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TIMES 


No 62,540 


WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


V, ~ 



Russians offer 
peace 




From Christopher Mosey, Stockholm 


>.» 


A breakthrough was ach- 
ieved at the Stockholm se- 
curity conference yesterday 
when the Soviet Union agreed 
to inspection by the West of its 
military activities and said it 
was prepared to reduce its 
forces and armaments in 
Europe. 

It is the first lime the Soviet 
Union has agreed to obliga- 
tory military inspection. But 
the questions remaining to be 
answered at Stockholm are; 
how many inspections are 
needed and just what con- 
stitutes a military manoeuvre? 

The Soviet move at the 
opening of the 1 2th and final 
session of the conference was 
dearly intended as a follow- 
through to the announcement 
by Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, 
the Soviet leader, of a contin- 
ued unilateral Soviet nuclear 
test ban on Monday. 

It was conveyed to Stock- 
holm by Mr Oleg Grinevsky, 
bead of the Soviet delegation, 
who was dearly conscious of 
the propaganda advantage to 
be gained. 

The thrust of the Soviet 
initiative was contained in 
one paragraph of his speech: 
“We could ■ . . agree to the 
conduct of on-site inspection 
of confidence building mea- 
sures on the basis of a limited 
quota — one or two inspec- 
tions per year — on the 
territory of each-state." 

Then he said the Socialist 


bloc was also ready “to pursue 
a large scale programme of 
reducing the armed forces and 
armaments in Europe under 
effective control" 

He said Mr Gorbachov was 
working to reverse the trend of 
Superpower confrontation 
back to detente and attacked 
President Reagan for his dis- 



Mr Oleg Grinevsky at the 
peace conference yesterday, 
missal of Mr Gorbachov's test 
ten initiative. 

He hinted that Mr Gorba- 
chov had been opposed by Ms 
generals in prolonging the test 
ban until January 1, 1987. 
“We have all justification to 
resume nuclear testing," be 
said. The fear had been ex- 
pressed that the new ban 
“might damage the security of 
the Soviet Union". . 

The news that the Warsaw 
Pact has agreed to inspection 
removed the main stumbling 


block to the signing of a final 
document on September 19. 

It would be a mistake to 
believe that the solution of the 
verification issue automati- 
cally paved the way to an 
agreement, Mr Grinevsky 
said. “The tell is now in 
Nato's court." 

• WASHINGTON: The US 
welcomed the Soviet Union’s 
agreement to on site inspec- 
tion of military activities 
(Mohsih Ali writes). 

A State Department spokes- 
man said the US and its allies 
had maintained from the 
beginning that effective 
verification, including on ate 
inspection, must be an integral 
pan of any Stockholm 
agreement. 

He said that to reach agree- 
ment by the September 19 
conclusion dale of the con- 
ference, “we encourage the 
Soviets to intensify drafting 
on the details and modalities 
of inspection" of military 
exercises and related matters. 

But he warned that h was 
these ^practical modalities 
such as inspection quotas and 
guidelines which will give 
effect to the Soviet agreement 
in principle on inspection". 

The US in many arms 
control negotiations for years 
has * . on adequate 

inspection and verification 
procedures to ensure that no 
side is cheating. 

Summit hope, page 5 


Tomorrow 


Dinosaur’s 

demise 



Profile of 
Fleet Street in the 
grip of a printing 
revolution 





• The Times Portfolio 
Gold competition prize 
of £12,000, treble the 
usual amount because 
there was no winner 
the previous two days, 
was shared 
yesterday by two 
readers — Mrs - 
P.Cooke, of Dunstable, 
Bedfordshire, and 
Mrs D.M .Armstrong, of 
Northumberland. 
Details, page 3. 

• There is another 
£4,000 to be won today. 

• Portfolio list, page 
21 ; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 16. 




r-'i "r^ 


S- 1 ©TOi*. 


RUC attack 

The role of Irish Republic 
police in cross-border security 
is criticized in a secret Royal 
Ulster Constabulary docu- 
ment released by the Rev Ian 
Paisley Page 2 

More butter 

Figures released in Brussels 
show that the EEC butter 
mountain has risen by 30.000 
tonnes in the past month to a 
record high of 1358.000 
tonnes Page 6 


Hone News Xi 

Features 9-12 1 

Overseas 

5*9 

Leaders 

13 

Apjrts 

14.18 

Letters 

13 

Aits 

IS 

Obitoarr 

14 

Births, deaths. 

Property 

22 

marriages 

14 

Science 

14 

Bnsiness 

17-21 

Sport 2S-3GJ2 

Chess 

2 

Theatres, etc 

31 

Conn 

14 

TV & Radio 

31 

Crosswords 1QJ 6 

Universities 

14 

Dian 

12 

Wnt her 

16 

Exeats 

16 

Wills 

14 

«£»■ 

* * 

* * * 



TUC pact 
may head 
off clash 

By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

Union leaders accepted yes- 
tenday fhat legally en forcible 
pre-strike sedret ballots are 
here to stay. 

They agreed a face-saving 
formula that is expected to 
avert -a damaging clash with 
Mr Neil Kinnock at next 
month's Trades Union Con- 
gress conference in Brighton. 

The Labour leader’s 
determination to salvage bal- 
lots from a promised repeal of 
the Government's employ- 
ment laws bad brought him 
into confrontation with left- 
wing unions led by the Trans- 
port and General .Workers’ 
Union and the National 
Union of Mineworkers. ' 

Yesterday, however, 18 
unions, including the TGWU. 
gave assent at a meeting of the 
TUC’s general purposes 
committee, to a composite 
resolution to be put before the 
conference. It asserts the legal 
right of members to a secret 
ballot before a strike. 

They insisted that the com- 
promise was not a “fudge" 
and that it was fully in line 
with the joint TUC/Labour 
Party polio,' document, which 
gives statutory' force for secret 
ballots. 

The decision will come as a 
relief to Mr Kinnock and most 
TUC leaders, who regard the 
conference as an important 
showcase for new-found unity 
in the labour movement. 

Continued on page 16, col 5 


Souness 
banned 
for brawl 

By John Goodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 

Graeme Souness, the new 
Glasgow Rangers plaver-man- 
:r. bas been banned for 

ee matches, his club fined 

£5.000 and their opponents 
Hibernian £1.000, tor their 
parts in the centre circle brawl 
which marred the two clubs* 
Premier Division match on 
August 9. 

The Scottish Football 
Association also penalized 21 
of the 22 playera involved in 
the incident by adding a 
booking to their disciplinary 
records after a match in which 
Souness was sent off and nine 
other players’ names taken. 

Mr. David WilL President 
of the Scottish Football 
Association, said that after all 
their efforts’ to stamp out 
violence “ the association 
were appalled to learn that the 
first day of the new season had 
been marked by one of the 
most serious incidents wit- 
nessed in Scottish football in 
recent vears. 

"It is with relief that we 
were able to record that ac- 
tions by players, which would 
have led to arrests had they 
occurred on the terracing, did 
not spark off caiasirophic 
crowd trouble. 

Details, page 32 

* 


Secretary 
case man 
detained 

By Stewart Tendler 

‘ Crime Correspondent 

A private detective- yes- 
terday trapped -and handed 
over to the police.. a man 
suspected of posing as a 
businessman and duping a 
London secretary into vanish- 
ingwith him last weekend. 

The man, whose photo- 
graph had been issued by the 
police, was-spotted near Read- 
ing magistrates court, Berk- 
shire. 

The detective, Mr Brian 
Wiggins, who had seen the 
face on television on Monday 
night, followed the man on to 
a bus. told the driver to keep 
the doors closed and to drive 
to his garage nearby, where he 
challenged the man. There 
was no struggle and police 
were called. 

■ Last night the man was 
bang questioned at a London 
police station. 

The secretary. Miss Sarah 
Lambert, aged 25, yesterday 
began making a statement at 
Eaijpg police station, west 
London, that is expected to 
take three days to complete. 

She had been found at 
Basingstoke railway station on 
Monday just as a nationwide 
search for her got under way. 

Yesterday, pet Supt Trevor 
Brown said there would be 
changes, though he did not 
think these would involve 
violence. 

Miss Lambert had been 
missing for four days after 
taking a supposed £12,000 job 
with a bogus businessman 
calling himself Mr Simmons. 

Mr Brown said she had been 
“an innocent dupe”. There 
was no suggestion that she had 
been held by force and, as yet 
there have been no reasons 
given why she bad not con- 
tacted family or friends. 

Mr Wiggins, who runs the 
Alliance International Detec- 
tive Agency, is a former 
London detective constable. 
He was on his way to serve 
court papers when he spotted 
the wanted man. “People 
think that a private detective’s 
life is exciting, but it is mostly 
very boring.” 

Police had originally named 
the man they wanted to 
interview as Mr Joseph Mi- 
chael Hanson, who had failed 
to return earlier this month to 
Kirkham open prison, near 
Preston. 



Mr Keating, the Australian Treasurer, right, has a last-minute talk with Mr Hawke, the 
Prime Minister, before delivering the country's “most austere budget since the Depression". 


Spending slashed 
in Australia’s 
toughest Budget 

From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


In Australia's most austere 
budget since the Depression, 
the Labor Government yes- 
terday outlined its strategy to 
restructure an economy which 
Mr Bob Hawke, the Prime 
Minister, says is in a crisis as 
serious as war. 

A budget session of Par- 
liament heard Mr Paul 
Keating, the Treasurer, out- 
line measures intended to 
slash the deficit next year to 
SAus3.5 billion (about £1.4 
billion) from $Aus5.72 billion 
in the last financial year. 

- In a package- designed to 
convince ibe- pdtsple world 
that the . Hawke Government 
can take unpalatable- de- 
cisions, and to persuade the 
nation that they have to be 
accepted. Mr Keating outlined 
spending cuts across the board 



in social security, health, 
education, defence and over- 
seas aid amounting to $Aus3 
billion. 

Broad and deep as the cuts 
are. they are less than had 
been foreshadowed in some 
budget “leaks.” and it is only 
by increases in indirect tax- 
ation that the deficit has been 
so substantially reduced. 

Shaped by reduced prices 
for Australia's primary ex- 


ports and a widening balance 
of payments deficit, budgeted 
spending for 1986/87 is es- 
timated at $Aus74.764 billion, 
which amounts to zero growth 
in real terms. Inflation is 
projected at 8 per cent. 

The measure which is likely 
to cause Labor the most 
difficulty with its own constit- 
uency’ is a plan to resume sales 
of uranium to France sus- 
pended two years ago. Mr 
Keating said the uranium ten 
had been counter-productive, 
as France had bought at lower 
prices elsewhere and it was 
being rescinded as the mineral 
was onfybeiBg use^gtr peace- 
ful-purposes. 

The Treasurer’s fourth bud- 
get also disclosed that the 
Government will seek the 
trade unions* agreement to 
accept a 2 per cent reduction 
in a probable increase of 4 per 
cent in the next national wage 
case. 

This may come as a dis- 
appointment to the business 
sector which had been hoping, 
for a wage freeze. Scheduled 
tax cuts and benefit increases 
will be deferred by between six 
weeks and three months. 

The international finance 
community's judgment on the 
package will be reflected in 
what happens in coming 
weeks to the Australian dollar, 
which has depreciated against 
sterling and the US dollar by 
almost 20 per cent since the 
beginning of the year. Further 
significant devaluation could 
imperil the Government’s 
survival. 


British 
firms line 
up with 
Boeing 

By Rodney Groton 

Defence Correspondent 

The battle by bidders to 
replace the Royal Air Force’s 
Nimrod airborne early warn- 
ing project intensified yes- 
terday with three British 
companies aligning them- 
selves with a Boeing bid to 
snpply its AWACS aircraft 

Plessey, Ferranti and Racal 
said in London that they had 
signed agreements to co-op- 
erate with Boeing. 

Six companies are bidding 
to replace the GEC project. 
The three main contenders are 
Boeing, Grumman and Lock- 
heed, all from the United 
States. Three British com- 
panies, offering limited sys- 
tems, aie regarded as 
outsiders. 

Mr Jerry King, rice presi- 
dent and general manager of 
Boeing Aerospace, said if 
AWACS was selected at least 
8,000 man-yeats of work 
wonld come to Britain within 
the next five years. 

The Ferranti agreement cov- 
ers the provision of software 
support throughout the life of 
the programme, but Mr King 
said the other agreements did 
not provide any guarantee for 
a specific level of involvement 

All the foreign contenders 
for the RAF contract are 
required to proride work in the 
UK to offset work that would 
be lost by the contract being 
placed abroad. 

Although the three com- 
panies are allying themselves 
with the various American 
contenders, they would all 
hope to gain work whichever 
bidder won. 


Ex-clippie 
buys bus 
company 

By Our City Staff 

A former bus conductor 
yesterday masterminded a 
management buyout of the 
first local bus company sold 
under the Government's plan 
to privatize 52 subsidiaries of 
the National Bus Company. 

Mr Harry Blundren, chair- 
man and managing director of 
Devon General, who began 
work on the buses as a 
conductor for another com- 
pany in 1962. led a team of 
five senior managers. 

Devon General is also the 
first NBC company to be 
bought by existing manage- 
ment. National Holidays was 
sold to another company last 
month. The price is believed 
to be more than £3 million. 
The company employs more 
than 1.000 staff 

Report, page ]7 


Conrad Black group to 
repay pension cash 


Dominion Stores, a large 
but troubled Canadian grocery 
chain, yesterday was unaer a 
court order to pay $Can 37.9 
million (about £182 million) 
back into an employee pen- 
sion fund from which it 
removed the money earlier 
this year- 

The Supreme Court of On- 
tario gave Dominion Stores 
seven days to come up with a 
repayment plan. Otherwise it 
will be required to repay ihe 
money immediately, three 
.judges ruled in Toronto. 

Dominion Stores is con- 
trolled by Mr Conrad Black, 
part-owner of the London 
Daily Telegraph. Once one of 
Canada’s largest and healthi- 
est retail groups, it has run 
into financial difficulties in 
recent years. 

Besides having to repay the 
money. Dominion Stores 
must r pay interest on the 


From John Best, Ottawa 

money and court costs total- 
ling around SCan 2 million. 

in its 46-page judgement the 
court ruled that Dominion 
“received the funds and holds 
them without authority.” The 
Pension Commission of On- 
tario should not have au- 
thorized their withdrawal. 

The ruling overturned one 
by an Ontario Supreme Court 
judge. 

The company's withdrawal 
of ihe money’ was disclosed 
earlier this year in the midst of 
a round of lay-offs at Domin- 
ion. The dismissals followed a 
decision by Dominion to sell 
most of its’ grocery’ stores to a 
rival chain, A&P. 

The employees' union 
claimed the money was used 
to pay off 1984 losses and 
meet the cost of closures. 

Mr Black argued that the 
money uas a surplus belong- 
ing to shareholders. 


Britain leads world currency markets 


By Richard Thomson 
Banking Correspondent 

London is the world’s, big- 
gest foreign exchange market, 
according to a survey pub- 
lished by the Bank of England 
yesterday. Its annual turnover 
is worth* more than 20 times 
the total Of trade elsewhere. 

With a daily turnover of S90 
billion (£60 billion), the City's 
currency market handles al- 
most twice the amount traded 
daily in either New York or 
Tokyo. 

Surveys in the United States 
and Japan show that foreign 


exchange trading has grown 
rapidly in both cities, amount- 
ing to a turnover of $50 billion 
a day in New* York and $48 
billion in Tokyo. 

There are no figures for the 
growth of trading in London 
because this is the Bank's first 
survey of the London market 
But Bank officials suggest that 
London has been growing at 
least as fast as New York, 
where currency trading vol- 
ume has increased by 5Q per 
cent since 1983. 

The majority of foreign 
currency transactions in Lon* 
don arc carried out between 


banks. Their business with 
customers accounted for only 
9 per cent of total turnover. 

The results of the survey 
may cause concern in official 
circles, where disruptive cur- 
rency fluctuations are often 
blamed oa speculative dealing 
by financial institutions. 

But the Bank believes that a 
high level of turnover is 
necessary in the foreign ex- 
change market to allow it to 
operate efficiently. 

Bank officials said that al- 
though there were no figures 
on the London market to 


prove il it had almost cer- 
tainly been the world’s largest 
foreign exchange market for 
many years. 

The number of institutions 
taking part in the London 
market is more than twice the 
that of New York. The Bank’s 
survev included 348 banks 
and licensed deposit takers, 
and eight brokers operating in 
London, compared with 123 
banking institutions and nine 
brokers co' ered by New York 

survev 

London leads, page 17 

■* ’ 



on 

Tory editor for 
Stockton story 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


- The foil weight of the 
Conservative establishment 
descended yesterday on the 
Too' student editor of a party 
magazine who published 
accusations that Lord Stock- 
ton was guilty of "war 
crimes". 

Lawyers acting for Mr Nor- 
man Tebbit. the party chair- 
man. obtained a High Court 
injunction restraining Mr 
Harry Phibbs and the 
magazine's primers from fur- 
ther distribution of Aw 
Agenda. 

They also served writs on 
Mr Phibbs. aged 20, a member 
of the national executive of 
the Federation of Conser- 
vative Students, which is 
based at Centra] Office, and 
Annagh Graphical Company, 
of Ilford, Essex, alleging libcL 
misrepresentation and breach 
of contract. 

An unrepentant Mr Phibbs 
countered by saying that 2.000 
copies of the magazine had 
been rushed out to forestall 
possible legal action. 

Mr John Bercow. chairman 
of the federation., dissociated 
the organization* from Mr 
Phibbs. insisting that he had 
acted alone in breaching party 
rules by publishing the allega- 
tions. without first clearing the 
article with the organization's 
leaders and Central Office 
legal advisers. 

The article in question is an 
interview by Mr Phibbs with 
Count Nikolai Tolstoy, in 
which the former Mr Harold 
Macmillan is accused of being 
a “war criminal” for bis pari 
in sending back 40.000 Cos- 
sacks to Russia in 1 945 to face 
certain death. 

The allegations are not new. 


but their publication in a 
magazine carrying ihe Conser- 
vative imprint enraged Mr 
Tebbit and senior party 
figures. 

Mr Tebbit interrupted his 
holiday in France to condemn 
them as “disgraceful'', to or- 
der the destruction of ali 
remaining copies of the maga- 
zine and to issue an unquali- 
fied apology to Lord Stockton, 
aged 91. 

Mr Phibbs said; “I will be 
taking legal advice and intend 
to battle against this all the 
way. 

“As for as I am concerned. 
\ew Agenda is no longer the 
property of Tory party Central 
Office. U is an independent 
publication. No party money 
goes into Ihe publication - it is 
paid for entire!) hv subscrib- 
ers, advertisers and 
donations.'' 

But the federation said that 

its national executive ex- 
ercised ultimate authority 
over the magazine, not Mr 
Phibbs. 

Mr Bercow said: “ Regard- 
less of the content ot the 
interview in question, on 
which people may huld differ- 
ing views, the fact is Harry’ 
didn't follow the proper 
procedures. 

“He is making much of this 
being a matter of principle but 
he cannot do that w hile cower- 
ing behind the FCS imprint. 
That is a bankruptcy of 
principle." 

Almost alone among 
Conservative politicians yes- 
terday. Lord Stockton sought 
to defuse the row. the latest in 
a series of damaging clashes 
between the party hierarchy 

Continued on page 16, col 4 


Sellafield shut 
in waste alert 


The Sellafield nuclear 
reprocessing complex was 
shut down completely yes- 
terday after radioactivity in 
waste’ to be discharged into the 
Irish Sea was found to be 
above government safety lim- 
its introduced just six weeks 
ago. 

British Nuclear Fuels, 
which runs the Cumbrian 
plant, admitted last night that 
the cause was not known. It 
denied it could not meet the 
strict new levels set by the 
Department of Energy. 

One reason for the new 
standards is a report from the 
Commons environment 
committee last March which 
called the Irish Sea “the most 
radioactive in the world*' as a 
result of Sellafield discharges, 
and urged that they be reduced 
to as near zero as possible. 

A spokesman for BNFL 
said that closing down the 


By David Sapsted 

reprocessing was a precaution 


after routine checks yesteniav 
morning showed that liquid 
waste stored in a sea tank 
reached -a level of radioactiv- 
ity likely to breach the new 
limits. 

It is not known how long the 
plant will be closed or the cost 
to BNFL-The incident is simi- 
lar to one in November. 1983. 
when there was also a build-up 
of highly radioactive effluent 
in a tank. The liquid was 
discharged into the sea result- 
ing in contamination and 
subsequent closure of local 
beaches. 

BNFL was later charged and 
convicted of two criminal 
offences relating to the 
incidcnLSincc then, two new 
effluent treatment plants have 
been built to treat the liquid, 
which is a by-product of the 
reprocessing of spent uranium 
and plutonium. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


Irish police 
under attack 

by RUC in 

‘secret file’ 


Deep criticisms 
performance of the Irish 
Republic’s police in assisting 
the Royal Ulster Constabulary 
in cross-border security were 
disclosed yesterday in a 
confidential document said to 
be the minutes of a security 
briefing between the RUC 
chief constable and senior 
officers. 

The document, was released 
by the Rev Tan Paisley, leader 
of the Democratic Unionist 
Party, who said it was left 
anonymously at his Belfast 
office. 

It includes assessments by 
divisional commanders of 
“loyalist” and republican 
paramilitary operations, de- 
tails of future parades and 
comments on die morale of 
RUC officers. 

The need for greater intelli- 
gence on loyalist groups be- 
cause of the dose alliance 
between political, paramili- 
tary and subversive organiza- 
tions within the' Protestant 
community is also outlined. 

Sectarian tactics mentioned 
during the meeting in June 
indude the possibility of take- 
overs of villages, as occurred 
in Hillsborough in July and 
Gontibret earlier this month. 
It also raises the possibility of 
loyalists damaging sewerage 
plants and the paramili tary 
Ulster Defence Association 
causing explosions in the 
south. 

The criticism of the Garda 
in the document reflects the 
private thoughts of many 
policemen. Sir John Hermon, 
RUC chief constable, is 
reportedly said of the Garda: 
“It was evident their capacity 
and contribution was small” 

A report from a division 
covering Londonderry says 
there were many terrorists on 
the run in Co Donegal but 
“no real assistance from the 
Garda at all”. 

An assistant chief constable, 
with responsibility for a rural 
area in the west of the prov- 
ince, is alleged to bave said: 
“The Garda promised much 
but delivered little. Border 
reclosures after illegal 
reopenings are much top slow 
In being processed.” 

Under the heading “Terror- 


By Richard Font 
of the ist Threat” the document says 
that intelligence coverage of 
the IRA and Irish National 
Liberation Anny is good, “but 
similar penetration of loyalist 
groups was essential due to the 
dose alliance of political 
paramilit ary and subversive 
organizations and personal- 
ities on that side”. 

Mr Paisley said that he bad 
released the document be- 


cause it was essential that the 
public was aware of the 
contradiction between what 
ministers were saying about 
improvements in cross-border 
security and the police's own 
thoughts. “It is a conspiracy 
against the whole Protestant 
community and our constitu- 
tional position. The authori- 
ties are lying through their 
teeth.” 

He claimed that the men- 
tion of improving intelligence 
on loyalist groups meant that 
the RUC was to infiltrate his 
party as spies. They were 
being singled out because Urey 
were the hard core of resis- 
tance to the Anglo-Irish agree- 
ment and the authorities 
believed that if they were 
broken other unionists would 
compromise. 

Last night tire RUC said it 
was investigating the 
authenticity of the document. 

Improved cross-border se- 
curity was one of the main 
aims of tire Anglo-Irish agree- 
ment with the RUC believing 
that greater co-operation be- 
tween it and tire Garda could 
contribute to destroying 
republican terrorism. 

Earlier this year Sir John 
Hermon said that to meet tire 
challenge the Garda would 
need reorientation of its re- 
sources and methods. He said 
that he expected more positive 
results and that a co-operation 
programme was to start within 
weeks. 

The Garda has neither the 
resources nor the reforms 
needed for it to match the 
RUG It remains an 11,800- 
strong largely unarmed force 
formed to police a rural 
society, and is lacking in 
management skills and com- 
mand structure when com- 
pared with the 8*270 full-time 
RUG 


New sightings in 
Lamplugh search 


By David Sapsted 

A Photofit picture of “Mr 
Kipper” was released by Scot- 
land Yard last night after new 
witnesses came Forward and 
cast doubt on previous the- 
ories about the movements of 
Miss Susannah Lamplugh on 
the last day she was seen, more 
than three weeks ago. 

Dei Supt Nick Carter, who 
is leading the hunt, believes 
the estate agent, aged 25, may 
have had lunch with Mr 
Kipper after showing him 
around a house for sale in 
Shorrold's Road, Fulham, 
south-west London. 

A witness has come forward 
with a new description of the 
man after seeing him, clutch- 
ing a bottle of champagne, 
with Miss Lamplugh outride 
the house at 1pm on Monday, 
July 28. 

