient Line. 3. 1 5 Franchise. 3.45 Sarihah. 

4. 15 Longstop. 4.45 BRONZE OPAL (nap). 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.45 Ciren Jester.. 3-15 Reno Ralph. 3-45 Naive Charm. 4.15 
Dashing Light- 4.45 Exclusive North. 



hind (8f. £11 48-pood to fton. Afc.lS, 23 ranfc FUaiW Dg TWWTLg_{8-6) nhoft h aafl 2nd 
to Monoo Boy t^ta at Yarmouin £738, good to flrnuJuna ia 7 ran) on penuflimaie 

rat- _ 

SalacUon: NELSON* LAOY 

2.45 IVYCHURCH JUVENILE MAIDEN AUCTKM STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£959:6f)(11) 


0 ALAHOUNAKICapi H 
00 KNVS TICKET (B)(Vfl 
02 OMBi rLWEp Ltan 
00 CBENJESreftgtaS 
00 ROCK AL1TTLE fT||i 


0020 BALLANTIUE 
0 GTPSTS — 
0 HUSHWTtAW 
330 REMAMF« 



0 SABOTEUR {Mrs A 

■ wmAMpeerBj 


(Mn C Nbonj C M WHaro 82 


7-4 Ortwt Una, 11-4 Wnrt TUat. 9-2 Remain Frae, 8-1 Ala Howak. 18-1 
Batontnw. 14-1 Rock A LMb. 20-1 rthera. 

FORIfc ALA HOUNAKI 


E3477.OOOd.Augf 
25yds. £1126. goo 


i llili of 12 behind Most MWcame (wn at Naumartat (Of. 
r(8«2NISih to Vtatoiy BaJtartjM) at Yam»u!h(5f 

r ^j8aasAsaasH»fi»MUi 

H fl 9 701 to Carol'eTreasure (9-0} at Doncaatar J5I. £2396. 28. 9 ran). 

.... {8-1 1) 111 80i to Try The Duchess (8-11) at Le*caster(6f- 91300. good. June 

14. 15 ran). REMAW RtBE 98i last 1lme'(7fl; prevtously (83) 31 3rd Of 5 to Gray WbK 
TlgerjS-fi) aBatli^ jSMBTyds, £1180. fttn. July 51- 

3.15 APPLEDORE STAKES (£959: 1m 7f 100yd) (7) 

1 84 MGHFtELDS LAO (B 0«J Mttl. B SaiKtaa 44-7. 



154 FrancMsai 7-2 Reno FWtoh. 4-1 Cap Oaj Mood. 7-1 Seat Of Learning. 
10-1 Toms Treasure. 14-1 Porty. 281 HlgWIeWs Lad. 

FORM: HtGHFIELDS LAO (11-1) 22541 8th id Sadeem (10-13) Jn amwaufrt aeQrec e at 
Newmarkai flm it, £2 677. ' " " " 

12) lOtti. TOMS TREASt 

£1208. good. Ji8y ti. 12 

nALWl^3) beet Fwt Lk» . .. ^ J 

FRANCHISE (8-11) «l Warwick ureiner from Newquay (8-11). wtaneT anoe Ore re 
150yds. £706. good to fere. July 26, 5 ran). 

SetoctkHE FRM4CHISE 

3.45 PRIX DU TOUQUET NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £1^46 6f) (7) 
0122 5AIMHAH (USA) (Hanidan AMAafctOun^ H Thomson Jones 9-7 - Ajtaray S 

04310 TaBMWFUL£^»3g^7.11 IMP) I 

0100* GLORY BEE^ OT® KtaWLW? 7-10 SiwT.t 

300010 8l«FT PURCHASE w (C) (Wropourt R Hannon 7-7 — i OFreeek4 


2 

6 

7 

9 

11 

12 

13 


84 Make Charm, 3-1 Sadhah. 9-2 Telesto. M Okay Bee, 10-1 Telegraph FoHy. 
16-1 Swift Purchase. 20-1 MWdey Santo. - 

FORUfc SARIHAH (8-8 71 &Klto7 to Just A Butjarfll ^aTM nOi^.^ygjocidtoWTH. 

ran) 

Saiacdon: NAIVE CHARM ■* 


4.15 UTTIESTONE HANDICAP (£t^05: tm 4f) (10) 

WWAOE panjBA)Wg»l WWSra) R Nrah wt*»i p-. 


1 000002 

3 404000 

4 000403 GENTLE STREAM] 

5 300300 __ 

7 404323 OASHMGI 
9 030040 JANE-0) 

11 044003 WEIGHT! 

12 004004 MSS JAW ( 

13 0-3000 

14 000400 SUMJEY SPRIT] 


)PMatti444. 

IDltofteySW 

tyan 3-8-10. ^ 

kMbqfrnoiS44. 


PatEddaiyS 
. 8 AoumS 
SStataylO 
N Adam 7 
MHMaS 


[LftflWJvvU 3-7-12 LMggta (7) t 

Turf) S Christian 3-7-7 ■— S 


3-1 Vtotaw Port. 4-4 longs top . M Jm&X M GatW a Sfraaffn. M HregM Of 
Summer lOTSurfey Spirit. l£i WiMr PWaea. 14-1 ottatato- 



£4753. firm. 

3f. £2170. 

4JUCVUOVC 

445 DYMCHURCH STAKES (3-Y-O: C & G: £959: 7f)(T) 

2 000101 BRONZE OPAL (UStofMre E “ 

3 0010 C0WCB (USA) Lo(*Dl G HaWOOd 9tL...— — 

4 233041 EXCLUSWENOnTH (USA) (Dr C Li) R Armsuong M 

5 221 8JR ARNOLD (OyAmofi) A 

7 000 CAREBHM0riESS(TRani9danlMRyan87 

11 0 MWAH (FPyni) DONB 8-7 — 

02 USFAN (USA) (Prnn A EgiMl) J Oia4op87 


.OfitatayS 
SCwttaol 
MRotams 
notes 2 

»p)7 

f 4 


■s®?; 


2-1 Eadum North.' 10040 BranaOpaL 4-1 Uafan-S-I Grefcee. B-1 Sr Arnold. 
12-1 MuDah. 20-1 Career Madness ^ . ± 

FORM: BRONZE OPAL (9-0) aa w 61 Goodwood wi nn er from TsrtlEMft Dm, £*305. 
l«m. Aug 2. 1 1 ran), with &B|CES<9« was 7ft. whotiad previously (94) nadn- 
amobaat USFAl!fffl4J 31 at Kempton (7t. £2392. ffcm. Juhr 17. „ 

NORW (M) 21 Ssn&ren waaiarowSflca ChW 04) (1m. 0310. ^od to ftmAArW. 
* ram sRAfWQLO I8411 WFofttatonawinfta tW»B roetaP*a<wmaB-2lJ«. ass. 

10 ran), wHh CAREER MABNESS (94) taawn ftPtoar BXJ 5fc 


Get On Geraghty beats 
best time for race 


Get On Geraghty showed his 
liking for foe Newcastle track 
when landing his second win 
there in two weeks with a head 
victory over Stelby hi the open- 
ing Wansbeck Auction Stakes 
yesterday. The winner, hit the 
front two and a half furlongs 
out. but began to idle in foe 
hands of Gary Carter, and had 
to be ridden to hold oil 

Geoff HufTer. foe Newmarket 
trainer, said: "He is a good 
horse, and I might run him in 
foe Washington Singer Stakes at 
Newbury on Friday, or foiling 
that, foe Acomb Stakes at the 
York Ebor meeting.”Get On 
Geragbty's time of one minute 
I4J2 seconds beat foe race's 
best time of one minute 14.65 
seconds. The winner is owned 
by Michael Goaghty. a book- 
maker. and his. wife Christina 
owns Prospect Place, the third 
home. 

Catherines Well, who had 
been working promisingly with 
Wiganthorpe, who was fourth in 
Europe's richest juvenile race - 
the Heinz 57 Slakes at Phoenix 
Park on Sunday - kept up the 
fine winning run of 
Hippodromo Racing at New- 
castle yesterday. 

She swept to an easy two and 
a half lengths victory over Dark 
Promise in foe Northumberland 
Sprint Trophy with Hallgate. in 
the same ownership as the 
winner, a further head my 
third- 

Mick Easterby, foe -winning 
trainer said: “Wiganthorpe was 
sandwiched m his race in Ire- 
land. He could be my Gimcrack 
horse, but we win have to see”. 

Catherines WeU. powerfully 
ridden by Gary Carter ; surged 


ov er w ei ght on foe winner. 

The winner is one of 38 horses 
in training carrying foe colours 
of Hrppocromo, who have al- 
ready recorded 13 successes this 
season. 

Hallgate. who prefers softer 
ground, could make quick re- 
appearance in foe Great St 
Wilfred Handicap at Ripon on 
Saturday, provided foe nec- 
essary rain comes. 

Russell Teague, another tal- 
ented apprentice from Henry 
Candy's stable, gained the sec- 
ond success of his short career 
when bringing Gershwin to lead 
inside foe final furlong and win 
the Cookham Apprentice Sell- 
ing Handicap at Windsor 
yesterday. 

The Dan O'Donnell'irained 
gelding, a 6-1 chance, beat 
winning Format by two lengths, 
and was bought in for 4,100 
guineas. O’Donnell, who trains 
a small string at Lamboum. 
said: “That is the first time 
young Russell has ridden for 
me. He was recommended by 
Billy Newnes, and came down 
to ride Gershwin at home. They 
went wefL and did even better in 
foe race. Gershwin was dis- 
appointing at Brighton last time, 
but had a bad draw, and suffered 
traffic problems during foe 
race." 

Robert Williams, the New- 
market trainer, equalled his best 
season's total with newcomer 
Tiszta Sharok, a 12-1 shot, 
which landed the Long Acre 
Maiden Stakes. 

The Song filly, ridden by Ray 
Cochrane, took command well 
before the final ftiriong and ran 
on to beat Ebony Pride by two 
lengths. Williams said: "That is 


through to take up the running my 22nd winner, including four 
with three ftalongs still to travel, abroad- 1 thought this filly might 
Carter had to put up one pound need foe race. 


Newcastle results 

Gotogsgood 

Z36 (W 1, GET ON GERAGHTY (G 
Carter. Mfm2. State (A Proud. lO-lk 
3. Rrm p uc t me* (W Carson. 10-TL 
ALSO RAN: 10 WeNta Springs (4tW. 1i 
Joret Ssrvicas, 12 Fran chgata (5th). 33 
&nStey* Hwghte. 50 Shannon Lad* vBih). 
8 ran. hd7£ 2L *L 1»L G Huher at 
Newmarket. -To* El -30: El. 10. £230. 
£120. Of- £4.70. CSF- £5ii Imln 
14£2sac. 

3.10 flm IQ 1. CAPRICORN BLUE <0 
NfchoM. 5-2 favO: 2. Patrick*, star 1) 
Uwe. 10 - 1 : a Jafctalra (Gay Keflewav. 4- 
IV ALSO RAN-. 4-1 Tama*. Prtncttis {5tW. 
10-1 Rupert Brooke (&iL 12-1 Hare Hft 
m. 14-1 Galaxy Gaia. 9 ran. 2%L 11. H 
71. s. Ammy FtagonUd at Mater. Tote: 
S3.40; £1 JS6 OJO. £2.10. DF- £14.40. 
CSF- £2537 2m* 00.76see- No bid. 

145(B) 1. CATHERINES WELL fG 
Carter. 4-1); 2. Dark Promise (SPwIte. 1D- 
IV. 3. Hataate (W Caraon. 1 54 tajV ALSO 
RAN: ]3-2Quaita Rarri (4»V 70 Suncteed 
(5th). 10-1 Lochonoic. 14-1 vatMt*. 20-1 
Debtee Do 16 th). 50-1 Seoffly Pte^C- 9 
ran. 254L tei. 5L 21 . hd. M W EMtartiy at 
SheriQ Hutton. Tote: W30; SJ. 50. EZ2G. 
El . 20. DF- £1680- CSF- £3730. Imui 
1250sec. 

4.15<tnr)1.0HALEEM(W R SwWwm. 
5-1): 2 . Dwtrakte r (M Robwra. M-« 
Ktan (Gay Keteway. 5-1) ALSO RAIt * 
2tav High Conduct ( 6 th). 8-1 HwwadL.9-1 
Pepencn. 12-1 Bell Wather. 25-1 1 Turn am 
Bade Jack (5th). 33-1 Avada (4th). jC-l 
Greek Mtwc. Smw .J 0 ^ 1 

BtehraowLaf. Conantmont Dnjinbarra, 
SuparTiuckar. Tknsteo. Togdato. 18 tm . 
VtL 1 L 51 . 1 *l. M Stoito 3 l^martefc 
TOte: 050: 0.10. £4.40, £1.90. DF- 
nzon CSF- SS&5*. Iron 44.B9sec. 

4X5(71)1. MAROUJANA. 

114k £ StotertU Lpwa., 

Bantw (M Hmdley. 7^)- Ali. . . . 

tev Rosseu (5th). W 8-1 

Double CM (4th). Nno Goto. Jfri 

IHoCa'Bt'Corartwn. Ttfj: E5|0: £1^, 
£1 70. d.BO. DF- £1620. CSF' OQ.1&. 
Tricast 2153.46. Him Z7.S1S9S. 

8.15 (2m) 1. JUMSPRUDB4CE JN 
Connoncn. 8-11 2. TteaUder (G 

Dlfhawn (Sth). fl-1 Walter Tt» OretoPW- 


Sememe. 50-1 1 


2KL i*. 12- J W Vlterts al Wchmond Tote 
£170: £1.10. £1^0. El-20 DF- £5.00. 
CSF £7 12. 3n*i 40.65sec 
Ptocepot E7 J5. 


Windsor 


st r a i ght couras. good; remainder 
to firm 

2J0 (601. GERSHWIN (RTaagua.6-1t 
2. Winning Format (G Landau. 7-lk 3, 
P8tUhwtenBeOe(SWWttere,33-1LALSO 
RAN: 4 fav less Venezuela, 11 Pe rata n 
Bazaar. 6 Jacqulr Joy. 8 Absteutaty 
Bonkers (5th), Bao. 14 Sunk Wane (4re). 
16 Gaywood Sri. 25 Private Sub. Sea 
Shanty. Someway <6tn>. 33 Nignt Of The 
Coma. Fo»y Aj^tl 15 raa 2L nk, *L a 
2»L D O'DormaU at Upper Lamtxjom. 
Tot* £6.70: E2.40. SHOO. E3J0. DF- 
£44.70. CSF: E47S4. Tticaat £1187.66. 
wmnar txwgte in. 

34 (50 1. TISZTA SHAROK (R 
Cochrane. 12-1): Z Ebony Pride (4 RaM, 
12-1): 3. Boca D* Boteogne (S Catithen. 3- 
1). ALSO RAN: 5-4 tev Rank The Btak. 6 

Update GaL 15-2 Sky Bott (8th). 2S Kept 

WaiOng, 33 Shannon 
4th). Ri 




(4th). Regal Rhythm (5th). 10 ran. 
Father Tima. 2*. )L 9. *1 U R WWama at 

Newmarket Tote: E14J0; £3.0a El 70. 

£1.80. DP £16830. CSF: £132.74. 


RAN:4 jt-tav 


Mr 


tenaga (Mh). 6 Oanctog 

Mumbtea. GoWorina. B ' 


9-2 

H 

ran. NR-. Sonar 


Country. HI, «L 21. 1»l SI. J Dontop a 

AftrfdSL TOte: £4 JO; £1 .6a £120. &20. 
DF- £12.10. CSF- tSZOd. 

4 M (Un 70yd) 1. CANADIAN STAR (T 
Luces. 9-4 w); 2, Windsor Knot (Pad 
Eddery. 12-1): 3. Hit The Heidrts (T 
Wi Items. 7-1). ALSO: 92 Bundabuna, 6 
Fee* Loona 13-2 Court Bertrand, 10-1 
New Central (Bttfl. 12 Fast Sennee (5th). 
14 Avar Coeur (4th). 16 Ponogror. 50 

Aqaba Pnnca II ran. VL *12SM. ML 1LM 

Jarvtg at Newmarket. Tote: £3 JO: £1 SO. 
£3.10. £1.60. DP £27.00. CSF- £2886. 
Trrcast El Bl 56. After an objection and a 
stewards' enquiry the result stands. 


RAN: 16 Pyjama Party (4th). 66 No Border 
15th). Cteavaga ( 6 th). Ratum To Tara. 
Rockhold Process. Sharp Reel. 9 ran. 11 , 
41. 151. a. 71 J Dunlop at ArundeL Tola 
£3.40. £1.10. E1.40/E1 10. DF- £7.40. 
C 8 P £1926. 

54 (Im 31 150yd) 1 . SWEET ALEXAN- 

DRA IA Madtay, 5-1): 2. F«B Sneed 
Ahead (PW Eddery. 13-2): 3. Up To Unde 
(A McGlone. 7-2 nv): 4. God's Hope (P 
COok. 13-2). ALSO RAN: 15-2 Kuwait 
Moon. Socks Up. 12 (aom Dart ( 6 th). 14 
PUkaumy. 16 Capuiet Liamora (fttn. 20 
Hatewed. Rusting. 25 Toucher Le Bos. 

33 Homeward. Mossaut. II Pontevec ch a. 

16 ran. iftl. «L hi. hd. a J Shaw at 
Newmarket. TOte: £5.00; £230. E1J0. 
£1.30. £2.40. Of £7730. CSF £39.19. 
Tricast £122.78. 

Pteeapat£74J0 


Today’s course specialists 


FOLKESTONE 

ntAUHRSc G Harwood. 42 wmnsre from 
ids runners. *x£%: ft Simpson. 11 from 

52. 21 2V F Durr. 7 from 42. 16.7^5. 

JOCKEYS: G Starkey, 30 wlnnera from 87 
ndes. 345%. S Caulhen. 13 from 54. 
24 1%. Pat Eddery. 12 hum 57 21 1%. 

BEVERLEY 

TTUUNEN9: P CoK. 6 wtnners horn 16 
runners. 40DV M Stouta. 19 from 58, 
32.8V C Thom ton. 15 from 62. 242* 


JOCKEYS: W R Swkitxmi. 18 wiroers 
from 61 ndes. ?9£%; M Both. 37 from 
127. 29 IV W Ryan. 14 from 70. 20.0% 

NOTTINGHAM 

TRAINERS: C Tinkler. 6 wmnara from 30 
runners. 20.0%. B HanteFV. 8 from 54, 
14 8*«. J Du mop. 13 from 98. 132*# 
JOCKEYS: Pat Eddeiy. 24 winners from 
1 1 1 tides. 21 6% W Carson. 21 from 147 
14.3V Paul Eddery. 17 from 141 121% 


Western Dancer doubtful for repeat Ebor victory 


Western Dancer, 8-1 second 
favourite to win next week's 
Tote Ebor Handicap at York for 
the second consecutive year, is a 
doubtful runner. 

