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No 62,539 


TIMES 


TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


3D) 


Gorbachov to 

test 

moratorium 



Moscow (A?) — Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov, the Kremlin lead- 
er, said yesterday he was 
extending until January I the 
unilateral moratorium on 
nuclear testing that he began 
more than a year ago. 

Speaking on national tele- 
vision and radio, Mr Gorba- 
chov challenged President 
Reagan u> sign a treaty ban- 
ning all nuclear testing this 
year at a US-Soviet summit 

“That event would un- 
doubtedly be the main real 
outcome of the meeting, a 
considerable step on the way 
toward ending the arms race," 
Mr Gorbachov said. 

The Soviet Union began its 
testing moratorium on August 
6, 198S, and extended it twice. 
It was to have expired this 
August 6, the 41st anniversary 
of the atomic bombing of 
Hiroshima. 

But Mr Gorbachov said the 
ruling Politburo had come to 
the derision to prolong the 
testing ban with difficulty and ' 
made it despite the “tone of 
alarm*’ it found in letters from 
Soviet citizens who were wor- 
ried the moratorium was hurt- 
ing national security. 

“And so comrades, 
ing all pros and cons, 
by a responsibility for the fate 
of the world, the Politburo of 
the Central Committee of the 
Communist Party of the So- 
viet Union and the Soviet 
Government look a decision 
to prolong the unilateral mor- 
atorium on nuclear testing 
until January 1, 1987“ Mr 
Gorbachov said. 


He called the derision “as 
much political as military. In 
taking Hus step, we believe 
that people in all countries of 
the world, political circles and 
the international public will 
correctly evaluate the long 
silence on the Soviet nuclear 
{estranges.” 

He said he was appealing to 
“the reason and self-respect of 
Americans not to miss once 
this historic chance on 
road to stopping ihe arms 
race.” 

Mr Gorbachov and other 



Mr Gorbachov 
Soviet television 
Soviet officials have maA» the 
moratorium a central issue in 
pronouncements on arms con- 
trol, hinting that an agreement 
to curtail testing could help 
the two sides reach an agree- 
ment on a date for the next 
US-Soviet summit 
Mr Gorbachov and Mr 
Reagan agreed in Geneva Last 
November that they would 
meet again this year in the 
United States, but the Soviets 
have delayed setting a dale for 
the second summit They have 


said they want assurances first 
that it w ill lead to concrete 
progress in arms control. 

Mr Gorbachov’s speech fol- 
lowed a special two-day meet- 
ing-near Moscow between top- 
level Soviet and US arms 
control negotiators. 

It came about a month 
before Mr George Shultz, the 
US Secretary of State, and Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the So- 
viet Foreign Minister, were to 
meet in Washington to discuss 
a summit agenda. 

Mr Gorbachov's speech was 
noncommittal on the question 
of a summit. The English- 
language version provided by 
Tass said only that the “Soviet 
Union is confident that agree- 
ments on ending nuclear test- 
ing can be reached speedily 
and signed already this year* 

Mr Gorbachov and Mr 
Reagan have exchanged letters 
on arms control, but the 
Soviet leader maria no com- 
ment on the most recent 
message from Mr Reagan, 
which he received in late July. 

h a speech on July 28, Mr 
Gorbachov said Mr Reagan’s 
stand on space weapons would 
determine in large measure his 
next step. - 

• WASHINGTON: The US 
yesterday reiterated that an 
American nudear testing mor- 
atorium “is not in' our security 
interests nor that of our 
friends and allies” (Mohsm 
Ali writes). 

The State Department spo- 
kesman said this at his daily 
press briefing about an hour 
before the Moscow speech of 
Mr Gorbachov. 


Links with estate agent ruled out 



Miss Lambert who turned up yesterday, and Mr Hanson, who police wish to interview 


Tomorrow 


Stalin’s 

legacy 


A. ?! 
v ^ 




Harvest of 
sorrow: how Stalin’s 
genocide has 
affected decisions of 
the Soviet 
leadership to 
this day 

The third 
degree 

Graduates in 
industry: how the 
head-hunters 
assess the high-flyers 



• There is £12,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition, treble the 
usual amount as 
there has been no 
winner for the past 
two days. 

• Portfolio list, page 
19; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 14. 



Colonel killed 

A Spanish Army colonel was 
killed in the Basque town of 
Villareal when gunmen shot 
him in a restaurant 


Hone News 2-4 
Overseas 5-7 
App* 12 

Alts 13 

Births, deaths, 

marram 12 
Bridge 12 

■fastness 15-20 
Chess 2 
Chart 12 

Crosswords 844 
Diary IS 

E veals 14 


Features 7-10 

Law Report 

20 

Leaden 

11 

Letters 

11 

OfailBSTT 

12 

Science 

12 

Sport 26-2830 

Tbesurett-c 29 

TV A Radio 

29 

Universities 

12 

Weather 

14 

Wfl b 

12 


■tit h it •& •& 


Protesters 
win nudear 
round one 

Bjr Staff Reporters 

Protesters yesterday 
claimed victory .in the first 
round of their battle against 
exploratory work at three of 
the four sites earmarked by 
the Government as potential 
underground nudear dumps. 

Local men, women and 
children massed at each of the 
sites where work was due to 
start yesterday — South Kfll- 
ingbolme, near Grimsby, 
Fulbeck Airfield, in Lincoln- 
shire; and Elstow, near Bed- 
ford — to block access to the 
test areas. 

At each erf the sites, soil 
engineers’ and contractors’ ve 


Leading article 


11 


hides turned back when con- 
fronted by the protesters. 

The demonstrations were 
peaceful and police made no 
attempt to intervene. 

Nirex, the Government’s 
nuclear waste agency. ■ has 
drawn up a test programme 
for four sites in England with 
the aim of establishing then- 
suitability as locations for an 
underground dump needed to 
accommodate low-level waste 
from the country’s nuclear 
energy industry. 

Residents fear, however, 
that there could be long-term 
risks to both humans and 
agriculture from such a site. 
Similar protests to yesterday's 
have been promised at the 
fourth test area at BradwelL 
Continued on page 14, col 8 


Freighter’s 

position 

questioned 

From Frank Johnson , 
Bonn 

The West German sea cap- 
tain accused , of abandoning 
more than ISO Tamil refugees 
off the Canadian coast is 
believed now to be falsifying 
his ship's position so as to give 
the impression that he was 
never anywhere near Canada. 

In a radio-telephone inter- 
view at the weekend, Herr 
Wolfgang Bindd told the West 
German radio station Nord- 
deutscher Rundfunk that he 
was in the area of Casablanca. 
Checks carried out by the 
German telegraphic authori- 
ties. however, suggest that at 
the time of ihe conversation 
he was off the Azores. 

If he were near Casablanca 
it would have been consistent 
with his ciaiiri t which he made 
to the radio station, that he 
never crossed the Atlantic and 
that, on leaving Germany, he 
had been bound for Dakar. 

To reach Dakar, on the 
westernmost tip of Africa, be 
would sail near Casablanca. It 
is considered here not to be 
impossible that he might, for 
some reason, also pass near 
the Azores on such a voyage. 
But his presence in that area is 
thought more likely to mean 
that he was returning from a 
ivage across the Atlantia 
Herr Bindd told the radio 
station that he never had any 
Tamils on board his vessel, a 
coastal freighter, The Aurigae. 

He has not denied, how- 

Continued on page 14, col I 


Fall in shop spending 


Spending in the shops in 
July declined from the June 
record, but the trend remains 
strongly upwards- Sales vol- 
ume dipped by 12 per cent 
after a 3.6 per cent June surge. 


The Government's finances 
were in better shape last 
month than City analysts had 
expected. The Government 
repaid £226 million of its 

borrowing. Details page IS 


Missing 
secretary 
is found 
unharmed 

By Stewart Terafler 
Crime Reporter 

Miss Sarah Lambert the 
London secretary who was 
feared to have been a second 
victim of the man responsible 
for the disappearance of Miss 
Susannah Lamplugh, was 
found yesterday tired, con- 
fused but unharmed on a 
Hampshire railway station. 

Last night London police 
travelled to Basingstoke police 
station to collect and talk to 
Miss Lambert aged 26, who 
vanished on Friday after set- 
ting out to meet a man calling 
himself J Simmons. 

She had been hired to work 
for his company and believed 
she was on her way to. a 
working weekend at .. a 
Buckinghamshire hotel but 
the couple never arrived. . 

Police said last night that 
they had ruled out any link 
between the di s ap pearance of 
the giri last weekend and the 
case of Miss Lamplugh. 

Yesterday, on the second 
day of a nationwide hunt for 
Miss Lambert London offi- 
cers were about to issue details 
of Joseph Michael Hanson, 
aged 41, who they wanted to 
interview about her dis- 
appearance when the news 
came that she had been found. 

Scotland Yard said last 
night: “We are still anxious to 
trace Mr Hanson who from 
inquiries may be the man with 
Sarah over the weekend.” 
Police have appealed to hotel 
owners in the south of En- 
gland to come forward if they 
have any information. 

The search ended shortly 
after 3pm yesterday when 
Miss Lambert telephoned the 
garage hear Devizes where her 
mother works. She told the 
employee who answered the 
telephone where she was and 
rang off. 

The man recognized the 
voice and alerted Wiltshire 
policewho contacted their col- 
leagues in Basingstoke. They 
found Miss Lambert 
The search for her had been 
intense because the descrip- 
tion of “J Simmons” matched 
in some measure the descrip- 
tion issued several weeks ago 
for a “Mr Kipper” who is 
thought to have abducted 
Miss Lamplugh, a west Lon- 
don estate agent, after making 
an appointment to see a 
Fulham house. 

Yesterday police said that 
Miss Lambert’s cash card had 
been used twice over the past 
few days. 


Pretoria names 
8,501 detainees 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 
The South African Govern- the Minister of Mineral and 


mem yesterday told Par- 
liament in Cape Town that 
8,501 people were detained 
under the state of emergency. 
It is first official tally of 
detainees. 

The Minister of Law and 
Order, Mr Louis Le Grange, 
tabled a 171-page document 
with the detainees' names but 
no other information. It is 
presumed they are aO still in 
detention, and that the list 
does not include people held 
for a while and released. 

Parliament resumed its 
1986 session yesterday after a 
two-month adjournment In 
law, the minister was required 
to report to Parliament within 
14 days of the stale of emer- 
gency being declared on June 
12, but the previous sitting 
ended before that period had 
expired. 

In a separate development, 
the Department of Mineral 
and Energy Affairs published 
draft legislation yesterday, en- 
titled the Mines and worts 
Amendment Bin. that would 
make it possible for blacks to 
become fully fledged miners 
for the first time. 

Blacks are prohibited from 
obtaining a “blasting certif- 
icate", the basic qualification 
for the top category of job in 
the mines. The Bill would 
open this category to “com- 
petent” people of all races. 

Sources in the Chamber of 
Mines, the employers’ organ- 
ization, and the black Na- 
tional Union of Mineworkers 
said yesterday they were con- 
cerned about small print in the 
draft Bin, which might give 


Energy Affairs powers to regu- 
late black advancement by 
other means. 

Meanwhile, a fuff bench of 
the Natal provincial division 
of the Supreme Court re- 
sumed its hearing of an urgent 
application to have the severe 
restraints imposed on the 
news media under the stale of 
emergency declared unlawful 

The plaintiffs are four En- 
glish-language newspaper 
groups - Argus, South African 
Associated Newspapers. Natal 
Newspapers and the Natal 
Witness — and the defendants 
are President Botha, Mr Le 


The Bureau for Information in 
South Africa has signed up 46 
local performers to sing a 
three-minute song which is 
designed fo dispel gloom and 
despondency and project a 
message of hope for the future. 
The song will be broadcast as 
a conunerrial advertisement. 
It is all part of what the 
Bureau calls “Operation 
Optimism.” 


Grange and the Commis- 
sioner of Police 
The case raises the same 
point of law as two conflicting 
rulings by Natal courts last 
week on the emergency regula- 
tions permitting summary ar- 
rest and detention. 

The issue is whether the 
various regulations enforced 
since June 12 go beyond the 
authority President Botha was 
granted by Parliament under 
the Public Safety Act of 1953. 

NZ sanctions, page 5 


Campus 
cash is 
linked to 
reforms 

By Lucy Hodges 

Education Correspondent 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec- 
retary of Slate for Education 
and Science, has made it plain 
to the universities that be is 
more likely to obtain extra 
funding if they agree to a 
package of reforms which 
show that they are putting 
their bouse in order. 

He is hoping to agree an 
“action plan” with the vice- 
chancellors and the Univer- 
sity Grams Committee (UGC) 
during September. 

Discussions have already 
begun between his officials 
and the universities about a 
package of agreed reforms in 
tour areas, in advance of the 
battle over public spending. 

The universities will be 
expected to show evidence of 
reform in academic standards 
and appraising the perfor- 
mance of lecturers; financial 
management and monitoring; 
the preparation of perfor- 
mance indicators by which 
universities may be judged; 
and the rationalization of 
departments which are too 
small or weak. 


Student monitoring 


Changes are in hand in all 
these areas as a result of 
pressure from Sir Keith Jo- 
seph, the former Secretary of 
State, and Sir Peter Swin- 
nenon-Dyer, chairman of the 
UGC. 

In a confidential note the 
Department of Education and 
Science has spelt out that it 
wants university vice-chan- 
cellors to look at what stu- 
dents think of their courses as 
a means of monitoring stan- 
dards. 

In the week that Sir Keith 
left office he managed to 
secure agreement from Cabi- 
net for extra spending on the 
universities. 

Figures were not issued but 
it is understood that agree- 
ment in principle was given 
for university funding to be 
maintained at roughly its 
present level That should 
prevent possibly as many as 
six universities being dosed 
by 199ft 

At the time that commit- 
ment to find more cash was 
thought likely to mean there 
would be an extra £180 mil- 
lion for the system between 
1987 and 1990. 

That is the amount which 
the UGC says it needs to keep 
funding at present levels and 
to prevent the closure of a 
number of universities. 



S’- 


faces 



action 

By Peter Davenport 

A confidential report into 
Mr John Stalker, the sus- 
pended Deputy Chief Con- 
stable of Greater Manchester, 
is believed to recommend 
disciplinary action on up to 11 
counts. 

It was understood last night 
that, at the end of his nine- 
week investigation Mr Colin 
Sampson. Chief Constable of 
West Yorkshire, reached the 
conclusion that there was 
sufficient evidence for disci- 
plinary action against Mr 
Stalker on 1 1 separate counts. 

Those invohe the alleged 
misuse of police vehicles on 
five occasions, associating 
with known criminals and five 
instances during his long 
friendship with the Manches- 
ter businessman Mr Kevin 
Taylor, including a holiday 
they shared aboard Mr 
Taylor’s luxury yacht off 
America in 1981 and four 
social functions they sub- 
sequently attended together. 

Throughout the investiga- 
tion Mr Stalker, aged 47. has 
insisted that he has given full 
and satisfactory explanations 
of all the incidents on which 
he has been questioned and 
that he saw no reason why he 
should not be returned to 
work. 

The decision, however, rests 
with the 44 members of the 
Greater Manchester Police 
Authority. They must decide 
whether 'to allow Mr Stalker 
back to his desk or to for- 
mulate formal charges against 
him. 

Tomorrow the Labour-con- 
trolled Greater Manchester 
Police Authority will receive 
summaries of the report be- 
fore deciding Mr Stalker's 
immediate fate at a special 
meeting on Friday, chaired by 
Councillor David’ Moffat. 

If the matter does go to 
tribunal then Mr Stalker has 
the ultimate right of appeal 
against any decision it may- 
make to the Home Secretary. 

Last night Mr Stalker said 
that if the report were accurate 
about Mr Sampson's recom- 
mendations then he was both 
“disappointed and very 
surprised.” 

He added: “I emphatically 
deny that I have done any- 
thing wrong or that I have 
knowingly mixed with known 
criminals. I also deny, as has 
been suggested, that 1 had 
previously been warned about 
my behaviour.” 

Mr Stalker said be was 
anxious to be allowed a per- 
sonal hearing with members 
of the police authority before 
they reach any decision 


£120m brewery deal 

Scottish & Newcastle Brew- Home made low profits in 
enes. tne . toinourgn-based recent years, but it has strong 
brewmg -^boidroup, yes- assets, inducting 470 lied 
terday agreed a £120 million pubs, dubs and off-licences, 
takeover offer for Home 

Brewery, Nottingham. Details, page 15 


Woman with rabies is 
put on ventilator 


By Jill Sherman 

confirmed yes- disease in this country since 
1902. 


Doctors 
terday that a British woman is 
seriously ill with rabies in the 
Queen Alexandra Hospital in 
Portsmouth. 

The hospital said last night 
that the woman, aged 45, an 
expatriate holidaying with her 
sister in Portsmouth, was on a 
ventilation machine. She is 
understood to have been bit- 
ten by a dog about six weeks 
ago in Lusaka, Zambia, where 
she lives. 

It is the first reported case of 
rabies in Britain since 1981. 
and in the past 10 years there 
have only been eight other 
cases, all fataL In each case the 
disease was contracted 
abroad, usually from dog 
bites. No one has caught the 


Doctors at the hospital say 
that the patient has displayed 
classic symptoms of rabies, 
including hydrophobia — a 
fear of water — brea 
difficulties and episodes 
terror. 

Hospital staff would nor- 
mally wear protective clothing 
and eye protection, according 
to Dr Sylvia Gardner at the 
Central Public Health Lab- 
oratory in ColindaJe, north 
London. 

A health authority spokes- 
man said that the hospital was 
in dose touch with all the 
patient’s contacts. 

Precautions, page 2 


Praise for brave victims of ‘savage mountain 9 


By Michael McCarthy * 
The deaths of two ot 
Britain's best climbers on K2 
proved once again that it is the 
hardest mountain to conquer, 
the leading British Himalayan 
expert, Doug Scott, said yes- 
terday. 

Mr Scott, who has made 
three unsuccessful attempts 
on K2 and will try for a fourth 
time next year, was a close 
friend of Alan Rouse and Julie 
Tullis, who a fortnight ago 
became the first Britons on the 
28450ft peak, the world's 
second highest 
As more reports filtered out 
of Pakistan yesterday about 
what happened to the eight 
climbers, which included Brit- 
ons. Austrians and Poles, of 
whom six died. Mr Scott 
described the “savage 
mountain”. 

“It is the mountaineers’ 
mountain. It is far more 
difficult to climb than Everest. 
Two hundred people have 
been to the summit of Everest 
but only a handful lave 



Worst of all on K2 is the 
weather, said Mr Scott, who 
has climbed Everest “That 
was what cost them their lives. 
The storm came at just the 
wrong time. They had just 


a bad yesterday after spending 
the weekend in Skardu recov- 
ering from severe frostbite and 
exhaustion. They gave a de- 
tailed account to diplomats, 
saying that the storm that 


reached the summit of K2. 
They really did fantastically 
well to get to the top. 

“Unlike Everest, K2 is very 
steep on ail sides, almost 
oomcal; it looks like a moun- 
tain ought to look. And while 


two-thirds less oxygen at those 
altitudes, so not only are you 
drawing on your reserves, you 
haven’t got the fuel to generate 
heau You just can't keep 
warm, you deteriorate very 
rapidly. ” 

Mr Scott said it was notice- 
able that one of the two 
Survivors, Kurt Dierabeiger, 
was a b[g man. “He has a lot of 
flesh with a lot of reserves in 
him. Alan and Julie were both 
basically rock climbers with 
the base of Everest is only two dw build of gymnasts, very fit, 
days' trek from the nearest buL without the reserves 
village, the base of K2 is ten perhaps.” 
days' hard walking, so your Diemberger, Mrs Tullis’ 
lines of communication are long-time climbing compan- 
.very stretched and you’re out . 'on. and another Austrian, 
0 {t a limb before you start” Willy Pauer. arrived in Islam- 


finished that exhausting climb trapped them for five days 
and should have been gening from August 5 at 26.000 feet 
down as last as they could, but ■ brought heavy snow, winds up 
they were trapped. There i$ to 90mph and temperatures of 


minus 30 degrees Celsius. 

Mrs Tullis died peacefully 
in her sleep, in her tent on 
August 7. When the weather 
cleared six climbers moved 
down but Alan Rouse was too 
exhausted. On the descent two 
Austrians. Alfred Imitizer and 
Hannes Wieser, fell to their 
deaths. The same fate over- 
took the Poles. Wojeiech 
Wroz and Dobroslawa 
Miodowicz. 

• The British premiere of the 
play K2 by Patrick Meyers 
about two mountaineers 
trapped on the peak is to open 
at the “fringe” tent studio at 
Chichester Theatre next 
Wednesday. 


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Tri£ im£S lUbSDAV AUGUST 19 1986 


Belfast aircraft firm 
calls in RUC after 
threats to Catholics 


MPs want 
facts on 
Gurkhas’ 
discharge 


By Richard Ford 


Detectives arc investigating 
"loyalist" threats to Roman 
Catholics employed by Short 
Brothers, the state-owned air- 
craft manufacturer, which is 
already under pressure to 
make its 7.000 workforce 
more representative of the 
community. 

Shorts, die largest manufac- 
turing employer in Northern 
Ireland, was given a warning 
yesterday that its very future 
as a company would be at risk 


who, if found guilty, would be 
dismissed. 

The statement added- "The 
company deplores this recent 
attempt to introduce sectari- 
anism in the workplace, with 
its inevitable threats to the 
jobs of everyone." 

Mr Bob Cooper, chairman 
of the Fair Employment 
Agency which has monitored 
Shorts* employment practices, 
said that the future of the 


unless it dealt rigorously with .company, based in strongly 
attempted intimidation of its loyalist east Belfast, depended 


few Roman Catholic workers. 
The Royal Ulster Constabu- 


on its success in attracting and 
holding Roman Catholic 


lary is trying to- find out who applicants, 
was responsible for ripping up "Management is 
ihe time cards of seven Re- 


creating 


respon- 
an at- 


man Catholics and erecting mospbere at work in which 
three posters claiming the both sections of the 


employees were Provisional 
IRA and republican 
supporters. 

In a statement last night the 
company, in which Roman 
Catholics number between 14 
and 1 7 per cent, said that 24 
clock cards, including seven 


oemmunity can feel safe, free 
and easy and able to work in 
security." 

Mr Cooper said that be 


heightened tension, when 
paramilitaries ou both sides of 
the sectarian divide are issu- 
ing threats against workers 

During the weekend the 
bungalow, at MarkethiU, Co 
Armagh, belonging to Mr 
Seamus Mallon, deputy leader 
of the Social Democratic and 
Labour Party, was scorch- 
damaged by what he believes 
was a sectarian attack. 

The actions of the Shorts* 
People's Loyalist Council 
have caused concern among 
management and the Govern- 
ment for the company relies 
heavily on orders from the 
United States, with 70 per cent 
of its production being ex- 
ported across the Atlantic. 

It is known that officials in 
the US have been critical at 
the rale of progress towards' 
equality of opportunity and 
the company is winning or- 
ders in the face of strong 


MPs are demanding a full 
explanation of how ill Gur- 
khas came to be discharged 
from the Army after refusing 
to co-operate in an inquiry 
into a brawl in which two 
officers were injured in. 
Hawaii 



. ■ ' - 




Mr NeQ Thorne, Conser- 
vative MP for Ilfbrd South, 
and a member of the defence 
committee, said yesterday; 
"MPS cannot understand how 
all this had happened." 


Mr Thome, chairman of the 
British Nepalese par- 
liamentary committee, is con- 
cerned that the Gurkhas* 
dismissal could rela- 

tions between Nepal and 
Britain. 


w: 


fasti 






thought one of the effects of lobbying against it by Irish- 
the intimidation attempt American groups in America, 


would be to make potential 
employees and their families 


belonging to Roman Catho- apprehensive about going to 
lies, had disappeared and Shorts, although he thought 


three posters had been erected 
by the Shorts' People's Loyal- 
ist Council. 


those Catholics already work- 
ing there would recognize that 
the vast majority did not 


"The company views this as support this type of action. 


a very sinister development 
with overtones of sectarian 
intimidation, which is a crim- 
inal offence." The statement 
said that the illegal posters had 
been removed and the RUC 
asked to assist the company in 


The company has agreed 
with the agency an Affir- 
mative Action Programme to 
try to attract more Catholics. 

The attempt to intimidate 
Roman Catholic workers at 


Shorts occurs ai a time of employment. 


who are critical of its employ- 
ment practices. ■ 

The Shorts' People's Loyal- 
ist Council said yesterday that 
it had taken the cards only of 
workers who were known 
republicans and that innocent 
Roman Catholics were not at 
risk in the company. It said 
that those whose cards had 
been taken had themselves 
been involved in intimidation 
of loyalist workers in Shorts 
and at their previous places of 


Nearly two weeks ago Sir 
Geoffrey Johnson Smith, 
Conservative MP for 
Weal den, and vice-chairman 
of the backbench defence 
committee, wrote to Mr 
George Younger, Secretary of 
State for Defence, for an 
explanation. 

Mr John Stanley, Minister 
of Slate for the Aimed Forces, 
is to make a long-planned visit 
before the end of the month to 
Hong Kong during which the 
Gurkha incident is likely to be 
discussed folly. 


wm 

: 4 AM 


Spitfire 
flight for 
ace of 71 


More than 30 Gurkhas have 
made representations against 
being discharged. Some pleas 
have been upheld, but an 
unknown number of cases are 
still being considered. 


Ridley attacked on 
extra spending cut 


Tories swoop on 
Labour ballot rift 


The Tory Reform Group 
this morning will launch an 
attack on government 
environment policies in gen- 
eral, and on Mr Nicholas 
Ridley, Secretary of Stale for 
the Environment, in particu- 
lar. for cutting proposed extra 
spending on housing (John 
Winder writes). 

The group, which labels 
itself "moderate", is generally 


He urged the Government 
to add to that situation limited 
targeted expenditure not only 
to reduce unemployment but 
to improve housing stock and 
reduce housing deprivation. 


By Nicholas Wood and John Winder 


Conservative MPs moved wilderness and will expect to 
sterday to exploit the inter- enter the garden — a garden of 


TNT awarded injunction 


Reforme 
article by Mr James Hewitt, a 
partner in a Midlands 
architectural practice. 

The article concludes that 
investment in construction 


considered to be on the left of was an extremely cost-effec- 
the party. live method of creating jobs, 

"The fabric of our nation is not onlv in the industrv itself 


"The fabric of our nation is not only in the industry itself 
embarrassingly tatty, un- fordeariy needed projects, but 


kempt, and. in pans, pos- 
itively slum-tike," Mr Iain 
Picton, chairman of the group, 
writes in its periodical. 
Reformer. 

He says that Mr Kenneth 
Baker asked for £3.25 billion 
extra to spend on housing 
when he was Secretary of State 
for the Environment and that 
Mr Nicholas Ridley cut that 
amount back to £3 billion. 

“He should not have cut it. 
He should, if anything, have 
increased it," Mr Picton 
writes. 

The group points out that 
opinions expressed in its 
magazine are not necessarily 
endorsed by the Tory Reform 
Group. Bui the feels remain 
that Mr Kenneth Baker is a 
patron of the group and that 
Mr Ridley has not applied for 
membership. 

Mr Picton writes that there 
are hundreds of thousands of 
skilled, unemployed building 
workers and countless com- 
panies willing to take them on 
if they had the work. 


also in the furniture, carpet 
and textile industries. 

"It demands priority for 
government attention and a 
prompt change of strategy 
now” Mr Hewitt writes. “I 
am sure that the Prime Min- 
ister recognizes that there is 
not much merit in the pride of 
having a tidy purse if the 
handbag is shabby and the 
shoes leak and pinch. It is time 
the country had a new outfit" 

The themes taken up in 
Reformer reflect those decided 
upon by the executive 
committee of the Tory Re- 
form Group each year in May, 
at the annual meeting. 

Mr Picton's leading article 
today also calls for more 
spending oo health and 
education. 


union rift over Labour Party 
plans to salvage statutory pre- 
strike secret bailors from its 
promised repeal of the Gov- 
ernment's industrial relations 
legislation. 

The divisions, which threa- 
ten Mr Neil Kinnock's efforts 
to give his party a more 
moderate look, have surfaced 
in conflicting motions for the 
Trades Union Congress in 
i Brighton next month. 

A left caucus led by the 


their own planting, and a 
garden of stinging nettles and 
thistles it will be. 

"This law must be retained 
and Neil Kinnock will have to 
fight for iL" 

Mr John Prescott, shadow 
employment secretary, ack- 
nowledged there were "dif- 
ferences of points of view" 
between the left-led caucus 
and the policy set oat in the 
document, but denied that Mr 
Kinnock's leadership was be- 


were accused of carrying out Hillcrest Road, Bromley, 
various unlawful activities at Kent, and Mr Sean Blackman, 


Transport and General ing undermined. 

Woriters- Union and die Na- He aid that in repealing the 


He says that the people 
value those services. 

They seemed willing to pay 
to make them better and no 
one denied that improve- 
ments were not only possible, 
but needed. 


tional Union of Mineworkers 
is opposing the ballots, which 
were pledged in a joint 
TUC/Labour document due 
for debate. 

Yesterday Mr Geoffrey 
Lawler, former secretary of the 
Tory backbench employment 
I committee, said secret ballots 
| commanded widespread sup- 
port among union members 
and bad been a great success in 
protecting them against the 
worst excesses of leaderships. 

He said that they were a 
significant factor in the latest 
figures, which showed stop- 
pages at their lowest level for 
50 years. 

Mr Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark, secretary of foe back- 
bench finance committee, 
said: "There is no way the 
unions are going to lie down. 
They have spent what they 
look on as years in the 


Tory legislation, “as we are 
committed to do" Labour 


was making the point that 
matters regarding ballots on 
strikes and elections of union 
executives would be in the 
rule books of unions and 
would require secret ballots. 

He added that a resolution 
put forward by the Union of 
Communication Workers 
went further than the comm ti- 
ment given in foe joint docu- 
ment because it would outlaw 
spontaneous walkouts. 


TNTs depots in Luton, Brad- of Finland Road, south-east 
ford -and Maidstone between London, are a lleg ed to have 
June and August The allega- been involved in an attack on 
lions included intimidation, a TNT worker's car outside 
violent attacks against the the company's Luton plant on 
company’s employees and June 24. Both men deny the 
harassment accusations. 

Earlier this month Sogat '82 Mr Peter Jarvis, of 


and the NGA gave court Shrublands Road, Hackney, 
undertakings not to organize east London, aJsc accused of 


illegal picketing but made it attacking a TNT depot denied 
clear foal foe unions could not any involvement with vi- 


be held responsible for the olence or intimidation against 


actions of th ei r members. the company but gave an 


Miss Brenda Dean, general undertaking in court, "not to 
secretary of Sogat '82, arid Mr assault the plaintiffs, dnmag g 


Danny Sargeant, its president their property or goods or 
have sent circulars to branches threaten to do so or incite 


Mr Ralph Howell, chair- 
man of the Tory employment 
committee, said that the con- 
flict proved that Labour, 
"with such people as Mr 
Prescott as their spokesmen, 
are siding with the militants in 
the unions against the more 
progressive people who rec- 
ognize that ballots are here to 
stay". 


the undertakings. 


Transport union ballot CID chief 


complaints are upheld 


By A Staff Reporter 


Rabies menace 


Britain safe from disease 


The case of a British woman 
being treated for rabies at the 
Queen Alexandra Hospital in 
Portsmouth this week has 
highlighted the risk of a rabies 
outbreak in this country. 

Humans contract the dis- 
ease from infected animals, 
usually through bites. (The 
woman in Portsmouth is 
understood to have contracted 
the disease after being bitten 
by a dog in Lusaka, Zambia, 
about six weeks ago.) 

Three people in foe world 
are known to have contracted 
the disease and survived, al- 
though none in this country. 
The vims which causes the 
disease attacks the nervous 
system after an incubation 
period, usually lasting six to 
eight weeks. But it may be as 
short as 10 days or as long as 
two years. 

The first symptoms are very 
general with victims showing 
signs of fever, nausea, vomit- 


By JQl Sherman 

The third phase leads to advertises at European po 
paralysis and coma and, even- and airports warning of t 
tually, death. rules about importing pets. 


Some people die of the 
disease within two or three 
days, while others might live 
up to a month. 

Although there is no known 
cure for foe disease hundreds 
of people each year are treated 
with a course of injections 
which can prevent the disease 
developing. 

Last year 463 people were 
given prophylactic treatment 
which included a vaccine and 
anti-rabies haemogiobulin, af- 
ter being bitten by animals 
abroad. 


advertises at European ports 
and airports warning of the 
rules about importing pets. 

In Europe the disease is 
most firmly rooted in West 
and East Germany, France 
and Czechoslovakia, accord- 
ing to the Iastest World Health 
Organization figures, and 
more than 19,000 animals 
died from it last year. 

According to the Ministry 
of Agriculture yesterday, it 
had reached southern and 
eastern Paris. 

The main danger of the 
disease arriving in Britain is 
people smuggling an infected 


Time-out 
move by 
Karpov 


Ballot irregularities have 
brought foe Transport and 
General Workers' Union, into 
fresh trouble with Mr Mat- 
thew Wake, the government- 
appointed Certification Off- 
icer. 


papers and an opportunity to 
vote. 


faces 

charges 


Total membership of the 
two branches is 212. Mr 
Dufiy's majority was 8,390. 


Chess 


Keene 


The Department of Health animal ashore, Mr Tony 
said foe treatment, which Crowley, a leading expert on 


involves intramuscular injec- ra ^ es pohey? said-. 

lions was used as a precaution. During discussions about 


ing and general malaise, usu- 
ally lasting three or four days. 

The disease then passes into 
a second phase of hyperactiv- 
ity. excitation and spasms, 
again lasting about four days. 

It is often accompanied by a 
fear of water — lire mere sight 
of fluid can bring on violent 
contraction of the throat mus- 
cles. 


The vaccine has to be injected 
within foe incubation period. 

The World Health 
Organization said that al- 
though the disease has been 
contained in many developed 
countries it was stii! rife in the 
Third World. 


foe Channel tunnel. Ministry 
of Agriculture experts insisted 
on special precu lions 


Britain's long-standing bat- 
tle against a rabies invasion 
uses strict quarantine laws and 
draconian control regulations. 

The campaign, so fer 
successful, is run by the 
Ministry of Agriculture, which 


Entrances to the tunnel will 
be barred with cattle-grid style 
installations and trains will 
have sealed windows to pre- 
vent animals hitching a ride. 
• An Italian doctor who 
brought his pet Yorkshire 
terrier into Britain was fined 
£300 plus £60 costs, by Dover 
magistrates yesterday for 
breaking anti-rabies 
legislation. 


Anatoly Karpov yesterday 
took the first of his three 
permitted time-outs in foe 
World Chess Championship 
being held at the Park Lane 
Hotel central London. 

After his shattering defeat in 
the eighth game, all expats at 
the scene were of the opinion 
that the ex-champion would 
opt to take a rest 

In games seven and eight, 
Karpov had come under 
heavy pressure towards foe 
close of each same. 

In the eighth game, Karpov 
lost on time forfeit with nine 
moves still to make. That was 
regarded as unprecedented in 
the 100-year history of the 
championship. 

Game nine will now be' 1 
played at 5pm tomorrow. 

• Grandmasters Hjartarson 
(Iceland) and de Firmian (US) 
are sharing foe lead in the 
Commonwealth Open Chess 
Championship, each with 6 
points out of a possible 7 
(Harry Golombek writes). 

In round six, de Fennian 
beat Hebden and so took the 
lead in the following game; 
White: de Fennian Black: 


Mr Wake has upheld two 
complaints from a member of 
the 1,500, 000-member union, 
'but recommended that no 
action should be taken. 


Mr Ray Coffins, the TGWU 
administrative officer, said: 
“The Certification Officer ac- 
cepted that we have taken 
action that would prevent it 
happening in the future." 


The complaints under the Earlier this year, in the same 


Trade Union Act, 1984, re- executive elections, returns 
la ted to the election last year from b ran c he s in London, the 


of Mr Dan Duffy as a Scottish 
repnesentiave on the union’s 
executive coundL 


Home Counties and the Mid- 
lands were declared invalid by 
the Certification Officer. 


Mr Wake found that the In 1985 foe election for a 


union failed to make sure that new general secretary was held 


votes at one branch were 
“fairly and accurately" coun- 


after ballot-rigging 
tions. The new vote was 


ted, and that at the other requested by Mr Ron Rodd, 
branch the union failed to do who won the first poll, to 


"all that was reasonably remove the "cloud of sus- 
practi cable” to ensure that piefon." He was returned with 


members were given ballot an increased majority. 


Husband 
accused 
of family 
murder 


Mr Robert Healey was re- 
manded in custody until Au- 
gust 26 at Stockport 
Magistrates* Court' yesterday 
charged with the munJerofha 
wife and stepdaughter. - 
Mr Healey, aged 38, of 
Longmead Avenue, Hazel 
Grove, Greater Manchester, 
said nothing as the chares 
were read to him during foe 
threotninutc hearing. 

He was accused of foe 
murders of bis wife, Greeba, 
. aged 40. and Marie Walker, 
* aged 13, whose bodies were 
. found in a shallow grave in 
ra North Wales on Friday. 
^ Reporting restrictions were 
not lifted. 


* Postal staff 
return to work 


Air Vice-Marshal Johnnie 
Johnson, aged 71, a Battle of 
Britain fighter pilot who 
brought down 38 enemy air- 
craft during the Second World 
War, was back in a Spitfire 
yesterday flying over 
Leicestershire. 

The aircraft, flown by New 
Zealanders in the Battle of 
Britain, was piloted by Mr 
Nick Grace, who had rebuilt it 
Johnnie Johnson's awards 
included the DSO and two 
bars, the DFC ami two bars 
and tite Croix de Guerre. 

He is to open the Leicester Johnnie Johnson yesterday (top) with the Spitfire in which 
International air display on be flew ova- Leicestershire, and (above) as a fighter pilot in 
August 24. 1944. 


A strike by 400 peso] 

workers in Aberdeen over 
bonus payments and foe use 
of casual labour has ended 
after agreement was reached 
with regional management gf 
the Scottish Post Office 
Mr John Taylor, assistant 
secretary of the Union of 
Communication Workers, 
said a worker dismissed last 
week for refusing to operate a 
system to dear the back-log of 
mail during a short-lived re- 
turn to work had since been 
reinstated. 

Council may 


Mr Basford and Mr 
Blackman also gave similar 
undertakings after the plaintiff 
accepted their evidence that 
neither was involved in the 
attack on TNTs premises on 


By Angella Johnson 

TNT, the distributors of In its affidavits TNT had Mr Basford and Mr 
News International's news- named four London Sogat Blackman also gave similar 
papers, obtained undertakings members and two NGA mem- undertakings after the plaintiff 
and a High Court injunction bers as having been involved accepted their evidence that 
yesterday to restrain members in attacks against its staff and neither was involved in the 
of foe print unions Sogat '82 property. attack on TNTs premises on 

and the National Graphical During foe course ■ of June 24. 

Association from illegal yesterday's hearing, undertak- Mr Peter Lake, of Singfewell 
picketing and intimidation ings were given by three of the Road, Gravesend, Kent, was 
outside its depots. defendants. said to have been idpn iificd by 

Six members of the unions Mr Nicholas Basford, of a TNT worker as one of 
were accused of carrying out Hillcrest Road, Bromley, several people who damaged 
various unlawful activities at Kent, and Mr Sean Blackman, vehicles and buildings in the 
TNTs depots in Luton, Brad- of Finland Road, south-east company's Thetford t rans port 
ford -and Maidstone between London, are alleged io have depot on July 31. He denies 
June and August The allega- been involved in an attack on foe charge. Mis Megan 
lions included intimidation, a TNT worker's car outside Dobney, of Sf Louis Road, 
violent attacks against the the company's Luton plant on south London, denies being 
company’s employees and June 24. Both men deny the involved in an attack on the 
harassment accusations. TNT plant in Bradford. 

Earlier this month Sogat '82 Mr Peter Jarvis, of Mr Justice Hoffinann said 
and the NGA gave court Shrublands Road, Hackney, that there were “no findings 
undertakings not to organize east London, aJsc accused of foal the defendants had done 
illegal picketing but made it attacking a TNT depot denied anything wrong". All he was 
clear that foe unions could not any involvement with vi- acVM to do was decide 
be held responsible for the olence or intimidation against whether he should grant an 
actions of their members. the company but gave an injunction at this stage, prior 

Miss Brenda Dean, general undertaking in court, "not to to the final hearing, 
secretary of Sogat *8 2, an d Mr assault the plaintiffs, damage After hearing legal aign^ 
Danny Sargeant its president their property or goods or ments, he then granted injunc- 
ha ve sent circulars to branches threaten to do so or incite tions against Miss Dobney 
asking them to comply with others to do so until the trial of and Mr Lake, 
the undertakings. this action or further order". 


sue singer 

Roger Dal trey, foe rock 
singer, may be taken to court 
after providing an alternative 
venue for a. banned pop 
festival at the weekend. „ 

Wealden council is consid- 
ering a prosecution after 
allegations of excess noise at 
foe festival, held on , land 
owned by the singer at 
Sbeepsetung Lane, near 
Heathfield, East Sussex, ffe 
allowed his land to be used 
after the organizers were 
banned from a ate near 
Horam. 

Man accused ■: 


of murder 


A man aged 32 was its 
Branded in custody by 
Horsefeny Road magistrates 
yesterday charged with the 
murder of Mrs Henrietta Os- 
borne, aged 86, at her home in 
i Pimlico, south west London, 
last year and the rape of a gill 

aged 14k. 

The man has already Spent 
sax weelrain custody 'charged 
with rapinfc'’"foe gW at hfe 
home in Pimlico ori June' 26 
and on five counts of having 
unlawful sexual intercourse 
with her. He was remanded in 
custody until September 1 1. 


Severed hand 
sewn back on 


The head of Jersey’s CTD, 
Det Insp Charles Quinn, and 
Insp Barry Blenldnsop and 
Det Sgt Brian Follain, were 
arrested in the island yes- 
terday, and charged with 
conspiring to pervert the 
course of justice. 

The three detectives, who 
have been suspended for sev- 
eral months after an investiga- 
tion by police officers from the 
mainland, are accused of fab- 
ricating evidence in the case of 
a man convicted in 1984 of 
robbing a betting shop. 

Iaa brief court appearance, 
foe three detectives ptaarfyi 
not guilty and were granted 
balL 

A fourth detective has also 
been suspended. 

It is expected that the case 
against the man convicted of 
foe betting shop robbery, who 
has been in prison since 
October 1984 serving a three- 
year sentence, will be 
reopened. 


A boy aged 1 1 was recover- 
ing in hospital yesterday after 
half of his hand was severed in 
a lift and then successfully 
sewn back on. 

Thomas Bloomfield was 
playing with friends at a hold 
in Folkestone, Kent, when his 
right hand became trapped in 
the lift gates. Two fingers anff 
a thumb were severed, but 
police packed them in ice, and 
the bey was taken to the’ 
W illiam Harvey hospital at- 
Ashford. 

Mother ends : 


hunger strike 


Mrs Jara Backer, aged 42, 
who has been battling to win a 
grammar school place for her 


hunger strike after 21 days. 

Mrs Backer, of Market 
Street, Long Sutton, Lincoln-' 
shire, started her fast after 
Lincolnshire County Couacil 
refused an appeal to aDow her 
son to resit foe 1 1-plus: 
examination, which he foiled 
in May. 


Prisoner on 
run caught 


Thatcher 
visits 
new home 


Militant stronghold in 
Liverpool threatened 

The Liverpool power base disciplinary action. A decision 
of Militant Tendency could will be made very shortly on 

aah hp hmlwi im hv I atuMir urlm* -p ■ 


Police have recaptured a 
prisoner who escaped from, 
Cardiff jail four weeks ago, .- 
after he was seen in a city night 

duh. 

Peter Spriggs, aged 29, of . 
Pemrebane, Cardiff was the : 
last of three prisoners, in- 
volved in a breakout, to be 
recaptured. 

McGuigan on ' 

the box 


hoTARiANs 1 1 Prince ‘missing acting 9 


Fly Concorde to Denmark. 

! Attend international Ak Display on 

SATURDAY 

13TH SEPTEMBER 1986 

in the presence of HM The Queen 
Of Denmark and The President of 
AS proceeds to international 
prefects in Thailand. 


Prince Edward disclosed for audience was Liberal lead- 
yesterday that be intends to er Mr David Sled. Lam a 


lake part in plays again as Fairrie, aged 12, from Lon- 
soon as possible, resuming the don. Said: “The Prince told me 


acting he began at university, how much he had enjoyed 
He was speaking to foe cast taking part in plays and how 


For details: RTN MA CHIN 

193 New Kings Road 
Fulham 

London SW6 4SS 
PHONE: 01-731 2900 (24 Hous) 


of youngsters after a charity 
performance of the musical 
The Ragged Child at the 
Edinburgh Festival. 


he was missing being on the 
stage." 

Mr Jeremy James Taylor, 
foe show’s director, said that 


It was staged by foe Na- foe Prince expressed interest 
tional Youth Music Theatre in teaming more about acting 
and tickets cost £10. Among and directing. f. 


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By Nicholas Wood 

Political Reporter 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
paid a brief visit to her house 
tn Dulwich, south east Lon- 
don yesterday to make final 
choices over fixtures and fit- 
tings before the move some- 
time in the next few weeks. 

She was accompanied by 
her husband. They spent 
about two hours looking over 
their £400,000, five- 
bedroomed home 

Furniture from their old 
house in Chelsea will be 
brought in shortly. But Mrs 
Thatcher will continue to use 
her flat m Downing Street. 


soon be broken up by Labour what sort of measures will be 
Party chiefs. taken," 

The party’s national exec- Rnf . _ 


Barry McGuigan, the boxer, 
begins a weekly half-hour chat 
show with BBC Northern 
Ireland on September 2. He' 


* uv IJ o uouuiuu Dnt ki. M.U. 

utive is expected to take swift . wfao ip- 
action and disband foe . 

Broadgreen constituency for ~ ward ,m " 

aitnwin? Mr nwek Hartnn_ a mediately after he was re- 


allowing Mr Derek Hatton, a 
Militant supporter, into hs 
meetings. 

The deputy leader of Liver- Meanwhile he is denying 
pool City Council has been I™ a 9*^* bas developed 
expelled from the party and is ! bveen himself and Mr John 

therefore not rfi g ibi e to Hamilton, the moderate lead- 
attend. ft* city council, who 

.. , v donned out of their last 

Mr Peter Kilfoyle, a Labour meeting when a national party 
tidal who was sent m to ran official was refused per- 
e Liverpool co-ordinating mission to address them 


elected, is determined 
attend party meetings. 


easier on foe face." 

Peer banned 


official who was sent in to run 
foe Liverpool co-ordinating 
committee after the district 


Lord Strauss, aged 85, a- 
forraer Labour Minister for 
Transport was fined £100 ; 
yesterday for careless drivings. 
At Haywards Heath;, 
Magistrates’ Court, West Sus- 
sex, he was also banned from 
driving or from holding a full- 
licence until he had passed a , 
driving test. . . 


Photograph page 4 


Mrs Thatcher has returned 
from Cornwall and plans to 
spend the rest of her break, 
until foe end of August,, 
^supervising arrangements tot 
. the change of scene. V" 


UHUIIULICC *ru3 iuc uomvi Mice j .. . 

party was disbanded, said Go^oraaniz- 

yesterday that action against 

Broadgreen may be taken in MrSESJfiiS 


teratfewdai. trying to issue a warning about 

next cays. ihe consequences of allowing 

He said: "In allowing Derek non-members into meetings. 
Hatton into - their meetings When she was not allowed in. 


they have placed themselves 
wide open for some form 


es foe ^peering broke up and Mr 
of Hamilton walked out. 



0f* 

ovei 

to I 


Huge 

lefem 


Rape 


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V... : 

i '' 


*an 



THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Sj Briton wanted by Yard 

** over bullion raid told 







to leave Costa Rica 






By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 













.■■a*: 1 


v. \ 


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.t ■:* 

rc >?< 










3: k i 




k- 



k;\ 


-rW'. 
■ . .r'li- 

• .. ^t.S 
•• ■ **as 

• ^ ^ 

Council, 
sue 1 


John Fleming, the fugitive 
-Briton wanted by Scotland 
'Yard for questioning about 
the. £26 mOtion Brinks-Mat 
jobbery, may be forced to 
return to Britain after a de- 
; astonby authorities in Cost% 
Kica to deport him.) 

Flights from Costa Rica 
.normally go to Florida in the 
United Slates or to Spain, 
Vwhicfa Mr Fleming cannot re- 
enter because be would face, 
3br the second time; expulsion 
or arrest for possible extra- 
dition to Britain. 

' Trouble over Mr nesting's 
passport tray mean that he 
will have no choice but to fly 
to Miami and then to Britain. 
He travelled to Costa Rica 
under threat of deportation 
-from Spain when: he had lived 

-for several years. 

- Other fugitives have also 
'shown an interest in the 
Central American state, which 
'-has no extradition agreement 
with Britain. The decision to 
xxpd Mr Fleming means that 
‘die country wQl not become a 
haven for fugitives. 

‘ Mr Fleming flew to Costa 
Rica several weeks ago as the 


Spanish authorities- were 
preparing’to order him out of 
the country, under a new 
aliens Act, for passport 
irregularities. 

The Briton, aged 47, van- 
ished before Spanish police 
conld interview him about Ins 
travel plans and his date of 
departure^ ■ 

7 riends of Mr 


Fleming , 
who comes from south Lon- 
don, told the police that they 
believed he had gone to Brazil 
and was living in Rio de 
Janforo, but Scotland Yard 
instituted a search which dis- 
closed hisreal location. 

A detective from Scotland 
Yard's flying squad flew out to 
talk to the Costa Rican 
authorities. Last week them 

were talks between the Yard 
man and local police. 

Mr Fleming, who took up 
residence with a Spanish 
woman, was traced and ar- 
rested over the weekend by 
members of Costa Rica's 
Directorate of Intelligence and 
Security, outside a block of 
apartments on the outskirts of 
San Jose. 

Senor Alvaro Ramos, vice- 


minister for home affaits. said 
that. Mr Fleming would be 
deported. . 

In an interview recently 
Senor Ramos said that the 
government had derided on a 
policy of not allowing 
“undesirables ” to stay in the 
country and be had been given 
powers to operate the tilling. 

He said that the govern- 
ment would not allow Costa 
Rica to become a haven for 
fugitives and they would be 
uncovered and expelled. 

• Since the Brinks-Mat rob- 
bery in 1983 Scotland Yard 
officers have conducted a 
lengthy search for the missing 
gold bullion taken from a 
security warehouse at 
Heathrow Airport. 

Three men have been con- 
victed for the robbery and 
another three for the handling 
of the bullion in Britain's 
hugest modern robbery 

Last month Mr John 
Palmer, another fugitive liv- 
ing in Spain and wanted by 
Scotland Yard, flew to South 
America and was deported 
from Brazfl. He returned to 
Britain and has been charged. 


Huge rise in GPs’ 
defence premiums 


— ifi:. 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 






ctio 


Doctors are facing huge 
increases in medical defence 
subscriptions because of the 
rapid rise in negligence claims 
against them and the bigger 
compensation awards paid to 
victims. 


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M‘»n bail 


The Medical Defence 
Union, which represents 
about 80,000 doctors and 
dentists in Britain and is the 
biggest organization of its kind 
in the world, announced in- 
creases of pp to 70 per cent in 
its subscription charges 
yesterday. 

Members of the union have 
been sent a document explain- 
ing why the new charges . are 
being made. It shows mat the 
highest sum awarded m medi- 
cal negligence cases has risen 
from £132.970 in 1977 to 
£679,264jhis year. 

The standard subscription 
rate for a doctor will go up 
next January to £576 from the 
present £336. ... 

In the documegl, a senior 
barrister criticizes. ffie “cur- 
rent obsession with> jwtient t 
versus doctor 

confrontations'’. Mr Bernard 
Hargrove, <2C said that this 
“undermines the natural trust 
between the parties so that 
more claims are made now 
than ever before. Some are 
doubtless justified but a num- 


ber are either misconceived or 
frankly bogus”. 

Doctors and dentists were 
“bewildered” by the rising tide 
of riamflg re awarded ag?fngr 
their colleagues. 

Legal aid was often pro- 
vided in spite of the fragility of 
the case being put forward. 
More than 75 per cent of 
negligence cases reaching 
court were supported by legal 
aid, Mr Hargrove said. 

The dama 
in the case 


mages now payable 
i of a brain-damaged 


child “have escalated out of aD 
proportion”, he said. In 1970, 
it was possible that such a 
child would receive between 
£20,000 and £40,000 in 
compensation, but awards of 
between £300,000 and 
£650,000 were now common, j 

Mr Hargrove posed the 
question whether, lawyers 
were now being “too clever by 
half’ in extending and 
increasing damages “safe in 
the (false) assumption that 
there isabettontiess bucketof 
‘insurance money*- available”. 

He added: “What is certain 
is that an air of unreality is 
entering the computation of 
damages in medical neg- 
ligence cases, mid a ‘galloping 
consumption' of defence 
organization funds is occur- 
ring at a frightening rate.” 


Duke to 
visit 
Holland 


The Duke and Duchess of 
York are to visit The Nether- 
lands on October 4 marking 
their first foreign engagement 
together. 

They wiS attend the open- 
ing ceremony, performed by 
Queen Beatrix of The Nether- 
lands, of the Eastern Srhririt 
flood barrier — one of the 
world's biggest flood preven- 
tion schemes. 


£10,000 bail 
for Shinwell 


Ernest Hany Shin well, aged 
68, was remanded on bail to 
October 10, on a surety of 
£10,000 stood by Mr Samuel 
Shin well his brother, by mag- 
istrates at GuddhalL City of 
London, yesterday. 

Mr ShinwdL, a business 
consultant, of Melrose Ave- 
nue, Wiliesden, north-west 
London, is alleged to have 
attempted to evade by deceit 
liability to pay $6.25 million 
(£4.16 million) on March 27, 
1984, at the Yorkshire Bank, 
Cbeapside, City of London. 



Freeports 
caught in 
a ‘sea of 
red tape’ 


r tv 

Ursula Dawtry feeding docks yesterday at Papworth Hospital, Cambridgeshire, where, on 
Augusts, she became its fourteenth and youngest heart and lung transplant patient. Ursula, 
aged 16, from Priory Meadow School, St Osyth, Essex, said she had never felt better. 


a sea of red tape is prevent- 
ing Britain's six freeports from 
competing on. equal terms 
with their European rivals and 
creating hundreds of jobs, the 
Adam Smith Institute claimed 
yesterday (Mark EDis writes). 

The right-wing research 
body campaigned vigorously 
for British freeports — spe- 
cially designated duty and tax- 
free zones for the import, 
manufacture and export of 
goods - and in a book pub- 
lished tomorrow says the 
experiment is flounder! og. 

HM Customs and Excise 
bear the brunt of criticism in 
the book. The Freeport 
Experiment. Dr Madsen Fine, 
president of the institute, said: 
“Customs and excise have not 
gone whole-heartedly into this 
business and never really ac- 
cepted the experiment.” 

The institute says that free- 
ports in Belfast, Birmingham, 
Cardiff, Liverpool, 
Southampton and Prestwick 
in Scotland, are “engrossed in 
the minutiae of regulations” 
and labour under the most 
stringently applied rules in 
Europe. 

A spokesman for the Cus- 
toms and Excise Board said 
that the rules for freeports 


Solicitors split on new rules 


were rigid, but it tried to apply 
efficiently. 


them 


Riot plea 
man is 
sentenced 
for affray 


Nigel Heath, who took part 
in an incident that led to the 
Handsworth riots, was sen- 
tenced to one year's imprison- 
ment suspended for two >ears 
yesterday. 

Birmingham Crown Court 
was told that he later tried to 
quell the troubles. 

Judge James Ross .QC. said 
the riots bod serious results 
but he accepted that Heath 
was horrified by them and had 
shown remorse for whai had 
happened by helping to stop 
the disturbances. 

Heath was arrested carrying 
a pool cue during fighting 
three hours before last 
September's riots began, the 
court was told. He was re- 
leased by police the next day, 
when he toured the riot area 
with a loud hailcr. and suc- 
ceeded in persuading the riot- 
ers to disperse and the police 
to reduce their presence. 

Heath, aged 32. of Regent 
Road. Handsworth. Bir- 
mingham. had denied the 
charges of affray and possess- 
ing an offensive weapon but 
was convicted by the jury. 

He was cleared of two 
charges of assaulting police 
officers. 

He was also fined £50 after 
he admitted posscssinga small 
amount of cannabis. 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Solicitors are divided over 
proposed changes to their 
practice rales which wiD en- 
able them to be employed by 
banks and building societies 
and carry out conveyancing 
when the Building Societies 
Bill becomes law. 

The draft rales, drawn up to 
comply with the Government's 
plans to extend conveyancing 
to financial institutions, have 
been attacked by (be West 
London Law Society as bound 
to “ruin the livelihood” of 
thousands of solicitors. 

In a statement in the Law 
Society Gazette, it nrges solic- 
itors to demand a referendum 
before any changes are made. 

For the first time solicitors 
would be able to share fees 
with unadmitted bodies. These 
bodies “will be offering 
conveyancing services to the 
general public in direct com- 
petition with the private prac- 
titioners, who form the bulk of 
the Law Society's own 
membership,” the society 
says. 


As a result, the profession's 
“independence, skill and 
reputation, oar corporate 
strength and discipline will be 
exploited by others for finan- 
cial gain” and on a scale 
which conld pat many private 
practitioners oat of business. 

Tim society does not accept 
the Law Society's statement 
that the law will oblige solic- 
itors to rhnng p their rales to 
enable them to be employed by 
their c om pet i tors. 

Instead, the new non-solic- 
itor licensed conveyancers, 
who will be able to do 
conveyancing from next spring 
after tests of competence, 
should service foe financial 
insti titi ons, foe West London 
Law Society proposes. 

The draft rales, which wiD 
also give solicitors greater 
freedom to advertise then- 
services. have won the backing 
of the force big provincial law 
societies of Birmingham, 
Liverpool and Manchester. 

The changes are vital If 
solicitors are able “effectively 


to counter the self-promotion 
of competitors outside the 
profession” and they urge the 
Law Society to king in the 
new rules without delay. If not. 
they say, individual solicitors 
may “take the law into their 
own bands 

The new rales will “preserve 
the essential principles of foe 
profession”; not demean its 
status and enhance rather 
than hinder its progress, foe 
societies say. 

The draft rules are attacked 
by two Cardiff solicitors, Mr 
John Loosemore and Mr Rob- 
ert Parsons, who are also 
directors iff a consultancy. 
Lawyers’ Planning Services. 
They say that if soOritors want 
to work for the financial 
institutions they should come 
off the rolL 

They urge the Law Society 
to “have the courage of its 
convictions” and make dear to 
the Lord Chancellor that it is 
not prepared to allow solicitors 
to be employed by banks and 
building societies. 


‘Levelling out’ in 
price of houses 


By a Staff Reporter 
House prices are showing 


the first signs of levelling out, 
latest 


according to the 

monthly survey by the Royal 
Institution of Chartered 
Surveyors. 

This is confirmed in a 
report by Britain's laigesi 
building society, the Halifax, 
which says that the present 
rapid rise in house prices is 
unlikely to continue, although 
it dismisses claims that a price 
“collapse” is on the horizon. 

Figures released today by 
the surveyors* institution 
show that nearly a quarter of 
the 206 estate agents who took 
part in the survey in England 
and Wales recorded no in- 
crease in house prices during 
the past three months. 

Although more than half the 
agents registered a 2 per cent 
increase in house prices, only 
one fifth recorded higher- 
than -average increases. 


Golf vandals 


Hundreds of holes which 
were dug across five greens at 
Rhondda Golf Club, South 
Wales, at the weekend, caused 
damage put at £10,000. 


Rape victims remain silent 


) chiv i 

artu ^ 


M.itheiS 

iiiiiiufl 


if. 1 


t 


Peter Evans 
.Affairs 
Correspondent 

■ An estimated 76 per cent of 
raped women were too scared 
or suspicions to report the 
attack to the police, according 
to a Women’s Own magazine 
survey. 

A qnarter of victims who did 
not go to the police said it was 
because they were afraid they 
would not be believed. 

Another 17 per cent feared 
the police would not be sympa- 
thetic, while 21 per cot 
wanted to forget the whole 
experience. 

Eight per rent could not face 
the thought of internal 
examination. 

When the rapist was the 
woman's husband or boy 
friend she was more reluctant 
to start legal proceedings. 
Only II per emit of those 
raped by their husbands went 
to foe police, and only 5 per 
cent ■ raped by a boy friend, 
compared with 43 per cent who 
were attacked by a stranger. 

Women’s Own received 
25*000 letters in foe survey 
many from women of all ages 
whose lives have been blighted 

Twelve per cent of those 
responding to the qnes- 
tiomairehad been raped, with 
a disturbing proportion of 


juveniles a ttack e d: 29 per cent 
raped between foe ages of 10 
and' 16 and a farther 14 per 
cent when they' were under 10. 

Most (41 pa- cent) were 
attacked between the ages of 
16 ami 24. 

Equally disturbing was foe 
proportion attacked by a rel- 
ative — 39 pm- cent of those 
under 10, and 20 per cent of 10 
to 16-year-olds. 

Nearly aO who replied (98 
per cent) to the questionnaire 
believed that rapists were not 
punished severely enough, 
with 8 1 per cent wanting to see 
life imprisonment imposed 
automatically and 60 per cent 
In favour of castration. 

Fear of rape meant that 68 
per cent now never walk home 
alone at night, 47 per emit 
would not go out unless some- 
one they trust agreed to see 
them borne, and 52 pa* cent 
avoided using public transport 
alone at night. . 

Even at borne foe fear 
persisted. Twenty-eight per 
cent said they did not feel safe 
within their own walls. That 
fear of rape had become an 
everyday part of women's 
lives. Forty-four per cent said 
that they were constantly 
aware of foe possibility, and a 
further 54- per cent said they 
sometimes felt vulnerable. 

Women's Own said the re- 


port would now be sent to 
evety MP in the country, to the 
police and to other interested 
authorities. 

A letter from a reader said: 

. . Tim victim was my 
daughter, then aged eight. 
Even fooi^h foe rape hap- 
pened four years ago, she still 
has bad dreams. . .This has 
rained her life, yet the man 
who a ttac ked her, an ex- 
policeman, was fined £125 and 
told to do community work. 

But Women’ll Own said 
there woe indications tint 
improved police 
were having some effect. 

Of those who reported a 
rape within the past six 
months, 54 per cent said they 
were treated with sympathy. 

The inevitable internal 
examination was also being 
carried out in a more com- 
passionate way ft seems: 54 
per cent of victims who went to 
the police in the past six 
months did not find the 
examination too much of an 
ordeal whereas more than five 
years ago only 24 per cent felt 
they had received sympathetic 
treatment. 

A heartening 74 per cent of 
women who have not been 
raped said they had no doubt 
that if it happened to them 
they would report it 

Spectrum, page 8 


Miscarriage 
woman admits 


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& 


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IV 


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Li 


f; r 


taking baby 

A woman who had a mis- 
carriage pretended she was 
still pregnant and abducted a 
baby oh the day she should 
have given birth, a Wolver- 
hampton court was told 
yesterday. 

Julie Williams, aged 20, 
who bad had several un- 
successful pregnancies, did 
not tell her parents or boy 
friend when she miscarried 

She took a new-boni girl 
from her crib at New Cross 
Hospital, Wolverhampton, 
the town's stipendiary mag- 
istrate was told. 

The abducted baby, Natalie 
Firm, was found safe and well 
at Miss Williams's home m 
Silva- Road. Brieriey Hill, 
West Midlands: 

Williams admitted unlaw- 
fully taking the baby and was 
remanded on bail until 
September 8 for medical and 
sooal inquiry reports with a 
condition that she resides in a 
secure hospital. 


Room 629 is 
renumbered in 
bombed hotel 


The Grand Hotel In Brigh- 
ton yesterday opened its doors 
to its first guests since an IRA 
bomb exploded on October 12, 
1984, kilting five people 
attending the Conservative 
Party conference, and injuring 

31 others (David Sapsted 
writes). 

Room 629, where foe bomb 
went off no longer exists; it 
has been substantially altered, 
and is now numbered 621. 

Since rebuilding started 18 
months ago. £11 million has 
been spent About £3.7 million 
went on repairing the bomb 
damage; the rest has been 
devoted to giving foe hotel a 
new and luxurious look, com- 
plete with swimming pool, 
nightclub, and executive 
rooms. 

The work is not finished. 
Only 40 of the 160 rooms are 
ready for occupation. The aim 
is to complete the rest in time 
for foe official opening on 
August 28. 




Fourteen fined 
at city’s court 
for prostitutes 


Fourteen women were fined 
a total of £940 with £780 costs 
when they appeared before a 
second “prostitutes only” 
court at Nottingham yes- 
terday, but hundreds are wait- 
ing to have cases heard. 

The couns were convened 
after a police drive against 
prostitution in the city's red 
light district. 

In-tbe first half of this year 
870 women were arrested in 
connection with prostitution, 
twice the number compared 
with the same period last year. 

Last Wednesday 10 women 
accused of loitering and 
soliciting for prostitution were 
fined a total of £895 with £230 
costs. 

The 14 women dealt with by 
Guildhall magistrates yes- 
terday were fined between £50 
and £210. 

Afterwards some of them 
said that they would have to 
go on foe streets to earn the 
money. 


According to the institution 
this represents a 10 per cent 
decline over the Iasi month, 
and reflects the dampening 
effect on the market caused by 
the holiday period. 

But in spite of the overall 
slowing in the house market, 
some towns registered an un- 
expectedly high level of activ- 
ity. particularly in areas of 
high unemployment, such as 
Newcastle upon Tyne, Hull 
and Leicester. 

Demand for houses in the 
higher price brackets has also 
been notably higher than nor- 
mal in most regions. 

In a special survey of East 
Anglia, the number of prop- 
erties sold was higher than 
average, although price in- 
creases remained steady, with 
nearly half of those surveyed, 
twice the national average, 
reporting no prices rises over 
the last quarter. 



ITS A I£>VELY DAY IN 


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•These projected vahies assume tbai onr current rates of bonus are mamamed. Bootes depend upon 

future profits, therefore benus rates cannot be guaranteed. Currently annul bonuses are 375% of 

ihe Guaranteed Som Assured and 759b of existing bonuses. Our cnrreni Capra] Boom rate is 75% of 

the Guaranteed Sum Assured. 

FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £20 

| Present Age 




Thai 


II iffurtfouwibtofcrfc 

Gtumnueed 

Anfloal 

Capital 

Projected 



nHM 

Sum 

Bonuses 

Boons 

Maturity 

Life 

Male 

Female 

Assured 


at 75% 

Value- 

Cover 

18-28 

18-32 

0.129 

£1,130 

£1397 

£4356 

£2.129 

30 

34 

2,128 

• 1,130 

1396 

4354 

2,128 

35 

39 

2,123 

1.127 

1392 

4342 

1123 

40 

44 

2,1 U 

1321 . 

1383 

4J815 

2,111 

45 

49 

£089 

1,109 

1367 

4,765- 

1089 

50 

54 

2.061 

1,094 

1,546 

4,701 

2j041 

55 

59 

2,034 

1,080 

1,526 

4340 

1,912 

60 

64 

L012 

1,068 

1,509 

43» 

1,670 

65 

69 

1,975 

1,049 

1,481 

4305 

1,422 

70-79 

74-79 

1,975 

1,049 

1,481 

4305 

1.166 

I! FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £50 | 

18-28 

18-32 

£5.492 

C2.916 

01.119 

£12327 

£5*492 

30 

34 

5.489 

2,915 

4,117 

12331 

5.469 

35 

39 

5.176 

1908 

4,107 

12,491 

5,476 

40 

44 

5.445 

2391 

4,084 

12.420 

5,445 

45 

49 

5388 

2*61 

4,041 


5388 

50 

54 

5319 

1K4 

3.989 

12,132 

5366 

55 

59 

5.250 

2,788 

3.93S 

11,976 

4.935 

60 

64 

5398 

2,760 

3399 

11357 

4315 

65 

69 

5,107 

2J12 


It. 649 

3378 

7WJ 

74-79 

5.107 

27L2 

3330 

11,649 

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COMPLETE THIS COUPON 
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OFFER CLOSES 
29 AUGUST 86 


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Students could monitor 
academic standards, 
vice-chancellors say 


tiiL iiiviLb 1 U I ni^Oujl 17 i?60 


By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 


. A proposal that universities 
monitor academic standards 
by asking students what they 
think of their courses and their 
lecturers is contained in a 
report from the university 
vice-chancellors’ . committee 
which is due to be published 
This autumn. 

It says that appraisal of 
courses by students is widely 
used in the United States and 
increasingly so in the United 
Kingdom. It can take the form 
of a questionnaire to students 
asking for their views on 
courses, degree programmes 
and teaching effectiveness. 
Universities are asked to con- 
sider such ideas. 

-The long-awaited report 
from the Committee of Vice- 
Chancellors and Principals on 
academic standards, set up in 
response to questions from Sir 
Keith Joseph, former Sec- 
retary of State for Education 
and Science, contains three 
codes of practice: on external 
examiners, postgraduate re- 
search, and appeals proce- 
dures for postgraduates who 
fail to be awarded degrees. 

Three years ago. Sir Keith 
asked “what prospects there 
are for more radical changes 
directed to the maintenance or 
improvement of quality in the 
context of a more efficient use 
of resources”. 


The answer is the 36-page 
report which was strongly 
criticized yesterday by Re- 
form University Law and 
Educational Standards 
(Rules), a pressure group, for 
not stating in detail what is 
meant by academic standards. 

"Essentially this report is 
about academic standards and 
yet it has nothing to say about 
academic standa r ds," Mr 
Barry Adams, secretary of 
Rules, said. "Standards are 
taken for granted." 

The working group which 
produced the report was 
chaired by Professor Philip 
Reynolds, former vice-chan- 
cellor of Lancaster University, 
and contained Sir Randolph 
Quirk, former vice-chancellor 
of London University, and 
other eminent vice- 
chancellors. 

The report concentrates on 
practices and procedures^ 
universities for maintaining 
-standards. 

It says that the public is 
entitled to know that univer- 
sities are up to standard, but 
says any scrutiny should be 
undertaken by the universities 
themselves "not only because 
this duty is inherent in their 
charters and statutes but be- 
cause the task of monitoring 
must be so conducted as to 
stimulate and not to inhibit 


-and 


development 
innovation”. ■ 

It adds: "It is difficult for 
this task to be performed in a 
way that ensures this by any 
except university teachers, 
themselves engaged in re- 
search, who are in touch with 
the movement and advance of 
knowledge in their fields.” 

The code cm external 
examiners says that no univer- 
sity degree should be awarded 
unless one external examiner, 
from outside the institution, 
has taken part in the examin- 
ing process. 

The code on appeals by 
postgraduate students against 
degree results says that ap- 
peals are allowed in case of 
procedural irregularities in the 
examination, if there are spe- 
cial circumstances affecting 
the student’s performance, or 
if there is evidence of prej- 
udice or bias or inadequate 
assessment try an examiner. 

But appeals are not allowed 
for inadequate supervision, 
because students have rights 
to complain about that during 
their course. 

Mr Adams said the appeals 
mechanism for postgraduates 
was an improvement on the 
present position (some 
universities have no proce- 
dures) but it was for from 
being independent 





Energy saving: 2 

Houses designed 
with economy as 
a selling feature 

Most of the SO houses on show ai Energy World 
Keynes from Saturday hide their energy-saving devk 
the h 'alls of a conventional house. In the second of mi 


r the SO houses on show ai Energy World ai Milton 

' devices behind 

- . _ of two articles , 

Christopher Woman, Property Correspondent, describes what 
they contain. ■ 


Dr Chris Girtqn, an 
environmental scientist, and 
his wife, Helen, a solicitor, 
who both work in London^ are 
the first owners of one ox the 
specially built energy-savins 
houses. The Lifestyle 2000 
house is based on a Canadian 
design and is the fust of its 
kind to be built in the United 


Kingdom. 
The Girt 


The Russian grandmaster, Anatoly Karpov, aged 35, who joined tourists on a river trip to 
Greenwich during a break in the World Chess Championship contest with Gary Kasparov. 


Child of 3 ‘locked in police cell’ 


Mr Marie Fisher, Labour 
MP for Stoke-on-Trent, Cen- 
tral yesterday demanded an 
inquiry after a girl aged three 
spent an hour locked in a 
police cell because her mother 
could not pay £2 ofa motoring 
fine. 

Karen Cartner, aged 26, of 
Brackenfield Avenue, Stoke- 
on-Trent, was issued with a 
warrant with bail for alleged 
non-payment of fines. When 


she arrived at Hanley police 
station. Stoke, she was ar- 
rested, searched and locked up 
with her daughter. 

Miss Cartner claims that 
police told her she would stay 
in custody until fines totalling 
£128 had been paid. 

She scraped together £126 
but it was not unul Mr Brian 
Cartner, her lather, arrived 
with the outstanding £2 an 


hour later that mother and 
child were released. 

Mr Fisher said: “I am 
contacting the chief constable 
immediately to demand a full 
investigation into what 
happened" 

Staffordshire police said 
yesterday: “If anyone wants to 
make a complaint there are 
proper channels to go through. 
We have no comment to make 
at this stage." 



__ j Girtcns liked it because 
the timber-framed house has a 
traditional appearance, and it 
has a conservatory with a solar 
wall to provide warm air. 

The main energy saving, 
however, is from increased 
insulation and draught-seal- 
ing, a heat exchange which 
uses the warmth from stale air 
to pre-heat incoming fresh air, 
double glaring and a condens- 
inggas boiler. 

The house measures 71.3 on 
the Milton Keynes Enemy 
Cost Index, putting it well 
within the standard laid down 
for the exhibition. It is es- 
timated that heating costs can 
be reduced by up to 70 per 
cent and eneigy consumption 
halved in the four-bedroom, 
three-bathroom house. 

It is estimated that it could 
cost only £70 a year to beat. 

The bouse which claims to 
be tire most efficient is one of 
three units built by Laing 
Homes, with a rating of 41.9. 

John Salter, marketing 
director, said they had not 
designed tire house specially, 
as their timber and brick 
houses were already energy 
efficient. They upgraded the 
standard house with double 
glazing, and added insolation 
m the roof and under the Hoot; 
which halved the heat loss. 

By these methods, using a 
heat-pump system to recover 
heat from air or water, and 
low-cost electricity, the three- 
bedroom house can be heated 
for £80 or less (an estimated 
£29 for water and £48 for 
heating). 

Laing estimates that the 
extra equipment would add 


about £3,000 to a house 
costing £60,000. 

It would add about £1.000 
to a flat costing £35,o00- 
40,000. Il seems very little for 
such savings. But Mr Salter 
tints out that people still 
: to the price of the house,, 
without considering, the run- 
ning costs. 

Several of the houses use. 
passive solar design, which 
provides space heating from 
sunlight by means of censer- - 
vatones or large south-fed ng 
windows. 

One is built by Constructive 
Individuals, which enables 
unskill ed people to build their 
own borne. Timber-framed, 
it relies on insulation mid 
south-feeing glazing for solar 
rain while using a high-ef- 
ficiency gas boiler. The house - 
costs £65,000 or more. 

KC Developments has built 
a conically-shaped house, 
partly underground, whose 
form minimizes external sur- 
faces while the doping earth 
banks against the walls re- 
duces heat loss. 

This four-bedroom house is 
the most futuristic on show, 
with a two-storey conser- 
vatory and an underfloor beat- 
ing system partially powered 
by solar panels. Its brick core 
acts both as a central struc- 
tural support and a heat bank. 
This house is valued at more 
than £150.000. 

Hosby, Denmark’s biggest 
house builder, has put one of 
its standard houses into the- 
exhibition without modifica- 
tion, achieving a rating of 
79 X 

Hus four-bedroom house 
costs more than £145,000, and 
uses triple glaring, insulation 
and a heat recycling system 

Substantial savings can be 
made easily. A guide pub- 
lished by the Energy Efficiency 
Office, Department of Energy, 
estimates that beating costs 
can be halved by good insula- 
tion. 

Concluded 


Majority 

‘against 

secrecy’ 

Most people want to end the 
secrecy surrounding informa- 
tion collected by public 
authorities, according to an 
opinion poll published 
today on the seventy-1 
anniversary of the passing of 
the Official Secrets Act 

The survey, carried out on 
behalf of tire Campaign for 
Freedom of Information by 
MORI, asked 1,909 people 
whether they would favour a 
freedom of information Act — 
.subject to safeguards on na- 
tional security, crime preven- 
tion and personal privacy. 

Only 23 per cent oppose the 
idea, while 65 per cent are in 
favour. 


WORTH MAKING A SONG AND DANCE ABOUT 

At this rate, the new Alliance & Leicester Investment Bond With such attractive terms as these, we to add 

will be a favourite for people on die lookout for a generous the Alliance SC Leicester Investment Bond is a linitoxl issue; 

i ■ 


are more nicely to oem 
(69 per cent and 72 per cent 
respectively) than women and 
older people (62 per cent and 
61 percent). 

Regional analysis shows 
there is little difference of 
opinion across England and 
Wales. But, at 72 per cent, the 
Scots are much more in favour 
of such an AcL 
Mr Des Wilson, the 
campaign’s co-chairman, said 
that 69 per cent of Conser- 
vative supporters want the Act 
and only 25 per cent are 
against it. 

“All three major opposition 
parties support freedom of 
information be said. “So do 
all the civil service unions, 
and a wide variety of- other 
organizations. 

’Now we have dem- 
onstrated conclusively that 
the public do as well es- 
pecially Conservative 
supporters. In her refusal to 
act, the Prime Minister is now 

isolated in her obstinacy.” 


Visa plans 
provoke 
racial talk 

The Government's consid- 
eration of foe use of visas for 
Commonwealth visitors be- 
came a racial issue yesterday 
(Peter Evans writes). 

The Commission for Racial 
Equality, already concerned 
about foe way immigration 
control works, said: “We 
would be unhappy at further 
discriminatory procedures." 

The visas are one option 
being considered to ease foe 
problem highlighted in July by 
a sadden influx of Nigerians, 
who were forced to sleep on 
floors white awaiting inter- 
views with immigration offi- 
cers. 

The commission said in a 
report last year of its formal ' 
investigation of immigration 
control procedures that they 
put at a disadvantage people 


from & New Commonwealth 
and Pakistan. 

A spokesman now adds: 
“The proposal to introduce 
visas for visitors specifically 
from West Africa, India and 
other countries in Asia would ‘ 
cause great hardship to those 
legitimately seeking to ex- 
ercise their right to visit 
friends and relatives." 

Visas are not at present 
required for visits from people 
in Commonwealth countries 
ess they come from Sri 
Ianh»- 

Chnunonweaffo countries 
are concerned at the prospect 
of delays. . 

The Home Office said yes- 
terday that 169,600 visitors 
arrived in foe United Kingdom 
last year from India, 163,700 
from Nigeria and 11,000 from 


Planning law is eased 
for handicap homes 


By JHJ Sherman 


return on their money. 

Especially as the minimum investment required is just 
£2,500. 

The investment re ma i n s in the account for at least one 
year, 1- during which it will certainly pay you handsomely. 

Because no matter what future interest rates may be, during 
the first year of your investment the Bond guarantees to pay you 

annual interest at a level 3. 25% above our basic rate.* 

Alternatively, you can receive monthly income for the first 
year at a guaranteed 3% above our basic rate.* 

Then, at the end of the year, you can have access to your 
money with only 28 days’ written notice. 


INTEK3” *5 W5BUAU-* flWD ANNU AUj ANC THE INTEREST RATES ABE VARIABLE CURBS)! MONTHLY INTEREST BATE&a’.NEI tMNUUUlimSTMEM P0WOONE YEA* THEN WTM«MI^AT2BMYS « WSJCBtTE REFERS 10 THE V- 

t 'i *! V 


Health authorities wiH.no 
longer need planning consent 
for small community homes 
for the mentally handicapped 
under Department, of 
Environment proposals now 
out for consultation. 

The guida nce, contained in 
proposals by the department 
to modernize the Town and 
Country Planning Use Classes 
Order, 1972, would enable 
health authorities to buy 
houses without needing par- 
mission fora change of use of 
the building. 

The move has been wel- 
comed by the National Associ- 
ation of Health Authorities 
(Naha) which has now written 
to the country’s 192 health 
authorities ■ anting them to 
1 support the proposals. Many 
authorities have experienced 
delays and local opposition for 

community schemes when 

j A brighter idea altogether 

■ • — r~ J l Mr Philip Hunt,, the . 

rogation's director, de- 


Which means, of course, first come, first served. 

O * " 

So burry along to any one of our 430 brandies throughout 
the country or send off the coupon (no stamp needed) to 
Alliance & Leicester Building Society, FREEPOST, Hove 
Park, Hove, East Sussex BN3 2ZU. 

^ Investment Bond 

□ I/We enclose a cheque for £ 


Investment Bond Account (minimum £2,500). 


.to open an 


NAME 


ADDRESS 


POSTCODE 


STM IT/S 


ALLIANCE LEICESTER 


>JE READ* MQNEV PUB RATE. CUWKWTiy 5KANEI 


scribed foe proposals as a 
“significant victory in terms 
of the Government's care in 
the community policies”. Sev- 
eral authorities bad com- . 
plained that house tellers were 
put off by the delays incurred 
m dealing with the health 
service and prefe r red to sell to 
private buyers, he said. 

The proposals recommend 
that small community homes 
be made exempt from plan- 
ning consent provided that 
there are no more than sn 
permanent residents, un- 
related to each other. 

“There is no difference 
between the effect on a locality . 
of four or five mentally handi- 
capped adults and a house foU ' 
oF students, but the students 
do not have to seek planning 
permission,” Mr David 
Bowden, Brighton Health - 
Authority's district general 
manager, said.- "Mentally * 
band! capped people should be 
given the same rights as 
anyone else." 





THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


First Soviet-Israeli meeting in 19 years 

Talks end but contacts to continue 


From Om Krrinen, Helsinki 

The first formal meeting 
between Israeli and Soviet 
officials in !9 years began and 
ended here after 90 minutes 
yesterday, but both sides said 
the contacts would continue. 

The talks were on consular 
matters. 

The Soviet Union broke off 


the two governments “in due 
course” 

Yesterday and today had 
been reserved for the meet- 
ings. However, no formal 
agenda had been, agreed in 
advance, nor how long the 
sessions should last 
Mr Gol in s i s ted that it 


- ^ 




r 

!:«w' 


- -S-i’;. 


A' 

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a- 

t. 




diplomatic relations with Is- be wrong to consider 

rad after the Six Day War in d*® nieeting a failure. But the 
1967. 

Mr Ehud GoUhe Israeli 
spokesman, said afterwards 
that “contacts will continue,” 
mid Soviet sources here, used 

Plea to Moscow 

The Soviet Union has been 
asked to help Israel prepare 
its case against the suspected 
Nazi war criminal, Ivan John 
Demjanjuk, accused of haring 
been the mass executioner at 
Trebfinka (Ian Murray writes 
from Jerusalem). 

Moscow has been asked to 
provide copies of documents, 
inducting the identity card, of 
the so-called “Ivan the 
Terrible? which gives lull 
particulars of the executioner. 

Mr Yosef Harish, the Attor- 
ney-General, yesterday asked 
the High Coot for an exten- 
sion of the remand against the 
defendant until October 1. 

the same words to describe 
future steps. 

According to Mr Gol, the 
talks were conducted in . a 
“candid and concrete at- 
mosphere” in English and. 
without interpreters. He said 
the two sides had agreed that 
one session was sufficient to 
air their views. 

“We will be continuing our 
contacts with the Soviet 
Union through normal dip- 
lomatic channels”, he said. . 

He added that the possibil- 
ity of reciprocal visits to the 
Soviet Union and Israel had 
been discussed, and a derision 
would be takra on the issue by 


Soviet negotiators refused to 
comment on the talka. 

The meeting was very for- ■ 
mal, the sources said. The 
Russians tabled their wish to . 
. inspect the Finnish Embassy's 
B-smion, which looks after 
Soviet interests in Tel Aviv. 
They also asked for contact 
with Soviet citizens in Israel 
and to inspect Soviet property 
in the country. 

The Israeli delegation, fed 
by Mr Yehuda Horam, head 
of the East European Depart- 
ment at the Foreign Ministry, 
presented the Israeli position. 
“We told them that any such 
visit must be reciprocated 
and we assume they wiB take 
that position back to their 
Government," Mr Gol said 

“We for our pan presented 
the position of the Govern- 
ment on Soviet Jews and 
expressed our views over the 
prisoners of Zion,” Mr Gol 
added Israel also emphasized 
the danger posed by the arms 
race in the Middle East. 

Neither side revealed the 
timetable of fiiture contacts. 

According to Mr Gol, Octo- 
ber was mentioned but ito 
decision was taken. 

Both delegations win now 
report back to their govern- 
ments, and after that proper 
diplomatic channels would be 
used. Until now the Finnish 
Government has acted as an 
intermediary between the two 
countries. 

Even before the talks began 
the Russians insisted on keep- 
ing the Helsinki meeting to 
purely consular matters, while 
the Israelis wanted more sub- 



Finnish police holding back well-wishers and journalists crowding round Mr Yehnda Horam, the Israeli delegate. 


stantive political discussions. 

Most observers believe here 
— and a high-ranking Israeli 
source here shares this view — 
that the Russians want to 
proceed slowly towards better 
relations with Israel How- 
ever, relations with Israel are a 
very sensitive issue for Mos- 
cow because of the country's 
close ties with Arab countries. 

Arab concern was under- 
lined here yesterday by a 
statement pm out by the 
Palestine Liberation Org- 
anization: “We are sure that 
no political changes in Soviet 
foreign policy towards the 
Zionist entity will take place 


and there will be no establish- 
ment of diplomatic relations 
with Israel because the reasons 
why the Soviet Union had cut 
these relations with Israel are 
still unchanged ...” 

A group of Israeli tourists 
held a brief demonstration in 
from of the venue of the talks 
here before the meeting began. 
• MOSCOW: A Soviet For- 
eign Ministry spokesman yes- 
terday expressed surprise at 
the sudden ending of the 
Soviet-Israeli talks and hinted 
that an Israeli statement on 
the plight of Soviet Jews may 
have been tire cause (UPI 
reports). 


“They were over very, very 
quickly,” Mr Gennady 
Gerasimov, the spokesman, 
said. “I am surprised. They 
were to have lasted until 
Tuesday. As I have told you at 
previous press conferences the 
question (of Jewish emigra- 
tion from the Soviet Union) is 
not on the agenda. If Israel 
introduced this question that 
obviously means a change of 
agenda.” 

• JERUSALEM; A report on 
the talks is to be presented to 
the Israeli Cabinet, which 
originally ordered the delega- 
tion to raise the subject of 
Soviet Jewry at the meeting 


and to protest at Soviet arms 
supplies to Syria and Libya 
(Ian Murray writes). 

The Cabinet will consider 
the Soviet request to send a 
delegation to Israel to survey 
church property. 

A Foreign Ministry- spokes- 
man said: “There is lots of 
time. The meeting was short 
and we raised everything we 
wanted to. We hope' that now 
the first contact has been 
made there will be other 
meetings.” 

There were anti-Soviet 
demonstrations outside the 
Finnish Embassy in Tel Aviv 
yesterday. 


,'.w. 




Canada’s Tamil controversy 

Mulroney defence 
arouses anger 

From John Best, Ottawa 


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The controversy over Can- 
ada's decision to admit 154 Sri 
Lankan Tamil boat people 
continued yesterday in tire 
wake of a statement by Mr 
Brian Mulroney, the Prime 
Minister, vigorously defend- 
ing his Government's position. 

Mr Mahoney broke* week- 
long silence onthefesnewn 
Sunday, when he said that 
Canada would always be a- 
beacon to refugees who come 
to its shores seeking freedom* 

“Canada was but by im- 
migrants and refugees . and 
those who arrive in lifeboats 
off the coast of one of oar 
shores wOt not be turned 
away,” -he told reporters. 

The Prime Minister’s state- 
ment added farther foe! to the 
faroreover the Tamils, who 
earlier admitted that they lied 
to gain entry to Canada. 

They were pfocked from two 
lifeboats last Monday after 
being cast adrift off Canada’s 
east coast. A cargo vessel bad 
brought them from West 
Germany. 

AH test week they main- 
tained they had come directly 
from India -r as refugees from 
the dvfl war in Sri Lanka — 
but by the weekend they 
admitted they had fabricated 
their story. The admission 
that their voyage had origi- 
nated in West Germany was 
made at press conferences in 
Montreal and Toronto, where 
tije refugees are now living. 
West German police have 
identified the ship which 
brought them to Canada as the 


Aurigae, but its skipper, Herr 
Wolfgang Bindd, has denied 
that be was involved. 

The Canadian authorities 
are reported to be considering 
the legal aspects of die case* 
bat whether' charges trill be 
laid was undear yesterday. It 
wooM first have to be estab- 
lished, presumably, that- the 
refugees were in Canadian 
waters when cast adrift 

Canadian MPs are report- 
ing a flood of calls foom their 
constituents, condemning the 
Government’s decision. T h 
have even been suggests 
that Canada establish refugee 
detention centres where people 
arriving without valid, docu- 
ments could be confined until 
their cases had been 
considered. 

Mr Jim Hawkes, chairman 
of a Commons committee 
which has been studying Ca- 
nadian immigration policy, 
said that the Tamils should be 
sent bode to West Germany 
provided their safe haven 
there can be gnaranteed. 

However, there have also 
been public expressions of 
support for the Tamils, along 
the lines that tbey are des- 
perate people who need betp 
and that, therefore, the ques- 
tion of whether they told lies to 
get into Canada is irrelevant. 

That is, broadly, the po- 
sition taken by Mr Mnlnmey. 

Mr Mulroney added, never- 
theless, that immigration pro- 
cedures would be tightened up 
If this was respited. 

Letters, page 11 


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Gas to be 
rationed 
in Perth 

Perth (AP) - A strike by 330 
workers who seized control of 
Australia's largest offshore oil 
and gas rig threatened to cut 
off natural gas supplies to 
more than a million people, 
officials said yesterday. 

The workers, who struck in 
support of 14 drillers dis- 
missed last Wednesday, 
vowed to continue the sit-in 
on the North Rankin A plat- 
form until the 14 were 
reinstated. 

The men have refused to 
allow police and company 
officials to land by helicopter 
to discuss their demands. 

Woodside Petroleum, the 
rig's owner, said the dispute 
began when 14 members of a 
contract drilling company, 
Seadrill, stopped work on a 
gas well and left it in a 
“potentially dangerous 
situation” 

North Rankin A, 80. miles 
from Dampter m north-west 
Australia, is the hub of the 
huge north-west shelf natural ' 
gas project that supplies most 
of Western Australia's power 
needs. 

Although gas 1ms stopped 
flowing from the rig, wood- 
side has about a week's re- 
serves. It said the state energy 
commission planned to begin 
rationing in Perth, which has a 
million people, in the south-, 
west of the state if the dispute 
was not settled by last night 


Own bomb 
theory in 
car deaths 

From Susan MacDonald 
Fads 

Four men were killed when 
their car was destroyed by an 
explosion , early yesterday 
morning in Toulon, in the 
south or France. 

One of the dead has been 
identified as M Claude 
Noblia, president of a small 
extreme right-wing racist asso- 
ciation known as “SOS 
France.” . 

Even before this identifica- 
tion, police indicated that the 
four men had perhaps been 
planning a terrorist attack 
when the four kilos of ero- 
sive they had with them in the 
car exploded accidentally. The 
explosion occurred in a cen- 
tral area of the city with a large 
North African immigrant 
community. 

“SOS France” was formed a 
few months ago in Toulon 
under the banner' of “the 
defence of French citizens”. 
Its name is a take-off of the 
well-known organization 
“SOS Racism" formed two 
years ago to defend immi- 
grants* interests. Hie explo- 
sion was near offices used by 
“SOS Racism" until the 
organization moved to a new 

In May there were four’ 
racist-inspired bombings 
along the C5te d’Azur, two m 
Marseilles, and one in Toulon 
and Nice: . ... 



Mr Gandhi: 
troops to curl 


to deploy 
terrorism 


Police hold 
400 Hindu 
protesters 

Delhi (AP) —Police arrested 
400 Hindu protesters yes- 
terday after they staged a noisy 
demonstration outside the res- 
idence of Mr Bute Singh, the 
Home Minister, a Sikh, 
demanding his resignation for 
fading to curb Sikh terrorism. 

The demonstrators from the 
right-wing Bharatiya Janata 
(Indian People’s) Party shout- 
ed slogans blaming Mr Singh 
for the assassination of India’s 
former army chief 
General Aran Vaidya, who 
commanded the Army when 
troops stormed the Sikhs’ 
Golden Temple in 1984, was 
shot dead on August 10 by 
four Sikh extremists. Terrorist 
groups have vowed to kill 
other army generals involved 
in the temple attack. 

More than 2,000 police in 
riot gear occupied roads lead- 
ing to Mr Singh’s house. The 
protesters were allowed to 
make speeches before being 
arrested. A police source said 
they would be released later. 

Mr Madanla! Khurana, 
president of the local Bhara- 
tiya Janata party, told follow- 
ers that 'thousands of people 
would stage street protests if 
the Government of Mr Rajiv 
Gandhi, the Prime Minister, 
did not deploy troops in 
Punjab to curb Sikh terrorism. 

More than 500 people, 
mostly Hindus and dissident 
Sikhs, have been killed in 
Punjab this year by Sikh 
terrorists who are fighting for 
an independent nation. 


Optimism as both East and 
West aim for agreement 


By Rodney Cowton 
Negotiators in Stockholm 
today begin a month-long 
effort to win international 
agreement on confidence and 
security building measures in 
Europe. They do so in a mood 
of “cautious optimism” de- 
spite the fact that agreement 
has eluded them since negotia- 
tions opened in January 1 984. 
What has changed is that 


this summer both sides have 
shown a strong desire to reach 
agreement before the session 
ends on September 19. Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the So- 
viet Foreign Minister, in- 
dicated Moscow's feelings 
wheq he visited London test 
month. 

According to the West, the 
stumbling block in the past 
has been Russia and its 


Owen caffs for UK initiative 

Britain should take an in- 


dependent initiative on nuc- 
lear tests. Dr David Owen, 
leader of the Social Demo- 
cratic Party, said yesterday 
(Our Parliamentary Staff 
writes). 

In a statement on the exten- 
sion of the Soviet mora- 
torium, he said that Britain 
should propose a new start to 
trilateral comprehensive test 
ban talks and should urge the 


United States to accept, as a 
minimalist response to the 
Soviet initiative, a mora- 
torium on all nuclear testing 
above 10 kiltons. 

Such a ban, he said, would 
signal that Britain was “not 
prepared to support continued 
testing underground by the 
Americans with a view to 
extending nuclear explosions 
into space in connection with 
their SDI programme.” 


alliespressing for a treaty 
incorporating broad declara- 
tions of intent, while the West 
was seeking specific measures 
to restrain the threat or use of 
force. 

Hope is expressed by some 
diplomats that a compromise 
might be reached along the 
lines of the West agreeing to a 
declaration that neither side 
be the first to use force. 

The length of the negotiat- 
ing session is restricted by the 
requirement that a report on 
its progress, or lack of it. has to 
be given to a review meeting 
in Vienna beginning on 
November 4. This is regarded 
as ruling out any possibility of 
the Stockholm talks continu- 
ing.beyond September 19. 

The reaching of an agree- 
ment would be regarded as an 
important step towards a sum- 
mit meeting between Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov and Presi- 
denl Reagan. 


Anti-pollution 
squad launch 
raid on Capri 

Capri (AP) — This resort 
island has become a target for 
police seeking to dean up its 
azure waters and ensure the 
“purity" of its restaurant 


About 40 carabinieri from 
the nearby port of Sorrento 
spent this weekend in boats, 
and even helicopters, as tbey 
checked on suspected pollu- 
tion and other deterrents to 
tourists, the R Tempo news- 
paper reported on Sunday. 

Finding the Blue Grotto, the 
sea cave and main natural 
attraction, sullied by sewage* 
police tracked down the own- 
ers of the offending sewer 
pipes, shut them off and 
turned over their fimUwgp to 
the local magistrate for even- 
tual prosecution. 

They then turned their 
attention to restaurants, five of 
which were found to be serving 
frozen fish and meat that had 
been listed on their menus as 
fresh. 


Tornado rips through 
small Loire village 

From Susan MacDonald, Paris 


The inhabitants of the small 
town of Charite-sur-Loire in 
Nievre, central France, yes- 
terday surveyed the path of 
destruction taken on Sunday 
evening by a tornado, which 
left one woman dead and 18 
other people injured, two of 
them seriously. 

The tornado, bringing with 
it high winds, rain and hail- 
stones the size of goUbaffs, 
wrecked everything along its 
650ft-wide, 1 'A -mile path. 

Worst hit was a camt 


• FREIBURG: Hailstones as 
big as tennis balls wrecked 
homes and cars in south-west 
Germany overnight. 

Huge hailstones crashed 
through the roofs of houses, 
one narrowly missing a sleep- 
ing child. 

Torrential rain pouring 
through the gaping roof of a 
monastery in the Black Forest 
caused damage estimated at 
more than £320,700 to valu- 
able stucco ceilings. 


ping Six people were injured in a 
site near the Loire river where car accident resulting from 


more than 200 campers were 
left out in the cold after 
caravans were upturned or cut 
in two by felling trees, tents 
whisked away, and can buried 
under debris. 

The townspeople, who 
themselves suffered great 
losses, offered shelter to the 
holidaymakers. The woman 
killed was said to have been, 
hit by a felling tree. 


poor visibility, crops and 
forests were also badly dam- 
aged and lightning sparked 
several fires. 

• VIRGINIA BEACH: Hurr- 
icane Charley, with winds of 
75mph, lashed the central 
Atlantic coast of the US, 
causing a plane crash that 
killed three people and a 
storm surge of up to 5 ft along 
the coast (Reuter reports). 


NZ sets 
limited 
ban on 
Pretoria 

From Richard Long 
Wellington 

New Zealand decided yes- 
terday to impose limited sanc- 
tions on South Africa, banning 
farm imports from December 
1 and asking the national 
airline to stop acting as agent 
for South African Airways. 

Mr David Lange, the New 
Zealand Prime Minister, an- 
nouncing the decision after a 
Cabinet meeting, said that the 
Government was also op- 
posed totally to investment in 
South Africa and that legisla- 
tion to ban such investment 
was being considered. 

He said that the Cabinet 
bad also derided dun imports 
of uranium, coal, iron and 
steel should be prohibited. 
Details of such items and the 
dates from which the ban 
would be imposed would be 
announced later. 

The value of New Zealand 
agricultural imports from 
South Africa is tiny — only 
SNZ5.5 million (£1.8 mil- 
lion), mainly consisting of 
wine, peanuts, raisins, dried 
and preserved fruit, confec- 
tionery, seeds and bulbs and 
vegetable oils. 

New Zealand's total im- 
ports from South Africa in the 
year to June 30 were $NZ 26 J 
million. Exports totalled 
SNZ 22.5 million. 

Mr Lange said that the 
Government was banning the 
promotion of tourism to 
South Africa by government 
tourist offices. 

Mr Lange said that his 
Government was giving effect 
to the measures derided by the 
Commonwealth mini-sum- 
mit. 

“It is ray hope that the 
measures being taken by the 
Commonwealth and other 
countries may help persuade 
the South African Govern- 
ment to begin the process of 
dialogue that could lead to the 
establishment of a non-rarial 
and representative govern- 
ment in a united South 
Africa,” be said. 

