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THE 



TIMES 


No 62,535 



THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 



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• Pr^ona offered to organize elections + The Defence Minister called the 

among blacks for representatives to sit - ANC an organization of terror with 
on a national advisory conncfl which there could be no negotiation 

• The National Party congress agreed • Zimbabwe is to continue selling snb- 
that apartheid most continue for the stantial amounts of grain to Pretoria, 
protection of minority rights (page 5) despite its stand on sanctions (page 5) 

From Michael Hornsby, Durban 


The South African Govern- 
ment yesterday offered to 
organize a country-wide ejec- 
tion among blacks to enable 
item to choose repre-; 
sen ta lives to sit on an ad- 
visory National Council to 
discuss the constitutional fu- 
ture of the country. 

The election. Mr Chris 
Heunis. the Minister of 
Constitutional Development 
and Planning, told a federal 
congress of the ruling National 
Party, would be birthed to 
blacks outside the Intel 
homelands, in which more 
than half the country's blacks 
live. 

“If the need exists in blade 
communities outside the Na- 
tional States (the homelands) 
to elect their representatives 
to a National Council, we will 
assist with the division of the 
country on a regional basis for 
the election of such leaders 
and the compilations ofKsts of 
black South African citizens to 
participate in such an election 
of leaders.” 

When the Government pro- 
posed the National Cotmol 
earlier this year, it was envis- 
aged that most of its members 
would have been appointed by 
President Botha, or nomi- 
nated by black interest groups 
and organizations. 

Holding an election appears 
to be designed to give grata- 
legitimacy to the council. 


run for election and ensuring a 
credible turn-out of voters- 
Also addressing the con- 
gress, the Minister of Law and 
Order. Mr Louis Le Grange, 
said the state of emergency 

Detainees released 

Dozens of political detainees 
were reported to hare been 
freed after a ruling by the 
Natal Supreme Court on Mon- 
day Invalidating sections of 
the June 12 emergency decree 
(AP reports). Mr Justice 
Frank Smuts confirmed the 
release of all 42 detainees beW 
in tire Orange Free State town 
of Frankfort, a Johannesburg 
newspaper, reported. Another 
report said eight activists from 
Lenasla, the Asian township 
outside Johannesburg, were 
released yesterday. _ 


would be maintained so long 
as the “revolutionaiy climate” 
in the country persisted. 

Earlier the South African 

Defence Minister, General 

Magnus Malan, warned black have spoken of the. existence 
Afru«an muninM tut,* -r “genuine nationalists” 


Western governments which 
urged Pretoria to let Mr 
Nelson Mandela out of gaol 
and talk to bis organization, 
the outlawed African National 
Congress (ANC): “We will not 
be manipulated by words 
which clothe the devil in the 
cloak of an angeL” 

Those “who so piously wish 
to prescribe to us to talk to the 
ANC. sbould note the follow- 
ing: Why don't the British talk 
to the Irish Republican Army: 
why don't the Germans talk to 
Baader Meinhofr and why 
don't the Italians talk to their 
Red Brigade;” he dertainwl 
In one of the strongest 
denunciations of the ANC by 
a government minister. Gen- 
eral Malan called it an 
“organization of terror and 
violence” with which there 
could be no negotiation. With- 
out violence, he believed, 
there would be “very little 
left" of it anyway. 

In speeches and interviews 
in recent months, botfa Presi- 
dent Botha and Mr Le Grange 


African countries who "chant 
loudest in the chorus for 
(economic) sanctions and 
condemnation” that “we have 
not even -started using our 
muscle and capabilities” 
Seconding a motion on 
order and stability. General 
Malan said South Africa was 


of 

within" the ANC and Mr Le 
Grange has allowed that Mr 
Mandela might not be com- 
munist-controlled. 

nighthowlver, Mr LeGrange 
was more preoccupied with 
the terrorist threat. “We don't 
negotiate with terrorists; we 


"too powerful to be seen as a 

which has so far been shunned -pawn in a chess game”, and fight them”, he dedared, add- 
by all black leaders with any that it had “no intention of jug that South Africa would 

significant political following. " surrendering” not hesitate to cross “over our 

Pretoria’s problem will be , The .General also had an borders to wipe out terrorist 
finding any credible leader to uncompromising message for gangs”; 



• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize was shared 
yesterday by two 
readers. It was 
£8,000, double the usual 
amount, because no _ 
one won on Tuesday. 
Details, paged. 

• Portfofiotist, page 
19; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 14. 


Babies ‘at risk 
at weekends 9 

Some babies may be more at 
risk from cot deaths and other 
sudden fatal illness at the 
weekends, an analysis of more 
than 6.000 infant fatalities has 
shown Page 3 

Malta’s way 

A British frigate sails into 
Valletta harbour tomorrow as 
Malta picks its careful way 
between potentially conflict- 
ing Mediterranean power ali- 
gnments Pag/e 7 

Legal dispute 

Radical proposals to overhaul 
the legal aid scheme could Iraki 
to a second class legal service 
for the public, according to the 
Law Society Page 3 

‘Wall must go 9 

Chancellor Kohl said in Berim 
on the 25th anniversary of the 
the Berlin Wall that the Wall, 
barbed wire and orders to 
shorn to kill must go Page 14 

Patient power 

Dissatisfied patients are to be 
given more powers to com- 
plain about treatment by doc- 
tors. demists and opticians 
Page 2 

On This Day 

A famous cricketing victory 
for England over Australia. 
“Jessop’s^ match” in J 902 saw 
the "Colonial" bowling 
collared Page 11 

Degree results 

awarded by the 
of Kent are pub- 
ly Page 20 


Umversi' 

lishedt 


' iv’j 
’.fl/ ■ 


Home News 23 
Overseas 53 
Appis 12.16 
Am . u 
Births^oUhs. 
Barrages 12 

Books - 9 
B«s»*ss. 15-20 
Chcs 1 2 

Court 12 

Cmw w rit.m 
Daw 10 


Fealmtt 

8.10 

la* Report 

25 

Leaders 

11 

Letters 

11 

Obtesrr 

U 

Sckbcc 

12 

Spert 2MK30 

TheMrtMtc 

29 

TV & Radio 

29 

Uuvs 133 

Weather 
Wife . 

14 

12 


■fr a* a. a it 


By Philip Webster, Chief Pofitfcal Correspondent 


The Prime Minister's per- 
sonal popularity has sunk to 
its lowest level since the last 
general election, in the wake of 
.die- dispute with Common- 
wealth Jeaders over sanctions 
against South Africa. 

And the Labour lead over 
the Tories bas stretched to 6.5 
per cent with the Alliance 
moving up to join the Conser- 
vatives in second place, 
according to a Gallup opinion 
poll published in the Daily 
Telegraph today. 

The outcome suggests that 
the Alliance has completely 
recovered from the drop in 
popularity that followed the 
internal dispute in June over 
the future of Polaris, when Dr 
David Owen, the SDP leader, 
openly disagreed with the 
conclusions of the panties’, 
joint commission on defence. 

The Gallup figures put La- 
bour on 36.5 per cent with the 
Conservatives and the Alli- 
ance both on 30 per cent. In 
July Labour was on 38 per 
cent, the Tories on 33 per cent 
and the Alliance on 27 per 
cent In June, in the.wake of 
the defence dispute, the Alli- 
ance had been on 24.5 per 
cent 


Only 28 per cent of those 
interviewed said they were 
satisfied with Mrs Thatcher’s 
performance as Prime Min- 
ister and 66 percent said they 
were dissatisfied. The poll was 
taken between August 6 and 
August 1 1 after the end of the 
Commonwealth Summit in 
London, when Mrs Thatcher 
was isolated, as six other 
Commonwealth leaders de- 
rided on a fresh package of 
sanctions against the South 
Africans. 

As a MORI opinion poll in 
The Times on August 1 in- 
dicated the controversy over 
the alleged rift between the 
Queen arid Mrs Thatcher over 
the South Africa issue would 
also have had a bearing on the 
poll's finding. 

A Marplan poll published in 
The Guardian today puls La- 
bour on 38 per cent, the 
Conservatives 32 and the 
Alliance 27. 

Mr Neil Kinnock's popular- 
ity rating also suffers a fell in 
the Gallup poll. Thirty eigbt 
per cent of the 994 respon- 
dents said they were satisfied 
with his performance as the 
Opposition leader, compared 
with 43 per cent last month. 


Suspect 
freed on 
warrant 
blunder 

By Richard Ford 
and Frauds Gibb 

Cross-border security co- 
operation suffered a set back 
yesterday when mistakes in 
extradition warrants issued by 
the Royal Ulster Constabulary 
enabled a terrorist suspect to 
walk free from a Dublin court 
Mr John O'Reilly, aged 26. 
had jumped bail in the north 
while awaitng trial But he left 
the Republic High Court mo- 
ments after two warrants for 
his extradition were declared 
invalid. 

He bad been held in the 
Republic's top security 
Ponlaoise Prison having been 
detained in the south last 
October. 

Mr Harry Kirkpatrick, an 
Irish National Liberation 
Army informer had im- 
plicated Mr O'ReDIy in a 
conspiracy to murder 
Kenneth Shimeld. a Civil 
Servant, and to cause an 
explosion in 1981. He had 
been charged in the north on 
the evidence provided by the 
supergrass. 

Two warrants for his extra- 
dition to the north had been 
granted by a court in Limerick 
last November, bur his law- 
yers contested the order argu- 
ing they were not valid under 
the Republic's law. 

Yesterday in the High Court 
in Dublin Judge Patrick 
MacKenzie ordered Mr 
O'Reilly's immediate release 
after the state accepted that 
the warrants were invalid. 

Mr Edward Comyn, for the 
prosecution, said that since a 
High Court order last week 
urging an inquiry into the 
detention of Mr O'Reilly, the 
state was satisfied that the 
issuing of the warrants in the 
north had not been done in the 
manner required by the 
Republic's law. 

“They would be valid in 
Northern Ireland but under 
our laws they would not be 
regarded as emanating from 
judicial authority,” he said. 

As he left the court after the 
five-minute .hearing, Mr 
O’Reilly said: *T feel very 
relieved. -The facts speak for 
themselves.”' ■ ■ v , 

Mr O'Reflly had been ar- 
rested several times in the 
north and charged onthe word 
of informers but had never 
been brought to triaL 
He jumped bad before the 
completion of the Kirkpatrick 
case in which 27 men were 
jailed for almost 200 charges. 
One man was given six life 
sentences for murder with a 
recommendation that he serve 
at least 25 years behind bars. 

It is understood that the 
extradition papers were 
invalid because they were 
signed by a court official 
rather than a judge. 

This latest blunder is yet 
another embarrassment to 
authorities in the north after 
the collapse last year of an- 
other attempt to- extradite a 
man wanted for the murder of 
five British soldiers. The 
Republic's High Court freed a 
man because the Lord Chief 
Justice of Northern Ireland 
quashed 15 warrants for his 
extradition because they were 
defective. 

The Attorney General’s of- 
fice in London yesterday said 
it would be investigating why 
yesterday's defective warrant 
had not been checked in the 
wake of the warrants blunder 
in March when Evelyn 
Glenholmes, the IRA suspect, 
was released. 

The warrant had been is- 
sued before that date and 
should have been checked. 
Contused on page 2, col 6 


Optimism keeps share prices rising 


Stock markets 
further gains yesterday 
optimism over interest rates 
and company profits, plus 
technical factors, pushed 
prices higher round the world. 

The mood was unchanged 
by official economic figures, 
published in the United States 
and Britain, showing an un- 
impressive economic perfor- 
mance in each country. . 

Trading in A thin London 
market produced gains in the 
consumer sector, including 
food and drink related slocks. 


By Richard Thomson. 
Good profit figures from 
Commercial Union and Gen- 
eral Accident helped to under- 
pin the market and pushed 
prices in the insurance sector 
higher. The FT 30-share index 
advanced 19 points to 1.261. 

After-hours trading in Lon- 
don provided further rises as 
the New York market ad- 
vanced rapidly. 

Government figures show- 
ing a fail in- industrial produc- 
tion of 0.7 per cent in the 
second quarter, despite a 0.4 
per cent rise in manufacturing 


output over the same period, 
failed to discourage share 
prices. American retail sales 
rose by only 0.1 per cent last 
month. 

Details, page 15 


Siege ends 

Police carrying riot shields 
battered down the door of 
house in Whiston Road. 
Northampton, to end a nine- 
hour siege yesterday after 
being held at bay with a sword 
and knives. Two men and a 
woman were arrested. 


Links found with homes in Hamburg 

Drifting Tamil 
refugees ‘came 
from Europe 9 



A Tamil refugee waiting to learn his fate in 
St John's, Newfoundland. 


MPs upset 
by petrol 
increases 

By Peter De Ionno 

As cost conscious motorists 
shopped around to beat the 7p 
a gallon petrol price rise. 
Conservatives and Labour 
MPs called .on the Govern- 
ment io intervene and refer 

E etrol pricing to the Monopo- 
es and Mergers Commission. 
The calls came after Esso. 
BP and Mobil followed Shell 
in increasing the price: push- 
ing up four-star petrol to 
I64.6p a gallon on average. 

Mr Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark. Conservative MP for 
Birmingham Selly Oak. said: 
“1 would like to know how 
much more evidence one 
needs of a cartel than three 
major companies following 
Shell in this disgraceful opera- 
tion. Exactly the same thing 
has been happening over the 
last five years and longer. 

“This matter must be re- 
ferred now to the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission. 
Bandits will never be dead 
while there are petrol compa- 
nies acting like this.” 

He was backed by Mr Terry 
Dicks. Conservative MP for 
Hayes and Hariington. 

Mr George Foulkes. Sha- 
dow Foreign Affairs Minister, 
speaking on behalf of the Op- 
position from bench, said the 
Government's failure to inter- 
vene showed “a total disre- 
gard for the interests of the 
consumer and puls the profits 
of the multi-nationals ahead 
of concern for the British 
motorist. 

But Whitehall sources dis- 
missed the criticism, referring 
to advice given by Mrs 
Thatcher in March that con- 
sumers should shop around 
for the best prices to ensure 
that competition would keep 
prices low. 

The increase by the four 
major retailers, who control 
about 70 per cent of the mar- 
ket. has taken the average 
price to I64.6p. according to 
Mr Clive Ainsley. director of 
petrol services for the Motor 
Agents Association. 

He predicted that prices 

Continued on page 2 


Observer 
to cut 
print staff 

By Michael McCarthy 

The Observer became the 
last of the main national 
newspapers to face the Fleet 
Street technological revolu- 
tion yesterday. 

. It announced plans to leave 
its offices in the City of 
London for a new building in 
Battersea and put the printing 
of the paper out to contract in 
four provincial centres. 

The move, predicted m The 
Times two weeks ago. will 
involve shedding virtually all 
the 500-plus casual printing 
workers, mainly members of 
the print union Sogat '82. who 
man the presses on Saturday 
night at the plant in St 
Andrew's HilL 
It is understood redun- 
dancies will be sought in other- 
areas of the paper. “Compre- 
hensive” redundancy terms 
would be offered, the paper 
said. 

The Observer management 
would not specify exactly how 
many jobs would have to go 
when it met the unions 
yesterday. 

It said that “negotiations 
over the number of staff to be 
retained will take place over 
the next two months”. 

Specific proposals for job 
numbers will be put in sepa- 
rate meetings to each of the 
five unions involved, the 
journalists, the engineers, the 
electricians and Sogat and the 
National Graphical Associ- 
ation representing the print- 
ers. 

But there is no doubt that 
the main target will be the 
Saturday night casual printing 
staff as" the paper will be 
abandoning its own printing 
when it moves next March to 
the Marcopolo building, a new 
business centre being built on 
the south side of Chelsea 
Bridge. 

After the move the paper 
will be primed on local-paper 
presses owned by Portsmouth 
and Sunderland Newspapers 
at Portsmouth. East Midland 
Allied Press at Peterborough. 
Westminster Press at Brad- 

Continued on page 14. col 8 


Guinness alters plans 


Guinness, the brewing and 
retailing group which took 
over the Distillers Scotch 
whisky company in April 
yesterday modified controver- 


sial plans for its board struc- 
ture. The proposals had been 
heavily criticized by financial 
and Scottish interests. 

New structure, page 15 


Games marksman faces ban over heart drug 


By John Goodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 

A Scottish marksman re- 
turned a positive drug lest at 
the Commonwealth frames in 
Edinburgh, the first Briton 
ever to be found guilty in an 
international shooting event. 

Robin McDonald, aged 56. 
has been disqualified from the 
free pistol shooting event for 
taking Beta-Blockcrs. which 
he told the Commonwealth 
Games Federation had been 
prescribed for a heart 
condition. 

Beta-Blockers were banned 
in May 1985 by the Inter- 
V 


national Shooting Federation 
because of widespread misuse 
by shooters seeking to relieve 
anxiety, stop tremors and slow 
their heart beats, all useful 
conditions for the sport 

At some events in the 
United States, up to 30 per 
cent of competitors have pre- 
sented medical certificates 
declaring that they needed 
Beta-Blockers for heart 
conditions. 

McDonald said: “I believe 
in my own mind that I was not 
shooting with an unfair 
advantage. ! was aware of the 
ban but this rule was aimed at 


youngsters taking massive 
doses, not someone like me 
who has had a heart condition 
for nearly 1 0 years.” 

McDonald, who has com- 
peted internationally since 
(969. and has taken part in 
two previous Commonwealth 
Games, agreed that he bad 
signed a form before the 
random test stating that he 
had taken no form of medica- 
tion for 48 hours before the 
event 

“I did not want to go blaring 
around that I was on the drug, 
Trasicor. It was cold. I was 
angry as I had shot badly. 


finishing two from last I was 
also due at Hollyrood House 
for a drink with the Queen at a 
Commonwealth reception.” 

McDonald, an industrial 
agent, who lives in north 
London, said that he had not 
taken the drug on the morning 
of the event but agreed that he 
had taken it the previous day. 
He had been confident that his 
daily medical dose would not 
show up in his urine sample 
because he had not been found 
positive at the Scottish air- 
weapons championships last 
year. 

He could be banned for six 


months by the international 
federation, to which the 
Commonwealth Federation 
has sent its report. 

Dr Lazio Antal chairman of 
the Great Britain Pistol 
Committee, and a member of 
the medical committee of the 
international federation, said: 
“I cannot see any leniency 
because it would be hard to 
give him credit because he did 
not declare the drug on his 
form.” 

McDonald said: **Mv doc- 
tor savs that there is not an 
alternative to Beta-Blockers, 
w hich is not on the banned list 
of drugs. 


British and 
authorities, using satellite 
communications, were still 
trying yesterday to identify 
and apprehend the ship which 
abandoned 152 Sri Lankans 
picked up off the Newfound- 
land coast on Monday. 

It is now believed that the 
refugees started their voyage 
from Europe, and not Madras 
in India as they had told the 
officials who were questioning 
them. 

In Jork. near Hambuig, Mr 
Waldcmar Stehn. who de- 
scribed himself as a consultant 
to those seeking asylum, said 
that the boat people were 
Tamils who had been living 
near Hamburg and had paid 
$2,900 to an organization in 
Paris called Tamil Aid. 

They had then been taken in 
French-registered buses to the 
French port of Calais to board 
a Lebanese freighter on July 
27 with the help of a Tamil 
separatist group called the 
Liberation Tigers of Tamil 
Eelam. 

Mr Stehn said that he had 
recognized some of the boat 
people from television news 
broadcasts as Tamils who had 
been living in communities 
around Hamburg. A spokes- 
man for the Lower Saxony 
Free Democratic Party said 
that other local people had 
also recognized several of the 
Tamils as having been living 
recently in the area. 

The Jork town council con- 
firmed that six Tamils who 
had been living in a house in 
the town were now missing, 
and other Tamil families who 
had applied for asylum were 
reported to have left council 
accommodation in the nearby 
twon of Slade. 

The lifeboats in which the 
Sri Lankans were found drift- 
ing were identified as coming 
from a vessel formerly named 
Regina Maris and Mercato 
One. though the lifeboat 


By Robin Young 
Canadian markings 


had been scraped 


off. 

The Regina Mans. Mercato 
One. now renamed once more 
as the Alexander, belongs to 
the Madere Company with 
offices in Sark, but is at 
present in the Mediterranean. 

The owners said that the 
ship, a former passenger bout 
now registered as a yacht, had 
been refilled in Germany List 
year and four spare lifeboats 
had been sold to the shipyard 
in Bremerhaven. Investiga- 
tions were continuing tost 
night as to w ho had exentually 
purchased the lifeboats. 

In Canada, some of the 
castaways told their rescuers 
that had paid up to $>000 
each for passage from India to 
Canada, and said that the ship 
had been crewed by 
“orientals" But Mr. Rod 
Singaraycr. a Sri Lankan liv- 
ing in Newfoundland, who 
interviewed them said that 
many were carrying West 
German newspapers, tele- 
phone numbers and currency. 

“1 do not believe they have 
been telling the truth at all”. 
Mr. Singarayersaid. "I believe 
they started out from Ger- 
many, not India.” 

In Bonn, a spokesman for 
the Interior Ministry said that 
of 37.00(1 Tamils who had 
sought asylum in West Ger- 
many since 1980. only a very- 
small number had been rec- 
ognized as genuine political 
refugees. 

Though many Tamils 
whose applications were re- 
fused in West Berlin were 
deponed to Sri Lanka in the 
early !9S0s. other stale gov- 
ernments have been more 
lenient, and up to 30.000 
Tamils remain in West Ger- 
many, living under the care of 
local government authorities, 
on social welfare benefits and 

Continued on page 14, col I 


Israelis open way to 
summit with Egypt 

From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 


Preparations for an early 
summit between President 
Mubarak of Egypt and Mr 
Shimon Peres, the Israeli 
Prime Minister, are going 
ahead after the unanimous 
acceptance by the Israeli inner 
Cabinet yesterday of an agree- 
ment on how to arbitrate the 
sovereignty of the beach resort 
of Taba in Sinai. 

h took two tough four-hour 
sessions yesterday to reach 
agreement. The Likud faction 
was unhappy about moving 
ahead on Tate without further 


undertakings from Egypt on 
normalizing relations. 

Mr Yitzhak Shamir, the 
Likud leader, was accused of 
try ing to stall for time to stop 
the summit from taking place 
before he takes over as Prime 
Minister on October 7. 

Three international ar- 
bitrators must still be found to 
join the two already nomi- 
nated by the two countries to 
decide the issue. If this is done 
within the next few days the 
agreement could signed by the 
end of next week. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


New powers will help 
dissatisfied patients 
to make complaints 


Study will 
set maths 
targets for 
cluldren 


New powers are to be added 
to the complaints procedures 

• covering family doctors, den- 
" lists, pharmacists and op- 

• ticians under government 
proposals put forward y ester- 

'■ day. 

Mr Barney Hay hoe. Min- 
ister for Health, said the aim 
was to make the existing 
system “simpler, clearer and 
more effective". 

■ . A consultation paper from 
the Department of Health 
suggests that family prac- 
tilioner service committees, 
•. which conduct the invesiiga- 
- lions, should be able to accept 
: _ oral complaints by dissatisfied 
patients as a basis for action. 

it also proposes extending 
; - the deadline for filing a com- 
plaint from eight weeks to 
■ thirteen, ensuring there is a 
balance between professional 
■' and lay people on the disci- 

• plinary panels, and giving 
•- * them the power to call wit- 
■ • nesses and examine docu- 
«* mens such as doctors* notes. 

Mr Hayhoe said: “Many 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 
led people find the present system pn 


By Lb 
E ducation 


too complicated and daunting. 
It is in the interests of both 


proposals before coming to a 
conclusion. 


It is in the interests of both 
public and practitioners that 
complaints should be dealt 
with as quickly and fairly as 
possible." 

Other ideas include 
clarification of the right of par- 
ties to a complaint to be 
represented at a hearing and 
the introduction throughout 
England and Wales of an in- 
formal conciliation procedure 
to resolve swiftly less serious 
cases. 

Ministers would also like to 
give the committees the power 
to discipline erring prac- 
titioners rather than, as at 
present limiting them to mak- 
ing recommendations to the 
Secretary of State. Sanctions 
range from reprimands to 
fines and dismissals. 


The proposals drew an ini- 
tially cool response from the 
British Medical Association 
with Dr Michael Wilson, 
chairman of the General Med- 
ical Services Committee 
(CM$C), retorting that they 
would deter patients from 
coming forward- 

Dr Wilson said: “Doctors 
have always believed there 
should be a procedure where 
patients can make their com- 
plaints. The existing proce- 
dure has operated satisfactori- 
ly for .70 years but anything 
which makes the procedure 
easily understood and oper- 
ated should be given careful 
consideration. 

Dr Wilson said it was es- 


tes and dismissals. sential that any changes 

As pan of its review of should enjoy the confidence of 
primary health care, due for patients and* doctors and cnt- 
completion at the end of the *9 ized the Government's deci- 
year, ministers are consulting S' 00 to release the complaints 
bodies representing the pro- document separately from the 
fessions and patients on the one on primary health care. 


Hospital funding 
meeting sought 


By Jill Sherman 

An all-pany delegation of ioration in services and in- 


DuCann 
debt case 
withdrawn 


MPs and membere of health 
■ and local authorities is seeking 
an urgent meeting with the 
Minister for Health. Mr Bar- 
ney Hayhoe. in attempt to 
prevent further ward closures 
in two teaching hospitals in 
south London. 

The delegation, which in- 
cludes the local Conservative 
MPs Mr Colin Moynihan and 
Mr John Maples, will press for 
more money for Lewisham 
. and North Southwark Health 
Authority, which has to find 
. £3 million. 

“The district has done all it 
J can to meet Government ob- 
jectives. It has become more 
. efficient and made substantial 
cost improvements but it is 
. still facing the prospect of 
further bed closures". Mr 
. Maples said. 

More ward closures were 


pita!" where two wards have 
closed this summer, he said. 
“It isn’t acceptable that a 
major district hospital will be 
substantially closed during 
pan of the year,- This can't be 
the Government’s intention." 


creased waiting lists. 

Dr Winyard said the district 
often had difficulty finding 
beds for people needing emer- 
gency treatment. “On a num- 
ber of occasions patients who 
come into the accident and 
emergency department at 
Lewisham Hospital have had 
to be transferred for treatment 
to another hospital because 
there were no beds." 

Last year the hospital re- 
stricted admissions to emer- 
gencies only in certain areas 
on 165 days. In the first six 
months of this year these 
restrictions applied on 121 
days. Referrals to community 
nursing services have also in- 
creased. which could be attrib- 
uted to a reduction in acute 
beds resulting in patients be- 
ing discharged more quickly, 
said Dr Winyard. 

Bed closures have occurred 
in major hospitals throughout 
London this summer both to 
find savings and to carry out 
urgent' maintenance- work. 
The Royal Ftee Hospital has 
dosed seven wards with a 


By Michael Horsnell 

Legal proceedings by the 
Eagle Star insurance company 
against Sir Edward du Cann, 


UIW VJU.VI iiioviu. a ••■u.utJVM. - lOA U-J- L . j 

The health authority will- ' t0 ^ of ] 89 .beds, -staggered 
meet at the end of this month . _???•. 


to discuss further cuts. Its 
financial difficulties, similar 
to those facing all London 
leaching districts, have been 
made worse by a reduction in 
private patient income follow- 
ing the building of a new pri- 
vate hospital in the district. 

Mr Graham Winyard. the 
district medical officer, said: 
“We are very concerned about 
the effects the cutbacks we are 
being forced to make are hav- 
ing on the local community. 
In spile of everything we are 
doing we are seeing a deter- 


Three theatres have dosed 
while the - air conditioning 
system is overhauled. 

The hospital said ortho- 
paedics. paediatrics, and 
opthamology beds were being 
protected but all other special- 
ties shared the cutbacks. 

Charing Cross Hospital has 
closed 104 beds in four wards 
because of repairs to the air 
conditioning system. Similar 
work at Guy's Hospital has 
meant closing eight of its I i 
operating theatres and 158 
beds. 


to recover mortgage arrears on 
his medieval manor home in 
Somerset, have been with- 
drawn. 

The company said yester- 
day that a third writ in less 
than a year had been issued 
against the former chairman 
ofthe Conservative Party, but 
again arrears had been met. 

Sir Edward, MP for Taun- 
ton, said: “I don't know how 
this arose, but it is totally 
misleading." 

Sir Edward, who bought the 
336-acre, fifteenth century 
Colhay Manor near Welling- 
ton in 1972, when it was on 
the market for £200,000. said 
that he had been having talks 
over repaying part of the 
mortgage. 

An out-ofeourt settlement 
• was. reached last September 
after it 'was revealeif.he awed 
mortgage arrearsoirthe estate, 
now valued at £500,000. " 

Eagle Star, which specializes 
in executive mortgages for 
people who want to borrow 
. more than, building societies 
will lend,: refused to reveal the 
size of loan or arrears. The 
company said that it had no 
fixed rules for deciding -when 
to file a writ for default. 

The company said that the 
mortgage on the property 
owned by Sir Edward, who 
also has a London home, will 
continue. 

Sir Edward is not seeking re- 
election. He earns up to 
£100,000 a year as chairman 
of Lonrho and from other 
business interests, in addition 
to his MFs salary. 


The Government has com- 
missioned a study into setting 
targets for primary school 
children in mathematics. 

These would lay down what 
they should be able to achieve 
by the ace of H- 

Mr Kenned) Baker, Sec- 
retary of State for Education 
and Science, has announced 
that King's College, London, 
is to receive £30,000 for re- 
search into what targets 
should be set and how children 
should be assessed. 

The Government's intention 
was reported in The Times on 
April 16. 

Mr Chris Patten, Minister 
of State for Education and 
Science, said then that pri- 
mary schools were good at 
developing personal relation- 
ships and giving pnpils pos- 
itive attitsdes towards life, but 
were putting insufficient em- 
phasis on science. 

In mathematics and lan- 
guage they concentrated on too 
narrow a range of skills with 
too little practical application 
to children's experiences. 

Mr Baker hopes that 
improvements in the achieve- 
ment of children in maths will 
lead to move students studying 
it at university, and more 
choosing to teach it 

The research, which is to 
begin next month and mil be 
completed by next summer, 
will also describe what should 
be taught, and what new 
training for teachers is needed. 

More funds for 
student places 

Polytechnics and colleges 
are set to receive extra funding 
from the Government to pre- 
vent them having to cat as 
many as 9,400 student places 
in the academic year 1987-88. 

The Department of Educa- 
tion and Science confirmed ! 
yesterday that more money j 
would be made available, as 
expected, to defuse a poten- 
tially serious political issue, 
bnt officials would not say how 
much. 

They denied a suggestion 
that public sector institutions 
would receive an extra £12 
million or £13 mnikm, more 
than half the £23 million 
which the polytechnics and 
colleges say they need to avoid 
cutting .student places in 
September 1987. ■ 

. The ^NatitmaL ^Advisory 
Body for local authority higher 
education, which advises the 


m&M 


‘■smw 

ilSi 








2 million 
find jobs 
with help 
from MSC 


glcd out for special mention 
by Mr Nicholson. 

The Community - Pro- 
gramme expanded its initial 
tareet set in June 19S5 of 
130.000 filled places and now 
aims to have 255.000 people 
on its books by the end of the 
year. Each will receive, an 
average weekly, wage of £67 
and double the chances of 
finding employment on 
completion of the programme, 
the report claims. 

Restart, the. commission's 
counselling service, which was 
launched on a pilot basis last 
January and introduced 
throughout Britain from July, 
'helped 75 per cent of those 
interviewed to find jobs or 
training. 

Meanwhile. 360.000 people 
aged 16 to 17 took pan in the 
Youth Training Scheme at a 
cost of £8 1 8 million. 

The commission's .total 
expenditure in the 1985-86 
financial year was £2362 mil- 
lion. an increase of £31 1 mil- 
lion on the previous year. 


Mr Phil Dayman of Beckenham was philosophical about dearer petrol. New prices at three 
garages are shown beside him (Photographs: Alan Weller). 


MPs upset by petrol prices 


Continued from page 1 
would foil to an average 155p 
a gallon within six weeks, as 
rates on the petrol spot market 
stabilised at around 5 160 a ton 
from the current level of S 1 82. 

“Unless there is another 
international crisis prices 
should stay steady through the 
winter," he said. 

Mr Ainsley said the latest 
rise could be directly attrib- 
uted to the American bombing 
of Libya, which led to a huge 
increase in demand on the do- 
mestic petrol market because 
American tourists holidayed 
at home to avoid the threat of 
terrorist reprisals in Europe. 


The agreement by OPEC 
members to cut oD production 
has boosted the price of a bar- 
rel of crude ftura $10 to 
$13.50. ; 

Mr Ainsley described the 
MPs* reaction to. the latest 
increase as "amusing". 

“Texaco put prices up by 7p 
two months ago and nobody 
batted an eyelid." he said. 

“Sales soared when the 
price was 20 Ip." he said. 

Prices in London for four 
star yesterday ranged from 
185p at the traditionally 
expensive Gulf site in Fins- 
bury Square to I49.6p at Gulf 
and Jet garages on the A2 New 


Cross in south-east London. 

At the independent Jet ga- 
rage in Brixion Road, Ken- 
nington. the price for four star 
was J55.5p biit few motorists 
were 'stopping, even though 
the Texaco in nearby Ken- 
nington Road was charging 
164.6p 

Mr Phil Dayman, of Beck- 
enham, was philosophical at 
the prospect of paying an extra 
7p a gallon. 

“I think 164p is quite 
reasonable," he said. “I am 
just pleased I am not paying 
200p like we were a few 


■ Investigation 
into CPS A 
election starts 


The Sectoral Reform Soci- 
ety today begins its investiga- 
tion into the election which 
last month returned Mr John 
Macreadie. a supporter of 
Militant Tendency, as general 


months ago. Paying for petrol secretary of the Civil and 
is a feet ot life." Public "Services Association 


Janner 

angers 

Labour 



‘loyalist invasion’ 


By Sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 


From Richard Ford 

A big security operation cause chaos on border roads. 


began in the Irish Republic • Mr Jim Wells, a club mem- 


Labour MPs reacted angrily 
ye sterda y to the' defection of 
MrT^niel Jan nerra^fbrmer 
parliamentary candidate, to 


last night as the Rev Ian frer. said: “I am confident 
Paisley - urged "loyalists" to there be several hundred 


Government on spending, said j-the Conservative Parg'. 


. travel to. Dundalk/Co Lpuih, people from- my: area alone. 1 ' 
'for the court appearance today The ideals to have a; very large, 
of Mr Peter -Robinson, the convoy to gj ve : Peter Robin-’ 


that an extra £12 million would 
not .necessarily save half the 


Mr Janner, aged 28, is the. 
son of Mr GreviUe- Janner. 


deputy leader of the Demo- 
cratic UnionistParty: 


son protection.' We. don't 
- think the gaidai-have- the- will 


places which were threatened Labour MP for Ldcester 
^ This was because some West- and grandson of the late 


Hundreds of Irish' police to'do so,^. .„ , - 

aijd .soldiers were .on 'duty at Mr Robinson is on bait on 


courses, such as science, 
maths and computing, were 
more expensive to nm than 
those in arts and humanities. 

Ministers are sceptical of 
the figures produced by NAB 
and the planning exercise it 
carried out in April which 
showed courses and depart- 
ments haring to dose if the 
£23 million was not given. 

Ministers believe that the 
NAB’s figures were unduly 
pessimistic. 


Shipyard 
strike on 
dismissals 


Jobless in 
Jarrow 
march 


Hundreds of shipyard work- 
ers facing dismissal walked 
out yesterday, refusing to hear 
the ‘ management’s redun- 
dancy plans. 

Employees at the French- 
owned UIE yard at Gyde- 
bank. near Glasgow, stopped 
work after a lunchtime mass 
meeting and said they would 
not return until today. 

A management plan to cut 
the workforce by hundreds 
was due to be presented to the 
unions yesterday afternoon 
but shop stewards said they 
would not attend any meeting. 

They said they were angry at 
being "kepi in the dark over 
plans to cut short-term con- 
tract workers and possibly 
reduce the permanent staff of 
530. 

Reports have suggested the 

redundancies could be as high 
as 900. The unions say any 
reduction in the permanent 
workforce would break a six- 
year-old agreement to main- 
tain existing levels. 

The yard, which has a 
relatively trouble-free indus- 
trial relations record, has been 
badly affected by the world- 
wide slump in the oil industry. 

As John Brown's it built the 
great luxury liners of the past 
but its main business now is 
oil rig construction. ! 

Days ago its latest project a 
£50-million rig. was launched 
from the yard by the Queen 
amid a blaze of publicity. 

A company spokesman said 
all work at the yard had 
ceased. More than 1,400 men 
and women had walked out 
over what they claim has been 
the management's refusal to 
keep them informed about the 
survival plan. 

A union spokesman said 
there would be no more work 
done at the yard until today. It 
was not clear whether manage- 
ment would press ahead and 
announce redundancies with- 
out meeting the unions. 

The shipyard in its heyday 
was responsible for building 
the QE2. Queen Mary , and the 
ro^al vac hi Britannia 


Flans for a reenactment of 
the historic 1936 Jarrow 
march against unemployment 
were disclosed yesterday. 

Thirty jobless people from 
Tyneside, and representatives 
of other regions of high 
unemployment, including 
Scotland, Wales, the West 
Midlands and Merseyside, 
will set off on October 5 to 
retrace the original route to 
highlight the unemployment 
crisis. 

Two unemployed people wfl 
join them from each of the 23 
towns on the route. The march 
will end with a Trafalgar 
Square rally on November 2, 
then on November 5 a petition 
will be presented to 
Parliament 

Accompanying the march 
will be a touring theatre show, 
“Heads Held High", by Alan 
McDonald, writer for the tele- 
vision series Brookside. 

The plans for the march 
were announced on a rain - 
swept platform at Jarrow's 
Metro station, beside a sculp- 
ture commemorating the orig- 
inal campaign. 

One of the organisers, Mr 
Don Dixon, Labour MP for' 
Jarrow, who as a seven-year- 
old watched the start of the 
original march, said: "Al- 
though the 1936 march 



Lord Janner, who also repre- 
sented the seat for Labour. 

Mr Daniel Janner, a bar- 
rister. left the Labour Party 
last autumn to join the SDP 
because of a dispute over the 
miners’ strike. He had con- 
tested Bosworth for Labour in 
the 1983 genera] election. 

He said: “Unlike Mr Robert 
Kilroy-Silk. who has opted out 
of politics, I still want to fight 
the bard left and Militants. I; 
now believe that the only" 
place to do that effectively is 
in the Conservative Party. 

“I had a flirtation with the 
SDP. I now believe it was a 
waste of time. I am now firmly 
convinced that the way to 
fight the hard left is to make 
sure they do not get in." 

Mr Donald Anderson, a 
Labour spokesman on foreign 
affairs, said yesterdays “It is 
sad that he is on the fast train 
from party to party. It is. 
difficult to see where he may 
stop at this speed. He is 
leaving at a time when Mr 
Neil Kin nock has largely over- 
come the Militant problem, 
which he gives as his reason 
for leaving. This is no reason 
for his father to feel 
embarrassed." 

His defection comes two 
weeks after Mr Robert Kilroy- 
Silk, Labour MP for Knowsley 
North, announced that he was 
being driven out of politics by 
the Militant Tendency. 

Mr Janner has written an 
article for next month’s issue 
of the Conservative news- 
paper Newsline, entitled SDP 


the border to ensure die safety 
of Mr Paisley and Mr Robin- 
son. because of fears of vi- 
olence between loyalist and 
nationalist gangs in the 
strongly republican town. 

Mr Paisley urged loyalists to 


two charges of assaulting po- 
lice; and maliciously damag- 
ing a police car and unlawful 
assembly. It is understood that 
authorities in the south are not 
ready to proceed with the case, 
and that he will be further 


show their, solidarity with hfe remanded. . - '• 

deputy, who feces four charges' tf'Mr Robinson, who has 


(CP5A); : 

Mr Macreadie was banned 
from taking office by’ the 
union's executive after allega- 
tions of irregularities in the 
ballot, in which he defeated 
Mr John Ellis, a moderate, by 
121 votes of more than 40.000 
cast 

CPSA members have had 
28 days in which to register 
complaints about the ballot 
and it is understood that more 
than 40 have been received. 
•The Sectoral Reform Society 
will ipv&tfgate and produce a 
report 'for the union's exec- 
utive The society said yes- 
terday nhat the inquiry was 
expected to -take- . several 
weeks. r 

Decisions on whether the 
ballot should be rerun, and if 
so, whether partially or in fulL 
will be taken by the union's 
accountants. Hard Dowdy 
and Co, who acted as return- 
ing officers in the election. 


arising oulofthe “invasion' of pleaded not guilty to all four 
Gontibret, Co MonagharLlast charges, is. sent or elects for 


week.' 

The DUP recognizes the 
publicity to be gained from the 
court hearing and the sight of 
perhaps thousands of loyalists 
arriving in the republic. 

Mr Paisley urged, “as many 
people as possible, men with 
their wives, to go to Dundalk 
to be with Peter Robinson on 
the day. of his trial. r Every 
available loyalist should be 
there to show solidarity with 
Mr Robinson”. 

^ The Ulster-Clubs' organiza- 
tion was finalizi ng plans for an 
operation which threatened to 


trial, it will; be .held at- the 
circuit court m either Mona- 
ghan or Dublin. 

Mr Michael Noonan, an 
Irish Government cabinet 
minister, appealed yesterday 
to loyalists to stay away from 
DundaHL and refuse to allow 
themselves to be used as' 
pawns for publicity purposes. 

Mr Noonan said that no 
attempt would be made to 
stop people acting in a peace- 
ful manner from crossing the 
border. He said that Mr 
Paisley, as “an Irishman”, was 
also entitled to enter. 


Lead at open 
chess contest 


Guns haul Man freed 
found in on warrant 


the post blunder 


Arms and ammunition hid- Continued from page 1 

—’“ d r ? -22 An official said th 
seoed yesterday when Irish 


Mr Claude Robinson, aged 88, a veteran of the 1936 Jarrow 
march, at the unfurling of the banner 

achieved a lot, problems, in town is 27.6 pa- cat out of 


many ways, are as great as 
ever today, with Jarrow still 
suffering from vary high 
unemployment 
“The official figure for the 


work, but in parts of the area it 
is higher than 50 per cent” 
He said the march was 
being given donations of 
£100,000. 


He writes: “The problem is 
that in feet it really is a small 
party run in the main by 
extraordinarily nice, middle- 
aged. middle-class, politically 
wishy-washy people who are 
as likely to break the mould of 
British politics as Neil 
Kinnock is likely to stand 
down before the next general 
election." 

He says that the SDP 
seemed to attract the wildly 
naive and the political virgins. 

Mr GreviUe Janner is- in 
Canada until Friday. 


£ 16 . 5 m for east coast sea defences 


Mr Michael Jopling, the 
agriculture minister, has re- 
sponded at the eleventh hour 
to calls for more funds to prop 
up Britain’s failing flood sea 
defences by announcing a 
£16.5 million increase in gram 
aid to water authorities over 
the next three and a half years. 

The principal targets for the 
extra cash are to be the East 


councils whose total coastal 
defence grant over the same 
period will be cut by £2 
million to pay for them, 
ministry said yesterday. The 
move comes after a vigorous 
campaign by the Anglian Wa- 
ter Authority, responsible for 
850 miles of sea defences from 
the Humber to the Thames.. 
Estuary, and local authorities 


warning that £15 million a' 
year would need to be spent 
over the next 10 years on East 
Anglian sea defences .with a 
minimum spending of £10 
million a year. But since 
I984.its government gram had 
been cut by a quarter. 

The authority has feiled this 
year even to meet the mini- 


Parts of East Anglia face 


police foiled a. terrorist eun- 
ronning operation (Richard 

Ford writes). 

- Nine handguns, ports of a 
sub-machine-gun end a quan- 
tity of ammunition w ere 
discovered after . one- of- the 
packages burst open at a 
sorting office in Dublin city' 
centre. 

Police immediately seated 
off the building and begad 
searching other packages in 
case more illegal arms and 
ammunition was on the 
premises. The packages, des- 
tined for different addresses in 
the Dublin area, had been sent 
to repubUcan terrorists from 

Chicago- The police later 
raided a number « homes and 
two men were being questioned 
last rights 

The weapons fmd is the 
latest in a series of successes 
by seenrity forces on both 
■sides of the border .doing 
recent months in which there 


An official said that they 
had been informed by the 
authorities for the Republic 
that yesterday's' warrant were 
defective that, the defect was 
“irretrievable’' and codld.not- 
be remedied. - 

- 1 Underthe Republic's Extra* 
dition Act 1965 extradition 
orders most - be signed by a 
“judicial authority", which 
would mean a judge or some- 
one holding judicial office. 

The Republic’s courts are 
not easy to satisfy in respect of 
extradition requirements. 

The Attorney. General's of- 
fice said yesterday that “it was 
riot, until ; after Glenholmes 
that the foil rigours ofthe 
Republic’s procedures become 
apparent - to those issuing 
warrants"'. 

The Irish judge described 
tnewarmnts as.“bad” because 
foe “information" describing 


shared by 13 

Only two of the five 
grandmasters competing in 
the Commonwealth open 
chess championship in .Lon- 
don — de Firmian from, the 
United States and Hjanarson 
from Iceland — have scored 
maximum points after two 
rounds (Harry Golombek 
writes). - - - 

De Firmian defeated Ander- 
sson of Sweden and Hiartar- 
son won againsT the - Indian 
player. Ravi. The lead is 
shared by 13 players. 

The biggest upset , in the 
second round .was when 
grandmaster Kudrian lost 
against Depas.quale from 
Australia. Plaskett drew with 
Mannion of Scotland and 
Shamkovich won against 
Stepak of Israel. 

The first win by a computer 
was achieved by ’Novag -Forte 
X. which defeated Singh - of 
India. - 


Killer given 
child-care job 


A council yesterday began 
an investigation to 'find out 
how a convicted child mur- 
derer was given a. job looking 
after handicapped youngsters 
in Bradford, South Yorkshire. 

Mike Waters, aged 4S.‘who 
served 10 years of a .life 
sentence for bludgeoning and 
strangling a girl aged nine, lied 
to get the £l2,000-a-vear job. 
He had been working at the 
-centre for five years until his 
conviction was .discovered 
-this week. Helias resigned 


BAe in £20m 




the offence and the suspect, ill JU6UIU 

deal with US 

had not been sworn before British Aerospace has sol 


Anglian -coastline and the and MFs. culminating in a- 
coast at Seafoid -Sussex. In plea for cash at a meeting Iasi 


mum figure, in spite of trying 
to make ud the difference with 


both areas lack of money has nronth between Mr James 
prompted fears of breaches in Prior. MP for Waveney. Sir 

. , , . ■ : r»„. -v ii - ud c c 


coastal defences, causing sen- Peter Tapsell.' MP for East 


ous flooding 


Lindsey.and 


Prime 


But the increases are at the Minister. 


rase of maritime district The authority had given 


to make up the difference with 
big increases in ife precept 
levy on the county councils. 

The extra cash means the 
AWA will be within striking 
distance of the £10 million 
expenditure l 


the 1953 floods, which 
swamped large tracts of land 
and led to the loss of lives after 
the sea defences were 
breached the AWA says- 
Danger spots include 
Felixstowe, where last winter a 
gaping hole appeared in the- 
sea wall, the 10 - mile stretch 
of coast between Happisb'uigh ' 
and Wintenon, and 
Aldeburgh, home ofthe festi- 
val, where all that protects the 
town from the sea is a 30-year- 
old sea wall, the foundations 
of which are being constantly 
eroded 


Irish Republic, France and the 
Netherlands. 

Meanwhile, in the Ninth, 
foe Provisional IRA threat _ to 
people servicing seenrity 
forces has ted to distbin men 
refusing to collect refuse from 
Royal- Ulster Constabulary 
bases at. Coofestown, Don-: 
gannon and Newcastie. , ; 

Dustbin men In Strabane, 
Co Tyrone, have been refusing 
to collect rabWsh" from foe 
local RUC base for several 
weeks, causing nmntiisg piles 
of rubbish outside foe station. . 


A statement issued by the 
Attorney General’s office later 
said that it ■ was the 
responsibility of the Crown 
Solicitor for Northern Ireland 
to advise as'to the accuracy of 
warrants issued in Northern 
Ireland with the Attorney 
General’s role confined to 
considering the sufficiency. of 
evidence, m .‘relation to "the 
Offences. . - 

*'• With warrants issued in 
England and Wales, the Direc- 
tor of Public Prosecutions 
.undertook personally u> en- 
‘sure that warrants were valid. 


British Aerospace has" sold 
seven of its Jetstream 31 mini- 
airhners to a United- Sales 
airline in an agreement worth 
up to £20 million. 

Jetstream International Air- 
lines. of Eyre. Pennsylvania, 
has an option on. a forther M 
of the ^ 18-19 .seat . turboprop 
aircraft. 


a it 


■£CO 


Nearly two million people, 
77.000 of them disabled 
found jots through the Man- 
power Services Commission 
km year, according to its 
chairman. Mr Bryan Nichol- 
son. in his annual report 
published ioday. 

Extra money from the Gov. 
emmeiH for the Community 
Programme and the launch of 
the Restart Programme, both 
aimed at helping ihe long- 
term unemployed, were sin- 


THwm ' 


Dr l 






ooq; No rw ay Kr 




THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 lyoo 


nuivin iNcwa 


Law Society sees legal 



as 


second class service 


By Fiances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

Radical proposals to over- solicitors because they have 
haul the legal aid scheme neither time nor -expertise to 
could lead to a second class deal with them. Family, per- 


n'estigmj 

into CP$ 
election* 


.legjd service for the public, 
according'io the Law-Society. 

In a draft response -to the 
legal aid scrutiny report pub- 
lished in June by the Lord 
Chancellor's Department, the 
society condemns the key 
proposal that legal advice, on 
civil matters should no longer 
be provided by solicitors. 

Thai should instead be pro- 
vided by advice agencies such 
as Ctizens' Advice Bureaux, 
the report proposes. 

The society says that will 
waste resources; that pubficly- 
funded legal advice will be- 
come "a second class service 
because funding will be inad- 
equate to meet demand";, and 
Thar- client choice will be 
reduced. - 

Abolishing .the “green form 
scheme" under which solic- 
itors at present give legal 
advice will “make some inner 
city legal aid practices un- 
economic”, rbe society says. 
“The consequence will be a 
reduction of legal services in 
areas where it is most 
needed." 

The society's response, 
which has forwarded for 
consultation to local law soci- 
eties and has yet to be 
approved by - its council, 
makes a number of criticisms 
of the jjropasaL 

Solicitors ‘ offer a service 
which complements that of- 
fered by advice agencies, it 
says. Such agencies already 
refer large numbers of cases to 


sonal jpjury and criminal 
cases are routinely referred 
. For the advice agencies to 
provide skilled, up-to-date 
' auid legafly-accurate advice on 
property, bousing, welfare 
rights and access to children 
would mean “a major change 
in direction for them". 

..It “win in effect require the 
establishment of a legal ser- 
vice parallel to and duplicat- 
ing the service already offered 
by solicitors" which would be 
a “waste of resources". 

The society also casts 
doubts on the scrutiny team's 
costings for such a transfer of 
work. A 30 per cent increase in 
staffing is “plainly inad- 
equate" to meet the huge 
volume of work , the scrutiny 
team forsees tor the new 
service, it says. 

Other criticisms are that 
consumer choice will be re- 
duced; a Greek may choose a 
Greek-speaking solicitor; an 
Asian &n Asian solicitor. Un- 
der the proposals they would 
be deprived of that choice. 

There could also be con- 
flicts of interest m places 
where there is only one advice 
centre, even with several 
branch offices. Clients in rural 
areas would be particularly. 
Inconvenienced. 

Finally, clients in many 
cases would “not know where 
to turn." Under the proposals, . 
solicitors will still give advice 
concerning an imprisonable 
criminal offence. Members of 


the public will not know if an 
offence is imprisonable or not, 
the society says. 

It was also “intolerable" 
that solicitors would have to 
ask exactly what offence had 
*een changed before knowing 
what advice could be given. 

The society urges a pilot 
study before the recommenda- 
tions were implemented to 
avoid what would be a “mac, 
sive disruption in the pro- 
vision of advice to the 
public". 

It says the proposals will 
"lead to a worse service for the 
public and yet foil to meet the 
Government's need for cost- 
effectiveness". 

The society also criticizes a 
number of other proposals in 
the report; it is concerned that 
legal aid may be restricted to 
“the enforcement of defence 

ofnghis^. 

Such a restriction, which 
would remove legal aid for 
making a will or for convey- 
ancing, would result in legal 
aid only being available after a 
dispute bad arisen and not to 
arrange affairs to avoid 
dispute. 

The proposal that diems in 
dvil cases should pay contri- 
butions towards the cost 
throughout the case breached 
the prindple that contribu- 
tions should be based on 
means and not on length . 

There would also be the 
anomaly ihat the “be tier-off 
person with a quick case will 
pay less than the poorer 
person with an extended 
care". 





Simon Bornhoft, aged 21, from Havant, West Sussex, setting our from Weymouth vesterdav to windsurf to Brighton in an 
attempt to set a new endurance record of 90 hours. The record is 87 hours, 33 min utes.( Photograph: Suresh Karadia). 


Cot deaths research 


Weekend risk for infants 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

Some babies may be more 
at risk from cot deaths and 
other sudden fatal illnesses at 
weekends, researchers have 
found.- 




'■•V 

- 

r ' H 


for 

ion* 


Bailiff remedy for 
arrears ‘archaic’ 

By Our Legal Affairs Correspondent 

The landlord's remedy for - - Government's- watchdog body 
tackling rent arrears by send- on law reform, concludes that 




, ing bailiffs to demand money 
: or seize' goods - should be 
abolished, the Law Commis- 
- sion says in a working paper 
. published today. There can 
< scarcely be a greater strode for 
a tenant than finding bailiffs 
; on his doorstep; demanding 
rent arrears and authorized to 
seize and sell his goods to pay 
‘ ; what is outstanding, H says. 

The bailiffs, can appear 
without warning and without 
. any. court proceedings, under 
the. remedy “distress torrent' 


the time has come for a change 
because the law is com- 
plicated. partly obsolete and 
out of step with modem ideas. 

It is also “riddled with 
inconsistencies, uncertainties, 
anomalies and archaisms". 

Among these anomalies are; 
• A tenant with a* claim 
against a landlord who has 
failed to do repairs- cannot 
make, a- deduction from rent 
claimed- in distress; 

I Other people’s goods, such 


j Ult ItUILUV UtoUWJIWf.ittIL , ' . -• J 

• which annlies both to apri- , ‘ ^ nfntcd car or borrowed 

s ^■aWBJB-.jasBsaai 

tioh for thrir owners. ' 




I .cad at of 
chess to® 
shared bd 


and some residential ones.. 

The remedy has .been de- 
scribed as “an archaic medi- 
eval relic, out of place in 
twentieth century housing 
management”, -the commis- 
sion says. 

There have also been com- 
plaints that bailiff's sometimes 
.behave oppressively, seize un- 
justified quantities of goods 
for small sums of arrears and 
that although they need a 
certificate from - a county court 
judge, are subject to too little 
controL 

But there is a view that 
landlords are “peculiarly 
vulnerable creditors and 
therefore deserve the extra 
protection afforded by special 
remedies such as distress". 

The Law Commission, the 


• Bailiffs cannot seize loose 
money, although raising 
money is their object 

The law is also hard to find. 
It is buried in 1 1 statutes, the 
earliest an Act passed m 1267; 
many separate- sections in 
other acts and in hundreds of 
decided cases. 

. It provisionally concludes 
that “distress for rent” be 
abolished. 

The commission invites 
views on what should be done 


by December 1. 
The 


Law Commission: working 
paper 97; Distress for Rent 
(Stationery Office, Conquest 
Hbuse, 37-38 John Sum. 
Theobalds Road, London WCl 
2BQ; £4.75). 


root! 

rani 

der 



child- 4 * 




: BT hit by 
: fraudulent 
; credit calls 

I.y Trial telephone kiosks for 

- the exclusive use of ordinary 
f credit card holdera have been 

costing British -Telecom sev- 
, . era! thousands of pounds in 
I . fraudulent calls, a court was 
told yesterday. 

On just one credit card 
i alone, a band of cheats made 
: £8.000 worth of free inter- 
national calls over a sax-week 
period. Mr Ernest. Ridgeway, 
tor . the prosecution, told- 
Horseferry Road Magistrates 
Court. 

"Mr Simon Gedge. defending 
three Brazilian students 
. ' caught using the stolen 
‘ Barclaycard. said; “It is a new 
' twist m the consumer credit 
t society in which we live," 
The three, living* at Inver- 
V ness Terrace, Paddington. 

- west London, admitted dis- 
i" honestly receiving the stolen 

credit card, on which a total of 
! 516 calls, mainly to Brazil. 
y. were made from kiosks at 
: Victoria station. 

. Miss lzilda Cunha. aged 30, 

' admitted making 10 fraudu- 
lent calls and was fined £400. 
She was ordered to pay £228 
’in compensation to British 
Telecom. Mr Renato AmapaL 
.aged 29. admitted making 
. .il , three calls, and was fined 
j \ £400- Miss Mhria Rodrigues, 

i 'll» . ..aged .31; admitted making 

L r .nine calls, was fined £400 and 

• ordered to pay' £106 corapen- 
7 ration. 

Mr Ridgeway said the three 
~ claimed iheyftad been respon- 
. . stole for only, a limited 

amount ofthe calls. 

__ He said. British Telecom 
had not devised a way to 
* ; - determine, whether the taller 

> ’ wastoe genuine owner of the' 
’- • credit card inserted. 

. ’ Several others have been 
. arrested for misusing the' ki- 
■fsosk*: which do not take the 
: special British. Telecom 
Phonccards.- ; 


,n - 

d 




Relic of 
technology 
for sale 

By An gel la Johnson 

The first transmitter to 
bring cable television to Swin- 
don. Wiltshire, is for sale. 

■ But although several com- 
munications firms have 
shown interest' in the tech- 
nological monument to the 
1960s. it. looks set to become 
part of a nature reserve on the. 
Wan borough Downs. 

Mr Peter. Beaufort, whose 
estate agency, is handling the 
sale, said that, it was . not 
known if the. aerial and its two 
'satellite dishes, built in 1961, 
were still working.' 

He said that the quarter- 
acre of land on which the 
transmitter stands would 
probably be best suited to 
hoffsing butterflies or other 
forms of wildlife, because of 
its isolation and undergrowth. 

"It is a real challenge for us 
to try and sell land with such 
an unusual and specialized 
equipment, . and we are trying 
to find out if it is stillusefiiL” 

“It is a sign- of how quickly 
technology is changing, that 
Thorn EMI have already 
made redundant this 
transmitter which only 30 
years ago was hailed as new' 
arid revolutionary:" 


Motorway 

bonuses 

extended 

By Mark Ellis 

A bonus scheme for con- 
tractors who repair Britain's 
motorways is being extended 
by the Government, which 
says it can make substantia] 
savings for only £1 million in 
bonus payouts. 

Mr Peter Bottomley, Par- 
liamentary Under-Secretary 
of State for Transport, said 
yesterday, the success of the 
bonus and penalty-scheme in- 
troduced two.years ago by. the 
then Transport Secretary, Mr 
Nicholas Ridley, was good 
news for road-useis and would 
mean fewer, roadworks,- es^ 
bperiaily - on the August 25 
Baltic Holiday. 

The Department of Trans- 
port says die scheme, known 
as lane rental, under which 
contractors are charged a daily 
rent for work that overruns 
the allotted period or re- 
warded for early complete 
is reducing the backlog of 
repair , work, but critics fear 
too little is being spent on the 
problem. 

Last year 12 lane rental 
contracts worth £31 million 
were completed on average 38 
per cent faster than expected 
and the Department estimated 
it saved 499 days of delay, 
worth more than £8 million. 

Penalties range from £1,000 
to £40,000 and the exact figure 
is assessed by a computer to 
take into account traffic flows, 
queues, vehicle operating 
costs and the size of the 
contract The £1.6 million 
paid in bonuses was offset by 
£670.000 in penally charges. 

Mr Bottomley said: ‘‘Lane 
rental. has provided a viable 
solution to the delays. It is a 
massive benefit to the road- 
user, taxpayer and the Gov- 
ernment 

“The effect of competition 
for contract work keeps prices 
20 per cent lower in real terms 
so there is no significant 
increase in costs to the depart- 
ment in paying the bonuses. 
Competition is the best form 
of co-operation." 

This year 21 lane rental 
contracts worth £45 million 
have been approved. They 
cover more than half of the big 
motorway repairs. 

Mr Bottomley said a special 
effort would be made to keep 
roads clear during the Bank 
holiday weekend, but some 
roadworks were loo large to be 
safe or economic to stop. 

GA premiums to 
increase this year 

General Accident Britain’s 
largest motor insurer, -will 
raise its motor premium rates- 
by 10 per cent before the end 
of this year.. The rise follows 
two increases by GA this year 
- from 5 to 7 per cent in 
February and from S to 9 per 
cent in June. 

The company said the rising 
number of road accidents was 
responsible for the increase. 


An analysis of more than 
6.000 infant fatalities during a 
five-year period has shown 
that on weekends there was an 
increased risk of death in 
babies aged between three and 
twelve months. 

The researchers believe that 
could be because parents are 
more hesitant to call a doctor 
at weekends for apparently 
minor illnesses in their baby, 
or because doctors are less 
likely to regard such calls as 
important 

- Dr Michael Murphy, who 
led the study, said yesterday 
that the greater number of 
tragedies on Saturday and 
Sundays may be a “genuine 
phenomenon", perhaps ref- 
lecting changed parental rou- 
tines as the baby gets older. 

Dr Murphy said some of the 
cases, known as sudden infant 
death syndrome, could be 
.preventable if parents and 
doctors were alerted to the 


risks and were more vigilant at 
weekends. 

“It is possible that parents, 
and perhaps doctors, take 
more chances in this way with 


sec- 

ad- 

thc 


older infants. If a. baby has 
survived the first three 
months of life, they may feel 
there is no need to worry 
unduly about apparently mi- 
nor symptoms." 

Dr Murphy, of the commu- 
nity medicine and medical 
statistics department of Sou- 
thampton University, said 
that “hesitation or diffidence" 
in calling the doctor at week- 
ends, or deficiencies in pri- 
mary care at weekends, could 
explain the higher number of 
deaths. 

The results of the analysis of 
sudden infant deaths, includ- 
ing those known as cot deaths, 
were published in the British 
Medical Journal last week. 

Deaths of children under 
three months showed no 
association with the day of the 
week But more children aged 
between three months and a 
year died at weekends, the 
statistics showed. 


Dr Pamela Davies, 
reiary to the scientific 
visory committee of 
Foundation for the Study of 
Infant Deaths, said yesterday; 
“If a child has minor symp- 
toms during a weekend, par- 
ents should not hesitate to 
contact their doctor, because 
subtle changes can often be of 
great importance to a baby's 
health." 

Research has shown that in 
up to 60 per cent of sudden 
infant deaths, minor symp- 
toms, such as sniffles or 
coughs, were noticeable in the 
child in the proceeding week. 

The analysis showed that 
babies aged between three 
months and one year were 
about 8 per cent more at risk 
of death during a weekend 
than any other day 

An average of 1.84 deaths 
occurred on all days of the 
week. On Saturdays, the av- 
erage figure rose to 2.00. and 
on Sundays to 2.02 deaths. 

"This represents a signifi- 
cant excess at weekends." Dr 
Murphy said. 



Lenny Henry shaping up for his first acting role in a series of six situation comedies on 
BBC1 television this autumn (Photograph: 


Leslie Lee). 


BBC discovers a ‘superstar’ 


By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 

Mr Sid Jenkins, an RSPCA and caring depicted in the film, 
inspector in Yorkshire, is I agreed at once." 
tipped to become a rani Berriff, an award- 

“superstar". winning film producer, fol- 


The unlikely discovery fea- 
tures high on the list of a £60 
million package of drama, 
comedy ami documentary pro- 
grammes scheduled by BBCI 
television this autumn. 

Mr Jenkins and his team 
are the guardians of en- 
dangered creatures great and 
small in Animal Squad, a six- 
part documentary series that 
questions whether Britain is 
really a nation of animal 
lovers. 

“I predict Sid Jenkins wfi] 
be the television star of 1986. 
He is an extraordinary charac- 
ter, his dedication and sincer- 
ity shine through as he tackles 
a very depressing job. Yonr 
heart just goes out to him. Sid 
is going to be a folk hero.” 

The unnsual accolade comes 
from Mr Michael Grade, BBC 
television's director of pro- 
grammes, who singled opt the 
series for special mention 
daring an autumn preview 
reception yesterday. 

u It started out as a si 
documentary. But when 
producer looked at the rashes, 
be called me to say this chap 
was pure gold and deserved a 
series. When I saw the passion 


lowed Mr Jenkins and his 
team round Yorkshire as they 
investigated complaints of ani- 
mal abuse. 

They found evidence of 
cock-fighting and badger bait- 
ing. a self-proclaimed witch 
who is alleged to have per- 
formed an autopsy on a dog, 
and horrific conditions, in a 
battery chicken farm. 

Another social documentary 
was ChUdwatch* in which 
Esther Rantzen and Sne Codk 
examine child abuse. 

The 90-mimite programme 



Mr Sid Jenkins, RSPCA 
inspector cum superstar. 


is based an 3,000 ques- 
tionnaires submitted by vic- 
tims of physical violence, 
neglect and sevnal abuse. 

It reports on some of the 
cases, and will also launch a 
nationwide, confidential tele- 
phone service for children in 
danger. 

Other documentary high- 
lights include an Omnibus 
special on the Bolshoi Ballet, 
and a thirtieth anniversary 
focus on the Hungarian upris- 
ing of 1956 featuring inter- 
views with survivors and 
archive film. 

In a lighter vein, the 
children's science-fiction hero 
from Doctor Who goes on trial 
for hts life - in more ways 
than one. 

The long-run ning series was 
dropped last year because of 
declining viewing figures and 
concern within the BBC about 
scenes of explicit violence. 

"The first episode of the 
new run is much less violent. 
It's a vast improvement, but 
I'll be awaiting further epi- 
sodes before deriding on its 
future," Mr Grade said. 

Both BBC channels will be 
screening special programmes 
to mark the fiftieth anniver- 
sary’ of BBC television on 
November 2, but details are 
being kept secret. 


Sister pleads for Mr Kipper to come forward 



Miss Tamsin 
flew home to be with 



By Michael HorsneD 
The sister of Miss Susannah 
Lamplugh. the missing west 
London estate agent, yes- 
terday asked the mao -who 
calls himself- Mr Kipper, to' 
come forward and pul her 
family out of its misery. 

At her parents' home in East 
Sheen; Miss Tamsin Lam- 
plugh said; "l should like to . 
think Susannah is still safe. 

“1 haven't even thought she ■ 
might have been murdered. I 
am just appealing for her 


abductor to lei us know where 
she is." 

Miss Lamplugh. aged 24, 
flew home from her job in 
New Zealand as a hotel 
management representative to 
be with her ' parents, elder 
brother and younger sister. 

She is planning with police 
to go through letters her sister 
wrote to her abroad to see if 
they produce any clues to the 
identity of her abduqlor. 

Miss Susannah Lamplugh. 
aged 25, disappeared on July 


28 after leaving her office to 
show a man calling himself Mr 
Kipper a house in Shorrolds 
Road. Fulham. 

Dei Supt Nicholas Carter, 
who is leading the police 
inquiry, said; “A man who has 
done what this man has is 
likely to brag about iL We 
want to know who knows the 
secret and is protecting him. 

“We are encouraged by 
Tamsin’s return for the sake of 
the family after 16 days of 
sheer misery and pain "from 


not knowing wliere she is. An 
anonymous call would ^.put 
them out of their misery “ 

A taxi. driver has told police 
of picking up a fare in the area 
where she is believed to have 
disappeared. The passenger 
told him: "I'm glad you've 
come because there's a couple 
over there having a right 
rucking and l think they 
thought I was watching them - . 

Bui police appeals for the 
passenger to come forward 
have produced no response. 


Jealousy 
‘motive 
for attack 9 

The “deep hurt, frustration 
and jealousj" felt by Jayne 
Scott when she discovered her 
lesbian lover had fallen for 
another woman brought on an 
orgy of violence, the prosecu- 
tion told the Central Criminal 
Court yesterday. 

Miss Scott, aged 30. a gym 
teacher, of Croft Hill Road. 
Farnham Royal, Buckingham- 
shire. denies causing and 
inflicting grievous bodily 
harm to Miss Susan Craker. 

The Slough and Eton 
Secondary School deputy 
headmistress was battered on 
the head with a 21b claw 
hammer last August. 

The prosecution has alleged 
the attack happened eight days 
after Mrs Debbie Fox. with 
whom Miss Scott was living, 
slept with Miss Craker. 

Miss Craker is now brain 
damaged, paralysed and in a 
wheelchair. She cannot read or 
write and is able to speak only 
a few halting words. 

In his final speech, Mr John 
Hilton, for the prosecution, 
said the attacker was guilty of 
“a horrendous crime". 

Whoever hit her intended to 
do her very serious harm. In 
the circumstances of the case 
he said it was right the jury 
had seen Miss Craker. heard 
her, and heard a lot about her. 

He added: “The fart that in 
this case the protagonists are 
lesbians and a change of 
partnership took place gives 
this case a certain cause 
ceiebre." 

Mr Hilton said he had no 
idea where the jury's feelings 
lay. whether they felt in- 
comprehension or sympathy 
for lesbians. But he hoped 
their attitude was one of 
understanding and tolerance. 

Lesbian relationships were 
not as tolerated and far harder 
to replace than heterosexual 
relationships.“You may think 
someone who is deprived or 
anticipates deprivation of 
their partner becomes far 
more possessive than the av- 
erage heterosexual.” 

Mr Hilton said; “By its very 
ferocity this crime cries out for 
a motive.” Thau he said, was 
the green-eyed monster, jeal- 
ousy. He appealed to the jury 
not to lose sight of reality. 
“May I say merely because 
there is motive, inclination or 
opportunity, it does not mean 
to say they are conclusive. 

“ir you take them individ- 
ually. it may be they are not 
conclusive— but the sum total 
is overwhelming." 

He added; “One thing is 
clear — that when Scott gave 
evidence, she made a des- 
perate attempt to. try and 
minimize the effect that the 
news of the love-making 
which had taken place be- 
tween Debbie and Craker had 
on her." 

Miss Scott had claimed the 
attack was by an intruder, but 
said she had not heard a 
struggle. 

He alleged Miss Scott 
“made a fairly desperate 
attempt” to prepare the 
ground in case Miss Craker 
accused her. She also made 
preparation in case of a foren- 
sic science connection be- 
tween her and the hammer. 

He said of Miss Craker; 
“There have been few cases 
where such chilling evidence 
has ever been given. Those 
staccato answers, the use of 
nouns and toe ability to 
remember some things and 
not others." 

Mr Richard Chemll. for the 
defence, said: “At the centre of 
this tragedy is the wreckage of 
a woman ... let there not be 
another tragedy which there 
would be if Jayne Scott is 
innocent and is convicted." 

He said there was medical 
evidence that Miss Craker's 
memory had been defective. 

"I do not say Miss Craker 
has deliberately ! fed to you but 
you must decide if her 
recollection is true. It must be 
a strong temptation for some- 
one as injured as she is to find 
a culprit" 

She had been so badly 
injured she could not possibly 
remember her attacker's 
identity. 

The "trial continues today. 


SPchtSctw 

-<gM- 

Borrowed 
computer 
a winner 

A borrowed computer won 
Mr Ken Francis, of Quinton, 
Birmingham, a half-share in 
the £8,000 Portfolio Cold 
prize yesterday 
~! feed all of the numbers 
into the computer every morn- 
ing and the program I wrote 
checks them against m> card,” 
Mr Francis said. 

“It takes a bit lunger using 
the computer but is more fun 
and I use it to check my pools 
as welL" 

He said that he used the 
small Japanese computer, bor- 
rowed from a friend, to teach a 
computer course when it was 
not working out his possible 
winnings. 

The £4.000 prize is bis first 
w in with the computer. He will 
now take his wife on a holiday 
and buy a video recorder. 

Mr Francis has been read- 
ing The Times for a year and 
started playing Portfolio Gold 
when it began earlier this year. 

The other winner. Mrs 
Sheila Montgomery, of Glas- 
gow. also intends to spend the 
£4,000 prize on a holiday. 

“We base always wanted to 
go to the United States. Han- 
ning it will be pari of the fun," 
Mrs Montgomery said. 

She has read The Times for 
many years, but only started to 
play Portfolio Gold a few 
months ago. 

Readers who hate difficulty 
obtaining a gold card should 
send a stamped addressed 
envelope to: 

Portfolio Gold. 

The Times, 

PO Bov 40, 

Blackburn. 

BB1 6AJ. 

Rock concert 
death remand 

Three men from Stevenage. 
Hertfordshire, were remanded 
in custody until August 21 by 
magistrates at Stevenage yes- 
terday accused of the murder 
of a Scottish rock fan at the 
Queen concert held at 
Knebworth Park near 
Stevenage last Saturday night. 

Adam Ozdale Grant, aged 
21, of Julians Road. Colin 
Peter Ritchings aged 24 or 
Palmeston Court, and Robert 
Dean Taylor, also aged 24. of 
Wisden Road, are accused of 
murdering Mr Thomas 
McGuigan of Airdrie. 

Helicopter in 
Healey search 

A helicopter using a beat- 
seeking camera flew over Pres- 
tatyn, Clwyd yesterday look- 
ing for bodies buried in the 
beach area as part of the inves- 
tigation into the disappear- 
ance of the Healey family from 
Stockport. 

Sixty police officers from 
Greater Manchester and 
North Wales toured caravans 
and seaside camps seeking 
information about Mr Robert 
Healey, aged 37. Mrs Greeba 
Healey, aged 40. and her 
daughter Marie, aged 13. 

Green pebble 
puzzle solved 

The mystery of pebbles 
found on the beach at 
Penmaenmawr, Gwynedd, 
which glowed green and gave 
off a homing sensation when 
handled, has been solved. 

Geologists at Llanrhos, 
Llandudno, said yesterday 
that they believed microscopic 
marine organisms were res- 
ponsible. after a Gwynedd fire 
service unit spent several 
hours searching the beach in 
case chemicals bad been 
washed ashore. 

Boy’s death 
‘suspicious’ 

Scotland Yard yesterday 
launched an investigation into 
the death of a south London 
boy which they are treating as 
suspicious. 

Lee Kendal, aged 14. of 
Hazel May. Bermondsey, col- 
lapsed in a park last Friday 
and died five days later in 
hospital. Friends claimed he 
bad been among boys sniffing 
typing correction fluid thinner 
and police say further tests are 
to be carried out 

Court plea to 
find girl 

A man charged with abduct- 
ing a girl aged 15 has been 
asked by a court to help to find 
her. 

Magistrates at Reading. 
Berkshire, agreed to lift their 
original condition of bail that 
Steven StockwelL. aged 28, of 
Whitley. Reading, must not 
see or contact the girl after 
ng that she has dis- 
appeared since bis last 
appearance In court on July- 
22 . 

Meningitis 
city survey 

A medical survey is being 
conducted in Plymouth into 
why the incidence of men- 
ingitis has been five times the 
national average. 

The study is being carried 
ont with Stroud. Gloucester- 
shire where the Illness has 
affected more than 100 people 
since I9$I. 







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■ IlhiinuillllHMlI 


1 9 If 8 6 






THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


South Africa in crisis: National Party meets as blacks reject homeland status 

Botha congress agrees 
on continued need 
for racial segregation 




-<s ’ 




The federal congress of the 
ruling National Parly, meeting 
here yesterday, agreed that 
separate political structures 
for the different race groups, 
and the segregation of residen- 
tial areas and schools, must be 
maintained in South Africa. 

Motions passed by the two- 
day congress, which was 
opened on Tuesday night by 
President Botha, confirmed 
the strongly conservative 
mood of the party, reflecting 
the Government’s determina- 
tion not to deviate from the 
basic constitutional principle 
of racial segregation. 

This was set out most 
clearly in a speech by Dr 
Gerrit Viljoen. the Minister of 
Education and Development, 
seconding a motion on 
constitutional development. 
A former chairman of the 
Broederbond, Dr Viljoen is 
one of the intellectual gurus of 
the National Party and close 
to President Botha. 

‘'Protection of minority 
rights and the entrenchment 
of group security are essential 
against the background of the 
bitter consequences resulting, 
in many lands and at many 
times, from majority domina- 
tion in multi-cultural soc- 
ieties." Dr Viljoen told the 
congress. 

“For the effective protec- 
tion of minority rights the 
National Party considers it 
essential that, within the reali- 
ties of South Africa, participa- 
tion in the political processes 
should be on a group basis. 

“Participation on the basis 
of regions only will not effec- 
tively and peacefully accom- 
modate the population div- 
ersity of South Africa; 
therefore political participa- 
tion also on the basis of 
population groups and com- 
munities is essential." 


From Michael Hornsby, Durban 

: This approach. Dr Viljoen 

5 insisted, did not imply sup* 
t port for apartheid. “It is a 
> serious misconception that 
. political representation based 

- on population groups (i.e. 

: race) has anything to do with 

discrimination or the out- 
. dated concept of apartheid," 

. he declared, illustrating the 
, gap between Pretoria's and the 
I outside world's understanding 
of the term. 

The motion on constitu- 
tional development approved 
by the congress recommended 
the creation of a “Council of 
Slate” in which “leaders and 
other representatives of all the 

- political entities may partici- 
■ pate in policy formulation 

over common interests by 
means of consensus decision- 
taking”. 

By “political entities”, it 
. appears, are meant the rural 
tribal homelands, the autono- 
mous black “city states” out- 
side the homelands envisaged 
by President Botha in nis 
speech on Tuesday, as well as 
the other political structures 
and bodies representing 
whites, mixed-blood Col- 
oureds and Indians. 

All these entities would 
supposedly be in charge of 
their “own affairs”, such as 
hospitals, schools and so on, 
and send delegates u> the 
Council of State where mat- 
ters of common interest, such 
as presumably foreign affairs, 
defence, finance and justice, 
would be discussed and de- 
cisions taken by consensus. 

“Consensus” is a code word 
here meaning, in essence, a 
form of decision-taking which 
ensures that whites, and more 
specifically the National 
* Party, cannot be outvoted. 
(Consensus, for example, is 
the term used to describe the 


operation of the existing bi- 
cameral Parliament set up for 
whites. Coloureds and Ind- 
ians). 

In a separate motion pro- 
posed by the powerful Min- 
ister of National Education, 
Mr F. W. de Klerk, who is 
leader of the National Party in 
the Transvaal, the congress 
agreed that “the best interests 
of all the population groups" 
in South Africa required “the 
assurance of their own com- 
munity life for all commu- 
nities, inter alia, by means of 
the maintenance of their own 
schools and residential areas 
wherever practicably poss- 
ible”. 

There has been talk over the 
past year of making adherence 
to the Group Areas Act, which 
enforces racial separation of 
residential areas, voluntary — 
that is. whites in a particular 
town or district could choose 
to open it to all races if they so 
wished. 

Mr de KJerk slammed the 
door on that possibility. 
“When it comes to the fun- 
damental corner-stones of 
group security, such as an own 
community life, own residen- 
tial areas and schools, then the 
National Party believes that 
some or other provision, 
embodied in binding mea- 
sures, is imperative in order to 
ensure proper order and 
meaningful association be- 
tween tne individual and the 
group”. 

Unless group coherence was 
maintained, “the friction pot- 
ential would be extended to all 
comers of the country”, be 
declared. Without it. South 
Africa would be unable to 
meet its greatest challenge, 
which was “to compose a 
symphony from seemingly 
discordant sounds”. 

Leading article, page H 





k % 




jf".: - ^ ’ 



'•'-’IIP 



’ifc »'• ... 


about oil 

Harare (AP) — Four inter- 
national oil companies sup- 
plying Zimbabwe said yes- 
terday that they did not expect 
imports to be disrupted if 
South Africa imposed eco- 
nomic embaigoes on black- 
ruled nations in the region, the 
Zimbabwe Inter-African news 
agency reported. 

Caltex, Mobil, Shell-BP and 
Total said they would back Mr 
Robert Mugabe's efforts to 
secure alternative transport 
routes and sources of supply, 
the semi-official agency re- 
ported. 

Zimbabwe gets most of its 
petrol by pipeline from the 
Mozambique port of Beira. on 
the Indian Ocean. But much 
of its aviation fuel and lubri- 
cants are ferried into the 
country by rail and road from 
South Africa. 

The Government has set up 
a special Cabinet committee 
to explore ways ofbiunting the 
impact of possible counter- 
sanctions by South Africa. 


From Jan Raafh, Harare 


While political teas ions rise 
between Sooth Africa and 
Zimbabwe, Pretoria is to rely 
yet again on its northern 
neighbour for food. 

In March and April this 
year, Zimbabwe sent 206,000 
tons of white maize by rail to 
Sooth Africa, which suffered 
widespread crop failure after a 
severe summer drought and 
still had to honour a long- 
standing contract to sell yellow 
maize to Taiwan. 

Ground and milled maize, 
cooked into a stiff, dry por- 
ridge, is the staple food of most 
southern African blacks. Hie 
yellow variety, however, is 
regarded as unpalatable and is 
sold for food only when mixed 
in a low ratio with white maize. 

Reliable sources confirmed 
here that Pretoria has asked 
for another 250,000 tons of 
white maize. 

The delivery of the crop, 
however, has been stalled by 
Pretoria's “take it or leave it" 
offer of only £66 a too. This 
compares with £82 a ton paid 


for the March and April 
deliveries, representing a loss 
of £4 million on the second 
order. Zimbabwe’s Grain 
Marketing Board, the only 
body permitted to deal in 
maize, has rejected the offer. 

But alternative arrange- 
ments are being made. The 
sources said Zimbabwe was 
now seeking private com- 
panies to undertake the 
delivery. 

They said the private con- 
tractor would dearly make no 
direct profit, bot could stand to 
win a substantial proportion of 
the foreign exchange earned 
from South Africa’s payment 
in rands, instead of in Zim- 
babwe dollars. 

Zimbabwe, after two rainy 
and abundant seasons, is des- 
perate to reduce its maize 
stockpile. Early next year it 
will have grown to an on- 
manageable two milli on tons. 
Storage space is said to be very 
limited and the existing stock- 
pile is costing £16 mmfon in 
interest charges alone. 


Irish and French UN troops under 
fire as Amal fails to curb gunmen 


Irish and Fijian, as well as 
French, troops of the United 
Nations Interim Force in 
southern Lebanon came under 
machine gun and rockeiattack 
yesterday in a continuation of 
the battles between the UN 
andShia Muslim Amal militia 
men which had left four men 
dead and 17 French troops 
wounded on Tuesday. 

Another French soldier was 
injured in the latest attacks, 
although by midday Amal 
commanders appeared to 
have restored their half- 
hearted ceasefire. 

Intermittent shooting had 
gone on all night around the 
town of Mairakeh as Shia 
gunmen, angry at the killing of 
two local militia officials by 
French troops on Monday 
night, continued to fire at UN 
positions. 


From Robert Fisk, Beirut 

Amal blamed the truce 
violations on “friends and 
comrades'’ of the two dead 
men, although the truth may 
be a little more uncomfort- 
able. For many Hezbollah 
(Party of God) gunmen appear 
to have involved themselves 
in the battles; they are not 
under Amal's control and 
oppose the presence of French 
troops anywhere in Lebanon. 

Their existence in Mairakeh 
is not officially admitted by 
Amal and Mr Nabih Bern, the 
Amal leader in Beirut had to 
content himself yesterday 
with a public statement urging 
that good relations should be 
restored with the UN. 

The Israeli occupation 
Army in the far south of 
Lebanon almost was the target 
of a suicide car bombing 
yesterday but plain clothes 


Swedes insult the seafood pride of Louisiana 

Claws out in crayfish war 



Shin Bel secret service agents 
managed to prevent the attack 
and to capture the prospective 
car bomber. 

According to local reports in 
the Hasbaya region, the Shin 
Bet men found the driver 
sitting in a parked van with 
6001b of explosives in the 
boot He was apparently wait- 
ing for a routine military 
rotation of Israeli tanks and 
armoured personnel carriers 
which regularly passes down 
the main road near Hasbaya 
on its way to the Israeli 
frontier. 

Israeli agents were later 
reported to have detained 
eight civilians. 

Meanwhile Mr John Gray, 
the British Ambassador to 
Lebanon, yesterday visited Si- 
don to discuss the case of Mr 
Alec Collett, the kidnapped 
British freelance writer, with 
the provincial governor and 
the Army commander. 

Mr Collett's captors were 
believed to have been holding 
him in the Ein Helwe Palestin- 
ian camp in Sidon until they 
released a video tape purport- 
ing to show Mr Collett dan- 
gling from a gallows. 

Mr Gray said that he “still 
lacked confirmation of the 
claim” of Mr Collett’s death. 
“We need evidence to clear up 
the issue.” he said. 


From Christopher Mosey 
Stockholm 

Today is Crayfish Day in 
Sweden, the day special plates 
are brought out, trestle tables 
are set up by (akesides, paper 
lanterns are lit, funny bats 
donned and crayfish, each of 
which must be at least 20 cms 
long, are consumed quite lit- 
erally by the ton. There is an 
almost mystical significance 
to it all for Swedes. 

The reputation of the Swed- 
ish crayfish has apparently 
been little damaged by radio- 
active fall-out from the 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster 
which was particularly high in 
Sweden. The experts raved 
about its “taste, consistency 
and light colour”. 

The crayfish tradition is to 
Sweden wbat Beaujolais nou- 
veau is to France and the 
Glorious Twelfth to Britain. It 
has been built up on (he fact 
that from midnight on the 
second Thursday in August it 


becomes permissible to fish 
for them. 

This year fresh crayfish are 
selling at about £40 per kilo. 

And this year there was 
great excitement when, for the 
first time. Louisiana crayfish 
were allowed to compete for 
Swedish favours alongside the 
domestic and Turkish vari- 
eties. But to the horror of 
Americans of patriotic dis- 
position living here. Dagens 
Nyheter. the main Swedish 
daily newspaper whose annual 
crayfish preview is eagerly 
awaited, awarded the new- 
comer from the Deep South a 
derisory one-star rating, com- 
pared with four for both 
Swedish and Turkish brands. 

“It goes against all the 
traditions of the Swedish 
crayfish”, was the damning 
verdict of the paper's culinary 
experts. “It is dark red, large 
and sweetish in taste, the 
broth is muddy, and the skin 
and claws tough- 

The outrage of US citizens 


can be compared to that of a 
colony of East Enders defend- 
ing jellied eels from foreign 
attack. 

Dr Sheldon Utt, an Ameri- 
can psychologist living in 
Stockholm, denounced the 
test as “rigged to accord with 
Swedish political prefer- 
ences”. while admitting some- 
what sheepishly that as a 
native New Yorker he had 
never actually eaten Louisiana 
crayfish. 

Mr John Burton, aged 62, 
an American touring Sweden 
with his wife Ellie. who lives 
near New Orleans, was out- 
raged. “rve been eating Loui- 
siana crayfish all my life," be 
said. “In my book there’s no 
seafood belter. Who do these 
guys think they are?" 

Seventy-five per cent of the 
3.000 tons of crayfish that will 
be consumed tonight and in 
the weeks to come are, with 
the exception of the American 
intruder, imported from Tur- 
key. 


Six leaders seek test ban meeting 


Athens — The leaders of six 
countries who met in Mexico 
to offer their services for the 
verification of a nuclear test 
ban treaty have asked the 
leaders of ihe US and the 


Soviet Union to send experts 
to discuss the proposals 
(Mario Modiano writes). 

The texts of the almost 
identical letters were released 
in the capitals of the six — 


Argentina. Mexico. Greece, 
Sweden. India and Tanzania. •, 
“We believe that we are in a 
position to make a contribu- 
tion in the field of i 
verification.” the letters said 


People from the township of Sryabuswa showing their delight after the leaders of the KwaNdebele ho mel a n d reversed their 
previous decision to accept nominal Independence from the Sooth African Government- 

Zimbabwe Pretoria orders Harare Botha call 
reassured maize despite tensions welcomed 

about oil From Jan Raath, Harare jjV Reagan 

aUUUl U11 White political tensions rise for the March and April J 

Harare (AP) — Four inter- between Sooth Africa and deliveries, representing a loss From Michael Binyon 
national oil companies sup- Zimbabwe, Pretoria is to rely of £4 million on the second Washington 

plying Zimbabwe said yes- yet again on its northern order. Zimbabwe’s Grain Pr __ irf - nT Rp _ ran 
terday that they did not expect neighbour Tor food. Marketing Board, the only ^ pSirient 

imports to be disrupted if in March and April this body permitted to deal in w to 

South Africa imposed eco- year, Zimbabwe sent 206,000 maize, has rejected the offer. , ^ jl Africa to resolve 
nomic embargoes on black- tons of white maize by rail to Bot alternative arrange- JjJ* Jj™ rv'a criS La ndsaid 
ruled nations in the region, the South Africa, which suffered ments are being made. The HJJj mc 

Zimbabwe Inter-African news widespread crop failure after a sources said Zimbabwe was ii mnld tn h«*1« • 

agency reported. severe summer drongbt and now seeking private com- r . diH he 

Caltex, MobjJ, Sheil-BP and still had to honour a long- panics to undertake the (rf ^ attend such a 
Total said they would back Mr standing contract to sell yelfoW delivery. 

Robert Mugabe's efforts to maize to Taiwan. They said the private con- ‘SSTS Sr 

secure alternative transport Ground and mated maize, tractor would dearly make bo “"i ■ w ^ 

routes and sources of supply, cooked into a stiff, dry por- direct profit, but could stand to between foreSn mfiv 

the semi-official agency re- ridge, is the staple food of roost win a substantial proportion of inSSd I.T count™ 

ported. „ southern African blacks. The the foreign exchange earned 

Zimbabwe gets most of its yellow variety, however, is from South Africa's payment 53^ aamreiEta^atKm 
petrol by pipeline from the regarded as unpalatable and is in rands, instead of in Zhn- A 

Mozambique port of Beira. on sold for food only when mixed babwe dollars. defended IreS pfiisal to imnose 

the Indian Ocean. But much in a low ratio with white maize. Zimbabwe, after two rainy He ifXTa 

of its aviation fuel and lubri- Reliable sources confirmed and abundant seasons, is des- 

cants are ferried into the here that Pretoria has asked perate to reduce its maize Riff 5 wde!?in 

country by rail and road from for another 250,000 tons of stockpile. Early next year it SS lh n ?S r J £? JSdl him of 
South Africa. white maize. will have grown to an on- nnnISion to sanctions. 

The Government has set up The delivery of the crop, manageable two million tons. 2*j r RRRRSr 0 JU? PrSSmt 
a special Cabinet committee however, has been stalled by Storage space is said to be very 2JJJ. ™L JJSJfjL 

to explore ways ofbiunting the Pretoria's “take it or leave it" limited and the existing stock- to see an end io 

impact of possible counter- offer of only £66 a too. This pOe is costing £16 million in PSp,,!-?:' WA11 id 

sanctions by South Africa. compares with £82 a ton paid interest charges alone. not oX bfSiHive to 

. , " “ ~ surrounding stales ... but 

Swedes insult the seafood pnde of Louisiana would also be very punitive to 

- — — the people we want to help.” 

9 — And in an extraordinary harsh 

Claws out m crayfish war 

a/ black organization in South 

From Christopher Mosey becomes permissible to fish can be compared to that of a Africa, he suggested it was 

Stockholm for them. colony of East Enders defend- influenced by communists 

— , . rrovf : eh ry, v This year fresh crayfish are ing jellied eels from foreign was , uy 11 ^ *>■ foment 

selling at about £40 per kilo, -attack. chaos and economic collapse . 

Sweden, the day special plates And this vear there was nr ^hpiHnn t itt an Ampri. through sanctions. 

are ^uD'bv’SkSdS raSer great excitement when, for ihe can psychologist living in “The one -group tiiat is in 
fentmis S ^5 hrst time. Louisiana crayfish Stockholm, denounced the Jjlgrt. 
r nt ^\ s * h «r were allowed to compete for test as “rigged to accord with Africa is a group that veiy 

whirh^?tel£t?0 ms f Swedish favours alongside the Swedish political prefer- d ^ n,l I eI LS aS 
ion^b^e'eonsume^a u i tetit- domestic and Turkish vari- ences” while admitting some- radttakmdwantstbediottp- 
Sv hJ EfKFnS cues. But to the horror of what sheepishly that as a «on that would come from 
SS^mvSiSJ' SSfkina Americans of patriotic dis- native New Yorker he had massive unemployment and 

toTIllforsirfes! position living here, Dagens never actually eaten Louisiana hun ^^ °!£ C r 

to it all for Swedes. Nyheter. the main Swedish crayfish. . people, because it is their 

The reputation of the Swed- daily newspaper whose annual Mr John Burton, aged 62, belief that they could then nse 
ish crayfish has apparently crayfish preview is eagerly an American touring Swedoi out of all that disruption and 
been little damaged by radio- awaited, awarded the new- with his wife Ellie. who lives -n. n 

active fall-out from the comer from the Deep South a near New Orleans, was out- •Lx?NLKJl\: the foreign 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster derisory one-star rating, com- raged, “rve been eating Loui- Office yesterday expressed 
which was particularly high in pared with four for both siana crayfish all my life," be “disappointment at the gen- 
Sweden. The experts raved Swedish and Turkish brands, said. “In my book there’s no content of President 
about its “taste, consistency -ft goes against all the seafood better. Who do these Botha s address .to “ e con- 
and light colour”. traditions of the Swedish guys think they are?" of “? e /“““S ‘l a ^£. nai 

The crayfish tradition is to crayfish”, was the damning Seventy-five per cent of the 
Sweden what Beaujolais nou- verdict of the j»per sculinary 3.000 tons of crayfish that will 

veau is to France and the expensj*!! is dark red, large be consumed tonight and in irtUffS 
GloriousTwelfthtoBritain.lt and sweetish in taste, the ihe weeks to come are, with ° t hp ns 

has been built up on the fact broth is muddy, and the skin the exception of die American '"nVith p? vEL~m 

that from midnight on the and claws tough. intruder, imported from Tur- VfrSL, JaHEt* 

second ThurHiay in Augutf il The outrage of US citizens key. 

Office said it was disappointed 

Six leaders seek test ban meeting 

^ forward which was so dearly 

Athens - The leaders of six Soviet Union to send experts Argentina. Mexico. Greece, necessary. Britain remained 
countries who met in Mexico to discuss the proposals Sweden. India and Tanzania, convinced that successful di- 
to offer their services for the (Mario Modiano writes). “We believe that we are in a alogue could take place only if 

verification of a nuclear test The texts of the almost position to make a contribu- me representatives of a hill 
ban treaty have asked the identical letters were released lion in the field of 13^ 0 f black opinion in 
leaders of the US and the in the capitals of the six — verification.” the letters said. South Africa were involved. 


Japan 
takes 
big step 
in space 

Tokyo (AFP) - Japan's 
National Space Development 
Agency (Nasda) has made the 
first launch of its HI rocket, 
which is partly powered by 
liquid oxygen and hydrogen, 
placing two satellites in orbit 
938 miles above Earth. 

The H I is the first rocket to 
use a Japanese-designed iner- 
tial guidance system and a 
second-stage engine using liq- 
uid oxygen and hydrogen. 

Despite this breakthrough! 
Japan cannot become truly 
competitive in the inter: 
national market until 1994: 
when the next generation of 
Japanese rockets is due for its 
first commercial launch.' , 

Kenya finance ■ 
panic deepens : 

Nairobi (AFP). — One of 
Kenya's oldest financial in* 
stitutions, the stockbroking 
company Dyer and Blair, has 
been forced to halt its opera-5 
lions following the collapse of 
the Union Bank, which held 
the firm’s main account, the 
Standard newspaper said. . « 

The panic in the banking 
and business community was 
sparked last month by the 
collapse of another private 
bank, the Continental Bank. • 

Turks killed j 

Ankara (Reuter) — At least 
eight Turkish Army privates 
and a major were killed anc$ 
three soldiers wounded when 
Kurdish insurgents ambusbed 
a military convoy near the 
south-eastern town of Ulu-- 
dere. close to the Iraqi border- 

Tanker toll 

Taipei (AP) — Rescuers 
found three bodies floating iif 
Kaohsiung harbour, raising to 
13 the death toll from explo- f 
sions on board a 41.000-ton- 
; tanker that was about to : bd 
scrapped. At least 50 jpeople 
were seriously injured. ' 

Labor loses 

Sydney (Reuter) — Th(* 
Australian opposition Liberal 
Party has won the once-safe 
Labor seat of Bass Hill, for- 
merly held by the ex-premie£ 
of New South Wales. Mr Nev- 
ille Wran. in the state Par-! 
liamerrL The Liberal can-* 
didale won by 103 votes in at 
. 22 per cent swing against 
Labor. 

Floods spread; 

Peking (Reuter ) -t One hun-’ 
dred thousand people are 
working round the clock to 
bolster dykes in north-east 
China, where floods have 
struck 2.500 villages and; 
threaten the city of Harbin. - 

Czechs stay 

Stockholm — Eight Czechs 
have gone missing from Z( 
Soviet cruise ship which put in 
here this week, and six of them; 
have applied for political 
assyium in Sweden. 

Sect ousted 

Hong Kong (Reuter) - 
More than 20 members of the 
Children of God sect have 
been ordered to leave China 
for preaching sexual freedom. 

Death slide 

Wellington (Reuter) — A 
young American skier wearing 
nylon trousers slid 1 50 yards 
to his death in New Zealand's 
Southern Alps after he sat 
down to rest a park ranger 
said, adding: “He had no way 
of stopping himself.” 


Anzus pact sails into stormy waters as interests conflict oyer trade as well as nuclear issues 


Australia caught in discord 
between alliance partners 


US sugar deal with China further 
sours relations with Canberra 


^ - .... 


A French soldier taking cover at Marrakeh, south Lebanon, 
as Shia AmaJ militiamen lay siege to French VniTil troops. 

Paris sends sympathy message 


Paris — M Jacques Chirac, 
the French Prime Minister, 
and M Andre Giraud. his 
Defence Minister, have sent 
messages of sympathy to the 
French contingent of the UN 
force in southern Lebanon for 
the injuries in the attack 
(Susan MacDonald writes). 

M Chirac gave his support 
for “the courageous way the 
contingent was carrying its 
peace-keeping mission under 


difficult conditions." 

Some 1 .400 French soldiers 
arc stationed in Lebanon: 10 
have died and several been 
wounded since they arrived in 
1978. 

Since April there have been 
several rumours, denied by 
Paris, that the French are 
withdrawing pan of their 
forces. The Government says 
it is not a question of with- 
drawal but of redeploy menL. 


The formal suspension of 
New Zealand from Anzus by 
the United States has left 
Australia wedged uncomfort- 
ably between the two dis- 
putants. 

The strain of this position 
has been showing for some 
time, but is made particularly 
dear by the comm unique is- 
sued after the meeting between 
Mr George Shultz, the US 
Secretary of State, and Mr Bill 
Hayden. Australia's Foreign 
Minister. 

Washington has tried before 
to persuade Canberra to be 
more robustly critical of tbe 
Lange Government's policy, 
but onto now tbe strength of 
links between Australia and 
New Zealand, which in the 
military sphere indade the 
relationship forged by tbe 
Anzacs at Gallipoli, has been a 
restraint. 

Canberra expressed regret 
at New Zealand's nuclear ban. 
but slopped short of directly 
supporting US retaliation. 
The communique changes 

that. 

Australia's endorsement of 
the view that “New Zealand’s 
current polities detract from 
individual and collective cap- 
acity to resist armed attack”, 
and expression of understand- 
ing for tbe L r S action, is the 
most unequivocal criticism of 
its old friend yet. 

Tbe communique was the 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

result of lengthy and intensive 
negotiations, but such re- 
marks. one foreign affairs 
official in Canberra noted, 
“might as well have come 
direct from the Pentagon”. 
The quid pro quo, for Can- 
berra. is the direct linkage for 
the first time of trade and 
defence interests. 

Tbe communique contains 
reference to Australia’s vocif- 
erous complaints over tbe US 
invasion of its markets with 
subsidized grain sales. 

There was no indication, 
however, of a reversal of tbe 
Reagan Administration’s pol- 
icy. which the Hawke Govern- 
ment says could cost Australia 
more than SAus 500 million 
(£210 million) a year. 

Behind the rhetoric. Can- 
berra officials are adamant 
that there will not be any 
change to what for months 
have been separate bilateral 
defence alliances with tbe US 
and New Zealand. “Whatever 
Reagan does about tbe Kiwis, 
as far as we are concerned it’s 
business as usual,” an official 
at the Defence Department 

said. 

A Foreign Ministry spokes- 
man said: “We regard our 
obligations to New Zealand as 
constant and unduninishing.” 

There is no US objection to 
tbe continuation of those links, 
it is said. The form of the 
relationship is tbe same as it 


was under the umbrella of 
Anzns: Australian and New 
Zealand forces continue to be 
involved in joint exercises: 
personnel are exchanged be- 
tween the three services on a 
regular basis; and the two 
countries co-operate in joint 
equipment purchases wher- 
ever possible, an example 
being the British Hummel 
105mm field gun. 

A Defence official said : 
“New Zealand ships are often 
in our waters. We have had a 
dozen exercises this year and 
there will be no change to 
that.” 

There is also the sensitive 
question of intelligence. New 
Zealand has the facility to 
monitor maritime movements 
in the region, which it has 
indicated is still available to 
Canberra and therefore re- 
mains in Western defence 
interests. 

The fact remains, however, 
that the meeting ushered in a 
new era of bilateral defence 
ties in tbe Pacific which 
signify a diminution of re- 
gional security. 

Canberra's hope mast now 
be that the anti-nuclear senti- 
ment stirred in New Zealand 
dies out before ft becomes a 
more potent force in the region 
at large, and perhaps Austra- 
lia itself. 

Leading article, page II 


From Mohs in Ali 
Washington 

Washington has announced 
the sale of its entire stockpile 
of 145.850 tonnes of taw sugar 
to China at 4.75 cents a 
pound, two cents below tbe 
prevailing world price. 

Tbe SIS.3 million (about 
£10.2 million) sale has an- 
gered key allies such as 
Australia, which has already 
bitterly criticized President 
Reagan's recent derision to 
subsidize US grain sales to the 
Soviet Union. 

The Agricultural Depart- 
ment said the sugar would be 
delivered early next year and 
that no credit was involved in 
the sale. 

Sugar analysts calculated 
that the sale, negotiated with 


the China National Cereals. 
Oils and Foodstuffs Import 
and Export Corporation, was 
made with the aid of some 
$38.6 million in government 
subsidies. 

China is one of Australia's 
major export markets, taking 
490.000 tonnes of Australian 
sugar last year. The Australian 
Sugar Board yesterday said the 
US sale showed that Wash- 
ington was an “indiscriminate 
dumper” of subsidized pro- 
duce on the world market 

The Administration, under 
pressure from growing trade 
protectionist moves in Con- 
gress. has been trying to get rid 
of the sugar stockpile for some 
time. China, with its refin- 
eries, was an .obvious market. 

Washington accumulated 
the sugar when domestic 


Moscow faces earnings crisis 


Vienna (Reuter) — The 
Soviet Union faces a collapse 
in its hard currency earnings 
this year after the crash in the 
price' of oiL its main export to 
the West, according to a report 
published yesterday. 

The Vienna Institute for 
Comparative Economic Stud- 
ies forecast that Moscow 
would lose some $7 billion 
(£4.7 billion), or one-lhird of 
its bard currency revenue, in 
1986 as a result of the two- 
thirds drop in world oil prices 
earlier this year. 

Herr Jan Stankovsky. who 
wrote the report, warned that 


things could turn out even 
worse for Moscow. He said 
that his estimates were based 
on the assumption that Opec's 
plans to slash production by 
20 per cent by September 
would boost world prices 
significantly. 

Moscow could lose another 
S3_5 billion this year because 
of the dollar's dramatic de- 
cline against other leading 
currencies, according 10 the 
institute. Moscow sells oil for 
dollars but buys most of its 
hard currency imports, apart 
from grain, in Western Euro- 
pean currencies. 


producers opted to turn the 
1984-85 harvest over 10 Lhe 
Agricultural Department 
rather than repay government 
loans, taken out against the 
crop, from earnings at de- 
pressed prices. 

The wheat and sugar sales 
are seen as part of Mr 
Ragan's determination to 
help hard-pressed American 
formers in the run-up to the 
November elections. 

• SYDNEY: Canberra Yes- 
terday angrily attacked Wash- 
ington for selling cut-price- 
sugar to China and warned 
-that its military alliance with 
the US might stand or fall on 
the issue of subsidized trade 
(Reuter reports). 

The Australian Govern- 
ment. which has already for- 
mally protested against pro- 
posed US sales of subsidized 
wheat to the Soviet Union, 
said the sugar sale would 
further damage its ailing 
. economy. 

Washington's announce-, 
ment of the sale came just one 
day after Australia and the US 
.condemned protectionism, at” 
defence talks in San Francisco/ 

Mr Bill Hayden, the Austra>, 
lian Foreign Minister, said in a- 
radio interview . from San-. 
Francisco that the sale threai-- 
ened the welfare of all Austra- 
Hans. “U's as serious as that," . 

Mr Hayden said relations? 
with the US couid be'-' 
approaching a significant' 
“threshold. . 


v* V 


0 ; 
i • 




I 



■ ■I 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


LA CRfiME DE LA CRIiME 



ALFRED MARKS 


S >!• 


f hit 


A very demanding position with work sometimes of a highly confidential nature* 

SENIOR AUDIO TYPIST 

Assistant to Chairman's Secretary 
CENTRAL LONDON UP TO £1 1 ,000 

A LARGE INTERNATIONAL COMPANY 

Our client seeks a mature person who will have an extremely high standard of audio 
typing gained in any demanding and exacting environment- A knowledge of shorthand 
and wordprocessing will be useful, but is not essential. Training tn wordprocessing win be 
given. The selected candidate, who will assist the Chairman's Secretary, will take control 
of the Chairman's Office in the absence of his Secretary. Other key attributes are: 
self-confidence, discretion, diplomacy, tact and integrity, above average initiative, the 
ability to get things done and remain calm under pressure, the willingness to work long 
hours where necessary and to have a smart, presentable appearance and be wed 
spoken. Inrtal salary negotiable up to £11 .000. 

Written applications, with fuU CV, under reference SAT18141HT wifi be forwarded 
unopened to our client unless you list companies to which they should not be sent in a 
covering letter marked for the attention of the Security Manager 

audreai-iomsTn BEcaimuarr aovotisk uwthi. 

35, HEW B8QAD STREET, LOUDON EC2M INK. 


Career Opportunity 

iSKM h GERMAN-SPEAKING PA 

to Executive Director 

LONDON EC2 £14,000-£1 6,000 + Bonus 

INVESTMENT BANKING DIVISION OF MAJOR 
INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES HOUSE 

For this Appointment we invite applications from candidates, educated to 'A* Level 
or equivalent, with German as the mother tongue, and excellent secretarial skills, 
including German and English shorthand and wp/pc ability. The Executive Director 
is responsible lor the bank's investment banking activities in German-speaking 
countries and previous working contact with clients in this area will be helpful in 
providing full support to the ED. This appointment calls for full commitment 
flexibility in laying the groundwork and assessing the needs of this department and 
the poise for client contact The job content will grow in line with the successful 
applicant's ability and can lead to further career opportunities, initial remuneration 
negotiable £1 4.000-El 6,000 + discretionary bonus. Applications in strict 
confidence under reference GSPA672 to the Managing Director- 

OUfOQ l-J— ST0! EXKOTTYE SECRET AHE5 LIMIT®, (REISQmiBrT CONTACTS), 

3S, MEW B8M0STBET, LUBU EC2M UBL TBEPHHE: 61-588 3588 or 01-588 3576. 
TBEX: 887374. FAX: 01-256 8501 


EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 
up to £8,000 

SeltnJgn require a mature, nurooaw. all -founder to work as Secxnaiv to ime of" 
their Merchandise Connoflen. 

Your vaned and tnwodng day will involve dealrna with telephone enquines. 

lulling with suppliers and oiganmnc naval arrangements, whilst keeping a hecnc dory; 
There will alsoie some murine sransocal work. In onfcr to tneer this challenge mu will 
need excellent t>pcng/shorthand skills and a knowledge oTRTP mould be a duoncr 
advantage- 

In add inon co an excellent- salary, we offer a valuable range of sofflwiefiis, 
including shopping discounts, subsidised meals, interest free season ticket loan and paid 
bobdaes within the first rear of service. 

Please send a written cv with full career details ro: Manin ft yne, Bnsonnd 

Department, 5th Floor, Selfridges Ltd, 400 Oxford Street, London W1A 1AB- 


ACADEMIC REGISTRAR'S 
DEPARTMENT 

ASSISTANT 
DEPARTMENTAL 
ARY 

Up to £8532 

The Faculty of Administrative Studies is seeking 
an Assistant Secretary for the Department of 
Management. Economics and Industrial Studies. 

The post-holder will offer secretarial and adminis- 
trative support for a large number of staff, 
including several Course Directors. 