An estate agent acquaint- 
ance of the missing woman 
has disclosed that she saw the 
couple driving along Fulham 
Palace Road at 2.45pm that 
day with Miss Lamplugh look- 
ing “serious but not 
distressed,” according to Mr 
Carter. 

This is at odds with the 
previously-accepted theory 
that Miss Lamplugh's car, a 
white Ford Fiesta, bad been 
parked in Stevenage Road 
where it was found later that 
evening, at about Ipm. 

Three new witnesses have 
come forward in recent days. 
A resident of Shorrold’s Road 
reported seeing Miss 
Lamplugh waiting for the 
client at 12J0pm and a man 
saw her and Mr Kipper- 
“immaculately dressed”, 
according to police, in a 
charcoal grey suit and light 
coloured shirt and tie-looking 





» %\ 4 vV ' ”• 

The Photofit picture of Mr 
Kipper issued by the police 
yesterday. 



■r'OSj'Pv '•J 



Right, a policeman and a fireman helping one of the victims to safety 


Brendan Beirne). 


SDP green paper 


Promise of additional cash for health 

originally described in a paper 


By Jill Sherman 
The Social Democratic 
Party wifl spend an extra 2 per 
cent per year on the National 
Health Service (NHS) and 
establish a £500 million inno- 
vation and primary health 
care fund if it comes to power. 

Launching the SDFs green 
paper mi the health service, 
Mr Charles Kennedy, party 
spokesman on health and 
social services, said yesterday 
that the extra spending was 
the Tntnimiiin iy»eded to cover 
the cost of demographic 
growth, technological change 
and to allow some service 
development 

He said that although health 
authorities would still be en- 
couraged to make efficiency 
savings, cost improvements 
would not be included in the 
extra 2 percent 
“There can’t be any serious 
argument that the biggest 
civilian employer in western 


is bound to. have 
icienries in some sectors. 
But we feel that mslead of 
centra] diktat these decisions 
are better made by local 
people on the spot and there 
may be greater scope that way 
of achieving more efficiency 
savings.” 

He said that the party had 
revised its U per cent figure, 
announced in its 1984 paper, 
because of a viable increase in 
problems facing the NHS. 

The innovation and pri- 
mary health care fund would 
allow district health authori- 
ties, local authorities and vol- 
untary organizations to apply 
for funding for projects to 
tackle inequalities in health 
care, and to develop new 
schemes for priority groups, 
such as the elderly, handi- 
capped and mentally £11 

Tire great paper also pro- 
poses tackling lengthy waiting 

lists by im posing a maiimmn 


waiting period for different 
types of treatment. Patients 
should be allowed the right to 
hospital treatment within a 
specified period. 

“It would be entirely fea- 
sible for tire Secretary of State 
to lay down regulations for 
waiting times,” Mr Kennedy 
said. 

Where long waiting lists 
existed, such as for hip 
replacements, the specified 
period could be fixed at six 
months, and then reduced 
again for a reasonable time, 
during which the district 
health authority (DHA) must 
respond. 

“The DHA would have to 
either buy services from other 
districts or hire more doctors 


by fYofesor Alain Epthoven, 


Stanford University, Cali- 
fornia, that districts should 
establish an internal market 
by buying in specialized ser- 
vices from some districts and 
selling spare capacity to oth- 
ers, an idea already practised 
by a few districts in Britain. 

The paper proposes scrap- 
png the existing system of pay 
review bodies and separate 
Whitley councils to determine 
NHS pay, and suggests replac- 
ing this with one single public 
sector pay review body. 


The policy document lists 


several other innovatory ideas 
lany of which 


for the NHS, many 
would require extra finance. 
But it says in a preface: “The 
SDP intends to review all its 


policy proposals which have 
ridhf m expenditure commitments, 
andestaNish dear priorities 
tnatmeut, tire paper said. ^ to ^ ^general 

It also takes up an idea election. ' 


BMA talk 
on cash 
for victims 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

The Law Society has agreed 
to talks with tire British Medi- 
cal Association on the pa 
bilityofa state-funded scheme 
to provide compensation on a 
“no fault” basis for victims of 
medical negligence. 

The talks are to take place 
amid growing concern about 
the mounting number of neg- 
ligence claims and tire huge 
awards for damage ordered 
against doctors. 

Under such schemes, which 
exist in Sweden and New 
Zealand, a patient who Suffers 
injury as a result of a medical 
: is entitled to compen- 
sation .without having to 
prove fault in the courts. 

The annual meeting of the 
BMA earlier this year voted 
for a review of such a scheme 
because it said the growing 
number of negligence claims 
meant doctors woe practising 
“defensive medicine”. 

The Medical Defence 
Union and the Medical 
Protection Society both said 
on Monday that American- 
style litigation and awards 
were just around the corner, 
and announced increases of70 
per cent in premiums to be 
paid by doctors for cover. 

The courts and the lawyers 
came in for crit i c i sm as a 
possible reason for the in- 
creased amounts being paid 


soon 
level 
so far 
000 . 


jih of Susannah 
taken just before 
she disappeared. 


at the outside of the house 10 
minutes later. The champagne 
he carried may have had a red, 
white and blue ribbon round 
the bottle 

The thud, witness said she 
was cycling along Fulham 
Palace Road when she saw 
Miss Lamplugh and a man 
travelling in the Ford Fiesta in 
the opposite direction. 


to 


out in 

to reach the £1 
The highest 
against a doctor is 
Mr Bernard 
said yesterday in a 
the Medical Defence Union's 
special notice to doctors: “Are 
the courts and the lawyers 
being too clever by half in 
extending and increasing 
damages, safe in the (false) 
assumption that there is a 
bottomless bucket of insur- 


NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF 
BRITISH GAS 3 PER CENT 
GUARANTEED STOCK. 
1990-1995 

GAS ACT 1 986 

On 24th August 1988. by virtue of the Gas Act 1986. HM Treasury 
wiU assume the rights and teWioes in redact of British Gas 3 per cent 
Gmpw poed S tock. 1S90-1995. The stock win therefore become a 
direct habfcty of HM TVeasury (having been previously a Hgbriiry of 
the Bmwh Gas Corporation guaranteed by HM Treasury) and wfl be 
renamed 3 per cent Exchequer Gas Stock. 1990-1995. 

These changes do not requre any action to be taken by stockhokferc. 
All existing Cfcvktend mandates etc in respect of holdings of British Gas 
3 per cent Guaranteed Stock. 1990- 1995 on the register of the Bank 
of England win eutomancaRy apply to holdings of the renamed stock. 
However, Income Tex will no longer be deducted Irom dividends of £5 
or less per annum 

Certificates for existing holdings wrl not require amendment and w# 
continue to have effect hi relation u the renamed stock. 

On or after 24th August 1986 transfers should be comptered lo ralare 
to the renamed stock, transfers of British Gas 3 percent Guaranteed 
Stock. 1990-1995 executed before 24th August 1986 but received 
at the Bank of England for registration after That day will be treated as 
transfers of the renamed stock 


Bank of England 
19th August 1986 


ance money available?” 

New rules have also been 
recently brought in whereby 
the payment of damages in 
one lump sum will in appro- 
priate cases, be superceded by 
the payment of damages with 
a right reserved foe the patient 
to have a “second bite”. 

Mr Hargrove said this was 
likely to increase overall costs 
and payments. 

Another factor was legal aid, 
which encouraged plaintiffs to 
press forward with their ac- 
tions in the knowledge that 
they have nothing to lose. 
Three out of four claimants 
are legally-aided. 


Boys die 
in chase 
up pylon 


■ ■ • , , i ‘/.y .«V* • M- . “* > • : V . - 

-• • '• •fl’M .! '■ r ‘Kv. f.* 

• 1. '■ /. * . ’ , ^ i ,•{, . V i. ■ * . 

•• ' V. • ' • '• ' '•> 'A-av, •.*. I : •. : 


Three firemen risked there 
lives to reach a dying boy 
trapped on a live electricity 
pyton. 

Mr John Thornby, aged 36, 
Mr Frank Duckworth, aged 
40, and Mr John Mair, aged 
36, were returning from an-, 
otter incident when they saw 
two yontts on a tirel 66,000- 
vrft pylon. Both boys were on 
fire-one was dead and the 
otter was screaming in agony. 

They brake their safety 
rales to bring James Donkin, 
aged 15, to the ground before 
the sepply of power to the 
pylon was switched off. The 
boy died yesterday at Sunder 
land General Hospital 

The body of Ptter Richard- 
son, aged 15, was recovered 
after the North Eastern 
Electricity Board switched off 
the power. 

The two school friends had 
chased each other up the pylon 
in a field near their homes 
in Barniston, Washington, 
Tyne and Wear, during a game 
of tag. They ignored the 
warning of a passer-by to stay 
dear and danger signs posted 
at the bottom of the tower. 

Mr Ian Griqnhoaa, of the 
North Eastern Electricity 
Board, said^Whik we would 
praise the motives (ti die 
Bremen involved we would not 
advise them to go too near five 
cables at any time. They coaid 
easily have been killed 
themselves.” 

Questions abort the safety 
of prions were being asked 
yesterday over the apparent 





Workmen carry ont repairs to the pylon where two boys died. 

ease with which the young- 
sters dn n b cd the gantry. 


The electricity board said 
there was the normal protec- 
tion of heavy doty barbed wire 
guard on each leg. On this type 
of structure the barbed wire 


forms a special phtte, abort 
12ft from the ground, creating 
the cqurakst of an overttang- 
ing obstacle that the climber 
bra to get round. A danger 
warning sign was attached to 
the left leg. 


Council defends safety record 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


The death of the two boys 
who climbed a live pylon m 
the North Eastern Electricity 
Board's area is the worst 
accident recorded in the 50- 
year history of the national 
grid, the Electricity Cornual 
said. 

It said every precaution was 

taken to secure such struc- 
tures, and that since the grid 
was created there had been 
few incidents. In the past five 
years there have been two fetal 

incidents, both involving 
teenage students in different 
areas. 

The network of pylons is 
divided into two levels. Cables 
carrying the very high capacity 
lines of 470,00 volts and 
275,000 volts from 
stations belong to the i 
Electricity Board. 

The next level is from 


132,000 volts and below, 
comprising pylons carrying, 
the local overhead distribu- 
tion network of the area 
boards. 

The proportion of the local 
supply carried by pylons var- 
ies. In London, for instance, 
99.9 per cent is distributed by 
underground cable, according 
to the area board. 

In technical terms, there is 
no legal deterrent against peo- 
ple climbing pylons unless 
they cany dam ag e 

Safety measures against 
people clambering the towers 
rest on barbed wire barriers 
and spikes around the base of 
towers to a height of 12 to 20. 
ft. 

This has been regarded as a 
firmer deterrent that alter- 
natives such as anti-climbing 
paint, which is intended to 


have a slippery pole effect for 
anintnider. 

The spaces between the 
girders on most structures are 
wide, providing another dis- 
couragement to all but the 
most determined, in the 
Electricity Council's view. . 

The two boys appear to 
have been ldfled by a “flash 
over” from a 60,000 volt line 
as they reached ont as if to 
tsp the line. 


grasp 

Under normal 
stances, when an 

breaks down the electricity 


circum- 

insulator 


arcs to the pylon which acts 
like a lightning conductor 
carrying toe current to earth. 
Conductors are inspected ev- 
ery day, and about 80 miles of 
die giia is being replaced with 
new conductors each year so 
they will not sag like old ones. 


Icelander has 
dear lead in 
chess contest 


By Harry Gotombek 
Chess Correspondent 


The grandmaster 
Hjaitarsou, of Iceland, took a 
dear lead in the penultimate 
round of the Commonwealth 
Open Championship in Lon- 
don when he outplayed de 
Furman, of the United Stax 
in a nice positional effort. He 
has 7 paints out of a possible 
8 . 

Prasad, of India, is m 
second place with 6% points. 
He defeated Depasquale, of 
Australia, who rejected the 
offer of a draw only to blunder 
three moves later. The win 
ensured Prasad his final leg for 
the International Master tide. 

The American 

g rand masters, Kudrin and de 
Finnian, share third place 
with the international man. 

ters, Murey, of Israel Con- 
quest, of England, and 
Thipsay, of India, all on 6 
points. 

The Israeli, Stepak, who 
holds the world record of the 
longest game in tournament 
chess (212 moves), lived up to 
his rotation by drawing with 
Agnos after 112 moves and 
more than nine hours of play. 


Dump site 
protesters 
keep out 


engineers 

By Mark Dowd 


Shutdown 
threat to 
oil rig yard 


Management at the French- 
owned UIE oil rig construc- 
tion yard on the Clyde said 
yesterday the yard could dose 
if the 530-strong permanent 
workforce goes on strike next 
Monday. 


Engineering contractors' 
made two unsuccessful at- 
tempts to gain access yes- 
terday to the site at 
KiOingholme, South Humber- 
side, earmarked as a low-level 
radio-active waste dump. 

At 9.15am, IQ protesters 
blocked tbe way of an 
approaching Land Rover, and 
a request to change the lodes 
of the compound was politely 
twi firmly rejected. ■ 

Four hours later, the con- 
tractors made a second at- 
tempt, this time getting out of 
the vehicle and making a half- 
hearted effort to walk through 
the cordon. 

After the second attempt 
Nirex, the Government’s 
nudear waste agency, gave a 
warning that injunctions will 
be taken out as a last resort 
Ami-nuclcar protesters yes- 
terday maintained their 24- 
hour vigil outside Fidbeck 
airfield, Lincolnshire, another 
of the four proposed nuclear 
waste sites, but contractors 
hoping to start .test drilling 
failed to turn up. 


A mass meeting of the 
workers agreed yesterday to 
strike over the management’s 
decision to make 270 of them 
redmxlanL 


Bat the 850 subcontractors 
at the yard, who will also be 
paid off over tbe next few 
months, rejected the call fora 
strike at their meeting. 

Mr Brian Henson of UIE 
said the company only had 
work for 250 men until the 
end of next year. If those 
contracts were not fulfilled on 
time, the company would 
have to pay penalties. 

The redundancies, an- 
nounced on Monday; were not 
negotiable, he sakL 

“There is a severe shortage 
of work for as much as three 
years depending cm -how the 
price of oil goes. Most ) 
are m the same position, if we 
don’t get more work then tbe 
yard may go over to a care and 
maintenance basis > ”said Mr 
Henson. 

He believed the disi 
could still be resolved and the 
yard's good industrial rela- 
tions record would remain 
intact 

But the shop stewards' 
convener, Mr James Hamil- 
ton, said the company was 
breaking a 1983 agreement 
protecting the jobs of die 
nucleus workforce; 

Mr Hamilton said the 
unions were angry that the 
company intended to retain 
some short-term contract 
workers after full-time staff 
were laid off and accused UIE 
of trying to rid itsdf of 
workers protected by 
standing agreements. 

night shop stewards 
representing the full-tune 
workforce were meeting to 
their next step. A 
r spokesman said he 
was confident that tiie dispute 
coukl be settled before a 
strike. 


Expansion at 
airport sought 

The civilian operator at tbe 
Mansion RAF base in Kent 
has announced plans to rant it 
into an international airport 
handling one million pas- 
sngers a year. 

Seabounte Aviation, is to 
seek planning permissioa to 
build a new passenger termi- 
nal and cargo facilities at the 
base on the Isle ofThanet Tbe 
company says it has local 
authority support for the 
scheme which it claims would 
create 900 jobs over five years. 


Radio services 
join forces 

BBC Radio 4 and the World 
Service are joining forces to 
present a season of drama to a 
world-wide audience for the 
firsttime. 

Beginning at the end of the 
month, the simultaneous 
broadcasts on successive Sun- 
day afternoons will focus on 
classic European plays-by 
Shaw, Chekhov. Ibsen, Mo- 
liere and Pirandello. The 
exception will be AH My Sons 
by Arthur MiUer, the, Ameri- 
can playwright. 


Man freed on 
gun charge 


James Kearney, aged 23, 
unemployed, of Romford 
Road, Forest Gate, east Lon- 
don, was cleared at the Central 
Criminal Chart yesterday of 
threatening an official at an 
unemployment benefits office 
with an imitation gun. 

He was accused of demand- 
ing money with menaces and 
possession of the firearm with 
intent He denied tbe chaiges, 
but did not dispute that he had 
the gun when he went into the 
office at Romford to inquire 
about money due to him- 


Ulsterman 

accused 


An electrician appeared at 
Lambeth magistrates' court in 
south London yesterday ac- 
cused of conspiracy to . cause' 
jlosions between October 6, 
1983, and January 25, 1984„ 
Gilbert Thomas Patrick 
McNamee, aged 25, of 
Crossmaglen, Co Armagh, 
who is accused of conspiring 
with . Paul Kavanagh and 
Natalino Vella, was remanded - ; 
in custody until tomorrow. 


Man quizzed 
on flare death 


Police have questioned a: 
man after tbe death of a 
retired businessman who was. 
struck m the chest by a distress. . 
flare during a fireworks dis- . 
play to mark the end of Cowes 
week. 

A resumed inquest yes-, 
today into the death of Ledeyr 
iged 61, of Ring- 
_ Hampshire, was tokl 
that it had not been decided • 
whether to prosecute the man. . . 


Oder traffic 
moves to rail 


Vocal young Tory no stranger to controversy 


More than 4,000 lorries a 
year win be kept off Somerset 
roads because of a big wods 
contract won by British Rail 
. Up to five million tonnes of 
cider a year will be carried by. 
rail to Scotland, northern and ! 
southern England, and North- 
ern Ireland for Taunton Oder, ! 
which produces a third of 
Britain’s cider in Norton .. 
Fitzwarren, near Taunton. . 


By Nicholas Beeston 


Mr Harry Phibbs, editor of 
the Conservative student 
magazine which attacked Lord 
Stockton and has angered the 
Tory Establishment, is no 
stranger to controversy, in 
spite of his relative yorth. 

One of the more vocal and 
militant of the breed of young 
Tory ideologues in tire Federa- 
tion of Conservative Students, 
Mr Phibbs first surfaced in 
1982 when, as a pupil at 
Pimlico Comprehensive in 
London, he was arrested by 
the SGB at Moscow airport 
for attempting 


r- 


leaflets on disarmament into 
the Soviet Union. 

Later the school suspended 
him briefly for distribating 
anti-feminist leaflets in the 
classroom. 

Since then his exploits have 
become almost an annual 
event, usually resuitiag in red 
feces at Conservative Central 
Office and publicity fin • Mr 
Phibbs and his li b ert a rian 
supporters In tike federation. 

In ffe latest fadtf ffft Mr 
Phibbs used tike fede ra tion ' s 
quarterly magazine New 
Agenda to brand the former 
Prime Minister Mir Harold 
Macmillan, now Lord Stock- 


ten, a war criminal and de- 
manded a justification for his 
alleged wartime decision to 
repatriate Soviet troops. 

Mr Phibbs and the federa- 
tion have been involved in 
several wrangles with the 


its thumb” than he would like. 


That became apparent m 
1984 when, after two years as 
chairman of the Westminster 

Yuan Conservatives, Mr 
Phibbs and sane of his asso- 


and like-minded 
leaders. 


student 


Dog attack 


A federation spokesman 
that branches had the 
power to disciplbe members, 
brt . the attack on Lord Stock- 


a dn.'skpn ranmsw Hm-ino rtu> tiKUT SfiRBS V1BW5- «mlilr*|y to result M sU$d- 


a Hfimkim rampaga riwriijg tfa» 

federation's annul meeting at 
Loughborough last year, 
which resulted in an mquiiy by 
the Conservative Party. 

Mr Phibbs said yesterday 
that he was “completely 
committed to the party”, al- 
though he also anjmfttprf that 
the Establishment had tried to 
' keep him “more firmly under 

f -..0 



their extreme 

He is determtaed to remain 
editor of NarAgmda, which is 
setf-fbndmg, even if- the 
Conservative Party and the 
federation cut its links with 
him. 

The federation's 


ptinary measures. 

At the federation’s annual 


Surgeons were trying test..' 
night to sew back ns ear that ' 
was bitten off when Mrs.- 
Kathleen' Roffe. aged S6. ' J 
postwoman, was attacked- by- 
three alsatian dogs as she - 
delivered mail to a bouse in ■' 
Wheairidge, Gloucester. 


siik 


‘ a 


Gt 




line 


i i i 


Kk: '; ■')' 
fan . ; 
ov- - - ; 


•t B 


h, 

V 


^p\ .... 


• • * » 


J3& 

in the part ' displayed 
strong support for Mr PMlisi 








1 


unU* 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


HOME NEWS 


\i 1 
\ 


a tobacco company 

By Frances Gibb; Legal Affairs Correspondent 


\ rt: a . 
!** ft* i» u - 


'huldtm n 
hrcat 
l r *K yard 


^POBsjj 

a * r Portif 


. A man who it is claimed 
. risks losing a leg as a result of 
smoking is planning to sue 
imperial Tobacco in the first 
legal action of its land in this 
country. 

If the case succeeds, it could 
-open the floodgates to 
^ compensation claims totalling ' 
"■ millions of pounds, the aoti- 
“ smoking group, ASH; said 
yesterday. The man, who is 
aged 31 and comes from 
Liverpool, is said to be suffer- 
. ing from Burgher’s disease; a 
■ type of peripheral vascular 
•disease which affects the 
circulation and frequently 
' leads to amputation of a.Iimb. 
..ASH says the disease is almost 

- exclusive to smokers and the 
fact that the man is so young 

, makes the fink with tobacco 
‘ all the stronger. 

So far neither the man, nor 
the solicitors who expect the 
.case to be filed within the next 
few weeks, have been named. 

- Before beginning the action, a 
.report is being prepared on 
-whether the suit has “a sport- 
'ing chance of success". 

With the backing of that 
report ASH will then seek to 
raise funds from charities and 
.bodies such as the British 
Medical Association to bring 
proceedings. The costs are 
-estimated at a minimum of 
£ 200 , 000 . 

-- Details of the case were 


released yesterday at a meet- 
ing of British and American 
legal experts who gathered at 
the Royal Society of Medicine 
in London to discuss product 
liability law and the potential 
for legal action in the United 
Kingdom. 

Laywers who specialize in 
product liability jcases are 
being advised by a leading 
American fegal campaigner. 
Professor Richard Daynard, 
who forecasts that, it is only a 
matter of time before such 
lawsuits succeed. 

“There are now something 
like 100 lawsuits that have 
been filed in the United States 
against American tobacco 
companies for claims in cases 
of sickness or death, and these 
are at various stages of 
progress," he said yesterday. 
Only two had so far reached a 
jury but those cases had been 
weak ones. “It is only a matter 
of time; it is trying to defend a 
bunch of rockets that have 
been thrown. Eventually one 
of them is going to get 
through." he said. 

Mr David Simpson, the 
director of ASH, said yes- 
terday that since its founda- 
tion' by the Royal College of 
Physicians in 1971, ASH had 


, "It is absnrd that foe manu- 
facturers of the -single most 
lethal consumer product that 
the world has ever known 
should apparently be exempt 
from paying damages, Mr 
Simpson said. 

The medical profession 
were more trailed about the 
dangers of smoking than on 
any other matter and of all the 
dangers linked with smoking, 
inducting lung cancer, coro- 
nary heart disease and vas- 
cular disease had the closest 
link of all, he said. “It is* now 
virtually unknown for some- 
one to have a limb amputated 
for gangrene except where he 
is a smoker,” Mr Simpson 
said. 

So far, in the United States, 
the tobacco companies have 
not paid a penny in damages, 
but their legal bills are rising. 
According to Professor 
Daynard. it has cost the 
industry an estimated £10 
million to defend a lawsuit 
brought by a youth of 19 who 
contracted cancer of the 
tongue after taking snuff for 
several years. 

But the fight is not likely to 
be a quick one. One issue will 
be - as in America- whether 



cuter disease had the closest '. *' r rvi-i' _ . _ _ .. __ 

virti iany ^m irn nwn for*some^ pofiee resetting two adventurers from their sinking craft on the Thames yesterday (Photograph: Graham Wood). 

Bubble bursts on trial Channel ‘roll’ 


The bubble burst for two adventurers 
yesterday when a stunt on the river 
Thames went wrong. 

Mr David Kirke and Mr Hugo 
Spower were trying to “roll” down the 
river inside a huge 65ft-high air balloon. 
But after only five minutes on the water, 
the massive transparent bubble popped 
and slowly deflated. 

It left, the men, both members of the 
Dangerous Sports Club, smothered 


underneath the huge PVC balloon, 
nicknamed Melon ball, after- the spon- 
sors who produce a new melon liquer. 

The two men hacked their way out 
with knives and were picked op by a 
police launch. The stunt was supposed 
to be a test run for a Channel crossing 
later this summer. 