• JOHANNESBURG: South 
Africa asserted yesterday that 
the effect of economic sanc- 
tions against it would be akin 
to chemical warfare, a weapon 
so indiscriminate that no one 
would be spared* "not even 
cats and dogs” (Michael 
Hornsby writes). 

Mr Louis Nel, the deputy 
Minister of Information and 
chief government spokesman, 
was commenting on US Sen- 
ate approval on Friday for a 
package of sanctions. 

“If the western world ap- 
plies sanctions, all South 
Africa’s peoples, and the peo- 
ple of the whole of the south- 
ern African region, will suffer, 
even cats and dogs . . . Sanc- 
tions are like chemical war- 
fere, everybody will suffer, 
and it is just as immoral” 

Mr Nel also castigated the 
“double standards” of western 
countries that opposed terror- 
ism yet felled to condemn the 
African National Congress 
(ANQ for “horrendous deeds 
of terror and violence”. 

He was referring to the 
killing of five people in two 
landmine explosions in the 
rural Eastern Transvaal on 
Sunday. He said the mines 
were Russian and claimed 
there was no doubt that the 
ANC had been responsible. 

“The succour and the tacit 
support given to the perpetra- 
tors of these murders, friends 
of the Ted Kennedys, the Bill 
Hawkes and the Biff Grays of 
this world, again demonstrate 
the double standards applied 
to South Africa” he said. 



Mr Nel: economic sanctions 
akin to chemical warfare 


Furious 

crowd 

lynches 

youth 

Val Verde. California (AFP) 
- A crowd of youths lynched 
one of their number after he 
shot one youth dead and 
injured three others. 

Gerardo Valle, aged 17, 
tried to intervene in a fight 
between two youths. 

One of them fetched his 
hunting gun from his car. shot 
the youth in the face and fired 
into the crowd of 30 to 60 

n iths who turned on him. 

ting him to death with a 
post. 

Flood flight 

Delhi (Reuter) - The In- 
dian Prime Minister. Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, flew over 
flood-ravaged areas of south- 
ern India where nearly 120 
people have been killed and 
military helicopters have had 
to rescue survivors and drop 
supplies to stranded villagers. 

Driver’s fury 

Bern (AP) — An angry 
driver dumped his car on the 
state rather than pay a 20 
Swiss francs (£8) speeding 
fine. He told police they could 
keep the 1969 Volvo, con- 
firmed in writing he would 
pay for towing and scrapping, 
and left the scene on foot. 

Plotter to die 

Brazzaville (AP) - Claude- 
Emest Ndalla, the former 
secretary-general of the ruling 
Congolese Labour Party, has 
been sentenced to death after 
being convicted of conspiracy 
to overthrow the Government 
in connection with two bomb- 
ings which killed nine people. 

Stay-aways 

^funich (AP) — Twenty- 
seven Polish and Czecho- 
slovak tourists abandoned 
their tour groups and re- 
mained in West Germany last 
week. 

Tamil attack 

Colombo (Reuter) — One 
government soldier and three 
Tamil guerrillas died in sepa- 
rate rebel attacks on two- 
military camps in Sri Lanka's 
northern Jaffna district 

Bank strike 

Beirut (Reuter) - Staff at 
the Central Bank of Lebanon 
staged a one-day protest strike 
yesterday, the first anniver- 
sary of the abduction of three 
Christian colleagues. 

Thirsty work 

Berlin (UPI) - Two East 
German bonder guards bolted 
from their watchtower and 
jumped off the Berlin Wall 
into the West, then celebrated 
at a bar where they were 
treated to beers. 

Death dive 

Quincy. Illinois (UPI) — 
Two American sky-divers 
drifted too close during a 
jump, entangling their para- 
chutes and plunging to their 
deaths before hundreds of 
spectators at the International 
Free Fall Convention. 

Gold for eyes 

Bern' (AFP) - Nearly 2,000 
Swiss responded in 1985 to a 
Red Cross appeal to citizens 
who replace their gold false 
teeth to hand in their old 
dentures ro help thousands of 
Nepalese with eye diseases. 

Prince jailed 

LameziaTerme. Italy (AFP) 

— Prince Hermann von Sach- 
sen of West Germany has been 
jailed for a year for attempting 
to smuggle 100 million lira 
(£43,000) out of the country in 
a private aircraft. 

Honest cop 

Corvallis, Oregon (AP) — 
Everyone in the audience 
knew the chief of the Albany 
police department was telling 
a lie when he took the podium, 
and they encouraged him to 
fib some more, but Chief 
Darrel Pepper’s story about a 
mule that got stuck in a 
swamp failed to win a prize. 


Pakistan Opposition admits doubts on Bhutto challenge 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Karachi 

The fritter campaign against 
the Pakistan Government 
dominated- by President Zia 
httWfhnj by MBS Ben arir 
Bhutto, daughter of the Prime 
Minister hanged by the Zia 
regime, seems to be getting off 
to a half-cocked start. 

Although a number of peo- 
ple have died in conflicts with 
the security forces in Lahore 
and Karachi, foe present 
disturbances have not yet at- 
tracted the whole-hearted sup- 
port of tite 10-party anti- 
government coalition, the 
Movement for the Restoration 

of Democracy . 

a number of file 
older warhorses of the demo- 
cratic movement are appar- 
to sit on the 
'ami wait mitil Miss 
Bhutto foils. 

“The heads of the other, 
parties- have been fmOdozed 
into accepting her, ” a 
pronrinment Karachi MRD 
supporter said. 

ignored the coatribn- 


tion of other members of the 
democratic movement keepfrg 
constant pressnre on the re- 
gime while she was in exile, 
and now she has told them: ‘If 
yon want to Isolate yourselves 
from the movement, then that 
is up to you*. Parties other 
than her Pakistan People's 
Party have become irrel- 
evant.” 

Mbs Bhutto’s autoc ra tic 
ways are said to have caused 
offence among die older 
generation of politicians. "Her 
party has become a fan dub. It 
has no manifesto, do party 
programme. She acts tike a 
film star," said one former 
opponent of her father, stiD in 
the MRD. “But once she fails 
to defiver the goods, people 
wfll lose patience with her.” 

Mbs Bhutto, at present in 
Karachi's central jaB after 
having addressed a nieeting 
banned by the Government, 
may also have lost the ability 
directly to control the opera- 
tions of the protest movement. 

The ultimatum which she 
presented to the Government- 




to call elections or fece mass 
demonstrations does not ex- 
pire until September, bat her 
supporters have already laun- 
ched an agitation to protest at 
her arrest In doing so they ran 
to risk of Morning the effec- 
tiveness of the weapon she was 
proposing to ose. 

• It is too early to say how the 
protests which began last 
njght wiD tarn out, but the 
indications are not wholly 
encomaging for Miss Bhutto. 

The main protests have so 
for come from the raral centres 
in Sind’s interior. Sind prov- 
ince has a long and turbulent 
history, but no rural uprising 
there has managed to rihenge 
any government. This was 
particularly proved in the 
tnrbntence of September 1983. 

For governments to be af- 
fected, there most he big urban 
uprisings. The only urban 
disturbances so for have come 
in Lahore and Karachi — key 
cities undoubtedly, but there 
has so for been nothing in 
Baluchistan* or the frostier, 
and no other Puqjab town, 


apart from Lahore, has felt 
any ripple of trouble. 

The numbers involved in 
last week’s running battles 
with the police in Lahore were 
derisorily small by the normal 
standards of such things in the 
subcontinent- Witnesses re- 
ported that the maximum 
number of people actively 
operating oa (he streets at the 
time was 1,800- 

In Karachi the disturbances 
have been limited to the 
suburb of Lyari, an area which 
people compare to Brixton in 
London or Harlem in New 
York. 

Lyarfs inhabitants are am- 
ong the most deprived and 
exploited in the country, and 
fed themselves outcasts in a 
society which has begun to 
develop a taste for a rising 
standard of living. 

A policeman on the streets 
there described them as Ne- 
groes, and indeed . many of 
them are said to be descen- 
dants of African slaves 
brought to these parts by Arab 
traders. They are popularly 


referred to as Sufis, a local 
term for Abyssinian. 

Though the demonstrations 

in Lyuri yesterday began to get 
increasingly bitter, they, no 
more than the outbreaks in 
rural Sind, wfll not cause the 
foil of the Government or even 
reimposftum of martial law. 

“1 was part of the movement 
against the Bhutto regime, and 
the Only way that you can 
bring a government down is if 
the lower middle classes ami 
the urban professionals are 
behind yon," Sirdar Sberbaz 
Mazari, brad of a powerful 
Baiuch dan and former leader 
iff an MRD party, said. 

“I see no sign of that at 
present The doctors and the 
lawyers and die shopkeepers 
are not supporting this agita- 
tion. Unless and nntfl they are 
involved, you will have do 
results.” 

Mr Wali Khan, oae of the 
few leaders of the MRD still at 
liberty, said yesterday that his 
party was not yet ready to start 
the protests, which have been 
called for by the People’s 
Party. He has hist formed the 


Awami National Party from a 
coalition of three other parties. 

He so tittle regards the 
chances of the present agita- 
tion succeeding that he left last 
night for a lv-day visit to the 
Soviet Union and a meeting iff 
the Afro-Asian Solidarity 
Organization. 

Other observers noted Miss 
Bhutto’s chances are not like 
Mrs Corazon Aquino’s were in 
the Philippines. Unlike the 
situation in Manila, the Oppo- 
sition is still essentially dis- 
united, the religious elements 
in the MRD are not wholly 
prepared to support the notion 
of a woman leader, and there is 
no evidence of any split in the 
armed forces. 

It is suggested that Miss 
Bhutto’s best hope of achiev- 
ing power might be to cause 
such an upheaval that a re- 
newed martial law regime 
comes into being. Once the 
newly active generals have got 
rid of President Zia, it is 
suggested that Miss Bhutto 
hopes to negotiate with than 
for a share in power. 






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OVERSEAS JNfcWS 


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The Sudan civil war 


Red Cross halts airlift 
of food to south after 


rebels shoot down plane 


From Charles Harrison, Nairobi 


The International Commit- 
tee of the Red Cross has halted 
its food relief airlift from 
Entebbe to Wau, in southern 
Sudan, which began only last 
Thursday in an attempt to 
alleviate the famine there. 

Red Cross officials said the 
airiifi would be restarted if an 
assurance of its safety could be 
obtained, otherwise the 
planesused for it would be 
withdrawn. 

The Sudan People's Libera- 
tion Army, which is fighting a 
guerrilla war against the Gov- 
ern menu yesterday confirmed 
that its forces shot down the 
Sudan Airways Fokker 
Friendship as it took off from 
Malakal, 400 miles south of 
Khartoum, on a scheduled 
flight on Saturday. 

The SPLA's clandestine ra- 
dio station, monitored here, 
said the plane was brought 
down by a missile. It said the 
Sudan Government must ac- 
cept responsibility for the loss 
of the 60 lives, because it had 
ignored an SPLA order ban- 
ning all flights over the “war 
zone." 

Yesterday the governor of 
Upper Nile province. Colonel 
Simon Manang, reported from 
Malakal that there were no 
survivors. All the 57 pas- 


sengers and three crew were 
Sudanese, he said and most of 
the passengers were women 
and children. 


Colonel Manang described 
the shooting down of .the plane 
as a “savage deed'. It crashed 
about four miles from Malakal ' 


Attack on rebels 


Mr John Luk, a spokesman in 
London for the SPLA, said 
that the shooting down of the 
plane on Saturday morning 
came only three hours after 
Libyan warplanes branched an 
attack on rebel positrons at the 
town of Bor, 300 miles away. 
He said that the strict air 
extension zone announced by 
the SPLA was imposed after it 
was learnt that Sudanese 
troops, backed by Libya, were 
preparing an offensive. 


airliner as an “enemy plane," 
and said the Fashoda battal- 
ion had carried out a “heroic, 
historic and successful op- 
eration.” 

“The deaths of the innocent 
civilians on the plane rest 
squarely on the shoulders of 
the Khartoum Government,” 
it claimed 

The radio added that the 
Sudanese Prime Minister, Mr 
Sadeq al-Mahdi, should aban- 
don his warlike attitude to the 
SPLA. 


It repeated allegations that 
the Prime Minister had visited 


Libya recently to obtain mili- 
tfor 


airport, after witnesses had 
seen a surface-to-air missile 
strike oue of its engines. 

The SPLA radio station, 
which operates from Addis 
Ababa, yesterday broadcast a 
message of congratulation to 
men of the SPLA's Fasboda 
Battalion for shooting down 
the aircraft. 

It described the civilian 


rsuppoi 
the SPLA, and claimed that 
13,000 Libyan troops were 
already in Sudan. 

Only hours before the plane 
was shot down, the SPLA 
issued a warning that all 
aircraft, including relief 
planes, were banned from 
flying over the “war zobe" 
because the Sudanese Army 
was using them to reinforce its 
positions in the south. 

Aid officials said yesterday 
that two million people now 
face starvation in the south of 
the country. Efforts are being 
made to move some food by 
road from Uganda to Juba. 


Chance to charm at snake festival 



Three youths celebrating 
Nag Panchami, the snake 
festival, yesterday in ShiraJa 
village, India. 

They ranght and wore a 
dozen non-venom ons ones 
around their necks and bod- 
ies. In India the snake is a 
symbol of life, strength and 
good lock. 


Impressionists moving house 


Paris (AP) — Thousands- 
crowded into the Jeu de 
Paume yesterday for a final 
look before the great museum 
of Impressionist an is dosed 
permanently. 

The Culture Ministry said 


the collection, with works by 
Cezanne, Renoir and Manet, 


had outgrown its quarters and 
was to be m< 


moved, with Im- 
pressionist works from the 
Louvre, to the Orsay Mu- 
seum, opening in December. 


Westland 


gathering pace 
to a 


new 

future 


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the wo 
helicopter 
speed record! 


A Westland Lynx has just beaten the world absolute speed 
record for any helicopter. The record is a direct result of 
an exciting development programme of revolutionary rotor 
blade technology in which Westland is the worlds leader and 
which should lead to significant export business. Dramatic . 
improvements in blade profile design and composites 
technology mean much more than the obvious benefits of 
high speed, they considerably increase manoeuvrability and 
virtually eliminate conventional maintenance problems and 
costs. They can also improve existing helicopters by retrofitting 
the new blades. Such technology is one example of Westland's 
commitment to improving helicopter and other defence equipment 
and systems engineering absolutely essential in todayb highly 
competitive markets. This achievement was with the support of tire 
Ministry of Defence and many companies in the aerospace industry. 

Our partnerships and programmes in Europe and North America 
demonstrate Westlandb international strength. 


‘Rasuttssutje&toa/lk& c on B riiman 


WESTLAND 

TEAMTECHNCftOGY 
Westland Helicopters Limited. YbovU, England 

Over thirty British based companies 
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Australia quits air 
exercise with US 
as trade war looms 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


Australia has followed up 
protests to Washington over 
what it condemns as un- 
friendly trade practices by 
withdrawing from a big air 
force exercise with the united 
States next month. 

What is emeigfng as a 
serious rift in muttons be- 
tween the two countries took a 

new turn yesterday when the 
Defence Ministry confirmed 
that die Royal Australian Air 
Force would not take part hi 
exercises with the US Navy 
and Air Force because of 
“resource constraints". 


linkage with the trade dispute, 
but Canberra has never before 
withdrawn from a defence 
project with its -dasesralfy, 
and the message is. 
ratable. 


Mr B31 Hayden, the Raw 
eign Minister, was “ 


critical of the Administration 
last week when be exchanged 
letters with Mr : Geo»Shira% 
the Secretory of SteJe.' 7 fo 
formalize the misting of NM 
Zealand from Anzus. 


There is a widespread 
conviction in Canberra that 
Washington has taken its 
friendship too much for 
granted, particularly given 
Australia's support in the 
effective dissolution last week 
of Anzns as a trilateral defence 
affiance. 

Ministers here are outraged 
that the Reagan Administra- 
tion has Mandly ignored 
Canberra's appeals against 
the decision to sol US grain at 
subsidized prices to Austra- 
lian customers, such as the 
Soviet Union. 

The Defence Ministry said 
participation in the Cape 
Thunder exercises in the Phil- 
ippines from September 5 to 
20 had been ‘‘deferred' 1 in 
fa vour of the next in the series 
in May. There was no public 


Australians saw theft ecofo* 
omy threatened with “terrible 
damage” at the hands of theft: 
best friend, Mr Hayden said. 
“We do not demand aid from 
the US. Australia is One of the 
few countries which has an 
adverse balance of trade with 
the US.” 

He repeated the message at 
the weekend: the trade war, 
which could cost Australia 
SAas 500 million (£205 m3- 
lion) a year, would undermine 
its defence capacity. 

“We won't be able to afford 
to buy helicopters or fly our 
aircraft as much as we want to, 
or go out on maritime surreO- 
lance patrols,” he said. 

The stage is set for the risk 
to Canberra next week by 
Senator Richard Lngar. chair- 
man of the Senate foreign 
relations committee, for talks 
on the trade issue. 


Cameroon 
mission 
by Peres 


Jerusalem — ' Mr Shim on 
Peres, the Israeli Prime Min- 
ister, is expected to fly to 
Cameroon next week when 
.the two countries renew dip- 
lomatic relations after 19 
years (Ian Murray writes). 

The West African country is 
one of six on the continent 
where Israel now has a con- 
sular interest section and 
where, according to Foreign 
Ministry sources, there have 
been talks recently about re- 
establishing the ties broken off 
at the outbreak of the Six Day 
War in 1967. 

A report on Israeli radio 
that relations were to be 
restored was not confirmed, 
but the ministry spokesman 
said it was normal practice to 
make no announcement until 
an agreement was completed. 

There have been persistent 
rumours in recent weeks that 
other African countries were 
to - renew relations, following 
the example of Ivory Coast, 
which agreed to exchange 
at the end of last 


ami 


year. 

Before the Six Day War, 
Israel had 29 embassies in 
Africa but rally South Africa, 
Lesotho, Swaziland and Ma- 
lawi have maintained rela- 


tions. Egypt, Zaire, Liberia 

)W Ivc 


and now Ivory Coast have 
diplomatic finks , and there 
has been a series of high-level 
private missions by senior 
Israeli officials and politicians 
in recent months to try to 
persuade Others to resume 
normal relations. 

These visits have been 
spearheaded by Mr David 
Khnche, director-general of 
the Foreign Ministry. 

Apart mom Cameroon, Ga- 
bon and Togo have been 
reported to be considering 
restoring relations. The other 
three countries where there 
are interest sections - are 
Ghana, Kenya and Burkina 
Faso: 

Given the Soviet influence 
in much of Africa, it is hoped 
here that the talks on consular 
matters between Israel and the 
Soviet Union will encourage 
others to re-establish links. 


Israel cuts 
funds to 
ministries 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 


The Israeli Cabinet has 
voted for a 3.9 per cent across- 
the-board cut in funding to all 
civilian ministries in a bid to 
slash the cost of bureaucracy 
by a further 320 miHton 
shekels (£160 million). 

The cuts were approved by 
14 to five votes with five 
abnentions. 

Many ministers expressed 
concern that education would 
inevitably suffer from these 
new economies and that the 
defence budget was not being 
reviewed by the entire Cab- 
inet 

Only last December the 
national budget was trimmed 
by 250 million shekels, with 
new levies Jjeing imposed on 
education and teachers having 


to give up free periods to save 
tours of pak 


' paid working 


60,000 
time. 

The National Parents’ 
Association has now written 
to the Government demand- 
ing that education be spared. 
Mr Yitzhak Navon, the Min- 
iser for Education, has al- 
ready warned his Cabinet 
colleagues that further cuts are 
impossible without reducing 
grants to cultural facilities, 
such as museums, orchestras 
and youth movements. 

Once again defence has 
been spared, with Mr Yitzhak 
Rabin, the Minister for De- 
fence; demanding a 92 million 
shekel increase in his budget 
because the value of the dollar 
has fallen against the shekel, 
so reducing the purchasing 
power of American aid. 

This feet, however, under- 
lines the successs of the co- 
alition Government's aus- 
terity programme in stabil- 
the economy and 
the runaway inflation 
rate. 

Fra* the &st time in recent 
years, the whole budget debate 
has been conducted in shekels 
rather than in dollars — as had 
been necessary until recently 
to ensure that figures with- 
stood exchange fluctuations. 


Zionist tombs daubed 


Jerusalem (Renter) — ‘Nazi 
swastikas were daubed on the 
tombs of modem Zionism's 
founding father, Theodore 
Herd, and the former Israeli 
Prime Minister, Golda Meir, 
during Sunday night. 

Ponte suspect ultra-ortho- 


dox Jewish fanatics were re- 
sponsible. 

Slogans on their tombs and 
those of lesser-known Zionist 
leaders indicated the desecra- 
tion was aimed out by Jews 
who consider the state of 
Israel an abo minatio n. 


Djibouti breaks Aden 
link over jet incident 


Djibouti (Reuter) — The 
Red Sea slate of Djibouti has 
broken air and sea links with 

nearby South Yemen after two 
MiG fighters of the South 
Yemeni Air Force intercepted 
an Air Djibouti airliner over 
the sea. 

Mr Moumin Bahdon Farah, 
the Djibouti Minister of For- 
eign Affaire, lodged a formal 
protest with the South Yemeni 
charge d'affaires and de- 
scribed the interception on 
Saturday as a . grave and 
disturbing act of piracy. 

The Air Djibouti Boeing 
720 was flying home from the . 
North Yemeni capital of 
Sanaa with 59 passengers on 
board when the two MiGs 
forced it to land at Aden. 

Armed men searched the 


plane, apparently in thetoge 


of finding .supporters 
former President. Mr Ali Nas- 
ser Mohammed, who lost 
power in South Yemen last 
January after bloody fighting 
between rival Marxist fac- 
tions, informed sources said. 
jHiey reported that Mr Hu& 


sein Kassem Ahmed, an asso- 
ciate of Mr Nasser Moham- 
med, was on board the p!ane^_ 
but was allowed to continue 
his journey after the Ethiopian 
pilot refused to take off with- 
OUl him. 

Mr Ahmed has been shut- 
tling through Djibouti on trips 
between Addis Ababa, where 
Mr Nasser Mohammed is 
living in exile, and Sanaa, 
where thousands of his 
supporters sought sanctuary* 

In Aden yesterday an of- 
ficial spokesman, quoted by 
Aden radio, said the airliner 
left its usual course and 
“strayed SO km (50 milesj'into 
prohibited Yemeni territory". 

The dispute is complicated • 
by the close ideological links 
between Marxist Ethiopia.and 
South Yemen and by the 
desire of both Yemeni govern- 
ments for good relations with 
each other. 

The interoqption of the . 

E lane marks the first time 
Djibouti has become caught 
up. in the affair. .' 



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Without a grain of remorse 


>* & 
, 3; Vi 


*THE HARVEST 
OF SORROW 

by Robert Conquest 


UKTuun 

lission 

Peres 


v> 


■~i Part 2: The famine rages 

v. : h 

; _ ■ ... , 

the winter of .1932 wore on, 
s Jw famine in the Ukrainian country- 
‘ beside grew steadily worse. On 
N November 20, a government 
:T ■■ **- decree withheld the distribotion of 

• k ;; J , any grain ai all to peasants in 

• ; payment for their work on collec- 
■ • r -V.'-,tive farms until Stalin's grain 

• .. delivery quota had been met. 

’-v Villages that could not meet the 
« demands were literally blockaded. 

| C v*n A ] A month later, a list was published 

* 31 fJH ft of whole districts “to which 

f> m supplies of commercial products 
have been halted until they 
^ UilyK B achieve a decisive improvement 
Ujn fulfilment of grain collective 
plans". Inhabitants of these 
blockaded districts were deponed 
^ , en masse to the north. 

* ia \ As the government's brigades of 
thugs and idealists probed houses 
■ and yards for grain in the later 
' months of 1932, the peasants 
invented methods of finding and 
; . preserving something to eat 

There were public attacks on 
hiding grain in the straw by 

• inadequate threshing, which took 
'--place on a number of collective 

• ^ farms. If the peasant took this 
. . grain to the local nationalized mill 

it would go to the government, so 
.-..local artisans built hand mills. 
"Party newspapers reported that 
~4they were discovered by the 
. hundred'— 200 in one district, 755 
in one month in another. When 
. .. Mhey were found, the constructor 
-and user were arrested. With or 
without such implements, extra or- 

• - dinary “bread" was made — for 
example, sunflower oil cake 

• soaked in water, but with millet 


Fifteen years after the 
Russian Revolution had 
removed the Soviet 
Union's private 
landowners, Stalin 
began his assault on the 
peasantry. Hundreds 
of thousands were 
deported or put in 
labour camps and then, 
by imposing 
unrealistic grain quotas, 
he starved the rest into 
submission, paying 
particular attention to 
the Ukraine, whose 
people had a tradition 
of independence. By the 
end of the campaign, 

14.5 million peasants 
across the Soviet 
Union lay dead; more 
than a third of them 
Ukrainians. 

and buckwheat chaff and a little 
rye flour to hold it together. 

There were local rebellions in 
the Ukraine throughout the winter 
and spring. The peasants were 
usually infuriated into revolt be- 
cause there was grain available, 
often, within miles of where they 
starved. Not all the grain was 
exported or sent to the cities or the 
army. Local granaries held re- 
t serves for emergencies such as 
war the famine itself was not 
sufficient occasion for then- 
release. 

Food available on the spot but 
denied to the starving constituted 
an unbearable provocation — 
particularly when grain and po- 
tatoes were piled up in the open 
and left to rot. In the Lubotino 
area, several thousand tons were 
held in a field, surrounded by 
barbed wire. When they began to 
go bad. they were transferred from 
the Potato Trust to die Alcohol . 
Trust, but were left in the fields 
until they were useless even for 
that. 

Riots took place with the sole 
aim of getting at grain in granaries 
or poiaioes in distilleries. In the 
village of Pusiovarivka, die Party 
secretary was killed and the po- 
tatoes seized. In 'punishment, 
about 100 peasants were shot. At 
Khmeliv, a “women’s revolt" 
stormed the granary and three 
were later sentenced. A witness of 
these events noted: “It happened 
at a time when people were hungry 
but still had strength." 

At the height of the famine in 
the spring of 1933, peasants in 



Mikolaiv province attacked an 
already-rotting dump of grain and 
were machine-gunned by the 
guards of OGPU, Stalin's secret 
police. In Poltava province, villag- 
ers looted a grain warehouse but 
some, too weak to carry the corn 
home, died on the way back and 
the rest were arrested next day. 
Many were shot, the rest given 
sentences of between five and 10 
years. 

The state devised systematic 
methods of extracting the 
peasant's family valuables. Even 
in small neighbourhood towns or 
the larger villages, a peasant was 
able to use the Toigsin (“trade 


with foreigners") shops. Part of 
the Soviet government's efforts to 
unearth any resources usable in 
the international market, these 
shops freely sold goods, including 
food, but accepted as payment 
only foreign currency and precious 
metal or stones. 

Many peasants had the odd gold 
ornament or coin which would 
bring them a little bread. At these 
shops, golden crosses or earrings 
would go for a few kilograms of 
flour or fat. A teacher received “50 
grammes of sugar, -or a cake of 
soap and 200 grammes of rice" for 
a silver dollar. 

In a village of Zhytomyr prov- 


ince, the landlords and other 
richer pre-revolutionary inhab- 
itants had been Roman Catholics. 
In the Catholic cemetery they had 
often been buried with gold rings 
and other jewellery. In the winter 
of 1932-33, villagers opened the 
graves secretly and used the 
jewellery to buy food. 

At the begj nning of 1 933, a third 
grain levy was announced and a 
further assault on the now non- 
existent reserves of the Ukrainian 
peasantry took place. People had 
been dying throughout the winter, 
but death on a mass scale really 
began early in March 1933. '■ 

"People had swollen faces and 


In a cabin near Kharkov, 
a 14-year-old girl and her 
brother, aged two and a 
half (left) survived. An eye- 
witness reported: “This 
young chfld crawled about 
the floor like a frog, and 
its poor little body was so 
deformed that it did not 
resemble a human 
being . . . black bread and 
potatoes in varying 
quantities had been the 
sole nourishment of this 
infant that had been on 
the point of death many 
times in the past winter 


legs and stomachs . . . and now 
they ate anything at alt" one 
observer wrote. "They caught 
mice. rats, sparrows, ants, 
earthworms. 

"They ground up bones into 
flour, and did the same with 
leather and shoe soles: they cut up 
old skins and furs to make noodles 
of a kind, and they cooked glue. 
And when the grass came up. they 
began to dig up the roots and eat 
the leaves and the buds; they used 
everything there was: dandelions, 
and burdock, and bluebells, and 
willowroou and sedums and 
nettles . . 

Murder became commonplace. 
In the village of Biika, Denys 
Ischenko killed his sister, his 
brother-in-law and their 1 6-year- 
okl daughter in order to obtain 
their 301b of flour. Ischenko also 
murdered his friend, Peiro 
Korobeynyk. who was carrying 
four loaves of bread which he had 
somehow obtained in the city. 
There are innumerable reports of 
suicide, almost invariably by 
hanging: mothers frequently put 
their children out of their misery. 

The most horrifying result was 
cannibalism. “Some went insane." 
the samizdat novelist Vasily 
Grossman wrote. "There were 
people who cut up and cooked 
corpses, who killed their own 
children and ate them. I saw one. 
She had been brought to the 
district centre under convoy. Her 
face was human, but her eyes were 
those of a wolf. These are can- 
nibals. they said, and must be 
shot" 

But not all were shot. In the late 
1930s, 325 cannibals from the 
Ukraine — 75 men and 250 


women - were reported to be still 
serving life sentences in Baltic- 
White Sea Canal prison camps. 
One man who had been working 
on the collectivization campaign 
in Siberia came back to the 
Ukraine in 1933 to find the 
population of his village “almost 
extinct'-'. 

Driven by desperation, large 
numbers of those who could still 
move left the villages. If they 
could not reach the cities, they 
hung around the railway stations. 
If unable to reach the stations, 
they went to the railway lines and 
begged bread from the passing 
trains. Even skilled workers in the 
Ukrainian cities found themselves 
existing on black bread, potatoes 
and salt fish. As early as the 
summer of 1932. office workers' 
bread rations had been cut in Kiev 
from 1 lb to l k lb a day. while 
industrial workers' rations were 
reduced from 2 lb to l'A lb. 

At the bread shops, there were 
queues more than 400 yards long, 
the people so weak that they were 
able to stand only by holding on to 
the belt of the person in front. 
Each would receive from under 1 
lb to under '■? lb of bread, the last 
few hundred perhaps getting noth- 
ing but tickets or chalked numbers 
on their hands to present the next 
day. 

The peasants flocked towards 
the cities to join these queues, to 
buy from those who had managed 
to get bread there, or simply under 
vaguely understood compulsion. 
Although road blocks and controls 
were set up to keep them out. 
many managed to get through. 

In the towns, eerie scenes took 
place. People hurried about their 
affairs in the normal way although 
“there were starving children, old 
men. girls, crawling about them on 
all fours", hardly able to beg. 
mainly ignored. 

In Kiev. Kharkov. 
Dnipropetrovsk and Odessa it 
became routine for the local 
authorities logo round the town in 
the early morning, clearing up the 
corpses. In 1933. about 150 dead 
bodies a day were gleaned in the 
streets of Poltava. 

% Adapted from The Harvest Of 
Sorrow by Robert Conquest, to be 
published by Hutchinson on Au- 
gust 28. price £16.95. 


( TOMORROW ) 

How Stalin kept 
his secret 

© Ttanw Nmmnim** LM. 19W 


Changing role of Hungary’s Catholics 


Church girds itself to compete 
with state for min ds of young 




r- -nbs 


idu# 




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v. f 




:k. 


ini' 


From Roger Boyes 
Budapest 

“Jesus arrives in Budapest," 
declared the oddly disturbing 
■ headline but as the bulky 
presence of the British lyricist 
Tim Rice seemed to confirm, 
the newspaper was celebrating 
the hit musical Jesus Christ 
Superstar rather than a sudden 
religious revival or the Second 
Coming. 

Something, though, is stir- 
ring in the becalmed religious 
life of Hungary. 

For years die Hungarians 
have been overshadowed by 
the strength and militancy of 1 
the Polish Catholic Church 
which, buoyed by a Polish 
Pope, has not been shy of 
criticizing the Government 
By contrast the Hungarian 
Primate, Cardinal Laszlo 
Lekai, who died last month, 
was a great conciliator, a man 
who believed in small steps. 
“The Hungarian mode! differs 
from the Polish," he 'said some 
months before he died. 

The Hungarian Church re- 
served the right to discipline 
priests who used “too sharp a 
voice, perhaps in a ‘Polish' 
.way". The new head of the 
Hungarian episcopate. Arch- 
bishop Laszlo Pacskai, will, in 
the view of many priests, have 
to adjust the Lekai line and 
perhaps put up a tougher from 
to the authorities. 

Cartoon 
politics for 
Chinese 

From Robert Grieves 
Peking 

The readers of two Shang- 
hai newspapers this weekend 
were treated to the first car- 
toon depictions of Chinese 
political figures since 1949. 

The cartoons of the Chinese 
leader, Mr Deng Xiaoping, 
and the Communist Party 
General Secretary, Mr Hu 
Yaobang, appeared on Friday 
in die conservative, Shanghai- 
based Liberation Daily ami in 
the Shanghai Culture and Art 
News. 

The cartoons were printed 
on the back page of Liberation 
Daily (circulation nearly one 
million) along with other car- 
toons that were exhibited in a 
Shanghai competition at the 
weekend. The Shanghai Art 
and Culture News carried the 
cartoons on its front page and 


“It’s not a question of 
timidity or bravery," com- 
mented a long-standing critic 
of the late cardinal. "We 
simply have to face, rather 
than avoid, our problems and 
do so honestly and directly." 

Cardinal Lekai was sec- 
retary to Cardinal Mind- 
szenty. his predecessor as 
Primate, and as such wit- 
nessed the humiliation of 
many priests at the hands of 
the Stalinist secret police. 

Cardinal Mindszenty him- 
self was arrested, jailed, tried 
and eventually sought refuge 
in the United States Embassy. 
Cardinal Lekai, by moving the 
Church out of an explicitly 
anti-communist corner, 
wanted to avoid a repetition of 
these terrors. 

But the problems to be 
tackled by the new Church 
leadership will inevitably 
mean some confrontation 
with the authorities. 

The most glaring issue is 
that of the so-called “bpsac 
communities”. There are be- 
tween 3,000 and 4,000 of them 
in Hungary, each grouping on 
average about 25 parishioners. 

They are essentially gather- 
ings of young people and the 
services often include guitar- 
playing priests, sennons that 
touch on politics or Hungar- 
ian history and long discus- 
sions. 

But about 5,000 follow a 


radical priest called Father 
Gyoeigy Bulan yi who, as- 
sisted by some 25 sympathetic 
defies, encourages pacifists to 
dodge the draft and does 
nothing to discourage criti- 
cism of the authorities by his 
young supporters. Not only 
the Government but also the 
bishops disapprove. 

Yet the new Primate will 
probably have to pul up with 
Father Bulanyi and the in- 
evitable criticisms from the 
Government, if only because 
of the chronic shortage of 
priests in Hungary. 

The basic communities are 
at least ensuring that the 
Catholic faith is reaching 
young people and, despite 
Cardinal LekaTs efforts, there . 
is really no way of splitting 
these young Christians into 
good, non-political ones and 
bad radicals. 

Hungary has only about 
2,400 priests (Poland could 
probably export this number 
as missionaries and not notice 
the difference) and about half 
of its episcopate are either 
extremely old or ill. The new 
Primate therefore has to re- 
juvenate the clergy. . which 
means a much more active 
role in church education and 
among young people. 

“It is a question of compet- 
ing for youngsters," a Buda- 
pest priest said, “of luring 
them away from state univer- 


sities and into our world.” The 
clever Minister of Religion, 
Mr Imre Miklos, spoiled by 
yearn of smooth sailing with 
Cardinal Lekai, may not Like 
that much. 

Before his death. Cardinal 
Lekai had worked out with the 
Vatican two ways of rejuv- 
enating the Church. When 
they are put into practice they 
will spell an uncomfortable 
lime for the authorities. 

The first move is to build up 
a new female religious order — 
the Sisters of Our Lady of 
Hungary — which will have an 
explicit responsibility for so- 
cial work. This is the first time 
that the Church order in 
Hungary has moved out of the 
sphere of teaching. 

Social work — dealing with 
alcoholics, potential suicides, 
broken families — will pull the 
Church into the mainstream 
of social criticism. 

The other big change is the 
authorization of laymen to 
preach, teach the Catechism, 
dispense Communion and, in 
the absence of ordained 
priests, run parishes. Women, 
too, will be allowed to work as 
so-called “co-operators". 

It is the bishops who choose 
these laymen, but the Govern- 
ment has veto powers and also 
insists that full-time co-op- 
erators swear allegiance to the 
state. - 



“Comrade Yaobang leads us in a new song”: a cartoon breaks with conventions. 


also ran * leading article about 
diem. 

Mr Deng was portrayed as a 
bridge player in a caricature 
entitled “The China Card," by 
a young artist named Zhang' 
Wei ping- 

far tbe cartoon. a foll-faced 
Mr Deng in a Mao jacket, 
rendered in a style similar to 
that of the Western cartoonist, 
Lurie, raises his right band' 
with a playing card that reads 


“ China style." On the table in 
front of him are arranged three 
cards that read “Modern- 
ization". The domestic China 
news service said Mr 
was portrayed "as 
and in control." 

Mr Ho, pictured by veteran 
cartoonist Ke Da in a sketch 
called “Comrade Yaobang 
leads ns in a new song," wears 
a Western suit and tie and has 
bis hair slicked back. With 


arms raised, eyes shut and 
mouth open, he appears to be 
crooning in a nightclub. 

fat an editorial entitled 
“Funny Chinese Characters," 
Hong Kong's South China 
Sunday Morning Post said: 
"Any doubts about the scope 
of China's current social and 
cultural change should be 
dispelled by the latest news 
from Shanghai - the political 
caricature is back," 



Senator Logan backing for a 
young democracy 

US letter 
of support 
delivered 
to Aquino 

From Keith Dalton 
. Manila 

American Senator Richard 
Lugar, who led a US mission 
to observe February’s pres- 
idential election in Manila, 
returned here yesterday to 
begin a three-day visit and to 
deliver a personal letter of 
support from President 
Reagan to President Aquino. 

After a 216-hour meeting 
with Mrs Aquino, Mr Lugar 
said the letter from Mr 
Reagan, who is due to meet 
the Philippines' leader next 
month, "simply indicated 
how much he looked forward 
to entertaining her. (and) how 
strongly he supports this 
democracy in the Phil- 
ippines':. 

■ Mrs Aquino is going ahead 
with an eight-day visit to the 
US beginning on September 
15. despite official and private 
warnings of a possible military 
coup or an attempted takeover 
by supporters of the deposed 
President, Mr Ferdinand 1 
Marcos. 

Mr Lugar said her sched- 
uled address to a joint session 
of Congress “will be very 
helpful" in securing speedy 
approval of a mufti-million- 
dollar aid package. He also 
said her talks with American 
business and banking leaders 
should attract more US 
investment to the country. 

The future of US bases in 
the country was not discussed. 
• Mourners shot: Eight 
mourners at a wake for a 
murder victim were them- 
selves shot dead before dawn 
yesterday by 10 masked men 
wearing military fatigues. 

The state-run Philippine 
News Agency said 10 others 
were wounded when the gun- 
men barged into a north 
Manila house and ordered the 
mourners to line up before 
opening fire with automatic 
rifles. 

Police said the motive for 
the killing was not known. 


Clampdown tries 
the drug addict 


From Onr South Asia 
Correspondent 
Kathmandu 

As the new Nepalese Gov- 
ernment takes stock of its 
position and faces up to the 
country's problems with an 
almost completely new Cabi- 
net, plans are being made for 
initiatives on two widely differ- 
ing bot internationally im- 
portant fronts. 

As with all Nepalese gov- 
ernments, the principal prob- 
lem that confronts tbe mini- 
sters of King Birendra Bikram 
Bit Shah Dev is the grinding 
poverty and economic chaos 
that make life uncommonly 
hard for the peasants. 

Officials are being some- 
what more confident of late 
that there will be an unproven 
menf in tbe economy — tbe 
balance of payments was in tbe 
black for the past year after 
two years in the red. even 
though tbe balance of trade 
was severely out of kilter. 

A severe devaluation last 
autumn was largely to be 
credited for the improved fig- 
ures, but an associated in- 
crease in costs will rapidly fuel 
inflation unless domestic' in- 
comes may be held down. 

The Finance Ministry is at 
present negotiating with the 
World Bank for a "structural 
adjustment loan" of “sig- 
nificant" proportions. While 
the loan will undoubtedly help 
the country's budgetary prob- 
lems, the conditions on which 
it may be granted will not 


NEPAL 

Part 2 


reduce the political difficulties 
of tbe Government 

It may well be compelled to 
withdraw fertilizer subsidies, 
and unravel the hidden sub- 
sidies to the consumer given by 
huge loans to public corpora- 
tions. An increase in the tax 
take — presently only 9 per 
cent of gross domestic product 

— is also possible. 

But one of the most striking 
changes the new Government 
plans to bring about is in 
control of the illicit narcotics 
trade. 

Nepal's drtm image stems 
from the 1960s, when Kath- 
mandu and its “Freak Street" 
was the last stop on the hippie 
road to paradise. 

According to a Jesuit mis- 
sion which has nude a speci- 
ality of looking after Nepal's 
own drug addicts, there are 
15,000 of them among tbe 
capital's population of 450,000 

— about one in 30 of the 
inhabitants. “Tea years ago," 
according to Father Tom 
Gafttey, who heads the St 
Xavier's social service centres, 
“there were a mere 50 hard- 
drug addicts here." 

Kathmandu has also be- 
come a key transit point for the 
international dnm trade. What 
can be bought lor $20 (£13) 
here, Father Gainey points 


to erase 
image 

out, can be sold on the streets 
of New York for $500. 

This international trade has 
increased dramatically since 
the opening of a direct Ka- 
raebi- Kathmandu air Huh, 
which brings the poppy fields 
of the Afghan frontier un- 
comfortably dose. 

Both social workers, such as 
Father Gafttey, and Western 
authorities with an interest in 
halting the drug trade are 
encouraged by clampdown 
plans Nepal is making. 

A senior government official 
noted that even without fur- 
ther legislation there had been 
an increase in drug arrests 
The official indicated that 
Nepal might even consider 
bringing in a penalty as severe 
as capital punishment for drug 
smuggling. "1 would certainly 
prefer a Malaysia-type so- 
lution.” be said. 

Until last year Nepal kept 
the death penalty for regicides 
only, but after an outbreak of 
bombing they introduced it for 
acts of terrorism, too. 

Western authorities expect 
the new measures to indude at 
least a customs crackdown on 
smuggling, the installation of a 
single authority to deal with 
tbe problem, and an extension 
of the special court set up to 
mete out punishment 
The special court last week 
handed out a three-year jail 
sentence and a fine of 15,000 
rupees (£500) to a West 
German girl trying to take 
hashish out of the country. 

Concluded 


Protesters in 
Peking for 
N-piant talks 

Peking (AFP) - An anti- 
nuclear group from Hong 
Kong said it was disappointed 
after meeting Chinese officials 
yesterday to protest about the 
planned construction of a 
nuclear power station close to 
the British territory. 

The delegation, which asked 
to meet Mr Zhao Ziyang, the 
Prime Minister, had cancelled 
the rest of its appointments 
during the visit 
They were waiting for an 
answer from Mr Zhao, a 
spokesman for the delegation. 
Mr Fung Chi Wood, said 
They wanted to meet people 
capable of making decisions. 

The 12-member delegation, 
canying a petition signed by 
more than one million Hong 
Kong residents opposed to the 
planned power station at Daya 
Bay. 32 miles north-east of 
Hong Kong, discussed mainly 
technical problems. Mr Fung, 
an Anglican minister, said. 


Chernobyl victims tell 
Pravda of their fears 


Moscow (Reuter) — Pravda 
published letters yesterday 
from people affected by the 
Chernobyl nuclear accident 
asking for more facts about the 
dangers they are facing and 
what their future may hold 

Describing rumour as an 
enemy no less dangerous than 
the radiation released Pravda 
criticized officials in affected 
zones for not providing 
enough information. 

“Above all. people are wor- 
ried by questions about radi- 
ation levels,” wrote a reader 
from Kiev, 80 miles south of 
ChemobyL “Some are asking: 
'Will our children mum to 
Kiev in September or will they 
spend the winter in pioneer 
eampsT" 

Children from Kiev were 
among more than 100,000 
people evacuated after the 
explosion at the nuclear power 
station on April 26. The 
accident killed at least 28 
people 


One letter came from a 
group of women from the 
Gomel region of Byelorussia 
sent to a sanatorium with their 
infants. Expressing concern 
about relatives staying behind, 
they said they faced insensitiv- 
ity from local leaders. 

Another woman complain- 
ed that people had repeatedly 
broken into her parents' home 
near Chernobyl after their 
evacuation, eliciting the com- 
ment from Pravda that police 
should make better efforts to 
keep order. 

The newspaper said it had 
received many letters from 
readers concerned about the 
health of workers inside the 
piemobyl plant during the 
first release of radiation, and 
answered with a letter from 1 9 
survivors of the blast 

They said they bad been 
sent to a radiological institute 
and had undergone intensive 
treatment. The\ felt ready to 
return to work won 


l 









Degrees of 
risk: earn 
or learn 

As A-level results are declared, 
schooMeavers have to decide 
between going to university, 
if they can get in, and starting 

m a job, if they can find one. 

Sally Brompton, in the first of a two-part 
series, reports on this crucial decision 


U was with a mixture of hope and 
dread that 1 9-ycar-old Lizzy Ella 
scanned her mail each morning, 
searching for the letter which dic- 
tated her immediate future and 
possibly affect the entire pattern of 
her life. Along with thousands of 
other young people, she was waiting 
for her A-level results to discover 
whether she had qualified to go to 
university. 

In today's climate of high un- 
employment and diminishing job 
expectations. Britain has become 
very much a country of those who 
have degrees and those who have 
not 

And despite the fact that un- 
employment among graduates has 
dropped dramatically in the past 
five years, youngsters like Lizzy Ella 
who have just received their A-level 
results still face the dilemma of 
deciding whether to enter the groves 
of academe for the sake of that 
glittering prize or to spend those 
often vital three years earning 
practical experience in the academi- 
cally grey area of commerce and 
industry. 

Almost a quarter of students who 
acquire three A-levels make a 
positive decision not to go to 
university, which is some indication 
of the extent to which a degree has 
become something of an unknown 
quantity. 

Apart from professions such as 
medicine and the law. where the 
necessary qualifications are cut and 
dried, an increasing number of 
school leavers is turning to careers 
in which apparent ability to do the 
job exists entirely in the eye of the 
beholder in a buyers' market. 

Certainly. Lizzy Ella is not un- 
usual in neither knowing what she 
wants to do when and if she 
graduates nor understanding what 
career benefits - if any — a degree 
may provide. “I can’t see any harm 
in having a degree", she argues. 
■■Surely it can only help?" 

Yet in spite of her vagueness she 
was so anxious to go to a red-brick 
university to read classical studies 
that she retook her three A-levels in 
the hope of improving on last year's 
grades — which she did. marginally. 

Her decision is fuelled by the 
desire to acquire some son of 
qualification plus a genuine interest 
in the classics, although she admits: 
*‘l can't actually think of any super 
job that requires a classical 
education". 

it is an attitude which suggests 
that a degree is. in many cases, no 
longer a measure of knowledge but a 
marketable commodity. Signifi- 
cantly. more university students are 
choosing to study social administra- 
tion and business studies than any 
other subject. Equally significant is 
the fact that of the 51.921 students 
who applied for that particular 
course last year, only 21.437 were 
accepted. 

While competition is high in all 
subjects — of 1 76.553 applicants to 
the 46 universities in the United 
Kingdom last year 82.889 were 
offered places — university is still 
regarded by many as a three-year 
respite from the traumas of the job 
market. 



Tm grateful that 
I started at 
the bottom’ 

GLARE GUYER 


feels that by starting at the bottom 
he gained a certain long-term 
advantage over his graduate col- 
leagues. “I don’t think going to 
university gives many people the 
ability to think on their feet", says 
Talbot. "And at least I have 
personally experienced how every 
department works". 

Despite winning a scholarship to 
his minor public school and passing 
three A-levels. Talbot left school at 
18 anxious to earn a living He 
admits that it has been a hard slog to 
the top. “To be honest. I do regret 
not going to university because it 
might have meant that I could have 
joined a big agency right at the 
beginning instead of spending lime 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 

SPECTRUM II 










Nicholas Taylor, aged 16, is 
typical when he says: “1 don't really 
feel 1 would be experienced enough 
to leave school at 17 and go straight 
into a job. I took most of my CWev- 
els when I was about a year younger 
than anyone else in my class and .1 
feel a year younger". 

With a dozen O-levels under his 
belt, Nicholas is currently studying 
for the three A-levels he plans to 
lake next year. His ambition is to 
read English at Cambridge but he 
says: “My main reason for wanting 
to go to university is not to achieve 
any academic excellence but be- 
cause I equate getting a degree — any 
degree — with getting a good job 
afterwards” 

U* is a realistic approach to his 
future and although he has yet to 
decide what career to follow - 
“possibly advertising, otherwise 
something vague in business" — he 
is considering spending an addi- 
tional two years articled to a 
solicitor in order to have “some- 
thing to fall back on if everything 
goes wrong". 

As it happens, advertising is one 
of those service industries in which 
a degree may open the first doors 
but is not necessarily an advantage 
in the long run. Roger Talbot, a 39- 
year-old account director with an 
advertising agency in Middlesex. 


'*m**-} 


‘I can’t think of^suf^r job thsit requires a classical education’ 


in small agencies learning the ropes. 

“And I think that, ultimately, 
there is a practical advantage be- 
cause university does give you a 
much more intelligent and keener 
mind — and possibly a much more 
disciplined mind" 

It is not the kind of practical 
advantage that 3 1 -year-old Jac- 
queline Gray has found lacking 
during her eight years as an insur- 
ance broker, “i considered going to 
university but 1 had an urge to 
travel and that was more important 
to me than further education", she 
says. “Also, at that time there were 
an awful lot of people who had got 
degrees and still had difficulty 
finding jobs. I felt I would have a 
good chance of getting a better job 
By not going to university". 

She got into broking through 
secretarial work and says: “I doubt 
if I would be doing the same job 
today if I had gone to university. It's 
not the most interesting of busi- 
nesses bul I'm very successful at it 
and good at what I do. Anyway, my 
only ambition was to make lots of 
money. 

“Now l*m a director of the 
company, well established with lots 
of clients and that's what I shall 
continue to do. I feel that from an 
education point of view graduates 
are at an advantage but business- 
wise they're not". 

That was something Clare Guyer 
discovered after leaving university. 
Guyer. now aged 38, is one of the 
approximately 15 per cent of stu- 
dents in Britain who for a variety of 
reasons leave university before 
taking final exams. 

Just two terms into her modern 
languages course at Birmingham 
University, she decided it was not 
what she wanted. “I expected it to 
be more stimulating'*, she recalls. “I 
was a bit immature and unsure of 
myself and I found that at univer- 
sity you don’t get much chance to 
gel to know yourself and what 
you're capable of doing as a 
person". 

Instead, she joined a London 
store as a management trainee and 
worked her way up to the position 
of buyer. Today, married with three 
children, she teaches and admin- 
istrates at a Youth Training Scheme 
school near her home in Essex. 

“I haven't the slightest regret 
about leaving university" she says. 
"If I had stayed on and gone into 
retailing as a graduate trainee I 
don't think I would have got on as 
fast as 1 did. 1 don't feel I would 
have gained much either financially 
or as a trainee. I'm very grateful that 


LIZZY ELLA 


I started at the bottom and worked 
my way up". 

It is certainly a philosophy that 
has paid off in Lhe past, as is 
illustrated by many of today's 
captains of industry. Both Gerald 
Ronson. chairman and chief exec- 
utive of the Heron Corporation, and 
Sir David Ptastow. managing direc- 
tor and chief executive of Vickers, 
are classic examples of high achiev- 
ers who have reached the top 
without the benefit of a university 
education. 

Now 47, Ronson left school at 1 5 
and went to work in his father's 
furniture factory. “I have no regrets 
about not going to university , he 
says, “but for those who have the 
ability and brain power to maxi- 




‘A degree was 
the first rung 
on the ladder’ 

DIANA 8ATTLE • 


mize a university education for 
their career. I think that is very 
worthwhile. But it is something they 
must really want to do because there 
are people who have the intellectual 
ability but don't apply themselves 
to academic learning." 

Sir David Plastow, aged 54, 
admits that he would like to have 
gone to university but was "rather 
preoccupied at the time with play- 
ing a lot of cricket". Instead, he 
spent five years as an indentured 
fitter, earning about £7 a week, 
before joining Vauxhatl Motors. 

Despite regretting his lack of 
academic qualifications, he feels 
that his “immediate immersion into 
industrial life taught me to relate to 


a lot of different people". And he 
believes that although a degree “sets 
one apart and is necessary for 
certain roles, the qualities required 
for posts in commerce and industry 
are those of being a self-starter, 
capable of making judgements and 
taking risks and above all of having 
leadership qualities". 

The possibility of combining such 
characteristics with an academic 
record is demonstrated by 32-year- 
old Diana Battle. After graduating 
in biology and physiology at Lon- 
don University, she sold space for 
an accountancy magazine, became 
articled to a chartered accountant 
for six months {“too boring, dear, 
absolutely deadly"), and ran Radio 
Caroline for two years before being 
called to the Bar. However, instead 
of serving her pupilage (“I decided 
this really wasn't for me") she 
started her own tax practice in 
London which led her into 
lecturing- 

Today she works as a tax adviser 
as well as lecturing in business 
affairs, tax accounting and law. 
“There's no doubt that having a 
degree was really the first rung on 
the ladder for me", she says, “but 
that alone wouldn't have got me- , 
where I am now. I think that further ; 
stop — in my case, training for the 
bar - makes you a much more 
viable commodity." 

It can be argued that those 
destined for the top are going to get 
there anyway, irrespective of 
university education. That is cer- 
tainly the conviction of Dr Dave 
Hessayon. the 58-yearold mil- 
lionaire chairman of Pan Briiannica 
Industries, an agricultural chemi- 
cals firm, and the world's top selling 
author of gardening books. Despite 
his own academic qualifications — a 
special honours degree in botany 
and chemistry from Leeds Univer- 
sity and a doctorate in soil sciences 
— he has no doubt that he would still 
be where he is today even if he had 
taken a non-academic route. 

"I would hgve worked my way up 
through the marketing side where a 
degree is not so essential". Dr 
Hessayon says. “Certainly as a 
writer my degree has never helped 
me. I’ve met -graduates who really 
can't string two sentences together". 

( TOMORROW ) 

What the headhunters 
look for and how they 
assess job-seekers 

© Tim** NMapapen Ud, 1386 


Invest from 
£2,000 
and enjoy a 

monthly 

income. 

Income Bonds now paying 11-25% jxa. Details from 
your post office. Or ring 0800 100 100 (free) anytime. 

Or send the coupon-no stamp needed. 

| To Nationjl Sj\ mgs. FREEPOST -4J35. Brisco! BSi 3YX. Please send me details. ~~j 


Yeats mystery unearthed 


ADDRESS 


2 STQ 3 DE 


I - — INCOME BONDS ag | 


ids 

1 NATIONAL 


Where is the great 
Irish poet buried? 
The issue has been 
raised again in an 
unlikely setting 


W.B. Yeats has suddenly be- 
come topical in an unexpected 
spot — the French Riviera. 
Three years before the 50th 
anniversary of the poet's 
death, the house in which he 
died, at Cap Martin, across 
the bay from Monte Carlo, is 
to be sold for redevelopment. 
And, thanks to the late Prin- 
cess Grace of Monaco, the 
tantalizing question of 
whether he is buried in nearby 
Roquebrnne cemetery, or in 
Sligo, Ireland, “under bare 
Ben Bn 1 ben’s bead", will soon 
be re-examined. 

As a tribute to his Irish- 
American wife. Prince Rainier 
established the Princess 
Grace Irish Library, a literary 
and cultural centre in Monaco. 
Next year, its annual sympo- 
sium will be on 'Yeats the 
European.' Papers will be 
delivered about the mystical 
dreamer during his days in 
Spain, France, Switzerland, 
Italy and especially his win- 
ters spent in the 
Mediterranean. 

Yeats died on January 28 . 
1939, in a building with peel- . 




Yeats: a raised profile 
‘ ing paint and rusty plumbing, 
which would iiave dis- 
appeared, an photographed 
and unremembered, had it rot 
been for rwo of the library's 
trustees. 

They tracked down the mod- 
est Hotel Ideal Sejour. and the 
small room, with its one large 
window with mosquito netting, 
opening onto a wrought-iron 
balcony looking out to the sea. 
This was Yeats's last mortal 
vision. 

Yeats died in bed on a 
Saturday; It was many hours 
before Canon Tupper, the 
Anglican vicar in Monte Carlo 
amved. The body was left in 
the room til! Monday morning 
when it was taken up the hill to 
the Catholic chapel in 
Roqnebrune. 

The death certificate at the 
Mairie at Cap Martin is in the 


name of “Butler, Yeats 
William," and ail references to 
the banal have disappeared. 
The pages from the register 
are not to be found. 

The Irish Government 
telegraphed condolences to 
Mrs Yeats and asked that the 
coffin should be returned to 
Ireland. Yeats had indicated 
that if he died in France he 
would like to be buried there. 
Later, he said, they could “dig 
him up." 

Family and friends left 
France with plans to bring the 
coffin to Drnmdiffe, Sligo, via 
Galway, after the summer. In 
September, 1939, war brake 
out. So for nine years, Yeats 
remained in a dirt grave. 

In 1948 the coffin was 
disinterred, but it was left in 
the cemetery chapel for five 
months. Finally, in Septem- 
ber, an Irish Corvette arrived 
in Nice to take the coffin to 
Galway. But there were ru- 
mours that the French had dng 
up the wrong body, that Yeats 
was still in France and a 
certain Capitaine Guillaume 
had ended up in Ireland. 

But wherever Yeats Is, un- 
der Ben Bnlben in Ireland or 
above Monte Carlo, the old 
villa in Cap Martin, remains — 
for a while. Perhaps, after ail, 
the Yeatsian scholars, next 
May. can toast a jar or two in 
the room where he died. 

JOIian Robertson 

©Tmm* Newnpapore LM-, 1386 


Guess who’s just 
discovered rape? 


A t Iasi. HYwkw's Own 
has discovered Tape- 
Feminist publications 
started dealing with it 20 
mars ago and. partly as a 
result of their continued 
struggle to offer outraged 
women a better deal, official 
perceptions of rape have 
changed. The London Rape 
Crisis Centre has been 
publishing annual reports 
since 1977. In Juno 1984 the 
Women's National Commis- 
sion set up an ad hoc working 
group to study women and 
violence: its report was pub- 
lished at the end of 1985. 

Yet Htmwn’s Own. having 
had 25.000 replies to a ques- 
tionnaire published in the 
magazine in May. dares to 
proclaim “Our report — your 
report — will now be sent to 
every MP in the country, to 
the police and other in- 
terested authorities. From 
now on no one in Britain wilt 
be able to say that there is no 
proper information on the 
subjecL" 

If Woman's Own had both- 
ered to research the informa- 
tion already available it 
would not have found so 
many of the results of its 
questionnaire “incredible". 
The magazine found that 76 
per cent of victims had not 
reported the crime to the 
police: lhe rape crisis centres 
have reported consistcntly 
that only one in four of the 
incidents they know of is also 
known to the police. How- 
ever, unlike the rape crisis 
centres. Woman's Own put 
words into women's mouths 
to explain why. Women were 
offered five alternative 
explanations: “I was afraid 
they'd be unsympathetic"; “I 
didn’t think they'd believe 
me"; “l couldn't stand the 
thought of those questions 
and the internal 
examination": “1 was too 
upset": “I just wanted to 
forget it had ever happened". 

Actually. women's 
unwillingness to report rape 
is quite realistic. The “clean- 
up rate" in rape cases — i.e.. 
those declared dosed — is 64 
percent in a third of cases no 
perpetrator is ever identified. 
In about half the cases known 
to the police the woman 
recognized her attacker, so 
the clear-up rate is largely due 
to the victim's identification 
and not to police woric. 

N ot all of the cases 
dcared up result in 
arrest; a recent survey 
revealed that only 80 per cent 
of arrests resulted in 
prosectuion. and only half of 
the prosecutions led to a 
conviction for rape or a 
related offence. 

Woman’s Own made no 
mention of rape crisis centres 
or counselling or women's 
support systems: jndeed it 
seems to be labouring under 
the delusion that it is the first 
publication to offer raped 
women compassion. “Who 
cares?” it wailed. “We do!" 

The magazine would have 
us understand that it ran the 
rape questionnaire “to dis- 
cover how widespread the 
problem is: and because pre- 
cious liule research has been 


The latest issue of 
Woman's Qivn 
features a ‘cynical 
attempt to exploit 
women’s suffering 
and rage’, says 
Germaine Greer 

carried out into this brutal 
crime". Students of the raw 
data might wonder why, if 
information is the goal, the 
questionnaire begins “In gen- 
eral. how do you fee) about 
the sentences given to con- 
victed rapists?" That ques- 
tion screened out all those 
who did not feel strongly, and 

would consequently not 
spend an hour on the ques- 
tionnaire. or bother to buy a 
stamp and post the letter. .As 
a result we have the shock- 
horror lead story that 98 per 
cent "of women" think sen- 
tences for convicted rapists 
arc too lenient. It is highly 
unlikely that 98 per cent of 
women know what sentences 
rapists actually get. 


B it 7 ! iNp-MiliirtUh 

RJSSSSS — 

If tsicsKav 
saeBSi— 




Shocking: but is there anything 

new behind tbe headlines? 

Four out of five of these 
same respondents want life 
imprisonment for rape: 60 
per cent of them think rapists 
should be castrated and 34 
per cent of them want hang- 
ing brought back for rape. 
This kind of emphasis is 
counterproductive. So few 
rapists are convicted because 
the crime is considered so 
grave that the accused must 
have every opportunity to 
defend himself. 

Actually, rape is simply 
having intercourse with a 
woman against her will: it is 
always despicable and cruel 
but it also happens to be a 
national sport. Brutal rape is 
ait outgrowth of the accepted 
practice of date-rape, of not 
taking no for an answer. 
Punishing tbe one with hang- 
ing while tolerating the other 
is a nonsense. 

Sex-and-violence sells 
newspapers; rape is the quint- 
essential expression of sCx 
with violence. This week's 
Woman's Own cover story 
represents no more than a 
cynical attempt to exploit 
women's suffering and milk 
the reservoir of women's rage 
for free, sensational copy. Its 
information value is nil. 

(g) Tinas Newspapers Ltd. 1996 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1032 


19 Flaw (S) 

20 Despatched (4) 
22 In favour (3) 


1 Second Portuguese 
city (6) 

5 Cheat (4) 

8 Armpit (5) 

9 Dramatic scene (7) 

II Encumbrance (8) 

13 Jetty (4) 

15 Lord Peter Wimsey 

creator (7.6) 

17 Therefore (4) 

18 Serendy joyful (8) 

21 In funds (7) 

22 Cut tack (5) 

23 Throw off (4) 

24 Game (6) 

DOWN 

2 Nabataean capital (5) 

3 Navy T A equivalent 
(M.l) 

4 Bone marrow in- 
flammation < 1 3) 

5 Owed amount (4) 

6 PanicuVar (7) 12 Sanity (4) 19 Flaw (5) 

7 Squalidness (10) 14 Permit (4) 20 Despatched (4) 

10 Not determined (10) 16 Formal robes (7) 22 In favour (3) 

SOLUTION TO NO 1031 

Sited 4 Quarrel 8 Relic 9 Enliven 10 Warranty II 
V . l7Tru6 18 Intruder 21 Stimuli 22 
Gunge 23 Sceptre 24 Limit 

1 Screw I 2 Tyler 3 Dictator 4 Questionnaire 5 .AIK 6 
Denim ZORunr 12 Madn zal 14 Elusive 15 Stasis 16 Arrest 19 


Happily, your help could 
make all the difference between 
a healthy okl age and infirmity 

Contrary to popular thought, infirmity is not an heritable result of old age- 
Indeed, medical research is today earning to terms with more and more 
traditional elderly ailments lihe senile 

dementia, tncontmerc^ 

fragBe bones, hypothermia and loss of Lste. 

We've every hope that one day soon 
Ihese can be cured fix good. But we need 
your help to cany on our work. Over 
£1 #000,000 is already well invested in 

nearly 70 key projects. It's nowhere near 
enough. Please become a Mend and fteto 
us make all the ttiffaence between a 

Adding life to yeare | 

TO: BRmSH FOUNDAnoFrORAGE RESEARCH”! 

. freepost, Lwmon ec4& iaq . 

I D»OtckJSead»«|ueliir£S«l0/il00/i> _ __ I 

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I — I 

| Address .... . __ j 

| ""SSgcMftlfcTrw } 


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THE -TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 

FASHION 




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HER: Shocking pink cotton cabled sweater E1SL95 'floral print voile skirt £32.95, voile headscarf £4-95, all from Monsoon, Covent 
Garden, WC2 and branches throughout the country. HIM: Fuschia and blue patchwork patterned cotton sweater, indigo blue linen 
trousers, both fromaselection at Malcolm Levene,-15.CWttem Street, Wl. Blue and wttitabengal striped cotton shirt El 7-99, from 
- selected branches.of. Marks & Spenceraround the country. His glasses froiji a selection at Dollond and Aitcfttsan 



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HER: Candy pink Fair Isle sweater £210. cream silk blouse £85. both from Edina Ronay at 141 King's Road. SW3; Liberty, W1 and 
Harvey Nichols; SW1 . Cream pleated ankle-length skirt £64, by Wild at Hyper-Hyper, Kensington High Street W8, Reaction 


Harvey Nichols; SW1 . Cream pleated ankle-length skirt £64, by Wild at Hy 
Premiere, Manchester and New Options, Bury St Edmunds. Pate straw hat 
HIM: Blue and yellow. Fair Isle sweater £49.50, khaki trousers £24 £5. froi 


gth skirt £64, by Wild at Hyper-Hyper. Kensington High Street W8, Reaction 
(Edmunds. Pate straw hat £31 . from Nicole FarW. St Christophers Place. Wl . 
khaki trousers £24.95, from S. Fisher, 18 The Market Covent Garden. WC2 


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HAND KNITTED, DESIGNER STYLE 


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W alk into the shops 
this week, and all you 
will find are pristine 
rails full of autumn collections 
of woolly coats and" heavy 


range which arrived in the 
shops at the beginning of this 
month. She is one of the few 
designers to do this extra 
collection. The Farhi shops 


sweaters. So contrary are Brit- - seem to stock the right clothes 
ish retailers that at the height at the right time They change 


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HER: Yellow cotton c 

matching skirt £89, 


jarvE1 18, yellow and black shift £72, 
icote Farhi, St Christopher’s Place, 


matching skirt £89, by Nicole Farhi, St Christopher’s Place, 
W1 . HIM: Yellow and black sweater £21.99, beige corduroy 
trousers £23.99, from Next for Men, South Motton Street Wl 


ypfwh 

If ii\ C*Jii W 




STJMMP.R SALE REDUCTIONS ON OUR 
COMPLETE RANGE OF KITCHENS . 
& BEDROOMS 
★ FREE DESIGN SERVICE 
★ COMPLETE INSTALLATION SERVICE 


of the holiday season, the 
lesser spotted sundress is a 
rare find indeed. 

. The last, of the summer 
- buys, with the shops full of 
autumn clothes, needs to be a 
classic and one item that most 
wardrobesare crying out for at 
this time of year is a new 
lightweight cover-up. The best 
tms year are traditional fair 
Isle or cable sweaters knitted 
in cotton. 

Since Benetton brightened 
up the high streets with a 
multi-coloured range of knit- 
wear, cardigans and sweaters 
.have become throw-over 
accessories, worn tied over the 
shoulders like, a scarf to co- 
ordinate with cord trousers or 
cotton summer skirts. Their 
success seems to lie in our 
ever-chan g in g British weather 
she who dares to leave home 
sleeveless in the morning will 
.return goose-pimpled and 
shivering by early evening. 

Nicole Farhi, who designs 
■ for the Stephen Marks label 
introduces knitwear to her 
collection with a mid-season 

Suede pumps with bow, £35.99. 
Lace-UDS. £35.99. High- 

hee 

£39 
Acc 


with the seasons, from tai- 
lored spring suits, crisp sum- 
mer whites, through to bright 
mid-summer silks and the 
long languorous cabled cotton 
cardigans in the shops now. 

B etty Jackson’s cruise 
collection, designed to 
link our long winter to 
spring, fits perfectly into this 
difficult transition period. 
And more by luck than, I 
would think, logical judge- 
ment it arrives in the shops 
next week. The nautical navy 
blue and cream lightweight 
ribbed cotton jersey skirts, 
with long-line cotton colle- 
giate sweaters and gaberdine 
blazers, are perfect for 
September weather and will 
also come into their own in 
January. 

The Next shops, catering for 
both men and women, have 
three phases to their autumn 
season and August sees the 
first wave of lightweight 
sweaters. The shape of the 
versatile cotton polo shirt for 
men is carried through into 
knitwear, teamed with 


needlecord trousers and a 
summer jacket 

This summer sees men's 
fashions m a very elegant 
English mood. Jackets are cut 
wide, in plain stub linens, and 
the colours are neutral allow- 
ing scope for bright Fair Isle 
sweaters or colourful abstract 
patterns. Dyed-in-the-wool 
English country gentlemen 
spurn the gaudy golfing styles 
that used to be the only 
alternative to the comfortable ; 
“Higgins” cardigan. So good ' 
hunting grounds for hand- 
knitted waistcoats, crew-neck 
sweaters arid cardigans are the 
smaller designer shops that 
commission their own 
patterns. 

S. Fisher in Covent Garden 
sell a wide range of country 
sporrif styles, including Mi- 
chael Ross's primary coloured 
Fair Isles. There is a boutique 
atmosphere at Malcolm 
Levene in Cbiltem Street 
where cool wool pleat-front 
trousers in subtle houndstooth 
checks are sold with elabo- 
rately patterned jumbo-sized 
sweaters. This preppy look 
suits both sexes, so a team 
effort and clever clothes swap- 
ping should see you through to 
planning your autumn 
wardrobe. 

Rebecca Tyrrel 


The recent boom in designer 
knitwear has revofutioiuzed 
hand-knitting. Yon need to be 
an experienced knitter to 
make the traditional Fair Isles 
and Arans, but with the in- 
trod action of new yarns, the 
knitwear companies are 
producing brochures with 
more fashionable styles. 

Designer fashion is the 
theme of the Christian de 
Falbe kits. His colour bro- 
chure features neutral col- 
oured cotton knits with a 
definite summer feel The 
sleeveless cardigans with 


^ner twisting cables and intricate 
uzed lacey-knrt vest tops are fairly 
to be complicated, but beginners can 
- to cut their knitting needles on 
Isles simple polo-collared tops and 
* in- ribbed cricket sweaters. Pat- 
tbe ' terns and yarn Grom Liberty, 
are or by mail order from Studio 
with Yarns, 97 Wakehorst Road, 
London SW11. 

the Ehrman are best known for 
i de their elaborate needlepoint de- 
bro- signs. Transfer these tap- 
col- estried patterns pn to an 
h a oversized cotton cardigan and 
The yon have a truly covetable 
with garment Knitting kits from 


Ehrman at 21-22 Vicarage 
Cate, London W8. 

The Designer Knitting book 
produced by Wendy wools is 
packed fnU of fun Ideas. 
Crunchy ribbed mini skirts in 
lemon and tangerine with zip- 
up tops and cut-away vests are 
for the young and slim, but 
there are softer Aran tunics in 
peaches and cream coloured 
yarns. The book costs 95p 
from House of Fraser stores. 

Photographs: CHRIS DAWES 
Makeup: RUTH SHELDON 

Suzy Menkes is on holiday 


Hie dunhill 
unique 

AT HARRODS. 



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Harrods, Knighratnidge, SW1 
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26 Castle Street, Edinburgh 
21 London Road, Tunbridge Wells 
I<> Hotvwell Hill, St. Albans 
16 The Parade, LeamingiBn Spa 


RING 0734 876 161 FOR BROCHURE 


OPENINGS 


• The ever expanding Next empire adds 
another branch 10 its tree tomorrow with the 
opening of the first Next Accessory shop at 
69A Fungs Road, SW3. The shoes are classic 
suede pumps adorned, of course, with Yoritie 
grosgrain tows, and belts in natural leather 
have matching sturdy bags for transporting 

• your Next cosmetics. Whatever next? 

# The chicest. highest shoes in town are 
designed by Claude Montana and Jean Paul 
Gaultier for Stephane Kefian whose first 
British shop has opened in Sloane Street, SW 1 . 
Woven leather pumps stand next- to sassy 
suede zipped ankle boots on slabs of cool white 

. marble. Prices siart at £52. 


"Binocular 
bag” £28.99. 
briefcase 
£49.99 





The classic design of the Dunhill Unique lighter has been unmistakable since 1 924. 
Today the new Dunhill Unique is butane-fuelled and available in either silver or 

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THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Cashpoint 

flashpoint 

Britain's 10.000 cash dispensing 
machines in tanks could be shut 
down if a baronet succeeds in 
getting an injunction against the 
Queen's bankers Coults and Co. 
Sir William Otho Jaffray has 
issued a writ against David 
Burdeu Money-Courts, chairman 
of Coults. a NatWest subsidiary, 
claiming that the use of dispensers 
breaches the 1 98S Companies Acl 
H e maintains that as the machines 
do not require users to sign 
receipts for withdrawals, the trans- 
actions cannot be audited by 
accountants: therefore the bank js 
breaking the law. Sir William is 
bringing the action on behalf of a 
friend. Welsh computer consul- 
tant Richard Williams, who also 
claims a long-standing copyright 
on a transaction slip designed for 
this purpose. Williams claims that 
his copyright is worth £2 million, 
but has offered it for sale to 
investors For a mere £300.000. He 
is a "vexatious litigant" in the eyes 
of the law because of a crop of 
similar actions he has taken 
against the high street banks, and 
cannot start a legal action without 
permission from a judge. Sir 
William is only too happy to 
oblige as his family has a long- 
standing feud with the Money- 
Coutts family over disputed trust 
funds. Coutts refuses to comment 

Lese-majeste 

If there is indeed alienation be- 
tween Mrs Thatcher and the 
Queen, author Leslie CunlifFe says 
it is not without precedent. In a 
new book. Great Royal Disasters, 
he recalls a Buckingham Palace 
garden party soon after Mrs T 
became prime minister. Seeing 
people waving, says Cunliffe. she 
(Mrs Thatcher) thought the adula- 
tion was for her. and waved back 
enthusiastically. This, he says, 
apparently irritated the Queen, 
who frostily withdrew into the 
palace, trailed by her corgis. 

Bier delivery 

Good news at last for the much- 
maligned undertaker concerning 
one of the profession's many 
occupational hazards — parking. 
As 'traffic congestion worsens, so 
the boys in black have found 
themselves obliged to do such 
unspeakable things as double park 
outside a cemetery and then hump 
a heavy coffin over the bonnet of i 
an offending Cortina. At last a 
firm called Road Cones Inter- ! 
national has come to the rescue 
with a black and white plastic 
cone, tastefully embossed with a 
cruxifix. which can be set down 
outside churchyards and cre- 
matoria to deter stray vehicles. 
Small wonder that undertakers are 
delighted with the device, and that 
a sales boom is reported. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘Better not tell Neville. He IiVes in 
hope of the ' 60 s malting a 
comeback." 


IQ I do 

"Exceedingly good looking 6ft lin 
American entrepreneur, with Har- 
vard MBA: seeks well-educated 
Englishwoman who wants a large 
family. Will consider relocating 
for the right woman." If this 
sounds like the man for you. then 
contact a new outfit called 
Gentlepeople. which describes it- 
self as a lonely hearts club catering, 
solely for the intellectual elite. 
Zelda Fischer, the founder, is over 
here from Massachusetts to open a 
UK office, and for the immodest 
sum of £500 vows that she can fix 
customers up with a wide range of 
prospective partners whom she 
has personally vetted for their 
educational suitability. "We have 
been having a wedding a week for 
the past two or three months", she 
says. Clearly she is hoping that the 
fear of being left on the shelf will 
bring in the custom: "I read in 
Npirsweek that unmarried women 
over 40 are more likely to be killed 
by terrorists than get married”, 
she tells me. Still, I have my 
doubts about the value of the 
organization, and for one very 
good reason: although her own 
marriage is on the rocks. 
Ms^ Fischer's refuses to avail her- 
self of such services herself. 

Expat and Mike 

More news of Norman Tebbit’s 
mailshot to i 00.000 British 
expatriates exhorting them to sign 
on the electoral role. As you will 
remember, the response has so far 
been poor, to say the least. One 
reason for this may have been 
provided bv Perry MacIntyre, a 
reader living in The Hague, who 
writes to say that despite extensive 
contacts among the British expat 
community, he knows of only one 
person who has received a Tebbit 
fetter. And he is an Irish national. 

PHS 


Why austerity 
is in store 
for Australia 

by David Butler 


Canberra 

The Australian economy — and 
with il Australian politics — are in 
crisis. Today Paul Keating, the 
Hawke government’s tough, prag- 
matic young treasurer, will unveil 
the harshest and least socialist 
budget ever framed by a Labor 
government in Australia. Keating 
wants to slash the government 
deficit by billions of dollars, 
hoping that his cuts wilt be enough 
to check a run on the Australian 
currency which, since 1984, has 
fallen from 92 cents to the US 
dollar to a mere 60 cents. 

The present trouble echoes 
Britain's in 1976 — a left-of-centre 
government faced by an amalgam 
of inflation, high interest rates, a 
balance of payments deficit and an 
uncertain deal with the unions. 
And, as in 1976, the Australians 
have suddenly realized how bad 
things are. 

When Keating floated the 
Australian dollar in December 
1983 he opened the door to a 35 
per cent devaluation against the 
US dollar and a 55 per cent 
devaluation against the yen. He 
did not foresee that the rise in 
interest rates needed to check the 
outflow, as well as to cope with 
domestic inflation and increased 
borrowing, would triple the 
government’s total indebtedness 
in a mere three years. The deficit 
on overseas trade is now equal to 7 
per cent of gnp, and world 
Financial centres seem to share 
Keating's fear of his country's 
becoming “a banana republic” 

Labor may feel this is all very 
unfair. Australia is still a rich 
country with high wages and 
relatively low prices. Hawke has 
an able cabinet which has man- 
aged affairs competently in a 
scandal-free way since taking of- 
fice in March 1983. 


He has maintained a high level 
of personal popularity against a 
notably unimpressive opposition. 
His consensual, middle-of-the- 
road approach has persuaded the 
unions, under successive "acc- 
ords”. to accept wage awards 
below the real increase in national 
income. He has presided over a 
growth rate which, until this year, 
averaged over 4 per cent Un- 
employment is lower than in 
almost every European country 
and job creation higher. 

Six weeks ago everyone took it 
for granted that when the election 
came. 18 months hence. Hawke 
and Labor would have no diffi- 
culty in securing a third term. 
Now you can get odds on a Liberal 
return to power. 

A Thatcheriie opposition has 
overtaken a moderate government 
in the polls not because of any 
basic ideological shift but because 
suddenly the country is seen to be 
in economic trouble; the party in 
office gets the blame. Daily front 
page stories about the plummeting 
Australian dollar appear to have 
panicked the electorate. A by- 
election in New South Wales two 
weeks ago saw a 17 per cent swing 
against Labor. 


The opposition has done little to 
earn this turnaround in electoral 
opinion. It has exploited the 
widespread anti-union feeling but 
its simultaneous advocacy of the 
deregulation of wages and of a 
national wage freeze is hardly 
convincing. Its desire to dismantle 
the "accord” and to take on the 
remarkably moderate Australian 
council of trade unions is scarcely 
a recipe for setting the economy to 
rights, ax least in the short run. 
And its espousal of a free market 
will do nothing to improve the 
terms of trade or help the be- 
leaguered wheat formers. 

La addition, the Liberals' spe- 
cific promises of lower taxes sit ill 
with unspecific promises of expen- 
diture cuts. And their National 
Party allies, most notably the 
egregious premier of Queensland, 
Sir John Bjelke-Petereen, have 
some conflicting ideas which an 
anti-Labor coalition would have 
difficulty in reconciling. But with 
Labor in trouble and the sudden 
p rospect of power, the Liberals 
have closed ranks. 

Australia has prospered for so 
long that today's chill economic 
winds will have sharp political 
repercussions. How do you a 


nation to accept a cut in its 
standard of living and and its 
disappointed expectations? 

Australians are being made 
painfully aware that the country's 
problems are world problems. 
There are no easy domestic solu- 
tions. Only about 15 per cent of 
expons are manufacturers; min- 
erals and agricultural products, 
roughly equally, make up the resL 
At a time of over-production, raw 
material prices are unlikely to rise. 
The problems of paying overseas 
creditors must grow, and living 
standards must foil. 

The political consequences of 
presiding over that adjustment 
win be hard to manage. Electoral 
logic and economic logic are at 
odds. Australians seem about to 
learn, as the British have learnt 
over the last 25 years, that no 
party has an answer the solutions 
devised in opposition are no more 
likely to work than those devised 
in government 

Both government and oppo- 
sition hope the situation will 
generate a sense of crisis acute 
enough to legitimate the tough, if 
different, measures which each 
believes to be necessary. The 
maturity of Australian voters will 
be tested by their reactions to the 
exaggerated alternatives which 
government and opposition offer. 
The economic choices are com- 
plex and not easy to understand. 
The Australian electorate, in the 
past extraordinarily stable in its 
loyalties, seems likely under the 
new pressures to show something 
of the' volatility, the capacity for 
sharp (but sometimes short-term) 
swings that over the last genera- 
tion, we have had to get used to in 
Britain. Australian politics are 
going to get more interesting. 

The author is a fellow of Nuffield 
College, Oxford. 


Alex Henney shows how privatization could be made to work 

The way ahead for water 


The proposal to privatize the 
regional water authorities origi- 
nated in the objection last year by 
Roy Watts, chairman of the 
Thames Water Authority (TWA), 
to the government forcing up 
water prices for reasons which bad 
nothing to do with the business 
and the interests of its customers, 
but a lot to do with reducing the 
Public Sector Borrowing Require- 
ment While the plan to sell off the 
authorities as normal profit moti- 
vated companies has been 
dropped the original problem 
remains. 

Over the past three years, at the 
government’s behest, the TWA 
has increased its water rate by 
almost 25 per cent Its profit in 
1985/86 was £150 million on a 
turnover of £501 million — a 
staggering figure by any standards, 
lei alone those of a financially 
riskless public monopoly. It not 
only financed all of its capital 
programme from cash but repaid 
£76 million of debL As Watts 
commented “The Treasury lakes 
too much". By comparison, the 
privately owned Essex Water 
Company, which serves 1.4 mil- 
lion people, reduced its prices over 
the same period by I per cent 
reflecting the benefit to customers 
of a staff-shedding reorganization. 
If the TWA was also a private 
statutory water company its rate 
would be a quarter lower. 

TWA's exorbitant profit is the 
consequence of unbridled monop- 
oly power exercised by and on 
behalf of the quasi owner, the 
government The major part of the 
“profit” is a surrogate tax. The 
rationale, such as it is. for TWA’s 
pricing is founded in the controls 
set out in the 1978 white paper 
Nationalised Industries . The La- 
bour government of the day 
expressed concern that the finan- 
cial performance of the state 
undertakings was often inad- 
equate: that pricing policies, es- 
pecially subsidies, were resulting 
in an inefficient allocation of 
resources; and that return on 
assets was lower than in the 
private sector, suggesting an in- 
efficient use of capital. 

The government introduced 
some financial controls and tar- 
gets for an acceptable return on 
assets. But the white paper, a 
typical product of Whitehall, was 
short on crisp analysis and long on 
generalizations and ambiguities; it 
said for example, that the “level 
of prices will be set in the light of 
general government policy" — an 
approach which allows change 
with the seasons, the phase of the 
moon, and the ministerial whims 
dressed up as pseudo science. 

The white paper claimed that 
"performance in relation to a 
financial target provides an effec- 


The Church of St Dimiana can be 
found in a tack street alley in a 
Cairo slum. It is a small, squat 
structure, built hard up against the 
walls of the houses on either side, 
distinctive only for its newness 
and two square towers which, in 
the tradition of the Coptic Chris- 
tian Church, flank the facade. 
Inside, the plaster on the walls is 
unpainted and electrical wiring 
protrudes from the pillars, as if the 
builders had left in a huny. 

Yet this unremarkable church 
in an unlovely street has now 
become a place of pilgrimage for 
thousands of Egyptians. For here, 
almost nightly, the Virgin Mary is 
said to appear. 

The phenomenon began last 
March. According to the faithful, 
St Dimiana. an early Egyptian 
martyr, was troubled because few 
people were choosing to worship 
in her new church. She therefore 
enlisted the help of the virgin 
Mary, who appeared in a great 
light above the church to house- 
wives hanging out washing on 
their balconies and children play- 
ing in the filth below. 

The vision moved inside the 
church, appearing at any time 
during the day or night.' Some- 
times it is simply a light; at others 
the light contains the outline of the 
Virgin in the classic pose, holding 
the Holy child. She has been 



A source of rampant profit — or a trust administered on behalf of the public? 


live discipline and is a measure of 
how well an industry is using its 
financial assets". While this is true 
of competitive industries, it is not 
true of a monopoly like water 
which can set any price it likes and 
achieve any target no matter how 
inefficient it is. Further, control- 
ling prices by financial targets only 
affects the allocation of resources 
when customers have a choice, 
based on prices, of how much of a 
given product they will consume; 
as 80 per cent of the income from 
water and sewarage is not me- 
tered. but is based on the rateable 
value of properties, the charges 
have a minimal effect on how 
much water we choose to use. 

The white paper's view that 
prices should be set "to cover 
costs, including the opportunity 
cost of capital” actually runs 
counter to what the government is 
doing. Most of the assets of a water 
authority have no other use than 
processing water and sewage, and 
so their “opportunity cost” —their 
value for other purposes —is 
small and is in no way related to 
the cost of creating them. 

Water organizations, whether 
privately or publicly owned, raise 
funds to undertake works on 
behalf of their customers on the 
financial security of the revenue 
which the customers can be made 
to provide through the water rate. 
To claim that consumers should 
subsequently have to contribute to 
a profit on assets for which they 
have already paid is as fatuous as 
suggesting that we should pay 
building societies a percentage of 
the increased value of our homes. 
It is reprehensible that the govern- 
ment should use the monopoly 
power of a public service to levy a 


tax. If politicians want to tax us 
through water they should do it 
openly, not through the tack door 
with an undeclared tax dressed up 
in Whitehall sophistry. 

Any measure which removes 
operations from Whitehall’s ca- 
pricious incompetence is desirable 
provided that the interests of the 
public are safeguarded. Regret- 
tably this aim was not foremost in 
the government's water privatiza- 
tion plans. It wanted to sell off the 
capital value of the undeclared tax 
to under-regulated profit-oriented 
companies that would have been 
motivated to lower the quality of 
service, minimize environmental 
spending, under-invest in the 
maintenance and development of 
their long-term assets and pollute 
rivers up to the allowed levels. 
Rather, the starting point for water 
privatization should be that a 
monopoly franchise to provide an 
essentia] public good is a privilege 
which should be exercised in the 
public interest. 

The Essex and the 27 other 
existing private statutory water 
oo mpanies provide a model. They 
are financed by borrowings se- 
cured on their ability to raise a 
water rate, and do not have to earn 
profits in the usual sense of the 
word. By law. any surplus revenue 
is credited to reducing the follow- 
ing year's charges. 

The companies are akin to a 
breakeven customer co-operative. 
While some are dozy, they have 
generally served their customers 
well in providing water more 
cheaply than the public water 
authorities and protecting them 
from the depredations of the 
Treasury. Their financial structure 
and lack of profit motive provides 


a flexible framework that allows 
them to look after their assets and 
to spend money on financially 
unprofitable, but socially de- 
sirable, purposes such as improv- 
ing the quality of river water and 
reducing pollution discharge into 
the sea near bathing beaches. 

The structure of the water 
companies should be updated and 
improved to allow them to di- 
versify their activities, in particu- 
lar to export skills and products 
and to tender for contracts over- 
seas. They should also be able to 
offer incentive payments to 
management for achieving perfor- 
mance targets. 

And they shoutd be properly 
regulated. Before 1974 they bad to 
justify their charges at public 
hearings, where customers and 
local authorities could challenge 
their spending; this procedure 
should be restored, as die abuses 
by the water authorities shows. 
We should have an independent 
water commission that operates 
openly and in the public interest to 
ensure that all suppliers are 
accountable to their customers, 
the public; that their spending is 
reasonable; that environmental 
standards are maintained and 
improved; and that customer 
complaints are independently ar- 
bitrated instead of being handled 
by the authorities’ own consumer 
front organizations. This ap- 
proach could also be relevant to 
privatizing other public utilities, 
such as electricity supply. 

Alex Henney is the author of 
Regulating Public and Privatised 
Monopolies. The Public Finance 
Foundation. 3 Robert St. London 

ivez 


Our Lady of the slum 
— miracle or hoax? 


accompanied by St George or 
Si Dimiana herself and. occa- 
sionally, she whispers "I am She, I 
am She”. 

Word of the visitation spread 
among the Copts, and hundreds of 
pilgrims now flock to the church 
every nighL The men sit down- 
stairs and the women in the galleTy 
above. Here they pray and chant 
supplications, working themselves 
into a religious frenzy, while 
incense is swung and cymbals 
clash. The Coptic rituals. like the 
language of the church, go back to 
the traditions of ancient Egypt 

Miracles have been recorded: a 
man. blinded by metal splinters, 
who regained his sight a crippled 
woman who picked up her 
crutches and walked. The list 
continues, each with a medical 
history appended. The Coptic 
Pope sent a delegation, who 
pronounced that a strange phen- 
omenon was indeed taking place. 
Evidence has been gathered from 
Muslims, considered in this in- 
stance to be more reliable wit- 
nesses than Christians themselves. 


Nothing of this has appeared in 
Egypt's daily press, except for one 
disparaging reference to boys play- 
ing with torches outside a church. 
Only the Copts’ own newspaper 
has carried the news in full. The 
Christians, who make up perhaps 
6 per cent of the population, see 
the official silence as an example 
of thehr treatment as an oppressed 
minority. 

It is more likely that the 
government wants to prevent 
large numbers of people collecting 
in an already overcrowded slum. 
As soon as the church began to 
attract crowds, a nightly cordon of 
security police sealed off the area, 
letting no one in or out between 
six in the evening and dawn the 
following day. An attempt to 
discredit the miracle was made by 
cutting off the electricity one 
nighL but the plan misfired. Those 
present say the Virgin appeared 
anyway, to lighten the darkness 
and confound unbelievers. 

Officialdom has not always 
been unwilling to recognize the 
Virgin Mary. The last occasion she 
was said to have visited Egypt 


regularly was in a church on the 
outer edge of Cairo after the defeat 
of the Egyptians in the 1967 war 
when, it was said, she was upset by 
the return of the Jews to Jeru- 
salem. The government sur- 
rounded the church with chairs 
and charged an .entrance fee: 
President Nasser himself visited 
the church by helicopter, but was 
said to have been unconvinced. 

The majority of the Coptic 
faithful, whose Christianity is stilt 
in the age of miracles, regards talk 
of laser beams and holograms as 
blasphemous. Sophisticated Cop- 
tic journalists are more sceptical, 
possibly because the Virgin does 
not appear whenever journalists 
are in the congregation. 

It all depends on faith. The 
revelation that a photograph of the 
Virgin is identical to one produced 
of her reputed appearances in 
Yugoslavia is. to the sceptic, proof 
of a put-up job. Bui to the believer 
il is confirmation of the authentic- 
ity of both the photograph and of 
the vision. The question of 
authenticity docs not. in any case, 
alter the vision's most important 
effect Millions of Christians are 
drawing comfort from the belief 
thaL as the Islamic tide gathers 
strength. God has not entirely 
foresaken them. 

Kate Finch 


Digby Anderson 

Facts that stay 
concealed 


Aids deaths will soar if 
"something” is not done soon. 
Within six years, according to a 
recent British Medical Journal 
editorial, deaths per month will be 
the equivalent of the crash of a 
folly-loaded jumbo jet. 

According to the Coflegp of 
Health, the “something which 
will stop this is information. The 
college may be right but it i s no t 
the only voice advocating inform- 
ation. More generally, among 
progressive persons, information^ 
giving is regarded as a "positive" 
step. They want it spread in 
campaigns about for example. 
Aids and homosexuality, funded 
by the taxpayer and they want it to 
be explicit, describing sexual acts 
in the language of those who 
indulge in them. 

Conversely, what is commonly 
viewed as "negative” is a "moral 
panic” with or without “hound- 
ing" of homosexuals. The tabloid 
newspapers are alleged to have 
encou rag ed both, so much so that 
it once seemed that the y, rather 
r ban the disease, were, for progres- 
sive persons, the problem. 

There is much to question in 
this account Health educationists 
have been aware for more than a 
decade that supplying mere 
information does not necessarily 
change attitudes, let alone behav- 
iour. Furthermore when it does, it 
often does so in unforeseen direc- 
tions. One wonders, therefore, 
why information is seen so un- 
critically as the answer. 

The reason, perhaps, is because 
it can play another role. Informa- 
tion-giving was part of that Sixties 
rhetoric of getting things out into 
the open, replacing old-fashioned 
fears, judgments, stigma and 
morality with “facts”. It is becom- 
ing increasingly clear that this 
game is still being played with the 
aim of preventing, at any cost. 
Aids being seen as a moral issue. 
Now that progressive persons are 
themselves panicking a tittle, we 
see that what they rally objected 
to was a moral panic they don't 
mind a medical panic or indeed a 
panic about lack of information. 

The attempt to suppress the 
moral aspects of Aids won't work, 
as anyone who looks at leaflets 
such as those from the Terrence 
Higgins Trust can see. They 
purport to tell homosexuals which 
practices are safe, which dan- 
gerous, and are aggressively ex- 
plicit — even flaunting their 
explicitness. 

We are told that anal sex of any 
variety — and there are several — 
is very risky even with a condom. 
Deep kissing and oral sex are not 
sale. Homosexuals appear to get 
up to a range of other bizarre and 
revolting practices which are 
particularly unsafe if the skin is 
broken. 

The pamphlets claim that “with 
a little care and knowledge you can 
still enjoy sex and life and be sure 
of staying healthy” But their long 


list of dangerous practices leaves 
next to none which arc safe- soto 
masturbation, talking fontasiei 

and sex toys (as long as they are 

not shared j. 

The conclusion they should 
have reached is that more, or jess 
all homosexual practice *. dan- 
gerous. Why are they so explicit in 
their descriptions of sexual activ- 
ity but so coy in their conclusion. 

Similarly, they arc unable to 
confront the logic of their own 
-facts” about partners, limply 
proposing that homosexuals 
should be “cutting down" on the 
number of them. But if informa- 
tion fa good, why not spell it out 
dearly? To be safe, the numbers 
should be cut down to one. 

To show that I am not. yet, 
hounding homosexuals, I stress 
the same coyness could be found 
in the Health Education Council s 
advice to heterosexuals anxious to 
avoid venereal diseases. Il, too. 
suggests keeping the number of 
partners "down” but does not 
stggest reduction to monogamy or 
c has tity. Why not? Could it be that 
such a conclusion would be un- 
comfortably close to that fuddy- 
duddy Judaeo-Christian sexual 
ethic that progressives sought ti* 
bypass with their "information" 

The pamphleteers cannot even 
bring themselves to accept the 
message of their own facts — a 
profoundly gloomy one for homo- 
sexuals — when it comes to head- 
lines and tone. One pamphlet, 
much illustrated with happy 
homosexuals, starts "Sex is great” 
and invites its readers to change 
habits and discover "new dimen- 
sions of sex and excitement". 
What new dimensions — solitary 
sex toys? 

The troth is that these pam- 
phlets are not "explicit” at all in 
their conclusions. They shy away 
from informed conclusions. Per- 
haps because, for once, their 
information, rather than replacing 
traditional morality, supports iL 
This is the lesson of Aids which 
the progressives cannot take. They 
fear that the disease will soon 
daim its most important and 
deserving victim, the sexual 
progressivism which has spread it. 

Despite talk of the "gay 
community”, homosexuals have 
never been a homogeneous group. 
With Aids, the dear distinction is 
between those who threaten others 
by promiscuity and not disclosing 
their infection and the monoga- 
mous mid chaste. The same 
applies to heterosexuals. The dan- 
ger comes from the promiscuous 
of both inclinations. Why should 
sodety not protect itself by hound- 
ing them a little?. 

Might it not also, with some 
justification, - prise the Sixties 
prophets of sexual freedom out of 
their retirement and call them to 
account for encouraging others to 
promiscuity? 

The author is Director of the Social 
Affairs Unit. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Reckoning up 
Auld Reekie 


I sometimes feel that I'm about 
the only person in Edinburgh not 
running an award scheme at 
Festival time, so today I am going 
to put that right. Herewith, my list 
of the best and worst from the past 
iOdays. 

Newest Restaurant in Edinburgh: 
A Greek restaurant in Cockbura 
Street called The Meieora, which 
has been open for two weeks, fm 
not saying it's the best, just the 
newest, though the Greek salads 
are pretty vasL 

Soon-to-be-the-nqwest restaurant. 
Jn Edinburgh: The Pizza Hut in 
.Cockburn Street, which won't be 
open for another four weeks, it 
says, or until just after the Festival 
doses. As a result, it also gets the 
prize for the Worst Time To Open 
a Restaurant 

Only Fringe Company Which Has 
Its Venue Ax Home: The Edin- 
burgh medical lads, who put on 
their show in the hospital. 

Best Place for Secoud-band 78s in 
Edinburgh: Gramophone Em- 
porium m St Stephen’s Street 
Most Interesting Cnlinary 
Development in Scotland: This 
prize goes to Ibrox Park football 
ound in Glasgow, where they 
ve decided that if they cannot 
improve the football, at least they 
can improve the catering, and 
have replaced the half-time meat- 
pies with quiches, pizzas, etc. 

A man recently who 
once worked for a big meat pie 
firm told me recently that pies for 
the Scottish market always con-' 
tamed less meat and more po- 
tatoes and filling. When he asked 
why the Scats were getting short 
measure, his boss told him he 
didn't understand the situation. 
"These are not for eating, lad. 
They’re for throwing ” 

Best Theatre of Violence Event: 

Also awarded to Rangers, for their 

performance on August 9. when 
they came to Edinburgh to open 
the season against Hibs and 
played so bruisingly under then- 
new captain, Graeme Souness, 
that there was a bloody fight 
involving 21 of the players (one of 
the goalies didn’t join in) and 
Souness was sent off The point of 
the drama seemed to be that 
whereas in England the fens go out 
of control, in Scotland they man- 
age to confine the punch-ups to 
the pitch. This was not strictly part 
of the Fringe, but the award is well 
deserved for total commitment 
Best Free Show: Briar Matthew's 
nightly live Radio 2 broadcast 
with the best of the Fringe, from 


the Caledonian Hotel, public we! 
come. 