Western Dancer's trainer Con 
H organ said at Windsor this 
afternoon: ‘‘Western Dancer 
was walking round verv dead on 
Saturday, and we found he bad a 
temperature of 102. Sunday was 
the same, but although he was a 
bit brighter this morning, a 


setback like that is too dose to 
the race for my liking. I want to 
make an early decision to save 
more people backing him, but if 
i can canter him tomorrow 
there's hope. I'll definitely make 
a decision tomorrow. At the 
moment, though he's 99 per 
cent certain not to run.** 
Western Dancer won foe 
£41.000 added York handicap 
last year by two mid a half 
lengths and has been running 


well again this season, having 
won the Lad broke Chester Cup 
in May. Several of Hotgan's 
horses have been under the 
weather in recent uecks. 

• William Hill, the book- 
makers, make the Guy Harwood 
trained colt Primary 9-2 
favourite for the Tote Ebor. 
Other prices are: 12 High Ten- 
sion. 14 Russian Noble. Special 
Vintage, Stately Form and 
White Mill. 


BEVERLEY 


to firm 

Draw: 9! and above high numbers best 

230 WOODHALL WAY AUCTION STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£1 ,631: 5t) (15 runners) 

G Dufflrid 13 



a GASCON NCHR 0 MoaTOMd 8-5 . 
040 MAYSPARK H Rotten 8-5.. 


00 MR BERKELEY CTnlter 8-5.. 

15 322 ROYAL CROFTER (BF| M H Etstefty S5 MBrJi7 

16 00 THE DEVIL'S MUStt NT 

17 0314 KALA*SD4AGEt 

22 OVERNITEi 

25 

26 4020 HAZEL'S GML M Brian 7-12 KDartey 15 

27 0 LEADMGWRENR Thompson 7-12 G King (5)3 

28 00 MBS BHLYDCmjman 7-12 SPtMffttaU 

29 PARK FROUCSW Wlaron 7-12 NCteMal 

5-2 Royal Crofter. 3-1 Lradng Player. 10030 Kate's 

image. 5-1 (litre Nova, 10-1 Dancing Bette, 12-1 Hazel's GUI. 
14-fomers. 


ur l oi inrj m n eas»rw o-a — , m oroi i 

.*6 MUSK N Bycroft 8-5._-_ L Otanocft 6 

IAGEtC4)G MOOT 8-4 AUactay2 

J SENSATION T Barron 8-1 — I 

04 VOL VITESSE (ffl) R Whaaker B-1 DMcKeown S 

020 HAZELS GnLMbrinan 7-12 


Beverley selections 

By Mandarin 

230 Dancing Belle. 3-0 Upland Goose. 330 Bold 
Archer. 4.0 Tropica. 430 Signore Odone. 5.0 The 
UonbearL 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

3.0 MetelskL 4.0 Tropica 430 Topeka Express. 

5.0 Spy Gift 

By Michael Seely 

3.30 Missel fore. 4.0 ST JAMES'S RISK (nap). 
5.0 Spy Gift. 


16 0310 CHABLiSSE (C-tftR Whtakflr 3-8-0 DMcXmw»16 

17 0000 G0DL0R0 (B) T Taylor 6-8-0 A Proud B 

19 0000 TEEJAY (Cl P Bwan 7-7-10 — 11 

21 00*0 BLACK RNERMHEaMait»S-7-8 JUm*7 

25 -000 HSSaF0HEPWafcM)37-7._ . A Mackay 2 

26 3003 SMART MART (8X0 MCtendiO 7-7-7 M Fiy 5 

9-2 Smart Mart. 5-1 Rapid Lad. 6-1 Black Rivar. 

RastoraOon. 8-1 Msm80k». Pvsteng. Cadenatte. Lotus 
Pnncass. 10-1 Bold Archsr. Chabftssa. 14-1 ottwra 

40 HENGATE CLAIMING STAKES (3-Y-O: £1311: 
1 m 100yd} (12) 

1 1000 TAXI MAN K Stott 9-4 —10 

2 00-0 QUICKEN TIC BID JWlntar 9-0 

5 0001 ROSI NOA (FR) P KeRaray 8-11 — Gay Kc8awayp)1 

6 on ON WATER M Prescott 8-10 GOnflteW12 

7 0-00 ST JAMES'S RISK P Makln 8-10 TOntaS 

9 2310 TROPK»(BXBF)P Hasten 66 TWOtanall 

12 0000 LONE GALAXE (USAKB)RSUMB 86 JH Brawn (5)3 

14 0 TAUFAST M Bnoain 62 KDartey 5 

15 400 CLOUDLESS SWfH Bohan 6-1 S Monts t 

16 006 FAIR ZMNUH Rohan 8-1 JBteasdate7 

17 0000 LADY AT71VAH Rohan 8-1 A dark 2 

21 0000 WA1ENDLATH (B) E KteynteS 7-11 MFry6 

7-Z Troptco, 4-1 Far Zfcmia. 9-2 St James's Rtek. Si Rote 
Noa. 13-2 Lady Attrva, Si CkxxSoss Sky. 10-1 Lone Gatooe. 
12-1 oinars. 

430 MANOR ROAD HANDICAP (£1,581: 7f 100yd) 
(19) 

1 ran SIGNORE OOONE (C)MH Easterby 4-10-0 M BMi II 

2 tyoo BURNWG ARROW KMdgMtw 46-11 P n o Mn a nn H 

3 -200 BVROVISE A Smth 36-11 S Wetater 19 

5 4202 GOU> CHi» JW WteBs 366 NConoortMitt 

6 3100 RAPD ACTION € Moore 566. JBk*»ttete12 

7 <020 T0P«A EXPRESS (USAXBRRArmsO^^^^^ 

9 004 R.YRW ZIAD (CAN) A Btetey 3-6-5 JC«r(7)3 

10 4000 TOP O' 1H* LANE NByreoft 96-5 LChareockl 

11 0000 REMEWRANCERPaacoek564 CDwyerlO 

12 0000 MR PANAO* (C) M Chapman 4-6-3 IJahmoo15 

CREE J Ettwrmgton 466 M Wood 9 

_ . .. KDartey? 

18 -OOO CLOIKUA TO PCahrw 4-7-12 M Fly 2 


14 /OOO GREY 

15 0200 CHARMMG VIEW H Jonas 462 

16 0043 KAMARESS M Bnttan 4-8-1 


3.0 LADYGATE SELUNG HANDICAP (£924: 1 m 4f) 
(13) 

2 0002 DUSAVARNA C&sy 56-1 1 NCorwortoeS 

3 m THE RUSK F Jordan 569 ACtericIT 

4 VStn METEISM (8) G Btere 56-7 MR to— r9 


DKX KNIGHT « K Ewvy 556 A 

EARL'S COURTS ft Frencte 1666 

UPLAW GOOSE H Rohan 566 


5 W) MAJESTIC STAR A Batting 96-7 E Guest (3)12 

6 4030 MUSICAL WBJ. (SI TFaMaast 466 QDufMdS 

7 406 ROYAL VALBR P Bevan 6-9-5 “ 

8 2000 

11 MD0 

13 ran 

14 060 BUSHY BAY (to M Chapman 166-12 
17 0013 MAX CU7WNTOgF)WWtarion 366. C Balter ^10 


(S|2 

S Webster 1 

D Mcbols 4 
I Johnson 6 


ia OOW PORTO IRENE uTuckar 666 ... _ 

19. 0000 JUBILANT LADY D Chapman 56-3 J rtte fl o w ka r (7) » 

116 Meretski. 52 Max Ctown. 6-1 Musical WW. Upland 
Goose. 8-1 Dueavams. 10-1 Royal Vateur. 14-1 others. 

330 WEDNESDAY MARKET HANDICAP (£2,341: 
1m 21) (16) 

2 1400 RAPID LAD ffMflBF) J8pBWing 666— PMdioBtl 

4 0140 LOTUS PROCESS K BridgrtMr>-9-2 PtfAreyS 

5 0000 ELARM (C-D) T FaHaate7-8-13 GDafMdS 

6 3220 PERSHING (BR J Laigti 56-12 TNea13 

8 603 RESTORATION Q0SSert46-1Z_ N Rodgers (7) 12 

9 060 DAWN SPWTMChwraw 46-7 IJohtaonM 

10 BOW MEXICAN MU. (FKIRHol 


12 0440 CASHEW PONG 

13 4210 CADETCTTE 
15 2010 BOLD 




Hoteitehead 4-67 — SParicsTS 

B McMahon 366 — « 

466 P Robtaeon 10 


362 
CYteUar(3)4 


19 3000 M0NSTROSA J Spaarevj 3-7-10 T 

20 0002 HOPTONS CHAINS Vfees 4-76 MLTtaoaufi 

22 ZOO- CAROUSEL NOUGAT GOI*»d 4-7-7 —5 

24 04» HARK MY CARD C Thornton 3-7-7 J Lowe 14 

25 0003 THE GOLF SUDE BMcMabOR 4-7-7 AMactay17 

4-1 Gold Crvp. 9-2 Signora Odone. IT-2 tmoroWs*. 

6-1 Kvnaxess. 7-1 Hop»ns Chance. B-1 Charming View. ID 
The God State. 12-1 rebars. 

SJ0 MINSTER MOORGATE MAIDEN STAKES 
(2-Y-O: £1.017: 71 100yd) (19) 

■ 1 400 ALBION PLACE (FR)MH Easterby 96- KHodgaonS 

2 0 ALLOUSH L FNqgod 9-0 BCresateylO 

3 03 ALPENMRN GPrrtchmTl-Gortion 96.. W Ryan 4 

4 30 BROTHER PATRICK t PiogoB 96 TMttJ 

5 0 COLNEY HEATH LAD JSStalnfl 56 _ DNlchoJUTB 

6 • FALLING LEAF MPreacOtt 96 GDuHWdS 

9 0 WEROFALCOFDuir96_, A Clark 7 

10 3 LAW BECK J Jefferson 96 l Cham** 1 

11 04 MELnR0VEJEmerogton96 M Wood 9 

13 04 MON COEUR (B)C Ontam 50 P Rnktesoo 15 

14 ORSTOU. DANCER (DEN) LPiogpd 96 MFoacaid 14 

17 0 SOMBRERO GOLD RWhtakorMTK Bradshaw ®T3 

18 00 SPARKLER BOY F Carr 96 JCatr(7)2 

21 02 THE LIONHEART B H<*S 66 B Thomson 19 

24 00 ACCUSTOWD (USA) M JarvtK 8-1 1 — W Woods (3) t2 

25 2200 CARSE KELLYS Norton 8-11 J Lows 3 

28 FLAUNTING MW (Women 8-11 — RHH>17 

29 03 SPY OTTM Scute 6-11 WRSarWaanTT 

30 404 HUNK HAVONO Motley 8-11 MIMS 

3-1 The UonftaarL 9-2 Alpenhorn. 5-1 Spy (31ft, 

116 Brother Patrick. 8-1 Lamb Back. 10-1 Malgrow. Thank 
Hawn. 12-1 Cana Ka»y. 14-1 others. 


NOTTINGHAM 


Going: good 

Draw: 5f-6f, high numbers best 

5.45 LAMBLEY HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1^91: 5f) 
(13 runners) 

2 0003 IASS KNOW ALLR7SA) (D) 6 l^s 9-7 ACntane(7)7 

5 0204 WEBSTERS FEAST (Bj (DJ M McCotroack 61 

VNnvm 19 

6 040 FOUNDRY FLYERTO A Btatey 8-12 P BtorenfleW 9 

7 3821 ARDafT PARTNER RHokter 8-10 (7ax)_. S Dataoa 2 

8 MM QLEADHBi. PARK TO K Braseey 8-9 — SWMwerthS 

9 2222 MUS1CREVCWffimiTompka«86^RCQcteaiw4 
10 -000 LAURIE’S TROJANTO CAM 86 J Leech (7)11 

A Shoutts (5) 5 


14 82 SOMETHING EXTRA P Cote 96. TQoUiS 

17 0 SUNOWUS JGkw90 0McKeowe2 

20 W WOTOMAN WEAVER J Douglas-Home 96 WNawm 3 
7-4 Something Em. 5-2 Mad Max. 9-2 Kings Victory, 
6-1 Ooflar Seeker. 6-1 Ccxrwnontedr Gipsy. 14-1 oiners. 


11 0000 CHORAL PARK MW Wharam 86 

12 0020 PACKAGE PERFECTION TFMTKM 6-5 

JCMHhnlf)] 

IS 0030 JACQtf JOY TOKtvoryB-4 NCM4nte^12 

14 -430 TOLLrS ALE I Msttncws 84 Q Carter (3)1 

15 3040 LEFT RKDfT Mrs N Maoutey 86 PateEdtanrtt 

16 0000 HOBOURNEG KATE RHollneheid 7-13 — P HO (7)6 
9-4 Muuc Review. 7-2 Ardent Partner. S-1 Mtes Know-AS. 

7-1 Webssrs Feast HM Loft RitfiL 12-1 Jacqui Joy. Package 
Rerfactoft. 20-1 others. 


Nottingham selections 

5.45 Ardeni Partner, 6.15 Rosie's Glory. 6.45 
Dollar Seeker. 7.15 Pentland Hawk. 7.4S Lost In 
France: 8.15 Music MinstrcL 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
5.45 Music Review. 6.45 Mad Max. 7 15 Simon's 
Fantasy. 7.45 Bananas. 8.15 Sun StreoL . 


7.15 STRETTON AUTOMATICS SUMMER 
HANDICAP (£3,078: 1m 2f) (18) 

1 3MB BUSTED FLAVOUR W J&nrts 56-10_... R Cochrane 12 

2 001 D PENTIANO HAWK fD) ft Kotashead 36-7. SPerki2 

40086 HKM FOREST MtencMfla 466 RUnas(3)7 

5 060 8WISS NEPHEW (BF) J Duriop 3-94 WCarunS 

6 OOOI CATCH THE THATCH OHtWSi Jonas 566... — 14 

7 0083 VEROMCA ANN C Nelson 36-13 JRekflO 

8 0004 COLEMAN HAWK1KS P Maldn 36-11— TOMB 

9 -000 MISTRAL MAGIC P MaU 3610 BThomonU 

10 0000 MANABrt-S Sownng 466 A Prood 3 

12 086 GUEST IMAGE G Laws 467 T Cocas 4 

14 3410 SMEWS FANTASY (DKBQ R Armstrong 367 

G Baxter 11 

15 0004 ADHARI B Harbuiy 367 Pat Eddery 1 

17 QOOO GREGORIAN CHANT PWWwyn 36-4 Paul Eddery 15 

18 603 FILM CONSULTANT J BOStey 464 — IJoUmmS 

19 -400 STRICTLY BUSneSS TO RWhokar 460 

DMckeownIB 

20 0300 MOTS OF TOE TO I Bakang 3-7-13.^.. WNrwtMl7 

25 -000 SIRDAR FLYER Mrs C Ream 3-7-10 — G0(ck*13 

26 2044 REGENCY SQUARE PFHdn 3-7-7 A Mackay 6 

156 Veronica Arm. 3-1 Cotanan Hreriune. 6-1 Panttend 
Hawk. Ssoon's Fantasy. 8-1 Swiss Nephew 12-1 Regency 
Square. 16-1 others. 


7.45 HEMLOCK STONE MAIDEN STAKES (£1.372: 
1m 20 (12) 


S (USA) O Pwiteb 96 
I D O Donne* 96 


6.15 COL WICK PARK SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£962:80(11) 


000 GOLD STATE W Wharton 8-11 
MAX STAR W Mac* la 8-11 


. HCa£ste7 

.. —5 


_ Fat Eddery 10 

WNowmsI 

96 RCocfaraaa12 

W Canon 8 

S Whdwarlh? 
C Dwyer 11 
MRnaaer3 


RAGTWE PARTY Bon Thompson 8-11 RPEMutt2 


9 0004 RA1NTBEE COUHTY (B) P Ftegare 8-11 -RCnchrane 9 

11 4W SLOPUfC FOR BEK RHoBer 8-11 JRtalll 

12 1300 BINGO QUEEN J Baity 86 _J Carrol (7) 4 

17 LANE PATROL KBndnnlar 86 PifArcy B 

19 0013 MiSSSfflARiQNDfBF} NTnUer 84. Km Twtoer R 3 

20 0002 RECORD FUQHT R Hodgas 86. __.RQmnt10 

22 00 ROSIER QLORYCTmMar 86 M Wood 1 

25 00 T1LLOUJODHqWiJm*86 DWBfams(7)6 

2-1 M to Drummond. 4-1 Rafenraa Corow, 11-2 Stewtaio 
For Beds. 6-1 Bern Queen. Recort mam. 10-1 Ftocte's Glory. 
14*1 otfiera. 


6.45 EBF NOTTINGHAMSHIRE MAIDEN STAKES 

(2-Y-O: £1,725:6f) (10) 

2 020 COttMDHSOR GtPSV 0 Bttnren 96 —7 

3 DOLLAR SEEKER (USA) M Ryan 86 R Cochrane 4 

6 42 KINGS VICTORY M Usher 9-fl MWRnl 

7 D HRCWAN G Hutrar 96-_ O Carter (3)0 

8 43 HAO MAX P Hastem 96. TWHtamsS 

10 0000 MHTER WIZARD (B) MFrsm 86 CRWW»1 
13 o REGALCROFTO Haydn Joms 96 D WBtams (7) 10 


T 234 BANANAS 

8 HUDSON 

9 0423 MOONSTRUCK. 

10 D OUR HERO JDimlOp 

14 0 STORUGHT FREDDIE KBreaaey 96 

16 0 ASCOffllT S Bowmg 8-11 

17 03 BAYTINO H CoOngndM 8-11 ___ 

20 DM UNASHGWara>lT Paul Eddery B 

21 860 LOST M FRANCE B HUB 8-11 BUmmreal 

22 IMQ UAOC TOWER C BnrtWi B-Il G Baxter 2 

23 m MALADETOC G HuR0r8-11 G Carta (3) 4 

38 OFOO 9TOttl.YCBOoto8.1l TLuctaS 

5-4 Bananas. 5-2 Moonstruck, 8-i Baytmo. 8-1 Our Hero. 
14-1 Lnash. 1 B-1 Magic Tower. 25-1 others. 


8.15 BYRON HANDICAP (E1.5Q& 2m) (13) 

Pst Eddery 12 
A darks 9 
I Johnson 1 
. —13 
. P Kfl (7) 6 
SVINMMb5 
J Raid 4 


3 4002 StM STREET CBniSM 467 

5 0303 SWP90UWJEG Htnwod 366.~ 

6 620 COMHAAOTON F Yardtey 563— 

7 086 DEW R Hekter 568 . , . 


TO 0243 OtMORKUMO) R Hobtsnead 7611 

12 004- HASHOOD fUSAi hir* N Mkujm S6S 

13 0014 MUSIC MINSTREL (C) C Ntaron 369... . 