Applicants must be able to organize their own 
workload, work under pressure in a busy Depart- 
ment and be able to deal sensitively with a wide 
variety of people. 

Shorthand and/or audio skills are required, in ad- 
dition to excellent typing. Applicants should be 
able, or willing to learn to use a word processor. 
Application forms and further details are avail- 
able from the Personnel Department. South 
Bank Polytechnic. Borough Road. London. SE1 
OAA. Telephone 01-928 3512 (answering 
service 9.00am to 6.00pm). 

Please quote Ref: R71 

Closing date for appficstions: 29th August 1986 
An Equal Opportunities Employer 

South Bank 


Polytechnic I 

l . j . 1 m 


fct the hurt of London 


SECRETARY/PA 

MUSIC PUBLISHING 

We are looking for an experienced 
Secretary /PA to the Managing Director 
of one of the world’s major music publish- 
ing companies, CBS Songs. 

In addition to excellent shorthand and 
typing skills you will possess a confident 
outgoing personality, the ability to work 
under pressure and on your own initiative 
and have sufficient organisational skills to 
enable you to act as Office Manager. 
We are offering an excellent salary plus an 
attractive range of benefits including 
discounts all CBS products. 

Please write giving full details of experi- 
ence to date to Maureen Heneghan, CBS 
Records, 17/19 Soho Square, London 
W1V 6HE. 


MARKETING 

CONSULTANTS 

in the drinks industry require an energetic, 
responsible person with IBM PC and Lotus 
123 experience for Finance Department 
| The position involves contact with manage- 
ment at all levels and the successful 
candidate should be numerate, adaptable 
and efficient with word processing skills 
and knowledge of offics communications 
an advantage. 

Superb West End offices, attractive salary 
and fringe benefits. 

Apply to Nicola Davies-Cooke on 
01-235 1221 


ACADEMIC REGISTRAR’S DEPARTMENT 

FACULTY SECRETARY 

Salary up to E8£32 (Pay award pending) 

The Faculty of Administrative Studies is seeking a 
mature secretary to offer 

secretarial/administrative support to the Dean and 
Faarity Administrative Officer. 

Applicants should have exceflent shorthand and 
typing skiis, the abiltiy to work under pressure and 
have the confidence and communication skins to 
deal with a wide verity of people. The post holder 
will be committed to the use of new technology.. 

Application forms and further delays are 
avatebfe from the Personnel Department, 
South Bank Polytechnic, Borough Road, 
London, SE1 OAA. 

Telephone 01 928 3512 (answering service 
9.00 am to 6.00 pm). 

Please quote Ref: R/66 

Closing data lor app l ications : 29th August, 1986. 
An Equal Opportunities Employer. 

South Bank 




! We won't pretend that all of the vacancies at our i 
Berkeley Square branch are out of this world. But 
as Britain’s foremost recruitment consultancy, we 
do tend to attract Britain's foremost companies in 
the Mayfair area. Which means we've a pool of 
vacancies no other agency can match. 

If you'd like some practical help on your future, 
come and ask Alfred Marks at 16 Lansdowne 
Row W1 or ‘phone 01-499 S88I. 

Alfred Marks Recruitment C on sul tan ts 


THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE IT. i 


ADVERTISING AGENCY 
RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST 

Wanted young starter wishing to cut teeth. 
Starter for one. 

Phone Leslie 01-434 0507 


MACMILLAN 5M1TH 


PARTNERS LTD. 


DEVELOPMENT CAPITAL GROUP LTD 

Prime venture capital bouse expanding rapidly wants 
person Friday, lOOwpm shorthand ana 70wpm typing 
plus WP (Wordstar), plus PC friendly, for dynamic new 
Director. Good organiser, determined f hwrfi it 
From £9,000 pa. (more for proven skills). 

Interviews Friday only 1400 - 1600 boors. 44 Baker 
Street, London Wl 2nd floor. Bring C.V. 2 refer- 
ences . Start Mondcp. Telephone 01-935 2731 ext. 230. 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO 
JOINT MANAGING DIRECTOR 
NORTH WEST LONDON 

The joint Managing Director (Operations) of a rap- 
idly expanding construction personnel recruitment 
company requires a highly confident PA This posi- 
tion will appeal to a person with flair, style, 
dedication and experience of dealing with all levels 
of employees and customer personnel Working 
knowledge of word processor and good typing skills 
essentiaL Salary c£! 1,500. 

SECRETARY TO DEVELOPMENT 
AND CONTRACT MANAGERS 

A conscientious and reliable person is required to 
assist the managers in this very busy department. 
Good audio, typing skills and excellent telephone 
manner essentiaL Salary c£9,000 

Please write with CV for both positions to Margaret 
Enright, McGinley Construction Services Lid, 
Crown House. North Circular Road, Stonchridge 
Park London N10 7PZ. 


I Polytechnic 1 


Wm **»0 for tomorrow 

kith* heart of London 


SUPER SECRETARIES 

ESTATE AGENTS 

£ 8,000 

Great job for Junior Sec/Person Friday 
willing to learn about the property world 
Good typing, average shorthand and a 
lively personality to join young team of 
Fulham n gpo fei 

Ring Michael Winter 

01-736 9822 . 


AD-FAWS/NANMES Required. , 
Malar*. mpniMe. to live with ' 
families in Taranto. Canada. 
Good salary. with jed 
opuponunily. Reply IO ABC 
Personnel c/o janir* Conan 
TH. Knock hoi I 34342 


OUTSTAWMKC COOK (Female! 
for famous family In London. 
Temo or perm. Super aecom. 
C1S0T200 pw Tel 10962) 
64123 temp agy) 


□tPOHENCCD Housekeepers, 
cooks and mother* helps for stt- 
uauoos from September Phone 
Book -a -Cook 0929 *71606. 



m 


Duff & Trotter need a hard work- 
ing and dynamic person, 27+, to 
run their City delicatessen. Ap- 
plicants must have a thorough, 
keen knowledge of fine food and 
previous retail experience. 

Please ring Kerstin Morris 

01 627 2770 . 


MEMBER SERVICE 
REPRESENTATIVE 

Do you have good communication skills? We 
axe looking for a well educated man/woman in 
their early 20’s who are interested in finding a 
job with high P.R. content You would be out 
visiting clients most of the time, but must be 
able to write clear concise reports. At least “O' 
level En gl i s h & Maths would be necessary & 
the ability to use a key board would be an 
advantage. If you get on well with all types of 
people & would like to be part of a young team 
in a go ahead city company with plenty of 
opportunity for promotion then this is the job 
for you. 

■ Please send your CV to Jane Hamon at 
3 Gracechurch St London EC3V OAT 




COMPANY 

Managing drector of Music 
Publishing Company re- 

to cootoSm^b actVitias 
in the UK S abroad- Lhasa at 
senior lev*] excellent 
shorthand/typing skin re- 
quired. Music business 
experience protemed but not 
eseen e e l . 

Salary C. £8,250- 

Ptease send C.V. to Jackie 
Romain. Chyeafis Music 
Ltd. 12 Stratford Place. 
London WIN 9AF. 


EXMMTION CO PA lo Dir 90/50 
* French Mv. professional 
manner and Mgh cUest Hatton. 
Oio * attend I unctions- £9.500. 
Call Natalia TED Aff 01-736 
9857 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


MATURE nmUCD Audio 

Secretary, wishing to learn 
word praremng. tt moving to 
London area shortly. Seeks po- 
sition al Chairman / Senior 
Director let el . Quiet lady, dto- 
aeet. used k> wonting In 
positions ol confidence, excel- 
lent references. Temporary 
accommodation reoutred taUUal- 
tv Tel: 0207-345772 


SALES 

EXECUTIVES 

We are a young city company who needs 
bright attractive sales people to expand 
our sen-ices throughout the city. If you 
are good at selling and would like to work 
with a young enthusiatic team & earn 
salary + generous commission 

Ring 01 62$ 9555 and ask for Jane. 


THE LAW SOCIETY 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

Salary c £8£Q0 

A Personal Assistant is required to work for a Senior 
Solicitor in our busy Professional and Public Relations 
Department 

Tins varied position requires good audio-typing skflls 
but there is a high administrative content arid a flair for 
this along with a good telephone manner is essential. 
The position involves the use ot a Wang Word Proces- 
sor and although experienced operators are preferred 
training can be provided tor the right appOcant 

Applicants should have a number of years secretarial 


Applicants should have a number of years secretarial 
experience with accurate typing of 50 wpm and be 
educated to 'O' level in Engfch and Mathematics. 
Benefits Include 23 days annual hofiday. staff restau- 
rant and pension and season ticket loan schemes. 
To apply send a typed CV with covering letter to the 
Personnel Officer, The Law Society, T13 Chancery 
Lane. London WC2A 1PL 

NO AGENCIES 


MAYFAIR 

Shorthand/audio secre- 
tary, good speeds 
essential required for 
busy and expanding 
commercial department 
in nationally known 
property auctio n house . 
Non smoker preferred. 
Salary nttoiiable. For 
further information tele- 
phone 491 2220 Sue/ 


SMART YOUNG 
SECRETARY 

Sal. + benefits £7-9,000 
Management Consul tan ts-Oxford Grcus 

Interfiling, ijtciy job assisting a small team of consiliums. 
\anro dunes include liasion and administration id busy 
fl lend l> office. 


Upponunin lor » P/compuicr l raining. Aatd ideal! v J9-25. 
minuses. Oolites allowance. LV&. STL. medical miuranra. 

Phone Stephen Glover on 

01-631 3780 

up lo 7pm. {II boor are. serrice), quoting nL no. 5/952 


ADVERTISING CO W1 

Experienced secretary required 
for company Director. 
Shorthand, audio and WP. 
Interesting and varied work for 
self motivated person. 

Apply Julie Hyams 
01-499 8254 


PR/SECRETARY 

preferably with 2 yeas ax- 

R anti mature outlook. 

I. Mayfair PR onsuf- 
tancy. Good prospects in a 
lively and friendly team. No 
shorthand required. Salary c 
£7,500. 

CaD Jahanoa cm 
01-491 3764 


coring: luvh, Kingston 

Golden Opportunity, Aiming to 
be e pa mnnen a /ulLy ne 09 M 
nccum?? Wail lo act on your 
own uuuame from nay one? 
Left Secretarial College with loo 
shorthand A typing grade*? 

Wdl-MifiM. numerate with 
an racNImi command of En- 
^isnr Want exceptionally good 
wlary ana benefits now? if 
you'ce lusl said ■Yea" five 
hmn. Nnse ring Pamela 
Jovceat Financial Management 
goiwjiuhu Jonn Scon * Pan- 
pto Lid. 01977 8831 


SECRETARY /AsSttUnt 10 Direc- 
tors reoinred in Be lg ra via, aom 
mer 25. Shorthand /lypirg ana 
general office duties. 5 day 
week 9 OO - 5.30. Splendid Ms 
poriumty for Mmonr wUh 
OdmmlStraUv* WOT- Salary by 
arrangement depending Upon 
previous ro tnent r . Musi be 
able to rom m ance immediately 
Tel 01-255 9515 lor inteniew. 



LEGAL NOTICE 

To: In Johnson late of 29 Spmp- 
hgld Close. StoriSHi Une. Yo*. 

TAKE NOTICE flat » action has 
been commenc e d agdnst you in 
the High Con of Justice. Queen's 
Bench Division. York District 
Beastly under Action Number 
19&-M-NoJ*6& by kUflnund HI 
F LM. of 3 The Crescent. York, m 
winch the Ptenofts darn lor goods 
suppted and dekvend lo a vdue at 
£44.950. 

And that It las been ontoed flat 
service at the Wtft n On saM 
Ac tion on you be effected fay this 
adwftsenont 

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE flat 
you must wflm 14 days horn the 
putritam of flns adwttsemenr 
inclusive of the day ol such 
pufataflon a ttuio wM ge service of 
the sad Writ ot Salmons by 
correlating a pre s cribed form a 
Acknowledgement of Service 
■tan may be ojflare d on request 
from the Sotxitois whose name 
and address appear below, 
otherwise Judgment may be 
erearad against you.' 

Signed : RENIUD KAY A SOUS 
26 UadaL Ytet 


Dated 14» day at Aeges! T9S6 


TN TOE MATTER of 
HANOYHOMES KITCHEN FUR- 
NITURE LIMITED AND IN THE 

MATTER Of THE COMPANIES 
ACT 1948 

Noocp Is hereby given mar the 
creditor* of uw above-earned 
Company, which is being votun- 
iariiy wound no. are required. on* 
or before the 50i day M Septem- 
ber 1986. lo send in their fbO 
Chrtsi un and surnames. Uielr ad- 
4re*»e» ana dnaimaa. ruP 
pamodare of their debts or 
claims, and the names and ad- 
drrae* of Iheir SodCUon Uf any), 
lo the unomigned David 
SWA DEN FCA Of 46 Rodney 
SireeL UverpooL LI 2TE. the 
Lrauidaior of Hie said Camsany 
and. II so reouired by nouoe m 
wrlung from me said Liquidator, 
are. personalty or by ttwtr Soho- 
nn. lo come In and prove mar 
debts or aairm a) such time and 
Place as shall be spedfled in such 
noUce. or in default thereof they 
will be excluded from the benefit 
ol any distribution made before 
•urh debt s are proved. 

DATED this Slh day Of AopuM 
1986. 

& SWADEN 


BCOM MONDAY! Highly mtetea- 
■re Bookings available in 
Putotthtng and Media. Current 
Affair; and Aixfcuecu. proper. 
W and Banking. Chanan and 
non Commercial. Top rales. 
Ring today Com ml Carden Bu- 
ngm. 7 ITO flrrt SL EC4 


N0N-SEC8ETARIAL 



MAItLBOROUON Jus off High 
SI V. Quwt III., ms ot tor bee. 
5 bed*. I toe rerepL fit fctteft. 
bam. 99 r. gan. c/h. Good comu- 
Uoo. CB6D00. 0072 53870 


PROPERTY WANTED 


ACCOMMOMlKm WANTED all 

areas far pro) « student from 
Sunllng 955 1846 1*0 


TIMES HARE 


IN THE MATTER Of THE COM- 
PANIES ACT 1985 
and 

IN THE MATTE R of 
AMBLECUILD LIMITED 
Rrentered Office. 

55 Cardur Road. Luton Beds 
Bittiness Address; 

LnlU 4,5. Barratl industrial Park. 
Spnunea Road. 

Lb Ion. Beds LU2 9NH 
NOTICE IS HEREBY CUVEN pur. 
suoM lo Section 988 of iha 
Compante* Art 1986 that a meet- 
ing of the CREDITORS of the 
aoove named company wtu be 
Md al 3 Noble Street London 
ECZV 7DQ on 21 August 198601 
10 JO am for Uw Durpoacs men- 
tioned insertion 589«taeQorihe' 
Com panie s Act 1986. 

DATED (hb 6th day of August 
1986 

BY ORDER DT THE BOARD 
S S Cheama 
_ Director 


TEffEMPK Fly) « AH 
Amo™ Studio oi^rtooWng 
DOOI with ocean Open 

pun. Sins a, Kiicti & bath.* 
Walking disunce all amcntUo. 
Weeks 27 4 28. £6.000. Tat 
■02SH5S259 



GENERAL 
APPOINTMENTS 
APPEAR ON PAGES 
21^2^3^4 


TRAVEL 
PA/SEC £10,000+ 

The two voung directors of this expanding travel com- 
pany require a fluent French speaking PA /Secretary 
with speeds of 100/60 wpm. You must be bright, per- 
sonable and used to taking responsibility as directors 
are often abroad- Also ability iq work under pressure 
and longer hours when necessary is essential Smart 
Kensington office and travel benefits. 

Write with foil C.V. to:- 
Frora Gillett* Mark Warner 
20 Kensington Church Street London W8 4EP 


cars CMODm mures ■ 
VcrPtara- Small busy map pub- 
lishing bustim* pi«tt extensor 
nouncAl/outsidp laifrem Uw 
wordcrati wp on ApricoL lot- 
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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


7 



Benazir Bhutto barred from Punjab 


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Pakistan’s opposition 
leaders detained on eve 



In- a swift countrywide 
move, ibe authoritiesin Paki- 
stan have haired Mss Benazir 
Bhutto, the Pakistan People's 
party leader, from - travelling 
to Lahore, and have detained 
several opposition leaders in 
Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi 
and Faisakbad; 

They have also banned all 
public meetings and demon- 
strations. except those held 
officially in Lahore, the capital 
of Punjab, to celebrate 
Pakistan's Independence Day 
today. 

The government action fol- 
lowed the rejection by the 
opposition alliance of 10 par- 
ties, the Movement for the 
Restoration of - Democracy 
(MRDJ.of air appeal from Mr 
Mohammad Khan Junejo, the. 
Prime Minister and president 
of the raiing Muslim League, 
not to hold an Independence 
Day mass rally m Lahore. The 
Prime Minister has already 
cancelled his own public meet- 
ing in Lahore. 

The district magistrate of 
Lahore has issued an order 
banning all public demonstra- 
tions and meetings in Lahore 
from August 13 to 13. 

The public has been asked 
not to carry arms, raise slo- 
gans or use abusive language. 


From Hasan AJkhtar, Islamabad 


According to reports from 
Karachi. Rawalpindi and La- 
hore. Miss Bhutto told her 
followers that she was barred 
from entering Punjab for five 
days. She returned to her 
Karachi home at Clifton. 


and workers belong to the 
People’s Party which, as an 
MRD component, is regarded 
as the most potent Threat to 
the Government 


Among those arrested in the 
three cities were Nawabzada 
Nasmllait Khan, Rao Abdul 
Rashid, Ranfl sbanirat Mah- 
mud, General Tikka Khan 
(secreiary -general of Miss 
Bhutto's People's Party), 
Sheikh Raftq, Makhdoom 
Khaiiquzzaman, Syed Qaim 
Ali Shah, Khawaja Khai- 
ruddin, Meraja Mohammad 
Khan, Iqbal Haider and 
Faiehyab Ali Khan. 

Most of the arrested leaders 


On Monday Mr Junejo 
cancelled his own party rally 
planned for Lahore today, 
apparently to avoid open 
confrontation with Miss 
Bhutto and the MRD leadens, 
who were determined to hold 
their own public meeting 
about the same time on the 
same day in dose proximity to 
the government party's meet- 
ing. 



It was generally believed 
that Miss Bhutto, who has 
been able to draw crowds of 
hundreds of tho usan ds since 


in 


her return from Europe _ 
April, would be able to dem- 
onstrate her massive popular 
support at the Lahore meet- 
ing. in contrast to Mr Junejo's 
rally. 


While cancelling his own 


be 


meeting, Mr Junejo said 

>fTMusiim League 


Miss Bhutto: banned from 
travelling to Lahore 


was calling o: 

rallies and processions across 
the country in order to main- 
tain law and order and to 
avoid confrontation on In- 
dependence Day. He appealed 
to the opposition parties to 
reciprocate his gesture. The 
MRD, however, rejected it. 


Delhi gains power to seal borders 


Delhi (AFP) - The Indian 
Parliament granted the Gov- 
ernment sweeping powers yes- 
terday to seal the borders with 
Pakistan in an effort to combat 
Sikh militancy. 

The Home Minister, Mr 
Bnta Singh, fold the Upper 
House of Parliament that the 
resolution, which involves a 
constitutional amendment, 
was of paramount importance 
to the national interest 

India regularly accuses 
Pakistan of sheltering and 
training Sikh militants who 
are fighting for a homeland in 
Punjab. Delhi say s they cross 
into India, attack selected 
targets, and flee back over the 


border. Islamabad denies the 
charges. 

The- resolution, passed by 
172 votes to 48, grants Delhi 
the right to pass laws in border 
areas overriding state legisla- 
tures, which have fnD law-and- 
order powers. Bowing, to 
opposition demands, the Gov- 
ernment has limited its new 
powers to the north-western 
border for one year. 

Official reports have said 
that Delhi will declare the 
entire border with Pakistan — 
spanning the states of Jammu 
and Kashmir, Punjab, Raja- 
sthan and Gqjarat — a pro- 
tected area. 

Killings of alleged intruders 


from Pakistan are reported 
daily % the bonier security 
forces. Eighteen people have 
been shot dead on the border 
since the weekend. More than 
100 people were arrested in 
Kashmir on Sunday and Mon- 
day, according to the Press 
Trust of India. 

• BOMBAY: A bomb explo- 
sion damaged the Sikh-owned 
Hotel Preetam in Bombay 
yesterday but caused no inju- 
ries (Renter reports). 

The hold is in the Dadar 
area, where shops have been 
dosed for two days in protest 
at the assassination of General 
A run Vaidya. the former Army 
chief. 


Ministers 
split aver 
terrorism 


From Ahm ed Fad 
Dhaka . 


South Asian countries 
ended a two-day meeting in 
Dhaka yesterday, Ming to 
reach agreement on a regional 
plan to combat terrorism, 
official sources said. 

The Council ofMinisters of 
the South Asian. Association 
for" Regional . Co-operation 
(SAARQ called- for a fresh 
meeting of a group of experts 
to work out guidelines to 
separate purely “terrorist” 
activities from politically- 
motivated moves for purposes 
of extradition. 

The sources said that the 
ministers from India, Paki- 
stan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, the 
Maldives, Bhutan, and Bang- 
ladesh itself grappled with a 
definition of terrorism. 

They said that sharp dif- 
ferences arose while consid- 
ering whether Tamil separ- 
atists in northern Sri Lanka 
and Sikh extremists in Punjab 
in India could be called 
terrorists-- 

The Foreign Minister of 
Bangladesh, Mr Humayus 
Rasheed Choudhiy, told a 
news -conference at the end of 
the meeting that the seven 
countries had derided to 
speed up the implementation 
of an integrated programme of 
action. 

He said that they were 
unhappy with the progress of 
regional projects since the 
SAARC was set up formally in 
December 1985. 

Mr Choudhry, who chaired 
the meeting, said that a re- 
gional agricultural informa- 
tion centre would be set up in 
Bangladesh, and a similar 
body on meteorological re- 
search in India. 


Seoul to release 
man 


Seoul (Reuter) — South 
Korea win release today 885 
prisoners, including dissi- 
dents, under an amnesty 
marking the country’s libera- 
tion from Japanese colonial 
rule in 1945, the Justice 
Ministry said. 

State prosecutors also said 
they had dropped charges of 
violence in Parliament 
brought against 16 members 
of the opposition New Korea 
-Democratic Party (NKDP). 
which is backed by Mr Kim 
Dae Jung and Mr Kim Young 
Sam, two leading dissidents. 

The~move was intended to 
promote a compromise on 
constitutional reform between 
the ruling and opposition 
parties. 

Among the prisoners being 
freed were 36 students, work- 
ers and other dissidents and 
10 people convicted of pro- 
communisi charges, bnt most 
of those to be released were 
common criminals. 



But -the -amnesty did not 
benefit President Chun Doo 
Hwan’s most ootspoken.oppo- 
nent. Mr Kim Dae Jung, who 
is not in custody bat is 
from political activity. 

The NKDP has demanded 
that the Government restore 
Mr Kira's political and civil 
rights and free about 800 
people it calls prisoners of 
conscience. 

Government prosecutors 
said they withdrew the indict- 
ment against six NKDP dep- 
uties and dropped preliminary 
charges against 10 others who 
had not been indicted. 

The deputies were accused 
of violence in connection with 
fighting that broke out be- 
tween ruling and opposition 
members in Parliament in 
December after President 
Chun's Democratic Justice 
Party forced through its 1986 
budget despite an opposition 
boycott. 


Mexico in drug talks 


Washington — President 
Reagan and President de la 
Madrid of Mexico held talks 
yesterday on ways to give 
impetus to the anti-narcotics 
campaign in their countries 
(Michael Binyon writes). 

The two Presidents also 
reviewed Mexico's recent 
moves to stabilize its troubled 
economy. Seflor Gustavo 
Petricioli, the Mexican Fi- 
nance Minister, will discuss 
efforts of more than 10 central 
banks to provide Mexico with 
a $1.5 billion (about £1 bil- 
lion) bridging loan through the 
Bank of International Settle-, 
menis. 

■ Mr Reagan’s support for the 
Nicaraguan Contras and the 


Comadora peace process was 
not expected to be a main 
issue at the this fifth regular 
summit between the two 
leaders. 

As well as being an un- 
it trans-shipment point 
>uth American coc ai n e . 
Mexico is also a major sup- 
plier of heroin and marijuana 
to-USmarkets. 

President Reagan has just 
launched a nationwide cam- 
paign against drugs, and- has 
set an example by taking a 
drug tesL Asked about the 
results at his press conference 
on Tuesday, he laughed and 
said: “They haven't told me 
But I can bet on what it is, 
luse I know what I put in.” 


Lethal cargo raised from North Sea 



Three floating cranes of the Dutch 
salvage company Smit Inter- 
national raising the l*584-ton 
coaster Olaf from the bed of the 
North Sea to see if its 3,500- ton 
cargo of arsenic and lead is safe. 

First indications of the inspec- 
tion yesterday were that the cargo 


was intact except for a small 
amount of ash and heavy metals 
which leaked out as it sank, Smit 
International said* 

The British-registered Olaf 
sank SO miles south-west of Den 
Helder in The Netherlands on 
July 7 on a trip from Denmark to 


Tankers 
ablaze 
after Iraqi 
airraid 


Bahrain (Reuter) — Fire still 
raged yesterday on two super- 
tankers crippled in the Iraqi 
air strike on Iran's Sirri Island 
oil lermma] on Tuesday, but 
shipping sources said the key 
oil installation might soon be 
back in use. 

As a fleet of salvage tugs 
tried to dear the debns, 
sources in Norway and the 
Gulf said the Sirri outlet could 
have been back in operation as 
early as last nighL 
The Norwegian sources said 
three vessels were heading in 
to load at the terminal, Iran's 
main outlet for the oil exports 
which fund its six-year-old 
war with Iraq. One source 
said; “There's no problem 
loading there now. They must 
have got it fixed veiy 
quickly.’' 

The raid damaged three 
tankers and killed as many as 
seven crewmen, creating 
havoc and sending most tank- 
ers from the terminal. 

The souites said many -of 
the tankers that left were Still 
lying off Dubai awaiting 
instructions from Iran. 

The makeshift Sirri termi- 
nal is about 100 miles west of 
the mouth of the Gulf and had 
been considered out of range 
of lhe Iraqi Air Force. 

Almost all Iran's oil exports 
— estimated at 1.4 to 1.9 
million barrels a day — have 
been channelled through Sirri 
after continued Iraqi strikes 
against the Khaig Island facil- 
ity in the northern Gulf. 

A Filipino seaman, Mr 
Adriano Tambuyat, aged 45. 
on board the 39.722-ton Ven- 
ture, was hit in the shoulder by 
shrapnel when the jets struck. 

He said after receiving 
medical treatment in Dubai: 
“It was all so sudden. I heard a 
noise, looked up and saw a 
plane diving in front of the 
ship. There was a big bang and 
~ fell back unconscious.” 

The Iraqi attackers also 
scored a direct hit on the 
21,970-tonne supertanker 
Azarpad. Five big explosions 
were reported overnight as the 
tanker broke its back and it 
was later towed onto a sand- 
bank to prevent h sinking. 

A tanker alongside the 
Azarpad, the 176,070-tonne 
Klelia, was still burning after 
early attempts to extinguish 


the flames failed. 


The attack poses a serious 
problem for Iran, lhe sources 
said, with Sirri now shown to 
be vulnerable to attack. But 
the option of switching to 
another makeshift terminal at 
Larak Island— at the mouth of 
the Gulf — seems impractical 
because of heavy seas. 

The official Iraqi news 
agency IN A, quoting a mili- 
tary source, said two Iranian 
warplanes tried to cross Iraqi 
air space over the northern 
town of Sulaymaniyah yes- 
terday but were driven ofxby 
anti-aircraft fire. 


Broadcasting Bill passed 


Chirac programme succeeds 
despite blocking tactics 


From Susan MacDonald, Paris 


The Chirac Government's 
first parliamentary session, 
which had to be extended to 
accommodate the heavy 
workload, ended in the early 
hours yesterday with the last- 
minute final adoption of the 
new broadcasting Bill. 

By a series of deft manoeu- 
vres the Communications 
Minister. M Francois Leotard, 
managed to push the Bill 
through before the end of the 
session and return it to its 
original form by cancelling the 
amendment introduced dur- 
ing the Senate debate. 

As has become a habit over 
the four-month session, the 
opposition Socialists are likely 
to send the new legislation to 
the Constitutional Council for 
its approval and therefore it is 



M Chirac: success without 
the National Front 


unlikely to become bw 
finally until mid-September. 

For the first time under lhe 
Fifth Republic. President and 
Go\ eminent have not been of 
the same political persuasion 
and the trials of co-evisience 
have seen the emergence of a 
more stunted form of par- 
liamentary debate, with the 
Socialists using all the block- 
ing procedures ax their dis- 
posal while the Government 
has employed the guillotine 
method to push legislation 
through Parliament 

The uncertainty of co- 
habitation and of the political 
future has made it a govern- 
ment in a hunry . feeling it only- 
had a short time to prove 
itself. To do this, an enabling 
Bill was one of the first to be 
passed, allowing it to legislate 
by decree on key issues such as 
privatization, electoral reform 
and the economy. 

President Mitterrand's re- 
fusal to sign the privatization 
decree meant that the Govern- 
ment had to urgemlv push 
legislation through before the • 
end of the extended session in 
order to stick to its timetable. 

In Parliament a familiar 
patient has emerged with the 
Government presenting a Bill 
and the Opposition then ta- 
bling an inflated number of 
amendments to take up time. 

Several times the Govern- 
ment has then used Article 


49.3 of the Constitution to 
push a Bill through the Na- 
tional Assembly without a 
vote, whereupon the Socialists 
table a censure motion which 
lakes up another day's debate. 

When a Bill is finally passed 
the Socialists have sometimes 
sent it to the Constitutional 
Council, which may amend 
the text and further delay it. 

While in the past such 
tactics have been fairly com- 
mon. during this session the 
Government has used the 
guillotine procedure five times 
and the Socialists followed up 
by tabling unsuccessful cen- 
sure motions. 

This session also saw the 
extreme right-wing National 
Front taking seats for the first 
lime as an individual party in 
the National Assembly with 
35 deputies. While they have 
probably been a thorn in the 
side of the Government, the 
Prime Minister, M Jacques 
Chirac, has proved that he 
does not need their support. 

M Chirac has proved wrong 
the people who believed that 
the risks of cohabitation and 
his party's small majority 
meant that his Government 
would have only a few weeks 
in power. 

However, the next big co- 
habitation test will be whether 
M Mitterrand signs the decree 
concerning electoral reform. 


Panama’s 
leader 
hits at US 


Volunteers told to quit 
Nicaragua war zones 


Panama City (Reuter) — 
Panama’s powerful military 
chief. General Manuel Anto- 
nio Noriega, strongly criti- 
cized the United States 
yesterday in a speech tinged 
with nationalism and scorn 
for his critics. 

“Traditionally, we have I 
been friends of the North 
American people. But wci 
won't allow colonialist lead-1 
ere. the defenders of apartheid 
and racism, together with 
Panamanian Bunau-Varilla. 
to smear our conquests." Gen- 
eral Noriega told a rally 
attended by tens of thousands 
of government supporters. 

Philippe Bunau-Varilla 
negotiated and signed the 
original Panama Canal treaty, 
which gave the United States 
sweeping powers in Panama. 
Under new treaties signed in 
1977. Panama is to assume 
control of the canal in 2000. 

The rally, called to dem- 
onstrate support for the 1977 
treaties, also marked the third 
anniversary of General Nor- 
iega's rise to the top of 
Panamanian armed forces. 


Managua (Reuter) — Nica- 
ragua has ordered the with- 
drawal of all foreign volunteer 
workers from war zones, after 
three Europeans were killed in 
an ambush by Contra rebels, 
diplomatic sources said. 

A European diplomat, re- 
cently briefed by a govern- 
ment official, said President 
Ortega had ordered that for- 
eigners be moved to areas 
where the Government could 
provide protection from raids 
by rebels based in Honduras. 

"The move followed requests 


by the West German Govern- 
ment to prevent foreigners 
from working in war zones 
after the three volunteers, one 
a West German, were killed 

Their deaths brought to six 
the number of Europeans 
killed this year, and brought 
protests here and in Europe 
for an end to US support for 
the Contras. 

The volunteers, organized | 
into “brigades" mainly by 
overseas solidarity commit- 1 
tees, are involved in develop- 
ment projects. 


The tail of a whale 


Dharan counts cost of its British dependence 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Dharan, Nepal 

A British Gurkha officer 
with sweat pouring down his 
free from the beat and mon- 
soon humidity declared: 
"Dharan would not really 
exist if it wasn't for the 
Gurkhas.” ' 

The little market town nes- 
tles at the junction between 
Nepal's hills and the Tend, 
the land at the foot of the 
Himalaya range, which used 
to be Nepal's first line of 
defence. -Once it was swamp 
land, now H is Nepal's rice- 
basket. 

Dharan first existed as the 
gateway to the hills, where 
plainsmen would come- to sell 

their staple* and hOlmen came 
to buy. Bnt since the British 
set up here in the 1950s their 
recruiting base fo selecfand 
induct the raw hfllmen into the 
British Army, the town has 
become dependent os them. 

However, the people of 


Dharan are now beginning to 
complain that their depen- 
dence is being ernefly pun-, 
ished by the British, who are 
proving to be less generous 
than they seemed to promise. 

As the last of the 110 or so 
Gurkhas dismissed by - the 
British Army after a fight in 
Hawaii arrived in the town 
protesting their innocence, lo- 
cal politicians pointed out that 
the town, was suffering from 
Other British-induced prob- 
lems. 

The British built a road 
from the nearest airport at 
Biratnagar, 25 miles away, 
which pleased the inhabitants, 
but -the road has been contin-. 
oed now into the hills, and that 
has brought two problems. 

In the first place, the retail 
market where the hfllmen and 
the plainsmen exchanged ttMir 
goods moved with the end 
.of the road deep into the hills, 
leaving Dharan as a simple 
way station, ami even more 
dependent on the neat canton^ 



meat In the south-western 
quarter of the town. 

Secondly, as the British 
built the nod above the town 
they channelled the water run- 
off of the hills into one stream. 

“Every time we get a heavy 
rainstorm in the monsoon,” 
Mr Shyam Gorind Shrestha, 
the mayor, explained, 'the 
water, which nsed to ran down 
the hills in many different 
directions, now poors down 
this one channeL It has de- 
stroyed bridges, it tears ont the 
banks. Culverts are stripped 


ont . . It is costing ns a great 
deal of money. We are haring 
to spend money on repair and 
restoration that we should be 
spending on new develop- 
ment,” be added. 

Conducting me round the 
town on the back of his motor 
cycle, Mr Shrestha stopped at 
a broad stretch of green with a 
few goal posts on it 
“We had a brigadier here at 
one time who was very keen on 
sports, and so we built this 
stadium together,” he said. 
“But one brigadier's interests 
are different from another's, 
and we are finding it difficult 
to continue the development” 
The mayor, who is a reason- 
ably well-off fanner with some 
rich paddy fields in the Terai, 
is grateful to the British for the 
help that they have given to 
the town in the past. “They 
used to help os with the 
drinking water, and with 
schools, bnt now they have 
stopped. They , have stopped 
maintaining: the road they 


built for ns, and we have had to 
find money for it,” he 
remarked. 

For years the people of the 
town used to get medical 
treatment at the cantonment 
medical centre. That too has 
stopped recently, and the lo- 
cals find that they have no 
medical facilities to call their 
own, and are haring to start 
(wilding them from scratch. 

Gurkha soldiers off duty fill 
the streets of the town, ready 
to spend some of their British- 
earned cash on boosting the 
local bars. Former Gnrkhas 
work as clerks for the British. 

“We are grateful to the 
British, there is no doubt.” Mr 
Shrestha said, “and the rotr 
about those soldiers who have 
been sent back is their own 
problem. Soldiers should be 
disciplined. People should 
obey the laws of where they 
live. But we wish the British 
had not slopped gfring help to 



Navy in 
symbolic 
return to 
Malta 


From Peter Nichols 
Valletta 


Britain. The 18 members of the 
crew were lifted to safety. In- 
vestigations continue into the 
cause of the sinking. 

Lloyd's Register lists the vessel 
built in 1962. as owned by Ankej 
Maritime Company of George- 
town, Cayman Islands. 


The Maltese Government's 
relations with the West have 
come into prominence with the 
growing interest in the return 
tomorrow of the Royal Navy 
after seven years' absence, and 
the anger caused by Wash- 
ington’s allegation that Val- 
letta is aligned too closely with 
Libya. 

The Royal Navy's return is 
seen as symbolic. The frigate 
HMS Brazen will sail into 
Grand Harbour tomorrow 
morning and its crew will then 
spend four days at receptions, 
parades, wreath-layings and 
other ceremonies. 

The frigate's arrival will 
coincide with both the biggest 
public holiday of the year — 
Assumption Day - and the 
44th anniversary of the arrival 
of the convoy that saved 
wartime Malta from starva- 
tion. It is sore to be an 
emotional occasion. 

Dr Carmelo Mifsud Bonn- 
ici, the Socialist Prime Min- 
ister. rejects allegatiuns that 
he invited the British back 
because of electoral consid- 
erations. “ft is,” he said, “a 
symbol of partnership between 
two equal partners in the 
Commonwealth, not equal in 
size and importance hut equal 
in slatas.” 

Britain and Malta do not 
agree on Malta's insistence on 
neutrality and non-alignment 
in its foreign policy, but they 
do uoi publicly criticize one 
another either. But with the 
Americans, it is different. 

Dr Bonnici felt he bad to 
send a verbal diplomatic note 
to the US Embassy here 
Tuesday night objecting 


on 

to 




Dr Mifsud Bonnici: raid 
warning, to Libya defended 
comments made in Wash- 
ington by a State Department 
spokesman, who said Malta 
was aligning itself “too closely 
with Libya in violation of their 
avowed position of neutrality ”, 
The immediate cause of the 
split, according to the US. was 
Dr BonnicPs recent interview 
with The New York Tima in 
which he revealed that Malta 
had given the Libyans a good 
30 minutes* wanting of the 
approach of unidentified air- 
craft in ApriL (The aircraft 
were those of the US force on 
its way to bomb Tripoli and 
Benghazi.) 

Dr Bonnici freely admits he 
made a mistake in the inter- 
view by using the word “ally" 
when referring to Libya. But, 
be said, he also listed the US. 
Britain and Italy in the same 
category. 

The interviewer, however, 
highlighted the reference to 
Libya, allowing the State 
Department to make the com- 
ment: “This is the first time 
that Malta has described 
Libya as an ally.” 

The Maltese Government's 
diplomatic note to the Ameri- 
cans pointed out that “by the 
word allies, the Prime Min- 
ister meant friendly coun- 
tries”. and its press office 
released the verbatim text of 
Dr BonnicTs comment in order 
to place it more clearly in 
context. 

I asked him if, at least, the 
Libyans had thanked him for 
his warning. He replied: “We 
have been thanked by nobody 
and criticized by everybody.” 

He explained what had 
happened in these terms: “You 
know that Malta has a flight 
information region in the cen- 
tral Mediterranean area which 
we cover and control. Planes 
coming into the region have to 
report (o ns. We contact them 
and give them the lanes they 
most follow. 

“When planes are leaving 
our region to the north we have 
to inform Rome, which has the 
flight information region to 
our porth, and if they are 
heading south we inform Trip- 
oli When our radar spots 
aircraft that do not identify 
lhemselves we inform the next 
flight information region of 
this. We have to do that 
because they might constitute 
a danger to the civilian popula- 
tion. And so we did that. 

“But what I want to tell you 
now, and yon are the first to 
know, is that the information 
we gave to the Libyans had 
been passed on to us by the 
Italians. They alerted us that 
unidentified aircraft were 
approaching Malta. Only the 
Libyans failed to do anything 
and that is very typical of 
them.’* 




Sharau. one of four killer whales on display at Sea World 
near Orlando. Florida, raising its tail flake to be scratched 
by Miss Laura Perkins, an animal behaviourist. 

- 4, 


Dr Bonnici described the 
US reaction as “absurd” — not 
only because Malta's prior 
warning to Libya was unavoid- 
able bnt also because the 
Americans knew the position. 

On Malta’s relations with 
Libya since the US air raids. * 
Dr Bonnici said: “Our position 
remains the same. Circnm-; 
stances in Libya have cha- 
nged.” 




m 








8 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 IVSO 




SPECTRUM 


Miner at the top of the heap 


■TOE TIMESB 

PROFILE 


SIR ROBERT HASLAM 


A s the next chairman orthe 
National Coal Board 
now blessed by the outgo- 
ing chairman Sir Ian 
MacGregor with the 
marketing-oriented title of British 
Coal. Sir Robert Haslam clearly 
feels that he has come home to a job 
he trained for in his youth, it is said 
that he started down the pit and has 
finished at the top of the heap. 

The new 63-year-old head of the 
stale-owned coal industry is a 


mining engineer, brought up amon^. 


the dangers and intricacies of 
wresting nehes from the earth. He 
comes back to the industry after the 
traumas of a period in which miners 
and their union made a last-ditch 
stand for the old ways, and lost. It is 
his task to continue along the 
MacGregor path towards a profit- 
making. decentralized coal industry 
fully able to compete with oil and 
nuclear energy in the next century. 

He is also in the happy position of 
knowing that he was the Prime 
Minister’s first choice to replace Sir 
Derek Ezra as NCB chairman. A 
serious illness early in 1982. in 
which he suffered a haemorrhage 
dose to the brain, ruled him out for 
a year and Sir Tan took the post. 

Sir Robert now regards the coal 
job. for which he will be paid 
£145.000 a year (Sir Ian earned 
£67.000). as **one of the biggest 
challenges in British industry'*. 
While he understands the industry 
inside out. associates believe he will 
need to draw on all his reserves of 
personal charm, business skill and 
persuasion to keep the peace and 
drive the industry forward. 

. His manner and style are a world 
apart from that of Sir Ian. The 
brusque North American has given 
way to a self-effacing Englishman. 

Sir Robert has had a distin- 
guished industrial career. As deputy 
chairman of Imperial Chemical 
Industries and chairman of the 
British Steel Corporation, he is 
regarded as the ideal choice to 
swcci-ialk both politicians and 
union leaders, to try to heal the rift 
between the National Union of 
Ntihcworkers and the Union of 
Democratic Miners, to restore pride 
and profits. 

“Unde Bob" Haslam. one of the 
few British industrialists who gets 
away with oozing charm and integ- 
rity from one side and intense 
devotion to hard-headed business 
principles on the other, is also a 
mwnber of an elite club. Few 
captains of industry retain the 
quality demanded by a privatizing 
Government of combining a 
commitment to the workings of the 
market with a willingness to put up 
with Whitehall interference. 

^Xhosc who know him testify to a 
strong will and unyielding sense of 
fiuc play. “He projects an avuncular 
ifrTgge''. said one associate, “but he 
does insist on getting what he wants 
and anybody who thinks they can 
push him around or bluff him is in 
for a shock. He doesn't go in for 
confrontation but he is not an 
appeaser." 

Others are not so complimentary: 
“He is seen by the Tories as one of 
the faithful, committed to privatiza- 
tion. He will bend with the wind, 
and does not rock ihe boat.” 

Sir Robert was bom in Bolton. 
Lancashire — “where there are more 
Haslams than Smiths” — and his 
first taste of work was pushing his 
father's painters and decorators 
hand-carl. The Haslams had other 



BIOGRAPHY 


1923: bom Bolton, Lancashire. 
Educated Borton School and 
Birmingham University. 
Married, two sons, two 
grandchildren 
1944: joined Manchester 

Collieries as mining engineer 
1947: technical service 

engineer. ICI Nobel division 
I960: personnel director, Nobel 
division 

1971: chairman, ICI Fibres 
1980: deputy chairman. ICI 
1982: non-executive director. 

Cable & Wireless 
1983: chairman of Tate & Lyle; 

chairman of British Steel 
1985: freeman of the City of 

London; director of the Bank 
of England 

1986: Knighted; chairman- 

elect National Coal Board 


Mining in the veins: bat Sir Robert will need all his knowledge and diplomacy as Coal Board chairman 


ambitions for their son and in 1941 
he won a scholarship to Cambridge, 
but failed the entrance because he 
fluffed his Latin examination. In- 
stead he graduated from Bir- 
mingham University in 1944 with a 
BSc in coal mining. 

In the same year, three years 
before nationalization and the cre- 
ation of the NCB. he joined 
Manchester Collieries and three 
years later was awarded his colliery 
manager's certificate. Impatience at 
not being promoted led to a blazing 
row with the pit supervisor and a 
chance meeting with a stranger in a 
pub later that day led him to apply 
fora job at ICI. 


the giant company. They included 
the chairmanship oflCI's model job 
assessment scheme for staff and 
managerial workers. To this day it is 
known as the Haslam scheme. 


By the end ofthe 1970s Sir Robert 
was heading for the United States to 
begin ICI's new acquisition pro- 
gramme and in 1 980 was appointed 
deputy chairman alongside two 
other ambitious ICI career men — 
William Duncan and John Harvey- 
Jones. A year later, the battle to 
succeed Sir Maurice Hodgson as 
chairman was oven Harvey-Jones, 
later to be knighted, had won. 


New vistas appeared. For the next 
10 years, as a mining engineer with 
the Nobel division of ICI. he 
worked in mines in every continent 
In 1952. during the build-up to the 
Suez crisis, he travelled to Egypt to 
advise on the demolition of the 
colfer-dam behind the new Aswan 
scheme and was thrown into gaol 
when he was discovered at the 
airport with what looked liked plans 
to blow up the Aswan dam. The 
spectacular destruction of the bridge 
in the film Bridge on the River Kwai 
was also the result of Sir Robert's 
advice and planning. 

From these beginnings. Sir Rob- 
ert started on a seemingly unstop- 
pable ICI career, holding 
management positions throughout 


D uncan, later Sir William, 
left to become chairman 
of Rolls-Royce. He died 
in 1984. Sir Robert, 
knighted this year, was 
head-hunted for the top job at Tate 
& Lyle. He remains philosophical 
about not getting the coveted ICI 


job. “I did not have high expecta- 
>fthi 


lions; I was the junior of the three, I 
was in America and late in throwing 
my hat into the ring." 


Then came the chance to be part- 
time chairman of British Steel 
following the end of MacGregor's 


term, a job he thought he could not 
“e. He 


tackle. He noted that Sir Austin 
Bide and Lord King were success- 
fully working in similar posts ai BL 
and British Airways, but for Sir 
Robert, the move would mark his 


first venture into a nationalized 
industry. 

in the event he was persuaded to 
take the job, and was to impress his 
own management and workforce 
and government ministers with his 
resolution during the miners’ strike. 
Unlike some nationalized industry 
chairmen, be spoke out roughly 
against the NUM's leaders. They 
were attempting to forge a suicide 
pact with the steel men, he warned. 

Out of fear or loyalty or both, 
steelworkers crossed the picket lines 
and stayed at work, and Sir Robert 
praised them for it. He had shown 
that his caution, seen in the past by 
his detractors as blandness, could 
give way to a fierce paternalism. 

Then came a second chance at the 
coal job. an offer he found irresist- 
ible despite his earlier illness and 
the additional time he would be 
away from his wife Joyce, his two 
grandchildren and his home in 
Virginia Water. Surrey, conve- 
niently situated near Wentworth 
golf course. He already spends 
almost every weekday night away 
from home and is trying to visit a 
different pit each week. “He knows 
more about mining than any 
miner", said one colleague, “and he 
knew it before most of them were 
bora." 

At British CoaL as at Tate & Lyle 
and the BSC. he will encourage the 
rising managerial talent within the 


enterprise to take over from him. 
and his ambition in three years lime 
is to leave the industry with a home- 
bred chief executive and a healthy 
profit and loss account 

Some observers point out that the 
congenial Sir Robert is untried in a 
big crisis. He was once-removed in 
the miners' strike and the shakeout 
at the BSC had been completed b; 
Sir Ian. He will have to grapple wid 
fluctuating oil prices, exchange rates 
and possibly the renegotiation ofthe 
comma with his biggest customer, 
the Central Electricity Generating 
Board. Bui he has shown himself to 
be good at the accountability part of 
running a state business, dealing 
with groups ranging from church 
leaders to MPs. 

He comes from a family of 
Liberal voters, but remains vaguely 
apolitical. He believes, though, that 
people possess an inherent dislike of 
subsidy. “I am not a hard man," he 
says, “but 1 am aware of the 
problems of gelling rid of subsidy. 
These things have to be done with 
care, thought and compassion." 

He remains painfully aware of the 
struggle ahead to return British Coal 
to viability. The NCB’s £400 mil- 
lion a year loss would be equivalent 
he says, to wiping out ICI’s entire 
profits - “and that puls the job into 
perspective”. 


Edward Townsend 



Tomorrow 

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I t is not often that a British 
idea catches on Down 
Under but when it does — 
like cricket, or abusing the 
parliamentary opposition — 
the Australians like to do it 
properly. And so it is with 
Britain's gift of a tall ship for 
the bicentenary. 

It is a 35-metre schooner 
and at Sydney's Darling Har- 
bour in January, 1988, it will 
join other sailing vessels in a 
lavish nautical pageant to 
mark the 200 years since the 
arrival of Australia's first 
European settlers. 

In the intervening 17 
months, the ship, still being 
built at a Suffolk yard and as 
yet un-named, will be the 
focus of an adventure for 
young Britons and Austra- 
lians. Each country will select 
six young men and six young 
women, aged between 17 and 
24 and probably with no 
previous sailing experience, to 
crew ihe vessel on an eight- 
month, 16,000-mile voyage 
from Portsmouth to Sydney. 

Then, after taking part in 
the tail-ship pageant, the 
schooner will be presented to 
the Royal Australian Navy for 
use as a sail training ship. 

"No gift could have been 
more appropriate", says Com- 
mander Michael Parka, head 
of the Australian selection 
panel. “We were discovered 
by a British ship, we were 
settled by British ships and for 
a long time British ships were 
our lifeline. Such a vessel is 
the very embodiment of Our 
history". 

Bui could it be that the 
Australians are trying to steal 
a march on the poms? At a 
time when recruitment has 
not started in Britain, prepara- 
tions are under way in Austra- 



Captain Cools the tail ship will 
retrace the early voyages 


lia with an intensity normally 
associated with the Ashes. 

Challenging full-page 
advertisements have been 
appearing in newspapers : 
“Crew wanted. Only one in a 
million need apply" 
(Australia's population is 
about 16 million). The or- 
ganizers have been deluged 
with inquiries and have sent 
out 15,000 application forms. 

Mr Laurie Hayden, the 
psychologist who exhorted the 
Australian team to victory in 
the America's Cup. is on the 
crew selection panel and the 
criteria are demanding. 


A part from commitment 
a spirit of adventure 
and an ability to get on 
with others in cramped con- 
ditions. the essentials are an 
ability to swim 50 metres fully 
clothed, a head for heights and 


a strong stomach (crew mem- 
bers will have to furl sails 
while clinging to a yardarm 
I40fi up in heavy seas). 

After that Hayden says; 
“What we are looking for is a 
heterogeneous mix of young 
Australians who will do them- 
selves and their country 
proud. All the successful 
endeavours I have witnessed 
have had an element of in- 
house competitiveness to 
them. But 1 think you will find 
that when the vessel sails the 
question of nationalities will 
quickly get lost m the 
excitement". 

Selection proper starts next 
month when each state draws 
up a shortlist of about 200. 
Between December and Janu- 
ary the possibles will undergo 
physical and psychological 
stress tests before final selec- 
tion in February. 

The Australian crew, plus 
two reserves, will flies to 
Britain next May to train for 
two months, alongside the 
British crew.' under the 
schooner's Royal Navy master 
and Royal Australian Navy 
first officer. They will leave for 
Australia a year later, follow- 
ing the course taken by the 
first fleet to Tenerife and Rio, 
and then across the South. 
Atlantic with the made winds 
and into the Indian Ocean. 
The Cape will be missed out 
for political reasons. . ; 

“The whole project has a 
very good feel about it". 
Hayden says. "There' are too 
few opportunities for young - 
people to face a challenge in a 
controlled environment, and 
this one has pressure, adven- 
ture and romance. ’ I don't 
doubt that for these young 
people it will be the. turning 
point of their lives.!’ 


Stephen Taylor 


Conservationists 
win a sea battle 


Lundy island, off the Devon coast, is set to 
become Britain’s first marine nature.. ~ 


reserve and others seem certain to follow 


IF THE sunset star coral was 
found on land rather than 
under the slate-grey waters 
that surge around Lundy, 
there would be queues to 
view it and strict rules against 
injuring it. 

As it is. this vivid coral, a 
rare immigrant from Medi- 
terranean waters yet abun- 
dant around Lundy, where it 
is caressed by warm currents 
from the south, is both 
unknown to the public and at 
risk from a catalogue of 
damaging activities. It enjoys 
no official protection. 

More than 40 govern- 
ments. some not noted for 
their regard for nature 
conservation, maintain of- 
ficially-protected nature re- 
serves in their coastal waters. 
The United Kingdom is not 
yet one of them. 

By autumn, however, the 
Writ of Official Nature 
Conservation should at least 
be extended to Lundy. 12 
miles off the north Devon 
coast, when William 
Waldegrave, the environ- 
ment minister, is expected to 
designate it as the UK's first 
marine nature reserve. 

Conservationists and the 
Nature Conservancy Coun- 
cil. the Government's nature 
agency, will use the publicity 
to promote the wider appeal 
of the largely unspoiled and 
often wonderful habitat un- 
der the shallow waters 
around our shores. 

Great injury has already 
been done to the coastline. 
Many features such as la- 
goons. small inlets and es- 
tuaries have been heavily 
polluted or filled, in. The 
hazards include scallop fish- 
ing. which tears indiscrimi- 
nately at seabed life: bait 
digging; spear fishing: and the 
leaching of toxic anti-fowling 
paint from boats into estuary 
waters. The. unseen casualties 
are delicate marine plants 
and animate as important as 


■ PropOiodJ 
? mar ine nlatutel 
■MB reserves! 



concession which ought to- 
clear the way for other 
designations, the Devon 
Fisheries Committee agreed 
to introduce by-laws in wa- 
ters around the island 
prohibiting potting, dredging- 
or fishing over one area, 
containing rare sea fans, in a 
wider zone traw ling, dredging 
and spear fishing arc 
outlawed. 


THE SLOWNESS of the 
designation procedure, how- 
ever. worries Dr Susan 
Gubbay. of the Marine 
Conservation Society. “Wc 
feel it could be a lot simpler", 
she says. 

“And when wo see 
the exceptions, such as not 
preventing discharge from 
vessels, wc wonder how effec- 
tive designation will be." - 

It will still take four or five 
years for the NCC to des- 
ignate its first list of seven 
official reserves. After Lundy, 
they arc expeaed to be 
Skomcr in Pembrokeshire, 
which has the world's largest 
population of Manx 
shearwaters. and Bardscy. off 
Gwynedd, both islands where 
the vast bird population de- 
pends on dear undisturbed 
sea for food: Loch Swccn on 
the west coast of Scotland. 




mi 



Safe water conservationists 
Banker at Skomer, likely 

anything on land. A single 
kdp species is a self-con- 
tained nature reserve 
containing as many as 350 
different creatures. 


m- 

w 

Jon Moore, left, and Francis 
to become a nature reserve 


THE 1981 Wildlife and 
Countryside Act gave the 
NCC power to create reserves 
between low water and the 
limit of territorial waters, and 
to restrict damaging activities 
in them. The formal 
consultation period over the 
designation of Lundy- ended 
last month, with 80 of the 1 30 
bodies and individuals orig- 
inally notified having replied 
with their views. The NCC 
hopes to make its final sub- 
mission for designation to the 
minister by the end of this 
month. 


with its colonics of massive 
sponges: the Mcnai Strait, 
where tides cascade off jagged - J 
rocks containing marine crea- 
tures which arc specialist' 
sumvors in turbulent con- 
ditions: St Abbs, close to 
Berwipk-upon-TwcedL. home, 
of the leopard-spotted goby 
and cup coral; arid (optimis* 
.ticaJly) the isles of Scillv;,. 
again, where low tide cP v Pafs 
copious marine plants arid* 
animals, including many spe- 
cics normally found onl\. in 
deep water. 


The fiercest opposition to 
designation has come from 
inshore fisherman who until 


recently rejected any reside-' 
" NCCs 


lion: In 1984 the NCC“s first 
planned reserve, the Isles of 
Scilly. which enjoyed the 

personal support of the 
Prince of Wales, was 
scuppered by fishermen. 

The NCC. then turned to 
Lundy and in an important 


The non-diving public will, 
be able to tour the reserves in 
glass-bottomed boats and 
look at the marine wildlife in 
aquaria and interpretation, 
centres, many of which, are 
likely to be privately funded. 

Dr Roger Mitchell of the 
NCC is hopeful Lhat the 
marine environment . .will, 
eventually receive the .same 
level . of protection -as land 
habitat, “Our aim is to 
protect as much as lOpcrtcnf ■ 
of our coastal environment", 
he says. 

Gareth Haw Danes 

©rtoea Newspaper* Lid, fsiff 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1028 


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: : 


When hackery is hterature 




Gathered here is a selection of 
the essays which , the distin- 
guished Hungarian bom, but 
now British domiciled, novel- 
ist Stephen. Vizinczey has 
contributed over. the last 20 
years or so to such newspapers 
as The Times anti The Sunday 
Telegraph. Taken together 
they have a weight and an 
elegance andamptitutude of a 
very high order an order, at 
any event, not popularly sup- 
posed to belong to weekly 
journalism. • 

This is a mistake. The best 
journalism shares the foil 
exigency of literature. Mr 
Vizinczey is ' a formidable 

scourge of the too numerous 
professors who take a whole 
book to say what could besatd 
in a sentence. His own knowl- 
edge of literature as demon- 
strated in these essays, is 
wonderfully wide and relaxed. 
His writinghstyle is generous, 
sued nr and dedicated to 
judgement. 

The word “Lies’! bn the 
book's dust jacket is italicised 
and jumps out at the reader. 
Do- we believe that there are ' 
such things as lies any longer,, 
or is everything a matter of 
“opinion"? Mr Vizinczey*s 
background under a totalitar- 
ian regime from which he 
courageously escaped allows 
him to be, as one might 
expect, a powerful diagnosti- 


Mark Le Fanu 

TRUTH AND LIES 
IN LITERATURE 
By Stephen Vizinczey 

Hamish Hamilton £12.95 


cian of the political lie, wher- 
ever it turns up (in the West as 
wdl as the East). 

- But the essays under discus- 
sion go further than this in 
their ability to pinpoint what 
one might call the moral lies in 
fiction itself especially the 
modem “Psychgologicar va- 
riety — so often, and so 
casually, passed of as wisdom. 
Reviews ofHerman Melville's 
Billy Bud Gore Vidal's Burr 
and Gregor von Rezzori's The 
Death of my Brother Abel hold 
fast to the view (and brilliantly 
persuade us to share it) that 

sophistication is compatible 
with profound error. 

In another superlative es- 
say, on Heinrich KJrist (one of 
the best literary essays I have 
ever encountered), Mr 
Vizinczey goes out of his way 
to stress the great German 
writer's “Aristotelian" mas- 
tery of plot. It is an emphasis 
that turns up repeatedly in the 
book, and serves to define the 
author’s own “Epic” anti- 
modernist position, 
central ambivalence about ac- 


Mr Vizinczey would say, 1 
think, that the falsity of much 
modem literature resides in its 
tion. Everything is in the 
mind, or the entrails: nothing 
is properly attached to the 
outside world by way of 
custom and stability and 
shared knowledge. The great 
literature of the past, on the 
other hand, took it as its task 
to show, precisely and pitiless- 
ly, how consequences grow 
out of decisions. Here, if 
anywhere, is a morality for 
literature — indeed a morality 
for life. 

In feci, what is most impres- 
sive about these essays (apart 
from their range and erudi- 
tion) is the way that Hterature 
and life are so subtly inter- 
twined with each other. The 
passion for the one is the 
passion for the other. As it 
ought to be in criticism, but 
seldom is. 

Mr Vizinczey can make us , 
care about favourite writers 
like Kleist and Stendhal be - 1 
cause the flavour of his own i 
writing makes it apparent, 1 
without tedious egotism, that 
be him self has experienced the 
rapture of love, and reflected 
on its immutable meaning. In 
a word, he unerringly knows , 
how to find the weight of ! 
experience, and states it m j 
unflinching, aphoristic Ed- j 
glish. 


A lmost everybody has anoth- 
er country. Martin Amis’s 
is America. It is the country 
of his novels and to some 
extent his dreams. He leDs us be 
spent some of his childhood in 
America and from that lime on it 
both excited him and frightened 
him. He recollects a crew cul He ate 
Thanksgiving turkey. He wore a 
grotesque mask at Halloween. 

More recently he has adopted or 
he may say had forced on him since 
he is rather coy about his journalistic 
ventures, a profitable line in Ameri- 
can-based articles, the reviews and 
interviews and almosi-siraight re- 
porting which now, strung together, 
are the content of this book. The 
ambiguity; of Amis's responses to 
America is suggested by his title, a 
borrowing from Bellow who bad 
lifted it from Wyndham Lewis. The 
ambiguity of his attitude to journal- 
ism. which he regards as a ‘left 
handed' form of writing in that he 
docs it to please others, as a whore 
does, is expressed by the parodic 
persona be creates for himself in 
many of his pieces, that of joke 
investigator, comedian reporter. 
‘Casting all modesty aside where 
would you place yourself?* He 
questions pornographic film direc- 
tor. Brian De Palma, playing show- 
biz interviewer, fondling his biro. As 
we know, a normal journalist does 
not fondle his biro. Marun Amis in 
America is non-stop double take. 

Martin Amis is quite small and 
America is huge. The dramas here 
are visual as well as in the mind. Big 
buildings: giant servings of food, the 


Caustic clever clogs 


A devastating view of apartheid 


If President Botha realty be- 
lieves his own claim that 
apartheid is becoming an out-' 
dated concept, then be should 
read Mr Lelyveld's compelling 
account about what life under 
apartheid is really like for 
South Africa’s black majority 
Mr Botha is not alone in 
being ignorant about the pain 
and ignominy which blades 
suffer daily as a result of South 
Africa's unique experiment in 
racial segregation. Most whites 
are also blissfully unaware of 
the hardship of life in black 
townships, the squalor of the. 
rural slums: in the tribal; 
“homelands” the terror of 
police raids, or the fear of 
being uprooted because you 
are living in a “black spot”. Mr 
Lelyveld's book should be 
compulsory reacting for all 
South African whites, and for 
anyone in this country, who 
wants to understand why 
blacks are not rushing to 
embrace the reforms that Mr 
Botha’s government is begin- 


Nicholas Ashford 

MOVE YOUR 
SHADOW 
By Joseph Lelyveld 

Michael Josephs 14. 95 


uing to introduce.The author 
has served two assignments in 
South Africa as correspondent 
for the New York Times. The 
first, in 1966, was cut short 
when the authorities ordered 
him to leave after being there 
for less than a year. But so 
fascinated - was be by the 
country, which bore many 
resemblances to the southern 
United States of Mr Lelyveld's 
youth, that he always wanted 
to go back again to complete 
his tour of duty He served a 
second term from 1980 to 
1983. He is now his paper’s 
correspondent in London. 

Being the fine repoiTo* that 
he is. Mr Lelyveld does not 


seek to impose his own views 
on the reader, but lets the 
South Africans he interviewed, 
blacks and whites, speak for 
themselves. His book if re- 
freshingly free of the one- 
dimensional propaganda that 
mars so much writing about 
South Africa. It gets behind the 
headlines and the slogans to 
reveal not just the cruelties 
and absurbities of apartheid, 
but also the humour and 
humanity of its victims. 

Although its overall impact 
is a devastating commentary 
on The horrors of apartheid, he 
does not set out to condemn 
the while authorities (although 
they • frequently condemn 
themselves with their own 
words). He confesses to a 
liking for many Afrikaners, 
understands the historical pro- 
cess that has caused them to 
try to preserve their cultural 
identity in such a ruthless way, 
and is sensitive to the predica- 
ment they now face as white 
rule begins lo crumble. 




Fiona MacCarthy 
on Martin Amis 
and his America 

THE MORONIC 
INFERNO 
And Other Visits 
to America 
By Martin Amis 
Jonathan Cape. £9. 95 


most obnoxious being the Chicago 
mixed fish platter on the way back 
from Saul Bellow, massive literary 
figures. Mailer, Vidal Vonnegut, the 
terrifying Mrs Trilling. Every inter- 
view a David v Goliath confronta- 
tion. But the diminutive hero shows 
himself to be not merely quick on the 
footwork but ruthlessly determined, 
rarely opting out of what they used in 
olden-days America to call the 
64.000 dollar question. .Asking Sic- 
ven Spielberg why his films are 
sexless. Broaching coitus interruptus 
with Gloria Steincm. Checking with 
Kurt Vonnegut, as from one writer 
to another (switching on the tape 
recorder), whether he has lost his 
talent. 

Martin Amis's America is funny 
and horrific. It is lovely to read 
somebody so totally hard-hearted. 
He is dreadful to Hugh Hefner and 
still worse to Penny Baker, the 
Special Playboy Playmate who is 
trundled out to meet him. Disobey- 
ing the inherited wisdom of hack 
journalists that every’ living soul, 
especially half-naked ladies, has 
some son of a story which is worth 
the telling, the Martin Amis inter- 
view is over in one minute. Joining 
in group prayer amongst Falw-ell's 
New Evangelists Amis tries hard to 
look pious, for the sake of a good 
story. But while they pray for 
salvation be prays for Winston King 
Size and outsize gin and tonics. He is 
an unashamedly clever clogs report- 
er. and American absurdities exhila- 
rate him greatly. A straightforward 
LIS. colour piece, like Palm Beach: 
Don't You Lore It?, has him at his 
fast and caustic journalistic best 

I n a land in which the concepts 
are large and somewhat blurry 
Martin Amis comes over as a 
master of precision. Because his 
fiction dwells on salaciousness and 
sex he has been billed, quite falsely, 
as a bit of a louche writer. As this col- 
lection shows, Martin Amis is in fact 
unusually disciplined and 
wonyingly moral 
He is good at demolition, though 
from time to time his niftiness seems 
wasted on a lolloping opponent like 
Joan Didion. We all know Joan 
Didion is woolly-minded and long- 


winded. Martin Amis wiles her 
woozy. His attack is true and nasty. 
Was it really worth lux while? 

But then much of this hook goes. 
far beyond the call of common sense. 

It verges on obsessive. Martin Atr.is 
(or Many Amis, as he is delighted to 
be labelled by the press badge which, 
they give him in the Reunion Arena.- 
Dallas. Texas) is answering some 
devastating inner urge to search out 
and describe in minute dcuil the 
worst side of America, the false, silly, 
double-thinking land of violence, 
vulgarity, of grid-lock and decay. He 
ignores have-a-mcc-<ia\ America 
completely. Almost all his cast of 
characters have absolutely dreadful 

days. At best Truman Capote in the 
grip of a grand hangover At worst ". 
Sunny von Bulow. so well cared for 
in her coma. Incidentally an unex- 
pected phone call from her husband. ’ 
Claus von Bulow, suspected of her 
murder, which Amis compares to a 
sudden friendly overture from the 
Yorkshire Ripper, reveals there jre 
Big Issues even Martin Amis ducks. 

I t is most unlike the home life of 
the English literati. This hook 
makes lots of mischief with us 
frequent siark comparisons of 
sty le amongst the people Amis meets 
with in America, mainly the big-time 
writers and the scandal-ridden so- 
cialists. which however fearsome has 
a certain verve and glamour com- 
pared with the lustiness ot bookish 
Britain. As Amis rightly comments 
the son of wild bonanza Norman 
Mailer had embarked on after the 
publication of The Naked and the 
Dead is just not understood m 
Britain where after an equivalent 
success an English writer might, if he 
is being really daring, give up his job . 
as a schoolmaster, or buy a couple of 
filing cabinets. Whose side is Aims 
on? It is the sense of indecision, the - 
way in which he loathes and is 
fixated by Amenca, which makes 
this book so entertaining and so 
shocking. He is still the little figure in 
the horrid mask, cavorting, frighten- 
ing himself and all the rest of us to 
death. 

All in all this is a pretty rad 
collection. It is. ironically, the non- 
literary pieces which reread best, the 
plain, urgent, sheer reporting like' 
The Killings in Atlanta and Amis’s 
most excellent quite recent piece on 
AIDS. The reviews have lasted 
worst, being particularly prone to the 
Yorkshire Pudding principle. Once 
reheated only miracles will make 
them rise again. 1 think in any case 
Amis expects too much of them. He 
is not often pompous, but at one 
unguarded moment he suggests that! 
thousand word reviews are minor an 
forms. This is doubtful and if true 
would not increase the sum -of 
happiness. A thousand word review 
is a review. 


Warm Italian fantasies, frozen hells on earth 


The entries to .this yfea£s 
Times/Jonatkan Gape Young 
Writers', competition, which 
in 1985 resulted mthepabti- 
cation of five new novelists, 
has this year produced a 
disappointing response. No 
award has been made. 


BOOK SUPPLY SERVICE 

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Guido Morsdli committed 
suicide before. any ofhis seven 
novels were published in Italy. 
His death preceded his feme— 
sic exit gloria ntundL Diverti- 
mento 1889 is the first of his 
books to be published in 
English. “One person, at least, 
I who- write it," Morselti 
commented, “was diverted” 
The plot concerns the incogni- 
to holiday of the King of Italy, 
Umbeno l among the Swiss 
mountains in search of relax- 
ation, a land sale, chamois 
bunting and amorous in- 
trigues. The book is not 
escapist, according to 
Morsellu even if its subject is 
escape. It is a fantasy of the 
Belle Epoque that delights in 
period inns, trains, coaches 
and women's clothing, on and 
off- Its. significance lies in its 
elegance and historical detail 

With .halo Calvino dead 
and published, . I am glad we 
have Guido Morselti to suc- 
ceed him, even if ironically 
and posthumously. There is 
an imagination m the writer 
that stops short of whimsy, a 
poetic and sensuous realism, 
and a delicate wit that is a 
pleasure to read. The (ages 
slide by, the book closes with a 
sigh thar it is too short. 
Divertimento 1889 is perfect 


FICTION 


Andrew Sinclair 

DIVERTIMENTO 

1889 

By Guido Morsdli 

ChatioA Windus. £9.95 

PACK OF CARDS 
By Penelope lively 

Heinemann. £10.95 

ICE 

By Anna Karen 

Peter Owen. £8.95 

PAST CARING 

By Robert Goddard 

Robert Hale. £10.95 


summer reading, especially on 
a trip to the Alps, and it will 
linger in the memory as 
Indian summers do, warm, 
nostalgic, particular. 

Nine stories have been add- 
ed to Penelope Lively's first 
two volumes of stories. Noth- 
ing Missing but the Samovar 
and Corruption. This omni- 
bus, Pack of Cards, confirms 
her as the most original and 
piercing writer now working 
in that most unsparing of 
genres. In one new story, a 
group of Tourists is abandoned 
by their guide at Abu Simbel: 


they pass a night linked by 
hostility and aversion to 
emerge in the morning bound 
by an exhausted solidarity 
They have muddled through. 
In other stories, a gentleman 
reduced to being a bus-con- 
ductor confounds his general 
sister-in-law; a girl drops her 
uniform and walks naked 
through the- school only to 
find her protest meaningless: 
an old woman, meant to be 
literary, has locked glass- 
fronted bookshelves of first 
editions that have never been 
opened. These are the packs of 
cards that Penelope Lively 
builds into houses, but does 
not knock over. She leaves her 
characters sustaining each 
other precariously, connected 
by femiliarity. if not emotion. 

However wicked her insight 
into , pretension, her compas- 
sion always rules. These vi- 
gnettes of the human 
condition and of very human 
responses to it are absorbing, 
canng and careful. 

Anna Kavan was a heroin 
addict most of her life. She 
called her syringe and needle 
“her bazooka.” It shot her up. 
Her withdrawals made her see 
the nightmares that are the 
subject of Ice. In a frozen 
wasteland two men search for 


a girl fragile and brittle and 
haUurinaiory, with albino 
hair. When they find her, they 
break her, they persecute her. 
She is a victim of men, of cold, 
of the nuclear wilderness 
about her. She is Anna Kavan, 
trapped in the paranoia and 
isolation and chill of drug 
addiction. In the words of the 
old song, there ain't no sense 
in sniffing snow. 

At one level Ice is science 
fiction; at another, a private 
scream of despair. Like 
Kafka's novels, it is a personal 
journey through an anony- 
mous country where pain and 
torment are the disorder of the 
day. But although the narrator 
is a man, this is a woman's hell 
on earth. In Ice, reality and 
dream are all the same. A 
journey of the mind into these 
barrens makes for desolate 
travelling but on the far side, 
one can only admire the 
strength and courage of the 
visionary and sufferer who 
mapped the route. 

Shades of Daphne du Mau- 
rier. Out of the West Country 
comes a tale of ok) misdeeds 
and present solutions, mur- 
ders and sleuthing, remorse 
and retribution worthy of the 
past mistress herself. Past 
Caring is a first novel by 


Robert Goddard, a young 
man who knows his Edwardi- 
an political history, his Madei- 
ra (the island and the drink), 
his Cambridge and his Devon. 
He has a nose for a mystery 
story like a hound of the 
Baskervilles. From the time 
that his flawed and penniless 
herOTis summoned to Funchal 
to be hired in the investigation 
of a Cabinet Minister who 
resigned under Asquith . 
through encounters with a 
cool lubricious don called Eve 
and blustering villains called 
the Couchman family, the text 
tangles and unravels in a web 
of circumstance and a laby- 
rinth of motives. 

If Robert Goddard had 
extended the complexities of 
his plot to his characters, he 
might have written a good 
novel rather than a fascinating 
yam. Bui sometimes he seems 
past caring for his people as 
they perform their necessary 
intrigues and couplings, evo- 
lutions and explanations. He 
explains too much of what lies 
behind the actions, yet he 
leaves his protagonists both 
arcane and obvious, protest- 
ing that they are what they 
cannot be. In solving his 
crimes, he makes enigmas of 
his criminals. 


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RABAN Foreign Land 

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’ £3.95 

- « „ 1 v - , L „ An inventive narrative that 
F0RE1G. LAND ejjp^^unfiiniiDar aspects of the 
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Peter Da valle 

THE COMPANION 
TO THE MYSTERY 
OF EDWIN DROOD 
By Wendy S Jacobson 

Allen and Unwin, £22 JO 

THE COMPANION 
TO OUR MUTUAL 
FRIEND 
By Michael Cotsell 

Alien and Unwin£27J0 


In two such deep Dickensian 
digs as these, it is hard to know 
who to admire more: the 
diggers or the dug. Literaxy 
archaeologists do not come 
much better than Doctors 
Cotsell and Jacobson. But 
Dickens was so generous with 
his buried treasure that his 
two exegetes are hard put to 
insert a shovel between then- 
finds. 

Not everything, of course, is 
Grade A material It is scarce- 
ly an occasion for shouting 
Eureka! when Dr Jacobson 
establishes that the first train 
caught by the London-bound 
Septimus Grisparkle in Edwin 
Drood was probably the 
7.00am. And the long arm of 
speculation is practically torn 
out of its armpit when Dr 
Cotsell opines that when 



Jasper's unwelcome proposal — from Edwin Drood 


Dickens spoke of Gaffer 
Hexam’s likeness to a “roused 
bird of prey" in Our Mutual 
Friend, he might have been 
thinking of the line in 
Jonson's f ’olpone which men- 
tioned such a scavenger, albeit 
unaroused. It is also of mar- 
ginal interest I think, that 
seasonal allusions in Our Mu- 
tual Friend point to the plot's 
spanning a period of three and 
a quarter years. 

Dr Jacobson rarely departs 
from her annotator's brief 
She does not. for instance; 
offer an opinion as to how 
Dickens might have ended 
Edwin Drood had he lived, 
and her only conjecture as to 
the identity of the shadowy 
Datchcry is a popular one - 
i.e.that he is probably some 
sort of criminal investigator. 


She explores some interesting 
territory in looking for paral- 
lels between Drood and The 
Hunchback of Notre Dame 
and The Moonstone. Like Dr 
Cotsell she finds so many 
inspirational sources in 
Shakespeare that one wonders 
how Dickens could have man- 
aged without the Bard. 

She shows how life could 
not only imitate art but im- 
prove on it The auctioneer 
Sapsea's blush-making grave- 
stone epitaph for his wife in 
Drood was a model of auster- 
ity compared to the one to 
Lady O’Looney, great -niece of 
Burke (“Bland, passionate and 
deeply religious, she also 
painted in water-colours and 
sent several pictures to the 
exhibition”). 


Unlike Drood. Our Mutual 
Friend is a completed book, 
with a vast cast and a wide 
range of targets for Dickens's 
satirical darts. Nothing daunt- 
ed. Dr Cotsell has tackled his 
huge task of annotation with 
as much enthusiasm for the 
novel's minutiae (“gum lick- i 
Jen an Americanism; the first | 
drink, taken straight”) as for 
more complex contemporary 
issues such as the plight of 
London's paupers, the train- 
ing of teachers, and those 
maladorous but commercially 
profitable dust-heaps that as- 
sume such vital symbolic 
importance in Our Mutual 
Friend. 

The columns of The Times 
provide mush grist to Dr 
Cotsell's mill. Five years be- 
fore Dickens penned Our Mu- 
tual Friend, the paper 
conducted a serious debate on 
whether one could marry on 
less than £300 a year. A man 
was held to become a gentle- 
man at £150, but his wife 
became a lady only when the 
income reached £350. And as 
for upstart schoolteachers of 
the day. the newspaper’s MP 
proprietor damned them in 
Parliament for having the 
affrontery to place themselves 
on the same footing as law- 
yers. doctors, and other 
learned bodies. 


.“. . a book one turns to with constant pleasure, - ■ - 
and which achieves the seemingly' impossible " 
task of being both lively and judicious at once. ■ 

It is a book with much style and little prejudice!- 

TLS Apr! Jd ' c 35 

The Times Literary Supplement is the worlds pre-eminent 
literary weekly- It reviews over two and a half thousand books 
a yean of which The New Oxford Companion to English 
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BOOKS 



The House of the Spirits 
Isabel Allendc/Black Swan 
£3.95 

Isabel Aliende's extraordinary’ 
debut novel, thick with plot and 
bristling with eccentric characters. 


WHSMITH$ 





IU 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Tarzan’s 

testament 

Following in Ihc ink wells of ex- 
tra bind ministers Francis Pvm. 
David Howell and Jim Prior. 
Michael Hcseltme is about to 
delis cr a hardback critique of the 
Thatcher scars. Amid great se- 
cjvn. Hcscltinc is approaching 
experienced politics-watchers for 
their advice and has signed a 
cnnlract with Hutchinson. The as- 
>ci-unlillcd opus will emerge next 
spring - before a biographv writ- 
ten b> his friend Julian Cntchley. 
Hutchinson will not discuss the 
book's contents, but after the 
Tovicih riots. Hcscltinc wrote a 
secret paper to the cabinet. It Took 
j K/. •/. pleading for extra resources 
for the inner cities. Critchley 
>esierda> pointed out that the 
same theme runs through the 107 
speeches Hesfef ine has made since 
storming out of No 10 in January . 
In the pasi. Hesoliine has denied 
ho was w riling any thing more than 
a book on gardening {which he is). 
But Criichlcj says of the other 
work: “He has described it to me 
as j credo. He is sketching an 
alternative Tory policy, an alter- 
native voice to Thatcherism." 
Credo'’ Curiously appropriate for 
a man known to friends in his 
youth as "Grid". 

• Mrs Thatcher, holidaying in 

could not have known 
that Xen-snight was going to 
feature a long report on sewage 
pollution immediately before the 
item concerning her. For. asked ir 
she was going for a paddle, she 
replied: “No. you never know what 
you might stand on." 

Tax collector 

Official Ulster Unionist MP Ken 
Maginnis is not joining party 
leader James Molvneaux in his 
Trappist vow towards the media. 
Quite the reverse: Maginnis is 
handing all and sundry copies of a 
letter lie has sent to the Stormont 
authorities regarding the Anglo- 
Insh agreement. He informs them 
that in protest at it w ill not pay his 
rates, that his three dogs are 
unheeneed and that he has not 
renewed his TV licence. Having 
taxed his car before the hated 
Hillsborough accord was signed, 
and thus finding himself within 
the law. he has resolved not to 
display his tax disc. His letter 
adds: “When my car lax becomes 
due I will send you further 
notification as I do not intend to 
pay this cither." 

• An “Ulster Says No" wall 
graffito in Fermanagh has long 
barn the addition “But The Man 
From Del Monte. He Say Yes." 
Now a wag has added: “And He's 
a Heal Orange Man." 

Out of puff 

More on Thomas the Tank En- 
gine. whom the unacceptable face 
of capitalism has forced olf the 
rails at the Nene Valley railway, 
near Peterborough. Some 12 years 
ago the railway painted an old loco i 
in blue and decorated it with the 
smiling face familiar to readers of 
the Rev \V. Awdry's books. But 
since then Thomas has become big 
business, and Britt Allcrolt. the 
merchandising firm which holds 
the copyright to the engine's 
design, has ordered Nene Valley to 
wipe the smile, and indeed the 
face, oil* the loco. The railway has 
been inundated with emotional, if 
badly spell. letters I genera I man- 
ager Harry Bennett tells me quite a 
few of them were from adults), 
and ihe mailer now rests in 
solicitors' hands. 


BARKY FAN TONI 



■Suit ymirvelf. I'm off to Ulster to 
take my chances with plastic bullets' 


Real prince 

No sooner does The Tunes run a 
feature on Zsa Zsa Gabor's latest 
marriage ihun we receive phone 
calls casting doubt on the identity 
of husband number eight. A lady 
calls, saving her daughter was 
engaged to Prince Frederick von 
Anhalt's brother, and knows for a 
fact thai Frederick was killed in a 
car crash in Munich, in J .So 
who is going to walk up the aisle 
with Zsa Zsa? I can reveal the 
bridegroom is innocent. Robert 
Hans Lieh ten berg was adopted by 
Duchess von Anhalt. Under a 
_L»orman law dating back to 1925. 
adopted sons are allowed to take 
the title so in name, if not in any 
other sense. Robert can call him- 
self prince, and Duke of Saxony, 
too. Why his first name was 
changed is still a mystery. This 
information comes courtesy of 
Tim Pearson, w ho is researching a 
book on the German princely 
houses and initially was as puzzled 
a*, my earlier informant about 
Prince Frederick's return from the 
grav e. Hav e a good wedding, now. 

PHS 


One sanction that means business 

by Andrew Young 


When we see South Africa on tele- 
vision. it seems that it is already too 
late, that the bloodbath has already 
begun. But I remember visiting Salis- 
bury in the midst of the Rhodesian 
conflict and being surprised by the 
peace and prosperity that managed to 
co-exist with the violence and conflict 
Even now. amid the chaos of Lebanon 
and Iran, it amazes me that life goes on. 
Shops open, factories function, and 
people can even be seen eating in 
outdoor cafes. 

in most social struggles, even revolu- 
tions. the activists usually number less 
than 10 per cent: 5 per cent on each 
side. There are perhaps another 40 per 
cent who are supportive of the activists. 
This leaves nearly 50 per cent of the 
population virtually neutral or un- 
involved except in wishing that the 
conflict would end, so that they might 
go on with their lives. This is the 
"passive majority" that attempts to 
blind itself to the conflict and go on 
with business as usual. 

This neutral group (in South Africa's 
case, a passive majority of whiles) is the 
target of sanctions. For the most part its 
members profit silently by the system 
of apartheid, but struggle daily to bury 
their consciences and religious'guilt in a 
maze of rationalization. Often, this is 
the successful business. labour and 
farming sector, which hopes the gov- 
ernment will handle things and allow it 
to remain uninvolved. Almost always, 
this sector votes with the government 


and supports the status quo. because 
anything else requires too much cour- 
age or vision and risks jeopardizing its 
primary and often only interests: 
success and security. As long as these 
people can go on with business as usual, 
they will. When the bloodshed finally 
reaches them, it will be too late. 

Much of this passive majority is 
making plans for some alternative 
home in Australia, Britain. Argentina, 
the United Slates, and. ironically. 
Zimbabwe, for these are genuine Af- 
ricans who want to remain in Africa if 
at all possible. 

The purpose of sanctions is to force 
the invol vement of the passive major- 
ity before it is too late. A total ban on 
air travel w and from South Africa 
could do just that, for it is a sanction 
that is redemptive rather than punitive. 
Such a ban could be enforced immedi- 
ately under article 41. chapter 7. of the 
UN Charter and verified. It would not 
destroy the South African economy. It 
would add an extra day to travel to*Eu- 
rope, Latin America and the US. 
because people would have to go to 
neighbouring countries to get a plane. 

The psychological impact of such an 
international sanction could be 
phenomenal. Air carriers that now fly 
to Johannesburg and Cape Town would 
have to reroute their flights to Bo- 
tswana. Mozambique, Zambia, and 


Zimbabwe. Such action might also 
succeed in finally getting the airport 
runway in Lesotho extended. 

The dependence of South Africa on 
the hospitality of its neighbours would 
also help to prevent the South African 
military from continuing its raids into 
those countries and would offer a new 
possibility for stability in the region. 

The reported sale and lease-back 
agreement by South African Airways o 
all its wide-bodied aircraft suggests that 
the South African government is 
prepared to endure an air travel ban 
However, the inconvenience to the 
passive majority could create a voice 
for change, for it is not yet dear that the 
passive majority would be prepared to 
endure such a sanction. 

America's experience with its own 
South showed that, once confronted 
with the reality of local and naliona 
sanctions, the business community 
begin to assert itself. A committee o 
100 businessmen defied the laws of 
Alabama. Bull Connor and Governor 
George Wallace because it realized that 
business was no longer profitable in the 
political climate of racist oppression. 

The situations are different, but so 
are the times. The stakes are much 
greater. South Africa can be saved, but 
onlv if the US and South Africa's other 
friends in the international community 
apply the external pressures to fadlitate 
involvement of the passive majority. 
The author is mayor of Atlanta. This article 
first appeared in the Washington Post 


David Nicholson-Lord on a significant shift in environmental thinking 


The seismograph that measures 
the more deep-seated political 
cons ulsions looks set fora twitchy 
period next month when, in 
advance of the party conference 
season, the "small is beautiful" 
school advances its own version of 
how tomorrow's world should 
make ends meet. The Living 
Economy is already being billed as 
the first comprehensive and prac- 
tical articulation of Schumacher- 
stvle economics — the vegetarian 
answer to the red meat of Marx. 
Keynes and monetarism. What is 
more intriguing, however, is its 
testimony lo the strange consen- 
sus forming around a set of values 
once considered the province of 
fringe groups. 

The Living Economy is the 
distillation of two years of The 
Other Economic Summit (Toes), 
the annual gathering initiated in 
NS4 at which an alternative 
culture previously associated with 
little more than dissent began to 
assemble the rudiments of an 
economic credo. In the process it 
has discovered some strange bed- 
fellows - not least the new school 
of Conservative minimalism. 

Probably the chief task facing 
the alternative economists has 
been the reconciliation of those 
I wo mighty opposites, economic 
growth and environmental protec- 
tion. Since the .later 1970s the 
realization has dawned that indus- 
trialism and consumerism, how- 
ever unpalatable many of their 
side-effects, provide jobs, prod- 
ucts and styles of self-expression 
and arc thus rather popular with 
the voting masses. The first in- 
stitutionalized recognition of this 
was the !98U World Conservation 
Strategy, which sought a “new 
partnership between conservation 
and development, to meet human 
needs now without jeopardizing 
the future". In Britain this cul- 
minated. in I9S3. in The 
( \ mental h 'it and Development 
Strategy tur the L K. a breeze- 
blocfc-sizcd tome which, sadly but 
perhaps predictably, failed to ex- 
cite the public. 

That there was life behind its 
crepuscular prose, however, is 
borne out by two developments. 
First, the wealth of detailed analy- 
sis it contained, and the agonizing 
that went into it. means that 
philosophies of sustainable 
development or “ecodevelop- 
menl" are slowly diffusing 
through the country's three-mil- 
hon-plus environmentalists and 
hey and. Second, there leapt rully 
armed from the heads of all those 
committees a new organization, 
the UK Centre lor Economic and 
Env ironmental Development, 
which is proving an assiduous 
promoter of the new wisdom. 

Anyone doubling this should 
east their eyes over the list of 
speakers lined up by the Centre for 
ns lirM mayor conference. Sustain- 
able Derch’pnicni tn an Industrial 
/.* ■■iii-ii/r. held last sear at 


Will industry 
find growth 


in greenery 







Paul- Ekins, author of The Living Economy 


Queen's College. Cambridge. 
Companies represented by chair- 
men. chief executives, directors or 
departmental heads included ICI. 
BP. De La Rue. IBM. British 
Shipbuilders. Blue Circle In- 
dustries and John Laing. Academ- 
ics rubbed shoulders with venture 
capitalists, government develop- 
ment agency chiefs with county 
planners, researchers and consul- 
tants from so-called “sunrise" 
industries with rural protec- 
tionists. The message now being 
promulgated, in fact, has under- 
gone a significant modification. 
Environmentalism may not only 
be compatible with growth. It may 
actually, in a post-industrial world 
increasingly anxious to amend, 
transcend or camouflage its indus- 
trial base, promote growth. The 
centre, with the help of an 
accumulating portfolio of case 
studies — one. for example, cov- 
ered sustainable development at 
IBM — is proclaiming un- 
ashamedly: there's money in 
greenery. 

The much-vaunted greening of 
the main political parties has thus 
been matched by a “browning" of 
the environmental movement. 


Yet this unlikely symbiosis has 
extended even further, as the third 
Toes, held last April, and notably 
one of its two keynote papers. The 
Economies qf Local Recovery, by 
James Robertson, made abun- 
dantly clear. Reading iL one has 
an uncanny sensation of double- 
take — of seeing old friends in new 
and unexpected company. 

Robertson is a former senior 
Whitehall official who founded 
the Inter-Bank Research Organ- 
ization and wrote studies for the 
Cabinet Office before locating 
himself firmly in the Schumacher 
“economics as if people mattered" 
tradition. Parts of his paper, 
however, read like the latest 
pronouncement from Lord Young 
of GratTham or a watered-down 
version of the truth as pro- 
pounded by Lhe Institute of Eco- 
nomic Affairs or the Centre for 
Policy Studies. We hear, for 
example, of “self-reliant local 
development" of the removal of 
“unnecessarily restrictive plan- 
ning regulations", of self-manag- 
ing residents' associations and the 
“progressive localization of the 
welfare state". We hear of people's 
capitalism and profit-sharing and 


local savings and investment 
channels. The concept of 
“community contracting" is ad- 
vanced. the enterprise allowance 
scheme praised and even FA 
Hayvk quoted with approval — in 
this instance, fur his support of the 
denationalization of money in an 
Institute of Economic Affairs 
pamphlet of 1976. 

In part. Robertson is describing 
reality - specifically that remark- 
able burgeoning of local economic 
activity which has characterized 
the recession of the last decade, 
and is represented by strands as 
diverse- as local (voluntary ! enter- 
prise agencies, local authority 
enterprise boards and the growth 
in home-working and self-employ- 
ment. The British Unemployment 
Resource Network (Bum), for 
example, listed 1.400 local groups 
and projects in a recent directory. 
But his broad conclusion is that 
the trend should be reinforced, 
that public spending priorities 
should be shifted “away from 
programmes delivering depen- 
dency -rein forcing services to pas- 
sive recipients. towards 
programmes that encourage and 
enable individuals and local 
communities to meet their own 
needs in their own ways'*. 

Here, it seems clear, is a 
meeting-ground between Hayek 
and Schumacher, between 
Thatcherism and alternative 
economics. Yet it is a blend that 
also features older-fasbioned 
socialist ideas and even those now- 
emerging from reborn Tory wets. 
The first local authority employ- 
ment department of its type in the 
country, for example, was David 
• Blunkett's Sheffield. Robertson 
also deals in the economics of co- 
operative ownership and proposes 
an unconditional basic income for 
all m an age of mass unemploy- 
ment. Robertson himself, mean- 
while. is quoted approvingly in 
David Howell’s Blind Victory. 
published in June, which owes a 
large intellectual debt to the 1 970s 
counter-culture — so much so. in 
fact, that Paul Ekins. a moving 
spirit behind Toes and author- 
editor of The Living Economy. 
regards it as having stolen a small 
part of his thunder. 

It is heady and perplexing slufT. 
this apparently unwitting elabora- 
tion of a common ground between 
such disparate groups and affili- 
ations. its shared theme is an 
emphasis on the local, the small- 
scale. the home-grown, and a 
fierce antipathy to what Howell 
calls "aggregutism". For students 
of politics, debate over its intellec- 
tual provenance — one version 
might be Mao and flower-power 
out of Samuel Smiles. Kropotkin 
and Buddha — could prove as 
fascinating as working out whose 
clothes have been stolen by whom. 
The Living Economy is published 
next lib mih hr Rom ledge and 
hi -gaii Paid. T'O hardback. £S.V5 

paperback. 


" arsaw 

Alan has a leathery moustache 
and sports an ear-ring. ”1 wouldn't 
mind staying here in Poland, if 
there was work, like." he says. 
Back home in Southampton he 
goes to the Jobcentre twice a week. 
"No point in going more often, is 
there? Nothing changes." Rick 
and Darren are sitting on the sofa. 
They nod in agreement: there's no 
point at ail. 

The suunds of farmers coming 
back from the fields for lunch filler 
through from outside: hens 
scattering, an engine revving, a 
woman calling her dog. "To toll 
the truth. I feel like J.R. here." 
Alan continues. “You could really 
live on your dole money." ( Later a 
Pole asks: "Wlui's a dole? Is it 
short for dollars?") 

It all seemed a bit sinister at 
first. Two-paragraph reports fre- 
quently appear in East European 
newspapers ahom groups of un- 
employed Britons on working 
holidays, the guests of communist 
youth organizations or unions. 
The visits have been taking place 
lor more than a year. What is 
going on: selective brainwashing, a 
socialist sofl-soir. 1 

It is nothing of the kind, judging 
by a visit last week to a rural 
corner of northern Poland where a 
dozen young jobless Britons have 
been living and working on farms. 
Instead, there is the collision of 
two uuridv Young city kids, fresh 
from a file circumscribed by the 
Jobcentre. tele>isiun. and a night 


Roger Boyes finds the spirit of Helsinki 

alive in a new breed of exchange visits 

From dole-queue 
to Pole-view 


oul with the lads, confront a 
Poland that seems barely to have 
changed in decades, where the 
pace of life is still dictated like a 
metronome by the solid clang of a 
horse's hoofs on the rutted paths. 

“It was a shock to them." said 
Donald Irving, organizer of the 
youth project tn the Basseu- 
Sway tilling suburbs of Southamp- 
ton to which the teenagers belong. 
He is employed to ensure they do 
not float adrift in high-rise estates. 
In Cicchocin. 20 miles out of 
Torun. they have to find their way 
by the positions of the haystacks. 
The village, if that is whai ii is, has 
a bar that shuts at eight o'clock, 
and a shop. 

Many of the group, all between 
16 and 20. had never been abroad 
before. For them. Poland was a bit 
like Mars. "They've always been 
told that everybody abroad speaks 
some kind of English." Irving said. 
In Cicchocin. with its inward- 
looking fanning community, it is 
something of a miracle that people 
speak at all. 


Bui it worked out well enough 
after a lew days, if only because 
the boredom of the local children 
coalesced with the city ennui of 
the Southampton teenagers. The 
two girls in the group found 
themselves taken up by a couple of 
Polish motorbike boys, the fast set 
of Cicchocin. The boys managed 
to make some kind of contact with 
the farmers' daughters. “We could 
communicate OK." Rick said. 
"They wanted to know about my 
tattoo." They were also interested 
in Duran Duran and Wham!, 
giv ing the boys a chance to flash 
their sophisticated credentials. 

• The exchange — Polish teen- 
agers will go to Southampton 
homes later this year —was or- 
ganized jointly with the Polish 
Young Fanners Association. .Al- 
though the ass<K:i3iion is an 
officially sponsored body h has 
little to Jo with communism. Its 
brief is to spread culture among 
the isolated farmsteads, organiz- 
ing folklore contests and disco- 
theques and putting together 


tourist trips abroad. In its turn, the 
Swaythiing Youth Project is not 
some kind of Trotskyist cover 
group: Irving is paid by the 
Methodist church. 

For the Poles the Britons' visit 
has provided an insight into the 
British unemployment problem so 
loudly trumpeted in the official 
communist press: in fact, some of 
the Polish youlbs. accustomed to 
working in the fields from early 
morning to past seven in the 
evening, rather liked the sound of 
the dole. 

For their part the British teen- 
agers have gamed in confidence, 
and been shaken out of the apathy 
that tends to engulf the young 
jobless. They have probabaly noi 
learnt a great deal about Poland. A 
trip to Gdansk did not have any 
political resonance for them: they 
were between HI and 1 2 years old 
when Solidarity sprang into lift in 
that northern seaport. They were 
moved, though, by a trip to a 
concentration camp and. as the 
ever-paucni Irving put it. “they' 
have learned a little bit about how 
to earn themselves, how to cope 
with unknown situations, how to 

communicate". 

Thai seems a wonh while 
achievement. These East-West 
contacts.- envisaged in the Hel- 
sinki accords 1 1 years ago. are 
gaining rather than losing their 
v aJuc. 


Roger Boyes 


Shirley Letwin 

Learning not 
to be drones 


Liberal education has become the 
scapegoat for Britain's economic 
difficulties. On every side we hear 
that it has made industry a dirty 
word and that the cure, as the 
chairman of the Manpower Scr- 
v ices Commission said recently, is 
to overcome Britain's obsession 
with “the academic". 

Whai is wanted instead, we arc 
told, is an ‘‘enterprise culture". To 
get it. education should be geared 
to the needs of industry and 
commerce. Children should spend 
more lime on mathematics, sci- 
ence and economics and not waste 
it on useless subjects, such as 
reading Shakespeare. Cicero or 
Macaulay. They should be en- 
couraged* to start business projects 
before they can even count. Then 
Britain could compete with Japa- 
nese. Germans and Americans. 

An obvious reason forquestion- 
ing this orthodoxy is that it rests 
on a false picture of Britain's past. 
From Stuart limes to laic in the 
19th century. Britain led the world 
in industry* and commerce. This 
was also a time when the ideal ora 
liberally educated gentleman went 
unquestioned. He. moreover, 
never disdained dirtying his hands 
in business. On the contrary, the 
ideal gentleman was distinguished 
by his devotion to doing well 
whatever he did. 

In practice, the involvement of 
all classes in industry and com- 
merce was a notorious distinction 
of Britain. Montesquieu was 
horrified by the involvement of 
the English aristocracy in com- 
merce: other visitors were 
favourably impressed by how all 
classes worked together. Through- 
out British history, the aristocracy 
and gentry married into and were 
recruited from the world of com- 
merce and industry. 

Equally disputable is the sup- 
posed “shortage" of engineers, 
scientists and businessmen which 
is blamed for Britain's economic 
difficulties. This shortage is put in 
question by the large numbers of 
engineers and scientists who take 
jobs abroad or in the City for 
higher pay. If British industry is so 
shon of engineers. w.h> does it not 
make use of them? The reason for 
a reluctance to go into business is 
less likely to be a disdain for it 
than the mountain of taxes and 
restrictions that make starting and 
conducting business in Britain an 
act of high courage. 

Current economic difficulties 
arc not due to lack of “growth", as 
we arc told, but to extravagance. 
An economy can be healthy 
without growth but it cannot 
flourish if a bloated state and a 
public besotted .by “rights" insist 
on spending what they fancy. 

Bui even if there were a shortage 
of engineers and businessmen, 
would it be desirable to- organize 
education so as to produce more 
of them? Should British life be 
reduced to an enterprise of 
producing more wealth? The tra- 
ditional answer was a resounding 
no. It was implicit in the pref- 
erence for a market economy, 
liberty, and liberal education. For 
the great virtue of a market 
economy is that it can accom- 


modaic addicis ofbo.h Herod*™ 
and hi-tech gadgets. A market 
economy is therefore the natural 
preference of those »hO lo"- 

liberty. . _ 

It makes no sense, however, to 
value liberty if one does not 
esteem the personality of human 
beings. And the cultivation o 
personality is the aim of a liberal 
cducaiion.an initiation into our 
cultural inheritance through en- 
counters with the intellectual 
adventures of our ancestors, tt 
includes mathematics and science 
because they are important and 
distinctive modes of understand- 
ing. not because they arc useful. 

Where liberty has no value, 
liberal education disappears. Thai 

is why under communism there is 
no liberal education and why i« 
has lost ground as corporatism and 
socialists have taken over. For 
they regard men as factors ot- 
production. Whatever distracts 
people from production becomes 
“irrelevant". 

To oppose liberal education in 
order to promote the success oi a 
market economy is ridiculous, as 
the reason for preferring a market 
economy is that it does not reduce 
people to drones. Bv protecting 
the imagination against being 
trapped in immediate concerns, a 
liberal education makes it easier to 
deal with the here and now more 
effectively. Because Ihe liberally 
educated can look beyond the 
present, they arc flexible and 
inventive: and these are the 
qualities of entrepreneurs. 

If they are lacking now. it is 
because there is too liule liberal 
education. What now- goes on in 
many schools under that name is 
nothing of the sort, it is waffle and 
propaganda, obsessed with the 
here and now and utterly devoid 
of the discipline and discrimina- 
tion. let alone subject mailer, of a 
libera! education. Vocational 
training is infinitely preferable, for 
a good carpenter can reach not 
only a genuine skill but also the 
discipline needed to learn it. 

Bui we need not choose between 
vocational training and genuine 
liberal education. Advocates of 
the latter would make room for 
more vocational training because 
they do not think of education as a 
“system" that processes children 
like sausages, and do not require 
everyone to have a university 
education or to stay at school until 
they are 16. 

What is at issue now is not 
whether there should be more 
vocational training but whether it 
should replace liberal education in 
those institutions where a genuine 
liberal education- still flourishes, 
institutions which are the glory of 
Britain arid iff'difficult 46. create. 
More generally., .tbt issue is 
whether we should aim at making 
all schools an extension of the 
workaday world, or should rather 
aspire to give everyone an experi- 
ence like Sir Ernest Barker's: 
"Outside the cottage. I had noth- 
ing but my school: but having my 
school, I had every thing." Michael 
Oakeshott's epitome of that 
experience should be memorized 
by every teacher and politician. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

Everyday tale of 
cricketing folk 


Last Saturday ] met one of my 
favourite soap operas, and found 
it was nearly true to life. It's called 
Test Mutch Special and it's Radio 
Three's only important serial. For 
those who have never heard it. it's 
set fn the commentary box of an 
international cricket match, and 
features such characters as Crusty 
Fred Trueman. Jolly Uncle Brian 
Johnston. Posh Christopher Mar- 
lin-Jenkins. statesmanlike Trevor 
Bailey, and a mathematical 
character called Bill Frindall. who 
either does not exist or is not 
senior enough lo get his own 
microphone. 

Well, last Saturday l was written 
into the scries for half an hour as 
an unexplained lunchtime guesL 
The match forming the back- 
ground was the second Test 
against New Zealand, the place 
Nottingham. And the day was one 

of those hazy sunny days which 
make the crowd lethargic, but not 
half as lethargic as the England 
bowling. 

At the pavilion. I found that the 
Test Match Special set was a series 
of boxes fixed to the front of the 
building, quite high up. The room 
was small, containing half a dozen 
people or more, not all of whom 
could sit. 

Whereas I had expected a room 
full of reverent silence, everyone 
was talking. Softly, admittedly, 
but still talking. One of these men 
must be broadcasting, but which 
one? Ah. the one with the old- ■ 
fashioned microphone pressed to 
his ftps like a metal moustache. 

At that moment, it was Crusty- 
Old Fred. Trueman, who looked 
vaguely dissatisfied with the state 
ol modem cricket, and the man in 
the other chair was Brian John- 
ston. who never looks dissatisfied 
wiih anything. The third man in a 
chair was bearded Bill Frindall. 
who has three stopwatches and 
enough charts to sink lhe Titanic 
He waved a bit of board at Brian, 
on which was written H 'clcomc 
World Service. 

“And w-c welcome World Ser- 
ice with the good news, good for 
listeners in New Zealand at least, 
where 1 think it's the middle of the 
night at the moment, but I'll ask 
Bill in a moment “ set Brian oflbn 
difficult sentence. The morning 
wore on. The England side toiled 

r 


without success. Fred groaned and 
said: “I don't' think Gatling knows 
wbat to do nexL I think he's totally- 
run out of ideas," though he was 
not on the air when he said it. 

Lunch neared, and some bottles 
of Frascati arrived, as well as some 
in-flight packed lunches. The 
room was so small that some 
people had to leave to make room 
for the tray. Then suddenly thev 
had all gone, and it was time for 
me and Brian to fill in at lunch. < 

But we were not quite alone. On 
the grass right in front of the 
commentary box 30 or 40 young 
people had appeared, all dressed 
as hotel assistant managers and 
carrying glittering instruments. 
They were a brass- band, and just 
as Brian turned to me and said: 
“Well. Miles, were you interested 
in cricket from an early . .. *.*“ jho 
started the first number. Brian and 
1 did not hear very much of each 
other after that. 

After lunch life in Test Match 
Special resumed its old .course, a 
rambling discourse over all hu- 
man life. The only real moment of 
excitement came when the visiting 
New Zealander got - uj* from his 
charrand said: “And HI hand over 
to Christopher Martin-Jenkins “ 
Only. Christopher Martin-Jenkins 
was nowhere to be seen. 

When he did arrive, in the nick 
of time. I was delighted to see him 
use a tnck which I have heard on 
the radio: Switching Fred On To 
An Anecdote. One of the New 
Zealanders got his maiden 50. and 
Chris ; said to Fred, all innocent- 
like. Do you remember your first 
half-century. Fred?" 

"D° I remember?" said Frvd 

nLm* 5 3t in lhc County 
1 at one end. 
and the Master were at t'other end. 
Sir Leonard Hution. of course 

&rl W h y ‘'* and Chris tamri 

^™r aV,ng g01 rid of the acting 
chores for some time e 

At th ree o'clock. I tiptoed awav 

^1 went I peeped into the T V 

room next door, h wax .. . 
granger in there. Evcrv^^ 
talking except the comment,, 

said virtual ™no £ a!i 

afternoon. Why should XJ! 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


II 



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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

5 A SURVIVOR’S SPEECH 

It Is almost exactly a year.- in the past year -is that Mr 
since. Piissident. P.W. Botha — A * J — 




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crossed- .his -own imaginary 
Rubicon — and- helptoi to 
piun^e -South Africa- into a - 
financial” crisis .from which -it 
b&ytl to;recoyer P It is small 
comfort J to those who desire a 
relatively peaceful, transition 
inSoulh- Africa thathis speech 
diis week to the faithful at the 
federal- congress of the- Na-; 
tionaf Party was maiicedly less 
caiamitons, but only because 
the damage had. already been 

discounted. 

:,Ater a hitter, bruising' year 
fat aJL who - have gone on . 
missions of persuasion to Pre- 
toria.' the wbrld has come* to 
reduce - its expectations: ■ of 
President Botha and his gov- 
ern'moit" It. ts- utdikeTy, thefe- 
fijre,” that Tuesday's speech 
will -add to the. concerns of 
those investors who have not 
yet .-fled the South African 
Market .-“'or further fuel the 
flames' of inteniaiionaf out- 
rage. 

" Indeed its virtues, if any, 
were entirely negative; Mr 
Botha 'did not lapse into his 
now customary: stance- of -fin- 
ger-waggmg cfcfiabce- of • an 
uilriisive"; / and;, preemptive 
#6ricL ; He\d!d not turn his 
bacK' -ori oommitment to his 
own ■ reforms -^-althdug^i the ~ 
temptation to disown or at 
feast- forget them while he 
assiduously: woos the Afri- 
kaner right wing must have 
been great. Instead he contin- 
ued to stress his dedication to 
dialogue with black commu- 
nities; to “broaden South 
Africa's -democratic in-. 
£titmibns'*- and -; to hint at 
“dr^rc- changes to the cbh- 
sthutron^t. ' . : . 

; The: probfem -r! which the 
rest bf .tiie. world has copie to 
appreciate somewhat painfully 


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To end - the “Greenpeace 
affair" Mr David Lange’s gov- 
ernment in. New. Zeafend was 
eyerjpjallr nrepa^i'to 

the - p^se:,Tvas.p6ined; by^ the 
leader of #e;^Opposinon ,- . 
tfade. before . menalitat . To 
lamb, in Europe 'ftt'wioked Mt 
€\fc*.Frenchr agemsr crime- Mr 
tan^;s ; Sariwider was expedi- 
eni-an^apprarS to have been * 
ao^pted as such' by . New 
Zealand opinion. Why then 
has thwe been no compromise 
6n the issue of the nuclear 
Opacity of visdng American 
Warships? • 

Perhar» the United- Slates 
4td~qo^ r&B 0 ~the -stakes- suf- - 
fidently. Washington, unlike _ 
Paris, Shis ^prepared to^play 
diplomatic -naKfliall -and visit 
upon New Zealanders* wallets 
tnetfopsequences of their pris- 
tine * desire 1 for. “nuclear 
fneedbm”- Perhaps New Zea- 
land public opinion simply 
wanted." tp. • enjoy two 
incompatible*: security pro- 
vided'by the United States and 
nuclear, cleanliness. When, 
soon. .Mr. Lange's Labour 
Batty facte the electorate some ’ 
choice beW«en them will have 
to. be .made^ • ’ : ; _ - 

; s ; No_ dfte'who values amity 
!among me nations of thfe Free 
."World: could have watched 
American action being taken 
-against New Zealand produce- 
without alarm; no member of 
that historic alliance which 
saw Antipodean troops serving 
alongside' Americans in. a 
'succession of European and 
Asian iheatres.of war can have 
wanted the ensuing riff. :. 

