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THE 



TIMES 


No* 62334 


WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


£ 


Qsg 




the world 
on apartheid 


Durban (AP) — The inter- 
national campaign against 
South Africa was "one of the 
most extreme forms of politi- 
cal fraud of the 20th cemuiy". 
President Botha said yes- 
terday. 

He said sanctions would 
make his country stronger. 

President Botha also pro- 
posed negotiations with the 
leaders of Britain, the United 
States. France and West Ger- 
many and of neighbouring 
southern African countries on 
regional security and eco- 
nomic problems. 

"The international cam- 
paign against South. Africa, 
especially from the ranks of 
certain leftist Western leaders 
and countries, is one of the 
most extreme forms of politi- 
cal fraud of the 20th century.” 
he said. 

"We are probably no better, 
but certainly no worse than 
the rest of the world." 

In a seaside conference haJL 
President Botha addressed a 
crowd of 3,000, mostly dele- 
gates of his National Party, 
meeting for the first time in 
four years to shape political 
policy for the future. 

"We do not desire sanc- 
tions. but if we have to suffer 
sanctions for the sake of 
maintaining freedom, justice 
and order, we will survive 
them. Not only will we sur- 
vive them, we will emerge 
stronger on the other side,” Be 
said. 

Most of his speech re- 
iterated established govern- 
ment policy and endorsed the 
National Party’s programme 
of cautious political reform, 
slopping shon of a one-man. 
one-vote system. . 

He put forward one new 
proposal, that black urban 
communities close to the 
main cities could receive full 
autonomy as city-states. 


Tomorrow 


Man in the 
hot seat 



After Macgregor. 
Times Profile of Sir 
Robert Haslam, 
incoming chairman 
of British Coal 

Full results of 
University of 
Kent final 
examinations 





• There was no 
winner yesterday in The 
Times Portfolio Gold . 
daily competition, so 
today’s prize is 
doubled to £8,000. 

• Portfolio list page 
21; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 16. 


Wall charge 

Moscow has accused the US. 
Britain and France of churn- 
ing up “’hysteria” over the 
25th anniversary today of the 
erection or the Berlin Wall 
Removal call, page 5 

England lose 

New Zealand beat England by 
eight wickets in the Second 
Test at Trent Bridge to take a 
1-0 lead in the three-match 
series Page 34 

Chess drawn 

Gary Kasparov and Anatoly 
Karpov agreed a draw without 
resuming play in the sixth 
game of their world title 
match Pag* 2 


Home News 2-4 
Overseas 54 
A pjns 14.22 
Am 15 

Birthsjlaihs. 
marriages 14 
Business 17-22 
Chess 2 
Coon 14 

Crosswords 10,16 

Di»rj 12 

Eachk 16 


Features MM2 
Law Report 19 
Leaders 12 
Letters 1? 

Obituary J4 
Property • 34 

Science ]4 
Sport 30-3234 
Theatrc&etc 33 
TV* Radio 33 
Weather 16 
Wills 14 


"In the West, we in author- 
ity here, and our evolving 
South African order are often 
presented as worse than the 
Soviet Union,” Mr Botha 
said. 

"But in the same Western 
quarters we find a general 
tolerance of the Berlin Wall, 
and the Communist tyranny 
over Poland. Afghanistan and 
other countries in Eastern 
Europe.” 

He described a scenario of 
“greedy world powers”, hop- 
ing to pounce upon South 
Africa’s riches. "We are not in. 

Namibia blast 

Windhoek - A Mack man 
was critically injured yes- 
terday when a bomb ripped 
through a magistrates court 
building in Tsnmeb, northern 
Namibia, 320 miles north of 
Windhoek, the capital (Renter 
reports). The blast cause d 
slight damage to tire braMmg. 

the dock before an inter- 
national conspiracy because 
we are guilty,” he said- 

“The struggle in South Af- 
rica is not one between blacks 
and whites,” he said. “The 
struggle is an ideological strug- 
gle between the supporters of 
genuine freedom and stability, 
and those who wish to force a 
socialist dictatorship of a 
small power clique on South 
Africa. 

"The historical hatred of the 
Third World, and the histori- 
cal guilt complex of the First 
World interface in the ven- 
detta against South Africa . . . 
The blood of a sacrificial lamb 
is sought as penance for 
centuries of injustice. That 
sacrifical lamb is South Africa, 
and more specifically, white 
South Africans." 

Mr Botha detailed what he 
called immoral policies and 


examples of racism by other 
countries. He defended the 
motives of National Party 
leaders of the past, and listed 
the reforms the Government 
has made in the last decade. 

“As the elected Govern- 
ment, we are involved in 
process of reform whereby the 
democratic basis is being 
broadened, and group security 
is being extended,” he said. 

"This evolutionary reform 
process can take place only in 
a climate of order, stability 
and socioeconomic welfare.” 

He said the Government 
would not be forced into 
negotiation with radical ele- 
ments. a reference to calls 
from the Commonwealth and 
the European Community to 
unban the African National 
Congress, the- main guerrilla 
group fighting to overthrow 
the white-led Government. 

Moderate blacks, including 
Zulu Chief Buihetezi. have 
said that Mr Nelson Mandela, 
the ANC leader, imprisoned 
since 1962 on conviction of 
sabotage and conspiracy, must 
be released to take part in 
discussions about changing 
the apartheid system. 

Mr Botha gave the 10 tribal 
homelands — four of them 
considered independent states 
by the Government but not 
recognized by other nations — 
as examples of expanding 
freedom and distribution of 
self-government to blacks. He 
suggested the concept could be 
extended to black commu- 
nities throughout the country, 
including the township areas. 

"I sometimes ask myself the 
question: If a state such as 
Luxembourg can be indepen- 
dent — why can black urban 
communities close to our 
metropolitan areas not re- 
ceived full autonomy as city 
states?” Mr Botha said. 


fr fr ☆ <r * fr 



detainees ruling 


From Michael Hornsby, Durban 
The South African Govern- Town and Johannesburg, re- 


mem yesterday set the scene 
for an intriguing tussle with 
the country's still-indepen- 
dent judiciary bv announcing 
that it did not accept 
Monday's judgement by the 
Durban Supreme Court that 
arrests and detentions under 
the Slate of Emergency were 
unlawful. 

."We are not accepting the 
decision of the court,” Mr 
Louis Le Grange, the Minister 
of Law and Order, said. “We 
have entered an appeal which 
will be heard by the appeal 
court as soon as possible.” 

The Government appears to 
be taking the view that until 
the appeal is heard, the Dur- 
ban judgement is in sus- 
pension. 

This, however, is strongly 
contested by legal opinion 
here which maintains that, 
•unless overturned by the 
Appellaie Division of the 
Supreme Court in Bloem- 
fontein. Monday's ruling is 
binding on all courts in Natal 
and on “persuasive authority” 
throughout the rest of the 
country, where courts will be 
likely, though not obliged, to 

follow iL 

Lawyers in Durban, Cape 


presenting some 1.600 people 
detained under state of emer- 
gency regulations, told The 
Tunes yesterday that they 
were seeking their clients' 
immediate release on the 
grounds that their continued 
imprisonment was unlawful 

A Cape Town attorney, Mr 
Essa Moosa, whose firm is 
acting for “close on 1,000 
people” held throughout the 
Cape Province, said: “The 
court declared the regulations 
to be unlawful and we there- 
fore take the view that every- 
one arrested in terms of the 
regulations should now be 
released”. 

Mr Moosa said his firm 
would wait 48 hours for its 
clients to be released before 
applying to the courts to 
uphold the Durban judge- 
ment 

Independent monitoring 
bodies estimate that as many 
as 10.000 people may have 
been detained at various times 
since die emergency was de- 
clared on June 11 

When the Durban court 
handed down its ruling on 
Monday it also ordered the 

Continued on page 16, col 8 


Prince ends holiday 

By Mark Dowd 

Prince Charles returned un- weeks ago. but denied that the 


accompanied from a four day 
holiday in Maioita yesterday, 
leaving the Princess of Wales, 
Prince William and Prince 
Henry to enjoy the hospitality 
of King Juan Carlos and 
Queen Sophia of Spain at the 
clifftop Marivem Palace. 

Buckingham Palace said 
there was nothing unexpected 
about the arrangement which, 
they say, was planned several 


uip was a security measure 
following the outcry last 
Thursday when the three heirs 
to the throne fiew out to the 
island together, allegedly 
breaking with royal safety 
protocol. 

The Palace confirmed yes- 
terday that the Princess of 
Wales and the two princes 
would be returning from their 
holiday later this week. 


TSBin 

free 

shares 

offer 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

The Trustee Savings Bank 
yesterday unveiled the con- 
ditions attached to its £1 
billion-plus flotation sched- 
uled for next month, including 
free shares to investors still 
holding a stake after three 
years. The bank will also give 
free shares worth nearly £4 
million to employees and 
pensioners. 

Shareholders who bavenoi 
sold shares after three years, 
will be issued with one free 
share for every ten, up 10 a 
maximum of about £5,000. 
The move is to discourage 
slagging — buying shares to 
sell at a profit a few days later 
— and encourage long term 
investment. 

The TSB aims to attract 
more than one million private 
investors. About 1.6 million 
people have registered an 
interest in the floatation. 

Employees and "priority 
customers” — those who had 
TSB accounts before Decem- 
ber 17. 1 984 — will be assured 


Leading article 
Sale details 


13 

17 


of receiving an allocation of 
shares if they apply. They will 
be allowed 10 invest a mini- 
mum of £200. compared with 
£400 for all other applicants, 

• The political controversy 
over the TSB intensified last 
night as the Treasury was 
accused of going back on a 
promise in the Lords to await 
the full judgment on the 
bank's ownership before 
announcing a vesting day for 
the sale (Philip Webster 
writes). 

Although the Treasury has 
denied any such assurance, a 
solicitor who acted in the 
Lords case said last night that 
it was stated by the Treasury 
counsel -that no vesting would 
take place until the full judg- 
ment had been read, ana that 
other people in the court were 
well aware of what bad been 
said- 

Mr Grant McCulloch, who 
acted for Mr Jim Ross of the 
Scottish. TSB depositors’ 
association, said that he had 
written in his notebook: “No 
vesting until Lords opinions 
considered by Treasury” and 
had had no doubt about what 
was said. 

The Labour Party, which 
accused the Government of 
indecent haste over the flota- 
tion of the TSB and said ft was 
arousing the “deepest 
suspicions,” regards the al- 
leged pledge as crucial to its 
attempt to delay the flotation. 

The unanimous judgment 
of the Lords given on July 3 
was that the bank did not 
belong to the depositors, seen 
as at last clearing the way to 
the sale. But the full judg- 
ment, not released until last 
week, concluded that the stale 
owned the bank's £800m sur- 
plus assets. 

The possibility that the foil 
judgment would reach such a 
conclusion was raised by Mr 
Donald Dewar, Labour's Scot- 
tish affairs spokesman, in a a 
letter to the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer, on July 1 1. 

Three days later it was 
announced that the vesting 
day would be July 21, and 
Labour was questioning last 
night whether the "hurried 
derision” was taken because 
the Government suspected 
that the full judgment would 
reveal that the assets belonged 
to the state. 






Mrs MargarefThatcber, her hand bandaged , striding out 
yesterday on the sands in Constantine Bay in Cornwall. 


Baker backs big 
school changes 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Right wingers pressing for a 
radical switch in Conservative 
education policy believe they 
have scored an important 
victory by winning Mr 
Kenneth Baker to their cause. 

They say that' the Secretary 
of State for Education has 
sided with those within the 
Department of Education and 
Westminster, who argue that 
the current •classroom malaise 
can only be cured by injecting 
market disciplines into the £8 
billion-a-year schools system. 

He is understood 10 support 
far-reaching changes, requir- 
ing a substantial 'piece of new 
legislation, which amount to a 
refinement of the voucher 
scheme, rejected as imprac- 
tical by Sir Keith Joseph, bis 
predecessor. The main fea- 
tures are: 

A central government cash 
grant direct to schools for 
every pupil they attracL the 
size of which would be deter- 
mined by a new national body 
analogous to the University 
Grants Committee, the cam- 
pus paymaster. 

Transfer of the control of 
school budgets, as much as 
£1.5 million a year for a big 
comprehensive.' from local 
education authorities to 
boards of governors. 


Acting in concert with the 
head, they would have a free 
hand to make appointments, 
determine* staffing policies 
and allocate money for books, 
stationery and equipment. It 
is not vet dear whether their 
powers would be extended to 
cover repairs, maintenance 
and new buildings. 

• Scrapping the powers of 
local authorities to set ceilings 
on school intakes. Under an 
“open enrolment” policy, gov- 
ernors would be in charge of 
admissions and allowed to 
accept children up to the 
physical limits of the accom- 
modation available. 

The latest ideas are similar 
10 those produced by a 13- 
strong group of right wing 
MPs last month in a pam- 
phlet. “Save our Schools". 
They also stem from a 
confidential policy proposal 
drawn up by Mr Stuart Sex- 
ton. formerly special adviser 
to Sir Keith, a copy of which 
has been passed to Professor 
Brian Griffiths, head of the 
Downing Street policy unit. 

Both the Prime Minister 
and Mr Norman Tebbu. 
Conservative Party chairman, 
are said to be enthusiastic 
about the proposed changes. 

Parents wait, page 12 


Comeback continues for shares 


By Richard Lander 

The world's leading stock 
markets continued to 
strengthen yesterday after the 
gains in London. New York 
and Tokyo on Monday. The 
pound remained firm against 
most main currencies. 

There was confirmation 
that the boom in mortgage 
borrowing in Britain contin- 
ued in July. There was record 
lending by building societies 
during the month despite a 
disappointingly low level of 
net receipts from depositors. 

The London stock market 
moved ahead again yesterday. 


Spectrum 
Leading article 
Shares leap 
Stock markets 


10 

13 

17 

19 


the FT-30 share index rising 
13.3 points to 1.242. Trading 
was helped by a surge in New 
York on Monday when the 
Dow Jones industrial average 
leapt more than 28 points to 
1.811.16. 

Share prices were helped by 
better-than-expccted profits 
from Unilever, reversing the 
pessimism caused last week by 
poor results from a range of 
big companies. 


■ Meanwhile, gold ran into a 
barrier after Monday’s ad- 
vance. It fell back on profit- 
taking to 5384.50 an ounce. S2 
down on the day. There was 
greater uncertainty in the mar- 
ket over whether South Africa 
intended to reduce gold ex- 
ports. 

Sterling was little changed 

on the dav. closing in London 

at $1.4845. 

Meanwhile, the Building 
Societies Association pub- 
lished figures showing that the 
societies had promised to lend 
more than £4 billion 10 home 
buyers in July — a monthly 
record. 


Ship search after Sri Lankans are found adrift 


From Paul Vallely 
New York 

The Canadian Air Force 
and Coastguards last night 
launched a search for the ship 
which cast adrift 152 Sri 
Lankan refugees in the At- 
lantic off Newfoundland. 

The refugees were found 
drifting in two lifeboats in 
thick fog off the coast of 
Newfoundland on Monday. 

Immigration officials'' ex- 
pressed doubt about the 
refugees' story that they had 
been drifting at sea for five 
days and said they were 
working on the hypothesis 
that the vessel might still be in 
the area. 


> 


"There were around 75 
people in each boat, designed 
for half that number, so they 
were sitting pretty low in the 
water. 

“Yet though these people 
were cold and hungry, they 
were not wet which seems odd 
for people who have been at 
sea for five days." said Mr 
Wayne Piercey. the regional 
manager of Employment and 
Immigration Canada. 

He said that so far 50 of the 
refugees had been interviewed 
and that most of them ap- 
peared to be Tamils. They had 
told Canadian officials' that 
they* had joined the mother 
ship on July 7 somewhere oft 
the coast of southern India. 


Canadian immigration of- 
ficials also announced' yes- 
terday that the Sri Lankans 
were deliberately cast adrift. 
The name of the ship had been 
scratched from the bows of the 
lifeboats. 

Yesterday, at a press con- 
ference in Si. John's, 
Newfoundland, one of the 
refugees, who identified him- 
self as a Sri Lanken Tamil, 
said that he and his fellows 
had paid 30.000 rupees 
(US$2,400) for the voyage. 

It is believed that the ship, 
whose name the refugees 
claim they are unable to 
remember, left Sri Lanka 35 
days ago bound for Montreal. 

Captain Felix Dobbin of 


The Beckfo«3L one of three 
Canadian fishing boats which 
came across the drifting life- 
boats in ti?ick fog six miles off 
the coast of Newfoundland on 
Monday, said the refugees had 
been”left to the mercy of the 
waves”. 

The castaways had told him 
that “they were pul off the 
ship — they said they didn't 
have much choice,” he said- 

“The lifeboats were packed. 
I don't know how they stood 
it. Some were dressed fairly 
well but not real warm. 

“A couple could speak En- 
glish. They told me they left 
Sri Lanka. They said they were 
escaping for their fives.” 

Eight of the refugees were 

\ 


yesterday taken to hospital 
after being seen by medical 
and immigration officials. 

The remainder, including 
three women and five chil- 
dren. were taken to Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police 
headquarters for questioning 
and were expected to be 
housed overnight in a univer- 
sity dormitory. 

Mr Jarrett Lctto. the man- 
ager of St John's Immigration 
Centre, said that the refugees 
had indicated a desire 10 stay 
in Canada but that they had 
not asked for political asylum. 

More than 160.000 Sri 
Lanken Tamils, who are 

Continued on page 16, col 8 


‘Loyalist’ show 



into violence 


By Richard Ford 


Violence erupted at the end 
of a "loyalist” parade through 
Londonderry yesterday when 
police were attacked by loyal- 
ists and nationalists. 

Several plastic bullets were 
fired to disperse crowds of 
nationalist youths, who hurled 
stones and petrol-bombs at 
the RUC and in the Gobna- 
scale area. Republican terror- 
ists opened fire on a security 
forces patrol, who retaliated in 
a brief exchange. 

There was sporadic trouble 
as Apprentice Boys began 
leaving the city, with police 
being stoned, a bar set alight 
and a child, aged eight, receiv- 
ing minor injuries ’ when a 
ihunderflash was thrown at 
the security forces. Six people 
had to jump 10 safety from a 
first floor window when the 
bar was set alight, but no-one 
was injured. 

The violence came after the 
two key figures in the Demo- 
cratic Unionist Party (DUP) 
had put on a display of unity 
and friendship by marching 
side-by-side with thousands of 
loyalists. 

’Onlookers cheered and 
clapped as the Reverend Ian 
Paisley. leader of the DUP. 
and Mr Peter Robinson, his 
deputy, paraded with Appren< 
lice Boys commemorating the 
29?th anniversary of the Re- 
lief of the Siege of ihe City. 

Both men were clearly anx- 
ious to quash any further 
speculation about divisions 
between them, or Mr Paisley's 
position as leader being under- 
mined by his younger deputy. 
"1 invited Peter here as my 
guest.” Mr Paisley said. 

Later the two men shared a 
snack of chips while the march 
passed over the River Foyle, 
which effectively divides the 
city into nationalist and loyal- 
ist areas. 

The parade commemorates 
action taken by 1 3 Apprentice 
Boys who shut the gates of the 
city on the army of King 
James II at the start of a siege, 
and Mr Paisley walked with 
the Dromara Apprentice Boys 
Club. 

Tomorrow. Irish security 
forces mount a major security 


operation 10 protect Mr 
Robinson who is to appear in 
court at Dundalk. Co. Louth, 
on charges arising out of the 
loyalist “invasion" of 
Cliiniibret. in Co. Monaghan, 
last week. 

Mr Robinson has con- 
firmed he will be accompa- 
nied by his party leader, and 
yesterday Mr Michael 
Noonan, un Irish Govern- 
ment Minister, said senior 
figures in the Gardji would 
like 10 diseuss the arrange- 
ments for their journey south 
of the border, so to ensure 
their safety. 

Hundreds of police and 
soldiers were on duty in 
Londonderry as l>.ifci0 Appr- 
entice Boys from all over the 
Province alien tied an induc- 
tion ceremony lor new me ro- 
llers. church verv ice. and the 
parade. Roads leading from 
the city centre's main square 
into strongly nationalist areas 
were sealed off. and a screen 
was erected across a road 
k-jdong to the strongly repub- 
lican Rossville Flats and 
Rogside. 

Minor scuffling occurred 
when rival gangs taunted each 
other, and (he police came 
under attack from both sides 
with stones being thrown by 
loyalists and petrol bombs by 
nationalists. The security 
forces remained in the city in 
large numbers until the early 
hours of this momingto pre- 
vent serious clashes between 
opposing factions. 

In Belfast, a cache of arms 
and ammunition was discov- 
ered during a search of a house 
in a Protestant area in the 
north of the city. Two hand- 
guns. a rifle, submachine gun. 
and a quantity of ammunition 
were seized. 

And following two further 
provisional. IRA attacks on 
RUC stations. Mr Tom King, 
Secretary of State for North- 
ern Ireland, held a three-hour 
meeting with security advisers 
and officials to review safety 
precautions at stations and 
hear reports on what further 
measures might be im- 
plemented. Mr King had vis- 
Continued on page 2, col 6 


Petrol reaches 164.6p 
as companies lift price 


The average four star gallon 
of petrol is now 1 64.6p after 
BP, Esso and Mobil, yesterday 
followed Shell by increasing 
the price by 7p. 

The. companies blamed 
fierce competition on the 
forecourts for the rise. 

But motorists are likely to 
face further increases within 
weeks. 

BP warned of another rise 
before the end of the month as 
higher crude oil costs work 
their way through the system. 

Since last week's decision 
by the Organization of Petro- 
leum Countries to curtail 
production, oil has risen from 


below $10 to $13.50 a barrel 
but this is not ycl reflected in 
petrol prices. 

The increases by Shell, BP 
and Esso took effect from 
midnight. 

In South Wales, and the 
North-west and North-east, 
where petrol has fallen as low 
as 140p. motorists could face 
increases of up to 20p per 
gallon. In contrast. London 
and the South-east and Scot- 
land. which have not enjoyed 
a cheap petrol bonanza, may 
see only small increases. 

The increase still leaves 
petrol well below the January 
average of around I95p. 


m?m\ 



Why is it only the 

PRIVILEGED GIRLS WHO 

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Actually, auconfra/re. It’s those 
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The reputation of privilege comes 
from the fact that the top jobs go 
to the best girls. 

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NAME 

ADDRESS 







HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


Exploration to 
start at three 
nuclear waste 
disposal sites 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


The Government has mov- 
ed a slep nearer to choosing 
the site for a new dumping 
ground for nuclear waste. Jn 
spite of growing opposition, 
exploratory drilling will begin 
next week at three of the four 
places on the short-list and 
work on the fourth will start 
next month. 

The sites at which a shallow 
trench for dumping low-level 
nuclear waste could be en- 
gineered are at Elsiow near 
Bedford. Kiliingholme in 
Humberside, Fulbeck in Lin- 
colnshire and Bradwell in 
Essex. 

Intention to start investigat- 
ing the sites, earmarked in 
March, was announced yes- 
terday by the Nuclear Industry- 
Radioactive Waste Executive 
(Nirex). 

At Bradwell. reaction to the 
news that drilling is to start on - 
September I . two weeks later 
than the three other sites, has 
been been muted. 

“If the Government even- 
tually chooses to put the dump 
here it will probably suffer less 
political damage than with 
any of the other locations”. 
Mrs Jackie Davis, secretary of 
the Essex Against Nuclear 
Dumping Group, said. 

The 1 .000-mcmber co- 
alition of local anti nuclear 


ITil Wy-i 



groups intends to hold a 
public meeting in Southend at 
the start of October. “We shall 
noL be doing anything illegal, 
it would only alienate fragile 
support,” she said. 

“Putting the dump here 
would only reduce the Gov- 
ernment's majority in the con- 
stituency." said Mr John 
Loxley, Alliance member of 
Essex County Council. 

At the last election Mr John 
Wakeham. the Government's 
Chief Whip and MP for 
Colchester South and Maldon, 
which includes Bradwell. had 
a majority of 1 2. 1 65. 

Villagers at Fulbeck. in the 
heart of prime Lincolnshire 
farmland, who are linking 
hands across the entrance to 
the proposed nuclear test drill- 
ing site in a 24-hour a day 
vigil, plan a mass protest on 
Monday. 

So far they have prevented 
Nirex engineers from carrying 
out preliminary work in spite 
of the threat of a court 
injunction. 

Protesters in Kiliingholme 
have planned a campaign 
worthy of an army squadron 
to stop drilling on the pro- 
posed site, by mounting daily 
patrols lo man entrances to 
the land. 

With watches synchronized 
and mobile radios tuned in to 
a .central control van, the 
Humberside Against Nuclear 
Dumping group will begin a 
24-hour blockade on Friday 
until they decide to allow 
Nirex lo begin work. 

In Elsiow. Bedfordshire, the 
anti-dumping group has plan- 
ned a similar reception for 
Nirex diggers. A handful of 
protesters will carry out a 
token blockade of the' site.' 



Men of the first, second and third battalions of the Parachute Regiment unloading their cargo at Victoria Embankment. 

Nemesis calls for 


unlucky grouse 


By Mark Ellis 

Earing heather at dawn and 
heartily eaten at lunch, the 
grouse got its come-nppance 
yesterday 'on (he Glorious 
Twelfth, with a peculiarly 
English blend of ritual and 
sportsmanship. 

As if the bird did not have 
enough troubles, after surviv- 
ing one of its worst breeding 
seasons, disease and poor diet, 
lagopus scoticus, or red grouse, 
became a target for guns on the 
first day of the shooting 
season. Then came the races to 
the best dining tables. 

A hotel in the North daime 
(0 have served the first gram 
of the season from a kill at 
5.15 am. It was on the dining 
table at Horsley Hall Hotel in 
Stanhope, Weardale, Co Dur- 
ham, at 533 am. 

Mr Charles Nodder, of the 
British Field Sports Society, 
said: “There has been very 
little shooting this morning 
because the grouse have ma- 
tured late, bat we are hoping 
that things will pick np in the 
next few weeks.” 


Gastronomic opinions on 
grouse, which is usually 
roasted and served with bread 
sauce and gravy, vary from a 
succulent delicacy to a “boxful 
of bony matches”. 

But that did not deter 19 
people from lunching on 
grouse, claimed to be the first 
served in London, at The 
Savoy Hotel. The £19.95-a- 
head meal was served after a 
race from the Lancashire 
moors. 

Twenty-one brace of gronse 
shot on the Duke of 
Westminster's estate in Lan- 
cashire were Down from 
Blackpool airport by the Red 
Devils at 9.15 am for a para- 
chute drop into the grounds of 
the Royal Hospital in Chelsea. 

From there three teams of 
paratroopers from the first 
second and third battalions of 
The Parachute Regiment 
raced in boats down the 
Thames to The Savoy hoteL 
The second battalion took the 
honour just after 11 am. 



Anton Edelmann, maitre chef at The Savoy, taking delivery 
of the highly prized gronse (Photographs: Les Lee). 



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‘Loyalist’ 
show ends 
in violence 

Continued from page 1 
ited bases in the South 
Armagh area, and said that he 
wanted to ensure that the 
provisional IRA threats to 
contractors and workers 
would not prevent repair work 
going ahead. ' 

The terrorists drove an 
excavator with a bomb in its 
bucket through the security 
fence at a police station in The 
Birches, near Poriadown, Co. 
Armagh,, on Monday night. 
The explosion extensively 
damaged the station, caused 
minor injuries to six civilians, 
and damaged nearby homes 
and a public house. Damage 
was also caused to an RUC 
base at Pomeroy, in Co. 
Tyrone. 

Meanwhile. Mr James 
Molyneaux's decision to sus- 
pend contacts with the media 
and the Official Unionist 
Party’s weekly press con- 
ference, was backed by Mr lan 
Gow, who resigned from the 
Government in protest at the 
Anglo-Irish Agreement 


Brooks leaves 

Norwich City have parted 
company with their chief scout 
Ronnie Brooks, who has been 
with the club for almost 40 
years. Brooks's greatest single 
achievement ws the discovery of 
the Fashanu brothers. Justin 
earned Norwich a £1 million 
payday with his transfer to 
Nottingham Forest, before 
eventually ending up at Brigh- 
ton. and his younger brother 
John, now pJavs lor the first 
division newcomers Wimble- 
don. 


■•Has Tta Than mmui 

Auslrfa SCU 29: Belgium B FT, 80: 
Canada S3.76: Canaries Res 200: 
Cyprus 70 cents: Denmark Dkr 9.00; 


Ffitland Ml 
Ocmtatny 1 
Clreece Dr : 


bourn L/ 40: Madeira Esc 170. Malta 
SScj Morocco CKr 10 . 00 : - 


9o6. Pakistan Rp, laPon 
1 70: Singapore SB sofspaui 
Sweden Skr 9.00: Swib* 


Yugoslavia Din 400. 


Norway 

Ortugai 


Eae 

PCS 200; 


Chess Correspondent 


World chess championship 

Draw agreed after 
fierce sixth game 

By Raymond Keene, 

The sixth game in the 
World Chess Championship 
was agreed drawn without 
further play yesterday after- 
noon. Gary Kasparov sealed 
move 42 Bc4 at the end of play 
on Monday night and Anatoly 
Karpov settled for a draw 
without resuming play. 

The game was a fierce and 
violent" affair in which Kas- 
parov tried to improve on a 
similar game in which he 
employed the Petroff Defence, 
in Moscow last year. 

He sacrificed two pawns, 
but Karpov’s deft defence left 
him with a minimal edge in an 
ending of rooks and opposite 
coloured bishops. 

On the 1 1th move Kas- 
parov introduced an idea 
which gave him a big initia- 
tive. By move 19 expens were 
predicting Karpov’s position 
was on the verge of collapse. 

Black's queen appeared shut 
out on the edge of the board, 
while while’s bishops were 
aimed at the black king. 

But Karpov’s 1 9th move 
was a couniersirokc which 
seemed to throw the cham- 
pion into confusion. 

Kasparov's next move. 20 
Rd7. weakened the founda- 
tions of white's position, in- 
stead of this, the obvious 
move was 20 BdS with the 
likely follow up 20 Qc2. 21 
Be5 Rad8 and then either 22 
Rdcl or 22 RdX 
Karpov was able to seize a 
second pawn and in so doing 
set a devilish trap. Had 
Kasparov played 23 Qf3 {in- 
stead of the game move) then 
23 Qxc3. 24 Qxc3 Nc2 ch 
would have forced an instant 
win for Karpov. 

Game 7 will start at 5pm 
today. 


Moves: 





wwe 

Black 

WMe 

Black 

1 

64 

e5 

22 

8c3 

M4 

2 

Nf3 

m 

23 

0xW 

Nxh3 

3 

Nte5 

06 

ch 



4 

M3 

Nxe4 

24 

oxh3 

BxW 

5 

04 

d5 

25 

Axe? 

06 

6 

Bd3 

NC6 

26 

Rxa7 

Kg? 

7 

(M 

Bg4 

27 

Rd7 

MS 

S 

C4 

W6 

28 

Axd8 


9 

Nc3 

Bxf3 

29 

Rdl 

RC6 

■10 

0x13 

Nx04 

30 

M3 

h5 

11 

Qe3 ch 

Ne6 

31 

KW 

Rd7 

12 

cxd5 

Nxd5 

32 

Ka2 

Bc5 

13 

NK& 

QxcS 

33 

Kfl 

hi 

14 

6e4 

OW 

34 

Bc4 

Re7 

15 

a4 

Qa6 

35 

RQ 


16 

Rdl 

Be7 

36 

Kg2 

Rc7 

17 

b4 

0-0 

37 

Bb3 

6 

18 

Qh3 

S6 

38 

M3 

Bc5 

19 

BD2 

0c4 

39 

Rc3 

KtS 

20 

Rd7 

Rae8 

40 

RC4 

gs 

21 

Bd5 

QxM 

41 

Rc2 

Ke5 


Draw agreed. 

• There were no surprises in 
the first round of the 
Commonwealth Chess Cham- 
pionship which began in Lon- 
don on Monday. 

Four of the five participat- 
ing grand masters - Kudrin, 
PlaskctL de Rrmian and Hjar- 
tarson — won while Shamko- 
vich drew with Singh. Another 
unexpected draw was obtain- 
ed by international woman 
master. Rohini Khadilkar of 
India, against the Israeli 
player, Asek. 



Philosophy falls 
victim to cuts 

By Lucy Hodges. Education Correspondent 


Philosophy departments at 
British universities are being 
forced lo close because they 
are small and considered to be 
uneconomic at a time when 
the university sector is suffer- 
ing an overall cut in real terms 
of more than 4 percent for the 
next academic year. 

Three universities are cur- 
rently planning to abolish 
their degrees in philosophy, 
and one has already done so. 
But university administrators 
are at pains lo point our that 
this is not because of any 
prejudice against philosophy, 
as suggested by Professor AJ. 
Ayer in his letter to The Times 
yesterday. 

The universities of Exeter 
and Leicester, and the Univer- 
sity College of Wales, Aberyst- 
wyth, are threatened with 
closure, and Surrey shut down 
its philosophy department be* 
cause of the 1981 cuts. .All are 
small departments, and Sur- 
rey had trouble attracting 
students to its joint honours 
course. 

It is part of University 
Grants Committee policy, un- 
der the chairmanship of Sir 
Peter Swinnerton-Dyer, to 
encourage universities to close 
small, weak departments and 
to build up the strong That is 


at the heart of what is known 
as the “selectivity” exercise, 
whereby a proportion (15 per 
cent) of the money which 
universities receive is allo- 
cated for quality of research. 

The philosophy department 
at Exeter, which currently has 
four staff, including Professor 
Ronald Atkinson, and 44 
students, is due to close in 
1990. Mr Malcolm Histop, the 
university registrar, said the 
reason was that the philos- 
ophy lecturers were all ad- 
vanced in years and would 
have retired by 1994. 

In common with other 
universities, and as a result of 
government cuts, Exeter has 
been forced to adopt a policy 
of not filling jobs which 
become vacant by natural 
wastage. 

“It has not been selected to 
be closed.” he said. “It is being 
destroyed as a result of 
circumstances.” 

At Leicester, where there are 
also only four staff members, 
the plan is to close the 
department. Mr Maurice 
Shock, the university’s vice- 
chancellor and chairman of 
the Committee of Vice-Chan- 
cellors and Principals, said 
philosophy should either be 
taught properly or not at alL 


Cracks found 
in cockpits of 
RAF Victors 

Two Victor tanker aircraft 
based at RAF Marti am. Nor- 
folk developed cockpit cracks 
in during flying exercises in 
die United States, the Min- 
istry of Defence revealed 
yesterday. 

Inspections of other aging 
Victors at Marham showed 
signs of cockpit corrosion. The 
ministry said there was no 
danger to crews. Faulty panels 
could be replaced. 

But pilots are being ordered 
to avoid pressurising cabins 
for high altitude flying and 
have been told to wear oxygen 
masks above 10.000 feet. 

Victors are due to be phased 
out in the early 1990s. 


Government 
urged to trace 
Tsar’s riches 

A Richmond solicitor called 
on the Government yesterday 
to find the treasure of the 
Tsars and use it to reimburse 
people who lost money and 
property in the 1917 Bol- 
shevik Revolution in Russia. 

Mr John Perry says the £45 
million compensation agreed 
between Britain and Russia 
last month is only a fraction of 
their rightful dues. 

He was commenting on a 
Foreign Office statement that 
an Order in Council would be 
made within the next few 
weeks setting out the proce- 
dure for claimants and' the 
method for distributing the 
money. 


National Theatre succession 


Speculation on shared roles 


By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


The impending arrival of a 
new executive at the National 
Theatre has intensified 
speculation that two people 
may ran the complex jointly 
after Sir Peter Hall retires as 
director. 

In accordance with his con- 
tract, which expires at the end 
of 1988, Sir Peter has recom- 
mended a successor, Mr Rich- 
ard Eyre, an associate director 
at the National since 1981, 
whose a ward- winding Guys 
and Dolls has been among its 
most outstanding productions. 

The second candidate Is Mr 
David Aitkin, who will share 
overall direction and manage- 
ment with Sir Peter when he 
takes np .the post of executive 
director next month. That 
position was created after an 
independent report recom- 
mended that Sir Peter should 
share his responsibilities. 

Unlike Mr Eyre, whose 20- 
year career has spanned the 
theatre, cinema and television, 
Mr Ankin does not direct 
plays. 


His forte is as an admin- 
istrator and producer, cur- 
rently with the Haymarket 
Theatre, Leicester, and pre- 
viously with the Hampstead 
Theatre, London. 

The theory is that the two 
would complement each other 
admirably as the National's 
first joint directors. 

The National yesterdav de- 
nied a report that they had 
been chosen as joint heirs 
apparent to Sir Pelen “Ab- 
solutely nothing is settled yet, 
neither Sir Peter's departure 
nor the selection " 

The dramatis pemuuute of 
the mystery were also notice- 
ably reticent 

No one was available for 
comment, although in Mr 
Ankin's case for the good 
reason that he was flying back 
from New York after an 
opening performance of Me 
and My Girl. 

However an associate of one 
of them said that it would not 
be an unusual arrangement: 
“The navigation officer (Mr 


Eyre) and chief engineer (Mr 
Aiikiu) kind of relationship B 
quite normal in the theatre.” 

The two men have been been 
working together over the past 
two months on a stage version 
of High Society-, which opens 
at the Leicester Haymarket 
next week. Their co-operation 
as director and producer is 
said to have been harmonious. 

An independent arts source 
suggested that joint direction 
would be a sensible way of 
nuuisng the National, partita- 
•ariy in view of recurrent 
criticism of Sir Peter's role as 
the sole chief executive. 

“Richard is a brilliant direc- 
tor and David is a very capaUe . 
administrator. It would be a 
new twist for the National, bat 
something that could work 
very well.” 

If Sir Peter officially serves 
10 * eavc National in 
J9S8, when he will have been 
in the job for 15 years, the 
ward is expected to begin 
considering his successors) 
towards the end of this year. 




% 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Borrie signals new 
purge on 
cowboy salesmen 


By Derek Hams 
Industrial Editor 

New legislation to protect 
consumers, particularly from 
used-car dealers and 
’‘cowboy" home-imrovement 
operators, was urged yesterday 
by Sir Gordon Borrie, Direc- 
tor General of Fair Trading. 

The call for new “safety 
nets" signals tougher curbs, 
specifically in areas where the 
Office of Fair Trading (OFT) 
has said consumers are at 
most risk. 

The OFT has been con- 
cerned about cases in which 
consumers are asked to pay in 
advance either the full cost or 
a deposit on such iiems 
asfurniture, books and 
clothes, or for home improve- 
ment work includingfiued 
kitchens or double glazing. 

As much as £18 million a 
year is lost in advance pay- 


ments to traders, usually be- 
cause they had no scheme 
such as insurance to protect 
their customers, the OFT 
found. 

There are still “serious 
problems" for consumers in 
their dealings with the used 
car trade, according to the 
OFT. Thai includes 
“clocking" — the winding back 
of mileage recorders — even 
though it is a criminal offence. 

Consumers also particularly 
need protection, the OFT 
believes, where selling is done 
by telephone. Protection was 
needed to prevent an unwit- 
ting committal to binding 
contracts as a result of persua- 
sive telephone sales calls. 

Sir Gordon yesterday in- 
troduced a discussion paper 
designed to lay the ground- 
work for a more detailed 
policy which would be drafted 
next year. 


End to limits on cheap 
air tickets urged 


By Robin Young 

Airlines and travel agents discounted 
should be allowed to sell flight flight with: 
tickets as cheaply as they like The con 
and minimum air fares should CAA's nil 
be abolished, the National should be 1 
- Consumer Council said ing maxim 
yesterday. retail^ price 

It was responding to the no minima 
Civil Aviation Authority’s pro- says, sine 
posals on bulk discounts for present ha 
air fares. infonnatioi 

The authority’s proposals airlines ai 
would restrict t be sale of prices artif 
discounted tickets by airlines _ The NC( 
and travel agents to clients imposing m 
who spend more than the way t 
£100,000 a year. The con- from unfi 
sumer council says that is competitor! 
illogical, unfair and fares at I 
unenforceable. attempt to 

The council is also con- Instead it 
ceraed that the CAA consul- conduct si 
tative paper, published in penalized a 
May, implied that discounted that airline 
fares would only be permitted to hold pri 
subject to air service agree- that they k 
meats with other countries. The NC( 
The NCC points out that routes prio 
such air service agreements bear no rei 
are subordinate to the Treaty Involved. It 
of Rome and that the Enro- In heavOy 
pean Court has ruled that the through to 
competitive articles of the agencies wi 
Treaty of Rome apply to air forego the 
transport Bea cause of that it skm, is ' 
says, the CAA should have no consumers’ 
problem in getting a ruling absence of ; 
that air feres can be sold at itive marker 


discounted pikes for any 
flight within the EEC 
The council says that the 
CAA’s role in setting prices 
should be limited to authoriz- 
ing maximem wholesale and 
retail prices. There should be 
no minimtun prices, the NCC 
says, since those fixed at 
present have to be based on 
information supplied by the 
airlines and serve to keep 
prices artificially high. 

The NCC report argues that 
imposing minimum fares is not 
the way to prevent airlines 
from unfairly undercutting 
competitors* prices by offering 
feres ai below cost, in an 
attempt to gain a monopoly. 
Instead it suggests that such 
conduct should be heavily 
penalized after the event, and 
that airlines could be obliged 
to hold prices down to levels 
that they had themselves set 
The NCC says that on most 
rentes prices of airline tickets 
bear no relation to the costs 
Involved. It says that the trade 
in heavily discounted tickets, 
through backet shop travel 
agencies which are prepared to 
forego die airlines’ commis- 
sion, is “strongly in the 
consumers* interests** in the 
absence of a property compet- 
itive market for air transport. 


Legislation could be ex- 
pected to be a job for the next 
government, whichever party 
formed it. Sir Gordon in- 
dicated. He expects to discuss 
the implications with all 
political parties. 

Sir Gordon described his 
suggested new approach to 
consumer protection as a 
made-to-measure law which < 
could gn e better protection to 
shoppers and mean “less 
head-scratching"for sellers. 

It would introduce into 
Britain for the first time a 
general duty on traders to 
trade fairly in their dealings 
with consumers. 

Sir Gordon said: “The 
United Kingdom 1ms often 
been a pioneer in introducing 
laws to protect consumers but 
because of this we have a 
network of Jaws which has 
been built up bit by bit over 
many years. What is needed 
now is some kind of legal 
safety net to catch all rogue 
practices which are still slip- 
ping through the net” 

A crucial suggestion is that 
codes of conduct would be 
drawn up for individual sec- 
tors by the OFT in discussion 
with the trades involved and 
then be given statutory force. 
Enforcement could largely be 
in the hands of local authori- 
ties. It would mean court 
action could more readily be 
taken than at present with Sir 
Gordon also having the op- 
tion to take over cases. 

The codes would provide 
guidelines as. Sir Gordon 
suggested, a sort of “designer 
law for shops, garages, build- 
ers and in fact for any firm or 
individual who serves the 
public." 

A number of voluntary 
codes of practice already exist, 
many created with the help of 
the OFT. but they have weak- 
nesses because trade associ- 
ations which have adopted 
them do not necessarily have 
everybody in the trade as 
members. 

Sir Gordon said: “We 
would be trying to build on 
our experience of codes of 
practice. Only statutory back- 
ing would realty ensure that 
standards would be raised 
above what they are and 
applicable to alL” 

A General Duty to Trade 
Fairly: a discussion paper by the 
Qffice q f Fair Trading: available 
from OFT. Room 515, Chan- 
cery House. Chancery Lane, 
London WC2.A ISP. 



Paul ShowelL, aged seven, making a new friend (Photograph: Snresh Karadia). 

Splashing out on £1 Dulwich des res 


Hidden among the terraced bouses of 
London's suburbia in Dulwich is what is 
believed to be Britain's smallest nature 
reserve — a pond measuring all ofl2ft 
square. 

Though not much to look at and with 
hardly enough standing space for a 
heron, its very existence represents a 
sizeable victory for the cause of 
conservation, the London Wildlife 
Trust, which owns it says. 

An original pond at the Plough Lane 
site was destroyed by property 
developers. 

Bnt people living near by alerted the 
trust and at a public inquiry last year the 


Department of the Environment's 
Inspector ordered the firm to provide a 
replacement. 

The trust then bought the new, 
slightly larger, pond for £1 and named it 
Plough Lane Pond. 

It manages about thirty sites in 
London, bnt that is the first it could 
afford to buy one. 

Now an army of displaced amphibi- 
ans. forced to skulk in neighbourhood 
gardens, have a home; they needed no 
prompting to take the plunge. 

The trust estimates that about fifty 
pairs of adoit frogs use the rubber-lined 


pond to breed, 20 pairs of toads, 10 pairs 
of common newts, and even a dragonfly 
or two. 

Among abundant plant life, duckweed 
blankets a surface broken by Flag Iris, 
Water Mint and Horn wort. 

“Plough Lane Pond is significant 
because we’ve demonstrated that there 
is an environmental case, to be argued 
even on such a small scale— it’s one step 
farther up the ladder,** Mr Jerzsey Des, 
bust director, said. 

The poad will be looked after by the 
trust's Southwark group. Visitors will be 
admitted by appointment only. 


Lesbian love case 


Police ‘frightened teacher’ 


Hunt wins 

trespass Wheel-C 

battle By Fra 

A farmer who blames bis Motorists without insur- 

local hunt for the death of his or road ™ could find 
lather lost a county court Bteir cars wheel-clamped, im- 
action against the hunt pounded or removed under 
veslerday. proposed changes to road 

’ Arthur AJsop , aged 44, of traffic law to be looked at by a 
Weir Farm, Napton, committee set up by the 
Warwickshire, sued the four Government, 
joint masters of the Warwick- The changes could also 

shire Hunt for trespass after affect diplomats who - at 
hounds went on his land last present can escape prosecu- 
January. non for parking and driving 

Backed by the League offences, but may in future be 
Against Cruel Sports. Mr caught by wheel-damps or 
AJsop also sought damages impounding.* 

Su” ,o ■" * j 0 ? h s n u “rv^: 

He t nirt thp murt that hi« relar y of Stale for Transport, 


Road transport 


Wheel-clamps may spread 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 
without jnsur- dampjm, impounding and to report at the end of this 
ox couW End removal of vehicles. ^ jear. 

ej-ciampeo, un- n, e committee, under Dr Whed-clampiqg was in- 


Sealink to[ 
get tough 
on soccer 
hooligans 

Tbugh security measures to 
help to combat soccer vi- 
olence were announced- by 
Sealink British Ferries 
yesterday. 

In response to rioting by 
football hooligans on the ferry 
Komngjn Beatrix last Friday 
night, when three people were : 
stabbed and many others werer ^ 
injured, Sealink said ii would 
no longer cany soccer fcztsr< 
unless full police security was& 
provided at -ports and on ' 
board. 

In addition, supporters may . 
be required to surrender thefts 
passports during the voyage. 
Anyone wishing to take or*'* 
ganized groups to matches-.; 

■ abroad may be asked to post 92 

■ security bond with ibe^dha^s 
party which would be returned , j 
at the end of the voyager- 
provided there was no troubles i 

A company spokesman said 
that bars and duty free shops. - 
would be closed for the sale ot-1 
alcohol when necessary. v.-> 
At' Stoke-on-TrenUv 
Staffordshire, Mr Philip Car*- * 
ter. the Football League presi- 
dent yesterday called Sm* 
suffer court sentences for soc-7 
cer hooligans at the start of a:* 
two-day conference organized^. 
by Stoke City FC to try to find 
ways of encouraging more- ? 
families to grounds. " '» 
Mr Carter, chairman of-j 

■ Everton - FC ' saidr- “UJv.'i 

limatety, when these people 
are caught and apprehended* « 
the ultimate sanction must be ' 
thal they are given very severe 
sentences" .»■£. 

Mr Jimmy Hill the tele- -; 
vision commentator' and 
chairman of Charlton Atlv- . ; 
letic, who is chairing the:?, 
conference at Keete umverri 1 
sity, wanted a system o£~ 
national service for offenders.' - 

• Up to 26 British footbalk ;. 
fans accused of various ofM: 
fences after 39 people died at 
the Heysel Stadium in BnisTj 
sels T5 months ago -are- ex- * 
pected to face extradition* ’ r : 
proceedings in.; Bow. Street^ 
Magistrates Court London. 

The Director of Public* 
Prosecutions is studying re- ’ 
ports from the Belgian* and 
Merseyside police, which set < 
up a special squad to identify * 
rioters at the 1985 European > 
Cup Final between Liverpool s 
and Juventus. : 

• A soccer fan held by the ; 
polices berried to board the . 
ferry afr Harwich on Friday ?. 


and a court injunction to ban 
the hunt from his land. 

He told the court that bis 


Jayne Scott the gym mis- 
tress accused of attacking a 
woman with a hammer in an 
alleged lesbian love triangle, 
claimed yesterday she was 
“frightened and intimidated” 
by the police interviewing her. 

She told the Central Crim- 
inal Court “a large gentleman" 
kept banging on the table. 
Miss Scott aged 30. of 
Famham Royal, Buckingham- 
shire, was facing the seventh 
day of her trial. She denies 
causing and inflicting greivous 
bodily harm on Miss Susan 
Craker, deputy headmistress 
at Slough and Eton Secondary 
School last August 

She had been asked by Mr 
John Hilton, for the prosecu- 
tion. why she had not given 
the police the reason she was 
giving the court for moving 
the hammer she found by 
Miss Craker. she had told the 
court she moved it to get dose 
to the hurt woman to help her. 


not saying it was 
misbehaviour. I was just 
frightened by the gentleman, 
that is all. I felt frightened and 
scared - it was the end of the 
day, I was tired, 1 did not 
know what was happening, ft 
was like a nightmare." 

Mr Hilton told Miss Scott: 
"The reason you were so 
anxious to tell friends and 
police that you not only 
touched the hammer but felt 
Sue saw you with it is because 
that is exactly what she did 
know she had seen — you with 
the hammer just as you struck 
her a second and third time." 

Miss Scott replied: “That is 
not tine." 


have realized there was a near 
madman about". 

The idea of an intruder had 
passed through her mind, but 
then she was overcome by 
panic again. She never 
thought she might be a victim. 

Miss Scon agreed she had 
said: “1 have no reason at all 
to hurt Susan because 1 ad- 
mire and respect her very 
much and we are all good 
friends." 

Mr Hilton: “This was the 
deputy head who was about to 
or in the process of or possibly 
taking away your girl "Miss 
Scott: “She wasn’t my girl by 
then, and hadn’t been for , 
nearly a year." 1 

When re-examined by her . 


When Mr Hilton suggested: counsel. Mr Richard Chemll, 
“You had the nightdress on, SJS* S' fe 


the bath was run. you blud- 
geoned her and then went 


interviewed at length by the 
police. Miss Scon replied: 


Mr Hilton said there had Miss 

not been any suggestion of * ' * ial 5 not tive. 
police misbehaviour. Mr Hilion suggested when 

Miss Scott replied: “I was she found Susan she “must 


£buiibvi Hbi miu until -cm 1 J 

upstairs and washed your Y^P, \ iret ^ frightened and 

hands, your nightdress and ,■ 

any pan of your body with 

blood on." Miss Scon said: ? ,d 


“The realization began to 
dawn that perhaps they did 
suspect me. It made more 
confused and panicky — I was 
shaking all ihe time." 

The trial continues today. 


NHS savings Inquiry as two Musical aids 
should ‘be patients die of mutiny on the 
spent on staff food poisoning Bounty isle 


The public wants more 
money spent on medical and 
nursing staff and on reducing 
waiting lists, according to a 
National Opinion Poll survey 
(Jill Sherman writes). 

The survey, commissioned 
by the pro-privatization asso- 
ciation, Aims of Industry, 
asked the public how the 
National Health Service 
should spend the £52 million 
saved so far on competitive 
tendering in ancillary services 
in national health hospitals. 

More than half the 1.953 
respondents said the money 
should be used for more 
medical and nuTsing staff. 


Salmonella food poisoning 
which killed two elderly pa- 
tients in a Welsh hospital is to 
be investigated. 

Medical staff, a consultant 
microbiologist and an 
environmental health officer 
from the East Dyfed Health 
Authority, will try to establish 
the cause of the infections at 
the West Wales General Hos- 
pital Carmarthen, and deter- 
mine if the cases are linked. 

Mr Keith Thomson, the 
hospital administrator, said 
there was no evidence linking 
the illness to the hospital’s 
catering service. 

He said that a salmonella 


Bounty isle 

The Pitcairn islanders, an- 
cestors of the eighteenth-cen- 
tury mutineers on HMS 
Bounty, are to get a cargo- 
passenger ship partly paid for 
from the proceeds of a charity- 
showing of the London musi- 
cal Mutiny. It will be staged at 
the Piccadilly Theatre . 

The main financing will be 
by a consortium including Mr 
Glynn Christian, a direct 
descendant of Fletcher Chris- 
tian. ibe mutineers’ leader. 


IK WIU Ult WUIl LUai Ul) .n.Tmmnnit ,L_. L. 

father. Thomas Alsop. died of 

a heart attack 17 years ago as ^ committee now 

he tried to mm till bunt 'ESZ 

Mr Alsop said that last of road traffic law to. extendiis 
January the hum was meeting terms of reference to wheel- 
in a neighbouring field and 

Mr Anthony Adams, the j niirtTIHUTI 
huntsman, encouraged VxUUl 11 UU11I 
hounds to go into his field .-m -m 

The confrontation took 

place near where his father vUH/ttVlVk3 

had died he said adding that • a • • _ J 

when Mr Adams rode away he CF1 ilClZGfl 
did not call the hounds with * 

him, but let them run By Our Legal Affairs 

Mr Adams, who said he Correspondent 

knew ihe hunt was not al- Government proposals to 
lowed on Mr Alsop’s land, abolish small, underworked 
i said he had gone to the hedge magistrates' benches in a 
to talk to Mr Alsop, although wjdescale reorganization of 
he did not know then who he petty sessional divisions were 
was. criticized by the National 

“The hounds were with me Association of Local Councils 
and some went on to his yesterday, 
property — eight or ten. but no The association, which 

more. I did not intend them to represents thousands of par- 
go on.” ish. town and community 

Judge Alan de Piro dis- councils in England and 
missed Mr Alsop’s claims. Wales, says the proposals 
Although some hounds wen: from the Home Office and 
on his land, there was no Lord Chancellor’s Depart- 
iruent or neglect on the part of ment will mean a lower stan- 
Mr Adams. dard of justice in rural areas. 

He ordered Mr Alsop to pay if access to magistrates' 

costs, expected to be about courts is “sacrificed to econ- 
£10.000. They will be met by oniy in the use of courthouses 
the league. or staff", the “quality of 

The judge added: “I have justice dispensed may well 
some sympathy for Mr Alsop suffer”, it says iu its response 
in view of the wretched and i 0 the proposals, 
tragic event of 1969. bm the The association says that in 
claim must be dismissed many rural areas public trans- 
Mr Richard Course, for the port is not conveniently 
league, said they would be timetabled to enable return 
appealing. journeys of any length to be 

A spokesman for the hunt m ade within a day. 
masters — Mrs Mary Way, of If benches are merged some 
Frankton Grounds Farm, courts may be reached “only 
Frankton. Mrs Charmian with difficulty or considerable 
Green, of Dad glow Farm, expense. 

Bishops Itchington. Mrs Di- “As a result, the public will 
ana Mcllveen of The Cose. nol convinced that the 
5u i lon-under-Braj lies, and magistrates represent the 
John Barnett, of Fossebury whole area of their jurisdic- 
Farm. Combroke. all |, on aiK j witnesses may be 
Warwickshire — said “we are reluctant to come forward for 
very pleased cases." 


Peter North, the principal of troduced in three parts of notttsat the 1985 European 
Jesus College, wifi look at how London - Westminster, Chel- ajfpfod between UveipcK 
such penalties might be ap- sea and Kensington - three Juventus. 
plied to a wider range of yeans ago. #A held by the 

offences than parking. . But there has been consid- notice^s berried to board the 

^ Those are h tody to md tide: . arable jifteresi in the rtrifoity ^ ^Harwich on Friday 
feUure to have insurance,- from police throughout the ££d bedTo'n'Abe run for 15 
vehicle excise duty or an MOT country as weflas in London, -months after an arrest for 
certificate. Depending on . . The. EfeparttnfitiLPf Trans-; ^assessing a&anley knife at a 
circumstances ucroramioee , portrsaid yesterday-tied it was footballs- natch, Stoke-on- 
wtll look at the feasibility of because of that interest, cou- Trent ntagistraies were told 
wheel-clamping or vehicle with concern about tack- yesterday’ 
removal. v ... .. ling., the problem of aban-. . Andrew Brooker, aged- 19, 

The committee, which was doned vehicles, that the of Salford Manchester, who 


wbeeMamping or vehicle pied with concern about tack- 
removaL ^ -- ling.. the . problem .of aban - 

The committee, which was doned vehicles, that the 
set up jointly by tile Home committee had been asked to 
Secretary and the Secretary of widen its terms of reference to 
State for Transport in January include wheel-clamping as 
1985, has already published a well as impounding and 
consultation paper and Is due removaL 


possessing a&anley knife at a , 
fbbtbafc- match, Stoke-on - 1 
Trent qjsgistraies were told 
yesterday ‘ 

_ Andrew Brooker. aged* 19, * 
of Salford, Manchester, who ; 
admitted possessing 3n often;. • 
sive weapon, felling to surren- r 
der to bail and theft, was : 
sentenced to nine months* ■ 
youth custody. . 



NATIONS GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP 


WINA£LS;000 PRIZE IN THE 
DUNHILLCUR 

WITHOUT PLATING A STROKE 







mm. 





pi- 



‘Urban adoption 9 jobs boost 


Forty eight per cent thought organism probably contrib- 
the money should go high uied to the death at the 
technology, such as kidney hospital on August 3 of a man 
machines, and 45 per cent felt aged 79. 


it should be earmarked to 
shorten waiting lists. 


Last week a man aged S9 on 
the same ward showed similar 


Less than a quarter of symptoms and a salmonella 
respondent wanted to see the organism uas confirmed on 
savings spent on improving Saturday. Two days later he 


services for the elderly. 

The survey showed that 


died. 

Mr Thomson emphasized 


Liberal voters wanted more j that no other patients or staff 
money spent on increased [ had shown any sign of the 
clinical manpower 1 s "“ 


Psst! 

Want to own a Bank? 


A pilot scheme for commu- 
nities to adopt a street, indus- 
trial estate and school in six of 
Britain's biggest cities could 
provide a model to improve 
rundown urban areas, Mr 
Richard Branson, head of the 
£300 million Virgin airline and 
record group, said yesterday. 

Mr Branson, who is chair- 
man of IIK 2000. the Govern- 
ment-backed scheme to clean 
up the environment and create 
jobs, said the adoption scheme 
was one of dozens of projects 
being considered for introduc- 
tion later this year. 

After less than a month at 
the helm of Britain's clean-up 
campaign. Mr Branson said: 
“What has excited me is the 
tremendous opportunity out 
there waiting to be harnessed, 
and the support from hundreds 


By Trndi McIntosh 
of organizations throughout 
the country." 

But he said that UK 2000, 
“must really get the ball 
rolling in the first year", and 
provide worthwhile jobs for 
young, unemployed people 
which will benefit the commu- 
nity as a whole. 

The Department of Employ- 
ment is moiling available 
5.000 places, at a cost of £22 
million, through the Man- 
power Services Commission's 
Community Programme, in 
the scheme's first year. 

“We would like to see more 
trees planted in streets and 
school grounds and the trans- 
formation of industrial estates 
into more pleasant environ- 
ments. If the local adoption 
scheme worked, it could be 


introduced in many towns and 
cities." Mr Branson said. 

Other proposals included 
turning disused railway lines 
into walkways and bicycle 
tracks, and providing teams of 
young people to help dear 
litter from tourists sights, such 
as London's Trafalgar Square. 

There are also plans for 
young people to help elderly 
and handicapped people with 
baggage and to give directions 
to tourists at each of the main 
London Underground 
stations. 

Mr Branson said that be 
would like to see more com- 
panies recruiting young people 
as part or UK 2000's projects. 
“We want to create perma- 
nent. full-time jobs for young- 
sters who have been out of 
work for more than a year." 


DU HILL FASHION AND ACCESSORIES FOR MEN. 


To celebrate the second year of the Dunhili Cup, an event 
has been devised which should prove equally as exciting. 

And the winner will receive £15,000 worth of Dunhili 
merchandise. 

Simply visit your nearest Dunhili store before the 19th of 
September and enter your name and address on a leaflet. No 
purchase is necessary. You will then be matched with one of 
the forty-eight players competing in the final at St. Andrews. 

If your player scores die best individual round, vour name 
will go into a draw. The first name drawn will win the first prize of 
£ 15,000 worth of Dunhili merchandise of their own choosing. The 
next five will win a second prize of a Dunhili watch, and there will 
be prizes of Dunhili silver-plated Dress Pens for the next 100 names 
drawn. . _ * ... 

Naturally, as the Dunhili Cup has become the world’s 


exciting than last year's. 


Visir Dunhili in London « Duke Street, Sr JmnesV 

Burlington Arcade and ar Hamids, SeUndges and Harvey Nichols. 





I 







\ 





HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


****** 


SL 


Officials block 


TY interview 
with Hailsham 


for law series 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


A television programme on 
judges to be broadcast next 
Monday has run into trouble 
with the Lord Chancellor's 
Department 

Officials have withdrawn all 
facilities, including a possible 
interview with Lord Hailsham 
of Si Marylebone. after the 
programme makers refused to 
give what they say amounted 
to an undertaking that no 
judges would appear. 

The programme is part of a 
Yorkshire Television series on 
the legal profession. 

The programme makers 
had filmed the swearing in of 
QCs and magistrates by the 
time the dispute erupted. 

Bui it has cost them the 
chance of filming the swearing 
in of new judges, a judge's 
lodgings on circuit ana a 
judicial seminar as well as an 
interview with the govern- 
ment official in charge of 
judicial appointments. 

According to the television 
company, the Lord 
Chancellor's Department was 
concerned they would seek an 
interview with Judge Pickles, 
the controversial circuit judge, 
who recently defied the rules 
prohibiting judges speaking in 
public. 

Depanmem officials were 
concerned that Lord 
Hailsham. who maintains the 
rules on behalf of the ju- 
diciary. would appear along- 
side a judge in blatant breach 
of those rules. 

However, the programme 
makers did not seek an inter- 
view with the judge. 

Instead, the programme will 
feature an interview with one 
of the country's 10 leading 


judges. Lord Templeman, a 
senior law lord. 

Lord Templeman, who also 
took part in a recent Radio 4 
programme on the Bar, said he 
had not sought permission to 
appear on the programme: nor 
did be believe he was obliged 
to. 

But he said he fully sup- 
ported the Kilmuir rules 
which restrict public speaking 
by judges and did not see any 
need for a relaxation. 

The Lord Chancellor's 
Department confirmed that in 
Lord Hailsham's view, the 
Kilmuir rules did not bite on 
the law lords. 

But a spokesman confirmed 
that it had sought an assurance 
that no judge would appear 
who had not sought guidance 
from the department first 

He explained that if Lord 
Hailsham. or his officials, 
took part in a programme with 
a judge in defiance of the 
Kilmuir rules, it could be 
thought the Lord Chancellor 
was disregarding the views of 
the judiciary. 

Lord Templeman said he 
was taking part because it was 
important that members of 
the public should see what law 
lords look like. 

The programme, the last in 
a series called Scales of Justice. 
concludes that judges are 
“overwhelmingly male and 
often very old . 

But the Lord Chancellor's 
Department is determined to 
lay that misconception to rest 
It says that the average age of 
circuit High Court, Court of 
Appeal judges and law lords is 
only 60.9 


Computer 
cuts AA 


response 

times 


By Clifford Webb 
Motoring Correspondent 


A £7 miOion computerized 
control centre to be opened by 
the Anfomobile Association 
today to cover the 700 square 
mile area of Greater London 
will reduce rime taken by 
patrols to respond to break- 
down calls. 

The “hi-tech” approach is 
the latest move in a £30 mil- 
lion investment programme by 
the world's biggest motoring 
orgamzationJt is designed to 
meet increasing competition 
from the Royal Automobile 
Club and a number of fast- 
growing smaller breakdown 
specialists. 

The new centre at Scanmore, 
Middlesex, is twice the size of 
the old centre a few doors 
away. Designed to handle 
more than two million calls a 
year, it replaces paper with 
quick response micro-chips. 

Operators bey breakdown 
details into a computer which 
provides instant location of the 
breakdown, passes details to 
road patrols via a computer 



A computer operator keys in details of a breakdown caO as an AA patrolman checks the 


printer in the patrol vehide 
and checks that the caller is a 
paid-np member entitled to 
breakdown service. 


The centre has been "work- 

inn nn** nocf Mivaa 


months. In that time the 80 
operators have handled 
200,000 calls and the AA 
claims 90 per cent of them 


were answered immediately 
and the remainder within 15 
seconds. 

For years the AA has claim- 
ed a patrol will reach- 80 per 
cent of breakdowns within an 
hour. Last night it said it is 
mnch too early in the life of the 
new equipment to see any big 
improvement in that Haim. 


There are also many other 
factors which have to be taken 
into account, including the 
difficulty of coping with Lon- 
don traffic. 

Mr Nigel Clarke, AA direc- 
tor of operations, said: “When 
yon are handling three million 
breakdown calls a year 
throughout the UK together 


printout unit in his vehicle, 
with another 2i million gen- 
eral information calls, speed 

and efficiency are paramount. 

“This new centre, serving 
the busiest part of the country, 
will be followed by others in 
the near future so members 
throughout the country are 
served in die best possible 
way". 


Westland regains helicopter speed record 


By Rodney Cowton, Defence Correspondent 


The Westland company has 
set a new world speed record 
for helicopters using an ad- 
vanced rotor design. 

The 249. 1 mph record was 
set on Monday night in a Lynx 
helicopter which had been 
fined with the new rotor 
jointly developed by Westland 
and the Royal Aircraft 
Establishment at 

Fam borough. 

Westland explained that 
one of the reasons helicopters 
appeared slow in relation to 
fixed-wing aircraft was that 
traditional rotors stalled at 


speeds over about 200 mph. 

However, the new rotor, 
known as Berp (British 
Experimental Rotor Pro- 
gramme), was much more 
aerodynamicaliy efficient, and 
had a much higher stalling 
speed. 

Advanced composite 
materials were used and the 
rotor blades have a twist in 
them and are paddle-shaped at 
the ends. 

The record was set over a 15 
kilometre course in Somerset. 

The speed of 249. 1 mph was 
the mean time on the fastest of 


the four passes over the 
course. 

Westland said that the time 
had been certified by officials 
of the Royal Aero Gub, but 
the record was still subject to 
official confirmation. 


its decision to allow Sikorsky, 
the American company, and 
Fiat of Italy to take a stake in 
Westland. 


It was more that 20mph 
over the previous record of 
228m ph set in 1980 by a 
Russian helicopter. It also 
regained for the Lynx the 
record which it set in 1972. 
then at a speed of 198mph. 

The record boosted morale 
for the Yeovil-based company 
after the political battle over 


The company still faces a 
serious shortage of orders to 
see it through until 1990 when 
full-scale production of the 
new EH- 101 naval helicopter 
begins. 

The EH-10I, which is a 
joint Anglo-Italian venture, 
will have rotors using the 
same technologies as those on 
the record-breaking Lynx. 

Westland said that the im- 
proved efficiency of the new 


rotor did not have to be used 
to produce high speeds: it 
could equally be used to 
increase range or to improve 
load carrying. 

More than 300 Lynx heli- 
copters have been sold, 
including 200 to the British 
armed forces. 

The new rotor is now being 
offered to existing users for 
retro-fitting. 

Sikorksy has expressed in- 
terest in the rotors, and may 
use the technology for some of 
its helicopters, including the 
Black Hawk. 


Car tax 


violence 
‘a prelude 
to riots’ 


An incident where a gang of 
70 black youths surrounded 
police who tned. to arrest a 
man for not having fits car 
taxed, wus a prelude to last 
year's Handsworth nets, a 
Birmingham Crown Court 
jury heard yesterday . 

Mr Roger Smith, prosecut- 
ing, said a policeman checking 
cars illegally parked on the 
main roads into Birmingham 
saw the vehicle without a tax 
disc outside the Acapulco Cafe 
in Handsworth on September 
9 Iasi year. 

When the driver tned to get 
away the officer told him he 
was -to be arrested, but the 
man walked into the cafe and 
returned accompanied, by 70 
blacks. Mr Smith said one of 
the gang. Nigel Heath, ran into 
the road and knocked a police 
motorcyclist off his 800cc 


machine with 
footed kick. 

Mr Heath, 
farian. of 
Handsworth. 


a flying: two- 


32, a Rasta- 
r Road. 
Birmingham. 


denies assaulting two pohee 
officers, causing them actual 
bodily harm, possessing an. 
offensive weapon and affray. 

Mr Smith said when police 
tried to arrest another man. 
Ginton Holncss, the officers 
were punched, kicked and had. 
missiles thrown at them. 

When Mr Heath tried to get 
away. Mr Smith said he was 
pursued by two policemen, 
but used the hea vy end of the 
cue to inflict a “severe blow" 
to the arm of Police Constable • 
Charles Davis. 

Mr Smith told the jury that 
September 9 was “a bad. day" 
in the city. “There were, in die 
evening, very considerable 
and violent disturbances in 
the Handsworth area of Bir- 
mingham. You are not di- 
rectly concerned with those, 
but this was some son of 
prelude to that violence.". 

The trial continues -today 


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>1 


Survivor tried 


to save crewmate 


The lone survivor of a 
North Sea rescue drama yes- 
terday told how he supported 
a fellow crew member for 30 
minutes in a vain bid to save 
his life. 

Mr Trevor Forster and Mr 
Shaun Mingay were tossed 
into the sea when the trawler 
Pescador capsized three miles 
■off Orfbrdness on the Suffolk 
coast early yesterday. 

Mr. Forster, aged 24. a 
strong swimmer, grabbed hold 
of his unconscious crewmate 
and fought to keep him afloat 
as the ship went down. But 
after half an hour Mr Mingay 
slipped from bis grasp. 

Mr Forster was in the water 
for three hours before he was 
picked up a North Sea ferry 
on its way from the Hook of 
Holland to Harwich. The two 
other members of the Lowes- 
toft-based trawler’s crew, Mr 
David Friday, the skipper, 
and Mr John Moran, the 
mate, are missing, feared 
drowned. . . 

Mr Forster was taken to 
hospital in Harwich where his 
condition yesterday was "sta- 
ble and comfortable". 

The Pescador was hit by a 


freak wave as Mr Forster and 
Mr Mingay were hauling ip a 
net The skipper and the mate* ] 
were both below. Mr Forster .. 
was spotted at dawn by xBier;..; 
ferry -St Nicholas when hUf./ 
cries were heard by the feny’s , 
second mate. Mr Herman , j 
Ramsey “ . . - 
“L thought it was someone - ’ 
being notsy on deck so frwaf;,:. 


going tajeft-theiu tobe.giiiet,*' 
he said-TThi 


en; 1 realised lb* ;• 
cries were coming from oytSr 7 
the side more than 200 yards ■/ 
away". '• -/ • •' •. - 

Mr Ramsey said: "The only - 
reason for his survival was his ' 
physical and mental 7 fitness. 
He obviously had a very good 
pair of lungs or we wouldn't 
have heard him” 


The master of the St Nicho- 
las, Mr George Pack, said: 
“It’s a miracle he survived and 
was m surprisingly good con- 
dition. He had apparently 
tried to keep his mate afloat 
for more than half an hour" 
Throughout . the day four, 
lifeboats and an RAF rescue 
helicopter from ColtishaJI in 
Norfolk searched for the miss- 
ing crew. 


Light boat 
blamed for 


race death 


A Danish powerboat driver 
who was killed in an accident 
during a grand prix race in 
Bristol may have died because 
his boat was' too light an 
inquest heard yesterday. 

Mr Jorgen Askgaard. aged 
30. died of multiple injuries 
after his powerboat ploughed 
into a jetty and exploded in a 
90 mph crash on June 15. 


Mr Steven Kurton, the race 
co-ordinator, said he would 
not have’ driven the light- 
hulled 2.000cc catamaran on a 
course as dangerous as BrisioL 
Mr Kurton, four times British 
champion, said: “It's a very- 
light boat and hard to control 
on tight bends. I can't say that 
was the reason for the ac- 
cident. but I would not have 
driven that boat in Bristol." 


Police Constable Hugh Da- 
vies told the inquest:"! saw 
the boat come around the 
corner at high speed The from 
end lifted very high out of the 
water and it hit the jetty. The 
front of the boat 
disintegrated.” 

The coroner, Mr Donald 
Hawkins, said: “I hope race 
organizers wfli take into ac- 
count the evidence we have 
heard about light-hulled boats 
in the race." He returned a 
verdict of accidental death 


Hunt for 
for flare 


revellers 


A serious criminal charge • 
may be brought after the death ; 
of a man ha by a distress flare 
during Cowes Week! the Isle . 
of Wight coroner said 
yesterday. 

Mr Keith Chesterton de- 
layed issuing a certificate of' 
cremation for seven days oii 
Mr Leslie Hoggett, a motor 
cruiser owner after police said • ’ 
they were trying to establish 
from which boat the flare' was ' 
fired 

Mr Hoggett. aged 61. a ' 
retired garage owner, of 
Lionswood Ashley' Heath. 
Dorset, died during firework 
celebrations. - 

Dr Neil Greenwood a‘ 

pathologist, said Mr Hoggett * 
had a deep circular . ' 
woundTbe cause of death wds : 
a raptured heart due to a 
penetrating chest injury. 

Police constable volin Page 
said several people spoke of ‘ 
seeing the flare strike Mr - 
Hoggett. who was with a party ■ . 
of people on his 36ft turbo 
motor cruiser Fourth Topper. 

The coroner adjourned ti» 
inquest until September 30 for 
a full hearing before a jury. He' 
said there was a possibility ofs. 
senous criminal charge, add- ■ 
whoever might be chaqged, 
must have the opportunity or ' 
arranging a post-mortem . 


Hopes fade for sailors 


Hopes are fading for two 
Italian sailors lost in mid- 
Atlantic after their 60ft yacht. 
Beriucchi. capsized during the 
Carlsberg two-handed Trans- 
atlantic race. 

Beppe Panada and Roberto 
Kramar were last heard from 
on June 14. when they relayed 
a message torace organizers 
via a passing ship, saying all 
was well except that a radio 
transmitter was not working. 
When no further news was 
received se\en days after the 
first yachts arrived in New- 








port Rhode Island! Falmouth 
coastguard launched an air - 
ships alert on July 3; - : ■; r;? 

On July 20 the Pana- ■ 
manian-regisrered Amelia" 
sighted an upturned hull and . 
on July 2 1 a French warship-,’ 
located the Beriucchi. Divers ' 
who inspected the hull said a' 
life raft and lifejackets were 
missing, which raised, hopes- . 
that the two might be alive. \ 
No sightings were made dur- 
ing an intensive, search and 
authorities called off the 1 
search last weekend. ■ ’ ■ : v. :: ~ 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


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Amal militiamen battle UN troops 

Three die, 17 wounded 
as French come under 
siege in Lebanese town 


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- Fnmrfiobert Fisk, Marrakeh, sarthwa Lebanon 

The bullets were every- 
where, hissing and cracking 
down the narrow alleyways, 
skittering over the roofs of 
Marrakeh and ricocheting off 
the cheap breezeblock village 


walls. 

Even when the bearded, 
craggy figure of Mr Daoud 
Daoud emerged onto the 
street to talk -of ceasefires, he 
could hardly mate himself 
beard , above the crash of 
French Amy . and militia 
gunfire. 

“Do you see. what is 
happening?” he shouted at us. 
“The firing- is everywhere. I 
am: trying to stop it but it is 
very difficult Listen to the 
French soldiers shooting now. 
This is a dirty business. It can 
only help the Israelis.” 

There were at least a hun- 
dred gunmen swarming' thro- 
ugh the streets, driving into 
battle against the French 
Army hi. smashed pickup 
trucks, ancient limousines and 

Jeeps, .clutching automatic ri- 
fles'- and brand new rocker- 
propelled grenades. 

It took Mr Daoud at least an 
hour 10 persuade his men. to 
stop shooting. When they, 
eventually did. three of his 
Amal militiamen were dead. 
17 French soldiers lay wound-' 
ed in their besdged outposts 
and a lot of hatred had been 
stored up hr the little homes of 
Marrakeh. Twas not a famous 
victory, 

•Indeed, far the French 
contingent of the United Na- 
tions Interim Force in Leba- 
non, it was something appro- 
aching a disaster, a breakdown 
in relations with the local Sbia 
population so bad • that it 
turned peacekeepers into com- 
bat troops and the generally 
quiescent inhabitants of Mar- 
rakeh and the surrounding 
villages into gunmen. 


The UN spokesman said 
later that it was the .most 
serious incident involving UN 
troops ante the Israeli Army 
withdrew most of Hs occupa- 
tion soldiers Iasi year; winch 



was putting h mildly. 

It 'all -started- — and both 
sides agree about lhisu— when 
a 'car carrying two Amal 
officials pulled-up aia French 
checkpoint outside the neigh- 
bouring village of Abbasiyeh 
late on Monday night. One of 
them was Mr Haidar Khalil 
the Areal commander in 
Marrakeh. 

, According to the UN, the 
two men became involved in 
an argument and pointed guns 
at a French soldier on the 
checkpoint, whereupon his 
UN colleague shot both men 
dead. 

Killed while trying to dis- 
arm a French soldier, said the 
UN. Murdered, - raid Mr 
Daoud. And the battles which 
followed went on for 14 hours, 
the French troops trapped in 
their compounds, unable to 
evacuate their- own -wounded 
by helicopter while the Amal 
militiamen laid siege to them 
throughout the nighL 

When we managed to drive 
into Maiakkeb after daybreak, 
the strain was beginning to 
teH The French were using 
heavy machine-guns to defend 
their positions, running for 
cover between sandbag po- 
sitions behind baited wire. 

I found one French soldier 
running bem double towards a 
concrete hat in his outpost 
outside Teir Dibba, one hand 
holding his blue helmet on his 
head, the other clutching an 
automatic weapon. 

The French battalion bead- 
quarters at Marrakeh had 
bees attacked with anti-tank 
rockets, one missile having 


smashed through a wall op- 
posite the officers’ mess just 
beside, the regimental crest. 

In the centre of Marrakeh, 
the mood was curiously re- 
strained. Even the gunmen 
standing behind the walls 
answered our greetings. But 
being the only Western 
journalist amid a crowd of 
Shia gunmen who are fighting 
the French Army is an in- 
teresting experience. 

“Are you French? Are you a 
Frenchman?” one armed man 
kept asking me meaningfully. 
A crowd of women took us 
imo their home when the 
firing became heavier, and the 
appearance of Mr Daoud had 
a calming effect. 

He was trying to find a way 
of explaining to his militia- 
men why they should stop 
shooting. “Our two men, our 
cadre were murdered, there 
can be no doubt of this.” be 
said. 

“We do not blame all the 
French. We are not asking 
them to leave. But the French 
soldier who shot our men, I 
think he worked for Israeli 
intelligence." 

It was a preposterous no- 
tion. Indeed, Israel's only 
involvement in the whole 
wretched affair was the offer 
of its medical services to a 
seriously wounded French sol- 
dier who was later transferred 
to Rambam hospital in Haifa. 

But that is what the gunmen 
were told, together with a 
promise that Amal would be 
demanding a UN investiga- 
tion. It did little to soften 
hearts in Marrakeh. 

When the dead were buried 
in the village cemetery just 
after midday, hundreds of 
young Shia men screamed one 
refrain over and over again. 
“Death to the French,” they 
kept shouting. 


JJ *v 
' * \ 


Chief Justice Bunrej^ critical 
of legal advertising '' ' 

Burger 

censures 

lawyers 

From Michael Binyon . 

Washington 

Chief Justice Warren Bur- 
ger. in his last speech as head 
of the Supreme Court, to the 
American Bar Association 
strongly criticized the un- 
seemly rush of American law- 
yers to India after the Bhopal 
chemical disaster. • 

“Few things have done 
more serious' damage to the 
standing of the legal pro- 
fession than the unseemly, 
indeed shocking, spectacle of 
open solicitation by a handful 
of lawyers who dashed off to 
India,” he said. 

In his annual “State of the 
Judiciary” address in New 
York, he also repeated his 
frequent denunciation of ad- 
vertising; by lawyers, which he 
called a “very grave problem” 

Some advertising '“would 
make a used car salesman 
blush with shame”. He 
particularly criticized as “im- 
proper” advertising a first 
visit to. a lawyer as free of 
charge,. 

There was growing concern 
that the US. legal profession 
was “turning away from tra- 
ditional values and becoming 
more, and more like a com- 
mon trade in the market- 
place” 7 

Anticipating legislation en- 
acted in many stales hit by 
soaring insurance rates from 
exorbitant lawsuits, he also, 
s uggested that courts should 
monitor the contingency fee 
system. 

.Only the United States, he 
said, accepted the. practice by 
which lawyers are paid a hefty 
percentage of damage awards 
in return for the risk of taking 
a case. ' 

As Mr Burger spoke; more 
than 2,000 Gay Rights ad- 
vocates demonstrated outside 
against the Supreme Court’s 
recent decision upholding the 
constitutionality of state laws 
barring homosexual conduct 

This controversial decision 
was. one of the last important 
judgements under Mr Burger, . 
a moderate conservative who 
voted with the majority.. . 

After 17. years He is retiring 
to chair the commission 
preparing for the bicentennial 
of the US Constitution. One of 
the first events will be a four- 
day fireworks and show- 
business spectacular to hon- 
our the constitution at Dis- 
neyworld, where Mr Burger 
wifi -'Tub- shoulders . with 
Mickey Mouse. • ; 

*<, 


Pretoria ‘loses 40’ 
in Angola raid 


Lisbon (Rente-) - Angolan 
femes hare repelled two at- 
tacks by Sooth African troops 
on a stratepc sooth-eastern 
town, killing 40 off the 
attackers aim capturing four, 
the Defence Mimstry m Lu- 
anda said yesterday. 

A5«rabtiystatement qaoCed 
by the official Angolan news 
agency, Angep, said that three 
South African battalions 
backed by armoured cars and 
heavy artillery attacked Drito 
Coanavale m Cnando Cu- 
bango province; some 185 
Bides inside Angola, on Sun- 
day and again early yesterday. 

Two Angolan soldiers were 
IdDed in the attacks and 23 
civiliaiis were IdDed ami 18 
wounded by the shelling, the 
statement added. ~ 

The Sontfa African Defence 
Force declined to comment on 
the reported attack. But a 
military spokesman in Pre- 


toria said South African forces 
operated against guerrillas 
“wherever they may be” and 
accnsed Angola of aid in g 
them. 

South Africa has said that 
previous military incursions 
into Angola were in pursuit of 
black nationalist guerrillas 
for the independence 
South African-ruled Na- 
mibia (South-West Africa). 

Unifa (National Union for 
the Total Independence of 
Angola) rebels, who are said 
by Angola to be backed by 
South Africa, said yesterday 
that their forces attacked 
Onto Guana vale on Saturday 
night, destroying radar equip- 
ment, artillery and monitions. 

Onto Coanavale is a strate- 
gic jumping-off point for op- 
erations by government forces 
in Angola's south-eastern 
Cnando Cubango province 
which Udfta claims to control. 


Kaunda seeks to evade 
South African curbs 


Lusaka (Reuter),-- Presi- 
dent Kaunda of Zambia has 
held talks with Mr Gavin 
Reify, the leading South Af- 
rican businessman, on how to 
obtain mining equipment now 
that -Pretoria has imposed 
trade curbs on black neigh- 
bours. a spokesman for Mr 
Relly's Anglo American 
Corporation said yesterday. 

The spokesman gave no 
details of the talks but said 
they were continuing. Mr 
Refly is chairman of Anglo 
American. South Africa’s big- 
gest company. 

The troubled Zambian 
economy could come dose to 


collapse if mining equipment 
is held upiZambia depends on 
copper exports for 95 per cent 
of its foreign exchange 
earnings. 

Mr Relly worked for Anglo 
American in Zambia for five 
years and is an old friend of 
President Kaunda. 

• Police beatings: Two tour- 
ists. a Swiss man and an 
Austrian woman, who suf- 
fered severe beatings while in 
Zambian police custody on 
suspicion of spying, were re- 
covering after being freed but 
remained in a slate of shock, 
an Austrian embassy official 
said. 


30,000 see assassinated general’s last parade 



Indian Army officers carry- 
ing the body of General Aron 
Vaidya to his cremation in 
Pune. More than 30,000 
Hindus watched Che funeral 
procession. 

Indian newspapers said yes- 
terday that a Sikh extremist 
group had claimed responsi- 
bility for Gen Vakfya’s as- 
sassination on Sunday (Re- 
nter reports from Delhi). 
General Vadiya was Army 
Chief of Staff when troops 
stormed the Sikh Golden 
Temple in Amritsar in 1984 
Sikhs have meanwhile lulled 
three Hindis in a Punjab 
village despite increased se- 
curity following the murder, 
polks said yesterday. 


Wife escapes 
as Dane shot 
in Sri Lanka 

Colombo — A Dane was 
shot dead by an unknown 
gunman near Trincomalee in 
Sri Lanka's Eastern Province 
yesterday morning (Vijitha 
Yapa writes). 

Mr Tim Johanssen, aged 47. 
was driving home with his 
wife after shopping in Trin- 
comaJee when he was stopped 
by a gunman dad in a sarong, 
about four miles from the 
town. 

Mr Johanssen, who was 
working on a housing project 
in Trincomalee, was shot with 
a revolver. 

His wife ran from the car 
and escaped into the jungle, 
and walked four miles to 
report the shooting. 

The reason for the killing is 
unknown. There has been 
violence in the Eastern Prov- 
ince involving Tamil sepa- 
ratist guerrillas and Sri fnnVa 
security forces. 


ill I 


n calls 
for Wall to 
come down 


From A Correspondent . 
Boon 

Bonn has claimed on the 
eve of the 25th anniversary of 
the building of the Berlin Wan 
that its removal would be in 
the interests of the East Ger- 
man administration. 

Herr Heinrich Windelen. 
the West German Minister for 
Intra-German Relations, said 
the wail was a symbol to all the 
world of communist disregard 
for human rights. 

The landmines and auto- 
matic firing devices along the 
border have been removed, 
but the East German guards 
still have orders to shoot on 
sight would-be escapers. 

He said the situation in 
Germany and Europe had 
changed since the building of 
the Wall and it was in East 
Germany’s own interests to 
remove “this blot”, which had 
damaged the reputation of the 
German people. 

Leading article, page 13 


Kathmandu welcomes inquiry into 
dismissal of brawling Gurkhas 


From Michael Hamlyn, Kathmandu 

The news that Mr John Members of Nepal’s Na- 
S tan ley. Minister of State for tional Panchayau the part} less 
the Armed Forces, has asked Parliament, have already 
for a report on all the cireum- raised the subject during 

Question Time here, and have 


stances surrounding the dis- 
missal of 1 1 1 Gurkhas after a 
brawl in Hawaii has been 
welcomed by the Nepalese 
Government in Kathmandu. 

Officials here have also 
welcomed the reported rein- 
statement of some of the 
discharged men following 
appeals. 

While the public govern- 
ment attitude is that the issue 
is a matter of internal disci- 
pline for the British Army, 
senior officials have made it 
dear that the treatment of the 
men. all from the support 
company of the 1st Battalion 
of the 7th Duke of Edin- 
burgh's Own Gurkha Rifles, 
based in Hong Kong, is much 
resented. 


sought a statement from the 
Government But as the For- 
eign Minister is currently 
away, attending a meeting of 
the South Asian Association 
for Regional Co-operation in 
Dhaka, such a statement may 
well be delayed. 

A senior official, who de- 
clined to be identified, said 
yesterday that “no-one could 
say anything about action 
against those directly involved 
in the attack on an officer, but 
it is a bit unusual to expect 
them to iell on their fellows.” 

The Nepalese hierarchy 
prides itself on its sense of fair 
play, which has long been 
nurtured at English public 
schools, and the dismissal of 


their fellow citizens for refus- 
ing to rat on their colleagues, 
so to speak, strikes an ugly 
note. 

“The explanation smacks of 
a very dangerous kind of 
stupidity and silliness.” the 
official added. 

Newspaper opinion in the 
capital is beginning to harden 
against the British action, and 
the daily publication. The 
Motherland, declared: “It is 
unbelievable that 1 10 of them 
could be sacked on charges of 
breach of discipline.” 

The newspaper said: “This 
should serve as an eye-opener 
for His Majesty’s Government 
of Nepal to rethink about the 
arrangement made for permit- 
ting the recruitment of Ne- 
palis for the British Gurkha 
regiment.” 

Letters, Page 13 


Dispute at co-operation meeting 


From Ahmed Fazl 
Dacca 

Foreign Ministers of seven 
South Asian countries laun- 
ched a fresh attempt yesterday 
to speed up regional co-opera- 
tion, in an effort to repair the 
psychological divisions which 
have mured bilateral rela- 
tions in the sub-continent ever 
since the British left. 

The first meeting of die 
CouncB of Ministers of the 
South Asian Association of 
Regional Co-operation se- 
lected Kathmandu as the site 
of the regional body's secretai> 
iat and approved new co- 


operative development pro- 
jects. 

President Ershad of Bangla- 
desh. declaring the meeting 
open, called for more co- 
operation among South Asian 
countries 

General Ershad said that 
although relations among the 
seven countries — Bangladesh, 
Bhutan, India, Maldives, Ne- 
pal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka — 
had not always been smooth 
and free from tension, dif- 
ferences should not be allowed 
to harden attitudes. 

But hours later, as the 
foreign ministers began their 


working session serious dif- 
ferences emerged on a com- 
mon strategy to deal with 
regional terrorism. 

India and Sri Lanka sharply 
differed on whether the actions 
of the Tamil separatist move- 
ment in northern Sri Lanka 
could -be called acts of terror- 
ism. 

The ministers said they 
regretted the absence of de- 
pendable communications 
among their capitals, includ- 
ing direct air links. This was 
highlighted by the arrival of 
the Bhutanese delegation 
three days before the meeting. 


‘Treasure’ wreck to be 
raised after 200 years 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 


Divers and salvagers have 
completed preparations for 
raising the wreck of an 18th- 
century British warship from 
the bonom of Delaware Bay, 
where she has lain. Laden 
perhaps with gold and jewels, 
for almost 200 years. 

Despite delays forced by 
winds and waves, salvagers 
are hoping soon to bring up 
HMS deBraak, a two-masted 
brig that preyed on Spanish 
ships in the New World. 

When she sank in a sudden 
squall off Cape Henlopen, in 
1798, it is said, sailors who 
survived paid for their rooms 
ashore with gold doubloons. 
Ever since, she has been the 
object of treasure speculation. 

The find is considered an 
important historical and ar- 
chaeological treasure by mari- 
time historians, who are 
hoping to bring up not only 
gold, silver and jewels, hut 
other artefacts. 

Among those already recov- 
ered by divers are a gold ring 


belonging to James Drew, the 
ship's captain; a man's wig 
made of human hair, all the 
ship's 18 cannon; china from 
the officers’ table: two black 
glass bottles foil of very aged 
rum; a long-barrelled pistol; 
spoons, brushes, a toothbrush 
minus bristles, shoes, hun- 
dreds of buckles and a small 
glass bottle marked “ketchup” 
— apparently a mushroom 
extract that was put on meat 
. The salvage operation, cost- 
ing $2 million (£1.35 million), 
began to bear fruit in 1984 
when Captain Drew's ring was 
found. Delaware has claimed 
25 per cent of any treasure 
recovered. 

The brig will be raised from 
its grave 90 feet down by a 
crane mounted on a barge 
which can lift 300 ions. Eight 
cables will be attached under 
the hull. 

The mouth of Delaware Bay 
is a treacherous place, and 
more than 100 wrecks lie at 
the bottom off Cape Henlo- 
pen. 


Rubik’s Magic lunges on getting things right 


From Paul Vaflely 
New York 

This time, decided Profes- 
sor Rubik, be was going to do 
it right. Doing it wrong was 
what the Hungarian math- 
ematician had done with his 
famous Rubik's Cube. 

Around 150 million of these 
were sold daring the three- 
year craze which seized the 
world hi the early. 1980$. Yet 
Professor Rubik received roy- 
alties. from fewer than 100 
million of them. 

Not that be was exactly 
complaining, the Communist 
bloc millionaire told toy fn- 
dnstry insiders on a recent 
nnpnblidttd visit to New 
York; but this time he would 
do better-; 

With the forthcoming Rubik 
Hinge, which will officially go 
by the more flamboyant name 
of Rubik's Magic, be is deter- 
mined to get the marketing 
and patenting worked out as 
thoronghly as the mathemat- 
ics. Which was why he was in 
New York- 

The mathematics of the 
Cube, devotees win recall, 
were impressive. Its 54 

*• 


squares and six colours were 
capable of being arranged in 
some 43 quin til lion positions 
or, to be more exact, in 
43,252,003,274,489,856,000 
ways. 

Hie Cube was originally 
devised by Erno Rubik in his 
work as a professor of 
architecture. He used it as a 
tool for teaching algebraic 
group theory to a class at the 
Budapest Academy of Applied 
Arts. 

The Hinge, which took him 
another two years to invent, is 
capable of even more .confir- 
mations. But although it is 
said to produce a similar sense 
of obsession once it is in the 
hands of the victim, the Hinge 
was designed as a toy. 

Describing the original was 
difficult enough: It was a 
single cube made np of 26 
other cubes (think about it, 
there wasn’t one in the middle) 
all of which rotated on vertical 
and horizontal axes. The idea, 
as millions of despairing 
adults and millions of cocky 
children will recall, was to . 
twist the object so that the six 
small cubes on- each side 



Professor Rubik: deter- 
mined to do bener. 

formed a single Mock of 
colour. 

The new device is a different 
thing altogether. It consists of 
eight squares of transparent 
plastic linked by an ingenious 
hinge w hich is cmrently being 
patented by Professor Rubik 
in every’ country in the world. 

The squares, which are 
covered in diagonal lines, con- 
sist in their original format of 
two equal rows. 

Now comes the hard bit. 
Printed on the squares, appar- 
ently at random, are sections 


of rainbow colour. The object 
of the puzzle is to connect the 
sections to make three inter- 
connecting ovals. In (he pro- 
cess the entire device can be 
twisted into rectangles, tri- 
angles, parallelograms and 
shapes which defy’ geometric 
definition. 

The editor of Toy and Hobby 
World, Mr Rick Anguilla, who 
is one of the few outsiders to 
have laid hands on the device, 
told mr: “Unlike a movie 
sequel, this is better than the 
original. It is derivative in that 
it has the same obsessive 
quality as the Cube bat it is 
less mathematical, more ima- 
ginative and playing with it is 
more creative. 

“Physically you can’t figure 
out how the_ Hinge works, 
which is weird. And when 
you're trying to solve the 
puzzle you get side-tracked 
into seeing what “interesting 
shapes you can make.” 

Mr Anguilla’s opinion is 
much respected. Since the 
demise of the Cabbage Patch 
DoD, a vacuum has developed 
in the craze department of the 

•l- 


American toy industry and 
Rick Anguilla has a track 
record of being able to spot tbe 
next winner. He sees one in the 
Robik Hinge. 

Certainly Matchbox, the 
makers of the mi nature toy 
cars, hope so. They have 
signed a contract with the 
chain-smoking professor and 
have already taken on 2.000 
puzzle production workers — 
in China, appropriately 
enough. 

Together with the inventor 
they have devised a strategy to 
launch the Hinge simulta- 
neously throughout the world 
in October, thereby — they 
hope — forestalling the 
counterfeiters who did so well 
onf of the Cube. 

The launch wfll be accom- 
panied by television ads pre- 
sented by the softly-spoken 
scademicin his precise, rather 
quaint English, and followed 
by more advanced versions of 
the Hinge over the next three 
to five years. That. Professor 
Rubik has concluded, is doing 
it right. 


Grain deal 
defended 
by Reagan 

Washington — President 
Reagan went to Illinois yes- 
terday to campaign for Repub- 
lican candidates in the hard- 
pressed farm belt, and 
defended his controversial de- 
cision to sell subsidized wheat 
to the Sox iet Union (Michael 
Binyon writes). 

He said it was a way of 
boosting US farm exports and 
was fair to American farmers 
and trading partners. 

Admitting it was difficult 
for some people to understand 
— “aficrall. the Soviets are our 
adversaries" — he said he did 
not make the decision for the 
Russians but for the American 
farmer. Grain would other- 
wise have to be stockpiled. 

Mr George Shultz, the Sec- 
retary of State, has publicly 
called the plan ridiculous, and 
Mr Bob Hawke, the Austra- 
lian Prime Minister, has ex- 
pressed his country's outrage. 

Domestic critics have said 
the decision to sell four mil- 
lion tonnes of grain at sub- 
sidized prices is politically 
motivated, to hall the erosion 
of support for the Republicans 
in the US farming heartland. 

Mr Reagan will also an- 
nounce other relief measures, 
including higher Ices to farm- 
ers to store grain. The increase 
of almost 20 per cent would 
raise the incomes of thou- 
sands of farmers who are 
expecting near-record har- 
vests. 

The President attended a 
fund-raising luncheon in Chi- 
cago for "Ciou'mor James 
Thompson, a popular Repub- 
lican who is seeking an un- 
precedented fourth term. In 
the evening he gave a televised 
general news conference. 


Sydney casino 
deal dropped 

Sydney ( Reuter) — The New 
South Wales Government has 
cancelled a £24 million con- 
tract with an Ausiralian- 
American consortium to build 
the world's largest casino. 

It says it has received an 
“adverse" police report on the 
partners, the Australian 
Hooker Corporation and the 
US chain. Harrah's Hotels and 
Casinos. 

lit 

‘Jf 


Iraqi jets 
damage 
Iran oil 
terminal 

Bahrain (Reuter)— Iraqi jets 
blasted a major Iranian oil 
terminal in the southern Gulf 
yesterday, hours after Iran 
iired a surt’ace-io-surface mis- 
sile at Baghdad. 

The low-level raid on Sirri 
Island left up to three tankers 
on fire and halted operations 
ji the terminal, shipping 
sources in the region said. 

One source said a number 
of people were killed in the 
raid. Iraq's first on the termi- 
nal. while others spoke of 
about 10 casualties. 

In Baghdad, an Iraqi mili- 
tary spokesman said Iran fired 
a surface-to-surface to missile 
at the capital early today and 
called the act "a grave 
escalation” of the war. 

Briton accused 
of crime spree 

Belgrade (Reutert - Mr 
Brian Thomas Hodgkins, a 
Briton, is to be tried in 
Yugoslav ia in connection with 
a crime spree against tourists 
on the Adriatic Riviera. Brit- 
ish consular sources said. 

He has been held in “in- 
vestigative detention” in the 
port of Pula since late June 
and is io face charges concern- 
ing a senes of crimes ranging 
from hotel burglary to credit 
card theft. 

Narrow win 

Sydney (Reuter) - The 
premier of New South Wales, 
Mr Barrie Unswurth. won a 
narrow victory by 71 votes 
after the final counting of 
postal votes in a state by- 
election which shook the rul- 
ing Labor Government. 

Petrol up 

Paris ( Reuter) — The French 
oil company Total and Royal 
Dutch Shell subsidiary Shell 
Franga isc will raise the price 
of normal and super-grade 
petrol at the pumps by 12 
centimes a litre from today. 

Spy ships 

Tel Aviv (Reuter) — The 
Soviet Union has deployed 
two spy ships off the Israel's 
Mediterranean coast to mon- 
itor radio transmissions and 
gather intelligence informa- 
tion, according to Israeli state 
radio. 

Last film 

Tokyo (Reuter) — The last 
minutes of life for 520 people 
on board a doomed JAL 
jumbo jet were captured on 
colour film by a passenger 
before the airliner smashed 
into mountains in central 
Japan a year ago. 

The film has not been 
released. 

Students held 

Seoul (AP) — Police de- 
tained about 60 Korea Uni- 
versity students after violent 
clashes between about 1,000 
police and hundreds of stu- 
dents hurling firebombs. 

Silent song 

Delhi (Reuter) - India’s 
Supreme Court has ordered a 
school to readmit three 
Jehovah's Witness children 
expelled for refusing to sing 
the national anthem. 

Guess who 

Jakarta (Reuter) — Caroline 
Kennedy and Edwin 
Schlossberg. whose marriage 
last month turned into a 
Kennedy clan reunion, are 
honeymooning in an Indo- 
nesian hotel under the alias 
Mr and Mrs Hirsh. 

Paper pays 

Kota Kinabalu (Reuter) — 
The Sabah Times w ent on sale 
again, a week after being 
closed by an cast Malaysian 
court for not repaying a loan. 

Chicks live 

Kuala Lumpur (Reuter) — 
Three million chicks due to 
have been suffocated in plastic 
bags to combat a poultry glut 
in Malaysia have been re- 
prieved after a public outcry. 

Fly menace 

Sacramento (UPI) — 
California is to bunch a pest 
eradication scheme after the 
discovery of three guava fruit 
flies, their first known appear- 
ance in the Western 
Hemisphere. 


THE 

ROYAL MASONIC 
HOSPITAL 

Ikwntw rt Part. Inmtoo W8 STN 

Cowmens as unarmed that nonwa 
inns are sought lor candidates for 
Clcdun lo the Hospital Beard of 
Management 

Norrmalions are required by 26th 
September, 1966 

Canrtdates must be Gonemcrs and 
must be nomraled or over/ case by 
me* lodge (*mich must be a subs- 
ctbmg lodge) o< by two mdmdual 
Governors 

Nonanalion forms and «.-*ptanal(*V 
'lairmems have been sent to a* 
Lodge Secretaries ler the 
miamaunn d the* membeis 
Further copes .wc available to 
Governors on apptaauon lo 
Th* Ctuel Executive Oncer. 

The Royal Masonic Hospital. 
Ravenscoun Pam. 

London W6 QTN 
applicants should stale- the* lodge 




OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


Wellington urged to change its anti-nuclear policy 




New Zealand from Anzus pact 


i ■ From Mohsin AK 
* ; Washington 

Jhe United States, with 
Australian backing has for- 
merly suspended its security 
6b ligations to New Zealand 
under their tripartite Anzus 
Alliance. 


t A joint communique issued 
h the end of a two-day 


at the end of a two-day 
meeting between Mr George 
Shultz, the US Secretary of 
State, and Mr Bill Hayden, the 
Australian Foreign Minister, 
tpade clear that the suspen- 
sion would last until Welling- 
ton took “adequate corrective 
measures" and restored port 


and air access to US warships 
and military aircraft 

The announcement was ex- 
pected, and formalized a situa- 
tion that has existed for about 
16 months. 

The crisis in the 35-year-old 
Anzus treaty was triggered in 
February last year when 
Wellington's Labour Govern- 
ment said that US warships 
could only visit New Zealand 
ports if they were not armed 
with nuclear weapons. 

This demand conflicted 
with a long-standing US re- 
fusal for security reasons, to 
disclose whether any of its 


warships were carrying 
nuclear weapons. 

The communique said Can- 
berra. which maintains its 
bilateral military ties with 
Wellington, "disagreed com- 
pletely* with Wellington's 
nuclear-free-zone policy and 
understood Washington's 
action. 

It said, however, that the 
Anzus pact was not dead. 
“Both sides agreed that the 
relationship between Austra- 
lia and the US under the 
Anzus treaty" would remain 
constant and undiminished. 

Mr Shultz told reporters: 


Lange shrugs off allies’ rebuff 


"New Zealand has. in. effect, 
withdrawn from our security 
relationship. ■ 

“We miss New Zealand” he 
said, but if the US Navy 
cannot call at New Zealand 
ports “how can we maintain 
our alliance?" 

Mr Caspar Weinbeiger, the 
US Defence Secretary who 
also attended the talks, said 
Wellington was now without 
the security and protection of 
the US but would be wel- 
comed back if it chang ed its 
stand. 

While siding with the US on 
the New Zealand controversy, 
Australia strongly attacked 
President Reagan's recent de- 


| By Richard Long 

i Mr Da rid Lange, the New 
Zealand Prime Minister, yes- 
terday shrugged off Wash- 
ington's reaction to the dispute 
between his country and the 
US over the Anzus defence 
treaty. 

: He said the situation had 
pot really changed since Feb- 
ruary last year when the. 
dispute started after New Zea- 
land banned a visit by a US 
Warship. 

' Mr Lange, faring an Oppo- 
sition attack in Parliament, 
Said be regretted the United 
States decision to renounce its 
qecnrity guarantee to New 


Zealand, but it was not 
unexpected. 

The Prime Minister, who 
was to have spent yesterday 
relaxing in Sava, Fiji follow- 
ing the Sooth Pacific Forom 
meeting, made a late night 
change of plan on Monday 
after consulting his deputy 
Prime Minister, Mr Geoffrey 
Palmer, in Wellington. 

Mr Lange feces another 
problem in the report of the 
Defence Review Committee, 
set up by the Government last 
year in an attempt to smother 
the Anzus issue. 

Instead of producing a re- 
port of differing views, as 
expected by the Government, 


the four-person review comm- 
ittee, whose members ranged 
from a Quaker to an Army 
general produced a unani- 
mous document which is said 
to make a strong case for 
collective defence. 

This is built in part around a 
detailed public opinion poll 
undertaken by the committee. 
While neither the report nor 
its poll have yet been made 


cision to support a congres- 
sional call for the sale of US 
subsidized wheat to the Soviet 
Union. 

Expressing Australia's out- 
rage, Mr Hayden asked: "Is 
this the way the Congress of 
the US treats old and firm 
allies? Does the Congress re- 
alize that the tidal wave of 
protectionism it has un- 
leashed has consequences for 
regional stability in which 
both Australia and the US 


public, enough indications of have vital interests?" 


its contents have leaked to- 
show that die Government 
regards the findings as 'an 
embarrassment. 

The poll is believed to show 


, He asked Mr Shultz to .pass, 
on; to Congress ijiis supple 
request; 1 “We appreciate you; 
have your own "problems. But 
please don't iry to solve them 



Arms talks 
end 


silence tin 
both sides 


Kodikovo (AP, Reuter);—; 
Senior American and Soviet; 
negotiators yesterday ended > 
two days of special arms talks 
with no word from either side 
on what, if anything, was 
accomplished. 

The US delegation, fed by 
Mr Paul Nitze, President 
Reagan's chief arms adviser, 
left Moscow in the late after- 
noon without making any' 
comment to the press. 

Apart from saying that the^ 
talks here were to prepare fora 1 
meeting in Washington aqct • 
month between Mr EduapL 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet For- : 


eign Minister, and MrGctxge ■ 
Shultz, the US Secretary Of' 


'•<C" 'Aa*-' * 


State, foe official Soviet mafia - 
has also maintained a nedsj 
blackout. ■' 1 j 

- Mr Shevardnadze, and Mr 
Shultz are trying to set the' 
stage for a second summit 
between President- Reagta;- 
and Mr Gorbachov, the Soviet ; 





leader, due to take place t|isi 
vear in accordance with an 


a dear majority is favour of af the expense'- of allies and 
continued Amos membership, friends of the US". 


< a i rcr aft : t rash, which killed -520 people on Augnst 12, 1985. The woman was one of more 
.than 100 relatives of victims wbo visited the site to mark the first anniversary of the crash. 


year in accordance with an : 
understanding reached at thrir 
last meeting in Geneva last* 
November. r ! 

Progress here has been seat; 
as crucial to the meeting, /in: 
view of Moscow's condition ? 
that any new summit shodM; 
produce at least some concrete • 
arms control agr eeme n ts. ; ; 

After the first day's talks Mr 
Nitze described the dts- 
cusaons as "serious"- r 


Eastern bloc overture to Israel 


J 


cTa 


r 



Mil; Shamir asked 

' . ^ ■/ ; 1 

back to Bulgaria ! 


'f 


: ---r. .* -f.Vv V. i. 


r ft ■ 


r-r 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem f 

She was 17 years old when and places she would like to: 
cleft her native Bulgaria for see. She may wdlderide logo, 

October 7, when her 


die left her native Bulgaria for 
Israel and ever since then she 


has been subject to attacks of husband takes over as Prime; 


homesickness. 

Now, after more than 40 
years. Mrs Shulamft Shamir 


Minister of Israel. 

The invitation has been 
issued only a week after the- 


has received a personal invita- Soviet Union arranged to, 
tion to visit her birthplace, an meet an Israeli delegation to ■ 


4 % 


-«■ -■ W 

P 


J 


invitation interpreted bene as discpss.coosularmwtiefs, and: 
a further^gn that Soviet bloc within r three 'weeks- of the 


countxfes-are preparing spend expected exchange of dip- 
4be lF^yeqr breach uwebrtion?- Jkmftts to nip an “interest . 
wit&Isra-JL s setifion” between Tel Aviv; 


Stramir is "Sk* wife <8* anct 


Ji 


f lsraefi Foreign Mmstdt 
Yitz fa Sha m jar irfe. 
migranfrrom Pobisr'Gke^o 
many senior Israeli j>oti- 
ticmns. The invitation follows 
a United Nations meeting in 
New York nearly a year ago at 
which the Israeli ample mm 
their Bulgarian counterparts, 
Mr and bus Peter Mladenov. 

Though the visit has been 
suggested by Mr - Yoseph 
Astrokov, president' of the 
Bulgarian Jewish Committee,- 
there is no doubt in Jerusalem 
that it was approved by die 
Soviet satellite's government. 

Mrs Shamir has been asked 
tt&Bggst dates for the visit 


J 




\P 



A i Israeli donation visited; 
Poland last month to check' 
fi&tiraes artt!'' Dutch Efo-' 
bassy, which will be used for 
the Israeli diplomats. - ! 

Israeli officials have noticed ; 
other signs of a thaw xn 
relations with die Eastern 
bloc, which, with the excep- ’- 
tion of Romania, broke off ; 
diplomatic relations with Is- 
rael in the wake of the 1967* 
Six Day War. ' 

There has been a distinct ! 
increase in tourism~ftom Hup- ; 
aary. Mr Shimon Peres has 1 
become the first Israeli Prime 
Minister for years to be inter- •' 
viewed by a feading Yugod&v ‘ 
publication. - . 