“Of course Pm a tittle melancholy,” 
Mr Kirke, aged 40. of Fulaxn, south-west 
London, said after the near disaster. 


neglected the possibility of- the Jaw requiring a health 
court actions against tobacco wanting on cigarette packets 


companies, largely because of 
the cost of litigation. 


tuuguc ajier raxing snun kjt W -W- 

Homes on 

But foe fight is not likely to . 

be a quick one. One issue will GlirillllC 

be - as in America- whether 9IU fJ.lU.t3 
the law requiring a health 1 J| j 

wanting on cigarette packets ISHlfl lITOAfl 
protects companies from -•**■'* ■'* 


Scottish exams controversy 


product liability actions. By John Winder 

HP— *2— 1 About 3,500,000 acres of I 

I WlTlS IIV fanning land which -is surplus 

” ***** to the needs of agriculture 

svn r Arv/r should be used for providing 
UCTT cEfil homes and industry, Mr Gra- 
# LIU ham Pye, chairman of foe Pye 
foohninno house-building group, argues 
1 V W UC in a paper published today. 

The article is part of a reply 

r « ZSSSS 10 ^e. Oxford speech on 

t-orresponoeni fanning and environment is- 

A woman in Meiseyside is sues by Mr William 
ex parting twin* after under- Waldegrave, Minister for 
going .a new treatment for Environment, Countryside 


Radios® 
join fores 


Genetic factor to 
meningitis found 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


■ Scientists believe they may 
Jflj have discovered that an inher- 
ited factor makes some people 
[ft vulnerable to meningitis, and 
u that this may explain why foe 
disease strikes only at clusters 
- of people in certain areas. 

*"■: . Researchers at Edinburgh 
^ University and Edinburgh 
Gty Hospital have discovered 
that a high percentage of 
victims do not produce natu- 
4 ral defences to some infcc- 
■ lions, including meningitis, 
r ■ The studies showed that 69 

S r cent of those with the 
ness belonged a group 
> known as non-secretors, wbo 
represent only about 20 per 
cent of the British population. 
Similar work in Iceland. 


find out more about why 
certain people are susceptible 
to this disease. 

“People are boro either with 
or without the ability to 
secrete Mood group antigens. 
It looks tike these antigens 
play a role in natural defences 
of foe body against this form 
of meningitis-” 

Dr Ray Brettie, of the 
infectious diseases unit at the 
City Hospital said: “If we 
could establish whether there 
is a higher ratio than foe 
national average of non-se- 
cretors in areas such as Stroud 
it would help remove some of 
foe mystique about the source 
of the infection, and why only 
some people become ifl- - 
“This research could help 
identify those; in .the popular 


Second chance for pupils 

By Lacy Hodges, Education Correspondent 
bools in Scotland are to no-awards will be seen as “When we realized ' 


Twins by 
new egg 
technique 

By Our Science 
Correspondent 


Schools in Scotland are to 
be told that Standard Grade 
examination candidates wbo 
were given a “no‘ award” 
certificate this month wiD get 
a second chance, if teachers 
agree to carry out the vital 


norwards will be seen as 
failures. 

Most candidates in these 
subjects were entered for the 
old O grade; which was spe- 
cially retained because of the 
effects of the pay dispute and 


classroom assessment by the which contains no teacher 


end of December. ' 

More than 5,000 Scottish 


assessment. But some schools 
chose to enter their pupils for 


infertility. 

The technique is quicker, 
cheaper and more natural 
than test-tube baby methods, 
the consultant who developed 
it said yesterday. 


and Local Government, test 
January. 

In a comment at the end of 
foe paper, published by the 
Centre for Policy Studies, a 
right-wing Conservative 
“ think tank” set up by Mrs 


pupils aged 16 and 17 were left the new Standard Grade, 
with a no-award because Mr Farquhar Macintosh, 
teachers refused to assess their chairman of the Scottish 
work during the pay dispute. Examination Board and bead 
which coincided with the of the Royal High School 
launch of foe new Standard Edinburgh, said that it was 


. , « Similar work in Iceland, some people become ifl. ■ 

\ i 2 P. rft wf ?? ie l * ,ert: t as 9*“ “This research could help 

l ¥* 3 *^ identify those in .the popula- 

min I'han showed .that 54 per cent, of who. are. potential can- 
'r J meningitis patients were also didales for a vaccine when one 

non-secretara - ‘ . becomes available.” Another 

: 183111 B case of foe disease was con- 

offering to analyse samples finned in Worcester yes- 
from patients m cluster areas, terday. Two people in ibearea 
. ,*c such as Stroud in Gloucester- have died from meningitis this 
r *: .* - to investigate whether a and foe number of local 

cases is now six. 

A total of 540 cases in 
England and Wales have been 
reported ibis year, including 
86 deaths. 


la inf tr 

ar lead i-’ 


• similar high proportion are 
non-secretors. 

• Dr Caroline Blackwell, who 
led the', research at. foe 
university’s bacteriology 

' department, said yesterday: 
“Our findings may help, iis 

Football 

l ister®: fan sues 
- KVLi - over view 

A football fen is suing 
- Oxford United because he 

• could not see a match properly 
' from a £10 seat in the main 
. ■ stand. ‘ * 

Mr Michael Walker, aged 
39, bought four £10 seats to 
watch his team. Portsmouth, 

. . play Oxford United last Janu- 
. ■ ary in a Milk Cup tie, which 
. Oxford won 3-L 

Judge Leo Clark was told in 
, Oxford County Court yes- 

M .n aflb 11131 an anti-hooligan 

an H , barrier prevented Mr Walker 
n from seeing any more than a 

till third of the pitch. 

1 ' Judge Clark visited Oxford 

; United’s Manor Ground yes- 
. terday to see where Mr Walker 

; - of The Keep, Portchester, 

- Hampshire, was obliged to sit. 
Mr Walker is claiming £200 
compensation for alleged 
. breach of contract 

Mr Brian Dalton. foe.Ox- 
■ ford United managing dircc- 
- tor, said that other clubs used 
. ' * similar barriers. 

The case continues. 

Ship’s master 
1 '' charged with 


Eggs, instead of being re- Thatcher and Sir Keith Joseph 
moved and fertilized m foe fo e 1970 s. Mr Waldegrave 
laboratory, are transferred di- rejects Mr Pye’s solution, 
rectiy by laparoscopy from foe saying that Britain must surely 
patient's ovary to the fallopian not retreat from nineteent h 1 
tube. ^ S perm from the century cities and move a 
woman's partner are then oeariy stable population into 1 
injected by syringe to attempt the undamnyd coun tryside; 
fertilization. Mr pye. immediate past 

The technique,, known as president of the House Build- 
Gift (gamete intra-feflopian ers Federatioh, rays that the 
lube transfer) has-been devel- minister’s approach to the 
opedby MrDarwishDarwish, problem is worrying because it 
consultant obstetrician and fails to recognize foe scale of 
gynaecologist at the Arrowe the problan faring forming. 


Grade examination. It re- 
placed the Scottish O grade, 
and is roughly equivalent to 
foe new GCSE exam. 

About 20,000 “no award” 
certificates have been given in 
mathematics, English, science, 
and soda! and vocational 
skills, foe four subjects in- 


made. plain to schools last 
November what would hap- 
pen to children who were 
entered for the new examina- 
tion and whose teachers re- 
fused to cany out the 
assessment element 
“It was dearly repeated.” he 


troduced in foe first phase of schools has foiled to make it 
reform. This contrasts with perfectly dear to pupils and it 


said. “The administration of certificates would be seen as 
schools has foiled to make it failures. 


only 12,000 awarded certifi- 
cates. The concern is that the 


did not sink in with the 
parents. 


“They will be of consid- 
erable value to youngsters, , 
even without an overall grader' 


Park Hospital Birkenhead. the financial implications and 
_ . foe regrettable disdain of the 1 

of environmental campaigner 
Wallase y, is th e first patient to for the rights and wishesofthe 1 
become pregnant by the treat- majority to share in wealth 
menL mid personal comfort from the I 

Mr - Darwish said: “This development of new homes 
technique could offer hope to and jobs, 
many th miganilK of infertile He says that keeping out of ; 
couples. We are hoping to production the IS per cent — I 



pier damage 


er s ? 


.Mr Frank Boyd, master of 
• the sludge ship, Kjngsabbey, 

. which sliced through South- 
.end pier causing damage es- 
timated at £2 million, is to be 
taken to court. 

The Kingabbey ploughed 
through foe pier, talaitg with 
her two souvenir shops and 
pari of a lavatory. 

Mr Boyd, aged 43, of 
Bexley heath, south-east Lon- 
. don. will appear at Grays 
\ J* : r ‘ . Magistrates' Court in Essex on 
6 September 17 to fece charges 

'' of navigating without due care 
and attention, or in-a manner 1 
likely to injure or endanger j 
. persons and other vessels and 

structures above the high iva- 
icr level. 

He is also chained with 
wing the roaster of a . vessel 
.'.which failed to comply with 
*“• iirectious relating to the use 
P . - - ■ >f the automatic pilot and for 

illegedly foiling to maintain a 
- upper lookouL 


R^rons at risk, page 11 I achieve more successes. 

Acquittal 
in mower 
drink case 

J3I Dowson, a divorcee, 
thought an early monring 
drive on a lawn, mower would 
be the perfect way to round off 
her thirty-fifth birthday party. 

But an ofMuty policeman 
saw her as she drove across a 
neighbour’s garden with three 
friends and a dog In tow, and 
she .was arrested and breath 
tested. 

As a result, she was accused 
of driving a motor vehicle with 
excess alcohol, driving while 
disqualified and driving with- 
out insurance 

PC Gordon Slade told mag-, 
istrates at Glastonbury, 

Somerset, that be had jut 
returned home to NeriOe 
Park, Baitonboroegh, when be 
heard lan|hter and saw foe 
mower towing a trailer across 
the lawn of the house opposite. 

A breath test at Frome 
police station showed that Mrs 
Dowson had a reading of twice 
the legal . limit for driving. 

Mrs Dowsoo’s solicitor, Mr 
Patrick Butler, told the court: 

“The success of the prosecu- 
tion case hinges on whether a ‘ 

g»d« traitor is a nwtor Jffl Dowson. birthday 
vehicle intended or adapted for . ^ ^ fo ^ 

use od the road.” 

Mrs Betty Boyd, foe conrt Mrs Dowson was dearc 
chairman, said the mag- all three offences, j 
.istrates were not satisfied that application tar costs 
it was. accepted. 


Sex equality fight Engineers 
on council’s hands w ®° school 

By Our Education Correspondent 0I*S 

Bradford council feces an- orientations,” be declared in 1 The number of unfilled 


3.5 million acres - of agri- 
cultural land could cost foe 
nation at least £175 million a 
year and possibly as much as 
£400 million annually. 

On - Ministry of Agriculture 
budgets, he says that h could 
be paid for by permanently 
abandoning all research, 
which costs £240 million, but 
that for Mr Waldegrave the 
abandonment of the urban 
programme at £227 million 
could almost pay for the 


other battle with a teacher, 
similar to foe Honeyford af- 
fair over race and education. 
But this time foe issue is foe 
authority’s policy on sex 
equality. 

A senior teacher in Keigh- 
ley, West Yorkshire, could 
fee disciplinary action as a 
result of a scathing article he 
wrote in the Telegraph and 
Argus, m Bradford, about the 
council's derision to appoint a 
sex equality adviser at a salary 
of £18.000 a year. 




countryside. 

Mr Pye argues that foe need 
is widely accepted to adapt 
and modernize economic 
structures and to re-site in- 
dustries in locations which 
would help to produce profits. 

Since it would be beyond 
the ability, and probably the 
wifl, of foe taxpayer to fund 
formers' inactivity on the scale 
foe environmentalists' . solu- 
tion might dictate, it was foe 
development industry which 
could, and should, make com- 
mon cause with foe former, 
Mr Waldegrave's riposte 
suggests foal the achievement 
of preserving about 80 per 
cent of land from develop- 
ment should be maintained. 

The minister says: “I do not 
believe that all foe land which 
need not be used for intensive 
forming in the fixture need go 
wholly out of forming and 
forestry uses. The market wiD 
see to it that more extensive, 

■ trip ends in conrt ’ less intensive fanning 
uses will become more worfo- 
Mrs Dowson was cleared of while -just as long as the land 
1 three offences. Her is not finally lost 10 urbaniza- 
iplkation for costs was lion while urban derefiction 
cepted. elsewhere grows.” 


which costs £240 million, but Mr Peter Thorpe, head of rfjrf T aS 

that for Mr Waldegrave foe mathematics at Higbfield ^J—nSv^Sioointed with 
abandonment oTto nAan middle school, who Scribes aSLnS 

programme at £227 million hims elf as a life-long Labour ~z- 
SSTXost. pay. for the voter, said tte^dviser’s 

“preservation in aspic of the, appointment ms a waste of brents disdphnmy 

countryside. taxpayers* money. ^"1 * H x 


the article. 

Tt seems foal foe majority 
of girls are - many would drink 
sensibly - following foe tra- 
ditional female role model _ 
presented to them by then- 
mothers and huge numbers of 
eariy-years teachers.” 

He argued that "career- 
oriented” females should be 
stopped from imposing their 
values on others. 

His views have met with a 
hostile reaction from the La- 
bour-controlled Bradford 
counriL 

Mr Brian McAndrew, acting 
chief executive, said: T am 
extremely disappointed with 
die article. I have asked the 
acting director of education to 
decide whether this is a matter 


action.” 

Tt is dear that in spite of Councillor Barrie Thome, 
the vociferous efforts of ram- chairman of High field 


pant feminism and the toady- 
ing opportunism of local 


school’s governors, has asked 
die school's head to interview 


politicians, the great bulk of Mr Thorpe about foe article, 
the population still acknowl- and to tell him that it contra- 


edges that men and women 

have natur al l eaning s and 


venes the council’s policy on 
sex equality. 


technical apprenticeships in 
foe engineering industry is 
worrying companies in the, 
Midlands so much that 
employers have launched a| 
new campaign to attract . 
school leavers. The Engineer- j 
ing Employers’ Association in , 
foe region wants to show 16- 1 
year-olds and their parents 
that the old metal-bashing I 
image is long ont of date; The j 
industry needs to train at least 
200 youngsters, mostly as 
technicians , each year. Mr 
Rod Hastie, foe association's 
director of operations, said: 
“A reason why individuals 
shun foe apprenticsehips is 
because they think of en- 
gineering in terms of metal- 
bashing; a sunset industry. 

“They don’t see the big 
strides in technology that have 
been taken. ”An apprentice 
technician can hope to earn up 
to £15,000 during foe four 
years of training and about 
£9,000 a year three years after 
graduating. 

The lack of interest among 
suitable school leavers in the 
.region and surrounding areas 
has led one company. 


1 m if a #* nas led one company, 

Channel 4 pulls out 01 

schools film scheme I situation as “desperate”. 


By Gavin Beil, Arts Correspondent 

Channel 4 Television has tionist, who has been co- 
witbdrawn a promise of sup- ordinating the scheme, said 
port for a project by Mr David that the prospects of it being 
Putinam, foe film producer, to launched were now receding. 

introduce film studies to . . 

schools. We will be approaching 

Mr Paul Bonner, Channel 4 olh f r Potential sponsors, but 
controller of programmes, at foe moment it looks IJe it 
said yesterday: Tt is certainly happen. It s pameu- 

*a worthwhile project. But with If ly disappointing in view of 
foe best will in the world, we foe aippon wevc had from 
could not see a precise enough the film industry itself: he 
connection between it and our atL 
primary objective of malting Hopes that foe Department 
programmes to justify divert- of Trade and Industry would 
rag funds." give its support were dashed 

Mr Ian Wall, a film educa- earlier this month. 


Powers for police to evict mass trespassers 


By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

t powers for police and 
effective legal action by 


nsk of causing serious damage “particularly useful where 
to property, and harassment trespassers are evicted from 


or intimidation of foe lawful 
occupier. 

At present trespass is not a 
criminal offence. The Govern- 


one piece of land in foe area 
and try to find an alternative 
nearby site" 


luv.s . - criminal onence. lucuovero- t-w m0 ves is 

landowners are containedin a ~ mBlt rauld a bact-up 

mmhjned government strut- .r „ supponetL i ou may iaxe 


combined government strat- 
egy against mass trespass an- 
nounced yesterday. 

The strategy' arises from the 
mass invasions of land by- 
hippies earlier this year. 

Ministers are drawing up 
detailed proposals on new' 
police powers to evict tres- 
passers, which are promised - 
lor foe report Stage m foe 
Lords of foe Public Order Bill 
Action would be set off by a, 
refusal to leave on 'request, a 


offers, lflht mtsprer ns 


fiised to obey police instruc- 
tions to leave. 

Concerted action to identify 
potential trespassers to travel- 
ling groups so that preventive 
legal moves can be made, is 
recommended also is advice 
yesterday to formers and land- 
owners b> the Ministry of 
Agncufture, Fisheries and 
food 

The ministry says joint 
tactics of that kind -are 


entiy by trespassers on to your 
land by blocking foe entrances 
to fields, but you must take 
care not to obstruct any rights 
of way” 

. But the ministry gives a 
warning to landowners not to 
use force, although foe law 
permits reasonable force to be 
used to remove trespassers. 
“Use of excessive force could 
result' m civil or criminal 

Vi 


proceedings being taken 
against you,” it says. 

One of foe difficulties of 
enforcing a High Court order 
for possession is that a pay- 
ment of costs may be granted, 
but only against named defen- 
dants. Enforcement is earned 
.out by officers of foe uuder- 
shenff m whose area foe land 
is. 

“A fee is payable to foe 
under-sbenff for enforcement, 
as wdl as his charges, depend- 
ing on the number of men and 
amount of equipment be 
needs.” the advice savs 

The advice, prepared wifo 
the help of foe Country 
Landowners’ Association and 
foe Nanonal Farmers’ Union. 


Worcester, to describe its own 

SCneme Situation as “desperate”. 

Extensive advertising has 
s Correspondent drawn only two qualified can- 

... . _ „ di dales, Mr Rex Delicate, its 

Jrirf personnel manager, said. 

ordinaung foe scheme, said The companyTSke many of 
foat foe prospects of it being the 2.000 erSring firms in 
launched were now receding. ^ We st Midlands, wants to 

“We will be approaching attract 16-year-olds wifo four 
other potential sponsors, but or fi ve Q levels in mathemat- 
at foe moment it looks lie it lCS * physics, technical drawing 
might not happen. It's particu- and English. _ 
larly disappointing in view of • A Berkshire hotel is hir- 
foe support we’ve had from ing French waiters because it 
the film industry itself” he cannot find anyone to do the 

said. j<*. 

Hopes that the Department „ 

give its support were flashed 

earlier fois monfo: B(Jt ^ ^ M ^ 

venised in a French magazine 
QCC01*G earlier this year it had 48 

dljSvl 9 replies. 

“French job seekers see 

tsdestgedtohdpfirmenm hononrable career, which is 
make me best use of the nvfl not how w ^ b 


Mr Kirke, who was soaking wet, 
added: “If anything it makes me more 
keen to do the Channel crossing” 

Mr Spower. aged 26. said foe bubble 
burst because a wire attached to foe tug 
pulling h snapped and punctured the 
balloon's skin. 

“We are definitely going ahead with 
the Channel crossing — there's no doubt 1 
about it” he said. 


procedures available 


> . , England,” Mr Andrew Hvin, 

^to M ^ tohotar, personnel mauagar, 

possession of their land. — - 

It covers action required PollCC hOTt SL S 
before the trespassers amve; , • 

apphcation for a county or VOtltllS FlOt 
High Coun mjunenon to pre- . . P 

vent tbe trespass, and Hundreds of ’youths were 
proceedings m foe High and .involved m a fostoibance at 
county courts to recover pos- Uanelh m w»t Wales yes- 
sesHon terday in which four police 


Police hurt as 
youths riot 

Hundreds of youths were 
involved in a disturbance at 


Copies of the advice are 
available from the ministry’s 
regional and divisional offices 
and tbe agriculture depart- 
ment of foe Welsh Office at 
Aberystwyth 


officers were injured. 

Trouble started when police 
tried to arrest a man on 
suspicion of causing criminal 
damage Youths shouted 
abuse and hurled missiles. 
Nine people were arrested^ 


-^dd- 

Two share 
£12,000 
jackpot 

Two people shared prize 
money of £12.000 in Portfolio 
Gold yesterday after no winner 
was declared in the previous 
two days. 

Mrs Dorothy Margaret 
Armstrong, aged 54. a teacher, 
of Middleton Street. Blyth, 
Northumberland, who has 
been playing the competition 
since it began, won at her first 
attempt after her return from 
holiday. 

She said her £6,000 share 
would be very welcome. 

Mrs Armstrong shored tbe 
money with Mrs Patsy Cooke, 
aged 34. a mother of four, of 
Dunstable, Bedfordshire, who 
will use tbe money to help 
establish an alternative medi- 
cal service. 

Mrs Cooke, who was de- 
lighted with foe news, said: “I 
feel like a million dollars”. 

Readers who have difficulty 
in obtaining a Portfolio Gold 
card should send a stamped 
addressed envelope to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn. 

BB1 6 AJ. 


“When we realized what 
might happen, we presented 
foe bulk of candidates at our 
schooi for the O grade exam. 
That is what most schools in 
Scotland did. but some, un- 
fortunately. did not and it is 
their children who are 
suffering.” 

However, the Educational 
Institute of Scotland (EIS), 
which represents most Scot- 
tish teachers, said tint the 
blame for what happened 
must lie with foe board and 
ministers for “encouraging” 
schools to do the Standard 
Grade examination knowing 
that teachers would not co- 
operate. 

A spokesman for the Scot- 
tish Education Department 
denied foat foe no-award 



Mrs Cooke, money for medi- 
cal service. 

Ironing death 
brings plea 
from coroner 

Mr Michael Rose, the 
Somerset Coroner, called for 
higher safety standards yes- 
terday after hearing how Mrs 
Christine Way was elec- 
trocuted as she did her ironing. 

Mrs. Way, aged 42, died in 
her garden last month as she 
did foe ironing outdoors. 
Faulty wiring caused her 
extension socket to come alive. 

Recording a verdict of ac- 
cidental death at the inquest in 
Taunton yesterday, Mr Rose 
urged people to buy circuit 
breakers. Such a device, if 
fitted to Mrs Way’s iron cable, 
would have ent the current and 
saved her. 

The inquest was told that 
Mrs Way's daughter Sarah, 
aged 13, found her mother 
dead in the garden of their 
home in Monition Heathfield, 
near Taunton, when she came 
home from school. 

In a statement read ont at 
the inqnest, she said her 
mother's body was on tbe 
lawn. A cable was running 
across her chest and she had 
tinned blue. 

Mr Douglas Sweet, who 
investigated the accident for 
foe South-West Electricity 
Board, said a plug on the 
extension lead was wrongly 
wired, wifo foe live and earth 
I confused; a second lead had no 
earth. 

I Thai caused the metal 
extension socket to become 
live and had ted to Mrs Way's 
death. 

Leaking fuel 
catches fire 
on holiday jet 

Passengers on board a Dan- 
Air jet were taken off the 
aircraft after fuel leaking from 
an engine ignited while it was 
preparing for take-off at Man- 
chester airport yesterday. 

The aircraft was being 
poshed bade by a towing 
vehicle when foe dripping fnel 
caught fire on the ground. 

The 109 passengers, who 
had been on their way to Port 
Malum in Minorca left the 
aircraft by the normal stair- 
case. The captain shot down 
foe engines and the fire was 
put out by ground engineers 
using fire extinguishers. A 
spokeswoman for foe airline 
sajd^The fire was contained 
and put ont extremely 
quickly.** The passengers left 
later on a replacement aircraft. 

Boy, 2, saves 
sick mother 

A boy aged two saved his 
mother after she fell into a 
diabetic coma yesterday. 

Paul Wilcox, of Dnkeries 
Crescent, Worksop, Notting- 
hamshire, ran round to a 
neighbour's bouse and raised 
the alarm. 

His mother, Mrs Paul 
Wilcox, was taken to hospital 
after a 999 call and was given 
emergency treatment. She 
lata- recovered. 

“The boy showed amazing 
presence of mind and con- 
rage,” Mr Brian Wilkinson, 
an ambulanceman, said .later. 
“He realized urgent action was 
required. He is a little hero.'V 


* ‘‘T-* -• * ^ . 

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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


The world ponders Gorbachov’s initiative on arms race 


US sees Soviet problems 
as aid to summit outcome 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

President Reagan let slip a 
revealing remark the other day 
when asked about the pros- 
pects for success at a summit 
with Mr Mikhail Gorbachov. 

“I'm optimistic that we're 
going to make more progress 
than probably has been made 
in a number of years, because 
of some of the problems that 
are concerning the General 
Seotiaiy at this time," he 
said. 

The Administration is con- 
vinced that those problems 
are pressing, and lie behind 
the Soviet leader’s new 
flexibility, his recent initia- 
tives on arms control and his 
attempts to give a new direc- 
tion to Soviet foreign policy. 

Soviet specialists here insist 
that the Soviet Union’s eco- 
nomic problems are already 
grave and are worsening, with 
the sharp drop in oil prices 
seriously reducing Soviet hard 
currency earnings. 