14 0002 NflGKTS HBR H wrung 567— W Woods Q)3 

15 600 QUICX REACTIOM M Ryan 365 RCoctem7 

16 40H ALFCDKWNSTORHrtanhaad&M WRynll 

17 06 FRANCISCOS C Miter 9-66 JWHUamiS 

18 4000 CROOK N HONEST R Holder 460... .. A Proud ID 
20 0030 BOREHAM DOWN NBycrefl 7-76 M RtetanteM (7) 2 

7-2 Sun Strrei 4-t Quadnaton. 61 Shto&eurne. 
13-2 Kragte Heir. 8-1 Muse Minstrel ID-1 Alfa Dskina. 
12-1 Dew. 161 others 


For whom 
the sky 
is simply 
the limit 


Simon 

Barnes 


It is not just a matter of flying 
straight al the son and falling 
backwards out of the sky- Yon 
must plunge cowards the earth 
precisely. Fur degrees out and 
you've lost another mark: no 
point in all soar vomit- making 
stall tarns and tail-slides unless 
you can do them with 
micrometre precision. 

The Volkswagen World Aero- 
batic Championships are cur- 
rently taking place, and the 
grass at Somh Ceme? in 
Gloucestershire is covered with 
lough butt) little planes that 
come from ihe United States, 
Russia. Australia and every- 
where In Europe. They will spin 
and roll, defiant of each other, 
until August 17 as they battle 
through for complex maces of 
the competition. 

The aeroplanes may be 
painted in the most cheerful 
colours, but there is no disguis- 
ing their ugliness. They are not 
sleek and elegant: they are as 
ruthlessly functional as a pistol. 
They need lobe: they are built to 
take stresses of 12G. "Du these 
manoeuvres in a weekend pilot's 
plane, and you'll just tear it 
apart. Kail out of the sky." one 
pilot said. 

The aeroplanes are specially 
adapted for the job. if not 
specially built. The Ccechs. it is 
true, fl) factory -built planes, 
which is perhaps typical, but (hr 
French planes are tailor-made 
fur the indhidnal pilot, which is 
equally lypkaL 

The man oeuvres themselves 
are stunning, appalling, un- 
believable. Humpty -bumps and 
negative flick manoeuvres and 
two-point hesitation rolls: these 
gymnasts of the air. more often 
upside down than the right way 
up, with their screaming, 
protesting engines, and their 
brightly coloured power tools of 
aeroplanes ... they must be 
having the most tremendous fun 
as they burn np the sky. 

“Actually no.” said Peter 
Kynsey. the British captain, 
stepping from his bright blue 
and yellow machine after his 
second phase flight. “Right now. 
I feel as if I hate a slight 
hangover. But I am quite pleased 
with my flight. No major errors, 
anyway.” 

Hangover? "WelL it is mostly 
the negative G forces (hat do 
that — the flying upside down, 
the ’nanoeuvres that throw you 
against the straps and throw the 
blood to your head. No one can 
take too much of it. If yon were 
to sit with me, you would start to 
grey-out almost as soon as we 
got going-The body docs get 
used to sustaining these G 
forces, but even so. when I have 
a full day of practice I can't do 
more than three 15-minute 
sessions.** 

Kynsey flies for an air taxi 
firm by trade, and is in the 
competition at his own expense. 
"One small error and y ou've lost 
your chance for two years and 
wasted all the time and money 
that brought you here. 

"It is exciting and challeng- 
ing, seeking the exactness, foe 
precision of tine. Sometimes air 
show flying, where anything 
goes, is great fpn. Bat this is 
different." Yes: Kynsey is ap 
there trying to ru something. 
He is hurling his stnbby little 
plane aronnd the sky in pursuit 
of perfection and a kind of 
beauty: but above all he is 
seeking victory. For all sports- 
men, even those with their heads 
in the clouds, beauty is only ever 
a means to aq end. 


KARATE 

Experience 
is key to 
third title 

By Nicolas Soames 

Although there exists no 
apparent historical, physical or 
financial reason for it, no coun- 
try has been able to match the 
sheer consistency of success 
achieved by Britain in the leam 
event of the world champion- 
ships. Britain first won the c\ ent 
in 1475. beating Japan on its 
way to ihe title. 

In Taiwan in 1982, a new- and 
exciting British team, featuring 
Jeff Thompson, who went on to 
win the individual heavyweight 
inle. and foe Scot. Pat McKay, 
who won foe middleweight title, 
again brushed foe Japanese 
aside and then crushed Italy in 
foe final. It was a victory 
repeated even more devastat- 
ing!^ two years later in Holland. 

This weekend, the national 
squad of the British Karate 
Federal ion gathers at Crystal 
Palace fora training session that 
will conclude with formal selec- 
tion for the the 8th World 
Championships, taking place in 

Sydney from 3 to 6 October. 

And the question that will be on 
everyone's lips is whether it is 
within the reach of the British 
team to take force world leam 
titles m succession. 

Jeff Thompson and Pat Mc- 
Kay are almost certain to be 
selected again, despite the fact 
that they- are both 28 years old. 
The charismatic Vic Charles 
also fought in the 1484 team, 
and has managed to retain his 
fitness and speed even though 
he is 32. 

Thomas, aged 21. a middle- 
weight. is sure to win a place in 
foe individual competition, but 
whether his youth and relative 
lack of height will count against 
him in the prestigious team 
competition — where there arc 
no weight categories, with foe 
result that height and reach is of 
t importance — remains to 
seen. 

It could be argued that it wtis 
foe quick adaptation bv the 
British fighters to foe sports 
environment, with phvsical 
training especially geared io 
sports requirements, that 
brought them their success, even 
though the British team has only 
a fraction of grant aid com- 
manded by other leading karate 
countries 


■ v 






CRICKET 


Walsh reaches 
wicket 

century against 
Middlesex 

By Richard Streeton 


CHELTENHAM: Gloucester- 
shire. with seven first innings 
u ickets in hand are 2SS runs 
behind Middlesex. 

Courtney Walsh, 

Gloucestershire's spindly fast 
bowler from Jamaica, look his 
1 00 th wicket of the season 
yesterday, the earliest date the 
feat has been achieved for 15 
years. Otherwise, though. 
Gloucestershire. the 
championship leaders, had lit- 
tle solace on a day shortened 
by min and bad light. 

Gloucestershire had to con- 
tend with three interruptions 
when their innings started on 
.a wet pitch, which yielded 
awkward lift to the last 
bowlers. Romaines was 
caught behind first ball and 
Daniel took a -second wicket 
when he bowled Wright 
Bainbridge edged a catch into 
the slips off Rose just before 
the end. 

After overnight thunder- 
storms left the held drenched, 
Middlesex, resuming at 502 
for five, let their innings run 
its course when a start was 
possible at half past two. They 
added a further 47 runs in 
even time before they were all 
out Walsh, by Saturday's 
close, had taken 98 wickets — 
and reached 1 00 after dismiss- 
ing Carrand Rose, the seventh 
and ninth men out. 

Carr hit a high return catch 
and Rose's off stump was hit 
as he made room. Walsh 
finished with 5 for 95, the 
tenth time this season he has 
taken 5 or more wickets in an 
innings. He has had fO or 
more in a match on four 
occasions. 

This was Walsh's 18th 


match this summer — he 
missed Gloucestershire’s away 
game with Northamptonshire 
- and his high wicket fre* 
quency rate is shown by his 
seasonal figures. He has now 
bowled 659.1 overs and his 
100 wickets have cost 17.1! 
each. After the championshjp 
programme ' was reduced in 
1969. the earliest date on 
which 100 wickets has been 
reached was August 5 by 
Lance Gibbs in 1971. 

Since Gibbs, the earliest 
date has been August 17 by 
another West Indian, Andy 
Roberts, in 1974. In all cricket 
history, the earliest date for 
100 wickets has been June 12, 
bv J T Heame (Middlesex) in 
1§96 and C W L Parker 
(Gloucestershire) in 1931. 

AT CHELTENHAM 
MIDDLESEX: first Innings 
W N Slack c Romanies b Lawrence — 47 
A J T Mdfer c Curran b Bainbndge _ 32 

K R Brown c Russell b Walsh 66 

R O Butcher c Romaines D Walsh — 33 

C T Radley tow b Walsh 15 

J D Carr c and b Walsh 68 

*tP R Downton c Curran b Lawrence 46 

GDHOSOb Welsh 9 

S P Hughes c Curran b Lawranca — 5 

W w Darnel b Lawrence 0 

N G Cowans not out 8 

Extras (lb 13. w 2, nb 7] — _22 

Total 349 

100 ovens: Z72 lor 5. 

FALLOF WICKETS: 1-63.2-104.3-161. 4* 
206. 5-223. 6-326. 7-327. fr341 . 9-341 , IQ- 
349. 

BOWLING: Walsh 35-9-95* Lawrence 
25.1-2-112-4: Bainbridge 10-2-16-1; 
Graveray 32-10-62-0; Lloyds 17-3-51-C. 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE: Firm hmngs 
PW Romaines c Downton bOamal — 0 

K P Tormina not out 35 

A J Wnghl b Dame! 13 

P Bambridge c Brown b Rosa 9 

tfl C Russell rw out 0 

Extras (nb 4) 4 

Total (3 wtds, 23 overs) 61 

A w Stovqld. K M Curran. J w Lloyds. -o A 
Graveney. C A Walsh and D A Lawrence 
to bat. 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-0, 2-19. 3-48. 

Bonus points: Gtoucasterehire 2. Middto- 
sex 4. 

Umpires: C Cook and J H Hampshire. 



TENNIS 





1 * 

; ■ : ti 


■ r-J *. • f - 


-y;*, .. ,; v .£vr . 


Jesty century as 
Surrey close in 


By Peter Marson 

Trevor Jesty made 103 not 
oul and Monte Lynch 72 not 
oui. as Surrey closed up behind 
Warwickshire at The Oval, 
yesterday. When rain fell in late 
afternoon, Surrey shouldered 
arms in the 83rd over, at 286 for 
four. At the start, five minutes 
and 13 overs had been lost, 
presumably because some areas 
dose to the pitch had not yet 
dried out following rain during 
the night. Among a handful of 
spectators present, some had 
found the delay baffling. 
Radford conceeded 22 runs in 
five overs before retiring suffer- 
ing from what was Lhoufpu to be 
the start to a bout of influenza. 
Newport replaced him. and it 
was he who took the second 
wicket, that of Butcher, whose 
intended hook finished up in 
Pridgeon's hands. Butcher hit 
six fours in 45, in a stand of 65 
runs. At lunch. Surrey were 83 
for three from 38 overs, Felton 
having fallen to Newport. 

At Southampton, alter Sussex 
had declared 18 runs behind at 
302 for four, Hampshire lost 
Middleton before the dose in 
making 46. It had been another 
good day for batsmen, with 
Imran making 104. Parker. 83, 
and Colin Wells. 56 not oul 


Starting out at 15 for no wicket 
and 305 runs behind, Sussex 
soon lost Green and Alikhan — 
Green 10 a good catch by 
Nicholas at slip off Connor's 
bowling, and with the score 51, 
Alikhan was caught behind off 
Connor . Parker, who had been 
Sussex's hero on the previous 
day, had shown himself to be in 
the same forceful frame of mind 
as he hit Marshall and Connor 
to the boundary. 

It was hereabouts that Nicho- 
las had turned to Cowley’s off- 
spin, and to the slow left arm 
bowling of Maru, a tactic which 
seemed rather more to speed 
than impede the batsmen's 
progress. A century stand was 
quickly established, and with 
Imran radng to the forefront, a 
half century was his at lunch 
when Sussex were 137 for two, 
and Parker, 45 not out. 

Because Tremlen was injured. 
Nicholas was obliged to tum 
over an arm and it was this shift 
to medium pace that took the 
wicket Hampshire needed. . 
Parker had been 92 when 
Hampshire polished him off in 
Sunday's match, and now 
Nicholas, with Middleton's help 
brought him down 17 runs short 
of a hundred. 


Villagers 

earn 

Lord’s trip 

Forge Valley, from North 
Yorkshire, beat the weather and 
Chaddesley Corbett on Sunday 
to book a date at Lord's on 
Sunday, August 24, in tbe final 
of the National village 
championship, sponsored by 
Norsk Hydro. 

But they will have to wait 
until next Sunday to find out the 
identity of their opponents after 
the other semi-final between 
Ynysygerwn and Langleybury 
failed to start because of a heavy 
storm. 

Chaddesley Corbett, from 
Worcestershire, made 157 for 9. 
Truswell hitting 67, but an 
opening stand of 63 between 
Wall (48) and Ridsdale (23) set 
Forge Valley up to clinch their 
first trip to Lord's by a four 
wicket margin with two balls to 
spare. 

In the National Club 
Championship, sponsored by 
William Younger, both semi- 
finals between Stourbridge and 
Guisborough and Weston-su- 
per-Mare and Northampton 
Saints were rained off. At Stour- 
bridge. 22 overs were possible 
with Guisborough reaching 74 
for 2 but not a ball was bowled at 
Weston. Weal her permitting, 
both games start afresh today. 


Surrey v Worcs 

AT THE OVAL 

WORCESTERSHIRE: First tarings 381 for 
5 dec (D N Patel 132 notouLSJ Rhodes 
67 not out T S Curtis 51). 

SURREY: Fuslnrringa 
A R Butcher c Prrtgeon b Newport -45 

G L Clinton b Pndgeon . 2 

M A Fettham c HI* b Newport IB 

A J Stewart c Rhodes b Pridgaon — 24 

T E Je9ty not Out 103 

M A Lynch not out 72 

Exbas (0 5, 8) 11. w 1. nb 7) 24 

Total (4 wkts. 823 ewers) 286 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-8, 2-73. 3-79, 4- 
112 . 

1C J Richards, D J Thomas. K T 
Medtycott A H Gray and *P I Pocock do 


Bonus points; Surrey 5. Worcestershire 5. 
Umpires J H Harris and B J Meyer. 

Hampshire v Sussex 

AT SOUTHAMPTON 

HAMPSHIRE: First innings 320 tor 6 dec 
(D R Turner 79, C G Greenioga 78. T M 
Tremlett5B>. 

Second Innings 

C G Graanldge not out — 24 

TC Middleton bleRoux — - 6 

R A Smith notout — 11 

Extras (to 5) 5 

Total (1 wkt) 46 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-20. 

SUSSEX: Flrarmrangs 

P I Alklwnc Parks b Connor 14 

A M Green c Mchotes b Connor 17 

PWG Parker cMtadtatonbNfchotaa 83 

Imran Khan 0 Maru 104 

CM WMs notout 56 

A p Wells not out 13 

Extras (04,fc6. wS) 15 

Total (4 wfcrs dec. 97.1 own) — 302 
N J Lanham. *tl J GmM. G S ie Roux, D A 
Reeve and A N Babbtagton rid not bat. 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-30. 2-61.3-196,4- 
265. 

BOWUNG: Marshall 16-3434: Connor 
16-8-34-2: Maru 30.1-6-67-1; Cowley 13 
1 -743: MchotoS 15-1-54-1. 

Bonus points: Hampshire 5, Sussex 6. 
Umpires: D R Shepherd and H J Rhodes. 


Natural sportsman who is thinking of hanging up his boots 

Kiwi workhorse by day and by night 


Richard the Horse is the 
nickname the great cricketer’s 
father has coined for his son. “I 
am a little concerned that they 
drive him like this ,* 1 Walter 
said. He is the highly respected 
former New Zealand captain, 
and President in recent years of 
his country's Cricket Council — 
a remark delivered after watch- 
ing his son bowl two balls short 
of 30 overs at Trent Bridge on 
Friday, the most he had ever 
undertaken in a day's play. 

The burden ef greatness is 
becoming harder for Richard 10 
carry with his usual equanimity 
and dedication. At the age of 35, 
be is not Just expected to lead his 
country's bowling attack, then 
score some quick runs, but is 
also engaged In a hectic pro- 
gramme of activities for his 
Benefit Year with 
Not! inghamshire. 

Host at a dinner 

On Saturday night, hostilities 
at Trent Bridge having just 
ended, he played host to a 
hugely successful dinner more 
than 300 people paid £15 a bead 
to dine on iamb douated by a 
New Zealand meat importer, 
and feast on the wit of Jeremy 
Coney, the team captain, and 
the wicked impersonations of 
Peter Braekley, the football 
commentator- On Sunday, he 
and his wife. Karo, entertained 
and competed with 200 -odd 
golfers, including celebrities like 
Mike Garting. the “enemy" 
captain, and Fred Trueman, the 
former fellow-pace man, who 

won a prize for the longest drive 
on the last bole, Last night 
Richard was cued np for an 
exhibition snooker event with 
Rex Williams. 

"It gets very tiring, and the 
demand is great," a drawn if not 
haggard Hadlee said on Snnday 
night. “But I have just got to do 
iL" Altogether by November he 
will have attended over 100 
Benefit events spanning eight 
months, and he has successfully 
induced his Kiwi team-mates to 
assist in some of these activities; 
Ewan Cbatfield, who hopes to be 
fit for the third Test, played golf 
on Snoday despite a bandage 
around his injured thumb — 

It is almost certain though 
that the Richard Hadlee 



Hadlee: less than superhuman on the golf course 


roadshow is co ding to an end 
soon. He insists a total derision 
is yet to be taken, but this is 
likely to be his swansong in 
English county cricket He 
stresses that the Benefit year is 
for “services already rendered", 
and does not confer a moral 
obligation to continued service. 

After his home series against 
the West Indies, he will be 
tempted to hang np those huge 
boots that have earned him the 
nickname "Paddles". Since he is 
dedicated to peak fitness 


half, to be without their father 
for snefa long periods." 

Walter believes that his son, 
provided he stops playing 
cricket all-year-round, and re- 
tains motivation, could still play 
for three more years. Bat it is 
significant that Richard, a crick- 
eter to whom statistics and 
records have of late been the 
main motivator, has not publicly 
committed himself to reaching 
the next big milestone — beating 
Lillee's record of 355 Test 
wickets. Perhaps tbe return of 
Ian Botham, who has captured 


through a ppai-jMKg schedule of 354 . nigg, him 


"We are both now ready to late*. He *■* elegant right- 
settle* down in New Zealand," handed ba tsm a n and great tac- 
Karen, his ebullient wife, said in tieian. His son, Dayle, may have 
a Radio New Zealand interview been far more successful in Test 
last weekend. -It is not good for cricket, "hich he played atong- 
our boys, Nicholas, who four, side his younger brother, had be 


back injuries; while a third 
brother played one-day inter- 
national cricket as welL The 
family has scored over 30,000 
runs in first class cricket, and 
taken more than 1.500 wickets. 

Wise mother 

It was because Dayle dam- 
aged his toe mowing the bwn 
that Richard played his first' 
representative match — his 
mother told the selectors of her 
elder son's mishap, bat advised 
them that she had another boy to 
replace him. Wisely, they con- 
curred, and young Richard mode 
a hat-trick in his second game 
for Canterbury. Not that he was 
an instant success in Test cricket 
— at Trent Bridge in 1973, he 
took one for 143, and it has been 
largely because of his originally 
inch-criticized shortened ap- 
proach, described by his 
country’s leading cricket 
correspondent as a “pop gov 
run-up", that he has become so 
consistently unplayable and has 
extended his career, through 
energy conservation to so mature 
an age. Give Rice, his Not- 
tinghamshire captain, claims 
the credit. 