Officials here do not believe \ 
that these signs of a thaw are ; 
or ch estra t ed from Moscow , \ 
though there is hope that next < 
weeks meeting . with Soviet; 
officials in Hcteinki will hejp : 
to encourage other Cofov 
munist countries to make ! 
overtures: i > 

That meeting, requested by | 
the Soviet Union, is to be used » 
by Israel to arg ue foe case for *, 
granting exit visas to the * 
400,000 Soviet Jews reported 1 
to be seeking them. MrShamir j 


A 


J 


J 



Mrs Shamir homesick for 
Bulgarian birthplace. 


yesterday described this issue « 
as "foe most important, foe \ 


as "foe most important, 
most vital for us. 


Negev archaeology site! 
‘wrecked by extremistsr ! 


J 


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Jerusalem — An important 
archaeological site -dating 
from the eighth centnry BC 
has-been vandalised this week 
(Ian Many writes). 

The aau suspects are mem- 
bers of an oitra-Orfoodox 
group called Atra Kadfeha, 
which is dedicated to preserv- 
ing the sanctity of Jewish 
cemeteries. 

The site, at Tel Hauer in foe 
Negev desert, is rewired .by 
local Bedoum as foe copto of a 
pupil of foe Prophet Moham- 
mad. But according to - Mr 
Menachim Porosh, n Knesset 
member who represents an 
ultra-Orthodox party, -the 
grav es on the site are likely to 
be Jewish. 

He has warned that if 
archaeologfeal eXcaratieti of 
the site does not stop there will 

be a huge public ontexj, to 


use for mfesaeuaiy actfride*. 

A statement from foe! 
Citizens' Committee for Jert- J 
salon, which has feaght a y 
long, . hard battle. against foe* 
Mormon project, has de-i 
Bounced the derision as un^ 
issue "of the raise m 
the State .of Israel and foe! 
survival of foe Jewish people."! 

While foe:caaipajgn tostop* 
the Monnons contimes, 
other straggle, hacked by > 
former Ashkeaezi Chief Rah-, 
hi, DrShJomoGoren, hasbeed* 
launched to allow Jews to prar S 
on Temple Mount, Which few ? 
been crowned .for foe pdft; 
U00 years by foe Mirib! 
Done of the Boris. .7f ! 

There have been two seridtf ! 
disturbances there fofe iyefrtj 
following attempts by Knesset-, 
merabers to inspect foe aremj 
and arrests have ben made of , 


Investment Bond 

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POSTCODE 


ALLIANCE ■■■ LEICESTER 


! which threatened foe survival 
ofthe Goventment ‘ 

I. Professor Eliezer Oreo, who 
is in charge of the excavation, 
says that the graves have been 
identified positively a» Turk- 
uh and Bedoum, datfog only 
from foe First World War. 
The dig. he insists, *iH go on. 

Israel's Ultra-Orthodox 
community, always wary of 
.» Judaism, is 
Particularly anxious afterlast 
xeetoad's govertimatt dt- 
o$hm to afiow foe Mormons to 
complete what they say will be 
a ouverslty on Mount Scoim 
in Jerusalem 

Jh*t decision followed an 
elght-moatfa inquiry by a spe- 


mea to pray and to ralse the j 
Israeli flag on one. of tfej 
holiest sites hi Islam. . ( 

The new Supreme RabUti-j 
cal CtomcO of the Tcm^C ; 
Mount, which aims not only tot 
nUow-prayjng .bat to bufidisi 


s^’uagogue there, was set 'ip; 
last week in foe presence of 40 ; 
rabbis, many of whom me; 
associated with foe extreunri! 
settlers movement, Gush Ea-J 

pmiiq. | : J 

TMrinbers of titispoup were » 

shw « by the Tthny laGsTwedc 

when they tried to ignore a. 
roadblock outride Jericho set 
■P to prevent their reaching 
foe rite of an old syitagogne is 
the ancient town, which is 
toitey a main Arab community 
mthe. orrnpfed West Bank. 

The group stopped, only 
when one of foe sokficrS' 
bullets smashed a windscreen. 


1 mqaiiry py a SDt- 

I money wim omy ze gays' wntten nonce, Ab^htoidcaaltogethct: ^ I 

I budding should -go ahead pro- 

BSrtRESr (S itOHIHLLr wo **MJAU.Y AND THE HITCREST KATES ASE VAIBA6L£ C r^ry»-7>L-' * -£*£T BAT l MET TfJlMUuMl WESTWEHT PEHiOLi Or*. 1£AR TH£N WrrHJ3RAVKV!,5 AT & DAYS' WWTTCW NQHCE ’BftSK; RATE REFERS IQ WM6LE RtflOV MOl^flUS RATt-CUPIRCflU' RET I dfoT At Wy prohibits hs 

i J y: . j. 1/ ■ ... ' . i . t- " 


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v> » i li. llj 


Pinochet claims seized arsenal could equip 20,000 guerrillas 


Chile ‘captures 
weapons in raid 
on rebel cache’ 


Santiago (Reuter) — The 
Chilean Government has 
seized enough weapons to arm 
20.000 guerrillas. President 
Pinochet said yesterday. 

He was commenting after 
the intelligence service. CN1, 
displayed an array of US and 
Soviet munitions and weap- 
onry. which it said was part of 
a 12 -tonne haul smuggled by 
Soviet fishing boats to left- 
wing rebels. 

General Pinochet said: 
“This shows 1 have been 
telling the truth. There is 
enough here to arm 600 men, 
that's to say in guerrilla terms 
the equivalent of a division or 
maybe 20 , 000 .'* 

“Here are . . . 1.300 kilos of 
TNT . . . with that they could 
blow up half of Santiago," he 
said. 

The CNI said its men 
captured the weapons, which 
included 348 US-made MI 6 
automatic rifles, 313 Soviet 
Katyusha rockets and sub- 
marine mines, in raids in 
northern Chile last week. 

A CNI spokesman said that 
six guerrillas of the Manuel 
Rodriguez Patriotic Front, 
four of them with Cuban 
training, were captured in the 


operations. About 20 more 
escaped, he said 

The rifles and rockets were 
displayed to the military Gov- 
ernment and reporters yes- 
terday. along with a large 
quantity of explosives, sophis- 
ticated Western communica- 
tions systems, robber boats 
often used by commandos and 
wetsuits. 

"This action of the intelli- 
gence and security (services) is 
the most severe blow inflicted 
on subversive terrorism in the 
last decade, in relation to the 
clandestine supply of arms 
and equipment provided from 
outside." the CNI spokesman 
said. 

He said one of the detainees 
was a senior leader of the 
Manuel Rodriguez group, who 
had entered Chile secretly in 
January after 12 years in 
Cuba. 

Soviet fishing vessels had 
brought aims and ammu- 
nition for the guerrillas twice 
this year, he said 

The guerrillas had chosen 
the storage site, at Carrizal 
Bajo. 446 miles north of 
Santiago, after searching most 
of the 5.307-mile Chilean 
coastline for a suitable area. 



A JKvS • 


Chilean police officials showing off rocket launchers, rifles and explosives said to have been captured from guerrillas. 


Togo foils bomb plot 


Lom6 (Renter) — The tiny 
West African state of Togo 
says it has foiled a plot with 
Libyan involvement to blow up 
the United States diplomatic 
mission in Lome. 


Nine people were arrested 
on July 23, after the discovery 
of two suitcases filled with 
explosives meant to destroy 
the US mission and the 
capital's main mar ket, said 
Mr Kpotivi Tevi-Dpdjogbe 
Lade, the Interior Minister. 

The announcement was 


made as President Gnassingbe 
Eyadema of Togo was in the 
Ivory Coast, meeting leaders 
of several other conservative 
French-speaking West Af- 
rican states. He returned to 
Lome immediately. 

Mr Lad£ told reporters that 
Togolese security forces Inter- 
cepted the two suitcases of 
explosives, transported via 
Libya's embassy in Cotonou, 
Benin, along with an auto- 
matic pistol and three 
grenades. 


US assault on Everest 


Los Angeles (Reuter) — A 
group of 16 American moun- 
taineers and film-makers has 
left the United States to 
undertake an ambitious ex- 
pedition through Tibet to the 
north-cast ridge of Everest. 

The team includes three 
women. 

They will retrace the steps 
of George Mallory and An- 
drew- Irvine, the British climb- 
ers, in an attempt to unlock 
the mystery of their disappear- 
ance after being sighted close 


to the summit in 1 924. 

Mr Andrew Harvard, the 
team's leader, on his seventh 
expedition to Everest said the 
assault was the most am- 
bitious he had undertaken. 

A sponsor had agreed to 
fund the film of the climb if 
the three women — Ms Mary 
Kay Brewster, aged 28, of 
Boulder, Colorado, Ms Cath- 
erine Cullinane, 31, of Jack- 
son, Wyoming, and Ms Susan 
Giller, 39, of Boulder — were 
included. 



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Tonis (Renter) — In a 
dramatic upheaval in his per- 
sonal and political life, Presi- 
dent Habib Boaigniba has 
divorced his once-powerfnl 
wife in an apparent row over 
the manner of bis succession. 

The announcement of his 
divorce from his second wife, 
YVassila, came a little more 
than a month after the 83- 
year-old President dismissed 
Mr Muhammad Mzali, his 
Prime Minister, and replaced 
him with Mr RachidSfar, the 
former Economy and Finance 
Minister. 

A presidential conummiqoe 
said the Tunis High Court 
granted the divorce because of 
“statements (made) without 
the President's knowledge and 
authorization which violated 
the constitution". 

Mis Bonrgniba, who is in 
her mid-70s and _ wielded 
considerable behind-the- 
scenes influence before' her 
disgrace early this year, made 
dear her views on tire succes- 
sion issue in a rare interview in 
1982, in which she proposed 
that, should the President's 
post (aD vacant, presidential 
elections should be held. 

She suggested that there 
should be a list of several 
candidates for the post of bead 
of state, and that a poll should 
be held within, for example, 40 
days. 

Under the present constitu- 
tion, the Prime Minister auto- 
matically succeeds Mr Bo«r- 
guiba until fresh general 
elections are held. 

There was no immediate 
official confirmation, however, 
that the mention of a constitu- 
tional violation in the court 
ruling referred to Mrs 
Boargmba's views on the 
succession. 

The abrupt decline in favour 
of Mrs Bonrgniba, who had 
been an imposing figure in 
Tunisian public life forabonta 
quarter of a century, began 
with a reported dispute in 
January with her husband 
over an anti-cormption 
Inquiry. 

Diplomatic sources said she 
was then banished from the 
Carthage presidential palace, 
and after a period of hospital 
treatment for diabetes she 


went into self-imposed exile in 
the United States. 

At the same time, the 
President's sou by his first 
marriage, also called Habib, 
lost his job as special adviser 
to his father with ministerial 
rank. 

Mis Bourgniba's disgrace 
bas coincided with a 
corresponding rise to prom- 

inenceof the President's niece, 
Saida Sassi. who bas bees 
constantly at his side in recent 
months and was shown on 
state television on Monday 
night swimming with him in 
the sea near bis Skanes pal- 
ace, outside the eastern port of 
Monastir. 

Mis Bourgtoba's former In- 
fluential position in Tunisian 
society in part reflects Mr 
Bourgttiba's landmark de- 
cision to pass a law in 1956, 
the year of independence, 
emancipating women. 

The announcmment of the 
divorce came just two days 
before today's anniversary of 
the passing of that law, a 
momentous step for an Arab 
Muslim state, which paved the 
way for women to take jobs as . 
doctors, lawyers and even 
Cabinet ministers. 

Since January, two prom- 
inent businessmen dose to 
Mrs Bonrgniba, whose ample 
figure, flowing dresses and 
broad features behind tinted 
glasses had become fiunOhr to 
Tunisians, have been jailed for 
financial irregularities. 

Mr Bourguiba's first wife, 
Mathilde. a French war 
widow, deed in 1967. 



Mr Bonrgniba: divorce at 
- age of 83. 


Nakasone 
takes back 
defectors 


From A Correspondent 
Tokyo 


Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, the 
Japanese Prime Minister, 
added to his election triumph 
yesterday when he accepted 
the political surrender of the 
breakaway New Liberal Club. 

The Clnb, which left Mr 
Nakasone's ruling Liberal 
Democratic Party (LDP) in 
1976 in protest at the LDP's 
corrupt and hierarchical struc- 
ture, held the balance of 
political power in a coalition 
with the LDP in the last 
Japanese parliament. 

' But Mr Nakasone's over- 
whelming victory in the July 6 
elections ended all that 

Only Mr Seiichi Tagawa, 
the former Home Affairs Min- 
ister, has decided to stick to 
his principles and remain 
outside the LDP as an 
independent 

• Trade' record: Japan has 
announced a new record mon- 
thly trade surplus, despite all 
the promises and efforts to 
reverse its trade imbalance 
with the rest of the world. 

The Finance Ministry said 
the July surplus reached $8 J2 
billion (£5.5 billion) compared 
with $4.60 billion a year ago. 

The figures underline a 
growing rear on the part of 
economists from all sides that 
there will be no dramatic 
reversal of the surplus in the 
near future. 

The pessimists believe that 
the 40-per-cent fall in the 
value of the dollar against the 
yen since last September will 
actually, increase the surplus, 
because Japanese export vol- 
ume has not dropped as fast as 
the value of the dollar. 


Anti-drugs 
drive on 


Amazon 


Lima (Reuter) — Colom- 
bian and Peruvian police are 
preparing to launch a joint 
anti-narcotics drive aimed at 
eradicating cocaine lab- 
oratories along their Amazon 
jungle border, Sefior Agustin 
Mantilla, Peru's Deputy In- 
terior Minister, said 
yesterday. 

The move follows the Peru- 
vian Air Force's weekend 
bombing of two traffickers' 
bases ami the seizure by police 
of a third complex. 

A total of 144 air ships and 
30 cocaine laboratories have 
been destroyed in drives 
against drug traffickers under 
the government of President 
Garda. 

Officials said over the week- 
end that Peru would wage the 
anti-drug campaign on its 
own, unlike Bolivia, which 
used US troops and heli- 
copters in a joint operation 
last week. 

“We are prepared and 
trained to combat narcotics 
trafficking, and we don't need 
a US pilot in our aH-ont, 
relentless fight," the official 
news agency quoted Senor 
Mantilla as saying. - 

Peru grows nearly half the 
coca leal used to produce the 
world's supply of cocaine, 
narcotics experts say. Bolivia 
is believed to harvest nearly 
the same amount. 

The leaves are converted 
into coca paste, which has 
long been flown from ilk 
airstrips to Colombia 
processing into cocaine. 

But in recent years, increas- 
ing amounts of the coca paste 
have been refined in Pern and 
Bolivia. 


X 


Madrid questions true 
unemployment level 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 


sJSraS? n S 5 y i. Mil,is P r ' UCL brought indignant de- 
^ *“2 Jpands from the Socialist and 
“J* Communist trade unions that 
^ Economy Minister should 
““ms about the tnie shoulder his responsibility 


: . ~ BWUUl LUC 

level of unemployment. 

Senor Sjplchaga estimated 



at 1 5 per cent of the wortang. 
age population. The unions 
have always followed the of- 
ficial figure of 22 percent. 


The minister’s figure repre^ 
sents the first official estimate 
of the importance of the 
“black" economy in providing 

■An AnnAriiiHitisii _ w 


and rectify such a state of 
affairs. 

“I am sure the official 
figures exaggerate; unemploy- 
ment in Spain does not reach 
22 per cem," Senor Solchaga 
said. 

. He has ultimate rcsponsibfc 
ity for such' figures and con- 
fessed the difficulty he Jaces 
7 If we say afi this, we are . 
immediately accused of mani- 
pulating the figures ia -thfc 




Tunisian President 1 
divorces wife in 


twuuuiy in proviGing pula ting the figures 

SKSSKSsffis , f 

. ^ . There is a great deal of 


this prevents an explosive 
situation from developing, es- 
pecially among those aged 
under 25. 

Recognition of the existence 

of aqout one million Span- 
iards working in the black 
economy, ana accounting for 
perhaps as much as a quarter 
*e Gross National Prod- 


hypocrisy about the black 
economy. I am sure the trade 
unions know the real situa- 


tion. but they do not come 
dean." 




The only solution was to set 
up an independent British- 
styie royal commission ^to 
establish facts and figures 
acceptable to everyone. - 


Ml 


\ 












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10 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


SPECTRUM 



The golden age that never dies 


This week's leap in 
the price of gold, a 
response to fears that 
South Africa would 
retaliate against the 
threat of sanctions 
by cutting off 
exports, highlights its 
historic importance 
to the world 
economy — yet its 
role is rarely 
understood. Where 
is it produced, and 
how is it used? Who 
buys, hoards and 
sells it and how does 
the market work? 



Yellow metal that 
men will kill for 


No doubt about it. gold is terrific 
siufT. It is beautiful and shines 
brightly. It is virtually indestruc- 
tible ycl so malleable it can be 
worked with ease. It is found in 
nature in an almost pure form. But 
its greatest attraction lies some- 
where else. It's the one thing 
everybody wants. 

This week's dramatic surge in 
the gold price illustrates perfectly 
that the yellow metal continues to 
keep the central place in the 
world's system of values which it 
has held since the start of history. 
People began buying more be- 
cause they feared there might be 
less. Dealers and speculators, fear- 
ing that South Africa, the western 
world's major- supplier, might 
retaliate against international 
sanctions by restricting gold ex- 


NATIONAL RESERVES 


Gold held by countries (in tonnes) 
'1979- ‘ 1985 

USA 8230.0 8169.3 

W Germany 2902.6 2960.4 

France 2548.0 2545.8 

Italy 2073.7 2073.7 

Japan 753.6 753.6 

Portugal 688.3 628.9 

Canada 689.9 625.5 

UK 567.6 591.9 

India 266.2 292.4 

South Africa 312.0 150.5 

Saudi Arabia 142.1 143.1 

Greece 118.5 128.1 

Libya 76.5 1 12.0 

Brazil 52.9 96.4 

Uruguay 103.0 81.5 

Mexico 61.6 73.4 

Hungary 55.4 72.5 

Peru 36.1 60.7 

Colombia 72.2 57.2 

Philippines 52.9 46.0 

Sourca: tmemanonai Financial Statistics 


ports, began a frenzy of buying 
which sent the price soaring. 

It exercises a dominion over- 
men 's minds which is unchanging, 
and the lore and legends surround- 
ing gold account For much of its 
fascination. Men kill for it. Man 
and wife unite with it. The 
medieval alchemists founded 
chemistry by trying to reproduce 
it. Benvenuto Cellini, wanting to 
make his patron, who had seen 
everything the Italian Renaissance 
could offer, for once stand back 
and gasp, made a salt cellar out of 
it:’ : 

. Bur its true hold is its universal 
acceptability; it is the one sub- 
stance everyone will accept as a 
- means of exchange, no matter how 
troubled the limes, and in this the 
Governor of a modem central 
bank and an .Assyrian king or a 
Minoan merchant are not one 
whit different. Gold is safe. 

If Russia invades .Afghanistan, 
watch the gold price. If America 
tries to rescue hostages from Iran, 
and fails, watch it climb. Euro- 
bonds? Not today, thank you. 

Although it has kept its residual 
strength as an investment, in 
recent years gold has lost some of 
its public glitter and has passed 
from being the underpinner of the 
world's currency system to one 
more metal being traded on the 
exchanges. Until 1914 Britain was 
on a full gold standard and anyone 
could walk into a bank with 20 
shillings and come out with a gold 
sovereign. 

The strains of trying to keep the 
depression economy lied to a 
renewed gold standard proved too 
much between the wars and 
Britain abandoned it for good in 



Boom time for 
JanPubliek 


Rocks to riches: gold mining near Johannesburg; and price fixing at N.M. Rothschild in London 


1931. But in 1945 gold became the 
fixed basis for the international 
exchange rate system established 
by the Bretton Woods conference. 
For more than 20 years the price 
of gold remained where it had 
been fixed hy Roosevelt in 1934. at 
S35 an nunce. and currencies 
hovered around it. 

In the late 1950s the fixed 
exchange rate system began to 
break up as it became dear that 
central banks were simply not 
powerful enough to maintain their 
rates against combined attack by 
the world's speculators, and a free 
market in gold began in 1968. 

For five years there were two 
gold prices: the official price and 
the free market price. They began 
rapidly to diverge. By 1973 the 
official price had climbed with two 
devaluations of the dollar to 
$42.22 an ounce, but the open 
market price had soared past $100 


and the two-tier system was 
abandoned. Since then, gold has 
found its own price on the market 

Losing its public position did 
not affect its lure. It was a prime 
investment at the beginning of the 
1980s when detente disappeared 
and tensions rose again between 
the United States and the Soviet 
Union, and in 1980 the price 
reached its all-time high, touching 
$850 an ounce.- 

Since then., gold has seemed 
superficially less attractive be- 
cause the dollar has dominated the 
currency markets during the 
American economic boom. In- 
April last year gold dropped to 
$283 an ounce, bul its underlying 
attraction has never weakened and 
central governments continue to 
hoard massive stocks. The United 
States alone has a ^stockpile of 263 
million ounces. -valued at $92,000 
million (£62.000 million). 


It has been suggested that the 
vast amounts of gold kept in 
central bank vaults — estimated at 
950 million ounces - could be the 
one effective sanction against 
South Africa. The 21 million 
ounces produced each year in the 
Republic earn the Pretoria Gov- 
ernment $7,000 million, by far the 
greatest proportion of its foreign 
exchange. If the banks started to 
sell their reserves, the price would 
collapse and the South African 
economy would be threatened in a 
way which import-export restric- 
tions could never match. 

-It. is a suggestion unlikely to be. 
taken up. Gold's history, no less 
than the events on the market this 
week, indicates there is no .sub- 
stance with which man finds h 
hairier to pan. 

Michael McCarthy 


The front-page headlines in South 
African newspapers yesterday said 
it alL “Gold nears $400", the 
Johannesburg Citizen trumpeted. 
Its Afrikaans-language stable- 
mate. Beeld, exulted with “Golden 
milliuns!" and carried two inside 
pages of stock exchange news and 
comment. 

The euphoria is understandable. 
On Monday, turnover on the 
Johannesburg stock exchange, fu- 
elled by the surges in bullion and 
platinum prices, soared to a daily 
record of just under Rand 110 
million. 

In ‘real money" terms, bearing 
- in mind that the rand is now worth 
a fraction of its value a year ago, 
this is equivalent to' about £30 
million, but it is far, far better than 
the average-daily turnover of about 
Rand 40 million (£10.5 million) of 
the last few weeks. 

Jan Publiek, the white Sooth 
African in the street, has always 
been sensitive to the performance 
of the Johannesburg stock ex- 
change and a boom in gold share 
prices, no matter how little it may 
affect him directly, is a reassur- 
ance that all is well. 

This one could not have come at 
a better time for a country being 
clobbered by sanctions moves and 
whose politicians are challenging 
the world to try' them and see. 

There could hardly have been a 
better scene-setter for President 
P. W^, Botha’s speech last night to 
the. federal congress of the Na- 
tional Party in Durban. 

Dr Gerhard du Kock, the gov- 
ernor of the reserve bank, echoed 
the mood. He said: “We are 
obviously not counting the chick- 
ens, as it w ere, yet, but the sharply 


higher gold price is very good news 
for the country. We certainly 
welcome the boost it will give to 
our reserves. The money supply 
hus been rising at too slow a rate 
and any sustained rise in the price 
of gold would not be held back." 

This was underscored by 
Barend dn Plessis, the finance 
minister, who described the gold 
price gains as “faelpfur financially 
and also in terms of business 
confidence". He added: “Obvi- 
ously we welcome the rise in the 
dollar price of gold, but it all 
depends on how the price will 
perform in the longer term and 
how well related parameters will 
perform. 

“We certainly do not inordi- 
nately pinpoint oar hopes -for 
another economic recovery on the 
gold- price. We have to continue 
addressing the fundamental struc- 
tural problems of onr economy." 

Mr dn Plessis may well have 
been smarting from a savage 
attack on him delivered by Dr 
Andreas Wassenaar. recently re- 
tired chairman of Sanlam. the 
Afrikaans insurance giant -At a 
luncheon in Cape Town on Mon- 
day given by the South African- 
British Trade Association 
. (Sabrita). Dr Wassenaar rounded 
on Mr du Plessis and his cabinet 
colleague. Dr Dawfe de ViUiers, 
minister of trade and industry. - 

President Botha, be said, sltorid 
remove both men from office, 
combine their jobs and give it 
somebody who had the qualifica- 
tions, competence and experience 
in economics and finance to do it 
properly. . - 

Ray Kennedy 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1027 

ACROSS 

1 Fishing. gear (6) 

4 Toimthl 
7 Sugar suck (4) 

R Hoodlum Hi) 

O Shame (HI 
13 Second Danish is- 
land 

16 New spaper specialist 

|I3» 

|9 Touchable (81 

24 T real » lift smoke (8) 

25 Pisconneci (4) 

26 OimwctAl 

27 Partition (6) 

down 

I Tortilla roll (4) 

2 French caretaker (9) 

3 Keen 1 5) 

4 LouscjackcKS) 

5 Iiu|uisi|i\c ( 4 ) 

6 Piping (51 

10 BipC’t 
.SOLI TIDN TO NO If Co 

ACROSS. i Salami 5 Fume SEmpiv ■> Decorum It Dcdasse 13 
Mind 15 Lc\ cl crossing 1 7 Eros 18 Wundnous 21 Ghettos 22 Ma- 
lta 23 Atom 24 Yearn 

DOWN 2 Aspic 3 Am 4 Imlusinouslv 5 Face fiMamm 7H«dirl- 
Nf* 10 Madagascar 12 Axle 14 Used 16 Violent 19 Offal 20 
Stem 22 Moa 



11 Colorado ski centre 

12 Boredom (5) 

13 Sclf-cmplotvd writer 
<“1 

14 Observe (41 

15 Scrutinise (4) 


18 GivcofTlS) 

20 Expeo (5) 

21 1'nccnam estimate 
(Si 

22 Homd(4) 

23 FuoU4) 


In the money but out of the swing 


The cash that used to be spent on pop 
albums now goes on armchairs, as 
Steve Turner discovers in the last part 
of his series on baby-boomers 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


EVERY THURSDAY 


CHIEF EXECUTIVES ■ MANAGING DIRECTORS 
DIRECTORS ■ SALES & MARKETING EXECUTIVES 
OVERSEAS APPOINTMENTS 
FINANCIAL & ACCOUNTANCY 

A wide range of management appointments appeals 
even?' Thursday, 

THURSDAY 
MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 

THE^t^sTIMES 


t 


You can tell a baby-boomer by 
the albums stacked next to the 
hi-fi. Somewhere in there a 
badly-scratched copy of the 
Beaties' Sgt Pepper’s Lonely 
Hearts Club Band leans 
against Simon and 
Garfunkcl's Bridge Over Trou- 
Ned Water. Fleetwood Mac's 
Rumours and The Best of the 
t'agh's. 

These arc the people to 
whom the British Phono- 
graphic Industry refers as 
“lapsing or lapsed buyers'', 
and whom, with a -shrinking 
teenage market, it is anxious 
to revive. In February it 
started a £350.000 campaign, 
including television commer- 
cials. with the theme "Life 
Sounds Better To Music". 

The BPl's Terri Anderson 
explains: "Wc’rc trying to 
reach the people . for whom 
recorded music was an im- 
portant part of Iheir growing- 
up years but who. because of 
changed spending priorities, 
no longer buy." 

David Oser of Research 
Perspectives, a market re- 
search company, reports that 
baby -boomers lack the stimu- 
lus of a social life centred on 
music, are noi alert to current 
trends and even feel un- 
comfortable browsing in 
specialist record stores. This is 
confirmed by Judy Swann, 
planning manager for the 
HMV record shops, who says 
lhat 60 per cent of their 
customers are under 24. 
“There's been some rejuvena- 
tion through compact discs, 
but by and large it's a youth 
market.” 

Compact d, : scs. which ac- 
count for 6 ycr cent of the 


baby-boomers who want the 
highesl-qualily sound possible 
and who don't mind spending 
almost twice as much on each 
record. The best-selling artists 
on compact reflect the tastes 
of those who grew up on the 
sounds of the Sixties and who 
want music which is familiaT 
and comfortable. 

The stare of the new tech- 
nology are Phil Collins' and 
Dire Straits. Willie Richard- 
son. sales manager for Virgin 
Records, says: “I wouldn't like 
to say it’s cofiee-table music 
which sells best on CD. but it's 
not tar off." 

pavid Lees, marketing 
director for London's Capital 
Radio, who began an experi- 
mental 10 hours a week 
channel in May aimed af 
listeners between 25 and 40. 
says. "A 40-year-old today is 
very young in lifestyle. A 40- 
ycar-old 15 years ^ago was 
quite an old person." 

Yet over-25s still make up 
fewer than a third of the 
cincma-going audience. "It’s a 

"They’re a major 
group in 
spending power’ 



. Baby-boomer music is familiar and. comfortable: Phil Collins 

find' ibbl almost half the , manufacturers of Empathy 
audience, come from that age shampoo (“I'm 40 and proud 
bracket" of it"), discovered that today's 

Research has shown that w oman of 40 spends as much 
this generation is surprisingly ■ b^ir care as her teenage 
reluctant to take risks when it daughters. 


.IU . l-.il 


young habit which tends to die 
off when people get married”, 
say 5 Steve Perrin of Wamcr- 
Columbia. “Other pressures 
come into their lives.” Which 
films gel ihctn out? ~ Terms ot 
F.nihxtrmcnt. Out of l/rtea. 
The Colour Purple. On Golden 
Pond. Gandhi, Amadeus. The 
Killing Fields. Passage to '.fn- 


comes to cinema-going. Rob- 
ert Mitchell, advertising man- 
ager for Warncr-Columbia. 
says: "The first problem they 
mention is finding a parking, 
place, the second not knowing' 
what the film is going* lo be 
like and the third is bad 
seating- poor sound ora screen 
that's not -up lo standard." - - 
But the generation whose 
appearance was heralded in 
.1959 by Mark Abrams in a. 
book called The Teenage Con- 
sumer still has money to 
spend and is spending it on 
holidays, homes, videos, cars 
and time-saving durables. Re- 
cent market research John- 


“If you look at the distribu- 
tion of income, it's particu- 
larly the Tamil y-formers 
between 25 and .45 who’rc 
experiencing a growth in dis- 
posable income": says Gerard 
O'Neill of the Henley Centre 
for Forecasting. "They're 
benefiting from home owner- 
ship. from inheritances and 
from the economic situation 
generally. They're a major 
group in spending power;" 

The rise of retail chains such 
as Next is frequently men- 
tioned in this conicxL O'Neill 
describes ■ them as’ “grated 
towards the older consumers 
who retains an interest in\ 

.1 nlllhful.fiu'luAil.*!. ,Clflrliul_in. 


February 1982 and aimed at 
women who “want to be as 
stylish as they were when ihey 
were 20”. Next has sub- 
sequently moved into mens- 
wear and interiors. In 
Newcastle upon Tyne the 
Next store links the 'clothing 
and furnishing stores with a 
restaurant hairdressing salon, 
cosmetic stand and florist 
The picture that emerges of 
the baby-boomer as a con- 
sumer is of someone who 
values in-touch ness but who 
no longer has the time to 
•investigate, who would love to 
enjoy more entertainment but 
is less likely to lake the risks 
involved, who would like to 
experiment wiih fashion but is 
increasingly constricted by 
practical family concerns and 
new peer pressure. 

These arc the people who 
once cruised the aisles of 
Habitat looking for design 
statements but arc now raid- 
ing junk shops and buying 
reproduction furniture. 

"When people get what they 
call their ‘first real family 
home', a certain constipation 
seems to set in" Sir Terence 
Conran says of the original 
Habitat shoppers. “They start 
lo want things that are rather 
unadventurous. They're mak- 
inga major in vestment and so 

They want things 
that are rather 
unadventurous’ 



L, ' 


they stop experimenting and 
buy what they see as -good 
solid stufT.” 6 

Magazines which have 
courted ihc bahy-boomer 
generation have a patchy 
record, the men tradiiionaljv 
being rhe hardest io target. 
The women's magazine which 
has best ^captured their c on - 
** Oniony whose. main 


readership is between 25 and 
40. These are the people for 
whom Honey was launched In 
ihc early Sixties and who later 
grew in and out of Cosmopol- 
itan. How would Sue Phipps, 
the magazine's publisher, de- 
fine these babv-boomers 
today? 

“Life is more realistic now 
than when they were teen- 
agers. It was rather a dream 
world then. Whai they do 
carry with them is' a slightly 
more broad-minded outlook 
on life. They’re prepared to 
question rather than accept 
everything as received 
wisdom." 

Mick Jagger once said he 
thought he’d look rather silly 
singing "Satisfaction" at 30. 

• vet he was "Dancing ifi.the 
Street” at 42 and nobody 
laughed. Will he be singing 
“You Can't Always Gel Wlwt 

^ ou Want*' at 65 ? 

“As baby-boomers -grow 
older, every new age bracket 
they reach’, will assume -its 
importance because iCs the* 1 
and there arc so many, of 
them", says Os Guinness, who 
wrote f Critique of 'the 
C turner Culture in 1973. ' 
O’Neill says: “The middle- 
aged now win be very wealthy 
retired people at the beginning 
of the next century. They'll 
have paid ofT their homes ana 
they 1| have inherited "their 
palms' homes. They'll be 
financially very secure and a 
major market" in terms of 
spending, much bigger than 
any previous generation bfr # 
cause of the inheritance factor. 

"Even over the next 10 
> car * we're going to see a drop 
in the number of teenagers 
and a great deal of growth in 
the 25-10-44 age group. This 
makes them a very important 
consumer group. If you take U 
lo us conclusion. 'you'll. -be 
talking very much about 
^ower* by the turn of 
:entun." ? 

■Ml i y .i 



I 1 , 


!v? 

c*. 


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11 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


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te swiil 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 




no 



Tomorrow, in a Roman Catholic ceremony, 
Zsa Zsa Gabor marries her eighth hus band, a 
Teutonic prince and businessman. She is the 
supreme example of what sociologists call a 
marriage repeater, but to Gabor her lifestyle is 
defensible, as she explains to Paul Vallely 


The trouble with people like Zsa Zsa 
Gabor is that they upset the 
statistics. Today more than a third 
of modern marriages are between 
pfcople who have been married 
before and the signs are that the 
percentage will steadily increase in 
the coming years. 

Miss Gabor's eighth wedding (if 
you don't count die Spanish duke in 
19X2. and she doesn't) puts her m a 
different league from the . more 
mundane remaniers or “repealers", 
to use the jargon of the sociologists 
and psychologists now studying the 
phenomenon. But news of the 
growing body of research on the 
subject intrigued her. 

“TeD me: Tell me. darling, what 
these people say about me", she 
said, evidently titillated by the 
prospect of a new way of talking 
about herself. "I expea they say I 
am immature." 

Well, actually they did. but to say 
so might have seemed rather an 
aggressive start to the proceedings. 
It was late afternoon on a warm and 
passably clear Californian day. Zsa 
Zsa Gabor had emerged from her 
boudoir in the Bel Air mountainside 
mansion which had once belonged 
to Howard Hughes but which has 
been -her home through husbands 
belter and worse, richer and poorer, 
for the past 12 years. 

But before she appeared, husband 
number eight had entered the room 
with four dogs at his side. Two were 
handsome black german shepherds 
and two were assertive little lap 
dogs. Frederick von Anhalt the 
Duke of Saxony, extended bis hand. 
He was a tall, striking man with 
light sandy-brown hair and a suit- 
able tan. His conversation was as 
casu^ and elegant as his clothing, 
but there wasa reticence behind the . 
charm. He looked as a Teutonic 
prince and businessman -ought to 
took. 

- -Miss Gabor made only the small- 
est of entrances. She paused briefly 
beneath the chandelier in the hall 
and then walked into the living 
room between the two gilded .rock- . 
ing horses, which looked ancient 
but still impressive in their fading 
glory. 

■Earlier, on the telephone, she had 
told me that the wedding was to be 
in Saratoga, which is in season now 
among the fashionable New York 
socialite set. She had said that the 
ceremony would be of the Catholic 
rite and that her Tennessee walking 
horse Silver Fox- (which she herself 
rides to world-class competition 
standard) was to be the best man. 

There is a studied humour to 
most of her public utterances, 
though she makes what in Holly- 
wood is the mistake of not announc- 
ing her jokes in advance: “We have 
changed it [the wedding venue)", 
she now announced with impish 
melodrama. “The day after the 
wedding we have to go to Vienna 
where 1 am starting work on a new 
film on thelife of Johann Strauss. It 
would be too much to have to fly 
from New York back to California 
U> collect all my things and then go 
on to Vienna. And it was too far for 
the horse. 

■ “Anyway, all the- Los Angeles 
people would never get all the way 


to New York. They’re so insular. 
They never leave here, you know. 
So we changed the plans." And the 
Catholic ceremony? There had been 
reports in the American papers that 
local priests had raised one or two 
doubts about the validity of a 
church service: 

“Why should they? Even though I 
have been married seven times I 
have never been married as a 
Catholic My First husband was a 
Muhammadan, my second was a 
Catholic divorcee, the third an 
atheist the next was Jewish. . . " 
She paused for thought 

“1 can't remember all the rest 
The last was Greek Orthodox. I 
suppose Anyway, none was a 
Catholic ceremony so, in the eyes of 
the church. I have never been 
married. The prince and I are 
Catholics so why shouldn't we get 
married by a priest?" 

A theological reply did not seem 
appropriate I turned to the views of 
the sociologists and counsellors and 
told her that Mrs ZeJda West-Meads 
of the National Marriage Guidance 
Council said that serial marriers . 
were in a perpetual state of search 
fora perfect relationship which does 
not exist 

“Ah. darling, how true. That is 
me exactly. I am the most- unbeliev- 
able per fe ctionist — with clothes, 
with secretaries, with men. It is a 
sickness .with me. I get it from my 
father. He was so exact he would fire 
the groom if a horse's tail was not 
squared exactly. I like men who are 
like that too. The prince is very 
orderly and he has wonderful taste." 

The researchers say that people 
who remarry often begin very 
young. “That is true. I was 16 when - 
1 married first I only did it because 
I wanted a- Scottie' dog. My -father 
would- not' let me have- one. His 
friend said he would let me have 
one only if l married him, so I did. 
What else?" 


They say that repeat-’ 
e often 



For better, for worse: Prince Frederick von Anhalt shares champagne with bis bride-to-be Miss Zsa Zsa Gabor 

‘I never liked the idea of having an affair. I would be 
embarrassed when the maid brought the morning coffee’ 


entered into too quickly. - 
“That's me. too. Pm impulsive. If I 
see something I want it straight 
away. The prince is like that. too. 
You know, he decided to marry me 
simply from seeing my photograph. 

“I can't live alone. I need 


companionship. But I was raised in 
convents and I have never liked the 
idea of having an affair with 
someone. I would be embarrassed 
when the maid brought the coffee in 
in the morning. - 

“My mother said: ‘Zsa- Zsa. you 
don't have to marry every man you 
want to sleep with.' But I said: why 
not? They were-all intense relation- 
ships. At the time I married each 
one I thought that this was it, this 
was for life. I only divorced them if 
they cheated on me. 

“What else do 'these rese ar chers 
say?" -That remarriers often commit 
themselves on. the rebound from a 
painful divorce, when they are in 
too vulnerable a state to make a 
proper- . decision. “No. not . me. 
unless you count the Duke of Alba", 
she said, enigmatically. I asked for 
elaboration. • 

“It was after one very painful 
divorce from - Michael O'Hara 
wh ich was all tied up with drugs and 
was very nasty.. I was alone. It was 


hard gelling over it. Alt- my friends 
told me to snap out of it and get 
back into the swing of things. 

“They found me this new hus- 
band, he was a Spanish nobleman. 
He was a silly man and I hardly 
knew him at all. They chartered a 
plane to Mexico and we had a fake 
wedding on a yacht in the bay. 
There were lots of friends there to 
cheer me up. It was silly really. I 
flew off after a few hours. He never 
even kissed me." 

She. asked for more sociology. 
People remarry the same type of 
person again and again. I reported. 
And they repeat the same patterns 
of behaviour in each marriage; 
making the same mistakes. "That is 
true: AD -ray -husbands were tall 
grey-haired men. like my father. 
And they were all nasty. Well, they 
were all difficult. 

“As for lessons. I don't learn 
lessons. I only learn scripts. I always 
made the same mistake. The men 
were too old. That is why I am 


HUSBANDED: THE GABOR COLLECTION 






Men of the moment; from left, husbands Sanders. Hntner and Ryan, plus quasi-husband the Duke of Alba 


1. Burttam Asaf Beige. Turkish 
minister of propaganda. Married 
1939, drTOrcea1939 

2. Conrad Hflton, hotel magnate and 
tether of her daughter, Francesca. 
HHton. Married 1942. divorced 1946 

3. George Sanders, actor and = 


matinee idol. Married 1949, 
divorced 1954 ’ 

4. Herbert Hutner, businessman. 
Married 1962, divorced 1966 .. 

5. Joshua Cosden Jnr, oH tycoon: 
Married -1 966. divorced 1967 

6. Jack Ryan, inventor, of tbe Barbie 


doll. Married 1975. divorced 1976 
7. Michael O’Hara, lawyer. Married 
1976, divorced 1982 
7%. Philippe. Duke of Alba, property 
developer. Their instant "marriage 
on a yacht in Mexico, 1982, is not 
counted by Miss Gabor 


marrying the prince." Prince Fred- 
erick is 45. Miss Gabor, depending 
upon which newspaper files you 
consult, is anywhere between 53 
and 67. “A woman who will tell you 
her age will tell you anything", she 
said, crediting Oscar Wilde. 

Miss Jackie Burgoyne. reader in 
sociology at Sheffield Polytechnic, 
maintains that in an era where there 
is considerable upward social 
mobility, people change their part- 
ners as a public statement of the 
type of person they have become. 

“Men may do that but not 
women. Anyway. I have not." She 
began a chronicle of her marriages 
and the worlds she occupied 
through them. Her third husband 
was the English actor. George 
Sanders, and she talked of him fora 
long time. The prince shifted a little 
uneasily. Eventually he stood up 
and left tbe room. The actress 
looked furtively after him. “He 
doesn't like me talking about 
George Sanders." Then why do it? 
“Perhaps I shouldn't", she said, and 
continued. 

The real problem in marriages 
nowadays is that the women don't 
grow with the men. Men progress in 
their jobs and move up socially. 
Women have to change too. If they 
don't it's unforgivable. In my 
experience, if a man takes a mistress 
or a second wife it's usually his 
wife's fault because she made no 
effon." 

The phone rang. Prince Frederick 
came back into the room. Tm in an 
interview, darling. Ring me in an 
hour", she purred down the 
telephone. 

“That was one of my admirers", 
she told number eight with pouting 
gravity. “I will invite him to the stag 
night which my hairdresser is 
organizing for me. He is very 
handsome. Perhaps 1 should have 
married him instead." 


Additional research by Heather Kirby 


Second chance to 
make the grade 


Young people who Open their 
dreaded envelopes tomorrow 
to find that they have failed 
their A-lcxds or achieved 
poorer grades than those 
required for university en- 
trance should not be too 
despondent — although manv 
families do become 
hysterical. 

"There is absolute panic*', 
says David Taylor, director 
or the advisory* service at 
Gabbitas Thring. the consul- 
tants on independent educa- 
tion. “We gc! people crying 
down the telephone at us. But 
it is important to remember 
that there is life after A- 
levels". 

There are a number of 
options after failure or poor 
grades. Perhaps the toughest 
is to resit. Growing numbers 
of people do this because of 
the value placed on a univer- 
sity education and because of 
the difficulty in obtaining a 
place. Many find ihat their 
grades improve dramatically. 

A-Ievel results, particularly 
the grades, mean a tot more 

now that they did IS years 

ago. With more and more 
students taking them, and 
more getting better grades, 
allied with the squeeze on 
university places, it has be- 
come increasingly difficult to 
enter higher education. Av- 
erage grades required for 
university entrance are now 
two Bs and a C. 

Students may resit the 
examinations in a stale 
school sixth form or in a 
further education college anu 
it will cost them nothing. 
Those who can afford it may 
choose to go to a private 
crammer where their parents 
will have to find up to £2,000 
for resits in two subjects, but 
where it is not uncommon for 
students to improve their 
grades from two Es to two Bs. 

Melanie Ashton, now aged 
19. did even better. She was 
awarded two Cs and a D last 
August after studying at Tu- 
dor Hall an independent 
giris’ boarding school in Ban- 
bury. This was a bitter dis- 
appointment because she had 
been expeaed to do better, 
and those results cost her an 
Edinburgh University place 
which had been conditional 
on a B and two Cs. 

She resat economics and 
politics at a new tutorial 
college. Abbey Tutors in 
Notiing Hill Gate, west Lon- 
don. and in February 
achieved a grade A pass in 
each subject. She goes to 
Edinburgh this autumn. 



^You were 
treated 
more as 
an adult 9 


Motone Ashton 


Melanie says that she found 
the crammer greatly pref- 
erable to schooL The teaching 
was good and there was 
continuous assessment 

“You were treated more as 
an adult" she said. "I lived at 
home and was doing all the 
work on my own which gave 
me a sense of satisfaction." 

Crammers worts students 
extremely hard. Mander 
Portman Woodward, a Lon- 
don college, sends a postcard 
to parents when students fail 
to turn up for a tutorial. 
Students are supposed to 
concentrate on nothing but 
work. There are no extra- 
curricular activities and no 
distractions. 

Michael Alton, an 18-year- 
old who failed two A-levels 
last summer at his state 
grammar school in Kent. 


Feelings will be 

running high 

tomorrow as A-level 

results arrive. But 

failure need not 

lead to despair 

resat mathematics and 
economics at Lansdowne Tu- 
tors in Kensington. Within 
four months he had an A in 
economics and a C in 
mathematics and is off to 
Hull University in the au- 
tumn to read economics. 

“It did fed like the end of 
the world when 1 got my 
original results", he said. “It 
is as bad as everyone thinks." 
Michael lost his place at 
Bradford University last year 
and had to watch many of his 
friends go off to polytechnic 
or university. 


~ - j *It did 
. feel like 



the end of 
the world' 


MxtiMlAMn 


His parents spent £1.750 
on the cramming fees and 
Michael had to work hard. 
"The college was completely 
different from school", he 
says. “All the teachers 
seemed to be very motivated 
and generated interest in the 
subjects they laugh l They 
seemed to give us more 
motivation." 

AH students were given 
examination practice each 
week and old papers were 
studied minutely. “W’e would 
do them time and time again 
until we understood every 
question on them'*, he said. 

The alternative to resitting 
is to apply for a university or 
polytechnic place where 
lower grades are accepted, 
bui Brian Heap, author of 
Degree Course Offers, says 
the important thing is for 
students to telephone the 
university of their first choice 
to see if they will accept them 
despite the lower grades. If 
that fails he recommends that 
they ring the university of 
their second choice. After 
this, they can telephone any 
university they fancy. “Some 
will offer places, others 
won't", he says. 

“In the non-science sub- 
jects. places are going to be in 
very short supply. But last 
year there were a lot of 
vacancies at this stage in 
engineering, chemistry, bio- 
chemistry and the biological 
sciences so it is well worth 
ringing around.'* 

Once applicants who have 
not done as well as expected 
have been turned down for- 
mally by a university, they 
will automatically receive de- 
tails from the UCCA clearing 
house, the system for allocat- 
ing surplus students to spare 
plaees.lt is worth filling in the 
clearing house form. Of the 
23.49 1 candidates going 
through clearing last year, 
about a third. 7 .221. -were 
given places. 

The polytechnics operate a 
similar procedure to the 
universities, but they go one 
better. The Polytechnic Cen- 
tral Admissions System will 
be running a 24-hour seven- 
dav a week vacancy informa- 
tion service. Hopeful 
students should simply dial 
0272-217721 from August 18 
onwards. 


Lucy Hodges 


I lh«nil s 

i ait**' 1 . 


id t * 




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Families under threat 


From Mrs P.RJJ. Webster. 
Exet er Road. 

Kidtington . Oxfordshire 

May I reply to some of the 
points made by Penny Perrick 
on the book Fatuity Portraits 
(Monday Page, Aug 4). At the 
risk of being accused - of 
stereotyping T would say that 
the tone of her article is 
exactly what one would expect 
from a feminist teacher with 
journalistic leanings, and is 
exactly what tbe authors of 
Family Portraits are complain- 
ing about 

I belong to a family of the 
type described in Family Por- 
traits and I feel that /hit sort 
of family is under threat from 
a number - of sources. The 
feminist movement does -not 
see the husband in the family 
being the principal or sole 
breadwinner. They are con- 
cerned to see that women 
continue their careers and, in 
my experience, their attitude 
to bod- working mothers is 
hostile. 

Reading the last paragraph 
of Penny Perrick’s article I 
assume that the better new 


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-a i 


TALKBACK 


days include my having to 
explain, what is meant by 
“pornography" to a 10-year- 
old and trying to explain 
“contraception" to a - six-year- 
old. Both children had been 
looking at the Radio Times. 
One had seen tbe subject of a 
Tuesday Call programme and 
the other had seen a cartoon 
advertisement for Durex. 

From Ms Jan Morgan, 
de Beauvoir Road. London NI 

I would like to take issue with 
one point in your otherwise 
perceptive article on sexual 
harassment at work (Wed- 
nesday Page. July 30). The 
way to make men aware of (he 
feelings that women, suffer 
when they are sexually ha- 
rassed is not role reversal as a 
man is usually under no threat 
if be refuses the advances of a 
woman. 

However, a pass from an- 
other matt might well raise his 
awareness of tbe problem. A 
colleague who experienced 
this said he felt extremely 
uncomfortable and embar- 
rassed. and did not know how 
to handle the situation - just 
the feelings a woman experi- 
ences when she receives as 
unexpected and unwelcome 

pass at work. In the man's 
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THE TIMES 
DIARY 

National 

interest 

The National Theatre is em- 
broiled in yet another controversy, 
this lime over its likely landing of 
an extra £50.000 gram on top of its 
£7 million subsidy. Because of 
GLC abolition and our with- 
drawal from Unesco. the Foreign 
Arts Unit which sponsors foreign 
an in Britain, has this year been 
blessed with extra government 
and Arts Council cash. It is now 
planning to help the National 
stage a prestige season of perfor- 
mances by the likes of ingmar 
Bergman's and Jason Robards’ 
companies. Paul Cotlard. the dep- 
uty director of the ICA. which 
staged a sell-out German show at 
the Royal Albert Hall in February, 
is fuming. “Instead of giving it to 
people with a genuine commit- 
jncm.” he says, “they bribe the 
National into taking an interest." 
Oaus Henning, director of the 
FAU. says the gram, and its size, 
have vet to be approved. “The 
word has got round the arts 
community that we're flush.** he 
says. “The fact is that if you have a 
tuppeny- ha’ penny grant and you 
give tuppence to somebody you 
only have a ha'penny left. But 
tuppence-ha'penny isn't much in 
the first place.” 

Right on 

Selection committees for par- 
liamentary candidates are notori- 
ously unpredictable affairs, as 
Tory rightwinger Peter Clarke will 
confirm. After trudging round the 
country for several years looking 
for a scat. Clarke finally ended up 
a few months ago in front of the 
selection committee in Easl Lo- 
thian (which he refers to as East 
Loathsome). How. he was asked, 
would Mrs Thatcher be remem- 
bered? “As the last socialist prime 
minister.” said Clarke, who be- 
lies cs that the age of the truly free 
market is just around the corner. 
The committee took him to be 
joking and selected him for his 
sense of humour. 

• Rhodes Boysoo. tipped as a 
future Tory' party chairman, is 
growing progressive in his old age: 
he has just paid his subscription to 
join the 300 Group, the campaign 
for more women MPs. 

In the running 

A farewell cricket match at the 
weekend for actor Peter O'Toole 
apparently dissolved into farce. 
Having left the West End produc- 
tion of Shaw’s The Apple Can and 
prior to jetting off to filming in 
China. O'Toole's XI took on the 
aptly named Northamptonshire 
Milage team of Great Billing, it 
was clear from the outset that the 
star, having sustained a hairline 
ankle fracture in a net session, was 
not going to be running very far. 
But to the surprise of all he turned 
adversity to advantage by opening 
the balling with colleague Stephen 
Thorpe — himself suffering from a 
badly wrenched knee — and 
employing two runners to do the 
tiring pan of the job for them. 
Amid confusion, the semi-crip- 
plcd partnership knocked up 50 
runs by lunch. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘.And I'd like another 39 charges not 
io be taken into consideration* 

Special offer 

While Dr Roger Sawyer was in the 
Sahara researching his forthcom- 
ing book. Slarery in the Twentieth 
Century, his interpreter took him 
to visit a relative who lived in a 
small village. During the con- 
versation Sawyer made it known 
that he was interested in the 
welfare of children. The relative 
misunderstood Sawyer's purpose 
and immediately offered him a 
scvcn-ycar-old girl. adding:“This 
is one of my slaves: you are 
welcome to her.” Sawyer politely 
refused: “I said that the girl would 
be better olT with her mother." 
Whereupon the mother was added 
to the gift 

Shooting party 

I have before me a photograph 
from the 1930s of Neville 
Chamberlain. Edward Halifax and 
Geoffrey Dawson (then editor of 
The Times) setting out for a day's 
grouse shooting on the Earl of 
Scarbrough's estate, ail correctly 
attired in plus-fours, flat caps and 
brightly polished black shoes. 
Wondering whether the shooting 
tradition was being maintained by 
present Cabinet members. 1 did a 
rough count yesterday and while 
cimI service departments have 
become remarkably cagey about 
revealing the holiday destinations 
of their ministers. I am fairly 
confident that Willie W'hiielaw 
and Michael Jopling were the only 
two who celebrated the arrival of 
the Glorious Twelfth. Whether 
thc\ kept up the sartorial stan- 
dards of their predecessors l have 
no way of knowing. 

“Ho 


Schools: still the parents wait 

by Stuart Sexton 


Because concern about the quality 
of education is widespread in this 
country, and because in so many 
parts of the country that concern 
has not been met with satisfaction, 
education policy will remain a 
major political factor in the run- 
up to the next general election, 
and no doubt beyond that. The 
government is not perceived as 
having done a good job. 

But the irony is that it is one of 
the present government's praise- 
worthy achievements that parents 
are now so much more concerned 
at the quality of education re- 
ceived by their children, and are 
now so dissatisfied with much of 
the state sector of education. 1 do 
not believe the education pro- 
vided in our schools today is any 
worse than it was 10 years ago, or 
20 years ago in the Sixties when all 
kinds of rubbish crept into tb* 
school curriculum. What has 
changed is that parents today are 
much more aware that the educa- 
tion received by their children is 
not good enough. The trouble is. 
that having created that demand 
for better schools, the Conser- 
vative government has yet to 
satisfy it. 

What then ought the govern- 
ment to do over the next two 
years? One thing it has already 
done is to shake the complacency 
of the educational establishment, 
of those officials who run. or think 
they run. education. 1 recall in my 


earlier days al the Department of 
Education an official telling me 
that education was all about 
administration and that he had 
“not seen a live child in 20 years”. 
Or again, when arguing, a$ I have 
done so frequently, that the prime 
responsibility for the education of 
a child is that of parents or 
guardians, and not the state. I was 
met by the retort: “Parents, what 
do they know about education?” 
And do you recall, just a few years 
ago. the row because the govern- 
ment wanted to publish examina- 
tion results so that parents could 
have a measure of the academic 
quality of the schools? “Publish 
examination results?” came the 
expression of horror from an 
official: "Parents can't be trusted 
to understand examination 
results!” 

We have moved a long way to 
restoring the rightful, central place 
to parents and children, but so far 
wc have refused to accept the logic 
of that in management of schools. 
In any other enterprise it is the 
clients, the customers, whose de- 
mands and needs have to be met 
by the suppliers if they are to 
continue in business: Only in a 
slate monopoly of education could 
you have the nonsense of. the 
suppliers telling the consumers 
that they don't know what's good 
for their children, and that they 
shouldn't be so bothered about the 
three Rs. 


The logic of using this new- 
found concern of the consumers is 
to use it as a. force to raise the 
quality of education. The logic is 
to put back into state education 
something that has been missing 
for a long time, a direct, tangible 
link between the school and the 
teachers on the one hand, and the 
parents and their children on the 
other. Restore a free market as 
much as is practicable in a stale- 
funded service, be it through 
•vouchers, or direct grant, or 
whatever, and you will restore 
quality out of the sheer necessity 
to respond to the demands of the 
clients. 

No amount of extra money is 
going to solve the problem of poor 
management. All the policies of 
the Education Secretary. Kenneth 
Baker, should be geared towards 
devolved effective management at 
school level, and the creation of a 
direct relationship between the 
school and the customer. 

Let me list a few for him to get 
on with in the next six months: 

□ Negotiate teachers' salaries lo- 
cally and individually according 
to the schools* needs and the 
teachers' worth — no national 
wage rate. 

□ Establish a per-pupil system of 
funding schools. Spending per 
pupil per year is the highest it has 
ever been. Let us know precisely 


what it is. and allocate money on a 
per capita basis. 

□ Require local authorities to 
devolve management, including 
financial management, to each 
school, giving each a dear budget 
based on the per-pupil funding. 

□ Extend this system of funding 
not just lb local authority’ schools 
but to independently owned and 
managed schools on a direct-grant 
basis. There is no.reason at all why 
state funded' schools have to be 
slate owned or state managed. 

□ Establish a' “model teacher's 
contract”, to be negotiated by each 
teacher with his or her school 
with financial reward geared to the 
terms of the contract 

□ Pull government right out of 
'the examination system. * The 
examining bodies should be to- 
tally independent 

□ Establish a system* of training 
in which student teachers are 
articled to experienced teachers- of 
quality within the schools. 

Once such modest proposals 
bave been implemented, the scene 
is set for more radical measures to 
be incorporated in the election 
manifesto of whichever parly has 
the courage to trust the people and 
free the education system from its 
excessive bureaucratic control. 

The author is a farmer special 
adviser to the Secretary of Stale for 
Education . 


Barbara Amiel finds Canada’s troubled leader seeking solace abroad 

Consensus man rides out 


For Brian Mulroney. last week's 
Commonwealth meetings were as 
good as 3 week at a health farm. 
The diet was bland, the work 
scarcely taxing and the public 
attention as soothing as a deep- 
pressure massage. It was all very 
pleasant compared with Ottawa, 
where his government is beset by 
scandals and resignations, his 
personal popularity is at an all- 
limc low and his Progressive Con- 
servatives are trailing the oppos- 
ition Liberals in the opinion polls. 

Canadian newspapers reported 
their Prime Minister's activities at 
the mini-summit in some detail, 
complete with photographs of 
Mulroney looking consensual. 
The Zambian leader Kenneth 
Kaunda was quoted at length. He 
pronounced Mulroney one of ”our 
stars ... a great man” and 
thanked God for his existence. 
Mulroney himself, in keeping with 
his new status as Commonwealth 
conciliator, was not about to 
indulge in basty rhetoric Though 
he has been an enthusiastic sup- 
porter of sanctions against South 
Africa, he would cast no stones. 

“It's not for us to act as judge 
and jury* in regard to a policy of the 
British government”, he told 
Canadians, and he even “heartily 
applauded” Mrs Thatcher for her 
compromise offer. This last bit of 
moderation needed a spot of 
exegesis by Robert Mugabe, of 
Zimbabwe. “My friend Brian”, he 
explained, “didn't want to be 
ungemlemanly to a lady.” 

Next month. Mulroney will 
have been Prime Minister of 
Canada for two years. He came 
late to politics, starting his career 
at the top in 1976. when he lost an 
attempt to win the leadership of 
the Progressive Conservatives. A 
highly regarded labour lawyer by 
profession, he passed the next half 
dozen years as president of the 
Iron Ore Company of Canada. By 
1983. when the Tories had their 
next leadership purge. Mulroney 
had learnt his political lessons. 
After winning the leadership he 
was elected Prime Minister with 
the largest majority in Canadian 
history. He had never previously 
held elected office. 

His victory was as much a vote 
for change as an endorsement of 
the Progressive Conservatives. 
Canadians had been governed by 
the Liberal Party for 42 of the 
previous 49 years. For the last 16 
\cars (except for a brief interreg- 
num) the country had been led by 
Pierre Trudeau. The rapturous 
fling with T nideau had begun with 
his daring prom ise to take the state 
out of the bedrooms of the nation. 
It had ended when Canadians 
discovered that he had neglected 
to mention that he would be 
ensconcing the state in every other 
room in the house. 

As deficits mounted and the 
state bloated into all aspects of 
citizens' lives, even the thrill of 
Trudeau's jet-setting life and 
matrimonial soap opera were not 
enough to comfort voters. By the 
time Mulroney took over. Canada 
was paying the bill for its idyll with 
sialism: the country faced a 
Can$37 billion deficit with 33 per 



•ik r watt 


cent of every lax dollar simply 
paying interest on the debt 
During the 1984 election cam- 
paign there had been much talk by 
all parties about the need to get 
Canada's fiscal house in order. 
This created some panic among 
the media, who worried and 
fussed about the prospect of a 
right-wing Brian Mulroney cutting 
grams to Canada's poets or 
permitting private medicine to 
continue. Canadians sucked in 
their tummies and waited for the 
new era of fiscal restraint. 

‘His politics are 
based on a mortal 
fear of 

giving offence’ 

And waited. Brian Mulroney. it 
seemed, couldn't quite believe he 
had got such a sweeping mandate 
in his election victory and so he 
behaved as though he hadn't. He 
appointed committees to study 
problems and report on “options” 
or “choices" or “alternatives” He 
wanted to be sure, he explained, 
that he could arrive at a 
“consensus” and above all avoid 
“the politics of confrontation”. 
The only certainty seemed to be 
that the surtaxes on middle and 
upper incomes imposed under 
Trudeau would remain. 

In this attitude. Brian Mulroney 
was quimessemially Canadian. 
Canadians see themselves as the 
“nice guys" and peacemakers of 


their time. They are proud of the 
fact that they are liked more 
around the world than the Ameri- 
cans. and don't quite see that they 
have achieved this by doing little 
in the world. Brian Mulroney is 
the embodiment of this spirit. His 
politics of consensus are based on 
a mortal fear of giving offence. 

This obviously creates some 
practical problems, particularly in 
domestic affairs. Mulroney 
couldn't bring himself to partially 
de-index Canada's generous pen- 
sions because that was an offence 
against “the sacred trust" of 
universality — as well as some very 
vocal lobby groups. Money had to 
be found to make good Mul- 
roney's election promises to every 
group from women to wheel- 
chairs. Being inoffensive plays 
■ havoc with fiscal restraint. . 

What has-never loomed large in 
Mulroney's sphere of interest is 
foreign affairs. His book Where / 
Stand indicated that, unlike Tru- 
deau. he was going to stand firmly 
in the rich loam pfNorth America. 
As for South Africa and the 
Commonwealth: well, said one 
prominent Canadian Tory 
businessman watching the sum- 
mit: “Commonwealth? Mulroney 
couldn't spell it before he ran into 
this opportunity.” 

All the same, it would be unfair 
to describe M ulroney as simply an 
opportunist. He is a pragmatist, 
which is the dominant political 
impulse in Canada. Unlike the 
Uniied Slates. Canada has never 
had a real conservative parti- or an 
influential right-wing faction in 


any of its political parties. Any- 
thing that smacks of ideological 
conservatism is viewed by the 
press and intelligentsia as akin to a 
disease. Only the official social 
democratic party, the NDP. is 
allowed to have an ideology.. 

In so far as Canadian political 
parties ever consider the world 
beyond North America, it is 
through a mildly left-wing lens. 
Canada has expressed support of 
the North-South dialogue and the 
Brandi report. When the Ameri- 
cans cut relations with Nicaragua, 
Mulroney's Tory government 
found a home for the Sandinisia 
trade office in Canada. Mulroney 
won't participate in the Strategic 
Defence Initiative, but as a prag- 
matic Canadian compromise pri- 
vate business will be allowed go 
after SD1 contracts. 

To his crediL -Mulroney has 
managed to stop growth in the 
deficit, even if be can't bring 
himself to cut spending. He has 
made the Washington-Ottawa 
friendship official again, which is 
important, even if the new 
warmth has more rhetorical titan 
policy substance. 

But political life is unpredict- 
able and Mulroney is currently in 
a slough of despond. For three 
months the opinion polls have 
shown his party running second to 
the Liberals. His mistakes are 
catching up. 

In his first two years as Prime 
Minister, five cabinet ministers 
have resigned under various de- 
grees of scandal. The minister of 
defence chatted up a prostitute in 
a West German bar. another 
minister; sanctioned . tins of 
contaminated tuna. Currently,, a 
third minister is the object of a 
public inquiry over a conflict of 
interest involving a multi-milh'on- 
dollar loan. Mulroney's patronage 
handouts, which included award- 
ing a Can$24 million advertising 
contract to. the advertising firm of 
his campaign manager (sub- 
sequently rewarded further with 
an appointment to the Senate) 
have evoked intimations of* 
Trudeau's patronage sprees. 

His personal image has suffered, 
not least because of .bis . own 
intense preoccupation with image, 
which led to such unseemly 
moments as the attempt last April 
to get television cameras into his 
audience wiih'the Queen, and the 
rental of a Hercules transport 
plane to carry a video crew on all 
his travels. Now the Gucci shoes 
that Mulroney favours, .and the 
designer clothes his attractive wife 
Mila wears, appear less.the stuff of 
an elegant. Kenned y-esque couple 
than symbols of an uncaring and 
corrupt government. 

It was during this period of 
despair that the South African 
situation boiled upi For Mulroney 
it was manna. With the image of 
Canada's two great international- 
ists. Lester Pearson and Pierce 
Trudeau, dancing like tiger cubs in 
his head. Mulroney. " the Irish- 
Canadian kid from the Frencb- 
Canadian company town in 
Qucbed sailed off to save the 
Commonwealth — and- himself. It 
was a great photo opportunity- • 


Etymology is a notorious adven- 
ture playground of eccentricity. 
English of all languages, because of 
its mongrel mixture of Germanic 
and Romance and all the lan- 
guages of the world, has words 
with very' rum roots indeed. 
Lunch comes from a Scottish 
word for a hunk or thick chunk, 
perhaps derived from the Spanish 
Ionia, a slice. It was lengthened to 
luncheon, by analogy with punch 
and puncheon, trunch and trun- 
cheon. because the longer form 
sounded more genteel. A chapel is 
derived from the cloak or cappelia 
that the Hungarian soldier. Mar- 
tin. divided with his sword to give 
half to a beggar. An admiral comes 
from the Arabic Amir, of the sea. 
False etymologies are almost as 
much fun: a belfry does not come 
from bells, a salt-cellar has noth- 
ing lo do with cellar, and a 
gillyflower is ultimately derived 
From the Greek karuophyllon or 
dove-tree — the flower is a 
corruption. 


Rooting around 

Philip Howard: new words for old 


But at least there is no problem 
about philately. Or is there? You 
all know the authorized version of 
the bizarre etymology? The first, 
postage stamps for prepayment of 
letter postage were introduced in 
1840. Shortly afterwards loonies 
started to collect them: I suppose 
it was more intellectually demand- 
ing and less of a public nuisance 
than jogging. Originally the hobby 
was called timhmmania. In 1865 
the Frenchman M. Heroin coined 
the word philatelic in his Lo. 
Collectinnncur de Tiinhres-Postc. 
He derived it from two Greek 
roots: phi/, meaning a lover or fan - 
of some activity, and aides, free 
from tax or charge, atdeia exemp- 
tion from payment. 

Aides was taken as a passable 


equivalent of "free” or “franco”, 
which was formerly stamped on 
prepaid letters, before the in- 
troduction of the impressed re- 
ceipt stamp, or its successor, the 
adhesive label with perforated 
edges and silly pictures. A philat- 
elist was a person who was dotty 
about stamps that showed that a 
letter Was untaxed and could be 
received free of charge: That is the 
orthodox account of the etymol- 
ogy Of the word: no more ridicu- 
lous than that of many words that 
have come into English. Philately 
was adopted into alT the European 
languages except one: its mother 
language. Greek. They order these 
mailers differently in. Greece. 

The Greek words are philOtely 
and philOidtsL sd tbe love of 


charges or taxes. Look them .up m 
the big Greek dictionaries' if you 
don’t believe me. They define 
Phifotdcia as the loye of collecting, 
stamps, and explain: “The word 
Phitotde'iQ is more correct ra 
Greek, although it is derivedlrom 
the French Philatelic, which, al- 
though wrong etymologically, has 
been adopted by nearly all 'Euro-.: 
pcan countries. Phifotokia maga- 
zine was established in 1924 . and 
is published by . tire Greek 
Phflotelic Society, which- was 
founded in 1926.” And so on. - v‘ 

There docs* seem to be a*' radical 
difference between the loveoflhe 
untaxed and the love of the taxed. - 
Perhaps the Greeks don't under- 
stand their own language as wdl as; 
the rest of us. in the same way that 
wcarc better at looking afteriherr 
marbles than they are. It goes to' 
show that etymology is a science 
into which the prudent man gangs 
cannyways. and tries not to make 
too many unqualified assertions:. ; 


Peter Fenwick 


Bad dreams that 
divide the law 


John Cooke, a Colorado civil 
engineer, dreamt one night that he 
was surrounded by people who 
were trying to ruin him. An evil 
spirit wanted him 10 kill himself. 
Cooke picked up a knife from 
beside the bed and. in his sleep, 
stabbed himsclffour or five times. 
Then he woke and. just before he 
died, told his wife about his 
dream. 

Cooke's wife was fortunate in 
that the violence in her husband's 
dream was directed against him- 
self. Not so lucky was the family of 
Jo Ann Kigcr. a pretty 16-year-old 
from Kentucky, who dreamt that 
burglars were murdering her fam- 
ily. In what was to be described in 
court as a “super-nightmare”, she 
picked up two revolvers and 
battled the “burglars” She fired 
10 shots in all. killing herfaiher 
and six-year-old brother. Jo Ann 
was known to be a somnambulist, 
and suffered from nightmares. 
These facts were offered in her 
defence at the trial, which ended i n 
her acquittal. 

It is a principle of English law 
that a man cannot be found guilty 
of a crime unless he intended the 
act and thus had a “guilty mind”. 
If he knew nothing of the crime 
while he W3S committing it. (for 
example during sleepwalking), his 
“absence” of mind allows him the 
defence of automatism. 

So far. so good. It would seem 
reasonable that if a crime is 
committed in such circumstances 
the defendant should be allowed 
to go free, as happened in the 
recent case of Colin Kemp, who 
Stranded his wife in his sleep. 
Another case, in I960, concerned 
Willis Boshears. who woke to find 
his hands around his dead 
partner's throat He. too. was 
acquitted. 

But what about the case of a 
man who kills or injures while his 
mind is “absent”, due to an 
epileptic fit? He too can claim 
automatism as his defence, but the 
law now makes a distinction. 
Instead of the automatism being 
simplicilcr (sane), the automatism 
is seen as arising from a disease of 
the mind and therefore as insane. 
If he succeeds in his plea of 
automatism he must, by law. be 
sent to a hospital such as 
Broadmoor. Tor many years. In 
one recent case an epileptic was 
forced to plead guilty to a crime of 
which he had no memory. Had a 
plea of not guilty, due to automa- 
tism. been accepted, he would 
have been found insane and sent 
to hospital. 

The same would apply in the 
case of a crime committed by a 
man whose mind was “absent” 
because of the mental effects of a 
cerebral tumour. The law main- 
tains that an insane automatism 
arises from a mind diseased by 
some cause within the body. Sane 
automatism, on the other hand, is 
said to arise from an. external 
factor, such as a blow on the head 
leading to concussion and distort- 


ing the functioning of the brain, or 
when a diabetic is confused after 
an injection of insulin. 

The illogicality of this distinc- 
tion is plain. In another case a 
diabetic who committed an as- 
sault while confused by 
hypoglycacmia resulting from in- 
jetted insulin (an external (actor) 
was freed. Someone committing a 
simitar act in a hypoglycacmk 
confusions! state caused by an 
insulin-secreting tumour of the 
pancreas (an internal factor), 
would, as the law now stands, be 
sent to a secure hospitaL 
The argument has been that if 
automatism arises from an in- 
ternal cause it is likely to recur and 
thus the assault may recur. The 
public will then need to be 
protected - hence the exit from 
court to the hospitaL External 
causes, by contrast, are unlikely to 
recur. But what about sleepwalk- 
ing. night terrors and violent 
dreams, which — as the law now 
stands — are regarded as sane 
automatisms? These arise from an 
internal cause which -is partly 
genetic — as sleep disorders run in 
families - and partly due to in- 
dividual factors such as associated 
brain damage, as in Kemp's case. 
Violent dreams do recur and 
repetitive violent acts are fre- 
quently reported. Surely sleep 
disorders fulfill all the criteria of 
insane automatism? And. logi- 
cally. those who commit criminal 
acts during these noctural events 
should be sent to hospitaL 
The recent case of Regina r 
Kidby illustrates the confusion. 
Kidby was accused of strangling 
his wife during his sleep. He was 
acquitted when evidence was put 
forward at the trial that it was 
possible that his son. an epileptic, 
might bave done this during a fiL 
In neither case would itus act have 
been a criminal offence: But if the 
father had been held responsible, 
he would have been set free, while 
his son would, if found to be the 
one who had killed his mother, 
have been committed to hospitaL 
The law relating to automatism 
is confused and illogical and needs 
to be revised by parliament It is 
unfair that epileptics should be 
treated in one way and sleep- 
walkers in another. What is 
needed is a change in the powers 
of sentencing, so that if a plea of 
automatism is accepted by the 
court the judge has freedom to 
make the appropriate recom- 
mendation either lo admit the 
defender t to hospitaL to acquit or 
to make an intermediate disposal, 
such as recommending some form 
of medical care, though not nec- 
essarily in hospital. 

This would protect the public 
and meet the needs of the defen* 
dant And the distinction between 
sane and insane automatism 
would become irrelevant and 
redundant 

The author is a consultant neuro- 
psychiatrist at the Mauds ley Hos- 
pital. London. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Fear in a handful 
of peanuts 


I suspect that the revival of 
TS. Eliot's play The Cocktail 
Parry has had more effect on 
London society than anyone re- 
alizes.. I myself go to cocktail 
parties very rarely, but I found 
myself at one the other day. 
trapped in one of those groups in 
which I always get trapped, com- 
posed of a doctor, an advertising 
man and somebody's unidentified 
wife. Which is why I so seldom go 
to cocktail parties. 

To my surprise though, the 
conversation seemed rather dif- 
ferent from usual. By good luck, 
my tape recorder was accidentally 
switched on. so I am able to bring 
you a direct transcript of our talk. 
Mk Well, at least the rain's held 
off. eh? 

Doctor: Evening comes like a 
riluaL wet or dry./ When dav' 
ends, we celebrate evening!/ As a 
sign that night comes after- 
wards./ Where evening is con- 
cerned, there arc no unbelievers. 
Adman: An evening may be 
wasted, yet there will always 
be/ Other evenings. A drink raised 
here/ Is a drink pul down some- 
where else. 

Me Well, absolutely. I hadn't 
thought of it like that before. What 
do you think. Mrs . . . ? 

Wife: We arc the unidentified 
wives at parties/ We belong to 
someone who ' ts always/ Some- 
where else, perhaps talking on the 
landing^ Perhaps admiring the 
pictures on the stairs./ We arc the 
married mindsV The opinions 
that come afterwards^ Like the 
dap of thunder that alwavs 
follows/ The flash of lightning 
that comes firsL 

Doctor: All evenings are perhaps 
contained/ In evenings to come or 
already pasL/ Perhaps this eve- 
ning is some other evening,/ And 
what I say has already . been 
Said/ In the shadow under the 
laurel 

Adman: Aitd will be said again. 

Met Yes, well, now you mention 
it,* you may well be right. I hadn't 
thought, of it like that before. Er. 
what do you think of this Bov 
George business, then? 

Adman: Between midnight and 
dawTu/ There is only a look-alike 
Marilyn Monroe contest/. Bui 
who can judge so many Marilyns?/ 
Who can say that this looks more 
like that/ Or unlike that? The real 
Marilyn/ Is but a box of withered 
bones. 

Docton* Perhaps -Marilyn past is 
contained/ Within -Marilyn Mon- 


roe future, and both contained/ 
Within a Channel 4 repeat? 

Wife: As an unidentified wife at a 
party./ I think of all the unidenti- 
fied husbands of Marilyn Monroe: 
and I weep. 

Me: Well hold on, I think we do 
know who they were. There was 
the baseball player, what was his 
name. Joe DiMaggio. and * the 
playwright. Arthur Miller, and 
another one. Artie Shaw, perhaps: 
he married almost everyone! 

Wife: To marry almost everyone 
is to many no one./ Between the 
mountain and the sea, the 
river/ Passes everything and col- 
lects nothing. 

Adman: The wife past is perhaps 
contained whhin/ The future 
wife. Everything comes again. 

Me: You mean, we go on marrying 
the same girl over and over again? 
I'm not so sure about thaL I 
actually know a bloke who got 
divorced, and then married his 
first wife again, but he said to me 
afterwards; I think I've married a 
completely different girl second 
ti me ro und! Pretty ironic eh? 
Doctor To ask the question is 
perhaps to answer iL 
Adman: To go exploring is to 
foraet one's home 
Wife: I have married one man a 
thousand times/ And he was al- 
ways the same. 

Me: Too right? Blokes never 
change, do they? Gosh, it's hot in 
here ... By the way, we haven't 
discussed sanctions against South 
Africa. Think we ought to get it ’ 
over with? 

Adman: In the burning sands at . 
the end of man's sou C/ A single 
diamond lies. One picks it 
up./ Another claims iL another 
sells it. 

This is what we call 
trade./ Precious stones which 
gather no moss. 

Wife: I would forgo the diamond/ 
To help the man that picked it. 
Adman: This is the way the sloe* 
market endsy Not with a big bang, 
but a big whimper. 

Dotton AH South Africa paid is •’ 
pmiaps/ Contained within South 
Africa future. 

Me: You may well be right WdL 
«? Y 6611 n i c c talking to you, bull 
think I see my wife beckoning to 
me. so I d better go and see what 
She- wants - she probably needs 
mscuing from some dreadful 
conversation, know what I mean? 
Doctor All conversations arc' per- 
haps contained ... 

(Etc. etc. etc:) 


13 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


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The TSB Group passed 
another date yesterday in the 
countdown to its floiaiion 
when it /announced . special 
inccniives to encourage niore 
than a mil Hon investors to buy 
its shares. They hardly seemed- 
necessary. 

Thc tasisof the sale always 
defended on the legal advice 
tdllie Government thaL until 
the. .1985'. Trustee Savings 

Banks Ad gave the Govern- 
ment power to vest-the banks' 
assets in; new public com- 
panies. no-one could establish 
ale^l right to ownership; As a 
resist depositors, employees 
and. .outside investors who 
were' able. to buy TSB ..Group 
shares were virtually guar- 
anteed a bargain. 

Any money they put up for 
iheTSOO million or more of net 
assets ..would itself go into the 
ri^w holding coin pany. further 
swelling its balance sheet 
value. Such a happy outcome, 
giving; so many ordinary peo- 
ple a sweet taste of privatiza- 
tion; in front of the all- 
important 'flotation of British 
Ga^appeared to harm no-one. 
That is no longer the case. 

.The written judgment of 
Lord.Templeman, supporting 
the L^aw Lords decision against ■ 
the depositors, ruled that until 
the 1 985 Act. the banks had all 
along bdonged to the state,-. 
LoTd Templeman did not. 
baulk at the implication of that 
ruling The House was not, he 
said, concerned with the wis- 
dom of Parliament's decision, 
in passing the Act to present 
the surplus assets to the succes- 
sor companies. 

The Government should be 
extremely concerned, how- 
ever.. And there has so far 
seemed precious little sign of 
that yet* • 

The Treasury's anxiety to ■ 
press ahead with the flotation 
is understandable and led h to 
vest the TSB assets before the 
fuh j-ords judgment was pub- 


lished. The aim of transferring 
the Trustee Savings Banks into 
the private sector, freeing 
them to provide more and 
better services and to enhance 
fair competition in the high 
street, is a good one. . 

It has been delayed succes- 
sively by the apparent need to 
son out the banks' legal po- 
sition . by objections to turning 
regional banks into a national 
organization and latterly by 
the court- case brought on 
behalf of depositors. 

• Such delays are bad for the 
morale . of management and 
staff and for the banks’ free- 
dom 10 act in a fluid market. 
Whatever may be said about 
the past ownership of the 
banks, the 1985 Act is on the 
statute book: there is nothing 
in law lo stop the flotation, 
whereas changing things 
would involve repeal and new 
legislation. And there have 
been so many hiccups in the 
privatization programme of 
late that another would seem 
exceptionally embarrassing. 

But Lord Tem pieman's rul-' 
ing, however perverse Govern- 
ment lawyers may think it 
cannot simply be swept aside. 
To the ordinary man, it sug- 
gests that the Government has 
mistakenly given away more 
than £800 million of 
taxpayers’ -money. Such a 
phenomenon is not unknown 
in the history of government 
spending- But it not something 
that an administration, which 
puts a proper stress on proper 
use- of -taxpayers' money, 
would e ver ha ve contemplated . 
doing voluntarily had . it 
thought dial die. bank's assets 
were state property. Still less 
should it do so to save face. To 
press on regardless might well 
lead to a far greater embarrass- 
ment for the privatization 
policy. 

However gleeful Opposition 
parties may be over the 


PARADOXES OF GOLD 


. . . Miles Kington 

i a hand! 
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There is little prospect of any 
sustained change' in the price 
of 1 gold. So said Consolidated 
Gold A ■Fields’ group f innual* ’ 
report.* eight weeks "ago: Is the. 
analysis, which was widely 
shared until June.- to be con- 
signed to the treasure house of 
erroneous predictions' made 
on the eve of momentous 
events, or is there an under- 
lying truth in Consolidated's 
view which ought still-, lo- 
cation against any panicked 
reaction to the sharp rise in. the 
price of the “South African” 
precious metals? 

With hindsight some move- 
ment in the price of gold 
appears to have had a certain 
air of inevitability. On the 
demand side, the persistence 
of high American deficits in 
federal spending and trade was 
always likely to produce es- 
capees from currency into 
precious metals. ' 

While labour unrest in 
South Africa in recent months 
apparently had more direct 
effect on platinum than gold 
prices, fears about subsequent 
interruptions in : supply plight 
have been expected to firm up 
a sagging gold price leveL And 
now, after the Commonwealth 
heads of government meeting 
in London, a new set of 
calculations has been made; 
reflecting, not. sp much the 
prospects .of sanctions as the 
possibility of retaliatory reduc- 


tions in supply- by the South 
African 'government' ' 

But barring, .some suicidal:^ 
mtprfereh.ee with gold sales, by , 
Johannesburg, none of the 
underlying conditions in the 
market for the metal have 
■ changed. For that , reason the 
past few'' days’ fever seems 
unlikely to become a rush back ' 
towards the levels of the mid- 
1970s (when the dollar-de- 
nominated gold price peaked 
at $850). 

For one thing, patterns of 
exploration and exploitation 
in the smaller gold-producing 
countries have recently been 
lively. Production has been 
rising in Australia and Canada 
(two countries with — the 
South Africans have not been 
slow to point out — patterns of 
commodity trade that give 
them considerable amounts to 
gain from sanctions). Brazil 
and Papua. New Guinea have 
also raised their ^ output 

The Soviet Union may 
entertain long-term hopes that 
cooperation with a friendly 
black government in 'South 
Africa might deprive the free 
world of its favourite metal. . 
But the. USSR is as. ever 
watching short-term market 
movements with tynx-iike 
attention arid it has some 
immediate incentive to con- 
tinue its sales volume which, 
last year increased by over 1 00 
tonnes. The disruption of its 
energy programmes . after 


Chernobyl may reduce rev- 
enue from oil sales. Its evident 
demand for Western grain 
.should, maintain Soviet de- 
mandfor bard curreiicy.. ' ' 

This, week’s boom in the 
gold price cannot be disentan- 
gled from general factors^- of 
confidence. Nothing else, for 
example, explains the concur- 
rent rise in silver prices when 
supply of the metal evidently 
exceeds demand. The answer 
can only be market* credulous- 
ness or, more specifically, the 
great unease caused- by the 
persistence of US deficits. 

Twin paradoxes; remain. 

• First, the lack of confidence in 
the dollar has stimulated a 
flight into metals (platinum 
even more markedly than 
gold) produced in a country, in 
the fiiture of which confidence 
must surely be uneven, to put 
it mildly. Secondly, concern 
about the future supply of the 
metals has produced specu- 
lative movements that must 
have the effect of strengthen- 
ing the fiscal position of Mr 
Botha's Government and 
revalorizing a primary South 
African asset. . 

Effective . action by the 
American Government on 
revenue and - expenditure 
could, by operating on the 
attractiveness of gold or plat- 
inum. eventually put consid- 
erably more pressure on the 
South Africans than any bas- 
ket of trade restrictions. 


BIRTHDAY IN BERLIN 


**. 




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Cities are organic beings which 
arc born, flourish and die as 
integrated wholes. A divided 
city is an aberration, ^ de- 
viation which attracts to itself 
other deviants. Such a city, 
divided for the past 25 years by ' 
concrete and baited wire, is 
Berlin. ; ' 

For a quarter of a century 
the Berlin wall has stood as a 
monument to the post-war 
division of Europe. Its line was 
drawn as arbitrarily and as 
callously as the post-war fron- 
tiers of Europe. Families were 
split; many would never be 
reunited. A pall descended on 
the East which made the lights 
of the West seem all the 
brighter. • 

To- some, the wall was the 
last and logical lesson taught to 
the children of Hitler's Ger- 
many. The perversion that was 
Nazism had brought the in- 
contfovenible division of the, 
German nation: The wall was 
one guarantee that the double- 
headed eagle would never fly 
again; 

To others, the wall was a 
gratifying though belated sign 
that the Soviet empire in 
Europe had been contained. 


Thus far had Moscow ven- 
tured. It would go no further. 
The West and its outpost in 
West Berlin were safe. . 

And to others, the wall was a 
realistic, if undesirable;, elu- 
tion to an otherwise -intrac- 
table problem. It put ah end to 
the fiction that post-war Ger- 
many was or ever would be 
one*, it gave a measure of 
security and certainty to the 
Eastern zone and thus made 
possible the East-West accom- 
modation of the 1970s. 

But the wall is not a perma- 
nent solution. It was imposed 
unilaterally by the Russians oh 
a city of which they had shared. 
custody. For the. other three 
custodial powers to recognise 
it is to give the division of 
Berlin a legitimacy it does not 
have and must not be given. • 

The ugliness of the .wall, its 
crude concrete and jagged 
wire, are constant reminders of 
its impermanence and its 
unacceptability. The time for 
concern is when the rough 
edges start to be . smoothed, 
when the barbed wire is taken 
down, when the wall begins to 
resemble a landscaped bound- 
ary between two separate cit- 
ies, 

‘I 


Keeping the status of Berlin 
open has its price in un- 
certainty. Berlin is still a city of 
tension, and it will remain so. 
It is a weak point on which 
Moscow exerts pressure when 
the Easi-West .going gets 
rough. Even in the past year 
there have been shootings, 
incidents in the Berlin air 
corridor and on the roads. In 
the 25th year of the wall’s 
existence, the status of Berlin 
has twice, been called into 
question: by the Western pow- 
ers after the West Berlin 
discotheque bombing: by the 
East over the use of diplomatic 
passports. Such incidents will 
.goon. 

Nor should the ingenuity of 
those who planned .the wall be 
underestimated. They are now 
using hs crossing points to 
export in their thousands the 
privileged poor of the Third 
World — thosejust rich enough 
10 buy an air ticket to East 
Berlin. The pressure is telling. 
West Germany has rightly 
protested at the abuse of its 
hospitality. But Berlin will 
continue to suffer, in the 
greater interest of Germany 
and of Europe. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A CASE FOR DELAY 


Gurkha brawl in perspective 


Templeman ruling, the Trea- 
sury has thus far little of which 
to be ashamed. Indeed, the 
plan to move the TSBs into the 
private sector was a powerful 
counter to cynics who claimed 
that the purpose of the 
privatization programme was 
simply to raise money for tax 
cuts through assets sales. The 
Treasury acted on the best 
legal advice that no-one owned 
the banks and resisted any 
temptation to legislate owner- 
ship into its own hands. 

Its response to the Law 
Lords ruling has been wanting, 
as might be expected when 
most senior ministers and 
senior lawyers are on holiday. 
The Government clearly be- 
lieves that Lord Templeman 
has made a mistake in relying 
on TSB Acts going back to 
1817. Disagreement among 
lawyers is nothing new. But the 
Law Lords are the supreme 
interpreters of statute in the 
constitution. And' the 
Govemmenfsown reliance on 
implications of the TSB Act of 
1976 is equally open to dis- 
pute. For Mr lan Stewart, a 
junior Treasury minister, to 
make a sweeping constitu- 
tional distinction between the 
state and the Crown and 
Government to justify going 
ahead with the flotation is 
both inappropriate and inad- 
equate. 

The Solicitor-General will 
no doubt make a better fist of 
it. He is unlikely to still the 
clamour. If the Government 
accepts the implications of the 
Law Lords ruling, it would 
logically switch to a . con- 
ventional privatization, to the 
benefit • of the Exchequer. 
However immediately regret- 
table. it would be better in the 
long run for Government. TSB 
and the taxpayer to delay the 
flotation until all the implica- 
tions of the Templeman judg- 
ment have been fully worked 
out. 


From Field Marshal Sir Edwin 
Bran tall 

Sir. I wondered if you would allow 
me to make one or two observa- 
tions on the 'sad incident which 
occurred in a Gurkha company on 
an American air base in Hawaii 
(reports, August 6 and 7). 

First I would caution against 
getting the incident confused with 
the longpr-icnn fiiture of the 
Brigade of Gurkhas. This will be 
decided not on possible errors of 
judgement or misdeeds by a tiny 
proportion of an over 8.000-strong 
brigade, but on Britain’s defence 
commitments as we eater the 2 1st 
century. The incident itself which 
apparently was so out of character, 
belongs to that category of passing 
aberrations and spontaneous out- 
bursts from which occasionally, 
down the years, scarcely a regi- 
men! in the Army has been 
immune. 

Second, although 1 would be 
most surprised if there wore not a 
number of important lessons to be 
learnt from the whole unhappy 
affair. I believe one should be 
careful before jumping to the 
conclusion that it must have been 
all due to the Gurkhas and their 
officers somehow not getting 
“with it”, and being too out of step 
with our modem, cynical and 
politically orientated society. 

Indeed just the reverse: it is 
much more likely to be that the 
old-established procedures and 
practices which have made the 


Gurkhas so unique and so particu- 
larly loyal to the Queen, the 
British Army and their own 
regiments, may somehow, in the 
heady atmosphere of Hawaii have 
got side-tracked, out of alignment 
or temporarily forgotten. 

Or course the reputation of the 
Gurkhas, who have been held in 
such particularly high esteem by 
so many in this country, has 
suffered a knock. Bui having 
myself only recently, and since the 
incident, had a chance to visit 
other Gurkha battalions in Brunei 
and Hong Kong as well as in this 
country. I have not the slightest 
doubt that, with the fullest co- 
operation of ail ranks, it win be 
rebuilt on the traditional prin-r. 
riples of discipline, loyalty, integ- 
rity and military skills." in the 
shortest possible time. 

Yoilrs faithfully. 

EDWIN BRAMALL. 

Room 103 A. 

The County Hall. SE1. 

August 10. 

From Motor Rajinder Singh ( rctdl 
Sir. When 1 joined a Gurkha 
battalion in 1952. the Command- 
ing Officer said. “Men arc never 
wrong. It*s only the officers who 
arc responsible for the misdeeds of 
their soldiers”. Has the Army 
tradition taken a tumble? 

Yours truly. 

RAJINDER SINGH. 

1 93 Wollaton Road. 

Nottingham. 

August 6. 


Nuclear power 

From Mr P. E. Wans 
Sir. Mr Kapp and Professor Fells 
(August 6) suggest substitutes for 
nuclear power which on examina- 
tion do not bear out their claims. 

Mr Kapp says that insulating 1 0 
million unlagged hot water tanks 
and attics could save the equiva- 
lent energy output of eight nuclear 
stations. It could not: first the 
number of unlagged hot water 
tanks is IV: million and uninsu- 
lated attics 2 '/i million; and second 
the Central Electricity Generating 
Board, in the demand projection 
on which its case for the Sizeweil 
pressurised water reactor (PWR) 
was based, assumed that by 2000 
all hot water tanks would be lagged 
and that the number of unlagged 
attics would be halved. 

Moreover, domestic water beat- 
ing makes, and isexected to make, 
only a trivial contribution to peak 
electricity demand so that much 
the same new generating capacity 1 


would be required even if domes- 
tic electric water heating were 
eliminated. 

Professor Fells mistakenly 
equates the 7.200MW installed 
capacity proposed for the Severn 
barrage scheme with six PWRs. 
Because of the timing of the tides 
it is not possible to credit such a 
barrage with a capacity at time of 
system peak of more than 
1.I00MW, equivalent roughly to 
one PWR. Similarly, the energy 
provided at all times equates to 
two not six PWRs. 

Moreover, although Professor 
Fells considers the barrage could 
be commissioned by 2000. the 
CEGB will be requiring new* firm 
capacity five years earlier. 

Yours faithfully. 

P. E WATTS 
(Economic Adviser). 

Central Electricity Generating 
Board. 

Sudbury House. 

1 5 Newgate Street. ECl. 

August 8. 


Hampton Court limes 

From Lord Ncidpath 
Sir, The lime aven ue. as visitors ta 
Dun com be Park', or Boughion 
House or Hampton Court will be 
aware, is one of the glories of 
British arboriculture, the trium- 
phant fusion of natural grandettr 
and hitman orgamsation. But the. 
success of these liviog monuments 
depended upon the method of 
propagation, as' well as the choice 
of variety. 

To ensure that all trees in the 
avenue are of similar height and 
form, the 17th centuiy method of 
propagation — stooling and 
French layering — should be 
adopted: a mature tree is felled 
and the resulting stool-shoots are 
pegged to' the ground until they' 
can- be divided into rooted trans- 
plants. producing, in a few sea- 
sons. enough clones for a whole 
new avenue. The parent of these 
clones must, of course, be 
outstanding, and burr-free. Even if 
no such specimen exists in the 
fountain garden^ several of the 
requisite quality have been identi- 
fied in other avenues at Hampton 
Coun. One of them could be felled 
this winter and propagated. 

The Department of the 
Environment has a rare opportu- 
nity to restore the fountain garden 
to its original glory, using the 


proven I7th century methods and 
tree varieties. May we hope that 
•this opportunity will be seized? 
Yours. 

NE1DPATH. 

Stanway. 

Cheltenham. Gloucestershire; 

August 7* 

Pitched rather high 

From Mr Michael Morgan 
Sir.- 1 thought your Cricket 
Correspondent, in his entertaining 
report on the Gloucestershire v. 
Hampshire match (August 5). 
went over the top a bit by 
comparing one of the buildings 
around the cricket pilch at 
Cheltenham College to a railway 
station.' 

1 remember the building well. In 
its quintessential. Victorian way it 
was. and I am sure still is. both 
good to look at and - as it was 
then the college gym (is it still?) — 
good.. to perform in. John Betje- 
man. the College proudly -claims, 
thought it his favourite Victorian 
building — but then I suppose you 
could say he was very fond of 
Victorian railway architecture, 
couldn't you? 

Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL MORGAN, 

1 6 Cleaver Square. SE 11 . 

August 6. 


Oppressed peoples 

From Mr Anion Logoreci 
Sir. In his attempt to argue that 
Judith JJstowel- (July 25) was 
wrong to compare the plight of the 
black population of South Africa 
with that of the national minor- 
ities of the Balkans. Dr Mark 
Whcder (August 4) has unfortu- 
nately misrepresented the position 
of some two million Albanians of 
Yugoslavia. He writes: 

Yugoslavia gave up seeking to expel 
or denationalize its Albanian 
population after the Second World 
War. ... 

According to Yugoslav aca- 
demic sources published in 1971. 
some. 230.000 , Albanians, were 
forced to leave Yugoslavia, as a 
result . of police pressure, between 
1953 and 1966. 

Regardless of whether the Yugo- 
slav Government has or has not 
-pursued a general policy of de- 
nationalization. all the evidence 
shows that it has in feci pursued a 
fairly consistent policy of harass- 
ment and persecution toward the 
Albanian population since 1945. 
apart from a few brief pauses 
Yours sinccrclv. 

ANTON LOGORECI, 

18 Disraeli Gardens. SW15. 
August 7. 


For better or worse 

From Mr Peter LiHey. MP for Si 
Albans (Consenaiire) 

Sir. Mr James Kirby (August 6) 
welcomes the proposals for 
transferable tax allowances in the 
Green Paper. The Reform of 
Persona I Taxation, and suggests 
that the Government should also 
tackle the anomaly that a married 
couple qualify* for mortgage in- 
terest relief on £30.000. whereas 
an unmarried couple can get relief 
on up to £ 60 . 000 . 

In feet, the Green Paper ad- 
dresses this issue as welL Chapter 
S suggests that one approach 
might be to apply mortgage in- 
terest relief to the residence rather 
than to the individual taxpayer, so 
that. two or more people buying a 
house would share the £30.000 
limit between them, whether they 
were married or unmarried. In- 
deed. one of the main aims of the 
Green Paper proposals is to end 
this and other tax penalties on 
marriage. 

Yours etc. 

PETER LILLEY' (Parliamentary' 
Private Secretary to the Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer). 

House of Commons. 

August 7. 


Unreality in a 
regional frame 

Front pmlcwor D. H* Rhmd 
Sir. The logic of your deduction 
(leading article. August I) that 
there are now no significant 
regional attitudes or regional 
dimensions to policy is surelv 
questionable, 'tour critique of 
Regional Trends is. however, ab- 
solutely justified and should be 
extended. For all the care taken in 
the compilation of these statistics 
most of them arc. at best, 
meaningless or. at worst pos- 
itively misleading. 

The reasons for this arc two in 
number. First, the regions them- 
selves arc ad hoc creations, having 
neither administrative signifi- 
cance nor contemporary geo- 
graphical reality. Secondly, they 
are so large and internally diverse 
that ihc within-region variation is 
enormously greater than that be- 
tween the regions. Any simple 
arithmetic average is therefore 
bound to give a poor impression 
of reality. 

To lump together Brixton. 
Chatham. Guildford. Hampstead. 
Lambeth and St Albans with the 
remainder of the 30 per cent of 
Britain which comprises the 
South-east region is to produce an 
amalgam from which nothing can 
be interpreted. The same is no less 
true of the other regions — what 
can possibly be deduced from a 
statistical average which covers, 
amongst others. Durham city. 
Middlesbrough and Washington? 

Worst of all. the very use of 
these regions as area units ob- 
scures the real and often dramatic 
differences between the vanous 
parts of Britain. The smaller the 
areas used, the greater the dis- 
parity between the ‘“best" and the 
“worst**. 

Regional Trends has one real 
advantage: it is compact. Beyond 
that, it is so misleading that 
Government should cease its 
publication forthwith and replace 
il with the publication of appro- 
priate statistics based on more 
meaningful, smaller areas. 

Yours failhfullv. 

D. W. RH1ND. 

As from: University of London. 
Birkbeck College. 

Department of Geography. 

7-15 Grcssc Street. Wl. 

August S. 

TSB flotation 

From Mr Gerald Godfrey. QC 
Sir. Your August 5 report on the 
TSB “flotation** that Treasury 
officials have said privately (!) 
“that Lord Templeman had mis- 
understood the Trustee Savings 
Bank Acts'* suggests that trie 
Government now proposes to add 
a . touch of arrogance to the 
unsavoury mix of ignorance and 
incompetence with which it has 
already basted its gift turkey. 

No doubt the Law Lords do get 
it wrong now and again, but when 
il comes to understanding Acts of 
Parliament they are surely more 
likely to be right than Treasury 
officials. And the Jailers' reliance 
(which you also report) on the 
1976 Act. which set up an admin- 
istrative quango for the TSBs 
called the Central Board, proves 
that it is they, not the Law Lords, 
who have misunderstood the 
point. 

All that that Act does is to 
provide that the Central Board's 
assets (which are minuscule) shall 
not belong to the Crown. The Act 
does not deal at all with the 
ownership of the surplus assets of 
foe whole TSB movement, which 
is what the present controversy is 
all about 
Yours etc. 

GERALD GODFREY. 

9 Old Square. 

Lincoln's Inn. WC2. 

August 5. 

A separate Bar 

From Mr C\ It*. Kivnigsbcrgcr 
Sir. 1 am surprised that Mr Inglis 
(August 3) appears to be unaware 
of the reason for the Bar's rule that 
a brief fee must be agreed and 
marked before the hearing. It 
effectively protects foe loser 
against the liability to pay an 
inflated fee agreed between the 
winner's solicitor and counsel 
after the result is known, fs the 
standard of integrity of Scottish 
lawyers higher than ours? 

Yours faithfully. 

C. W. KOENIGSBERGER. 

10 Old Square. 

Lincoln's Inn. WC2. 

August 4.- 

Sandown Bay 

From Mr If. Culling 
Sir, The comment on foe quality 
of bathing waters (report. July 28) 
is out of date. Southern Water has 
recently commissioned a modem 
sewage works at Sandown. Isle of 
Wight, and the latest monitoring 
results show the bathing waters in 
Sandown Bay to be amongst the 
cleanest in Europe. 

Yours faithfully, 

WILLIAM CUTTING. 

Divisional Manager. 

Southern Water. 

Isle of Wight Division. 

58 St Johns Road. Newport. IoW. 
August 7. 


Grey battalions 

From Mr C. Raii? 

Sir. I am sorry that Digby Ander- 
son finds the poor so boring 
(August 5). I have no doubt that 
the poor would agree with him 
that poverty is indeed boring buL 
whereas he can turn away from the 
boredom after writing an occa- 
sional offensive article, the poor 
arc denied that freedom of choice 
as they arc denied most other 
freedoms. 

BuL as they arc undeserving in 
Mr Anderson's opinion, that 
doesn't really mailer. And. as their 
poverty is not absolute, they have 
no real claim on the rest of us. 


And. as their numbers are wildly 
exaggerated by such pathological 
obsessives as Frank field. MP. 
even their imagined deprivation 
cannot be treated as a major threat 
to our fulfilled and deservedly 
interesting lives. 

So. let us heed Mr Anderson's 
advice. Let us keep these boring 
people on foe margins of society. 
After all. we have a Government 
committed to our interest rather 
than their boredom. Let us re- 
move more of their benefits, their 
quaintly termed “rights**, foeir 
shreds of dignity and their few 
protections against absolute squa- 
lor and deprivation. Then perhaps 
they will become less boring. 


L-vcniuail} interesting and even 
dangerous. 

Wc might have the excitement 
of confrontation. Then Mr Ander- 
son and the rest of the deserving 
rich will be able to stop yawning 
and Stan preaching about Vic- 
torian values and the fabric of 
society. 

Meanwhile 1 would like to 
dissociate myself from his ar- 
rogant claim that everyone finds 
the poor boring. 

Yours, in undeserved relative 
affluence but unborcd. 

CHAS RAWS. 

102 Bamston Road. 

Heswall. Merseyside. 

August 7. 



ON THIS DAY 


AUGUST IS 1907 

Cnniran fit ihe assertion helnu. 

I he origin »/ then' event* certainly 
lay in a - ttrtke of dockers ar.d 
carters, bi'gun mmc dav< 
previously, during which violence 
had erupted on the picket hne* 
During the nights uf August / / 
and T2 the Rio! Art u a< mid and 
2JSXI troop* u ere railed into 
action: three p*'npic uvre killed — 

iinr a bystander 

I RELAN D 
THE FIGHTING ON 

SUNDAY 
BELFAST. Aur. 12. 
The serious riming in Belfast in 
the early part «»f last night, which it 
was believed the presence of a Luye 
military force of rjvjlry and 
infantry hud effectually quelled, 
broke out ufStin with increased 
virulence in the Nationalist quar- 
ter surrounding the Cullinginv- 
mad and Kails- mod towards It 
o'clock. Grave disturbances wm- 
continued up till midnight, streets 
being held hy foe soldier* with 
fixed bayonets. It. is difficult t«» 
slate what were the actual ur 
contributing causes of the serious 
riots: but one thing is certain — and 
it is important that it should tv 
made kni>un — that they had 
absolutely no connection with the 
.strike «f the carters nr duckets. As 
far as can he ascertained at present . 
the trouble arose «»ut of the arrest 
of a drunken man by some of the 
cmintry police recently drafted into 
the city l» take the place of the 
men tran.strrn'd on account of the 
recent insubordination. It is welt 
known that a large proportion of 
the memliers of the Royal Irish 
Constabulary, who incurred the 
displeasure nr the authorities and 
were deported from the city, had 
many Nationalist sympathizer*, 
particularly in the district when* 
disturbances occurred lost night, 
and threats of vengeance have been 
openly made against the men 
brought from country districts to 
take their place. These men haw 
come in for much odium already, 
and have frequently been assailed 
in the Nationalist districts with 
shouts of '■blacklegs" and even 
more opprobrious names. Their 
presence in the streets has caused 
much irritation among the Nation- 
alist rowdy element. Towards mid- 
night last night one of the wildest 
street riots which has occurred 
since the notorious disturbance of 
21 years ago occurred off 
Cullingtree-mad. Leeson- street. 
McDonnell -street, and other small 
streets ahulting on the main 
thoroughfare. Matters had quieted 
down after the first riot, and 
towards 10_ .o'clock il was thought 
that the military might with safety 
be withdrawn. But the mob. who 
were evidently waiting for this, 
grew impatient: the lamps in the 
side streets were extinguished, and 
in foe darkness, from houses, back 
yards, and entries, a hail of stones, 
bottles, and other missiles poured 
upon the infantry, cavalry, and 
police on duty un the Cullingtree- 
road. 

There were some exciting mo- 
ments. the most sensational of 
which were the combined charges 
of all arms. At a given signal the 
Dragoons took the lead: behind 
them were massed the foot soldiers, 
and behind these again the black 
columns of the police. The force 
would double off along McDonnell - 
street or Culling! ree- road, the cav- 
alry horses spoiling the alignment 
as they shied at the volley uf stones 
i hat never failed to meet them, and 
the infantry behind hoping that at 
last they would get a fair chance. 
The crowd would always scatter 
and run. but from adjoining streets 
stones were constantly being 
thrown on the heads of the 
assaulting column. A few prisoners 
would be setxiped in. and the men 
would return, and in a quarter or an 
hour the game would have to be 
begun all over again. In McDon- 
neli-street the fighting was particu- 
larly fierce, and practically every 
house was turned into a fortress. 
The most severe charges failed to 
deter the mob. and at length the 
police sent for a couple uf priests, 
who addressed the crowds, and for 
a time managed to keep them 
quiet. But even the priests could 
not restrain the mob. which re- 
turned tn the attack. . . . 


Killings in Ulster 

From the Dowager Duchess of 
Westminster 

Sir. Your cartoonist (August 8l 
scorns a little one-sided in his 
injunction to ihc Ulsterman to 
“love his neighbour** — apparently 
arising from the atrocity of 
bonking a garda over the Head. 

1 would recall that, since the 
beginning of this year, nine mem- 
bers of Ihc Royal Olsicr Constabu- 
lary and seven members of the 
Ulsier Defence Regiment have not 
been stunned but buried. 

Sincerely. 

VIOLA WESTMINSTER. 

Ely Island. 

Enniskillen. Co. Fermanagh. 
August S. 


Royal ascent 

f rom Mr Allan Hailstone 
Sir. Has it occurred to no one that 
foe Queen may have had a routine 
check-up simply because she was 
due to climb 152 steps? 

Yours faithfully. 

ALLAN HAILSTONE. 

34 Melville Road. SWI3. 

From Mr Robert I'iiKcm 
Sir. One was relieved to read that 
the Queen's heart is in good 
condition. However, her sub- 
sequent visit to Clydebank result- 
ing in the breaking of a gallon 
bottle of whisky nearly caused me 
cardiac arrest. Is it not possible to 
do il with a pint? 

Yours failhfullv. 

ROBERT VINCENT. 

Dijly House. 

Wildhcm, 

Andover. Hampshire. 

\ 




COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
August 12: The Princess Anne. 
Mrs Mark Phillips. C'olonel-in- 
Oiicl'. Royal Corps of Signals, 
was entertained at luncheon 
with the Officers of The Queen's 
Guard, the Royal Corps of 

Signals, at St James's Palace. 

Miss Victoria Legge-Bourke 
was in attendance. 

Princess Anne will visit Christ- 
church Hospital. Dorset, on 
September II and. later, will 
open Blandford Community 
Hospital. Blandford Fonim. 
Princess Anne will open the new 


National Canoe Slalom and 
White Water Course at the 
Holme Pierrepont National Wa- 
ter Sports Centre. Nottingham, 
on September 13. 

The Prince of Wales. Colonel- 
in-Chief. 2nd King Edward 
VIPs Own Goorkhas (The 
Sirmoor Rifles), will attend the 
Delhi Day Parade and the 2nd 
Battalion centenary celebrations 
at Queen Elizabeth Barracks. 
Church Crookham. Hampshire, 
on September 14. 

Princess Anne. President of 
Save the Children Fund, will 
attend the launch of New In- 
dustry and Commerce Iniative 
at the Mansion House on 
September 15. She will address 
the guests at the launch lun- 
cheon held afterwards. 


Church news 


TV Rn r Road.T. AwwM.ini Oinile. 
Si Mark the \ irqm. Soirwrs Town. 

of London. 10 !*• Aswsiaiil 
Cm Hr Hoiv Tnnilv. SteBterdess 
Walk wWti SI Man Hoslon. Mme 
diorfy „ 

Thi* Rrx J A Rc-ndaii. R«ior. 
RuKorlh Mim Moor Monkion and 
H<-ui. Vicar. Loim Marsion. and 
Rural Dran ol -Xlnslv. diotesr of 
Vnrk. lo or also an my Rural Dean at 

T.wK.nsirr, umc diocrsi- 

Ttir Rrv n t Pollock Reclor. SI 
Marx. Norwood, iliorev ol London. Ic 
hr R prior. RuIopo ax' Tram Mints) ry. 
dioiTsr of Saltsburv 

Thr Ri-x C RttDnT' Assistant 
Curslo S« Oswald. Nrlhrrlon. dlofcsr 
ol LixrrvMl. lo Dr Pnosl-m charge. SI 
Dax Id. Carr Mill, sann- diocese. 