’ It -should never have been 


Botha’sdefinition of'draslic" is 
peculiarly his own. It is.not Sir- 
Geoffrey Howe's “quantum 
leap of the imagination'' and h 
certainly does not include any 
negotiations with the African 
National Congress or other 
exiled black organizations. In- 
deed perhaps- the greatest 
value of this week's speech is 
that it showed more clearly 
than any of his utterances over 
the past 18 months just how 
far he is prepared to go to reach 
ah accommodation with the 
black majority. 

The plan is for autonomous 
black city states in metropoli- 
tan South Africa and insis- 
tence on recognition of the 
independent homelands and 
increasing autonomy for the 
self governing homelands such 
as KwaZulu. It illustrates once 
again "his unshake&ble com- 
mitment to group rights and 
group identity as the corner- 
stone of his country's further 
constitutional , development 
Eclectic references to the 
political viability of mini- 
states such as San Marino and 
Liechtenstein and to. obscure 
former British colonies such as 
Vanuatu, bemuse European 
audiences but to those who 
understand Botha-speak they 
are useful signposts to his 
political destination — notone 
grudging step beyond a race or 
group federation in which 
power is shared without being 
lost 

And there's the mb. For 
despite his claims that black 
leaders are willing to. negotiate 
on those terras they are cer- 
tainly not "terms that will And 
favourwith the black majority: 
They also betray a key and 
persistent frilling . in the 
government's political think- 

AFTER ANZUS 

beyond the wit of Prime 
Minister Lange (which is large) 
and the capacity of Secretary 
of. State Shultz (who has been 
squeezed, by. -the. Pentagon) to 
find some form of../ words, 
putJiq or. private, that wbuld ' 
have", allowed American war- 
ships to - visit - New Zealand 
without:" declarations - about 
.their weaponry. The opportu- 
nity was let slip.' 

. . At the San Francisco meet- 
ing this week between the 
Australians and Mr Shultz, the 
exclusion of New Zealand 
from the pact became formal. 
The treaty is dead. Long live 
• -the informal treaties between 
the United States and Austra- . 
lia and between Australia and 
.New. Zealand,. 

Both those bilateral defence 
relationships may, in - fact 
have" been strengthened by 
these regrettable recent events. 
Even the South Pacific Nu- 
clear. Free Zone Treaty may 
have some value if it enhances 
Mr Lange's (and the Austra- 
lian prime minister's) regional 
role as architects and guar- 
antors of stability in the South 
Pacific. 

New Zealand attitudes have 
come to be characterized by 
some- as isolationist, in- 
trospective, pacifist But with- 
out diminishing the elements 
on Mr .Lange's left which 
favour “non- alignment**, ev- 
idence from the opinion polls 
denies this. Indeed the latest 
emphasise just how strong is 
the New Zealanders’ desire to 
maintain connexions with the 
wider world- Despite the rup- 
of ANZUS. 


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ture. of ANZUS. now . is the 

i CUBA’S REVOLUTIONARY GREYBEARD 

'Fidel Castro^ the firebrand of : An outwardly uncom- 
yesaerday's : revolutions, has promising leadership has been 
joined the pensionable classes, forced into compromise. The 

generation of warriors is being 
eased out of influence. At the 
Communist Party Congress 
six months ago, educated man- 
agers, women and. blacks re- 
placed a number of the old 
warriors, Castro gave himself a 
deputy in the form of his 
younger brother' Raul. There 
has been a partial rapproche- 
ment with the Roman Catho- 
lic Church and a visit by the 
Pope is being planned. 

But it is abroad where the 
decline in Cuba's revolu- 
tionary fervoufand reputation 
has been most marked. Some 
of Cuba’s internationalist ten- 
tacles have been slowly re- 
tracted, Cubans still serve in 
Africa - an estimated 35.000 
in Angola and 10,000 in 
Ethiopia. 

But African adventures are 
no longer a .substitute for 
neighbourly accommodation. 

After the debacle in Grenada 
three years ago, .Castro has 
welcomed peaceful change in 
Brazil. Argentina and Guate- 
mala: he has not increased aid 
to . Nicaragua in step with 
increases ih American aid to 
the anti-Sandi nista rebels. The 


Unlike his lounge-suited spon- 
; sofSi.in Moscow, he has pre- 
-served his revolutionary vis- 
!age intact His battle fatigues, 
fus impassioned oratory, his 
•talk- of: turning the world 
’upside down have: faded little 
■pver - the years. The - same 
cannot be said of the- Cuba he 
■Has led fpr the past 27 years. „ 
i..;Commtitiist Cuba is .settling 
.less. lhan. gracefully mjo mid- 
-dle age. The ’inspiration of 
youth, "the. ; pioneering.- spirit 
thecertamties of the past — ail 
-hive left behind them a coun- 
try where the P°° r ^ un " 
doubted ly richer, but so are the 
nch;, where; the living for the 
many " is- more secure, but 
.freedom and variety, has gone 
tfrom life: '• 

Castro “‘at 60 is presiding 
oyer a country whose stigar- 
^bihipated .economy is ip ruin, 
.to the point where It last year 
had tp buy sugar, abroad." to 
"meet- sdes-obUgatiqns to- the 
Soviet' Union- Cuba ^is deeply 
■indebted, both to Moscow and 
West ffs. social pro-, 
grammes have stowed, its! 
‘essays into the tourist industry 
have friiled. Its prisons are full. 


Duvalier clan was ousted in 
Haiti without Cuba's interven- 
tion or help. 

The gulf between Cuba and 
the United States, however, 
remains unbridged. Periodic 
overtures and hints of over- 
tures have foundered on 
apparent trivialities. So far, the 
spectre of the hostile super- 
power has provided justifica- 
tion of a kind for the 
deprivations of Cuba’s siege 
economy and closed society, 
whatever the human suffering 
Involved. Nor has the Cuban 
phenomenon — a Marxist state 
subsisting on" Soviet aid at the 
very doorstep of the United 
States - been .without its 
advantages for successive 
administrations in Wash- 
ington. 

So far change has suited 
neither side. But it may not be 
slow in coming If Havana’s 
relationship with Moscow 
cools in deference to improved 
Sovict-US relations, if the 
debts -can neither be paid nor 
postponed, if material 
deprivation threatens instabil- 
ity. then the image as well as 
the fact of revolution in Cuba 
may be change. And Fidel 
Castro will start to show his 
age. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Collapse of La Mama franchise An antidote for 


tng — an obsession with struc- 
tures which, lacking black 
"support, lack legitimacy and 
finally will be unable to stand. 
Thus has Pretoria produced in 
the last few years one constitu- 
tional device after another, 
from black local authorities to 
regional service councils, only 
to find the plaster they are 
applying to the fundamental 
division in South African poli- 
tics will not stick. 

Mr Botha's speech, which 
was addressed not so much to 
the world (which he now 
appears to have dismissed 
from his calculations) as to his 
own people, a speech which 
attempted to survey Af- 
rikanerdom's present, past and 
future on the planet, cannot be 
dismissed as out of tune with 
the time. It certainly showed 
once again the almost un- 
bridgeable divide between Pre- 
toria's perception of the world 
and the -world's perception of 
South Africa. But it was very 
much a product of what the 
world has done to white South 
Africa m the last tumultuous 
year. 

It has enabled Mr Botha to 
say with conviction that he 
will rally most of white South 
Africa behind him fn making 
the choice is now between 
survival and suicide. And to 
insist that white South Africa 
will survive on its own terms. 

Those terms are still rooted 
in the past and in Mr Botha’s 
own political histoiy. For all 
that be has led South Africa 
into the first stumbling steps of 
reform, he remains a product 
of early post-war nationalism, 
the last survivor of the genera- 
tion that invented apartheid. 
He cannot now take his coun- 
try or his constituency much 
further. 


moment for New Zealand to 
be encouraged in its search for 
that connection. 

• A central objective of diplo- 
macy in the South Pacific must 
in some-sense be to rope in the 
micro-states scattered between 
Port Moresby and Honolulu 
Into some credible western- 
leaning grouping, one that 
recognizes their often prickly 
sense of identity. In such a 
grouping the New Zealanders, 
especially in the posture 
adopted by Mr Lange at 
Raratonga a year ago and this 
week in Suva, are natural 
leaders; New Zealand leverage 
could, in time, stabilize the 
region' and, • by so doing, 
diminish the opportunities for 
Soviet adventuring. A non- 
nuclear New Zealand might, in 
other words, have some use. 

MrLange — with the Austra- 
lians - has made the nuclear- 
free zone treaty, a regional 
rallying point. The United 
Kingdom and the United 
States have been asked to 
adhere to its protocols and, 
since the treaty would circum- 
scribe neither the passage of 
nuclear armaments nor the 
American Pacific bases, there 
is a good deal to be gained if 
London and Washington are 
seen to approve. 

Mr Lange Ji as argued that 
the long-run security of the 
South Ficific does not depend 
on the occasional deployment 
of nuclear weapons in New 
Zealand ports. He is right, 
although that in no way ex- 
cuses the manner of 
Wellington's whimsical 
disruption of its pact. 


Front the Editor of Franchise 
World 

Sir. Reporting (August 9) on the 

e of a number of La Mama 
uses you headline your 
story. “Franchises: who takes' the 
blame?" Whilst I have even- 
sympathy with anyone who has 
lost money. I am afraid that much 
of the blame in this case seems to 
lie with the franchisees them- 
selves. They appear to have 
ignored the basic ground rule in 
evaluating a franchise — talk to 
existing franchisees (chosen by 
you. not the franchiser). 

Lawrence Lever writes that 
people were still buying La Mama 
franchises in August. October and 
even November — the month in 
which the receiver was called in to 
the franchising company. Given 
that there is substance in the 
franchisees’ complaints, surely by 
ihat time the writing must have 
been clearly on the wall in the 
shops of the earlier franchisees. 

A franchise has to start some- 
where. But those who buy in at the 
formative stage must realise that 
the risks are high — perhaps 
approaching the same level as they 
are when starting up entirely 
independently. As the number of 
franchisees increases and time 
passes, the risk, if the outlets are 
successful, diminishes and new- 
comers can base their assessment 
on the results being achieved bv 
those who joined earlier. There is 
a world of difference between 
buying, say. a Wimpy fianchise 
and a franchise that was launched 
six months ago. 


Then: is no evidence here or in 
the US to indicate that franchisers 
can diversify successfully. There- 
fore. potential franchisees should 
not assume, as the} appear to have 
done at La Mama, that because 
the franchiser is successful in one 
field he will automatically be 
capable of repeating that success 
in another type of business, even if 
it is closely related. 

All this, however, tsno consola- 
tion to those La Mama franchisees 
who arc in trouble. Their best 
course would probably be to 
exercise patience and give the new 
owner of the franchising company. 
Cyril Spencer, die opportunity to 
work out a solution. 

What lesson docs La Mama 
hold for franchising in general? 
Potential franchisees must never 
lake short cuts in assessing a 
franchise, but painstakingly follow 
the guidelines that are clearly laid 
down, and if they are among the 
first to buy into a new concept 
-then they must accept the feet that 
the risks are that much greater. 

There is today plenty of advice 
available to help prospective 
franchisees. If people will only 
lake the trouble to read and ad 
upon such advice you will, hope- 
fully. m the future not have to 
pose the question. **Who takes the 
blamer 
Yours smcercK. 

ROBERT RULING. Editor. 
Franchise If arid. 

James House. 

37 Nottingham Road. SWI7. 
August 12 


Power from the sun 

From Professor D. Bnve-Smirh 
Sir, In the wake of the Chernobyl 
disaster there have been various 
public assertions that the use of 
nuclear power stations fbr electric- 
ity generation cannot be dropped 
because it is the only alternative to 
reliance on non-renewing coal and 
other fossil fuels. 

There is evidently a serious lack 
of awareness about recent 
developments in large-scale power 
generation from sunlight using 
multi-layer photovoltaic cells. 
These cells are based on cheap 
amorphous silicon rather than the 
expensive monocrystalline silicon 
that has made such devices only 
suitable for specialized applica- 
tions in the past. 

In 1985. US production of 
amorphous silicon solar cells was 
already equivalent to about 8 
megawatts and a senior British 
photoebemist who visited Japan 
last year informed me that the 
Japanese “are rolling them off like 
newspapers". Most Of the work in 
this important field is-beihg done 
in Jdpan-and the US, and Britain 
JOOks: like missing the boat yet 
again, even though some of the 


pioneering work that led to this 
breakthrough was earned out by- 
Walter Spear, at the University of 
Dundee. 

Although Britain is not very- 
high in the world's sunlight league, 
our solar radiation flux is suf- 
ficiently high for the Government 
and the CEGB seriously to re- 
consider the solar energy- option 
for large-scale electricity' genera- 
tion in the light of these latest 
technical developments. 

I agree that we shall incrmingly 
need the nudear option in the 
future; but the sun is a fer safer 
nuclear reactor than man-made 
devices, and has no waste-disposal 
problems or risk of accidents. We 
are now very close to the eco- 
nomic and practical large-scale 
generation of electricity from solar 
radiation, even if the news has not 
yet reached those responsible for 
what passes as an energy policy in 
Britain. 

Yours faithfully. 

D. BRYCE-SMITJH. 

Department of Chemistry, ’ 
University of Reading, ' 
Wbitdcnigjus. 

Reading. Berkshire. 

August 6. 


Sanctions debate 

From Dr Blair Worden 
Sir, An academic conference on 
Sir Philip Sidney, to which I was 
to have been a contributor, is to be 
held early next month at Zutphen. 
the Dutch town where Sidney died 
four hundred years ago. One 
speaker, invited long ago and an 
expert on literary manuscripts, has ■ 
now been “excluded" from the 
conference on the ground, not of 
any actions or opinions of his, but 
solely of his nationality. That 
nationality is South African, a 
point necessary to an explanation 
of the case but irrelevant to the 
principle involved. 

The British and Dutch or- 
ganizers of the conference explain 
that they have taken this step at 


the behest of “the Council of the 
Municipality of Zutphen". a spon- 
sor of the event, which is acting 
“in line with Dutch government 
and university policy". Un- 
deterred. the organizers will “press 
on with preparations fora success- 
ful conference". 

Docs it never occur to those 
who wish to dictate the future of 
South Africa that liberty begins at 
home? As the movement that 
passes for liberalism becomes ever 
more powerful and ever more 
illiberal, academics of all people 
ought to be able to discern the 
dangers — and ought to resist the 
temptations of appeasement. 
Yours faithfully. 

BLAIR WORDEN. 

St Edmund Hail. Oxford. 


Lost chords 

From MrsF.de Verd Leigh 
Sir. Mr Meredith (August 5) 
intimated that there might be 
peace for genuine prayer in the 
Kremlin cathedrals. Yesterday, in 
those same cathedrals. I observed 
that not only is there a steady 
tramp of fret through these once 
hallowed walls, and voices raised 
in many tongues: but also the 
queue for compulsory tickets was 
over an hour long. 

During the one Mass (Ortho- 
dox) I attended, whilst in Lenin- 
grad not only was there 
competition for the wonderful 


unaccompanied cantor and choir 
from the tourists, but also from 
energetic workmen renovating the 
interior above the heads of the 
communicants. 

Perhaps the fact that the praise 
of God continues despite all this, 
and in a communist state, evokes 
the awe and genuine prayer that it 
does and will continue to over- 
come the minor difficulties of 
tourism. 

Yours feithfuilv. 

FRANCES de V. LEIGH. 
Dennetts. 

Broughton, 

Stockbndge. Hampshire. 

August 10. 


A fairer chair 

From Mr P. J. M. Sinclair 
Sir. If August is the month for 
shooting grouse, it is also seem- 
ingly the season for sniping at the 
hapless Chairman of the Conser- 
vative Party. In 1980 and 1981 
Lord Thomeycroft was under fire: 
in 1983 it was Cecil Parkinson: m 
1984 and 1985 John Selwyn 
Gummer. This year Norman 
Tebbil is the target. But critics, in 
fairness, should train their sights 
not on the man but on the 
undemocratic way m which the 
Conservative Party is organised 
and controlled. 

The party chairman is ap- 
pointed. not elected. If he foils, 
often for little fault of his own. he 
is either unceremoniously re- 


moved. or punished by having 
Jeffrey Archer appointed as his 
deputy. Now it is rumourcd that a 
second deputy chairman is to be 
appointed — presumably to tour 
the constituencies trying to ex-- 
plain away the gaffes of the first. 

When will Conservative Party 
members demand and win the 
right to elect the chairman (and 
indeed the deputy chairman and 
treasurers) of their own 
organisation: before the party wins 
the next election, or after it loses 
if 5 

Yours faithfully. 

P.J.M. SINCLAIR 
April Cottage. 

Amcrsham Road. 

Chalfont St Peter, 
Buckinghamshire. 

August 8. 


Presidential terms 

From Mr Raymond Barker 
Sir. In your leading article (August 
S) about the move by Mr uuy 
VanderJagL the Michigan Repub- 
lican. to get the 22nd Amendment 
to the American Constitution 
repealed, you wme: ~. . . the 
amendment forbade any future 
incumbent to stand for presiden- 
tial office more than once more," 
That is not quite accurate, on two 
scores. 

In the first place, the amend- 
ment expl tally exempted from its 
provisions whoever might be 
president at the time it came into 
force. That exclusion clause was 
written in by ns Republican 
sponsors, in 1947 partly in the 
hope and (not unreasonable) 
expectation that ^>y the lime u 


came into force, a Republican 
would be occupying the White 
House. In the event of course. 
President Truman won the 1948 
election so that, even though the 
amendment was finally ratified m 
1951. he remained theoretically 
eligible to seek an indefinite 
number of tcrms.of office. 

Secondly, the amendment also 
laid down' that if anyone should 
succeed to the Presidency (from 
the Vice- Presidency) in the second 
half ofa given presidential term of 
office, that indi' idual was entitled 
to serve out the remainder of that 
term, and then seek mo further 
full terms in his own right 

Thus. Lyndon Johnson became 
President on November 22. 1963. 
beyond the half-way point of 
President Kenneth's term John- 


son was therefore entitled to seek 
election in 1964, which of course 
he won by a landslide, and again in 
196S. On March 31. 1968, how- 
ever. he announced that he would 
not be standing again. 

It is deliciously ironic that the 
first two “victims" of the amend- 
ment — which, as you say. was 
"inspired by the Republican Party 
m 1947 as a' way of denigrating the 
memory oFFranklm Roosevelt"— 
have both turned out to be 
Republican presidents: Dwight D. 
Eisenhower and Ronald Reagan. 

Yours faithfully. 

RAYMOND BARKER 
10 South Close. 

Tranmcrc Park. 

Guiselcy. 

Leeds. West Yorkshire 
August 8 



meningitis 

From Dr II P Ferrer 
Sir. There has been considerable 
emphasis on the future control of 
outbreaks of meningitis by 
developments including vaccines 
etc. 

This high-icchnology approach 
has still to be dev eloped but in the 
meantime simple precautionary 
measures, especially improved 
ventilation, could be undertaken 
without delay. It is known that 
meningitis bacillus is earned by up 
to 10 per cent of the population 
and that spread is by close human 
comacL which is especially likely 
in crowded conditions. 

The increased cost of fuel has 
meant that many institutions such 
as schools, offices etc. keep win- 
dows dosed throughout the day 
and the thick atmosphere that 
develops is ideal for transmission 
of meningitis. 

Opening of windows used to be 
a routine which was implemented 
rigorously before fuel costs made 
it unpopular. Perhaps a return to 
improved ventilaiion may help io 
reduce ihe transmission of men- 
ingitis. 

Let's have some fresh air? 

Yours feithfuilv. 

H. P. FERRER". 

District Medical Officer. 

Worcester and District Health 
Au thorny, 

Isaac Maddox House. 

Shrub Hill Road. Worcester. 
August 12. 

Gurkhas incident 

From Mr D. F. Britt 
Sir. In your issue today (August S) 
there is an article about the grossly 
underpaid Gurkha soldiers from 
Nepal, who. it is claimed, have 
won 26 VCs. Should not brown, 
mercenary soldiers, employed by 
the British Army, be paid the same 
rate for the job as our own 
soldiers, if they face the same 
bullets, as thev did in the Folk- 
lands? 

This fact alone is a possible 
explanation of their alleged mis- 
conduct in such an expensive 
place as Haw-ait, where American 
prices and high cost of living 
would operate. Much concern is 
expressed here on all sides about 
the disparity between black and 
white in South Africa: by the same 
logic there should be no distinc- 
tion between brown and white in 
our modem .Army. . 

Native soldiers (the Army's 
term I of the Indian Army, w hich 
included the Gurkhas, only be- 
came eligible for the award of the 
VC in 1911 on the occasion of 
King George V"s visit to India. 
Native-born Gurkhas have not 
won 26 VCs since then. 

It is possible that all the original 
10 regiments of the Gurkha Rifles, 
the majority of whom remained in 
India after that country's indepen- 
dence. may have been awarded 
this total in the 130-year history of 
the VC. However, this total can 
only be achieved by including the 
medals won by British. t.e.. white. 
Gurkha officers and white staff 
officers of the old Indian Army, 
attached to the Gurkha Rifles on 
temporary duty, prior to 191 1. 
Yours faithfully. 

DEREK BRATT. 

26 Windsor Road, 

Mableihorpe. Lincolnshire. 

August 8. 

New passport 

From Mr Miles Cato 
Sir. 1 cannot share Lord BciheH's 
apparent enthusiasm (despite his 
reservations) for a Euro-passport 
(feature. August 5). What is so 
newly humble about Great Britain 
that the present passport is “too 
arrogantly grand" 9 
Yet there may be a simple 
solution for those dismayed by the 
unwelcome arrival of the new 
Euro-pass port. When my grand 
old one expires I will simply 
remove the inside pages and fix 
the feeble new one inside. I would 
suggest ail patriots do the same. 

^ ours faithfully. 

MILES CATO. 

Bwlch Uchaf. 

Rhoslefam. 

Tywyn. Gwynedd. 

August 5. 

A pinch of salt 

From Miss D. J. Ide 
Sir. He’s done it again - not once, 
but twice. I do love your compos- 
itor even ifheisonlya micro-chip. 

No wonder the crew of Trilogy 
(report from Cowes, August 8) had 
their hands full controlling the 
boat and fell out of the frame when 
running back to Leon Solent. 

I would have fallen out of the 
frame too — he sounds a real dish. 
Yours feithfuilv. 

DIANE J. IDEi 
Quayle. 

Banlham. 

Nr Kingsbndge. South Devon. 
August 8. 


AUGUST 14 hvc 

Onr nf Gilbert i "Thr Cr. f j. »vr 
Jrs*np \ , ISTl Ji*vi ■ 
inn inis tins anainy. Au^raiic 
Althnunh naruraj'y i.-ftf. r ,i» 
Jcxistip’x maun, in nh.'rh he 

« iirrd /!>-/ run i. f Jjivr it. ■n 
than i mi- hrm a »:«• st .-n - iJ 

-itf and earned hit, but ;<■ : u 
ind Rhode*, ic*: man ;.-j ;/ i: ! r i : 
needed, n hu "*h>pped !ht 

unes. judini'tish lef: rt’e 

risimt iff hal!-.." end m.-iw the 

a inning hit 


[CRICKET.] 

(ENGLAND V AUSTRALIA. 

|Frum Our SjKviaf l «in.-sp.>nd.n: t 

Whatever may he ssiid uhoui th«* 
un?-dl blue lory weather that » run 
Hers have experienced thin w.i 
iheyear haspmduci-d iwi-Mru^k- 
lhal ran never have hern mkjuw 
fur excitement. England ha- In* 1 
ihe rubber, hut her deirjl .it 
MancheMer and her vu'f**rv a: th 
Oval will never be lurp-tlni. .iim 
! both were much in her credit. 

Every batsman on his »vjv to the 
wicket yesterday tell ihai »n hi 
sunt-**, nr failure d the :.t! 

ol the match. In other word-, tin 
match was always in a criu*..il 
position, and evrrv run had (•« in. 1 
{ought fur. The how linn **i Nlr 
Trumhle could nut haw h.'» n 
heller. Every varietv ,1 pilch 
hrrak hack seemed he .it h: 
command, and he never sent dew: 
a Kill nt had lengi h. In t hi- he u 
very different bowler tnm Mr 
Saunders, who huwls a verv diflt' 
culi lull, hut many verv b.ui»nos - 
ut Mich had lenyth that a child 
could store fmm them. Mr 
Trumble bowled from the ii.ndi.in 
end irum half -past l] m the 
mi inline until four in the .liter 
noon. He w jr never take:] «>|i. tu 
was his lMWling once toiLm-d ::i an 
innings of lifi;,. 

At the end of the second dj\ 
play Australia were runs jhv.it! 
with two wickets in Kind. No r.r.n 
had fallen in the night, hut it was 
generally thought that the wukc 
would be slow and easy There was. 
however, a heavy dew. and the 
wicket up to luncheon tun. wj 
very difficult and never bvvaine 
easy all day 

At 11.35 England began the la-; 
innings no u wicket that appeared 
madr to suit the Australian attack 
and the firM three wickets fell for 
ten ruuK. The chances were quity 
four lu one on Australia at this 
stage, and six to one when the iittft 
wickel fell at -Id. The batsmen dui 
not play well, but there wo-s evert 
excuse i»n such a wicket and 
against such bowling. But Mr 
Jackson was still in and wonderful- 
ly free was his play To him i» dui 
to a very large extent. England's 
victory. On- five occasions in the;, 
Iasi five test matches has Mr 
Jackson had to go in at a critical 
moment for his side, and only once 
did he feiL There is no lutsman m 
ihe world whose nerve is mi surely 
to be relied on. When he w.ts Mined 
by Mr. Jessup the great stand that 
paved the way for victory was 
made. Up to lunch time the wicket 
was so difficult that nobt*dy could 
have fell surprised if either bats- 
man had got out: but they stayed m 
and brought the score to 87. though 
Mr. Jessup appeared to give 
chance nf stumping, anrl was 
missed by Mr Trumper off a 
difficult chance in the long field. 
Runs came fast after luncheon. Mr 
Jp5sop putting in some of his finest 
work, while Mr Jackson wai 
content to take things steadily 
Tiki much use was made •■! Mr 
Saunders who was now bowling a 
very bad length and was freely 
punished by Mr Jessup. Three full 
pitches and one lung-hop were 
bowled consecutively, and 17 run-, 
were scored from une over Mr 
■Jackson was then caught and 
bowled by Mr Trumhle tor 4tf. 
after an hour and forty minute- 
first-rate batting. The match ap 
peared io be lost when he left Hir-iJ 
came in next, and he, Mr Jessup, 
and Mr. Jackson were the tlnv«- 
hemes of this famous innings. It 
must, however he confessed that 
Hirst looked very like heuiu l-b-w 
to Mr. Trumble almost immediate- 
ly after he went in. Mr Jessup 
continued his hitting, and -ent Mr 
Trumble twice in un over into the 
pavilion . . . Mr. Jessup must h jv e 
lunged for Mr. Saunders again. He 
could not hit Mr Armstrong's leg 
balls with a little break on m hii 
usual style, and the new bowler got 
him caught at short leg. Mr Jessup 
has accomplished several vei* 
wonderful performances in his lue. 
but has frequently, both here and 
in Australia, failed against the 
Colonial bowling. Bui as long iis 

crirket history lasis will this great 

performance be remembered. Hv. 
ran risks as every man must who 
makes more than a run a minute, 
but he only gave two chances, and 
one of them was verv- difficult 


Not cricket 

From Mr -1 J Soble 
Sir. The naming of a cncket team 
as a squad b> the media (letter. 
August 9) is indeed abhorrent and 
wrong. Equal!*, to report that 
Bowler X “picked up** so man> 
wickets is indefensible 
Wickets are taken as a result of* 
work and sweat. “Picked up" - 
ugh! 

Yours faithfulh. 

A. J. NOBLE' 

Crossbill House. 

B\ Auchterarder. Perthshire v 
August 9 

Getting the bird 

From Mrs 4 M Goldstein 
Sir. Since when has the Glorious 
Twelfth heralded the open season 
for Christmas catalogues” A right 
and left dropped on to the 
breakfesl table tilts morning, one 
of them from the World Wildlife 
Fund. 

Yours faithfully. 

ANNA GOLDSTEIN. 

Kent Edge. Crockham Hill. 
Edenbndge. Kent. 

August 12. 


v 


u 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


COURT AND SOCIAL 


SOCIAL 

NEWS 


Princess Anne win open the new 
container terminal at 
Felixstowe. Suffolk, on Septem- 
ber i 6, and. later, as President of 
ihe Missions to Seamen, will 
visit the ' Felixstowe Seafarers' 
Centre. 

The Princess of Wales will 
present the prizes at the Young 
Engineer for Britain com- 
petition. organised by the En- 
gineering Council, at the 
Wembley Conference Centre on 
September 17. 

Princess Anne will open the 
North London Business 
Development Agency at 37 
Blacfcstock Road. Finsbury 

Park, bn September 17. 


Princess Anne wilt attend the 
Associated Press dinner at Mid- 
dle Temple Hall on September 
17. 

The Princess oTWaies, Patron of 
the British Lung Foundation, 
will visit the foundation at 
Brompton Hospital on Septem- 
ber 18 

Princess Anne will open 
Lightfoot House, the qew Carr- 
Gomm (Midlands) Society's 
home at Kitts ' Green, Bir- 
mingham. on September 18. She 
will visit HM Prison Winson 
Green and later open Park lands 
Housing Society's sheltered 
housing scheme at PelsalL 
Walsall. 

The Prince of Wales. Com- 
modore of the Royal Thames 
Yacht Gub, accompanied ■ by 
the Princess of Wales, will 
attend the America's Cup Ball at 
Grosvenor House on September 
19. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr A. Gammer 
and Miss MJF. Aspinall 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr and 
Mrs E.N. Gummer. of London 
W8. and Melanie, elder daugh- 


Mr JJ5. Rndgard 
and Miss SXRedseU 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of Mr and 
Mrs E.M.S. Rudgard, of Woods 
Court. Bad les mere, Kent, and 


ter ofMrand Mrs J.W. Aspinall, ' Stephanie, daughter of Mr and 

Mrs A.E. RedseJL of Nash 
Court, Boughton-under-Bkan, 


of Famham, Surrey. 

Mr S.C. Fraser 
and Miss FJ. Tytier 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs P.B. Fraser, of 
Wimbledon. London, and 
Fiona, eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs R.M. Tytier. of 
Haslemere, Surrey. 

Dr R-W. Hobbs 
and Miss A.C. Dobson 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard William, son 
of Mr and Mrs Ronald Hobbs, 
of Banbury, and Alison Clare, 
daughter of Mrs Margaret Dob- 
son. of Brancepeth Castle, Dur- 
ham. and the late Mr Dennis 
Dobson. 

Major-General R.M. J errant 
and Mrs J.A. Naylor 
The marriage has been arranged 
between Richard J errant. CB, 
MBE, late Royal Tank Regi- 
ment. of Trevanson, 
Wadebridge. Cornwall, and Su- 
san. widow of Mr John Naylor, 
of The Mill House, Brantley, 
Hampshire. 

Mr RJ. Leartnont 
and Miss AJ. Thomas 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of Major- 
General J.H. Learmont, CBS. 
and Mrs Learmont, of Cuny 
Rivd, Somerset, and Amanda 
Jane, eldest daughter of Mrs J. 
Carpenter and stepdaughter of 
Mr Carpenter, of Gaygate, 
Surrey. 


Kent. 


Mr C. Stone 
and Miss C. SQoock 
The engagement is announced 
between Colin, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs Alfred Stone, of 
Lower Weedon. Northampton- 
shire, and Cheryl, younger 
daughter of Mrs Maurice 
Silcock. of Snaresbrook, 
London. 


Mr A.G. Torrance 
and Miss CA. Ormerod 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr and 
Mrs T.E.R. Torrance, of Bath, 
and Clare, (laughter of Brigadier 
and Mrs Denis Ormerod. of 
Allcar. 


Mr H J> Younger 
and Miss SJL Engel 
The engagement is announced 
between Hugh, elder son of Mr 
Gavin Younger, of Chapel-on- 
Leader, Berwickshire, and Mrs 
Diana Younger, of 
Friarshawmuir, Midlem, 
Selkirkshire, and Sophie, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs F.B. 
Engel, of Hunter’s Lodge, 
Moniaive, Dumfriesshire. 


Birthdays 

today 


Major-General J. W. Charming- 
Williams. 78: Mr Fred Davis, 
73: Vice-Admiral Sir Peter 
Dawnay. 82: Sir David Evans, 
93: Dr H. Montgomery Hyde, 
79: Dom Philip Jebb. 54; Profes- 
sor Sir Andrew Kay, 70; Lord 
Mishcon, 71; Mr Frederic Ra- 
phael 55: Lady Swaythling, 78; 
Mr Feliks Topolski, 79; Sir 
Charles Villiers, 74; Lord 
Whaddon, 59: Mr Sydney 
Wooderson. 72. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr David Roycroft, formerly 
assistant private secretary to the 
Prince of Wales, to be Admin- 
istration Manager and Com- 
pany Secretary of Independent 
Television News from Septem- 
ber 1. 


Christening 

The infant son of Mr and Mrs 
Thomas Bek was christened 
Charies Thomas Hamar by the 
Rev E.D.R. Simms at St 
Andrew's Church, Tich borne, 
on July 27. The godparents are 
Mr Charles Delevjugne, Mr 
John Raymond. Mr Laurie 
Hunter, the Marchioness of 
Reading, Mrs Michael Sugden 
and Mrs Michael Bird. 


Marriages 

The Rev M J. Hemraod 
and Miss C.R. Browne 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, August 9, at St John’s 
Church, East Dulwich, between 
the Rev Martin Hen wood and 
Miss Caroline Browne. 

Mr M.R. Orduul 
and Miss C.E. Bridge 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. August 2. in Notting- 
ham, between Mr Mark Robert 
Ore hart and Miss Christine 
Elizabeth Elvidge. A reception 
was held at Colwicfc Hall, 
Nottingham. 

MrC.K. Sieracki 
and Miss M J. Stiassni 
The marriage look place on 
Saturday. August 2. at the 
Kenwood Community Church, 
Kenwood, Sonoma Valley, 
California, between Mr Chris- 
tian K. Sieracki, son of Dr and 
Mrs Carl Sieracki, of Burling- 
ton. Connecticut, and Miss 
Margaret J. Stiassni, daughter of 
Mrs John £. Gerli. of Green- 
wich, Connecticut, and the late 
Mr Charles Stiassni. A reception 
was held at the Kenwood Depot 



Thoughtful moments captured during a children's coaching session held yesterday at the World Chess Championships in- 
London. Mark Jackson (left)* Nicola Him and Paul Colburn ponder their next moves (Photographs: Harry Kerr). 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and hi Memoriam 


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5.30pm Monday to Friday, on Satur- 
day between U , 00 am and 12 noon. 
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PDHTHCOMMB MARRIAGES. WED0M6S 
ck oo Court and Social Page 85 a In 
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st Mark a. w 


BIRTHS 


On Ctonous 1 2th August, al 
.Ihe Middlesex Hospital, to Georgina 
and Rick, a daughter. Charlotte Kay 
-Rosuu 

BOLADO - To Elisabeth Jane auSe 
SJofttei and Andris, a son. Andres 
Juan Anionlo Bolado at 9.28am on 
' 13th August at Bristol Maternity 
Hospital. 

CUMIES-ROSS On August 7th. in 
Cocos. Indian Ocean, to victoria (nee 
Vickers) and John, a sister for Kate 
.and Jock 
COUPS ■ On CUt August, to Sarah into 
Grmdey) and Matthew, a daughter. 
Charlotte Elizabeth. 

DALTON On 8th August 1986. at 
Queen Charlotte's Maternity Hasps 
tal. Hammersmith . to Jennie (nee 
Keane) and Andrew, twin sons. 
Frederick victor Burden and 
Beniamin Edward Alexander, 
brothers (or Abigail. 

DALY ■ On llth August. 1986 at St. 
Thomas' Hospital, to Chrtsbane (nee 
Samuel) and John, a boy. James 
Christian 

DMEYER On August 10th. to 
.Alexandra and william, a son. 
EYLCS see Kershaw. 

INGHAM On August 8th. 1986 In 
Annapolis. USA to Naomi mee 
Webber) and Ptunip. a son. Charles 
Geoffrey Clayton, a brother for 
James. 

KERSHAW on August 10th to Mane 
(Nee Eytes) and Richard, a daughter. 
Jane Mane Durell. 

LEAROYB On Thursday. 7th August, 
to Beterley mee WeUieropi and Pe- 
ter. the safe arrival of a beautiful 
baby boy. Gregory Jon. 

LEATMAH On 12th August, to 
Catherine (nee Adnanopoulos) and 
Jonathan, a daughter, Cecily, a sister 
lor Jane 

MADSEN On llth August, at St 
.Georges' Hospital, lo Caroline (nee 
Shepherd) and Mark, a son. 
Christopher John, a brother for 
„ James Peter 

MOORE. On 13Ut August to Alison 
mee Drake) and the late Anthony 
william Moore, a daughter and a sis- 
ter for Rosemary. Charlotte Antonia. 
PARR to Helen and Andrew a daugh- 
ter a sister for William and Ltzzle. 
PAYNE. On Aug. 1 2 The West London 
Hospital to Ann (nee BalUnga!) & An- 
drew. a son. Frederick William 
Robertson. 

ROT1IWEU. - On 1 5Ui August at Luton 
and Dunstable Hospital, to Detrdre 
and Tom. a son. William David. 

5A VELD-HOLT on 7Ui August at 
Gum Charlotte's Hospital to 
Rosseda and Ed. a boy. Miles Alexan- 
der. a brother for James Elliott. 
SCOTT MONCWEFF ■ On August 1st. 
to Robert and Kale, a son. wuuam 
Louis 

SHERBROOKE ■ On 8th August 1986. 
to Miranda and Simon, a son. a 
brother for Archie-. Rosie and Ben. 
THOMPSON - On August 12th at 
Lewisham Hospital- to Alison into 
Finn i and Stephen, a son. 

WEBBER on August 12th to Susan 
(nee Drake) and Charles, a son. 
George Wmgyett 

WHITE On August 1 1 th. at Portland 
Hospital, lo Janet (nee Collmgndget 
and Boh. another one, Alexander 
Leo 


MARRIAGES 


ARNOLD JONES s CONNOR - The 

marriage has taken place between 
Mr Richard Arnold Jones, son of the 
late Mr and Mrs J. AmcM Jones, and 
Miss Jean Marie Connor, daughter of 
Mrs D.G. Connor and the late Maior 

D.G. Connor. 

LLOYD : CALMETTES - On August 
2nd. 1986 at Bonnat France. 
Michael Colin Lloyd of Southend-on- 
Sea to Christine Raymond® 
Calmettes of EcoubillaL Bonnet. 
WMTTINGHAM s CHAMBERS - Flnal- 
lyl Keith Whltllngham to 0» 
Chambers an 13 August 1986 at 
Chelsea Registry Office. 


DEATHS 


BOATH very suddenly but peacefully 
In Kings Cross HospilaL Dundee. On 
Sunday August KNh 1986. Elizabeth 
Siratheam. beloved wife of John 
Boaih. 22 Ramsay Street. Brough ty 
Ferry. Dundee. A beloved -mother 
and grandmother. 

BOYDEN ■ On August 12th. at the Rad- 
eftffe infirmary, following a fan at 
home. Mollte aged 83. widow of 
Dents, much loved mother arid 
grandmother. Private cremation. 
Memorial Service and Interment of 
ashes at All Saints. Btstum on Fri- 
day. September 19th at 12 noon. No 
Rowers please: donations, tf desired, 
to John Groom's Association for Dis- 
abled or Keston College. Kent or 
Headway, c/o 13 Foxcombe Drive. 
TUehursL Reading. 

DAVIES - On August 1 1th. at Princess 
Margaret Hospital. Windsor. Thomas 
Edward (Ted Davies, sometime of 
Shanghai. China) aged 66. Beloved 
husband of Mary, dear father of 
Caroline, grandfather of Rebecca 
and Sophie. Funeral Service at me 
Royal Chapel of All Saints. Windsor 
Great Park at 1 1.00 am on Tuesday- 
August 19th. followed by private 
committal. Family flowers only. 
Enquiries to F. Harmon, do Harvest 
Road. Englefiefd Green, tel. Eghant 
32163. 

DKK-CLELAMD - Suddenly on the 
llth August 1986. Michael David 
Buchanan of d2 Hoimewood Ridge. 
Langton Green, the beloved husband 
of Margaret and much loved father 
of Neil. Robert. Sally. Catharine and 
Rebecca. Funeral Service at AO 
Saint's Church. Langton Green on 
Tuesday I9lh August ai 2.45pm fol- 
lowed tor private cremation. Family 
flowers only please, but tf desired do- 
nations to Asthma Research may be 
sen! c/o J Kempster & Sons. 2 and 4 
Albion Road. Tunbridge Wells. 
DONOVAN ■ On August 6Uu peacefully 
in hospital. Kale. Loved by her 
friends. Ckriders Green Crematorium 
at 11.20 am on August l5Uv No 
(lowers but donations. u desired, to 
R.U KBA- 

DWJGHTY ■ On 12th August. 1986. 
Dame Adelaide BailUeu. at home. 
Widow of Charies John Addison 
Doughty, mother of Alice and 
Charles, toeing grandmother and 
great grand mother. Funeral private 
and by her specific request no 
mourning, no Dowers. Details of 
Memorial Service lo be announced 
later 

DUNN. Captain WUUara Henry ■ AI 
SerahUI House Residential Home. 
Whllchureh. Hants., on 6th August 
1986 aged 97 years The Funeral 
Service will be held at St Mary's 
Church. Kingsdere on Wednesday. 

1 3Ui August at 12.00 noon. No flow. 
m please, but if desired toxutkma 
may be sent to the Vicar and Church 
Wardens. Kingsdere for the Fabric 
Fund. SL Mary's Church. 

EVANS- Marion? Gladys, at home In 
Ashford. Middlesex, on I2 Ui August 
deeply loved wife of Tom and moth- 
er of David. Christopher. Robed and 
Alun There win be a cremation for 
family only: a Memorial Meeting wlij 
be held later. No flowers, no mount- 
ing; donations. If wished, lo the 
Nat ional Children's Home. 

FINDLAY on 12th August 1986 at the 
MaUn Court. Mamets. Ayrshire. 
Mary Helen, beloved wife of the late 
Brigadier Charles Bannatyne Findlay 
C8E MC. Funeral ai Kllmaronock 
parish Church on Friday 16th Au- 
gust ai 11.00 am. Family flowers 
only. 

GANOON - On 12th August 1986. 
peacefully at Sevenoaks. Mary 
Eveline aged 87. formerly of 
Sidmauih. Devon. Last surviving 
child of Henry and Dora de Jongh of 
Smyrna and wife of the laie Kenneth 
Cannon. Mother of John, and grand- 
mother of Alexander. Thomas and 
Edward. 

GRAY - On August 2. 1986. suddenly 
al her residence. Bridge Street 
Ooolehltl. County Cavan. Ireland. 
Kathleen Florence (nee Murphy L 
wife of the late Rev. Waller R. Cray. 
Deeply missed by her loving son 
Stephen, relatives and friends. Bunal 
took place after service in Dnungoon 
p^nsh Church on Monday Augiot 4 ■ 


CUrrifMSon 9th August at The Uni- 
versity of Wales HaspUal. Cardiff. 
Arthur Griffiths M.BJE. Formerly Di- 
rector of Griff's Bookshop. London. 
Memorial service to be announced. 
HART - The Revd. Gerald H.V. Hari on 
July 3tsL at home, aged 86 years 
Funeral Service at WestmlD Parish 
Church on Friday. August 15th at 2 
pm. followed by cremation for fam- 
ily only. No flowers, but donations U 
wished lo Missions to Seamen, c/o S. 
Newung and Son. FUneral Directors. 
122 Mm Rd. Royston. Herts. 
IKMSLEY - On August 12th. 1986. 
Alan Macartney (Peach), aged 67 
years of Newton Park. Torvey. Bed- 
fordshire. Funeral Savin at Newton 
Blossom vtoe Parish Oiurch . on 
Monday. August 18th at 2.30 pin. 
Enquiries lo Oanibul * Ptumbe. tel. 
Bedford 54647. 

HERBERT-SMTH. Doris Mary - On 
, August llth. suddenly but peacefully 
al Putney Hospital, after a brave 
struggle with ■ cancer. Beloved 
mother of Mark. Robin and Martyn. 
Service at Putney Vale Crematorium 
on Friday. August 16th al 2-30 pm. 
Flowers to T.H. Sandere & Sons Ltd. 
36 High Street Barnes. London 
SW13. Donations, if preferred, for 
‘Friends of Putney Hospital'. 
HOWARD On August llth 1986. Bar- 
bara. peacefully in King Edward VII 
Hospital. MUdhursl. Beloved wife of 
Henry Howard and step-mother to 
Alex and Andrew, cremation fal- 
lowed by Memorial Sendee at 
Heyshoa Parish Church. 3.00pm 
Monday August 18th. Flowers and 
enquires lo LF. Union & Son. North 
StrvcL MidhursJ. West Sussex. Tel : 
Midhum 3264. 

LA YELL - On August 13Bi. at home. 
Dorothy Laved, aped 94 years. Dear 
mother of Ann and Cherry, grand- 
mother of dies and Naomi 
Cunningham. Cremation at Chelten- 
ham on Monday. August 18th at 12 
noon. No flowers please, but 
dona (tans, tf wished, to Oxfam. 
MALONE - on August llth 1986 
Margarete. d party beloved wife of 
D<mms (Pat) Malone OAE. (MUyi. 
CremaUon al Tunbridge Wells on 
Monday August 18th ai 230pm. Me- 
morial service to be arranged later. 
Cut flowers only to C- Waterhouse A 
Sons. High St. Burwaah East Sussex. 
MCKSOH - On July 26. 1986 In 
Johannesburg, suddenly but peace- 
fully. George M.M. (El Alameini late 
of Castrol. England and South Afri- 
ca. A devoted husband, father, 
father -m-law and grandfather and 
caring elder brother of Bernard 
(France). Kay and FaWi (England). 
NORTON, Suddenly on August 12Jh a _ 
tits home in Stain. David George! 
Pepter. beloved husband of Monfouefl 
and much laved father and grandf i j 
Iher. Funeral In Spain. No flowers 

PLANT Lord Plant of B ene odm CJLE 
suddenly on 9th of August in Tours. 
France. Beloved husband of Gladys 
and father of Jennifer. Christopher 
and John. Funeral private but a me- 
morial service wui be held at a time 
and place io be announced. Family 
flowers only- Donations m*y be seni 
to the Benenden Hospital Trust. 63. 
Catherine Place. London SW1 0HE. 
PODMORE on August llth In 
Banchory. Scotland. Barbara, wife 
of the late Conrad Podmore of 
Grange Over Sands, aged 91 years, 
second daughter of the late Mr and 
Mrs William wollon of Ipswich. 
Mother of Derek iX/A) In IWfi. Guy 
art JtlL grandmother of william. Ra- 
tnaa. Michael and great- 
grandmother of Rebecca. 
mORDAH: On 12th August peacefully 
at home: 36. Main Street East 
Brtdgeford. Nous. James Lindsay 
aged 87. years, formerly of Bombay, 
hidla and Bromley. Kent Dearly 
loved husband of. May. and -loving 
father of Ian and Shirley. Frances 
and Barbara, and devoted grandad of 
Lindsay and Andrew. Service SL 
Peters Church. East Brtdgeford. 
Monday 18th August at 11-46 am. 
Followed by cremation. Flowers may 
be sent to: Raddtffe & District Funer- 
al Services. 59-Main Road. Raddiffe- 
on -Trent. Notts. 

WOOS NAM - Peacefully to hospital on 
Wednesday. August 6th. 1986. aged 
71 years. Thomas Nod Morgan, of 
21 Downing Court. Swaffham 
Buibeck. Cantos. Funeral Service at 
Swaffham Buibeck Pandt Church on 
Thursday. August 14th al 11.30 
a .m- fouiowed by committal al Cam- 
bridge City Crematorium. Family 
flowers only. Donations, if desired, 
to The Briltsft Heart Foundation- c/o 
The Weyman Funeral Service. 
Abbey Walk. Cambridge. 


University 
news 

Cambridge 

The following elections and 
awards have been made; 

CHRIST'S COLLEGE 
Dacnetar Scholarships 
Rented ed: W j Sutherland. 

Elected: E G Abel, RJLH Anderson. 
J A Bresun. N R oilier, h Clayton. P 
Curzon. I R de Snoo. D Fox. D W 
Cent- J V Hawley. P J Hunt. Y-K Jcfc. 
C N Laws. C Ml ran into- M J Parsons. 
A P Smith. S D Smith: P S T Steen. M 
J Unsworth. 

Scholarships 
Re-elected: J N Airey- M S Anderson. 
J C Anderl on. N j Ashton. M v oase. 
C J Duff. J R Durrani. V 
Kadirkamanathan. D I Kitsberg. T M 
Lord. I McGrath. R C Parkinson. A P 
Robson. R J Thomasson. PDF 
Vernon. P B Warren. M J Whitworth. 
M D Winn. J M woodward. 

Elected: K G Atkin. K M Atkins. S J 
Btyth. M E Bray. A R Brewster. R L 
' Bull. S J Daines. A M Foreman. L E 
Fountain. C Haley. K G Hardwick. N 
L Hart. M R HeaL G M Henderson. A 
H Kilpatrick. J P Lucas. D J Mackay. 
R J Marcus. A J Maxfleid. m a J 
North. C M Roach. A N Ross. J A 
Sedan. T I Silverman. M P Smalhnan- 
Raynor. l J TebbutL J D Thorp- v 
Wettings. M A Wilkinson. 

Exhibition 

Reappointed: A J Layton. 

College Prizes: 

E C Abel. J N Airey. RJLH 
Anderson. M S Anderson. J G 
Anderton. N J AshtOO. K G Atkin K 
M Atkins. S J Blvih. M E Bray, j A 
Brestin. A R Brewster. R L Bull. N R 
CUlver. M V Ciase. H Clayton. P 
Curzon. S J Datnes. 1 R de Snoo. C J 
Duff. J R Durrani. A M Foreman. LE 
Fountain. D Fox. D W Gent. C Haley. 
K G Hardwick. N L Hart, j V Hawley. 
M r Heal. G M Henderson. P J Hunt. 
K Y Jek. V Kadirkamanathan. A H 
Kilpatrick. D I Kitsberg. C N Laws. T 
M Lord. J P Lucas. L McGrath. □ J 
Mackay. R J Marcus. A J Maxfleid. C 
Mlranthts. M A J North. R C 
Parkinson. M J Parsons. C M Roach. 
A P Robson. A N Ross. J A Sedan. T t 
Silverman. M P Smaliman-Raynor. A 
P Smith. S D Smith. P S T Steen. W J 
Sutherland. 

I J TebbutL R J Thomasson. J D 
Thorp. M J llnsworth, PDF Vernon. 
P B Warren. V Wettings. M J 
Whitworth. M A Wilkinson. M D 
Winn. J M Woodward- 
Named Prizes: Calverley 1 classics): J 
Klitner: Pres i (economics): c 
MirantMs: Wyatt (engineering): t R de 
Snoo. O W Genu Steal lEiigl&h): D A 
South. A G Stewart: Parker (geog- 
raphy). M P Smaliman-Raynor: Mrs 
Vincent Aster (history): N J Ashton. S 
D Smith: de Hart flaw): j A Bred in. N 
R Calver. T M Lord: Ranapert daw): 
M A Wilkinson: John Whelan 
(mathematics): S J Btyth. M V ciase. 
D Fox. P J Hunt L McGrath: Staines- 
Read (medical soenceSh R J Marcus: 
Rapa port 

Anderton: . _ . 

‘‘WSSW: Fay (natural sciences 
part it: a H Kilpatrick. Haddon 
(natural sciences part iBk P B 
warren: Shipley (natural sciences part 

iBh J W Airey: S W Greig (natural 

sciences pan iai: K M Atkins. M E 


Science report 

A cheaper way to 
cover up rubbish 


(medical sciences): J G 
Latimer Jackson .(modern 


R 


„ ... Brewsier. R L Bun. S J 
palms. L E Fountain. C Halro. M R 
Heal. A H Kilpatrick. A J Maxfleid. T l 
Silverman. 1 J TebbutL V weuings; S 
W Greig (natural sciences part iBk J 
N Airey. J R Durrani. A M Foreman. 
K G Hardwick. D I Kitsberg. M A J 
North. C M Roach. A P Robson. A PC I 
Ross. PDF Vernon, p B warren. M D 
Winn: S_W Greta (natural sciences 
part 2): E G AbeL H Clayton. M J 
Unsworth; Darwin (natural sciences): 

E C Abel. H Clayton. M J Unsworth; 

EUnsJle (theology and religious stud- 

ies): D I Kitsberg: Rtdout (theology and 
retlBtaus studies): RJLH Anderson. 


CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE 
Postgraduate awards 
Caldwell Studentships (continued): P 
R Brown. J l Collett: Donaldson 
Studentships i continued): D J Plumb. 
M J Strickland: Caldwell 
Studentships: T J Bean land. S R 
Boa rri man. j B Kenney. Donaldson 
&■ uden (ships; A R CruUenden. R O 
Hopkins. 


Undergraduate awards 
Foundation Scholarships: T j 
Beanland. O R Blggar. TDK Han. R 
D Hopkins. J Veale. N J Warner 
■continued): Title of scholar: T C T 
Johnson. I C King: Caldwell Scholar- 
ships: J M Allwood. E A Baker (Vice , 
Exhl. S E Bradforth. J C GtRwrt. O A.| 
Lowe. KSJ McDonald. M A Pfigrem. 

A J Teuten. R P Travis. W G Weaver: 
Manners Scholarships: N Bhatta 
■continued). H R Davies. A N ParfitL 
Smyih Scholarship: J H D Bassett 
(continued): Intermediate Exhibitions: 
SJ Doran. J J Feeney. I S. Henderson. 

P Higginbotham. U H Khanka. N 
Lavender. Spence 
Dem. E s Dtaiey. 

Prises 

gtshop Green Cups: T J Beanland. N 
Graham-Rack: College UXOT. T J 
Beanland, S R~Boardman. A n 
Crutlenden. N Graham- Rack- R D 
Hopkins. P A Heyaratnam. T C T 
Johnson. J B Kenney. I C King. M 
west: Baron (£25): J M All wood. E A 
Baker. J H D Bassett. D R Blggar. S E 
Bradforth. S J Doran. J C Gilbert. T D 

Teulen. R P Travis. W C Weaver: 
Cowell (C2Sr. N BhaUa. H R Davies. J 
J Feeney. I S Henderson. U H 
Khemka. N Lavender. A N Partin, j 
Veale. N J Warner: Books (£60): J M 
Allwood. E A Baker. J H D Bassen. N 
BhaUa. D R Bigoar. S E Brad (Orth. H 
R Davies. J C CsiSert. TDH HaU. D A 
Lowe. KSJ McDonald. A N Partin. M 
A Pttarem A J Teulen. RP Travis. J 
Veale. N J Warner. W O Weaver. 


Exhibitions: S Z 


DOWNING COLLEGE 


The amount of rubbish pro- 
duced by a consumer society is 
a problem that will not go 
away. Waste tips can be 
grassed over and made Into 
parks or covered in soil and 
used to grow crops. Bat the 
critical factor is the cost 

Now research at Essex 
University has shown that the 
restoration of tips can be very 
much less than expected. 

DrSne Gregson, manager of 
the Industrial Applied Biology 
Group at Essex, and her 
colleagues have been studying 
several landfill (waste tipping) 
sites in the county. They have 
noted the rates at which 
potentially toxic chemicals 
and metals, such as lead, zinc, 
copper, cadmium and com- 
pounds such as phenols, are 
leached and dissolved out of 
waste tips. 

From these calculations the 
scientists have estimated the 
risks of toxic compounds and 
metals becoming concentrated 
in plants, insects and small 
animals living locally. 

Their findings are encourag- 
ing. Because metals and other 
similar substances become 
chemically bonnd into 
insoloable chemical com- 
plexes fn the rubbish, very 
little leaching oat occurs, No 
plant roots can take up heavy 
metals of toxic compound. 

The Essex findings also 
demonstrate that reclaimed 
waste tips need ranch thinner 
coverings of soil than thought 
necessary. There is little need 
to protect the environment 
from toxic substances leaching 
oat of the rubbish, nor to 
prevent roots of plants or trees 
from penetrating refuse since 
they cannot absorb harmful 
substances from it 
There is also, this research 
has shown, no need to use 
expensive topsoil to cover 
refase on landfill sites which 
are being reclaimed unless the 
aim is to nse the reclaimed 
land to grow crops. 


By John Newell 

Tests carried out by Dr 
Gregson's group show that 
freely or very cheaply avail- 
able waste materials such as 
dredgings from the River 
Thames, treated sewage 
sludge, pulverized fuel ash 
from power stations or even 
well-matured refuse from very 
old landfill sites, mixed in the 
right proportions can actually 
be better than expensive top- 
soil for some purposes. 

For example, such waste can 
support the growth of lash 
grass when mixed in the right 
proportions but do not contain 
agricultural weeds, unlike top- 
soil .which harbours high 
concentration of weed seeds. 

But the group's tests at a 25- 
acre landfill area near the 
university and on other sites 
have shown that really impres- 
sive financial savings are pos- 
sible by applying their 
findings. A covering of only 
30-40 ctns of soil is needed to 
reclaim the site for amenity 
nse, and a covering of 60-70 
ems is required for agricultural 
use. That compares to 130 ems 
using conventional top soil 
spreading. 

Reclaiming of a 20-acre site 
using the Essex technique, 
with the five years of after- 
care, which are needed to 
establish grass dr crops, would 
cost about £133,000 for arable 
use, £74,000 for grazing and 
£66,000 for parkland, with 
trees and grass. Traditional 
techniques using imported top- 
soil would cost about 
£600,000. 

There are hundreds of simi- 
lar landfill sites in the United 
Kingdom and overall savings 
by applying the Essex tech- 
niques could total hundreds of 
millions of pounds. These 
figures must make the 
redaimation of ugly landfill 
sites appear a much more 
attractive and realistic pros- 
pect for many local 
authorities. 


Open gets 
£lm for 
research 

The Open University won 
research grants and awards 
worth just over £1 million in 
the first half of this year, about 
£400.000 down on the 
corresponding period in I9S5. 

But university's officials 
said the basic value of its 
research work was “level- 
pegging" with last year, when 
income was inflated by two 
exceptionally large grants. 

“li is very encouraging that 
the money for our research has 
gone up so much compared 
with three years ago when we 
earned only about £700.000 in 
a foil year. It is a tribute to our 
academic excellence", said a 
spokesman at the university's 
Milton Keynes base. 

Unlike conventional 
universities, the Open was not 
assessed on the quality of its 
research by the Universities' 
Grams Committee earlier this 
year before the share-out of 
government funding was 
decided. 

The financing of the Open 
University, which currently 
has 80,000 undergraduate stu- 
dents. is outside the 
committee's jurisdiction, with 
90 per cent of funding coming 
directly from the Department 
of Education and Science. 


Latest wills 

Professor Ifor Gamant Austin, 

I 'V°‘* k foe reference division; 

-at Sheffield University, left es- 1 nnfl imlimtArv hade until tell- 
tate valued at£I 1.1,143 dcl 


OBITUARY 

DR ERIC 
DINGWALL 

Psychical 
research 
and erotica 

Dr Eric Dingwall, librarian, 
anthropologist and authority 
on ghosts and spiritualism, 
has died at the probable age of 

Eric John Dingwall was 
bom in Ceylon, the son of 
.Alexander Harvey Dingwaj] 

in 1S9Q. though he was always 
secretive about his date of 
birth. He was educated pri- 
vately. and then at' Pembroke 
College. Cambridge. After 
graduation he joined the staff 
of the Cambridge University 
Library. 

In 1921. he went to five fo 
New York, as director of the 
Department of Psychical Phe- 
nomena, a post he held until 
1927. He then became re- 
search officer for the Ameri. 
can Society for Psychical 
Research and investigated 
many mediums in Europe and 
in America. 

.As a “ghostbuster" ' and 
investigator of the powers of 
alleged mediums he became 
almost as famous as h& 
colleague. Harry Price. But 
Dingwall, although convinced 
of the existence of psychical 
phenomena, was not an easy 
man to hoodwink. He was 
more learned, more sceptic^ 
and much more meticulous 
than Price, and never hesitat- 
ed to expose fraudulent 
claims. 

He published fascinating 
results of all his investigations 
in the Proceedings ana Jour- 
nal of the SPR. 

As' an anthropologist and 
psychical researcher he visited 
Trinidad and Haiti in 1936 to 
discover more about "abnor- 
mal menial phenomena" al- 
legedly arising from - the 
unusual social and religious 
conditions in those countries. 
Until the end of the 1930s be 
was an indefatigable traveller 
on behalf of his exacting 
profession. 

During the Second World 
War Dingwall, because of foe 
specialized knowledge he had 
gained of foreign countries, 
was attached to the Ministry, 
of Information and Trade 
Department of the Foreign-’ 

After the war, he offered his! 
services to the British Muse- 
um Library (now the British. 
Library) in cataloguing its 
"private case material’’ of. 
erotic literature. He was soon 
appointed an honorary Assis-. 
tant Keeper and pursued his 


Mrs Selina Campbell Coates, of 
A I tine ham. Greater Manches- 
ter, left estate valued at 
£1.718.161 net.' 

Mr Edwin Stanley Luff, of 
Tockington. Avon, left estate 
valued at £321,431 neL He left 
persona] legacies totalling 
£99.500 and the residue to the 
general cancer fund at Frenchay 
Hospital, Bristol, for research. 


on a voluntary basis until well- 
into 4is eighties. - 
He was extremely knowl- 
edgeable on eighteenth centu-' 
ry erotica and acquired for the 
library much extra material 
from various private colleo; 
tions to which he had access. 

He was also a vice-president 1 
of the Magic Circle, becoming 
interested in conjuring as a 


Mrs Kate Mabel Alice Janes, of result of his experience of the 
Luton, Bedfordshire, left estate ingenioustricks played by lake 


valued at £8 1 4,740 net 
Mr Philip Edward Brockhank, 
of Worthing, West Sussex, char- 
tered patent agent, left estate 
valued at £514,889 neL 
Mr Frederic Allan Stracban. of 
Gosforth, Tyne and Wear, char- 
tered accountant left estate 
valued at £1,545.21 7 net 


Sovereign’s Parade, Sandhurst 


greeted to IrtiSiihlps SKAS?' KSESJS" 


Virgo: maihemaiics: C B West: medi- 

cal sciences. P S Ramrekha: natural 
sciences, j P Aldington, w o Mass. 
Restarted lo exiiUMlions 
Chemical engmeertng: W S Mansfield: 

J T Marshall: fdstorar: A K 


English: . . __ ___ 

McKenzie. W G Noek law: M G 
Arnold. R G W Arthur. J C Cooke. A. 
T Lee. r m Shrives. R A B Sink: 
natural sciences: J P Gaff. 

Elected to title of scholar . 

Cttermral engineering: J C Castilla. 
Rubio. G H McKinley; electrical 
sciences. P Spencer: English: R 
Carroll: law. S Fung. O K BUM. M 
Rutstein. S M wamow: natural 
sciences: C I Birss. J D Hughes. M R 
Ormerod. J Pamnglon. 

Elected to UUe of Harris sc holar paw): 
5 K Chime. D K B Loo. M Rocmtn. S 
M wornoiM. 

Elected lo Senior Harris sehotarshijis 
Uawi S K Chima. D K B Ljoo. M 
Rutstein. S M Womow. • 

□Med lo title of Jarvis scholar flaw* 
S Fung. 

Elect edto senior Jarvis scholarship 
flaw): S Fung. 

Elected to Senior Whitby scholarship 
* medical ■sciences* E J Hammond. 

Elected to vrtiotarstUjK 

Engineering: C H O Dawson. S Read. 
R N Surtees: history: R M Short: Law: 
P J Gillyan. A J Ryan, w c L Lee: 
mathematics. S SU Greaves. M C 
Souilv. medical sciences: S A Irvta. J 

M Noble. P j Rtddle. R J Wilkinson: 

natural sciences: O M Broomfield. J A 
G Furness. P J Legg. C T PeoengeU. K 
H Tan. 


The Sultan of Brunei repre- 
sented the Queen at the 
Sovereign’s Parade at the Royal 
Military Academy Sandhurst on 
August 8. 

The following have had their 
commissions confirmed in the 
regiments, corps shown, having 
successfully completed standard 
graduate course no 861. 

R p Alton. RHF. Leicester: J K 
Armstrong, RE. Newcastle: P J 
Arnold. RCr. Aston: I C Baker. LL 
York: S N Baker-Monlm. RA. 
Suiting; S O Bamford. RCT. Plymouth 
Pour: A T Barum. RA. Manchesier C 
A Bavin. RAOC. PoJy of uw South 
Bank: A P C Beard. R SIGNALS. 
Thames Poiy. J m Beer. raec. 
Liverpool: R C Best. PWR. Newcastle: 
E M Brawn. INT CORPS. Ea« Anglia: 
M 4 P Carieion-Snuth. 1G. Durham: A 
Charlton. PARA. Hatfield Poly: J D 

- n j 

_ _ Cook. 

. - . RAOC. St 

Andrews, S H crtthton. AAC. Cardiff. 

S J pereen. RE. Pour of Wales: N 
_ onnethi. Re. Tram Poly: A L Down. 
PARA. Reading: J R Oils. CHESHIRE. 

? ^ N - FSftn."® 

_ I G French. 

JJniv. Oocgge. London: D 

A Gibson. RAPC Bradford: M P 
Oram. -Winner of the Queen's 
Medal-. PARA. Aberdeen: M J 
Griffin. RE. Birmingham Poty. L P 
Hall. RCT. Nottingham: R ■ J M 
HamWetan. RA. Manchester: MAW 
Harrison- Pope. PARA. Southampton. 


Manchester: S N I 
Birmingham Poty: J I 


Cardiff; I Hooper. GLOSTERS. Ab- 
erysrwyth: j § N Hornsby. RCT. 
Shefneld: _A T D Jackson. PARA. 
Sheffield Poty. M C F Jackson. RE. 
Liverpool: S J F James, para. 


— , am: /t D Jennings. RCT. 

Hull: Tlj Knox. RE. Portsmouth Poly: 
T J Lai. AAC. St Andrew;; A P 
Latham. R Anglian Durham: I G 
Laurence. R SIGNALS. Plymouth 
poly: K Livingstone. BMP. SI Davids. 
Lampeter; D J Locke. AAC. Leicester 
A Macteod. RTH. Kent; N Maher. 
RAEC. Essex: E H R Marta w. RHF. 
Manchester: M A J McGovern. R 
IRISH. Edinburgh: E L Moore. RAEC. 
Hull: D J MoorhOUCT- REME. Man 
Chester 

R J Nightingale, 


confiremd in the Women’s 
Royal Army Corps having 
successfully completed course 
ho 861. 

S M Baqguley. WRAC. LougMOn Co 
High: V Barra ud. WRAC.- RE. 

Benenden S: S A Bonn eta. Qaranc. 
Gaywood Bark See Mod: T E Bowden. 
■■Winner of the Sash of Honour". 
WRAC re. Plymouth college; CEL 
Brawn. WRAC. St Ounstan's A obey 
School: N J Brown. WRAC. Pilgrim 
school: S P Byrne. WRAC. British 
Srtiool of Ihe Netherlands: V S 
Collins. WRAC. 9 Michael's: A M 
Davis. WRAC. Chariton Paric M M 
Eccles. WRAC. SI Mary's Convent: H 
A Eroud. WRAC/ RAOC. Ursutlne 
Convent High: R C Crtffiths. WRAC. 
St George's School for Girts. 

K M Halford. WRAC. Cambridge 
Tutorial College: S L Harris. 
WRAC RAEC. FUzmaurlce Gram- 
mar: J A Henry. Wbac. Queen 
Elizabeth High: A A. W Hudson. 
WRAC REME- Carterton School: E A 
H James. WRAC. The Richard Huish 
College L K Joyce, wr AC/ RAPC. SI 
Anthony's Convent; R R Littlejohns, 
WRAC. Shrewsbury College of Arts 

§o 

McIntosh. WRAC- Dally Clare HS. J H 
McKee. WRAC, R SIGNALS- Banner- 

man High: p P Peak. wbac. 

Edinburgh School. -Germany: L J 
Richardson. WRAC. Tonbridge Gram- 
mar School. 

_ I Rose. WRAC. Gondotraoun: H F 

C R wngM. ' WRAC. The Nottingham 
Bluecoat School. 

The following overseas cadet 
has been granted a commission 
in the Jamaican Defence Force 
having successfully completed 
Women's Royal Army Corps 
course no 861: C A Davis. 


„ CT D Hewitt GREN CDS. Harrow 
SN J Hewitt. RA. Slwbbear C: R J 
HBtoen. 16/ Sl_ Marlborough C; A G 
Hill- R SIGNALS. Weston Part: S: J G 
a HD Is. 17-21L. Bradilefd C: P M 
Hodgso n 4 7DG. Loretto S: A O C 


Hoey. 


Undtetorne C; P H 


Huplans. COLDM GDS. Godaiming C: 
R S Houranane. RE. Weitieck CS J 
Howe. DERR. Forest S- 


P J Istead. 

Wellington C: . . 

King ’s S:R M John. RAOC. Scar- 
borough C: M) F Johnstone, rrf. 
Monmouth Comp: G I Jones. R 
SIGNALS^ Welbeck C: G P Jones. 
QUEENS- Judd S: J C R LamiSiiS; 
S9- Benedlce* S: J j Learmont. 
RA. Klng^ C: J W‘£ Lewis. R 
ANGUAN. Rugby S: A H Loder. 
CREN ccg^pon C: I St C l£S 
RTr. Welbeck C. R J Long, GREN 
CDS. Elleamere C .T T ALoveringl 
RA. Windsor & Maidenhead C: CA 
Lucknam. R HAMK^ai LSJrtSwe C. 

J Lyglard-WUspn. RHC D.J Harrow 
S. A S Maber- Jones. RAOC: Y&ool 
John Brwht>- R £ Mack/mrieHlIL fa 
Siowe S: J_ G Marion lay. KOSBl 
Dollar Ac; P d K Maroues. QOG. 
Tonbrtage S: S C E ManSSt? 16/5L: 

— • J. F C Masterton. LG. 

D _ Mrinlosh. REME. 


GREEN HOWARDS. 
_(TN Jaoues. DERR. 


annate: T _ 

Seaford C: S 
Doual S: D A _ . 

MUton Abbey: s G MfUsted. 


C^Meredlth- qoh . 


san Muwi « on -' «■ 

Taylors S; GNeai. R SIGNALS. Royal 
AlwMj^andAJbwtS: M RNlSSqg! 
aLOsTE-AS. Poole GS; M A Norton. 
PA- Welbeck C: Lj Nunn. RAOC. 
Duke Of YDrtsHMS D E Park. RCT. 
Snenoate S, R E RarkLnsou. RCT 

OriefBoys ' 

Gds. Mllhm . 

Wtiiiefriars u. 

RRW. Lewes Priory: G R C Quilter 

ro- Harrow & 1 RMltoik fieiSC 

» u U% ? te, R R ?S: 

Manstiead S. 


Reason. rapcI 


The following have been R S£ l ^?g ,1 7“ 1 SS^ l £ i - b w 
granted commissions in the 

J Modrtiouse. REME. Man- having E^T^j^s 

A G 1^. Uverooql Poly; Successfully Completed Standard Halesowen C: P J K r^£‘ Re si 
military course no 861. ^ L - #l 


mediums. 

DingwaH was a man (ff 
volatile personality and a 
superb racomeur, whose spare 
(ding conversation did more, 
than justice to the strangeness 
of his experiences. He puhr 
lished many books, including 
some slightly dubious ones 
such as Studies in the Sexual 
Life of Ancient and Mediaeval 
Peoples and Male Injibulation, 
(1925). 

He had many comic stories 
to tell of the haste with which 
the heirs of eminent deceased 
persons disposed of erotica, of 
whose existence they had pre- 
viously been unaware. 

Much more important were. 
DingwalFs excellent and in^ 
structive How to Use a. Large. 
Library (1 933), and, in partic- 
ular, his account of The. 
Haunting of Borley Rectory 
(1956), which he wrote in. 
collaboration with his SPR 
colleagues Dr Trevor Hall and 
K. M. Goldney. He also wrote, 
again with Hall, the fascinal-' 
ing Four Modem Ghosts 
(1958). 

Dingwall was a. learned 
bibliographer, lively and cun-: 
ous in both senses. Whatever 
he investigated, he investigat-: 
ed in a rigorous way. and his. 
collection of strange watches' 
and automata (which he 
would deftly take to pieces and.' 
put back together again) be- 
came rightly famous. He nev-; 
er married. 

DR RICHARD 
BARNETT ; 


M S Ottver. RE. 
Ommhaw. GREN 
College London: R 


Surrey. R A 
COS. Bedford 
D Owens. RE. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


MORTON - a Memorial Service for 
William E. Monon. toed 16 th July. 
1986. of WUmor Sc Co- Caledonian 
Industries. Northern Ireland and 
C.F.T.; and of Cullra. Co. Down. 
Northern Ireland, will be held on 
Wednesday. 20 m August at 3.00 pm 
In Malone Pneshyienan CSUircn. 
Balmoral Belfast '/ 


peeled to mutntians 
Engineering: P C ECakterbank. R C 
Hague. PVHli; history.- S J Moore: 
manteniaiirs: A J George. M L Hlilel. 
R J Walley. natural science* , "S N 
Oujmun: ptuiasophy: MOM 
Thomas. 

Eteri ed to Ptitey SchoJarsWur TEW 
Brown. R j MacLeod. S J Mamtlon. S 
L Wickena. 

Assort! Lion Pnra: E J Hammond: 
Braditmek Prize- H M Down: Graeme 
Hall Prize: M Rutuein: Hamshaw 
Thomas Prize. J Farrington: E B 
Moullln Prize: K C Cghi J C Plan 
Prize* A J BenrasnS. E J HamntomL J 
D Hughes. E M Morale. C B warn; 
Lnwm Prizes. -S Downes. D_ R 
Harrison: H H WhKetegg Prize - . R N 

Surtees. Chanel Reading Prize: S T H 

Merrick. 

awaLm, j C GartUU- 
Rutxo. P J Coates. G H Wctcjntey: 
clasters. E M Moratee? etertneal 

Pnicnard. s D Raimden. S Read. R n 
S urtees: LngUsh- R carrgu. H M 
Down: history R M Short: law: A J 

Belirami. S k Chima. S Fung. P J 

Siiyon. D K B loo. M Rtostetn. A J 
R>an. G J virqo. S M womow. W CL 
Ye*. malhemalKr S Dowite*. S $U 

Great w. DR Harrison. MC South. C 

B West, medical srienreE. $ A Irvin. J 
M Noble, p s Ramrakna. P J Riddle. R 
J Wilkinson, natural some*: J P 
Aldington. C 1 Bins. D M BroornfleM. 
R A Burk. J Al O Furness. E . J 

S am mo IK). J D Hughes. PJ Lego. W. 

M«b. M R ornteroa. J Parelngian. 
C T Petnmgeti. K H Tan. Oriental 
studies, p N WhUlom* 

Spmai College Rnzes. J A Bottom) 

B Curail c Mamwanng. NCT" 


Cambridge: D L Pascoe. RA. Bristol: □ 
S Powell. RAOC Cardiff: p K 
RaidJffe. WC. Cardiff: S C Rayment. 
PARA. London (Queen Mary's): H M 
Robertson. LG.' Reading: O F R Rudd, 
RA. Coventry Poly: G K O Ruddlck. 
RHF. Newcastle: H J Semple. RE. 
Hatfteta Poly: J Sfbbald. RA. Glasgow. 

J P Stbdntore. RE. Cambridge; J A F 
Smith. R SIGNALS. Live rpool: M J 
Spearing. RCT. LTWIST. A J o 
su*wan- wiison. RGJ. ■ Brtstot. j p 
Sioddart. KOSB. Dundee. A M Straita. 
PAHA. Sheffield Poly; P M Tarrant. 
RAEC Crewe and Haisager Cott 
w p H Tatham. ^LDM 
Soutoampion: i N A Thomas. 

Kha. oxford: J M Thwailes. R 
Swansea: R K Tomlinson.' 

Southampton. G vale. BMP. 

•mngham: J viasto. R SIGNALS. 
Bristol: O.l Wallace. RE. Stirtiim CP 
J wasthr. RA. Thames Poty p r 
W atkins. RA. London: O M Waugh. 
PARA. Hull: PUT Wharton. OLR. 
York: M J Whitcombe. AAC. 
Souihampiofi: s h N Williams. RE. 

M Wood. AAC. AheroeenTK 
Pwrlghl. RE. London iKingsi: DNM 
Yiannopoullos. RRF. East Anglia. 

The following overseas cadets 
have had their commissions 
confirmed in the aimed forces of 
their countries, having success- 
fully completed standard gradu- 
ate course no 861. 

T .Bogle. Jamaica. P s jagno. 
Gambia: B M S Mabena. Botswana. 

The following have been 
granted commissions or have 
had their commissions 


M AstiweiL aac. Gravesend G& p 
R C Allard. HA. St Atoyto® C: N A 
Baker, r anguan. Brenon Woods S; 
A D Balgamle. RE. wetHngton CSH 
Barclay. COLDM COS. Shrewsbury S. 
T D Bell. ACT. wetbeek c J w 
Blarkljum. RAOC Welbeck C: R I 
Biariuiork. RE- Welbeck CC A 
Bommun. 5 INNIS DC. Tonbridge S. 
A J Boilerill, R SIGNALS. Welbeck C; 
C j Breese. RAOC warave-s &PAM 
Brown. RPC Rannoch S. 

J O Brown. RA. Khnbolton S: T J w 
Burnet. BW. Ediwurgh Ac: $ R 

NS. Easrbonme r ' 

F CapLen/RCT. Barton Peieril S 
Chalmers. R IRISH. Bearwood C: I P 


gwwstfraF 6 


Roy, 


M J - 


C J O 


n^^Ttorlon Pnerll S: D M 

j *. p IRISH. Bearwood C: 1 P 

Chan non. PARA. Robert Hainlno S: J 
C Cheshire. OijRKHA. Mlliori Abbey 

C.JEJ Cornock. RA: Martbroougn C: 
A A Cbtfper. RCT. Aberdeen <&: R A 
L Cnuall. SCOTS OG- Canford S: A 
Cuilis. ACC Ruitiln S: M P Davmf. 
WFR. prices C C C Davies. LG. 
Bj shoe's Stortford C: S JB Davy. IW 
AmpKHorih CiMW B C Dyer-WC 
Cheiiennam. H R A, Eaton. <* 
HLDRS. Fort Augustus Abbey: C D A 
Emim. RCT. Framllngltant C 
JMEians.W f R...B^o J _C^ 


S JCFi . 

W Forgrave. . 

A J Freeman. 

Frost. 14 ZOH 
Gardner. K1NC_ _ . . 
Rossall. D A Gtovtri, A and 


RA. Chosen 

JH1RE. EltaSdteCeC 
R. Maiveni C. J A 
.... Btundett’a *fe J ,A 
NGS OWN TO RP^L 


Lew S: J L GUuer. re. wesaeck C p 
S Goddard. RA. Sutton Valence S: R 
M Good body. CHESHIRE, wtrrai Met 
CHIM Gordon. 14 20 H. WeUIngion 
C. t R Coway. ES ANGLIAN. Wefflcltff . 
HS. R l Graham. OLEENS. Sneooear 
C M R Crimes. HA. Otirtdte S: R D W 
Hall. 4 and SHI. SI John 's 9s N 
Ha iianav. REME- Burnley GS: M P 
Has. 'A and-SH. DoHar at: a » E 
Hendervm. PARA. Straihailan SJK 
Vw Henne-ttev RA. W«|*ck C 


R. J. L. writes: 

Your otherwise excellent 
obituary notice of Richantf 
Barnett (August 6) omirtec 
reference' to his distinguished 
contribution to AngloJewish 
history, both through the Jew- 
ish Historical Society; of 
which he had served as presi- 
dent. and through- the Jewish 
Museum. 

As archivist of the Spanish 
and Portuguese Jews' Congr£ 
gallon of London, he iunieti 
lev HM. . i h,s fa mHiariiy with its rich. 

I 31111 ils ritual .silver - 

both ascending to the sevei> 
teenih century - to excellent 
scholarly account. .1 - 
niis. combined with his 
professional experience at foe 
British Museum, made him 
me ideal choice to edit tw 
congregation's Treasures. tfo 
London Temple (1951) and 
the Catalogue of the Jewish 
Museum (1974) 

” e directed the exhfob 


C WE 

.& J c 

to A Tiltey. AAC.’ jSS»h A, i3H" 

Va55t2n klN^ Ow'MfoiftEZ 

« Logdon BSmSS!^ A PwiS? 

CawttOn C: P H wJmi' 
RAPC. Bridlington G8: C R 
RA. Willing! mi CTs s^wmKSHS- 
REME.- Wetbeck E 3 S Watiwrgn. 

I N Whitri 
Con>«U: A J 




House; 


The following overseas cadets 
also passed out with a view 
being commissioned in the 
armed forces or their countries. 

M A Abdul Sa tar. ‘Iraq: a T a a 
A tman. Jordan. M ai aE*™. r£.Jr. 
Arabia: A n ai gudain-. SsSH-. 





ts 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 




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recoil 


: **Astnamali” is a Zn la word 
.meaning “nothing to Jose 1 
-bind, by itself, it sums up the 
gut-insnnci of rebellion. It is a 
.‘DoStkaf cliche that oppression 
commonly depends upon some 
Tnoral conspiracy within the 
tanks of the oppressed. If the 
^oppressed do not resent what 
is being done to them, or if 
they, do not resent itabsolotefy 
enough, or if fear or avarice or 
mere drcmnspection serves to 
Jliint deeper and more fira- 
itamenta) loyalties, then they 
'ire nhlikeJy to take die des- 
gerate measures by which 
%ra®ai«S ire overthrown. 

/ the remarkable thing about 
Jast night's play. AsinamaR 
3QBBC2), was that it was more 
aitardricr than ; polemic, more 
concerned with bitting back at 
Random than with the rational 
programme of civil protest. 

- Its five characters . are 
Blacks who have been thrown, 
for arbitrary and often absurd 
reasons, into a Sooth African 
prison. As they talk we begin 
to share their own gleeful and 
quite unquenchable sense that 
the world Is mad, that aothor- 
fty is not merely' stupid but 
capricious and inconsistent, 
and that, in such circum- 
stances, laughter and common 
sense. -are die inevitable pre- 
lude to violence and revolt. 

’ AsinamaR does not simply 
argue a case, or rerite a fist of 
grievances.' It takes ns to the 
emotive, individual, idlosyn? 
erotic centre of the problem, 
the area which politics alone 
duuot touch, the region of the 
imagination in which Blacks 
perceive their privacy to be 
invaded and their culture held 
in contempt 

; There can be no collusion 
with an authority that thinks 
like this, and much of the 
play’s energetic vitriol is re- 
served for those who have so 
lap toed -the line, tbe-Blacks 
who have sought an accom- 
modation with- an intolerable 
governing creed. Blacks wOf 
fight Blacks, the play tens ns, 
because this is the primary 
betrayaL 

• Asinamali was filmed in 
South Africa daring the State 
of Emergency and its promoter 
was killed, by an armed mob, 
who may have been working 
for Chiri Bdt&elezi. and who 
loathed its message and had 
set out to’ murder the author, 
Mbongeni Ngema. ^t 1 war 
directed vrith riridlarit of-fbss 
b} : Boss Devenfah- • 

.v. Andrew RissIk 


THE ARTS 

In Sugarbaby, which opens, in London next week, Percy Adlon breaks with 
the classical style of his previous films: David Robinson meets the director 
and his slightly improbable star, Marianne Sagebrecht 


A comfort for man’s inadequacy 


13 


Sugaritahy is a marked shift in subject 
and style for the Genian director 
Percy Adlon. His two previous films. 
Celeste and The Swing, were elegant 
period pieces. Sugarbaby. set in 
present-day Munich, is the sioty of a 
tat and unattractive woman who 
discovers that given a little courage 
and a little luck, everyone can have a 
chance to be loved. 

The leading role is played by 
Marianne Sagebrecht who was ra 
London with Adlon for the presenta- 
tion of the film. Although no light- 
weight herself she is a very attractive 
woman: how did she feel about 
playing such a heroine? “If you are 
really interested in a character, you 
have to forget yourself to be un- 
selfish. Most actors like themselves 
too much.- they want to be beautiful, 
so that they cannot give. Hie hardest 
thing for me in this' role was to be 
slow and stoic. 1 have a lot of energy 
and I’m used to moving fast But it 
was a good discipline.” 

Sagebrecht a well-known stage 
actress and producer, all of whose 
work has a strong social orientation, 
provided the original inspiration for 
the story. She and Adlon met during a 
television production based on Don 
Quixote. **Ai the start of the produc- 
tion there was a poolside party”, 
Adlon recalls. “All through the 
evening Marianne was floating in the 
pool like a cork— or rather like a dead 
person, but with one eye painted 
laughing and one eye crying. At the 
end of the shooting, we bad another 
party, and this. time she was dancing 
rock and roll all the night, in high 
heels. 

“That was in 1979; but I deter- 
mined to make a film that would link 
these two pictures which I had of 
Marianne and which suggested the 
idea of a journey of coming alive. 
This was the frame of the film. And 
then someone told me the story of a 
cleaning lady who fell in love with a 
tramway driver, and who became 
beautiful as a result. So out of these 
things h grew up like a plant” 
Although they recognized that the 
film.had something to offer everyone 
who felt handicapped or inhibited to 
any degree (which means most of ust 
neither Adlon nor Sagebrecht antici- 
pated how strong reaction to the film 
would be. “I get wonderful letters 
from very young girls”, says 
Sagebrecht “and from men too — 
people needing all kinds of psycho- 
logical help. They are all very friendly 
and warm and I take -them very 
seriously. I reply- to every letter, l 
worked for two years in a psychiatric 
clinic, so I can understand.” - 
“i have made- another film since . 
then, .and written another, script”. . 
says Adlon. “bui people stiU come 


QlMartawwSagafawcftlwqPwyMtenbyDoiiiyWhr 



back, wanting to talk about 
Sugarbaby. I think for one thing it is 
tremendously optimistic. At the end. 
when she gives the primal scream, 
there is a great chance for the 
character to grasp life, to know 
people: And ! think it is true of the 
man. too. Maybe he is more of a man, 
with more of experience to help him 
face up to life and his little blonde 
rattlesnake wife.” 

Technically. Sugarbaby marks a 
break with Adlon's previous films, 
which were photographed in very 
classical style. “But this other style, 
with the bold, unrealistic' use of 
colour, has deep roots. In my early 
documentaries I was already looking 
for something more than filming 
reality. Working on feature films I 
discovered that camera people always 
try to find natural light and naturalis- 
tic light sources — always assuming 
that we are obliged to copy reality. 
But. if you look at art history, we were 
long ago released from this prison of 
reality. Already in Celeste I tried to 
find an artificial kind of light for the 
apartment — the light that Proust 
.tried .to imagine. I did not really 
succeed. 

“So . I derided to try- to find a 
camera, artist rather than a camera 
technician. And I found Johanna 


Heer— I met her at the London Film 
Festival in 1981. and immediately 
saw in her face that there was 
something different about her. She is 
a Viennese who went to New York 
ten years ago. and is now a video 
artist. When I started on Sugarbaby I 
asked to see her work and realized 
this was exactly what I wanted. An 
artist. I wanted a camera that was not 
shy. The ideal of conventional 
“good” camerawork is for the camera 
to remain unobtrusive. Johanna is 
just the opposite.” 

The visual experiment of Sugar- 
baby is developed further in Adlon's 
latest film. Herschel and the Music of 
the Stars, which is based on ah 
historical inridenL During his second 
stay in England. Haydn visited the 
emigre William Herschel in his 
cottage at Slough, and saw the 
astronomer's giant telescope. Adlon 
imagines the details of the visit and 
the impact upon the composer of the 
celestial vision. 

The piece was shot on video-tape. 
“After my experience with Johanna 
on . Sugarbaby I was able to tell a 
normal camera person my feelings 
about modern photography. But I - 
had the video magic box of tricks. 
.You can do much mote with video. 


You can learn much more cheaply. It 
was all worked out with a very 
sophisticated story-board.” The film 
is revolutionary as a demonstration 
of a mature and rifted artist using the 
vocabulary of electronic effects that 
until now have been the territory of 
pop video wizards. 

Adlon's current project. Lotus with 
a Star, records a curious piece of his 
own family history. His great-grand- 
father founded the Hotel Adlon. the 
first true international hotel in Berlin. 
It passed to Percy's grandfather, who 
in the Twenties sent bis three sons 
and one daughter 10 study the hotel 
business in the United States. Uncle 
Louis drifted to Hollywood, where he 
met and married the sister of the 
movie star Marion Davies, and 
became involved with the circle that 
moved around her and her protector, 
the newspaper king William Ran- 
dolph H caret- His adventures are the 
subject of the film. 

“It is a personal drama of one 
young man. and at the same time it 
treats Hollywood myths and Holly- 
wood topics. All the legendary Holly- 
wood people appear in the film. 
Hearst is called ‘Kane*. It is the first 
film in which I use film history.” 

Adlon himself was a by-product of 
his family migration. Young Miss 
Adlon fell in love with the opera star 
Rudolph LaubenthaL who was then 
regularly performing at the Met. and 
crossed the Atlantic with him 10 
times. “He was a very famous 
Tamino: and he sang Tristan at 
Covent Garden.” Back in Germany. 
La u ben i ha I built her a house on the 
Siam burger See. On the opposite 
shore of the lake he lived with his 
wife. “They sent signals by lights at 
night. Sometimes he would visit — 
always very elegant.” Percy Adlon — 
whose given name is really Parsifal — 
was the fruit of their romance, born in 
1 935. “My father warned to adopt me 
when I was 18. but I said 'No, sir, 
really not. My mother took me 
through all these times, and — no. 1 *. 

“In a way Louis with a Star will be 
my first real feature film. The others 
were etudes in a way. In the earlier 
films there was a lot of dialogue and 
monologues — typical low-budget 
style. Because of the little money and 
little time you have, you have to 
shoot one master shot after the other 
and then put them together. People 
suppose that this is a matter of choice, 
that these are the kind of films you 
want to make - when all the time it is 
simply from pressure ofmoney. I like 
very much to make these chamber 
film! with low budgets and little 
time: but I know what a feature film 
is. and I hope that with Louis I '.will 
have the chance to show what l have 
learnt” 


Despite the blue skies and 
sultry Provencal sun which 
make . Avignon one of Eur- 
ope's most agreeable summer 
theatre events, this year’s 
festival- is somewhat . over- 
shadowed by the unequivocal 
success last year of- Peter 
Brook's.-. MahabharaiCL No 
such .event has managed, to 
light. up the 1986. festival in. 
quite the same way. • . . . 

-One of this year's most 
satisfying performances is a 
tribute to the writer Nathalie 
Sarrauie. which comprises 
two short plays and two 
dramatic readings. Selected 
dnd directed by : Michel 
Dumoulin. they show to 
advantage Sarraute's lucid 
observation of human il- 
logicality. While Sarraute re- 
fiites any suggestion that her 
work -can. be compared with 
that of r Beckett. There are 
nevertheless similarities to be 
drawn • in ' • her relentless 
exploration of emotional ob- 
scurities and singular man- 
ipulation of the language. 

; The “die” in the four- 
hander Eile est La is the , 
unspoken, idea of “F”. whose 
refusal to speak her thoughts 
provokes surprising reactions . 
from **H“ (Homme) I. 2 and 
J.'Ii is hard' not to make a 
disappointed comparison be- 
tween Dtimoulin's flabby 
treatment of Poor Un Oui on. 
poor on non and Simone' 
Ben m ussa's .compelling direc- 
tion . of the play's Paris pre- 
ipicre earlier . this season. 
(Be nm ossa first staged' it in 
New York- under the tide For 
S'o Good Reason.) A male 
iwo-handcr. it is a verbal 
vivisection of a chance re- 
mark, which finally destroys 
the men's, long-standing 
friendship. 

The two literary works. 
Tropiqnes and L'Usage de la 
iarole. are given voice by six 
performances, including three 



Hysterical action in a public laundry in LeLavoir 

■ Diane Hill concludes her report from the ~ 
Avignon Theatre Festival 

Under the shadow 
of the master 


of France's most intuitive 
interpreters of contemporary 
drama. Maria Casar^s. Guy 
Trejan and Jean-Paul Rous- 
sillon-. Correctly- described as 
“readings”, their dramatic 
content however manages to 
surpass, that of most of the- 
new plays premfered at -the 
festival, which can be sum- 
med up as theatre- for the ear. 

Etats d 'amour by Mich die 
Guigon is not a great work 
but it shines bright in a 
programme which is almost 
totally’ devoid of humour. As 
the title suggests it is a series of 
related sketches about being in 
love: expressed, with a mini- 
mum of text and a charming 
naively, by the young com- 
pany Ftit Matin. 


Avignon's new direcior; 
Alain Crombecque, took over 
from Bernard F&ivre d' Airier 
at the tail end of 1984. Most of 
.the 1985 programme had al- 
ready been decided upon, so 
this is the first festival to bear 
the foil Crombdcque stamp.' 
With the charismatic ghost of 
Vilar still haunting Avignon 

15 years after his death, and a 
regular supply of political hoi 
coats to be juggled from left to 
right. Crombdcque’s role js 
not an easy one. Currently his 
mind is racing towards Avi- 
gnon '87. the opening gambit 
of which is to be a new 
production of Paul Claudel's 
Soulier dc satin.. 

With the undisciplined 
enthusiasm of a precocious 


chikL the alternative Avignon 
now runs wild in every comer 
of the town. It continues to 
expand, much to the satisfac- 
tion and consternation of 
Alain Leonard, who declines 
the title of director but never- 
theless heads the team of 
unpaid workers who manage 
to bring order to a programme 
which this year hits the 300 
production mark nearly all of 
them either Avignon creations 
or shows staged for the first 
lime this season. 

If success is an audience 
willingly packing itself into 
makeshift chicken-coop seat- 
ing. in near-tropical con- 
ditions. with crowds outside 
- battering to come in, then Le 
La voir, written, directed, de- 
signed and performed by the 
Amiens-based company The- 
atre de la Basoche, can start 
packing its trunks for Paris. 
The hysteria the piece has 
caused is, for the most part, 
justified. The action, of which 
there is plenty, lakes place in a 
public laundry — re-created in 
a miniscule room behind a 
shop, wiih an uncanny atten- 
tion to derail — just before the 
outbreak of the First World 
War. For two hours the audi- 
ence are allowed to eavesdrop 
on the rumbustious, often 
ribald, conversation between 
12 women, whose ages range 
from 16 to 75. 

A remarkable group of ac- 
tresses, most of the time either 
up to tiieir ears in suds or 
dashing away : with a smooth- 
ing iron, they meticulously 
flesh - out their individual 
characters.' When the piece 
ends, on the news that war has 
been declared, there is a 
genuine desire to know more 
about each of them. 'Sen- 
sitively directed by the 
company's founder, Domi- 
nique Durvin. the piece has 
the air of a documentary and 
the compulsion of a television 
soap-opera. - • 


Promenade Concert 


Nash Ensemble 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 

Knowing the Nash Ensem- 
bles reputation for the enter- 
prise dt tiieir programmes at 
smaller London venues, one 
might have expected some- 
thing like this delectable mix- 
ture of French and Italian 
quisle . in their Prom. The 
same, of course, applies to 
tljcir clqgaht. .although never 
precious: playing style. There 
i$ no small ensemble better 
equipped for endearing an 
audience to the - music oT our 
own century, . : 

. However" , they began this 
concen with something from 
the century past, in the shape 
of Gounod's Petite Spnphonie 
for nine wmd instruments.' a 


work that, although occupying 
the category of. light music, 
does So with • a polished. 
Mozartian craftsmanship. The 
Nash played it with a rhyth- 
mic incisiveness that com- 
promised neither its lyricism- 
nor hs jauntiniess. 

It was neatly balanced by a 
comparably light piece at the 
beginning of the second half 
although one which parades 
its virtuosic demands, particu- 
larly upon one player, rather 
more .extroverlly. But Skaila. 
Kangs gave the notorious 
harp part of Ravel’s Introduc- 
tion and Allegro confidently 
and sumptuously, while her 
colleagues helped to present 
this jewel at Its gleaming best. 
From this to the vaguer sonic 
and verbal imagery of the 
same composer's Trois 


) 


Primes die Mallarm? is a 
considerable step, but one 
which held no terrors for these 
players as they delicately 
touched in the exquisite tex- 
tures which lay beneath the 
concentrated sensuality of Sa- 
rah Walker's mezzo-soprano. 

It was arguably a smaller 
leap thence to Messiaen's 
Oiseaux exotiques (1956), 
however, for both pieces de- 
pend more upon colour than 
motivic organization, al- 
though Messiaen’s colours, 
derived, needless, to say, from 
birdsong, are more primary. 
In this work we were once 
again reminded that the Nash 
is an ensemble of distin- 
guished soloists when their 
regular pianist Ian Brown, 
stepped up and despatched yet 
another demanding solo part 


with- considerable panache. 

It was a logical progression, 
too. to the more concentrated 
but equally carefully shaded, 
euphonious music of Dalla- 
piccola. the title of whose 
Piccolo musica nottuma. here 
placed after the Gounod and 
heard in its 1961 transcription 
for eight instruments, again 
conjures up Mozartian allu- 
sions. In fact, in its aromatic, 
evocative and concentrated 
poetry, it goes for beyond 
anything in the 18th century - 
or the 1 9th, for that matter. 

Lionel Friend directed an- 
other meticulous perfor- 
mance, and the concert 
finished with Miss Walker 
performing Berio's clever Folk 
Songs with wonderfully outra- 
geous theatricality. 

Stephen Pettitt 


Theatre in London 

Key Exchange 

Old Red Lion 


Some of the truths of human 
nature are too banal to be 
worth stating, even when they 
are true. It is not enough to 
stand back point proudly at 
your own work and exclaim 
“People are like that”, because 
the audience has the right to 
reply “Yes, we know that, but 
we don't know why and, on 
the evidence of this, neither do 
you”. All drama has, in some 
measure, to offer us a distort- 
ing glass, not a mirror, and 
without that strange, idio- 
syncratic im perfectness of vi- 
sion the theatre is reduced to 
mere reportage. 

Key Exchange at the Old 
Red Lion is a street-smart 
contemporary American con- 
versation play about love, 
pain, sex and the whole damn' 
thing. It is set In the idle, 
bleached-oui urban spaces of 
the long hot summer, against a 
backdrop of parched trees and 
distant skyscrapers. Its charac- 
ters arc solid and convincing 
and observantly drawn — two 
men and a gjri talking, argu- 
ing. fighting, making up and 
being funny as they cycle 
nowhere in particular. But the 
emotional patterns • which 
underpin the sharp, no-non- 


sense dialogue are dismay- 
ingly trite and dismayingly 
inconsequential. 

I guess the easiest com- 
petent play to write is the one 
where the audience are per- 
fectly happy with the evening 
until they realize, well before 
the characters do, that they 
will be going out into the night 
saying “So what?”. 

In Kevin Wade's play — 
seen here for the first time 
after a successful two-year run 
in America — Philip is a 
healthily-built athlete with un- 
complicated needs. Lisa is his 
wised-up, hang-up-free girl- 
friend. while Michael is a nice 
weirdo with a perfect marriage 
already behind him. Mostly, 
they talk sex. bicycles and 
each other in different com- 
binations. but beneath that 
chrome-bright goad-time ex- 
terior Lisa wants commitment 
and emotional security and, 
when he loses it. Philip wants 
it too. So, in a way does 
Michael but as a concession 
to the romantic and bitter- 
sweet. no one gets what he or 
she wants. 

Wade gives us little more 
than this generalized human 
truth, and. although the play is 
well acted and fined together 
with hard-nosed precision. I 
went out disappointedly say- 
ing “So what?". 

Andrew Rissik 


Rock 


Prince 

Wembley Arena 


Since his only previous perfor- 
mance in Britain, at the 
Lyceum in 1981. Prince Rog- 
ers Nelson has become the star 
he always thought he was. His 
1984 album Purple Rain is 
reputed to be one of the 10 
best-selling records of all time 
and, whether he is scene- 
stealing at awards ceremonies, 
or- having stickers slapped on 
his record sleeves to alert 
potential buyers to the “off- 
ensive” nature of his lyrics, he 
is always the talk of the town. 

It was surprising then that 
such a fresh, controversial 
talent should rely on such 
dyed-in-the-wool techniques 
of stagecraft. His M-piecc 
backing band, including a 
horn section, and a sharp- 
suited backing vocal trio were 
the perfect foil to Prince's song 
aiid . dance routines. In a 
variety of costumes, mostly 
black and all of which ended 
up in the audience, the skinnv. 
stiff-backed singer led his 
ensemble through a roller- 
coaster sequence of “New 
Position”. “I Wonder U" and 
"Raspberry Beret” with spit- 
ii^-polish arrangements m 


the classic soul revue style. 
Movements like bouncing the 
microphone, and twirling and 
dropping to the splits position, 
were pure James Brown, as 
were the flamboyant brass 

fanfares that he used to segue 
the numbers together. 

Although on record Prince 
has forged his own unspecific 
style of music from a variety 
of sources, including soul, 
funk rock pop and psyche- 
delia. at Wembley he opted for 
the straight dance-floor funk 
But. apart from the excite- 
ment that is automatically 
generated by slick dance-mu- 
sic. there was little evidence of 
any spontaneity. Everything 
ran along smoothly predict- 
able lines, including some 
carefully choreographed grop- 
ing on the floor with the 
microphone stand. 

Prince’s complete mastery 
of band, audience and event 
was set in perspective by the 
final encore of “Purple Ram” 
when, picking up a guitar for 
the first time, he slipped 
effortlessly into the new role of 
guitar hero, casually adopting 
the look and sound of a latter- 
day Jimi Hendrix. His is an 
old head on young shoulders. 

David Sinclair 



James Telferas the upright hero Young: Douglas 

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 
Theatre: Martin Cropper 

Douglas 

Signet Library 


The vaunted theme of this 
year's festival is the Scottish 
Enlightenment, the period of 
the mid-to-late 18th century 
that turned Auld Reekie into 
the Athens of the North. 
Paradoxically, of course, the 
greatest invention of the neo- 
classical age was Romanti- 
cism: hand-in-glove with the 
clear-eyed rationalism of 
Adam. Hume. Smith and 
Telford came its dialectical 
antithesis in the form of 
Ossian's Scotch mist. 

One of the staunchest cham- 
pions of Ossian's authenticity 
was John Home, the rural 
divine whose staggering suc- 
cess with Douglas led to his 
resignation from the scan- 
dalized Church of Scotland. 
First given in 1756. his play 
has not been seen at the 
festival since 1 950. when Sybil 
Thorndike and Lewis Casson 
joined the Glasgow Citizens’. 

. Here ft is performed by a 
feirly ordinary company in the 
magnificent setting of the 
Signet Library, whose tooth- 
some entablature and gilt 
acanthus-leaf capitals shim- 
mer above a bough t-in rake of 
seating. The stage is a square 
wooden dais (which augments 
a surprisingly decent acous- 
tic). while the company have a 
son of time-out area in the 
distance beneath a blow-up of 
an original playbill. 

As to the play itself - a 
medieval tragedy of a lost 
child returned to its grieving 
mother who. on his violent 
death, flings herself off the 
nearest precipice — one can 
only suggest that its tragic 
purpose might have been bel- 
ter served in a dirgeful ballad 
than in ninety minutes of 
produciion-Iine blank verse. 


The most deadening thing 
about it is that, notwithstand- 
ing ihe Kirk's original outrage 
Home's tone remains as un- 
relentingly polite as one would 
expect to hear from a country 
vicar in any age (always 
excepting Sterne). Lust, grid 
and jealousy seem to have 
been passions about which 
Home had read in books. 

In terms of theatre, this is a 
pretty preposterous piece of 
hokum, with a cack-handed 
structure that explodes the 
revelations like damp mat- 
ches. The heroine's valiant 
husband. Lord Douglas, meets 
his sticky end against the 
marauding Dane; her infant 
son goes AWOL with his 
nurse on a wild and stormy 
night she marries the stolid 
Lord Randolph, whose chief 
thug. Glenalvon. sexually ha- 
rasses her. her new husband is 
saved from assassins by a 
braw young shepherd: Young 
Douglas (for it is he) wins the 
approval of his real mother; 
and falls out with the slim; 
Glenalvon. who poisons his 
lord's mind with lubricious 
hints, thus precipitating tha 
fetal denouement 

Joan Knight's company, got 
up pleasingly in mid-Georgian 
costume, deliver the piece' 
with not a hint of burlesque — 
an altogether too respectful! 
procedure which makes the 
evening an archaeological 
exhumation rather than ai£ 
entertainment. 1 have no 
doubt that the stylized oratori- 
cal gestures, the puffed-up 
chests and clutching of basket- 
hilts. are as historically ac- 
curate as one could wish, but 
Clare Richard's well-con- 
trolled Lady Randolph and 
James Telfer’s upright Young 
Douglas find but flimsy sup- 
port. The solo fiddler, un- 
credited in the programme, is 
rather good. 


Dance: John Percival 

Cendrillon 

Playhouse 


Here is a fine thing. As one of 
the dance productions of this 
year's Edinburgh Festival 
Frank Dunlop has found a 
production of Cinderella so 
tediously banaL so tiresomely 
lacking in dance interest, that 
to my mind it qualifies as anti- 
balleL 

The perversity actually be- 
gan earlier, with Francoise 
Ad ret the new director of the 
Ballet de Lyon, who chose to 
commission Maguy Marin, 
reputedly one of the most 
uncompromisingly avant- 
garde of young French chor- 
eographers. to stage Proko- 
fiev's score. 

Marin began by cutting 
Prokofiev down to size. The 
production (which we had 
benercall by its French name. 
Cendrillon. to avoid un- 
fulfilled expectations) lasts, 
without intermission, only 95 
minutes. Large chunks of the 
music have been amputated: 
even more than you might 
expect,- because within this 
restricted length no Fewer than 
four episodes are given to 
what the programme calls 
additional music sequences by 
Jean Schwarz. That may be 
meant as a joke, since they 
comprise mainly recordings of 
children's babbling, crying 
and laughing. 

The performing area, too. is 
drastically reduced by having 
much of the stage filled by a 
giant dolls' house: the son 
that, opened up, is like an egg- 
box. in this case three storeys 
of three rooms each. Some of 
them are used occasionally by 
the performers: others are 
filled with giam dolls* heads or 
with cui-oul or moulded fig- 
ures to supplement the small 
cast. 

WcIL I suppose that produo 
ing this usually large-scale 
ballet with a cast of 23 keeps 


the costs down: and even the 
orchestra pit is modestly, al- 
though conscientiously, "filled 
by the Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra. 

As if all this were not 
ignominy enough for the 
dancers, I have to add that 
Maguy Marin has decided to 
have them all disguised as 
dolls. The papier machc 
masks by Monique Luyion 
cleverly mimic the porcelain 
feces of 19th-century dolls 
(rather dingy with age. some of 
them), while Monserrat 
Casanova's costumes give 
them all stuffed, ragged 
bodies. 

Actually. 1 imagine that if! 
were a dancer I might prefer to 
be unrecognized while per- 
forming such blatantly simple; 
repetitive movements. The 
idea, presumably, is to present 
a child's-eyc view of the story., 
but the result is the son of 
elementary mime and dancing 
that are all too familiar to 
anyone who walks the streets 
or visits the fringe venues of 
Edinburgh at festival time. 

There are a few clever 
touches. One such is having 
the stepmother hide' Cinders 
by sitting on her when the 
Prince arrives seeking a foot to 
fit the slipper. Another is the 
way the Prince and Cinderella 
at the ball are trampled under-, 
foot by the guests in their rush 
for refreshments. But what orf 
earth are a game of hopscotch 
and another of skipping doing 
in Cinderella — or cverr 
CendrillorO And what are we 
to make of choreography' 
where the most striking move- 
ment is the heroine tumbling 
(very slowly) head-first down 
a flight of stairs when mid- 
night strikes? 

The dancers may well be 
gifted: they have little chance- 
to prove it. The best thing all 
evening is John Spradberry\ 
lighting, but the twinkling 
costumes of the principals^, 
probably not his idea, grow 
tiresome. 