He was a natural sportsman 
as a child, according to his 
father, playing representative 
schoolboy rugby when 13 and 
keeping goaf for the Sooth 
Island schoolboy football team 
soon afterwards. Even then, 
though, his childhood dreams 
were to foBow in his father’s 

cricketing footsteps. He would 
often bowl a golf ball against tbe 
garage brick wall or repeatedly 
strike a ball suspended from the 
rafters. Sometimes he would don 
Walter’s red and black Canter- 
bury cap, several sizes too large, 
and play imaginary innings, 
acknowledging the plaudits of 
the non-existent spectators, his 
father recalls. Inside, he. would 
deliver commentaries ou imagi- 
nary cricket or rugby matches — 
a possible pointer to bis career 
after he retires. 

I am. pleased to report his golf 
performance on Sunday. He 
plays right-handed, does not 
used a wood off the tee. and says 
he has never broken 90. S o the 
man Is not super-human after 


Lendl gets his revenge after 
thrashing at Wimbledon 


. Stratton Mountain. Vermont 
(AP) — Ivan Lendl's two-set 


victory — in the tiebreaker to 
decide the final set. Lendl said 


victory over the Wimbledon he cut short a conversation with 
champion. Boris Becker, was a Becker during a court-change for 


j classic Siudy m concentration — 
Lendl’s abundance of it and 
Becker's lack of it 

Lendl aged 26, was smooth 
and unrelenting on Sunday as be 
served and volleyed his way to a 
6-4. 7-6 victory in the 14th 
Volvo international tour- 
nament. Tbe win avenged his 
defeat in the Wimbledon finals 
last month at the bands of the 
West German, whose game was 
a! hs best on Wimbledon's grass 
courts. 

Playing on a hard court on 
Sunday, the red-haired Becker 
fought gamely, for example, 
breaking Lendl’s serve on the 
eighth Breakpoint of the 20- 
minute sixth game of the derid- 
ing seL But with Lendl on his 
favorite surface, lew doubted 
that be ultimately would 
prevail. 

Lendl's comments after the 
game illustrated tbe concentra- 
tion and intensity that has made 
him — and kept him — the 
world's No. I men's angles 


fear oflosing his focus. 

"I was anxious to ‘concentrate 
very hard and not 10 let any- 
thing happen, like dropping my 
serve at 6 -love," he said. 

A cross-court backhand by 
Becker went wide on tbe next 
point, giving Lendl game, set, 
match and a $40,000 (about 
£27.000) paycheck that made 
him the first male tennis pro- 
fessional to top $9 million in 
career earnings. (Martina 
Navratilova, another native 
Czechoslovakian, was the first 
player to surpass $9 million.) 

It Lendl's concentration was 


If Lendl's concentration was 
intense, Becker's was anything 
buL He attributed his mental 
letdown to an emotional hang- 
over from' his diffhanger semi- 
final victory on Saturday over 
John McEnroe. 

“I really wasn’t, with my 
mind. 100 percenL in the match 

today,” he conceded. “It was 
very difficult to psych myself up 
again, which I have to. I have to 
be psyched up 110 percent to 


to an emotional match that when I 
id cot out of bed this morning. I 
ih said. ’Oof, ,,fn si< u *!* lhe 
or tournament' I thought it was 
the final yesterday." 
ite The Stratton coura are Deco- 
y- Turf II, the same hard surface 
ay players will encounter at the US 
Open later this month ut New 
by York, where Lendl will be the 
xt defending champion. But Lendl 
et, said Sunday's win should not 
ut increase the pressure on him at 
de Flushing Meadow. "There is 
o- always pressure and basically, 

in there is as much pressure as you 

ia |et get to you,” be said. 
w McEnroe and Peter Fleming. ’ 
51 playing together again for the 
first time in a year, won the 
“ doubles title, by defeating Paul 
Annacone and Christo Van 
a * Rensbuig. of South Africa, 6-3. 
5" 3 - 6 , 6-3 to complete the ratn- 

^ plagued tournament. I 

Because of heavy rain during ! 
... the week, the schedule of 


player. Up 6-0 — one short of beat Ivan. Yesterday was such 

DRESSAGE 


the week, the schedule of 
matches was so far behind that 
McEnroe and Fleming had to 
play two doubles matches on 
Sunday. But by the time they 
had finished the second, it was 
too late to play the tide match. 


IN BRIEF 

Wimbledon 
great 
dies in ;■ 
hospital 

Chuck McKinley, former 
Wimbledon tennis champion, 
died on Monday at Baylor 
University Medical Center in 
Dallas. He was 45. McKinley 
had been ill for about I S months 
and was suffering from a malig- 
nant brain tumor, a family 
spokesman. George Ribeu said. 

He won the men's single title 
at Wimbledon in 1963 and was a 
finalist in 1961. He was US 
Open doubles champion in 
1961. 1963 and 1964 with 
partner Dennis Ralston. Mc- 
Kinley won the US indoor 
singles championship in 1962 
and 1964 and was -doubles 
champion in 1962 and 1964 
with Rod Laver and in 1 963 and 
1965 with Ralston. He won- the 
US clay championship in 1962 
and 1963 and was the doubles 
champion in 1961 and 1964 
with Ralston. 

McKinley, who was a mem- 
ber of the US Davis Cup team 
from I960 to I96S. was named 
in the Tennis Hail of Fame last 
July. He retired From active 
tennis ih the late 1960s and 
worked as a broker. 


Sacrifices yield huge reward Miandad 

From a Correspondent, Cedar Valley, Ontario • . • 

month’s leave from the scores proliferated, the pannes Danish secretary andMaraog. OljtlUllStlC 
Civil Sen-ice to con- shin with Marzog was outstand- for whom she has turned down .r 


■ " . • J? 
g . *. V ; ' ' : 

r-,-- r Asf',i-£S\ _ Cry, , 




Trevor Jesty on his way to an unbeaten 103 for Surrey at the 
Oval yesterday. (Photograph: Hugh Routledge). 


From a 

Three month's leave from tbe 
Danish Civil Service to con- 
centrate on the preparations for 
Cedar Valley proved worth- 
while for Anne-Grethe Jensen, 
the new world champion. Nor- 
mally she has time to ride only 
before or after work as a 
secretary, but having lost her 
European title last year and 
finished second to Reiner 
KJimke. at tbe 1984 Olympics, 
she put all her energies into this 
year's event 

Even in these body contested 
championships, where high 


BOWLS 

LEAM INGTON SPA: U— rpooj/Vfoireta taaur- 
mcc Emm womon'i inM oi — l dunukiD- 
tfnp: TripfccPre&otoary Round: RayJ*gn (O 
Lows) bt Bunadon iGascoign). 15-14; down 
<B Proud) n Bamaster Parti. Sownanvwi (F 
Guy). 23-10: Newbunr [N Cannon) bt Brafcaroo 
{C Ducfcwonn). 18-16; ! 


ship with Marzog was outstand- 
ing. Their tremendous rapport 
in their seventh season at the 
top. plus the willingness of the 
horse and the talent of his rider, 
carried the day. 

Next year it might be different 
as such brilliant youngsters as as 
Gaugjn. from Switzerland, Jd~ 
eaal and Am per. from Ger- 
many, Dynasty, from Canada, 
and Corlandus, from France, 
challenge for the top honours. 
But until the Stockholm world 
championships in 1990, the 


for whom she has turned down 
offers alleged to be as high as £1 
million, will hold the world" title. 



FOR THE RECORD 


Guy). 23-10; Newbury [N Cannon) bt Bralmw 
<c aidwMM iSLiA- iW iwi Auckland 

,21-15: 
Reams) WFartirt 
Redruth 
16-15; 

Armstrong ) in Boufttwm Pvfc Lincoln 
Cd>dweflK24-8: Mansfield CoUery (N wason) 
M East Oxford (S luHer) 25-10: Rugby 
Ttwraliwd (M Edmras) tn Faratnm (E Potato, 
21-8. Rddboume Cherny VMItsIm (K Bone) bt 

Lfludexmigh (V Hortey). 21-14; 

(E VntiByjbt Bristol Sleaford Lmcalnstnra (J 
Pratn 19-8. First round: Oadby (D Lewis) bt 
BhKtawL. Somerset (E Marin). 20-11; Bor- 
ough Park Radcar (B AkMrston) bt Highsm 
Farrars |L BtackwoB), 23-10; County Arts 
Norwich (V 

mg). 24-10: wekSng hsdoiw 
Hannah) bt IBC Site* (P Wngfffl. 29-7; 
FtoaiMfough and Ostrict £J Anthony) bt 
Brnpon (if Jonas). 21-17; Bedford Russefl 
P«H ( J H*«) bt Plymouth Ho (T GoodchUd). 
16-15: CM Sanwe Warvwctahra {J Green) bt 
Cowes Marina (R Law). 23-8, GraanM 
Dorset (j Sam) bt Camabury (R 
Cheesamanj. 20-12; Kastngs Whoa Rock (L 
Meppam) « Leonmnr. Hereford (G Bey). 
21-9: Broadway (I Snwlbone) bt Bafoanon, 
Notts. 19-16: North WUstaam (J Rmfance) M 
Amesbury. 17-12; Oxford C and C (M BGs) be 
CTOydon (P Ward). 17-7: Gfoucestar CXy U 
laalW Woodford (BGrindrod). 30* Afowk* 
Nonnunfoartand (J Meyer) bt LMapan 
Cambndgestwe (J BrownnriL 19-12: ft*) 
Place Sussex t J Backed! bfBaom Pam (P 
SoutebyL 19-12: St AiaMI (B Bate) bt New 
Hemngron Coumy Durham (T Stevens), 15- 
12: Rayleigh bt Cowes, 14-13; Newbury bt 
Bishop Auckland, 19-14; 
BUcMwafo/dnenunch bt Reriutfi. 25-14; 
Mansbefo Cofteiy bt B rampt on. 21-20; 
Rodboume Ctayney bt Rtxfoy^ ThomMd. 17- 
15: Bsldocfc bt Svivofllnm. 18-17. 

WORTHING: Gateway EB&A national fours 
ctiempkuisblp: Brat round: Stockton Rooks 
(Ourem) 20. Princess RUxxough 
ift St Qeorae'9 Hospital (Nonhutiiuotwmij 
20. Watford (Harts) 17: BHC(ToW) 18. Devizes 
(WBts) 16: Andover (Hants) 23. Erttngton 
CoiXT(Wanmcks) 21: Oxford C and C 1 ” 5- * 
19. The Downs (Kent) ift Holman [ 

17i Madeira 

^na'LWji Hmi inwrtoMII: WNU 
fiunax) 23. MBdanhsad Town 
GraanM jr searte, Dorset) 




SEATON CAREW: British boys’ chan«ion- 
sMp: Fiat Bound: M Church [City ol 
Wakefield) bt P Hodbtam JS»w). 2 and i; G 
Kmg (Shoos) bt J Webber (Tewkesbury PaiW. 

4 and 3: 1 Donnelly (Royal Wfocheswr) M S 
Rev (Switz) 3 and 1 : J Barnes (Banon-on-Sea) 

over; 5 Duffy (Shorts), scratched. D 

Bathgate (Sandhny) bt A MacCaeM 
(Dwram). 3f and 2: G Roberts (Rotherham) bt 
M Sheooard IConwvL 2 and t; K Waibank 

Taft Pnrtne). 3 and 2. S 
lEnMffl bt B Ctarke (HolryeL 3 and 2: 
M Dawson ISeahousos) bt S Syrna (St 
Andrew's) 2 and 1: A Uorley (Batten Park] hr 
M Bratriwood ISaxscnH(8. 6 and 5: C Fraser 
A Stevenson (Leigh). 6 and 4; 
nbomam IBrsmhiat ra <t .inmo 

_ Park), ona hola;. 

bt S Mams (Dentem). reared; N Gemtnau 
(Tantalon] bi J Btodonare (Manifold), one 
note; M McBean (Moa) bt A Jeffreys (Ryt 
Liverpool). 5 and 3; BAeay tKawicfc) bt J 

ToofceyfLeeW. af 19m; E Grey 

J Greener (WoodcotM. 4 and 
mewbetse) bt d whinalM- iHxihi i-n 

ZnquriLBa 

CareerLS and 1; G fifoflaa (WanwiMint) bt D 
Royto iBaddey), 6 and 3; M Rose (Omsdaki 
Spa) H M Godson OTynemoudi), 6 and 5: D 
Locked iPKWMOod ml Buckley) bt C 
UacPnati ffQm nm. one ifolSL J rime 
(Weymouthjbt D Erttly (HemStegaL one how 

5 Bar mer ma n ( Cruder Bay) bt E McIntosh 
rTumhousa). af 2fth: J HadomarvWBiMtl U A 


r(B«h). 2and 1: D 
. bt B Robertson (Seaton 


BASEBALL 


ENGLISH LEAGUE: Hret 0riafoK Sun» 
Breves 8. Croydon Bfuerays 9: Sutton Braves 
12. Croydon Bteeters 1; Enfiafo tartans 4. 
Cobban! Yankees 1 Goldare Sean Sox 3. 
Crawley Giants 20: SasJktoo Raiders it. 
BemasStomiareSO Second dWriom Brgh- 
W! Jett 6. Gnmspam Dodgers 37; watBwn 

London BiOeu 0. CySkCk Sktavrindare 26. 
GoWwstm Cougars 2IL Crawley Comats 20. 
TonbndBa Booean 19. 

NORTH AMERICA: American Laagaa: Bos- 
ton Red Sox 9. Dettori Tigers ft Kansas Qty 
Royals 13. Naw York Yankees ft demand 
hxfians G. Bahmore Onotes 3: MforetAaa 
Braware 5. Chicago Whaa Sox 4; Oakterid 
Athletics ft Minnesota Twins Z Oakland 
Atnlates ft Mmnason TVrets 5: Caatonw 
Angela 4. Seattle Mamwi ft Toronto Blue 
Jays ft Texas Rangers 7. naUunai League: 
Near York Mats 7. Momal Expos 2: San 
Frenc a oo Gents 4. Atlanta Bravos 3; 8L 
Loin Caidfoau 5. Pmsburgb Pirates 4; Loa 
Anaai es Oodgers 5. Cincinnati Rada ft 
^ CuSsA. Phdadefoha PMHas ft San 
D«gdhBdras5. Houston Astros 3. 

AMERICAN BASEBALL 


bt J P 

(WeymouODbtH Bettam 
M Sana (it) walkover v Si 




M Sana (It) waluvar v S Wfbon 
Scares Ot) DTK Lure (Si Mateft one bote; G 
Matthew (Melrose) M M MacGutgan 
(Ro sec ommoni one hole: F O'Callegfian 
(Haggs CasUa) bt R Hutton (Ardglass) one 
hole; G Star (Heswsfi) wahowr v □ Basttin 

K irem): J Kamedy (Oman) bt M Barnes 
Magog), two horns; J BerweC 
N Hansen (Den), s and 4; I 
sfc (Dunsi bt M Haztaaan (Mannings Haatfi). 
sra 1: C Htggns (Teawtida) « P Cam 
Carew). at I90v SMdGanck (Cattkm 
bt A Patankovaky (Austria), a and 3; N 
Jonas (Wanvoe Caedo) bt A 
Sussex), a 20m; O wood Walton 
BoD (Sfcthl. 5 and 3: J W Amtt | 

OWcom (Ratho Park). 7 and 
(Woriangton) nt C Rawson (Braugnk 2 and 
M Betaftam (East Hens) M D Brown (Dews- 
bury- and Distnct). one hole; S Docheny 
(Crooen Bay) bt H Roaens (Ltentrisant and 


Won 1st Ptf GB 


Javed Miandad. aged 29, the 
Pakistan Test batsman, has 
made another appeal to 
Glamorgan to take him back on 
their playing staff. He was 
dismissed in April after failing 
to mum 10 the club to fulfil his 
contract but is now keen to play 
again for the Welsh county. 

Javed's request is to be 
considered by the county's 
cricket committee today, but 
David Lewis, the club chair- 


ATHLET1CS 


ORE Men's Gold Cup sem-finrt: 1, Shaftes- 
bury. I44pts;2. Thames Valloy Hamers. 112; 

3. Btfotd, 1H»r: 4. SmithmuXon. 104; 5. 
Norfo London. 79: ft London tosh. 8ft 7. 
SpwUhl, 59M: ft Hama Hft 58. ShMhHtavy 
and Thames Vafley Hamers Qua tty tor tend. 
GRE Women's Jutoce Cw aonHInab 1, 
Essex Lmfies. I03;ft DemyJftS. Cmdff. 77; 

4. Coventry, 76; 5. Bornet Copihafc. 7Z ft 
Enfield. 5ft 7. Bristol. 51; 9, Rader. 3ft Essex 
end Darby auaWy for final 

STOKE: GHC Men's Gold Cup s mUtea fi 1. 
Wowamampun and Bosion.T35pts; 2. New- 
ham and Essex Bangles. 133: X Luton. 103»i. 
4. Edmburan Southern wooBon mius. 92%; 5- 
Sfofia AC. 89; ft Lisburn, M'S. 7. ShMtMston 
Hamer*. 85, 8. Ware* Park. «■ 
hampfon and Nmham quaUfy tar ItooL GRE 
W omen' s JrAriee Cep sa uu ^toa L 1. Stret- 
ford. 1D4; 2. wofrerhaopton and BUston. 8ft 
3. Bteiuron Southern vvomso MW 84; *. 
Notts AC. 7ft ft Leicester Contanten. 68; 6. 
licbren. 6ft. 7. Broke. 4ft Strettonl and 
wotverhainpion Qutttor tor hnaL 
WIGAN: GREMen's Gold Cap aamMbut: 1, 
Sale Hantare. Mlpts; ft-BechWd. 134; 3. 
Morpeth, 94: 4. Umpool. 92D; 5. Lmx&. 
Snetteu. 79K; 7. Nattmaftam. 6fti; ft 
MxidteibroiK&S2.5aiaanaBtoMiaid(MMy 

tor final, tMMK 1. BrchtekL lift 2. 
UmpoaL 8ft ft Sate Hamers. 87. A North 
Snwkts r v yw cn ra c, 72: 5. McLaren, Glas- 
gow^: ft FMartehm. 56; 7. Ean Cheshire. 
52. ft Wigan. 31. Bsdiflald and Umpool 


i Bay) bt H Roberts 
n).3andl:RHafl(i 
(Rnuriten). 2 ana 


Sandy Town (Bee® Ift Botome (Uacel 72. 
Saemy end District (Hurts) T7; GraenhM (R 
Qbwbs. Dorset) 22. Woronster (Wares) 10: 
Darby West End (Derby) 28. Sandy Town 
(Beds) 12. Balgrave (Laics) 22. Sawoy and 
17; Osannil (H Dawes. 
Worcester (Wores) 10: UndfisU 
) 24. Bedford Boraugh (Beds) 17; 
Castle (SutfonFSl. CamOndge 
15: Nottingham 