They say that Mr 
Gorbachov's economic re- 
' forms and attempts to get ins 
country moving win not be 
possible if the present high 
level of arms spending 
increases. 


They believe that he has to 
create some dynamism and to 
show a success in foreign 
amirs if he is to consolidate 
his power and overcome the 
negative effects ofChernobyL 
-- President Reagan dearly 
believes these analysts. But 
within his Administration 
there are serious disagree- 
ments over bow the US 

Mr Gorbachov left Moscow 
(br a holiday after his (devised 
speech about die nsdear test 
moratorium, Tass said, with- 
out revealing the de«fhw i yi nn 
or length of the break (Renter 
reports from Moscow ). 

should take best advantage of 
Mr Gorbachov's diffic ulties. 

The hardliners, whose in- 
fluence is waning but who are 
by no means a spent force, 
have often argued that the US 
should tighten the screw, es- 
pecially now, forcing the Rus- 
sians to change their bad old 
ways and to undertake genu- 
ine reform at home. 

They opposed the offer of 
subsidlzedgrain to the Soviet 
Union. They would like 
America now to “hang tough” 
in arms negotiations, es- 
pecially over Ihe Strategic 


Defence Initiative, knowing 
that the Russians cannot af- 
ford a new arms race. 

The pragmatists have ar- 
gued the exact opposite. They 
say that driving (he Russian 
bear into a corner could have 
dangerous and unpredictable 
results. 

Instead the US should take 
■ advantage of Soviet flexibility 
to seek genuine verifiable 
arms agreements, draw the 
Soviet Union back into a 
more stable and cooperative 
relationship and set a pattern 
for regular conciliations. 

Mr Reagan, who dearly 
wants a summit, is now 
inclined to take the latter 
advice. But he has been some- 
what vexed by Mr Gorba- 
chov’s frequent new in- 
itiatives,- which have not 
allowed the Americans to take 
the negotiating advantage. 

The US response has there- 
fore been ambiguous. On the 
one hand they have welcomed 
“positive elements" in Soviet 
proposals — on a SO per cent 
cut in strategic missiles, on the 
reduction of troops in Afghan- 
istan, on more openness over 
nuclear power. 

But they have also regularly 
dismissed many such oners as 


propaganda, wanting their al- 
lies and Western opinion not 
to be duped by Moscow's 
constant attempts to split the 
Nato alliance. 

Unlike the disharmony of 
two years ago, US arms con- 
trol policies lave been more 
closely co-ordinated with 
Nato allies, despite disagree- 
ments on Salt 2 and the 
interpretation of the 1972 
anti-ballistic missile treaty. 
There is therefore less worry 
that new Soviet offers will 
throw the West into disarray 
again. 

But now the battle seems to 
have moved on to home 
territory, with Congress play- 
ing an increasingly assertive 
role in aims control and 
foreign policy issues. 

President Reagan has been 
aghast at recent moves by the 
Democrat-controlled House 
of Representatives to Hnk 
funds for the Pentagon to 
specific arms control mea- 
sures. 

He complained that such 
votes were undermining his 
delegates at Geneva, and that 
Congress was giving away 
what Mr Gorbachov could not 
win at the negotiating table. 



Nobel men Picasso 
unite in painting 
support found 
for Darwin unharmed 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

The monkey trials are back 
in court. Nobel Prize-winners 
and scientific organizations 
have urged the US Supreme 
Court to throw out a Louisi- 
ana law that would require 
schools to teach "creation 
science” as well as evolution. 

In the latest twist to a battle 
that has ragjd through the 
pulpits and schools of the old 
South ever since Charles Dar- 
win published his treatise. 
America’s scientific commu- 
nity has taken up arms against 
this latest fundamentalist at- 
tempt to balance the monkeys 
with the angels. 

What Louisiana calls "cre- 
ation science" is not science 
but religion, they maintain — 
the Genesis story retold in 
pseudo-scientific terms. 

The laureates include al- 
most all the living Americans 
with Nobel awards. They are 


Melbourne (Reuter) — Pi- 
casso's "Weeping Woman” 
stolen from the Victorian 
National Gallery 16 days ago, 
has been found in a railway 
station locker after an anony- 
mous telephone tip-off. 

A group calling itself 
"Australian Cultural Ter- 
rorists" had claimed respon- 
sibility for the theft of the £! 
million work. 

The gallery director, Mr 
Patrick McCaughy, was with 
police when they removed the 
1937 oil painting from the 
locker and confirmed that it 
was the missing Picasso. It had 
not been damaged. 

Friends again 

London — Britain and 
Guatemala have renewed dip- 
lomatic relations at consular 
level after a five-year break 
arising from the Central 
American state's claim to 
territory of the neighbouring 
former British colony of 
Belize. 


believed to form the largest 

5£g?&*2!£ v ~ atrb ‘ | Defence chief 

Moscow (Reuter) — The 


Bonn hails SDI warning puzzles experts 

test ban 
extension 


Bonn (Renter) — West 
Germany’s Foreign Minister, 
Heir Hnns-Dietnch Geosch- 
er, welcomed yesterday the 
Soviet Union’s extension of its 
nuclear test moratorium until 
Jan nary L, and said that the 
move could he a useful step 
towards a complete ban on 
atomic testing. 

Mr Gorbachov’s address 
showed that the Russians were 
interested in arms control 
negotiations and in a meeting 
with Mr Reagan, he said. 

"It is important now tint 
contacts between the Ameri- 
cans and the Soviet Union lead 
to a doser approximation of 
views on verification,” he said. 
"We would be happy if an 
agreement on a comprehensive 
test ban could be reached at a 
summit” 

Herr Volker Rnehe, defence 
spokesman for Chancellor 
Kohl's Christian Democratic 
Union, also welcomed Mr 
Gorbachov’s proposal - 
said he hoped tint the West 
would respond constructively. 
• PARIS: The Ministry of 
Defence yesterday declined to 
comment mi Mr Gorbachov’s 
announcement (Susan Mac- 
Donald writes). 

Fiance continues to adhere 
to the position that the two 
major powers should reduce 
their nuclear arsenals to a 
level in line with other nuclear 
powers before France can 
become involved in dis- 
cussions. 

In a Krenrim speech daring 
bis visit to the Soviet Union 
last month. President Mitter- 
rand made dear that France 
was proud of her independent 
nuclear detenreut/’France 
does not intend to kt anybody 
determine the level of bar 
dissuasive force,” he said. 


US defence analysts are 
puzzled by Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov’s enigmatic warn- 
ing that if necessaiy Moscow 
would respond to President 
Reagan’s Strategic Defence 
Initiative (SDI) programme 
by making the whole of it 
"pointless and useless". 

On Monday the Soviet lead- 
er said on Moscow television 
that the Kremlin would find 
an answer to SDI and that it 
would not be "the kind of 
answer that the US is 
expecting”. 

American experts have been 
examining closely what coun- 
ter-measures the Soviet Union 
could take. 

Possibilities that Moscow 
might consider could include 
depressed-trajectory missiles; 
fast boosters which burn in 
about 75 seconds instead of 
four minutes; and coating 
missiles with heat-resisting 
material. Such measures 
would make the task of SDI 
weapons in shooting down . 
. incoming missiles much, more 
difficult ■ 

But a senior defence analyst 
said yesterday that Mr Gorba- 
chov was probably thinking 
more of counter-measures 
which are not related to 
strategic ballistic missiles. 

He said that the Soviet 
Union would probably deploy 

S rnore cruise missiles, 
have low trajectories 
and are thus much more 
difficult to detect by radar. 

His information was that 
the Soviet Union had already 
begun to deploy sea-launched 
cruise missiles. 

The analyst added that the 
Soviet Union could also go in 
for more heavy strategic 
bombers; and also for more 
anti-satellite weapon systems, 
aimed at neutralizing any 
American SDI space stations. 
The Soviet Union mam- 


From Mohan All, Washington 


tarns tin world's only opera- 
tional anti-ballistic missile 
system, around Moscow. 

Soviet scientists have for 
years been carrying oat re- 
search for the Soviet Union’s 
own strategic defence systems. 

Pentagon officials said that 
the Soviet laser programme is 
much larger than US efforts, 
involving more than 10,000 
scientists and engineers and 
more than a half dozen main 
research and development 
facilities and test ranges. 

They estimated that this 
was costing Moscow the 
equivalent of about $1 billion 
(£670 million) each year. 

Officials added that Mos- 
cow was also performing re- 
search in particle beam 
weapons, radio frequency 
weapons, kinetic energy weap- 
ons, and computer and sensor 
technology. 

• LONDON: Responses to 
Mr Gorbachov's, warning on 
SDI ranged from “it’s just 
rhetoric” to “sure, be can do 
it”(RodneyCowton writes). 

One source said that the 
Soviet Union had maintained 
consistently that counter-mea- 
sures against a strategic de- 
fence system would be fully 
effective^ and would be 
cheaper and quicker to deploy 
than the defence system itseff 
on which tire US has a $26 
billion prog ram me. 

He said that Mr Gorba- 
chov’s statement might be no 
more than a rephrasing of that 
long-held position. 

But Mr John Pike, associate 
director for space policy at the 
Federation of American Sci- 
entists, said that tire Soviet 
Union had several ways of 
seeking to counter an Ameri- 
can strategic defence system. 

An initial step would prob- 
ably be greatly to increase the 
number of rockets, warheads 
and decoys winch it deployed. 


He said that tire Soviet 
Union produced about 300 
inter-continental ballistic mis- 
siles a year to maintain a force 
of about 1,400 operational 
missiles. This was because the 
liquid-foeDed rockets had a 
life of about five years, 
whereas a new generation of 
solid-fuelled rockets would 
have a storage life oflO or even 
IS years. 

If the Soviet Union main- 
tained its present production 
capacity it would be able to 
achieve a substantial increase 
in its ICBM arsenal within 
about four years. 

An increase in numbers of 
rockets, warheads and decoys 
could threaten to overwhelm a 
defensive system. Such steps 
would be likely to be followed 
by the development of the 
“tast-burn" rocket booster, 
which would substantially re- 
duce the boost phase of a 
missile’s flight and make it 
invulnerable to certain kinds 
of space-based weapons. 

This would reduce the most 
vulnerable period of a mis- 
sile’s flight and make it more 
difficult to attack the missile 
before it had ideated its 
warheads and decoys, which 
would hugely increase the 
number of targets to be dealt 
with by the defence. 

A somewhat later stage of a 
Soviet response to an Ameri\ 
can strategic defence system, 
Mr Pike said, could be the 
deployment of directed energy 
weapons such as lasers , 
initially on the ground but 
later in space, tazgetted on the 
enemy’s defence platforms. 

Other sources said that 
satellites in low orbit were 
vulnerable to attack, and that 
the Soviet Union in particular 
was already thinking increas- 
ingly of baring a strategic 
defence on earth rather than in 
space. 


Mr Gennady Gerasimov, the 
Soviet Foreign Ministry spo- 
kesman, giving a news briefing 
yesterday in Moscow. 

He said that the Soviet Union 
was disappointed at the 
United States* (affine to re- 
spond positively to its exten- 
sion of its andear test 
moratorium (Renter reports). 
A Reagan Administration 
statement that Mr Gorbach- 
ov’s address contained a lot of 


propaganda was ‘’very dis- 
appointing. But we are son foil 
of hope ftat common sense 
and reason iriD prevail” 

Mr Gerasimov said that pre- 
parations were going ahead for 
a meeting in September be- 
tween Mr George Shultz, the 
US Secretary of State, and Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the So- 
viet Foreign Minister. 

“Beyond that it's foggy. It’s 
impossible to see,” he said. 


The Supreme Court agreed 
earlier this year to hear an 
appeal in the case, after two 
lower courts declared un- 
constitutional the Louisiana 
law, passed in 1981, to 
"balance" the teaching of evo- 
lution. 

The first amendment to the 
US Constitution forbids the 
"establishment’ of a religion, 
generally taken to mean that 
schools cannot favour one 
religion over another. 

The scientists said "creation 
science" was not only religious 
but was also based on specifi- 
cally Christian fundamentalist 
beliefs. 


Museveni strengthens 
Libyan economic ties 

Flrom Charles Harrison, Nairobi 

If Uganda does .bring in 
Libyan oil products, it will 
upset the existing marketing 
framework in East Africa. 
Kenya's oil refinery at Mom- 
basa, which normally supplies 
Uganda, gets its crude from 
the Guff 


Uganda is strengthening its 
links with Libya, which is 
believed to be offering subs- 
tantial economic aid in order 
to strengthen its influence in 
East Africa. 

President Museveni of Ug- 
anda flew to Tripoli on Mon- 
day with his finance, planning 
and energy ministers and the 
governor of the Bank of 
Uganda. 

The trip was not announced 
in advance, but coincided 
with a near-doubling of the 
local price of petrol a measure 
necessitated by Uganda’s high 
inflation. 

Kampala sources say that 
they expect Libya to oner oil 
to Uganda on easy terms in 
order to ease the country’s 
balance of payments prob- 
lems. 


The Museveni Government 
has tended to play down 
suggestions that it is forming 
close links with Libya. But the 
presence of Libyan financial 
expats, doctors and other 
specialists in Uganda in- 


dicates strengthening ties. 

Libya formed a close 
relationship with the dictator, 
Idi Amin, when be was in 
power in the 1970s, and even 
sent troops to fight at his ride 
when he was being over- 
thrown by a Tanzanian force. • 



King BSrendra of Nepal, right; lighting a peace torch In 
Kathmandn yesterday. The torch will Be taken as for as 
possible up the Mt Everest route followed by the climbers 
H. L. Mallory and J. Irvin in 1024 to commemorate the 
* toted Nations International Year of Peace. Looking od at 
left is Sherpa Nawan* Yongdem, the first Nepalese to climb 
die world’s highest peak during winter. 


Fugitive’s 
expulsion 
is blocked 

From Martha Honey 
San Jos£ 

A Briton wanted by Scot- 
land Yard in connection with 
the £26 million Brinks-Mal 
robbery in 1 983 remains in jail 
here after his lawyer blocked 
his deportation with a legal 
•manoeuvre. 

Costa Rican authorities had 
hoped to deport Mr John 
Robert Fleming, aged 45, to 
Miami on Monday night, but 
Senor Mario Ayala Torres, his 
lawyer, argued before the Su- 
preme Court here that his 
arrest was illegal and de- 
manded that he be released 

im mediately . 

Immigration authorities 
suspended the expulsion order 
pending a judicial derision, 
but they continued to keep Mr 
Fleming under arrest in an 
undisclosed location. 

Costa Rica has no extra- 
dition treaty with Britain, but 
has a policy of deporting 
undesirable foreigners. From 
Miami fugitives can be legally 
extradited to Britain. 

The press has not been 
allowed to talk to Mfr Fleming, 
who is suspected of being 
responsible for the November 
26, 1983, robbery of gold bars 
worth £26 million from a 
Brinks-Mat vehicle near 
Heathrow Airport. 

He and a Spanish woman. 
Senorita Leocadia Zaplana 
Aguilar, aged 23, were arrested 
outside a moderately priced 
hotel in San Jos6 on Saturday 
morning. The woman was 
later released without being 
charged and left the country, 
reportedly for Madrid. 

Mr Fleming’s arrest was 
assisted by a Scotland Yard 
detective who arrived here last 
week following a tip that the 
fugitive had fled here from 
Spain on July 25. 

While in Spain Mr Fleming 
reportedly lived in a well- 
guarded luxury chalet in 
Benidorm on the Mediterra- 
nean coast. 

In Costa Rica, however, he 
moved around without 
protection and stayed in sev- 
eral moderate and first-class 
hotels and beach resort. 
Employees at two of the hotels 
described him as extremely 
calm, affable and polite. 

Mr Fleming disappeared 
from Spain three weeks ago 
after its courts ruled that he 
would have to leave because 
of passport irregularities 
breaching the new Aliens Act. 


Pretoria detainees 
could total 12,000 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


The 8,500 people named in 
Parliament on Monday by the 
South African Minister of Law 
and Order, Mr Louis Le 
Grange, as having been de- 
tained under the State of 
Emergency include only those 
held for more than 30 days; 
the total number of detainees 
could be much higher. 

A spokesman for the Re- 
pression Monitoring Group in 


detainees who had completed 
30 days in jail. 

The reason the names were 
not tabled in Parliament 
sooner was because the legisla- 
ture went into recess less than 
two weeks after the emergency 
was declared, and resumed its 
sitting only on Monday. 

In feet, for some weeks 
several newspapers have been 


printing lists of people known 
Cape Town, one of several be m detention. The papers 
independent bodies keeping a GovemSt 


tally of detentions, said yes- 


The Rev Jesse Jackson, the 
Mack American politician, 
said on arrival in Botswana 
that the US should have a role 
in bringing peace to southern 
Africa, ana called for a new 
US policy on Africa (Reuter 
reports from Gaborone). 


former commander of Soviet 
troops in East Germany, Gen- 
eral Pyotr Lushev, whose 
appointment as a First Deputy 
Defence Minister emerged at 
the weekend, has replaced 
Marshal Vasily Petrov, who 
worked without portfolio. 

Strike broken 

Penh (Reuter) — More than 
300 sacked workers have 
ended their occupation of a 
giant natural gas rig after 
having been threatened with 
heavy fines. They began leav- 
ing by helicopter. 

Militant free 

Washington (AP) — Mr 
[Stokdy Carmichael, the for- 
mer American black militant, 
has been released from jail in 
Guinea after three days of 
detention. 

Nudear tour 

Hong Kong (Reuter) — A 
left-wing Hong Kong news- 
paper, Wen Wei Po. is 
organizing tours to the site of 
the proposed nuclear power 
plant at Daya Bay. 30 miles 
inside China, which has 
alarmed many citizens. 

Death leap 

Philadelphia (AP) — Robert 
McPeake, a defendant in a 
rape case, bolted across a 
courtroom, dived through a 
window and plunged six floors 
to his death as the jury was 
returning a guilty verdict 


today that the total number 
held since the emergency was 
declared on June 12 could be 
as high as 12,000. 

The Government's decision 
to table the names in Par- 
liament was not the result of 
political pressure but was to 
comply with a little-noticed 
clause in the Public Safety Act, 
under which the emergency 
was declared 

Tins stipulates that the 
names of detainees hekl for 
longer than 30 days must be 
released to Parliament within 
14 days of the expiry of that 
period. Government officials 
said yesterday that they would 
in future publish weekly the 
names of each new batch of 


statement that the detain res’ 
next-of-kin were always in- 
formed amounted to “official 
disclosure”. 

Tire lists throw little light on 
the number still in detention. 

Not is any information given 
on the age, place of arrest, 
length of detention, occupa- 
tion or political affiliation of 
detainees. Only the bare letter 
of the law has been complied 
with. 

What does appear to be i n » • 

dear is that tire rate of arrest is 1 Kurat view 
far higher than during the 
previous partial State of Emer- 
gency from July 21, 1985, to 
March 7 this year when, 
according to polio: figures, 

7,996 people, 2,100 of them 

under the age of 16, were I r J T y hrft flk 

Port Moresby (Reuter) — 


Mine trap 

Managua (AFP) — Seven 
rivflians died and three others 
were injured when their ve- 
hicle ran overa mine bdieved 
to have been planted by 
Contra guerrillas fighting the 
Sandinisia Government 


Peking (Reuler) — Thirty 
million rural households in 
China — nearly one in nine — 
have television, according to a 
report to a conference. 


detained. 

On the basis of the limited 
data released by the Govern- 
ment, it would seem that more 
people have been detained 
during the first two months of 
die present emergency than 
during the whole 7 % months 
of the last one. 


South African ‘agents’ 
blamed for Swazi raid 

From Our Own Correspondent, Johannesburg 
About 10 armed men, both Monday night quoted 


white and black, who crossed 
the border illegally from South 
Africa, were said yesterday by 
Swazi sources to have been 
responsible for raids last week- 
end on houses and offices in 
Mbabane, the capital of 
Swaziland. 

Assistant Superintendent 
Solly Mkhonta, of the Swazi 
police, said that one of the 
targets of the raiders was a 
building housing the offices of 
a Scandinavian-backed organ- 
ization which arranges schol- 
arships for Swazis and South 
African refugees. 

Swaziland television on 


in- 
formed sources as speculating 
that the raiders might have 
been South African agents 
looking for information on 
African National Congress 
(ANC) sympathizers. 

A spokesman for the South 
African Defence Force in Pre- 
toria said yesterday that it was 
policy neither to confirm nor 
deny such allegations. 

Last Thursday the Swazis 
announced that a separate 
group of 10 men had attacked 
a police station in western 
Swaziland and released three 
ANC members being held 
there. 


The Papua New Guinea Gov- 
ernment rushed new laws 
through Parliament to prevent 
the introduction of television 
into the South Pacific country 
until January 1988. 

Sun power 

Moscow (AFP) - A new 
solar energy oven near Kiev, 
the Ukrainian city contami- 
nated by fallout from the 
Chernobyl nuclear disaster, is 
about to start baking bread 
and pastries, turning out 
loaves in 20 to 22 minutes, 

| and baking pastries in 16 to 18 
minutes. 

Old bones 

Prague (AP) — A grave with 
three skeletons, estimated to 
, be about 25,000 years old, has 
been discovered at Dolni 
Vestonice in southern 
Moravia. 

Seeing red 

Brussels (Reuter) — A bull 
that charged a bright red fire- 
engine in Dorpstraat, in north- 
west Belgium, caused £5,000 
damage. 


Bank workers 
held in £5m 
shares fraud 

Stockholm (AP) — Four 
people have been arrested in 
what may be Sweden's largest 
bank coup: the stealing. and 
selling and stealing again of 
forestry stores wrath up to 
£53 million. 

Police said yesterday that 
two employees at the Form- 
ingsbankemas Bank head- 
quarters stole shares of a 
forestry concern that were 
brought in for invalidation 

But i n stea d of invalidating 
the shares, the employees stole 
them and sent them to a firm 
in Lund, which sold them to 
genuine stock exchange deal- 
ers, police said. 

The dealers then, under the 
romputerizafion scheme,- ban- 
led in their shares to the bank, 
where some of them were 
Bolen again. 


Chirac gives 
his pack a 
small shuffle 

From Susan MacDonald 
Paris 

The Elysfie Palace yesterday 
announced a mini-shuffle, the 
first since M Jacques Chirac's 
Government came to powex 
M Bernard Bosson, who 
was a secretary of state at the 
Interior Ministry, has been 
moved to the Foreign Min- 
istry to fill the new post of 
Minister for European Affairs. 
M Yves Galland replaces him 
at the Interior Ministry. 

M Camille Cabana, his job 
as Privatization Minister com- 
plete, has been moved to the 
Prime Minister's Office. 

M Jacques Boyon has been 
made secretary of state at the 
Defence Ministry and M Ge- 
rard Longuet has become 
junior minister at the Ministry 
of Industry. 


Israel tries to rid itself of troublesome Black Hebrews 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Israel has begun a new 
attempt to rid itself of its most 
embarrassing and tenacious 
community iff iDegal im- 
migrants, the Black Hebrews . 

Huger and the reputation 
of American-organized crime 
me now proving allies of the 
law in tackling a problem 
which has refused to go away 
in the 17 years since fc first 
members of the cult arrived to 
Haim a rightist place in what 
they insisted was their King- 
dom of IsraeL 

The colt originated m the 
Mack gbettoes of Chicago in 
the early 1960$. It was the 
brainchild of a young met- 
allurgist called _ Gerson 
Parker, who evangelized in his 
spare time, and who had a 
(beam of his own one day when 
an old asked him if he 
had ever heard of the ancient 
black Israelites. 


By 1967 that dream had 
become a strange kind of 
reality as 134 followers of the 
founder, now rammed Ben- 
Ami Carter, pooled their re- 
sources and Dew to Liberia, 
where they b&flt a 300-acre 
settlement on land 80 miles 
from Monrovia. 

This, their leader told than, 
was a direct parallel to what 
happened to their Jewish fore- 
fathers when they left slavery 
in Egypt to minder in the 
desert before arriving in the 
land of IsraeL 
They were leaving the slav- 
ery of the United States, 
time in the wilder- 


from which their 
ancestors had been expelled 
4,000 years before. The Israe- 
lis, he told them, were the 
usurpers of that kingdom 
After two years in Liberia 
the first five Mack Hebrews 
arrived at Lod airport. In best 


biblical tradition they had sent 
ahead a spy, who discovered 
that wder Israeli law they 
were able as Jews to claim 
migrant rights. Bemused of- 
ficials let them in while an 
investigation began into their 
Jewishness. 

A mouth later some 50 
women and children arrived 
and, in March 1970, they were 
followed by 70 men led by Beo- 
Ami Carter. 

While research went on into 
their background, they were 
granted three-month tourist 
visas and allocated flats in the 
Negev development town of 
Dimona. The visas expired, 
tat they stayed on. And a few 
hundred more arrived as tour- 
ists from the United States. 