Thr Rrx Dr M Rnhrrls. Senior 
OMDlam Lrtlumr Wr-si Sussex In- 
slilulr of Hlqhrr Cdtu-alfon. dioccseol 

Chichrslrr. lo IK- Senior Chaplain. 
Ini rsirr Polyircnmc. dloccsc of 
Liirmlif 

Thr Rex L RoOillsoil. V Kar. Bvxwrtl. 
riloriV Of NnwcMIi'. lo hr Nicar. 
Wxmrsvvoid. diorrsr ol LoIcmim 
T hr Rrx P C SlK-ncrr. \lcar. SI 
Francis, woolorook. Sidmouih. di 
orrsr ol E.\r1er. lo hr Rerlor. Birlh 
xxiih Laytrr Bin on and Layvr 
Marnrx. dnxiv of ChcJinJord. 

Thr Rrx A Thrcadmll. Radd Chap 
lam dioti-sr of Chrlnblord. lo be 
Curalr. MWlon Mowbray, droceso of 
Lni i-aer 

Thr Rrx I R S Walker. Tram Vicar. 
SI Barnabas. Franrho. in Ite Team 
MiniMrj ol SI Marx's. H iddrmunsirr. 
diort-a- of Hvoslrr. lo hr Reel or. 
Krx iimnam with Ollrlnqham. 
Hal-hain and Sunk island, diocese of 
Vork 

Rcsgnations and retirements 

Thr Rrx G M Dowell. Mcar. SI 


John al Hampstead, diocese of Lon- 
don. lo mire on December i 
Thr Rpx P L C Smith, vicar. 
Bur- mi. diocese of Lichfield, to retire 

01 Thif' < Rr\ r J 1 W Theobald. Recior. 
1 oflns m- Cleveland. diocrw of >ork. 
lo resign on Augusl 31. lo lake up Ms 
appointment as Assistant Chaplain. 
Armies’ Prison. Leeds. 

Falhrr E Simmons. CR. Superior. 
Cnmniunily or ihr Resurrcciion. 
Miriuid. Wrsl Yorkshire, will nol be 
— rrkiiuj re efrciion lo Uie office of 
SiiDTrior when hts presem lemi of 
offire expires al the beginning of 

January 1987 
Other appointment 

anronm E Planl. Deaconess. 
Counlesihorpe. diocese of Leitesler. IO 
hr ciooronets. Loughborough. All 
Samis, same diocese 

Church in Wales 

Dior esc of Bangor 
Thr Rex J B Oaxles. Red or of 
Llannedr y Cenmn. lo be \ kar of 
Brlws x Coed wild Capo I Curly wilh 
Penmachiio and Dolwyddelan 

Church of Scotland 

Translations 

The Rex .1 Hosie from Ayr. S 
Audrrxx lo Burra isle wiih 
Tmg wall 
lixfiiirhons 

Tb.' Rrx D Murray lo Lossiemouth. 
SI Gerarrtine'sHWh 
The Rrx J A Cook, to Foxeran . 
Tnr Rex D M Main lo Errol wiUi 
Kilspindie and Ralt 

Reiiremenls 

Thr Rrx J N Blair from Sandaling 
and Aiin-.li no wMh Walls 
Thr Rex A I Dunlop from Edin- 
burgh. Si Stephen’s. 


University news 



Essex 

Professor Rei Shiratori has been 
appointed as director of the 
university's Centre for the Study 
of Contemporary' Japan from 
October next year. He is at 
present professor of political 
science al Dokkyo University. 
Japan. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Vlr Justice Bingham to be a 
Lord Justice of Appeal from 
September 30. 

Mr Martin Morlaad to be 
Ambassador to Burma, in 
succession to Mr N. M. Fenn. 
Mr Peter Smart to be British 
High Commissioner to the Sey- 
chelles. in succession to Mr C. 
G. Mays. 

Mr Geoffrey Holland. Director 
of the Manpower Services 
Commission, has been pro- 
moted to the grade of second 
permanent secretary and will 
continue to hold the same post. 
Vice-Admiral H. L O. Thomp- 
son 10 be Chief Naval Engineer 
Officer, in succession to Rear 
Admiral G. G. W. Marsh next 
February. 

Captain M. C. Cole. RN. to be 
promoted Rear Admiral and to 
be Commander British Naval 
StalT. Washington. Naval Atta- 
che Washington, and UK Na- 
tional Liaison Representative to 
SACLANT. in succession to 
Rear Admiral N. R. D. King in 
December. 


Forthcoming 
marriages 

MrC.R. Peck 
and Dr J. Shawcross 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles Russell, eldest 
son of Mr and Mrs Russell Peck, 
of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
United States, and Joanna, 
daughter of Lord Shawcross and 
the late Lady Shawcross. of 
Friston Place. Sussex. 

Mr S. Boddie 
and Miss $.A. Fox 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, son of Com- 
mander and Mrs R.G. Boddie. 
of East Clandon. Surrey, and 
Sarah, daughter of Mr C.R.M, 
Fox. of Westwell, Burford. and 
Mrs D.M. Atkinson, of 
Warborough. Oxford. 

Mr R.H. Cohen 
and Miss RJ- Smith 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, only son of 
Raymond and Anthya Cohen, 
of ' Hampstead, and Rachel, 
younger daughter of Derek and 
Wendy Smith, of Grimbsy. 
South Humberside. 

Mr J.P. Harrison 
and Miss C.MA. Buckley 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, son of Mr and 
Mrs Peter Harrison, of Sdo 
Paulo. Brazil, and Catherine, 
youngest daughter of Mrs T. 
Buckley, of Cardiff*. Wales. 

Herr J. Kinde 
and Miss M. Wylson 
The forthcoming marriage is 
announced between Jakob, son 
of Herr Kurt Kinde, of Lisbon, 
and Fru Ninni Enell. of 
Vanersborg. Sweden, and Mari- 
anne. daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Anthony Wylson. of Sevenoaks. 
Kent 

Mr R.A. Williamson 
and Miss PJ. Cobley 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, youngest son 
of Lieutenant Commander 
D.W.P. Williamson (retd), and 
Mrs Williamson, of The Ram- 
blers. Boxgrove. Sussex, and 
Penny, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs R. Cobley. of Yonder 
Barton. Westward Ho!, Devon. 


Marriage 


Mr J.D.H. Griffiths 
and Miss A.A. Du Ison 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. August 9. at St John’s. 
Epping. of Mr Jolyon Griffiths 
and Miss Avis Dulson. 


Birthdays today 

Dame Elizabeth Ackroyd. 75: 
Miss Sheila Armstrong. 44: Air 
Chief Marshal Sir Michael 
Beavis. 57: Sir John Bunting. 68: 
Vice-Admiral Sir Henry Burrell. 
82: Sir Moore Crosthwaiie. 79: 
Mr A. P. Firth. 58; Mr R. D. 
Jackman. 41: Major Sir Rennie 
Maudsley. 71: Sir John Milne. 
62: Lord Oram. 73: Sir James 
Richards. 79: Lord Sainsbury, 
84: Dr Frederick Sanger. OM. 
CH. 68: Air Chief Marshal Sir 
Denis Smallwood. 68. 



Mr Maurice Webb (left) and Mr Donald Anderson judging begonias at the show yesterday. 

(Photograph: Alan WeUer) 

From bonsai to begonias 

By Alan Toogood, Horticulture Correspondent 


Big is beautiful at the Royal 
Horticultural Society’s sum- 
mer flower show, which 
opened yesterday in West- 
minster. 

There are shrub-like coleus 
from the RHS Garden, 
Wisley, in colours ranging 
from almost black ('Black 
Prince’ and ’Midnight’), to 
brilliant orange-flame 
(‘Display’) and yellow 
('Lemon Drop'). A vast bank 
of gladioli from Jacques 
Amand. of London, features 
well-known and new varieties; 
but gaining most admiration 
are the giant begonias and 
fuchsias in the specialist soci- 
eties competitions. 

Al the other extreme is a 
bonsai (dwarfed trees) display 
from Herons Bonsai, of 
Newchapel, Surrey. This ex- 
hibit consists of miniature 
rock landscapes in the classi- 
cal Chinese style and includes 
a 35 to 40-year-old yellow 
flowered potentilla. an un- 
usual subject for bonsai. 

Three Counties Nursery, of 
Marshwood. Dorset, is show- 
ing garden pinks, including 
the new crimson and pink 
'Maria' and scarlet 
‘Huntsman’. W. G. and D. M. 
Maishman, of Stowmarket 
Suffolk, are scenting the hail 
with their sweet peas, includ- 
ing varieties like ‘Royal 
Wedding* and ’Terry Wogan’. 

The Saintpaulia and House- 
plant Society has an exhibit of 
coloured and variegated fo- 
liage houseplants suitable for 
growing on windowsills, 
including brilliant caladiums. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS and M MEMORHM 
£4 a be + 154b VAT 

(minimum 3 lima) 

Aniwuncrmcnls. auihcnucaicd bx> I he 
name and pm-runcni address of ihc 
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or telephoned (hx telephone subv 
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H«xc allow at least 48 hours before 
publication. 


I Mill Itwri-rorr llvri men grit 
rino.heri’. IKIIiki ip holy hdlHb 
uiinoui «%mlh ..nd rfouhiinq 
1 Timothy tJ 8 


BIRTHS 


BATEMAN • On 10th August, al St 
Luke's. Guildford. 10 Gillian uxw 
Costaim and Richard, a daughter. 
Cenex iex e Tara EiUahrth. 

BERTAUT ■ On ath August, to Jane 
i nee Rhe.idi and John, a number iwo 
snil. Pent Harry 

BfEBEJt To Joey inee Lyons) and 
John, iheir third child, a second 
daunhicr, bom Friday. 8th August 

DON NISON On 6th August, to Rita 
■ nee Piullipsi and Brendan, a son. 
Samuel Brendan. 

HODGSON On 3rd August. 1986. to 
Martin and Pauline inee Shatloei. a 

s<n. Douglas Martin. 

MACNAIR - On Auguvl bth. 1986. al 
RAF Wrgberg. G'munv. to 
Ch.iiioitr inee Doyle) and William, a 
Hurd son. i Archie James Cameron i. 

METCALFE On 81h August 1986 at SI 
Pi-ierx Cherisev. lo Vanessa inee 
hikwhi and Kevin, a son Daniel 
Dax id 

MONTAGU- POLLOCK On 9th An 
gusi. to Dee mee Binding i and 
Jonathan, a son. Arche' 

SCHRODER • On 8ih August. 1986. to 
j-ssica inee van Holli ana John 
Henry Richard, a son. Chnslian 
MaHhias Evlard. a brother lor 
Theodora and Frederick. 

TAYLOR On August Slh 1986. local! 
and Richard, a daughter Anionia 
Mann, sisier for Jarauellne 

TRICKS On July 9!h. at Royal Buck 
inghnnKhire HoutitaJ. Aylesbury, lo 
Sarah i pee LtnrwHIi and Stephen, a 
daughter. Rachel Katherine. 


MARRIAGES 


WADDAMS : HOWARD On 2nd 

Augusi. 1986. in Hastings. David 
John Wad da ms of Citium to Janet 
Margaret Cazenoxe Howard of R>c. 


DEATHS 

BLENKIN On Sunday. Augtnl 10(h 
1986. peacefully at home In 
Gatrhoube-orrieel. Pelef. dear lx 
lovrrt hinband of Pat and father of 
Hugh Anltica and Tim. Cremation 
piixale Memorial Service to be an- 
nounced later. No flowers. 

BRAMLEY on August lOUi (986. 
peacefully ai ihe Siraihallen Nuffield 
Hre-pital Bournemouth, after much 
lounn rare and attention. Lctiire 
Maroarei Chisholm Bramlcs ‘Peg) 
au.il T4 years. Devoted companion 
of Tim for nearly SO years. Crema 
lion al Bournemouth crematorium 
oil Monday .August 181h at 2O0pm 
Enawrn*x lo Head .ind U'hebie. la 
l/xiord Rd. Bountemouih. 21190 


BROWN - On lllh August. 1986. alter 
many months of great courage and 
serenity. Patrick David. Very dearly 
loved and loving husband of BeryL 
father of Sue and Jennifer and proud 
Grandpa B. of Simon. Rosanna and 
Kaiic. Burial private. Service of 
Thanksgiving al SL Mary's Church. 
Common Abbas on Friday. 15th 
August al 2.30 pm. Family flowers 
only if wished, donations In hts 
memory lo the Marie Curie 
Memorial Foundation. 28 Belgrave 
Square. London SWi. 

C/UHPfiELL Richard Brewster On 
August 9lh. aged 41 . at Canmesburn 
Hospital. Much loved father of Jane 
and Jamie Funeral at Si Modoc's 
Church. Donne. Perthshire al 12.45 
pm on Wednesday. August l3Ui. 
Flowers welcome. 

CUNYNGHAME On Augusl 9th. 
1986. Maior David Hardlnge 
Cunynghame of Minster Lovell. 
Ovford Dear husband of Mary. 
Funeral Service al SI. Kenelm's 
Church Minster Lovell on Friday. 
August 15th al 11.30 am No 
(lowers 

DAVEY On August 10th. alier a short 
illness al King Edward vn Hospital. 
Midhursi. Dorothy inee Slakes* aged 
73 years, beloved wife of victor and 
moi her of Ann 'deceased) and Julian. 
DENHOLM On 9th Augusl 1986. m h» 
86th year. Sir William l_ Denholm. 
TD. DL Funeral Private Thanks- 
giving Service in Kilmacotm Old 
Kirk, on Friday. 22nd August al 2 15 
pm No llowers. 

ELFORD inee MCCOLLi Hester, wife 
of Ketih and sister of Hamah. 
Duncan and .Alice. In car crash on 
August 8th. Funeral at 10 30 am on 
Thursday. August I4ih al 51 
Saviour's. Guildford and Memorial 
Service later No flowers please bid 
donations to Phyllis Tuck well 
Mem orial Hospice. Famham. 

FITCH On 12 th August. 1986. peace- 
lulls ai her home in King William 
Street. Swindon, artera short illness. 
Elizabeth Anne aged 26 years The 
dearly beloved wife of Marty n. 
mother of Rebekah and daughter of 
Robert and Diana Tilehner. Funeral 
on Tuesday. 19U) August Service al 
the Evangelical Church. Dei ires 
Road. Swindon al 2 IS pm. folloxxrd 
hy inlenuent al Lower Stratton Cem- 
etery Family Rowers only please bul 
donations would be appreciated for 
Ihe K.O M A.P Medical Proicct. c/o 
Rex Finn ip. 67 The Mall. Swindon. 
Enquiries 0793 22797 
FOOEN On August 7th. peacefully m 
hoxpiial. Jane. Widow of Waller B. 
Fodcn. MC. Enquiries please lo W 
Garstin & Sons. 01-935 4868 
GERARD On Aucusi 10th. peacefully. 
Elizabeth Mary, aged 85 years Wid- 
ow of Bishop Vinceni Gerard and 
much loved mother, grandmother 
and great grandmother Funeral at 
S). Mary and 4U Saints Church. 
Effingham at 230 pm on Tuesday. 
August 1 9Ri Flowers and further en- 
quiries to Barrow Bros . Ringwood. 
Hamps 104254 2104) 

GORDON on 9lh August 1986 al his 
home. The Dower House. 
Mcichbournc. Bedford Peter James 
Liiiru aged 52 years, the dearly loved 
Husband of Sue and dear Father of 
Jason and Emma. Funeral Service 
on Friday 15th August 3.30pm at SL 
Man - Magdalene Church. 
Meichboume. Bedford Family flow 
ers onlv please, bui if desired, 
donations in lum for The Mane Curie 
Memorial Foundalion or SI. Mary 
Magdalene Church. Melchoourne 
may hr- SMOI to A L AC Abboll. Fu- 
neral Direclorv ISO Bedford Road. 
Kempsion. Bedford MK42 8BH 

GRAY On Augusi 1 1th. peacefully in 
hospuai drier a long illness bravely 
borne. Mary Max is Beloved wife Of 
Bruce and much loved mother of 
Dax id and Philip Funeral al Lplon 
Lovel on Friday. Augusl 15fh al 
2 30pm for family and village only 
as church small Cremation prtx ale 
So flowers ouf donations fo 
Haemophilia Society. 123 Wesunin- 
11 vr Bridge Road. London SE1 or 
Salisbury Cathedral Spire Appeal 
would he appreciated 

HEWING Muriel Warwick tnee Gib- 
son< On 8th August 1986. after a 
long bray e struggle wuh cancer Top- 
sv will miss her many mends 
Funeral Service at St Mary's Partsn 
Church. Tolnrs. on Thursday 14th 
AuwrA al 10.30 am. followed by pn 
vale family cremation. Enquiries and 
Rowers lo Per ring Funeral Services. 
ICila High Street. Toines Tel i 
862417 


H ER R IN G T ON. Edward wuttam - On 
Augusi 9th. peacefully In hospital. 
Cremation on Augusl 15th al 11 30 
am at Reading Crematorium. No 
flowers. Donations lo charily. 

HOBSON On Augusl 9th. peacefully 
al home in Aylsham. Norfolk. 
Josephine, beloved wife of Alec. 
Funeral al fttenngham Church, near 
Aylsham ai 12 noon on Tuesday. 
August 19th. Flowers to Dockers, 
Aylsham. 

HOPE - On July 26th. 1986. suddenly 
In hospital. Mane Genevieve 
iGinetie) nee Beauvoir, aged 86. In 
Monte Carlo. Monaco. 

HOUGH. Rosemary of Rose Lawn. 
Thurlestone. Devon On 12th Au- 
gusl. peacefully in hospital. Darling 
wife of Robert, beloved mother of 
Nigel. Richard. Timothy and Theresa 
and grand mol her. Funeral Service to 
be held al Torquay Crematorium on 
Monday. 18th Augisi al 11.00 am. 
Family flowers only 

KAMNREIITNER Joseph Ashby Uacki 
on Saturday 9th AugusL peacefully 
al home aged 86. Funeral Service. 
Eckingion Church. Friday. August 
15Ui. 2.30 pm Family flowers only 
Enquiries lo Perks Brothers Ltd. 
Eckingion. fTet Evesham 750227). 

KEANE On Augusl lllh. al lus home. 
Si. Andrews. Mere. Wiltshire. 
Nicholas Colpoys aged 78. Husband 
of Helen, dearly loved rather of 
Anihea. stepfather of Michael and 
Primrose and a dear grandfather 
Funeral Service on Monday. August 
18th ai 3 00 pm at SI. Pelcr's 
Church. Stourton. Wiltshire. Family 
flowers only but. If desmed. dona- 
tions m lieu to Ihe Marie Curie 
Foundalion or Cancer Research may 
be senl lo L.C. Hill A Son. Waler 
Street. Mere. Wills., ref 0747- 
860361 

MACCABE On August 9th. at Royal 
Masonir Hospital. London. Nlall 
Francis of 1261 Trelex, Switzerland. 
A beloved and loving husband and 
father of Mary. Nicholas and Aidan. 
Funeral al Mortlake Crematorium. 
London, at 1 30 pm. on Monday. 
Augusl 18th. Please no flowers, 
donations if wished, fo Imperial 
Cancer Research Fund. 


On Sunday. August 10th. 
Phyllis MabeL peacefully at a nurs- 
ing home In South Norwood. Funeral 
Service lo be held on Thursday. 
August I4ih at All Samis Church. 
Lovelace Road. London SE21 at 2 46 
pm. followed by a committal at West 
Norwood Crematorium. Flowers, if 
desired, lo Rowland Bros.. 301 
Whitehorse Road, west Croydon, tel 
01-684 1667 

MERRETT On August 10th. 1986. 
Gertrude, widow of Ray Funeral 
Sen ice ai United Reform Church. 
Brighton Road. Purfey al 12.30 pm 
on Thursday. August 14lh. No flow- 
ers please Donations to League of 
Friends ol Purley Hospital. 

PRICE on Augusl 8lh. at Sloke Mande- 
\ life Hospital. Jonathan Villiers 
'Principal. Department of Energy) 
aged 32 years Beloved youngest son 
of Eric and Hone of Great Masenden. 
Sucks, dear brother to Neville and 
Graham A laved friend and respect- 
ed colleague Funeral Service at 
Croat Mnsenden Parish Church, on 
Wednesday August 13th at 10.45 
am. followed by cremation ai ChU 
terns Crematorium. Amentum. 
Flowers 10 H J A A Wright Ltd of 
Great Mtsaenden Tel 02406 
3101 /S 

PUL VERT AFT On August lllh. 
1986. suddenly al home. Robert Guy 
Pulvertafl. C.B.E.. of Dufflrld. Der 
bvshire. Dearly loved falter of Clare. 
Alison and Roger Funeral Service al 
Hazelwood Parish Church al 12 
noon on Monday. August isth. 
Family flowers only Donations to 
Hazelwood Parish Churt+v. 

RHODES JAMES, viol el Stirling (Han- 
nah! on August 10th Beloved 
mother, grandmother and areal 
grand mol her Service al 

Waierbeach. 4.00 pm. Thursday 
lain Auousl. followed hy cremation 

SCOTT MONCXIEFF. Francs Joseph 
Robert, aged 55 years, tragically In 
Portugal on 22nd July. 1936 Funer 
al service ai Church of £1 John Ihe 
Bapust. Great Raslnglon on Thurs- 
day rain Augusl at 2 00 pm. 
followed by uilermenl Family flow 
ers only but donations in lieu. If 
desired, lo Uie R N LI may be left al 
Ihe church Of ■ami lo W J WrigM- 
Funerai Director. Well Lane. Slow 
or- ihe wold Gum 


SHEPARD on 10th Augusl. Manor* 
Alys. (Sally 10 tier friends), aged 79. 
peacefully al home at hew. after a 
painful iUness bravely borne Funer- 
al 10.30 am on 15th August at 
Mortlake crematorium. Flowers to 
Sanders Ltd. 30 Kew Road. Rich- 
mond. Surrey. 

SPENCER - On August 6 th. tragically. 
Jonathan Simon iJonlo) aged 28 of 
Wesi Slowed and Salisbury. Wilt- 
shire Dearly loved son and step-son. 
brother and step-brother. Funeral 
Service Ipm Wlicot Church. Thurs- 
day (4fh Augusi. 

TALBOT, Frederick Maurice of 77 
Hay mans Close. Cullompton. Devon, 
aged 69. passed away August 9Ui 
1986. 'The power of the mind makes 
us see* He did lus best for an he 
loved and left us to remember. 

THMLBY - On Augusl 10 th. peacefully 
at Lancaster Lodge. Wimbledon. 
Florence Manon inee Menztesi. 
widow of Arnold and mother of 
Barbara Kenyon and Jean Peacey. 
Funeral private. 

WARD • On 10 th August. Jack Uonei 
Ward. 8 A . O.B.E.. aged 76. at home 
with Betty. Gillian. Nicholas. 
Felicity. Sarah. Lucy and Emily. For- 
mer Join! Managing Director of 
Merrydown Wine PLC. and first 
Chairman of the English Vineyards 
Association Funeral Service at SL 
Denys Church. Rotherfleld. East Sus- 
sex al 2.30 pm on Tuesday. 19th 
August. Family flowers, but dona- 
tions. if desired, to League of Friends 
at ihe Kent and Sussex Hospital. 
Tunbridge Wells. KenL Memorial 
Service lo be announced later. 

WEBSTER, peacefully at Bertchamsted 
on August 9th. aged 84. Mofly (nee 
Lily Mary Mitesi. loving wife of 
Derek and wonderful mother of 
Jeremy and Veronica. Funeral at 
Sunny Side Church. Bertchamsted on 
Friday 15U> Augusi al I2.30pm. 
Flowers lo Sunny Side Church or do- 
na lions. if desired, (o St. Franos 
Hospice. 37 Shniblands Road. 
Berkhamsted. 

WILSOfMtAFTENDEN On IOO) 
August 1986. ai home. Wallace of 
Upper Harbiedown. near Canter- 
bury A dearly loved husband and 
father. Funeral Service takes place at 
Barham Crematorium on Thursday. 
1 Jlli August al 4.30 pm. Family and 
dose friends only No flowers. Dona- 
tions. If desired- to Ihe Mane Cune 
Memorial Foundation. 124 Sloane 
Street. London SWI 9 BP 

WWCHT - Peacefully on Augusi 9th. In 
his 95U) year. Frederick William 
Wrignt. O.B.E.. Vice-president Asso- 
ciation of Civil Service-Art Clubs. 
Hinband of the late Josephine Ellen 

I Leila) Much loved by his children, 
grandchildren, great grandiildren 
and m& wide circle of family and 
fnends. Service on Monday. August 
teth. 12.30 pm at Eastbourne Cre- 
matorium. Langney Enquiries <0 
Mummery. F.D.. Bexhill <04241 
210418 

YOUNG On Augusi lllh. 1986. 
peacefully al Carrfsbrook Lodge 
Nursing Home. Sieyning. 
Carmichael Aretas Young. M D„ 
F.R.C.P. Beloved husband of Marta, 
devoted father of Bill. Richard. Roste 

and Pip. lovuxg father in-law and 

much loved and loving Grandpa of 

I I grandchildren. Funeral Service al 
Worthing Crema Ion urn. Findon. 
West Sussex on Monday. Augusl 
18 th at 1 2 noon. Family flower* only 
but dona l tore. If desired. 10 The 
Special Trustees of Si. Mary's Hospi- 
tal. Padding) on. London W 2 . aji 
enquiries to Qiaicrafl Bros.. 
Si fining 0903 812656 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


COLDHAM. John Maurice Scrv rcc of 
ThanJogiv tog at S>- John Ihe Baphsi 
Church. Boddington near Oaventry 
on Saturday. October 4lh al 3.00 pm. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


BENTLEY W. a On Augusl 13111 
1971 Remembered wnh deepest 
respect Members- of Ihe Bentley 
Drivers Club 

POLAK Rudolf 113.8 1916-16 2 1984) 
taxed ana iwu e mDored today and 
always by Susi- Cnartcs and Kate 


In ihe RHS heather com- 
petition Major-General and 
Mrs P. G. Turpin, of West 
Clandon. Surrey, are leading 
prizewinners and have gained 
a first prize for three heathers 
in bloom. 

The RHS gladiolus com- 
petition has the highest num- 
ber of entries for many years. S 
Price, of Romford. Essex, won 
the Foremarfce challenge cup 
for 12 varieties including ex- 
cellent spikes of deep scarlet 
■Oscar* and warm pink ‘Euro- 
pean Song’. J H Begley, of 
Reading, has iwo champion 
spikes: the red and yellow 
‘Drama’ and ihe gold, edged 
red 'Mr Fox’. 

In the Saintpaulia and 
Houseplani Society’s com- 
petition Mrs F. Vivian, of Mill 
Hill London, won ihe Frances 
Walker irophy formosi points 
in the saintpaulia section, and 
the Silver Jubilee trophy for 
best saintpaulia (variety 
‘Rosebery’). Mrs M. Mills, of 
Colchester. Essex, won the 
James Minty trophy for most 
points in the houseplani sec- 
tion. and the Margot Isaacs 
memorial trophy for best 
houseplani (Hava carnosa 
Tricolor’). 

In the National Begonia 
Society's competition. B. 
Simmons, of Portsmouth, 
Hampshire, won the anony- 
mous cup for best pot (bril- 
liant orange double tuberous 
begonia ‘Tahiti’). R. G. Hop- 
kins.- of Si I Chester. . Hamp- 
shire. took the class for six 
pots of double tuberous vari- 
eties. Hts giant plants indude 


the varieties ‘Roy Hartley’ and 
'Sugar Candy’. 

Major prizewinners in the 
British Fuchsia Society's com- 
petition are: H. W. Nicholson, 
of Buckinghamshire (the 
beginner's cup): D. E. BenneiL 
of Ware. Hertfordshire (the 
novices cup): N. A: Raison, of 
Nuneaton (the Blake challenge 
trophy for seven plants and 
the Coronation cup for- best 
exhibit): and F. G. Austin, of 
EfTingham. Surrey (the Sir 
Ralph Newman cup for five 
plants). 

First prizes were gained by 
L. Hedges, of Windsor. Berk- 
shire. for a tree-like plant of 
‘Barbara’: Mrs B. Morgan, of 
Luton. Bedfordshire, for a 
laige half basket of ‘Harry 
Gray’: and C. Gardiner, of 
Attleborough. Norfolk, for a 
large basket of yellow-leaved 
Fuchsia tnageilanica ‘Aurea’. 

Results 

Gold medals have been 
awarded to W. G. and D. M. 
Maishman (sweet peas) and 
County Park Nursery, of 
Hornchurch. Essex (New Zea- 
land alpines and shnibs). 

The award of merit went to 
Hypericum maciarenii. a yel- 
low-flowered hardy shrub 
exhibited by Anne Countess of 
Rosse and The National 
Trust, of Handcross. .West 
Sussex: and Lamtra olbia 
‘Barnsley’, hardy shrub with 
pale pink flowers, exhibited by 
David Barker, of Much 
Hadham. Hertfordshire.- 

The show is open today 
from 10 am to 5 pm. 


Science report 

‘Lock and key’ in 
arthritis found 


Major-General Leonard 
Hawes, CBE. DSO. MC. who 
followed a notable army ca- 
reer with many years’ service 
to the British Red Cross 
Society, died on August 7 at 
the age of 94. . . 

Leonard .Arthur Hawes was 
born al TTirocking. Hertford- 
shire. on July 22. 1 891 He was 

f-JL a ^ 9 ’ r IT ,,derit ™, TX- , I Ro U 5 S led Mili“A^ 1 ^ 

A group ofdocKKsat Stan- - becomes scarred. Tbis hap- j Woolwich, where he was corn- 
lord University School of pens because of the odd bebav- 


OBITUARY 

DR HANS HOLLANDER 
New light on Mahler and Janacek 

Dr Hans Hollander, a musi- ground at the time, and which 
cofoeist noted for his pioneer- are now recognized as being 
iSe Kvh into the music of among the mosumponant of 
Mahler and Janacek, died on early Mahler studic^ 

August S. Hevras86. ^ Being cut olT from hts 
iom in Moravia on Octo- original source meant, how- 
^,-5 iggo Hollander was of ever, that no did not resume 
Gemian-Czech origin. He was his Mahler research. But Jana- 
w . -■ — j — ■ — .««. h,- ih#» cek. whom he had known 

personally, continued to fasci- 
nate him. as did Czech culture 
generally: and in 1963. he 
published in English a study of 
the composer. Lcos Janj^eh 
llrs Life and H V<rA. 

It is imaginative and stimu- 
lating, using carefully-assem- 
bled facts, both biographical 
and musical, to awaken echoes 
in the mind. With a biographi- 
cal section which genuinely 
helps to illuminate the nature 
of the composer's music, it is a 
work which will remain a 
permanent contribution to Ja- 
naCek scholarship. 

Hollander was a charming, 
interesting and interested 
man. whose striking presence 
was accentuated in- his later 
years by his shock of white 
hair and ruddy complexion. 
He was also a man close to 
Nature, as were the two 


awarded his doctorate by the 
University of Vienna, where 
he studied with Guido .Adler 
and Egon Welles^ He was 
then, for a time, director oi 
music for the Brno Broadcast- 
ing Service until the Nazi 
invasion of Czechoslovakia in 
1939. His promising career as 
a writer and teacher was 
thrown into turmoil and he 
immediately left for England. 

He spent some time work- 
ing on a farm in the West 
Country' before being offered 
ihe shelter of Exeter Universi- 
ty, which was to be hts 
academic home. From 1948 to 
1965 he was a tutor in the 
extramural department of the 
university, and he was made 
an honorarv research fellow in 
1979. 

Before being forced to make 
a new life for himself in 

England, Hollander had al- mature, as wore uiv- iwo 
ready published a number of composers he so much adr 
highiv interesting papers on mired. He was a generous 
Mahler, and in particular on colleague, always ready ■ *o 
the composer’s early life and share with others the results of 
music, which broke new his research. 

MR STUART MANN 

Mr Stuart Edward Mann, 
scholar of Central European 
linguistics languages, died on 
Augusi 5. aged 81. 

He was born in Nottingham 
on June il. 1905. Having 
taken a degree in Germanic 
Philology at Bristol Universi- 
ty in 1929. he spent two years 
studying the language in Alba- 
nia. which was not thtn 
covered by English scholar- 
ship. His work there w»as to 
lead to a number of major 
publications that are still in 
use: An Albanian Grammar. 

Albanian-English and Englisb- 
Albanian dictionaries, and a 
history of Albanian literature. 

In 1931. he moved to 
Czechoslovakia, where he lec- 
tured in English at Brno 
University. During this time 
he studied the life and lan- 
guage of the city's gypsies and 
published a Moravian- 
Romani translation of the 
.Acts of the Apostles. 

At the outbreak of war he 
returned to Britain, where he 
worked for the Ministry of 
Information’s censorship de- 
partment and. from 1945 to 
1947. for the Foreign Office. 

..From 1947 until bis retire^ 
ment in 1972 he was lecturer 
.in Czechoslovak language and 
literature. later reader in 


MAJOR-GENERAL 
LEONARD HAWES 


Medicine. California, believe 
they have made a discovery 
which could lead to a more 
effective treatment of rheu- 
matoid arthritis. 

While the exact cause of 
arthritis fa not understood, 
scientists know that once the 
disease catches hold, in- 
flammation of joints is accel- 
erated through attack by the 
body's own defence system. 

New findings by the Ameri- 
can researchers cast light on 
this self-destructive mecha- 
nism. and open np the -way to 
safer and more effective treat- 
ment for the disease. 

They have pinpointed the 
existence of a molecular “lock 
and key” system, which con- 
trols the entry of lymphocytes 
(the white blood cells) into the 
joints of patients suffering 
from this condition. 

Once the lymphocytes have 
entered the arthritic joint, they 
mistake it for invasive tissue 
and attack, cassing stiU more 
inflammation. Normally, 
lymphocytes control the blood 
system on the lookout for 
invaders and are pre-pro- 
grammed not to attack body 
tissues. 

Dr S. Jaikanen, of the 
department of pathology at 
Stanford University, and col- 
leagues at other US medical 
research centres, have estab- 
lished what draws the killer 
cells into diseased joints. They 
have found that it is the plump 
capillaries symptomatic of dis- 
eased bone tissue that provide 
a false target for lymphocytes. 

More importantly, they 
discovered that the “magnet" 
which draws the lymphocytes 
into the bone tissue is specific 
to diseased bone tissue alone. 
It is quite distinct from the 
“magnets" that attract 
lymphocytes elsewhere in the 
body, such as into lymph 
glands of mucosal tissue. 

Rheumatoid arthritis is. a 
disease, affecting the joints, 
which become inflamed, swell 
and, iir many cases, stiffen 
completely, when the normally 
smooth and lubricated joint 
lining tissue - called synovium 


four of lymphocytes. 

As part of' tiie immune 
system, they are called upon to 
help fight bacteria and viruses 
invading the body. But as far 
as rheumatoid arthritis fa 
concerned, they -are thought to 
play a crucial part in 
contributing- to the abnormal 
growth of the synovium, caus- 
ing pain, and crippling 
swelling. 

To do their job properly, 
lymphocytes travel through 
tiie bloodstream to reach tis- 
sues where they might be 
needed to attack infections. 
They do so by passing through 
minute blood vessels, called 
venules, which signal the 
white blood cells whether they 
are allowed to gain 
admittance. 

Previous studies with- mice 
had established that white 
cells needed distinct “keys” to 
“unlock" different venules. 

When ' the American 
researchers, led by Dr Eugene 
Butcher at Stanford, examined 
inflamed synovial tissue from 
four rheumatoid arthritis pa- 
tients, they found that a 
specific “lock and key" recep- 
tor system was required for 
white blood cells to enter tbe 
joint tissues. 

From this they deduced that, 
it might be possible to seal off 
the joints from lymphocytes, 
without preventing these from 
entering other body tissues. A 
drug or a monodonal anti- 
body, which would selectively 
block lymphocyte traffic into 
tbe joints, would, they believe, 
be a more effective and less 
toxic treatment than currently 
available. 

But it fa much too soon to 
know whether their discovery 
will result in such a drug. 

However, they will first 
hare to establish if the "lock 
and key" system involving 
joint tissues is unique to them, 
or whether it fa also applicable 
to other sites of inflammation 
of the body, that would benefit 
from the presence of 
lymphocytes. 

Source: Science. August 1. 
1986. 


Latest wills 

Sir Alexander Bradshaw Clegg- 
of Tadcasier. North Yorkshire, 
formerly chief education officer 
for the West Riding, left e$wie 
valued at £73366 net. 

Mr Neville Hirst Gilt.' of Leeds, 
left csuue valued at £2.716.909 


Dr Stanlev Balfoor-Lynn. of 
Ba>swatcr. London, and 
Goudhursu KenL who bought 
the Harley Street Ginic in 1 960 
and developed il into a hospital 
of world standing, left estate 
valued at £60 1.873 neL ‘ 
Parsons. Betty Rosalind, of 
Esher - £357.494 


'missioned 2nd lieutenant in 
the Royal Garrison Artillery 
in 1911. 

He served with distinction 
in France and Italy during the 
First World War. when he was 
thrice mentioned in despatch- 
es. In addition to the DSO and 
MC. he was awarded the 
Order of the Crown of Italy. 

As a soldier in peacetime he 
achieved the rank of brevet 
lieutenant-colonel in 1932 and 
colonel iii 1938. During the 
Second World War he held 


SIR WILLIAM DENHOLM 


Sir William Denholm, ship- 
owner. who was chairman of 
the Shipping Federation from 
(962 to 1965. died on August 
9 at the age of 85. 

William Lang Denholm was 
. born in Greenock on February 
23. 1901. Educated at Gree- 
nock Academy and Greenock 
Collegiate, he joined the fam- 
ily firm of J. & J. Denholm 
Limited in 1918. 

In Scottish shipping circles. 
-Denholm was a familiar and 
respected figure who. 3fier the 
war. was directly concerned in 
selling up the Merchant Navy 
Established Service. Scheme. 
He was a member of both the 
general and Scottish commit- 
tees of Lloyd's Register of 
Shipping from 1935 to 1977; 
and for many years served as a 
shipowners' representative 
and negotiator on the Nation- 
al Mantime Board. 

From 1950 to 1962, he was 
vice-chairman of the Shipping 
Federation, a post* earlier held 
by his father. He was president 
of the International Shipping 
Federation from 1962 tty 1967. 
and was chairman of the 


family firm from 1966 to 
1974. 

Following the settlement of 
a threatened strike by mer- 
chant seamen in 1964. com- 
ments by Denholm accurately 
foretold the troubles that were 
to beset the industry- “No- 
body is forced to use British 
shipping”, he warned, “and 
unless it can by its own efforts 
maintain its place in the face 
of intense international com- 
petition. there will be fewer 
jobs for British ships and 
British seamen” 

Denholm's concerns ranged 
beyond the shipyard and he 
look a personal’ interest in 
hospital work in Glasgow 
where he was. from 1949 to 
1 964. firsL vice-chairman and 
then chairman of the Glasgow 
Royal Infirmary 1 and Associat- 
ed Hospitals. He was also 
president of the city’s 
Shipowners' and Shipbrokers 
Benevolent .Association. He 
was knighted in 1965. 

He married, in 1931. Doro- 
thy Jane Ferguson and" there 
were two sons and a daughter 
of the marriage. 


DR RICHARD McCONNELL 

\fary Stcwarr-W g/lace uri/ej; el. Professor Glynne 


In the excellent obituary of 
Dr Richard McConnell (Au- 
gust 9) mention is made of the 
Richand Bradford Trust set up 
to explore the mystery of 
man’s ■development by exam- 
ining. using scientific method, 
human artistic. and creative 
achievement. 

The Trust published, in 
1 985. Art. Science and Human 
Pmgrcss . a collection of lec- 
tures by eminent people sup- 
porting Dr McConnell’s 
thesis. These lecturers were 
Lord Clark, Professor H. D. F. 
■Kino. Jacquena Hawkes. Sir 
: Peter Medawar. Dav id Samu- 


Wickham and Sir Ernst 
Gombrich. The book also 
includes a fine preface by Dr 
McConnell and an account of 
a symposium held bv the 
Trust in 1978. 

Dr McConnell was a belie'* 
or in the innate greatness and 
goodness of man and was a 
particular admirer and lover 
of ancient Greece. 

Ii was typical of Dr 
McConnell that on the day 
before^ he died his wife had 
JJj s t finished re-reading th? 
Odvwtr to him. She is con- 
tinuing the work of the Trust 
from their home in SireoL 
Sussex. 


< 


Czech and Albanian languages 
and literatures, at the Univer- 
sity of London School of 
Slavonic and East European 
Studies. While there, he pub- 
lished books on Czech and 
Slovak language and literature 
(including a Czech historical 
grammar). Albanian. Romani 
and general and historical 
linguistics. 

Of all his work. Mann was 
proudest of his Indo-Europe- 
an comparative dictionary, on 
which he worked with charac- 
teristic enthusiasm through- 
out his life. It was not 
published until recently, when 
ii began to appear in instal- 
ments in Hamburg. 

Despite recurrent bouts of 
ill health (he could breathe 
freely only at high altitudes), 
he was a devoted teacher who. 
in 1968. sought means to 
ensure that several students 
from Czechoslovakia, adrift 
after the events of that year, 
could study in London. 

Though in general he was 
reserved and might even seem 
distant, on his own subject be 
was always open, accessible 
and communicative. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Helen, originally Czech, and 
by their daughter. 


short-term staff posts when he 
was a brigadier, general staff 
Eastern Command and major- 
general in charge of adminis- 
tration. Home Forces. From 
1942 until his retirement in 
1945 he was GOC South 
Midland District He was 
appointed CBE in 1940. 

Following his retirement 
Hawes developed his interest 
in the work of the British Red 
Cross Society to which, over 
the next ten years, he devoted 
much t i me and energy . He was 
secretary-general to the Nurs- 
ing Advisory Board from 1945 
to 1946; controller of person- 
nel from 1946 to 1947: and 
thereafter controller of the 
Home Department until 1957. 

He was twice married: first 
in 1919. to Gwendolen 
Gnmsdale. who died in 1970. 
and. second, to Yolande Rob- 
inson. who died in 1984. 
There was one son. since 
deceased, of the first marriage. 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


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action 

“Politicians? Where are 
they?" demanded an. irate 
white resident during 4flKr the 
jRi'otc, Central's documentary 
about Handsworth, the suburb 
of Birmingham that harm its 
way into the national cons- 
ciousness last September. Onr 
politicians are not very good 
with riots. They are toned for 
slow decay. Placebo politics 
seem out of place when fire- 
raisers are running amok. 

Even claims by the Govern* 
meat to have tried more rad- 
ical surgery only invite the 
accusation that its cures 
caused the convulsions in the 
body politic. 

After iht Riots gave os some 
politicians: an action replay of 
Douglas Hard's brief, bar- 
racked sniffing round the 
ashes, a repeat image of Mrs 
Thatcher claiming, almost 
spitting, innocence. Mostly, 
however, they were the local 
variety — committee men, 
placid, easy in their anonym- 
ity, dithering rather than 
dissembling. 

The documentary was the 
result of a year spent in 
Handsworth by a crew* from 
Central's progr a m m e for eth- 
nic minorities. Here and Now. 
It adopted no dogmatic po- 
sition and offered little analy- 
sts. bat rather juxtaposed a 
discordant choir of varied 
voices: anguished Asian, an- 
gry Indian, rough-trade mar- 
ket Anglo-Saxon, meddling 
middle-class Midlands, ha- 
rassed Turkish, educated 
West Indian proud in its 
rounded vowels, poolroom 
Rasta, low-key community- 
copperspeak, police commis- 
sioner pi-jaw, teeth clenched to 
bite tiie plastic bullet 

The effect was rather like 
that of - Kurosawa's film 
Reskomon in which each 
character gave a conflicting 
account of a violent assault At 
one extreme the riot was an 
“uprising", at the other a 
crime organized by drug-push- 
ers. The result was frustrating. 
The more information you 
were given the less you knew. 
Bat then political debate itself 
is now as much about descrip- 
tion as prescription: How 
many of the unemployed are 
unemployed? Is the Health 
Service being cat? 

One black councillor de- 
manded action rather than 
wordy reports. American im- 
ports from Watts assured es 
that things coaid be done. U, 
that is, the politicians are 
anywhere to be found; but 
then, as one committee mem- 
ber said to another who had 
ceased helping some p>od 
Handsworth citizens over a 
project becanse they had not 
come back to him, “You might 
think about going to them". 

Andrew Hislop 

Dance in 
London 

Cdppelia 

Festival Hall 


EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 
Dance: John Percival 



with Neumeir 


LFB2 

Lyceum 


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Festival Ballet entered the 
final week of its long London 
season on Monday with a 
revival of Ronald Hynd*$ pro- 
duction of Coppciia. receiving 
an extra fillip from the pres- 
ence of Rudolf Nureyev in the 
first of two guest appearances 
as Franz, the only perfor- 
mances he is scheduled to give 
in London this summer. 

The role suits him well. He 
has a gift for comedy which is 
ail too rarely seen and he 
brings a very particular fla- 
vour to the part, making the 
character more of the Russian 
innocent than the two-timing 
village dandy. His mime 
scenes demonstrate an exem- 
plary clarity and a wonderful 
sense of fun. and he is a model 
of style in the national dances. 
11 is a beautifully rounded and 
complete performance, and 
demonstrates very clearly that 
dancing is not just a matter of 
steps. 

Lucia Truglia was his 
Swanhilda. as bright pretty 
and responsive as one could 
wish. This is a rote which can 
appear shallow and heartless, 
and 1 admired the way Truglia 
kept the comedy under con- 
trol. allowing a gentler nature 
to show so that her remorse at 
Coppelius's distress and the 
tenderness of the lovers* final 
duet seem very much in 
character with the deception 
of Act II. 

My biggest quibble with 
Hynd's production comes in 
this act. where an infernal 
engine has replaced the book 
of spells: a poor exchange, 
especially with a Coppelius as 
richly comic and deeply poetic 
as Alexander Grant In ballet 
as in life, technology is' no 
substitute for old-fashioned 
magic. 

Judith 

Cruickshank 


SOUTH AUSTRALIAN 

WATER COLOURS 

WALTER WOTZBX 

«b . f Tih aiigimt 

MALL 


(KAft ADMRALTY ARCH) 
THE MAU. LONDON SW1 

TEL 01-830 0844 


John Neumeir's ballets are 
shamefully little known in 
Britain, in spite of the huge 
success of his Midsummer 
Night's Dream when the Paris 
Opdra Ballet brought it to 
Govern Garden a few years 
back. Elsewhere in Europe his 
reputation stands high, based 
mainly on bis dramatic ballets 
and also on the series of 
symphonic ballets he has cre- 
ated to Mahler and Bach. But 
for bis own -company in 
Hamburg he provides a varied 
repertory, and it was astute of 
Peter Schaufuss to get him to 
revive forthe London Festival 
Ballet his small fight-hearted 
Petrushka Variations. Il was 
given its British premiere on 
Monday by LFB2. a group of 
28 of Festival's dancers 
appearing at the Edinburgh 
Festival while the main body 
of their colleagues continue 
the London season. 

The music is the suite of 
three movements from Pet- 
rushka which Stravinsky ab- 
stracted from his own ballet 
and arranged for solo piano. 
Except for the scene in 
Petrushka's celL which forms 


the middle movement Stra- 
vinisky avoided the emotional 
and dramatic climaxes of the 
full score, choosing the lively 
puppet dance from the first 
scene and the vigorous epi- 
sodes for the crowd which 
begin the third. That choice, 
together with the transcription 
for, piano, makes the music 
sound fighter and brighter 
than in its original context, 
and Neumeir has matched this 
by choreography that is witty 
and individuaL 

Sometimes he quotes steps 
or gestures from Fokine's 
ballet, and there are often 
hints of puppets in the way he 
makes his dancers droop a 
bead or jerk a leg. but the 
ballet presents no characters 
and tells no story. What you 
have instead is 20 minutes of 
quirky, unexpected, amusing 
and thoroughly rewarding 
dancing for *a cast of six. 
Quick, wry patterns predomi- 
nate. Several limes one dancer 
enters to do something that 
bears no relation to whatever 
else is happening on stage. The 
partnering often has the 
women held extended at odd 
angles, their legs making pat- 
terns in the air that you would 
expect to see on the floor. 

Festival Ballet's dancers 
take to all this with spirit. 


There is a trio in which 
Greichen Newburger and her 
two partners twist their feet 
and legs with unlikely syn-. 
copation. Matz Skoog has a 
quick, sharp solo. Janette 
Mulligan and Alessandro' 
Molm provide a contrasting 
quiet episode in their central 
duet, but Mulligan is out- 
standing also in the many 
nifty little jumps that punc- 
tuate the action. Karen Gee 
and Daryl Norton complete 
the strong cast- 
It would be pleasant to see 
Festival Ballet, after this ex- 
cellent start, develop a con- 
tinuing relationship with Neu- 
meier. His ballet made an 
attractive programme to- 
gether with two works created 
for Festival over the past year. 
Christopher Bruce's dramatic 
Land and Michael Clark's 
satirical Drop Your Pearls. 
They are very varied in mood 
and style, but all three works 
make use of the skills of 
classically trained dancers in a 
contemporary way. In this 
context Bgjart's Wayfarer 
duet for two men looks' curi- 
ously old-fashioned. in spite or 
full-blooded performances by 
Schaufuss and Patrick Ar- 
mand. A somewhat anaemic 
account of the Mahler songs 
did not help. 



The Impressionist look gradually evolving: Monet's On the Seine at Bennecoart 

Galleries: John Russell Taylor 


Theatre: Martin Cropper 


Dreaming of 
Babylon 
Theatre Workshop. 


It is never less than intriguing 
to sec one's judgements 
“improved" (i.e. flagrantly 
hyperbolized) hi theatre hand- 
outs. The publicity material 
for Kerry Shale's current one- 
man show quotes The Times 
as having burbled of his effort 
last year “This is a must!" A 
Confederacy of Dunces was a 
dazzling entertainment and 
my notice said so. but I feel 
the words attributed must 
have come from The Times of 
Timbuctoo. 

Dreaming qf Babylon is 
more of a might than a must. 
Adapted from a novel by 


Richard Brautigan. the late 
Wesr Coast whimsicaiist who 
stands considerably lower 
than John Kennedy Toole in 
the ranks ofliterary suicides, it 
tells the story of a low-rent San 
Fransiscan private eye. Seedy 
to the point of sprouting, ana 
with no money to buy bullets 
for his gun. C. Card takes on a 
job to steal the body of a 
murdered prostitute from the 
city morgue (having suffered 
an autopsy, she is literally a 
heartless blonde). 

The tone of the gumshoe's 
first-person narrative is degen- 
erate Sam Spade, contami- 
nated by a -liberal dose of 
1940s movie-serial schlock; a 
failure in his elective career, 
he retreats into a fantasy 
world (see title) wherein he 
becomes “Smith Smith versus 
The Shadow Robots" — a 


mildly engaging pastiche 
which Brautigan no doubt 
found immensely appealing. 

Mr Shale's version, directed 
and lit by Anthony Matheson, 
consciously renders the pro- 
tagonist as a Woody Allen 
type of nerd, as someone, in 
other words, who knows the 
charm of his unheroic incom- 
petence: this is not. in prac- 
tice. charming. 

The wooden-legged old 
mortuary attendant comes 
across as vintage Walter Bren- 
nan, and there are also ex- 
cellent impersonations of 
Sydney Greenstreet and Peter 
Lorre. But the thing comes 
alive only when the player 
launches into two- and three- 
way conversations with. him- , 
self — these are as razor-shaip ’ 
as ever; and Mr Shale is 
welcome to quote me. 


Lighting Up the 
Landscape 
National Gallery of 
Scotland 

The only major show put on 
forthe Edinburgh Festival this 
year which does not have 
anything notably to do with 
Scottish art is Lighting Up the 
Landscape ( until October 19), 
which is subtitled “French 
Impressionism and its Ori- 
gins". In the event it is much 
more about the origins than 
about Impressionism itself, 
and its general effect is to 
abolish any too hard-and-fast 
fines of distinction between 
Impressionism and what went 
before, or at least to make us 
question closely what, pre- 
cisely. the essence of the 
Impressionist revolution was. 

We have been used to the 
view that the real novel ly of 
Impressionism was something 
quasi-sciemific to do with the 
painters' understanding of 
light, the interdependence of 
light and colour, and the role 


of light in the creation of a 
feeling of movement in paint- 
ing. But in fact almost all of 
these things are to be found 
quite clearly in the work of the 
Impressionists' predecessors 
of the Barbizon school, and 
even further back. Indeed, 
they have been understood 
more or less by any painter 
wonh his salt since repre- 
sentation became an im- 
portant consideration in art. 
But it is striking here to see 
how sensitive were many 
quite minor painters like 
ChintreuH and Guigou to the 
play of light over a landscape, 
and how little difference there 
is between the early work of 
Monet or Pissarro and that of 
their masters* generation, with 
the distinctive Impressionist 
look evolving only gradually. 

Because of this it is nec- 
essary to consider a bit more 
closely in what, exactly, that 
“look" resides. Surely it has 
more to do with the way the 
paint was put on canvas than 
anything else. The Impres- 
sionists begin to look rec- 
ognizably Impressionist when 
the heavy impasto of their 


early work breaks up into 
light, individual brush- 
strokes. The same insights and 
the same emotions face-to- 
face with landscape arc snil 
being recorded, but the tech- 
nique is different, and so the 
whole feeling of the work. 
Even the old stand-by of 
painting on the spot does not 
stand up too well to scrutiny 
in the light of this show-, there 
is a lot of evidence that many 
earlier sketches and studies at 
least were done cn plcin air. 
and that not so many of the 
fully Impressionist works 
were necessarily completed on 
the spot rather than worked up 
in the studio. 

But the principal interest of 
the show remains not so much 
the message one can extract 
from it as the enjoyment to be 
gained from looking at the 
individual art-works in it. 
Here there is much that will be 
unfamiliar even to specialists 
in the subject, particularly in 
the paintings by minor figures 
or the work of great painters 
working in a less familiar 
register, as with Delacroix's 
Pyrenean Landscape. 


Concert: 

Richard 

Morrison 

BBCSO/ 
Pritchard 
Usher Hall 


An anonymous Aida but a flowing Fanciulla del West. John Higgins concludes 
his report on the summer opera festival in the Arena di Verona 

When history should not repeat itself 


In 1913. so the story goes, the tenor 
Zcnatcllo went into the Verona Arena, 
delivered a veree of "Celeste Aida" to the 
empty tiers and pronounced the acoustic 
good. And so the summer festival was 
born. Aida was given that year, which 
also happened to be the centenary of 
Verdi's birth, conducted by Tuliio 
Serafin and with, naturally. Zenateilo as 
Ra dames. 

The present Aida in the Verona 
repertory is described as a “rei in- 
vocation" of that first presentation, but 
on the basis of ibe performance I heard h 
would be impossible to pronounce it as 
more than mediocre. Recalling the 
glories of the past may be an act or piety 
but it scarcely makes for good drama. 
Hie art of opera production has moved 
on during the last seventy years, just as 
movie-making has changed since 
D.W. Griffith put Intolerance before the 
cameras. Vittorio Rossi plants sphihxes 
and carved columns around the playing 
area, but large slices of h look un- 
comfortably bare.. Gianfranco de Bosio's 
production, despite a high-kicking Egyp- 
tian chorus-line, is dispiritingly anonym 
mous and he allows his principals to 
display only minimal interest in one 
another. 

This is precisely- what opera should not 
be about io the Eighties: a tenor, a 
soprano, a mezzo, a baritone and a 
couple of basses performing as unlinked 
individuals. And individually they were 
on no more than modest form. Much 
was expected from the Russian Natalya 
Troitskaya! who has been having a 
splendid twelve months up until now. 
The Arena held the promise of an Aida 
in the style of the young Vishnevskaya. U 
was not to be. The middle and bottom of 
the soprano sounded as rich as ever, but 
the top was used "With considerable 
discretion — so much discretion in fact 
that neither of the arias came close to 
achieving its proper effect. The gestures 
were stock central European and could 
have done with a producer’s controlling 
hand. 

Few directorial hands have ever 
managed to control Franco Bonisolfi. 
With chin jutted out towards the back of 



Every inch the old-time warrior: 

Franco Bonisolli as RaduiesiaJidt 

the Arena and arm raised in a constant 
salute, he looks every inch the old-lime 
warrior. The Arena audiences seem. to 
like their Radameses that way and do not 
seem to mind that Bonisolli reaches for 
many of his notes. But at least be gets 
them and he enjoys them, just as he 
enjoys being carried around on a massive 
golden throne. 

Cornell McNeil as Amonasno shook 
his shaggy locks at the audience, stand- 
ing, whenever possible, at centre stage. 
“Non mi tradir". he bawled out fiill-force 
at Amneris, a phrase marked “in a 
whisper". The voice sounded raw. So il 
was left to Amneris herself to provide the 
most satisfying singing: Fiorenza 
Cossotto has been playing the role at 
Verona for over a quarter of century now 
and she takes it still with her usual 


assurance and without too much regard 
for the conductor. Daniel Oren. who 
exerted little discipline over the evening. 
As midnight struck I left the Nile for the 
■ Verona night. 

Puccini's La fanciulla del West the 
.fourth of the season's operas, was a much 
more satisfying affair. Handsomely de- 
signed by Luciano Ricceri. it turned the 
Arena stage into a grey place of hard 
work where only Minnie's Polka Saloon 
offers a little comfort among the fissures 
of the mines and the dark and uninviting 
forests. The horse-drawn carriages 
delivering mail or sheriffs, the white 
charger bringing in Minnie in the nick of 
time: these provided the very core of 
Puccini's extraordinary vision of the 
Californian gold-rush rather than being 
mere appendages to dazzle a naive 
audience. 

Ezio Zefferi's production has. total 
grip, even though someone appeared to 
be taking the soprano. Olivia Stapp. 
through a stage-familiarization course 
during the first interval. She had arrived 
to sing the last four performances and is 
a natural Minnie, with the lung-power to 
penetrate Puccini's- unusually thick 
orchestration and some gentler, more 
liquid notes in reserve for the bar- 
owner's invitation to the dance in Act I. a 
moment which is in its way as touching 
as the first encounter of Rodolfo and 
Mimi. Giorgio . Casellato Lambeni's 
Dick Johnson, shared with another 
open-air performance down the road at 
Torre del Lago. partnered her with vocal . 
courtesy and did not beg the audience for 
applause after "Ch'clla mi crcda" as 
others might have done and indeed he 
was entitled to do. Giampiero Mas* 
tromei's Ranee, forceful in manner and 
swarthy in tone, completed a welL 
matched trio of principals. 

But this was a Fanciulla well cast all 
the way down its long line and conducted 
with admirable rhythmic and dramatic 
flow by Maurizio Arena. His name 
obviously equips him nicely for the job. 

• There are further performances (with 
changing casts) of Fanciulla on Frida 
and Aida on August 1 6. 1 9. 22. 28 and 


Jazz 


Chet Baker 

Ronnie Scott's 


Looking a good deal more 
fragile than on his last visit to 
Frith Street, when for an 
entire week he played what 
sounded like the finest music 
of an unusually eventful ca- 
reer. the American trumpeter 
Chet Baker opened his new 
season on Monday by giving 
an impression of "a high-wire 
walker struggling to regain his 
nerve. 

Such is his peculiar genius, 
though, that Baker manages to 
use hsllessless and uncertainty 
to create music every bit as 
convincing as that fashioned 
by others from energy and 
enthusiasm. The tone might 
crack and the ideas fall apart, 
but something in his playing - 
something more. 1 venture to 
suggest, than the legend of a 
-tarnished golden boy of cool 
jazz — grips our attention. 

Sensitively accompanied by 
John Horler's piano. Dave 
Green's bass. Tony Crombic's 
drums and a competent Ital- 
ian flautist. Nicola Slilo. 
Baker began his first set with a 
long solo on a gently swaying 
Brazilian tune, gathering up 
the threads of melody with 


exaggerated care and display- 
ing straightaway that unique 
lone, the sound of guileless 
adolescence transmitted 
through the frame of a man in 
his middle fifties. 

“For Minors Only", an up- 
tempo tune by Jimmy Heath 
which has been in his rep- 
ertoire for 30 years, showed 
clearly that, like Miles Davis, 
he hears music in the middle 
register of his horn.* where his 
phrasing is secure and mobile. 
Lack of breath makes the 
lower register shake, while 
high notes are liable to spurt 
wildly out of control. 

Yet “My Ideal", taken at a 
funereal tempo and sung in an 
exhausted whisper, was 
among the most affecting 
performances I can recall. The 
intonation may not always 
have been dead-centre, but the 
thin vocal tone was shaded 
with immense care and the 
details of his phrasing were 
exquisite. Suddenly, too. his 
trumpet rose like a' dancer on 
tip-toe. carving double-time 
arabesques in the air with a 
defiance borrowed from what- 
ever secret core of integrity 
has kepi him at it all these long 
and difficult years. 

Richard Williams 


Promenade Concert 


RPO/Groves 

Albert Hall/Radio 3 


a 


Theatre in London 


Double Double 

Fortune 


DauNe Double is a romantic 
comedy thriller, a trivial piece 
of work whose dramatic idiom 
was obsolete when T.S. Eliot 
wrote The Cocktail Party in 
1949. In this kind of play wc 
are invited to breathe the 
sterile, gentrified air of the 
Home Counties, although the 
scene is usually set in Chelsea 
or Knightsbridgc or some 
opulent Mediterranean hotel. 
Its heroine is wealthy, well- 
spoken and well-manicured 
but wc learn that inside, 
beneath the diamonds and 
make-up. she is wretchedly 


unhappy, trapped by some 
dark predicament from which 
only the hero can free her. The 
hero, of course, is raffish and 
young, with an engaging grin, 
and, if he speaks with a 
regional accent the play is 
irretrievably a comedy. 

These two arc plainly de- 
signed to fell in love, whatever 
their superficial differences, 
and, because of these dif- 
ferences. the plot must 
equally plainly, separate or kill 
them. In this preposterous 
way. comedy becomes ro- 
mance. and romance turns to 
mvstcry. Romantic emotion 
has its own. stylized truth in 
ibe best of these plays. In the 


worst of them, wc arc left with 
mere contrivance. 

Double Double t's depressing 
not because the form is dated 
and naive but because die 
writers treat il with such 
cynicism. Philippa is a glam- 
orous young widow who em- 
ploys an impoverished Scots 
poet to impersonate her dead 
husband so that they may both 
lay their hands on a large and 
conveniently mysterious trust 
fund. Throughout the evening 
the characters circle each 
other. buL although they arc 
given long speeches in which 
to declare their secret lusts and 
loyalties, the play itself grows 
weary of such nonsense. In the 


end. there are none of the 
satisfactions of a clever plot 
because the writing obeys no 
inner logic and cannot con- 
vince us that there is anything 
at stake, even in fun. 

Since the play opened Ihc 
cast has changed, with Rula 
Lcnska and Keith Drinkcl 
replacing Roger Rees (the co- 
author) and Jane Lapotaire. 
Lcnska plays Phil.ippa as a 
serious emotional heroine out 
of Rattigan or Coward, and 
the performance has a grave 
dignity which docs wonders 
for the clinkcr-rauling di- 
alogue. Drinkcl is light-voiced 
and perfectly pleasant 

Andrew Rissik 


It is always rather sad when 
the hungering and thirsting 
attention of the Promcnaders 
is rewarded with only a snack. 

So mild was Sir Charles 
Groves's reading of Schubert's 
“Great" C major Symphony 
that it seemed as if he and the 
Royal Philharmonic were 
afraid of anything so in- 
discreet as the revelation of 
purpose, and frightened to 
speak a word out of place 
(though plenty of notes found 
themselves in this position). 

I have never heard the 
finale's reference to Beet- 
hoven's Ninth quite so bash- 
fully introduced, nor the 
scherzo's soaring phrases so 
casually sketched in. It was 
not just a matter of technical 
shonfalL like the lack of bass 
ballast oftenuto in bowing: it 
was the apparent inter- 


pretative indifference which 
let these matters ride that was 
more disappointing. 

It was periiaps in frustrated 
response to direction which 
seems to assume that melody 
will phrase itself that Stephen 
Bishop-Kovacevich gave such 
an edgy, aggressive perfor- 
mance of Brahms's Second 
Piano Concerto. The first 
movement's exposition was 
snapped irascibly back to the 
tonic, and. rather than use its 
rhapsodic passagrwork to 
broaden and warm its mus- 
cles. Bishop-Kovacevich see- 
med to prefer to dismiss it as 
so much flippant filling. The 
ever-amenable Sir Charles was 
not really the man to provide 
in the .Allegro appassionato 
the son of accompaniment 
which Bishop-Kovacevich ob- 
viously needed to kick against: 
the orchestra's only response 
was to snarl back with whoop- 
ing hom solos and agitated 
ensemble playing. 

Hilary Finch 


The Scottish Press is generally 
giving a rather chauvinistic 
lhumbs-up to the Edinburgh 
Festival's decision not to in- 
vite any of the “big four" 
London orchestras this year. 
In the past, one writer 
claimed, '‘routine South Bank 
programmes" have been of- 
fered for “crippling fees’*. 
That may be so. but the fact is 
that in the Londoners' absence 
festival-goers will hear a Mos- 
cow- orchestra playing Johann 
Strauss polkas and an Oslo 
orchestra playing Tchaikov- 
sky symphonies: a somewhat 
imperceptible revolution. 

One London-based sym- 
phony orchestra is here, but 
the BBCSO has always pro- 
grammed more boldly. It is 
not under the same commer- 
cial constraints, and it can 
repeat programmes two days 
later at the Proms and thus 
maximize returns on the extra 
costs involved. For Richard 
Strauss's Alpine Symphony, 
those little extras certainly tot 
up. Well over 1 00 players were 
employed here, and even then 
I do not believe that Strauss's 
grandiose stipulations in the 
matter or ofT-siagc horns were 
fully met. 

Sprawling, superficial, smug 
and self-satisfied: all these 
charges can be levelled at the 
. I Ipmc Symphony. Yet a great 
festival needs such noisy, 
straightforward blockbusters 
(what else can explain the 
continuing allure of a military 
tattoo?) and. in Sir John 
Priichard's hands, this strenu- 
ous ramble around the pistes 
sounded tremendous fun. He 
was the perfect mountain 
guide, characterizing each of 
ihc 23 episodes with the 
requisite degree of nostalgia- 
tinged exaggeration. Dawn's 
rosy glories were relished lei- 
surely - well they- might be. 
with such a large body of 
strings shimmering to ravish- 
ing effect. The climbers' stout 
footwear was adjusted with 
suitable pomposity, and. in 
the waterfall episode. Pritch- 
ard managed to evoke a 
spectacle of aqua-sports pur- 
sued with Teutonic v igour. 

If the violins had their own 
perilous moments on the gla- 
cier. traversing the angular 
phrases (better to remember 
their luscious lyricism on the 
lower slopes), the brass play- 
ing was a blaze of triumph. 
Both trumpets and horns were 
superbly assured, thrusting 
their jagged unisons through 
the tumult of wind-machine 
and ill under-sheet. 

To watch so distinguished 
and long-serving a pianist as 
Jorge Bold going through a 
public nightmare was. by con- 
trast. depressing. In Beet- 
hoven's Piano Concerto No 5 
passagework frequently went 
askew, the keys were thumped 
to increasingly harsh effect 
and. even in the Adagio. Bold 
never found the touches of 
old-style poetry for which he is 
celebrated. 

The malaise even occa- 
sionally affected the orchestra! 
ensemble, although the open- 
ing exposition had been 
impressively beefy. One won- 
dered. though, whether the big 
string section precipitated the 
problems: was Bold simply 
trying to compete in volume? 


"THE RSC HAS TRIUMPHED. BRAVO! 



BARBICAN THEATRI 

01.628 8795/638 8891 


TROlLUSaCRESSIDX 

'THE ACTING IS STEELY AND BRILLIANT' 




V 

I ■ 




16 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


MoD accused 
of massive 
overspending 

By Sheila Cano, Political Staff 


The Ministry of Defence 
overspent by £938 million on 
12 major defence contracts 
and paid out more than £200 
million on a further seven 
projects which were later can- 
celled. Sir Gordon Downey. 
Comptroller and Auditor 
General, reported yesterday . 

In one case, costs rose by as 
much as 232 per cent because 
of underestimating research 
and development costs. 

Sir Gordon's report, which 
will go to the Commons' all- 
party public accounts commit- 
tee. discloses a long history of 
massive overspending on the 
annual £9.000 million defence 
equipment budget. It is 
particularly critical of the 
failure of MoD officials to 
control rising development 
costs, and is expected to lead 
to fresh demands by MPs for 
better checks on projects. 

Sir Gordon examined in 
detail !2 of the most expen- 
sive defence projecis. includ- 
ing the Nimrod airborne early 
warning system, the Bales 
artillery target system the Sea 
Eagle ami-ship missile, the 
Harrier GR5 advanced jump- 
jet. the SP70 self-propelled 
howitzer, the Javelin anti- 
aircraft missile, the Ptarmigan 
mobile communications sys- 
tem. and the Tornado Recce 
aircraft. 

He also found that the 
cancellation of seven projects, 
including the Sea Dan Mark 2 
missile, cost more than £200 
million. 

The Nimrod system was an 
excellent example of the weak- 
nesses in controlling the cost 



Sir Gordon Donnie cost 
control weaknesses. 


of large defence projects. In 
spite of eight years of develop- 
ment it is still a long way off 
completion. Sir Gordon said. 

GEC Avionics has until the 
beginning of September to 
demonstrate it can solve the 
problems with the Nimrod 
system. In the meantime, the 
MoD is examining seven bids 
to supply an advanced early* 
warning system. 

Sir Gordon said that the 
decision to continue with the 
development of Nimrod 
"proved a particularly expen- 
sive option”. 

“Although it is the largest 
and most complex avionics 
system procured by the RAF, 
the compressed programme, 
with a tack of clearly defined 
stages subject to review before 
further progression, and with 
significant overlap of develop- 
ment and production, made 
little allowance for possible 
delays and difficulties.” he 
said. 

Underestimating the cost of 
correcting the software prob- 
lems in new equipment gave 
rise to big increases in some 
projects, such as the Bates and 
Ptarmigan systems. Other rea- 
sons given for the overspend- 
ing were over-optimism by 
contractors and poor cost- 
conlrol. 

"Another source of delay 
found in seven of the cases 
examined was interruptions in 
the availability of funds, 
mainly arising from the 
MoD's moratorium on de- 
fence expenditure in 1980-81, 
but also from their re-assess- 
ments of priorities within the 
equipment budget”. 

Among these seven projecis 
were Bates. Sea Eagle, Ptar- 
migan and Nimrod. 

Sir Gordon said that at- 
tempts by the MoD to tighten 
up control of large equipment 
projects after criticism from 
the public accounts commit- 
tee had only a limited effect. 

He said that proper mon- 
itoring had been hampered by 
staff shortages. 

Control ana Management of the 
Development of Major Equip- 
ment. Report by the Comp- 
troller and Auditor General: 
MoD (HMSO £4.50). 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 
Prince Michael of Kent at- 
tends the 13th FA I World 
Acrobatic Championships. 
Duke of Gloucester Barracks. 
South Ccrncy. Cirencester. 
Glos. 1 1. 

New exhibitions 
Maij an Horniozi: paintings 
and drawings: Newcastle Poly- 
technic Gallery. Library Build- 
ing. Sandyford Lane: Mon to 
Thurv 10 to h. FriandSat I0to4 
lends Sept 5 1. 

Exhibitions in progress 

Durham University: it's tea- 
ching. research, history and 
student life: The Exhibition 
Hall. Palace Green. Durham 




City; Mon to Sat II to 4. Sun 2 
10 4 (ends Aug 3 1 ). 

20lh century drawings: works 
by ariists of the British School: 
Octagon Gallery. Fiizwilliam 
Museum. Cambridge: Tues to 
-Sat 2 to 5. Sun 115 to 5 (ends 
Sept 28). 

Kelims. jewellery and carv- 
ings from Central .Asia: The 
Read Mollcno Gallery. The 
Buildings. Broughton. Stock- 
bridge: Wed to Sun 10.30 to 6 
lends Sept 14). 

Bath's Secret Gardens: photo- 
graphs by Peter Woloszynski: 
National Centre of Photog- 
raphy. Milsom St. Bath: Mon to 
Sun 4.30 to 5.30 (ends Aug 31). 

Crafts for every day. Fal- 
mouth Art Gallery. Municipal 
Offices: Mon to Fri 10 to 5 (ends 
Aug 15). 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,123 



This puzzle c< <m pined within JO minute > by W per cent of the 
crmpcnttirs ji the /vWo London A regional ji mil of the Collins Dic- 
nonario Tunes Crossword Championship . 


ACROSS 

1 Work by explorer, presum- 
ably a pot -boiler? (8). 

5 Place in grave situation (6). 

10 Unsound religious scholar 
caughi in drink (5). 

11 He lakes up new craft, but 
may be dropped after a trial 
14.51. 

12 Direction in additional set 
of rules for key communica- 
tion l >.4>. 

13 Old city a centre for both 
sides of the country 1 5). 

14 Fed by a river of gold (7). 

16 Nippers making regular 

journeys (61. 

19 The Iree god in Masonry i(S). 

21 Plant to carry home in the 
back scat (7 1.' 

23 Test casual worker before 
end of shift (5). 

25 Treacherous lieutenant to 
be incarcerated in dungeon 
( u ). 

27 Churchman who acts in a 
Russian way" (9). 

28 Goose without a tail died — 
bury il (5). 

29 It's nothing, perhaps, after 
the example of Sir Wil- 
loughby Patterned). 

30 Contract to have on woollen 
garments (8). 

DOWN 

1 Shakespearian female has 
occult power over Scotsman 
(Si. 

2 Military instruction for 
those who want peace (5.4). 


3 Lines by a woman to note 
i5». 

4 Beaten, due to no fault (7). 

6 You can't stay here dipping 
gingerbread in strong beer! 
1 2.7). 

7 "The giver of lhe glad eye" - 
line in Kings (5). 

8 Kind of neck liable to ar- 
terial obstruction (6). 

9 Out to please, perhaps (6). 

15 Ritual washing arranged in 

Biisuio lake 19). 

17 Up a hill on a plateau crops 
are this (9). 

18 Climber has an upright 
character (8). 

20 Bird that is identified as a 
greenhorn 16). 

21 Strong man about to live as 
a lama, maybe (7). 

22 Obstacle 10 putting oneself 
firsilb). 

24 Special bread for a master at 
weight-lifting (5). 

26 Pan time entertainer too 
lifeless (S). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,122 

is 






President Castro (left) as the long-serving leader of Cuba applauding at a Havana ceremony and (right) after taking power in 1959. 

The man in Havana celebrates 60 years 


From Mohs in Ali 
Washington 

Fidel Castro, the revolu- 
tionary who, as a young man, 
overthrew Cuba's dictator and 
in the process shook the world, 
celebrates his 60th birthday 
today. 

The cigar-smoking, bearded 
president started the revolu- 
tionary movement against the 
pro-United States Batista 
dictatorship on July 26, 1953. 
It achieved power on January 
1, 1959, when Batista fled the 
country. 

Castro has transformed 
Cuba from virtual dependence 
on the United States into a 
communist nation, closely al- 
lied with Moscow 1 , and a 
leading advocate of Third 
World revolutionary causes. 

When he began advocating 
revolution in Latin America, 
relations with Washington 
worsened. And after Cuba 
established foil diplomatic 
relations with Moscow in 


I960, the US broke off its ties 
with Havana. 

A Washington-supported 
invasion force of Cuban emi- 
gres landed in Cuba on April 
17, 1961. The mam body was 
defeated at the Bay of Pigs and 
mopped up by April 20. 

The US then imposed a total 
embargo against Cuba. 

In 1962 the US faced a 
major confrontation with the 
Soviet Union over Cuba, dur- 
ing which the world stood on 
the edge of a midear war. 

President Kennedy ordered 
a US navy blockade of Cuba 
from October 22 to November 
22. He forced Mr Nikita 
Khrushchev, the Soviet leader, 
to give op his plan to place 
missiles in Cuba, less than 1 00 
miles from the US mainland. 

The era is was resolved 
when Mr Khrushchev agreed 
to dismantle the rockets. 
Shortly afterwards Castro was 
made a hero of the Soviet 
Union. 

Castro, usually dressed in 


olive-green battle fatigues, 
continued to make world head- 
lines by horting colourful 
abase at successive US admin- 
istrations and sending troops 
to fight for . revolutionary 
movements abroad. 

In 1975 Castro sent about 
20,000 crack troops to Angola 
to bolster the Marxist govern- 
ment which had just won 
independence from Portugal 
ami was fighting insurgents 
that were supported by the US 
and South Africa. 

The US accused Castro of 
acting as a Soviet surrogate in 
Africa bat be insisted that the 
decision to intervene was 
purely Coin's. 

In 1979 Castro underlined 
his position as a leading voice 
of the Third World by presid- 
ing over the summit of the non- 
aligned movement in Havana. 

He has been the leading 
supporter of the Sandinista 
Government in Nicaragua, 
supplying arms, military 
advisers and training. Presi- 


dent Reagan has also accused 
him of hacking left-wing 
guerrillas in other central 
American coon tries. 

In October 1983, US-led 
forces invaded the small 
Caribbean bland of Grenada 
shortly after the left-wing 
Prime Minister, Maurice 
Bishop, was killed in a coop by 
other Marxists. 

President Reagan said a 
. Soviet-Cnban colony was be- 
ing readied there as “a mili- 
tary bastion to export terror 
and undermine democracy'*. 

The sense of dissatisfaction 
felt by many Cubans after a 
generation of Castro's rale was 
seen in 1980 when about 
125,000 Cabans fled the coon- 
try in boats. 

Among them were many 
lunatics and common crim- 
inals sent ont by Castro. A 
recent book by a former 
political prisoner has detailed 
the very harsh conditions in 
Cuban jails. Castro has 
particularly persecuted politi- 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Concise Crossword page 10 
/ 


Mixed arts and crafts: Frome 
Museum. I North Parade. 
Frame: Mon to Sat 10 to 4, 
closed Thors (ends Aug 29). 

Tierra’ y' Libertad: photo- 
graphs of Mexico 1900-1935: 
Collins Gallery. Strathclyde 
University. 22 Richmond Su 
Glasgow: Mon to Fri 10 to 5. Sat 
12 to 4 (ends Aug 23). 

23rd summer exhibilion: 
works by 75 gallery artists: Colin 
Jcllicoe Gallery. 82 Portland St, 
Manchester; Mon to Fri 10 to 6, 
Sat I to 5 (ends Sept 1 3). 

William Barnes of Dorset: 
poet, painter, scholar and artist; 
Dorset County Museum. High 
Sl Dorchester, Mon to Fri 10 to 
5. Sat 10 to I and 2 to 5 (ends 
Oct 4). 

Hand Signals: works by vari- 
ous artists around the theme of 
hands: Peterborough Museum 
and Art Gallery. Priesigaie; 
Tues to Sat 12 to $ (ends Aug 
16). 

Music 

Recital by Mary Beverley 
(soprano) and Adrian Hobbs 
(piano): Sheriff Hutton Parish 
Church. 4. 

• Organ recital by Dr Townhilt: 
St Mary's Cathedral. Palmer- 
ston Place. Edinburgh, 6. 

Recital by Steven Isetiis 
(cello) and Jeremy Menuhin 
(piano): Ambleside Parish 
Church. 8. 

Harrogate International Festi- 
val: Recital by the Academy of 
St Martin m-lhe-Fields and 
Lynn Harrell (cello): Royal Hall. 
Harrogate. 8. 

Concert by (he Guildhall 
Camera ta: Pump Roam. Bath. 
8 . 

Organ recital by Jonathan 
Rennert: Norwich Cathedral. 8. 

Organ recital by Norman 
Pope: Brighton Parish Church. 
St Peter's. York Place. 8. 

Organ recital by Andrew 
Teague: .All Saints Church. 
Ryde. Isle of Wight. 8. 

Talks, lectures 

A bywoman's guide to the 
galleries, by Annete Wilson: 
Castle Museum. Nottingham. I. 

World of the red deer, by w R 
Mitchell: Lake District National 
Park Visitor Centre. Brockhole. 
Windermere, 1 JO. 

General 

Mask workshop for 9 to 15 
year olds, with Sue Morley: 
Niccol Centre. Brewery Court. 
Cirencester. Glos. 10 to 4. 

Historic lutes, guitars and 
similar instruments: a lecture 
recital, by Harvey Hope: 
Howsbam Hall. N Yorks. 8. 

Ventnor Main Carnival Pro- 
cession: childrens' procession. 
Dudley Rd. Ventnor. 2: Main 
Procession. Dudley Rd. Vent- 
mu-. Isle of Wight. 7. 

Sandown fey Regaua: water 
sports, racing, children's com- 
petitions. and firework display. 
Seafront. Sandown. Isle of 
Wight. 10 to 9.30. 

Hayling Carnival '86: floats 
and procession, funfair and 
firework display: Legion Field. 

fling Island. 


New books — hardback 


The Deputy Literary Editor's selection of interesting books published tUs 

My Appointment with the Muse, Essays and Lectures, by Paul Scott 
(Heinemann. £14.95) 

The CoBected Letters of Joseph Conrad, Volume 2 1898-1902 (CUP. 
£27.50) 

Shefley’s Venomed Melody, by Norah Crook and Derek Guiton (CUP. £25) 
The brtetfigent Traveler's Grade to Historic Scotland, by Pimp A Crawl 
(Sidgwick & Jackson, £12L95) 

WBtiam MarshaB, The Rower of Chrvaby, by Georges Duty (Faber. £9.95) 
Ids Murdoch. The Sant and The Artist, by Peter Conradi (Macmfitan, 
£27.50} 

The Last Dalai Lama, by Mtehael Harris Goodman (Sidgwick & Jackson, 
£15) 

The Character Factory. Baden-Powefl and the Origins of the Boy Scout 
Movement, by Michael Rosenthal (Colins. £15) 

T heA nn^and the Currajpt Incid en t, 1914, ecuted by tan Beckett (Bod ley 

Walter Wilson: Portrait of an In v e n t o r , by AGordon WBson (Duckworth, 
£12.95) MS 


The pound 


Amnia S 
Austria Sch 
Belgian Ft 
Canada* 
Denmark Kr 
Finland Mkk 
France Fr 
Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 
HongKoog* 
tretaadPt 
Katy Lira 
Japan Van 
Netherlands GU 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
SwodenKr 

Sw i t z er la nd FT 
USA* 

Yugoslavia Dor 


Bank 

2250 
6620 
2.12 
11 .94 
7.77 
1035 
021 
211X0 
1180 
1.1 45 
2205.00 
242X0 
3X1 
1M1 

99Ktlt I 
5X0 
20&50 
10.71 
2X0 
1X45 
6 3 0 X 0 


Bank 

Sells 

241 

21X0 

63X0 

2X3 

11X4 

7X7 

9XS 

3X4 

109X0 

11X0 

1X85 

228X0 

3X2 

10X1 

213X0 

4X0 

195X0 

10.16 

246 

1X75 

58000 


lerant rates apply to travellers* 
foreign c u rrency 


Rams for smaa denonwaaon bank notes 
only as suppled by Barclays Bank PLC. 
□ilierent rates ap f “ * 
cheques and other 
Durness. 

Reran Price Index: 3852 

London: The FT Index closed up 133 at 
12422. 


Roads 


Tower Bridge* 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 3pm and 6.45pm. 


The Midlands: MI: Con- 
traflow at junction 20 
(A427/Luiterwonh); only two 
lanes in both directions. 

Wales and West AS: Long 
delays due td Anglesey Show at 
the Mona Airfield; alternative 
route signposted for Holyhead 
for ferry passengers. A30*. Tem- 
porary traffic lights between 
Launceston and Okehampton. 
A36: Temporary traffic lights 
causing delays at Limpley Stoke, 
Wilts. 

The North: M6: Rebuilding 
work could cause delays in both 
directions between junctions 32 
and 33 (M55/Lancaster). A6: 
Repairs to a bridge at tbe 
junction of Chorley Rd with 
Monside Rd. Swinton. Greater 
Manchester local diversions. 
Al: Carriageway repairs N of 
the Testo’s roundabout causing 
delays. 

Scotland: M90: Northbound 
carriageway closed between 
Gaimey Bridge and Kinross; 
contraflow. AI: Possible delays 
at East Linton Bridge. Lothian. 
Glasgow: Queen Si dosed be- 
tween Arglye St and Si Vincents 
Sl; local diversions. 

Information supplied by AA 


6 am to midnight 


(i . 

Outlook for tomorrow and Friday: 
Cloudy at first with some rain but 
brighter showery weather extending 
to a* areas tomorrow. Sunny inter- 
vals and showers on Friday. Near 
normal temperatures, becoming 
rather cool in the N. 


SonriMK Sub. iota: 
5.42 am 8X8 pm 


Legion Rd. Hayling 
10. 


I to 


Anniversaries 


Binhs: Sir George Grove, 
Editor of Dictionary of Music 
and Musicians. London. 1820; 
John Ireland, composer. Bow- 
don. Cheshire. 1879; John Logie 
Baird, pioneer of television. 
Helensburgh. 1888. 

Deaths: Sir John Millais. 
London. 1896: Florence Night- 
ingale. London. 1910: 

Wells. London. 1946. 



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u 

Moon rises: Moon oafs 

3.15 pm 11.13pm 
First quartan 3X1 am 


Lighting-up time 


London 8X8 pm to 5.14 am 
Bristol 0X7 pm to 524 am 
Bdmburgb 925 pm to 5.11 am 
Manchester 9.12 pm to 5.16 am 
Penzance 9.15 pm to 5X0 am 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c. 
doud: f. tarn r. ran: s. suft. 

C F G F 

Belfast c 17 83 Guernsey c 18 64 

Eftnxrfura c 16 81 Inverness ( 13 55 

Blackpool C 17 63 jersey c 17 63 

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Seabird scheme 


A leaflet on how public co- 
operation can help protect 
Britain's' second rarest seabird, 
tbe little tern, has been pro- 
duced by the Royal Society for 
lhe Protection of Birds. Roped 
off beaches and special war- 
dening schemes set up by the 
RSPB have halted the decline in 
numbers. Utile terns and their 
nests, eggs arid young are pro- 
tected by special penalties under 
the Wildlife and Countryside 
Act 1981. 

Copies of the leaflet can be 
obtained from the RSPB. Spe- 
cies Protection Dept. The 
Lodge. Sandy. Beds, SGI 9 2DL 
(enclose s-a.e). 


NEWSPAPERS UMTTED. 


_ . _ _ . Kited by Loocon Post (Prlnl- 
erai. Limited of I Virginia Street, 
London El 9100 Wednesday. August 


cal dissidents, homosexuals 
and former landlords. 

Castro has often claimed 
that in tbe past he was the 
target of US-backed 
assassination attempts. Ha- 
vana has alleged that the 
Central Intelligence Agency 
(CIA) had planned to poison 
shellfish, give Castro explod- 
ing cigars and give him a 
substance to make bis beard 
fall out 

Despite moves to improve 
relations under President Car- 
ter. US-Cuban contacts now 
remain as frosty as ever. 
President Reagan is planning 
to issue an order to tighten the 
trade embargo and stop Cu- 
bans emigrating to the US 

Castro's marriage in 1948 to 
Mirta Diaz Balart was dis- 
solved in 1955. 

In 1985 be confirmed that 
his brother Rani, who is six 
years, younger and has held 
many leading • posts in tbe 
party and government, would 
succeed him. 


Pretoria 
rejects 
ruling on 
detainees 

Continued from page 1 

release from jail of Mr 
Lcchcsa Tsenoli. the Naial 
publicity secretary of ihe 
United Democratic From 
(UDF). on whose behalf the 
cose was brought. 

His release was not con- 
tested b> the state, which, legal 
experts here say. thereby ac- 
cepted that his detention was 
unlawful. It remains to be 
seen, however, whether the 
courts will take ihe view that 
all emergency detentions are 
now unlawful. 

The essence of the Durban 
ruling is that President P.W. 
Botha exceeded his authority 
under the Public Safety Act of 
1953, the law which provides 
for a State of Emergency by 
giving unrestricted powers of 
arrest and detention to the 
Minister of Law and Order 
and the police. 

If more detainees are or- 
dered to be released by the 
courts, the Government could 
re-arresi them under separate 
permanent security legisla- 
tion. which provides for 
detention without trial for up 
to 180 days. 




Hunt for ship 
after 152 
refugees found 

Continued from page 1 

mostly Hindus, are estimated 
to have fled the country* over 
the past three years alleging 
discrimination in the wake ot 
ihe Tamil separatists' guerilla 
campaign for an independent 
homeland for the minority 
community. 

• OTTAWA: According to 
reports, the refugees arranged 
their passages through an 
Indian agency. The ship is 
believed to be either Chinese 
or Korean. The Sri Lankan 
High Commissioner in Ot- \ s 
lawa, Gen Tissa Weeratunga, 
declined to be interviewed on 
the bizarre episode (John Best 
writes). 

New coach 

Plymouth Argyle have ap- 
pointed Siewan Houston, the • 
former Manchester United and 
Scotland defender, as their new 
coach to replace Martin Harvev. ;.,i 

iilh* 1 • 


Weather 

forecast 

A ridge of high pressure 
over £ districts will move 
away as a trough to the W 
of the UK moves into W 
areas during the day. 


London, SE, E England, East 
Angia: Dry with sunny periods but 
cloudier during the evening: wind 
light variable at first becoming S to 
SW; max temp ZAC (75F). 

Central S, central N, NE England, 
Mkflands, Channel islands: Dry 
with sunny periods at first becom- 
ing cloudy later with some rain 
during the evening: wind S to SE. 
fight becoming moderate; max 
temp 22C (72F). 

SW, KW England, Wales, Lake 
District Cloudy, outbreaks of rain 
spreadng from W; wind S, light to 
moderate, increasing to fresh; max 
temp 20C (68F). 

Isle of Man, SW, NE Scotland, 
Glasgow, Central Highlands, Ar- 
gyll, Northern Ire la nd: Cloudy, 
occasional rain tocafty heavy with 
hift fog: wind S. fresh or strong; max 
tamp 16C (61 F). 

Borders, E d in bu rgh, Dundee ^ 
Aberdeen, Moray Firth, NE Scot- 
land: Cloudy with outbreaks of rain, 
heavy at times, spreading from W; 
wind S, moderate to fresh; max 
teirnp 18C(64F). 

Orkney, Shetland: Fair at first 
with some sunshine, becoming 
doudy later; wind SE, light incraas- 
1 — to moderate; max temp 16C 



Sl)*! 


'alls 



High Tides 


TODAY 
London Bridge 


Avonmouth 


Canflff 

Dave np ort 

Dover 

Fsmoufti 

Glmsqom 


Sr— 

Wrecwntoe 

Loath 

Liverpool 

Lowestoft 


WHuf sky; be -Hue iky end cloud: c- 
efoudy: ©-overcast: t log: d-drtzzJe. h 
hail: mlsi mtu. rraui: 9-snow, ut- 
thunderstorm: p-siiowers. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 
sp eed imotn circled. Temp o ral ure 
centigrade. 


Wford Haven 

Newquay 

Oban 

Penzance 

Portland 

Portsmouth 

Shorohara 

Southampton 

Swansea 

fleas 

WTton-on-Nze 
Tide measured 


AM 

KT PM 

HT 

7.31 

62 725 

63 

704 

3J 7J3 

35 

12.30 

11.6 1253 

109 

4.53 

3.4 520 

30 

1215 

10.7 12.38 

102 

11 16 

4.7 11.40 

4.7 

439 

5.8 5.04 

59 

1046 

4.5 11.10 

45 

6.08 

4.B 644 

42 

532 

35 642 

as 

333 

60 424 

47 i 


1224 

65 

1148 

76 


829 

5.0 926 

4.7 

4.45 

8 4 520 

89 

326 

22 320 

22 

5.41 

43 5.48 

4.4 


12.06 

58 

11.04 

52 11.33 

59 

11.30 

3.1 11.56 

32 

1029 

4.7 10.55 

47 

12.06 

1.7 1225 

15 

5.05 

4.1 5.41 

42 

4.37 

52 612 

51 

434 

42 5.12 

4.1 


1211 

82 

934 

42 10.19 

44 1 

5.30 

68 642 

32 


1 S 


In metres: 1nfc&28O0& 


V r,i 


Around Britain 


EAST COAST 


5unRaln 
■nrs In 


BridBngton - .18 

Cramer - .15 

Lowestoft x 

Ctacton ZZ .48 

Mairato x .06 

■SOUTH COAST 


Max 

C F 

16 61 ctoudy 
13 55 doudy 
10 68 doudy 


Fo&estone 


Eastbourne 

Brighton 
Worthing 
LMetanpto 
BognorR 
Southsea 
So nd o wn 
Shankfin. 

Du i mti nmlh 

Doumemm 
Poate 

Swsnago 

Weymouth 
Exmouth 

Teignmouth 
Torquay 
Falmouth 
Penzance 
Jersey as 

Guernsey 23 

WEST COAST 
Scfltyfales SO 

Newquay 1.1 


5.7 M 
3.1 .07 
2.9 .02 

4.7 - 

1 4 . 

1.0 .Ot 
15 - 

55 - 

4 3 xn 


18 84 tfwnder 
IB B4 founder 

18 64 doudy 
21 70 sunny 

19 66 bright 
10 86 bnght 
19 66 surmy 
19 66 sunny 

19 66 sunny 

20 88 sunny 

19 66 bright 

20 68 
20 68 
20 68 

19 66 

20 88 
20 68 
20 68 
10 88 
19 66 
19 66 
19 66 


Sun Ram Max 

hrs in C F 
Wtaeombe * .12 19 66 

Tenby 43 .68 19 66 

ColwynBay - 16 61 

Mere ca mbo 1.5 - 15 58 

Douglas - .01 14 57 

ENGLA10 AND WALES 
London 
B*ham Akpt 
Bristol (CM) 

CtaSttJCW) 


«amy 

ran 

doudy 

onzzfo 

drizzle 


sunny 

doudy 

bnght 

sunny 

doudy 

doudy 

bngm 

sunny 

bngm 

doudy 

tmght 


17 63 bright 
19 66 ctoudy 


Manc hes ter 
Nottingham 
{fctt-is-Tyne 

Cattish 

SCOTLAND 
Exkdate m ug 8 2 
Prcshricfc 
Glasgow 
Urea 

Storno way 
L enripfc 
Wide 
Kfokws 

Aberdeen 

St Andrews 9.8 
Edinburgh 114 

NQRTHBW IRELAND 
Battest x 


1.1 

.28 

20 

68 

doudy 

1 ’• i 


25 

15 

59 

rain 

1 

3.4 

22 

51 

.02 

20 

19 

86 

66 

bright 

bright 


0.1 


18 

64 

doudy 


• 

- 

15 

59 

du* 


- 

.01 

15 

59 

ran 


_ 

.50 

13 

55 

rain 


i a 


16 

61 

onghi 


5.5 

- 

18 

61 

sumy 

• Sl -u «i . . 


123 - 

9.1 

3.0 .08 
22 - 
0.4 - 

11.8 - 
7.8 - 

13J9 - 


17 63 
20 68 
19 66 
17 63 

15 50 
12 54 

14 -57 

16 61 
ifi 64 

15 59 

16 61 


sunny 

sunny 

trey 

hngtt 

doudy 

doudy 

weny 

sunny 

8UTPW 

sunny 

sreoy 


are Monday's figure* 


Abroad 


Afacdo 

AJooriri 

Atertfeto 

Alatv* 

ArasTOm 


C F 


C F 

30« 


Bsrbeds* 
BaraiiH 
Belnit 


r m n s 31 88 Rome 4 30 66 

i w S EiE? * 24 Setxbura ft i* g 

c ir m ***“ s 33 91 S Panto* C 3> £ 

* §3 f 10 50 S Frisco* C 17 g 

I ® ESS? 0 ’* 19 ® Santiago* 0 M 57 

t 30 88 Seoul f2$2 

• 30 86 Mkan f 27 Bl Sunrtw * 

r *T 70 Momraar f 22 72 I8&55 

c 23 73 Stresti'ig 
e 18 5« Sydney 


Bourne I 
Bctde-x 


B Aires* 

Cairo 

CapeTn 

Cbianca 

Chicago* 

Cn-chtth' 


f 24 75 Moscow* 

c XI MMtorid, 
a 27 81 Nakott 
1 16 61 N autoil 
e 29 64 NlSS 
ft 18 64 NYoil!* 

® 31 88 Nk»^ ■ 
« 37 99 <>*»„ 

* 20 68 Pail, 

1 30 66 Pekfoo* 
c 23 73 ESI. 


T 29 84 Corfu 
S 34 93 Dublin 
f 19 66 Outovnk 
s 34 03 Fore 
s 38100 Ftoranee 
c 29 84 Fra nk f o rt 
s 26 79 Funchal 
Geneva 
s 33 91 GtoreltBr 

.C 20 68 Helsinki 

Bermuda* s 30 86 HangK 
I 22 72 Innstxck 
C 18 64 Istanbul 
( 23 73 Jeddah 
C 19 66 JO*faorq* 
a 31 88 Karachi 
s 12 54 L Palmas 
S 34 93 Lisbon 
s 19 66 Locarno 
( 23 73 I irremlju 
s 22 ~ ■ *- 

-ssssmomT,; 


c 23 73 Tangier 
s 32 SO Td Mr 
■ 31 88 Tanertte 
r 28 82 Tokyo 
s 32 90 Toronto* 

9 19 66 Tuds 
c 20 68 Valencia 
s 30 86 VancVeT .C » s 
I 12 54 Venice > 29 £ 
C IS 64 Vienna 


f 

1 'IS 

o 19 » 
s 15 » 

:?S 

,'SE 

s 36 S 
ISB-S 

17 6? 


v *Uk- 


68 Inrwnu e is » e is w Vienna t *1 5 

73 i e tb ri bEH* r 9 48 Waraow ■ t 24 » 

72 LfoSta* t 21 to RhS? * 31 88 WoahW e # ^ 

46. Madid s aiioa WaTngV c T g 

* denotes MqtxW, TL ^ s 25 77 Zurich c 17 


« « e « 9 ? sl 


17 




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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 


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[?ritai n 


■ t *r ‘ s 

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TIMES 


SPORT 30 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 33 


WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


' h?- 2? 

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STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share ■ 
1242.0 (+13.3) ; 

Ff-SE 100 ' 
1558.2 (+15.4) 

Bargains - . 
20816 

USM (Datastream) 
120.29 (+0.11) ■ 

THE POUND 


US Dollar . 

1.4845 (same) 

W German mark 

3.0840 (+0.0267) 

Trade-weighted 
71 .4 (+0.3) 


Protection 
fund up 

Lloyd's insurance market 
revealed yesterday that the 
earmarking of the central 
fund. which is for 
policyholders' protection, had 
risen to ,£238- million from 
£225 million previously. The 
fund itself stands at' £260 
million.. 

An extra £10 million of the 
earmarking related to syn- 
dicate 970. which is being 
taken over by AUA3. the 
manager of the former PCW 
syndicates. A further £3 mil- 
lion was . to. cover non-PCW 
names' liabilities. 

Lloyd's also published yes- 
terday the results of the Davis 
inquiry into the management 
of the PCW syndicates from 
December. 1982 to June. 
1985, -when they were pan. of 
Richard Beckett Underwriting 
Agencies. 

' No Fraud, page 18 



societies 
record 
£1.1 bn in market 



Profits soar 

CM Firth, the 1 steel stock- 
holding company, more, than 
doubled profits from £950.000 
to £2.48 million in the year to 
March 31. Turnover rose from 
£21 million to £50 million and 
the final dividend is up from 
0.22p to 0.55p. 

. . Tem p us, page 18 

Drinks cheer 

Matthew Clark and Sons, the 
wine and spirits company, 
reported pretax profit up 1 1.6 
percent to £6-6 million for the 
year to. April 30 on turnover 
up 14 per cent TbedrvkJend 
was increased by Ip to 8p. 

Tempos, page 18 

Analyst quits 

Mr Bill Dixon, the head of 
Smith New Courts team of 
electronics analysts, is leaving 
to join Merrill Lynch, the 
American brokerage house. 
His departure follows .eight 
other defections from Smith 
New Court. 

Swedish stake 

Skandia Insurance UK, a 
subsidiary' of the. Swedish 
insurance company, and two 
Swedish businessmen have 
taken a combined 20 per cent 
slake in Octavian Group, the 
Lloyd's of London 
underwriters. 

Blythe spirits 

Johnson Matthey an- 
nounced yesterday it is ceasing 
the manufacture and sale of 
Blythe Burrell Colours classi- 
cal pigments ranges and has an 
agreement with Ciba Geigy to 
complete any outstanding or- 
ders and lake over the manu- 
facture and supply of the 
products. 

Share payout 

Liquidators ' of Hongkong 
(Selangor) Rubber are paying 
out £3-25 a share after the 
settlement of tax liabilities 
and the realization of part of 
its investments. 


Tempos 18 foreign Em* 19 
WaJIStree* 18 Traded Opts 19 
Co News 1 R 77 Unit Trusts 20 
Comment 19 Commodities 20 
Stock Market 19 L'SM Prices 20 
Money Mrftfs 19 Share Prices 21 


Building societies commit- 
ted *a record amount to 
bomebuyers last month, but 
were forced to borrow more 
than ever before on wholesale 
money markets to makeup for. 
a continuing sluggish inflow of 
funds from investors, figures, 
published yesterday by the 
Building Societies Association 
showed. 

The figures also revealed 
that the number of loan 
repayments in arrears, pub- 
lished for the first time this 
month, had reached their 
highest ever level in the first 
half of this year. Out of a total 
of 6.9 million /bans outstand- 
ing at the end of June. 53.130 
were six to twelve months in 
arrears, compared with 49,630 
in the previous six months. 

Net inflows from retail 
deposits rose to £387 million 
m July compared with £177 
million the month before: Mr 
Richard Weir, secretary-gen- 
eral of the BSA, said:‘Tbe 
improvement reflects seasonal 
factors and more competitive 
rates being paid by societies. 
However, net receipts remain 


By Onr City Staff 

.well below the desired level." 

The industry hopes to take 
in about £800 million a month 
during most of the year 

The demand for mortgages 
remained high, with societies 
lending a total of £3.9 billion 
during July, with net new 
commitments of £4 billion — a 
record for a single month!, 

' But building societies 
turned to wholesale money 
markets more than ever before 
to fund the growth in lending. 
Their net borrowing from 
alternative sources of funds 
amounted to £1.1 billion. The 
previous highest monthly 
borrowing from money mar- 
kets this year was £463 million 
in March. The previous high- 
est monthly total was last 
December when societies bor- 
rowed a net £9 1 7 million. 

Retail inflows are tradition- 
ally slack during the summer 
as money is withdrawn to pay 
for new cars and holidays. 
Some societies said that their 
inflows had improved consid- 
erably in August and that the 
industry would Jake in around 
twice July's net retail receipts. 
But the reliance on whoiseale 


funding is likely to remain 
high in the near future as retail 
inflows are hit by investors 
withdrawing deposits to buy 
shares in the Trustee Savings 
Bank, to be floated next 
month, and British Gas.* 

The Halifax. Britain's larg- 
est building society, said that 
although competition among 
societies was intense in lend- 
ing and borrowing money, 
there was unlikely to be any 
change in mortgage rates in 
the next few months. It said 
that borrowing from the 
wholesale markets was a tem- 
porary expedient to iron out 
fluctuations in retail receipts. 

The BSA calculated that' 
house prices had risen by 17.8 
per cent by June this year, but 
the figure was probably dis- 
torted by changes in lending 
terms during the year. The 
BSA said that, allowing for the 
changes, the underlying in- 
crease in house prices over the 
first six months of the year 
was closer to 13 per cent 
During the first six months 
of the year 13,800 loans were 
more than 12 months in 
arrears. 


Dow Jones Industrial I Nikkei Dow Jones 



Sears bids TSB plans loyalty 
^Ldsure S bonus for investors 


By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


By Teresa Poole 

Blacks Leisure Group, the 
troubled camping and sports 
equipment retailer, was yes- 
terday saved from the brink of 
receivership by an agreed £3.3 
million bid .by Sears, the 
Selfridges and shoe shops 
group. 

The offer has the backing of 
shareholders for 30.4 per cent 
of the shares. The company 
said that, without the Sears 
bid or other .firm proposals, 
the directors believed that 
Blacks would be unable to 
continue trading. 

The company- added: ^Tn 
these circumstances it is most 
unlikely that there would be 
any return of funds to the 
ordinary or preference 
shareholders.” 

Results.- published yes- 
terday for the year to March 1, 
show pretax losses of £1.64 
million, compared with a 
£4,8.1 million loss in the 
previous 16 months. Net as- 
sets at the year end show a 
deficiency or £600.000 and net 
borrowings had reached £2.8 
million. There is no final 
dividend. 

The terms of the offer are 
3.6p cash for each ordinary 
share and *150p for each 
preference share. The or- 
dinary shares fell by 3p to 4p. 
Last week, before a specu- 
lative rise in the share price to 
I I.5p prompted an announce- 
ment that the company was in 
takeover talks at well below 
the market .value of the com- 
pany. the middle market price 
was 6.5p. 

Blacks has been struggling 
since it acquired the chain of 
Greenfields Leisure outlets 
through a reverse takeover in 
October. 1984. 

Soon afterwards it discov- 
ered that most of the stores 
were making losses and. when 
efforts to reduce costs were 
unsuccessful, the company 
was forced to sell all but four 
of the 66 Greenfields shops. 

It is intended that Blacks 
will join Sears’ existing Millets 
operations and Milletts opera- 
tions in the Foster retailing 
division, but it win continue 
to trade under its own name. 
No shop closures or jobs 
losses are planned. 


The Trustee Savings Bank 
yesterday laid out details of 
how it would persuade more 
than a million investors to buy 
its shares when the company 
is floated next month, includ- 
ing provisions for free shares 
and special allocations. 

Like the British Telecom 
share issue, there will be an 
incentive for investors to hold 
on to their shares rather than 
selling -for a quick profit. A 
loyalty bonus of one free share 
for every 10 shares held will be 
given to original investors 
who still have a stake three 
years after the flotation. 

A maximum amount of 
£5.000 worth of shares is being 
set on the bonus. The TSB is 
keen to prevent .slagging 
which became widespread on 
the BT share issue. - 

The bank is also copying BT 
in threatening to take legal 
action against anyone making 
multiple applications for 
shares. Peat, Marwick, Mitch- 
ell.' the chartered accountant, 
will be policing the system. 

However, employees and 
any customers who had ac- 
counts with the banks before 
December 17, 1984 will be 
allowed to apply for a mini- 
mum investment of £200 as 
“priority” applicants and can 
make a further application on 
non-priority forms. 

Half of the issue, which win 
amount to more than £1 
billion, is being set aside for 
employees and priority cus- 
tomers who will be assured of 
receiving shares even if the 
issue is oversubscribed. No 
specific amount of the issue is 
being set aside for institu- 
tional shareholders, the TSB 
said. 

The TSB’s 26.000 employ- 
ees registered on its payroll 
before June 1 will also auto- 
matically receive free £150 
worth of shares, but these will 
not be eligible for the one-for- 
ten loyalty bonus after three 
years. ' 

Eligible children under 16 
years old will qualify for 
priority and application can 
be made on their behalf by 
parents or guardians. 

All other ■ applicants will 
have to apply for a minimum 


of about £400 worth of shares. 
Payment for all applicants will 
be in two equal -parts — one 
this September and the other 
in about a year's time. 

Mr Richard Bing. TSB 
group communications con- 
troller, said: “By setting a low 
minimum level of investment 
we are seeking to give as many 
people as possible the chance 
to apply for TSB shares. 
Already over 1.1 million peo- 
ple have contacted the TSB 
Group share information of- 
fice. In all more than 1.7 
million have sought informa- 
tion on the offer and of these 
over L2. million have reg- 
istered for priority ” 

Sir John Read, the chair- 
man. said that 50 per cent of 
the adult population was now 
aware of the flotation com- 
pared with 31 percent in July, 
following intensive TSB 
advertising. The bank is plan- 
ning to spend about £30 
million in total on publicising 
and providing information on 
the launch. 

All investors win also bene- 
fit from reduced commissions 
arranged by the bank. On sales 
and purchases of shares worth 
less than £300. the dealing 
commission will be 1.65 per 
cenL On sales of £300 to £424, 
commission will cost £7 while 
on purchases of £300 to £606 
it will be £10. For sales 
between £425 and £7.000, and 
on purchases between £607 
and £7,000 the commission 
will be 1.6S per cenL 
The TSB is due to publish a 
“pathfinder” prospectus at-lbe 
end of this month, rapidly 
followed by publication of the 
full prospectus. The flotation 
is expected to take place on 
September 12. 

City analysts expect the 
flotation to be a resounding 
success even if it does not 
imitate the success of the BT 
issue when the share prices 
doubled within a month. The 
TSB flotation will the largest 
share issue ever launched by a 
private company on the Stock 
Exchange in this country and 
is expected to take in between 
£1 billion and £1.2 billion- 
which will go directly to the 
bank itself. 


Further surge for shares in 
London and New York 


The strength of the umbili- 
cal cord linking the world's 
'major stock markets was 
dearly shown yesterday as 
shares advanced strongly 
again on the London Stock 
Exchange after sharp gains in 
Tokyo and New Vork. 

‘ The FT-3Q share index rose 
133 points to 1,242.0 after a 
strong session on Wall Street 
which saw the Dow Jones 
industrial average climb 28.54 
points to 1,811.16, its biggest 
day's gain since May. 

Hopes over lower US in- 
terest rates helped shares on 
Wall Street, while further help 
for London equities came 
when Unilever, the chemicals 
group, announced better-than- 
expected interim results. 

Prices advanced across the 
board in a firm start to trading, 
although dealers said volumes 
were again low. The FT index 
has now advanced 243 points 
in the first two trading days of 
this week, hot it 1ms still some 


By Richard Lander 

way to go before recouping last 
week's record loss of more 
than 56 points, which took 
about £7 billion off equity 
values. 

On Far Eastern markets 
Tokyo shares benefited most 
from the Wall Street surge, 
with the Nikkei-Dow Jones 
average rcording its second 
biggest one-day rise. The in- 
dex finished up 31538 at 
17.794.69. 

The Singapore exchange 
closed higher as buyers contin- 
ued to fortify 1 the market 
throughout the day. Brokers 
said prices jumped throughout 
after news of the government's 
renewed efforts to help boost 
Singapore's economy. 

Australian shares saw a 
dramatic rumroiwd after the 
All-Ordinaries index was up 
56.4 points in response to Wall 
Street. Speculation about an 
impending gold tax and a 
decision by tbe US Congress 
to enact legislation to sell 


some US gold holdings helped 
to drive the share market, and 
the indicator finished down 4.7 
at 1.149.2. 