■ HI 


\ 



— ^ r*OVj.oOi i-s i >OU 


Patten call for 
solidarity on 
sex education 


By Siieila Gunn, Political Staff 


Conservative MPs have 
been urged to drop their 
campaign to give parents the 
right to excuse their children 
from sex education classes. 

The plea comes from Mr 
Chris Patten, the Minister for 
Education, who has written 
privately to the MPs over the 
issue. 

The 68 backbench MP5 are 
determined to win a con- 
cession from the Government 
to meet the feats of parents 
who object to the way sex is 
taught in schools. They have 
threatened to try to remove 
the whole clause governing sex 
education from the Education 
Bill. 

Controversy about the sex 
education syllabus started 
with claims that some schools 
were undermining family life. 

There was also concern 
about ihe literature used, such 
as a book called Jennie lives 
with Eric and Martin about a 
young girl who lived with her 
father and his lover. 

Mr Peter Bruinvels. Conser- 
vative MP for Leicester EasL 
said that he had received 400 
letters from worried parents 
and religious groups. 

He said that he intended to 
force a vote in the Commons 
on the issue. 

In his letter. Mr Patten 
claims that if children are to 
be properly equipped to face 
the modem world they should 


receive adequate sex educa- 
tion. 

“Many parents are reluctant 
or even unable to provide this 
fully at home. It is in the 
interests of the pupils that 
schools fill any gaps and 
complement and develop 
what parents may provide," 
he said. 

Clause 26 was added to the 
Education Bill in the Lords, 
requiring schools to encourage 
pupils "to have due regard to 
moral considerations and the 
value of family life”. 

Mr Patten wrote: “1 firmly 
believe that sex education 
undertaken in accordance 
with Gause 26 will give 
parents no legitimate cause for 
concern and the Government 
sees no case for parents to be 
given a right to withdraw their 
children from provision in 
this field.” 

He said the Bill would give 
parents more rights to 
information about the cur- 
riculum for sex education, 
backed up by a circular sent to 
schools last week. 

Most MPs are believed to 
want the issue to be dealt with 
by the circular instead of by 
legislation, which could lead 
to parents with strong moral 
or religious views taking a 
school to court if they did not 
agree with the sex education 
syllabus- 


Drifting Tamil refugees 
‘came from Europe 9 


Continued from page 1 
what they can earn in the 
“black economy”. 

Sri Lanka's High Commis- 
sioner in Canada. Brigadier 
Tissa Weeratunge. conveyed 
an ofler from the Sri Lankan 
Government to the Canadian 
Government to repatriate the 
1 52 people if they were found 
to be Sri Lankans. Of the 152. 
four are women and five 
children, the youngest a baby 
of less than a year. 

Scepticism about the 
group's account of events 
arose when coastguards, po- 
lice and doctors cast doubt on 


their claim to have been adrift 
for five days without food 


Ten of the group were 
admitted to hospital but none 
was diagnosed as being seri- 
ously ill. Others were housed 
in the local university. Red 
Cross officials arranged for 
food and clothing while the 
group were at Sl John's in 
Newfoundland, and the Ca- 
nadian immigration minister. 
Mr. Benoit Bouchard. said 
that the refugess would be 
given one year permits to 
remain in Canada if it was 
confirmed that they did come 
from Sri Lanka. 



■:m/r 


Former East German border guards, who had fled to the West laying wreaths at the Berlin Wall where a young East German was shot dead in 1962. 

Kohl brands Berlin Wall a 


monument to inhumanity 


By Omr Foreign Staff 


Chancellor Kohl of West' 
Germany described the Berlin 
Wall as a monument to in- 
humanity yesterday and 
warned East Berlin that the 
West would never cease 
demanding that h be torn 
down to allow free contact 
between the German peoples. 

However, in his address 
commemorating the 25th 
anniversary of the division of 
the dty, the Chancellor also 
pledged that Bonn would seek 
steadily improving relations 
with East Germany to try to 
ease the divisions the Wall 
had caused. 

Speaking in the Reichstag 
building in Berlin, Herr Kohl 
recalled August 13, 1961, 
when East German guards 
drew a cordon through Berlin 
to stop a mass exodus. 


“We must not and will not 
come to terms with this monu- 
ment to inhumanity, which - 
tears families apart and pre- 
vents human contact” he 
said. “We demand humanity 
and peace at the border 
through the middle of Ger- 
many. Walls, barbed wire and 
orders to shoot to IdU must all 
go" 

Chancellor Kohl and other 
political leaders paid tribute to 
the estimated 75 people killed 
trying to cross the WalL 

Shortly before the Chan- 
cellor began to speak, a 
wo man who had emigrated 
from East Germany two years 
ago seized the microphone to 
demand that her two children 
be allowed ont to join her. 

Herr WDly Brandt, the 
former Chancellor who was 


Governing Mayor ' of West 
Berlin when the Wall went up. 
said: “It was an admission of 
failure by the East Germans 
that they bad to wall in their 
own people to stop them voting 
with their feet.” 

Meanwhile, in East Berlin 
the communist authorities 
marked the anniversary of 
what is termed the “Anti- 
Fascist Defence Wall” as a 
day of triumph. 

The Communist Party lead- 
er, Herr Erich Honecker, 
speaking on a podium be- 
decked with red flags, said the 
building of the Wall had saved 
peace in Europe. 

Massed ranks of workers" 
militia wearing steel helmets 
and with guns slung over their 
shoulders marched down the 
broad Kari-Marx Alice. 



Children presenting East German guards with flowers. 


Observer 
to reduce 

staff in 

print move 

Continued from page l - 



ford and a Reed Groan 
subsidiary at Worcester. 



Exact figures for the casuals 
are hard to obtain, but it a 
known that 650 casual shifts a 
week are worked at The 
Observer. . probably by mote 
than 500 men. and all these 
will have toga - • • v 


,„.*4 


SogaL representing most of 
the print room and publishing 
workers, will be much harder 
hit than the NGA which 
covers the paper’s composing 
room. 


A- 


The management intends to 
introduce the principle of 
single-keysirokingat Battersea 
- where copy typed by a 
journalist into a computer 
does not need to be reset by a 
printer. But some NGA 
compositors will work at the 
new planL setting classified 
advertising and makmgAip 
pages on display screens. 






Gon* 


Redundancy' terms to be 
offered are four weeks' pay for 
every year of sen 1 ice. pi us ’four 
weeks' severance pay and four 
weeks' holiday pay. There is 
ofs 


i at err 11:4,1 


also an offer of a another eight 
weeks' pay to all staff leaving 
if production is uninterrupted 
till next March. 


A printer earning £20.QQCta 
year with IQ years' service 
could expect a payment of 
more than £23.000. 


Mr Roger Harrison. TTlre 
Observer's Chief Executive, 
said yesterday: "We are fully 
aware of the hardship caused 


by any redundancy but. in Jhce 


i opening in the 
Observer arim 


what is haj 

industry. The < 

maintain its present staff and 
continue to run a large print- 
ing works for one night a week 
production." 


was 


He added that he 
optimistic about the future of 
the paper under the proposed 
new printing arrangements as 
it would offer better priming 
quality, more competitive 
costs and the possibility, of 
colour. 


The Observer's staff of more 
than 90 journalists lias 
dropped its original outright 
opposition to the move to 
Battersea. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today's events 


Exhibitions in progress 
Portrait 80s: British por- 
traiture 1980-85: Peter Burke: 
sculpture and drawings; Vic- 
toria Art Gallery. Bridge Sl 
B ath: Mon to Fri 10 to 6, Sat 1 0 
to 5 (ends Sept 6). 

The Danish Show: paintings 
and sculpture by eight' Danish 
artists: Cartwright Hall. Lister 
Park. Bradford: Tues to Sun 10 
to 6 (ends Sept 28). 

The Danish Show: work by 12 
Danish sculptors: Yorkshire 
Sculpture Park. West B return. 
Nr Wakefield: Mon to Sun 10 to 
6 (ends Nov 21. 

Land space: place nature, ma- 
terial: Kettle’s Yard Gallery. 
Castle St. Cambridge: Tues to 
Sal 12.30 to 5.30. Sun 2 to 5.30 
(ends Aug 31). 


, Shipping sketches by John 
{■ Wilson Carmichael' reiids'SCpt 
4): Seascapes: artists and the sea 
In the twentieth century (ends 
Aug 24): Sea Drifts: sea rhythms 
explored in painting, sculpture 
and music (ends Aug 24): Laing 
Art Gallery. Newcastle; Mon to 
Fri 10 to 5. Sat 10 to 4.30. Sun 
130 to 5.30. 

Focus on Tiles: history, use 
and decoration: Derby Museum 
and An Gallery, The Strand: 
Tues to Sat 10 to 5 (ends Aug 
23). 

Last chance to see 

Jim Wilson: retrospective; Art 
Gallery. Civic Centre. Mount 
Pleasant. Tonbridge Wells, 10 
to 5.30. 

Caribbean Focus: photo- 
graphs of Caribbean working life 
by Roshini Kempadoo: Hinck- 
ley Library. Lancaster Rd. 9.30 
to 7. 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,124 



ACROSS 

1 Smooth twin at home in this 
club (7). 

5 Where an animal lives 
partly under cover? (7). 

9 Tangled vine concealing an 
unknown quarry, perhaps 

10 Not impressed, a Parisian 
emulated Kipling's bullerflv 
(9). 

11 Minor characters let down 
ihe court action (5.4). 

22 After which, it's said, this 
shrub supplies an astringent 
lotion (5). 

13 Watery spirit Scot sent back 
with notice (5). 

15 Terribly non-U daughter of 
a Mafia boss (9). 

18 One-rime alremaiive 
booze in opera? (9). 

19 Kind of deal contributing to 
popular charities (5). 

21 Beg for key when behind 
bars (5). 

23 Writer brings dance to a 
stop (4-5). 

25 Biggles's set-up? (9). " 

26 Lacking publicitv, )3 ac- 
cepts an Order for her (5). 

27 Fuss caused by performing 
bear? On the contrary (5-2). 

28 Hide directions to lake is- 
land (7). 


3 Gaffe made by a single 
railwayman (5). ’ 

4 Rule again broken — it pains 
one (9). 

5 Expedition keeps meal short 
(5). 

6 One’s sphere of activity at 
low tide, perhaps? (5-4). 

7 Gem of a leading article on 
zoo’s origin (5). 

8 A little fish for Tom? (7). 

14 Character at heart of 8. 

maybe, or dreamv creature 
(9). 

16 Accommodation the Psalm- 
ist found amiable (9). 


17 Two boys beginning to emu- 
14. for example (9). 


late 


to 


18 The kind of islanders op- 
posed to using force (7). 

20 Tithe? It ruined this old per- 
son (7). 

22 Painter of the French king 
and queen (5). 

23 Child one found in farm 
building (5). 

24 Grass - or give way to ter- 
ror (5). 

Solution to Ptttzle No 17.123 


DOWN 


1 Spear from island cut off up 
river (7), 


2 Mans neat young lovers at 
the helm (9). 


Concise Crossword page 8 
/ 



JVfusic .. 

Recital by the Endellion 
String Quartet: De La Ware 
Pavilion, Bex hill, 8. 

Concert by the Choir of Leeds 
Parish Church; Bath Abbey. 1. 

Concert by the Tregye Festi- 
val Players: St Mawes Castle, 
Cornwall. 8. 

Concert of sacred and secular 
music by the Keble Choir, 
Ledbury Parish Church, Wor- 
cester, 8. 

Organ recital by Peter Back- 
house: St Mary’s Cathedral, 
Palmerston Place, Edinburgh, 6. 

Concert by the Franz Schu- 
bert Quanet of Vienna and 
Simon Rowland-Jones (viola); 
The Lakes School, Titrat beck 
Bridge. Cumbria, 8. 

Recital by the Nash Ensemble 
of London: Strensall Garrison 
Church, N Yorks. 8. 

Talks, lectures 


Around the world in 80 days 
by bic^cleL by Nicholas Sand- 


New 


ere: The Folk Hall, 
Earswick. N Yorks, 4. 

Lakeland from the air, by 
Peter Thornton;' Lake District 
National Park Visitor Centre. 
Brockhole. Windermere. 1.30. 

Cats and madness: illustrated 
talk on Louis Wain, by Patricia 
Allderidge: York City Art Gal- 
lery. Exhibition Sq. 7.30. 
General 

Margate Carnival Procession: 
O'ftonville to Westbrook: de- 
parts Palm Bay. CliftonriJIe, 
7.15. 

Lifeboat Day: full sea rescue 
display by rescue services; Cro- 
mer seafront. Norfolk. 1 1 to I. 


Anniversaries 


New boots — paperback — 


The Deputy Literary Editor's selection of interesting books published this 
week: 

NON-FICTION 

The Human Province by Bias Canefti (Picador, 

The Way We Live Now, by Bernard Levin (H odder a Stoughton, £3.50) 
Revolt in. The Revolt, by T.E. Lawrence (Hutchinson. £5.95) 

Wordsworth and The Human Heart, by John Beer (Macmillan, £8.95) 
Ramakrishna and his disefefes, by Christopher Isherwood (9iep hoard 
Wi ' 


The Lover, by Marguerite Duras (Coifirs, £2.95) 

Other Fire*, Stories from the Women of Latin America picador. £3.50) 

To Have and To Hold, by Deborah Moggach (Penguin. E2L95) 

Paradise Postponed, by John Mortimer (Penguin. £3.50) 

The Andeison Question, by Bel Mooney (Pavanne, £255) NS 


The Halifax House Price index 


ALL HOUSES 


NEW HOUSES 





Average 

Annual 


'Average 

Annual 



- Index 

pnoeE chaoge% 

Index 

price E 

change% 

1983 


100.0 

30896 


1005 

34.795 


1984 


107.2 

30552 

75 

1065 

3*559 

65 

1985 


1175 

32.9S3 

9.1 

115.4 

37557 

ao 

1985 

Quarter 2 

1155 

32583 

85 

1135 

38592 

65 


duartera 

1175 

32578 

7.7 

116A 

37347 

7.7 


Quarter 4 

120.7 

34A07 

8.7 

1195 

40,122 

95 

1966 

Quarter 1 

1125 

35.164 

95 

1205 

40592 

9.0 


Quarter 2 

1285 

38588 

115 

12S5 

44582 

10.0 

1985 

July 

11&4 

31562 

65 

1155 

35539 

75 


August 

1175 

32552 

7.6 

116.1 

37.439 

65 


September 

1185 

33590 

8.1 

1175 

38536 

8.1 


October 

1195 

34.088 

BA 

1185 

39590 

85 


November 

1205 

34599 

85 

119.7 

40.071 

92 


December 

122-2 

34517 

9.7 

122-1 

41.015 

105 

1988 

January 

121.0 

34.372 

B.7 

1205 

40529 

85 


February 

1225 

34541 

95 

1195 

39.733 

&4 


March 

1245 

36534 

9.7 

1225 

<2557 

102 


Apri 

126.7 

37536 

105 

122.7 

43,771 

TA 


May 

128.4 

37500 

115 

125.4 

<4.121 

105 


June 

1305 

39.453 

12.1 

127.5 

45.611 

124 


July 

1325 

40560 

- 135 

1285 

46562 

11.0 


SouraKHaUax Budding Soctaty 


Call-a-Course service 


Births: John Galsworthy. 
Kingston Hill. Surrey, 1867. 

Deaths: John William Flet- 
cher. evangelist. Madeley. 
Shropshire. 1785: Richard Jeff- 
eries. naturalist and writer. Gof- 
ing-by-Sea. Sussex. 1887: Alfred 
Harms worth, 1st Viscount 
Northdifle. founder of the Daily 
MaiL proprietor of The Times 
1908-1922. London. 1922; Sir 
Landon Ronald, pianist and 
composer. London, I93S; Wil- 
liam Randolph Hearst, news- 
paper proprietor. Beverly Hills. 
California. 1951: Bertolt Brecht, 
writer. Berlin. 1956. 

Unconditional surrender of 
Japan. 1945- 


Capital Radio is again run- 
ning its Call-a-Course service 
offering confidential advice on 
all aspects of further education. 
The service runs each weekday 
until August 22. from 4 pm to 7 
pm on 01-388 6111. 

Advisors from the London 
careers service will be able to 
deal with calls on a wide variety 
of topics from all age groups. 


Fleet Street vigil 


An all night vigil of prayer for 


News International lakes 
at St Bride's Church. Fleet Street 
between 9 pm tonight and 9 am 
tomorrow. 

There will be a service of Holy 
Communion at midnight to- 
night and at 8 JO am tomorrow. 


Weather 

forecast 


A depression off NW 
Ireland will be slow mov- 
ing whilst a trough of low 
pressure will move NE 
across Scotland and E 
districts of England. 


6 am to midnight 


London, SE, E, central N En- 
East Anglia, E Midlands: ■ 
in places at first sunny' 
Intervals and isolated' showers 
developing; winds to SW moderate; ' 



max temp 22C (72F). 
Central S, SW, NV 


NW England, W 
Midlands, Channel Islands, Wales: 
Sunny intervals, occasional show- 
ers; wind SW moderate or fresh; 
max temp 19C (66F). 

Lake District, Isle of Man, SW 
Scotland, CMasgow, Argyll, North- 
ern Ireland: Rather cloudy, show- 
ers, perhaps heavy and prolonged; 
wind S moderate or fresh; max temp 

an 

Nc tnan 


: England, Borders, Etfinburgh, 


Dundee, Aberdeen, Central High- 
at first. 


lands, Moray Firth: Rain 
sunny intervals and occasional 
showers developing; wind SE mod- 
erate: i 


ate: max temp 17C(B3F). |. 

NE, NW Scotland, Orkney: f- 

dudy, rain at times; wind E to NE I 


Cloudy, 

■moderate or fresh; max tamp ISC ■ 
.(59F). 

Shetland: Rather cloudy, scat- 
tered outbreaks of rain: wind E 
moderate or fresh; max temp 14C 
(57F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Sat- 



High Tides 


TODAY 
London Bridge 
Aberdeen 
Avonmoulb 


Cardiff 

Oavonport 

Dover 

Falmouth 

Gtosg o w 

Henoch 

Hothead 

Ilfracombe 

Leith 

Liverpool 


8126 

8.14 

1.19 

SJSB 

1.04 


541 

11.51 

7.01 

&27 

*57 

1246 

12.15 

9.30 

545 

451 

6.40 


unday: Sunny intervals and show- 
i. heavy and 


era 

Temi 


and 
res rather 


in places, 
normal. 


ft-uue sky: be- blue sky and cloud: c- 
Ctoudy: o-overras; (-fog: a-drtzdc: h- 
hpll: mnt-nUsi: r-rain. vsnow; Uv 
Uiunderslotm: pshown 
Arrow* snow wind direction, wind 
weed imphl circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


Margate 
MOfordKaven 1234 
Newquay 
Oban 

Penzance 11.38 
Portland 1254 
Portsmouth 6.05 
Shoreh am . 557 

Sout h ampton 5.43 
Swansea 1240 
Tees 1046 

Wltoo-oo-Nze 626 


KT P* 

6.0 &4> 
26 964 

10-8 156 
12 6.29 
10.1 141 
1221 
55 6.11 
4.3 

45 759 
35 6.47 
4.8 5.48 
62 158 
7.ff 1251 

4.8 10.10 

8.0 6.32 
Z0 456 

4.1 657 
55 1.12 

12.12 

1249 

■ 45 
15 1.33 
35- 645 
55 622 

3.8 623 
75 122 
45 1153 
35 647 


■ KT 
- 6.1 
54 
105 
10 
SB 
45 
■55 


4.1 

34 
-46 

62 

72 

4.6 

.7.7 

22 

•'.42 

55 

.55 

35 


14 

■45 

51 

.40 

75 

42 

57 


Tide measured in metres: UnM3280*ft. 



Sun rises: Sunsets: 
544am 826pm 


Around Britain 


4.43 pm 
Pul moon: August IS 


11.48 pm 


Sun Rein 
hr® in 


Roads 


Wales and West MS Various 
lane closures southbound be- 
tween junctions 8 and 9 (M50 S 
Wales/A438 Evesham). AA: 
Road improvements on Bath 
Rd. Bristol, near Kensington 
Park Rd. A449; Two sets of 
contraflow heading towards the 
M4 (junction 24) S of Usk. 

The North: M6: Possible 
delays on both carriageways 
between junctions 32 and 33 
(M55/LancasterL A& Repairs at 
the junction of Otorley Rd. 
Swinton with Moorside Rd: 
local diversion. M63: Avoid 
Barton • bridge. Greater 
Manchester. 

Scotland: A92: Two sets of 
single line traffic with tem- 
porary lights on die Montrose 
H igh St and S of Montrose at the 
A934 junction. Tayside. A77: 
Contraflow' ‘with temporary 
lights: also various southbound 
lane closure* (A77/A70 Holm- 
ston roundabout). A I: East 
Linton bridge works. 


■ 'TIMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
I rS8d Primed nv London Post iPnm 
1 w*' Limited oi i Virginia 4«rc«. 
London £i_ W Thursday. August 


14.. IS86 Rewtrred as a newsiupet 
Post Office. 


at the 



rules are as 


Times Portfolio Cold 
Tallows. 

1 Times Portfolio W free. Purchase 
of Thp Times Is noi a condition at 
taking pari. 

2 Times Portfolio Usi comprises a 
group of public companies whose 
shares are listed on the Slock 
Exchange and quoted In The Times 
Slock Exchange prices page. Trio 
companies comprising mat usi will 
mange from day to day. The lls« 
i which |s numbered I - A*) » divided 
into (our randomly distrlbuied groups 
of 11 shares. Every Portfolio card 
contains two numbers from each 
group and each card contains a 
unique set of numbers.- 


li If lor any reason The Times 
Prices Page n not published to (he 
normal way Times Portfolio wUl be 
suspended for that day. 


How to ptajr - Duty OMttoM 
On each day your unique sei of eight 
numbers win ■ represent commercial 


and Industrial shares published in The 
Times Portfolio Usl which_wiii appear 


on the sioc it Exchange Prices page- 
in Ihe columns provided next to 
your shares note the price change i+ 
or -i. in pence, as published ut uiat 
day's Times. 

After listing the price manges 'of 


your^rfght shareafor chal day. add op 


3 Times portfolio *diiktend* will be 
the figure in pena? which represents 
Ihe opHmum movement in prtcea (i.e. 
ine lames! increase or lowest loss) of a 
combination of- eight itwo from each 
randomly dotrtbuiedgroup wltlun the 
4a shares) « ihe 44 shares which on 
any one day comprise The Tunes 
Portfolio list 

4 The dally dividend will be 


all etehl share manges to give you 
your o\ era) I total plus or minus t+ or ■ 


Check your overall total 
Tunes Portfolio dividend published on 
the Stock exchange Prices juge 


*t against The 
1 published 


ft your overall MU] matches The 
Times Portfolio dividend you ' 


announced each day arid the weekly 
> each 


dividend will be announced 
Saturday 4n The Times. 

5 Times Portfolio nsi and details of 
ihr daite or weekly dividend win also 
he. available for inspection al the 
oftices of The Times. 

6 If Ihe overall price movement of 
more than one combi nation or shares 
ruuals the dividend, ine prize will be 
equally divided among the raiments 
bolding those combinations of snares. 


4 you have 

won outright or a j share of the total 
orue mooes- stated for that day and 
mini claim your pm* as instructed 
below 


How to |rigr^- Weakly Ohrhknd 


Monday Sal 
Portfolio total. 


record your dally 


these farther io .determine 


Add _ 

your weekly Portfolio total. 

If your total matches the published 
weekly dlv idend figure you hate won 
outfight or a share ot the pmc money 
staled tor that weeL. and must claim 
your prize » Instructed below 


7 Ail claims are subject to scrutiny 
l. Any Times Portfolio 


beforr payment. 

card that n defaced, tampered with or 
iiirorriYilv primed In any way will be 
declared void’ 

8 Employees of News international 
Nr and ns subsidiaries and of 
Europrini Group Limited i producers 
at>d distributors of the card) or 
Members of their immediate ramilies 
an* no! allowed to play Time* 
Portfolio 

o -Ml participants will be wbteci to 
Jh'-v Rules All mNnirUons onc*'how 
to may and -how io claim “ whether 
published in The Times or in Times 
Par iroi in cards will be deemed to be 
part of these. Rules. The Editor 
resen c$ the right to amend the Rules. 
. 10 In any dispute. The Editor's 
decision ts final and no correspon- 
dence mIU he entered into. 


How tO »i»hw 

matches ?he Ttaiu ^OTrroiS^StdwS 
No etna* can be accepted euUffle these 
non 


you must have your card wflh you 
when you telephone 


II vou are uimmp to telephone 
romeoiw else can claim on your behalf 
hui thro- musl hjie vour card and call 
The- Times. Portfolio claims Hite 
hciuem ihe stipulated times 

. Ko responsibility can Be accepted 
for laiiuie to contact the claims mftce 
for any reason within the stated 
hours 


The above instructions 
pbrabte to both dally ana 
dividend claims. 


are up 
wesfcfy 


Lighting-up time 


Loudon 858 pm to 5.15 sm " 
Bristol 555 pnrto 525 am 
Edinburgh 9-23 pm to 5.13 am 
Manchester 9.10 pm to 5,16 am 
Penzance 9.73 pm to 5.41 am 


EAST COAST 
Scaitooro 95 

Bridlington 10.4 

Cramer 85 

Low est o ft 8.6 

Clacton 65 


Max 
C F 


ICGAST - 
FdAtenone. 72 


.17 63 sunny 

17 63 sunny 

20 68 sonny 

18 64 sunny 

18 64 sunny 

19 66 bright 


Sun Rain 
hrs in 

Hnconilia x 
Tenby 10.0 » 

CoiwynBay 65 
Moncamba 05 -- 
23 - 


Max 
C F 

is 64 aumy. 
18 64 sumqr. 
18 64 maw 
18 64 cloudy 
IS 69 *uw«. 


Yesterday 


Eastbourne 

Brighton 

Worthing 


Belfast 
8 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: & 
doud: f. faxrr. tarn: s. sun. 

C F 

r14 57 Guernsey 
e 17 63 Inu emaes 

r 17 63 Jersey 

r 18 64 London . 

cT0 61 MTKtittBr c T7 63 

Edinburgh r 14 57 Ne wc astle r 13 55 

Glasgow c 15 59 R’nJdamjr. c 15 59 


Bristol I 
Cardiff 


C F 
ci7 63 
c 15 59 
f 19 66 
f 19 66 


Sou Bts ea 

Sandown 

Stonfcfin 

B oumceaft 
Poole 
Sw an a ge 
Weymouth 
Exmouth 
Tdgnmoutti 
Torquay 
Fakaou&i 
Penzance 
Jersey 


5.4 
32 - 

1.0 - 
12 - 
15 - 

1.6 55 


2.4 

45 


20 68 sunny 

21 70 sunny 
20 68 tfoudy 

19 66 Cloudy 

20 68 cloudy 

21 70 cloudy 
19 66 cloudy 
19 66 cloudy 
18 64 bnght 


ENGLAND AND WALES 
London - 

B'hsm AbpC 
Bristol - 
Cardiff 


- 52 


B*i . 

Manchester 


WeH-it-iyee 

Carlisle 


1.1 

6.0 

85 

1.1 

22 

0.1 

7.7 

67 


19 66 moddy 

18 64 bri^rf 

- 19 66 ‘ 

- 20 68 

- 17 63 

- 19 68 

- IS 64 

- -18-64 _ 

- 18 64 sunny. 

- 20 Sa-'brtght 


The pound 


WESTt 

ScOy files 

Nawqny 


1.8 

1.4 

15 

3.0 

2.7 

55 

4.6 

3.0 

5.1 

1.6 
5.1 


19 66 

19 66 
18 64 

20 68 

18 64 

19 66 
.18 66 

20 68 

19 68 

20 68 
19 66 


bright 

□rigni 

bright 

bright 

bright 

suiny 

sunny 

sumy 

doudy 

sunny 


SCOTLAND 

EstaMemidr 

PiastWick 


10.1 - 20 66 


sunny 


Bank 


Australia S 
Austria Sen 
Belgium ft 
CarndaS 

Denmark Kr 
Finland MUr 
France Fr 
Germany Dm 
-Greece Dr 
Hong Kong S 
tatenriPt 
Italy Lira 
Japan Yen 
Netherlands Gkf 
Norway Kr 

Portugal Esc 

South Africa 
Spain fha 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Ft 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Ofir 
Rates tor sma« denomination bank notes 


Bank 

IS g 

2250 2150 

6650 6320 

2.12 253 

1154 1124 

7J7 727 

1025 955 

321 354 

21050 18600 

1155 1125 

. 1.15 159 

220000 20KL00 

24250 22600 

350 . 251 

1151 1051 

22550 21350 

350 450 

20650 18550 

1021 10.16 

259 2.45 

1545 .15m 

63050 56050 


TVee 
Stornoway 
Lerwick 
Wiek 
KMoss 
Aberd e en 
St Andrews 
Edinburgh 

NORTHERN IRELAND 

5.9 


62 

61 

5.7 

7.4 

7.4 
0.1 
62 
92 

132 

6A 

6.4 


18 64 tMtf 

19 66 stmv 
19 66 ewidjr 

16 61 sunra 


IB 64 sum 
dwtv 


ia 55 

14 ST bngW. 

16 61 sunny 

17 63 -sunny 
17 63 sunny 
17 63 sunny 


Talks cm! 


HP 


* hm 1 


fcnier s-k- 


li, . ■ 

*. ■; i 


Maithc\ 


fwcurh 


l ? salts 


i 


- 18 64 .ongM 


Tll “d toe Tuesdays Sgure* 


Abroad . *. 

fcTOOAY: a doul; d. dra^Tf. fair fg. fog; h, hafc r. rain; Tsuasn. sww: th. trohd^ 

c 16 01 
19JB 
6 15.64 
0 11 82 
0 2751 
f 32-te 
C .T5 St 


Atat’dria- 

Algiers 

Amt’dtn 


S 40 


only as subpteb by Barcteys Bartk PLC ; 


Different rales apply to travellers' 
foreign currency 


cheques 'and other 
business. 

Retail Price Msk 3885 


London: The FT Index dosed up 195 at 
1261.0 


Brussels 

Budapst 

8 Aires' 

Cairo* 

CageTn 

CMaitta 

.Chicago' 

ctfSfSr 


c F 

* 28 82 Cologne 
4 29 84 C*Siun 

jawcS* 80 
f 33 91 Dtedn 

s 33 PtoO 

s 38100 FJorenee 
, „ „ gwwiurt 
8 S I 9 ^whOisi 

8 ^ 64 Geneva 

c IB 64 Istanbul 
f M 75 J«Meh 
8 .IJ 63 Jotnag- 
e 28 79 Ksndri • t S il S3? 

f 12 54 lSSo, i s S 22** 

3, 34 M Ltata * - s 2 ?W«I 

c 17 ® Loesnto 
I 22 72 • 


S 32 90 uST l i i H 

s » S 1 74 57 si 

Mexico C* f 19 
S 25 77 MililiT* j if 

!sB.aau:i?7. 

4m life 

TelXdv 






r ii KSK 


8 88 Wee 

5 gireosio 

* 22 72 Part, 


s 25 77 
s 32 90 

r 25 77 i Ban , 
f 23 ra Tokyo 


e 7 45 




7SIS& 

r 16 61 Rhodes 

*» wane •Si*® 1(1 




■ 27 81 Taranto* 

J 17 63 Tunis 
t 22 72 Valencia 
VtowW 
f 13 55 Venice 
( 21 TO Vtareie 
I 13 55 Warsaw 
8 Wash ton* 



$ 


A 41(06 WeTrgto* 







Ms ■■ 



f ftSa-snl j n 



Higfcft 


\ 




Sriwin 


.. . *'■ 

. 4'-’ { 


,,-*4^4- 


• *■ , !*■ 




•.A 


.J 

■& 

>: 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 26 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 29 


THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


"■i . ‘ 

■ ."?h 

■ 

.'•A 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


, . 1 i -'ih7- 
; 1 % * 

-■ 

•• - rr j w 

''"•'tin J:; 
" ' 'tilth 

. il,,h hij 

Hat- 

‘"hirf j. 
i^' W 

, • |T ' h-Jui**,; 

' « hlj^ 

.. ‘ ' 

• "•••j.n ir* presj., 
lo runaw 

" Lvivji" 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1261.0 (+19.0) 

IFT-SE 100 

1581.0 (+22.8) 

Bargains 
20750 - 
USM 
120.1 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 

1.4860 (+0.0015) 

W German mark 

3.0745 (-0.0095) 

T rade-weighted 

71-5 (+0.1) 


Sir Gordon 
overruled 

Mr Paul Chan non. Scc- 
- rciaiy of State for Trade and 
Industry, yesterday over- 
turned a recommendation by 
Sir Gordon Borne. Director 
General of Fair Trading, that 

- the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission should investi- 
gate the takeover of Screen 
Entertainment, once part of 

- . -Thom EMI. by Cannon, the 
Hollywood films group. 

But Mr Cbannon warned 
■- that if there was any concern 
in the. fixture- about exploita- 
tion of a monopoly situation. 

■ a wider-ranging inquiry by the 
commission couldbeordered. 

Mr Channon said he agreed 

■ that ' the merged company 

- -would have enhanced market 
power but pointed out that a 
merger reference would be too 
narrowly drawn for the 
commission to be able to 

-consider the more general 
..competition problems in the 
"film industry. 

An anti-competitive force 
in the - industry was the 
J method by which films are 
'distributed — largely con- 
trolled by Rank and Screen 
- -Entertainment 

.Talks end 

The public relations group 
Addison Consultancy has 
;called off bid talks with 
’ Aidcom International, the 
market research company, 
whose shares fell 7p to 46p on 
the news yesterday. Addison 
was unhappy at a statement 
from- Aidcom -tins --week 
announcing that an’ approach 
had been made. ...... 

Philips rise 

Pretax income of Philips 
lamps, the Dutch electronics 
.group; rose by 6 pdr cent t p\ 
FI370 million (£107 million) 
'in the second quarter to June] 
-30. Turnover fell by 7 per cent 
to FI 133 billion, ‘ 

Tempos, page 16 

Reuter sale 

-Associated- Newspapers 
" Holdings has sold 3. 12 million 
Reuter B shares, which cany 
-limited voting rights, but does 
not intend to sell any of its 
^remaining 20.52 million stake. 
Associated also bolds 6.76 
million A shares. 

Matthey sale 

■' Johnson Matthey has sold 

- Matthey Printed Products, hs 
; -South African transfer print- 

- jng subsidiary, to Stephen 
, -Looghton, managing owner of 

- 'Clanon Display. 

Oil curb 

; Nigeria says it is cutting 
■crude oil production from 1.7 
'miOion barrels a day to 1.3 
; million to keqp inside Opec 
.Jiraits. 

TJS sales up 

US retail sales rose 0.1 per 
“Cent last month after a revised 
0.1 per cent fall in June. 


Guinness’ new 
structure fails 

critic 

By Richard Lander and Clare Dobte 

Guinness, the brewing and shareholders at an exiraor- die formation of a separate 

dmary meeting, confirmed the 



mailing- group which took 
over the Distillers Scotch 
whisky company in April, 
yesterday revealed proposals 
for its new corporate structure 
aimed at answering wide- 
spread criticism over 
controversial {dans o utlined 
last month. 

The new proposals, which 
follow discussions whh the 
Takeover Panel, the Stock 
Exchange, the Scottish Office, 
the Bank of England and the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry, include the appoint- 
ment of five new non-exec- 
utive directors, two with 
strong Scottish connections, 
and the transfer of Guinness’s 
company registration and 
head office mom London to 
Edinburgh. 

Both moves are apparently 
aimed at assuaging fears that 
Scottish interests would be 
swamped or ignored in the 
new conglomerate. 

However, yesterday’s pro- 
posals, which will be put to 

Anthony Greener 


announcement by Guinness’s 
chief executive Mr Ernest 
Saunders in July that a joint 
Guinness-Distillers super- 
visory hoard promised in an 
offer document is March is 
not to come into being. 

This brought criticism from 
Scottish Amicable, the Edin- 
burgh insurance group. 

Mr Graeme Knox, general 
manager in charge of invest- 
ments, said: “The situation 
remains a test for self regula- 
tion in the City. 

“If you can’t rely on legal 
documents, then what kind of 
City will we be operating in 
the new world?" 

The scrapping of the 
commitment to the board, 
under the non-executive 
chairmanship of Sir Thomas 
Risk, governor of the Bank of 
Scotland, provoked the dis- 
approval of the Bank of 
England 

Instead, Guinness an- 
nounced plans yesterday for 


committee designed to give 
the eight non-executive direc- 
tors “as a group, influence at 
least equivalent to that of a 
non-executive chairman”. 
The non-executive committee 
will have powers to elect and 
remove the chairman and 
vice-chairman and to fix the 
salaries of the executive direc- 
tors. 

Yesterday’s statement also 
reaffirmed the proposal that 
Mr Saunders would assume 
the chairmanship of the 
group. 

The Department of Trade 
described the latest proposals 
as a great improvement on 
those outlined in July. 

Four of the new non-exec- 
utive directors were named 
yesterday as Mr Anthony 
Greener. Sir Norman 
Macfarlane. Mr Ian Mac- 
Laurin. and Sir David 

Plaslow. 

A fifth non-executive with 
strong Scottish ties is to be 
named soon. 



New boardroom laces: clockwise from left above, Anthony 
Greener, Sir David Plastow, Ian MacLamin, and Sir 
Norman Macfarlane 



Mr Anthony Greener, the only 
one of the four new non- 
executive directors of Guinness 
not to be mentioned in the 
current edition of Who’s Who, 
has been managing director of 
Alfred Dunhill since 1975. The 
post was created for him before 
Mrs Mary D unhill, now die. 
company’s president, retired 
from her post as executive 
chairman. He believes his 
experience of marketing inter- 
national brands, including 
Montblanc poos and Chloe 
perfumes, qualifies him for his 
new role He has family connec- 
tions with Scotland through 
both his grandfather and his 
wife He is not a golfer but says 
his company sponsors the sport 
actively. 


Sir David Plastow 

Sir David Plastow, who was 
knighted in the last New Year’s 
Honours list, is managing 
director and chief executive of 
Vickers, the engineering com- 
pany which owns Rolls Motors. 
Aged 54, he started his career as 
an apprentice at Vanxhall Mo- 
tors from where he went to Rolls 
Royce as a salesman. He be- 
came managing drirector just as 
the parent company went bank- 
rupt. Rolls Royce Motors was 
floated off by the receiver and 
acquired by Vickers in I960. He 
was The Guardian Young Busi- 
ness Man of the Year in 19 76. In 
a personal capacity he is presi- 
dent of die Crewe Alexendra 
football dub and belongs to the 
Royal and Ancient golf dub In 
St Andrews. 


Ian MacLaurin 

Mr Ian MacLaurin, aged 49, is 
the first chairman of Tesco from 
outside the founding Cohen 
family. He took over the chair a 
year ago after two years as 
deputy chairman and 10 as 
managing director. He joined 
Tesco in 1959 as the super- 
market company’s first trainee 
manager, after a chance meeting 
in an Eastbourne hotel with the 
founder, Mr Jack Cohen. Bely- 
ing his Scottish name, Mr 
MacLaurin was born in 
Blackheath, south-east London 
and educated at Malvern Col- 
lege, Worcestershire. He has 
been a non-executive director of 
Enterprise Oil since 1984. A 
keen golfer, he is also and 
member of the MCC and a 
Lord’s Taverner. 


Sir Norman Macfarlane 

Sir Norman Macfarlane has the 
strongest Scottish credentials of 
the four new non-executives. He 
was born and bred in Glasgow, 
where he still lives. He is 
chairman and managing direc- 
tor of Macfarlane Group 
(Clansman), a company he 
started with just £200 in 1949. 
He is on the board of the 
Scottish Development Agency 
and a director of General Ac- 
cident, which is based in Perth. 
He is also vice-chairman of the 
Scottish Ballet and a director of 
the Scottish National Or- 
chestra. Any spare time he has 
is occupied with golf, which he 
plays enthusiastically, and 
cricket, which he now just 
watches. Sir Norman is 60 years 
old. 


Manufacturing 
output rises 
by 0.5 per cent 


By Richard Thomson 

gag UK OUTPUT 

Sun ojuifis**! 


There was a modest 
improvement in manufec- 

110 

luring output in June, official 
figures show. But a sharp drop 

Aj/vy 

108 

in oil production meant that 
the output of production in- 

J industry^ ' 

106 

dustries as a whole declined 
for the second succesive 


104 

month. 

Manufacturing output rose 

wf\J I Manutecfatfingji 

102 

by 0.5 per cent during the 
month while that from 

1984' 1985 ' 1988 

100 


eral declined by 1.2 per cent, 
compared with a fall of 1 .8 per 
cent in May. 

The movement in produc- 
tion, seasonally adjusted over 
the second quarter compared 
with the first, showed the 
same trend. 

Production industry output 
was down by 0.7 per cent over 
the last three months, h fell by 
the same amount in compari- 
son with the corresponding 
lime a year ago although, after 
taking account of the eiTects of 
the coal strike in 1984-85. the 
decline was 1 per cent. 

Manufacturing industry 
was up during the quarter by 
0.5 per cent compared with 
the previous three months, 
but it was still I per cent below 


the level at the corresponding 
lime last year. 

The drop in industrial 
production was largely be- 
cause of a seasonal cutback m 
British oil output, which ex- 
perts ascribed to substantial 
maintenance work. Within the 
index, energy production dur- 
ing the quarter fell b\ 3 per 
cent. 

Within manufacturing in- 
dustry there w-as a growth in 
output of consumer goods ot 
1.2 per cent, while the ouput 
of minerals, metals, food, 
drink and tobacco also rose. 

Despite its recent decline, 
industrial output in the sec- 
ond quarter was 14 per cent 
higher than its trough in the 
first quarter ofl9SI. 


Greenwell man praises 
Boots’ US purchase 


By Our City Staff 

A leading analyst spoke out to launch 
last night in favour of Boots’ 
controversial £375 million 
American takeover bid. 

Mr Ian White, of the broker 
W Greenwell. issued a circular 
saying that in his view Boots 
was “pursuing its long term 
US pharmaceutical ambitions 
in a very sensible way.” 

He claimed that the ac- 
quisition of the Flint division 
of Baxter Travenol would 
enable Boots to call on a 
ready-made sales force with 
strong contacts with American 
doctors for the time in the 
early 1990s when it was ready 


new drugs, of us 

own. 

Boots itself dismissed 
suggestions of a City revolt 
over the cost of acquiring 
Hint, which earns S5 per cent 
of its profits from selling a 
drug for the treatment of a 
thyroid disorder. 

Bools said it had not heard 
of any plans by institutions to 
oppose the deal by voting 
against proposals to' increase 
the share capital 

A spokesman said:“There 
has been a lot of unfounded 
criticism, mainly from retail 
analysts who tend to take a 
short-term view. 


Base-rate gloom vanishes 
and share surge continues 


Stare prices continued to 
rise yesterday, buoyed by a 
flow of good company results 
and hopes that lower interest 
rates were not for away. 

The FT 30-share index rose 
19 points to 1.261-0 on the 
day. Trading wras -relatively 
thin, as it had been earlier this 
week, with a number of large 
price rises resulting from the 
covering of short positions by 
market operators. 

The stock market has been 
helped in shaking off last 
week’s pessimism by a change 
in sentiment over interest 
rates, which are now expected 
to follow anticipated falls in 


By Onr City Staff 
US and West German rates, 
possibly next month. 

After the good results from 
Unilever on Tuesday, there 
was more encouraging news 
from Commercial Union and 
General Accident yesterday. 
And Plessey is expected to 
follow this lead today. Interest 
rate sensitive sectors such as 
consumer stocks did well on 
the day, as did insurances. 

Gold fluctuated sharply af- 
ter the gains of the past few 
days. By lunchtime bullion 
had risen almost S6 an ounce 
to $39(125 in London, but it 
closed at $385 an ounce, again 
of around $ I on the day. 


• Economic news in Britian 
and the US had little effect on 
the currencies of either coun- 
tiy. 

Sterling weakened slightly, 
closing down one pfennig at 
DM3:0760 after news that 
industrial output had fallen 
during the second quarter. But 
the pound held its own against 
most other currencies, with 
the trade-weighted index end- 
ing 0.1 up at 71.5. 

In the US, a rise in retail 
sales last month helped to 
underpin the dollar. Against a 
steady pound it rose 0.1 cent 
to dose m London at $ 1 .4860. 
Stock market, page 17 


Eight new members for SIB 


The full line-up of members 
for the Securities and Invest- 
ments Board, the City’s new 
regulatory authority, was an- 
nounced yesterday by the 
Bank of England and the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry. 

Eight new members have 
been appointed, bringing the 
total to 18, under the 
chairmanship of Sir Kenneth 
Benin. 

The 


Tempos . 16 Foreign Excb 17 

CmptHNews 16 Traded Opts 17 
Walt Street 16 Unit Trusts 18 
Coameot - 17 Commodiffes 18 
Sun* Market 17 USM Prices 18 
Money Mrkts 17 Stare Pres 19 

iiialfy scheduled for before the 
Parliamentary recess, was de- 
layed last month when die ■ 
Treasury blocked the appoint- 
ment of Mr John Kay, director 


STOCK MARKETS 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 

New York 

Dow Jones 185025 (+14.76T 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow „. 1 800076 (+206.07) 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 1908.02 (+3.02) 

Amsterdam: Gen 297.7 (+1.1) 

Sydney AO 11012 (+11.0) 

Frankfurt 

Commerzbank 2020.0 (+18JJ) 

Brussels: 

fionaral 806.59 {+14 62) 

RISES: 

Affied-Lyons 326p (+21 p) 

Bass J 745p |+15p) 

Plessey 200p (+I0p 

ICl ' 997p(+8p 

Commercial Union 314p (+6p) 

General Accident — 832p (+21 p) 

Taylor Wbodtow 326p (+6pi 

Untgate : 283p (+8p) 

Salisbury S80p(+6p) 

D.RG _ 284p (+I2p) 

300p (+120} 

parte CAC _ . 384.0 (+ 0 . 6 ) 

Zurich: 

Trencherwood 435p (+20pl 

NMW Computers 295p (+I5p) 

Goode Durant 123p i+Sp) 

“London ctasmg prices Page 19 

BOG Group 3Z4p (+6p) 

Automagic 93p (+5p) 

Hunterprint 256p (+6pj 

FALLS: 

JCG8S - 428p f-12p) 

Samuetson IBOp(-IOp) 

Bestwood 583p l-25p) 

Tay Homes 149p (-I5p) 

INTEREST RATES 

'London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-month Interbank 

3-momh eligible MteS"i»4%% 
{WingratB 

Prime Rate 8% 
federal Funds 6 1 >6% 

■ 3-month Treasury Bffis £635-61% 

; 30-year bonds 96*»-99 

GOLD 

London Fixing: 

AM S391.25 pm-S388.00 
dose $383.00-388.00 (£259.00- 
260.00) 
ftlmu Yovfc 

Comex $384.90-385.90* 

CURRENCIES 

London New York: 

£:$1.4860 E.-S1.48KT 

. £: DM3.0745 & DM2.0735* 

X SwFr2.48C» & Index; 110.9 
-£FFrm008 

■ e Yen229.14 ECU £0.685472 

£: lndex:71 J SDR £0.812775 

NORTH SEA OIL 

Brant (Sept) pm $1335 bW($1350) 

• Denotes latest trading price 


ByTeresa Poole 

of the Institute of Fiscal 
Studies, as one of the lay 
meraberti 

The Chancellor, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, objected to Mr Kay, 
who is an outspoken critic of 
government taxation policy. 

The new appointments 
mean there will be four lay 
members of the board. The 
two new lay members are Mr 
Garry R unci man. the chair- 
man ofWalter R unci man. and 
Mr John Qeraenl, the chair- 
man - and chief executive of 
Unigate. 

-- They join Mrs Rachel 
Waterhouse; chairman of the 
Consumers' Association, and 
Mr John Kerridge, the chair- 
man and chief executive of 
Fisons. 

SIB’s full-time chief exec- 
utive, Mr Roy Croft, who has 
jno connections with the finan- 
cial services industry, has now 
also been made a board 
member. 


Neither the Bank of En- 
gland or the department 
would comment on whether 
Mr Kay’s position had been 
filled by another candidate. A 
spokesman for the Bank said: 
“The board is an excellent one 
which we are very pleased to 
see appointed. AU of the 
names are very good.” 

The increase in member- 
ship of SIB follows the de- 
cision, announced in 
December, to merge the board 
with the Marketing of Invest- 
ments Board Organizing 
Committee (MIBOC). Two of 
the new members, Mr An- 
thony Alexander and Mr Wil- 
liam Proudfoot, previously 
served on MIBOC. 

As already announced, the 
deputy chairmen win be Sir 
Martin Jacomb and Mr Mark 
Weinberg. Seven other mem- 
bers of the present board will 
continue to serve 

All the names, page 16 


Ultramar’s 
profits 
fall to £7m 

By Carol Ferguson 

After BriioiL another in- 
dependent British oil com- 
pany has announced a cut in 
its dividend. Ultramar yes- 
terday halved its interim pay- 
ment from 4p to 2p a share 
due to felling oil prices. 

The group also announced a 
slump in pretax profit in the 
second quarter to end June to 
£7.2 million compared with 
£60-8 million in the first 
quarter and £61.5 million in 
the second quarter of last year. 

Mr Peter Raven, senior 
vice-president, finance and 
accounting, blamed the profit 
fell on the collapse of Ca- 
nadian retail prices and the 
impact of the oil price fell on 
its Indonesian gas contracts. 

Stock holding losses in the 
second quarter owing to the 
falling oil price were £55.7 
million. Stocks were ab- 
normally high because 
Ultramar stocked up ahead of 
a four week closure for 
maintenance of its Quebec 
refinery in May. 

Looking ahead, the com- 
pany said that prices remain 
good in its main marketing 
areas and if conditions stay 
the same, the second half will 
be good. Ultramar’s third 
quarter supplies are in hand, 
bought at prices prevailing 
before foe last Opec meeting. 

Ultramar is selling assets 
worth up to $100 million (£67 
miDion). Half of these are in 
Canada and result from the 
Gulf Canada acquisition. The 
other half comprises two par- 
cels of land in the US where 
the sale contracts are expected 
to be completed before the end 
of this year. 

Tempos, page 16 


Big insurers return to profit 


Commercial Union and 
General Accident, two leading 
British insurance companies, 
yesterday announced interim 
results which demonstrated 
strong recovery from the re- 
cent cyclical downturn in 
profits. 

CU swung from a pretax 
loss of£l 2. 1 million to a profit 
of £41. 1 million and GA made 
profits of £48.4 million against 
losses of £2.1 million. The 
most marked improvement 
came in the United States, 
where CU's underwriting 
losses nearly halved to £65.9 
million from£120.9million in 
the same period last year and 


By Alison Eadie 
GA's fell to £38.2 million from 
£56.8 million. 

The stock market was 
particularly encouraged by 
GA's beuer-than-expected 
profits, and marked its shares 
20p higher to 832p. CU's 
shares rose 6p to 314p. 

The weather was kind to 
insurers in the second quarter, 
giving a low incidence of 
weather related claims. But 
the number of motor claims in 
the UK continued to rise. 

GA. Britain's largest motor 
insurer, made an underwriting 
loss on its UK motor account 
of £15.1 million in the first 
half, against £8.9 million in 


first half of 19S5. It will be 
raising premiums by 10 per 
cent before the end of the year. 

CU. made an underwriting 
loss of £500.000 in the second 
quarter on motor against £l 
million in second quarter of 
1985. It is hoping to hold its 
rates for the present. 

CU's investment income of 
£115 million fell from £l2h.l 
million in first half of 1985. 
Strong growth in the UK was 
offset by a reduction in iht US 
due to exchange rate changes 
and a lower volume of busi- 
ness. GA's investment income 
rose to £139.2 million from 
£122 million. 


Pleasurama and Mount Charlotte 
.plan £500m joint leisure empire 


£500 


million 
ho- 


Pians for a 
leisure empire 
tels, casinos, fruit 
and holidays, were unveiled- 
yesterday when Pleasurama 
and Mount Charlotte eon- 
finned speculation that they 
were in merger talks. 

However, the get-together 
could be wrecked if predators, 
long suspected of eyeing the 
Mount Charlotte hotel chain, 
decide to pounce. 

Mr Robert PeeL managing 
director of Mount Charlotte 
which owns 50 hotels, includ- 
ing the Royal Scot at King's 
Cross in London, said : “ We 
are 70 per cent owned by 
institutions who have watched 
our shares come up from 2’Ap 
tea years ago and I think they 


By Cliff Feltham 
will like to stay with us now 
that we have the opportunity 
of being a strong force in the 
leisure business.” 

Mr George Martin, manag- 
ing director of Pleasurama, 
saidrA combination of their 
assets and our earnings will 
turn us into a very dominant 
force.” 

Pleasurama operates 22 
casinos - 17 in Loudon — four 
business hotels and 16 tourist 
hotels linked to its coach tour 
operation expected to carry 
around 750,000 passengers in 
the current year. There are 
also around 28,000 amuse- 
ment machines and other var- 
ied leisure interests indude 
arcades, discos, bingo halls 
and theme pubs. 


Last year, Pleasurama made 
pretax profits of £37 million 
compared with profits of £16 
million from Mount Charlotte. 

The boards are planning a 
holding company which will 
make offers for the shares in 
the two businesses. On the 
stock market yesterday Mount 
Charlotte dosed 3p ahead at 
98p. its peak, with Pleasurama 
finishing 2p better at 320p. 

The stock market welcomed 
the proposal. Mr Nick Greg- 
ory, of the broker de Zoete and 
Sevan, sauL“Pleasurama has 
been looking at something Klee 
this for some time. It wOI make 
a good company nicely bal- 
anced between assets and 
cash.” 



Accountants 




Professional 

Partners or Partnerships — 
Need Capital? 
Unsecured? 

Partners in professional partnerships of four or 
more, can now obtain unsecured loans from £15,001 to 
£100,000 (practice loans from £60,000 to£2m) in a 
highly tax-efficient way. Interest rates are extremely 
competitive from 11.75% (3 month LIBOR plus 1.75%). 

Raise or increase partnership capital 
sfc Raise merger and acquisition finance 
^ Re-arrange capital structure 
* Buy-out a senior partner 
sfc Unlock individual capital 
% Finance pension contributions 

Return the coupon today for details of this 
special Berkeley St. James’s Scheme, developed in 
conjunction with Scottish Equitable Life Assurance 
Society and HFC Trust and Savings Limited. 

To: Berkeley Sr. James's Financial Management Ltd, 

FREEPOST, London SW1H 9BR. Telephone: 01-222 8785. 
Please send me derails about raising or replacing 
partnership capital. 


TS86| 


NAME. 


ADDRESS. 


ZZ=|B|S|J 

I telephone f.i JAav.atf.y wj 







16 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE . 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


WALL STREET 


Dow edges higher 


New York (Agencies) - Share 
prices opened slightly higher 
yesterday as traders deter- 
mined whether a small in- 
crease In the July retail sales 
will affect the bond market 
Speculation about a co- 
ordinated cut in the discount 
rate with West Germany and 
Japan was still a bullish factor 
for shares. 

. The Dow Jones industrial 
average edged forward by 1-51 
points to 1.837. The number of 
rising stocks outnumbered 


failing ones by seven to four. 
Volume reached 18 million 
shares. 

Goodyear was top of the list 
of active stocks, being 32 '4, 
unchanged. The shares rose 
earlier this week after a fore- 
cast of better profits for the 
car-makers. JC Penney in- 
creased by Vfk to 79V*. 

On Tuesday, the Dow Jones 
industrial average jumped by 
.24.33 points to 1,835,49. This 
followed Monday's advance of 
2&54- points. 


AMR 

ASA 

Alietl Signa 
AUied Sirs 
Allis Crtmrs 
Alcoa 
Amar Inc 
Am'rdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Gan 
AmCynm'd 
Am EiPwr 
Am Expres 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
Am St nrd 
AmTetepb 
Amoco 
AmtcoS 
Asarco 
AsNand CM 
At Richfield 
Avon Prods 
BkrsTstNV 
Bankamer 
BkolBston 
Bank of NY 
Betti Steel 
Boeing 
Bse Cased 
Brden 
Bg Warner 
Bn st Myers 
BP 

Bun'tonlnd 

BurTtonlWr, 

Burroughs 

CmpbeliSp 

Can Pacific 

Caierpiter 

Celanese 

Central SW 

Champion 

Chase Man 

ChmBkNY 

Chevron 
Chrysler 
Cihcotp 
Clark Equip 
Coca Cola 
Colgate 
CBS 

C'lmtM Gas 
Cntb'tn Enc 
Comwtth B 
Cons Erte 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Powa 
Cntrl Data 

Coming Gl 
CPCfntl 
Crane 
Cm Zener 
Dartfi Kraft 
Deere 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 


DowChem 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Pot 
DuPont 
Eastern Air 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Corp 
Emerson B 
Exxon Corp 
»^0P|St5 


V 

‘Iff 


V 

tf 

: 9 .tf> 

5TV 

60S 

■Presto™ 

24% 

24% 

pazar 

€9% 


34* 

35% 

Fst Chicago 

30% 

til 

PMpspa* 

19% 

20 


40 

FstmtBncp 

62% 

62% 

Phifip Mrs 
Philips Pet 

73 

72% 

■’>71 

49% 

FaPennC 

IV, 

/% 

■ llB 

9% 

3% 

as 

Fort 

58% 

56% 

Polaroid 

B3% 



36 

FTWachva 

44 

42 

PPG ind 

64% 

62% 

13 

12X 

GAF Corp 

32% 

32% 

PretrGmbl 

78% 

76 

19K 

19% 

GTE Corp 

54% 

54% 

PtiSE&G 

43% 

43 

9354 


Gen Cong 

67% 

&% 

Raytheon 

63 

61% 

88 

88 

!|*gri>nn??l 

72% 

72% 

RyndsMn 

42 

*2 

S3 

8? 

76% 

75% 

Rockwell Int 

42% 

42% 

2944 

28% 

Gen Inst 

20 

20% 

Royal Dutch 
Safewsys 

82% 

82% 

62V. 

61% 

Gen Mils 


66 

65% 

65% 

92% 


Gen Motors 

73% 

71% 

Sara Lee 

69% 

DCWl 

3 

2% 

GnPbUtny 

22% 

W'>YM 

SFESopac 

30% 

29% 

37* 

37S 


3% 

3 

ScMtwrger 

29% 

28% 

23''. 

24 

Georgia Pac 

31% 

31% 

Scott Paper 

60% 

60% 

62K 

62 

Gillete 

45% 

44% 

Seagram 


59% 

7% 

7!4 


36% = 

37% 

Sears Rbck 

44% 

43% 

13* 

55V4 

13% 

54%- 

IcWU 

32% 

17% 

31% 

17% 

Shed Trans 
Singer 
Smifidn Be 

50% 

52% 

50% 

52% 

52*4 

S2X 


48 

48% 

92 

91% 

34*4 

34% 

(3t Att&Tac 

24% 

■■24% 

Sony 

SttiCalEd 

18% 

19- 

48% 

47 K 

Grim 

31% 

■30% 

35% 

35% 

12* 

42 

12% 

40% 

GrumanCor 
GoIfS West 

24 

66% 

24% 

64% 

Sperry Corp 
Stdooorw 

75% 

45 

75% 

45% 

6514 

9'4 

64% 

8% 

Hsnu HJ. 

48% 

51% 

46% 

50% 

Staring Dra 
Stevens JF 

46% 

33% 

48% 

33% 

60S 

58% 

Htett-Pkrd 

41% 

40% 

Sun Corap 

49% 

49% 

54S 

47V4 

53% 

46% 

Honeywell 

tClnds 

65% 

24% 

64% 

24'/, 

Teledyne 

Termeco 

m 

318% 

37% 

SIX 

31 S 

(ngeraoll 

58% 

58% 

Texaco 

30% 

31 

81 X 

80S 

18% 

18% 

Texas E Cor 

28% 

27% 

35 V 

35% 

IBM 

132% 

131% 

Texas Inst 

113% 

112% 

35 X 

35S 

INCO 

12% 

12% 

Texas Utte 

35% 

35 

52*4 

53 

liUPapor 

Irrl TalTel 

64% 

63% 

Textron 

57% 

56 

70S 

69% 

53% 

53% 

Travlrs Cor 

45% 

45 

61 X 

62% 

Irving Bank 

53% 

52% 

TRW me 

101% 

101% 

11 

11% 


58 K 

69% 

UAL me 

51 

50% 

46S 

46*. 


15% 

15% 

Unlever NV 

220 

220% 

213 

R >21 

Kerr McGee 

27% 

28% 

Un Carbide 

21% 

21 

34X 

34% 

Kmb'ty Clrk 

85% 

84% 

Un PacCor 

55% 

55 

23>. 

24% 

K Mart 

SPY, 

51% 

Uld Brands 

28% 

28% 

4QV 


Kroger 

LT.V. Corp 

62 

61 % 

USGCorp 

37% 

36 

46X 

46% 

2% 

2% 

Uld Tecfmol 

44% 

42% 

40X 

40% 

Litton 

77% 

78% 

USX Corp 

17% 

16% 

3914 

38% 

Lockheed 

49% 

49% 

Unocal 

20% 

19% 

54S 

64% 

Lucky Strs 
ManH'nvar 

24% 

24% 

Jim Walter 

48% 

47 

17X 

17% 

44% 

44% 

WmerLntt 

60% 

59% 

39". 

38% 

MamineCp 

2% 

2% 

Wells Faroo 
WstntiseH 

107 

103% 


t'il 

Mapco 

46% 

46% 

56% 

55% 

137 

138% 

Manna Mid 

50% 

40% 

Weyerti'ser 

33% 

33% 

39U 

39 

fM Marietta 

43% 

43% 

Whstpool 

71% 

71% 

26 S 

28% 


30% 

29 

WoOhWttl 

41% 

40% 

33 

32% 

McDonalds 

65% 

65% 

Xerox Carp 

56% 

55% 

K<E9 

50% 


60% 

79% 

Zenith 

24 

24 

28X 

28% 

Meed 

53% 

53% 




114. 

11% 

Merck 

110% 

108% 




21V, 

21% 


111% 

109S 




62X 

66S 

62% 

67% 

Mobil CM 
Monsanto 

33% 

66H 

32% 

65% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

30X 

30% 

Morgan J.P. 

91% 

■via 

AMfci 

Fr-rj 

22 

39’/. 

39% 


40% 

40 

Alan Alum 

43 

42% 

61 K 

60% 

NCR Corp 

53% 

52% 

AigomaSti 

14% 

14% 

23% 

22% 

NLIndstrs 

4% 

4% 

Can Pacific 

15% 

15% 

41 

41% 


34% 

35% 

Cammco 

13 

13 

17X 

17% 

Nat Med Ent 

73% 

21% 

Con Battvst 

23 

22% 

96*4 

96% 

NatSmcndt 

9% 

9% 

Hkr/Sid Can 

27% 

27% 

48 

46% 

NortofcSth 

70S 

78% 

HdsnBMin 

28% 

28% 

■IvJ-N 

51% 


37% 

37% 

Imasco 

35% 

35% 

16’m 

48 

79 

15% 

48 

78% 

OcodntPet 

Ogden 

28% 

41% 

45% 

26% 

39% 

45 

Imperial Ofl 

In Pina 

Ryl Trusreo 

40% 

39% 

32% 

40% 

39% 

3l« 

6S 

8% 

Owens-W 

37% 

36% 

Seagram 
Steel Co 

83% 

82% 

56S 

56% 


25% 

25 

20% 

20% 

68X 

67% 

Pan Am 

5% 

5% 

Thman N 'A' 

29% 

30 

82*4 

63% 

81% 

63 

Penney J.C. 

77% 

52% 

77% 

52% 

VarftyCocp 

WlkrWram 

275 

38 

2.75 

38 

■ lilfl 

82 

PfifVSCO 

32% 

32% 

WCT 

13 

12% 

Asfcea cfciOGfttaKi 

4 NEW kMaWdosfO. »N*v*QSue pSKOIDM 1 1 rued 

fUBODOl 

aa 


Swiss Bank to join in 
$500m Mexican loan 


Zurich (Reuter) - Swiss' 
Bank Corporation -this week 
dropped its opposition toi 
joining an emergency loan for 
Mexico, designed, to keep the 
country financially afloat in 
the face of the oil price slide. 

A spokesman for Swiss 
Bank Corp said it would now 
take pan in the $500 million 
(£337 million) bridging loan, 
pan of a larger rescue package 
totalling about $8 billion. 

Bankets said pressure had 
increased to avoid more seri- 
ous consequences such as a 


default or a unilateral debt 
moratorium. - 

- Swiss Bank Corp : is -co- 
chairman of a steering 
committee of Mexico's 
commercial bank ncreditors 
and also co-ordinates all Swiss 
banks' dealings with Mexico's 
efforts to restructure its $98 
billion foreign debt. 

Its initial refusal to back the 
loan had raised doubts among 
the banks that the larger 
rescue package, including a 
$1.6 billion IMF loan and a 
bridging loan from central 
banks, could be put together. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 

.1000% 


.1000% 

HTCJ ' ' 

.10.00% 

Citibank Savings! 

.10.75% 

Consolidated Ms.. 

.10.00% 

Continental Trust. _ 

.10.00% 

.10.00% 

C. Hoare & Co... . . . 

.10.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai .... 
LLovds Bank 

.10.00% 

.10.00% 

Nat Westminster 

.1000% 

Royal Bank at Scotland „„ 
TSH 

.10.00% 

10.00% 

Citibank NA 

iririri% 

[ t Moroaxe Base Rate. I 



Meggitt offer 
for Bestobell 
closes today 

By Clare Dobie 
Meggitt Holdings is ex- 
pected to announce increased 
acceptances for its bid for 
Bestobell today, the first clos- 
ing date for its £84 million 
offer. 

It already has acceptances in 
respect of the 29 per cent of 
Bestobell held by BTR . 

Mr Ken Coaies, managing 
director of Meggiu Holdings, 
said in a letter to shareholders 
yesterday that Bestobell “had 
produced nothing which re- 
futes the inescapable commer- 
cial and financial logic" of the 
bid. 


REPUBLIQUE DE GUEVEE 

MIMSTERE DE L’EQUIPEMENT ET DE L’URBANISME 
SECRETARIAT D’ETAT AUX TRAVAUX PUBLICS 
OFFICE DU PROJET R0UT1ER 

NOTICE OF INTERNA T10NAL INVITATION TO TENDER 
REF 3PR 9 A 

The Office du Projcl Rouiier invites, as part of the 
works for the third highway project, international 
tenders for the delivery of earthraoving, tran s port 
and other items of equipment allocated amongst the 
following lots: 

LOT 1 : Earth moving Equipment 
LOT 2 :Compaction Equipment 

LOT 3 :Heavy Transport Vehicles 

LOT 4 : Light Transport Vehicles 
LOT 5 dumping Equipment 
• LOT 6 tSite 'Workshop — • 

LOT 7 :Refrigeration Containers 

LOT 8 : Housing and Office Equipment 

LOT 9 rGeneraiors 

LOT 10 iSmall Site Equipment 

LOT 11 (Mobile Long Range Radio Equipment 

LOT 12 : Compressors and Pneumatic Hammers 

The supply of these items is to be financed with the 
assistance of the Arab Bank for economic develop- 
ment in Africa, and the International Development 

Association. 

This invitation to tender is open to all digable 
organizations in accordance with the. funding 
agencies’ rules for award of contracts. 

Documents will, be available for. collection tom. .. 
August 15, 1986 at 

THE OFFICE DU PROJET ROUTIER 
PK 10 - ROUTE DE L'AEROPORT 
BJ*. 581 

CONAKRY - GUINEE 

The cost of the tender documents is Two Hundred 
U.S. Dollars. Tenders must be received at the above 
address. The deadline is October 31 1986 10am. 


T 


Allegheny troubles may 
force Wilkinson sale 


Wilkinson Sword, the British- 
based company best known 
for-its razors, may soon be put 
up for sale following severe 
problems at its American 
parent Allegheny Inter- 
national. 

The move would come just 
as Wilkinson is mourning a 
new promotional campaign to 
revive its fortunes in the £53 
million wet-shave market in 
Britain. 

Wilkinson has never man- 
aged to topple Gilletie.from its 
dominant position as a razor 
maker in Britain or to shake 
die French group Bic at the 
bottom end of the market 

Although analysts find it 
difficult to unravel the Wil- 
kinson performance among 
Allegheny's various divisions, 
they estimate an increase in 
turnover of $30 million (£20 
million) between 1984 and 
1985 to $330 million. 

Allegheny itself lost 3109 


million in 1985 and a group of 
shareholders is suing the 
directors, alleging breach of 
duties. 

The Wilkinson share of the 
overall wet-shave market in 
Britain is about 30 per cent 
while Gillette accounts for 45 
per cenL Bic has the third 
largest market share. 

The biggest growth area has 
been in disposable razors 
which "have seen the volume 
of sales rise from 36 percent in 
1980 to 65 per cent this year. 
Systems razors (floating head 
and retractable blades) with 22 
per cent of volume sales is 
worth about 45 per cent in 
value. Traditional double- 
edge razors cling on to 12.5 per 
cent of volume sales. 

It is in the systems market 
that Wilkinson Sword is 
attacking Gillette's Contour 
range, claiming that in a 
survey, 60 per cent of users 
preferred its Profile product 


But in the disposable market, 
users (many of whom are 
women who use them to 
remove body hair) do not 
stick to one particular brand. 

In Britain, Wilkinson's 
matches division accounts for 
49 per cent of its sales, shavin; 
equipment 20*per cent an 
garden tools and the Kitchen 
Devil range of knives 31 per 
cenL 

Wilkinson Sword's man- 
agers.point out that it has been 
a profitable business since 
1771 It does not see any of its 
rivals bidding for it for fear of 
falling foul of US anti-trust 
laws. 

Last year Wilkinson in- 
creased its workforce by 
nearly 20 per cent after the 
success of its Retractor dis- 
posable razor and reported a 
substantial rise in exports. 
Shaving is becoming more 
popular worldwide. 


Americans 
to fund 
coal tests 

By Derek Harris 

An Anglo-American agree- 
ment announced yesterday 
will expand and hasten British 
experiments on electricity 
generation, using coal in a new 
cleaner-burn system. 

Two American bodies, the 
Electric Power Research In- 
stitute and the US Depart- 
ment of Energy, will 
contribute £8 million for addi- 
tional experimental work in 
Britain. An exchange of 
research information is also 
part of the agreement. 

The new experimental work 
will be done at Grimethorpe, 
Yorkshire, where British Coal 
and the Central Electricty 
Generating Board have been 
partners since 1984 in 
developing a power genera- 
tion technology which burns 
coal relatively cleanly while 
avoiding the high costs and 
efficiency losses associated 
with conventional flue gas 
cleaning systems. 

This is a £28 million project 
which has involved creating 
the world's largest pressurized 
fluidized bed combustor. Coal 
is burnt in a bed of hot sand 
which is fluidized by passing 
jets of air through it The fuel 
bums with high efficiency so 
that almost all the combus- 
tible matter is consumed. 

Acid gas emissions are kept 
to an acceptable minimum in 
several ways. Sulphur can be 
trapped by adding limestone 
to the bed. Emission of nitro- 
gen oxides are lower because 
the technology employs rel- 
atively low temperatures. 

Pressurization also adds to 
efficiency because combustion 
gases can be used to a drive a 
gas turbine. 

Under the new agreement, 
steam tubes from the US, 
American coal types, and a 
new high temperature exhaust 
gas filler will be tested. 


Greycoat will 
not lift 
offer for Phit 

Greycoat said yesterday 
that it will not increase its 
offer for Property Holding & 
Investment Trust despite 
Phil's recent valuation of its 
properties. 

The bid will not be referred 
to the Monopolies and Merg- 
ers Commission, contrary to a 
report in The Times yesterday. 

Acceptances have been re- 
ceived for 3.9 per cent of the 
ordinary shares, taking 
Greycoat's stake to 52 per 
cenC and for 27.5 per cent of 
the preference shares. The 
offer has been extended to 
August 28. 

Greycoat said that it had 
reviewed Phil's valuation of 
all its properties, and it re- 
mained convinced that the 
offer was fair and generous. 
Greycoat, however, is con- 
cerned that Phil has made two 
property acquisitions in recent 
weeks at a total cost -of more 
than £23 million. 


SIB board names 
new members 


The Securities and Invest- 
ments Board wifi comprise 18 
members with Sir Kenneth 
Berrill as chairman 

Seven other members con- 
tinue: Mr Archibald Cox, Mr 
Robin Hodgson, Mr John 
Kerridge, Mr Ralph 
Quartan a, Mr Edward Ray, 
Mr Robin Stormonth-Dailing 
and Mrs Rachel Waterhouse. 

The following eight new 
members complete the- 
membership of the board: Mr 
Anthony Alexander, Mr Denis 
Child, Mr John Cement, Mr 
Roy Croft, Mr John Manser, 
Mr William Proudfoot, Mr 
Garry R unci man, and Mr 
Brian Williamson. 

The full membership of the 
SIB, with the dates of expiry of 
their present appointments, is: 

Chairman; Sir Kenneth 
Berrill, May, 1988. 

Deputy chairmen: Sir Mar- 
tin Jacomb, chairman, 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd, May, 
1987. 

Mr Mark Weinberg, chair- 
man, Allied Dunbar Assur- 
ance, July, 1989. 

Mr Anthony Alexander, 
chairman, British Insurance 
Brokers' Association, director, 
Sedgwick Group, July, 1987. 

Mr Denis Child, deputy 
chief executive, National 
Westminster Bank, chairman 
of executive committee, Brit- 


ish Bankers' Association, July. 
1989. 

Mr John Clement, chair- 
man Unigate. July, 1989. 

Mr Archibald Cox, manag- 
ing director. Morgan Stanley 
International, May, 1988. 

Mr Roy Croft, chief exec- 
utive, SIB, June. 1988. 

Mr Robin Hodgson, manag- 
ing director, Granville & Co. 
July. 1989.- ■ 

Mr John Kerridge,' chair- 
man and chief executive, 
Fisons, May, 1988. 

Mr John Manser, chief 
executive. Save and Prosper 
Group, July, 1989. 

Mr William ProudfboL 
chief general manager. Scot- 
tish Amicable Life Assurance, 
July, 1987. 

Mr Ralph Quartano, chief 
executive. PosTd Investment 
Management, May, 1988. 

Mr Edward Ray, senior 
partner. Spicer and Pegler, 
July. 1988. 

Mr Garry Runciman, chair- 
man, Walter Runciman, July, 
1989. 

Mr Robin Stormonth-Dar- 
ling, member of the Stock 
Exchange Council, deputy 
chairman of the Takeover 
Panel, May, 1987. 

Mrs Rachel Waterhouse, 
chairman of the Consumers' 
Association. May, 1988. 

Mr Brian Williamson, 
chairman of Lifife, July, t9S9. 


C TEMPUS ) 

Ultramar’s tale of woe 
confounds analysts 


As Robert Bums once 
philosophized “the best laid 
schemes o' mice and men 
gang all aglcy". In Ultramar’s 
second quarter, things went 
wrong with a vengeance. 

As expected, the upstream 
results were disastrous as the 
falling oil price gradually 
worked through to Indo- 
nesian liquefied natural gas 
contract prices. 

But what really decimated 
profits were the losses down- 
stream. especially in Canada. 
Refining and marketing lost 
£500.000 compared with a 
profit of £18.9 million in the 
first quarter. However, in- 
cluded in these. figures arc 
inventory writedowns total- 
ling £59.2 million, of which 
£55.7 million related to the 
second quarter. 

The group’s stock tosses 
were particularly high be- 
cause. in addition to falling 
oil and gas prices. Ultramar 
had unfortunately high stock 
levels. It stocked up ahead of 
closure of its Quebec refinery 
for maintenance to be sure of 
maintaining supplies to 
customers. 

Normally, it can count on 
some of its supplies not 
getting through the ice-bound 
waters of the St Lawrence 
River, but since taking deliv- 
ery of its specially ice- 
strengthened oil-bulk-ore 
carriers, its orders have-been 
delivered in full, contributing 
to stocks. And the slump in 
shipping rates means that its 
ships are losing money, to the 
tune. or £42 million in the 
first six months of this year. 

Even this understates the 
full extent of Ultramar's 
woes. There were additional 
stock writedowns of £23 mil- 
lion taken below the line as 
extraordinary items. These 
arise out of surplus stocks 
relating to the acquisition at 
the beginning of the year of 
Gulf Canada's refining and 
marketing operations. 

To cap it all. the company 
lost £ 1 36 million (16'per cent) 
of shareholders’ funds- in the 
last 12 months. 

Analysis are bemused. 
Their earnings forecasts 
range from 4.Sp to 92p a 
share. On one thing they are 
unanimous, the final divi- 
dend will be cut to give a 
halved total of not much 


more than 5p. The shares are 
only for the brave. 

Philips 

Dazzling figures from 
Philips' Lamps arc not ex- 
pected until the United States 
market improves. But results 
for the second quarter of 19S6 
were not as gloomy as had 
been feared 

Although turnover fell by 7 
per cent to 13.3 billion guil- 
ders (£3.85 billion), income 
before tax rose by 6 per cent 
to 370 million guilders (£107 
million). Earnings per share 
marked lime at 0.85 guilders 
(24.6p). 

Net margins widened from 

2.4 per cent to 2.8. The 
company is hoping that this 
second quarter trend will 
continue. 

The problems facing the 
US semi-conductor market 
are well known, with 
overstocking and price reduc- 
tions continuing to make life 
difficult. Over the past six 
months Philips has restruc- 
tured Signetics, its US semi- 
conductor business, and 
losses there have been 
substantially reduced. 

There is no sign of an 
improvement yet. but tower 
US interest rates and cheaper 
energy should provide some 
stimulus before the end of the 
year. A streamlined Signetics 
should enjoy an immediate 
benefit. 

Demand for consumer 
products is particularly 
strong, with sales boasted by 
World Cup followers keen to 
savour every moment of the 
action. Good progress contin- 
ues to be made with compact 
disc players, although profits 
are insignificant so ran 

Even cautious analysis are 
expecting comfortably over 
four guilders ( 1 1 6p) per share 
for this year — and more than 

5.5 guilders for 1987. • 

At the London market 
price of £1 5.48 the shares are 
on a p/e ratio of around 10 
times. If good signs come 
from the US in the autumn 
the shares should have a 
further 20 per cent to go. 

Composite 

insurers 

Both Commercial Union and 
Genera] Accident produced 


good interim results, but 
GA’s were somewhat more 
encouraging. 

Us second quarter recovery 
was much more marked with 
pretax profits at £43.8- million 
against a first quarter £4,6 
million. CU made a second 
quarter £28.7 million' against 
a first-quarter £12.3 million, 
giving rise to concern that its 
potential for recovery is more 
limited. 

CU‘s retreat from the 
heavy liability end of Ameri- 
can commercial insurance 
means that the massive rate 
increases now coming 
through on that dass of 
business are passing it by. 
That said. CU and GA. which 
has also moved away from 
heavy commercial insurance, 
are still seeing rate rises of 30 
per cent on medium to small 
commercial American 
business. 

GA has done well to bring 
down its American under- 
writing loss to £382 million 
from £56.8 million in the first 
six months of 1985, given 
that half its business is in 
personal lines which are not 
showing any improvement. 

Both companies provided 
encouragement on the divi- 
dend front. CU managed a 7 
per cent rise, its firsi interim 
dividend increase for five 
years. GA dished out a very 
generous 25 per cent, which 
' has excited hopes of simitar 
generosity at the final stage. 

CU’s prospective yield, 
assuming a 10 per cent total 
dividend increase, is 5.8 per 
cent and GA's is 4.7 per cenL 
CU's historic yield premium 
is still significant, but is being 
eroded. 

GA shares' traditionally 
wide discount to net asset 
value has been somewhat 
knocked by the fell of the UK 
stock market in recent weeks. 
The net asset value has 
dropped to 101 9p a share 
from 1043patlheendofJunc 
1985. but the discount is still 
around 20 per cent 

Wood Mackenzie, the 
stockbroker, is expecting full- 
year pretax profits from CU 
of around £130 million 
against a previous loss of 
£58.8 million and it has 
raised its expectations for GA 
to £140 million against £26.6 
million in 1985. 


• UNIDARE:. Six months to 
June 30. Pretax profit Ir£1.51 
million (£1.37 million), against 
Ir£1.14 million. Sales Ir£28.02 
million (lr£2S.66 million). In- 
terim dividend 3p (2.3p), pay- 
able on Sept 2. Earnings per 
share 9.03 p (5.53p). . 

• WOODHOUSE & RDCSON: 
Half-year to June 30. Turnover 
£5.75 million (£5.48 million). 
Pretax profit £628,000 
(£532,000). Interim dividend 
l.35p (lpX payable on Oct 9. 
Earnings per share 3.9p (3.6p). 

• METAL BULLETIN: Halt 
year to June 30. Interim divi- 
dend 1.65p ( 1 .50p), payable on 
OcL 10. Turaover£3.18 million 
(£2.79 million). Pretax profit 
£497,900 (£312.000). Earnings 
per share 3.6Ip (2.09pX 

• RESTMOR GROUP: Year 
to May 2. Total dividend 4.5p 
(4p). Turnover £14.83 million 
(£15.46 million). Pretax profit 
£1-53 million (£1.62 million). 
Earnings per share fl.89p 
<8.93p). 

VOGELSTRUISBULT 
METAL HOLDINGS: Half- 
year to June 30. Pretax profit 
R3.6I million (£961,000), 
against R3.I9 million. Earnings 
per share 18 cents (15 cents). 
Interim dividend 10 cents 
(same). Earnings for the year 
should not be significantly lower 
than 1985, the board says, so the 
dividend should be maintained. 

NEW WITS: Year to June 30. 
Pretax profit R15.3 million 
(£4.07 million), against R 13-23 
million. Total dividend 80 cents 
(70 cents) Earnings per share 
130 cents (!09cemsX 

• GOLD FIELDS PROP- 
ERTY: Year. lo June 30 L Pretax 
profit R 10.71 million (£2.85 
million),. against- R7.7 million. 
Turnover R 17.21 million 
(R 1 2. 76. million). Total divi- 
dend 30 cents (24 cents). Earn- 
ings per. share 59 cents (48 
cents). 


COMPANY NEWS 


• DAVIES & METCALFE: 
_ Half-year to. June 30, including 

six months for .the overseas 
subsidiaries, compared with 1 1 
months last time. Sales £3.12 
million (£5-56 million). Pretax 
loss £232,998 (profit £255,902). 
Interim dividend 0.63p (same), 
payable on Ocl 6. Loss per 
share 4.31p (236p earnings). 
The group entered profitability 
in April 

• BIOTECHNOLOGY 
INVESTMENTS: Year to May 
31. The board proposes a nine- 
for-one scrip issue. Dividend 
unchanged at 10 cents. Gross 
revenue $2.71 million (£1.82 
million), against $2.8 million. 
Loss per share 5 ce n ts (earnings 
10.6 cents). 

• DOWTY GROUP: Following 
the acquisition of 50 per cent of 
Hydrostatic Transmission in 
1983, the group has completed 
the purchase ofthe remaining 50 
per cent for £125,000 in cash 
and 514.706 shares. 

• BESTOBELL: An agreement 
has been signed for the ac- 
quisition of the level controls' . 
division of Fisher Controls of 
Solingeo, West Germany, sub- 
ject lo tbe approval of Fisher's 
parent's board- Disregarding 
exceptional items, BestobelTs 
pretax profits for the second half 
of 1986 are forecast to increase 
by at least 20 per cent over the 
first halt 

• MEAT TRADE SUPPLI- 
ERS: The company is reporting 
for the S3 weeks to April 5. Total 
dividend 5 -3p (5.25p). Turnover 
£7.4 million (£7.99 million). 
Pretax profit £273,000 
(£285.000). Earnings per share 
7.09p (7.69p). 

• BESTWOOD: First half of 
1 986. No interim dividend (nil). 
Turnover £8.65 million (£1.25 . 
million). Pretax profit £707.000 - 
(£121.000). Earnings per share ~ 
9-2p (2.6p). 


• ELECTRIC & GENERAL 
INVESTMENT CO: The com- 
pany has placed £7 million of 
10% per cent debenture stock, 
201 f. at £99.16, payable in full 
op acceptance. Net proceeds are 
estimated at £6:86 million. 

• J SAVILLEGORDON: Year 
to April 30. Total dividend 
2:56p (232p). Turnover £41.9 
million (£32.04 million). Pretax 
profit £2.52 million (£2.31 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share 6.2p 
(6.6p). A one-for-one scrip issue 
is proposed. Since April 30, the 
holdings in Duporc (8 per cent) 
and Leigh Interests (6.4 per 
cent) have both been sold for 
£7.03 million. Borrowings are 
now 35 per cent of shareholders' 
funds. This sharp reduction in 
borrowings will have a 
favourable impact on interest 
costs in the current year. 

• TRENCHERWOOD: Half- 
year to April 30. Turnover 
£1 1.35 million (£7.46 million). 
Pretax profit £2.02 million - 
(£730.000). Earnings per share 
I3.74p (4.86p). Interim divi- 
dend I.65p (1.5p). payable on 
Ocl 20. The board is confident 
that the second half-year' will 
enable the group to recordjyet 
another year~ of substantial" 
growth. 

• AUTOMAGIC HOLD- 
INGS: Total dividend raised to 
6p(S,6p) for the year to April 26. 
Turnover £7.68 million (£6.52 
million). Pretax profit £707.000 
(£512.000). Earnings per share 
8.2p (S.8p). Sales and profits in 
the first 12 weeks of the current 
year are ahead of last time, the 
board reports. 

• SNOWDON & BRIDGE: 

The company has -acquired, for 
£310.000 cash. Porter Pro- 
visions. a catering wholesale 
-distributor, based nr Sheffield. 
Porter's turnover and pretax 
profits in the year to Jan. 31 last 
were £3 million' and '£13,774 
respectively. 


C&W signs optical 
fibres venture pact 

By Teresa Poole 


oa rr tis’t tenl u in nmpflgro wH lifKfnxilatmaqftbe Cbwvil (fib* Stock 
£rrta*jr. It don not cnaOUuI,- an mnltawn to Hie pmtitc to xattfcnbtJororpiarMx any 


FRANCIS SUMNER 
(HOLDINGS) p J.c. 


'Nwnlfer 
-60,000 


— £ 
AOOO.OOO 


WTRODl'CnONTO THE OFFICIAL LET 
~XlrdGmaiySfoaiesorSjpflfiC&' ' ~ 

- - - • - - Anthoriseff .... _ 

- Ifisredaat|ta beamed. 

51527,001 — all IhUy paid' ■ - 'jyWMSO 

Prnnbsinn has Ijot 

share capita] oT Francis Sumner (Holdings) pic, honed and to' be issued, to be 
admitted uj the OffidaJ list. The shares tor which permission has beer parted 
comprise the easing Onttrwy Shares of Francis SuirajerfHokfliifs) pic. and those 
bang issued pmsuait u Ibe offer for Astra Holdings pie. Daring wil] commence 
bxfeff. 14th August 1886. Die Company has resolved to change its name to Astra 
Holdings pie. subject onfc lo theaidoffisr bramungor being declared uncondkwnal 
in all respects and to the existing Astra Holdings pit ctangine tetania 
listing Panwulare Hating » the Company are asailabte in (he End Statistical 


on 

August, 1886 Item: 

Francis Sanmer (Holdings) pic. 

. PiirMn^ham House 

45 Vivian Avenue 
Hendon. London NW4 3XA 

Fmw&Braldnraife 
2.' Austin Friars 
London ECSiiBU 


Hflnfl Krm gWyfc tJmfrwi 

ttatdfey House. . 

7 Devonshire Square 
London EC2M4HN 

Onse Registrars limited 
80S fflf* Road 
leyton, London HO 7BR 


and are abo available from the Company AnMuMenwnts Office, Quotations 
Department, The Slock Bwtange, Londnn EC2P 2BT, for coflecttoa only, «* l*h “d 


15th August, 1986. 


14th August, 1WG 


APPOINTMENTS 


Macro 4: Mr Michael R 
Smith has become finance 
director. 

Appleyard Group: Mr Mi- 
chael Williamson is to be chief 
executive. 

The Rover Group: Mr 
Frank Saondry has been 
named as personnel director. 

The British Red Cross Soci- 
ety: Mr James Gunning is to 
become director of finance 
and committee services. • 

.: Whitworths: Mr JRbger 
Davenport has been appointed* 

London World Traj^Cen- 
tre Mr- Antony Reardon 
Smith has become executive 
director. 


Royal Ordnance: Mr Trevor 
Trbman has been named op- 
erations director. 

Hilton Mining: Mr Allan R 
Hilton becomes group chair- 
man and chief executive. Mr 
Brian Fowler will be managing 
director. Hilton Mining 
Machinery, and Clwyd 
Manufacturing. 

Baggeridge Brick: .Mr B G 
-Hughes has become execiitive- 
saies director. . 

Davidson Pearce:- Mr 
Alistair Proctor and Mr Nefl - 
Fazakerley are to be joint 
creative directors. . 

Electrolux: Dr Roger Baxter 
has been named managing 
director. 


M.I.M. HOLDINGS LTD 

180 Ann Street. Brisbane. Queensland, Austrafia 4000. - 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that die Annual.General Meeting of MJ.M. 
Holdings Limited will be held at the Park Royal Motor Inn. Alice 
Street, Brisbane. Queensland. Australia, on Tuesday 21 October 
1986 al'TO.OO A.M. for the' purpose of receiving and considering 
the reports of the Directors and Auditors and the Financial State- 
ments for the financial year ended 22 June 1986 and to elect 
Directors in accordance with the Articles of Association of the 
Company. 

D M Munro. Secretary and General Counsel . 

Brisbane, 7 August 1986 

7 ? 


Cable and Wireless yes- 
terday announced that a con- 
ditional agreement has been 
signed in Washington, con- 
firming the planned partner- 
ship with Nynex Corporation 
in a transatlantic optical fibre 
venture.'. 

The agreement follows the 
announcement in June that, 
subject to regulatory ap- 
provals. Nynex — the regional 
Bell telephone operator for 
New York and the North- 
eastern states - intended to 
buy Tel-Optik. Cable and 
Wireless's 50 per cent partner 
in the £400 million cable 
project. 

Nynex has now formally 
agreed to pay $10 miifion for 
an option on all the Tel-Optik 
stock. But. before the takeover 
can go aheacLihe: companies 
must secure a waiver of the 
Modified' Final Judgment, 
wh ich governs the activities of . 
the Self telephone companies. 


formed when American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph (AT&T) 
was broken up in 1984. 

The judgment restrains any 
Bell companies from running 
a transatlantic cable business, 
but both partners are con- 
fident of a waiver. 

The joint venture also heeds 
approval from the Federal 
Communications Commis- 
sion. the American telecom- 
munications watchdog. The 
agreement will lapse if all 
regulatory approvals have not 
been secured by mid- 1 988. 

Under the joint venture two 
transatlantic submarine fibre 
optic cables linking New York 
and London will be installed, 
with the first scheduled to be 
in service by mid- 1989. - 

Tel-Optik was formed 
specifically .to.panake irt the 
project, and it was always 
expected to look for help in 
financing _its . half . of _ the 
venture. 


REPUBLIQUE DE GUINEE . 

MIKISTEAE DE L'EQUIPEMEMT ET DE 1’OBBJIIHSMI 
SECRETARIAT D’ETAT ARX TRAVAUX PURUCS 
OFFICE DU FR0JET ROUTIER 

MIKE OF HTTERMA TIOEAL UMTATWK TO TEOOER 
BEF 3M 0B 

The Office du Projet Rouiier invites, as part of the 
works for the third highway protect, international 
tenders for the delivery of earthmoving, transport 
. ' and other items of equipment allocated amongst the - ■ 

. following lots; ■ 

-LOT 1 dEarthmoring Equipment ■ ■ 

LOT 2 Compaction Equipment 
LOT 3 :Heavy Transport Vehicles 
LOT 4 .-Light Transport Vehicles 
LOT 5 tPtunping Equipment .. . 

LOT 6 'Silt Workshop 
LOT 7 : Refrigeration Containers 
. . .LOT . 8 . housing, and .Office Equipment 

- LOT 9 (Generators " " ~ ’ 

LOT 12 .Compressors and Pneumatic Hammers 
LOT L3~<tona«ie Mixers .... 

The supply of these items is to be financed with a 
• grant from' the Government of Japan, as pair of a 
special financing package linked to the special fund 
for Africa which is administered by the International 
Development Association. 

This invitation to tender is open to all *1^ 1* 

. organisations in accordance with the funding 
aphides' rules for award of contracts. 

Documents will be available for collection from 
August 15, 1986 ati 

tHE OFFICE DU PR0JET R0UTIBI - 
PK 10 - ROUTE DE L 4 AEROPORT 
BJ. 581 

CONAKRY - GUINEE 

- The cost of the tender documents is Two Hundred 
05. Dollars. Tenders must be received at the above 
address. The deadline is October 31 1986 10am. 










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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


17 


STOCKMARKET REPORT 



-Lyons rises on hopes 
of green light for Elders bid 




By Michael Clack 


. '"^Knies 

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. - The Monopoh'es-and Meig- 
-crs Commission is expected to 
. dye the the Australian brewer 
:flders IXL the aB-dear to 

- proceed with its bid forAJlied- 
.. Lyons, the brewing, wines and 

-spirits and food manofac- 
: turinggroup. - 
; An announcement from Mr 
Pad Chanson, the Secretary 
. .of State for Trade . and In- 
cfostry, confirming that the bid 
‘ has been cleared is expected 
' within the next- conple . of 
. weeks. The market, sensing 

- that the verdict was im- 
..mroent, tharked Allied ISp 
-higher at. 320p yesterday. 

' Elders, weU known for its 
; Fosters lager and only a 
^-quarter of the size of Allied, 

•-■HadewoodFaodsze- 
' Ktins a linn market bokQng . 
steady yesterday ^ 144p — 

; jast 4p shy of the peak. Pre- 
' tax profits last year almost - 
■' dotokd to £1L1 mHIka and. 
r are on target for at least 
' £16 million tius time, helped 
by a strong overseas 
expansion programme. 
Observers claim the shares 
. are destined for better things 
and should tap 200p before 

. the year end. 

launched its £L7 billion bid 
last year-with the bacldogof at 

- least eight overseas banks. But 
-.the bid was referred to the 

Monopolies Commission in 
December after the Bank of 
England . expressed - doubts 
about Elders’ ability to finance 
thedeaL 

But now Elders can call on 
die financial muscle of BHP, 
the big Australian industrial 
group, which has since bought ' 
a 20 per cent stake in the 
' company. Elders' balance 
sheet is now in a much 
healthier state and the 
Monopolies Commission is 
apparently satisfied that . Mr 


Alan Bond, the chairman, has 
the backing to finance such a 
bid. . 

It now only remains to be 
seen if Mr Bond is prepared to 
return - to the say. Some 
brokers are convinced he is. 
Vivian Gray has already said 
that it expects . Elders to 
bounce back with a bid of up 
to 400p a share: That would 
value Allied ai about £2.7 
trillion. 

Meanwhile, rival Klein won 
Grieveson is also optimistic 
that Elders- will renew its bid 
and rates Allied as the cheap- 
est stock in the brewery sector. 
It nates the shares. as a “buy" 
on fundamental grounds 
alone. 

The finny of activity in 
Allied was also the opportu- 
nity for the other -brewers to 
shrug off recent gloom stem- 
ming from proposals to refer 
the tied- house system for 
pubs to the Monopolies 
Commission. There - is. now 
sowing speculation that Mr 
Chan non’s office may decide 
to overturn the decision. 

It has until Monday to make 
up its mind. As a result, Bass 
rose ISp to 745p, Grand 
Metropolitan, the Truman 
and Watney Mann brewer, 7p 
to 380p. Greene, King 5p to 
2I8p and : Scottish & New- 
castle 3p to 189p. Whitbread 
“A" firmed lOp at 263p after 
lunch with W illiams de Broe, . 



the broker, which is still a fen 
of the shares. 

The Test of ihe equity 
market maintained this 
week’s rally on the back of 
another strong overnight 
performance on Wall Street. 
The FT Index of 30 shares 
rose by 19.0 points to 1.261.0. 
while the broader-based FT- 
SE 100 spurted by 22.8 points 
to 1,581.0. 

But gilts finished PA lower, 
amid fears that the Govern- 
ment broker is considering a 
new tap stock tomorrow. 

Scrim geour Vickers, the 
broker, took a bold step and 
pushed out a “buy" circular 
on Plessey, ahead of- figures - 
later today. The stores rose 
lOp to 200p with Scrimgepur’s 
markeimajdng arm reported 
to be Mg buyers: 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Bemereo (W5p) 

Borland fI25p) 

Ctetsaa Man n25p) 
'Coated Electrodes (84p) 
Coftne (HIM 
Evens Haitstaw ft20p) 
Hat c her Denny s (70^ 

£5uthr^ r ^ro'p50p] - 
Harrison [(154^>1 
HSe Ergonom C9Qp) 


140 
188 +3 
70 
150 
140+2 
128 
88 
112 
. 117 
72 
203 
184+3 
159+2 


Hughes Food 
Lon Utdtnv C 
M6 Cash & O (106 
Marina Dev (HOp) 
Mormi Gramafl (500p) 
Omratech (33 q) 

Shield (72p) 

Stanley Leisure (110p) 
TV-AM (130p) 

Tandy Inds (Il2p) 
Themae TV (I90p) 
Tibet & Britten (120p) 
Trass 2H%lfl 2018 *07 
Unite* fB3p) 
Windsmoor (1 06p) 


23 

68+0 
81 -3 
96 43 
438-2 
32 
145+5 
120 
149'2 
146 
230 +2 
130 
£41 ’j 
68 
105+1 


Renters “B” dipped 2p to 
503p after Cazenove, the bro- 
ker, placed 3.1 mlUion shares 
at around 482p. The shares 
belonged to Associated News- 
papers and reduces its stake to 
20.5 million shares. 

Good Relations, the PR 
consultant and advertising 
agent, fell by a further Sp, to 
equal its low for the -year of 
8Sp, as the full impact of the 
latest botch of . rerignations 
from the group’s City office 
started to be felt. The market 
is only just coining to terms 
with “people” businesses and 
the effects on those companies 
when the talent walks out of 
the door. 

Good Relations has been an 
example of this and it has seen 
its share price gradually 
eroded by a series of resigna- 
tions. This time last year, the 


YMverton (38p) 
RIGHTS ISSUES 

Barter & Dobson N/P 
Cttyvistei N/P 
CoteOll F/P 
Expamst F/P 
Rock N/P 
Television Sth N/P 
Top Value F/P 
Wright Coffins F/P 

(issue price In brackets). 


28+2 
200 +4 
163 
3’?+1 
17-4 
85 
440 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Three Month Starting Open Mgb Low done Eat 

Sep 88 ________ "MSS 905 t 9028 ' 90-28 548 

Sw ' 9057 . 9052 9057 - 905B- 548 

Mar 87 9060 V 90.61 9058 - 9058 108 

Jun87 an*" 1 

Sep 87 
Dec 87 


Vai 


9050 

9030 

9023 


Previous day’s total open Wsrest 14192 
Three Month E u rodol l ar 


9050 

9036 

9023 


9046 

9030 

9023 


9046 27 
9032 20 
9019 10 


Sep 86. 

Dec 06 

Mar 87 : 

Jon 87 — 1- 

US Treasury Bond 

Sep 86 

D0c9B-__=; 

Mar 87 


Previous dtystotalopM lilSfinl 19819 
93.71 93.76 93>1 S3J6 1102 

9372 93.79 93.72 93.77 2733 

9355 . 9370' S3 .65 9958 375 

9345 9349 9343 9348 211 

Previous (toy's total open interest 8192 
90-20 9029 99 -10 99-16 8195 

90-05 -99-08- - 9821 - 9827— ITS ■ 

N/T. 0 


Short G* 




. Prerious day's total open interest 1 
100-57- lOOte : 10048 516 

Ji. -«• .1 -mfLio n 


1148 


10848 


Long QM 

SrahS — 


Dec 66. 

Mar 07 

Jun 07 — . 
FT-SE10Q 

Sep 06 

Dec 86 


120-14 

120-10 

■-W 


128-18 

12811 


PmteMdM'aktelapwr Interest 13728 
11825 119-26 5661 


11826 


11824 304 

11817 0 . 

11847 0 

Previous oajfsloW cpanjntnrwi2542 
38190- '15840 ■ -16145 738.. 
16450 18250 18430 30 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Ftat Oe a Mngs 
' Aug.4 ■ 

Aug 18 
Sep8 
-55 oc 


LnrtDaaBnfli 

Aygl^ 

Sop 5 .. 
Sap 19 


N«r6 
Nov 20 

Doc 4 


For Sad 
Nov 17 
Dacl 
Dec 15 


^mBsassssst 


Ceremlc, S. Banks, 


tOorajGtan&eid Lawrence. Hawtey.ANZ.S8 U Stores y«al Hag-Jinrama^ Unigpup, 
- — ‘ Photo, CH Bailey, PartteW. Somtf Dfftustei, Pony PBcfc, 


Centrowncai, 

Abaco. Sears. 

Put Matxxo. . 

Put SCM: Hawtoy. URrwnar. 


& D, WA Hoktings. 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


££ST 

N York 1.4850-14075 
Montreal 20613-25679 ' 
A)ns'rtam34586-34681 
Brussels 6347-8350 
Cptasn 11.4938115258 
DtEtfi 3.0690-30784 
Frartidhrti: 10581.1 121 
Lisbon 215L77-21732 
Madrid 199.14-19977 
Mian 211157-211959 
Oslo ‘ 103408103666 
-Paris — -95747-100160 
SOtWm 192814-103210 
Tokyo- J-22B54-22944 
Iflfnw 21582156 ' . 

-Z»ch -2.4718-24832 


Aoutia 

14^581.4065 

2061820655 

346Z7-34073 

6352-6371 

115008115256 

30735-30778 

11(081.1090 

215.77-217 40 

' 19821-199 49 ' 
211357-211836 

103511-109659 
-99988100160- 
10X42-103105 
2290822944 - 
21. B1 -21 05 ..’ 
2479824832- 


0.480 43prwn 
037-0.1 Borwn 
MWNprem 
17-i2prem 
%prem-5Wte 

1»-1Xpram 


2-5cfia 
4-4Kdte - 
2)4-2S4pram- 
%-parffie 
1K-9tprem 
914-754 pram 
134-1 Kpram 


130-137prBffl 

Q5B-054pram 

3S4-3Kprem 

443Sprem 

Kprem-IUs 

4£3Kprem 

5dis-5prem 

175-455rfis 

1OO-105dks 

5-8dte 

13*-l35fafe 

6H-614pram -- 

Jfc-ns 


251 
3K-3J*prem 


wMi 1978 wen ap at-715 (daiTm reega 714-714.- 


OTHER STERLMG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentine aureaT . 


Cyprus potmd — 
Fnland marks — : 
Greece drachma. 
Hong Kong dolar . 
teUa rupee _ — 
Iraq dinar. 


. 1426814320 
. 2.410824*51 
, 0.4775-04875 
.20482059 
_ 072600.7360 
^.7315873550 
_ 199JSS-201.S5 
1158&-115911 
18481855 


Ireland 


AushaBa 

Canada, 


Kuwait (tinarKD 
Mteystei 
Mericopi 


. 04300-04340 


Sweden 

Norway. 

Denmark 

WestGermwiy 
Switzerland — 


NewZeatatedotiv, 
Saudi Arabia riyal _ 
Singapore doBar — 

South Alrca rand — 

UAEffirham 

UoydsBank 


39851-35907 

948990 

.23536-25675. 
. 5560855000 
. 83053-32091 
.39892^3124 
. 54415-54815 


France-. 


: Horig Kong 
Ponug# — 
Spain — . — 
Austria _ — 


.1389813425 
. 2.15782.1585 
. 2915829170 
. 03156413163 
. 1387813800, 
.6335869400 
. 7370873750 
. 7.74287.7475 
. 29670-20680 
. 1666813675 
.2328523295 
.6.72088.7250 
. 154.1815430 
. 14213-14229 
— 42.784293 
. 7.79687.7965 
.1469814630 
. 134.1813435 
_ 14581457 


■uppflatf by tereteye Bre* HOFEX and ExteL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


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Aug 

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700 

750 

600 

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22 

6 

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43 

23 

85 

55 

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13 

30 

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200 

216 

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Aaguat 13,1916. Ttatal conlncte 18001 . Cri*12888. Pnt»5X2. •thidariytog.aaswfty price. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Period rates were margin- 
ally easier yesterday bat trad- 
ing was not active. Operators 
said the lower rates were more 
of a markdown then an indica- 
tion of trading. Bat hopes for a 
base rate cut within a coturie of 
months persist Longer dates 
in sterling CDs were 1/32 
down. In the absence of real 
activity attention was focused 
on die overnight situation, 
with comfortable money con- 
ditions enabling the rate to 
ease. Eurodollar deposits 
tended marginally lower. Lo- 
cal authorities showed the 
market 

BaaeRateeX 

Owing Banks 10 
France House 10 
DteceoreMaitet Learn % 

Owmkjht HlQh: 9 low 6 
Week Sntiz H4K 
Treasonr Mte (Discount 
Buying Senna 

2niritn"9 ,, i* 2mntt 9 *m 

3 mntti 9% 3 renth 9K 


(Discount %) 

1 math 9 ,3 i+9K 2 mnth 9»i»-9H 

3mnttiW*6ft 6mrth9*.+954 
Trade B*s (Discount 1^ 

1 mnth HP* • 2 mntti iCPw 

3 mnth ItPi* 9+» 

tntartnnk (%} 

Ovemaht open 9% don 5 
1 week 9'ii+9 u '6 6mntti9t8»» 

1 mmh 9"*9i4 9 mnth 9^-9" w 

3 mntti 9»'«-9»ta 12 mm 

Lent Aumarity D ep oa lta (%) 

2 days 7 days Ss 

- 3 mntti 9« 

12mtti g»ia 

au 

2m8i 108-10 
5 mnth 10%-Mi 
llntih 9Viw9"w 


1 mntti 954 
6 mntti 9% 
Local Auiteri te 
1 mnth 1054-10 
Smith' 1054-10 
9 moth m-454 


1 3 owfc 9 r *i*-9 ,, >* 

6 mntti 9 a i+8 ,, ia l2rmh goivO"* 


DoOarCDsM) 

1 mnth 528K20 
6 mm h 635-620 


3 mntti 638820 
12mth 638630 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days flSI-6'is 

3 mntti 8»ia4F» 
Dnotsdneifc 
7 days 4»«-4' w 
3 mnth 4<ig-4 ? ia 

r,.-r 

rTTCfCH hnmc 

7d*¥S 7*ie-7 , >* 
Smith T^wT'ia 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 154-1K 
3 mnth 454-4K 
Ye* 

7 days 41L4* 

3 mntti 454-451 


cafl 7-6 
1 moth 6H-8S 
fimrth 6*v^'ie 
call 84 
1 mntti 4 *w-4 7 m 
6 mnth 4 *i«-4*m 
cal 754-04 
1 1Tflft T^ivT'ib 
6 mrth 754-754 
cal 254-1)4 
1 mntti 414-454 
6 mnth 4 , »-4*te 
Ctri ,454354 
1 mntti 454-4K 
6 mmh 451-4% 


GOLD 


Gott638590386:00 


■excludes VAI 


15) 


ECGD 


Fixed Rata Sterling Sxpart Finance 
Schema IV Average reference rate for 
Interest period July 7. 1986 to 
August 5. 1966 -induwvs: 10.009 par 
cam.. . 


shares stood at 285p, but the 
rot quickly sei in when fonner 
director Ms Maureen Smith 
derided to sell her 1 1.6 per 
cent holding in the company 
to Mr Christopher Moran, the 
insurance broker, at a substan- 
tial discount to the ruling 
market price. Her resignation 
and a censure by the Slock 
Exchange quickly followed. 

As a result, morale at GR 
hit a new low and more 
resignations were announced 
as Ms Smith formed a new 
company and poached some 
of her old stafE There was 
plenty of bid talk earlier this 
bear and even some formal 
talks with rival Vallin Pollen, 
but nothing came of it and last 
year’s profits setback only 


• Loss-making Viewplan, 
the USM-qnoted broadcast 
equipment supplier, held 
steady at 75p- It announced 
recently thar ft was in talks 
with a mystery smtor and that 
a bid con Id follow. Sugges- 
tions that Lee International Is 
tiie suitor are wide of the 
mark. Now fingtts are point- 
ing at Samuelson, down 
lOp at 180p after Tuesday’s 
annual meeting. We should 
hear news shortly. 


added to the despair 
surrounding the shares. 

. Today's interim figures 
from Good Relations are also 
expected to make gloomy 
reading and show another 
sharp full- in pretax profits, 
from £710,000 to about 
£400.000. 