Best Brainwave of 1986: To That’! 
Entertainment a firm from S 
Albans, for having had the bril 
liant idea of turning a train into i 
hoteL On Platform 16 at Waver! 
Station foey have hired an entiri 
sleeper train with buffet; you jus 
turn up and get a berth am 
breakfast for £15. So far it's no 
been full any night, and the sleepei 
is guaranteed not to go anywhere. : 
almost wish I hadn’t got dig; 
already. 

Nicest Venue in Edinburgh 
Queen’s Hall, an elegant grey 
painted former church which 
with its pillars and curved wooder 
gallery, has overtones of an old 
fashioned Test cricket ground 
This year they have classics 
muse in the mornings, Harvej 
and the Wall hangers late, am! 
some very good jazz at weekends 
Also Mel Caiman’s cartoon show 
Also genuine 18th century snacks 
Also some of the best food ir 
Edinburgh. I have not been paid s 
penny to say this. 

Best Show Involving a Tombstow 
Which Lights Up At Night: Bet 
Keaton in Intimate Memoirs ot'ar, 
Irish Taxidermist at the Assembly 
Rooms, and a grand show it is. 
Most Amazing Musical In- 
struments in the Festival: The 
exhibition by the Fringe Club ai 
the Reid Concert Hall. 

Most Alcoholic Musical In- 
strumous in the Festival: Those 
belonging to the Brighton Bonk 
Orchestra. 

Best Story About A Bank Hold- 
Up in Milton Keynes: Arnold 
Brown. 

Best Sicilian Patisserie in Edin- 
bmgh: The Sicilian Patisserie in 
Albert Street, just across the road 
from Pilrij* Park, where they sell 
the loveliest fattening things 
around. 

Best Japanese Restaurant in Edin. 
bnrgh: Aye Restaurant. 

Nicest Thing To Do In All 
Edinburgh: Go to the Cafe Roval 
at a quiet moment and eat fish 
smmg up at their tar. 

Sb °!*J! Am Most Looking For- 

Which I, 

^^^ 8KC0l0Ur ° f 1 ^' 
Fringe s hw Which Other People 
A« Most Hoping Will Fail: The 
Time Out late-night chat show 
Most Incomprehensible, Violent 
and Repetitive Show in Edin 
bnrgh: The Tattoo. 


I 


uu Auuoji i'y 1>6U 


1-F- 


i i 



PC Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


THE VOTES IN BALLOTS 


Mr Neil Kinnock’s campaign 
to present the Labour party as 
a respectable contender for 
office — a campaign which has 
enjoyed considerable, if some- 
times uncritical, success — has 
just encountered a little local 
difficulty. As so often, more- 
over, that difficulty can be 
traced to the party’s relation- 
ship with the trade union 
movement 

. At its annual conference 
next month, the TUC will be 
holding a debate on the pro- 
posals of the TUC-Labour 
Party liaison committee on 
industrial law and, until this 
weekend, the debate was ex- 
pected to celebrate the 
movement’s return to modera- 
tion. Ratified there, the indus- 
trial law document would have 
then proceeded to a second 
ceremonial endorsement at the 
Labour conference amid gen- 
eral applause. Mr Kinnock 
would have established that 
Labour and the TUC now 
accept something that they 
once bitterly contested — 
namely, the statutory right of 
workers to hold a secret ballot 
before being called out on 
strike. 

That acceptance is im- 
portant on several grounds. It 
would, first, establish that, 
when forced to choose between 
two versions of workers's 
rights. Labour had finally 
come down on the side of 
individual over collective 
rights. 

There should, of course, be 
no real contradiction between 
these two concepts. Unless 
workers have the right as 
individuals to determine how 
their collective rights shall be 
exercised, they are not exercis- 
ing them at alL They are 
merely standing by while 


union officials exercise them 
in their name. And if union 
officials exercise such rights 
against the wishes of their 
members, those members are 
being conscripted for someone 
else’s private cause. 

Ultimately, we can only be 
sure that union members ap- 
prove of some action, taken in 
their name, if they vote for it in 
an atmosphere free from coer- 
cion. In endorsing ballots, 
therefore, Mr Kinnock and the 
TUC-Labour liaison commit- 
tee were voting to accept a 
more exacting definition of 
trade union democracy. 

And because union de- 
cisions have important eco- 
nomic consequences, the 
public has an interest in ensur- 
ing that they are not taken 
-lightly or against the wishes of 
union members. This is 
particularly so since the mass 
of union members will usually 
prove more moderate than 
union leaders who must work 
within a tradition of respect 
for militancy. More demo- 
cratic decisions are thus likely 
to prove more moderate. 

Labour has resisted this 
logic in the past And union 
leaders have argued that such 
restraints as strike ballots, in 
addition to being unnecessary, 
would blunt the strike weapon 
to the disadvantage of labour 
in industrial relations. It is 
easier, however, to resist a 
theoretical reform than to 
overturn a popular feet. And of 
all the reforms introduced by 
the present government, secret 
strike ballots seem to be the 
most popular. Hence the 
acceptance of them by a 
Labour and TUC leadership 
with its eyes fixed firmly on 
the next election. 

But the longstanding TUC 


preference for “collective 
rights” is not dead. Looking 
ahead to the TUC debate, the 
Transport and General 
Workers' Union proposes 
deleting a reference to the 
statutory right of workers “to 
have an individual secret bal- 
lot before being asked to 
participate in industrial 
action.” It does so on the 
grounds that such a broad 
endorsement of ballots would 
outlaw spontaneous walk-outs 
over workplace disputes. 

As the TGWLTs opponents 
in the TUC have pointed out, 
that seems to be an unneedless 
objection. Existing law only 
insists upon a ballot fora strike 
which has been officially called 
by a union. Spontaneous walk- 
outs, by their very nature, 
cannot be restrained in that 
way. But the requirement that 
ballots must be held if the 
union proposes subsequently 
to make such walk-outs official 
is both a useful incentive for 
second thoughts and a protec- 
tion against militants en- 
gineering such walkouts as a 
device to evade prior ballots. 

The TGWLTs Mr Ron Todd 
seems to accept this. His 
union’s amendment, there- 
fore, looks disingenuous. 
While apparently directed at a 
threat which doesn't exist, it 
would have the general effect 
of weakening the Labour-TUC 
conversion to the secret ballot 
principle both in the public 
mind and perhaps after an 
election. Fudging that conver- 
sion would awaken old fears 
about Labour’s more general 
conversion to moderation. If 
Mr Kinnock is wise, he will 
reaffirm Labour's commit- 
ment to ballots in 
unmistake able terms. 


GREEN BUT NOT PLEASANT 


Middle-class, middle-aged 
hooligans from middl e-En- 
gland have to be considered in 
the same light as urban youths 
blockading a housing estate or 
Greenham women stopping 
the movement of missile 
conveyors. Is “hooligan” too 
strong a description for the 
respectable people who took to 
the roads yesterday, to stop 
equally respectable geologists, 
acting with full Parliamentary 
authority, from setting up their 
rigs on public property ? 
.Answer yes, and a breach is 
made in the fabric of lawful- 
ness. 

The lout who smashes milk 
bottles in the road to prevent 
the passage of police cars is 
ostentatious in his contempt 
for the peace. The protesters 
around Greenham and Mo- 
lesworth self-evidently put 
their personal convictions be- 
fore the national defence. Is 
some exception to be made for 
the comfortable inhabitants of 
mid-Bedfordshire or west 
Lincolnshire who put their 
local interests above national 
policy, properly arrived at, and 
upset the peace by preventing 
Nirex contractors going about 
their business ? 

Some of the protesters 
against drilling and survey 


work on the four sites chosen 
by the Department of the 
Environment as candidates for 
a long-term dump for radio- 
active waste are not amenable 
to aigumentTheir concern for 
any factual account of the 
safety involved in burying 
low-level wastes in clay pits is 
small* The mere mention of 
the word “radioactive” is 
enough to send reason spin- 
ning. 

But some are saying that 
they have been denied proper 
procedure in the process by 
which these sites were selected 
and so are justified in disturb- 
ing the peace. Their case, while 
it deserves a hearing, has no 
merit. 

Nuclear waste exists in vol- 
ume and is daily being aug- 
mented — not least by X-ray 
diagnosis and treatment It 
will have to be disposed of. 
The tips of Cumberland will 
soon be full Alternative 
dumps will have to be found, 
and Nirex's criteria for eligibil- 
ity (demographic as well as 
geological) have pointed to the 
four sites now about to be 
appraised in deiaiL 

The Government has said 
that once one has been chosen 
an inquiry will be held under 
the Town and Country Plan- 
ning Acts. Until then all 


research is preliminary. The 
drilling rigs are temporary. 
The drilling season is confined 
to the summer and early 
autumn. It was in order for the 
Government to use the proce- 
dure of a Special Development 
Order to allow the test drilling 
to take place speedily. 

Those orders were the sub- 
ject of a full House of Com- 
mons debate with, at its 
conclusion, a whipped vote. 
Pari iamentary democracy was 
in other words allowed to run 
its course. Parliament's de- 
cision on the SDOs is as 
legitimate as Parliament’s de- 
cision to subvent the farmers 
of Lincolnshire or electrify the 
rail lines used by Bedfordshire 
commuters. 

Nirex contractors yesterday 
beat a retreat in the face of 
protesLChief constables in the 
respective counties must, of 
course, be allowed discretion 
in how their men are used to 
uphold the peace. But Nirex 
has indicated its intention of 
going to court to secure injunc- 
tions to gain access to the sites. 
If the demonstrators show 
themselves to be persistent 
hooligans the day may soon 
come when the police will 
have to act and clear the 
roads — in the green shires as 
in the back streets of the city. 


ONE SMALL STEP 


The passage of the first Soviet- 
Israeli talks for 19 years was 
always going to be turbulent. 
The priorities of the Soviet 
Union and Israel were so 
different: Moscow interested 
above all in re-establishing 
formal relations, Israel want- 
ing the Kremlin to improve 
the lot of Soviet Jews. Small 
wonder, then, that the first 
session lasted no longer than 
90 minutes. It was a minor 
achievement, perhaps, that 
further talks were planned at 
all. 

The more public this week’s 
talks had become, the greater 
the opportunity had been for 
doubters, on both sides, to 
make their misgivings felL 
They were most public in 
Israel where the Soviet human 
rights campaigner and former 
prisoner, Anatoly Shchar- 
ansky. lent his voice to the call 
for no relations without freer 
emigration. Israel, 

Shcharansky said with all the 
weight of his bitter experience, 
should not treat with Moscow 
except for an acceptable re- 
turn. And he had massive 
support. The number of Soviet 
Jews now living in Israel — the 
fruits of the US-Soviet detente 
a decade ago — makes them a 
powerful lobby and the cause 
of Soviet Jews refused per- 
mission to emigrate is one any 
Israels government has to take 
seriously. 

Then there was the question 
of need. Was Israel's position 
such that it really needed to 
talk to Moscow? The talks 


constituted an acknowledge- 
ment, doubtless welcome in 
Israel, that formulating a Mid- 
dle East policy without includ- 
ing Israel was an impossibility. 
But the stale of Israel had 
survived and been strength- 
ened without help from the 
Soviet Union. Israel was in a 
position to name its price, and 
as the days went by that price 
became associated increas- 
ingly with the demand for 
emigration. 

There are also likely to have 
been doubters, less publicity- 
minded but no less influential, 
in the Kremlin. For Moscow to 
decide to deal openly with 
Israel was a bold move and not 
without risk. It was a con- 
cession to political realities in 
the Middle East but it was also 
a change of policy — a policy 
which had been pursued stead- 
fastly by the pre-Gorbachov 
leaderships and which had 
arguably worked to Moscow’s 
advantage in its relations with 
many of the Arab countries. 

The interval between the 
announcement of the Helsinki 
talks and their opening would 
have. allowed attitudes in the 
Kremlin to harden, no less 
than in Israel. The increased 
emphasis placed on talks 
aboul a minor matter, prop- 
erty belonging to the Russian 

Orthodox Church in Jeru- 
salem, suggested a concern on 
the part or Soviet spokesmen 
to limit the damage. 

Mr Gorbachov has got away 
with some startling changes in 


Soviet foreign policy, but the 
Jewish question is more deli- 
cate than most. It is so 
emotionally charged, thanks to 
Russian and Soviet history, 
and Jewish emigration arouses 
such suspicion and such envy 
that talking to almost any 
other country, including erst- 
while communist heretics like 
China and Albania, would 
have been an easier decision. 
There was bound to be oppo- 
sition. 

Yesterday’s meeting pro- 
duced no agreed agenda for the 
future, only a presentation of 
viewpoints. Its one tangible 
result was agreement to con- 
vene further talks outside the 
glare of international pub- 
licity. But it would be incorrect 
to say that the exchanges in 
Helsinki, brief though they 
were, produced neither win- 
ners nor losers. 

For Soviet officials to go to 
Helsinki to talk to the Israelis 
was an admission that the 
Kremlin's earlier policy had 
failed or at least was no longer 
applicable. They needed a 
result in the form of consular 
links or a promise to that 
effect. They have relumed lo 
Moscow not quite empty- 
handed but with r.o promises 
either. Their Israeli 
collocutors, on the other hand, 
have returned with tacit recog- 
nition from Moscow (in that 
the meeting was held at all) 
and with their demand for 
freer Jewish emigration intact. 
They will be well pleased. . 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Hidden crisis of world’s refugees 


From the Director of the United 
Sot ions Association of Great Brit- 
ain and Northern Ireland 
Sir. Your timely and sympathetic 
leading article. Seas of Hope 
(August IS), is to be applauded 
and the action of the Canadian 
authorities rightly commended. 

However, for the great majority 
of the world's refugees there is no 
hope at all of permanent settle- 
ment in a third country — and 
least of alL an industrialised state. 
These men. women and children, 
many of whom are very old or 
very young, are increasingly the 
victims of war and civil disorder. 

Certainly, long-term refugees 
are the hapless sufferers in human- 
made crises, since those who have 
crossed an international boundary 
to escape a natural disaster are 
more often able to return home 
after a relatively short period of 
time. For the victims of war and 
civil strife the opposite is largely 
true. 

The world today has over 10 
million refugees registered with 
the United Nations High 
Commissioner for Refugees 
(UNHCR). He it is who has been 
given by the governments of the 
world the prime role in ensuring 
protection for refugees; in provid- 
ing them with their immediate 
needs and where necessary, their 
longer-term requirements; in seek- 
ing to negotiate their possible 
repatriation or, where this is not 
possible, their permanent accep- 
tance in a country other than their 
own: and in providing relevant 
training so that they can become 
productive citizens of wherever 
their final home is. 


Todav we have a“wortd record" 
of refugees — a tragedy of which 
none of us can feel proud. The 
high commissioner is in need of 
adequate resources to cope with 
these unprecedented demands, 
but is still fearfully short of 
securing them, being, as he is, 
dependent almost entirely on the 
voluntary contributions of UN 
member states. As a result he has 
had to lum to this association in 
the UK and to other organisations 
elsewhere with a plea That we 
launch emergency appeals to help 
him find this shortfall. 

May I urge through your col- 
umns a great outcry by concerned 
people that our Government 
should take a lead in co-ordinating 
a programme of seeking increased 
immediate support for the 
UNHCR before he runs so short 
of funds that death starts to stalk 
the refugee camps of the world and 
we suddenly find that it becomes 
politically necessary to respond as 
the media unravel the gruesome 
story before us? 

Prevention is, indeed, so much 
better than cure and a timely 
response now would ensure a far 
smoother passage for the weald's 
refugees as they try to gain a 
greater stability and security in 
their lives. 

Yours sincerely, 

MALCOLM HARPER, Director, 
United Nations Association of 
great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land. 

3 Whitehall Court, SW1. 

August IS. 


Clergy’s future 

From Mr Derek Wilson 
Sir, As a member of the Church of 
England's "suffocatingly com- 
placent ecclesiastical parliament”; 
I write to support warmly Nicolas 
Stacey's critique of the religious 
establishment (August II). The 
introverted little world of General 
Synod, its party rivalries, personal 
ambitions and clerical cynicism 
are worthy the pen of a latter-day 
Trollope. 

Yet Mr Stacey's surgery does 
not cut to the root of the cancer, 
perhaps, because even his percep- 
tion is limited by his loyalty to his 
profession. The malignant growth 
sapping the energy of the body 
ecclesiastic is its lamentably sub- 
standard parish clergy. 

This is not because the quality 
of candidates is poor or because 
the selection process favours the 
mediocre. Many men serving 
curacies and first incumbencies 
possess spiritual insight, stamina 
and vision. What defeats them, 
unless they are constantly vigilant, 
is an antiquated system which 
gives them security and (within 
their own little world) status, 
without accountability. 

No matter how badly a parish 
priest does his job. no matter how 
rapidly his congregation may 
dwindle, no matter how out of 
touch he may be with the local 
people, no matter how barren his 
own spiritual life may become, he 
cannot be moved; his salary, his 
house, his job, his pension are 
secure. 

The natural tendency, especially 
when suffering discouragement 
and disillusion, is for him to do 
the bare minimum. I have worked 
closely with scores of clergy over 
the years and have been struck 
over and again by an incom- 
petence and lack of commitment 
that would not be tolerated in any 
lay profession. 

Nor is it only laziness that the 
system encourages. So many 


clergy lose their sense of purpose. 
From this, in turn, stem psycho- 
logical disorders and domestic 
upheaval (both reaching alarming 
proportions among the clergy 
today). 

The debilitating parochial sys- 
tem is supported, at least at the 
Catholic end of the church, by a 
doctrine of priesthood which 
stresses mystique and status above 
quality. The priest, it asserts, is a 
man set iwixt heaven and earth, 
indelibly marked by God with a 
"character” that puts him above 
criticism. 

This theory of privilege is not 
only nonsense, it is dangerous 
nonsense. It makes difficult any 
effective collaboration between 
clergy and people, undermines 
any concept of “shared ministry”, 
has caused frustration for large 
numbers of active lay men and 
women and has driven many out 
into other denominations and the 
house church movement. 

It is the more reactionary clergy 
who. thanks to the voting proce- 
dures of the General Synod, 
dominate the House of Clergy 
and. to a lesser extent, the 
"ciericalised” House of Laity and 
effectively stifle any p rogressive 
measures. 

Mr Stacey is right when he calls 
for "radical” changes. I suggest 
three more to add to his list: 
abolish the parson's freehold, thus 
making clergy more accountable 
to the rest of the loose, change 
synodical representation and vot- 
ing procedures so as to deny clergy 
the automatic right of veto; and 
banish medieval doctrines of 
priesthood which have probably 
done more than anything else to 
distance the clergy of the Church 
of England from the people of 
England. 

Yours etc, 

DEREK WILSON, 

Codecombe House, 

Cutcombe, 

Somerset 
August 1 1. 


World of learning 

From Mrs Shirley Let win 
Sir. Those of your readers who are 
not able to divine unprinted words 
may have been mystified by the 
reference in my "Learning not to 
be drones” (August 14) to “Mi- 
chael Oakeshott's epitome” of Sir 
Ernest Barker's experience in 
school. Since you did print my 
suggestion that every politician 
and teacher should memorize it 
may f now supply them with the 
text? 

There, in school, the narrow bound- 
aries of the local and contemporary 
were swept aside to reveaL not whai 
might be going on in the next town 
or village, in Parliament or in the 
United Nations, but a world of 
things and persons and happenings, 
of languages and beliefs, of ut- 
terances and sights and sounds past 
all imagination and lo which event 
the dullest could not be wholly 
indifTerenL 

The going was hard: there was 
nothing to be got without learning 
how to get it. and it was understood 
that nobody went to school in order 
to enjoy the sort of happiness he 
might get from lying in the sun. And 
when with inky fingers a schoolboy 
unpacked his satchel to do his 
homework, he unpacked three thou- 
sand years of the fortunes and 
misfortunes of human intellectual 
adventure. 

Yours feiihfullv. 

SHIRLEY LETWIN. 

3 Kent Terrace. NW|. 

August 14. 


Good for business 

From Mr Christopher Longmore 
Sir, .As chairman of a very small 
business I attend various meetings 
organised locally. They are ad- 
dressed regularly by both Civil 
Servants and bankers. The Civil 
Servants, with a few honourable 
exceptions, have no real knowl- 
edge of what really goes on day-to- 
day in the small -business world. 
The same goes for the bankers. 

A bank manager friend la- 
mented to me that his employer 
would not allow him a year's 
sabbatical to go and work in 
industry. Many small businesses, 
us included, would have been 
delighted to have welcomed him 
as a pan-time, non-executive 
director. We would even have 
been prepared to pay something 
towards the cost of bis time. 

1 doubt we are alone in this 
view. Larger companies, I suspect, 
would similarly welcome such a 
scheme, but on a full-time em- 
ployee basis. 

Surely it is time that there was a 
concerted effort to facilitate this 
kind of mutually beneficial ex- 
change. What better place to start 
than the clearing tanks? 

Yours faithfully. 

CHRISTOPHER LONGMORE, 
Chairman. 

4S Computing Ltd., 

25 The Nursery. High Street, 
Sunon Courtney. 

Abingdon.Ox fordshire. 


Grammar test 
in schools 

From the President qf the Histori- 
cal Association 

Sir, I write to lend the support of 
the Historical Association to the 
pressure for the setting up of an 
independent enquiry unto the 
teaching of English language in 
schools. 

Your report (August 12) of the 
unresponsive way in which the 
teaching profession's leaders have 
reacted to the proposals from Her 
Majesty's Inspectorate for the 
teaching of grammar (long over- 
due). along with the apparent 
climb-down by the inspectorate, 
demonstrates that neither the 
inspectois (despite right in- 
tentions). nor the teachers’ leaders . 
jnot to be confused with their 
rank-and-file), nor 

"educationists” (a numerous 
band) can be left to solve this 
serious problem. 

The decline in the teaching of 
English language is leaving many 
students at entry to university 
unable to express themselves eas- 
ily in writing because they are 
uncertain about grammar and 
spelling- This has led to the 
undermining of the study of all 
disciplines which use essay work 
as a test of knowledge, ability and 
originality. Even some British 
students of firet-dass potential are 
retarded by English language de- 
ficiency. 

-If such is the effect upon the 
brightest group of school pupils, 
the effect of poor English-language 
teaching upon the less able is not 
difficult to guess. 

Pressure upon the secretary of 
state is now also building up for 
the introduction of a compulsory 
common-core arts/science 
curriculum, which all pupils aged 
14-16 would be required to study 
in school as a basis. The Historical 
Association has submitted a draft 
syllabus which would require all 
14-16-year-olds to learn about the 
course of British history during 
the twentieth century, giving them 
an awareness of the background to 
present-day institutions of govern- 
ment and influence and to 
contemporary problems. 

We tend to forget that these 
boys and girls are expected, within 
two years of leaving school to act 
and vote as fully knowledgeable 
citizens. But if such a 14-16 
common-core curriculum, ranging 
over several arts and science 
subjects, is to be effective, it must 
assume pupils to be securely 
literate and numerate by age 14. 
Parents have always expected this; 
but they are coming to realise that 
they cannot take it for granted. 
-Yours etc, 

DONALD READ, President, 

The Historical Association, 

59a Kennington Park Road, SEI 1. 
August 13. 


Asthma deaths 

From Dr E. .V. Wardle 
Sir. Since asthma (feature. August 
11. 12) is an allergy, -it is not 
without significance that many 
patients with refractory asthma 
turn out to be keeping a dog or a 
cat in their home and that they can 
be shown to be sensitive to the 
animal's fur. Under such circum- 
stances therapy can hardly be 
expected to be successful. * Un- 
fortunately kindly paediatricians, 
because of their belief in emo- 
tional factors, are often reluctant 
to be firm about the facts. 

Yours faithfully. 

E. N. WARDLE. 

33 Hawthorn Gardens. 

Kenton. Newcastle up^on Tyne. 


Looking askance 

From Dr H. Lister Wilson 
Sir. The suggestion by the Chair- 
man of the Institute of Commerce 
(August 12) that station names be 
placed aslant to platforms is very 
welcome for those travelling fac- 
ing forward, but I suggest it would 
be more helpful if two name 
boards were used in chevron 
formation. In this way there would 
be two chances of reading the 
name and for those travelling with 
their tacks to the engine at least 
one opportunity. 

Yours faithfully. 

H. LISTER WILSON. 

Applctrecs. 

Vat-teg. Gwent. 

August 14. 


Sanctions debate 

From Sir Neil Pritchard 
Sir, You were certainly right 
(leading article, August 4) to take a 
critical view of the moralising 
over this issue. Of course there is a 
moral aspect to it. But the moral 
campaign has served (has perhaps 
been deliberately used) to draw 
attention away from the central 
dimension of the problem. 

It is to do with power. For 100 
years power in South Africa has 
been held by the white minority. 
The "abolition of apartheid” 
means the transfer of that power 
to the Mack majority. Such a 
fundamental and traumatic 
change is bound to be difficult in 
any circumstances. 

If it is to be "immediate” it can - 
only be brought about by revolu- 
tion — Le., chaos and violence. 
Naturally some of the black 
leaders, seeing that tire achieve- 
ment of power in the near future 
may be within their grasp, are 
impatient to use any device to 
secure il But it is by no means 
self-evident that a violent revolu- 
tion would be in the interests of 
anyone else —.go- morally justifi- 
able. 

There have in the past been 
instances of a peaceful transfer of 
power — for example, the transfer 
of power away from the landed 
aristocracy in I9tb-centmy En- 
gland. It may be optimistic lo 
hope that such a process of change 
can be evolved in South Africa; 
but at least it seems premature 
deliberately to throw the possibil- 
ity away, when the alternative is, 
in human terms, so disagreeable. 
Yours sincerely, 

NEIL PRITCHARD. 

Little Garth, 

Daglingworth. 

Cirencester.Gloucestershire. 

August 8. 

Doctor of the Church 

From Mr Cvril Davies . 

Sir. With bus characteristic drill in 
innuendo. Lytton Strachey used 
the "moving story”, as you de- 
scribe it in today's leader (August 
12), of the aged Henry Newman - 
"in floods of tears” near his old 
vicarage at Littiemore to suggest 
that Newman bitterly regretted his 
break with the Church of England. 

This story loses much of its 
force; however, if read in the light 
of Hilaire Belloc's reminiscence; - 
cited by his most recent biog- 
rapher. Mr A. N. Wilson, of 



ON THIS DAY 


AUGUST 19 1868 

Although it is not easy to picture 
the families of today on an outi ’ 
taking part in kiss-in-the-ring, 
liking af the public for pageantry, 
bands, and dancing remains 
largely unchanged. 


THE FORESTERS 1 FETE 


Yesterday was the 

■‘outing,’’ festival, and general) 
holyday of the Most Ancient I 
of Foresters at the Crystal Pa 
and though, it was in m 
rather below the average of 
annual displays, it was still a great) 
gathering, and all passed off wit' 
the utmost success. The 
has a slighter influence on 
fgtes than is generally the case. On) 
a 5s. or even a half-crown day 
single heavy shower will suffice 
bringdown the expected 
from thousands to hundreds. Zt 
not bo, however, with these _ 
shilling fetes* In most cases 
workman has made his own 
rangements for a holyday, 
bought his tickets or take" 
places in the van, hnught 
“ Missus” a new bonnet, and, i 
wet or come dry, is determined 
have as as be ***** for 
money 

The visitors came both by 
and rafl. In spite of all 
drawbacks of increased fores, how- 
ever, the tail was by for the 
extensively patronized, the 
were literally thronged as fast 
they came upland until a late I 

of tire day hundreds at. all 
intermediate stations were 
behind for want of room. The 
glories of the road had faded i 
into insignificance. The great' 
heralded with blatant 
were few and for between, 
woe, to be sure, plenty of 
carts with a fondly inside, 
select party of invited 
sitting on the shafts; but the great 
rush which used to turn the pr 
lanes of Dulwich into roads 
those through Sutton on a 
day was wanting. 

At the Palace tire first; 
ing of the day was a 
which was from the 
ground at 1 o’clock. This as to i 
was executed with tolerable _ 
tuality, but as to pageantry it 
on the whole deficient. The 
merits of processional 
were very weak. There were ban- 
ners certainly, of which the specta- 
tors seemed almost as tired as 1 
bearers, and more it would 
difficult to say in fewer woe 
Then eama the harmless persons! 
who are supposed to be dressed) 
after the fashion and costume of 
Robin Hood hinself, and 
amid the haze and damp, loot 
about as cheerful as cocks on 
drizzly morning. With these 
were bands of music, one of which, 
as to wind, was a very paragon. 1 
splendour of the head of - 
column soon died away, however.) 
and it became a matter of simple-) 
tons in paper caps and 
feathers, ami even these 
attempts at pageantry soor 

disappeared . . . 

After this formal 
the Foresters abandoned them- 
selves to their own devices as 
amusement, and seemed to 
plenty of it. The day. after 
threatening, cleared up towards 1 
afternoon, and the gardens 
thronged at once ... Some went to) 
the archery butts, where 
knaves in Lincoln green” 
such practice as soon com 
the spectators that the only place| 
where it was possible to stand < 
safety was as near the targets 
passible. Otbera betook 
to boating, with more or 
success. The main body, however, | 
preferred the dancing platforms,) 
ere, where the lawns were 
with the visitants, the 
game of kiss- in-the- ring. At the) 
dancing platforms there was a) 
great crowd, and the bands [ 
aD sorts of tunes, to the strains 
which couples went in and shi 
through, the thibng ami d cor 
able applause, because this was i 
dancing. Kiss-in-the-ring, howev-J 
er, seemed to be the favourite! 
pastime. Rings were formed in all) 
directions, and the amount 
running which some of the best-) 
looking of the young ladies had to| 
do was severe. Some ran like i 
half over the gardens, and some, i 
course, only fled to be pursued . . . j 
The temtee. fountains played at 4| 


o’clock, but owing, as it was stated, 
to the unprecedented dryness of 
the weather, the great fountains 
could not be played at alL After this 
there was the Duke of York's Band, 
then the band of the company, 
then two balloon ascents — one by 
Mr.Orton in his fish balloon, 
another by Mr Adams in the Robin 
Hood- This was to have been a 
race, but. both balloons, 
passing through the lower current 
of air. stood quite still at a great 
attitude, as hUe as painted ships 
upon a painted ocean.. . .the Pal- 
ace was not illuminated in the: 
evening because it was wished to 
get the visitors away as early as 
The rein helped this 


but still it was very late before the) 
tram crowded with tired) 
revefiere left Norwood. 


Newman's habit of sweeping into 
a classroom at the Oratory School 
and disconcerting the boys "first, 
by making them recite some 
favourite passage of VirgiL and 
then by bursting into a flood. of 
tears at its poetic poignancy”, 
which suggests that sentimental 
tears came easily to the Cardinafs 
eyes. 

Yours faithfully, 

CYRIL DAVIES. 

Burcott, 

Brynhafod Road. 

Oswestry. Shropshire. ’ 

August 11 


Verbal shorthand 

From Colonel R. L. Bell 
Sir. At least Mrs Bdf (August ! 1) 
was understood, albeit belatedly. 
As a medical student ! was less 
fortunate in telegraphing my doc- 
. tor parents: "Got Rubella meet. 
2.15”. After three miserable hours 
of seff-imposed quarantine in a 
cold luggage van I was not amused 
by not being met, and not'aLalt on 
teaming that my brother had 
failed to pass the message on. 
comfortable in the certainty that 
having backed a winner I could 
easily afford a taxi. 

I have the honour to be. Sir. your 
.servant, 

R. L. BELL, 

The Belfry. 

Potters line. 

. Send, Woking. Surrey. • • 

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II 



12 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BALMORAL CASTLE 
Aiigusx !& The Prince Edward 
this afternoon attended a perfor- 
mance of The Ragged Child by 
the National Youth Music The- 
atre at the George Street The- 
atre, Edinburgh. 

His Royal Highness. Chair- 
man of the Duke of Edinburgh's 
Award 30th Anniversary Trib- 
ute Project, later attended a 
dinner at Hopetoun House. 

Wing Commander Adam 
Wise was in attendance. 


the Commonwealth 32nd Par- 
liamentary Conference in West- 
minster- Hall on September 25. 
Afterwards she will attend 
reception in The Queen Eliza- 
beth II Conference Centre. 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Beryl Markham will be 
held at St Clement Danes, 
Strand, London, on Thursday, 
September 4, at noon. For 
further information please tele- 
phone 0722-330618. 


Birthdays today 


Princess Anne will open the new 
laboratory of the Coopers* Com- 
pany and Cobom School at St 
Mary's Lane. Upminster. on 
September 24. 

Princess Anne will attend a 
dinner, in aid -of the Caldecott 
Community, at the Banqueting 
House. Whitehall, on 
September 24. 

The Queen, accompanied by the 
Duke of Edinburgh, will open 


Professor Quentin BeU. 76; Sir 
Lionel Brett 75; Mr A. CaJder- 
Marshafl, 78; Mr MicbaeL 
Cocks, MP. 57; the Right Rev 
Dr Gerald Ellison, 76; Lord 
Ennais. 64; Mr Sid Going. 43; 
Air Vice-Marshal J. R- Gordon- 
Finlayson. 72; Sir William Har- 
ris. 76; Mrs Justice Heilbron, 72; 
Mr E. R. Heward, 74; Mr 
Richard Ingrams. 49: Mr A. G. 
L. Ives, 82; Mr Edward Rape, 
64; Sir Philip Rogers, 72; Sur- 
geon Vice-Admiral Sir James 
Wan, 72. 


University news 

Longhboroogh 

The following appointments 
and promotions are announced 
Dr J. Richard S. Morris, chair- 
man and managing director of 
Brown and Root ( UK), has been 
appointed Senior Pro-Chan- 
cellor and chairman of the 
University Council in succes- 
sion to Df H. W. French. 
Professor L L. Jones, Professor 


Bull ham. 
Engineering 


Department of 
3 from August 


CtwinitaJ 

I. 1986: 

Economics. Dr M C Fleming, reader ui 

me Deportment of Economics from 

August 1. 1986: construction 

Management: Dr B^McCaHcr. reader 


Management: Dr H Mcumr. reaner 
.ji me Department of Qvn Engineering 
from April t. 1986: Flexible Automa- 
tion: Dr R H Weston, senior lecturer 
in Ihe Department of EnqlneertiM 

Production from August 1. 1986: 
Sports Sciences: Dr C Williams, senior 

lecturer in the Department of Physical 

Education and Sports Science from 
February 1. 1986; Mechanical En- 
gineering: Dr J R Hewtl reader In 


robotics at Newcastle University from 


of Structural Engineering "in the 
Deronmeni of Civil Engineer- 


Department 
ing, has been appointed Dean of 


June l. 1986: Ubrary and Informa- 

UOn Studies: Professor A J Meadows, 
professor of astronomy and the 
history of science and director of the 
Primary Communication Research 
Centre at Leicester University from 
October 1. 1986. 

READERSHIPS 


the School of Engineering, 
fessor A. L. Webb. Professor 


Dr K D Eason as reader in cognitive 
f Human 


Professor 
of Social Administration in the 
Department of Social Sciences, 
has been appointed Dean of the 
School of Human and Environ- 
mental Studies. Both appoint- 
ments are for three years with 
effect from August 1. 1986. 

Of AIRS 

Chemical Engineering: Dr B A 


nganamtcsr Degaruneni of 
Sciences from April 1. 1986: Dr R M 

Smith as reader In analytical chem- 

istry. Department of Chemistry from 
August 1. 1986 
SENIOR LECTURESHIPS 
A E Brynun. Department of Social 
Sciences: A J Clegg. Department of 
Engineering Production: J M Etos. 

Department of Economics: L Hobson. 

Department of Electronic and Elec- 

trical Engineering: R Perrin. Depart- 
ment of Physics: G E Pells. 
Department of Geography: R Smith. 
Department of Mathematics: J R 
Traynor. Department of Chemistry: 
all with effect From August 1. 1986. 



• COWESSJKSISK,* 


34 * 




A hew stamp (pictured 
above) goes on sale today to 
mark the animal Common- 
wealth Parliamentary Asso- 
ciation Conference in 
London next month. The 34p 
stamp, designed by John 
Gibbs, shows a ballot-paper 
cross representing the basic 
principles of parliamentary 
democracy. The sections of 
the cross represent the geo- 
graphically separated coun- 
tries coming together at tike 
centre, united m a common 
cause. 


Dinner 


Army Board 
Lora Trefgarne, Minister of 
State for Defence Procurement, 
presided at • a dinner given 
yesterday at the Royal Hospital, 
Chelsea, by the Army Board of 
the Defence Council in honour 
of Major-General Sani Abacha. 
Nigerian Chief of Army Staff 


Among those present were; 

Thu Nloi - . . 


Igertan High Com mi s si oner. 
Mawr-General Ean camcarL Bar- 
oness Young. General Sir Nigel 
Bagnall. General Sir Roland Guy. 
General Sir Richard Tram. Lieuten- 
ant-General Sir John Read. Lieuten- 
ant-General Sir John Chappie. Sir 
ivus Hum 


Philip Foreman. Sir David Hunt. Sir 


Mr John Bieudch. Mr Ivor . _ 

MP. Mr Ewen Fengusson. Major - 
General Andrew Watson. Brigadier 
Bashir Ayodeie. Mr Gerald Boxan. Mr 
Pefer Cannon. Mr David Gardner. Mr 
Peter McLougbUn. Ml* David Wil- 
liams. Mr Gordon Wilson and Colonel 
Damuma Dyerts, - • 


Bridge trials 

The British Bridge League 
trials for the open team to 
represent Great Britain in the 
European Championship at 
Brighton next August started at 
the Young Chelsea Bridge Club, 
London, on Saturday and 
continues this week. 

Leading scores: 

It N Row. R SroaotsKl. M J Flint. R M 
Sheehan. 73: ZJ M Armstrong. G T 
Kirby. R S Brock. A R Forrester. 7a 3 
S F»hpool. D J Greenwood. A 
CaMorwood. D She*. 70: 4 A P 
Sowter. S Lodge. Mrs S Landy. Mrs S 
Horton. 62: 9 D G W Price. 42: 6 V 
SUierstonc. 39. 



Forthcoming 

marriages 


Major-General Sani Abacha, Chief of the Nigerian Army Staf£ who is on a five-day official visit to the British Army, 
inspecting a guard of honour of the 1st Battalion, the 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment in London yesterday. 


Archaeology 


Theseus and the Minotaur 
given a new perspective 


Laboratory tests have re- 


vealed that much of the In the last of three articles, Mario Modiano reports on 
rapper used in Miaoan Crete the advances in technology which have provided new' 

nin nrvt mm** frnm ivnnn sc I. .r r ■ r _ . > , . - . » 


tad met ! lods of anrtyss for archaeologists, and the new 


MnSSb DmuSdoni"^ revealed from examining sites of early 
Lavrion. near Athens. The PoP^uma. 


near 

discovery and its significance 
were outlined by Dr Richard 
Jones, director of the Fitch 
laboratory, during recent 
celebrations for the centenary 
of the British School at 
Athens. 

Dr Jones said: 'The major- 
ity of rapper and bronze 
artefacts from late bronze age 
sites in Crete were not made of 
Cypriot rapper. I accept this 
extremely important conclu- 
sion from the scientific data. 
Instead they seem to match' 
the composition of Lavrion 
copper.” 

He urged caution, however, 
until more artefacts were 
submined to isotope analysis, 
and fieldworkers sought ev- 
idence of late bronze age 
shafts at the Lavrion mines. 

But the discovery has trig- 
gered some tempting specula- 
tion about the origin of myths. 
The hypothesis is that perhaps 
the tribute Athens was obliged 
to pay to Crete, which gave 
rise to the legend of Theseus 
and the Minotaur, did not 
consist of seven Athenian 
youths and seven maidens, 
but of ingots of valuable 
Lavrion copper. 

Dr Jones outlined the broad 
range of scientific aids that are 
now available to archaeolo- 
gists to help them resolve 
problems of dating, the origin 
of materials, techniques of 
ancient craftsmen, even the 


in terms of materials and as a 
testing ground for hypoth- 
eses,” he said. 

By using neutron activation 
analysis and proton-induced 
X-ray emission spectroscopy 
(pixe), or isotopic analysis, it 
was now possible to determine 
the origin of materials and 
even plot trading routes and 
patterns in prehistoric times 
where no written records have 
survived to help researchers. 

Scientists were, for instance, 
able to establish that man 
navigated the Aegean 1,000 
years before sea travel was 
assumed to have been under- 
taken around 6,000 BC, by 
identifying the material used 
for tools found at Franchthi 
.cave, on the coast of the 
Arcolid. 

Recent work at the temple 
of Apollo at Bassae yielded 
unexpected information about 
the . materials and the 
construction of this remote 
edifice of the fifth century BG 

“The marble forming the 
upper part of the temple was 
not, according to petrographic 
and isotopic analysis, from, 
any of the well-known Aegean 
quarries, but from Cape Tai- 
naron. in southern Main,” Dr 
Jones said. 

Dr Jones announced that a 
carbon-14 testing laboratory 
would be established in Ath- 


ens in the next few months to 

detection of buried ruins by • help in dating ancient objects 
geophysical perspection. by radioactivity counts, es- 
■$uch is the nature of Greek pecially now that the tech- 
antiquity that it offers enor- nique of the accelerator mass 
mous scope to scientists both spectrometer pushed back the 


range of accurate dating to 
70.000 years. 

The technique of 
thermoluminiscence, which 
has been useful in ceramic 
dating and authentication, is 
now applied to date flint and 
burnt stone in palaeolithic 
contexts. While dendro- 
chronology (dating through 
tree rings) has allowed the 
establishment of sequences in 
Greece spanning 738 years - 
from 1242 AD to 1979. 

Dr Jones explained how a 
scanning election microscope 
helps to expose the micro- 
structure of pottery, revealing 
potters' techniques such as the 
choice of day and the firing 
temperatures. 

He emphasized the ability 
of scientists to identify com- 
plex organic mixture residues 
in ancient pots, and cited the 
discovery of traces of opium 
in sherds of a late Cypriot vase 
by John Evans, of North East 
London Polytechnic, and the 
frankincense and myrrh de- 
tected in two Canaanite jars 
found in an early fourteenth 
century BC shipwreck off 
south-west Turkey. 

Dr Jones disclosed that a 
scientific method used by a 
British-Greek team com- 
bining aerial photography and 
the electric resistance method, 
revealed much of the layout of 
. the fourth century BC town of 
StymfiJos, in the Arcadian 
mo untains, before f-anarfian . 
and Greek archaeologists be- 
gan excavating - 

Concluded 


Latest wills 


Lady Daphne Mabel Eveline 
Gale, of Hampton Court Palace, 
Surrey, who died in the fire at 
Hampton Court Palace on 
March 31, left estate valued at 
£65,994 net 


Baron Russell of KDbna, of 
Orchard House, Petworth, West 
Sussex, a Lord of Appeal in 
Ordinary 1975-82, ana presi- 
dent of the Restrictive Practices 
Court L961, and former Attor- 
ney General to the Duchy of 
Cornwall left £164,729 net. 

Mr Bernard Alan Copping of 
Morston Hall. Norfolk, who 
specialized in the manufacture 
of fine silver and was considered 
one of the world stiver experts, 
left £1,447,700 net. 

Mrs Heather Wilson, of 
Stockleigh Hall, Prince Albert 
Road, west London, left 
£1.321530 net- 
Mr Richard Herbert Ingpen de 
la Mare, of Tithe Barn House, 
High Street, Gunnor, publisher 
and collector, and former chair- 
man of Faber and Faber and 
Faber Music, left £261,427 neL 

Mrs Ema Helene Bants, of I 
Swan Court, Chelsea Manor 
Street, west London, left 
£353290 net. After bequests of 
£9.500 she left half the residue to 
the Winston Churchill Me- 
morial Trust and a quarter ofj 
the residue each to toe Jewish 
Home fix the Aged, south west 
London, and the Ravenswood 
Foundation, central London. 

Mr Edward Grantham foghion. 
of Evesham, Hereford and 
Worcester, left £614*678 net 
Mr Charles Oswald Stacey, of 
Stanton by Date Derbyshire left 
L447J66 net 

Mrs Ena Kathkeen Tbonaa, of: 
Ash water, BeaWorthy, Devon, 
left £431.073 net - 


Appointments in 
the Forces 


The Army 

COLONELS: P Kumnond to HQ E 


August 2 z. 


UEm ^^^ 5 r^- RE s 


tJ^RSfONALS » HO BFfL August 
32: S Fortthan WG to MCondt 
MCTC August 18: D E KInO REME to 
MoD. August 10: l J A Lows KOSBIo 
HQ 65? Lowland Bde. August 18: P W 
Moiling RCT - to HQ RCTrBR) Comm 
Z. August 18; T ft soar raHE to 
MoD. August 22: J N G Sfarmtr- 
SmlOi RA to HQ AFNORTH. August 
18: C N B Wcllvipbd RRF to MbO. 
August 19. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memariam 


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BOOHS 


CARTER ■ on August 10th 16 MctKHa 
and Thomas, a daughter. Ella. 
CARMICHAEL - On 14Ui August to 
Angela (nee Cox) and Malcolm, a 
(laughter. Isooel Rosemary, a sister 
f or Lou tea. 

CAYZER on 17th AugiBL to Sara (nee 
McAlptne) and Room, a daughter. 
Hanie tte Jane. 

CURRY On August the 14th to Sarah 
I nee Small wood land Patrick. 20 At- 
atanta Street. SWfi. a daughter 
Nanetle Emma. 

DAVIES - On utti Augua. le Kate (Dte 

Coodryi and Arthur, a daughter. 
Sophia cuarioue KaBinue, a stster 
for Tom, outer, Carl, saBy and 
Edwin. 

BUNSTAN ■ On Augusl iZth. to Fiona 
foie Goodhughi and Chnstopher. a 
son. Matthew John Dudley a brother 
tar Kaly. 

ELSMUe - On 18th August at The 
Royal Hampshire Hospital. Winches- 
ter. to Patricia mee Chang) and 
Patrick, awn. James GeraU Patrick. 
EL WES - On August 19th. his father's 
birthday, in London, to Eknbctli and 
Cues, a son. William Cuy. 

EVANS On August 18th at the BMH 
Rtaitetai to Jane mee Robertson) A 
Chris, a son iRorte Charles Edward) 
a brother for Joanna & MicheaL 
Griffiths - on August tem. at 
Perobury Hospital, to Angela (n£e> 
CaldweUl and Barry, a daughter, 
staler for Clare. Franas. Kaiy. Pelts-. 
CectUa. Dominic and Antonia. Deo 
prauas. 

JONES - On the 17Ui August, to Usa 
info BretUngtiam) St CrUflth. a 
daughter Alexandra viciona. 
KEMtEWELL - on 16U1 August, to 
CilUan tnee Glddings) and Brian, a 
daughter. Qiarlone Sara, a sister for 
Dominic. 

KERSHAW On August lfith to Tina 
mee Sexton) and David, a son 
Charles Henry Alexander, a brother 
for Oliver and Toby. 


LE SOKE On 1<M\ August to Anne 
and Valentine a eon. 

MATHUR ..On August 16th to Jenny 
tnee Htstopt and Satfsh. in Evanston 
Mosul la! . mums, a brolher. Tarun 
Edward, for Navin and Serena. 


- On 2nd August, to 
Frances Ince Helbyl and David, a 
daughter. Eleanor Rosemary Heiby. 
WNANA - On Augua 17th. 1986. to 
Miranda and Simon, ai St Richards. 
Chichester. Tristan Alistair Jock, a 
brother for Dinah. 

POLLABD - On 15th August. 1986. lo 
Andrew and Linda, a son. Robert 
Michael Andrew, a brother Tor 
Heather. 

PROSSER ■ On 15th August In Hud- 
dersfield. to Joanna mee Windsor- 
Aubreyi and Nicholas, a daughter. 

ROLLS - On August i«Ui at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital to Fhma tree 
Byrne) and Robert, h daughter 
Annabel India Sarah, a sister for 
Giles. 

HOSE -On August IfiftalOnnsIdrfcto 
Lynda and Terence, a son. James 
William Effison- 

SHEEHAN On August 15th at John 
RadcUffe HospllaL Oxford to Marytu 
mee Etcombi and Richard, a son 
Richard Michael Si. John. 
SHERfllAN On 15th August at Leices- 
ter General Hospital to Juiieu (nee 
Lanl) and MIchaeL a son. Frederick 
John Cecil. Always remembering 
dea rest Maximilian. 

5TEHH. On August 16th. to Louise 
mee Vance) and Nick, a daughter 
Alic e Jane a sister for Holly, 
STEVEKS ■ On llUi August to Jane 

mee Whlpp) and Michael a daughter. 
AUcp Jane, a sister for Henry. 
STKUDLET on ldth August to Tracey 
and David, a beautiful daughter Ra- 
chel. Jane. 

TOLSTOY - MnodavsKy. on August 
nth. 1986. to Carounda (trie 
Pilcher) and Andrei, a son, Oleg . a 
brolher for Liubov and Igor. 

WALSH - On Augusl 1711). to Elizabeth 
inde Weils) and Jeremy, a son. 
Edmund, a brother for Chloe. 

WATES - On August 8th. to Veronica 
(nee Cardwell) and William, the gtn 
of a son. Nell Edward. 


CHERRY - On Augusl 16UV VAfb. at 
Moimi Alvernla. after a short fBness. 
Margaret May. A much loved stater, 
sister -in -law and great aunt- Funeral 
Sendee at CuUdford Oetnatorluin. 
on Wednesday. August 20th at 
l. attorn. Flowers, or donaUoiu If pre- 
ferred for the National Eqidnr 
Defence League, may be sent c/a. 
and all enaubnes please to. Ptmms 
Funeral Services. Charters. Mary 
Rd. Guildford. Td -67394. 


CWLLYMORE • On 170, Aogrot Eve- 
lyn Martorte dearly loved mother of 
Peter and Gillian. In her sleep al 
Heath Mount. Rake. Hants. Grateful 
thanks to Ihe staff who cared for her 
for 5 yean. Thanksgiving service al 
Mwihursi Parish Church 3pm Friday 
22nd August. 


GHCVELYAN John Crevrtyan C.V.E. 
on Friday l5Ui August al home. Fu- 
neral arrangements to be announced. 


MARRIAGES 


GAMDOSC : WUdreoa. on August 
16th. at ' St Mary's Church. 
Wcsterham. Julian to Jill. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


®*IICE s DAVWSOH - On 19th August 
1956. In King's College ChapeL 
Aberdeen, Frederick Fyvle Bruce to 
Betty Davidson. 


DEATHS 


AW® On August l«h. Ronny at 
home Funeral a! St. Mary at 
Cbrmnlng. Wes! Swsex. on Friday 
22nd August at 12 noon. Ai Ronny* 
exnren wish uiere will be no 
Memorial Service. 


BASSET -On 1 7th August, very peace- 
fully. Staler Mary Honor. ReUglous 
of the Sacred Heart aged 78 Requt- 
an Mass on Friday. 22nd Augusl 
11am, at Duchmne H». Au*vn 
Square. Roehamoltfn Lace. SW15. 


cmn ILrfDENOn 16th August, peace- 
fully. after a brief illness, 
ai Pembury HospitaL Martorte Char- 
tone widow of Peter. Sadly missed 
by an family and friend*. Funeral 
service at Tunbridge Wells Cremato- 
rium on Wednesday. 20tb August at 
3.30. Flowers If desired to W & F 
Groembrtdge. 31 Quany HU Rd. 
Tonbridge or donations if preferred 
to a favourite charity. Memorial ser- 
vice later. 


CUUilT On August 16th. peacefully at 
home In her 87th year. Soma. 
Cremation private. Service of 
Thanksgiving for family & friends at 
Our Lady Of Wamford Parish 
Church on Friday August 22nd at 3 
pm. Flowers to John Steel & San. 
Chesil House. Winchester. 


CUKUFFE - Antony M B. - On 7th 
August. 1986. Funeral Sendee at 
Christ Ctuuch. Quorieywood an 
Wednesday. 20th August a! 2-00 pro. 
If desired, donations to Christian Aid 
or Heart Foundation, c/o James 
Peddle Ltd. 65 High SL 
Rtckmanswonh. Hens. 


do GEX - on August 16th. suddenly m 
hospital in Bail). Major General 
George Frauds de Gex CJL O.BJE.. 
Royal Artuiery. Beloved widower of 
Ronda and father of Jenny. Funeral 
service at PUkm Parish Church. 
Somerset go Friday 22nd August at 
12 noon. MemonaJ Service to be an- 
nounced later. Flowers or donations 
if desired for The Royal National 
Lifeboat Institution C/O A.R.W 
Connocfc & Son Funeral Directors, 
The Croft. Shepton MalM. Somerset. 


DOUCLAS-MANN On Saturday Au- 
gust 16th, Captain Leslie John 
DouglafrAtonn. MC„ peacefully at 


home to Tomuay aged 91. Much 
loved husband of LaUfe and father of 
Jean. Bruce. Keith and Stewart. Fu- 
neral private. Memorial service to be 
announced. 


ELUS peacefully on 18ttt August 
1986. In her 97tfa year. Helena 
Nora!) widow of Oscar erf Old 
Hunstanton. Norfolk. Funeral 
service at Minttyn Crematorium. 
Kings Lynn. Norfolk on Thursday 
atst August at U.OQ am. Family 
flowers only to E.W. WitMo Funeral 
Director. 26 Statwn Rd. Heocham. 

ESSAM Grace, on 17th August after a 
short lUneK - Maurice- 

ESSAM, Grace - Peacefully, on 17th 
August after a short, illness. 

FOSTER • On 16th August peacefully 
at home. Charles Frederick. Much 
loved and sadly mbsed tor hb wife 
Helen and ha family. Enquires lo 
J.V. Rule on MUtUon:9*0266- N® 
Dowers, donations to me R.NJL4- 


J 


tv. 


On VTTh August peacefoDy 
In hospital. Dennis Charles Gkmny. 
Service at Putney Vale 
Crematorium, on Thursday. 2 1st 
August at tiara. Flowers and 
enquiries to J-HJCenyon Ltd. 49 
Martoes Rd. W8 (01 937 CT787X 
OUIW - On August lfittu at the age of 
82. Stoyl Marian Gunn Cnfe 
Thomas), much loved by her late 
husband. Alistair Livingston Gunn. 
F.R.CLO-G. her stater Patricia, her 
children Andrew. John and Sarah 
(Jamesi and for her 10 
grandchildren. She was chairman of 
Chtalehurst and Sid do UDC. an 
alderman and mayor of the London 
Borough of Brofnlqr and a J.P. The 
Funeral Service wffl be held at St 
Nicholas' Church. ChtseBiurst on 
Friday. 22nd August at noon. En- 
quiries and Flowers, to Francis 
Chappell & Sons. 238. High St beck- 
enham. KenL (Ol 650 0304) 
(fOWOXTH - On 16th August -peace- 
fully in Hlndhead. Surrey. John 
Francis F.RJJUA. of Jtoncota. 
Ascona. Switzerland, and fo r m erly 
senior partner of Messrs Leigh & 
Orange, Hong Kong. Cremation at 
Gundford Crematori u m at 3pm on 
Wednesday. 20fh August Donations, 
if desired, to The MacndUUn UnB. 
King Edward vu HospitaL MMhursL 
Mnrr-Ou I6tn August 1986. after a 
long illness, borne with great cour- 
age. Col Christopher Francis Hun. 
O.B-E^ husband of the late Josentdne 
Hun Otoe Lovatt). much loved and 
admired father of Sarah aid 
Jemima, grandfather of Primp and 
Cresslda and Fleur. Funeral Service 
. at All Saints Church. WhUeparish. 
Salisbury. Friday. 22nd Augua. at 
3-30pm. Family flowers only, dona- 
tions if desired, to Salisbury 
Cathedral Spire Appeal, c/o Wffl 
Case & Partners. 22 Chorchflelds Rd. 
Salisb ury. 

>®TVE, Rupert Gavin, aged 35. cou- 
rageously on Sunday. 17Ui August 
Beloved eldest son of Kate and the 
late Rupert Kettle, brother of Kather- 
ine and Christopher, unde to Lucy 
and Edward QrlfBstan. of Pd»s Hfll.' 
Btariow TtchmoUm. Le a mi n gt o n Spa. 
Warwickshire- FUneral - 1 1.30am on 
Friday. 22nd August at Ktnetoo 
Church. Warwickshire. Family flow- 
only. Donations, if desired, to 
Regimental AssodaOon. sth Royal 
lnnuuiting Dragoon Guards. The 
Castle. Chester, or to Cancer Re- 
search. No letters to Kale please. 
WW8DKC. Roy - Beloved husband 
of Betty, brother of the late Sir 
Ceoffrey and Tudor, on 1 7th August 
after a very long and painful illness 
home with great fortitude. Crema- 
tion. family only. Memorial Service 
to be announced later. No flowers 
hut donations, if desired, to SL files 
Worsted Keynes, c/o Chappell & 
Hilton Funeral Service. 13 South 
Road. Haywards Heath. West Sussex 
RH16 4LE. 

M Al LEN OOf - On August 17th. 1986. 
peacefully at hta home. In North 
fieake. Norfolk. -Basil Henry 
Ramsey, formerly of Kepton. Please 
no flowers or tetters, if desired, 
d onations to Cancer 'Research. 
KJTGmMDGE - On August 7th. 
1986. in Bermuda, Ira Stuart Jr. Be- 
loved husband of Susan, aut tether 
of Mazy. Ira Stuart -ID. Stephen. 
Patrick, and Layton. Funeral held at 
8t John’s. Pembrok e - Bermuda, on 
August 1 2th. 

QM W LAII . On 17th August at Has- 
soda, peacefully In his 890) year, 
Gerald Andrew. With Bk love, 
admiration and gratitude he and 
Rosaanne had shared always from 
their children Sheila. Michael. 
Bernard. Raymond and Angela, their 
22 granddiwen and their wtos- 
family. 


.RUSSELL - On Augusl 15UL 1986. 
peacefully at home in London. Afaric 
Charles WUUam. Dearly loved hus- 
band of Charadan and tether of 
Michael and Amanda Cremation op 
Wednesday. August 20th at The 
Crifliems Crematorium. Amersham 
at 11.00 am. Funeral private. Family 
flowers only- End litres to JJf. 
KCnysn Ltd. 74 Rodtester Row. SW t 
teL 834 4624. 
SCMCMUMIU-IOUEr On 10th Au- 
gaau 1986. Edward Peter NigeL alter 
a toa9 Illness. The funeral took place 
on Augu st 16th. 

SKEMFTON- On 9th August 1986 at 
Birch Heath Lodge. Chrtauetoo. 
Chester - Mrs Evelyn. C. SfcempKm., 
BA. L&M. (gold medal 
Kharkov 1910). ofOder D'Academle 
(France) 1953 peacefully. 
Cremation has taken place. 
TENNANT - On IStti August 1986. af- 
ter a short and painful BUkk borne 
with great dignity. Mary. Beloved 
wife of Hugh and wonderful mother 
and grandmother. Cremation pri- 
vate. No flowers please. Donations to 
RJVX.I or The Jersey Hospice Care. 
70MKMHM. Miriam Robinette, 
daughter of the late Mr and Mis Her- 
MB TonUd n s o n and twin stater of 
Christopher, on August tan. peace- 
fully ai home after a tong Ulness. 
Funeral at the Church of Die Sacred 
Heart and Our Lady. Tembury WeBs 
on F riday. August 22nd at 12 noon. 
TOTE on August 14th 1986 after a 
short fflness In hospital Esme. 
Theodora MAE. a dearly Loved sta- 
- ter of wubam. Nettie and Carafola. 
Cremation at cnfleid on Friday 
August 22nd » 11.15am. • 

TATES - Peacefully, on 17th August 
1986. in tier 86th year. Minna, 
widow, of Chaites. and a much loved 
mother and grandmother. Cremation 
Private. 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


The Funeral Service for 
Colonel Jonathan AKara will be twM 
at the Parish Church of Donhead SL 
Andrew, near Shaftesbury on Fri- 
day. 22nd August, 1986 at 3.00 pm. 
followed for burtaL Flowers and en- 
quiries, please, to J.H. Kenyon Ltd. 
12 OUltera Street, w L. W. 01-935- 
3728. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


■ELLAJK, Robert John Emerson • 
Thantogtring Service at Blandford 
Paah Church. 2J0pm. September 
6th. No flowers please: donations if 
desired, to Wessex Kidney AppeaL or 
Sudan Relief (Blandford). c/o David 
ChemdL-10 Market Place. Btandford 
Forma. 


IN MEMORIAM - WAR 


HJU. CALK. Heamuanars State. 
Dieppe Raid- 19th August 1942. m 
memory of shimttales who did not 
return: Thomas Barry. Dennis 
Brunton. Robert Oarkfson. John 
Nicholas. John O^Sullivan. Frank 
Stanley and Maurice Threader. And 
those from Britain. Canada. 
Australia. Poland. .France and 
Germany who Mi Bui day. “Rot 
eternal grant unto them. 0 Lord.' 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


MMXS - Philip DavKL Suddenly a year 
090 today, aged 24. Too dearly loved 
ever to be forgotten. 


A 


* 


Brigadier R 61 C Preeion. late LL an 
August 24. 


Royal Air Force . 
GROUP CAPTAfN^J M Brook a i OC. 
D6MRU Headley Court. August 22. 


WINCCONMANDERS: SC Fowler to 

RAFCtofl. Cranwea. August 18: D RG 


18: 

M A Paley (o HQ SAC. August 18: M 
J cumilngriam to MoD. August 18: B 


The Hon RJ). Beckett 
and Miss SbW.Towns«d-Ilwe 
The enflMemem is announced 
between Ralph Daniel younger 
son of Lord and Lady 
Orirathorpc and Susanna, ewer 
daughter of Mr and Mis Conn 

Towwend-Rose. 

Mr SJO- Cooke 

and Mis* PA. Fatter 

The engagement is announced 
between araon Donald, son of 
Mr and Mrs Donald Cooke- of 
Shipley, West Sussex, and Pa- 
tricia Anne, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Frank Futier, of 
Truningham, Norfolk. 

Mr F.T. Craddock 
and Mrs M A Wanrington 
The forthcoming marriage 
announced and will take place 
on August 2$. 1986. in Bridport. 
between Frank Craddock ana 
Ann Warrington, (daughter of 
Mr and MrsH. K. Moore) both 
of London. A service of blessing 
will be held in Laden Parish 
Church afterwards. 

Mr JJVLDarb 
and Mhs F.C W3 mm 
T he engagement is announced 
beiween James, younger son of 
Colonel P. S. Davis. MBE and 
Mrs Davis. ofRuddington, Not- 
tinghamshire. and Fiona, only 
daughter of Major and Mrs K. 
aTc Wilson, of Shaftesbury. 
Dorset. 

Mr WJ>. Fhutlcel 
and Dr V^V. Letts 
The engagement is announced 


between Wayne, son of Dr and 
Mrs M. E. Frankel, of Staten 
Island. New York, and Venry, 
elder daughter of Mr and Mrs R. 
F. Lens, of Blean, Kent 
Mr JJX Gordon 
and Miss ELA. Yates 
The engagement is announced 
between John, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs W. G. Gordon, of 
Lude. Blair AtboU, Perthshire, 
and Harriet, youngest, daughter 
of the late Mr J. L rates and of 
Mrs J. L Yates, of Westmcsd 
House, - Brimpton Common, 
Reading. Berkshire: 

Dr EJ>. Lewis 
and Dr GAM. Jansen 
The engagement » announced 
between Ewan, second son of 
Dr and Mrs R. J. Lewis, of 
Narberth. Dyfed. and Candy, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mis 
LCJ. Jansen, of Melbourne, 
Australia, formerly of Ealing, 
London. 

Mr SJL SangRt-AnderMR 
sad Mbs JJVL Wheeler 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, only son of Mr 
and Mrs S. J. Sanger- Anderson, 
of Brambridge. Hampshire, and 
Jane, eldest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs B. R. Wheeler, of Oakley, 
Hampshire. 

MrCJULSDex 
and Miss CJF. McCormick 
The engagement is announced 


between Christoph, son . of the 
late Professor Dr Karl Sflex and 
of Mrs Rose-Marie Silex, u4e 
von Arnim. of Cologne, and 
Christine, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs R.C McConnkk, of 
Hambk, Hampshire. 

Mr JXSumefffidd 
Miss PS- Green 
The e ngagem ent is announced 
between James, son of the late 
Mr J. V. Sumerfidd and Mrs P. 
M. Sumerfidd, -of Bromley, 
Kent; and ftnetope, daughter of 
Profifos o r and Mrs ML-Grcea, of 

Baines, London.^ 

Mr AJWJP. IhoiBsea 
and Miss C.G. Bachaa- 
Htpban " 

The en gage ment is announced 
between Andrew, son of Dr and 
Mrs W. P. Thomson, of Edin- 
burgh. and Caroline, eldest 
daughter of Mrand Mrs Alastair 
Buchan-Hepburn, of St 
Andrews, 


on 


J w 


^*1 

C^oiiton to MoDOP^iWA). August 

la. 


Marriage 

Mr AJLV.Wakwjchby 
and Miss VJVLA. One 
The marriage took place 
Saturday. August 9, at- St An- 
drews, Meonstoke, Hampshire, 
between Mr Anthony Wfl- 
knighby. son of Cofond Mau- 
rice Willoughby and the late 
Mrs Nancy Willoughby, mid 
Miss . Victoria Gaze, elder 
daughter of Mrs Giles Kirby and 
the laic Mr Michael Gaze. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage, by her brother, Mr 
Justin Gaze, was attended by 


William Gaze, Matthew 
Francesca dunam, Antonia and 
Samantha. Norton. Mr • Raid 
Hfewitt was best man. 


Science report 


OBITUARY 

RONALD 

AIRD 

Well-loved 
secrel 
ofM( 



Mr Ronald Aird,! 
tary of Marj 


Gub from I9S2 to 1962; died 
on August I6anheagedfg>t, 

A finespcaistnaiL hegaised 
distinction as a cricketer aada 
rackets and rcal tennis pfejtr, 
and was a devotee trf 

National Hunt raemg. But itis 
for ^hn sound jndg ^w w tad 

remembered. 

Ronny Aird was bom qq 
May' 4, 1902, and educated at 
Em and Gam College, Cam- 
bridge. He was in the Etou kl 
from 1919 io 1921, and 
at Camtaidgc won bhics 'for 
cricket and' rackets. Between 
1920 and 1938 bo played 
cricket for HanuiriHre, sddom 
regularly but often enough to 
score four hundreds and to 
share,- in 1924, hr a third- ■ 
wicket partnership of266 with 
C. P. Mead. 

He worked at the Stock - 
Exchange from 1924 tmtd 
1926, when he was elected 


secretary of MCC Except for 
the war years, be held the post 

until 1952, being president in 
1968/69. His MC was won in 
the Middle East in 1942, while 
serving with the. Royal Tank ’• 
Regiment 

The rare affection in which • 
Aird was tekf at lord's owed ' 
much to his quiet charm, and 
staff and members alike were - 
at home in his company. 

Although he. had retired' 
from the secretaryship by the 
time the game had begun to 
move into its present political . 
and highly commentiafized 
era, he sampled the political''' 
side of it whra, daring his year 
as president, he took the chair 
at the special general meeting 
of the dub, held at Church 
House, Westminster, in De- 
cember, 1 968, to debate the 
issue of cricketing links with 
South Africa, 

This was a meeting dial 
aroused strong feelings and 
was given world-wide publici- 
ty. Aird was acclaimed on all 
sales for the way be conducted 
it As an essentially amenable 
person, he saw cnckel as “a 
game to be played wherever 
and whenever possible”. 

Hb slim, elegant, somewhat 
aquiline appearance with- 
stood the passing years. Even 
in iris eighties he, looked ^ood 
for a set of real tennis in the 
court behind the pavilion at 
Lonfs. After his retirement he 
became a National Hunt ■ 
Reward. . . 

He married, in 1925. Viola 
Mary Baririg, who' died in 
1965. There was one daughter 
of the marriagie: 


MR J. W. 
SCOTT 


Glandular fever links 
to afternoon cat-imps 


By Andrew Wiseman 1 
People who feel sleepy patients felt 


V 


ing the day and regularity need 
an afternoon nap, could be 
suffering ; from the con- 
sequences of glandular fever 
contracted many years ago. 

These are the findings of 
American doctors, Dr Chris- 
tian G aflleminant Dr Su- 
sanna Moodini, from Stanford 
University Medical School, 
after they had investigated a 
gronp of adults who continued 
to complain of daytime drowsi- 
after a hotel of 
infections mononucleosis 
(IM).. 

The s ympt o ms iff this ill- 
ness include fever.sore throat, 
swollen and pahfel lymph 
nodes, as weU as an ab- 
nonnally large number of 
white blood ceflsr. Serious 
complications are rare, aJ- 
thot^h complete recovery can 
take several weeki. . 

The doctors studied 11 
adnUs (seven men and five 
women) between the ages of 14 
and 26. All complained of 
disabling daytime sleepiness, 
haring contracted CM frmu . 
three to 22 years earlier. 
Monitoring began within five 
months of the initial Olnessi 
which had been tbor^ ghiy 
documented by dinkal and 
laboratory teste. 

According to their families, 
friends, and medical staflE, all 
patients in tfcejtioaly grpop.had 
normal daytime alertness ^be- 
fore the onset of ^todnlar 
fever. Apart from a few broken 
limbs, the restor of sporting - 
activities, the 12 had no-, 
complicated medical histories- 
None was takings any medica- 
tion, apart, from birth control 
pills. 

When they had IM, the 


tired and were 
encouraged by their doctors to 
spend more time in bed. All 
slept or rested in die after- 
noon. They amtfoned to suffer 
from lack of alertness during 
foe day months after the 
fever’s ottset; «Iks dl its 
symptoms, should have 
disappeared. 

• Wtii -time, they became 
even more sleepy during the 
day, and their afternoon naps 
did not refresh them* They 
also found it more and more 
difficnltto wake up. 

The condition of patients, 
particularly those seen 10 or 
12 years, worsened propes- 
shely. They spent more rime 
napping in the afternoon, al- 
tegb they tried to fight the 
lengthening periods ofdrow$v-- 
uess. Sometimes, they fotmd it 
difficult to wake np n the 
mo rnin gs, and occasionally 
they were confined and dis~ 

orientated after a kmg daytnne 

nap. 

Tr eatment with' various 
stunubmts and anti-depres- 
sants produced only ^mediocre 
wsnlte”. Some of tfe patiots 
are now nnaUe to work^others 
were forced to take 


aD 


Although not 
bents wul 

father 


IM pa- 
chronk 
studies 


risk. The magnhnde of tills 
medical promem out - •• be 
ftenged from the feet that in 
the JJnfted States, excessive 
traytime sleepiness planes 
mo« than 50 per dent m all 
with variohs steep- 
disorders. 

Source; Archives if Internal 
Medicine: July 1986,-- 

■ 7 


, Mr Joseph Socrtt, librarian 
of University; College Loudon 
for almastthree derades, died 
on Ai®ust 4 at the age of 7 1. 

Joseph (Joe) WUham Scott, 
was bam on November 14, 
1914, and, after attending 
Leeds Grammar School, be-', 
gan his career in librarians!) ip 
as a student assistant in the 
university library of his home . 
town while working for his 
degree in classics, wbich he 
obtained, in 1937. .The follow- . 
ira year, he was put in charge 
of the Brotberton Collection, 
of rare books and manuscripts 
as a sub-librarian. ' 

He volunteered for active' 
service in January; 1940, was 
commissioned two years later, , 
and was posted, as a staff . 
officer to the HQ of Force 1 33i 
which was involved in clan- 
destine operations in'- the 
Balkans. 


After the war, Scott was'. 


appointed librarian of Birk- 
'beck College where, with great 
devotion, he carried out the . 
enormous task of rebuilding a 
library- which was' almost en- 
tirely destroyed during toe- 
war. In 1954, be became 
lrbrarianofUmversity Coifege 
and it -ftourisbed under- fos~- 
expen miidance.- Its stodt 
increased to over. a million 
volumes, and important col- ' 
lections were acquired, anfong 
them the library of C 1L 
Ogden, the inventor of Basic 
Engfislt: He retired in 19S2L ' 
Sam was also a gifted 

teacher to generation$ofaspiV 
ing librarians, and xfoarnpi- 
oned a system of subject 
specialists which has been 
widely accepted by British 
academic librarians^ Col-' . 
leagues enjoyed his wit -and' 
admired, his Inexhaustible 
knowledge of bibliography. - 
and he impressed all wha 
knew hhn with his radiant 
personality and readiness to 
hdp. ■ 

He is survived by bis Wife, 
Elizabeth, and by his two sons. ■ 


COLONEL 
C. R. WIGAN 


Colonel Charies Richard 
Wigan, MC, mesktent of foe .. 
Under SjCtths' Association . 
from 193! to 1961.- ditefon 
August 7. He was 95. 

During the First World War : 
he served with the 5th‘ Battal- 
ion. Queen's Royal Regiment 
and .was awarded .foe MC for' . 
service in Mesopotamia: ; • 

He was under sheriff of 
Surrey from 1921 io 1961. and, 
deputy lieutenant from 1933" 
His revision -with Lord 
Meston of Mather's Skw< ' 
Imw <1935), is still foe stan- 
dard woric on foe subject . . 

His wife. Barbara, died? .u“, 
1980. He is survived' by ki> 
only son. 


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THE ARTS 


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Television 


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' ' ° :'si^Unta last itigKf'* episode, 


Opera at the European festivals: Paul Griffiths reports on the world 
premiere of Penderecki’s Die schwarze Maske at Salzburg and 
Roger Warren on Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg in Munich 


* ■ sivUUW wt u%<u» «|U9W1C, 

: ]; T '~:Figtoi*g Back (BBCl) had 
■^^strtdc me as ode of the best 




t* 1 «. ; 
»* 1 *. •, ._. . 


^drama serials in' ages. The 


two- boors were fanny, 
.. “<! tJlbSetaiMK Sltd n^TMllIlHlIl 


. .. 

* 

»l : ii 


^.-'boisterous and refreshingly 
: ' *bsul-t£xapered. Viv" Sharpe, 


This is the kind of opera- where a. 
hunchbacked servant (inevitably 


odd behaviour ts explained by the 
feci that.' unknown to her present 


. ' fe. beading for Bristol, fleeing stage to the accompaniment of an 
' ’^from everything, bolding on to „au d . . shrieks “Der Anti- 
■ -5^ *• chadren,tiynig to lose two chnsiT. ft is the kind of opera. 

!j- : H? t husban ds , an embodiment where the heroine has to go about 


the role is for a character tenor) . husband, she had a child by a black 
comes hobbling to the front of the- slave and is still sexually obsessed 


by the child's fether. 


fit fausbnnds. was an embodiment 

' as a awwpinicy 

,■ ^ theory, that we are teigg 


t ^ j^picked op Igr the entire work! 


for much of the -time -with arms 
stretched up ahead of her and head 
. thrown back, wearing a crazed look 
m her eyes. It is the kind of opera 


• f-j >,> 1: . 

1 i . i. 




The ittagicaL rather original !>*«« tumultuous flourishes 


■ ij. jJHiijg aboutViv is that she 
'l? k. ' simply is -not very bright 
* j^When'-sbe is ennered she 
abandons common sense and 
.^^nnus and snarls. In Hazel 
>, O'Connor's winningly mt- 

* ‘ sentimental performance, she 


dowdy, hearDy-bnilt, 


* .. 
t »s » •. 


k flashing-eyed oddball, hun- 


the -percussion alternate with 17th- 
century dance m usic, and where an 
unseen- chorus keeps coming on 
heavy with the “Dies irae”. It i i in 
short, debased Expressionism, and 
it is what Penderecki has ravaged 
from Gerhart Hauptmann's one- 
act-play Die schwarze Maske. 

Written in 1928, the play belongs 


0 iedhnp and defiant, beautiful Hauptmann’s second phase of 


.‘^fcCjnfo & rare moments' «T re- more symbolist dramas. A very 
. throDgJi ate! tajure of ^n ed g roup of pwgle mvdrawn 


. v J 'C-weat and dm. 

’■ "iv"??'! But last night she started to 
fefjecoine radiant and - soft- 
I -'-;. parted, suffused by a grubby 
• - \."'i tenderness, thanking her nice, 
- veU-spokeu Indian lover- for a 


mo nitor wo iubfe ^ hoaes$ - s naay p» Md ** 


together to lunch with a Silesian 
mayor in 1 662. just after the Thirty 
Yeats’ Wan there is a prince of the 
Roman church, a Lutheran pastor, 
a Jansenist. a Huguenot and a Jew, 
but what disturbs the party is hot so 
much their religious differences as 


■*•»*•■ ■ ■- 

-i 1 t. • 


• ^ tirjtd sized tfae hub up in an 
' -'^uistant and, although be was 
c^^dausible and, she weed him,. 
" ^ibe had the measure of him, 

' There was something in 

--.;-:he tone of last night’s post-. 

thank-yon that was 
^ vindngly off-key. I agree that 
would have happened, bat 


we learn, has been made possible 
by profits from the slave trade; her 


The irruption of Africa into the 
score is potent: there is a stark 
contrast between the fierce drum- 
ming that enters about a third of 
the way through this 100-minute 
single act and the sometimes 
skittish, sometimes relentless, per- 
petual motion of the main sub- 
stance. And the most effective 
moment in the whole opera comes 
at the very end .when the slave 
beats his tattoo for a danse 
macabre executed by nearly all the 
casu only the Jewish merchant, 
excellently acted and sung by 
Gunter Reich, is left as observer of 
the tragedy. 

But the awesomeness of the 
finale is more an achievement of 
the production than of the music 
by means of projections, we are 
persuaded that the baroque interior 
lifts away from some wasteland of 
an asteroid, reinforcing the point 
that has been made before, that 
outside, beyond the fine wine and 
the Venetian glass, there is eternal 
darkness. It is not a very new or 
subtle point, perhaps, and the view 
-of black Africa as sensual and 


destructive is grotesque, but Harry 
Kupfer, producer and joint libret- 
tist with the composer, keeps his 
side of the baxgain. 

If Penderecki warns hysteria, 
then hysteria he provides. The set 
by Hans Schavemoch. looking like 
an engraving but with a huge 
mirror that swings across the stage, 
is enough to remind all the 
characters that they are in a 
fantastical melodrama (though 
rather charmingly the count, 
Rainer Scholze. goes' through the 
whole thing under the impression 
that this is real life), and the 
costumes by ReinHard Heinrich 
are beautifully apropos: I particu- 
larly liked the lavender silk and old 
lace for the Prince Abbot slinkily 
sung by the young bass-baritone 
Huub Claessens as a man of 
decadent intelligence and luxury. 

Such characterization, though, 
owes a lot to the cast: the people do 
not live in what Penderecki has 
- written for them, nor does the 
opera. Much is being made of its 
synthesis of his two worlds, the 
shock effects of the 1960s and the 
lugubrious synth on ism of the last 
decade; his range, though, remains 
extremely limited. One hears a 
very great deal indeed of the 
downward-moving chromatic 
stale, which is not too surprising 


when he has no other means of 
providing continuity. The prob- 
lem. however, is not just that there 
is a lack of musical invention; 
anyone with more idea of what 
music was about would not have 
chosen this unpleasant little fable 


(> P 


in the first place, or perhaps would 
have treated it entirely differently. 


have treated it entirely differently. 

There remain some excellent 
performances, besides those I have 
already mentioned. Josephine Bar- 
stow runs the risk of being too well 
cast as the highly neurotic leading 
female character Benigna, but in 
feci she carries the role marvel- 
lously, and flings her voice unstint- 
ingly through the long central 
scena. She can also look convinc- 
ingly scared out of her wits when 
the **black mask” of the title comes 
on to execute a dance before her; 
she even manages to copulate with 
a dining chair. 

Others to make a mark certainly 
include the conductor. Woldemar 
Nelsson. who persuades the Vi- 
enna Philharmonic to put a very 
brave fece indeed on Penderecki’s 
unimpressive score. There is also a 
neat cameo from Heinz Zednik as 
the musician Hadank. whose threat 
to make an CHheib opera is. in this 
context, more than a little disquiet- 
ing. - P.G. 





V. - 


would not have gushed. 


ft • , 

' » **.- 

sr- 


'A.vC; Dramatists who are good at 
>r^eing .fenny, who engage us 
■ ~ t /,iiroogh the dislocation of 
^inmonr, often feel the need to 
Juow their gift aside as the 
'-.V'tory grows increasingly seri- 
. „ J^os, as if hwghter is trivial and 
_ / '/tcetious. -It- is as if the 
^^haracters snddenly wise up to 
„ J >bat the author really wants, 

. '■.■' ^nd theyget sober and start to , 
"‘'reach. One of Alan Bless- 
■ : -ales huge achievements m 
j r ~^ioys from the Blackstaff was i 
~ - tint be did almost exactiy the 
averse. Gareth Jones got. 

; - jgkting Back off to a cracking 
- • tort- But I dread Viv Sharpe 
.'econring a gullib le and ear- 
’■ "-test- urban crusader, heading > 
* -■» rhetoric and poetry and the 

hilsophical overview. . ... , 


It has become a tradition to 
end the Munich Festival with 
a performance of Die Meister- 
singer. The current produc- 
tion. by August Eventing, 
dates from 1979. but.it now 
combines members of its orig- 
inal cast with several inter- 
preters who have come to 
prominence m other- Meister- 
singers since then. It is enjoy- 
able^ but lightweight and it 
illustrates a reluctance-in re- 
cent productions to come to 
grips with the piece 
Jurgen Rose's light bright 
sets are made almost entirely 
of wood — timbered floor and . 





galleries, finally enclosed by a 
huge, beer-tent for the Jesi- 
weise. They do not evoke 
Nuremberg, but create a neu- 
tral space for a debate about 
art 11175 works surprisingly 
well in Act I, which suggests a 
sunlit schoolroom as much as 
a church, where David in- 
structs Walther von Stolzing 
in art and where the masters 



Crisis of choke: Lucia Popp and Ren£ KoDo 


position examination. It 
works much less well for the 
•teemed midsummer night of 
Act II. where a few potted 
shrubs and some flimsy trellis 
have all the heady enchant- 
ment of a garden centre. 

Such inconsistency, how- 


Andrew R£ssik 


put on Wue academic gowns to . ever, characterizes a produo 
supervise ' ^tofemg’s -com- lion ■ that veers uneasily 


between staging debates about 
art and loading the action with 
fussy incidental detail It 
misses the conversational 
naturalness of Wagner’s score, 
with the striking exception of 
the delicately bitter-sweet ex- 
change between Sachs and 
Eva in Act TL Berad Weikl 
and- Lucia Popp catch .every 


nuance of this, and they 
receive notably alert support 
from Wolfgang Sawallisch and 
the Munich orchestra. 

In this act Weikl and Rene 
Kollo establish an excellent 
rapport They are so equally 
matched that Eva's crisis of 
choice is intensified: Lucia 
- Popp vividly makes the point 
torn between them. But the 
scene lacks its full impact 
because of the production's 
uncertain touch. Kollo over- 
does his fear that he might lose 
her 1 Weikl overacts the bad 
temper of his cobbling out- 
burst and then goes to the 
opposite extreme- by turning 
the reference lo King Marke 
into a joke. 

That moment indicates 
dearly what is at present 
missing in Weikl's Sachs. He 
is an extremely honest singer, 
dear, direct and untiring 
throughout the huge role. He 
presents a powerful personal- 
ity in the prime of life, but he 
misses the character's reserves 
of wisdom, his awareness of 


the “cry of pain” beneath the 
geniality. Over-familiarity 
with Stolzing's role now en- 
courages Kollo to overplay the 
impatient petulance: he is too 
aware of his natural superior- 
ity as aristocrat and artist. 
Hermann Prey's beautifully 
sung Beckmesser laudably at- 
tempts to avoid caricature, 
but ultimately his very re- 
straint ends up by drawing 
attention to Wagner's labori- 
ously over-extended parody of 
his pedantic critics. 

Like other productions re- 
cently. this one makes a 
further attempt to soften 
Wagner's humiliation of 
Beckmesser by introd uring 
him into the final rejoicing. 
This gratuitous sentimentality 
has nothing to do with either 
text or music, it shows a 
concern with peripheral rather 
than essentia] matters. What is 
now needed is a thorough re- 
thinking of the work, and the 
Munich revival, despite in- 
cidental pleasures, comes no- 
where near that. — R.W. 


Josephine Barstow, marvellously carrying the leading role of the 
neurotic Benigna, scared out of her wits by the M black mask” 

£$ Promenade Concert 

1 Improbabilities of 
S- the semi-stage 

ature, _ 

7 «- Simon Boccane&ra l .°° mai, y h “ v >’ f °° lfai,s; and 

: ■« uric n Kiri micmlpuloliArt Ia 


Albert HaU/Radio 3 


too many heavy footfalls; and 
it was a bad miscalculation to 
have flags waving and chairs 
being noisily set in place as 
Act I's introduction led into 
Carol Vaness's movingly sung 


Verrff'cyclt wiih She daric "Come in quea'ora brana'\ 
complexities of Simon Boc- ** ie council chamb 

canegra. then it was downright sccne - though, the small rai» 
hubris to choose this opera of ^86 used to ad van tag 
shadowy exits and entrances. Vl ? 101 ? of the crowd to 


of confused loyalties and 
identities, to bring to the 
bright lights and confined 
semi-stage of the Albert Hall. 

The gradual move during 


the evening from the improb- 
able to the possible was 


For the council chamber 
scene, though, the small raised 
stage was used to advantage; 
the vision of the crowd top- 
pling backwards in fear, and 
the strength of Gordon 
Sandison’s performance as 
Paolo, provided the impetus 
needed to cross the interval. 

In the second act the Lon- 
don Philharmonic Orchestra, 
dearly delighted with their 


able to the possible was a , on r ,, ‘j L 
achieved almost entirely 
through the commitment of 

individual nprfnmunrM and tiieir own. Responding to 


MR V 

scon 


EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 

Galleries: John Russell Taylor 


individual performances and " ° 

the dramatic assurance of 


• • • : he “International” in the 
■ ‘ -tie of the Edinburgh Inter- 
■ v : ational Festival.has generally 
: • ; i the past seemed to be there 
’ > establish n clear rejection of 
" ‘"je pardchia}. And presum- 


ought to be not always is. But 
in this case the show is wholly 
fascinating and revelatory. 

It indicates for a start, that 
there was - little parochial 


mond with her rosebush in 
1739 to the easy, fluent 


Edinburgh while one listens to 
a sort of Schools Broadcasting 


portraitist responsible for distillation of the ideas and 
Anne Brown and Anne Bruce diversions of key figures in 


in the early 1760s. By that 


-'dy,: in so far as Scottish art during that time: if we have 
as felt to be', parochial, it underestimated Ramsey, Rae- 


about painting in Scotland' time he has developed to a 
during that time: if we have fine point the elegant (but not 


links 


'~:ldom played any important 

- ml in .the festival: even last 
“-rar. when the suggested 
• teme was the Auld Alliance, 

- was expressed much more in 
/.rnns of French art in Scot- 
■ nd than of Scottish . art in 
-v ranee, as . though the traffic 

- -as mainly one way. Obvi- 
' Jsly this is far from the truth, 
. . id one wonders whether to 

jt it down to Scottish mod- 
■ly or Scottish snobbery to- 
ards anything oflocah origin 
at such testimony to So)t- 
. nd's international impact as 


burn and even Wflltie of late; 
we now have no excuse for 
failing to appreciate that they 
were right in the mainstream 
of European art Ami there are 
other, even bigger surprises: 
from now on we shall nave to 
pay mudi more attention to 
Alexander R unci man as si 
history painter and, perhaps 
even more strikingly, etcher, 
and to such other one-time 
members of Fuseli's Roman 
circle as -John Brown, whose 
wash drawings here often 
suggest Fuseli himself and 


culpably flattering) softening 
of focus to give .a delicate 
diffusion of image, suggestive 
of Fantin-Latour more than a 
century later, or even of the 
blurry “painted photographs” 
of Gerhard Richter, a couple 
of which are to be seen in the 
Fruitmarkct’s The Mirror and 
the Lamp show. 

Raeburn in his turn uses a 
very similar technique, for 
men as well as women, and it 


five-minute chunks. I must 
admit I found it more divert- 
ing to run backwards and 
forwards making my own 
sound collage, but no doubt 
many are more appreciative 
than I of being lectured, even 
in such an amusing context 
The National Portrait Gal- 
lery's fine photographic show 
Printed Ligfef, which cele- 
brates the “scientific ait” of 
Fox Talbot and David Octa- 
vius Hill until October 26, 
does much more credit to the 
enterprise of the Scot. Many of 


seems to arise straight out of these photographs, apart from 
contemporary studies of how their great documentary value 


e great Ossian exhibition of - Goya, and do nolsbrinkin the 
)74. seen in Hamburg and comparison. 


the eye worked by the son of for anyone interested in the 
Scottish scientist-philosopher manners and customs of the 


1-IUlpS 


iris, was never shown in 
•'Jinbutgh. However, this 
‘ tor the festival is taand- 

■ \imely making amends: the 

■ _ ,eme is the Scottish En- 

- /Jitenmenf, and'the results 
\e enlightening even to us, 

:• ;'en today.. 

- .As Duncan Macmillan, de- 
• set of the show at the Talbot 

" ice Art Centre until August 
.'K Painting in Scotland: The 

- olden Age, points out, since 

much of the intellectual 
. rment of the later lfith 
ntury in : Edinburgh was 
... • ncemed with perception, it 
inds to reason that the 
sual arts in Scotland during' 

- -at period should be deeply 
teresting. Unfortunately an 

- story does not always con- 
mi to reason, and what 


Not all the art in the show is 
necessarily very artful: a few 
Scottish painters boedering on 
the primitive are included to 
make a point, and one would 
not ' perhaps hold up Robert 
Barker’s Panorama of Edin- 
burgh from the Cation Hill of 
1792 as the -height of land- 
scape sophistication for its 
period — except .that it is 
apparently the earliest 360- 
degree panorama -known in 
painting. But, when we come 
to the big three,, there can be 
little doubt eiiher.of what they 
learnt from- their philosophi- 
cal friends or what they taught 
the world. 

It is illuminating. to observe 
Ramsey developing from the 
stiff almost Caroline painter 
of Agnes Murray Kyrmyn- 


celebrated in the Royal Mu- 
seum of Scotland's show A 
Hotbed of Genius, which is at 


people or the changing shape 
of the city (interestingly 


enough, photographic pan- 
oramas of Edinburgh come 



Bernard Haitink's direction. 

But I am not sure that, in the vJSwkLhS 

end. radio listeners did not for rcmrrtded of Verdi s uwning 
once have the better de al . 'J characters 

ll ic c ntnt- mriirarinn nf th* ^ made: BOCCanCgra 

Prim y° u have 10 make ,hem ”- 
rwSn °rh Noble’s energy and concentra- 

remSpjbhiJ tion rtSCrealed lhe rale with 

unflagging conviction. 

was clothed. This time the 
evening dress, particularly of 

the chorus, was incongruously 50 unded somewhat con- 
apparent throughoutfand I 

amafraid this was largelv due Roben V° >d s J ,es 9°* 

to the stage direction of those 1?^°^ 
wearing it disposed colleague at snon 

g notice. Geoffrey Moses, a little 


If the fell complement of vreak in the lower depths, 
house and stage lights must nevertheless conveyed the 


glare mercilessly on, even in 
the nocturnal Prologue, it is 


man's great sadness in care- 
fully shaded tones of grey< 


surely sensible to minimize while Alastair Miles, a bass 
physical activity. Stephen well worth the hearing, did 


Lawless, staging Peter Hall's 
production for the Proms, 
allowed too much business. 


stalwart service as Pietro. 

Hilary Finch 


London debuts 

Mature subtleties 


being about abstract ideas every sign, of artistic concern 
rather than specific images of in their lighting and com- 


AUan Ramsay on the road to development in the almost 
Caroline portrait of Agnes Murray Kynnynnumd 

ms from antique gems tury painting A GaBow 


Marina Milk, a Yugoslav 
pianist based in London, 
made an exciting impression 
with her playing of Rach- 
maninov in a Park Lane 
Group recital three years ago. 
Since then she has developed 


people or things. Whenever position — Hill was in feet a 
possible there are portraits of painter as well, and one of the 


the main figures, both straight 
and as . seen through the 
deforming glass of John Kay 
(he caricaturist as well as 


original editions of the epoch- 
. making, boohs concerned and 
the investigative tools used or 
the machines invented. 

That is in the second half; 
the first half tries a more 
radical approach by sending 
one armed with a sort of 
Walkman through a series of 
d£cors representing various 
aspects of Enlightenment 


earliest to use photographs as 
sketches for paintings. 

There is a touch of enter- 
prise too in the small show 
dedicated to James Tassie 
1735-1799 (until September 
30), for he was not only a 
portraitist of the Scottish 
Enlightenment but also had a 
hand in evolving a glassy 
substance which looked rather 
fake ivory and enabled his 
works to be reproduced at will. 
His best work is clearly in the 
portraits, but his reproduo- 


pons from antique gems 
played their part in the dis- 
semination of knowledge of 
and enthusiasm for the arts of 
classical antiquity which were 
so important in late 18th- 
century Edinburgh. 

The story of Scottish art is 


brought closer up to dale in 
the fine Art Society’s delight- 
fill show At Home: Scottish 
Interiors 1820-1929, which 
until September 20 turns the 
gallery's elegant terrace house 
into a home again with a series 
of rooms charting the recent 
history of Scottish taste, and 
in Bourne Fine Art's engaging 
collection of rum -of-th e-cen- 


tury painting A Galloway 
IdyD, on until August 30. But 
the one thing not to be missed 
is the small yet incredibly 
choice show of Mackintosh 
Watercolours downstairs at 
the Academy until October 5. 

Mackintosh was a Jack of all 
artistic trades and apparently 
a master of all: it is a 
discomforting experience to | 
play on oneself the old trick of 
trying to decide which single i 
picture, given the choice, one 
would carry off for one’s own. 
The only answer is all of them 
- but, since none is available, 
one can hardly do better than 
go to the show and luxuriate. 


into a performer capable of the qualities. 


winner Barry Douglas, gave a 
similarly refined recital re- 
freshingly devoid of ex- 
hibitionism for the sheer sake 
of it. Indeed much of the 
music seemed to have been 
chosen largely for its subdued 


greatest subtleties. 

Her playing of Brahms’s 


opened with 


Tchaikovsky - the Romance 
in F major. Op 51 No 5, and 


Piano Pieces, Op 116, for the dark-bued Dumka. Op 59. 

V- . • Um AC 


example, was mature in its Here, as in Shostakovich’s 


thoughtfulness; even the three comparatively rarely played 
Capri cri os, rather more exu- Second Sonata. Op 61, a work 


berant than the Intermezzos 
in the group, were played with 


laden with tragic qualities, 
Lisney impressed with his 


great control, while the slower clarity of sound and his ability 
pieces were mellow, intro- ^ ol ^ 1 10 elucidate the shape of 


specuve and spacious, which 
is just as they ought to be. 

After Barber’s Three 

Dances from Souvenirs, done 
with a wit similarly refined. 
Miss Mitic tackled the Beetho- 
ven sonata more apt than all 
of them, perhaps, to be played 


the music and to stand back a 
tittle from it as if in modest 
deference. 

The second half of his 
recital was devoted to Chopin, 
and he prepared the way for 
the B flat minor Sonata with 
exquisitely controlled perfor- 
mances of the Op 55 Noc- 


INO/Jarvi 

TsherHaU 


,, . u,sb * CTS10 "' **' which Wagner might have 
1 i v heard before he wrote The 

t jl.i linburgh Festival. And it- is F/tw Dutchman. Both found 


rowing up some curiosities 
its path. There is. for 
stance, the cocktail of the 
me name at the Caledonian 


Concert: John Higgins 

■ WA/T«nn totally unknown in a weirdly M§huU Napoleon’s favoured 

uiu/Jitfi'l compiled programme Twq composer, was expert at writ- 

Jsher Hall overtures were used to start ing patriotic Choruses and it 

• ■ Mendelssohn’s Hebrides and did not much matter whether 

« r . . ' Echoes of Ossian. by the they were inspired by Aber- 

.ve theme of the Enlighten- Danish composer Niels Gade, deen or Abbeville — the 

L.enL Spoilt v-remn , s which Wagner might have Scottish colouring in Uthal is 

e heard before he wrote The minimal. These found the 
* Firing Dutchman. Both found chorus in much better heart 
s Neeme Jarvi in northern and voice,, also the bards 
r nautical mood. (Chief Bard. Anthony Mi- 

e : A choral extract from chaels-Moore) who offer com- 
® Lesueur’s • Ossian. ou les forting words before and after 


mfi' e J^ hose m E r j enis hordes was a weak way to close 
. rn ° re conducive al half-time, and was muzzily 


: ■JEJiJ’SS 1, tha I l lh , e sung by the Edinburgh Inter- 
" •2 d 7S R ,! rh ^ man c kT,0 J wl ' national Festival Chorus. Be- 
fue A 2? ■ Was S L und ?y fore that Pamela Myers left 


Shi’s concert given by the 
Dttish NatiortaT Orchestra. 


Dttish NatiortaT Orchestra. 
Most of the music was 
spired by the bard Ossian. or 
her his impresario, irans- 
or or — some would- say — 
ernor. James Macpherscm- 
, c first half was a mixture of 
• very famfliar and the 


and voice, also the bards 
(Chief Bard. Anthony Mi- 
chaels-Moore) who offer com- 
forting words before and after 
battle. The solo writing is dull; 
Pamela Myers made some- 
thing of the heroine and 
Roderick Earle rather more of 
her fether. but Jeffeiy Talbot 
provided only a pinched tenor 


Theatre: Sarah Hemming 

T|,p Rnari fn a rnan ^ c ' crowded, sometimes cib/e, the cast all operating on 

A uc JAUStu iu threatening atmosphere. slightly different levels, until a 

Immortality The Show is in four pans, pitch of controlled demonic 

. “ each one building on the last hysteria is reached — com- 

ntiirrfiill and calling on techniques pleidy at odds with the mood 

v^umumu from other media to give it its of Pan Three. Here, at the 

disjointed, alien quality. A same table, the cast float 
In all its 40 years the Edin- long cable covered with elec- through the atmosphere of a 
burgh Festival must have ironic . paraphernalia and Sixties drug party. Fan Four, 
hosted some fairly bizarre art- video sets dominates the front and a debate is staged between 
forms, but it can never have of the stage — suggesting a Leary and Liddy, framed by a 
seen anything quite as un- board meeting, a panel game disjointed dance act and inter- 
conventional as New York's or perhaps a trial. Seated runted by a man from an 


Miss Mitir sank her finwrs brautifully SOnOfOUS, impec- 


In all its 40 years the Edin- 
burgh Festival must have 


Ossian for Walter Scott and provided only a pinched 
the Mad Scene from Lucia . in the title role. 


the Mad Scene from Lucia. 
which found her in steadily 
improving voice but indicated 
that Donizetti was not Jam’s 
favourite composer. . 

And so to Mgfaufs one-act 


The oddest element of an 
odd evening was that no one 
included possibly lhe best 
music inspired by Ossian: 
Werther’s verses in Mas- 


Vihati based on another seneCs opera of the same 


ian/Macpherson creation. <>carae. 


seen anything quite as un- 
conventional as New York's 
Wooster Group. Even their 
unconventionality is uncon- 
ventional. Plot, characters, 
narrative line and structure 
are. ostensibly, absent and 
interpretation is perilous, but 
The Road to Immortality does 
have its own peculiar logic. It 
rushes you on a trip in four 
parts through America of the 
Fifties and Sixties, mingling 
shades of McCarthy with the 
Sixties, .preoccupations with 
drugs arid perception to evoke 


or perhaps a trial, heated 
behind this, the company 
loom like a dreamworld afl- 
powerfiti committee. They 
proceed to read fragments at 
random from Sixties gurus — 
Leary, Kerouac, Huxley — 
under the dry-witted direction 
of a grey-suited chairman. 