Much of the fall could be 
attributed to a sell-ofT among 
gold mines. At the start of 
trading the gold index was up 
almost 30 points, but by the 
close it was down 1 1.7 to 
1.141.1. 

Hong Kong also faded after 
a good start took the Hang 
Seng index above 1.930. The 
fall gathered momentum after 
a drop of 1! points around 
lunchtime, and the index 
closed down 22.04 points at 
1905.00. 

The pound traded firmly on 
the foreign exchange market, 
reflecting the recent strength 
of oil prices, closing steady 
against the dollar at $1.4845 
and adding around two pfen- 
nigs to DM3.0840. The ster- 
ling trade-weighted exchange 
index advanced 03 to close at 
71.4. 


Unilever 
rises 
to £513m 

By Alexandra Jackson 

Unilever, the Anglo-Dutch 
consumer goods 

conglomerate , is “increas- 
ingly confident about 1986 as 
a whole” following . the 
announcement of better than 
expected interim results for 
the six months to June 30 

Attention was. however, 
drawn to the foci that adverse 
exchange rate movements in 
■the second half could have a 
damaging effect on the results 
in future quarters. 

Pretax profits were 18 per 
cent higher at £513 million 
compared with £433 million 
last year. Turnover was down 
by 7 per cent at £7861 million 
against the 1985 figure of 
£8494 million. This reflected 
the effect of disposals and 
rationalization throughout the 
group as well as lower selling 
prices for certain products. 

Attributable profits rose by 
26 per cenubut it is not 
expected that this rate of 
improvement will be continue 
in the second half. 

Operating profits' in Europe 
rose by 9 per cent with the 
performance from Germany 
being particularly encourag- 
ing A provision was taken 
above the line in these results 
to take account of the 
restructuring of the meat busi- 
ness in the UK. 

North American profits 
moved up sharply, albeit from 
a very low base. Lever Broth- 
ers which has been operating 
in a very competitive market 
mproved its market share. 

Unilever’s interests in the 
rest of the world also made 
steady progress 

Tempus, page 18 


Turner & Newall raises 
AE offer to £244m 


Order book 
turndown 
threatens 
steel profit 

By Edward Townsend 
Industrial Correspondent 

The recovery of State- 
owned Bntish Steel, which has 
just returned to profitability 
for the first time in 10 years, 
could he threatened h> a drop 
in orders in the past three 
months. 

The lower order book, al- 
though not quantified, was 
revealed yesterday by Mr 
Robert Scholev. chairman of 
British Steel, but he remained 
confident that the corporation 
uas on target to improve its 
earnings in the current year. 

Last year, the BSC made a 
profit after all charges of £5S 
million, regarded as a sound 
recovery from the clKvts of 
the year-long miners’ strike, 
and a decade of government 
funding totalling i” billion. 

Mr Scholev. speaking alter 
re-lighting the £50 million 
rebuilt Redear blast furnace 
on Teessidc, said the 1151% 
order hook was doun hut 
would not. at -the moment, 
affect profit forecasts. The 
average figure for orders over 
the preceding two years was 
lower than at present. 

The re-lighting ceremony at 
Redcar — home of the biggest 
and now most modern blast 
furnace in Europe — marked 
BSC'S return to profitability 
and self-funding 
Mr Scholev said: "We will 
need to do better to improve 
the strength of our financing 
so that we can be increasingly 
self-reliant in the fulfilment of 
projects such as this." 

The £50 million invest- 
ment. which follows the BSC s 
£170 million investment at 
Port Talbot. West Glamorgan, 
has been funded internally. 


By Clare Dobie 


Turner & Newall yesterday 
increased its offer for AE the 
motor engineering company, 
and introduced an all-cash 
alternative. The new offer 
values AE at £244 million. 

AE said that the increased 
offer was still inadequate. Its 
chairman. Sir John Collyear. 
said that AE would soon be 
making a profit forecast for 
the current year, and this 
would demonstrate that the 
offer was loo low. 

Turner & Newall is offering 
one share plus 70p in cash for 
each share in AE. With Turner 
& Newall at I77p yesterday. 


AE*s shares jumped from 
204p to 234p. where they 
stand below both offers, in- 
dicating that the market no 
longer expeas a rival bidder to 
emerge. 

The new oilers compare 
with the original offer of six 
shares plus £6 in cash for f0 
shares in AE This would be 
worth only £164 million, after 
a fall in Turner & Newall's 
share price from 226p when 
the bid Was launched in June. 

Sir John Collyear admitted 
that demand for truck and 
tractor components was weak, 
but he said that AE had not 


down 5n on iht* dav the offer 1 Sd,u ,lwl naa no * 

values AE°sharKm s 47DMch ' f xp f neiKed lhc sudden drop 
v aiues At shares at _47p each. ln dcmand rcponed i ast weck 

by GKN. 


There is a cash alternative 
worth 240p a share, provided 
partly from Turner & Newall's 
own resources and partly by 
NM Rothschild, its financial 
adviser. 


Commercial and agri- 
cultural vehicles accounted 
for less than 10 per cent of 
AE’s sales last year. 



Robert Scholey at the re- 
lighting ceremony yesterday 

said Mr Scholey. In most areas 
of the country, iron and 
steelmaking were now secure, 
“and not least in Teesside.” he 
said. 

However, uncertainly about 
over-capacity in Britain's steel 
industry still bedevils the 
BSC. Its Ravenscraig stnp 
mill in Scotland is one of its 
most vulnerable plants. 

The furnace, taller than St 
Paul's Cathedral, has new 
engineering features which 
will extend its second life to up 
to 12 years, in which time it is 
expected to produce 30 mil- 
lion tonnes of liquid iron for 
the Teesside works. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 

New York 

IVMw.Innoe 1 ffl !W (-U4 

RISES: 

Rla*n ... «Wp (4-PHp) 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow .... 17794.es (+31&58) 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 1905.00 (-22.04) 

Amsterdam: Gen 296.6 (+3.6) 

Frankfurt 0 1149.2 (-4.7) 

IC1 996p (+25p) 

AE 234p (+30p) 

Eleco Holdings 146p (+11 pj 

RHM ZL - 248pi+13p) 

Press Tools .. — 158p (+13p) 

Sidney Banks 333p (+I3p) 

Tay Homes I64p (+I6p) 

W Cook. 245p (+20p) 

Brussels: 

General 787.27 (+0.03) 

Paris: CAC • •*»4 (+3_0) 

HUIsdOwn — 293 j) (+12p) 

BPCC 276p +10p) 

P^ntlanri 430p f+20p) 

Zurich: 

London lot "2l2p f+i2p) 

London dosingprices- Page 21 

Wamford Inv .. 650p {+40pj 

Norman Hay 2Q5p (+7p) 

INTEREST RATES 

Metal Bulletin ' . 113p (+8p) 

jaguar 538p (+8p) 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-mortti Interbank 9%-9 ,a ie% 
3-month eligible HiK9 9 i0-9K% 
taking rate 

Prime Rato 8% 

Federal Funds tPuflfe’ 

3-month Treasury Bite 5.60-5.59%* 
30-year bonds 98 9 *3>99 to* 

Hogg Robinson ... 31 Op (+8p) 

FALLS: 

Samuels on — I90p(-35p) 

GOLD 

London Fixing: 

AM S386.10 pm-5384.00 
dose $383.50-385.00 (£258.25- 
259.25) 

New York: 

Com ex S385.2O-38S-20- 

CURRENCIES 

London: . New York: 

£.$1.4885* 

£ DM3.0840 & DM2.0775* 

£ SwFr2.4880 & Index: 1 11 .1 

£: FPri 0.0204 

£ Yen229,58 ECU E0.6861 18 

£ Indejc71 .4 ■ SDR E0.81S584 ' 

NORTH SEA OIL 

Brent (Sept) pm ST3.55 bbl(S1330) 
* Denotes Latest trading price ■ 


Over-the-counter dealers 
set up rival exchange 


The over-the-counter prac- 
titioners committee, represent- 
ing 50 OTC dealers, derided 
yesterday to set up a Rec- 
ognized Investment Exchange 
to rival the Stock Exchange's 
proposed third market 
The committee of eight 
OTC dealers met yesterday 
and agreed their new exchange 
would be called the London 
Securities Ex c h ang e. Details 
wfl] go out in the next few 
weeks to all prospective mem- 
bers, who must become 
shareholders in the new ex- 
change to qualify for 
membership. 

Prospective members will be 
asked to subscribe a total of 
£300.000 to cover start-up 
costs, mainly for setting op an 
electronic market {dace. There 
may be a need for secondary 
financing at a later date, a 
committee member said. 

The meeting of the prac- 
titioners committee was at- 
tended by a representative of 


By Alison Eadie 

the Securities and Investment 
Board. Tbe new exchange. If it 
is to qoalify as an RIE under 
the terms of the Financial 
Services Bill, most be ap- 
proved by the SIB. 

Mr Tom Wiimot, chairman 
of Harvard Securities, one of 
the committee members, said 
yesterday: “We are. confident 
we can branch an exchange 
that will meet the required 
standards of the SIB.** 

He said he was very excited 
by the prospects for the ex- 
change .and added that al long 
last the OTC dealers had 
agreed to do something instead 
of fighting each other. 

The Stock Exchange pro- 
posals unveiled last week had 
a had flaw-, as far as the OTC 
dealers are concerned. They 
insist that members of the 
SE's third market must be SE 
members. 

Mr Wiimot described the 
proposals as impractical, be- 
cause stockbrokers are not 


going to want to sponsor small 
issues. The Stock Exchange 
has placed great emphasis on 
the role of the sponsor bring- 
ing a company to the third 
market in terms of checking 
the bona fides of that com- 
pany. There is likely to be 
more work to be done in 
bringing a third company to 
the market than in bringing in 
a blue chip company, but the 
rewards for stockbrokers wfll 
be for less. 

Mr Wflmot believes Har- 
vard and other established 
OTC dealers will be able to 
bring companies to the market 
much more cheaply than 
stockbrokers. 

“It ^ not in tbe interests of 
the industry for the Stock 
Exchange to control the OTC 
industry,” Mr Wflmot said. 

The Stock Exchange's pro- 
posals for its third tier market 
WerE drawn up after consulta- 
tions with 200 parties, includ- 
ing OTC dealers.. 


GOLD 

Prices Surge 

Exciting news for Financial Investors 


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Commodity and Financial Futures Markets. Our growth has been 
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For further details about betting on Gold with LG. Index or about betting 
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To:_MrP. R. O’Neill, I.G. Index Lid. 9-11 Grosvenor Gardens. London SWlWOBD. 

Please send me more information about I.G. Index 


Name 



Address 


Day Tel: 


Post Code 
Evening 


■ 4 * 







18 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


WALL STREET 


Bond strength helps 
Dow to edge ahead 

New York (Agencies) - 23 Vs. The company reported a 
Shares opened moderately share buy-back. IBM rose by 


higher yesterday as bond 
prices strengthened. 
Speculation that the Federal 


ft to 131 Mi and Safeway by ft 
to 65%. 

On Monday, die Dow Jones 


Reserve Board is considering a industrial average dosed 
further easing of the discount 28.54 points higher at 
rate, this time possibly with IJM 1.16 — which was its best 
the West Germans, bolstered gain since Jane 13 when it 
the bond market 
The Dow Jones industrial 


dim bed by 36.06 points. 
Monday's gain was fuelled by 
average rose by 366 points to the opinion that deflation had 
1.81462. The number of rising ceased to be a threat to the 
stocks outnumbered declining economy, 
ones by about two to one on 27 The market also advanced 
million shares traded. 

National Medical Enter- 


last week after Opec had 
agreed to cut production, 
prises was top of the list of lowering concern about flag- 
active stocks, rising by 1V4 to gjng oil pricey 


AMR 

ASA 

Ailed Sign. 
AJ ted Sirs 
Albs Cti tens 
Alcoa 
Amaxlnc 

Am'rtia Hs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
AmCynm'd 
AmElPwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
Am St'md 
Am Teteph 
Amoco 
Armco Steel 

ASdTCO 


Bankamer 


Bern Steel 
Boeing 


BP 

Burr ton Ind 
Burt ton Nw 
Burroughs 
CmpOuUSo 
Can Pacific 
Catenrtar 
Ceianese 
Central SW 
Chatman 
Chase Man 
Own BA NY 
Chevron 
Chrysler 
Citicorp 
Clark Equip 
Coca Cola 


CmbtnEtw 
ComwWiEo 
Cons Eds 


Cntrt Data 
Commg Gl 
CPC Ind 
Crane 
Cm Zeller 
Dan & Krati 
Deere 
Delta Ar 
Detron Ed 
Digital Eq 


Dow 


Du Pom 
Eastern Air 
EstmKoaA 
Eaton Coro 
Emerson tl 



r 



r 



f* 

50". 

son 


24% 

23% 

Pfizer 

60% 

66% 

m 

34 

FstChcago 

30% 

29% 


2U 

19% 

40 

A9V. 

38 

4AU 

Fstmtencp 

FsiPannC 

62% 

7% 

62% 

7% 

PMfipMrs 
Philips Pet 

72% 

9% 

9% 


3 

Fold 

56% 

54% 

Polaroid 

63% 


38 

34% 

FTWacbva 

42 

41 

PPG Ind 

62% 

60% 

l2’/i 

11% 

GAFCorp 

SiY, 

31% 

PrctrGmtt 

78 

76% 

m 

18% 


54% 

53% 

PbSES G 

43 


93% 

92 

GenCorp 

65% 

65% 

Raytheon 

61% 


88 

87% 

GenDv'mcs 

72% 

71% 

RyntdsMet 



82 

82 


75% 

73% 

Rockweaim 

42% 


2BH 
61 S 

26 % 

60 

Gen Inst 

Gen MAS 

20% 

86 

19% 

88% 

Royal Dutch 
Safeways 

82% 

65% 

81 

66% 

90% 

89% 


71% 

70% 

Sara Lee 

68% 

68% 

2’/. 

2% 

GnRbUtny 

22% 


SFESopac 

29% 

30% 

37% 

37% 


3 

3 

ScWberger 

29% 


24 

23% 


31% 

29% 

Scon Paper 

60% 

59 

62 

61% 

GAOS 

44% 

44% 

Seagram 

59% 

58% 

7% 

7% 


37% 

36% 

Sears ROck 

43% 

42% 

13% 

13 

Goodyear 

GouWlne 

Grace 

31% 

31% 

Shefl Trans 

50% 

49% 

54% 

52% 

54% 

52% 

17% 

48% 

18% 

48% 

InSwnBk 

52% 

91% 

51% 

90% 

34 % 

32% 

Gl All & TaC 

24% 

24% 

Sony 

SOI Cal Ed 

19 

19% 

47% 

47% 


30% 

30% 

35% 

35% 

12% 

40% 

13% 

39% 

GrumsnCor 
GutfA West 

24% 

64% 

23% 

63% 


75% 

45% 

75% 

45 

64% 

8% 

65 

8% 

HnnztU 

46% 

50% 

45% 

50 

Sterling Dra 
Stevens JP 

48% 

33% 

47% 

32% 

56% 

58% 

HTen-Pwd 

40% 

39% 

Sun Comp 

49% 

49% 

53% 

46% 

51% 

-45% 

Honeywe* 

IClTKS 

64% 

24% 

62% 

23% 

Tatedyne 

Termeco 

316% 

37% 

306% 

37% 

31% 

80% 

30% 

78% 

IngwsoO 

58% 

18% 

58% 

18% 

Texaco 
Texas E Cor 

31 

27% 

30% 

26% 

35% 

34% 

IBM 

131% 

130 

Texas lost 

112% 

110 

35% 

35% 

INCO 

1?% 

11% 

Texas Utts 

35 

•34% 

53 

53% 


63% 

64% 

Texvon 

56 

57% 

69% 

67% 

im Tel tel 

53% 

52% 

TravtrsCor 

45 

44% 

62% 

62% 

lrvmg Bank 

52% 

50% 

TRW Me 

101% 

100% 

11% 

11 

Jhnsn 4 Jtin 

69% 

68% 

UAL Me 

50% 

49% 

46% 

48% 

Kaiser Alum 

15% 

14% 

Unlever NV 

220% 

214% 

210V, 

208% 

Ken McGee 

26% 

25% 

UnCarwde 

21 

20% 

34% 

34% 

KmbTvCJf* 

64% 

-84 

UnPacCor 

55 

54% 

2a % 

23'S 

38% 

K Man 

51% 

51 

Utd Brands 

28% 

28% 

40% 

Kroger 

LTV. Corp 

61% 

62 

USGCorp 

36 

35 

46% 

46% 

2% 

2% 

UuTecnnoi 

42% 

41% 

40-4 

40 


76% 

77 

USX Corp 

78% 

18% 

38% 

37 

Lxxneed 

49% 

47% 

Unocal 

19% 

19% 

54% 

S3 

Lucky Sirs 
Man H' rarer 

24% 

24% 

JMi Walter 

47 

46 

17% 

17% 

44% 

44% 

WmerLmtt 

59% 

57% 

38% 

37% 

MamdeCp 

2% 

2 % 

Weas Fargo 
WsrohseEl 

103% 

100% 

40% 

40 

Mapco 

46% 

45% 

55% 

54 

138% 

134% 


49% 

48% 

Weyorttser 

Wrarfpool 

33% 

31% 

39 

38% 

Mrt Manetta 

43% 

42% 

71% 

70% 

28% 

28% 


ay 

28% 


40% 

40% 

32% 

32% 

McDonalds 

65% 

62% 

Xerox Corp 

55% 

54% 

50% 

49% 

McOonnefl 

79% 

78% 

Zenith 

24 

23% 

28 % 

28% 

Mead 

53% 

49% 




11% 

11% 


108% 

107% 




21% 

21 % 

Minsta Mng 

109% 

108% 




62% 

67% 

62% 

67% 

MOW 04 
Monsanto 

32% 

65% 

32% 

65% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

30% 

29% 

Morgan JJ* 

90% 

B8% 

AMU 

22 

22 

39% 

38% 

Motorola 

40 

39 

Aten Allan 

42% 

41% 

60% 

59% 

NCR Co»p 

52% 

52% 

AtgorneSa 

14% 

13% 

22% 

21% 

NL Inostrs 

.4% 

3% 

Can Pacific 

15% 

15% 

41% 

41% 

NaJ Discs 

35% 

35% 


13 

12% 

17% 

17 

Nat Mao Era 

21% 

21% 

ConBadxst 

22% 

22% 

96% 

92% 

NatSmcnOt 

9% 

9% 

Wtr/SkJCan 

27% 

27% 

46% 

44% 

Norte* Sth 

78% 

75% 

HdsnBMn 

28% 

28% 

51% 

49% 


37% 

38 

1 TOSCO 

35% 

36 

15% 

15% 

OcodmPei 

28% 

25% 

Imperial Ol 

In Pipe 

40% 

40% 

48 

48% 

Ogoen 

39% 

38 

39% 

39% 

78% 

78% 

45 

44% 

By) Trustee 

31% 

31% 

6% 

56% 

8% 

54% 

Owens-a 

PacGasB 

36% 

25 

38 

24% 

Seagram 
Steel Co 

82% 

20% 

80% 

20% 

67% 

68% 

pan Am 

5% 

5% 

ThmsnN A 

30 

30% 

81% 

63 

79% 

62% 

Penney 

Pentuoil 

77% 

52% 

76% 

52% 

VantyCOtp 
Wita Hiram 

2.75 

38 

2.65 

37% 

82 

80% 

Pepaco 

32% 

31% 

WCT 

12% 

12% 


Lloyd’s inquiry 
clears RBUA 
of negligence 


• t><n tisttB cEiSmSSm 


tea iiueMirew iMUmii iMM 


WPP buys marketing 
and design company 


WPP Group has acquired 
Sampson Tyrrell, a consultant 
in communications, market- 
ing and design. 

The price will be based on a 
multiple of 10 times the 
average post tax profits of 
Sampson Tyrrell for the three 
years to June 30. 1991. 

Sampson Tyrrell's sales 
have grown from £58 1 .000 in 
the year to June 30. 1982 to 
about £1.5 million in the latest 
1 2 months. Pretax profits over 
the same period have grown 
from £17.000 to about 
£250.000. Net tangible assets 
at June 30 were about 
£325.000. 

An initial cash payment of 
£1 million will be made on 
completion, and further pay- 
ments in cash or shares this 
year and in 1988. 1990 and 
1991. based on profits, subject 
to an overall maximum of £5 
million. 

Mr Martin Sampson and 
Mr Terry Tyrrell, joint 


founders, will join the board 
of Rasor Communication. 

WPP's wholly-owned subsid- 
iary. the-holding company for 
manufacturing activities. 

WPP says that, as a result of 
the transaction, it will be 
among the top five graphics 
and design groups in Britain 
with a strong base from which 
to expand in Britain and 
overseas. 

After reconstruction the 
WPP board is to be reorga- 
nized to reflect the growth in 
the services area. 

Mr P M C Rabl and Mr M S 
Sorrell, formerly non-exec- 
ulive directors, will become 
executive directors with 
responsibility for services. Mr 
A W Summerfield and Mr A 
W Sparkes, who are associated 
with the manufacturing di- 
vision. will become directors 
of Wire and Plastic Products, 
the holding company co- 
ordinating the group's 
manufacturing. 


Lloyd's insurance market 
yesterday published the report 
of an internal inquiry imo the 
management of syndicates by 
Richard Beckett Underwriting 
Agencies between December 
6, 1982 and June 30, 1985. 

RBUA replaced PCW 
Underwriting Agencies, which 
ran the syndicates • until au- 
tumn 1982, when money 
belonging (o names was found 
to have been misappropriated 
by PCW managers. 

The committee of inquiry, 
chaired by Mr John Davis, 
vice-chairman of Lloyds 
Bank, included Mr Henry 
Chester, chairman of HG 
Chester, the Lloyd's under- 
writing agent, and Mr Alan 
Brookland. a partner of Coo- 
pers and Lybrand, the accoun- 
tants. 

Below are some of the more 
important conclusions of the 
report: 

“We were asked by Lloyd’s 
whether we had found any 
evidence of fraud or gross 
negligence by the management 
of the agency or by any party 
involved with the agency dur- 
ing the period of time covered 
by our inquiry. We found no 
such evidence. 

“Directors and senior 
management, under continu-. 
a us heavy pressure and amid' 
great uncertainty, gave 
unstinungly of their time and 
energies: many of them had 
only limited experience of the 
agency and its business. It is 
against this background that 
we comment on a number of 
errors of judgement and of 
inadequacies in 

performance.'* 

On the £38 rail Goa offer to 
names made in June 1984 by 
RBUA's parent. Mind Hold- 
ings, and Alexander & 
Alexander Services in 
compensation for money mis- 
appropriated, the report says: 
“Inevitably there were the 
inequities of a compromise, 
an element of rough justice, 
but we are satisfied that the 
agency's directors obtained 
and, where appropriate, pro- 
vided to names all the in- 
dependent advice that could 
have been reasonably 
expected.” 

About the role of Arthur 
Andersen and Arthur Young, 
joint auditors in 1982 and 
1983 until Arthur Andersen 
became sole auditor in 1984, 
the report says: “The auditors 
were seen in a predominantly 
statutory and regulatory role 
at RBUA during the period 
covered by our inquiry. 

“Their advice was sought 
on a number of occasions by 
management as general advis- 
ers. but to an extent which was 
surprisingly limited in view of 
the trials which RBUA faced. 

“In tins statutory and regu- 
latory role, we consider that 
both firms carried out their 
work along the lines expected 
of them. 

“We do, however, comment 
upon: 

• The additional provisions 
against amounts due from, or 
to become due from, reinsur- 
ers in their audits of the 
syndicates as at December 3 1 . 
1982. which might have been 
judged necessary had further 
work been done. 

• The representation from 
management in res pea of 
anticipated reinsurance recov- 
eries. They did not directly 
address the question of the 
allocation of recoveries be- 
tween individual syndicates, 
although Arthur Andersen 
had suggested in a manage- 
ment letter issued shortly after 1 
the accounts were signal that 


By Alison Eadie 

the allocation ought to be 
reconsidered. 

• Their acceptance of notes to 
the 1983 and 1984 accounts 
which did not make clear the 
change in reserving methods, 
the change in the method of 
allocation of reinsurance 
recoveries between syndicates 
and the extent to which 
discounting had been used. 

• The absence in their report 
to Lloyd's in 1984 to draw 
attention to the weakness in 
the agency's systems and 
records commented on in the 
auditors' 1983 management 
letters. 

“In these four respects we 
consider that their statutory 


and regulatory role could have 
been fulfilled to greater effect. 

“In the provision of advice 
and support to management 
on matters which came to 



.. P A! . 

Sm'M 

John Davis: chairman of 
the inquiry 

their attention during the 
audit, the performance of both 
firms of auditors was 
disappointing: 

• They should have done 
more to ensure that Mr Rich- 
ard Beckett was fully aware, in 
his first few months as chair- 
man of RBUA,' of the prob- 
lems presented by the nature 
of his reinsurance protection 
programme. 

• They should have done 
more to alert Mr Beckett to the 
dangers of reserving on a 
simplistic basis for long-tail 
liability business. 

• They should have done 
more to ensure Mr Beckett 
appreciated the risks of mak- 
ing a distribution to names in 
May 1983. 

• Arthur Andersen in 1984 
appear to have expressed only 
minor concern about the non- 
marine reserves when they 
might have been expected to 
indicate a need for higher 
reserves on the non-marine 
syndicates. 

• They did not -take steps to 
summarize and present to the 
board jointly their manage^ 
mem letter points, especially 
in 1984 

“However, some of the 
responsibility for the dis- 
appointing performance of the 
auditors as advisers rests on 
management for not seeking 
their advice.'* 

On die .role of Lloyd's, the 
report says: “Lloyd's had a 
limited capacity at that time u> 
manage such problems. 
Rather than being allowed to 
continue underwriting, the in- 
terests of the agency's names 
might have been better served 
by the immediate establish- 
ment of an additional under- 
writing agency. 

“We arc, however, of the 
opinion that Lloyd's decision 
was a reasonable one on the 
basis of information available. 

“Mr Beckett kept Lloyd's 
informed of progress buL in so 
doing, mistakenly believed 
Lloyd's were endorsing the 
agency's derisions. We believe 
some derisions were ' thus 
made without sufficient 
inquiry. 

“Lloyd's should ensure that 
misunderstandings of this na- 
ture do not occur again.” 


‘Danger signs’ 
for US growth 

The United States economy 
will grow more slowly than 
forecast by the Reagan 
Administration, and it faces 
increasing signs of danger. Mr 
Jerry Jasinowski. chiefecono- 
misi of the National Associ- 
ation of Manufacturers, said 

"The sources of weakness 
are more substantial than the 
sources of strength.” he told 
reporters. 

Mr Jasinowski revised ear- 
lier forecasts to show growth 
of 2.5 per cent to 3.5 per cent 
in the second half of 1986 
compared with the 4 per cent 
projected by the White House. 


Tesco expands in West 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 10.00% 

Adam & Company 10.00% 

BCC1 10.00% 

10.75% 

10 . 00 % 

10 . 00 % 

1000 % 

10 . 00 % 


Citibank Savings! _ 
Consolidated Crds._ 
Contmentaf Trust-. 
Co-operative Bank-. 
C. Hoare & Co 


Kong Kong & Shanghai ...-10.00% 

Lloyds Bank 10.00% 

fiat Westmmster 10.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland— 10.00% 

TSB 10.00% 

Otibank HA 10.00% 


Tesco Stores, which is 
spending £233 million this 
year on new superstores, is 
increasing its drive imo the 
West Country. Work starts 
soon on an £8 million 
superstore in Truro. Cornwall 
which, when completed next 
summer, will recruii about 
320 staff. 

It will bring to six the 
number of Tesco superstores 
being opened in the West 
Country since last autumn. 
The first four are at 
Brislington in Bristol. Wes- 
ton-super-Mare, Avon, Plym- 


i CSR: The company says that 
iis Bradford Insulation group 
has signed a S43 million (£2.9 
million) contract to construct 
and commission a rockwool 
insulation plant in China. 

• BICC: The group has ac- 
quired a 50 per cent stake in 
Swire Haden for £44 million 
from Haden. Swire’s former 
partner in the joint venture, 

• FALCON INDUSTRIES: 


P e 


Soutwark Corporation 
iZVHfc Redeemable Stack 1987 

Bmfafs fen* Pic fepsnen Oranm 
Rrtnfe Han. Kransnm CMm WM6 9EU 
"once M n erto lo pqtan He 
Mmsl due on Be 15* Aogtst 1986 he 
telaocK d i he several taunts m mi above 
SW* vat be skud al tne dost or h&ns on 
me 6h Augua IS66 


How to get into 
banking* 

SEE PAGE 23 


outh. and. most recently, at 
Easiville in BristoL These 
alone employ about 2.000 
staff. 

Another is planned for 
completion next February at 
Barnstaple. Devon, in a new 
district centre at St John's. 
This outlet will employ about 
300. 

The St John's centre in- 
volves a £6 million invest- 
ment overall with five smaller 
shops and a community hall 

The Truro superstore is 
ilanned to have 35,000 square 
eet of selling space. 


COMPANY NEWS 


The company has sold its 
interest in its subsidiary. Kestrel 
Fasieners. 

• MARKING NAMES: Divi- 
dends payable in Canada and 
the United States on^or after 
Jul> 30 and up to and including 
August 5 are valued at 46J2p 
per Canadian dollar and 64.7 Ip 
per US dollar. 

• TECHNICAL COMPO- 
NENT INDUSTRIES: Interim 
results. Figures in £000. Turn- 
over 807 (696). pretax profit 1 73 
(142). tax 63 (59). Earnings per 
share 5p (3.77). Interim divi- 
dend l.5p (nil). The company 
says that it looks to the future 
with confidence. It has readied 
conditional agreement to ac- 
quire the entire issued share 
capital of TKR. a private com- 
panv which designs, manufac- 
tures and sells components for 
the aerospace industry. The 
initial consideration for the £1.6 
million acquisition will be sat- 
isfied as to £794.675 by the 
allotment of new ordinary 
shares which have been con- 
ditionally placed on behalf of 
the vendors at 3!5p per share, 
and as to the balance by the 
allotment of 255.658 new or- 
dinary to the vendors of TKR 


Spain attacks 
cut in tariff 

The agreement between the 
European Economic Commu- 
nity and the United States 
over agricultural trade tariffs, 
reached at the weekend, is 
under attack. 

Spain regards the agreement 
as “too generous" to the 
Americans and. if it is not 
changed, will hit its exports of 
almonds, olives and olive oil 
to other EEC countries. Spain 
objects to the EECs import 
duly cut from 7 to 5 per cent 
on American almonds, and 
argues that American reduc- 
tions will not compensate 
Spanish olives sufficiently. 


• CAPITAL & COUNTIES: 
Results for six months to June 
30 (six months to September 29. 
1985). Interim dividend 3p 
[ 2.21 Figures in £000. Pretax 
profit 6.066 (6J580L tax- 2,199. 
(2.512). Earnings per share 5p 
(4.9). Company anticipates that 
profits for the year will show an 
improvement over the 
annualized results for the nine 
months to December 31. 

• PENNY A GILES INTER- 
NATIONAL: Penny &. Giles 
Conductive Plastics has been 
awarded a contract worth more 
than £1.5 million K> supply 
quadruples position sensors as 
the primary flight input device 
on the fty-by-wne system devel- 
oped by GEC Avionics for Aer 
Italia's AMX light attack 
aircraft. 

• DELANEY GROUP: Con- 
tracts have been exchanged for 
the sale of the company’s free- 
hold interest in the Greet trad- 
ing estate. Birmingham, for 
£3-5.500. marginally more than 
the book value. 


More company news, 
page 22 


( TEMPUS ) 

Unilever sets City bubbling 


Unilever does not usually set 
City hearts racing, but there 
were signs of quickening 
pulses vesierday when the 
Atiglo-Dutch group reported 
its interim results for the six 
months to June 30. For the 
second time this year it has 
beaten analysts' forecasts and 
the share price jumped above 
£18. reflecting the market's 
enthusiasm. 

Is this, however, a sign of 
things to come or merely a 
flash in tire pan? Indications 
arc that the group’s actions in 
Europe are bearing fruit and 
there are more goodies to 
come from the dow stream- 
lined Matteson-Wall in 
Britain. 

Sceptics who are still un- 
convinced that Unilever 
knows what it is doing in the 
US. will not find many points 
to criticize in the results. 

Detergents’ market shares 
are now much healthier and 
the problematic personal 
products division is under 
new management. Some win 
say. however, that this second 
business still lacks the critical 
mass to succeed and that the 
money saved on Richard- 
sons-Vicks may prove to 
have been a false economy. 
Only time will tdL 

If a perfect candidate turns 
up. the strength of the group's 
balance sheet will not deter it 
a second time. 

Despite Unilever's insis- 
tence that the rate of 
improvement seen in the first 
half of the year will not follow 
through to the full year, it will 
be hard, barring extreme 
currency fluctuations, to re- 
strain the pundits from 
increasing forecasts. 

Whereas £1.08 billion 
looked ambitious before 
these figures. £I.I2S billion 
now looks achievable. This 
would give a maximum earn- 
ings per share of around 1 63p 
and put the shares on a p/e 


UNILEVER 
Share price 

Source^Daiastream 


. 1 

a£i600 


Nr 

— $00 

gsL 

ALL SHARE IN 

. 

Bll 

id 400 

1961 1982 

1983 1984 

1985 

1986 


ratio of 1 1 times. On this 
basis the shares are selling at 
around a 10 per cent discount 
to the market. 

In the short term, the gap 
should begin to close but a 
few more sets of decent 
results will be needed before a- 
premium rating could be 
justified. 

GM Firth 

Mr lan Wasserman is quietly 
building up a well spread 
engineering company. Thro- 
ugh GM Firth, where he has a 
21.6 per cent stake, he also 
controls the separately 
quoted Porter Chad bum. a 
company best known for its 
bar taps and other brewery 
fittings. 

Yesterday Firth announced 
a big jump in profits from 
£950.000 to £2.48 million 
before tax in the year to 
March 31. Most of that 
increase came from the 
wholly-owned companies but 
within the total Porter 
Chadbum managed to turn a 
£63.000 loss into a £506,000 
profit 

The Firth businesses are 
dominated by steel stock- 
holding which probably ac- 
counted for 40 to 45 per cent 
of profits last year, with 
furnishing and flooring 


cent transport 10 per cent 
and property and investment 
the balance. 

Mr Wasserman says that 
GKN's gloomy warnings of 
last week about profits from 
steel stockholding do not 
apply to Firth, which has a 
much smaller exposure, with 
only £16 million turnover in 
the business against GKN's 
£195 million. 

For the next year or more 
growth is likely to come more 
strongly from Porter Chad- 
burn than the wholly-owned 
companies. This follows the 
closure of its Bolton factory 
at a cost of £626.000. charged 
below the line in a £251.000 
extraordinary charge. The 
closure has halved the 
amount of production space 
and should result in signifi- 
cant savings of up to 
£500,000. ' 

The market has anticipated 
Porter- Chadbum's better 
prospects, valuing its historic 
eamings on a multiple of 34 
limes, against a multiple of 
11 accorded to the rest of 
Firth. 

Matthew Clark 

Many of us have enjoyed 
drinking Stone's green ginger 
wine. But how many of us 


know that it is made from 
raisins, steeped in water, 
fermented, fortified, matured 
and then 'gingered' with the 
best ground ginger? And all 
this within the City at the 
Finsbury Distillery. 

Stone's .wines arc Matthew 
Clark and Sons' third most 
important profit earner. Its 
biggest is its '52 per cent- 
owned subsidiary - JE Mather^ 
manufacturer and bottler of] 
British wine£ and sherries 
from imported grape juice. 

Nearly 60 per cent of 
Matthew Clark's profits were 
earned by its interest in JE 
Mather in the year to April 30 
1986. Pretax profit for the 
group as a whole was £6.6 
million, up nearly 12 percent 
on last year. Of this, 
£4.8 million was attributable 
10 JE Mather. (Mauhew 
Clark's share £2.5 million) 
leaving £1.8 million for the 
rest of the group. 

Just over£l million of this 
was made from the group's 
agency business - the dis- 
tribution and sale of such well 
known brands as Martell 
Cognac. The Macallan Scotch 
whisky and Chartreuse. 

Founded by Matthew 
Clark in 1810. Mauhew Clark 
& Sons has retained a very- 
strong family flavour with no 
fewer than four Gordon 
Clarks on the board. Indeed, 
all the agencies in the Mat- 
thew Clark group are family 
businesses, except of course 
Chartreuse since, as the chair- 
man Francis Gordon Clark 
points oul monks do not 
have families. 

Profit growth of 1 5 per cent 
next year will pul the shares 
on a multiple of 15. The 
shares have been strong 
performers in the last year, 
and at these levels are likely 
to run out of steam. 


Eleco fights higher Whitecroft bid 


By Richard Lander 

The Eleco Holdings mini- 
conglomerate is continuing to 
fiercely roppose the takeover 
advances of Whitecroft. the 
Cheshire properly, building 
supplies and lighting group, 
despite the announcement 
yesterday of an increased final 
offer with a full cash 
alternative. 

The new seven-for-ten share 
swap offer from Whitecroft 
values Eleco at about £26.5 


million compared with £22.7 
million for the original bid. 
which attracted only 1.S per 
cent acceptances. 

Whitecroft has also sweet- 
ened its approach by allowing 
Eleco shareholders to retain 
their company's final 3. Ip 
dividend fbr the year just 
ended. The new offer is 
equivalent to I54p per Eleco 
share while the cash alter- 
native, underwritten by 
Schraders, is worth I43.5p. 
Eleco shares jumped lip to 
I46p yesterday while 


Whitecroft strengthened 2p to 
224p. 

Eleco, whose interests are 
similar to Whitecroft's. said 
the bid was still far too low 
and failed to take account of 
its properly portfolio and 
growth prospects. 

“We basically don't believe 
they’re offering enough 
money,” said Mr Michael . 
Webster, a director of Eleco. 
He added that a fuller defence 
statement would be issued 
soon. Eleco has already es- 
timated a 22 per cent rise in 


pretax profits for 1985-86 

Whitecroft said its new offer 
would be open until August 29 
but would not be raised unless 
a competitor entered the race. 

After announcing a slight 
drop in profits for 1985-86 on 
the day it announced its first 
bid in June, the company said 
yesterday that first quarter 
profits this year were well 
ahead, with the lighting di- 
vision making record profits. 
Dividends this year are fore- 
cast to increase from 8.4p to 
lOp. 


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The Sunday Times 
how covers more businessmi 
than anv other liewminw 


for you r Renner* <3i*le to th. 1986 Bwine^on Reoder*ip 
cod Jube Ferguson on 01-833 7720, or write to W m Times 
New* papers Ltd.. P.O. Box 7. 200 Gray , | m Rood. London WC1X BEZ 









THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


19 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Unilever and Wall Street 
help to restore confidence 


By Michael Clark 




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A sturdy, overnight perfor- 
mance on Wall Street and 
some encouraging interim fig- 
ures from UmlevCT went some 
way to restoring confidence in 
a highly nervous stock market 
yesterday. 

Share (trices opened up at a 
cracking pace; hoping to re- 
coup some of the ground lost 
in last week’s £7 billion mil- 
lion shakeout.. But 'with the 
general low level of turnover, 
they were hard pressed to 
mam tain the rally. The FT 
index . of 30 shares, which 
opened 1 1.9 higher first thing, 
appeared to lose ground be- 
fore rallying to close at its best 
levels of the day. 13.3 points 
up at 1.342.0. The broader- 

• BTIPs shares advanced 
by 5p to 290p yesterday, de- 
spite the news of a brae 
line of stock on offer. W 
Green weD, die broker, 

placed 3 3 million shares at 
jnst over 280p with various - 
instit ution s. Interim figures 
from BTR are expected 
next mouth and should make 
pleasant r eading . Dealers 
claim the shares still look 
cheap, having 

underperformed the market. 

based FT-SE 100 finished just 
below its best 15.4 points 
higher at 1,558.2. 

Blue chips enjoyed selective 
support and were helped by 
the appearance of a few US 
investors towards the close. 
ICI rose I8p to 989p followed 
by Lscas Industries I2p to 
535p, Vickers 7p to 400p, 
Beedtam Up to 396p and 
Glaxo 23p to 983p. 

Gilts showed little change 
on overnight levels, despite 
the firmer appearance of ster- 
ling against most European 
currencies on the foreign ex- 
change market 
The derision- by the Gov- 
ernment broker to cut the 


price of the tap. Treasury. 8 Yi 
per cent, 2007, made little 
impact 

Speculative baying lifted 
Ranks Hovis MdDongaQ by 
lOP'lo 245p with dealers still 
hoping for a full bid shortly 
from the Australian food 
group Goodman Field, which 
recently bought S & W 
Berisfonfs 13 per cent stake. 

The insurance composites 
were wanted ahead of the 
inrerim dividend season 
which gets under way today 
with figures from Commercial 
Union, np 9p at 308p, and 
General Accident unchanged 
al8!2p. 

Royal Insurance, reporting 
tomorrow, finned 5p to 824p. 
Guardian Royal Exchange 
was steady at 829p- after 834p, 
as was Sim Affiance 667p. 

Gold shares tried to make 
the most of their recent return 
to- favour and scored some 
further, useful gains in early 
trading, but they soon ran out 
of steam as profit-taking 
developed after their -recent 
strong run. This follows last 
week's sudden flurry of activ- 
ity in the gold price, which saw 
it break free from the S350 
trading range. 

Bulbon dealers fear that 
South Africa may choose to 
retaliate and apply its own 
trade restrictions following the 
Commonwealth's decision to 
adopt sanctions. South Africa 
is the world's biggest producer 


FTA ALL SHARE INDEX, 



Jan 7 1984=100 

M 

V. 


of gold and platinum. Yes- 
terday, the gold price was 
fixed at $386.10 as ounce — 
compared with the overnight 
price of $387 — and at die 
afternoon fix was standing at 
$384. 

The market is convinced 
that the bullion price is des- 
tined to hit $400 an ounce 
soon. Bui the price is still way 
below the dizzy heights it 
achieved a few years ago when 
the Soviet Union invaded 
Afghanistan. Then it reached 
$850 an ounce. 

Since that time, gold and 
gold shares have continued to 
underperform the rest of the 
market, so this latest surge of 
demand must come as a 
welcome relief to many 
investors. 

Consolidated Gold Fields, 
which has led the entire sector 


higher, started to lose ground 
and finished 8p off at 454p. 
Among the heavyweight 
producers, Vaal Reels ended 
S2K lower at $61, Randfontein 
$2 at $72>4. South vaal 50 
cents at $28 V:, Western Deep 
50 cents at $28% and Anglo 
American Gold $1 % at S58& 

Among the cheaper issues. 
Blyvoors dipped 2 cents to 468 
cents, but Bracken advanced S 
cents to 163 cents and East 
Daggafontein 12 cents to 300 
cents. Even those companies 
with interests in other pre- 
cious metals ran into profit- 
taking. Impala Platinum fell 
25 cents to 1,094 cents and 
Rustenbnrg Platinum 18 cents 
to 1,038 cents. 

Johnson Malthey, which 
has trading links with 
Rustenburg, fell 5p to 2l0p, 
after 220p. The group is 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Anglia Secs (115p) 
Beavsreo 

Borland 

Chelsea Man (?2Spj 
Coated Bectrodes (Bto) 
CoJme fllQp) 

Evans HaBshaw ( 120 p) 


Fletcher Dennys (70p) 
lent (210 


GT _ 

Guthrie Carp (it 
Harrison ff150p) 


Op) 


140 +1 
IBS +5 
70 
150 
138 
128 
aa 

112 -1 
117 
72-1 
2031-3 
1S1 +1 
157 


Hina Ergonom (92p) 
Hughes Food (2Qp) 

Lon Utd Inv (330pf 
MS Cash & C (lOOp) 
Manna Dev (I10p) 
Morgan Grenfell (SOQp) 
Omnnech (33p) 

Shield (72pj 
Stanley Leisure 111 to) 
TV-AM (13Qp) 

TerxJy Inds (112p) 
Thames TV (190p) 
Tibbet & Britten (i20p) 
Treas 2H%i/l 2016 *97 
Urrttoctc (63p) 


S3 

23 

63+2 

84 

95 

440+7 

32 

140-5 

120 

149'.- 
146+2 
228 +3 
130 
B41« r + , « 
68 


Windsnioor (106p) 
Vatverton (38p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Barker & Dobson N/P 
Cityvision N/P 
CobroU F {P 
Expamet F/P 
Le«h interests F/P 
Rock N/P 
Television Sth N IP 
Top Value F/P 
Wight Collins F/P 
(issue price in brackets). 


104+6 
• U 


26-8 

196+1 

163+7 

94+1 

2‘j 

21 

85 

440 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Three Month Sterfing 

Sep 86 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jon 87 

Sep 87 

Dec 87. 


Previous day's total open 
Three Month Eurodollar 
Sep 86 

Dec 88 
MaiS7 
Jui87| 


US Treasury Bead 

Sep 86 

Dec SB 

Mar 87 


Open 
- 9016 

9§5 

- Lon 

90.16 

One* 

9023 

EstVoi 

1209 

_ 9049 

9052 

9047 

9052 

395 

_ 9047 

9063 

9047 

9054 

63 

- 9045 - 

90.47 

9065 

9046 

21 

NT 


— 

9020 

0 

NT 

— 

— 

8005 

0 

interest 14417 





- 9363 

Previous rim’s total open interest 20040 
9366 93.63 93.64 1294 

_ 93.64 


9364 

9366 

1304 

_ 8365 

9368 

9355 

9356 

439 

„ 8364 

9338 

9364 

9365 

163 

_ 9836 

Previous day's total man interest 7131 
9827 980® 9817 -6587 

_ 8819 

99-05 

9819 

BM3 

761 


NT — — 


Short GBt 
Sep 86 — 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 — 


Previousda/s total open Merest 1045 
100-54 10067 10060 10067 285 

NT — — 10067 0 

NT — . . — . 10067 0 

Previous da/s total open interest 13188 
120-01 120-20 119-28 120-18 5732 

11025 119-30" ‘ 119-25 120-14 107 

NT — — 12007 0 

NT — — 12007 0 

Previous day’s total open Merest 2664 
15490 15850 154.60 . 15R50 313 

15825 160.10 15825 ’ 16125 5 


,v 


jQBt 
Sept 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

J isi 87 

FT-SE 100 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 


These prices refer to Monday's trading 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FMDesfings LastDeafings Last Dedantion ForSetnemant 

Aug 4 Aug 15 Nov6 Nov 17 

Aug 18 Sep 5 Nov 20 Decl 

Sep a 6ep18 Dec 4 Dacis 

Cad opdo ne were taken out ore 12/06/88 Marlborough Pip, CB m nwfai rial . Raine, 
Hepworth Ceramic. Samueison. Amstrad. THF. Euo Ferries, Asset Trust Car Boyd, 
Abaca Ittrnmar. C Gas. Havriey.Tatemetrix. Good ReMions. Times Veneer. Gutrtus, 
Sound Diff. Ml Charotte. rtawtm. OSver, Banks SJtenfartm, Victoria Cpts, Argyla 
Foods. Abbey Life. 


STERUNG SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Meikst rates 
day’s range 
August 12 

N York 1.4825-14900 
Montreal 20609-20664 

AmsdarrO. 4640-3.4779 

Brussels 6364-6324 
C'pbgen 116030-116407 
Di*ft 1.0995-1.1123 
Frankfurt 3.074886643 
Lisbon 21562-217.63 

Madrid 199.15-19961 
NBan 211320-212068 
Oslo 106368106652 
Peris 96803-106297 
StTcMm 102935-103267 
Tokyo 229.1822968 
Vtonna' 21. 6321 .68 
Zurich 24790-24918 


Market rates 


112 

1A640-14850 
2062820664 

3473834779 

63,65-6364 
116248116407 
l: 10881.1096 

366083.0843 

21562-21765 

199.18199.44 

2114282119.10 

106504-10.9652 

10.012810.0297 

10612810.3267 

2294822968 

21.6331.67 
24872-24918 ~ 


Q48Q44prsm 

029-ai9pram 

IH-IXprem 

17-i2prem 

K-Xprem 

81 pram 

iX-IXprem 

®- 160 dis 

20-75dis 
2-Sdt 
. 3K-42dS 
2 %-ZXpretO 
%-Xprem 
IX-Xprwn 
-9%-8Xprem 
1 X=TXprem 


3 ino oO t s 

127-t24prem 

0.61-0.45prem 

3*3Xprem 
4836pem 
X -per pram 


4> 

1C 

108l95dts 

1^13'XOis 

6K-6Xprem 

X-JSprem 

2X-»torem 

25X-22Xprem 

3%3Xprem 


Sterfog index compared wtt 1975 was up el 7l4fday*s range 714-71^. 


OTHER STE RLING RATES 

Argentina austiar 
Australia dollar 
Bahrain (Snar. 

BrazH cruzado* 


Greece drachma 
Hong Kong dobr 
Indie rupee 
Iraq dmar 
KuacutdrarKD 
Malaysia doBar . 

Me«opeso — 

New Zealand dokar. 

Saudi Axabionyui 

Sngapore do«ar 32074-22111 

South Africa rand 3663336868 

IMEdktem 5450854900 

■Lloyds Bank 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



RMas stapled by Bndaye Bank HmEX end EateL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 




V 

L 


N' 




\ 




\ 

\ 

S' 


* ■ 
V 




Series 

Oct 

Cato 

Jan 

Apr 

Oct 

Puts 

Jan 

*Pr 

AKad Lyons 

300 

20 

SO 

40 

10 

13 

15 

(*305) 

330 

£ 

15 

23 

3(1 

33 

37 


360 

2 

6 

13 

57 

60 

63 

BP 

500 

95 

105 



1ft 

5 



rss3> 

550 

50 

65 

80 

A 

18 

27 


600 

16 

37 

50 

33 

40 

4/ 

Cons Gold 

420 

57 

65 

77 

1? 

25 

32 

T454) 

460 

30 

42 

55 

34 

50 

57 


500 

12 

25 

— 

67 

77 

— 

CowtaUUs 

260 

17 

25 

36 

11 

15 

19 

(*260) 

280 

10 

18 

25 

25 

28 

30 


300 

5 

12 

— 

42 

42 

— 


330 

3 

6 

— 

72 

72 

— 

Com Union 

260 

30 

38 

44 

4 

6 

9 

1*306) 

300 

16 

27 

34 

11 

15 

17 


330 

5 

1/ 

22 

30 

32 

36 

Cable & Wire 

300 

50 

62 

77 

6 

10 

18 

(*337) 

325 

32 

45 

60 

13 

20 

25 


350 

13 

27 

37 

27 

32 

37 


375 

S 

15 

rr 

40 

47 

— 

Dofltars 

600 

110 



4 


_ 

re9s> 

650 

70 



15 

— 

* — 


700 

2/ 

— 

— 

35 

— 

— 

GEC 

180 

16 

24 

30 

8 

ft 

11 

P86) 

200 

7 

13 

18 

17 

19 

22 


220 

3 

6 

— 

36 

38 

~ 

Grand Met 

327. 

50 

_ 

— 

2 



_ 

1*373) 

355 

30 


e— 

8 

— 

— 


360 


40 

45 

— 

16 

20 


382 

17 

— 

— 

25 

— 

— 

ICI 

900 

110 

137 


7 

1? 

_ 

C989) 

950 

70 

100 

115 

17 

30 

37 


iooo 

42 

67 

77 

40 

47 

57 


1050 

20 

47 

57 

67 

72 

80 

Land Sec 

300 

27 

36 

44 

4 

6 

9 

f3l8) 

330 

10 

18 

?6 

16 

18 

20 


380 

2ft 

6 

14 

44 

44 

44 

Marts SSpen 

180 

22 

27 

35 

3 

4 

7 

(197) 

200 

9 

15 

21 

9 

11 

13 


220 

2 

8 

•13 

24 

26 

28 

She* Trans 

750 

A5 

113 

1?5 

3 

14 

22 

(*841) 

800 

50 

66 

92 

15 

27 

33 


850 

20 

40 

58 

42 

47 

52 

TJjtelgar House 

• 240 

42 

48 

55 

■3 

6 

ft 

r273J 

260 

24 

31 

39 

/ 

10 

15 


280 

10 

18 

26 

18 

21 

25 


SOnws 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Beediam 

360 

45 

55 

85 

5 

9 

17 

(*396) 

390 

25 

35 

43 

15 

Zi 

27 


420 

12 

23 

30 

33 

40 

43 


460 

2ft 

10 

20 

67 

72 

73 

Boots ■ 

200 

24 

33 

40 

4 

7 

9 

(*213) 

220 

13 

20 

27 

11 

14 

lb 


240 

5 

12 

18 

2b 

2b 

2b 

BTR 

280 

20 

30 

40 

8 

15 

15 

CSC) 

307 

S 

14 

— 

20 

27 

— 


333 

154 

6 

— 

45 

45 

— 

Baas 

.700 

550 

70 

M 

4 

15 

25 

("73QJ 

750 

17 

35 

53 

35 

45. 

45 


BOO 

6 

20 

33 

75 

7b 

80 

BJueOrde . 

SO 

1ft- 

37 

fiO 

17 

25 

30 

(*546) 

600 

ft 

17 

38 

57 

57 

57 


650 

2 

7 

18 

10/ 

107 

107 

De awr# 

650 

100 

25 

140 

7 

20 

30 

0555) 

- 600 

70 

90 

05 

15 

35 

50 


660 

40 

60 

80 

35 

bb 

75 


700 

20 

38 

— 

7b 

8b 

— 

Dixons 

300 

40 • 

4ft 

54 

3 

7 

10 

f336) - 

330 

1ft 

?fl 

3? 

10- 

14 

16 


.360 

6 

12 

22 

28 

32 

36 


280 

1? 

zT 

33 

1ft 

7?, 

24 

(*275) 

300 

R . 

13 

22 

33 

34 

3b 


330 . 

2 

B 

12- 

HO 

W 

HO 


360 

1 

2 

7 

W 

90 

90 

Glaxo 

900 

115 140 



17 

30 

■ 

(*983) 

*. 950 

70 100 130 

30 

40 

55 


1000 

40 

70 

95 

50 

6b 

70 


1050 

20 

50 

72 

00 

95. 100 

Hanson 

- 135 

34 



1 



(*165) 

-150 

19 


- 1» 

_ 

— 


160 

10 

20 

24 

3 

8 

11 


180 

3 9ft 

73 

16 

20 

22 


200 

1» 

4 7ft 

36 . 

38 

37 






Cato 



Puts 

■ 



Series 

Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

Sep 

Dtc 

Mar 

Jaguar 

rag) 


500 

45 

63 

75 

12 

20 

27 


b50 

17 

33 

50 

33 

40 

50 



600 

2 

15 

30 

70 

75 

77 

Thom EMI 


420 

67 

77 

87 

3 

9 

15 

(•477) 


460 

3(1 

45 

55 

17 

2? 

25 


500 

7 

22 

37 

32 

37 

42 



550 

2 

a 

— 

82 

82 

— 

Tesco 


300 

93 



7 



(*385) 


330 

63 

73 

— 

2 

4 

— 


380 

34 

50 

63 

6 

13 

15 



390 

11 

23 

37 

15 

18 

20 



Series 

_**a 

Now 

Feb 

Aug 

Nov 

Feb 

Brit Aero 


460 

33 

45 

67 

5 

15 

23 

(•491) 


500 

10 

28 

45 

20 

33 

38 


550 

1ft 

12 

25 

63 

68 

TO 

BAT inis 


360 

31 

45 

55 

2ft 

6 

9 

(*390) 


390 

7 

25 

37 

7 

20 

23 


420 

1 

11 

18 

33 

40 

43 



460 

ft 

3 


73 

78 


Barclays 


460 

15 

37 

52 

B 

20 

25 

(*487) 


500 

2 

IK 

32 

37 

4/ 

50 


550 

2 

7 

15 

87 

92 

92 

Bm Telecom 


180 

13 

21 

76* 

2 

6 

9 

(190) 


200 

2 

11 

17 

14 

15 

21 


220 

1 

5 

B 

32 

32 

34 

1 Cmtiury Schwpps 

160 

9 

19 

23 

2 

6 

10 

1*168) 


180 

3 

9 

15 

1b 

16 

IS 


200 

1 

3 

7 

35 

3b 

35 

imperial Br 
0345) 


300 

45 

55 


1 

7 




330 

20 

30 


4 

8 

— 

L 

360 

4 

1b 

— 

20 

23 

— 

Ladbroke 


300 

58 

67 

73 

1 

3 

5 

C355) 


330 

28 

40 

45 

3 

8 

9 


360 

/ 

20 

22 

10 

20 

22 

LASMO 


100 

15 

75 

30 

3 

8 

12 

P1?> 


110 

8 

16 

23 

6 

1? 

18 


120 

3 

12 

16 

12 

18 

23 

MrUandBank 


500 

37 

55 

70 

7 

10 

15 

(*534) 


bbO 

8 

22 

37 

22 

32 

37 


600 

2 

7 

18 

87 

70 

70 

P&O 


460 

36 

45 

63 

2 

10 

15 

(*4 95) 


500 

6 

25 

43 

13 

30 

35 


bbO 

2 

10 

20 

be 

0) 




600 

1 

3 


108 

108 

— 

Racal 


160 

22- 

X> 

38 

2 

5 

6 

(*180) 


180 

7 

■T7 

74 

6 

12 

15 



200 

l». 

> 9 

15 

22 

24 

26 

HTZ 


500 

77 

82 

97 

2 

7 

12- 

(*564) 


SO 

22- 

47 

62 

9 

20 

32. 


600 

B- 

30 

42 

40 

50 

60 



B5D 

1ft 

14 

23 

8b 

9b 

102 

vaal Reals 


50 

lift 

14 

16 

1 

2ft 

4ft 

(*81) 


60. 

3ft 

3ft 10ft 

4ft 

6ft 

8ft 


70 

ft 

4ft 

— lift 

13 

*“ 


Series 

tag New Mar Aug New 

Her 

. Lonriio 


200 

12 

28 

31 

3 

8 

11 

(-210) 


218 

4 

19 


9 

lb 




238 

1 

10 



26 

29 




240 



11 


— 

38- 



255 

1 

4ft 


45 

48 



Series 

tag Nov Feb Aug 

tow Feb ,j" 

Trm%1991 


106 

2*.« 

2ft 

• 

ft 


. 

(*£108) 


108 

ft 


1ft 

am 

1ft 

— - 


110 

*3Z 

*.e 


2 


3M-. 

Tr 11 Vk 03/07 


114 

4ft 

5ft 



1 

•_ ■ 

(*£118) 


116 

2ft 

4ft £>ic 

* » 

1ft 

2ft ‘ 


118 

lit SV. 4*.b 

iw 

2ft 

3ft 



120 


2* 

3ft 

2 

3ft 

4ft - 



122 

Ss ■ 

1ft «•«. 

3ft 

5ft- c 



124 

'in 

■in 

— 

7 

— 

S 



Sept 

Oct Nh Aug Sept 

Oct 

NO. | 

FT-SE 1525 

5? 

75 

so 

107 

6 

13 

22 

30 ’ 


37 

58 

7? 

90 

16 

23 

30 

40 - 

(*1568) 1575 

25 

4ft 

60 

75 

77 

33 

40 

57 

1600 

11 

33 

48 



47 

80 

53 

—m 

1625 

4 

20 

3ft 



70 

77 

72 

— 

1650 

2 

11 

77 


95 

9/ 

97 


1675 

1 

6 

20 

— 

20 

122 

122 

— S 
ii 


August 12, 1986. Tool cootracts 1B725 . Cels 11883. Puts 4842. *Underiyieg security priee. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


The markets had another 
extremely quiet session. The 
day started on an optimistc 
note, but buyers who nibbled 
at sterling CDs in the first 
boor or two quickly polled 
back when they found rates 
easing against them. The 
ket really fizzled ont then. 
Rates, however, retained the 
slightly easier levels of the 
first part of the morning. Local 
authorities continued to show 
little - interest. 

Baa* Rates* 

Clearing Banks 10 
finance House 10 
Discount Market Loans % 

OvemmM High: 10 Low 9 
Week fixed: 

Treasury Mi (Discount %) 

gSSv 


3 ninth 9» 


2 mntfi g*,# 
3mmn 9X 


Prime Bank BMs (Docount %) 
9 >, i»-6X 2 mntfi 9" 


1 mnth . 

3 rrmtti S*m-9X 


. W-9X 
6 mntfi 9 "m-9'jj 


Trade Bils (Discount %) 

1 mnth 10*'® 2 mnth lIPn 

3 mnth 10 *i« 6 mntfi »>'» 

Interbank (%) 

Overnight open Oft dose 1 0 
1 week 9ft-9»« 6 mnth 9«ie-9»= 

1 mnth 9' 0 -a3»B 9 mnth 9”«^X 

3 mnth Bft-9 u is 12mth 9 ,] <a-9ft 

Local Authority Deposit* (%) 

2 days 6ft r 7 days 9X 

1 mnth 9X 3 mnth SV, 

6 mnth 9% I2mth 9"u 

Bonds (%) 

2 mnth 10K-10 
6 mmh tOft-aft 
l2mth 9ft-9% 


1 mnth 10K-1. 
3 mnth 1054-10 


1 mnth 9 n w-9'4i» 3 mnth 9 n »9"if 
6imm fl» 12 mth. 9" ir&n 

DoBerCDsr*) • 

.38825 Smith 66032S 


1 mnth 6. 

6 mnth 660325 


12mtn 890365 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


can 7-6 
1 mn0r6ft-6!4 

&mnh Pita’s 
can 84 
imiith 4H«4ft 
6 mnth 4 >m* 4’,| 
can 7ft- Bft 
1 mntfi 7V7 
6 mnth 7ft-7X 
can 25ir-1ft 
1 mnth 454^4ft 
6 mnth 4 7 <e4*i» 
can ' 5ft-4S 

1 mnth 4V4>4 
fimnth 4-K-4S 


GOLD 


’(per coin!: 

LOO-384 60 (£25760-259.00) 

LOO) 


ECGD 


con. 


& 


rrod July 2 1988 to 


running down its organic col- 
ours business, resulting in the 
closure of its MiUwali. Lon- 
don and Stockport. Greater 
Manchester, plants. Loot ho, 
also with interests in precious 
metals, finished only lp 
higher at 210p. after 21 3p. The 
Mutual Shares Corp has been 
buying more shares in the 
company and now speaks fora 
total of 24.27 million Lonriio 
shares. 

Bid speculation increased in 
Exco International, the money 
broker and financial services 
group, where the price hard- 
ened 3p to 232p. The group 
has announced that First City 
Financial Corp. a Vancouver- 
based investment group, has 
built up a stake of 14.6S 
million shares (6.25 per cent). 


• Shares of Allied-Lyons, 
unchanged at 305p yesterday, 
have been a doll market 
lately, still awaiting the 
Monopolies Commission’s 
report on the bid from Elders 
IXL — and now worried by 
its probe into the tied-faouse 
system for pubs. As a re- 
sult, some brokers are now 
recommending investors to 
switch out of Allied and into 
Guinness, 5p np at 313p. 


AE, the automotive compo- 
nents group, leapt 30p to 234p 
after Turner & Newall 
bounced back with a higher 
offer following the rejection of 
its initial bid. Turner is now 
offering one of its shares, plus 
70p in cash, for every share in 
AE. There is also a cash 
alternative of 240p a share. 
The deal now values AE at 
£246 million. Turner’s share 
price dipped 5p to 177p. 

Good Relations, the finan- 
cial PR and advertising 
agency, saw its share price 
suffer a bout of nerves after 
news of the latest in a long line 
of departures. This time a 
team of five, led by Mr Jeremy 
Wyatt, a director, has been 
lured away by rivals. Good 
Relations has seen its share 
price gradually eroded by 
defections and last year's scan- 
dal involving Ms Maureen 
Smith; a former director, who 
sold her entire stake in the 
company to Mr Christopher 
Moran, the insurance broker, 
at a substantial discount to the 
market has only added to the 
group’s miseiy. 

Both parties were even- 
tually given a dressing down 
.by the Stock Exchange. The 
GR price finished 2p dearer at 
95p. after hitting a new low of 
85p. 

The big four clearing banks 
continued to enjoy renewed 
support. Marketmen claim 
that the razzmatazz surround- 
ing the Trustee Savings Bank 
flotation next month could 
rub-off 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Light at the end of 
the Lloyd’s tunnel 


For ihe first time in five years 
Lloyd's can look at the light at the end 
of the tunnel knowing that it ts not an 
oncoming train. It is 18 months since 
the last scandal surfaced, which docs 
suggest that the real villains of Lime 
Street were confined to some three 
dozen characters who seemed to 
believe that high taxation was a good 
enough excuse for theft and cared 
nothing for the name, or the names, of 
the great institution they manipulated 
for their own ends. 

In the second place, 1983 (the 
returns for which will be published in 
September) was the turning point in 
the underwriting cycle. As premium 
rates have risen and the demand for 
Lloyd's services increased, profits 
have improved. The prospect is good 
for several years of pleasing returns. It 
is always easier to solve problems in 
good times. 

In the third place Lloyd's, commer- 
cially unscathed abroad by the scan- 
dals that have caused so much 
concern at home, is increasing its 
share of the non-life-insurance market 
at an impressive rate. Between 1978 
and 1982, Lloyd’s premium income 
rose at a compound rate of 27 per cent 
a year. Since 1982 it has doubled to 
£8.6 billion. Moreover, the value of 
Lloyd's to the balance of payments in 
1985 was no less than £1.8 billion 


The Davis report on the Richard 
Beckett Underwriting Syndicates, the 
hapless successor of the infamous 
PCW, thus marks the end of a black 
period for Lloyd's, although one of far 
reaching and constructive change. It 
leaves Lloyd's with four major tasks: 
the PCW settlement, re-rcgistering of 
Lloyd's brokers, development of its 
internal training, administration and 
policy-making, and the recommenda- 
tions of the Neill Report. 

Primary responsibility for clearing 
up the PCW mess — the losses are now 
put at £235 million — rests squarely 
with Lloyd's. If the settlement prom- 
ised by Lloyd’s by the end of the year 
is not forthcoming, massive litigation 
by the names looks inevitable. 

Lloyd's is well aware it cannot 
afford to botch the PCW settlement. 
Sir Patrick Neill's Government-ap- 
pointed inquiry into regulatory 
arrangements at Lloyd's, and particu- 
larly into the protection of names as 
investors, is due this autumn. Lloyd's 
ability to deal fairly with PCW names, 
who have been the victims of fraud as 
well as bad underwriting, is now on 
trial. The clamour, which precipitated 
the Neill inquiry, from both sides of 
the Commons for Lloyd's to be 
included in the Financial Services 
Bill, has not gone away. 


The great credit boom 


The latest building society figures, 
as foreshadowed here yesterday, are 
witness to another great’ house-buying 
boom, which is loudest in ceriain 
areas of the country, notably the 
South-east, bringing problems, includ- 
ing difficulties in repaying mortgages. 

Last month societies lent a record 
£3.87 billion and for the first time 
committed themselves to lending 
more than £4 billion. For their part 
the clearing banks made housing loans 
in July totalling £670 million and they 
too have stepped up their commit- 
ments to house buyers to unprece- 
dented levels. 

It is not the least bit surprising that 
house prices have risen by 17.8 per 
cent in the last year, or that they are 
still rising. Demand for loans for other 
types of consumer spending is also 
strong and there is no question that 
credit is being pumped into the 
economy at a rate that cannot possibly 
be sustained 

. Normally higher interest rates , 
would start to curb the pace of 
borrowing but there is no sign of that. 
Other banks may follow Barclays' 
lead, when it said that ‘‘long-term 
prudence" demands that the growth 
in lending to British customers is 
restrained The solution to the credit . 
spiral no one wants is a major 
financial collapse. 


A good stock market during the 
autumn is important for general 
confidence and the successful launch- 
ing into private waters of the TSB and 
British Gas. Lower interest rates, 
which at present look on for Septem- 
ber, would help the cause. 

The gilt-edged market was fairly 
quiet but fractionally harder yesterday 
as dealers digested the Bank of 
England's I 1 /: points cut late the 
previous afternoon in the price of the 
Treasury 8 1 /: per cent 2007 tap stock. 
This was the culminating move in a 
deft series that has brought about a 
useful devaluation of sterling, particu- 
larly against the mark, while at the 
same time forestalling a run on the 
pound 

The main play has been in the 
money market where, by turns, the 
Bank has oversupplied and under- 
supplied credit to such good effect that 
the key three-month interbank rate 
has 'remained on balance, pretty 
steady, while the yield on high coupon 
stocks since the end of July has hardly 
risen. 

If the Bank's latest tactic works and 
the jobbers drive the gilt-edged mar- 
ket higher, ordinary shares, tn better 
form yesterday on the back of 
Unilever's figures, would benefit. 


Keep it in the family 

A national firm of Chartered Accountants 
with strong representation and 
substantial experience and expertise 
in helping the expatriate and his family 
in minimising their personal taxation liabilities 

We may be able to help mitigate: 

Income Tax-Corporation Tax-Inheritance Tax 




Fpor further information on Personal Tax Planning and our complete^ 
( range of services please complete the coupon and send to: 
Patrick Rushmore, MacIntyre Hudson, 28 Ely Place, 

London EC1N 6RL Telephone: 01-242 0242. Ttelex: 25177 


NAME 


COMPANY. 

ADDRESS_ 


zrz^TJ 

r ■ V 

Alternatively, if you require further information 
regarding Our practice, please contact 
Patrick Rushmore. 

macintyre Hudson 

Chartered Accountants 


E 


l 






I 


» 


M qhct ctmg YU 


ABBEY IMT TRUST MANAGERS 
80 HMhmwsl Rg Bcunemouffl BH8 SAL 
0345 7l?073 <untl>v> 

G4iS F..« 1170 1228 *03 980 

H'fln Inc Equity *15 97 3# *13 5 09 

YJondw»v Bono is* 5 3002# -1 4 * 86 

Anwncvi Crown 1509 160 5 *31 I 54 

Awn P»i<e ASS 52. J -03 305 

AiMM A Eato 101 2 1093 + 12 224 

CMtol Reserve 66 0 86.4 . 1 52 

Comm A Energy 734 705 +09 211 


H^n Inc Eautv 
Bom 

Amencwi Grown 
Amu p»u 
*5 sen a Earns 

Cavul Rescue 
Comm A Energy 
European CJPMI 

General 

Japan 

un Grown Me 
Do *«vn 
US* Emerang Cos 
Equaas Prouess 
MasiWiLAee 


S r l 1032 -03 133 

15 I AOS* +2.1 3.02 


SI 5 as 7 
W 1013 
1352 1A53 
540 577 
lB7 1 1«9 
64 0 680 


AIMED DUNBAR IMT TRUSTS 
ABM Dumur Cewe S+ndOA 3M1 1EL 
0793 610386 S 0793 28291 


F*«l Tn»« 2207 2350 

Growth & Income 1312 139 7 

Capra* Truer 225.4 2*0.0 

Ba*ancM 3*5 3 367 7 

Mam Trull 535 3 570.1 

Aimjrrjn tnwroe 320 34 f 

Hgn Income Tsi 243.8 258 6 

Equrfv Income 1330 IC3 

Ywfc 139.8 1480 

Gon Sees Tmsl 29 9 312 

mtomniarui 64 4 89 9 

Ja»M Fvrt 1187 1264 

Paott Trust I7J 8 188-2 

AlTMf SOO SrfS 64 7 889 

Sect 01 Arner Tm 2I14 52SI 

Aid Asset value 2202 234 5 

G4| Grown 37 8 394 

Smaier Cos 1 15 4 tffiA 

2 nd Snuenr Cos 1506 100.* 

Recovwv Trus 79 S 84 7 

Met Un A CnratY 789 84 o 

Oseas Eamnqs |767 1882 


220.7 235 Oe +32 360 

1312 1397 +19 324 

225.4 2400 +33 £83 

3*53 367 7 +49 X31 

535 3 5701 *7 4 310 

320 341* +01 431 

24X8 2506 +28 4 79 

1336 1CM +15 500 

139.8 1480 +15 550 

29 9 312 +0 1 9 23 

644 899# *09 080 
1187 1264 +2.4 04)1 

174 8 1882# +4)9 056 
6*7 889 +03 142 


KM M^i he 
Prt* Sn*n» 
Commomy 
Financial Sues 
(WSOt* 
w Lvov* 

Prop Star?* 
urov Energy 
¥ltorw Teai 
Am# CTO« 

Amw Income 
Ana Smaller Co's 
ausi Grown 
Euu 5m* Mr 
Far EjsI 
Hong Fpng Prt 
M Grown 

Japan Pert 
japan Smsner 
Ewmn 

WM 

BROWN £MH£Y 

9-17. Perrymoum Re 
04*4 458144 

Fjianoa 

Smaller Cos Act 
Do Income 
Hajli income 
income 

Man Portfgtg Inc 
Do ACC 

Win Ameraam 
Onem 


1850 197.3 

162 19 4C 

1174 1252 
44 5 47 6 
181 17 4 

163 174 
66.6 710 
410 437* 
396 C5* 
90 6 96.6 
57 6 61 4 
21 2 22 SB 
620 661 
160 171 
49 3 526c 
2*7 £63# 
382 386 
785 8)8 
166 17.7 
792 029 


1226 131 1c 
2253 2422 
14*2 1552 
643 601 
73 6 791 
588 620* 
982 1056# 
56 7 63 2# 
66 1 927 


41.2 £72 
*15 

+ 1.0 096 
+08 584 
+0 7 *98 
+88 327 
+ 14 

♦07 133 
*02 022 



74 2 
5£7 
HI 

no +09 
66.1# +0.1 
633# +05 


73-5 

7B2 +06 


505 

620 *03 

zm 

824 

07 7# +03 


BUOCMASTBIMANAO eM Or r 

The Swdi Exchange London EC2P 2JT 

01 586 2868 


378 394 +02 227 

1154 12? d« +0.4 £79 
1506 100.* +0 5 750 

795 847 +08 221 

789 8*0 +0 9 236 

1767 1882 +26 3 15 

863 919 +0.7 098 

1222 1302# *1 0 624 


Tecntwogr Tsi S6 3 919 +0.7 098 

income Exempt 1222 1302# *t 0 62+ 

Even'd 5maa«i Cos 226* 2*00 +08 301 

USA Eu^mn Trust 337 6 357 0 *42 115 

AfUnmiNOT SECURITIES 
131. Fntstwy Pavomern, London EC2A tAY 
01-638 9976 01 200 8540/1/3/3 
Cental Grom me 564 503 *03 175 

BO Accun 63 1 67.4 +Q4 1 75 

Eastern 8 ma 1*05 1502 +03 OBO 

Do 6°* Wimdravul 753 802 .020 

Fnjnco 2 Property 63 l 67 4 +02 222 

Gw A Freed income 47 9 504# +0 1 829 

Do Accurn SI S as 7# -03 829 

EQwry mcame 71 St 76.4# +04 5.02 

Do Accun 169 4 161 +08 502 

Hdi YW ham 72.7 777 +Q1 7 71 

Do Accum 190 7 2039 +0 2 7.71 

bm marine 768 821 +02 222 

DO Accum 782 842 +07 222 

Do 5'. Wtfiowl 71 2 761 +02 222 

Manned Ftmo 61 6 642 

Preference income 29 4 314# -01989 

Do Acorn 952 1018# -01 929 

Smaller CoS Accun l2S1 133 7 176 

World Peony Sloe 96 102# .. 073 

FUTKAO Ttt UK 732 785# +£U 1 67 

Pomoho Tst JKHO 1052 1090# +06 000 
PorPo+o TW LIS 687 71 1# +Ol 11) 

PortUMTsI Europe 1156 1l97« *1.9 000 
PorPoiiO TV Hh 422 443# -02 0.10 


X GtaHirJas Si Efrntwtfi EH3 6YY 
031-735 2581 (Dealers Ml -276 8086) 
im E* 1221 443 1 462 6# 1 09 

Japan E. |J31 4382 *55 1 020 

UK E> (311 739 5 25* 7 . 1 32 

PsjI Pens hm 4*8 0 471.6 
P +41 Bens UK 199 0 2096 
SO Amenca 164 7 I75.a# -20 029 

6G Energy 1375 1463 +O6 1J0 

BG income Grwn 1886 1986 +09 641 

BG Japan 1991 2M 9 +03 000 

BG Technology 139 2 148 8 -17 0 68 

BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25/26 AJBermane Sonet. London WlX 4AO 

01-191 0295 

American 46 4 49.7 -08 01* 

Ausnahan 164 176 -01 321 

Japan A General 1121 1200 -0 9 017 

hoi income *46 *77 +11 7a* 


General Inc f*l 
Do ACCum 1*1 
mam Fund Pt 
Do Accum (3) 

mo me (2) 

Do Accun J3 
smator me El 
Do Accun IS) 


3072 2184 108 

3372 3491 30B 

TOO 4 1057 4 73 

1762 165-5 .. 4.73 

1277 133 + e -03 151 

1822 1784 -04 121 

Ell. II 1179# .. 330 

E11B3 1236# .. 320 


CS FUND MANAGERS 


125 HHfl Horan. Lender WCiv SPY 
01 242 1142 


01 242 1148 
CS Japan Fund 


871 027 *03 023 


CAIWON FtStD MANAGERS 
1 Orympe Way. Wander HA9 ONB 
01-902 8876 


Far ESSI 

North American 
Octal 
Euopean 
Japan 


2883 2833# +12 3.15 
313 4 333 4# +12 393 
2082 221 fi +13 030 
1480 1575 *07 058 

480 51 1# -01 130 

507 539 +01 TOO 

502 630 +0.7 030 


American 
Ausnahan 
■Iron A Gen et# 
r hjn income 
Fnlamabmal Trust 
Aieome Gin Tv 
G*ts. 3 Freed mt 
Oobai Markets 
Special Seuahons 
BARCLAYS UMCONN 


79 0 843# +07 1.00 

440 47 1* +05 412 

192 2U +0.1 922 
32 1 3J4 -02 217 

37.4 400 +02 163 


n»°p iMiir+ Mir|»i;nnir 
PO Bo. ^Ifc+iuarfs uiidon EC3 7 JO 
01-621 0011 

Caonal 359 9 3850 +31 188 

income 274/ 2916 *36 493 

Norm American 2802 3062 -02 020 

CATER ALLEN 

1. iuh WWam SL EC4N 7 Ml 
01-6256314 

OH Trust 1012 108 a# *0.11120 

CENTRAL BOARD OF FINANCE OP 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 

2. Fore Street London EC2V SAD 
01-568 1815 

1+v Fund 3979 447 

Freed mt 144 4 9.90 

Oepral 1000 .. 970 

OURHIES OFFICIAL INVESTMENT FIRE) 

3 Fare Street. Lanaon EC2T 5AO 
01-588 1815 

mcame 36414 505 

ACCum El 03721 

OetxnM 100.0 035 

CLERICAL MEDICAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow Ram. BnSBK BS2 OJH 
0800 373393 

Am# Growth 229 24.4 +04 1.90 

Eouiy Mgn meeme 40.7 433 *03 4 80 

European Grom 28 7 302 +02 2.00 

General Eauly 37 4 398# +05 2.70 

om s Fneo in am 293 31 5# +01 320 

Gfl 8 F«ea me 24 5 250 *01 920 

indm Seamtwe 254 268 +01 238 

JSPtn Gnwth 33 7 352 *09 020 





■l-’.I 

4i®ri 











unesm House. 252. FlamKM Rd E7 
01-534 5544 


AnwncH B53 90.7 

Aim Accum 1304 1280 

Da turn B5 5 901 

Camtol 680 702 

Emmpl Trust 410 I 436 2 

Ertra Incane 72.6 772 

Financial 2232 2374 

500 2582 2751 

General 133 1 1413 

G4l 2 FntM hie 546 574 

Japan A Gen me 160 8 1792 

Do ACC 1708 1812 

Grom Aocum 173 3 1843 

mcome Truv 3?ao 3383 

Lmsire Trust 78 * 83 4 

Speoai Smianons 1350 1436 

P fernery i860 197 8 

TiuVee Fund 102 4 1089 

Un» Tech Accum 608 5*0 

Do mcotnp 503 Si& 

WortdMle Trust 1*9* ISB9I 

'6 Tsi Imr Fund Ace 3121 3320 

Dome 2022 2151 

BARWO FUND MANAGERS 
PO Bo> 156. BaCWnbam. Kwv E 
01-656 9002 

Australia 505 625 

EaSMrti 57 0 609 

Eonty Income ‘54 7 588 

Europe 125 6 1336 

Growm 8 Inc 60S 653 

Japan Special 1038 IHO 

japan Sumse 9l G 07 9 

Few Empg 1103 1173 

Frsi japan 883 950 

Frsi N Amer *9 3 52 7 1 

Fesi Smaller Co S 617 S63 

BARRMCTON MANAGEMENT ' 

10 Fenovdi Si. Lanaon EC3 
01-623 8000 


853 90.7 *1 2 139 

1208 1260 -IS 1S7 

B5 5 001 -1.1 157 

680 702# +11 310 

A101 4362 +6.1 4.15 

726 772 +0.6 572 

2233 237 4 *20 3 IB 

2562 275 1c +12 330 

1331 1415 +22 325 

5*6 574c .. 954 

160 6 1795 +19 0 06 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
161 OwMM. London EC2V 6EU 
01 726 1999 


Energy Trust 
Emm mam 
Fumaai 
G41 Strategy 


44 5 472# 
1566 1665# 
1625 1722# 
563 573 


Grom Investment 355 4 2823# 
income 4 Grom 384 406# 


.. 954. 
+19 006 
+20 008 
+26 248 


173 3 1643 +26 246 

3180 339 J# +4 1 330 
784 B3 4 +02 1 A3 

1350 1436 +1 1 2*2 

I860 1978 +22 250 

1024 1089# +1 I 101 
50 8 540# +05 021 
503 535# +05 031 
U94 1589# +22 099 


Nm Amer Growm 

ms Recovery 
SmaMfr CDS 
G totoi Inc Tst 
'Soecof&B Aec 


101 1 107.5 
1084 1I5J# 
2055 ZI87c 
57 1 60.7 
2893 297.1 


+03 382 
+19 563 
+15 243 
-. 19* 
♦55 289 
♦0.4 481 
♦33 071 
+0.7 1 15 
+ 1.1 128 
+03 191 

-01 52a 

♦ 1.1 125 


CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. Woking GU2I 1XW 
04062 5033 

Hqn income Trust 2300 2480 +29 

Growm Trust 2115 2282# +22 
American Trua 1299 13&3a +22 

CRUSADBt UNIT TRUST IHNAGBISLTD 


Ragate Surrey RH2 SSL 
07372 42424 

UK twin *84 515 -+03 447 

UK Growm Acorm 479 51 0 +02 2*3 

Do DW 479 519 +02 243 

.Eiropeon Growm 535 570 -09 123 

Paul* Growm 54 1 57.6 +0.1 .. 

EFM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. Mehr#e GrOSCenL 
031-226 31.92 - . 

Amencan Fund 7 24 77.4 +12 220 

Capital Fund 91.4 972 +04 1.74 

Growth 8 Inc FoxJ 1225 131.1# +23 458 . 
tfcgn Om Fund 10*B llll +03 692 

imerpanonal Fund 195 0 2087# +19 1.08 

Resoures Fung 2T9 234 +D.1 0.43 

Snwi Jap. Cos Fnd 37? 405 -04 . 


484 515 
479 510 


Planned nw 

European Sic 
Do Aceam 
General Inc 
Da Accun 

Gm TiM me 1)35 1)69 +04945 

Do Accum 1830 1085 +0 6 9.45 

Hrti liettj he $38 092 +05 5 68 

Da Accum l«89 1776 +09 568 

Japan income 2SiO 2642 +0 4 D.10 

Do Accun 2526 2881 +04 010 

N Amencan me 48 8 519 +03 058 

Do Accun 56 7 601 +0 3 058 

Pacftc income 1331 139 7 -06 021 

Do Accum 1499 157 2 -0 6 021 

Smer Cos hie 779 029 +01 1.89 

Du Accun 923 902 +01 1.69 

BRltAMOA UNIT-TRUST 
74-78 Fmsaunr Pavement London EC2A 1JD 
°LSPS ■ ?7 ^L De *°9 D1 -«3e 0479/9 MoneyGude 


1279 1359 . 390 

334 980 *14 156 

115 1 1205 +1 7 1 JG 

150 6 1630# +0.9 200 

3054 2102 +13 £98 


tE«l Amer «2» 
(Eel Jaoan (31 
IE«I Paohc (4) 


1736 1057# +33 0 00- 

1470 1526 +4.1 359 

1109 1145 .. 0.19 

2867 2980 .. 034 


lE*l Senator Jap (4) 2222 229 4 . 010 

Euofund 27.1 29.0# +0-1 145 

EAOUi STAR UWT TRUST MANAUtK. 

Batti Road. Cnetamam. Gtoucever GL53 7LQ 
0242 521311 

UK Balanced Inc 662 706 +0.6 297 

Do Accun 672 71 7 +0.7 292. 

UK Owe Accun 003 857 *15 1.78 

UKFhgnmcmc 025 670 +02 527 



NORWICH UT MAUAMWI 

P0 Bo* 4 Nonncti NH1 3NG 
0603 622200 

Ge»p Trust C1I03 1225 

mil Trust <203 135 1 


-0*0 303 
*04 132 


OPPENNBHER TRUST MANAGEMENT 
88 Cavern Snaei. Lanaon EC4N 6*E 
ar«ngs 01-238 3885/8/7/8^9/0 
mtematatai Gtowti »403 150 1# +03 1 89 
moome t Grom 58 9 63 0 3 08 

Warthwda Ree 832 890 L50 

Amencan Oream '324 34.7 0 00 

Ja&»n GnJwm 610 653 -03 000 

European Growm (64 71 I# *03 0.07 

UK Grom 528 565 +0fl 1.16 

PK*cGlO*Bl 532 S60 +04 126 

Hon income 32 B 35 1 -0 1 737 

FVacacal income 530 56.4 +03 E 14 

Do Accum 959 1021 +05 21* 


252 Wa n HOBOT. WCIV 7a 
01-405 B44I 


01-405 8441 

Groih FuM me 

Oo Accum 

income Fund 
mg E«my w 
Do ACCUn 
Una TruV.bK 
Do Accun 


BEL5 94 1 
1325 1413 
1166 134 0 
1301 1384 
130< 138.4 
1234 13+3 
2137 2273 


tnrj rncome il?2 Kin® ** 

Sd mcame 5»j wi fj 

t»*KRM «M3 nr. I .O-Cx' 

tvome 8*6 *1.0 4 S: 

japan 10J4 1096# *10 01(1 

lUOy A 5nWJ" -j* •£5»;i 

■PaoK me M+ WOc +Ci 10: 

□o Runvm 1149 lEEvC iq; 

Pid Sw* fa '88# 1JU* 

UK Cl 0431 68 7 'J , • >P1 ly) 

SoSsm **'• +01 uy{ 

tSmoKW fil *'0 .«oia 

world income VB 60:# »PI Jo 

SSS-Scipnat ««5 i»;# .15 

Ftai/v E+ IJ 1 '2- 41- -0- -- tl 

DO ACtun |3I U.1 H7 4 -15 JIT 

THORNTON UWT MANAGERS ITO 
Pm House 1C nraamy Cecus Lcnacn eciu 

7PJ 

01-638 4781 

Far East 6 Sen 55 6 59> -Oi 084 

Japan A Got MS 5.9 OK 

Ntn Amor 6 Gao *9t! 5c ) +0.' 096 

pjcJt Tech 521 59 4 -1 * (|9i 

v£r 57 7 613 +D4 060 

jKSGen *3 1 488 +05 Cig 

S UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 

7 SI Mary Ate London ECJA 3SP 
Oi 938-3356 

Snvtt* Cos 61 1 556 +0C 1 go 


Far East 6 On 
japan & Gfi 
Ntn Amer A Goa 
RaabcTPCti 


PERPETUAL UNTT TRUST 

48. Hart Street HHMy On Thames 

0491 570868 


WortOmdc Bee 
Amer OroPi 
5# Emerg Co's 
Far Eos* Giwm 
Eutnean Gffl 


2603 3886 

(84 7 1978 
1465 1572 
683 733 
7&S 842 
752 808 
548 643 


234 34 
£34 34. 
27 2 29 
272 29 
283 30 
M6 30 
1)84 123 


PROUHC UNIT TRUSTS 
722. BahGpgste. London EC2 
01-247 75*4/7 


01-247 7544)7 

tmematml 
mcome 
Corw « G4 
Far Em*em 
North Amencan 
SoectP Ses 
Tec h nology 
Em Income 


1139 122.1 +15 093 

SSJ 638B +0# 441 
S60 1033c . 591 

179l7 )B£7 +£8 000 

1270 1375 +1.7 1.10 

aao 732e +10 1-6S 

109.1 1174 +04 0.10 

855 92D +07 4.78 


PRUOBnUL UMT TRUST MAtMOCm 
51-60. nom H4L Word Earn. 01 2QL 
01-470 3977 


Horan Equty 385.4 *nas +62 334 

Euocean im2 106S +a* 05fl 

Horan Comms 52.1 554# +01054 
Horan hui me ®.o +03 6*o 

Horan mg 98.7 1050# +1.0 082 

Japanese 995 1050 +1.1 005 

n Aomen 7*JD 78.7 +12 057 

Horan Spec 9a 62.* 663a +08 3 1« 
Horan UK Growm 783 832# +1.4 225 
Horan G <S Trust 1885 T97.7 +05 247 


TOUCHE REMNANT 

Mermaid Hddt* 2- Ph60» I 
3AT 

01-248 1250 

Amonun Groff) <1 0 

General GnwKn 51 1 

GWmi Teen gs 

InoCme GlOMfl 51J 

Income Montniy 4. . 
jaowi Grom 4&n 

ManEouiy me 

DP Accum 71+ 

DvBS Growm 489 

Smaaet Cd« G04 

Special Opp* 7i0 

TYNGAU MANAGERS 
^ C a n^g e HO. Bn*m 

Aieanhan 51 6 

Do ACC 

CapcN soa? 

Do Accun 5*1 6 

Exempt £838 

Op Accum 6537 

Far Eastern 165 1 

Do Aocum 1701 

Fn A prop S< 5 

Do Accun 812 

G# Cat Mai 124.7 

Do Actum 1-K3 

Get mcame 1092 

Do A«um 1775 

Hem Ymu 52.7 

Do Accun 1153 

feioome 2292 : 

Do Accun 7081 ' 

km Eamngs 1550 


OcC» LCndan EC4V 


-08 1 Tl 

-or 1 m 

*5? 3*1 
-92 341 
-14 503 
*3? 583 
-01 C J8 
-04 038 
-06 3*5 
-10 3*5 
-03 63* 
-03 S39 
-01 9 51 
-02 *sl 
•05 631 
• 1 1 633 
*25 520 
.7 7 530 
•23 271 


31-45 Gresham SL London ECW 7LH 
01-600 4177 

Chodro Oenerai «i88 4*55 25* 

OuaUanr income 2206 2435# 5*8 

Quadrant H Fd 3815 *015 1 10 

Quaorani flRC Oyery 2505 2665 - £82 

NyRQTHSOMJa ASSET MAMAGBdT 
St Srtla Lena. London EG4P 40U 
01-280 5456 


UK PROWENrUT MANAGERS 
UK House. Cason SL SahSbufY SPt 3SH 
0723 3362*2 

UK 0MW 1005 1103# *2 I 

Paohc Bosm 161 7 171 6# -29 

N Amer 1145 1220# *09 

VANGUARD TRUST 
05 Horan Maduci EClA 2EU 
Genemt Enquoes 01-236 3053 Deahng Lew fli. 
235 £400 

Grom inc 1835 1952 +t6:B0 


NC Amenca me 
DO ACGun 
MC Energy Rn 
NC mcame 
NC Japan 
NC SmaSar Cos 


2795 2902# +08 1 34 
302.7 3220# *08 124 
1322 1407 -05 £77 

852 912 +1 4 388 

1925 2042 +1.0 001 

137.1 1*58 +07 133 


NC Sink Europ GO'S i860 1072 

NC Eaampi Gfl E13QD 1350 

NC Amer Prop S1 157 12.10 

NC Proper^ 1582 1682 


ROWAN 1287 TRUST 

33 Kmg W a rn 5tnM. London EC4R SAS 
01-638 5678 


Growth IPC 
Do «ccun 

Hum Yield 201 t 21*0# *26 527 

Do Accum 205 5 218? -3b 93' 

Soeoasna 40 7 *34# *05 23t 

Do Accun 41 0 437 *1)3 734 

Trustee 1317 1*02 rlT+li 

Do Accun 2008 213 » *33 4 13 

.Amer KC«n BOO S39 +04 1 3i 

Do Accum 600 639 *0 J 1 31 

Master Pontaho «027 01 8i# +039 2 3r 

Do Accun E6052 5207 *029 2 37 

Aung Rom AVS (S) 112* M96# 193 

Do Accun 1125 1196 ■ 93 

Far East 0 Gen me 50 1 53* -0 5 056 

Do Accun 50 1 53* -05 OK 

WAROLEY UWT TRUST MANAOERS 
WanMy House. 7. Oevo ne rwu 6q London EC- 
01 -929 1S32 

Amencan Tmsl 6*0 689 *00 170 

Far East 8 Gen 106.1 1129# *1 * 040 
w Grom 710 702 '03 060 

Income Trust 012 88* *06 5 M 

Japan Growm 1284 138 1 *'+020 

SmmCampms 107 1 1152 -05 2M 

Technology^ 33 7 351 -0J 820 

AusPWa 35 lB 385 -04 200 

UK That 1258 1319 *1 • 2 20 


2069 36*0*. -21 280 


Secueas P) 
High Yield (S) 
Merni 13) 
Fixed interast 
Hgn mts ro 
Fu East (!) 


£105 222D 156 

0665 681.0c -145 £66 
1650 1605 067 

3945 *025# . . 1 88 

1715 1725 + 1.5 241 

1225 1230 +051247 

3*05 3*4.0 +35 0.19 


courwood Hae. SPier Sl Head. snenaM SI 3RD 
0742 708842 


ROYAL LVE FUND MANAGEMENT 

New HH Rkl LaMapool LB9 3HS 
061-227 4*22 

Equn Trust 590 835 *05 258 

H Trust 727 77 3# -03 1.35 

GN TiUBt 266 275 *0 1 02* 

US Trust 325 3* 0 +03 153 

Pae#c Ban Tst <13 465 -31 030 

20CWign SL London EC2 
01-920 tan 

Ecxwv Dot (120 120.1 *15 156 

Do Accun 1507 1685 *21 156 

X mamoe Tnist 865 82*# *05 <59 
Accum 1023 ICS 9# +11 *58 

US Growth 56 4 601 +4U 057 

DO Am*n 67.6 615 +04 097 


Amencan Tmsl 
Far East 6 Gen 
mt* Grom 
income Tiust 
Japan Growth 
Snua Comparer s 
Techndogy 
Ausaaha 
UK Tiust 
European Grom 
Hong Kong 


550 594# -03 040 
236 252 -0* 1*0 


DS0M1O-J33 
Grown GJi 
me Pectheiy 
Smafler Cos 
UK Growm 
Em Inc 
GO 

Inc A Growth 


59 5 80 . 4 # 
1017 1085 
1380 147 2 e 
35 9 38 3 
533 589 # 
261 27 5 # 
1055 1?rg 


UK Bala need Inc 662 70 S +0.6 257 

Do Accun 672 71 7 +17 292 . 

UK Grom Accun 803 857 *15 1 . 7 $ 

UK legn Inc Inc 625 67 0 +02 527 

N Amencan Accun 653 696 # +09 MO 

Far Eastern Accum 99 * 1065 # +1.1 000 
EuMpean Accun 802 855 # +04 079 

UK OH 8 FI Inc 54 4 500 *02 028 

Do Accun 501 590 +02 003 

ENDURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 
Ataren Centra Hexagon House. 20 Westsm 
Road. Romford RM1 3 LB 
070886968 


EQUITABLE UMTS AUKHU I RATION 
35. Fouxam si. Mandiester 
061-236 5685 

Eourae Pei-can 713 759 *19 33* 


Cap» hwome 
to Acojm 
Commtxity 6 Gon 
to Accum 
Extra High Me 
Do Accun 
08 0 Ffaad he 
to Aeon 
hoi Yah 
to Accun 


Japan 5 Paohc 
to Accum 

N Amercan me 
to Accun 
Euro Gdi he 
to Aecam 
Sma*er Cos me 
to Mam 


735 787 # +05 252 
1005 1072 # +12 252 
1055 1128 +10 316 

1486 1587 +15 316 

575 613 # +14 7.86 
67 1 715 # *14 756 
5*7 57.1 +02 079 

00 * 933 +14 879 

1 * 9.6 1505 +15 £64 

2539 2700 +23 55 * 

1617 171 .*# +20 309 
2061 2035 # +33 309 
2905 3090 +19 109 

304.0 32*9 +15 059 

1114 1188 + 1.4 126 

1335 1423 + 1 6 156 

1218 T 285 +14 1.10 

M 45 15*5 +14 1.10 

1105 1175 # + 0.4 217 
1177 1205 # «K 217 


MURRAY JOHNSTONE UWT TRUST 
MANAGBCNT 

163 . hope SveaL Glasgow 02 21 M 
0*1 221 9252 

American 1102 12 * 5 # + 1.1 3 .MT 

European 2 * 9.4 26 £2 -a* 146 

Smaaer Cos 2001 2232 *21 148 


NATtONAL PROVB»fr BNEETHBIT 

MANAGERS 

48. Graraducfi SL 6C3P Sen 
01-623 4200 Eat 269 


NR UK 
to Accun 
NPI Overseas 
to Accum 
Far East Me 
Amencan ACC 
Euapeon Ace 
WortdMfe ACC 


1935 2054 +25 £90 

311.7 3317 +45 290 

5853 6227 +25 170 

7145 7505 +35 170 

806 943# +17 are 

575 679 +15 130 

533 569 +0.1 050 

409 521 +0.1 MO 



WAVERLEY ASSET MANAGEMENT 
13 Chanouo 8a. EUnourtm 
.031-225 1551 

Ausman Gold 1B£ -194 

Paohc Basel 135 14 4 

CanaoanBMGm 56 7 806 

Gene Mae Fnd «l<£5 106 J 


WHfTIMOOALE UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
2 Honey La EC£ 08T 
01-806 6085/6 

SMDUORRmd 67 6 68 7 0 00 

US Gcnrl Bond Fd «S0B 511 *0 » 

WINDSOR TRUST MANAGERSUO 

INtohsor Huso. 83 hmgsway London ACTS 

8S0 

01-405 8331 

Com S EquN 47T 502 *02 790 

Income 519 SB 3# *08 530 

Growm 40 3 535 +05 2 31 


• Ex dMdand. c Cum dMdond k Cum 
stock spit s Ex stock spfal. m Cum all 
(any two or more of above), a Ex afl ianv 
two or more of a bowel Dealing or 
valuation days: (1) Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
(31 Wednesday. (4) Thursday. (5) Friday. 
(20) 25th ot month. (21) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 
month. (23) 20th of month. (2*) 3rd 
Tuesday or mon t h. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday c< month. (25) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st WeOiesdayof month. (28) 
Last Thursday ot month. (29) 3n3 workng 
day of month. (30) 16th of month. (31) 1st 
wonting dsy ol month. (32) 20th oi month. 
(33) 1 st day of February. May. August. 
November. (34) Last working day of 
month- (35) 15th of month. (36) I4fti of 
month. (37) 21st of month. (38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 


ll) Last Thursday of Stock 
account. (42) Last day of 
I 2nd and 4th Wednesday of 
Quarterly. (45) 6th of month 
jesday of mo n th. 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


60 

45 

U0 

91 

69 

30 

141 

45 

100 

37 

71 

9 

22 

10 

?"5 

103 

173 

108 

747 

.TW 

14J 

130 

I’l 

103 

158 

131 

790 

715 

750 

105 

355 

l&J 

180 

ljl 

670 

*43 

*0 

16 

£i) 

180 

17* 

170 

95 

61 

TO 

t.9 

770 

185 

8* 

60 

173 

50 

27 

17 

53 

Jl 

15 


91 

31 

*60 

778 

JO 

15 

3* 


43 

Cl 

135 

K+J 


10 


06 

O0 123 

54 


SI 

39 1*5 

110 


36 

3' 16 0 

30 


31 

62 IDE 



*61 


£4 




I 

10 



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15 


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. 1 

9 

108 


£6 

14 999 



77 

71 

755 


93 

3 6 14 4 

140 

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73 

■ 6 19 4 

10* 




153 

• . . 

£9 

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£5 75 

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72 

08 
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£5 S3 14 6 
31 £3 236 

72 
+.6 
00 
72 
8* 
22 


74 

60 

77 

31 

20* 

100 

60 

30 

08 

85 

220 

145 

in 

65 

655 

470 

140 

94 

ISO 

93 

47 

38 

83 


16S 

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1? 

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60 

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106 

B5 

174 

08 

128 

98 

91 

50 

73* 

110 

38 

19 

115 

81' 

•80 

160 

92 

50 

*9 

36 

710 

133 

755 

196 

46 

7d 

440 

383 

3jQ 

2M 

145 

I4J' 

415 

135 

705 

SO 

^6 

90 

30' 

7 

113 

105 

133 

105 

150 

115 

340 

200 

£5 

77 

14 

6' 

16* 

H5 

755 

IBB 

730 

165 

31 

16 

1'5 

44 

103 

6« 

J53 

190 

37 

75 

340 

733 

190 

110 

78 

2 

140 

105 

7TB 

73 

70 

48 

330 

?S3 

90 

67 

300 

270 

81 

55 

113 

67 

H3 

67 

63 

37 


70 

43 

33 

110 

too 

91 

74 

140 

95 

196 

133 

67 

17 

90 

84 

7*5 

160 

160 

10i 

135 

55 

74 

54 

55 

90 

778 

97 

35 

9 

116 

101 

135 

93 

763 

195 

270 

138 

98 

75 

19 

9 

75 

7i 

148 

140 

390 

3S0 

138 

95 

107 

71 

95 

59 

760 

360 

770 

118 

47 

22 

183 

82 

385 

£31 

193 

US 

270 

130 

47 

13 

158 

108 

124 

82 

158 

145 

50 

a 

73 

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115 

05 

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135 

367 

237 

31 

13 

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75 

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136 

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5$- 

135 

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37 

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£93 

IN 

35 

73 

143 

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72 

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.. 39 

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£56 

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31 109 

100 


75 

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92 

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£7 

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650 

■ .. 

11 7 

18 169 

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93 

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18 

33 143 

162 


010 30201 | 

233 

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14 214 

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430 


133 

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123 

32 153 

144 . 



3.1 11* 

195 

-5 

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65 




93 


29 

31 149 

29 

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30 

19 179 

123 

121 

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46 

37 138 

330 


60 

19 200 

23 


07 

30 135 

9 

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44 90 

133 


38 

17 173 

730 

+15 

£1 

39 277 

ITS 


32 

18 130 

17 


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176 £1 

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.. 108 

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190 


79 

42 92 

re- 

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07 

£6 205 

335 


33 

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173 


73 

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59 

40 149 

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#•10 

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29 175 

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• . . 

149 

52 124 

72 

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1.7 

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39 

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54 

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103 

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3.3 

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80 

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108 


35 

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108 


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63 63 

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30 213 

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23 

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217 15 

143 

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113 

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595 

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0 5 638 

120 


57 

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10 

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173 

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£3 794 

375 


36 

1.0 ZT 9 

100 


. 35 

£0 392 

160 


74 

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2.0 

4) 85 

138 


i.4&6 

120 


30 

33 150 

1*5 

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43 3*'4 

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79 

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£5 14 7 

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80 

31 153 

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83 52 

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276 


43 

i 0 234 

31 


21 

87 89 

100 

• 

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1988 

H9i Low 
255 168 
79 56 
158 130 
560 £06 
54 10 

53 £0 

ITS 1*3 
152 80 
1*8 S3 

39 23 



350 171 
355 253'. 

80 

5* 22'- 

£20 168 
185 IIP 

101 so 

173 128 
250 136 
205 131 
180 158 
131 96 

37 33 

102 ItS 

31 11 

99 98 

150 90 
83 48 

38 £0 

99 07 

71 55 

so 85 
70 2? 

IDO 71 
38' 17 
93 58 
125 100 

£30 1» 

£35 150 
200 110 
13* 116 

151 • 137 T 
HO 108 Task 

104 52 Tey I 

1*8 98 Tech 
365 194 Teen 
205 115 Tl 

iaa ns ti 

130 70 - 

772 100 
81 63 

96 43 
144* 113 Thd 
50 3£ 

180 (36 
470 270 
00 66 
£60 1*0 
75 43 
94 S 420 
13 S 93 
9* tt 
100 53 
106 66 
IW 75 
10 14 

55 66 Yteu 

90 43 

188 ISO 
ID 4 " 

zr 16 

130 38 
90 48 

180 tSI 
230 165 
00 75 


FIX# 

205 

63 

Ch'ge pence 

% P/E 


43 

6 .0 63 

153 


bJ 

34 142 

4/0 

•-15 

31 

1.1 256 

64 

+2 


1 .. £36. 

31 



.. 56 

170 

■ +2 

3.1 

16 166 



4.7 

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33b £0 502 

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138 


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40 24.7 

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77 

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£6 

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36 

16 £13 

78 


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46 11.B 

43 


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4.7 

34 282 

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16 

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56 

37 136 

415 


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70 

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5*5 


246 

46 .. 

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42 + 6 

82 

64 

78 99 

7S 

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16 

24 259 

70 


£1 

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15 116 

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7.9b 99 119 

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24 961 

M 




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21 



29 


1986 

Hgti Low Company 




♦1 

36 

33 21.1 

•I 

316 

42369 

+2 


14 359 

•2 

89 

26502 

+4 

09 

09 7S6 


391 

14 429 

-4 

161 

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10 

S*313 


07 

19 507 


217 

52 260 

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129 

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149 

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47 

14 409 

+1 

34 

19 57.8 

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23 

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29 

23 580 

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11 

13 816 


0.1 

12 . 


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46 297 



109 87 

16 

82 

16 84.1 


7* 



129 

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f2 


1.1 . . 


38 

£0 502 

4 

5.7 

09 .. 


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33 403 

* 

39 

17 S3 





29 

13 623 


21 

13 615 

+7 

70b 

10 


19 

16 930 


176b 

01 259 


14 

£8 539 

■2 

52 

47 2BS 

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8 

13 

16970 

F5 

51 

23 04 


■''Mu 








i 




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TL 1 Tl 


Tj. L- 

B'^JRN! 





T. Ta 


j7l* JA ; 



.. 


Stewan Emerp *2 
TH AuMraM 87 

TR CM Of Loo DM 100 
TRW 6 Gen 192 
TR Mutual Res no 

TR Norm America 94 

TR Paertic Basn 178 

TR Property 180 

TR Tech 103 

TR Trustees 1S6 

Temple Bar 149 

Thoramorton 274 
Throg Secued Cap 360 
Trans Oceanc 197 
Trane 130 

Trrtnmsi me 90 
US Deoemura £70 
Wing Resources 30 
Westpoei 53 

W4atl 97 

Yeoman 342 


Grass 

Ok Yld 

Q»g* pence *. p;e 


r 06 14 

+1 33 38 »6 

• +1 6 3D 69248 

+2 07 30 415 

S 59 5 4 236 

*3 £6 £6*7 7 

•5 14 OS 

+1 07 32 309 

+1 £6 £5 406 

• +? 60 38 3*7 

• +2 0 lb 54 260 

• 119b 43 3?B 

+1 35 20*94 

• +3 «d £9 395 

15# i?6 81 

93 34 54.1 

• 29P 01 *?7 

-I 27 oat 

o+l <6 *7 SSI 

• 1510 4 4 35 3 


^ FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47-. 34 - 
71 31 

*9 £1 
15* 116 
23' 13- 
£0-. 12- 
156 131 
140 90 

2*7 187 
106 66 
750 075 
94 77 

133 75 

900 *90 
£18 153 
**0 370 
290 190 
30 25* 
120 70 

27 16 

206 152 


Argyte 
Btusmo 
ftnanrea Arrow 

toay mm 

Do 'A 

Bear* 

Eng Trua 

Ei cn 

£ »mqramni 
Ff ah id iyn*i 
Froet Gp 
Oooae ID A M) 
Hendenan Aran 
ICH 
MAI 
M 8 G 

M etc e rwe House 
PBolc ln» T« 

Do Werrwes 
Sroffi New Caui 


Q W Jpf Bi a wn dCp repot! ■ 

SUQAR (Ftan C. Canfcov) 

148.0-47.8 
157A6&0 
164.8-64.4 

leame 

173JJ-72J) 
1780-74.0 



COMMODITIES 


Three Months . 3^-00-370.00 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COM M ISS ION 
Avenge (atsucfcpffceoet 


1305-29.0 

13OM9.0 


SILVER LARGE 

Cosh 359 00-361^0 

Three Mentha . 36S .DO-370.00 


12 August 

Q& Cattle. 95.Mp per kg tw 
(+1*9) 

GBi Sheep 160.74p per kg sat 
CJ 

CW (+4 .76) 

OB: Pigs. 77^4p per kg tw 


England and Wales: 

Catdenas.up&O Vava. 

§«e(M«%wna?1 %, sva. 
mice- 162-08p(+3S4) 

Pig nos. down 12B%, am 
pnee, 77.32p(-l^2) 


Cam nos. down I2i) %, ave. 
pries. 99.06p(+1.04J 
Sheep noa. down Tt. 7 %. avs. 
wfce. 1XJS4&+&Z7) 
no nos. down 21^%. a«e. 
prfce, 7522pl+20i) 


LONDON MEATFimmes 
EXCHANGE 

Month 

Oct 

Nov 

Feb 

Apr 

Jun 

PigConbMi 

p-perkflo 

Open Close 

Unq- 97J0 
UftQ. 103J0 
IM- 104.00 

Unq. aaso 

. Unq. Unq. 
Unq. Unq. 