The tiny flats were bursting 
at the seams, and neighbours 
began to complain about the 
noise, sewerage and slum con- 
ditions, By foe end of October 
1971, the Ministry of the 


Interior derided to get rid of 
them, 

It has proved an almost 
impossible task. 

Under their charismatic 
leader they have closed ranks 
and multiplied. They have no 
identity cards and do not 
register births or d e a th s, SO 
their wart number is un- 
known. But as many as 3,000 
of them are now estimated to 
be living in towns around the 
Negev desert. 

They are ruled by 12 
“princes”, who form the ‘^di- 
vine 000001 ” administering 
their pooled income derived 
from selling jewellery, leather 
goods, records of their jam 
group or wages paid to male 
members working at the Dead 
Sea potash works (the cult 

calls i the Live Sea). 

They are vegans and polyga- 
mists, vnth the men allowed up 
to seven wives and the women 
expected to give birth mice a 


year - usually in an air-raid 
shelter to the sound of tom- 
toms played to hide any 
sounds of screaming. 

Ben-Ami Carter is now in 
his mid-4Ds and has mellowed 
with the years. Ten years ago 
he bombarded world leaders 
from President Carter to Idi 
Amin with complaints of Is- 
raeli racism. Today he says he 
wants die groop to integrate, if 
ft can only be allowed to 
remain. 

A government report six 
years ago recommended that 
they be granted citizenship, 
apart from those with a crim- 
inal background, on condition 
that no new settlers came. But 
the report gathers dost and the 
Ministry of the Interior, now 
headed by an ultra-orthodox 
Rabbi, Mr Yitzhak Pcretz, • 
wants them out 

The method chosen is to 
pick off those who leave the 
desert settlements to look for 


work ami to deport them for 
havingno proper entry or work 
visas. The High Court has jnst 
upheld deportation orders 
ajpmst 46 men arrested in this 
way last ApriL 
Breadwinners are being 
forced to look for jobs because 
more than 80 per cent have 
beat made unemployed since 
ApriL 


m Israel has been further 
saffied by the conviction of 
eight of the 3(LOOO members 
claimed by the group in the US 
on a multi-million dollar air 
ticket fraud, allegedly linked 
with organized crime. 

Bat as deportation orders 
are carried out against the 
male members, foe moral 
problem grows of what fins 
proudly democratic country 
should do with the 600 or more 
diSdm bora in air-raid shel- 
ters to the sound of tom-toms 
on Israeli soiL 


v 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


EEC butter mountain 
reaches record peak 
as dairies exceed quota 


Violence engulfs Bhutto stronghold 


From Jonathan Braude, Brussels 


The EEC batter mountain 
has readied new heights over 
the past few weeks, topping 
13 million tonnes for the first 
time as dairies sell more and 
more unwanted butter to EEC 
stores. 

figures released by the 
European Commission in 
Brussels yesterday show that 
publicly-owned stores of sur- 
plus butter totalled 1,358,000 
tonnes at the end of July, an 
increase of 30,000 tonnes in 
the space of a month. 

EEC dairy committee fig- 
ures show that stocks have 
continued to rise since then 
and readied 1,363,000 tonnes 
by August 14. 

Meanwhile, stocks stored 
privately by dairies with the 
aid of EEC subsidies have 
been rising even fester, bring- 
ing the total butter stockpile to 
1.4 million tonnes by the 
middle of this month. Pri- 
vately-held butter stocks are 


increasing at a rate of more 
than 6,000 tonnes a week. 

At the same time, milk 
powder stocks have also been 
rising inexorably. By August 
14 they topped a million 
tonnes, more than double the 
amount of a year ago. 

Ironically, the increase in 
stocks comes at a time when 
the introduction of milk 
production quotas has cut 
E EC milk output by mom 
than six million tonnes a year, 
although farmers have ex- 
ceeded production quotas this 
year for the first time since 
they were introduced in 1984. 

Mr Carlo Trojan, chief ad- 
viser to the EEC agriculture 
commissioner, has recently 
blamed the increase in stocks 
on shrinking export markets. 

While EEC farmers have cut 
milk production, he told an 
EEC dairy trade conference in 
May, the United States, 
Australia, New Zealand and 


the Nordic countries, the 
Community's Market's main 
competitors on the dairy mar- 
ket, have increased their share 
of world exports. 

In an attempt to win bade 
markets and to reduce stocks, 
the EEC recently announced 
measures, including special 
cut-price offers to the Soviet 
Union, India and the Middle 
East of butter for use as calf- 
feed at the equivalent of 2.5 
pence a half-pound packet 
Consumers have also bene- 
fited from sales of cheap 
“concentrated” butter for 
cooking, while food proces- 
sors have been tempted to 
replace vegetable oils with 
butter and milk-powder. 

But EEC stores stiU repre- 
sent an attractive guaranteed 
market for surplus produce, 
and the dairy policy continues 
to account for almost a quar- 
ter of the EEC’s agricultural 
budget 


Moscow angry at Jewish claims 


Moscow (Reuter) — The Mr Gennady Gerasimov, a ■ His statement contrasted 
Soviet Union Iras no plans for ministry spokesman, accused sharply with a comment on 
further talks with Israel after Israel of “unjustifiable int- Monday by Mr Yitzhak 


further talks with Israel after 
Monday’s first meeting in 
Helsinki between the two 
countries for almost 20 years, 
the Soviet Foreign Ministry 
said yesterday. 


Yitzhak 


erference” on the issue of Shamir, the Israeli Foreign 
Soviet Jewry. He said there Minister, who described the 


would be no more discussion 
of consular ties with Israel 
after the 90-minute talks. 


Helsinki talks as a good 
beginning of dialogue with 
Moscow. 


From Michael Hamtyn 
Tham Adam, Pakistan 

Men of Pakistan's Baluch 
Regiment in machme-gnn- 
BHnmted Jeeps foully restored 
order test night to this little 
agricultural town 150 miles 
into the interior of Sind prov- 
ince, north of Karachi, after 
two days of violence and 
counter-vhdcsice by rival polit- 
ical groups. 

On Monday, after the call of 
the Pakistan People's Party 
(PPP) of Miss Benazir Bbuttp 
to start protests at her arrest, a 
mob 2,000 strong assembled at 
the crossroads and began a 
programme of mayhem. 

When the police came to 
disperse it, the crowd itself 
opened fire with Kalashnikovs 
and shotguns. Two policemen 
were killed on tiie spot and one 
was seriously injured. The 
police opened fire in return, 
wounding a number of demon- 
strators. 

The protesters scattered, 
took to the rooftops and began 
sniping at police, while bands 
of 200 Or so began systemati- 
cally burning government 
property. They burnt the of- 
fices of the national bank, the 
water and power development 
authority, three shops, M an 
Urthi school. 

The violence mirrored 
events taking place elsewhere 
in the province, which is the 
stronghold of Miss Bhutto’s 
party. 

In several towns and vil- 
lages angry mobs bant banks 
and other bnfldings. They 
blocked the main “super 
highway” from Karachi to 
neighbouring Punjab with 




A supporter of Miss Bhutto comes in for rough treatment from police in Karac hi yes terday, 
trees, and at one place burst Yesterday in Thane Adam Pakistan at the tone of Ptt- 
open a reservoir and the inhabitants were bitterly tition m 1947. 

flooded the road. counting the cost like many Among Ihe Msfesfira 

The KarocM-Labore interior Sind towns the port for the authoritarian irale 
railway was ent in ten places population is hugely Urdu- of Ceneral&a M-Haq (who 
by crowds who simply un- speaking, and not indigenous was himself dotii m wnat is 
screwed die fishplates, re- SindhL They are Mohajirs, now I nd i an Poqjab) runs 
moved the rails and burnt the those imm i grants (or their strongly, 
sleepers. children) who crossed into The m hab itants Mtteriy re- 


Among die Mohairs sop- 
port for the authoritarian rale 
of General Zia al-Haq (who 
was himself bom in what is 
now Indian Punjab) runs 



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The whaMaidt Utterly re- 
sented the PPP attacks on 
their town on Monday, which 
they said were carried oat by 
Sindhi-speaking outsiders 
from the villages armad- 
So yesterday another nob 
rampaged through the town, 
this time shooting slogans tfltt 
u Zia zmdabad, Beaagr mard- 
abad" (“Long five Zia, death 
to Benazir*^ They set fire to a 
paint store owned by a known 
PPP supporter, which Wared 
with a fierce ardoor, and thick 



Mack smoke. Two other shops 
betoogiag to PPP mem were 
also Un brio before the 
police and the Army came oa 
the scene. 

For a time tike forces of law 
and order seemed rnatwit to 
stand by and let the pro-, 
government mob get on with 
ris destructive games, but the 
local magistrate, Mr Muham- 
mad Ibrahim Menton, urged 
them into action, yeUfog: “Go 
and arrest them. Arrest 
them.'* 

Last night the town stirred 
naeasfty under a tightly-im- 
posed cmfew. 

Mr _ Mohammad Shah 
Amroti, Karachi convenor of 
toe ten-party Movement for 
the Restoration of Democracy 
(MED), yesterday emerged 
from hiding to give a press 
conference in toe dty, to which 
he said toot at least 25 people 
had died since the start of the 
disturbances on Pakistan’s In- 
dependence Day last 
Thursday. . 


Israel and 
Egypt play 
snap over 
arbitrators 

From Ian Mvray 
Jerusalem 

On the neutral ground of 
Geneva, Israeli and Egyptian 
negotiators are playing a dip. 
iomatic game of snap. The 
aim of the game is to agree On 
the international ar b itrato rs 
who win decide which of the 
two countries has sovereign 
rights over the bonier resort of 
Taba on the Gulf of Aqaba. 

The rules have been agreed 
with the United Stares, which 
is acting as referee. The play- 
ers most choose three people 
whom both countries will 
accept as impartial in resolv- 
ing (be complicated dispute, 
with its references to the 
Ottoman Empire. Lawrence of 
Arabia, the British Mandate in 
Palestine and the sates of 
wars m the area since brad 
came into being m 1948. 

The United Stales has given 
each country a secret fist of 30 
names. It is rumomed (hat it 
includes such figures as Dr 
Henry Kissinger, but nobody 
on the list has been told that 
his or her name is on it. 

Each country is now 
handing in to the Americans a 
choice of names from the hst 
Neither side knows which the 
other has chosen, nor do the 
Americans say which names 
they have been given. But as 
soon as a name appears on 
both lists that person is chosen 
automatically. 

So far each side has nomi- 
nated six people, but none of 
than coincides. When they 
eventually do, tin arbitration 
agreement between the two 
countries will at lasLfae ready 
fbr signing and a meeting 
between Mr Shimon Feres, the 
Israeli Prime Minister, and 
President Mubarak of Egypt 
will be arranged. 

The “cold peace” which has 
continued between the two 
countries since the Camp 
David agreements were signed 
in 1978 is expected to warm 
up and the stalled Middle East 
peace process could well get 
under way again. 

The stakes in this particular 
session of snap most be 
among the highest in the 
history of the game. 

• CHICAGO: US authorities 
are said to be investigating an 
attempt by Israeli military 
officers to steal plans for a 
sophisticated airborne spy 
camera system from a US 




; The Chicago Tribune, atmg 
government officials, said that 
i the US Customs Service was 
investigating the theft at- 
tempt ABC News has carried 
■a similar report, but Customs 
■officials would not comment 
yesterday. 

Security officers at Recon- 
Optteal in Barrington, Illinois, 
stopped three Israeli Air Force 
officers as they woe leaving 
the plant on May 27 and 
confiscated 50,000 pages of 
technical drawings and notes 
handwritten in Hebrew, the 
new s paper reported. 

Recon had filed a lawsuit in 
New York accusing the Israe- 
lis of having tried to steal the 
technology used in a secret 
.aerial reconnaissance system 
that was being developed for 
Israel by Recon, the news- 
paper said. 

Mr Jeffrey Ffllman, a New 
York City lawyer who repre- 
sents Israel, said that the 
accusation was false. 


20 killed by car bomb 
in Tehran rush hour 


Tehran (Reuter) — Twenty 
people were killed and many 
others wounded when a car 
bomb exploded in a busy 
square in central Tehran yes- 
terday, Tehran Radio-said. - 

The blast ripped through 
morning rush-hour traffic xn 
Ferdowsi Square, . shattering 
windows of nearby buildings 
and setting ablaze several 
vehicles. 

Some of the casualties were 
on a passing bus caught in toe . 
blast, the deadliest bomb at- 
tack reported in Iran this year. 

The radio accused “Ameri- 
can agents” of having planted 
the bomb in a Jiyan car, the 
locally built version of a 
Citroen 2CV. 

Informed sources cited by 
Inia, the banian news agency, 
said the device contained 
more than 50 lb of TNT and 
was detonated by a timer. 


Four previous explosions 
have claimed five lives in 
Tehran this year, and a car 
bomb blast killed 13 and 
wounded about 100 in the 
holy city of Qom, in central 
Iran, on Saturday. 

Tehran newspapers said 
that several suspects had been 
arrested in connection with 
the Qom explosion. 

• LONDON: The Mujahedin 
Khalq, an . Iranian left-wing 
opposition group, said it con- 
demned “any form of bomb- 
ing In public places causing 
the deaths of innocent people** 
and denied an involvement 
with recent explosions. 

“By relating such acts of 
terrorism to the People’s 
Mujahedin, the (Tehran) re- 
gime seeks to pave the way for 
the execution of yet more 
political prisoners,* it said. 


Vatican bars professor 


1 9 ¥8 6 


issued by Iazairi Brntogas & Cfa-, limited, Share InfbnpalkmQffif^ cmbeJialfnfffiftThisfaae 


- From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

The Vatican has stripped aa 

American professor who chal- 
lenged Chwcfc teaching on 
abortion and c on trace p tion of 
his right to teach theology at a 
Roman Catholic univer si t y 

here or at aay other pontifical 

institution. 

A' Vatican aimnnai niinii 
said that toe dissent of Father 
Charles Curran (right) over 
semi et hi cs mde Mm no 
tager “statable or efigflUe to 
teach Catholic toe logy”. 

The dedsku, approved fay 
toe Pope on Jaly 10 , comes 
after 'Su yens of a o—Hi—i 
healed negotiation between 
Father Cmraa and the Cfanreh. 

On several obcasfoaahe has 
pabfidy and emphatically re- 
fused Vatican demands that he 
retract dissenting pftjjfjftMif on 
such bases as divorce, abor- 
tion, contraception and pre- 
marital sex; 



The. action was announced 
on Monday evening byArch- 
hishop Jams Hickey of 
Washington, Chancellor of the 


Father Curran, who woo 
support from toe Catholic 
T'Mtofical Society of Amer- 
ica, may stay on the university 

staff In a position; not Andy 
under the Archbishop’* 
control. 








Come 300th in this competition 

ou win a Concorde holiday 
imagine what the 1st prize is. 



Its Concorde’s 10th birthday. And to 
celebrate were holding a litde competition. 

It’s called The Concorde Challenge. 
Between the beginning of September and 
the end of October we’ll be giv ing away 
over 300 prizes. 

Even if you come 300th you’ll still win 
a Concorde holiday for two in Miami 

Golden sandy beaches, palm tree 
groves, warm turquoise sea. 

Miami is one of the few good reasons 
for getting off Concorde. 

‘ ' We’ll be giving away five of these 
wonderful holidays every single day for 
two months. 

Of course, you’ll stay as our guests in a 
luxurious hotel. And all the time you’re 
soaking up the Floridian sun, you’ll have 
the supersonic Concorde flight home to 
look forward to. 

Every week, a year’s unlimited travel for 
two on British Airways to be won. 

If you win one of these weekly 
runners-up prizes, there’s absolutely no 
limit to the number of times you — and a 
partner of your choice - can fly Super 
Club or Club Class on any of our 151 
subsonic planes. 




VS 


By the end of the year there needn’t 
be a place in the whole world that you 
haven’t visited. 

And as if that wasn’t enough we’ll also 
throw in a round trip on Concorde. 

First prize: A Concorde for a da y. 

Your very own Concorde awaits your 
pleasure. But when? 

Perhaps you should reserve it for your 
wife’s or husband’s birthday, invite all 
their friends and give them the ultimate 
surprise party. 

Or imagine a supersonic, champagne 
wedding reception, 10 miles high! 

You can choose from dozens of des- 
tinations. Venice in the spring, Nice in the 
summer or the Azores in the autumn? 
Wherever, whenever, you’ll never forget 
the day Concorde was all yours. 

How to enter The Concorde Challenge. 

You can enter every time you fly with 
us during September or October. See your 
travel agent for details. 

The Concorde Challenge tests your 
skill and judgement. (It’s also a lot of fun). 

Good luck from everyone at British 
Airways. And may a tail wind be with you 
all the way. 


















British Airways 

The worlds favourite ai rline 


/ 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


HOW YOU CAN BEAT 


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The class-leading range includes 
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features/overseas news 


9 


1 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


SPECTRUM I 



Stacking the odds against a test ban 


America has made aa average of four 
nuclear warheads every day for 40 
years. But, as Keith Hindley explain^ 
many scientists think Washington's 
coolness towards the Gorbachov call 
for a test moratorium is justified 


Vare stm at 
onev. 


\ 





METRO 



At first sight, the scene could 
be from any western. The 
morning sun lights the bluff 
rocks of the mesa walls. Only 
scrawny grass, yucca, mes- 
quite and Joshua trees sprout 
on the arid valley floor. An 
eagle circles while, far off; dust 
from a group of mustangs 
drifts away. The distant 
mountains already shimmer 
as the crushing heat builds. 

A closer look reveals several 
square miles pock-marked 
with hundreds of small craters 
and criss-crossed with dirt 
roads. Diggers, trucks, d rilling 
rigs and temporary buildings 
are everywhere— but this is no 
civilian contraction site. 
Yucca Flat, Nevada, is where 
the United States's nuclear 
weapons are tested, and in 
recent years business has been 
booming. 

At 830 every morning, 
more than 9,000 people start 
work here. They include sci- 
entists, engineers and armed 
security guards but most are 
construction workers prepar- 
ing fresh shafts for upcoming 
“shots” or “bogies”. 

The United Slates explodes 
about 15 big nuclear devices 
every year (up from eight a 
year in the 1970s) along with 
perhaps a dozen sinaO battle- 
field weapons. And the rale is 
rising. In all, the US Depart- 
ment of Energy spends $2 
million a day (about £13 
million) to run the Yucca Flat 
test site. 

Responsibility for the de- 
sign, development and 
production of nuclear war- 
heads lies mainly with the US 
Department of Energy (DoE k 
Bombs are designed at the 
Lawrence Livermore National ■ 
Laboratory in California and 
the Los Alamos National Lab- 
oratory in New Mexico. 

The political influence that 
the resultant gigantic — and 
autonomous — nuclear in- 
dustry generates is so great 
that many politicians and 
scientists believe that Ameri- 


can warhead research is but of 
control In the 40 years since 
the first atom bombs, the 
Americans have buih 60,850 
nuclear warheads at a cost, in 
1986 dollars, of $217 bflKon. 
That is four bombs every day 
for 40 years. Add to this 

$1,860 billion for delivery 
systems such as planes, mis- 
siles and submarines and the 
grand total is $2,080 billion. 
The current stockpile is 
26300 warheads and is rising. 

Since 1 963. the su p er p owe r s 
have tested midear warheads 
only underground. Planning 
for a “shot” takes about 14 
months. A spot is chosen and 
then a large hole some nine 
feet across is sunk from sev- 
eral hundred to more than a 
thousand feet deep. A six- 
storey portable building or 
“bogey tower” is moved into" 
place and the test bomb, sahed 
with chemical traces, is in- 
stalled at the bottom- of the 
shaft. 

A diagnostic cannister, in 
reality a 200 tonne miniature 
physics laboratory, is lowered 
on top of the bomb. About 140 
leads run to the “red shade”, 
an advance post close to 
ground zero mid on to the 
“war room” a control centre 
in a path between two mesas 
near by. The shaft is sealed 
with sand and rock. 

On lest day the site is 
cleared. Two engineers sitting 
in the red shack draw num- 
bered counters from a black 
bag. This generates a six-figure 
code that is used to activate 
the “arm enable” in 

the computer. In the war 
room, the range officer fo r the 
day — a DoE official — checks 
security, weather, scientists 
and engineers before giving 
the go-ahead. The six-figure 
code then arms the bomb and 
starts a 1 S-minute countdown. 

The explosion creates a 
100ft cavity deep under- 
ground and this collapses to 
generate the slump crater on 
the surface. The cannister 



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control room 


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_ . . . _ 

Nuclear state; Nevada outlines the risk of straying into the Yucca Flat testing ground, America's atomic backyard 


sensors record the bomb 
explosion in the few mil- 
lionths of a second before they 
are destroyed. Gases are 
yiifferi through tubes buried 
with the cables and foe heart 
of the explosion is drilled to 
study the chemical traces. 

An increasing n um ber of 
tests involve tunnels driven 
into Rainier Mesa, overlook- 
ing Yucca Flat Small battle- 
field bombs are te s t e d in this 
way, buried except for a 
tapered steel pipe, lOin across 
near the bomb but 14ft across 
at the entrance. As the bomb 
explodes, a pulse of magnetic 
waves and radiation passes 
along the tube before it seals. 
Recent research suggests that 
such pulses could disable 
modem micro-electronics mid 
so military equipment can be 
checked and “hardened” 
a gains t damag e. 

The two weapons lab- 
oratories are ran by the 
University of California for 
the Department of Energy. 
Bubbling with pride and new 
schemes, they attract brilliant 
young physicists and boast 
high-powered computing 


facilities. They also have little 
time for any kind of nuclear 
test ban. 

“Right now, the nuclear 
weapons programme is more 
exciting to work in than I've 
ever known it”, says Paul 
Robinson, a principal asso- 
ciate director at Los Alamos. 

“There are lots of new ideas 
being looked at in offensive 
uses, defence and defence 
suppression. A comprehen- 
sive test bon would prohibit 
our most important experi- 
ments. As experimentalists we 


would have little productive 
research to do. A ban is the 
wrong way to go. It distracts 
from foe real aim of reducing 
foe stockpiles of nuclear 
weapons". 

in terms of physics, the 
research is undoubtedly fas- 
cinating. Nuclear explosions 
generate conditions that can- 
not be duplicated in the 
laboratory. Bombs produce 
blast, heat and radiation, and 
a warhead op timising what- 
ever factors are required can 
now be designed. 


Stockpiled nuclear weapons 
deteriorate like any mu- 
nitions. The Polaris Mk 1 
warhead suffered corrosion of 
its uranium charge and prob- 
lems with arming mecha- 
nisms. The conventional 
explosive charge in the Po- 
seidon warhead deteriorated 
and theW45 warhead suffered 
crumbling of its nuclear 
charges. 

Problems like deterioration 
make testing essential, accord- 
ing to many experts. But their 
views are not shared by every- 




one. A group of prominent 
American physicists is ada- 
mant that continued .nuclear 
testing is unnecessary. “Such 
explosions", says Nobel laure- 
ate Hans Befoe, “have never 
revealed problems that did 
not show op during non- 
nuclear tests and 
maintenance”. 

Hugh DeWitt, a physicist at 
Lawrence Livermore, believes 
his own group to have domi- 
nated the thinking behind US 
arms policy. “The 
laboratories' management has 


rX YUCCA I 50 miles 

Vyp- 

Las VBQBS*** pfixzQHK 


repeatedly convinced poli- 
ticians over the years thai high 
technology can provide na- 
tional security; thai tech- 
nological solutions to the arms 
race are a better bet than 
political solutions through 
negotiations”, DeWitt says. 

“Many new ideas for Star 
Wars originated here at Liver- 
more. This race is damaging 
both superpowers economi- 
cally and can only sow dis- 
trust The risks are too great”. 

©Ttmom Nampipm Ltd. IMS 


All 9 Beethoven Symphonies 


Detainee release cheers Zapu 

Harare inches towards unity 


The sudden release from 
detention on Monday of 10 
prominent Zimbabweans ac- 
cused of plotting to overthrow 
the Government has made 
dear that the Prime Minister, 
Mr Robert Mugabe, is serious 
about concluding long-stalled 
unity talks between his ruling 
Zanu party and the Zapu party 
of the opposition leader, Mr 
Joshua Nkorao. 

Mr Mugabe also promised 
to review the cases or all those 
detained under security laws 
or held for “political" crimes. 

Hundreds of Mr Nkomo’s 
supporters qualify for such a 
review. Some of them, Mr 
Mugabe said, could be re- 
leased almost immediately. 

Mr Nkomo was not avail- 
able for comment yesterday, 

UN fear on 
Cambodia 
refugees 

Bangkok (Renter) — Cotm- 


From a Correspondent, Harare 

but another influential Zapu 
official said font something 
akin to Mr Mugabe’s gesture 
had been sought since the two 
groups began discussing unity 
late last year. 

“Zantfs attitude now is one 
of peace . . . unity is just a 
matter of time, possibly a very • 
short time,” said the Zapu 
official who asked not to be 
identified. 