Meanwhile. GR’s rival, 
Addison Consultancy, has bro- 
ken offbid talks with Aidcom 
International, the market re- 
search group. A terse state- 
ment from Addison 
confirmed that it had hoped to 
make a bid, but was unable to 
agree terms. A report in The 
Times earlier this week re- 
vealed that Addison had been 
annoyed at leaks in the press 
hijghfyghling the talks. Aidcom 
slipped 7p to 46p after ihe 
statement while Addison lost 
an early 4p lead, to close 
unchanged at J36p. 

Tuesday’s attempts at a 
rally by recent newcomer 
Morgan Grenfell proved 
short-lived, with the price 
dipping by 2p to 438p yes- 
terday. This compares with 
the original striking price of 
SOOp and will only- fuel-com- 
plaints in the market that the 
issue was originally, 
overpriced. 

' The rest of. The merchant 
banks enjoyed solid support. 
Henry Anshacber improved 
by 2p to 81p, while stories that 
Areyle Trust was bnikfing up a 
stake helped Guinness Peat to 
a Sp rise at 90p. 


COMMENT 


Accountants turn to 
face the lawmakers 


If asked to list problem areas in 
company law and regulation or finan- 
cial services, few would put the 
accountancy profession at the top. But 
experience, not least at Lloyd’s, 
suggests that sleeping dogs can turn 
into mad dogs. Better to keep the rules 
in trim as you go along. 

In that light, the Department of 
Trade's decision to use implementa- 
tion of the European Community’s 
eighth company law directive as an 
excuse to take a wider look at 
structural issues in accountant^ is not 
such a bad idea as the Institute of 
Chartered Accountants might think. 

The profession and its critics and 
customers should respond positively 
to the many questions asked in the 
department's newly issued 
consulative document on the regula- 
tion of auditors. They have until the 
end of next January to do so, hardly 
generous given the timescale of the 
directive but a lot more than some 
consultative documents have offered. 

The directive mainly wants to 
ensure that company auditors are 
properly trained and qualified and 
that member states impose legal rules 
to protect their independence. 

That need not involve much change 
in Britain, except that the practice of 
leaving the accountancy* bodies to 
look after their own affairs needs to be 
established in law. The obvious way 
to achieve that would be by extending 
the idea of supervised self-regulation 
in the new financial services legisla- 
tion but missing in the Lloyd's Act. 

The supervisory powers over the 
institutes could be vested in a state 
body such as the Department of Fair 
Trading or they could be devolved to 
a new accountancy equivalent of the 
Securities and Investments Board. 


r* 


joint body on the lines of the General 
Medical Council, which is neat but 
more radical. 

Controversial issues raised on the 
back of the directive include incor- 
poration of accountancy partnerships, 
compulsory rotation of auditors every 
five years and splitting the auditing 
function from the other consultancy 
and management services which have 
formed the backbone of the growth of 
the big firms. 

Incorporation — already allowed in 
France, Germany and Italy — no 
longer looks a great matter of prin- 
ciple after the changes in the Stock 
Exchange. 

Hiving off auditing in separate 
firms would surely be a triumph of 
regulatory purity over commonsense 
and the day-to-day needs of business. 

To oblige companies to use separate 
accountants for auditing and con- 
sultancy, as in the public sector, would 
answer many of the profession's 
legitimate objections about recruiting 
and interesting the best people, but it 
is still open to objections in terms of 
business efficiency and cost. 

Compulsory rotation, on the other 
hand, would oblige accountants to 
compete more (with vet more market- 
ing) and add powerfully to auditors* 
independence. 

It has the merits both of simplicity 
and strengthening the auditor's hand. 
The weakness in present practice is 
that the auditor's relationship is with 
management rather than 
shareholders. 

That, and much else, will be the 
subject of passionate debate among 
accountants in the next six months. 
Let us hope they are not too defensive. 


A question of timing 


Although the Monoplies and Mergers 
Commission had until the first few 
days of September to send the results 
of its investigation of the Elders IXL 
bid for Allied- Lyons to Paul Channon. 
the Secretary of State for Trade and 
Industry, it is already sitting in the 
ministerial in-tray. On past form we 
can expect to hear the verdict within 
two to three weeks. If so Allied might 
have a timing problem. 

The stock market is convinced that 
the bid will be cleared in its present 
form. It remains possible that the 
commission may have given the 
Elders bid a thumbs down in this 
leveraged form, while recommending 
that it is free to renew its attack in a 
more acceptable way. 

• Either way Allied could still spend 
much of September negotiating hur- 
dles in its own bid to gain control of 
Hiram Walker’s wines and spirits 
interests in Canada. 


Allied might find itself having to 
respond to a reformulated bid from 
Elders before it had settled the Hiram 
Walker affair. In such circumstances 
would Allied feci it had to shelve 
Hiram Walker for the time being? In 
which case the poison pill dissolves 
away. The Canadian company had 
poor third quarter results especially 
on the drinks side, reviving questions 
over the price tag Allied has put on the 
business. 

Now that the brewers are to be 
investigated by the commission, with 
a prospect of the brewers’ tie on pubs 
being broken or loosened, one strand 
of Elders' strategy is starting to look 
more interesting. Elders was talking of 
selling a part share of pubs to tenants. 
That idea could turn out to be a 
shrewd anticipation of changes which 
could come out of the commission's 
hard look into the darker recesses of 
the barrel. 


c 


u 


SIX 

MONTHS’ 

REVIEW 


r 

ASSURANCE 


Interim dividend 
increased 


★ Strong improvement of £53*2m in 
unaudited operating profit before tax. 

★ Interim dividend raised by 7% to 5*2p, 
total cost £21*5m. 

★ Life operations make good progress. 


★ Good growth and profits in the United 
Kingdom. 

Continued improvement in the United 
States. 

★ Other territories maintain their important 
contribution to profits. 


MAIN FEATURES OF RESULTS 

Total premium income 

6nx*mhs 

1966 

Unaudited 

£ni 

1,368.0 

6 months 

1985 

Unaudited 

£m 

1.249.4 

Yew 

W85 

Actual 

£m 

2.306.0 

Life profits 

35.8 

32.4 

80.3 

Non-life operating result 

5.3 

(44.5) 

(139.1) 

Operating profit/(lo$s) before taxation 

41-1 

(12.1) 

(58.8) 

Taxation and minorities 

(15.9) 

(16.1) 

(31.6) 

Realised investment gains 

39.2 

21.4 

59.9 

Profit/ (loss) attributable- to shareholders 

64.4 

(6.8) 

(30.5) 

Earnings per share 

15.60p 

(1.63b 

KESn 

Shareholders' fends 

£l,315m 

£1 ,050m 

£l,161m 

Operating profit/ (loss) before taxation 

£m 

£m 

£m 

United Kingdom 

343 

20.0 

71.5 

Unired States 

(11.5) 

(55.6) 

(178.6) 

Netherlands 

203 

17-9 

38.8 

Canada 

43 

3.9 

5.6 

Rest of the World 

12-8 

13.9 

30.1 

Interest on London borrowings 

(193) 

(12.2) 

(26.2) 


41.1 

(12.1) 

(58.8) 



ASSURANCE 


The half yearly report will be sent to shareholders. 

Commercial Union 

Assurance Company pic 







18 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST. INFORMATION SERVICE 


B*J Ofier Cwifl YU 


ABflfiY UNTT TRUST MANAGERS 
BO HMennrasT BbunwncMfi BHB 8AL 
03*5 7 I 7373 ibnUnej 
OA & Fn« 
rtqn wc Erjvry 
wwtaMW Bond 
Airwrmn Growm 
Mian Paofic 
Aawn A Cams 
Omul Hasarva 
Germ 3 £ m*}y 

Cj'npun Capral 
General 
Japan 

UK Grwuiti me 

Do ACC urn 

VS Eme**ng Cot 
Emms Ptmmt-z 
UBMCSLMX 


7UJJSDDUN8M UNIT TRUSTS 
ami Duns*' Centre Smndon Sni iEL 

mj mm s am wst 

aro.7 23fl0c 
131.2 139.7 


1 IT □ 

1238 

♦00 

969 

9i b 

9/3# 

• 12 

S« 

toh 

306 29 

-1 4 

4 Ur 

IW9 

1805 

*?i 

i-U 

499 

52* 

-03 

303 

1010 

1080 

+12 

234 

060 

(HL« 


1 02 

734 

715 

*09 

2-M 

9T1 

103 3 

-0.1 

1 73 

1315 

1406# 

♦21 

302 

fil.S 

56.7 

+00 


943 

1013 

+09 

?3* 

I3U 

14U 

♦ 10 

106 

M0 

57.7 

+00 

OH 

1677 

1999 

+07 

3*7 

640 

660 

♦60 

300 


Bo Offer dreg YU 


325 a 2U0 
•HS3 3877 
635.3 5701 
330 3a IP 
3430 2596 
1336 i«UP 
1398 1*89 
293 312 
tW* BOM 
US 7 128.4 
174 8 1862a *03 0.96 
H7 689 <03 1.42 

21 1 4 225 1 
7702 234 5 
37 8 33 4 

71S 4 122a# 

1506 16Q« 


*1? 380 
•i.fl 334 
433 363 
•<9 331 
474 310 
40 1 4 31 
♦09 479 
*15 500 
♦ 15 S SO 

♦01 933 
*09 090 
*2.4 001 


Fra Tnrtt 
Growth 5 incoma 
Canmi Inst 
Pauncae 
*«vm Tiisr 
Anwfun incoma 
Hqn Income Tsi 
EQuev mwire 

M^6 View 

ton Seen Trust 

WamihOnal 
Japan Fund 
Paonc Trust 
A m« Sed Sea 
S«*. or *mcw tm 
AC A5M1 VAW 
Gat Growth 
S rw ni rr Cot 
2nd Smater Cos 
Recovery Trust 
MflMJ Cmtfiv 
Onus Earnings 
TePmo *oq > Tst 

Inrtnw t mmv* „ 

Exempt Srrufer Co S 226 4 240 0 
USA Eternal trust 337 6 3579 
ARBVTMNOT SECURITIES 
131 Finsbury Pavamrae. London EC2A 1AY 
01-828 9876 01 280 89407172(3 
Caoul Growth he 56.4 603 

63.1 67.4 

lias tso a 

ru 805 
63 1 67 4 
47 9 SO *• 

815 05 Tm 
715 71 4« 

1694 181 ta 

Hah r«4d Incrane 72 T 77 7 
Do tecum 1907 2039 

768 821 
TBS 842 
712 76.1 
616 64 9 

794 314* 

952 1015# 


795 84 7 
785 84.0 
1787 1682 
863 812 
1238 1302a 


DO Accum 

EaeiMfl & Inti 
Do 6*. UMndrasai 
F«a«ce & Property 

Ga & FoH hunt 

Do tecum 
EtMV Income 
Do Accum 
Vald Incrane 
«Cum 
hd Income 
Do Accum 
Do &■• MIMnri 
Mjnjljpd Fund 
Poi Kv I'ooi Income 
Do Accum 
Smjeet Co i Accum 1251 1337 
world Pemw Share 96 102® 
Porrioko T» UK 735 765a 
mattfota Tsi Japan I0S2 1090a 
Pontraa Tm US 86.7 71 la 
Porttoho Tsi Erato* 11S6 1197a 
Porfoho Tsi hk 425 4*9# 


27 093 
♦29 332 
•0" 287 
• 04 £79 
♦05 350 
♦08 281 
*08 W« 
♦25 315 
*07 098 
*10 624 
♦08 101 
*45 1.15 


♦03 175 
♦04 1 7S 
*03 0 BO 
. 089 
*08 ? 22 
♦01 829 
-03 82S 
•04 5 02 
•08 102 
*01 771 
♦02 7 71 
♦08 222 
*0 7 222 
♦06 222 


-01 989 
-0.1 9 99 
1.76 
. 073 
♦04 157 
*08 000 
♦ 0.1 1.11 
419 000 
-02 010 


BAIUJEOmWO 
1 Giemmus SL Edmtjurgh 
031-225 7581 |De#an03l- 


Intl Ex (221 

J man Ex |4JJ 

UK Ex (311 
Pud Pens mu 
Psil Para UK 
BG America 
BG Energy 
BG Income Orwtti 
BG Japan 
BG Tdcrmatogr 


4431 
4362 
2395 
4*a n 

1990 
164.7 
1375 
1865 

1991 
>192 


EH3 6W 
>228 60661 
46? sa 
4551 
2547 
4718 
2096 
i7S.«a 
1463 

1986 
2118 
I486 


109 

030 

132 


-20 026 
*0.6 139 
*09 541 
•09 0.00 
-1 7 088 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25726 AMrmjrie street London W1X 4AO 

01-491 0295 

Anunan 46 4 48.7 -08 0 79 

Australian 164 17A -01 321 

japan 5 General 112.1 1208 -08 at? 

Hnti income 44 8 47 7 *1 I 7.44 

miemanonai Trust 790 8«0# +07 100 

Income an 7* 44 0 47.1a +05 4 12 

G4ts 8 Fired lm 19 9 213 *0 1022 

dome Martiets 321 344 -02 217 

Speoai 54uawra 374 400 *02 183 

BARCLAYS UNICORN 
Ureccm House. 232. Romford Rd E7 
01-534 5544 


America 
Auji Accum 
Do income 
Carnal 
Emshjt Trust 
Extra Income 
Financial 
500 

General 

Gill 8 Food Inc 
Japan & Gen me 
Do Acc 
Growth Accum 
Income Trust 
Lwsure Trust 
SoecuJ SrtuoMns 
Recovery 
Trustee Fund 
Una Teen Accum 
Do income 

Wonihwde Tium 

3 Tsi m. Food Arc 312 1 3320 
Dome 2022 2151 

BARKIS FUND MANAGBIS 


853 907 
1204 1280 
85 5 901 
66 0 702# 
4101 4382 
72 6 772 
2232 237« 
2566 2751c 
1331 1415 
5x6 S74c 
1688 1785 
170 8 181 6 
1733 1843 
319.0 H83a 
78 4 83.4 
136 0 1436 
1868 1978 
1024 108.9a 

33 S3 

1494 1589# 


♦12 1 39 
-13 157 
-11 157 
♦II 3 18 
♦61 4 15 
♦06 572 
♦20 3.19 
♦ 19 320 
♦28 3.25 
954, 
*1 0 00G 
♦20 006 
♦2.6 246 
♦41 380 
♦06 143 
♦1.1 242 
♦22 250 
♦1.1 3.01 
-05 021 
*05 021 
*22 039 
*52 334 
♦34 334 


PO Box 136. Badrannam. i 

CM BR3 4X0 

01-638 9002 




Austrau 

566 

620 

-20 030 

Eaaero 

37 0 

609 

-15 030 

Eoraiy Income 

3*7 

368 

*00 080 

Eurooe 

1206 

1336 

♦16 090 

Growm & tac 

E09 

633c 

♦09 030 

Jeowi Stwoai 

1039 

111 0 

-1 1 030 

jxorai Smroe 

916 

979 

•14 030 

Fra Europe 

1103 

1173- 

♦ 14 000 

Fra Japan 

869 

95.0 

-05 030 

Fra N Amer 

*93 

37 7# 

*0.7 180 

Fra Smeuer Cos 

617 

663 

*00 2.70 


BARRINGTON MANAGEMENT 

10. renown Sr Unarm EC3 
0<-6Z3 8000 


Planned W» 
European me 
Do Accum 
General Inc 
Do Accran 
G* Yraa me 
Do Accum 

flh Yaw me 

1 Accum 
Japan income 
Do Accum 
N Amencan Inc 
Do Accum 
Pacific Income 
Do Accran 
Sm» Cos inc 
Du Accum 




127 9 135 9 
93 4 968 
1151 T20S 
150 6 1600S 
205 4 2182 
1135 1169 
183 0 1885 
83 8 892 
1669 1776 
2510 2642 
2528 2661 
488 51.9 


567 

Si 

779 

92.3 


601 
139 7 
1572 
829 
982 


330 

♦ 1 4 1 56 

♦ 17 156 
*09 288 

♦ 1 3 288 
*04 945 
+06 945 
*05 sea. 
+09 568 
+04 0 10 
♦04 OiO 
♦03 058 

♦ 03 058 
-06 021 
-0 6 021 
•01 169 
-0 1 169 


BRITANNIA UNIT TRUST 

74-™ Fmchory Pa*emem Lonoon ECSA UD 

S1^2.5rSn DM ‘ ,n 9 0,,KB om > B 

0600010-333 


Growm G4i 
inn Recover* 
5maJ#r Cos 
UK Growm 
E»w me 
Get 

Inc 8 Growm 


59 5 604a 
1017 1085 
138 0 14?Zc 
35 9 38 3 
533 569a 
281 27 Sa 
195 S 1979 


041 
2.73 
132 
227 
788 
7 75 
430 


run n*jn me 
Pn*i Snarea 
Com nyjany 
FmanCai Secs 
Goto S Gen 
mt Larva 
Prop Snares 
l*»v Enrgr 
World Tech 
Amor Growth 
Amor Income 
Amer Smaller Go 1 
Avar Growm 
Euro Smile* 

Far East 
Hone Ko"9 Prf 
mcl Grown 
Japan Perl 
Japan SmW 
E+amst 

Exempt uhM 
BROWN SfflPLBT 

9-17 F ^ iynoum Rd Haywards Heath 


1850 

1973 

4 94 

150 

lB-rc 

100! 

1174 

1232 

27t 

44 S 

470 

221 

It? 

174 

0F 

163 

174 

00? 

tttkb 

71.0 

1 0* 

410 

*3.7# 

ie 

390 

420# 

OS 

90.6 

966 

3L4f 

97 6 

614 

631 

21.2 

22.6# 

039 

620 

Hi 

1.84 

160 

171 

020 

493 

529c 

095 

24 7 

26 34 

152 

360 

360 

102 

760 

01 6 


166 

177 


792 

(2.9 

*01 

64.7 

67.7 

414 


0444 £Ml. 

FmancNH 

Smao* Co * Ace 
Do mconre 
rtfln kuwne 


Man Pomoiio me 

Dp ACC 

NoHh Amencan 

Oram 


1228 >31 ic 
32S 3 :aS2 
144 9 1553 
B4J 691 
73 6 79.1 
58 6 626a 
988 1058a 
587 632a 
881 927 


♦12 272 
♦15 
*10 0.96 
♦OB 584 
*07 438 
*08 327 
+ 1.4 
+0.7 123 
♦06 022 


DUOU1ASTER MANAGEMENT 

The Stock Exchange LcnHn EC2P 2JT 
01-586 2868 
General me (4) 

Do Accum (4 1 
Incoma Fund pt 
Do Accum (3) 
mo me O 
Do Accum 1 
Smafer he Li 
Do Accum I 

C8 FUND MANAGERS 

125. Hwn Habam. London WC1V SPY 

12 114 


2076 jig* 


jatancec Gtn nc 

47.7 454 

190 



Do tecum 

433 461 




noome GW me 


500 

1760 1855 

.. 4.73 

Do accran 

41 1 43 7 


127 7 1334c 

-03 151 

fence Cos me 

460 490 

1.00 

ms 1764 

-0.4 101 

to tecum 



£11.11 11.79# 

300 

1 FIDELITY IffTERNATJONAL 




| Raw wa# Tanpmlga. TW9 1DV 



01-242 1148 
CS JRMtl FUnd 


87 1 92.7 *0.3 023 


CAtMONFUa MANAGERS 

oi^STSpb* 1 **" HA9 WB 


Growth 

Income 

Far Ea st 
Norm American 
GWBai 
European 
japan 


286 3 2833a +15 315 
3134 333 4# +18 393 
208 5 221 8 
1400 157 5 
400 51 ia 

50.7 539 

592 830 


♦ 12 0J0 
*07 028 
-01 ’-50 
+01 100 
♦07 050 


CARL (JAKES) MANAGEMENT 

PO Box 561 Seva UMt London EC3 7 JO 

01-621 0011 


Capital 

Income 

North American 


3599 3850 *J> T 88 

27X7 2938 +3 8 493 

2862 3062 -02 086 


CATER ALLEN 

1 . k«* waam Si. EG4N 7AU 

01-623 6314 
&A Trust 1018 1088a *01 1 1 DO 

CENTRAL BOARD OF FINANCE OP 
CHURCH Of ENGLAND 

2 . fore StreeL London EC2Y 5AO 

01-560 1015 
Inv Fund 3979 447 

Foeo M 144 4 990 

Deposit 100 0 9 70 

CHARITIES OFFICIAL INVESTMENT FUND 
?. Fora SreeL London EC2Y 5AO 
01-588 IBIS 


moome 

Accum 

DdPOU 


364 14 
CIO 8781 
1000 


CLBVCAL MEDICAL UNIT TRUST 

MANAGERS 

Narrow flam. Bnstol BS2 OJH 
0800 373393 
Amer Growth 
Cowry Hx^i Incoma 
European Growth 


General Eoudy 
Gut & Fixed ire Gth 
am 8 food Inc 
Index SacwiMs 
Japan Growm 


224 ?«4 
40 7 433 
28 7 30.6 
37 4 384# 
299 314# 
246 254 
25 4 26 0 
33 7 359 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
161. Chaaosale. London EC2V BEU 
01-726 1999 
Energy Trust 
Erh-a Income 
Fmancul 

Gat Strategy 
Graww Invesamere 
Income & Grewth 
Japanese & Paotc 
Nlh Amer Growth 


Recovery 
Smww C05 
GKButi me Ta 
Specai Sts acc 


445 473a 
IS6E 1665a 
1625 1728a 
562 579 
265 4 2823* 
384 408# 
1815 1930 
101 1 1075 
1084 U52a 

2056 2167c 
571 60.7 

2069 287.1 


CROWN UMT TRUST SERVICES 
Down House. Woking GU2l IXW 
04882 S033 

Hfli Incoma Trust 2300 2480 
Growth Trust 211 S 2262a 

Trust 1293 1383a 


CRUSADER UMT TRUST MANAOERSLTD 
Roreare. Surrey RH2 B8L 
07372 42*24 


*04 190 
+03 440 
♦D4 200 
*05 270 
♦01 320 
*01 940 
*0.1 229 
+09 090 


♦69 692 

♦ I 9 563 
♦14 243 

. . 19* 
♦54 269 
+04 441 
♦19 OJI 
*0 7 1 15 
♦1.1 189 
♦09 191 
-0.1 529 

♦ If 145 


*22 321 
+22 07* 


UK Income 48* 

UK Growm Accum 479 

Do Dai 479 

Euraoesn Orewm 515 

Pacrfe Dowth 54.1 


51 5 
51.0 
510 
570 
575 


+03 447 
+02 243 
♦02 243 
-06 193 
+ 0.1 .. 


EFM UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. Menao CraseaK. Eranourgn 
031-228 3492 


American Fund 

Capaw Fund 
Growm 6 he Fund 
High Dot Fund 
international Fund 
ResoiFces Fund 

SnWr Jap Co'S Fno 

Tokyo Flkld 
(Eil Amer i?i 
(E*l Japan (31 
(E«i Peake t4i 


724 774 
9>4 978 
1225 131 la 
104 8-1121 
195 0 2087# 
219 214 
37 9 40 5 
173 6 IBS 7# 
1478 1528 
1109 1145 
386 7 2980 


IE«1 Smalm Jap (4) 73Z2 2294 
Eurotmo 27 1 290a 


♦12 220 
♦04 1 74 
*23 458 

;?ns 

♦01 043 
-0* 

♦32 000 
+4.1 359 
. 019 

034 
.. OiO 
*0.1 145 
EAGLE STAR (7X77 7RU9raUNA(fCHB 
Bern ROKL CMMnliam. Ghucester GL53 7LO 
024? 521311 

UK Buencod me 862 706 *04 297 

Do Accum 67.2 71.7 *07 292. 

UK Grown Accum 80 3 85.7 +1 0 1.78 

UK H^i Inc Inc 628 875 +02 527 

N Amoncan Accum 85 3 69M +09 110 

Far Eastern Accum 994 1060a +1 I OOO 
European Acaan 802 855a +04 0.79 
DK GW I FI Inc 544 560 +03 828 

Do Aecwn 58 1 59 8 +02 803 

ENDURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 
Adnwt Came. Hexagon House. 26 Weearn 
Hoad Remtard RM1 JLB 
070866966 
Eiwanee 


1084 1118 

EQUITABLE UMTS ADMINISTRATION 
35. Fotmun Sl Manehea rer 
061-238 5685 


114 


EowMOie Hekewi 


7t3 759 *09 334 


BO Offer Chng Vk) 


Hwn income Tiuu 
G*S B Fnea *x 
Tsi 0< h* Tresis 
Specui Sm Trust 
Nlh Amor Tnm 
Far Eastern Trust 
mn Qrawth 


7<2 790 
527 »ta 
59 5 53 3s 
735 762 
564 625 
82 4 87 7a 
503 514 


*09 519 
*0 1 045 
+05 204 
*08 245 
*03 1 73 

•0? 0 56 
+0 5 106 


EDUTTYSLAW 

& George hbo Cotporaeon Si Conroy Cm 
0203 553231 

UK C/Owth Accum 1419 153 0 *22 360 

Do income 1244 1328 •19 380 

Higher me Accum 2392 294 4 -32*88 

Do income 1B20 20*8 *)M . 

GxamiM BCOjm 101.5 1068 +03 266 

Do Income 868 993 *02 246 

Mn Amer Tst Accum 1312 1395 +14 05? 

Far Ejnt Tst Acaan 1563 1662 >03 049 

Eure Tst Accum (964 1664 *06 1 >8 

General Trial 2312 2459 +13 2 48 

FlC UNIT MANAGEMENT 
1 Laurence Poutney hr. London EC4R DBA 
01-623 4680 

US smaoer Cos m2 75 1 +03 0 29 

caudal Fund 1036 H09 *05 042 

■ncpme Fund 775 959 *1 2 •Ti 

Far Eastern Fund 775 829 -03 032 

Overseas income 701 754 *01370 

Fried Interest 575 618 -05 940 

Natural Res Fund 39 1 41 9 *05 4 17 

European moon* 798 882 -03 3 id 


FS INVESTMENT MANAGERS 
190. west Gecxoe SL GUsdbw G2 
341-332 3132 


BH Offer Cmg no 


GUMNCSS MAMON UMTTRUST 
MANAGERS 

PO Ben 442 3? Si Uary-tt-HU London EC3P 

3AJ 

01-623 9333 


Hvxh income 
N Ame» Trust 
fieemerv 
Gm Tnet 
Si ifmcent me 
Si vneent US tot 


499 536# 
1020 1085 
2015 2144 
38.7 40 ta 
835 86 ic 
745 778c 


Tympte Pa' Sm CP * 1715 1810* 
Tenw Bar USM 354 6 3829 


♦0# 67? 
♦l 9 D.BS 

♦ 14 ?41 
+02 906 

♦ 12 550 
*09 078 

327 

296 


2PA 


1030 110* 

*09 067 

325 

349# 

♦Oi 403 

469 

520 

199 

348 

37.1 

•00 3.71 

311 

324 

. 9fe 

931 

996 

*07 4 75 

440 

476 

+0 2 

1»7 1503 

+04 .. 

1*04 

140* 

♦09 001 

770 

634 

5-33 

300 

349c 

*02 248 

298 

310 

-01 D43 

1570 169? 

♦06 093 


0732 362222 

American 

Amer Etjuor moome 
Amer Specai sna 
Far East me 
Git & fixed m 
Growth 8 income 

Japan Soaoal See 
Japan Treat 
kunegtd mt Tst 
Max moome Equoy 
Fveiesiioiwi Gth 
Sown em Ana Tm 
Specai SHs * 


FLEMINO (ROBERT) 

8 &^j^gi London ECSA BAN 

Amenean Exempt £3542 3819 186 

Japan Exempt £*232 *366 055 

Am nopeny Tu 1107889 a 500 

Preoeny Trust £20320 590 

FRAMUNGTON UMT MANAGEMENT 
3 London WM Bugs. Lonoon Wax. London 
EC2U 5NO 
01-628 5181 

Amer 6 Gen Inc 2210 2372c 051 

00 Accum • 2278 2422c -02 051 
Amer Tumarnd he 2050 3159a +1 0 I.T6 
2106 224.0S +11 1 18 

2039 2168 +1 4 1 98 

244 4 2399 +20 1.90 


Do Accum 
CatMIl Tit tnc 

Do *CCum 

Core S Gi> Inc 
Do Accum 
Extra Inc Til Inc 
Do Accum 
Income Trust 
Do Accum 
Ini Growth ft) he 
Do Accum 
Japan & Gen Inc 
Do Accum 

Mommy Income fa 

Recovery 
Da Accum 
European Inc 
Do Accum 


858 91 2# -02 534 

4« -A2 M4 


1142 121 - 
1549 164 4# 
1878 1784# 
1149 1220 
1208 1284 
100 4 1706 
1782 1 694 
999 954 
908 884 
782 842# 

1314 13B«« 
143 0 1820© 
BOB 646 
608 648 


Pwham End. Doming. Sumy 

0306 885055 


fp Equnv Dai 
De Accum 
FP Fmoo tm Dat 
Do Accum 

Stewardship Out 

Do Accum 


1909 2023 
317.7 3372 
114 1 1213 
1299 138.1 
1869 177.1 
1722 1828 


+1.1 441 
♦1 4 4 41 
♦1.4 436 
♦16 436- 
♦06 
♦08 

-02 008 
-02 008 
*09 500 
+10 188 
♦ 12 <68 
-04 Q»h 

•04 aes 


*32 290 
♦55 290 
♦04 552 

♦OX 5S2 

+22 I 77 
♦2.1 1.77 


FUNDS W COURT 

Pupuc Trustee Kmgswey WC2 

01-405 4300 

Cwbi 3519 3602 

Gmxi he 148* 1498 

t+gh Yard 2189 2209c 


260 
7 7* 
597 


07 UMT MANAGERS 
881 Floor. 8 Dewmfwe ! 
01-283 2575 Deeres OH 


London EC94 *YJ 
9431 

*65 110 
*07 110 
*00 620 
+09 190 
-01 090 
♦13 090 
♦13 120 
-0 7 020 
-02 040 
-02 030 
♦07 090 


UK Cap Fno he 929 99.1a 

Do Acaan .1314 1427 

incoma Fund 782 010 

Henson Exempt 16&S 1749# 

trmmanonal 167.4 179.1 

US 8 General S89 EOS 

Tech 8 Grewth 623 667 

Japan A General 2506 288.1 

Far EM 8 Gen 1132 121 1 

Eureoeari Fare 2519 2719 

Germany Fund 698 747 

GARTMORE FUND MANAGERS _ 

2 Si May Axe. London BC3A 68P 

01-623 1 212 Dealing 01 -4BS 5786 OoaregDt-623 

American Trail 874 9*0 +12 800 

Australon Trust 178 199 -05 OS 

Bntiah Ta Aceura 533 573# +0 7 2 01 
De Dot *83 097# -10 201 

ConxixxHY Snare 529 582 +1.1 151 

European Trust 514’ 551 .. 034 

Extra income Trust *83 *85 ♦OS 540 

Far EasMfn Truu 1382 1479 *04 0.00 

FKed intoraM Fund 283- 382# +02 089 

OM Trust 269 270 

GM©t Fund Accum 1779 1892 

Do Dot 1694 1803 

GaH Share Trust 12* 132 

Hedged Amandin- 302 32* 

High income Trial 1370 IJOJ* 

Huig Kong Trust . 209 307 

Income Fund 721 7728 

(entrance Agenoes £4591 4926a *075 209 

Japan Tnot 151 9 1813 *22 090 

Managed Ewnw 268.1 2772 *38 2*7 

OH rferargy Trust J'2 B3 *SI IS 

Special 8ra Trust 919 979 *04 090 

UKSmhCsRecTsl 701 75.1 +09 158 

OOVETT (JOHN) UMT MA NA G EMENT 
wmchasMr Hsa. 77. London WR, London EC2N 
IDA 


*01 844 
*01020 
+01 020 
*01 214 
*09 OIO 
+1.6 5 9L 
-03 MO 
*i2 336 


01-568 5630 
Ml Growth 
Amtnean Growth 
Amercan he 
Eixapean Growm 
Gold A M nereis 

Japan Growth 


794 863 
618 982# 
67.1 721 

2201 2353 
356 382# 
.1849 1753# 


GRE UMT MANAGERS 
Royai Exchange. EC3P 30N 
01-669 9903 


Cm A Fixed mt 
Gnjwm Eqiwy 
GUFdM 


Rapf* 

Propertv Snare 
Smarer Comparaes 
Euraonan Trust 


12T.9 1287 

194 0 2084 
?7J6 2835c 
1384 1*52 
2359 2509 
25*1 2704# 
2075 2208 
2499 2659 


♦09 132 
+01 094 
*09 593 
-0.1 023 
+02 1.77 
-14 


♦0* 878 
+15 206 
+21 292 
♦08 131 
+08 012 
+2* 147 
+13 183 
♦1.4 107 


HAARMOS BANK UMT TRU9THANAG1RS 
pr«mer (JT Admxi. 5. Roman HO. Brentwood 
Essex 

0277 217916 
Hamcra Sm»r Gat 1272 ISSla *06 131 
Haore* N Anw 680 7? 3 +0*091 

HareorosjapAFE 1239 IHB *03 005 
Hamtros Seandtn BT * a66a -03 099 
990 10$J +1 1 099 

«&5 51.6 -01 155 

913 B7.0 *09 481 

591 61 9 •03 586 

583 5998 +06 255 
48.1 532 -01 096 

hCNOERSON ADMM8TRATIQH 
Premer irr Adohnatribdn 5. Rd. Hutton 

Bramwood Essex 
0277217238 
Spaas Sas nc 
Do Accra* 1 
Recovery Trust 
Caatji Growm he 
Do team 
incivrv Assets 
FntftMi TIWJ 


Hanarm Eimputi 
Hatrcm Canacxan 
Harrerru Gouty tnp 
Hamer os Ugh Inc 
Hamoros Res asms 
H em era M Saa 


1307 1393c 
184 1 197 0c 
949 1005c 
51 7 575 
817 680 
1059 1139 b 
I486 

Income A Growth he 1370 1473 


High li 


Do Accum 

Income Trust 

Income 

Smaher C06 Orv 

Pref 8 GW 

GW Truer 

Fixed imermt Tnjxi 
Groat Htaoiare 
GTOal Tech 
Gere 

hremaoenM 
OTOai Resourees 
wertdwrde (51 

Ausvakan 
Eunawan 
Euro Smelar Coe 
Japan Trust 
Japan SpeoM SOS 
: smaSnr cos 


P»d»c 


288 0 288 2 
1673 1790a 
1599 169.7 
1050 113.0* 
875 506 
*39 *85# 
5*0 572 
706 755 
10S3 1170# 
429 481 
1648 1763 
617 65 4# 
35*3 3729 
55 9 599 
2*5.1 2815 
940 101 7 

HB3 177.6# 
177 7 191.1 
71.7 77.1 


Sxigaooro A UWy. . 29.7. H9a 
North Amoncen 1*23 1523# 
Ame* 5ma*ar Cos 513 55.1 
Amer Raaj.w*y Tit 1029. 1099 
Hjgn hcorne Exempt 1189 1281 
Smater Cos Exempt 1153 1214 
Euro Exarrax 1200 1299 
Japan Exempt (5) 1603 1887# 

N Amer 885 B1.I 

GUM Tech Ex Oj B68 101.9 
Pacrhe Exempt (5) 1513 1893 


♦14 104 
+21 1.04 
*1 9 304 
+09 148 
+1 1 148 
♦3.0 37D 
*13 397 
+3 0 111 
♦59 311 
♦20 SOB 
*28 490 
♦05 312 
*05 930 
*01 933 
♦0.1 929 
+01 001 
♦1.1 001 
♦02 2.13 
+0 2 0.09 
♦04 211 

319 

1.54 
*2.1 098 
-02 03« 
+32 001 
♦17 OOI 
•10 070 
*04 266 
+34 038 
*08 aoi 
♦13 0.S4 
♦19 505 
♦Q* 178 
-13 1 IB 
♦14 053 
♦1 I 10S 
♦03 001 
♦29 £99 


HRL SAMUIL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
NLA Tower. Adascomoe Road. Croydon 
01-888 4355 01-628 8011 
Treat lints 


Brash 1 


Tnot Urxts 

Doan Trust (Am 
European Trust 
Far East Truer 
Fmanoal Truer 
Got Fixed tm he 
Do Growth 
High Yana Trust 
income Tmst 
WemeHonoi 
Japan Tech 1st 
Natural Resources 
Securoy Trust 
Smalm Coe 
Special 5ns 


5080 5405 
9SJ 1013a 
1826 1843 
1343 1429# 
1205 1282 
3496 3709 
292 304# 
417 463 
617 657 
79.7 84 8 
1213 129 ia 
355 375# 
J00 320 
178.1 1895 
87 6 932 
890 94.7c 


♦75 335 
♦14 2 T9 
*4 0 305 
♦19 070 
-?1 1.19 
+84 277 
-0.1 9*8 
♦02 7.46 
*0 7 537 
*33 482 
♦09 223 
-0.7 034 
+03 261 
♦26 302 
+09 192 
♦15 238 


UH RH) MANAGERS 

32 Ouaon Ames Gate. London SW1H SAB 
01-222 1000 

n Bnt 8 O seas 131 7 1482 *15 1 70 

lOi he Rkxs 55 6 593 .. 680 

IB) Canal Grewth 54 1 576 .. 200 

InveslnHM Tst FnQ 685 708 *0.7 140 

RUMWCnr BENSON 
20. Fanchuroh Sl London ECS 
01-823 8000 
Amer Growth he 
DO Acoxn 
Raid in* Tsi he 
Do Accran 

Han you he 
Dc Aoaxn 
Ml Recovery he 
Do tecum 
Japan Qrowh he 
Do Accum 
Snueer Cos he 

Do Accum 

UK Ed Grown he 
Do Accran 
WortrtwsM Teen he 
Do Accum 

L> CUMT TRUST MANAGEMENT '. 
^rouMLtopma.AreLEORT. 

hcome Fund 434 2 *329# 

MMmeaonM A Gan J411 249.1 

LEGAL A GENERAL UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

5- ^i^^Raed. Brantwood Essex 


624 

660# 

♦20 

1.15 

639 

660 

♦29 


190 

217 


238 

261 

269 

♦ai 


1209 

128 7 

+0 5 

592 

2014 

2140 

*09 


1006 

1071 

*04 

201 

1059 

1120 

+04 


1007 

1060 

♦03 

090 

101 1 

1073 

♦03 

. . 

1590 

167.7 

+03 

2.16 

2060 

2199 

*04 


27.4 

29.0# 

*00 

a«> 

451 

«7i^ 

♦01 


383 

409c 

-03 

1.06 

385 

41.0C 

-04 



522 

107 


0277 
Emmy DamuMn 
Do Accum 
Do hcome 
European 
Far Eastern 
GW Trust 
ht Managed 
Natural Res 
N Amercan Trust 
UK Soeaal 9es 


2535 291.8 
411. B 4*04 
587 628# 
721 771# 

1115 1192 
789 835 
793 645 
521 557 
769 821# . 
6ZT 664# 


+42 238 
+65 236 
♦05 5.18 
♦03 136 
♦ II 091 
♦05 691 
+64 099 
*61 192 
♦68 151 
♦69 13* 


LLOYDS BANK UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Rtgwrars Dpi Owwa-ay-Se*. Wormnq. W 
Sussex 

0444 459144 , 


Do Accran 
Energy ha 
DO Accran 
Extra tncoma . 

Do Accum 
German on inc 
Do Accum 
hcome 
£» Accran 
hd Teen 

Oo Accran 

are Growth 
DO Accum 
N Amer 6 Oan 
Do Accum 
Pac*e Bean 
Do Accran 
Sneoei Coe 6 Ree 
Do Accran 
wrarewrea Qrawth 
Do Accran 
UK Growth Fund 


1754 1875 
3123 334.0 
499 M3a 
569 597# 
T489 1592 
2689 287.4 
69.4 742 
09A 742 
2573 7757 
307.5 5427 
181 8 1942 

189.7 2029 

860 919 
863 922 
1013 1060# 
109.1 1186# 
1319 1461 
136 7 1462 
1862 1991 
206* wti 

1993 217 1 

2861 2995 
462 494 


LONOON t MANCHESTER 
Wmtade Park. Exetra EX5 106 
0392 52155 

General Trust 420 450 

income Thai 360 306 

InarnMansI Trust 367 369 

American 326 349 

Japan 
Trust Of hv 


♦IS 329 
♦S3 128 
+0.4 2*3 
♦OA 2 A3 
.♦16 5A8 
♦27 640 
+10 009 
+13 609 
♦3.1 4 70 
*61 47 0 
+1.1 038 
♦10 038 
♦65 032 
*65 032 
+13 1.00 
+17 100 
♦63 613 
+06 613 
♦12 190 
♦T3 1.99 
+19 695 
*33 695 
♦67 23* 


*67 170 
+05 630 
*05 0.70 
♦68 200 


*5 0 462# +06 190 
283 303 *02 240 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 










“ ' 






1966 













Hjgn Um 

Company 

Prato Oi'ge pence 

-Vi P/E 

60 

208 

72 

31 

100 

RetCfer Drama 

72 

50 

208 


90 

54 19? 

15 

IT 

A 6 M Gp 






♦To 

at 


00 

45 








Floyd CM 

43 



.. 174 

130 

91 

Atjoeycresi 

118 


36 

31 168 
66 10.1 

220 

145 

Faro I Wexton 
Friend! Cram 

53 

ITS 

-S 

40 

70 

61 109 
44 114 

143 

45 




*91 

103 

U5 

FrexTOnke 

94 

• +2 

2? 

29 15? 





+1 



40J 

Fltaw 3mm 'A' 

U50 

• .. 

11.7 

19 159 








9* 

GebtMO 

144 


4.1 

29 20.4 

22 

10' 






ISO 

93 

Gee (Cecfl) 

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*5 

37 

39 .. 










GMptaaan 



24 

60 111 










Gttbon Lyanx 

83 

• . 

54 

84 154 

297 

204 

awT ” 







Gabs Mew 

ISO 

• .. 

61 

34 184 


IJO 




£3 

16 104 







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248 7 *40 
2WJ 2464 
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ten A Fixed tm 60 8 638# *01916 

DpA4oim 936 993 +02 9.16 

Gold hcome 357 382# +08 260 

DO Accum 381 49)8# +09 269 

Hon Income Inc 38*3 3255 +17 559 

Do Accum 824 3 8810 *46 559 

hill Growm he 7385 7832# +84 168 

Do Accran £1199 USO *0<3 166 

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Japan £ Gen Inc 8152 ffl2 *7 ! 007 

Do Accran 87* 7 331 6 +76 007 

Japan Smetier A« 916 976 -05 007 

Mxaond 6 Gen he 5518 584-7 +14 4 23 

Do Accran £1373 1455 *003 4 23 

Recovery Fung kc 3*69 37*6# +36 35* 

Do Accran 450 ? 4862# *34 354 

Second Gen tac 6999 73138 +17 384 

Do Accran £1361 14*3 *003 184 
Smaere Coe Inc 6319 6835# *0 7 299 

Do Accum 99801077 8 +10 2 99 

Trustee Rare tac mi q 471 9 *1 1 4 51 

Do Accum £1264 1353 +003 451 

CnaraoreT me (3) mi 1092 

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Pmvuan Exempt (1) 443 6 4630 *53 

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Do accw (3) 459.8 # 839 


MM UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
II. Chuomlxra So. Loooan EC2M 4VR 
01-756 8260(8282 - 

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MLA WOT TRUST MANAGEMENT 

99-193. SanOng Rd. MaxtMone Kart MEM 1XS 

0822 674751 

MLA General 31 9 330 *00 23 1 

MLA taumaaonal 54 1 573 *02 092 

k&A Ota unx 233 2* 9a 10*4 

MLA hcome 399 *22# *00 5 33 

MLA European 30 6 3£4 -01 077 

MANUUnE MANAGEMTWT 
St Gererea Way. Suvanaga Herts 
38 356101 


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570 590 
1306 1388 
89 0 7X3# 
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289 

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MEHCAP UMT TRUST 

Uncom Hse. 252. Romtrea Rd. E7 

01-334 55*4 

Memep 1319 1395 

MERCURY FUM) MANAGERS LTD 

33. Khg wreim St EC*R BAS 
01-280 2860 
Amer Growth 
Do Accum 
Amer Income 
Da Accum 
European Growth 
Oo Accran 


General 
Oo Accra" 
GA 6 Fowl 
Da Accran 


Do Accran 
htemanonet 
Do Accran 
Jaorai 
Do Accran 
Recovery 
Do Accran 
E <untn Dot 
Ewmor Accran 


9*9 HUB 
968 1050 
512 SA4 
533 567 
1305 1369# 
1350 1*30# 
2332 JjSjD 
3790 4031 
88 2 89 0 
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3070 3274 
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190 7 20 29 
203 5 2165 
226? 2317S 
351.1 1619# 


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♦2.8 242 
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MIDLAND BANK GROUP UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Couiwood Hse. sew St Head SnehewSi 3RD 
0742 7899*3 

Cam income 73.B 797# 

Do Accran 1000 1072# 

Commodity 8 Gan 1056 ii2 
Do Accran 1488 ISA: 

Extra High he 57 5 61 3# 

Oo Accum 67| 710# 

G4i A Fixed he . s*7 57l 

De Accran 89* 5X3 


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Euro Gin Inc 
Do Accum 
Smader Cos tac 
Do Accun 


MURRAY JOHNSTONE IR*T TRUST 

MANAGEMENT 

163. Hope Sum Glasgow G3 2 uh 
(M l 221 9253 

Amencrai 1162 1240# 

EuraP"*" 22J 

Soreer Cos 209 1 2232 


+1.1 3 12 
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NATIONAL HtaVDEHT INVESTMENT 
MANAGEHS 

*8. Gmchrach St EC3P 3HH 
01-623 4200 Ext 269 


NPI UK 
Do Accran 


Do Accum 
Far East Roc 
American Acc 
European acc 
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1939 205* 
311 7 331.7 
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+35 C.7D 
+07 010 
♦00 100 
+01 000 

*01 1.40 


OaPGMiEMKR TRUST MANAGEMENT 

86 Cannon 5" eel Lrareen EC*n sal 
dNknge 01-236 3886/H7787670 
inwaMne! Growtti 1403 '50 1# 
Income 8 Growffr 569 830 
VJOrtOMK Rec 
Amencrai Growm 
Japan Growth 

European Orowth 

UK Growth 
Pas*: Grown 
t+gn moome 
Pr*n«i income 
Do Accum 

FfiARLi TRUST 


610 

884 

528 

532 

328 

UO 


BSD 

3*7 

659 

71 ta 

560 

569 

131 

56* 


959 1021 


156 
000 
*03 000 
+03 007 
*0 9 1 *6 
•0.4 1-26 
-01 707 
♦03 7 14 
•OS 21* 


332 high Hoi DOT" WC1V 7E0 
JSBWt 


01-405 

Growm Fund he 

Do Accum 
Income Fund 
M EGuay he 
Do Arcum 

linn Tnrtf he 

Do Accum 


88 5 94 1 
1328 14<3 
1166 12*0 
i30i tsa* 
130» *36* 
I2J4 <Ji 3 
2137 227.3 


♦1 0 2 15 

• 1 4 2 13 

♦ 17 Sis 
♦10 130 

• 10 1J0 

♦ 19 293 

+J3 293 


PERPETUAL WIT TRUST 
40 nan Srro*. Hertay 0" Thames 
0*9) 576868 


bih Growtn 
income 

Hwrehmda Rac 

Amur Growth 

M Emero Cos 
Fra Eaetfirwm 
European Cm 


258 9 388 6 
l|47 1978 
1469 1572 
883 730 
78 * 842 
■7S? B08 
59 6 84 0 


+30 0 76 
•29 4.45 
+1.7 133 
♦08 0.73 
♦06 0 59 
-00 009 
+24 1*4 


mounc unit trusts 
27? Psmmmc London ECZ 
0i-?*7 75x4/7 
kvemaerarai 
Hoh hcom e 
Grinv 0 Gxi 

Far Eastern 
North Amercan 
5 dkui Sta 
Technology 
Extra hcome 

PRUDENTIAL UNIT TRUST MANAOWS 
M-69. aord ml Mom Essex. 1G1 20L 
1 3377 


1139 

12? i 

♦1 5 

093 

593 

-63 8* 

+06 

441 

980 

103 3c 


341 

179.7 

192 7 

+2 9 

000 

1278 

1374 

• 1.7 

1 SO 

Urn 

732e 

+1 0 

105 

1091 

1174 

♦0* 

OiO 

850 


*0J 

4.78 


01-478 
HcXbom Eoray 
European 
Homom Comm 
Hoitxjrn Hy 


me 


N 

Hoteom Spec 3ns 
HoAMrn UK Grexmn 
HoAXX" GA Trust 


395* 4095 
1002 1060 
821 56 4* 

a*9 ego 

967 105 0# 
990 1006 
74 0 78 7 
62* 663# 
783 832# 
1886 19L7 


*63 334 

+04 056 

+01 064 

+03 a ■«> 

♦ID 082 
+1 1 005 
♦ 12 087 
+aa 2.14 
+ 1 * 2J5 
+0.9 247 


OUH.TER MANAGEMENT COMPANY 
31-45 GrkSMm SL London EC2V 7LH 
01-M0 4177 

Ouedram General 4188 445 6 294 

Ouadrenl income 2286 +400# 6*8 

Quadrant tad Fa 3810 401 6 UO 

Quadrant Recovery 2505 2660 292 


KM ROTHSCHU ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Si Swrhwa Lane. London EC*P *0U 
01-280 5*66 


NC America he 
Do Accum 
NC Energy Res 
NC hc ome 
NC Japan 
NC Smater Cos 


278 5 2962# 
302.7 3220# 
1323 1*0.7 
850 91 J 
192.6 20x8 
107.1 1409 


NC Smar Europ Co s I86 0 1979 
NC E-ranpI Gtl * £1300 1359 
N-; aitkv Prep Sii 87 1018 
NC Property 1560 1660 


♦00 104 
-ma 10a 
-09 277 
♦ 1.4 389 
♦19 091 
♦OJ 1.93 
♦00 033 
646 


ROWAN UNfT TRUST 

33 Itrog W*am Strem. London BC*R 9AS 
01-618 1678 


American Ml 
Sacrarees I?1 
HW" Y>eM |Si 
Moran i3 i 
Fix ad taterast 
Mtjfi irearesi 
Far East (2) 


2160 2229 . 196 

6860 681 Oc -140 295 


1 850 1880 
3840 4025# 
1710 1710 
122.0 1230 
2400 2440 


697 
198 

♦IS 241 

+061247 

♦as 019 


ROYAL UFE FUND MANAGEMENT 
New H4A Prate. Uveroadi LfiS WS 
05T-227 4423 

Eqranr Tnusi 998 639 

tad Thor 727 770# 

0# Trust 26 6 27.9 

US Trust 32 0 34.0 

Paote Basin Tr 400 469 

20 Olion Sl London EC? 

01-900 (fill 

Etxjxy Dai 1129 1261 

Do Accun 1567 1690 

NMR hcome Trial 868 92.4# 

Do Accum 102.3 1090# 

US Growth 56* E61 

Do Accran 57 6 613 


+00 286 
-03 105 
+01 804 
*02 163 
-01 000 


♦15 106 
♦21 106 
+00 409 
+1.1 409 

S * 097 
4 097 


ROYAL LONDON IMTTRW MANAGERS 
Royai London houm. Gowrasw COi IRA 
UM5 


i 576115 
Amencan Growth 
Catxii 1 Accran 
Gat hcome 
High incoma 
hco me 8 Growth 
Japan Growth 
Sbea# 54a 


870 93.1# 
1704 18*0 
55.7 567# 
799 84.1C 
97.1. 1033# 

044-1065 
.1049 1107 


♦10 091 
♦24 224 
. 878 
*04 497 
+14 X.4D 

♦20 OK 
+3 5 1« 


SAVE A PROSPER 

28 Western Rd Romtord RU1 3LB 
69-73. Queen Sl Edmbrnh EH2 4NX 
(Ramtoroi D70B-G696B Or (Earn) 031-226 7361 
Ame- me S Growth 878 726 *01 686 

1005 1074 
461 490 
42 7 456 
1099 1175 
788 830c 
392 624 
*0 4 430 


Capital Ltatt 
Conxwdnv 
Energy mo* 
EraoDean Growth 
E»empr inc are 
Dg hd (43| 
Exphrakon- 
Fnanoxi Sera 
Oh 6 FI he 
High Renan itaae 
H^n Yolo UnrtS 
hcome Unas 
Investment Trust 
Waroreonai 
Japan Growth 
Japan Smater Cos 
MoatertuM 


S€ am Grawxi 
Scotoos 
Scotsnares 
Scotywtds 
Seraa hitei nouonoi 
Smater Cot he 
Sueoat SKuakcne 
UK Eoudy 
US Growth 
Unvote# Growth 


960 1039 
5*3 570 
1756 1678# 
1601 171? 

919 982c 
944 900 
1180 1260 
959 1020 
1281 137.0 
28 7 305 
867 948 
998 1067 
1289 135 6# 
149 0 159 3 
1*99 1569 
77* 027 
156 5 1673 
870 94 0 
1068 1906# 
700 75.4 
959 917 


♦11 208 
*06 192 
*00 403 
♦19 049 
♦10 506 
♦05 229 
*08 000 
+19 207 
♦001079 
+17 519 
*21 4*2 . 
+00 651 J 
♦00 2.70 
-07 0ig 
-i.O 
-1 1 . 

+01 600 

-10 201 
♦10 288 
+10 404 
♦18 4*5 
♦ 14 197 
+1.1 *11 
208 
295 
167 
104 


Bn Ortv Chng 7*0 


SCHRODER U*MT TRUST 

E«»»P"»e House Portsmouth 

0705 827733 

American me 
pjj 4cCum 

Aufuahan Ite 

Do Ac" li 1 " 

CurotoM" « 

Do Accum 
Grii i F«ed me 
Do Actran 
Goto Fund Inc 
Da *cCum 
income 
Do Accra" 

InF l"«*n* 

Do ACCitai 

J4D SmFr Cok Ac 

SteHFr * M*M7 
Do Accum 
Smater Cos ite 
De tecum 
SpbpJ 1 me 
Do Accum 
Tokyo Fund *e 


1 28 A 13»8 

1316 140? 
5*5 586# 
59? nj 5# 
H83 1M6 
l2t 5 1»9 
M 6 574# 
637 804# 
X9 330 
JT3 3*5 

167 7 1790# 
2 4003# 


1123 1199 
1 5*8 <655 
iA+,.4 1565 
52 8 60 4 
54.7 105 
126B 1356 
IX) 1 1*23 
100? <07 7 
1044 1116 
2299 2*5 B 
232 4 J*65 
52 6 562 
98* IDS?# 
1529 182 
7667 8200c 


Do Accra* 

USSmaRcr Cos Ac 
UK Eoviy tat 
Do Accran 

ReanrOry 

Pennons & Ounrv 563 7 6028# 

Extra income SOS CU# 

fCRNTAR ASSET MAN AOEWNT 
33-38 Graceclu cn Si London EC3V OAX 
3 577M711 


• 1 9 0 65 

♦ l5 06? 

xi 6 206 
.18 206 
-04 100 
-a* too 
♦0? 80S 
•03 

700 
200 
519 
5 IS 
0*7 
047 
000 
DM 
096 
1 18 
1 (9 
100 
IDO 
022 
037 
000 
J44 
3*4 
793 
3»9 
718 


*P 
•01 
•JO 
+4 J 
•04 
-04 
•12 
rO I 

.01 
•c: 
•02 
♦09 
• 1 0 
-14 
-15 

-01 

•20 

*30 

+319 


•at 


01-023 
uk Eauay me 
Dc acc 
E ure Tu he 
to *ce 

GwtMri GFi he 
De Ace 

Menaced Exente 


734 2*9# 

234 »9 

370 89 0# 

27 2 290# 
380 303 
26 6 30* 
1164 1330 


SCOTTISH EOWABLC 

26 Si Andtewk SO. Edefirasn 
031-556 9101 

tad hoomc Unde 147* 150.6 

Do A«um 2169 232 9 

SCOTTISH UFE INVESTMENTS 
is Si Anraewi So Eranbugn 
OOt J25 2211 

rjK Eqrary 177 3 189 7 

American 1*5.6 1556 

PacAc 1BAJ 197? 

European 2380 SS5 2 

SCOTTISH MUTUAUNUESTMENT 

MANAGERS 

109. vmeera Sl CBasgow 02 SHN 
0*1-348 8100 

1619 1720 
117 6 i960 
1*35 1527 
3018 21*5 
1110 1181 
1778 1890 


UK Eoudy 
G# 8 Food 
UK Smkr Cot Et! 
Eureoaan 
n Amai — 

Paote 


SCOTTISH UNIT TRUST 
29 Osurena So. Eonoragh 
031-226 *37! 

Pacfc 6*9 695 

Wort) Growth 363 369 

N Amercan 330 357 

taoome Fund J3 2 -iSJ# 

Europaan 409 «59 

N Amer tac 25 9 278 

UK Crowh 303 323 

tm tac 309 331 

san'ROHMcaws 

PO BOB 902. ErhnButgh B416 5BU 

031-655 6000 


'll 


tac 

Accran 


2250 2399 
2595 2760 


SENTINEL RJND8 MANAGEMENT 
3a City M. London ECiy 2aY 
01-638 6011 

Amer Tech 6 Gen 100 0 107 0 
Paote 194 6 2062 

Sec Income Fnd 1628 17*D# 

Spec# Sum 2020 210 ■ 

hd Growth 321 340# 

American Maim 703 752 

Small Cos 37.7 400 

Japan Tech 6 Grai ii3 1 t2i-0 

tntarnaMnel Income 55T 59.0# 

Exempt 5<93 555.7# 

UK General 310 338 

Euro Growtn 344 360 

Euro income 429 455c 


526 
538 
♦04 too 
*04 tOO 
•03 1 OO 
+0.3 100 
ADD 


♦09 333 
♦10 303 


+2 0 18S 
.10 132 
♦10 005 
•04 057 


♦20 2 65 
+08 918 
+0.9 2 17 
+05 097 
♦10 142 
♦10 057 


•08 03? 
-as ia. 
*01 016 
*04 496 
*00 088 
-05 301 
+04 «61 
+03 509 


l.t 01* 

IB 014 


004 
000 
4 15 
149 
018 
031 
187 
000 
504 
225 
191 




mura l i rri n TY-n 

1. London wire Brega. London EC2M 5PT 

1*7 


070 


♦05 335 
♦06 336 


*34 00J 
•35 002 
*2* 202 
-a? 100 

-07 108 
*40 *34 
+61 404 
-0.4 011 
-05 091 
♦45 021 
+45 021 


01-568 364* Eh 
Spaa# Sas 15) *90 52.7 


STANDARD UFE 

0 Oeagv Sc EanOunh BIO 2XZ 
031 22T2S52 

hcome Unde 24 4 262 

Da Accum Unmt 27 1 260 


STEWART. IVORY UNIT TRUST 
MANAtGERS 

031-226 3271 

Ameneen Fund 22*5 2361 

Do Accum 252.1 2665 

DdWMrawet 1575 1679 

Aumkan Fund 977 1&0 

Do Accran 993 1057 

Bmsi Fund G03£i 

DO Accum 8120 S65 0 

European Fund 3026 3220 

DO Accum 3166 3390 

Japan Fund 3420 36*9 

Do Accun 3*3 7 3061 

SahU PPP 1684 1794 

SUN ALLIANCE 

Srai Atainca Hie. Hoatoim. Susaex 
0403 56293 

Eoudy Trun Acc 3789 4009 *55 275 

N Am Trust Acc . 580 81 7 *07 1 18 

Far East Trust 4oc 869 91 4 +11 0:00 

MttrkkxMa Bond- 499 -530 -03 893 

TS8 UNIT TRUSTS LTD 
Keans House. Annoer. Hares. SP10 IPG 
0264 56789 Derange 026* 8343273/4 
Ameneen tac 
Do Accran 
Extra hcome he 
DO Accun 
Goner# (tad he 
Do Accum 
G* 3 Fwed tac 
Oo Acorai 
hcome 
Aoeum 
Paote tac 
Do Accran 
tad he 
Do Aoeum 

Selected Oooe tac 
Do Accran 
Nature Res 
Do Accran' 



TARGETTKUST MANAGERS 

It Hnrae. GnthouM Rd. Ayleftray Bucks 
59*1 


Taroet 1 

0298 55 


Amir Eagle 700 766 

Aranntan 169 170 

Commodty 666 737 

Energy 29.7 3i.7g 

EiMy 1209 1298 

European Spec Sa 1040 1107 


♦09 (LOO 
-01 aio 
+07 102 
*01 20 * 
+Ofl 055 
-09 106 


ftd Offer cmg vig 


115J 

121 it 

•0-1 6C3 

ft - ? 

2ft J 

* 2 ib 

1057 

nice 

■Cl ‘S 

*>J 

I'd ! 

-35 SV 

103 3 

no 1 

*07 

794 

«f 

-i 7. met 

103* 

i«e# 

‘.’(I 310 

*• • 

+4 2 

•02 13! 

H{ 

09 Dc 

•Ol 107 

1 149 

122 VC 

- 1 OT 

IPS 

158# 

1 jOI 

»7 

7J,> 

•01 150 

925 

mm- 

*s« oji 

*4 1 

4* 0 . 

•05 0:8 

568 

6C># 

•0 I 388 

1395 

nfi'J# 

•li I'd 

ft? 

#r 

-0 ' 2 n 

147 1 

ft.’ 4 • 

•is ?n 


EMM mur'd 
FteNSi 
CM hcome 
Go# kkpnw 
to tear" 
fcxrome 
Jatw> 

Malay 3 Sragitw 
-PKK «e 
Do Bamwi# 

Fret snare Fd 
uk Caoui 
5NW5D 
Tacnrwgv 
wtxw rnnmre 
WertfXta CapdN 
Eoudy E< 431 
to Ream iJ) 

THORNTON UMT MANAG ERS LTD 
Pam House 16 Fmtbun C-i-J. Ld*!8" £«« 
-’OJ 


01438 4»t 
Ft» fast I Can 
Japan A 0«n 

Ntn Omar A On 

Per** Teen 

STag-i 


Mb 

96 i 

5*5 

579 

490 

VI 

521 

334 

5>? 

S' J 

431 

456 


-01 08* 
' . 088 
•a? 095 
• ta oyi 

•Ii* 083 

•09 316 


31 UWT TRUST MANAGERS 

; 51 Mara >h London Lk-jA 8flP . 

01 9J84336 

SmrearCos 6< > 850 *02 1 (0 

TOUCHE REMNANT 

Ufrm)4 HOUS6 2 PwMM Dock UKOV EC417- 
3AT 

01-248 1250 
Ainanevi Growth 

Gan## Orowth 

Greore racn 
hcome Growm 
meoma Monmy 
japan Growth 
Mm E«i4y K 
to Accum 
Oaaas Growm 
Smater Coe 
Saco# Own 

TYNDAU MANAGERS . 

«8 Canyrw Rd. Brar# 

0272 ;3»4I 
Australian 

to acc 
C epn* 

Do Actum 
Exempr 
Do Accum 
Far Eastam 
Do Aeeum 
Fh 6 Proa 
Do Accran 
G4i Cap Ml 
DO Accum 
041 hcome 
Do Accum 
Hah vnm 
D o Accra" 


410 

*3 T 

■9« 

CM 

51 1 

54 4# 

•38 

iff, 

*23 

*32 

•04 

oio- 

MJ 

*22# 

#1 V 


*7 r 

31 I# 

* 02 

541- 

496 

5i8 

*0i 

01? 

239 

255 

•04 

2K 

739 


.14 

736 

*63 

32 J 

•CJ 

AH 

W* 


*05 

;o+ 

no 

ft M 


187 


3<6 

M2 . 

-06 

lit) 

337 

b?* 

-or 

• re 

3022 

9216# 

• S? 

341 

Ml 6 

578 8# 

•92 

341 

2638 

3022# 

♦ 1 4 

583 

6327 

696 *• 

•3 2 

383 

1651 

ift 6 

-03 

018 

1751 

1903 

-04 

018 

31 S 

5*8# 

-OS 

J4S 

812 

85 5# 

.10 

3*3 

12*7 

1280 

■03 

639 

I-U0 

>493 

-03 

539 

1092 

1 12 * 

-0 I 

95'. 

9-7 » 

182 7 

-02 

951 

527 

56> 

+05 


1153 

1228 

• l i 


239? 

2441 

*25 

i?a 

?»1 

TM 1 

• 7 • 

520 

iMO 

165 1 

•23 

271 


I8J3 

195 3 

• 15 

svt M 

2669 

204 ora 

-.73 

280 ' 

201 l 

2i* 0# 

*2 S 

5 27 ' 


2i8’ 

-.'6 

527 i 

4(1 7 

*.i4a 

103 

33* a 

41 0 

« r 

•05 

IR* 

131 ? 

140? 

•22 

413 , 

200 6 

213 7 

• 3 J 

«n * 

600 

639 

-04 

i.T * 


63 9 

•0 4 



61 Fi# 

• ff.'W 

J37 > 

£8002 

620’ 

-029 

2.17 a 


1196# 


iMi 

1129 

HS6 


i«3 h 

501 

534 

-0 5 

036^- 

501 

53* 

-0> 

053 


Do Accra" 

Fdl Eamingt 

UK PROVIDENT UT MANAGERS 
UK House. Castte Si. Sateeray SPi 3SH 
0723 3362*2 

UK Eoudy 1095 1161# -2 t 

PaoteBMxt 1617 1718# >29 

li Amer H49 1220# .+09 

VANGUARD TRUST __ 

65 Hottom Vtaoua EC1A 2El» 

Ganrrai Ererumn 01-236 3053 CS.-., • L-na 01 
236 2488 
Growth me 
to Accran 
(Ml YlOU 

Do Accra" 

Soaoa) Srts 
Do Accran 
Trustee 
Do Accra" 
amer & Gen 
Da Aeeum 
Mister Ponfote 
Do Accran 
Atxng Rdh Asn 1 51 
Do Accran 
Fra East 6 Gen he 
to Accum 


WAROUEY IRRT TRUET MANAGERS 
Warmer House. 7 Oreonshm 5a Lemso" I 
01-93 1532 
American Trust 
Fra East C Gen 
tail Grewth 
Income Trust 
japan Orowth 
5meB Compares 
Teomoio® 

AustraU 
UK Trust 
EiKOonan Grew# 

Hong Kong 

WAVBRJ8Y ASSET MANAGEMENT 
13 Chariode 5a EflWmrgn 
031-225 1551 

Austranun Gore 102 19* 

Pacmc Beam 135 <44 

Cretan BN GO 56 7 60 G 

Guum Mae Fnd B102S 106* 


WWTTWGOALE UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
2 Honey LerE£2 BBT 
01-606 9085(8 

Sm DM 0*i Fund 676 68 7 000 

US Govt Bond Fd (508 511 *01 

WMOSOR TRUST MANAGERS LTD 

Windsor House. 83 Kmgsway London WC2B. 
6S0 

01-405 8331 

Com 6 Gouty 471 M2 +0? 790 

income 519. SS3# *08 530 

Grown 493 525 -05 231 


MO 

889 

‘06 1 70"! 

1061 

1129# 

• 1 1 090 • 

71 6 

76? 

♦OJ OM ■ 

822 

(8* 

+0 3 itD* 

1284 

1361 

.15 020 > 

107 1 

ns? 

•03 ?00 a 

32 7 

35 1 

•0 J 020 ■ 

358 

38 3 

-0* 200 . 

125 6 

133 9 

-1 B 57D * 

538 

M4# 

-03 CM * 

236 

252 

■04 1 40 * 
* 


-09 

• 0 -* 


Oii « 
020 . 
017 

720 , 


The prices m this 
section refer to- 
Tnfesday’s trading 


0 Ex dMdand. c Cum tondsnd- k Cum 
stock spttt. a Ex stock Spirt, m Cum all 
[any two or more o( stoore). a Ex all (any 
two or more ot above). Dealing or 
valuation days; (1) Rtendoy. (21 Tuesday 
(3] Wednesday. (6) Thursday (5) Friday. 
(20) 25* of month. (21) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday of 


month. (23) 20th of month. (24) 3ra‘ 
Tuesday ot month. (2S) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday of month. (28) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st Wednesdarof month. (2S) 
Lrest Thuniday Of month. (29) 3(d working, 
day ^ month. (30)i8Vi of month. (31) 1st 
working day Of mqntn. (32) 20th of month. 
(33) 1st day of February. May, August 
November. (3*1 Last working day ol 
month. (35) 15m al monm. (36) 14tn of 
month. (37) 21st of month. (38) 3rd 
Wednesocy of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesday ot month. (40) Valued 
monthly. (*1) Last Hwirsday of Stock 
Exchange accourrt. (42) last day of* 
month. (43) 2nd and 4th Wednesday of' 
month. (44) Quartarty. (45) Eth of month. . 
(46) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1996 

High Low Company 


Grow 
ckv YU 

Ch'ge penee s p/e 


117 94 
780 663 

149 125 

358 288 
120 94 

120 96 

25* 159 

82'? S3 
53 31 

4*8 354 

102 BO 

228 139 

167 10B 
1*3 110 
384 314 
190 13* 
738 420 
3® 178 
117 99 

150 119 
374 284 
158 138 

93'? 78 
190 119 
112 85 

213 S43 

10 *'j 

348 287 
120 65 

BBS 480 
193 145 
346 294 
128 84V 

MO 109 
718 *80 
161 123 

li! 


Amer Tree 
Ang Amer Sec 


Bray 

Br AN# 

Hr Erasure Sec 
Br tnv 



109 

788 

130 

338 

98 

116 

348 

55'i 

36*? 

418 

92 

227 

153 

132 

322 

179 

738 

197 

102 

140 

944 

159 

88 

145 

112 

013 

9-> 

312 

80 



^ 2i.t 
319 40 309 
44 04 369 
69 29 530 

OS 0.9 75.6 
.39b 34 409 
Ub 09 .. 
10 54 31 0 
0.7 1 9 500 

21.7 90 269 
30 3.6 426 

00 00 .. 
109 6* 180 

14 B 40 3T> 
10 09 .. 

14e 00 .. 
60b 4.1 35.1 

00 OS 767 

40 04 410 

94 19 57.6 

50 as 44.1 
20 20 530 
20 1.4 80.6 

29 20969 

01 10 820 

0.1 10 . . 

140 40 299 
9.7 109 67 


520 

+7 

62 

10 862 


ffl 

164 

• .. 

74 

40 310 



309 

• *l 

129 

*2 33.7 


* 

126 

+1 

1.4 

1.1 .. 




•+: 

39 

27 510 


147 




00 .. 



156 


61 

39 409 






■ ¥4 

741 


MS 

•+2 

39 

1 ' 1 iiT 

328 

287 

127 

s .. 

29 

29 620 


91 

. „ 

2.1 

23 610 



BO 




m li 

Fil 





El 

Ed 


+1 

42 

+2 


29 10 850 
179b 6 1 259 

04 20S39 
52 4? 290 
40b 29 *33 

30 10 98.7 

61 20S34 


1908 

H>gn Low Company 


G/otf. 

Ckv YU 

Prtca OFgt petipe % P/E 


Graaomar - 
Grereiem Hooka 


I CPI. 


tav c# 
bory A Sane 


350 2*4 

320 215 

194 158 

305 283 

000 5*0 

284 244 

185 132 

SOL- 49 
101 BO 
132 110 

285 237 
233 188 

70 56 

71 00'. 

138 102 
206 161 
159 128 
187 137 
314 215 
380 318 
*40 380 

a «8 
189 150 
64 SO'? 

2BS HH 
829 278 NUi AttSnUc Sec 

KL S ? >A “* i 

372 279 mm Amer 
OuMch 


Ktotavrort Cnener 
Wenreort O 'kaea 
Ktotavrort Smater 
Lew Debenture 
Lon Unbent Sec 
Lon Tnret 
Ntondtente 


310 

177 

897 


192 

«)'x 


04 07 .. 

69 20339 
64 0630.1 
1S4 50Z79 

60 10 .. 
69 20724 
99 60 161 
0-1 00 .. 
39 07 409 


Mrarajr tacoroe 
Usrey Mi 
Murrey Bare! 
Meray venture 
New carat 
ktow Derton 0* 

•ErScJ? 83 


Dowmte 


RkSTMero 




113 86 S 

420 390 Scat Mere -A- 
526 402 Scot Urge 
3l> 2*6 Scot Net - 
670- 570 Second Aina 
1 M V SMflerCpi 


57 
62 
, 113 
206 
1S1 
158 
31* 
377 
*20 
57 
185 
64 
265 

324 
27 

372 

196 

77 

33 ■ 
96 
383 
ISO 
2*1 
288 
Ml 

325 
£14'? 
138 
382 
302 


•+f 
*1 
*1 
+1 
• ■+2 
• +S 
+3 
♦2 
+1 


♦2 

♦1 


00 

00 

1.1 

& 

7.7n 

7.16 

09 
100b 
210 
00 
67 
49 
1.1 
49 
a7 

if 

10 


09 270 
69 146 

10 423 
64 290 
10 77.7 
61 28 0 
48 33? 
10 .. 

2.7 610 
61 29.1 

1.8 820 
01 360 
79 161 
04 .. 
10 900 
20 314 
61 960 
20 604 
10 929 


06 14M7 
17.1 44 38.0 

|9b 64 294 

124 5.1 270 


7.1 30 499 


*2 


66b 

69 

100b 

20 

32-1 

101 

79 

TM n 

1 a 


64 469 
20 924 
34 424 
20 661 
9.1 169 
04 561 
20 530 
30 339 
20G6G 


1986 

Hgn Low Company 


si 


tSlroiMl CaaaM 

42 


102 

81 

■m Aj orUx 

87 


122 

95 

TH Cbv 01 Lon DM107 


t» 

13b 

TR tatf 6 Gan 

188 

+3 

113 

100'i 

1 TR Naval Re* 

110 


101 

as 


95 


180 

ire 

TR Pacific Basin 

130 

+2 

186 

140 


1E0 


119 

90'i 

i TR Taw 



174 

139 

YR Trumsae 

159 

• ♦2 

I0tt 

133 


160 

• *1 

305 

23/ 

Tboromortiw 

275 


310 

300 

ThftJg fioarsd Gap 3S0 


20/ 

IS/'i 


1B6 


143 

119 

TVXhkm 

IX 


9* 

274 

79 

217 

TnptoieB me 

80 

m 

♦2 

62 

33 


X 



a 

Wearoaol 

S3 


IDS 

80'J 

Wttan 

97 


339 

286 

Yeoman 

340 

• -2 


Grosi 

Ov YU 

Pnce to go pence *» P(E 


06 14 
33 .38366 
63b 50 260 
67 29*21 
69 64236 
20 2? <80 
14 00. 

57 30 399 
29 20 49.1 
60 38 3*0 

Bib 5* 262 
M.9b 40 329 

55 28*96 
4 0 30 367 

168 178 61 
93 04 540 

29b 61 177 
90 40 361 
49 47551 
161D 44 351 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47'. 3*' 
71 31 

49 21 

16* 116 
22' 13'. 
20'- 12'. 
156 131 
140 90 

2*7 187 
106 96 
750 3ft 
94 77 

133 75 
900 *90 
219 153 
440 320 
290 190 
38? 252 
120 7G 
27 It 
206 152 


£19'. 

141 

128 


.American Express £42'+ 
Argyto 42 

Bmouad 30 

Bmanna Anew 137 

Qa*v Mai £18'. 

Do A 
Etocira 

ISo™" „ 

Exploration 100 

730 
83 

* M) 123 

Attorn 830 
161 
345 

~ - - 345 

Marcranre House 254 

Paote bw Tet 120 

Do Warrant! 26 

Smell New Coral 163 



MAG 


14 

60 

» 700 

V 700 

69 

♦5 43 

-a eo 

33 

+10 93 

64 

to 25 
- ITS 

♦3 129b 

♦10 229 
♦5 81 

> 200 

05 . 


33 205 
81 1 

4.4 160 

06 ua 

38 131.. 
*+ 326, 

34 1*0 
26 14 7 
33 131 
t-3 34 0 

7 7 89 . 
20 340 
23 I8a. 
80 65 
66 9» 

2 5 296 
79 *7 
04 


-2 100 61 60 


LONDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 

GW Joynaon and Co report 
SUGAR (From C. Czamikow) 


fob 

Oct™ 






«*y 



'Aug 


T39.E-39.4 

147.0-46.0 

157^57^ 

1B1M1.4 

166.M4J) 


Vot 

COCOA 

firai 

3445 


„. 1429-28 

Mar 

145M7 

May 

Jut .. 

1488-87 

_ 1505-04 







COFFEE 

Cap 

1850-845 

Nov 

s mm 


ISipl 

M»y 




Sto-- 

1970-920 


■ 3462 


vat 

SOYABEAN 

Sep 130^-26.0 

0(9 127-5-25J 

Doc 12&S-25D 


Fob 

Apr. 


129 0-27 1) 
1305-285 


Mill H 


Jun 1295®J 

1285^^0 

gasoil 

Sod 12S. 00-2850 

Oct 13300-33 00 

Now 13850-3850 

Dee 140.00-38.00 

Jan 140-00-39.00 


) 14iOM7.00 

r 14000-3450 

r 138.00-30.00 

y 138.00^30.00 

: 376S 


LONDON METAL EXCHAWK 
UnefflcMptfcts 
Otffctel Turnover figures - 
Price in £ per mttftetonni 
Sfiw in pane* per trey ounce 

RudoH Wolf A Co. Ltd. report 

COPPER GRADEA 

Cash ... 880.00-8S1.00 

Three Months . 099.00^950 

Vtf 2250 

Tone Barely Steady 

STANDARD CATHODES 
Cast! K 1.00-86350 

Three Months. 880 oossaoo 

VO) ™..200 


LEAD 


Cash 

265.00-266.00 

Thris* Month*.. 2fi5.OCL2SS0a 

vol _ 

tz*gs.s?Wm£ lit* 

Tone 

. Staadv 

ZINC STAIOJARO 

Cash 

50a00-510fi0 

Vo* . . 



_... __ Me 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 


J v*. -*,' '1 

■ Lru ?Tv-:i"i 


mMHM 

taww ■ J 

Tone 

. asadier 

SILVER LARGE 


396X0-357.00 



rpwmmmm 



Tone 


,.kte 


SEVER SMALL 

Cash 35600-35700 


COMMODITIES 


Three Months . 36SJXW665fl 

Vol Nil 

Tone Idta 

Cash 75350-75450 

Three Months. 76350-76350 

Vtf 700 

Tone — 


MODEL 

cash L — 2506-2510 ' 

Three Montis 2525-2526 

VO) 420 

Tone 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COMMISSION 

Average fatatock prices at 

representative mart eta on 
August 13 

CT Cattle. 95.47p per kg hr 
(-0.10) 

. CTSheep 16157pperkg end 
ew(+S5ft 

CT Pigs. 7751 p per kg Iw 


England end Wale*: 
Catenas, down H2%.0ve. 



Scodamh 

Cate no*, down 05 %, am. 
s&4ip(+a:67) 

> nos. uo 201.6 %,*vp_ 
. 152.13d (* U3) 
nosi n]a %. RM. . 

' n/a 


LOWXNl MEAT FUTURES 

exchange 

Pig Contract 

P-perUto 

Month Open Close 
unq. 9850 
una- 10350 
unq. 104.00 
unq. 9850 
unq. 99 60 
unq. 9950 

VofcQ 

Bg Meet vpEO 


SS 

Now 

FAD 

Apr 

Jun 


LONDON HEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Live CetBe Contract 
p. per kilo 


Month 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Feb 

Apr 

Jun 


Close 

unq. 9050 
unq. 9650 
unq. 9750 
unq. unq, 
unq. 99.00 
unq. 99,00 
unq- 99.00 


VotO 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 

Epar tonne 


Month 

sop 

NOV 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

Wheat 

Ctoee 

1D4.S5 

106.70 

109.70 
11240 
115.00 

dose 

102.25 

104.80 

107.55 

1Oi0O 

111J0 

Volume; 

Wheat-, 


261 

.Barley _ 

— — — — 

. — 202 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 

£ per tonne 


Month 

New 

Fab 

X 

Nov 


Open Ctase 
117.00 117.50 
13050 13000 
19000 l87-« 
206 00 199.00 
B5.10 9050 
Vqfc 1774 


BIFPSC 

CLNJ. Freight Futures Ltd 
report S 10 per tadei point 
tre^tindeR 


High/Low 

721.0- 709.0 

745.0- 7345 
787 0-775.0 
7300-7285 
8i 00-8100 


Oct 68 
Jan 87 
Apr 87 
Jut 87 
Oct 87 
Jan 88 
Apr 88 
Jul88 


VoL 385 lots 
Open tntwsst 2039 


Close 

716.0 
•7450 
7855 

730.0 
" 805.0 

8025- 

9450- 

8025 


/ 


TANKER REPORT 


High /Low 0039 

i ... 13075 

1190-0 • 

twig 

11460 

11025 

mso- 


Aug 86 
Sep 85 
Oct 88 
D« 86 

Mar 07 
Jun 87 

va.oiots 

Open interest 4Q 

Spot market comm e ntary- 
Tanner mdex; . 

1 1905 to 300 on 12/6/88 . 
Ory cargo Max: 

5085 up6.0 on 12/8/® ' 
















STOCK EXCHANGE, PRICES 


. From vour portfolio card check \our 
eight shair price movements. Add them 
op io bvc.)Ou yonr overall total. Cheek 
(bis . against' the ■ daily dividend figure 
putriistKd cm this page. If H matches vou 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daH> prize money stated. If you are a 
winner follow (he claim procedure on the 
tack of iour card- Vou must afcvavs have 
ypur card available when claiming. 


Selective support 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began August 1 1. Dealings end August 29. §Coniango day September 1. Settlement day September S, 

§Forward bargains are permitted 'on , two previous business days. 


o 1 HHr« V*wrr> I jaulca 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Oaims required for 
+36 points 

Claimants should line 0254-53272 




Gam or 

So. Camay. 

Gnmo 

ins 



First Nil Finance BanksJJwnmiii 


Aksum 


IE 3 SE^®I 



Please be sore to take acomat 
of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 



BRITISH FUNDS 



.. — r -- r < 


11 2 *. 
■i. fr> 
fl. 2 S 
•L 2 VV 

1988 

1990 

1998 

2001 

122 *. 
to? -■• 

1104 .*-', 

104 

21 

22 

24 

30 

1 

■ 1 L 2 '% 

2003 

103 

00 

3 

IL !*fc 

2 RK 

105 * -V 

20 

3 

ILa'.te 

2009 

10 i > 1 . ' 


3 


2011 

107 ^to-'r 

00 

3 

02 VS 

200 

89 . 

30 

3 

IL?' S 

an g 

9 >- 

3.1 

J 

U s 

2016 A 

97 V 

26 

3 

lU'iS 

2020 

sy. 

34 

3 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


«0 1 93 
85 « 

W« 1 85 

1?V 6 V 

an m 

i . 6 

!M 230 
*« 3 M 
MO C 9 
«■ 32 

no no 
■da 

50' 35 
32 - Zf- 
* 2 - 33 ', 
00 <6 
112 80' 
n^. 

31 ? 140 
370 its 
10? «S 
ai i« 
*» am 

74 j* 
C S 0 318 

m 

BfA 585 
*51 293 
434 .310 
'53 1 » 
W» 41 ’ 
31> 191 
MJ 4?6 
IK >*0 . 


**« tesh 
AmMrtw (Menryl 

rui Mm. z 

BMunnci 
g«* 01 Nva 
Bam Lawn tom 
Bam Laum ut 
B** Of ScoOdns 
ftsmoy*: 
Bendniart 
Bffrm SVptey 
Cdlre Man 
Cam 

emsa Uamman 

oocwp 

Con Bar* sva*, 
QunnasBani- 
w«w Bam 
Nfl Ffw« 
imrraro no 
Owness Peo 
Hamms." 

Ha Omul. 

Hh snsnore 
jgMgi ifSxwd) 
« 9 *-a»« 3 (n 
wmmwH Benton 
Uowv 

Mwaey Ind 
Oofi’i A 
Mdflnd 

■U 1 Aid) Bk 
Wbu 
.CTO nwn 


341 

Bi *3 

195 . *5 
IBk 

?i 5 »2 


C 27 \ • * V 
OtL. 

69 

£ 1 M', ♦ 
OB 9 

177 •♦6 

307 -5 

90 *6 

•218 *0 

-W 

470 .to 

14 ? ' 

raa 

4i» a +s 
945 1 *5 

135 -I 
572 a-7 

315 *4 

504 .*-3 

rua 


90 17 ES 
• 420 

15.0 7.2 


18-0 0 7 H 2 
MO 50 J 7 
381 60 67 


448 200 P na m aw ' 318 +1 iu 40111 

» M flMaus 73 *3 08 08 167 

3 1 ® awuewtfojua 129 • . 7 i as iis 

#*} 2 «n Rsp Be* Of Scat 306 . M 0 *7 Lb 

_S 5 • ScNdai £*'; t'. tsa an oj 

E£ fS p***- ris • -a 5 o.od fo m 

tea 60 iwa 848 to-iO.HJ 84050 

73 . 43 ■ Vrab Faroe* . £72 + 2 V 

320 220 Wlntmt 285 a-S 77 2? 130 


® - *'• ga 3 j0 jzs 

779 • -8 5O0t> 70 89 

848 a -10 . 523 BJ 65J 

£ 7 ? * 3 '. 

285 a-S 77 27 118 


BREWERIES 


M AkepiyCHS 




3®w 


wnmai 

DO -B 

wa m wB WH fc D 
Yorag 'A' . 


£ :ii 
& • ; 


218 a -5 
331 *10 


TS 7 -s 

189 a*a 

3» *S 

263 -10 


116 43 14JI 
217 28 tU 
12 18 3U 

4 6 38 160 
20.00 40 lfLB 
78 92 15.1 
154 17 188 
tl A 23 173 

73 43 124 
80 17 125 

103 31128 
258 43 132 

28 19 152 
6.8 44 &9 

6.8 28 . 
32 29168 
21 38 198 

10O S3 115 

104 43 145 

HI 42 121 
11J 43 119 

1C 6 49 277 

127 24 185 

1(14 32 224 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


HO 

87 


2B5 

m 

4*0 

040 

323 

186 

191 

133V 

MO 

07 

M 

70 

SIB 

3<2 

348 

236V 

160 

M0 

*33 

326 

101 

75- 

IK 

131 

95! 

m 

280 

248 

W 

sa 

20* 

172 

12 . 

or 

U* 

-41 

281 

157 

216 

m 


25 
25 

47 

54 90 214 

53 7.1 M A 

28 21 336 

79 21 111 
84 4j 125 

.. 845 
24 35 121 

121 43 143 

>94 12 165 

7.1 39 KL7 

290a 59 144 
109 24 115 
inn 25115 
52 48 39 

55 75 93 

102 25 144 

74 43 19l1 
115 40 174 

54 43215 

75 39 1U 

0,1 Q.1 . . 

173 «3 135 
82 .3L5 123 
14 42 .. 
23 73 UJ 
229 59113 
157 19 173 
23 53132 
75 13129 
43 45 19 
114 52 79 
ZOO 11-145 
165 39 113 
123 4.4 «9 
11 62 182 
33 24 215 
096 85118 

13.4 sj) no 

123 37147 
7.8 47 119 

122 28.183 
■19. 20 9A 
rflO CO 229 
114 39-114 

124 33-158 

14 17 23 

88. 15115 
59 21 288 
07 OS 171. 
23' 12129 
54 25 20.1 



250 13 ! grebe (Cremcri £39 


215 

136 44 

140 

?0i a +3 

£19 

345 

33 *1 


246 215 AIMM«rtn 
1 B 4 126 Mw Huna 
176 '< 71'. Anotagtaa 
210 110 Straw Taco 
36 18 Crenefe 

263 194 Can***. 

43 16 Saw w 

29'. 17 EouayTcen 
in 13? iwry & Sane 
194 153 Hwm 
79 6? tat Home Louts 

95 90 DOB* ■ 

148 114 Nawnama* 

220 213 Tamptevn 


FtaancM Trusts appaar on Pag# 1* 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


48 36V 
208 160 
425 291 
247 180 
158 106 

111 rev 

132 102 

168 112 
100 57'i 
136 82 

306 245 
168 .135 
160 112 
21 *.' 15 
163 127 
131 100 
7*5 177 

133 111 
298 215 
168 113 
453 330 
101'. 72>. 
10'. 73* 

410 330 
118 98 
155 119 
91 62 

176 128 
330 216 
>3 3B 
233 178 
153 67 


AKZO Hjv Bearer 
Wad Dome* 
Maa 
Anew Cnamcai 
BTP 

Bayar DM50 

BtagiM 

HnnOam* 

B> Banzol 

Coaie* Brea 
Do • 

Cc»v (Hurra) 
Croda 
Do DM -- 
EK 6 Ewarerd 
Ereoa 

Fonco 4 Hraw 
Haknao (Jamaaj 
Uda* 

HoachH DM50 
am Chon aid 

BT 

BMOreok Mdgc 
OareoU 
SW BPD 
SutcUfa Spaaunan 
Wohnrhoma no* 
Vensnaa Cnom 


*SB 

a .. is 
. 100 

6.1 

*1 84 

700 
-1 103 

*&■ 89 

5.1 

*3 107 

65- 
69 
09 

-1 109 

*‘2 

» .. 33 
a . 47 

-I 128 
64 

a . 219 

♦ 1 *. .. 
1*3 489 

*1 119 

1-1 54 

18 

+1 16 
35 

-10 


CINEMAS AND TV 


270 176 4n*a TV 'A 
52 57. Orwnoon 
2*0 ITS MV NjV 
366 263 (.UTTWtJsp 
350 188 Grot TV A' 
273 1*9 TVS H/V 
46 31 TSW 
230 223 ThaowTII 


+3 

100 

U 100 


09 

63 62 


IL* 

53 90 

-a' 

210 

ET 140 

-2 

150 

-4 7 105 

r . 

M 0 b 6.6 HL 7 . 


20 

58 12*4 

♦2 




433- 328 Grend MM 380 a «7 135 38 127 

286 208 llcnway »«**» 238 24 1 0 123 

391 315 Lawn*® 353 161 48 168 

M5 447 Lon Part Homs 520 .. M3 £8 156 

1M 76 . Mown CWW* 97'. #+?'. 21 22 16.1 

105 67 PmraOlWIttM 86 a*l 21 24 155 

79 ' 56'.- Ckigens Moat 70 *3 25 13 154 

*05 36B Savoy HOWL A 366 50 14 145' 

8T 56 SIMM 65 • *2 18 28160 

209 1*1 Tresmous# Fora 152 8f6 79 52 151 


INDUSTRIALS 
A- D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


183 90 
96 81 

98 re 
XB 128 
18 4 

660 387 
62 *0 
730 626 
366 236 
174 84 

53 40 

*00 355 
56* <28 
268 '145. 
152 116 
365 210 
H 88 
438 216 
516 3*5 
100 73 

715 600 
220.134 
274 194 
IK 38 
179 105 
I33'i SI 
203 133 
464 310 
1 TB 67 
te 54 
150 69 
232. 172 
14‘.B30 
11.721 
307 190 
33 25 

*3 28 

162 10? 
86 76 

35 24 

13? H0V 
2 « iM 
830 675 . 
250 165 
231 163 
350 2S3 
635 530 
2 ia 112 
297 i89 
353 305 

m 55 

130 too 
191 105 
370 220 
179 IS 
44 31 

1*6; KB 
36* 234 
73 47 

90 65 

98 74 

365 265 
24.. 15', 
tS 22 
523 413 
TS 33 
89‘ 57': 
193 170 
196 158 
342 235 
178 98 
935 430 


Maran 167 

MMSCutun A 6* 
Baawa tttmesl A- 90 
Bareare i» 

aaena cm 4 

Body Snap 580 

Bremnw 92 

&e~n (N) 730 

Burton 302 

Careor* -A- 131 

Caaot tSj 41 

Cnucn 368 

CWna VM«a <K 
GrenDMd Enps®h 215 
Cowl* (Nam 'A' 126 
OAKS Sreanon 'A 2SO 
Dawrwil |U) P* 

DoonaGre 344 

PreiM *90 

BtS 6 GoMsMti 87 
Ely* (Wmomoon) 600 
En«ra Stores 185 
Earn 252 

EHOMi dOMB ID 
CM An Ok 156 
Fora (Manx) 68 

Foreman 1 203 

Fraacnam 4M 

Gt*r IAJ) IS 

Bart Sfl 76 

Qo*®»U (A) 1*1 

GoduHOQ Cp 198 

ous no- 

Oo * no . 

Harm Omanway ZS) 
Hatona Of London 
Horn *1 

man Of Lame .152 
Jonas lEmoH) 76 
LadM Pnflo . 32 V 

LCP IS! 

Laa Coooer 205 


nan Of Lan» .152 
Jonas lEmaa) 76 
LadM Pnflo . 32V 

LCP IE! 

Laa Coooar 205 

L4nrejp 675 

L«ron lupoor 258 • 

Mina 6 Sonar 201 

Manua l fjonm 306 
mom Brea - 540 
NfiS NMugas 206 
Man 2*4 

Oxre (G) 325 

Pnnttn 73 

Preadjr (Mredl li! • 
Bam uaraiarq 1B6 
Rma lAustoU 335 
Do 'A 142 

S 8 U Stores 36 
Sam imv 

SmHHfWH) A 264 
DO B' 86 

SoftfavlAG) 81 
Stood 6 SaieM* 'A B8 • 
SaOWMUM 3*6 1 

S»mi0Bre 16 

SuwtoCHdtof 24 ' 

Supremo Store* *55 • 

Ttrn-Consuiato 43 
Dm* Preowai . 68V * 

Do Too Drag 193 
UndanMiada . 17D . 

Ward Wrew 332 

MDWto 156 

Wo**“Brth 640 


• *2 46 28 100 

30 50 210 
II 41120 
33 20 ZM 

*5 10 05 660 

07 13 380 

1C I 22 253 
+14 6 5 23 20.9 

. +2 32 2*337 

11 70 73 

121 13140 

+6 17 1 30 M0 

+5 9.6 AS 190 

+1 0 7 13 70 

80 34 -07. 
*3 10 10T70 

• +8 41 10 240 

+10 73 10 160 

*1 35 40 10 J 

13.6 23 232 

+2 54 20 HI 

*6 6.1 14 170 

21 UU 
*2 67 17 111 

+3 90 40 104 

*6 100 23 180 

77 50 117 

14 10 450 

5.7 *0 T73 

*8 107 15 420 

+'. 300 22104 

*> 30.0 29 119 

+6 86 20 102 

23 B7 00 

• . 31 7 6 120 

+3 120 70 110 

50 66 12 2 

1.1 1* 24.1 

6.4 52 102 

+4 B0 29 00 

11 1 10 220 

• . . 102 47 15.7 

*3 56 20 240 

*2 ' 50 1 8 »0 

-10 32 U866 

. . 51 25 21.7 

*1 asm E4»3 

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I 


ELECTRICALS 


276 55 S3 
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398 1B0 «B«b 33? 

101 sag AtonnwiK 153 • ■ 

138 36 Amrfrwi 136 *2 

99 *3 *ena» Counaan m *b 

66 03 »rw 04 -1 

300 205 anaroic Come AO -5 

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230 140 *UW 5*e 175 

370 Pffl mC 270 +2 

138 to &JR 71 -2 


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143 08 Otyian Son 
520 360 Conan 1*1 
2ib 141 Conn* Ob 
30'. 6*. Camsmao Tte*i 
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66 20 Com Suwxwry 

255 74 Com IWM) 

570 356 Cowioi 
BO 32 Cceaon (»i 
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174 lte Cres) Hooacn 

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315 zor-i ones 
305 308 Ostgecy 
23' 17'. D*n* 

80 48 DsviM 6 Ual A 
236 1 78 D»»n« & Mewrntn 
133 m Drew 
10-698 On U doe 
25 9 167 Dasa 

375 1 86 Demand Stampreg 

315 16B Dnounar 
19V 17 Drereexeai 
371 180 Dvorja 
f02‘.' 83 DoMon Parti 
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123 95 Oonreon M 

1 60 » Dure* 


313 7*6 EasiBni Proa 
221 1 M l.acro 
277 214 ES 
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29V 18'* Enrean 


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138 100 72 sj 

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200 •+* 71 36 <55 

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65 «2 13 20 >65 

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473 +7 III 23 129 

68 2 1 3 1 362 

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57 •-? 3G 53 143 

144 60 * 7 1 1 7 

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7W +5 33 09 378 

273 +8 179 EG 104 


56 53 US 
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7*1 15 Tuner t «ul 

175 75 iy*rxa 
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58 - s* . umterer iNV) 
736 21 ? HP 
5*3 793 Van 
130 >02 moor nemos 
195 120 «m®n 
70 * . 13 * '.- VOSiMgtn 
15 B 15 * U 5 EL 
TIE. 116 «5L 
165 176 wsae Panned 
738 15 G Wagon infl 
£6 .■ 29 W8MV iCtWl 
144 69 wmrara ctm 
199 161 VUHIum 
37 » 239 WMToeoa 
154 a »••* 

331 174 WMtoen* 

53 . u. Miman 
110 55 w*wxj 
110 7B wins 
295 210 VFrtatman Rare* 
17* 82 Mnui 

763 t ,™ wvmeretT 
tbs 137 iMhn uanrei 
7*c 395 uun MM31 


183 -6 10 75 55 70 

90 a-1 (6 11126 

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£ 88 » 

2*1 •«* 73 10 130 

401 •> 186 46 116 

122 -2 68 50154 

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158 Bl 5 t M 

186 867 

130 4 4 3 4 132 

313 *-3 12 1 i7n5 


110 55 toWtono 75 

118 73 Wtvs 108 

295 210 urareian Raere 270 

12 * 82 tonesva* 9 * 

763 t ,™ wvmeretT 77 ? 

tbs 137 vukn uanaai iso 

7*0 395 WAanw rtBai 8*0 

160 170 IMb So 136 

598 476 iwnan M 5 

e* 56 BJM ( *WIl») 63 

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93 *3 VtnoGhOutr I Ri 72 

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1 "B 135 lore*G iHi 148 



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INSURANCE 


265 



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186 


107 

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88 

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142 II! Do 5 -. Ptt 136 

342 150 E mad 20* *2 

214 12* E * p* m el im 163 I 

411 312 Eclat 388 *2 

55 22 Faun 39 

42 26 Faadn A one HW 35 +1 

1*3 108 Farrar (JHI 129 re-1 

73 58 Fila redmar 58 

828 *08 Faons 605 .7 

67 35 Fnm ao n 82 re-2 

124 8* Fteu4o CAW 96 

68 siv Fatal 44 *2 

123 W Foaany W0 +l 

41V 37V Fom Group NfV 34 

199 157 Forerevi 6 Hanrey 171 

67 48 Frencn (Tnonusi 48 • 

dl 8* GUM 94 -1 

385 256 Wl 275 

310 260 GR 295 

116 80 Cretan Eng KK 

157-100 Customer IQ9 • -2 

150 111 G«IM 116 -3 

H'.TSCV <9toO SSffl *7 

3*4 194 Gtoored 3a? -1 

» 250 Gorreg Karr 280 • . 

18? <07 GramocM r*tas 138 


DU 8* GEI M 
385 256 CAN 
310 260 GR 
118 60 Cretan Eng 


157-100 Customer 
150 111 Gram 
11. 756V duo 
3*4 194 CArand 
505 250 Gorreg Karr 
18? <07 Grrenoon rfldga 


*3 D5n 03139 
68 50 100 

71 53 

+2 50 25 11 i 

860 5 9 139 
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07 IB8E7 
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•1 7 1 5 5 20 3 

50 88 IBB 
•7 79 10 259 

-2 10 16 

58 58 72 

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• I Bl 61 131 

20 59 79 

125 73120 

4 1 8 5 841 

•1 84 89 12 0 

179 65 92 
100 2 * 81 
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-3 47 4 1 131 

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10 08 
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17.1 0O 76? 
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10 40274 
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31? 208 Grenada 282 re +2 

10V S'- Groan** 7. • 

93 SB 1 ; Hum Pmcoun 80V 

232 134 Hal Eng 164 

162 126 Hi* (to) 136 *4 

265 ISO HUM 198 ■ 

290 zm Hatma 275 re+2 

41 15L llampiPd Ind 05V re + V 

49 20 Hanmaa 23 +i 

191 Mi Hamon 16? +2 

190 MS Do 8*. Cm nu +1 

116 98 i s. 5h*. Pt 1B» 

12* VMS’. DO ION CI17V 

283 133 Kmmam 26? -1 

27S 175 Hama (PM0 250 • . . 

623 431 Hareaar&dMay 495 *2 

150 90 Hantoy 94 -3 


129 *0 151 
I5S 5 5 107 
57 41 139 


282 re+2 100 39 128 
7. to 05 57 135 

80V 28 3 2 160 

164 120 70 7 7 

136 *4 84 47 102 

198 to M3 72 124 
275 to *2 24 09 306 

35V to+V 18 40 88 



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' — - 

■> 


LEISURE 



150 90 Hantoy 94 *3 

205 Bl Kay pieman) 200 -4 

221 140 Haowardi Caremc 19? +4 

am M Hama* 1S3 *0 

96 65 Hawtl (J) f» -3 

142 122 Hango* A JOB mo *5 

81 62 Ho** Bros 

108 60 HoR Udyo 92 

2S5 140 Hoptowna 238 +8 

120 91 Horedan 98 +2 

310 234 HunWg Auoc 270 

116 68 Hunting Group 98 • . 

295 207V huKhm W a npoa 287 
191 119 DM 163 *1 

315 211 bom 215 S 

295 250 Jack ions Bourns 250 • .. 

134 96'.- Jantow Man 130V 

615 *73 Joimaon Qaanart 560 -3 

220 133 Joanoon Mannsy 208 -2 

44V 22V Jonnson A FB 33 . ■ 

345 235 Jcnr mun 310 

140 68 Joraa a Sntoman 12* 

132 67 Jouman frnomas) 128 to . 

29 21 KahnonM 2B 

38 25 Kalon 31 

32 s 188 Radar tod -3oo 

130 105 Kantody Srntoe 111 

298 230 KresMw (A) 273 

215 123 Ktoan-E-Za 200 to 


•2 57b 34 M9 

+1 BOO * 8 
82 7 6 

+'. 0 65 

-1 79 30 182 

.. 132 50 120 

*2 207 42 109 

+3 27 ?0 75 

-4 5.4 2 7 382 

+4 103 5.4 160 

+0 Bib 37 100 
-3 20 43 79 

•5 .re 271 
*01 

57 62 130 
*0 107 40 94 

♦2 55 50 70 

114 42 80 
BB 60 75 

*1 73 4 6 138 

-5 18 08 393 

06 342*7 


144 96 Bar* A IK* A 170 -1 

2T0 128 Soc^y A Harem <50 

t?i 98 0mm ware* ia3 

58 04 Canon- 48 

225 158 Ornate 180 -6 

410 325 F*+r Laowa 066 -2 

S'. 49 GR* 49 

81 65 rta-aaore Brooks 65 

128 93 Hanson Trexet 115 +1 

131 9* H Larart H3 to+1 

103 32 Jiarenas HUgm 39 +1 

um 137 LM ins 1*9 -2 

169 130 Maenrestor 130 

391 278 Rwanffli 320 to -2 

393 326 Haa*y Utah* 370 

6* 41 Way Lsrsiaa 45 

228 134 Saga Hakdaya 13* to -2 

360 180 Samuataon Go 160 re-tl 


-M too 80 94 
225 

70 *6126 
1.4 30 123 
-6 B0 44 11 7 

-7 93 25 IBB 

*12 
425 

+1 80 U 55 

+1 71 83 105 

•1 4 1 110 152 

79n 81 87 
•2 111 35 132 

16 1 44 152 

. 349 

■2 66 40 113 



360 ISO SrenuatoonGo 180 re-10 0* 1 9 107 

K 51 ToeranOton honour 70 *1 57a 81 127 

185 126 Mare 182 to+2 71 30 105 


V 


MINING 


9 


39 22 LDH 

T58VT20V Lap 

323 21# Laad 
75 42 LaMHK 

TB'j *1 Laa lAniu) 

113 m uaesnii 

08 64 Lmesd 

73 53 Uort (FHV 

35 23 Locker |T1 

230 179 Loo Motor'd 
135 85 DO DM 

77 UV Urn 8 Mlm 
227 159 Um Ind 
258 134 Umgtonand 
*SO 319 Lore s Bonn 
410 306 ML nags 
US 6* MS bn 
49 31 MV Howrern 

393 255 MrartnytTViSffil 


78'.- +•; 

•06 *3 

74 

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2 *. 

195 to 


-a 290 5 2 15 2 

-2 36 1.7 1*1 

. a 168 
117 35 12.1 

55 4* 82 
> . 55 40 170 

20 * 10 * 9.4 
1.7 55 214 

a? 

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05 10 205 
090 34240 
66 07 90 

360 5i 00 
00 40100 
02 30 ZDS 

36 40 30 
5A 51 77 
1.9 70 80 

M2 70109 


71 +'; 

715 to +3 
258 

415 +2 

095 to 
107 to + l 

39 '.- 

330 to -3 
12 B 

55 *3 

208 


+’.• 7* 104 124 

*0 B6 31181 

S.T 22330 
+2 150 36134 

1140 29 M9 
• I 20 2 7100 

-s.. 180 47 120 

393 255 Mrarmpltowni 330 re-3 168 50 161 

•.SB 121 MacHHane 12B .05 07 170 

79 43 MaOMMn (PAM 55 +3 2.7 40 102 

288 IBS McRacmre 208 . M3 80 too 

126 70 Magneto 125 40 38 US 

710 *85 Mtoidiertar Sl»B 710 *30 08 1 2 24 1 

79 52 Maranasa Bunn 65 *0 68 76 

06 61 Martov te • 25 09 78 

143 #5 Manna! (Unlay) 12* 52 *2 96 

178 105 Mam Boh 168 +2 60 40 

184 128 MstoCkMures 1*0 -1 86 6.9 21 0 

91 55 Maura* 79 12 n 13* 

78'.- 5* MacnanCons 5* -1 11 t!3 U 

125 7J® MnonaH Soman HI • 85 50 127 

198 183 Man* 178 11] U 90 

318 212 Morgan Cmoeto 258 -2 121 *7 1*3 

*2 20V N eed* a n a 27 »v Oi 04 U0 

216 150 NtolCJ) 163 100 61 55 

41 28 Nswman Ind* 3* *1 11 US'S 

153 92 Newman Tonka lag • 10J 69 12* 

133 66 NdOtoALura 127 +2 10 0.8 410 

65 43 MMon 46 i* aa 51.7 

2B9 186 toon 246 re +5 130 54110 

258 £33 Office Eted Mad! 213 12.1 57 8 7 

*48 2*7 fMarKiwI A 378 150 40 13 7 

965. 525 tenon JT 960 

186 163 P-E mu 163 

803 383 tenon 026 +3 M0 2.7 <76 

27 11 teak 19 *52 

135 88 tearless 125 +2 9 On 7 2 160 

674 J32 tefA>4tMMnm 621 288 4 5 103 


13 - 3 . AngAmerCoal 
10V630 Ana Am 

57 . 31 Am Goto 

58 33 AAIT 

40 22 aw** 

41 22 Do A 

198 120 Ayer Hearn 
« 238 BH«(»>5 

160 80 ' Brae* an 

21V 0V BulMto 

358 - 226 CHA 

09 *Z Carr Boyd 
53* *09 Cons GokffiakS 
531 3M Da Bean 
200 105 Deatonai 
9'« *v Doomkmare 
IT- 7 Dne ta nren 
7 . ?V Durban 
255 150 E Dagger 
59* 258 Etonosrend 
205 129 00m 
195 85 Bsrwg 

390 2i0 E tend CM 
*'• 2V E Rand Prep 
9 4V FS Con* 

213 93 FS DO- 
TS 17 Gaamr Tm 
8v «•. Ganvai 

W fi Gan k+nreg 
W« 5% GFSA 
*78 013 GMMVren 
83 35 Ccvang 

95 85 Gmenrecn Ras 

575 165 GrOCkwre 
158 91 Hampren Ann 

9- *, HJfmcmy 

3SO ITS terttol 
81 47. Jcnma* 

1?" 5. n-nra** 

0 ■ 2-- 1W 
160 65. LaJ+e 

13 . 6*. Ujreop. 

*10 170 Larera 
157 6 * HO 

28 15 MFMW1 Mrerea 

123 60 Marroal* 

29 i4v Msnto E*o 

2# 5 ■■ Mnangurk 

9 5 . ucm wns 

655 *S0 MreOTB 
5 » Nt« ffia 
142 73 W Broan Mb 
44 25‘. ton >mr> 

32'- 10'. Onnae Free 


520 1« PsnSmd tod **0 

m 775 PnomJte 02 

483 311 Mongcm 420 

96 51 Ptoosc Coornr 73 

365 195 terms £90 

323 216 tenet ChadDum 303 

31* 238 Poreel DuTtryu 778 

16* 95 Pmstwcn HUgs f 10 

190 H9 BK> 172 

ISC 123 Redan Mem 1*5 

589 421 Rank Og 477 

228 115 terrain* Sms IS8 

138 98 Rskmis (d &kfgsl i25 

900 805 RaduO S Coreun 758 

3*5 118 teotoam Casa in 

3*6 200 Reeo E*aai0to 346 

2V 162V Reed toi 253 

173 132 Renan 171 

Bl 57 Renew 68 

102 86 Rtotmm 10? 