VefcO 


Pig Meat vdI:2 

LONDON HEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
UMCattoCerereet 

Month 

a 

Oa 

NOV 

Feb 

Apr 

Jun 

p.perkflo 
• Open Close 

Unq. S&SO 
Unq. 38^0 
Unq. 9B20 
. . Unq. 99 JO 

Unq- 99,00 
Unq. 99.00 

Unq. 9&00 


VOhO 

LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 
£por»nra 

Month 

Sep 

Nov 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

WJ»« Barley 
Close Om® 
104.95 lO&gg 
107^0 105.15 

110.15 108.00 

112-ffi 11050 

11&3S 11230 

vetorw 

Wheat ..Q2t 

1 uwrajr 

256 [ 


Mr. *•- 
42 
30 

137 +l 
C19 1 • 
Ci0- • 

141 +2 

121 *1 

232 +3 

100 
720 
83 

119 

830 S 
158 +3 

335 +S 

£40 

254 #-3 

120 +3 

29 

165 -1 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 


Epertomo 


Ooen Ctosa 
13130 1£4M 
134-50 137 JO 
200 00 20090 
210.80 21300 
90.00 85.00 
VoL 1510 


BffTEX 

GXL Freight RitureaLhl 
report $10 per index ppM 
freight Index 

Htgh/LO* Ctosa 

Oct 86 713.0-6950 7050 

Jan 87 735.0-712.0 729.0 

Apr 87 775.0-772.0 771$ 

JU87 720.0-720.0 720.0 

Oct 87 B05i) 

Jan 88 780.0 

Apras 830.0 

Jill 88 7900 

Vot 31510(8 
Open interest 1955 


TANK&n REPORT 

High/Low Ckae 

Aug 88 H^S 

Sap 86 1105-1100 M^-0 

Oci 88 1080.0 

Decffi — 1075.0 

Mar 67 1065^ 

Jun&7 1090 XI 

Vot; 17 tote 
Open interest 40 

Spot meikatcommantMT 
Tenkerindax; 

11805 up 1ft3 on 11/8/88 



Dry cargo ANJaN.- 
562.0 i*j 30 on 1 


tp3ion 11/6//88 



































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


— t&dd — 

From your portfolio card cheek your 
dim share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall total. Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daily prise money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on. the 
back of your eanL You must always have 
your card available when rtaiming 



Advance continues 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began August! 1. Dealings end August 29. JContango day September I. Settlement day September 8. 

■ §Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 




0 Tims Nmpaptro UoriMd 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required for 
+30 points 

Claimants shoold ring 0254-53272 



Gaia or 

Grow 

kaa 




Br Aerospace 


Soph 


Gr Portland 


Norton Opax 


Mffiot*,AircraA 


MotcxvAirenfl 



g a Ofc maa ' 3C6 

Baas 730 

HXiim 6 * 

Soddngtaaa W 
BrtM (Urohaw) SOS 
(H P] 147 
Bmmwoo 9vm 565 
curt mronao sos 
DMnsau m ata 
Ormawasiy 172 
(VMM KM 213 

OttSMSS ” 313 

Karoy* i hksoh 511 
HVWnaOM IS 
m mua i Xi a am <55 
MiiDafl ata 

wan ton Thompson 108 
Monro 357 

SA h»wi 182 

Soot a Mwu in 

Vta ■ 375 

munad-A . 253 
Oo -0 268 

mwNd few 2.3 
HOMnpntO SM 

Ttoonj A' . 315 


us *5 t3s 

• 21 7 3 J 165 

• -1 12 10 26.6 
*6 as 1*D 
-s . 20oo <0 i&a 

• 76 52 113 

• ' IS* 27 1*1 

-| «03 2.1 Sc 

-2 70 A* 123 

• *a M HIM 

*6 103 33 11 a 

• 250 49 132 

23 33152 
U 44 92 
-3 S3 23 

• 32 30 164 

91 33 133 

•-2 . IDO 54 113 
134. 44 MS 
*2 11 J 44 11 7 

*8 ill 43113. 
103 53 773 
127 24 193 
1QA &2 224 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 



DesiBncn. I Elccmate 




Food I Foods 



Triton Europe 


Robinson fThomas) 


Smith &. Nephew 


Bndporr-Gundry 


ir~rig.i i 

ir 

EZ 



Please be sure to twice account 
of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £ 8 J 300 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


213 MaMnCWr 238 
213 Amec 287 

52 AmdMa SB 

125 Ao-ocxte 162 

331 BPS IM—J8 SOS 
28* Bagganape Bn* 3*5 
114 Baron dws 138 
22 BMetfBen} CO«tr a 
128 Befway 177 

63 BMBmt 84 

STS BUddeyt WO 

531 BhsCMa 546 

235 Br— OnnAOmd He SCO 
81 Br DreMag 74 

IB Browoijiksoo 2 * 


11 Bm«i 8 Mwn 11V 

158 ClIUBrood Hncey 158 
05 Camere-ftnednone 112 
B0 Condor Grp 125 
448 Como 512 

flS cSS hoSm q iso 

n ssy? as £ 

53 Be M2 

75 ft* 3B 

54 0o-A 82 

51 FOdereud Her mo 
5* Fnun Go 60 

80 OM40RI m 

10S G*b»3 Oaw Oro 121 

25*. B-wnSur 383 

86 HAT . 134 

SB HCtafSv 226 

42 Hemen-SborT 89 
1<9 Haywood 1 — m 220 
428 Hm im 610 

126 Kstodr Jonnun 182 
288 Jams PI 3 Son* 421 
296 LmbU) 409 

286 Do A *07 

78 Lawrence flMtol H2 
7i Uky (WC] 72 

250 LOW* fYJ) *06 

126 IAp«N 3 Saudi 174 
178 MMH ZBfi 

101 Madoy • ‘ TO 

181 Mnwb (HaHM 193 
98 ror«HM(tf ioi 
30i McAkilm (Ubad) 420 

171 Mavto far 233 

23 MBar tSariey) 33 
109 Monk (AJ Tl7 

306 UowtontMa* 380 
7BB U — HM BBS 

163 Nomgnm Brack 178 
IIS Pk— amen 225 

87 PtKWro TBafaar 88 


« Rugby Cee— a 145 
snarca 3 Aher 188 
SamW BO 

Tarmac *52 

. Tnwr Woodrow 320 
Trowy Sra« 162 
Trawa 8 Arnold 417 
Tram 77 

Tumfl 16B 

Vtoropreni 3*5 

■Ward . . m 

5srs. m i&- 

w ero m Bcoa ■ re 

Worn — ■ M4 

wBati (Ooreuy) 253 
Wmpoy (Garage] 205 


114 43 220 
+1 1ST B0m2 
01 0.1 104 

61 33 143 

»*7 129 23 149 

• 102 30 123 

•2 109 73 .. 

■ ■ • . 33 
TOO 33194 
9 43 39 TBO 

-10 37.1 4.1 127 

♦5 300 35 77 

M3 35 246 
43 33133 
. . 815 
i . 33 8329* 

♦6 49 40 142 

« it :: 

*2 39 29 131 

*2 2*36 47 96 

I 83 13 ns 

33 5J103 

• 83 19 1X7 

250. 23 227 
47 43193 
25 23 W> 

25 43 84 

47 34 147 

34 S3 23.4 

83 7.1 144 

23 21 335 

79 21 132 

141 54 40 123 

41 .. .. *19 

24 35 12.1 

101 49144 

194 39167 

71 39137 

-2 259a 59144 

-2 109 24 115 

-2 100 25 TT5 

32 46 89 
S3 75 83 

I . 102 IS 14* 

142 74 43 193 

42 115 49 174 

43 54 49213 

75 39 16.1 

0.1 0.1 .. 

17.9 43 135 
-4 83 35 124 

1.4 42 . . 

i-1 93 79159 

42 229 69 114 

4* 157 19 173 

93 52 123 

75 33129 

43 49 33 
184 32 79 
4* an xi io 
46 165 49 110 

123 44 99 

41 9 1 63 16.1 

33 24209 
65b 85 169 

42 134 39 199 

49 03 89 142 

7* 47 119 

02 29183 
16 21 92 
ran 69299 

-1 134. 39 151 

-•104 39155 
• 14. 17 83 
■ 69 35139'- 

• 15 21 229 

07 05 16J 

-s 29 *i an 
+4 6.4 25 193 



Cans# tQemenfl as# 
CttymoSoa 138 
Conen lAl 490 

Coon* Gp 196 

CombNd Teen * 

Concar—c 106 

Com SuMim 63 
Com nYrrc 345 

Cotfoon 466 

CflMOfl JT) 68 

. Cost* oq 

toamw pcoa *06 
Cowan be Craw 56 
Cresi Neuron 1*4 

Cro-n nouse 182 

C11BV 

CSC 06 

■ OPC£ SS5 

£5*7 265 

Dana C18V 

Dan— 4 MM 'A S3 
Daves & Newman 233 

ffi 

Dweofl SMapmg 263 
Deiauiaer 3*o 


65 2 7 556 
Wig 72 82 
164 31 
M 36 153 


«2 56 

13 

• 64 

*5 it 1 

21 

• 46 

138 

• 36 
65 

■ .. H3 
I 42 375 


Dmue Mae) 

Deem 
Draco Pam 
Dom 

Dameaon bit 

Dm— 

' Bra?" VMU) 
DO A 


au 2(8 Easwm Proo 265 

221 >58 E* ro 188 

777 214 BS 228 

O'- 29- EX** 35 «-1 

153 KC'. EUco 148 411 

29 '■ 17V Reclr—a LA£I fl E29V 

ID* SS poaffll 88 9‘i 

2B-. 1|*| Emma C22‘ a 

TO 2(2 Engb— cnme Oay 322 .90 
2T> WV Cr<saon IU0 0 G2 A 
16* 13* EnUVHogM a*0 

1 77'.- 130V Euqoom F«rjaf . 135V 4>» 

T42 1C Do 5*« Prt 135 
3«2 198 E—reo 202 

214 12* Eabamal bn 183 r *7 

(it 312 Enel 386 «1 

55 27 mean 38 4V 

*2 29 F— dan tax tod 34 

143 M6 F anner |JH1 t2fl a - . 

re SB F— toamer 58 .. 

628 406 Ferns Me .j 

67 35 Fcnwaon 64 * 

IT* 6* rmao c*w 96 

88 31V Fgoal *2 

1S3 96 Fogarty 99 .2 

« 27 ', Fg — Oouo HIV 34 
IB9 '57 Forrwrgc » Harvey 171 

87 48 Frencn Hhomai) 48 • . 


T aab LNMI 
U-l^rouJ 
(J— «r 
utk—er nrui 

Vtcr 

Ve*ff 5 

Lew 

VKOMI 

IRWswaotA 

VOL^ 

w«oe Rooenat 
Waton M 
MUmar ICSWI 
waanicid Goss 
WevMms 
V gM 4 


Wnano 

Wests 

wnamiM naa— 
wane* 
VroaeaA 
VMM Uto—s) 
Wtoai— reogs 
wftCa 
WdtMW 
Wtxxs lArvw] 
wood .SW1 
Wooannise 4 fta 

Wynm im Enn 

idunarH} 


•5 lOTla 60 66 
16 17131 

• 552 31 1*5 


*9 41 

41 30 


n 

*2 120 
96 

*10 171 
66 
150 
36 
14 # 
36 
260 
47 



OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


P ore n ee u 

CMHigm 133 

F«»y Uanma) im 

Hamsun CnashaU 3ra 

ton— 38S 

■lacn WO) 33 

tomna 711 

Ocean Mtoon «7 

Paterson iodi ?til 

DO A 710 

Pdby PM 1*6 

Sne Daroy 43 

r.MM Bros 5S0 

lore* k ertW e y its 


131 84 GEI tot 05 

385 258 QKN 275 -3 

310 260 GR 295 

ITS 60 Garten Eng 105 *2 

157 too n n n.mii 111 • . . 

150 in Paine 119 

1 1 ’-756 1 / 0**o 903 *13 

344 194 Oynwod 293 

505 250 Gong Kerr 280 «*I0 

1S2 107 O— »an Hogs 139 . 

3T2 206 Granada 290 • .. 

105 Va Groveoea 7‘j • . . 

ra 59V Hat* Pracwon 80V 
232 13* Ha* Eng 164 *2 

162 126 NWlMf 132 -2 

265 180 HSTO 198 • . . 

290 230 riafena 273 9-2 

41 25r>* Hamason lad 36 • . . 

48 20 Han— 22 -1 

T91 Ui Hanson 185 

IM 145 Do as CBv El 67 *2 

116 96 Do VA pi 106 *2 

12* M 15V Dc 10% ET1SL 41 

2S3 133 H ai s —i ma • - 963 4* 

27S ire Hams (Pne* 250 ■ • .. 

823 431 Hawker 6*MMay *93 *3 

150 90 Ha— ay 91 *1 

205 81 Hay (Normant SOS *7 

221 MO HapwOAh Cararnc IBB 42 

301 aa Hast— iso 42 

96 85 HawaiCjJ 83 

M2 122 MHMtJob 135 

81 62 Hohs Brae 

106 68 HOB Ut>fd 99 

285 148 HBBkto s oas 230 4 7 

170 91 HOW— n 86 41 

310 23* Maitng Assoc 270 

115 86 Meieng Group 96 • 

395 20Tj unman vn— 287 S 
191 111 M 169 41 

915 911 Mtron 220 

295 250 JacMone Borane 250 # . 

134 960 jarane Mam ■ 130*r -3'»' 

015 (73 Job— i Otar— a 563 *3 

220 133 JO-soti MUm 210 . S 

44', 22'? Jeenson 6 FB 33V +2 

3*5' 235 Jebnaan- 310 -3 

MO 66 Jonas 6 Snvmtn 194 

132 67 jananniom) 12a to.. 

•20 .21 KM— a - 2 8 .. 4 

.5* 25 KHoq ; 31 * 

325 IBS KStoayRH 300 -..-v 

130 MS K*noeay~3ntoe 1T8. .. U 

296 230 Kdra—tA) 973 

215 123 KtoafrC^a - SOD a;. 


7*6 215 AObuprorm 715 -1 1J 

184 198 Atoton tkana 132 32, 

I78v 71 1 , AnMagnto. w -5 !? 

210 110 BtoWn Taefi 188 • . . 

.25 16 Caoatoe E19 T7.I 

263 184 Caedover 2*5 -6 5.7 

*3 16 C— ay 37 

W 17 . Equcy I Gen 29 e-Vr 

165 13J . May 5 Shna 132. U 

194 153 *— ISO .- -3 89b 

7B 82 -tax Heme L—ns 66. 

95 80 DoS* <84 . . 

Mt 114 ■ H en - bat 139 

920 913 Tan— 913 


Flnaocim Tmsts appear on Papa 20 


CHEMICALS* PLASTICS 





FOODS 


45 34 148 
98 108 480 
11.1 16 116. 
67 23 110 
60 57 28.6 

17.1 32 13J 
164 42. 7i 

.. ia» 

13.1 39 35 
9.7 55 179 
3.1 *9167 
57 36196 
74 30 234 
-20 IflZJS 
«4 ! i0l93 
89. -34 17 

103 43129. 
103 61T16 

103 - all lit' 

32 13227 
159 59 127 
59- 39.147 

29 13 807 
47 27147' 

30 29 133 
4* 31 99 
34 19225 
74 2*137 

29 23 129 

59 59 89 

17-9 33 170 

30 1 6219 

79 79 156 
19 09 219 
38 89143 
27 69 M3 
114 .43139 
69 34148 

80 3B 123 
30 39167 
174 45137 

73 21 217 
.46 . 31 136 


143 54 67 
107 57 123 

96 4 2 125 

97 77 12.7 
6 fin 45 M3 

49 49214 

139 61 
161 50 129 

90 04 . 

050 04 136 

68 50 100 

71 S3 

SO 25 110 
83b 59 139 
143 37 176 
07 19867 

21 62 68 
71 5 5 231 

SO 66 169 
79 13 266 
10 16 

56 S3 72 

09 14 50 

61 82 128 
20 59 7» 

125 73 128 

41 85»4i 

84 83 121 
179 65 92 
100 34 81 
50 47 60 
2.1 1 9 100 

47 40 US 
157 16 264 

125 4 4 14 7 
155 55 107 

57 41 139 

109 39 12 7 

05 67 139 

7* 32 169 
120 7J 7 7 
84 45 93 
143 72 124 

24 09 334 
13 59 37. 
.. a 

57b 35 M 7 
600 4 6 
32 76 
0 66 . 

73 30 183 
132 53 129 

207 42 109 

27 39 72 

54 25 371 
tD3 55 15.7 

640 25 187 
39 42 32 
..a 232 

43f .. .. 

57 62 133 

107 47 91 

55 37 77 
114 42 03 

36 38 75 

75 45 135 
19 08 406 

36 . 34 247 

293 52 153 
18 17 142 
■ . a . . 166 
137 35 12 1 

35 44 62. 

55 . 43 17 C - 
29a 10 4 84 
17 55 214 

114 39146 
20b 17 207 
214 79 228 

36 43 173 


ACOev LJe 
«u a Am 
Am G*" 
bncu 
Bntarmc 
Com Lrun 
Eoury A Law 
Fai 

Gen*— 

Hum c E 

Hogg Ro — won 

Leg* A Gen 

London i Man 

urn Utd bw 

Mann A Uetaa 

urns 

P *5 

Rear 

PryQgmil 

?***> 

Raiai 

Seopn* Go 
SitoMWI Wr son 
Saii.jp wags 
Sun Man 
Sun 14* 


*3 99 55 

* 100 40 

»• 890 33 

»-b 33 22 274 

•: 426 51 

•9 K.9 55 

■2 96 36 

HI 39 20*4 
411 50 24 0 

*5 34 9 70 75 

» *6 13 7 4 4 125 

-3 117 46 109 

85 46 70 
*5 2*8 62 116 

1*1 . 220 48 
*1 114 46116 

.5 129 43 196 

629 45 . 

•? 37 l 45 S44 

-3 196 Si 

•5 368 45 675 

•8 157 40 171 

-5 15 7 0 7 173 

»*I0 IDOn 25206 
250 37100 
-2 33 9 4 0 

JB 19 37 
•5 125 30 196 


07 13 148 
100 7 S 71 J 
*6 59 70 

286 ID til 
•10 25b 67301 
16 48 t?J 
•? 171 61 to 4 

•; 54 115 AS 

35 4 1 69 
.3 ?5 51 *■ 

33* 4, IS? 

>5 6 T» 

• 10 UO 48 15 


tavea—ot TAsts appear on Pago 20 


LEISURE 


bntWlk' 134 

Boost* E Kaunas ISO 

Bran Wjfcar 183 

Ce—n 46 

0*1— 186 

F*r Learn 370 

GR* 49 

Henburnar Brooks 65 

Hat wi n T taunt 114 

M Laeure 1C 

j—anjs HUge 31 

lea mo 151 

Me— 130 

PUesurama 316 

Pe*ny useful 370 

Itoey ensure 45 

saga Hehomn ’36 

Sam— Go 190 

Tcnei aiaui Hobb# 89 

Za—rs 180 


MINING 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


CINEMAS AND TV 


433 323 (band Met 373 

288 206 Kennedy Brookas zn 
381 312 LnObfOke 353 

545 447 Lon Ant Hotels 520 
100 7G-. Mourn Charme 95 
105 67 Pnnce Of W Hotels 85 
79 58'. Queens Moat 67 

405 390 Savoy Hctoli 'A' 3» 

81 56 Sntoa 63 

20} i«i inaaeuse Forte M7 


to +5 135 39129 

2 * 1 . 0 123 

-2 18.1 49 169 

. . 143 20 159 

• «4'i 2.1 22 157 

• . . 21 25 153 

+1*» 23 34 14.7 

50 14 145 
to 13 29159 

• T 9 MM 3 


370 178 AMU TV 'A 
52 27 GnEkmn 

240 176 HTV N/V 
3SS 253 uvr Mags 
350 188 Scot TvTl 
273 149 TVS NAT 
48 31 TW 
228 223 Ibstnas TV 



139 

£7 123 

-1 

219 

67 62 

+2 

114 

S3 93 

*2 

21 3- 

62 133 


150 

47 105 


W3C 

63 10.7 


3b 

63134 


INDUSTRIALS 
A- D 


nit**c*L 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 



111’* 9IS. Trees ION 2001 

103 V 93'. 

9.7 

9483 

•O'* OS'. Caw »-*V 2001 

181V -V 

S3 

9612 

97 95'. Con* 9% 2000 

w>t.'. 


0420 

t37'.-117’«TrtWS MS8M1 

128V -V 

raa 

9635 

111- 94V Caw 10% 2002 

104 -V 

93 


12* '< 3 03L Excn 12% 199902 

116V -V 

103 


ID#'. 90 Tieao 9'.S 200Z 

10?v w-V 

95 


1J2'- 93b Treat 109. 2003 

lOIVto-V 

93 


139 1 . 118’. Tree# 13'.% 200040 

129. -V 

103 

9378 

123MM Traek 11' *W 20014* 

114 V -V 



IS’ 9* ‘-Trees 10% 200* 

isr. -v 

96 



56V -V 

62 



TOO*. -V 

95 


US'- 96V Carr B'.Va 2005 

TOO'* -V 

9.4 


106-. SO’. Cony 9'.> 2005 

100V -V 

94 

9399 

117V W'.Erch TO ■% 2005 

109V -v 

96 


l3*'-1l?vTr*a* !2V% 200305 

124V 

100 

9539 


88'. -V 

S3 


107 V 102 Com 0i% ZOOfi 

tar. 

118'* ♦ V 

95 



90 


?4 - 23 Tree* B'/N. 3007 =25 

22V -V 

360 


9*-- 82 V Tree* S .-N 2007 

93'- -V 

91 


1*3 - ITS'. Trees 13’-% 200*38 

133'. -V 

101 


95'. ar. Trews 8% 2009 

88'. -V 

9.1 



65’. to-'. 

93 


33 - 78 V Treat 7-.% 2812-15 

86V -V 

90 


136 lOVBrtt T2S 2013-17 

128V. 

as 

9374 

UNDATED 

4BV 38'. Cooeots 4% 

43 

93 


42 3* '.war ui 3T% 

38 +'- 

M 


52'- **■. Com 3'.% 

50V +., 

70 


3J - 2S'. Trrvn 3% 

32V *V 

92 


29 1 - MvContoB 2'.S 

27V +■* 

gi 


29*. 24VTnas 2'.-N 

27V *v 


INDEX-UNKED 

i22‘> 114>jlroa> d 2% 1988 

132-. 

2.1 

2258 

I07v 96V Treat IL 2% IB® 

107V 

22 

2745 

K2 IDS'. Trees IL 2% 1996 

119V to* V 

24 

3638 

tor- 9S'i Treei u'.*« am 

104'. -rV 

30 

0583 

107-. 93V Treas £2'.% 2003 

108V +'. 

33 

lUfl 

110‘. 98V Trout L 2V20D6 

105 *V 

26 

3477 

106'. ». Tree, 12'. % 2009 

101V +V 

30 

3.42* 

111 97 17BUJU‘-N2011 

HJ7'.to*V 

33 

33*0 

94;- 79*. Treat *2V% 2013 

89V to*'. 

33 

1307 

102’. 87v Tree* lli'.S 20i6 

97-. *V 

31 

3254 

100' 68v Treat IL2' % 2070 

B7V +V 

23 

1227 

0SV 

30 

Ml* 



DRAPERY AND STORES 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


Abo torn 241 

A—b*cbar iHewyt 79 

AlB now Z IM 

Bankamanca re 
Bam Of baton o 213 
fim Laum UaH E8 
Bto* Ltoari UK 2*0 
Saw 01 Scodond 397 
Barca ye 487 

Bancfmrk 39 

Broun SiM* 470 

Caar Alan 388 

ettau S3 

erase Itontitoun £27'- 

Wafa* V 
CommufTtm* CUM 
Deutscbe Bam. £26# 
fta MB Franca 171 
Oeniid mm 292 

Bum in Pern 95 
Hantaos 210 

Haswaiei 361 

HCSRM so 

Joncn ttJMpeaj 470 
Ka« & WWOtol 142 
Kfuifion Benson 790 
UrydF 404 

klireiay to« 3*0 
Db 8”* A 124 

14— d 629 

Nat Auk Bh 211 
TOVAtot SO? 

Omman Cii£ 

PtMant . 315 


e-l 90 3.7 6.9 
*3 a 409 
-2 150 »9 


160 8.7 112 
*3 200 50 67 

k an ui u 



210 

•8 

21 B 

348 

73 

600 

220 

134 

274 

194 

135 

39 

179 

105 

133 ' 

51 

200 

183 

46 * 

310 

-178 

87 

*4 

64 

ISO 

*9 

233 

172 

14 ' 

830 

11 * 

721 

307 

190 . 

33 

75 

*3 

28 

162 

102 

a 

75 

36 

24 

T 32 

110 ' 

226 

135 

830 

673 

250 

165 

231 

163 

3 S 0 

283 

228 

179 

635 

530 

214 

112 

237 

109 

353 

305 

81 

55 

130 

100 

191 

105 

370 

220 

179 

135 

44 

3 i 

149 

102 

36 * 

234 

77 

47 

90 

65 

88 

74 

365 

285 

21 ' 

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623 

413 

75 

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90 ' 

57 ’ 

190 

T 7 D 

196 

1 S 0 

343 

235 

178 

88 

925 

430 







MM 




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71 

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25.1 



95 

20 

42 

12* 



247 


14 

326 


M 

170 

361 

23 


229 

30 

U.4 


ELECTRICALS 


27 6 S4 S3 

600 54 68 

153 43 71 1 


898 

190 

AB BMt 

332 


11.4 

3*240 

187 

120 

Aiptamene 

163 


21 

13167 

131 

■a 

95 

38 

43 

63 

Amswd 

Acrosi Cnmputare 

134 

s 


03 02 308 
046 1 1 T6 
322 

800 

58 

205 

46 

Arome Carol 

255 

89 

*5 

30 

M 1« 

370 240 

amp Sec 

BOC 

£ 


20 

167 

SB 131 

13* 

64 

ssn 

73 

-5 

24 

as 46 


226 


11.1 

.4*136 

167 


96b 5.7 270 



80 


558 

*2 

160 

80 100 

03- 

• to .. 

80 

73 93 


-a 


as 136 

r 295 


80 

£9 170 

153 

238 

165 

• 

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ai 110 
62 9.1 

39 

♦2 

Ob 

10 79 


03 

10 156 

410 


280 

70 110 


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• ■5 


30 .. 

62 

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23 97 

335 

+5 

80 

26120 

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S3 

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229 

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50 110 

67 


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318 

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186 

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TO. 7 

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253 

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80 t£4 

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2574103 7.7 

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183 

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50120 

82 


36 

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27 150 

366 

• +11 

17.1 

40185 

44 

244 

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7* 

30 379 

to 

75 

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91 

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■ 124 

• 

81 

09270 

5U2 


ZMt 

1 43 131 

008 

*20 

6b 

1.4 4&3 

240 


98 

40 146 

190 



16353 

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50 

40 12.4 

137 

• *1 

61 

46 UI 

108 

• *10 

89 

S3 99 

IO 

to*i 

71 

40TD9 

240 

• 

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303 

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rw. 

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120 

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310 

*2 

170 

50 117 

(6 


33 

38 93 

$ 


ll 

45 223 
14 34.7 

155 


7.1 

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214 

+2 

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35 187 

S 125 

• 

1.4 

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745 


11 1 

45 100 

IN 


43 

49 116 

aw 

*5 

100 

31 130 

324 

-2 



113 



1.7 188 

29 

-1 

07 

29 2S0 

34 

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20 

59 88 


-* 

1030 

79 80 

28 

•*2 

430 81 138 
124 43120 

238 

•A 

30 

15 220 , 

76 

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S3 182 i 

100 

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264 26 170 ■' 




4 0 413 

72 

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20* 40 11 1 

422 

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104 

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THET1 


WEDNESDAY AUGUS 


Chinese 


Michael Butler on the global financial market 


APPOINTMENTS 


wmrace 


to get oil 
flowing 


From Stephen Leather 
Hong Kong 

The first commercial oil has 
started to flow from the South 
China Sea field. It is below the 
Oulf of Beibu and is now 
flowing at the rate of 10.000 
barrels a day, according to a 
joint announcement from 
Promet Petroleum, which is 
listed in Hong Kong, and 
Total the Frendb group. 

Production has started 
while the price languishes at 
SIS a barrel and the world's 
big producers are cutting back , 
- which suggests that lhisj 
joint venture with China has 
been under great pressure to 
start earning revenue. 

The project is 51 per cent 
owned by the Chinese-run 
Nanhai West Oil Corporation, 
while Total has 14.7 per cent. 


The City’s way ahead: teamwork 
with Europe to repel boarders 




New London chief if y* 


joins John Brown i# 0 ® 1 

trthn Rmim PiuHMfwc ?• Bain Dawes: Mr Peter 1 % 


John Brown Engineers & 
Constructors: Mr lan Robin- 


Bain Dawes: Mr Peter 
Jackson becomes a 


son becomes managing direc- director.wonawioe 


European heads of govern- 
ment decided in Milan in June 
last year that the remaining 
barriers to a single market for 
financial services and finan- 
cial instruments were to be 


removed by 1992. In the last 
year the French, Italian and 


Elf Aquitaine Chine 4.7 per 
Cent Japan's Deibn Offshore 
Oil Development Corporation 
9.8 per cent, Norway's Statoil 
9.8 per cent and Elf Aquitaine 
Company. 10 percent 

Promet has a 4.9 per cent 
stake in the field through its 
Peachuee Investment subsid- 
iary. which owns 49 per cent 
of Elf Aquitaine Company. 

The full details of the joint 
venture's investment in the oil 
field have not been disclosed 
— but it is known that 
Peachtree has spent almost 
S3Q million (£20.2 million) on 
exploration in the region. Last 
year, Promet reported a 
5286.525 loss, against a 
$90,481 loss in 1984. 


Nanhai said that four wells 
which had been drilled in the 
Beibu Gulf and another two 
which will be sunk by the end 
of the year should push output 
up to 30,000 barrels daily. 

The oil is being transferred 
from a four-well platform 
through a 1.5 kilometre pipe- 
line to a floating storage 
facility and into tankers. 

China's decision comes af- 
ter Opec agreed to cut its 
output by 4 million barrels a 
day for two months and after 
Mexico announced it would 
reduce its production by 10 
percent to 1 .35 million barrels 
a day. 


year the French, Italian and 
Spanish governments (all with 
Socialist leaders) have taken 
significant steps towards 
liberal izalion. 

Under the Treaty of Rome, 
exchange controls should only 
1 be permitted in case of baJ- 
I ance-of-paymems difficulties 
1 and should therefore in most 
cases have been removed long 
1 ago. There now seems a good 
chance that France, Italy. 
Belgium and even Spain will 
soon join Denmark, West 
Germany, the Netherlands 
and Britain in A state of 
freedom. 

They would be well advised 
to follow Britain's good exam- 
ple in 1979 and scrap the 
control machinery if they 
want people to believe that 
controls will not be reimposed 
and thus benefit fully from the 
return flow of funds parked 
abroad over the years. - A 
gradual but incomplete lib- 
eralization can always be 
reversed. 

Freedom from exchange 
controls is the critical step. 
Once it is taken, the existing 
process of integration wifi 
gather speed, though much 
will remain to be done. Some 
things are in the pipeline, such 
as the freedom to market unit 
trusts throughout the Euro- 
pean Economic Community 
in 1989 under the already 
agreed directive. 

On insurance services, a 
breakthrough may now be 
possible at last, thanks to a 
reasonably liberal ruling from 


the European Court. The 
Bundesbank may even soon 
permit the European currency 
unit to have a life of its own in 
West Germany, as it already 
has elsewhere. 

Technological advances and 
financial innovation are also 
pushing fast in the direction of 
global integration. Bond and 
foreign exchange dealers 
worldwide are trading the 
same products 24 hours a day, 
with London the main centre 


in the European “time zone”. 
What this means for die 


Integration is 
already under way 
under some 
directives 


world financial system is ex- 
plained in the April report of 
the BIS study group set up by 
the central bankers of the 
Group of Ten and is beyond 
the scope of this article. 

But in my view, one conclu- 
sion can be drawn: removing 
the barriers in Europe will 
result not in the creation of 
anything recognizable as a 
single. European market but 
rather in the Continent follow- 
ing Britain into an integrated 
global market 

What will the consequences 
be for European banks? There 
is a parallel hens with the 
world electronics market — 
another new global if slightly 
less open, market. Ju both it 
may be the Americans, with 
powerful Japanese companies 
coming up from behind, who 
will have positioned them- 
selves best to exploit the new 
opportunities. 


Pessimists say that after the 
big bang the Americans and 
the Japanese will eat up or 
overwhelm the traditional 
Gty institutions. And yet the 
City is still the strongest 
financial centre in Europe. 
What then will happen to the 
rest of Europe after the har- 
riers fall? 

This is a vital question for 
our economic future. Let no 
one try to persuade you that it 
does not matter if market 
forces result in American and 
Japanese domination of the 
European banking or informa- 
tion technology-industries. 

’ It is true that competition is 
already intense. In the Euro- 
dollar bond market, for exam- 
ple. many houses have been 
tempted into frequent loss- 
making issues in an attempt to 
stay in the game. 

Financial innovation has 
permitted financing to move 
off the balance sheet, with 
attendant risks of over-exten- 
sion. European banks without 
a sound strategy may find 
themselves struggling. 

But. just as well-managed 
and intelligent European IT 
companies will be able to 
compete, even with IBM and 
Ftjiisu. if they have a sound 
strategy, Britain's merchant 
banks and their equivalents 
elsewhere in the . EEC should 
be able to do better than hold 
their own against Salomon 
Brothers and Nomura. 


retain and recruit skilled staff. 
A merchant bank is only as 
good as its expert operators. 
To devote a high proportion 
of their capital base to backing 
the least profitable activities 
is. however, not the only 
choice open to them. 

In the new situation, exper- 
tise will bring success in a 
significant number of special- 
ist markets where substantial 
profits may be obtainable fora 
more modest commitment of 
resources. 

Traditionally, the Gty has 


Controls must be 
scrappedto 
benefit from funds 
_ parked abroad 


riven too low a priority to 
EuroDe. Now is the time for a 


Europe. Now is the time for a 
change. European banks are 
beginning to see the need to 
work together, where they 
have complementary skills 
and interests, to create a two- 
way flow of mutually profit- 
able business. 


Success will probably go to 
those who concentrate on 
what they do best, building on 
specialized skills, and who 
create a network of co-opera- 
tion in Europe. 

European banks have no 
choice but to compete, expen- 
sively, with the Americans to 


New opportunities are 
opening up. Not only savers 
and investors in Europe, but 
their governments have 
discovered their national- 
stock exchanges. 

Privatization is becoming 
fashionable: Investors will 
look further afield, as and 
when the removal of exchange 
controls permits, creating 
possibilities for skilled asset 
management and for placing ' 
bond and equity issues. The 
latest foreign exchange 
“products", many invented in 
London, will be in demand. 


Intra-European mergers 
and acquisitions, now grad- 
ually beginning to gather mo- 
mentum. will require expert 
corporate financial advice in 
more than one country. 

Teamwork between a Ger- 
man and a British bank, for 
example, ought to be able to 
offer a more expert service to a 
German or British company 
wishing to make an ac- 
quisition in the other country 
than any American or Japa- 
nese institution recently in- 
stalled in Europe. 

There is no need to make a 
complete list- of tbe possibil- 
ities for co-operation. 

' Exploration of eacb : others' 

' fields of specialization and 
innovation in ' the market- 
place will produce other 
mutually profitable tines of 
business. 

British merchant banks 
could, of course, simply join 
the Americans and Japanese 
in trying to conquer the I 
European market on their 
owtl. But the other European 
banks would then see them as 
part of the opposition and 
would dose racks. 

The British mil surely do 
better to seek out European 
partners with complementary 
interests and skills -with whom 
to form a dose but non-, 
exclusive association. 

Making such cooperation 
work wifi require effort, in- 
ventiveness, willpower and a 
readiness to give as well as 
take. For those who succeed 
the rewards should be greaL 
Those who do not make the 
effort will be neglecting an 
important way of reinforcing 
the advantages of 
specialization. 

Sir Michael Butter is a director 
of Hambros Bank. 


tor. London. 

Thomas Warrington & 
Sons: Mr Graeme Jackson 
and Mr Philip Reid join the 
board, the latter in a non- 
executive capacity. 

Motorola Ltd: Mr Michael 
Phillips becomes chairman. 



Michael Phillips 


COMPANY NEWS 


Phit inquiry 


The Trade Secretary has 
dedded to refer the proposed 
merger of Greycoat Group 
and Property Holdings and 
Investment Trust to the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. 


• FIRST SECURITY 
GROUP: The chairman. Dr F J 
Westlake, says in his annual 
statement that he looks forward 
with optimism to a year of 
continuing profitable growth for 
the group. 

• JAMESONS CHOC- 
OLATES: Results for six 
months to June 30. Figures in 
£000. Interim dividend 2p 
(same), payable November 21. 
Turnover 3,285 (3,026), loss 
before tax 104 (1 13). Loss per 
share 2.6p (2_5>- Company says 
that the second half will include 
substantial sales for the Christ- 
mas trade and should result in a 
profit for the year. 


• ROTHMANS HOLDINGS: 
Fihal dividend 18 cents, making 
32 cents (23.5) for year to June 
30, payable September 24. Fig- 
ures m AusSOOO. Turnover 
992,97 8 (758JI7). pretax profit 


100.729 (77,633). Earnings per 
share 109 cents (85). 

• CAP GROUP: The chair- 
man. Mr Barney Gibbens. says 
rn his annual report that he is 
confident that 1987 wilt be 


have been allotted, credited as 
fully paid, to the vendors of 
Miller Wheeldoo. A maximum 
of a further 3 million new Raine 
deferred ordinary may be issued 
to the vendors of Miller 
Wheeldon once the profit before 
taxation for Milter Wheeldon 


for the year ending December 
31. I '86 has been audited. 
Lazar* Brothers and Co has 
places 4,356,208 new Raine 
shares on behalf of certain 
vendors of Miller Wheeldon. 

• BRITISH PETROLEUM: 
BP Malaysia, a subsidiary, has 
restructured its equity in re- 
sponse to the Malaysian 
government's . new economic 


• RAINE INDUSTRIES: Tbe 
acquisition of Miller Wheeldon 
by Raine has been completed. A 
total of 13 million new Raine 
ordinary shares and 53 million 
new Raine deferred ordinary 


policy. Terms have been agreed 
under which Malaysian institu- 
tions will, subscribe for 
12495,000 new ordinary shares 
of MalSl to be issued by BP 
Malaysia. British Petroleum's 
state will be reduced to 824 per 
cent. 

• GUINNESS PEAT GROUP: 
The company says that the 100 
per cent acquisition of Hender- 
son Crosthwane has been com- 
pleted. Tbe business has been 
transferred to a new company, 
Henderson ' Crostbwaite, and 
recapitalized. This business wiD 
in tbe autumn join with that of 
White and Cbeesman to become 
the core of Guinness Mahon 


Securities. The substantial pri- 
vate client department of 
Henderson Crostbwaite and tbe 
country offices are to be devci- I 
oped with the private banking I 
business of Guinness Mahon 
and Co. I 


• HOWARD SHUTTERING 
(HOLDINGS): Final dividend 
0.7p, making l.4p (same) for the 
year to April 30. Pretax profit 
£461.206 (£748.799). rax 
£195384 (£312170). Earnings 
per share before extraordinary 
items 24p CL9p)u The board js 
confident that the group null 
again be able to increase 
profitability. 


Initial: Mr Andy Cooper 
joins the board and becomes 
chairman of Initial Service 
Cleaners and Initial Auto- 
matic Services. 

Newspress: Mr Michael 
Thorold- Palmer has been 
made a director. 

Leslie & Godwin Aviation: 
Mr Tony Payer becomes a 
director and Mr Andrew 
Fletcher a divisional director. - 

Media Technology Inter- 
national: Mr Stanley Kenneth 
John has been made financial 
director. 

Woolworth Holdings: Mr 
Archie Norman is to join as 
finance director. 

Mandarin Oriental Hotel 
Group: Mr Peter Bates is sales 
and marketing director. Mr 
David November will be exec- 
utive director with opera- 
tional . responsibilities from 
September. 

The Ralph M Parsons Com- 
pany: Mr John Russell is 
managing director. 

Cityvisioii: Mr David 
Quay I e is chairman, Mr Colin 
Gerraise-Brazierand Mr Guy 
Askham aredirectors. 

CPC (United Kingdom): 
Mr William Alfaudyce is a 
director. 

Aqualisa . Products: Mr 
Martyn Denny is 
’nowcommercial director. 

Wimpey Construction UK: 
Mr Peter Hart is a director. 

Johnson Group Cleaners: 
Mr John Mason has joined 
tbe board. 


reinsurance. 

Brooke Bond Oxo: Dr John 
Byrne is now the technical 
direclor.succecding Mr Den- 
nis Cockerill. 

Family Assurance Society: 
Mr Jeremy Rowe is chairman. 

Octavian Group: Mr Arne 
BernrotluMr Stewart Cohen 
and Mr Erik Fraser are now 
directors. 

Target Group: Mr Murray 
Ogston becomes divisional 
safes director. Target Life, Mr 
Andrew McKinna is made 
marketing director, inter- 
national division. Target Life. 
Mr Peter Alien is appointed 
administration director. Tar- 
get Investment Management, 

Mr Dylan -Evans: becomes 
investment marketing- direc- 
tor. Target Trust Managers. 

UFB .Asset Finance: Me 
Michael Spring-Rice becomes 
chairman and managing direc* 
tor. 

P & O Group: Mr Howard 
Phelps is appointed a director 
of Peninsular and Oriental 
Steam Navigation Company; 
chairman or Earls Court & 


Court & 


Olympia and chairman of 
Sutcliffe Catering Group with 
effect from September 30. He 
also joins the board of P A Q 
Cruises. Mr T fan Harris is 
made chairman of P&O 
Cruises. Mr Les Overs be-’ 
comes deputy chairman of 
Earls Court & -Olympia and 
Mr David Faskenis appointed 

j: if. ca. 


managing director. Mr Stir- 
ling Gallacher becomes dep? 
uty chairman of Sutcliffe 


Catering Group. 

Renault UK: Mr Guy 
Bergen ud, managing director; 
is to be commercial director. 
Fiance, with the parent com- 
pany. He will be succeeded by 
Mr Loic Caperan, sales direc- 
tor, France. 



Peter Hart 


LA CREME DE LAC 


ONLY THE BEST 
NEED APPLY 


ASSISTANT TO ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 


Business Affairs Manager 
c. £9,000 


We are expanding our successful sales department due to 
the continued growth of our publications. 


Therefore there are opportunities for sales people who 
possess the qualities and character to complement our 
existing team. The required qualifications are a good level 
of education, enthusiasm, dedication, and a good appear- 
ance. A knowledge of typing would be desirable. 


Our Business Affairs Manager is currently looking for a young and able 
secretary to assist him in the running of his Department at Manchester 
Square. The Business Affairs Department is responsible for the negotia- 
tion and drafting of contracts between foe Company and its artists,, 
producers, eta, the contractual aspects of the licensing of recorded 
material by, and to, the Company and all other matters of a legal nature. 


A unique opportunity to make a career 
move into advertising has arisen with the 
setting-up of a London office for this ex- 
panding Advertising Agency. As assistant 
to the Account Director you would be in- 
volved initially in all aspects of setting-up 
a London office from scratch and helping 


f for the 18-25 year olds 


to provide a first dass advertising service. 
The. emphasis is on people, taking respon- 
sibility and organising social functions. 
Good typing skills are important 
^ is a flair for administra- 01-4999175 
tionand organising. i6 hanover saw t 

w finesse 


The secretary wfO be working in a dynamic and cheerful atmosphere 
undertaking duties of shorthand, typing, filing, organising meetings. 


APPOINTMENTS ITD 


There will be ample scope to capitalise on new business 
opportunities and full training will be given to equip you 
to meet the challenge and demands of this role. The right 
applicants will be ideally aged under 35 and will reside in 
Loudon or within easy travelling distance. 


taking minutes, general administration and a good deal of telephone 
liaison work. It is Important that he/she understands and keeps in- 


formed of the work which is being carried out by foe office in order to 
deal with numerous queries without supervision. 


PA TO PUBLISHING 
CHA 1 RMAN/MD 

cX 10,000 


AUTUMN CHANGES 


Your ability to respond to the competitive nature of 
advertising in order to develop new business for Times 
Newspapers will earn you the reward of an excellent 
starting salary plus bonus scheme and generous holiday 
entitlement. 


Candidates with a good educational background must have first-class 
shorthand and typing skffls ( 110 / 60 ), an excellent telephone manner and 
the ability to work confidently and efficiently under pressure. A sense of 
humour is essential 


Excellent secretarial staff* and a approach' 
required, and the ability to work independently aa 
well as part of a team. You will be a good all-round 
organiser, ca pable of running an effi cien tly. 


If you would like to apply please write with full CV to> 
Jane Sullivan, Personnel Department, EM RECORDS (UK), 
20 Manchester Square, LONDON W1A 1ES 


Please send foil CV in confidence to: 


SEC/PA W1 UPUEUB Co. cJM 3,000. 

5L3S* you need first dass orga nisationa l 

SW1 PA/SEC £12,000 

«ro aMSWttfltt.w. 


Please telephone: 


The Chairman, 

Perry Pubficatioiis Ltd, 

49 Old Bond Street, London W1X 3AF. 




Steven Oxley 01-837 1234, extension 7706 


**rr**JJZl*j 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

P.O. BOX 7, 

2 00 GRAYS INN ROAD. 

LONDON. WCIX 8EZ 


c. £10,000 

UK subsidiary of large German 
company requires a secretary to the 
MD and his team. 

25 DAYS HOLIDAY 
AND I3TH MONTH! 

You will need English mother- 
tongue standard, coupled with rusty 
German and good secretarial skills 
in English. 


• <d 


City bank needs bright all- 
round secretary for busy, 
friendly operations team deal- 
ing with Mexico. Good typing 
needed but rusty shorthand. 
Bookkeeping experience not 
necessary and excellent bene- 
fits include snsbtidised 
mortgage. 


tom uuKua auuMt 


OFFICE OVERLOAD 


SfcmM / tome / WP skills are 
needed bar 99% of the enwtoyers ran* 
these columns. V 


needed by w* ot roe e mploy ers team 
these columns. WE NEED THEM 
TOO! However, if pin these you can 
speak Reach. German or another ian- 
goage yon are very special. As 
summer ts here oar demand for 
lempor ai ies Ins increased so be the 
one who benefits. Telephone row - 
wed like to bear afl about you. 


c. £1*000 Mf 

A highly saccessfid international 
company has moved to fabulous of- 
fices at Richmond in Surrey where 
they need four experienced director- 
level secretaries. 


;UtssTB*Tyw_ 

! to fete mt rats ; 


The top job is as PA to tbe Chief 
Executive. The others are in Fi- 
nance. Legal and Marketing where 
relevant top-Jevd experience is 
needed.- • 


We offer 

• Top rates * 

* Top Assignments * 
’ Top Companies * 


Yery Dynamic 

Oil fAn* * 


£11,500 


He is young, charismatic and very very successful. 
He now requires a top W to o/panise tbe many 
different levels and aspects of his life. International 
business deals, a migor role in UK industry and a 
fall social diary require the very best of your 
organising Hair, skills and experience. French useful. 
Good education essentiaL Excellent skills taken as 
read. Age 24-34. Please telephone 01-409 1232. 

Rermritment CvntultUlt ■■■■■■ ■ 


f11,BN+ Sales promo* 
tan/martating eo. ban just 
won Rapt account aid an 
looking lor dynamic PA/ 

En& Must have Ms otirt- 
lawe aid confidant* to 
attend meetings and tnef 
dants/prmtocUon. Good 
sec. sHte rawed (SH 90, 
«p. prscabte. 




fWeateo otter Bank HoWw par- j 

: taitiay p ay a nd W trattng. 3 
: H you consttr wuned to bt 

: w afire temp men earn what I 


wu deserve and 0 a or 

Unt ts#* Phono tarn. o» 

Judfflm 01-034 OM». 
150, Victoria Street, SW1 


01-491 7100 


01-4917100 


01-4917100 


01-4917100 




letowOTtoowren 


tlMM Sec/Admnstra»r 
required by maior ad. 
aoency to run then business 
rantrc. Must be seif starter 
and have ettafient shifts 
(SH 100. tjp SD+J. 


TUNBRIDGE 

WELLS 






PERSONNEL 


PA IN FILMS 


Ttw Vkb Presto* al lira wtrid . 
Camus fflmwny 6 torture tor 
a Secretary who can asset hm 
win he hecac flaty sdwMe. 
ExcefltnJ stats are a tre-mw* : 
Sfle tor Bte poston n addCon | 
: to Stole wtwtncs at a h*ob j 
level vou w* become a real 
r asset to lwn. o roa n a n o he <n- 
i vestments, trawl home aftvs 
wo expenses, u name pst a 
1 tee at the (Jutes mated. A 
dean tomg tenet and goon 
secretarial state ire afi you 
need 

Ptmw JUDY lewis on 

84647*7 


6RADDATE 

SECRETARY 

£ 8,000 + 


E9JR0 Rut, Successful PA 
co. era looking for a PA to 
asssi two of their Accost 
□rectors. Plenty of scape 
toMcom A/E. butlnlhe 
meantime must have good , 
sec. strife. 


ftsssang me PR Otrectorof 
btgo muftWationaL you 
attend press confer, 
wees and meetings at 
Rartameifi. A confident 
personality and smart ap- i 
pearance are needed tor the . 
extensive contact with cl- 
ems and (oumolists. 
Experience s not required 
torttas ctiaDenpng ponton. 
For Ml detafe tetactxn: 


£1506 Account team of 
top ten agency want 
good Sec. (no s/H). 
(test have sense of Jw- ; 
moor and good typ. 
speed. Wang WP »Q3. 1 

preferable. i 


interested caadl- 


Employment Agency seeks 
Manager/Manageress for new 
secretarial bureau in Central 
Tunbridge Wells, Good salary and 
commission; attractive location. 
First class career prospects for 
professional person with good City 
experience. Interested? Then call 
Roy Buckle on Tunbridge Wells 
(0892)48933. 


Tasteful Temping,. A I W)rld Rims 


design 

£ 9,000 

NEG 


No hassles. No let-downs. Just plain, ample, 
high grade temping. 

A tasteful package of top jobs, elite rates and 
thoroughly professional service. 

If yon have sound skills and experience, you 
should be talking to The \forfc Shop*. 

Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1232. 

■■ratototeMte Becr uHi oani Conmltmto 


£10,500 

This is a civilised, urbane environment in the 
executive suite of one of the world's leading film 
ronrames. As R\ to VicfrPiesident you**ll be 


3*upaa; 

sr.tas.S3 

IS* • kaen »«weMB 

tte creates world, wfin 

mo ahMrt). 


_T — Tl. * — ’ oucr on aspects 

from fixing his ooffise to driving his m. .VDvdy 

S mr^solid secretarial experience and 
U00/60)requested. Age 24+ . Please call 

tenjftuwiii Consul cuts 




01*499 6566. 


Ssrab Shattock. ; 
(fort. 


iBwioxil 


SECRETARY 


P.A. TO STUART DEVLIN 


H BgM feB jafc If 

iWMmwmwnoiiMLGnur 


623 8863 

■HODGEj 

.recruitment! 


DAVIS CO* 

SECRETARIAL 

01-7346652 


Required for interesting role in Electronics 
Trade Association in West End. Audio, short* 
hand or Wp. Salary related to a ge and 
experience. 

Please telephone Joyce Flint for 
farther details 01-437 4127 


The tocceuful applicant wij| need to be way effiaenL adzmbte. 
aud an excnkni communicator. : 


SALARY £11,000 

Pleare Tdephoee Carafe Hedtey^bomdere 01-153 5471 


TEMPORARY f 
MBNCAL A 
SECRETARIES £ 

AS areas of London 8 
Tefc Jenny IWs on \ 
0895 834086 A 


la creme 

appointments 

also APPEAR on 
PAGES 24 a 25 


TS »=. t 


cec n ,<l 




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yjpw-- -* >x 
3. «***-*” 


iXSCBWE 


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fe-.‘ xT * 1 ■ 


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TOWS CHA 


THINK 

CHAI 




Cn 

RlOv i 



Sio s£ 




}. 










gMMpii 


tote 


&$&*? 




j Ifyou hold an account with a r~i 
. TSB bank please tick the box. * — * 




j&ex* 


&^^° UCOUl J dS ^ e f abailk . if you hold on to your shares for 3 years, you U receive 

The TSB Group is looking for as many shareowners one bonus share for everv in mn mnrim +A Jireceive 

as possible, among people in all walks of life. of £5000 worth nf vrnir mrirrmal Um^ 


M 5 


»P S me.™»g-psoptein-a]lwdtea ( l4; =35333"*“- 

mvestment y° u canmake wfll be about Fbr further information, a prospectus and aoriKratinn 

£400, payable m two instalments; about £200 nnw and fnrm l Tr a , a PP Jlcatlon 


feTSBGroup Share Information Office, PO Box 330, Bristol, 
^™^BGro%Sh^eOffei 


Name 




Address 


LA C&gfil 

iPFO'^S 

£££ * # > 


wr minimum investment will be about £200, similarly lt,r , . . . . . 

lyable in two instalments.) iMOWIlSyOUr tUffltOSay V0S. 

Jssued by WdBrothers & Co., limited, through the TSB Group Share infcmiafon Office, on behalf of the Thistee Savings Banks Central Board. 


Post Code 


zfeOtWfo 














24 


i nc iiivicb WcL»iNc6UAV AUO'uSi Ii_b>d0 



LA CREME DE LA CREME 


TTTTTIpTYnYlTTV^ 


The European Molecular Biology Laboratcfty. an international research orga- 
nization situated in Heidelberg. West Germany, invites applicants for the fol- 
lowing two positrons : 

SECRETARY 

(Personnel Section) R6f. 86/30 

to be responsible for correspondence and general administration work in 
this small, busy department The secretary will be expected to be able to 
work independently on a variety of administrative protects. 

SECRETARY 

(Cell Biology Programme) 

Rtf. 86/ 19 

for the joint groups of the Cell Biology Programme. The successful candidate 
will be expected, in addition to the general secretarial and administrative 
work, to deal with the production of manuscripts for scientific papers, 
reviews etc and the planning and organization of scientific conferences and 
workshops. 

For both positions, fluency in either English or German is required, with a 
very good knowledge of the other language. A third language (Bench) 
would be an advantage. 

An above-average salary will be offered. Certain allowances are payable in 
addition, depending on personal circumstances. An Wtial contract of 3 
years' duration, which can be renewed. wiH be offered. 

Please write briefly for an application form, quoting reference 86/30 or 
86/19 to :EMBL 
Personnel Section, 

POStfeCh 10.2209, 

D-6900 Heidelberg. 


HIGH-TECH U.S. 
MARKETING 
CONSULTANCY BASED 
IN MODERN CHELSEA 
OFFICES HAS THE 
FOLLOWING 
VACANCIES: 

L SECRETARY/SECEPTIONIST 
Enthusiastic, unflappable person re- 
quired for this busy and . varied 
position, which calls for cheerful and 
positive attitude working for a team of 











DON’T MISS THE WP TRAIN 
Learn a New Machine - FREE 

We are offering first class temporary secretaries the opportunity to 
be cross-trained free of charge on a further word processor and be 
paid at the same rime- Successful applicants will then be kept busy 
working on our professional team where everyone with the same 
skills is paid the same excellent hourly rate. 

You should have speeds of 100/60, 2 yean* Director level secretarial 
experience in London, and proficient WP skills on at least one 
machine. 

As an express route to finding the right platform for your talents 
please telephone 01-434 4512 NOW for an appointment. This 
amid be just the ticket! 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


CAREY l . ye'd baa a 

STREET! tit only ™ 

; I secretary from 

Senior Secretari.ee> 


vJuUit it.: 


cel lent WP, communication and 
organisational skills required. Age 20- 
25 years. Salary c. £8000. 

2. SALES AND MASKEI1NG 
ADMINISTRATOR/SECSETARY 
An ' excellent opportunity for someone 
who wants to use their organisational 
skills in the challenging world of high- 
tech sales. You will have good 
secretarial skills and an aptitude for 
using your own initiative and used to 
working under pressure in a hectic 
environment. The position will allow 
the right person to gradually move 
from a secretarial into an adminis- 
trative and marketing support role, so 
ambition and motivation for success 
are key requirements. Age 25-30 years. 
Salary c. £11,000. 

Please call Tritia Henry on 351 7733 
■ No agencies please 


Elizabeth Hunt 

PR 

c£1 0,000 


PR £10,000 

Project the image - on the telephone and in 
person to the clients of an expanding PR firm 
in beautifully remodeled warehouse m Nl. 
You need confidence plus w.p. skills but not 
necessarily shorthand as Office Manager/P A. 
to the MX>. Mid 20+. 

BANKING £11,000 neg 

You wifi always be busy in Corporate Finance! 
You have A levels, good shonhand/w.p. + 
banking experience for the Vice president of 
this City Securities firm. Free lunches; bonus; 
plus spacious offices. 

NO SHORTHAND £10,500 

Lois of travel arrangements + liasion + 
audio/ w.p. as secretary in the Capital Market 
area of a WC2 bank. Age 23+ 

PERSONNEL?£14-15,000 ++ 

You have at least 2 years personnel 
managmeni experience with the emphasise on 
recruitment plus a Positive Personality: As a 
consultant placing permanent secretaries your 
hard work and expertise will gain you job sat- 
isfaction plus earnings of £14-13,000+. Call 
Lyn Cedi on 439 7001. 


Ory 377 8600 West End 439 7001 




P.A./Co-Ordinator 

for Director of 
International Marketing 

The Cromwell Hospital has a super job for . 
a RA Co-Ordinator to work for our Director 
of international Marketing. The jdb entails 
meeting with people of ail nationalities, 
arranging accommodation and visas for 
patients and femiiies. lots of international 
telephone work, dealing with, general 
enquiries and billing duties. 

Applicants of mature and flexible outlook 
with cheerful personality will need to be 
well organised and have excellent audio/ 
typing skills (no shorthand). M edial 
experience would be useful. Preferred 
age 22-35 years. Salary c. £9,500. 

If you think this job Is for you, please write 
enclosing CV to Ms. Freya Slade, Personnel 
Department Cromwell Hospital, Cromwell 
Road, London SW5 0TU 




Cromwell Hospital 


Short-term contracts 
for high skill 
||J(|\temporary staff 

^C/PR Some S,H 

SEC/PA Some S 'H IBM PC D'W2 Srir. AcOlL WC3 *til Oct 

£6.45 pih. Call Janette Rainer 01-430 23Ji 

SEC/PA Oil to a %o ^ 

SEC S/H Finance Du. 430 3531 

AODIO^EC Bank ECS. ^ ^ ^ 

AUDIO/SEC Bank EC4. Boss out of offica Magic! “til (X* 

£&80 jxh. Call Janette Rainer 01-430 3531 

AUDIO/WP EC4 LawyerWordptex Gemini. Probate- Litig. IND5F 

£EL55 pA. CaB Janette Rainer 01-430 2531 

WANG PC OP All spreadsheet work with Mngt Cons WC2 tit Sept 28 
£650 jih-Call Janette Rainer 01-430 8531 
DECMATE II Base text process work with SW1 publisher INDEF. 

£635 pi. Cadi Diane Davenham 01-6300844 

CREDIT CONTROL With System 38 VDU Win X train *til Oct 

£430 pLh. Call Diane Davenham 01-630 0844 
LEGAL AUDIO Fleet Si Lawyer. Litigation. Busy. *01 Sept 12 

£&80 pi. Call Janette Rainer 01-430 2531 
LEGAL AUDIO Piccadilly Lawyer. Madhouse. Til doomsday 

‘ £Su80 pi. Call Alex Sinclair 01-6200777 
LEGAL AUDIO IBM D W All Probate. Partner. Til Sept 19 

£6J0pi-Gall Alex Sinclair 01-629 0777 
VDU OPS NIGHT OR WEEKEND WORK. City Bank. Great overtime. 
Average typing skills 

£450 to £Z0Q pi. ChB Janette Rainer 01-430 2531 

For the most rewarding temporary and contract work m and around 
London call: 

►Alex Sinclair - Foley House 12a Maddox Street London W1 
01-629 0777 

► Janette Rainer — 13 Lambs Conduit Passage off Rad Lion 
Square London WC1 01-430 2531 

► Diane Davenham — 189 Victoria Street London SW1 
01-6300844 

► Kay Burgess - 60 Comhill London EC3 01-621 9! 


nfflr-o 



CONSULTANTS 




*»! 


’ SPANISH 

tecamns See Mo^c con qma cwraL tXM^riQa en espata ■ 
mates liOOppn) y mtamxia 1 60 ppm. ton tobaar con d Director da Kb 
pnsbgosa corona «> array. 0 rata*) inctow teuton. WP. traduedta da 
□mtenodcaca y Ok v Im ol aaba coke (flows rti ampMa n aMn 
Bores. Edo) fat-. 25-35 ENeg sab. 

GERMAN + FRENCH 

Raal otthw e> tte City nouns we*flroome4 Mi caflra Scatter att 
Uuem FfHtt and (toman to wofc tars team «nta die Forept Bond mfog 
sea. tey stmtoni and (as typng pks sm WP te essential s is proas 
ajisncftce. jwL m a banco Ma m d ZDs. £BjS-9jOOOL 


SOYEZ INDISPONTBLE 
c £ 12,000 + bonus 

On behalf of a major U.S. international investment bank with superb 
offices near Liverpool Street we seek a secretary with fluency in both 
written and spoken French and English. 

Working for a charming director covering French-speaking Europe 
your language skills will be crucial in dealing with appointments, travel 
arrangements and general secretarial duties. You will also be involved 
in the preparation of material for various lectures and seminars. The 
ability to exercise your own judgement and to work under pressure is a 
must, as is the capacity to enjoy your work. Good shorthand and typing 
in both languages are required and banking experience would be 
preferred. Please telephone 588-3535. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 



PRESS & PUBLIC 

£JB,500 

This prestigious PR consultancy, renowned for datogattog 
to and involving their secretaries, are currently seeking a 
young and fkndbie PA (80/50). Woridng as part of a ream 
this s a marvelous opportunity to leem a tremendous 
amount about tWe test moving and extr emely c ha l on Blng 
business, where Raising writh press and cSents, arranging 
press co nferences and promotions. alba part o« a fuB 
and varied day. 

For farther detsls please cor de d Trecy Forbes 


Ol £31 IwrnecCora' 

Price Odmieson 


GENUINE CAREER 
OPPORTUNITY 
***£8,500*** 

Join one of the top media teams in London. If you haw 
good typing and a quick mind, you can rally grasp this 
opportunity. If you ret this job and you are good yon wul 
be a TV buyer/merea planner next year. Age about 23. 


planner next year. Age about 23. 


Susan Beck recru, ™ eht 


01-584 6242 


RECEPTIONIST/TELEPHONIST 
FOR ARCHITECTS 

£7,000 - £8,000 

Urge. Mondy anMBcaral practice, dose to Tannham Court- 
Roed underground, requires a Reo^rtte ria t / Talephontei with 
some typing ab#ty. 

AppRcsnts with previous r e le vant experienc e, smart appear- 
ance and good Wo p t io n e manner gtxxfld app» in wrWng with 
CunioAre VBas to: 

Carol Creek, Rede Town send. 33 ftnn Street. 
London W1P 1PM. Teh 01-637 S300. No kgenrtM. 


TOP ADVERTISING 
AGENCY 
***£9,500*** 

Young demanding Media Board Director needs a 
sprightly, whirry PA. Apart from exemplary SH & typing 
you must be prepared to spend at least 50% of your time 
working with bis top-drawer Clients. Age about 24. 


Susan Beck "IVSS 


PA 

£12,000 VI 

if you are totally commit- 
ted. well-organised Bid 
searching for an involving 
Exec/PA positron this is for 
you. The Chairman has 
many directorships includ- 
ing one with a very 
successful group which is 
ffrvotved in acquiring bitti- 
nesses. There is also some 
personal work. Ago 27-40. 
SUSS 100/60. 


Senior 

Secreiaries 



Cm you be one step ahead of 
i dynamic, tnreural boss? 
The Mvtagmg .Director ol a 
smtf but experienced mer- 
chant bank in EC2 is seeking 
a naht hand person to 
or gani se ban and help ptot 
Ins activities. You poise and 
mafigara* matched by ex- 
relent secretarial Stotts 
(100/60) wM ensure that he 
office ett rot smoothly and 
tus many prestigious clients 
are nurtured. 

01-606 1611 

Senior. 

Secretaries 






DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


Are you worth £1 8,000 p.a? 

If you have excellent skills, a logical and 
orderly mind, good business acumen, the 
willingness to work very long hours and 
an interest in the City then we have the 
job for you. 

Phone us 


Office Manager 


to £15,000 


This leading firm of international consultants 
relocates its European headquarters to Lon- 
don in September and needs someone who 
can organise an office move, research new 
equipment and settle a small team into new 
premises. Working closely with the dynamic 
Managing Director your opinions and con- 
tributions will be actively encouraged as you 
assume total responsibility for the smooth 
running of a busy office including full secre- 
tarial support and client liaison. This is an 
exciting opportunity for an experienced per- 
son to team and progress within an expanding 
field of consultancy. Knowledge of languages 

an advantage. 

Age: 25-35. Skills: 100/60. 

Career in the City to £12,000 

Promotion prospects out of secretarial are ex- 
cellent with this US investment company. 
Supporting their advisory service on invests 
ment. portfolios you will be encouraged to get 
to know clients, organize presentations and 
attend social functions. To succeed you will 
need a confident personality, self-motivation 
and flexibility. 

Age: 22-28. Skills: 90/ 60. 

: RECRUITMENT S“<S 

- C 0 M P A N Y TEL: 01-831 1220 

SECRETARY 
TO M.D. 

£ 12,000 


WALTERS 

FLADGATE 


w 


r OSBORNE RICHARDSON 
THE TOPS! £12,000 +++ 


Elizabeth Hunt 


1 Fast growing young 
company has an M.0. 
under pressure who needs 
an energetic and intelligent 
secretary to assist him. 
Opportunity to become an 
essential and valued 
member of the team. 90/60 



Contact mo 
personally: 
WBHobhoura 
Managing Drector 
Tie Rack United 
70-78 Yorit way 
London N19AG 
Tel: B37 4222 


CONVEYANCING LEGAL 
EXECUTIVE/WP OPERATOR 
for expanding Practice in W.l. 

A challpnging responsible position with excellent 
prospects for someone with experience in han- 
dling a varied and consistent workload of 
registered and unregistered domestic conveyanc- 
ing, much of it leasehold. 

You will handle your own files and correspon- 
dence from a computer/wordprocessex. Keyboard 
skills are essential but we are happy to train you 
on our WP. You would be expected to work with 

and expand our system. 

Please call Mrs Huggins on 01-637 5181 


f CflROIM wno ~ 

f TEMPS! TEMPS! TEMPS! 

I EARNING £11,000 pa 

| An Bxperenced soaetny wltti WP sfctti within the Carefim 

| King temporary mam can expect to earn m excess oMhe 

■ above wMeeiso^ng a variety at ssErnnems in aOBiaae of 

9 London. We also haw a great demand tor shonh an u. audio 
I and copy sldls. Please wa ph ona Brend a Stewart lor an 
8 bameciata appointment. 

1 46 Oid Bond Street W1 

01-4998070 J 

CAROLINE OK SECBETAmAPPOfllTWEIITS 

UP TO £12,500 TAX FREE 

A major cm plover of expatriate toff" in Saudi Arabia has a require- 
mem. for secretaries - shorthand 40 wpm. typing AS wpm. Medical 
secretaries uilh audio npoince. 

Unrivalled benefits package, accommodation and facilities. Phase 
send full CV or telephone for application form ux 
Rec nan acwt intemadooal Lid. 

Quebec House, Quebec Street 
Leeds LS2 3 HA. Telepfase: (QS32) 454288. 


Our dtont is reguiarty In the headlines duo to its 
exceptional success end numerous takeovers. 

Its Chairman, for whom we are recruiting, 
spearheads this success and Is a major person- 
afity within foe business community, we 
therefore seek a PA of exceptional qualtfes 
who wfll be rewaded by one of foe most presti- / 

fiSfa *" Lond0n ’ 100 / 55 

FILMS & BOOKS £9,000 

Famous publishing house seeks bright secre- 
tary forme Director who ties up deals on flkn 
rights. The joti Is BOX admWstrativB and offers 
scope for indvidual talent Slow shorthand, 
some awfio & 55 wpm typing needed. 

Ftatt cal Bdtta BoMri, km M 
km thbanw or Btew HcMta asm - fi-Hpm 

v 4092393 sA&mw omm 
x W7«w Atx wmmsr.umM 


PERSONAL SECRETARY TO 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 

It is essential that the job holder should have at least 2 
years experience working a$ a secretary in the 
ad vertisintf communications industry. 

As well as needing impeccable shorthand and typing 
( 1 00/60) the applicant must be well organised and work 
efficiently under pressure. 

Salary will be in the region of £9.000 plus other fringe 
benefits asso cia t ed with working for a bank. 

Please seed your C.V. marked privaie.and confidential 
UK 

The Advertising Manager 
Advertising Department Barclays Bank Pfc 
Jtexoa House, 94 Sr Pants Church Yard 
Loudon EC4M 8EH 


GASCOIGNE PEES 


m 


£9,000 


Tilt tiuq r fasonnel department of this fame Victoria based 
comuny need a calm, wefl organised second jobber to 
pwtdeaMI iniloH aid j/Jit/hKltaUvs back up. Lass 

involved at mere 

^g j o^Bieri»rtinert process. 55 wpm typing and WP 


BOLD DIGGER 

£10,000 


As PA to the tMcd dbector oTlNs 
o r gartsab on ti sliffls wW be used 


COTpany.jjwir 
AmngB social 


of overseas ncraitnient and 
tabs boss’s personal fife. 


ertremely appre- 
nwded. 


.EfinbottiHunlftocmftnMntConsuAoniSi 

V 23 College I# London EC40H290 3551. A 


COMPUTER 

SUPERVISOR 

ziojm + taHflts 

Wefltt* Otis is a terrific job 
for a carwJsr-ltoafa person 
win enjoys being part oi a 
haooy team in Mayfair. Take, 
over their computers and 
organise staff. Great pros- 
pects. £1 .000, worth of 
benefits! Fmd out tnore. mg 

Sue Owen on 
4340030. 


PA/ 

FASHION 

EIO^OO + (Oscotod 

An exotmg job in a smafl tean 
n tone retail fasten dam. 
ConWertM corrsponCsnce, 
mart>iosetc.inmrUMgde- 

.partnwi Busy amt rowifing 
for an accotnpttsbed Sec/PA 
West God. Phone 

Join Hourston on 
434 0030. 


iwrai >ur--g, wiiii ick*«ih caikiicikc \tm. xv waiiar wm uwu * 

dminglienux. Exrrilcni prospect^ aniafiivc salar> and Cb car. 
Please appl> to: 

Mss E Gvwqr, 

5M6 IwSbiwW 
Lamdoc SWIMS 8BP. 

•1-730 8482. 


WEST END ART GALLERY 

Seeks smart. iwriH*cm penon 28+ for receptioa and light set 
urial duties. Non-routine work.' KnowfedtC of French 
sdvanugc- Stan October. 

Write with deads UK 

Mrs.’ L Ncffc, . 

JPL Fine Arts, 

24 Davie Sueeu 
London W1Y 1LH. 


01-629 9323 


City Mover 
sn,ooo+ 

This tsatc^j level opening in a fast moving 
City environment As PA to MD of this highly 
regarded ‘market-maker’ you will operate 
ac ross m any levels, playing a social role; 
entertaining VIP diems; handling tough 
and situations; liaising, organising and co- 
ordinating. The company is expanding. So 

too your pan in iL Excellent skills, presen- 
tation and work record required. Age 24 - 34 . 
Please telephone 01493 5787. 

GORDON-YATES 

1 BeoteneatOMutonti 

> ■> 

APOLOGY 

THE TZMES wouJd like to apologise to the anoli 
omsand dmu of HODGE KEOtUmffifnrS'r 
Bond House, 19/20 Woodstock SlreeL uJ,! 

hUi HL*" 9 confttSion tha* may have 

been caused by the placing of Sarah Hottead 
vertiscmoits on Wednesday 6th Aug^jo^ 
under the name of Hodge Recrmtmenu 986 

Hodge Recruitment and Sarah Hodge am emirrfv 
separate recruitment businesses with rm 
tion whatsoever. 110 °onnec- 

LA CREME 

APPOINTMENTS 
also appear on 

PAGE 22 



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LA CREME DE LA CREME 



runner, we won’t hold 



As one of London's leading temporary consultancies we are 
constantly in search of high calibre secretaries who possess 
first doss secretarial skills, initiative, poise and personality. 

In return, we offer excellent rates, a constant flow of senior level 
assigririmts and a personal service that is second to none. 

Be a step ahead this autumn and join one of London's most 
sought after temporary teams. 

Contact UzBarratt on 01 439 0601. 



Secretaries 

3rd Floor. Carrington Houas. 

130 Resent Street. London WlR 5FE. 
(Entrance in Regent PL above Iberia Airways. 1 



c £10,000 

We urgently seek 
someone with some 
experience in retailing and 
interior design. Educated, 
intelligent and with ability 
to use their own initiative. . 

You will not only enjoy 
being on the sales side of 
this expanding company 
but also have a knowledge 
of fabrics and a sense of 
colour co-ordination. 

Please send CV tos 

Douglas Covnmaille 
LM Kingcome Ltd 
304 Fulham Rd 
London SW10 9EP 
Ref DC2 


ANEW 

A major international service Sk& required are good shorthand, WP 

organisation, based m the City seeks a and administrative experience, 

senior M to the right hand to the newly 

appointed Managing Director of an PfCB$e telephone 01*439 €477 

operating group. 

APPOINTMENT 

£12,000 

The successful candidate will be aged 

25-30 and have the ab&y to put clients 
and coBea&m, at ati levels, at their ease. 

ConSder&atoy is important, as is toe ' 

JSr**"*""" Mac Bhin Nash 


PA Secretarial Recruitment Consniants 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

3^ r\|^ w 0rD,n; G-rert. London EC31VI 1NH 

Tir! o . 1383 3500 cn01-S8S 357S 

f-4o 3B737i P:>» Me. Ol 638 '33 3 S 


is i.r .. ..• 

i 1 **’!.: ■ .j • 

r Hairs.-. 

d-.r-. : \t t 

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* , '' K a 

ill 

- j-tT 

Mr 3 s _i . I,! 




Opportunity rajotoaprograsatvetaara and expand your compritorknowledgeu 

SECRETARY - GROUP SYSTEMS 

London W.C.I. £7,500-£9,000 

MAJOR INTERNATIONAL NEWSPAPER GROUP 

-This mtareeting new appointment will be attractive to carefidates wflh an interest in 
computer systems as the Group Systems Department acts as interna! consultants to the 
ILK. companies of this tmff-known group and them wl tie opportunities to use and 
further train on IBM PC. Good secretarial and wordprocessing sWte (shorthand useful) 
are requited and the successful applicant teti assist to projects and keep trade of three 
very busyyoubg men. Aimowledge of oompmerterminology and an outgoing personality 
wflteheipfid as therewdl be telephone support of systems users- Initial remuneration is 
negotiable £7^00-29.000 + 6 weeks* hoBday, subsiefised canteen. AppScations in strict 
confidence under reference SGS670/TT to toe Managing Dfaecton* 


EXEC PA/SEC’S 

£9*00 - £13*00 
OrdnM «■ maw lv*i» 
MnMiMvnM Cry. Ogata 

Upkvon A CUM 

•wr now raqun wnl up-tap 
a you nm otewr Auto. 
9l * IIP l ew or m 


tote. OMItp yoar SMB » M 
flw ma pore ure Eid parks n- 


■■■■VmgngMi. EI 1 & 
Pccson A cany tmmm. 

I CTTY: 01-4812345 L 
[WEST END: 01-938 2J 88 

flHmtt 


■■■ 


PROPERTY PA 

E10JX10+ 

MM Muwmad flan of SuraVfM 



pea tar a qdefc- 


■ CITY- 01-4812345 ■ 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 

ftHmm 


EUCOimnaETJUBUHTB, (■XnfTMBTCNBUIAMTS), 

snsr, um Etta 1M. IBflWE M-5H 3588 er OHM 1576. 
TBSCM7374. RUbOMEStm 


INVESTMENT PA 

twjm + Profs Stare 

OwetrMMCMagini an 

M tabo ur « nontc P A/Sac wtn 

poea sh Mt id nacMe Mm MD of 


May you fend Bh poMdo boDl 

DMitandng B daMU, A Good 

panooaiqr nemn for m uoqbd 


■ CTTY: 01-481 2345 ■ 
WEST END: 01-938 21881 

aWhnft 


. • ■ ■iii**- 
•• ii-' 

■ . 

01499S : 

fid r 


01-5849033 

lUJOBMunOWL 

SEOTETABW. 

KOUITHBIT 




01-5848931 

50HMSQVSCENT 


UMHMSW1 


EXEC 9 T 1 VE SECRETARY £ 10,000 

Our efisres a prastigtous, marke t toa d to g Admtis- 

ing- Agency with beautift% fight, interior designed 

of f ice s in Covent Garden are tooktog-for an execu- 

tive secretary to work for one of toe founders. You 
will be working with new business meetings as wei 
-as some-prebiinary fiaison with established con- 
sumer cfientSL An exoefient pre s e n t a tion .is 
essentta as weft as good, sscretarfal .and 
[j organisational sldfis. A fcstpfess tofe phone manner 

Jj ? necessary. Age-c. 24. -Speeds A O^^O. __ 

I YOUMG CHWRilAM’S M £ 12,000 

The young, dynastic and newly appointed Cttar- 

man of a well known multi-national company to toe 

City la looking for ah asaiatant/seenrtary -to. help 

hta to toe day-tod ay , funring of Ns office. Y^awfll 

be o^anisingbin-hoifin, board meetings, fitting :> 
with til tofrdka cto ts and htat» jf\ fepartrnaritsas \ 

wal as co-ordinating Ns busy travel schadttie. Age 

23 - 25. Speeds 9Q/80. WP eogiertonoe required. 

| Please call us for arrirKETView until 6.30pm. ■ J 


YOUR 1ST JOB? 

Interior Design, Wine and Banking 
are just some of the exciting careers we 
can offer you now if you have ski Us of 
80/45, good presentation and enthusiasm. 

OR YOUR 2ND? 

We also have many interesting, well-paid 
permanent and temporary jobs for good 
calibre secretaries with experience. 

If you are keen to get started, don’t miss 
thes» opportunities and ring us today. . 

437-6032 



RECHUfTMEWT CONSULTANTS ' 


AUTUMN CHANCES ; 

?/PA Wl UCUEUR Co.cXJ» 
SW1 PA. SEC Cl 2,00® vi 


THINKING ABOUT A 
CHANGE OF JOB 

We would be deigttad to try to bdp. We- don't advatisa 
EVERY jab we have on our flies and w may have just the 
one to suit you particular strife and personality. One of otr 
consultants would be happy to discuss job prospects wilfi 


you and if we de not have anyth mg suitable immediately wa 
would heap you in ntind and consider you for new jobs as 
they come in. Mfe hamfle a wide range - from coHege leaver 
to the reafiy sensor PA positions. If you haw secretarial 
skBs why not ring for an appointment to either our Qty 
office (588 3535} or West End office (434 4512). 

Crone Corkill 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


PA in Personnel 

£10,000 

This is a challenging role in one of die UK's 
top professional firms. As Sec/PA to 
Personnel Officer yod will' organise diarg 
meetings etc while handlings rich \ariety of 
administradve' tasks. Theabfiity to antidpaie 
and solve problems is essential. An eye for 
detail and a confident, mature approach in 
business dealings also important. Fast, 
accurate typing and good work experience 
requested. Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


Bwtw Ii w w m C o rn u lm 



EXPERIENCED PRIVATE 
MEDICAL SECRETARY/PA 

Required to work for busy 
consultant cardiologist and cardiac 
surgeon. Previous private practice 
experience, shorthand/typing, 
administration and bookeeping all 
essential. Salary £12,000 pa. 

Please contact 
01-935 3922 for details 


111 



RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANT 

£10,500 BASIC + COMMISSION 

Luokfafctera Rnesti efisnenytf. ' „ 
ItearEaflourisiiingcdm^wilhanewaxI exciting 
outookonttBSecrtt^recnjitnaem business. 

We require someone with self motjvatiCBi, enthusiasm and 
gootfcommunicaMn sfuds to help dwetop our business 
and become a Vej memtmr of our team. 

Idedty yrai wi31 hava some eoiejwnce Of persomel or 
recruitment; tww a positive attitude and wUfingnes 
to leam is more important. 
hitanM? PhB»Jw on IHOMffiSTSaiiyttae 

or Peter «t D1-831 429S 

FI7HJRES 

RECRUITMENT SPECIALISTS 
PuturoaUd.,61 Greer Portland Swot London WIN SDH 


WINDOW DRESSER 

£8,000 21+ 

urgently required. 

Only applicants with previous fashion experience will be coossf- 
ered. Please ring Karen Dover on-Ot -249 6041 for more details. 




ettie 


‘.f 

•j] 

i'V 


LA i 


EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 

c£i 1,000 m 

Prestigious Merctttitt 
Bankets seek senior 
apptaant with previous 
Banking wp, good sh/typ 
+ taov!ftdgeofMuitinate 
WP. Exceftent working 
conditions and extenswe 

, benefits are. offered. 

and recent photo to: 


wut 

■fringe I 
Cvar 


33 9 Gewge Stari, MT1. 
TeiepbooB W4ffi SW 


AUDS SECRETARY 
ASSIST 

SAUBT £9,500 
KEfiOTlABLE 

To assin owncrand 
secreorv/PA in small busy m 

and fhnnciti prankr 
(Vioona). iob csscnmis aic 
accuracy, speed. usini_own 
ioiuaiive andadapunlny. 
booL-kcepmg and inyesuncn 
knowteda hdpfiiL Pir fer ernc 
for wnHuns ■" a snail office 
and an equitable temperament 
arc essential. Age 30-45- 

Pfease Tel: 

Mr Nlghtingirt 
on 01-222 1468 


£10,000 

AT 20+ 

You w* have excelent skfls 

100/80. • atom personality 

and be llsiibla and hard 

wortang. fa return you can 

have tits (qp salary, excel- 

lent benefits, beautiful 
Bunotmdmgs and a young 

eooabie auwd to work with. 

Try e out tanp to perm. Cafi 

Jane Capon. 

01-933 1840 

M&mtmn 

: 


ENG/FRENCH. 


i/fRI 
SEC/1 
£10,000 


l/PA 

No|W.1. 


Major French imporysatos 

c omp a ny eaek a mature 

axperlanced person ter 

busy dsmanoing postUon 

ass«tng m/d fa aa as- 

pects « too day to flay 
running and- edministra- 

tton. Varied duties wMCtl 

w« emaa responsftoy for 

own work. Sfti in EnaHsn 
useful *r Ranch. ■. 


6b Paragon Language 
Consultants G1-58D 705B 


MEDICAL 

SECRETARY 

PUMkne seoretary required 
far priva® practice of 
teafafag hospital eye 
surgeon. Salary c. £8.000 


Apply 01 -035 9523 


SECRETARY/PA 

Quick to team enthusiastic 
person to hMp me net srrufl 
busy wheelirn end dealing 
office. Must be able io use 
maive am be adaptable. 
Great future for someono. 
Safety around £12,000. 
Tat 01-223 9823 
A. Patrick ' 


HAUTE COUTURE 

£ 10,000 


Hdum «W M. kcim Itqnnl 
Sk id wad « Otaaor M Om » I 

WqilM'BBMnca O* ON MBJMI 

■twty H> wol on ifour mhi 

W an w B . Pood ouwnnw wen > | 

gear m*i c o m p— m SHPyptaQ.1 
M WW. So**0 MRB. a OOBi I 
cwmng B W an a a gm—d 
tfKOUfltt. 

I CITY: 01-4812345 M, 
WEST END; 01-938 21881 


YOUR FUTURE 
OUR CONCERN 

Temporary Temporary Temporary 

If you join oar pnrftanoaxl team of Sedeouies 
we can offer immediate boefciggs with die 
most mstqnos companies. Whether yon 
have SHORTHAND, AUDIO. COPY TY- 
ING or WP skills, jmH Dud oar place m ents 
we distinctly diflereat! Ring or drop into any 
of oar offices TODAY. 

Permanent Permanent Permanent 
CONSULTING! to £10,000 

Are you a Secretary whose Administration and 
Audio skills are not being utilised? If you also 
enjoy a fast moving environment which empha- 
sizes team work, then a Management 
Consultancy wants to pul you on the correct 
career path. Re£ 551 /Cl 32029. 

BANKING! to £10.000 

There's no substitute for experience, ana a ma- 
ture, enthusiastic personality will be perfect for 
this full Secretarial role m a Qty Bank. Your 
Shorthand might be rusty bot ^our typing should 


be polished. 


562/At 


PERSONNEL! to £9.750 

Think of all the possible Secretarial and Admin- 
istrative duties in a Personnel Deportment ami 
they'll all come true for a competent, reliable. 
- sen-starter m this International Company. Dis- 
cretion. flexibility and rc$ponsibi1iiy are key 
requirements lor Ref: SSI/B/B1320I7. 

PHONE OR CALL IN NOW! 

19/23 Oxford St, Wl Teh 437 9030 

131/133 Cannon SL, EC4 Teh 626 8315 
185 Victoria St. SW1 Teh 828 3845 
22 Wormwood St, EC2 Teh 638 3846 


REACH FOR THE SKY £12^00 ta £12,500 

^ s -, L o t s ” dtttif contact omarusmq rational md international travel 

S?5ipS» SSwlflSJK g a^fimrengsmoottiiy. Age pref 
Zft». s uperb benefits guaranteed. Reasonable shorthand s ne cess ary. 

ERTREFREHEOHIAL PA £11,000 + C0MPAIY CAR 

gireiWMir s offering a tree oteer to a 
«ViURtejbgeffl Sec with a tot of common sense and secreiinil aMibes. 
You win have me opportunity to use your Kunanve 100%. Get involved 
mainly on the photogfapfac tod motor racing side of the bumm wtih 
cuent contact galore. 

SHAMUTI £8,500 ++ 

Total trailing n computer progommiaB for a bright young graduate wdh i 

destre to succe ed . 

VD8 SVER VISOR £10,000 + BOWS 

VDU Operator in Broking with supervisory experience. A lively wnhhy 
personality essential. KCELLENTPROSPECft GUARANTIED. 

Phones 283 3464 




#■ 


Secretarial & Commercial Div. 
City Recruitment Consultants, 
58 Houndsditch, London 
EC3A7DL 




dd Recruitmem Consultants 

aKbatt Challoners 


SECRETARY FOR 
WEST END FASHION HOUSE 
£9.000 

To work for Publicity Manager of PR department. A flexible approach is 
required for this exciting and stimulating position which involves ar- 
ranging merchandise for special promotions and other events. Good aB 
round secretarial skids essential. Will cross train on WANG. 


Pam HaybHtte Personnel 
12-14 High Street West 
Wickham Kent 
Telephone 01 776 0491 



TOP RECRUITERS 
RECRUITING RECRUITERS! 

If you are ambitious there’s plenty of room for 
you to progress in a career with Kingsw- 
Recruitment Consultants. Tonight we are hoi 
ing an open evening between 5-7.30pm at 1, 
Kings way WC2 opp. Bush House (nearest 
tube Holbom), telephone 836-9272, and would 
like to talk to people who want to “run their 
own show”- as branch managers or would en- 
joy assessing the skills and potential of job 
seekers as recruitment consultants. Why not 
join us for an informal chat over a glass of 
wine and discuss the marvellous opportunities 
that our group have to offer you. Recruitment 
experience is an advantage but you wiH have a 
successful commercial background preferably 
gained in a sales environment We look for- 
ward to meeting you - no appointment 
necessary. However if you are unable to at- 
tend, please send a C.V. to the above address 
marked for the attention of Paul Jacobs. 

Kingsway Recndtnent Crasoltants 


ADVERTISING 

Trading direct marketing agency seeks 


media department. The successful at 
cant will need good all round 
(100/60) and have the capability to use 
their initiative. Salary £8,500 with early 
review. 

Telephone 01-727 3481 ext. 234/282. 


AUDIO SECRETARY 

With experience and initiative for 
partner in Mayfair Estate Agents. 
Must be able to operate WP and 
telex. Top wages. 

01-491 3154 


Bank Reception 

£9,000 

Sumpnrously appoimed offices and luxurious 
style set the tone, hen? in the City premises 
of this leading American bank. As recep- 
tionist you will meet and greet VIP visitors, 
deal with calls on a Monarch switchboard 
and handle secretarial work for one of 
their officers. Some reception experience is 
essential and good typing 1$ requested. 
Benefits include STL, BUPA and subsi- 
dised mortgage. Age 22+ . Please telephone 
01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


Seoameni CoanfonB 


SI -.H - i-i.iJV V 

: i. /.yiiissK __ 


PA in Oil 
circa £11.000 

The scope is Smitiess. 

Wrtoout the abifiiy to 

create order out of 

chaos, and a natural 

flair fog adnant s tr a t io n. 

you would not be able 

to cope with this chal- 

lenging opportunity. 

As a truly motivated 

mK starter with good 

shorthand you will 

have afl the opportu- 

nity you need, or wan, 
to mould ties position 

into an inter esti ng and 

rewartfing career. You 

will be utilising your 
communication and 

organi sa tional skills to 

the M and Raising with 

efients at the highest 

level in your role as PA 

to a Main Board Direc- 

tor of this renowned ofi 
company. 

For further infor ma tion 

please contact GSlan 

□wood. 

m01 -491 1868m 


SECRETARY 
FOR ARCHITECTS 

£ 9,500 to £ 10,000 

Large, tnemty. archnctural practice, dose to^ Tottenham Court 
Road wdargraund. raquxBB an expenenced secretary to work 
tor a Partner and hs team. 


25 or over, have ex c e fi u m 
useful), and previous 


The ideal candidate wM be 
typng and anjanestionsl stalls i 
experience in an arcMects' 
tt you filtha des c rip ti on, phase appfr m writing wttt CumcUtgn 
Vitae to: 

Carat Creak, Reck Tawnuad, 33 Gram Street, 
London W1P 1PN. Tat 01-637 5300- (Me Agencies) 


Get Busy hi Baker Street! 

Less a Sec/PA em a PA/Sec. £18,600 

The sec bit (accurate 100/60 sit/lyping, mind) wll take only 
40% of your time, the PA role the rest, wortting far the MD - 
pleasant, swtetwd-oo. ruining a iMild-wrdemedicrisup- 
pfin business tut also involved in others. Ttting is. Bb the 
teller Baker's dozen there youU be very, very busy. Midi 
phoning and office adm in, touch of marketing. PR etc. So 
you'd better be used to pressure - a discreet, marv 
dfatomatic. setf-startng. sett-confident 30+ u,ai * 
iiitti a coot head. Offices s6ohlly down-at- nvprinn 
hee). but yoj-fi be too interested to care. uvclu,n 

*■ on 01-734 7282 

MteyOiPteeReaelDnentlttl,l5PlccidBy.Loedes.WlVWB. 


IWI 


CHARTERED 

ACCOUNTANTS 

require a responsible and intelligent 
Secretary to work in their small City 
office. Applicant will have previously 
worked for a firm of Accountants. Ac* 
counts, typing and audio 60 - 70 wpm 
skills essential. Salary £9 - £10,000. 
Telephone Clare on 
236 7892 for details. 


IDflAKE 

PERSONNELS 


DRIVE TO WORK 
£10,000 

Based in beauteui fflodem 
once (whore there a a 
parting space far you) ths 
prasonoue tirm of eftar- 
tereef accountants are 
tootang ter a Semor Secre- 
tary; pa to the Senior 
Partner. Your days wiR be 
mad. to eiyoy correspon- 
dence, organtte tas day. 
enfoy audfa typng and WP 
and organs* hts diants. 
For a senior position wsh 
good prospects, cad 

Moira Beoqsffli 
M 01-734 0911 


ABE Y00 A 6000 
ORGANISER? 

To £10,000 

A yowg succmsM proparty 

company needs a setf-mott- 

vatad PA wan an imarest fa 

property to nefa raanaga and 

sal the* newly refurbished 

hmuy flats. You must be 

able to taka respon s tetey 

and u» your maahve when 

faced w«i a vansiy of situa- 

OOns such as supervising 

soctar functions ana edwtsmi 

residents. II you have skOs 

of 90/55 (atthoutei they are 

only used occasionally) mi 

a comment personalsy you 

cotid tad ttss a chaflangng 

position with long-term ca- 
reer poteofaaL 


.01-329335. 


ADMIN 

SECRETARY 

Kensmgton Markottog Co 
has a vacancy at their 
busy Ptomohone DopL No 
shorthand, but good typ- 
ing (GO) and 8dmm skate. 
Salary nog Age 20 - 30. 
■ha Awnr east 


BILINGUAL 

PA/FRENCH 

for M.D. of 
expanding young 
company in 
South London. 
High standard of 
French, excellent 
typing/shorthand 
and w.p. skills 
essential. For 
further details 
telephone: 

01-703 7031 


£12,500 

PA/SEC. 

2 broken need PA with 
90/50 

+ yip for besubU City 
offices- 

flxeefent career 
prospects. 

01-370 5066 



'recruitment 


IDItAKE 

PERSONNEL ^6 


PA WITH FLAIR 
£10,000 

Have yote owB oth c e st ttss 
cartowy prastgous property 
company trim wu ante tee 
oarows Vauwwamoyraspofr 

90fl*y tent you twtp h oaks 


PB so nnBL na ti Uog . 
and HftnerciMp pirn Vour 
mnsmtuR aMpss wd he 
u tteed to the fall nan you 
aae to dad etei me M ma- 
wiO ol the offices Sc 0 you 
ham a mare outlook, mi- 
lax shorthand and typing aep 
ertfoy a chteenQe. all 
Jagte Mflfiten on 734 Mil 

< BLnTL| n ,, da 

THtfiMBl 



HABDWORIIN6 
PA /SECRET ABT 

Eiojro oeg 
100 / 80 . 5 0 totes «Mfa 
mams French A wte.-ocgm 
hetnlul flnoteedge ol eewspa 
pars, magannes m aomttwg 
praffiionn a es nn aal 
Ms) fagtyteteqd 
penence References znt the 
atakiy to sustain last pace and 
take total responstofay for ran- 
rang snail 
company. 

01-734 


tmawpiwi 


1 




DRAKE 

PEIHONACL 

TAKE OR A 
CH AUERfiE Ojjj 

This ntemaunany copoeetad 
and faghiy succeshd compare 
re looking far a PA to asset 
Bter wry tasy HU. You would 
use your.Bodkflt short ha nd, 
typng. WP. adimstratnn and 
orgariottral state to assst 
tee md n me oy-tuday tun- 
rang id ta conpany. A you 
went a demandng. wciupg 
md wned |oo and wsh n tesk 
on a ane-to-on bass arat you 
lane good state and sesttaral 

w pnnrer j rat 

Karen Laitee on 734 0S1T 


a:CRETARY/PA 

Required for Park Lane 
luxury Mercedes Benz 
dealers specializing in 
limousines io Royal 
Families and Heads of 
State worldwide. Age 
JO-30 Years. ■ Book- 
keeping experience 
would bean advantage. 
Excellent salary for the 
right person. Send C.V. 
io: The Managing Di- 
rector. Trasco Irn Pic. 
65-67 Park Lane. Lon- 
don WIY 3DS. 

Td: 01-629 7779 


Dear Madam (or Sir), 

1 byourtatdhgencegEtnng 
enough exernse? 

I DccdaPA/5ec,wnh dqpcc 
or 'A' levels S shorthand 
wbol argute my bustnea 
h&. desk and communlcaTfan 
wnfa the outside world. I am 
MDofamedhan-dzeaHinaBj’ 
Involve d to multiple rm»rng. 

w u i l twlnp ifwt'pittf rt , mcror 

adng ana property. 

Tne avenge secretary 
coukto’r cone, but thr- 1 
person wd mve own 
prtvawpbooelme,pasotial 
computer, fax. company or. 
Please write to: 

John F. fatten. Shadow Lid. 
Hampton Farm lnd. Estate. 
rg k hain Mdtfo TWi? ODB. 


■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

INTERNATIONAL 
AFFAIRS 


Defy 3n shcrtland aed lyciag 
a tbs unauial ooeiuag. As 
Seotevy/PA to the Assets* 
Nbnagng Dnctor d tee Dw- 
aa &WSCP yon te l enjoy 
taw ten Managers and di- 
ems warMmde. sorting om 
trabtams. oteng wh gate 
ate tonteig manm t* ym 
m ntem nmoyow boss's 
tieoKflt absences tatncaie 
mad anangemaas rte ato to 
outco ol your um. also 
organising Ibbcmoits and 


Far mi 

recUA PfBCE an OHM 

Eefe&tfcp fe 

TTS DRAKE PVT13tfMnONAi.GROUP 


RECEPT10HIST/ 
TYPIST 
£8,000 pa 

Wefl spoken presentable 

and expenenced person 

aged 25+ required for blora 
of sarviced offices m Wl. 

01-935 9841 


TEACHING 

ADMINISTRATION 

SECRETARY 

required fix busy Tutorial 
College. Must have envgy. 
common sense and good 
secretarial stalls, W.P. 
exnenence preferred. 
Graduates preferred, 7 
weeks Hobday. £9.000+ . To 
start by SepwnberisL 
Loom ol afolicaban aid 
full C.V. 's to 
Dabbia Ibfsb. 
Lu pd o— Tutpra, 
7-8 Pataca Gate. 
London W8 £LS. 


NON-SECRET AJUAL 


SALES ASSISTANT 
O £6,500 

We are In need of an enthusiastic Salas Assistant to 
work with our currant sate taam at our showroom an 
the Fulham Rd. 

You must be numerate and enjoy deafing with ettants 
who demand only the highest s t an d a rds. You r brief is 
to be an afi round help to the sales team and so you wffl 
need to have an interest in the design trade. Please 
send CV to: 

Douglas Commaille 
LM Kingcome Ltd 
304 Fulham Rd 
London SW10 9EP 
Ref DC2 


MTERNATIONAU-Y 

EkMulN Km lire «w or two 

iMm lor iranwn mmnlnl 

in a nviiBtng and mvardma ra 

int Vpplirants ahouM he 
mahK motuatro and rrrom 

iwndrd arply to BOX K » 4 


ASSIST AMT USQIUMD tor Km 
4inquNi Awiqiiv CUtirv 
Lwnmr nmniry. hmu- 
Bhorir 01 4SS ABI 


PMMCM SPAJaSH/DW irauw 

liaid rMk Stem IIiiwi in 

*11 A I'wnaaJ wun ennsm m/t 

C7J00 No amrous ns rr 

IHHII-d dQr IBM. 

LniMWdir Core 01-380 TOM 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


PUT TIME WMWy rrguinvl 
m foinntlanry rorniunv tn 
CM nil Uardm. Audio and mod 
tatrsnoiv maniwr rwilul 
Hour, nreoriautr. dov to on 
and Hott'orn lubtt. Trt: Holm 
AJO 17dl 

tO. KSC 'Ntpaamu Bimiwre 
Cmu-uw (KW-e 00 Manure 
In liNVn. 10 004.00 Ml 
C3S0 ph 01-936 2131 


mfsnmrum 
IMmufasnal Co atm nmruUi- 

ing apparuuniv m rwnwM 

praoir te-tunng to return to 

v M»rk PoMUam in \ai\r rrcvv 

DM rtutxN. term 

adiumurauan and bnure 
' oui nun anonaianrr and n- 
mrtwnai MvMuMMnte 

tenhure roHid vatu iou om- 


and anmuMM »auw 
bowuooh CUI Jure or Jam 
now on Ol 2 20 rtli OllKv 
OirrlM A^nin 


gnu maunnr punmnvr mh 
Mrt-imr vr to Mp otd m o r n - 
m W Vann. murHuii 
work LllUn lum lo rtlM> Arru- 
iuVt tv pi no iroko 90 •« 
requrred. Srearv r Ol 803 pa 
Ptrrer iw Ol aos 5787 cordon 
V*ln ConuiHaiKY 
PMT-TREKCwigMlBr WM 
Lnd artalrm mikp Ynunp. 
Hvnv mi irwnumtii Modrm. 
MilmiMitm. Hour* <* OOjni to 
1 mpm Salary toOOnpr now. 
GNduwnsnvMui PVivin 
Ol 009 TW work Shop. 


FASMOM SHOP VA d mH OM 
kir holt da»-v por w* mnwrdk 
ten «ton onunvni ladHw witn 
IMhita flpir Ring HdlAwWIII 
10 870 3707 












































MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 



• MORTGAGES * 10096 advanced up to 
£120.000* Snxmalnlncomepius' ixsecondary 
income * 3* x jo int Incomes taken • non status 

• REMORTGAGES Forany reason, eg: 

• Home improvements* Badness Reasons 

• Educational Expenses* Large Leisure purchase, 
ttnac caravan, etcJ* Second House, (U.K. or 
Overseas* kotrimonat settlement 

• consolidate Existing Borrowings , 

• COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

• Shops, Factories, Etc. 

• PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUSINESS FINANCE 




e Lovatlsre. 

London 

EC3 


Robson 

Limited 


Me 


u*e 

Fc-nttcrt i 

nr«: 
tgvsce: wa' 

01-623 3495 




* 3U fines facome or 3 

incfliBe 

times joiol 




Hi 




Winkworth 

Financial Services 

S. 25a Motcomb Street 

London SWI A 


WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
YOUR PROPERTY 

And gel the benefit of your equity 

* Installing Central Hearing 

* Refurbishment or your property 

* Extension of your property 

* School fees 

* Buying a Car 

* Going on holiday etc 

(No fees payable) 

HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One of Europes leading Mortgage Brokers. 
15, Berkeley Street, London wlX 5AE 
Tel: 01-629 5051/2 TELEX 28374. 


GIDEA PARK (ROMFORD) 

Cottage Style 4 bed detached house. Convenient & prestigious 
location with easy access to Central London {20 mins Liverpool 
SL0.R. & A1Z/M25 - 2 minsfj 3 (ge recaps, bathroom, exten- 
sive garden, dbte length garage. Superb decorative order 


Gidea Park Estates 
(0708) 43411 



MARBLE ARCH OFFICE 
TEL: 01-724 3100 


Humphreys. 205 Mch High w 

CkiHRCn - London SE10 8NB 

aun&uo 01^58 1102 

GRfflCWBL apart 4 sorer penod. amt-d* Use. e 1820 in consansrtun 
area Pose Park. Rw & BR atom. 1* Mania tt/ king sea. many 
aqfeaues. si c 1 tied RaL wUetT pin. £225,000. 

SHDOTBtS MU. * lartseaped, resfeanrol area. Pratesswafty taontoL 
5 beds, del tan. 17tt rend. 21 ft tone. 2» tit W/ diner, ulfay im Lge 
comer pM. Space tor me. EI38JOOO. F/ H. 

I to nphra y Skin 8 Co. . 01 850 1102 WMyn 


WA8KXS HE PtmttT MBT 
81-785 6222 

CHMuram HMD. Sw& tawu renal r 8* brat el West Mays taas a wM* 

art it*, bunra crane own j oik. ? «k art W. tduniur. 8® 

c-Hr rdtui«hre«im*DSPnWlanmvnee EMhjOOO Uk 
umKUULSWtt CtamatotayMce nFnwaMWBAm 6 bees ?igt 
■rem u h* septfflOfcZMte sacks te tn Seduam Wteagprap Gangs 

pj; Iff) 

MnonTKlMHT SaeMVoaeusenuci WOvWOPMnM 5tx*fc. 7 raaes. 
H n iron ddv mi Gas cn «0 W uoq qaan. to* rad I18UOO tkOJ. 
DKWftKS HOWL SO*. ■- Ptara - MmjoiU* 8 « mm hane. * m. [tojrt 
Mt -rm TMMiOBe). W-wt urge tummi Gs eft Smm w twQ 
ganm tiij&O late 


VICKERS & CO 

MUM VJUE wacoas In ft mason rm t»v> cate® * stuM arm 

tacatian 3 ownrnv receoDan. W & DM Gas cJl lease 120 rears £92.500. 
HEWS HOUSE. HjOf ih moo Muse on 2 fl* on* (n quta COMM mew. 
St jams vmm<w utmost** burs. 3 Bedims. taorm. layVK dole read. 
tWm Gu t» oil Free f 1*9.500 for twtt sft 
LITTLE VENICE. Ex nAc to sanffi nal Elegant sa*M tor olton gdra 3 
trains ?khih 1 an soeei recw 5 W GascJi EtMW Isa 120 ns ftTOjHw 
tPMOOBMSS) FLAT. VS. 2nd Itr Hat wen tecary t> Hputo imam Bosk 
A MMU Vale. 2 Ms. MOL W A ntm 90 y iso. Owy EH9599. 

01-289 1692 


E.A. SHAW & PARTNERS 

COVENT GARDEN, W.CX2. 

Spacious 3 Bedroom unmodemsed maisonette In good location. 
99 year lease, r? SO, OOO. 

COVENT GARDEN, W£2. 

Superb stuefio flat m modem development dose to Piazza. Sidy 
fined and carpeted, long tease. £75.000. 

01-240 225S 


SLOAN & CO. 

CWL WORTH mews, W A Unusually spacious. elegant recap 
l2i x 1?) 2 dbte bedrooms 2 bathrooms fl en hjHm, urge 
garage. 

FhU E2KUW0. 

stanhope PLACE, MARBLE ARCH. Outstanting "Batchelor 
Per. An exdusM manor dssigrad coraeprin tomg. Loose 56 
years. 

Offers Id excess or f2 0QJ0q 

01-402 7355 


HARLEY ST/QUEEN ANNE ST W1 

Magnificent 4th flr apartment in mod P/B block, com- 
prising 3 dbi beds, 2 lux baths, (1 en suite), spacious 
recap/dinmg room, futfy fitted Wt quality fitted car- 
pets/ drapes. Expensively decorated. Covered 
garaging. Lift resident porter, c/h. e n tranc e phone. 
71 yr ise. Medical user rights avaltebia. 

01 445 0224 (office hrs) (T) 




ment 24 hour porteraga. lift 2 reception rooms. 2 
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, fitted kttehen. 1 14 year Lease. 
Sole Agents £175,000 

ST JOHNS WOOD NWS Magnificent 1st floor family 
anartmenL 24 hM- oorteraite, lift. 2 reception rooms, 5 
year tease. £350,000 


apartment 24 hour porter 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. 


ELLIOT ROSS 

Regents Park Office 01-485 4500 


HI LI 
HUBBLE 


As established estate agents we have also 
offered a Residential Letting and Manage- 
ment Service. Our expertise and success m 
this field allows us to offer specialist advice, 
structured to suit your individual 
requirements. 

We urgently require properties from one bed 
flats to six bedroom hpuses. 

For further odnea and in formation telephone 

MARGARET SCRIVENER OR 
MICHELLE BETTS on 
01-950 5059 


MARBLE ARCH 
PENTHOUSE 

KabuJousIy interior-designed with direct access 
lift. 1st tinw on market. Double reception room 
opening onto lush, secluded patio, with computer 
watering system. 3 bedrooms, 2 magnificent mar- 
ble bathrooms (1 en suite) each + double bath, 
Jacuzzi, underwater lighting, gold plated fittings. 1 
with sauna, video entrance phone, cable T.V. 120 
year lease. Low outgoing. 

£525,000. View today. 

Ol 724 8912 or 01 935 1544- 


Pacey Rogers ft Co. 01 458 9337 
ONE MILE TOTTERIDGE, N20. 

A Beautiful sympathetically 
modernised (teamed Vic- 
torian House. Prin. bed 
with Mh. 4 other beds & 
bath. Staff flafist 3 elegant 
receptions. Farmhouse 
kitchen. Utifity room. Gas 
CH. Gge. K acre wafted 
garden. 

FREEHOLD £250,000 


Conveyancing 

£280 by City Solicitors 

S ’ VAT and dtohursenianis} (or buying or seHng your home 
the usual way on pnees up a flBOOOa. Rteg lor quotes an 


me usual way on pnees up » 00000. Hr 
higher figures. 

BARRETTS SOUCfTOfl 
49 an Reran sr. uwma i 
ramote maw oeoi 


HALLAM STREET W1. 

Excel ent 2nd ffoor annrnert. Mtocal area. MW rawt ewd tu U l 
Accent 3 boos. 2 rasps, fin wow. 2 bate, sep WC, gaage. Raqoras 
sons ledacurafioL £220000. Sole Agents . 

SUPSffl FRSEHOLD FAMILY HOUSE 
Dose to Stew Street Accon: 6 ti«h. 2 news, 3 Wts. fitted hitmen. 
Panofl teattxre. tovnaculasely retuWwl tWMjraut £395j)00 FrceficMd. 

JOHN MOSLEY ft CO: 
01-724 3759. 


Douglas & Gordon ^ 

CMOGfiN SARDBtS StQ. QoUw dMlcania oopotaeics. tire tested 
a rewaumni <n South tacegpostan. 39 jw toasts. El 50000 & 1350* 
IteK ST SSL tMWM 1^ ton. 2 reoos. 4 Ms. 2 Hto. U. ete, 

£375.000 FR 

Joint Sole Agents Friend & FaJcke 

01-730 8411 


ASHIET CMS. SW1. Spa- 
CRUS 3 bed. (is in heart of 
MiMster, 121 yr Isa, 
£135fW0. 

cttusifniCE.svi.SM- 
cans 3 bet 2 nespt maiwon 
fiat needs smaN amount mod 
ite. ET9&000. 


77 Bocldagbam Gtee, 
London SWI. * 

01-222 3133/6 






BanoMtreaandlMifionted.4e- 
adral tamly house wnti gatags m 
qua irefl. 4 tareoms. bathroom. 
2 recasMns. lounge ball. taMoi 
4 treaidasi mom. guest ctoak- 
mom. Gas CH & 13Dtt rear garden. 
4 rare a tune. Easy nsaaTltorff 
Crass and West End. 
£179,950 

Teb 01 202 5804 


WZ QUEENSWAY 51ll (OOT flM. 
m mown DtecK ML emtawr. 
.CH. N w m some rMK. ffinn 
IMIMHtSSOOO ono Ol 689 
9292 Ow. T41 9479 Eves. 