There is speculation that an 
agreement could even be con- 
cluded before the eighth sum- 
mit of the 101-nation Non- 
Aligned Movement, which 
begins in Harare under Mr 
Mugabe's chairmanship a 
week today. 

The men just released in- i 
dude three Zimbabwe Na- i 
tional Army brigadiers and i 


four of Mr Nkomo's most 
trusted party officials. 

But noticeably absent from 
their ranks is Mr Dumiso 
Dabengwa, Mr Nkomo's So- 
viet-trained intelligence chief 
during the Rhodesian war and 
the only man thought capable 
of taking over leadership of 
foe minority Ndebde tribe 
that is Zapu's power base once 
“the old man* steps down. 

He has been behind bars 
since 1982, despite his acquit- 
tal in a Harare High Court the 
following year of charges that 
be had plotted a coup. 

Mr Dabengwa is distrusted 
— some say feared — by many 
in Zanu. His release could be 
the last act before a unity 
agreement, or the epilogue 1 
immediately following a deaL 



\ M'rv il l- <)| 

I WH SMITH 

L j : tr i. ^ 



Aquino ends sweep 
after families flee 


From Keith Datam, Manila 



... f j 

ity c “ 




riMfiS 


V£j 


tries which have promised to 
resettle refugees cannot meet 
^ Thailand's deadline at the end 
f . of the year for moving 26,000 
> Cambodians out of a camp it 
wants to dose, according to the 
J United Nations High Com- 
missioner for Refugees. 

Mr Gerald Walzer, the 
UNHCR representative in 
Thailand, says that 5,000 
Cambodians at most might be 
seeded this year. 

Thailand said in Jnne that it 
would dose Khao I Dang 
? camp, near the Thaf-Cam- 
bodia border, at foe end of foe 
year and send remaining refu- 
gees to join in temporary 
border camps foe 250,000 
Cambodians not eligible for 
resettlement. 

The camp's dosnre and foe 
removal of foe refugees was 
not definite, be said. Thailand, 
the UNHCR and resettlement 
countries would continue to 
search for a durable solution 
for Khao I Dang's population. 

Thailand has been the coun- 
try of first asylum for most 
refugees from Vietnam, Cam- 
■! bodia and Laos since foe 1975 
f\ communist takeovers. 

* Since 1975, the United 
States has resettled about a 
million refugees. More than 
140.000 Cambodians have 
I been green new homes abroad 
\ since K h a o I Dang camp was 
Yf opened in 1979. 

** Thailand considers Indo- 
' Chinese refugees both an eco- 
nomic and security burden and 
has tried to discourage them 
by giving refugee status only to 
dear-cut political refugees or 
those with sponsors abroad. 


President Aquino yesterday 
suspended military operations 
against Communist rebels in a 
southern Philippines town in 
which six civilians have died 
La the crossfire and from 
which 1,000 families have 
fled. 

Her suspension order, the 
first she has so far issued, 
followed the warning of the 
Political Affairs Minister, Mr 
Antonio Cuenco, that military . 
actions in eight villages near 
Calamba town, 480 miles 
south of Manila, were “caus- 
ing displacement and hard- 
ship”. 

About 6,000 people had fled 
their homes and were shelter- 
ing in the town centre. He said 
that six refugees had died. 

Some of the victims were hit 
by military mortar fire di- 
rected against hideouts of foe 

Sikh kills 13 
of family over 
extremist link 

Delhi (AP) - A Sikh man 
killed 13 members of his 
family, including eight chil- 
dren, in Uttar Pradesh be- 


links with Such terrorists. 

The United News of India 
reported yesterday, fow Mr 
Gurrait Singh attacked bis 
family with a sword on Sun- 
day night after drinking with 
an unidentified friend, who is 
sa «d to be an extremist and to 
have helped in the killing. 

Two other people were seri- 
ously hurt is foe attack. 


Communist New People's 
Army, the state-nm Phil- 
ippine news agency reported. 

Air transport officials an- 
nounced yesterday that an 
airport in the northern home 
province of foe deposed lead- 
er, Mr Ferdinand Marcos, was. 
closed indefinitely to light 
aircraft landings amid persis- 
tent rumours that Mr Marcos 
intended to return from exile. 

Mr Marcos meanwhile has 
been accused of having di- 
verted millions of dollars in 
Japanese war reparations to 
secret Swiss bank accounts 
during his 20 years in office. 

■ “We have evidence to show 

some of the reparation pay- 
ments were diverted to Swiss 
banks,” the chairman of the 
Commission on Good Gov- 
ernment, Mr Jovito Salonga, 
told. a press conference. 

Bur kina Faso 
denies crisis 
after shuffle 

Ouagadougou (AP) — Presi- 
dent Sankara of Burkina Faso 
has dissolved bis Government 
and named three longstand- 
ing collaborators to act as 
“general co-ordinators.” 

In a decree oo Monday, he 
said that affairs would be 
handled by civil servants with 
the co-ordinators, Captain 
Blaise Compaore, Major Jean- 
, Baptists Boukary Lmganiand 
I Captain Henri Zongo. 

A spokesman said that foe 
action did not indicate a 
I “crisis.”' 



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SPECTRUM n 


V< v s 



THE HARVEST 
OF SORROW 

By Robert Conquest 
Part Three: The Cover-Up 




Stalin's slaoghter of the So- 
viet peasantry took place under 
an umbrella of lies so effec- 
tive that even most Western 
reporters either conld not or 
would not convey its signifi- 
cance. Others, like Sidney 
and Beatrice Webb, became 
apologists. And the terror 
sent an echo down the years 
which even today haunts the 
Kremlin's corridors. 



When paper can’t 
make people 


“They had gone over the country like a swarm of locusts and taken away everything edible": carts taking away grain 






Stalin had a profound grasp of what 
Hitler approvingly called the Big Lie, 
and the terror famine with which he 
killed millions in the Ukraine and 
other regions in the early 1930s was 
. the first major instance of the exercise 
of this technique of influencing public 
opinion. Every effort was made to 
persuade the west that no famine was 
taking place, and later that none had 
taken place. 

Even in 1932 it was not feasible to 
keep all foreigners out of the famine 
areas, and a number of true accounts 
reached western Europe and America. 
In most cases, journalists could not 
both keep their visas and reveal the 
facts, although Malcolm Muggeridge, 
who sent some of his reports sub rosa 
through the British diplomatic bag, 
reported: “The battlefield is as deso- 
late as in any war and stretches 
wider . . . on tbe one side, millions of 
starving peasants, their bodies often 
swollen from lack of food; on the 
other, soldier members of OGPU 
carrying out the instructions of the 
dictatorship of the proletariat 

"They had gone over the country 
like a swarm of locusts and taken away 
everything edible; they had shot or 
exiled thousands of peasants, some- 
times whole villages; they had reduced 
some of the most fertile land in the 
world to a melancholy desert” 

In the Soviet Union, no word about 
the famine was allowed to appear in 
the Press or elsewhere. People who 
referred to it were subject to arrest for 
anti-Soviet propaganda, usually being 
sentenced to five or more years in 
labour camps. 

In 1933 a soldier serving in 
Fedosiya in Lhe Crimea received a 
letter From his wife, describing the 
deaths of neighbours and the mis- 
erable condition of herself and their 
child. The political officer seized the 
letter and next day had the soldier 
denounce it as a forgery. The wife and 
son did not survive. 

One agronomist, bullied for sending 
a sick messenger, replied that the 
whole village was starving. The re- 
sponse was; "There is no starvation in 
the Soviet Union." 

Arthur Koestler, who was in Khar- 
kov in 1932-33, wrote that it gave him 
a most unreal feeling to read the local 
papers, full of pictures of young people 
smiling under banners and reports of 
awards to shock-brigaders, but "not 


one word about the local famine, 
epidemics, the dying out of whole 
villages ... the enormous land was 
covered with a blanket of silence". 

Outside tbe Soviet Union, the 
denials were hot and strong. The 
Soviet embassy in Washington 
claimed that the Ukraine's population 
had increased by 2 per cent per annum 
during the early 1930s. and that it had 
the lowest death-rate of any Soviet 
republic. 

Stalin was also abetted by many 
Westerners who for one reason or 
another wished to deceive or be 
deceived, in the huge work — Soviet 
Communism: A New Civilization? by 
Sidney and Beatrice Webb, which 
followed their visit to the Soviet 
Union in 1932 and 1933 — one finds 
the general hostility to the peasantry 
matching that of the Bolsheviks. The 
Webbs wrote of the peasants' 
“characteristic vices of greed and 


• DEATH TOLL ' ' ' | 

Peasant dead, 1930-37 
Arrested in this period, 
dyincj in camps later 

11 million 

3 J5 million 
14.5 million 

Of these: 

Dead as a result of 
dekulakization 

Dead in the 1932-3 famine 

6.5 million 

Ukraine 

5 million 

N Caucasus 

1 million 

elsewhere 

1 million 


cunning, varied by outbursts of 
drunkenness and recurrent periods of 
sloth". They also spoke approvingly of 
turning these backward characters 
“into public spirited co-operators, 
working upon a prescribed plan for the 
common product to be equitably 
shared among themselves” 

In a significant statement at the 
time, M.M. Khatayevich, a leading 
Communist, told a party activist “A 
ruthless struggle is going on between 
the peasantry and our regime. It’s a 
struggle to the death. This year was a 
test of our strength and their endur- 
ance. It took a famine to show them 
who is master here. It has cost millions 
of lives, but the collective farm system 
is here to stay. We've won the war.” 

With the “victory" won. however, 
Moscow realized that the disastrous 
agricultural situation could hardly be 


allowed to go on indefinitely. In 
February 1933, a “seed subsidy* was 
authorized' for the next harvest, with 
325,000 tons to go to the Ukraine. In 
the following month the grain collec- 
tion in the Ukraine was officially 
halted at last. 

The debilitated peasantry were now 
launched on a new harvest campaign. 
Neither they nor their surviving 
horses were capable of bard labour, yet 
the Ukrainian government called for 
harder work. . The sowing of 1933 was 
accomplished in various ways. The 
inadequate local work force was 
supplemented from outside. Students 
and others from the towns were 
“mobilized" to reap the harvest and 
army squads were sent to help. In one 
village, where the whole population 
had either died or left, troops were 
kept in tents away from the village and 
told, as others had been, that there had 
been an epidemic. 

The central fact of the whole famine 
is that the Soviet Union's total grain 
crop for 1932 was no worse than that 
of 1931, and was only 12 per cent 
below the 1926-30 average. It was 
from famine level, but procurements 
were up by 44 per cent There was no 
way in which local readjustments 
could have prevented the crisis and 
the famine; and it can be blamed qnite 
unequivocally on Stalin and the 
Moscow leadership. 

There has never been an official 
investigation of tbe rural terror in the 
Ukraine and neighbouring territories 
in 1 930-33; no statement on the loss of 
human life has been issued; nor have 
the archives been opened to indepen- 
dent researchers. Nevertheless, we are 
in a position to make reasonably 
sound estimates of the numbers who 
died. 

The casualty rate varied consid- 
erably by area and even village, fium 
10 per cent to 100 per cent. In villages 
of 3,000 to 4,000 people (Oriivka, 
Smolanka, Hrabivka), fewer than 100 
were left. 

Nowadays the term “genocide” is 
often used rhetorically, but it certainly 
appears that such a charge can be 
levelled against the Soviet Union for 
its actions in the Ukraine. 

It was Nikolai Bukharin's view that 
the worst result of the events of 1930- 
33 was not so much the sufferings of 
the peasantry, frightful though these 
were. It was the “deep change in the 


psychological outlook or those Com- 
munists who participated in this 
campaign and, instead of going mad, 
became professional bureaucrats for 
whom terror was henceforth a normal 
method of administration, and obedi- 
ence to any order from above a high 
virtue", diagnosing “a real de- 
humanization of the people working 
in the Soviet apparatus". 

The main lesson seems to be that 
the Communist ideology provided the 
motivation for an unprecedented 
massacre of men, women and chil- 
dren. and that this ideology, perhaps a 
set-piece theory, turned out to be a 
primitive and schematic approach to 
matters far too complex for iL 
Sacrifices of millions of people were 
made and they were in vain. 

The question of whether the present 
leaders of the Soviet Union would be 
willing to kill tens of millions of 
foreigners in a war, or suffer a loss of 


The present rulers 
are heirs of that 
dreadful history 


millions of their own subjects, is 
sometimes canvassed. The fact that 
the older leaders were direct accom- 
plices in the actual killing of milli ons 
of Ukrainians and others in order to 
establish the political and social order 
prescribed by their doctrine, and that 
the young leaders still justify the 
procedure, may perhaps be regarded 
as not without some relevance. 

The events which took place in the 
Soviet Union in the early 1930s 
cannot be shrugged off as too remote 
to be of any current significance. So 
long as they cannot be seriously 
investigated or discussed in the coun- 
try where they took place, it is clear 
that they are in no sense part of the 
past but a living issue very much to be 
taken into account when considering 
tbe Soviet Union as it is today. The 
present rulers remain the beirs and 
accomplices of that dreadful history. 

Adapted from The Harvest Of Sorrow, 
by Robert Conquest, to be published by 
Hutchinson on August 28. price 
£16.95. 


Japanese play with Stoppard language 


Theatre director Leon Rnbin 
gained an intriguing insight 
into the problems presented by 
his most exotic assignment on 
the day when the Japanese 
leading lady and Tom 
Stoppard came to dinner. 

Rubin organised the infor- 
mal soiree last month after 
accepting an offer to direct The 
Real Thing, Stoppard's most 
recent play, in Japan, in 
Japanese, by a Japanese 
company. 

An interpreter evidently 
conveyed the playwright's wry 
humour with some success, for 
Kiwako Taichi, star of the 
Bungaku-za company, was 
highly amused. But to Rubin's 
consternation, every time she 
laughed she discreetly covered 
her mouth after the Japanese 
fashion. Not the most appro- 
priate gesture for the adul- 
teress. outspoken Annie, 


"That’s exactly the kind of 
key question we'U have to 
resolve,” Rnbin admitted. “Do 
I tell her a western character 
would never do that, and would 
I then make her feel awkward 
and uncomfortable as a Japa- 
nese actress? 1 don't know the 
answer yet.” 

Before even contemplating 
the challenge of presenting a 
play in a language as in- 
comprehensible to bim as 
advanced nuclear physics, 
Rubin accepts he will have to 
come to terms with the dif- 
ferent culture. “Apparently 
they don't overtly discuss 
relationships in the way the 
characters in the play do, and 
Kiwako said she was finding it 
embarrassing and difficult 
even to think about playing 
some scenes." 


Theatre audiences 
in Japan face 
a puzzling 
introduction to 
western humour 


ST. JOSEPH’S 
HOSPICE 


MAREST. LONDON E84SA. 
(Charity ReL No. 231323) 
“Her final days wlh you wee 
among the happiest of her life. 
Your gentle skills convert the 
drnsj business of dying into an 
art-farm." 

Thee poignant words hum a 


andapm by grateful families. 

They are quoted here in 
thanksgiving to you far file land 
support on which our care de- 
pends. 

\ Sister Superior. S 


The proper way to express 
love in Japan, for example, 
would be for a lady to glance 
qnickly and then lower her 
eyes until the man looked 
away. Alternatively, Miss 
Taichi suggested that sbe 
could signal her affection by 
mending a hole in his pullover. 

“So dearly there is a cul- 
tural gap to cross," Rubin 
observed, with some under- 
statement. “But Tom's ans- 
wer. which I agreed with, was 
that we still have to deal with 
these effects, and for the 
Japanese it will be a strange, 
exotic, perhaps quizzical play. 
That should be fine; it's the 
quality we are looking for, but 
it's going to be a strange 
journey." 

So what makes a young 
director with a successful play 
running in the West End 



Culture shock: Leon Rubin 
{Double Double at the For- 
tune) and a promising career 
move to the Bristol Old Vic 
pending, embark on such a 
magical mystery tour? “It 
seemed like fan. I think it was 
tbe idea of total immersion in a 
foreign culture that was so 
exciting and invigorating. 

“Also, it seemed an odd 
choice of play for a Japanese 
company. Hie oddness ap- 
pealed to me because it is so 
quin (essentially English in its 
theme and manner, and, of 
course, so did the language 
There are so many puns and 
plays with words that it in- 
trigues me to know r how they 
will translate, not just in the 
literary way, but how an 


audience will respond to that 
humour. That's the challenge, 
to try and assimilate a Japa- 
nese cultural eye-view of a 
western relationship.” 

After deciding to remain as 
faithful to the English produc- 
tion as possible, Rnbin has 
already encountered some mi- 
nor practical problems. 

A set design for a. scene, 

which takes place in a train, 
recently arrived from Japan. 
“It was just like the interior of 
one of their modern, high- 
speed trams, nothing at all like 
our slow inter-cities. So we 
had to rework it” 

.Another problem may be 
repeated references to the 
radio programme Desert Is- 
land Discs. Miss Taichi found 
them unintelligible and Rubin 
admits be is worried that the 
humour may be lost on Japa- 
nese audiences, who have 
never heard of it. 

“I discussed it with Tom 
and he pointed oat that In the 
American production, there 
had been no problem. He 
recalled somebody coming up 
to bim in New York saying 
bow dever he had been to 
invent that funny radio pro- 
gramme. One hopes it would 
work for a Japanese person.” 

Rubin must take it on trust 
that the interpreter and bi- 
lingual Japanese assistant 
director have understood tbe 
nuances and subtleties of 
Stoppard's peculiar humour. 

“lhe main difficulty will be 
how to play a line m rehearsals 
to get the desired effect. 

I here's bound to be a whole 
different approach, how a 
Japanese actor would deliver a 

< 


line, a look, or a movement, as 
opposed to an English actor. 

A more delicate and poten- 
tially embarrassing problem 
will be Robin's ignorance of 
tbe elaborate codes of courtesy 
and behariour.“I think one 
can easily make mistakes, and 
say exactly the wrong thing," 

Preliminary dealings with 
the assistant director gave hhn 
an insight into the difficulty. 
“He’s been extremely polite, 
but I've understood that be- 
neath all the courtesy, some- 
times he wanted to. say he 
totally disagreed. It fakes a 
long time; yon have to be very 
patient. Ti lt’s die key to 
starting work in a Japanese 
environment” 

His latest venture is rare, 
but not unique. Kim Grant, the 
director, accepted a similar 
offer from Japan to stage The 
Diary of Anne Frank, bat 
realised Only later that it was 
to be a rock musical version. 

Rubin leaves England at tbe 
end of the month for five 
weeks" rehearsal before the 
show opens in Tokyo's prosa- 
ically-named Sunshine The- 
atre. Then it’s back to England 
for his first production as 
artistic director at Bristol, a 
musical version of the film The 
Blue ingel. 

Presenting irreverent En- 
glish attitudes to love and 
marriage in downtown Tokyo 
will he admits, be a hard act to 
follow. "W hat next? I think 
Shakespeare in Chinese wonld 
be interesting, or maybe Che- 
khov in Russian . . " 


No one is ever going to 
become chairman ora major 
corporation today without 
two. perhaps even three, de- 
grees or qualifications; the 
speaker i$ Clive DeveieU, 44- 
year-old headhunter for the 
manufacturing industry, 
marketing, banking and 
insurance. 

It is a view based upon his 
experience as a leading 
recruitment consultant. Yet, 
it is an attitude which is not 
necessarily borne out by the 
beliefs of some of the current 
heads of industry who still 
insist that they are more 
impressed by “the man" than 
by any formal qualifications. 

For the 18-year-old school- 
leaver it all adds up to an 
impossible dilemma. Is it 
better to spend those three 
valuable years reading for a 
degree which may have noth- 
ing to do with his or her 
fimire career or invest the 
time getting a foothold on the 
bottom rung of the commer- 
cial ladder? 

DevereU, a partner with 
recruitment consultants Bull 
Thompson, firmly believes 
that a university education is 
invaluable in today's compet- 
itive job marketplace. “The 
advantage of a degree is that 
it proves to employers 
reasonable intelligence, 
reasonable drive and interest 
in long-terjn careers", be 
argues. “Without one, long- 
term futures will un- 
doubtedly be limited.” 

He also feels that today’s 
employers only regard jobs as 
“being serious" when they 
are over the £20,000 a year 
mark. “They may not be 
concerned about total perfor- 
mance and total promolabil- 
ity below that so long as the 
total job is being done in a 
competent fashion. Where 
you start using management 
skills of a conceptual form, 
you are talking of jobs above 
that level and that's where the 
person without a degree 
would find themselves facing 
stiff competition and would 
also find themselves being 
questioned as to their own 
intellectual drive capacity." 

For, the average youngster, 
the jargon is as daunting as 
the prospects it portrays, yet 
even employers occasionally 
suffer doubts as to tbe 
reliability of what some of 
them regard as the graduate 
rule-of-thumb. 

“The bit I am always 
uneasy about — and we 
haven’t found a solution to — 
is that all big companies tend 
to find themselves milling 
around competing for the top 
five per cent of the university 
output and one has that 
uneasy feeling that lurking in 
the next 25 or 50 per cent are 
all sorts of people who may in 
the event turn out to be much 
more practical operators in 
business than those top five 
per cent", admits Ronnie 
Archer, personnel director of 
Unilever. 

“A much higher propor- 
tion of able children goes to 
university now and I 
wouldn't want to see it other- 
wise, but Td always recognise 
there are a number of people 
doing relatively dull un- 
demanding jobs who are 
actually capable of being 
directors of public com- 
panies. It’s merely they have 
never been tested on the 
difficult things." 

The problem, according to 
Archer, lies in identifying pre- 
cisely who these potential 
directors might be. “In prin- 
ciple, I am absolutely in 
favour of as wide an entry as 
one can get — blocking 
nothing”, he says. “In prac- 
tice. granted a heavy un- 
employment situation, it is 
remarkably difficult to devise 
an organised way of getting in 
the people who don’t come by 
tbe usual routes — although 
one would love to do so. 

“A proportion of the top 
stream are going to go for the 
City and tbe rewards in the 
City at the moment are so 
high that it is difficult trying 
to compete with it" 

To the young layman con- 
fronted by the often bewilder- 
ing choice of career 
possibilities underlined by 
the decision about whether or 


7 


Work or university? With 
A level results published, 
some of the big corporate 
headhunters explain their 
attitudes to graduates 


not to go to university, it may 
come as a surprise to discover 
the extent of the non -gradu- 
ate opportunities currently to 
be found within the hallowed 
square mile of the City. 

“ The profile of the City 
has changed and so have the 
customers", says Cify ob- 
server Brian Law, former 
director of S & W Berisfoni, 
the international commodity 
traders. "Nowadays the mar- 
ket-maker is likely to be more 
plebeian than patrician. Bro- 
kers need something of the 
smoothness you find in se- 
nior advertising executives, 
all things to all men, good 
company, gregarious. You 
feel comfortable with them 
because if you don’t you'll go 
to someone else." 

These are the traders, tra- 
ditionally the backbone of the 
City and who. according to 
Law, are “loyal, hard-work- 
ing. energetic, able to attract a 
following, go out and root the 
business, have the charm — 


degree counterparts. The Na- 
tional Westminster Bank, 
which takes on 150 graduates 
a year compared to 1200 A- 
level entrants, expects at least 
half of its topmost positions 
to be occupied by the prod- 
ucts of its graduate develop- 
ment plan. “As far as wc are 


concerned the right graduate 
and the right 'A' Level entrant 


and the right 'A' Level entrant 
both have very good pros- 
pects and compete equally ”, 
says Mike Shippam, head' of 
personnel planning. “But just 
looking at the figures will tell 
you that the graduates have 
greater chance of success. 
But, having said that, there 
are still a significant number 
of vacancies on that exec- 
utive development plan for 
'A 1 or, indeed, better 'O’ 
levels to aspire to. The aca- 
demic qualification is, of 
itself, not important but what 
you tend to see is a marked 
tendency for the better-edu- 
cated to be coming through 
more strongly." 


PlkJ LovtfK* 



. ,,r 


‘Without a degree, long-term 
futures will be limited’ 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT CLIVE DEVERELL 


and it may be a rough charm 
— to get people to trade with 
them and to get them to take 
decisions'’ — none of them 
characteristics formally 
taught at university. 

“They start young”, says 
Law. “It's a jungle and they 
have to fight their way up 
from the bade office clerks. If 
they prove themselves good 
as traders or at winning client 
business which is more im- 
portant than speculating with 
the firm's capital in most 
companies, they’ll do well. 
Honesty is important Educa- 
tion attainment is 
secondary." 

That is the present. The 
future, however, according to 
City headhunter, Colin 
Barry, of Overton Shirley and 
Barry, is likely to favour the 
applicant with a degree. His 
view is that to survive long- 
term with better communica- 
tions systems, people are 
going to have to be better 
educated. 

“When you apply for a 
great number of jobs these 
days in middle career they 
want a degree and if you 
haven't got one you are at a 
great disadvantage. I think 
that unless someone is excep- 
tionally entrepreneurial he 
should lake up the option of 
going to university.” 