There is a pause, then the 
actors reconvene at a hearing/ 
play-reading. Somebody is ac- 
cused and they speed through 
a manic, dislocated rejigging 
of Arthur Miller’s TheCru- 


slighily different levels, until a 
pitch of controlled demonic 
hysteria is reached — com- 
pletely at odds with the mood 
of Pan Three. Here, at the 
same table, the cast float 
through the atmosphere of a 
Sixties drug party. Fan Four, 
and a debate is staged between 
Leary and Liddy, framed by a 
disjointed dance act and inter- 
rupted by a man from an 
invisible audience, who lost 
bis sight during an hallucina- 
tory episode and who accuses 
Leary of irresponsibility. 

It is all a little like turning 
on a radio and reaching all 
stations simultaneously. It is 
undeniably terribly preten- 
tious. But it Is also consis- 
tently fascinating and bizar- 
rely unique, assaulting you 
with a peculiarly distilled 


Miss Milic sank ber fingers 
deep into the keys and her 
intellect deep into the more 


iiucuci.1 uwu juiu uic inuic j ” 

elusive implications of the ■ 

music. One might have aiBued 


that the performance lacked a 
degree of bite, but surely more 
important were the insights 
that Miss Milic was in con- 
sequence able to give us. 

James lisney, a pianist 
whose teacher, John Barstow, 
also taught the Moscow prize- 


compromising the distinctive 
personality of his playing. 
Lisney was still able to match 
its demands, so that the 
strange finale, 100 often given 
like an irrelevant postscript, 
here assumed the qualities of a 
veritable transfiguration. 

Stephen Pettitt 


MONTPELIER MODERN ART COURSES 

Our comprehensive 10-week course on the 
VISUAL ARTS OF THE 20TH CENTURY 


covers Pointing, Sculpture, Architecture, Film, Design, 
Photography etc. 


ENROL NOW FOR SEPTEMBER 1986. 


a manic, dislocated rejigging atmosphere of ap era. What it 
of ^rthur Miller’s TheCru- cannot do is move you. 


Information from the Principal, Mis Helen Frayfina MA (RCA), 
4 Montpelier Street, LONDON SW7. 

Teh 01-584 0667. 




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14 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


Karachi faces 
its brand of 
urban warfare 


From Michael Hamtyn, Ka rac h i 


The intermittent warfare 
taking place between the pov- 
erty-stnken inhab itants of the 
Karachi suburb of Lyari and 
the forces of law and order 
flared again yesterday after the 
funeral of one of the people 
killed in a police firing the 
previous day. Altogether throe 
men have dud in the past 24 
hours. 

Early yesterday an angry 
knot of people gathered at a 
dusty crossroads in the narrow 
streets of the Baghdadi area of 
the tropical slum where the 
firing took place. Mr Elahi 
Buksh, a 25-year-old hotel 
labourer lay in a small court- 
yard, his beard pointing lo the 
sun. The bullet that kilted him 
had entered his arm, pierced 
his chest, exited and lodged in 
the chest of the man next to 
him, who survived. 

The crowd pointed out 
holes in the breeze block walls 
where police rifle bullets had 
blasted into their homes. In 
the shadows of an open square 
a group of police also stood, 
bandages dressing the wounds 
they had received from the 
hail of stones buried by the 
demonstrators. 

Elsewhere in the district two 
plainclothes policemen were 
identified by the slum dwellers 
and were almost lynched. The 
two were taken to hospital 
critically ill with stab wounds. 
The previous day four other 
police had been captured by 
the mob, and only by releasing 
16 arrested demonstrators 
were the authorities able to 
have them freed. 

Later yesterday the I O-party 


Movement for the Restora- 
tion of Democracy began its 
announced campaign of de- 
monstrations protesting at the 
widespread arrests of its lead- 
ens, including Miss Benazir 
Bhutto of the Pakistan Peo- 
ple's Party. The demonstra- 
tions took place in the rather 
more upwardly mobile bat not 
rich suburb of Cisri and 
_juatabad. 

More than 200 uniformed 
police, armed with batons and 
shields, with tear gas and 
shotguns and with rifles, were 
present on the so-called super- 
highway as it passes through 
the district of Anchuli in 
I.iaquatahad. As many police 
were obviously present in 
plainclothes. 

In three or four different 
places along the road young 
men started throwing stones at 
the traffic on the highway, and 
hurling lumps of rock to Mock 
it The traffic stopped in- 
stantly. 

Before long police trucks 
sped up and the young men 
melted into the back streets, 
throwing stones at the police 
as they went Police replied 
with tear gas, and for a time 
stood around and threw the 
stones back at the dem- 
onstrators. 

The protesters set fire to a 
pile of tyres and to a refrig- 
erator in the road, and the 
flam es and smoke enhanced 
the drama 


Later both sides went home 
to dinner, with honour sat- 
isfied, a few arrests made, and 
the protest registered. 

Bhntto doubts, page 5 


Ship’s position doubted 


Continued from page 1 


ever, that the two boats in 
which the refugees were 
found, came from his ship. He 
says he left the boats at the 
Belgian port of Seebrugge and 
that they were laden with 
legitimate cargo. 

Seebrugge port authorities 
were yesterday quoted here as 
denying that The Aurigae had 
been there recently. The 
freighter's last registration in 
that port was on July 12. 


Herr Bindel, then, looks like 
being in some difficulty when 
he gets back to West Ger- 
many. He says he will reach 
Bremerhaven in about a week. 

Hie accusation that be 
transported the Tamils came 
from the Hamburg police. It is 
unclear, however, what of- 
fence he will be charged with— 
possibly that of enabling for- 
eigners to leave West Ger- 
many without proper docu- 
mentation. 

Canada co ntr oversy , page S 


Today’s events 


New exhibitions 

Caribbean Focus: photo- 
graphs of Caribbean working life 
by Roshini Kempadoo; Library, 
High St, Coalville, Leics; Mon to 
Fn9.30 to 7, Sat 9 JO to 4 (ends 
Sept 17). 

Watercolours by Hamish 
MacLachlan; New Gallery, 
Abele Tree House, 9 Fore St, 
Bodldgb Saltertoa, Devon; 
Tues to Sat 10 to 5 (ends Aug 
30). 

Exhibitions in progress 

History of Dudley Castle: 
archaeological finds, paintings 
and prints; Art Gallery, St 
James's Rd, Dudley, W Mid- 


lands; Mon to Sat 10 to 5 (ends 
Sept 20). 

James Boswell: Artist against 
Fadsm; City Art Gallery, Mos- 
ley St, Manchester; Mon to Sax 
10 to 6, Sun 2 to 6 (ends Aug 31). 

Recent paintings by Noel 
Monks; Derby Museum and Art 
Gallery, The Strand; Tues to Sat 
10 to 5 (ends Aug 23). 

The Space Between: work by 
Sally Freshwater, Brigitte Gib- 
bon and John Newton; John 
Hansard Gallery, Southampton; 
University; Mon lo Sat 10 to 6 
(ends Aug 23). 

Summer exhibition of orig- 
inal paintings; Chichester House 
Gallery, High St, Ditchli — 
T ues and Thurs to Sat 11 to 1 


and 2.30 to 5 (ends Aug 30X 
Photographs of South Africa 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,128 



ACROSS 


] Female bevy get Weller into 
'a wreck (7). 


a bit of a 

S More than one present here, 
but returning after meal (4- 
3)- 

9 Three-foot line enclosing 
southern quarter (9). 

10 Animal trainer is compar- 
atively unexciting (5). 

11 Education initially by the 
three Rs contains no fault 
(5). 

12 Wrong about a king taking 
another's place (9). 

14 In an. plenty are confused 
between Jupiter and Mars, 
say (14). 

17 Entertainer who takes the 
point (5-9), 

2! Vessel for collecting tin 
around a Cornish river (9). 

23 A record has not finished in 
the top class ... (5). 

24 . . . and another is left in 
the keeping of a foreign 
loafer (5). 

25 Come to life — here's one 
drink to talk about! (9). 

26 Canvas support has three 

- feet and a projecting rail (4- 

3). 

27 One who scrapes together 
the real gen, perhaps (v). 


5 Sand in the mouth — hence 
Kingsley's moaning (3). 

6 Haggle — remove penny 
change (5X 

7 This should put up the num- 
bers atthe fete (7). 

8 It provides an overall view 
of the plant (5-3). 

13 Hanging cell break-out - 
how daring! (1 1). 

15 Bringing out note case for 
personal address (9). 

16 After Corsica, perhaps 
Boney at last got equal 
power (8X 

18 One third of 9 is the time for 
revolution (7). 

19 Homely old wife is first to 
clear up (7). 

20 Concern mounting about 
employment (6). 

22 Creeper is black or green, 
but may at first sound yel- 
low (5). 

25 When mounted, drum-horse 
shows resistance (3). 


Solution to PnzzJc No 17,127 


DOWN 

1 Richer race in the grip of 
fear perhaps (6). 

2 Secret kind of dot inside let- 
ter (7X 

3 Sharp end of shaft may be 
ear-shaped (9). 

4 Examination over, 1 have 
authoritir for a driving 
agency (6,5). 



Concise Crossword page 8 


Nuclear dump protesters win the first round 






Continued from page l 

Essex, where drilling Is sched- 
uled to start next month. 

A spokesman for Nirex said 
last night thin it* organization 
had no immediate intention of 
inking teal steps to gain 
accession 
realize we i 
to it eventually* 1 . 

At Elstow, .75- people- sat 
cross-legged and reftaed to 
move as a convoy from 
Northwest H6&, a Leeds soil 

engineering finn, poDedupat 
tire gates of electricity board 
land near the vfflagk 

Police asked the protesters 
from Band ' (Bedfordshire 
Agansit NudcarDunming) to 
move but they refused j-ven. 
tua&y the workmen drove off 
past signs reading; “Welcome 
to Sunny Ehtow Nearly as 
Warm as OrernobyL" 

Mr Jim Ekbidge, one of the 

founders of Band, said: "We 

are delighted our protest was 

carried off successfully and 
peacefully, with no arrests. W c 
will now continue with rotas 
to keep the gates manned 24 
hours a day.** 

Asked what the: organ- 
isation would do if Nirex took 
out a court injunction, Mr 


Ft 

V** - 






FULBECK: A Nirex convoy sent packing from die Lincolnshire aerodrome by jnbibutt protesters after their blockade- (Photograph: Chris Harris) 


EldridgerepliKfc “The people 


jDec. w,: 



on the blockade are prepared 
to go to jafl to sop these tests 
being carried out. 

An estimated ISO people, 
including Mr Austin Mitch dl. 
Labour MPfijr Grimsby, gath- 
ered at the entrance to the 


South KiUinghobne site and, 
/after 1 lam. a j 


•• .■ i-t' ‘ ’'.-i.-v 

ELSTOW: A mother pots her case. (Photograph: Graham Wood) SOUTH KDLLINGHOLME: Shoulder to shoulder with a graphic message. 


shortly after Ham. a group of 
protesters from Hand (Hum- 
berside Against Nuclear 
Dumping) formed a human 
chain across the roadway.. 

After a brief exchange of 
words, the convoy tuned 
back, but not before the 
engineers had promised to 
return. Organizers of the 
demonstration were dis- 
appointed by the relatively 
small number who had turned 
out to protest against the tests, 
as a petition with 150,000 
signatures bad been collected 
in the Humberside region 

Outride Ful beck more than 
300 villagers cheered, sang 
and danced in a country road 
after twice preventing con- 
tractors getting access to the 
disused Lincolnshire ahfidd. 

Dr Robert Chaplow, the 
project manager of the test 
drilling, was shouted down 
when he tried to warn the 
crowd of court action if access 
to the site were not allowed. 


i;. 


ter 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


by David GoldUatt; Of Mut- 
ability: an installation by Helen 
Chadwick; Ikon Gallery. 58-72 
John Bright St. Birmingham; 
Tues to Sat 10 to 6 (ends Aug 
23). 

Artists in Industry; Walsall 
Museum and Art Gallery, Lich- 
field St Mon toFri 10 lo 6, Sat 
10 to 4.45 (end Aug 23). 

Rycoiewood CbUege exhi- 
bition; Cheltenham Art Gallery 
and Museum, Clarence St Mon 
to Sat 10 to 5.30 (ends Aug 30). 

Paintings by Ken Howard; 
Unton Court Gallery, Duke St 
Settle; Tues, Fri and Sat 11 to 5, 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Aug 24). 

Cats! Work by Louis Wain; 
York City Art Gallery, Ex- 
hibition Sq; Mon to Sat 10 to 5, 
Sun 2.30 to S (ends Sept 7). 


Music 

Music at St Columb, Festival 
'86: Piano recital by Paul Coker; 
Parish Church, St Cohnnh, near 
Newquay, 8. 

Organ recital by Peter Good- 
man; St Martin’s, Scarborough, 
730. 

Recital by Brian Lancaster 
(baritone) and Mary Powney 
(piano); Parish Church, Hawks- 


redta] by Jane Watts; 
Cathedral, 1.10. 
Recital by Hortus Musicus 
with John Kitchen; St Salvator’s 
Chapel, St Andrews, 8. 


Talks 

Birdwatcbing in the Lake 
District, by Mike Madders, 1.30; 
Langdale January and July, by 
John White, 3.30; Lake District 
National Park Visitor Centre, 
Brockhole, Windermere. 

General 

Teddy Bears’ Picnic for 3 to 5- 
years olds; Art Gallery, Civic 
sntiq, 
to 33a 


Roads 


London and South-east: M25: 
Delays clockwise between junc- 
tions 9 and 10 (Rergate/Wisley) 
due to roadworks. Ml: Smith- 
bound delays due to reduced 
carriageway width around junc- 
tion 1 1 (Lut o n /Dunstable). 

Mil: Construction work at 
junction 8 (Birch anger round- 
about) will cause delays. 

The Midlands: AI: Con- 
traflow N of Newark at Crom- 
well, Notts. A46: Delays be- 
tween Warwick bypass and 
Stratford. Atie Single lane traffic 
with temporary lights along 
Kettering Rd, Market Har- 
bonough. 

Wales and West: MS: Lane 
closures southbound between 
junctions 25 and 26 (Taun- 
ton/WdlingtonX AS 19: Road- 
works with temporary lights 
between Flint and Northop. 
A 449: Two sets of contraflow $ 
ofUsk, Gwent. 

The North: Mds Lane closures 
at junction 23 (Merseyside). 
AS* Care required at Kdsafl 
Hill, Cheshire, due roadworks 
on bypass. A644: Gas repairs 
along Wakefield Rd, Brighouse. 

Scotland: Aft Various lane 
closures SE of ToffMttin. A807: 
Single line traffic with tem- 
porary at Torrance and Miin- 
gavie, Dumbartonshire. A702; 
width restrictions along Bigear 
Rd (North City bypass), Lo- 
thian. 

Information supplied by AA 


TV top ten 


National tap ten television pn^nna in 
the week owing Aug 10 : 


BBC1 

1 E a s t& xtera (Thurs/Sun) 1855m 

2 EastEndars (Tues/*3un) 1550m 

3 Street Cop 1 1 .30m 

4 The Thom Birds (Thurs) 1020m 

5 Nine O'Oocic News (Tins) gjjom 

6 Daflas 9.65m 

7 No Place Lice Home (me. N. Iran 
9X5 


8 Dynasty 925 m 
The Thom Birds 


9 


10 Mne O'clock News 


9.T5m 

905m 


rrv 


1 Coronation Street (Wed) Granada 
1426m 

2 Coronation Street (Mon) (Canada 
14.15m 

11.55m 
1085m 
. Yorkshire 

10.65m 

6 Ream To Eden (Mon) rrv 10£m 

7 Crossroads (Wad) Central 1025m 

8 Cromrodas (Tubs) Central 10.15m 

9 Crossroads (Thurs) Central 10.15m 
10 Winner Takes AlYoriatans 990m 


1 The PaU Dantete Magic Show 6.15m 

2 Moonlighting 580m 

3 The Travel Show 485m 

4 Reflections bi A Golden Em 4.15m 

5 MASH 3.65m 

8 Steam Days 385m 

7 The Mokingaf A Continent 380m 

8 Red River 320m 


9 To ttw Dew! A Daughter 3.10m 
10 Crime Club 380m 


Channel 4 

1 Brooteide (Mon/Sat) 585m 

2 Brooketds (Tuas/Sat) 585m 

3 International Athletics (Fri) 5.00m 
-4 international Athletics (Tom) 480m 
5 Each Dawn I Die 940m 

G Gotdan Girts 35Sm 

7 Budgie 285m 

8 The Kacurran Radio Show 245m 

9 Looks Fam*ar 1.95m 
10 The Twffgtit Zone 180m 


Breakfast tel ev i s i o n : The average 
weekly figure* for wxfiences at 


times (with flams h . ... 

ream- the number of people 


showing the . . . 

who viowed far at least three minutes): 
BBCI: B/vakfost Tima: Mon to Fri 
18m (78m) 

TV-anr Good Morning Bit tail Mon to Fri 
2.6m (10.7m) Sat 24m (52>n) 

Sun 18m 


Broadcas te rs* Audtonce Research Board. 


Anniversaries 


Births: John Dryden, Aid- 
winkle, Northamptonshire, 
1631; John Flamsteed, first 
astronomer royal, Denby, 
Derbyshire. 1646; James Na- 
smyth, inventor of the steam 
hammer. Edinburgh, 1808; 
Charles Doughty, travellor, au- 
thor of Trends in Arabia De- 
serta, Leiston, Suffolk, 1843; 
Orville Wright, pioneer of avi- 
ation. Dayton, Ohio, 1871. 

Deaths: Augustus, first Ro- 
man emperor. Nola Campania 
(Italy), 14; Blaise Pascal, Paris, 
1 662; Richard Bunion Haldane, 
1st Viscount Haldane, states- 
man, established the Territorial 
Army, Cloaxt, Perthshire, 1928; 
Sir Hemy Wood, Hitchiu, 
Hertfordshire, 1944; Groocho 
Marx, Santa Monica, Califor- 
nia. 1977. 


The pound 


Bank 


AnstrafiaS 
Austria Scb 
EMgkmFr 
Canada® 
Danmark Kr 
FMaodbftk 
France Ff 
QauuainDm 
Greece Dr 
Hang Kong $ 
Ireland Ft 
Italy Lire 
Japan Yen 
NetbcrtsKbiQkl 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd * 
Spain Pte 
SwadanKr 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

YogostevtsDar 


2285 
S7JSS 
2.14 
IZOI 
729 
1037 
821 
21280 
11 JC 
1.153 
221 ©80 
24280 
381 
1181. 
22580 
OSO 
20028- 
1074 


1 855 


• Bank 
Safe 
285 
2185 
6040 

285 
1181 

729 

987 

384 

20080 

1180 

1893 

2090® 

22000 

042 

1081 

21380 

480 

19525 

10.19 

286 
1.485 

58080 


BaMmntadae3842 


London; The FT Index dosed in 28 at 
1273.6. 


Tower Bridge 


- Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 9.454un and 10 am. 


Weather 

forecast 


A depression over France 
will move away E, leaving 
all areas ina N airstream. 


6 am to mkhught 


Mainly dry, 

with sunny periods developing; 
wind Bght N to moderate N or NE; 
max twrm 20C (68F). 

East Anglo Central S, E, SW, 
central NEngtand, Mklands, 
Channel Islands, 8 Wales: Sunny 
frrtervate wtth a tow showers; wind 
NE to N Bght, locally moderate; max 
temp 20C (68H. 

NWatea.NW.NEI 


A4iA 

NOON TOPAYftwmm btenwn h mflBi.tei HtOMWWnw bid ; .5 vStSid 










District, tote of Man. SW Scotland, 
Northern Ireland: Sumy 


,®SfsS 

intervals 

and scattered showers; WM light N 
to NW; max temp 19C (66F). 

Borden, EtfloturUt, Dundee, 
Glasgow, Central Hi g hl ands, Ar- 
gyfl: Sunny intervals and showers, 
possibly heavy; wind NW to N 
or moderate; max temp 17C 

Aberdeen, Moray FMb, N 
Scotland, Orkney, Sheftamfc. 
intervals and occasional showers, 
some heavy; wind N to NE mod- 
erate, tocatfy, fresh; max tamp 15C 
(59F). 

Oudook for tomorrow and Thurs- 
jraiy intervals and showers, 
to me N and E, bid further 
and rain reachtogthe SW cxi 
Thursday. Mostly rather cool. 



High Tides 


TODAY AM 

London Bridge 2.06 
- ‘ 1.19 

7>t9 
1127 
Cwritff 784 

Devonport 
Dover 


PM KT 
228 • M 


HT 

6.7 

4.1 285 42 

128 909 129 
38 11.41 M 
118 784 114 


Qtesgow 
■ » . - 1 

*■-*-» 

nofymHKi 


Her 


; j f i 


Mon i. 


i)\ 


Lhmpool 


Often 


□ 


Sunrises: 
582 am 


Sunsets: 
8.16 pm 


4.48 am 
Rjfl moan: 784 pm 


840 pm 


Mtue sXjr- bc-Wae sky and cloud: c- 
ckiuflyr o-overcasu f-fo® d-drizdo h- 
hall: latei-mtst: r-nun: s-snaw; Qv 
Utunderatorm: ^hown. 

Arrows show wtnd dlrectton. wind 


Tuts 

WHo no Ha 
fids 


Lighting-up time 


631 

53 

651 

54 

11.42 

8-4 



6JW 

4.8 

621 

5 2 

1232 

45 

123 

4 2 



12.17 

35 

1058 

55 11-08 

W 

037 

7.1 

7.19 


629 

85 

W1 

11 J 

248 

55 

825 

55 

1151 

9.1 



.929 

24 1052 

24 

12.18 

45 1252 

45 

044 

65 

735 

7.1 

555 

65 

558 

7.1 

6.43 

as 

850 

41 

528 

5.1 

5A7 

55 

739 

13 

833 

23 



1235 

45 

1151 

ai 



1150 

45 1159 

44 

653 

89 

7.12 

94 

351 

52 

452 

55 



12.13 

19 

bunMn 

sell 

*0208 

ML 


Around Britain 


Londo n BM pm to 528 am 
Bristol BAjteMteM 
Edktbwgbl 


Bristol 885 pm -to 583 sm 

9.11 pm to 523 am 


.11 pint 
889 pm to 588 am 
9.04 pm to 548 am 


Yesterday 


M NEWSPAPERS LOOTED. 
QVHPPnnied hv Uwaon .Post rpnni- 
ers) limited of 1 Virginia Omk 
London ei 9XN. Tuesday. Aug&ssr 19 . 1 
1986. R cdinicrcd at a newspaper « 



Times Portfolio OoU ndes ore as 
r«Uowr. . . __ 

1 Tiroes PonroOo is Owe. Purchase 
of The Tina is not a condition or 
taking mat. 




a 


2 Times PwtfaUo Hst compr is e a 
public OHuanUs- whose 


■untaueMtari 


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ExcbWM and quoted in The Ttonea 

mwnla wsulfl£jhff& % 
change from day to day. The bm 
< which ts nurabsTed 1-44) b divided 
into four randomly dtetritwEed youps 


Of U otwre. Eveiy Portfolio card 
numbers 


contains two numbs* from each 
group and each card conta in s 
unique set or numbers. 


On each 

numbers 

and toduHTlai shares pcbllahed la The 
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on the Stock Exchange. Prtcos page, 
In the cotman orovldsd next -to 
your ahorea note the price change (+ 
or -1. hi pence, qs pubthteed in that 
day's Times. 


After ttrttng 




3 Times portfolio ‘dtvtdenr win no 
In pence 


Dm figure In pence which' 

Die optimum 


IS 


dm price cha _ 

. w dgM shares for mat day. add up 
all eight sharr changes to give you 
jrour overall total plus or min in <+ or - 


MP movement in ■ 

low largest increase or lowest losia of a 
combination of etebt (two from each 
randomly dfatftWiMWBP within Bit 


Check yore 1 overall I 


Times Portfoli o dividend puKfaibedil 
tha Sock EWraMlHH 


44 shares) or the 44 sharnwniai on 
any one day c o mp ri se The 


Portfolio iisL 
4 The 


Time* 


EtiKhangs Prices page. 

If your overall total mat ch— The 


Times Portfolio dhridend^cw^have 


. .... ^ dhrtdend wm m 

announced each day and the : 

dividend wm be 

Saturday in The Times. 

5 Times Portfolio ut wdtMtefb tf 
the daily or weekly dtvMsnd wiu ateo 
be available for tnspecdon at the 
ofllces of The Times. 

6 ff the Ovwafl prtco imwwbi or 
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to ror re e t ty grimed I 
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°g a w— 
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hava your card with you 


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Portfolio eases wm be deemed to be 
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reserves ihs rtfit to amend me Rules; 

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for failure to contact foe ddnn — 

for any reason wunin me stated, 
hom. 

The shove 


ShSSSi 10 - *** 


UP UOUJ 

cfadros. 


I' 


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doud: t, fair; r, rakes, sisi. 

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11457 Ja ra oy c 1864 

d 1661 London . r 17B3 

ORB! r 1355 Mhdwur e 1355 
C1S59 NSteCHBn C1355 
c 16 BI ffnMsny 11355 


House repair guide 


Advice for tenants whose] 
landlords won't cany, out re- 
pairs to their homes is available 
in two new g u ide s from SHAC, 
the London Housing Aid 
Centre. 

Your Rights to Repairs: a 
guide for council tenants and 
your rights to Repairs: * guide 
for private and housing associ- 
ation tenants, can be obtained 
from SHAC 189a Old F 

ton Rd,- London, SW 5 
(£1.9S ekh, iscp & p). 


Edinburgh Festival 


Details of events taking phtoe _ 

atthe Edinburgh Festival, which *" ■*■* " 
continues until August 30, from: 

Festival Ticket Office, 21 Mar- 
ket St, Edinburgh; credit card 
sales; 031-225 5756; informa- 
tion 031 226 4001. A Festival 
Information Centre at The ■ ■■■■ « ■ 
Mound, in the car park of the Eg* 
National Galleries of Scotland. ” — 

on the- availability of seats fori 
the whole of the Festival 
programmer - ' ■ 

Details of the Edrn__ 

Festival Fringe ssot. 031- 
5257/9. , 



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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 26 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 29 


% i _ Sit a 

. . ' .Yffl 

■M - 

•vtL U 


TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Reet 









FT 30 Share 
1273.6 (+2.6) 

FT-SE 100 
1609.0 (+7.1) 

. £$ Bargains 

'■>: 21151 
-A USM (Datastream) 

^ 124.16 (+02) ; 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

;•£? 1.4925 (-0.0020) 

; •-*? W Gentian mark 
3.o9io (+0.0108) 

Trade-weighted 

71.7 (same) 

} ■*» - 

Dee buys 
g Medicare 

Dee Corporation, the 

■ acquisitive supermarkets i 

■ >u" v group, yesterday added a new 

' string to its bow with the £20 
million purchase of Medicare,. 
.!■ v the retail chemist owned by 
.f"l: Reed Executive. 

7: Medicare is the fourth larg- 

: -k est chemists chain with 49 
- r . : 5? stores in the South. Dee 
. -*<!:• intends to build the business 
up into a national chain of 200 
' to 300 stores in three to four 
years. 

. Reed, whose main business 
r is employment agencies, had 
-• V planned to float off Medicare 
5 . on the unlisted securities mar- 
-,'K ket next year. But Dee’s offer 
:-;-s made it more worthwhile to 
resell and provides Medicare 
with the resources for 
expansion. 

. . Medicare made £572,000 

■ < pretax profits in the year to 
\~y March 29 oh sales of £27 
■■ •• million. 

H Merger off 

: J' Merger talks between Reas- 
.‘J urama and Mount Charlotte 
are understood to have broken 
down. The two companies last 
week announced they were 
‘ : p lanning a £500 mitlinn em- 
' • pire embracing hotels, fruit 
m achines and holidays. 

Bibbybuys 

* . Hanson Trust is selling its 

Hamlyn Milling agricultural 
, busiaess,.hBsed ncar/Perth, to 
7 J Btbby &_Scms for an. un- 
; disdosedpd.ee. Hazulyn made 
‘ pretax profits in the last 
• financial year of just over 
‘wi £300,000. ' 

Premier offer 

T Premier Brands, the com- 
f pany bought out from Cad- 
t „■ bury Schweppes in May, is 


S & N in £120m 
agreed bid for 
Home Brewery 


1 ‘ -t .. 



By Richard Lander 

Scottish & Newcastle Brew- That an increased geographical 
cries yesterday fulfilled mar- spread was the mam reason 
ket expectations that it wanted for the purchase, but be said 
to buy a regional brewer by that Home had made the first 
making an agreed £120 mil- approach, 
lion takeover offer for Home u Until we had a look we 
Brewery, of Nottingham- hadn't realised what a rich and 

Home - has 470 public well-looked alter company it 
houses, clubs and ofTticences, was,** he said. 

' mostly in Nottinghamshire Although Home made pre- 
and Derbyshire. " tax profits of just £4.4 million 

The target surprised stock on turnover of £56.4 million 
market analysts. Few of whom in its latest financial year, Mr 
seemed to know much about Rankin said that S & N was 
Home, a tightly-controlled justified in paying £120 mil- 
company which has only pref- lion for Home, 
erence shares listed on the Apart from its range of tied 
Stock Exchange. public houses and strong local 

As if prepared fin: raised loyalty. Home had also built 
eyebrows in the City, Scottish what Mr Rankin described as 
ft Newcastle issued a glossy “the most modern brewery in 
brochure about Home en- Britain,” after ploughing back 
titled, “Whydo S&N want to £25 million from profits over 
pay £1 20 milKon for a brewery the past six years. The pur- 
many people have never heard chas e price also represented a 
of?” slight discount on net assets of 

The acquisition of Home, £123 million. . 
whose beers sporrthe logo of Mr Rankin said he hoped 
Robin Hood with bow and that Home’s 4 per cent rale of 
arrow at the ready, shifts the return on capital could be 
centre of gravity of S & N’s improved to nearer its own 13 
brewing interests. .per cent, and he thought that 

The Edinburgh-based com- pretax profits of between £13 
pan y has 1350 outlets, most million and £15 milli on would 
of which are in ffcntlanri and be possible within two years. 
North-east England, and three Apart from plans to develop 

breweries — at Edinburgh, Home's free trade sales, which 
Manchester and Newcastle. account for only 20 per cent of 

Mr Aiick Rankin, chief turnover, Mr Ranldn said that 
executive of S & N, confirmed it was possible that some S ft 


N brands would he brewed at 
the Home plant to bring them 
nearer to the southern market. 
However, S ft N pledged to 
retain and rebuild Home's 
“current distinctive identity.” 

Mr Rankin said there was 
"no question" of S & N selling 
hs 30 per cent stake in the 
Blackburn-based Matthew 
Brown brewery, acquired in 
an unsuccesfiil takeover bid 
last year, as a result of the 
Home acquistion. 

He played down suggestions 
of a possible bid for Courage, 
the brewery owned by Hanson 
Trust, sayingS ft N was only a ; 
medium-sized company. 

The bid for Home — a 
mixture of ordinary shares, 
convertible preference stock 
and cash — already has accep- 
tances from shareholders 




i . ; Mi: I. 




slight discount on net assets of controlling 673 per cent of 


£123 milli on . 

Mr Rankin said he hoped 
that Home's 4 per cent rate of 
return on capital could be 
improved to nearer its own 13 
. per cent, and be thought that 
pretax profits of between £13 

million and £1 5 milli on would 

be possible within two years. 

Apart from plans to develop 
Home's free trade sales, which 
account for only 20 per cent of 


votes in Home, which has a 
dual share structure. 

It is conditional on not 
being referred to the Monopo- 
lies Commission, although Mr 
Rankin thought this unlikely 
in view of the lack of geo- 
graphical overlap. 

The Home takeover comes 
three weeks after another in- 
dependent brewer. Ruddles, 
lost its independence to an 
industry giant. Grand 
Metropolitan. 


Sir John Egan: believes Jaguar's profit growth will not continue for the full year. 

Jaguar profits surge again 
despite the weak dollar 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Retail sales decline but the 
upward trend is maintained 


MJlHlJi I U P 1 t-TI-; -Mir: . d-i 1 J 


/to 1,000 share options at Ip. 

1-Blagden down 

Blagden Industries, manu- 
}i£ ! facturers of steel drums, have 
-""reported a 16 per cent drop in 
,_. T * interim pre-tax profits, down 
. " ’ to £23 million. Jts turnover 
-* : was 18 percent higher at £ 66. 6 
• million. . The dividend was 
maintained at 33p. 

Tempos, page 16 

; Highams’ bid 

. Highams, the private com- 
pany making a contested £37 
- million bid for the Manchester 
. Ship Canal Company, has 
** received acceptances for 53.4 
•: per cent of the voting shares in, 
r • the company. Highams’ in- 
terests have 55 per cent of the 
publicly held equity. 

’Hawker deal 

Hawker Sidddey has paid 
£7.5 million cash for the 
' Reliance Fuse division of the 
Challenger Electrical Equip- 
‘V ment Corporation of the US. 


By David Smith 

Economics Correspondent 

Retail sales fen last month 
from their June peak, but the 
trend remains strongly 
upwards. 

Government borrowing was 
below City expectations, 
mainly because of buoyant lax 
revenues. . 

The volume , qf retail sales 
declined by 1.2 p ex cent in 
July after an exceptional 3.6 
per cent rise in June. Sales 
volume was up by 13 percent 
in the latest three months 
compared with the previous 
three months, and 4 per cent 
up on the corresponding pe- 
riod of last year. 

The average weekly value of 
sales last month was £1,775 
million, compared with 
£1,740 million in June. Sales 
value was up 8 per cent on 
July 1985/ 

Government officials said 
that sales of consumer dura- 
bles were strong last month, 
but those of doming, footwear 
and food feQ. 


UKraWa 

19HWI00 
a— fl u — 1 1 
of Tm 



I I® .1 JIM . 

6 PubUc If 
sector V 
borro w i n g • ' 

diets that Angnst will be 
another good month fix* 
retailers. 

The latest figures fin* public 
borrowing show that the Gov- 
ernment repaid a net £226 
million last month, compared 
with borrowing of £522 mil- 
lion in June ana £541 minion 
in July last year. 


The July repayment of £226 
billion, around £750 minion 
better than the average of City 
expectations, led to some 
suggestions that the Govern- 
ment was heading for a second 
successive undershoot of its 
borrowing target, set at £7.1 
billion for 1986-87. 

- However, Treasury officials 
said that it was too early to 
make such judgements and 
that, despite the buoyancy of 
non-oil tax revenues, the fell 
in the oil price had still to 
show through fully in lower 
North Sea revenues. 

Local authority borrowing 
may also have been erratically 
low in the first few months of 
the current financial year. 

Inland Revenue receipts in 
the AprikJuly period were 
£ 2.1 billion up on a year 
earlier because of healthy 
company profits and strong 
growth in wages. Customs and 


In the first four months of Excise receipts were up by £1 
the 1986-87 financial year die billion. 


public sector borrowing 
requirement was £ 2.1 billion. 


The latest CBl/Firumcial compared with £32 billion in 


Times Distributive Trades 
Survey, published today, pre- 


SuppJy expenditure, at 
£32.9 billion in the first four 
months of the financial year, 


the corresponding period of was just under 43 percent up 


1985-86. 


on the corresponding period. 


Trebled profits at Mrs Fields 


Coonent 17 Share Pres 19 
Teams 16 W*U Street 16 
Cmpoy News 20 Mosev Mrkts 17 
Stock Market 17 Unt Tnsb 18 
Foreign Excfa 17 Commodities 18 
Traded Opts 17 USM Prices 18 


By Alexandra Jackson 

As if to code a snook at 
those who left 84 per cent of 
the issue with the underwriters 
in May, Mrs Fields, the 
specialist relailier of cookies, 
reported interim pretax profits 
up from $13 million to $4.6 
million ( 0.1 mfttion). 

Turnover rose 1 8 per cent to 
$383 million (£25.6 million). 

The interim dividend is 0.75 
cents. 

Tbe interest charge dropped 

slightly from $1.97 million to _ . . . _ __ 

$1.8 million. The group, Debra Fields: launching 100 
whose president and chief stores this year, 
executive is Mis Debra Fields, their pro forma profit forecast 
was not yet been able to enjoy of* $183 million (£12.4 
the full benefit of the proceeds million), 
of the offer for sale. This assumes that the pro- 

The directors remain con- ceedsoftbe offer for sale were 
fident flat they will achieve- available throughout the year. 



On a basis which compares 
directly with this interim re- 
sult, the forecast would be 
$16.8 million. 

The group operated from 
more than 300 outlets in the 
United States and 20 or so 
overseas. It will launch 100 
new stores this year, 80 of 
which will be opened in the 
second half 

Five are to be “stores within 
stores.” This is part of a joint 
venture with Sears Robudc. 

Overseas, expansion 
continues in Canada, Austra- 
lia , the UK and Japan. A shop 
in the US airbase at Yokota in 
Japan, has newly-opened and 
is doing welL New products 
such as muffins and ice 
creams are also being tested. 


Jaguar profits have contin- 
ued to surge ahead with the 
company disclosing half-year 
earnings of £64A million be- 
fore me autumn laanch of its 
new XJ40 saloon. 

The six-mouth pretax prof- 
its — op by £4 million on the 
previous year's— was achieved 
rfpfpitf a d cnififaiit weaken- 
ing tf the dollar, which in- 
creased the price of Jaguars in 
the US, the company’s most 
important mark et. 

Jaguar announced that the 
interin dividend would be 
stepped up by 10 per cent to 
33p. 

Bm Sir John Egan, the 
chairman, gave warning that 
the profit growth, which has 
been taken for granted by the 
City since Jaguar's privatiza- 
tion from BL, was not expected 

McKechnie 
bids £24m 
for PSM 

By Alison Eadie 

McKechnie Brothers, the 
Midlands metals and plastics 
group, has launched a £24.4 
million bid for PSM, the 
Midlands industrial fastener 
manufacturer. 

PSM is already in the bag as 
its chairman, Mr Jim 
Tildesley, has accepted for his 
57.6 par cent bolding. The 
PSM board put out a holding 
statement, but Dr Jim Butler, 
chairman of McKechnie, is 
hoping for a speedy 
recommendation. 

The two companies know 
each other well, as McKechnie 
has for several years supplied 
PSM with brass extrusions for 
its fasteners and, more re- 
cently, PSM has begun supply- 
ing McKechnie with plastic 
fasteners 

PSM has operations in the 
United Stales, which will give 
McKechnie a "listening post” 
for acquisitions there. Dr But- 
ler said- McKechnie is also 
seeking further acquisitions in 
Britain. 

The company has had an 
eventful year, seeing off take- 1 
over attempts by Williams 
Holdings and then Evered, 
and failing itself to win New- 
man Tonks in a contested bid. 

The terms of the offer are 44 
McKechnie shares and £95 m 
cash or loan notes for 100 
PSM shares. PSM sharehold- 
ers wiD also be entitled to a 
special interim dividend of 

! 2 p. 

McKechnie has forecast to- 
tal dividends in the year to 
July 31 of lOp. 


to continue for the foil year. 

The interim figures take 
into account about £3 million 
of pre-faumch costs for the 
XJ40, which Is to succeed the 
XJ 6 , and another £10 million 
will come in the second half. 
The halancp of the £20 millio n 
investment wiD be reflected in 
next year’s accounts. 

Sir John said that as a 
result of the extra costs, 
profits for the whole of 1986 
would be “very flat”. Bat he 
added: “Early indications are 
that the new car will receive an 
outstanding reception in the 
market place, thins waMing 
Jaguar to maintain its wlwt 
growth." 

Jaguar sales in the US rose 
23 per cent in the half-year to 
11306 mils, boosted by the 
introduction in April of the V- 


12 engined XJS Cabriolet 
version. 

Turnover for the six months 
was £4262 million, np from 
£400.9 million a year earlier, 
with the US market account- 
ing for £2793 million and the 
UK £67 S million. Total out- 
pot of Jaguars was 22,049 
against 20,195 in the first half 
of 1985. 

In a bid to achieve a wider 
spread of overseas sales, Jag- 
uar has been studying Japan 
where, at present, it sells only 
400 cars a year. But within five 
years the company believes 
the total could be 4,000- 

Sir John added: “We are 
starting to look very seriously 
at the Japanese market. The 
current level of the yen makes 
it particularly attractive.” 

Tempos, page 16 


Maxwell delivers his 
BPCC profit promise 


Tine to his promise made to 
shareholders at the British 
Printing ft Communication 
Corporation’s annual meeting 
at the beginning of June, Mr 
Robert Maxwell, the chair- 
man, has more than doubled 
the company’s interim profits. 

The results, announced yes- 
terday, showed that the group 
made £2 million more in the 
first half of 1 986 than it did for 
the whole of 1986. 

Profits increased by 141 per 
cent for the six months to 
June, compared with £11.3 
million it made for the period 
last year. The interim divi- 
dend was increased by SO per 
cent from 4p to 6 p. 

Much of the improvement 
has come from the inclusion 


By Carol Ferguson 
: made to of the 


of the recently acquired 
Penamon Journals and from 
BPCCs contract to print 
newspapers for the Mirror 
Group. 

The Daily Mirror and the 
Sunday Mirror were printed 
on BPCCs presses in London 
and Manchester for the entire 
six month period. It has been 
printing the Scottish Daily 
Record and the Sunday Mail 
since April 1, and the Sunday 
People since the beginning of 
July. 

A statement accompanying 
the results said (he acquisition 
of a major US public printing 
and publishing company was 
imminent. 

Tempos, Page 16 | 


CESin 

£26.7m 

Zales 

buy 

Combined English Stores is 
to acquire Zales Jewellers for 
£26.7 million. 

The purchase will be made 
through the issue of 13.6 
million new shares, 13.1 mil- 
lion of which will be placed by 
Samuel Montagu. Hoare 
Govett is the broker to the 
issue. 

There is also an open offer 
to shareholders to subscribe to 
the full amount of the placing. 

CES estimates interim pre- 
tax profits of£43 million, a 30 
per cent increase compared 
with £3.45 million for the 
same period last year And the 
company says that prospects 
for the remainder of the year 
are encouraging. 

Zales is a leading multiple 
specialist jewellery, retailer, 
with 1 12 shops in prime 
locations throughout Britain. 

For the year to March 1. 
Zales earned £1.82 million in 
pretax profits. 

The combination of Zales 
and CoQingwood. the jewel- 
lers. will make CES the second 
biggest multiple specialist re- 
tailer in terms of market share, 
the company said. 

It will have total of 247 
stores and some 43 per cent of 
the British market 
CES intends to maintain the 
Zales group's up-market iden- 
tity and to expand the number 
of outlets. 

CES is to give existing 
shareholders the opportunity 
to participate in the issue of 
new shares. 

Samuel Montagu will offer 
existing shareholders all the 
placing shares for purchase at 
the placing price of I97p per 
share. 

With regard to the present 
financial year, the CES board 
estimates that profit on or- 
dinary activities before tax for 
the 28 weeks to August 9 was 
£4.5 million, compared with 
£3.45 million for the same 
period in the last financial 
year. 

The board intends to pay an 
interim dividend in Novem- 
ber of 3p per share for the year 
to January 31 1987. 

This represents an increase 
of 22.4 per cent over the 
interim dividend of 2.45p per 
share paid last year. The new 
shares will not rank for the 
interim dividend. 

Avis Europe 
plans offer 

Avis Europe, a new group of 
companies formed by 
tbeEuropean, African and 
Middle East car rental and 
leasing operations of Avis , is 
likely to apply for a foil listing 
on the London Stock Ex- 
change later this year. 

Morgan Grenfell is planning 
an offer for sale, in London, of 
a majority shareholding in 
Avis Europe and the issue is 
expected to attract significant 
investment from other Euro- 
pean countries. 


A Macmillan nurse needs 
more than dedication to care 
for the victims of cancer. 






tz'iSfSS.ZXZXrsZ 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


Haw York 
Dow Jones 
Tokyo 
Nikkei Dow 

Hong Kong: 


1850.86 (+126) 

18597.44 (+221.03) 


BueCfeds 


Hang Seng 1950.12 (+1436) 

Amsterdam: Gen — 298.7 (+3.0) 

gytbmyiA O 118430 (+74) 

■ Frankfort 

Commerzbank 20505 (+40.7) 

Brussels: 



Air Call to leave USM and 
link with American group 


Air OB, the loss-making 
radio paging and car tele- 
phones communications 
group, said yesterday that it 
plans to go private — almost 
ax years since it became one 
of the first companies to be 
traded on the Unlisted Securi- 
ties Market 

The pressures of surviving 
in the increasingly compet- 
itive telecommunications 


By Teresa Pinole 

cent of the British radio- 

S market, compared with 
Telecom’s 85 per cent, 
and about 5 per cent of the 
cellular radio market, where it 
is a lamp distributor for FacaL 
Mr Warren Tayler, chair- 
man of both Air Call and Air 
Call (Holdings) company, 
gave a warning that many 
other small telecommunica- 
tions groups may be forced 


market has forced Air Call tof into jomt ventures m order to 
seek as alignment with inter- survive the liberalized market 


SO-ysar bonds 


CURRENCIES 


.London: 
i £ $1.4925 
) £: DM3.0910 
if: SwFr2.48B2 
FFr10.0445 
eft Yen229.99 
MbMnxTU 


Now York: 

£S1.49»r 
S; DM24700’ 

& Index: 1108 

ECU £0.684104 
SDR 0X808506 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

AM 5377.25 pm-$377.25 
Close $37750-378 DO (£252.75- 
253.25) 

NvwYoric 

Comex $376.70-37720* 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brant (Sept) pmS14.7Dbbttl4.8B) 
* Denote west tracing prion 


national partners. 

Under the proposals, 
BellSouth, the largest local 
telephone services company 
in the United States, in its first 
British tekeomm unications 
venture, will pay £6 million in 
cash for a 40 per cent stake in 


Mr Tayler, said that the 
second market had been good 
to the company when it 
started, but added: "For a 
group going for long term 
growth, the USM might not be 
the right place. It is difficult to 
sustain support all round if 


Air Can’s communications you are going for growth.' 


businesses. 

These include the telephone 
answering, media response, 
paging, and car telephone 
activities. 

Air Cali holds about 10 per 


The family of the founder 
chairman, Mr John Stanley, 
who died last year, will make 
an offer to acquire the 41.3 per 
cent of Air Call not under their 
coo^oL 


The company wiO then 
enter into the joint venture 
agreement with BellSouth, 
which will ensure the financial 
backing needed for Air Call to 

maintain its marke t chare . 

The offer wiD be made by 
the family-controlled and un- 
quoted Air Oil (Holdings), 
which owns 58.7 per cent of 
Air Call TTie terms are 225p 
rash per Air Call share, valu- 
ing the company at £ 12.8 
million, or one new Holdings 
share, Air Call’s shares gained 
18p to 218p, compared with 
their high of about 450p in 
early 1984. 

Mr Tayler, said that the Air 
Call (Holdings) shares will not 
be listed on any stock market 
and may prove difficult to 
deaf. 

He said the company had 
derided to reorganize because 
profits and dividends would 
continue to suffer while H 
tried to bold onto its market 
‘‘share. 


Qrb ^ 


ShV* 


I ‘ __ 


t 


There are still many thousands of cancer victims who have ■ 
to suffer ihe pain and anxiety of this cruel disease without the care of a Macmillan nurse. But | 
you can begin io ease their pain, simply by sending a donation to Major HCL Garnett cbe. 
Cancer Relief Macmillan Fund. 15/19 Britten Street. London SW3 3TY. Tel: 01-351 7811. I 


[_nw 


Macmillan fund ] 

J* rv itru-nj: $.v*i, f e » l'jbcct ScWRegd f« . r j 









z' 


16 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 




J 


•WALL STREET 


Early selling hits Dow 


New York (Renter) — Wall 
Street shares slipped in early 
trading yesterday as investors 
took early profits after a week 
or solid gains. Oil shares 
continued to strengthen as the 
price of oil rose. 

Speculation that the Federal 
Reserve Board might take 
action to ease credit was 
expected to stimulate the mar- 
ket later. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was down 3.10 points 
at 1,857.08, on a volume of 14 


million shares. Declining is- 
sues led advancing issues by a 
margin of three to four. 

Kentucky Utilities led the 
active issues, up Kth to 48. 
Exxon rose to 65% and 
Tenneco rose ftth to 39%. 
Proctor and Gamble was np % 
at 78%. 

The transportation average 
was down 3417 points at 
752.13, utilities, at 210.04 
were down 1.20 points and 
stocks, at 716.12, were down 
2 JO points. 


d- 

n 

fc 



Aug 

U 


V 

V 



Aug 

14 

AMR 

54% 

54ft 

Firestone 

24ft 

24ft 

Pfizer 

70% 

70% 

tl 

ASA 

32v; 

34 

Fstctwago 

30ft 

30% 

Phelps Oge 

19 

19% 

C 

ARiad Signal 

40% 
5 0* 

aw 

40ft 

5T 

FsttntBncp 
Fst PenrC 

62ft 

8* 

62% 

8% 

PNBpMre 

PwapsPtt 

73 

10% 

73* 

9% 

n- 


3ft 

Ford 

59ft 

59% 

Polaroid 

65 

65% 

IX 



37ft 

FT Watfrva 

44ft 

44ft 

PPG bid 

86% 

65% 


12'S 

12ft 

GAFCorp 

33 

33ft 

PrctrGmbi 

77ft 

70% 

at 


20 ft 

19ft 

GTECorp 

Mitt 

56 

PPSE&G 

45* 

45% 


Am Brands 

97* 

9?ft 

GenCorp 

74ft 

73% 

Raytheon 

61% 




B7* 

88 

GenDy'mcs 
Gen Electric 

74ft 

73% 

RynidsMet 

44 % 

49ft 

b 

AmCynm'd 
Am BPw 
Am Express 

83ft 

83ft 

7Bft 

77 

Rockwell* 

43 

43% 

ti 

il 

29ft 

62ft 

29ft 

6? 

Gen Inst 

Gen Mils 

20ft 

89ft 

20ft 

88% 

|\-T, '■ ■- 

65% 

66% 

84 

6S% 


9?* 

toft 

Gen Motors 

70ft 

71 

Sara Lee 

/u% 

70% 

TV 


2ft 

2ft 

GnPt>Utny 

23ft 

23% 

SFESopac 

29% 

29% 



38 

37ft 


3ft 

3ft 

ScM'berger 

32% 

31* 


AmTeleph 

23ft 

23ft 

Georg® Pac 

32ft 

32ft 

Scott Paper 

60 

60% 

n 


65ft 

64ft 

GUtem 

44ft 

45ft 

Seagram 

59% 

99 

rr 

li 


6ft 

7ft 


39ft 

38 M 

Sears Pbck 

44 ft 

44ft 

Asarca 
Ashland Oil 

13 

55 -4 
56ft 

13ft 

55ft 

Goodyear 

Goukflnc 

32ft 

17ft 

33 

18% 

Shell Trans 

Singer 

SrrmMnBk 

52% 

52% 

51% 

52% 

1c 

T 


54ft 

Grace 

47ft 

47 

90 

90% 


34ft 

35ft 

Gt M & Tec 

26 

2S% 

Sony 

Sth Cal Ed 

18% 

18% 

BkrsTsl NY 

50ft 

50ft 

GOtnd 

31ft 

32* 

35* 

35* 

P 

H 

Bankamer 

12ft 

41ft 

12ft 

41ft 

Gruman Cor 
GuU&West 

24ft 

65ft 

24% 

65ft 

Sparry Corp 
SttlOBOfm 

76 

46 

76 

45% 

Bank of NY 

67ft 

69ft 

Heinz HJ. 

46ft 

46ft 

Staffing Dra 
Stevens JP 

50ft 

49ft 



8ft 

8ft 


55 

54% 

33ft 

33 



59 ft 

59ft 

H'tetJ-Pkrd 

41 

41% 

Sun Comp 

51% 

50* 



55 

56 

HoneyweB 

1C tans 

73 

68* 

Teledyne 

324 

321* 

il 


4? ft 

47ft 

257. 

25% 

Tenneco 

39% 

38% 

u 

Bg Warner 
Bnst Myers 

35 

81 

34ft 

62ft 

Ingersol 
Inland Steel 

59 

17ft 

59 

18% 

Texaco 
Texas E Cor 

31% 

28% 

30* 

28ft 

fr 

BP 

37 

36ft 

IBM 

133% 

134ft 

Texas Inst 

118% 

115% 

il 


37ft 

36ft 

INCO 

lift 

lift 

Texas Utils 

35% 

35ft 

BurT ton Ntn 

54 ft 

53ft 

int Paper 

67 

65% 

Textron 

56% 

57% 

Cl 

Burroughs 

CmpbeDSp 

70ft 

71ft 

■ntTsiTei 

53ft 

53ft 

Travtrs Cor 

47% 

46ft 

ai 

63ft 

62ft 

Irvins Bank 

54ft 

54ft 

TRWtnc 

101ft 

1Q2tt 


10ft 

107. 

JhnsnS Jhn 

7P* 

72% 

UAL Inc 

54ft 

53% 

al 

Caierpriler 

44ft 

45ft 

Katser Alum 

16ft 

16% 

UndeverNV 

218% 

218ft 

I 


PI 3 

PIPft 

Ken- McGee 

28ft 

28% 

Un Carbide 

21* 

21% 

Central SW 

35 

34ft 

Kmb'iy Oik 

88 

88ft 

Un Pac Cor 

56ft 

56% 

Champion 

?4% 

» 

K Man 

53ft 

53ft 

UTO Brands 

28* 

28% 



41ft 

41% 

Kroger 

LT^Corp 

63ft 

63% 

USGCorp 

38% 

39* 

T 

ChmBk Nr 

47ft 

47ft 

2ft 

2% 

UtdTechnof 

45% 

45% 


Chevron 

43 

41ft 


76ft 

76ft 

USX Con) 

18% 

16% 



39ft 

39ft 

Lockheed 

49% 

48ft 

Unocal 

20% 

20% 

in 


54ft 

56 

Lucky Strs 
ManH'nver 

75ft 

24ft 

Jim Walter 

50% 

50% 

at 

Clark Equip 

18 

iBVi 

45ft 

45% 

ttmer.Lmbt 

61* 

61% 


39ft 

39 

MarmUeGp 

2ft 

2% 

Wafa Fargo 
WstBhseQ 

109* 

110 

in 

Colgate 

CBS 

40 

40ft 

Mapco 

45ft 

46% 

57% 

57% 

le 

145ft 

142ft 

Marine Mid 

50ft 

50% 

Weyerh'ser 

34ft 

35% 

C'lrrb-a Gas 

40ft 

40ft 

Mn Marietta 

43ft 

42* 

Whirlpool 

73* 

72 


Cmb'tn Enq 
Com with Ed 

m 

29 

Masco 

79ft 

29ft 

Wodwonh 

42% 

43% 

dt 

33ft 

33ft 

McDonalds 

esft 

65% 

Xerox Corp 

55* 

56% 

“i 


50ft 

50ft 

McDonnell 

67ft 

82ft 

Zenith 

24% 

24% 

Cn Nat Gas 

30'/. 

29 ft 

Mead 

56 

55ft 




cr 

Cons Power 

IP* 

12ft 

Merck 

115* 

113% 




te 

Cntrl Data 

22ft 

22 

MinstaMng 

111% 

111% 




Comma Gl 

60ft 

62ft 

MoW OK 

35ft 

34ft 

CANADIAN PRICES 

P» 

CPC ind 

70ft 

70 

Monsanto 

69ft 

68* 





30ft 

30ft 

Morgan J.P. 

94ft 

93% 

Abmbi 

22ft 

23% 

if 


42ft 

42ft 

Motorola 

39ft 

39* 

AJcn Alum 

42% 

42ft 

Dart 8 Kraft 

61ft 

61ft 

NCR Corp 

54% 

54* 

AtgomaSt) 

13% 

13* 

w 


26ft 

25 


4% 

4% 

Can Pacific 

15 

1454 


41ft 

41ft 

NatDisttre 

35 

35* 

Cominco 

12* 

13 

R 

Detroit Ed 

177. 

17ft 

NatMedEnt 

24 

24ft 

ConBathrst 

22% 

23 

rr 


96ft 

96ft 

NatSmcndt 

9ft 

9ft 

Hkr/SidCan 

28 

27* 

Disney 

46ft 

46ft 

Norfolk Sth 

81ft 

81% 

HdsnBMki 

28% 

28* 

P* 

54 

53ft 

NWBanap 

39ft 

39ft 

bnasco 

34ft 

35% 

II 


Ifift 

16ft 

OcodntPW 

27% 

27ft 

Imperial ON 

42 

41* 

I 

Duke Power 

49ft 

80'-. 

48ft 

79ft 

Ogden 

OflnCorp 

40% 

47% 

40% 

46% 

In Pipe 

Ryt Trustee 

38 

33 

38* 

33 


67, 

8ft 

Owens-ID 

39 

38% 

Seagram 
steel Co 

82 

81* 

Estm Kodak 

57ft 

56ft 

Pac Gas B 

25% 

25% 

20 ft 

20 * 

T 

Eaton Corp 

70ft 

69ft 

Pan Am 

5ft 

5ft 

ThrnsnN'A" 

30 

30 

ir 


85 

84ft 

Penney J.C. 

79% 

79% 

VarftyCorp 

WBcrHkam 

3.10 

3.20 


65ft 

64ft 

Pwmzoil 

53ft 

53 

38 

38 

\\ 

Fed Dpt Sts 

81ft 

81% 

Peooco 

32ft 

32ft 

wer 

13X 

12 % 


« t>L'. «7noil7iMnMai dm tfimieSH iESwRSiSn5ZilR5 


Addison and Aidcom 
merger to go-ahead 


The merger between Addi- 
son Consultancy, the public 


relations group, and Aidcom 
International, the design and 
market research company, is 
to go ahead after all. 

The two companies yes- 
terday announced an agreed 
£13.4 million takeover by 
Addison on the basis of 9 
Addison shares for 20 Aidcom 
shares. Addison shares fell 8p 
to 1 25p on the news, while 
Aidcom gained 9p to 55p. 

Last week the companies 
announced they were in 
merger talks, only to call them 
off two days later. Mr Michael 
Page, joint chief executive of 
Addison, said common sense 
prevailed. “We were never far 
apart,” he added. 

Mr Pratt Thompson. 
Aidcom’s chairman, said both 
sides had always been agreed 
on the commercial logic of the 


By Our City Staff 

merger, but differed on price. 
Addison has marginally raised 
its terms, which secured the 
unanimous acceptance of the 
Aidcom board. 

A management buy-out for 
more than £800.000 of 
Cockman, Copeman & Part- 
ners, a corporate services con- 
sultancy 5 1 per cent owned by 
Aidcom, is pan of the deaL 
Full acceptance of the offer 
would involve the issue of 
about 1 0.7 million new Addi- 
son shares, representing 19.5 
per cent of the enlarged equity. 

Aidcom and Addison are 
complementary in several ar- 
eas including design and mar- 
ket research. Aidcom’s shares 
have been depressed in recent 
months after 1985 pretax prof- 
its emerged at £1.28 million, 
little changed from the pre- 
vious year and about half what 
the City expected. 


GEC offshoot’s ‘first’ 


By Our Energy Correspondent 


An order has been placed 
with Ruston Gas Turbines, a 
GEC subsidiary', to build 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN t0.00% 

Adam & Company 10.00% 

BCQ 10.00% 

Citibank Savimjsf 10 75% 

Consolidated Ofls 10.00% 

Continental Trust 10.00% 

Co-operatrve Bank 10.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 10.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai ...... 10.00% 

Lloyds 8ank._ 10.00% 

Nat Westminster 10.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland 10.00% 

TSB 10.00% 

Citibank NA 101)0% 

t Mortgage Base Rare. 


Europe's first turbine which 
will run on methane gas drawn 
from a council waste tip. 

The turbine will be installed 
at Purfleet Board Mills at 
Avely in Essex and draw gas 
produced by rotting material 
from an adjoining tip. It will 
generate electricity for the 
plant and the heat from its 
exhaust will be fed into the 
factory boiler system to raise 
steam fora new steam turbine 
generating set and for paper 
board drying. 

Mr Derek Fothergill, of 
Ruston Gas, said: “There are 
some 6.000 landfill sites in 
Britain. Just bow many of 
these would be suitable for 
development is difficult to 
assess, but if only one in 10 
prove viable they could pro- 
vide about 10 per cent of the 
Central Electricity Generating 
Board's installed capacity. 


Unilever poised to buy 
Dutch firm for £110m 


By Teresa Poole 


Unilever, the Anglo-Dutch 
foods and detergents conglom- 
erate, yesterday announced it 
was negotiating terms for an 
agreed takeover — worth 
about £110 million — for 
Naarden International, a 
Dutch fragrences and flavours 
company. 

By combining Naarden with 
its own PPF International 
subsidiary. Unilever would 
create the world's second larg- 
est business for the develop- 
ment and manufacture of 
fragrences and flavours for 
foods, drinks, soaps and deter- 
gents, behind IFF of the 
United States. 


If agreement is reached, 
Unilever will make a cash 
offer for all of Naarden’s 
ordinary shares, which are 
quoted on the Amsterdam 


stock market. The company 
hopes the deal can be com- 
pleted in the autumn and said: 
“There are reasonable 
grounds for expecting 
agreement.” 

Unilvefs shares lost lOp to 
£1 8.80 on the announcement 

Last year. Naarden had 
sales of FL663 million (£191 
million) and made net profits 
of FL22 million (£63 million). 
PPF is of a similar size and its 
present turnover is more than 
FL650 million. 

The two companies believe 
that to succeed in the inter- 
national fragrences and fla- 
vours field over the next 
decade will depend on being 
large enough to maintain a 
global marketing network and 
to finance the necessary high 
level of research and develop- 
ment spending. 


At the moment half of the 
world demand is met by six 
companies, including 
Naarden and PPF, which op- 
erate internationally, while 
between 800 to 1.000 smaller 
companies concentrate on 
well-defined geographical ar- 
eas or specially areas. 

Unilever said Naarden and 
PPF would fit together well 
and give both companies a 
broader scientific base. 

The combined strength 
would give the companies a 
more favourable competitive 
position in the US market and 
could lead to “attractive 
growth opportunities in many 
countries”. 

Unilever has announced 
better-ihan-expected interim 
pretax profits, up by 18 per 
cent at £51 3 million. 


Campaign for nuclear power 
emphasizes safety record 


By David Young 
Energy Correspondent 
The Government yesterday 
continued its campaign of 
support for the nuclear power 
industry by emphasizing the 
safety record of those stations 
already in operation and the 
high standards being enforced 
at new stations under 
construction. 

The re-affirmation of sup- 
port for nuclear power is pait 
of the Department of Energy’s 
campaign to re-assure the 
public about the merits of 
nuclear power after the 
Chernobyl accident and trade 
union demands for an 
abandonment of the nuclear 
power programme on safely 
grounds and to support the 
coal industry. 

The Government campaign 
of support for mid ear power 
has been launched in the run- 
up to the completion of the 
public inquiry report into the 
application by the Central 
Electricity Generating Board 
to build a pressurized water- 
cooled (PWR) nudear power 
Suffolk. 



station at Sizewdl in 


Alastair Goodlad: “UK 
record second to none.” 
The chairmen of both Brit- 
ish Coal and the CEGB have 
said that without nudear 
power present levels of 
electridty supply could not be 
maintained, even if new coal- 
fired power stations were 
built. 

The Government is aware 
that the Sizewdl derision 
could become a election issue. 

Mr Alastair Goodlad. the 
Energy Under Secretary with 
responsibility for nudear 
power yesterday visited the 


Heysham nuclear power sta- 
tion. 

The station, an advanced 
gas-cooled reactor (AGR) de- 
sign is due to bring its first 
reactor into operation next 
year and its second in 1988. It 
will be capable of providing 
the power needs of a city the 
size of Liverpool. 

He said: “I welcome the 
ecceHent progress of this im- 
portant project, which is being 
built to the highest standards 
of safety, the highest standards 


of efficiency and the highest 
ofreliabil' 


standards of reliability. 

“Thie acheiveraent is 
remarkable when one realizes 

that planning and building a 

power station of this size 
compares with the planning 
and building of a new town. 

“Heysham is being built to 
the highest standards. Nuclear 
safety is of utmost im- 
portance. In Britain, the 
nuclear safety record is second 
to none. 

“We have the finest nuclear 
safety inspectorate in the 
world, which has given us 30 
years of safe nuclear 
electricity.” 


c 


COMMODITIES REVIEW 


3 


Gold takes on a bigger role 
in land of the rising Yen 


The financial world Is often so 
obsessed with the swinging 
fortunes of the dollar that it b 
easy to forget that most of its 
inhabitants do their day to day 
business in other currencies. 

Frequently the anra of the 
almighty greenback Minds as 
from seeing die way markets 
behave through other sets of 
eyes. 

However casting aside die 
dollar can be tantamount not 
just to looking at the land- 
scape from another angle but 
to turning it completely upside 
down. An event that might be 
seen as a recipe for economic 
recession in America may 
appear as a stimulus to growth 
in West Germany or Japan. 

Take, for instance, the path 
of commodity prices in die 
1970s. The generally accepted 
wisdom b that prices boomed 
because of frantic economic 
growth, crop shortages and 
effective supply control by 
producing countries. 

At least they did in dollars. 
In yen terms, however, history 
has to be rewritten. Commod- 
ity prices dbplayed no more 
than a mild blip upwards from 
what they had been doing for 
the previous 20 years — falling 
gently. And when the dollar 
commodity boom coded with 
an almighty crash in the 
1980s, yen prices continued to 
enjoy a soft Landing because of 
the dollar's all-crashing 
progress on die currency 
markets. 

Taking the same perspec- 
tive is helpful when looking at 
last week's scree in p redoes 
metal prices which took the 
fin a ncia l markets by surprise 
and put bullioa back on the 
newspaper hoardings. 


level for more than two years. 
It b doubtful however that the 
news set the pulses raring SQ 
quickly in Tokyo. In local 
currency terms, gold was 
quoted at around Y6I450 an 
ounce, a frill 28 per cent down 
on the price a year earlier 
(when Americans where pay- 
jng only $330) and still around 
its lowest leveb for seven 
years. 

The reason, of course, is the 
sharp depreciation of the dol- 
lar from its lofty pinnacle, 
which has seen the yen's value 
rise by 35 per cent over die 
past year. 

Thb has encouraged Japa- 
nese investors to buy bars and 
coins, such as the Canadian 
Maple Leaf, to give gold a 
larger role in their portfolios. 

It has encouraged also the 
country's jewellers to import 
more bullion for crafting into 
rings, necklaces and bracelets. 
There b also a strong link 
between investment and 
jewellery demand. 

As the Consolidated Cold 
Fields annual gold review 
pointed out, several Japanese 
outlets sell jewellery items 
with low mark-ups on their 
underlying gold value at prices 
relating to the rating bullion 
price. 


anniversary of Emperor 
Hlrobfto's accession. 


The effect on Japanese gold 


import figures has been 
made. In the first six months 
of this year, 348 tonnes of gold 
— excluding coins — came into 
the country compared with 95 
tonnes in the corresp on ding 
period last year and 197 
tonnes in the whole of 1985. 


Gold came within a whisker 
of $400 an ounce, its highest 


Apart from demand from 
private investors and jewel- 
lers, the Japanese government 
has bought 200 tonnes in order 
to strike 10 million coins to 
commemorate the 60th 


Some London traders 
reckon the demand for thb 
issue might lead the govern- 
ment to mint another 5 mtition 
coins and import a further 100 
tonnes. 

In assessing what will hap- 
pen next to Japanese demand 
it should be remembered that 
Far Eastern buyers tend to 
accumulate bullion when 
prices are tow and sell when 
they are h igh. Thb may sound 
rule number one of investing, 
bnt unfortunately many 
Westerners tend to become 
blinded by the glamour of gold 
and do the opposite. 

Thus if the yen remains 
strong, buying from Tokyo can 
be expected to remain an 
important component iff global 
de man d, estimated at around 
1,500 tonnes thb year. 

However, the consequences 
of the gold price strengthening 
in krai terms have been 
foreshadowed already in plat- 
inum which, on the whole, has 
been responsible for pushing 
gold higher in recent weeks. 

Platinum's bold surge thb 
year, dictated by a far more 
bullish supply-demand situa- 
tion than exists in gold, has led 
to it setting a $160 an onnee 
premium over gold after a 
slight discount during 1985. 
The reaction from Japan's 
jewellers, who account for half 
die couatry M s platinum im- 
ports, has been swift, underlin- 
ing the strong price elasticity 
of precious metals in the 
Orient. 

As demand has switched 
into gold, platinum imports 
have slumped by 35 per cent in 
the ffrst five months compared 
with tbe same period last year. 

Richard Lander 


( TEMPUS ) 

XJ-40 launch will slow 
Jaguar profits growth 


Ai 7 per cent ahead of last 
year, jaguar's interim pretax 
profits were bang in line with 
expectations. Nevertheless, 
investors must be feeling a 
little cautious about tbe sec- 
ond half, which will bear the 
frill brunt of the marketing 
costs of the XJ-40 car, to be 
launched this autumn. 

Sales in North America, 
where Jaguar makes 66 po- 
cent of its profits, surged in 
the six months 10 June. The 
number of cars sold there 
jumped by 23 per cent to 
11,506. There was as even 
more spectacular increase in 
Canada - of 58 per cent to 
945. 

With 80 per cent of its car 
sales overseas. Jaguar contin- 
ues to hedge its cunency 
when it can to minimize the 
effect of cunency fluctua- 
tions. The strength of sterling 
in recent months has meant 
that the group has been 
unable to obtain the 
favourable rates of 1985. But 
it has bodged for the whole of 
1986 and part of 1987. 



JAGUAR 

SHARE PRICE 



1984 


1985 datastoeam 1986 


Capital spending b reach- 
iehts. In 


ing new heights. In the first 
half of 1986 it doubled to £32 
million and, for the year as a 
whole, it will be £90 million 


as the group catches up after 
afea 


years of capital starvation. 

An engineering centre is 
being builtfor £37 million 
and a paint plant for £15 
million. And capital spending 
of £100 million a year, 
funded largely out of cash 
flows, is planned for the next 
five years. 

Shareholders should not be 
looking for fast growing prof- 
its in the short term. Launch 
costs of the XJ-40. estimated 
to be between £15 million 
and £20 million, will fell in 
the second half of thb year 
and the first half of next Full 
year profits for 1986 and 
1987 promise to show little 
growth as a result 

Pretax profits of £123 mil- 
lion in 1986 imply earnings 
per share of around 45.5p. 
The prospective multiple at 
the share price of 533p is 
11.7. 

Longer term, the group will 
benefit from its intensive 
capital expenditure pro- 
gramme, but the prospect of 
two years of flat earnings 
could cause the shares 10 
mark time in the short lens. 

BPCC 


distinctly uninformative 
about where the group made 
its money. It appears that 
profits from printing proba- 
bly doubled since now the 
group has five profitable 
contracts to print newspapers 
for the Minor Group. 

Perga mmon Journals are 
estimated to have contribut- 
ed £5m for tbe 10 week 
period for which they were 
included, while Purnell will 
have made a smaller loss. 

Analyst Luke Johnson at 
stockbrokers Klein wort 
Grieveson b “extremely 
bullish” about tbe shares. He 
b forecasting a full year's 


pretax profit of £7 2m to give 
of 26.1 


If Mr Maxwell b to achieve 
bb goal of turning BPCC into 
a. £3 billion to £5 billion 
company in the 1990s, thb is 
the sort of performance he 
will need to put in from now 
on. Turnover for the six 
months to June was £191 
million. Double that and add 
on a bit for growth and a full 
six months' contribution 
from Fergammon Journals 
and it is dear dial there b a 
long way to go. 

As usual, the statement is 


earnings per share of 26. Ip. 
The rise at the pretax level b 
not folly reflected in the 
bottom line because the tax 
charge will be significantly 
higher than last year when 
there was a tax credit, al- 
though it will still be a 
subnormal rate of some 15 
percent. 

The point about the shares 
is not so much that they are 
standing on a prospective 
price earnings multiple of 
11.4, which may look a bit 
expensive to some. Rather, 
investors should be looking 
for action in this increasingly 
acquisitive company. 

The group plans 10 become 
a global information and 
communications business by 
1990 and will be making big 
acquisitions in the US, the 
Pacific basin and Europe. 

An announcement about a 
major acquisition of a US 
public printing and publish- 
ing company is imminent. 

To buy BPCC is to put your 
faith in Mr Robert MaxwelL 
There will certainly be plenty 
going on and, if he gets it 
right, it will be very 
profitable. - - 

Blagden Ind 


Mr Ronald Sparrow's swan 
song as executive chairman 
of Blagden Industries was to 
spend more than £25 million 
on City Investing Group of 
New York’s European Con- 
tainer businesses in March 
1985. 


Although the financing of 
the scheme was considered at 
the time to be too dever by 
half (it effectively incor- 
porated a rights issue, a fixed 
price offer and a tender), the 
directors must be breathing a 
sigh of relief at the wisdom of 
this move. 

Without these European 
interests, the group would be 
in extremely serious trouble. 
At present, European packag- 
ing is easily the largest single 
contributor to profits, 
accounting for about two 
thitds of tne group total. 

The rest of the group, with 
the exception of speciality 
chemicals, is still performing 
below par. Yesterday's in- 
terim results, at £2.3m. are 
down 16 per cent on last 
year's figure. However, ac- 
tion is being taken to elimi- 
nate loss makers. The 
injection and compression 
mouldings business at 
Billericay is being sold to Lin 
Pac for £4 million. 

The proceeds, together 
with £3 -3m which should be 
realised from associated 
property sales, will reduce 
gearing substantially. 

If the rest of 1 986 is used to 
tidy up problematical plating 
and transformer businesses 
and to contain or reduce 
Spanish losses, then 1987 
should see Blagden returning 
to the offensive. 

Plastic drums, for example, 
a market in which the group 
is presently unrepresented, 
look like the way forward for 
Blagden. At present this prod- 
uct is taking away market 
share from the traditional 
steel drums at the rate of 3-T 
per cent a year. Blagden is 
investing in equipment in the 
UK to adapt its blow mould- 
ing technology to this market. 

In the current year, 
Blagden should make £S.5m 
pre rax profit and report 
earnings per share of 1 1.25p. 
In 1987, £7m pre rax and 
thirteen pennies of earnings 
are in their sights. It may take 
some time, however, before 
investors look to BJagdon for 
anything more than its yield 
f over 8 


of over 8 per cent 


Credit fee 
first for 
Norwegians 


From Tony Samstag, Oslo 

Norwegian charge and 
credit-card holders will be- 
come the first worldwide to be 
charged the 2 to 6 per cent 
service foes on transactions 
usually paid by the vendor 
accepting the card. 

From October 1, Norwe- 
gians who choose to pay by 
American Express, Diners 
Cub, Access or Visa will have 
the surcharge automatically 
debited to their accounts. 

Under Norwegian law, ser- 
vice fees on aQ credit or charge 
cards arc theoretically tbe 
cardholder's liability. Inter- 
national cards have been ex- 
empted because the business 
they generated was in the 
national interest American 
Express, for example, had 
transactions worth $140 mil- 
lion (£94 million) in foreign 
currency last year. 

Tbe change in regulations 
would affect only Norwegian 
accounts; foreign tourists and 
businessmen would be able to 
use their cards normally. 

The move is meant to 
restrict tbe use of credit by the 
average Norwegian consumer 
in an economy that has been 
described as “overheated”. 


Cannon Street in 
£3.1 m purchases 


Gannon Street Investments 
is to pay a total of £3.1 million 
for BS Heating, SB8 
(Mechanical Services), 
Powercourt, Davron En- 
gineers Sales and Agricultural 
Packaging and Containers. 

The initial payment will be 
made through the issue of 2.5 
million new shares. The ven- 
dors will retain 622,000 of 
these, giving them 1 per cent 
of the enlarged Cannon Street 
capilaL 

Charterhouse Bank has ar- 
ranged for the balance of 1.88 
million shares issued to the 
vendors, together with a fur- 
ther 280,000 shares, . to be 
issued to raise additional 
working capital. 

This will be placed at 125p 
per share with investment 
clients of Charterhouse and 

Capel Cure-Myers. 

BS Heating, SBB (Mechani- 


cal Services) and Powercourt 
form the BS . 


Heating Group, 
which installs heating and 
plumbing systems for private 
housebuilding contractors in 
the north-west of Englan d 
The company is also in- 
volved in the supply and 
installation of . security 
systems. 

An initial payment of £1.85 


million is due on completion, 
to be satisfied by the allotment 
of 1.49 million new shares. 

Payment for Davron, an 
agricultural services company, 
wall be made in instalments. 

An initial payment of 
£750,000 is due on comple- 
tion, to be satisfied by the 
allotment of 605,816 new 
shares. 

An additional payment of 
up to a maximum of £3.75 
million is payable over a 
three-year period, depending, 
on the profits achieved by 
Davron. 

Payment for Apac. a horti- 
cultural sevices company, will 
also be made in instalments. 
An initial payment of 
£500,000 is due on comple- 
tion, to be satisfied by the 
allotment of 400,000 new 
shares. 

Additional payment of up 
to £300,000 maxim um is pay- 
able over a three-year period 
based upon the profits 
achieved by Apac. 

The acquisitions are part of 
the company’s policy of 
expansion through the ac- 
quisition of young, service- 
related companies which are 
cash-generating and have 
good growth prospects. 


LONDON 


FRANKFURT 



N0W0UR SMILE SPREADS 

TO FRANKFURT 


EVERY FRIDAY AND SUNDAY AT 10AM. 

ENJOY GULF AIR’S GOLDEN FALCON SERVICE TO FRANKFURT. 
WHETHER YOU CHOOSE FIRST CLASS. FALCON BUSINESS CLASS 
OR GOLDEN ECONOMY YOU’LL FIND OUR STANDARD OFSEftVlCE SUPERB. 
FLY WITH GULF AIR TO FRANKFURT 
DISCOVER THE 6ULF AIR SMILE FOR YOURSELF. 

IFR0M JUNE 1ST EVERY WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY) 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT 
OR GULF AIR, 73 PICCADILLY. LONDON W1V SHF. 
TELEPHONE: 01-409 1901. BIRMINGHAM: 021-632 5931. 
MANCHESTER: 061-832 9677/8. GLASGOW; 041-248 6381. 

OR KEY PRESTEL 223S13. 


SWA1I 



ONCE FLOWN, NEVER FORGOTTEN 


ABU DHABI AMMAN ATHENS BAHRAIN - BANGKOK - BOMBAY • CAIRO - COLOMBO ■ DELHI ■ ■ D H A H R A N - DHAKA - DOHA' - DUBAI * FRANKFURT - HONG K0NS 
ISTANBUL • JEDDAH -‘KARACHI ■ KHARTOUM • KUWAIT t>lARNACA - LONDON • MANILA -'jlUSCffT - PARIS • ty S AL KHAIMAH - RIYADH S A LA L A H ■ SANAA - SHARJAH - TUNIS 


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S*RC PRICE 



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» ♦ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


17 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 




of abid from BPCC 


By Michael dark 


■ : 




"v: c * 


'rfc* 


Shares of. the troubled 
PMKp HD1 Investment Trust 
leapt by I8p to a new high of 
3I6p yesterday, amid growing 
speculation that Mr Robert 
Maxwell's British Printing & 
Commimiratioq Corpn was 
preparing to launch a bid. 

PHIT, camently the subject 
of a shareholders' revolt, car- 
ries a stock market value of 
£305 million. Maxketmea 
daim that a ted for the 
company would enable BPCC 
to pick up assets cheaply and 
would eflectively be another 
fbnn of rights issue. 

■ Earlier -this month, PHIT, 
whose chairman, is Lord 
Keith, received an ultima turn 
about comprehensive changes 
from Barclays de Zoete Wedd 

• Despite crafinnation of 
Hawley Group's 845 per cent 
stake in the company, tike 
shares of HAT Group held 
steady at )35p yesterday. 

Mr David Telling, the chair- 
man of HAT, has em- 
barked oq a tom- of brokers' 
offiott, trying to dram up 
support for HAT*s defence 
afflinst the unw anted, £90 
mill i nn bid from BET. 
Marfcetmen believe that - 
Hawley wfll use its stake m 
HAT tobairter with BET 
for control erf Breagreen. 

Investment Management, 
representing a group of in- 
stitutional shareholders 
accounting for 56 per cent of 
the dares. The. dissidents 
were believed to include the 
Kuwait Investment Office, 
Eagle Star, Standard life 
Assurance, the Pest Office . 
Pension Fund, Prudential 
Corporation, the Save & Pros- 
per unit trusts and the Coal 
Board Pension Fund. They 
want to see the group adopt a 
fresh investment strategy by 


making it an index-linked 
trust, which would be wound 
upin 1991. 

Shares of BPCC finished 6p 
higher at 298p after revealing 
interim figures showing pretax 
profits leaping .from £11.43 
million to £27 J million. 

The rest of the equity 
maricet started the second leg 
of the long, three-week Bank 
holiday account in lethargic 
mood. Turnover was down to 
a. trickle as holiday influences 
and the absence of institu- 
tional support took their toll. 

Dealers reported selective 
support among leading shares 
and tins was enough to lift the 
FT Index of 30 stores by 2.6 
points to 1,273.6. The 
broader-based FT-SE 100 was 
in better form, extending its 
lead to 7.1 points at 1,609.0. 

But gilts spent a lacklustre 
session with prices barely 
changed on Friday night's 
close. Gold dares were also 
dull as the price of bullion lost 
a couple of dollars. It dosed at 
$377.25 an ounce: 

International Si gnal A Pun. 

trot advanced lOpto 260p 
with Robert Fleming, the 
investment bouse, reported to 
be big buyers of the shares 
following a recent visit to the 
company in the United States. 
Dealers claim the shares axe 
due for a run soon, ahead of 


DATASTREAU 



JAN' 


BOl! 

ITATERS 

i — 

HARE PR 

ICE 

FEB 

MAR | APR 

MAY 

JUN J 

JUL 


AUG 


theFarobor 

Shares of Mount Charlotte 
Investments, the hotel chain, 
could be due for a shakeout 
when dealings resume today. 
It looks as though merger talks 
with Pfeasmma, the casino 
and leisure group, have bro- 
ken down. Mount Charlotte 
rose 2p to a new peak of lOOp 
as a line of 800,000 share went 
through the market. The word 
is that they went to one buyer. 
This has fuelled speculation 
that Pleasuranja may launch 
an agressive bid for Mount 
Charlotte: Pleasnrama was un- 
changed at 32 Ip. 

Bowater Industries, the 
pulp, paper and packaging 
group, moved quickly to 
squash growing speculation 
that it may be the next target 
for Hanson Trust, which al- 
ready- owns 10.86 nriUkm 
shares, or 1 1.71 per cent of the 


RECENT ISSUES 


EftimES 

BSB Design Ts7p) 
Baavwco ri45p) 

Borland p25p) 

Chelsea Man (125o) 
Coated Electrodes (B4p) 
Coline IllOp) 

Evans Ha&maw (120p) 
Belcher Dennys (70pl 

6utt!2 , ^TO(StS 0p, 
Harrison (i50p) 

Hilla Ergonom (S2p) 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


90® 


Three North Staring 

SepBB . 

Dec 86 9071 

Mar 57 .90.71 

JunS7 9034 

Sep 87 ; HIT . 

Dec 87 • N/T 

Pravxxis day's total open interest 15253 
Month Ewodoter 


144+2 
191 
70 
150 
141 
125 -1 
88 
115 +3 
117 
72 
205 
164. 
163 


MW 


Hughes Food 
Lon utd Inv 
M6 Cash & C (1 
Marina Dev (11. 
Morgan Grenfell 
Omritech (33p) 
SWeM(72p) 


^rLateureniOp) 


(130p> 
Tandy inds (11 
Thames TV (I90p) 
Tibbet & Britten (1 
Traas 2Wti/t 2016 
Unlock (83p) 


. 24 
426+16 
77 -T 
98 
436-4 
32 
145 


120 

157‘j 

145-2 

237 

132+1 

£41 

67 


Wtndsmoor 
YeTverton 

RIGHTS ISSUES 
BBA Gp N/P 
Barker & Dobson F/P 
Cfevvtsion N/P 
CobroU F JP 
Expamet F/P 
Forward Tach N/P 
Rock N/P 
Television Sth N/P 
Top Value F/P 
Yorkmount. N/P 
(issue price in brackets). 


106+1 

U 


14 

12>*+t« 

28 

206 

168 

2 

3*2 -'a 
17 
83 
77 


Three 
Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun87 

US Treasury fend 

Sep 86 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 — 


9034 . 9038 380 

9071 9066 9C.ee 487 

90.72 90.70 • 9072 151 

9054 9054 9058 14 . 

- 9035 0 

8016 0 

Previous day's totst open Interest 19815. 
9350 3381 93.78 93.78 422 

9350 9352 93.78 9080 1741 

.9373 9174 93.69 93.71 210 

9355 9355 9352 ■ 9351 128 

Previous days total open teemt 6753 
100-20 100-23 90» 100-09 2960 

100-00 100-05 99-12 9B-14 .116 

■ HfT. . ... . 0 


Short G8t 
Sep86__ 
Dec 88 _ 
Mar 87 


. _ ‘ ftevfaus day's total open I 

-i 1 - 10060 ' 101-01 * 10060 1KW2 

^r-bJjjT y. : ■ ■ iowa 




v r 


Sep I 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jim 87 

FT-SE 100 

Sep 86 

DecTO 


101-03 

101-08 


PnWtaua day's total open in 
120-17 120-21 120-11 120-18 

120-10 120-16 120-10 120-14 

NJT ■ 12007 

WT. 12007 

Prerious day’s total open l 
16350 16400 . lean - isEro 

N/T . 16550 


HI 

<7- 

0 • 


15383 

3658 

118 

0 

0 

2423 

102 

0 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Aug 15 
Sep 5 
Sep 19- 


annon Stresli 
Mm purcta 


RrstDeafinge 
Aug 4 
Aug 18 
Sep 8 

Cell options were Mftm out ok 1 . 

ControtSoca. GkanfekL Btackwood 
CoOne. Adamic. Aran Euro. Ferries, 
AyershkaMst 
Put : TriwurtroL 

Put 6 CaM : Utanar. Amend. Lon. & Nth. 


fer 

Nov 6 Nov 17 

• Nov 20 DSC1 

-Dec4 Dec 15 

Bwtocfc, Uttramar, Thomas Mu. 

Sheraton, Aprioot. Amstrad. BSR, OKN. 
Group. Nth. Kate, Bate? CH, Diploma. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


trad wtt 1975 m sane M717 (dap* 


715-717). 


OTHER STE RLING RATES 

Argentina austral* 

Austrate dedar 
Bahram Ai i i . 

BrazB cruzado 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Cyprus powd 
FMand marto 


Hong Kong dodar . 
Intfia rupee 
Ireqdtear 

Kuwait drier KD 



L 0.7280-07380 

75315-75715 
■ 1985020150 
11558011.7000 
H 185018001 


0^432004^0 
. 3536035439 
100000106050 

— 25680-30027 

Saudi Arabia rtyte - .r..-- 55845-55245 

SSngapoce dodar ^ — 37162-U2200 

South Africerend £919035433 

HACAhnn. 5488085088 
UoydeBank - 



bffereleya Bank HOREX end ExteL 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


iiMijy 
N Ybtk 1^52015870 
MooM 2078940841 

Ams-dsm3582O3j4840 

Brussels 63508358 
C-ptmen 115253-115088 
DUfe 1.1095-1.1135 
FrarWurt 35736-35905 
Usher 21654-21870 

Madrid 198.12-13354 
Mian . 211653-212454 
Osto 105423-105700 
Paris 95958-105583 
Sfkhbn 105301-103540 


August II 

1.^2014930 

25791-25820 

0477004824 

63.77-6358 

115920115096 

1.1125-1.1135 

35882-35905 

21034-21756 

19956-19854 

2120.10212454 

100423-105571 

100412-100583 

103396-103540 


049-04flprem 

0344125prwn 

IN-lXpram 

16-13prom 

IVKpram 

16pnwvl2rSs 

IVlXprwn 

60-l60dh 


150-1 TSprem 

052-O*8pram 

®W1ipSTl 
43^ren» 
2*2apreni 


3 MS 
3X-4Scfa 
2V2%pram 
5-aprem 


1 

12021 Ode 

12%-13Ntfs 

0%-6%pnm 

J4prem-Xda 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


-fed— Oq Jen Apr Oct Jen 


AM Lyons 300 47 58 70 5 8 

(■336) 330 » 38 48 15 18 

360 12 20 28 33 35 


*EL 

11 

20 

38 


BP 

reio» 


500 113 127 — 1 4 — 

550 65 90 92 5 13 20 

800 » 47 82 23 30 96 


a***—*-' 



Cons Gold 

420 

85 

77 

85 

10 

17 

30 

(■471) 

460 

3b 

60 

tii 

27 

40 

5b 

500 

1/ 

V 

— 

52 

/Q 

• — 

GourtauUs 

260 

as 

34 

43 

9 

12 

10 

(*270) 

280 

14 

24 

30 

19 

22 

2b 

300 

6 

14 

_ 

33 

36 



330 

3 

7 

— 

83 

84 

— 


230 

31 

38 

42 

4 

7 

9 

(*308) 

300 

13 

2b 

31 

11 

14 

19 

330 

4 

14 

21 

30 

31 

33 

Carte 3 Mrs 

300 

50 

82 

• 77 

6 

10 

15 

r345> 

325 

32 

4b 

60 

12 

18 

23 

350 

13 

27 

37 

2b 

32 

3b 


375 

5 

15 


42 

48 

— 

Defers 

600 

143 


_ 

2 





(*728) 

650 

97 

— 

— 

b 

— 

— 

700 

60 

— 

— 

10 

— 

— 

GEC 

’ 180 

18 

to 

30 

5 

8 

10 

(190) 

200 

8 

14 

20 

15 

17 

20 

220 

3 

8 

— 

32 

32 

— 

Grand Mat 

327 

60 


_ 

2 





("378) 

355 

38 

— 

— 

/ 

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— 

380 


48 

57 

— 

12 

15 


382 

25 


— 

20 

— 

— 

ICt 

■ 900 

122 

in 


5 

9 



(*1004) 

950 

77 

112 

127 

13 

18 

25 

1000 

46 

77 

92 

25 

3/ 

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1050 

23 

4S 

85 

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to 

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300 

30 

39 

47 

4 

7 

8 

C324) 

330 

9 

20 

2 9 

13 

15 

1/ 

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2 

10 

16 

29 

38 

39 

Marks&Spen 

180 

29 

38 

43 

2)6 

4 

6 

(*205) 

200 

13 

22 

2/ 

b 

9 

11 

220 

354 

10 

14 

16 

70 

22 

Shell Trans 

750 

128 

142 

153 

1 

10 

18 

(*870) 

800 

78 

96 

11/ 

* 

2U 

28 

-850 

40 

60 

83 

28 

33 

4 1 

Trafalgar House 

240 

43 

49 

57 

4 

G 

9 

1-273T 

260 

?fi 

32 

40 

7 

to 

14 

280 

14 

22 

30 

18 

21 

24 


SmUm 

fep 

Ok 

■far 


fee 

Mar 

Beaten 

360 

50 

60 

70 

4 

8 

13 

(*<01> 

390 

27 

40 

48 

12 

20 

23 

420 

10 

25 

33 

25 

36 

40 


480 

2% 

13 

22 

to 

6b 

to 

Boots 

200 

28 

37 

45 

2 

4 

6 

(*224) 

220 

15 

24 

29 

9 

11 

13 

240 

6K 

14 

18 

18 

22 

24 

BTR 

280 

17 

28 

38 

8 

15 

20 

(-286) 

307 

5 

14 


2/ 

33 

— 

333 

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— 

50 

52 

— 

Bass 

700 

70 

85 

'so 

4 

10 

17 

cm 

750 

30 

50 


15 

25 

to 

800 

7 

30 

4b 

4b 

60 

bU . 

BtoeCtete 

550 

13 

33 

48 

25 

32 

40 

(*533) 

800 

3 

15 

28 

70 

70 

/0 


650 

1 

4 

16 

12U 

120 

120 

DaBears 

550 

135 

150 

16S 

6 

13 

28 

cm 

600 

90 

no 

12b 

10 

28 

40 


650 

60 

80 

100 

22 

40 

55 


700 

35 

50 

— 

5b 

65 

8U 

Omro 

. 300 

65 

72 

80 

2 

4 

6 

(•380) 

330 

38 

48 

58 

' -3 

8 

12 

360 

14 

24 

38 

13 

18 

22 

GKN 

280 

8 

18 

78 

21 

24 

28 

W 

300 

4 

10 

IB 

38 

39 

44 



1 

5 

10 

68 

88 

88 



1 

2 

5 

98 

98 

98 

Glaxo 

900 

1?0 

150 


12 

25 



7385) 

950 

80 

115 

140 

» 

40 

45 



42 

as 

no 

40 

60 

65 


1050 

16 

58 

82 


66 

90 

Hanson 

135 

44 

_ 

_ 

1 


— 

CITS) 

150 

2fl 

— 

• — 

1 

— 

— 

ISO 

19 

28 

33 

2 

3 

7)6 


180 

R* 

16 

21 

a 

11 

15 


200 

256 

6)6 11)6 

25 

28 

28 


Seriee Sept Dec Me Sep Pec Mar 


500 - 30 52 
550 9 25 -40 

000 2 15 22 


18 22 25 

40 - 43 43 

78 80 85 


Thom EMI 
(*482) 


420 67 80 95 

480 35 50 65 

500 10 27 42 

550 2 10 - 


3 8 IS 

12 15 22 
25 30 37 
72 75 — 


Tesco 

r«0) 


300 107 — — 

330 77 86 — 

360 52 SO 75 

390 23 37 - 50 


2 — — 
2 3 — 

4 7 10 

8 13 18 


Series Ang Nov Feb Aug Nov Feb 


Brit Aero 
(*488) 


460 33 

500 5 

550 '1 


47 70 
30 45 

12 25 


2 13 20 
15 28 35 

60 65 68 


BAT IndS 
(-406) 


360 45 

390 1 5 

42 0 1JJ 
480 & 


55 68 
35 48 

15 25 
4 — 


2 6 9 

3 14 18 

20 28 30 

60 65 - 


Barclays 

T489) 


460 35 

*500 5 

550 2 


57 70 
27 42 

13 23 


S 12 17 

15 30 37 

80 87 72 


BrWTe tocom 

(*202) 


180 23 

200 416 

220 * 


29 36 
17 23 

8 13 


IN 4 7 

4 11 16 

20 22 24 


CadbwySchwpps 

(*170) 


180 12 
180 2 
200 1 


22 25 
10 16 
4 7 


2 5 90 

12 13 15 

31 32 33 


GT 


300 65 

330 35 

380 10 


73 — 

43 — 

20 ■ — 


12 — 
2 5 — 

8 IS — 


Cedbreke 

(*348) 


300 50 

330 . 20 
360 3 


58 67 
28 40 

13 20 


1 3 5 

4 10 14 

17 25 25 


LASMO 

rm 


100 28 
110 20 
120 13 


35 40 
28 35 

20 28 


1 4 7 

1 7 11 

4 12 14 


Midland Bank 
(*539) 


500 42 

550 7 
600 2 


57 72 

28 40 

12 20 


2 8 15 

15 28 35 

62 65 70 


P8 0 
P513) 


460 53 

500 16 

550 2 

600 1 


65 78 

35 47 
18 30 
5 — 


1 4 10 

3 18 22 
42 45 47 
92 92 


Ratal 

(186) 


160 30 38 44 

180 10 22 28 

200 2 11 17 


2-4 6 

3 10 12 

16 23 22 


RTZ 

(*597) 


500 97 107 117 

550 47 65 75 

800 10 37 52 

850 IN IS ZB 


2 5 9 

3 14 20 
18 37 - 50 
60 77 92 


Vaal Reefs 
(-58) 


50 8 1154 14 

60 2 754 BH 

70 X 3 — 


1 3 6 

4 7 10 

13 14 — 


Lonrho 

(*213) 


Series Aup Nov Mar Aug Nov 


200 12% 28 34 2* 8 10 

218 2% 17 — ? 13 — 

238 1 9 — 25 28 -L 

240 12 - - 34 

255 % 4* — 44 48 — 


Series Aua Nov Feb M Nov Feb 


Tr 11%% 1991 100 254 2»w — >ib »n — 

(■E1W) 108 »w 1» »’>• * 1* 1* 

110 ■« - « 1 "n 2X 3 : 


TM7«%C3/tJ7 114 4)4 S’fi — ** J - 

(H18) • 116 « 4*» 554 * 1* » 

118 1 3 1 ie 4»» 3% 

120 *•* 2*»' 354 2h* 416 

122 54 1H 2*« 3X »j. 5K 

124 '» IH - M 6Jt - 




Aug 3apc 

Oct 

Nov 

Aug sept 

Oct 

Nov 

FT-SE 

1525 

TO 

110 

125 

140 

2 

7 

14 

18 

index 

IbbO 

TO 

TO 

105 

179 

4 

1856 

22 

32 

IZF-vil 

1575 

45 

70 

87 

104 

10 

to 

32 

40 


1«0 

27 

55 

73 

ss 

18 

TO 

42 

b2 



■ 12 

40 

TO 

— 

28 

46 

63 

Mi 


1650 

4 

P7 

47 

— 

■ 4b 

65 

62 



1875 

2 

14 

28 

— 

70 

75 

to 

— 


Angwl 15, 1968 . Twel contracta 20847 . Cs8s1S6a2. Putt 5128,.’ . ’Vndariyios securihr prit*. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


The market stayed very 
quiet yesterday. Period rates 
showed little change on bal- 
ance. Day-to-day money also 
showed tittle variation. It 
opened on 10-9% per cent and 
showed no further change until 
nud-aftefnooa, when it besots 
to fluctuate narrowly. After 
10-9 per cent; swiftly followed 
by 11-10 per cent, it reverted to 
about 10 pear cent and was still 
there at the dose. 


Clearing Beaks 10 
Flnanca House 10 


Overnight Higtr 10 Low 914 
Weakftwfcfl 0 - 


Trtaaiy 8 

fmrSS 9" 


‘IroS 9K 
3mrtft 9*i* 3 moth S*i* 


. (Discount 1M 

lmn1h9“i*« B n 2mnth9"»fl»‘w 
3 ninth 954-9**» 6 man 9>i»4K 

Trade Btts(Dtecoie>t%) 

Imth 10 7 !* 2mrth 10 *k 

3rmah 10)6 Cmnth 9 m m 

Interbank (%) 

Overnight open 10 dose 10 
1 week 10-9% 6mnth9«OK 

1 mnth Siwah 9"ta-9% 

3mmh9S6-0X 12mh9X«6 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 9X 7 cteys « 

Imnth 


9k 
Smrrtfi 9)6 


3rrmth 916 
12mth 956 


, nds^ 

1 mrth lOJt-lO 2mnth 109-10 

3 mnth 10)4-10 Bmnth 1054-954 

Bmnlh 10 ’+-956 12mth 91L066 

Starting CDs 

1 imah 9 lfc i*9®ia 3 mnth 95C-OK 

6 mrth 9V9H 12 mth 954-9)6 

Defer CO. f%) 
imnth 62M.15 
6 mrth 6.15-6.10 


3mmh 6.15-6.10 
12 rath 8.154.10 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6)fr8»M 
Smrth S’tfrS'w 


7 days W e 4 7 w 
3 m«h 456-4)6 
French Franc 
7 days 7)4-7 
3 ninth 7 9 »7 , w 
Quill Franc 
7 days 156-1)4 
Smmtl 4)6-414 
Yen 

7 days 4*te4'Si. 
3 man 416-4)6 


CM 6*** 

1 mrth 854-656 
Smntfa 6 * * 6'w 

cal 44 

1 mrth 456-4)4 
6nsah-4*i*47is 
cat 756-6% 

1 mnth 7)6-7 
6 mnth 7 , w7*is 

caH 256-156 

1 mrth 4)4-454 
6 mnth 4)6-4X 
cat • 4%4V 

1 mrth 456-4X 
6 mnth 4"i«-4 # a 


GOLD 


GolUS377^p-37BJ)p 



ECGD 


totaL The group says it has not 
received any approaches, de- 
spite weekend speculation 
that Hanson may be ready to 
launch a £400 nriflion lad. The 
group is currently capitalized 
at £312 million. In 1984, the 
group demerged its North 
American interests. 