HJ. Nrwiy bull det tar on 
HjiwtUw. 4b«B. Studs. 2 
ret. kU/ttundrv. d/ow. d/«j- 
grh. JUrrn. NHBC. £195X300. 
Tfl 01 993 6706 


mcLsauvc rd swi. ctnmum 

3 M nauw win pp tar moot- 
aana floor, tteyn.ci99.ooa 
Tfl: 01 828 5410. 


vnmoMnuwl (VsL 10 floor, 
onsnon budding. yean 
tax. £147.000. 01 244 8189 


MQHBiHrr M, High vwant 
nfw nnnnm FHlcd kite, tint 
bUM. 103 IM& moots 
rrm 1 s.qcn.LgFCOtran 9 dn.Stl 
noted ut 5 turn C*organ 
t m aw d no use nos* ga local 
mow A HtgMHIiy Grids. 

a»i.ooo. cofuxx). caaooo. 

cos. GOO 94 sear mhi 
SOCMTV ft Km 309 0961. 

UTIU VEMCC. Mod ugni A 
jyeoousF batrons- RaL 
o/toohinq A MKH I or at hush 
communal gdm. i/3 mens. 
S/3 bfds. 0f M4D fut wtin att 
aeouanm. badi ♦ wow. 
CCH.90 vr tar. £112.000 lie* 
tooay TrC 0128b 2350 now 
DI-93S 3W4 oflrcp 

n w RC S SlVE aut owtroom Cmtoiv 
M ux & one garden, own » 
rallOO cl 10 luor and >Mn 
CM~kfc W« £ 295.000. 
T.HodaiM. Oi 730 9957 (Sun- 
day OI 9*6 23071. 


HOPE CLOSE 
CANOffiURY, Ht 
Jan lOescd gtan R ol ■ tnoa 



W2. 3 bad maMBnauf Sutwre. 
oirh eruon FBir gnct tar 

Sf2SJ3«£. l39 - a00 f^teHd. 
01-229 0836. 


WAPPBNL SOtnn Quay 4 bfd 
s*m <m tar m new Braanry 
dfirMomfriL Cl 12.000- Tm 
Ol 266 (fc&i fees Wends. 


autmso. ST, SWI. DrHgntfid 
rod (M toTKv nouor wim 
crwnmng waiiM gatdm m 
mwit 4 /M t mrect oft Vacent 
Squaav. DouBla raccoon- u. 3 
Mlroom*. baxnrra. mw rm & 
elks. FTiid C238XW0 
Tuffirnnam 01 22? sen. 


rmra OrrHrai Line. Hyde Park. 
Sunny 141 flow UiMor rial 
Ju irony Largo now. 
knrtm & namroom. CS9,96a 
Tri H 0 "» 402 796a: Work 936 
6570 

DOCKLANDS - OTT • BOW. 
Snmam oi pengd A New 

MoibM A rials dose Otv and 
Rn«r £36 C25Q.OO0. Pnonr 

tarOowaato. Tkf taimecr On# 
aofiu m Oonuanaa: 790 9632 

FU LHA M; tmumsnr newly dec- 

oraim rial, a tera douoir mh. 
2 da UK. lorof tnyii iwuoon 
room. If KHctirn. tail/dinin4 
rm. 9rb. t 2 S yr leasa. 
£146.000 Tfl 01-370 6337 



FULHAM 

Spacious 2 bed gete flat, 
good dac order, 2 dU 

beda lge recept rm, mod 
kft. delightful 40ft garden. 
GCH, long Ise. £79.950. 
Oulcfc sate required. 

4tfea fc ft g wH . 
01 736 6401. 


193ds when it was remodelled at hugs 
cost 5y the then owner, a sfocfcfcroksr. 
There is fine 18th century paneTmg in the 
dining room, and the house has six 
reception rooms, eight bedrooms and a 
staff fiat 

The grounds of 17 acres include a 
17th century dower house, staff cottage, 
squash court tennis court swimming 
pool and stabling. 

■ Number 1, The BoHons, m South 
Kensmgton-aprestlgiausaddrass'- 
vres bum in 1865 at a cost of £1,400. 

Now the house, needing “some 

updating”, is for sale at£2£ mflBon 
through panar Stead and Gtyn*s Cbafsaa 
office. The house, one of 28 m tMs 
garden square, has three racepflon 
rooms, a games room and nine 
bedrooms, with a roof terrace 
overlooking the gardens. 

Fine farmhouse . 

■ Manor Farm, at Shalden, Alton, 
Hampshire, is a Grade II Eliz abetha n 

andgrounds of sonresoc acres on the 
edge of the village. Well maintained, it 
has 19th and 20th century additions, but 
essentially remains a fine example of 
the Bizabethan farmhouse, of brick and 
flint and built in an ‘E* shape. 

Inside, it features a Jacobean 
staircase, gaUeried Jarxfing, Tudor arched 
open fireplace and oak-panelled 1 6th 
century screen. The accommodation 
includes a main bedroom suite and 
five further bedrooms, reception trail and 
three reception rooms. 

Welter Eggafs Aiton office is asking 
for offers over £400,000. 

■ A rare example of late medtaval 
architecture has come on to themarfcst 

Chester SS^^ST/^B^Thouse 
at Cflcain, near Mold, Ctwyd, north 
Wales. Set in over an acre, the house, 
with original beamwork and wattle 
and daub paneffing, has three reception 

rooms and four bedrooms and is for 

sale at around £120,000. 

Sussex estate 

■ The sturdy name Mockbeggars 
describes a house of Bteabetnan origins 
at Bedham, Rttieworth, west Sussex, 
which is surrounded by 27 acres erf 
gardens arid wooded grounds, 
forming one of the most delightful smafl 
estates in the county. 

Originally two cottages, the house has 
agalleried hail, drawing room, (fining 
room, and son room looking on to a 
swimming pool, four bedrooms and a 
separate guest suite. The grounds 
include ponds and a Sussex bam. 

King and Chasemore's Patworth office 
is asking for offers of around £450,000. 


was the country seat off the EaiterfCovenfay, is for sale *f8TCBBJ | ^ ^ 

Robert Barry of Cirencester. The bouse was fmflt m IMP ** « 
usually ascribed to Lancelot ‘‘Cspahaity” of Robert 

desi&nm the boose. Much of the interior, lBdodi ^^P l ^ ce i a f‘jf h , ime d to be the 

centre. When (t wis SoH fa 1984 the astdsg price ires £ 750,000 , ^ 

see it as a country house hotel, company headquarters, mstuutmu, or perhaps pn- 
vate bonse far a vary rich individual. 

Going for £lm in SWI 


By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 

The only qualification for ownership of 
one of the five apartments in Hans 
Crescent, Knightsbridge, London SWI, 
is the ability to pay £1 million or more 
for the privilege. The other option for 
this block is even more impressive — 
£7. 1 million for the freehold of the whole 
building. 

W. A. Ellis, the estate agents, regard 
the development as having “probably 
the most sophisticated turn-key apart- 
ments ever presented in London”, and 
the location of the devdopmem, just 
behind Harrods, gives it a certain 
standing. The apartments art built 
behind the facade of two red-brick 
Victorian, Dutch style houses, and the 
building has all the facilities the discern- 
ing buyer is likely to need — including 
resident porter, optional domestic clean- 
ing, laundry and dry-cleaning services, 
and TV satellite dishes for international 
reception. 

The development was completed 
more than a year ago and the whole 
building was purchased by a Hong Kong- 
based buyer who has spent more than 
£100,000 per apartment All the apart- 
ments are over 2,000 square feet and are 
fully fitted, interior designed and fur- 
nished. For the 999-year leases, the 
prices range from £1 million for the 
ground-floor three-bedroom fiat, to 
£1.75 milli on for the 4th/5ih floor 
penthouse, which has five bedrooms, 
two reception rooms and a patio/roof 
terrace. 

That may be the answer for the person 
who wanted to buy the penthouse on the 
eighth and ninth floor- of Number One 
Poichester Gate, overlooking Kensing- 


ton Gardens, which is under offer 
through Hampton and Sons at the asking 
price of £1.6 million. The penthouse has 
seven bedrooms, a large recepuon room 
and terraces. The 27 apartments m the 
block, designed by Green Lloyd Adams, 
range from two bedrooms upwards — 
most having three - and the pneessrart 
at £280,000, ranging up to £740,000 for 
the remaining apartments, not including 
the penthouse. 

Residential Holdings, formed two 
years a go by Nikki Mapelli Mozzi and 
Edward Wood, aims to convert large 
ho uses, usually in pairs and with period 
features, into high quality apartments. 
They now have more than 100 units at 
various stages of development and it is 
interesting and instructive to see their 
progress from seeming impossibility to 
completed luxury. 

The latest examples are at Weiherfry 
Gardens, London SW5, where a bnck 
and stucco building is being developed 
into sax apartments costing from 
£125,00G£475,000, and in Stanhope 
Gardens, where a pair of Victorian 
buildings will be transformed from an 
apparent ruin into 17 apartments, 
including two new mews houses. These 
will come on to the market in spring 
1987 at prices between £90,000 and 
£425,000. 

Residential Holdings has another 13 
apartments in Evelyn Gardens, costing 
from £80,000 and £297,500, and also a 
penthouse apartment in Queensgale 
Gardens, London SW7, which has four 
bedrooms and a fine roof terrace. It costs 
£435,000. The developers provide each 
apartment fully equipped and are 
increasingly putting them on the market 
fully furnished. From experience they 
find that fully furnished they sell — 
unfurnished they do hql . 


BELGRAVIA 

Digcm Aura stectPmoiMm- 
swme Jos off Eawn Sqwic. 
Unvote Maine Semi Trapnl Pn- 


«atf Gsnkn. 

TamOy mtotettat ftlnMr flows. 
Sapeib Ul t ima. 3 Ml 24 fl Re 
ccptm. 2 V? Bute. J4 year bra 
EZ2SJH. Vim aftaj. 

Tefc 01-730 5061 

•r 0683 503791 (24 hs) 




rM;li d ki 


W10 

Magnifieant Edwardian 
house in quM tree Hoed vm- 
nua. Good decorative outer, 
drawing mam, (fining room, 
morning mom. kitchen, 4 
bedrooms, bathroom. 2 

Alex Nsfl 221 2000. - 


SPECTACULAR 



OMSUM mas. ms 

urt&Ttvendale 1 

Extwaety toge i wta map- 
and Edwanfafl ms. mtanu 
ongral teams. 5 beds. 3 
means, bahrm, kt fitted epts 
& ping. Gdfl. 

tmjm. 

01-883 0055 




Extremely spacious ex- 
pensively refurbished 1 
bed fiat in P/B Mock. 1 
minute Marytabone High 
St/Baker SC Long lease 
£93,500 

Tel: Davis Wooffa & CO 
402 7381 


EZM3EHASTOM, StmWndtaat. 
nuns Haoan. kiinaiy RM 
UMoo ntry ml naur 196 
mutu County ground 6 m» 
Liouinout 3rd floor (M a o/b 
1930& work. SMnouS. ligM. €*■ 
r«M drawing room <26 - 9- x 
i r a-j. s b waora . mam 
ijreMn. 04. mraiif, pnoor. 
ML oraar. Coo»'« Mi 
imn 49 year Mar. U7A» 
Tor mark sate rang: (QSw 464 
3718 l«vt» 


WESTMINSTER 

Exqsnsite 4 bedrm flat 3 
en suite bathrms & shvr 
rm. Dbte recepti on , bar, 
dintognn, new fully fit kh. 
Just decorated £ cptd. AO 
amenities. £285,000. 
Pbtme 01-221 2221 


BKVANSTOH SO. tm duttM 
gma/loww gma du ow x . Oar at 
goo so. Real, doing han. 3 
tad. 2 bun. guest dH. kitchen, 
tmnw cono. low outgoings. 26 
yr tease. Call Ol 46 SI2L Ot- 
ters over CiSOuOOO. 


ITC Snanous aunny A 
L 4 betas, large audio. 2 


covorr garden, 
WC 2, 2 superb flats in 
Meal Street. 2 bed- 
rooms, root terrace, 
long leases. E13QJDQ0 & 


BizaM Street SWI. 

Noisy end. Supert) ttacoraed 
own peraho u ra RaL 1 bed. 1 
recBfAOQ, conservatory /dning 
room. 3G ft mu fadrn ter- 
race, garage prim arable, 
lour ootDMgs. Raray to mow 
in to. GCH. 70 war lease. 
E12000QL Cat: 81-7W 5625 
(10 am - 12 noon My). 



SpBciaBsts. R e sid ent ia l from 
£lOO.OOO-£5 mtton avai- 

aUe & raquradL 

Teh 0836 592824 
er 458 3688 



VKTOWLOwMatamodial 
oenceS mm walk Besgrava. 6 


mw. 4 betas, large ra dio. 2 1 beds. 2 home. 2 reornoon. 
rawuoos. lge KiaOra/ brafc-l cwnn. kdAwot. waned garden. 
arn roam, large garoew. Jraa I nwmd CSOaooa Hinson 
irra. DtnuUfid «rws. B Mbs I Assoc; 4S7 3077 
wta I kgrigo te tub*. F/taid. I 
£>«(LOOa. Oi 340 A3l9 am 



EAST FOCMiY 112. In one -ot 
Uie area-s roam presugovt MG» 
(tons, a a i*(* outstanding 4 
bedroom tuny am aowd rsu 
dnw In ortsune romunon 
utroughout. £ 606 . 000 . MOU 
rental potential producing 
£2^00 pm araoc For ful do 
Laus. pieasc contact: Martyn 
- Cerrard 01 886-0077 


HOttK HUHiMST we oner a 
prfsoroui Drooerty ruung ter- 
sire. Mason A Mason: Ol Wto 
6477 or. home Ol 006 3069 


west Hampstead sunny one 

double m nettmtn rial. Fret 
floor, brawny. 90 iw Jew. 
CCH. ESAJOOa Ol 794 1016. 


MAI — I T RIMV. Omp 
W alk. Pmogoui townOouse 
ovetwoung mtr / pern, vt 
bdrm. 2 badirami. Mow In 
oa £U»4joa (Muai lea ttw 

n e t e l ope r, pneu. ®nofc sale 
rego 340 6516 iH) 387 4603(0) 


■Louffimv. wet, 

reepr flat vAlh rear MW In 
nnad character ml Cl Hft C/ 
H/ W 98 yn IW. CB6000. 
Frank Hams A Co. Of 387 
0077 


<- .-'i ,Tl' ■ 


PtBlMORE BATE. Very IgM 
sradnBixialfllMrtU.3tiHl- 
raans. 2 tahroans, dmg roan, 
dam man, ftted t u cncn. Oe- 
MMul decor, tags tey wndwr. 
htot caAngs. confess. 32 yma. 


O W oeeBB SH L 2 sow 1 bed- 
room UsaiW Bosr. 32 jar 
tele, r 70000 for both. 
THERM RACE SW7. 4 bataan 
am ban. 12 yar teas. 
nmopcL • . 

rnfino tr road w l ( om-A 4 

bedroom. 4 bMsoom 3 mwiO M i 
tm house on gmund 1st end 2nd 
Amu. FmmoU. £289.000 to 
qutt sde. 

Unross Ltd 
01-602 9554 



Rocandy redecor ata d and 
pardaly mottonie e d, 
spBdouUB. Crarmer Court 
tat for stee. 3 bed, 2 
recap, k benen. 2 batn. j 
ctoek. as year lean 
aaoiflooL 

TEL 61-586 2947 




SOUTH 

KENSINGTON 

SfcnonQ 1st Hoar tatomytet 2 
Dote {teams, tew Rm ow- 
tofieng Canon Gas. npml 
Blast (to. Bathroom. fttenOl 
tor StenMr Rm. bnracstete con- 
tttoo. £21 Dm 74 yea lease. 
Berachaap Estates 225 0111 


MJ MM 


Flat Soar tofcaiy NO. nth ww 
owr nraens. 2 bedrooms, 1 with 
en site snw. Bsttram. Be- 
am dmnog room. Mod f/f M- 
ctttfl- To Bduas aracs and 
carpets. GCH. Comemsnt Tube. 
Long feeso, tntaxd tor eerty 
conaXhon. 

£172,000. 

Tel: 067963 581 



BASSETT ROAD, 

W10, 

superb, split-level flat 
with lge studio rm & roof 
fee. 90 yre. £785,000. 
Heritage & Woods. 
Open unffl 2pm. 
01-221 8821. 


HA toCT AD Superb seteoido or 
tiara. Open Door- Ot 794 6601 


PUil 



KNKsmMDGt Ground Poor 
(laL A large roonw. k*n. Omrai 
healing, mn water, po n ua w . 
irav* cruras m year tense. 
<hwnd rent £260 H. DV 
C6I5. £306,000. Ot SB4 l2«l 
Pin me euorr m Ops Reg 
Ph. Only n» tar saw in a. 
James- caste. 7 am. 2 rec. 
immar. Ua9XXX>nno Teh Mr 
Hihon (Sun) 01 686-4331 rWhj 
Ol 46Q1760M667 
urn* atirwuHTOw mv 
DeaBMte smut, a taw house. 5 
Bern. 2 Bams u enranei. tag 

lounge. o«r thr Mp Known, 
Him « rapeo. £64.960 Tm: 
&iO 6066/630 0087 IT) 
CMWmcK. OPhgntRil 14 nrcofl- 
'ran* luuy mod. Lge nns. 
Perpnrty aee Long Me CMWU 
ail wiraiin C68.960. Tel Ol 
994 4091 

FUUUU n - auis um Road. Sunny 
m o oM jin ed tmarr wun MK9- 
ny 3 beds, iM/raxwr. w bont 
reran Pana pan: £*36.000. 
361 6404 nm 930 2666 office 


mm to hmtoos. Pretty AbrtahL 
3 brt*. 2 ra. 9 tabv a™, wt- 
■nnty rani. Pauo goraea. fun 
Sway. C34&000. 889 0619 
«MUnsoOD Off, Win, bright. 
no nr m. m maraon Wk. nn. 
C/H. S Dsns, recept. Kn A MQi. 
41 yr*. £95.000, HoUUM. Ol 
570 6781. 

CMUMW1K Mwinliig grad 
nr m a JtoB. 2 ueo. rmpbU 
A bam. C/h. 1 18 ywSBBjOOO: 
Hcbnan&'Ol 370 6781. 
.lALMWllWii 3 bed flat to 
ouBtaodme desejgprai*, 
excHUtenl IMHn. £62.900 
TciOl 86742i«eia*/SuiMay. 
ruuuue hpmt non. eras' 
n« 2 ordnas. nsran. Oas OL 
ftaAy roooemisadj ampul tep- 
lurafc. C85.O0O. Ol 381 3631. 
eoum BSfSL Omel 2 bed 
rm in anr dwu. Lge ran. 
views. Oas OL £79.960- Open 
Ooorv Ol 794 6 pQ 1. 
MOUTWODD ffto^ »WS8t superb 
nrae- *4 f* oedsu. lot A oath, 
m small Mk. 120. yrv CAO.OOO. 
Homunft. Oi 370 6781. 
UT7U! VEMCX pearend 3 bed 
Mao. 2 iww. nrtgps KndM. 3 
acres of comm Cans. Freehold 
n 96. 000. Tel: Ol 289 2098. 


OVC 2 LOOMMS LORDS, imnw. 
5Ui nr fk in mod Mk. wim pm 
gar. i bed. nape. wt. mil Otar.. 
G/ H £84.980r Oracc 6 Co- Ol 
431 1122.. 


W* 8 T SOU SHE PK SD WU 

linmM tee for renovation or 
lanenui u 4 pats. Lge gar- 
den. L 176.000, 01 244 8189 
HDCMDFJWtH BmOUPLef- 
•gam 2 bed maraaneae wi» 
parpen. JCl iOlOOO. 994 4871. 
MAIIMX MOL UPC 1 bed dm: 
hml tor tettra. C110-.000. 
Open Door: Ol 794 6001. 

ML Cnmodemwd 3 bed. ft*» 
with West taong roar terrace, 
£179,980 ono, LPF 938 2222. 


Conservation area. Wit, 3 
aifioWng period houm 
converted into superb 
units offering evary 
modem convonlenoe. 
Studios £9^50; 1 bad 
flats &89J950: 3 bed 
Penthouses £195,000. 

01-221 3534(7). . 


DltP lOD SI lAhD I Aia CPUS- LWhl 

spacious garden k-wH mansion 
flat. Lee orawuig roam. 2 dM 
beta, potential 2 oaths. Long 
lease. \jx « guns. Offers in ex- 
cess of Cl 30000 Tel: Ol 373 
9271 


un SASwncr sniua ib* x 

16'. 97 year Lease Air Cand 
CCH Srjwafr BaUvro A Kitch- 
en. C52.000 To hinuae Futmgs 
« peairas Tel: 01-373 isss 


eMB.it A Uotunousty renovated 
• 2 Dcaraom 2 baihraora 1 st 
floor balcony nu on StoaneSa. 
£236.000 TWOI 730 1832 



8 HAMHAM com. SmaB quih 
ixwi a lerre. one rm. K A a 
Smw coo. root terrace. U» 
dmoaggs 1 30 yean * freehold 
l merest. C69.000. Teli Ol 370 
0081 tSun ft m», 
■KDCUFTC SqilARC vast puo 
fur wtui two laroe oeonwnts. 
Dautroam ana rawer room, i* 
' ym t 108.000. T.Hoswns. Ol 
730 taW 


499 9981 
CWUO swu. Snail 1st floor 
-RaL centmuy located «■ Itie 
Puttana Ooad. 1 (M barm, i 
Mrtn/taudsr. open pun knrtien. 
«s C/H. Morally a worara 
and ramud. 9o year tease 
. £86.000. Tel: 362 2o27 

dnyirmr. 

rAtrCCTT ST SWIO. Mew. on 
Market immar nrmni ft spa< 
nous flat on 1st nr of Sirtl 
bktek. Mr aseeiwoi uxal lams. 
Urty Mawmg vronaty re c 
.Brd.Rervp.Kil/entalrm Sath. 

. Ind OOf. Lift. Lse 9t yrs 
• C128.-000. Tel: Oi Ml 3746. 
HUMS COURT MOUTH, SMfS. An 
Mtrartrte 7 bed ananmefir ar 
Die rear of dus Dmnoar Mock. 2 
bras. 1 raep. **»mrm. eui rm. 
'kiWtteiL porter, mi. Lse 47 yra 
leomnn to 120 yf* possi 
Price csaooo huifm Crntani 
Ltd. 01-352 0113 


lUNIMUUNi Irnnurgdn Ita on 
2 firs m han) penodbudtang. 3 

beds. 2 uihsji ensunsl umay 
rm. elegant rw. kit/dmer. avau 
. gge- S imra iraru Hign Street. 
92 yr lease LlS&OOO, T«t 01 
603 7695 1 Q1-436442S. 


WU .W A swiQi Immaculate 2 
dot to 2 mane, tee nnotton 
nxn. CCH. ecrefleut storage 
tanhbra 95 vr, teSt. 
£129.600 TeMJl 36lC«6a6 


MCCHM PLACE SWT An rm 
marudir 3 nro. 2 baui isfloor 
bamuy Fiat Touuy rehs- 
DBMd 10 a hum Standard. Lie 
148 m ClTOUOO often tavri 


HAMPSTEAD k 
HICHCATE 


luHnruo tflUAoc mu, 

Uijc kjo floor mnar Vino. 1 
P«Mu»e 1 Mr bearoom. Bvmg 
roor " . Mienen/giner. o*Zr 
rowB. (X». 1 to yetr 
JJJtoO Tel lodby. 01-794 
92® Utereaiier 01-794 (Ota 


•Wtet Hill Rtek Ah 
wtnnma arvekxjmenc A um, 
toflii 14 « htoi ££S! 
oral IO vran ago- A/4 
•xv roorra. huge ncetuan 
rooros. oaraor. ran, 
^XSTSOOO MS 4867 O^Srv' 
IUW51CAD PACRMK 

• K* ysgyw rtouse. F r eeiw ag 

STtTOlT £llac »^ 

»«w»* YEA* L2AKG fffehara. 
W teiuon Atniur Luxury 3 
ted nai CCH rZrLr 
«29£00 TM 01S«1 tSTP* 






GREENWICH 

11 rrtns from London 
Bride. Deceptively large 
EdwartSan end of ter- 
race house with views 
over Royal Greenwich 
Park. 4 bedrooms. 4 re- 
ception rooms; large 
fitted kitchen and weti 

tetd mature gardens. 
Oilers m tm ngm of 
tOSMB 

Tel: 91-487 0073 flay 
81-853 5448 ms A 


BATTERSEA 

Superb 2 nd Boor flu in prime 
position, offering 3 beds, spa- 
cious drawing room, designer 
built .kitchen/ dining room, 
beaunnri baduoom suite, 

sunny, west feting terrace. 
ImntanilaK throudwut 
Mm leasehold. TetJohn 
Dean & Co. Ql 228 1 $ 50 . ’ 


TCLEMAPN mu. scm. 8 nnm 
Wijdun Bnogp. fme Vm lamiy . 

*«» oh. lAta or etar*e 

u* wprrb rater, knt^y nar 
oun. uurrvwnrn rccrat wuh 

ojraAioh. 36* etawma 
»n 2 hatits. 4 ooad bMb. CH. 

ei*7.00a ROCOQMH. ot , 

BteuiKui Ed 
houtte nr mw A 
rem mon Sturoung S7fl trap 

,*«**» fiednra. DM ■ 
jrocb- iMUTta «g: tanoBM Mite r 
Vprcttypft 

l» gdn. osp <i63.c>oa for - 
quirk site T«. Ol 7887440. \ 
A r.yjy°- QteHi Sate of ante | 

Htfiz 

T*’ 1 * own Buto * canted 'i 
JSSfftat styte kuetteb nited i 
OtM 8 aun tj 
..“g pmr Oi 286 KMO m - ; 

ttDC. kmx Ed 
mw ettra RK-nmoaS - 

Ei Jt?*' «*"l»rv«vto 

“• 1 « tech, nm 
O.CJl., Drctty gdjj-’- 
Wmm room C99 9S0 : 
_hunhw ♦ KWdterOl 8768244 ■ 

*?™WffaiM lint Unite 
■kn ci ium knd Coraiyxi -M : 
CtelHtem c ALKMTHcppt ‘ 
730 Wt&L oTW 


jil '■« 


I.ISUB iff 



s:< v 

Ai\ .* . \ 


































































|P£RTy 




PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRy PROPERTIES 


Lane Fox 


£ Partners 


STRUTT &AV 
PARKER^!' 


?*** I^Ud.an „ 

r w, «‘ *** fmi|, in * - ,r « 

*>»" Rh..« s " fi 


WrtHit. ‘-‘“I «ui ,u he 

re'SaSSasSS 

$»sS.a&l 

* I'tine ^ andT^s? 

«P«HS brad, ■ "'Hill *j?*fc|6? 


- *-**««£ J^uv . 

(p * H> ^wl'juurirfA 


"'Mhiu 




seydmm ■rea.iaMiM.or- 
fm iovfttd |b region 
punmn 


CiOODOO. . 

ftrf i ff Tester Dtera Prater 

01 <76 OllS 



Orenoester 7 mfles. Cheltenham 12 m3es 
SUPERB SPACIOUS COUNTRY HOUSE 
In an Outstanding Position 
3 Reception Rooms, Kltcben/Braakftist 
Rooms, Office, 5 Bedrooms. 2 Bathrooms. 
Oil central heating. 

Garaging. Gardens. 

Hard Tennis Court Paddocks. 

About 10 acres. 

Cirwcester Office: 0285 3101 


6L08CESTEBSH3E - HI CffiEMCESTER KENT - BAPCHILD 



Th/atonic 

with a dash of the Cotswolds. . . 

Drink in the charm erf a rural view from your own front door 
in the Cotswolds. See these thoughtfully designed 
apartments for an active, independent retirement in the 
bustling market town of Tetbuiy. \bu may be surprised how life 
»eems to open up when you wake up to a view of the Cotswolds. 


Retire to Tttbury fbra future that ncrer looked fetter. 

Prices range from £59 Jffl to£95J000. 

Par farther details contact Ann Rackham, (rtf: A7) 

General Wolfe's House, THm Street, Bath. Telephone: 0225-338000. 

. Acting now for an active future 

Retirement Properties limited 


WMUIOlUtCirr £73.000 Al- 
UKtliPiMmdnnMumw 
hi d^noMiui rime smn mm 
K« 2 terep. lOmltawW imhi 
lux- «mmv. BO nuns Waterloo 
GCH. Mil S/ianng lanrarapM 
OH dm. Trt 0902 OO07B 


HOOK, HANTS, M3 V, mtte, watt, 
lo un (SB mo, WWnoai mad 
OnhM.lDMhkKKiLdti Irae 
orom £74,000. Tel <U25 67) 
25*78 


KNIDUMPTOH 2080 FaiHUV 
Homo GCH. 6Bsra.3rer.ff kM 
HH dBI oat. « MW. 4b OHM. 
Ham E 1 1 0.000 0705 22^048 


M 



:n 'imctiip in 




1 - n ^Mnned fc- imu no swu. mmac v»e- 
lonan S bed dais recto. 
“P5. Ku/bras nn. pure garden. oar 
* H|f*> bite- CH. 4 MIW Common Of Tub*. 
W -' 017.000. Ol 676 4126 


•VJlhiVQ •frSl, 

MTTOBU IWdBUt (ffidBg 
fist off par*, s bed cater dMos), 
i . lounge- kitchen. bath. OOL 

"'-.ut to MTS rands. £89.000. 01-7208666- 




SOI I H 
if NMM.ION 




|«flWAU t/isrurs 


1 i-vfifrs. 
tit) 


L3XBIT im 

tunc a u 


■ARMS SWU 2 bed Cottage. 
Prareful posmoa. Moderated. 
C.CH. Small DM«L £104000 
Trt. 01-943-4739 CucnMgR. . 
SPACIOUS 3 bed SOt HHteL 
Luxury ML Gas CH. cree. Odn. 
In sought after SE*S area. Tcf. 
699 8S92 ervesX E76SSSX 
UVOBE* OHMS SWU B bed- 
Hal. ga r den . «eBar. £78X00. 
TO K0-13S4. , ... ...... . 


drenoeotw 3 mfles. Fabford 7 mfles. • 
COTSWOLD WATER MILL AND 
BARNS FOB CONVERSION 
Water Mfl - consent for 3 Reception 
Rooms, 5 Bedrooms, 3 
Bathrooms. Single bank 
• , trout fishing. 1% acres. 

Bams - permission for 2 three bed- 

room and 2 two bedroom 
houses. 

Private Treaty - as a Whole or In Two Lots 

Mat Age its: Humberts, Tetborj: 0665 
52284 and Use Fax A Partners with 
Rfbuis, ttreBcesten 0285 3101 . 


HAMPSHIRE - THE WALLOPS 

Salsbury 13 mfles. Winchester 15 mfles. 

AN EXCEPTIONAL VILLAGE PROPERTY IN 
IMMACULATE ORDER THROUGHOUT set in 
attractive grounds with adjoining paddocks. 
3 reception rooms, study. 5 bedrooms, 2 bath- 
rooms. CXI central Heating. Garaging and 
stabting. Attractive garden. Paddocks. 

About A65 acres. 

Wtachester Mu: 0962 69999 


HAMPSHIRE - PHIVETT 

PetersfWd 6% miles, Alton 8 mfles 
A CHARMING EASILY MANAGED 
VICTORIAN HOUSE 

Completely surrounded by attractive farmland 
3 Reception Rooms, 4 Bedrooms and 
Bathroom 
Ofl central heating. 

Double Garage, Stable Block, 
attractive Garden. 

Woodland and Paddocks. 

About 4% Acres 

Wiacbestef Office: 0962 69999 j 


BATH 

AWARD-WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

Renowned for Quality - Chy Centre Flats 
Best Luxury Development of 1985 
Beside the River Avon - Landscaped Gardens 
Fully Fitted Kitchens . Luxury Bat hr oo ms 
A few splendid flats sdfl available 

- PUCES: £854004245^00 

Brochure from:: " * -- -- 

UTHODOMOS LTD 

• sue* Office. I Nonbnaer Com. Crave Street Bxda BA2 CPE 

Tel: Bath ($225) 50487 or 60006 


SSOngbouam imBs. (Victoria SSmtnotBs) 
FnrntmnSaOm.ua 5 maos. 
A«i*rat»nM V i eeDrtw»ia«ratt 

-i Boca ptton rooms. 6 Bodroom* 3 BaJtwxxrw. Ofl Ceniiff 
Hsatm Atom wWi 2 Badm®, Bathroom. Kfehari/DMng 
room. C oajvHo w/aafa leBk)ck.Ouftuidbg^ Heated 

Swraiwg Pool. Gwdons and Groorate. 

MMliXtan 

batatasau 


Camwbay Ofte 2 St Wl SB 
Tat (022^481123 



WYE VALLEY 

owes Rdo. 7h Mnvwuh 
>nr Soqwi son Nooi «• m* 
A4£)M nn nxeffy U, Licenrt 
KIM awn MVly \ Kan laungr 
HU SkBHDtoMgilgoM 3i«At. 
rew> to cooa man 9 
Brcnxwn S teXBB M Saw 
Bn &2M fbK 0/BuHnk 00*1 
Sarc-mg OCO CM l rn*i 
dbm» Offtnnaaan £200000 
COUS.MMVSOHCm IM 
Naur Roa«nW)9.0BM SSU 


r« uh pwHteiuc flaw ? 

IHted. nrvhr IM W ff r Wt« 9 » W 
nrrf tent onMT ConprtUao of 4 
DMfHMnk. duunoraem. loune*. 
HMiMXf lull, f/f MICMMI. bteh 
room, nmnuwy. *'■ an, 
bihlumd parte m 4 douMr 
mi jut Ofttn brawl m. 
EQVOOOTW 0360 033646 (« 
lunix-T tetaiii 


MUOPMOOKUnca MAJvO 
31 Bnua £» mod er% fmur « 
pptePMb.'star.Htuaat mivb 
WC l r WCOf BMf(nC6*SnO 
QUKH Ute. TW 3301. 

CWMU. Coronon Tto Caaen 
Hnura. 3 BmH 2 n»th a i amb 
Mountain imo. £98 COO OHk- 
MOn 41340. Uvmu 86133 
MOBUlOni M/CMHrm 
hoM 4 M lux. on m o toaa 
ooj( coura* mr c yQy 

OB* £70000 OOO OTUo um 


OXFORDSHIRE 


rUMSMM 17 ink Or Uff . 
BMuUnu WM rmtara a te 
dMfdmedmph V4b*te- 
3 IWJH. £96.900 0367 20*36 


NKMCLV ? btd chararter ranap*. 

walk ia town, n rann h tramp 

abroad For Mara rntp 
£69.980 DAO. 0491 574071 



{IM 88C267BJ 



01-629 7282 

Carter Jonas 

( hant n i) >ur\rmr> 


BOSSINGTON COHN BARN 

Nam ccxMtrycid* do** W Cantarbtay and o t*f 75 naa. from London. 

“‘" OT- P»h * * SmM« tooroonm. loonga. 

TEMPLARS 


SCOTLAND 


*, SPACIOUS 3 bad Town Hons* la 
>•:: *• «uM cul-orasac nr CMteoe. 

.•(■VS ihowOstn. UiWaaVtcACbyr 

. -.-b Garage, warm wrCH-aKC- dec. 

' ‘■■■T- X7ELOO0 000 02-670 *883. . 

llrjfBMWS 

Tel 01 C6 -- - 


fet 8S"563 


Iff 88 1 

4 tm \*> osi iW’C 
ttpH •«* s*ai'W5 


U> 2* •• '**• l! r a 


kSStn kcao. 

WIG. 



RICHMOND HIU 


Unusual converted mews in 
seduded sttudion. 2 raesp, 
kit/b'tst rm. clkrm, 4 
bednre. 2 bathrms (1 on 

Taylor Dixon Port er 
01-891 1282. 


HCHHNP Pretty cottage in 
Awns' am. NMydac. 2M4 
Mh Ip* Inlag rro. Cbntets. 
F/hUrhen. Off itnti nrUn*. 
£89.000 ooc. For muck sale. 
Tel 388 8886 nr 439 2SM9- 










-?HF?3P3Sri 


ram 


musM (4(9 bm Victorian 5 
ted Km), immaculate contt- 
uon. latefnQy mode rate d, 
many onouue icatm. on 
ffnwi praldop. tlB&OOO. 01 
946 6380. 

W WW EP Off 2 bed Mr mum. 
GCH. oanx New roof. ParUits- 
aose lute. BR. stion. Fined 
UUhra. C7&000. Ot 3S2 4712 


CITY OF BATH 

3 mites North in the beautifull Swamswkk Valley. 
144 - Few mind 

Detached Victorian farmhouse with 4 acres, stabling & 
swimming pod. Living room, dining room, krtcbep/ 
breakfast room, 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Excellent 
order throughout. Freehold £200,000 

HaOetts Fox & Sons (0225) 25111 


SOUTH DEVON 


inTH [i i ■ A [cTT 


SmaB dewtopmant of prestigious detached chalet homes 
on the bite of the River Pert Superb specification having 
verandah with river views, double tfazku 2 bedrooms and 
own garden. Show home open. Rom £28,000 leaga hoid- 
BuBchig Society mortgages avaflabie SXs. Dartbridge 
Manor, fticktasttaigh: BS 4 4 M 7 S (T). 


QAIRLOCHp WESTER ROSS 

Modem HOUSE comprt ff n p : poona floor; Wtchen/dWng ersa; 
lounge; bathroom; 4 Mttooms; one with an surte showerg WJX 
Upsoks: gnaws mom; 3 bedroo m s. Landscaped garden, 
garage/stora; 2 detached atoms 00 fired OH.&D&RJ Stan, 
Ttoww phone: Gattxfc {044^ 2382.0Rar» around ESSJQQD to, 
and twiner pariiculafs ton: 

MIES ft (MCKAY 
Soflotors * Estate Agents 
19 Union SL Invenwas 
Tafc (0463) 220579 



Ctaadthaneferrencvaticn and 3 modem cottage s . 
BDRSALEWTTH WCANT POSSESSION 
ASA WHOLE OR IN 9 LOTS. 

Closing date 12 noon Tfaursdag 21st August 1986. 


46ChadomSquflR,Edmbu£)EH24HQ 
031-226 6961- 


JOHN D WOOD 


MIDDLESEX - 
MOOR PARK ESTATE 

IN THE BEST PART OF THIS EXCLUSIVE 
ESTATE. TWO SUPERB 14 ACRE BUILD- 
ING PLOTS WTTH OUTLINE PLANNING 
CONSENT. 

FOR SALE FREEHOLD 

23 Berkehy Square, Lsata VI X 881. 

. Tftt 01-8238050 (Rvf; DCV/MPB) 


ffTfTTT VJI 


rgsM ena of gnat cnsacter. tneflent sene wet 3 paddocks, 

Ewoao -DYRS A Humflctrt detached mktan to ffaricusroaf 
knatim eWi umtaut fti g was am tta Tow May ft awn nftnu 
Nfaides. Oenksly IwW ■ecommoftfliM compmas; StoptBR. kUm. 
4 bods, bauvooo. gnunds of *t acre 


— yul Place, 


r . SStVti 


(•SB) 822461 









CITY OF BATH 

Aidiiiect's ground A 1st floor fcriod q, 

prime position overiookng City. Hall, cloakroom/ 
shower, drawing room, dining room, flfldc, 2 bedrooms, 
bathroom, small study, private parking. fiaaMished 
garden. High quality period conversion. £100,000 

HaUetts Fox & Sons (0225) 25111 


SCANDUAVlAfl STYLE HOIKS FOB SALE 

Located in Britixflr Vfege. near Doigedau, n beautiful 
Snowdonia National Part. 2 or 3 bedroom types - ready 
for imnwdiaffi occuptfion. 

Pries £29,500. 

Substantial reductions far oath completion. Show house. 
Fririnformution ring Ruth on: 061 6245631 



SteyningsnsEx 



itinr— tnaia swv mm ran 

period mtk«i coitope in nutet 
mmrr of ctormlng nuikrf 
bMV Excrllnn oxter through- 
out. Cra CH. strati mri 
tKlnp/duum room txo orad 
beam*. FIRM kuchen. 3 Mdh. 
Bat hr oom. flufty/playraMn. 
Malurod pardon. Ol 622 7772 . 
£46.000 ono. 


Wtmovmt Dot 4 bca. 3 tren rm 
house, bt i acre gro u nds In grl- 
vela hno on Oiitterm Stem- 
Sad (6 b In open country raf- 
ting. (MM east walk lo siabon A 

ahum- (Marytebop* 80 mteff. 
£168000. 0096 6238 9 2 


MUM NEVWU energy raving 
detached 3 ted how*. CauMS. 
RUJIrtiHi.wUQ. MnliM. Oi. 
garage- 0908662929. £48^00. 


DEVON & CORNWALL 


Nft WU ft free sanding, 
two storey bam. m areali ra- 
auded coniptek. views 
Dartmouth. 2 ted*. 2 former 
rooms, bathroom ffwwcr 
room recMffan. open plan 
kitchen, fun gas cn. bsana. 
£7&000 for dWcfc rale. PkM 
available, separate ar ran o o - 
nol Td 01-730 7608 or 060 
432499 


tendon MOH. (Kings X 48 
mtra). Lara* bone in ‘ft acre 
sauOi (aelna garden etookuw 
Crdbn water (fishtna. sadtno 
& windsurfing avail), a oouotr 
tere. i bamroom. x e» fehtt 
shower room. 3 new. large 
kitchen, uutxy room A 2 huos 
with linked graden room. 041 
CH. £128.000 T« ! 0480 
•11410 latter 7pra or w/endS) 


I tains) County around 6 mins. CUTMTL Altractts* detached 
1 Luxurious 3rd Doer im ki p/b larally house. Very mcMos 4 
19SOB Mock. S oa rt osm. Bran, rt- teds, 4 teceni. beauty uUy dene 

•tent re a n m g room CEB* ** * ****■ . . SfcJuartS gardens - 

1-r on. 3 bedrooua. fined tteya Me ouM teeauon. Otyre 

Kitchen. CH. entrance pnone. L n -I!y rgg of cig c.000 Tel 

HR. garage. Extensive leafy <»72 68439 IhOTneK 

vtrwa. 49 year lease. CSXJOO. 1 
Far ouKk sal* ■«« C0S1) 484 
3718 (eves). 

STH mmUHTC Vmaot. 8 ids 
Central MU loo Korns Slone 
Cooagp in quM Cul D. Sac. Dtn- 
Ing room and large Mum* wnh 
exposed beams and tnglenoofc 
nmiscn. Kitchen, utdtty roam 
and IMIrl. 3 bedrooms, large 
bathroom. Oaragp space, paved 
garden. Phone 0327 33 461. 


NORTH EAST 


ATCUTTE Village Nr DHagkm 
3 mins At. 2 bed end wr eon. 
Leaded Lt windows. DPC. park- 
ing. ExreUenl barg«n £17^00- 
Tel: 0004 4Q0o46 


4 iMdrooa ho«M from £105,000 

Sitastwi Ǥaoait to (be ioBiflg eountiyiide of the South 
Dgtmg. SUyamg fa smost pnurreque amafl madeeb town 
of BBspo&chann. 

Tins impteaaive development at Chmdlas Way, eonreflts 
of 18 haiaw . cadi wfli mfljridually extminr , gaa 

central baatfog, an ctHreite shower room, paage *nd a 
somber of other fine features. 

TfetephoO B. 01*6444321 orcoroptaeaxjponfiffdetais. 


■TO DVVOM - With tovdy vkrws 
arrow riser valley. 3 bed. new- 
ly matched, detached co m p* 
ww« 2 large recepUora. f/f 
kUcnen. bamroam, ooaitroom 
6 garden. 8Mtusk» wlDnS 
Isolation. Commuting ills t an cd 
Exeter. All tradesmen CWL 
mjBDQ Td : 0884 860724 


PLYMOVne Very snadoos 8 


with s/r 1 (ted granny ftaL m 
cxocttcM condition Oiroushoui, 
*«i woodland view* and sm on 
beautiful mature garden corner 
ffoL £110000: <7782 42901. 


9 »us listed budding 
m w iwil, FUtMHd » flw 
Ughest standard. caiHMnd 
ton 3 properties sUuaMd wutun 
the enmstey Han Estates n a 
toesm tiiKcaa be only dassrd 

■ H uniquef £143X100 U 
£157.000 0804 280644 (T) 

HOWTN NORFOLK COAST Med. 
3 bad bungalow, private road 
tew beach, aiid reserve, sws 
teg-goH Summer use. Ehdesed 
garden. TW. (0406) 370832 or 
(048628)228. 

■OUSE HVNTSWr Save (line 
and effort, lei Tad ZUrHndra 
find U for you: 0440 702176. 




li^i'j^ . 'iyy ^ ra ffu | 


se 


GURUM TYE GflEBI 

n Mddwi E28O000 ran Mg- 
rteitiy rtswed 8 modBrased 
tarmboDM «nn extetisivg 

K ls me i paddock. 5 
. 2 teDims. (bM rm. 3 

paiaewa 

Sttvn& 0245 352653 C 
0621 50105. 


nmu 4 miles 
Modernised. 191b ceMiny. 
satPMMached. derepm.e(y spa- 
OOUS raure With many 
dffgmal <HtaM SHinfi rare 
wen slocked garden x*t> ru- 
ral. 3 beds (2 double). 2 rrerpn. 
soioy. fully mt*d kuuten iwttn 
solid lurt Rnywria cellar and 
wngt Offers *« te reffon at 
£.90.000. Tel : 0730 67156 


COOXTST UnNS re- Ute -es. 6 
bed. 2 recen hoos* was 2 acre 
orchard, nunules from mndy 
beach £n slew IOW 
CTO .000 Tet098 371 2146 
re y mtpm a i96s house, a b*d 
3 rccep. 2 bath- dtee «9*. Mmi 

parden. GCH. V O pot n. AsaU. 
STM. £140000. 0730 61634. 
l umaffaraa L n. mm uhim 6 
M house. 1/3 acre M3 to 
nans; Waterloo 45mm*. 
Cl 9a OOO. Tel- 0636 297384. 



rtlW WA 30 mins from UIswb- 
ter 19Uv Cranny Csunav 
Collage set m debghtfUl slllrae 
of Kuitosteuld. Cden VaUeT 
Very trrennv renocaus re ra 
cMiretsdesmn. Flagisane ooor. 
oak beams Many onomal tab. 
braes. Lae. Din Rm. Fit KIL. lire 

t5Mw ^'W 

076 88372? 


EAST SUSSEX Kll«wn wing at 
ten IT councry house, three bed- 
rooms. sfMU waned garden, 
tevtar surround mgs £68500. 
leraehow . 0323 852189. 

Rottimudcam Dec efuiet bonga- 

tew. bucks termuma. long rt 
diner. 3/4 beds, dim kuchen. 
2 bbthrms. mas. garage, serl. 
Odn. CtOSkXMkBfigh krai 36169 
HOVE SCAmOKT. 3 bM man 
non flat. Inge, bll/diner. Hath, 
rh <hw. mcHkfd dec. £59.950. 
Pm sip sale. 0273 729420. 
COTTAGE CdlCA 1730. Romng. 
desn. 2 dHe beds, run GCH. 
L69.99S. 0275 464881 XI 306 



































































■ at 



28 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


SUSSEX 


AUCTION 

ANNOUNCEMENT 


CAST 6ftatsmtn 2 
BUOVHG HUSKY THE RtiEST 
raws IN SUSSEX oral THE I 
WEIR WOOO RESERVOIR 
TOWARDS ASHDOWN FOREST. I 
A chatmng angle aaqr cotugel 
IStaHMIv eittttMd to Iivpi » Fue 


Fanny Hre* sanftng <n 1 superb. 
RMJWI ueascnanm 


XU shewed 
DOsWn FwKlftmnUgeXMltti 
rmtes May Pmccte suae at bed- 
room diessmj am and tattmwn 3 
lunher bedrooms. 2nd ojtbroom ai- 
trad me soft level hug area ntei 
dUlpied 1st Hour and ooeftng onto 
Balcony. fVwrj room, kdctten. Break 
last, sun Hum. fuity BoobM quad 
and trsjted double ear port trade, 
Gaidai store and greenhouse. The 
grounds, nctotag paddoA and 
wwdltod amount to axnu 3 acres 
FREER DtD F OB SAli BT AOCIHW 
XIH OCTOBER 1986 
Unless sold maier beforehand 
The Brawny and its unooe pusoren 
■net be nspested lo be fUfy 
HXnoated. 

JOINT AUCTUWffRS 
MMME ft CO. EAST GMtSTEM). 

TIL (0342) 21271 
POWHI A PTH. FOREST HOW 
TH: <034282} 2261 


Donald Beale 


GOLFERS SPECIAL 


EAST SUSSEX. 

NR. CROWBOROUGH: Detected 
Cottage doso in Gofl Course set 
n 3 acres of Gardens and Wood- 
tend. 3 beds. 2 rec. tt/b-faa 
mydble grg. Oit ch. £12 Sj000. 
EAST SUSSEX. 

CROWBOROUGH: Substantial 
modem detected House, cud 
pnvue rd. waling Rsaica. GoH 
Club GBeds.4iec.dBlegrg>aG 
ams. ml ch. £155.000. 

EAST SUSSEX. 

CROWBOROUGH: Fanner coach 
house. 200 yds. God Course. 3 
beds. sriTmg/dmmg. M/b'faa. 
grg. car pmt tLglaz. gas clL se- 
cluded gdn. £ 110 , 000 . 


( 08926)3333 


ROVE: II HOUR LOUDON | 
ELEGANT .S U NNY. REGENCY. 
BALCONY FLAT. 1ST FLOOR. 
runiiMwd»y Hamm Oppo- 
MIp mm and lawns 3 
hedtocare.. Drawing Dining 
100 m. (■!■«-«■ kitchen. tarh 
room and Vi e wer room Car 
r h Very QUWT Part. I no 
swr Lift and caretaker 

(himnm £1637 per 
ann um 0SWO MC CON- 
TENTS. immMUie 

orriUMlion ICS7JI 779060 


HOVE 

LUXURY 

SEAFHOfrr BALCONY FUT 

WITH LIFT 


Enengvrtv itetsteSied n tmd pe- 
nod res 3 beds. 2 turns M 01 
suicl. tele asoea tenge' On. 
room. Ui hi tat Gis t h Fit ca- 
pos. excesent sea views. £35000 


Hafta aid Sawyer. J2d, Church 
Road Hove (0273) 721041 


DETACHED 


character property, 
magnificent views. 1 1 
acres, 5 beds, 3 
baths, 2 dks. 4 
recept £240,000. 
FI H. Fox & Sons. 
0444 450105. 


OVMC. 3 mis Chichester- 3 bed- 
room luxury mm -fared 

Bungalow 2 bal h ro om s. Gas 
CH Double garage. QuM ill- 
lage pouihm Easy arms 
Goodwood. Sailing etc . Imme- 
dialr vacant p w rawn. 

Cl 14.000 Freehold. Hoddens 
Edam Agnus >02«] 552172 

PENTHOUSE /CHICHESTER spin 
levt-f in Georgian country hse in 
130 arm <2 arm of gdnr. 3 
beds ■! Igr L shape). 2 baOn. 
silling living bar area. CCH ft 
wood burner Dragrr kitchen, 
roof gdn sun deck, gagage. 
Mews downs, sea. Offers 
Cl 60.000 0243 781704. 

BRIGHTON Ideal lamllv town 
house, rtose all amenities. 4 
beds 2 rvilhs. double garage, 
root lerrare C97.soa Tel 
Flmls 0273 477219. 


PERIOD BUNGALOW 
COTTAGE 


Situated by the beautiful Ashdown 
Forest and Gow Come. 2 bed- 
rooms. sitting / dtnmg-room vein 
ingelnook turplra, newly fitted 
kitchen iwtb Neff MB}, barroom, 
wc. leaded hghts. Bide wide gar 

%BSigM3t 

Tel : 834 28Z 2168 


WURWASH. 

A fetrtgudwd ViCtonan coun- 
try house « magrohcwi setang 
wxh detain was. Hall. 3 rec. 
M'h (9 rrr. efiters. 4 prnajni 
beds. 2 Bath. 3 secondary bads. 


Amen. Coach taree. garaanu 
PastwelaM i5 


Garden 5 aacs. 

acres. Oden muted Bemad 


Thorpe ft Partners. Tunbndoe 

. Race? 


Writs. Tel 0692 30176 Ret 
6328 


HOVEJUSTOWFSEAFRamr.su 

txr milage. 2 TerrfKIoin. fined 
kitchen & balhrm. 3 Able bed* 
Completely refurbished Gas 
CH 3 Gas I To lire £65.600 
CMilrnl) .nailable Tel. W/E 
Bnqhlon (02731 773867 or 
W/Davs 01 491 2199 


wales 


RADYR RR CARDIFF 


StAuanbU iMdtm dmcnee rise n 
UeatdiUly tea sail tone orte. si «k 
oewabta S nub gougte mum C4v 
raxre 5 i rti IK ? mb Mum* letbge 
uftrts 41 anenres nldiq actnn 


xDOOls lOf Itxmjc dnna nn flSS 
im * doubkr btdmis etc. 


.tCMn.uWv» 

CH Carajjr Firnada 

£85.000. 


0222 842638 


SNOWDONIA 1 7m Cent Cot m 
evrl rood, wnh aD anginal fea- 
tures. 1 acre S beds . 3 recept 
Seriuded pavilion Maanilicefil 
views at mountains and sea 3 
mb LLanhedr. 6 miles SI Da- 
« ids Coif course. Hartecti 
Guvnedd C42.000 TH. 0600 
5811 or Ol 242 3436 


LLEYN Peninsular beautiful 
modernised a bed (arm House Mi 
arre Full Oil C H L59.950 
QuM-k Sale Pwllheli 614446 


WILTSHIRE 


MARLBOROUGH Just off High 
SI. V quiet Ml . end ol I err hse. 
3 Imto. I loe rerepL I/I kllcti. 
bath. qqe. gdn. r/h Good rondi- 

llon. C55.QOO. 0672 64870 


YORKSHIRE 


HAWQimi W. Yarns Nr Brorne 
Parsonage. Edwardian end terr. 
kwiw. lilted kit /diner. 4 beds, 
modem •h Uled tuUirm/WXy 
F.CCH. Umtjer/damp course 
guarantee, gd dee order, small 
gdn £43.000. 0636 46942. 

BOSTON SPA WETHEXBY Ret 
Coll for over 56s. BlUII 1984. g 
beds. Fully double glared. CCH 
Vward ser 9 50 per wk includes 
mainl. £49^00 0937 844294. 


RENTALS 




Horner Hill 


LIMITED 


INCORPORATING 



RENTALS 


BUXINaSHURST WEST SUSSEX 

A tJMuWui txuraiy tonti dallog tram Bw 10* Cara»y sal in a 

sule. 3 reraphon rooms, 3 tHttrocmtt, (1 an-soy offers in the regon of 
acres ol grant) notable.- 

Tel Oxshott (0372841 3811. Telex 89S5112. 

«o (ACB a Dmm. Am. Hnonoi fc*OM|B. HbnHttn. DUMB aw SoongM. 


To rank 

6twhionB,fluesi 

DJn. 6 Loose brans audio 


Hampton & Sons 


FURNISHED RENTALS 


munrxi ayzwe, inns, ha. cqhm const, qestei stuet. lshoi. swi 

Superb hiresiwd/iaitamNwd tnusa Nth wmnmg pool Ctemtng igoe in dh mart nor couqvn) in EtoknvH. 
ivgegvdenaWusiolconinwialgaidwiwithWnsawrL Tte honso s wunai deapred so) hK I RQfle. 2 double 
monvnMUoon inctadtedrewno mm, dnng room. 5 bed- berimoro. duuBln rnenponn more, 2 t ahmwn s. Mr Hied 
.'gams, nursery. 3 bathrooms, shoeer room. fiBhr hired Uchen. £535 par WNk, 

Wten ana flwhtea room. £1500 par reeok. HOME SIHBT, L6ML SJfJ. 

FARM SilBT. l OM DOB. H.l. Loefy house suBMe hr ether a caipta or faeWy. The 

AaaefateniaMhMihfkHiTBsonettBvOiagaQgeand hooxissDBcrehaemreiMBWtuintNdtlnuihauLiasj 
real terrace Tite aaaon umvma of dtrewno nnai taipe sm^wrace and ac t onwna UB irei mcteHs tege docMfl 
temg mom sway. 3 bedrooms. (2 doobh. 1 swtfc}. 2 reopkon room. 3 bodoa im . 2 i nn....n, ad taly Httd 
tarframs. sep. w.C_ hfly hoed u. £050 par wmk. latchen. 

A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 


£600 per week. 


6 Arlington Street, London SWJA IRB 


01-4938222 


BELGRAVIA SWI 


« ay bh 

Recsnuy lurmshsd and nihy ftted. 

Lift, video emranco-ptums and GARAGES. 


1 BBMOOM FLAT - 

2 BEDROOM FLAT - 

2 BEDROOM PENTHOUSE - 


£200 pm. 
£400 pw 
£600 pw 


Go Jots only. Preferably long term toe a 

Contact: Santa 23S 9087/8833 

D. HOLDINGS 


OAKLEY STREET, SW3 TREGUNTER ROAD. SW1Q. 
WON lurTnshed 2nd floor ItaL 1 Wefl decorated 1st floor Hat 3 
dble bedim. 1 battwm with beds. 1 bath with shower. 1 
showe r, i roccphon m. kit- recap, kitchea £375 pw. 

C *wimc , mAn swift DRAYTON GARDBtS, SW3 
aiUNS ROAD. SWtO vory smart 3 td floor flat. 3/4 
Pret»y 2 stoiey house with gap bSims. 2 ba t hu ns. 2/3 recep- 
den. 3 beds. 1 bath, cflts, 1 tioo rtns. utchen/bfeeldast rra 
recepbon. knenen/breamast mm w 
rm. £250 pw. 

ORR-EWWG ASSOCIATES 
01-581 8025 


LAND FOR SALE 


SANDWICH - KENT 


FreshoUSte 

OoMed pteiMg 3 Onaflnss m 
tewwed caosereaun area. 


ForataiwTaPdef 
a Is 


(tkfflng dare noon I S October 1006). 
14 Martel StaMLSMdMkh. 
CTO 90ATMk(B3M) 014119 


L-$grsfoMs 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


ROYAL WVISOR. InlerevUng 
rials and houses in Rtver 
Thames boatyard. Fully fur- 
nished and equipped, service 
and malniainanre. I or 2 bed- 
rooms. Telephone 0769 862 
944. 


MORTGAGES 


SAHATFICAL 

Cotv wold Collage Oxford 14 
Ms £80 pw Tct 01-828-0166. 


NEW HOMES 


HISTORIC 

BERWICK UPON TWEED 

iBBrint Now Sente Horn 
Far ta wit a ra I or I taMwa fl 


A oetqreM iwate d oatcocert at 
2 ax) J bedroom atunmepts masong t es 
» houses a «< e«U9w tuck style 


Ideal inessnent or ifinnei pnu- 
■ty - atead 2 nwate ton awn 
cage. Axw to peberee mkv. on 
Rmn Orleans ad nahoor. 

Oast u HotomDetoJ Nakraf 
Pat tbanoc nuatoe ad ream 

Chew life- 

fad iwmnuhon rq A1 or ton 
Note b Edited). Sou* to to m a to 
R*es ton £33.000 
ShMhOBse op« toy Ereunes tt 
Htadarenh ft Ptars, Mde M. 
Berwick. Tet (0239) 387571. 


SOUTH OF ENGLAND 


OVER SS? You're eUgUde for a 
beaulHu) English Courtyard col- 
lage or flat, planned spectflcaUy 
(or the needs of ret i r e d people. 
Maximum privacy and met e twn- 
dertce. Many soenalsed 
(ealurrs. 24-hour warden ser- 
vice. Convenient alarms. And 
you own a valuable lease on an 
excellent property in the most 
al Irani ve surroundings. From 
£79.000. Devon. Berks. 
Norlhants. Somerset Surrey. 
Hampshire Full details (ram 
The Engusli Courtyard Associa- 
tion. 8 Holland St- London ws 
4LT. Tel. Ol 937 4611 


BATTRSEA, SW11 

Steremg Garden flat overtook- 

ng Bathnn Path n pjLh mill 

acatort scanty. 2 Beds. 2 
Recaps. 1 Bath. FF ML Awt- 
abto I Yaw. £i50pw- 
225 1872. 

ST J0HK WOttB, IW8 

Newly decorate) modem town- 
bouse m d go od quakty 
cat pete & curuns UiaugbauL 
Pmau Gin ft imegral onga. 
4 Beds. 2 Baths (1 en-suae). 
Ire Drawing Hm. New Ml well 
A marines. Close to US 
scfaOOL ESOOpw. 722 7101. 
BAYSVATEB, W2 

Ureoue 1st floor fte a brand 

new canverston. Dec ft hm hi 

edremriy tagh stondBtL 3 
Beds. Swung adhfled Re- 
apdoa Z Baths. W»b Kit ft 
^inng ftn. £450pw. 727 7227. 


□ Sturgis 


IKm PUCE, S.M.7. tarac 
Bm n Kogtobndge. Beaa fi M y 
hm ft dec 4 Beds. 2 receps. 2h 


Lge tody equpped lot Snal 
soBo. ling Co. Lbl £1200 pw. 


Long Co. LaL ! 
mfeMKB.S.1.7. Be- 
gan! iakrar de se ed flat mh 
(tori access to gdns. 2/3 beds. 
1/2 reaqs. 2 laths. Long Co. Lfl. 
E6S0 pw. 

■AnCMMI ISM, SJV.Ifl. Ex 
1st ft Bat writ lge tar. 2 dbie Beds, 
Keep, baft adb shwr. Fifly 
egrepe! U. uag Co. UL EZ75 

ranui nJCE, s.v.7. s»- 
cws ft prefly 4th Hr ftaL Lge iflds 
recqi beftm. baft reiA shir. New 
wta kto Long Co. LeL £200 pw. 

Mf Aadeon or Jirita Wggks 

81-2*4 7441 


04 OH Brenatoa Rnd. 

Lretea 6.W.7. 


LETTING 



■■■Fixtec CoUt H3 

CMtoTU tffi. RAHEIfil 


BUMS RB. swt 
cmd a is nr no n 
OB to ofl Uarnr 
M. ret +fe M 1 U 
NW4:Ded1lM.BMB 

t va 

Body Hi M A tt d. Mhwn Bto*. 
qae ng ■+ ton dOb U + aoshw/ 
tew + tei am hi sea A 7 Ms. 2 
taftc conn BBS pkan Co. 1st 
5200 p* oeg 

OBIfU GLS. BMUTS UK. MM 
Gd (an. tee d. Fdhn Bdmr w tt 
recap ♦ bale gnd tat * Mag taste 
* * dti iaJmrr 1 bwh + wpitaw 
ged oral gta. 3 beds, l/n gga 



feUt ESB mreg 

hkktt no. toe tody 

hse d PwsoB Gat iHc recOR SB 
pab U + m oachaw + dnag area 
n SOB to 4 BMX 3 Bte to lie: 
sowy v*k 0* Lit £4SD ow neg 


01-736 4851 


HOLLAND PARK 


Sunning mews house to tet 
2 dble bedmts. 2 tattems, 2 
recs, fuOy fitted Uchen. 
Gge. Terns. 

J.TREVOR ft SOUS 

01-584 6162 


COOTES 


WflUffl. s 

BHBAUIUtCE! 


a%[TaBi 


Srewh 2 Bad 

3 torn IttH lot anrenareng. 

M. 


SlhKIMnew 

dBMdi wwrr 3 Bias, tom- tew 
HWid toESBK. Bare E3ZSOW 
sutoiO H mB w rrnwiwT iaiajMa 
noon ol pmea inrered Hra. On 
itat O* Bod. BL Ui/Ster rate 
Gto E14Spw. 



OVERSEAS PROPERTY 




Quraishi Constantine 


GEORGE KNIGHT- The \ mu * v - \»,- n - 


D8ATT0I GABBaS S110 

Newly detested ana bnttMly 
ftrohed 2«r tote 3 bedmts. 


map. dmnjrBMflttgte n. toy tit- 


led W. 

Heaang and hot wa» nc. 

FUCKLEY R2 

Patatsil detached tmae m grit 
course * gens, bath ft shower nn 
2 see WCs. recap, dnogun. and*. 
tat-D last rm. strong cenarva- 
tay. IOOH gita-Hngoda ft (ountan 
Gge USI he sees to tot £400pw 


wmmznEMrisCeartRomL SWS. 
CHELSEA SW3 

An esDBiwiy attraowe 2 bedun Rai 
wah tjrge roof toiBce. ftity 
eguvoed Ut with 8H machines, 
veto sreamty. porter Co let 


B0RW00D PARK 

WaltoMB-Tlames 


HMS COUT SW5 

Amazing desiper's flat BeauBtdy 
decorated and lurmhed 2dMe 
batons. (Both on srete bamma). 
daring rm. study, bteten witn K 
nppftanas Co lot £250 pm 


Magnificent Geor^ JwWLt'jj 
acre gnwnds m pnvtte eWt 

■ j m baihfi ntwi*?i A rpoflL 


=s*i!«*EK/iKS! 


Amencan styte m" '"r~a 
rm. baited swunmmg P«f 

iomi iihiflnnft tfnrtv 




system. 


£885 pw 


houses and apartments 


For immcdutc sod pmU-waut stlcMM. 
tekpimito’ either our 


4i.uu.- other our 

Hampstead Officer 01 79 4 11 25 - 

Or iSTtsbridse Office: 01 589 2133 


01-244 7353 


-management expkr hsk 


CHESTERTONS 

R ESIDBNTIA L — ^ 


KENSINGTON, W8 

Exceptional house just 
off Church Street. 3 
beds. 2 baths, rec. good 
size kitchen dnfng area, 
delightful roof terr ace, 
tease £375 pw. 
ngton Office: 
01-M7 7244 


BELGRAVIA, SWI 

Charming house situated I 
m quiet mews newly dec-1 
orated and furnished to at 
vary high standard. 21 
beds; bath, rec eption | 
and kftdien E375 pw. 
flair Office: 

1-629 4513 


CAVENDISH AVE NW8. 


LUXURY CLUB 
ACCOMMODATION 
IN CHELSEA 

Large double bedrooms, Suites- Room sjj^ice 
etc. Choice of Menus. Plus Chauffeur driven 

Mercedez 380 SEL’s (full day). 

From £195 per day all inclusive. 

TELEPHONE: 

01-589 1939 
OR 01-581 3635 
FOR RESERVATIONS. 


Send detached house. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. 3 recep- 
tion rooms, fitted kitchen, morning room, ufflfty room, 
space. Front and rear gardens, Other unfur- 
fumtshed. Long Company let From £600pw. 

MANNING & CO . 

01 262 2005 . 




BRUCE 


s partners 




F STATE AGENTS 


WMOfl rba rawr Mns-Stodupnoi tamynoi sm 
nqlM man. oagg toga tor HM Udaa. sepntt rec. 4 I 
tata wi cwureral sbtttre Oaonay In E3Q0 pw arek. ' ' 

CMttFIM COBRr. npHTIBIl flD tn towB M wO aaBM rerew mar Latow 
■ pwagt tacatre ttataHe anatocly Iw 3 to 4 maate Nreretre area hAly Hfed 
UthH. MHosoi 2 bednm HL prerer et CottoY kl 050 par wMi Mtosn. 
BBBM GMOBB HL Onorreg towre gmad Hoar to to «sy V( red nay 
Emu seeaniy. My caippMfa(rim.«iqHrecapBH wander, bteawiuiaabii 
Mm wper pna. ga cental tatog, AoM* tor i yew. E1S0 pci reck. 


BRUNSWICK GARDENS, W8 

OttVithdl 1 bodroom tol centotoy tocawd. srtBng raom^tewn 


mah mm st, sws 

Lumfy funfly bouse con sl s d n g ol 4/S bed rooms 2 batfifo oip. 

shower room. 3 recepbon rooms, tt»d ktteben waBedO^rden 

£800 pw I 


ADAM A EVE MEWS, W8 

Charmbig detached Maws house; 4 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms, 
shower room, large studio room, sitting room with doore mic 
private garden. Otaiing room, end fitted kitchen — £500 


pw 


Fulham 
01-736 5503 


Putnev 
01-739 5004 


Gasc oigne-Pees 


H0U8N MENS, SWIM 
Sweats aribwuofuBy ton 
ton wtn eoomoiB nof to- 
raoe. 4 beds. 

Bafts. FF U and gge. fl 


now tar long Co. Lcl$ 750 prel 

oNsmw awoew. swi 

hreuoiate Interior resgned 
Oat m citoob tosftrei. I Bret 1 1 
recta 1 Baft Bid FF M. Arei 
row to tag fa tot Q 50 pw. 

Wen dacoraedltal wsh swetb 
pM toy near French Lyce* 
1 bod, 1 recap. 1 wft and Ff I 
k£ toad nuw (or long CD. la. 
£225 pw. 


01-730 8682 




LMPSFIELD 

Dbl family hse n ennenent po- 
stom. Wafting ftstance sm. 
London 38 mss. 4 dbie barns. 2 
bthrms. 3 rec. Gas CH. 3 ggos. 
gdn. And Sept to op to 2 yis. 
£1300 pan id. rates ft gatkner. 

Bernard Tfeoipe 
and Partners 
(08833) 2375 



n.JBMBWSIL New 2 Beftaom flare 
p/b MxL Met be 
' Co kl 


SWBS COTTAGE. A raapdeerf 3 Bed. 2 
BjOl 2 ttaep Ite 6h M oMy cm- 


retted t375m. IMwn. Lag to to.! 

nans iwl AbMi2|toto|BBv 


01-724 3160 


FULHAM SWS. 4 hrd beauUfuHy 
rinreM luxury Oat win at 
tracUvv b-ikony. large 
KUrtm/brnlLsl room, lovely 
drawing roam. Miner bjehroom. 
km storage. CCH. CJav to tube 
and shops, company Id pre- 
ferred. 6 months - 1 year- £276 
per week. Tel: 01 736 4629. 



Sixty-three acres of woodland and 
gardens -and only seven acres for 
development... that’s the Marina 
del Este. 

A little over an hour’s drive east of 
Malaga, the Marina, with 326 berths, is 
positioned with exquisite care around a 
sheltered bay -with enticingly luxurious 
apartments in a garden setting. 

For more information, please contact our 
London sales office at 150 Regent Street, 
W1 R 5FA, Tel: 01-439 6288 or the Marina 
on 010 34 58 640 400 (7 days a week). 


SOUTH KENSINGTON. Luxury 

serviced. 2 double bedrooms. 2 
receptions, bathroom with wc. 
separate cloakroom. Near rube 
and buses. £450 00 per week. 
CO let only Phone Monday - 
Saturday 1000 am - &OD pm 
Ol 581 5109. 


SOUTH KENSINGTON 2 dbie bed 
mansion ftaL nr tube with high 
ceilings & full length winnows. 
Decorated in neutral tones. Ul - 
w/drser. video entrance phone 
A porter. Co let 6 manors pus. 
£ 2 fio pw coaaara & south oi- 
930 7S21 


swaneme pool and lereure 
complex In Bromley do* B. R. 
Station f City 20 mlmV Choice 
of I, or 2 bedroom luxury (WS 
from £140- £180 pw. Andrew 
Reeves. 01 *64 0939. 


BiZc 


hwiee aTGmada. Spain. 



LttkaGttRttva 

& Mountain rtio r te 
to ere MB JMMBffwOfKil n. 


mm. IB MUHS. BW 
ML BTUB Mo, JBt, And 

CM* h to Mre Mqi dc_ tge 

& nun - toreanteLdto rearei 
REVACSJL 

stwaMau-Bison 
M4BOI6«- fetal 23S 


For sala hi Tartar. Stoteattreri 


MAGNIFICENT CHALET 


ire i m nfi wva 5 Wc i OOTv 
i-iny I.iiX} ciW dnng fWW 
i*m jwrm>r«. ■jtat'Mr 

< ir-vta'T 

le-.i ;-£i wrsiosr? ™u« frm 911 


swi KJft- tc&te Cmetra pa 
- : wren rawifl »«** 

(x-t .CL'.: 

fw-. :»000 

totorneC to we ta unvias hwij 

ottoac 

Mlfmjtxl' I Vim 
7*1 010 II A CH4A33 


•ERTH ■ AUSTRALIA WIMer 

home htuciMH bungalow in 

pnmr poMiion close 10 beach A 
Citv 4 hod-. 3 baths fool 
C76O00 near oHer Buy now to 
gam from VS ai oil lunr low 
Phone >06301 4009 On ice 

hours iOclSO' 57744 evenings 


FRANCE 


COTS D'AZUR. V ilia Mluaird in 
htmiwjl vilUye. (our OM 

rooms mIIiini room, two Mlln. 
talchrn. ccnlr-il heaung. 46 
mnis Nice .union. M.OW re 
tent Luitl Pnrn C9O.000 Tel 
Ltnh d38o34 


UNIQUE OPPORT. South France 
r3 mins MM at Lvon. IO mms 
Mailnns.il in rvnr. 90 rmrr. 
Iron, -J.I sl.ilmfr, 2 hours from 
Merlitixanean. is mine from 
air poll m Farm House 

Hunt on 1 S OOO m uim Many 
ophons a lot ot possibilities 
£■>8.000 00 Good value Tel 
mghi icoodi 697041 


SOUTH FRANCE, Limousin 
Dontawn- Itrcnrnr ihe owner 
rrt a rnunirv house, farm now 
nr ,i phsasmaj paaxr of land in (he 
heai I ax qreen area « the Li 
min eali I torn 80 000 FF Reo- 
■lurtie linmobiUrr. 2 Place aje la 
Kalian 87SOO St Stiaxx La 
IVrcnn Franre Tcl.SS 75 0461 
TRtZAI CMAROfTE ManlllW. 
lOfita Iraxn sea bungalow 3 
lieu, rrri-p. K*B. lge ndn. gge 

390.000 (I ona. IH 010 3335 
OTfvyu c>IO 5549 252875 
F WUS TERC COAST. Onq stone 
Brelnn rollag.- lot rennvaUOfl 
CIO OOO UNO 07214 404? 


PORTUGAL 


ALttARVC Private Sale of new 
villa in bluet setting wilh views 
lo Ihe Hilli. Easy access lo town 
A sea. s D ed r ooma. Fully IHlcd 
Kit A Bathroom. Wood During 
Hove EhsoL No Ua-ooiU. 
C62.000 i including legal km 
payable on compJetwrv Tel: 
0484 06461 


VELAMOURA 


2 bed villa with large 
gardens and pooL 
British owned, good 
Idling record. £65.000 
tel 0I-435 8811 

Osbournes 

Solicitors 


ALGARVE propn> buyers 
do lUHninq until Ihny've been lo 
Ihe annual Altairve In London 
Lvlntnllnn at Ihe Oorrheder. 
Park Lane sepiembi-r 29.40 
and October 01 Come an U meet 
mole man 5C< lop aonilv. dnvel 
operv and service romiuiim at 
Britain's itmsl excluMie ovrr 
w» proper ll event. 34 hour 
rremden liilarniallon aa 01 
991 6010 


SPAIN 


■UIUMNC PLOT 3.000 «i melrrv 
Inllvkle ImalNin. Brnanolng 
le-.ir IVma (Vrsla del .Vmhar 
Cl 5 000 in Pearson Ol 754 
4604 «Tl 

MALLORCA, Menorca. Mar brita 
Beat n from. 3 bedroom apart 
mom From £25.000 lo 
C250 oCO BatMt-rs lmrrnaUon 
Ol Ud 109321 765749 


PENTHOUSE 


( HifL la- B. ixhes. 
Cusu dn Snl ■ wr. prrruc and 
rerore on <ea teal. Littr kvs& 
dorr. aad.«nise. cudm itmr, 
brehimuL sbiwTr nnn. larpe luBv 
cqogqMd knehra. J dmiMr bed 
narets with fined reanfenbes. to 
BBrtttd Anns. ronpfctfT nimshHl 
in a hlpb rundatd. all m insuro* 
toe orediure. Sraureng puol md 
prrratr patting. 

Offers over £70.000. 

Tet Mr J N AnckBoa 
0783 480235 
(during busmens bouts only) 


PUENTE ROMANO 

Wdb m the gaktai mie of 
MzrtRta Imnracrifflehr tmenor 
too rated (illy bruited dM 
bed. bath Lge tounge dnet. 
tarace Also aolmes tor adft- 
fon 2 beds Air cond 
tnroughout Fully tilted 
known, gtnsfeq. 2 swimmrg 
pool, access to beach dub. 
Sara b« ftsh tom. tetepbone. 
tatwous garden, mao scrace 
avail fcttotw secumy. wttlm 
ramus imB comofa ft Al 
jmentas. EIIDflOa 
01-225 0100 


COSTA BRAVA 


Lovely tab. —teteta fl Bay 
ol fans. Large Mtg.‘ ftneg 
roam, 3 bedrooms. 2 bath- 
rooms. Part covered terrace 
with pool garden, wrage. t»e- 
pnone. timshed ooBt 082. 
fTSJMfl. 


Tel (0202} 748519 


DCCHAKOC • MunnllKt-nl penl- 
house scu lionl Morpelta. huw 
Irrrjcp, V\jnl<xl Jisirimml/ 
house Londnn/<> r.Uiunlirx/!i 
Frui^e TH. 0730 8931 SO 


COSTA DEL SQL 2 (uni. xtudto 
.intv im vile l at £■» N.Xi A 1 at 
U 0,500 Tel. 0422 521 946 <T> 


COSTA BLANCA: 
Javea, Cova AnqAa 

Starero knwie turn muse type 
bungalow, re prwae mil Kttfr 
ttshed pounds. 3 a more beds. 2 
Baftrooms. sp mnus kxnqc. ttmo 
room. Urien. garage Urge onvaie 
pool mft covered wn terrace and 
Bartwuf Mans etectnty Irio- 
pfiom mstaDed. fully furnished 


RS>IY TO BOX BH 


LOS ALTOS U MARS ELLA 


A fabrious fu«y panminc appt 
wdi gge any 4 kms from 

Mrebrib cmre ft dose to 2 GoH 
Causes. Air cand ten Beorm with 
ensuie lam. lge kange/ita lo 
sip 2 adults. Mod u 
cfoAmt/shower. Spac terr. Pool. 
wrafcTtttmjrtiEttean 
secunty ac E4IU0L 
Tel: 01-584 0277 


FUEXCmOLA. Pmaieulc. 4 (wo 
villa puetuo Loper Excf Uriel- 
opnKiil nr town and bracti 
£49.000 Abo i ilta m Marbeita 
TM. Ol S87 7878 ntal i 01671 
9001 i ivceLends/cv r*i- 


MAHttO I A. Sheer luxury Don 
GmwulO Ail hoM Don Pcpc. 
Sto earner opanmem 2809) M 
Tet. 01 5B9 9849. 


COSTA BLANCA. Lovely villa on 
omkirtv of Dnma. bouohi now 
butll three yean 409 funuMirt 
witn love trom torji sourm. no 
expend -akired. Sptendid mol. 
6 V 10 m.1»« in bMUlllul Irr- 
rorp vwroiind. ettabuihHl 
oravs. uriMrd Pfanu. Stled on 
tower Unpey ol mountain, 10 
minuuw unm (own Brpjlhtak 
irn view "on clear ddi lo ihum 
Llpen Plan Intiiiqn and tan-hen 
5 dnubk' taxuoom. ukI nwMer 
bedronm- wilh haih rn-unlp. 
one ol I’v-o haihroonw plu* 
blnni Two ruHoniev waier 
healing alt Liid on. ptuy Integral 
■ipr-MO TV arul. Selling loe nn- 
vole nvrion* ComptHely 
iumi>4»r«l vx>u lake Ihe lot ail 
900 VO ntHie, ot prime property 
in lie mil lot- C7SOSP ong 
Unto . lo DS Itarholls. 
-UliMlrurei' The Drive. Kmgy 
ton HlU Surrey KT2 7NV TH 
01 M78 0951 idoyr 01942 

7£?&eve*/wkep<hl 


ALMUHEGAB/NERJA 


unspoit Costa del SoL 
widest selection apts, 
vfuas and land from 
£11,500 


Contact 
Marisol VBIas, 
Oxford (0865) 739422 


BOULMABBUL 9 one bed apts 
■li quirt private area L-diaped 

lounge, newly Itned bath A 
hilrhen. Few yards beach ana 
marina. ClAGOO ft £16.600 
ono Telephone Epsom 24890. 


villa in 

•■xrlusive estate. ? double beds, 
loungr. veranda, kllchen. hath, 
lerrare root, garage ft asub- 
iivhec garden. Fully fumwied 
£38.000 finny H> BOX C81 


SWITZERLAND 


THE SWISS SPECIALISTS Com 
mete range o< properties In over 
oO w-uiter/summer resorts. Eg. 
v erbier. Vinarx. Lake Lucerne. 
Bernese Obnland eir Con lari 

Hittrv yrpn property. «3Z Lp 

per Richmond Road toesj. 
London SWM. Tel; 01-876 
bSfiS 


U&A- 


Insfllu 

tiniui I arm and woodlands 
-VnmoalnMHly 1 3 hours lo ,M 
lama Airport. Ovrr loo parrels 
Irotn 50 lo 2000 acres. Pnrm 
4300 9976 per acre Evrrtlml 
terms or eavh dteeouiil. - 16 "- 
oohTi pevmem. 26 » ear pai out. 
• inlnnl Depressed L S land 
rnaieor makm limma rorreel 
I am A Company. •* *2-5 Pied- 

■ maul Road, buite 4 1 2. AILihta- 

C \ KUOS Trt *404) 231 5760 
Tcti-v 81T4&66 


TIMES HA BE OVERSEAS 


Pi»* dc Ah 
Imrnrav.siudio oimookirw. 
pout wilh ocean Mew Open 

man Sips 4. Kllrb ft Ivtlh 
ls.ill.liw dlslanrr Oil anlrniliw. 
*mv ?r ft 28 t&000 Trt 
'TOUOl 5U2ER 


A LUXURIOUS spaoosB Hamp- 
stead Flat. Large Reception. 
Separate Diner. 6 Bedrooms. 
Every Comfort (or Cl 85 pw 
Available now. 01286 8040 
-A4HUCICH ESTATES spectator 
in renting ft letting ID the West 
End ft Central London, from 
simple studios to luxurious 
apartments, contact 409 0994. 
FULHAM, very well dee flat close 
to luoe a shops. OMe bedrm. 
siting cm. kit. badirm Long/ 
short let £120 pw Telephone... 
Sullivan Thomas 73 1 1434. 
HARLEY HSE. Regents Park. To- 
tally refurb mcl new Ku. 5 
Beds. 4 Recepi. 2 Baths. Rent. 
£19£OOSW. FftF. 499 9981. 
E\CS 870 4703 <T) 

HOLLAND PARK. Furnished B 
bed lomfortabie ramily house. 2 
baths. FuUy equipped. CH Gar- 
den. Co Lei. Avail 1st October. 
£600 pw. 727 2SS1 
NR FAttMHAM, SURREY. Or- 
IWitful del beamed cottage. 4 
bedims, 4 rers. nc kit. gas ch. 
Dbie gge £700 pem Southern 
Properties 0252 724438 
OUEEMOATC Bright new tot d(~ 
signed 1 Bed apt. Open plan 
Kil/Reccp ft Good Bath. All 
new Cteopw Senham ft 
Reeves 938 3S22. 

WCL Lovely J bedrm flat over- 
lookiDO Queen Square. 
C175PW Tel 0223 360393. 
WE LET FLATS AND HOUSES. 
Gonlart Richard or Mick- Davis 
Woolle ft Co 402 7381. 
KMWHTSBHHMSE: tovety Urree 
mom flat. C|96 pw Tel: Dr 
Millar <0895) 45352 
LUXURY FLATS ft HOUSES 
Available m prime London ar- 
eas. May A Co: 01 370 "6101. 
SOUIH WEST. DtMr bedsH. 
C40PW. Nr Tube Phone. Can 
686 7576 Rental Ckdde- 


Keith ■ 
Cardale 
Groves! 


* 


HYBE PMK. W2 

Spnus are Beet to •« ree 

HMnrttttt flnMA 

anueUFtoiM 


Ktoren.30DbBM.2aHB. 

ram atkaor. saaopq rend chw. 

UL 




NomreretusbrenHPodBsah 

no * tore ol toreretaeH* dbgaice 

lIMtt 2 nd Dare U re oreton dock 

■o i gt oB Mi ka. s oebMs. 2 


W S ruitrir 

GARAGE tiki BE AVAL. BY SEPA- 
RATE 



UWSOi 8 REBIBAI 


8 Afatadon Rd W8 
tAGE GATE WB, 


VICARAGE 
Excsfcnl 3rd Hoar tteL 3 BakOOlt iS . [ 
2 BatlnanH. ML vreeo vreypnane. 
Gas C/H. £400 pm 
DUKES AVENUE W4. 

Lftgt erecune madsnee u 
5 bedlams. 2 raceoUans, 3 butf- 
rooms. eresdem tatriren wdfi all I 
norim. gadan. elf street parting. 
£425 pw. 

01 838 342S 


WELUNCTON COURT 
LONDON VC2 


Moments from Covent 
Garden and Trafalgar 
Square a selection of su- 
perb fully famished one 
bedroom Rais to let. pro- 
viding ideal pied a tores 
or company flats. Lift, 
porterage. £185 per week 
(per flat) exclusive. Long 
Lets. Limited Companies 
only. 


935 0190 


ENCHANTING 
TOWER FOLLY 


of stately home near AJresfort. 

Exquatsh timshed, 3 
reatmons. 2/3 Bedrooms, 2 
tetbraoim. Use trt pool and 
terns court. London m tetn. 
TetepbooB Cooaga Conrectwns 
0580 (BeaiiKUj 612562. 


DAWSON VLACC, WS Stunnlna 
Ground floor Oat in period 
house. Lov «y Mg high coUmgcd 
Rrc«p- Wood panel led wdb. 
Mbicr Bedroom. Smglr Bed- 
room. Lor Pine fitted Kit 
leading to private gdn Baoinn 
UOOew. l yr*. Around Town | 
229 9966. 


BRITTON PQQLE 
& BORNS 
01-581 2987 

8URXABY STREET, SUMO 


Ver^etty nenbi cvnoM lift 


Bed Recto, Dnmg Rm. 
LwnCokL 


Open nao KL Bam Lwig i 
£l75gw. 

Ftats/Nnses Cowa Loam 
atnys nqwrd. Usual tees. 


H«aEHSl=E»iiaai 


MASKELLS 

ISWEAOMS 

siamnianaMStocwrito 

twb ator WHtttefl t m tettto 

Id MM MJto Wm 

mo®: noMte >rt HUM ttW 


iwwuaoi 
MPWttw vw jft i w a rn Uae 
H« red Mtttte w. lta| Cota 

F«0 tre (to 

Kuan* an tank, m to x 

Vfliomfiwwm rtteNIttll Ullklto 


mm tittsteHn cm- 

dw6m?ima Rto 


rm W 2 1 

non U*S OF M. IBOOpP Hft 

187 RMMb StoMl 
LMrfw SWS 2HP 
TekpfwflC B1-5tT 22V 


barnard 

marcus 


SOTST MMD im BnabU 4 
bad hso. floe aa tom » »«**». 
iianaliy sign stawt ‘ _ 
memm room, m 

u. break room lWBLt___ 

/ctere £300 B» kng kt 


Bttim 


81427 9M 
WM ^tasoiB 3rt R to. t bids, 
iteept/ftn room, m omb B u 
gdn. dvthw £285 p*_ 


81482 208 


SKIN ROAD WM 
Spams red Sumy orenets 
own. 3nl floor flat < beds. bath. 
Kdriien/b'tast room. 


BIPBiairS M1E SW7 
An inaal aid figU tower 
paste floor flat n pend con- 
veraon. 1 Bedroom. Bath wdh 
sBgwer. reap. WcteR, ptta 
£175 pw 

01-581 7840 


ST. JOHNS WOOD 


Bright 1 bodroomed flat to 
ptspose buot block. OL/ 
CJiW„ Mi and porter. Close 
to a> amentoss and nan- 
port Available kronsdazedy. 
£110 pw. 


: 4/6 STJmTQMG^ RM I 
*01-586 3888 TH£X 299368. 


ST JOHNS WOOD. Truly stun- 

ning Itat offered tn tmoeccatuc 
docorallv <■ order. 4 bedroorra. 3 

receptions. 2 baths, sop WC. 

signers kllchen. Avrelfabto now. 

Long/^iftorl lets. Palace Proper- 

ties 01 486 8926. 


TW LONG /SHORT LET Speclal- 
Ms. We have a targe wfeetron of 
luxury 124.4 bedroom flats 
with maid service. Interior de- 
signed and centrally located. 
An9ela Williams Ol 258 3659. 


02 - Superb Itat ha garden 
satiate Double bed. bath, large 
reception and fitted kitchen 
Available early September 
£12X7 per week exclude p 
C oroapny Let. Tel ; 0722 
436222 X 2218 [office) 


I DM IM on SUl 
floor, lge rec«p ft 2 nd bed. kn 
w/drver. parking available. 
£200 pw Ooddard ft Smith 01 
930 7321 


BELSRAVtA super new tnlertor 
destgned Mews house. 2 receps. 
2 dbie beds. 2 baths * wc. while 
Ul - alt machines, brick gge. Co 
M £660 pw Goddard ft smith 
01-930 7321 


F.W. CUFF (Management Ser 
ura) Ltd require properties In 
Outre!. South and Were Loh 
don areas for wading 
applicants. 01-221 8858. 


to 


HTERNATIOHAL EXECUTIVES 

L'rgpnlly require flats ft houses i 
In central London from £160 lo 
£2.000 pw. Please call Sally 
Owen or Lorraine Campbell on 
01-957 9684. 


Heathrow * ctow ren. 3'btd 
Mew* hse. 1/ fil kiL gge + fur- 
ther pUng. £i8Spw j.w. Ud. 
01 949 2482. 


SWI FWUCO exclusive I Dtde 
bedroomed ground floor apart- 
ment Fully furnished to a very 
IMgh standard. Parking avad- 
able. £220 pw ExcL Tel: 01- 
730-1161 after 2pm 


KEMSttfttRM.Hm STJmcury 
3bedroom flat Large reception 
ft dining room. Recently refur- 
bished. Co lets preferred. £360 
pw. Ol 968 5170 


NEW MALDEN easy across to AS. 
WeU dec ft torn 2 bed toe. 2 
recigi. reudy. pretty gdn. Sidi 


couple. Long M. £U6pw. j.w. 
Ltd. Ol 949 2482. 


VBmNC LONDON /PARIS Aden 
Bales ft Company have a targe 
selection of flats ft houses avail- 
able for l week* from £200pw 
499 1665. 

AMERICAN BANK urgently re- 
quire* luxury flare and houses 
from £200 • £1.000 pw. Ring 
Burgess Estate Agents 581 6136 
AVAILABLE NOW Luxury riots ft 
nouses. Ctietseo. KMghtsbrMge. 
Belgravia. £200£2XXX>pw 
Tel: Burgess 581 6136. 

A WBE RANGE of Houses, flats, 
bedsit, sham tn south London 
All prices sizes. Open 6 days 
Can Rental Guide: 686 7676 
MLDREN/PETS OJL 3 bed 
room house, wasner. phone, 
garden. Cl 40 pw 
Express Rentals 884 B457 
FINCHLEY M1Z. Nr Tube. 1 lge 
bed. rerep. kit. bath. CH. Newts- 
fum. C96 pw Mr Snaer -*OS 
5965. after 7pm 446 7468. 
FINCHLEY HU WeU furnisher} 
comfortable 3 rra flat m 
serviced blk. CH. Pleasant out- 
look. £365 PCM. Ot 446 0846 
HOLLAND PIL Nice noous sc! 
run. DMe bed. Mg lounge. 1 
ktr/dln. New eo. Comm gaps. 
Co Let C18SPW. 741-9677. 
MEAL FOR V UF IC m* . South; 
KenMngton. Fufty serviced flat 
for 2. LHL Phone Cot TV. CH 
etc. Oi 584 2414/785 4281. 
KKNSUtCTOM Beautifully 

furnished targe 1 bedroo m flaL 
Fully equipped. A17D p.w. Tel; 
Oi 602 6241 

SW3. a bed toe. 6 baita. 2 rec. , 
patio, garage. £ 860 p w. Andre | 
Lanauvre: 491 7822 
SWlft, attractive sunny IM. dHe 1 


kAP. LI40 pw. 01-681 
ML 3rd floor 1 bed. recop. k ft b. I 
CH. CHW. Exc value. £2 15 pw. 
956 9612 m. 

Nil. Lire 2 bed mod torn flat in 
pb block- O l Pot to. £115 pw 
T.P.M. 446 2025. 


Quality 3 

houses. SW18 ft SW19. £I7S- 
CftEOpw Home from Home 
946 9447. 

UTNEV. LOOK! i Includes Cm- 
tret hea ling e h-waren lge lux 2 
hro flaL si 3. 2 min lube. £160 
pw 788 4448 Finch's 
»*7 MBX The number lo remem- 
ber when seeking best rental 
prutiretlfs In central and prime 
London areas £160 /£2£>O0pw. 
W1 Conrendenl 1 Bed flat in ex 
rood Lge Hern.. Kit A Bath. 
C140pw. Benham ft Reev 
938 3622. 

W2, Nt HYDE PARK LUXiay 1 
tod modem flat. £176 pw Inc, 
C.H.. H.W COMPANY LET. 
01-444 6713 or 01-436 0634. 
WEST WrtWnXPON fum or 
unfum 4 Bed. 2 Bath house. 
C300pw. Co trt. Rome from 
Home. 046 9447. 

WIMBLEDON PARK- Lovely 2 
Otoe Bed toe. Scdi 2 couples or 
family- £l40pw. Horae from 
Home 946 9447 
BARNES lie I ux house, new de- 
cor. nr Station. Co let £225 pw 
788 4448 Finch'S 
CABRAM ft OASCLEE Offer wide 
choice or tong lets from 
Cl50pw. CMI 01-589 5481. 
CHELSEA branac lux balcony 
itat. UgM rereo. dblc bnLun. 
Doner. Long IM. 622 B82S. 
EARLS COURT Modern flat 2 
nods newly der Long let C2O0 
pw. Tel. even mgs OI 788 6908. 
ONE BEDROOM FLAT. Nr tube. 
Reception, garden. £7Spw. Ol 
686 7576. Rental Guide. 
SOUTH KEM sonny 2 bed flat 
over gdns £215 p.w Co leL 
Trtfll 584 5737/228 2985. 

LONDON dtoe berisll. own 
coofcer/fndge £36 pw Express 
Rentals 883 5487 
OFF SLAANE SO SWS Otoe bed. 
r «". kfttv CH. pb. •Ayr* ci25 
pwOk/OlP. prfrd. 070746986' 


THE VERY BEST 
Landlords & Tenants 
come' to os for 

BELGMIM. 

HAMPSTEAD. 

KBKMGTOk. WHKBXM 
and Blm i ar srwa. 
Ptraee ml 

BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


SUPERIOR FLATS 
avail. A reqd. for diplomats, 
executives. Long ft short lets In 
all areav lipfrtmd ft Co- 48. 
Albemarle SI W 1 . 01-499 6534 


SWI PIMLICO 3 bedrooms, 
bathrooms, targe attractive recb 
and kitchen, new conversion, 
an new tortuiure ere. Company 
JetJC33S pw Tei- 01-854 1026 


SWI FIMLICO 3 bedrooms. _ 
bamroerm. large reception and 
kitchen At! new conversions. 
£220 pw company te< Tel Gl- 
ass 102 e 


TEMMttGTOM 2nd fir Oat over- 
looking Thames. 2 dbie beds. 2 
baure. garage, close station ft 
Kingston town £ieopw. j.w. 
Ltd. Ol 949 2482. 


VKT0RU3WL kwrt Of -Vie 
Iona. 3 bed flat, wed 
maintained blk. long lei 
£lBOpw. J W Ud. Ol 949 
2482- 


WEYBRIOCC retorts, character 
toe within wotted gdn. Funs ft 
dec to w hrgti standard. 4 
-died. 2 balh. C2SO pw toe. 
dener. J.W Ud. 01 949 


ter collage vltd heart of village 
Lgererep. i bed. suit stogie pm 
only- Cl 20 pw. J.W ltd. 01 949 
2482- 


Wft. Close R tv erode, luxury mat- 
sonede avail for tnunedlate 6 
mondisor annual Ireanv. Pref 
Co. (ei. 2 Herts. 2 baths, large 
rec cp with bNrony. tody fitted 
ku/Mkiasi on. Gas CH. Very 
dose to mops ft tube. Refer- 
ences essential £166 pw cxd. 
Terr Ol 579 0702 daytime. 

HDKWGTON SWS 2 spadOUS 
family homes, all machs- new- 
tv decorated. I rmn. Iube> 
Duplex 3rt nedrms. ft ttvlog. 
dining- study. tc/bfcfsL 7i baths 
ft gdns. LMO Fiji l bedrm. Hi - 

tng i2 hidden beds). paUOL 

h/dhi. CISC i nr chw. 370-1362 

MIVNCY. Fabulous penthse wilh 
spectacular views. 3 beds. 3 
baths, huge rereo. kO/brk. all 
mart! it r* Root umt. £373 pw 
2 bed rial m small m Mock dose 
all araeniiie*. Dbte reret>. ktt 
with alL machines. £138 pw. 
Ter Ptppa 786 6222 Warren. 

QUEEN6CATE StW7. Brand new 
conversum Large reception. 2 
double bedrooms. 2 bathroom. 
L’nfurnMied evrept for camels 
and curuim Company/ Em- 
bassy M only C290 per week 
tndudlng C/H ana CH W. Mr 
James: Ol 688 1049 iDay). 
MEROCAN EXECUTIVE Seeks 
lux nat/houw im m £ 800 pw. 
Usual Ires reg. Phillips Kay ft 
Lends. South of the Pwk. Chel- 
sea office. 01*352 8111 or 
North o< the park. Regerog 
Park Mire . 01 686 9882. 
ATTERSEA F rom m|d-SepL 
own room, own entrance, own 
bathroom, own tefepnooe. own 
mini kitchen for light use. £280 
pan tnrtustve except irtephoree. 
references recurred, imp Ol 


sS’SsSaJSSShcTVSuS I nrrrnnrTni'i °V g3T “«■ 
IT. 4-““"**®™“- Lux studio 


NX7. Lux 2 bed tom ftaL Lge 
recep rm. ch. frl kn. £110 pw. 
T.P.M. 44® 2025. 

•""WJEOOK AREA 2 Bedroom 
/taw. Company A non Company 


LET ANDREWS 
MAKE LETTING 
MAKE SENSE 






& 


PRQ°ERT!ES T 0 LET 


S.se a ! ce 1, : =»: • 


01-685 0111 


cmswtCK - 

BEDFORD PARK 

Lge house, 5 beds. 2 baths. 
2 lge reaps, tt. wasting 
maefttne, dstnosher. CH. 
gsdm. unfurnished. 

£350 pw. 

Ha Bet Unas & Co 
01-741 2102. 


HEYCOCK & CO 


SW3/SW7 


Large selection of 1 
bedroom flats avateble 
now & September. £1 20 
-£180 pw. 


01-584 6863 


PHUttEftOlCPHB. KW5.LUX Iff 
s/r Oars. 1 bedr m . £llO pw. 2 

hrdffls. balcony. 1 £180 pw 
Each with urge k ft b. comm 
gdns. Colei 7206212 Warm ark 


DOCKLANDS. Superb rm de» I 
ben ftai close Tower Bodge All 
appltanres. col TV. 1 mtn lube. 
Co M. £160Pw. Ol 6Z2 2690. 


KENSnMnCNWttLux 2 bed tom 
fit. superb. Go ML £28Bow me 
hw ft ch. GW Opt extra. 01-603 
6857 cr 992 4477 


bOOW/SHOWr UT properties 
from ClOOXS-OOOpw. Praorul 
Service. 01-468 3680 or 0836- 
69282a anytime m. 


SNARERS SWS. 4 bed house. 2 
reams. 2 receps. targe kitchen 
with all machines, garden. 
G220PW: Ol 937 9801. 


sm P IM L ICO sev contained 1 
bedroom, satnng room, k and b. 
£127 pw. Tel 01-834 1006 


WANTED Superior properties tor 
long/shon Co Veto. 01-488 3680 
or 0836 592824 anytime m. 


DULWICH. Modern town house - 
thru lounge, toning area, filled 
Lit. 3 berts/1 study. Private pa- 
tio. Carage. Close mam BR 
te.Plon. Victoria and Cm- min- 
utes by train. £150 pw. 
Keyhotd: 733 4518 124 bourst. 

SOUTH KCNSMCTOI Luxurious 
penl ho use duplex in ewikM 
P/B block with new u/ground 
pk» 2 Otoe Beds. Bath. Boar 
Rerep. Bair. Lov ley LS KU 
C37Dpw neg. Hlghty Red Ascot 
Properties 01-486 6741. 

STUDKL SWS, Close to lubes. 
Mam room, entrance, kitchen, 
bathroom, well finished, 
washing machine, music ren- 
ter* Available 1 year. £32Spcm. 
R e ierences. Ring. 01-373 9612 
tbY/evcnmg. 

W14 2 bedroomed maison e tte 

with recep. kU and bath. £460 
per montn met CH and hot wa- 
ter Available until end Jan '87 
Deposil 'returnable) and reler- 
cnees required. Tel : oi 741 
6127 after 6.50pm. 
AmoHPs/cmm m . a yap 
have a quaUty property 10 let 
trtl us abou> It. We offer a 
professional and rrhabfe ser- 
vice Ouartshi Constantine Ter. 
Ol 244 7363. 

FAMILY 3 BEDRM HSE. Washer, 
phone, gdn. £116pw. Ol 686 
7576 Rental Guide 

FULHAM SWS Superb lux ItaL 2 
recep. 2 bed rms. filled KM ft B 
Balcony C220PW. 0342 713280 
FLAT I bedroom, nr 
“ Recep. Phone. £70 pw 


T lllte. 

E.vpre» Rentals 883 6467 

"OUDAY APARTMOfTS front l 
J*"*kto 3 Months. from £300 eo 


Cot r\ etc 6 nMnu2 U £95 pw 
Futlv equipped . 01-570 6681 
LARCC SELECTION of flab ft 
homes in Wimbledon atm 
available for tong ga Oanipa- 
nv ft non Company lets HtS£ 
front Home 946 9447 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


JUNIOR SEC/PA £8-600 ItltHU- 
-4- very lively Person Friday 
role with two easy going execs 
tn swi. internal, transport. 
IBM off rrr tynctn. wui X train, 
tots letephpne Italson. LVs. CBO 
Mlrhejp konapthSKI OFFHX 
ANGC lS Rec Cans. 0 1-629 
0777. 


TtOUNCUAL 


FRENCH /CBt- 
MAH SEC To -partner of 
property co. Cood language and 
secretarial skins ronfrueni out- 
going nature in deal with ctienb 
km, of phone work able 10 toe 
IDpibalh e. C9.00C-9.S000. 
Morrow £mp Agy.tThe Lftn- 
guageSperlaitsisJ Ol 636 1487 


FRENCH ft /or Spsrfsfc spoaiditg 
Shorthand secreiary for com- 
modity broken. Excellent 
opporiunttv for Irattung In the 
business for bright numerate 
person. Salary e C9 I O.OOO. 
TetnmonoR J Rec Cora 01-493 

6446, 

SHOtTTHAND NOT ESSENTIAL. 

jiki good audta and w p. » sec- 
mary to the Finance Dtreclor 
Ol On EC3 .tMuranre company. 
L 10.000 Call 577 8600 'QtVl 
or 439 7001 (West End\ Secre- 
lanes Plus The Secretarial 
Consutuntb. 

aUMCUAL SECRETARIES for 
« arlous luplor and venter Vtnt- 
ikhm in the Oil 1 ft around 
Loudon If you speak Spanish. 
Kalian, French or German with 
S/H ring Ca n el our Agv 01-404 
4B5J 

ART RALLDtY: dUOO Excel 
1ml opportlMllv for Sec/ 
AssKiont lo help run wed. 
Known galierv Imitative and 
romnrni sense etaenlul S/H ft 
tv bmp. Early 20's Jaygar Cl 
INN « Sknne SQi Lid 01 730 
5148. * 

AUDIO SECRETARY expd 
leqat/ ppty SWT Tel 01-668 
3722 


MOUHHW MSKAYWMUR 

needs VOL19G SEC to lake If to 
Tevlpak 4 wun USA consul- 
tant. NUT team spirit. 
CBSOOrtb Suil 9t-23yrold STL 
and meat allowance. Cate Clive 
Rlnqroae OFFICE ANGELS Rec. 
Own. 01-629 0777. 


TRENDY FASHION COMPANY 

require attract I ve Hvrty young 
person b ofim rutoor. *A" level 
English ft Maths, seovtartof 
skills, good salary according u 
experience + rtoUtes attewanee. 
TeU Lorraine 01-229 1903/- 
9603 


COLLEGE LEAVER 07/690 - 
nughi hy teafling nuoartne 
PuhUshrr' A txlglrt- ■soarky" 
outgoi nq personality and lots of 
enmiKiasm are nuotul. Good 
education ana a cc o ra ie ridiis 

I BO/ SOI area requested. Good 
Drowns. GoOd benefits. Love, 
IS- St Jotnev offlm. Pfcflse let 
01495 S787 Gordon YMW 
Gomuttancy - - 

EXHtltnQN PLAKMHKt to 
C8000. TM> leading exhibition 
organiser K seeking an Asafc- 
lanl to become involved tn a 
larted computer based func 
lion. You wui receive fun 
Irani lug and will be awe to at- 
tend the atm on which yoa 
work krvboarfl skills at 40 
wptn. Svneria. me rKTUltmetU 
ronsultajKv. 01-637 9633 


FRENCH M/T Audio See for Ini 
Lawvrrs nation would be on 
advantage No Vh nrraurv. 
OmiMni- win train on wp. 
C7.BOO tain consider college 
trover Paragon Language QMS 
01680 7050 

STOCKBROKER S TO £ 7 . 000 . 3 

. 10 mm Qly Execs require c/- 
leaver nr grad AMblaol with -l 
IVPthg. In join Uieif VMbHd 

1 rom Cau Di warren. Sredplm 
Rer Care- OL 880 8822 


AUDIO SEC £8750 Holhorn Con 
Sudanis, wp exp vttaL Coed 
hots. Losefy aUnok. Profit 
share. Oil Sylvte Lang OFFICE 
ANGELS Rec. CMS. 01-630 

0844 


OPERATOR £9.000 
wanq ots west London. Pqm- 
bto promotion M supervisor 
with small team. Call Suzanne 
Dunphy OFFICE ANGELS Rec. 
Cons 01-630 0844. 


MEDICAL SECRETARY £100008 

Hotburn GohsuiMm. Very re 
sponsihlp pod needmg 
rfedirauoa very bright PA. Cau 
Suzanne Dunphy OFFICE AN- 
GELS Are. Coos. 01-6300844. 


MIRUC RELATIONS PA 90/80 
a- fluent French Amt PR Ch- 
rmor. Aliena tannmns A 
Bunches C9LOOO + Co Car. Call 
Kataba TED Aw 01 736 9867 


PROPERTY aCVEL OFM EWT AS- 


SOTtefT -■ £10.000. Half 
aaHO/YW. haK 4 whofr 


range 

at tiHrtigangaainui tor mam of 
wrvnm in targe City ro. Pre 
v In property exp wanted: mid 
40\ can 177 8600 lOtyt 
or 439 7001 iWnl End) Secre- 
• lanes Plus ■ The Secretarial 
. CDWUBUm. 

TELEVISION. £9160. Join UiB 
feeding TV' rornpony where jrou 
wiU tarry oul a vatred. tasi. 
men tng funroon in addition to 
' H«h levet bauen. you wiifassat 
■ rn preparing reports and win be 
,■ ante to make a broad coninou- 
t«m SVilfe ' 80/50 wptn 
hvrvpTBV. .the rerrufunetu con- 
sultancy. 01-637 9S3S 
VERSATILE SECRETARY 

required for ante friendly 
ExponAmport Co working 
wilh Africa A M East Coed 
skUti but noSH. Plena- of grope 
(or Mb development Aar 21 e 
Satan- £8.000 CL please to 
Branvihi Lid. 16-Atbcntarte 
■SI reel. London W1 TohpMitf 


m 


PURLfMRNCABJIOa. This Mtator 
MMWMR 8 house needs a (ruM- 
br. entcienl secretary 10 
the Group Pcnducbon Dfrecior 
and no Asstsum. tm> is a 
busy, sonable position. wUh tats 
wnh Pint- 
ers ana deadlines to meeL 10 , uu 
90/E0. wp exp Telrphone Cx- 
Mine King Appa 01 499 8070 . 


TO fftNO Ser 71*. 100/60. 
ttxne audio 3om a Ctry co 10 
worn for younq Otredor owa» 
Ing ctwiul persoRauty 

apere ftatad Working 

atmosbrere K friendly. Other 
young -Mail always ready u> 
help. Phone Milter Mental, 457 


QftXS OUOMSTER froierm a 
Secrrtan- Small ousv map riitr 
tKJtang buMdew Mus ntaMi. 

Ktorocrafl WP <m AprKqt S 
native imponam NMignaku 
Safari- ncgotlalile Appiy^ torti 
at Francis Cturnesier i ur _ a « 
James's Ptare. London swi. 


'ojimws Dui levwr ncr+tartml 


Zi msst— •T ta'sas 


ftUDN* WANE S9000 VICTORI A 
Pr «?«»nafa. Nice bunrh M 

OlflJO OWL 


Jay 

Oms. 


can s ou 


tvrebm^o,^^ 


MT8FIIRUS* *»nrtitinikei m 
CUv. Use own imbaUsg mi-. 
uws. Orttantsauoh CU 2 J 000 * 
Bonug Photo- 01-888 9861 
Ann Warrington Sec Careers 


Rerman brjncual sec 

W1 Cb. ReHKtosfWc to MO mid 

PVSS S 0 ? 00 - 

6 M 1487 ,rhP Lanfl S<WC, 01 
•ALAS * MARKETING Aflmlnrt- 
•-Irafor -Stlis coormnauna 4 
. fbenl lunon. 60 wpm iy nfrw, 
Puckape CQ.ooa cuu 
TED Agy Ol 75o 9867 
EXECUTIVE SEARCH OjOdo . 
- . trading Prorevoonai fomnanv 
seek rXpenentefl PA/ Ser vs 
workai Board level. Ttus H an 
involving rote with loo. of rl trot 
and (amMale.ltaMon Good au- 
dio' D-otito ng mature 
prafnaHHUl -flDPUMrh TTQIIfll' 
M. TWJWO^ 01 409 lSa 


- WfWR kNeirt 


inl^ujenremtoeSiWSn^ 

Pul vou 011 ihe career pailr? 11 «, 
rtfW now* Jpyqar Career* ■ 
htoan ** Sb-l Uflof 7305148 




confidential work amh 
TavKtork AmubiteneMs. 0886 




MW in Iheatre? Puy > tarviuL 




•"Minnie •» 


^•srasr-btE 




CnttMiiianrv 


J 


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1 4! s «:-.s 


i ; 



SIDE 

i»c't 





rompauv --Yk^^wgraJS; 


Ime 

design 




uTi STSLiff " rU «* ««• 
Trtephon^rSSS 


CORtMcdOB 


19 


■J •- ' 











THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1980 


F* club^i 

“aiii iON 

Sttv . 

r i ~ «. 1 , i ' ' * ■ | 

rt i'K . I 

mm 

1»J5 

3635 

CRVATrONs 









ss^fjsa 


» y? Uy° Far Lonely OM 
People esn bo pnwkM by your 
wm Pttaww foci uoe » beooect 
tor TTV Nattonu Btnmoient 
Ftmd lor toe Aurd. Now Broo d 
. . Sired Hmbt, 55 Now Br oad 
Stre et. Londo n EC3M 1NH. 
STOP CANCOt-Earty del rcuonis 
ftru doo. Ewmi Quest tor a 
TeM ter Cancer. Wrxxfcury. 
rW ow Ron d. ftayqop- Essex. 
KB797922SSL 

THANK YOU *r FHAMCtS or 

Assist wnn lovo from Brian 
end Dorothea. 