518 3*5 Reuire* 503 

39 21 Reamer# 38 

160 110 Near do EDO 147 

90 53 fficnam (Lao) bo 

58 19 teararmon vmu 39 


528 +3 M0 2.7 176 

19 *52 

12S +2 9 On 72160 

521 288 46 102 

4*0 +10 11 0J Z4.9 

C12V 7.5 0 8 32 4 

420 to+2 190 46 111 


73 • 41 58 128 

290 +5 100 36 1!0 

303 10 05 

278 to+2 21 7 7 8 201 

110 +2 10 09 23 B 

172 »i 8 a 37 128 

145 to . 3 8 20 99 

477 43 228 <T 168 

«E8 >1 *0 128 

125 30 29 *5 

758 +9 229 20 184 

in +3 29 15 117 

3*§ +3 64 18 156 


15? 83 Rooanson Res 88 

3*3 151 Roomson (Thomas] 338 

55 30 Rodrrem* 45 

ISO 127 Homer 127 

146 110 Do A 116 

3 ov Rnapnm . n 

102 116 teffirt. 127 

130' 88 Russell (A) M 


2S3 +11 

171 to .. 
68 •+* 
102 +4 

503 • -2 

38 to+l 
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+3 14 II 156 

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• +*'. 20 40 95 

+4 64 63 88 

re-2 84 11380 

to+l'j 1* 30 11.7 

41 2B1G0 

*3 14 aa 
. 17 7 

• 08 41 95 

•2 464 

+1 107 

93 73 87 

93 80 B0 
12 

+2 81 6 * 96 

•-S 23 20 278 


28 15 Mpaasan um 21 

123 60 Mane- ate 65 

29 14V Matoto Esc 28'. 

26 5 Mnangurk 10 

9 S'. MkBto MM* £S'« 

655 *5® Mreomo 513 

5 1 ?'. Nare BO £3 

142 73 NK Broken HA 83 

44 25'. ton warn 39'. 

32'- ID'. Orange Free £13 . 

128 SO tenmg Tm SO 

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20 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


( COMMERCIAL PROPERTY } 


Optimism on rating reform Offices vital to dock’s success 


The Government's 
promised reform of the 
commercial rating system 
in England and Wales will 
have much less of an im- 
pact than many fear, accord- 
ing to Healey & Baker, the 
firm of chartered surveyors. 

If the revaluation of 
commercial property is under- 
taken by 1990. with a sin- 
gle commercial rate in the 
pound, a typical high street 
chain store would have a 30 
per cent higher rates bill, 
the firm says. 

But H & B estimates 
that the rise would hit only 
the percentage of In mover 
allocated to operating profit 
bv 1 per cent. Retailers 
still want to stay in prime 


sites despite the threat- 
ened rate rises. 

H & B's findings are 
drawn from a comparison with 
Scotland's revaluation, 
which produced assessments 
realigning the rates 
burden. 

In spite of a significant 
reduction on the overall rate 
poundage, the high street 
shops paid between 2&4 and 
193 per cent more than in 
the previous year because of 
the increase in rateable values. 

But rental values have 
risen to the extent of an im- 
plied growth rate of 9 per 
cent this year. 

• Centra] and Gty Prop- 
erties, the private company 
ran by Mr David King and 


Mr John Mactaggart has 
refurbished 112 Jermyn 
Street, in the West End of 
London, with 9,155 sq ft of 
offices at a cost of £1 million. 

The asking rent, 
through De Morgan & Co, is 
more than £32 a sq ft. Cen- ' 
tral and Gty bought the bnild- 
ing and the adjoining 1/2 
Babmaes Street, where a fur- 
ther 9,037 sq ft is being 
developed, fur more than £1 
million. 

The properties wfll be 
retained in the portfolio. The 
company also bought the 
66,000 sq ft Canard House 
nearby in Lower Regent 
Street, which is being re- 
constructed and wfll fcg 
worth £35 million. 




/Generally 


i 


Accident 


INTERIM RESULTS 


.. .* o' 


The results for the six months ended ,30th June :1986, estimated and. 
unaudited, are compared below with those for the similar period in 1985, 
which are restated at 31st December 1985 rates of exchange; also shown are 
the actual results for the full year 1985. 

It must be emphasised that the results for the interim period do not usually 
provide a reliable indication of those for the full yea l 



6 Months 
to 30&86 

Estimate 
£ millions 

6 Months 
to 30.6.85 
Estimate 
£ millions 

1985 
Year 
Actual 
£ millions . 

Premium Income 

General Business...:...: 

.1,006.9- 
. 92-6 

825.T • 
J15J . 

Ij6913 

205.0 



1.0995 

• 941.0 

1j896l3 

Investment Income 

Underwriting- General Business Result 
Long Term Business Profits 

1392 

(94.8) 

5.0 

1220 

(127.9) 

4.7 

256.7 

(237.0) 

8^ 

Less Interest on Loans 

49j4 

-L0 

. 0-2) 

' 0.9 

28J 

10- 

Profit (Loss) before Taxation. 

Taxation -U.K. and Overseas 

Minority Interests and Preference 

Dividend 

484 

3S 

U 

(ID 

(6.8) 

U 

26_5 

(100) 

2.0 

Net Profit (Loss) attributable to 
Shareholders 

43 J 

. 3.4 

34J 

Earnings per Ordinary Share 

23.7p 

20p 

205p 

Principal exchange rales used in 
translating overseas results 

U.S.A 

Canada 

$1^3 

$2.13 

S1.45 

S202 

SL45 

$2.02 


ANALYSIS BY TERRITORY OF GENERAL BUSINESS 
PREMIUM INCOME AND UNDERWRITING RESULT 

(before interna] reinsurance) 

6 wraths to 38^84 6 months 10 30.6.85 

Under- Under- 


lucerne 


wriUu Premium (nm 
Renh income Result 



£M 

£M 

£M 

£M 

U.K 


(368) 

275.4 

(43 3) 

UJS.A 

372.0 

(382) 

335.9 

(568) 

EEC other than UK 

643 

(98) 

58.0 

(7.1) 

Canada 

122^ 

(38) 

69.4 

(12-9) 

Australia 

16£ 

(18) 

15 J 

(2-1) 

Others, including 





London Market business 

83.6 

(48) 

71.7. 

(5.7) 


1,00&9 

(948) 

825.7 

(127.9) 

. 






N et written premiums and investment income increased in sterling terms by 
21.9% and 14.1% respectively. The 1986 figures include the results of Pilot 
Insurance of Canada for the first time. Adjusted to exclude the effects of 
currency fluctuations and Pilot the increases were, 19.6% and 1L5% 
respectively. 

In the second quarter there were underwriting losses of£32 Jm (1985£50.2m 
loss) ofwhich£9.8m(1985£12.4m loss) occurred in the United Kingdomand 
£13.0m (1985 £24.7m loss) in the United States. In the aggregate other 
territories produced underwriting losses of£9Jm(1985£13.1mIoss).The pre- 
tax profit for the quarter amounted to£43.8m 0985£16.4m profit). 

Forthe six months in the United Kingdom there was an underwriting loss of 
£36.8m (1985 £43 Jm loss). Losses in the Motor account increased to£15.1m 
(19S5 £8.9m loss) reflecting a sharp increase in the incidence of claims. The 
Homeowners account influenced by severely adverse weather in the first 
quarter showed a loss of£lZ3m(1985£9.8m loss) despiteasmallprofitinthe 
second period. The Commercial Property account continued to benefit from 
rating increases and a reduction in large Industrial Fire claims to show a loss 
of £7.9m {1985 £183m loss). Liability classes showed a satisfactory 
improvement 

Forthe six monthsnet premiums written in theUmtedStatestotailed$569m 
(1985 S487m) with an operating ratio of 109.99% as compared with 116.97% 
for the same period in 1985. On the United Kingdom accounting basis the 
underwriting loss was£383m (1985£5&8m loss). Commercial Lines benefited 
from continued rating increases to showstrong improvement whilstPersonal 
Line results were little changed. 

Elsewhere there were aggregate underwriting losses or£19.8m (1985 £27.8m 
loss). Improving trends were evident in many territories, and most 
particularly Canada. Trading conditions in France, Netherlands and New 
Zealand continue to be difficult. 

New annual premiums for Gfe business in the United Kingdom in the firstsix 
monthsof 1986 were£13.6m 0985 £14.0m) and single premiums£lL7m (1985 

Dividend 

The Directors have declared an interim dividend for the year ending 31st 
December 1986 of lO.Op per share (1985 S.Op) payable on or after 1st January 
1987 to ordinary shareholders on the register of members on 1st December 1986. 


General Accident Rre & Life Assurance Corporation pic. 

World Headquarters: Pitheavlis, Perth, Scotland PH2 0NH. 


The resiorau'on of the Al- 
bert Dock in Liverpool is the 
most visible expression of the 
activities of the Merseyside 
Development Corporation, 
which is responsible for 
regenerating 865 acres of dere- 
lict land and docks along the 
Mersey waterfront 

The MDC has so far in- 
vested £25 million in restoring 
the Albert Dock, Britain's 
biggest collection of grade 1 
listed buildings. 

Arrowcroft, the private 
property company, has pul £4 • 
million into the scheme with 
another £2 million agreed by 
its board for the ambitious 
project The JQ-year pro- 
gramme will total £100 
million. 

Speciality retailing and 
some office space at the dock ' 
has already been let by 
Arrowcroft and its agent, 
Sykes Waterhouse, now pan 



Restoring Albert Dock wfll cost £100 pillion over 10 years 


of the Lloyds Bank Black 
Horse empire. 

The Tate Gallery is to take 
space for its northern exten- 
sion. And Arrowcroft says that 
negotiations are under way. 
with a national organization 


for 1 00,000 sq ft of the 
400.000 sq ft of offices 
planned there. The MDC will 
soon become a tenant 
Rems of about £6 a sq ft, 
dose to city centre prices in 
Liverpool, are being asked for 


the offices, with larger 
amounts of space cosung 
slightly less. 

Mr Leonard Eppel, chair- 
man of Arrowcroft, said that 
the office element of the 
Albert Dock was vital: “It. is 
the key to its commercial 
success and it is where most 
private investment will be. in 
the next three to four years 
private investment will over- 
take public input.” 

The MDC plans to develop 
the site adjoining the Albert 
Dock for tourism and leisure. 
It is about to market a site for 
an atrium style four-star hotel. 
Grants will be available to 
hotel operators. 

Farther away, a site once 
earmarked fbr a science park 
is being considered for edge- 
of-town retailing. The 
corporation has recognized 
that it is unlikely to attract the 


electron ics industries to the 
heart of Liverpool, and it has 
turned its attention to the 
retail sector, still a buoyant 
market. 

The site of the Liverpool 
Garden Festival is being op- 
erated by Transworkf Leisure, 
a British company set up 
specifically for the purpose. It 
has an agreement with the 
MDC whereby, after it raises 
the £5.5 million it has to 
invest in the Festival Gardens, 
it will receive a 149-year lease 
on the site. 

There is no doubt that the 
restoration of the Albert Dock 
complex has helped the MDC 
to market its land. Buildings 
offered for tender in 1983 
found few takers at a price the 
corporation could accept. But 
competition is increasing, 
resulting in it being able to sell 
1 50-year leases at a premium. 
Judith Huntley 


Degrees awarded by the University of Kent 


degrees are an- 
University of 


ICIns 

Ctau 


The fblli 
aounced 
Kent: 

BA 

Faculty of Humilities 

Cbm i (Dh HI): C E Ptoum 

Theology and English 

2 (DM I): J J Mount* ord 
2 (DM II): 8 J Luscontbe 

English and Theology 

2 (Ur Or N D Winder 
2 (DM H): M A Murphy 

Theology and History 
Clan 2 COM IQ: R T K BorthwiCk 

Philosophy a»d Law 
Ctm 2 on* l): P J Reynolds 
AapotaC GCA CatiaUne 

Theology 

Bus 2 (Ur Q: M Andentm C E 
dements: G N Crayden: B Lewis O A 
Leuremz 

Bus 1 (Dh IQ: O L Cpofcjt M F 
Gobey: N Houghton: A F McNeill 
L Healey: D R 


Philosophy 
Ctm 2 (Mr Qs D MMh A J 
Brennan: S E Bunce: SP Childs R 
Hopewell: r Hotfies: NL Kfflnw J 


Skipper: t B 


W L RandaiTT^M 
Walker 

Ban 2 (Mr l):PJ CtmU el ewrt d: P 
Jacobs A K Murray 
ftgpMSfc M T Dawson 

Philosophy and Social 

Anthropology 

2 (Mr QiJDG Love 
Philosophy and Comparative 
Literary Studies 

2 (Dh 10: G L Sawyer 

Philosophy and Po litics A 
Government 

ClMf 1 (pfcr 0): K A J Brown 

Philosophy and Social 

Beharionr 

Ctass 2 (DM »: P C Robinson 

Philosophy and Sociology 

Ban 2 (Die B): A Hoyle 
History & Theory of Art and 
Comparative literary Studies 

Aegrotat M Levy 

History & Theory of Art 
and Comparing 
dan 2 pH* 0}s SB Pun 

History & Theory erf Alt 
and 

Ban 2 (Mr 0: G V Lanodon Davies 
Ban 1 (Mr B): R D Kay 

History & Theory of Art 
and History 
Ban I (Mr Q: N I J WeHby 

History A Theory of Art 
and Philosophy 

Ban R R W F Sharpe 

Italian 

2 (Mr H): K M Bator 
Italian and Drama 
Ban 2 (Mr Qs R J toman 

Italian and French 

Ban 2 (Dfcr QiDM RapadoO 
Ban 2 (Dfcr M)i H L Richer 

Italian and Philosophy 
2 (Dfcr Q: D P Ayres 

History and Classical 
Cmtiratioa 
2 (DM Q: E JUtUa 

History and Compu tin g 
2 (Dfcr l)> S A Johnson 

History and English 
CMS 2 (Dfcr IQs S J Mulifnn 

History and FBm Studies 

2 (DM Q: p WWdxwon 

History and Law 
Clan 2 (DM Qijf Keenan 


Bristow: E 


History & Theory of Ait 
and Film Studies 
2 (DM l):SR Jones 
Visual & Performed Arts 
Bus 2 (Dfcr m O N Dawns: N D B 
Green: L Howtooc B L Hum 

History and Politics A 
Government 
Ban 2 (DM I>j R Cain: _ C 
Franooalkolopoutas: S Hurttras C J 
Jarfcnn: J J F G CMara 
Ban 2 (DM UJLL 9 J BeWa ny: E S 
Browning: S J Davtcs: T A Hants: M 
- Quigley: P Wood 

History and Economic & Social 
History 

2 (DM Q: JN BcMmon 
History and History A Theory 
of Art 

2 (Mr Or A M Thornton 

History 

Ban fcLK Jones: R 1 MMnr 
CMS! 2 (Dfcr Q: A Banks: N J Bungey: 
P M Burrell: J E Burrow s: A w I 
Cannon: A J Cox: P J Edwards. C J 
earner: D8 Hammond: K Plronman: 
DF.J McO Kennedy- K pbanmert: L 
M MarsJon: S Mltrhmh A^P 
(TManony: CParakw RD^tKv™wv. 


i: c A-Rd und: A . 


J S Hun II no: A R Irwin: ih i o Jong; « 
D G Knjjbil: S Lo wfarMge : J P C.MM k 
A S M Price: I E Roger* A L Sexton: 
N wall: R S Wetttord; S J Young 
On 3e J O SamWoofc. 

BA HMery: P J B«wme 

French and Philosophy 
3 (DM QjkRS McCunough: M 

German . 

8ur%s&ak. ti ’ 

Aepotac X S Jenkins 

German and French 
Oasi 3 (Dfcr Q: s Cook 
CUtl 2 (Dnr II): U Sarnia; C L Webby 


French 


Class 2 (DM Q: MJ Betts: MAQwNn: 
I S L Gardiner: S jaconet- N B Joy: F 
fi M Portaill: SML Tlrburtlu6; X R 
Vaughan Williams 

Bass 2 (DM IQ: H M Ayers: J D 
Beniamin: j p Chambers: J D Doran 
C M Had. J A LawBMUfcS 
Smith: s C McDonald: J A QbWLH 
Parry S E A Pike; TCBawbone: SC 
Rob: S L Taylor C A Worrall 
BUS HR J Duck 

French and Comparative Lit- 
erary Studies 
Clan 2 (DnQtJ L Crilflilw 

French and Comparing 
Class 2 (DM H): C A Edwards 

. French and Drama 
Ctau 2 (On Q: S Woodhedd- 
French and English 

Bass 2 (DM Qi c E Horn: D A Ward 
Baas 2 (DM B): K M Chrtsiodoulou 

French and German 
Ctau a (Dfcr IQ: S D Norton: L M 
Smith . 

Class a s C K Hughes 

European Studies (Italian) 

Qks 2 (DM I): S A Parks- 
Class 2 (DM IQ: I- R Marrtvrtli. J 


Film Studies and Comparative 
Literary Studies 

Bm U O A Seen 
Ban 2 (DM Qs L A Owen 

Film Studies and Drama 

ctm 2 (DM IQ: J R Mactde 

F3m Studies and History A 
Theory of Art 
Ctm 2 (DM Qs T R Lemon 
European Studies (Combined 
Languages) 

Ctm 2 (DM Q: M E J Hawke* S A 
Wigley 

Class 2 (Dfcr SV M E Buchner: L-J 
Cooley: RE G Dear; C A Graves: A 
Jain: J Jenkins: J Kaur. S MertMtz: M 
V Rhoda 

European Studies (French) 

GfcK 2 (Dfcr Q: M M C Our. MJJ 
Patterson: E C Searles: S Seplekin 
Ctm 2 (DM IQs J McGlone: D F 
McUDm 

European Studies (German) 
Ctm 2 (DM Q: A C Bird: C C 
Edwards: D A Hamer. J L Spuroeon 
Bus I (DM ■): S MleheO: V G Toland 

Enropean Studies (History) 
Cam 2 (Mr IQ: J R Caning: RGMD 
Merchant: R Powell 

En^Qshand Film Studies 

Bast 2 (DM Q: A B M Darling: B J 
Mila 

Clm 2 (DM R): L E A North 
English and French 

Ctm 2 (DM Qs C J Reaklrt 
Ctm 2 (DM B): L D Howe: K Laktn 
fnglwli eml Tjitin 
Clm is M R P Berry 
English and Comparative lit- 
erary Studies 
ctm 2 (DM H): R J Wheeler 

En^ish and History A Theory 
Of Art 

Clm 2 (DM ■}: T A Bator: N D 
Kttson: A H M Lewis 

English A Comparative Literary 
Studies 

ctm 2 am Q: R Green: P Lucas: T E 
Pazzl: P S Singleton: A R Wood 
Bm 2 (DM DiWj Hoisefleld: 1 J 
Kemp: J A SMgMMiiw 

English & Comparing 
Clm 2 (DM IQ: J R French 

English A Drama 

Clm 2 (DM tty: E L Macntierson: C J 
Middleton: C V Smith 

English A Philosophy 
Ctm 3 COM Q: H H Clegg 
Aagnipt S R Tradooc 

Film Studies & English 
am 2 (DM QiDC Wise 
Bus 2 (DM H): P E Kitchen C C 
RoMmcnu S G West 

Philosophy & English 
am t:sj Elves 

English & History 
CMn 2 (DM Qs J G Neep: G J Osborn 
Ctm 2 (DM IQ: AS L OuHleld: D C 
Mortloclc s-A M Paneni: C Trait 

Eng^isfa A Sociology 

Clm 2 (DM l)r M Abrahams: K A 
Saner: Jl Bradkey. 8 J Scanlon: C A 


Bm 2 (DM tQ: J A iu t S Ob u n: S F 
mum: E M Croad: A C Leask 


Smith 
Bm 3 
Berryman: 

Eng&sh & American Literatnre 
Clm 2 (Dlv IQ: A venton 
English with African & Carib- 
bean Studies 

Bm t F M O' Aguiar: D M Narahi 
Bm 2 (DM Q: A W McCulloch 
Ctm * M W E d u u mdu ui M Hoayun 

English A American Literature 

Bm MRS Cox: T R Kelly: H M 
Rainy 

Ctm 2 (DM D= C M S BalNngen A G 
constable: J M Cook: S E Devonshire 
C M Gibbs: J Hawkins: N P Hodgkins: 
C L Hubbard: V M Khnin: H Lean: a 
D Lutcv: P J Lutr. E H Made D A 
McQueen: D P Qzanne: M M 
Ramkissoau: W A Scott: J A Smith: D 
M WBUmns 

Bm 2 (DJv ay. G K Amos: N S 


: Burrows: J M A Cassell: S 

R Coruabv: F P Danes: K D Davies: N 
F Dowden: S F Dunn: A J Canon: R P 
Grainger: C B Halles: S £ Kins C 
Uney: G F Martin: S Mason: T j 
Nunn: H M Nurwy: S L Pvtzold: A J 
Stokes: P S Sturrock: L Thomas: H 
Watson: S H : Williams: S- N 
woodhouse 
dm s L Mania 
Agg T S HL C L Cwmity 

Drama A Theatre Studies 

Bm 2 (DM D: S M Emmas: M F 
Fisher: A C lleUwnnqton: P S A 
Howard: S A Howdlr P Kool: K H 
Lewis: c A WMte 
Bm 2 (DM IQ: L E EOenor 

Drama and Comparative Lit- 
erary Studies 
Bm IKS Pom 

Drama and Computing 
dm 2 COM ■): S Perdval 
Drama and English 
Bm 2 (DM IQs A M EUienngtou 
Ctm S J A S Van Eeckhout 

Drama and Freaeh 
Clm 2 (DM l>s M F A Arthurs 
dm 2 (Dfcr IQ: H J Kean N M Sortoa 

Drama and Italian 

Clm 2 (DM Q: C G Fitzgerald 
Clm 2 (DM IQ: J p Heame . 


Classical Civilisation and 
French 

Ctm 2 (DM U>: A Harriett: C R 
Hanueu H 

Classical Civilisation 
Clm 2 (DM Q: K R Boston: S M 
Hopkins: X H Irwin 
Bm 2 (DM IQ: J M Dalton WhUe 

American Studies (Literature) 

Ctm 2 (DM D: S J Baiters: J Wilde 
Ctm 2 <DM H>: C M Bawakv G 
Cailan: EK Johnson: K F McFeaL J M 
A Ransley: K M A Smith 
Ctm 2J A Stew 

American Studies (History) 
ctau 2 (DM Qs A J Walpole 
Clm 2 (DM (HOC Bradshaw; j a 
G ambling 


Classical Civilisation and 
Drama 

Ctm 2 (DM QiAE San key . 

Classical Civilisation and* 
English 

dm 2 (Dm Q: M V McKee 
Classical Civilisation with Inter- 
mediate I Jitin 
Ctm 2 (DM D-'GL Arnold 

■ Greek 

Ctm 2 (DM Q: N M williams 
Latin 

Ctm .2 (DM.Qi S J Pfddlesdcn 

American Studies (Literature) 
Ctm 2 (DM 0): G R Crompton 
English -and Philosophy 
Ctm a (Dm IQs J l M Scarameila 

BSe 

Faculty of Natural Sciences 
Microbiology 

Ctm 3 (DM Q: T J Heliytr J R Hunt: 
P W Richmond: K M SatkiUd: P P 
Smtth 

Bm 2<DM IQ: H L Bm M J urm: V 
D McCregor D K warnor 
oau XSJ Bunblrv: A J Cobb: J D 
Good win* 


Chemical Phyacs 

dm 1 D J verrau 

Bm 3 (DM Q: A A Jenkins 

Clm 2 (DM II): S P Angles: A M 

Edwards 

Clm tCl Cheung: I L Sewed: J C 
W eMail: T C WorsfoW 
Past M K Brawn 

Biological Chemistry 
dm 2 (DM Q: E A Boyd: G R Evans: 
L Simmons 

dm 2 (DM n» J E Kay: M Upton 
Chemistry with Management 
Science 

Clm 3: D L Cornwall; R G Lewis 

Biochemistry 

cam 2 (DM Q: C S Bust: A F Gibbs; C 
M Grant: J A Morgan: PS Party: DA 
Raynor B A Thorne: A woods 
Ban 2 (DM n; D A Gibbons: N 
Kleinkauf: C D Canton: N J Morris: P 
M Nlcholls; M A Nome: C J Mowers: 
E V E M Okokoo: T J Purton: S I 
Reed: S W Robbins: V A Sessions 
Ctm 1VS Amzit A K Badxnan: R E 
Myers: S J Whu chouse: t C wuttams 

Chemical Systems Antomatiini 
Engineering 
Ctus 3 (DM 1): M C Webb 
Bm 2 (DM H): P Farrai 

Chemistry with Environmental 
Science 

dm t A P Lovetay: A P Moult 
Clm 3 (DM Q: N C Blacker: C M 
Dunn: G S Km 

Ciui 2 (DM H): D R Ames: J 

Dethrtdge: E Sinagra 

Clm 3: K L Hans: A J Potter 

Chemistry 

Clm t: R P w Green haMi 
Ctm 2 (DM): J M Kennedy 
Ctm 3 (DMO):J Aledo: A P Barwick: 
N S A Halls: R K Patel: C L Rene 
Ordfcin y aywi M Dtmnett 

Physics with Cotnpatisg 

Ctm 3 (DM l):SP CottraU: A T D 
Deacon 

Clm 3 (DM H)iGC Blair A AFrascr: 
L P O'Mard 

Ctm IBP Chapman: P Valuta 
Ordinary Degree: P a BecMngham 

Computer Science 
dm t j R c Cupm 
dm 3 (DM Q: A B Armltage: N T 
Armstrong: A D T MaUmson: A 
Patched 

Ctm 2 (DM IQ: T M AtannH: A F 
Bell: S J Freer: T HartaTsJMortey: T 
Parvee: N M Stmwer 
Ctsss kTK Bassi: R J Coats: N M 
Jones: H G Thompson 
Orti way degree: D DfrS 

Computer Systems Engineering 

Ctm ISM Davies: L H Ngotu I 
warren 

Bast 2 (Dfcr Q; 0- Aberdeen: J 

Bradford: A N V 

A WIBM 

Bass 2 (QM IQt R S Armltaoie:'J W 
Brawn: PKY Fung: J A Gtedman; K 
J Gordon: N Hague: J A Johnson: S K 
Knlbbs: K P MtUsoo: N D Mtstty: K A 
Mumtord.- A K Patel: S M Potter: D E 
whiung • ■ • 

Class X P Desal: J M Wiseman 
OnMnaiy dagrass D P Foxley: M E 
k'ltson: S P Perera 

Electronic Engineering 

Clm 2 (DM D; N Allan: D A Clark: J 
N W Fhy: P KoukouzMM: C K Lai; 5 
Patel: C w Wan 

Clm 3 (DM H): A Duda: A Eales: R M 
Mew: F | Moughal; c B Saveley; A J 
wills 

Ctm * J AUshaw: A C CoUant: E A 
Diez: G K Hughes: M P Jones: G W 
Sron: c M Sherman: 8 Vasin: c J 
Wall house 

OnUnaty Degree: C D Dampen P K F 
Fung 

Comai on katioos Engmeerrag 

Clm 3 (Dfcr I): N K Booker: S F P 
CWu: V C Uu: L T Tam: MJ Twang: 
M H Waktson: W K Wong 
Clm 2 (DM QiCJ HoftmeWen S P 
JH lings: 

Clm * V J crowtey: MSA Jordan 

Electronic 
Medical 

Ban 2 (DM IQt R W Blown: M J 
Dencr: T P Devlla: F GhoreMU- 
Ncgad*. P M WUMngton 
Clm 3: N F A AMasr. G N Collins 

Theoretical Physics 

Bass 2 (DM Q: A NtchoTls 
Bass 3 (Dfcr H)r D J A Hawke* 
Ordinary Degree: a All 

Physics with Astrophysics 

Bm UN F Arnold: C H Perry 
Bass 2 (DM Qs W B Bishop: R C T 
Chapman^ M G Helllweu: S Nappo: D 

Ctas* 3 (DM H): P Dumont: S B 
Goddard: D A Wtiaroson 
Bass 3: J E S Dixon 
MUStoMCHMariA 

- Physics with Electronics 

Ctm 2 (DM IQ: K P Holloway: M W 
SlnHskaoD 

M C Bull 


with 


Physics 

Clm 2 (DM Q: M B Lawrence: V a 
S lxsmlth 

Cl» 2 (DM IQ: K FLynn 
Class X J M Conachcr: H M bon 
Onflnaqr Degree: T K Fairfax 

BA 

Social Psychology and 
Philosophy . 
ctm b J B Leith 

Social Psychology and 
Soda! Statistics 

Bass Is C M Dawson 

South-East Asian Studies and 
Social Anthropology 

Ctm 3 CDfc» Q: ; W M Cook: S O 
Jackson 

Clan 2 (DM tty A Hamid 

Urban Studies 

Clm 2 (DM Q: S C Gilford 

School of Mathematical Studies 
BSc (Hons) 

Mathematics (Statistics) 

Ctm 2 (DM Q: A F Jones: PJ Senior; 
J C Staugtiter 

Ctasa 3 (DM IhHJ Cocfcman 
Clm 3: P W Monaghan 
Ordinary Degw K Phalp 

Mathematics 

ctm 3 (DM JQ: T J Potliecanr 
Ontoanr Dsgmt: J D Cooper: J N Lay: 
A M Robinson: G A Tale 

Mathematics (Mathematical 
Physics) 

Class I'P A Oiannell 
Ctm 2 (DM 0» J P Wlfflams. 

Mathematics (Pare 

Mathematics) 

Class 3 (DM Q: R J Morris 
Clm r (DM H): M (C HUdUCTi 
Class t a McFaii: P A Thompson: I J 
R Clarke 

Mathematics - (Applied 
Mathematics) 

Clm2 (DM Q: N Dedduwa: J D Ealex 
C T Quick 

Bass 3: A Cameron: D J Fasten G 
Martinez 

Computing, Operational 
Research 
and Statistics 

Base 2 (DM Qs T B Saint J 5 Pa**: S 
P*TKl«HiS 

Ctm 2 (DM IQ: J E Janwii J J 
Mar kinder: K K Purohlfc M , A 
Ririwown 

Class 1AC Caroemen COM Chan: C 
ElMrauou: G HarateMdia: 0 A How- •- 
art 

Mathematics and Accounting 
Clm 2 (DM Qi P A Qinneld: C J 
Cooow - - - 

Clan 3 (DM H): J B Pasafldd 
Clasa 3: m k Reiihaiha: M Young 

Mathematics and Economics 

Bass 3 (DM 11)1 W B D'Steop- 
Bau 3s T Kimberley E J RoOwsv 


Mathematics and Philosophy 

Clrn 2 (DM It); NAS Endtcott 

Mathematics and Computer. 
Science 

Bm 3 (DM Ifc A H Anderaoiu AN 
GOtoft: KMT McCarthy: R SondW 
Ban 2 (DM D):T M Dennison: B C 
Smith: R J weeks 
Ctau 3t P AmetL J R Norman: D G 
Ward 

Actuarial Science 
2 (DM I): R J Karting 
ctm 2 (DM IQs G R Fallows 
Ctau as □ D'Medo: R G Kern: M Lam; 
D J Sweeney 

BA 

English and French Law 
Ban n (DM Q:M R Butler Payette 

Sociology and Philosophy 

Ordinary mm: P V Jinks 

Management Science with 
Cbm poring 

Ctm 3 (DM H): M-c Tung 
Social and Educational 
Psychology 

N J Lock 

Social Psychology 

CMl 2 (DM Q P J Flridlng 
Politics A Government 
data 2 (DM Q P J Hethenngton 
Accounting 

am I (DM Q: C P Brook er: M 
Girraedy: 5 J Eddy: C J FtttaU: M D 
FTO-sTa JOCrtW* KSHhm G L 
Hopkins: J P kHK M H M Lee: D 
Morgan: H S D Ong: K Y Quan: C A 

IQ: P M AmboL R K 


Redgmenl. 


I HarUsnL.S M Ua^ss: R 


Clm 2 (DM 2): A M Ashford: S M 
BMidiecombe: JP_J Bcwsodc F H 
Bradshaw: D G Close: W R Cook S T 
Cutler: A P D Emery: R M Forster: S 
A D Godquhi; C P N Kibble: A P 
Maclean: E Reeves: A G Shaw: m 
S hetnrard: CBC Slmond: M R Slack. 
Clm Hk I J Main A Shaw: 

Ordinary Agn I D C Soartu 

Economic and Social History 
Clm tJ j stake 


2 (DM Q J A Bullion: M A 

S^^J%^: A A C F t tei!}g 

Luilerlocb 

Economic & Social History and 
History 

Clm I (DM 2): D H Weymouth 

Economic A Social History and 
Politics A Government 
Ctm 2 (DM |) M J Childs 
Ow 2 (DM IQ L K Poole. 

Economic & Social History and 
Sociology 

Clrn kgWr IQ D J E\ans: £ C Jones: 

Economics and Politics & 

Government 

Ctm 2 (DMI) MHOanWc: BJ Walsh 
Ml 2 (DM 10, J A Clifford: M M 
D^Soozar M D Lewis: -t K snarka 
Bus Id: O A Jones 

Economics irith French 

0 D A R 

Economics with Computing 

Bass 2 (DM It) P G King 

Economics and Economic & 
Social History 

Ban 2 (Dfcr O P J Randan 
Clm 2 (DM H) O BamkMe 

Economics and Econometrics 

Bass b H L Cameo 
a m 2 (DM Q A P Owner 
dm 3 (DM IQ A T Gosling 

Economics with a Langnage 

Clm r (DM It) P J Mettcfshaw 

Industrial Relations (Law) 

2 (DM IQ 0 A Kufell 
Industrial Relations (PoUtics & 
Government) 

Ctm 2 (DM Q K E Sarnuetx 

3. (DM nr) R G Burton: M j Hah: - 


H -Tcngt I G TonUtoson 
dm Hfc J P Gorrell: A R HL Stock: D 
K T Pasel 

I A D Peters 


Economics and Politics A 
Government 

dm 2 (DM Itj: J J Munashbraiwe 

Law 

KSc 

Sociology and Social Policy A 
Administration 

ctm 2 (DM H); M K M Chow 

Accounting and Economics 

Bass 2 (DMO SBD FUUnghatn: BC 
Lochead 

Bm » (DM 2): 6 A MBdUi MMM-..K K . 
Cheong: V J Ecdes: C B Head: M B 
W«bb. 

. Accounting and Law 
Ctosl (DfcQ M R.nuings . 

Clm 2 (DM IQ:C w Chew; J M Cross: 
P N snorrock: S K Tanna. 

Accounting and Social Statistics 
Bata 2 (DM IJilFM Chan 

Accmmtiag with Computing 
Clm 2 (DM 0 K JAdnams: O J 
Arrosirofw: D K BjOcher. v w s 
Chan: L M Davies CNJfowG H 
Lee: R w Rove: MS Shato M D Soba 
H R Thomas: R V K Tran; W c S 
Wong. 

Class 2 (DM ID: It AL Anton: G S Ball: 
S J cooper: D K Fatter. C UmNJ 
Maine: K WNp: r K Pamar M Shah: 
S W Tea J W C Woo: C J Woolf 
Onttovy dagim N w Raiah 

Accoanting with French 

Bus 2 (DMQ J S Standing 
dm2 (DM IQi SC Money: HJ warn 

Development Studies 
(Economics) 

Clm 2 (DM Q C I Mead 

Devdopment Studies (Economic 
and Social History) 

Clm 2 (D£ It): R J Martin 

Development Studies (Sociology 
and Social Anthropology) 

Ctm 2 (DM ORA Gam- 

Economic Analysis, History and 

Policy 

dm > (DM Q G J A email 
Clm 2 (DM IQ D J Heoarty 

American Studies (Politics & 
Government) 

Bm 2 (DM I) W Barton 

Ctm 2 (DM D)AC Attwoodr N M A 

Pavey 

Bm Hfc S G H Edwards 
British and American. Policy 
Studies 

Ctm 2 (DM Q L A -Rennie - - - 
Education and Social Policy A 
Administration 

Ctm 2 (DM Q S M S Fan 

ctau 2 CDM H) S A de Jong: M H Law. 

Economics 

Bm 2 (DM 1): S H Betcham: B J 
Cohen: CE Cooper: S J Crtddte; P J 
Duncan: T A Fenton PHWI; S P R 
Neve: B. Pfoertzsch: T Reid: P L 
SUtahr: P E walcrs 


Geography 

cun 2 (DM DA J Bucfcl^P A Bun: M 
W Dairy: ST Hamson. L C lUundy: 
.A M Sopher 

Bass 2 (DM IDRM Batrt. K C R Bur- 
ion. N J iSanK v L Finrti; L 
HinnberMone: R J Hunt. O L Jonn. J 
C Passey: K E Rowseli: J A Thorp 

Law 

dm ts j L b Jap 
Ctm 2 (DM Q C E Alexander: J C 
Bn ion. H M Bn»s. R L Blackhuni: E 
Bradley: C C Bread ner: ME Calway: 
CSP Chong. D M K Chomr. L K 
Chixllrtoh; DW P Cook.-: NQMW' 
West: S C pyer: A G Efdrtow. J D 
Garlont: L SGundOn: D E Gulhn*. C 
JHarttoy: D E Jones: MF AS Julart. 
J ME Um: C M MacGregor: R 
Marmnil: B J McConnell: J MC 
Moruzzi. M T D Mulrooney: K 
Ncnirocrt Shambagrttv. H M Pah««iv. 
S A Phillips: v ASCott: A Shahajbf. A 
E Simmons: A P C Smith: JJ Smith. 
A M Taylor: S C Taykrr D • Thoroka .. 
a J Timms: P O A Uche: L S L Wee; R 
D WUhcoombe: H woUcind 
Ctm 2 (DM 0) O O AklnreM. P J 
AHUtn: AS Arfrul R. toman. J L 
Clifford SmHtu C L Dfwhurw: G T 
Donnell: M‘L Douglas. N Comm: A l 
Gregory: 1 C M Harrison. G A Jeffrey: 
A SEhd All- C £ Philip; P C Ryan P 
V Seaman: R V Selden; C L Wooles. R 
C W Yeung. TAT Zwenmn - - 
Ctm Hk M Abdul Rahman. M D 
Culling: B H A Hwmtd: R J Tugman 
Onflnanr ago: P C Ruane 

Law and Social Anthropology 

Ctm fc N Fulton 

Law and Economic A Social 
History 

Bm 2 (DM H) T C ChitUrk 
Law wtth.a Language 

Ctm X (DM Q S R Branigao. A H 
Burns J S Kanaan: E M S um: L C 
Stand ring Smith 

dm 2 (Dfv H) P E Freestone: S J 
Goddard Jones: S A Parker: R M 
Worthing 

Law and History 

am 2- (DM t)SL Payne 

Law and Philosophy 

dm b D W Mcvitty 

Law and Sociology 

CMti 2 (DM Q D M Jackson: C L 
Knotty* 

Bm 2 (DM IQ~C L Dixon 
dm III: J J SaRus 

Management Science with 
Comparing 
Clm fc M J Love 

Clm 2 (DM Q R HIBs: J F Howe: J L F 
Nazareth 

Ban 2 (DM to S J Beesley; P M 
□uncombe: B M Ooodboorn M R 
Gough: T F Heung: C Senaip. F K L 
Woo 

Clm Bb A O Kahan 

Political Economy 

Class 2(Efor U>S P Murphy 
Class HI: M W Pang 

European Management Science 

dm 2 (DM Q M R Tate Smith 
Class 2 (DM IQ A M L Callum. H C 
Daniel: J E Richards: P J Thomaztn 

European Management Science 
with Computing 

BBU 2 (DM IQ M R Usselmann 

Management Science 

BUS 2 (DM Q T A Jonkin: R J Kent: A 
C R Maddocfcs: A C PoUard 
Bass 2 (DM to R D P Oeranlvagala: M 
lomdou: S C D LKou: M Ntcotaides 
dm Olt G S Rostron 

Politics A Government and 
History 

Baca U (DM l); A J McLean. A J S 
Parsons 

Class 2 (DM N) T M Hall 
Politics A Government and Law 
Ctass 3 (DM -IQ J R Lee 

Politics A Government and 
Philosophy 

Cfcwa 3 (DM Q M J Oner 
Clm 3 (DM H) D M worn. 

Social Sciences (Politics A 
Government) 

Clm 3 (DM 1): P Hodgidraon 
Politics & Government 

Bm fc P Borschberg 

Bm 2 (DM I); A C Bentley: C J 

onnstod: M Mackey; P Singleton: M 

w Wallen: G R Young 

C*W» £ (DM 3)1 J W Adame G R 


English and French Law 

CMM fc S A LowtS 

Bass 2 (DMI) h M Browne; SJ Buck: 

^reTKh-' $ & j 5 

-English and German Law 

C>m fc QC More 


Bm ut N F Mencan 

Politics and r International 
Relations . 

Bm 3 (DM ; 1):_M AUayiaHnr E B 
tnf H T Evan*, d Laltu: J M 
Porter: T D Robemcn: T Yomj 
®"*l ffiM 2): T C Cherry: D Edafe: 
Yaies M "* onaza ' 1: A A SekonI: j c 

Social Anthropology 
Clm 2 (DM i): D C McNally 
Bm 3 A a Ankrah.-H B 

Karnes: C J Blrchley; A R Klfchjng: A 
M Panned: C E Yapp 

Sociology 

Clm 3 (DM l)! a J Hedge: T L Teger 
Bm3 (DM 2): D R Bfrnoaum: K 
Momirwr 

Ctoi 2t k F Nasi i 

Sociology and Social 
Anthropology- . 

Bass fc a J Bicker - 
Bm 2 (PM MM L Gotten-. C W 
Ferguson: H L -Martin: H K winter 
Bm 2 (DM 3): M A B Castle 
CMts Ob a Wilkins 

Pnbfic Administration & 
Management 

Bass 3 (DM l)i S J Harrtwm 
groJ JDMZ)i H M AAbang Medaan. 
P W Ayioth N R Crawford: A S 
Jenkins: w Jiiab: R i B Turk as 
Bass Ht m Tapuono 

Social History 

DMU 2 (DM I): H Mann: J M PbUUps 
2 (DM 2): d R Coleman: L J 
Ctm St C O jonee 

Sociology and Economics 
Bass 2 (DM 2); C S E Palmer 

Sociology and Politics A 
Government - 

Oteu 2 (DM i)s L S Parker. S A 
i nommon 

_Bm 3 (DM 2)| j B Ftohen L a Rhodes 

Ctau lit C B emu • 

Sociology and Social Polfcy A 
Administration 

Om 2 (DM »)i j a Hazell: G A 
wa *S9fl 

WOkim*™* 7,1 S ? alrt ‘ M Tang: M J 

Sociology and English 

CUM 2 (DM l)j M L R FLynn 

Social Psychology. 

Bm 2 (DM i)r D J Ounce: C A 
^rWelh, K M Oueard. T cKii P R 

BSW=UV!&S. m J E 

Social and Edncational 
Psychology 
h E C C Eacofl 

» <5*» t)i A ‘SwUanKJco 

Bm 2 (DM 2); M J Collin: S RalUiw 

Sociology and Social 
Psychology 

Om 2 (DM 2): s M Morgan 

Social Policy A Administration 

22! t L M PaUraymen 

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TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

PXTT 


Action 



For the ultimate 
Sales 

Professional, 
the ultimate 


challenge. 


EDS, one of the largest providers of Information Technology 
services in the world, is now set to rapidly expand its European 
Business Development Team. 


With a turnover of $4.2 billion and 43,000 staff, we are 
recognised leaders in the management and operation of comput- 
ing and communications environments for major corporations. 
EDS addresses the complex needs of companies in the Finance, 
Government, Retailing, Transportation, Manufacturing and 
Insurance sectors as well as major multinational corporations on 
a global basis. 


It’s a unique opportunity for a unique individual. You will 
be in at the early developmental stage of what is destined to 
become one of the largest sales programmes the industry has 
experienced to date. You will develop and implement sales 
strategies for complex and challenging business environments 
which are based on EDS’s ability to deliver solutions for a client’s 
information service requirements through a blend of hardware, 
software and communication technologies. 


We now have opportunities both in the UK. and major 
European tides. Tb arrange a confidential discussion: You can .. . 

1 Can other Roger Baker or Eaul^ Wilson on01-8612233extensions 
3192/3242 dnzmgoffice hours. - 

•• / '* ' " or ; _ ■ V\ 


Are you ready to take on the challenge of EDS New 
Business Development? You are, if you enjoy working in the 
rarefied atmosphere of Executive level sales. In fact, you’ve 
already proved you’re a self-starter with all the entrepreneurial 
qualities it takes to succeed. Qualities like creative ability, con- 
ceptual thinking, board level negotiating skills and all-round 
business acumen. You are a proven performer and ready to meet 
the ultimate sales challenge. 

Our compensation program equals the challenge we offer. 
Base salary and commission will enable you to be among the 
top earners in the industry. Future earnings are limited only by 
your success. 


3-Wnte endosfeg ytnirc.v. ttfltoger Baker; EDS Executive Search, 
Queens House Wfest, Greenhfll Way, Harrow, Middlesex HA1 1GR. 


Electronic Data Systems 


^ - 

; ■ » •* tf • 


ARE YOU AT THE CROSSROADS 


MARKETING MANAGER 

FINANCE COMPANY 


Badenoch & Clark 


Very often, executives and other 1?* 
professional people contemplate 
a change right in the middle 
of their career. 

Most often their reasons 
for this are a general dissatisfaction with their 
present career and the belief that they could 
and should be doing better. 

Chusid Lander is a group of specialist 
career consultants who for many years have 
been helping people earning £15,000 a year, 
or more, to get better jobs -whether they are 
currently in a job, unemployed or fating 
redundancy. 

Vfe have turned pessimism into 
optimism, failure into success and 


. jaded Executives into highly 
successful people earning very 
much more- and we can prove it 
For many years, we have been 
guiding people in the right 
direction - now it's your turn! 

Telephone us to arrange a confidential 
personal assessment, without obligation, or 
write to*. The Administrator, Chusid Lander, 
Ref: o / • / z 35/37 Frtzroy Street London 

W1 P 5AF - enclosing a brief career summary. 


We arc one oFBriuin’s roosi successful, young, agprssive and highly professional 
finance companies. 


Our continued planned growth requires that we recruit a high calibre Marketing 
Manager to develop ana coordinate our Finance/Leasing Plans, Advertising. 
Market Identity ana Customer Liaison. 


The position will be Rocester based and offers an attractive salary pins Profit 
Sharing Plan. Company Car. Subsidised Mortgage. Private Medical Scheme and 
reJocaiioa expenses. 


SENIOR 

CREDIT 

MANAGER 

To £30,000 + Car 


The successful applicant wilt be well educated, have at least 3 yean experience 
with a mqor national finance company, have a natural ability Tor creative think- 
ing. flair and i magi nation. 


An ability to read market trends and position the company to benefit from them 
will be an overriding factor. 


LONDON ~ 01-5806771 MANCHESTER 061-2280089 

BIRMMGHAM 021-6438102 NOTTINGHAM 094937911. 
BRISTOL 027222367 GLASGOW 041-3321502 

BELFAST . 0232621824 


01 CHUSID LANDER 


Apply with fall C.V. to Gordon Green, Managing Director. 

JCB CREDIT LIMITED, 

\^V^\ The Mill, Rocester, 

\u\tW 3 Staffordshire 

ST14 5JW 


£25K+ 

PROFIT SHARE POTENTIAL 


UK based Management Consultancy seek Project Directors/Managers 
with the ability to develop and implement project strategies for one or 
man: projects, each comprising 4/5 Consultants. 


Age 28-40. Must have sound experience in existing cost reduction 
oriented consultancy practice. ■ 


Contact Jo Goodwin on 
0742 755631 


BROOKLOWE LIB 



375/385, -Glossop Road, Shewed. S10 2HQ. 


ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, 
LOWER NUTT. 


The Hurt Vatoy Energy Board has > vacancy fora N«w ZsMnd 
n ag Oturad O ectrical Cnglnaor or an Bactrical Enghear suffl- 
ctondy quaffed to become rsgistarad in New Zealand. 
Xppfcants should be aged about 30 and hare at aa ri cfydUtritw. 


The Board Is a pubic uifey supptyteg D ecUicfcy and Gee to the 
greater pan of me Watington Metropolitan Aree. The position is 
located in tM Board’s Head Office BuihSng. Lower Hutt. 12 mfes 
north ot Wo On gt or v . New Z ea l and. 

The a ppohdee w# be expected to assist the Assistant CNsf 
Beartcal En ginee r with any ol the dudes wtach ere his teepoo- 
stotoy. to stand hi lor Area Distribution Engineers and to 
undertake flehJ projects as required. 

The Board offers a generous stHay. e w efen t working contS- 
tions. p romotion pree p ecte and mny.stafl prtvflegee. Removal 
expanses end motiniflil uhi ti ray be open to ngoMn. 
-Further Wwnwtion end sppfcsfion ferra are awifabie from ttts 
Pemoonal Deparmant Hutt Uafey Energy Board. Private Bag, 
loner Hutt. New Zealand. TaL (Ot) 666-929. 


HUTT VALLEY 
ENERGY BOARD 


ecutive Project Co-ordinatoj 

£ 15,000 


A substantial servin' organisation based in Central London with a regional 
_ network of seme 20 mfices and 3/300 employees is seeking a Project ■ 
Co-onfinator *o work cioseiywiAtbrir two senior de c isio n makes. 

This is an ctceDe n t c a reer opportunity far x graduate aged 26-35 yeart who is 
ir m ere m ri in ob taining ffru han rl fjmcricnce of rhe inrinme workings xod 
decision maJdng processes of a lu^ly successful business. 

Applicants should be nmnetHe; have excellent communjcsjon skiOs; die 
abniwro work ondidr own inraative; have an undemanding of the business 
world and its related poKrical and economic fianots and enjoy a £251 moving, 

people orientated armopmetn. 

AppEaats should appfy m writing to: Mr Geoffrey Nash or phone 01-4371014 

Macgain 

& Associates 

RcenBa n eatCooRfams 130 R^mt Sam, London W1R5FE 


based in Central London with a regional 
3/300 employees is redong a Project ■ 


interested in 


Our client, a m^jor international commod- 
ity trading company, wishes to appoint a 
senior manager to develop and strengthen 
its credit department 
The successful applicant who must have a ! 
thorough knowledge of commodity mar- 
kets and of documentary credits, will be a 
graduate or hold a professional qualifica- 
tion. Aged 28-35, candidates should have 
completed a formal credit training pro- 
gramme and should be able to 
demonstrate their ability to succeed in a 
demanding environment. A working 
knowledge of French or German would be 
an advantage. 

This position represents an excellent 
opportunity for career progression and the 
remuneration package will be made suffi- 
ciently attractive for the right individual. 
To discuss this further, in strictest confi- 
dence, please contact Christopher Lawless. 


Financial Recruitment Specialists 
16-18 New Bridge St London EC4V 6AU 
Telephone 01-583 0073 


RESTAURANT AND 
WINE BAR MANAGER 


Experienced/ qualified required for 
leading West End Wine Bar/ 
Restaurant Excellent salary for the 
right person. 


The Canning Kenkyusha School, Japan 


We are a very successful, new subskfary of our London-based training 
organisation specializing in business communication in English. 


We train Japanese executives for their international business dealings. 
You. win have to contrbute your professional experience to Improving 
Iher performance In English in multinational meetings. 

We are looking for graduates aged between 26 end 35, wfth at least 
two years commeroal/industriai background. Previous experience of 
training is useful but not essential. 

Training, which is paid, begins hi London on 5th January 1987 and 
continues in Tokyo from 12th January 1987. Visas lake at least three 
months so-please apply immediately. 

The current starring salary is ¥3,600,000 p.a. net 


Please write enclosing a C.V. giving full details of afl types of work 
experience and giving home and work 'phone numbers- to 


Anno Staunton . 

-The Canning- School 
88 Earls Court Road, London W8 6EG 


EXECUTIVE 


A Jeatfng Omani advertising agency requires a 
top qudfy media executive to sefl space In 
In terna tional, pan-Arab and national newspa- 
pers and magazines in the Sultanate. 

Thts-is a start-up job and requires an enterpris- 
ing; dynamic and lard working peron who Hkes 
to get out and to get things done. 

The position Is Muscat based, wifi oav exceo- 


The position Is Muscat based, wifi pay excep- 
tionally well and is, ofcourse, open to fades as 
wen as to men. Interviews in London. Please 
send short, hand written letter to: 


Paul M. Griffin. 
Park Advertising 
8 Adam St 
Strand 

London WC2N 6AQ 


International 
Marketing Manager 


The Hugh Johnson Collection Ltd is a 
new company marketing luxury wine ac- 
cessories world-wide. We are looking for 
an ambitious person with experience of 
marketing luxuzy goods to develop and 
coordinate markets in Britain, Europe, 
the USA and the Far East. Knowledge of 
languages is an advantage. An interest in 
wine and its traditions is important. Ex- 
cellent references -are 


The salary and commission will be com- 
mensurate with performance at a high 
leveL Apply in writing to: 

Chris Todd 

The Hugh Johnson Collection Limited 
5 Praed Street, 

London W2 INJ 



Reply with CV to BOX A06. 


TRAINEE BROKER 


A vacancy has arisen 
in a leading West End 
Brokerage. The 
successful applicant 
win be 23+ and of 
smart appearance. 


Please caB 
Chris Unwin 
on 01-409 1215 


SPEAK WELL? 

Mae* £400 a week? 

AgBd 23 • 50, nasxnoiy mteti- 
tgun/MSiKiied. very deter 
nwen/jetf-fOam m UN e 
ngoum at femur tod or wil- 
mg to tom. then ttteptane me 
today as our next training 
CDWSKt start on 26th August amt 
la September m our oltas near 
1&1QS toss station. No evma 
fir weekend work and you dont 
need you mn car or phone. 


Telwlw i Herat Tritefc 
BVS37OTS7 or 837 5S3L 


LA CREME 
APPOINTMENTS 
APPEAR ON 
PAGE 6 











GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


SALES EXECUTIVES 


&30KOTE 


C.CS. the UK distributor for the American multi-million dollar communications 
conglomerate, CONTEL, are expanding their systems sales force. 

They have an immediate requirement for individuals who can demonstrate a 
successful track record in the medium-sized business systems sales or production 
control field 


Aged between 25 and 30, of graduate calibre, successful applicants will possess the 
ability to perform well under pressure and achieve consistent results within a dynamic 
sales environment 


For further information call, or write with a fall CV to Robert G. Cox, 
An Bout du Monde, 10 Bedford Road, Bedford Part:, London W4 1JJ. 
Telephone: 01-747 5039 or Vodaphone 0836 217995. 


Au Bout du Monde 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


EMPLjO/MENT AFFAIRS i^TIT 
DIRECTORATE ■ K | 

Head of 
Employee 

Relations Department 


ARE YOU INVOICED WITH INSURANCE 
OR THE COMPUTER INDUSTRY? 
ARE YOU TIRED, DISILLUSIONED AND 
LOOKING FOR A NEW CHALLENGE? 


We are looking for an irxft/idual who has a rare combination of 
talents to fill this important and chaitenghg position. Initiative 
needs to be combtoed with analytical abity; knowledge of 
current employee relations practices with commercial good 
sense; and a good pen with an enjoyment of public spealdng. 

The successful appficant wffl be part of a young team and wi 
be responsible for the development of CBI poBcy on practical 
employee relations issues as wefl as for the CBrs promotional 
work in the field of employee invotvement This embraces the 
preparation of policy papers and briefs; contact with senior 
management r member companies; the organisation of a 
comprehensive conference and workshop programme; the 
provision of advice to members, 'not least trough the 
preparation of publications; and management of a consultancy 
service based on communication audits. 


The post provides an excellent opportunity for someone with 
recent although not necessary extensive employee relations 
experience to widen their horizons. 


Salary is related to age and experience. Benefits include 
company car, a performance related bonus and BUFA. 


As a leader in the European Leisure Industry, we have a 
number of vacancies for experienced, proven sales people to 
sell villas and timesbare in the United Kingdom and Spain. 
We’re not looking for people who wanton easy life. We’re 
looking for people who can sell an easy way of life. 
People who can convert leads, people who can establish 
relationships and make presentations. 

For people who sell the good life, we guarantee a good 

living. 

Earning potential is £50,000 and over per year. 

More than enough to buy your own place in the sun. 
Also EXHIBITIONS ORGANISER required. Nationwide 
coverage, but based in the West Midlands. 
Required to co-ordinate busy Exbibitions/Promottons 
programme. Full written applications orgy to 
- Please apply to: Personnel Director 

DMDM 
121 Etifpy Street, 
Hehley-in-Arrien 
"Wfesf Midlands, B95 5AU 


Please reply enclosing comprehensive CV and stating present 
salary to Personnel Department, Confederation of British 
Industry, Centre Point, 103 New Oxford Street, London 
WC1A1DU. 


THE NATIONAL TRUST for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty 


MIDLANDS 


Employment 

Negotiators 


Renter Simian seeks nvo weO educated people to woris at its excellent new 
Qty Centre offices. The work is finding lawyers employment and whilst no 


Cfty Centre offices. The wade is finding lawyers employment and whilst no 
experience is sought and training vriU be given an outgoing nature and the 
ability to deal wdl with people will be required. One person appointed trill be 
30-40 and the other muter 30 years okL Any experience in nxn&nnent or 
estate agency wiD be an advantage. 

Remuneration is negotiable up to c£14,000 and will include BUPA and 
insurances. The company does not pay commission. 

To apply for or to discuss this post contact Robert Macdonald, 

Reuter Simian Limited, 26-28 Bedford Raw, London WC 1 R 4 HE. 
Telephone 01-405 6852 . 


RESEARCH ASSISTANT - 
HISTORIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 


We are seeking to appoint a second Research Assistant to provide support in the 
Historic Buildings Department at the National Trust’s Head Office in London. 
The post holder will assist primarily in administrative work connected with the 
care and conservation of new and old buildings, garden architecture and specific 
projects. 


Candidates must have knowledge of the history of Architecture, practical experi- 
ence of the construction, care and conservation of buildings, and administrat iv e 
experience. A knowledge of the work of the National Trust and experience in 
lecturing would be an advantage. A driving licence is essential. 

Age range 35-40 

Salary £9,320 pa ^ £10,790- pa. -- 


REUTER 
SIM KIN 


Please write enclosing full CV to? 
Margaret Harris, Personnel Officer 
36 Queen Anne’s Gate, London SW1H 9 AS 

dosing Date: 22 August 1986 


RECRUITMENT 


TECHNICAL 
SERVICE ENGINEER 


We are a major company seeking 

SENIOR MANAGERS 


to control a diverse range of skilled and 
semi-skilled, manual staff in a unionised 
environment in the entertainment industry. 


A leading International Manufacturer of Papennachine Cloth- 
ing requires a motivated young Service Engineer. The position 
would suit a Mechanical Engineer qualified to degree level with 
at least four years experience in Papermill Production Engineer- 
ing. or a Papermachine Clothing Company. 

The applicant would preferably be located in France, West 


Suitable candidates must have proven ex- 
perience of the following:- 


Germany or the United Kingdom and have a knowledge of the 
English, French and/or the German language, and also must be 
prepared to spend a minimum of ISO days per year travelling. 
Minimum age 25 years. A clean driving licence is essential. 


- direct and positive management 

- staff scheduling to meet variable 
workloads 

- industrial relations practices 

- motivation of staff 


Salary: commensurate with experience, with annua] reviews. 
The company provides the usual hinge benefits, and a two litre 
company vehicle would also be provided. 

Applications in writing to: • 


You must also have the ability based on 
technical knowledge and skills you have 
probably gained elsewhere to acquire the 
specific awareness which is necessary to 
carry out the work. 


Niagara Lockport 


Salary will depend upon the degree of 
experience and skills of a successful 
candidate. 


(Quebec Industries Incorporated) 

U.K. Office 

12a Town Street, Marple Bridge 
Cheshire SK6 5DS 
England. 


Base: London 


Reply in confidence with a full'C.V. to: 
Box EOS 


ASSISTANT 


7 M ^ ; 


is required for a busy and friendly 
medical agency based in WC1. Ap- 
plicants who are well presented with 
a good telephone manner should 
also possess a patient and tactful 
disposition together with a sense of 
humour.. Intelligence and ability to 
use your initiative is a must Previ- 
ous medical experience is not 
essential but would be useful. Pre- 
ferred age 25+. Salary £l 0,000 
negotiable + luncheon vouchers, 4 
weeks holiday and perks. 


Please send CV to: 


-Miss Mary Saunders 
Manager 
18 John Street 
London WC1 
Telephone 01-242 2085 


nn 


TTVflT, - . 


LTU 


Memo* rant, Cram 


Numerate 

Graduates 


To work with the UK leader in 
Pay and Benefits Surveys 


Victoria 


HAY-MSL produces a range of sways of pay and benefits that are the 
most authoritative and comprehensive in the UJt We have a major 
progr am me already underway to further enhance the range and 
quality of these. 

Wd ae looking to fill a number of both Junior and more senior 
positions, the former with recent graduates and the totter with 
graduates who already have related work experience- Successful 
applicants must be interest e d In the design, devel opment, 
administr a t io n, arwrfysis and presentation of pay and benefits surveys, 

and for the senior positions must also be wflfing to market the surveys 

and work extensively away from the office with clients. 

Starting salaries tor the junior positions will be £8,000 - £8300 plus 
bonus; for the more senior positions salary will depend on experience. 

Please write with toll C.V. including current salary, or telephone for an 
application form: Sarah Patterson, HAY-MSL Management 
Consultants Group Ltd., 52 Grosvenor Gardens, London, SW1WQAU. 
TeL’ 01-730 0833 ExL 371. 


Management Information 
Administrator 


An interesting opening has arisen for an Administrator in the 
Secretariat at the Association's Head Office in Basingstoke. The 
Secretariat provides administrative support and information for the 
AA Committee, the Association's group of Companies and Senior 
Executives. 

The Administrator win provide editorial expertise with regard 
to the writing of papers and other material for the Committee, 
Director General and Senior Management; in the preparation, co- 
ordination and production of a dig^t of information on AA activities 
which is circulated monthly to all Management; and in the ooUation 
and circulation of other information. The Administrator will also 
provide an editorial and administrative service in connection with 
Committee and other major meetings, and in respect of formal and 
social functions* 

Applicants should have a good general education to at least 
‘A 1 level standard and preferably nave had experience in asimflar 
working environment In addition to administrative skills and an 
ability to write dearly and concisely, highly developed skiRsoU— 
communication and diplomacy are essential as the post involves 
contacts atsenior level. 

A starting salary of£8,500 is offered, together with a 
comprehensive benefit&package; Including relocation assistance 
where appficabie. The Association also provides training and 
induction facilities. For further information and an application form 
please contact Mrs. K.J. Bowman, Personnel Officer, 


AA 


THE AJIOMOBILE vISSOCWnON 


Fanum House, Basing View, 
Basingstoke, Hants RG21 2EA 
Tet (0256) 492971 


PART QUALIFIED 
ACCOUNTANT 


£ 12,000 


£ 18,000 


Corporate Rnance. -Treasury — Financial and Management Reporting 


..Costing ..-Project Management — Planning ....Financial Analysis 
— Management Consultancy ....Marketing .-..Internal Audit and EDP 


— Management Consultancy ....Marketing .-..Internal Audit and EDP 
are just a few of the many areas in which we urgently require ambitious 
part-quaKfied accountants. 


At Hudson Shribman we have smirch envied reputation for 
profe ss ionalism, career guidance and probably the most 
comprehensive client base a young., aspiring accountant could wish to 
find. 


Whether contemplating a Job move, or simply seeking impartial advice 
on your career development can one of our consultants now for an 
initial discussion. 


MAKE YOUR NEXT MOVE THE RIGHT ONBU 




which career 

SUITS BEST? 


THE DIRECT LINET0 YOUR NEW CAREER 


tamasaKraeaiweamrtgowrS^^ 
sucassM. badwriaagzriSBddeny- 
UNEMPL0YED. 

0icr7»dDetoPKfosnnewaiwris8d! 


ConuBaiiqmcomsttoaaM^iocw 
dcn&whoareoatolwark. — 

Mamspeaafeban&eiHfe^^ _ 

saw* ewcufiws. Fora free confidents tSswsan# I v 


Professional GuUance and 
Assessment for H ages. 


7H4 yrx Courses. Caras 

ycx Fraptss. Clanflw 
35-54 yn: Aniew, 2nd Cmcre 


Fletcher Huri&AssooatEsareagjeoafcfteara 
estabfehed to trip redundant, wpat or those 
SK^adanEEtafindBttn^oos^.qiBcty 
andprotesarfly Brough On lmdraflsedjob 
market 


TeUtod Renter 


FuB ike* in **> twdwre- 

;'••• career analysts 


FLETCHER HUNT & ASSOCIATES 
Pwnier House, 77 fofati Street, WIRIRB. 
let Ql -439 1188 




THE COMPLETE FINANCIAL SELECTION SERVICE 

Vernon House, Sjcjjjon Avenue, London WC1 A 2QH. TeL 01 -83 \ 2323 


Applkanons a raravii e d 
from 19 fl 6 qiadnatiBa for the 


postal ’ 

RESEARCH 

ASSISTANT 


al a rapidly expanding- 

Gnnaf psveyuof end 
commercial property 
agents in (he City of London. 

.The soocasaful Candida* 
will be responsible far . 
researching an extensive 
Office M a rfc mr twe*n nam . y 

Systran and will be reqisied 
to collate and present the 
infaunaiiaa far internal nse . 
aadp uMahed Tp oriir. 

Applications in writing 
wifoa cnrutaiUim viae 
Jtodd.be addressed to: r . 
Sandra Joees BA, 

Bead of .Research, 

Baker Homs Saunders 
NackmD House. 

Guildhall Yard, 

LONDON EC 2 V 5 AB. 

TeL 01-726 2711 



FINANCE 


leading drinkt^l 
need a capable perranH 
IBM PC and Lo tus 123 ax. 

■ L_Iju„ihiLui 

iiRsacrasassCKj 


For rurtfw data** see 
. .MARKETING 
CONSULTANTS In Creme 
da la Crame or ring Wcota 
DawasOpoAQ on 
01-235 1221 


JOBS DITWMHdnA. AftJ. 
ZfiO vacation for news girfc 
18+ k> work h, ram«» Alptat 
more. Long hour* ana very 
torn work bui good- pay and 
ORKUOom. Know Wsr of 
Reach Orman and or howl 
expert rnce vetuMMr An low 
last full season Oc. - April m 
lervtewiSepL WrtwwHiaAU 
P O. Box are. London SWIX 
BIX 



negotiator 


Islington Estate Agents require a 
Residential Negotiator with some 
experience. Excellent salary plus 
commission and car allowance 

- Telephone 01-482 1050 


MANAGEMEIT 

OPPORTUNITY 


rumouCBMoe. central London. 
Inlrresinw \araocv for tnight. 
IWd working and career imM- 


ea iu» wjw wAUant. 
wonderful ownrtunfly W X*® 1 
siudenl of renames. -MU*» be 
aide lo drhe and tyn« Refer- 
ences reawrvd 01 727 8106. 


CVS, WHWIIW MLB AM* 
expert lob search guMtura 
Rwlo-v av MgS***™ 
BerUumsled K«427> 72209 


CVa for pro f essionals W grafts. 
smnaM. CV Plus. 90 Ownwjfl 
Dow. SaMttary WlQfc 0722 


SKI mSORT KPS 86/87 sea- 
son S5 fs good French, 

rrosonahle skMng. rewt-ani «- 
Mrlence raieiUVN Cowries or 
suiMM Bin* lain pbul Free- 
dom HoUday* Oi 7di 4660 


UOYDS MARINE SVMMCAn- 
maim a brignt vtung WW» 
cduraim lo level siandam U 

WW die undrrwrtKng bdp. 
Please aotriv in wrlluvfl only 
with fun CV to, Jssmtitne 
Matanev uhhm (.nderwwi- 
ing Aiomtv Ud 21 WMegaftr. 
Street t andon 1 1 7HP ' 


oo yw have MabMiy and 
. c ha racter to aartB in an 
anpawdBwjw tf d Cnd ai lenmga 

oWoBfTTyptng aaopntel - 
tegsttwr s«h Mtativs and 
satnusiasm. Car cwnwr. 


An exciting career 
is open to 
udividuak (22+) 
who are single 

minded and 
interested in their 
own future. This 
is an opportunity 
to earn over 
£20,000 pju and 
earn shares in a 
nationwide group. 

Please call 
Mir Pickerstrill 
OX-439 8431 


■***"* - CHALET aw. „ 

wtvS Si 

*? Good worktr/tSri^ 


Westlake & Co 

Member of 

THE STOCK EXCHANGE 




I ONE; DAY 
FORPWjSP 



2QTHSS 

V. 


rd oi as 4 0606 
















THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1 986 




me 

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11 l Vi ltMmNTPNfeii. 


COfllpJr !»*!■■ 


s Itsnr.t'ut 
With roi.:-»,i 
1? h*UU 
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kKblttr^r 


Any inav 
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K» tV>T..i: 
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(,o 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 



Sales Account Managers 

Outstanding Opportunities in Business Automation 


Realistic OXE. at least £50,000 p.a. 

Based In N.VK London Co m p eti ti v e Basic Salaries. Reafi 


SeBfng to major accounts In London and S.E. 

D DXIAPOiNT is a leader m bnsfnp-<re automation fo the 
UK. and throL^wut the worid. It has earned an 
acknowledged leadership position in IT by outstanding 
tedmolqgcal development over almost two decades which 
includes: 

• 1967 first mass market VDU 

• 1971 first desktop business system. 

• 1977 flitf toad area artwork (AR^^ 

• 1982 odour business graphics. 

• 19S41btaDy Integrated OJL<mIJUi 


DATAPOINT 


Competitive Basic Salaries. Realistic 
Guarantees. Qnality Car and Benefits 

D IKE^POINT are entering the new business year with 
ambitious expansion plans wbicbdemand the recruitment of 
a limited number of outstanding safes professionals. 

We want to discuss our superb earning potential and 
career prospects with high achievers who relate dosdy to 
the following: 

• Major acGomds/strategfc sefflng. 

• System* *effing at board lereL 

• A cCOODtHiM yMt 

• New business developments 

• Career motivated. 

Candidates abonfcf contact Bob Bower; Director of Hattons 
ntoiieadiUtf bb on Am tfpotataeott. fefc stosio/a 


n Nua M «i, 


n ut—i tu M o w cm 

IUi BI-UO 7XC3 


SPEOAUST RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Hoggett Bowers 

Executive Search and Selection Consultants 

BlUOMtHAM,CAa)IFF,CUSGOW,IStiS,lOlt)Otl,MANCHESIEIUN£WCASILE,SHEFFtElDaadV’7MiSOK 

Managing Director 

Personal Financial Services 

City, Substantial Remuneration Package 

Financial muscle, a household name and total board commitment are the key 
elements which will enable this well established organisation to becnmn a 
market leader in the provision of specialised personal financial services. Th»* 
existing product and client portfolio provide an ideal platform from which to 




up to £20,800 


a 


Design Centre Selection is a product: 
approval scheme under which the Council 
selects well designed British consumer and 
contract goods far promotion snd 
educational purposes. 

We need a qualified industrial designer to 
manage the activity and to ensure that it 
provides a comprehensive and up-to-date 
record of weH-detigoed British products. 

Applicants should have several years’ 
experience m industry end/or professional 


manufacture and marketing of consumer and 
contract products. Good managerial «k3b 
and the ability to communicate effectively in 
speech and writing are also mnw"tin1 

In addition to «n attractive sa la ry w e offer 
an excellent non-contributory pension 
scheme, a generous holiday allowance and 
other benefits. 

Pm farther and |»t> farm . 

please contact 

Miss Prtte Beard - • ■ ~ 

Personnel Manager 

The Design Council __ 

28 Hayxnarket . . 

London SW1Y 4SU- 
Telephone 01-830 8000 
ext 89 

An equal opportunities employer 


Key high profile appointment wfthfn our Public Affairs department- presenting the 
new image of The stock Exchange to trie general public. Substantial opportunity for an 
individual with creative flair and proven management skills. 

HEAD OF 

PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS 

£20,000 -£25,000 + Car 

The Stock Exchange is at the heart of the City's rapid evolution. There ts a significant 
change in attitude by the general public to the buying and selling of shares and there is a 
vast population of potential share owners seeing information. 

Your rote wffl be to assess and implement the best ways of communicating with and 
Informing visitors to The Slock Exchange and those seeking Information about buying 
and seffing shares. You wffl be responsible for training, developing and motivating a team 
of about 12 staff to assist you in achieving your objectives. A commercial approach to the 
deployment of financial resources is important 

Projects inchide 

• A major refurbishment for the Public Gallery of The Stock Exchange 

• Developing retail outlets 

: • Share information centra 

• Mobfle exhtoitions 

• Presenting the ‘electronic market floor 
Ymit background? 

You should be able to show that you have successfully developed pubic 
communicalioos and i nfor ma t io n for any substantial project, development or 
organisation. 

Excellent fringe benefits include non-contributory pension, free travel and BUPA. 


areas of tax planning and investment management . Relevant E-D.P. systems 
experience would be a distinct plus. Restructuring and repositioning will 
require strong management skills, a high level of intelligence and an 
uncompromising approach to achieving objectives. Probably agpd *10+, yntj 
will be mature, ambitious and looking for an equitable share ofvoiir sucres*.. 
Please forward detailed C.V. and list separately companies to whom you do 
not wish your application to be sent. 

J.R. Salmon. Homed Bowers pic, 1>2 Hanover Street, LONDON, IV JR HUP. 
01-734 6852, RefT 2 602&T. 

Marketing Director (Designate) 

North West, c£26,000 Car, Benefits 

A £l3m turnover private company, which publishes and sells a booklet with 
over 14.000 agents, throughout the UK. seeks a marketing professional Y> n i 
should be qualified to degree level, ideally with an MBA and marketing 
qualification and have at least one year’s marketing management expern -m 
Reporting to the Managing Director, this new position has been created to 
develop objectives, policies and programmes for the total marketing str.iiHuv 
of the company. Candidates, ideally aged 27-35, must have a proven tr.ii R 
record in marketing and also P.R. skills- It is envisaged that this key 
appointment will play a significant part in the growth plans of the umipau v 
R. rlude. Hoggett Bowers pic, St. form's Court. 78 Gortsidr Stn.vt, 
MANCHESTER, M3 3EL 061-832 3500. Re/: 33026 T. 


Export Sales & Marketing 
Manager 


NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE 
GENERAL 
MANAGEMENT 
WITHIN LOmiANHEALTHBOARD 


ONE DAY SEMINAR 
FOR PROSPECTIVE UNIT 
GENERAL MANAGERS 
SATURDAY 
20TH SEPTEMBER. 
1986 





1 ■ 


!■* # -' » i | " - j > » * *« 

*gn — > l W - -4 . m ■ n ip ■ I ' f U 


SmngHB 




Lothian Health Board 




*SH 


THE 

STOCK 

EXCHANGE 


• j -Please reply with full av. to: 
Jennifer Gregson. 

" . Personnel Manager , 

* Thfe Stock Exchange. 

Old Broad Street, 

London EC2N1HP. 


North West Based, cS20,000, Car 
The growth potential in overseas markets for this manufacturer of small 
specialist engineered products is significant. Supplying a large number of 
outlets, the customer base is extremely broad. Reporting to the Sales and 
Marketing Director, key accountabilities will be for determining the export 
sales/ marketing strategy and objectives and through a structured and 
professional team, ensuring that these objectives are achieved. Aged 3(1—15, 
relevant candidates must be experienced in export sales management, 
essentially within an engineering or related industry. Above all, they must 
have the ability to determine business plans, and be able to control all tin- 
functions related to the department, including office management and 
shipping. Regular travel is an important feature of the position. As part nf a 
major pic, success in this demanding role could lead to further opportunities 
within the Group. Benefits are considered first class and arc appropriate for 
such a senior appointment. 

G. Sable, Hoggett Bowers pic, St. John's Court. 78 Gartside Street, 
MANCHESTER, M3 3EL- 061-832 3500, Re/: 2SB821T. 


These positions are open to male or female candidates. Please telephone 
for a Personal History Harm to the relevant office, quoting the appropriate 
reference. 


BBQ APPOINTMENTS 


MILLS & ALLEN MONEY BROKING (SERVICES) LTD 

TANDEM/TXP - FINANCIAL. 

We - are developing a financial dealing system on Tandem equipment This is a leading edge 
project utilising networked broadcasting to. microcomputers. To further strengthen the 
existing team the following openings arc available: • ■ ■ 

. Project Manager £l8-22k 

A minimum of two years Project Management e xp erience is required to control the 
development of front and back office systems. Knowledge of TAL, Pathway, TMF and 
Guardian is essential. 

Analyst Programmer £15-18k 

A minimum of 18 months experience ofTandem Cobol is essential in order to assist with the 
hack office project TAL knowledge is preferable. 

The Company is a subsidiary of a U.K. PJLC, with offices in all international financial centres. 
The working environment is demanding and exacting therefore, potential candidates should 
be resilient and d edica t ed. 

Please apply in writing with current C.V. to: . 

Mrs. E. Mozley, Personnel Officer, 

Mills & Allen Money Broking (Services) LtiL, 

8th floor, Adelaide Honse, 

London Bridge, London EC4R 9HN. 


RELIEF 
PRESS AND 
PUBLICITY 
OFFICER 

Information 

Dfvison 

Central London 
£11,164 — £14,170* 


MA 

RESEARCH PROJECTS 

SALARY C. £ 16 , 000 /£ 17 ,Q 0 Q 

We are seeking someone who har served an ap- 
prenticeship wtth a motor manufacturer, has a 
Knowledge of car body design and preferably a pro- 
fessfcxudwiaBfication. Aged about 40 years, you 
must possess negotiating sldlls and be an exceoant 
communicator. 

The prime responsibilities are initiating and pro- 
gressing motor accident damage research 
programmes, evaluating methods, malarial and. 
tods used in motor manufacture and repair, liaising 
and negotiating with motor manufacturers and have 
a knowledge of work study and methods. 

You may currently be engaged in consultancy. .work 
study or body design tn the motor Industry and be 
ready for a more responsible rote. The postionqr- 
fere a rewantna and stoutating future for the right 
appticanL 

A nvKontr&utory pension scheme, subetfsed 
mortgage and a c&npany car torni pert o* an attmo- 
tive remuneration padcage. 

Written appli ca tion, with e.v. to: f ' \ 

The Director of Research, j * ==% 

The Motor tosurancti, / ££=? 

Repair Research Centre, / < —■ . 

CoOhrop Lana, Thafecham, / 

Nr. Newbury. * sr 

Berkshire, RG13 4NP. 


BROKING 

BREAK! 

Our expanding brokerage based in London and 
Bristol requires enthusiastic, ambitious, go- 
ahead young persons of smart appearance, ajpd 
20-^5 for RMiUnp n g career, with high earning 
potfnrifot, in the fiminciat world. 
Interested? Then contact: 

Mike Peach on 0272-213642 or 
Caroline Pavey on 01-240 9439. 


DIVISIONAL MANAGER 

Becbonic Displays 
Manchester 

We ere a well established company providing a wide range of 
electronic display equipment for the Ministry of Defence, 


We wish to appoint a divisional manager to take responsftvtity 
for the development of .an established manufacturing unit 
far which a fourfold increase in turnover is envisaged 
within the period of^ the current development plan. 

The Nrxtiwdual concerned will have experience of production 
management and control at a senior level in a technical 


BEZ5G S3S K R 

w mmm mm Sm 

mgESEEEZSSS 


CHIEF EXECUTIVE 

Home Counties based national dfetrfovtor of flexible 
and rigid tubular goods, valves and fittings, general 
engineering and petoH^emfcai. seeks a person to 
replace extetmg encumbent who wi remain as Chair- 
man for a time before retiring. Likely candidate wU 
currently be number one in similar organisation with 
£15M turnover. ... 

PteasB reply tioc- 

MrHH Stokes 

GOC Ltd. QOC House 
BJadcwater Way . 

Aldershot 

. HampsNre GU12 4D6 ' 


REPORTERS 

Radio Cornwall 
Radio Lancashire 
Racfio Merseyside 
Radio WM 

£8^28 — £10^81* 


FINANCE HOUSES 
ASSOCIATES 


ADMINISTRATION 




The Finance Houses Association repre- 
sents the sitereests of the instalment 
credit industry and is administered by a 
Secretariat with a staff of 15 whose role 
is to serve the Association's members 
and committees over a wide range of 
activities. 

The Association invites applications from 
candidates for the post of Administration 
Manager to be responsible to the Direc- 
tor-Secretary for all matters relating to: 

- upkeep of the premises 

- office administration including the su- 
pervision of a photocopying and post 
room 

- word processing and other equipment 

- accounts and budgets 

- employment and supervision of secre- 
tarial and general staff 

- organisation of functions including re- 
ceptions, major City dinners and 
conferences.. • 

Salary by negotiation. A pension scheme 
wiil.be provided. 

Applications wtth full c.v. should be sent 
mailed “PRIVATE" to: 

The Director-Secretary 
- Finance Houses Association 
18 Upper Grosvenor Street 
London W1X 9PB 


We are an equal 
opportunities employer 


This is a permanent appointment which provides coverage 
within the BBC’s Information Division, inducting Press and 
Publicity offices, Corporate Publicity and the BBC's staff 
newspaper Ariel, during the temponuy absence of staff, or 
when additional effort is required. Under the guidance of line 
managers, you win promote the activities of the BBC and act 
as a EiBC spokesman at^ Television Centre, to radio and 
External Services Publicity and in the central Corporate 
Publicity area. You will therefore be required to work from a 
number of bases, and outside normal office hours on 
occasions. 

Experience in journalism or publicity is essential as will 
be the ability to adapt quickly to working within different 
sections of the Division. You must also nave editorial 
judgement and be able to communicate accurately and 
convincingly in speech and writing. (Ref: 2340/T) 


Contract Reporters 

Radio Cornwall is looking for a young reporter (to be based 
Truro) capable of covering the vast range of news thrown up 
by this fascinating area — from the collapse of the 2.000- 
y^r-otd tin industry to the taking hostage, at gunpoint, of an 
entire district council committee! 

A solid journalistic grounding in newspapers would be a 
great advantage. You will need to be enthusiastic and ambit- 
ious and able to uphold toe high news-gathering standards 
of one of Britain’s most consistently popular radio stations. 

Further details from News Editor Phil Reeves on 
087275421 (Ref:2315/T) 

Radio Merseyside, broadcasting in one of toe newsiest parts 
of the country, now needs a contract reporter (based Liverpool) 
for one year to join its busy news team. The work is primarily 
reporting, interviewing, bulletin writing and newsreading. 

ideally you will be ambitious with at least three years 
journalistic experienca (Ref: 2321 /T) 

Reporters 

Ifyouareayoting, ambitious reporter with at least three 
years’ journalistic experience. Radio Lancashire and 
Radio WM have vacancies that may interest you. The work is 
primarily reporting, interviewing, bulletin writing and 
newsrekfing. 

Radio Lancashire (Based Blackburn). (Ref: 2320 /T) 

RacfioWM (Based Birmingham). (Ref: 2325/T) 

For aO posts, good microphone voice and current dm/mg 
ticence essential 


Salaries currently under review. 

TtaidbMnoaoffBNpA 
Relocation expenses considered for permanent posts. 

Confewtus im ined fet Bty for apptotion form (quota appropriate 
nrf. and endbsesia*.) BBC Appointments, London Wl A i aa. 
TeL 01-927 5799. 



LA COMISION DE LAS COMUNIDADES EUROPEAS 

organfza 

cinco concursos de m6ritos reservados a 
Rationales espanoies para puestos de 

JEFEDE DIVISION 

(formation universitaria indispensable - 15 afios de experien- 
ce profesionaU. Para los detailes solicltar losanurtcios de 
concursoa: 

commission des communautes Europeennes, 
Division Recrutement 

rue de la Loi 200. B-1049 BRUXELLES. 

Tdl.: 02 /235.H.H. 











.... fc-“ 



Tilt iiMBS 'iHOKbDAY aUGUM 14 iyoo 


GENERAL APPODSTIMENTS 


Business Management 
Adviser 


Prestige car importer Midlands 
c.£ 18 , 000 + bonus + quality car 


Our client, the highly regarded. UK 
subsidiary of one of the world’s most pres- 
tigious car manufacturers, has achieved 
outstanding success in the British quality car 
market, with sales more than doubling over 
the past few years. 

Continuing business expansion and a 
comprehensive programme of dealer develop- 
ment have created this new opportunity for 
a Business Management Adviser in the 
Midlands area. 

This wide-ranging role will involve the 
provision of guidance and support in all areas 
of financial and operational management to 
dealers throughout die region. Specific 
responsibilities will include reviewing dealers’ 
results, analysing problems and recommend- 
ing ways to improve business performance. 

Whilst formal accountancy qualifications 
are not mandatory, a proven remrd 
of management accounting/ fll a 

business advisory experience H 

gained in the moror industry or H . 
a similar high-profile sector is 


essential. Typically, therefore, applicants 
could be business management advisers with 
other manufacnirers/imponers or alter- 
natively zone managers possessing well 
developed financial skills. In all cases, 
the persona] presence to establish credi- 
bility rapidly with dealer principals and 
general managers will be of key importance. 
Preferred age range: 28-40. 

Tha is a senior role within the company 
with potential for further progression. Starting 
sakry will be around £18,000 plus bonus, 
with quality car, private family health care 
and, if appropriate, relocation assistance 
among the many benefits. 


□canons omx 

BY 


To apply, please send full cv to the address 
below, quoting ref: P3046/T on the 
envelope. Your application wiD be fo r ward ed 
h directly to our client unopened, unless 

A marked for the attention of our 

Security Manager with a note of 
companies to which it should not 
be sent. 


R\ Advertising 


Hyde Park House, 60a Knightsbridge, London SW1X 7LE. 
Tel: 01-235 6060 Telex: 27874 


Mq™m 


MARKETING MANAGER 

(Consumer Products) 


TRANSLATOR! 


Chesterfield 

Robinsons of Chesterfield are a substantial private company, manufacturers 
of babycare, cotton wool, feminine hygiene, dressings and non woven 
products to both retail and medical markets. 

To help us meet the dha I lenge of these interesting consumer markets, we are 
looking for a young marketing manager to join a small, but highly-skilled 
and innovative team managing a group of existing and newly-iaunched 
products. The job involves implementing and developing the business plan 


From GSUIMI into tucid, 
stylish English. An 
opportunity for some- 
one ambitious and 
craaBwe to make thair 
mark wHNn a City Arm's 
Research Dept Finan- 
cial exper ience Is 
essential and HBKH as 
a second language 
would be preferred. Exc 
salary. 


numeracy, capable of detailed analytical work and with good written and 

verbal skills, if you are mature, in your mid-20*s capable of meeting a 

challenge and have two years' experience in a consumer marketing 
environment, you could be (he person to makea significant attribution to 
our expansion and take advantage of the scope for personal development 
within the company. 

This position carries a salary of c.£1 1,000 plus an attractive benefits 
package, including relocation expenses where appropriate. 

Please write with full details of c.v., to: 

Mr. F. L Smith, General Manager, 

Personnel & Industrial Relations, 

Robinson & Sons Ltd., Wheat Bridge, Chesterfield, 

Derbyshire 540 2AO. 


II 018363794 II 

aOMlnCwBnri.limlwiWCaifll 


Wdiorcr 90% oran-duli 
io Smior Middle 

Mm— an a * icUnc jab 
■cm tli tween tbraagh the 
mLKtramea jou mmri 


Robinsons 
of Chesterfield 



ToEndaat toe onr ewer 
~3ndajna> end C.V.. 
Services can maxtome yoor 
ewer progression. contact 
m aam far a exploratory 
meeting; -at no cast or abb- 
gidn-artniiijoerCY, 


| Yaw tom cardd depend 
i oak. 


(toner AMmry Sentoee U4 
fi Qveca Street Msatinr 

London WIX7PH 

T«fcSl-4932MS 


A CAREER IN 
COMPUTER 
RECRUITMENT 


AREA MANAGER - 
IUITMENT CONSULTANCY 


Compuvae Personnel Services are a 
highly respected and long established 
Computer Recruitment Consultancy. 

Due to our continued growth and 
success we are seeking two exceptional 
individuals to fern us. 

The successful candidates will probably 
be of Graduate standard, have a true 
desire to succeed and a genuine interest In 
the computer industry. Personal qualities 
are more Important than experience. They 
will find high standards of achievement a 
demanding but informal environment and a 
rewarding career. 

For further details phone Martin Barry 
on 01 -253 5042 or send a CV. for hb 
attention. 


Our (Ant a UK subsidiary of one of the world’s 
tearing recruitment groups, are keen to talk to 
people, who have a proven sales background 
preferably gained within the recruitment indus- 
try. Bass o in central London you will be 
responsfota for management and development 
of afi branch resources within your area. You'l 
be expected to achieve and improve upon profit 
and sates levels by the provision of a nigh stan- 
dard of service to applicants and cSents alike. Of 
course the job is a demanding one that requires 
a proven abJBty to manage people whist provid- 
ing a skitled team with guidance, motivation and 
enthusiasm. In return our clients wifi provide 
thorough training and backup resources to- 
gether with an outstanding salary package 
including a comprehensive bonus scheme, car 
and other fringe benefits. 

Please send full CV to: 

MaUermao SummerfieW & Partners (Ref Tf) 


2 Goodge Street 
London W1P IFF 


7 2M 25 CITY ROAD, LONDON £C1 
Telephone 01-253 5042 


mm h 

Radio Oxford 

RRJQOUS PROGRAMME 
ORGANISER 


Are yon Decisive? 
Unconquerable? 


RACING INFORMATION BUREAU 
(RIB) 


A vacancy will shortly arise for the post of Director of the 

RIB. The Bureau is based on Ascot Bace Course as ai 
integral part erf the Baca Course Association, tor whicti A 
provides a comprehensive Press. PA, Promotion and Group 

Sales, Marketing and Sponsersftip service. 


to specafisa in the pro- 
duction of raefio material 
reflecting local reEgtous 
affairs. The successful 
c an di d at e wil probably 
be orgained. but with 
broad refigious horizons 
and capable of working 
in a genuinely ecumeni- 
cal context. 


Would you describe 
youtself as persuasive, 
a dven turous, self- 
reliant? Have you - 
willpower? 


Could you successfully 
come through a 
d emanding training 
schedule to break into 
something writing , 
new and rewarding. 


icants will be expected to have a good knowledge of 
g journalism, and leadership qualities for the direction 
' staff members and command of Public Relations 
officers in Great Britain. 


to be negotiated, based on experience but win 
fa Insurance, Pensions. Private Medical insurance 
and provision of a car. 


is desirable r axi n g than 
e ssen t i al, but an outgo- 
ing personality, a facSty 
with words and the abn- 
ity to work with other 
broadcasters are basic 
to the task. 


If you are aged b et we en i 
28 and 47 and came 
from the obvious 
background call 


Peter Radford on 

01-831 0621 


IjIjT 


development 

finance 


The Commonwealth a SaMmy 


We are looking for a bright young 
business brain with a flair for financial 
analysis to join a highly successful and- - 
dynamic British multinational company. 


The successfiil candidate will be a self 
sufficient, enthusiastic individual keen to 
join a team responsible for the investment 
appraisal of major capital expenditure 
projects. Strong inter-personal skills are 
essential and an understanding of discounted 
cashflow techniques and costing and 
appraisal of multi-million pound projects 
would be of particular interest • 


and management or commeroa 
projects in the developing 

offices, in 50 countries* with imestments and commitments ex- 
ceeding £900 miffion. . , _ . . 

. wte have a number of career openings for financaj 
the prospect of overseas emptoymertw avw^l 
We would, therefore, like to hear 
mid- 20 's, who are professtonaltyqualffied n 
related discipline; some post qualifying experience would b# 
preferred. 

Staff joining us would normally be expected to spend upto 

two veare in our Loreion Head Office before posting overse as. Duri ng 

this period they would gain 

■ i r nnahniB buKhnont nornnho moiMkifki 


Full training and support will be given 
in relevant disciplines where necessary to 
people of the right overall-calibre and 
education. 


acm/rees mowing m m ™ k- -r - ----- 

and Investment appraisal. This may involve short term assignments 
overseas. 

Starting salaries, which wifi depend on quaB taations e nd 
experience, will be up to £15£00 per annum. Other beneffls mclwfe 
a non-oontributory pension scheme, free medical msufanceXwter 
12 months). folly subsidised lunches and season -ticket loans. 

The range of benefits for service overseas is generous ana 4»m7 

petitive. Applications, with a full curriculum vitae, should be sentto: 
M. B. Knott, Senior Personnel Executive, 

Con m ionwe a lthDe w etop«»w nt Corporattaiv33fCI Street, 
London W1A3AR, quoting Serial No. 2197. . 


If you are looking for a career move with 
more interest, responsibility and excellent 
prospects with a progressive remuneration 
package then send your CV to Derek Wreay 
at die address below. 



Commonwealth . 
Development Corporation i 


RJB Manpower LtxL, 17/18 Great Pulteney 
Street, London W1R 3DG^ 01-439 8591. 


HNANCIAL CONTROLLER 

‘Extraordinaire’ 


UK/Europe 


. £ negotiable 


A Finance Outer in Publishing 


CASHIER ACCOUNTANT 
£9,500 

ACCOUNTS TRAINEES 
£7,500 


Onr ch'ent is a high-profile publishing Company based in EC1. 
BaAed by a multinational mrnrnnniratiftna group they continue 
to develop and expand. 

Three committed individuals are required to Join the Finance 
Department ami establish longhorn accounting careers. Both 
positions require sound accounting and/or cashier experience, an 

nya-far de tail and a gpndagadgTnigrecnrri- Likfijy age mi ri gn's. 

Most important is the determination to carve-out u successful,^ 
secure career in a major c ompany which rewards effort and 
ability. In addition to competitive salaries and good prospects, 
benefits include 6 weeks* Jialidaypa apd BUPX. 

For fiutherinibnnatian contact ANDREW FISHER. '' 


Our diene, part of a S 1,500 mi]]ionlnrernational 
Electronics Corporation, wishes to appoint a FINANCIAL 
CONTROLLER for Western Europe in January 1987. Based 
in pleasant South of England surroundings, but necessitating 
some travel on the European Continent. 

This is a major growth area for our dient and applicants 
wiU need to be wdl above average to be considered for this 
senior management appointment. Candidates must be fully 
conversant with' MLS; including sales order entry and 
accounts reponmgas their infliiaicewill play an important 
part in the receiulyfbrimilaiied^ European Computer System. 

Thistsarareoppwtunityforanacaxmranturtthpast 
industrial/efecorpnic experience who now wishes to broaden 
their horizon within a young, entrepreneurial environment 
where an extrovert personality and strong innovative character 
will inspire confidence and bring well deserved success. 

Ap^ fro m a substa nri a l sa lary, company car aid relocation 
package, fringe benefits ateasone wotddexpect from a 
successful Cbrpoiation.Apri^ricHisfrpm«uicaUbcarK£dBies 1 
which is open t» botb roen and wonien, should be made by 
writing or telephoning fora personal si lmoliary^ym quoting 
reference 152L . . .• 


Tel: 01-242 6321 

Personnel Resources 75 Gray’s Inn Road London WC1X BUS 



Harry Guy Associates 


RECRUITMENT ADVISERS 


WBSt End House Hills Place London W1R 1 AG 
Telephone: 01-439 3084 


c ;nonce Department 

Investment Accountant 


£11^82-fi14,126 

Grad* P01-4 (Pay Award Pencfing) 

As a naturo! centre lor the Nortti Sea Ol and Cos 
Industry, me Shetland Wands ham undemone can* 
sUereble economic gnawlh. Tire Wands Councfl has 
responded vdSti pngresske poSdes to deed wBh toe 
Impact an toe looed eoonomy: 
As hwwstment Accou ntu iri your wmi wN be to 


Help manage our move into 


PERSONAL CREDIT 


r In ImplemenNng those poBctos ond ac 
toe voted acMtos oltfw Charikdde kust and areodated 
oompanle».Itie post o So n the op p o rtuni ty ottowdsement 
In a wider variety of wo* than any otoer tocai autoody. 
and of dkect hwdmment wOh the membas of the 
commurfty tseneEIng tom toot fiindt 
Ww shosdd be an experienced professional 
accountant wtth chariered status (or stndka), probably 
oged 25/35. ANed to your Mgtdy dewetoped com- 
munteodon s»& your pwfe w torxd background «« 
•doedy Include experience at txxddng or commercial 
bMBsiment and investment appm aa l. a warfdhg 
imowriedge of company law and taraflart and an 
undentaKbig of toe problems of smo* businesses/ 

communities. 


Applications Processing c.£ 13,500 


Benefits Include a normal 34 hourwodslng week. 
' tofiottNiKproaf periston scheme, generous hofidays. 
repayment at remoKd expenses, and the posstbWy of 

Gouncf houring. 


tfyou w e lc o me toe opporiunfly to develop ycxsr 
career In a sttmuiaflng erauonment, Shetland aflerr 
OBDoeitenteductdtorxd and leisure todMes and a unique 

cpcfty oTQIe. 


The Abb^r National is preparing to launch 
a new Person al Loans service from its' 
Head Office in Mzicon Keynes- This is a ■'* 
highty-com petitive and profitable market 
and we anticipate rapid growth. 

You will be required to manage the 
processing of volume applications for 
personal loans and, bong in at the start of 
this development, will have the challenge ' 
of helping to create tfie section which wifi 
produce the required quality of business. 
Joining a small team reporting to the 
Operations Manager, one of your main 
tasks will be the training and motivation- 
of staff to ensure the most effective 


Preferably aged 25-35 and educated to a 
minimum of A’ level standard, you wifi 
have at least 3 years’ experience in a 
' consumer oecfrt environment with in the 
finance industry, for example personal 
loans, credit cards or revolving emfit. 

A background hi the^ processing of a high 
volume of applications ts essentia! and will. 

ideally, have been gained within a central - 
computerised unfL You should also have 
experience h> the control and supervision 
of staff. 


customer service. 


For on Momol < 


1US.U272. 


i rwir—nljjB too pet boetoct 
t racto r oi f fe aoBi, ea fcuri ek 


iewleeto « ie to »M e enUi»»tok l i OficMMde 


Mtavrii becanktared on toe baris of *Mk 

torfho pot t o j ard tocc olooK. race. OMrttalolafcio 


Applicants should wply in writing Muding a C.V tax 


The Cbainnaa, 

Race Course Association Ltd, 
WiiikfieM Road, Ascot, BotaAtre, SL 5 7 HX 
Cover C 0 NF 1 DEKTIAL by 11 SeptmdMr. 


This is a half-time post. 
The salary will be 
£4,000 per annum, and 
tha person appointed 
wfl M required to work 
in close co-operation 
with tha Oxford Council 
of Churches. - 


INNKEEPERS 
~ USA 



ABBEy 

NATIONAL 


BUILDING SOCIETY 


The competitive salary is accompanied by 
tire range of benefits to be expected of a 
large financial institution, biduding 
relocation assistance where appropriate. 
Please send fufi career and salary derails to- 
Mrs B Miles, Personnel Department. 
Abbey-National - Building Society, 

-Abbey House. • 

201 Grafton Gate Ease; 

Milton Keynes MK9 I AN. 

The dosing dace for applications, which 
are invited from all sections of the 
community. Is Friday 22 August 1985. 


accountemps 


Historic Ocean Grave, 
Heir Jwrsey 


GRADUATES 


Application .forms, 
which must be relumed > 
by September 1 are ; 
available from: 


Martowe-Sachs. a subskfiary of Nevl Baltic pic are totor- 
medenes in the field of Unit Trusts. Pensions, 
Investments (Onshore and Offshore), and insurraice. 

As pan of our expansion and traWnn plan tor 1986/87 we 
require mteaigent ambitious people (23-35) to job! our 
successful team of sales professionals. 


ThNnur 3 
NEC Rafie Qxfanl 1 
2C-254 Brabef Brad 


Enagric cante, no GbUran to 
' narage a w room boW (ns 
msals swvajj; ona Hock tram 
ocean. B wm eMaw kbit 
maottonaw of boM s fl and par- 
don. Prior squriwcs noarad. 
wne 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Means LOCUM CHIEF ACCOUNTANTS 
Means TEMPORARY FINANCIAL ANALYSTS 
Means TEMPORARY LEDGER CLERKS 


FINANCIAL FUTURES TRADER 


q£SiS?A 

'SALE now OH 


.. V* * ■*. • • 

■ y;.T, . *i' * ’• 


A,, 


■X “»I\ I ■«*. . T1[ 








IV... . s 

.n: • i . 


'Nsh Hapr 



bra CWEF 

D 




. Stk S25J0OQ 


EDITOR 

SUDANESE AFFAIRS 


BriaoL 0X2 7DW 


aSR 

Hm YHt Nbi YmK ttffffi 

ua 


accountemps - 

01-638 8171 


SPOT DEALER 

Sat: £2S - 3(LOOO 
. AfipatEMv a minimBnT of 3 was 1 expariono 
’iiqwed (or a Infog WmatuuFtaflng ttarir 


M nr a tmtog Hcnatoa) Ttaifing Badt 

STEHLHIS T. BU/U. TRMERS 


we vriu provide you with 
* Full technical training and support 
ft a chance to txrid a sound progressive career In one 
ol the most rapiefy growing industries in toe UK. 
ft eartyrnanaggTiemopporiun l tlBS.depenainaonabl»W 
ft good basic income package and commission 
structure 

if you have toe drive and determ i nation to aocceed 
telephone 01-242 2420 (TT24/7) 


COULD YOU SELL LONDON HOMES ? 


Leading Kensington Estate Agents, Saunders of Ken- 
sington, are now able to recruit further trainee safes 
executives. Excellent training and tegh earning potentoL 


28 Crevilte Street London ECIN8SU 

.Tel: 01-242 2420 


Telephone:- TONY COE: 
.01 581 3623 


to SB the posmoa of Eanor for Sm i wito Amin. 

' The applicant duuU have tod axafaterAte eaperiena i in a 
mvernmou type backgraond in eiiha- the Clvfl or Diplomatic 
Services in a appropriate field. 

Ptemurigis are an excellent c ommand of both written and 
jpofcen Arabic as as a working Knowledge ofEnghsh. an 
understanding of French £ German would be a cnraderable 
advance, praftowl age range 45-5S. 

THe posUian offered is a Senior Editorial one. and this win be 
reflected In the terms and ooodraons of employment 
Please reply m-the-Sna Instance tre 

The General Manager 
Box No. G71 . 


SALES AND 
MARKETING 
£13,900 

Poblislilng ' Co needs an 
excellent sales person ' to- deri 
vKh'thlr htamalaniaf efiante 
previous media sales or 

Sl'St^ciporBrtly for flw 
r^tit person. . 

Call 01-370 1562 


C mriain ; 



PrestUoas-lKStidUntarki 

taes. CkSA: 53 tonrid tam.i 
whmants rated in an Mm 
aMonomy wttta ghm to da 


lyrarMaoM- 
tnooBjf mnfm 
at CansUeabM 


US EQUIT&S TRADER 

Safe £25^00 

Tnder'.twjij 


"JTggyjM* Wft OH OHM IMP or write 
tt*nrat T® Rood Law*, bondtet SG3M 4AP. 


M ■myaHnt' vA bn banted wfih Met oanfldanMNV* 

BRUNNEL 

BANKING APPOINTMENTS 




i 




SHSb, 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


«iih a***,. 

-■“-""'-'Si 

w • •* , -.tfrri /».. 

••*■*» t*. txc.'i «• . ' ' 11 

V** Via-stfi ,. ; . ** 


— 

^-wHwasjon.,, : ;.; ; ,r,,r -t.. dta * 
teUkSai< V'a!^- V 1 

,,£,rl CJS 


rr. rtlvSHVivi.W.;^ ' 

S**" w*, :^?«3S 

- Vj «»•■»* *-r .. , r 3 **0tt wjfe* 

w, c “ sc 'SHoi*i5 , fc. 


m he ■M -aia prt by gfeatall t 

(e»Kpt ATOWttmen&i. The 
dridmBSHMZd^ipmr 
co tMbtnuoR fie SLflQpn Moo- 
d& Gw 'Wednesday); Should 
you wph to send «n advenar- 
acM in aflhiaf please include 
your daphne. pixroe aenber. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
wnMBtr, if yw bneuy 
aoettoor pntms ttfetnf to 
y«* odvertitMMol once *t fast 
iffMBl, pfcascaxma oar 
Ctettmc Services Department 
by iritjjfcaK as 01-491 4100. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


P i » « we«hoe > .wwOBcgwh - 
rum imFto/oesi. Mary**.. 
Suncwi- XXX — - 


BIRTHDAYS 


rMIMMr.'VoASraS »* 

«w»* <Ugr..K**ggr B*ttM>rl M. 


MUSICAL 

instruments 


Gnjuuw runtn) on Ma -- 
»."»■* Mured .Mn- 
"*•"**■■ VntalM.ainr sales 
service Free catalogue. S5* 

ttrwsST^® 


CLUBS 


-YOUNG CWun BStBCC cU 

and. school (1IHO m otuu 
T etOl -373 MRS.- 77 


.SH{*rjLETS\ 



W1A 3AR. quot.-ip c,, ^n- ^3^9-, 

— SI 1 "a- 2l» ^ 


■CD C 


Jmmonweaith 

? ment Corporation 

C ? NTT R0LLE8 

straordinaire’ 


: . -SERVICES 


HUncm Ud prnftwiarl 

enfrMUun - vitae documents. 
SeUadl.dM 3JR. 
BKAKAMS3T. LMdont-ctat* (or 
HdHM«dnMaKAMDC«Mr 
2 MJO**r 200 rv«DH raeanv 
ly. -scar Mo tape. 997 799A. 
ADVICE « .mwt/iMCC Audi 
P ro M a to aK about tue avaUom ■ 
of your. C-V and mniw 
KeiMMc Oi>«9» am -^ce 
lor mac tot* 

urfnLCVcmMr»M|h4ia|. 

■ ty nmcicnm vfl^ 01-607 
7V0S;.ii".,.- ’ r. 

FIHIBSW, Lnesr Mvrhgt 
An ages. arras, OMW. Dr» - 

lOI* 25 Abingdon Rond. Lon- 
don wa Trt. 01-938 toil, 
cowwnr sols say, omm 
lor mu or nmanm. Any n 
canon Tel 073* 872722. . 


LEGAL SERVICES 


-COMVETAMCSM ov rrayguan- 
MSOUCHOTS £160 + VAT and 
sunoaru msemeawntt ring 
OMI 319S9& 

op VISA MATTERS ESOudeea 
US lawyer 17 B u Wrode sl 
L ondon Wl 01 486 0013. 


Start 2 doOUe bedroom!. 2 bat*. 
" **.- 0*x baleen? Oac. 

- Avana nw tamsratotoly for two. 

PJTW UOOjw Td W17a» 

■ WW> 9703791 ttftcr bni 


MUUVruni tawnana 
able. ooac3.ooopw Pmaui 
Service. 01 -498 3880 dr 0836- 
MtWMMMCTL 


MAIM VA1K. M- LMne Veaicr. 1 
- large not. 

en» not. Stasa. fuo n.w Tel: 
Ol 672 4291. '£. 269-1 67a . 


• ■Aman^reqnmpwtapadooo 
- -da bed ana. )gr recas. .ul 
■ -t»tt-£14apw.r«rot-876a9Aa 

" 11T WATO S 2 Bed Flat.' 
xn/ocntno. TV. Brand New 
fWWMNr Tube. LT 6 
snada. £3» m tael. Co lc< 
Peel- Tel : 014748129 
-CWSSnex 2 Bodrm Um Crd nr 
™ X«» ion. AvaiiaM* oi 
Sent Contact San on 01-741- 

• - B491 : 9am to S ora 


-waiMvanm BUSH Pei^air 
ooder 25 to snare Urge room 
£3Snw Exel. Tet oi 7«O-S068 
WlA-M/risuun lux 3 brd Hal 
Ojmroim* £SO ger week. Tel; 
OI 727 S776 rra 269 
WAWI1P amecxleaei room pror 
- F Wad 24. K/s Mb £40 nw! 
Mmr Mbol 021 358 1967. 
WBt prof M>S lo sbarr 2 Bed flat 
« «atd». £22Sgcm. 01-837 
6579 


- OVERSEAS. TRAVEL 

SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
$99 RETURN 

iSave with Swissair^ 
-Super Apex. 

Umdqn to Zurich or 
. Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
lights. Add daily 
flights to Baste 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
"before departure. 