Meanwhile, shares of Han- 
son Trust hardened 3p to 
178p, still drawing strength 
from last week's sale of the 
SCM paint division to IQ for 
SS80 rniOioo (£388 million^ 
Dealers take tire view that tire 
deal should be good news for 
both companies. IQ, now the 
world's biggest supplier of 
paint, dipped 5p to £10.09. 

The market is also pleased 
with Dee Corporation's at- 
tempts at diversification. It is 
paying Reed Executive £20 
million for Medicare, the high 
street chemist chain. Medicare 


is the fourth laigest chemist 
chain in the country with 
about 50 shops throughout 
southern England which last 
year made pretax profits of 
£527,000. 

Earlier this year, the highly 
acquisitive Dee pakl over 
£600. million for tire Fine Fare 
supermarket chain from Asso- 
ciated British Foods and fi- 
nanced the deal with a vendor- 
placing. Dee has spent about 
£1 billion ou acquisitions so 
for this year. Reed responded 
to the sale with a leap of 35p to 
385p. Dee's shares closed 2p 
higher at 263p. 

Oil shares opened in a 
confident mood following the 
news that the Soviet Union 
had stopped selling crude ofl 
on the open market and was 
seeking some form of co- 


• There could be an offer 
of increased terms today for 
Barrie Investment & Fi- 
nance, the financial services 
and machine tool group, 
currently the target of a £17 
million ted from rival 
Bcstwood. The new terms may 
include a more attractive 
cash alternative that may find 
favour with Mr Geoffrey . 
Suckling, the chairma n , ami 

the rest of the Barrie 
board. 


operation with tire Opec mem- 
bers. But prices closed below 
their best levels with investors 
still only too aware of tire 
impact lower oil prices are 
having on the producers. 

Britoil, Shell, Uftramar and 
Tricentrol have all reported 
lower profits in recent weeks. 

BP led tire way higher, still 
making the most ofiast week's 
renewed support in the wake 
of Guinness's placing of its 
18.8 m ininn shares in the 
company. The price rose 9p to 
61 Dp, after 61 3p and now 
stands£p shy of the year's high 

Britofl continued to rally 
from its recent poor figures, 
adding 7p to 130p, 

The merchant banks were 
also a dull market Recent 
speculative buying at 
Guinness Peat appeared to be 
evaporating with the price 
losing an eany lead to dose 5p 
lower at 88p. Kteinwort Ben- 
son slipped Sp to 790p and 
renewed selling left the recent 
newcomer, Morgan Grenfell 
4p off at 436p. Only Merany 
international, 5p higher at 
355p and Brown Shipley, a 
similar sum dearer at 475p, 
made any headway.- ~ - 

Blue Circle, which, has 
borne the brunt of recent 
nervousness over imports, ral- 
lied 12p to 538 p. There was 
also support for Rugby Port- 
land, up by 4p to 1 


COMMENT 


Brewers get back to 
business as usual 


Whatever hopes the brewers had that 
ministers would veto the reference of 
the beer tie to the Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission, the investiga- 
tion is to go ahead. But the Commis- 
sion has two years to report. More 
immediately, John Elliott of Elders 
IXL is still breathing down Allied's 
neck, his Australian rival. Alan Bond, 
has ambitions and Lord Hanson has 
Courage on the market for anyone 
eager to pay a fancy price. 

It is not a moment when the big 
brewers can afford to sit back and do 
nothing for a couple of years. That is 
especially the case for the odd-man- 
out, Scottish & Newcastle, which is 
tagged as the smallest of the nationals, 
but, in terms of market capitalization, 
might equally be called the largest of 
the regional brewers. 

After the problems trying to buy 
Matthew Brown, S&bTs Alick Rankin 
must have felt his Luck had changed 
when the Farr family approached 
him. They had spent £25 million 
turning their Home brewery in Not- 
tingham into one of the most modem 
in the country, but that did no good to 
their balance sheet. The price agreed 
reflects its tied estate and brewery 
assets rather than its profit. 

The bid represents old-style brew- 
ery thinking as much as new. S&N 
notes happily that Home at present 
buys in all its lager and S&N is 
thinking of brewing its own brands in 


Nottingham as and when demand 
calls. The move neatly extends Mr 
Rankin's territoiy south.But Home 
ales have a good traditional reputa- 
tion and their Robin Hood logo might 
well travel easily round the country. 

S&N is not reckoning to abandon 
its 30 per cent stake in Matthew 
Brown, which can be reactivated at 
the end of the year. The Monopolies 
Commission go-ahead more im- 
portantly declared open season on the 
smaller brewers when the big boys 
have been adjusting their strategy to 
the real ale revival. Grand Metropoli- 
tan bought Ruddles strictly for the 
reputation of its beer, but the Home 
deal is a reminder that other moves 
can now be contemplated. 

Which brings us back to the 
Commission. The reference was all 
about beer prices in pubs. But the 
brewers' failure was in developing 
brands. The criticism applies less to 
S&N, the king of the free trade. The 
great estates tended to push captive 
customers into the latest high-margin 
product and concentrate on produc- 
tion. The end result is rather like what 
happened to the old television manu- 
facturers who thought they had tied 
up the market through their rental 
chains. The pub chains are now full of 
European, American and Australian 
brands, developed where there was no 
tie, and real ales from companies that 
never got round to going modern. 


Preparing for the challenge 


British Airways' new ploy to attract 
more passengers is the £6.5 million 
Concorde Challenge. By correctly 
drawing a cross to marie the exact 
position of a Concorde at a particular 
moment on its flight to New York, a 
whole Concorde is yours for a day. 

The choice of destination is apt 
Transatlantic traffic has still to re- 
cover completely from the Libyan 
raid and will inevitably leave its mark 
on this year’s profits, the last (barring 
further delays) before privatization. 
Thechainnan, Lord King, will be 


Cathay Pacific, and BA. Kleinwort is 
clearly encouraged by BA's manage- 
ment strategy. 

Productivity comparisons are also 
heartening. Looking at the available 
tonne kilometre per employee. BA 
ranks half-way up the group and well 
behind Northwest, JAL, Singapore 
Airlines. Cathay Pacific, and a host of 
others. This is despite the large staff 
cuts since 1981, which reduced em- 
ployee numbers from 53,600 to below 
40,000. 

However, when the cost of such 


playing on every ounce of goodwill in employee is looted ai in relation to 
Downmg Street, after BA’s decision to * e ou, P“ l they generate, the rankings 
stick witL Rolls-Royce, to twist arms f han ^ <h*matiraUy. Air India' now 
and ensure a preelection sale. “P 5 hst. vnth.BA ahead of all the 

, , _ big North American and European 

In the latest accounts, he says carriers. Lower wages among Asian 
privatization is an “essential step carriers give them an enormous 
towardsreahzingthefuUpptential of advantage. But BA’s salaries also 
BA. He also claims that his org anize- emerge as relatively low — ■ at around 

half to a third of their European 
counterparts. 

However, an analysis of overall 
operating costs per available tonne 
kilometre shows BA well down the list 
again.. Longer distances and larger 
aircraft appear to give Asian and other 
carriers an important cost advantage. 


>reai 

effic 


tion is now one of the more efficient, 
profitable and productive airlines in 
the world — something that is put to 
the test by Kleinwort Grieveson’s 
analysis of world airlines this month. 

The review, based on 1984-85 
results, makes mixed reading. On a 
straight forward ratio of revenue to 
expenditure, three airlines stand out Clearly, BA will not enjoy one of the 
ahead of the flock: Thai International, top share ratings of the airline world. 


Fixed Bale Starting Export Finance 
Some iv Average reference rate tor 
interest period July ?. 1986 lo 
August 5. 1986 indurtve; 10.009 per | 







UNAUDITED HALF YEAR RESULTS FOR 1986 


INCOME BEFORE INTEREST AND TAXATION 

UP 87% 


Net sales 

1986 

$000 

38,256 

1985 

$000 

32,524 

Pro Forma 
1986 
$000 

38,256 

Income before interest and 
taxation 

6,411 

3,419 

6,411 

Interest 

1,808 

1,967 

133 

Income before taxation 

4,603 

1,452 

6,278 

Taxation 

276 

75 

377 

Net income 

4,327 

1,377 

5,901 


Proposed dividend per share 


0.75 cents 


Income before interest and taxation up by over 87%, reflecting con- 
tinuing improvement of operating efficiencies 

Over 100 new stores anticipated for current year, with around 80 
opening in the second half 

Store openings planned for Australia, Japan, Canada and United 
Kingdom 

First store on United States military base opened in Japan. Signifi- 
cant opportunities for opening similar stores worldwide 

In 1986 Jessica's to open five stores within stores on test basis with 
Sears, Roebuck 

The Directors are confident that the pro forma profit forecast of 
not less than $18.5 million (equivalent to earnings per share of 
11.6 cents) wifi be achieved. The outlook for the future growth 
of the business is excellent 

The fun Interim Statement will be sent to shareholders. 




-J 


/ 








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133.7 142J 

225.7 2*46 
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5*75 5835 

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1419 151 1 
30 3 313 
865 921V 
1210 1283 
163 0 1949 
666 T0 1 


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0444 *58144 
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Comm ft Gen re 1*4 r 154 0* +0 7 332 
DO A4GAT 191 4 204 B +1 Z 332 

CcmpoimS Growm 4016 4337 +2 8 3 28 

O+WWI GrtJwtn 3153 5405 -13 306 

Cc nc 183 I 190 9V +3 1 612 

Dvcenp Fund He 4S49 429 1 *23 5 M 

Do A«um Ell 97 1658 -0 06 5 14 

Eu-rneen ft General 2135 2263 -05 0« 

Be Accum 255 1 2704 -06 0.74 

E*»a r« me 3195 22+7 +14 570 

Dc *syi «72i 5M5 +26 5.70 

Far Easieci He 126* I3S3V +34 151 
Dr Acsutn 15*6 1654# +4 0 I Si 

F-W 01 bft me 2407 Z551 +06 262 

00 Acs 3782 4009 +09 262 

General meame 6095 6416s -+5 + IS 
DOACCuet £120 1380 +009 4.(5; 


£1201 1264 +OOT 360 
13DJ 137.6 *06 1.30 


OWKIMER TWST MAfMOEMENT 
68 Cannon Sneei. London EC*N ur 
MJHUja 01-236 3885jG/7;MlfO 
inumanoiiai Grown 1413 1511 

.HcanHB Grown 600 642 

wartime Ree 839 898 

American Grown 327 34 n 


HENDERSON AOMWSTRATK9N 

Premwr UT ArSm+nwratlon 5. Reylmgn Bo. Hunon 

Brentwood Esse* 


Secs 01 Amer Tm 2165 2306 


BUCXMASTCH HANAggaai T 

The suck E Wu nga London EG2P ZJT 

01588 2868 


FS MWESTMOrT MANAGERS 
19a Wl George 3 l Gusgow GZ i 
0*1-332 3i32 


4*5 Asset V3M 223 8 238.3 U 

Gm Grnwth 378 394 21 

SnulerCos 1170 124 6V 2i 

2nd SmaBflr Cos 1519 167.8 2/ 

ReeowyTiiBi BOB 859 2J 

Mel Un ft Cmdly B02 35 4 21 

O seas Earonas 1798 191S 31 

TedmglMV TM 86.7 923 Oi 

income Exams! 123.7 1311# fti 

Eremoi Smaaer Co s 226 4 242.1 Z e 

USA c.«mpi Trust 3** 7 365.4 1 1 

ARBUT1WDT SECUWT1ES 
131. F cowry Pavement. London EC2A 1AY 
01«8 SS76 01-280 85*0/1/2/3 
CwxtHl Grower Inc 584 S24 +06 1 1 

Do Accum 65 2 69 7 + 07 U 

Eastern ft lira 1461 1562 +ft7 01 


General He t*) 
Do Acaan (41 
Income Find pi 
Da Aeon (3) 
Ing He (2) 

Do Accun (21 
Smaller Inc (5) 

1 Do Accum (5) 


2009 220.7 
33S.1 3528 
903 KM.8 
1743 1BU 
1277 133.4c 
1B89 1764 
E11J2 1193 
El 1.95 1Z71 


Balanced Gtn Inc 
Do Accum 
Income Gdi He 
Da Accum 
Service Co s me 

Do Accum 


439 4ftA 
449 47.1 
409 429 
429 449 
46.1 512 
489 519 


CSFUNDMANAOERB 


12s. KW1 Hoaam. London wav SPY 
01-2421148 


01-2421148 
CS Jeeen Fund 


CANNON HWO MANiOCTS 


Do Accum 652 £87 

Eastern ft IM 1461 1562 

DO &*-> WHtWrawal 7B3 63.7 

Finance ft PrOOeitV 647 01 


1. Otynw Wey. Wembley. HAS 0MB 
01-90? 0878 

Growth 2759 29398 


FIDELITY HTBWATIONAL 
Rner Walk. Totonon. TW9 1DY 
9732 3M222 

Amencsn 1050 11U 

Amr Equey Hcome 32.7 35.04 

Amer Spncat Sna 499 534 

Fat Eaw inc 352 375 

Gat ft Ftaed Ha 3i9 325 

Growth ft income 95 * 1021 


Gm 6 R*m income *8.1 506* *<M aa 


Do Accum 817 069* +02 698 

Eflurty income 73 B 7S5V +04 496 

Do Accum 1750 187 IV -09 4.96 

H>gn View income 73 4 785 +0 1700 

Dc Accum 162 S 2098 +03 703 

kb inxme 77 6 829 -0 4 219 

Do Accuti 79 7 852 -03 219 

Do f. Wnnonvf 720 77 0 -0J 2 19 

Menaced Fund 63 a G64 . - 

Preference Hcame 296 316# . 983 

DC' Accum 95 6 102JV -0 T 983 1 

Smaller Coe Accum 1269 136.7 +01 1 7* 

wora Pvny SHare 9 6 i02v . an 


Far East 
Norm American 
Global 
Etfloroan 
Japan 


2759 2915V +11 39* 
3210 3415V +17 384 
215.1 2288 +48 Q2B 

152.0 161.7 -03 057 


49 A 525# +06 150 


509 54.1 
61.0 645 


Fat Eaw ine 352 375 

Gat ft Fired ire 31.2 325 

Growth ft income 95 4 1021 

Japan Speoel SBs *75 SOB 

Japan Thru 148.8 1586 

Managed K Tr 1*5.7 1EC.1 

Mar fiffionio EtXrty 79 2 852 

PMaeiKnal Gttt 326 3*64 

Souti East Asa Tst 30.9 326 

Special Sts 162.1 17*4 


+«i a«3 
.. *67 
+02 1.7* 

-ai a?* 
.. *01 
+01 486 
-02 .. 
+23 .. 
+04 001 
+6 * 533 
-03 2*4 
+06 052 
+19 192 


□277-21 7338 
SpaoN See He 
Do Amen 
Recwaiy Tutsi 
Copeai Qmrih Inc 
Do Accum 
Income Assets 
Finanoal Trust 

Income ft Growth Inc 

Do Accum 
^ = Tn,a 
ssTcSr*- 

OR Thai 

Fw*d HHreU TruST 


Em SnvBsr Cos 
Japan Tnret 


Peofce Smew cos 
Smgwwra ft usury 


figure UAlff+n IlminaiO IT 
po BwTaiBwi Marta London EC3 7Ja 
01-621 0011 


FLEMING (ROBERT] 

a. Cnnav Sa London EC3A BAN 

01-838 5858 


Capital 3622 3865 

Hcorna Z7U 2503 

Norm Ameren 2806 3106 


Amencan Eaempl £3542 3819 
Japan Exempt £471? *38.6 
Am Property tr SI 07890 4 

Property Trust £20329 




Jjwm^&empi (51 


POTOOUO Tr UK 774 KL24 +19 1.58 

pprrioko Tm Japan iffij.8 1iZ7# -03 090 

FC+TtOkO Til US 702 72.7V 1 1B . 

Pprtfekd Tsi Europe 1156 1196V -OB 0.M I 
PprttokC Tel HA *27 442# *02 0.10 I 


CATHI ALIBI 

1. King WMOam 3L EC*N 7AU 
01023 8314 

GN That 101 A 1003# -031195 


FRAMUNGTON UWT RUNAG0O9IT 
3. Lonaan Wei BUM. London WeS. London 
EC2M 5NQ 


OoBelTecnEx ® 

Pecec Exempt IS) 


♦11 IBS 
+15 102 
*98 299 

+04 144 
+02 144 

+03 359 
+10 25' 
+09 3 01 
+1.7 301 
+09 499 
+08 *70 
+0.8 5.02 
+02 933 
.. 931 
-0.1 998 
+04 001 
*03 aoi 
+02 MS 
+02 098 
+06 206 
.. 3.12 
+1.4 1.46 
+1.8 DB6 
-01 034 
+oi am 
-a« am 

+08 077 
*0.1 260 
-17 038 
-a* aoi 
-1.1 093 
+06 <96 
.. 176 
-02 l.lfl 
+22 051 
-0.1 107 i 

-as am 
+09 201 


Qc ft fixed mt 
to Acewn 
Ora 'r-esme 
Do Accum 
teen items me 
Do Actum 
mt flrowm me 
Da team 
in nc k 
Japan ft Qen me 
Do Accum 
Japan SmaBR Acc 


255 1 Z704 -0 6 0.74 

2195 22+7 +13 570 

*722 5003 +28 5.70 

126* 1353# +34 15i 
15*6 1654# +40 151 
240 7 Z55 1 +06 26? 

3782 *009 +09 262 

8095 641 6s -*3 * IS 
£1263 1280 +009 4.15 

S' 0 6*1# +02 912 
94 1 98 B +03 9 19 
254 379# -C.l 260 
3*8 404# -02 280 
312* 3313 +1 1 546 

846 3 9M 5 -2 B 546- 

7S4J 7999V +33 137 
£1214 !2B7 +0C6 157 

+02 520 


Japan Growm 
European Growth 
UK Grown 
Pac*c Growth 
rbgtl Income 
Procacoi Income 
Do Accum 


BU at 

327 350 
820 87* 
865 712# 
515 573 
SSO 589 
330 354 
533 565 
967 1029 


Atrencan me 
DO fleam 
•uWrjun Inc 
Oo Accum 
Europe#* He 

DO wa i 
On ft Face He 
00 ACC»m 
GPU Fund me 
Do Kut 
Inc o me 
Da Aceun 
m3 income 
00 Accum 


1310 1401 
13*2 1435 
53 B 64 3# 
65.0 898# 
1208 1289 
1239 132 J 
545 571* 
830 883V 
305 326 
319 341 
1716 1S3 5# 
3829 4093# 
1150 1229 
1589 ;ns 


. 0S4 

•0 I 064 
+1 2 ISS 


Emr'V 

European Scwc San 
C«h» m«me 

Finanbn 
r*4 mcumo 
0.+d uvsme 
Do ittum 


+1 J CM 

•to on 

-01 BU 
-01 8 55 


Japan 

nukjj ft^Smsaoaro 


PEARL TRUST 

252. H4n Homtyn, werv 7EB 
01-005 8441 

Growm Fund UK 9i 0 96 s 

Do Accum 1388 145J 

mcontfl Fund 119.9 1276 

hi8 6au4YH9 1388 1*21 

Do Accum 1318 142 I 

Una Thai He 1270 135 I 

Do Accum 2200 2341 


Jap SmW Cot Ac 1*7 * 157 ft 
Smgacoro S Mala* Wg 
Do Accum 589 809 

5mafi« Cas lac 1292.UBI 
DoAMure 135 S I44J 


•08 209 
+09 209 
+0.8 3.71 
+06 126 
+00 1 28 
+06 285 
• 15 28b 


500051 SUB nc 
Da Acsom 
Tokyo Fund ne 
00 Accum 


569 809 
1292- UBT 
1355 1*49 
1013 HO* 
lO’O 114 4 
754 9 2512 
737 5 25*0 


643? 8580 +<2.9 004 
904.7 963.5 +13.9 004 


PCflMTUALUWT TRUST 

<8 Han Street. Henwy On Themes 

049< $76868 


US SfluJhr CO! Ac MB S?^ 
LAI EtMtY He 1009 1079V 

Jfe«curo 1M7 1878# 

Recovery 766.7 0200# 

FWitA-rvaOianW 563 7 WM 

Ertro weome 59.0 (01# 

Fv East Gm Acomr $60 598 
ErorSc K? M5# 

C %ew Sn* Co 498 532 


-C2 202 
• l? $0< 

•25 S.CI 
+19 046 
*2 7 045 
+04 ON 
•oB aw 
•or oo* 

♦oj i ift 
+09 1 16 
♦0 $ 098 
+08 098 
+29 021 
*25 021 
+0 3 OjW 
+34 335 
+13 3 35 
.. 29* 
3 re 
•Of 712 
+i I OW 

♦ai 712 

03B 


Do ttvmwro 
Prnf 5MTO Fd 
UA Ca»M 
5f«tdi SJt 
T+Cimoksor 

wtyw income 
norowm Cjobi 
E iartv E* W 4 
Do Amim I3> 


123 7 1120 
iiU.i If! 5 

lira 1206# 

2W< 283 5 
10$: DOM 
•wA *-94 
1 22.0 u)8 * 
81 ■ 965 
1*23 1t»J# 
23 0 244 
933 104 4# 
1710 >2*.9 n 
17 5 189# 
TOO 75. i# 
Mt GST# 
45 2 481 
5T9 M.fi* 
<450 :55 '# 
70 2 837 
I4 T I 1814 


•13 41? 
*4 2 hhf 

-2* IO» 
•32 TOP. 

130i 
•Pi ic 

«si. 

•C: “to. 
m!3 IS f 
+JI l*T 
.’If 
2IF 


THORNTON UNIT MANAGERS LTD 
Part Htfcso lb Fmssutf CRsa LSrBqn 
7DJ 


01-638 4781 
Far East ft Gen 
.lir m S Gen 
f*jn Atn#r ft CSen 
oaow Toth 
Tupir 

UA ft GMn 


57 8 812 
MS MO 
50 4 536 
MO 5KJ 
!»6 623 
MS 476 


•OS p» 

!S?SS 


•05 OJT 
088' 
♦07 OBI" 
.♦03 IftJ- 


Japon SmaBer Acc 9*0 iKi +0 7 0.0 1 
ucuno ft Gan me S649 me +28 4 14 
03 Acnm £14.06 1450 +008 4.14 

Reeawnr Fund nc 3569 3854# +05 3.40 


Da Accum *612 5003V +12 340 

Second Gen me 704 I 7483 +21 373 

DO Arnan £1389 14.73 +4.04 3.73 

SiiUSw CM toe 6*10 6325V +25 29* 

Da Accum £1011 1052 +004 254 

TruRea Fund He 4*93 4807 +1G441 

Do Accum £1247 1377 +004 441 

Cnvocne be CD in 8 .1089 

Do Accum (3) 3808 • ..1089 

Cnonkma me O) 3773 38 1 7V .. 690 

Co Accum 63 999510095# . 558 

Pension Exempt (If *59 * *80.1 +103 457 

NAAOFInc/31 375 V ..038 

Do Aeeum (31 *603 • . . bjjb 


HH GriMh 
Broome 

woridiwie Rac 
Amer GtowH 
km Emera Co s 
Far 6jKt Grwtn 
European Gin 


272.0 291 9 
1ST 8 201 1 
1494 180* 
7QJ 7S5 
80S 866 
773 83.0 
598 643 


SOMTTAfl ASSET MANAGEMENT 
3308 Gracnchuron Si LPfldsn EC3V OAX 
01-623 5776,-87(1 


81 UNIT TRUST MANAGERB 
2 Si UJiY 4*4. Ltnwn EC3A 80P . 

01 92&J3U " 

SdiaScr Get 02ft 688 '+09 OOh 


UK Eauty Inc 
Do Acc 
Euro Tsi He 
Oo Acc 
Gtooei Gtn me 
Do ABC 

Managed Exampi 


238 253# -0* $21 
23 H 2»S -0* 521 

27.2 28S# -O! I8D 
372 389# -0? IM 
29? 31-0 -01 100 

293 31 1 -01 100 

1195 124.8 .. 4» | 


HIM IMT TRUST MANAGERS 

11. Dovdnsnra So. unmi EC2M *vn 

Di-258 92905262 


PROUFK UNIT TRUSTS 
222 BOKmW. UMMlbn EC2 
01-2*7 7544/7 

treematiana/ 1165 12 

- HMt UTOOBW 605 6 

Con. A GJt 96.1 to 

Far Eastern 1900 is 

Norm Amencan 1295 13 

Soma) Ses 688 7 

Tocnrotoar 1092 ll7S 

Ertm income 885 93.1 


1165 1244 -AI 0.93 
605 649 B +04 441 
96.1 toa+v -03 891 
iaao 1994 +os ooo 
1295 139.7 +15 i id 


SCOTTISH EQUITABLE 

28. SI Anmwl SO EdxCMMi 

031-656 9101 

M Hecma Ueos 1474 ittO 

Do Accum 2100 23? 9 


TOUCHE REMNANT 
Mermaid House. A Pudde 
3AT 

01-C46 1280 

AmatcaP Growth 41 7 

Goners) Growm 81 S 

GVbsl Tech 43 l 

income Growth 602 

Income Monthly 475 

Japan Gro-nh 522 

Man Earn He 2*6 

Do Accum 246 

One Qrowm *97 

SmoUr Cos B?5 

Special Cops 731 


Deck. Lonaan LC*v v 


+02 On 

+03 3«r 

•0 3 0 I®' 
+Q6 IV 
*CJ 6jy- 
+'« fciz* 
•07 236, 
+05 336, 
•02 dS_ 
+09 1 9r 

♦tu m* 


688 740a *05 ISS 


Eauty Exempt 
Do aceun 
UK Matvei Fed 
Do Accum 


4055 *258 

5130 536 4 
769 620 
761 8*4 


Japan Ha bwi ro t 1«28 153 i 


Co Accum 1*32 1527 

US SpvooJ Features 66 1 713 
Do Accum 687 719 


+33 3*9 
+4.0 149 
+03 1.90 
+A3 190 
.. 001 
001 
+1.0 OOO 
+1.0 050 


PRUDENTIAL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
01-69 mom WL Mm Essex. K31 201. 
01-478 3377 


SCOTTISH LME DIVESTMENTS 
19. Si Andrews Sa Edraiegn 
031 225 Z711 

UK Equay 1810 1938 

Amencan I486 1590 

Pao+C 1600 2033 

European 341 2 2585 


Gold ft Proems M« **6 *0*c +05 123 


BAOJJE GIFFORO 

3 Onlmias Sl Eondtran 6H3 6YY 
031-225 2561 (Deairai03l-226 60681 
me Ex 122) 4431 4625V 

Japan Ex i*3) 454 4 4735 


mu Ex 122) 

Japan Ex h*3) 

UK E> Ml) 

P sal Pens Ha 
p-sai Pens UK 
&3 Amerce 
5G Energy 
BO income Grwtn 
BO Japan 
BO Tecimomav 


2305 2537 
4*6 0 471.6 
1990 209.6 
1705 181.4 
141 I 1502 
191 0 2032 
2112 224.7 
1420 151 1 


CENTRAL BOMB OF FRANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENOLAM) 

2 Fora StreeL London EC2Y 5AQ 
01-588 ISIS 

kw Fund 3975 

RxAd bit 144.4 

Depoeh 1005 


01-628 5181 
Amer ft Gen me 
Do Accum 


2228 237 OV -3.1 080 
2278 2425# -33 0J0 


Amer Tunumd me 207 8 221 0 


MLL SAMUEL UMTTRUST MANAOBIS 
NLA Town. AOdOCOmpe Rond. Croydon 
01-686 *355 01-628 8011 
Brash Thai UratS 5322 573.7 +105 315 

Cscnw That Lines 975 10*5# +09 271 
Doom That ima 


Do Acaen 
US Scecal He 
Do Aoaxn 
Efxotman Perl Inc 
Do Accum 


*60 500c +05 123 
57 5 61 9V +02 450 
522 67.IV +02 4 56 
ass 920 -ai 097 
867 922 -0.1 097 


Hotoom Equny 
Eixccroen 

HotBorn Comma 
hoAmto non He 
HORXim Htf 
Japanese 
N Amencan 
Hotarn sp« Sits 


3904 *21.6 *24 325 

1009 1072 -03 0 56 

52.7 56 0V +03 0 6* 
857 592 *02 B32 

1012 1076# +06 000 


a COm SH MUTUAL WVESTMPfT 
MANAGERS 

■ 109. Vincent a Glasgow G2 5HN 
041-248 6100 


160.7 1774 
1175 125* 


iw.S 1112c +20 005 


N Amencan 758 BOI . . 025 

Hobom Sdk Sits . 643 684V +04 207 
rarooni UK GmwOi 009 869V +00 2.17 
Moton Gif That 1837 i860 +0.1 248 


UK Sit* Cos Eq i«63 155.7 
Eixopean 2035 2165 


1129 1202 
1859 187-8 


♦IJ 270 
815 

+03 2*1 | 
-TO 1.03 
+04 135 
+31 060 


TYNOALL MANAGERS 
13 Canvnqe Rd. BnRd 
027? T3JMI 

AuMraban 55. 

Do AOC 57 

Cocxisi an. 

Do Accum 558 

Exempt 289. 

Do Accum K5. 

For Eastern 170 

Do Accum IM 

Fro ft Prop 52 

Oo Aceun S3' 

Get Caoui I35J 

Do Accun 1441 

Gut income 1091 

Do Accun 173! 


CHARITIES OFFICIAL INVESTMENT FUM) 

2 Fore SnssL London EC2Y 5AQ 
01-508 tars 

income 384.14 .. 505 

Accum £106701 .. .. 

Deposit 1000 .. 3*5 


Oo Accum 
Caonai tm me 
Do Accum 
Corn ft GO He 
00 Accum 
Extra Inc TM He 
Do Acorn 
Hcome Tron 
Do Accum 
M Gntwtn Fd Inc 
Do Accum 
Japan ft Gen He 
Do Accum 


2150 2232 +19 1.15 

2000 219 0 -02 107 

2470 283.4 -04 107 

872 926V +0.6 342 
1 160 1232 +06 5.42 

153* 1634V +12 421 
1710 TB3BV +12 *51 
1142 1214 -21 428 


1202 1270 
1856 1762 
1842 1950 
932 990 
9*0 1002 


-Zl 438 
-22 4J8 
+0.8 .. 
+60 .. 
+0.4 007 
+0.7 007 


Far East Tram 
FHanoN Trust 
OU Read mt He 
Do Growm 
hkyi Yi tfd Thai 
Income Trust 


1B95 201.6 +0 7 39* 

134.7 143 4# -0.5 DOS 

123* 1340 +1.8 1.14 

363 1 3863 +30 278 

292 30.4V .. 846 

430 464 .. 733 

63.8 87.1 • +0.* 5.25 

015 860 +06 4-71 

1220 13SE7V 221 

3*.7 370# -03 03* 

a ? 327 +0.4 256 

9 195.7 +30 202 

890 95.1 +00 1.49 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25/28 AHarnane Street London W1X 4AD 

O1-491 02S5 

American 474 507 -01 377 

Austrakon (74 136 +0J 30* 

Japan ft Garami m* 127.7V +20 0.17 
rooti Income 455 487 +03 Sfil 

International Trust 802 85 Ow +o* 10* 

krocme Gtn Tm *57 439V +04 396 ! 

Goa ft Fixed Hi 203 210 9.0) I 


CLERICAL MEDICAL IMT THUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow PlaH. BUtf BS2 OJH 
0800 313393 

Amer Growth 235 231 

Equny tkgh Incanw 410 4*0 
European Grown 233 300 


Mommy Hcome Fd 012 834# *03 *.B5 


Rscoiwy 1340 14248 

, Do Accum 1450 15408 

Ewopaan Inc Gi.6 654 

Do Accum BIO 664 

FRIENDS PROVBEIIT MANAGERS 
Ptxtiam End. Drakkig. Sum 
0300 885055 


1340 1424# +04 105 
1450 15*0# +04 185 
61.6 654 +04 am 

BIO 66* +34 004 


Japan Tam Ta 
Natural Rosouroa 
Security Trust 
Smaker Cos 

Spread s*s 


+20 27B 
.. 846 
.. 733 
+0.4 505 
+05 4.71 
221 


MLA UNTT TRUST MANAGEMENT 

99-100. Sarafind Ro. Moxbrons. Kent ME1* 1XX 

06 22 B7+7S1 

HA General 330 349 +31 214 

MLA ireemraonei 55.5 58.8 +08 090 

MLAG41UM 23.7 251V +0 11035 

MLA Hc o me 41.0 *34# +02 510 

MU European 31.1 329 +05 0.75 


QUK.TEH MANAGEMENT COWANV 
ji-45 Gut-mam SL London EC2V 7LH 
01-600 *177 

Quadrant Ganerai 430 1 4575 .. 206 

Oiaoram income 2353 250 4 .. 503 

Qua am nm « 388 a *039 «7.i l.os 

Oiuarani Reeowwy 2552 2729 . . 258 


SCOTTISH IMT TRUST 
29. Cnarione Sa B H O un yi 
031-226 *372 


Do *ccum 
Hcome 
Oo Accum 
Hd Earrengs 


+L2 IM* 
+ 1.4 lir 
+24 ui* 
+42 33T- 
+2l 57lr- 
*4 8 571+ 
+2 8 (UZ_ 
+J0 D17_ 

+0S 337^ 
+0 7 337 s 
♦a2 838-' 
+0 3 838- 
-0* 9*5- 
+07 9*5- 
*00 824. 
+08 B24. 
•li 508. 
+40 508 
+11 265' 


Paafc 

World Growth 


913 97.BC *03 250 


MAHUUFE MANA GEM ENT 
St Geeroes Way. Snvenage Harts 
0*33 350101 


NM ROTHSCHILD ASSET MAHMOEMEHT 
S< 9-nnns Lane, London EBP *OU 
Q1-2B0 5458 


income Fund 
Euopaan 

*: Amer me 
ux Grown 
Extra Inc 


702 751 

37.6 401 
345 363 
442 <73# 
43.3 404 
202 281 
31.0 332 

31.6 33.8 


+00 030 
+05 1 03 
0.16 
+03 488 
-03 DOS 
. 298 
*01 158 
+02 5J7 


UK pRovmorrur MANAGERS 
UK HDUW. Oida SL SakSOury SPT 35« 

07=2 335=42 

UK Eouey 1127 1197V +08 . 

Paokc Basel 1752 1902V +4.1 . - 

N Amer 1182 1235# +02 ... 


General Eoun 303 400# +02 250 
Gut ft Rued tut Gtl 290 315V .. 320 

OR 5 Fixed He 2*5 250 ..928 

tram Saomiee 25.4 ynn . . 230 

Japan Grown 350 370 *0.7 OOO 



GiOOil Mafeat* 

334 3SB 

+01 2.08 

1 

Spsccv Smiaoon* 

39 0 410 

+00 156 

CT 

BARCLAYS UNJCOHN 


1C 

uracom House 2S2 
01-534 5544 

Romlord RO E7 

P' 

Amanca 

B70 9=5 

+03 107 

Aust Accum 

127 S 1360 

+3.1 1.48 

tv 

Dc Heane 

90 8 965 

+20 1.48 

lY 

Capra 

68= 7=£V 


ExemcH Trusl 

4=30 4608 


w 

Ertra tecomo 

74 3 79.0 

+0.4 559 

financial 

=28 S 2*30 


R 

500 

261= 277.8# 

+1 8 3 17 

G«wal 

137.4 1461 

+1.2 315 

IT 

Gxl ft Ruu kK 

539 S6.7V 

. 966 


JJWn ft Gan inc 

178= 1890 

-ai 0=6 


COIWTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
1Hl^Cn«g«Wo. London BC2V 0EU 


FP Eqmy DW 
Do Accum 
FP Fixed bit Dai 
Oo Aacum 
SHwarashp Dal 
Do Accun 


1965 2085 
3275 3*7 6 
1144 12T6 
>301 1384 
172.8 1832 
1702 1801 


■I FUND MANAGERS 

32. Oman Arne a Gen, London SW1H SAB 
01-222 1000 

U9 Bril 5 0*3810 13 4.1 T427 405 120 

ia He PkiS SA3 590 +02 9.70 

in Capital Grown S&.a sao +05 200 

Hnesorieni T« Fhd 880 724 +03 240 


Growm Units 727 773# 

ON ft Farad M 1123 1153 
HWl Income UIMS 112* 119.4 
Higri Yield GOT Wit 57 2 502 
m Grown Urea i3ao <473 
N American UreB 71 0 75 Si 

Far East um 97 4 iaao 

5nHIler Cos Fund 67 3 715 


NC Amanca He 
Do Accum 

hc Ene^y Res 

NC mcome 
NC Japan 
NC Smfkar Cos 


2B16 301.7# 
3004 3200# 
1335 1*20 
875 333 
1970 2105 
1402 149.1 


13aB 147 3 
710 75 S# 
97 4 1035 
67 3 715 


NC Souk Europ Ctfa 1872 199.1 

NC Exempt a £1290 134.0 

NC Amer Prop 81157 1218 

NC Property 1583 1652 


.♦1.7 123 
+1.9 133 
+10 277 
+05 337 
+10 OD1 
+14 138 
+03 032 
-13 852' 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

TO Bo. 902 Ednourgh EH18 SOU 

031-655 5000 

Peg Ea he 3313 2453 

Do Accum 261.1 284J2 


+24 295 
+25 295 


SENTINEL FUNDS MANAG8MEMT 
30. C4y Rd. London EC IT ZAT 
01338 8011 

Amer Teen ft Gen 10* a 1089 
Prone 1989 2128 

Sec Hocune Fnd 167 3 1790V 


SdkoI Seaton dTt<' 1 22i 5 


20. Fencfuxrti SL London GC3 
01-823 8000 


Got Strategy 


Hcome ft Grown 


Ntn Amer Growth 
IM Rocovary 
Smaker Co's 


Do Acc (802 191 7 

Grown Accum 179.1 1B9 < 

income Trust 3284 3*9 8 

Lnsure Trust 794 8*4 

Spinal Snuatons 138.7 1475 

RnconHV 1905 2026 

Trustee Fund 1060 111.0 

Urav Tech Accum 51.8 55 1 

DO Income SI 4 54 6 

WohCwice Trust 1K.1 161 5 

B Tsi in. FuM ACC 3?1 5 3420 

DO UK 20BJ 2215 


1802 1917 +3.1 006 

179.1 1894 +1.1 239 

3285 3*9 8v +25 3 78 

^5 843 +0* 1X1 

138.7 1473 +1.0 245 

<905 2026 +1.1 244 

1060 111.B +05 234 

51.8 55 1# 020 

Sl 4 54 0V ..020 

152.1 1618# +CLB 038 

321 5 3420 +32 344 I 


45= 

400# 

.. =06 

1501 

169=# 

,. 554 

1870 

1770V 

.. 208 

543 

573 

.. 15* 

Z77.B =50# 

.. 257 

38.1 

415# 

.. 473 

1950 20 83 

.. 006 

10=0 

ioaa 

.. 1.13 

1101 

117.1# 

.. 158 

211= 2240# 

. 15E 

57.4 

61.0 

.. 5=8 

Z7S0 2020 

.. 10= 


FUNDS « COURT 

Putt*; TriMM KHBkway WC2 

01-405 4300 


Aon Growth He 
Oo Aecon 
Fund Uw Tst Hc 
fti Accran 


844 68.7V +0.1 1.15 
062 702 +0.1 . 


M2NCAF UNIT TRUST 

Uncom Hse. 252 R cntf o ro Ro. E7 

01-234 5544 

Meneep 1343 1431 


Capital 
Gross He 
High Yield 


3495 3615 
1432 1403 
215.1 2202# 


X VMd He 
Aeeum 

HI Recovery He 
Do Accun 


QT UNIT MANAGERS 

toi Ro a 8 . DMonarva Sa Union EC2M *yj 
01-283 2575 Dealng 01-828 9431 


Japvi Growth He 
Do Acaxn 


GtoM He Ter 57.4 610 

Spacal 5U* Acc 2754 2828 

CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. Woking OUST 1XW 
04882 5033 

H#h Hcome Trust 2395 2562 

Growth Trust 217.3 2323# 

Amnnan Trusl 1294 138.4 


UK Cep Fnd kK 
Do Accun 
Heane Fund 
Pension Exempt 
pttwnational 171.0 T82J -02 0.90 

US 4 General 991 B33 -03 030 

Tech 5 Growth 833 S8A +02 120 

Apen 6 General 273.0 291.0 +48 010 

Far East ft Gen 12*2 1329 +32 0.40 

European Fund 2543 3725 -15 030 

Germany Fund 097 7*8 -02 030 

GARTMORE FUND MANAGERS 
2 81 Mary Axe. London EC3A 8BP 
01-823 1212 Deaino 01-023 5788 Dealng 01-823 

5006 

American Trust #90 053 -0.1 OOO 

Australian Trim 185 103 +04 035 

British Tst Acaxn 553 60.0# +05 131 

DO DM 485 522# +05 131 

ComroodM Share 543 58.1 *03 1.46 

Eiropwm Trust 523 50.1 -01 033 


983 1033# +08 100 
1355 1402 +08 330 ,1 


Do Acaxn 
Smaker Co's He 
DO Aoasii 
UK Eq Growm Hie 
De Accum 


202 213 
255 274 
1204 1325 
2074 2308 
1035 1102 
1090 1141 
1055 1122 
1064 1125 
T611 1705 
2105 2231 


+05 540 
+03 .. 
+0.7 1.80 
+03 . 
-02 000 
-04 .. 
+04 2.12 
+08 .. 


MERCURY FUND MANAGERS LTD 


33, Kmg IM&am SL EC+R 9AS 
01-2802950 


241 295V +02 079 
445 493 +05 .. 


WOrithirfda Tech he 384 41.4# +01 132 


79.6 854 +0.4 600 

1755 154.1# +55 1 80 
171.0 1823 -02 0.90 


CRUSADER UNIT TRUST MANAGERS LTD 


BARING FUND MANAGERS 

PO Box 156. Bechartfiam. Kent BR3 ■ 

01-858 9002 


*83 524 +04 *47 


UK Growth Aeeum *85 51.7 +01 2.43 


Australia 
Easfero 
Eoxiy Hcome 
Europe 
Growth ft Inc 
Japan Speoai 
Japan Sunrise 
First Europe 
Fril Japan 
Fxsl N Amer- 
Fxsi Smauer Cos 


625 668 
54 5 638 
560 602 
136.7 134.7 
616 662# 
1093 1183 
S=3 987 
1110 imo 

97 I 904 
501 535# 
62 5 672 


+07 040 
+07 040 
+03 5.80 
-08 090 
+02 240 
+1 1 040 
030 

-08 080 
+06 030 
. 150 
+03 270 


Do Dim 485 517 +0.1 2*3 

Etxtnean Growth 54 0 375 -04 153 

Pacific Growth 553 59.4 +07 


EFM UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. Mah#e Crescent EdnBumh 
031-226 3492 


Do Acaxn 394 413# +02 

L ft C UNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
Pwnj^Hou&a CaomaK a™. EC2R tbe 


01-280 2360 
Amer Growth 
Do Aeeum 
Amer income 
Do Aceun 
European Growth 
Do Accun 
Gereira) 

Do Accum 
&» ft Farad 
Do Acaxn 
Income ' 

Do Acaxn 


Income Fund 429 3 438.1# 

Inra ma kOntl 6 Gen 240* 2514 


LEGA L ft GB iCRAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 


5 RattaM Read. Brentwood Em 
0277 23483* 


DO Accun 

Xacoxh 

Recovery 
Do flccum 
Exams Dot 
Examp Acaxn 


984 1023 
100.1 106 4 
320 554 
54.4 57 8 
131 5 1398# 
136 0 144 6# 
2394 2545 
389 1 4133 
884 SB 3 
995 1006 
824 875 
903 88 7 
25E.0 2724 
317.5 337.7 
200 * 2131 
205 I 210 1 
195.0 207.4 
20B4 221 « 
228 7 233.7# 
351 1 361 9v 


+01 070 
*01 079 
+02 4 43 
•OJ 4*3 
-03 107 
-05 107 
+10 224 
+15 224 
*01 751 
+0.1 751 
+07 497 
+0.0 4.97 
+1.7 057 
+22 047 
+33 000 
+34 OOO 
*09 2 47 
+1.0 247 
.. 275 
.. 275 


ROWAN UNIT TRUST 

33 King WMam Swat London SC4R 9A8 
01038 5078 

Amencan (41 2330 2370 

Securraws Cq 6800 6814# .. 

H*jti YwH (6) 1685 1730 

Morin (3* 3964 4064V 

fixed tmerost 1720 1734 +15 

Hon marest 1225 1235 . . 1. 

Far EasiGJ 2*05 2+*0 .. . 


.. 154* 
.. 266 
.. 050 
.. 154 
+14 240 
.. 1242 
.. 010 


HOI Growth 31.9 34.1 

Amencan Motors 715 765 

Sms* Co'S 39 2 418 

Japan Tech 6 Gan 1100 1=0 
ntenueonal income SSO 598# 

Exempt 5382 5737 

UK Ganerai 338 358 

Euro Growth 344 365 

Euro Ham 4(4 445# 


+03 03* 
+04 000 
+03 4.15 
+02 149 
.. 018 
+02 031 
+01 167 
+05 000 
.. 50* 
. 225 
+01 181 
.. 03? 
. *40 


VANGUARD TRUST 

65 Hokum Vleaua ECiA 2EU ’ 

General Enquras 01-235 3053 Dealing Una OW' 
235 ?*W 

GrowH He 1872 1992c +14 268* 

Da Aeeum 2723 989 7c +15 285* 

T rwtO 2053 2185# +12 500* 

Aacum =099-2213 +12 SOOw 

Sped# SB 418 443v +03 2*1, 

Do Accum 420 44.7 +0* 241, 

Trustee 1350 143 7 +06 *00_ 

Do ACtun SOS 5 216 7 +08 440* 

Amer ft Gan 61 * 65.* +01 13T* 

Do Accum 614 05.4 +01 137* 

Master Porooto ESI. 75 63 3*v *03= 2 4k* 
Do Acaxn £6201 6360 4032 2.41 + 

Atang Rdfn Axtx (5) 1120 1202# . 240. 

Do Accum 1129 1205 . 7*0. 

Far East ft Gen He 31* 517 +07 059 

DOAcasTI 51.4 54 7 +07 059 


♦08 *00_ 
+08 440* 


+0 1 1 37.* 
+01 137* 


SIMON ft COATES 


wjununr u#r trust managers 

WardHy House. 7. Oewrahtre 3a London I 
01-820 1532 


1. London WaP Bktgs, London ECSM 5PT 
01-588 XU ExtKr 


ROYAL UFE FUND MANAGEMEN7 
now Has Piece. Lwetpeoi (49 ate 
051-227 44?2 


01-580 36*4 Ext : 
Special Ses (5) 


Equity Trust 81.4 8S3 +0* 281 

mu Trust 74.7 79.4V +05 1.32 

Gn Trust as a 28.0 ..021 

US Truer 329 3*9 +01 159 

Paofe Baaai Tet 445 473 +02 029 


STANDARD LIFE 


2 Georoe Sl EdxHuigh EH2 2X2 
Ml 22S 2552 


Do Accun (Mb 


293 271 
204 300 


American Trust 
Far East ft Gen 
Md Growth 
Income Trust 
Japan Growth 
antf Cormnut 
Tactxrottgy 
Austraxe 
UK Trow 
faxoceen Growth 
Hong Kang 


803 =03 +0* 

1103 11BD* *09 

738 785 +07 

<KL0 899 +0* 

137.6 1480 +28 

1104 1103 +18 

337 36= +06 

383 41.2 +09 

1303 1356 +13 : 

504 60 Ov *04 1 

217 SS3 +01 


20 Omen Sl London EC? 

01-920 0311 

Eraav DM 1155 123 2 

Do Aceun 1027 1721 


rural income TluM B9L2 9*4 
Do Aceun 105LB 111.8 


Amenean Trust 
Australian Trust 
British Tst Acaxn 
DOOM 


Com m o d ity Share 
Eixopeen Trust 


Amanean Fixid 725 707 +0.1 218 

Caokai Fund 935 10a 3 +1.4 i.gs 

Grown ft He Fund 1203 1353# +08 443 

High Drat Fund 1067 114.1 *06 552 

■memanonal Fixe) 1965 2105 +00 1.07 

Resoixoes Fund 224 =40 .. 042 


BARRINGTON MANAGEMENT 
10. FancHxcn St London EC3 
01-823 8000 


intematxmai Fixxl 1965 2105 

Resoixoes Fund 224 S45 

Shot jap C01 Rid 374 *00 

Tokyo Fund - 18*2 107.0 


Planned Hv 
European He 
DO Accum 
Ganerai Inc 
Do Accun 
Gil VHka ine 
Do Accun 
ikon Yrak) He 


1310 1394 396 

33.1 97.6 -05 157 

114.0 1201 -1 1 1.S7 

1558 165.4V +13 3d 
2124 2255 +1.8 301 

1138 117.3 +01 9*2 

IBS 5 1804c *01 9*2 
858 OU +06 555 


lExj Amer fg . 

(Ext Japan 131 1183 120 1 018 

lExi Pacific [4] 2331 3032 033 

lExi Smaker J*o (41 =160 225.1 . . O.iQ 

| Enron** 27.0 285 -32 147 

EAGLE STAR UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bom Rood. Oukertum, Ocucasv OLS3 7LO 
02*5 521311 


1475 1528 
1183 1201 
2317 3032 


+08 1.07 
.. 042 
-02 . 
+35 013 


Eixopeen Trust 523 501 
Exn Income Hurt 475 5i5 
Fdr Eastern Trim 1402 150* 
Rxkd HHrast Fund 26= 28.1# 
GU Tnas Z7.I 285 

GUUU Fund Aecun 101.7 1935 
Do ore 173= 1843 

Gdd Share Trust 125 137 
Hadgad American 300 33.1 


+03 146 
-01 053 
+05 5=2 

+u 000 

-. 072 
+02 031 
+07 010 
+05 0.19 
+ 0.1 20 * 
- 0.1 010 


Du Acaxn 
Do Income 
EiXDPun 
Fa Easton 
Gk Trust 


Int Managed 
Natural Ffe 


Natural Has 
N Amencan Trust 
UK Speoel sra 


=70 I 

2805 

.. 201 

4=2= 4515 

.. =01 

597 

630V 

.. £09 

732 

780# 

.. 1=4 

1154 

123.4 

.. 001 

780 

835 

.. 851 

810 

87.0 

.. 057 

537 

574 

.. 10B 

777 

83.1V 

.. 1J«9 

635 

E&M 

.. 101 


Do Aceun 
US Grown 
Do Accum 


1055 1115 
578 813 
507 825 


*04 152 
+08 152 
+05 447 
*1.1 4.47 
+03 095 
+03 005 


STEWART. IVORY UNTT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

48. CAalMMS Sa EMBuidi 
031-226 3271 


WAVERUV A89IT MANMCWNr 
12 CM»rk*» Sa. BanOurgh 
031-229 1551 


MIDLAND BANK OROUP UN IT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

CouttwoocH».S4wrSi Head. SnaihsidSi 3RD 
07*2 769842 

Craesl Hcome 753 809 +07 244 

60 Accum 1034 110= +10 2*4 


ROYAL LONDON UWT TRUST MANAGER! 


Do Accum 1034 110= 

Ccm m eoty ft Gan 1072 114 4 
Ds Accum 151= 181 = 


LLOYDS BANK IMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Rega t r on OpL Goraig-By-Sea. iKraeg. w 
Sussex 


. H0n Income Trust 1302 1401# +09 551 


' Haig Kong Trust 207 305 
kwoma Fund- 733 705# 

Hsixanca AgancHe £4062 5017 
Japan Trust 1573 167.4 

Managed Exempt 2705 282= 

O* ft Energy Tran 32a 3*9 
Speoai Sxs That 025 902 
UK Smlr C"s ftxc TM 70.7 7S5 


1707 181.7 

Japan income 264= =705 +40 0=2 

DO Accum 2801 2B03 +4.0 0=2 

N American Sic *8 7 529 -32 OST 

Do Accum 57 8 81= -0 1 057 

Paoic income 137 1 1*35 +10 0=1 

Do Accum 15«4 1619 +1.1 0=1 

Soar Co 5 Hc 793 64 4 +0.4 1 73 

Du Accum 910 100 0 +05 1.73 

BRITANNIA UNIT TRUST 
74-78 Rnsouy Pavement London EC2A 1JD 
01-sea 7777 OoxfcffOI-KM 0478/9 UoneyOxm 
O8CO-01O-J33 

Grown Gil 59 6 605® 041 

Uffi PoCOrixy 10=5 1053 406 271 

Smaito Go's 139= 1405V +02 131 

UK Grown 37 7 40= +03 216 

E*»a HC 55 6 58.7# +06 7.6* 

G*!_ _ 20 3 278 +0 1 756 

me i Growth 1928 2007 +2= 431 


UK Batmcnd He 803 720 +05 287 

Do Accum 094 740 +05 =83 

UK Grown Accum 821 B8E +07 1.72 

UK High He me 84= 80S +03 5.16 

N American Accun 003 70.7V +05 1 09 

Far Eastern Accun 1045 1115# +15 000 
European Accun 805 802V -02 078 

UkM ft FI he 545 501 +01 027 

CH Accun 581 505 803 


GOVETT (JOHN) UMT MANAGEMENT 
WHchensr Haa. 77. London WU. Loodon EC2N 
IDA 

01-588 8820 

HN Grown 81= 008 +03 150 

American Oawti 834 801# +0= 091 

Amencan He 888 735 . . 543 

European Growth 2240 2305 -0.1 0=5 

Goa 0 Marts 350 907# .. 1.78 


0*44 450144 
. BNoncad 
Do Accum 
Energy Ml 
DO' Acaxn 
Extra Steorne 
DO Accun 
German Gm He 
Do Acaxn 
Income 
Do Accum 
UW Tech 
Do Aceun 


1803 1029 +1.<t 317 

3215 3*33 +24 117 

505 545# +04 234- 
500 605# *04 23* 
153 8 1B4.4 +25 5 23 

+45 329 


Exn H*pi He 
Do Accun 
Gn 6 FUM me 
□O Accum 
Mai Yield 
DoAcaxn 


Japan Growth 
Do Acaxn 


Do Accun 
N Amer A Gen 
Oo Acaxn 
Prate Bosh 
D o Acaxn 


2778 2005 +45 5=9 

895 733 -0.8 007 

590 737 -06 057 

2656 2845 +28 455 

52=5 558.1 +5.4 455 

1839 1965 +14 027 

19=1 205.4 +15 0=7 

885 0*9 -03 052. 

89.1 95= -03 002 

10=8 1099# . . 090 

111.0 1107# -01 050 

1355 14*5 *22 059 


Do Accum 
Japan 0 Paoic 
Do Accum 

N American he 
DO Accun 
Euro Gtn He 
Do Accun 
Smaker Cos He 
Do Accum 


753 809 +07 244 

1034 110= +1 0 244 

1072 114 4 -08 3.10 

151=181= -II 310 
50= 620 +03 777 

67 B 723 +03 777 

54 0 S72 . . . 895 

895 935 095 

1522 1(5=3 +05 534 

2585 =75.7 +14 534 

1050 175 BV +09 279 


Royal London Horae, Cc wu e w r C01 IRA 

rate 5761 15 


rate 576115 
Amencan Grown 
Cape# Accun 
Gxt Incoma 
High Income 
income 6 Growth 
Japan Growth 
Spacal Sna, 


American Fund 
Do Accum 
Do WHhdrawal 
Ausmun Fund 
Do Accun 
Bra* Fund 
Do Accun 
Euopaan Raid 
Do Acaxn 


894 B5=# 079 

1708 ISO 1 +08 217 

501 59.1# +04 073 
81 1 863c +04 455 
005 1002# +07 427 
000 105.x +15 055 

1007 1100 +07 133 


Japan Fund 
Do Accum 


Do Aceun 
Stotts PPP 


2257 2405 
2524 2701 
1504 1889 
1001 1007 
1018 1086 
9990 8383 
8079 8606 
3030 3250 
3212 3423 
347 0 3705 
349 5 3724 
169.4 17&4 


Australian GoM 107 200 +03 015 

Pachc Bran 141 15 0 07o 

Canadian Bel Gm 555 59* -07 007 

GSM Mae Fnd 4H5LG 1050 +0 ■ 7=0 


WWmNQDAUeUMTTMSr MANAGERS 


2 Honey Ls EC2 68T 
01-608 9085/8 

9k Did Olt Fund 07 8 800 
US Don Bara Fd 4509 51 = 


+15 005 
+07 143 


2505 275.7 +14 534 

1650 175.B# +00 279 
2732 2914# +15 219 


3025 32*5 
318 5 339 7 
1125 1=1 0 
135 9 1*40 
1227 1305 
1*7.1 )565 


1115 I10=# +09 21* 
1195 1 27.4V +1.1 214 


Smekir Gas ft Ree 1805 2019 


1845 1702# +01 


WortdwWB &uwth 2®4 2195 


ENOURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 


Admin Centra, Hexagon Mouse, J0 Weston 
Road. Romford RM1 3LH 


Growlh Gil 
Inc Fecrewv 
Smaito Go's 
UK Growm 
Extra Hc 
G« 

He 8 Growm 


Road. Romford 

070206086 

Endurance 


ORE UNIT MANAOBIS 
Royal Exchange, EC3P SON 
01-888 9903 

G# ft FUM tot 12Z3 1 

awtti Equay 1901 ! 


Oo Accum 
UK Growm Fund 


2807 3007 
475 50.7 


+24 009 
♦15 150 
+1.7 150 
+14 051 
+19 051 
+03 154 


MURRAY JOHNSTON* UNIT TRUST . 
MANAGEMENT 

162 Hope Street Gteagaw 32 2UH 
Oil 221 9252 

AmenctM 1183 126=# +04 299 

European 2524 Z70* +1.7 TJ07 

Smaker Cos 214= 2285 +1.1 095 


^AVE ft PROSPER 
28. NMMi Rd. Romford UMl 3LB 
68*71 Quean SL EdmOorUi EH2 *NX 
(Romford) 0700-68988 Or (Eon) 031-Z28 7351 . 
Araw He 0 Growm 090 732 +05 845 

Capital LkVB 10=3 1094 +04 20* 

Cornmodiy 45 7 405 184 

Energy tote 428 408 +04 4.12 

Euopaan Growth 110= 1175 -05 040 

Exempt me BM 795 84.1# +04 525 

DO HO Ml 61= 6AS +07 =23 

.ExOftMOPn 390 425 .. 000 

Frtwaai Secs 100= 1071 +13 =01 

G4ll FI He 545.57= -0110.79 

fkgn Rerun Units 100.1 1028# +1= 558 

rrxjh Yield Unas 1635 175.1 +05 43? 

HconelHks 902 005# +05 658 

investment That 801 020 +0.7 =83 

Htemaeorwl 1180 1205 +0= 210 

Japan Growth _ 1035 111,1 +1.7 .. 


SUN ALLIANCE 

Sin Alunoe me. Hontum. Sussex 
0*03 66293 

Euxty Trusl Acc 3874 4121 
N Am Trust Acc 508 - 636 
For East Trust Acc 605 96= 
Worldwide fluid SOI- 532 


+2= 251 
+02 .1 18 
+17 081 
+03 0M 


MNDSQR TRUST MMAGERS LTD 

.vthndxcr Houa*. 82 NngaiMy. Lfindan WC2S 
SSO 

01-405 8331 

towftEqu^l 400 511 +5? I 7 ? 

Income 520 564# +0= 5 10 

Growth 502 525 *0 4 2=5. 


*04 =04 
104 
*04 4.12 
-05 049 
*04 525 
+07 2=3 
.. 0OS 
+13 201 
-011079 


TUB UNIT TRUSTS LTD 

Keans Horae. Andover. Kitts. 8P1O IPG 

0254 66789 OmUr/s- 026*83432/3/4. 


Income iteks 
Inv est ment Trust 
Htemancyrai 
Japan Grwth 


EQUITABLE UMTS ADMMSTRA1KM 
35. Foil maxi St Man e f lee te r 
061-230 5685 

EouuNe Psfean 724 7a 1 a 


N Aoiancui 
Paocc 

1*1 uppity Share 


SRMto GompeniM 2i=* 2200 
European Trust 2528 2000 


12Z3 127.1 c .. 073 
1901 2105 +1.7 =02 

2732 2834# .. =SS 

1400 14BJ0 +02 1=7 

2482 2015 +27 0.12 

2503 2745# +05 1.45 
2124 2200 +1.4 1.70 


LONDON ft MANCHESTER 
(Mnaude Perk. Exoto EX5 IDS 
0398 521 55 

General Turn 43= 462 +02 350* 

Hcome Hum ate 392 +03 0=0 

Umn a tanl Hum 375 40= +03 050 

Amulcan 33 1 354 . . 200 

Japvi 403 517V +1.1 1.00 

Hun Oi He 289 31.0 +02 240 


NATtOHALPROvnen- INVESTMENT 
MANAGERS 

i& Gracacnuen Sl EC3P 3hh 
01-623 4200 Ext 269 


Japan Smoker Cos 1292 130= 


New TecnnoJogy 
6E As# GtOMh 


29= 31= 
B5L0 B5.1 
1018 ioaa 


♦07 205, 
+ 0 = 210 
+1.7 .. 
-01 -- . 
+03 288 
-03 

+08 27B 


NPI UK 

1870 =090 

200 

Do Acaxn 

318B 3390 

200 

NPI OvXTMXS 

504.7 632.7 

0.70 

Do Acaxn 

7=54 771 B 

.. 0.70 

Far Eon acc 

9=3 902# 

0.10 

Airrencvi Ace 

500 627 

. 100 

Europran Acc ' 

540 575 

. 000 

WDrttfMte Acc . 

51.6 540 

140 


Scouharaa 1520 1625 

scotyrakte 15=6 163= 

IMP imamentxxa BOO 855 

SmUto Co s He 1504 189 4 


130.1 139.1# +1= 201 
1520 1625 +05 296 


Amencan Hc 
Do Accun 
Earns Income He 
Da Accun 
General the He 
Do Accun 
OB A Fixed ine 
Du Accun 

income 

Accun 
Partite He 
Do Accun 
md He 
Oo Acaxn 
Selected Opps Inc 
Do Accum 
Natural Res 
Do Accun 


1163 123 ft# +05 1.10 
12=3 130.2# +05 1 10 
112B 1200# +05 557 
1351 1438# +10 537 
1507 1805# +11 =81 
258= =74.7# +1.B 281 
489 820# ... 033 ; 

881 509# . *035 

213 S =27.3 +15 4.48 I 


• Ex dividend c Cum dmdend ft, Cure 
stock spbt. ft Ex Stack splil. id Cum aB 
(any mo or more of aDovej. a Ex an (any 
two or mote 0! above) Dealing or 


valuation days (1) Monday. [Zl Tuesday 
(3) Wednesday. {«) Thursday [Sl Friday. ' 
(20) 2Stfi of manm. (2i) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22i 1st and 3rd Wednesday ol 


333= 35*5 
17=5 1816 
170= 18B5 
3300 3521 
4008 434.9 
63.4 675 
. 09 4 730 
44.1 470 

454 483 


.. 8U35 
. -035 
+15 4.48 
+=3-458 
+40 0=9 
+41 0=9 
+27 1=2 
+34 1=2 
+05 1.75 
+05 1.75 
+07 202 
+07 202 


month. (231 20m of month. (261 3rd 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st ana 3rd 
Thursday ol month. (26) 4tn Tuesday of_ 
month (27) 1st Wednesday of month (28) 
Last Thursday of morah. (29) 3rd working 
day m month. (30) 16th ol month. (3f) 1st 
working day of month. (32) ZOtnof momhi - 
(33) 1st day of February, May. August/ 
November. (34) last working day of- 


November. (34) Last working day of- 
reontn. 135) 15th of month (36) 14m of 


Speoai Smoacns 
UK Equhf 


UK Equty 
US Growth 
Itovaru Growth 


+1.0 455 
+08 152 
+05 4=1 
+ 1.0 =01 


TARGET TRUST MANAGERS 
TwgwHouae. Gamhonur Rd. AytuBury Bocte 


morth. (371 2ist of mourn. (38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2ntT' 
Wednesday ot month. (40) Valued' 


1704 IB0B# +1 7 273 
73.1 701 +01 101 

904 905 +1.1 1=8 


Amer Eagle 
AitanSen 
CammnMy . 
Etragy 


73 7 7B4 +1=008 

185 175 *0.1 O.iO 

88 1 Ufi -01 1=2 

290 31=# +01 203 


Wednesday ot month. (40) vaSued' 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday or Stock’. 
Exchange account. (42) Last day of 
month. (43) 2nd and 4th Wednesday ol. 
month. (4£) Quarterly. (45) 8th of moron. 
(48) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


1986 

HiqtT Lew Comwr, 


Grmi 
<pv YVJ 
Pnc+Chge pence *+ 


1986 

Fk^i Low Coropanv 


Do Till 

Price Oige pence % PS- 


1988 

High Low Curaany 


Gross 
0» YM 

Price Ch-ge pence % P/E 


15 8': A ft M Gp 11 ■» V+I 

60 45 ATA Seiecaon SB 

130 B3 AUeytresl 170 + 2 

09 33 Aheroeen S» Hu 33 -5 

108 32 Aram Comp 44 

=75 >83 Air Cxi =18 +18 

1=3 IBB Airaprxig 108 

397 20* AMs 350 

144 130 Ami# Securum 144 +2 

131 103 Anker 104 

153 V .. 


06 5= 14= 
2.1 36 155 

16 =0 17.1 
21 04 9= 

. . 3.1 

=6 l= 09.4 
77 7.« 

03 3714.1 
23 1.6 195 


390 315 App HotograjHcs 3*5 

350 185 DoWmu 305 

355 163 Aspen Ccmms 3=5 

180 131 Asanall 135 +1 

630 *43 Asprav 568 V . 

40 16 Assoc Energy 36 +6 

2U <H *30 1CB . 

134 119 AIMS Equipment 119 


95 6i Automagic 
70 69 B86 D*»jn 

328 185 BFP 
8S 69 UTS Grp 
139 56 BecKOTO tVMarat 


12 Domett ft Fountain 25'.- 


4 4 1 4 329 

aa a* 7= 
1 4= =9 16= 

.. 09 

11.4 &l B 1 
70 59 100 

08 9.8 13.1 

14 2J> IBS 

7 1 3fl 183 
07 67 01 
ft* 9165 
06 24 27 4 


53 

31 

Bensons Craps 
Borviioy ft Hay 

*3 

-2 


.. 1=1 


Pi 

14 

+ '* 


.. 24.1 

91 

31 

Bsrxawy Exp 

31 



40 


=78 

Bafsowy Go 

430 

• .. 

aa 

1.4 23.7 


14 

0*0 Isootas 


*T 



34 

18 

B*jm«cna>ic3 

2? 




4.1 ' 

*»■ 

BteW 

42'l 

v 1 ! 


42 106 

135 


BUKrttort* 

118 

-7 

6*0 5.4 165 

wn 

if* 

GfeaDKO Toy* 

220 

+5 

00 

20 170 

144 

<38 

Boriond 

141 




JT 

i« 


21 

*1 




105 

Bntun 

105 


a»j 



175 


=00 




130 

75 

Bmnnnia Sac 

111 



19 18.1 

Z50 


B* Btowswcx 

185 


12.8 

65 07 


50 

Br Island 

50 


40 









163 

115 

Brown (Cnan+) 

148 


3 6 

2 4 21.7 



Di-T+M (tlWBBI 





9 

Bins Hraourex* 

3 




97 

-J 

CCA Gskanas 

75 


34 


180 


CML M«ro 

160 


3.6 

16 104 


43 29 CPU Comp 

195 (30 CVD 


14 24 3 3D 

. 47 


330 90 CMeaan o n OH 

S5 K Camprocn 


1*0 88 Cannon Straw |r. trs 


350 3' 3 Centra tj 
130 64 Ounce ry Syr. 


IIP S3 cnertepoen Europe '00 


29 45133 
3 6 2.9 19 0 
179 55 127 

31 3 0 125 


128 

129 

CttetSM Man 


m 


Cbam WBinods 


2S3 

120 

Cltesnmi W 


17 

8 

OHr 


40 

31 

Cnyvrron 

.16 

603 

M 

Cnyroxsi r* B 

586 

Hi 

70 

CxEatnxn 

75 

IS? 

152 



23 

11 

Oorau Go*a 


«a 

=8 

cun Ol HOgi 


« 

67 


KM 

95 

53 

CcOiB EntoJM 


1 li 

111 

CokM 

115 

UM 

50 

Cesarean Inc 

SO 

1T5 

no 

Comp Financial 


50 

30 

Ccmpscrt 

48 

118 

7A 

CorauitarMS 


60 

j« 

Cans Tfen hyr. 


343 

208 

Carol McionM 

iSn 

UW 

05 

Cowais 

93 

143 

115 

CfW 


*15 

308 



78 

40 

c/snsro-j- 


114 

96 

CniK*rt 


1JB 

:s 

Cnccn UMtp 


10! 

63 

Down Int 


57 

74 

Cm SO 



+3 

DSE Teen 


178 

l‘» 

PET 

1SB 

un 

78 

QJ Sac terns 


9i 

63 



?16 

195 

DsvvsiDY) 

isa 

83 

55 

Coon ft Bawm. 


29 

so 

Do Bran lAnonrj 


145 

13* 

Dobto 


57 

40 



138 

1» 

Draws 

iM 

115 

75 

Denmans EMC 

75 

186 

TO 

Dean* Warren 

90 

228 

130 

tteiiws 

70S 

*60 

3*5 

Drue* 

430 

W. 

18': 

Bunion 

=0': 

53 

36 

CAM 

4ft 

14F 

i(K 

Ejkng Elect Ocncs 

134 

.11 

0 

Eccthc 

31 

325 

;j5 

Fund 

;w> 

43 

72 

B>n Seer- 

25 

an 

2« 

Berms* Pope a 

374 

148 

Ili 

Eteewori Mouse 

115 

103 

61 

Bucitotic Paia 9 

KK 

33 

75 

Emei 


15 


Enwiarfmem Prod 



31 25205 
30 4=9 
5= 22 256 

* 16 


15 20 85 
33 2.1 221 


60 38 
ea os 

220 145 
103 65 

855 420 
148 94 

150 93 

*7 38 
83 7= 

165 100 
17 11 

60 32 

188 85 

124 89 

1IB 96 

91 58 

124 118 

38 19 

115 01 1 

180 160 

92 56 

49 36 
210 133 
2S5 196 

46 K 
*40 383' 
390 233' 
1*5 143' 
4is 195 
205 SO 
96 90 

30'.- 7 
113 105 
133 105 
158 115 
340 200 
?4 22'. 

14 0': 

16ft 115 
255 188 
230 105 
31 16 

115 44 

103 « 

353 190 
3= 25 
3*0 233 
190 116 
28 2 
140 105 
lift 73 
70 48 
330 2S3 

50 87 
300 220 

83 55 

113 67 i 
113 07 

63 37 

125 70 

43 32 

118 ICO 
91 73 

140 95 

198 133 
62 17 

84 77 
245 190 
160 101 


Floyd Ol 43 

Fora B Waxen 85 

French Conn 175 

Freentuka 9* 

FUto Smith 'A' 850 

Oratxca 144 

Gee JC+cSl 98 

GeoJHojxn 40 

Demon Lyons 83 

GBJta Mew 150 

Qtoen Horan 15 

Otatss Gp 43 

aoomn warren 1=1 

GooOheno Print 120 

GouH IL+unrace) 107 

Grams SixOci 50 

Green lErn»«d 1H> 

Oeaiwrrti CxhH 31 

Grosvencr Sq 85 

Gumsey Ararat 100 

Hamxtoi Homocara 71 
Hertons 47 

Honav ft Thoop 168 

Havelock Europe 233 

Hnatn Cera 41 

1 Hnontree 430 

Do 'A LV 390 

: Henoarcan FWne 144'.- 
HryvPoira 200 


Hde Erganom S3 

Hooeon 39 

Hoogsan 105 

Hctoen tiyo romen 123 
Hatmra Proucttan iso 
Howero Group 335 
Hugnes Food =* 

: HuwriO Elec 9 

femur Siaxf . 14ft 

fexntognTecn 235 

INSTEW 175 


HO Scot Energy 90 

HiraRsO 00 

Hterempe Terti 195 

toad Dock LI 26': 
JS Pxnokwy 33E 

Jaouns von 173 

J asserts 9 

Jarmsen ft Jorg 1=3 

Joer n mnaa Fvnta 110 

Jua Ruboer 56 

KLP 296 

Kmn (John) 79 

Kanyon Sacs 285 


new# Systems 72 

■Ktok-Tahvli 73 

LPA HO BD 

UaSaw 63 

LOKAbv TtameOn 100 

Lerauni Inv 4= 

Lewmar 103 

Lodge Cara 73 

LonSOwMda 115 

Loren BeG • 188 


Lrsander Pet 26 

M6 Caen 4 Catty 77 


3.1 =D 285 
.. .. 80 
18 1.7 21.0 
71 18 7 255 
57 ZJ 14= 
17 40 1£9 
25 U 17= 
7 4 22 234 

or o i * i3= 
7.6 7= 0= 
=■ 35 1B0 

M 95 1=5 
14? U 110 
.. 26D 
I 7 1.1 137 

=1 1.7 90 
14 2J 50 
40 =5 21.1 
36 4.4 20.0 
OJ 10 15= 


MMT Comp 23S 

McLaugnkn ft Kar 113 
Mtmc Moenals 55 
Mammet 80 

Mirau Dev SB 


Moron (Ranad) 160 


=0 80 00 
20 =1191 
M 7= 5.7 
107 11.0 6.1 
70 34 17.2 

56 10 £88 
0= 10 150 

=0 5BU9 
31 3 3 233 
04 10=31 
56 35 U 6 
• . 5=5 

96 =6 17J 
*9 40 152 
=3 36 1=9 


13S S3 
269 lW 
220 138 
98 75 

W 9 
75 =1 
143 140 
390 350 
138 95 
102 71 
9S 59 
700 360 
220 118 
47 a 
ns a 

305 231 
193 1(5 
2TT 130 
47 13 
158 109 
1W 82 
150 145 
50 25 

a . 15'; 
115 63 
173 125 
367 337 
31 13 


Mayuur Cxy 
Mavnews Foods 


Mavtwrs Foods 126 

Meadow Farm 245 

Meoa Teen 136 

Maitoware 94 

Memory Comp 12 

Mwneom inti feoqs 25 
Menwer^waai 143 

Menydtjwn Wine 380 

Mata Bunsen 120 

Metsoc 92 

M'Choai (Johni 73 

MKrofam 660 

Moenut 120 

Nkwqwiec 38 

Uctand Mans 173 

WSuirr* inns 375 

Miewira Brown 1B0 

Miss Wcrid 175 

Mnamos 

Mootguc Gp 135 



40 

5.1 10J 


75 

40 114 

• .. 

23 

29 157 

• .. 

110 

19 169 


4 1 

08=04 


30 

39 . . 

. „ 

=4 

09 101 

• .. 

SO 

69 154 

• .. 

5.1 

34164 



. . 600 


3= 

7 A 100 


01 

00 17= 


40 

36 100 


50 

50 ee 


30 

5= 10.1 


49 

4.1 109 

• r. 

80 

10.1 89 


35 

10 6=9 


=1 

30 11.4 


1= 

39 145 


61b 30 200 


57 

04 214 





1=3 

09 169 


103 

3= 153 

r. 

03 

11 103 


=9 

01 149 

r +1 




10 

20 170 


40 

07 15B 

-i 




6.0 

1 8203 



00 170 


04 



16 

06 ISO 


01 

00 283 


12 



30 

17 B 2.1 



.. 108 

-5 

79 

4.1 95 

• .. 

07 

06 205 


30 

10 30= 


79 

4.6 153 


- . c 

09 


59 

49 140 

v .. 

«« W 102 


25 

43 99 

• . . 

47 



20 

20 17= 

• .. 

145 

5= 124 

• .. 

1.7 

24 106 

-2 

1.4b 10 133 


30 

40 13 


4 U 

6.3 78 


&4 

5*12.1 



.. 209 

• . 

30 

37 107 


08 

4.0 15= 


80 

70 104 


lb 

19 IBS 

-i' 




66 

08 107 


109 

38 65 


40 

73 50 

• *S 

14 

19 2=7 


47 

29219 

♦3 



• . 

43 

42219 


1 1 

09 17.1 

r 

54 

02 214 


50 

08 114 


40 

45 22.1 


KB 

00 


50 

209 1.7 

• 

38 

=0 14 4 


06 

a* i94 


63 

5= 169 


35 

U 103 


1.7 

=3 18= 

+5 

£9 

04 807 


5.7 

40 99 


10 

50 159 


5= 

03 70.4 


36 

1.0 279 


Paritftaki On 
FHU M Leu 
Renan 
Pepe Group 


A 166 

I Gp 490 

Lets SS 

31 

mjp i® 

133 

(0 20 

t Coroner . . 


40 00 03 
50 3A 14= 
5.1 10 =57 

. . ■ . . 350 
.. ..50 

43 XI 140 
30b =5 0=4 
1.7 01 00 


1986 

fegh Low Comptty 


Gross 
On YkJ 

Pnor Cnge pence "■ P/E 


1906 

fegn Low Company 


Gums 
O hi" YH 

Price Oigapenn p/E 


Arn# Trust 
Ang Amer Sec 
Atlantic Asset* 


Wen Imam 
Resmec 


Praenna 

Fvcnopnnt 


Bw*o Ctjma 
ftoteiS 
Ramco Oi 
Ramra 
RandswxOi 


RManr Moor 

RMH ID&3 
ITocfcwoawt 
Rod# 4 Noun 
Rwxsa (G) 


141 


17 

25 179 

16 




30 

• .. 

29 

03 1*5 

28 



.. 39 

81 

-Z 



116 


09 

03 109 

43 

• .. 

19 

23 53 

1W 


44 

09 100 

1*0 

+2 

24 

1.7 359 

00 


54 

69 109 

83 


29 

01 11.1 

110 


36 

03105 

S'; 

+>* 




+*. 



218 

• .. 

&3 

29 147 



. - 1 


*8 


49 

99 159 

103 


14 

14 155 

15 


19 

57 39 

00 


7S 

0315.1 

46 




55 


29 

53 152 

IS 

-a 


.. 106 

151 


in 

0.1 .. 


bTZwKs 
B r Empke See 
Br Cm 
B nxtner 


Owby Hc 
Do CW 
Drayton Cons 
Drayton For East 
Drayton Japan 
Dundee Lon 
EOxi-Ahto Asset 


■ +1 30 33 210 

+4 310 4.1 360 

+1 44 X4 360 

V+Z B0 =8 54= 
+1 OS 09 77.1 
• +2 350 33 *44 

100 0.6 . . 
•+■■ 30 S3 310 

. 0.7 10 50-7 

.. =17 XI =7 S 

U 19125 
*0. W OJ- 
V . . 1=0 04 180 


1088 

fegn Low Company 


360 2M ftaanmar 
320 =15 Grertewi Houae 
194 15B HamOras 
310 SB3 HU |P| 

800 540 Hvest « Success 
=84 =44 ew Cep 
185 132 IJnryft Skua 


EamaxrH 

BnnricGen 


Enottoi Hi 
EngWi Sea 


fFc Awnca 
FI C Pscdc 
Pro cnerime 
Fro soa Amer 
First Un Gan 


SAC 

Sanger* Photo 
Sopjvwe pw 
S ain# 

Ecbixo 

Scot HaraabH 


Saa x^uanl 1g 


l™!“E20 


iSSScS - 




Menus ft Crons 1=0 


Manama 
Money (Ftni 
Moms iWiVan) 


16 20 390 
70 .40 90 

20 15=50 
39 30 190 


Mon Adwaroax’g 63 


NteiaeriH 
NMW Gone 


New Cl Net has 15 


=1 40 240 

.. ..90 

15 56 7.8 
40 20 1*0 
80 =8 180 
2 4 160 4.0 


New Emwnd Proos 15 


215 !4d Ecu* Du 

2£0 HI 

248 151 FkB So 


14 200 31 
7.1 4.6 I1J 


i+j 136 f ft H Croup 
90 Ea Featftae 1 ' 

42 i3 FergaDroo* 
i?8 tU Fte«a 1M111 
7* ?5 Ftetchar Dennys 

60 31 «a«iecn 
209 IM F<$» 


13 7.1 190 
17 54 =8 


36 50 187 
80 
2S6 


De 10S ES5 

lunCD 11 

NcranF 1*4 

Uvtum SB 

Norsct'i Hotels 1 15 

nh Saa ft Gan 20 

Ort*« Hsoac 35 

OmmtBcn 3? 

Optomwnes 26 

OsMmt ft UOa 276 

Owners A>0*d 33'. 

TOT 108 

Paca> Systems 205 


43 30 187 

1.0 1.7 80 
3* 30 1=6 
.4.0 
=9 03 52 


70 22 
IK 71 

i;l 

235 150 
200 110 

134 114 
158'f137 
110 100 
164 52 
1*6 00 
36ft 194 
305 115 
188 113 
138 70 
BZ'flBO 

81 63 
56 43 
144'il13 
50 3= 
180 136 
470 270 
98 85 
260 140 
75 43 
545 4=0 

135 93 
04 ffl 

in 51 
in 68 

108 75 
19 14 

95 88 
« *3 

188 150 
7'.- 7'; 
27 18'j 
490 98 

90 4ft 
158 151 
220 195 
98 68 


Stefteg Pub 100 

suniign&a 39 

SutnaUna (ET) ES 


70 

+10 

06 

09 .. 

BE 


00 

34 355 

=63 


69 

03 201 

113 


01 

19 105 

86 


01 

06 349 

19 



.. 05 





146 

+2 

57 

09 119 

158 


43 

07 139 

110 


09 

35 203 

23 

+1 



335 


53 

1 ft 414 


-5 

00 


80 


06 

83 93 

*5'.- 


1.1 

04 106 

215 

-5 

4 3 

00 259 

1*5 


29 

20=43- 

SS 


Oft 

19 51 

151 

■ .. 

57 

39 185 

ire 


75 

00119 

185 


40 

02 125 

160 


51 

2= 140 

105 


00 

37 123 

3fi 


1.7 

49 104 

15/ 

■ .. 

43 

07 99 

11 



.. 44 

98 


26 

07 151 

MB 


2.0 

29 221 

5H 


36 

52 91 





0* 

+1 

50 

4 3 14= 

85 


4,7 

7=107 

173 


50 

05 34.7 

MIH 




100 

-4 

20b 

09 20= 

30 



.. 81 = 

bb 


*9 

7.4 205 


FJemng Toot 
Ftoang UnMnal 

te. 

Genera C<« 


140 40 31.7 
16 09 .. 

1<f 02 . . 

80S *0 35= 
OS 09 8=0 
4.7 30 4=1 

OjT 10 57 5 
U 30 44.1 
=0 20 533 

=a ' 14 820 
=6 '20 589 
= 1 ' 10 814 
01 1= . 
140 40 299 
07 10B 03 
82 1.6 88.1 
74 40 31= 
1=9 42 330 
14 1.1 .. 

» ft™ 
SJ “Sl 

“Hi 


205 237 Ktonwort Smoker 
=33 188. LmDebenu* 

70 56 Lon M er ch a n t Sac 

71 - BOY Lon Trust 
128 102 Mvcnaras 
210 181 Monks 

159 12S Murray income 
187 137. Murrey M 
324 =10 Murray Stn* 

W 318 Muiray venture 
440 390 New Court 
66 49 New Darren Oi 

189 150 928 
8* 50VNw«irin kic'83 

269 IBS Naw Tokyo" ' 

338 27B NO) AttoitK Sac 

fti ot H9i Saa Aura 
384 =79 NOxi Amer 
SOI 145 Gunme n 
79 86 Paafc Assets 
38 31 Do Wntts 
« * Person# A«eo 
405 338 Raeeum 
171 147 River ft Merc 
258 =18 Mver Mote 

270 207 Rococo 
244 101 RatHca 
332 =67 Romney 


348 


24 

OJ .. 

315 


5B 

2=330 

178 

p 1 

54 

39 383 

316 

+10 

154 

40 209 

800 

• .. 

0= 

19 .. 

258 

• .. 

69 

09 703 

132 


69 

5= 101 

62-7 

+1 

01 

02 .. 

re 


35 

00 41.4 

13* 




285 




229 

• +l 

09 

00 27.B 

57 


3= 

5914 8 

6* 

• -1 

1.1 

1.7 409 

114 

+1 



210 

+3 

07 

1.0 70= 

154 

+1 

7.7r 

59 205 

ISO 

• +2 

7.11 


324 

V+l 

09 

1= ■■ 

370 

+2 

1000 

29 801 

420 


213 

51 29.1 

57 

-1 

00 

1.6 625 

185 


57 

11 350 

6* 


49 

"7 5 101 


103 81 
122 95 

199 156 
113 100 ' 1 
101 BO 
186 118 
IBB 140 
118 SO'.- 

174 139 
168 135 
905 237 
370 SOD 
207 lS7h 
143 112 
84 79 

278 217 
02 33 
74 S3 
105 80 'r 
358 288 


TR AustraU* 90 

TR Cay Of Lon 0*0 109 
tr mo ft Gen 197 
in Natural Rw 111 
TR Monti America 96 
TR Pacific Bun 185 
TO Propeny no 
TR Tech 103 

TR Trustees 181 

Tumpie Bar iso 

Thorgmonon 283 

Rirog Secured Cep 350 
Trans Ocvanc 197 

TWhtxre 130 


Tnptawm h# t» 

US Debenture 278 


VIhxig Resources 3B 
W ro pooi 84 

wren 101 

Yeomen 3*2 



liras- 




no 

Digs 

pence 

P/E . 

+1 

33 

07 317 

• +1 

BJb 

58 255 

+1 

57 

00 405 

s . . 

59 

53 239 


29 

07 *07 

+2 

14 

06 ■ 


5.7 

02 309 - 

• *’i 

06 

60 

05 408 \ 

3 7 353 ' 

•+i 

81b 

54 26= ■* 

• +4 

11 80 

4= 339 ;- 

♦T 

05 

29 484 i 

. +2 

40 

29 385 . 


159 

176 -81 i. 

+2 

03 

03 55.7 . 



01 177 


2= 

At 389 

»+a 

48 

4.6 57 4 t 

# +2 

191b 

44 353 


1.1 04 .. 

49 1 4 942 

U7 2.7 30= 
7.7D =0 702 
40 =0004 

1.0 10 66= 


05 1A 94.7 
17.1 44 30= 

08b 3.S =9= 
1=4 S.1 =7.9 


14.*v 11'f 

138 116 St Andrews 
374 297 Scotian 
323 =73 Scot American 
1 *• 89 Scot Eastern 
420 390 Scot Marc 'A' 
528 «02 Scot Mgs 
318 2*5 Sax Nat ■ 

670 570 Second Wkanoa 
■ 81 67 Snoear Cos 

51 3S .' Stewart Emtrp 




34 25 533 

Ute SJS3 

51 2= fB0 


4T>. SS'i 
71 31 

49 21 

15* 118 
22*» 13>* 
20-. 1='. 
156 131 
1*0 80 
=47 187 
105 M 
730 are 
94 77 


Amencan Expreas 
Argwa 

n ousteva 

Brama Arrow - 
Defy MaK 
Do -A- 
Bscrra 
Eng Trust 
EiCO 

EvororaMn 


HIL *■• 
42b 
30 
143 

C=1 ■ . 

=19 •+'. 

143 

181 +1 

227 -2 

98 
730 


33 22.7 ■ 

■ ®'- 1 ~ 
41 170 "* 


33 140 " 
37 134 - 
41 330 u 
30 140 .f 


133 

75 

Doom ID ft II) 





900 

ADO 

HomJtrecn AOnxn 

8 20 



2= ift= ' 

218 

1b3- 

(CH 




7 9 07 


320 

um 



a?*- 

6= 07 

290 

190 

US Q 

JHjj] 



04 30* 

38 2 


Mwcxntte House 

919 


ren 

74 51 

m 

IB 

p-joiic kw tm 

tn 


05 

04 

27' 

16 

Do watraus 

27 


206 152 

5*n«i Now Com 

164 


ido 

tl 01 . 


LONDON COMHDOTTY 
EXCHANGE 


GW Joynson and Co report 


Synapse contp iso 

T ft S Store 220 

TDS Grates 170 

TUD Advert 115 

T-V AM 157 

Task Forts 110 

Toy Homes 1*9 

Terti For Bus 103 

Tech Comp 335 

Tejoramaxeig 123 

TN Sam In lift 

Thermo* 136 

Therm Sen**: 233 

Thorpae 78 

Tinsley lEkzal 4a 

Tm IWftj) Hi 

Towngnoa Sec 35 


TmtowU 

Trtun 


Tyne Tran 'A' 
uw Cerante 
Um Frienaiy 
U« PftcXBgiEig 

Usher (Frank) 

Vwwptan 


Wayne Krar 
WmMr Electro 98 

Weteac 17 

WeN Yonohirg 86 

WMworaiS Foods 51 

wcxre 170 

Wlk»re fiyat 7 , 

wnwm (ffex) Mag* 20 

Wngsne 430 

won gi 

Woroacnr 168 

Wte pi Laamer 1B0 

Wyxo 68 

‘Wyi 2004 

vekpwftammer 148 

Yaiuraron 35 

Torn Mount 78 

York ft Sooty 04 

Do B% E95 

Zygoi Dynamre 21 


43 t ft 264 
=1 63 90 
4ft 40 1=J 


168 118 
38 35 

e: so 
6ft a 
10* 80'r 
=7 16 


ISO 


01 

\22ia 

220 


43 

29 205 

170 


09 

1.7 73 

IIS 

+1 

04 

01 209 

li/’i 




110 

+2 

25 

23 16= 

Ml 

+6 

66 

4 4 224 

103 


7.7 

75 103 

335 


451 

14 411 

123 


01 

1.7 119 

Hi 

-a 

20 

£5 379 

176 


1 4 

11 .. 

=33 

• . 

36 

15 2T.0 

78 

* .. 

39 

40115 

44 

•+i 

4.1 

93 00 

141 


4.7 

33 264 

35 

-3 

1.6 

49 273 

153 

-s 

69 

37 199 

440 

♦5 

7.6 

17 219 

IU 

• 

10 

03140 

240 


1045 

70 01 

75 


£4 

7= 120 

S% 


m.g 

*9 

M 


49 

52 49 

A? 


64 

79 S9 

56 


19 

31 199 

78 


21 

29 65 


SUGAR (Frame. Czanakow) 

FOB 

Oct — 1312-31 .0 

Dec 13afr38£ 

Mar 151.4-51 Z 

May 155.8-552 

Aug 1BD. 0-59.0 

Oa 155.053.0 

Vot 1231 


Feb 142.75-400 

Mar 135.0O-25J) 

Apr 140.00-25.0 

May 140.00-254) 

Vot 2951 


Three Months . 352J)0353J» 


Three Mont 

VU 

Tore 


COCOA 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

May 

Jy_ 
Sep — 

Dec 

Voh ... 


1380-63 

1433-32 

1471-70 

1491-90 

1509-08 

15ZT-Z5 

1551-50 

1585 


COFFEE 

Sep 

Nov 

Jan — . 

Mar 

May 

Jly j_ 



13 ‘3.4 1=0 
04 2A 110 
7=0 9= 118 
2.9ft 37 ia.i 
20 1.7 20.7 
3*1 

13 B0 15 1 
=5 00 89= 
1.1 1.8 540 

79 4 7 178 
J5 =0 194 
37 50 10* 


Aug 

Ocf...— — 


Doc 

Fob ..... 

Apr 

jun .... 

0S.:=: 


. 134.0-29.0 
,. 131.8-31.0 
.. 129 0-Z8-8 

- 131.5^05 
. 132.561 5 
.. 1305-29.0 

- 1305-29.0 
IBS 


GAS OH 

Sea — 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Jan - — — 


133.06250 
135.75-350 
13&25-380 
141 a5-*i. q 

143.00-42.0 


LONDON METALGOMUKX 
Unaffldafpriew 
OfflctolTumowr figures 

Price tn£ per metric tome 
SOrer In peace per troy atmee 

RwWf We« & Co. Ltd. report 

COPPER GRADEA 

Cash 88430-665.50 

Three Months . 883J0684JU 

VoJ 3100 

Tone - - - Steady 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 842.00-842^0 

Three Months . 863.00665.00 

Voi 150 

Ton# Qunt 

LEAD 

Cash 2S7jOO-2G8.no 

Three Months . 267.50-28a00 

VOI 875 

Tone ....... Steady 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash .... 520. 00-530.00 

voi Ml 

Tone idle 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash 551.00-552.00 

Three Months . 549.50-550.00 

voi 1100 

Tone - — Steady 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 3433-344.5 

Three Months .. .. 352.0-353.0 

Vo) NM 

Tone kUa 


Cash 7463-7476 

Three Months 751.5-7526 

VOI 2750 

■Rwo — „ Steady 


Cash 2400-2500 

Three Months 2620-2525 

VOI ^ 126 

Tone Steady 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Pig Contract 
piper Mo 

Month Open Cftua 
Auq unq. 19750 

Oct Utkv 103.30 

Nov Unt>. 106,00 

Feb Unq. 100.00 

Apr (Jnq. 10Q.OG 

Jun Unq. 100.00 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 



Epartonne 

•Month 

Open Close 

NOV 

121.8 110.0 

Fab 

134.8 131.8 

Apr 

mo iaao 

M»y 

201.5 193.0 

.Nov 

870 800 

Voi. 1332 


Pig Meat vofc2 


; MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COMMISSION 
Average fetatock prices at 


rep rexen ratf v e ma r ke ts on 
18 August 


OOt Cattle, 95 -57p per kg tw 
G8:»eep T58E7ppariigea 


feONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Uve emt Contract 
p. perUo 

Memh Open Close 
Aug Unq. 975 


BtfFEX '. . 

GJJJ. Freight Futures Ltd 
report 810 par index portrt 
freight indei 


68: Sheep T58J57ppBrfege» 
d 

cwHOJa 

Qa Pw 7836p per «g hv 


Open Close 
Unq. 97 SO 
Unq. 3830 
Unq. 9930 
Una 96.50 
Unq. 99.00 
Unq. 99.00 
Unq. 950a 
Unq. 99.00 
Unq. 99.00 


High /Low . Ctose * « 

OCI88 712.0-7120 712J) J 

JanB" 745.0-7300 745,0 •„ 

Apr 87 787.5 ; 

Jill 87 7258-7200 727.5 ^ 

oasr -—i— 7®^ ^ 

Jon 88 812 5 

Apr 88 —— 915.9 v 

Ju)88 B10.0 * 


Vot 133 lots 
Open ttiteresh 2029 


Engtend and Wales 


Cattle nos. up 4.8%. jve. 
pnea. 95.65p(+OiSg 
Sheep nos. up 12.9 %. aw. 

Sg IK» down 1.7 V aw. 
pros, 7&9flp (+002) 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash 343 50-344 JiO 

!), 


Cattle nos. up 30.5 "L. ava. 
pneo. 95^2p (-1.57) 

Sheep nos- up 195 °t.anr. 


VBfcO 

LONDON SRAM FUTURES 
Cper tonne 

^ Wheat Barley 
Jtenai Clooo Ctaie 

5ep 104.90 103.40 

10690 105.80 

ton 11050 10855 

mji M2.75 naes 

Way 11550 11205 


TANKER REPORT 


Wgn/L«v . Close 

Auq 66 1 290.0 t 

Sep 86 1281-1275 12^0 

0086 1225.0 

DecBfi 1215.9 -T 

Mar 87 1207-1 - 

Junar 12225 .s» 

Vot 1510(0 . ^ 

OpenimoresMD ‘ l. 


vetuma 

Wheat ign 

Bertey Zr^.,77 


Spai mjrkei coraraentary. 
Tanker Inflav; 


1 3675 UD 25 5 on 15/8(88 

s^TiSSW 


? f 14 





FINANCE 


19 



T 



fs^tSStf+S— ;/-v:-r‘~' :-• -. 
■■".■ r'- i ■ ■". 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


BUSINESS 



From your ,portfWK> cud cbeck yoar 
eight share price moranans. Add them 
op-io give you your overall tool. Check 
®s agaiast the daily, dividend figure 
pablistei on the page. If it matches you 
bve won- outright or ashare of the tool 
daily prize money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the aarm proced ure pa die 
hack of your.cani You must always have 
yoar card-svirilaMe when . 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Selective gains 



ACCOUNT DAYS; Dealings began August 1 1. Dealings end August 29. §Contango day September 1. Settlement day September 8. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


r 


Gtaar' 

IN*. Csrayaay 

- 

lore 


— — 


© Tots Nmpwcn Linked 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£12,000 

Claims required for 
+53 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 






1996 

f*gn Low Company 


2 S 0 T» dart* (OamanQ 
22 W wywi Son 
920 3a CWM(AJ 
316 Ml CoknlOo 
a* «'» Contend Tta 
1TZ 71 conotttn: 

67 a GoctSoacxwry 

an « cw*(Wmj 7 

570 3S8 CookMn 
to a Casco (FJ 

111 53 Cook 

8ST&.X* 

g a 

aia’iiuv cmukjia 
315 2g7b DPCE 

90 43 QMS 1 Mat •*• 

238 T7» DMl Nmm 
13! 93 Sm 
10SBM Da la Rut 

2 SB TE7 CMS 

773 IBS Dartsnd Stapng 

319 1G3 Dnusr . ' ~ 

19b 17 onus HM 

571 tM Oucna 
IIB'i S3 DobSOn Farit 
110 *3 Don 

123 95 Donmon Ini 

ISO 25 Mi 

£ ft 0 ??}?* 


239 

136 

<90 • 

206 • 

5b *b 
MS 

57 +1 

235 »-a 

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too • 

8! S*J 

us +1 

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tilth -1 

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290 

283 

120 -<« 

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235 *2 

120 «-1 
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263 

2S5 +10 

17b 

220 +|4 

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S3 -1 

109 -1 


65 Z7S&3 
100 7.2 92 
194 XI .. 
7.1 34160 

U 55 >44 
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64 2.7 17 0 

11.1 ZJ 129 
Z1 11 374 
U UlU 

149 Uiu 
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68 4.7 118 
1*2 *4110 
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07 s 10 .. 
23 66 370 
174 64 1U 

30 68 T 
143 6.1 74 
60 54 71 

47.1 40 120 
U 50 83 
114 43 133 
10.4 4.1 106 

04 14 117 
78 34 138 
74 38 125 
7.1 76 108 

78 7212.1 

84 72 128 

64 68114 


941 75 TnsINMS 

125 75 Ungroup 
ID 13b oSm 

M 1 ! 