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uuiuimt on iMiBi/hoa 
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AFRICA SPECIALISTS. Key 
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CHEAPEST FUCHTS W/WIBC - 

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AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £420 rm £760 AiKUaod 
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ONE CALL lor some of me best 
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WINTER SPORTS 


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performance CARS 


LOTUS EXCEL 19R3. irr btue. an- 
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PUBLIC NOTICES 


S. DEVON. Sua Soaelaas family 
flai. Sew on for 2 / 6 . £S4-£l54 
pw 01-794 0257/01 -674 6680. 







Why retake your GC£*s 
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Tsbeen more Hr gong to 
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harder aMreuBT 
■you too noaU Hm to laipaDRe 
your grades oatoad: 

IralwmtHfntoi 
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V/ Krak«m. 

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TftOI-531 3307 


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imr worn 

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your grades st 

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01-225 0577 
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A HIGH 1NC0>IE: You will earn over ilZnoOm jwir 
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Plaasa quote rafaianc* nab 36/3S 
CteHug date M Saptenber 1985. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 

C o n flated from page 21 


FASHION PR COCKTAIL 
£9,000 + discounts 

Whan you mix together two of the most sxcfflng Bakte In 
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For an iramaefiate hdantaw cal Amabel on Of-734 2S67. 


Stdla Fry 
V Recndtment 


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1666 Eves or 671 3238 Day 
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ADVERTISING 
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c £8,000 

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LONDON SCHOOL OF 
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External 

Relations 

Office 


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DeteH Me ter apflUieK ii 




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Sir John Betjeman 
General Mac Arthur 
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What do they have in common? 


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^ 1 » VJ K 

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WCt Lowest tons ir 09 . 
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SELF-CATERING ITALY 


r"‘ ."u i -.U-, a.ii 


^‘'Lvv'^W I 
TifmimiTrr 





raiNM to mtor tod and dr- 
wpioptd admnra tra uv* raoto. 
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wrap or i v i fh o n p Ma na Mua 
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mt a n dCCPrvf. '»' toanttwT 
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TEMPTING TIMES 

YOUNG GRADUATES with ryp. 
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Lniversntev. rharlHn Mr. 
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LAW 


CHARITY CF/MMt&SiON 
to tor nuurr ol tor (Dtomirni 
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1 The Clurrrv called the loom 
Rhodes P-vj,rh Scholarsiua 
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4 htir Otmtif of tor 8016 
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Order ufnkKsiino irnvlm 
Older under draibn an 
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The cnarnv commmioners 
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MUihduiiU Copies of the draft 
Or m-T mat be obtained linn 
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ai Craeme Motor. Demy Square. 
Liver Dari. 17 7S8 O temow or 
sugpiHlHMVi may he sent to mem 
wutan one monm from may 


LEGAL NOTICES 

to I he Hnn Court of Jnuce No 
005177 <4 1Q85. 

Oonrerv On-MOB 
Mr /inure Hoffman 
Monday l«h JUy 
to toe mailer of me Oral Nonh- 
em London Cemnery Company 
Lam MO. 

AND 

In the MMier of the CompaMm 
Art 1048 

NO TXT IS HEREBY GATN 
that me Order of toe HMi Court 
of JtMve iCXvancrry DnNOnl 
dated lorn July 1986 cenfirmtog 
the rrOumon ofme Crantal gf toe 
above mcniioned Umvinv from 
£2COOOO to £400 apd UN Minute 
approver! bv He Coun showing 
wm rnpcci 10 tor casual of tnr 
Company a» altered toe apteral 
panmilara reqiored b» me abostt 
men boned Act were rmwe i r d by 
mo RcgMfar of CompaniM ou 
FirN dav of August 1986 
OHM ton an day 01 AuguH 
1986 

„ Rye a Leman 

SotKItan of toe above-named 


COURSES 

WOLSEY KALLi Home futy for 
GCE Dwa v ev Prninnow Pro- 
spectus. PW AL2 Vtokev Had. 
Oxford 0X7 6PR TM 0006 
M20O i?4 hr*.. 

_ Onluil^l^L' 

RETAKE COURSES! 


Law Report August 13 1986 

Evidence of wish 
to stay together 


You have al least 2 years per- 
sonnel management experience 
with tor em ph*ns on nendt- 
meni ♦ a pouiive penonadly. 
Ai a consuflanl placing perroa- 
peni secretaries, your hard 
work and cxperUie win gain 
you lob MiBfarUon pfua earn- 
ing* of £l4.000-£is.000+. 
mmaiiy on a 2-3 monm con- 
Imcf wnn a vww 10 
oermanency CPU Lyn OOI of 
SecretarK* «* 459 7601. 

UNDER ORAM v-Atfl teCTHarlal 
Nous for umnediaie IfoerMOng 
bookings for summer vacation. 
Coniacx Salty Bird Ol 683 
0063 . M v ceddh Scon 
RixruRiiml 


Regina v Immigration Appeal 
Tribunal, Ex parte Kumar 
Before Sir John Donaldson. 
Master of the Rolls. Lord Justice 
MustiUand Lord Justice Nourse 
[Judgment given July 30] 

In deciding, under paragraph 
54<n) of the Siaicmcru qf 
Changes in immigrauan Rules 
(HC 169 of I**S3|. whether a 
marriage, celebrated in India 
between a husband who had 
lived there all his life and a wife 
who bad been settled in the 
United Kingdom, hod been 
entered into primarily to obtain 
the husband's admission to the 
United Kingdom, an entry 
clearance officer should take 
into account evidence of devo- 
tion between the parties which 
tended to show, under para- 
graph 54(b), that thev intended 
to live together permanently. 

The Cowl of Appeal so held, 
quashing the refusal of the 
Immigration Appeal Tribunal 
on June 26, I9SS. to grant the 
applicant. Aran Kumar. leave to 
appeal against the dismissal by 
the adjudicator on March 25, 
1985. of his appeal from the 
decision of the earn clearance 
officer in New Delhi who on 
February 8, 1984, refused him 
entry clearance for settlement in 
the United Kingdom. 

Mr Andrew Collins, QC and 
Mr Alper Riza for the applicant; 
Mr David Latham. QC. for the 
appeal tribunal. 

LORD JUSTICE NOURSE 
said that the mamuge between 
the parties, which bad been 
arranged prior to 1981. had 
taken place in India in 1982. 
Thereafter, the panics lived 

X hcr in India until 1984 
i the wife, who had become 
pregnant, returned io the UK, 
where she suffered a mis- 
carriage. After the husband was 
refused entry clearance to join 
her. she returned to India where 
she again became pregnant. 

Paragraph 54 of HC 169 of 
1983 provided: “The husband 
of a woman who is settled in tbc 
United Kingdom ... is to be 
admitted if be holds a current 
entry clearance granted to him 
for that purpose. 

“An entry clearance will be 
refused unless the entry clear- 
i ance officer is satisfied: (a) that 
the marriage was not entered 
into primarily to obtain ad- 
mission to the United Kingdom; 
and (b) that each of the parties 
has the intention of living 
permanently with the other as 
his or her spouse, and (r) that 
the parties to the marriage have 
meL” 

The effect of the rule was to 
place the applicant under the 
burden of satisfying the entry 
clearance officer, and in due 
case the adjudicator, of all the 
matters mentioned. 

No question had arisen on 
subparagraph (c), which was 
admitted to have been satisfied. 
The dispute centered on the. 
interaction between 

subparagraphs (a) and (b). 

In R v Immigration Appeal 
Tribunal Ex parte Bhaiia (The 


54{ft and under paragraph 4 1 he 
looked onK ji i he prewnL 

Bui evidence of intervening 
devotion might make it easier to 
salisl'v the officer that the 
parties’ purpose at the umc of 
the marriage was not primarily 
to obtain entry to the UK. 

In refusing the husband’s 
appeal, the adjudicator said: 
“Under the Indira arranged 
marriage system, an ulterior 
primary reason for entering into 
a marriage can exist alongside 
an intention to make a lasting 
marriage . . . One such ulterior 
primary reason could he :n gam 
admission io the UK.” 

He also rejected a submission 
that it was easier to show that 
the primary purpose was no! to 
rain admission to the United 
Kingdom where the endenee 
showed that a good mum age 
existed, particularly where the 

wife was pregnant. 

In so doing, the adjudicator 
was failing io ap|»U ihv Liw is 
now staled in BhaUJ. He ought 
io have treated the pii-'rJ 
devotion between the applicant 
and the wife as evidence nl' their 
primary purpose in entering 
into the marriage, hearing in 
mind that the purpose to make a 
true and lasting nurrujv could 
often, in circumstances such as 
the present case, be Conned utter 
only a short acquaintance. 

Furthermore, it seemed that 
the adjudicator might well have 
attached too much importance 
to the fact that it was. as he 
described it, a typical Induit 
marriage, perhaps leading him 
too readily to conclude that it 
was arranged tor tin* purpose of 
obtaining the applicant’s ad- 
mission to the UK. 

In the circumstances, a gmxl 
case hod been made ou: lor 
saying that the adjudicator had 
misdirected him sell :n Liu anJ 
leave io appeal ought ihetelore 
to have been given by the appeal 
tribunal. 


Times August 9. 1985; (19851 
Imm AR 50) the Court of 
Appeal had considered the com- 
parable rule in relation to 
fiances, rule 41 of HC 169 of 
1983. 

Lord Justice O'Connor had 
said: “Paragraphs (b) and (c) 
spell out matters for separate 
consideration which will in any 
event be relevant to ihe proper 
consideration of paragraph (a). 
To that extent an applicant who 
satisfies the entry clearance 
officer of the requirements of (b) 
and (c) is better placed to satisfy 
! him of (a); but, just as no one 
would suggest that (c) is conclu- 
sive of (a), so I am clear that (b) 
is not conclusive of (aL~ 

There was for present pur- 
poses no substantial distinction 
between the meaning and effect 
of the three subparagrphs in 
paragraphs 41 and 54. The 
requirements of each 
subparagraph were cumulative 
and had all to be satisfied in 
turn. 

The only important difference 
was that under paragraph 54(a) 
the entry clearance officer was 
required to look back to the lime 
w/hen the marriage was entered 
into, whereas under paragraph 


THE MASTER OF THF 
ROLLS, concurring, said that 
the adjudicator seriously mis- 
directed himself in compart- 
mentalizing the questions which 
he had to ask himself under 
subparagraphs (a) and (b) 

They were, of course, separate 
questions, both of which hod u* 
be satisfied; but evidence hear- 
ing on one would often cast a 
flood of light on ihe other. 

His Lordship was also dis- 
turbed at the adjudicator’s ref- 
erence to the Indian arranged 
marriage system. Where the 
applicant belonged to a commu- 
nity in which arranged mar- 
riages were the norm, the Lict 
that the marriage concerned had 
been arranged was of itself 
without significance. 

All that an entry clearance 
officer could legitimately bear in 
mind was that it was less 
difficult to achieve an 
“immigration’’ marriage under 
that system than under the 
Western one. since the personal 
feelings of the parties, and in 
particular the wife who already 
had a right of entry, could more 
easily be set aside or by passed. 

Any attempt to achieve a 
delicate and detailed analysis of 
the motives for the marriage was 
more likely to obfuscate than 
enlighten. 

Detailed analysis also in- 
troduced a “Caieh 22“ element. 
If the wife was already settled in 
the United Kingdom and 
wished to remain, it would be 
idle for her to marry' a man who 
did not wish to obtain ad- 
mission to the UK. 

Yet ii was fatally easy to treat 
his admission that he did wish 
to obtain admission as evidence 
that that was the primary pur- 
pose of the marriage. 

The proper approach was lor 
the officer to consider the 
question as would a jury, hy 
imprcssion based on the ev- 
idence as a whole, rather than on 
legalistic analysis. 

It was only if the matrimonial 
relationship was or might have 
been of subsidiary importance 
that he would fail to be satisfied 
that _ it was not an 
“immigration" marriage and 
that the requirements of 
subparagraph (o) were not met. 
Lord Justice Mustill agreed. 
Solicitors: Ms V. A Jones. 
Coventry: Treasuiy Solicitor. 


Occupier entitled 
to cause damage 

Home Brewery Co Ltd ▼ fell to be decided for the first 
William Davis & Co (Lough- time in English law. 
borough) Ltd The line of cases concerned 

Before Mr Piets Ashworth. QC SJ ? f oc ?}^ 5 <’»' 

iimimnmf ... land in relation to watercourses 

1 «r y , L and that concerned with nghis 
J °S c V pier . of knd in relation to flooding, were not 

enuUcdtake aeps toprevent conclusive of the present 
water from flowing freely and question 
naturally from higher land ^ rammon law rule was 
«■ over his land, even ,hat the lowvr occupier had no 
hi?h^ i da fi UB ! ^ ground of complaint and no 

KTSi J ausc of acl » n 3 h ‘8^ r 

3 «*«P« r *«■ Permitting the 
«. natural flow of unchannellcd 

>?/■: S,t " waler * whether on or under the 
- 3 o W u snriace- 10 P 3 ^ from the higher 

Judge m Bench t 0 [he lower land. 

Division, accordingly dismissed Al Mme Umet Ibe lpuiT 

I™ by the plaimiffs. Home occupier was under no oWiga- 
Brewery Co Ltd. for nuisance tian l0 receive such water. He 

might put up a barrier or 


The common law rule was 
that the lower occupier had no 


Davis Sl Co (Loughborough) 
Ltd. but gave judgment for the 
plaintiffs for trespass. 

The plaintiffs owned land 
through and over which water 
naturally and freely flowed into 
day pits and an osier bed on 
lower adjacent land. The defen- 
dants bought the adjacent land 
and infilled the day pits and the 
osier bed with a view to 
developing the land commer- 
cially. 

Drainage of the plaintiffs' 
land was thereby impeded and 
some flooding occurred. 

Mr Harold Burnett. QC and 
Miss Susan Hunter for the 
plaintiffs; Mr lan McLaren for 
the defendants. 

HIS LORDSHIP said that the 
questions arose whether ihe 
owner or occupier ofhjgher land 
bad a right to discharge water 
percolating through or over his 
land into lower lying land; 
conversely, whether the owner 
or occupier of lower lying land 
was obliged to accept that water, 
or whether he was entitled to 
prevent it entering his land, 
i That question, surprisingly. 


otherwise pen it back, even 
though that might cause damage 
to the higher occupier. 

However. the lower 
occupier's right to pen hack the 
water was not absolute but 
subject to the qualification that 
such rejection of water had to 
result from his reasonable user 
of the land. 

, In tbc present case the opera- 
tions carried out by the defen- 
dants which resulted in blocking 
off the natural drainage of the 
plaintiffs’ land were reasonable 
and accordingly the plaintiffs 
had not established nuisance. 

That left the allegation of 
trespass that the defendants 
squeezed water onto the 
plaintiffs' land by infilling their 
Own. thereby causing flooding. 

The flooding of the plaintiffs’ 
patio by squeezing water out of 
the clay pits and osier bed was 
reasonably foreseeable and tres- 
pass was accordingly established 
against the defendants. 

Solicitors: Stone & Simpson. 
Leicester; Moss. Toone & 
Desne. Loughborough. 






































































SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUG] 


13 1986 


‘Sometimes I resent being so successful . . - it cuts you off from the others’ 


When not having to be best suits Cram 


In the second of three 
articles, Steve Cram tells 
Pat Butcher, Athletics 
Correspondent, why he 
looks forward to the day 
he can run carefree again 


F ame does not immediately ap- 
pear to have exacted too great a 
price from Sieve Cram, if not to 
make him. as a Sunderland 
supporter, a readily identifiable 
target for Newcastle fans. So far he has 
managed to stay as far ahead of the odd 
fracas as he has of his opponents on the 
track. “But it’s been close a couple of 
times." he says. “Tve had one or two try 
to thump me. Bui no. I have changed. 
You get hardened by events and people. 
I*m a lot harder than l was. and it doesn i 
necessarily make you a better person. Jt 
makes you a little too wary of people. 

That wariness is evident from the 
wonderfully hollow telephone 'hello' he 
employs, doubtless honed on a legion of 
determined news reporters. His im- 
pression of the speaking clock is dropped 
when he hears a vaguely familiar voice. 
But then there is an awkward silence at 
the suggestion of coming to his house to 
do an interview. Cram is a private fellow. 
The hotel-restaurant near his home in a 
village outside Newcastle is suitably 
quiet. 

A thousand words on Steve Cram. The 
Personality? Even he blinked. "Do you 
mean my’ vices? Plenty!" But hardly 
enough to keep those news reporters out 
of ihe bar. What is getting booked for a 
traffic offence, or having a little too 
much champagne after running a world 
record, or dancing on a table when all the 
stuffed shins have gone home from a 
reception, when the only other com- 
parably leading sports stars are making 
rude remarks about royalty, or publicly 
admitting to drug-taking?"! suppose J 
lead a reasonably quiet existence really. 
Cram said, almost apologetically. "The 
nice thing about living up here is that 
you're out of the way. I go down to 
London a lot during the winter and after 
two or three days you're getting caught 
up in iU and going here, there, and 
evervwhcre. I think, Christ, if! lived here 
all the lime. I’d be a wreck." 

But the advantage of coming from a 
solid family background, and marrying 
your childhood sweetheart, of having a 
select group of friends, and the same 
coach for 1 5 years, makes for the sort of 
stable existence that is necessary for a 
career in top-class athletics, a sport 
which cannot be faked. As Frank Duffy, 
the dearly-departed Donegal coach to the 
great Irish half-miler. Noel Carroll, used 

SWIMMING 



High profile: Cram enjoys one of his private moments — ‘The nice thing about living up here is that you're out of the way’ (Photograph: Chris Smith) 


to say with a sly smile: "The basis of 
good athletic performance is regularity — 
do what, or who. you did the night 
before." 

Accordingly, Cram goes out every 
Monday night for a drink with the lads, 
led by Brendan Foster, his mentor and 
ostensible employer at the sports cloth- 
ing company which sponsors him; he has 
two or three outings a week with his wife, 
Karen, and friends, plays a couple of 
rounds of golf (handicap? “I shoot 90. so 
IS I suppose. I'll never be world-class") 
and three or four games of snooker 
(maximum break. 35). 

I also play soccer and cricket as 
often as I can in season. I'm a great 
sports enthusiast all round. Not 
having to be the best is nice 
although, having said that, I am very 
competitive." His young training part- 


ner. David Sharpe, can testily to that. 
Sharpe, the world junior 800 metres 
chamRjon and the only youngster Cram 
can see with any chance of emulating 
himself, has got so good at snooker this 
summer that he had a run of about 10 
winning games against Cram recently. 
“He wouldn't let us leave until he won a 
frame.” Sharpe said innocently. "And 
not for the first time they were late for 
training." added their coaching adviser, 
Jimmy Hedley. 

it still sounds like the anodyne 
existence which invites the occasional 
indiscretion. A local restaurant staff 
thought they were privy to such an event 
a couple of months ago when Cram’s 
wife, who tries to keep out of the 
limelight as much as possible, paid fora 
meal by a credit card with her maiden 
name on it “When we left it was: 'Good 
night Mr Cram, good night Miss Waters.' 


I just creased up and said to Karen: ‘Hey, 
I can take anyone I want there now." A 
lot of his early days as a celebrity were 
spent in rebuffing opportunities to 
capitalize on his ferae. He has a six-figure 
breakfast cereal contrad but there can- 
not be too many people in his position 
still making more from his sport than 
from the spin-offs. 

M ost of my money comes 
from races. A lot of 
commercials and personal 
appearances are not some- 
thing 1 want to spend my 
lime doing. You can only spend so much 
money and, with my Socialist back- 
ground. I already find it difficult to 
justify earning as much as I do.*The 
result of that diffidence and now, even 
greater feme, has pushed Cram into a 
limbo. “I seem to be in less demand. 1 
think people feel that once you’re 


superstar level, they think you're 
untouchable. I think I've almost reached 
that stage."And that has contributed to a 
realization that stardom can be solitary. 
At its simplest level, it manifests itself for 
Cram in not having enough friends to 
play golf and snooker with: “They’re all 
at work.” 

And it also impinges on his sport. “I 
look forward to the day when I can run 
my races a little more carefree, enjoying 
the whole business of going to races, and 
being with the lads. Because that side of 
it. I enjoy as much as anything. And I 
sometimes resent being so successful 
because to a certain extent it cuts you off 
from the others, and they s ometim es 
look upon you as something different to 
what they are. That’s why I like going to 
Colorado (for three weeks altitude 
training each spring). I have this mate 
who keeps a bar. All sorts of wend people 
come in and I can talk to them all night. 


And I'm just introduced as ‘Sieve irom 

a howl 

could 

“ *5? 3? retrieved . from 

f He 'smiled resignation al 
ihcecin hold-up and complied. He then 
waltedwwaids a white Mercedes sports- 
SSSch was parked as .MennUowN » 
XK skirted around it and got mio 
an anony mous saloon, and drove off. 

0 Coprf>flM Pa* Butc& 8r ' 

( biography ) 


Born October 14. Gates- 
head- educated at Janow 
Orammar School and 
Newcastle Poly ..technic 
(BA in Sports studies), 
joined Jarrow and 

fSSiin English Schools 

EWn 

3m in 47.7 SOC [Of L500m. 
Worid best rrute time of 
3 min 57.43S6C for a 17- 

^uropean Junior 3.000m 
htie m Bmin 05.2sec: ran 
mile in 3m in 57.03sec. 
Eighth in Olympics 1500m 
iiiSmin 42-Osec; ran mite in 
3min 53.8sec. 

Third m European Cup 
Final 1.500m. 

Won 1,500m gold medals 
in European champion- 
ships (3mln 36.49SBC) and 
Commonwealth Games 
(3mm 42.37 sec); _ ran 
mftein 3rrJn 49.90sec. 
Member of world 4 x 800m 
record-breaking British re- 
lay team. 

Won 1.500m at first world 
championships in 3mm 
41.59 sbc European Cup 
Final in 3mm 4227sec; 

Married Karen Waters. 

Silver medal in Olympic 
Games 1.500m in 3mm 
33.40sec. 

World 1.500m record of 
3mm 29.67sec in Nice 
(July 16). subsequently 
broken by Said Aouita, of 
Morocco, in 3mm 29.45 
sec: set world mile record 
of 3mm 4&32sec in Oslo 
(July 27) and 2.000 metres 
m 4mm 51.39 sec in Buda- 


GOLF: DRAMATIC FINISH IN THE 68TH PGA CHAMPIONSHIP 


pest on August 4. making 
a total of three world 
records In 19 (toys. 

1986 Won Commonwealth 800 
metres (Imin 43.22sec) 
and 1.500 metres ( 3 min 
50.87 sec). 

TOMORROW 

His ambition is to 
be the best 
there has ever been 


HOCKEY 


East-West summit 
inspires champions 


Tway steps out of the shade 
and into the limelight 


Madrid (Reuter) — Michael 
Gross, of West Germany, leads 
a 2.000-sirong cast as swimmers 
from East and West, kept apart 
by successive Olympic boycotts, 
contest the world champion- 
ships which open here today. 
Gross and champions of the 
calibre of ihe American Man 
Biondi and Vladimir Salnikov, 
of ihe Soviet Union, guarantee 
excitement in the 10 days of 
competition in a brand-new 
pool. 

The swimmers enter the fray 
on Sunday, the prelude to their 
appearance provided by the 
synchronized competition, wa- 
ter polo and diving. More than 
60 nations are taking part in 
these fifth world championships 
— an event inaugurated in 1973 
when the East German women 
made their spectacular world- 
beat mg breakthrough in Bel- 
grade. and last contested in 
Guayaquil. Ecuador in 1982. 

The Olympic boycotts, which 
kepi ihe Americans away from 
Moscow in 1^80 and most of the 
Soviet bloc away from Los 
Angeles four yeans later, have 
given the world championships 
an extra edge as the one East- 
West swimming summit of the 
198tis. 

1 1 accounts for the continued 
presence of Salnikov, who had 
planned to quit following the 
Los Angeles Games but changed 
his mind after the boycott 
denied him a chance of winning 
the Olympic 400 and 1.500 
metres titles a third time. 
Salnikov, aged 26. a veteran in 
the youthful world of swim- 
ming. now attempts an equally 
astonishing world champion- 
ship treble following his tri- 
umphs o\cr both distances in 
|97S and 1982. 

The world championships in 
Guayaquil saw the emergence of 
Gross, then an 18-year-old stu- 
dent who upstaged more fancied 
Americans to win the 200m 
freestyle and 200m butterfly 
titles. Gross collected a record 
six gold medals at last year's 
European championships in So- 
fia and w ill compete in the same 
events here - 200m freestyle, 
100 and 200 butterfly and three 
relays. This rules out a dash 
with Salnikov over 400m — the 
distance at which the West 


German has taken over the 
Soviet swimmer's world record. 

Rainer Henkel, a team col- 
league of Gross, could be 
Salnikov's biggest threat, having 
returned the fastest times over 
both 400 and 1.500m this year. 

Biondi. the revelation of 
1985. underlined his supremacy 
in the freestyle sprints when he 
set world records over 50 and 
100m in Orlando two months 
ago. The American, aged 20. is 
also third fastest in the world 
this year over 200m freestyle 
and second over 100m butterfly, 
in which Gross saw his world 
mark surpassed by the Ameri- 
can Pablo Morales, in Orlando. 

These championships mark 
the introduction of 50m free- 
style events and will give Ta- 
mara Costache. of Romania, a 
rare chance of thwarting the East 
Germans following her three ! 
world records over the distance 1 
this year. Other women with 
justifiable hope of defeating the ■ 
East Germans, who won 10 of 
the 14 swimming titles in 
Guayaquil . are Britain's , 
Commonwealth champion Sa- | 
rah Hardcasile in the 800m. the 1 
United States Olympic butterfly 
champion Mary Meagher, and 
compatriots Betsy Mitchell 
(backstroke) and Michelle 
GrigJione (200m individual 
medley). 

The American and Canadian 
women divided all the gold and 
silver medals in the syn- 
chronized swimming — the 
aquatic equivalent of ice danc- 
ingand figure skating — in 1982 
and can be expected to domi- 
nate again. The sum of the 
synchronized figures pro- 
gramme gives the champion- 
ships an early send-off today 

before the official opening cere- 
mony in the Plaza de Toros bull- 
ring m the evening. 

Greg Louganis. the 
Amcricanworld and Olympic 

highboard and springboard 
champion, should maintain his 
supremacy in the diving. The 
women's springboard opens the 
diving programme on Friday. 
The water polo gels underway 

tomorrow as ihe Soviet Union 
defend rhe men's title they won 
in 1982 and. for the firsl lime, a 
women's tournament is being 
held. 


Bob Tway's final-round vic- 
tory over Greg Norman in the 
rain-delayed PGA Champion- 
ship may have been dramatic, 
but it was no surprise. 

In only his second season on 
the United States tour, the 
American, aged 27, has been 
shadowing Norman all the way. 
with the big. blond Australian 
and the pencil-thin Tway first 
and second respectively on the 
tour's earnings list. Before 
Monday's exciting climax, when 
Tway holed a bunker shot for a 
birdie on the final hole to win 
his first major championship 
and SI 40.000 (around £95.000). 
each had woo three 

tournaments. 

“Greg's victories are probably 
better than mine because be 
won the British Open — there is 
more pressure in the majors," 
Tway had said before the tour- 
nament got under way at the 
Inverness Club in Toledo. Ohio. 

Bui after scoring a one-under- 
par 70 to Norman's 76. Tway 
passed the British Open cham- 
pion in terms of the number of 
tournaments won and matched 
him for major titles. Added to 
that Tway is the first player to 
win four tournaments on the 
lour since 1982. when it was 
achieved by his compatriots. 
Tom Watson. Craig Stadler and 
Calvin Peeie. 

In addition he has finished in 
the top 10 of eight other 
tournaments this year, earning 
around $600,000 in the process. 
Norman, who has eleven top-10 
finishes on the tour this year, 
has won almost $645,000. 

Tway did not fare well in the 
British Open at Turnberry. 
where he lied for 46th place. But 
he played well in the Masters 
and United States Open, where 
he led after the first round with a 
level-par 70 shot in gale-force 


winds at Shinn ecock Hills, and 
shared eighth place in both. In 
contrast to Norman, Tway has 
come from behind on the final 
day in each of his victories. 

Starting out in joint 46th 
place after an opening 72. Tway 
moved into 16th place with a 
second-round 70 and then 
jumped into second place with a 
course-record 64, eclipsing that 
set by Norman on the first day. 
It was a position from which be 
was poised to strike —and did so 
in convincing style. 

“The better guy won and he 
deserves it," Norman said. “It 
was just one of those days." He 
has had several bad days this 
year. He also led the Masters 
and the US Open after three 
rounds, only to falter in the 
closing stages. He finished sec- 
ond al Augusta and shared 
twelfth place at Shinnecock 
Hills. 

Even if Tway never wins 
another major title, which 
seems highly unlikely, he will 
long be remembered for his 
electrifying finish at Inverness. 
“I wasn't trying to make it." he 
said of his spectacular bunker 
shot. “I was just trying to get it 
close to the hole. For it to go in 
was unbelievable^" 

“Bob did the right thing at the 
right time," Norman said. 
Norman's ball was buried in 
deep rough just off the green 
when his rival's exploded out of 
the sand and rolled into the 
hole. The Australian, who had 
made some outstanding chips 
during the tournament, had no 
choice but to try to pitch his ball 
in too. But his effort rolled past 
the hole and he took two puns, 
missing par and picking up 
$80,000 for finishing runner-up. 

FINAL SCORES (US unless Stand) 27B: R 
Twav. 72. 70.64.70 27fcG NocmsnfAusL 
6S. 66, 69. 76. 279: PJacotosen. 68. 70. 70. 
71 2MfcDAWefcrtna71.72.Ga.69.28l! 


PStewart. 70. 67. 72. 72: B listzka. 69. 71. 
70. 71. 282: D Graham (Aus). 75, 68. 71. 
67: J Thorpe. 71 . 67. 73. 71 ; M Hubert. 69. 
6a 74. 71. 283e D Tewet 73. 71. 6& 71. 
284: L Trmno71. 74. 69. 70: LNWsen 73. 

69. 72. 70; B Crenshaw. 72. 73, 72. 67; L 
WatSons 71. 75. 70. 68: D Hammond. 70. 
71, 68. 75. 28S: J Nickiaus. 70. 68. 72. 75; 
C Beck 71. 73. 71. 70: T Watson. 72. 69. 

72. 72; A Sifts. D Pootev. 71. 74. 68. 71. 
288: H Sutton 73. 71. 70. 72; W Grady 
(Aus). 68. 76. 71. 71: C StadlBr 67. 74. 73, 
74; C Pawt. 71. 72. 70. 73; R Black. 6a 71. 
74. 73: D Frost. 70. 71 66. 75. 287: H Irwin 
76. 70. 73. 68. T Kite 72. 73. 71. 71; OPo hi 
71 . 71 . 74 . 71 ; K Green. 71 . 72. 71 . 73. 288: 
I Woosnam (GB). 72. 70. 75. 71; J Stamen 
70. 71. 76. 71; C Poate. 72. 73. 69. 74; K 
Graea 71 . 72. 71 . 74; c Stadler. 67. 74. 73. 
74; G Sauers. 69. 73. 70. 76; W LM. 68. 

73. 71.76. 289: 1 Acid (Jnen). 73. 69. 74. 
73; B Upper 71 . 73. 72. 7$B Gardner 72, 
73. 71.73: F Canties ES. 73, 72. 75: M 
Lye, 72. 71. 70. 7& 29ft H Green. 75. 70. 
74. 71 : S Hoch 72. 70, 75. 73; J Mudd. 72. 
73. 73. 72: M Reid 71. 73. 70. 76: B 
Wtadkms. 69. 74. 70. 77: S Simpson. 70. 
70. 75. 75. 291: D Barr (Can). 71. 73. 73. 
74; H Mdttrie 73. 70. 74. 74: 292: B GMer 
69. 75. 7a 75: D Low 70. 72. 72, 77: M 
Wrebe 75. 67. 72. 77; T Nakalma (Japan). 

71. 73. 71. 76: M Donald. 7^69. 7175. 
282: J SmdeSar 74. 72. 73. 73; J Cook 71, 
72. 75. 74; M SuBvan 72. 73. 74. 73. P 
Black mar 67. 73. 79. 73: D Stockton 70. 
75. 74. 73; L-Mize 69. 76. 75, 72: J Haas 
69. 77. 74. 72. M McCumber. 71. 74. 68. 
79: C Rose. 73. 71. 72. 76: S Pate. 76,69. 
71.76: A Bean. 74. 70. 72. 76: R Gilder. 69. 
75. 73, 75. 293: J Stair 72. 74. 72. 75. 294: 
G Koch 68. 77. 74. 75. 2SS: L dements 71 . 
75. 72. 77. 296: D Edwards 72. 69. 7a 79. 
287: B Mivpfty 73. 73. 7*. 77. 296: K 
Brown (GB). 7*£ 73. 72. 80. 299: D Watson 
ja»^71. 74 77 77. 30Q: J C Snead 70, 7a 

Sinn in front 

Santa Cruz. California (Reu- 
ter) — Pearl Sinn, aged 19. an 
American student, had a rwo- 
over-par 74 on Monday to take 
the first-round lead in the 
qualifying stages of the 86th US 
women's amateur champion- 
ship on the ‘ difficult Pasa 
Tiempo course. “My putting 
saved me all day and I'm not the 
best putter in the world." the 
South Korean-born Sinn said. 

Nine players came in with 
75s. including Michiko Hatton, 
of Japan, the defending 
champion. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

Tour match 

EDGBASTON: TCCB XI v New 
Zealanders. 

NatWest Trophy 
Semi-finals 
(11.0. GO overs) 

THE OVAL: Surrey v Lancashire 
WORCESTER: Worcestershire v 
Sussex. 

MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Mardc Cam&ndgesmre v Nonhumber- 
larw: Shrewsbury: Salop u Oxlarstare: 
Reading CC: Berksfue « Devon: 
Brewood: Staffordshire v Suffolk: 
Chippenham: Yttlsmre u Buckhamsfwe. 
SECOND XI CHAMPIONSHIP: Hasting* 
Sussex v Surrey: Moacfar CC: Warvnck- 
s fwe v Mtddtosex. Marne: Yorkshire v 
Lancashire 

FOOTBALL 

7.30 unless staled 

Scottish premier division 

Aberdeen v Hibernian 
Clyde Dank V Dundee IM 


Dundee v St Mirren 
Hearts v Hamilton 
Motherwell v Celtic 
Rangers v Falkirk 

Scottish first division 
Airdrie v Brechin 
Clyde v Queen of Sth 
Dumbarton v Dunfermline 
Forigr v Parti ck 
Kilmarnock v Morton 
Montrose v E Fife 

OTHER SPORT 

ATHLETICS: SCAAA open meeting (at 
Crystal Palace NSC). 

CROQUET: Nottingham tournament. 
GOLF: Peugeot Tatoot PGA assistant's 
cnampnnsmp lai Sand Moor GO. English 
woman's intermediate champtarahp (at 
Hexham GO: British girls' open amateur 
champwnshp (at West KSmde GCh 
British boys' champongtnps (at Seaton 
Cwml 

LAWN TENNIS: Prudential Sussex open 
(at Wear wont/mg LTCl 






Jfg •'sS'v.. .'-"13:^3^ 

- * 



W inning shot: Bob Tway plays himself into the history books at the PGA Championship 


Gracious 
Norman’s 
patience 
wears thin 

Greg Norman, as gracious 
in defeat as in victory, had , 
tittle tune, however, for ; 
suggestions that he has a 
tendency to choke when in a J 
winning position, j 

After going into the final | 
round of the PGA Champion- j 
ship with a four-shot lead over 1 
Bob Tway and, more to the 
point leading by the same 
margin with just eight holes to 
play, the Australian was even- 
tually beaten on the last hole 
by his American rival's stun- 
ning bunker shot 

Yet despite leading each of 
the four major tournaments 
before the final day's play and 
winning only one of them — the 
Open at Turnberry — Norman 
said be was happy with the 
way his season had unfolded. 
Asked if *rthe monkey" was 
a gain on his back, be replied: 
“What do yon guys want? Yon 
are never satisfied. Face it. 
You know I did a hell of a job 
today. 

“Bob Tway just won the golf 
tournament 1 don't under- 
stand you guys. Don't go 
saying the monkey's back on 
my back. Til probably win 
next week and the week 
following that" Then, getting 
up to leave, Norman looked at 
the reporter who had raised 
the issue and said: “T h a nks 
for ruining a good Press 
conference.*’ 

Peter Jacobsen, who fin- 
ished third, wasted little time 
in defending Norman. He said: 
“Let me just say it's a bell of a 
lot better to have been there 
and tried than to have never 
been there at alL Greg Nor- 
man is possibly one of the 
classiest individuals ever to 
play this game." 

Jacobsen, grouped with 
Tway and Norman for the 
final round, added: “When be 
says that a lot of times the 
media isn't satisfied, he's not 
saying 100 per cent of the 
media. Bnt there are few 
people who, for some reason, 
always want to write about the 
bad things. . 

“ I don't see anything but 
the good things in golf when 
yon see two guys like Tway 
and Norman corning down the 
stretch playing the game the 
way it’s meant to be played, 

giving it back and forth to each 
other. That’s wonderfnL 

“The way he won the British 
Open is a lot the way Bob 
Tway won this tournament. It 
was destiny. He knows it, he 
recognizes it. Tway's bunker 
shot went in and Norman 
missed his shot. But % big 
smile came across Greg's fece 
and he shook Bob’s hand . . .1 
don't see things like that in 
other sports-" 


Bolland makes the 
big step forward 


By Sydney Frisian 


England's selectors left noth- 
ing to chance when announcing 
ihe squad yesterday for the two 
matches against Belgium at 
Bisham Abbey on August 23 
and 24. Except for Paul Bolland, 
the party is full of seasoned 
campaigners. 

Bolland. who shone in 
England’s defence at the Junior 
World Cup tournament at 
Vancouver in August of 1985. 
has since been on three, ex- 
peditions with the Great Britain 
squad spending most of his 
time on the bench. 

Fourteen of the 16 players, 
including Bolland. who were 
chosen by England for the 
match against Ireland last Janu- 
ary in London are back in 
business, the two omissions 
being Craig who withdrew for 
personal reasons and Duthie 
whose ankle injury on Sunday 
has put him out of the World 
Cup tournament starting in 
London on October 4. Their 
places have been taken by 
Dodds who was not available 
for the match against Ireland 
and Shaw, of Southgate. 

Thus. there is little scope for 
experimenting against Belgium 
who are not in the World Cup. 


Unless injury and business 
problems arise England's ul- 
timate choice for the World Cup 
now seems fairly predictable. 

Of the notable omissions are 
the younger players: Clark, 
Ferns. Gordon. Jennings, Knott. 
Skinner. Swayne and the two 
goalkeepers Rowlands and 
Steve Taylor, ail of whom now 
appear to have little chance of 
selection. 


aKSLAND SOUAO: P Barter (Sough): S 
Batchelor (Southgate): K Bhaura (fndun 
Gym): P BoRand (Yortc): R Cftlt (Houns- 
low); R Dodds (Southgate); D Faulkner 
IHavam): M GrMey (Brooklands): N 
Hughes (WakeHekftj Hunt (St Albans): S 
Keriy (Southgate); R Leman (East 
Gmstead): J rotter (Hounslow): J Staw 
(Southgate): I Sbenmi (Stone): I Taylor 
(East dm stead). 

• David Whitaker, the England 
team coach, will receive a new 
car from Slazenger Ltd. the 
international sports goods com- 
pany. when he begins his duties 
as director of coaching for the 
HockeyAssociation on Novem- 
ber l. This is pan of Siazenger's 
three-year sponsorship of En- 
glish hockey which begins with 
support for the World Cup 
tournament in London and also 
for the senior international 
coaches symposium to be held 
in London at the same time. 


SPEEDWAY 


Nielsen is plotting to 
overthrow the kin g 


By Keith Macklin 


On the track, as members of 
Denmark's all-conquering 
squad, Erik G undersen and 
Hans Nielsen are partners, 
friends and loyal colleagues. Yet 
a bitter rivalry exists between 
these two peat riders when they 
become individuals. 

Nielsen smarts inwardly at 
the fact that for the past two 
years he has finished behind the 
brilliant and virtually unbeat- 
able G undersen in the world 
individual championship. At 
other meetings, and in other 
championships, G undersen has 
invariably had the edge, even 
when the margin of victory has 
been as slender as half a wheel 

Nielsen desperately wants to 
overtake his fellow countryman 
as the world’s top rider and he 
has taken the remarkable step of 
virtually following around the 
world the former world cham- 
pion Ivan Mauger. of New 
Zealand, to help him in bis 
quest. Mauger was six times 
world champion and bestrode 
the world of speedway in the late 
1960s and early 1970s in a 
manner that Gundersen threat- 
ens to rival in the 1 980s. 

Nielsen believes that coaching 
and advice from Mauger. ana 
his presence in the pits at 
Kaiowice. in Poland, on August 
30. can help him beat the 
exasperating, controversial and 
at times arrogant Gundersen. 
The trainer of the Meat English 
Olympic Sprinter. Harold Abra- 
hams. told him that he could 


“give him a couple of yards" 
Nielsen believes that Mauger’s" 
tutelage can give him half a 
wheel. 

However. Gundersen may al- 
ready have trumped Nielsen's 
ace. He will have alongside him 
m “ ie < , K ^towice pits another 
major figure in the sport and a 
former three times world cham- 
pion in his fellow Dane. Ole 
Olsen. Many people believe that 
Gundersen s flair and feel of 
skills need no augmenting but 
Ulsens guidance and support 
“ av ® already proved invaluable' 
to the fiery Erik. 

The English rider. Kelvin 
Tatum, will also have the back- 
rng of a world champion on the 
Dig day. Tatum's mentor will be 
Barry Briggs, another New Zea- 
lander. but even his vast experi- 
ence is unlikely to put Tatum in 
ine same bracket as the iwo 
invincible Danes 

Meanwhile, the English squad 
nave a chance next weekend to 

S^ son ¥ lhin * from a ^ 

™“ na f l season by showing 
improved form in the world 
should avoid 
the humiliation and misery of 

fe- 10 Group B and. with 

S‘l E ' m ^ d,n 8 on his homc 

^ un j c,cn t points should 
?? Sft me red io avoid the drop. 

S27 Ver * Jeremy Doncaste r fca 
1 m!** V 3un8 man to keep his 
notching three points 
Ii. tlrsl l . wo w ortd team cup 
Denmark. S “ cd '" *" d 


4 .. v 

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SPORT 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


RACING: RACECOURSES LINK-UP INFORMATION SERVICES PROVIDED BY RACECALL 


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strides to what looks like being 
his fifth jockey’s championship 
title today by winning the first 
two races at Salisbury on 
Hawaran . Cat (2.0) and All. 
Smith (2J0). 

When flawawtan Cat he 
made his racecourse debut al 
Newbury last month be was 
beaten six lengths ralo second 
place by Bellono. But I suggest 
that be was far from disgraced 
on that occasion because 
Befiotxo came to the course with 
the reputation Of being Jeremy 
Tree's fastest two-year-old coft. 

Bellono duly lived op to that 
high flying reputation, and ft 
wm be bad luck indeed if the 
connections of Hawaian Cat 
come across one so smart in the 
Ampoit Maiden Stakes today. 

At Newbury Hawaian Cat 
finished three lengths ahead of 
the third horse home, with the 
test of a big field wdl strung out 
behind. In the circumstances I 
think that he ought to be capable 
of beating Mashbub even 
though be shaped like another- 
likely winner, sired by that 
exciting young stallion Sbarpo. 
at Windsor where he was beaten 
only a head by Jovick. 

The form of Ascot's Granville 
Stakes, which is always some- 
thing of an unknown quantity 
simply because h is restricted to 
two-year-olds who have never 
run will be put to the test when 
Ali Smhh contests the EBF 
Rockboume Slakes. Al Ascot 
Ali Smhh started the outsider of 
five but he made mockery of the 
betting by finishing a highly 
creditable second to the second 
favourite Naheez. The well-bred 
newcomers Sharp Victor and 
Nettle could easily prove more 
troublesome, than Last Dance 
who only managed a dead beat 
with Copper Red at Sandown 
Park last time out. 

Otherwise it could pay to 
follow the fortunes of Gerald 
Cornell today. Admirers of the 
skillful Cullomplon trainer have 
plenty to choose from because 
he will have runners in four of 
the races at the Wiltshire track. 
While conceding that Talk Of 
Glory has a lot going for him in 
the H S Lester Memorial Chal- 
lenge Cup. I still fed that 
Cottrell's best chances are with 
Sonny Match (3.0) and Fey dan 
(4.30). 


before finishing a dose second, 
running on. 


race ironically enough at Salis- 
bury when he finished third to 
Paragraph and Star Of A 
Gunner, 

After that good run behind 
Come On The Blues at 
Goodwood he is napped to von 
the Bournemouth Handicap at 
the expense of Coomayjo, who 
won this race 12 months ago. 
The recent Newmarket winner 
Mr Rose who has been 
penalised for his pains. Fey dan’s 
Goodwood race was over a mile. 
Before that he bad ran well at 
Salisbury to finish a dose fourth 
behind Out Of Hand, Gold 
Prospect and Lonely Street over 
only six furlongs. To me all that 
suggests that today's distance of 
seven furlongs could weB be 
ideal for him.. 

Stable companion 
Match had not shown 
ting a di 

behind Angels Are 
Blue at Bath last time oul Hot 
race was run after the weights 
for today's Hommgton Handi- 
cap was framed. It was a step np 
on anything that Sunny Match 
had achieved before, and now 1 
feel that this is a golden opportu- 
nity to take full advantage of 
what appears to he a decent 
handicap. 

Impressive though Plymouth 
Hoe's racing record is. I still 
doubt whether Luca Cumani's 
unbeaten winner of races at 
Canerick Bridge and Carlisle 
can cope with Wassl Reef m the 
Man ton EBF Stakes. 

Today’s course 
specialists 

SALISBURY 

TRAINERS L Oman. 9 Miw from 23 
runrws. 39.1%; G Harwood. 42 turn ISA 
27.3V W Ham. W taw 96. 1 Afi%. 
JOCKEYS: G Starkey. 41 wtrmas from 
159 rates. 24,3%: W Carson. 33 from 142. 
232V Pat Eddery. 27 from 154. 17.5V 

CATTERICK BRIDGE 
TRAINERS: L Gunani. 9 winners from IB 
runners. 5&3V P Cole. 7 from 16. 43.8%: 
Jtrnmy RtzgeraH. 8 from 20. 400%. 
joercrenr MS. 21 winners from 93 
ndes. 22£V N Day. 9 from 40. 225V G 
DuftaicL 40 from 229. 17.5%; S Perks. 17 
from 138. 125%. 

FONTWELL PARK 

TRAINERS: S Woodman. 19 winners from 
99 runners, 192V Mrs N Smith. 23 from 
127. 101V J Gifford, 42. from 240, 
17.1V 

JOCKEYS PScudamore. 14 wi nn ers from 
67 rides. 21 JO%i S Sherwood. 7 from 35, 
20.0V R Dunwoody. 17 from 100, 17.0%, 



j »w-- 

Snap Decision, who runs In the Homingtoo Handicap at Salisbury today 


Scottish Reel 
leads strong 
British raid 

Despite the absence of the star 
three-year-old miler Sonic Lady, 
the British challenge for 
Sunday's Prix du Haras 
Fresnay-Ie-Bufiferd Jacques Le 
Marois at Deauville still looks, 
like being a strong one. 

Scottish Reef, trained by Mi 
cbael Stoute. looks the pick of 
the likely English runners for 
this important mile event. Re- 
cently Scottish Reel finished an 
excellent second to his stable 
companion Sonic Lady, in the 
Swettcnham Stud Sussex Stakes 
at Goodwood, and on this 
running ft must give hnn a good 
chance. 

The ground at Goodwood 
that day was much firmer than 
he would like. Also in the race 
was Efisio. who is a possible 
runner. 


CATTERICK BRIDGE 


Going: good 

Draw: low numbers best 


HANDICAP 


2.15 LEVY BOARD APPRENTICE 

(£953.90: 5f) (19 runners) 

1 0112 MUSIC MACnNE(DXBf)P Hasten S'lD-SymO^ g 

2 0104 PBtGOOA(8VD]l VidceraS-ICH} RVk*aa@10 

7 0000 KAHBre STAR (D)DW Chapman 9-94 N Inch (9 12 

8 4000 BAY BAZAAR (D) M W EastHty 4-0-4~ SHuMter{5}6 

11 0303 PHJLSTAR (VHD) A Bakting 59-1 — > 

12 2024 LADY CARA P) J Barry 890 JC«rro*(3)1 

13 040 UGHT ANGLE (VXUSAJ 0]} G Cahart 5-8-13 


15 0020 POKEHFAYES m(USA) B McMahon 77-12 

GDafMHO 

18 0004 GARQAS GOLD M Bnttain 3-7-12 KDwtey2 

17 -000 TREE fELLADW Chapman 9-7-11 APraudl 

20 0040 FOREVER TMQOHWtipng 4-7-9 Lfbggtems 

21 004 CLASS HOPPER W &ey ?7-S S Downs (7) 15 

22 004 GOOD H SHARP GCaMn 5-7-8 SPQrtffiHttll 

23 0000 NIPPY CHPPY PWH M W Eastarhy 3-7-7 _ J Lowe 4 

24 2000 LA saLE OF SANTO Denys Smith 3-7-7 LCframock 10 

25 3024 GOLDEN IXSCM Camacho 4-7-7 N Ry 13 

9-4 BBS Ahead, 3-1 Krtehts 

6-1 Pokerfeyas. 10-1 GotearDfec. Young Bruss. 16-1 


.Secret, 5-1 


15 0003 SILBANDOR Carter 40-11. 


nd makes f 
step fonvaii 


N Rodgers {^4 

17 4040 PARADEGWL(b)JKo ate W O l4- 07 — — 17 

19 0003 TnCENCOmw Sorey 4-86 — JnBeBwefcerCSJIS 

20 2041 CAPTAMfS BPD (D| H WOBeg 6-8-4 (7erj) ||( . 4 

21 -800 EVER SO SHMPJP Smhh M4 

24 MOD TRADESatAN JHfrdapaS-Sg, , ..>■ JfliteelB 

25*2023- WES8REE BAY N Bycroft 4-7-1? _ M HM a ideen {$1 

26 0000 LAST SECRET (mdO)DW Ch^ran 5^2^ # 

27 COM aRMPCMEBtDWOnpnan*7<— 

28 0000 ACKA'S BOYD Moftaft 4-7-4- — P.Btenp}2 

30 0000 BLOCHARNSKOlARmN ^croft 87-7 _ 

AamdaByqaftmiS 

31 0233 PONCLE CREAK G Moore 3-7-7.. SWaodffl.19 

7-2 PuodB Creak, 9-2 CaptteYs Bktdi 5-1 Music Machine, 

7-1 Wastroe Bay. 10-1 Trtcenco, SSbanda, 14-1 Lady Cara. 
TradBBnwi. 1W PWstw. 20-1 others. 


3.45 PADDOCK HOUSE MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES 
(2-Y-O: £822: 5Q (21) 

1 0002 BAY WONDER G PlfeftartfGanJoR 8-11. GDuflMd12 
3 BMGOOH BOLDBtS B McNteten B-11 — 3 

8 0000 JEAN JEAMEJRowteteS 8-11 DMehoblS 

9 LEWISTA E WBymes 8-11 — J flUeecfrla 10 

10 233 MARMBAJ Winter 8-11 WR O w tebnu t 

11 2242 MDKZEN LASS MBdaan 8-11 KDwtey17 

12 404 MISS MANAGEMENT MWEasterby 8-11 K Hodgson 11 

- 13 MOf094DMcCan8-11 LCtamoexS 

15- OAK FELD JHiicten 8-11 JOte»tS)1S 

17 ' 2" PARADISE COFFS O DOMb 8-1T» Ttthnp7 

18 000 PETANGQ p) E Alston 8-11 AMacfcayT3 

19 4202 PRENBER nDBlJ Bony 8-11 JCamomB 

20 00 PRODKaOUS IA0YW ArvraB-11 EGontaU 


04 RABffiOW TROUT UCtenecho 8-11- NCooeononB 

00 ROSE OFTIBXJR J GtorerB-IU DMcKaownT 

000 HOMES IMAGE JJelfamn 8-11 A States (5) 9 

BOO SEKDtel ON SAM M W Easterly 8-11— MHtedteylfi 


40 STARCH BROOK R ■■ 
03 STYUSHGW L L ffggotl B-11. 


14-11. 


State 21 

.TftralO 


Catterick selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Silbando.2.45 Patriotic. 3.15 Young Brass. 
3.45 Paradise Coffee. 4.15 Relatively Easy. 4.45 
Astral. 5.15 Wessex. - 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15 Music Machine. 2.45 Patriotic 3.15 
Pommes Chateau. 3.45 Paradise Coffee- 4.15 
Relatively Easy. 4.45 Admirals AIL 
By'Miduid Sedy 

2.J5 CAPTAIN'S BIDD (nap). 4.45 Astral. 

2j 45 TILTON HOUSE SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£951: 1m 5f IMyd) (8) 

1 4-40 ANDREA'S PRIDE A 5iAB> 9-0 S Webster 7 

2 0340 MRE LORD GMocm 94 SVteodgl 


29 . 43 TEAQ®rSGAMEK Brassev 8-U„ StateMrthli 

30 0 VERYAN8AY(USmBF)M wpicteiS0nB-11 JLiwel 
5-4 Marimba. 7-2 Rainbow Trout 11-2 Paradfce Cotteo, 

7-1 Bay Wonder, 8-1 Mnizen Lass. ID-1 o thers. 

4.15 SKYRAM HANDICAP (3YO: £1.707; 1m 5f 
180 yd) ( 12 ) 


3 -000 TIBER GATE RHOfrnshead 94 

4 -000 Fite BABYG Harman 8-11 

5 ODOO GROVHX1TEP MBUrr 8-11 

6 HEtSEYSPEEDJ Parkas 811 

7 044 PATRIOTIC M Prescott 811 

8 -000 SUNLIT C Thornton 811 

82 Patriotic, 81 Andreal. Prida. 


SI 

JBM Eads (7)2 
WRStabvnS 

J Qatar (9 8 

GDuthad4 

— Jflte—rWeB 
9-2 Fire Lord. 


2 

t 3002 RHODE ISLAND RED (V) J W Watts 9-2 NCcwnottoo9 

5 4031 gVBIHILSftkV) Jimmy RtzgerNd 82 

6 2000 CHEVET LADY RMutefcar 813 KBmdafrawS 

7 4200 GG MAGIC (OXClDMoriay 813 MBtafaS 

8 084 COLQURF1BD mK Brassey 810 — SWWworibll 

9 0000 HITQ«ST0nN(B)DMcCaai81D LChemockl 

11 0400 PiNTURfCCMA E Mesa 8-6 MBfcacmftT 

12 0000 WTOAfflJEYtomesM S Webster 12 

14 0000 TRIAS LAD MC Chapman 7-10 J Outer (S) 6 

81 Sevan HBIs. 11-4 Relatively Easy- 81 Megan's Move. 
182 Cotourfieu. 81 Rhode Island Red. 181 SB Ma^c. 
281odrera. 

445 STOCKWELL MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £822; 
1m4f 40yd)(11) - . 

1 4030 ADMIRALS ALL J WWW 9-0 WR8tatan4 

2 M ASTRAL P Cole 94 TQtam2 

3 0 DALSAAMTO H Cotewalge 94 MBtanwrl 

4 88 DANCING FROBWJtewM E GoMt (3) 11 

8 MARETH LOC Jknmy Rtroarald 94 M Roberts 7 

10 444 MATBARYBJl Matthews SHt GOkkiBO 

►ROWAI 


11 -00Q TOPI 


rAWjonMM. 


MFryS 


81 Gmvecote. Ttoer Gate. 181 Sunfit, 181 Mereeyspeed. 
281 Fur Baby. 

3.15 TURN TO YORKSHIRE HANDICAP (£2376: 
71)<18) 

i 0210 OARWT(D)EWemWS 4-104 MTWrbOtt(7J3 

3 0310 WORKADAY <8DJCGr» 4-812 NCcm«tpo12 

4 4034 KMGHTS SECRET {CKDXBF) M H Easterly 5-811 . 

G Hindman*! (7) 7 

6 0O1O OTWLM0RE(USA)(BF)EWeyme5444 

E Guta (3)8 

8 1300 YOUNG BRUSS (IHJ Etharfmion 4-813—. MVjteodl? 

9 4412 BILLS AIEAO (DIG Moom 8810 RPE0MM6 

10 0004 POMMES CHATEAU (B) H CctagPdge 4-810 

MRaBMTi* 

13 0040 TRADE HIGH I viefters 7-84 DtOrtataS 

14 0444 ZPPgPWO(D)MtsCUoyd-Jones880 _ 

MMBMXMv)? 


13 0430 INDIAN LOVE SONG RHotershead 81 1— State 10 

14 000 JELLY JBJ.R Aten 811 C Dwyer 6 

15 0 LA DUSE L Ctmanl 811 HGwml 

16 ULK*YTASGNkrc*e811 RPEBoBS 

11-8 Admirals AB. 81 Dancing ftog. 82 Indtan Love Song, 

81 Astral. 81 Matbar. 181 Top Row” *81 others. 

5.15 MIDDLEBROOK MUSHROOM NORTHERN 
TRAINERS INVITATION RACE (1m 4f 40yd) (7) 

1 3401 WESSEX N Tatar 8124 N1Mter3 

2 4333 GOLDEN FANCY 1 Victors 8124 IVttml 

4 0-01 PRICEOFLOVEO Mpftou 81 1-11 DMotteB6 

5 OW ASCOT AGANfrnjPSntth 1811-7 JPSaritii2 

7 0334 NIGHT WARRIOR AM Robson 4-11-7 — A Robson 7 

11 00/0 MOONLKWTWGJ Partes 8M-4- JPtaM4 

13 «00 VANDER PUP Mas ZGnen 811-3 ZaeSmnS 

81 Wasserc 4-1 Night Warrior, 11^2 Golden Fancy, 81 Van 
□er Pi^Pncaottow. 181 MoonBgiling, 181 Ascot Again. 


FONTWELL PARK 


Going: good to firm 

ZD BAT A PAD NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £885: 
2m 2f) (6 runners) 

2 BUFRANNEVBJJENACMaabalfria — JSuthem 

-3 CLEONAte J J Bndger 1810 UrLFogerty 

4 MR WHAT3-HB-NAMEGP Enright 1810.^ M tales 

5 SALES PROMOTER K Cunrfng^Brown 1810— A Webb 

6 WS-SH CROW MJ Beta 1810 RGoMsteki 


MOUDAY MU. J R Jtasia 186.. 


81 Hotday M8L 81 Safran Nevtite. 7-2 Ur What'8His* 
None. 81 Walsh Crown, 181 Soles Premotor, 181 Cleanair. 


FontweD selections 

By Mandarin 

2JD Holiday MilL £30 Applante. 3.0 Hubli. 3.30 
Donaghmoye. 4.0 Americk. 430 Derby Day. 


19 P38 HOIMSTOUT (B) G R Prta 8114 TEdW»to(7) 

20 MON TELL Mbs LBowar 8114 MteaGAmittge 

21 OOP- RU FCHAg )MraNSrohft8114— T Thomson Jones 

22 P3F- GBJERISCHOICEAJQiantoerta7-189CSaiyth(7} 
11-4 Amsntiss. 7-2 Hubs. 4-1 WHsfcey Time. 7-1 Atotis. 

81 Caro Wood. 181 Gaeaan, 181 Ruteha. 181 Sir Eamon. 
181 Home Yar Go, 281 others. 

130 COURAGE SUSSEX COLTS HANDICAP 
CHASE (£2,338: 2m 2f 110yd) (10) 

1 204- GAPTAM DAW (80) J T GiftORf 1811-10 _ 8 Rom 

2 004- D0NAGHII0VNE&4) Mbs L Bower 81 1-5 

MrTOnUteemM 

H8182 Eterapby 

5.FPP- STRE TCH O UT (C-tn A Moora 8180 G Moore 

i ROnamodf 


4 FFU- CELTIC WAY JQGWaraham 
I OUT (rib)/ 
fl 0U8 MLANESSAG R Prta 8104- 


Z30 CRICKET BALL 
2m 2f 11 0yd) (7) 


SELLING CHASE (£830: 


2 12-P PARSOirSPRDEK 6 WtapOM 11*11-9 MrPTotoBrtay 

3 341 TUNZSIBBKiNRWdSl8l1-9._ MrTMilchta(7) 

4 180 VALE CHALLENGE (BF)K A Moman 12-11-9 — 

9 424 APPLANTE tBJRChrmyage 11-11-2 

MtaGAnnytage(7) 

10 R*4- JOHNNY TAROUIN R R Ledger 18T1-2. taa N Ledgar 
it Of- STHAB OTUNE NJ Wheeler 1811-2^. taNWhaelar 

12/8M SW1NGLETREE R Cbsmgton 1811-2 NDoogtay 

7^ Turaentteg, 7-2 Paraon's Prida. 81 Aoptonte. 
182 Wb Cntago, 81 Smngtefree. 81 Johnny Tarwm. 
12-t Sowpi Una. 


343 REG TUCKER MEMORIAL 
(Amateurs: £ 1 .788: 2m 2 f) (19) 

J SS AM=TB P D Haynes 8124 

2 »4 ANANTBS G B BaUng 8124 

‘ D Davies 


HURDLE 


18124. 


.State 
LSax 


3 S? 9 *«ow oodjdi 

C SS2: ^B>®FT(8)JELong8124 NON-RUNNER 

5 402- HU8U J T Gtftord 8124 T. TGmthm 

f SI 3 yw®^W»P>JRJCTtai5 8ia4. CBroote 

l teACKR OQ aTbiwB 811-8~~^- J Benf 

J Wf EtPEWM NAPOLEON J E Forte 81 1-8 — A Forte 

Jf °(£ SSSlSSSSWCiii 3S 

15 9 3^,§iX^?^!lL T 'sa 


7 4/P2 SSMON B0UYAR J FTteft-HeySS 7-180 _ 

MM P RfcliJLffM fT) 

8 230/ CAffifGEEM Hftl JSKtng 18180. $MeNtiD 

9 OOP- U KXYGai tftsBMuita81M~ M.Pwwti l 

10 428 SNTTTERREIDTM Jones 8180 MRfctWtiS 

11 40P- DOWPAYNeNT (C4) MJ Bta 18180 RGokteteto 

2-1 Captain Dawn. 4-1 Simon Bobvar. 81 Oonartffloyne. 

13-2 Stretch Out 81 Celtic way. 181 MHanessa, 
12-1 Carrigeen WB, 181 othare. 

4J0 STUMPS & BAILS NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 
2m 6f)(11) 

1 081 AMEHCKJD Roberts 6-1 1-6 _■ — r. C J? n * n 

2 40F- OUST COHQUEREROWiJNfissB Santas 5-11-0 

SSmtivdixI 

3 OOF- FLAMTEX LAD RP Hoed 811-0. — M teed (7) 

4 U8 HWION CORNS1 P Hayward 811-4 CMtai 

5 FF2- PADDY OHAULEYJTGWord 81 1*0 Rftwn 

6 08 THAWS THADBIPO Haynes 8H4- 

8 008 BAY POND GGGracev 4-1811 — - GMcComt 

9 PP-0 JANAAB J RJenkats 4-1811... 

10 POP- LITTLE KATHMAWTKanp 8189- SShtaton 

11 083 SHIRLEY CREPEL1AJJ Briber 8104^~R Goldstar' 

12 8 LA DflAGOMERE (B) D M Gnssel 4-186 Rltawoody 
188 AmariCK. 84 Paddy O’Malley, 81 names iTfteter. 

81 Dust Conqueror. 1H Flamtex Las, 181 Shotoy Oepela, 
181 outers. 

4.30 LADBROKES SUSSEX YOUNG CRICKETERS 
.HANDICAP HURDLE (£2.096: 2m 2f) (8) 


3 008 INDIAN MAJOR Miss P Barnes 811-7 M Seated 

4 00-0 DUSKY BROW (DJGGGracw 81 BPowal 

6 138 ROYAL CRAFTSMAN (B) Mrs N Smdh 811-3 C Brown 

10 2P-1 PteSWtooaman 81810 — ■ RDurwoOdJ 

11 111- DEHBY0AYffl>DAWfi5Cn8l8« PSeu8tmm 

12 810 FWE CWB^nUN (8D) M ii lL .ujL 

13 P-01 SLIP UP F Gray 8182 BtaJSiy 

I PARTISAN I 


14 008 BBOTHERPA 


l(0-D)JB&ayais818l MPbdbq 


]5 ^0 B.CITONTMUiaa8ll4. 

» 3£^ HARD OAK M MadQM* 81>0 


N MNetwOl 


2-1 PI p, 82 Derby Oey.134 Indan, Major. 7-1 Royal 
Craftsman. ! 81 Fire ertawn, 12-1 Bp Up. Dusky Brown. 
181 Brother Partisan. 


SALISBURY 


Gtring: good to soft 

Draw: high numbers best on soft ground low numbers favoured 
ZOO AMPORT MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,157: 51) (14 runners) 

P Cook 7 

13 

10 


00 BATTLE SXMGptaYSnctak) DM 
040 CHARMED PRMCE (Mrs F8acon)jH 
4 EVER SHARPIE Robbers) LGMrta 88 
000 FLAG BEARER (kitarcram M MeCoun 9| 
2 HAWAIAN CAT ptePPiMMMita>>te 

| S«LSB HERO (Mss HBisgrrta)M^re 



MPCTAL WAY (Aflgto Enteprtses 1 

^^■LOVS (Rterata) c BandMH^^H 

■■■tHa«toanAiMatoPumlCBet«tote80. 


|JSut eMto94. 

Bsnstsad9-0^^^H 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

8 

. B 
9 
10 
11 
J9 
20 
21 
22 

2-1 Muhbutx 10830 Hawaian Cat 4-1 ZeeSa, 134 Charmed Prince. Ewr Sharp. 

181 Baals Sung. 12-1 amera. 

FORM: CHARMED PRINCE tost of 6 at GrjodwoodMkprejjously |9-0) 81 4ttt of 16 to 

EVER SHARPra4] 9^i4ano Startle at 
HAWAIAN CATfiW1«2nd by BtaM» 

. 24 ran). MA8WOB (94) trnaO 2nd to 

good. July 21. 16ran).ZnBIA(811)5^19th to Make 
at Newbury (SI. £3425, good » firm, Jlily 18, 11 ran). 

HAWAIAN - 


MB MOTIM BROKER (RCleuei?0 Lang 94 WNn 

0 LA PirmE NOBLESSE (Chetae Tracing) DHJJtaiJcnaa 811 — Jl 

0 MARIE BABY (MraHCotaBlCwadman 8-11 BCrae 

O YS1HAD FLOWER MMcftoaD>BPaing 811 JWM 

0 ZITELLA (D Alan} i Baking 811 JMtai 



Salisbury selections 

By Mandarin 

3-0 Hawaian Cat. 2J30 Ali Smith. 3.0 Sunny Match. 3.30 Free On 
Board. 4.0 Wassl Reef 4.30 FEYDAN (nap). 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2-30 Ali Smith* 3.0 Beech wood Cottage. 330 Samhaan. 4.0 
Plymouth Hoe. 

Michael Seety's selection: 3.0 Dancing Sarah. 


2J0 E B F ROCKBOURNE STAKES (2-Y-O: £3.662^0: 61) (11) 

04231 LAST DANCE p Ncaman) R Hamgn 81 — LJtate J 

* AU S MITH (M m GBon)R Bow 811---—- Pal 

ZTPCookS 
_ SCautbenS 
_ QStartey2 

B Room 7 

„ W Canon 5 
.AMcGtawi 
.BTframt 


BUYMUars ACTJMriJSfegah JSutdteeWI — - — 
CHARLIE ME DMLMG (Mias A WlggnMC Horgan 811. 


PAUIREB : M5SPiJCenCHcrgar811 

SHAW* VICTOR (USA) (U BtotMlilG Harwood8l1 

40 TASJB-IHaWtan Al Maktoum) C Bensttad 811 

tCT TLEfTha Quean) W “ 

SCATTERED SHOWERS 


Ham 88. 


« 

6 

7 

8 
14 
16 
17 
21 
22 
23 

82 Last Dance. 11-4 AS Smith, '81 Tasjfl. 7-1 Sharp Victor. 81 Palm Reef. 

181 Nettie, 14-1 others. ■ 

FORM: LAST DANCE M-O) MMteH wfth Copper Red (94}at Sandown (51. E10981. 

' 9 ran). AuLJ SMITH (9-0) HH2ndol5to Naheer (94)at Ascot (Bt. £7035. 

TASJR. (9-0) 9KI 5th to Suae Bata! (9-0) here (71, ETB3B, good to soft, 
rani 
SMITH 


ISHOWSIS(CHarper)DSsworthl 

M STABBBYGteL{CCo^)RVoorapuy8«. 


good. Juhr : 
July 12. a 


3.00 HOMMGTON HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1^12: 6f) (17) 

1 234001 BOOFV «)0 EABottMtanmSt) Ud) C Natan 180. 

5 141120 MHTBt MARCH ffl) JT BtafoJR Hutchinson 88 

6 080402 SNAP DECISION ft Om»tar)R 

7 0030 ACUA [J Hendatsotr) N Wgors 9-5 

8 03-4000 VAIGUAN O Strdey) J Bathefl 85 

9 813000 MRAMDA JUUA (D HOOOBS) □ S^Mortil 9-3 

000032 DAMCMG SABAH tCbnnm Trading) D Haydn Jam 81. 

022440 GBI OF G0U) (S Dim) WChartas 8-13 — 

001440 BEEGHWOOOI 


10 
12 
14 
16 
18 

19 

20 
22 

23 

24 
26 

81 

81 Srap 


oflo mm :? aSSsili 


Mull Mill mu II l mini) II Harfeuy 87 

000004 MBWY140LES 0(80) [A M McCtxrt 87. 

080000 CRAO0NGnL|pHoterd)JE^mi84 

812001 GERSHWIN (D) Mrs EOTjorneDO ODottofll 86- 

034030 SO.VSI FORM Ms R Newton) W MAtenmin S^_ra 

000402 SUNNY MATCH (Mrs HMacfariane)LGotBB084l 

080000 MONATATKM (tas J Scartoougti) L CoUrBl 7-1 


84. 


J tad 12 

NON-RUNNER 7 

L Jams « 

P Cook 9 

W Carson 11 
, AMcGkmr3 
.DWtent 
. W Newness 
Pst Eddery 1 
GStarksy 14 
— G Baxter 2 


C RuoarO)5 

J Cater (7)13 


H Adams IS 

I Johnson 17 

NCadMelS 

i. 7-2-Dandng Sarah, 81 Acta. 11-3 Sunny Mater. 7-1 Gershwn, 
"* i, Do e ch wood Cottage, 181 others. 

v 1-11) (W, Era7. 
3 4ih to frSstw March at 

36) 21 Folkestone 2nd to 


RNtAt BOQFY (9-0) won W oNgta mptan maidan by 31 fr om Sartza 

mod to hrm. Aug 4. 11 r»).BEECHWOODCOTTAO%f81^^H 

Hamflton (5L &30B. firm, tay 24. 7 ran). SNAP DECtSiON| 

Marcmdea (8-13L wdh ACUA (9-2) Z'il hack 5th of 15 (fif.M 

□AMONG SARAH 17-1 0) nock 2nd to Myrna’a Specal (81) 

J ulyZ^. 3 ran )-CS>SWwN (87) beat Vnnr Xnq Format (9-5]j 
se« heap, £844. good. 15 ran). SU.VBtHtatataMte 
Unfltald on peraAtrmatB start (w. £24 92.| 
ll %T2nd to Angels Ar* Blue (811) at ■■ 

Setocrion: SUNWY MATCH ta 


at Chepstow (51. 

) 21 at Windsor on Mond»(84 

II aid to War Wagon (9-0) at 
11, 11 ran)- SUNNY MATCH (8111 
i. £1373, fem, July 28, 12 ran). 


3.30 H S LESTER MEMORIAL CHALLENGE CUP (HANDICAP) 

(£2,342: 1m2f)(9) 


tad Eddery 5 
. BROOM 3 


2 intMW CWCLET (B)(D) (P Gatandris) P Mtawyn 4-9-9 Jl 

3 2(32138 FBE BA Y (VXD) (A Thonrpldns) P Haynes 5-8-1 3HjH 

4 1M00I THE FOOTMAN (rig Mss D Mactan) R Shtas 44-12 — JH Brown (5)7 

5 010112 SAWMAN(BKmrari(pZawawf)BHaatMy48l0 PH Eddery 6 

6 OOOOOO OSWYKNG (CKu) (T Stratton SnWh) D Lang4-8-8 CRtd20r(3)9 

7 200223 TALK OF GLORY IBF) IE C5adKten)LCotireir5-8-6 — G Barter 4 

B 043214 WELSH MEDLEY (D) (Cheshire Trading) D Haydn Jones 4-85 I 


DWteamsfOl 

■TWataos2 


1 800202 FREE ON BOARD (GSiaHrertfC Horgan J-7-13 _ 

1 010040 SUPBRRWGT (Gar Eqiaptota&ReirigeraBOn Go LSI} JFoa 4-7-7 

N Adams 8 

154 Samhaan. 81 CNcta. 82 Tate of Glory. 81 Free On Board, 81 Welsh 
Melody. 481 The Footman, 14-1 other*. 

FORM: CMCLET (82) 71 4ih to Power Bandarf82) H Newmataat pm 2f, good. Aug 2}. 
Earita* 0-11) W Kampmn 2nd to Kaiwur (82) (1m 2f. £2788. good to Arm. May 5. 14 
ran). FME BAY best effort m 1985 when »4) beet F Share (813)1 W ai Brighton ftm2f. 
007. good, Oct a 9 ran). SAMHAAN (94) 11 2nd to Guneen Boy (87) at Windsor (8f, 
£*f 14) Prevtosty (87) ben TALK OF GLORY (85) 1*1 at Qrepstow (1m 21. 


E243& ftfn. July % 12 ran). TALK OF GLORY|8-a went on to be »l 3rd to Heart Of 
Stone(84) HUnHtad (im 21, good. Aug BL WteSH MEDLEY 181) beat TATs HIB (84)31 
at Chepstow on perujttineteatertflma, £2411. soft. May 2a 14 ran). FREE ON BOARD 
(74) lf2nd to JoyM Dwcer (84) at Sandown (Bt. £3167. linn. July 23, 5 ran). 


4.00 MANTON EBF STAKES (3-Y-O: £2^16: 1m 4f) (2) 

7 11 PLYMOUTH HOE (FRMD) (Lady Oiata)LCumanl 83. 

9 224316 WASSL REEF (DliShaWl 

15 


WASSL REEFJD)1Sha*di Atoned AlMataouselJOurfop 83 

M CONTBnKMIMn E BouchaO D Oughton 810 

Evens Wassl Reef. 11-ID Plymouth Hoe. 12-1 In Contention. 

FORM: PLYMOUTH HOPE (85) 2M CarBs te winn er from i Deputy Monarch 
£953, good to soft. June 5. 5 ran). WASSL RES 1 7tft in GocxJwood IVcr- 
vtout*^Mjwon at Ungflekl by 1 »l from Ruesan Logc(9-0K1m4fmdn. 

" '“SL^EEF 


. PU Eddery 1 
__ W Carson 3 
P Cook 3 


Selection: WASSL 


m4t, 
m4fl. Pr»- 
'.good to 


4J0 BOURNEMOUTH HANDICAP (£2^8850: 7f) (15) 

3 012222 SATUPOUR (V)(B^(HH Age Khan) R Johnson Houghton 86-7 SCaolfrsn 2 


4 033010 COMUYJO 

5 300000 

6 S/00083 A SttEY R OCKET 

7 000010 GURTEENBOrri 
9 001330 GOLDEN SLADE (I 

11 280400 APRIL FOOL (VI (E t 

12 008000 GAMBLBtS DREAM 

13 420040 CONCERT PITCH 

14 004201 MR ROSE©) (E 

15 080443 FEYDAN (u) (Mh 

16 004000 MCKY 
IS 444000 GAIBU 


D Havdn Jones 5-9-7 DWB8au(7)4 

(p£taAcffiOBnnrti7-84 Pat Eddery 11 

M Pipe 5-9-0 Paid Eddery 3 

Hannon 8813 Q Starkey 14 

A Tucker (T) 13 
NCarSsto15 
12 

JWBRamaO 


(DUM MCCOUft) M McCOflt 4*10. 

(E RoOtWS) L Cotm 48! 



PHotcbbson(3)9 
W Carson 10 

.A Motor* 8 

Bn Al Malayan) m Berated 87-6 

N Adana? 

19 080000 CAIMAN ®JMBS I RSCrte) N UtChCI 87-7 G French 5 

20 000002 HATOflNG(E GattSCen) L dottrel 87-7 T Long (7)1 

Breton, 11-2 Giuwen Boy. 

others. 


10830 SatiaptM. 4-1 Conmeyjo. 8a Ashley 
Man ti reatora fcy B te n. 13-2 Mr Rom. 81 faydan. 181 c 



to SOIL May 23, 9 

" 1163. Urns. 


PORHbSATUPOURj 

19). COMMA YJC . . . 

3&J beck In 6th when Haydock .......... 

1Y «WKET (81 1} 1 1 3m » Fteel Bay (7-13) at Bath (im 8yds, E11I .. 

■an). G0US&4 SLADE 5th tat wire; Pnwtausly (86) lW 3rd to S ams Wood 
2) at Bntfrmn (1m. E4S57. good to tern. June 23. 10 ranx tah GURTEEN BOY (87) 
was 6»l back in 6th. HR ROSE (8-7) beet Blue Bricam (82) 1W it Newmaritei p( 

£2467. good. Aval. 18 ran], wfth GAMBLERS DREAM (83) ffliother 31 away 5th flnfl 

NICKY jhKi te-1 1) 1 Bth. FETOAN (7-7) 31 3rd to Come On The Steel (8Q) at Goodwood 
(im. £4885. good to fem. Jidy 31. IS ran), with GURTEEN BOY 184) was tafled OH U«L 
Iravmg previously won At Wtatoor (87) by II from Samhaan (87) (im70yd. £2588, good, 
July u, 7 ran). 

SetoetieiK MR ROSE 


k A huge crowd swelled 
Doocasier's sales ring yesterday, 
the interest was ten horses 
offered for sale by the champion 
Poim-to-poini rider Peter 
GreenalL, who has retired from 


the saddle. The sale collectively 
feiched 90-000 guineas. The top 
lot. SandiclifTe Boy. unbeaten in 
four Poim-to-poims last season, 
was purchased fbr 26.000 guin- 
eas by trainer John Wilson. 


Live commentaries 
to be available 
by the telephone 


Racing commentaries from 
every racecourse in Britain are 
to be available live by telephone 
as a result of an agree mem 
signed yesterday by the Race- 
course Association and Tele- 
phone Information Services. 

The service is expected to 
stan before the end of the year, 
the new Racecall service wiU 
relay the official racecourse 
commentary provided by Race- 
course Technical Services, as 
well as offering a coraprehensi ve 
results and information service 
24 hours a day. 

Using the latest telecommuni- 
cations technology. RacecaJI’s 
central service wfl! consist of a 
daily programme from a studio 
in London, where racing 
journalists and broadcasters will 
link the live commentaries from 
the principal meetings »nh race 
previews, reviews and inter- 
views. When the volume of 
racing is such as to produce time 
dashes between two or more 
fixtures, provision will be made 
for callers to dial directly into 
the racecourse of their choice. In 
this way commen ta ry from ev- 
ery meeting, regardless of the 
number of fixtures on any one 
day will become available by 
telephone. 

A specialist early morning 
service from 7.30am. designed 
primarily for the raring industry 
itself, will give the official going, 
results of stewards* inspections, 
weather conditions, while a 
more leisurely preview of the 
day's racing will be available to 
racegoers and punters from 
9am. An evening summary of 
the events of the day. featuring 
recorded highlights, win follow 
the Iasi live race commentary. 

Telephone Information Ser- 
vices Ltd. which is funding the 
£1.25 million investment in- 
volved in Racecall. is a new 
company bringing together 


some of those most skilled in the 
fields of computer and tele- 
communications technology. 
Chairman of the company is 
City Financier Mr Clive Rich- 
ards. and the Managing Director 
is Mr Grant Wilkinson, maiur 
shareholder in Answercall Ltd. 

Director of Racing for 
Racecall uiu be Mr Tony 
Fairbaim who has resigned after 
more than 2D years as Director 
of the Racing information Bu- 
reau to take up this post at the 
end of the year. 

General Sir Peter Lcng. Chair- 
man of the Racecourse Associ- 
ation. commenting on the new 
service said yesterday: 

“Racecall. which uses the Brit- 
ish Telecom network, is a 
premium senior and as such 
will produce significant revenue 
to the racecourses. Estimates as 
to the number of calls we can 
expect have been kept delib- 
erately conservative, but as the 
service detelops I hope race- 
courses will cam upwards of £1 
million a year." 

Mr Clive Richards, Chairman 
of Telephone Inform anon Ser- 
vices. referred to Racecall as 
“probably the most exciting of 
all the premium services avail- 
able to telephone users. British 
Telecom recorded racing results 
were second only m volume to 
the Speaking Chick among their 
Guideline Services. This new 
live common (ary will have enor- 
mous appeal and »c are de- 
lighted to have the official 
backing of the racing industry 
and the RCA in particular. The 
original concept of Racecall 
owes much to Tony Fairbaim 
and we are delighted thal he has 
agreed to join us as Director of 
Racing. His long experience in 
the racing industry and knowl- 
edge of the personalities in- 
volved will prov e of immense 
benefit to us." 


Bold Archer on 
target at Beverley 


Bold Archer battled home to a 
short head victory in the 
Wednesday Market Handicap at 
Beverley yesterday - but he 
almost missed the race. 

The improving three-year-old 
had been under a 48 hours 
emergency poultice treatment 
after treading' on a flint and 
tearing away Ms off fore shoe. 

**I almost pulled him out of 
the race because he was bleeding 
so badly after the accident, but 
the treatment seems to have 
worked." said his deligbted 
trainer Martin Fetherston- 
Godly. from East Ilsky. 

Fetherston-Codly must rate 
Beverley his lucky track. From 
his 19 horse string he has sent 
out eight winners in bis first 
season, and three have been at 
the Humberside course. 

Bold Archer, owned by Lon- 
don travel agent Jenny Rick, 
could reappear at Ripon on 
Saturday. 

Chris Rutter brought his 
mount with a well-timed late 
run to lead approaching the final 
furlong. 

Fetherston Godley. had bis 


woo won the Crocker BuIteeL 
Handicap at Ascot in July. 

Super Trip, reported “in great 
form", makes his reappearance 
in one mile Bradfilord & Biogjey 
Handicap next week at the York 
Ebor meeting. 

Richard Quinn rode his 50th 
winner for the season when 
Ultra Nova, the 9-4 fhvourite, 
came home by four lengths from 
Royal Crofter in the Wood hall 
Way Auction Stakes. The fillies 
owner Constantine Shiacolas. 
who was in the building in- 
dustry. made the longjourney to 
see her run. 

“I had to set off on Monday 


afternoon from Cyprus, but the 
trip has been well worthwhile. 
At home I have six horses, and 
this is mv first irip to Beverley" 
he said the delighted owner. 

Quinn, who looks set io beat 
his previous best total of t£ 
winners, achieved in 19S4. said: 
“I don’t often come to Beverley 
and that was only my fifth 
winner here." Ultra Nova dis- 
puted the lead for two furlongs 
and then went away from her 
rivals. 

Dick Knight came back to 
form when winning by seven 
lengths victory from Musical 
Will in the Ladygare Selling 
Handicap. Mas Clown, the 7-2 
favourite, could finish only fifth. 
The winner, always going easily 
in the hands of Adam Shoults. 
cruised through to lead four out 
and surged farther away from 
his rivals. 

Peter Swailes. representing 
trainer Ken Ivory, said: “We 
have bad a virus in the stable, 
which we now seem to have 
shaken oft “ the winner is 
owned by Wallace Farms Lim- 
ited a company based near 
Radletu were we train." 

• Geordie Dun will be Stable 
jockey to Ayr trainer John 
Wilson for this National Hum 
season. Among the horses he 
will be riding is SandiciilTe Boy. 
for whom Wilson (aid 26.000 
guineas at yesterday's Doncaster 
Sales. 

• Northern raiders Grey 
Desire and Bollin Knight will 
participate in the Group Three 
Trusthouse Forte Hungerford 
Stakes at Newbury on Friday. 
Grey Desire, second to Green 
Desert in the Noreros July Cup. 
will be ridden by Kevin Darley. 
while Mark Birch partners 
Bollin Knight. 


Folkstone results 

Going: good to firm. 

2.15 (Im 3). 1, GRAND CELEBRATION 
£ Whteortti. 81): 2. Beur te Dtato (R 
Rat, 821: 3. Btaefc Spout (S Couthen. 81 
Jt-fav). ALSO RAN: 81 F-t» Just Cam*d 
(4tiW5Ttokusan. 10 Blair's Winno. 12 Futt 
01 Speed- 1 6 Onag[6ttU 20 Sotem Dawn 
(Stfil 9 ran. NR- v& SaieHra. Nelsons 

Lady. 4L 1W. U 81 11 R Smrpson to 

Upper Lwnboum. T«k £810: TV 50. 

EUSO, £1.50. DF: £20.00. C$F: £28.82. 

Tricast £7547. No bid. 

245(60 1 . ORIENT LINE (Pat Eddery. 8 
4 fav); 2, Ctren Hester (M Mgham. 7-1): 3. 
Gypsy's Bam Rat (R Morse. 182). ALSO 
RAN: 11-2 Saboteur (6(h). 6 Reman Free 
L 16 Hush Kit, 2S Ala Harak. 
arm. 33 Rock A Utile. MftBam Pere 
(5tt>L 10 ran. 3L 21. nk. 6L sn hd. R Harmon 
at Marttorttogn. Tote: £2.00: £1 .10. £1 30. 
£220. OF: E53Q-CSF: £983. Kim s Ticket 
flt-2) mtiroiawn, not under outers - rule 
4 applies to all bets, duduebon TOp n 
pound. 


4-7 toy): 3. -. 

1). ALSO RAN: 82 Ram Ralph (4»X 16 
Seat Ot Learning (5ft). SO Portly tStn) 6 
ran. NR: Hignteds Lad. 21. 2iiL 2L G 
Harwood at Putoorough. Tote: £4J». 
£2.00. £120. OF- £2.40. CSF: £6.73. 

345 (6ni . GLORY BEE (N AOam^ 81): 
. Naive Charm (Pat Eddery. 7-4 fl- to v). 3. 
SarftBb (USA) (A Murray. Ta p-tow). ALSO 
RAN: 7 Tetesto, 10 Swift Purchase WtnL 


4.15 pm 4() 1 . LONGSTOP (Pat Eddoy, 
4-1 h 2. Vintage Port (P Cook. 4-ifc 3, 
Dtatlng Light (S Rouse. 82 lav). ALSO 
RAN: 6 Heroin 01 Sttangr, 7 Gentie 
Stream rant. 9 Jame-0 (Stir). 12 Waiter 
Palace 20 Miss Ja«. 33 wrangbrook 
ptii). Suntey So«- i"«L 3L 1 

Mann at Marlborougr Tota: £530 : CT 70. 

£120. DF: X8.M. CSF: £2046. 

Tneest: £4394. 

4.45 (7f)1. CODICES (G Starkey, 8l HE. 
(Pat Eddery. 82); 3. Sir Arnold (M 
Robert, 7-1). ALSO RAN: 2 fev Bronw 
Opal (4tt>L 9-4 eruawwe North (5th). 33 
Career Mtanese (6tm. 50 Mubah. 7 ran 
hd. mi. 21. y. 4i. G Harwood at 
" jh.Tott:£t2ft£1J0.21.50,DF: 

£390. CSF; 22598. 

PtacepoC £7090 


8 Restorafton. 10 Black Rwer <Sti«L 
Cadenesa. Smart Man. 12 Lotus Prrv 
cess, 14 Ctraoasse [4ihl. 20 GodJord. 
Teejav. 33 Dawn Spni. Mexican MN. 15 
ran. Sir txL 2V»1. ■ A. ll. 1 VjL M Fuhereton- 
Godtey at East llstev. Tote: £7.60; £2.60. 
£8D0. C* BO DF; £21100. CSF: £75.82. 
Tncast: £565.40. Sanm (181) wnuidrawn. 
not under onteis - tvto 4 appt«3 to all 
oers. deduction (Op m poind. 

4.0 (im 100yd) 1. WATENOLATH (M 
Fry. 181): 2. Trop-co (T Withams, 81): 3 

OnWatsr(GDuftie<d.8li ALSO: 11-Uav 

St James's Risk (6th). 5 Rosi Noa (Stfil. 

11-2 Lady Attwa. 8 Oucken The Bid, 10 
Cloudless Sky (4th) . 14 Lone Gataaa.Tan 
Man. 20 Tautast, 33 Fair Zoma. 12 ran. 

4':-l. 51. nk. 21. E Weytnes at Leybum. Tote: 

£2550: £950. £150. £2 10 OF: £135.00. 
CSF: £7tL61. 

480 (7r 100yd) 1. KAMARESS (K Dar- 
ley. 81). Z Signore Odom (M Bucrt, 5-2); 
3. Moftstinos (R Hilts. 12-1): 4. Mootons 
Chance (M L Thomas. 181). ALSO: 82 
Gold Chip. 9 Charmmg view. 10 Im- 
proviso. 12 Rememorance. The Go« 
sue. 14 Rape) Action (6m), Top 
OThLana. 20 Flying Zted (5 til). 

Cree. 33 Burmng Anow. Mr PanaOie. 
Oottida, Carousal Nougat. Mark My Card. 
18 ran Na Topeka Express. II. nd. ^l. 21. 
IM M Britain at wanmll. Ton: £830; 
£1.78 £150. £290. £140. DF: £16.40. 
CSF. £33.90. Tncasi £28932 
5.Q (7( 100yd) 1, BROTHER PATRICK (T 
Ires. S-ih 2. Mon Coear (P Roomson. 12- 
1): 3. Spy Gift (W R Swmburn. 84 lav). 
ALSO: 7-2 The Ucmheart (6th). 5 Aipen- 
tsxn. 10 Lento Back. 15 Onentat Darner. 
20 Carse Kefly. Fating Leaf. Flaunting. 
Sombrero Gold. Thank Haven. 25 Mte- 
Otove. 33 Ai&on pace. Aiiousa (4tn). 
Coiney Heath LmJ. H>ero Fata. Spmdw 
Boy. Accustomed (5th) 19 raa Sh hd. 7L 
IM. !A sh hd. L Pmoon at Newmarket. 
Tote* £9.90: £290.' £520. £1J20. DF: 
D».70.«>k £73.84. 

1 08340. 


Beverley 


Gafrig: good to frrm 
130(51)1. ULTRA NOVA (T Oum. 84 
tent 2. Royal defter (M B#cfi. 5-218 
Dencino Beta (0 MUL ll lA | $80 
RAN: 182 Leadng Ptoyer («* J|£The 
Devfl's Music. 91* Benetay 004 IT 
Kata's Image (5tti). 1 6 Ovemte Sensation. 
20 GarconNiv. Vo! Vitesse, 25 Hazel s 


£1.50. £1.40. £1.80. OF: £230. CSF 
D0.16. 

iOIlm 4f) 1. WCK KNIGHT (A ShOute. 
81): l Muscat Wffl (G Dufrteta ): 8 
Earte Cowl; (S Webster. 1 81). AL Sd 7-2 
taw Max Own (SW. 4 Meittsta rath). 7 
Dubavama. Upland ®«Be. 17^ 

Lady. 14 Royal VaJeur. The Riok (ML 20 
Mafestc Star. 33 Bushy Bay. 12 ran. NR. 
Porto Irene 71. 2f. 3L ft K Iwora at 
Radtett. Tote: E6J0. ££30, 22.4OQD0. 
DF. £22S0. CSF- £4889. Tncast £372.14. 

830 (im 20 1. BOLD AR CHER (C 
Rutter. 811: 2. Casheiw ton s) (S Webster. 
I8fh 3. Mbsettore (A tatay. WD 
ALSO: 5 tl-tavs Repel Lad. Perahmg (6thk 


Nottingham - Monday 

Gonpgood 

5.45(lm 50yd) 1 . Solo Style (P WWdittr. 
7-2 p-tavR 2. Harrtout |12-1>; 3. 
Annabeferra (81). Country Gentleman 7-2 
n-taw. 14 ran NR- Jcweworth. Speaa) 
Guest nk. Si. G Lewis Tote £4-20;£l.60. 
£1620, £1 4a OF: £43 20. CSF: £41.60. 
Trieast £187 Jl. 

6.15 dm 21) 1. Angles Video (J Rato. 2- 
IV. 2. Run Chartie (3-u. 3. Patchouli's Pw 
(11-8 te»). 5 ran ’.-L Trl NR Reoecca's 
Pet. 'it. 15W. R Holder Tote- E2J0: £1.20. 
£2.00. CSF: £7.74. 

84512m) 1. Prelude (W Carson. 84* 2. 
Q Canqustador (813 tovi. 3. Star Stoner 
(581) 7 ran. 1 Vjt. 7L W Hem. Tore- £2.70; 
£t.3Q. £1 10. OF. £1.80. CSF £3 71. 

7.15 (8T) 1. Joktot (R street. 81 ): 2. T«- 
Roy (1 i-2l. a Ra Ra Gut |7-T> Ameghtno 
7-2 fav. 10 ran. NR- Powder Bhie 25,1. 2t. 
J Shaw. Tote: £3.00: £190. 82.10. £2.40. 
OF. £1350 CSF E31 79 TncacT FI 79 29. 

7.45 (6f) 1. Nora pa (K Dartey. 81); 2. 
taemuood Nut 1281 1.3. PanotSherpaner 
(4-5 tsv). 17 ran NR: Irene. Naoanma. 6L 
sh nd. M Bnttam Tote: £5.00; 21.1ft 
£558 £1.30. DF- £15-30. CSF: E95.43. 
After a stewards' mouiry toe resuft stood. 

8.15 (61) 1. Fickle Young Man (G 
DuWieid. 81 ): 2. FOurwalk (82). 3. Sand Ol 
Tone (181). 6as« Bbss 7-2 tov. 8 ran. 
Setter Country BL 11. T FairftUfSt. Tota 
£530. £1 90. £1-20. £t 50. DF: £950. 
CSF. £31 78. 

Ptoeepot £4023 in 50p stoke 


Blinkered first time 

SALISBURY: 430 NiWy Nek. 

«E: Patango. 4.15 


CATTERICK BRIDGE:; 
Hitchenstown. NBtoa. 


RUGBY UNION 

Northern 
boys do 
England 
proud 

Schools Rugby 
by Michael Stevenson 

Lancashire Schools, newly re- 
lumed frnm Australia, have 
done English rugh> a tremen- 
dous service Rentettibcring the 
bn Hunt rugb> plascd b> the 
■Vustralian Schools m this coun- 
try. ihcy expected to be ex- 
tended ta\ingl> and probably 
beaten in a number of games. 

Scan Higgins, their coach, and 
master in charge of rugby at 
Lancaster RGS. xowedL with the 
lull support of his team, to play 
1 5-man rugby, come what may. 
The results, especially m the 
context or the English game in 
general, were renurkahlc. The 
tourists lost to Vtaoru Under- 
21vand to extern Australia 
UnderOls. drew one match and 
won S. 

The two UndtrCI fixtures 
were rather foisted on Lan- 
cashire and. indeed in the 
Victoria match. Lancashire were 
winning 1S-0 at halt' time when 
several bionic substitutes were 
brought on for Victoria and the 
discrepancy in physical presence 
-accounted for the single point 
deficit. 

There were three sons of 
distinguished rugby -playing la- 
thers on the tour Jason, son of 
Alan .Ashcroft, the former Lion 
and England hack row tbruard: 
Chris, whivse tiither. Phil Ma- 
hon. played stand-off half for 
Waterloo and Lancashire, and 
Gary French, whose lather Ray 
represented England and Great 
Britain in diilcretit codes. 

Ray French wjs over for the 
tour, partly on business, and 
shrewd judge of the game that he 
undoubtedly is. >1 tv pleasing 
that his gloomy forecast that 
•\ . . the party would not win a 
match on the eastern seaboard" 
was proved incorrect. Having 
watched the triumphant Austra- 
lian schools during their 
successful lour of the British 
isles Iasi winter, it was difficult 
not to believe that their rugby 
was generally of a vastly higher 
standard than ours. 

Perhaps the most interesting 
comment of Scan Higgins is in 
direct contrast to the general 
v lew of English and Australian 
rugby. “The Australian lads 
were very impressive with re- 
gard 10 athleticism, si/e and 
fitness, hut we definitely had the 
edge over innate skill." He 
selected the wins against New 
South Wales schools and 
Queensland schools as the twin 
climaxes of the tour. 

In the first. Jason Ashcroft 
kicked a penalty (hen scored a 
trv. set up by a fine break by 
Chris Mahon which Ashcroft 
also convened. .Against Queens- 
land James Pond's blistering 
pace brought him two tries, one 
rn each half, the second being 
convened by David Pilkington, 
Lancashire's other score being a 
drop goal by Ian Jackson. their 
stand-off half,. 

Naturally, the physical de- 
mands of a tour of this sort were 
extreme. Martin Stroll, a tal- 
ented and promising centre, was 
outstanding in the early games 
but lost his sparkle as the tour 
progressed. Jeff Rignall was 
excellent in defence in midfiek) 
and Gary French, who started 
the lour as number two hooker, 
was first choice by its close. Of 
the 24 tries scored to seven 
conceded, 17 were scored on the 
wing or at outside centre, and 
this was equally pleasing ar a 
lime when young people do not 
always get a particularly good 
press. Sean Higgins stresses that 
without exception ”. . . the Lan- 
cashire schools were magnifi- 
cent tourists, never putting a 
fool wrong in any way". 

RESULTSd-ancastors'scoros first) West- 
ern Australia Under-2rs. 13-15: Western 
Australian Schools. 36-6, south Austra- 
lian Scroots. 22-9. Verona Uitoet 21 s. 18 
19. New Soutn Wales County Districts. 18 
3 Australian Capital Territory Schools, 
1810. Now South Wales Schools. 8& 
Tne Queorsiano Schools. 13-4. The 
Oueensuito State High Schools 1 80. 


TENNIS 

McEnroe will 
not play 
his brother 

Toronto (Reuter) — The pros- 
pect of John McEnroe playing 
against his younger brother. 
Patrick, in (he Player's Inter- 
nationa! championship was 
spurted by Todd Nelson's first- 
round v ictory on Monday - 

Nelson used bis superior 
serve and speed to beat Patrick 
McEnroe 6-4. 7-5 in the 
S 575.000 (about £255.000) 
event, so ending hopes of the 
McEnroes clashing in the sec- 
ond round. 

Instead. Nelson, who 
slammed M aces, will face the 
elder McEnroe, a two-time 
defending champion here who 
recently returned 10 the circuit 
after a six-month lay-off. “I am 
noing to try my hardest," 
Nelson said. “Maybe I'U sneak 
by." In other first-round action, 
the only two seeds to play were 
beaten. 

Displaying uncharacteristic 
patience. Marcel Freeman 
shrugged off some disputed 
first-set line calls to overcome 
Matt Anger, a fellow .American 
and the I Ith seed. 6-7, 6-1. 6-2. 
Anger, who pushed the top seed 
Ivan Lendl, to four sets and two 
tic-breaks before bowing out at 
Wimbledon, was not in top 
form. Freeman, crucially, hit 
low to Anger's weaker (worsted 
backhand, resulting in 24 un- 
forced backhand errors for 
Anger. 

Dave Pate, an American, 
seeded 14. was a 6-2. 7-5 v ictim 
of windy conditions and the 
steadiness or Jonathan Canter. 

Results, page 32 


Right on cue 

A prize of £7.000 is expected 
to attract more than 10.000 
players from Scotland for the 
Silk Cut Snooker Challenge 
which starts in November. 
The top four players from 
each club will qualify for a 
knockout round and the 
remaining 32 players will 
qualify for the finals, starting 
on April 26. 


i 


t 






32 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


CRICKET: GLOUCESTERSHIRE’S TITLE HOPES IN JEOPARDY AS ESSEX MAINTAIN WINNING FORM 


Lloyds toils in 
vain as the 
leaders lose 
their way 

By Richard Streeton 

Middlesex 


. " JCV ■ 


CHELTENHAM: 

QQpts) beat Gloucestershire (2) 
by 104 runs. 

Though it remains too early 
to be adamant, this defeat for 
Gloucestershire yesterday 
could have ended their hopes 
of winning this year's Britan- 
nic Assurance County 
Championship. They con- 
tinue to lead the table but the 
gap has shrunk to 19 points 
between them and their 
nearest rivals. Essex, who 
have two matches in hand. 

Gloucestershire were left to 
make 357 in awkward con- 
ditions. following some jos- 
tling for position first thing, 
then were aU out for 252 just 
after tea. It was an efficient 
performance by Middlesex, 
who were without their Test 
players. Middlesex themselves 
lost their previous match to 
Essex by an innings and 
gained only their first win this 
summer in the game before 
that against 

Northamptonshire. 

Only a week ago 
Gloucestershire were 54 
points ahead of Essex. Since 
then they have drawn with 
Nottinghamshire and now 
they have been outplayed by 
Middlesex. Not for the first 
time in history the College 
Field here has been an un- 
happy ground for 
Gloucestershire's title 
chances. 

In a wet summer like the 
present one. the weather could 
play a decisive role as the 
championship reaches its cli- 
max. With 24 points available 
from each match, six or more 
teams still have a mathemat- 
ical chance of finishing first. 

The race remains, primarily, 
though, between Gloucester- 
shire and Essex, with the odds 
in favour of Essex. 

Next Wednesday 

Gloucestershire and Essex 
meet at Colchester when the 
Castle Park ground seems 
certain to have its biggest 
attendance for years. The two 
teams' remaining fixtures are: 

Gloucestershire: Warwick- 
shire (a), Essex (a), Lancs (a), 

Worcs (h), Surrey (a). 

Essex: Nonhants (h), Gloucs 
(h), Surrey (h), Somerset (a), 

Kent (a), Notts (a), Glamor- 
gan (h). 

After Monday's rain and 
bad light interruptions, there 
was some acceptable collusion 
at the start, with Gloucester- 
shire declaring 28S runs be- 
hind and Middlesex rattling 
up cheap runs for 20 minutes. 

Gloucestershire, with 90 overs 

YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


Brown 66. J D Carr 66; 

DV Lawrence 4 for 112). 

Second Innmgs 
W N Stack c Russefl b Stowld 

A J T Mller not out 

KR Brown not out 

Extras (w 2) 


alsti5for95; 


17 
32 
17 
_ 2 


Total (1 wfct dec) . 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-38. 

BOWUNG: Romanes 4.1-0-3S-0: StowM 
4-0-29-1. 

GLOUCBBT EBSI WC. Rrat tn nings 61 for 
3 dec (BOWLING: Daniel 8-1-15-2; 
Cowans 7-1-194; Hughes 4-1-1 14; Rose 
44-16-1). 

Second Innings 

PW-Romainese Miter bHu^ies — 27 

K P Tomlins c Can’d Cowans 0 

A J Wrtqm c RacOey b Darxal 6 

P Baaibndge c Miter b Hutties — 34 
AW Stovoid cDowntonb Cowans— 13 

KM Curran c Stack b Cowans 11 

JW Lkwds cDowntonb Butcher — 94 

tR C Russefl C Daniel b Butter 27 

*D A Graveney tow b Hughes 7 

C A Walsh not out — — . 17 

DV Lawrence cMBarb Hughes 0 

Extras (b 6, to 7. no 3) _1B 

Total 252 

FALL OF WICKETS: 14. 2-13.3-77. 446. 
940. 6-131. 7-180. B-231, 9-252. 10452. 
BOWLING: Dante! 6-1 -17-1: Cowans 13-4- 

604; Rose 44424 Car 114-534 
Hughes 11.4-4404: Butcher 9447-2. 
Umpires: C Coctt and JH Hampshire. 


Hampshire ? Sussex 

AT SOUTHAMPTON 
Hampshre (Spa) draw weft Sussex 
HAMPSHIRE: First Innings 320 for 6 dec 
j^RTuwr 79. C G Greenidge 78, T M 


Second innings 
rbAF 


C G Greenidge c Parker b A P Weis 

TCMkkfetonbleRoux 

R A Snath not out 

■MCJ Nicholas not out 


Extras (b 5. to 11) 
Total (2 wfcts dec) 


. 79 
_ 6 
128 
_ 13 
- 16 
, 242 


Northants y 
Somerset 

AT WELLINGBOROUGH 
Northants (5 pts) draw with Somerset f4) 
SOMERSET: First Innings 210 (V J Marks 
76 not out). 


Second Innings 
*P M Roebuck c Waiertonb Capel 

BC Rose c and bCapei 

N A Felton b Capel 


FALL OF WICKET: 1-20. 2-205. 
BOWLING: Imran Khan 6444 te Roux 4- 
0-15-1: Reeve 12-6-20-0: Green 13-2-33- 
0; C M Weis 7-4-74 Babbtogton 4-0-15- 
0: Lenham 134464; A P Write 9-0-42-1; 
Alkhan 54444. 

SUSSEX: First Irmirns 302 tor 4 dec 
(Imran Khan 104. P WG Parker 83. C M 
Weils 56 not out). 

Second Innings 
R I AShtian b Cowley 


IVA Richards c Lamb b Capel . 

R J Harden not out — . — 

IT Botham b Capel. 


V J Marks cBoyd-Mocsb Cook , 
fT E Gard not out 


A M Green st Parks b Maru 

P W G Parttar c and b Mare 

Imran Khan c Parks b Marshall . 
C M Wells run out , 


A P Wefl3 not out - 

‘H J GouW C Connor 0 Cowley — 

G S te Roux b Cowley 

N j Lenham c Parks □ Mare 
DA Ream not out 


Extras 00 2) 
Total (8 wfcts). 


_ 14 

- 40 
_ 38 
_ 31 
_ 41 
_ 25 
.. 13 

— 0 
4 

— 3 

— 2 
209 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-51. 2-59. 3-120. 4- 
138. 5-172. 6-197. 7-197. 8-202. 
BOWLING: Connor 9-1404 Marshal 
1364-26-1; Cowfay 164594: Maru 21- 
3-92-3. 

Umpires: D R Shepherd and H J Rhodes. 

Surrey v Worcs 

AT THE OVAL 

Surrey (6pai ew reft MtoreesttrsMre 
(81 

WORCESTERSHIRE: Ffist Innings 381 for 
5 dec (D N Patel 132 not out. S j Rhodes 
67 not ouLT SCUrtis 51). 

Second innings 

TS Curtis not out 

tS J Rhodes c Lynch b Fetation 
D M Smith not out . 


— 5 
.17 
.14 
.43 
.53 
-0 
.33 

.19 

Extraafol, toS, nb5) .11 

Total (6 wfcts dec. 58 overs) 195 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-10. 244. 349. 4- 
88. 5-86. 6-148. 

BOWUNG: MaBender 11-8404 Capel 
194-61-5: Harper 124-324 Cook 11-2- 
25-1; WaDiar 6-041-0. 
N0KTHAMP70MSHHE: Fkst Innings 

-G Cooke Gamer b Marks 12 

WLarfcmsc Gard b Coombs 58 

RJBayd-Mossc Richards b Gamer... 0 

AJ Lamb c Gard b Make 83 

NGBCookc Botham b Gamer 4 

R J Bailey not out 11 

Extras (to 5. nb HI 16 

Total (5 wfcts, 356 overs) 185 

D J CapeLR A Harper. tS N V Waterton. N 
A Ma lender and A Walker (Sd not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-54, 254. 399. 4- 
123.5-185. 

BOWUNG: Gamer 17-3-734: Botham 12- 
1-734 Coombs 5-141-1: Marks 16-14 
1. 

Second Innmgs 
G Cook st Gan) b Coombs — 

W Lartdns c Daws b Marks — 

R J Boyd-Mass not out 

R A Harper not out 

Extras 


Total (2 wfcts) 


Extras (b 2. lb 8. nb 5) , 
Total (1 wfct) . 


_ 6* 
_ 2 
- 42 
■ ■ 15 
123 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-26. 

BOWUNG: Gray 61-274 Thomas 9-1- 
330: Fallon 7-1-16-1: Mcdtycort 74174 
Pdeock 2-1-64 Stewart 2444 Lynch 2- 
1-64 

SURREY: First MttflQS 

A R Butcher e Pndgeon b Newport _ 45 

G LCSntonb Pndgeon ___ 2 

M A FetatiamcHtekb Newport — 16 

A J Stewart c Rhodes b Pndgeon 24 

TEJestycPridbeonb Newport 179 

M A Lynch c Rhodes b Newport 77 

tCJ Richards c Hick bSirim 60 

0 J Thomas c sub b Hick 34 

KTMedlycottc Rhodes bSmMh - 0 

AH Gray notom 12 

-PlFoeocknutout — — 16 

Extras (b7. b20.w1.nb7) 35 

Total (9 wfcts dec) - 500 

Score at 100 overa: 334 tor 5. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 14 2-73. 379. 4- 
112. 6405. 6424. 7-484. 3464. 9474. 
BOWUNG: Radford 192-274 Prldgeon 
164-41-2: McEwan 194494 Newport 
369136-4: Patel 24-7-714 Hick 204-4- 
74-1: Smith 19245-2. 