Stay m Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday after arrival. 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travelagenxs or 

01-4379573 


Fly Savely 

flights to 

MRO BARCELONA MACRO 
SC* MALAGA ALCAMTE 
ATW6 RK®fS HKVKUON - 
Off. HUMAN ANTALYA 

PUB MANY OTTER DESTINATIONS 

01-995 3883/4/5 

Simply Fly 

aTOl nzz 


UWE5THBS 


pm. » n vonc (sis 

Franfcho IfiS LAtfF OBS 
Lagn . £320 MmM 09 

Mm £325 S nu aw £420 
JOMq t*m Burtoh £335 
Caro C20S UMMb t**Q 
MjBcm OSS Rrogocn C3S0 
HbngKo^aio Cakwa IMS 


SUN S UNO 
21 EMM 9. L6MM WT 
t+os rmitx} mu 
MAJOR CjCMK Attffia 


«wtw MSS MNUMW 

AH48R . £400 tM* £370 

f wa ffM - £400 IMri tin 

Ugro - I33Q Jaddaa f«0 

MoorM £400 Ina £775 

Anwso £7S0 U.'aa £445 

BantfUk CEO Km fWS 

BomiOtl £3*5 urn (275 

CM OK Saul £730 

C BM — 8 £415 Std lM £765 

Damncro £270 loJqa (SSO 

BCWfl ro TW O. M 
Z DBOUM STREET. UMMM VI 
W BVW 352TMI7 


LEFKAS 

TZaz«A0fr»r . 
Uospoff Grett MM. W/t 
urn Btxts a boo 

DJERBA 

mUHH CT 

Fite w/s. turns, snoerti tood 
bggwn. CUs2# or 4* ta- 
14 y bosk by ssdy baebat. 
ACM & ntaMM MS <or mtos. 
eoeoto t farmocs. 
LUSAflSCAPf ATOL TS33 
S1-41T H22 2* M 


nwns FaMor 01471 0047 

AT 0V, |6«8i AMcm/Vm- 


*YB/ML £6ld Perm L04& AB 
nwdr earners id aih * N2. oi ■ 
8B4 7371 ABTA 
AimCAM VACAT10MS. No 1 to 
L*A r TM- 81 657 7853 
*. anocA From ml «w 
7371 ABTA. 


CRUISE £ SAIL ABROAD 


AMHATK CBUHK 0y SS. 
■OesUtny Sh04UUviOi' Sept 
4/15. U*oa at. Mnuu, 
Ceew-P u bid v mfc. Tnwr. Ven- 
«ce. from £493. ABREL'. 109 
VlbBOafBr Orave. W2 *U. 
Tel. OI 229 9906 CXMn 131. 
IWMSOEF UETKAS BJCRBA. 
19. 16. 19. 26 Aoo to oet W- 
merrtb. actheB rrtomng hob. 
on lwroout Mks. turn nun. 
Bwy* * Bog. For solo's. Coo- 
Man Famroes. umancaoe Oi 
441 0122 


RENTALS 



Komun. Oat T.V. 2*hr«w 
Bd. .Tdn. CoibnWwm AIK Ol- 
373 6306. 

ST JAMES KACC.5W1 Lumy 


! .» > !. V-’ 

:i-. : »»v : i, 

Wv vv ; 
Fny!.:ini ■ 

•il* 'jV' l* ‘ V 


•• •=' • 'irn.inonal 


■; Z :i V' ig57B ®i 

•• a u>ncoMaa e 


mi!; vs:. ! 

l - : 'il -inJ jpplicjuj 

•\ -ir .. 

•• * •■■Mjcitod ts<nbs 


1 "sHSi^muqlvjiSt 

' : •* ’ 

• TsVt enmanj 

. 

• •• r-’-'snmwm 

r;:.i iv : 

• v ".i .impurerSt^ 

uti:;'.r« * : 

■-■.••.ntwjdipaa 

cv,'-’-- • . . 

-hey tc* hroak: 

■■ ■- ■ ■ •- ; 

"■ ’■''lii’niTTiXima: 

k r- ■" . 

. ivn.n jmvdic 


WANTED 


12S per <9 up to pa M nr flmr 
an»neir-C2SO-per'oe (or gold. 
Legemry wanted ao diamond 
leweiierp Mr Han ai-9oo 
8030 or Write. 36i HArniw 
Rood. London. W». Ail CngBIto 
revered. 


”id y;cce» 

• ■ ■ ■ !: inJidoB 

•• -p-A-mviaj 
• n: , He canJii 
-• ■•■. l.'WnuikP 

. r t.’rm i|UJB 


FOR SALE 


RES1STA 
. CARPETS 
SALE NOW ON 

Wool mot Bertas from E3SS par 
sq yd + VAT.- BOX'tml' HBjvy 
DonwaicIWnn naB5 MrsqyN 
+ VAT. CoMptas Un S75 per 
sjld+VAT A jam. 
reflDcnoRS 

255 New l5a*ritt 
Pinw liras s«| r: 
TeI;01-876 208S 

w ‘ (lA^_ 

mt ranmnen um. 


irry Guy Associates 

}.: :v! \1 ACVISSB 




AT LEAST (1M PX osowance 
for your old VHS video tworfc- 
ine> when you bay or M a 
nrw 47 mMit from: Tom. 91. 
LoWr Stoane Street. SW1. OI 
730 0933. 


BRIGHTS OF Kmm £2 

nulhon vloria for Imrontiale de- 
livery. 17tH * 18m CrnTnry 

rraMaLftonflar* uxruf®»s'A'yr 

Ifiw Bren. TUdunafali A 
Goodwin, TU M( H . v 

Nenlebed. m«r ’ HbUe? dd 

Toovtunv. Devon 10392*7) 
7445b Berdetay. own (0485) 
810962. 


nNEST quality wool curort*. A1 
trade Rices and. under. aMo 
avaitaMe ltXTa extra. Largo 
room <6e r enm awo owtor m*f 
normal WKe. Quecay CtopeH 
01 406 0463. J' <2. '. ■ 


BMJJARO TABUL70 ffjt 5 fL Re. 
conditioned. Oak (now. Cud- 
leni qnMHv wftn au accamnes. 
£2.800. . 0023' - "400636 

fSOflWW) 

- T HE I 1 E S- I 7 SS l lS K .-OOig- 
linet avail. Hand bound ready 
(or pnsentatlon am 


5 73 630 6 ID 

WAHTC0 One rwtn Bedroom, one 
ituu>g room, tot A bOwm. On* 
weed November. S.W 1/7 or 
near Tel: 0243 693310. 
-aCVOM.qBttoortvu4e w tet er O at 
far 2/& £49X70 aw. 68 ndteL 
01-794 0237/01 -674 HtO. 

- UTTuvamuainonnit 

oedmom rurntfhed ftaf. 

^^^STS^SU 013 *- 

luxury umcD vlats.- 

eeg tr al Undni men J3» pw. 

- -RmgTown HseApts673-8433 . 


FLATSHARE 


Bridge «ayer. expert yardenet 
Fran 603 6383 btCore 11 am ■ 


SMTST 2nd Ctrl in 2 Ob tar ftte nr 
Tooung Bdway 6 EarHBeU 
SUo. £06 pw VVw I4in-I9th 
Aug .'7670463 or 030805217 


MlE Own room avaHaMo to 
: newtyd waam borae.0ch.10: 
diri lube. £406wiNa. TH.C1- • 


' HNUM FARfC lam 6twMe' \ 

: TvJpom i»» PObgpra SM.giglnbffE; ± 
1» LMTOMC-IW tklbe. £300 non V 
^ aaccl. -phone: "606 2727 «WY or : I ; 
4BS 1107 <h£ - - - 1 


arm Prof. Person. Bkcucm &• 
niluea in lor hae. Cdn. Nr 
tram /bus. Own ige dbir m. 
£66 p w. foe. Eves 870 6659 



UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. JoTfem. Qdro, Dshn, 
lsatdul.SiBppoic.tCL.DeiU, 
Baajfcofc. Hom Kcag. Srdxj. 
Europe. & The Ameacss. 

FbBBgB Travel, 

76 SbaQesbray A venae 
London WIV-7DG. -■ 

•-: 01-439 0102 

Oge« Soxatdxy KLOO-lLM 


, BARGAIN FLIGHTS 

1 Sydney £455 £755 

Auckland £415 £745 

Jo'Burg £306 £499 

Bangkok £209 £355 

Caro £135 £270 

New York £139 £320 

Loa Angolas £216 £399 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


: foxing at ora private bebch 
-boat, that a week. cntoAO oo 
oar rbcrn for £420. tar fb. 
H/B. free u/roont. other com- 
-bfaiawona so*. OI 326 1006. 


cosTCtfrims ok nmira/bata 
- -toEumoe. USA 6 mOM deattob- 
ttang Optomat Travel- 01-730 
2201. ASTA 1ATA A TOC 


GENERAL 



iroa vtaAiim. Key 

Travel. 50. Red Uoa ST. WC1. 
01 405 1495. ABTA/IATA. 


Bene Travel Tel Oi 386 8414. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Worldwide. 
Hay mart** 01-930 1366. 


auraiy 2 bed llaL Suu.N/5 prof 

- permi.'ClTG yen Inc e t e l a 

-pbooe-326 1646 _ . 

cuntAarcoMMOH/ Botaram.- 
-. T ahacr JvUao- awn. Doom, stator . 

- £46 pw. Odtroa- £70 -pwT Prof 

-c ae^sasgtoiff* 

O/R in Patio flat. -Cloae tnba.’ - 
ti SO pem ad. M MdCaio 626 - 
8000 Day or 6 27 3681 E vea 

no for 2 to rood mixed boosr 
with lovely roof garden; linen 
pvov.£74ow foC. Ol 874 2897 
CM Car den Coua ra la. Targe 


* 5YtMBf-~:+ 

ISs-v 

sss&: 
iaiir-s 

* UISWU * 

-* TOflOUTO 6 

* L W4Z1IS * 

* CffiSKAH * 

** scum 

* US* * USA 

SUNWORI 

(Esrt 1969) 

S South Sc Epsom .Sonw 

-(03???1.^538/2553(V2710V 


U.T.C Open Sac 07S5BS7D36. 


U7W COST FARES to LC&X. Mo- 

tor Travel 01 4869237. tATA. 


(ALMA r ““T Ol 441 
11X1. Travetwhe. AMa. awl 


SPAR*. PortaraL CheaseM fprea. 
PI Met. Ol 735 8191. ATOt_ 


S*Wnaa«JIM>8ehedai(d/Hgira 

. _ Ol 724 2388 ABTA ATOt. . 


-BARBADOS.' f own: a. DeabHRII 
.. vitta -6. cottage on. the WeR- 



mr move into 

.credit 

;m£ c. -3,500^ 


When. OI -668*6323. 

OCM» FOR ANY EVENT. Can. 
StamgM.Ew*. Cbem. ces MK - 
au iheatre and mart*. . ■ 

TeC B?J«.i6/828-p* 98. . . • 
A_Ex / v*» / DuServ. - 

BIRTHDAY DUE T Give someone 
an anginal Tmev Newspaper 
-dated toe very day they wane 
barn. £12-60. 0*92-31505. 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES, cob- 
ble tern etc. Nationwide 
dekvenea. Tot <03801 860059 
-fWdtaw 

SEAKIMMRS AnyeventtncLec 
Mb. ooveni Gdr. StarkRit Era. 
Last NigM of the Proma. 01-828 
1678. Mator cre dit raw. 

CATS, CHESS, La MIL Alt ttw> 
atre and apart. Tel 439 1763- 
All nudoc credll cda. 


IES* 

ABLES 


ROYAL POULTOWF Toby 
-Fwttrmea. Maivxc. - 
,ed. Oi 885 0034...- 


MAJDA VALE 1 oeraon to share 
ramforfafoe Opt with one other. 


bins pan. Tol-OMM 4466 


lux mi. All mod cons. Lae due 
rm. cioopw suit 2 prof. TetOl 
.589.4595 day.. , . 


-CLEAR OFF! 

PMM 24/1 £117 

Bmn 22/SCia 

iUksBto 28/S Cliff 

iff 23/IE13S 

Hafafi 21/S £148 

fan 28/S £145 

IMbb* 11/8 £188 

Ii8i«s 24/8 £168 


tracovr Out .Mb aarora to. 
share; u eef m ale : aO amertbos 
incL £300 pan. Evoa 302 8953. 

W8 Pro# M pers. 27+ n/a. share 
lux hsr. own rra. case Tdbe. 
£180 pm End. Tel: 01-748- 
0008. to) or 01-7480270 MVefi 

BMlur Prof n/a share hse 
o/r £45pw Inc + Re ta in Dcpra- 
8 01-464-5907 Eves 8 Whcnda 

CmStttCK. O/R to nroer OaL Nr 
lube. £17S wa evaty MB. 437 
4878 aA 296. 

CLAFHASb M/F to share lux ftoL 
O/r. ad mod rona. £180 pan 
UK. Tec 627-0939-aner 6pm. 

DULWICH person tostar flat O/R 
N/& £i7Dpcm Inc phone. 20 

- - mm CUy. TetOl 693 6805- - 

FULHAM SMWTtoom m troniey 

. house ur Hialuignam. £60 PW. 

- Ter after 6. Ol 731 8216 

H A MP STEAD . I" to sftr nzx OaL 

£?SOd.r .m- Tel Ol 222 4868 
lOferto. orSa/MO OuvaL 

LITTLE, VDRCE. Young pedf F. 
N/snoo it garden; Nr tube. 

- ,£6^r>w ud. 723 1308 


DISCOUNTED FADES 

Jotng/HA e3o ^ 

M*8h £275 E390 

Cairo £150 £230 

SSSmi CT CT 

- ' £220 CT 

£420 


•-.Hht «a»an;lw.WML; 
S eptendier A OOOber . For Jbro. 
chore & ‘Personal anqitlon.mf 
; Ham Saaoote Ofllce-oay 233 
1200 HPmew/e021 -454 0912 


ABIFABE SPEOAUBTA Sydney 
. o/w £420 rtn £760. Auckland 
o/w £420 im £77a JoTNas 
o/w £306 rtn £499. Loa Alto 
-teso/vr £218 *ta £40 8. Lon don 
FBght Centre 01-370 6332. 


lands. Algarve . Vtttat AMs 
P roton s Tavenuw. Hottoav*/ 
FHgira. Drachprea/bookBtat- 
veatura Hobdays. Tel 07*2 
351100. , 

WDBLB WBE FbUra jpeciMBtap 
to Fb«L Chib Oam. Booaomy to 

- Australia. Far EaaL-S. Africa, 
~GGA.'Ltflxto. Faro * Geneva. 
Phone Travel Centre 01-666 
7026 ABTA 73196 

U1B AM ERIC A. Low CON 
IMMS eg. Mo £485. Uma 
£493 rtn. Also Sana!. Group 
Holiday Jeurnoyucg Peru 
from £5001 J LA 01-747-310 8 

USA. S. Anttnca. Mt and Far 
EaaL 8 Africa. Trayvmia. 48 
Margarai StraeL Wl. oi 880 
2928 fvba Accepted) 




vlerdam. Brim Hi. Bruges. 

Geneva. B erne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dutton. Rouen. Sou 
Mgr A DKOpe TRIM Off. 2a. 
Owner Oh. London SW1X 
780 01-238 8070 
MRMLfA • CRETE. We sail 

have avalL ■ Au q /Re p l 

vsiiao/epH Some wan nrtv 

pool, era DOW on Ot 724 7775. 
Play* Holidays. AIM 2136 


SELF-CATERING 


Duato American cancel- 
lattons. we here some of our 
large luxury villas uilet lata 
August -October. All htra 
maid, beodi or pool - seme 
a cook. H you are thinking of 

taking a party, bate) (bid R 
expensive or b) can't find 
enough people, ghwua a ring I 
or call la. We can reduoe the 
prleaj end wsWe empty bed I 

mnpkments. VI Hal inTtaty. 

Pomiget Corfu, Cm, Fsmm. 

fognae ea Hi tdepwe 


Ol Ml oasisassMU 
.CWain-hMi 
^ rare aTOturg 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


. pools, aoartmeota. tavetiun- 
MoM dates avail from £153 
Ofttc Mondays. 01509 7070 6 
0622 677071 dr 0622 677076 
C4MIAW <772. 


^ELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


ANTIBES. 7 brroo uo i vflla with 
' pool Available 29 Aug-6 sepL 
Details tom COnltoenial VUaa. 
Tfl OI 246 9181. 


BCE. Lowest faro fr £99. 
Biggies. 736 8193 AIM 1893 


SELFCATERING 
;.y GREECE . 


ISLANDSINTHESUN 


UTfOOE STREET, SW3 RESOTS PASX, nil 

Smmrl « arooaa wi c «m Ctaraw* rm« p$iMy «Mng 

S CRM on TB 81*'. 2 **t 
MS Hua UMOH US lift U ra<w— <e MmeM Aero toa 

m My trad wm«> SmSamiSbS S3 5 

MB mo 3 doubts bMroonLj 

wrglf WMtm. 1 HWWU. 1 MfMASWff-ki—™ 

SkM Offer 

CMn rate BV5H 01 IKK 4S5S 


BERKSHK 

Between Bradroea and 
Ascot dose «> Ui. U3. 
M2S Tun oi mo camuy 
seroHjeadroo conaga 
wim ga rdan. 3 aad. 2 
racep. lushen ana batfi- 
room. pariona September 
to MOTtLieOD NT OOTtft 
Ttfc 0344 883 009 


QU&MSGA7E. SW7 

A voeTO IS ftoor aDMnsn of 
met .UDO hr Uapst cgn nans 
een hga OBtoCi A Wtands 3.-4 
neowm ? mmni ?•» 9BK. 

Rtody rr'JhaheC MugMd 
ltd oetah- 

nt«M 

MMte 

35 iaras Street. Wl. 

31 935 9512 


WYNDHAff ICWS. Wl Lfnefy 3 
Norey Uan tea* nKsnaos 
bora eatil M cboppna at the 
Wet Eod Knwn Kahen. < 
Sots, toi Sneer Rm A Reel 
iTens MOOm Nenbtote. 
mua fiXTE M i %#*m | 
| 0 t UanogrosHy itceoraefl ton 
antetM wn/hAy tuasMO No I 
•sene ok aeon s pa rw • ere- . 
la&ng boms at tm u teaUe 

astSfekira 

tas QOMOter atgotoMe 


^01-629 6604^ 


WEST KUVSTEAD 1 bed tot 

£110 - £130 dm 
MAIM VU£ ? bed RR ft SOD* 
HAMPSTEAD 2 tad f M £200 - 
£250 dw. 

HAKPSTEAQ 2 bed la mas 
£300 pw 6 months lei 

Company/Eotoassr LOB 
For hundreds mom luxury 

LOU&ffjET? ft*SAL£S 
01-825 4455 


Wl. to> ftonr luxury net m Re 
genrv csevretu TeMullv 
furruvhed wilh enluuv 2 bed 
room,, bathroom hail Urge 
rereplron. modern uni 
eo tapped kitrhen CN ratw 
Entry phone Lilt 24 nr -erurl 
tv Arrevv to pm dir gaitk-nv a 
ornate tenruv rourts Palling 
£400 pw. Long let Colelont). 
Phone Ol 6M 0456 


DOCKLARDS A Vlerhan of «u 
perb flats A IMWn to trJ. 
ulurrAmivv River Views, 
moil with lucoiv rum filled 
kitmrttu a an with ouatnv fur 
ntvnmga. Rnta LIICpw 
CSOQpw CarMoo SmHh A Co 
488 901? 


SOUTH KEMMUTM Luvurv 
vert wed. 2 double bedim-m. 3 
reception, tulhroom with w c. 
towaH- ctoevroom Near tube 
and bine* £550 00 pet week. 
Go let only Phone Morula > 
Saturday iOOO am - NOO pm 
Ol sat 5109 


W2 HYDE PARK Estate Otnel. 
mod Mock Luxury Top FI 3 
BetK. 2 Baths Balcony. FuHv 
equipped Video «*tr Ige Roof 
Gdn Porterage long let Co or 
Embasav USOpw inegi for 
ntM tenant Buckrae. 631 
0548/580 4839 


For the teat 
rental s al ectron of 

QUALITY 
FLATS A HOUSES 

in prime London arasa 
770 Curb OmrtHemL SWS 


FLYDIRECTTO CORFU. 

CS^HALONW.ZAJCYVncS. 
CRETE AND SK1ATH0S. 
BiHNiiMMidappHbMH* . 
Ckmtogtarious beaches 
fflffwndsring b Crete. 


■JOS ISLAM) 
HOLIDAYS 




i--.- 2 (0403)59788 


S» PLY CUTE 
HBtSMBSOS 4 CHMU 
Anghi Gate taniy otter ben*M 

pfktei WtM/stoKB. Many with 


-a - ■ • 
* i : f 
J V ‘ 


. e- : - l 
- * " 




AI^UNQEMENTS'. - 

I British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity 


102 Gloucester Place, 
LondonWlH 4DH. 


.USA. CANADA. MD JUMK. 

1 LOWEST AIR FARES. Ate 
dub pad First. BESTFARC Ol 
- ■394 1642: AIM 1400- -• - 


AilCAJmC. Faro. Malaga eta. 
- ■ Duuoad TratAf ATOL 1783 
. .01-361 46*1. Horsham 68541 


major tchechiira carriers. Ol- 

5B4 7JT7t ABTA 

BEST FARES. BEST FLIGHTS. 
• Bat hobdayo anywhere, sky 
Travel. Ol 834 7426. ABTA . 
HONG KONG £488. Bangkok 
- £369. sing C4S7. outer n Ot- 
ter 01-684 6614 . 

homo lor .prof M/F age* 26+ 
N/S. £46pw mcL Ol 892 3247. 
SWG girl wantM to share 2 bed 
flat large sunny roan. £68 pw 
Inez. 373 6133 



worldwide rt itopas t taro. 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke St 
Richmond ABTA 01-9*0 *073. 
* MOROCCAN BOUMS TRAVEL. 
Hotel reservations aH over Mo- 
rocco. TM: Ol 734 6307 
AST A/ ATOL 

TIRRSIA. Perfect beaches for 
your summer holiday, era te 
ow brochure now. Tunisian 
Travel Braa. 01-573 4411. 

. TUMMA/MOROCCO Book 
through the North Alrtca Spe- 
claUBL Samara Flying Services. 
Trt Ol 262 2734. 

SW17 Prut F. n/s. 23* to share 
nat o/r. £130 PCM OKI. i ISM 
' lube. 767 7036 after 7pro. 
U FTOH FK 30 mtn. Bonk sm. F. 
a/s. attract o/rs. £i to 6 £132 
PM No BPS. Mike 470 0220 



— — — TyTIlSf* . • ■■ 

s pC^ o£ ;ok,'; 

' CJ- 


- ' allL- ^ ' :’j ■; 

s,iru«5 T - J! *!*4!5 

* ■ < ' : - v 
- • - 


CHIEF ACCOUNTANT/ 
FINANCE URECTOB DESIGNATE 

-- . DRGMTLY REQURED BY 

■ London based -company, of perishable food 
processors and tftetrtoutors to the hotel and 
v. .catering sndu^y._ 

The position wj8 be fiTted. by a camfidate who; 

-A Witt be capable ofbeingoonsideTedfbr a 
! ' ' board appointment within 12 months. 

B Possesses managerial as weil as 
professional skills, coupled with an 
Instinctive commercial flair. 

‘ C Is Steiy to . provide a high caHwe of 
financial stewardship towards attaining a 
: . . pubfic ftotatjon. . . 

D Is capable of total commitment and 
identification with -the company’s 
.--objectives.. 

■■■E Can operate 'successfully within a team, 
where results, rather than effort, are the 
main criteria for performance. 

i Thtfiemeneration packagei-whfch wffl in due 
course indude an executive' share option 
-.scheme, will exceed the. successful 
^applicant's last^urrent earnings. 

-- Apply in strict cqnfldfl n ce with typescript C.V. 
and manuscript covering letter to; 

1 .1 The Chairman, Box No: C73 


RETAIL MEDIA GROUP 

FINANCIAL & 
TION 
CONTROLLER 

£18-20/100 PA 
PUIS CAR ft BENEFITS 


Situated in London Wl a amafl but rapidly s xpan dn g 
group ot companies active in The fifrn and video 
■ production business and supply of video hardware 
systems to tearing retail organisations; wishes to 
appoint a qualified a cc o unt an t conversant with the 
preparation of accounts on computer systems. The 
position wN ideafy srit efltw mala or temaia aged 
between 28 & 35. Reporting rirectiy to the chief 
executive, the successU applicant wffl apart from 
the above duties, be re spo ns ft l e for aU 
arintetetrtion aid management control. 

PLEASE FORWARD CV TO: 

JB Klein & Co 
Temple Chambers 
Temple Avenue 
London EC4Y OBB 
Ref: RMG/JBK 


prte^a wteAtnwftltaiy with 
pocH sontt on tbs beach A sura 
todad gray m ony wMb Crete 
wfigsLOna Sorts to HeaUan 

AVALAflUTy IflTH AUGUST 
rtng for smaJ. fntntSy brochure 
n4M44CfflaS AW 1822 


CORFU VILLA* w r MU forte 
avellraimy Sun 24. 31 Aug 7 
SeM for 2 wta. Beautiful ylllea 
nr toe bench ex Carwtrk- Pan 
World HcUMtayv oi 734 2562 
MAOC GRSEK W1AMD8 ot 
magR wen Flights It. 
hokdoyg. - Freedom HMidoys 
01 7*1 4686. ATOL 433. 
GREECE. Crapetli Wands, cheap 
rignts. mia rraiu Me. Zeus 
HOIS. Ol 434 1647. AML Alto. 
"WWOO Uxx apart hgt* from 
- £189 PP. 2027 Aug. Strama 
0705-867814- 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


A viua. a pom and a brauuitH 
view. What more could you 
want? Choose from Tuscany. 
Sardinia or Ravcllo • the kn aft- 
er parts of MMy when the maw 
market <roerator» don't go. Or 
roobme a tula holiday with a 
stay In Venice. Florence or 
Rome. Free brochure from 
momc of Italy. Dept T. 47 Shep- 
herds BUCh CTeen. W12 BPS 
Trt Ol 749 7449 1 24 h» 
• service) . 


SELFGATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 21 /U. 2 wta. Lov My 3 
bed villa, with pool. Vuamo u r * . 
£349pg. Oder date abo aval). 
Resort Vinas 061 833 9095 
ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. VHIa 
Mondays of dBUnrBan for the 
very few. Tel Ol-491 0802.73 
St- James's snw. swi . 
ALCAKVE. lux visas with poort 
A apt*. Avail Sepf/OO. Ol 409 
2838. iRtaurorid. 


SELFCATERING SPAIN 


COSTA DEL SOL r30 mins Puerto 
Banus Marbellai Super fne on 
beach 3 rum bedrms ft 2 baun 
" mune. polio, gon. s/doon, rev 
fouranb. supermarkel. Award 
winnftig aevefopme n i. Mad 
service from £200 pw. Owner 
01 586 *559/883 2321. 

HA MHI a. Lux vinao with 
pools ft aplk. AB9 IsOcL Ol 409 
2838. ViBaWerto. 


WINTER SPORTS 


■“WWffA Top Ski Resorts. 
Lowest Prices. Brochure. 01 
602 482C-. 


UJL HOLIDAYS 


S. DEVON, sra Snanou* lanufo 
(bl. Srpt on for 2/6. £84 -Cl 54 
pw 01-794 0237 AM -674 6660. 


28 MDWret Centre or London 
Luxury furnMlM 4.3 
bedreomed bouse in 2 ’■ acres 
with lake. txreUenl nouvekerp- 
er availabkv Company let 
preferred. £265 pw. Trt Radtett 
2467 or 7313. 


REGENT* PARK Him. Super 
modern apartment in presliue 
Mock 1-12 nuns £250 pw incl. 
Ring CasllMita 485 401 1 


WANTED Superior properties far 
tong/vhorl ODleK 01 -4S8 3680 
or 0836 692824 anytime >Tl 


WESTMSNfTER. sm New mi 
market H« entry renovalea 
manswn flat ideal entertaining 
Etepanl. spacious Rerep wdh 
fuvoiare 3 Beds 2 Baths il en- 
sulief FT KlL £475pw. .Copies' 
828 S2S1. 

AM EBIC AH EXCCUTirC Seeks' 
lux U/Hme. up lo ctoopw, - 
Usual fees reo Pndiias Key ft 
Lewis. South of the Park Chet, 
see office. 0I3S2 Bill •»' 
North of the Park. Regent's 
Pork office. 01-686 9882 

HB U MI I U II PARK. IWt Chore 
2 fabulous 2 Bed/2 Bath patio 
Oats m tovrty new develop 
roenl. Use of Sauna. Swimming 
Pool ft Gymnasium. Mini be 
iirvMic2Sftw Akm Proper- 
ties 01-486 S741. 

QUEENMATE 5W7. Brand new 
conversion Large reception 2 
double bedrooms. 2 Dam men's 
Lnfurnsned except for rarpeis 
and curtains. Company/ cm- 
batty Lrt only. £290 per week 
Includmo C/H and C H W. Mr 
lames. Ol 588 1049 iDayk 

CENTRAL LONDON ' wnn OM 
street partdng. Lux rial. Ln rm. 
kN. bath ♦ shower, upstairs 
open bed/drrM rm Evirvtfong 
provided. £160 pw 1 year 
into. TM: Ol 386 0919 

LANOL4MD8/OWIIERS. if you 
have a quality properly to tel 
Ml us about II. We offer a 
proffeauonai and reliable ser- 
vice Quantra cowumme TM. 
01-2*4 7365. 

A LUXURMMK spacious Hamp- 
siead Fiat. Large Reception- 
Separate Diner 3 Bedrooms 
Every Comfort for £185 pw 
Available now. Ol 28o 80*0 

BLACKHEATH Superb 4 tad. 2 
Bath detached property. AU roa- 
c tunes. Caraoe. Suit 
famUy/ekeruttve C 266 pw An- 
drews lettmra. 01485 out 

KD8WCT0N Cardeo flat with 
SOU South foci no garden 2 
Betti. Dole Rerep. ten tall asoft- . 
anresL Mod Bain. £ 1 70pw. 493 ’ 
2091. Eves 870 4703 «T>. I 

LARGE SELECTION ot flats ft I 
houses in Wimbledon Area 
available for long lets. Gompa 
nv ft non Company lets. Home 

■ from Home 946 9447 

SW11 dapham Common 
WevtMde 100 yards, tarralv 
home recently refurbished 4 
beds. 2 baths, central heating. 



HENRY ■ JAMES Gonlart meow- 
on 01 235 8861 tot the best se 
treuon ot twsMin fiats and 
braise*. 10 tent in Kmghnhndgr. 
ChrHea and Kmsmgtoa iTI 


LANCASTER GATEi lire 2 bed 2 
hath Hal F/l kit/dUMT. magndi 
. rent lounge In form buildropi- 
I year Mas LSSOpw ijirg' Tel. 
Ol 881 8022/886 9823 «ves 


SHARERS SWS. 4 bed house ? 
hrths. 2 recepv large knenen 
wilh au marnmes. garden 
L220PW Mars era Slmlh Ol 
937 9801- 


SUPERIOR PLATS ft HOUSES 
avail ft mud for drotomats. 
exrcunves Longa, short Ms m 
all areas Uptnend ft Co 48. 
Albetnarlr SI W 1 . 01 -4*9 533*. 


LOMO 'SHORT LET progerrles 
from CIOOLSlOOOpw Personal 
S m'** . 01-458 3680 or 0836 
592824 anytime m. 

DULWICH. Modern town house • ' 
thru tounge. tuning area, hard 
-J4.i beds/ 1 study. Private pa 
uo Garage Close .main. BR 
Matron Victoria and City min- 
uses og tram £150 pw 
KPl hcgd" 733 4518 12* boors) 
PUUMM A [tractive gra Rr flat 
ttnraediaiety avaitable Fuity 
tarnished 2 Dfdroo n a. siltmo 
room, small dining room. Mtrn- 
en ana hauiroom. garden Colet 
onlv Cl 20 pw. Phone Mary 
736 7133 ext 33 <U 
w DULWICH; BraahfaL antxnie 
• urn. Obi bad. gdn flat Mod ML 
tMin/«hower viudi.lrm Ctose 
ad omens. CCH £90 pw Refs 
and dog rra TMSI4RMH1 
FINCHLEY M2. Nr Tube 1 Ige 
beg. rerep. ML bail) CM hte—tv 
turn £98 pw Mr Sheer 406 
6965. alter Tpro 445 7458. 
IDEAL FOR VISITORS. South 
Kensington. Fully senved flat 
tor 2 Ull Phone CM TV CH 
e»r Ol 56*. 2*14/786 4281 
KEKSMBTON WS Stunning flat 
Rerep. tad. KLB. CH. TV 
Souin Garden £l68pw Trt Trt 
937 3954 day. /3703710evee 
9379CS1 The number to remern 
ner when seeking best rrnial 
progenies m central and prime 
London areas CI50'£2.000pi» 
CABBAN B CA SCLEE Offer wide 
tnour ot long lets rrotn 
CISOpw era 01 589 5481 
CENTRAL LOMOOM flats, houses, 
rooms, shares avail Lotto ft Hoi 
lei Sun Into 935 1B46 (Tt 
CHELSEA Ironwc lux balcony 
I la 1 hgni retep dole beturfe. 
ponn Long lei 622 5825 
FAMILY 3 BEDRM HSE. Washer, 
phone. 9 OH £116pwr. Ol 686 
7576 Rental Guide 
CARDEN FLAT I bedroom, nr 
Tube Recep. shone £70 pw 
r vpress Rentals 883 5457 
HOLIDAY AFARTMEMTS from I 
Week to 3 Atooths from £50010 
f OOO pw OI 937 9681 
KMlCMTSBRfDOE Uwrw 2 
bedroom lift! Lifl Porter £375 
m» 01 727 1788 
•NEWS HSE SWIG. 2 baths 1 
dMe 1 Iwm. study, poe £450 
pw A Lanauvrr 491 7822 
M. LONDON dMe Derail, own 
ronler/fndta tM p» tape ess 
Reman 8K3 5457 
ONE BCINH M 18 I FLAT. Nr tube. 
Reretamn oarden £75pw- 01 
686 7576 Rental Cudr. 

SOUTH WEST. DMe beam 
l-Wpw Nr Tube Phone Call 
686 7576 Rental Guide 
SWIO, anrartne sunny flat. dMr 
hedrm Dvina rm. duunq ten. 
kAD £130 pw 01-681 8771 
WANDSWORTH FaOuKxn rne 
hrdinom hotne Lar ge g arden. 
Co Lrt LSOOnur.Ol 7T71788. 
MfCl. I os el 


PUIREV Luxurious ourpose MR 
anarinwni in ptesuroros btork 
4 Beds 2 Recep*. 2 Balhs. All 

marhtnes Brand new lurm 
lure Sguasn 4 Tenms Courts 
£ SOOpw Andrew* Letting, gi 
686 0111 . 



CHILDREN 'FET5 OA. 3 tad- 
room house, washer, pnane. 
g-nden Cl JO pw 

Express Rentals 883 5437 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


PASTORAL MEASLRE 1983 
The Chnrh Commsbmoers 
trove prepared a dr an pastoral 
scheme pros Ming for declaring 
redundant the parish ciitorh of 
Cnrtsi Oiurfh Albany Street 
romerw-ve known as Christ 
Church. Regents Park) m memo 
rose of London, and ri> 
hoproprubon to use far lunrxfup 
serstcosand other retiqtousacmi- 
tax <n arrerdwe win, the njev 
Md-nntoms of the Creek Ortho 
dox Chuirh of Anittxh and the 
oneni Copies of the drad scheme 
marbeoMatned from meoiureh 
CommrtMoaei x t Muibank. lon 
oon bwip 3J2 to wTKum an ' 
rrpresrntatiom should be sent 
wtlhm 26 das* of ihr DubUcairon 
of lias nohre 

tOIVWORTH. GEORCE toll 
LIAM KTVWORTH We .sf 67 
\ in ona parade. Rnxteia. Bmioi 
died at Avortmouih. Bnstof on 
251 ti January 1983. 

estate about £3* 000 
The m«*hrr *1 the above named 
e» reaueded 10 apply to the Tfta 
sury SotKitor 1 B 1 , Queen 
Anne's Chambers. 28 Broadway. 
London Swi H gj& taUing which 
tne Treasury Sotmior may take 
steps In admwiwrer the nUr 


COURSES 


A LEVELS lor Retakes ft 
1 Tear C ao n es m all sqfnem. 
Ouitart CamhTNtge Seminars, 
a Hawlholne Was. Cambridge 
OU IA\ Trtr0223l 313464 
• Answering Serine 24hni 


TUITION 


EDWARD CRECHrS Tutorial ts 
lahlehmeni. 45 Pembroke St. 
UUind Tel 'OR6 Sj 3UU08 
Vs 11 , u-r and summer A l rvel 

Iirtls Individual or group lu- 
ll inn 


EDUCATIONAL 
COURSES REVIEW 


•AFTER CC» WHAT NOT? 
For am ire upon choosing tne 
brsl indepertofM or slate 
srtwils rollnge*. fourtec. ca- 
tens and other educational 
proMems. ronsull Educabon 
Tdiire Research Sees ire. Tel. 
09074 221 7“ 


LAW 


Law Report August 14 1986 

Differential trade 
union pay rates 
are not unlawful 


National Coal Board v The hoard enmended that jn 
RWgway and Anoiber rmplovvr u-as cm lik’d to m 

Before Mr Justice PoDptewell. an ^ kould 

Mr A. D. Scott and Mr R. Lewis ^ too B » «ndcpemltfnt trade 
[Judgment given July 31J J^ on x "« union '- 

TheNiiioil CmI Board w* 


&55SSSS mSSEL PS^TJSS, :•< i"SS 

union at aU rather than for being 

i ,«ww* Ir a nurmher of a particular uninn. 

BSST 0f . After omstonnr, the l«- 

Mine»orkcrs but noi xo Na- 'nL aurhnnn -l 'th - 
UOMlUn™ at Mineworkrrs *355^ ‘ bffis 

11 cotuenuon 

The Emplo>Tnent Appeal Tn- u . . _ 

buna! beta that section 23(1 Xa) ^. ls ^ w * sh, P ,ful ^ 
of the Ad which gave employers Parliament had intended t«t c: y s* 
the right not to have action short an Cm Plo>ee Ihe right «jch J'* 

I of dismissal taken against them contended for b> the jppL jnib. 
for the purpose of preventing or n ? ,hm R u «u!d ha'c Kvn sin- 
deterring them from being P* 01 " *° ha\c oms-ndcu 

members of an independem 1 40 'J* 31 11 rej »1 15 ] 

trade union or penalizing them a u *>> ip foe amended 

from so being, did not apply to t,ol > 2 3t 1 M c >. name 1 % 
inier-union dispuics. preventing or octcmnp him 

The appeal tribunal allowed "om being or seeking ,tu ht.Mtmc 
an appeal by the National Coal a member of am trade union or 
Boardtnow British Coal) from a of a particular trade uttnm v«r 
decision of a Leicester industrial or K of a . uumher ot pjtiicu..ir 
tribunal in June that the ap- trade unions or pcn. 1 l 1 .- 1 n 2 him 
plicants. Peter Rtdgnay and for doing ; so". Secimn 2 9 ! t ji 
Paul Fairbrothcr, succeeded in not direvled tuuurJs 1 . 11 . :- 
Iheir complaints that the Board union disputes as in > n u.rie -. 
had contravened section between two mdependv-nt irav!-. 
23(1 MaL unions. 

Section 23(1 Xa) provides: It had been next arena! that 

“Subject to the folkming pro- the phrase “taken ng,iniM In rsj-. 
visions of this section every an mdixidual" meant dirtied 
employee shall have the right against him as an indiM«lu.f. it: J 
not to have the action short of did not mean action u-lrch 
dismissal taken against him as might a fleet him a-, an 
an individual by his employer individual, 
for the purpose of. (a) prevent- M „ . . . . . 

ing or deterring him from being ^jSLjgTS Vi.t " . 

or seeking to become a member "V™ f° v 1,u • 

of an independent trade union ^5!!^ - J ,k^ S „ . d 
or penalizing him for doing so.” 

“Action” is defined by section P*^*: ,n ‘ hk • ■ 

1 53 ( 1 ) of the Act as includingan ,,, . n 

omission. uhen against the two appi .wan:-. 

. __ , as indix utuals. 

MrT- R- A. Monson, QC and , . . „ . 

Mr Charles Falconer lor the l, tt « clear foal Parlura rt 
board; Mr John Hendy and Mr . u *> IT,J . kl ■* ■ 


Ouxnsuk'. now 2 Otar Baft 2 
Ralft Crouna floor flat wra 
torgr mix tiara wrunty 
w4-ftar/4rsrr. curort awl trt- 
Pftooo C330pw Trt 9028161 


IWt rtO HJ CO Cxrtouvo 1 Db» 
Miouw* qtaroto ifoo, agarl 
mral F uMs- lurnruwa to 4 sots 
fott, Stonaara Parking **ra 
abb- £220 pw Lul rrt Ol 
t;o t Sol *Rn 2om 


F.W. CAFF •Vtftnsorfnonl So, 
sort: L14 rraiaro prooomps in 
C 00 U 4 I Soutn 4na krt ton 

rton 4I04S far waibaig 
oppuronls Ol 221 8838 


HAMPSTEAD NR NEATH. Lin 
iut 1 odorwmv t sluOi/sin 
on- nra rm Hr toungr ranrua 
tounrty kfl MUiTm/wc Mm 
•rt Ivi C295PW Ol 794 2789 


token against ihe two apphcjn:*. 
as indri iduals. 

Il was clear that Parlunt.-rt 


Tim Kerr for the applicants. I,on ^twes-n asti.'n usen 

against the union and therelore 
MR JUSTICE mcm bers on the mv hjn.! 

POPPLEWELL said that the and action taken Jpiiw in- 
case arose out of the miners* div iduals who happened to hv 
dispute. The National Union of members ol the union on the 
Mmeworkers had been the only olher 


union representing the miners 
in the industry. 


Il was clear that jctmn «*av 
being taken hv the board against 


At the end of the strike the the NUM. It alTccted the ap- 
Unitcd Democratic plicants as individuals but it 

MineworkCrs Union was could not be sjid that it uas 
formed. As a result of a meeting action being taken against them 
between the board and the as individuals. 

mrmvJrs. e Accordingly, the board HIS 

a,s0 en,i,Ic,J *«• succeed on the 
baMS *»•“ Clever the Kvrd 
°- hc dld did in reunion to the union it 


not get the same increase. 


ts. .Mik..,, was not action taken against the 

m ,^rrs P of X nSm ZZ a PP |lcan,s individuals, 
plained that the pay award was It was further contended hv 
action short of dismissal and the board that there was no 
intended to deter membership “action" even though an omis- 
of the NUM; that it was Sion was included m the deli- 
intended to pnsuade them to ninon, because the hoard was 
become UDM members or to under no contractual obligation 
penalize them from remaining to pay NUM members. 


IUM members. 


The industrial tribunal had 


The industrial tribunal found decided that by paving the 
that the payment of a wage UDM members the wage in- 
increase to UDM members only crease and refraining from pay- 
amounted to an omission and to ing the same amount to N I'M 
action taken against the cm- members the board were 
ployee as an individual. They “omitting". That finding would 
held that section 23( I Xa) could be upheld by the appeal tribunal 
apply when the employers' pur- and the board's submission on 
pose was to penalize the em- that point failed. 

i -1° 3 Tbe appeal tribunal's con cl u- 

nfn sitmS Werc: lha ‘ lhc lndustna l 

P 05 ™ to. belonging to “any old tribunal's finding thai the 


w y .K . tribunal's finding that the 
pa^os: to rcnil.,.- 

J52S-«! n ! e Ffv«- 10 fo® applicants would be upheld; 

forbeU,g foa* section 23<lXa) did not 
N ThJ T^^ftrihi.isa! mneri app, X lo inier-union disputes 
FtaHOso and the “Plants lwd no cbtm 

in tow: ,hat lhc a tfl « on when 

S!. I s n I , d J 1 ^- l " bun:i1 S ^ nd, " g against the applicants was not 
& pu rP osc [ was t0 anion taken againsi them as 
penalize the applirants was individuals so for that reason 

tbe fo^* - cluint failed and that the 
industrial tnbunal s deasion omission to pay the same in- 
was supponed by the evidence, crease in wages to the applicants 
T»I^ e eSl!f St,0nS 85 U-3S P 31 ^ to UDM members 

.V^ 1 * -*2* W ^ e ^ 1 , cr , ^ uas an “ 3Cllon of shon of 

dismissal" under section 
union meant a particular in- 23ii Ma) 
dependent trade union or trade 

union of choice on the one hand Solicitors: Mr C. T. Peach, 
or “any old independent trade Doncaster: Seifert Scdlev 


union” on the other. 


Williams. 


Sum for option release 
liable to gains tax 


Powlson (Inspector of Taxes) 
▼ Wei beck Securities Ltd 
Before Mr Justice Hoffmann 
[Judgment given July 24] 

The receipt by the taxpayer 
company of a capital sum of £2 
million in consideration for it 
agreeing to “release and 
abandon" on option qvc rise to 
a chargeable gain for capital 
gains tax purposes. The 


commissioners that the trans- 
action was excluded from the 
charge by virtue of the pro- 
visions of paragraph 14<3) of 
Schedule 7 to foe Finance An 
1965 was wrong in law. 

Mr Justice Hoffmann so held 
in foe Chancery Division in 
allowing an appeal by the Crown 
from the commissioners' 
determination in favour of the 
taxpayer company. Welbeck 
Securities Ltd. in respect of a 
corporation tax assessment for 
its accounting period of 12 
months to March 31. 197S. 

Mr Edward Nugee. QC and 
Mr Christopher McCall for the 
Crown; Mr Charles Beattie. QC 
and Mr G. R. A. Argles for the 
taxpayer company. 

MR JUSTICE HOFFMANN 
said that paragraph 14(3) pro* 


vided lhai “the exeru-e or 
abandonment of an option h> 
the person for the time being 
entitled to exercise it shall not 
constitute foe disposal of an 
asset". 

On indistinguishable facts Mr 
Justin: V melon had held in 
( tuldinf » v Kaufman ( The runt's 
December 18, 10S4; (N85| STC 
132) that that provision did not 
operate to exempt from the 


virtue of section 22 a gain 
realized on the abandonment of 
an option. 

Mr Beattie had tried to con- 
vince the court that that case 
was wrongly decided. Mr Nugee 
had sought to apply it, arguing 
that the decision was right albeit 
in pan for the wrong reasons. 

His Lordship said that the 
decision in Goldint; was right 
and for the right reasons. Para- 
graph 14(3) could not operate to 
qualify ihe provisions of section 
22(3) of foe Act: it did not 
provide that no transaction 
could constitute a disposal of 
assets if that transaction in- 
cluded the abandonment of an 
option. 

The Crown's appeal was al- 
lowed with costs. 

Solicitors: Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue; Courts & Co. 


Failure to clear snow 
not an obstruction 


SUSSEX 


CWDHHOLV tnmn 2 bra- 
room rntugr. ot* heat/poel. 
hwi», Aug 16-23. ESDOsw. 
Trt 01-362 BOBS 


S SL Matthews College Oxford 

A &0 LEVEL RETAKE COURSES 

MOM* to ONHMM Ttogtal 00*0* tar toP-ml® Bata*** 

iwgtaa ni — l ett Un i i im e» ta krataai i f « am 7— 

m »i — —r ift I lawn and! town woo— tt to. 

■•■ uju n. W PtaMlTNOttiBBeraeUn wtaa tt ara— rotator 

N MnftllraineNMnpiSrtMftmmNlIFMm 
ta mtatt a r e i n i i i on itowM gutag rewta pro-Nd or 
■BOM OIX NiMn m*r I »to0«4 B*a W» NMbnt»* 

ttrnHMMIMilrafom 

tmtalbN imi— miw i inrr iimiiltaami T»i ■ 

Personal also on Page 6 


CUmenbam v Anglian Water 
Authority 

The feilure or foe owner of a 
road to dear compacted and 
rutted snow, which had been 
rendered slippery by having 
partially thawed and then re- 
firozen. did not constitute an 
obstruction ofa person's right of 
way over it. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice May and Mr Justice 


Hollings) so held on July IS. 
dismissing foe plaintifTs appeal 
from Buiy Si Edmunds Counti 
Coun (Judge Stinson), which 
had dismissed her claim for 
damages for personal injuries. 

LORD JUSTICE MAY snd 
that foe coun would leave 
undecided the question whether 
any cause of action arose in 
respect of personal injuries 
caused by the obstruction of a 
right of way. 







i . i L- ii.i 




RACING: FRENCH TRAINER EXONERATED BY NEW YORK BOARD AFTER ORIGINAL DECISION IS OVE 


Cecil raiders can collect double 



CRICKET 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

Doubles fur Henry Cecil 
and t ‘\i\ Harwood, along with 
I heir respective jockeys. Sieve 
L auilien and Oft.' rile SiJrkex. 
arc .m the cards at Salisbury 
1'H.lay. 

Cecil rarely sends runners 10 
the Wiltshire track from his 
base in Newmarket so the 
presence of Bishah 1 2.01 and 
Natiu* Oak l-UH is a lip in 
itself. 

Each appear to have jusi 
one principal rival. In 
Bishali's ease it is Red Shoes, 
while Native Oak has most to 
I'ear from Land of Ivors. 

Twelve months ago Ian 
Balding and Pat Eddery 
teamed up 10 win the 
Amesburv EBF Stakes with 
Sheer Cliff, who started 
liiviuirile. 

Now they are relying upon 
Land nf Ivory, who has been 
pl;n.cd in decent company 
since she was disqualified 
alter passing the post first in 
the Princess Elizabeth Stakes 
at L'psom in the spring. . I udged 
on ih.u «me run alone she 
would have a favourite’s 
chance this afternoon. 

But in this instance I am 
Mill eoiiiem to go nap on 
Nat iv c Oak. who was far from 
disgraced at New market Iasi 
nn >11 ill when finishing fourth 
behind Aycmino. Pinstripe 
and Chief Pal. considering 
that he was giving 1 71b and 
mme to the first three 

Before that he had won well 
o'er seven furlongs at Leices- 
ter and Goodwood. Although 
he has yet lo wilt over today's 
distance nl a mile. Native Oak 
has given me the impression 
that he will relish u. He will 
also appreciate the current cut 
in the ground. 

Stable companion Bishah's 
form a i Redcar and Newbury 
is marginally better than that 
■ •I Red Shoes, who is the first 
foal out of the Queen's dual 
classic winner Dunfermline. 

Now that Don't Forget Me. 
Startle and Counter Attack 
have all dropped out of the 
field lor the Whitsbury Manor 
Stud and Britton House Stud 
Stakes i he way looks easier for 
Brau* Dancer lo regain the 
winning trail, and trigger otT a 



is commended 


by the Aga Khan 


1 <j 


Paris. (Reuter) — The Aga 
Khan, whose horse Lashkari 
and trainer Alain de Royer- 
Duprc. were ruled innocent of 
illegal drug use on Tuesday, 
yesterday commended the 
"New York Racing Board's 
action, but said the damage in 
this ease would not be quickly 
a*paircd. 

The Aga Khan said in a 
statement that he learned 
"with great satisfaction" that 
subsequent testing had over- 
turned initial findings of the 
drug Etorphine in Lashkari on 
the day of the Breeders Cup 
Turf Race last November 2. 

"This action by the Board 
is. in large measure. 


equitable and practicable sys- 
tem of equine drug testing in 
the Common Market. 

“It is a fact that serious 
errors of a like nature involv- 
ing anabtical mistakes have 
equally’ been made in 
Europe.” he said. 

•* In industries other than 
that of the thoroughbred, such 
mistakes would be severely 
dealt with, substantial dam- 
ages paid and immediate steps 
taken. If tile thoroughbred in- 
dustry wishes to be percciv ed 
seriously, it must itself take 
the neccssan steps on both 
sides of the .Atlantic to avoid 
the repetition of such gross 
errors.” 


, x, . .. ■■■.;■- . 




Neville Callaghan's Mansooj, seen here landing Newmarket’s July Stakes at the rewarding odds of 25-1. will be ridden by 
Ray Cochrane, instead of the suspended Cash Asmussen in next Wednesday's Gimcrack Stakes at York. 
Harwood-Starkey double to Cup here at Salisbury in June 


be completed half an hour 
later by Pearly King (3. JO). 

Last time out Brave Dancer 
managed only fifth place, but 
that was in the Coventry 
Stakes at Royal Ascot. Before 
i hut he had won in commend- 
able style at Newbury. 

Fairy Gold, one" of two 
newcomers in the field, is a 
half sister to those two good 
burses What a Guest and 
Infantry by the 1^82 Derby 
winner. Golden Reece. Her 
trainer Michael Dickinson is 
finding his first winner on the 
Rat for Robert Sangstcr 
elusive. 

Pearl v Kings close second 
to Mighty Rash in the Bibury 


marks him down as the likely 
winner of the Violet Applin 
Challenge Cup now. 

Jaisalmer. beaten only a 
head by Garnet in the Ralph 
Hubbard Memorial Nursery 
at Goodwood, can go one 
better in the Ogboume Nurs- 
ery. She finished like a rocket 
at Goodwood and would have 
won with a bit further to go. So 
today's slightly longer race 
should suit her. 

Finally, at Catterick Bridge 
I can envisage Ray Cochrane 
and William Jarvis pulling ofl 
a double with Shuttlecock Girl 
(6.3) and Briggs Builders 
(7.25). 


Impressive Nettle has 
Carson whistling 


Today's course specialists 


SALISBURY 

TRAINERS: G Harwood. *1 *mnens from 
I&4 runnurs. 27 3%. J Tree. 14 Irom 70. 
20 0%. W Hem 14 Irom 96. 14 6% 
JOCKEYS: G Starkey. 4) winners Irom 
169 rides 24.3%. W Carson. 33 from 142. 
23 2%. Pal Eddery. 27 Iron ?&4. 17.5% 


CATTERICK 

TRAINERS: Jimmy Fitzgerald. 8 winners 
Irom 20 runners. 40 0%. J Dunlop. 6 from 
20 30 0*o M Prescott 17 from 64. 26.6%. 


JOCKEYS: S Perks. 17 winners from 136 
noes. 12 5%. M Bircfi. 23 from 206. 
11 2%. 0 Nicolls. IS Irom 166. <0.8% 

NEWTON ABBOT 

TRAINERS: D Elswm. 17 winners Irom 
65 runners. 262%: J Jenkins. 31 from 
135 23.0%. D Gandollo. 12 from 56. 
21 4% 

JOCKEYS: H Davies. 21 winners Irom 101 
rides. 20 8%. P Barton. 12 from 61. 19 7'%. 
P Leach 25 irom 132. 18.9% 


Royal jockey Willie Carson 
gave an appreciative whistle as 
he dismounted from Nettle, who 
had just made an impressive 
winning first appearance for the 
Queen in the Rockboume 
.Slakes at Salisbury yesterday. 

Taking the lead two furlongs 
out. this well-bred filly raced 
home for a spectacular five 
lengths victory over Last Dance. 

l*ord PorchcsTer. the Queen's 
racing manager. said:‘*The 
Queen has had only three tvn>~ 
year-olds runners so far and 
they have all won. The others 
were Gentle Persuasion and 
Rnundlet. Nettle stretched oat 
really welL and this was a very 
encouraging debut. She’s in all 
the big races, but I don't know 
where Dick Hern will run her 
nc\f." 

Pat Eddery, riding the 
favourite, again had to settle lor 
third place on Alt Smith, who 
made the running for four 
furlongs. 

The Udsh trainer Derek 


Haydn Jones said “I've got a 
budding sprint Mar - after his 
filly La Petite Noblesse had 
landed Arapnrt Maiden Stakes 

“That was no surprise tome," 
said the Pontypridd handler. 
“This is going to be mv best 
since Annie Edge. I took her up 
to Hay dock for her first run in 
July and she led one nut on the 
bridle. I couldn't believe it. She 
just fell apart in the final furlong 
and fnished sixth. Hnwevcr. 
eight days afterwards she was 
covered in ringworm and was 
under treatment for a fortnight. 
I'm going to put my head on Che 
block and I'll promise you this is 
a really good one." 

la* Petite Nohlesse . always 
well there, took the lead for in- 
form John Reid at the furlong 
pole and easily held the chal- 
lenge of Mash hub. 


commendable. It is never easy 
to admit a mistake and less so 
when it involves an erroneous 
finding of one of Ihe two 
American quality assurance 
laboratories for equine drug 
testing." he said. 

The New York Slate Racing 
and Wagering Board had fro- 
zen the fourth-place purse of 
S 1 00.000 in the Breeders' Cup 
race for nine months after the 
laboratory at Cornell Univer- 
sity issued a report of a 
positive drug lest. 

Tuesday's announcement 
means ihe purse will go to the 
owner. The board had also 
suspended the licence of 
Lashkari's trainer, de Roycr- 
Dupre. who was held respon- 
sible for the horse's condition. 
Royer-Dupre has been 
reinstated. 

The announcement marked 
the first lime in New York 
racing that a positive drug test 
had bi.vn overturned. 

“Vindication came in spite 
rather than as a result of the 
procedures.” said the .Aga 
khan. “It required eight 
months of painstaking and 
expensive parallel investiga- 
tion. fact-finding and sworn 
depositions to arrive at the 
salutorv reversal.” he said. 



Aga Khan" Damage would 
not quickly be repaired " 


LX’ Royer-Dupre said '* I am 
verv relieved and grateful for 
fhe"Board‘5 unprecedented de- 
cision. I am relieved that thai 
this damaging ordeal is oyer 
and that no shadow remains 
on my record, I am grateful 
that throughout the past eight 
months the owner’s con- 
fidence in my innocence never 
wavered." 


Blinkered first time 


SALISBURY: 2 30 All Fan- 3 30 Broker. 
Tackle. 4 3D Par'S Guest. 

CATTERICK BRIDGE: 6 55 Highland Glen. 


The Aga Khan also called 
for racing authorities in Eu- Gontaui-Biron at 
rope to intensify efforts to The five-year-old. 
establish “a more thorough. 


• Chris Dwyer, the jockey, has 
been confirmed as ihe rider of 
K-B.TU.tv in Saturday's Pnx 
Deauville, 
trained by 
Bill Elsey. won the Lincoln 


Handicap in March. 




SALISBURY 


Going: good to soft 

Draw: up to 1m high numbers best 


4 CAJUN DANCER (M Perancm) M Franca 8-8 
KTREEN (USA) lMrs> R Waters,! P Waiwyn 6-8 


j Raid 3 
N Howe 7 
.. Demme Gibson i 

FAIRY GOLD (R Sangstar) itfW Dounson6-8 SCauHwn2 

6-4 Brave Dancer. 4-1 Try The Duchess. 9-2 His Highness. 6-1 Caiun Dancer. 
10-1 Kireen. 12-1 Fairy GoW. 14-1 WtutncJge 


0 WHITRIDQE IW Gaff) D Lamg 64. . 

ion M W Doonson M 


2.0 UPAVON EBF STAKES (3-Y-O fillies: £3,052: 1m 21) (9 runners) 


M2 BISHAH (USAKBF)IPrmceA A Faisal) HCeol 8-12. 
1003 FIRST KISS IDI iSnekh Moftantmedl J Dunlop 8-12 
013-00 GREY WALLS (£<t P Oooennwneri G WrapgB-12 . 


... SCaufflanl 
. Pat Eddery 9 
.. PRottasonS 
Paul Eddery 3 
. _ TQwnn2 
. B Room 6 

G Baxter 8 

. .. W Canon 4 
J WHtams 7 


FORM: BRAVE DANCER (8-11)11 5th to Cutting Blade (8-1 1 )at Royal Ascot i6( Group 3. 

' SHNESS |9-0j 1 "il 3rd « Locklon (9-2) ai New 


£24928. hmt. June 17. 19 ran| HIS H1GHNE: 
market (71 £4495. good to firm . JUy 19. 4 ran) TRY THE DUCHESS (6-B) 7-.l5fflto Sea 


0-310 RATTLE ALONG tO Water) P Waiwyn 8- 12 . ... 

3 72000-0 DAWN MIRAGE (I Thompson) W Brooks 8-7 

1 OOO- FAflCEUSE tH Le*ckerti G Balding 8-7 

10 0-00002 KICK THE HABIT iCapt M Lemost C Brittain 8-7 . .. 

12 0-30322 RED SHOES (The Queen) W Hem 8-7 

t > SHEER NECTAR (L TuiiWKtt.G Balding B-7 .... 

9-4 B’tnah. 100-30 First Kiss. 7-2 Rad Shoes. 5-1 Raffle Along. 8-1 Grey Wans. 
(0-1 Kick The Habii. i2-i offlets 

FORM. BISHAH i8-9t 1 1 2nd of 9 to Lavender MisiJ8-9) ai Newbury (1m 21. £8142. good 
-,-t; jnru' in FIRST KISS (9-7) l-.i 3rd to Strike Home (9-2| alWfndsor Jim 2| 
1 50re* . £274 z.oood. July 28 iSfanl. GREY WALLS 9th Iasi timr "» 122 
to ?***>■ AdttndeiS-Jiai iork itit £420i.goodtoson.Sept4. il ran) RATTLE ALONG 
*tb ia*.r tint® prevrousiy IS 1 1 1 beat Queen Ot Baffle iB-111 neck at VYolvertiamptpn llm 
f £«5P turn June 23. 14 ran) KICK THE HABIT (8-8) 2"J 2nd lo Anch N'BeelB-Hlai 
Ayr 1 1 m. £ 1 889 goodtosfflt AuqB.Brani RED SHOES |B-7|2’/*I 2nd 10 Boon Potnl (8- 
It'll ^1 Windsor lim 21 22yds. £959. good lo fimi. Aug 2. 11 ran). 

Selection- BISHAH 


Data f8-fl] at Newbury |6I. £7934. qoot) to Inn. July 19 8 ran) CAJUN DANCER 19-0) 4ffl 
beaten 171 by Classic Tate (9-0) ai Ascot <71. £7292. 

Selection: BR 


beaten 171 1 


r Classic Taie (9-0) ai Ascot <7f, 

9AVE DANCER 


good. July 25. 7 ran). 


Salisbury selections 


By Mandarin 

2 »i Ht-h.th 2 Id The i 'lo. 3.0 Brave Dancer. 3.30 Pearly King. 4.0 
Mill F. 0\K inapt. 4.311 Jaisalmer. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2 i» Bidiah. 2.30 Singing Boy. 3.0 His Highness. 3.30 Fourth Tudor. 
4 o Native 1‘iyV 4 3tl Munn Indigo. 

By Michael Seely 

2 «t RinIi.iI!. .3 d BK \VF DANCER (nap). 4.0 Native Oak. 


3.30 VIOLET APPLIN CHALLENGE CUP (Handicap: £2,193: 1m 60 
(16) 

32321V HIGH MORALE lShe*kn AI AbuKhams«i)DEIswortftS-t(M PMcEntee (7) 11 

020003 TAITS HILL (Mrs B Santenon) L Cottre* 5-9-0. ... . NC*i>*l*9 

4002 PEARLY KMG (USA) (A Boom) G H arwood 3-8*13 GSwnwyB 

030024 BALLET CHAM 1 (USA) (B) (S Gadagher) R Holder. B-8- 1 2 Pm Eddery 2 

001404 ALSIBA(D)tMiss A WestanhCkl G Senstead44-I0 — 13 

000/0 MYTWCAL BOY iMre C O Shea: J Fo* S-8-8 JWffliaiwfi 

01-0000 GOLDEN TRIANGLE (Mrs D Payne) J Roberts 5-5-7 . . .. B Thomson 10 

43030/0 WONDER WOOD ID Roar sun) R Holder 7-6-7 A Dicks (7) 15 

0/200 FOURTHY TUDOR (USA) iBHanburyiBHanowy 4^4 .. A J Gerw (7) 16 

220104 WALC1SIN (D) (C Rows) R Hatmon 3-8-3 RPerham(7)7 

402000 MY CHARADE (BHC-D) IT McCarmv) A4rs B Wanng b-9-i — 1 

0-00433 SHMZAD(BF)(K AodUWJ Trae 3-8-0 WNawnesS 

000000 LBRATCIS Malles) JMBfflfflev 5-7-12 . . . TWUatitsA 

0-30001 ALACAZAM iHeanwon SlaWes Ud) J Speanng 4-7-11 (4ex).. W Canon 12 

00000 NOBLE V1KWG IS Snertras) S Mel Or 3-7-9 . . R Fo» 3 

0-0000 BROKEN TACKLE (B)|Mrs D Ougmon) D Ougttran 4-7-7 ... D McKay 14 

5-2 Pearly King. 100-30 Ba8ei Champ. 4-1 Watasm. 5-1 Sbrzad. 13-2 Tar's HiO. 
8-1 Als*a. 1(1-1 others. 


FORM: TAR'S HtLL (B-7) 2' .1 3rd Of 12 to Primary (9-8) at Bath ( 1m St. £2725. «rm. July 


231 PEARLY KING 194)) '.(2nd lo Mighty Flash j8-8) here (1m <U. E3270. good to lirm, 
June 25. 9 ran), with WALC1SIN (7-13) be 


. J Denma Previously (6-8) 2*kl 4m benmo Seven 

HihsIB-Gjat Yarmoutn(im6l. £2128. good lolnm. Aug 7. 7 ran). BALLET CHAMP (B-3) 
6'.( 4th to Sadiaz (9-11) at Newmarket (2m. £2367. good to hrm. Aug 8. 8 ran). ALSI8A 
4|h last time; previously (8-11) 10 5m to Amigo EsOmaoo <9-21 ai t2£w - 


■ Detaw par 


2.30 NATTON APPRENTICE HANDICAP (El .210: tm) (18) 


mge tsfl 

goo-3 to tirm July 2. 1 1 ran) with BROKEN TACKLE 18-5) Bln. MY 
since (7- It) 31 2no to Trapeze Anrat (9-4) at Haydock (Im6(. £3130. good. June 6. 11 
rani ALACAZAM (7-12) t’.-i Wolverhampton Winner horn Don t fling Me (9-7) with Won- 
der wo?d (6-12) behind (im 8'.-t. £1937. good. Aug 4. 15 ram 
Selection: MY CHARADE 


0C00O2 ALL FAIR (BHDIiS Dnsmorei P Has'am 5-10-0 
aronot SINGING BOY (Dl (G £aefii * Hide 5-9 J i5e0 
n 0M2 FIJU OF UFEtiCunmnuhsmiM Pipe 3-9-2 

0W3M DOLLY ( J Srfit) A r.yvye 4y)-i3 

3!0. V .’1 SHAKE RIVER II u-.n,--.] F JO'dVt 4-B-13 
400000- THE UPSTART (Th-; OuUI J Fox 4^-12 


.. . J Scafly 1 
S Bndte (3) 18 
J Carr B 
S HOI (3) 5 
W Hayes 15 
R Pemam (61 18 


4.0 AMESBURY EBF STAKES (3-Y-O: 1m) (7) 


0-00 RUSSKI tOd'wtJury Racmg Statfes Ltd) K Cunmngftam-Bmwn 3-8- 1 1 


A Coney (61 12 
A Dicks (~ ‘ 


(3)2 

Karen Gurney IB) 17 
A Riding |6) 13 
P Francis (3) 6 
. B Umacke (3) 11 
A Lappm (31 7 


121000 SAHARA SHADOW (CXO) tM TrtKJull D Tucker 4-8-6 
?Ki HEADIN' On iiiPsHKtioniMEcKhevB-a-S . 

00 0 ASPARKiM'sF Ptibe*oni h Tnomson Jews 3-8-» 

0 nooiD TREMENDOUS JET (USA) |D Wiiksi M Mangwc v 3-8-3 
wo o'd “XEET SAY LO H T.W .v,:-«wri T Haflen q-a-2 
ororn). SILVER EMPRESS (SI (Mix; E Wnqhtt R Hannan 5-8-0 
232012 THE UTE (B1 iR [MSTurn Mi: L &:«« 3 7-13 
030-000 RLST AND WELCOME iLh.1v T Agnewl G Balding 4.7 II 
J 0QI >JP TOP FEATHER iG mn.il D Marks '4.7. 1 1 
000024 MR MUSIC MAN iMrs'C B.Mvevi Mrs C Reavev 12-7-11 

Fiooiuaia Madden (6) 14 

0M?0n CENTRALSPIRES BEST iJ Upwnl T Caw J-7-9 S Ohibfts (3) 3 

t .in Pm j-i Fun 01 Uic. il-2 Headin' On. Singing Boy ’3-2 Tne ute 
r.;ki 8-1 5n.xFoRr.er 10-1 others 


3- 42114 NATIVE OAK (C D Aiess«3) H Cepi 9-4 . ... 

04- 0433 LAND OF IVORY (USAKBF) (P Mellon) I Ba*dng 9-1 

0-000 DANRBOlRPavnejL Cottrell 8-11 .... 

00040 OUT YONDER (» Wigminani W Wuntman 8- n 

00 SIRTAK) DANCER (Mrs H ConmsiL Witoman B-il 

LA SHAKA iC Biackwein A Moore R-8 

00-0003 THEREAFTER |B) l Mrs, A No 'man) W Wightman 8-8 

13-8 Nanwi Oak. 7 -a Land of ivory. 13-2 Thereafter. 10-1 Out Yonder 
Dancer. '6-1 La Sha*a. 20-1 Dannbo 


12 


S Cautfien 3 
Pat Eddvry 7 
. I Johnson 4 
.J Williams 5 

J Rod 2 

... 8 Rouse 1 
AMcGtone6 
12-1 Slrtaki 


P McEntee (3) S 
<3)10 


FORM: NATIVE OAK (9-D beaten a 1 -t py Avantmo (7-12) at Newmarket (fm. £12918. 

OF IVORY 3rd last time 1 tm) Previously |8-1 1) 2M 


H Teague ( 

P Johnson (3) 4 


. uiy ID 15 

3ro IP Traimw (S-Il)ai Gooowocd(im2(. £11960. scm. May 22. 6 ran) 
Selection: LAND OF IVORY 


n r-- iui 1 .Tm ru uueiiirm ip-ai 41 narmiion iut. usjj. "'m jury 10 2 
Ov.fl 5lt«-HN«3rOr9-Ol i*a1 PompiractlBt £2562 aood lehrm. Aug 6. 
.’I : Mam or totwnmd BcwiOw(8-7)ai LmgueM(7'.-l. £2998. good. 

E RIVER lS-7) 2 I 4rn 10 Every Htlnn (8 I1| ai Bam. Wtm SAHARA 


FORM. ALL FAIR r Q 101 ' 1 2nn 10 Duellmo 18-21 at Hamillon iSf. £2553. 'mn July t8 5 

I. 11 1 SINGING BOv 1 ' ' ------ . . . - 

Sr.ltll DOLLYiP-. 

J. ’U '€1 -SNAKE RIVER |8-7| 2‘ ' 4in 10 Every 
SHADOW iR- “I .•! back 5im0l £3J61. lirm July 16. 12 ram FLEET BAY unplaced last 
lim-iim.' 11 SHi-inmimyi'' i3loe.it FULL OF LIFE i9-n '.lai Bain 181 £ii63.hrm. Jw 
In 1 5 r ini THE UTE i9 01 head 2nd Id Cessna! Drrve (8-111 at Wmosor 161 sell. E926 

.I.-: Ii.l, 36 ' - r.,m 

Sofecnon. ALL FAIR 


4.30 OGBOURNE NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: EZ.075: 

1 010 MOON INDIGO IR RvfflaidSI C Bnttam 9-7 

) 3020 MUBKlRiHamdan AiMaMouniPWaiwmB 10. . . 

6 10200 JAISALMER (Lady Scon) 0 Ebworth 8-5 . 

6 040 EDHAIANTHUS IP GoutandnSI D Lamg S3 . . 

S 010000 PARIS GUEST (B) (A Corsmsi Pal M-tcned 9-2 
13 312D30 PANACHE (D)|T Ernst PHasiam 7-12 
1! ' 142 OLOflE MALLE iMrsJRegarifl Harmon 7-1 1 

5-2 Ja>salmer. 3-1 Moon indigo. 5-i Mubkir. Oicma Malle. 
iO-i Edraiamnus '8-t Pans Guest 


60 (7) 

SCauthen 5 
Pat Ldoety 1 
. A McGSkme 2 
. N Adams 6 
. 1Gumn4 
. T WUtrams J 
W Canon 7 
8-t Panache. 


FORM: MOON INDIGO 9ffl (8-9l in Newmarket nursery i60 vnfh PANACHE (7-7) behind 
Preiircmi.lv i8-i 1 1 neck Sandcmn winner irom Last Dance (51 £4201 rjooatahnn. Ju<y4. 
8’ani PANACHE |7-I2) nad previously run2 , i Jro to PasD Encnefe(9-0)atGonowo«) 


3.0 WMITBURY MANOR & BRITTON HOUSE STUD STAKES (2-Y-O: 

£5.64)3 7ii{7l 


(61 £4032. good 10 Im. July 31 8 rani MUBKIR unplaced last time. Previously 19-0) 

- " ‘ 'on(9-" ■ " 


JiO BRAVE DANCER r*j 2l*V> >,, ai G HirwnX"' 90 
13 HIS HIGHNESS (01 iC.lpl N Lrvn.:siC EHiRam 90 
ICO TRY THE DUCHESS ( RMjr-JwmM Usher 8-» I 


G SUrtey G 
P Eddery 4 
0 McKay 5 


ne.> 2nco( 5 n? Ansoturion 19-0) at Warwick (5i. r793. gooo to mm. Jury 2j. JAJSALMER 
>• iQi new 2n.no Garnet (7-i3i ai GooiHvona i5i. £9318. ouoa io :rm. Aug t. 9 ran). 
PARIS GUEST 9m last time, earner (9-3l 8i 5m ic> Dutch Couiaoe iS-Ol ai nnmpian 15#. 
£2:49 hrm July 16 8 rani OLOAE MALLE 18-6I& 2no 10 Laurie's Warrior (9-6l ai Ef-ign- 
:rv- 171 £as?d grvjo 10 hrm Aug 5. 6 ran) 

J Salmi - 


Selection: JAISALMER 


Salisbury results 


Gornr] . i-i. I V- -..--Il 

2 0 i’ll ' LA P2TITE NOBLESSE IJ 

™-.: .■> 1! ..' Mashbuh.BH 1 .kjr 4 .' 3-1). 3 

Niw,i.,in C.*-l.F.r e.Wi'iy 11 -H'aii ALfO 
littj ? K'l'i '- 11.110 '5 MI .1 lnrpnn.il 
v. .-. Fi hi Burn j£n i. f.'L-ior Qmker 
,j in y> B.inii? 5"ng Cnarmr'n Pnn(M 
H- i. u-. H.'i,' ] tis.v Lovri iSrnj Mine 
)> r"v 1 >li id Ficuyr 14 rjn II ih hr) 
j ■ ^n ih! 0 Hayrin Jones i( 

p. ;n ..m t.mi- f.Z' jio lj ro £i4(i 

II til 2F C ji? C5F lSS 66 Imm 
(■*.. r-.-. r 

2.30 rfJr ■ NETTLE *W Clr:nT Ml 2. 
Lasl Dance .F Tp-.ni.,v.n A. fi 3 AbSrmth 
i r .i: fw. ham.! alPO Ran n-j 
vr.-'.'i nf.ln Reel .4mi llTas|.l 

1 7 .. Ill Ir...«ei<. (Ami 53 p„y 

A> ■ r“*i ii'.n ».in Darting :6ihl 

-1 itn -•> iV- ill i SI |v- Jl Jl 21 W 
r. in .r 1 1i.ilO C5 W. £| SO. 

r: of. .' ■ c-r cn 13 csf £4F, 32 

Iru.n 


AfWcy Rock el 10 Ownavio 
Gown (JiHoe. 14 Concert pi| C n (Aihi 20 
GdmmPs Dream, riatcnina. Nicky Nick. 
?SAtmiFno( 33 Gaunar iSlhj Carman 15 
ran 2' 1. *i. ho. 21. 31 . l Cotneii 41 
CullORiDIOft. Toie £5 20 £1 70. £1 90 
£2 50 DF £1120 CSF r32 56 Tn^as: 


PMi.ingn. Rose 01 Tixtor. Rosies Image 
P'd'iifflous Lady 21 ran l'.-i. I'.-i sn na 
i i ji j Winter ai Newmarkei Tote 1 
EJ60 £200. £4.60. C2 8U OF £24.30 
C&F £45 26. 


Fontweli 


H20 CSF F32 56 Trn^asi 
£19168 imm27 66sec 


Piacepot £1855 


Catterick Bridge 


3 0 oil I MERRYMOLESiR Wernham 
2 3*;«:r>-ood Cotnge iP.u 

ii'ii v l.i "■ ) Hiqmy Recummended 

• H.'i.i'"*' I. J Moiart lG ELnier 3-3< 

At -"i RAN 1 1 1 Mv Sunny M.ilfn 
:ru - r.ii-i-inrj.I.ir.ih E Stiver F-vmiSmi 
a I-'. [)l>Uv vaiglian on.io 
•I .nil. 1 1 Ml- -V'lla JulM In ArJid 25 
.n. hi Tm 1 Ci-.n O' T«rtd 33 Monatangn 

• • .ii Mi .ler .V.irrn nk Jl nc 3l nk 
.1 kVaniaoe Trjrr £ 12 7 0 


rr:.’ V« rn cths r> w df £45 eo 

C-' TeT 37 friuar! £i£)3C07 1mm 


2 lOi’m ”1 I SAMHAANrA Goran IJ- 

?'.>•< J f re- OnRoarciTwiiiiauis. ii-ji. 

: Su.St'rttC-! -.>.r.i 1 1 ALSO II- 

* .; in !*..■ ^ i in. c.i c.lwv iSini. 8 

i.'> J"iri> E.iy 0-.rn.nnc 
u:n. Fn.-I. •— .-.n 9r,n a 4J nv ?l II 

D 11 ii •*■■■' i ; (-...inji.t: 1 ^lii Uj 

.rtJ C"- £"40 C6*' 


1 ,'n-ir 


41- 


4 0 


■ • i WA95L PEEF I’-V Car m 
. p.. mu. i in Nee iF'Af trt.i.,-. 
C'.cif.i.Kjn ik i'i>on. j:i ■) .1 
4> d> Alll'l.Vi T lit- 
1 -II «2£r £l 6u 2n"'i 


creDANi'-VaiM 
r i .- 1 -am r fe. 
:-.n.-k|...- 

. • plr C 1I-'.- 


•O 4 I 

■»t*jiy T -!i 

■ n 6L;-0 

r*i|t»i 1 1-2 


Going-, good 

2l5l5'H LADY CARA U Carroii. 8 t> 
2 Karen's Star iN Leach 20-11. 3. Last 
Secret (J Callaghan 33-:; 4 Captains 
Bidd (L Ricgo'4-ii ALSO RAN 3 'av 
Musm Uavru'iia io Phiisiar i2 Pe>g«a. 

PunciP CniJk iSini S'lbahOO 14 Tiacef- 
mjn mini. Para® G'h. &av Its 

ttesb'eU 3-lv. 25 Ada i SOV Tncenco. 

LrOhl Atk3N>. Grand QuAS-t Swcnjim 

Sk.i'ri'r 18 rjn. NR £ve r So Snaro 2i 11 
hd I. '.I J Berry al Cockefflam. Totti. 

l?.io uoo. L5.W) Et; io. t:.io df 

£4540 CSF £15) % Tncasl E4 510B4 
2 4S llm 51 isovdi 1 PATRIOTIC iG 
Du*he«} '0-H lam. Fire Ldnl <i vtpoc. 

1 i'll- 3 Cwecote »W R Swmokirn. 3-li 
AL90 RAN- lb-2 Andrea s Pn-ie i.aim in 
Sunlit )5mi 12 Tiber Gate i6thi 86 Fur 
Bany 7 ran NR Mursey.Qjoo r i ■ i. 
' i Jl 2( M P»A«wn jl N; a mark el Tele 
0 70 £130 £2 70 DF- £J JO 05? 

£II5-i Bought m 

3.15l7d1 TflAOE NIGH .ONrctvIlls 20- 
i>.2 Damn i M Tenoun 12- 1 ■ 3 Fore»er 
TmgoiL RiQam 2s- Il J. Pokertayes iG 
DniTieu ii> ii alSO Ran. 6 p-Uv* 
nnijms Sev.rer Bills Aneaa. 1 3-5 Zio 
Penoina VVu»»aMy '0 S.r wiynon; 
T.jnoc Evriss ismj ii G».ien Disc '5 
F,.nimr.5i Cwtrcu ZSG^bnsOiBQ 33 
Ir.elVM Cl4S> n.mwrr Guurt M .Afrarr 

Ni.T.n Clnui’r. Lri Oik- 01 b-i.'IO 1DIPI 1 8 

I nh ' -I II. 51 I 1' • 1 V'Ck-r'i jl 
'i.ii'.De'd" Toie r'5 60 C?JD £4 50. 
££ 90 tc 30 OF iVkinnw O' . )r C wriin any 
amer iwwi £-» SO C5F £22? 2*. 

46 

3.J5 IS'l t MARIMBA I IV P --annbunr 5 

2 r.i vi J Bay WooomhG Duhkid la-U - 

Paradise Corte# <t Ciuiii-'. 4 i< *i_-0 
Rorj j siyusnCiin «ve .v .611*1 |( T 
Ramndw Trciit. 14 nn - iJJiii 
ip Mniizen Ls>s iSini Prnranr v-OdO 55 
Bnonftn Sijiiners On Sam. 

-rarch B’-'-dk 3.; .lean Jr.ime Lews'a. 

Mi'-f. Mdn.tjii'r-ni klOPIem On 1 " Fnj'rl. 


4 15 Mm SI iBOyd) I. SEVEN HILLS (M 
Fonens. ii-4). 5. Relatively Easy iG 
Ouiduio 2 1 Mvl.3. NitKfaiSWBMriur. 33- 
Ii ALSO RAN 8 Rnwe Island R« (Sffll. 
'-i«an s Move, io CcKOurfieid. 12 Chevei 
LtWv G G Magic. Manna Plata i Jmi. 33 
Frfcnensinwn. (*intufiochia. Tmas Lad 
•6ffli -.2 ran 21 SI. SL II 3l Juimy 
FirjiMraic at Mailed Tote £5 70. £1 M 
£140 £18 10 OF C3.60 C5F £6 70 
"'"-’si £12993 


4 45 dm Jl JOydl 1. ASTRAL (T Omrin. 
2-i iMavi 2 Indian Love Song (5 Perks. 
11-?: 3 La Duse tfi Guast. 8-l» AlSO 
Ran Jji.iav A-imiiau ah latti). 14 Diinnfl 
Frou M.iitiar i5mi 30 Marpffl Line om) 
2s D.ii’-jjmrie To{j Ruw. 33 Luc* V 1<n 50 
Jelly Jin II ran f l II. 1-.I.4I 4t P LOie 
.il Wr.aicantie. Toie: £2 80 £ I 50 £ i 60 
C2 iy DF £7 00 CSF- FI 3 65 Ansi a 
stewards T.Quiry the result stood 


5.15ilm Jl JOvdl 1 WESSEX IN Tinkler. 
0 11 taw 2. Night Warm* (A Robson. 1 1- 
nFar 


I) 3 Gohtm Fancy <i wiener* 7-2I.ALSO 


RAN " Pr-;»irtnvfl (5m). 33 MoOrtigWk] 


uih) i0 4$.»i Again (6tn). Van Der 
•an II 31 8< 3l 1' 1 N Tinkler 31 Manor 
Tgt.' £1 70 £1 io. £2 30 DF £390 CSF 


£529 


Ptacepot: £38.60 


Going 7000 10 hrm 

2.0 i2m 2t htfle) 1 Welsh Crown |R 

Coiorem. 3 U ? NevHle (b-l). 3. 

Mr wnai 5-His-rvame 118-8 lav) Sran sn 

hfl M M Eksnon. Tow £3 90 £1.70. 
£2 20 DF £9 60. CSF CT8.25 Alter an 
onieciron py me second io tne wmner in? 
result stood 

2.30 (2m 21 1 10yd C") 1. Vale Challenge 
(K Ryan 7-4 lavi. 2. Johnny Tarqum |T|. 
Ii 3 owinglerrw 1 1 1 4) 7 ran. idl. 51. K A 
Morgan Tote £2 6Q- £1 80. £2.80. Dr 
Ci4 60 CSF- £19 40. No om 

3.0 (2m 21 how) i Whiskey Tuna (Mr G 
Birytks 3 n. 2 Am-initss (2-1 lev) 3 
Hudiiiii-2i 18 ran. NR G»h«d Gift f i 

2 -i J Jflnmns Tow £4 20. £• 50 £2 00 
£2 00 DF £5 90 CSF 9 74 

3.30 i2m 21 1 tOyd ch) 1. Captm Oewn 

iR Ai.wu. 7-4 favr 2. Simon EkAiva* lA-l). 

3 Crtrnueen hill |33-1) 10 ran. 2(H. 2i. J 
GrMoM Tom C2 30: ft 80. £1 BO. £7 '0. 
DF £5 50 CSF El 2.-18 Tncasi: £228 75 

4.0 \2m 61 nrtite) 1 . Amenek iC Brown. 4- 
7 Mv). 7. Lime Katrina (50- ij. 3 Dus: 
Conqueror (7-1) tiran. IO 81 Jfioburrs 
Tnie El 60" £110. £11 30 £2.70 Df 
£102 30 CSF £32 80 

4.30 (2m 21 hdlei 1. D**n Day (P 
Scudamore. 6-5 tavj. 2. Indian Many H2- 
i|. 2. R'Dtj-t). 0 ffln. 2".i. ai 0 A'Witon 
Tots £ t 80. £1 50. £2 10. £150 OF 
£B 40. CSF. £u.68. 

Piacepor £15^0 


CATTERICK BRIDGE 


Going: good 

Draw: up to 7f low numbers best 


3 0004 D'ARTlGirr (BKD) K Brassey 9-3 . 

4 0004 DANCING TOM (D) T F*rrxirst 9-2 

5 0004 HIGHLAND GLEN (B)FWaoon 8-1 0 
9 0000 ROYAL ROUSER R Hofenshead 8-5 

11 0301 OUR CHILDREN (D) W wnancnr 7-8 . 


5 Wtutworth 2 
MHWs 4 
. DNichollsll 
. 5 Perks 10 
.. —9 


12 0004 MUSIC TEACHER (D) AM Robson 7-7. S P Grtlftths S 


6.5 CHRISTMAS MORNING NURSERY HANDICAP 
(2-Y-O: £1.693: 6f) (10 runners) 


A Mackey 6 
. . M Fry 3 
A Proud 1 


2 1001 EMMER GREEN (D)J Berry 9-12 J CanoH (7) 7 

3 3000 WHISTLING WONDER M Bnttam 9-7 . K Oartey 6 

4 0104 CLOWN STREAKS! |C)(D) M H Easterby 9-6 MBrreh 1 

5 4002 SNO SURPRISE R B«S 9-6 EGue«(3)4 

7 4000 PENBREASY R HoAnshead 9-2. SPmK>9 

9 3103 PASHMMA T Fairtiurst 9-1 MHHs.2 

9 3100 BROOM’S ADDITION K S we 9-t . GBrovm3 

10 031 SAUNDERS LASS (D)R Hffldfir B- 12 . G DuftMUd 5 

It 3033 SHUTTLECOCK GHtLWJarws 8-12 R Cochrane fl 

U 4003 SILVERS ERA N Callaghan 6- 10 —10 

7.2 Clown Streaker 4-1 Saunders La si. 9-2 Sno Sunrise. 
6-1 Pasnmina. 8-1 Bioons Adfflnon. 10-1 Wwtlmg Worwer. 


13 0-00 SPANISH INFANTA P Feigaie 7 7 _ 

14 0000 MAYBE JAYNE A W Jams 7-7 .... 

15 -000 HERB HOBBIT D W Chapman 7-7.. 

3-1 DArngny. 4-i Cumbrian Dancer. 9-2 Bon Accoed. 

6-1 OurOutdren. 15-2 Dancmg Tom. 12-1 Highland Glen Muse 
Teacner. 14-1 others 


7.25 PORT & STILTON MAIDEN 
STAKES (2-Y-O: £822: 71) (14) 


AUCTION 


00 ARIZONA SUN Jimmy Frtzgerffld 8-11 MHOS 14 
8RMURJW watts B1I NCwmorton HJ 


OOO GREAT WMORYLm^olt 8-11,..-:.. . BOoasley 3 


Catterick selections 


b.55 

7.55 


Bk Mandarin 

6.5 Shunlerock Girl. 6.30 King Lad>. 
Cumbrian Dancer: 7.-25 Briggs Builders. 

Slone Jug. 8.25 Golden Heights. 

B> Our Newmarket CortespKmdeni 
6.5 Sno Surprise. 6.30 Nightdress. 7.25 Briggs 
Builders. 7.55 Relatively Easy. 


6 042 MURPHY R Whitaker 
9 022 BRIGGS BUILDERS W Janus 8-fl .. 
9 40 CONNEMARA DAWN R Holder B-8 

10 0002 EUROCON 0 W Chapman 8-8.. . 

11 03 GRECISN JOS F Cart B-8 ... 

12 0200 LATERAL (B)J Berry B-8 

14 000 SAWDUST JACK (I 


O McKeown 12 
R Cochrane r 
G DuttieM 9 
D Nrcholts 6 
S Monts 7 
J Catra0(7) 8 


| M W Easterby B-B 

MHMkv(3)13 

15 0343 SCAWS8Y LEES MW Easterby 6^. K Hodgson 4 

17 VIRAL CAHGOE Carter 8B.. . . Wendy Carter (7) S 

19 0 QUIETLY mine R Boss 8-5 : . E Guest (3) 2 

20 00 REATA PASS Jimmy Fitzgerald 8-6 . M Roberts 11 
1 1-4 Arizona Sun. 3-t Bnggs Butters. 9-2 Great Memory. 

11-2 Murphy. 8-1 Bnmur. 12-1 others 


6.30 GASTLY GUEST SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£1.065:70(14) 

1 0040 ABOVE THE SALT N Tinkler B M . Kan Trtdnr (S) 13 

2 2103 BENF1ELD MORPETH JBeny 8-H . ... J Carroll (7) 7 

3 00 OAHUM LAD Ron Thcrttpson 8-11 R p EKtott 3 

4 000 FRIENDS FOR LIFE N TmWer 8-11 D McKeown 8 

5 4 RVESONGJS Wvson 8-11 C Dwyer 9 

8 2210 THE M AGUE (B) Miss L SOdad 8-11 .. . DNtcholteO 

9 0000 CREOLE BAY TFarrhursiBB ... MWtal 

11 3102 WM) LADY |BF) R SruDas 8-8 JHBrmm(5)5 

M 3W3 MtSS PSA (BF] W Wharron 8-fl J Ward (7)6 

15 003 NIGHTDRESS D Money 8-8 .... . .. M Bndl 4 

16 0020 PHILEARN M 9nttan 8-B. KDartey12 

17 0000 RIVERS SECRET Denys Smith 8-8 . LCharnock14 

18 0 SOARING EAGLES G Mwe B-8 ... . J Bieasdato 10 

19 00 THE WHITE UON G Harman 8-8 


7.55 COMATOSE HANDICAP (£1^95: 1m 71 
180yd) (12) 

1 0034 BUCKljOW HILL fC-D) Jimmy Fitzgerald 9-9-11 

MKmd*ey(3J11 

3 13-0 BELLANOORA F Durr 4-8-13 C HowU (7) 4 

4 0011 RELATIVELY EASY M Prescott 3-8-12 (Je*) 

GDuHWtfS 

5 0004 KEY ROYAL (USA) G Calvert S-8-1 1 ....'. . A Boro 6 

6 0411 STONE JUG (C-D) Miss S Hat 6-8-1Q (4ex). M Birch 12 

8 200- SECRET FINALE JH Johnson 7-8-1. .. . J BlMUdate 8 

9 TOO MARINERS DREAM (C-O) R Hottnshead 6S-0 

ACuR>ane(T}7 


10 0120 DUKE OF DOLUS (C-D) W Slorey 7-7-13 S Wtatwqrth 1 
.SETTLEMENT (USA) R Allan 5-7-lt. MFryS 


it 400- SPECIAL 

12 0000 STRMG OF BEADS (B7J Etrwmgton 4-7-7 J Lowe 9 

13 M0 JIPUAPA (B) E mosa 5-7-7 AMackay2 

15 0004 BRANDON GREY Denys Sman 4-7-7 LChamocklO 


G Dufheid It 


100-30 Kmd Lady. 4-1 The Maqu*. 5-t Mwa Pisa. 
13-2 Rye30ng. 8-1 Benfreld Morpem. 10-1 Phrieem. 


5-2 Relatively Easy. 3-1 Stone Jug. 7-2 Buckiow Hill. 
6-1 Key Royal, lu-t Manners Dream. 14-1 offlets. 


6.55 STUFFED TURKEY HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£2.211:61) (11) 

Whiting 9-7 . L Rtggju (7] 8 

CER (BJlOKBF) MH Easterby $3 


1 0002 BON ACCUE1L H 1 

2 1200 CUMBRIAN DANCER ( 


MBrreh 7 


8.25 QUEENS SPEECH EBF STAKES (£2.040; 1m 
5f 180yd) (3) 

2 2142 GOLDEN HEIGHTS PWatayn 3^9 .. Paul Eddery 3 

8 2142 KING JACK (BF) J Durvou jJLa . G Baxter 1 

9 42 MY WILLOW Jimmy Rtzgerarf 3*0 . . . W Rattens 2 
5-J King Jack. 15-8 Gotten Heights. 5-2 My willow 


' NEWTON ABBOT 


Going: gopd to firm 

2.15 AVON SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£639: 
2m 150yd) (10 runners) 


1P-P HEVEH(B)MCPw II «2-2. J Lower 

02-1 FLORI WONDER JD Davies 6- 1 1-12 in 


lieu G Heaver f?} 
GMcCourt 
Gl 


FO-3 TOP GOLOHONer* 7-11.4 

4 00-0 GVPSEY LEAP Wake* 6-1 1-3 . .. GKmgbi 

5 DM LIFT HIGH DR Tuck# 7-1 1-0 SMcNodl 

6 000- FENNY BOY (B) M S Smeeriand 12-tO-lO Mr PSchehetd 
8 2P-0 MOROCCO BOUND (B)H Ft Beasley 7-10-7 RGokMetn 

12 00-3 GOLD R.OOR J M Bradley 5-10-1 . G Danes 

14 0M OP CORNELIUS (B) G A Ham 5-10-0 B Pawed 

if 000- CAER PRINGLE O O Ne4i 5-10-0 . R Chapman (4) 

6-4 Firm Wonder 32- 1 GoW Floor 5-1 Top GWd. 
13-2 Morocco Bound. 8-1 Haver. 10-1 Gypsey Lea. 12-t Ligffl 
High. 15-1 Offlers 


7 13-0 MATCH MASTER (C-0) HONei* MO-4 R Ounwoady 

8 Oil- CAREEN MCPijMS-KW . . . .JLOwerpl 

9 0FP. JUPITER EXPRESS (B) R E P^cocK 6-10-2 

PODomeii(4) 

11 m- CELTIC BELL w r Wilkams 8- iO-O . .. A Jones 

14 000- ISOM DART (USARC-D) T B HgSett 7-10-0 

P Richards 

16 040- BROCHE (FR) K Bishop 5-10-0 S Earte (4) 

3-1 Capa. 4.1 Careen. 5-i TraHttanr. 13-2 Horn Dart. 
8-1 Dick s Folly. 10-1 No-U-Tum. Deary Going. 12-1 Matcn 
Master. 14-1 Brochfi.16-1 others 


3.45 BMW SERIES CHASE (Qualifier. £1.953: 2m 
5f) (10) 


0- ABEROYR Champion 7-11-6 
0-34 SajUVEH PRINCE J H Ba) 


Baker 5-11-6 


N 


3 OF-O BENS WAY h S Brvwwarer 7-11-8 . 
13-0 FINAL CLEAR (C) J A On 8-M -fl ... 


Newton Abbot selections 

R> Mandarin 

2.15 Tup (inld. 2.45 Ftriharil Fnend. 5. 15 No-U- 
Turn. 3.45 Final (Tear. 4.15 Lnndon funiaui. 
4.45 Around Town. 


. s Wi 

WWemngtbn 

. ._ C UewePyn (7) 

5 PF-0 MASTER BOO N D R T»oer 7-11^ S McNefll 

6 0 MIGHTY DISASTER «T Keltic 8-M^ S SMstofi 

7 IMM SAIUNG BY (BKBRJRJwms 811-6 J White 

8 QPP< STORIES GOLD PJ West 8-1 1-6. ... Mr S West (7) 

9 PPO- CHEV1T1NOWG Turner 6-1 1-1 Tracy Tomer (7) 

10 STONEYAROW R WMams 7-tt-l A Jones 

6-4 Final Clear. 3-1 Bellnnw Prince. 100-30 Barfing By. 
0-i Stoneyard. tO-1 Abetoy. 12-1 Bens Way. t6-1 offlere 


4.15 SUTCLIFFE CATERING JUVENILE NOVICE 
HURDLE (3-Y-O: £711: 2m 150yd) (6) . 


2.45 ‘PINELODGF CHALLENGE TROPHY 
HANDICAP CHASE (£2.802: 3m 2f 100yd) (9) 


1 24p- FETHARD FRIEND (C-DI J A Edwarru 11-12-7 P Barton 

2 P0-3 LEADING ARTIST N A Gastfiw 11-11-5 AAdams(7) 


3 HOME OR AWAY J H Baker 10-7 . . . 

2 KOUS ruSAKBF) R Stmtbon <0-7 
2 LONDON CONTACT 18) M C Ptpe IQ-7. 
StLGA CH1AV1 D R EG wortn 1(1-7 
MILLS AMEND 0 O'Neil 10-2 . . . . 
REPETITIVE (USA) M C PKW 10-2. . 


. L Harvey (7) 
G McCaurt 
PLeacrt 
. C Brown 
R Chapman 
PScuoament 


3 1,'U- THOMASCOURT (C-D) P J Hrjous 9.1 

5 130- BREAC BAN R CIV)m{Mn !L 10-9 

6 023/ FREDOT nsertor 1M0-7 

8 0-73 MAGGIE DEE (BF) R G Frost J- 10-5 

9 33-0 BAU.YEAMON P J Jones 12 i|)-i) 

It 0-02 ATHENS STAR jm Bradley 11 10-0 
12 FE P ALIGHTWENT OR Ti^er 8-10-0 .. . 

2-1 Leading Artisr. 100-30 Fnfflard Friend. 
J-i Thomascoun. B-t Bmac Ban. 9-1 Maggie Dee. 10-1 AtneflS 
Slat I2-I Baliyeamc4t T6-* otnets 


H Oavitts 
N Doughty 
□ Wonnscan 
. J Froel 
CMiot 
G Dawes 
. nstMiis»{7). 


7-4 Kbus. £>-2 London Contract. 3-1 &ka Chiaw. 9-1 Home 
Or Away. 14- 1 Bsoumive 16-1 Milts Ameno 


3.15 LES FLETCHER MEMORIAL CHALLENGE 
TROPHY HANDICAP HURDLE (£2,578 : 2m 150yd) 
01) 


4.45 WALLABROOK NOVICE HURDLE (£348: 2m 
150yd) (13) 

1 00-1 AROUND TOWN (C-DI B F<y«ey 5-1 HO PCrouchw 
5 032- NaOQak (USA) B PaPng S- 1 1 -3 C Evans (7) 

B PP-0 MOLYBDENUM JU Bradley 5-H 3 . . GOann 

8 023- RAP»D Gunn£H (USA8BI J A Edvyar* 5-11-3 P Baton 

9 000- SMEiLDAiG(8)KBwxr 5-n 3 . . SEane(4) 

11 40-4 YANKS DOOOLE (N2) 0 H Batons 6-11-3 PNwhoHs 


13 0 CLOUD OAHCEHGCDoirtqa 4-f 1-0 .. D Browne 

YWRW ft 


000- NO-U-TUBNSMrtor 8-1M0 * G Landau (7) 
643- DEADLY GOING (C-D) K S Bridgwater B 1 1-0 

W WortWngtan 

1F-0 WWS FOLLY RJHodqas 7-10-13 8 Powell 

10-3 TRAFFJTANZTD R ElsiMJrth 5-10-6 
123- CAPA (C-0) R J HolflBr 6-10-a . 


u r uwnii 

RAmott(4J 
A Webb 


16 F40- RA22U0A/2IE BOY WRwftans 4-11-0 A Jones 

17 002- GO PERSIAN |B| B Venn 9-1IH2 .. C Warren |7) 
IB OP- HALF YtDYWT Kemp 8-10-12 .. . R j Bmwan 

19 PR- LADY QF EQREM0NT N rCermck 6-10-12 M Yeoran(7) 

20 KIKI STAR R J Hod»S J 10-9 . B Powell 

21 000- TANTE MARIE DRGandoBb 4- 10-9 . T Woolley (7) 
16-8 Amund Town. 7 2 Rapid Gunner. 5-1 Yankee Doodh* 

13-2 Had oak 8-1 KiwSiar 10-» Tanre Marie, 12-y Go Persian" 
16-t omers 


Welsh Crown provides tonic Lady Cara leaves rivals trailing 


Jt.*hn Bulion. the fast 
i ■rin*>:o:id miner, enjujed ‘-uc- 
v •.•'“! «itli hi> lir*t runner of the 
Nji-inj] Hum season »‘hen 
W -.-Uh {. ro»n won Ihe ELil and 
J'.nJ >■'.>' re-.' HyrdMe m Foniiwll 

I 'in 5 * •esierj.ik. 

K'Iiimi. «.hit e.vpeei'- it* hjvi? 

■ f i P ;. j hi lii i - ijstii jumper* Ihts 
w;t*. puntcuhirK pleased 
iMM'ori. nnh ihis ihree-jnir-old. 
.l^ Iiivi tuner. Henr> Myslen. had 
i" he l.tkcn io hovpiUil lbi-> 
morning The i miner vtid: "1 his 


uid h.n e done him a lor of 

II ’U.” 

John Suihem. uhuse mount. 
I'-tilr.tn Neville. fim>hed ushun 
head behind Welsh L'row-n. 
cbrtried lo ihe winner lor 
"Uiktng gryund wmg lo (he 
List and slighi inierferencc alter 
ihe l.iM.” After an mquirv ihe 
view it rds allowed ihe phteings in 
M.-'nJ, 

Welsh frmvn was ihe hv«*ihI 
wn.ter io be ndden K Kus 
( iiiftlsiem si nee his eoniehark 


Lad\ Cara, rated un lucks b> her 
f cxker ham-based trainer Jack 
Bern in reeeni outings, ran out 
an easy winner ol ihe Levs 
Board Apprentice Handicap a'l 
Caticriek Bndge \eMerda>. 

Lade Cara, who was reeurding 
her tilth sueees*. i.s owned bj- 
v al U'Bnen. and now goes lij 
her husband Bernard's Mud in 
Kent. "I was going io send her to 
ihe \.vcoi Sales, htti Bernard 
n'Bnen huughi her privaieK 
Irom nte in win a race.” %tid 
Rertv 


John Carroll, who partnered 
ihe winner, now- needs one more 
success to lose his 51b claim. Ai 
bail was; Lady Cara showed wrih 
a eleaf lead. 

tioorge Dufiield. who de- 
lighted racegoers Jaat week with 
iwo powerful finishes 31 RedsTir. 
was again seen at his strongest 
when l he oddsrun Pairioiu'.wbo 
Itmkvsl to have a hopeless task 
■.ommu mlo (he straighl. haltled 
havk io setnv a one and a hall , 
length Miiors in ihe Tilton 
Molise Sel I ing'Swkes. ■ 


Sherwood buys 
Its A Pry 


Oli n er Sherwood, ihe 
Lamhoum trainer, t.tept.ied ititij 
the spviiligln vesierdov to pm 
top price of II.11W g*itneas on 
(he filial day of ibv D*ttieasHT 

Sales. He bought ihe H . . e.»r- 
tild gelding lt-« \ l*r». i".u.ed 
(htrd m.i l.ieh-elass ht.n-.vr tjie 
The sties, •slif.ft were tins 
year csienj.' I m ti.ive d;.-s h-r 
ihe first 1 ■ .n ■. s.' » .1 ii'i.il r.i ;.s.s 
lots sell lor 1 *-..' hi guineas. ,m 
aserage n| ! ' gitntr .e. 


ort but 
sweet 
amid the 
gloom 


4F 

!? i 

• 


* 

- 1 > 




3 i'itf 
3 ? * ? £ 


Bv Man (tihson 




s 

• r. * ? * $ 
1 3 i £ l * 3 


( iUM \H I'/ N.vVilw** 1 
It is a pi oily ground. 

< llipps'ith.ini. Si'itlb need and 
nn fdi> stiburKin. biit ti had been 
rain 1 tie m the murnine and plyy 
t Vllkl rail 'lari mini nearly |wi, 2 
0*1 lock. Rus’kinghamshia* won' 
ills' toss, and (uu Wiltshire in: 
Then* was inti much 111 IhC pilch 
nt lustily the espenmem. saL 
umtly (hough ilit- lasier bowlers- 
>ir<.o e 10 exlr.nt v>mr bie from 

it. 

Seaman jiul fulltp mad*.’ a 
brate start «ilh and al-. 
ihough the baisnu'ti weie oh\i- 
nusly aiiMOi»s in hurry, lour 
wiekels had gone down fi«r 

Thereafter Liitnhhuf. played 
lumdsoniely until lie had scored . 
42. \t tea the ilci la rat ton came. ■ 
at lol lot sis. You have nni 
ntueli time to waste, in thev . 
iwo-djv matches. esps-eufU" 
when ihcre is rain .tb.iui. Hur- _ 
row and (itunJen had both-' 
bowled well. 

Buckinghamshire losl a 
uickcl quieklt. I was reminded . 
of Ihe old days ■»! Minor 
Counties cricket by 
Merry weather, pi a using around . 
impressively in ihe Misers in a., 
fancy cap of green, while and 
black, winch lumevl 4<tn in he ' 
the eulours of ihe Twiekenham 
ehib. I wish we saw more of 
these atiraelise colours ai this 
stage of cricket nowadays 

fi was an entertaining though 
shortened day. and I think we. 
cart look 10 Knh sides, weather 
permitting, to strive 1b r an 
imaginative finish today. 


Miandad plea 
turned down 


Javed Miandad. the t.ilamor- 
gan batsman, lias li.uj hts final 
appeal to he reinstated by the ■ 
county turned down. 

Miandad tailed to return io 
Wales al ihe Mari of Ihe x'ason 
after a successful sea si.. 11 with the 
]*akistan Test leant and the 
cricket committee sicked him. 
They p.ud hint nn undisclosed 
amount li.tr his contract which 
was due lo end this year. Phil 
Carling, ihe Glamorgan sec- 
retary.' said: "The comm nice 
decided unanimously to uphold 
the decistun of the executive 
committee, taken in May. No 
new circtintsiances have arisen 
to change the situation. 

“The committee also agreed a 
payment lor Miandad lor his 
pasi services to the elub. The 


AJ t • • :• 1. .7 


money was pJid last week when, 
wi Ctwyn C 


he eontacicd C«wyn Craven, the 
Glamorgan chairman. The mat- 
ter is now closed." 


CARRIAGE DRIVING 


Leadership 
shared 
by three 


By Jenny MacArlhur 


Prince Philip, who is compet- 
ing as an individual in the FEf 
world four-m-hand drrv mg 
championships al Ascot, is the 
joint leader after ihe presenta- 
tion phase of the compel iiton. 

Driving the Queen's leant of 
Cleveland Bays- Olden burgs, 
who are regularly used in state 
ceremonials — most recently at 
ihe wedding of the Duke of > ork 

— Prime Philip collet led jusi 
one penalty point. The two 
others on the same score are 
Ijerd Vclsira. the Duichmaq. 
winner of the team jnd individ- 
ual gold medals in |ns 2. and 
Deiidre Pirie.^ from the l.'nued 
States, one of only two women . 
in the eompeiilion. hut a t-.tugh 
competitor who has competed- 
in three world championships. 

Peier Mum. u member of /he 
BnUsh learn, was surprised at- 
ihc siandjrd ol judging yes- 
terday. He cullccicd iltree pen-, 
ally pomLs hul said afterwards 
ihe judging was not nearly m>" 
thorough as al n.uitmal enm- 
pemions: "Out of the live. judges . 
not one of lltent picked up one 
ol'mv horses’ feel and only one., 
of ilicm actually touched thj.- 
harness." 

The marks for ihv presen ta?* 
lion — awarded on the lurnnul . 
oflhe grooms, driver and horses' 

— represent 3 small pan of the. 
actual com pc u lion and v tews on . 
its importance 10 (he event 
differ. 

John Stevens, the director ol. 
the championships said: "It is 
important because it sets stan-. . 
durds for bmli smartness and 
safety.” bin Lav lo Julias/, from 
Hungary, ihe reign mg world 
champion, thinks the preseniion 
phase oughi 10 he serappcvl 
alt'igeihcr. He collected l«n._ 
penally marks, but ’• 

"Pri-seniatmn is a uuesiion «>f- 
mi mey. mu of know ledge." • 

Prince Philip liimcd at his 
'inn v»e»»s on the rule of Hie 
phase iff the overall rhampmn.- 
sbips when he .si id a I the 
oivring ceremony yesterday 
** f he serious husttn-ss hr^mv 
lomoirou moinmw." 