Certainly, in the cut-and- 
thrust world of banking, 
graduates stand a vastly bet- 
ter chance when it comes to 
promotion than their non- 


The fact that Shippam 
stresses the need for "people 
who are clear-thinking 
leaders'* emphasizes the 
banking industry's subtle bias 
towards graduates. “Our ap- 
praisal system is an entirely 
overt one", insists Shippam. 
“Everyone knows exactly 
what is said about them." 

And while that is un- 
doubtedly the case in many 
organisations these days, it is 
nonetheless inevitable that 
non-graduates who fail to 
make the grade should feel 
that they are perhaps the 
victims of academic 


prejudice. 
It is a sii 


It is a situation with which 
Diane Halfpenny, 28-year- 
old graduate recruitment 
manager of Courtauld's, is 
only too familiar. “An A level 
entrant who has been in the 
company for four years may 
often feel, wrongly we think, 
that graduates get preferential 
treatment because there is a 
lot of attention being paid to 
them”, she says. 

“Our textiles division, 
which traditionally took peo- 
ple without degrees, is now 
tending to look for graduates. 
But those without them are 
still reaching manager, gen- 
eral manager status. The 
board all nave degrees bat 
senior management do not" 


Alison Miller and 
Sally Brampton 

© Tinws Nswspapars Ltd* 1988 


Tamil refugees 

In “Sharks who offer sanct- 
uary” (Spectrum, August 15), 
the number of refugees into 
West Germany - 13,000 in 
1985 and 1,875 m 1986 so far 
— referred to Tamil refugees 
only. The totals for all refugees 
entering Germany are 75,000 
and 40,000 respectively 


iiiQioia ama 


Gavin Bell 

£ Traa Newspapers Ltd, 

>7 


Tomorrow 

On the Books 
page, Enoch 
Powell reviews the 
collected works , of 
political 
economist 
Thomas Malthus 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1033 

ACROSS 

I Splittablerocfctf) 

4 Swimming style (6) 

7 Utter (4) 

8 Etrurian (8) 

9 Colliding (8) 

13 Pastry dish (3) 

M ‘Posh’ accent (6,7) 

17 Thus (3) 

19 Formal essay (8) 

24 Mourned (8) 

25 Ice crystal flakes (4) 

26 Characterise (6) 

27 Cave (6) 

DOWN 

1 Seigneur's Channel 
Island (4) 

2 Showing respect (9) 

3 Violent gale pan (5) 

4 Wader (5) 

5 Hard cnspbread(4) 

ia S > .£° k>urf 5, 13 Horse high jumping 20 Bad-tempered (5) 

10 SnaUhmmgiSl .-S'. 21 Echo sounder (5) 

11 Greek peace goddess ” » 22 Foregn Lcpou a 

(51 15 Fort tnoat 141 14) 

12 Legoflanibl^l 18 Garibaldi stale (5) 23 nnuhki.il 


asaa agiiaiiiil 
■ -i ■ ■ ■ 3 

agiiini aaii 


ifinii anm 


M Bad-tempered (5) 

21 Echo snunderfSl 

22 Foreign Lcgioo cap 
W 

23 Double (4) 


(5) 15 Fon moat 141 “ 

12 Legofbnibl^l 18 Garibaldi state ( 51 23 Double (4) 

SOLUTIONS TO NO 1032 

• n 


S > 


d 5 




* A 4 

A 


k 

% l 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 



11 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


C PCOnl^ ^ It’ s n °t an epidemic. It is serious and I understand the anxiety, 

® hut meningitis is rare compared to the risks of other infections 9 



Hv. Unlike most detectives on the trail erf 1 a 
mass killer Dennis Jones knows almost all 
there is to know about his killer — name; 
. . i description arid methods. The burden that 
>t‘ Si, \ wearies him in the midst of a public outcry 

- ,t mv is the knowledge that neither he nor anyone 

,‘rv , else can prevent more deaths -at least, not 

- .’• ■pti, yet 

, t > ' v; A rash -of blue pins across a map of 
s^sAk' England and Wales shows the -relentless 
."•vS spread of meningococcal meningitis, die 
. '' disease that so far this year has taken 86 
••• •„'!:> lives among 539 cases, most of them 
..."' children. Every other day. Dr Jones, 
-■ " ■?; director of the public health laboratory at 
the Withington hospital, Manchester, 
sticks more pins in the map, 

■. , ‘ The laboratory is the investigation centre 
■ for the outbreak of the disease. Every 

- 1 i - :.. morning the post brings another batch of 

v, small glass phials containing samples of the 

.1; "• bacteria taken firm victims as far apart as 
Cornwall and Teesside. The samples are 
. grown m culture, tested and typed in the 
laboratory, and added to the stockpile of 
V r S. evidence about the disease. 

, In me last seven months, laboratory staff 

. *’ have tested about 2,500 samples, twice the 
-V total of last year’s work on all types of 
'V,' ; meningitis, while also fulfilling their role as 
monitors of all other infections illnesses in 
i s£*- the greater Manchester area. 

- -■.> ;■ Dr Jones’s problem is having to maimnin 

the surveillance of the fatal ■ form of 
-C" meningitis, known as B1 5, for which there 
^ '' is as yet no vaccine, while striving to 
reassure an increasingly worried and 
~ ^ impatient public that the threat is less 

- v '-' serious than most people seem to think. 

• The illness can be spread by carriers of 


the bacterium coughing and sneezing. It 
enters the bloodstream and produces an 
inflammation of the meninges, the mem- 
branes around the brain and spinal cord, 
and can cause death or disability. Early 
treatment with antibiotics is highly effec- 
tive but the onset of symptoms can be 
frighteningly quick. 

“It’s not an epidemic”, he insists wearily. 
“It's not a national problem. The number 
of cases is comparatively small It is a 
serious situation, and I understand people's 
anxiety, but the disease is rare compared to 
the risks of other infections. Please, try to 
keep a sense of proportion”. 

Although 86 deaths among 539 cases 
suggests a very high mortality rate. Dr 
Jones believes that the true rate will later be 
seen as about 5 per cent of the cases. 
Research workers are predicting a total of 
about 800 cases this year, inevitably 
including more deaths. The tide of the 
infection ebbs and flows and is likely to 
show a resurgence early next year. 

The present figures show a 50 per cent in- 
crease in cases on last year— which was 30 
per cent higher than the year before. But the 
current outbreak is still well below the peak 
of 1974, when 1 300 cases were recorded. 

The medical detective work behind this 
outbreak involves, just like most police 
investigations, steady, but slow progress, 
using iong-establishea methods. There is 
little room for flashes of inspiration, little 
chance of a startling breakthrough. 

Those involved are microbiologists and 
bacteriologists m hospitals and laboratories 
wherever cases of BI 5 have occurred — the 
so-called “duster” areas, of which the 
Stroud district of Gloucestershire has 


Menmgrtls- 
the cluster areas 



become the focus of most attention. In 
addition, specialists in Norway, Holland, 
Iceland and the United States are pooling 
their expertise and offering it to British 
research teams to help speed the develop- 
ment of a vaccine. 

One vaccine is now undergoing safety 
and efficacy tests at Port on Down, the 
Government's microbiological research 


establishment. Scientists there have been 
offered the vaccine and a wealth of data by 
colleagues in the United States. A trial of 
the vaccine is likely to start next year in 
Norway, where BI5 first emereed in the 
early 1970s. 

Dr Call Frasch. the American scientist 
most closely involved, said yesterday; 
“Experimental batches of the vaccine are 
now being made ax Porton Down but 1 can't 
see it being used until next year.” 

The irony for Britain is that, serious as 
the impact of the disease undoubtedly is. 
there are not yet enough cases to justify 
large-scale tests of the vaccine among the 
population. Hence the trial in Norway. 

According to Dr Frasch, the vaccine has 
been shown to stimulate the type of 
antibodies that are most associated with 
the B 1 5 strain. But it must still be shown to 
be effective and safe before it can be used 
on the most vulnerable section of the 
community, children and young adults. 

No vaccine is completely free of risk, and 
the current epidemic of whooping cough 
owes some or its severity to inflated public 
fears in the last 10 years about the possible 
side-effects of a vaccine for that illness. 

To immunize a large number of people 
against BIS, when there are still compar- 
atively few cases, could possibly create a 
new problem if side-effects emerged in 
numbers approaching the actual cases of 
the disease. It is such a prospect that 
em phasizes the need for extreme caution in 
introducing a new vaccine. 

Baroness Tnimpington, the junior health 
minister, said yesterday; “I really hope that 
this vaccine is the answer. But it has to be 
thoroughly tested to verify the American 


claims that are being made for it It may be 
between one and two years before it can be 
used”. 

Though much is known about the B15 
strain, puzzles remain. Why do outbreaks 
occur, and recur, in specific pans of the 
country, while other areas are unscathed? 
Why do some individuals appear to be 
particularly vulnerable to the infection, 
when many thousands of others are 
symptom-less carriers? 

One theory, that certain people have an 
inherited factor that puts them more at 
risk, is being advanced by bacteriologists at 
the City Hospital Edinburgh. 

They believe that the protective mol- 
ecules which the body's immune system 
normally produces are not generated in 
some people. They found by looking at the 
blood of some of those infected by Bl 5 that 
a high proportion had not produced those 
antibodies from their natural defences. 

Further studies of this group of the 
population, known as non-secretors, could 
help to determine whether they are among 
the leading candidates for vaccination. 
“We could also help to explain why the 
outbreaks occur in clusters,” Dr Raymond 
Brenle. one of the Edinbuigfa research 
team, said. He and colleagues are now 
seeking information from doctors in the 
Stroud area about which victims of the 
illness are non-secretors. 

Dr Jones, who with Baroness Trump- 
in gion and other senior health officials 
attended a recent public meeting of anxious 
families in the Stroud area, welcomes all 
the clues that other research workers have 

to offer. Thomson Prentice 






The author of a new biography of 
Emma Hamilton could soon be as 
famous as her subject if the hype 
is any guide. Vai Hennessy reports 

Nelson's birthday!”) of this 



'lllUUii 


V !* 


? * ? 
* » * 


- Vs 


I W 1 


1 


f the name 

rings no befls.it soon wilL 
You can take it from an 
• effervescent publishing 
whiz-kidette called Mary 
, Caulfield that by next month, 
CrCC, iOUE*. if everything $oes to a meticu- 
y lously contrived, phenom- 
■""!£ enally expensive hype-plan, 
the name Flora Fraser will be 
tripping off the lips of tele- 
vision presenters, radio 
reporters, chat-show hosts, 
magazine readers, and droves 
of brainwashed biography ad- 
dicts who will be ransacking 
shops for Flora Fraser’s new - 
biography Beloved Emma — 
The Life qf Emma Lady 
Hamilton. 

Instructed by Lord 
Weidenfeld, of Weidenfeld 
and Nicdson, the commend- 
ably-effidenl Ms Caulfield 
placed a double-page 
advertisement in The Book 
Seller , announcing “the debut 
of a major new biographer - 
Flora Fraser". With this tactic 
she also alerted the book trade 
to the availability of free 
“stunning four-colour, oval 
posters and showcards”, to- 
news of a “major feature” in 
The Sunday Times colour 
magazine with photographs by 
Lord Snowdon, and to a full 
publicity campaign to co- 
incide with publication (“-on 


“brilliant new biography”. . 

According to Ms Chuffiddit 
is Lord Weidenfeld himself 
who bas&votired Flora Fraser 
with the “major new 
biographer" tag. Despite her 
only previous publications be- 
ing a facsimile edition of a 
Victorian lady’s diaries, and a 
romantic thriller called Doa- 
ble Portrait, (about which the 
sole reviewer grumbled “Miss 
Fraser closes the bedroom 
door firmly in the reader’s 
face”), a mere glance at the 
manuscript of flora Fraser’s 
first biography convinced 
Lord Weidenfeld that this 
book was, to use Ms 
Caulfield's phrase, “a biggie”. 

Ms Caulfield pulled out all 
the publicity stops. The afore- 
mentioned oval colour posters 
("ova/ posters are so much 
more distinctive”) and 
showcards were distributed 
nationwide. Sales reps were 
mobilised with Beloved 
Emma press packs. Flattering 
photographs of Flora Baser 
were sent to women’s maga- 
zines. Programmes such as 
Woman 's Hour , Wogan , 
Breakfast Time, the John 
Dunne Show. Kaleidoscope, 
Bookshelf and so forth were 
notified of the “brilliant new 



y - 
F & * 

Three generations of biographers: Flora Fraser, her mother Antonia Fraser, top right, and grandmother Lady Longford 


If Ms Caulfield entertained 


the least doubt about whether 
the world was ready for Flora 
Fraser, by the time die has 
done her strategic stuff it 
certainly win be. 

Furthermore, as she admits 
with a discreet cough, her 
“major new biographer” does 
have something of a head 
start “Obviously the feet that 
Flora Fraser is the daughter of 
Antonia Fraser and grand- 
daughter of Lady Longford 
makes her particularly in- 
teresting from a publicity 
point of view, especially as die 
is from the third generation of 
brilliant biographers. As it 
happens, Flora's background 
and the book lend themselves 
to good publicity angles. And 
being young and very, very 
attractive is also a help, es- 
pecially when it comes to 
getting the TV people in- 


terested. 1 know they want 
someone wbo looks good and 
is a good talker. They know I 
won’t offer them a dud”. 

And happily lodes aren't 
everything. Occasionally these 
enquire about 


M s Caulfield ex- 
plains that this is 
where her “short 
sales points” leaf- 
lets come into their own. 
“These contain brief sum- 
maries of the bode, the high- 
lights, the juicy bits and so 
on... also a synopsis of Flora's 
fascinating background and 
career. They are well worth the 
minimal extra expense and 
provide researchers with the 
instant information they 
require.” 

Ms Caulfield confesses that 


her publicity coup de grace 
was obtaining a window at 
Harrods. This didn’t cost a 
penny. For the week of 
publication, Harrods* window 
will be festooned with those 
stunning four-colour oval 
posters, with Beloved Emma 
showcards with huge blown- 
up photographs of Flora Fra- 
ser, and with a display of 
model ships, flags, naval uni- 
form and general Nelsoniana. 

Moreover, Ms Caulfield 
shrewdly contacted the editor 
of Nelson Despatch and the 
secretary of the Nelson Soci- 
ety, and the upshot is that 
Flora Fraser will give the 
annual Nelson Birthday lec- 
ture in Porstmouth. Her book 
will of course, be on sale in 
the vestibule. 

There is also a Foyle's 
literary luncheon to which 


Flora Fraser is invited. And a 
possible sign-in at her local 
bookshop. Finally, to coincide 
with publication Ms Caulfield 
saw to it that Flora Fraser was 
commissioned to write 
simultaneous pieces for 
■Harpers {on Emma’s garden at 
Caserta) and Cosmo (on 
Emma’s licentious cavortings 
in Naples). Vogue will print an 
interview with her, written by 
her sister. Taller is doing a 
review. And of course there's 
that colour magazine feature 
with photos by Lord 
Snowdon. 

Here it is worth mentioning 
from an impartial viewpoint 
that unlike the many bad 
books let loose upon the world 
in similar extravaganzas of 
costly hype. Beloved Emma 
fairly lives up to its advance 
publicity. It is bewi tellingly 


‘All the media 
exposure 
doesn’t terrify 
me at all’ 

readable, authoritative, and a 
sufficiently rip-roaring work 
to merit Lord WeidenfekTs 
impulsive financial outlay. 

As for 27-year-old Flora 
Fraser herself, she is definitely 
no “dud". She has all the self- 
assurance and charm you 
would expect of the daughter 
of Antonia Fraser and the 
granddaughter of Lady Long- 
ford. She is as bright and 
articulate as you would hope 
of someone educated at St 
Paul’s School in Florence and 
at Wadham College, Oxford, 
where she read Classes. 

S he is flummoxed by the 
“major new bio- 
grapher” hype. “Urn, 
well I mean, it's cer- 
tainly not for me to say. 
Emma is a major subject, and 
it's certainly a major biog- 
raphy. A lot of the novelty of 
my book lies in examining 
Nelson's letters to Emma. 

“She was an adorable 
character. A previous lover, 
not exactly her first, passed 
her on to her husband-to-be 
with the words *Sbe is a dean 
and sweet bedfellow’. People 
were very kind and allowed 
me first-time access to private 
manuscripts in England and 
Italy. The most exciting part 
was going to Naples, tracing 
Emma's footsteps.” 

Flora Fraser is unruffled by 
snide suggestions that family 
connections have boosted her 
literary career. “That sort of 
carping is honestly not some- 
thing that bothers me. I've 
always had my mother and my 
grandmother. The feet that 
both can write could, with any 
luck, make people suppose 
that coming from the same 
stable I might have written 
something readable too. I 
sincerely hope so. All the 
inevitable media exposure 
doesn't terrify me at all It 
should be fun. Great fun.” 

Q Ttnwa Mwapapara Ud. 1388 

Beloved Emma: The Life of 
Emma Lady Hamilton, pub- 
lished by Weidenfeld & Nicob 
son on September 29, £12.95. 


TALKBACK 


Are the 
Saudis 
feminist? 

From Sarah Holland. 

The Gatehouse Cottage, 
Naworih, Brampton, 

Cumbria 

Dr Germaine Greer (Augast 
15) chums (hat the Saudis 

execute adulterous wives be- 
cause — unlike us — they 
regard women not as 'passive' 
but as individuals capable of 

*nraking informed choices and 

accepting their destiny, grim 
as it may seem to ns.' Sorely 
that is ii blatant attempt to 
torn a situation on its head 
ami prove that black is white? 

1 had always assumed that 
we in the West did not 
penalise adultery in either sex 
because we accepted that any 
"informed’ adult, male or 
female, should be allowed 
freedom of choice in sexual 
matters, whereas the Saudis 
saw women as passive items 
of merchandise which should 
accordingly be destroyed if 
they were 'damaged' not 
merely by adultery but also by 
rape (in which case no one 
could suggest that the victim 
'had made an informed 
choice.') 

If Dr Greer believes the 
Saudis are such feminists, 
how would she explain the 
facts that they do not stone 
adulterous males to death, or 
allow women to have several 
husbands and divorce them 
whenever they feel like it? 

As for her last hypocritical 
reference to the so-called 
pleasures of 'social distance 
from men*, I must confess 
that they do not tempt me in 
the least. Judging by what 
she has written in the past, K 
honestly cannot believe that 
they would hold much appeal 
for Dr Greer either. 

From Jacqueline 
Williams, 

Hilton Close. 

Afanningtree, 

A listley. Essex 

Libby Panes asks why so 
many intelligent, amusing 
women end up alone or tied to 
the wrong man (August 8). 
Possibly the problem is that 
men generally make the final 
decision in relationships. Un- 
like women, they are con- 
ditioned to contain and 
control their emotions in fa- 
vour of a simplistic 
proposition. 

The average man tends to 
choose a partner who is in 
some way his superior or wbo 
wil] be financially useful to 
him. However, men with 
above average intelligence, 
which is what an intelligent 
woman is looking for, do not 
usually have such consid- 
erations and appear to prefer 
partners who are not particu- 
larly intelligent, but attractive 
on a superficial level. 

In other words, the “I never 
loved your mind” phenom- 
enon of toe Monroe-Miller 
relationship. 

He will not have the time or 
induration to cope with an 
intelligent woman, whose 
mind may be too inquiring, 
and who may have neuroses 
of her own that she cannot 
ignore. 

The intelligent woman, at- 
tracted as she is to a mind, 
often has to remain single, 
unless she can accept a 
socially or mentally inferior 
partner. 

From S K. Finesilver, 
Kirtlington. Oxford 

There is another technical 
term for those who marry and 
remarry ft la Zsa Zsa Gabor 
(August 13). It is serial 
polygamy. 


Just when you thought it was safe 



If there is anything more 
boring at dinner than a pair of 
word processor users moaning 
on about how they lost half a 
book the night before, it is 
swimming pool owners who 
chat the night away about the 
water balance or the tendency 
of their holes in the ground to 
turn green. 

My personal pool problem 
concerns two fair children 
with green hair. Nothing too 
punky, yon understand, just a 
mint tinge. Why this should be 
I do not know. Not even after 
talking to severe! swimming 
pool experts, a brace of doc- 
tors and a terribly helpful chap 
from the public analysts lab- 
oratory. It could be too much 
chlorine, then again it could 
be too little. The water could 
be too acidic, or too alkaline. 
On the other band h could just 
be something in the local 
water supply. 

But I shouldn’t complain. 
My problem is minor com- 
pared with some of those 
afflicting the 110,000 pool- 
owners in Britain.One friend 
has shock-dosed his pool at 
least three times this summer 
and still can't get rid of the 
algae. 

i don't know whether it's 
the green hair, the dead newts 
that float to the surface every 
morning or just a raised 
chemical consciousness in the 
wake of Chernobyl, but the 
thought of tipping' what 


amounts to large quantities of 
unfamiliar substances into the 
pool where my children splash 
around virtually every day for 
half the year is beginning to 
give me the creeps. 

It is not, however, some- 
thing over which most pool 
building companies lose much 
sleep. Which is why many 
pool customers are never told 
there is nn alternative to 
chlorine, let alone such a thing 
as a chemical-free system on 
offer. According to one tech- 
nical writer I consulted, nine 
out of 10 owners operate their 
pools wrongly, largely through 
complete ignorance of the 
chemicals they are using. 

Officially the use of chlorine 
in this country has everyone's 
blessing. It's cheaper, safer to 
handle, and better at killing 
bugs than anything else and 
it’s been around so long it 
must be OK- Yet I was 
interested to discover that in 
the United States there ap- 
pears to be something of a 
chlorine scare- 

Chlorine, it is suggested in 
some quarters, may be 
carcinogenic. But then the 
cynic might argue that you 
could take almost any sub- 
stance from holy water down 
and find at least one American 
doctor who'll say it causes . 
cancer. Nonetheless it is rather 
unnerving to see some of the 
marketing literature now be- 
ing pushed out in the US. to 


From turning hair 
green to stirring fears 
of cancer, swimming 
pool chemicals have 
a lot to answer for 



promote chemical-free swim- 
ming pool systems, with ref- 
erences to “killer chlorine”, 
complete with skull and cross- 
bones. and quoting medical 
opinion that it should be 
banned. 

There are indeed alter*, 
natives to chlorine: an IQ 
product called BaquadH and 


a system called Hypocell 
which uses salt and electrol- 
ysis to produce chlorine in the 
water. 

The nearest thing to a 
completely chemical-free sys- 
tem, though, is Tampere, 
which wonts through silver 
and copper ions. It has a rival 
which works on toe same 
principle called Ultimar. The 
main hazard appears to be to 
toe bank account These sys- 
tems can cost anything from 
£600 to well over £1,000 
depending on which one you 
choose and the size of your 
pooL 

The swimming pool owner 
is always in the wrong, how- 
ever. the industry contends 
stoutly that chlorine and the 
other chemicals are perfectly 
OK as long as you use them in 
toe right way. I would contend 
that it’s extremely hard for toe 
unschooled amateur to do 
this, particularly as there ap- 
pears to be an extreme short- 
age of easily digested guides to 
the subject 

1 am not suggesting that 
s wimming pool suppliers 
should go over the top, and 
follow the example of one 
Texas dealer who wrote to his 
customers: “The water in that 
pool is a friend. Don’t let it 
down. That water is there 24 
hours a day. Is someone with 
it?” But I do think that we 
could use something a little 
better than the Sw imming 

t ’ 


Pool and Allied Trades 
Association standard work on 
water and chemicals, which is 
far too technical and is pre- 
ceded by toe legend “the 
inclusion of a product or 
system in these standards does 
not imply SPATA approval or 
a guarantee of efficiency”. Just 
what you need when you’re 
about to sink a fortune. 

As well as alternative 
chemical and purification sys- 
tems you can now buy 
computerized control , units - 
one goes by the name of The 
Magic Box - that dribbles toe 
required amount of chemicals 
into the pool automatically, so 
you can't overdose. This tittle 
gadget can easily set you tack 
more than £1,000. 

The problem with trying to 
find out toe best thing to do is 
that if one expert reckons such 
a system is fine, toe next one 
will forecast rotting pipes and 
other dreadful problems if you 
install it 

So what is the swimming 
pool owner to do? My holiday 
reading is going to feature a 
few pool-care guides. I’ll read 
them on the beach, of course. 

Maggie Drummond 

© tom NBWaWW LM, 1886 

A list qf publications is avail- 
able from John Dawes 
Publications, Mercers, 
Hawkhurst, Kent TN 18 4LH. 


Multiyorks 

Summer Sale. 



THE 5UFFOLK RANGE 

Wkh In clncic lines atfd 
tosdy rounded anas, this b 
our most cradinocal 


MK 10 oral 


nr in selected 'E* I 
Country Plains at £12' 
per metre. 