UmprsE J H Hants and 8 J Meyer. 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-29. 2-67. 
BOWLING: Gamar 3-2-14. Boiham J-W 
0: Marks 7- 1-4-1; Coombs 7-925-1. 
Umpires: B Leadbeater and A G T 
Whitehead. 

Warwicks v Kent 

AT EDGHASTON 

Wannckshn (■* pts) draw with Kent fa. 
WARWICKSHIRE: First innmgs 326 tor 5 
0ec(BMMcMflsni06.GW 
PASnirthSsy. 

Second Innings 

A j Moles not out 

P A Smith not out 

Extras (bl. to 2) 


Total (no wfcts dec. 7 overs) . 


37 

17 

;-3 

.57 


BOWUNG: Astett 4-9334 Tavare 39 
214 


KBCT: First tammgs 

M R Benson c Hum page b Mutton _ 82 
S G Hinks c Humpageb Kvr . ....... .. 38 

C J Tavare c Hun^jabe b Mureon _ 14 
N R Taytgr C McMlBan bGrtlord 61 


*C S Cowdrey c Moles b GrflOfti 20 

OGAslottcAmssb Moles 13 

R M Shson c Humpage b Mutton 14 

IS A Mdrfih not Ota — . 12 

C Pam c Humpage b Mimton 0 

D L Undsiwood not out 3 

.22 
299 


Extras (b 6. lb 7. nb S) . 
Total (8 wfcts) 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-100. 2-117, 3-163. 
4-217. 5-249. 6-274, 7-282. 5493. 
BOWUNG: McMHan 163560; Smith 5- 
1-164 Minton 293594: Parsons 12-1- 
344: Kerr 6332-1; Gdtord 15-1-814 
Motes 5-91-1. 

Umjares: B Duddtoston and R Palmer. 


Yorkshire v Glamorgan 


ATHEADiNGLEY 

Yorkshire (SfitS) draw with Gtenorgan p). 
GLAMORGAN: First tamings 134 (S J 
Dermis 4 for 26) 

Second Innings 

J A Hopfcms c sub b Carrich 44 

■H Moms b Shaw 28 

G C Holmes c Robinson b Stew 19 

MP Maynard not out 85 

RCOntongnotout 15 

Extras (b Lb8.w3.nb 9) 21 

Tool (3 wfcts) 212 

P A Coney. J Derrick. tT Davies. S R 
Berwick. DJ Hxsiey and S J Base did not 
bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-57. 2-81,3-147. 
BOWUNG: Denns 162-394 Fletcher 19- 
2544 Shaw 13-2-51-2: Carre* 11-4-32- 
1: Swalow 3-2-24 Byas 2-9164 


YORKSWRE: First tamings 
SN Hanley c Davies bBarwx* — 

A a Metcalfe c Moms b Base 

PCamckc Davies b Base 

D Byas c Davies b Banwcfc 

PE Robinson cOmongb Base — 
J D Lo«e c sub b Derrick 


ID L8atasTowc Hickey b Base . 
I G Swakwr not out 


_ 2 
149 
_ 1 
_0 
- 2 
_ 06 
.42 
3 




left, made a poor start, when 
Tomlins was held at backward 
short leg in the second over 
and Wright was caught in the 
gully with 13 on the board. 

Romaines and Bainbridge 
made some forceful strokes 
but Middlesex achieved a 
Parthian thrust when they 
captured three key wickets 
either side of lunch. Hughes 
took two of them in successive 
overs as soon as be bowled. 
Romaines turned a simple 
catch to forward short leg and 
Bainbridge was held in the 
same place as be fended off a 
lifting ball. Stovofd was caught 
behind in Cowans's first over 
after the interval. 

The rest of the Gloucester- 
shire innings was dominated 
by Lloyds, who pulled and 
drove two sixes and 12 fours 
in a fighting innings which 
kept Middlesex concerned as 
rain clouds gathered. Curran, 
Russell and Graveney all lin- 
gered ibra time but Middlesex 
gradually winkled them out. 
Thin drizzle was ignored by 
the players but with the light 
poor, Middlesex resorted to 
Butcher's seldom used leg 
breaks. 

Curran fell to a bat and pad 
catch against Cowans before 
Butcher took the next two 
wickets. Russell lofted a high 
catch to long-off as 
Gloucestershire continued the 
chase: Lloyds after I OS min- 
utes mistimed a pull and was 
held by Downton as the 
wicketkeeper ran 20 yards 
back. Hughes ended the match 
when he dismissed Graveney 
and Lawrence with the second 
and fourth balls of the first 
over after tea. 

MDDLESEX Ftatt terms 346 (K R 
8: CAW — * 


Extras (IblO.w 7. nt>6) 23 

Total (7 wfcts dac. 80.5 overs) — 310 
C Shaw. S J Dermis md S 0 Fletcher (fid 
not baL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-29. 3-35.4-51. 
6232.6-288.7-310. 

BOWLING: Hickey 17-9794 Barwfc* 29 
8-52-2: Base 18.61-74-4; Ontong 61-16 
0: Holmes 62-94. Don* 14-1-70-1. 
Umptaes J w Holder and N T Paws. 



Fletcher fixes it for Foster 
to put Essex back in hunt 


LEICESTER : Essex (IS pis) 
beta Leicestershire (4) by 130 
runs. 

Essex narrowed the gap on 
Gloucestershire, the champion- 
ship leaders, to 19 points by 
howling Leicestershire out 
cheaply yesterday. A week ago, 
the difference was 54 points, and 
Essex still have two matches in 
hand. 

Victory came about only 
through some contrived cricket. 
Play on Monday had been 
washed out, and Leicestershire 
declared at their Saturday score 
of 55 for two. They had had 
much the better of the first day, 
dismissing Essex for 216. 

Now. Leicestershire made it 
exceedingly difficult for them- 
selves to win. By using their joke 
bowlers, they allowed Essex to 
score 1 59 in 52 minutes, and set 
them 321 in a minimum of SO 
overs. It was too one-sided a 
proposition on a pitch which 
had life in it. Leicestershire were 
never remotely in the hunL 

Admittedly. Essex were with- 
out Lever, who bad pinched a 
nerve in his back while sleeping. 
The fitter sportsmen become, 
the more bizarre their ailments. 
It was as well F S Trueman was 
not commentating. Still, Essex 
did not miss Lever, since Foster 


By Ivo Tennant 

took five wickets in an innings 
for the ninth time this season. 
He did not in feet, bowl that 
welL He bad no need to. 
Leicestershire succumbed with- 
out a figfu. 

By liinch, Foster bad three 
wickets, Cobb and Willey 
caught behind, and Balderstoue 
taken at backward short-leg. the 
ball lifting. On resumption, 
Whitaker hooked him for four, 
and played the same stroke to 
next ball, only striking it finer. 
Toptey, still at backward short- 
leg, held a remarkable 
catch.Two balls later, Pottet 
edged his attempted leg-glance 
and was caught behind. This 
was Foster’s 72nd champion- 
ship wicket of the season. At the 
same score, 69, Leicestershire 
lost their sixth wicket when 
Topley had Boon caught in the 
slips. 

De Freitas and Whitticase 
added 50 for the seventh wicket 
before de Freitas was caught at 
short extra-cover off a belted 
drive. Agnew skied to mid-off 
and Childs saw to the tail- 
end ers. 

Earlier. Essex had declared 
after batting for just 18 overs. 
From seven of these, Utley and 
Prichard put on 87 for the third 
wicket. Lilley hit four fours and 


seven axes in a 1 9-minme 63. If 
one did not know the bowlers 
and the circumstances, it would 
read like a Botha tnesque in- 
nings. There is something un- 
satisfactory about contrived 
cricket, but the same could 
never be said of Fletcher’s 
captaincy. 

ESSEX- First Innings 216 (B R Hartte S3). 
Second innings 

tD E East ede Freitas b Boon 20 

J P Stephenson c Ferns b Boon — _ 30 

Pj Prichard not out 40 

A WUteyc Ferns bVWmaker 63 

BRHanaanotout 1 

Extras f) 2. to 2- wl) S 

Total (3 vitas dec, 1 Stovers) - — 159 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-55. Z-55, 3-142. 
BOWLING: Cobb 69334 Boon 61-81- 
2 Wnitakar 42-0-41-1. 

LEICESTERSHIRE: First tamings 55 tar 
2 dec. 

Second tamtams 

j C Batoerstone c Toptey b Foster — 16 

R A Cobb c East b Foster 0 

"P Wffley c East b Foster 31 

TJ Boone Prichard b Tqotey 7 

J J Whitaker c Toptey b Foster 5 

L Potter c East b 


P A J de Freitas cHanSab Toptey — 22 

tP Whitticase not out 55 

JP Agnew cLIOeyb Topley 21 

G J Frems tow b CMda — — — — 10 
LB Taylor tow bCWdS 7 


Extras (to 1, w3.nb10) 14 

Total ! 190 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-3. 2-48, 3-59, 459, 
669. 669. 7-119. 6146. 6176. 19199 
BOWUNG: Foster 22484-5; Toptey 163- 
694 CMds 1366-362. 

Umpires: P B Wight and A A Jones 


Surrey’s best is not enough 


Finders keepers: Richards, of Surrey, finds his touch with the bat, scoring 60 at the Oval yesterday while his opposite number. 
Rhodes, found success behind the stumps, holding three catches for Worcestershire (Photograph: Hugh Roatledge) 

A full day 
bears 
no fruit 

By Peter Ball 

BUXTON: Derbyshire (4pts) 
drew with Lancashire (I). 

Buxton, with its sylvan 
ground nestling under the High 
Peaks, is one of the most 
beautiful settings on the county 
ciicuiL Its pitch produces rather 
earthier descriptions from pro- 
fessional players and yesterday 
it defeated the efforts of both 
sides to contrive a result even 
though the morning's frantic 
mopping-up operations allowed 
an uninterrupted day's play. 

After some hard bargaining 
followed by some easy runs for 
Mendis and Fowler, who 
reached his 1,000 for the season 
in a rush after spending his first 
1 1 overs acquiring two. Derby- 
shire were set a target of 280 in 
215 minutes. It was beyond 
their capabilities, but once they 
called off the chase Simmons 
and Folley could make no 
further inroads on a soft pud- 
ding of a pitch, Lancashire 
losing the opportunity of 
morale-boosting win before 
today's match with Surrey. 

The opening overs indeed did 
liule for Lancashire's peace of 
mind as Barnett clattered some 
wild bowling. 28 coming off five 
overs. More seriously. Maynard 
jarred bis thumb painfully, from 
a leg side wide from Henriksen. 

Barnett, however, departed 
when Makinson at last found 
the length to extract some help 
from the pitch and take the 
outside edge- Varcy. the third 
wicketkeeper of the innings 
(having deposed Fowler after 
two overs), took the catch with 
style to the noisy amusement of 
his predecessor. 

Henriksen had been promptly 
banished after Maynard's depar- 
ture. and Lancashire'spaucfty of 
bowling was demonstrated by 
the introduction of Fairbrother. 
Fairbroxher confounded the 
cynics with a tidy spell. Hill's 
normally anxious countenance 
becoming exaggeratedly so as he 
peered from bowler to wicket 
and back. 

After a cautious start, how- 
ever. Hill overcame his sus- 
picions enough to advance up 
the pitch against Simmons and, 
if the results were not always 
elegant, it was effective. Maher 
was more orthodox, and con- 
sequently more restricted, but 
the pair survived successfully 
until tea, when Derby needed 
192 in two hours. 

It seemed a feasible if difficult 
target, but after reaching his fifty 
in 97 minutes Hill was undone 
by a delivery from Folley which 
bit and turned. In the next over 
Maher reached his own half 
century with a cover drive, only 
to fell-next ball as he failed to 
reach the pitch. 

Suddenly the wicket looked a 
different proposition, the spin- 
ners finding turn and variable 
bounce. Morris threatened - to 
restore Derbyshire's advantage 
but drove a sharp return catch to 
Folley to leave bis side needing 
122 when the final 20 overs 
began. 

Derbyshire continued the 
chase for a while, bm Marpfes 
immediately became Varey’s 
second victim, a slow-motion 
stumping greeted with bilarity 
as well as congratulations from 
his colleagues. Warner and 
Holding holed out in the at- 
tempt to keep going, but Roberts 
remained and Finney stayed 
with him for 15 overs. 

LANCASHIRE: First Innings 173 (A E 
Warner 4 tor 38) 

Second tamings 

G D Mends c Fvmm b Rcnem 65 

G Fowler q Barnett 6 MO 88 

DWVarey notour — ; 15 

N H Fairbrother not out 4 

Extras to 2 . to 1 , W 2 , nb 3 ) ^8 

Total (2 wfcts dec) 178 

J Abtahaw, *C H Lloyd. +C Maynam. j 
Simmons. 0 J MaMneott. SHennksan and 
l Folley did not W. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-147. 2-166. 
BOWUNG: Finney 63-154 Werner 8-2- 
354 Barnett 61-444 Marpfes 44484 
HO 6622-1; Roberts 61-1 1-1. 


Phillip Neale had no difficulty 
in trumping Pat Pocock's soli- 
tary card at the Oval yesterday, 
where W or cest er shire followed 
Surrey's declaration at 500 for 
nine by making 1 23 for one in a 
drawn match. Because 
Worcestershire had been poorly 
placed, so fer as bowlers were 
concerned (Radford was at 
home in bed suffering from 
influenza and Pndgeon was 
nursing a strained hamstring). 
Surrey s thinking had turned on 
Jesty, Lynch and the rest piling 
on the runs and establishing a 
big first innings lead. 

Lynch, though, was soon to 
go. caught behind off Newport, 
having helped put on 193 for the 
fifth wickeL Richards made 60 
and Thomas 34 as Surrey 
pushed on to make their highest 
total of the season. 

At Southampton. Sussex 
made 209 for eight in chasing 
261 runs to win against Hamp- 
shire. In setting a target Robin 
Smith passed 1.000 runs for the 
season on his way to 128 not out 
as Hampshire came in at 242 for 
two declared. 

Hampshire were leading by 64 
when Greenidge. 24. and Robin' 
Smith. 1 1, took guard again at 
46 forone. But with Turner and 
Tremlett unlikely to bat Hamp- 
shire moved ahead in slow time. 
When Greenidge fell to a bril- 
liant one handed catch on the 
mid-wicket boundary by Parker, 

Broker who 
cashed in 
for Sussex 

Behan AUkhan, who had 

never played first-class cricket 
until two months ago. today 
finds himself one match away 
from a Lord's final as Sussex 
fate on Worce st ershire in a 

NatWest trophy semi-final at 

New Road. 

Alikhaa. aged 23 and a bro- 
ker. wrote to Sussex for a trial 
when he noticed they wens 
struggling with injuries m June. 
Sussex responded by placing 
Alikhan, a former Surrey second 
XI batsman, into the first team 
immediately. 

The London-born Alikhaa, 
who was raised partly in Karachi 
and partly in Wimbledon, has 
repaid Sussex's faith with more 
Hum 600 nms, mdoding five 
half centuries in his last nine 
innings. He sank am finding it 
all great fun. A Lord's final 
would be a tremendous boons 
because I could not have ex- 
pected it in my wildest dreams so 
soon. 

~My aha was simply to 
fSt»hlfch gjyself in Ute ham 
which I am stOI doing." 

Ian Gould, the Sussex skip- 
per. said Alikhan has been a 
welcome discovery in an injury- 
hit season." He came in as a 
middle order batsman with no 
experience and now be is open- 
ing the innings on merit-** 

Sussex have Adrian Jones 
and Tony Pigott. their lasl 
bowlers, back from injury in a 
foil-strength side to take part In 
their first semi-final since 1981- 


By Peter Marson 
Hampshire's second wicket pan- 
had put on 185. 

Ashley Metcalfe hit his sixth 
hundred of the summer on the 
way to 149 before Yorkshire's 
declaration at 310 for seven at 
Headingley yesterday. Maynard 
then took Glamorgan dear of 
trouble in an innings of 85 not 
ouL 

A barren second day meant 
that Yorkshire began m the 
morning at 138 for four, and 
four runs in the lead, with 
Metcalfe 73 not out and Love on 
48. Metcalfe was soon to pick up 
the threads to his innings, and in 
reaching his century had written 
in a new line to interest 
Yorkshire's statisticans by 
becoming the first player to 
mark his debut first class in- 
nings. and his first match as a 
capped player, by making a 
hundred. When Derrick even- 
tually prised out Love. 
Yorkshire's third wicket pair 
had put on 181 runs. 

Kent who had been asked to 
make 361 to win at Edgbaston, 
made 299 for eight of which 
Benson hit 82 and Taylor eight 
in a drawn match. Following 
Christopher Cowdrey's declara- 
tion at 23 for no wicket Kent's 
score at the close on Saturday. 
Moles and Smith made 57 
before Gifford responded by 
setting Kent a target Now it was 
the turn of Benson and Hinks. 
and these two made a promising 


Start in scoring 77 in 90 minutes 
before lunch. . . 

On the school ground at 
Wellingborough, Northampton- 
shire rook five points, and 
Somerset four. Northampton- 
shire having made 80 for two 
after Somerset's declaration in 
their second innings at 195 for 
six. This match, too, had lost a 4 
day's play on Monday. 

Lamb was in form once more 
and set the pace in makinga half 
century off 48 balls, before he 
fell to a catch behind. He had hit 
a couple of sixes and 15 fours in 
83. a total which happens also to 
be Lamb's average in eight first 
class ipnings since hie was 
dropped from England's teanfat 
the end of June. It was here that 
Geoff Cook declared. 

CHAMPIONSHIP TABLE 


p 

Gloucs (3) 19 

Essex (4) 17 

Swrey (S) 18 

Lees (16) 18 

YoikahirB (11) 19 
" - >12)17 


Hampsftirei . 

Worcs (5) 18 

Not®® 18 
Kant (9) 17 

Nocttiaiitena)l7 
Dertjys(12) 17 
SomersettlT) 17 
Lancs (141 18 

Sussex (f) 18 

Mfctotesex(l) 18 
Wanviciui (15) 18 
Gam (12) 18 

1 985 position In brackets 
YortcsNra total tatduttes eight potass for 
drawn match where scorasTmished level. 


D BtfM Pts 
8 40 53 237 

5 39 51 218 

6 38 56 191 

8 41 55 178 
11 54 50 176 

6 42 51 173 

9 46 52 162 
10 44 53 161 

9 32 55 151 
2 11 41 42 147 

4 9 27 54 145 

2 12 43 34 125 

3 12 36 40 124 
7 8 34 42 124 
9 7 32 53 117 
3 13 42 43 117 

5 12 31 37 84 



DERBYSHIRE: Brat tamings 72 for 1 
(Bowling: Makmson 13-4-32-0: 
Herwc&to 6 9261; Steimons 7-1-11-0) 

*KJBametrcvSSybM^aon 20 

tBJM Maher bSfctmons 51 

A HM c Simmons tt Robey — — 51 

J E Moras c and b Foley — — —— 15 

B ROMOS not out - — 25 

CMarptesstVto«rbanmcns 3 

A E Warner c sub bStamara Q 

M A Hqttng c Henriksen b Foltey 0 

R J firihey not out ' 


Extras to 3. to 1.w 2.ab 7) -- 
Total (7 wfcts) 


Back in form: Lamb scored 83 at Wellingborough yesterday, 
his average score in eight inungs snue England dropped him 


_._13 

TO 

0 H Mortensen and R StwrniadW nojbat. 
FALL OF WICKETS; 1-30.2-129. 6133,4- 
157,6182.6170.7-171. 

BOWLING: Makteson 10.4-1-49-1; 
Hereto ksen 60-11^: Fwtet>tew |916 
0: Simmons 227-563: ftHay 16644-3; 
Abrahams 6920. 

Umpires: H D Btatf and R A White. 


CYCLING 


Confusion reigns 
as Comillet 
moves to the front 



From John Wilcocksoo, Sacramento 

The chief race official, Gcnv 
McDaid. from Glasgow, ruled 

.1 »V.„ mmidIm 


A circuit-race victory m ,he 
Coors Classic for Davis 
phinnev. of the United States- 

provided a spectacular finish on 
Monday to a decisive day of 
racing through the California 
wine country- nnft 

Cheered on 

supporters in the cobbled se^ 
lion of Old Sacramento, 
phinnev brilliantly defeated 
Steve Bauer, of Canada, to claim 
a record 14th stage victory m 
five vears of racing in this 
American version of tnc Tour 
de France. . . - . 

Behind them m the ftnaf 
sprint, four other members oi 
the 1 1 -strong breakaway group 
crashed when Alan Mc- 
Cormack. of Ireland, caught his 
left pedal in the fencing. The 
Irishman was badly bruised and 
slightly concussed, but he man- 
aged to walk across the finishing 

line to a large roar of approval 
from the crowd. 

All this was an addendum to 
the day's earlier action, which 
left Bruno Cornillet. of France, 
with the overall race leadership 
— 27 seconds ahead of Greg 
LcMond. the recent winner ot 
the Tour de France and winner 
of this event in I985 ; The 
American, aged 25, who lives in 
the Sacramento area, completed 
the 1 02-mile second stage, along 
with Cornillet and three other 
riders, more than seven minutes 
ahead of the main pack. But it 
was not without controversy. 

The stage itself was won by 
Cornillet. who broke dear ofthe 

others throe Bauer (Can) sanw'ttmeTVj Pteo-jM 

finish only to be directed off s8ine:4,AZiw»ny(t£SSRSat4sK;5N 
mnrv AC 9 result, the French- Ducrot iNeiti) same: 6. K Enfoan Ote* 

same. 


that the mistake was not 
Corn 1 1 lei's fault, but poor 
organization of the finishing 

circuit in the streets of Smb!: 
memo. But the confusion 
marred what had been a 
magnificent four horns of me. 
ing, which began in mist and SO 
degree temperatures in the Napa 
Valley wine town of Sonoma, 
and ended in 100 degree heat ia 
from of the California Sta* 
CapitoL 

LcMond made his move with 
77 miles to go and Hampsten 
went with him. Also there were 
Raul Alcala, a young Mexican 
rider, and Jaanus Kuum. a 
native Estonian who became a 
Norwegian citizen last year. 

ComiUm. from the Peugeot 
team, was the last rider to catch 
the LcMond express, which 
rapidly gained five minutes on a 
regrouped mam pack. They 
emerged from tbe mountains 
with a nine-minute lead, which 
was maintained for the remain- 
ing 42 miles on flat, strajghi 
roads. *"1 found it hard.' 1 
LcMond said. “It was my fits) 
long race since the Tour <Je 
France, and I’ve Only trained on 
four days in the past formigtu.'* 

RESULTS: Stage to Somm to Sm- 
RMflto (102 nates): 1. B Com te al (Fn 
3:58:33. 2. G LeMonrt (US), at 20 mc: 3, n 
Aicata (Max) samo tma; a, j Koum mm 
same vne. 5. A Hamutan (usj, ^ 

Bme;6,TBroznowsfci(US).at7m*t53uc 

Stage 3: OU Sacramento Catering 33 
rates: 1. □ Ptimney (11% 1:15.16. 2, S 


r . 
.u*' 


' L-. 
r-‘‘ 






course. .As a result, the French 
man was awarded the stage 


(Neiti) same: 6, K Enksao (Dm 
O verall Po si tion s: 1. B CM 


man was awaroea me swp- r/iSYk ? fcifMtnrrt aha 
victory with a 20-second mar- ^ r licaia (Mex>. 33 sk I 

gin, even rhougb he armed five njsL at 39sec 5. J Kuum (Nafwmj a J ■“ 
minutes behind the rest. sssec; 6. □ Pnmney (US), « Twin I2s«c. j 

An Irish stew 1. 


i ' • . 


1 

u 


By David Dnffield 


The pedalling participants in 
tonight's second round of the 
Kellogg's City Centre 
championships will have moved 
from Monday night's race in 
Manchester to Dublin. The sea- 
going section will have travelled 
via Liverpool and BelfesL 
.The ingredients for the Dub- 
lin race arc as equally diverse as 
the route. Joey McLoughlin, the 
lively Liverpool rider, won 
round one in Manchester. His 
grandparents are Irish, so he 
will, no doubt, receive strong 
vocal support. All eyes, how- 
ever. will be on the Irish heroes, 
Stephen Rocbe and Sean Kelly. 
Both have had problems this 
season. Roche crashed in the 
Paris six-day. and since then has 
nursed an injured knee. Being 
48th in this year's Tour de 
France was a long way down 
from his third placd in 1985. 


Sean Kelly has earned tbe 
nickname “Cannibar from tbe 
Continental press for eating up 
classic after classic His crash in 
the Tour of Switzerland and a 
damaged leg with 1 S stitches put 
him out of the Tour de France. 
He is now hungry for success. 

In the 1984 Kellogg’s event in 
Dublin. Roche beat Kelly. In 
1985. “Super Sid" Barrass 
added to his 180-plus pro- 
fessional wins by beating Roche, 
who is a Dublmcr. in Dublin. 
He strengthened his young legs 
delivering milk up the steps of 
the tenement flats. 

He will need all that strength 
to stop Kelly this time. Qrwffl 
Joey McLoughlin bring a smile 
to Irish eyes? The strong field of 
six Continental professionals, 
three Australians, and some 40 
British professional riders will 
not make it easy. 


'L-y 






FOR THE RECORD 


TENNIS 


GOLF 


TOHOHTO: Pteyera* fctoimteioniil chanrpfcw- 

tetfcK Ffcto itnmt: A Mansdort {Isrt biRicwdo 

Acwa fCnitaX 2-6. 7-5. 6-3; M Freeman (US) 

bt MAqoeriuSL 67. 64. 6-to T Nelson ~ 

'McSroa 


I (US) 64. 7-5; J Carter (US) tt ti 
.7-5: GHotanes (US) WBCowao 


trtPI 

Tate (US) S4. ... 

Ida) 6-2. 62: C 1 

64. 62:. F Macal (itaod'bt R Viver ( 
4-6. 7-6: N Odaor |>tarana) tt M 
Woftentome [Can) 7-6. 6-4; Gl 
(USl tt M SrejOer (Czi 6-4* 7-& B i 
tt M Da« fUS) 4-6. 7-6, 7-8. 

LOS ANGELES: Vtattnfi SSm woman's 

taumaraant; Sfcigias: Fta* mood (US itotess 

santtaSRaha ttH Ketesi(CanL 7-6. 48. 61: 

A Mtanar (Aua) tt C UrefcWtt (S*wL 6-3. 7-5. P 

Loute-Hatper tt W Tunibul (AusL 6-3. 60: T 

Moetuzufci tt A Whtta 6-2. 7-tf (7-4). M Gumw 

tt A Halfcova (Cz) 60. BA A hianncfcison tt J 

Malta* (SA) 7-5. 1-6. 6-2: G Kim bl E Platt 

JWGJ63. 7-& L McNfll M E inoue (Jpn) 63. 6 

7. 7-fr. J Dune (GB) tt TPtatps4-6. 64. 6-3: P 


Kitahnan JUS) 4-6, 62. 5-4; W trim tt £ 
<SA)4-6. 7-5, 6-2; Hu Na tt SGonter 


Ranaaif 


•1.62:0 

1: N Tauztet(Fr) tt J Byrne (Aua) 


tt CKart&son/Swe) 5-2.6- 
6-7.6-1.61 


FOOTBALL 


ARGENTINIAN LEAGUE: DeporOvo Espanol 

2. Ureon O. Pfteanw 2. Radng (Cordooa) 1: 

Rosra Central 1. Institute fConlbba) 1: Ferro 

Cana Oes» i. Boca JixHors I: Deponim 

itakano i. Vetaz Sarefiata i; EatadtentBS de la 

Plata i. Racing Out> 1: independents 5. 

GnwaswEagnma La Plata l:Sm Lorenzo de 

Almagro 2. Tempertey j ; River Rate v 

Aigarmnos Juntare. suspended; NeweTa Ota 

Boys « Talerea (Cataotaa) suspended. 


S ANTA CWIZ:WO»we n^ 

plonmfaip: QuaBlyuig tou re anient flrat ste 

(US unless satetft 74iP Son. 7S K Cot*** 

C Morgue dAtgue tFr): M Hatton « K 

Rogersarc K Gaidner. S Lebrun, L ante 6 

Kt Star 75; K Dawes 75 (GB). 77; M te 

Lorann-Taya (Fri: C Howtoam (he); Mfc V 

Thomas (WilL 91: T Johnson (CBL St A 

Hashuntto (Jpm. 93: J ThORM (GBL •* V 

Pamrard(RKLBeh3narto.M McKenna (** 

85: A Nakata (Jpn): G Qumana (Venj y 
Tataalastaupn)- 

SATON CAREW: British Boys’ Ctliraplnte 

ship: Sseond roond: L Masi W D HBtaaat « 

and 3; C CasBoDs bt N Starting 3 and 2; U Bm 

(Swe) tt P GrUben o aito 2: J Davtason H f 

Hurww 6 and s: N Chtato tt D States 5 *0 
4. C MttcheB tt S Rofces 1 hote: D Ktafcpattai 

btCBtfuanaa MHastcttJFsmimiKfr 

Johnson tt M Mores (to? and 1: KSUsshanK 

T Cowgd 1 hole. F Gabnann (Swttz) bt JFoob 
5 ano 4; G Pootey w/o agamtM Psreate. ao: 
a Han tt a Salmon 3 and £ R Sena NT 

Qigrass 5 ana 4. A Dowerts tt V Row ttsal 

tote tt N Connote at i9th: G Ktata U H 

Outai 7 and 6. J Baffles H I OOrwtey #» 

hole: 0 Bathgate tt G Roberts one hate S 

Wlaffn bl K WaBonk at 1 9th: M Dawson W{ 

Morisy 5 and 4: J Htgcnboiham ttC Ftasar5 
and 4; p Graham tt N GornneB cm hote » 

McEwan btBAvey one hole: E Gray HASri . 

2 and 1. G McNefl M D Zeotat S and < 0 
Lockett ttM Rose 2 and t; S Bwnamitetil J ■ 

Watson 4 and 3: G Matthew W M Scarp* M ■ 
and i. G Star til F O'Ctaagnan 

I Bennett tt J Kennedy. 5 and 4; 1 1 

— "MCjWck ttl^B 

G Key bt m Beisham. at iflift ffita* tt S 
□ochsny. 2 and 1. 

2: A Wafer btS Pay 


:txC 

Hrans. one hole. S'McKoUcfc tt taJwk 

twonofe&r 


. 2 and 1. A BloR tt S Hogra. 9 ted 
S Payne. 4 and 2: L Hama ( 

tt A Rees. 4 and 3; M 


,4andtoL 

Crostowafii 


« 


BASEBALL 


NOR TH AMB BCte A m e ric an I aagim New 

Votfc Yankees 6. Clenlarta Indans 5. Balti- 

more Onttes 3. Toronto Bfeie Jays 1. Detroit 
Tgws S. Bmton Red Sox 0; CNcago White 
Sox 6. Mffwaukae Brewers 1: Urtncaota 

Jw«s2.CaWcnxa Angtts ft Seattle Mar mere 

6. Oakland AtNeocseT Ntetonta Lcooue: 

PttPtourgh _Piraes 10. Ctra«» Cutis 8: 

Prates TO. CtacagoCuta 7. San 

Fi*»««> Sants 13. Cmonnarr Rede 4: SI 

Uxm Caidnais S. Montreal Expos 4; Atlanta 
Breves IV San Dego Padres 6: Houston 


BOWLS 


LEAMWGTON SPA: thwpooVVIetorto tawm^ 

anoe ntafanw citamploMMps: Two wood 




R®* 1 16-14; v jjtest m P Bradley. l7^Tt 
Scorer WE Wa fcer. 15-10; N Shaw HO — - ^ 

Green. 18-5; IMoiyneuxttJWoodrough. 17- MOffley). 4 an 
ftTBarttoot A Remras. 16-9: D Massey wv Smyth iCourty 
Sharp. 15ft L Lowe bt S Jacfcson, 18-6 W «*——***-' 


Robertson. 2 and 1. W Ptdipaon HT Breffl* 
I 6 and 5. G Croce TOWN Fataer 2 ted LA 

Urtun (It) bt D Buster . 6 and 4; M Jositoh UG. 

Bnzay (Ft). 2 and i. J Amjti (So) UP1J 
Jones, om hole; N Duncantt G WMnr. 3ted 

1. Third found! G Evans tt D teoasae. BC 

holes: C Ronald n B Gtegan; 6 and 4: M 

Stanford bt C Chalk 8 end 7. V CO* tat 

Jones. 5 and 3, N Atsettook W G LSB.2B5 

1 ; A Sandywea tt M Scopetta (SwteL 3 ted| 

A Wteams tt S Edgiey/S lflttc T BernttP 
Smith. 3 and 2: Man tt Cassell; one H* 

Devtason tt 0«n. 3 and 1: CNdby MMtitaL 

6«ta4 : Hasw tt Knfcpatncfc. 2 an d! . 
WEST KUfDOft QMS’ Homo MenteMlta 

Scotland S Wales 2 iScontsh test): C lArtte 

LosiioJ Foster 2 and 1.K Mine ttLOteW* 
4 and 3: F McKay tt K Bant 4 sodS* 
FitzGeraM bt A Pemarn 4 and 3: N Bonett ^ 

Uoydt hree;SLiWeKSMounttort7*d5. 

M Dawson lost to R Harrison (Mold) Seed | 
En^and 5 tretend 2 [Ewgteti name s WS 
Shepoon tt o Mahon one hole: M Cnmtete 

lost to B Hacfceit 3 ana 2: AMBCdontedMO 

TEawn two notes: LFandounhttOMcCtttgt 

2andl:JFufbybtLMccS/and6;SBetete 

W P McKmsqy two notea: H Dotaeao « K 

Hunter Sand / - ' - ' 

DUBUffc ttteh aaateur dosed 

stop; OBranrondaytown end Bea y**p*WM 

A Snwn (island), one note: L MuOlteBj 
IWaodvoofc) tt N JenMns. CShendonWn. 


C"yr' . 








one hold: P Flayfus ITnte) oi J 
'i:C MarnpH 


Ptwoft. ifr-i ft M Dyer tN S Write. i7-ia c 
Anwn tt M Rose, 18^8: 1 Roberts ttAaiy l^ 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


&O0 CeetttAM. • - 

&50 Breakfast Tima wftP Frank 
• Bougft and Debbie 
Greenwood. Weather at 
&55, 7.25, 7£5,&25 and 
ZJSS; regional news, - 
weather and traffic at 6.57. 
7.27, 7.57 and *27; 
national and international 
news at 7 M, 7.30, &0Q, 
&30 and 9-0$ sport at ' 
7-20 and &20; a reviews! 
the morning newspapers 
at 637; and the latest pop 
music charts at 9.00. Plus 


The guests include BiUOwen 
920 Dudley Oo-RUht Cartoon 
series, set in 192fls 
Canada, about a reluctant 
. Mount®. (0 9J25 Why 
Don’t You-.? Entertaining 
ideas for yourwsters at a 
loose end. (r) £50 The 
Adventure® of BuJWnkJe * 
and Rocky. Pert three, (r) 
&55 Newsround Special - 
. Dafivary, presented Oy 

John Craven 1020 Tm 
A dventures of BuOwinMe 
and Rocky. Part four, (r) 
1025 Play School 
presented by Cared Leader 

. with guest Andrew 
Secombe. . 

1025 Cricket Peter West 
intnoduces coverage of a 
NatWest Bank Trophy 
semifinai match. 

1250 Nows After Noon with 
Laurie Mayer, indudes 
news headlines with 
subtitles 1.05 Regional 
news. The weather details 
• come from John Ketttey. 

1.10 Chocfc-a-Btocfc. (rj 
125 Cricket Peter West with • 
further coverage of a 
NatWest Bank T rophy 
semifinai match. 423 
Regional news. 

425 The Roman Holidays. 
Cartoon series set in 
Ancient Rome. Last ki the 
series 450 HeML Drama 
serial about a young 
- orphan girl, {rj 

■ 615 Fame. Miss Sherwood, in 
an attempt to contact 
Leroy's parents in 
connection with her 
inability to get to Leroy the 
student, discovers a 
shattering secret (i) 

600 News with Nicholas 

Witchell arid Philip Haytom 
Weather. 

635 London Plus. 

720 Wogan. On the guest Dst 
tonight are Harry Worth. 

Mia Carta, and Come 
Dandnq comment a tor. 

Peggy Spencer. Plus 
music from The Humart 
League. 

7M Lame Ducks. Comedy 
series starring John 
Duttkieand Lorraine 
Chase. Tonight Drake and 
Angie and their friends 
continue knocking the 
• disused railway station 
buBtSng into shape. (r) 

610 International Athletics. 

The Zurich Grand Prix . 
meeting, introduced by 
David I eke with Brendan 
Foster. 

920 News with JuBaSomervflle 
and Andrew Harvey. 

Regional news and 
weather. . • 

9-30 DaHas. Matt Is still in 
Colombia trying to 

convince Rueda thathe is 

not after Pam's money ■ 
while the lady in question 

arrives home. toa 

heroine's welcome; JR 

affections onceagain; axi 
Grace admits defeat after 
failing to rouse any 
romantic passion within 
Jack. (Ceefax) 

10.15 The Thom BMs. The . 
penultimate episode of the 
drama based on the novel 
by Co Been McCullough. 
Maggie tries to forget her 
grief while holidaying on 
peaceful Mattock Island. 

But her reverie is 
disturbed by the arrival of 
Ralph, unable to reum to 
Rome without seeing her. 
They consummate their 
love, ignorant of how 
tragic the consequences 
will be. Starring Rachel 
Ward and Richard 
Chamberlain. (0 (Coe fax) 
1120 International Athletics. 

■ ■ Further coverage of the 
Grand Prix meeting in 
Zurich. The commentators 
are David Coleman, Ron 
Pickering and Stuart 
Storey. 

12.10 Weather. 


TV-AM 


615 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Anne 
Diamond and Adrian 
Brown. News with Gordon 
. Honeypomt* at 620, 7.00, 

720, 820 and 630; sport 
at 640 and 7 .40; exarasas 
at 655; cartoon at 725; 

' pop music news at 725; 
and ways of keying 
young chBdren occupied 
on long car trips at 825. 

8.45 Wacaday presented by 
Timmy Maflett His guest is 
down. CharSe CafrcrtL 


I TV/LONDON 


925 Thames news headlines 
followed by Survival: - 
Those Cray Coots. The 
coot and the moorhen, (r) 
9.50 Mika. Adventures of a 
young boy takings 
remdier from Lapland to 
the Paris Zoo 1020 
Salmon Running, Bear 
Cunning. Canadian bear 
cubs bang taught to swim 
and fish. 

1025 FarebeflXLS’ Science 
fiction adventures, (r) 
1120 The Wuzzles. 
Cartoon series. 1125 
Wattoo Wattoo. 

1120 About Britain. The role of 
ttie sea in bringing . 
Plymouth into existence. 

1220 The Utile Green Man. 
Tales about a visitor from 
another planet (r) 12.10 
Our Backyard, (r) 

1220 Hair. Trevor Sortie 
demonstrates cutting 
■ techniques and styles for 
children's hair, (r) 

120 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 120 Thames news. 

120 Man in a S rt c eti . McQM 
finds trouble when a man 
thought dead tor six yearn 
returns, (r) 220 Massage. 
Carols Beresford-Cooke 
demonstrates how 
massage in pregnancy can 
help tone and condition 
the muscles before, and 
relax them during 
childbirth. 

320 Take the High Road. It's 
Hg race day. Will it go 
according to plan? 325. 
Thame® news headSnes 
320 Sons and Daughters. 

420 The Utile Green Man. A 



shown at noon 4.10 The 
Moontin®. Cartoon series, 
fr) 420 Do It With 
Sheefagh.GHbey and 
Norman Tipton. (Oracle) 
425 Razzmatazz. Pop 
music programme 
pfesenteaby David 
Jensen. ■ 

615 Whose Baby? EmKm 

Hughes, Nanette Newman 
and Ruth Madoc try to 
guess the celebrity parent 
or parents of a succession 
of toddlers. Presented by • 
Bentie Winters. 

645 News with John Suchet 
600 Thames news. 

625 What It’s Worth. 
Consumer queries 
answered by Penny Junor 
and David Stafford. 

635 Crossroads. 

720 Where There’s Life— 
Miriam Stoppard 
investigates what happens 

■ m famJbes when a teenage 
child turns out to be 
homosexual. 

720 Conniatioo Street The 
. ..refurbished Rovers' rises 
from the ashes. (Oracle). 

600 i n te rnationa l Athletics. 
The Grand Prix meeting in 
Zurich. 

9.00 The Return of Sheriock 
Holmes: The Man With ttie 
Twisted Lip. The master 
detective is called in by a 
distraught wife whose 
usually reliable husband 
has disappeared after she 
spotted ran in a room 
above an opium den. 

1020 News at Tan with Alastair 
Burnet and Pamela 
Armstrong. 

1020 Crime Jnc. Part six of the 
seven-programme series 
on the Mafia famifies. {r) 
(Oracle) 

1120 Mann’s Best Frienda. - 


Fulton Mackay as the 
- martinet bringing order to 
a chaotic household in 
exchange for a roof over 
his head. 

1220 World Chess 

Championship. A report 
on the Kasparov/Karpov 
series. 

1220 AGghtThoutfits. 


A rinamaKi on BBC2, 625pm 


•You are simply asking for 
trouble when you pick a 
comedian as dogsbody and 
general guide for a documental 
about a film festival as worthy 
as Edinburgh's. And when that 
comedian is as uningratiating 
as Robbie Cottrane (i accept that 
this judgment may set me 
apart from everyone else 
watching tonight), then it 
must be counted as miraculous 
that anything sensible 
survives in HOORAY FOR 
HOLYROOD (Channel 6 
1 1 25pm), which traces the 
festival's history since those 
sodaffy aware and duflish 
beginnings when 
documentaries featuring babies, 
sunsets, lambs. Cumberland 
coalfields, and the abattoirs of 
Paris w BTBdehgueur. David 
Robinson, 77w Tams film critic, . 
hits the nail on the head when 


CHOICE 


abatltthe beginnings of careers. 
Exposure of their films in ■ 
Edinburgh paved the way for 
British recognition of Woody 
Allen. Scorsese, Forsyth, 
Carpenter. If only for that 
reason, we should raise a 
modest cry of Hooray! for 
Hooray for Hotyrood. 

• ASMAMAU (BBC2. 

9.25pm) surveys South Africa's 


of a prison call that holds five 
blacks. H is not a play, as I 
had been led to believe, ft is a 
political variety show, and it 


ballon a demolition site. 

There is as much sorrow in it as 
anger. But l s uspect it is how 


it also manages to find the odd 
flash ot humour in the 
appalling experiences of the 
quintet that wiH most impress 
you, 

• CHANGING TIMES 
(Channel 4. 8.00pm) offers five 
films about museums rooted 
m their own communities Put as 
baldly as that, they do not 
sound much Re compulsive 
viewing. But when i tell you 
that they are the work of that 
veteran documentary master 
Denis Muctwu, that the emphasis 
is as much on humans as on 
exhibits and that (certainly in 
tonight's fSm about a Welsh 
miners' musuem) the films are 
exquisitely photographed, 
then 1 hope you have been given 
enough incentive to want to 
switch on. 

Peter Davalle 


655 Open Lkihrarsity: Cancer- 
Some (ri the Options. Ends 
at 720 
920 Ceofax. 

1025 Cricket Tony Lewte 
introduces coverage of a 
. NatWest Bank Trophy 
semifinal match. 

1250 Caefax. 

120 Cricket Tony Lewis and 
Peter West introduce 
coverage of both the 
semifinals of the NatWest 
i Bank Trophy competition. 

The commentat o rs are 
Richie Benaud, Ray 
Wingwarth, Toro 
Graven ey. Bob WDHs and 
David Aerie Id. 

720 Designer®. In this 

penultimate programme in 
the series about the 


public use, Barty PWIfips 
meets Jane Priestman 
who is responsible for 
design in the British 
Airports Authority which 
includes the highly praised 
Gatwick Airport interior 
design which airports m 
other parts of the world 
have purchased. 

600 Sweat of tbe Sun, Tears 
of the Moon. In part six of 
his eight-programme 
series on aspects of South 
American society Jack 
Pizzey examines the role 
of the Roman Catholic 
Church -both the 
establishment side and the 
rebels. Pizzey also 
examines the threat to the 
dominance of the Roman 
Catholic religion in the 
shape of the Mormons - 
the fastest growing church 
on the continent -who are 
touring, the vfflages and 
beginning to make 
conversions. 

920 M*A*S*H. Hawkeye is 
beginning to feel the 
effects of overwork and 
his behaviour becomes 
even more eccentric. 

When he removes one of 
' the 4077ths latrines with 
an important personage in 
residence, his friends, 
Trapper, Radar and 
Hotfips, deride to do 
something to help- (r) 

925 ScreenPtay: Asmamafi, by 
Mbongerti Ngema, the co- 
■ author erf the award- 
winning Woza Albert The 
story or how five black 
-.South Africans arrived in ] 
toil on charges ranging 
from shooting a security 

S riceman to sleeping with , 
a boss’s white wife. The 
play, produced In 
Johannesburg during the 
State of Emergency, 

. .opensinEdnourgnatthe 
end of the month and on 
Broadway next year. 
Starring Sotomzi Bishoto, 
Thami Cele, Bongani 
Hophe, Bheki Mqadi and 
Boy Ngema. (s8e Choice) 
1020 Newsm^tt. The latest 
national and international 
news including extended 
coverage of one of the 
main stories of the day. 

With Peter Snow, Donald 
MacCormick and Olivia 
O'Leary. 

11.15 Weather. 

1120 Cricket Highlights of 
today's two semifinal 
matches in the NatWest 
Bank Trophy competition, 
introduced by Peter West 
and Tony Lewis. 

12.10 Open University: The Art 
of Charlotte Bronte 1225 
The Adam Smith Lectures. 
Ends at 125. 


CHANNEL 4 


220 FQnt Blood on the Sun' 

(1 945) starring James 
Cagney and Sylvia Sidney. 
Thriller with Cagney 
playing the role of an 
American newspaperman 
in 1920s Tokyo who 
uncovered plot to take 
over the wood being 
hatched by the Prime 
Minister. Directed by 
Frank Lloyd. 

615 FBnc The Yoke’® On Me* 
(1944) starring The Three 
Stooges as war service 
rejects who decide to help 
the war effort down on the 
farm. Directed by Jules 
White. 

420 Dentin’ Days. Jufia and 
Caries steal a day away 
together In the country. 

600 AKce. Mel is in danger of 
being arrested when he 
helps Vera's policeman 
husband to trap a gang of 
cattle rustlers. 

630 The Abbott and CosteBo 
Show" Bud and Lou join 
the local amateur dramatic 
society. 

620 Femiy Tie®. American 
domestic comedy series. 

620 Flashback. This third 
pr o gr amm e in the series 
examines local authority 
publicity on flkh during the 
Twenties and the Thirties. 
Sadness and Gladness 
was a fund-raising f9m for 
the Necessitous Children's 
Holiday Canto Fund: in 
Bermondsey, the Pubflc 
Health Propaganda * 
Department made 
community access record 
films of their of their 
revolutionary pubSc health 


Radio 4 


services, (r) (Oracle) 

720 Channel Four new® whh 
Alastair Stewart and 
Nicholas Owen. 

750 Comment With her views 
on the matter of free 
speech is Marjorie Lee 
from the Women's Metis 
Action Gnup. Weather. 

600 Changing ^ Times. This first 
of a new series of five 
documentaries on 
museums focuses on the 
Welsh Miners' Museum, 
Cymmer, South Wales. 
(Oracle) (see Choice) 

630 OpHtMis: Triumphs of 
GafutaBsm. Sr Alan 

Walters is the first of four 

leading economic and 
potted theorists 
explaining their views of 
capitalism. Sir Alan 
believes that Sociaism is a 
parasite on the capitalist 
system - dependent on it 
but at the same time trying 
to destroy ft. 

920 International Athletics. 

The Grand Prix meeting 
from Zurich. 

920. Fight Into HeL Episode 
one of a two-part 
dramatization of the 53- 
day ordeal beginning In 
May 1932 of two airmen 
after they were forced by a 
storm to land In 
inhospitable territory on 
the north west coast of 
Australia white on a ffight 
from the Dutch East Indies 
to Darwin. 

1125 Hooray for HtiyroocL 
Robbie Cottrane reviews 
AOyaars ot the Edinburgh , 
International Rim FestivaL 
(see Choice) 

1220 Edfeto Gold. Christopher 
Logue reads Shetiy's 
Ozymandis; Belloc's The 
Justice of Peace; and the 
anonymously penned, The 
Streets of Laredo. Ends at 
1226 


On long wave. Stereo on VW 
655 Shipping 600 News briefing; 
Weather. 610 Farming. 


630 Today, tad 630, 720, 

630 New®. 645 
Bustaess News. 656 725 
Weather. 7.00, 600 
News. 726 625 Sport 7A5 
Thought for the Day. 

643 Lake Wobegon Days 
(Pm 8^827 Weather; 

920 News 

605 In the Ps y chiatrist's 
Char. Dr Antony Clare 
interviews Sir Michael 
Tippett, the composer fr) 

640 Juntaoihe Elephant, by 
(van Benbraok. With Bob 

.Docherty 

1020 News; Followed by 

Picnics. Susan Marling 
visits Wens Cathedral School 

1020 Morning Story. SWriey 
Dixon reads Walk TtiC by 
Betty Haskell 

1045 Daity Service (New Every 
Morning, page 2S) 

1120 Nerves of s£con: 

Modem robots. What 
next?(r) 

11.45 Last Words. Shirley 
WUams reveals her 
three “secrets ot life". 

12.00 News: You and Yours. 
Consumer advice wrth 
John Howard. 

122? I'm Sony l H . . .*T A 
. . . E. Edited highlights 
of I’m Sorry I Haven't a Clue 
(r). 1255 Weather 

1.00 The World at One; News 

140 The Archer®. 125 

*220 

Hour. With Jenni Murray 

320 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Dancing into the 
Night, by Peter Liney. WRh . 
Mark Jones and Susie 
Brann. (s) 

347 Letter horn the Sticks 
[new series]. David Bean 
with a personal report on 
rural me. 

420 News 

425 Dancing a Hornpipe in 
Fetters. Suzanne Burden 
reads from the journals and 
letters of Fanny Kemble 

4.15 y*rth-East Journey. The 
dash between the new 
pics 'o' captions joumaism 
and the art of printing afl 
the news that's fit to print (i) 


445 Kaleidoscope Extra. 

Michael Ofaver with a 
report on the 1986 
Edinburgh Festival. 

600 PM. News magazine. 

650 Stvppng. 525 
Weather 

600 News-. Financial Report 

620 Trivia Test Match. With 
umpire Brian Johnston 
and team captains Tm Rice 
and WAe Rushon. 

7.00 News 

725 The Archers 

720 Safe in Our Hands? Cime 
Cook son examines tne 
tatemal pofcoes ot the Health 
Service. 

745 A New Song. Dr Duncan 
MacmJIan. Curator ot the 
Talbot Rice Art Centre. 
University of Edinburgh, 
with poetry, prose ana song. 

8.15 A Man's Job Alone? A 
feature about 
policewomen. 

920 Thirty-Minute Theatre. 

The unofficial Guide, by 
Stariey Barrie. With Natasha 
Pyne(rXs) 

920 A Night Out Phfl Smith 
on Tne Nitett of the Wet 
Haddock. 

645 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
Nor the RSC, at the 
Almeida. 

1615 a Book at Bedtime AB 
the Brave Promises (3). 
Reader Helen Horton. 

1020 The World Toragm 

11.15 Tne Financial W&rid 
Tonight 

1120 The Mischief Makers {2). 
Bishop Charles Webster 
Leadbeater. 

1220 News; Weather. 1223 
Shipping 


overture-fantasy). 
Stravinsky (Suae iteunne: 
Garbousovajitor-KatinL 
Momeverdi (Ctaome d 'oroL 
600 News 

605 Mendelssohn; Fugua. Op 
8i no 4. Bacn (Sonata m 
Gnuncx. BWV 1020: 

Goebel; H:3), 

Rachmaninov (Piano 
Concerto No 2; 
Rehter/Lenmgrad PO). 920 
News 

925 This week's Composer 
Alan Hodtiinott. Horn 
Concerto Op 65 
(Tuckwell.soicxst), 
Lantemes das mortes Op 
105 NO 2, and Variants. 

Op 47 

1020 Medci Stmng Quartet; 

Havdn lOuartet m G. Op 
76 No 1). Janacek (Quartet 
No 2) 

1655 Steven deGroote; piano 
recital Schumann 
(Toccata in C, Op 7; and 
FantasieinC. Op 170) 

1145 BBC Welsh SO (under 
Leheh. Swam (Time 
Piece ill. Transformations}. 
Kodoly (Vanawxis on 
Hungarian folk song. 
Peacockl. 

SanoksDivemmento for 
string orchestra). 120 

News 

125 The Essential Jazz 
Records; with Max 
Harrison 

120 Lesdochesde 
Comevilie- Mesple. 
Stutzmann, Buries and 
Sinclair in excerpts from 
Ptanquehe's operetta. Sung 
m French 

220 Dvorak: Czech PO (under 
Neumann), play 
Symphony NoB 
3.15 English Saxophone 
Quartet; Wistiart (Five 


AquarePes), Glazunov (Sax 
Quanet m E Qat, Op 109) 
420 Choral Evensong: from 


S Wales only) as above 
except 656620am Weather; 
Travel. l25-220pm 
Listening Comer (s). 650-525 
PM {continued). 1120- 
12.10am Open University: 
1120 A Calculus of Fields 
11.50 Cancer Research. 


Radio 3 


On VHF only: - 
625 Open University. Open 
Forum: University 
Magazine. Until 655am 
On medium wave oofy: - 
6.55 Weather. 720 News 
725 Morning Concert 

Monteverdi (Pulcfua es, 
Vespers of 1610), attrib 
Pergotesi (Sonata in GL 
Tchaikovsky (Hamlet 


Canterbury Cathedral. 

. Live transmission. 4.55 
News 

| 600 Midweek Choice: Ame 
(Overture No 8 mG 
minor) Sibelius (VxjJbi 
C onceno: Kulenkamptf 
with Berlin PO), Mussorgsky 
(Picturesfroroan 
Exhibition Barry Douglas, 
pteno). L anggaard (Music 
of the Spheres) 

7.00 Proms 86: BBC SO 
(under Sir John 
Pritchard) With Bernard d’ 
Ascoii (piano). Pan one. 
Schumann (Piano Concerto 
n A mmort 

720 Soc Comments: foreign 
radiobroadcasts. 
monitored by the BBC 

720 Proms SNcomd); Strauss 
(An Alpine Symphony) 

650 Cool String Quartet 
Mozart (Quartet in D 
minor. K 421), Robert 
Simpson (Quartet No 11) 

945 Proms 86: from St Paul's 
Church. Kmghtsbridge. 
London Baroque, and 
Chiaroscuro. Purcell 
(Welcome to an the 
pleasures). Alessandro 
Scarlatti (Three madrigals). 
Purcell (From hardy 
climes and dangerous toils of 
war). Cartssimi (Jephtha) 
1120 Hindemith and Reicha: 
Robert Codd (bassoon), 
Martin Jones (piano). 
Hindemith (Sonata). 


Reicna (Sonata in B flat) 
1120 A Choice Collection 

music and songs ot John 
Blow. With Robert WCOrtay 
. (harpsichord). Emma 
Kirhtiy (soprano' 11.57 
Nows. 1220 Closedown 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medwm wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the hour (720pm VHF 
only). Headlines 520am. 630, 720, 
820. Cncfcet at 11.02am, 

12.02pm. 

420am Colin Berry 630 Ray 
Moore 720 Derek Jameson 630 
Ken Bruce 1120 Jimmy Young 

I. 05pm Dawd Jacobs 2.05 Anneka 
Rice 320 David Hamilton 525 
John Ourm (continued on VHF only) 
600 Cricket special NatWest 
Bank Trophy serm-fmal coverage 
7.30 Folk on 2 (pinmq VHF) 

630 Scottish Dance Party from 
Falkirk 600 International 
Athletics (from the wehkiasse 
Grand Pnx. Zuncn) 10.00 
Jimmy J e we l Remembers. Jimmy 
Jewel in conversation witfi 
Derek Batey 1615 Tony and Stod 
Swmgmasters. 10.30 The 

Unknown Ben BagJflv Shendan 
Money traces the career qt the 
detective of lost songs (rj 1120 
Round Mxlnighr from 
Edinburgh 1.00am Nightride600- 
420 A Lmte Nigm Music. 

C Radio 1 ) 

On medium wave 
News on the hatt-nour tram 
630am until 820pm than at 1020 
and 1220 midnignt 
520 Adrian John 7.00 Simon 
Mayo 920 Simon Bares 1120 
Ratio 1 Roadshow 12.30 
Newsbeat (Frank Partndgoj 1245 
Andy Peebles 3.00 Strvo 
Wright 520 Newsboat (Frank 
Parinddel S4S Peter PowaU. 
met at 630 Top 30 album chart 720 
Janice Lora 1600-12.00 Jahn 
Peel. VHF Stereo Ratios 1*2:- 
4.00am As Radio 3 5 05pm 
John Dunn. 7.00 Folk on 2 620 As 
Radio 2. 920 Listen to the Band 
(BrignouSH and Rastnck Bandl. 

10.00 As Radio 1. 12.00-4.00am 
As Ratio 2. 

WORLD SERVICE 

8-00 Newsoash 630 Mtvuun 7.00 

7.00 Twenty-Four Hours 7.30 DevWotv 
ment 86 600 Nows 609 Reflections 619 
Classical Record Hikhm, 630 Brwn of 
Bntam 1988 600 New^ 9 09 Rev^wof me 
Birton Press 9-1S wp«a Toctty 630 
hnancul News 940 Look Ahead 9.4S A 
Lana ol Song 10.00 News 1CL01 Onwteui 

II. 00 News 11.09 News About Bmen 

11.15 On me Bo» HJS A Leitw from 
Warns 1120 Merman 12.00 Radio News, 
reel 12. IS Naium NtMetwi-k 12JS Farm- 
ffl World 1245 Sports Roundup 120 
News 129 Twemv-Four Hours 120 
Dewtopmeni '86 2.00 Ouiktok 2.45 Re- 
pon on Refepon 320 Radw Newsreel 615 
A Ruler s Guoa to Resression 320 
Patterson 4.00 News 4.09 Commentary 

4.15 Counteipoit 645 Span Ftoumka 
7.45 Good Books 600 Nows 0.00 Twenty- 
Four Hours 630 Network UK 145 Lew 
Relay: Promenade Concdns 645 Record- 
ing of week 1600 News 1029 World 
Today 1025 A Letter from Wales 1020 
Fmanctit News 1040 Reflections 1045 
Sports Roundup 11.00 News 11.09 Com- 
mentary 11.15 Good Books 1120 Top 
Twnty 1220 News 12.09 News Aeon 
Bmam 12.15 Radio Newsreel 12.30 
Patterson 1.00 News 121 Outlook 120 
Waveguxle 140 Book Cnocs 1.45 Piano 
RoN 2.00 News 229 Ronew Ot Bntsft 
Press 2.15 Network UK 220 State Qt me 
Nation 600 News 329 News Atmrt Bntam 

3.15 World Today 445 Renecoora 420 
Fmanctf News 520 News 529 Twenty. 

Hours 545 World Today. U tinea In 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1ri053cHz/285m;1089kHz/275m: Radio 2: 693kHz/433m; 909 
92J5; Radio 4 b 200kHz 1500m: VHF -92-95; LBC: 1152kHz/261m; VHF 97^; Capital: 1 
1458kHz/206m; VHF 94S; World Servfco MF 648kHz/463m. 


'433m: Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m: VHF -90- 
tkHz/194m: VHF 95.8; BBC Radio London 



REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


ai news magnates. 


C H AN NEL 

Street. lOJOTetebugs. 1120-1120 
Wuzzles. I220pm-i20 Woman's Race. 
120 News. 120 Nothing But The 
Best. 220-220 Whose Ba&y? 615^45 
Pop the Quesdoa 600 Channel Re- 
port. 61®635 Feta me Cat. 1120 Uveal 
Oty Hat 1220 Comedy Tortght- 
123km Cknedown. 

Thing. 920 Nabra of Tteim 925 
Sesame Street. 1696 FolkTale. 1120- 
1120 Wuzzles. 1220PW-120 That's 
Hoeywood 120 News. 12D-230Counay 
Practice. 615645 Star Choics. 

&0&636 North Tonight. 1220 News. 
Closedown. 


YORKSHIRE 

ReeL 650 Ehns Mamones. 1045 
Short Stay. 11 20-1120 Wuzzles. 
t2J0pm-i JO Lunchtime Lira. 120 
News. 120-220 Hear Hare, s.15-545 
Benson. 600-635 Calendar. 1120 
'Legmen. I220am-600 Muse Box. 

mETEEjS^^^, 

920 Sesame Street 1025 Jaz2. 

TI20-1 120 Wuzzles. 1220pn-120ThB 
Year Was . . . 1961. 120 News. 125 
WhVB the Jobs Are. 120-220 Cowtry 
nacece. 615-545 Survival ot tha 
Finest 600-635 Northern Life- 1120 
Comedy TornghL 1220 Refection in 
Retirement. Closedown. 



yiJiie£yrsuSr,.65o. 



GRAPPA 

Ratals. 920 Secret veiey. 9 l 55 Sky 
Surfers. 1610 Unicom Tan® 1020 
WUzzles. 1120 Granada Reports. 

11JQ5 About Bntwn. llJMrtZOOOoanae* 

! tians.1220pre-120Mr5Mre.120 

| Grenada Reports. 120-220 RandaflA 
Hoptak (Deceased). 320-420 Short 
Stay . 615-645 Never the Twaai. 600 
Granada Reports 620-625 Ttas a 
Your Right 1120 Mann s Best Friends. 
1220 Show Express. 1220 m 
C losedown. 

S4C Sans: 1 . 00 pm Dancin' beys. 
3SS£ ijo Model Megrc. 220 Gao 
gocti a Maiwen. 2.15 interval. 325 
The Areas. *25 Flashback. 425 SHants. 
PiaiM. 520 GorfeWin Gwyn. 630 
Rets hi Particular. 600 Brooksde. 630 
Family Ties. 7.00 Newyddion Saltn. 

I 720PaLe.PaFtidri.600Cerodoria 
Genedbetnol leuenctid Cymru. 925 
I Film: Plaza Suite. 1125 AtMabcs. 1125 
GoomoMes. 1235am Closedown. 

SCOTTISH Sa" 

Bestnacnean meonach. Mo Car- 
toon. 1020 Under the MounUun. 1025 
! Adventures ot Raxy. 1D25GWiroe 
1120-1120 Wuzzles 12.30pm- 1.00 Lord 
Weymouth at Home. 120 News. 

120-220 Country Practice. 320 Venture. 
3.30420 Positively Unemployed. 
615-545 Wour Game. 620 News and 
Scotland Today 8.15-635 Lmht M 
me North. 1220 Late Call, dosedawn. 


htvwest^s^ 

Street. 1025 Jacksons. 1020 Car- 
toon 1120-1120 Wuzzw 1220 pm- 1.00 

Gierroo. 120 News. 120-220 
Tucker's Witch. 615-545 Whose Baby? 
600-635 News 1120 Eariy Beaties. 
1220am Closedown. 

HTV WALES ^S, 

1025 Sesame Street. 600pm-635 
Wales at Su. 

ANGLIA As London except: 
BBaesaa 925am Sesame Street 
10-30 Cartoon. lQ25Glenroe 1120- 
1120 Wuzzles. I220pm-l.00 Wt»se 
Baby’ i20News. 1^220 Counhy 
Practice. 615-645 Candid Camera. 600- 
£25 About Angtia 1120E3riy 
Beatles. 1230am I Shall Always Remenv 
bar. Closedown. 

9-50 Wuzzles 1615 Jack Hoiaam 
1040-1120 Roots Ot Rock n- RotL 
1220pm-120 Ten Green 8otHes 
120 News 120-220 Han to Han 615- 
5-45 Whose Baby 9 600 Ci pssroads 
625-7.QQ News. t025 Sfeeetkte U2S 
Film Mark ot the Dev* 1220am 
Jobtmder 120 Closedown. 



ENTERTA iNMENES 


; -HP 

( iP 1 


. CONCERTS 

BARBICAN MALL 620 *795/658 
8891 Lnui Sim. Eves 7 as. Sat. 
Mai 3sm. Sun 5 A 720. PACO 
AND MS FLAMENCO 


world** grrami /bunenco 
ouiarca aad hu Car 
romnany 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM S 856 3161 

CC 290 6258 

EMCUBM NATIONAL OPERA 
NOW Booiono. B Trw«tore/T M 
Marrlf vf FMaro/Tba 
Mih» +> /Mud— BNhrAf. 

Tirt>lmMtrOI 379 6*®S 
BLYMKBOUftNE Festival Opmrm 
with rtir London PMIhannooic 
Orrtwara until Frvuor 
ALL KRFtMWANCES SOLO 
OUT PosnMv returns nay 

bqv ofnee 0775 siaon 

.BOYAL FESTIVAL NALL 928 
319! CC 928 8800. 

TKfcMnvMM 379 6«33. 

LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET 

. Lon WrM Eve* 720- Sat MX 
3em C tap H ia. . fTon"i 

gwyMt/wmiUM/Oniift 
; Santrer WELLS 376 B9I6. 
rnmNATKMAL AUTUMN 
DANCC/ BALLET SEASON 
. Can Ol 278 06C6 for colour 
bro ct mre . 

THEATRES 

ADCLPHI 8 36 76 11 or 200 7913 
I* CC 7J1 9999/836 7388/379 
_64*3 Cm SU« 930 6123 Flrsl 

Can 2aiw 7 day Oc 240 7200 Itiko 

lew NOW BOOKING TO FEB 
1987 

' ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

- Mghity at 720 Man w*6 at 220 

4 Sat < 30 4 B.00 

“TNE HAPPIEST SHOW 
IN TOWN- S Exurcw 
TMMre Ah- r..A,..ri 

MBEWT Air CwnWIiaiit lire-* 

«rr Ol -836 0878 CC 3T9 6S66 

- /<A» Croup Stiles 936 3902. 

- JOHN SHEA M 

.. ™»'»4!uSa j!T 

“MACrWlCEKTr tVSH. 
“NOTitaic SHOrtrior 
SENSA-nOHAL- S £xb 
E\ p^ a Man Tnur a Sn a jo 

BZgRW OVBWMgLM 

POAMtQ UNTIL SETT 8 
ALDWVCH THEATRE Ot-836 
6401 ‘0641 rc 01-379 «3S3 
IRVtNB BERLBrS 

- -ao - linr-ow mncT Tima 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

from IV ChKtesMT FmUial 
Thretrr 
sutm 
suzi OOATRO 

~uqnn u* u» mom _ nx- mod 
dautim Wr a End dftiur ... catre 

z.\m 7 So MHa'Wd A Sot 2 30 
aattr 7 say ce book mg on Ftrvl 
Call Ol 240 7200 a»0 (W 


«tr»01 836 3878 CC 379 6S6B 
/6#33 Crow Sales 836 3962. 
From Srpi 9 for a imuiM s*j- 

aon BABBANA COOK 
ATOU.O THEATRE «7 Ztbi 

4J« 3598 Fir« Call Ol ZOO 7200 
Tkkhinuler rr 379 6*33 
MOD Fn a.oo sat a jo * 8J5 
Thurs mal a 3.0 0 
PAUL SCOTRELD 
-MAgroa-y ft. 
HOWARD ROLLINS 
“MAGNIFICENT" D-Mart 

Wlonrr 1989 Tony Award Btst 
PUy 

rM NOT RAPPAPORT 

“WONOERFULLV raw 

DEM) 

APOLLO VtCTORlA SS828 866S 
CC 630 6262 TicketmaBer ce379 
6433 1« call tr cMnri 240 7200 
(Ska Frei Cm saw 930 6123 
Eves 7.45 MW Tup « Sal 30 




Mump try 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyric* oy RICHARD srtLOOE 
DinrtM W TWEVOR N UNN 
APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 

FWt RETIBpra 

NOW BOWUMQ TO MUUICH 1 W7 

■ABB1CAH Ol 626 9796/^8 
8891 CC i Mon-Sun lO»m- 
tonl ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 
COMPA NY 

, BAHBKAH THEATRE tart 
730 Minor 2 00 A _7-30 
THOfLUS A CB E 5WPA, FH * 
Sal Muwno 
THE pit tom. totnor 730 
REM. DREAMS nr Trevor 
Orifiihm Fn L Sal 6 
CAHPEUUO 

BLQhMIUUlBY Cordon S WC1 
387 9609 «■ 380 l-»3 FVwn 


387 9609 rr 380 1 
Any 19 ai jwilkrl 



o u c H Esnar coaj 781312 
iAHE EYRC/A P1HWY TttMB 
KtfKNED ON THE WAY TO I 
THE FORUM El« 730. Matt I 
Thu A fat 220 I 

eamSLOE ■*' 928 22S3 CC 
iNatUmal Thntnt small and! i 
wn Toni- Tawr Mft 
Ihvil AlH 18 NEArnbC w 
sSh DtalHL AH 19 M 730 
A MATTER OF Uffc A DEATH. 
CftrnmoN Air Cond S 930 3216, 
CC 379 6565/ 379 6433/741 
9999. Gn» 836 3962. 800. 

WMSSOn DAVIES 


COMEDY THEATRE 930 2B78 
JOHN ALOENTOM ■ 
OWEN SWAN 

TAYLOft •* KvniiJQON 

THE MAINTENANCE 

By mcHUBMuisins 

Mon Thu 8 Fn/Sal &30 A 8-30 
HALF PRICE PREVIEWS 
FROM AUOLST Ifl 

DMHNKW THEATRE BOX OHIcr 
Ol 980 8845/01 636 8538/9 or 
ol 560 9662/3. ALL IdcMWOr 
CC bookings FtBSTCAU.24hr 7 
day on 0) 836 2428 NO booune 
fre cm Sam 930 6123 
DAVE CLANK’* 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE DtPCRKNCE 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR* 

THE PORTRAYAL OF -AKASH* 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

MOo-Fn 730 Tlia Mai 230 Sal 5 
A 8 30. 

SOME SEATS STUAVSEWL 
FOR TOOAY re PEN FORMAWCC. 
SPECIAL COaCPHOW AT JO 
ON THURS MA TOMES FOR 
OJLP-S, UB40* , STUDENTS * 
UNDER IE*. 

Nw I,6b i |a April <B7. 


OARRKM S 836 460! CC 379 
6433 A OC 24 hr/7 day 240 
7200. E%9» 8. WvO mol 3. SM S 4, 

a NO SEX, PLEASfi- 
WFBE BRITISH 
Tran la Pata M a Tba Sapt 2. 


OLOBE 457 1692. CC 579 6453. 
Bfe9 fev 14 Call 24 hr 240 7200.. 
CO saire 930 6123. Eves 8 
Matt WiA Sfe 4 . 
Andrew uoyd Wetaoer Pit slum 
DEJOS LAWSON 
IAN FRANCIS 
RONALD HOLOATK 
jmm mmow 

LEND ME A TENOR 

“A MARVELLOUS COMBIN’ A 
TION OF WONDERFUL 
FARCICAL MOMENTS. FU»IY 
LINES AND FRENETIC 
PERFORMANCES- T Out 
An American Comedy by 
Ken Ludwig 

Directed by OpiM OUmore 


8230 CC 579 6S4&/M33 

"TIBS SIMPLY GREAT 
SNOW- What'S On 
SBC BY SIDE BY, 
inraiiHiM 

Tw4U 8. Sat Ma B. 
%mm 4 A 7. SAT A SUN 
MAT® ALL SCAT® £81 
DRURY LAIC THEATRE ROYAL 

018368108 01240 9066j7.ee 
379 6433. First cafl fto- ho ur 7-day 
cc tikp 240 72C 0(nofe r»iJnB feel 

4ZND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL IRC FAIRLY 



ssa 

«nd 

PETER BLANC 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE! 

wntlm and dirertad tn> 

Over i. 5 » V «ldi i p et Wre retw 
-SHOULD RUN FOR llFT* N F- 


BEST MUSICAL 

STAWARD DRAMA AWARDS 

'DW 

BEST MUSICAL _ 

LAM REN CB OUVBR AWARD 

VMM 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLAYS® PLAYER® 
LONDON THEATRE CBRIC® 
AWARD 

Eiga 8.0 Matt %*«! 3.0. 

Sal SO 4. R 30 
Group Saire 900 6123 

Party Rataf AiMtafclr 

DUKE OP YORKS 836 3122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999/240 7200. 
Evre 8 Dm 3 Sat 5 A 830 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard Draw Award UM 

STEPPING OUT 

“TRILMPH ON TAP" Std 
HH Oommy Oy Richard Hams 
DU*cNd tiv Juba Mrifrndr 
-rtAUOH YOURSELF S&l-Y" T O 
“PERFECT DdJOHT** D Tel 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 

FORTUNE (Air Condi S <T 836 
2238 KP 741 9999 orp Sam 930 
0123 won ip Fn a sai a jo Mai 
ThufS A Sai 3.00 
Ml Kate! 

LMHha P rla fcH In 

DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-A hour Ol whodunury M 
nlrtuoiiMiil Oouur Double tt 
tuKiniHfc' Timre C Sunn 
- Stum Ihp lirtvnn- 1 ' S Thrt 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
437 2066, CC 734 B96I. 579 
, 6A3S.7419999MmM«t«Cl.nni. 
Call 24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. 
OP Sales 930 6123. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
A DENIS QUILLEY 

-tfSS&MFJSPl 

APtwoval- s.T« 
Mon-Fn 730. Mats w<« zoo 
Sat 230 6 8X0 
SUM [onmtwM avail, at door 

Mou rn a Sal matt 
GOOD SCATS SHU. AVABAMUC 
FOR TODAY’S r tTIF O GMANCK. 
Now booking k> Anru 1987 




Air Wl 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1560. 01-434 1050. 01-734 

cm nr ni ako „ 

“A brIUuni & Nyoudy 
comic parfomvantw F. Tbnre 
tn 

The National Thcotm acetataned 
nraductwo or 


NA YMARKXT THEATRE ROYAL 

BOX of/KT and CC 01 930 9832. 
Fim Call 24 hr 7 day CC booWnos 
Ol 24Q 7200. 

Direct from Broadway 
-A sutiret) London slag? da tiuT* 
Financial Timm 

JACK LEMMON 

-AS One a Raw actor as he tt a 
screen one - Today 

LONG DAYS JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Euoenc O’Neill 
"Jonathan MUter's bnfflani 
production" Standard 
Ev« only Moo-Sai 7-30 

HEX MAIE5TYS. KaymarVM 
930 4025/6606 2046/2866 
TKkemuaW 579 6131 
FtrR Call CC Z«0 7200 

THE PHANTOM OFTHE 
OPERA 

ShnlM 

W BCNA FL CRAWFORD 

Sarah Sun* 

Bnghtnum Banon _ 

Music by ANDREW UOYD 
WEBBER 

Libretto by RICHARD 
STILCOC A CHARLES HART 
amM by HAROLD PRINCE 
Own 9 Pel. 

MM3 MEAD 226 1916 VnU 
S W Dni 7. snow 8pm. 
BERTKX REA D me return oy ■ 
popular omund in her snow 
SPARKLE PLENTY. 

LTTTELTOH *S* 988 2252 CC 
iNanocul ThaabWc princenhan 
Maori Ton'l 7.4Bl tomor 3 18 
i now ones mao A 7*5. mn 
AM 15 6 16 A mol Auq i 8 4, 
AM 28 to Sept j THE 
PCrmoK tv stub dark 


A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

“Htartwealonuri' funny- Gde 
“HUartoitt-.- S. TfeM 
“A race wrtm o< 
comic ndUiarafeH'* TBh*» 
ElV 7 JO. Matt WM and Sal 30. 
Group Sake 01-930- 6123. 
RMmd nrtre man SiudaM & 

DAP Stand-by 

FIRST' CALL Z4BR 7 DAY 
CC BOOIUHCS OH 81 244 7200 

|H0 BOOKJMO FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
JAN '87 

MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036. Mon- 
Thu 8 Frt/SW 5.40 6 8-10 

RICHARD TODDjn 

Tha Bari IHa- tor jaar*”SM 

THE BUSINESS OF 

murder: 

"An unaMshM winner" 8 Exp 
Ttron I 

! 6TH THRILLING YEAR , 

RKRHAB Air CBnd 236 S668 cc | 
, 741 9999. Ftna call CC 240 T20O 1 
1 <24 Hr» 7 Day ) MonFn S. Sal 6 * 
8-30 

KAPHA'S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

aaaM by 

Steven BER KOFF 

"THE HOST txenM 
THE ATRICA L EVEWNO IN TIM 
WEST END" aumlts. 
LlmiMd season 
(Prwnrvaure rood A drmk) 

NATIONAL THEATRE 8U> Sank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 


NEW LONDON On*y Lane WC2 
405 0072 CC 579 6453 Evas 7^48 
Tut A Sal 3-00 A 746 
THE ANDREW LLOYD WE —ER 
/T-L ELIOT MMIBAL 

CATS 

APPLY OML Y TO BOX OPPKC 
me BETURHS 

Odun Booking 01-406 1567 or 
01-930 6123. Postal bookings 
only now brino accepted lor Pert* 
ftwiDK I In May 50 1987 or by 
Iricpnonr on Ol 379 6433 


flUnOt 'V «B 22S2 CC (Na- 
tional Theatre's turn stagrl 
TonT. To mor 7 IS. thrti firm S 
& 6 TTte TMSJDKMNY OPERA . 
bv Brecht, with music by Kurt 
WHU. Ton'l 6.45 Sm| A Ua- 
■ans. 48 nun H a llu i t ii prrf ail 
DdS £2.00 


! P HOENIX 836 2294 c C 240 966! 
741 9999. First call 24 hri. 7 days 
240 7200. 0)9 Sain 930 6123. 
Eves 7.30. Thre mol 3. San 4 & 8. 

THE COqOXLU’ARTY 

w ootall the flaqs for 
JOHN DEXTER AMD THE MEW 
THEATRE COMPANY** 

Sun Timm 

QUECIT6 01 734 1166/7/ 

- 0261/0120. | 

“THE BEST MUSICAL IN 
L ONDON " G-« 1 

MAUREEN UPMAN 

**A wonderful star- MaO 


486 2431 CC 379 6433 
cr KoOtno 4B6 1933 


„ r Today 230 

A 745. Sat 7.45. ARMS AMD 
THE MAM Tomor 2-50 A 7 45. 
FT17.4S Bararfch Malar to Laah 


PALACE THEATRE 457 6834 
CC 437 8527 or 579 6453 
mean aaHr 7n» cc aao 7200 

Cm sain 930 6123 

THE M U 5ICAI. SENSATION 

LES MISERABLHS 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONETsa 

Ev« 7.30 Matt Thu A Sal 250 
Lafeoomm not admrtted 
mid I hr inurval 

BEAT THE TOOT® BY EMOUDI- 1 
BW FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 


PICCADILLY THEATRE Air Cbn- 
diuonaa. 457 4506. Credit Card 
Houines 319 6S65- 741 9999 On> 
Gain 836 39tf /930 6123. 

2ND SEMSATfONAL YEAR 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

**SPECTACULAR MUSICAL* 
Rrarw Mnaanne 
On 8 O Mats Wed 5 A Sat 5 


PfHMOC EDWARD Bax Office 
734 8951 Flrsl Call 24 Hr 7 Dayi 
ce Booking B36 3464 ere Satre 
930 6123 

Mon-Sal 8. Mat Thurs a Sat 3.00 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

"B ri ppfcs «4lh nOfoirer 
F Tunes 

“Jusi wonSetlul** DEstn 
Mon-Sal 8 Mats w«t 2 30 Sal 6 

ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1745 
TU SaL Eire 8-0. A COLDER 
CLIMATE by Karim Alrawi. 
Otr. by Sonera Curttt 6 Max 
Siatrord-Clarfc. 

ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS 730 
2834 Eire 7 50. Sa l Mata A3P 

w o me n a meters 


STRATTORD-UPOto-aVON 
>07891 295023 or TKknmastrr 
Ol 579 MM ROYAL SMAKC- 
SPCARC COasPANY at RnyM 
Sfc a fcaap— re Tbaa lre . Di aa ai 
Tnrnqnr 7 3a Tomor. Sat 1 X 
Ramaa ami Md Tomor 7 JO 
Wtatoria Tale FfL Sat 7 30 

S wan Tbaalra, Rarer ToMpM 
T3a Tomor. Sal 130 Erery 
Man Tomor 7 30 Kkaaia Frl. 
Sal 7 30 For aprclal 
nxstJ/mearrr deals and hotel 
Stop twre nnn (07891 67262. 

THEATRE OF COMEDY 
• COMPANY 

“TV very bed of BmXn'i conic 
uuenl** Daily Mi* 

See senarale rntrlrt under; 


WCSTMMSTKR 01-834 0263/4 
rr H34 ooa& First call rr 24 hr 7 
dan MO 7200 & rr 741 
9999-379 6433. Grp Sales 930 
6123. Es es 7.45. Wrd Matt 3 Sal 
3 A 8 15 

MVREE DAWN PORTER 

dermoy perm 

WALSH BYRNE 


Murder Mystery 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP 

“Tin eery bant af T b eM are * * 
•HURRY totaa WK S TMI M3 I E S 


OF COMEDY/ 
WHITEHALL THEATRE/ 


VAUDEVILLE Box Office & CC 
036 9987/6015 Fust (Ml CC 24 
hre 240 7200 ibkg feet, tin 8 D. 
Mats Wed 7 30. SM 0.0. BJO. 

JINJA MrittMxa: 
MARTIN JARW 



ALAN A YC KDOiHWrS Maw Play 

WOM AN IN MIND 

OPENS SE P TEM BE R 5 AT 7J» 

VAUDEVILLE. WC2. BOX Office 
and CC 01-536 9987/5645. Fun 
CjU (CC 24 MX 01 240 7200 Bkg 
fee!. Exes 7 30 Exe* 7.3Q.- Wed 
Mats T 30. Sals 5 0 6 8. IS. 
SUSAN SIMON 

NAMTSWRE CADELL 

JOAMIA VANOYSCOHEM 


NOISES OFF 

otr by MICHAEL BLAKEMORE 

SMAPTESSrav THEATRE OP 
rnMEDT. 01.379 5399 rt 01-579 
6433/741 9999 fits call 24.hr 
240 7200 Grp £ai» MO 6125 
The Theatre of Comedy Co 

hf.^ri.ub 

TOM IAN 

, COURTENAY OGU.VY 

PCOCV MOUNT 
and LIONEL JEFFRIES 

ROOKERY NOOK 

by Ben Trarm 
Oirrcted by Mark Kingston 
Mon-Fri 8 Wed Mat 3 tfari 5.30* 
8 30 maured once pmiewa 
1 Irani An 87. 

Opera Sen 2 ai T Odum 


;“A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW” Newsweek 

Haw haaUta to March 2B, 1887 




ST MAKTHT® Oi-836 1443. Sm- 
Oal CC No. 579 6433. Dp 8JJ 
Tues 2.4S. Sal -50 and 8 0 

MM pr af ACAT HA OB STES 

THE MOUSETRAP 


STRAND 836 2660 CC 836 
4143/5190 741 9999 First Call 
24 Hr 7 Day ce 240 7200 
orp Sam 930 6123 

wjasu* 

ad, w ai t rl i j l L wI r —to ri naw 
maiWg to Ma Waal Cart” SU 

&urrm9 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Deeded a, Chur eewra iawtt by 

Mon-Frl 7.49 MalUed 3 00 
Sal 4.30 A B. 13 , 

NO SEAT PUKE MCRCASC 
BUT VALUE Iff WEST D® 
BOOKMC NOW TQMNY7 


HOC. CO WARD’S 
BLITHE SPHUT 

“FIRST CLASS. EM CUT. BITEL. 
UCSMT AfB! THOROUCMLY 
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WEDNESDAY AUGUST 13 1986 


THE 



TIMES 


First published in 1785 


SPORT 


New Zealand win 


leaves them 






set for the series 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


fa* 


TRENT BRIDGE: New Zea- 
land bear England by eight 
wickets. 

Thanks to the batting of 
their bowlers. England took 
the second Test match against 
New Zealand, sponsored by 
Comhill. to the thirteenth 
over of the last hour yesterday. 
They lost it in the end by eight 
wickets. New Zealand being 
left with 74 to win. and having 
all the evening in which to 
make them. 

When the last of their 
batting specialists was out 
long before lunch, England 


had looked to be going down 
without any sort ofa fight. But 
Emburcy saved it from being 
loo utterly inglorious a day. 
His 75. his best Test score, was 
only one run fewer than 
Gooch. Moxon. A they. Gower 
and Galling made between 
them. And then, when New 
Zealand went in to knock off 
the runs they needed. 
England's bowlers carried on 
Ihc fight, anyway for a while. 

JefT Crowe, opening New 
Zealand's innings in place of 
Edgar, who had hurt a hand 
while fielding, was soon Icg- 
before to Small. Then, in his 
first over. Emburey bowled 
W right with only 19 on the 
board, and there were even 
visions of a desperate finish. 
But Coney came in and look 
some quick singles, and Mar- 
tin Crowe served a reminder 
that beside having the best 
bowler in the two countries. 
New Zealand have the best 
batsman too. 

New Zealand's victory was 
only their fourth in 62 Test 
matches against England and 
their second over here. It was 
thoroughly deserved. They 
were usually playing the better 
cricket once Hadlee had given 
them the advantage on the 
first day. They have never 
won a series in England, nor 
had a better chance of doing 
so. One Test up with one to 
play, they are showing a 
confidence that it may need 
Botham to destroy. 

Although, after a quarter of 
an hour yesterday morning, 
Edmonds was dropped at 
third slip off Hadlee. England 
still lost three wickets in |he 
first 65 minutes, including 
those of Gatling and Gower. 


Edmonds, having gone in as 
nigh twaich man on Saturday, 
had batted for 28 overs, spread 
over four days, when he was 
out so he did his bit Moving 
across his slumps to play 
Hadlee to leg, he was leg- 
before. 

Hadlee bowls so well at 
Galling that he now tor- 
mented him for half an hour. 
Gatling received 24 balls, the 
first 23 of them from Hadlee. 
He scored four off the second, 
from an involuntary stroke to 
third man. The next 21 were 
all on or around the off stump, 
of a good length, and moving 
first this wav. then that As 


Scoreboard 


ENGLAND; Fast Innings 256 (D I Gower 
71, C W J Athey 55; R J Kwflee 6 tor 80) 
Second Innings 

G A Goods c Coney b Bracswefl — 17 

M □ Moxon c SrtMh b HacSeo 23 

P H Edronds Bm b Hadtee 20 

CWJ flmey c Smtth b Bracewefl S 

D l Gowei c J i Orowe b Brataswel _ 26 
K W Getting c Smith b Gray 4 

D R Piingle e Gray b StaWn 9 

J E Emburey c M D Crowe b Hadlee 75 

J G Thomas c Gray b SOritng 10 

tB N French not out 12 

G C Small ibw b Hadlee .. .. 12 

Extras (b 4, lb 9, w1.nb2) 16 

Total ... ■■■■ — — — - 230 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-23. 2-47, 3-63. 4- 
67. 5-08, 6-104, 7-176, 8-203, 9-203, 10- 

23a 

BOWLING: Knfee 33.1-15-60-4; Staling 
18-5-48-2: Bracewel 11-8-29-3; Watson 
9-2-25-0; Gray 24-9-55-1. 


NEW ZEALAND: Rat Irattnga 413 <J G 
Bracewea 110. R J Hadtee 66. J G WngM 
58, EJ Gray 50) 

Second Innings 

J G Wright b Emburey 7 

J J Crowe Ibw b Small 2 

M D Crowe not out 48 

■MV Corny no* out 20 

Total(2wMs) 77 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-5, 2-19. 

BOWLING: Small 8-3-10-1: Thomas 4-0- 


16-0: Emburey 6-1-15-1: Edmonds 4-0- 
16-0; Pringle 2-0-16-0: Gower 1.1-0-40. 


160: Pringle 20-160: Gower 1.10-40. 
Umpires: D J Constant and K E Palmer. 


much by luck as judgement. 
Gatting survived them, onlv 
to be caught at the wicket off 
his first ball at the other end. 
Gray, the left-arm spinner, 
getting one to turn sharply. 
Pushing forward at it Gatting 
was gathered in by Smith 
rather than cleanly caught by 
him. Gatling's four innings in 
the series have been 2. 26. 17 
and 4. and the snipers are after 
him. 

Gower spent the first 55 
minutes of the day at the same 
end. playing first Stirling and 
then Gray. By the time he 
faced Hadlee, the great man 
was about to come off. This 


was just tine of those things, 
not a deliberate ploy. And as 
soon as Bracewell replaced 
Hadlee. Gower was caught at 
slip off a ball that seemed to 
surprise him with its bounce. 
If this suggests a bad pitch, it 
was certainly not that. As a 
result of wear and tear, it gave 
the spinners occasional help, 
which is as it should be. 

At Gower's dismissal, En- 
gland were 104 for six, still 53 
runs behind. Defeat by an 
innings was now a distinct 
possibility- But Emburey. in 
the presence of Pringle, 
averted it. It was very much 
that way round. Pringle mak- 
ing only nine of the 74 they 
added in 95 minutes for the 
seventh wickeL The New Zea- 
landers had started to get 
worried by the time Stirling 
got a hall to lift at Pringle, and 
Gray, throwing himself for- 
ward in the gully, scooped up 
the catch which bad lobbed 
towards him. 

New Zealand still had a new 
ball up their sleeve. As soon as 
it became available. Hadlee 
took it and at once had 
Emburey well caught at slip, 
two-handed by Martin Crowe 
in front of his face. Emburey 
had been excellent, his 
method basic, but effective. 
He is patenting a sort of shovel 
shot which deposits the 
straight ball anywhere be- 
tween mid-wicket and the 
finest of fine-legs. It is a 
horrible-looking thing, but it 
brought him plenty of runs 
yesterday. 

Thomas had driven the last 
ball with the old ball straight 
for six. The new one he soon 
slashed to the gully for Gray to 
take another catch. There 
remained a last wicket 
partnership of 27. in which 
French and Small both drove 
with gusto. It was ended. 1 
need hardly say, by Hadlee, 
who had Small leg-before 
playing no stroke. 

This was Hadlee's 10th 
wicket of the match, the 
seventh time he has had as 
many as that in a Test Only 
S.F. Barnes, Grimmett and 
Lillee can equal that There 
were no such things as in- 
dividual awards in their day. 
Hadlee, though, must be 
wondering where to put all his. 



Basic but effective: Emburey on his way to 75 (Photograph: Chris Harris) 


Worcestershire’s hopes for 
Lord’s depend on Radford 


By Richard Streeton 


Gooch delays his decision 


Give Graham Gooch a de- 
cision to make, if it concerns 
going on or staying on an 
England cricket tour, and he 
can be relied npon to agonize 
over it Although he has had 
all the sonuner to dwell npon 
bis availability for Anstralia 
this winter, and was asked for 
an answer by last night, the 
selectors have agreed to give 
him a further few days to think 
things over. He has now 
promised to let them have his 
answer by Friday evening, 
when they are dne to choose 
the side for the next Test 


By John Woodcock 
Having taken an age to 
make up bis mind to go on the 
tour to West Indies last winter, 
he found when be got there 
that be wished be had stayed 
at home. But there were 
political reasons for that, and 
he was deserving of sympathy. 
Australia this time is different 


It is the best of all tours and he 
will not be harassed there as 
he was in the Caribbean or 
might be in India and 
Pakistan. 


The fact that be has asked 
for more time to study the 


itinerary for Australia sug- 
gests that be may be working 
out ways and means of getting 
his family there. He became 
the father of twin daughters 
earlier this summer and also 
has a third child. 

If it is a feeling of reluctance 
to spend the winter playing 
cricket in Australia that he is 
having to overcome, it would 
be better to leave him behind. 
The fact that he was unhappy 
in West Indies communicated 
itself to the rest of the team, 
and we don't want that 
happening again. 


Amid a welter of fitness 
problems due to be sorted out 
before the captain's toss in 
today's Nat West Trophy 
semi-finals, the most signifi- 
cant concerns Neil Radford, 
the Worcestershire fast 
bowler, who has influenza. 
This year's competition, 
whose final takes place at 
Lord's on September 6. has 
been littered with unexpected 
results. Not many people in 
April would have predicted 
that today's matches would 
have been between Worcester- 
shire and Sussex at New Road 
and Surrey and Lancashire ai 
The Oval. 

Worcestershire and Surrey 
are narrowly favoured to win 
by Ladbrokes, though limited- 
overs cricket has a habit of 
making nonsense of common- 
sense and reality. Radford's 
illness is only one of several 
problems Worcestershire have 
among their pace attack. 
Pridgeon has a leg muscle 
strain, Inchmore a stiff neck- 
For a team whose batting, 
thanks to players like Hick, 
David Smith. Curtis, Neale 
and Patel, is their main 
armoury, these eleventh-hour 
physical setbacks among the 
bowlers are worrying. 

Those with a sense of 
history, albeit modern history, 
will hardly need reminding 
that Worcestershire and Sus- 
sex were the teams involved in 
the 1963 Gillette Cup final, an 
event whose success has im- 
pinged itself so indelibly- on 
the game's worldwide pattern 
since. Sussex, an erratic team 
currently, often disrupted by 
injuries, have taken a new 


lease of competitive life since 
Gould took command at the 
helm. 

Imran Khan, ironically a 
former Worcestershire player, 
who "transferred” amid a full 
share of headlines and con- 
troversy. could be the crucial 
figure. Imran, le Roux, the 
South African. Jones and 
Pigott give Sussex a splendid 
hand of hostile bowling. 
Imran and Parker are also in 
peak form with the bat 

There is. however, a resil- 
ience and one-day flair in 
Worcestershire's ranks, which 
has already taken them to 
three successive one-day 


Lancashire, with the over-40 
Clive Lloyd and “Hat Jack” 
Simmons in the side, and Pat 
Pocock, the Surrey captain, 
who is 40 in September and 
retiring this year. Rather curi- 
ously these teams have only 
met once previously in 
cricket's knockout com- 
petition at Old TrafFord, in 
1977 when Surrey won a 
second round match by four 
wickets. 


Lancashire were des- 
perately searching for their 
third team wicketkeeper. War- 
ren Hegg. last night 1 after 
Chris Maynard injured his 
thumb in the championship 
match at Boxton yesterday. 
Maynard will have treatment 
this morning before deriding 
whether he can play in the 
NatWest Trophy senti-final 
against Surrey at The OvaL 
Maynard's replacement, John 
Stanworth, is in bed with a 
virus and will not be fit to play.' 


finals. Alone among today's 
four' contestants they have 
never won a final at Lord's. 
The critic on these occasions 
has to slick his neck out and 
provided Worcestershire have 
Radford in the side I suggest 
they will win a memorable 
game. 

Those at The OvaL both 
sentimentalists and neutral 
will be horribly tom between 


Lloyd's captaincy appear- 
ances in one-day finals at 
Lord's have been restricted to 
World Cups with West Indies, 
though he participated, of 
course, in Lancashire's fam- 
ous victories in the 1970s. 
Simmons, with bis low trajec- 
tory, will go down in history as 
the man to set new styles and 
methods for spinners in one- 
day cricket He and Pocock 
are the last of the great English 
off-spinner^ still playing, ca- 
pable of maximum guile and 
able to vary their technique to 
the day’s needs. 

Alton and Watkinson are fit 
to play for Lancashire after 
missing the last three-day 
match: Surrey have injury 
doubts about Bicknell and 
Needham, but Clarke’s 
thunderbolts are on hand The 
game will not lack for stroke 
makers: Fowler, Mendis, 1 
Abrahams, Lloyd and 
Fairbrother, for Lancashire, 
Butcher, Jesty and Lynch, for 
Surrey. Again with trepida- 
tion. the writer gives his tip. i 
with Lancashire's one-day tra- 
ditional background, the 
deciding factor likely to leave 
them winners. 


You are 
a newspaper 
publisher 
and your 
photographer 
offers you a 
photograph of a 
female member of 



sunbathing 

topless, 


Would 



It's a question of Scruples. 


SCRUPLE!? 




THE GAME OF MORAL DILEMMAS. AULi- 

... - . >'•" -'-^.w-V/GAWES; 


CARRIAGE DRIVING 


FOOTBALL 


Munt is a 
worthy 
inclusion 


Middlesbrough rescue deal rejected 


By Jenny MacArthur 


Peter Muni from Ascot has 
earned his place in the British 
team for the world FE1 four- 
in-hand driving champion- 
ships which start today on his 
doorstep at Ascot Racecourse 
with the opening ceremony. 

Munt who represented 
Britain in the 1981 European 
championships in Switzer- 
land. has had a superb season 
so far with his team of Dutch 
Gelderlanders which he has 
been driving for a year. They 
were runners-up at Windsor in 
May. won at Kelso in June 
and were third at both San- 
dringham and Cirencester last 
month. His forte is the mara- 
thon. the most demanding 
phase of the trials. Out of the 
seven marathons he has com- 
peted in this season he has lost 
only one. 


The Football League yes- 
terday rejected the rescue 
package of a consortium fight- 
ing to save Middlesbrough 
Football Club following their 
winding-up in the High Court 
two weeks ago over a £ 1 1 5.000 
lax bill. 

Graham Kelly, the League 
secretary, said: "The package 
does riot meet our require- 
ments over payments to cred- 
itors of an old company. We 
still hope a solution can be 
reached, but time is fast 
running out. 

"We set down our con- 
ditions on May 23 and the 
new season starts on August 
23.” 


The Midland Bank, as ma- 
■ jor secured creditor, accepted 
a consortium offer to buy the 
ground and the club's assets 
last week and there was hope 
of a compromise with the 
League over £1.9 million 
debts. 

Colin Henderson (1CI), a 
member of the consortium, 
said at a Press conference last 
Friday that Middlesbrough 
could be back in business this 
week with flexibility and 
understanding by the League. 

Middlesbrough's future 
could be decided at a monthly 
meeting of the management 
committee in London on 
Thursday afternoon. Should 


the committee decide to call in 
players' contracts there will be 
no chance of the club being 
readmitted to the League. 

• Sir Norman Chester, CBE 
who was the chairman of two 
major inquiries into the state 
of football in 1968 and 1983. 
has accepted an invitation to 
become president of the GM 
Vauxhall Conference, for- 
merly the Gola League. 

• Chesterfield hope to be 
given the all-clear when safety 
experts visit Saitergaie today 
for a pre-season check on 
ground improvements. The 
third division club have spent 
£130.000 on their ground in 
the last year. 


Richards 


kicks off 


The two other learn mem- 1 
hers are George Bowman, who ; 
has been a member of every 
championship team since 
1974. and AJwyn Holder, 
whose victory at the 
Cirencester driving trials 
helped secure his place. Prince 
Philip, who has not been on 
top form this season, was not 
expected to be in the team and 
will compete as an individual. ' 
Notably absent from the 
championships this week is 1 
Mr Alan Bristow's team. J 
driven by Micky Flynn, the j 
winners of the team bronze, 
medal at the 1984 world’ 
championships in Hungary. 
Mr Bristow- withdrew his team 
oxer the weekend "due to 
unforeseen circumstances” | 
and was not available for ! 
comment yesterday. 

TEAM: G Bowman. A Holder. P 
Munt. INDIVIDUALS: Prince Philip. J 
RicjiardS. M Weston. H Davies. M 
Cooper. 


Viv Richards, the West 
Indies and Somerset batsman 
rated the world's best, is to 
return to football this winter 
for Hungerford Town, ihe 
Vauxhall Opel minor league 
club in the Thames Valley. 

Hungerford officials per- 
suaded Richards to sign forms 
and rekindle his football ca- 
reer which last saw the West 
Indies captain play for Anti- 
gua in the qualifying rounds of 
the World Cup. He is expected 
to make his first appearance 
for Hungerford next month. 
"He will play occasionally for 
us throughout the season 
depending on his other 
commitments,'* Ron Tarry, a 
club spokesman, said. 



Up and down 


Australia cruised to a 3-1 
win over Argentina in a 
hockey international in Syd-: 
ney yesterday, but were then 
assailed by Richard Aggiss. 
the coach, for needing to 
improve considerably before 
October’s World Cup 


’SUe/**. 


Simpson aided 


Richards: World Cap player 


Club wrangles 


Cook wanted 


Kings Lynn yesterday 
made a bid for John Cook, the 
transfer-listed Ipswich speed- 
way rider. The American 
international aged 27. is In- 
volved in a pay dispute with 
Ipswich. 


Rugby League officials have 
been asked to deride disputes 
between two former inter- 
national placers, David Ward, 
the Leeds and Great Britain 
hooker, and Clive Griffiths, 
the Wales full back, from 
Salford, and their clubs. Both 
wish to quit playing to coach 
with Hunslei and St Helens, 
but the clubs object 


Judy Simpson, the 
Commonwealth Games 
heptathlon champion, is to 
receive £2.083 towards her 
training arid travelling ex- 
penses before the i 988 Olym- 
pics from the latest Mi net 
awards. Other athletes, Phil 
Brown (400m). Lincoln As- 
quith (sprinter). Roald j 
Bradsiock (javelin). Kira H ag- 
ger (heptathlon) and Diana 1 
Davies (high jump), are to 
receive similar . amounts, 
while Rob White, the Tornado 
class world champion, and his , 
crewman. Jeremy Newman, 
are also to share £24.000 with ; 
Rod Douglasfboxing. £2,078). 
Martin Bel! (skiing. £3.167). , 
Kerrish Brown (judo. £5.085) j 
and Malcolm Cooper (shoot- j 
ing. £8.800). 



Stuttgart-bound 
Coe banks on 


Zurich fast one 

By Pat Batcher, Athletics Correspondent 


The tt'ehklasse meeting in 
Zurich tonight is one ?f the 
few assets that the Swiss do 
not keep a secret. While other 
promoters talk about having 
the best one-off athletics meet- 
ing in the world, the Swiss go 
ahead and do it. Who said you 
cannot buy success? There is 
. l.9million Swiss francs 

I (£760.000) in the bank ac- 

| count, and the best athletes in 
i the world tum up in numbers. 


Sebastian Coe does not jasi 
want to prove that he is nt 
enough to accept his selection 
for the 800/ 1 ,500 metres in the 
European championships in 
Stuttgart in two weeks' time: 
he wants to prove that he can 
win those titles. He said 
yesterday that he was looking 
for “a fairly quick run” and 
when pressed for a time, 
responded with “around 3mtn 
32sec”, which would be the 
fastest of the year and the time 
which won the Olympic title. 


ably have three world records 
after tonight. 

Ingrid Kristiansen already 
has three world records, the 
5.000/10,000 metres and the 
marathon. But the Norwegian 
is unlikely to have four 
records after tonight, since the 
3.000 metres is probably a 
little too short both for her 
talents and even for her 
current superb form. Added to 
which Maricica Puica. the 
Olympic champion, is in the 
field, as is Zola Budd, who will 
be hoping to justify her double 
selection - for the European 
Championships after her re- 
cent uncertain form. 

The 5.000 metres looks like 


Wells date 


Coe's opposition in this 
latest Mobil Grand Prix meet- 
ing includes the Spaniards. 
Jose Ahascal and Jose Luis 
Gonzalez, Frank O' Mara, of 
Ireland, and Abdi Bile Abdi. 
of Somalia. But Peter Elliott 
will also want to prove that he 
would be a more than ade- 
quate replacement for Coe in 
Stuttgart should anything go 
wrong. 


Said Aouita, having missed 
last Friday’s IAC meeting, 
following his I3min 00.86sec 
5.000 metres (four tenths of a 
second outside his world 
record) last Wednesday, 
should go dose to the 3.000 
metres record tonighL When 
Henry Rono ran 7:32.1 in 
1978. it was one of four world 
records for the Kenyan. 


Allan Wells will meet 
Linford Christie for the first 
time in two years in the Dairy 
Crest Gaines invitation meet- 
ing at Birmingham next Tues- 
day. Christie took Wells's 
national 100 metres record 
earlier this season and they 
will team up in both sprints at 
the European Championships. 
David Moorcroft will contin- 
ues his rehabilitation after two 
years on the sidelines through 
injury by meeting John 
Walker in the mile. The 
Olympic sprint hardies cham- 
pions. Benita Fitzgerald- 
Brown and Roger Kingdom, of 
the United States, have also 
agreed to compete. 


Aouita's range, from 800 
metres to 10,000 metres, is 
broader and better than any 
other athlete in the history of 
the sport. And the Moroccan 
has the ambition to go with 
that talenL He has two world 
records at the moment, 
1,500/5,000 metres. And with 
the impetus of Sydney Maree, 
Antonio Leitao and Paul 
Kipkoech, Aouita will prob- 


a rehearsal for Stuttgart ex- 
cept that one of the European 
favourites, Steve Ovett will be 
in the television commentary 
box. That will be close enough 
to see how the Swiss. Pierre 
Delcze. who beat Ovett at 
Crystal Palace last Friday will 
fere against Vincent Rousseau 
of Belgium, another Swiss. 
Markus Ryffel. John Ngugi. 
the world cross country cham- 
pion. Irishmen John Treacy 
and Ray Flynn, and Italians 
Alberto Cova. Stefeno Mei 
and Salvatore Antibo. But 
Ovett's European team part- 
ners. Tim Hutchings and Jack 
Buckner, will have an even 
closer look, from the middle 
of the field. 


Sequence of losses 
hangs over Budd 


Zola Budd will attempt to 
end a losing sequence at home 
of three races when she com- 
petes for England in the HFC 
Trust international at 
CopthaU. Hendon on Sunday 
against Poland and a com- 
bined Scotland-Wales team. 
Beaten over 2,000 metres at 
Crystal Palace and over 800 
metres in Birmingham follow- 
ing her exclusion from the 
Commonwealth Games, Budd 
last week tost over 2.000 
metres in Gateshead'. 
Sunday's race will give her the 
chance for further preparation 
before the European 
Championships in Stuttgart, 
which begin on August 26. 

Shireen Bailey, overlooked 
for the Commonwealth 
Games but named for the 800 
metres in Stuttgart, will part- 
ner Budd in the 1.500 metres.- 
Others members of a powerful 
England squad include four 
gold medal winners at Edin- 
burgh. Heather Oakes. Sally 
Gunnell. Judy Simpson and 


Tessa Sanderson. Shirley 
Strong, who pulled out of 
Britain's team for the Euro- 
pean Championships because 
she felt unable to do herself 
justice, is included for the 100 
metres hurdles alongside 
Gunnell. 


TEAM: 100 metres: P Dunn (Stret- 
ford). H Oakes (Haringey). 200m: J 
Baptiste (Wolverhampton). S Ja- 
cobs (Reading). 400m: L Keougft 
(Basingstoke). A Pfggford (Gates- 


3,000m: C Banning (Ak 
Shields (Sheffield). 100m 


S Bailey (Bromley), 
enmng (Aldershot). J 


hurdles: S 


GunneN (Essex). S Strong (Stret- 
ford). 400m hurdles: S Gandy 
(Hounslow), Y Wray (Stretford). 4 x 
100m relay: Baptiste. Dunn, 
Gunnell. Jacobs. H Oakes. Strong. 4 


Guise (Birch field). 5km 
Elleker- (Sheffield), L 


Langford 


(Birch field). Long Jump: M Berkeley 
(Croydon), K Hamer (Essex). Shoe 
T Sanderson (Wotvemampton). a 


Lockton (Wolverhampton). Discus: 
A Avis (Barnet), K Pugh (Bkchtield). 


SKIING 


Race that never was 
because of officials 


Las Leras , Argentina (Reu- 
ter) — Skiers and race officials 
were at loggerheads yesterday 
after the cancellation of the 
opening men's downhill, first 
event of the 1986-87 Alpine 
skiing World Cup season. The 
race was written off after it had 
been postponed for the third 
time in four days because of 
bad weather. Bat it was called 
off on a day when snow was 
abundant, skies were bril- 
liantly clear and winds ap- 
peared .modi lighter than in 
previous days. 


Pablo Rosen kjer. president 
of the organizing committee, 
said that a meeting of race 
officials and team trainers 
ended with a majority saying 
the race should have been held 
and that calling it off was a 
mistake. 

He said that some unidenti- 
fied skiers had shown a “weak 
and lazy attitude” and that 
some of diem, complaining of 
strong winds, refused to ski 
even as they woe assembled at 
the top of the slope. Others 
blamed the Austrians for 
refusing to ski and causing the 
race to oe called off. 

Dieter Barsch, the Austrian 
trainer, said that shifting 
winds would have made the 
race unfair and that "all 
racers, not just the Austrians, 
wanted to cancel because of 
the wind”. Rosen kjer con- 
firmed that Hans Kung. the 
Swiss technical delegate, 
ordered the race to go ahead 
25 minutes after it was sched- 
uled to begin and with Marc 

Girardelli. i rf Luxemburg, the 


World Cup holder, ready to go. 
Bat only seconds later. Oskar 
Fischer, of West Germany, the 
starting judge, gave the order 
to stop the race because of 
volatile winds, Rosen kjer said. 

Fischer amid stop skiers 
starting their descent from his 
position at the top of the slope, 
but Rosenkjer said that 
according to World Cop rules, 
only Kung had the power to 
call the race off. Kong did call 
it off and the competition's 
organizing committee later de- 
cided to cancel the race for 
good. 

But Douglas Lewis, the 
American skier, fifth here last 
year and the highest seeded 
North American, said: "It was 
mostly the Austrians. They 
stood there and told everyone 
they did not want to go. There 
was definitely some wind, but I 
don't think yon can get a better 


day at Las Leras," he added. 

"We should haw rarpd be- 


“We should have raced be- 
cause there is no sense waiting 
around for two weeks doing 
nothing," 

Helmut Hoefiehner, of Ans- 
tria, the current overall wrorid 
champion, said he believed the 
resort suffered a chronic prob- 
lem with wind. “We ha»e 
wtongh snow. The problem is 
that it is windy all day" he 
said, adding that officials al- 
low races to go ahead here in 
higher winds than officials in 
Europe. 


“Vie are not saying we will 
only ski on a perfect day.*" 
Barsch said. "But it would 
have been unfair.' 1 


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