540 283 VOUf* 

IM ua Wear notes 
IB 170 tan 
WW; Votowngan 
ISO 154 V5S. 
tOS 116 WSt 

its 12 * tataM 

238 1S8 Moon M 
66'j 29 M&arfCBM) 

M4 as wmarta j QMS 
ia 161 tauiisui s 
375 SM Maagwooo 
154 a w*r^ 

231 174 WHOM 
504 144 MNfcaew 
110 55 Wnta 
IM 78 UtaS 
MS 210 wnssw Rant 

134 82 WIMI 

253 177 WMcict 
no ta wmiiibm 
740 305 VinNQ 
ISO 120 VMS £fe 
5*6 428 Min Hi II. 

•» 34 Wood (Araul 

44 28 Wooa rsw) 

£ MBOAU. 8 ta 

M SS W yn s ns m Bo 
178 136 7oaoo(M) 


+6 1070 47 7ft 

• ♦2 18 I J 128 

^ B2 20170 

■ +3 73 so as 

.. 118 4J 114 

-8 7.1 Sl5 TOO 

•*2 23 1.7218 


-1 18 
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' *9 143 

+1 41 

-1 30 

+1 

43 

70 

35 

70 

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-2 DO 
. . 17.1 

-3 68 

+S 150 ; 

30 . 
+1 14s . 

438 J 
+6 X8* < 

4 J I 


312 SCO 

£ 8 
440 271 

74 44 
64 26 
29 11 
MJ 8$ 
300 130 
46 IS 
143 6t 
31 21 
S74 43 
are css 
IBS 133 

S. w 

534 114 
153 41 

mo a 

216 12S 


GUONRH 
□on ta 
Ot Wmwd Ran 
Cta 
icc oa 
Mao 

KCA Mno 
LA5MO 
DoUoto 
Maw London 0* 


tan Eumo* 


Gftr.1 

Pnco Cnin panes *■ 


1.4 4.4 121 
+3 20 41 .. 

363 S« 11.1 


43 358 40 
+3 174 iso *3 

142 733 

-1 

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1+14 183 

-14 596 30 
-17 500 5 7 36 

*8 * 66 34 347 
10 
116 

+1 71*127 34 

+6 U4 

-1 7.9 33 42 


!i 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


56 31 

•a 127 
107 75 

395 325 
401 303 
37 184 

2*3 183 
« 34 

258 IK 


INSURANCE 


BavMek 

CMngtOn 

FrtsyUtasat 


Jtafta 

Unte 
Ocmii Man 
Pnraon Zocfl 
Do *• 


313 M COMfl Proa 
221 isa Edtre 
277 214 BS 
434 284 EM 
153 1024 Baca 
294 17b BKtmUilADV 
104 82 EMO [8} 

26b 16b bmn 
361 262 Enam CMn On 
26S 194 ErxSwn ILM) iT 
164 134 Erafcms 
17741304 Euianin tansa 

142 112 DO 5% Prf 
342 168 Grand 

214 124 Etamac In 
423 312 Eta 
56 22 FAtOa 

42 29 Fnrin Ante M 

143 106 Far-» (iSfl 
75 58 FM momar 

828 406 nuns 

67 as ftzwriOT 

124 84 I'totaa CAW 

86 814 Ktoaf 
123 88 Rawly 
414 774 f3Gs am N/tf 
IM 157 Rfihorga s tarray 

,s ur^ 1 

385 238 GJOf 

00 2B0 <3H i 

118 SO Omen Eng 
157 100 Qstanar 
150 ill BWvat 
1147564 <S*H> 

*44 |B4 Stymied 
SOS 230 QtJnng tar 
182 107 QronyWl HHg* 
Mm GranMS 
10b Bb oroaboa 
S3 Mb Hatat Pracamr 
232 134 Kaa Ena 
162 129 Hal M* 

2S5 in Hau 

290 230 HM 
41 25b Harapnon M 

48 zo Htanan 
1*1 141 Hanam 
IM 1*5 DoSXCW 

118 98 Do5b%Pf 

1244115b Do 10% 

264 ns l ln gra ma 
275 175 taTH(Ptiftp) 

623 431 NtaSIdta 
ISO 90 HMIa* 

205 81 Hay {NORM 

221 140 tam oHB Csttac 
201 96 HIM 

96 95 Hand (J) 

U2 123 HktontJDb 1 
«1 62 HofeTaros 

106 66 Ho* Lbya 
285 148 HWttQon* ‘ 2 

120 91 HOMMR 1 

310 234 Hwang Assoc : 
IIS M Minhg Group 1 
295 207-1 HMcnsn Wtawpna 2 
191 116 M 1 

313 311 total 2 

295 2So Jataons Buna a 
135 964 Jartna Warn t 

315 473 JDMon Ctonan 9 
220 133 Johnson tansy a 
444 224 Johnson 8 FB 
345 235 'Jofnatai 3 

140 66 Jonss 8 SWpcnsn r 
132 67 JounJan (lOomti) 1; 

29 21 .. ftajsasaoo 

30 25 - man } 

325 166 ■ taarr m a 

130 ids tansdy Sown i: 
298 230 Kata M| ' Z 
216 129 - Msan-E-Za a 


444 +4 

100 
334 
177 

H • 


276 -2 

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in - 4 

078 -at 
1114 «* 

£1214 +14 
264 +2 

MS • . 
<87 

102 -1 

200 

201 «4 

163 
90 
136 

68 +i 

240 42 

101 +2 

235 +5 

S • 3 

113 

215 

250 • 

1334 -14 

sea 
206 
36 
310 
IS* 

130 • • 

26 

St ■■ 


143 53 67 
1QJ 58 T21 
86 42125 
£7 73 1X5 
68a 48 144 

43 48214 
T» 60 .. 
161 48138 

tLD 04 .. 
05 03 138 

68 48 103 

7.1 58 . . 
50 2811.1 
980 57 143 

148 *5 182 

07 17 81.1 

21 &7 88 
71 53203 

38 06168 
78 13 27.6 

13 15 .. 

58 58 72 

08 13 63 

61 6.1 1*1 
28 50 78 

125 71 1*2 

4.1 78 .. 

84 88120 
T73 67 SO 

103 34 61 

J O 47 50 
1 18 07 

47 4.1 1X1 

15.7 15 207 
120 43 1X1 
185 5311.1 
57 4.1 135 
109 37 134 
05 67 139 

25 X2168 
123 72 71 

64 48 104 
143 73124 
24 08 313 

13 48 88 

575 33 1X8 
BOO 45 .. 
82 74 .. 

0 82 . . 
75 38 103 
182 54 118 
207 43107 
27 28 6.1 
&4 27 363 

103 5.1 168 
MB 37 193 
U U 75 
.. n .263 
421 .. .. 

97 6.1 1X4 
107 45 *5 
53 54 61 
114 38 01 
88 83 78 


268 231 
224 173 
430 257 
66b 28 b 


Com ttan 
Bj-yatM 

gjmtatan. 

Hanoi C E 
Hogg Ramon 
Lagsi 6 Can 

London 6 tan 
Lon IM M* 
Miran * Metan 


346 223 PWS 
154 12 Paul 
*42 71* PIWOMMI 

5^- 

420 329 SadQWCk Oo 
474 346 SWMR WTion 
445 390 Shags HUga 
772 S20 Son Mktaa 
BZ7 772 SonlSa 
560 120 leads htatay 
474 2M IWsFlNr 


4* *8 

100 

* .. 893 

B4S 85 
47 425 

ta so 

43 411 

•10 348 
*41 1X7 

-1 11.7 

41 65 

-20 246 
-4 220 

114 
12 * 

.. 628 
46 371 

Ml 

4« 868 

-I 157 
- 7 1S7 
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413 253 
+2 S3 8 
48 

•4 125 


r on Pap* It 


Tow tantoy 
YiaaCsdD 


•1 07 13 148 

100 75 117 

-1 5* 72 ■ 

—4 MS a* 174 
+5 26* 8 6 31 6 

16 4*123 
1-1 171 *1 W« 

I 36 IS *4 

88 41 6* 

■■ 41 69 

42 79 47 31 

42 

-3 108 47 8* 


144 M tor 6 tot 
220 126 Booaa* 6 Hanks* 
m u im Wm 
58 34 canton 

225 158 Cnrytta 
410 326 Fta inn 
624 49 GRA 
81 65 HWRuigar BnxWa 

126 S3 Koazon Trs«*l 
131 «* nUMB 
im 32 JiAsnsI mgi 
180 137 Las Ins 
199 130 Iianw 
391 278 Ptatitana 
393 326 Raaly UnU 
6« 43 Rtor lam 

72 51 Toaanham ituu^ar 

IBS 1264 ZMMra 


120 ' 42 
IIS t*1 
42 42 

144 
135 

Si * 

370 

46 

13« • .. 

170 8-6 

70 

185 • 


108 7.7 108 
.. .. 225 

75 48128 
1.4 X0 128 
50 4 A 11.7 
98 25 188 
. 42* 

..425 
■5 85 57 
7.1 X2 10.7 
45 102 188 

78n 58- 9.1 

11.1 35 1X2 
1X1 4A 1X2 

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68 4* 115 
XA 28 101 
X7s XI 127 

7.1 XS 107 



120 +2 
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295 52 1X2 
38 12 138 
1X0 

10.7 XS 1X1 
H 48 82 
X5 42 173 

.SMIM 9 A 

1.7 XS 214 
118 *5 148 

20t» 12*1.1 
»A 78 225 
*8 45 175 


105 XS 164 
32 18 238 
1X5 85WA 
XI 28182 
28 18201; 
4J 181X6 
XD 18184 
48 XI M 
*4 12 228 

74 *7 200 
88 {4 128 

55 53 67 

172 . 32178 
18 18 222 
78 78 U.1 
15 08 05. 
68 SJUuO 
27 5*152 

*18 XI 1*8 
X* *51X5 
XO 48122 
XO XI 178 
174 4411.1 

75 28 2X1 
48 X0 1B2 

Mil 68 111 
X* XI 228 
135 48 M8 

138* 98 132 
87 68188 


433 32* Oita tat 378 •-» 1X5 X* 127 

286 206 Karmady Broohat 2» 2A 18 12.1 

391 312 u pon** 346 -* 1X1 461X6 

545 447 Lon. Part HoMH 5» .. 142 28 1X8 

1 ® 7*4 MnnCMoa W0‘ •«* XI X! 16S 
105 67 Prra Of WHomb M. 8 . . XI 24 155 

71 . 3*4. G oa a n a Moat 75 ♦* 25 Xi 1X4 

*05 368 Saaoy HoM* ‘A’ 30* .. 58 1.4 145 

61 SX Stas 64 8-1 14 28 1X6 

are 141 tastnona* FOna is* #-1 78 XI IX* 


-2 11.1 48 1*7 

45 *8* 5JS298 
• 82 68128 

.. 1X8 38104- 

• .. XO 75 XI 

.. 112 82 137 

-10 X* 271X6 
41 

.. 1X1 XI 11.0 

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08 18 TJ 

.. 05 1.1 144 

8X8 78 1X1 
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44 14 22 10.1 

X6 281*2 
41 28 84 47 

t*V« 34* 15 2X1 
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. . 28 XI 85 

•-2 141 45 1X4 

XS 281*8 
-2 109 . 681X5 

+b .. ..1*7 

+3 185 82 11.7 

.. KL7 4.1-87 

46 85 45 140 

28 15 178 

X6 65 128 

. 2X7M0J 77 
... UK 88 .. 

.. 10.7 87 125 

88 X* 82 
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-V 18 88882- 

•410 78 - 75 84 

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■ 22 
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323 216 
73 42 
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86 64 

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230 179 
135 95 

77 5*4 


160 121 
78 43 

288 185 - 

130 78 

710 495 
7* 52 
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176 105 
1*4 121 

91 53 

78b 334 
123 70 

1S8 163 
08 212 
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06 196 
41 26 

1S3 92 

13S 56 

68 43 

289 188 
258 203 
448 2*7 


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X* 4A 107 
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78 *>1X2 

65 ID MB 
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X* 27 101 
18* *7 123 
168 9u0 1X1 
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27 4.7 105 
143 X7 105 
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134 34 
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40 22 

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534 400 
631 314 
200 106 
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»* 258 
205 129 
T9S 85 
39C 210 
44 2b 

9 4b 
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75 17 

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10 6 

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479 03 
83 35 

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373 165 
159 0 
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0 474 

124 5b 
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410 170 
157 64 

28 15 

123 80 

3*. 144 
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22b 10b I 
128 90 I 
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196 IM « 
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140 80 » 

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184 10b J 
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-10 2*0 133 . . 


600 11A 
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-3 548 292 .. 

SA *7 328 
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125 173 .. 

. 160 2*8 .. 
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415 468 118 

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410 970 179 
. 233 128 

171 XI 
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9t‘> 244 tom 
94 68 ttadlBn 
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193 155 Artogwi Sics 


*86 367 BraotHfl *30 

198 14* » Land ISO 

17D 138 srmjnn 157 

48 36 Can W tsooa 41 

233 08 Cap X Coundaa 233 

290 200 Canmf Prop 273 

198 199 CantnmiciM ISO 

*85 *10 OtaarfBld 455 

870 760 CALA 970 

171 131 Oarta MchoBa 161 

279 16* Comma 258 

20 14 Conmri Sacs 14'. 

140 » Country ft Hmw 117 

S w s 

175 135 EsiawaX Agancy tM 

120 47 Eganon Tnm 0 

120 IQS Emm Cm its 

182 i«0 Emms Prop 181 

112 63 Enns Of Lead* 107 

70 36 FwnONta 0 

209 170 Fregmori 196 

192 146 Or Pcrtta 173 

Z7* 202 CtaDMI 240 

164 11 I fta cad 00 nil 

400 204 HamCounyNftlH 

495 4» Hftomamon 445 

485 417', Oo 'A' 425 

248 130 HMMrDnn 8*3 

325 233 Haraangar 279 

380 770 toy 375 

l»5 155 Jmrnyn 185 

00 Z73 lama tap 290 

78 5a land Imi a a toa 79 

«• 278 IMShulM 324 

695 351 Lon 6 Eftn Tat 6*5 

as 1*7 Doevft 2*2 
268 08 Lon 6 ta* Shop 260 
175 151 Lor SHOP tap 173 
353 288 Ltoon 320 

380 275 M€PC 330 

12 S 90 M ttamah 115 

118 IDS McKay Sacs 118 

SB 4* Mamoa ai 50 

200 12 s Momma Moon 192 

79 80 Uetonxgn 77 

sis in tartar St 5ao 

10b510 Moundaign 945 

7n 36* Motota w 740 

106 62 Mitodcw |AAJ) 103 

20 IB'j Mtoctal £18'i 

130 73 New Cavandto 120 

88 *3 PftMta 83 

282 255 PBOChay 267 

2SO 72b Pnaat Mtann 2*5 

230 176 Prap 6 Ra* 22 * 

156 107 tap tags 134 

130 106 PrepBaonry 128 

13b 8b Ragftn 10 b 

33 a 10 Ragtan soo 

B45 03 ROwwauon 585 

297 242 Fbnh iiOTpkma 242 
ZTi isa SUM 246 

IM 78 Scot Mm 95 


t -’1 03b 0* . . 

20 23 190 

29 3* 178 

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171 61 1*3 

129 30 17* 

•‘-1 43 28 MO 

•1 XI 52 185 

76 33 216 

ft 26 10 

6.6 4 5 521 

171 38 1X8 

257* 30 1X9 
90 36 2*4 

-5 60 23 344 

27 23 272 

ft 4 II 58 29 65 

XS 33 00 

ft 209 11 112 


94 86 Sjocfito 
58 45 Town Cam 
260 198 Traffora P*ik 
146 05 UK Lana 
9b 525 IMTM 


28 17b wao* rjosi 
175 142 waat I. Country 


-10 >07 1 7 249 
13 38 .. 
67 28 229 
+3 7 9 4 4 209 

-10 104 33 237 

-6 1X7 49 0.1 

52 44 1X7 
31 62 17.7 

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•-S X7 1.1 49* 

• 143 15 122 

• 7.1 1.0 112 

74 72 158 

17J 09 3X3 

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59 62 31 8 

♦2 7.9 4 7169 

138 X2 222 

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1.4 27 31 0 
163 74 1X1 

-ID 0 * 22 3X7 
279 32 3X4 

343 37 238 

I 07 28 313 
11.4 XB 93 


8§ Ma fawn Benaoo 


810 09 BMbto *54 

210 126 Barra Ind IBS 

174 . 112 Barram 1*9 

405 IK Bartow Rand 2 55 

57 40 Bmow HipOOTi 53 

305 ISO. Baron Umpor 2S0 

32 0 Baynes (Ctato) 23 

241 m BaananCtoU IBB 

9i 4J Bautod 60 

630 151 Bastr (CH) 220 

443 0 « Smchto ^ 401 


205 140 BUM ISO 

123 W atom u 111 

153 Ba’t BataOwaast 137', 

200 105 taatommMto W 

T74 ,«7 BWek Smiw 148 

m 176 Btofe{Pnar) 240 

61 34 BJadcwood Hddga 42 

1*7 130 Bit* -Q0 

<00 >189 Bto Anon 386 

3S 167 BM yet*, 320 

385 2S5 Bower 3H 

SS6 206 Boas » 

0<t 8b Beuhon (Wm| U V 
353 2SB Boa n r 323 

0b. 16b Benwr to C16b 

130 75 Brtol ii aea ap 12S 

363 306 Btanmar 01 

97. SZ Brasiwy ' 85' ’ 

<7b 33b ta mfti i 4$b 

SO 35 Bnsgma Gp 37 

199 VO Bndon 161 

222 139 . nwiGuar 222 - 

g^fiiaatftDog 
303 ire ess qab 255 

M3 8T. arswhon 113 

» IDS Br Wb 325 

423 Si Breton Ml 30 

M5 .3* BnnamM 118 

34 15 26V 

49 S Brooto TSft 39 

m .148 Brown « Tama 1S2 

30 19 Btam MotM) 0 

74 48 Bw m lBna (Uua) 74 

303 SOO - BdUu^i 272 

292 136 BmgtH 2*0 

83 59 OnMndmw 77 

IM • £6 Carder* Ena 109 

58 2S'j Caoero W 61 

90 56 Cam lad 77 

435 253 Carom Eng <35 

120 56 Caanga 10 B 

38b 25b Cltatoi 5* 

8 4b Carnal * Smr 5b 

25 13 CamtoyM 23 

99 45 CHMd 97 

68 65b Oimoartam Pit 85 

i« 9 Ch—oarfti 6 f69 K 

280 133 CtoarCOK 256 

s *0 510 Crwnto i30 

aa 263 CtoNH •- Z75 

re 36 Chnsyjtol- 42 


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29 052X8 
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17.1 491X4 

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179 X1 139 
39 >XB XS 
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49 39 129 
109 3.1 133 

ii i.( 197 
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29a 89 119 
21A 49 109 

49 49 1112 
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X* XS 113 
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59 59 1&5 
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79 29 188 
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38 T7 9 

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99 59 SMIBtf 

90 49 Savft* Ggrxlon (J) 

40 IBS 1 , Sop* 
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154 106 . Do'A- 
164 99 SftemNSfthr 
32 29 BarsorBng 
136 75 SMoh 
153 103 $Uta 
990 703 Stoa 
5 S'j 32 Slemm 
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149 53 b Sot Um ttad 
500 368 Skatofay 
3ftb 36b 8KF "s 
133 94 8man6 NftMaw 
. 0 30 SmtoVtowo* 

326 238 SnmM 
22S 163 5psc(W| 

19t 129 Sprto&Rto 

19 0 Sana poms 
118 66 tagTiantoft 
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00 345 SBWto 

300 35< Staaday 
118 98 Swung Jnd 
29 170- SMtaa 
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22* 19 SuftgntSam 
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28* 90 Saftft PaSBc ‘A 
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20 ICO E par* 

567 3*9 T1 
195 115 TMT 

250 95 TSL Thermal 


Bb ftb tton 
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112 91 Tlwd wa 
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333 203 Tomdns (FH) 
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14* 78 TnplBX 


29V +'» 

228 -3 

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112 ft . 

111 ' •*« 
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223 ft -3 
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6,9 48 13.7 

23 it 9.7 
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43 32 91 
.. .. 198 

U 11 95 

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XI 63 9.7 
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28ft 7ft X3 
9ft 4.1 1X3 
1ft 28 697 
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49 2814ft 

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1.4 132S2 

2ft 252X1 
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129 102 7ft 
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IA XO 839 
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25ft 5A17J 

3ft 28 0ft 
OA 11 21ft 
6ft .28203 
B£ 451X7 
7ft 4811.7 
67 38 Si 
7ft 77 10,0 
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29ft 4ft 1X4 
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39 34 272 
171 7ft 52 
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.. a .. 57 
129 6ft 128 
6ft 2824ft 


1*3 &2160 
20ft 4ft 1X4 

4ft 3ft 57 
108 29 173 

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6.4 41 1X9 
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52B 17 261 
1X5 69 7 5 
1X7 XI 107 
9ft 33148 
27 6 

01 0 1 57ft 

29 1214ft 



SHIPPING 


31! b 187 Aiaoc 0 Pont 273 

398 238 Br Mill 283 

388 03 Caisdona 236 

M 56 F*hat(tata) re 

603 *60 Drag 500 

78 5*', Jacobs (J) 70 

,2b 5 LyW Vi 

« » wn*y decks 0 

20 1W Ocnan Twiaoon 06 

S7B *29 Piona 513 

<65 96 Ruianan (WMar) 1*1 

3*8 132 Tpnook 08 

390 360 Tufflfcu! Seed 370 


7.1 26 15 1 
71 27 185 

7, 31398 
47 6ft 125 
04 aft B4 
XI* 75 534 
06 
33 

9ft *5 99 
229 *5 1*7 
71 5.0 222 

S3 17 196 
12ft XS 51ft 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


360 290 re 325 

206 145 GanwBeom 1*5 
*5 32 Hamm Ebs . 36 

06 169 LwnDen Hewwtti 175 
62 82 NawttU & Bum, 64 

n* 82 JFiart 1D6 

157 118 Stong 6 Aster 148 
273 158 Stytd 2» • 


TEXTILES 


573 2Mb A*ad Taat 
300 135 ABwatas 

ire 0 Megohm 

106 M Bataan (A) 

I** 123 a Motor 
127 60 BtaorlUato 
76', 53b Corah 
05 150 cnawaaa 
179 74 Growth* (J] 

276 196 Dawson 
57 *2 oaoron 
60 25 Ours U4 

110 66 FOM* (John) 

113 M 'Qasknl BroKtoom 
57 33 Meueg PantooH 
00 ■ 90 Ingram LHaratt 
M 47 Jerome IS) 

IDO 132 Lam** 

183 136 Lands 
122 4« Uttac 

H 3s 2 ,(HuW 

158 94 taSSa A' 

47 30 FtoOOI 
195 109 SEET 
IS 133 SHW 
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140 re ShtoOWoT 
in 95 Tauurad Jana* 
205 85 TonAtoom 
106 , 75b T octal 
350 2S5 Vortoyda 


163 -6 

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133 
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110 45 

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144 • 

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98b Xft 12.7 
143 99 89 
07 13 

xa 47 93 
«« Xi 193 

63 58 73 
I1A 77 X9 

64 28 279 


10.7 88 T9B 
100 «ft 155 
68 42 61 
S-2 XO 121 
XS XS 66 
71 7608 
57 77 

93 34 9.1 
21 14 17ft 

6ft X* 139 
07 1 5 36ft 

5.7 127 61 
5ft Xfl 68 
79 81 71 

4ft 30 1X7 
43 54 76 
X* *1 102 
XO 4A 11 7 
1 * 1 1 10$ 
8ft 109 1X7 
6ft U 1X9 
a 58 
&2 49 17ft 
M 5.4 9ft 
7.6 X3 69 
6A 4ft 12ft 
« 6ft X5 
43 38 71 
86 XO X2 
96 4£15Q 
57 69 99 
Wft 38 8.1 


126 02 Ainpm 90 *4 

X 9 Aon Eoaror 13 

33 10 AHtoC RHAHH 16 -5 

818 516 0 PemWRV 00 49 

17b 9 Onst* 01 15 

3SS 323 BrBonoQ 3*3 43 

00 M Braos UO *47 

419 259 Bproto 600 

103 4* Gmaa Oad 52 

ISO B4 Coraury 10 

33 W OwnamaB 25 -b 

iKf SO Ewpcsa 1» -a 

62 2« Garb* Energy 42 *3 


TOBACCOS 


2 X 6 xa i 2 ft 
BJ 7ft 38 
182 4ft 11.7 
38 75 9.7 
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. SX8 
1X1 XS 4ft 


40 300 BAT 
167 10 Hoot 


*11 173 4310ft 
► 6.6 XO XO 


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ta-AMlBk 








































































SIEMENS 


Information for Siemens shareholders 


New 


capital spending record 


Higher net margin and more employees than last year 


As anticipated, Siemens did not attain last with median-range goals, there was a rise 
year’s unusually high level of sales during the in the number of employees and a substantial 
first nine months of the 1985/86 financial expansion of capital spending. It was also 

year (ending 30 September). However, in line possible to increase the net profit margin. 


Sales 


Owing to the billing of three nudear power 
plants, last year's third-quarter sales leaped 
38% to £12^282m; because no comparable pro- 
jects were billed in the period from 1 0ctober 
1985 to 30 June 1986, sales at £ 9,954m were 
19% below 1984/85 levels. Apart from the power 
plant sector, there was a slight overall sales 
growth of 1 %. Even more strongly influenced by 
the fluctuations in power plant billings were 
sales figures for the German domestic market 
Here, total sales at £ 4,678m remained 32% 


below last year's comparable levels despite 
gains of 10% outside the.power plant sphere. 
At £ 5,276m, international sales were 2% below 
the previous year's total, owing to the con- 
version of a weaker dollar into German marks. 


1/10/83 to 1/10/84 to 1/10/85 Id Change 
30/6/84 30/6/85 30/6/86 86 from 85 


Safeato 12^82 : 9,954 - 79 % 

Domestic business 4,127 6,898 4,678 —32% 
Intern, business 4,801 5,384 5,276 — 2% 


New orders The leveI of new orders reflected the absence 
of new power plant contracts and currency 
changes. Worldwide new orders of £11,333m 
were 7% down on the same period last year; 
excluding the power plant business, the level of 
order intake was maintained. New orders in 
the German domestic market, at £ 5,483m, were 
5% below the comparable figure for last year. 
However, if the power plant business is excluded, 
Siemens groups achieved a growth rate of 7%. 
Two-figure growth was recorded by the Power 


Engineering & Automation Group, the Communi- 
cation 8 Information Systems Group, and the 
Electrical Installations Group. International new 
orders declined by 8% to £ 5,850m - again as 
a result of a weaker dollar. 


T/H3/B3 to I 1/10/84 10 1 1/Tfl/85to 


86 tram 85 


Domestic business 


Intent business 



12,147 

11233 

5,764 

5,483 

6,383 j 

5,850 j 


Orders 
in hand 


Orders in hand drmbed 6% to £16,999m. 
Inventories have grown 18% to £ 6,229m since 
the beginning of the financial year. 


m£m 

• Sm -ItirtrtRjirf - * 

. DWHI 


30/9/84 

UBS! 


Change 

30/6/86 86 from 85 






Employees ,n tfle firs t nine months of the current financial 
1 year, the total number of employees increased 
3% to 357,000 worldwide. Siemens now 
employs 244,000 people in the Federal Republic 
of Germany and Berlin (West), 4,000 more than 
at the beginning of the financial year. Outside 
Germany, the workforce increased from 108,000 
to 113,000. An average of 353,000 people were 
employed during the period under review 
compared with 334,000 in the same period last 
year. Employment costs rose 7% to £ 4,596m. 


in thousands 


Change 

30/9/84 30/9/85 30/6/86 86 from 85 




Domestic 

operations 

International 

operations 


224 240 244 + 2% 


104 108 113 + 4% 


1/10/83(0 1/10/84 to 1/10/85 to Change 

1 30/6/84 30/6/65 ■ 30/6/86 86 from 85 




Capital 

spending 

and 

net income 


In pursuing it's growth targets, Siemens 
increased capital expenditure and investment to 
£993m in the first nine months of the current 
financial year, mainly for new high-tech factories. 
This was 26% more than in the same period 
last year and double the amount spent during 
the full financial year 1982/83. 

Net income after taxes was £293m, yielding a 
net profit margin of 2.9% as against 2.5% for the 
comparable period last year. 


VlO/83 to .1/10/84 to 1/10/85 lo I 


ki£m 

30/6/84 30/6/85 

30/6/86 ' 

86 tram 85 

. flxmridtture : araf 






VisiSsi 







All amounts translated at Frankfurt middle rale on 30/6/1986: £1 " DM 3.3650. 


Siemens sales in billions of DM 

60 



Siemens shows continuous 
sales growth and fluctuation 
in power plant business 


The level of power plant sales is determined by the 
billing dates of contracts, while all other areas 
show continuous sales growth. Siemens sales rose 
from DM 35 .3 billion in the 1981/82 financial year 
to DM 432 billion last year and will; top DM 45 bilGon 
in the current year. The power plant business con- 
tributed additional sales of DM 4.8 billion in 1981/82, 
3.4 and 7.5 billion in the following years, and last 
year power plant sales even reached DM 11.4 billion. 
However, (n the current financial year the contrt- . 
button from the power plant business win swing back 
to around DM 3 billion. This means that Siemens 
steady growth is affected by fluctuations in the 
power plant business. 


| * v . 1 . : 




Siemens AG 

In Great Britain: Siemens Ltd. 


81/82 


82/83 


83/84 


84/85 . 


85/86 


Siemens House, Wndmifl Bead, 

StinbUry-on-Thames 

Middlesex. TW167HS 


Garcia seeks political 
gain from debt crisis 

O . . Tn Addition, ihe cotmtn 


The government of Peru has bas tried to limit other typesof 
moved one step closer to an sanctions by toeping a j 
iconoclastic strategy to con- profile international position, 
front the debt crisis in the “The question is not 
developing world after the whether Peru complies with 


decision of the International 
Monetary Fund to' declare 
Fftru inekglhle to use fund 
credit lines. 

Peru provoked the sanction 


IMF rules," says a Western 
diplomat. “The country has to 
become more viable 
economically." 

Peru has an economy which 


* “ r- w — e rnu iuo au Gwuu'u; 

by payiMonlv $35 million of ^ excessively dependent on 
a total of $186 million arrears commodity exports, especially 
to the fund. metals and petroleum. In the 


to the fund. 

The president, Senor Alan 
Garda, is using the fund's 


past three decades each eco- 


Garrn, is using the fund’s upswing has been 

decision to squeeze the maxi- choked offby a lack of foreign 
mum political benefit. Over , v ^Hi n y 

•k* mulran/l ha HUita tn a ° _ . 


Si.'SK? t t*™'s * 14 wnion fr"**" 

debt does not rive iisuffiaent 

leverage to wnng concessions 
(balcony broadside) m nine ftom lhe inUsniatioil al finan- 


(balcony broadside) in nine 
months. 


isrssisvte 


get new loans out oi me worm f n , * w;* 

Bank and other international , “*ii pert, “ f0r 
leading abodes, acoonting lo ^ 


government finance officials. 
Pern should still be able to 
drew on $1 billion in commit- 
ted loans. 

For the past two years Peru 
has been sinking steadily into 
a high-risk creditor category, 
which means that only the 
most venturesome financial 
institutions are witting to ex- 
tend credit. 

The Garcia administration 


Senor Garcia must contend 
with a volatile political scene. 
Peru has the biggest Marxist 
left in South America. 

It regards his performance 
as tame. The united left 
received nearly a quarter of 
the votes in general elections a 
year ago. Although it cannot 
challenge him in congress it 
can stir up unrest in unions 
and among the jobless. 


In addition, the country is 
tom by a six-year guerriBa war 
which has cost more than 
8,000 lives. The Madia Shin- 
ing Path group has otploRed 
extreme conditions of pov- 
erty, and the narcotics trade 
and rising crime have added 
to the violent trend - 
The government's position 
is that sacrifice must be chan- 
neled towards creating pros- 
pects for growth rather that 
paying off bad debts. 

In a precedent-breaking 
move, Scot Garcia.has begun 
conferring with a select group 
of leading Peruvian ana for- 
eign businessmen. 

By enlisting corporate allies, 
the government hopes lo buiki 
up a healthy capital cyde 
which reverses the profiteer- 
ing instincts which have pre- 
vailed in the past. 

The government's strategy 
is to overhaul industry so that 
it replaces imports.' exports an 
increasing share of its output 
and meets a growing con- 
sumer market created by an 
aggressive redistribution of 


At the same time the gov. 
eminent has put in place the 
first phases of an agricultural 
policy which will make form- 
ing profitable. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• EAST RAND CONSOLI- 
DATED: First half of 1986. No 


interim dividend (same}. Pretax 
profit £285,500 (£309,900). 
Earnings per share 0.75p 
(l.Olp). The board reports that 
m the second half of this year 
the group realized a pretax profit 
of about £1 million on the sale of 
about 25 per cent of its interest 
in NMG It is confident that the 
results for the full year will show 
a substantial improvement on 
1985 and an unchanged divi- 
dend of lp a share is bkety. 

• VEBROPLANT: Total divi- 
dend I0.5p (9p) for the year to 
Mattch 31. Turnover £21.73 


million (£19.67 million). Pretax 
profit £3.28 million (£2.46 mil- 
lion). Earning* per share 34.93p 
(22.01 p). Capital expenditure 
readied record levels during 
1985-86 and profits in the 
current year are again ahead of 
the corresponding- period last 
time, the board says. 

• EALING ELECTRO-OP- 
TICS: The company has agreed 
to buy Optical Surfaces for £1 .33 
million. Optical's net tangible 
assets at June 30 last were 
£217,000. 

• PEERLESS: Total dividend 
63p (same) for the year to 
March 31. Turnover £42-53 
million (£46.17 minion). Pretax 
profit on ordinary activities 
£1.71 million (loss £379,000). 
The board OThim that profits 
would have. been substantially 
higher but for kwses at Glendale 
and Peerless Control-Systems. 


Both companies have now been 
sold. Management accounts for 
the first quarter of the current 
year show a profit, before tax 
and after interest, of more than 
£700.000. 

• CE HEATH: The company 
has bought Falcon Insurance, a 
US company, for $4.88 million 
(£3-26 million) in cash. It has 
also bought GM Foisaith Avi- 
ation Underwriting Agency, an 
Australian insurance agency, 
with broking interests, for 
AnsS3.05 million (£1-27 mil- 
lion) cash and Atlantica Insur- 
ance (Australia) and its 
managing agent. Salt Insurance 
Service, for AusS335 million 
(£1.4 million) cash. 


expansion by extending 


Aggreko's generator-hire opera- 
tions into the Europort region of 
the Netherlands. The ac- 
quisition of Van Rijn 
Eneigieopwekkende Apparaten 
of Maasdyk took place on Aug. 
15 for 2 million fl (£640.000). 

• SCOTTISH EASTERN 
INVESTMENT TRUST: In- 
terim dividend 0.85p (0-85p). 
Six months to July 31. Franked 
investment income £3.19 mil- 
lion (£2.48 million) and 
luifiranked £2.92 million (£3.33 
million). Earnings per share 
1.08p(1.09p). 

• ALBRIGHT AND WIL- 
SON: Sales £327.6 million 
(£333 million) for the first six 
months of 1986. Profit, before 
interest and tax, £24.1 million 
(£24.9 million). Capital expen- 
diture £12-2 million (£20-9 mil- 
lion). The company is a 
subsidiary of Tenneco Inter- 
national Holdings 

• SHEAFBANK PROPERTY 
TRUST: Year to. March 31. 
Final dividend 0-5p(nil). Gross 
rental income £685,393 
(£500,783). Pretax profit 


• ASEA: AB Haegglund and 
Soener, an ASEA Group com- 


Soener, an ASEA Group com- 
pany, has readied an agreement 
with Pneumo Abex, under 
which Haegglund is to acquire 
the Abex Denison Group. 
Pneumo A vex is a subsidiary of 
IC Industries. 

• NATIONWIDE LEISURE: 
Six months to April 30. No 
interim dividend (1.25p last 
time). Net turnover £7.12 mil- 
lion (£10.25 million). Pretax 
profit £309,000 (£407,000). 
Earnings per share, adjusted, 
1.8p(4.1p). The directors expea 
distributable reserves at the 
year-end to be sufficient to be 
able to recommend a final 
dividend comparable to that 
paid for whole of last year. 

• SALVESEN CHRISTIAN: 
The company has continued its 


£158,187 (£25,004). Earnings 
ner share O .80 f 1.09ul- The 


per share Q.8p: (1.09p). The 
company's net paring contin- 
ues to remain low, at below 30 
per cent of shareholders' funds 
despite continued investment 
and the upgrading of the port- 
folio. It -has substantial unused 
medium-term bank facilities to 
finance expansion. - - 


Law Report August 19 1986 


Council's decision for child 
in care quashed 



Regina r Hertford shi re County 
Council. Ex narte B 
Regina v Bedfordshire County 
Cooncfl, Ex parte C 
Before Mr Justice Ewbank 
[Judgment given August 15] 
Where a local authority pro- 
posed to allow a child, in care 
home to hts natural parent for a 
trial {period, bat considered 
changing their minds solely 
because they had received un- 
substantiaied allegations against 
the parent concerning his 
suitability as a parent, it was 
incumbent on the authority to 
give the parent an opportunity 
of refuting the allegations before 
deciding not to allow the child 
home on trial. 


suggest that local authorities are 
immune from judicial control: 
in an appropriate case ... the 
Wednesbury principle available. 
The. remedy of judicial review 


lutho rides are - Sbe. alleged that while she was 
iidal control: still living , with the father, he 
case ... the had brought a teenage boy into 
iple available, the matrimonial bed, forced her 
ldirial review to submit to intercourse with the 


under Order 53 of the Rules of boy and had then committed 
the Supreme Court is also buggery on the boy. 


available 

case.” 


an appropriate 


In nW 


The local authority's soda! 
services derailment were to Id of 


The same^oint wasjtnade Jn the allegation. They were by no 


Lord Scarman, at p795H- bean appropriate person 10 look 1 
In the mother’s case, her child after the children and in the light - 
was allowed home whb her but of the allegation they derided 1 ■ 
was removed three months later not to proceed with the -A 
and the local authority decided rehabilitation. f 


AC 791 \ per means sure that the. father would 


and the local authority decided rehabilitation. 

in a case conference of die social fh _ arn ,, nr t __ 

services department that n . v ^i 

n-hahiliMlinn haH G..W reVer5Cd thClf *»► . 


Mr Justice Ewbank, suing in 
the Queen's Bench Division, 


rehabilitation had foiled. 

A neighbour bad asserted that lalwe P- roposal 
the mother had come home one The lather was not asked for 


evening at about 1 130; that she his account of the matter and he 


granted an application by C, a 
rather, for judicial review by 
way of an order quashing the 
derision of the Bedfordshire 
County Council communicated 
to him on December 11, 1985, 
whereby they refused to con- 
sider bun for farther rehabilita- 
tion to his four children who 
were the subject of care orders 
made on November 20, 1985, in 
the Dunstable Juvenile Court. 

His Lordship dismissed a 
similar application made by B, a 
mother, in respect of the de- 
cision of the Hertfordshire 
County Council permanently to 
abandon the attempt to rebabili- 
tate her to her son who was 
made the subject of a full care 
order on August 9, 1985 at the 
Barnet Juvenile Court. 

Mr John Harwood-SteVcnson 
for the father and mother. Mr 

Roger McCarthy fix 1 the local 
authorities. 

MR JUSTICE EWBANK 
said that in both cases the 
parents had been hoping for a 
re-introduction To the children 
concerned who were the subject 
of care orders made under 
section l(2Xa) of the Children 
and Young Persons Act -1969. 

That hive bad been thwarted 
by the local authorities. 

Relying on the dicta of Lord 
Dtplock m O Reilly v Mackman 
([1983] 2 AC 237, 279), it was 
submitted in each ease that the 
parent was not. . gryen the 
opportunity to put nis or her 
own case azxl had accordingly 
been denied natural justice: 

The effect of the care orders 
was to vest in the local authori- 


had been drunk and lad fallen was given no opportunity to 


and lain in 1 the snow for 20 explain or put forward his own 
minutes with her riiiirf running ^ before the decision was 


about. - ■ . arrived 

But in that case the authority 
was '. concerned with wider Justice 
considerations; they were con- Monoi 
ceroed about the child's weight Comm, 
loss since his time at home and Brown 
his disruptive behaviour and 1986), 1 
hyperactivity. ih e kx 


arrived at. 

Adopting the approach of Mr 
Justice Macptierson .in /J v 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission. Ex pane Mauhew 
Brown Pic (The Times, July 18, 
1986), (he question was whether 
the local authority procedure 


There were many cases where was so unfoir that no reasonable 


children were allowed home on 
trial and where the local author- 
ity had later to decide that it was 
not a success. Such a derision 
was - well within the load 
authority's parental powers and 
was not amenable to judicial 
review in an ordinary case. The 
mother’s case was no different 
from tiie generality of cases and 
her application would be dis- 
missed. - 

In the case of the Either, after 
the care orders had been made 
and the local authority were 


authority could have adopted it. | 

Where the decision of a local ; 
authority was made solely on j 
unsubsta n tiated allegations it ] 
was incumbent upon them at ] 
least to allow a parent to make ] 
representations and to point to j 
evidence and witnesses to refute I 
the allegations. ] 


> s i:» 

1 * ' 


proposing to allow die 
home to the fother on trial, the 
mother, who was separated 
from the father, repeated to the 
police an allegation which she 
had previously made to her 
solicitor. 


The procedure adopted had to ; 
be designed to be foir; to allow: 
the fother to know what was 
bring said against him and to 
make representations and call' 
evidence to refute what was said-' 
against him. 


Solicitors: .Pollards,: 

Borehamwood; Mr WJ Church. 
Hertford; Mr R F K Corder, 
Bedford. ( 


- Co? 


Tribunal made Post 
Offiee bailee of mail 


ties parental powers and duties: 
see section 10 of the Child Cue 


Act 1980. 

: Under section 18 of tbe 1980 
Act it was the duty of a local 
authority, in reaching any de- 
cision with respect to the child, 
to ri y e first consideration to the 
need to promote the welfore of 


Lang v Devon General Ltd 
Where tbe central office of 
industrial tribunals had made a 
special arrangement with tbe 
Post Office that post received 
for deli very on a Saturday 
should be- kept until tbe Mon- 
day. a complaint of unfoir 
dismissal delivered to tbe cen- 
tral office on Monday instead of 


oral Ltd, had dismissal h eri 
un&iriy was presented more] 
than three months after bcf. 


than three months after her, 
dismissal contrary to section! 
67(2) of the Employment] 
Protection (Consolidation) Act 
1978. 



Saturday should be held to have 
been delivered in time, and an 


need 10 promote toe wejiare or 
the child; grvtne ~due"Consi(t- 
eraiion to the child's wishes and 


been delivered in time, and an 
industrial tribunal had jurisdic- 
tion to hear the complaint 
■ The Employment Appeal Tri- 


feelings. . , 

1 he parents could not invoke 
the wardship jurisdiction of the 
High Court see A v Liverpool 
City Council Q 1 9821 AC 363), 
but, in the words of Lord 
RoskilL at p 377R “that is nouo 


buna! (Sir Ralph Kilner Brown, 
Mr T. H. Jen Ians and Mr A. D. 
Scott) so held on July 28 when 
allowing an appeal by Mrs 
Monica Lang from a decision erf 1 

an Exeter industrial tribunal last 

February that her complaint 
lhatH&e employers, Devon Gen- 


SIR RALPH KlLNEfcj 
BROWN said that the appeal! 
tribunal derived coosidoabtei 
assistance from tberierision in! 
iiodgson v Armstrong 2 
QB 299), in lhe Court orApfraL 
where a similar arriuwemeni ■ 
had been made by the Post 
Office with the focal county! 
court -y 

The Court of Appeal had hefd] 
that the county court were 
coimkurins toe Post Office th^ 
bailees of the mail The appau- 
tribunal would follow tHdj 
derision. 1 




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THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


21 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


Edited by Matthew May 


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When wages begin to bite 


. There are now a barrage of reports 
available which conclude that Britain's 
future success hi information technology 
wjQ be thwarted increasingly by a severe 
shortage of well-trained and experienced : 
staff. ' 

Last week those largely academic and 
government studies were.joined by a 
survey from the research consultancy, 
Hay-MSL. which revealed that some 
high technology companies are no longer 
bothering to advertise many of their 
information technology vacancies. 

The number of jobs advertised by high 
technology industries in the first six 
months of 1986 fell by more than SO per 
cent, compared with the same period last 
year, says the: quarterly report which 
monitors job adverts for a variety of 
different industries in the national press. 

No one believes, in the present 
economic climate, that the number, of 
vacancies has fallen, but rather that the 
severe shortage of experienced staff for 
many sectors m the information technol- 
ogy industry seems to be making more 
and' more computer professionals un- 
likely to move to jobs offering traditional 
salary levels. . 

Those firms; unable or unwilling to 
pay higher salaries, have given tip -or 
reduced their advertising in despair. 
“Computer analysts and programmers 
for the company offering average salaries 
are extremely difficult to find," said 
Brian Woodrow of Hay-MSL. He points 
(o cost control, particularly on work 
associated with defence contracts, mak- 


ing many high-tech companies intent on 
holding salary levels for staff down to 
modest increases. 

With one major exception — the 
recruitment of computer staff for the Big 
Bang in October- companies have been 
remarkably successful in preventing 
laige . salary increases for most job 
functions in high technology. 

While' conventional demand and sup- 
ply economics would point to salary rises 
as the automatic response to a severe 
shortage of qualified employees, the staff 
who work in the data-processing depart- 
ments of companies that make extensive 
use computers have generally not seen 
their pay rise much fester than, say, the 


I 


THE WEEK 




By Matthew May 

staff in the marketing or sales depart- 
ments of their companies. . . 

it is only in the public sector, where 
the salary gap with the private sector has 
been widening for some time, that there 
have been some appreciable increases in 
the ‘ salaries ’ that are paid to high- 
technology staff 

Bui in the rarefied atmosphere of the 
City, companies are paying whatever it 
costs to hire computer staff with the right 
experience in the scramble before de- 
regulation in October. The potential 
profits for those City companies with 


sophisticated computer, systems that 
work efficiently will, it is argued, justify 
the expense. . . 

The City has another advantage 
computer -systems in any quantity are 
relatively new and, unlike in many other 
industries, computer staff do not have to 
fit into rigid departmental groupings. 
Salaries fordata-processing managers are 
often comparable with other department 
heads in .companies that have had 
computer departments for years. Con- 
sequently, salaries for computer staff in 
the dep art me nt tend to remain fixed to 
maintain differentials with other jobs. 

But salary levels that do not reflect the 
shortage of experienced staff remit in 
both unfined vacancies and a reluctance 
by employers to train staff — crucial if the 
shortage is to be reduced. Once trained, 
employers say their staff are often 
poached by other companies who still 
. rind it cheaper than providing their own 
training. 

A recent report by the National 
Computing Centre discovered that more 
than half of the 342 companies surveyed 
had no wish to hire adult trainees, 
although three-quarters felt that training 
was the responsibility of an employer. 

Increased salaries for high technology 
staff that recognize the shortage and 
value of experience, as witnessed by 
recruitment for the Big Bang, may be the 
only way to convince employers that 
training may be a cheaper option in the 
long run than putting up with the 
poaching of staff and unfilled vacancies. 


Know it 
all — do 
nothing 

By Chris Naylor 
For anyone who knows little 
about computers, the in- 
troduction of new technology 
to a firm can seem daunting 
and threatening. 

With its new jargon, would- 
be users find it easy to believe 
that if the language used to 
describe what is going on is so 
alien, the actual activities 
must be even more .so. 

1$ it then necessary to be 
“com puterate**? The answer is 
a definite yes, but first you 
must identify the various 
stages of computeracy so you 
can work out exactly how 
computerate you need to be 
for maximum career impact. 

At the lowest stage there are 
those who can use the jargon. 
Often, they can use it better 
than those higher up the 
hierarchy of computeracy and 
will come up with real treats, 
such' as “a user-friendly inter- 
face to window transparently 
on to the machine" to describe 
what turns out to be a colour 
screen. • 

This stage of computeracy 
can be acquired in a few weeks 


Sirohen Joftnson 



simply by reading a few 
computer magazines. Ideally, 
you will read them while 
watching TV or taking a bath. 
Whatever you do. do not try to 
understand the magazines be- 
cause this will only confuse 
you. You are trying, after all. 
to acquire the chat, not the 
knowledge. 

And it can be invaluable in 
your work. Once people hear 
you .talking like that can 
promotion be far behind? 

The next step up is to have 
some idea what the jargon 
means. This does not take that 
much longer and you can 
progress to that stage from the 
first simply by reading the 


magazines for a bit longer and 
trying to concentrate on what 
they seem to be saying. 

This. too. can be* invaluable 
in your career because, at this 
stage, you can beat the person 
at the first stage simply be- 
cause you will know what he 
or she is talking about — even 
if he or she docs not — and 
anyone who cannot see the 
promotional mileage in that 
docs not have much of a 
career in prospect anyway. 

The third stage is, really, a 
potential red herring in that it 
consists of being computerate 
to the point where you can 
actually use computers. 

The only way to get to this 


third stage is by actually 
pulling your hands on a 
computer and trying, and 
eventually succeeding, in get- 
ting it to do what you warn it 
to do. 

The result: you will become 
genuinely computerate and. as 
night follows day. indispens- 
able to your firm because you 
are the most computerate 
person on the payroll. 

You are the one who can 
really do things with the 
machine. 

So. why is this a red herring 
for those with a career in 
mind? 

Well, it is just that, if you 
Continued on page 23 


A testing time 
for Amstrad 


One of the : great impon- 
derables of • the personal 
computing 'business is just 
how many Sinclair Spectrums 
or Commodore 64s now re- 
side. forlorn and forgotten, in 
cupboards and drawers up and 
down the country? 

The question, until recently, 
might well have been consid- 
ered academic; Now it ' is 
becoming increasingly, perti- 
nent. for the public are once 
again soon to be assailed with 
a new computer system front 
Amstrad which is intended, at 
least iii part. to. take the IBM 
PC standard into the home. 

U is a market thai the 
company bas made almost its 
own during, the past year by 
producing a range of computer 
systems, culminating so far in 
the 8256 and 8512 word 
processors. Now. come the 
PCW Show in London next 
month, it will have its own 
IBM PC-done available in a 


By Martin-Banks 
by 


the likes of Olivetti, 
Compaq and IBM — arguably 
over-priced for what they are. 

This is definitely the case if 
service, support, development 
and marketing promotion 
costs are excluded from the 
pricing. These days, a PC 
takes no design work, is cheap 
to build and has a well-defined 
marketplace. Given this, the 
last year or so has seen 
steady stream of PC-cIones 
appearing with increasingly 
competitive inking. 

Having gone under £1.000 
earlier this year, the price of a 
PC done has tumbled fesL 

Unlike the launch of the 
PCW about a year ago, 
Amsirad's new PC will have a 
number of competitors with 
exactly comparable products 
— no one can be too different 
in a standard market like the 
IBM PC. And for users look- 
ing for the best value in this 

arm nihpr «innlipre misfit 



will make an interesting nirv-- 
up to Christmas, the tra- 
ditional time in which home 
computer users, their friends* 
relatives and. sycophants tend 
to rush out and* buy tiew 
products. 

It will be a testing time for 
Amstrad. to see if it can 
achieve the same levels of 
success with its PC as it has 
done already with the word 
processors and home comput- 
ers; There have, to be some 
doubts, both about Amsirad's 
potential performance and 
about the market. 

AmstracTs petition has sev- 
eral factors against it. First, it 
will seem to many users to be 
competing against itself The 
PC clone will appear more 
expensive than the current 
PCW.— and unlike the PCW it 
does not include a printer. For 
any potential customer who 
wants a system, rather than a 
specifically PC-compatible 
system. Amstrad's PC could 
seem a poor purchase com- 
pared to Amstrad’s.PCW, 

Customers who specifically 
want a : PC-compatible are 
probably professional people 
whose work spills over into- 
the home. But Amstrad still 
faces problems, for there are 
many other competitors in the 
market already. 

Far East companies have 
come to the same conclusions 
as Amstrad. that the IBM PC 
specification is easy to copy, 
made of 'easily obtained 
components and sub-systems 
and — in the forms marketed 


,al ready -available. 

This presupposes there are 
sales to- be made with dieap 
PC clones, which is arguable 
among some potential groups 
of users. Certainly there is 
considerable scope among the 
small business community 
and the self-employed. 


Wealth of good 
software 


The PC has become the 
standard workhorse of many 
businesses, with a wealth of 
good applications software 
available. Yet the relatively 
high price of standard PCs and 
compatibles - has inhibited 
their sale into these important 
groups. Cheap hardware, cou- 
pled with, the cheap' software 
now appearing, will open up 
this market 

But the potential of sales of 
cheap PC clones into the 
home must be considered a 
trifle dubious. As a games 
player, these -machines are 
grossly over-specified ■ and 
over-priced, even at £450. 
Many of the millions who 
have bought computers in the 
past for such purposes have 
often soon lost interest 

Lastly, the type of applica- 
tions • software readily avail- 
able — spreadsheets, database 
managers and the tike — are 
too strongly oriented to busi- 
ness use. Only word process- 
ing and perhaps, communi- 
cations software could be of 
any real interest to non- 
business home users. - 


Comma: Portable II £2700! 


coma 


Special oflfr on the new. smaller Portable 
II model 3, 80286. processor {8mb?), 

640k ■ RAM, lOmb hard disk, 360k 
floppy disk drive, combined graphics 
and text display. Compaq Portable 256k 
RAM» 2 360k drives, dual-mode display, £1350. Please phone 
for Morse prices on the Portable Plus, Deskpro and Deskpro 
286 products. 

* ■ AlpriM.ar»Ml»>ci»mV4T 

MftRSF ftfeMPHTFRS 78 Hofoom, London WC1V 6LS. 
IflUHOE MimrUILW Telephone 01-831 0644. Telex 262546 


Wright Air 

^^Conditioning 

— fiffyourcuii^iuterrocEn 
COMPUTER BOOM COKSMICTlOMffi CONDmOKWG 
KABTTEKAKCE&CONSimHCY 0217738421 


BMTCGaAi! 

BRISTOL 

GLASGOW 

-LLT1S 

LONDON 

NEWCASTLE 

WOKINGHAM 


IBM PC, complete, £895! 

True. The, IBM Personal Computer with 256k, 

360k disk drive, UK keyboard, monochrome dis- 
play, mono/pnnter adaptor and guide to ops & 

Baric, complete, £895. Upgraded versions also 
available, at special Morse priees. IBM AT/E 
20mb, complete. £2850- Reduced prices on ^ 

Proprihier & Prop rioter XL when purchased with IBM systems. 

MpiaHWibpfl W iar»\ AT 

MflDCt PflMPirTPIK 73 High Hotbom, London WC2V 6LS. 
mUnJE WWrU I tiO Telephone 01-831 0644. Telex 262546; 

• - - . . -Vs* 



COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


BUILDING FOR 

FOR SECURITIES MARKET - CENTRAL LONDON E12-20K 

GRADUATE ANALYST /PROGRAMMERS + CAR 

r n « »iT Lagc trittny of Wematnrai Bsrtang Corocratoc skated fit Central LonBon. wan 
oases *i Europe. F» East and North Arena. Provides toanaai information samces womwrte va 
an extensive on nMt 

PaiMysSemal Anafyst/Programnwsxnft good dope* or eauMlant are merited to wort in strafl 
group or alone, wtom i yomg and voy tnendty environment u aeapi end xnpterent new fnunoal 
systems serwng the pro tes sxx i al investment commonly. 

Experience Sold COBOL programming. T or ASSEMBLER coupled wiOi endive software develop- 
nSTEmMure to VH/CUS and tmanoal enters woum be a rttssnet advantage is the emnnrant 
encompasses Franco!. Investment. Eurobontf/Secvaes apptcanocs. Hamm: BM/Amdaiti man- 
frames. Tandems and micros with camnwracafioo fete. 

Biei .Ik Wonderful wwttirtty to jtm a l*gfc cafibn otpansafcn at the forefront at tta wortd's 
largest faancal ilila b utu . The anceUent salary k c omp hmen a fl oy non-cortntnittnv oenwm. BuPft. 
bow and company » scheme. K you respond wed in Vis fas&novmg and dynamic omtonment, 
yoe c» expect last promotion and kgh honcol rowan*. 

. REF: TO 1936 

ICL PROGRAMMERS/SENIOR PROGRAMMERS SW LONDON 
- TO MOVE INTO ANALYSIS S11-16K + 
." BENEFITS 

Cgeg One of die laipest ad most success*)! canpum senta companies dedng with trow 
hw owate gro pe and amroercal/tiusness gxkcato anas, started - wdh compete* and dynanvc 
professional!). 

Programmers and Senior Pnvanmers to mow into armfe* rote and wort on major 
pwieds. ptayng an negtal pan in • smafl team working tram the Antfp *8 stage through to 
■npJernantation. At the tor scoot level there wil be team leederetip. Ttamg w* be pen ei 
analysis. 

bgtgm& nrman - IB months -2yeare COBOL espariencB named tm ICL nwHnmea . lram a 


YOUR FUTURE 

SYSTEMS ENGINEERS BERKSHIRE TO £23K 

„ + BENEFITS 

C*m: Energenc young Eoraoean eomomv xMPwd in Skew taut oesxjrt Baste m Beriemra 
wnnomces n Munch and Pans, men we nxmer pans to set u> mex own mmoaaimi pant m 
Europe taer tbs veer. 

Pex toee : Enfeneers and Protect Leaders arc Round for the development of advarad CaD tools. 
CantMates wk be worxng on SUN ano DEC nardware using C. 

EgmMwac Caooases must nave area VLSI exoenence. DRtoraMv gained <M|tu a S*coa des«n 
«wx5fiSft. Successful appheams wai nave computet aes«n exoenence ano omwafloeot ohyscaL 
structural and bebavnual oaapi Constoenbie merest will oe snown to canoams won area 
«Boart to nsakng products dnedv on Ghent sites 

dxtxhent ocxnrWNy to worii lor a comoany who, m the non ten years, am to be in the 
torefrort of to-teoi Mom desgn. Bcneres siauoe an aceflera remmenoun package m stock 
options lor canoxaes al semor levels. REF: TX 1976 

☆ ☆☆☆☆ SALES ☆☆☆☆☆ 

BERKS BASE 


£17,000 0TE 
BASE TO £14.000 


commeraal or fenoriaf background. Senbr Projyaireners - 3 yean pfeo. preferably wki IDMS. TPMS 
and team leadeniip expenence. At the mom juraor level vaang wdl be own in UMS. 
Cimr* . These oppoffinties must be carotudv constoneri by ctfxfaas with har dw e /appicatioo 
expenence (ended u one or even two users, as tbs type of person has- benefited coaMenbly nthe 
pest. The weiy of herdMroemptoyed and de scope of aaphsaaons caupad wdh eacelent trentog.. 
can lead to fast pmtnkoa hgher skmes Md a cedkn pnapeous- future. 


- 


- Id^ ao . ■ 


ANALYST PROOiAMIffilS SURREY - 'TfftflBK SENEF9S - 

A dynamo faa- rnoencsotwore tohOk^iwweltfiB C^r piBdM gB ofatar 
packages n the Etispeao mow place. Eased in Smy wth wodeio-Pans: J - -• •" • 

tata Analyst Programroero reouxod to wok in ■ taamtn the dsMOpnttt oftapota ^stonST 
tnoiangn to ergacnenttoon. Wok kwolves tegular Bwk to Peris - al coerces pod. 
Cip Rfec A Upwards tri 2 years COBOL prpgrammm g jkftin an W-manfome enwronmanu 
Bpwifi CICS D0S/VSE or MVS essamoL Lde assurance or financial a pp h rm o ns eapeto n c e 
wood be of (wr tirwljr e k l l l 

T Wnkad caw opportuadri within this tM l M iy.wMi banaBs induding BURmiAM - 

xtsurance and Me assurance. 

' RfffTS 1915 

SYSTEMS ANALYSTS/ CITY £1^£21K 

COMPUTER AUDIT +BANK1NG BENEFITS 

Ceapmy (toe of the WothTa tortiQ banteg corporations, a major user of IBM mankvnes and 
assooeua computer hanNaro. Ifignar levels of excelence in taduioiogBi am constantly bemg atoned 

and for this to corknoe more OP. professionals an sought. . . 

E i iM ee r Systems Analysts to work on a vanety of fxwnoal and banking appfcatkm. parfakriy In 
the Computer Audit ana. Ate Comprfler Auton to wok wrfhm the Bank's Audd department, wtming 
on comiMtar systems and Ustog between aufil sal DP. ; • 

fHfiiCto Upwards of threa yens dtta processaig axpoience k Systems Arolysis. computer auM 
or qiriily assurance roJe. It w« be advantageous to have a hadvixiid in finance or accouncng. 
Candafaw eeth expenence of any hardware - ma u dr a me. mni or mcro am astef to apply. 


. These are golden ooportunties tor career ad va ncement, not only pmwdxto a way no 
hanfcng bU also to work on the test IBM Iwdware. A very generous- salary, mor^pge subsidy, 
bankaig and -a range of addbonal benefits should mafia these even more retractive poopects. 

REF: TO 1990 


MOVE TO SALES! 

DATACOMS, NETWORKS 
SALES TRAINING 

CMiptfp Recognised tfiroughour the UX as a leader n dafecommcrenns. networianq ad 
wtonon s ake, t bs nayr reamta carer » onekiy w shgasng a uanee sales programme for 
emnhous computng protessrenals. 

P i rifi a r fintkffir wortBM as a sales fiaison repmsewwk yeo wdl be reqved to dee) «Mh al 
customer enqaaes and mark* researoh withn two ristna manat scaurs: ue. Government /Local 
Autoonoes. and major accounts. Progression to m aa stre re n sales eperznn wdl touow worn nne 
months of jonng the compny. 

D roe ^ e re : : lhe successful anOd a tc s wk currently be woriano ti skas smoon or technfial sunoort 
raes.mlbaton.exce«ertcomt rasmu on stalls and good sales apMunekessenUal. An utidemand- 
ing oJ fatrenaaDM would naanOy be renamageous aMnogn not essentaL 
D w wrifc Young and — kk» redwiduals wdl recoonae tte as an ouBonann nooomxxtv in move 
xitn the sales arena. In addoon to the outsonong salary the company is aifenng full oradua ami 
srees traxang conducted externally by a pnnessaal organeanon. REF: TYB 1752 

SALES EXECS + SALES MGRS LONDON £40.000 + OTE 

NETWORKED IBM PC'S BASE TO £20,000 

TIMES TOP'IBBO " INCENTIVES SCHEME 

teufinadwters n-tt* O^c. Mh a woriotwoe turnover of 5250 maod. Is 
odergon^a ipor. expanaon p rog^h me . To help suaatrvm record of success. 
-je*hki_tt»'Wtostr¥ today, a n$nba of-vaaheks ree now Matte. • 

s new pumoce twift offices m Were London, the bnef wdl be to seB 
sot«WK.mtD coroow accounts ei London aid toe Home Counoos Cvrent 
tacanoes nctooe territory sales, accost uwne gtmeaL and srees management oosaons. 

c To oaky fa Iricse posmons. ad eanmoaes wdl need to Oem ouarX a sound baefi- 
solul ion sate and an noeedi wgeleaoe of me neon manaapace. Famdanty wtb urge 

marefreme sdes s of parnaikr nerest hxkndures mnsig to apply nr a management posnon 

should im rekvant experience at ms level 

'nw eompory Tandy beheves mre salary shot*! be comman su r ato wtti success aid 
areewmenL To this end, an aasandng meenhve scheme has been enpiemented (KUng tnos 
abroad tor Irigh aefaevere. The together wdti me e xc e ll en t eammgs potenoal M toe generous 
benefits package, make ths a srewo opoormy to tanner your career. . TV 1660 

SOFTWARE SALES CENTRAL LONDON OR BASE TO £15K 
INTERNATIONAL EASTERN HOME COUNTIES UNLIMITED 
OPPORTUNITIES EARNING 

GOOD MNGMNT PROSPECTS . 

tarepiwqpThB tmamaborire Sdhware Consultancy is pot of a tape mutoribooa) organsalon. and b 
se archxx ] for two exp e nencad consUtonts to ion thee successful toon. 

Setfng Mgh value sohrebits software ranreng on BM, DfC and other major hardware to 
existing Bh* Chip compass aid mm new buaness areas n Central London or toe Eastern Home 
Ctxxibes. Oppomntoes to develop into Europeat and US mafias are on offer axordng to indMauaf 
success re the UK. In adtWxm. prospects tor promoam no management ae antnoted. 
|MdiHC CaxhtMEs snodd OB awe to demonstw a good back recoin n a relevant anmrenent, 
Sstorawy wdh IBM experience in toianaal or accountng areas. Be capable of txgo level negotraaons 
and pn fr*oe outreanOng axrrmucKanon sfcdts. 

firejjJ The company is aheady lugtdy respected m toe martcetpiace hawng been established for 
over 20; yean The generous range of benefits mettle cmwz to car. BUPA. pension and untmded 
earrings potential and excclare prospects tor promobaa REF: TB 1951 



rning 
■ntfl 10pm:- 
0It311 8444 
03727 22531 

If you do ml sm i posifion But b 
Molly suited to you, please call as 
we bane toad suitable position; lor 
previous canctidales wflfHn 2 weeks 
of tben cootacfiog us. Calf our salef 
team today, we wnl endeavour to fmd 
ypo the right JOB! 

Retundog to Britan? 

We are specialists te assisting Brit- 
ish Nationals working overseas ami 
wishing to retura to the UK. 


6th Floor, Empire House, 175 Piccadilly, London W1Z 9DB Telephone: 01-409 2844, (24 hours) 


OUTSTANDING POSITIONS IN 
BANKING, SALES AND SOFTWARE 


PICK PROGRAMMERS CITY TO £16,000 

(PERMANENT AND CONTRACT! "BIG BANC" 

Tris International Systems House has enfcyed an earwndy successful financial year. At present thdr diems 
are tieavfly commltxed to Banfidng and StDchbraKfng systems. Due to more growth In new business, there 
are openings for PICK Programmers who \»ant to be Involved In exddng “BtC BANC" systems. The icfeaT 
cantfidaces wtCbeln their twenties, possess presentable academic qualifications and good professional 
etiquette. Several satisfied applicants have already started work In this company and'have Indicated that 
outst anding adti evemeng are qutddy rewarded by a substantial Increase of salary. REF TM 14205 

GRADUATE ANALYSTS G LONDON TO £20.000 

6r PROGRAMMERS (BANKING) +CAR 

■ eradiate Analysts and Programmers are urgently required to develop systems ready for die 'Big Bang’ in 
October This need is never more apparent than at this Chy based firm of Management Consultants, who 
are specialising in the development of Deafer Room. Foreign Exchange and Investment Management 
systems. Ideally aged mW 20‘s to (ate OTsarvd possessinga gpod degree, candidates should have several 
years experience in Data Processing and preferably a broad knowledge of a variety of appfcadore. Banking 
experience.' although preferable, is not essential, as. full training wffl be given, hi tUs and any new 
Imi Jwi i rfii u ftwnr r Tilnrl ri .irr nrrrgrnT rfrpriwlmrwnrprrirnrr fn ;vVtrtnn1rrtmTprrh(msf^hrT^^ 

REFTC 12996 


SYSTEM END USERS LONDON NEGOTIABLE 

(INVESTMENTS) SALARY 

\Mb have enioyed a special relationship with this company over a long period of time Recently, they have 
notified us of a very interesting posfoon. They require an End User who has considerable experience of 
Investment systems. Duties wil indude system demonstrations, user tral nlng. business analysis and support 
This isan unique opportunity for End Users in their twenties and of an ouwnd going personality to reaRse 
their potential In a consuhancy environment. The ideal candidate will have worked In operations, chent 
accounting or an investment assistant capacity. The salary Is negotiable with the possibility of a company 
car after a qualifying period. REFTM 14535 

BANKING BUSINESS CITY TO £25,000+ 

ANA1YST BANKING BENEnTS 

The function of a Business Analyst hi any international Bank is regarded as one of the most important 
services. These professionals have to speak two lanpiages: that of the noMedimcri user (Banked, and that 
of the DP. Department which does not understand banking applications. Both require a very high 
specification and applicants with these sklBs are desperately required at this leading International Bank 
fo the Oty. TOrtiodar areas of inewest include: Securities. Eurobonds. Dealer Room Opeotfons and FOREX. 
Ideal appBcapis shotdd have griped a thorough knowledge of at least one of these areas, coupled with a 
reasonable technical DlR background. Excdfem banking benefits are offered In addition to above market 
salaries. REFTP 13559 


SALES 


SALES EXECUTIVES 
MAINFRAME 4GL 


& ENGLAND £18K BASIC 

E38KOTE 
GUARANTEE 

THs prestige U& Software Company, one of the top companies hi Europe, is now looking tobrtngonboard 
two additional Sales Executives as business strategically expands: This isa timely opportunity to join this 
ergatfcation as ft plans the transition from geograph id to vertical marte systems sales split across specific 
UK. mainframe (brgdy IBM) insalbdons. Knowledge of IBM software architectures and experience of 
selling at Board/Director level would be useft3 and an obvious proven Hack ream) In multilevel business 
is eepeaed.^ The quotas are setua conservative level with an exceptionally high commisstonpercentage 
on afl owquoca bookings, last yean several of the safes team achieved I newcess of 1 7S* of target Average 
order vahies are hi^t and therefore a guarantee Is paid to ofiset the longer safes eydeof these premier 
produas. The usual high standard benefits apply Induding an executive car. REFTJ 14508 


CITY 


OTE £50.000++ 
BASIC £30,000 
EARNINGS UP TO £140,000 


AREA SALES MANAGER 
DATA COMMS 


- HOME ‘ CARLTON Z2 CD! 

COUNTIES £19,000 BASIC 

■ £37.000 OTE 

Thfc world leader in the Data COmrns field is seeking a top flight Area Sales Manager due to exceptional 
sales and ensuing expansion. A minimum of 5 years experience In the Dao Comms Industry is required. 
Ideally with oneof the major companies In this fidd. As this leading manufacturer sells to Governmental 
Edacatfonri.BMWngandaienvSQleiwIronmeBts, experience of these vertical m»tet5.andtheab»Bty.B> 
negotiate at dreaor level is highly desirable In return they offer a reatetically adriewbie £57.000 On Target 
Earnings. This is guaranteed for the first three months. ACaritOn 2J2 CDIand private mileage is provided 
and BURA and life Assurance come as standard with this executive padtage. This postdonwifl'enable the 
true professional Sales Executive to enjoy an interesting and higNy profitable career wfthhi a tremendously 
successful company. REF TX 14485 


SALES MANAGER 
FINANCIAL SOLUTIONS 
ACCOUNT MANAGER 

One of tire largest supp&ere of advanced Information systems for Foreign Exchange and raher dealing 
activities is recruiting an exceptional Sales Manager to head up a new division. The successful applicant 
should have detailed knowledge of the City and have the abifity to be effective In seIBng total solutions to 
major Rnandri Institutions. The company ofleiy a combination of spedalfsed advanced technology software 
and serviced The brief wffl be to run a full P & L for the area and to manage a team of Major Account 
Executives. Prelected business levels over the next three years are very substantial One Account Manager 
wtth Similar quafities is also being hunted. This is an outstanding opportunity to take up a senior position 
with a leading company and to be at the forefront of the dramaticchanges about to be witnessed In the 
Financial Markets. ” REFTLI4293 

• SALES EXECUTIVE \ _^- 'STeNGLAND £35K GTE UNLIMITED 

SOFTWARE-- '*'■ CAVALIER- BMW 5281 

A rapidly expanding Software deriership is seeklng-a dedicated Sales Executive to sell primarily word 
processing and accounts packages tiwt are generally acknowledged to be the leading brands avaBable 
today. Experience of die accounts software and database products wot3d be ideaL especially If rids was 
with a knowledge^ lihihHger Networking systems. Due to thdrcommeitiri success, t hi s c omp a ny 
Is now selling into the Educational and Governmental markets and Major' Corporations, therefore, 
eeperience of this Vuture would be very useful. A basic salary ol £16.000 is offered but potential income 
Is unlimited over and above the £35.000 on target earnings. This position offers a great opportunity to 
enhanoean already successful career path. The outstanding package Includes initially a CavaBer CDI wtth 
a progression to BMW 5281 with evidence of high achievement. . REFTX I45Q7 


BUSINESS PEOPLE IN THE PEOPLE BUSINESS 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 
21 CORK STREET, LONDON WlX IHB 


DAlA 



COMPUTER EMPLOYMENT LID. 


24 HRS (10 LINES) 


01 439 8302 
01 437 5994 


EVENINGS & WEEKENDS 


(0252) 27703 
01 668 2250 


/ 








22 * 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


i 

j 


Upgrading 

THe Office 
Computer 

an Hay 





EHFIOENC £ 


A switched-off computer isn't exactly a turn on 
for office efficiency 

But upgrading some systems requires network 
rewiring and software replacement 

And while the plug's pulled out, you can’t con- 
duct business properly 

At Hewlett-Packard, we've developed a unique 
approach to computer system planning. 

One that'll upgrade and still do business, with- 


out rewiring or rewriting a syllable of software. 

It’ll also provide all the hardware and software 
you’ll ever need for any office function . 

Word processing, data processing, networking 
electronic mail. 

We call it the Personal Productivity Centre ; if 
you think it could help you, complete the coupon. 

At Hewlett-Packard, a problem shared is a 
problem solved. 


jfeep idle computers off my hands. Please send me full information ”1 
about your Personal Productivity Centre. 


Nome. 

Title- 


Company _ 
Addre$s_ 



HEWLETT 
PACKARD 

We can work it out 

The Literature Enquiry Section, Hewlett-Packard Ltd, Eskdale Rd, 
Winnersh, Wokingham, Berkshire RGIISDZTef: (0734) 696622. 


Tel:. 


CMOS TO 


I 


1 


G 


:e 


:r 


E 


J 


Jsj 

Nl 


TAH£ TIMES TUESDAY AUGUSi’ 19 1986 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/2 


Knowu ^ shield against eavesdroppers 

Inof ■There have now been several - including several sales offices remain for 1 

lajl UU demonstration# of ho# a partredvwi sale by the receiver. - I 

r sMnoOuiskte a huHrffnc with an t 


Education 


Continued from page 21 
can do something useful for 
your firm, you will run the risk 
of being called on to do it by 
everyone who is less 
computerate than you are. 
And, if you are busy doing 
useful things for the firm, you 
cannot really spend the req- 
uisite amount of time needed 
to do those things which are j 
useful in “ advancing your I 
career. 

Now to the final stage of 
computeracy. which incor- 
porates all of the skills of the 
first two stages and neatly 
skips stage three. This is to be 
computerate to the point 
where you know what 
computers can and cannot do. 

At this, you are invaluable 
to your firm, because every- 
one else is still at the first two 
stages or has got stuck into the 
cul de sac of the third. 

You lack the skills to do 
anything concrete with a com- 
puter but you know enough to 
tell others what they should be 
doing. 

You are not going to have 
your time wasted by trivial 
matters, such as physically 
working with computers, but 
you will know exactly wbat 
goals should be set for those 
whose time is less valuable 
than your own. You are now 
personally taigeited straight 
for a board appointment and 
you have the time to ensure 
that any necessary goals on 
this path are scored. 

How do you actually get to 
this stage of computeracy? 
Frankly, there is only one way 
to do it: by travelling the 
whole road of compnteracy 
the hard way. including stage 
three. Attend night masses, 
read the magazines, learn how 
to program, practice word- 
processing. buy an IBM for the 
home, ask your children how 
it works. . 

But remember, whatever 
you do. do not let your 
colleagues at work see you 
making the thing actually go. 


■ There have now been several 
demonstr ati ons of how a parked van 
sitting outside a bidding with an 
ackgned television sat In It can sometimes 
pick up electromagnetic omissions to 
the extant of being able to reproduce 
what fe being typed on a computer 
terminal inside an office. It i# a very Ht 
and miss affair and if there are several 
screens In use ft is wtuftttylmpossfote to 
tune Into a particidar one. But some 
companies with sensitive information are 


i to reduce 


Banafix, a comp 
ton covering for 


COMPUTER 

BRIEFING 


glare from me sun, says As latest product 
has the useful side effect of promng 
raefio-frequency shielding. Caged Solar 
Bronze, it promises to make the job of 
any surveillance equipment much more 
fflmculL-Price is around £1.50 per 

square foot and further information is 
available from 0494 778888. 

■ Employees of the Interface Network 
chain erf computer rotators may avoid 
redundancy following the company's 
move Into receivership. MBS, a distributor 
of computer equipment has agreed 
with the receiver to take ovbt some of 
Interface's assets, ihcfixftng the 
London sales office, and says 
arrangements are being made to offer 
the 50 field staff jobs wth MBS. Other 
parte of the Interface business. 


including several sales offices remain for 
sale by the receiver. • 

■ The computerization of personnel 
records, combined with hardening soda! 
attitudes and a fear of unemployment, 
has led to a boom In blackmail, according 
to Michael Hepworth. Britain’s leading 
authority on the crime. Home Office 
figures show that blackmail is on the 
upswing* after a decline In the 1970s. Mr 
Hepworth has warned that access to 
computer records provides an ideal' 
environment in which Mackmafl can 
flourish. He said Information technology 
has made possibTe-the concept of the 
full-time master-Wackmaiter, previously 
confined to the pages of crime novels. 

■ The American armed forces are 
caught between rapid increases in 
tecrcwtogy and dangerous decreases 

eaSy19!Ws, America^SnS^Src^ ’ 
could be caught between a growing 
requirement for skilled people to 
operate arid maintain sophisticated 
weaponry and a diminishing supply of 
youthful recruits," said a report by Marti* 
Bmkin, a senior leUow at the 
Brookings institution. The 
microeiedronics revolution is 


ettsd/feetoring a transkion from 
"smart" to "brilliant" weapons. The 
weapon of today is already becoming 
“extremely sensitive to the ski! of Its 
operator and too compficated for the 
calfore of sokfier assigned to that duty,’ 
.saysMrBinfcin. ' 

■ It had to happen. The runaway 



■' Open-plan banking without 
high barriers and glass screens 
between cashiers and customers 
could be on the way if anew type of 
computer-controlled cash safe for 
bank staff catches on. The safes, 
made by Nixdorf, are controlled by 
a computer terminal, require pass- 
words from the cashier and can be 
programmed to give out only a 
maximum amount of cash, say 
£250, for each transaction with a 
time delay between each customer. 

success of FBofax "personal organisers” 
and a host of imitators has finally 
spawned a version complete with floppy 
disc so that the busy executive can 
use a PC to make up a smart-looking 
version on a computer printer. It can 
remember anniversaries from one year to 
another and if you have taken the 
precaution of copying the discs It might 
not be quite such a calamity if lost 
However, as it is priced at hefty a £287, it 
is likely to appeal only to those who 
are the most computer addicted. 


Missing link to a smaller world 


, From Geof Wheelwright 
In Vancouver 

The world of data commu- 
nications is getting smaller. 
Despite the many competing 
communications and com- 
puter technologies vying for 
global superiority, it seems 
that users round the world are 
demanding, and belatedly get- 
ting, ways of using one 
another's computers and 
establishing communications 
between them. 

At least that's the im- 
pression you jet after a visit to 
the Expo 86 fir in Vancouver. 
The' dual themes are trans- 
portation and communica- 
tion, prompting more than 80 


nations to put their staie-of- 
The-art computer and commu- 
nications technology on show, 
alongside the latest cars, ships 
and planes. 

While each of those technol- 
ogies takes a slightly different 
approach, they all seem to 
point to what many now call 
conveigency, where a commu- 
nications network is con- 
structed by marrying old, new 
and differing communications 
and computer technologies to 
produce a patchwork, but 
effective, global communica- 
tion system. 

The first step in this global 


the 20th century, quickly fol- 
lowed by the tdex and tele- 
phone. While all of these 
modes of communication 
have maintained separate 
existences, it is high technol- 
ogy that is bringing the low- 
technology systems together. 

Telex, for example, was 
established in many western 
countries in .the 1930s mid 
1940s, but is only now reach- 
ing some nations in any kbKl 
of volume. But the feet that 
developing nations may be 
using older technology doesn't 
shut them out of the conver- 
gence business. 

Countries such as Britain 
and the United Stales now 


do not let your The 1 dual themes are trans- . The first step in this global gence business, 
at work see you portation and commonica- link was the telegraphy, system Countries sue 
. thing actually go. lion, prompting more than 80 established near' the turn of and the . United 

COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


CLIENT 

SERVICES 

REPRESENTATIVE 


lut u ya sing Manning bemcesTtas an imme- 
diate entry-level opening for a (5Hent Services 
Representative. LPS offers atJufllengiiig and 
fist-paced work environment arid the opportu- 
nity to learn the computer industry in general 
and the computer leasing industry in particu- 
lar. Prignary dutiefewill include supporting the 
Account Manager™ handling cUrnt enquiries,-, - 
analysing industry announcements, and work- 
ing with numbers. The ideal candidate will 
posses strong analytical and writing skills. A 
degree m Business or Finance, and a European 
language preferred, but not required. 

Send resume to: 

Leasing Planning Service, 
International Date Corporation EaropaLtd, 
2 Bath Road, 

London, W41LN 


Great 

Western 

Recruitment 

The foDowing is ■ •election of i 
on oar boob: many more 
c — pater jiiofn— innela with 


200 jobs 
aHe*for 
nun 2 


. SATELLITE SYSTEMS BUJ H aUtt - 6ood honour In pin vey 
■Uiit— M e on— . Ham nuntta/Hamslfo -E1K25K. 

PR£- AND POST-SALES SUPPORT - Vakr nMtxSav - brttoc <* 
fmMctmg sys&m eamtenty. Bristol - c£l7K + ar. 

M%etMriTO 

mubmyianku 


. a-nx • 

BM SYSTEM 34/36/3S b ti tg um d - Aiafrfl J ff' n)g Mjm erc and Cqv 
stan Bnaol/M4 Corridor - E12-18K. 

CL MAMFRAME/UR: ASSURANCE APPUCATOHS - Pn*ct K»- 
■gw. Am** taMjWProsmmm. Pmpmnes. Ota - ma*. 


ANALYSr/mOOWMCRS - BM 4341/81 - BULDM6 S0CETY - 
•scoifl mdwumrtf ander myt Mortgage eoncuaonl MM - TO 
S18K 


51 Baldwin Street. Bristol, BSt IRA. 
Telephone Bristol 277448 (24 hours) 


offer electronic mail- services 
which allow computer users to 
send electronic mail to telex 
- machines in countries without 
such high-tech services, and 
vice-versa. 

But technology convergence 
does not necessarily mean that 
developing nations will be 
lumbered with old commu- 
nications and computer tech- 
nology while the developed 
nations figure out a way of 
hooking into it. In many cases, 
the developing countries will 
be able to leap-frog the old 
technologies and go straight 
into state-of-the-art 
communication. 

Remote areas of the world 
. can now establish immediate 
global telephone communica- 
tions by using satellites to fink 
straight into the international 
network. 

Convergency is not the only 
communications or com- 
puter-related idea which 
springs from the Expo fair. In 
a perhaps surprising move 
IBM has sponsored the 
construction of 12 touch- 
screen information complexes 
driven largely by IBM's own 
AT personal computers in 
coiu'unction with a video disc 

Youjns^ feuchihe-pelt of 
the screen displaying an image 
of the area you want informa- 
tion about. If, for instance, 
you want to know about the 
Australia pavilion, you press 
the picture of a pavilion and 
then a picture of the Austra- 
lian continent 
The system will either dis- 
play computer graphics relat- 
ing to the subject, or run a 
video disc to play both pic- 
tures and music about the 
relevant topic. The appear- 
ance of both video disc and 
touch-screen technologies un- 
der the IBM banner will come 
as something of a surprise to 
competitors as IBM has in the 
past been somewhat luke- 
warm to both. 


-r .— he** 


overseas with 
LA. recruitment. 


ATTENTION ALL 
DMA COMMUNICATION 
SPECIALISTS 

If you are a data communications specialist with 
detailed knowledge within any of the following areas.-- 

• DC INTERFACES AND PROTOCOLS 
— X21 AND X25 

— V24 AND RS232C 
— HDLC, SDLC, BSC 

• NETWORK PROCEDURES AND MANAGEMENT 
— WAN’S 

— LAN's 

• IBM PROTOCOLS AND PROCEDURES 
— IBM D/C 

- 3270 
— SNA 

— DISSOS, DCA, DIA . . . .. " 

• — EMULATOR PACKAGES 


Please call ANN -ARLIDGE on 0462 57141. immediately to discuss how 
your background matches the demanding requirements of our DUTCH 
dient’s new DC and NETWORKING development. Code NET. 


lE C R IJ I T 


1 1 BANCROFT. HITCH IN. HERTFORDSHIRE, SG5 1JQ I 

A (ftveym d NuSustntl Anrpt Uw«( mxi meaner d mCS fl 

Dif hyiam u AQtnty and £tf tt*ymsnr Bootless -pcC Um ftp SW 38 Z* ■ 

'*■ * * « ™ mm mm mm tm mm h as mm dm « m ra — « m J 


PC ANALYST/ 
PROGRAMMER 

PkogremMr requ i red with np wfaaa in Revelation 
fauqpMge. on IBM PC's or compatibles. Experience of 
pn y«mmin| in Qobol on Data Gcmnal Mainframe* 
also an asset C omp etit iv e salary for right person. 

Send CV to 

Financial Telecommunications 

at 46-50 Gun Street, London El 6 AH 


PASCAL 

(MODULA-2) 


Nonsmoking programmer required for 
small computer software house 
specialising in Office Management 
Systems. 

SHORT Off 
LONG TERM 

Telephone Cambridge . 
( 0223)68354 

for details 


SURREY MAGISTRATE’S 
COURTS COMMITTEE 
COMPUTER LIAISON OFFICER 

(£12328-114340 bsdnrive - award pending) 

Six stand-alone computerised systems based on Id. 
ME29 processors, with three remote sites, are to be 
! installed in magistrates’ courts throughout the County. 

A Computer Liaison Officer is required now to manage 

the project -in conjunction with the Clerks to (he Jus- 
tices and the Committee's consultant and in the long? 
term. to advise on and .assist in the development and 
progress of the systems. ; . 

Candidates should have had acquaintance with the use 
of autotnauc data processing equipment in a working 
environment and proven ability to advise do the man- 
agement of a large-scale system and should ideally also 
have an understanding of the operational requirements 
of a magistrates' court. Experience in a training role 
would be an added advantage. 

This permanent post aureas local government (NJC) 
conditions and superannuation scheme, subject u> 
medical fitness. Salary on the scale £12.413 ruing to 
£14,025 plus £315 Surrey Allowance. Essential user car 
allowance: assistance with removal expenses in ap- 
proved cases. 

Application form and fuller details from Westgaic 
House. 51. High Street. Esher. Surrey KTIO 9RQ 
(Esher 65454). Closing dare 8th September. 1986. 

BJEL ATKINS 
Clerk to the Committee 




BA Applied Sodal Sciences BA Geography 
BA English BEd Primary Specialist 

BA History BSC Geography 

BA Urban ft>Ccy ami Race 
Relations 

Edge Hill College «$ an associated college of the 
University cf Lancaster, offering qualifications 
validated by that University. There is a wide range of 
subject options from which to choose degree 
courses and a common first year ensures that an 
informed choice is made at the end of it A careers 
advisory service encourages students to investigate 
to the full the opportunities available to them. 

The college enjoys a pleasant coimiunity 
atmosphere and purpose-built teaching and 
residential accommodation, as well as excellent 
sport and leisure facilities, in rural Lancashire. 

^ yet near to Liverpool and Southj^ 

1 1 1 For further Information 

contact: 

Mrs. A. M. Matthews. 
Admissions Officer (R8). 
Edge Hill College of Higher 
.. Education, Omtskirk. 

H Lancashire 139 4QP. 

Tab (0695) 75171 ExL 269 


EDGE 

HILL 


CAMBRIDGE CENTRE FOR /"Sfe 
SIXTH-FORM STUDIES U 

4 -jf. An iwhlislwrt ihtShra 

U < - cojte(e ua^cvnind Out- 

on*, tin and thne tens 
rJ S M ,1 KI-r agBKr'.. rv-Mke conci starting io 
aO MMfo kCUggHBcCfc September end Jsnoary is 
fjfeMaAfltbr MBpP ■ Wide mn|e of Arte md 
Science eobjecte. Resides- 
tiel occom mode tion » 
availible. Further 
forme lion may be 
obtained from llr AdmiaeioaSecirtaiy, 1 Salisbury VUlia. Sta- 
Doe Road. Cambnd^e CBl ZIP. T 5a (0233) 316tt0. 

CCSS • inepectfd and recoteniaed by thr Conteencr lor Inde- 
pendent Ftstbce Bdncitiw rad the Britiah Acendtooiaa 


British Acavdilaljaa 


RETAKING 
O or A LEVELS? 

One term and one year courses with emphasis on 
written presentation in exam conditions. 

All Boards and Subjects are offered, and the 
examination record is excellent. 

Prospectus: 

BROWN & BROWN TUTORIAL COLLEGE 
20. Wamborough Rd. Oxford. 

TEL. OXFORD (0865) 56311 and 513738 


LEGAL LA CREME 


CNANamT LAW Leva] Secre- 
tary. Temps Co SO pit. 
permanents up Io JC10500. ». 
Meoftox SL. lonaon wi Ol 
493 004*. 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT to se 
mor Danner 01 Wnl EM firm 
An admintsiralitr role ratner 
ihan sen nan al Would hiU 
w <-g organued re sp o n a tu te arc- 
marv. w«n ssropg character & 
ronuaenl manner when deaUng 
with rtimti. Minimal tvpmg A 
rmileni salary Pie*e roman 
Claire Wiseman Legal OKmton. 
Caonrt Oufiy Consunanrv. 31 
Soouiamwon Row . London 
wcia SHJ 01 831 »ea 


Gabrid Duffy Consultancy 

DOCUMENT EXECUTIVE c. £11,500 

Our cflent wish to appoint a responsible iady/gentteman 
to organise documents- JOr.Sarge litigation cases. The 
ideal dnefidate win be meticulous S wall organisad with 
previous legal experience, either secretarial or clerical. 
An opportunity to establish and develop this new de- 
partment within this highly regarded and pleasant 
practice. 

CLAIRE WISEMAN 
GABRIEL DUFFY CONSULTANCY 
TEL: OT -831 22B8 


GRADUATE 

SECRETARY 

Yoonz graduate with secretarial qualifications re- 
quired for Senior Commercial Partner In large fins of 
solicitors, feral experience not essential, but dedica- 
tion and ability essen t ial to keep np with high flyer, 
developing specialised team for top level companies 
work. Salary £10,000 pa with usual large firm bene- 


work. Salary £10,000 pa with usual large firm bene- 
fits. Please submit detailed CV to Lawrence Graham, 
Solicitors tref PM) 6 New Square, Lincolns lno, Lon- 
don WC2A 3QX. 


WEST END SOLICITORS 

Seek partner's Secretary /PA in company commer- 
cial department The successful candidate must 
have an energetic and flexible nature. A methodi- 
cal and efficent approach to paper work and the 
ability to communicate a friendly and professional 
attitude are equally important Salary £11,000- 
£11,500 pa. 4 weeks holiday and bonus. 

Please contact Lynne Frank-Keyes on : 

01-491 2020 

(No agencies). 


"LEADING AUSTRALIA IN SRACE 
AND DEFENCE SYSTEMS" 






Briiisfi toospace flostraSallt is tnwflwedinthedesfofi. dodopment 




CurrMamvfappk^incItJds: 

• (^mn^cntiriadcinranilcafim 


•Arimks system 

• EWsisteDS. 

ErnpkV7Tienta(^Kytifitiese»sLiRAus6afiaaritfoveisras,fi3r^6tEfns 
Ei^»ere'mfoeaboveareas,aM1ntecMcdspedeSiS&inihBaeasDk 
9 CWBBWfaflWS 

• DataGunmHHBcafiBBS 
•ReaftkBssoftHre . 


'ArayinnssaB. 


The British Aerospace Australia Lid 
Personmi fiQBociaO % 

Officer SALISBURY South Australia 5108 


23 - 


**■ ml V Levels ? 
w» oa IM m 

Ssny TetsiU Callage 

'Sirantw Qum 

- CSAVMP 1 ? Vw CWKS 

■ &mo Gum w ndww (umo 
‘UDH uSmletai 

F ??22S2? 

(NH) SSH7 
«M >w"> or WV 
to Stvrey TuKral CollNe 

ilMMsM GWM 
- Sarny. OBI 4W 


COURSES 

A LEVELS lor Amn a 
I Yur C mm ui ail MAtKIs. 
Cwiuri CinurMw MniMn 

CIW I AX. TM-iOZ?S> 313444 
<Afl'Hrring brrvicv 34(ini 
c n n. tHT .HMi TUTORS KM 
wntfun SAC arc 0| 370OTM 
O' jna a - mm. Ton raum 


EDUCATIONAL 
COURSES RE\'I£^' 


THE BYAM SHAW 
DIPLOMA 

is i hlMm J-ftar enna n we nr 
«thd« n jotameo h universty M 
ro> Dosmnouae tutn 
Short term Aries BiUi muni M 
DOS! plOfltt reisil 

Envy fe NOrt ana ntuvew 
Over m*, at UK Hunm receive la- 
c a onnu 

Awri nr tfim Dm StM of 
Art. 70 CanvdH SM. LMiM 
W 701 <81-727 4711) 

A MRTR CHAMGB M A L O h* ■ 
cK M tri M dni coiwm*. 
AdvtTP race. Pikmmiw 
Nuupi. I NHon no. Camundoe 
OUH>26U0 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
Sm'ATIONS 


MANACCH nCQUUKD fat Lugr 
MnltMoHwlnr Good rrrrr 
rnrr Mtnui Mid a rnaultaor 
uf mod uouid br an aliMMer 
Ol WO 330U 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


UK WSri MT nuM agM 23 HM 
erndiuipil from unitmait in 
Dusint, I -SA BA in political 
urn r/mMrm nnipn . mUHi 
toad (uimi ttlntv S u m ml 
ok lull or pan ninp rnaairn at 
wslanl to Mfmtjrr of 
Pariumral London am 
MrtKnl R*WV Io BOX MOS 
Tho Tunas. Adirri Onx sir 
pui li si. London Cl 900 
AU PADt WANTXD (or >auiMI 
Amnuan umli lit mo in Our 
t, bwiurrtand. Non unukcf . 
iftftw rhorpHV iCUl i <??i 


PROPERTY' TO LET 
LONDON 


clswoatny ro. hwx su 
ruin imuniir an two IrivN 
9311 panrllra irerp. lirr din 
ina Kitnwn wun duum wim 
IMS. 7UDH Urqr Nlw iiki 
qdn «irln*iiHi Miin jfim 
HimiDtr Mill Lona Cn L«t 
COT 50 v, TrMlI 431 MM 


ROLLS ROVCE Si 
BENTLEY 


FORNBKSUtrr SMm SHIdmr 
or nuulMu Otlwr \mirtn 
ataitiWr Ol 940 9 ma/ 7 S 02 T 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


MORCAN 4/4 2 NU 1403 Aden, 
nitn/iwtr am. w/w. prr, 
llMlhrr lonnrau rlt Cl 1 290 
ono 0484 007059 iCim 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


BEAUCHAMP PLACE furnulwd 
IHlinp WMi ifatnfr a wtl 
moll t aim and rnmmnunn on- 
rnutm nmoiMior lor hum' 
omen. Trtndionr 581 513d. 


PUBLIC NOTICE. 0 


MONOPOLIES AND MERGERS 
COMMISSION 

BRITISH WATERWAYS BOARD 
INOUIRV 

Rrfrrvnre undrr arcllon II of thr 
Coimwiiuoti Ad 1980 
Thr Srcrrfary of Sato for uadr 
and induHry to mm thr com- 
mission lo invMmfr certain 
outsuons rriaUng to thr cfriom- 
cy and costs of. and smm 
providrd by thr British Water- 
ways Board. Thr Gommiauon's 
in\i-siioation will hair pamrular 
rnaard to thr Board's mamir- 
nanew aflmin. Co m— of Uw 
lorma of rr f trnw cm br no 
Uuiud from, and ranra— niannns 
rataung to UMs toouny Would b* 
ami io: 

The Secretary. 

Monopolies and Mergers 
Comm town. 

New Court. 

48 Carry street. 

London WC2A 2JT 

Ptoa— auotr PS Z3 

CHARITY COMMISSION 

Charity ■ MemaOonal Pubbr 
Rrlauom FoundaUon for PuMh- 
Rrtaiions Rnrarrh and 
EducMion. 

The charity Cammiaitonm 
propose to make a Scheme for 
Out Charily. Copies of the draft 
Scheme may be oMained from 
them tref; 38fc3S2 a/i-lSi « Si 
Alban's Home. BT-60 
Haymarket. London SWIV 4QV 
OMecUons and auMesoora may 
be sent io them wttnto one month 
from today 


UGAL NOTICES 


THE COMPANIES ACT 19 M» 
FLAIRPLAN LIMITED 
NOTICE B HEREBY CIVCN pur- 
suant to Section 588 of the 
Companies Arl I 960 Out a Meet- 
ing of Creditor* or me above 
named Company wiD be heM at 
THE DENBIGH ARM S HOTEL. 
HIGH ST. LUTTERWORTH. 
LEICESTERSHIRE on the atST 
day of August 1986 at 3^0 pm, 
lor the purposes mentioned in 
Secnom S» and 690 ol the said 
An 

Da led this 5 th day of AUGUST 
1986 

CJ. FAY 

Dwecwr 


COMPUTER 

APPOINTMENTS 


DATABASE EXPERntCE? in 
i er national Co needs help to 
romputende I heir library Min 1 
rrartexp rctOK * O/T Word 
Awocvale* Ol-STT 6433 Ag> 


TO PLACE 
YOUR 
PERSONAL 
COLUMN 

ADVERTISEMEMT 

IN 

THE 

TIMES 

TRADE 

ADVERTISERS 

TEL 

01-481 1920 

ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 
01-481 9313 
TELEX 
925088 

PRIVATE 

ADVERTISERS 

TEL: 

01-481 4000 


/ 









I 





Intellectual 

Property 

Lawyers 


We wish to recruit one or more lawyers of 
exceptional ability to join our substantial and 
growing Intellectual Property Department. A 
scientific or engineering qualification and some 
experience of patent litigation is preferred. 
Candidates must be energetic and enthusiastic, 
be able to organise large complex matters for 
major corporate clients, and be prepared to work 
irregular hours and to travel at short notice. 
Salary and benefits will be attractive and will 
reflect the qualfi cations and experience of the 
successful applicants. 

Please apply with full curriculum vitae to: 

Mrs Aiizoun Dickinson, 

Linldaters & Paines, 

Barrington House, 

59/67 Gresham Street, 

London EC2V7J A. 