Hungary, the nigntnv vham- 
pmns. are the lavunnies to "in 
the team tide in vv)n,!j mne- 
et»u m rtes are Lompclitig . 
J 11 has/. In "sever. *Uvs not ev- • 
pcci to ivuin his md|v iJujl-uuM . 
medal — he has ihuv new horws 
in his team and tl lakes lime Jo 
nniuld them mlo a lbur.sonic; 
Like nius! people ”111 die know ' 
he thinks ihai his ct*nip;tin»'i. 
liyorgv Bardns. vvtmu-r nf ihe’ .. 
cold medal in I^n.iikI l‘»SH. is ” 
1 he lavtmriie to win. Inn others 
he thinks arc in with a gistd 

— h.inee are \ elstni and lishtaitU-' 
Chardon. from Hullaml.' 
Chiisler Pahftsein. ol Swcds'iv 
and t ieorge Bowman, ■•fthil.iui.- 

RESULTS: Presentation; Equji 1. 0 ^ 
(U5t 1 I Vebu 3|iUi-int. 1 . rstiiip l •: 


0 


lit- 


wi: ; ;. c l 


f L . ■. ... 
UiV 


i 


VJ 




Salford signing ... 

Salford hove signed Murk: 
Wakefield, aged 24. ihe uuliiy .; 
back li'otn Sydney elub - . 
i ronullu. who could .nine »n. 
tune to play in ihe opening 
Knghy League match .11 " iisttit 
on August 31. U.iki field nun*: 

tellow ^iistrah.inv tm-g \11MiH. . 
(IcnlT Selby :tn<| <iarv SchtiK'H* - 
at Snlftird. ■ \ 


9 


t 







THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


SPORT 


27 


GOLF 


Patient Way drives 
for U-turn in his 
waning enthusiasm 


Paul Way moves into the 
Benson and Hedges Inter- 
nationa) Open, starting on the 
Fulford course in York today, 
insisting that a loss of enthu- 
siasm as much as any tech- 
nical ailment is behind his 
astonishing decline. 

He is (1 3ih in the Epson 
Order of Merit, with earnings 
of only £3.780, whereas 12 
months ago he was riding the 
crest of a wave as the PGA 
champion on the threshold of 
making a valuable contribu- 
tion to Europe's victory over 
the United States in the Ryder 
Cup. 

His decline is best illus- 
trated by the pure facts of the 
1986 campaign in which he 
has managed to survive only 
one hallway cut so that his 
highest finish is joint 30th in 
the Spanish Open. Way's 
stroke average for the season 
is 75.24. compared with 72. 16 
last season when he came 
tenth in the Order of Merit. 

“It might seem like a night- 
mare to a lot of people, but I 
prefer not to look at it that 
way," he said. “I’m far too 
voting to allow myself to 
become that downhearted just 
because things have not gone 
that well in the first half of the 
season. 1 can still have a good 
year, and I'm convinced that 
whatever happens, all will be 
right again in 1987. 

"I have to be concerned that 
I'm hitting destructive shots 
left and right. When you've 
just got one bad shot in the 
bag. it's easier to work out 
where you are going wrong. 
But, quite frankly. I've been 
more concerned by my lack of 
enthusiasm. I just have not 
been getting excited on the 
golf course. I thought I was in 


By Mitchell Platts 

the right frame or mind at the 
US KjA Championship last 
week, but I faltered alter a 
good start" 

The general belief is that 
Way has been trying to protect 
a wicked hook that has crept 
into his game. Even so. it 
should be emphasized that he 
has remained incredibly pa- 
tient. and that this virtue 
should enable him to com- 
plete a successful U-turn in his 
fortunes. 

Way has analysed his situa- 
tion to such an extent that he 
is already working on a fitness 

Joint project 

Wentworth have been given 
permission by their local 
council to build a third golf 
course. Scheduled to open in 
the 1990s it will be designed 
by John Jacobs and will join 
the existing east and west 
courses. 

programme for this winter. “I 
had an operation for the 
removal of my tonsils last 
year, and I don't think that at 
the lime I realised how energy- 
sapping that illness was to 
me." he said. “J used to be 
able to go out for a four-mile 
run and think nothing about 
it. But I tried to do it before 
the Open last month, and I 
came back puffing and pant- 
ing. 1 need to get fit again, 
though right now what I really 
need is one solid tournament, 
not just one good round, to 
increase my confidence.” 

Way is not alone in looking 
for some light at the end of a 
dark tunnel, for even Sandy 


winnings of only £25,286. 

Lyle said: "Apart from win- 
ning the Greater Greensboro 
Open on the US tour in early 
April, this has been my worst 
season as a professional in 
terms of performance. In one 
respect. I'm extremely happy 
that my reign as Open Cham- 
pion is over. Being the first 
home player to win that tide 
since Tony Jackiin in 1969 
was very rewarding finan- 
cially, but it put a lot of 
pressure on me. 

"I am a fairly laid-back 
character, but I found myself 
trying to force my way into 
contention because 1 thought 
that was expected of an Open 
Champion. But a few weeks 
ago, a little inner voice told 
me to ease up and that is what 
I’ve done." 

Lyle, who withdrew from 
the US PGA Championship 
last week, accepts that he has 
taken life reasonably easy 
recently — he has played in 
only two tournaments in six 
weeks — but he has been 
working harder on his game 
on the practice range. "I've 
imposed a new system of 
regular disciplined practice on 
myself,” he said. “I used to go 
three or four days on occa- 
sions without picking up a 
dub. but I now practice for at 
least two hours each day.” 

The mass exodus to the new 
International tournament on 
the US Tour has not materi- 
alized, and even Lee Trevino 
has arrived to add spice to a 
field which also includes How- 
ard Clark, Gordon J Brand, 
Sam Torrance, Ian Woosnam, 
and Nick Faldo. 


Shapcott weathers storm 


Susan Shapcott defied torren- 
tial rain to move into an early 
lead in the first qualifying round 
of the British g iris' champion- 
ship at West Kilbride yesterday. 
The defending champion from 
Knowfe. Bristol, set out in the 
worst of the weather but re- 
turned a commendable ihrce- 
over-par 75 to set the pace. 

Shapcott. who last week be- 
came the youngest winner of the 
English women's stroke-play ti- 
tle. made virtually certain of a 
place among the 1 6 qualifiers for 
the match-pJay stages with a 
level par outward halfof 36. -The 
Curtis Cup reserve, aged 16. 
sank a 30-foot birdie pun at the 
long third, buuook a one-over- 
par five at the fifth and a two- 
over-par six at the next. 

The highlight of her round 


came at the next hole, however, 
when she pot the ball into the 
heart of the green with two wood 
shots and knocked in a 12-foot 
putt for an eagle three. 

Although the rain relented 
during her inward half. Shapcott 
dropped three shots to the card 
at the )2tb. 13th and 15th, then 
narrowly missed opportunities 
for birdies at the dosing three 
holes to finish on 75. 

Only one other early starter, 
Catherine Thontell. of Sweden, 
managed to break 80 — with a 
round of 79 — but there were 
serious problems for several 

S rfs who played in the previous 
tv's international matches. 
Sara Mountford. the Welsh 
international player, returned a 
disastrous 94. while Rush 
Harrison, her Welsh team col- 


league. was only slighty better 
with an 88. 

• David Bathgate, of Cheshire, 
who was 15 last month, gave 
Graham King, the Scotland 
international, a tough time in 
the fourth round ofthe British 
boys' championship at Seaton 
Carew yesterday. 

King, aged 17, from Shotts, 
had not had to go beyond the 
I Sth hole in his three previous 
matches, but was two down alter 
seven as the pair battled to reach 
the last 16. 

King did not get on level 
terms until the I lib. He fell 
behind again at the 1 2th, but 
Bathgate faltered and the Scot 
went ahead for the first time at 
the 1 7th and secured victory on 
the last hole. 

Scores In For The Record 





Chris Cole's photograph of Gabrieta Sabatuii, which appeared in The Times on July 1, has 
won the Nik on-Kodak award for the best published picture at this year's All-England tennis 

championships at Wimbledon 


ATHLETICS 


Selectors separate 
Tulloh twins 


Katherine and Jo Jo Tulloh. 
identical and inseparable twins, 
aged 15. will be parted for 
Britain's junior international 
against West Germany in Got- 
tingen on Saturday. 

Katherine has been selected to 
make her international debut in 
the 1300 metres and will have 
to leave early from a family 
holiday. Bui there is no place as 
yet for Jo Jo. who has had to 
accept second best in their 
recent races. The girls, from 
Salisbury, run barefoot and are 
coached by their father Bruce. 

TEAM: Boys: lOOnc M Adam (Betaravs). 
R Buries (CroydonV 200m: I Stapleton 
" A OOss p 
P atterson 
Southern). 160m: K McKay 
(Sale). P Causey (Wigan). 1500m: J 

boaJcas (Photon). R Danmark (BastfOor). 

3000m: D Me ad (Thettort). D Donnet 
it 5000m: S HaSday (Halifax). 
(Bottorl 2000m sseepte- 
:R Sctuanker larefifWd). S Amote 
(Portsmouth. TIOm (unites: A Jarwtt 
(Haringey). P Gray (CartWf). 400m hur- 
dles: P CampoeU /Stoke}. D WarOunon 
(Cannock). High Jump: J Hopper (So&XJJ). 
HLmdo(Croye - • -- - 


n tuinte ivxuyuunj. <uuoc i 
(Shaftesbury). M Adam. < 
Crampton (Sponborougfi), G 
(Edrtiurgfi Southern). *60nt 


(Birchtteia). 0 Gommertall IMitton 
Keynes). Trip!* jump: J Campbell (WooO- 
fort Green). MWbrtBheadjSpenbcrQugni. 
Shot putt C Turner (Grtwmy). M Smson 
(Thurrock). Uaeum M Smortes (Oxford). 
G LAMriand (Burton). Hammer G Cook 
(Mitcham). M Gray (Sale). Ja ve fe c S 
BacMey (Cambnoge), N Sevan (tpevnchk 
Pole vanlb M Edwards (AHarstioQ, I Lawts 
(Hounslow). 10km wafle G Brown 
(Steyning). I Ashford (Sheffield). 4 a 100m 
re lay: Adam. Burke, Stapleton. Jarretr. 
Gray. 4 a 400m relay: Crampton. Patter- 
son, HU, Bakewefl. Rowtonas- 
Gktsr IOOrc D Myn« (Western). R Butjtet 
(Sale). 200m: S A Fnsby (Nuneaton), S 
Middfeton (Surrey Beagles). 400m: l 


ydon). Long Jump: S Faulkner 


Rotwison (Coventry). T Goddard (Mid. 
Hants). BOOM: J Heathcote (Hatfamsrwe). 
B Langston (Folkestone) iSOOm: P Ma- 
son (G MOtonf). K TuUoh (SaktOury). 
3000m: H Tttfflfingron (Leicester). L York 
(Lmcesteq. 100m hurdles: S Douglas 
(RatJey). L Griffiths (Torfaen ). 400m 
Writes: H Patterson (Sale). C Beasoafe 
(GtetafonJ). High jump: L Harnett (Heme 
H4I). K Mason {Kendall • LrmgKanp: F May 
(Derby): M Knowles (BattasQ. Shot putt: J 
Buttler - (Greenwicn). j Thornton 
Qjongwmod). Ota cua: A Barnes (MUfieW). 
R User (have nog) Jevebrt A PuOan 
(Homctuirch). A Momtt (North Down). 5km 
wtek: V Lawrenc e i°eadmoj, A HocW 
)}. 4 a 100m relay: (from) Myite, 
wgl as. Bufpm. Mxj&aton. 4 x 
400m re lay: (from) Robinson, GoddenJ. 
Heathcote, Lhqhart, Saltar. 


BOWLS 


Constable 

reaches 

semi-final 


Malcolm Fever, a police con- 
stable. produced the . match- 
winning extra end victory shot 
for Lindfield in the semi-finals 
of the Gateway Building Society 
EBA national fours champion- 
ship at Worthing yesterday. 
Lindfield beat the fathers and 
sons. Leon and Mike Crow and 
Doug and Robert Heath, of 
Newnham. 19-18 to move into 
the final. 

Alan Clarke. Chris Reynolds, 
Fever and Doug Whetstone 
hadied 14-6 at 1 1 ends and were 
in front until Newnham scored 
singles from the 20th and 2Isito 
draw level 18-18. On the extra 
end. the jack was shifted- off 
centre by Doug Heath and it was 
then that . Fever made his vital 
delivery. 

In the other semi-final. Stony 
Stratford beat Thrapston 20-19 
after trailing 1 7-14 at 1 7. 


football 


End of an era as 
the French 
turn to new men 


France will go to Lausanne for 
an international against Switzer- 
land next week without the three 
players who have been the 
cornerstones of their midfield' in 
recent years. Michel Platini. 
Alain GiresSe and Jean Tigana. 
who are al) nearing the end of 
their, careers, have-been omitted 
from a 1 6-man sq^tad named by 
Henri Michel, the national man- 
ager. fora friendly at Lausanne 
next Tuesday, 

- Their absence will give a 
chance to at least two players 
who have been waiting in the 
wings for some year s. Fca r e ri 
and Vercroyssc both made 
appearances in Mexico; but 
their chances haver generally 
been limited by the "old guard*; 

Maxim e Bossis. another regu- 
lar for several seasons, is miss* 


Both teams converted conscc- . 
utive penalties for » 5-5 lie. 
Then Giovanni Galli. the Milan 
goalkeeper, saved a penalty by 
Carlos Ereros. the left-winger. 

■ and Maura Tassotii. a defender, 
scored the winning goal for the 
Italians. . 

Claudio Daniel Borghi. the 

■ young star of Argerni nos Juniors' 
who has been hired by .Milan for 
the 1987-88 season, limped off 
the field after 10 minutes, 
suffering from a sprain. . 

The other finalist in the four- 
lean) competition was the Ital- 
ian second division club Genoa, 
who caused an upset by beating 
their first division neighbours. 
Sampdoria 7-6 on penalties after 
their match had also finished in 
a M draw. 

Roberto Policano. a defender. 


mg from tne cetence, out 
otherwise The squad is based 
largely on (he players who took 
France into the semi-finals of 
the World Cup in Mexico. 

SQUAD: J Bate. B Maritre, M ArecwoS. P 
Batman.. B Sob. J-F Oom&roua, >0 
Tbouuml. O Bfrotat, U T e own osz. J-M 
Perron. 8 aenoroL P Venruynb. S 
Befiono. G Buscher, J-P Pspm. Y Stoyra. 

A goal from Ray Wilkins, the 
England midfield player, helped 
A C Milan to secure a place in 
the final of the Columbas Cup 
competition in Genoa. Wilkins 
scored in the 38th minute 
against Argentines Juniors, who 
bad gone ahead ten . minutes 
earlier following a fine headed 
goal by Mario Vidda. With the 
score 1-1 at full-time, the'match 
was decided on penalty kicks, 
which Milan won 6-5. 


right winger 
equalized from the penalty spot. 
However. Sarnpdoria. who had 
the Brazilian midfield player 
Toninho Cerezo and the west 
German defender Hans Peter 
Brtesel ip their line-up. even-' 
lually went out on penalties. 

About 40.000 fens watched 
the two matches, with gate 
takings of 482 - million lire 
(about £232.000). The com-, 
petition was organized as pan of 
the Colombian celebrations in 
die hometown of the Italian 
navigator. Organ teers said it 
would be continued on a yearly 
basts until 1992. the 50Oih 
anniversary of the discovery of 
America by Europeans. 


SWIMMING 


Olympic medal 
winner leads 


Madrid (AP) • — Carolyn 
Waldo, of Canada, a silver 
medal winner in the 1984 
Olympics in Los Angeles, took 
the lead after the first three 
figures in the synchronized com- 
petition as the world champion- 
ships began here yesterday. 

Waldo, from Beaconsfield in 
Quebec, scored 45.9 points to 
lead her team, colleague, Sylvie 
Frechette, by 1-5 points. Each of 
the competitors in the syn- 
chronized swimming did three 

E ~rd figures in front of five- 

panels. The final three win 
ne today. 

Waldo was second to Trade 
Ruiz, of the United States, at the 
1984 Olympics. Ruiz also won 
the 1982 world championship 
.but retired from competition 
after the Olympics. 

Yesterday all the swimmers 
did the walkover front, barra- 
cuda and flamingo bent knee: 
Each requires the swimmer to 
assume a position in the water 
and slowly, .rotate Jar descend. 
Ltke diving, each has* degree - of 
difficulty. - 

Sarah Josephson. of the US. 
the national champion in ail 
three events, was third with 


44.25 points. Josephson was 
second to Waldo in last year’s 
World Cup competition m all 
three events. 

Canada won the team event in 
.the 1982 world championship 
after the United Stales won the 
first three world titles. 

The scores for each swimmer 
will be carried forward in each 
of the various competitions. 
Waldo is entered in the solo, 
duel and team competitions 
while Frechette only competes 
m the team event for Canada. 
There will -be eight members in 
the team event 

Swimmers from the United 
Slates and Canada took 1 8 of the 
top 20 places with Japan taking 
the six of the next 20 spots. The 
three countries have dominated 
the synchronized swimming 
events, taking all the medals in 
each of the four previous world 
championships. 

- After three more figures today 
the- solo swimmers nave their 
eliminations and finals tomor- 
row. 

RESULTS (after tons figures): 1. C Waldo 
torn 4&9PK 2. S Frechette (Can). 444: 
3. SJosepriaon (US).4«-2j;4, M Cameron 
. (pan). 43J5; 5. LtSikai (US). 43.1: equte 
B.-K Babb (US) and.T Meades C ‘ 
4245. 


(Cent 


CYCLING 


Outriders pile on 
the pressure 


From John Wilcockson, Squaw Valley 

Over the high, wide and 
handsome climbs and along the 
deep gorges of the Yuba river, 
the group worked well together 
and never looked like being 
caught by the pack. 

None of the five men who had 
dominated Monday’s stage was 
in the leading group. 

Stag* Four. (Nevada City to Squaw 


There was another eventful 
day of racing in the Coors 
International Classic on Tues- 
day when Phil Anderson, of 
Australia, out-sprinted Dagr 
Ono Lauritzen. of Norway, to 
win the fourth stage through the 
Sierra Nevada. These two men 
were pan of an eight-strong 
group that rode most of the 119 
miles together and arrived in 
this Olympic ski resort nine 
minutes ahead of the main pack. 

This big advantage meant 
Lauritzen moved into the race 
leadership. 

The action began after only 
two miles when Anderson, fully 
recovered from injury, broke 
clear on the second of five laps 
of a hilly circuit that opened the 
stage in Nevada City. The other 
seven riders joined him before 
the race left this small mining 
town, and they launched their 
way into the descents and 
climbs which faced them 
throughout the hot. sunlit day. 

At first Bernard Hinault, of 
France, did most of the work to 
give the breakaway group an 
early three-minute lead. Bui Jeff 
Pierce and Doug Shapiro, the 
two Americans in the group, 
soon lent a hand, pushing the 
leaders more than 12 minutes 
ahead by half way. 


vaitey. n9 rates): 1. P Anderson (Aus), 
Stir 27m« 


iwi 38sec. ft 0 Lauritzen (Nor), 
same: 3. D Shapiro (US), same. 4. J Prer ce 
(US), same: 5. B Hmautt (Fra) at 2secr. 6, M 
Arcjantm (it) at I7sec 7. V PNa (in at 
20wc. 8. T De Rooy (Noth), same. 9. P 
Uqmirw (USSR) at 9mm 5sec; 10. G 
LAMcrnd (US), same. O wril 1. Launtzen. 
12h> 26mm SSsacr. 2. Shapuo. at 28seq 3. 
Pierce, at 32sec 4. Hinault, at 3Ssee 5. 
Argentm. at 436BC. 

• While Grea LeMond. recent 
winner of the Tour de France, is 
trying to win his second big race 
in as many months his lawyers 
are hoping to secure another 
victory in the federal courts. 

LeMond filed three lawsuits 
in 1984 charging that his like- 
ness was used without his 
permission for advertisements 
by European cycle manufac- 
turers and equipment suppliers. 
One of the suits was dropped 
after the American settled out- 
of-court. The second suit awaits 
a hearing to determine how 
much damage LeMond has 
suffered, and a third is in pre- 
trial motions. 



FOR THE RECORD 


Effort rewarded: Phil Anderson, of the United States, with 
arms aloft after his stage victory in the Coors Classic 


Thumbs up to a sport’s strong points 


The Australian team who 
were awarded the prestigious 
Trafalgar Shield in the 
weightlifting competition of the 
recent Commonwealth Games 
have emphasized the impressive 
progress of a sport regarded 
down under as a minority pas- 
time only a few years ago. 

Since the 1984 Olympics, 
when (he 25-year-old heir to a 
runa-ffshing empire. Dean 
Lukin, won the super-heavy- 
weigh* category, weightlifting 
has become a high-profile sport 
in Australia. 

“Undoubtedly, Lukin is a 
hero," Lyn Jones, - the chief 
Australian coach, said. “He has 
become a model- Kids want to be 
like Lukin, and mothers want 
their sons to be like him: 
powerful and successful. 
Weightlifting has got a good 
image in Australia, and La kin is 
part Of It- There is no violence; 
there are no accidents. Mind 
you. Lukin is the product, not 
the source, of Australia’s good 
fortunes- " 

Jones, aged 45. a Welshman, 
is regarded os one of the most 
astute brains in international 
weightlifting- He was appointed 
national director of coaching m 
Australia in 1976. after being 
tamed down as head coach of 
the Welsh team- A great admirer 


of what he calls “the Bulgarian 
way" in weightlifting. Jones has 
introduced new training 
concepts. 

“We looked at the way Bul- 
garia, with &5 million people, 
hate taken the world of 
weightlifting by storm, and tried 
to emulate them. In 1965. Great 
Britain, a force to be reckoned 
with, were still ahead of Bul- 
garia in weightlifting. Since 
1972. when the Bulgarians won 
the Olympics, Britain hare been 
nowhere near them. The 
Bulgarians have this great man. 
Abagie*. He has revolutionized 
(be training techniques and 
coaching patterns. But they 
dont keep anything hidden. 

“It's up to us to take op the 
challenge and try to answer in 
kind. They've reached a new 
stage where they check their 
schoolchildren for their body 
parameters from an early age. 
They measure everything from 
the size of the hips to the length 
or the thumbs.” 

1 might have looked slightly 
puzzled because he felt com- 
pelled to explain. Thumbs are 
very important in weightlifting. 
A weightlifter always wraps his 
thumbs around the back. The 
longer the thumbs, the better the 
grip." 

Jones found understanding 


and support for his attempt to 
launch an Australia!} version of 
(he “Bulgarian rule of the 
thumb". Appointed director of 
coaching at the world-famous 
National Institute of Sport in 
Canberra, he was — alongside 
Panl Coffa and Brace Walsh — 
the mastermind of a national 
scheme designed to encourage 
children to take up weightlifting. 

"Paul Coffa was the brain 
behind what we call the school 
identification programme — 
which simply means finding the 
latent in sc hoofs at an early 
age." he said. “This is done 
through a nationwide com- 
petition open to all schoolboys: 
how- much weight a kid can lift 
abo«e the head safely." 

The national scheme is spon- 
sored by both the government in 
Canberra and by provincial 
administrations. Besides, 
following the string of imer- 
narJooa] successes, weightlifting 
enjoys wide TV coverage which 
attracts new sponsors. But the 
healthy outlook or the sport and 
the fine prospects mushrooming 
throughout the country do not 
make the men at the top 
complacent. 

“You cant afford to lower 
voor guard." Robert Kzbbas fbe 
Olympic silver medal winner 
and former Conunotnrealtfa 


champion, said. “Look what 
happened to New Zealand 
weightlifting after their suc- 
cesses in the 1970s. They took it 
for granted, and thought that 
success breeds success. How 
wrong they were: New- Zealand 
weightlifting is now gone." 

Ron Laycock. beaten by David 
Willey, of England, for the gold 
in the 67.5kg class, is one of 
Australia's brightest hopefuls. 
The Tasmanian, aged 20, is a 
product of the national scheme, 
having been spotted five years 
ago when he came fifth in the 
national schools championships. 
Laycock had promised after his 
defeat by Willey to break the 
world record in his class in two 
years' lime. “He has both the 
drive and the ability." Jones 
feels. “Alas, this Is not the case 
with Lukin. If he would train full 
time Tor two years, he would 
smash the world record. The 
first tu acknowledge that are the 
Russians and the Bulgarians.** 

But Lukin spends four months 
each year at sea on one of the 
fishing-boats of the family, 
“"eight lifting is not going to be 
my career. 1 have to earn a 
living, and the spoil is not going 
to do it for rae.“ he said. 

Chris Thau 


ptSp HAI 1 


NORTH AMERICA; American La wyer Oak- 
lam Anna 3.Smat*Uannera£Newyork 
Yankees 0. CtevMand indkans 4. Kansas Cny 
RoyaH S. Boston tefl So» L Kansas Cay 
Royals 6. Boston Red So* Sr. Toronto B»ue 
Jays 3. Banmora Oncws ft Detroit Tigers 7. 
Ocago mm Sox 3: kUmamw Bremers 7. 
Tews Rangers 2: C«rtotr*a Angels 5. 
ota Twos a. '■ 


tAnnesoa T*s» «. netten ei Lm^me Chica- 
go Cubs 3. Pmsbut* Pirates I. San Oego 
radres 4. Atlanta Bnw« 3. PruaoeWw 
Aattes 3. New Yoni Atets 1. Momraai Emos 
10. Si Lous Carina* 3. San Franosco 
Gants 2. Cmanneti R am 1 . Houston Asm 3. 
Los Angles Dodgers 0. 

BOWLS 

LKAMMOTON SPA: LteerpooWtetorta insur- 
ance nadonal cftampatnsiups: Two wood 
» ingles: Ouarter-Anate T Owner ( V«Kx*» 
Par*. Dean. 16. A Wtate iPwnoumt. 15: N 
Snaw (Ropner Parit, Dumamv. 17. c Sutton 
(Asnford MuxSasexl 1ft M Sauwftrs (Boro 
o» Eye. SutioV). 17. Llowe iB»n*ngnain C"N 
Service) 7. 0 Beny (HWheto). 16. C Anion 
(Peterborough!. 13 

Semt-finM* Snaw 16. Cteotme* it. Sauncws 
T5 Berry t4 

Tnples: Semifinals: Oadby 15. Boroupt 
Par*. iRedcar). M. Burnham. (Bucks). 21. 
Norm Waisnam 16 

WORTHING: Getaway EBBA nations! tours 

chtmpranatap: 

. OuertaMinete: LmttheMlW. Browsion Hal 1«. 
Newnham Zl. Hohnan IS: Thrapston 31. 
Camon Dorns 23: Stony Snan ora 2ft Mkj- 
Surrey ia S ene ro ute Lndf>»d 19. 
Newnham 18, Stcnr Strattons 20. Thraoston 
19 

CRICKET ~~ 

MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPIONSHIP: 

Shrewsbury. Snropsnre ’82-5 ats (M fi 

Dames BH Ostotoirwe 1St-6 March: North- 

umeertand l13llemorKjgB 5-431. Camrmoge- 

snre 153-0 iGeast* 90 noi Out. Miner 59 not 

Dull Mator Dpror 38-2 eec sne 51 iC D 

Booden 7-191. Bucks 38-0 aac ana S4-1 

BoOA wan by 9 wms. 

OXFORD: eiffiC CesUvaL- Shroosrwe 9S 


(Pantor 6-32). OtrtonMWe 101-4 Somerset 
1 1B {Gowns 53L Oerbyshee IBM. POrit 0ft 
Mover S-*Tr. Heretorderare 137. Kart 280-5 
(LongWv 153 nrt out): Worcester!*** 100. 
WBCvnCMhe* 125. (Heath £46): Bartsfie* 
166-9. Harashe* 250-3 (Lane 107 not oft 
lemer ISaT SaitaOstw ISM, (Bate? 83 
nee emit 

CAMBRIDGE: ESSO festtrafc Sussex 101 

<G*Jtoy 6-28). Laceaw at W* 81. (Anscome 5- 

» Sedtorotfm 195-9 [Stamay 4T. Rama »- 

73). Cneshre t(M. lEZrt Sierav 231-6 

(Thorpe 7a not out), leicainshire 127 (Jhcmp- 

; Sultetk 160 ( 


jaatLLna 

SO" 46. KenOhCk 5-52); j 
Nor® 


Sa«ag* 7-4n 
Lancashire 21 



171-6 JKrdght 55): 
19-3 (SpaaL 109 not out). 

ire J31 /York 55 not Otft Yates 

4-32t Hunts and PeowDonjugh 156-8 
(Howanti 54. Been *-551 Camon 

(Krwnr 68 not ou* Yorkasifl 160 \ 

43Sa»«byS-29t.l 
4-iOj Mdcflese* t 
154-7 (Jeyes 44. Wih» 

~ FOOTBALL^ 

(Tuesday's late results) 

SCOTTISH SKOI. CUP: Fill ro u nd : Albion 
Rovers 3, Scwacfc 1. 

OTHER MATCHES: Real Socttdsd 0. 
Liverpool 0: MAan AC 1. Argantnoa 
Jurors 1. (Milan won on prattm); 
Barnet ft Tottenham 2: Kettering 1. 
Coventry 1; Dagenham ft Bariung 1; 
Harrow Borough 1. Arsenal 1; Wycombe 
Wanderers t. Sutton 0. 

FRENCH LEAGUE: Parts SG 0. Metz 0; 
MarseAeft Toulouse 1; Mantas 1. Nee Or 
Nancy 0. Brest 4: Bordeaux ft RC Parts 1: 
Le Havre i, Samt-Ebanra 0: Rentas ft 
Toulon ft Lens 1. Auxerra 1; Monaco 0. 
Laval 0. Soctaux 1. Lilte 0. 

WEST GERMAN LEAGUE: Stuttgart 4, fC 
Hamburg 0. 

GOLF ~~ 

SEATON CAREW: British boys’ chempton- 

Shtp: Fourth rawift: C RonaB (Torrance 


Sydertoam tel) bt A Warns (Bryn Mesdow). 
2 and l: J Man fGutane) bt J Dsnfcfaon 

(UanwefTft. « and ft M Haste (St Anormsl M 

N Crtdknr (Wmham). 2 sno 1: F Gsbnsn 
fflwitz) « ft Johnson (CBnMft. 4 and 2: P 
Graham (LMceterrtwa) bt M Dawson 
(SBanousasLM2>scEGrM(LongniddrWbCD 

Locxen (Paoaswnod BitOdeA at iSflh: P 

ftge^erg (Den) bt G BUr (HaawuQ, 4 and 3: J 
Bennett (Nortrmoodj bt D Wood (lYsOon 

HeeftL 3 and ft H An IPtetey Owm) bt A 

EMou(Farsneza).3andftLHeme{S**)btG 
Cross (Q). Band 6: N Duncan (Bon Accord) M 
M Joseph CS ShteXML 5 end 4: L Wetar 
(Grange) W A DomaRaAVattvorvOeamaL one 
hole; G King Shotts) M O Bathgate 
(Sandwiayj. one hote- 

WEST KILBRIDE: Bate gMs* dut y It 

«Np:?5: S Snapcuti (KnoMef.79: C ThomeB 

tSmet a& A Mscoonau (Ahdotert. M kbM 

(SweL «1: S Moman (KenMinitt B2: A Johns 

(Boston), ta K Hunter {WtetetwadL V 
McGreevy (RoesmoreL H Bone(Bsra3MLP 
McKtostry (CwmcBiii). *4: H PrtWpS 
HJarwnynedM 89: H HanbatjMotf). 

SAND MOOR: Pewgeet-Talbot POA 
‘ Psnnm±STLP 


DtSM 


Trophy: (pass On B R Tonne (Womjt- 
bempron StadunBL 388 ap-ee CMtgtmi 

Gwdnar Locttet Trophy: (Claw X): T Norntan 

(BUngoun SyncJicne). 400. Captain Cteri- 

inM Cqpr (Class At. C J iWuefBaacorw- 
SSC 399i aoMflehe OteJOesB B): K B HN 
(Hot & PMe r shani ). 396. Swag Cup: (Pass 
Ck SpnhSL 39A OurtapCup: ( ~ 

Qunan (East Bristol). 393. M 

Tropnjc tense X so mots). N Bnmtter 

(Havant). 599. 

_ J SPEEDWAY 

NATIONAL LEAGUE (Twadav sten results): 
Poou 44. Mldanhal 34; MMon Keynes 5L 
BesgowZ7 

~ ~ TENNIS 

NEW HAVEN: Plot Pan Open: Ft* route: 

(US urtm stated): A Agasw bt 8 Ockraon. 

2 -6. 6-2. 7-5. B Testerrrem bt C Caropoefl ISAL 
frft Bft J Uwtoiubr S GOy (HQ. 7-* B 
bt Ktfyjgnaa, M. MiT Waroake at 


Gamin (Kennedy Can). C Been (NomancN 

DRV Bt D MiHOOh (RouKteayV 69: P 
Goteng (S Herts), G Poc* (Phoamft. N Bwch 
(unatL K Momj (MonkstoenV R Crag 
L P.WNter (Poottorvte-FykW. B 
(Tenmoaet Ttkh Btezes (Souwpon 
and AeadateV G Emereoo (FsrodownL T 
Coles (Muiennsfl). P Eats (Royal 
PonncateL G RmI ( Ct aeado n ). T Spurgeon 
_ ) J Beoneo (West MateigV 

CRUZ: US mtnnt'a entat atr 
drom p i o nsta p: IM qaa te^tea rotate: (US 
urtoss sta»5 148: M Hatran Am. 75. 73: P 
Sinn 74. 74. 148: U Oabek 76. 73. ISO: O 

(77.74: K 

5. 7ft K 

78. 7B: D 


(DKS3JI 

SANTA 


Mochn# 77. 75: C Mougua (TAIgue (Pr). 75. 

77; S L ebnjtt 75. 77. IS* C Hourtoane dm, 
77. 78; M Redman 79. 74; K Kesaur 75. fe. 


SHOOTING 


BISLeV. National I 

:400i 


nantnc in yi nii. ecw ict Ttoolir. 
HPuseJ W G Evens (WomrM. a» Mft M (CUM Aj; S PF^Mw (Tteci «erto»%St 
S«ntora [SaWord) IM V Cox (V« Essex). 5 and As Jo A a ie rtcw TVophr- (Pass By T Thoin- 
< A Sartoywaii lAstbrn) bt N ABsetxooh ton (Yeelmpan). 387. GBbay Trop Hr. (Ctass 
(Cravtharner. 2 ana t: Ti Beny (OWMcti end C7 R M S&rts (Rites BojceL 394. BMSto 


G Mulsr (SAV7-S, 6-3. 

SAMfT VMC&m Grate Pits: Hrt route: L 

Pnnefc(Cz)blOCwnoo>ese(tt).5-7.&4.7-& 

O Tyson (Aw) btP Cana (Ift. 3-6. &4, 7-8. . • 

EASTBOURNE: Brittsh PnteateM |untor 

charoptauMp: Bam' satgtes: T2 and undst: 

Aiarfor-fintes: E James (Lancs) M O 
Loosemora CS .Wales). B-i. W; B Cowan 
(Lancs) bt M SchoMd (Lancs). 6-1. B-i: L 
Bactenan(CsnrisititARidianison(ljncto.6- 
3.6-3; M George (Essexibt J Hamnwig (Haros 
and (OWL 3« 6-1. frft OHs' tengtec ft and 

tatesn Ou s rt ar B as i s: C Aatwiorm (Lancs) bt 

P vmet (Uhcs). 6ft 8-*: V Kero (Esau) bt 
S A StodaB (Dorset). 8ft 6-1; JOaouandat 


YACHTING 

Sm* -W Shtn RKr Cwy Sari 

AttentlcK (Larotek ro Gotn«toaro) 
: 1. Li» (Nort.ft Chosbanto (Noo. J 

wtoar tN og a y) . das* A and B; 1 

nun(USSR): 2. Georon Focx (VW3)- 3 



TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

Tour match 
(ll.Q to 6.0) 

EDGBASTON: TCCB XI v New 

Zealanders 

NatWest Trophy 

Semi-finals 

(10.30. 60 overs) 

THE OV AL: Surrey v Lancashire 
WORCESTER: Worcester v Sussex 

SECOND X 7 CHAMPIONSHIP: Huttings: 
Sussex v Surrey: Mesetey. WarvncKsnire 
u Middlesex: Marske: Yorkshire v 
Lancasnee 

MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPIONSHIP; 
Reading CC: Berkshire v Devon, 
B re wood: Statfordshne v Sutfotk. 
Chippenham: Wiltshire v 

Buckin^parnsnue. 

OTHER SPORT 
CARRIAGE DRIVING: World champion- 
ships (at Ascot). 

GOLF: Benson and Hedges tournament 
(a> FurtortQ: Bntsh gats cnam m a ns i jp (at 
West Kii&rteBl: Brmsn boys cnampton- 
sthd (at Seaton Career). 

SPEEDWAY: England * Uneeb States (« 
ipsvncrn. 

SWiMMINft Age group finals tat Leeds). 

Long jump 

PhiJJip Whitlock, of England, 
has made the biggest jump in the 
latest ranking list issued by ihr 
International Squash Players 
.Association. The Exeter player 
has leapt from 68 to 48. follow, 
tng two wins and one semi-final 
placing in lower grade IPSA 
events in France and West 
Germany this summer. 


Semi-final date 

Middlesex have arranged to 
play their under-25 cricket com- 
petition semi-final against 
Yorkshire on Sunday. August 
17. at RAP's Vine Lane sports 
ground in Uxbridge. 


FIRST-CLASS CRICKET AVERAGES 
Bowling 


Batting 

QuaMication: B innings, 45 average 

I NO Fiona HS Avga 

JJ Whitaker 23 8 1098 200* 7ft20 

A I KaKicrtarran 14 4 691 163* 69.10 

G A Hick 29 5 1578 2ZT 65.75 

A J Lamb 22 4 1060 160* 5BJ8 

B M McMfflan 21 4-999 136 58.76 

RJ Bailey 32 8 1395 224* 58.12 

RJ Hadlee IS i 628 129* 57.09 

C E B Rice 23 5 1012 156* 56-22 

CGGreenidge 24 ,2 1229 14 8 55-86 

P M Roebuck 26 7 1046 221* 55.05 

MWOsttmff 18 2 851 183* 53.18 

A R Bonier 30 d 1351 150 51.96 

G Boycott 17 1 829 135* 51.81 

M NeweU 16 5 561 112* 51.00 

9 JM Maher 13 3 497 126 49.70 

VJ Marks ' 25 10 736 83* 49.06 

TS Curtis 32 8 1152 122* 48.00 

Gtoc* 22-3 899 183. 47:31 

A A Metcalfe 33 0 1536 151 46-54 

J D Birch 17 5 551 79* 45.91 

P W G Parker 35 5 -1362 125 45A0 

RTRotonson 21 7 903 108 45.15 

J E Moms 30 2 1281 191 45A3 

* stgnrfras not out 

New Zealand tour batting 

1 NO Runs -HS Avge 



. O 

M 

Funs 

W 

Avge 

R J Hadlee 

403.4 

114 

888 

53 

15.05 

MD Marshal 

514^3 

132 

1167 

73 

15.98 

S T Cterfce 


64 

-536 

33 

1&24 

C A Walsh 

659.1 

169 

1711 

100 

17.11 

T M Alderman 

472 

107 

1449 

82 

17 £7 

A H Gray 

326.3 

63 

934 

49 

19.06 

M A HokSng 

2991 

84 

803 

42 

19.11 

JH Chads 

411.4 

135 

967 

49 

19.73 

M Jesn-Jeques 

96 

10 

338 

16 

21.12 

Imran Khan 

268.2 

64 

742 

35 

21.20 

P A J De Freitas- 545.1 

98 

1616 

74 

21.83 

JEEmbtB'ey 

313J3 

113 

- 574 

26 

FE/i 

G S Small 

5105 

119 

4438 

65 

F'Xvm 

KE Cooper 

344.5 

89 

841 

38 

22.13 

PW Jarvis 

428j4 

82 

1332 

60 


PBClrft 

413^ 

120 

1002 

45 


N AF Oder 


168 

1744 

78 

B'.-Jt; '.J 

J Gamer 

3S3.5 

94 

1014 

45 

22.53 

M PBlckne^ 

T65 

36' 

503 

22 

1^1 

DRPrinale 

379 

102 

96S 

42 


PMSixJ *. 

1703 

S3 

438 

19 

23.05 

DEMafcCrtm 

158.1 

33 

520 

22 


TDTopley 

236-4 

49 

■719 

30 

23.96 


New Zealand tour bowling 


J G Srecewetf 
M D Crowe 
E J Gray 
J V Coney 
a a Edgar 

K R Rutherford 

JGW right 

JJ Crowe 
I D S Smith 
TEBlain 
T J Franklin 
DA Stirling 
W Watson 


6 

12 

10 

13 
16 

14 

13 

14 
7 
5 
7 

.5 

5 


293 

672 

330 

506 

586 

391 

451 

379 

149 

87 

t71 

83 

30- 


110 

106 

83 

93 

110 " : 
91- 
96 
75 
58 
34 
96 
26 
10. 


97.66 

96.00 

66.00 
50-60 
49.00 
35.54 

34.89 

31.58 
29.80 
29 J» 
24.42- 
20.75: 
15J» 


RJHitMs . 
J G BreoaweU 
E J Grey 
EJOaifited 
J V Coney 
DAStWna - 
8 Barrett 
W Watson 
MD Crows 


O 
130 
311.5 105 

37B.2 129 

7SA is 

53 14 

202- 33 

tZtJS -17 

253.1 55 

48- 8 


« Runs 
36 


Mr 


A»»e 

298 ’ T7 J7 

ns 30 24 

891 36 24 

»58 . 6 36 

143 S 28 

772 23 33 

46? 13 34 

735 21 35 

187 ? 83 


Also batted: R J Hadlee. 19. 68; B Barrett 0. 3T, S': E J 
CnatfieW. 0*. 

* skiffles not out 


Atoo uewtod: KR Rutherforfl M-8-8: J G 4-1-1 3H). 

WWKETKEBTO fTotal Ct St): H J Parks 69^4-5; S J 
Rhodes«i-44-7: D B East 51-41-10; R c RutseO 49-46- 
P R «-37-4; S A 

FIELDERS' CATCHE& M A Lynch, 31; KM Curfeh. 26- 
R A Harper, 2AiC.es Face, 2& g a hwC^cs 
C owtirey. 21; K J Barnett 21 . - " 
Bm^^ERTORMANCE^ Fastest Hundred: r v a 
0 £ ^* n 48 baMs for Somwsetv Samoroan at 
T^witonon May S. BwrtowBogiC A Walsh (9 (ST 7a 
forQoucestsrvSonieraetatBitetolon Jdyii. 


SPORT 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1936 


Cram aims to 
be best there 
has ever been 

In the last of three articles, Steve Cram tells Pat 


Butcher, Athletics Correspondent, he wants to finish 


with 10 or 12 gold medals from major championships 


T here have been only two Olympic ately after completing his double in 
films worth their celluloid. Leni Edinburgh, Cram announced that be was 
Riefenstahl's Olympia , the going to attempt the same thing at the 
cinematographicaliy beautiful European Championships in Stuttgart, 


T here have been only two Olympic 
films worth their celluloid. Leni 
Riefenstahl's Olympia , the 
cinematographicaliy beautiful 
but philosophically tainted docu- 
mentary of the 1936 Games, whose 50th 
annivetWy is celebrated, with justified 
irony by the Jessie Owens Memorial sprints 
tomorrow evening in Berlin; and Kon 
Itchikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad Track and 
field athletics is the focus of the Olympic 
Games. And middle-distance running is 
the focus of athletics. 

Yet there is a curious omission in the 
footage of the 1 964 Games in Tokyo. There 
is not a single frame of Peter Snell winning 
the 800-1,500 metres double. It was a wise 
editorial decision to cut Snell. For the New 
Zealander's victories were so predictable 
that they were as boring as counting coffee 
spoons. A similar wasteland of opposition 
is opening up for Steve Cram, whose 
disappointment was boundless when 
Sebastian Coe, who was his only real threat, 
had to withdraw from the Commonwealth 
Games through illness. 

Said Aouita, the only other man cur- 
rently capable of challenging Cram at 1,500 
meires-mile has moved up to 5,000-10,000 
metres. And at 800 metres, Joaquim Cruz, 
the Olympic champion, has been out all 
season with an injury. Cram is moving 
towards a situation, where he is in danger 
of being faulted for his lack of opposition in 
the way that Percy Cerutty, the histrionic 
coach to Snell's legendary predecessor. 
Herb Elliott, suggested that Snell should be 
stripped of his Olympic medals “for not 
trying." 

The morning that Coe withdrew from 
Edinburgh, Cram turned up at a Press 
conference like a dawn duellist, whose 
opponent had reneged. The realization that 
he now had an untrammelled path to 
victory was frustrated by the knowledge 
that honour could not be satisfied. For Coe 
had not only denied Cram the supreme 
prize in athletics, the Olympic gold medal 
in his chosen event, the 1,500 metres, Coe 
had become the motivation for Cram 
doubling up in Edinburgh. 

"I was obviously disappointed. Seb 
pulling out took away a lot of what it was 
about for me. I was looking forward to it, 
because I much prefer to think about a race 
rather than go through the motions. But 
this was more a personal thing, two, races 
between me and Seb. The Commonwealth 
Games was almost incidental" 

Cram had conceived the idea of doubling 
up in Edinburgh almost a year ago. Having 
.won the 1,500 metres at the previous 
Commonwealth Games in Brisbane, run- 
ning the 800 metres as well, provided the 
motivation to train and compete. Immedi- 


ately after completing his double in 
Edinburgh, Cram announced that be was 
going to attempt the same thing at the 
European Championships in Stuttgart, 
wh ich begin on August 26. 

“At the start of the season, I had no 
intention of doubling up in Stuttgart. But 
the eight hundred's going so welL Some- 
times I think I’ve got a better chance at 
eight than fifteen." Snell had certainly 
seemed to win his Tokyo gold medals 
without exerting himself, although he said 
years later that if his opponents had known 
how tired he was in the second final the 
1. 500 metres, they would have made it 
harder for him. That may be a warning to 
Cram, but he was not content to win just 
the 800 metres in Edinburgh. In cool and 
blustery conditions, he ran a Common- 
wealth record of one minute 43.22 seconds, 
his second fastest, and he is beginning to 
entertain ideas of approaching what he had 
thought was (for him) an unassailable 
world record, Coe's 1:41.73. 

“I was amazed with the eight, to be 
honest. It fell so comfortable, plus it was in 
a race situation. In Zurich last year, I was 
on the top of my form, and 1:42.88 was an 
eyeballs-out run. I believe I can run a 
second faster than Edinburgh, I was so 
relaxed. But whether I can run a second- 
and-a-half faster is open to contention." 

I t wilt be interesting to see how close 
Cram can get to that 800 metres 
record without the impetus of com- 
petition. Of his three world records 
last year, only one was set in a solo ef- 
fort, and then he took only 0.01 sec. off 
John Walker’s - 2,000 metres record, with 
4:51.39. Whereas, in his close finish with 
Aouita in Nice, be took over a second off 
Steve Ovett's 1,500 metres record, and in 
his race against Coe in Oslo, he took the 
same margin off Coe's mite record. 

Middle-distance running has two mea- 
sures of excellence. Beating time or beating 
people. Cram's relish for confrontation was 
nurtured early. “Racing people is much 
more important to me than times. It's 
always been people I've aimed for. When I 
was a kid, Jimmy (Hedley, his coach) and 
my dad ■ never said you’ve got to two 
minutes for 800 this year, they said, you’ve 
got to beat so-and-so. It was always people 
not times as my target" 

Cram becomes most animated when he 
describes bow be planned ibe first victory 
over his junior nemesis, Graham William- 
son, the talented Scot who has been forced 
out of the sport by a succession of injuries. 
And although Cram says that the European 
double will be harder- than the Common- 
wealth, be knows again that it will only bea 
fit Coe, who can thwart him. The challenge - 



Record chase: Cram has a rare challenge and sets the world 1,500 metres record as be is chased hom| by Aouita in Nice 


would then be a projected 1 ,500 metres race 
against Aouita in Brussels on September 5. 

But with Aouita aiming for the 5,000- 
10,000 metres at the World Champion- 
ships in Rome next year. Cram is, “vaguely 
considering" the 800-1,500 metres double 
again for the same reason, that he won the 
longer distance last time, in Helsinki, and 
needs the motivation. But the loss to Coe in 
the Olympic 1,500 metres, when Cram was 
coming back from injury means that he will 
probably just do the longer distance in' 
Seoul in 1988. 

“If I’d won the 1,500 metres in Los 
Angeles, maybe the drive that I still have 
wouldn’t be there. There’d be nothing to 
prove. I see myself as a 1,500 metres 
runner. If you’ve got this drive to be the 
best there's ever been, you can’t start 
winning other events and be satisfied, with 
that If you can't win the event which you 
see yourself as being best at, then it 
obviously would be a disappointment 


Probably Steve Ovett feels thaL I'm sure he 
would have preferred to win the 1,500 
metres in Moscow. He was always a miler, 
whereas Seb was always an 800 metres 
runner, and we know how Seb feels about 
wanting to win an 800 metres title. An 
Olympic gold is an Olympic gold. But 
certainly for me, the i ,500 metres is the one 
I want to win. 

“If when I'm 50 I'm sitting in a pub 
somewhere and some bloke comes up and 
says, ‘ah, but you were never as good as 
Coe, because you never won the 
Olympics,’, obviously it will rankle. Until 
you do win the Olympics, you’ve got no 
chance of being held in the same esteem." 

G ram and Daley Thompson might 
seem an odd couple to be friends, 
apart from the gravitation of stars 
to each other. For Cram is a 
- hermetic character, while. 
Thompson seems to be conducting a love- 


hate relationship with the whole world. 
Cram admits that Thompson's eccentric 
behaviour “even makes me cringe some- 
times. But Daley's at his best wben there’s 
no one there to see. r ve got a lot of time for 
Daley." 

But one common, factor is the extent to 
which Cram is finding himself like 
Thompson, without opposition. 

“If it's a question of motivation. I've 
only got to sit and havea cup of coffee with 
Daley to motivate myself The motivation 
now is to win more than anyone else has 
ever won, to try and be the best there's ever 
been, and to try and set targets for other 
people. If I end up winning everything I 
want to win in the next few years, I might 
end lip with 10 or 12 gold medals at major 
championships, and that, obviously will be 
hard forpeopleto follow." . 


© Copyright P« Butcher, 18W 


YACHTING 

France close to wind 


TENNIS 


St Nazaire (Reuter) - Chal- 
lenge France, second string in 
Ibe French attempt to win a 
place in the America's Cup, was 
lau n c he d yesterday after the 
courts agreed a rescue by 
Gnmdig-France and a sports 
promotion company to its fisao- 
dal problems. 

The 12-metre yacht, skip- 
pered by Yves Pa jot, now bees a 
race against time aboard a cargo 


ship, scheduled to arrive hi 
Perth on the deadline of Septem- 
ber J5 when official 
scnrthwcriag begins. Any delay 
will disqualify the yacht unless 
its skipper can convince race 
authorities be was heU up by 
nnforseeu drcumstauces. 

Challenge France is the sec- 
ond French yacht after French 
Kiss, skippered by Pajot’s youn- 
ger brother, Marc. 



TREBLE CHANCE-Max 24 Pts, -No Client with 24 Pts. 

TOP DM FOR ONLY 23 Pts. 

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DiMa Ctunca dvMndi n ante o! 5 p. 


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12 HOMES £449 -1( 

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Top seed’s 


motivation 

Los' Angeles (Reuter) — The 
top two seeds, Martina 
Navratilova and Chris Lloyd, 
sailed into the third round of the 
$250,000 (£166,000) Los An- 
geles women’s tournament with 
straight set victories. 
Navratilova, the No. 1 seed, 
beat Debbie Spence 6-0, 6- 1 , and 
Lloyd ousted Elise Buigin 64, 6- 
2 in all-American matches to 
lead an advance of seeds. 

Miss Navratilova sometimes, 
had difficulty motivating her-' 
self but Spence was never going 
to give her any trouble and 
Navratilova breezed through in 
55 minutes. “I'm trying to gel 
used to cement again, ready for 
the US Open," Miss 
Navratilova said. “Last week we 
practised in Aspen, 8,000 feet 
up. and I'm trying to get used to 
the flight of the ball again. But I 
enjoyed it. I always do if I've 
played well. The crowd enjoyed 
it too. and that’s what it's all 
about." 

Miss Burgin. after stretching 
the opening set to 52 minutes 
and losing it 64, appeared to 
suffer a letdown against Mrs 
Lloyd at the beginning of the 
second match, going down 3-0- 
But Miss Burgin son troubled 
Mrs Lloyd with her lightening 
reflexes and saved numerous 
points. 

“1 usually play someone 
ranked about 100 in the first 
match." Mrs Lloyd said. “But 
Eli$e is dangerous. She doesn’t 
let you settle into a groove.” 
Some seeds had more trouble, 
however. The Americans. 
Stephanie Rehe and Kathy Jor- 
dan, and the Canadian. Carling 
Basseu. all had to dig deep for 
their victories. 

The ninth-seeded Miss Rehe, 
who fought a tough three-set 
match the day before to eiimi- 


ti M. II LIM sraEp 


Big salmon not just blarney 


By Conrad Voss Baric 

Rumours are spreading' that 
the salmon entering the riven 
this year are bigger than last 
year. The ( rumours lack 
confirmation, yet they persist. 
They cropped up first in En- 
gland (iv again in Ireland. 
On eight miles of the Erriff 
river, managed by the Ireland 
Centra] Fishery Board, 28 fish 
were taken in one day from nme 
beats by 22 rods and a good 
many of the fish. I was told, were 
above the average weight for the 
time of the year. 

The Erriff is a small spate 
river that nuns through a valley 
of rhododendron hedges and 
high mountains. One great 
dominant peak is named The 
Devil’s Mother and is regarded 
by the loads with a certain 


BOWLS 


Shaw looks 
for more 
gold medals 

Norma Shaw, of Durham, 
looks set to add to her impres- 
sive collection ofawards, having 
reached the two wood singles 
final in the Liverpool Victoria 
insurance national champion- 
ship at Leamington Spa 
yesterday. 

Speeding to an 1 1-! lead after 
the eighth end of her sem*-final 
against -Thelma Clcmmey, of 
Victoria Park. Shaw, a former 
world champion, was pegged 
back but eventually ran out a I fi- 
ll winner. Shaw had earlier 
defeated Connie Sutton,, of 
Ashford, in the quarter-finals 
and will now meet Mary 
Saunders, of Suffolk, in the 
finaL Saunders, 7-1 ahead after , 
six ends against Glen Berry, of 
Hatfield, completely surren- 
dered the advantage but scraped 
out a 15-14 win on the last end. 

A Commonwealth Games 
medal winner, Mary Price, took 
her Burnham team into the final 
of the triples with a win over 
North Walsham. skippered by 
Jayne Roylanee. They -will- play 
the Oadby squad, who de- 
feated Borough Park 16-14. 

Results, page 27 


FISHING 


amount of superstitions awe, It 
adds to the charm. 

.Not far away, in Mayo, a 
salmou of over 20 pounds was 
taken on the Newport House 
water. As the biggest ever taken 
there, it wifi be framed. On all 
these small spate rivers in the 
west of Ireland it is remarkable 
bow many big fish are taken on 
small flies. One grilse of about 
10 pounds was even taken on a 
size 14 double. 

The Irish Salmon Research 
Trust, based in Mayo, gives 
some interesting figures about 
{armed salmon. Its annual re- 


port states: “The 5,000 grilse in 
. Irish coastal waters which are 
the produce of 10(1000 hatchery 
eggs have cost roughly £25^000 
of which at least 75 per cent — 
£18,750 — .wifi go to the benefit 
of the netsmen and £6,250 will 
return to the river in the fora of 
spawning fish.” 

The overall impression in 
Ireland since their Fisheries Act 
was passed in 1980, is that 
fishery protection and admin- 
istration have improved. Repre- 
sentatives of angKng. dabs, 
riparian owners, netsmen and 
fishery hotels are elected to 
regional boards, compared with 
limited representation in Scot- 
land. One suspects that Dublin's 
fishery department is a shade 
more single-minded about fish- 
ery promotion than its opposite 
number in Whitehall. - 


BOXING 


Locals suffer as Bugner 
whets his appetite 


; Sydney (Reuter) — Joe Bugner 
is rapidly running out of spar- 
ring partners as be fights to- 
wards full fitness. Bugner. aged 
36. will end a two-year absence 
from the ring when he tackles a 
lop. and as yet unnamed, 
American heavyweight at the 
Sydney entertainment centre on 
September 15. ... 

A number of local heavy- 
weights, however, are wishing 
the former European, Common- 
wealth and British champion, 
now based in Sydney, had 
decided against coming out of 
retirement. Bugner, who weighs 
in at about 17st, has been 
handing out severe punishment 
to the local boxen and Bill 
Mordey, the promoter, has been 
forced to impon men from 
overseas to keep Bugner occu- 
pied. 

Kevin Barry, a former ama- 
teur champion from Adelaide, 
and the Fijian heavyweight 
champion. Niko Degei. will 
work with Bugner over the next 
-few of weeks and Mordey said 
be may import an American 
sparring partner. 

Johnny Lewis, Bugner’s top- 


Australian trainer who also 
guides the career of the IBF 
bantamweight champion, Jeff 
Fenech. has been impressed 
with the Briton's gym work. 

Mordey has a short list of two 
boxers to meet Bugner and wifi 
make an announcement next 
week after talks with the New 
York agent. Don Majeski.- 

Bugner. who twice went the 
distance with Muhammad Ali 
during a. 20-year career in the 
ring, believes a- new city, a new 
trainer and a new attitude can 
take him to the top in the 
toughest sport of all He said: “If 

I'd trained like this seven or 
eight years ago. 1 believe 1 would 
have won the world title then." 

Bugner watched Tim 
Witherspoon defend his WBa 
heavyweight title against Frank 
Bruno on television last month 
and said he was not impressed. 
Asked. whether he would tike a 
bout against Bruno in the near 
future. Bugner said: “If I. win a 
couple ofn^htsl won’t need the 
likes of Bruno. Tm going to take 


HOCKEY 


Never have 
British 
been fitter 

Bjr Joyce Whitehead y 

England,- Scotland and Ire- 
land are in Amsterdam for the 
women’s World Cup which 
starts tomorrow and ends on 
August 24. The 1 2 top countries 
in the world are competing are 
are seeded as follows: I, The 
Netherlands; 2, West Germany; 
3, United States; 4, Australia; 5, 
Canada; 6, New Zealand; 7, 
Soviet Union; 8. England; 9, 
Scotland; ' 10, Argentina; 11, 
Ireland; 12, Spain. 

The British teams have be- 
come quite professional in their 
build-up for this great event and 
are probably fitter than .any 
teams leaving these shores be- 
fore. Scotland, under their coach 
Denis Haye, have made great 
strides. 

England have had their ups 
and downs. They have done the 
work and had the practice 
matches but somehow there 
seems a ‘chink in their armour at 
the. vital moment. Last weekend 
they ended their training at 
Loughborough College with 
matches on three consecutive 
days against men's teams. The 
men proved too strong for them 
but the experience should have 
been invaluable for tomorrow, 
Saturday and Sunday. The pres- 
sure will be much the same 
when England play Australia, 
The Netherlands (world cham- 
pions) and Spain before they 
have a 'day's rest 

Scotland, drawn m the -same 
pool as England, play The 
Netherlands, then - Spam and 
Canada. Ireland are in pool B 
with West Germany, United 
States, New Zealand, Soviet 
Union -and Argentina and play 
in the opening match tomorrow 
against west Germany. 
gWW® iiJ » C Rute. L Cnrr, K 

Brown, V Dixon, B Handy (captain). J 
Attains. SHohnO,K Parker. M Cheatham 
J Barrister, S Wffiana, L BoBngton. G 
Blown, S LOtar, V Hatam. ^ 
SCOTLAMk G Stewart, A VtWr. M 
McLeflan. M McLeod (eaptain), j Dotm.c 
Jordan. N Kerr, W Fraser. A Rattray s 
Henderson, J Kennedy, M Young. u 
Duncan. G Messenger. E Blair n 
McGregor." . 


i FOOTBALL 


Shake-up 
by Dutch: 
to regain 
lost glory 

The Hague (Reuter) - Dutch 
football, once the pride of 
Europe, embarks on a new 
season this weekend hoping i 0 
recover some tost glory after one 
of its worst years in memory. 

The league structure has been 
reformed in a bid to raise 
standards while FSY Eind- 
hoven, first division champions, 
strengthened by. big new 
signings, plan to lari the revival 
with a serious challenge in the 
European Cup. - 
The shake-up follows a black 
year which made the days of 
international greatness with 
Cruyff, Neeskcns, van Hanegpm 
and the van der Kerkhof broth- 
ers seem for more than a decade 
ago. The top dubs ait made 
quick exits from Europe, the 
national side missed the World 
Cup, attendances continued to 


■ nlBi r-BirT- 




be may import an American . this one fightaia time but if Fra 
sparring partner. in the right shape, I doirt 

Johnny Lewis, Bugner’s top- believe 1’JI lose." . 


The marathon run of the major serial 


m 


pii 




■ fw 1* 'l j ’ | U 1 • jj- • '?■ B 



iroSSr 



When 1 see a novel with “Now 
a major TV serial” na the cover I 
have two reactions, both un- 
reasonable. The first rs to deride 
instantly not to boy it. The 
second is to wohder if there has 
ever been . a minor TV seraL 

There used to fie a warning in 
The Tima style book about the 
ose of the word major. “Major," 
it read, “appears too often in 
place of important, chief, main, 
big.” By an amusing coincidence 
the next piece of instruction was 
“Mammoth is no improvement 
on vast” and further down the 
same page yon leant that 
“Minuscule (not mtniscaJe) is 
not a variant of small; it should 
4 


be confined to the medieval 
script" . 

> I remember that we in the 
little, not minuscule, world of 
sport went on asms major as 
though nothing had happened 
because it is a useful word and 
the style book did not go so for 
as to forbid it on pain of 
execution. We also used minor, 
bar less often because, as fbe- 
years passed ami sport got a 
swollen head, jus ta bout every- 
thing began to be called major, 
not to say mammoth, even when 
it was mbrar. 

Crowding In on. ns were major 
championships, major titles, 

major innings, major races — 
and, locked away In a. corner 


among . Che so-called minor 
sports. Major Hnriugftam- 
Fortescoe. of dm Grenadiers, 
winning the Queen’s Prize at 
Bisleyia major achievement, but 
that fa by the way. Would that 
certain major footballers were as 
accurate with their shooting- 

boots as- the gallant major was 
with bis. rifle,. . . 

' f prefer -minor matters to 
major but by that I do not mean 
mini. Now' there’s a. silly word, 
or half-word. The otber'day I 
saw the expression “mini- 
re rivaT in a report Someone 
hod recovered ha match with- ; 
out managing to 'win. (The had 
won, presumably -his revival 
would have been maxL M i ni ca b ;.; 


miniskirt, minim nm — yes; mini* 
revival — no. thank you. 

Going boric to the rid style 
book, I note that “Marathon 
Should not be used for prolonged 
events or exercises; itsadjectral 
use in jkarticfllar should be 
rejected." 

The style book diverts me to 
the dictionary,' which says that 
“Phidippides ran ISO miles to 
secure Spartan aid in the battle 
of Marathon in '490BG" That 
waff aaajjor nut by Phidippides 
— so major that nowadays they 
would have to coin an ugly 

adjective to do Tt justice— bothe 

'probably thought tittle of 1 l 

Gordon Allan 


violence refused to go away.- 

Within the first division, the 
gulf between the leading sides 
and the rest seemed to widen, 
with PSV, Feyenooiti and cup 
winners Ajax Amsterdam rarely 
given the tests at home to 
prepare them for tough com- 
petition abroad. 

To tackle these problems, the 
football association . voted to 
slim down the league- over two 
seasons from 18 clubs to 16 and 
to divide the league season into 
quarters. The league champion- 
ship will continue to be run over 
the whole season but the new 
system means the two Dutch 
places in the UEFA Cup will be 
decided by an end-of-season 
playoff between the' winners of 
the four quarters. 

The hope is that this will 
boost quality and attendances 
by giving lowlier dubs frus- 
trated by years as also-rans 
something more to play for. It 
will also allow an eight-week 
mid-winter break. 

While these changes will tajte 
time to yield results. PSV are 
teadjng a more urgent chase for 
much-needed international suc- 
cess. With the backing of Phil- 
ips, the electronics giant, PSV 
have bought Ivan Nielsen, Dan- 
ish World Cup defender, and ine 
Dutch international midfield 
player, Gerald Vanenburg, in 
the dose-season. 

They join a side which already 
boasts Eric Genets, a Belgian, 
Frank Amesen, from Denmark, 
the Norwegian. Hallvar 
Thoresen. and the Dutch player 
of the year, Ruud GuliiL 

PSV were runaway cham- 
pions Jast year, losing just one 
match out of 34.bat if their run 
of success is to continue into the 
European Cup, the draw could 
have been kinder. Their first 
opponents are Bayern Munich. 

Ajax, managed by Cruyff, 
should have an easier start in the 
Cup. . -.Winners’- Cup against 
Bursaspor of Turkey, but they 
baveto prove they can succeed 
without the classy Vanenburg. 

. 'For the international side the 
campaign .begins to qualify for 
the 1988 European Champion- 


ship. The Dutch group includes 
Hungary, Poland and Greece. In 
the 1970s, when The Nethfer- 
lands reached two World Cup 
finals and Dutch dubs captured 
five European titles, these might 
have seemed safe opponents. 
Today they look a handful 

Mill wall 
pay the 
penalty 

Millwall have been forced to 
close a section of their ground 
because travellers have set up 
camp outside The Den. The 
travellers have been illegally 
camping on council land outside 
some of the entrances and it has 
become impossible for the club 
to use the Ilderton Road end 
because of the amount of refuse 
which has built up. 

Lewisham Council is seeking 
a High Court injunction to clear 
the land.' but the work' "is 
unlikely ro be completed before 
Mil [wall’s first home league 
match of the season, against 
Hull City on August 26. 

All spectators will have To 
enter the ground by the Cold 
Blow Lane entrance, from wtrae 
the visiting fens will be escorted 
to their own enclosure. TSny 
Shaw, the club's chief executive, 
said: “The whole -aflair is very 
annoying. We are powerless to 
do anything and must rely.- on 
the council to get the appro- 
priate court order." - 
• The Football League's trans- 
fer tribunal meets today to help 
settle a dispute between. Totten- 
ham Hotspur and Luton Town. 

Luton were disgruntled when 
David Heat, their former man- 


ager, persuaded Mitchell 
Thomas, a full back, tq follow 
him to White Hart Lane. The 
Bedfordshire dub- have 'de- 
manded £500,000 for tbeplaycr, 
although Spurs have offered 
only £175,000. 

The tribunal wfl] also mediate 
between Wimbledon and - South- 
end on die latter’s signing tof 
Dave Martin. Southend have 
offered £5.000, Wimbledon 
want £25.000. 

• Derby. County have signed 
Mel Sage from Gillingham, but 
nave still to reach agreement 
over the fee. The foil bade, aged 
22. was free to move, having 
completed his contract with die 
Kent club. With Derby offering 
£30.000 for the player, about 
half the thiixL division dub’s 
valuation it is likely ihaian 
independent tribunal will have 
to determine the price. 

• Don O'Riordan, the Middles- 
brough captain and central de- 
fender, has been given a free 
transfer. The Football League 
have backed his appeal over 
™«ms of a breach of contract 

Murcia mission , . 

. Murcia (Reuter) - Real Nfitr- 
e J a - fbe Spanish first 'division 
club, have signed the Algerian 
World Cup player. Lakhdar 
Belloumi, for a fee of approxi- 
JSffejY * million ■ pesetas 
(£66.000). Belloumi. aged .-27; 
obtained a special -dispensation 
y”” 1 to e Algerian FoofosO 
^deration, allowing him tojohi 
a foreign professional team be- 
fore he was 28. . . - • 

r* 



.Siesta 




V - 


v,,- 




: 











!o> 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 



- 
" ■ 

! * 
: '■•;>£$ - 
■ 1 v- 

! . ! -haL Up - v 

i .. 5" 

H 

. .sr-fisi t-. 
'i»5;§ * 

'N\ V 

•• 

: • 


6JJ0 CMfax AHL NOWS , 
headRnas, weather, bawd 
end sports bulletins. 

£50 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough and Debbie 
; Greenwood Weather at 
&55, 7.25,7.55, 8.25 and 
■ (L5S; regional news, . 

' weather ancrtn^Oc at &57, 

•.. 7.27, 7S7 and fL27; 

: .natkxtalandintematioittl 
news at 7.00,7^0, 8.00, 

; AjaandlOQ: sport at 

, 7.20 and 8-28; and a 

‘•v" t^viswrttheinwiwig 
*■_* . newspapers at 8-37. Plus. 

” ' Dr Richard Smith’s 
*"* rnedicai advice tor ’phone- 
'* in viewers: and Steve 
* Btecknefl'sSummertime. - 


8-15 Good Momaiq Britain 

presented by Anne 
Diamond and Adrian 
Brown. News with Gordon 


£20 DwSeyOo-fUghL Cartoon. 
: series about a reiudant 
. 1920s Mountie 9.25 

■ Record Breakers 

.r , introduced by Roy Castte, 
Fiona Kennedy and Jufian 
Farino. (r) 9.50 Newsround 
i ■ Special Defivery 
*■'" presented by John. 

> -r Craven. 9.55 The 

Adventures of BaflwMde 
v and Rocky. Part five, (r) 
10.00 Why Don’t You.? 

Entertaining ideas for 
L. : youngsters at a loose end. 

' (0.1025 The Adventures - 

of BtfTwinkta and Rocky. 

* • Part six. (i).10j 30 Ptay 

School, presented by 
- Carol Leader, with guest .. 

• Andrew Secomba . . 

1050 Gharbar. A musical 

* compilation from earner 

programmes in the series. 
Among those featured this 
' are Rakesh 

Sohanta. 


Si 


7.30,8.00, £30 and 9.00; 
sport at 6.40 and 7AQ; 
«®rote« at BjSS: cartoon 
at£25; and pap music at 

8A5 Wacadey presented by 


.’TV/LONDON 


9J25 Thames news hsadtines 
followed by World Chess 
Championship. A repeat 
of last night's report on the 
senes between Kasparov 
and Karpov. 

9-40 Lost Kingdoms, a profile 
of King TupcuJV of Tonga 
l0.18Jayoeandthe 
Wheeled Warriors. 
Animated science fiction 
adventures 1030 Street 
Hawto Jesse Mach is on 
the trail of an escaped 
prisoner 11 .25 Wattoo 
Wattoo. Cartoon. 

TL30 About Britain. Plymouth 
after the Btrtz. 

1280 Tales From Fat Tufip’s 
Garden. Never Eat a 
Tortoise, (r) 12.10 Poddte 
Laos. Puppet show, (r) 
12J0 The SuUhans. 

Drama serial about an 
Austrafian femiy during 
the Forties- 

1-80 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 180 Thames news 
1.30 Riptide. The marina- 
based detective agency 

investigate another . 
mystery 225 Home 
Cookery Club. Egg ’if 



Cfire Wearing: Prisoner of 
Consdauaiess. C4.&00pm 


• Jonathan Miller's medical 
case histories are the rare peaks 
on television to set against 
the excess of Unite. However, 
their subject matter, riveting 
though it might be - and it is 
certainly that in PRISONER 
OF CONSCIOUSNESS (Channel 
4. 880pm) - is not everything. 

Miller is one ot the great 
elucidators of our time, and R 
Is this quality that the scientific 

layman needs when Miller 
invttes us to join him in yet 
another exploration of mind 
or body. His gift is constantly 
cased upon in Prisoner ot 
Consciousness, an account, 

staggering in the breadth of 
its contradictions, of the almost 
impenetrable amnesia of the * 
musician Ctiva Wearing, a brain* 
damaged man who Miner 
categorizes as living In a 
constant state of just waking up. 












mm* 


upacfat -5:15 




230 Three Little W 

association game show. 
3JJ0 Take the High Road. 
Drama serial set on a 
Scottish highland estate 
3£5 Thames news 
headlines 3-30 Sons end 
Daughters. 

480 Tales From Fat Trip's 
Garden. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 

noon 4.10 The Moomins. 
Cartoon series 480 
Nature TraUButtertfies, 
wiicfflowers and nature 
book fflustratfng are this 
week’s subjects. 

4^45 Under the Sane Sky: The 
Latchkey Boy, by Gordon 
Mffuch. The story of a 
young boy living In a 
Belgrade hlqh rise block 


.555 Open Univer si ty: Inner City 
Story -Racism. Ends at 
720. 

980 Ceeffix. 

525 News summar y with 
subtitles, and weather. 

580 King’s Country. The first 
of a series ot wildlife films 
made by the award- 
winning cameraman 
Simon King over a period 
of a year to the south of 

. England, (r) 

680 Mission im p o ssibl e. The 
secret service agents have 
the task of penetrating a 
monastery where a 
cardinal is being kept aftve 

long enough for an 
Booster to learn his 
mannerisms and take Ms 


CHOICE 


Each reunion with his wife, 
albeit after only an hour’s 
separation, is an emotional 
explosion such as one might 
expect from lovers umted 
after half a lifetime. No 
experience leaves a 
conscious imprint on his brain. In 
absolute astonishment, he 
watches on TV the filmed record 
of his conducting of a choir 
only a day or so earner. Asked to 
look at a photograph of the 
Queen and Duke of Edinburgh, 
he says they are probably 
singers. He remembers his 
telephone number and haw to 
reverse charges but not his own 
name or address. 

His normal personality is 
briefly restored to Cftve Wearing 
during the action of making 


music, but when the music stops, 
he is left high and dry. ft is 
when watching such astonishing 
sequences in tonight s 
documentary that we especially 
need the Mdier touch. And, 
sure enough, there it is. Music, 
he explains. <s 
communication and not a 
language, we cannot for 
example, paraphrase a Dtabelb 
variation as we can a 
sentence. Musical memory is 
stored, and retrieved, in a 
different way. The tragedy of the 
Wearing case is that the non- 
musical memories of this 

intelligent, highly articulate, 
desperaterandnaaBy - - - - 
disorientated man are locked 

away in safesJor whicftaL 
present nobody knows the 
combination. 

Peter Davalle 


280 FBne One, Two, Three* 

(1961) starring James 
Cagney, Horst Buchhofz 
and Pamela Tiffin. 


’‘•‘’rvrjijo ; 

JIM lift; 
‘.-.ir RumGt 
i-N ' tor 

■ ■' * ;.!■■: IUJ. (puj 

■•w! 

’ ■' .-.tcwst 
lie 
linirl 

f ’ . — j*s Stom* 

'< ■ • "tueJ 
:irjs« 

. ^ flTr.;- 

- 'V Tsrtr. 

. rn’iiarc 

• ■ : 

i :r: muisaus 
• :vv.n hffafi 
■« L u r opra £ 

1 n,- Pcut.ce 


reminder to casting agents 
of her own talents rather 
, . than highlighting the 

. . budding store.. . . . 

680 News with Nicholas 
WftCheff and Andrew 
n ‘ * Harvey. Weather. 

- 6L35 London Plus with John 
Stapleton, Linda MRcheO 
' and Caroline Righton 
. 780 Top of the Pops 
presented by Simon 
- Bates. 

. 780 EastEnders. ft’s the day of 
the band's first 
appearance at the pub. '■ 
Can Whfcfcsy and Harry .i 
'■ settle their differences? 

: iB80 Bodymatters. ba»&adme 
. - Garden. AJ an Mawon to : 
Davis and Giffian P6ce - 
r:.. Bxptorethe nervous : 


*w6 •■■880 

'* TriMM* r - 

Is ..nJ nurid? -r. ' 

I . ■. •prin sfeC ■ ' - ■ 
s-.-wJ wr ‘ 

. •p.~. u> :u. 




andEmte. 
Comedy series about two 
female friends and office 
coBeagues. Tonight, how 
will Bsie react to her 
husband’s surprise 
wedding anniversary 




1*11 'H 1 ■ ill 


Loving Memory. Comedy 
series starring Thora Hint 

545 News with John Suchet 
6 80 Thames news. 

625 Help! SpeeiaL How the 
. . new Social Security Bin 
will affect the unemptoyed. 
685 Crossroads. 

780 EmmerdaleFann. How 
will Amos rid the 
Wootoack of the piranha? 
780 Give Us a Clue. Celebrity 
charades. Una Stubbs and 
Lionel Blair are joined by 
Russel Harty, Roy 
Kinnear, Jeremy Lloyd. 
Mary Parkinson, Angela 
. ..RipponandTessa 
Sanderson, (rt 

880 JWndw;ANumberof Old ' 
'■ Wives Tates. A wedding In' 
*" wttitih Arthur fe'gnhito” ' ’ 
away the bride andieny 
te best man. ends in a . 
pitodHv that makes the 
' front page oflhe local 
paper.(r).- 

980 Troubles and GtrHe.. * 
Comedy series about a 

- • young vicar and the ladies 

of his parish. (Oracle) 

980 Workout Will today’s 
schoolchildren be able to 
handle new technology 
better man their parents? 
1080 News at Ten with Aiastter 
Burnet and Pamela . 

- ~ Armstrong. — • - - 




rTi '''-i 


Painting, and the 
Printmaking and 
Lithography departments. 
1280 Ufesfytesof the Rich and 
■ Famous. Monaco’s royal 
fomily. 

1225 Night Thoughts 


<L45 Fanes Paces to Baker 
Street (1956) starring Van 
Johnson, Vera Miles and 
Cecil Parker. A thriller 
about Phillip Harmon, a 
successful, blind 
playwright who overhears 
In a London pub what he 
thinks is a kidnap plot 
Directed by Henry 
Hathaway. 

82S The 20th Century 
Remembered. In the 
second of three interviews 
the late Lord Boothby 
recalls his time in the 
political wUdemess; his 
secret mission at the 
beginning of the Second 
World War to acquire 
weapons for the British 

B and the scandal that 
cost him his political 

ajxi The Travel Show. Kathy 
Rochford reports from a 
windswept Tangier and 
ftorrUhe village of Asiiah 
where nearly aU the white- 
washed walls have murals: 
Matthew Collins reports 
on his Bulgaria trip and the 
advantages of changtog 
money on the Made 
market the British holiday 
is with two 15-year old 
girts on a horse-riding 
vacation to North Wales; 
and there is advice on 
what to take as hand 
baggage on ’planes and 
on now to be comfortable 

when flying. 

980 Moonfigtitfng.Maddieand 
. David are on the run from 
the police after ah . 

' • extortion attempt'ihaf . 
began with the theft of. a ' 
businessman's ffeof 
■ important telephone 
numbers. Starring CybOl 
Shepherdand Bruce ' 

1020 Making Waves. A wooden 
■barroW-boat priced at 
around £225, which can 
be constructed to 30 
minutes, is put to the test 
.. . . prior to the start of 
international raultihuR 
racing, foe bnpficatioris of ' 
’the new Rfrmula 40 class 
is examined; Dick Batt 
displays his skin with 
computer graphics 
designing dinghy sails: 
and mere is a profile of 
Britain's top oarswoman. 
Beryl Crocktord. 

■080 Newsntgtt. The latest 
national and international 
news including extended 
coverage of one of the 
main stories of the day. 

With Peter Snow. Donald 
MacCormick and Oflvia 
Oleary. Weather. 
11-40 Open University: 

weekend Outlook 11.45 
.. _ The .Greek Liturgy. Ends at i 
12.15. 


playing the role of Mac 

MacNamara. Coca Cola's 
boss to West Bertto who is 
trying to get the product 
sold to foe East Hte 
endeavours are 
interrupted by the arrival 
of Ms boss's daughter 
who he te asked to 
chaperon. Hte life is 
further complicated when 
he learns that the girt has 
been married for six 
weeks to a communist 
from the East Directed by 
Billy Wilder. 

480 Dancto’ Days. The day of 
the mayor’s party dawns 
and Yolanda has still not 
received an Invitation. 

580 FBnc The Bride Came 
CAD.* (1941) starring 
James Cagney and Bette 
Davte. Comedy about an 
etoptog hekess who hires 
a down-on-hto-luck pilot to 
fly her to her boyfriend, 
but the gkfs father gets to 
hear of the plan anc 
the pilot to deliver Ms 
daughter, unmarried, back 
to the family ranch. But the 
'plane crashes in the 
desert and this leads to a 
number of complications. 
Directed by Wffliam 
Keighley. 

6.40 FHm: Pop Goes the Easel* 
H935) starring The Three 
Stooges. On foe run from 
the police the Stooges 
dodge into an art school 
where they create their 
usual mayhem. Directed 
by Del Lord. 

780 Channel Fbur news with 
Alastalr Stewart and 
- Nicholas Owen. 

780 Comment With her views 
on foe matter of free 
speech is Marie Staunton, 


for foe National Council for 
Civil Liberties. Weather. 
880 Equinox: Prisoner of 
Consciousness. Dr 
Jonathan Miller examines 
the case of Clive Wearing, 
a talented musician, who, 

- - * since suffering brain 

damage caused by a rare 
.kind of.virai encephalitis, 

.t . .cannot remember anything 
fortonger than ten 
seconds, (see Choice) 

980 Gardeners' Calendar, 
introduced by Hannah' "" 
Gordon. Anne Swithinbank 
discusses growing exotic 
fruits; Bertie Poe harvests 
spinach and basfl, sows 
' leaf cMcoiy and pain de 
sucre, ana tends the 
Swiss chard, globe 
artichokes and Florence 
fennel Plus, a 
demon str a ti on of peach 
pruning and the budding of 

- Japanese maples: (Oracle) 
9.30 Right Into HeB. The 

second and final part of 
the drama telling the true 
story of the 53-day ordeal 
of two arrmen who were 
forced by a storm to land 
in an inhospitable area of 
north-west Australia while 
cm a flight from the Dutch 
East Indies to Darwin In 
1932. Starring Helmut Zieri 
and Werner Stocker. 

(Oracle) 

1125 Manife sta tions of Shiva. 

An American-made 
documentary, filmed to 
India, about foe Hindu God 

of-Life, Shiva. Ends at - 

1225. 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. Stereo on VHF 
585 Shipping 680 News Briefing; 
Weather 6.10 Farming 
685 Prayer (sj 
680 Today, md 680, 780, 

880 News 6.45 Business 
News 685, 785 Weather 
7.00,680 News 785, 

685 Sport 785 Thought tar 
the Day 

8.43 Lake Wobegon Days 
(PartS) ai7 Weather; 

Travel 
980 News 

9.05 Safa in our Hands? Cfive 
Cookson examines the 
Internal policies of the Health 

Service (r) 

880 The Natural History 
Programme. Fergus 
Keeimg reports on vermin in 
ships, lactones and 
warehouses. 

1080 News; The Good Book. 

Brian Redhead continues 
hte exploration of the Bible 


Tnangle. by Joan 


Lennon. Reader: Eileen 
McCall um. 

10*45 An Act of Worship (s) 

1180 News; Travel: A Man's 
Job Alone? by John 
Lock. The role of the 
policewoman. 

Documentary, introduced by 
Anna Carteret (of Juliet 

Bravo) m 

1 1.48 Time for Verse. Paul 
Muktoon In Belfast 
1200 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice with 
John Howard. 

1227 Trhna Test Match. 

General knowledge quiz 
with umpire Brian Johnston 
and captains Tim Rice 
and Wilke Rushton (r). 1255 
Weather 

180 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers 185 
Shipping 

280 News; woman's Hour. 
Indudes an interview 
with actress Dora Bryan. 
380 News: The Afternoon 
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30 


THURSDAY AUGUST 14 1986 


SPORT 



Jesty digs in to 
put Surrey 
back on course 

By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


Chasing 230 to beat Lan- 
cashire and reach the final of 
the NatWest yesterday, Surrey 
passed 200 in the 54th of their 
60 overs with three wickets 
still in hand. 

With 10 overs left. Surrey 
needed 55 and Jesty was 85 
not oul However, he was 
batting with a runner, having 
pulled a leg muscle when he 
was 76. His driving had been 
superb. It used to be said, 
when he was with Hampshire, 
that if he was playing well he 
was indistinguishable (Tom 
Barry’ Richards, one of the 
best batsmen there can ever 
have been. Simmons had just 
finished a good spell, and 
Lancashire had no one like 
Clarke of Surrey to knock over 
the tail. 

Having been put in, Lan- 
cashire were soon in danger of 
being bowled out while the 
pitch was still fresh. Off the 
first ball of the second over, 
young Bicknell had Mendis 
caught in the gully, and off his 
first ball from Clarke, Fowler 
went to a remarkable catch by 
Richards, diving yards to his 
right. For the best pan of an 
hour. Clarke, from the 
Vauxhall End. was an al- 
together fearsome propo- 
sition. bowling very fast and 
moving the ball enough, when 
he pitched it up. to beat Give 
Lloyd four times in one over. 
Lloyd, even so. looked in 
wonderfully good form, 
though he is 42 this month. 

He came in to face Garke in 
a sun hat. Whether it was 
reinforced, as Gavaskar's is. I 
am not sure. A confrontation 
between Lloyd and Clarke is 
something that West Indians 
would have to come to En- 
gland to see, Garke being 
banned out there. At the end 
of this one. honours were just 
about even; but Lloyd was still 
there, and meaning business. 
Abrahams stayed with him 


through 10 testing overs be- 
fore being bowled by 
Feltham’s first ball an un- 
expected. in-swinging yorker. 
Fairbrother’s 18 runs were 
also worth more. But he, too, 
was out by the 25th over, 
when Lancashire were still in 
trouble at 60 for four. Apart 

Scoreboard 


LAMGASHffiE 

G Fowler c Richards b Darks - 
G D Mends e Clarke b BicknaU 
J Abrahams b Fehham 


■OH Lloyd c Retards b Pocock. 
NHFsirbrofterl 


. 0 
. 1 
15 
65 

tM b Thomas 18 

S J O'Shaurtinessy c Lynch b Clarke 62 
A N Hayhuw c Rwianfe b Butcher — 3 
1C Maynard c Stewart it Fotttam — 22 

J Simmons b Clarke 9 

P J w AloR c Stewart b Ctarfee □ 

M Watkmson notout 2 

Extras! b 1.1618. w 9. nb 4) 32 

Total | 583 overs ) 229 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1. 2-8. 3-28. 4-57, 
5-158. 6-177. 7-214. 8-222. 9-222. 1 0-229. 
BOWLING: Clarke 11-34-21-4; BtekneB 
KM-2S-1: Thomas 9-2-40-1; Fehham 12- 
0-51-2: Pocock 9-0-43-1: Butcher 7-0-30- 
1 

SURREY 

A R Butcher oWhtkbnonbAlott 6 

G S Ctnton c Simmons O Mott 11 

A J Stewart tow b Watkmson 7 

T E Jesty not out —■ 94 

M A Lynch run out 15 

tC J Richards c Maynard 

b OShaughnessy 9 

D J Thomas c Abrahams b Simmons . 12 
M A Fatttiam c O Shaughnessy b 

Sanmona 12 

*P l Podock not out 1 


Total (8 wkts. 54 overs) . 


203 


Umpires: N T Plows and A G T Whitehead 

from anything else, the light 
was poor. 

The partnership that gave 
them their chance was be- 
tween Lloyd and 
O’Shaughnessy, who added 99 
in 2! overs either side of 
lunch. Lloyd's first boundary 
came off the 60th ball he 
received. Only when the sun 
came through and he found 
O'Shaughnessy playing ex- 
tremely well at the other end 
did he start to produce those 
great flowing strokes that 
made him for many years 
worth almost any two other 
batsmen in a one-day team. 


By the 45th over, Lan- 
cashire. now 1 58 for four, were 
threatening 250 and more. 
Pocock, Butcher, Fdtham, 
and Thomas were having a job 
to keep controL Then Pocock 
had Lloyd caught at the 
wicket, making room to play 
through the on side. Hayhurst 
soon went, and after a punish- 
ing 22 from Maynard, Clarke 
came back and finished the 
innings as he bad started it, 
bowling like a demon. Stewart 
had held a nice running catch 
at deep square-leg to get rid of 
O'Shaughnessy. though it was 
not quite in the class of 
Waikinson's at the start of 
Surrey's innings. 

Fielding at square leg, 
Watkinson jumped up and 
backwards for a high hook 
from Butcher, holding on to it 
as he fell and avoiding the 
boundary rope by inches. 

AUott's opening spell was a 
nod one. At 30 he picked up 
inton as well, caught low 
down at second slip. In the 
next over Stewart was leg 
before to Watkinson, leaving 
the men in form, Jesty and 
Lynch with an awfiil lot to do. 

But Lancashire were weaker in 
bowling than batting. It was 
still likely to be close — and so 
it remained. 

After 35 overs Surrey were 
109 for four, just as Lan- 
cashire had been. Lynch had 
been run out, going for a 
second to O'Shaughnessy at 
fine leg. With 20 overs to go it 
was still level pegging — 129 to 
both sides - with Jesty now 
going very well, but Richards 
out, caught at the wicket 
driving at a wide balL When 
Thomas drove the evergreen, 
ever-nagging Simmons to 
mid-offJesty was left to do 
the best he could — on a lovely 
evening before the season's 
best Oval crowd. 


S 


Air power fails to save game 


WORCESTER: Worcester- 
shire have scored 20 for no 
wicket against Sussex 

For the first time m English 
cricket a helicopter was used 
to help dry a soaked square in 
this NatWest Trophy semi- 
final match yesterday. Its use 
enabled a start to be made in 
early afternoon but only 32 
balls were possible before the 
weather worsened again and 
the match will be resumed 
today. 

Contrary to suggestions 
from spectators, the helicopter 
was not piloted by a certain 
Somerset all-rounder. It was 
handled by its owner, a 
Stourpon-on -Severn garage 
proprietor, and was originally 
engaged to take aerial photo- 
graphs of what should have 
been a memorable occasion in 
Worcestershire cricket 
history. 


By Richard Streeton 

At a cost to the county club 
of£l80an hour. the helicopter 
arrived from, its Droitwicb 
base and hovered low over the 
square for 40 minutes, 
watched anxiously by Roy 
McLaren, the club 
groundsman. The machine 
effectively completed the 
mopping-up work he and his 
helpers had been doing since 
torrential rain at the weekend 
left the ground flooded. 

Helicopters have been used 
more than once in Australia in 
recent years to dry cricket 
fields. Their use in this coun- 
try hitherto has been restricted 
to odd instances at football 
grounds and. I believe, once or 
twice at racecourses. It is 
certainly less damaging than 
pouring petrol on the field and 
selling fire to it — as was done 
in bygone days on occasion 
overseas. 


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. It was still 1.40pm before a 
start was possible with Sussex 
winning the toss and predict- 
ably putting Worcestershire in 
to baL Radford, though below 
par. had successfully fought 
off the worst of his influenza 
overnight The only pre- 
match casually hot able to 
play was Inchmore, the fast 
bowler, and Illingworth, a left- 
aim spinner, took his place. 

D'CHiveira twice drove 
Imran confidently, once with 
a lofted stroke for three runs, 
but. otherwise the batsmen 
went carefully. Curtis in le 
Roux’s first over edged a four 
which Gould almost made 
into a catch. Bad light first 
forced theplayers off" the field 
and was followed by several 
bouts of rain and drizzle. 

The umpires made regular 
inspections but the conditions 
were never good enough to 
allow a resumption. It was 
bitterly disappointing for the 
near-capacity 6,000 crowd, 
who endured the infuriating 
delay patiently for the most 
part, prior to the final 
abandonment at six o'clock. 


TSCumnotout . 


O B D'Otroeu-B not out . 
Extras (to 4) 


Total (no wta, £L 2 ov 0 ro) 


- 6 
10 

- 4 

20 


G A Hu*. O M Smtm. *P A Neale. D N 
Fatal. fS J Rhodes. P J Newport. N V 
RadtOTXl R K Bmgwonh and A P Pndgeon 
to bat 

SUSSEX: A M Green. R I AflUian. P W G 
Parker. Imran Khan, CM Wells. A P Weis, 
*tl J Gould. G S le Row. O A Reeve. A C s 
Pigott and A N Jones. 

Umpres: D L Ostanr end R Palmer 


GOLF 

Greengrocer’s 
son Berry 
is in ripe form 

Terry Berry, son of a West- 
minster greengrocer, is 
tbrough to the quarter-finals 
of the British boys' champion- 
ship at Seaton Carew. The left- 
hander. aged 16, now meets 
Mathew Stanford. 

Berry, winner of two junior 
tournaments in the past year, 
has won all his matches this 
week in sub-par figures, too 
good for Andrew Sandywell, 
of Cheshire, in the fifth round, 
who lost seven of the first nine 
holes and bowed out six and 
five. “My dad has sold grocer- 
ies to about five Prime Min- 
isters. but I think he might 
shut shop if I get through to 
the finaL” Berry, a three- 
handicapper. of Dulwich, 
said. 

The other quarter-finals are 
between Lawrie Main, the 
Scot four-handicapper. and 
Leslie Walker, an Irish inter- 
national: Graham King, an- 
other Scot meets Peter. 
Digebjerg. of Denmark: and 
Jason BenneL of Northwood. 
facts Lars Heme, of Sweden. 
• Susan Shapcott. from 
Knowle. is making a strong 
defence of her tiue os she 
shared the lead on 75. three 
over par. with Joanne Furby 
in the British girls' champion- 
ship at West Bilbridge 
Earlier reports, page 27 



A fitting reward 
for clever Capel 


By Peter Marson 


Master stroke: Clive Lloyd in action at the Oval yesterday (Photograph: Chris Harris) 


Gatdng in 
call for 
consistency 

By Paid Martin 

The England cricket 
selectors' chopping and chang- 
ing of the Test squad has ben 
criticized by oik of the men 
who bow helps pick it, Mike 
Gatting, the captain. There 
sboold be more consistency in 
selection, and players should 
be assured that they will not be 
dismissed after one or two Test 
matches, he told Radio New 
Zealand. 

“I know bow people fed 
when they play for one or two 
Tests, then get axed,” he 
added. “I was one id the great 
losers from that in my time — 
in and ont quite a ML" 

Giving some does as to the 
composition of the side for the 
Third Test, Gatting said Gra- 
ham DiUey would “team up 
weir with Gladstone Small, 
who had impressed him. But 
he continual with a sigh: 
“What we need are some seam 
bowlers." 

The E n gl an d captain laid 
down his terms for the inclu- 
sion of Ian Botham. “I'd like 
to see Ian back in the side, but 
the emphasis is on how fit he 
wishes to be and how seriously 
he's going to take it.” 

English cricket was not in 
decline, be said. “People don't 
give credit to the other nations 
who now have experience of 
our conditions. It’s not ns 
getting weaker, it's the others 
getting better. They're catch- 
ing up slightly.** 


EDGBASTON: A TCCB XI. 
with all their first innings 
wickers in hand, are 175 runs 
behind the New Zealanders. 

Against a backcloth of poor 
light and a nearly deserted 
arena, the New Zealand bats- 
men spent all but the last three 
quarters of an hour yesterday 
at the crease, compiling 218 
before dedaring. 

Having won the toss on a 
grey, chill morning, Nicholas 
had chosen to field first, and 
by lunch, when the New 
Zealanders came in at 70 for 
three from 32 overs, only 
Such's off-breaks had failed to 
take a wicket on a slow-paced 
pitch. De Freitas's accuracy, 
Lawrence's bustling hostility, 
and CapeJ's cleverness bad 
been instrumental in taking 
the wickets of Franklin, 
Rutherford and Martin 
Crowe, as the New Zealanders 
moved uncertainly to 36 for 
three from 17 overs. 

Franklin was dropped at 
slip off the last ball of the fifth 
over bowled by Lawrence, and 
then fell to the next ball, 
bowled by De Freitas. 
Rutherford's tentative glance 
was neatly taken by Russell, 
and shaping to drive, Martin 
Crowe may have been de- 
ceived by CapeTs pace, and he 
fell to a splendid catch by 
Whitaker in the gully. 

Wright, though, had already 
been driving to good effect, 
and at the start of the after- 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


noon session, three imperious 
strokes, two through, extra 
cover and anon-dri i» brought 
his tally in: boundaries to 
seven, all off Capel's bowling. 
He hitrtwo more tnjcojmpdeting 
his half century before bowing 
out to Chpel's first ball for 59 
at 122 for three. 

Jeff Crowe was going along 
nicely, hitting nine boundaries 
in a forceful half century 
before, perhaps, mistiming his 
off-drive off Such. 

Rain threatened briefly, and 
the umpires decided to go off 
before having a change of 
heart Between lunch and tea, 
the New Zealanders had ad- 
vanced in fits and starts by 96 
runs in 37 overs to 166 for 
five. 

NEW ZEALAIHfcFhst brings 

•JGWriQWbCari ___ 59 

T.J FrancBn Ibwto Os Freitas - 11 

K R Rutherford c Russell b Lawrence 2 

MD Crowe c Whitshar b Capel 4 

j j Crowe c Whitaker b Such 58 

TEBWnc Russai bDe Freitas 29 

J D S Swith c Bafley b Such 31 

GBracaweH tow b Capel 8 

W Watson tow b Capel ; 0 

B Barrett not out— : 0 

Extras (to 7. nb 9) __ — 18 

Total (9 wtas declared) _218 

EJChatfMdtMnotbat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-16. 2-20. 3-36. 4-' 
122. 5-146. 6-197. 7-218. 8-216. 8-218. 
BOWLING: Lawrence 15-2-47-1; De 
Freitas 105-6-39-2; Capel 17-5-51-4; 
Suet) 28-11-37-2; Bamettl 0-1 -27-0. 
TCCBXI: First brings 

KJ Barnett rat out 18 

A A Metcalfe not out : 2D 

Extras (to 2. rto 3) — 5 


Total (no wW) 


Souness on 
carpet 

The Scottish Football As- 
sociation have called _ a 
referee's disciplinary meeting 
to investigate the fracas on the 
pitch during last Saturday’s 
premier division match be- 
tween- Hibernian and Glasgow 
Rangers at Easter Road. 

Both chairmen and man- 
agers have been instructed to 
attend the meeting on Tues- 
day. Graeme Souness, the 
Rangers’ player-manager, was 
sent off and eight others -were 
booked. Atone stage, 21 of the 
players were involved in a 
brawL The Scottish FA now 
have reports from Mike 
Delaney, the match referee. 

Bill Richardson, the 
association's assistant sec- 
retary! said: “A copy of the 
reports will be sent to both 
dubs." 

Fenech fine 

Jeff Fenech. the Inter- 
national Boxing Federation 
bantamweight champion, un- 
derwent a successful operation 
on his injured left hand in 
Sydney yesterday and now 
hopes to become the first 
Australian to hold titles ai two 
weights by challenging Ji Won 
Kim. of South Korea, for the 
light featherweight title in 
Sydney on October 27. 


Ji 



■ & £ 

• .mV ' V ...• 

Souness: most attend 

Rules breach 

Hunstei were fined £200 by 
the Rugby League manage- 
ment committee yesterday For 
making an illegal approach to 
David Ward, their new coach, 
while he was registered- at 
Leeds. Leeds are seeking 
compensation for .the kxss of 
Ward. Meanwhile. St- Helens 
have been given seven days to 
settle their dispute with Sal- 
ford over wanting Give Grif- 
fiths as their trainer. 

Orwinswap 

John Orwin. the former 
England lock forward who 
captained Gloucester to the 
Rugby Union national merit- 
table club championship last 
season _and then announced 
his retirement, has joined 
Bedford. 


4 


43 

J J Whitaker. JE Morris. R J Brim. 'll 
C J Phchctas. D JCapS, PA JOoFrotes. 
tR CRussott. PM Such and dv Lawrence 
to bat 

Umpires: a A Jones and K J Lyons. 


Up in credit 

Prestwick Village, from -the 
North West, will replace 
Edgbasion Priory m the 
American Express premier 
squash league and win be led 
by Moussa Helal and amid 
include John le Lievre from 
their sister club at Hyde. 

Britain team 

Britain's team for tire Junior 
European three-day ‘event 
championships at Walkiorf, 
West Germany, from Septem- 
ber JO to ,14 are Pippa Nolan 
and Polly Martin (Sussex), 
Sue Cope (Worcestershire), 
Simon Hazlem - (Surrey), An- 
drea Morris (Lancashire) and 
Katie fetd-son (Hampshire). 

Cash bait 

Panasonic and Birchley 
.have offered an extra £50,000 
to- Greg Norman. , the Open 
champion, if - the Australian 
can- add the European Open 
title -at Sunningdale. from 
September I I to 14,' already 
wonh'£35.000 to'ihe. winner, 

. to his Turoberiyrtnumph; ' . 

Leeds swoop 

Leeds yesterday added Peter 
Jackson. the^Scwuh Brisbane 
centre aged : .-2(X to the two 
Australians the Rugby League 
ckifr signed last week. The 
move is conditional .oh Jack- 
son mot being; selected for. 
Australia's tour of Britain 
season. • 


Barcelona give 
new pair the 
seal of approval 


Barcelona (Reuter) - Barce- 
lona have named Gary 
Lineker and Mark Hughes as 
the two foreign players they 
will be allowed to field during 
the 1986-87. Spanish football 
season. 

Terry Venables, the Spanish 
club's coach, told a news 
conference yesterday that the 
new signings would replace 
Steve Archibald, the Scottish 
international forward, and the 
West German midfield player, 
Bernd Schuster, though 
Lineker is presently sidelined 
after sustaining a fractured nb 
during a pre-season match last 
weekend. 

Schuster was stripped of the 
Barcelona captaincy after a 
row with Venables last season 


and wasdropped following the 
defeat against the Romanian 
champions, Sieaua Bucharest, 
in the European Cup final m 
Seville in May. Venables said 
-Archibald would .play for 
Barcelona's second division 
affiliates.- Barcelona Ailetico. 
this season but the club were 
* still trying to find a solution 
for Schuster, whose contract 
runs for two more years. 

Lineker, tbe England for- 
ward who was top scorer in the 
World Cup finals in Mexico 
this year, joined Barcelona 
from Evcrton. and Hughes, 
the Welsh international for- 
ward, was bought from Man- 
chester United. Under 
Spanish regulations, clubs are 
allowed to register only two 
foreign players. 


Call to play game 


Ted Croker, the Football 
Association secretary, ■ yes- 
terday urged would-be foot- 
ball hooligans to kick a 
football instead of one other. 
Speaking at Keele University 
at a national conference a imed 
at improving the game's fam- 
ily image, he said: “Football is 
a hard, physical contact game 
and - it does get rid of 
inhibitions. 

.“It is a feet that there are 
very few hooligans who are 
actually involved in playing 
football Many of them argue 
they would play but don't 
have the opportunity and it is 
our responsibility to make 
sure this argument can never 
be used. It is crucial to provide 
the opportunities." 

At the meeting, staged by 
Stoke City and attended by 
just 34 of the 92 invited ctubi 
C-roker described . the latest 


troubles as a “major disaster 
in footballing terms" after aH 
the hard work Iasi season in 
the wake of the tragedies at 
Bradford and Brussels. 

“Everything changed over- 
night and it shattered us to see 
what effect one incident has." 
he added. “Now. of course, an 
air of pessimism has come 

u pon us .** 

• Hereford United, of the 
fourth division, will attempt 
to regain the. -Herefordshire 
Senior Cup when ; they meet 
Shrewsbuiy Town, of the sec- 
ond division, in the final ai 
Edgar Street on Saturday.. 
Hereford have won the trophy 
11 times in the last 14 yearc. 
Steve Spooner, who cost 
£7.000 when transferred from 
Chesterfield recently, will be 
making his first appearance 
for Hereford. 


GOLF 


Hattori and Sinn lead 


Santa Cruz, California 
(Reuter) — . Michifco Hauori, 
of Japan, the defending cham- 
pion. and tbe South Korea- 
born Pearl Sinn tied at 148 for 
medal honours yesterday in 
the United States women's 
amateur championship. . 

. Hattori. aged 17, collected a. 
73.toaddtober 75 on Monday 
for a four-over-par J 4& Sinh, 
aged 19_ -a college student, 
scored her. second .straight?4 


in the 36-hole qualifying 
round. 

Michelle Dobek. of the 
United States, finished third 
with 76-77 for 149, and her 
compatriot, Danielle 
Ammaccapahe. was fourth 
with 77-73 for 150. The 64 
survivors will Stan match play 
today, with the scheduled 36- 
hole- fiq&ts to take place on 
Saturday, 


TENMIS 

Top seed 
loses to 
outsider 

-'San Vincente, Italy (Agen- 
cies) — Libor Pimek, of 
Czechoslovakia, the second 
seed, and - Paid. McNamee, of 
Australia, the third seed, won 
second-round matches y< 
terday and advanced into the 
quarter-finals of the $85,000 
(about £58.000) Aosta valley 
international tournament m 
this Italian gambling resort 

Tbe top s«d, Paolo Cane, of 
Italy, lost a first-nmnd, three- 
set overnight match to the 
Australian, Desmond Tyson. 
The nnseeded Australian took 
two hours' and 45. minutes , to 
overcome Cane 5-7, 6-4, T-6, 
winning the decisive tie-break 
7-4. Cane, a member of the 
Itaiian: Davis *Cnp team, 
spoiled a match’ point when 
leading 5-4 in the third set. 
The real sensation, though, 
was Tyson's rally from 0-4 in 
the second set. 

McNamee earned a quarter- 
final berth by downing 
Ferrante Rocchi, of Italy, 7-6. 
6-2 bat Pimek needed three 
sets to get the better of Bod 
One, from the United States^ 
2-6, 6-3,. 6-4. In another 
second-round match, Lawson 
Duncan, of the US. defeated 
Gustavo Lina, of Argentina, in 
two hard-fought sets, 1 7-6, 7-5. j 
Dnncan will be pitted against 
McNamee in tomorrow's quar- 
ter-finals. 

In the first round of the 
doubles, the team of Roberto 
Argnello and Marcelo 
Ingaiamo, of Argentina, won 
an all-Latin American match 
against the Manuel Rodriguez 
and Belas Prajoux, of Chile, 6- 
3, 6-4. In another match, 
Carlos Castellan, of Argen- 
tina. teamed- .with*- Jimmy 
Gnrfein, of the US,’ to defeat 
the; Italian, team of Omar 
Caihporese and Eng&io^ Rossi 
6-3,. . 6^2.' • 


ATHLETICS 

World record 
is equalled 

Vienna ^Agencies) — 
Yordank* Donkoya, of Bul- 
garia, yesterday equalled the 
women's 100 metres hurdles 
world record of 1136 seconds 
which was set by Grazyna 
Rabsztyn,nof Poland, in War- 
saw in 1980. Miss; Donkova, 
aged 24, was competing in the 
Bulgarian .national 
championships. 

Miss OopJtova. a Physical 
Education student from Sofia, 
waaa European championship 
$9ver medal winner in 191EL 


SKIING 

Winds turn 
kind for 
Wasmeier 

Las Leilas. Argentina (AP) 
.— Markus Wasmeier. of West 
Germany, was fastest yes- 
terday in a trial for 
tomorrow's scheduled first 
race of the 1 986-87 World Cup 
circuit, covering the 2,680- 
meter downhill course called 
Mercurio in lmin 39.66sec. 

Pirmin Zurbriggen. of 
Switzerland, the 1 983-84 
World Cup overall champion 
and runner-up the last two 
seasons, clocked - second - at 
1:40132' and' his team col- 
league. Tranz Heinzer. - was 
third at -1:40137. - - . 

The 'trial.- the .first on the 
Mercurio course, was con- 
ducted in mild winds and 
under overcast skies. A second 
timed training nin was 
planned for later yesterday. 

In contrast, previous -at- 
tempts over the' weekend ',io 
hold this inaugural race on 
another more exposed course, 
called Jupiter, two miles 
above sea level, had to be 
postponed because of strong 
winds. The-race was originally 
planned to take place Iasi 
Saturday. 

The Mercuric course is 
slightly more sheltered. As an 
additional: aid. the winds bad 
dropped yesterday .with the 
temperature hovenrig: at- a 
satisfactory I°C (34°F). 

Skiers and race officials had 
been at loggerheads over The 
earlier -cancellations. Snow 
was abundant the skies were 
brilliantly clear and the winds 
lighter than on previous days. 

Pablo. Rosenkjer. president 
of the organizing committee, 
said a majority of trainers and 
race officials had met and 
decided that the race should 
have been held ■ and that 
calling it off .was a mistake. 
Some said it was the Austrians 
who had refused to ski. 

But Dieter Barsch. the Aus- 
trian trainer, said shifting 
winds would have made the 
race, unfair and that all racers, 
not just the Austrians, wanted 
to cancel. - 

“We are not saymg we will 
only ski on a perfect day. but H 
would have been unfair." 

fastest, times (Brat rank i. 

Wasmeier (WG) i mm 39.66sfic 2, P 
ZurbrjfBen (Swl) 1:40.32; 3.- F 


THHofigKi6r <AustrlL)T:40.9A-a 

Ray (jPrai 1:40.95: g, AStetfW 
(Austria) 1:4&98t 10. P VWm*ijeri£ 

fA* 1:41-08: 11. P Mufierf&fl 
1*14g- 12. J Bnar ThwAnllNal 
M Giwd3:,tUf 
rPSTl 4 - -W MMT'M VST& 
15. DMahme(Swi) U41 74- = -. 


i