— .21; Btowskhi 

24. Plymouth SfD (Devon) 12; N e wnh a m 
*») ift Stantex (Ctxntxla) 14; Dratwfch 


(Crcoen Bay) bt H Roberts 

Downs) bt 
A Eflfott 

. _ . _..SW2 

_ Hogan (Oeystones) bt S 
(Darington). 7 and ft A Waftar (Leek) br M 
Gunn (Wajgs Casual. 2 end i; s Pttyne 
(Bjfingry) walkover vJ Dawes (Abtedovey): 
A Rees (remoy) re A Cwwan (Uncastert. iwo 
!)<*»: L Heme (Swe) H D Read (Cotswofo 
Edge). 5 eno 3: M Ctomrmww (Btensyiam) bt 
w Henry (Porters Peri). 2 and 1; M Rooartson 


T. , ' l l wfer l | 


KS&t 


'|tobs) ift Stnmtex (Ctxntxla) 14; Dratwkii 
(Worts) 17. Hotgata (Yomsi 14 : Yanon 
terew zr. Long Eaton Town (Dereys) 17; 
HiC (Gtos) 21 . Krtorxnn victoria (Lefcs) 16; 
Ptesoy (Notts) IB. P a et on gton (Middx) 17; 


23. Hundem Park 
“ " 21 . 


Thrapston _ ' --- -- - - - 

‘ 14; Camon 
of 

Yorks) 22. , ^ 

- ~v— • .Hants) 1ft Boston Steekxd Road 
(Lines) IS: Swindon Bnbah Ra* (WWs) 24. 
Maraaret CmOpote (Suffolfo 15: HriSurrey 
1ft Aslley Park (Norttunberiand) 14; Stony 
Sntiord '(Bucks) 23. Dalston (Cumbria) 1ft 
Owstchurch (Cenfos) 2ft Bristol SI Andrews 
(Gtos) 17; Wei lard On Avon fWnnwcfca) 27. 
Mb En d.jHerwt.ft Bolton (Lancs) 21. 
C3n®nxi 


CROQUET 


'■i'-T.I'M' 


WEST KILBnoe arts' tatemefioaels: En- 
gkmd 4 Scadend 3: (Scatfish-names first}; C 
Lambert (North Berwick) t* S Shspcoit 

(KrtowteLzand^FMcKayirumberry)' 

M Comekus INewfo. 8 and 4; K 

OOrkcukM M S BemeB (OoWwster). iw 
holes; K Rtznarsid (Cathcart Castle) lost to A 
Macdonald (Andover), two holes; S Little 
(Hardhead) lost to L FeTOtaunh (Choriey). 5 
and ft H Bone (Barasrie) km to h Dooson 
(Seacroto. « and 3: M Dawson (Forres) bt H 
Hustler (May). 2 end 1- Wales 5 Ira lanri 2 

rWetih names Ann): J Foster "* * 

D Mahon (Roscommon). 2 
Melyd) H TEakrt (Layttw 
2 and 1: H Pnflfips (Uanymynech) tost to 
HaAett (Castteroy). 4 and 8; A Remain 
IBaixiodd) bt P McWnatry (Cwmdhu), 5 end 3; 


NATIONAL. LEAGUE 
East DMskxt 

New York Mots 7 

Montreal Expos 
PtriadBlpha PtfiBes 
SLLouta Cantinab 
Ctucago Cubs * 

Ptosburgh Pirates- ' < 

West Division 
Houston Astros - I 

San Fran Gtants 
LA Dodgers 
Ctocrmetl Reds 
San Diego Paries 
Wants Braves 


AHEMCAN LEAGUE 
EastDfvMon 

Boston Rad Sax 65- 

New York Yankees 61 

BaStoxxe Orfofias - 59 
MnXTtgm 59 

Cteret a nd Indtens 58 

Toronto Bbe Jays 58 

Mfinufcsa Brewars 55 

WestDMsJon 
Texas Rangsrs 59 

Chicago Whits Sox 49 

Kansas City RoyMs 40 

Mnnegota Twins ' 48 

Oakland Athletics ' 49 

Seattie Mariners 48 


74 35 .679 - 

55 52 J14 IB 
53 56 .486 21 
53 58 A86 21 
48 61 .440 26 
43 64 .402 30 


92 8. Wigan. 31. Esdifield and Umpool 
qua%tar1toM. 

RiDAPESn 

V Sedykh (USSR), suunt n. a asms inure. 
79.12m; 3.1 Tone* (BUL 7730m: *. Tj Gecsek 
(HrrL 76.4»n; ft I antes Wgn) 7&B0m. 6. D 
Smith IGBL 73.82m: 7. S Voeroes (Hun). 
7230ire ftTGustaltsan (SweL 712ftn. 


Iprtx meattKc Hammer: 1. 
«5jarn: 2. A Smka (Hixfl. 


MOTOCROSS 


49 559 - 
53 J23 4 

56 .495 7 

57 477 9 

58 j*73 9K 

59 .464 10K 


44 596 - 

52 540 6 

52 332 7 

53 JS 77% 

53 523 8 

54 ^18 8H 

55 J0010K 


52 .532 2 

60 460 11 
82 .441 .12 
62 .436 1254 

64 A34 13 

65 425 14 




Pa percentage. 08 = Games behtmt 

BASKETBALL 

WOtHfS WORLD CHAMPtOHSHtoS: On 
A (in Mnak. USSR): S Korea 71. Brazil Eft 
kq soviet Urapn 94. 

_ B (Vlnfus): Chau 93. 

Tateten 45; Czechosiovafcta 55. Australia 5ft 
United States 7ft Hungary 6ft 


4. KltecaD. , 

5. EGebom (Baft 21: ft C ataddfi Rp. 1ft 
world c haaipi u i u iifo atemfing s : 1. Thorpe 
3i6pts: 2. Matoarbe. 31 1; 3. Geooars. 299; 4, 
Jobe. 29& 5. K Van Ser Vtin (Mm. 21 1: ft L 
Psnjeon (Swe). 20SLKUOPIO: Fkaash 12Scc 
Ml mc neat one: 1. J nan den Bark 
hk 2. D StrftoelNeth): 3. A Pamtto 
WWrorwn fPiS: 5. D Lachar 
Koulo [ftifc 7. A van Asun (Natnv 

(Netro. Heel two: 1, randan Bark; 2. 

3.VeWtonen; 4. KoiAt 5. BMooreJUS); ft M 
, Contra (Ift 7. A Barozzi (W. ft P ben (Baft 
Leedtagateeifim: 1. St«wos.284pts; ftwn 
den Bark. 265: 3. CorttfiT 222: *. Pehka 
venkonen. 209; ft Kdute 193. 6. Pamela 174; 
7 I Vehfconsn. 173; ft Barozzi 12ft 


TENNIS 

KfTZBUEHEL: Marfa mand. prbe Doobtea 
ttoafcTStirt(C2)andHGunthardt(Swaz)MA- 
Gwnez (Be) and H GHameMv (Cute). -Mi. 6- 

STRATTOW MOUNTAIN; Man** grand pm 
S (Mess stand): Stocpea finafc l Lend (Cz) 
B Becker (WG), 6-4, 7-6 OouMea; Quartet* 
finals: J McEnroe and P Ffarmng bt K FtlCri 
«Kl R Semjso. 6-4, 6-2: 0 Grtwt and V Van 
Pjmwibt B Becker (WO) and T Wrtkwon. 5-7. 
6-4. 6-3 Uaraf-finat: P Annacone and C Van 
Rengiu^fSA) ttt K Curran and U MacrieA 6- 

MONTREAU Hqm' datam 'wMWrt 
Pytejw* H Sufcova fC&z} bt RStawar (1® 
6-2. 7-5. Ooubtes Hn«L 2 Garrison (US) and Q 
WH Sukova (Cz) arid Pairiwr 

NEWPORT BEACH, CMHortria: Meo-a tour-' 
re^FtoJ P Ca«, (Aus) bt 3 Fttzgerak) 


POOLS FORECAST by Paul Newman 


AspmaroenGRoy- 
NAspInaH -<-23 


Oop-Onnif 

Seini-nnai* M Murrey beat T Cotes +1& N 
Aspinaf beat G Roy +20 Final: M_Murmy beat 


taunannt Final 


k»t to D McCarthy 
Zand 1. 

PGA eeniore 
(54 holes): 2C3: C 


. . 1 - 1 : : 1 — ■ L' . 1 ■ 

F* -TIT; ,9r. 1 * I 


N Asplnaa +23 . .. 

Serm-ftoaia: « AspmaB near j wrara -nr: u 
Ounasekere beat M Murray +18 ftwb N 
Aspmte beat D Guwsekera +26 [tpj Tamer 
Cup-Prucac Finat D C O Wiggns beat Mas 
D A Comrtus +18 Youner (Sp-Beaw Hnafc 
M J B Haggaruon beet S GComefi us +7 
Y«mr Cwhocw Frrat S G Comalua 
beat CE WUnaon +18 
Young Cnp-Fteal M J B Haggeraton bear S G 
Com&us +6 LongMrth Cop-Drw Ftnt P D 
Hanjymenr beat Ms C A Oanxxxf +19 
Lomrwarth C u p- P reen Hnal: P D 
mere ben 0 .Petrie +9 Hu il fii g tieai 
uwiei FmaL K M H Ann A Mne J Maoeoa 
beat Mr ft Mrs J Ccrtsa +10 Ladea FWd 
Doublea Fmak Miss J MacfeotJ & Mre WBO 
Wiggns beat Mrs N Macmillan & Mis K 

Yeoman +21 Mrrt Handicap DanMnFtosi: 
DrWRDWiww&DCOWiwnsbeffProlE 

G NeM & D LGodfrae +19 Surer Jteteoe Cep 
Ftoak J Caritee beat DC D ’ 

B— m -Pteti Final: W T 

Peterson +26 


FOOTBALL 

YWOSUVIAN LEAGUE Parian BeigiBda 

2. Sparnk SimotsaiO; Buducnoa Titograd 2. 
Ohamo Wnkovo f:SkXxxfaTuzte2. SWwera 
2: Oafik 2amca 2. Valaz MosarS: Rwna 2. 
Hatouk Spit 2: Dhamo Zagreb l.RariwfoNls 
ofteifEttacar Sarajawo £ Vartar SkopK 0; 
Oajek 1. SuMSka Mtato £ PWtfra O/Red 
StarBatesdal. 

nweSn LEAGUE: ares Thmpara i, Kuusyal .. 
Lahti 2 Ksmki PaPoseura 1. Hobangn 
Jaikapattoktobl 4: Kopam Kuopio 1. 
RowMinen Patosnra 1: Mkhehn Patafifat 

3. Kuopion PBltoaeors ft; Oulun 


Rodngucz IP, RcOL 70. 87, 86. 2M: G 
(SAL 7l. 65. 71. 205: B Chartee 

71. aasc B Crempron (Am). .V, , 

Thomson, 68. 71. 67: H Harming, 72. 6ft 68. 
aotBEridOon. 68. 71.8ft 

HIGH POINT, North Carotins: Woman's 
toumemaoe Hnal moms (US uniass stand): 
277: B Ktofl 70. 87. 70. 70; J Carrier 68. 6ft 70. 
BB-. 27W nIomz 71, 89. 70. 69: R WUton 68. 
69. 66. 74. 280: C KreBtet 71. 69, 72. 68. 281: 
D Massey 71). 71. 67. 73; K WMtennh 71. 72. 
68. 70. 2K: AGHmUO (tort) 73. 70. 6ft 70. 
284: H Stacy 12 76. 70, M K PostiawM 7ft 

72. 73. 71: J Rosenthal 72. 69. 71. 72: K 
Monariwn 69 . 89. 74. 72: S Rattier 73.89. 69. 
73; S Turner 72. 70. 89. 73. 

HOCKEY 

LARGS: tatefntefamal KstctwE Scotland 2. 
Tin Nearer)®*)* 2 Scottend 2. The Nether* 
tovtoi. 

COLOGNE: Undar-21 tttamatiQnMs: Weal 
Germany 1. England 0: TWaat Germany 2. 


Tyovaenpaltoitaet Z Pro Rawest 2; Tina) 
Palosteira 2. wceakoskan Hake 0. 


BOXING 

StCfl-T: Wortd Bmong Cwacfi oitiaanreM* 
ehampfooship: Canos De Leon (P Rica 
hokter) bt *c5nef Graer (US), afopoed Afr 
md. • 

ROAD RACING 

IgNDON: Adhtaa Shartesbmy Qpec~(ifl 




„ ,,49-18: 

Z J Scoter (Shofasburft 4»1 Tew 1. 
Luton, sm: 2. Shohashury, 22: 3. Thames 
Vasey Hamer). 52 


- Saturday August 16 
CHARITY SMELD 
2 Everton v Liverpool 

GM-VAUXHALL 

CONFERENCE 

T Attrinriwii v Bath 
1 Dagenham v Northwich 
1 Emioto v Gateshead - 
1 Fricktey* Maidstone 
1 Kiddermtnatar v Barr. 

t Nuneaton v ScstxuQ 

1 Runcorn v Boston U 
X Sutton UvTtoord 
X WoeUstone v Suiftort) 

1 Weflng v Cheltenham 
1 Weymouth v Kettering 

MULTIPART LEAGUE 

1 Barrow vS Liverpool 

1 Button y Workington 

2 Buxton v Marine 
X Caernarfon v Macdesfld 
1 Gamaborov Choriey 
1 Hontech v Matlock 
1 Morecombe v Rhyt 
1 Mosateyv Bangor 
X Osownray v Worteiop 


1 Sorihport v Hyde 
1 WiODrt vGoote 


SOUTHERN PREMIER 
INwdwdi* Orawfoy 

X Basmmtokev Corby 
1 Canto cvYfiUantiM 
1 ChetmstortJ v Rodcitch 

1 Denton) v Aylesbury 

2 Fareham v BedworKi 
2 Gosport v Dudley 

2- Safistwry v Fisher 

1 Shepshed v Folkestone 

2 Witney v Bromsgrove 
1 Worcester v K Lynn 


VA UXHRL L-OPEL 

PREMIER 

X Barklnq v Wokingham 
X CarshMon v. Hayes 
2 Duterich v St Albans 

1 HarowulOngsronian 
X Htahtn v Bromley 
1 Stoughv.ftalihanistow 
1 Tooting * Windsor 

X Worttiaig v B Stortord 
1 wycantoe v Croydon - 


1 Yeovft v Hendon 

SCOTTISH PREMIER 

1 Aberdeen w Hamilton 

2 Clydebank v CHOC 
X Dundee vHtoerraan 

1 Hearts v Falkirk - - 

2 Motherwe* w St NBrnto 
1 Rangers w Dundee U . 


SCOTTISH FIRST 

2 Abode v Dumbarton 
2 Ctyda * East Fde 
1 Forfwv Kimamock 
1 Montrose v Psrock 
X Moiton v DunfemBna 
1 QolSthvBrechm 


SCOTTISH SECOND 

X Albion * Stonhamufr 
Not on coupons: AAoa r 

Oowdenbesto: Bwwx* v 

Qftrlmn- E Shriui/T f SI 




v Stranraer; QuriHi'ft Park ’ 

v Arbroath: ftarerv Ayr. .. 


7]®^ ffwe Sutton 

Urnie^- Was ids tons. Caernarfon, 
UgffSff y. Bas ai^iokB. Barfong, Car- 

ton. A lnqn. 

sosaes*'**'* 

sT/SS Be * WOrth ' Broma 9 raw - 


HOaESs. Altrincham, Enfold. ean»- 
Moracambe, Wrtton, CamfifogB 
Worcester. Tooting, 
Yowl. Hearts, Queen of the South. 

RXEO ODDS: Homes: Aberdeen. Hearts, 
Forfar, Montrose, Queen ot the South. 
Away®. Cakic. Dumbarton. East Fife. 
Draw: Dundee, MortorvAlbion. . 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


our DOJS, [Xicnotas, wnq i$ four, SIDE ms juungn ihuuwt, IBS ne ay, UT 4 ' , 

and Mattbew. aged one and a not Struggled against leg and FflOl JVuUtin 


CRICKET 

Second Comhfli Test matt* 

(11 .0, 90 overs minimum) 

TRENT BRIDGE: England v New 
Zealand 

Britannic Assurance 
Coity ChampioraWp 
(1 1.0.1 02 overs trtnimuni) 
BUXTON: Derbyshire v Lancashire 
CHELTENHAM; Gloucs v Middlesex 
SOUTHAMPTON; Hampshire v 
Susse x 

LEICESTER: Leicestershire v Essex 
WELLINGBOROUGH: North- 
amptonshire v Somerset 
THE OVAL: Surrey v 
Worcestershire 

BX3BASTON: Warwickshire v Kent 
HEADINGLEY: Yorkshire v 
Glamorgan 


EPnEKEMNMFNTS 


MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPIONSHIP: 
. March: Ca mbn dflearirB v North u rttoan- 
land; Shmnbwy: Shropshtie w Oxford- 
ahtte Marlow: BudriighamShire v Deran. 

FOOTBALL 

(WO) 

SKOL CUP: First round: Afoton v Berwick. 
MUR RANT TROPHY: Dagenham v 
Bartriw. 

OntGal MATCH: Sfough v Orient. 

OTHER SPORT . 
CROQUET: Notttngharo nunatnent 
QOLF: Peugeot Tatoot PGA watewrfs 
champnnsnip (ax Sand Moor GQ: Gui«' 
home foternatfonais (at won lOtortdeQC): 
Brtosn boys' cnam^onshtos (at Seaton 
CarcMi) 

LAWN TENNIS: Prudential Sussex open 
tat West Worthing l-TC). 

POLO: Hatch Mansfield Trophy: Obertor- 
finals (at Windsor). 


CMtincd froa page 2 g. 

OOeON LEICCSTER . SQUARE 

>930 OIZU Info WSO 4280 / 

^PHANIIWI AND hen 
•ttTVIB UC» &U proos Dupre 

won Daily 200. BOatS 
Credit Cera Hot Llnr lAcctea 
rvtsa /AnUCt) e» 1929. 24 

fojwyrwe Ce.SOweixmaii. 
abteMondvailptefi All proas 
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ODBON MMBLC ARCH fT23 
Sim .THE KteUATg Kto » 
jPg) grp Proas Doom 
OpteVpZiU 3 OS. S SS. 80&. 
tlured mm i« oreter lfir*. 
SludHii card heidcrx CBoO 
hoktert. O A.PX uauiwi 
on ft- CARS BARES MOVIES. 
a new oeNaju-noN nn 
Doors ooon Mon bte 1 IS All 
'*M'» Cl 50 

RtMOMtasrseoz 

1 AM_l«WrtlO«HT GUN. 1151 

_ 4M B4S 900 

2 rOLKIllSl I*, m, d | I 454 OQ 

6.20 8 4B AIR 

COhiOITWlVFD 


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3 3ft 516. 7 10. 9 0®. SMH 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1 986 


29 



BBC 1 


6.00 CeofaxAM. 

8 SO Breakout Time with 

Debbto Greenwood and 
Frank Bough. Weather at 
- 8J5, 7^735, A26 and 

RS5; regional news, 
weather and traffic at 837, 
737, 737 and 837; 

national and international 

news at 730. 730, 830. 
838 and 930; sport at 

■ 730 and 830; and a 
review of the morning 
newspapers at 837. Plus, 
the junior and adult advice 
fines; Alan Tftctatarsh's 
gardening hints; and a 
recipe from Glynn 
Christian. 