LINKLATERS & PAINES 



Lawyer 


Major industrial leasing, factoring 
and related transactions 

The Gty salary negotiable 

Forward Trust, a leading Finance House within the Midland Bank Group, 
seeks a young Barrister or Solicitor to join its Cty-based legal department. 
You will need at least 3-5 years post qualifications experience and, 
preferably, knowledge gained in a relevant financial or banking field. 

There, you will deal with a wide range of demanding work, including 
complex drafting and negotiating, o lot of which is for from routine. 

This is an ideal opportunity for someone' flexible in their approach and 
dearly capable of advising management at all levels across the entire 
spectrum of this major commercial organisation's industrial leasing, 
factoring ond related activities. 

The starting salary will be negotiable according to experience supported 
by an attractive range of major benefits induding a non-contributory 
pension fund and preferential mortgage and loan facilities. 

Please write, endosing full CV. to Paul Birch, Forward Trust Group, Heron 
House, 145 City Road, London EGV 1LP. 

JO*. 



Forward trust Group 

A member of Midland Bank Group 


Badenoch & Clark 


PROPERTY LAWYERS COMMERCIAL LITIGAl 


We are acting on behalf of small, medium and large 
firms in London and the provinces, who seek additional 
staff to join their expanding property departments. 
Candidates should have good honours degrees and up 
to 5 years post qualification experience. Some positions 
offer early partnership prospects. 

COMPANY/ 

COMMERCIAL 

CITY 

Our diem, a medium sized City firm, is keen to engage 
Solicitors with up to three years pqe for a variety of 
demanding commercial work in this expanding 
department. The positions available have a strong 
financial bias and would suit ambitious graduate 
lawyers with proven experience. 


COMMERCIAL LITIGATION 

ECl 

Due to continued expansion in the litigation 
department this large City firm currently requires young 
ambitious Lawyers to work on a range of quality 
commercial work. The positions will suit Articled Clerks 
and qualified Lawyers with up to two years experience 
who can expect excellent prospects and remuneration. 

MERCHANT BANKING 

U K. Merchant Bank seeks highly qualified Solicitor 
keen to make a move into one of the following areas 
Capital Markets; Corporate Finance; Corporate 
Banking. Candidates should have outstanding 
academic records and have served Articles with a 
substantial London practice. Post-qualification 
experience in the company/banking department of a 
top city firm is an obvious advantage. 


For details of these and other positions, please contact Join Cnllwi, Judith Farmer or Lisa Wilson. 


Legal and Financial Recruitment Specialists 
16-18 New Bridge St, London EC4V 6AU Telephone: 01-583 0073 


Trent Regional Health Authority 

Assistant Solicitor 

Up to £17,275 p.a. 

To deal with matters arising from the treat- 
ment of Patients, particularly disciplinary 
cases involving medical staff, and other Irtfcaa- 
t* 0 " arising from ail branches of the 
Au thorities I unctions, with an emphasis on 
building and engineering contracts. 

Application form and further 
details available from; 

Regional Personnel Division, 
Fulwood House, 

Old Fulwood Road, 

Sheffield. S10 3TH 
or Tel. (0742) 306511 Ext 622 
quoting reference EB 81. 

Closing Date 28th August 1986. 


PALMERS of BEDFORD 

Require a Solicitor for their very busy and 
expanding Conveyancing/Commercial 
Practice. Please write with GV. to: 

R.M. Palmer, Palmers 
71 Gwyn Street, Bedford 
MK40 1HH 


FULHAM SOLICITORS 

Small, busy general practice have vacancy far solicitor 
to deal with non-comantious matters consisting mainly 
of residential/commercial conveyancing and some 
probate. Competitive salary according to age and 
experience. Apply with C.V. to: 

Parfitt Cresswell & Wilson, 

. .567 Fulham Road, London SW6 1EU 


Law Placements 

SpedaBst Caosottants to tire Legal Profession 

COMMERCIAL PR0PHTTY £ Top 

Excellent opportunity withm mediifn sized City firm to deal with afl 
aspects of commercial property work and establish om nche. Mim- 
muti two years admitted. Ref: 7604. 

COMPUTER LAW £ Neg 

Experienced solicitor required by well estaWislHd commercial firm to 
handle caseload n computer law. Four years post admissrai experi- 
ence preferred. ReL 7176. 

PLANNING £ Competitive 

Manly planning and local authority writ within the property depart- 
ment of Centra London Arm. Should be wo/tttrea yeare admitted. 
Rtf 7172. 

NEWLY QUALIFIED Fran £1HQO0 

Tins mid Kent firm are looking fw a young Newly Qualfted (or about 
to ouaftfy) solicitor to join the (earn. Handing a variety ol contentious 
and non-contentious work. Ref: 7191. 

COMMERCIAL CONVEYANCING £ Good 

This him m Somerset rash a rate on ai ambitious sqicitn r to handle 
commercial conveyanong. Excdlerfl prospects as offered to some- 
ora wtsfwiQ to move to tins lovely pat of England. Ref: 7184. 

For farther details or advice on yosr career coo- 
tact us at Ladgate Hobs*, 107-111, Fleet Street, 
Leaden EC4. 01-353 5498 (24 bn). 


Clark & Son 
Reading 

Triis expanding 8 partner practice in the busy 
Thames Valley seeks ana assistant solicitor 
newiy/upto 3 years admitted to join the 
Property Department 
The work is varied and interesting with 
substantial commercial conveyancing. 
Competitive salary and good propects for the 
right person. 

Please write with C.V. to: 

Michael Slppitt, 

Clark & Son, 

7 Cross St, 

Reading, RG1 1SX. 


Group Secretary 

Yorkshire 

To £40,000 + executive benefits 

Our client is a progressive multi-national Group 
acknowledged as the world leader in the manufacture of 
specialist metal products for the energy, civil engineering, 
telecommunications and transport industries. 

This is a wide ranging and influential role which offers 
considerable scope for personal development. As a full 
member of the executive team, the successful candidate will 
be involved in ail aspects of corporate strategy and business 
planning. In addition to the statutory requirements of the 
position, responsibilities will be tailored to reflect experience 
and capability but could include systems, personnel and 
properly portfolio management 

Candidates - probably in their 40’s - will be graduates with 
significant experience of the function within a major pic - 
preferably with an international dimension. A legal 
qualification will be especially relevant 

Salary will be for discussion as indicated, the comprehensive 
benefits package will include a quality car and assistance 
with relocation expenses, where appropriate. 

Please write - in confidence - with full details. A. L Brown, 
ref. A.62104. 

HAY-MSL Selection and Advertising Limited, 

Oak House, Park Lane, Leeds LS3 1EL. 

Offices in Bumpo, the Americas, Aus&Hasa and Asta Pacific. 


New Issues Documentation 
International Banking 
City Package up to £40,000 

‘Develop your legal skills in 
capital markets’ 

This rapidly developing merchant hank is becoming a 
major force in rhe Eurobond markets. In line with this 
growth and their expanding role in these markets, they are 
seeking an additional professional 1 to handle all aspects ot 
new issues documentation. 

The position would ideally suit a person with legal 
training who is seeking an opening in this area. Excellenr 
exposure to all aspects of the structuring, negotiation and 
execution of new issue conrractsfor a wide spectrum of 
capital market instruments will be provided- 

The successful candidate will have a positive approach, 
be able to act on his or her own initiative, have an ability 
for drafting and a keen eye for detail. 

The hank is able to offer excellenr opportunities for 
career advancement in their expanding organisation, 
together with an attractive salary and the usual banking 
benefits. 

To apply, please telephone or write to Leslie Bensley 
quoting Ref: LB064. 

I International 

^ i LIU YU Search and Selection 

ft hanma n i 60 NewBorxlSriwtLxxidonWIYQHR 

V*rl lClfl^l 1 1CII 1 Telephone: 01 -409 1371 

mSSSmm 1 Associates > 


CHARTERED SECRETARY 


LAND AUTHORITY FOR WALES 

LEGAL 

ADVISER 

£ 20 -£ 27,000 

Applications are Invited from experienced 
solicitors for trie above post at the Authority's 
new modem offices in Caitiff. 

The postholder win be responsible to the 
Chief Executive for the provision of legal 


services for the Authority and for advising me 
Board of the Authority in aB legal matters. 

m addition to managing the legal section 
hfl/she wffl be directly involved In legal work 
and win be expected to contribute in a positive 
manner to achieving the Authority's role of 
making land available for development in the 
Principality. 

The successful candidate will need to demon- 
strate experience in ati aspects of the law and 
practice of real property as well as in planting 
and compulsory purchase (aw. 

> Please write for an appHcation form and job 
descri p tion to: Personnel Officer, Land 
Authority for Wales, Custom House, Custom 
House Street. Caitiff. 

Completed appScation forms to be returned 
by 501 September 1886. 


LAND AUTHORITY FOR WALES . 
AWDURDOD TER CYMRU 



COUNTY SECRETARY AND SOLICITOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Solicitor 

P0(L) - P0(M) 
£11,850 - £15,453 
(Pay award Pending) 

We are looking for a Solicitor to join the Legal 
Services Division of the County Secretary and 
Solicitor’s Department to deal with Common 




w 




ITHT! 



NEWLY QUALIFIED ASSISTANT 
SOLICITOR OR LEGAL EXECUTIVE 

With experience in Civil Litigation 
required for expanding practice in North 
Yorkshire as soon as possible. Please 
reply In writing with full CV to: 

Senior Partner 

Messers Christopher Wright & Co. 
22 Richmond Road 
Catterick Garrison 
North Yorkshire 
DL9 3JD 


Gdrkl Duffy Consultancy 

LITIGATION ASSISTANTS 

to £25,000 

Our diem, a major city prac n ce. Is looking for further wsfe. 
lants lor mar moving Wgatfon department, Candktttts should 
be ekher newt* qualified or have up w 4 years experience 'm 

ary of Ihefolowng areas; Weflectu^prop^. shiponaowoi- 

vency, buBdfng. or professional Indemnity work. Prospects and 
satoy at al lewis are axcatont 

COMMERCIAL CONVEYANCES 

to £25,000 

Our dares n the City Central London and the Weft ext are 
seekeig commensal conveyancer* at aM fewfe to deal with 
devetopmemandotharhlghquaatyM*nmaroalworli.Opgonu- 
fsties mist far tagh flyers with no definite prospects at present 
firms. Salarys & prospects are esceSont In el cases. 

For funner settle on these and other vacancies contact 

CLARE WISEMAN 
GABHEL DUFFY CONSULTANCY 
31 SOUTHAMPTON ROW 

lonoon were shj 

TEL: 01*831 2288 
01-740 0289 Eve* A trends 


THE LAW SOCIETY 
Professional 
Development Assistant 

Salary Range £9,484 - £13,060 p-a. 
(inc. L.W.) 

We require a high calibre administrator with a 
working knowledge of the operation of Com- 
mittees for this varied and interesting post 
assisting the Clerk to the Professional Devel- 
opment Committee.. 

This will involve a variety of administration in 
connection with the Society's work on 
present and future influences on the working 
solicitors' practices. You will be dealing with 
statistics, legal expenses insurance, answer- 
ing queries from the profession and the 
public and writing reports and undertaking 
research as required. 

An outgoing, mature person is required with 
an interest and ability in the use of statistics. 
You should have strong communication skills 
and be educated to degree level, preferably 
In law or with experience of work in a 
solicitors' office. Salary will be fixed in the 
above range depending on experience. 
Benefits include 23 days annual holiday, staff 
restaurant pension and season ticket loan 
schemes. 

Please apply as soon as possible but no later 
than 12 September, by sending a detailed 
C.V. to the Personnel Officer, The Law Soci- 
ety, 113 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1PL- 


Temporary Senior 
Law Clerk 

c. £12,500 
9 month contract 

• We need a competent litigator to deal wftii 
civil and criminal litigation, including advo- 
cacy in the magistrates' and County 
Courts, as well as general legal work. 

• This rs a temporary appointment for a pe- 
riod app oin tment for a period of 
approximately rare months to cover the ab- 
sence of the permanent post holder. This 
job may suit a Fellow of the Institute of 

• Legal Executives or a Solicitor, possibly 
retired. Job sharing or part-time appoint- 
ments would also be considered. 

Application forms quoting Ref. 388 from Hie 
Personnel Service, The Town Hall, Homton 
Street, London, W8 7NX Tet 01-837 8562 124, 
'hows answering service). 


i j.TTi ! : i 




ft 1- 1 . 1 | . HI U 



Legal Assistants 

£9,237 - £10,908 (inclusive) 

We are looking for two experienced convey- 
ancers to carry out a wide variety of 
domestic and c o mm e rcial work. This is an 
exceBent opportunity to widen your convey- 
ancing experience and to pursue a 
worthwhile career in local government 

The successful applicants win have a good 
grounding in at 1 types of conveyancing and 
be used to handling a large volume of work 
under minimum supervision. 

Further particulars and appticatlon form 
from the Borough Solicitor, Town Hall. Lon- 
don SW18 2PU. Tet 01-871 6107. 

Closes: 1 September 



iTiTuY/iUii 


an equal opportunity employer 

MoppuanUBn canaMedonine baas at 
m^aMaOeryhxtfm/abrrespeaiuot 
doaUamenc race. sax or mortal atatua 


GENERAL SOLICITOR 

We are 3 partners with a young team of about 20 
all very specialised in Insurance Litigation with 



PANNONE 

NAPIER 

j YOUNG LAWYER 

Based in Manchester. London and Sheffield 
Parmone Napier are a fast expanding practice, with 
an exciting case load. We deal wkh 
INTERNATIONAL high profile DISASTER and 
PRODUCT LIABILITY actions Involving negligence 
within aviation, pharmaceutical, rail way and similar 
fields Including ad vising OTHER SOLICITORS. 

An opportunity exists inour busy Manchester office 
for A YOUNG LAWYER to assist In the development 
and further expansion of the practice. The successful 
candidate would be working initially with one of the 
senior partners. 

This tea rare opportunity for the right person who 
will be recently qualified or about to qualify, and 
whilst experience or an informed interest in private 
international law would be an advantage: a dear 
willingness to learn would compensate. 

Salary, benefits and career opportunities wt& be 
commensurate with the position offered. 

AppBcadonsfaiwrttfaigcmfrwtthhrilainlcaluni 

vltaetix 

Rj. Pannong. Pannonc Napier. 123 D eans g ate. - 
Manchester M3 2BU . . . 


CITY OF LONDON 
COMPTROLLER AND 
CITY SOLICITOR 


PRINCIPAL 

LEGAL 

ASSISTANT 

Remuneration np to £18,639 inclusive 
(basic pay award pending) 

This post offers an opportunity for parsons with some 
experience to join a section daaSng with aH aspects of 

rfeil htarrtrif/wi irv*h ufirva «4nM nvwnAni IhiuMamI 



postholder wiB have special responslbifity for advising 



would be useful but not essential- Good 
prospects and salary. .... 

Call Mr Lidded on 01-404 564T 


Meredith Scott 

Commercial Property cJE27,000 

It partner rily practice seek solicitor, preferably with ai leas 3 
ycaa experience. 

Pensions Law cJE23,000 

Prestigious EC* practice requires Lawyer with minimum 2 
yean experience. 

Residential Property- c£l9,000 

Newly ooned position in WCI practice for solicitor, ideally at 
least Z years admitted. 

DEFINITE PARTNERSHIP PROSPECTS. 

Mixed Newly/ 

Recently Admitted c£l5,000 

Ih ? e «"4 ' other opportunities 
id pm-aic practices, both in and out of London, conuci: 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 

V 17 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1AA 
1 01-S83 0055 or 01-541 3897 (after office hrs) /" 


CONVEY ANCHIG TO £15K 

Mixed CommerciaJ/ReskJentia] workload for re- 
cently ramified conveyancer at rospocted Central 
London practice. 

BALING TO £ 18K 

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION TO £17K 

Varied Kgation caseload at feeding West Endprao- 
tiee tor ambitious Lawyer of up to three years oost 
qualification experience. 

CORPORATE PARTNER £ SKNOTCANT 

E minent. C entral London practice want to recruit 
outmxflng Company Commercial Lawyer forim- 

S*** 1 * 1 opportunity for 


lion experience, with proven track record." 

l&v'PersonneCM | 

Safi specHlitas to the legal profess™ vwtdwvie “*** 
95 AWwych. London WC2B 4JF, Tel. 01-242 1281 
jansaptione' after office hours! 



















LEGAL APPOINTMENTS PERSONAL RENTALS 




* r v 5 : 'v. 


i-fti.jf:, ij> • 


M’ vv: 
apjT.it 




... n 

'"•"Wo. 


-U kIi 


City Recruitment 

P m • . .. 


VvilL, 


Solidtor/Barrister 

£NegotiaHe 

Now is anexciringtime tobe in the City, withderegularion of the stock market, continuing expansion in the 
fcurosecurines maricee andLondoo s resurgence as the pre-eminent financial centre in the world. To fuel this 
development, banks, brokers and insurance companies need high calibre individuals in kev roles Michael 


All advmacmems 

CM be accepted by telephone 
(ciccfU Anoounccnwmsj. The 
dcadliiK is S.OOpm 2 day$ prior 
10 publioim tie SOOpm Mon- 
day far Wednesday), Should 
you wish to send a advertise- 
imm in wrU/ng please metode 
yOvr drrtnne pbooc number. 

c umm services re- 

PAHlMcrfT. If you have any 
qoBks or proWems reining to 
yow advenaentan ooce it hat 
appeared, phase contact our 
Cnaomcr Services Depinneal 
by tdqjhoae on 01 ^«l < 100 . 



men saccuum. Key 

Train. 30. Red Lion ST. WC 1 
Ol nos 1495. ABTA/IATA 


MVAL DOULTOM CHEAPEST FLIGHTS W/HK - 

"niUKSIL. A Br ” Tr *' H Trt 01 *“ 69,41 

od 01 BUOOOd 


i’-« 




continuing growth now leads us to seek an additional consultant. 

Aged 23-28 you must Have a proven track record in the legal field, with die drive and enthusiasm to cackle a new 
challenge and excel m a very competitive market place. Previous City experience will be of interest but strong 
interpersonal stalls and a lively intelligence are of greater importance. 

In remmyou will join a successful subsidiary of one ofBritain’s fastest growing public companies and an 
acknowledged leader in financial recruitment. You will receive an attractive package, including performance 
related bonus and other benefits, together with exciting career prospects. 

Itfyou are keen to pursue this opportunity please send a curriculum vitae to Lindsay Sugden, Michael Page City, 
39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B 5LH. 6 T 


"VH-AHMAL RESEARCH tmo 

Cn. Suwon. 
0 «m lor j T« ^ Cancer. 
Weodbwy. Harlow Road, 
aoydoiu Csce*. (03747942351. 


mm muku 8RSM uroenL 
PMtfe contact your mother. In 


BIRTHDAYS 


SHORT LETS 


CtBSWKK 2 Bcdrtn Luv Cfd Fb 
n« loOO pem Aiai ladle Ol 
set* Contact Sara on 01-741 
bmi 4am mSn 
SERVICED APARTftKXTS bt 
Kmunglon CM T V 24 nr Sw 
M. Tries CoUmgham Apt*- 01 - 
575o£0b 

HMHGATE VILLAGE IK. Luxury 
MUSA. Hill, garden. CSO per 
aav Rmg Ol -MO 740 a 
LUXURY SCRWCCD FLATS, 
mural London from C32S pw 
Town Hve Arts 573 3 A 33 


FLATSHARE 


CHEAP rURHTS wonnwMe 

HUWIM 01-430 ISM. 


nsooun- PARES worldwide. 
01-454 0754 JuallfT Travel. 


LOW COST FARC* IO V SA Me 
ror Travel 01 4859857. lATA 


MALAGA, ffAHARITS Ol 441 

1111. TravrtwA*. AHA. AM4- 


SPAN. Portugal OmpfllVM 
ftgom Ol 735 8191. ATOL. 


CHOSB. Ovnng bsc ftm 
Sfrrei Ail bi» dec. 3 bedrna. ! ' 
bars let- aw (erf?. irrpacr v 
owtorc u ftnim Pm gann. 

HJtD&S OOL Ha ten* tee 

dose nine aw sMppng am. 3 

MOOTS. SOP l(UP bl H mjEfl. 

DttnWC to 53® m 
& KBL Wtfl /im am n trim km 
wntw Me 2 warns, m* ft. U. 
MU ft CH COD p> 

POTWV. Vttf sue 0 2 twnns. 

: igt nop K & B fanaste taut 

W t. H SIS w 

01 409 5334 


HOLLAND PARR Drgml large 
:u iKwr fiat nr tube Rer«p 
kM>o rimcit Hmom A Par- 
oum f loon ng Ben o looks 
prnalr irtimsclUU CD Long Lei 
C2f pw Goddard A Smttl 01- 
030 7381 


THE VERY BEST 
Landlords ft Tenants 
come to us for 


and shnOr areas. 

Rhm dm. 

BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 



01-244 7353 


WMWMMOI, CMCUCA 

Brtgraiia fuh A Imum re- 
MiRt lor AmenranCompanm , 
from caoOCS OOQpw. High ral 

*ue Mopmm ate available HAMPSTEAD HEATHi tomb 



For the ben 

twh*» Detection of 

QUALITY 
FLATS A HOUSES 

in prime London areas 
WEwrisCmrtRHi. SWS. 


EAST dulwicm. p m » hr m * W»i ?™ >m>sci>«dui m nw w» 


ihM Sid pervon lor tpanow 
room in large house with gsr 
am C4AOO pm- week Mu* PUh. 
Trt day. 01-379 6076. 


01 724 2508 ABTA ATOL 


ANN. Happy Btnhday nv Juu. 
my snng without cad. to be , 

lotwdaM adored Forever. AU cum , thumt .. , 

BET DOWN Anna earns b 21. Go KcISISLSTcnSS 

Cor il Love Irom Usaano Alan. I . S^pi.i^^SS^iSJSK?" 

Frou 605 6585 before 11 am 


, Michael Page City 

International Recruitment Consultants -London Brussels NewYbric Paris Sydney 
A member of Addison Consultancy Group PLC 


EAST PUTNEY. Warned 
proticmtfr to share large 
CAURRE CV5 Lid profevlonal ho**'*' »*-n flW room. £160 
eumrulum ulae ooeunwote. O-ro exrl Trt. 01 87a 9694 

Details; 01-631 3588 

BREAKAWAY. London's < tub for 

pretewnal una , l a , chea people 5WL Avail Prime 9nd Female 
83-A3 Oier SCO eiems monUv mvt JO. li/s. own room LM 
ly 24 hr lalo tape. 997 7994. PW Ol 798 8287 ( 68 pm) 
CAPITAL CVs prepare high ouHl- 
ly nvnculurp xilaes. 01-607 1 
7906 

UMSON TV NETWORK has Stu- 
dio* aiailaotr FuU mase-up A 
i l naa np lacumesoi 452 3788 
for dermis 1 1 9Pm Mon-frl. 

THE MARIKA CC BUREAU 
HEATHER JETwNER. 124 Mew 
Bond S i Wl 01629 9634. 
ra PWH WB, Lose or Marriage. 

AU ages, areas. Dalebne. De pi 
IQ 16 I 23 Atxngdon Road. Lon- 
don W 8 Trt. 01-938 lOll. 


LITIGATION 

SOLICITOR/CROYDON 

E15-E20.000 p.a.+ Company Car 
Excellent opportunities for 3 years PQE 
person. Write with full C.V. to 

Andersons 

11 George Street Croydon 


IARY 

OF 


THE«fi8BgtTJMES 

CLASSIFIED 


CONSTANT & CONSTANT 

REQUIRE 

AN 

ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 
FOR THE 
CONVEYANCING 
DEPARTMENT 

We require an assistant Solicitor for conveyancing antj 
general private client work the nature of which reflect 
our international client base. Hie vacancy would suit a 
solicitor who already has some experience in this type of 
work and who wishes to develop experience in an 
expending, medium size City firm with good career 
prospects. 

Please reply with C-V. to 

R.TJL Wilson, 

Constant A Constant, 

9 St Helen's Place, 

London EC3A 6DD 



LEGAL SERVICES 


■CONVEY ANCUVC by luily auOb 
(u-d Solicitor* LI 60 ♦ VAT IM 
MMMUrd dnbmrmnit* rmg 
0244 319398 


WANTED 


CHARLOTTE LANYARD at TJlr 
Ongmol Pkiu(. Shop 33 
McKlOP SirM. SW3 ■•MIWHI 
moom NCiuni mrtes a part 
int. not mmurili' mu tunc, no 
ommum wiw or Tctcghonc 
01 226 2696 


OPTED YOtJNG CLASSICAL 

Compowr of Toon music ts m 
urgctil need ol Patronage Trt; 
R. Grins Ol 9403680 


£29 per oi up to paid lor iihcr 
arucim £250 p*r or for gold 
L rgrtUty warned any diamond 
jrweBerv Mr Han 01 9eO 
8030 or Wnfe 361 Harrow 
Road. London. W9 All England 
coined. 


FOR SALE 


The limes Classified cofamms are read by 
13 nriffion of tbemostafiSnentpeopleBi tire 
coontiy. The tottomag categories appear 
regularly each week and are generally ' 
accompanied by Kriramtedtoddartides. 
Use the coupon {below), and find out bow 
-easy r f*st andeccMiouikalit is to advertise in 
The Tones Classified. 

“MONDAY— 

Education: University Appointments, Ptep & 
Public School Appointments, Educational 
Courses, Scholarships and Fellowships. 

La Creme de h Crane and other secretarial 
appointments* 

— -TUESDAY— 

Computer Horizons: Computer Appoint- 
ments with editorial. 

Legal Appointments: Solicitors, Com- 
mercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, Private & 
Public Practise. 

Legal La Creme for top legal secretaries. 

Public Sector Appointments. 

—WEDNESDAY— 

La Creme de la Crane and other secretarial 
appointments. 

Property: Residential, Town & Country, 
Overseas, Rentals, with editorial 
Antiques and Collectables. 

— THURSDAY— - 

General Appointments: Management and 
Executive appointments with editorial. 

La Creme de la Creme and other secretarial 
appointments. 

— FRIDAY ' — 

Motors: A complete car buyer’s guide with 
editorial. 


WOODHAM SMITH 

LITIGATION 

We have vacancies for 2 additional assistant solicitors in 
thm expanding department. 

One is for intellectual property work: Applicants should 
have had 1-2 years’ good experience in this field and 
ideally should have a degree in science. 

The other is for general commercial litigation. There is a 
wide variety of work for corporate clients but a particular 
asset would be experience in employment and industrial 
relations law. 

Applications should be made in confidence to Richard 
Price at 12, Great James Street, London WC1N 3DR. 


nwrrr Quality wort rargrts. A! 
iraoe prices and under, alto 
aiaiuue 100*1 extra. Large 
room Mae remnanis under half 
normal once Chancery Cargett 
Ol 406 0453. 

THE TIMES 17B5'19BB. Other 
uile* mall. Hand bound ready 
lor presentation alto 

-Sundays-. £1250. Weraer nb ar 
When. 01688 6525. 

TICKETS FOR AMT EVEXT. CaiS. 
Starlight Exp. Chew. Lex MR. 
All theatre and spoils 
Trt. 82»66l6/82fMM9d. 

A Ex / Visa / Dmets. 

RUmreAY DUE T One someone 
an ongmai Times New sp a p e r 
dated l hr very day they were 
bom £1250. 0492 31303. 

OLD YORK FLABSTONES. rou- 
ble setts elr NalKmMM 
del Irenes. Tel: 1 CO 8 O 1 830039 
i wum. 

ICATYRCDCRS Any even l Inc Let 
MM. covert Gdn. Starlight Exp. 
las! Nfgfn of to* Proms. Ol -828 
1678. Motor credit cards. 

CATS, CHESS. Ur, Mis. ah the- 
•ire and wort. Tel 439 1765. 
ab nijao r cretm rd o. 

FRRMEC /FREEZERS. Cooker* 
etc. Can you buy cheaper? B A 
S Ud. 01 229 1947/8468. 

LADKS Beaming Set diamond 
rmg. emerald cw.«rt£iaooa 

will accent £7000061 2262108 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 

Wool fTM Bcrtws tram f335 per 
sq yd + WT. BW mo) Heavy 
DomBSKWtton £1345 per sqyfl 
+ VAT. CwkopJas! ttfes &75 per 
sq yd + VAT & many other peat 
MRrttft 

541 Mam Rod. 
Pawns Great, SW 6 . 

T«fc 01-736 7551 

Fm rt—i a Ra -fanl Ml 



now Bulges, Esiatr Agents 

581 5136. 


CHELSEA M Good QUOMIS 
bqht 2 bed tui with River view, 
re M • all agouoares. n* 
reerg with batcony. bath, sro 
cloak Avail note £325 gw T W 
Capo Ol 2C1 8858 


modem. Himmi 2 bed a i t »6 
■lais I. vets Unlifv 
C2IO/CI60 pw CtH Co Let 
4367363 nr J35 4137 


HENRY AMMCSConlon 11 , now 
Oil Ol RUM for Ihe nev| se 
kf lion ol loinnned flats and 
homes to mil in kliuiSNelda-. 
Cnetsra and kmvifojhin in 


COVENT DARDEN Brand new 1 j 
bed 4th floor Hal wnh HR and ISW1 Owners vets grrth 1/5 Bed 


porters, fumnhed by Heals. 
While kit an marMnes ce 
Long Lei CSSS gw Goddard* 
Smith Ot 930 7321 


F.W. BAN 1 Man a ge me m Snf 
vires) Ud reowrr progenies m 
Central- South and West Lon 
aon areas 1 or wmiim 

apgucaius 01-221 8838 


QUEEN5DATE. SWT A super? 
1 st no or apartment of over 
2000 suit Magmfirenl rooms 
with high ceiling, 6 balconies 
3/ 4 bedrooms. 3 rerejMKxn. 

hams Newly rrturbehed 
uuougnoui run detoih Ol 935 
9S12.il) 


VWfTBfD LONDON < PARIS Allen 
Bain & Company nave a tag e 
seferlUMi ol flats * houses avail- 
able lor 1 week- from £500 pw 
494 1663 

BARON* COUNT iw Ken) l bed 
newly convened luxury flat I 
min tube CltSpw- Trt. Sue 
Dm * eves 994 1523 
CENTRALLY LOCATED Wl. 3 


(lot tlee In all ufuriutirs Rp«it> 
Min iiiegiare Pn.im Had 2 
Baths Ml V.17SPW Lwlniua 
8561 


IM UCg. Alliariiir one bed 
rtyvp rial m period houv 
LloSCtOpei week T.-l Ol -105 
i« 1C 1 dan 


RICHMOND/ KEW 4 beds mod. 
ruin itiMii nsr M lube long 
lei CAApx 01447 1306 


ALBERT amocc ROAD. Boner 
sea SfUmus sell iMUmnl 
nunnyHi- 1 « 5 ompk- sillmo 
loom 1 dt» and 1 xnglr bed 
room, siirnen / dim in room, 
nainraum Aigihdr c 12 
month-. LI 5 np« I ompany )e( 
onls Trt lOJbHi t^AMt 
AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Sawks 
iuv flol/housr up lu INOOiM 
I suol lees rea Hnulim Km a 
L ewis. Souih nf Ihe fark Cnel 
sea MIKr Cl 355 Bill nr 
North pf thn Park ReormS 
Park off Nr Ol 5Me “HMT 


bedrootned rial in pmtiguoia NOUDAT APARTMENTS. Wr 


block Ai ail now for long roiel 
£S 20 pw Phone -Ol 881 2787 
CMELSCAi Red cone Caroens 
Lwoe Luxinious StudKi TMIS 
CoiMpnrd Througnout. £I2C 
n-r week Tei Ol 363 0489 
EAURtt MfS. Luvurv house. 6 
bedroom. 2 reception 2 hath 
mom £540 pw London 
£ Hates- 734 9029/8602 
HENS1NDT0N WS sunning flat 
Reren. bed. KAB. CH. TV 

South Carden i.l65pw Trt 01 


hose the ken selerbcai ul Linu 
n ftii nrsfint Hals in 
Keminoimi. Cimim 

ktughmdw Mdiloi. SI 
Johns Wuod and Hamoviead 
I rnnt cXUh> 01 5U MM 

(NWtmmWCI SUgr III term 

neuivurr luiiunitshed house a 
hum Hannas 3 Urte 1 Sqle 
Bedims Stlains Lar-K UlJirm 
Patio tVahmv Vers voaimus 
Vers- lomemenl lofiOow 
Her mam A ftrrlrs 43M .VmV 


937 5954 das- / 57 O 5710 eves ISW5. Supeib newli ri-furiNihed 


MARBLE ARCH Mansion Mock 
mce turn flai 2/3 beds. 2 
reeeps KAB. CH. comoonv 
Let £200 p w Ol 883 4057 
NW6 Losrtv furnished flat 1 bed. 
2 reeeps. open fire. CH Weekly 


lidl overlooking and Him access 
to romm odns rthii- heds 
Urge reti-p f I kitrh both 
loom Long ramouiis Iri L2S0 
pw utr CH /CH Vs Holmans. 
Ol 370 6781 


cleaner £120 pw excl. Ol 486 I LAMOLOKPS'OWfNCII*- II sou 


Eurtm/USA Flnba 01-937 5400 
Lore IW RwO 0I-EQ3 1515 
IR/Buma Cass 01-933 3444 
Corriirert Lcmstd/Bonded 
ABTA IATA ATOL 1453 


Travel Bureau. 01-573 4«ll. 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga ,rtr. 
Dlmoiid Train ATOL 1783. 
01-581 4641. HoraAam 68641 
ALL UB OIKS. Lowest Ians on 
motor scheduled earners. Ol- 
884 7371 ABTA 
HOMO KONQ £488. Bangkok 
£369. SUi« £457. Other FE dl 
Its 01-584 6514. 

STAIR PORTUGAL CKEECEi 
Fbghts F aider 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640. AKCM/VlSB. 


7244 CXI 262 /eves 604 2999 
P R 1 M R05 C HAL newly dec 2 
double beds study, lounge / 
diner kll. bathroom. £160 pw 
No sharers. 226 0420. 

957 MSI The number 10 retnem 
brr when ir<-hma bed rental 
PWrim in centra) and pnmr 
London areas £1 SOI C2 j000pw- 
ACADEMICS VtSITMC. Fiats nr 
Lnisersitv A Bra Museum. Trt 
Helen Watson A Co. 580 6275 
A CC OM M OD A TION far Mngles. 
rough! families - call Express 
RenloW Ol B83 5457 
CAST LONDON 3 bed flat. gdn. 
kxK wrtcomr £130 pw Ex- 
press Rpniort 01-885 5057 
RATS HOUSES and Brthits far 
South London arras. Rental 
Guide ol 68b 7576 
KENSINGTON. £133 pw. Cxrrt- 
Imt spacious well furnished 2 
bed garden flat 603 9«66. 
LARGE 2 RED C/H. nrsv der flat 
m N Loudon £76 pw inn Ex 
press Rentals 01-883 5457 
MW LONDON large Urdu!. CH. 
£40 pw 1 net Express Rentals 

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THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 


RACING: KING GEORGE RUNNER-UP TO HOLD OVERSEAS CHALLENGE AT BAY IN YORK FEATURE 


Shardari can continue Stoute’s charge 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 


Shardari looks capable of 
continuing Michael Stowe's 
great run of success in big 
races this season by winning 
the newly instituted group one 
Matchmaker International at 
York today. 

Lite Commancbe Run, the 
winner of the equivalent race 
last year, Shardari has made a 
name for himself by winning 
over extended distances. Lite 
Commancbe Run, I doubt 
him being remotely 
inconvenienced by this 
switch-luck to the shorter nip 
of lOVfc furlongs, especially as 
he will have a pacemaker, 
Dihistan, to ensure that there 
is a true pace on what is a 
galloping track. 

. Having won both the Chve 
G raham Stakes and the Hard- 

wicke States this season, 
Dihistan is some pacemaker, 
indeed, as be proved at Ascot 
where be helped Shardari 
finish second to Dancing 
Brave, while still managing 
filth place himself 

Judged on that Shardari has 
nothing to fear from Triptych, 
who finished lour lengths 
behind him in third place. 
Over today's distance I will 
not be remotely surprised if 
Fitnah, the other French chal- 
lenger, turns out to be more 
troublesome. 

Together the Gallic pan- 
look more dangerous than 
Flora vanti and Mr John, the 
two sent from Ireland. In spite 
of his reputation and sub- 
sequent inflated price tag 
Fioravante has not cut much 
ice this season, while Mr John 
has been given, little time to 
get over his race against Wise 
Counsellor at The Omagh 
last Saturday. 

Damister. who was awarded 
the Great Volligeur at this 
meeting a year ago on the 
disqualification of Shardari, 
would obviously pose a threat 
at his best. However, that best 
was not forthcoming in the 
Spring when it transpired he 
was suffering from a virus. In 
the gallop mat I watched on 
Salisbury raceconrse last 
Thursday Damister did not go 
wefl enough to make me want 
to desert Shardari, who has 




Jim Bolger’s Park Express, who attempts to add tire Yorkshire Oaks to her already impressive tally this term 


been going like an express 
train in his work at home 
recently. 

Sioute has posed problems 
by deciding to saddle both 
Cblorspin and Untold for the 
Yorkshire Oaks. In the Oaks 
at Epsom Untold finished 4% 
lengths in front of her stable 
companion on fast ground, 
but in the Irish Oaks, which 
was run in soft going, 
Colorspin came ont on top by 
IS lengths, the pair of them 
split by Fleur Royale. 

Faced with a difficult 
choice, Walter Swinburn has 
now picked Colorspin, even 
though Untold will relish the 
fester ground this time. 

Rather than chose between 
the two I have decided to go 
for Park Express, who im- 
pressed me so much at 
Goodwood when I watched 


her beat their stable compan- 
ion Maysoon in such style to 
land the Lupe Stakes. 

Before that she had won the 
Lancashire Oaks, thus proving 
that today’s distance is well 
within her range even though 
her sire, Ahoonora, was a 
sprinter. The Ribblesdale 
States winner. Gull Nook, 
also must be considered, but 
those in search of a place bet 
could do worse than consider 
Rejuvenate, the winner of the 
Musidora Stakes on the course 
in the Spring. Rejuvinate is 
now the subject of consistent 
encouraging bulletins from 
Lam bo urn where she is 
trained by Barry Hills. 

Classic Tale, the Stoute 
runner for the Acorn b Stakes, 
will have plenty of supporters 
following that runaway win at 
Ascot last month. But so too 


will both Bellotto and Merce 
Cunningham but for different 
reasons. 

While Bellotto justified his 
tali home reputation when he 
ran away with his only race so 
fer at Newbury. Merce 
Cunnin gham failed to live up 
to his at Goodwood. How- 
ever, he was unlucky as he was 
hampered badly rounding the 
bend into the straight 

The ground that he lost then 
probably cost him the race. 
Even at a difference of 71b I 
cannot get away from BeDotto, 
who made such a deep im- 
pression at Newbury. 

The fierce competition that 
exists these days in English 
racing is also borne out today 
at Folkestone by the presence 
of Pelf (1.45) and Exotic 
Source (4.55) in the fields for 


Televised: £30. 3.10, 345, 4.15 
Going: good to firm 
Draw: low lumbers best 


£0 EGUNTON NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £4^53: 7f) (14 runners) 


31112 GtOWAGAWlMraGUvauWqe) J0berington 
OHO FOURTH LAD (Mrs L Qav*s)RHaraion 9-6__ 

0210 GUtFKMGffMMU<0PK«wa*»4 

01 TOU.BAR(D)fftt»odnmnRacMMksSMI 
1211 PEN BAL LADY (D) {G PartsJG PrmsinKinlQi 


100 P0UUIG BEAUTYJK Um) E B(Sn M3 — 

2032 COLWAY RALLY (R Coteman) J W Watts 8-12 — 

14 URRAY OH HARRY fflR JDCoppenhal) fl HoBnshsadS-ti 
1301 - FICKLE YOUNG MAN { ■ , (1 BryaiO T FaJrhureJ B-6 (6ex) _ 

10 CONNAUGHT FLYER (J Ryan) C Tlrtder 8-3 

40001 JAYSSPK3ALflhfTWteon)M WEaBttrtiy&4 (Bax) 

3320 FOUHTAWSCriOiCe 


119 3320 POUNTABrS CHOKE (Trevi HoMngs LM) K Stone 7-12 LCfcamodtS 

120 40332 GATS RJJ7TS1 {Mrs X UrasonJ C Nelson 7-9 4 Law 11 

121 000212 BOLD KFFERBTCE (T Moois) W Wharton 7-fi J tow (5) 4 

5-1 Rckfe Young Man, 11-2 Glow Again. Pan Bat Lady.31 CUT King. 13-2 Parang 

Beauty, 31 CcAway My. 10-1 Fountain’s Choice, Gay's huBht. Tol Bar, IB-1 Fourth 
Lad, Array On Harry, 14-1 ottwra. 


ngtonS-7 M Wood 7 

■fl_ G Starkey 2 

B Rome 8 

S Hal 94 G Carter (3) 9 

Jordan 9-1 (Sex) 

AngrtRfctanl>(7)1 

A Mackey 13 

8-12 : _ Tims 5 

IHoftutaad-36 Starks 14 

tuna 8-6 (6ex)_~__ PM E ddery t 

U BtBMilO 

tw 8-1 (Bax) W Carson 12 

) K Stone 7-12 LCfeamocfeS 

xi 7-8 4 Lowe 11 

17-8 J Chain (5)4 


345 MELROSE HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £8,636: 1m 6f) (13) 

401 212210 ROSEDALE (USA) (N Hunt) JOuntop 9-7 BThOWSOfll 

403 1-38001 OSTENSffili (USAXD) (K AbduteKS Harwood 8-13 GStednytt 

404 1603 S«PB)CY(EMa«erlGWragg8-12 SCrttenl 

406 231011 COfVtoE(lto Jta RottisdSS) R Johnson Houghton 31 0(4«x)_ J Raid! 

406 ID4212 TWICE B0u) (K Af-Sad) N Cnurfun 8-6 — Pet Eddery 11 

407 0-14413 LIE M WAIT (W Du Pont A) GPrSdiard-Gorclan W Run 1 

408 331212 (fliSNAMfUSAVDIlSdeadi Modarnmed)!- CUrwiiB4 Then I 

409 341 WHITE REEF (Card RoOwwicfc) W Hem 33- W Carson P 

413 041 OWOEDESImY (USA) (KUddUJ Trail 80 B Route 1 

415 310421 RAST OUMBES (H HetnBrtonlWBsay 7-13 (TearS- — 1 

418 000-114 BEUBiG(USAXC-ig(E^(BirMd Manor Farras}P Cole 7-10 AMscfcayS 


419 2841 >neniMfiBUnarfcWaHia.7JB 

420 0208 ABADJERO (Margussa de MoratalB) Jbwny Rtzgandd 7-8 J Lome 13 

5-2 WhMe Reef, 9-2 Abtun, Twice Bold. 6-1 DMne Destiny. Sir Percy. 8-1 Husnaft, 

Ostensible. 10-1 Coinage, 18-1 Hosedato, 14-1 others. 


Starkey’s 

lucky 


escape 


21. 8 ran). OSTENSIBLE (9-10) 21 Sandawn winner from CoiKsto (8-1) (1m K B 
good to Rrm, July 24. 5 ran). StR P&ICY (9-6) 71 3rd of 6 behind Magic Slipper (8^R 
Yarmouth (im £2212. good to firm. Juty 17). COINAGE (34f 1W aftiner front 
WHterdata(7-8) to TWrek(2ia £2561, good to firm. Aug 1.4 ran). TWICE BOLD (8-0) 2i 
2nd to Five Farmings (9-6) n Newmarket (1m 41. £11550. good to firm. Aug 9. 7 ran)J 
WHnE REEF (B-7)Btoit Person's CNW (84) 25H to Doncaster (1m 6)Mmdn,fe59. good 
to firm. July 30. 8 ran). PAST GLORIA (7-8) beat Auction tarer (M) 31 to Ripon (1m 4fl 
MMtoiMrag 4, 5 ran). ALLATIM (84) beat Deserted (84) IKIfaia New) 



Selection: ROSEDALE 

4.15 YORKSHIRE OAKS (Group 1: 3-Y-O: fillies: £42,672: 1m 41) (II) 




HaHsx) J Dunlap 90 


York selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Fickle Young Man. £30 Bellotto. 3.10 Shardari. 3.40 
Ostensible. 4.15 Park Express. 4.45 Valuable Witness (if absent De- 
stroyer). 5.15 Cree Bay. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Gulf King. 2.30 Classic Tale. 3.10 Shardari. 3.45 Twice Bowled. 
4.15 Untold. 4.45 Majesxician. 5.15 Matou. 

By Michael Seely 

3.10 SHARDARI (nap). 3.45 While Reef 4.15 Colorspin. 


501 11-341 

502 WQ 

503 1100 

504 11 

505 131-414 

506 304411 

5W 21-0 
508 310 

505 14-041 

510 022322 

511 0111-23 

7-4 Gotanmin. 4-1 Parte Express. 5-1 UntokL 132 Raur Royals, 10-1 GuB Noe*. 
Queen Helen. 12-1 Gesadeh. Ivor's Image. Rejuvanato. 16-1 others. 








M am 


4.45 LONSDALE STAKES (£7,492: 2m) (6) 

601 271111-1 VALUABLE W ITNESS (USAKCMP) (S Me 

602 41300-4 OESTR0VB! (D)(D 


£30 ACOMB STAKES (2-Y-O: £8,714: 7f) (7) 

taKGfttayS 
IStoebtanS 

J Reid 7 

3 Thomsons 
_ M8bcti2 
1 Johnson 4 
W Canon 1 

11-8 Classic Tala. 3-1 BsUaao, 11-2 Dr Btdraca. Merce Cun n hg ta m. 8-1 Startle. 
12-1 Gomez. 20-1 SOman. 


603 32-1344 LEWULfSHi 

604 4^30320 SPICY STORY 


201 

• t 

202 

21 

203 

213 

206 

1 

207 

001 

211 


212 

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604 430320 SPICY STORY (USA)(C-0)(P Melon) I BakSng 5-94 SCsutenl 

606 01118/ BU GWTNEH (K Abduto) G Harwood 5313— G Stork* 3 

511 00212 MAJESHOAN (C-OXHF) (Mss U Mamawi) G Prttcftard-Gordon 3-80 

W Ryan 2 

• WtaabtaWtaMM atom arty tfflm terete 

11-10 Valuabie Witness. 4-1 Spicy Story. 5-1 Destroyer. 6-1 LerrMI, 


(S Marches) J Tree 6-9-6- Pat 
nr 59-4 SW 


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S Whitwora 5 
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£10 THE MATCHMAKER INTERNATIONAL (Group I: £117,288: 1m 
2f 110yd) (12) 

301 

302 

303 

304 

307 

308 


- W until 
I Metals 11 


5.15 HAREWOOD HANDICAP (£5,423: 61) (15) 

2 1-42001 MATOU (D) (Mrs T Pick) G PrtfctTanHaonSon 89-10 W Ryan 8 

5 000038 LtXaW tMCACW(IAsM Juta) A Jawis39-B pwetalsll 

7 0-03314 GREBi RUBY fUS^mfUF) (Mrs E Weinsmed G BaWJng 594 J internal 

8 200411 CREE BAY (HI (D) (D teeman) J Spomg 7^3 ; WCwaonG 

10 0C3004 TRUE NORA (H E A Bott LW) C Neteon 39-13 J Reid 3 

11 4-10013 BOOT ROUSH (DKBF) (G Paftenaon) J W Watts 4-8-11 MCamwrUalO 


Windsor resnlts 

Going; good 


14 000210 RAULMG 


W A Stephenson 886 
sent 



Canteen 12 

kJCtaMitS 
hMndtoe14 
. APrandO 
K0nrtey7 
Carter (3)4 
_J Lowe 2 



34 ShsderL 32 Triptych. 6-1 1 
Rtnrfx 12-1 Bold Arrangement 14-1 


r, 8*1 Ftormanti. 10-1 Bottoms, DHtoan. 


H&2.1 

7-2 Cree Bay. 31 BootPoteh. 11-2 Green Ruby, 31 Matou. 31 Lochonka. Roper 
Row, True Nora, 10-1 Ram&Sng Rnrar, Tobermory Boy. 12-1 Ottltos. 



Tough initiation 

for first-season 
training aspirants 


Ify Christopher Gonlding 

At the start of ewy Flat Berkshire Downs af lambnam. 


5 MiiiSpisa 


radng season there are several 
new names among the training 
ranks. These are Che yonag 
aspirants hoping to establish a 

place in the competitive world of 

training- racehorses. This year, 
as always, the competition to 
reach that coveted winner's 
enclosure has been tough. 

The big established trainers, 
Michael Stoute, Henry CeciL 
Gey Harwood and John Dunlop, 
a large slice of the cake 
with their endless supply of 
expensively bought* A«b- 
owaed bine bloods. The new- 
comer, therefore, finds 
opportunities few and fax 
between. 

Lester RnotfS role as a 
trainer had Been questioned; 
would the world's greatest-ever 
jockey be able t o sett le down, 
and communicate with his own- 
ers. Any doubts have been 
quickly banished. 

Flat race jockeys do not have a 
paitiesdary good record as train- 
ers, the National Hunt riders 
seem to do better. Bat Piggott 
was bo ordinary jockey* ami be 
is married to one of the 


shrewdest purchasers at the 
bloodstock sales, Susan. 

As well as Piggott there are 


the two divisions of the EBF 
Danes Maiden Fillies' Stakes. 
As they cost their respective 
owners $1,600,000 and 
$550,000 what chance have 
the others got some will be 
asking. 

Today's nap, though, is 
entrusted to Jabaraba /who 
cost his present owner, John 
Boswell, only 6,200 guineas 
after initially changfng hands 
two years earlier for $150,000. 
His trainer, Gerald Cottrell, 
told me that it has taken him 
18 months to get Jabaraba's 
wind right. Now, following 
those victories at Chepstow 
and here at Folkestone the 
horse, who won three good 
races as a two-year-old for 
Frank Durr, can complete a 
treble in the Cberiton Handi- 
cap at the expense of Shah's 
Choice. 


■ a«mu*g the training ranks *hl» 
season, who have already made 
their mark. Lord John Fitz- 
Gerald, the former assistant to 
the aow retired Newmarket 
trainer Bruce Hobbs, saddled a 
Royal Ascot winner with Siz- 
zling Melody in the Norfolk 
Stakes. 

Hobbs'S skill as a trainer has 
also been passed on to another of 
his former employees, Pip 
Payne, Ms head lad for six 


years. Payee, who was a trainer set np at Bnunley in Sarny, and 
m his own right in France wbere has saddled three winners, 
be saddled & winners, has now Michael Dickinson, can 
registered his first winner in tMs 


Michael Dickinson, can 
hardly be described as a new 


coaatry with Rnstic Eyes, at free. His achierments 


ltesk,hJriy. 


Doe to the harsh economics of surpassed. 


National Hnnt trainer cannot be 


radng Garin Hunter decided 
that be conld no longer continue 
as a trainee, and last season he 
handed the reins over to Ms 
AMwiMit, Martin Fethaston- 
Godley. Fetherston-Godley has 
grasped the opportnaity with 


Now tike private trainer to 
Robert Songster at Mantes in 
Wiltshire, the resnlts have net 
happened as everyone expected. 
Bnt the word from Mantoa b 
that winners wiU be on their 
way. Whatever happens' to 


relish, and is now saddling Dickinson this year he will make 
winners up and down the country Ms mark next season. He h the 


from Ms base in East Daley 
Over the other side of the 


man that every established 
trainer fears as their rivaL 


to firm 

low numbara bast 


1.45 EBF DANES MAIDBi FILLIES STAKES (Dhf k 2-Y-O: £1^38: 61) 
(15 runners) 


GreviBe Starkey, Britain's se- 
nior jockey, was indey to escape 


injmywtoi lairing a spectac u lar 
fell from the favourite. Lucky 
Starch, in the Suatfiddsaye 
Selling Stakes, won by Flag. 
Bearer at Windsor yestdriay. 

The colt, backed from 6-1 to 
100-30. was in the lead and 
looking the likely winner when 
be suddenly veered left and 
crashed into the Tunning raB: just 
over a furlong from home! 

The horse somersaulted, with 
Starkey underneath him, but the 
jockey was immediately back on 
his feet, although be did hitch a 
lift back in the amhnlance. 

Lucky Starch was a spare ride 
for Starkey. The colt’s intended 
jockey, Philip Waldron, bruised 
an ank l e when riding in Ger- 
many on Sunday and will rest 
until tomorrow. 

Lucky Starch is trained at 
Epsom by Geoff Lewis, who 
said “It was a horrible fell and. 
I'm just thankful that GreviBe is 
unhurt- The horse was running a 
bit green and just ducked ouL 
We fended him a lot and there 
is no doubt be would have 
trotted up." 

The form book was turned 
inside out when Uniformity 
made all the running to beat the 
5-4 fevourite,Centauri, - in the 
Newholme Slakes. Over . this 
course and distance earlier in 
the month, Gentauri won easily, 
with' Uniformity sixth, beaten 
nearly eight lengths. 

That was Uniformity’s race- 
course debut, and be showed the 
benefit of that experience here, 
knuckling down to work in fine 
style when challenged by the 
favourite inside . the final 
furlong. 


00 ABLE ABBE Ofcs 1 HacgrngorJJ Psyno 8-11 — 

3 ATTaS»Tte6 (Mra j Srt*5) B HBs 8-11 

BU08SWY(GB8Cde)DMortey3l1 

CARLTON GLORY (A tany)G fowls 311 

OEHACrf DELIGHT (J MM MTonpMn8-11 — 

0 DCLPHM1A (M Mutawa) J Dunlop 6-1 1 

00 HNG E H 8 CHOMP (fin A Alan) WJratog 8-11. 


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W Hatton 

_ trataraarlS 
_PRoUnaanS 

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NNmmS 

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04 LAITftJUC»NA(WflW)MSw>»8-11 . ~ — 

5 LITHE BCUhCM S atan) A amnrt 311 — 

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2 PELF ( USA) (Sta itfiMotararaa^LCunipi 311^— 

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00 SHOOTPE NOON (CBa$»0rt)PMacna4 311 A*£toM4 

00 STHATDHflFteSlraWR#t4ianH3qnloti)G WWta*Goniqn311 POaoli14 

5UNIEY PROJECTS (Sunloy HcWngs Ltd) C Brittain fl-11 — G Baxlar 2 

nampOng. 31 Part, 31 Stnncfc. 7-1 Uttte Bokter. 31 Lady Lucira. 


131 Dajphlnta, 131 atom. 


Folkestone selections 

By Mandarin 


1.45 Pdf £20 Zulu Knight. £55 Kous. 3-25 JABARABA (nap). 
3^5 Count Bertrand. 4 J5 Lord It Over. 4 j 55 Exotic Source. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
1.45 Pelt £20 Hamper. £55 FlameligbL £25 Dashing Light. 3 J5 
Count Bertrand. 4.25 Mnms.Man. 4-55 Shadiyama. 


220 WARREN MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £812: 8f) (18) 
1 034 

5 4 

■ . 6 0 
9 00230 

10 0-00043 

14 0 

15 0-80002 

17 003 

18 04 

19 0 

20 0 

24 0 

27 00 

28 0002 

29 on 

30 020444 


B^sysssil BO,. 8., **, 


BOWLS 


Old firm 
move 
to next 
round 


Willie Brooks, a former Barry 
HiHs and Paul Cole assistant, is 
rewarding the family finance 
pgongM into Ms training 
esrabtishment. Brooks's father 
sold hfo borne in Vferinia Water 
to enable yowm Brooks to 
porchase Paul Cole’S bottom 
yard. Aud it was with a Conner 
Cole-trained colt. Joyful 
Dancer, tint Brooks s add l ed his 


ByGordoo AQxa 

David Bryant and. David 
Rhys Jones nave been national 
pairs champions three limes 
since they fust played together 
21 vesrsago— in 1065. 1959 and 
1974. In the Gateway Enj&fo 


Bowling Association champion- 
ship ax Worthing PavOion yes- 
terday. they advanced to the 
second round with a 23-20 win 
over Paul Clarice and John 
Stephenson , of Bdgrave, 
Leicester. 

The match lasted four hours 
25 minutes and went w an extra 
end. The scores were level 20-20 


They say success breeds suc- 
cess, and if Richard Shaw 
inherits some of the good fortmc 
enjoyed by his former enqdoy- 
ers, Michael Stoute and Vincent 
O'Brien, he will go for. Lord 
Mostyn’S stepson registered Us 
first winner. Sweet Alexandra, 

at g Wolverhampton afternoon 
meeting recently, and qnicUy 
followed up with another suc- 
cess, Jofcist. at an evading ! 
fixture on the same day. 

Simon Dow and Alex Whiting 
are two young men who have 
chosen to tram away Cram the 
established centres* like 
Lambourn ami Newmarket. 
Whiting has 11 horses under his 
one at Costock Grange, in 
Leicestershire. 

Whiting recently took over the 
licence from Ms former em- 
ployer Ltn Light-Brown, who 
suffered from a stroke. At the 
age of 34, he has saddled three 
winners and six seconds from 
the six horses (hat he has oa the 
Flat. Hb first success was 
achieved at Brighton with Red 
Zulu. 

Simon Dow, aged 25, b the 
youngest r ec ruit this year, and 
has no regrets about Ms chosen 
procession. A former assistant 
trainer to PhOip Mitchell, whom 
he spent three years with, be has 


after Uw regulation 21 — and at 
one stage the Leicester men had 


one stage the Leicester men had 
been 6-18 in arrears.' 

There were five burnt ends in 
the first 1 1 - three to Bryant, 
two to Clarice - which explains 
the extreme length of the game 
and illustrates the refusal of 
Clarice and Stephenson to be 
overawed. “We were playing . 
well but not getting the rubs. 
Clarice said. Clarke was runner- 
up in the 1979 National Pairs. 

Roger Denny and Keith Cady 
of Framlingham Castle. Suffolk, 
needed an extra end to beat Bert 
Jacox and Graham Harris, of 
Stoke. Coventry. 28-26 at Beach 
House Park. Nothing seemed 
less likely after the eleventh end, 
by which time Denny and Cady - 
ted 22-5. On the twentieth Jacox 
and Harris scored their second 
five, and on the 21st a single, to 
force bowling's equivalent of the 
tie-break. 

John Gale, a deputy head- 
master in South London, broke 
his holiday in Miami to play. He 
and his brother Jeff, who-belong 
to the Vauxhall Park dub, beat 
Neville Hardy and Eric 
Cookman of Hornsea. York- 
shire 22-19. Jeff Gale used to 
May football for Corinthian 


The Oxford City and County 
am of Gary Harrington and 


team of Gary Harrington and 
Raul Sharman looked good on 
paper but Brian Archer and 
Ernie Price, of Tanhton Deane, 
looked better on the green, 
winning 20-17 with five shots 
over the last four ends. Adam 
Tidby and Brian Stone who 
helped Poole Park win the 
triples last week went out to a 
Lincolnshire pair. Nod Baker 
and Ray Freir. 

Jim Ashman, .of Hotevtc. 
York was among the England 


players past or present to lose. 
Cliff Simpson, ofOwton Lodge 
and another likely lad from 
Durham. Tom BuUer. of View 
Lane Baric, were among those to 
sufvive. 


YACHTING 


Light wind 
teste 
patience 

By Butt PSckthall 


. The 26 crews! competing in 
the Three-Quaner Ton Cup 
were forced to spend a third 
night ar sea last night after light, 
fickle winds continued through 
yesterday, testing patience as 
much as skin during the 355 
mfle-tong offshore race. 

Frontrunner, . the leading 
Danish entry, skippered by 
Niels Jeppesen. the designer, 
was first around the EC1 mid- 
Channel mark south of Poole 
late yesterday afternoon, shad- 
owed closely by three British 
boats, . Lion . (Tony Canning). 
Decosol- (Robert Bonom ky) 
and ' Indulgence .(Graham 
Walker) on the 'final 53-mfle 
spinnaker teg back to Torquay. 

■ However, with winds blowing 
from .the north-east at no more' 
than 10 knots in mid-Channel . 
yesterday afternoon, officials 
from , the Royal Ocean Racing 
Club were not expecting .this 
double points scoring race to be 
decided until. weD after mid- 
night, especially if the winds 
slacken again as . they did on 
Sunday night 

Jbe light patchy conditions 
caused some significant place- 
changing yesterday. One’ of the 
most remarkable recoveries was 
that achieved by Lion's crew. 


2JS LEAS SELLING STAKES (^35: Ira 2f) (IQ 


3 300334 
8 3D40M 
11 10301 



14 - 00 

15 0084)0 

16 30 
18 200900 
20 001300 

138 KOUS 

Candid. 31 My Myra, 20-1 attars. 


They had been 20th to round' 
Won Rock at die Stilly Isles on 
Sunday, but had gained consid- 
erably on tbe two easfcgoitwfegs 
to "challenge the leading- Danes . 
on. the reach to tHe finish. 

The RAF crew-sailing Wings 
of Cowley have also had their 
mis and downs. They "wire 
eighteen ib _at Wolf Rock but 
caught up to be within -IS 
minutes of Frontrunner when 
rounding East Rutt buoy off 
Start Point early yesicrdiy 
morning. -Unfortunately, they 
did not appear to be. among tbe 
front-runners at EC 1. . 

Throughout it afi. Jeppesen 
and hts crew have showremarip 
able consistency, along with- 
Robert Boltomley's Decosol 
which has maintained third 

place throughout. 


3-25 CHERfTON HANDICAP (£1,257: 1m 4f) (7) 

.2 
8 

7 

8 
a 


7-1 


£55 CANTERBURY HANDICAP (£1,535: 7f) (16) 
2 600010 

4 304000 

5 400300 
r. oo2oi 

9 000212 
10 042010 
13 300040 


15 033301 
TO 000210 


Capt Price's funeral 

The funeral of Captain Ryan 
Price, the former trainer, who 

died at tbe age of 74 on Saturday 

morning, will be held at 1 1 jO this 
Friday, at St John the Baptist 
Parish Church, Findoa, His 
widow, Dorothy, has requested 
no flowers, but has ashed for 
donations to be sent to the 
Injured Jockeys* Fund. 







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Francome hope 
has early exit 


The supporters of Aunt Etty 
in the Nimrod Novices Selling 
Hurdle at Worcester yesterday 
soon knew their fete. The John 
Francome-trained filly, who is 
rather a handful, refused to race. 

Angel Drummer, the 13-8 joint- 
favourite with Aunt Etty, led all 
the way for a five-length victory. 


Tony Ingham, the winning 
trainer, who was saddling his 
first winner of the new jumping 




Huckeropts 


at Kangere 


Ptter Hucker. the Queen’s 
Park Rangers reserve , 
keeper, has tened a new 


ivl'l 1 r-il V' -.Vnf -fl4( I 


guineas as a yearling, and won 
with her on the Flat The fiUy 
was ridden by Steve Knight, 
who was also recording his first 
winner of the season. 


Blinkered first tune 


YORK; 2JJ Jays Speoaf. 

FOLKESTONE SsfiKtay Oans. 125 Mr 
Gardkiar, '155 Tagore. 4,25 Gregorian 


Trtrcfn».f94a. Thursdav- 


The Pomp And Circumstance 
Novice Chase produced several 
casualties, only half the field 
completed the course, before 
Butlers Pet came home the 
length and a half winner from 

Karnatak. 


that he realizes his first-team 
opportunities could be few 

Rangers paid £200.000 w 

Birmingham City for ' DavfaE 
Seaman earlier this summer-anti 
are , sure to make him firs*- 
choice goalkeeper ahead : W 
Hucker. Yet Hucker. aged" 26, 
who had some-unhappy aispcHs 
in the reserves last season, bav 
agreed to siay at-Loftus Road. - 

That -is bad news for Paul •' 
Barron, the London club’s other - 
senior goalkeeper. Barron. , aged 
3£ who has played for Plytn- 


ouft Argyll ArsenaL 
Palace, west Bromwich Albion 
and Stoke City, is out ofactioa.- 
wuh an elbow injury but Jim 
Smith. 'the Rangers manager, 
has said he cannot afford -to 
nave three Goalkeepers, - • 




Damper 
Sons 
i boprs 










iiii- 1 i uLauni ftUvjuo i u i >QQ 


Ol WiV i 



CRICKET 


Gooch times his shots 
to perfection as he 
leads his team’s quest 


COLCHESTER : North- 
amptonshire, with nine second 
innings wickets in hand, are 
one run ahead of Essex 
A captain’s innings of 87 by 
Graham Gooch and substan- 
tial contributions by Prichard 
and Hardie helped Essex to a 
35-run first innings lead in 
their quest to continue to 
narrow the gap between them- 
selves and Gloucestershire at 
the head of the championship 
table. They took the wicket of 
Cook, Northamptonshire's 
captain, before bad light 
ended play four overs early. 

Essex made steady, iflargety 
unspectacular, progress all 
day, collecting maximum bat- 
ting points to add to the fo in- 
fer bowling that they attained 
on Saturday. Gooch timed his 
shots perfectly for an hour and 
a half and Prichard and 
Hardie batted effectively in 
their differing styles. 

This is perhaps the most 
attractive of the Essex' 
grounds. The first three days 
of the festival have attracted 
fine crowds — yesterday 
around 3,000 were present, 
about as many as one will see 
for a Monday of a county 
match. That is how popular 
cricket has become in these 
parts. 

Essex, one wicket down 

Damper on 
Notts’ 
hopes 

By Peter Ball 
TRENT BRIDGE: Not- 


By Ivo Tennant 

overnight, did not lose ' an- 
other until well into the 
morning. Lever, the 
nigh twaich man, batted for 
1 00 minutes, rather outstaying 
his welcome — or at any rate 
his usefulness. Eventually 
M alien der had him caught 
behind, one of five wickets be 
obtained on a dry pitch whiqjh 
primarily was of help to the 
spinners. 

Gooch had batted 140 min- 
utes and hit IS fours and a six 
when he was out to what 
appeared a premeditated shot. 
Trying to swing Harper high 
and wide, he holed out on the 
mid-wicket boundary and de- 
parted to a session with his 
black briefcase. 

Border made 28 before be- 
ing bowled by a ball Nick 
Cook turned considerably. 
Fletcher was also beaten by a 
sharp turn. The innings was 
given ballast by first Prichard 
and then Hardie, one benefit- 
ing by orthodoxy, the other 
showing how difficult it is to 
set a field to him. Both made 
half centuries in similar times, 
just over an hour and a half 

Cook also dismissed Prich- 
ard, caught behind. Later he 
added the wicket of Acfidd to 
give him four. In between 
Mallender yorked Pringle for a 
duck, had Foster canght at 


first slip and Hardie held in 
front of the sponsors’ tent, 
going for his eighth four. 

It was pretty murky when 
Northamptonshire batted 
again. Gooch sensibly soon 
bad both spinners on. In his 
second over Clukls had Geoff 
Cook caught in the gully off 
one that turned appreciably. It 
will be no surprise if the ball is 
turning square by this after- 
noon. 

NCKrtHAWTONSHIRE: First Mm 302 
jAJ Lamb 81. R J BsUoy 63; Fosters tar 

S aoanri fcmjms 

•Q Cook c Pnchana b cffife 9 

WLsrtctnsnotout 25 

R JBoyd-Mosanotaut 2 

Extras - D 

Total (1 wta) 38 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-23. 

ESSEX: First tarings 

"G AGooctl c Wafcor b Harper 87 

tO E East c Baiay b Malsndor 9 

JKLanrcWatanonbMaRwider 17 

PJ PrtchanJcWatwtonbN GBCook 72 

A R Border bNG BCoofc 28 

BR Hardie c Lamb bMaBendar 68 

□ R Pnngto b MaSamtar 0 

■KWH Fwtchar c Hrapor b N GBCook 9 

N A Foster cBaleyblMtomfer 0 

J Odds notout 14 

D LAcfiald c and bN GBCook 8 

Extras (108, nb 19} _Z7 

TOW 337 

Score at 100 onre: 333 tar 9. 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-38. 246. 3-150, 4- 
223. S2SB. 8291,7488, 8-298,9423. 10- 
337. 

BOWLING: MaBander 27-1-110-5; Cape! 
9-1-55-0: Harper 24-7-52-1; Walter 9-0- 
36-0; N G B Cook 32-7-78-4. 

Bonus points: Esaax4, Northamptonshire 

Umpires; N T Plows and D Lloyd. 



GYMNASTICS 


The wrong kind 
of beat to 
create harmony 


By Peter Aykroyd 


One for the road Down Unden Border hits out at Cook, who bowled him for 28, In the 
Australian’s last match for Essex (Photograph: Hngh Rovttedge) 


Weather the victor all round 


After an interesting morning, 
which held considerable prom- 
ise for further development, 
play was washed out for the day 
by rain which set in as the 
players returned to die field 
after lunch. Seventy-seven overs 
were lost and now 
Nottinghamshire's hopes of 
recovering tost ground in the 
championship will depend upon 
an arrangement between the 
captains today. 

After Lancashire’s attempt to 
add quick runs had produced a 
clatter of wickets, including that 
of Fairbrother, beaten in pursuit 
of his thousandth run of the 
season by Johnson's direct 
throw: the sight of the lively 
green wicket produced an eager 
response from Pauersbit.-The 
successes of Broad and Robin- 
son this season have provoked 
the suspicion that England dis- 
carded them too quickly, but. 
against Patterson in full cry both 
were found vulnerable to pace 
and bounce. . . 

Broad struggled . unconvinc- 
ingly, edging just short of Lloyd 
at first slip to his first ball and 
through the substitute's grasp of 
his seventh, before being beaten 
for pace and trapped Ibw on the 
full by an intended, yorker. 
Robinson had already departed, 
thick-edging a widish half-volley 
to be brilliantly taken one 
handed by M akin son at the finer 
of the two gullies. 

Broad's escape, however, had 
enabled him to survive into 
Patterson's sixth over. 

LANCASHIRE Ftrat Innings 
G D Mends c Rice b Fraser-Darling . 108 

GFbwtorc Johnson b Rice 57 

J Abrahams c Begad b Rice 3 

N H FairfiroSwr run out 97 

S J O'Shaughnessy c Robntson b 
Hammings 22 

A NHayburstc Bread b Sarafey 29 

C Maynard c Newel b Saxefty 6 

J Simmons tow b Fraser- Darting 1 

D J Makvtson not out 2 

Extras (b 6. to 9. 1*2) .17 

Total (8 wkts dec. 11U2 overs) — 324 
FALL OF WICKETS:1-116, 2-132, 3-139. 
4-203, 541 1 , 6-321 , 7-321 , 8-324. 
BOWLING- Saxetoy 26-5-B9-Z; Rice 17-6- 
31-2; Fraser-Darting 24.2-4-87-2; Cooper 
1 1-3-12-0: HemnrsngS 32-9-90-1 . 

NOTTMGHAMSHIHE: First Innings 
R T Rotonson c Makmson b Patterson .0 

B C Breed tow b Patterson 12 

M Newel not out 19 

P Johnson not out 36 

Extra, (to 2. w2.rto1) —5 

Total (2 wkts, 23 overs) 72 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-5, 2-18. 

Bonus posits: Nottinghamshire 1, Lan- 
cashire 4. 

Umpires: K E Palmer and BDutSeston 


I .' r x -J 

I • A'* -' V''-jr, 

I • ***->, J 


Because of bad light and rain, 
only 95 minutes play was pos- 
sible in the match between 
Middlesex and Hampshire at' 
Lord’s yesterday. Terry bad 
made 12 and Tremktt five, as 
Hampshire started out at 93 for 
four, 62 runs behind. Terry was 
soon out, disappointed appar- 
ently, to have been adjudged leg- 
before to Hughes, and if Gowiey 
had been encouraged as be got 
away with a chance to slip, 
discouragement was to follow 
all too quickly as he suffered an 
unpleasant blow on the hand, 
before Cowans bowled him with 
his next ball. By the time bad 
light and rain had combined to 
send the players in to an early 
lunch, Marshall, too, had been 
taken, and then Hampshire were 
151 for seven from 69 overs. 

A total of 28 overs had been 
lost when the umpires derided, 
play could begin again. BuU 
after Tremktt nad straight-tun 


By Peter Marson 

Edmonds to the boundary to 
bring the scores level and 11 
balls bad been bowled, the light 
worsened and the players 
trooped off to the pavilion with 
the score 158 for seven. 

At New Road, Worcester , 
Taylor and De Freitas had 
found enough movement to 
keep the batsnen on their toes, 
as Curtis and Hick, Worcester-; 
shire's third-wicket pair, added 
30 runs to their overnight 
partnership of SO. Curtis,48, and 
Hick, 45, had taken the score on 
to 128 for two, 81 runs behind 
LekesCerahire. when bad light 
and rain closed in. 

Michael Holding. Derby- 
shire's West TnH«m fast bowler, 
soon had taken his fifth wideet,- 
that of Peter Hartley, as York- 
shire began again at 131 for 
seven at Queens Park, Chester- 
field. With Mortensen polishing 
off the last two, Dennis and 
Fletcher, Yorkshire had moved 


on by 46 runs in 75 minutes to 
1 77 mom 66 overs. Holding took 
five for 46. When Derbyshire 
made a start, Barnett had got to 

32 when Canick dropped mm in 
the slips off Fletcher’s bowling, 
but he and Maher were there 
still at lunch, by when Deihy- 
shire bad made 68 for no wicket 
Rain during the interval and 
later, brought an early end to the 
day’s play- 

Fdrster retires 

Stuttgart (Reuter) — Bemd 
Forster, the West German inter- 
national defender and elder 
brother of the national team's 
defender, Karl-Hemz Fdrster, 
has been forced to retire from 
the game because of an injured 
right knee. Bemd, aged 30, won 

33 caps for West Germany and 
played in the bade four with his 
brother in the 1982 World Cup 


County leaders on 
collusion course 


By Richard Streeten 


YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


Worcs v Leics 

AT WORCESTER 

m C ES TE R SHMEs First timings 209 fT J 
Boon 63; P J Newport 5 for 76). 
WORCESTERSMRE: First Innings 

T S Curtis not out 48 

DBD’Ohveirac Du FruitaBb Benjamin 14 
'.DM Smith c Whitaker b Da Ftatas - 15 

G A Hick not out 45 

Extras (lb 2, rtt 4) 6 

Total (2 wtrts, 48 wars) 128 

•F A Neate. D N PataL M J Wastoa tS J 
Rhodes. P J Newport S M McEmn and A 
P Pndgeon to bat 
FALLOF WICKETS: 1-23. 2-48. 

Bonus paints; Worcastersldni 4, 
Lafcostarshiro 2. 

Umpir es: D O Qstear and R Patmor. 

No play yesterday 

SWANSEA: New Zaahndms: First to- 
mgs 378 for 5 dec (J J Crows 158. J V 
Coney 140 not cxd). Second Innings 71 tor 
3. Ghmoroan: First tarings 303 for 5 dec 
(J A Hopkins 142, G C Homes 74). Match 
abantoned. 

TAUNTOte Surrey: First tarings 427 for 9 
(foe (G S Cfinton 1 17. A J Stewart 78, C J 
Richards 70 not out). Somer set. First 
Inmgs 34 tar 0. 

Spectators to 
be registered 

Delhi (Reuter) - The govern- 
ment of India's border state of 
Jammu and Kashmir, ) in an 
apparent battempt to prevent 
separatist protests, has ordered 
cricket fans to register them- 
selves in order to watch a one- 
day match between India and 
Australia next month. 

Saifuddin Drabu, the chair- 
man of the state's cricket associ- 
ation. said all branches of the 
Jammu and Kashmir Bank had 
been authorized to register the 
fans until August 25. 


Sussex r Kent 

AT HOVE 

KENT: Fira brings 191 (ACS Ptgod 4 far 


tS AMarahc AadwnbPtgoa 

GROIloy notout 

D L Underwood c sub b Jones — 
T M Alderman c A P Wtts b RgoU . 

Extras (to 3. nb 2) 

Total I 


Second Innings 

MR Banian c sito b Jones — 31 

SGHinkscCMWoas bis Roux — 12 

C J Trrvart b Pigott j s _x — 3 

N H Tjrytar c arid b Pigott 0 

DG Asuitc AUchan b Ptooit 1 

X 5 Cowdrey c Latham b is Roux _ 34 

RM Steon tow b Jonas 10 

tS A Marsh c AHthan b Pigotl 20 

GROItoynotout — - — 13 

D L Underwood c sub b Jones IS 

TM Alderman CAP WabsbPtgod — 0 

Extras (to 3. nb 2) 5 

Total 1 145 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-19. 340, 3-40. 4- 
46. 5-54, 6-74. 7-109, 8-121, 9-144, 10- 
145. 

BOWLING: is Roux 15-3-37-2; Jonas 13- 
1-353: Pigott 1S2-G60-5; C M Weft) 7-2- 
19-0. 

SUSSEX: First brings 

R 1 Addon c Benson b Way 18 

A M Groan c Taytgr b EBson 39 

P W G Parker c and b Bison — 0 

A P Weis c Tovar* b Bbson 0 

CM Watts tow bMey : 82 

NJLanharntowbOnay 22 

0 A'Raeve not out 22 

GS la Roux c Cowdrey bDSay 10 

ACS Ptgob c Benson b Bison 35 

A N Jones b May 3 

*f1 J Goidd absent hurt 0 

Extras (b 4. to a nb 9} 21 

Tori (73J5 overs) 252 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-50. 2-53. 3-64, 4- 
81. 5168, 6-170. 7-139. 8-22a 9-S2. 
BOWUNG; Ofltoy 2*3-101-5: Alderman 
228-5847. E*son 21-5^-53-4; Cowdrey 
4-0-23-0; Underwood 2-0-7-Q. 

Second Irtnras 

R l ASchan c Aktorntai b Cwey 0 

A M Green not Out 5 

P W G Parker not out 3 

Total (1 w«) — 8 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-0. 

Bonus points: Sussex 7, Kent 5. 

Umpires: J BMcanahaw and D J Constant 


Derbys v Yorks 

AT CHESTERFIELD 

YORKSHRE: First brings 
M 0 Mourn cStvrma b Holding 0 
A A Metcalfe c Roberts b Warner — 20 

SN Hartley cHiIbHakJtag 8 

PERobmsonc Maher bHridtag 23 

J D Love b firmeyJ — ; — 32 

•ID LBwstowc Morris bfbmay — 17 

PCamckc Maher bHridiig 9 

PJ Hartley bHOttng 10 

SJ Dermis c Roberts b Monansen __ 9 

C Shew not out 7 

S D Readier c MWar b Mortentfl — 24 

Extras (b 1. to 14, w 1,nb2) 18 

Total (68 ovens) 177 

FALLOF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-14, 3-46. 4-77. 
599. 6-114, 7-129. 8-145, 9-147, 10-177. 
BOWLING: Holding 21-7-46-5; Mortensen 
22-6-61-2: Finney 12-1-403: Warner 1 1-6- 
151. 

DERBYSHIRE: Fhst brings 

*KJ Barnett not oui .34 

fBJM Maher not out 14 

Extras (b 4. to a nb 8) 20 

Total (no wkL 17 overs) 68 

A Ha J E Moms, B Roberts. G ROar. R 
Sharma. M A Haring, A E Werner, R J 
Finney and O H Morte nse n to bat 
Bonus ports; Derbyshre 4, YorkaMre 1. 
Umpires: B J Meyer and A A Jones. 

Middx y Hampshire 

AT LORD'S 

mSRESEX: first brings 155. 

HAMPSHIRE: First brings 
CGGreBfitogecDmntonb&knonds 17 

TCMiddtonn tow b Hughes 10 

R A Smith c Gating bEdnxxtds 39 

•M CJ Nicholas c Radtoy b Etinands . 6 

VP Terry tow b Hughes 18 

T M Tremten not crut 42 

N G Cowley b Cowans 2 

MD Marshall tow b Hughes 13 

tn J Parks not out 0 

Extras (b 5. to a w Q ii 

Total (7 wkts. 71 ovens) 158 

R J Mara and M E O'Connor to tun. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1S, 2-67. 3-68. 4- 
77,5105.5121.7-147. 

Bonus pomts: Middlesex 4. Hampshire a 
Unpres: R A Wlkta and P B Wight 


NUNEATON: Gloucestershire, 
withei&tjirst innings wickets in 
hand are 266 runs behind 
Warwickshire. 

To Gkmcestefshire’s chagrin, 
heavy rain yesterday washed 
away any chance of the 
championshire leaders held of 
settling their own fete in this 
match. Play was not possible 
after lunch and a dear-cut result 
can be reached only by collusion 
between the ' captains. 
Gloucestershire cannot expect 
any generous gestures. 

Sadly for Gloucestershire, 
who were aware of the good 
progre s s their rivals. Essex, were 
making at Colchester, was the 
feet that they made a promising 
start before the rain arrived. 
Warwickshire declared at 
Saturday’s score of 381 for nine 
and Gloucestershire reached 
US for two oh a pitch which 
played more reliably than ex- 
pected. 

For the first time since Ro- 
manies returned a fortnight a$o 
after a hand injury, be batted m 
his most fluent form and 
reached SO from 72 balls with 10 

Unsung heroes 
are toast 
of Stourbridge 

Two unsung batsmen, Chris 
Tolley and Dave Collins, guided 
Stourbridge into the final of the 
national club championship, 
sponsored by William Younger, 
with a four-wicket victory over 
semi-final opponents 
Gois borough on Sunday (Mi- 
chael Berry writes). 

Tolley, aged 18. made 62 not 
out and Collins, the dub's 
second-team captain, hit an 
unbeaten 25 to overshadow 
their more illustrious batting 
colleagues. Chasing Guis- 
borough’s 173 for seven, Stour- 
bridge were on 97 for six before 
Tolley and Collins came to- 
gether lo share an unbroken 
seventh wicket stand of 77, to 
see the Black Country side home 
with eight balls to spare. They 
now meet Weston Soper Mare 
in Saturday's final at Lord's. 

In the final of the national 
village competition, sponsored 
by Norsk Hydro. Ynysyeerwu 
will play Forge Valley at Lord's 
on Sunday. At the weekend 
Ynysygerwn. the losing finalists 
in the competition in 1979, beat 
Langley bory by eight wickets in 
the delayed semi-final 


fours. Romanies and Tomlins 
began briskly with a standofSS 
in an hour. It included four 
successive fours by Romanies in 
one over from Smith, who was 
then replaced by Munton. 
Tomlins played forward to the 
new bowler and was leg-before. 

The run rate slowed as Athey 
took time to settle down. Athey 
was almost canght at slip as be 
made his opening run against 
Munton and then did not score 
again for 40 minutes. He had 
batted 26 overs when he pushed 
forward to Ferreira and 

Humpage held a good, low catch 
right-handed. 

WAmnCKSMRE: First tarings 381 tar fl 
due (A J Motos 100. BowliiffTwwi 203- 
58-2: Lawrence 16-3-74-fc Itowfo 38-10- 
124-5,'Qravemsr38-8-8t-1:Banbri(lge5 
0-24-14 

GL0UCESTEnSHR& First kriogs 

K P Tontfns tow b Munton 22 

PWRomatoes notout 68 

CWJAVtricHunp u gebF : wrarii^. 20 
PBaWxMgenotout 

Extras (toAnbiQ — - ■ 6 

Total (2 wkts, 44oven9 1 115 

A WStovold. K M Curran, J W Uowis, tR 
C Ftusseft. *D A Gravaney, C A ar 

O V Lawrence to ML 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-55, 2-1 J A 
UmfMWE JH Hampshire and R JuSan. 

Ireland escape 
defeat 
by Scotland 

A stand of 1 18 for the sixth 
wicket by Garfield Harrison and 
Simon Corictt saved Ireland 
from defeat against Scotland at 
Titwood. Glasgow, yesterday (a 
Special Correspondent writes). 
In reply to Scotland's score of 
396 for seven declared, Ireland 
made 186. Ax 62 for five in the 
second innings Scotland seemed 
set for victory, but the sixth 
wicket stand saved Ireland, who 
finished with 205 for seven. 


Many women’s coaches and 
judges are now expressing con- 
cern about the uuiu t ore of 
recorded orchestral aresiciiithe 
1 floor exercise, co ntendin g that 
the trend acts against the call to 
bring women's gymnastics back 
to its aesthetic traditions. 

Orchestral music was permR- 
ted by the Federation 
Internationale de Gymnastiqne 
(FIG) m 1979 in the hope that it 
would gfcre gyamasls more cre- 
ative scope to refine .the 
astonishing technical advances 
of the decade with balletic grace 
and elegance as exemplified by 
Latynina, Caslavska - and 
Toariscbeva the great stare of 
the 1960s. 

Until that poht, masfcai 
accompaniment for tbeSO-sec- 
ond routine was decreed by FIG 
rules to be provided entirely by a 
‘tobuMOTOneetterinaUfliaud''. 
Today, the gymnast can call on 
the series* of a fid! symphony 
orchestra if she so wishes. 

Doling (be Door exerase, the 
gymnast mast harmo nise her 
movements with the music 
which mast Indicate variations 
of rhythm to match both slow 
and tost elements. Orchestral 
music, say its critics, make such 
co mb i natio ns extremely dffficnlt 
to achieve effectively unless 
expert dance techniques and 
considered c h o re o g raphy are 
employed - factors taken seri- 
ously only be a few lcadm g 
nations who are mostly from the 
Eastern Hoc. 

More specifically, to many 
followers of the sport orchestral 
mask seems focHental to what 
is being per f ormed on the floor 
mt A large number of gym- 
nasts use music which has a 
regular throbbing beat for the . 
whole nomine, allowing no 
changes to rhythm for the 
variety of gymnastic activities. 


ATHLETICS 


Setback to 
golden 
ambitions 

Stuttgart (Reuter) — Ingrid 
Kristiansen, Norway’s record- 
breaking runner, saw her 
chances of two gtild medals at 
next week’s European 
championships take a plunge 
when the final programme was 
revealed yesterday. Organizers 
said there have been so many 
entries for the women's 3,000 
metres that heats .will be 
necessary. 

Mrs Kristiansen, who holds 
world records over 5,000 and 

10.000 metres and a world 
marathon best time, is regarded 
as virtually unbeatable - in the 
10,000. But she now feces an 
exacting programme if she de- 
cides to try for the 3,400 as weB. 
She would have to run in the 
beats next Tuesday, the 3.000 
metres final two days later and 
the 10.000 metres final on the 
Saturday. Mrs Kristiansen 
moved down for a rare run over 

3.000 metres last week in Zu- 

rich, beating the Olympic cham- 
pion Maricica Puica of 
Romania in a brilliant run 
which saw her dock the fastest 
time in the world this year of 8 
min 34.10 sec. That victory 
elevated her to favourite over 
the shorter distance as wdl at 
Stuttprt. . .... . 

Organizers said no beats will 
be needed for the men's 10,000 
metres and that the final win be 
held on the opening day of the 
championships which nut from 
August 26 to 31. 


The overall effect, as desoibed 
by Michael Warren, chairman 
of the women's committee of tire 
British Amateur Gymnastics 
Association, is “lack of har- 
mony, poor interpretation, and 
die feefing that foe meac is 


With others in the sport, Mr 
Warren would Eke to see gym- 
nasts aud their coaches return to 
foe single instrument where a 
definite beat can be di scerned 
and a variability can be seen and 
beard with foe changes of 


heard with foe changes of 
performance during the floor 
tontine. An iusUuui e m, of 
coarse, need not be in a con- 
ventional category such as 
s t rin g, wo®d wind, brabs or 
pereassion; ft can also be a voice. 
Spectators of foe Nat West Gala 
for Sport AM. betd to Bir- 
mingham In May will recall the 
st ar ring renting by the graceful 
IiK» Ignatova, of Ehdgaria, foe 
world's No 2 rhythmic gymnast, 
which was performed to the 
e moti v e anaacrompanled voice 
of a' woman folk singer. 

To persuade gymnasts to 
make advantageous use of u 
single instrument wfll no doobt 
take several years. It is easier Ja 
toms of time and expense for a 
gymnast and her coach to work 
with a ready-made orchestral 
rec ordi ng rather than to con- 
struct an imtiridnal add musi- 
- caDy-taQored routine with, say, 
a. pianist. But stimntorion for 
change could come about with an 
alteration to foe intern atio n a l 
rales. At present, the FIG code 
penalizes the floor performer by 
0.1 points on each occasion that 
mssic and movement are not bi 
harmony, op to a maxntiHm of 
05. However, foe next revision 
. of the code is not due natil 1989. 

In the meantime, musical 
harmony has a low er priority , in 
,Brittoh floor exercises. 


HOCKEY 


Argentina 

beat 

Russians 

Amsterdam (Reuter) — 
Argentina beat the Soviet Union 
2-1 in the women’s World Cop 
yesterday. The powerful Rus- 
sians, pre-match favourites to 
head group B and reach the 
semi-finals, opened the scoring 
in the thirteenth minute when 
Natella Krasnifcova, their pro- 
lific scorer; touched in a pass 
from the winger, Larisa Oqpk. 

The game quickly slipped 
from thetrgrasp as the Argentin- 
ians went on the attack, forcing 
a series of corners. Lodmllla 
Sapaxanewa,. the Soviet goal- 
keeper, made some brilliant 
roves until- Alexandra Palma set 
up the -equalizer for Grisdda 
Belmonte in the 23rd minute! 
On the stroke of halftime 
Palma put the South Americans 
ahead. 

In a- frantic second half the ~ 
Argentinians owed their sur- 
vival to the masterful work of 
Claudia Media, their captain, in 
containing Krasnikova, scorer 
of six goals in three matches. 

If was not all defence, how- 
ever, and they might have gone 
further ahead had Gabridla Liz 
not sent a penalty stroke 
wide.The upset edged Argentina 
ahead of the Soviet Union in 
group B with two rounds 
remaining; but the contest for 
the two semi-final places re- 
mains wide open. 


GOLF 


• Arthur Sutton, the 47-year- 
old skipper of Cheshire, an- 
nounced his retirement from 
Minor Counties cricket during 
his side's final match of the 
season against Wiltshire at Toft 
yesterday (Michael Berry 
writes). 

Sutton, who had intended 
stepping down at the end of last 
season after leading Cheshire to 
the championship for only the 
second time in their history, 
made his debut in 1939 and has 
scored over 10,000 runs and 
taken more than 400 wickets 
during his 28 years with the 
county. 


Parkin sweeps ahead 



FOR THE RECORD 




* St T:? «; 

-v; - : : 

V - - 


| a-.' • • ; w:Jr 

I •-'< \'r :> 


Philip Parkin spreadearied 
the field in the opening rouna of 
the £12^500 Senator windows 
Welsh professional champion- 
ship at rai n-lashed Whitchurch 
yesterday. The former amateur 
champion fired a magnificent 
six-under-par 65 — his lowest 
score of the year in a mayor 
event — to lead at .the halfway 
stage by three strokes from the 
Vafe of Llangollen professional 
David Vaughan. 

Several top players, including 
the Ryder Coy), man Ian 
Woosaam, four-times cham- 
pion . Craig Defoy and the 
defending title-holder David 
Uewellyn, are all down the field. 
Parkin looked at one time as 
though he would threaten the 
course record of 64 set up last 
August by Llewellyn on his way 
to the title. He was four under 
par after seven holes and going 


extremely welL But although he 
made few mistakes after.that, he 
could not keep the momentum 
going. He was delighted with his 
round and is confident of taking 
the top prize of £2^00. “I have 
never won a Welsh national tide 
and want to do so very much. 
Now is my chance. Parkin 
was named rookie of the year in 
1984 within months of turning 
professional. * 

Woosaam, quoted by local 
bookmakers as 2-1 fevoarite for 


gear and had to be content with 
a 72 which in c luded halves of 3 9 
and 33. His black spot came at 
the 484-yard eighth which he 
dropped two shots. Llewellyn is 
on 71 — the same seme as two 
other past winners, Andy Grif- 
fiths and Kevin Jones — while 
Defoy, now the Welsh national 
coach, had a 71. 


! flyeir Greg Longanis, of the United States, on bis way 
old medal m yesterday's springboard event at the world 
swimming championships in Madrid. 


ttH&uraa xw-s&i'-MK&'Bfc sc 








28 


SPORT 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 




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New man takes up the challenge as sleeping London giants strive for a return to the glory glory days 


Prudent Pleat 


v . *■/*, ..f '-vTV Jj* 1 v.V* •• 





is looking 


for winners 


When the Football League season opens on Saturday some 
big-city clubs will be hoping to end lengthy spells without 
first division success. In the first of a four-part series. 


David Miller assesses Tottenham Hotspur’s chances 


T here is a difference between 
being financially prudent and 
being mean. Tottenham, so 
often dazzling on the field, 
have until recently tended to 
the latter. Bill Nicholson was among the 
first to jump at the increased opportu- 
nity of bringing great players to a 
successful club with the end of the 
maximum wage, but he remained a 
shade too care fid over wages. Thrift, 
from the pre-war era, was stitched into 
the club's way of life. 

“Nick" would inspect each training 
ball to see if it would last another 
season; and today be still lives in the 
semi, comfortably modernized, only a 
stone's throw from the ground, where he 
was before be became manager. Hon- 
esty poured out of him with the sweat 
from his furrowed brow. 

The boardroom, which largely let him 
run the club, was old-fashioned, digni- 
fied , paternalistic ~ and mean. Small- 


Of intelligence who has shown he can 
make bricks with little straw. 

The speculation has been that Pleat, 
the third in a succession of quietly 
spoken managers, will not have the 
lempermemal resilience to withstand 
the expectations of a chairman as 
youthfully excitable as if he was sill on 
the terraces with a clamouring public. 

White Hart Lane is not Lutoo, as 
Pleat is discovering. He hasn't played a 
league match yet and already his drawer 
is full of accusatory Press cuttings which 
he believes are legally actionable but 
about which be will do nothing except 
smile. Luton's accusation that be is 
stealing their players is the least of the 
criticisms. 



.,r 
■ - 

1 •_ . ;*** 




An end to free lunches 
asPleafs 

policies begin to bite 


New wave; David Pleat (above) is the man Tottenham Hotspur supporters are hoping can create a side to emulate the successes of the great doable-winning 
team of 1961, pictured below as they arrived on an open deck bus outside the Town Hall in Totten h a m to attend a civic reception in their honour 

lenge for a manager. He has.tb leant the 


mindedness nearly brought the club to 
j, a fail 


its knees six years ago, a faiiure.to react 
to the times, to realize Tottenham's true 
status. Meanness saw Pat Jennings 
unnecessarily leave for Arsenal, saw 
club servants inadequately treated, 
Nicholson included. When a neighbour 
of one of the Tottenham directors 
installed a swimming pool in a fashion- 
able north London suburb, he discov- 
ered that the Water Board had been 
telephoned to check if he had up-graded 
his water-rate. 


Inadequate funding of the new grand- 
stand threatened Tottenham with the 
same financial crisis which had over- 
taken Chelsea. In stepped Irving 
Scholar, a tax-exile millionaire, to shake 
modernize the financial administration. 
Scholar, barely middle-aged, is a life- 
long supporter, as he tirelessly tells 
anyone. Having bought his ultimate 
placing, he wants it, not surprisingly, to 
work. Tottenham have not won the 
league championship since 1961. 

There are reasons, as Arsenal and, 
Chelsea will tell you. London ought to - 
be the power in the game, but expensive 
footballers tend not to identify with 
their obligations as readily m the 
socially up-market south as they do in 
Lancashire. Saint Etienne, Nantes and 
Bordeaux likewise find it easier .than 
Parisian dubs. 


Tottenham, mind you, have continu- 
ously played entertaining football, and 
after the departure of Terry Neill and 
with the arrival' of Ardiles from Argen- 
tina in 1979, they twice won the FA 
Cup. Yet in the league they remained 
the nearly team: since 1979 their 
position has been eleventh, fourteenth, 
tenth, fourth, fourth, eighth, third and 
tenth. Keith Burkinshaw was sacked 
despite his Cup triumphs, Peter Shreeve 


And his most frequent caller on the 
phone is the chairman. ‘Tm learning to 
live with it," he says with an under- 
standing smile. “He’s so enthusiastic, 
constantly wanting my opinions on 
everything, so that I sometimes have to 
say I haven’t got time to explain, to tell 
him not to worry about the players, that 
I’ll look after that. He's only been 
chairman a few years and if I'm the right 
man for the job, he knows he must let 
me get on with it and practice my 
policies." 

The players are already finding one or 
two of Pleat's policies something of a 
shock. Free lunches after training at 
Cheshunt — the training ground which 
has been sold but is still m use — have 
been stopped unless there is further 
training in the afternoon. Reimburse- 
ment of green fees at local golf clubs is 
under review. “Why," aslw Pleat with 
the air of astonishment of a manager 
from the provinces, “should the dub 
pay for the players' hobbies?" Self- 
indulgence is probably one factor in 
Tottenham's under-performance: 
though Pleat was impressed when the 
team unanimously refused a gift cheque 
from the beneficiary of a testimonial 
match at 'Gillingham. 

Another, - and maybe the major, 
challenge feeing Pleat Is the accentua- 
tion over the past six years or more on 
the dub's most gifted player Glenn 
Hoddle. Looking at the mannered 
posters on the Underground, in which 
he models dothes specially fashioned 
for him, you would never suppose that 
Hoddle was a footballer. A voguish 
photographer, perhaps, or an interior 
designer, but hardly a man in physical 
combat 



came and, not surprisingly, went Now 
f David Pier 


it is the turn of David Pleat, a manager 


Pleat had a simple way of estimating 
the efficiency of his teams at Luton. At 
the end of the season he would mark 


each of them as being a “winner" or a 
“loser." In the best team he lad, he 
found there were three losers, “which 
was at least one too many — and they 
were all players I liked.” 

The sobering -aspect about Hoddle's 
exceptional skills is that no foreign dub 
has ever made a serious effort to prise 
him away. It is probable that by April 
next year Hoddle could be on Pleat's 
private list as a loser, yet to get rid of 
Hoddle if the team were not winning 
would be to hang a noose for himself: 
even if in Hoddle's most illustrious 


seasons he was leaning heavily on the 
industry of Ardiles. He is an entertainer 
when one up rather than a life-saver 
when one down. 

"The public, and even people in the 
game, tend to have fixed ideas about the 
players, about Roberts, say, as much as 
Hoddle,” Pleat says. “I'm open-minded. 
I think Roberts could be a very useful 
midfield player and Hoddle's attitude 
has been excellent in training. The 
players don't know quite what to expect 
of me, which is a good thing. It’s 
stimulating for me to converse with new 


■players because management is a 
continuously learning process. The test 
will come when the will among the 
players to want to do well for a new 


alternatives but he's only had one year 
in London so far." 

The versatility of Mabbutt, who woo 
nine caps two seasons ago and is capable 
of playing in almost any position, 
persuaded Pleat not to worry about 
failing to sign Butcher, though he has 
since signed Gough. He thinks Mabbutt 
could play as a free central defender, 
and that the wages Butcher was 
demanding would have made a rod for 
his own back when several contracts 
have to Ik re-negotiated in the oar 
future. 

neat finds himself surprised at some 
of the players on the books and, 
thinking out loud, wondered how they 
got there. Yet he is stimulated by ihe 
knowledge that if all goes well there is a 
dormant mine of public enthusiasm 
into which to expand; which is never 
there for the smaller dub. "In a lesser 
dub you are always breaking up the 
team because of lack of funds," be says. 