830 Dudley DtHRMit. Cartoon 
series, set in Twenties 
Canada, about a reluctant 
' Mounfie. (r) 935 The 
Monkees. (r) 9 lS 0 
Newsround Special 
Defivary presented by 
John Craven 155 The 
Adventures of BuBanffida 
and Rodra. Part one. 

1OO0 Why Dorr f You_? ideas 

for bored youngsters. 

including making home 
. movies. 1035 The 
Adventures of BuRwMda 
and Rocky. Part two. (r) 
1030 Pfay School 
presented by Carol Leader 
wfth guest Simon Davies- 
1030 Cricket: Second Test The 
opening session of the 
final day's play in the 
game at Trent Bridge 
between England and New 
Zealand, introduced by 
Peter West 

1.05 News After Noon mth 
Laurie Mayer includes 

news headlines with 
subtitles 130 Regional 
news. The weather detaHs 
come from Michael Ftsh‘ 
135 Rngermouae. A See- 
Saw programme for the 
very young, with tain I 
Laucnlan and Jane Hardy .(ra 
130 Cricket Socond Test - 
Further coverage of the 
final day's play m the 
match at Trent Bridge. 

433 Regional news. 

435 The Romsn HoSdays. 
Cartoon series set m 
Ancient Rome 430 HekflL 
Drama serial in 26 
about a young 

(r) 

5.15 Fame. The normally aloof 
Shorofsky faces an 

emotional time when, for 
the first time in nearly half 

■ a century, hemeets the 
sweetheart he left behind 
in Germany at the start of 
the Second World War. (r) 

630 News with Nicholas 

WrtcheR and Philip Hayton- 
Weather. 

635 London Pius. 


730 Vintage Morecambe and 
Wise . Ernie Wise 
Introduces a show from 
tiie Sixties on which - - 

Barbara Law and The 
Settlers were guests. 

7.30 EastEnders. Den and 
Angle are upset by a 
decision made by Sharon; 
Debs and Andy plan their 
future together Kathy and 
Pete go on holiday; and 
Ethel asks Den for a pay 
rise. (Ceefex) 

830 JuSet Bravo. The m&iers’ 
strike causes problems for 
InspectorKate Lorigton 
when two mining tan! Bias,' 
one husband on strike, the 
other atw oik. d ash after 
months of simmering 

wo rOflits of view, cm 
Took takes another 
into tha BBC's postbag. 

930 News with JuflaSocnefvffle 
and Andrew Harvey. • 
Regional news and 
weather. 

930 TheThom Birds. Episode 
three of the adaptation of 
CoHeen McCullough's 
novel, and Maggie, 
hearing that Ralph is to be 
made a bishop, makes a 
momentous decision. 
Starring Richard 
Chamberlain, Rachel Ward 
and Jean Simmons, (r) 
(Ceefax) . - 

11.00 The Taste of Health 

presented by Judith Harm. 
Food writers. Claudia 
Roden and Dinah 
Momson, prepare 
succulent not and cold • 
picnic food, Paul Levy 
suggests the drinks, (r) 
1135 Rhode. In the company of 
her mother. Rhoda meets 
Joe’s ex-wife, (r) 

1130 Weather. 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Anne 
Diamond and Adrian 
Brown. News with Gordon 
Honeycombs at 630, 730, 
730, 830 and 830; sport 
at fcfO and 7,40; exercises 
at 65$ cartoon at 735; 

pop music at 735. 


835 


Wacaday presented by 
Timmy Maflett His 
pop singer Belouis 


ITV/LONDON 


935 Thames news headSnes 
followed by World Chess 
Championship. A repeat 
of last night" report on the 
Kasparov/Karpov clash 
930 Struggle Pene a tt the 
Sea. NewfoureSand . 
Squids. 

1036 Cartoon 10.10 Jayca and 
the Wheeled Warriors. 
Animated science fiction 
series 1030 GatecMca 80. 
Part one of a science ■ 
fiction adventure entitied 
The Night the Cycfons 
Landed 1130 wattoo 
Wattoo. Cartoon 
adventures. 

1130 About Britain. The rise 
. and fad of Devonport. 

1230 Jamie and the Magic 

Torch. For the very young. 

(r) 12.10 Rainbow. (t) 

1230 The SuBhmha. 
Drama serial about an 
Australian family during 
the Forties. 

130 News at One vrith Leonard 
Parkin 130 Thames news 
presented by Robm 
Houston 1^) Tucker's 
Witch. The husband and 
wife detective team go n 
the hunt for a stolen coffin. 

230 University ChaBenge 

IntematlonaL University of 
Auckland meet Jesus 
College, Oxford, in the 
deciding rubber. 

Presented by Peter 
Sinclair and Bamber 
Gascoigne 330 HeMoom. 
John Bfy values and £ves 

■ advice on viewers' 
antiques 335 Thames 
news heacfflnss 330 The 
Young Doctors. Metical 
drama series set in a large 
Australian dty hospital. 

4.00 Jamie and the Magic 
Torch. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 
noon. 4.10 The Moonwta. 
Cartoon series, (r) 430 
Inspector Gadget 

■ Animated adventures of 
an indefatigable 


Groth reports on 
the San Francisco holiday 
of the five Supersleuth 
winners. 

5.15 Survival: Uttle Game. The 
smaller animals living on 
the African plains. 

535 News with John Suchet 
630 Thames news. 

630 Duty Free. Excitement 
abounds when it is 
discovered actor Frazer 
Hines is staying in the 
hotel, (r) 

730 Emmerdate Farm. Is it the 
beginning ofthe end for 
Joe Suqoan and Karen? 

730 Name That Tune. Musical 
. quiz presented by Lionel 
Blair. 

830 Film: Meteor (1979) 
starring Sean Connery, 
Natafie Wood and Henry 
Fonda. Disaster movie 
about the Earth being • 
threatened by a fivenmito 
wide meteor which can 
only be (Averted if the 
Russians and the Untied 
States pool their technical 
knowledge and resources. 
Directed by Ronald 
Neame. 

1030 News at Ten with Martyn 
Lewis and Pamela 
Armstrong. Weather, 
followed tty Thames news 
headlines. 

1030 Viewpoint 86: After the 
Riots. (Oracle) (see 
Choice) 

1130 Hammer House of 


’s television and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 


Crosby, in the middle of 
the night a wife awakes to 
find a wall pressing 
against the house. As her 
husband tries to punch a 
hole through the 
enveloping brickwork only 
their daughter seems to 
be unaffected by the 
bizarre experience. 
Directed by Val Guest (r) 
1235 Night Thoughts. 





Mea of Handswordc After the 
Rkte, on ITV, 1030pm 


•AFTER THE WOTS (TTV. 
1030pm), Central Television's 
documentary about last 
September's troubles in the 
Birmingham suburb of 
Handsworth and what preceded 
and followed them, offers 
only crumbs of comfort to those 
who would Bee to think that 
there Is no basis, only traditional 
resentment in one witness's 
pessimistic conclusion that "no- 
one has the guts to 
implement social changes in the 
area". It is important to bear 
in mind, when assessing Zia 
Mohyeddirr's film, that ft was 
made under the umbrafla of Man* 
and NOw, the regional 
magazine that reflects the view 
of ethnic minorities in the 
Midlands. I say this because the 
balance of Attar the Riots tips 
In favour of the charge that 
promises of a better 


CHOICE 


tomorrow for the disparate 
ethnic groups of Handsworth 
have not been kept On the face 

of it the evidence is strong. 

Just a few of the allegations: 
housing associations have 
turned properties into flats that 

resemble nothing so much as 
transit camps since the average 
occupancy lasts only six 
weeks; cash does not circulate 
locally because rebuilding 
work goes to contractors from 
outside the area; the doors of 
a community centre opened in 
1983 are dosed more than 
open; local traders who were 
promised help when their 
premises were destroyed in the 
1 985 nots cannot start up 
again, either because alternative 
premises are not available or 


because insurance companies 
will have nothing to with 
them. And as for community 
posting. one of the main 
planks in the social reform plans ' 
for Handsworth, After the 
Riots carries a reminder that 
such a scheme actually 

operated in the area throughout 
the 1970$. but it did nothing to 
prevent the riots oM98l. With 
issues like these steaming 
and bubbling away in the film, 
small wonder the question of 
whether the 1985 nots were an 
uprising or a criminal adnrily 
is put on to the back burner. 

• Radio choicer Christopher 
Whelen's Broad Daytiflht (Radio 
3. 935pm) imaginatively Inks 
Koranic wisdom with a tragic 
1 6th century love stray ana a 
20th century perversion of it 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


635 Open University: Science - 
The Fabric of Life. Ends at 
730. 

930 Ceefax. 

430 Cricket Second last The 
dosing session of the fifth 
and final day of the game 
at Trent Bridge between 
England and New 
' Zealand. The 
commentators are Richie 
Benaud and Tony Lewis 
with summaries Dy Ray 
U&ngworth and Bob Wi His. 

6.10 No units. Jenny Powell 
and Tony Baker grain 
Torquay and find that ter 
from being a sedate 
seaside resort the place 
boasts paragliding, roller 
skating and synchronised 
swimming among other 
activities, and the famous 


730 


Fawtty Towers. 

Fat lifen 1 


in the Kitchen. 
Tom Vernon, in his 
Musweti Hill kitchen, 
prepares Italian 
specialities such as 
spaghetti with tomato 
sauce; marrow-bone 
steaks with risotto; Po 
Delta salad, and 
artichokes with potatoes. 
730 Questions of Defence. 
Part five of John Barry's 
history of Nato examines 
the mystery behind the 
eventual indefinite 
postponement of the 
neutron bomb. A! the time 
there was fierce debate 
between the Untied States 
and the Federal Republic 
of Germany over the 
enhanced radiation 
weapon, in the end. 
Pr e sident Carter took the 
blame for the shelving of 
the project blessed by 
Helmut Schmidt 
830 WMSfe Showcase: 

Granby's Primates. A film 
made by undergraduates 
of the University of 
Vermont at Granby Zoo. 
MonfreaL They discovered 
that the primates 
responded to crowded 
and uninteresting habitats 
by overeating and 
engaging in anti-social 
habits; by falling to mate, 
or if successful, the 
pregnancy ending in a 
miscarriage. The students 
designed and constructed 
quarters for the primates 
offering stimulation, 
exercise and privacy, with - 
the result that all tiie great 
apes began to breed, 
n Days, br the last 
of his series 
lams the 


830 Steam 

■programme 
MftesKkKitt 


arranges 

a ride on the foot plats- 
930 The MM of a Murderer. 
The second and final part 
of the award-warning 
documentary about 
Kenneth Bianchi. a mass 
murderer, whose stats of 
mental health was a bona 
of contention between 
psychiatrists and the 

police, (r) 

11035 Cricket Second Test 
Richie Benaud Introduces 
highlights of the final day's 
play in the game atTrent 
Bridge between England 
and New Zealand. 

1035 Newsnfght1130 
Weather. 

1135 Music at Night Ptilfip 

Astie and Paul Williamson 
perform Ducatia and 
Estampie. and SaftareBo. 
1130 Open untversfty: 

Unemployed in Clwyd. 
Ends at 123a 


CHANNEL 4 


235 West Point Story* (1950) 
starring James Cagney, 

Virginia Mayo, Dons Day 
ana Gordon MacRae. 
Musical about a Broadway 

stage director who agrees 

to direct an amateur 
production at the West 
Point Military Academy. 
Directed by Roy Del Ruth. 

430 Dancin' Days. Julia learns 
of Yolanda's financial 
pBght and her concern at 
not yet receiving her 
Inv itat ion to the Mayor's 
party at Dancin' Days. 

530 Bewitched. Uncle Arthur 
ruins Samantha's cake 
and tries to make amends 
by producing a napoleon 
but only succeeds in 
calling up the French 
emperor. 

530 Pets in Particular 

presented by Lesley Judd. 
Advice on keeping a herd 
of goats; howto help an 
animal in the absence of a 
professional; and a profile 
of the People's 
Dispensary for Sick 
Animals. (Oracle) 

630 Re m ing t on Steele. Laura 
and Remington investigate 
the reasons why an 
aircraft firm, run by the 
founder's widow, suddenly 
has trouble with technical 
and mechanical failures, 
obtaining spares and bank 
loans. The plot thickens 
after Laura s apartment is 
blown up. Starring Pierce 
Brosnan and Stephanie 
Zrmbalist 

635 Mimm Buchatansangur. 
Cartoon series about an 
odious creature that 
inhabits the cracks in a 
sink. 

7.00 Channel FOur news with 
Alastalr Stewart and 
Nicholas Owen. 

730 Comment With her views 
on the subject of free 
speech is Vicky Phillips, 
president of the National 
Union of Students. 
Weather. 

830 Brookakfe. Sheila's mind 
is put at rest when the 
tea her of the 


Identity of the rapist 
830 The wine Pro gr a m me 
presented by Jancis 
Robinson. Tm 


programme includes the 
.. different grape varieties 
• used to make wine and 
' indudes film of vineyards 
in Spain, Italy. France. 
Portugal and Australia, (r) 
930 Rkn: Plaza Suite (1971) 
starring Walter Matthau. A 
Nefl Simon play about 
three different sets of 

'maNew 
hotel suite - a couple 
who celebrate their 24th 
wedding anniversary 
where they spent their 
honeymoon; a HoSywood 
producer Invites an okt 
flame to hfe room with the 
Intention of seducing her; 
and the parents of a 
rfistressedbride-trvbetry 
to persuade her to unlock 
her door and go and many 
her fiance. Directed by 
Arthur Hliler. 

1130 The Max Headroom 
Show. Highlights from 
previous shows. 

1130 Too Close For Comfort 
American comedy series 
about an over-protective 
father and hfe attractive 
Starring Ted 
Nancy Dussault 
Deborah Van 
Valkenburgh. Ends at 
1230 


( Radio 4 ) 


On Lora wave. Stereo on VHP 
555 Snpping.&oo News Briefing: 
Weather. 6.10 Fanning. 

635 Prayer (s) 

630 Today, md 630. 730, 

830 News. M5 
Business News 635. 735 
Weather 730. 830 News 
730 Letters 735, 835 
Sports 7.45 Thought for 
the Day 

8X3 Lake Wobegon Days, 
part 7. Read by the 
author, Gamson Kefflor fri. 
837 Weather; Travel 
930 News 

935 Tuesday CaB: 01-580 
4411. Phone-in. 

10.00 News; From Our Own 
Correspondent Life and 
poWics abroad. 

1030 Mom mg Story; Last 

Thing at Night by Donald 
Bancroft Read by Rex 
Hotdsworth. 

1045 Daily Service (New Every 
Morning, page 42) (s) 

1130 News; Travel; Thirty- 
Minute Theatre. The 
Unofficial Guide, by Shirley 
Barrie. With Natasha 
Pyne as the holidaying 
daughter who meets a 
man (Stuart Organ) (s) 

1133 The Living Wona 
Magazine edition 
presented by Peter France. 
1230 News: You and Yours. 
Consumer advice, with 
PetteCoJdwett. 

1237 Brain of Bntam 1986. 
Semi-final (2). 123S 
Weather, Travel 
130 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers. 135 


230 News; Woman's Hour. 

With Jenni Murray. 

330 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Roto Descending, 
by Cohn Haydn Evans. With 
Richard Pasco, Barbara 
Leigh-Hunt and Meg Davies 
In the cast (s) 

4.00 News 

435 Soundings. The Moral 
MeaL The morality and 


430 

comment oh Brian 
Clark's pteyTha Petition, at 
the Lyttteton Theatre, 
London (r) 

530 PM. News magazine. 

530 SMppingT535 
Weather 

630 News; Financial Report 
630 Counterpoint. Musical 
knowledge q uiz ch aired 


by Nod Shemn (r) 

730 News 
7.05 The Archers 
730 The Last Link. Portrait of 
Young British Jewry - a 
community m crisis. 

830 South-East Europe 
Journey. Julian Hale 
reports on the clash between 
the new pics *n‘ captions 
journalism and the risky art 
of tefiing fully, frankly and 

elegantly, an the news that's 
fittoprim. 

830 The Tuesday Feature: 

The Larks at Tangmers 
Sang Then. Throi^h hw 
noteoock of poetry, Enc 
Marsden tells hts story as a 
young engine fitter for 
fighters and bombers during 
the Second World War. 

930 In Touch. For people with 
a visual handicap. 

930 Writers on Blue Papers. 
Pnson Rambkngs. by 
Ndubuisi Abaa. Read by Ben 
Onukwe. 

945 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
comment on the 
Edinburgh FesnvaL 

10.15 A Book at Badtime: AO 
the Brave Promises (2). 

Read by Helen Horton 1039 
weather 

1CL3Q The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Enterprise. Marjorie 

Lofthouse meets finalists 
In the Radio Tunes/Radio4 
Enterprise competition 
(1) Neen Pain Management 
Systems 

1230 News: Weather. 1233 

VHF (avaSabfcPin England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 5355.00am Weather; 
Travel 135-230pm 
Listening Comer (s). 530-535 
PM (Continued]. 11.30- 
12.10am Open University: 
1130 Open Forum: 

University Magazine 1130 
Science: Urban Geology. 

C Radio 3 ) 


On VHF only: - 
635 Open University. Untfl 
635am. Modem art and 
modernism 

On medium wave only: - 
635 Weather. 7.00 News 
735 Morning Concert 
Mendelssohn (The 
Hebrides overture). 
Monteverdi (Zefiro toma. 
with tenors Derenne and 
Cuenod), Mendelssohn 


{CapnccxkOpSl No 3). 
Mozart (Piano Concerto 
No 27, with Casa da us. 
soloist). 830 News 
835 Concert (contd) Mozart 
(Sehnsucm nach dem 
Fruhbnge: Schwarzkopf. 
sopranoVAiso. 

Beethoven ( Variations on 
BeiMarmem: 

Casals/Cortot). S&Okus 
(Prospers. Ariel. 