“At Luton, a major night for the dub, 
a superb performance by the team, 
could go by almost without being 
noticed. There are only so many people 
out there who are available to enjoy it" 

But what about the possible bad 
nights at Tottenham? “When the public 
are clamouring with impatience. I'll 
count to 10 and try not to be impatient 
myself Tm merely grateful for the 
opportunity to be manager of a famous 
dub. If ftfer start throwing stones, if 
Hoddle should decide to leave, PH still 
expect to be given 12 months. Peter 
Taylor always used to say at Notting- 


. ham that what you need as a dub is bod- 
ies. I was looking at Alan Mullery's list 


of players down at Brighton the other 
manager has worn off How hungry will day. He’s only got 15. We had a pboto- 
they be?" ■ • • call here recently and I found myself 


He is fascinated to see what he can do 
with two other England players, Waddle 
and Mabbutt “Unpredictable players 
tike Waddle can be useful if the other 
players will accept them,” Heat says. 
“In time. Waddle, being left-footed, 
could be a very good right-winger. He’s 
so talented and I see him as a super chal- 


looking around at the size of the squad. 
They may not all be right, bull have got 
bodies." 


( TOMORROW ) 


How money has foiled to bring 

failed 


>neyl 

the title to Manchester Unit 


FOOTBALL 


Hoddle is 
back 
for Spurs 


Blind justice saves 
Kennedy a fine 


Tottenham Hotspur received 
another boost yesterday with the 
news that Glenn Hoddle, the 
E ng l a n d midfield player, has 
shaken off a back injury ami 
looks certain to start the season 
at Aston Villa on Saturday .This 
comes after Sunday’s si g nin g of 
Richard Gough. Before flying off 


The Portsmouth chairman, 
John Deacon, has defended his 
decision oot to penalise their 
former captain, Mike Kennedy, 
who was sent off in the friendly 
inst Queens Park Raneers on 


ay, despite a pledge that 
ild fine evc^pjayer sent 


to Barcelona yesterday for a pre> 
IPleat, 


season ro ornament, David 1 , 

the manager, said:" I expect 
Glenn to play in Spain." 

Gough, the Scottish World 
Cap defender, bought Cram Dim- 
dee United for £756,000, was 
with the Tottenham party 
left Heathrow airport along with 
Mitchell Thomas, the former 
Luton left back, a recent ac- 
quisition. 


Pleat added: “I am pleased to 
have signed both these lads and 
I will decide just who plays 
where when I have had a kiok at 
the team." 


be woul 

off this season £iuu in an 
attempt to dean up the club’s 
images. 

Kennedy, who was transfer- 
listed at his own request after 
having the captaincy taken away 
from him as part of the cam- 
paign, was dismissed for hitting 
the Queen’s Park Rangers for- 
ward John Byrne, but Deacon 
said; “He was unlucky because 
the referee, did not see what 
happened, and only had his 
attention drawn by a linesman. 

“Wh en we began this fines 
system, we told the players we 
would assess each individual 
case, and we have dedded Mick 
should not be fined. In hie faa» 


Portsmouth were fined 
£2^000 by the League for their 
poor disciplinary record last 
season. 

• Grimsby and Lincoln have 
reached agreement on a player 
ex chang e. Grimsby's England 
under-21 forward, Gary Lund, is 
joining Lincoln, and the 24- 
year-okl midfield player, Phil 
Turner, moves to Blundell Park. 
No fee is involved. 

• Neale Cooper, Aston Villa's 
£350,000 summer signing from 
Aberdeen, will miss ihe opening 
league game ax home to Totten- 
ham tins Saturday. The Scottish 
under-21 international limped 
out of a friendly at Leeds on 
Saturday with a groin strain. 

• The Middlesbrough captain 
Don O’Riordan was due to hold 
transfer talks with Manchester 


he retaliated and had already 
been booked." 


■Rioidan, who 
from 
>5.000 last 
year, has been granted a free 
transfer by the Football League 
over a breach of contract claim. 


POOLS FORECAST by Paul Newman 


Saturday August 23 
FIRST DIVISION 


FOURTH UVISKM 


2 Arsenal v Man U 1 
X A VBIa v Tottenham 
2 Charlton v Sheffield W 
1 Chelsea * Norwich 
i Eve nor v Nottm F 
X Lecastar v Luton 

1 Man C v Wimbledon 

2 Newcastle v Liverpool 
1 Southampton v OPR 
1 Watford v Oxford 

1 West Ham v Coventry 


X Exeter v Orient 

1 Halifax* Aldershot 
1 Hartlepool* Cardiff 
1 Hereford v Wrexham 
X Lincoln v Colchester 
1 Pefertoor u v Southend 

1 Rochdale v Crewe 

2 Scunthorpe v Nthamptn 
Nat on coupons: Swansea 


Michel rings 
chang es in 
France team 


ton; 

IL 


vCambndga 


SECOND DIVISION 


SCOTTISH PIWfflBt 


2 Barnsley *C Palace 
2 Blackburn v Leeds 
X Bradford * Plymouth 
X Brighton v Portsmouth 
1 Derby vOkftam 
X Hudoersffd * Sunderind 
XHuitvWBA 


1 Celtic v Aberdeen 

1 Dundee Uv Hearts 
X Falkirk v Dundee 

2 Hamilton v Rangers 

1 Hibeman v Momerwal 
1 St Mirren y Clydebank 


Lausanne (Reuter) — Henri 
Michel, the France manager, 
will barely be on shaking hands 
terms with most the side that 
faces Switzerland in a friendly 
international here to nigh l The 
World Cup third-placed team 
have already seen Giresse, 
Rocheleau and Bossis retire, 
while Platini and Tigana are still 
considering their international 
futures. 


1 1pswich v Gnmsby 
1 Reading vMRwdf * 
1 Shaft U v Shrewsbun 


SCOTTISH FIRST 


rShnewstxxy 
1 Stoke v Bffmngtem 


THIRD DIVISION 


1 Blackpool vChestttfld 

2 Bolton v Swmdon 

1 Brentford v Boumemth 

1 Bristol C v Bury 
X Chester v Carfcste 

2 MaiBfiflM v Doncaster 
2 Newport « GiRngham 


2 Brechin v Morton 

1 Dumbarton V Forfar 

1 Dunfermhna v Chdo 

1 East Fife v Airtne 

X KUmamoek v Montrose 

2 Psntdt v Qn of Sth 


SCOTTISH SECOND 1 


X Notts Co* Wigan 
ivFidh 


1 Rotherham * ndham 
1 Walsall * BnstcH R 
1 York v Darkngton 
Not on coupon* MkMGS- 
Brougftv Port Vale. 

TREBLE CHANCE (home teams}: Aston 
Villa. Leicester. Bradford. Brighton. 
Huddersfield, Hi*. Chaster. Notts County, 
Ewtor. Lmooto, Falk**, Kilmamock. 
BEST DRAWS; Aston VBIa. Brighton. Hull. 
Lincoln. Falkirk. 

AWAYS: Snettiew Wednesday. UwrpooL 
Crystal Palace. Gflngham. Morton. 


1 Aloav Ayr 

2 Artjroam v Stgnftsmuir 
1 Berwick vE SWUm 

3 Cowdentth v Sttrtng 
1 Meadowbenk v RaS 

{to* on cmunc Queen'! 

Park v Stranraer; Q 
Johnstone vaimm. 

HOMES; West Ham. 

Sheffield United. Stoka, Blackpool! Bristol 
Qjy. wStoll.Ywk. Si mBZ- 
hne. Meadowbank. 


With Genghini (ill) ,and 
Fernandez ' (injured), Michel 
warned: “We must solve our 
problems quickly. We play our 
first European championship 
qualifier against Iceland on 
September 10." Michel's prob- 
lems ensures a .barely e recog- 
nisable France side tonight as 
Dominique Bijotat, Fabrice 
Poullain. Basile Boil, aged 19. 
Jean-Christopher Thouvenal 
and Gerard Buscher, all find a 
chance to enhance their careers. 


SWITZERLAND: (front E BuTB«W. U 

wtort.fi 


™=P O0q& Homo *. West Ham. Derby. 

i. York. 


Zurbuchan, U Efentort. fi Bottom, C Ryt,- 
MWobar.G Breqy.HHarmann, JWHtwar. 
T BtcKeL A Gefcpr. C GW. A Hatter. E 
Mstssan. B Suitor. DZuffL 


Sheffield United. Bristol City 
a ways: Sheffield Wednesday. „ 
Palaca. Grttognam. Onm Aston 

n. Falkirk. 


FRANCE: (probable)- J Bats; J-C 
Thauvenel. M Amorce. P Bateson. B Bob; 
D Buotat j-m Fewi. P veraruysse. f 
B oulfan. G Buscharjf Swpyra. . 


% 


KARATE 


Britain’s 

heavy 


presence 

By Nicolas Soames 


The experienced heavy- 
weights, JeofT Thompson and 
Vic Charles, and the world figfrt- 
heavyweight champion, Pat Mc- 
Kay, cane str o ngl y through 
e limi n at ion contests at the Crys- 
tal Palace over the weekend to 
win their expected places in the 
British team for the world 
championships m Sydney from 
October 3 to 6. 


A 12-man team and three 
women are being sent by the 
British Karate Federa tio n. Th e 
British are favourites to retain 
the men's team tide, which they 
have won on the last two 
occasions, and to pick up in- 
dhridnal medals. 


“This is the strongest team we 
have ever seat to a world 
championships," Ttcky Dono- 
van, the team manager, said. He 
is pinning hopes, not only on 
established figures such as. 
Thompson and McKay, hot also' 
on the precocious talents of 
Willie Thomas, aged 21, the 
European light-middle weight 
champion. 





BASKETBALL 


Russians lose 
to US again 


Moscow (Renter) - The 
United States women's team 
confirmed their supremacy by 
beating the Soviet Union 108-88 
(half time 56-43) in the murid 
championship final yesterday. 


The Russians revamped their 
side after tut month's Goodwin 

Games defeat by the Americans 

— their first reverse for 28 years 

- bat were ratable to withstand 
the relentless pressure of their 
opponents, led by Cherly Miller 
who soured 24 points. Olga 
Yakovleva hit 29 points in reply. 


GOLF 


Victory for 
Green in 
stableford 


Chstle Rock, Colorado (AP) — 
Ken Green birdied two of the 
last three holes at the 7,503-yard 
Castle Pines Golf dub course to 

win the new and ■ controve rsial 

International stableford tour- 
nament and take the 5180,000 
first prize. 

Green finished on 12 points 
under the modified Stableford 
scoring system in an event 
offering a total of $1 million in 
prize money. His six-under-par 
medal score of 66 did not count. 


Only the points acquired un- 
der the Stableford scoring sys- 
J and these 


tern 


were awarded on the basis of the 
score on each hole: 10 for three 
under par; five for two under 
par; two for birdie,' nothing for 
par, minus one for ond over par 
and minus three for two over 
par or worse. 

Green, whose only previous 
victory in five years on the PGA 
tour came in the 1985 Buick 
Open, had six birdies in his 
round, taking the lead with a 15- 
foot putt on ihe 12th hole, and 
bolding it the rest of the way. 


The veteran, J C Snead, of the 

United States, West German, 
Bernhard Lancer. Howard 
Twitty, of the United States, and 
the South African, Nick Price, 
all challenged the leader «*»■*■ 
the match. But Green con- 
firmed Instead with critical par 
putts on the 14th and ISth, and 
birdied the 16th after an ap- 
proach shot to within six feet of 
the pin. 

Langer, holding second po- 
sition, needed to hole his second 
shot on the par-four 18th for a 
two under par to beat Green. 
But he left the approach short, 
then chipped to within about 8ft 
of the flag. 

Langer made the par putt to 
finish with nine points on a 
medal score of 69 and claimed a 
prize of 5113,000 His round 
included seven birdies, a two- 
over-par hole, and two one* 
over-pars. 


But Green then effectively put 
himself beyond reach with just 
two puns for a birdie four on the 
17th. That put him four points 
ahead going to the last bole, and 
made the match became little 
more than a fight for second. 


LEADING FINAL SCORES (US intoss 
stated): K Greer. 12 pts: B Langer. 9; J G 
Snead, k J Smdetor. 8: N Price (SAL 8 H 


Twttty.& K Knm. 4;B Ueteke. A. A 
1-Tftto.O; 


O.TCCttoft {Taiwan}.- it ■ 


TENNIS 


Navratilova’s win 


confirms her fon 


Los Angeles (Reuter) — 
“ova defeated 


Martina Navratilova 
Chris Lloyd, 7-6, 6-3 on Sunday 
to win the Virginia Slims of Los 
Angeles Tournament and the 
545,000 (about £30,000) first 
prize in one of the besx matches 
between the two women. The 
major difference in was Mrs 
Lloyd's erratic serving game. 
But she matched Miss 
Navratilova in every other 
phase of the game. They both 
made several b rilliant passing 


tie-breaker. But with the help of 
;, Miss 


shots, and when Mrs Lloyd's 
vrattiova 


serve pinned Miss Na 
to the baseline, Mrs Lloyd often 
would scored with drop shots. 

Miss Navratilova took -the 
first break for 2-1. but Mrs 
Lloyd, who won 520,000, (about 
£13,000) quickly pulled beck to 
3-3. Miss Navratilova broke 
again to lead 6-5 and seemed to 
be on her way to . serve out the 
set but Mrs Lloyd saved three 
set points — two of them passing 
shots — and went on to force the 


two double faults, 

Navratilova closed, out the first 
set m 64 minutes. Only one 
break was needed in the second 
set to give Miss Navratilova the 
championship, and once more a 
Mrs Lloyd double fruit, her 
eighth in the match, cost her 
dearly. It gave Miss 
Navratilova, who now holds a 
37-33 lead in matches betwiien 
the two women, the sixth game, 
a 4-2 lead and effectively the 
match. “If I'd have won that 
first set, h could have been a 
different story,” said Mrs Lloyd. 

In the doubles final, Mfea 
Navratilova and Pam Shriver. 
of the United States, won 6-4, 6- 
3 against Ctaudia Kobde-Kilsch, 
of West Germany, and Helena 
Sukova, of Chechoslovakia. 


„ UMfc m Nawxtlowa 


Learning the hard way 


Toronto (Reuter) - Playing 
an aggressive and gutsy game, 
Boris Becker tiiowed he can win 
on hard courts on Sunday, 
rallying from a set down to beat 

Stefan Edberg, of Sweden, 64, 

3-6, 6-3, m the final of the 
5375,000 (£244,000) Bayer's 
International championship 
here. 


. "In genoral, to win on hard 

courts you need more than just a 

hlO Wu^ imai 1 mii« 


Wg you have to play 

““ ‘ ” and 


good returns, good volleys 
you have to think much more 
than on grass,” Becker said, 
accurately summing up his win- 
ning strategy. 


T did not know how to play 
but r 


Becker and the Yugoslav. 


on hard courts last year, bur 
found out it suits my. game." 
Becker said. Becker has now 
won two of his six professional 
titles on that suffice. Last week 
be reached the final of another 
hard courts Grand Prix event. 
Becker won 531,000, Edbeig 
$25,500. 


Slobodan 23 v^movic. reached 


the doubles’ final where they 
were beaten 6-7, 6-3, 6-3 by the 
unseeded American team of 
Chip Hooper and Mike Leach. 


RESULTS: Singha flufc e Bectar 
S EdbM (&WL64, m! ml 


■ Edbun ^ 


M 


3» 


SPEEDWAY 


Denmark 


romp 
to victory 


Denmark won their third 
successive world team' title at 
Odsal Stadium, Bradford, « 
Sunday while the United States 
gained revenge for their recent 
defeat by England. 

The Danes were too pewerfd 


for the rest even allowing for the 
of -their 


bekrw-par form of -their maid 
ctaapMaa and captain,' Derek 
GaQdexsen, who had dutch 
problems and was his side's 
lowest scorer. 


England and the United 
States were kicked throughout 
the meeting but England wt 


into the final heat with- a two- 
point lead. 


England's Samoa Wigg fed 
from the tapes with the. Ameri- 
can Lance King in third place 
bat an f gim* fkQare . allowed 
King to win the race With Wigg 
last. 


The Daues were superW? ^ 
by Tommy Knndsen (Coventry) 
Hans Nielsen (Oxford) and J** 
Pedersed (Oaifey HeWft hi * 

admirable team show. •- 


headed the Americas 
« Ms horn hack 
hDe Kelvin Tatum (Coventry) 
was England's best on the day. 

Sweden- gave a poor slujwhW 
throughout the day and tiraj 
in fbnirth oftbe teams caapeftog 
and were relegated to Group i* 

RESULTS: 1, DMMMMk .42 (Kwitta 1 ^ 
Mebm 12, PedafaMiJ l Guid«aeRfr% 
unftaoStMM N (King 11, BmaMtaftS 
litoran SrStitamti 1 , MBw 1);3, Eupltod 
29; (TUuto t, Wag T. «oriDO T, Owv 
mw* 7); 4 ftradw u (Andmm * 
MBnnS. Jonsaon, 3 Stonkmd, 
pw Ww > » : 1, Denmark, Opto; Z »» 
St a ta a. <:3. Bngtond, 3; *, Sw ad an , i 


( ■ 


1 

: -j ’* 


• t 


1 


•. L. V 


,W" 








A.’*- - 








1*V»« 


-j.**! • ' 




Hiir? vr ? 




\ib 




U> 






'3*i 


» 


-J- , 


POWERBOATING 


Thlbodaux wins Formula One title 


Gene Tfubodaux. of the 
United States, was declared the 
1986 Formula One world cham- 
pion this • weekend (a Special 
Correspondent writes). His vic- 
tory at the Beaumont Grand 
Prix in Texas put him in an 
unassailable position on the 
points table, with one event still 
remaining to -complete the se- 
nes. 


Evmnide VS 450 horsepower 
outboard, took the lead three 
laps after the start of the 50 lap 
event in the Port of Beau mom. 
when : -Ben . Robertson, his 
countryman, broke down with h 
blown motor. . John Sanders 
was- second and Bany Woods' 
third. 


before pulling into the pil*. 
Bulkm retired aftixtife fifth 





V- - •; 







V 


■Aii. 


' ' ' • 1 


.O v i 


V vT 3 - 


RESULTS; -t. G dthbatuk 




Thrbudaut. -using -air'. 


: Both British drivers. R| C C 
:£rosi and \nd> Bullen. retired. 
■ fFnwx onlj completed two laps 


A 


H^ow.-etoafl/EvWud*, ft* a 
nefly fust, Jfteienmw 

In.VdoaniJomwoa t 

Robertson iU8t. 
lNem» R Fro* iQSl.u 6.C .WAflf. 
Wtoe* * 






rlur, , 

.... . , • Vihi\ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 19 1986 



’s television and radio programmes 


29 


Edited by Peter Davalle 
and Elizabeth Larrard 




$.00 Ceefax AM 
L5O Breakfast Thpb with Frank 
Bough and Nick Rosa. 
Weather at tS6. 755. 

7.55, &J2S and 055; 
regional news, weather 
it and traffic at (L57. 731, 

3 7.57 and 8^7; national and 

e fntemational news at 7UW. 

ft 7^0, 8-00, 8^0 and 9J»; 

-• sport at 7.20 and and 


6-15 Good Mi 


anting Britain 
Bd by Anne 






■f.i; 



newspapers at 837. Plus, 
y the Junior and Adult 

. , . 7 Advice Lines; gardening 

7 . >] with Aten T&chmarett; and 

■ j a recipe from Qynn 

■?. Christian. Steve BJadkneU 

t- -W and Adrian Mitts present 

their Summertime Special 
r atm 

5^0 Dudley Do-Rlght (r) SL25 
TheMonkess. (r) 

150 Newsround Special 
DeBvtry presented by 
John Craven. Featuring 
another of BBC Radiol 
Young Achievers, and 
today s Special Delivery 
report from Roger Finn. 
ft55 The Adventures of 
BuVwbikte and Rocky. 

Parts (r) 

000 Hartbeat A new approach 
to art with Tony Hart and 
Margot Wilson, (r) 1025 
The Adventms of 
BtdtwMde and Rocky . 
Part 6 fr) 1030 Play 
School presented by 
Fraser Wilson with guests 
Sarah Long and Lionel 
Morton 1050 Ceefax. 
t;".. t.00 News After Noon with 
**6?, Chris Lowe and Sue 
'■ni r , Carpenter, includes news 

headlines with subtitles 
■-L- ... U2S Regional News. The 

weather details are given 
by Michael Fish. 1 JO 
Bagpuss. A See-Saw 
■ 'V programme for the very 

young (r) 1.45 Ceefax. 

4JU Regional News. 

- v- 4.25 Watt TU Your Father Gets 
■ Home. Harry enters 

hospital unaware of the 
starring role he is to play 
■7 in a wond-wide surgical 

L* : telecast 4J50 Hekfi. Heidi's 

grandfather promises so 
'■ spend the winter in the 

wage. Klara has written 
7 from Frankfurt to say that 

she wfll be visiting Heidi. 

(r) 5.10 Fame. Drama 
series about the students 
and staff of New York’s 

■ School for the Performing 
Arts.(r) 

: ; 5u00 News rMth Nicholas 
WitcheH and Frances 
Coverdale. Weather. 

' 5.35 London Phis presented by 
Gavin EsJer and Linda 
L Mltchefl. 

■ -7JOO Vintage Morecambe and 
Wise.’ Ernie Wise 
introduces a show from 
the 1960s which this week 
co-stars The Bachelors 
and Ann Hamilton. 

-7 JO EastEnders. The Fowlers 
j- arei 

morning visitors next door; 
Hannah comes to talk to 
Pauline and Arthur, but 
finds them engrossed In 
n other problems; Arthur 

and Naima both prove 
reliable rna crisis. (Ceefax) 
3.00 Juliet Bravo: Chasing the 
Dragon. George Parrish b 
’* tryfng to give up"dhkridrig. 

Meanwhile, a family asks 
t: for Kate's help when one 

of them becomes addicted 
; .l. to an even more 

dangerous substance , 

' heroin. Starring Anna - 

" ‘ Carteret (r) (Ceefax) : : 

-MO Points of View. Bair 

Took reads more I 
comments. 

3-00 News with JuEa Somerville 
— and Frances Coverdale. 

Regional news and 
i weather. 

■ 3J0 The Duchy of Cornwall. 


845 


and Adrian 

Brown. News with Ja 
lrvmgrt6J0.7j)0.7j... 
«^P-8-30 and 9J0; sport 
at MO and 7.40; exercises 
at RS5; cartoon at 7.25; 

pop music at 7.55: 8J5 

■ Jem Barnett’s i 
Today's) 

Mary Stavin. 


Timmy 1 
guest is 


The special 

Pater Gosling. 


ITV/LONDON 


&25 Thames News headlines 
followed by World Chess 
Championship. Oose of 



The Prince of Wsles, firmer: on 
BBC t. at 9 JOpa 


• NO ONE SPEAKS FOR 
THE DEAD {JTV.10.3Qpm) 
proclaims the tide of Judy 
Levers documentary, and the 
film itself then proceeds to 
disprove it because a great 
number of people are 
produced to defend the 
characters of three women 
who died at men’s hands. None 
was cased as prosecution 
witness because the law - 
expressly forbids the giving 
of neareay. or second-hand, 
evidence. Asa direct result, 
their characters remained 
seriously blemished at the 
trials and the prosecution were 
able to plead that their cSents 
were provoked to kflL The three 
men were found guftty of 
manslaughter, not murder. As for 
the victims, two remain guilty 
of provocation because there Is 
no possibility (on this side the 


CHOICE 


grave) of their ever being found 
Innocent. The third victim - 
scant comfort to her now! - was 
the subject of of a letter of 
regret from a former Attomey- 
GeneraL Her character, he 
said, ought not to have been 
impugned in court in 
circumstances that gave her no 
opportunity for the 
allegations against her character 
even to be questioned. That 
« the only hmt of hope that Judy 
Lever, in making Afo One 
Speaks for the Dead, may not 

just be shouting into the wind. 

• Being the Duke of 
Cornwall might be somewhat 
a nbcH ma cbe for s o meone 
who is already Prince of Wales, 
but that is no reason why the 
rest of us should have had to 


wait 13 years for a film such 
as Dennis Adams's THE DUCHY 
OF CORNWALL (BBC1. 

9.30pm) in which the bucofc side 
of the Prince's nature, and 
the too extent of his privileges 
and responsibilities as a Very 
Special Landlord, are 
synthesized. This is a 
respectful portrait, very prettily 
photographed. It is. however, 
not wart-free, and the Prince 
himself contributes thB 
occasional blotch. 

• Radio choice: The Peace 
of WPstpfaka (Radio 3. 9.30), 
Peter Barnes's Thirty Years 
War interlude involving two 
robber-mercenaries and a 
coirty messenger, briiliantiy 
disposes of the conventional 
argument that the cessation of 
hostilities is good for 
everybody. 

Peter Davalle 


i Hotel London (r)&40 

Struggle Beneath the Sea. 
A close look at shrimps, - 
crabs and lobsters IMS 
Cartoon 10.10 Joyce aid 
the Wheeled Warriors. 
Cosmic cartoon 

adventures 
[1030 Qaiactfca 80. The Night 
the Cytons Landed; part 
two. 11JM Wattoo Wattoo 
1 11-30 About Britain. David 
Richardson explores ' 
some isolated towns and 
villages of East Anglia, 
historic parts of lowland '• 
England which are among 
the most unaffected by 

modem fife and where 
there are said to be 

.such as the Green 
rof Louth. 

|12J» Jaime and tha Magic 

I Rainbow. 


W 


Torch (r) 12.10 

with 

12J0 

Drama serial about an 

Australian famtty in the 

1940s. 

1.00 News at One with Alastatf 
Stewart 1 JO Thames 
News presented by Robin 
Houston 1 JO Tucker's 

Witch. Detectives Rick 

and Amanda solve a 


a's w in 
er form 


to 


U20 Come Dancing. David 
Jacobs introduces the 
final of the series from the 
Tower Ball room, 

- — ' Blackpool 

1-05 The Taste Of Health. 
Judith Hann presents the 
fourth of seven 

tmes about 
iy cooking. This 
week north London 
caterers ShWey RTla and 
Jil Cox demonstrate 
attractive breakfasts and 
light lunches; Joy Lariccom 
prepares some unusual 
salads and Leslie Kenton 
extols the benefits of 
eating raw food, (rt 
1 M we * 


rs 

2-30 Comedy Tc 

American series about 
famous comedy stars. 

3.00 Hefrfoom. Features a 
teddy-bear worth more . 
than £600 125 Thames 
News headfines 33) The 
Young Doctors. Medical 
drama serial 
Jamie and the Magic 
Torch. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 
noon. 4.10 The Moontiras. 
Cartoon series, (r) 430 
Inspector Gadget The - 
Inspector solves another 
crime helped by fits niece 
Penny and his dog Brain. 
445 Splash. Magazine 

i young. 

i a visit to the San - 
Diego zoo and wild animal 
park. 

5.15 Survfvab Solitary 

Conf i nement A fBm made 
in the bush country of East 
and Central Africa which 
recorded the i 
procedure of the 
billed hombiU. 

545 News with John Suchet 
6JI0 Thames News. : . 
6,30 Duty Free starring Keith 
“ ■ * Bamjri'Srid ^GwerfTayfor." 
Comedy series about two 
couples on a package: 
hofiday in Spate, (r) . 

7j 00 Emmardale Farm. Joe 
Sugden has made 
enemies in {heritage. WM 
iAhnie stand by him? 

.7 JO Name That Tuaei Music 
quiz wfflt Lionel Blair. 

M0 International Athletics. 

The Dairy Crest Games 
from Birmingham. Jim 
Rosenthal introduces - 
coverage. Commentators 
are Alan Parry, Steve 
Ovett and peter Matthews. 


BBC 2 


&S5 Open University. Science: 
Snowdon to the Sea. Ends 

*X730 
3M Ceefax. 

&25 News sunmafy with 
subtitles- Weather. 

530 King's Country. Award- 
winn mg cameraman 
Simon King, who spent a 
year observing landscape, 
habitat and animals in the 
south of England 
continues his series with a 
film about woodland fife. 

6lQ 0 No Limits. A day out in 
Blackpool for the rock 
-show's presenters Jenny 
Powell and Tony Baker. 
&50 Under SaB. Alfred John 
Pengeily has been sailing 
out of the Corresh port cn 
Looe for over 60 years 
aboard the sailing lugger. 
Our Daddy, which was 
bu2t in the 1920s for his 
grandfather, one of the 
few survivors of a 
diminished Cornish fishing 
fleet. Pengeily is the last of 
a family sailing tradition 
going back 200 years, (r) 
7.40 fan in the Kitchen. 
Chinese cooking with Tom 
Vernon, who prepares 
stewed dude in fermented 
rice salad, sauteed dude 
hearts and Be pig duck 
rods. 

7.40 Questions of Defence. 
John Barry presents the 
last of his programmes 
about the history of NATO 
te which he looks at West 
Germany’s part In the 
NATO AWanca The earfy 
SALT negot ia t i ons are 
examined and there are 
contributions from Helmut 
Schmidt, David Aaron, 
Walther Stutzte and Paul 
Nitze. 

8.10 WBcffife Showcase: A 
Thousand Cranes. The 
first showing of a film 
which took two and a half 
years to make about the 
■cooperative effort 
between the United States 
and the Soviet Union to 
save the Siberian Crane 
from extinction. The birds’ 
hazardous migration takes 
them from the Siberian 
Arctic to Iran, Afghanistan, 
India and China, migrating 


Mickey SpiUane’s Mfice 
H am m er. Private i 


rof 

lit 


SAG 

i eye Mike 

Hammer investigates a 
murder at a high school 
reunion- Starting Stacy 
Keach. 

It (L0Q NewsatTenwfthMailyn 
Lewis and Pamela 
Armstrong followed by 
Thames ifaws headlines. 
11030 No One Speaks for the 
| Dead. (See Choice). 

[1130 Band of The Year 1968. 
Highlights of this year's 
Band of the Year contest 
at the Spectrum Arana, 
Warrington, Cheshire. 

Plus the foB performance 
of the winning band. 
[1335 Night Thoughts. 


threatens than, as no ctee 
nation can fuBy protect 
them or their critical 
ma r sh land h a b ita ts , 

930 FBnttong Weekend . 
(1977) starring John 
Hargreaves and Briony 
Behets. A thriller with an 
ecological slant about a 
couple who spend a 
weekend on a deserted 
stretch of Australian 
coastline, to try to save 
their marriage. Directed by 
Cofin Eggleston. 

1035 Harty Goes to Edinburgh. 
From the Students’ Union 
RusseR Harty introduces 
items from this year's 
Fringe Festival. 

1130 NewsnighL The latest 
national and International 
news inducing extended 
coverage of one of the 
mate stories of the day. 
With Peter Snow. Donald 
MacCormick and Olivia 
O’Leary. 

11-45 Weather. 

1 1130 Open Untvaratty. How 
Bamade geese on the 
Solway Firth survived 
extinction. (r)Ends at 
1230 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Channel FOur Racing from 
York. Brough Scott 
introduces ooverage of the 
Acomb Stakes (230); The 
Matdmaker International 
(3.10k the M o fro s e 
Hanrteap (3.45); and the 
Yorkshire Oaks (4.15) 

430 Dancin' Days. In the first 
of five daily double 
episodes, Yolanda 
confronts Solange. Vera 
and Hetio’s romance 
develops, Ateerico finds a 
steady job and Carlos 
decides to give up his 
career. 

530 Pets in Particular. Leslie 
Judd visits Race Lane 
Farm te Liverpool with a 
local school, while James 
looks at buttertfies in the 
Dorset countryside. In the 
studio the smallest dogs 
assemble. Plus on 
investigation Into a 
common disease of 
domestic animals. (Oracle) 
6.00 Remington Steele. A 
second series of romantic 
comedy thriflers with 
investigators Laura Holt 
and Re mi ngton Steele. 
Frank Dannon finds 
himself te a motel room 
and cannot remember who 
he is, but realizes that he 
is the target of an 
unknown killer. 635 
Huron Buchstansangur. 
Further adventures of a 
filthy Rttie creature who 
lives In a cracked sink. 

730 Channel 4 News with 
Trevor McDonald and 
Nicholas Owen. 

730 Commen t With her views 
on a topical subject is 
Ethel Grey from Scotland. 
Weather. 

830 Brookmde. Annabel le 
receives a letter from 
Gordon announcing his 
return with a friend and 
has her interview with the 
Clerk of Justices. 

830 The Wine Programme. 
Janice Robinson 
examines the buying of 
wine, from a wine 
merchant buying Chianti 
Classic© In Tuscany to a 
commercial wine tasting in 
Woking. The programme 
includes an interview with 
a wine investor and with 
Bordeaux’s Pierre eoste, 
who discusses recent 
. vintages. Buying from off- 
- licences and by mailorder 
is also covered, (r) • 

9.00 Inter n ational Athletics. 

The Dairy Crest Gamas, 
(contteued-frora ITV). 

IOlOO rHm: 13 Rue 

Madrrielne*(1 946) starring 
James Cagney. Semi- 
documentary spy thriller 
about a group of AJUed 
agents sent into occupied 
France during World War 
Two to locate a German 
rocket-launching site. 
Directed by Henry 
Hathaway. 

11.45 The Max Headroom 
Show. In the last of the 
series (Max) Matt Frewer 
interviews Boy George. 

12.15 Too Cloae for Comfort 
Ted Knight stare as Henry 
Rush, the father who 
worries constantly about 
the evils that beftfll his two 
daughters, both striving 
for independence. Tonight 
Henry and MurieTs 
anniversary plans are 
upset when Sara and her 
new-found friend Monroe 
are picked up by the 
police. 

Ends at 1245. 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF Stereo at era 
555 Shipping. 6.00 News Briefing: 
630 Today, Ind 630, 730, 

. 830 News. 645 

Business News. 635,7.55 

Weather. 7.00, 830 . 

News. 730 Letters. 735, 

835 Sport 

643 A Night to'Remember. 

Part 2 of the story of the 
Titanic (r)- 637 Weather; 
gj)0 News 

9-Os Tuesday CalL- 01-580 
'4411. Phone-in 
1030 News; From Our Own 
Correspondent. 

1030 Morning Story; The Debt 
Collectors by jenny 
Hursed. Read by Malcolm 
Hebden 

1045 Dally Service (New Every 
Morning, page 17) (s) 

1130 News; Travel; Thirty- 
Minute Theatre Vi 
Leaving by Dave Sheasby. 
With Patsy Byme as the 
retired officer cleaner (s) 
1133 The Living World. 

12. DO News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice, wrth 
Pattie Cold well 
1237 Bram of Britain 1986. 
Semi-final (3). North. 

Scotland and Wales (s). 

130 The World at One; News 
1.40 The Archers. 

230 News; Woman's Hour. 

With Susan Matting 
330 News; The Afternoon 
Play Talk to the Pear 
Tree by James Pattifer. With 
Julia Swift and Peter 
Wight Drama about people 
'"orting for Government 
security, and the dastruct re 
effect it can have (8) 

430 News 

435 Turn of the Tide. Keith 
Ward chai lenges the 
popular assumption that 
Christianity In Britain is 
spiritually bankrupt (r) 

430 Kaleidoscope. Last 
night's edition. Includes 
kerns on Caribbean poetry, 
and the film Chan is 
Missing (r) 

530 PM. News magazine. 

530 Shipping. 535 
Weather 

630 News; Financial Report 
630 counterpoint Musical 
knowledge quiz chaired 

735 The Archers 

730 Rettels. (1) Albert Luthufi. 


who fought a lifelong 
battle against raosm in 
South Afnca. 

730 You Cam Be 

Serious -(new series) 

Steve Race on the bizarre 
sideoMife 

8.00 South-East Europe 

Journey. Julian Hale 
reports from spHt 
Yugoslavia, where the 
dilemma between tourism 
and industry is setua. 

830 The Tuesday Feature: 

My Machine and L Ted 
Harrison, one of 3,350 
patients awaiting a 
kidney transplant reports on 
the state of renal 
medicine from the patient's 
posit of view. 

930 in Touch. For people with 
a visual handicap 

930 writers on Blue Paper. 
Roboma. by Suntan 
Kapoor. Read by James 
Benson 

945 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
items on art exhibitions 
xt Manchester, and the 
Edinburgh International 
Festival 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: AU 
the Brave Promises (7) 

1030 The World Toraght 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Enter pr i se . Marjorie 

Lofthouse meets finafists 
in the Radio Times/Radio 4 
Enterpri se competition 
(2) Mr Wood's Fossils 

1230 News; weather. 

VHF (available in 
England and S. Wales oniyt 
as above except: 555- 

630am Weather; Travel. 

135-230pm Listening 

Comer (s). 530-535 PM 
(continued. 1130- 
12.19am Open University: 

( Radio 3 ~) 

On VHF only: 

635 Open University. Until 
635am. Modem art 
Surrealist Show 

On medium wave only; 

635 Weather. 7.00 News 

7.05 Concert Purcefl (My 
heart is inditing). Saint- 
Cokxnbe (Concert a deux 
violas esgaies No 48: 

Wieiand Ku$cen/Jordi 
Savall). Telemann 
(Overture in C: Hamburger 
Ebb' und FhihL 830 
News 

835 Concert (contd): KodaJy 
(Summer Evening), 


Enesco (Sept chansons da 
Clemant Marat Sarah 
Walker, mezzo), Dvorak 
(Romance in F minor, 
with Accando. violin). 
Stravinsky (Eight 
instrumental miniatures (or 

15playare). 930 News 

93S This Week's Composer 
Franck. Prehide, Fugue 

and Variation Op 18 (Alain, 
organ). Prelude. Aria and 
Finals (Crosstey. pano), Le$ 
Eolides. and Piece 
— S' 1 *®* (Langiais. organ) 
1030 Oboe and piano: Richard 


Miigail and Ruth 


Grabert(Soonatate 
G minor), Andnessen 
(Baltede). Gregson (Sonata 

1035 Barber New YoricPO 
(Wider Bernstein). Violin 
Concerto, with Stem as 
soloist 

1130 Edinburgh International 
Festival: part one. Young 
Uek Kim (violin). Yo Yo Mb 
( cello). Emanuel Ax 
(piano).. Beethoven (Trio te B 
flat. Op 1 1). Dvorak (Trio 
in E minor, Op 90. Dumky) 

1135 Pied Piper: David 

Munrow on countryside 
music (r) 

12.15 Edinburgh Festival 
teontd): Mendelssohn 
(T no in C minor. Dp 66). 130 
News 

135 BBC Walsh SO (under 
Antoni Wrt). Schumann 


145 Gutar encores: Jukka 
Ssv^oki plays works by 

Mertz. including An Malvina, 
and by Weiss (Surte in A) 

2.15 Beethoven's Rivals: 

Nash Ensemble, with 
David Mason (piano). Jan 
Deg aetani (mezzo). 

Gilbert Kahsh (piano). 
Krommer (Wind Partita in 
B flat Op 67), Hummel 
(Rondo in E Op 120), 
Schubert (An mein Harz, D 
860. and other works). 
Weber (Piano Sonata No 2), 
Krommer (Wind Partita m 
E flat. Op 79) 

430 Chicago SO (under 
Abbado and Solti). 
Tchaikovsky (The Tempest 
symphonic fantasy), 

Barrok (Music for strings, 
percussion and celesta). 

435 News 

530 Mainly for Pleasure: with 
Michael Berkeley 

630 Chansons and Fantasies: 
Ensemble Clement 
Janequ’m/Ensemble les 
Elements. Works by 
Claude LeJeune 

730 Hiding behind the 

Camera: CoVn Ford talks 
to the photographer David 
Hum 

730 Proms 86: English 
Chamber Orchestra 
(under Jeffrey Tate), with 
Ralph Kirschbaum 
(ceUo). Part one. Haydn 
(Symphony No 100). and 
Schumann (Cello Concerto) 

630 Strauss and tha 18th 
Century: Prom interlude 
talk by Michael Kennedy 

840 Proms 88 (contd); 

Strauss (the suite Le 
bourgeois gentiteonimB) 

930 Barnes' People lit Bob 
Peck. David Suchet and 
David Warner in The Peace 
of Westphalia, by Peter 
Barnes 

935 Choral settings of 
Spanish poems: BBC 
Northern Singers and John 


Mdls (guitar). Works by 
Geoffrey Burgon. Copland , 
and Castelnuovo- 
Tedesco 

10.40 The Blue Jug: Peqgy 
Ashcroft reads the story 
. by Ronald Frame 
1035 Peter Dickinson: 
Juxtapositions. 

Surrealist Landscape, lor 
voce, piano and tape; 
Concerto Rag (played by 
Dickinson, piano), and 
String Quarter No 2, with 
tape- 

1130 Weber Ciarmei Quintet 
m B flat, Op 34 m version 
lor strmg orchestra, with 
Sabine Meyer, clarinet. 

1137 News. 

( Radio 2 ) 

4.0Qbm Cohn Berry 5.30 Ray 
Moore 730 Nigel Dempster 930 
Ken Bruce 11.00 Jimmy Young 
incl medical questions answered by 
Dr Bdl Dolman 1.05pm Gerald 
Harper 235 Anneka Rice ind 
Racing from York (3.10 
El 55. TOO Matchmaker Gold Cup) 
330 David Hamilton incl Racing 
from York; (4.15 £75.000 Yorksmre 
Oaks) 535 John Dunn 7.00 
Ernie Wise Presents . .The BBC 
Radio Orchestra 930 Enc 
Coates - King ot bgm Music, 
(continued on VHF only) 930 
international Athletics (Dairy Crest 
Games) 1030 Non-Stop Stutz 
(Stutz Bear Cats) 10.30 On the Air 
(new seires) Quiz covering 60 
years of radio history 11. do Round 
Midnight from Edinburgh 
1.00am NigMnde 3.00-430 A Little 
Night Music. 


C Radiol 3 


5.30am Adnan John 7.00 Simon 
Mayo 930 Sunon Bates 11.00 
Rado i Roadshow with Peter 
Powell from Falmouth 1230 
Newsbeat (Frank Partndge) 

12.45 Gary Davies (incl this week's 
Top 40 singles) 3.00 Steve 
Wright 530 Newsbeat (Frank 
Partndge) 5-45 Bruno Brookes 
(incl new Top 40 singles) 730 
Janice Long 1030-12.00 John 
Peel VHF Stereos radios 152:- 
4.00am As Radio 2. 9.30pm 
Enc Coates - King ot light music. 
935 Sports Desk. 


WORLD SERVICE 


630 Nawsdesk 630 Countarpomt 730 
News 7.06 Twenty Four Hours 730 Tins 
Particular Place 7.45 Network UK 630 
News 639 Re Heatons 6.1S Every Day A 
Hcty Day 630 Lnzt Pono Musk 930 
News 639 Review ot British Press 91S 
world Today 930 Financed News 940 
Look Ahead 945 Whats News 1030 
News 1031 Wndows on Universe 1130 
World News 1139 News About Britain 
11.15 Wfevaamde 1135 A Latter from 
Scotland 1130 Sports Imamattonal 12.00 
Rado Newsreel 12.15 Every Be# in Rs 
Place 124S Sports Roundup 130 News 
139 Twenty Fov Hours 130 Network UK 
145 Recorder ot Week 230 Outlook 24S 
PMp Jones Brass EnsemMe 330 Ratio 
Newsreel 3.15 A Jofly Good Show 4.00 
News 439 Commentary 4.15 Omnibus 
545 Sports Rowtdup 736 Stock Market 
Report 830 News 639 Twenty Four 
Hows 630 Omratius 930 News 931 On 
The Box 9.10 Book Choice 9.1S From the 
Proms '86 1030 News 1039 World Today 
1035 A Leltar From Scotland lOJfi 
Fmencai News 1040 Reflections 1045 
Sports Roundup 1130 News 1139 Com- 
mentary 11.15 New waves on the Short- 
wave 1130 Every Bel In Its Place 1230 
News 1239 News About Bmam 12.15 
Radio Newsreel 1230 Omnibus 130 
News 131 Outlook 130 Repon on 
Refagkxi 1.45 Country Style 230 News 
239 Review of British Press 2.15 Engtoh 
Mmkttures 230 Mystery ot the Blue Train 
330 News 339 News About Britain 3.15 
Worto Today 445 Reflections 430 Finan- 
cial News SJ» Nows 539 Twenty Fair 
Hours 5.45 Workl Toda Al times In GMT. 


RBC1 WALES 230-433 Golf: 

BWV ' ' WeUh Professional C3wmptor>- 


tfilp 430-535 Fkme. 535430 
W&B T«My. 635-7.00 Golf: Welsh Pro- 
tosskxal Championsitips 1130- 
1135 Three's Company. 11 35-1230 The 
Taste of Health. 1230-17 t»am 
weather. NORTHEMi IRELAND 435pm- 

445 Hakfi. 445-535 Fame.535i4fl 

Today's Sport S.40-630 Inside tester. 

635-730Walt Til Yow Father Gets 

Home. 1130-1135 News raid weather. 

ENGLAND 635pm-?30 Ragtanri 

newsmagazines. 

1030 Jack Hotxxn 1035-1130 Cap- 

tain Scarlet 130pm News 130 Courary 
Practice 230330 Nature ol^ Thaws 

5.15-545 Sons and Dughtars 630 


7.00 

fad 

RevWtad 1130 Mystariee of Edgar Wal- 
lace' l23Sme waather. Ctosedown. 
Tl/C As London except 938am 
1 S e sam e Street 1030 Jack HaF 

bom KLK Cartoon 11.00-1130 Cap- 

tain Scarlet 120pm News 130 Country 
Practice 230-330 Nature of Things 

5.15-645 Sons and Daughters 630 

Coatt to Coast 635 Polce 5 635- 
730 Crossroads 930-1030 Brideshead 
Revtstad 1130 Mysteries of Edgar 
WaJttce- 123SMI Company. Ctosedown. 

HTVWEST^aas^, 

Street 1035-1130 Ofever Twist 
130pm News 130The Baron 230-330 
BMI FaWi 5.15-545 Me ft My Girl 
630 News 635-7.00 Crossitads 930- 
1030 Bridgehead Revised 1130 
Man In a Suitcase 1 230ero Ctosedown. 

HTVWAI pg As London ex- 
n i e _ tnrMi -co a35envi03S 

Sessme Street £30pm-&35 Wales at 
Six. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


iQBDERfiiSSSSn.. 

1035 Snagglapues 1030 Roboskxy 

l13IFir»Once Upon A Tlme^Mn 
130po-130 News 220330 Short 
Stcry Theatre 230-430 Sons and Daugh- 
ters 5.15-545 Me & My Glri 630 
Lookaround 535-730 Crossroads S30- 
1030 Bndeshead Ravished 1130 
Marm-s Bast Friends 1200 Closedown. 

TYWEIEESgaSr^ 

930 Sesame Street 1035 WorU of 
Stones 1046-1130 ixtte House on the 
Prairie 120pm News 135 
Lookaround 130 Water. Friend or Foe 
230-330 Moviemakers 5-1 5-545 
Whose Baby?530 Northern Lite 535- 
730 Crossroads 930-1 030 
Bridoshaad Revtsted 1130 Mysteries of 

Edgar Walace* 1220m People Mat- 

ter. Ctosedown. 

GRANADA 
Reports 930 Big BfcSjn China 1040 
Mountan Men 11 35 About Britain 1130- 
1230 Connections 1230pm-130 
Pent Along With Nancy 120 Granada Re- 
ports 130 Afternoon Theatre 230- 
230 Comedy Tonight 330-430 Wav's 
Why 5.15-545 Mr Smith 630 Grana- 
da Rnons 630 Tha is Your Right B3S- 
730 Crossroads 930-1030 
Brideshead Revtsaed 1130 Man m A 

ftnlteiMtii 1 9-SnMw 

Uones 10.15 Rexy 1035 Cartoon 
1035 Gleme 1 130-1130 Jacksons 
1230pm-130 Gardenng Time 130 
News 130 Man m a Sutease 230-330 
Suvival 330-430 Sons and Daugh- 


ters 5.15-545 Emmardale Rami 630 

News and Scotland Today 6.15 Light 

th.636Crossroesi3 730-T, 


ta ttw North 636 Crossroads T30-730 
Take The HMt Road 630-1030 
Bridaaheed fievtsked 1130 Acropote 
Nowt 1220m Um Cal, CtoudomT 

GRAMPIAN 

Thma 930 Once llpwATMne...Man 

&SSSasama Street 1050 Short Slory 

11.1 S-1 130 Smarts 1230pm-130 
Gardening Time 130 News 130 FamOy 

rtwatre 230-330 Sea to Their Blood 

5.15-545 Emmerdala Farm 630 North 

Tonight 835 Crossroads 730-735 

ate and My Gvl 930-1030 Bndeshead 
Rewsitao 1130 DevTs Lake Con- 
certs 1225am News. Closedown. 

TSW As London except 935m 
J-SS. Sesame Street 1 03Sm Captain 
Scarlet 1050 Max tha Mouse 1101k 
1130 Connections 1230pm-130 Leave It 
To Mrs O’Bnen 130 News 130 Hart 
» Hart 230230 Survival 33*430 Sons 
and Daughters 5.15 Gus Honeybur 
530 Crossroads 630Today South WBSt 
635 Televiaws 635-730 Corson's 

Law 930-1000 Bndeshead Revolted 

1130 Postscript 1135 Mann's Bast 

Fnends 1236m Closedown. 

Sesame Stieet 1030 Sea Urchins 
1130-1130 Cartoon 130pm Lunchttna 
130 Chips 230-330 Stxxr Story 
330-430 Dreams 5.15-545 Whose 
Bray* 630 Simmer Edition 530 Dia- 
ry Dares 630 Cartoon 635-730 Cross- 
roads 930-1030 Bndssnead 
Revsned 1130 Sheena Act One 1235m 
News, Ctosedown. 


S4C 130 Danon- Days 130 Ahce 
230 Goto Goch A Malwen 215 
Rackig 430 Bewitched 530 Car 54. 
Where Are You? 830 Looks Fanttar645 
Let's Pariez Frenrens 7.00 
Newyddton Saith730 Byw A Bod 630 
Cfty Centra Cyckng 9-00 
ChawauvaBon 1030 Max Headroom 
Show 1030 Athletics 1130 FIm: 

Man is Not a BnT 130m Oosadown. 
ANGLIA As London except 

935am Sesame Street 

1030 Cartoon 1035 Glewoe 1130- 
1130 Once Upon a Tima... Man 1230pm- 
130 Gardens tor All 1 30-1 30 News 

230330 That'S Hollywood 5.15-545 

Bnmerdala Farm 630 Miout Angka 

635 Crossroads 7.00-730 Me and My 

Gel 530-1030 Bnctuhead Revealed 

1130 TJ Hooker 1235m Tuesday Top- 
«. Ctosedown. 

CENTRAL 


250-1130 FAic Womb* no Free 
1230pm-130 Gardening Time 130 News 
130 Afternoon Play house 230 The 

Spaoeksts 230330 Educating Bnan 

5.15-545 Who's The Boss 9 6.00 
Crossroads 635-730 News 930-1030 

Bndeshaaid Rewsmni30 Sweeney 

1220m JoMnder 120 Ctosedown. 




1045 Stora Story 1135-1 130 Fireball 
XL5* l230pm-130Calandar Lunch- 

time Live 130 News 130 Horses tor 
Courses 230 Leave It To Mrs 
OUnen 220-330 Lifestyles ot the Rich 

320-430 Country Practice 5.15-5.45 

Whose Baby? &00 Calendar 625-730 

Crossroads 930-1030 Bnoeshead 

Revisited 1130 Mann's Best Fnenos 

1230 Show Express 1230am-630 
Music Box, doeedown. 


EOTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


l SMMCAN HAU.428 S7W/638 
8891. No pert Tea'L Tomor 
7.4S ST Lovo ~ 


EXHIBITIONS 


. 31A 

Bruton Ptart. wi, 499 «7t>i 
PreMtt YDUNS MASTERS 
unlU Sew«nMr 20m. 

Mon - Frt |0«.3a 


OPERA A BALLET 


hard 


tO UaO IM S 836 3161 

CC 240 5208 

. DtCUSM NATIONAL OHM 
_■ Now Booking: ■Trooatm/Tlw 
i'-' Hwiloao or nem/TlHi 

■ Mil i4i rMo4— « eillliilti- 

nrkwntuK Ol 379 6433 




THEATRES 


- 4BELPW 056 761 1 or 2407913 

- '/« CC 741 9999/836 7368/379 
-6453 Grp 54fn 930 6123 fM 

? CoB 24Hr 7 d*y CC 240 7200 (0*g 
W NOW BOOKING TO TEB 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

■> . - THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

Vighdjr M 7 JO Mars Wed al 2 JO 
* Sat 4 JO 6 830 


■r* J* TOWN" s Dana 
Tbeetro Air CnMnN 


f ,4LM»V S36 S378 cc 379 6666 
■ a . /0433 Grow SHM 836 3902. 
.»» Luokfd mm from Seol 9 

*1 BARBARA COOK 

r : ; WaU01KnK 437 2663 
*5^ swe first Cau 01-240 7200 
* ■ TldMiMK « 579 6458 

Moo-Frt 800 Sit 4JO & B.L6 

Him ma s 3.0 0 

pa ul wi ontie 

"MASTEHLV F.T. 


fri 1 




tl fii 


“MAOWnCENI- DJUWI 
"taw 1986 Tour Award Ben 
Piar 

rM_N0T RAPPAPORT 

"WONDEftFULLV FUNNY" 

]1 D3sj» - 


Thw 

•ira 01-836 3078 OC 579 666S 
76433 Group Sales 836 3962. 

JOHN SHEA I* 
TOiWRMAL^T 


' S£a> 

Exes 8 . Mab Thnr A S M 4 J o 

i sr ovu whelm 


t 01-830 

6404/0641 CC 01-379 6233 


“40- year-oM marvel" Tine 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

From tbe CtUcheswr Festival 


-UgMi op me ntoM. - the jropW 
demne West End debut « 
her M«" D.Tet 

Ere 730 Mars wm 6 sac 230 

aor 1 nay cc Mount on First 

can 01-240 7200 cure •*«> 


MMIC M t Ol 608 879S/63S 
8891 CC. tMom Sun 10 am- 
ami ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 


720 THE RAHKOH AFFAtetiy . 
pan areas. Wad A Thera 

rmus « aw n t tuwi 
mxrwmP^wiSML 

THE Ptr tool 7.30 US , 

U All tell IWhfTWirtl 

(Mia ouO. Wed A Thurs REAL 
PRg AMS, Frt & Sal 
PlPUSTwKI 


■L OOMl Rt mT Gordon St WC1 
367 9629 cc 380 1483 From 
TtonT at 8ptn T “ 


■APPCMED ON THE WAY TO 
THE FORUM Eves 7 jo. Mats 
Thu A SM 2-30 . 


oramaoH theatre box oence 

Ot 080 8846/01 636 8S38/9 or 

Ol S80 966 2/3. A U. tetephooe 

CC booktoos FHtST CALL a*hr 7 

day oa oire36 242S MO booklae 

fee 930 6123 

TIME 

IATE El 

CLIFF RICHARD 

A6 THE ROOT STAR" 

THE PORTRAYAL OF ‘AKASH- 

LAURENCE OUVIER 

M0»F7I 7 JSO Thu MM 2JO SM S 
a 430. 

SCATS CTRL AVAILABLE. 


I THURS MAT 
RS, lI BWs I 

tMBCR IVf 

Maw MaalrtaB ta t#H **7. 


RmtK (Air CaM) S cc 836 

2338 KP 741 9999 Ckn Sales 930 

6123 Mon to Fit 8 Sal 820 Mai 
Thin A SM 300 


DOUBLE DOUBLE 

■A daretc of wnodnnitry a 
ntertatamem Double Double la 
UMwatSMa- Times E SOTU. 
“Smos me audi ence " S. Tod 


SLORC 437 1592. CC 379 6433. 
Bke lee 1st Call 24 hr 240 7200. 
Grp sales 930 6123. Eves 8 
Mats wed 3 Sal 4. 
Andrewi^d w. 


JUMEHOUK 240 

8230 CC 579 6566/6433 


SHOW" Whars On 


TUr-Sat a. SR Mat 6. 

Ima 417. SAT A sure 


B O W A H W A REMTHiey Cpy Gdn 

240 8230 CC 579 6565/6433 
YATMCiA 


a> NOEL sod GERTIE 

Angus 26 - Scot 20 


C0I«DY THEATRE 950 2S78 


TAYLOR 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

By MERARB WUHBO 

Mon- The S Frt/S« 6-30 & BJO 

HALF PRICE PREV 
TONT! 


A«LU> VICTORIA gs 828 06*5 
TKkatmiawr cc3T9 
6433 1M can eciatoir) 24Q 7200 
’Bfcv Fed Grp Sala 930 6123 
Eva 7.4& Mats Tu* A 8M iO 

JWffiAEOL 


n iR RI H IUH J P EXP 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 
AmntwTSSm werbsr 

tarnratw RX3<ARD STTLGOC 
■ rar acRd by recvtw N UNN. . 

MteMf MAT TB BOX OFFI CE 


eermuc *r 92s 2202 cc 

INanonal ThMtre's wnBOaudL 
lorlUni) TonT 7 JO A MATTER 
BP UR ARR DEATH tv 
Anthony Clark and IX TKvIt, 
TWnor. Tluir 72KX men AM 26 
»28 MEAPIIOE. 


CRPVRWR AIT OondO 950 3216 
CC 379 65657379 6433/741 
9999. On* 336 3962. Ev» 5.00. 
Tt ni ma t 230. SM 630 A 930 

— ■HU H FARCE AT ITS BEST" 
D Malt 

nie Ttieaira oi Camedy Co mpany 



RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

wnaen and « reeled ay 
RAY COONEY 

Over 1.400 Ml MR U IK prefs 

- I6H— RWftlir&Bi 


DRURY LAME 1HEATW ROYAL 

01-836 810B. 01-940 9066/7. cc 
37? 6433. Tim can 24. hour 7-day 
CC bkgs 240 7200 (do tiOMdng fee) 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOB ALL THE F, 
M Ml the best 


BEST MUSICAL 

BARD DRAMA AMU 


voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAOREMCE OUVKR AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLAYS A PLAYERS 


AWARD 

Eras ao Mats wm 3a 

sat 5,0 4 8 JO 
Croup Sale* 930 6123 


PUCRE S S A 836 82 43 CC 240 
9648 CC 379 6433 A OC 24 hr/7 
day 240 7200 Eves 8 Wed real 3 
Bat 6 A 8 


MO SE X, please; 
WDntisH 


At Carrie* Th till 30 Ai 
Open* at Durness TH 2 


3*. 


DUKE OP YORKS 836 Si 22 CC 

836 9857/741 9999/240 7200. 

Evas 8 Thu 3 Sat S & B.3Q 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

ft iB l i 6 IB rei Award 1964 

STEPPING OUT 

HK Comedy Hr Rtcbard Harris 
Directed by Julia McKenzie ' 

TRIU MPH ON TAP* sta 

•XA UnH TO OBSELT SILLY" T o 

‘A raw e r naimir d ™ 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


IEN DMDEAJE NOR 

-FILLS THE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOUND OF LAUGHTER - 

S EXP 

An Amrelcan Oomeny tv 
Ken Lndwig 

Dtteoed by David COmore 


7756. Evenings 7.45 Mai SR 

ZJO SANDRA MCKRtenM,. 

BATLE HUIRULU1 1. aa 

f nisr Times bi THE BR SS 

wrrftaritjnt c o m t xs Y ay 

Beth Hwsey. -A enda" d, 

T«L Frtra Aoo 28 FOR MRS 

AmcotHmnruyjotinwrewn 


HAIR STEAD 722 9301. Eves a. 

sat MN» 4J0L ORSOrVE 1H 


Fscr assrsas 

V Odn, “A 8b* 

ly pmtermmd mmm 

***** S EXP. „ 


KUO’S HEAD 226 1916. STEVE 
HARLEY In BMLOW. A new 


LOmOH MLLABHM 437 7373. 
437 205 6 CC 734 8961. 379 
6436 741 9999 rnoUMtaL Find 
Call 24 Hr 7 D*y CC 240 7300. 
Pro Sates 930 6126 

THE HIT MUSICAL 


COMEDY 

George meai 
b DENB QUm 


8.TR 

Moo-Frt 7 JO. Malt Wed 2M 
Sat 230 * 600 
oonereawn avaa at dow 
Mon-Frl A Sal mats 

POOP SEATS s mLAVAR JtDLE 
OR TODAY’S mrnHM ANCI 

Now booidne to April 1987 


Ave Wl 01-457 56B6/7 01-434 
1550. 01-434 1050. 01-734 

6166/7 

CHUM BLAKELY 
“A tinman l & JoyooHy 
come pcribnMKe’* F. Times 
m 

The N8Uoa«l Theatre’s arc l a o aed 
produetioo or 


A CHORUS OF 

DISAPPROVAL 

“Heantirertimxy fanny" COB 
"HOanotiL..- « ts— 


Box antra and CC Ol 930 9832. 
First CaH 2* hr 7 day CC borednas 
01 240 7200 
Dired from Broadway 
“A sutierti Londoo saw debur 
Ftauncai Times 

JACK LEMMON 

-A* Hoe a sage attar as he is a 
savea one - Today 

LONG T>ATS JOURNEY 
INTONIGHT 

By Euaene OTfelD 
- Jonathan MUteris tiriWam 
production - S t andard 
Eves only Moo-Sal 7.30 


m MAJESTY6 Haymaritet 
950 4025/6606 2046/2856 
TkMNMr 379 6131 
rim Can cc 240 7200 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

■ROUI^^nBMPDDD 
Sarah Steve 

Britfdman 'Banm 

Misk by ANDREW LLOYD 
WEBBER 

Ubreno by RmARO 
SnLOOE A CHARLES HART 

nrecMd jw harold prince 

opens 9 on. 


LYRIC H i mmiH Hi lll 01-741 
2311. Pnu from Son l. Evas 
7.46 .wed matt 2^6 Sal mats 
4ft Opens Sere a at 7 0. THE 


grata uWLPsBlste Hy, 

•r5®*Eves 8m. Sal mare 
a.15 BHO ft JtHJKT wire 


—A rare eeeolnB ot 
comic extillaratlan - Ttraea 
Eras 730. Mad wm and Sat 2LO. 
ICtiouo Sales 01-930 6126 

ReducM price teats fitiirtmi ft 

O AP Stan d-by 

FBtST CALL Men 7 DAT 
CC BOOK1HOS OR 81 MB 728* 
(NO B00KM8 FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
JAN *87 


* 928 2232 CC 
(National Theatre's proaceHisc 
«BI TonT Thiir 8 j 00. Tomor 
2. 13 Oow price mat) & 600 (ran 
7-46 as c rin ged to leaflet*. Oku 
ABB » * 87 D AL I 1 A MCT by 
Scnnicdre'. ventoo by SNBstir- 

pen an tits goo. 


MEMMIto Air Cond 236 6SM cc 
74i 9999 . Fmt can oc aao raw 

CM Mrs 7 cay! Mon-Frl 6 Sal 6* 

KAFKA'S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

mbm by 

Steven BE RKOFF, 

"THE HOST CXCfnHC 
THEATRICAL EV6MBIC M THE 
WEST DR” CIMb. 
LntUlM Season 
(m^hntre rood * drtak) 


RATIONAL THEATRE Sth Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
. COM PANY 

See SE PARA TE PfTB gS under 
Ot-IY WR/ LYTTELTON/ 

corresLoc ExNOmi m 
sms days o f oerfa an dwetres 
from loan. RESTAURANT <928 
2059V EAST CAR PARK. lute 
633 0880. ABSCOND 


■N LONMIN Dnay Lane WC2 
405 0072 CC 379 6433 Eves 7.4S 

Tue 4- Sal 3 00 ft 7. AS,. 

THE AMMKW LLOYD MU 
ft*. ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

AFVLY MLY TO BOX OFFICE 


HUP BooUnos 01-406 1667 Or 
9306126 MOW BOraUHG TO 
SAY 38 1SS7. 


OUVBER V 928 2282 CC <Na- 

UonN Theatre's open stapei 

Today 2.00 (low price mad A 

7.16 Tomor 7 .16 men Sep* I 

to 4 MCODOWSKT AMI THE 
c ra n H n by WctM. m ts km 
by SN Behrman- A Dp 29 A SO 
Iasi perts YOaUUDAB. 


486 2431 CC 379 6433 

Cf Ho*Une486 1933 

BREAM Today 3 Wed 7.46 

W«d Mai 2.30. ROMEO ft 

JUUET Than 2-30 6 7.46. 


Sen l pm umcfuime today. 


PALACE TKATKE 437 

CC 437 83Z7 or 379 . 

FR Call 24Hr 7Day CC 2*0 7200 
Grp Saws 950 6123 


LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONET sm 

Eves 7.30 Mats Thu A Sat 280 
Latecomers not admitted 
until the interval 

BEAT T HE TO UTS BY DtQUnt- 
BIC FOR RETURNS AT THE BOX 


836 2294 cr 240 9661 
741 9999. Furr call 24 hra 7 days 
240 7200. Grp sates 930 6123. 
Evaa 7-30. Thur mat 3- Sab 4 4r & 


SIMON 

[WARD 


THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

by T-6EUOT 

“A ORAC K Dia CAST* F.1M 


MAVTAK S CC 629 3036 MOW- 
Thu 8 Frt/SK 640 A 610 

RICHARD TODD m 

**lbe Bast IWDter ter yoara” S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

'An unabashed winner" S Exp 
“Sensational" Times 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


PfCCADPLT THEATRE Air Con- 
di boned. 457 450&. Creek Card 
KontDes 579 6666 74 1 9999. 09 
SRe». 836 3462/930 6123. 

2PB9 SOtSATIONAL YEAR 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

“SFCCTacular muspcal” 
Review MagteiH 
Eves 60 Mats Wed 5 6 tire's 


FR DUT EPWAPa Box omee 
734 8961 nm ten 24 Hr 7 Days 
« Booking 836 5464 Grp Salts 
930 6125 

Mon-Sal 8. Mai Thun A Sal 2,00 

CHESS 

-A GRAND MASTER OF A 

...-SHOW* Newsweek 

Hire booUn* le Mardi 28, 1967 


FHDICE OF WALES 01-930 8681 

/2CC HOUtoe 920 0044/5/6 Crp 

Sales 930 6123. KCttb Prowse 

741 9999/379 6436 FMCbB 24 

hr 7 day 240 7200 

T0E- T AFFDI 6 GOOD* D. Mao 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 

SEVEN BROTHERS" 


_ PtlOY ri~ F Tro n.. 
“SEVXHIH HEAVEN” E Shorter. 
Evas 7.30. Mai Thw A Sat 3. 


01-734 1166/7/ 

0261/0120. 24hr cc 240 7X0. 
Crp Sales 930 6126 

“THE BEST MUSICAL IN 
LONDOrTom 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

“IT RIPPLES WITH 
EXCITEMENT" &TtR*S 
“JUST WONDERFUL" DE*P 

Mon- Sal 8 State Wed 2JO SM 6 


ROTAL COURT s CC 730 1746 
Frare Tlmra Eva 8pm (Sal matt 
from Aug 30 * 4pm> OUR- 
SELVES ALONE to- Anne 
Devlin. EMr by Simon Cute, 
mo port Abb 25}. 


SAVOY 01-836 8888 DC 01-379 
6219. 836 0479 EveWnps 7.46 
MSB Wrt 6 SM 0 * 630 
STH YEAR OF 
MICHAEL FRAYN'S 
AWARD- WINNING FARCE 
CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE MUCH 

COLE PADDtOC 

M ichae l qochrane 

COLETTE TIMOTHY 

GLEESON CARLTON 

_ NOISES OFF 

Dir by MICHAEL BLAKEMOHE 


SHAFTESBURY . __ 

®0»J5»Y. 01-379 6399W 01-379 
6433/741 9999. Frit Call Zo-hr 
3407200 Rricg fef > Crp Skies 930 

T7>c Thro ire of Comedy CD 

Fee. an* 

ROOKERY NOOK 

by Ben Wwrs 
.. Dfamrt oy Mark Kingston 
StoJ-Fn 8 Wed Hal 3 Sal 600 A 
830. Reduced price prev ie w 
from Aug Z7. 

Open* Sept 2 al 7.00pm 


SHAW THEATRE 388 1394 
M j dfe a a i Yoath tteikt 
MtSHTSWBEX A miBRal 
version of Macbedi. Opens 
ToaMir al 7.00. 


ST MARTIN'S 01-836 1443 Spe- 
cial CC No. 579 6433 Eras 60 
^ Tore 2.46 Sal 60 and 8.0 

38th jrr of AftATHA I DDMIPB 

THE MOUSETRAP 


836 3660 CC 836 
4143/0190 741 9999 First CBH 
24 Hr 7 Day « 240 7200 
Orp Soles 930 6123 

Cabaret 

“Tire darwL read ■■pMNfral 
•4 meat riirih^i ran Nr al new 
re iinfap hi tea MM End” SU 


Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed ^ajaw opraphee oy 

Moo-Frt 7.46 300 

Sal 4 30 A 615 ■ 

HOSEAT P RI C E IRCT ARK" 
BY VALUE HI WEST EH» 
800NU»a ROW TOUUtW 


(0789) 295623 or TIckMinaaieT 
01-379 6 433 RO YAL SHAKE- 
SPEARE COMPANY at Rage* 
Yh ah w p —ra Th ito ra. Wtnterte 
Tala Tomgm. Thors 7 Jo. SM 
1.30 M a n ft M-( Tomor 
7 30. Thurs 130. Draaaa Frl 
Sat 7 JO. fan T Tiaatra Man 
bmb TpnlphL Thurs 7-JO_S^l 
1.36 Eeary ««an Tomor 7 JO. 
Thurs 1-30 Raear FT1. Sal 
7 JO. For special meal/theatre 
deal* and hotel stop over ring 
107891 67262- 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
. COMPANY 

(“The very boi of Britain's comic 
latent" Hatty Mall 
See separate entries under; 


VAUOCVILLC Box Office & cc. 
836 9987/8645 First Call CC. 24 
tire 240 7200 Itike I eel Em ea 
Mats Wed Z JO. Sat 50. "30 


EEILR BLYTHE ■■ 
■xhoxn tewionibH 
ALAR ATCKBOUBTS Raw Fby 

■WOMAN IN M INDM 

•MMB3 AT 7^ 


VAUDEVILLE, WC2. Box dike 
and CC 01-836 9987/6646. Fir*/ 
Can (CC 24 hr* 01 240 7200 8kg 
hr). Eves 7.30. Eves 7 3a Wed 
Mats 2 30. sais 60 A 8.15 


JOANNA VAN CYSECHEM 


In ■ 

NOEL COWARD’S 


*TIRST CLASS, BMflHT. BfTEL- 


CNJOYAiaLrF T. Over 200 Pem 

MUST DID SAT 


VKTOHIA PALACE 0M34 UXT 
Eves 730 Mate Wed A Sat 2.4ft 

CHARLIE GIRL 

■TIiNnki, FenntaW 
Fahnteda FriaaDhT Sta 
PAUL tP CR OLAS 
CYD CHAMSK 


MARK WYNTEH 

CHARLIEGIRL 

Also book on FIRST CALL 84 Mm 
D ays. IBM Fen 01-240 7200 A 
ALL USUAL AGENTS 

PAUL W CW OUt reH bn teral 
•sr Dm Wete Yfera- ft Frf narfi IMS 
veaak. wtren JOE BRUHnlwn l*- 


WEsnmtsm oi-ea* 0283/« 
cr 854 0048. FllW call cc 24 hr 7 
days 240 7200 dc rr 74 1 
9999/379 6433. Op Sates 930 
61 23. Eves 7 45. Wed Mate 6 Sal 

ft A 8.13 

NYREE DAWN PORTER 


WALSH 


In 

Kjp 

Murder Mystery 

DEADLYNIGHTCAP 

The M9 MMIMRiV 
“HURRY to tea wtsma muj f 


“MO« gr™ THAN AGAtHA 
CHRMYDC" Whata On 


WHITCMAU. SW1 Ol 

7765/839 4455 CC Ol 
6S65/6433. 741 9999. Cm 01 
836 W62. Mun-Eri teoa Wrt KUt 
3 0C Sats 5.00 A 8 30. 


WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

By JB. PrirsUey 


WORLD” S. Express 


WYHDHAMS Air Coodliloned 
8363028/379 6665/3796433 
Grps 836 3962 

Eves 6 Sate S A 8 JO 

Pro A Limited Soman 

FAYE DUNAWAY 

“Etecirtfylno” ID MaU) to 
OWL ft BRAVO 

By Donald Freed 
Directed by HAROLD PINTER 
“A sURudanno play, weraie 
and winy" Times. . ~mn or 
passion, concern and outrage” 
City Limits 

ART GALLERIES 

ANTHONY tTOFFAY 23 Dertire 
SL Wl ANDY WARHOL 499 
4100 


LEMSTZX FINE ARY. 4DI Floor. 

3 Ctll lord Street London. Wl 

Tel Ol 437 4934 

GEORG TAFPERT ft RICHARD 
ZICCLER - Twa Artiste of ten 
■NOVEMBER CRUrPE*. 

Mon rn iD6pnt. Sal by 
appomtmenl only. 

MEDICI GALLERY. 7 Grafton St_ 
Bond SI.. Wl 629 3675. Patet- 
tocaby DCNYS WELLS VFRDA 
(1B8X-1B73I 20 AU9 - 2 Sept. 
Mon-fn 9-6 ao 

MUSEUM OF MAMUNB. Bur- 
lington Gardens. London Wl. 
LOST MACK KW000MS AMD 
sot PAPER MOORS. An Extu- 
Ullon created by EDUARDO 
FftOLOZZL Mon Sal 106. Sun 
2306. Adm free 

ROYAL ACADEMY. PICCADIL- 
LY. 01 734 9052 Open dally 
106 inr Sun. 1 reduced rate Sum. 
-until 1 45) SUMMER EXfCML 
WON Until 9Slh August £2.40. 
£1 60 rone rate cc booking 01 
741 9999 

VICTORIA * ALBERT MUSEUM 
.' Ite Nattml Btosonai al Art ft 

WHXlAM MULREADY poinl- 
lw>. MASTERPUam OP 
PHUTOCRAPHY. AMERICAN 
POTIERS TODAY. Retorted 
Info- Ol 6BI 4894. Wkdayi IO- 
530 $uns 2 SO ftfiO Cbaod 
Fridays 

****** «JUOTY I Cromwell 
Gantem. SW7 S8d 6612 cem- 
OF GOLD • Tha 
CaUaca ed MreHmtel Mare. Un. 

! *£S2:1SSte' m,sm 

CINEMAS 


e^moiPLAZA ABE 2443 SIO 
fj***z? Jtai Film as 1.30 
650 6.1 S A B4S 


CHELSEA CINEMA 351 3742 

AN IMPUDENT URL >15) Film 

al 2 30 4 35 n 40 8 50 


CUJtZON MAYFAIR Curron SI 
499 5757 FiiM Call MHf 7 Day 
CC 240 7200 iRkg Fnei Maogte 
Smith. Drnholm Elliott Jiali 
Dench in A ROM* WITH A 
VIEW (PCI Film al I 30 (NM 
Sum 5 45. 6 lO A U 40 
ALSO ATCURZON WEST END. 


eURZON WIST END ShJl Imbury 
Aimur Wl 439 4605 Fint 
Can 24 Mr 7 Da\ rr 240 7200 
iBLg Feel Mjw Simm. 
Dennopn Ell ion. Jimi Denrn in 
A ROOM WITH A VIEW (PS). 
Film al 1 30 i Not Sum. 345. 
6 IO A 8 40 


BATE CINEMA, hntlinq Hill 
Gate 727 4043 SID AND NAN- 
CY (18> 250 inol Sum 4 40 
6 50 9 00 Lhiohl II 15 THE 
KILLING OF A CHINESE 
BOOKK <PG> A A WOMAN UN- 
DER THE INFLUENCE iPCI 
Ad\ jnrv bookiiHi 


LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

9SO 5052 itmi-'SJo this Oa 
hr Airru.' Vm, amCs Bmi 
Ingxi Wall Drinrs 'v PIKOCCHtO 
<Ll PI us CUM Ml BEARS A MOW 
BECtHMMC ii. ' Cam prnfi To- 
dll 1.20 3 40 Sro proa a 20 
All pi 09* booWaBIr in amjiKr. 


LUMICRE CINEMA 379 3014 • 

836 0691 510 A NANCY H8i 

Film al 1 30 3 SO 6 IS B 45 


M1MEMA KMCHTSBRIDCE P3S 

4225 -BIT OF AnBCA n (N) 

PMtvt^Q 60 no MUST END 

THURSDAY 28th AUGUST 
Woodv Allan Michael Came 
MM Panovs “HANNAH AND 
HSR SISTERS”! 15) OPENS 
FRIDAY 29th AUGUST Ad- 
vance boobing* now open 


ODC ON HAVMARKET .839 
76971 Wall Onttet M FANTASIA 

iL'l Sep prom Dalit- 1 SO 5 oo 

e 10. All vail bookable in 
advance Arem ana Viu 
tefrohone naokinns wiMrome 


ODEON LEKESTCH SQUARE 

■930 6I1H info 930 42£o / 
4 259 H ANNAH AND HER 
SISTERS ilSi Sep pro>p Doan 
oern Daily 200. b 00 8 00 
Credit Card Mm Line •Arms 
/Visa /Amt*) 839 1929. 24 
hour service C2 50 seals avui- 
nbfe Monday all pem aiiproos 
bookable in advance There will 
be no 2 CO Perl on Tue Aiqie 


ODEON MARBLE ARCH i733 
20ll> UK KARATE KID - 
PART H (PC) Sep Proih Donn 
open Daily 3 05, 5.35. 8 05 Rr 
dured prim lor undrr 16's 
Siuctem earn noUers. LB40 
hNdrts. O-A P's. Manner s 
on IV CARE BEARS MOVIE H - 
A NEW ODKRATKM (U) 
Doors open MMi Sal 1 !5 Alt 
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SPORT 


Cram seeks test 
as Sharpe tries 
to prove a point 


Steve Cram, seeking re- 
assurance that a recent achiUes 
tendon injury has improved, 
will compete at 1,000 metres 
in tonight’s Dairy Crest 
Games in Birmingham, taking 
on his training partner from 
J arrow, David Sharpe, and the 
Commonwealth Games 800 
metres bronze medal winner , 
Peter Elliott 

Unless the injury has caused 
greater disruption to his train- 
ing than he has let on. Cram's 
appearance should be some- 
thing of a formality, but the 
real contest is likely to be 
behind him. between Sharpe 
and Elliott. Both are non- 
travelling reserves for the 
european championships, 
which begin in Stuttgart on 
August 26, with Elliott still 
unhappy that he has been 
named as reserve for the 1 ,500 
metres instead of the 800 
metres, his speciality. The 
reserve for the shorter event is 
Sharpe, the 19-year old world 
junior champion, who has 
been nominated presumably 
on the grounds that his 1,500 
metres running is nowhere 
near as strong as Elliott's, who 
has run 3min.35.62 sec for the 
metric mile. 

For Cram, the invitation 
meeting at least provides a 
timely chance to test his leg on 
the eve of the championships 
at which he is due to contest 
both the 800 and 1500 metres. 
But for many of the other 
British athletes, travel and 
competition weary, even the 


By Cliff Temple 
subventions offered by the 
British Athletic Promotion 
Unit have been an insufficient 
carrot to tempt them into 
further competition while they 
are trying to prepare for 
Stuttgart 

At least Allan Wells, the 
1 980 Olympic champion, can- 
not be accused of having over- 
raced this year, and tonight he 
frees his' successor, the United 
Kingdom 100 metres record 
holder, Linford Christie, while 
taking part as a guest in the 
final of the British Rail Sprint 
Trophy during the meeting. In 
the 200 metres. Wells comes 
up against Canada's 
Commonwealth champion 
Atlee Mahom, whom he beat 
in Gateshead earlier this 
month but who then turned 
the tables on him in Budapest 
three days later. 

In the mile, the contest 
between the 1976 Olympic 
1.500 metres champion John 
Walker of New Zealand and 
the 1978 Commonwealth 
1 .500 metres champion David 
Moorcroft, apart from being a 
tribute to their continuing 
longevity, could also be hailed 
as a prelude to next week's 
saturation TV coverage of 
Stuttgart, when Walker will be 
working as an analyst for FTV 
and Moorcrofl in a similar 
role for BBC. 

Not unexpectedly, tonight's 
meeting has a strong 
Commonwealth presence, 
with many of those who were 
not able to run at Edinburgh 


Cram and Aouita heading 
towards London meeting 

From Fat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent, Cologne 


The meeting between Steve 
Cram and Said Aouita, the 
most eagerly awaited athletic 
encounter of the season, de- 
spite the imminent European 
championships, could take 
place in London on Septem- 
ber 11 

Cram and Aouita, the car- 
rent leading middle-distance 
runners in the world, had been 
due to race in the penultimate 
Mobil Grand Prix meeting at 
Brussels on September 5, 
something that Cram con- 
firmed last week. However, 
Wilfrid Meert, the Brussels 
promoter, was having misgiv- 
ings yesterday about the pro- 
jected match at his meeting 
and Aouita, after his latest 
near miss at the world record 
here on Sunday, his third in 1 0 
days, said that he thought it 
unlikely that he and Cram 
would meet in Brussels. 

Aouita said; “Cram will 
probably be too tired to have 
such a big match after five 
races at the European 
championships the previous 
week. I can quite understand 
that. In any case I can't see 
Cram agreeing to meet me 
over the mile or the 2,000 
metres, which are his world 
records, which I would prefer 


to run, and I don't want to 
race him at 1,500 metres, 
which is my world record.” 

But Aouita admitted that be 
.was coming to London on 
September 12, something 
which Andy Norman, the 
head of the British Athletics 
Promotions Unit, confirmed 
yesterday. Norman also said 
that Cram was now going to 
run the 800 metres in Brussels, 
“which means that they won't 
be meeting- there, because 
Aouita will never do 800 
metres against Cram.” 

But Norman refused to 
confirm that the pair would 
meet in London. He is still 
mindful of the media mael- 
strom in which he found 
himself last year as instigator 
of the Mary Dedcer-Zola 
Budd meeting, when the race 
turned into a walkover for the 
American, and Miss Budd was 
later discovered to have 
earned £90,000 despite finish* 
ing fourth. It is likely that 
negotiations over money are 
also the cause of the shift of 
this potential meeting be- 
tween Cram and Aouita from 
Brussels to London. 

Norman went on to say: 
“Nothing will be decided on 
Aouita's part, whether be is 


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through selectorial or boycott 
causes, still trying to throw 
different lights'on the results 
there. Others who were there 
will be trying to do the same 
thing, and among them will be 
Fatima Whitbread, who has 
suddenly been robbed of her 
chance for revenge over Tessa 
Sanderson in the European 
Championships womens jav- 
elin. Miss Whitbread now 
seems destined to spend a 
frustrating year, with no 
chance of redressing the gold 
medal balance until next. Au- 
gust, following Miss 
Sanderson's withdrawal from 
the rest of this season through 
injury. 

The British Amateur Ath- 
letic Board announced yes- 
terday that Carl Thackery of 
Hallamshire Harriers would 
be replacing Commonwealth 
champion Jon Solly at 10,000 
metres in the British team for 
Stuttgart. They had reconsid- 
ered the position when Solly 
withdrew from the team, after 
they had earlier declined to 
nominate a reserve for the 
event Thackery, who finished 
fourth in the Amateur Athlet- 
ics Association's champion- 
ships in his best time of 28 
min 03.68 sec, narrowly 
missed selection for the 
Commonwealth Games but 
had beaten by nearly half a 
minute Steve Harris in the 
AAA's race and Harris has 
already been named for Stutt- 
gart 





















Pulling off victory: the British women's lightweight coxless four on their way to winning their heat yesterday 

British medal hopes are high 




Sunday, Tcun Van Vlia, of 
The Netherlands, led a pack of 
five riders clocked in at 1 hr 44 
min 1 sec. The others in the 
padc were: Joel Better. . of 
France, Bob Roll, of tbe 
United States, Ivan Ro- 
manov, of the Soviet Union, 
and John Talen, of ^ the 
Netherlands. 

Hinault was only two m ro- 
utes behind al 1:45:51. which 

? ive him a total time of 25 hr, 
min. and 3 sec, good for first 
place in the overall standings, 
surpassing Jeff Pierce; of the 
United States. 




finally coming and what event 
he will run until after the 
Grand Prix final in Rome.” 

But Norman is trying to 
turn this final meeting in 
Europe this year, ostensibly a 
United Kingdom versus West 
Germany match, into the 
climax of the season, which 
the 1AC meeting used to be 
before it had to change dazes 
to be included on the Grand 
Prix circuit. And an Aouita- 
Cram race wouldcomplete the 
occasion. 

Aouita said he would be as 
loathe to meet Cram in Lon- 
don as he felt Cram would to 
meet him in Casablanca. But 
the Moroccan has been known 
to' change his mind, even in 
mid-sentence. He was as 
entertaining as ever in his 
Press conference after his 
3,000 metres in 7:3223, just 
0.13sec outside Henry Rono’s 
record And many people are 
pointing out that that manual 
lime for Rono was. because of 
the delay in starting a watch by 
hand, intrinsically slower than 
Aouita's time. But the Moroc- 
can said: “I know that I've run 
faster than Rono, but I want 
everyone else to know it too. 
Thai means I’ve got to run 
under 720.” 

YACHTING 

Bond sayes 

American 

challenger 

Fremantle, Australia (Reu- 
ter) — Sail America, the 
syndicate led by Dennis 
Conner which is heading the 
US challenge for the 
America's Cup, put its two 
yachts into Fremantle harbour 
for the first time yesterday — 
and one promptly ran aground 
while being towed to the 
team's headquarters. 

Conner's rival Aostralian 
syndicate, which Is led by Alan 
Bond, came to the rescue by 
towing one boat away while 
the Sail America tender freed 
the stricken yacht Conner lost 
die cop to Bond's Australia H, 
skippered by John Bertrand; 
off Newport in 1983, breaking 
the New York Yacht Cub's 
132-year bold over dm event 

Now racing for the San 
Diego Yacht Club, Conner, 
who is due in Australia on 
August 29, has been testing 
five yachts off Hawaii for more 
than a year. Only the newest. 
Stars and Stripes 87, and the 
slightly older Stars and 
Stripes 85 were taken to 
Fremantle. 

Also landed yesterday woe 
the Newport Harbour Yacht 
Cub's Eagle, and tbe Ca- 
nadian challenger, Oywfla Q. 
Unlike Canada II and Eagle, 
the Conner yachts' keels were 
shrouded in covers which have 
become almost mandatory 
since Australia n surprised 
tbe yachting world when it 
unveiled a radical winged-ked 
after its cop win. 

But the Sail America project 
manager, Sandy Pnrdon, had 
an ominous-sounding warning 
for any potential spies: “We 
are going to ask that people 
consider our work, and try to 
keep a safe distance. We'd 
hate to have someone come out 
there and get hurt if they were 
a Hole to dose to the action.” 


By Jim Kafltou 

On a nigh perfect cours e , 
the world silver medal holders, 
Martin Cross and Adam Clift, 
of Great Britain, won their 
heat in tbe coxless pairs 
yesterday in the world rowing 
championships at Nottingham 
to qualify for Friday's semi- 
final rounds. 

Yesterday they appeared to 
be letting die race dip away, 
and only one crew in the heat 
was to qualify. By the 1,000- 
metre stage the new United 
States pair, Michael Teti and 
John Strotbeck, were a good 
length dear «nd looking 
impressive. 

Even a young Austrian pair 
of totally unknown pedigree 
were stamping on the Union 
Jack. Tbe British stroke, 
Martin Cross, decided enough 
was enough. Four minutes into 
the race he effortlessly pressed 
the accelerator. The British 
simply sliced through the 
opposition and arrogantly held 
off a token late challeng e by 
the United Slates to take the 
race. 

The Russian Pimenov 
brothers, the world cham- 


pions, looked mightily impres- 
sive cruising through to win 
their heat, and there are many 
good pairs around. The 
Pimenovs survived tbe British 
late charge in last year’s world 
champ ionships by eight hun- 
dredths ofa second, and I have 

a gut feeling Cross and 
Clift are going to be a key 
factor a gain in this event and 
keep ns with denched white 


The - Italian world and 
Olympic champions in coxed 
pairs, the Abbagnaie brothers, 
sent the Italian Press running 
to the landing stage to cover a 
national catastrophe when 
their crew finished last, bro- 
ken by the East Germans after 
leading af half way. Britain's 
Steve Redgrave and Andy 
Holmes cruised to a very easy 
victory for a berth in Friday's 
semi-final rounds, recording 
the fastest heat of the day. 

British mews are not only on 
beam in their medal quest 
after yesterday's heats . for 
women's lightweights aad 
men's heavyweights, but ap- 
pear to have unearthed an- 
other crew of medal potentiaL 


SWIMMING 


Britain's Ughtweight double- 
scnDers, Gillian Bond and 
Carol-Ami Wood, won their 
beat in foe lightweight double- 
sculls to qualify for Satnrday's 
final. With only one crew to 
qualify directly for the final 
six, foe British double were 
engaged in a fierce battle with 
the Belgians, and just lifted 
their rate sufficiently to win by 
a bare third of a length in foe 
second fastest time of foe day. 

With foe abdication of 
Britain's world champions, 
Lin Clark and Beryl 
Crockfoid, this event is wide 
open. The front runnels are 
Great Britain, mfli™, foe 
United States and tbe Nether- 
lands, who wear to be within 
a third of a length of each 
other. But foe West Germans, 
Claudia Fachinger and 
Cristiane Zimmer, who were 
victors in Lucerne, finished 
fond m tbe Britons' beat, and 
no one can tell me that they 
have lost eight lengths since 
Lucerne. 

Britain's lightweight 
women's flagship, the coxless 
four, who won foe Common- 


wealth Games gold medal, won 
their beat In foe fastest time of 
the day for a place in 
Saturday's finaL But they will 
have questions in their mind 
over foe United States, who 
were almost a length ahead 
with 490 metres to go, when 
they appeared to hit a buoy 
and came to a standstill, and 
that was that 

Lightweight single scnQer, 
Beryl Crockford, in the easiest 
BnkiiMi third will 
certamly need insurance to 
cover her survival in the 
repichage. The old spark 
seems to have sadly deserted 
her. 

And poor Young Britain's 
coxed four had a baptism of 
fire. They walked straight into 
the Russian world champions. 
East Germany, Poland, and 
Fiance in a hostile race, and 
finished last. 

Britain's other crews racing 
yesterday had mixed fortimes; 
The men's coxless four jgaiinerf 
a place ' in foe semi-final 
rounds, vrhSe the quadruple 
sculls and foe eight have a last 
chance for survival in the 
repechages. 



HORSE TRIALS 


Moorhouse appeal falls Everdon ride for 


Madrid (Reuter) —Britain's 
Adrian Moorhouse yesterday 
lost an appeal against dis- 
qualification which cost him a 
gold medal in the world 
championships. But the Brit- 
ish team lodged a further 
protest after the Canadian 
world record-holder Alex 
Baumann had an initial dis- 
qualification overturned by 
the chief referee in the beats erf 
the 400 metres individual 
medley. 

Moovhoose, a European 
and Commonwealth gold 
medal winner, was disquali- 
fied for a fruity turn in the 100 
metres breaststroke final in 
which he romped home first 
on Sunday. 

Banmann, • already ham- 
pered by an upset stomach 
that had severely restricted his 
training schedule, finished 
second in his heat in a time 
more than nine seconds out- 
side his world record. His 
time of 4:26.42 was just 
enough to give him a [dace in 
the nnaL But minutes after 
Baumann left the pool, of- 
ficials announced he nad been 
disqualified for an illegal 


touch on the breatstroke leg. 

Banmann was judged to 
have touched with only one 
hand at foe turn from breast- 
stroke into the final freestyle 
leg but the chief referee an- 
nulled the disqualification af- 
ter studying a video-tape of 
tbe race. The decision gave the 
Canadian a place in the final. 

Moorhouse was disqualified 
fry tbe turn judge for an illegal 
dolphin kick at the turn. 
Britain suffered a second dis- 
qualification when Gary 
Binfield was judged to have 
also used an illegal dolphin 
butterfly kick in a 400 metres 
medley heat 

The officiating Swimming 
Commission declined the 
British team manager Gory 
Thain’s request to view film 
taken by an American tele- 
vision company, saying it was 
“not a. device used in ac- 
cordance with die roles relat- 
ing to the automatic 
offidating equipment” The 
Canadian coach, Paul Bergen, 
referring to tbe Baumann case, 
said FINA rules did not 
require the referee to study a 
video-tape of the race. The 


Power of 
Tyson 

Mike Tyson recorded his 
24th victory inside tbe dis- 
tance in 26 bouts when he 
stopped Jose Ribalta in At- 
lantic Gty on Sunday night — 
the undefeated heavyweight 
flooring his opponent in the 
tenth and final round. 

Tyson, aged 20 and ranked 
No 1 by the WBA, may now 
fight Trevor Berbick, the 
champion, or Larry Holmes, 
tiie IBF champion, and still 
has 1 2 months to beat Floyd 
Panerson's record as the 
youngest champion. Ribalta, 
ranked seventh, was no match 
for Tyson, going to the can- 
vass in the second and eighth 
rounds before Rudy Battle, 
the referee, stopped the fight 
in the final round to save 
Ribalta from further punish- 
ment. 

Evans move 

. West Bromwich Albion 
have paid Wimbledon 
£60.000 for Stuart Evans and 
swapped Jimmy Nicholl for 
Bobby Williamson from 
Queen's Park Rangers. Both 
will rriay in a pre-season match 
at Walsall tonight. 







Tyson: another victory 

Irish smiles 

Flamengo, the Brazilian for- 
mer world club champions, 
will play Linfidd, foe Irish 
league winners, at Windsor 
Park. Belfast tonight to cele- 
brate tbe. Linfiekfs centenary. 

Racing time 

Middlesbrough, still des- 
perately short of cash, are 
raring against time to be given 
permission to play Manches- 
ter United tomorrow night at 
Ayresome Park. “We are keen 
to' help any stuggling dub.” 
said Hon Atkinson, the 
United manager, "but they 
need clearance to play or train 
aLtheir ground.” # 

j 


FINA Bureau, the 
Federation's management 
committee, rejected tbe Brit- 
ish team’s appeal against tbe 
Swimming Commission de- 
cision. The FINA Bureau said 
it could not accept an appeal 
relating to what it called a 
“factual decision” of judging. 
This ruling prompted Thain 
to submit a further protest 
when Baumann was reinstated 
after his initial disqualifica- 
tion had been announced and 
shown on the electronic re- 
sults board. 

“In the case of Moorhouse, 
this rule was oven as reason 
for tbe disqualification stand- 
ing. In the case of Baumann, it 
appears not to have been 
applied,” Thain declared. 
Coach Teny Dennison' said 
Moorhouse felt he turned in 
his normal way and did 
nothing different from other 
occasions. He. said: ”What do 
I need to do next time I swim 
so as not to be disqualified? I 
believe 1 did my normal turn. 

I have never been disqualified ! 
or even warned by judges . 
before.” 

Results, page 27 


Title bouts 

Dave McAuley. ofNorthern 
Ireland, will meet Joe Kelly, 
from. Glasgow, for tbe British 
flyweight tide, relinquished by 
Duke McKenzie, while Robert 
Dickie, of Wales, must defend 
his featherweight . title John 
Feeney, former bantamweight 
champion from HartlepooL 

Bradley's best 

Pat Bradley fired tiie best 
round of her 12-year career 
yesterday — a nine-under-par 
63 — ‘ to come from eight 
strokes behind to capture the 
$240,000 (£160.000) LPGA 
world championship of golf at 
Buford, two strokes ahead of 
Nancy Lopez and Betsy King 
on 281. . 

Hearns bait 

Tommy Hearns has chal- 
lenged the winner of the all- , 
British world light-heavy^ 
weight title bout between foe 
champion. Dennis Andries, 
and Tony Sibson at Alexandra 
Palace on 1 September 10. 
Frank Warren, the London 
promoter.' says he has been 
approached by . a repre- 
sentative of foe Amen can 
world light-middleweight 
champion for a contest m 
England in December. . 




By Jenny MacArfonr 


. Princess Anne, who was 
busy helping her husband. 
Captain Marie Phillips, run 
their own horse trials at 
Gatcombe Park last weekend, 
returns to the saddle today for 
the Carter Jonas Everdon 
Horse . Trials in 
Northamptonshire. 

It will be her fourth outing 
on the unregally named Tod, a 
nineyear-old gelding by Royal 
Clipper, with whom she is 
forming an increasingly 
successful partnership. A rail 
in foe intermediate section at 
Heckfield, their first outing, 
was followed by, a good round 
at Holker Hall ni Cumbria last 
month, and then by a fine 
dear at Dauntsey a fortnight 
ago. 

The horse's former rider, 
Jon Evans, now in his thud 
year with the Range Rover 
team at Gatcombe Park, win 
be competing with the eight- 
year-old Great Attraction, 
bought in May, in the second 
intermediate section today. 


Everdon, now in its 26th 
year, has long been popular 
with riders because it is a 
challenging but inviting 
course. Run over old turfi n 
provides an ideal testing 
ground for novice and inter- 
mediate horses. Mark Todd, 
New Zealand’s- Olympic gold 
medal winner, liked what be 
saw on his first visit last year, 
and returns today with two 
novice rides, the six-year-old 
Comet Venture* who won at 
Dauntsey, and foe five-year- 
old New Zealand-bred 
Bahlua, whom be bo light from 
Andrew Nicholson -two weeks 
ago. - 

Among the other inter- 
national riders competing on 
young horses are Richard 
Walker (Story Teller II), Rob- 
ert Lemieux (The 
Harvestmaster), Lorna Clarke 
(Fealiath MorL- Angela & Mi- 
chael Tucker (Red Ruddigore 
and What A Surprise), and 
Nigd Taylor (Poet’s Perfec- 
tion & Formidable). " 


Hunt still in pursuit 
in spite of her fall 


Rachel Hunt and Friday 
Fox head foe list of six riders 
from which foe team of four 
for this month's young riders' 

European championships will 
be chosen (Jenny MacAithur 
writes). Miss Hunt’s Jail at the 
water with Friday Fox in foe 
final trial at Gatcombe Park 
on Sunday was treated as an 
unlucky mishap by the selec- 
tors, whose confidence in her 
and her coloured mare Iras 
been wdl rewarded over the 
years. 

They brought home the 
individual bronze medal from 


whom she takes to Buighley. 
Aloaf has just- returned to 
competitive work after pulling 
a shoulder muscle at the 
Brigstock Horse Trials tast 
year and was not eligible for 
the young riders' team: - 
Vanessa Ashbourne, with 
Hector James, who missed the 
Bramham young riders* trial 
because her horse: was cast in 
his box just before, earned her 
place in the six after finishing 
second on Sunday. The two 
who finished joint third are 
also included — Alexandra 
Ramus with Spy Story IL wjio 


— — -V>u >wunu -IUI jp j 

foe 1984 European champion- was consistently successful as 
ships and were in the team a junior, and Julie-Anne 


that won the gold medal m 
France last year when they 
were fourth individually. „ 
Miss Hum. who at 21 is m 
her last year as a young rider, 
is one of foe most reliable 
cross-country riders and has 
proved she can hold her own 
with the seniors. She finished 
second on Piglet in appalling 
conditions at this year's Bad- 
minton and on Sunday won 
the . advanced class at 
Gatcombe, again with Piglet 
. She also won foe young 
riders' section on Sunday with 
her : second horse. Aloaf; 


a JUlUUlf <kUU 

Shield with Crimdon Lucky 
George, last year's riaerw. 

Lucinda Murray,: who had 
what appeared to be an on* 
lucky refusal with The Cocka- 
too at Gatcombe, is not food- 
listed for the team, biii will 
compete as an radtoiduaL 
swnT-usTFORYOuwaRffle®' 

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