Miranda. Naiads (Tempest), 
Schumann (Symphony 
no 3). 9.00 News 
935 Tins Week’s Composer; 

Alan HoddinotL 
Ritome&i, Op 85: Night 
Music, Op 48; Duloa 
luventutis. Op 97 (Shelley 
and Macnamara. pianos), 
Nocturnes and Cadenzas. 
Op 62. with Welsh, celfo) • 
1030 Antonio CaVJar a: BBC 
Singers and soloists. 
Cruafotus for i&part chorus 
a cappeto; ana Stabat 
Mater, for soloists, chorus 
and orchestra 
1035 Mozart Clarinet 
Concerto in A. K 622 
(Pay and Academy of 
Ancient Music) 

1035 Test Match: final day. 
England v New Zealand. 
Coverage continues on 
medium wave until 5.30 
On VHF only: - 

1130 Edinburgh International 
Festival: Heinnch Sctiitl 
(cello). Roger Vignoles 
(piano).. Part one. Bach 
(Suite N0 1 A G, BWV 1007). 
Shostakovich (Cello 
Sonata, Op 40) 

11.45 Pied Piper More about 
the trombone, from the 
late David Munrcrw 
1235 Edinburgh Festival 

Iconic): Beethoven (Cello 
Sonata in A, Op 69). Martmu 
(Variations on Rossmi 
theme). 130 News 
135 Polish Chamber 

Orchestra: with Michael 
Thompson (horn), Britten 
(Variations on theme by 
Budge). Elgar ( Serenade for 
Strings). Michael 
Berkeley (Horn Concerto), 
Tctwukovsky (Serenade 
for Smogs) 

235 Bach Mass m B minor: 

La Petite 

Band/Amsterdam Bach 
Choir/solorsts Poulenard. 
Laurens. Jacobs. EJwes. Van 
der Kamp. 435 News 
530 Mainly for Pleasure; with 
Roger Nichots 
On medium wave only; - 
630 Church music by 

Christopher Tye: New 
College Choir under Edward 
Higginbottorn 
735 An Art-loving Nation: 

John Bott as Ruskm in 
extracts from fus writings 


730 Proms 88: Nash 
Ensemble, with Sarah 
Walker (mezzo), and fan 
Brown (piano). Part one. 
Gounod (Petite symphonic, 
for wind). Dallapiccola 
(Piccola musiea nottuma). 
Ravel (Trois poemes de 
MaBarme). Messiaen 
(Oisaaux exotiques) 


825 A Halting Start talk by 
Professor Theo Barker. 
LondonSchoolof 
Economics 


835 Proms (continued): Ravel 
(Introduction and 
Allegro), and Berio (Folk 
songs) 


935 Broad Daylight Alec 


McGowan and Kate 
Perbvaf head tho cast m 
Christopher Whelan s 
love story in words and 
music See Choice 
10.40 Bernhard Klee 
Conducts: BBC 
Philharmonic perform 
Berg's Three orchestral 
pieces, Op 6, and Mazan's 
Symphony No 33 
1135 A Choice Collection: 
keyboard music and 
songs by John Bfow. Robert 
wooifey (harpsichord) 
and Emma Kufcby (soprano) 
1 137 News. 12.00 Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the how Headlines 
5.30am,, 630, 730. 83a Sports 
Desks 1.05pm. 2.02, 332. 4.02. 
5.05. 5.02. 6.45 (mf orrtvl. 935. 
Cncket Scoreboard 730pm 
4.00am Cohn Berry 530 Ray 
Moore 7.30 Derek Jameson 9.30 
Ken Bruce 11.00 Jimmy Young 
incl medical questions answered by 
Dr B4l Dolman 1.05pm David 
Jacobs 2.05 Annefca Rice 330 
David Hamilton 5.05 John Dunn 
7.00 Bob Monkhouse Presente 
(BBC Radio orchestra) 9.00 Enc 
Coates - King of Light Muse. 
Narrated by his son Austin 
Coates. (2) 1030 Non-Stop Stutz. 
(With Stutz Bear Cats) 1030 
Sloe Coaches, starring Roy Kir near 
and Andrew Sachs 11.00 
Round Midnight from Edinburgh 
1.00am Nightnde 3.00-4.00 A 
Little Night Musk. 


c 


Radio 1 




News on the half-hour from 
630am until 8.30pm then at 1030 
and 12.00 midnight. 

5.30am Adrian John 7.00 Simon 
Mavo 9.30 Simon Bates 11.00 
Radio 1 Roadshow from 
Westward Ho 1 12.30 Newsbear 
(Frank Partridge) 12.45 Andy 
Peebles, mcl tod 40 singles 3.00 
Steve Wright 530 NewsDeat 
(Frank Patndge) 5.45 Peter Powell, 
ind 8.30. Top 40 smqlas 7.30 
Jamc Lonq jmcl John Walters' 
Diary) 10.00-12. DO John Peel. 

VHF Stereo RADIOS 18 2: -4.00am 
As Radio 2. 1 0.00pm As Radio 
1 . 12.00-4.00am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


News IN Reflections S.15 Every Cat a 
Holy Day B.30 ASpeCIs Of LiSZt 800 News 
9.01 Rene* o* tt» British Press V.IS 
world Tocav 930 Financial News 9 40 
Look Alwad 9.45 What s New 1030 Naw s 
11X01 Windows on me Universe 1 1.00 
News 1109 News About Bruin 11.15 
Spom. world 11 JO Ongns 1530 Ra to 
Newsteei 12.16 A wend Trinket H G 
Walts 12.45 Sports Roundup 100 News 
1JM Twoniy-Four Hours 1 JO Network UK 
1.45 SponsworU 2.00 Outlook ZAS Philip 
Jones Brass Ensemble 3X0 Radio News- 
reel 3.15 A Jolly Good Show 430 News 
409 Commentary 4.15 OmnCuS 5.45 


itaiy 4 
ip 7.45 


Book Chaco 9.15 From me Proms 86 
1030 News 10.09 World Today 10-25 A 
Letter From Scntwnd 10J0 Financial 
News 10.40 RetlachQfts 10.45 Sports 
Roundup 1130 News 1138 Commenary 
11.15 New Waves n ttw Shortwave 11 J9 
A World THinker H G Walls 12.00 Newt; 
1239 News About Bntam 12.15 Rjco 
Newsreel 12J0 Omnibus 130 News 1.01 
Outlook 1 JO Report on Rakrain 1.45 
Country Style 230 News 239 Review ol 
Bniish Press 2 - 1 5 Engksh Miniatures 230 
Mystery ol the &ws Tram 3.00 News 3.09 
News About Britain 3.15 World Today A45 
Reflections 430 Financial News 530 
News 539 Twenty-Four Hours 5A5 Wand 
Today All times In GMT. 


635-730 Dm FVntnones 1130- 
3135 Nows and weather SCOTLAND 


1130-11 JO^ Three's CompnnyllJO- 
1136 The Taste of Heath 1135- 
1230 Weather NORTH81N IRELAND 
4JSpOH43D Heidi 5A0335 Fame 
SJS3A0 Totev's Sport 5*M30 fcmida 
UMer 835-730 Dm Roman H 06 - 
dqis 1130-11J3 News and mamtmr EN- 
ffl-ANO 6JSpm-7.00 Regional nowa 
mageiin*. 

1030 Cartoon 10J5 Glenroe 1130- 
1130 Once Upon a Time . ..Man 
12J0pm-l30&rdens tor Al 130- 
1J0 News 5.1 5-5A5 Emmaniala Farm 
too AOout Anglo 635 Crossroads 
730-730 Ua and My Girt 630 Magnum 
830-1030 Bndaahaad Revtsitsd 
11 JOT J Hooker 12JS» Tuesday Top- 
ic. Closedown. 

channel ag&gy 

Street 1030 Jack Holbom; 1035 

Cartoon 1130-1130 Captain Scarlet 

IJOpm News 130330 Cojitry 
Practice S.15-545 Sons and Dtotptars 


■JOMsgnun 

Bndeshead Revrsirid 1130 Mysteries of 

Edgar Wafeca T2JSem Closedown. 

eisasALjyssss™ 

930-1130 Flm: Steepen Cer to Tri- 
este 12JOpm-130 Gardening Tune 130 
News 1 JO-230 Afternoon P&yrxxise 
5.154L45 Whose the Boss? 63Q Cross- 
roads 635-730 News 630 Msgmm 
530-1030 Bridashed Rewrted IU0 
Sweeney 1230am Jobfrider 130 
Ooeedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


GRAMPIAN 


Thing 930 Once Uxm a , 

Tens ... Men 6S: Sesame Strew 1Q50 
Short Story 11.15-1130 Smafs 
1Z30pm-1 JOGardenwa Tmw 130-230 
FamOy ^ Theetra5.l5-5.tt Emmentale 
Farm 630 North Tonirait 635 Oroasrocds 
730-730 Me and My&l 630 Hotel 

930-1030 Brideslmad Revisited 1130 

Devrs Lake Concerts 1235am 

News Closedown. 

TJ5W As London aacept: 935am 
Sesame 8treet103S Captain 
Scarlet 1030 Max The Mouse 1130- 
1130 Connections I230poi-I30 Lamm it 
to Mrs O'Brmn 130-230 Han to Hmt 

338-430 Sons and Daughters 5u15 Gus 

Honeyrim 530-5A5 Crossroads 
630 Today South West 635 Televiews 
SJ5-7J0 Carson's Law 830 TJ 
Hooker 830-1030 Bndesnead Revistad 
1 130 Postscript 1135 Mann s Bast 

Friends 1236am Closedown. 

GRANADA 

Reports 930 High Treason 1135 
About Britain 11 J0-1230 Connections 
i2JOpm-t30 Prim Akmg With 
Money 130 Granada Reports 130-2J0 
Ahemoon Theatre 330-430 war's 

Way 5.15-5.45 Mr Smsh 630 Granada 

RepOrts630TrisisYourRi9it635- 

730 Crossroads 030 Minder 9.00-1030 

Bndeshead Reviotad 1130 Man In A 

Suitcase 1230sm Ctosedown. 

TYNE TEES Asuygny- 


9 JO Sesame Street 1035 vvorid of 
Stories 1035-1130 LWe House on the 


PraWe 130pm News 135 
Lookaraund 130-230 kufca 5.15-545 
Whose Baby? 630 Northern Life 
635-7.00 Ciosaioads 130 Qumcy 930- 
1030 Bndeshead Revisited 11 JO 
Mysteries ol Edgar WUaca 1230am Re- 
flection m RmwnwL Ctosedowa 

1035 Feiac the Cat 1030 Roocmtory 
11.00-1130 Onca Upon a Time . . . Man 
130pm-130 News &M30 Sons 
and Daughters 5.15-535 Me and My Gel 
630 Lookaround 635-730 Cross- 
roads 6tXJ Hotel 930-1030 Bndeshead 
Rewsnee 1 130 Mann s Best Friends 
1230 Closedown. 

S4C 1 30pm Dandn' Days 1 JO AF 
ce 230 Goto Goch a Malwen 
2-15 interval 3.05 Sons ot Abraham 
335 Vanisring Tntms ol Africa 430 Be- 
witched 530 Reppmo 530 Car 54. 

Where are You 9 630 Looks Faimhar 8.45 
Lera Pariez Frandais 7.00 
Newyddlon Sailh 730 ^w A Bod 830 
Cdy Centre Cydmc 930 
Chateauvadon 1030 Max Headroom 
Slow 1030 F4nc LnstTn&e 12.20am 
Closedown. 

HVTWEST ^^^s^ 

Street 1035-1130 Nicholas Nckiaby 
130pm News 130-230 The Baron 5.15- 
535 Me and Mw GM 630 News $35- 

7.00 Crossroads 830 Magnum 9.00- 

10.00 Bndashaad Revisrtad 1130 
Man n a Sun case 1230am CtesadcNvn. 

HTV WALES 


^OJTISH^^ W 

ons 10.15 Rexy 1035 Cartoon 1035 
Gtanroe 11.00-1130 Jacksons 130-230 
Man m a Suitcase 330-430 Sons 
and Daughters 5-15-S45 Emmerdalo 
Farm B3o News and Scotland Today 
8.1S Light in tne North 635 Cmssioads 
730 Taxa the High Road 830 They 
Shall Have Mus£ 930-1030 Bndeshead 
Ravtwaid 11J0 Aoopch* Now) 

1230m Late Call. Closedown. 

TVC As London except- 930m 
J—s Sesame Street 1030 Jack Ha>- 
Dom 1035 Cartoon 1130-11.30 Cap- 
tam Scarlet 130pm News 130-230 
Country Practice 5.15-5-45 Sons and 
Daughters 6.00 Coast to Coast 635 Po- 
hce 5 635-700 Crossroads 6.00 
Magnwn 930-1030 Bndeshead Hawk- 
ed 11 30 The Mystenes of Edgar 
Wallace 1235am Company, Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE ** l4»do«\«. 

J - car 935am Jayca 

and the Wheeled Wamora 930 Walk- 

<ng on Ar 10.45 Short Story 1135-1130 

FmumU XL5 1230om-I30 Lunchtime 

uve 130 News 130 Horses tor Comes 

230-230 Leave it to Mrs O'Brien 
330-430 Country Practca 5.15-545 
Whose Baby? 630 Calendar 6.35- 
7.00 Crossroads 630 Ouncy 930-1030 
Bndeshead RbwwIM 11 jo Kianns 

Best Friends 12.00 Show Express 

1230m- 630m Muse Box. 
ULSTER As London except 
ULO 1 Cn 93Sam Blockbusters 930 
Sesame Sheet 1030Groowe 
Ghoukes 11.15-1130 Cartoon 130pm 
Lunotrine 130-230 Crips 330-400 
Dreamt 5.15-5A5 Whose Baby? 630 

Summer Edition 620 Diary Dares 
630 Cartoon 630-730 Crossroads 630 
Qumcy 930-1000 Bndeshead Revis- 
ited 1130 Sheena Easton 1 235am News. 
Closedown 






#t‘ 

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CUattBocd or pise 28 






















TUESDAY AUGUST 12 1986 


" f I'Ll L' nmiyTDO 


■T.r.r.rfc 


T "V 


Pint published in I78S 


8 ****** 


Gooch’s worries 
add to England 
autumnal gloom 

By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


SPORT 


TREST BRIDGE: England, 
iivV// sc\'en second innings 
wickets in hand, are 93 runs 
behind Sew Zealand. 

Considering that no more 
than 75 minutes play was 
possible yesterday, in the sec- 
ond Test match, sponsored by 
Comhill. New Zealand made 
good progress, in dismissing 
Moxon and Athey at a cost of 
onlv 33 runs. With Gooch 
having been lost on Saturday, 
only Gower and Gatting of the 
specialist batsmen remain. 
The match ends today, and 
there is said to be less likeli- 
hood of the forecast of fine 
weather being thrown off 
course. 

The position is not much 
different from that at Lord’s in 
the first Test a fortnight ago. 
There, too. New Zealand were 
held up by rain on the 
Monday after gaining a first 
innings lead. On the Tuesday, 
England, thanks to Gooch, 
held on for a draw. Now. as it 
did then, the pitch may be 
expected to play as well as at 
any time in the match. 

Heavy overnight storms de- 
faced yesterday's start until 
I.'IO. and an autumnul gloom 
kept the players off the field 
from 2.25 onwards. Moxon 
was out in the eighth of the 
day's 18 overs and Athey in 
the 17th. h was the fourth 
time in two Tests that Moxon 
fell to Hadlee. It was the 
oulswinger that accounted for 
him. Already beaten by it 
twice he was lured again. 
Smith, the wicketkeeper, tak- 
ing a thickish edge. 


Afterseeing Hadlee off, which 
he did shrewdly enough, 
Athey was caught at the wicket 
down the Its, side off 
Brace we I L the on-spinner. 

To go by Athey’s reactions, 
he thought no more of this 
derision than Gooch had of 
his on Saturday evening. They 
were both in areas — Gooch 
was playing the bat and pad 

Scoreboard 

B4GUUG3:Fnllnainss:(DIQower71.C 
W J Athey 55: R J Hwfieo 6 for 80). 
Second Innings 

G A Gooch c Coney b Bracawsll — 17 

HOMoaonc Smith bKadlM 33 

P H Edmonds not out ■ 13 , 

C W J Athey c Smith b Bracewofl 6 

D I Gower no! out 0 

Extras ... - 5 

Total (3 wfcta) 63 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-23, 2-47, 3-63. 

Hadlee 11-3-31-1; StMhm 8-3-21-0; 
BrscewtO 3-2-2-Z; Watson 32-1-5-0. 


NEW ZEALAND; First Innings 413 (J G 
BracewM1 110; B J HacRee 68, J G Wright 
58. EJ Grey SO). 

Umpires: D J Constant and K E Ptfmer. 


forward push. Athey was try- 
ing a leg glance — in which 
batsmen lend, quite often, to 
get the worst of the deaL U has 
to be assumed that on both 
occasions here the umpires 
had no doubt that the bail had 
been played: otherwise they 
should have given the bats- 
man the benefit of it. 

Gooch was not letting on 
yesterday whether he had 
come to a derision regarding 
his availability for Australia. 
He will tell the selectors today. 
Moxon and Athey have both, 
of course, set their hearts on 
going, though there is unlikely 
to be -room for more than one 


HORSE TRIALS 


Murphy Himself 
to get an outing 


By Jenny MacArthur 


Virginia Leng, who will be 
trying for her fourth 
successive win at next 
month's Remy Martin Burgh- 
lex- horse trials, is likely to ride 
the relatively inexperienced 
Murphy Himself rather than 
her top horse. Priceless, on 
whom she became the world 
champion in Australia in May 
and the European champion 
at Burghley last year. 

“Priceless is in great form,’' 
Mrs Leng said yesterday, “but 
he has done so much for me 
over the last four years that I 
would like to ride him in a few 
one day events and just lei 
him enjoy himself.” 

Her other lop horse. Night 
Cap. at 13 the same age as 
Priceless but with less mileage 
on the clock, is heading for the 
Polish three-day event at Bialy 
Bor in September. 

Murphy Himself, however, 
will be no mean substitute at 
Burghley. He won the 
Avcnches three-day event in 


Switzerland as a six-year-old, 
competed at Chatsworth last 
year and won at Le Touquet 
this year. His youth will not 
deter Mrs Leng. “If he goes 
well at Gatcombe this week- 
end I'll be having a real crack 
at Burghley” she said. 

Other top riders having a 
crack are Ian Stark and Lorna 
Clarke, winners of the team 
gold medal in Australia, Lu- 
cinda Green. Captain Mark 
Phillips. Bruce Davidson from 
the United Slates and Mark 
Todd, of New Zealand. 

There are eight new or 
modified fences on the course 
designed by Philip Herbert, 
but the lower trout hatchery is 
excluded this year because it 
has been drained of water. The 
Trials, now in their fourth 
year of sponsorship by Remy 
Martin, who annually contrib- 
ute £100.000, take place at 
Burghley. near Slam ford. _ 
Lincolnshire, from September* 
4 to 7. 


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of them, if that Moxon has a 
74 at Lord's in his favour, 
Athev his one-day 100 at Old 
Trafford. but only one isolated 
50 in 14 Test innings. 

Sent -in as Saturday’s 
nighiwatchman, Edmonds 
survived yesterday where 
Moxon and Athey were un- 
able to. Edmonds revelled in 
it, 1 am sure. He can be as 
stubborn as a mule as New 
Zealand could find to their 
cost today. He played and 
missed a few times, but could 
be less likely than some of his 
superiors as batsmen to make 
the same mistake twice. 

Inevitably.there was much 
speculation about Gooch. He 
was told some weeks ago that 
the selectors would be coming 
to him for a decision about 
Australia. It is perfectly under- 
standable that they should 
want to know before choosing 
the side for the last Test match 
of the season, starting at the 
Oval on Thursday week. 

Until some time in the 
sixties the selectors would 
send out something like 30 
letters of availability, to which 
they would want replies by 
mid-July. It was usually fairly 
common knowledge who bad . 
been sounded out. The list was 
sometimes published. 

If the tour was to Australia, 
with the team due to sail 
during the second week in 
September, the party would be 
announced by the end of the 
first week in August Often, as 
with Gooch, there was some- 
one with domestic decisions 
to be taken who needed time 
in which to make them. 

ROWING 

British 
team 
ready for 
world 

By Jim Raflton 

Great Britain has selected 
probably the largest and stron- 
gest ever team for the world 
championships, which begin 
next Sunday in Nottingham. 
British crews have enjoyed an 
exceptional season at home 
and abroad and could well 
touch the mother lode with at 
least five medals — and there 
will be disappointment if 
some are not gold on the home 
waters. 

The flagship of the British 
men's heavyweight team is 
Steven Redgrave and Andy 
Holmes — victors over the 
Italian Abbaganale brothers 
twice this season — in the 
coxed pair, but they have 
dropped the coxswain, Adrian 
Ellison, the Olympic and 
Commonwealth gold medal 
winner. There appears to be a 
dash of personalities. The 
coxswain of the crew will be 
Patrick Sweeney. Sweeney 
coxed the 1974 and 1976 
World and Olympic British 
eights to two silver medals and 
it must be hoped that he will 
be worth his weight in gold 
next week. 









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Scourge of England: Hadlee strikes to dismiss Moxon for die fourth time in two Tests and 
raise doubts whether the opening batsman will tour Australia (Photograph: Chris Harris) 

GOLF ~~~ 

Norman delayed in battle 
for PGA championship 


Toledo, Ohio (Reuter) — 
The Open champion, Greg 
Norman, was forced to wait a 
day to try to win his second 
consecutive major title when 
rain washed out the final 
round of the PGA Champion- 
ship on Sunday. 

Norman, leading by four 
strokes, had just hit his drive 
on the second hole when play 
was suspended because rain 
had flooded the Inverness 
Club's 6,982-yard course. 

After a delay of more than 
two hours, tournament of- 
ficials decided to halt play for 
the day. The 60 players still on 
the course- resumed their 
rounds yesterday. 

“I don't think it is going to 
affect my play at ah,” Norman 
said. He won the Open last 
month by five strokes a day 
after heavy rains lashed 
Tumberry. 

“I don't think there will be 
any problem.” Norman said 
about having to wait another . 
day to try to add the PGA 
crown to bis British Open 
trophy. 

If he does, he will become 
the ninth player to win two of 
the major events in one year. 
He will also become the fiist 
golfer since Waller Hagen in 
1 924 to win the Open and the 
PGA Championship 


Norman also led after the 
third rounds of the year’s first 
two majors, the Masters and 
the US Open, but he faltered 
on the final day. Although he 
had to scramble to make par 
on the first hole Sunday, 
Norman said he was relaxed 
and comfortable. “And I'm 
sure it will be the same 
tomorrow," he added. 

With 17 holes to play, the 
big, blond Australian held a 
four-shot lead ovier Bob Tway, 
who jumped into second place 
on Saturday with a course- 
record 64, seven under par. 

Tway, aged 27, who has won 
three tournaments on - the 
American tour this year and is 
second to Norman on the list 
of money winners, broke the 
record set by Norman on 
Thursday when he shot 65 to 
take the first-round lead. - 

“I don’t think Greg is going 
to back up,” Tway said after 
he jumped over Is players to 
take sole possession of second 
place on Saturday. "But then 
again he might,” added Tway, 
who knew Norman failed to 
bold leads at Augusta in April 
and Shinnecock Hills in June. 

In addition, in the three 
tournaments Tway won this 
year — the Andy Williams, 
Westchester and Atlanta tour- 
naments — he came from 


behind in the final round. “It's 
a new day. You. don't know 
what’s going to happen," 
Tway said of he final round. 

“He will be tough to catch, 
but I want to be there if he 
doesn't play well I'll just have 
to be patient and try to stay in 
the hum.” 

Among the other players 
still in the chase, Peter 
Jacobsen and Payne Stewart 
were the next closest after 
Tway, seven shots behind 
Norman. Jack Nicklaus, Da- 
vid Frost, of South Africa, and 
Donnie Hammond wore an- 
other shot bade. Nicklaus and 
Frost had only 16 holes to play 
while Hammond had 17. . 

Thirteen players had com- 
pleted their final rounds when : 
play was suspended. Hale j 
Irwin, who won the 1979 US 
Open at. Inverness, was die 
leader in the clubhouse. He 
shot a three-under-par 68 fora 
72-hole total of 287, three over 
par. 

EARLY FINAL-ROUND SCORES 

(US unless stated) 

287: H Irwin. 76. 70, 73, 68. 

290: H Green. 75, 70. 74, 71. 

282: J Sndelar, 74, 72. 73. 73; J 
GpOfc. 71, 72, 75. 7<- MSufffvan, 72, 
73, 74, 73; P Blackmar, 67, 73, 79. 
73; D Stockton, 70, 75, 74. 73; L 
Mize, 69. 76. 75, 72; J Haas. 69. 77. 
74. 72; 294: 6 Koch, 68. 77,74, 75. 
297: R Murphy, 73, 73, 74, 77. 

299: D Watson (SA). 71 , 74. 77, 77. 
300: J C Snead. 70. 76, 75. 79. 


Neumann is in the money 


Men 

HEAVYWEIGHTS: Coxtid Four R 
Phelps, J Garman, C Greenaway R 
Bartlett D Gee (cox). Coxless Pair 
A Clift. M Cross Coxed Pain A 


drupte Scute: N BurfitL J Clift. $ 
Larkin, L Fletcher. Eight: j Spen- 
ce r-Jones, P Broughton, J Garrett 
M Buckingham, T Dillon. J Maxey, S 
Peel. R Stanhope, V Thomas (cox). 
LIGHTWEIGHTS: Double scute: C 
Smith, A Whitwell. Coxlesa four C 


Downirra. J Melvin. 
Howe. G Rees (cox). 


R Metcalf. N 


II! ft I ! i\: fit 


thz&uqt ie.clnd.oqu 


Women 

HEAVYWEIGHTS: Eight F John- 
ston, A Bonner, J Gough P Bird K 

Holroyd, A Callaway, K Grose. P 
Reid. A Norrish (cox). Coxed Four J 
Gough, A Callaway, K Grose. P 
Reid. A Norrish (cox). Coxless Pair 
F Johnston. PBird. 
LIGHTWEIGHTS; Coxiess Tran A 
Forbes. G Hodges. L Clark, J Bume. 
Double seuRs: G Bond, C A Wood. 
Single Sculls: B Crockford. 


There are high hopes for 
Great Britain's coxless pair of 
Martin Cross and Adam" Clift, 
who narrowly lost the gold 
medal in last year's world 
championships to the Soviet 
Union, The British men's 
team, apart from a good final- 
class eight, includes two very 
young crews in the coxed four 
and quadruple sculls who will' 
gain invaluable experience in 
Nottingham. 

There are very high hopes 
too for the men's lightweight 
double scullers, in Allan 
Whitwell and Carl Smith. 

The lop women’s light- 
weight crew is the coxless four, 
who have had an exceptional 
season too with wins at 
Amsterdam and Lucerne, 
beating on both occasions the 
West German world cham- 
pions. The women's light- 
weight coxless four gave an 
exceptional performance in 
the Commonwealth Games to 
win the gold ahead of Austra- 
lia and Canada. 


Liselotte Neumann, from 
Sweden, achieved a timely 
victory in the BMW German 
women's open championship 
on Sunday, primarily on two 
counts, first, her £6.750 prize 
in Munich lifts her to first 
place in the order of merit 
during the week when Ring & 
Brymer, the merit-list spon- 
sors. announced a doubling of 
the prizes for the first three at 
the end of the season. Last 
year Laura Davies received 
£2.500 for first place, Jane 
Connachan £1,500. for second 
and Beverly Huke £1,000 for 
third. The winner this year 
will receive £5,000, the second 
£3.000 and the third £2,000. 

Second, Miss Neumann 
goes to her own country for 
the next two tournaments, at 
Krisiiansand next week and 
Boriange the following week, 
and her welcome there will be 


By John Hennessy 

all the warmer for her win in 
Germany. It will be a fillip, 
loo. for the sponsors at both 
Swedish centres and by exten- 
sion the Womens' Pro- 
fessional Golf Association. 

Miss Neumann’s total prize 
money so for is £24,258, which 
is already £2.522 more than 
Miss Davies's winnings last 
year. And there are eight 
tournaments left This is a 
measure both of Miss 
Neumann's exceptional talent 
and of the extraordinary 
growth of the womens' pro- 
fessional game under the di- 
rect control of the Professional 
Golfers’ Association. 

Miss Neumann's ascent to 
the summit is hardly a sur- 
prise. She showed a preco- 
cious gift for the game by 
winning the Swedish 
stroke/play championship at 
of 15 in 1982 and. 


England Why the 
coach in money 
selection is on the 
row move 


By Pat Butcher 

Athletics Correspondent 

Alan Storey, the national 
men’s marathon coach, has 
threatened to resign to enable 
himself to criticise more niUy 
the selection procedure which 
he feels has wrongly excluded 
one of the athletes he coachg. 
Jon Solly, from the 5,000 
metres in the European team 
for Stuttgart which was an- 
nounced yesterday morning. 

When Solly won the 
Commonwealth 10,000 me- 
tres two weeks ago. he wrote to 
the British selectors saying 
that be wanted to be consid- 
ered for 5.000 metres in 
Stuttgart, pointing out that he 
was one of only two athletes 
(Steve Ovett was the other) 
who had achieved the BAAB's 
higher qualifying standard for 
the European event of 13min 
25 sec. Solly added that he did 
not want to run another 
10.000 metres this season, 
having only made his debut in 
the AAA Championships, 
which was the selection race 
for the Commonwealth 
Games. 

Solly was originally selected 
for the 5,000 metres last 
Wednesday, but when the full 
SAAB council met last Sat- 
urday, Solly was replaced by 
Tim Hutchings, and Solly was 
offered a 10,000 metres place. 
He is going to turn that down 
for the reasons that he wrote 
to the selectors, and all this 
has contributed to Storey’s 
anger. , **, 

Storey said yesterday: I 
offered my resignation this 
morning if my criticism of the 
council would pul the coach- 
ing office in a difficult po- 
sition. As a member of the 
BAAB coaching committee, 1 
was not involved in the selec- 
tion procedure. But I am less 
than enamoured that the orig- 
inal selection was reversed. I 
want to get some answers 
from the council and it looks 
as if I will have to resign to do 
it." 

The biggest surprise of 
yesterday’s selection of 88, the 
largest British team to go to a 


although she was twelfth in 
last year’s money list, this is 
explained by the fact that she 
turned professional late in the 
season. In spite of that, she 
won the European Open 
championship, now discontin- 
ued for lack' of a sponsor, and 
won more money per tour- 
nament than even. Miss 
Davies. 

’ She stands £4,368 dear of 
Gillian Stewart, a former Scot- 
tish champion, in second 
place. Muriel Thomson, an- 
other Scot who led the order 
going into the German Open, 
has dropped to third place. 

ORDER OF MERIT: 1. L Neumann 
rawel £24.258; 2, G Stewart. 
£19.890; 3. M Thomson. £18,436; 4. 
A Nicholas, £17.482; 5, K 
Leadbetter (US), £16,939; 6. L 
Davies £15,122; 7, 9 Grtce-Whtt- 
taker. £14.155; 8, D Reid, £13:913; 
9, D Dowling. £13495; 10 C Dftmah 
(Aus), £12,982. 



SPORT IN BRIEF 


Broken rib 
for Lineker 

Barcelona (Reuter) - 
Barcelona's England forward, 
Gary Lineker, suffered a bro- 
ken rib in a weekend pre- 
season football tournament 
but it is too early to say how 
long he will be out of action. 
Lineker, who joined Barcelo- 
na from Everton, was under- 
going treatment yesterday. 

Lineker collided with 
Morocco's World Cup goal- 
keeper. Badou EzakL during 
the final in which Barcelona 
beat Real Mallorca 2-1. 

Still champion 

Giardini Naxos. Sidly (AP) 
- Carlos De Le6n. of Puerto 
Rico, retained his World Box- 
ing Council cruiserweighi title 
through a technical knockout 
victory in the eighth round 
against his* American chal- 
lenger. Michael Greer, here on 
Sunday nighL 



Hi ggmv. charge to answer 

Action threat 

Alex Higgins and Kirk Ste- 
vens face disciplinary action 
from the World Professional 
Billiards and Snooker Associ- 
ation in Birmingham on Fri- 
day.. Higgins appears on a 
charge oT bringing the game 
into disrepute following inci- 
dents which allegedly took 
place behind the scenes at the 
Mercantile Credit Classic. Ste- 
vens has to explain his non- 
appearance at the Irish 
Benson and Hedges. 


Palace pros 

Professional boxing will be 
staged at the National Sports 
Centre. Crystal Palace, for the 
first time on September 26, 
with a top of the bill tight- 
heavyweighl contest, between 
the All-Ireland champion. 
Hairy Cowap. of BaHiam, and 
Keitn BristoL of Clapham. 

Twins chosen 

The McBrine twms,. James 
and Junior, are included in the 
Ireland team' which meets 
Scotland- at Titwood. In a 
three-day cricket international 
banning on Saturday. 

Bitter blow 

Derbyshire County' Cricket 
Club ^esterday banned al- 
cohol from all public bars for 
this season, following distur- 
bances at Sunday’s John 
Player League .match with 
Lancashire at Buxton. Four 
arrests were made after a 
group of Derby .football 
supporters chartered a coach 
io the • match 


European championship, was 
the selection of Zola Budd for 
both L.500 and 3,000 metres. 

Miss Budd had been pre- 
selected for the longer distance 
on last year’s form, but has 
been struggling in her last 
three races in recent weeks. 

The selectors are obviously 
confident of her assurances 
that her training is going better i 
than ever, and it is to be hoped 
that this is another double 
selection where the athlete 
does not beak down under 
pressure. 

Sebastian Coe has been 
given the same 800/1,500 
metres selection as Steve' 
Crain, with the proviso that 
Coe prove his fitness in a race 
at the longer distance in 
Zurich tomorrow evening. 

Alan Wdk’s return to form 
has been rewarded with a 
place in both sprints, and 
Derek Redmond’s timely re- 
turn from injury wins him 
selection for the 400 metres. 
Tom McKean has been se- 
lected io partner Coe and 
Cram at 800 metres, with John 
Gladwin the third man at 
1.500 metres. 

• Shirley Strong, a surprise 
choice for the European cham- 
pionships, has. decided yester- 
day to withdraw from the 
meeting (a special correspon- 
dent ‘ writes). The Olympic 
silver medallist is still devas- 
tated at foiling to make the 
Commonwealth Games and 
missing the opportunity to 
defend the 100 metres hurdles 
title. .She said: “It killed my 
motivation Tor the season. It's 
left a scar which lam sure will 
be there for a long time." 

“Deciding to withdraw was 
a difficult decision but Tm an 
experienced international and 
know in my present state I 
could- not do myself, my 
sponsors: Vimio, or the coun- 
try justice: Fm drained dry." 


r DAVID ^ 
. MILLER . 


Such is the growth in media 
and public awareness of the 
America's Cup that a front line 
multi-national retail sponsor 
in fonnala one grand prix 
motor racing is seriously 
considering whether it can get 
better valne-for-nwney expo- 
sure from yachts than from 
cars. 

A breakthrough in the 
financing of British America’s 
Cop Challenges pic, the busi- 
ness end of Roysl Thames's 


A breakthrough m the 
financing of British America’s 
Cop Challenges pic, the busi- 
ness end of Roysl Thames's 
two-boat campaign which is 
led on the water by Harold. 
Cndmore, has been achieved 
with the recent coodosion of a 
television deaL Previously 
• hesitant sponsors are now 
guaranteed substantial 
exposure. 

Two international com- 
panies, I understand, hare 
reserved a position ta the event 
of Crusade reaching the chal- 
lenge round against Australia. 
The America's Cop is possibly 
a unique vehicle for advertis- 
ers. Cadillac has pat one 
million dollars into the New 
York Yacht Cub's attempt to 
recover the trophy. “We are 
looking for a sportier, younger 
image, which yachting has, L 
B Pryor, Cadillac's sales man- 
ager says. “Yachting is also an 
expensive sport and that ties 
in with our enstotaers.” 

TVS has agreed to take a 
slice of the satellite signal 
from Down Under, which is 
being marketed on behalf of 
all ch affeagmg syndicates by 
the International Manage- 
ment Group from the start of 
the elimination series on Octo- 
ber S. TVS irill have exclusive 
call on the first-ever visual and 
sound on-board service during 
racing. Channel 4 will ran a 
minimum of 18 weekly half- 
boar bulletins. 

It is even possible that TV- 

A plot without 
parallel In sport 

am, say, under a network deal 
with TVS, could carry live 
coverage of Cndmore and his 
crew ins the kind Of match- 
racing duels which caught the 
sporting world’s imagination 
three years when Bertrand 
defeated Conner. 

Seven times as many Ameri- 
cans remember the names of 
the winners of that series as 
the wmners of the 1983 
Superbowi, a poll has re- 
vealed. Easy, yon may say: of 
.course everyone remembers 
that Which precisely proves 
the point. The New York YCs 
dirty tricks' department plus 
Alan Bond's secret ked pro* 
dneed a plot without parallel in 
sport. 

Twelve challenging and four 
defending syndicates are cur- 
rently exploiting the legacy. 
Some 30 new beats have bea 
built for an event which wfll 
have a gross budget well m 
excess of ClOOm, and wfll 
generate billions for the gov- 
ernment of Western Australia. 
At the Regent Street offices of 
BACC last week the board- 
room table was covered with 
charts of the British coastline: 
they were considering the 
potential sites for a defence 
such as Brighton, Poole, Wey- 
mouth, Torbay ami the CIy&= 

“We have to know before- 
hand what we intend if we win 
it,” Graham Walker says. 
Walker, chairman, of BACC, 
is convinced that a coincidence 
of favourable factors may. 
make this.the strongest bid by 
Britain since they lost the first 
contest in 1851. 

A financially 
confident front 

Walker, who has carefully 
helped create an organization 
of design, management; 
mar keting and sailing, “with a 
structure that doesn't allow me 
to tinker," litem tin: admin- 
istration, as well as the perfor- 
mance, fo a World Copt with 
an important difference. - ' 
“When our World Cup team 
off for Mexico, or the 
British Uoas for New Zea- 
l-wd, nobody doubts whether 
the FA or the Rugby Unioa 
can afford the trip/ be says, 
‘y** everybody tends to ques^ 
toon the state of our finances." 
False rumours about intern! 
payments still to be made _to 
Cougar, builders of Crusade I 
H, designed by Iafl 
Howlett and David Hollozn, 

1 “h fuelled scepticism. . A 
magfe remaining payment, 
*8w*d in contracts as a : con* 
dibon of receiving both orders, 
is doe next mouth. 

W alker is aoadOus / "io 

a financially confident 
front — “Everything the squad 
b asking for Ussf 'k getting, 
including two new keek tins 
mouth" — but at the same time 
not to deter farther sponsor* 
»biP- Investment in BACC got 
on . the ground, f@iows«® 
™*»ty among wealthy Royal: 
Janies membership, when 
the inland Revenue were per* 
gtaded, under the Business; 
5*52?s*o , » Scheme, that 
JJACC was * hmg-tena... 


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