NOTQUl 
usrrarx sum cores 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 



Myths that prop up the Bar nstoffother 

recent visit to Ann Arbor 1-vtr Qir changed the style of advocacy W AO tvl O v/ |/AXwX 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

In-depth 

defence 

Count Nikolai Tolstoy, author of 
the book which accuses Harold 
Macmillan of sending 40,000 Cos- 
sacks to their deaths in the Soviet 
Union in 194S, fears that he might 
now be banned from giving his 
intended address to the Young 
Conservatives' annual conference 
next month. This follows the 
rumpus yesterday over the 
Federation of Conservative 
Students' magazine which restates 
the allegations. Norman Tebbit 
objected to the Central Office 
name and address appearing on 
the publication and ordered all 
copies to be destroyed. Tolstoy 
tells me he is astonished: “The 
Conservative Party has been very 
silly. They should be going for 
discussion, not supression." He is 
also annoyed that Monday's BBC 
television news coverage of the 
FCS story omitted all mention of 
him, and is still smarting from the 
corporation's cancellation of four 
planned broadcasts earlier this 
year, based on the book. “The 
reason the BBC gave was that 
Macmillan might sue. but I have 
seen a letter from his grandson 
saying he has no intention of 
suing." says Tolstoy. 

Hatton hits out 

It comes as no surprise to hear that 
Derek Hatton is not taking his 
dismissal from his job at 
Knowsley council lying down. 
Word reaches me that he plans a 
two-pronged counter-attack: by 
appealing against his sacking for 
non-attendance and, second, by 
levelling charges of misconduct 
against his former boss, Alan 
Pearson, and Charles McGhee, 
chairman of the disciplinary 
committee that got rid of him. 
Local Liberals, meanwhile, are 
looking forward to the par- 
liamentary by-election in Robert 
Kilroy-Silk’s seat of Knowsley 
North, where Hatton is said to be 
roundly loathed. They hope that 
Knowsley council will reinstate 
him in time for the Liberals to 
garner the anu-Militant vote. 

Acid vein 

A strangely subversive note from 
the British Council announces 
that this year's international 
course on the management of 
hazardous waste is off because 
Britain is too dirty. Last year 13 
countries, including Denmark, 
sent representatives, but this year 
our reputation for airborne export 
of sulphur dioxide and for beaches 
tarnished by sewage and nuclear 
waste has brought "less than 
gentle mockery” down on the idea 
that we could teach the world 
anything in this field Don't tell 
the Brazilians, though, for that 
country has just asked the council 
to run a hazardous waste seminar 
in Sao Paulo in September. To 
date, three people have applied 

Small print 

Genealogist Hugh Feskett does 
not let the grass grow under his 
feet. No sooner does Moscow 
agree compensation for British 
property and bonds seized during 
the Bolshevik Revolution than 
Pesketi takes on a While Russian 
assistant, Tasha Lubetkin. To- 
gether — for a fee. naturally —they 
will help heirs of Britons who lost 
out 70 years ago to make their 
claims for a share of the £45 mil- 
lion kitty. Beneficiaries could 
include relatives of the owners of 
steam tugs, saw mills, and a parrot 
living in Moscow during the days 

that shook the world. 

Dear meat 

Further fallout from Chernobyl. 
The Swedish government has just 
ordered Lapp deer-keepers to kill 
35.000 of their animals for fear of 
contaminated meat It could be 
worse: the owners are to be 
reimbursed at the rate of £145 per 
deer, the foil market value. 

BARRY FANTONI 



Tnlbeck? Straight ahead. You 
can tell by the Nitex 
conroy coming the other way' 


Hurdfol 


Douglas Hunt's bookish output, 
like that of his Tory colleague 
Jeffrey Archer, always strikes me 
as being more valuable for its 
apercus of political life than for 
intrinsic literary merit. So it is 
with interest that I read a review of 
Hurd's latest fiction. Palace of 
Enchantments, by Charles Mos- 
•ley. London editor of the Encyclo- 
paedia Britannica. in the Young 
Conservatives' magazine. New 
Agenda. Mosley is less than kind, 
arguing that the book, which 
centres around a wettish junior 
minister, reveals “a mind of scant 
subtlety and minimal insight". 
This, says Mosley, would be all 
right from a leader of the Liberal 
Party, but not from a putative 
head of the Conservatives. 

PHS 


On a recent visit to Ann Arbor 
University in Michigan i was 
invited to demonstrate cross- 
examination injury trials together 
with American attorneys — a 
pursuit denied me in the Crown 
court in this country. The stan- 
dard of the cross-exam i nation by 
the attorneys was equal to. and in 
some cases exceeded, that found 
in this country, certainly over the 
great proportion of the Bar. In 
similar seminars, and in the courts 
of Canada, I have found the 
situation to be little different 

Since there is a fused profession 
in America, and since in Canada 
lawyers qualify both as barristers 
and solicitors and can practise as 
both, this experience does noi 
support the view — expressed 
recently by Dr F.A. Mann on this 
pafe - that the present methods of 
training and the division of func- 
tions between barristers and solic- 
itors are essential to our adversary 
system. Nor that if there is to be 
change, it would become nec- 
essary to remodel the legal system 
as a whole. Nor that the Ameri- 
cans largely engage in what he calls 
“ineffectual cross-examination". 

The existing structure of the Bar 
rests upon a series of easily 
exploded myths. The first is that 
barristers are specialists in their 
particular field. In fact, on first 
qualification a barrister is for less 
legally equipped than a solicitor. 
Those seeking a legal qualifica- 
tion, whether from abroad or to 
attain professional status in their 
employment, opt for the Bar 
examinations because they are 
easier to pass and less exacting in 
preparation. In making the choice, 
99 per cent of students have not 


by Sir David Napley 


the remotest knowledge of what 
practice of law in either branch 
requires — the only courts they will 
have seen are those depicted on 
television — and in this state of 
abject ignorance, they nominate 
themselves to become "specialist" 
banisters. 

The Bar contends, secondly, 
that it is a profession of specialists 
in advocacy. There are, of course, 
a number of barristers who are 
highly skilled and competent The 
remainder, who are denied access 
to the work and the experience it 
brings, are certainly not specialists 
in the sense in which the word is 
normally understood. 

And there can be no other 
vocation that would have the free 
to say, as the Bar does, that it must 
for all time have an exclusive right 
of audience in the Crown courts as 
a training ground for its own 
inexperienced members. It is 
small consolation to the accused 
on his way to prison that, although 
poorly represented, he assisted in 
training the Bar. (Moreover, to 
suggest that the bulk of the work in 
Crown court requires a specialist 
advocate is like saying a Fellow of 
the Royal College of Surgeons is 
needed to lance a boiL) 

Another myth is that the exis- 
tence of a “specialist" Bar in its 
present form acts effectively as a 
sieve and a brake on unnecessary 
litigation. Since in the higher 
courts both sides are represented 
by specialist banisters and only 
one side can win, it would seem to 
follow, if the judge's decision is 
right, that 50 per cent of the 


specialist opinions have been 
wrong. 

Judges are alleged however, to 
know the members of the Bar and 
thus to be able to evaluate their 
worth. If that were ever true, it 
certainly no longer applies today. 
With the vast increase in the 
numbers of practitioners and 
judges, the latter can recognize 
only a limited number of the Bar 
Only 1 per cent of the proceedings 
issued ever come to trial in the 
High Court, and High Court work 
finds its way to only a very small 
section of the Bar. So judges get to 
know only that small number who 
share the cream of the work. 

Myths, alas, abound in the law. 
It is a myth that only experienced 
advocates can make efficient 
judges - as clerks to justices have 
shown on being appointed stipen- 
diaries, and Chancery barristers 
when sitting in the Common Law 
courts. A myth that the quality of 
the judiciary would be lessened if 
solicitors with first-class degrees at 
the universities replaced a very 
limited number of High Court 
judges who may have scraped 
through with a poor second or less. 
A myth that every contested 
action needs a specialist, and that 
many cases need two. A myth that 
only barristers are specialists, 
since some solicitors are special- 
ists in particular fields and better 
at it than barristers. 

It is certainly a myth that to be a 
successful advocate one needs 
some God-given genius or talent 
as distinct from training and 
technique. Many factors have 


changed the style of advocacy 
since the days ofBlrkett, Marshall 
Hall and Pat Hastings so that 
today there is not one barrister 
who rau Id be singled out as a great 
advocate in that way. And ii is. 
finally, a myth that solicitors who 
can present cases to a bench of 
magistrates are ill-equipped to 
present similar cases to a jury. 

Young members of. the Law 
Society have reached a point 
where they now advocate fusion of 
the profession. The Green Paper, 
however, issued by the Law 
Society's Contentious Business 
Committee, advocated no such 
thing. It sought to establish a truly 
specialist Bar and not one in 
which the specialists nominated 
themselves to a status which they 
could not always justify by 
qualification or experience. I have 
been advocating for more than 30 
years that all those seeking to 
embrace the profession should 
have a common education; that 
they should then have the 
opportunity, on qualification, to 
gain experience over the widest 
possible field. Then, if they wished 
to practice as specialists they 
would have to demonstrate they 
had acquired specialist skills and 
possessed the requisite talent and 
aptitude or, certainly in the long 
term, undergone specialist train- 
ing and e xamina tion. Ideally an 
amalgam of these things is de- 
sirable. Were this done we would 
retain a separate Bar with skill, 
traditions and institutions. But it 
would be a truly specialist Bar. 

©Tknwi Nw np ^Wl. 1W8- 

The author is a past president of 
the Law Society 


battleground 


Anver Versi traces the origin of the Arab-Christian troubles in Sudan 

Two 
nations 
locked 
in civil 
war 


The shooting down of a civilian 
aircraft last week with the loss of 
60 lives bears witness to the 
increasing level of hostilities in 
Sudan's civil war. in which troops 
loyal to the Khartoum administra- 
tion led by the prime minister, 
Sadeq al-Mahdi, are fighting 
southern-based rebels led by Colo- 
nel John Garang. 

Garang’s Sudan People's Lib- 
eration Army (SPLA) was formed 
three years ago as a reaction to the 
repressive regime of President 
Nimeiri, who was ousted in April 
1985 and replaced by General 
Swar al-Dahab. The new leader 
promised elections within a year 
and appointed an interim govern- 
ment, but Garang refused to 
recognize the administration, 
claiming the largely Arab and 
Islamic north still dominated, and 
demanding that the Islamic sharia 
laws, introduced by Nimeiri in 
1983, be repealed immediately 
and a constitutional conference be 
held that would take in the views 
of the Christian, black African 
south. 

Elections were held in April this 
year. Several political parties con- 
tested the elections in the north, 
but in the south voting was held in 
only 31 of the 68 constituencies. 
This, the north, claimed, was a 
result of the “unrest”, a govern- 
ment euphemism for civil war. 
Turnout was poor, and the 
People's Progressive Partywon 
most of the southern seats. 

The SPLA boycotted the elec- 
tions and threatened to disrupt 
proceedings. The southern towns 
of Torit and Kapoeta were at- 
tacked. Bases of Norwegian 
Church Aid at Hilieu and Ploiaka 
were looted and an official was 
taken hostage. Meanwhile, the 
leader of the Ummah party. Sadeq 
al-Mahdi (grandson of the Mahdi 
who was defeated by the British at 
Omdurman) became prime min- 
ister of a broad-based coalition 
government with the Democratic 
Unionist Party the major partner. 

Several peace feelers have been 
sent to Garang since the elections. 
He and al-Mahdi held talks lasting 
more than nine hours during the 
Organization of African Unity 
summit meeting in Addis Ababa 
in July, and working parties from 
both camps are still working on a 



Southern rebels on the march in a conflict that shows no sign of slackening 


deal in Addis. Garang has asked 
for a lifting of the state of 
emergency in the south and a 
repeal of the sharia laws as a 
precondition for negotiations. Al- 
Mahdi wants a cease-fire first and 
has promised to modify the sharia 
laws so that they are applicable 
only in the Muslim north. Garang, 
however, wants unitary laws to 
apply equally throughout Sudan 
and has again demanded a 
constitutional conference. 

The roots of the trouble go 
much deeper. Sudan is really two 
nations. The north is largely Arab 
and Muslim dominated; the south 
is Christian or animist During the 
British occupation the north and 
south were kept apart — Christian 
missionaries were discouraged 
from going to the north and 
Muslim preachers were forbidden 
in the south. Most of the political 
and economic development was 
concentrated in the north and, at 
independence 30 years ago, most 
administrators were northern. The 
Sudanese legal system was a 
mixture of English criminal and 
constitutional law as developed in 
India, and Islamic civil law. 

There is a very strong fun- 
damental Islamic strain in north- 
ern Sudan, harking back to the 
days of the Mahdi. The north sees 
itself as part of the Islamic and 
Arab world and looks to Egypt and 
Saudi Arabia for moral leadership. 
The northern political parties are 
rooted in Islamic sects — al-Mahdi 
is the spiritual bead of the Ansar 
movement, the largest Islamic sect 
in 5udan. 

The question of the sharia law 
has been a major issue in Suda- 
nese politics since independence. 


Muslim intellectuals have called 
for a reinstatement of the sharia 
law rather than an introduction of 
it 

It was thus almost inevitable 
that Immediately after the British 
departure the south would ajgitate 
fora more equal representation in 
the Sudanese entity. This led to 
the first civil war and the Anya 
Nya rebel movement. The south 
at this time, 1956, was divided 
into three regions: Equatoria, 
Upper Nile and Bahr el-GazeL 
The main tribes in the regions are 
the Dinkas and the Nuers. 

After 16 years of bitter - civil 
strife, during which an estimated 
50,000 people died, Nimeiri got 
peace through the Addis Ababa 
agreement of 1972. The south was 
unified under a southern leg- 
islative body, the Higher Exec- 
utive Council, and granted a 
measure of autonomy. Tribal 
tensions, favouritism and corrup- 
tion, however, soon fueled tribal 
tensions and the council disinte- 
grated amid rising violence in the 
south. Northern control was re- 
imposed on the south and the 
region was again broken up into its 
constituent parts. 

In the north Nimeiri lost his 
popular base as food riots and 
anti-American sentiments polar- 
ized the country against him. In an 
attempt to win a fresh lease of life, 
he introduced the sharia laws in 
September 1983. The draconian 
laws, which resulted in amputa- 
tions and hangings, mainly of 
southern people, led to growing 
unrest in the south and railed to 
appease the north. Sadeq al- 
Mahdi strongly criticized 
Nimeiri's interpretation of Islamic 


laws and was jailed for a year. 
Garang, a colonel in the Sudanese 
army, defected when be was sent 
to the south to crash a rebellion. 
His movement, the SPLA, rapidly 
increased in strength. 

While Nimeiri was in power the 
rebel movement received its arms 
largely from Libya, and its sup- 
port, including bases, from the 
Mengistu Marxist regime in Ethio- 
pia. The Ethiopian support for the 
rebels is to offset Khartoum’s help 
to the Eritrean Liberation 
Organization. 

Today the situation is radically 
different Colonel Gadaffi of 
Libya has withdrawn his support 
for the SPLA and, according to 
recent reports, has sent up to 
10,000 troops to support the 
Khartoum army. A recent visit by 
al-Mahdi to Moscow could well 
mean that the Russians will 
reduce their arms assistance to the 
rebels (most of it through Ethio- 
pia) and might support Khartoum. 
Ethiopia is Likely, however, to give 
succour to Garang as long as 
Khartoum supports Eritrea. 

Whatever the politics of the war 
might dictate, however, Khar- 
toum will not burn its boats in the 
West. Sudan's external debts are 
£9 billion. The country needs both 
long and short- terra aid to keep 
afloat and the businessmen in 
Khartoum are looking to the West 
for investment 

Sadeq al-Mahdi cannot, at 
present more than tinker with the 
sharia taws if he is to retain the 
confidence of the north. This 
means that a quick resolution of 
the civil war is unlikely. 

The author is deputy editor of New 
African magazine. ' 


The Northern Ireland unemploy- 
ment rate is 21.5 per cent, the 
worst regional rate in the United 
Kingdom; and the average figure 
conceals the existence of much 
higher rates in parts of the 
province. Furthermore, seasonally 
adjusted unemployment, nor- 
mally strongly affected by what 
happens in Great Britain, . has 
recently shown a much fester 
increase; and them are further 
serious redundancies in the pipe- 
tine or threatened. 

Apart from differences of 
demography, there are two rea- 
sons for this deplorable record. 
One is the disadvantage of po- 
sition, on the fringe of Europe, 
with the prospect of slow sea 
crossings or expensive air carriage 
for both freight and passengers. 
The evidence suggests that these 
disadvantages are greatly in- 
creased by the less tangible 
psychological effects of remote- 
ness, such as slowness to react to 
new market opportunities. Gov- 
ernment regional policy can prop- 
erty be expected to help to offset 
some of these disadvantages of 
position, and indeed, though 
clumsy in conception and sluggish 
in operation, it has had an effect in 
stopping things getting worse. 

But the other reason for the bad 
record is the image of Northern 
Ireland as seen by investors and 
customers in the rest of the world. 
That imag e is variously conceived 
in terms of personal danger, 
danger to property, the general 
difficulties caused by communal 
unrest, and political uncertainty 
(Le^ the possibility of a transfer of 
sovereignty). About 95 per cent of 
the elements in this image have no 
basis m reality, but even if the 
image was wholly untrue, it could 
still greatly harm the economic life 
of the province. 

Unhappily, the government's 
initiative in the Anglo-Irish agree- 
ment whatever its political or 
foreign policy virtues, has made 
tilings much worse for the econ- 
omy. The agreement has stimu- 
lated new unrest (though thfc has 
greatly lessened); it has not had 
time to be effetfive in defeating 
the IRA and the INLA, nor in 
depriving them of a sufficient 
degree of support among Catho- 
lics. Further, by introducing the 
novel co ncept of giving another 
country a right to be consulted on 
»flah * internal to a part of the 
United Kingdom, rt has created 
political uncertainty. 

It is really no use trying to 
explain to a Japanese businessman 
that the province remains in- 
alienably British as long as a 
majority of its inhabitants so 
desire; it is much easier fat him to 
suppose that the perfidious British 
haw taken the fiiststep towards a ' 
change in sovereignty (which. 


indeed, most people, in Britain 
might welcome). It is not surpris- 
ing that inward investment, de- 
spite aU the inducements offered, 
is virtually at a standstill 

The government of course las 
the answer that, if the agreement 
had been welcomed by the major- 
ity, which it u naccoun ta bly failed 
to consult, these consequences 
would haw been much less. That 
is not a very good answer, since it 

was perfectly obvious that tie 
agreement would give profound 
offence to the majority conmm- 
nity- It is in this context, therefore, 
that the Northern Ireland Eco- 
nomic Council (a body represent- 
ing employers and unions .which 
advises the government on eco- 
nomic policy) has urged the need 
for some immediate and substan- 
tial offsetting action, to limit 
damag e and prevent a rise in 
unemployment to a level which 
further stimulated social unrest 
and violence. 

This involves extra spending, 
but also, in the exceptional situa- 
tion which the government has 
itself created, emergency action. 
The economic council suggests the 
restoration of cuts in the housing 
programme and bringing .forward 
other major construction projects 
(the construction industry ts 
particularly depressed). It suggests 
that, since electricity in the prow- . 
ince is mostly derived from oh, its 
price — winch is pegged to the 
London level - could be substan- 
tially reduced; that a son- of' 
“insurance" against loss caused by 
unrest might be offered to outside 
investors; that incentives should 
be reviewed and marketing aid 
stepped upc and that a higher 
proportion of government orders 
should be routed to Northern 
Ireland firms. 

On the last of these, there has 
been the welcome example of the 
award of a naval order to the 
Hariand and Wolff yard, fbrwhkh 
the Northern Ireland Secretary, 
Tom King, as well as the yard, 
should be congratulated. But 
otherwise reaction has been 
predictably cautious, amounting 
to little more than a promise to 
think about redeploying under- 
spending in the budget (e*, tint 
caused by not having much in- 
ward investment to subsidize). 

Many responsible people in the 
province fed that the government 
has allowed itself to assume a 
quite unacceptable risk and that, if 
nothing is done, there could be a 
spiral of further depression and 
violence until Ulster really does 
become ungovernable except by a . 
massive military effort, which ' 
would consume even greater 
amounts of public resources. 

Sir Charles Cotta- is chairman of 
the Northern Ireland Economic 
CoundL 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


Such a shlep this 
spelling out 


Will universities rise to the challenge? 


British universities proclaim that 
they are the best in the world. 
Perhaps they are. There is cer- 
tainly much truth in vice- 
chancellors’ claims about the 
quality of original research, the 
calibre of their academics and the 
success of undergraduates. 

But little evidence is presented 
to a sceptical government to 
justify more spending on a sector 
of education which has not shown 
itself to be particularly astute at 
financial management Sir Keith 
Joseph, when Education Sec- 
retary. made public his despair at 
the dearth of hard information to 
support his — admittedly be- 
lated — pleas for more money for 
the universities.Now Kenneth 
Baker is trying to tie up a package 
of reforms to help him in his 
efforts to win more cash for the 
universities in the public expen- 
diture round which gels under way 
next month. 

Sir Keith’s Cabinet colleagues 
were so surprised whenever he 
asked for more money for educa- 
tion that they usually obliged. 
Baker is not so "dry" on public 
spending, and his repeated calls 
for more money may fall on 
stonier ground. So his "action 
plan" is a sensible way of nailing 
down universities’ commitment 


to reforms which are already in 
train and so obtain more funds. 

Ministers have been presented 
with the prospect of up to six 
universities having to close by the 
end of the decade if funding 
continues to be eroded at the rate 
of 1 .5 to 2 per cent a year through a 
■failure to compensate for infla- 
tion. This warning comes not from 
militant dons but from Sir Peter 
Swinnerton-Dyer, chairman of the 
University Grants Committee. 
The government will ignore him 
aiitsperiL 

But, what will it be able to 
secure from the universities as a 
quid pro quo? The Department of 
Education and Science wants to 
see evidence of reform in four 
areas: academic standards and 
appraising the performance of- 
lecturers: financial management 
and monitoring: the preparation 
of performance indicators by 
which universities might be 
judged; and the closure of small or 
weak deparments. 

Judging by the report from the 
vice-chancellors' committee on 
academic standards, reported in 
yesterday's Times, universities 
have a long way to go before the 
government, and the public, can 
be satisfied that the universities 
know wbat they are doing. 


The academic standards in- 
quiry, set up after prompting by 
Sir Keith Joseph, looked at ex- 
ternal examining procedures, con- 
trols over postgraduate research 
and appeals by postgraduates 
against degree results. But it did 
not address itself to the question 
of what universities should expect 
from their students and how these 
standards were to be judged. Hie 
examination boards, by contrast, 
have made 'it clear what standards 
they require from pupils who win 
be beginning the new GCSE 
courses this autumn.They have 
broken down the requirements 
into such categories as skills, 
knowledge and perception and are 
very clear about what level of 
work deserves what grade. 

The vice-chancellors make no 
mention of what standards should 
be reached by students who are 
awarded a first class degree or an 
upper second, and in relation to 
what body of knowledge. In his 
preamble. Professor Philip Reyn- 
olds comments rightly that the 
word “standards" is bedevilled by 
ambiguities. This seems to ab- 
solve the vice-chancellors from 
considering the fundamental ques- 
tions at all. 

Most universities have little 
stated or public policy on such 


issues. Nor do they have policies 
on teaching, leaving academics to 
gel on with lectures and tutorials. 
U nlike the polytechnics, which are 
watched by the Council for Na- 
tional Academic Awards, univer- 
sities have considerable freedom, 
ind can put on new courses 
virtually at whim. One wonders if 
university academics define what 
their new courses are intended to 
achieve. Have they really thought 
about teaching skills and ways in 
which students might be assessed? 

Civil servants are pressing some 
radical-sounding ideas on the 
vice-chancellors in talks on tbe 
action plan. Many academics 
would not take kindly to seeking 
the views of students on courses 
and teaching, nor on the.idea of a 
senior member of staff sitting in 
on the classes of a junior member. 
The DES is also suggesting that 
teaching is assessed as parr of a 
programme of staff appraisal and 
that training should be required. 

This is all revolutionary stuff 
particularly at a time when dons 
see themselves as bdeagured and 
underpaid, unloved and unappre- 
ciated. Let us hope that they and 
Baker can make common cause. 

Lucy Hodges 

Education correspondent 


Earlier this year I wrote a piece 
about klezmer music, a wild kind 
of Jewish folk music that I had 
never come across before, as 
played by a band called the 
Kkzmorim, of whom l had never 
heard either. Thanks to those 
tireless readers who hate to see 
anyone wallowing m ignorance, I 
am now fairly dued-up about 
klezmer music and other aspects 
ofYiddish culture. In feet, there is 
an aU-day festival of Yiddish 
culture at the Purcell Room on the 
South Bank this Sunday which 
features the KJezmorim on their 
first visit to Britain. 

Klezmer music doesn't usually 
sound like jazz, even if it has 
roughly tire same approach. But 
occasionally they do sound un- 
cannily similar; .one of my 
favourite old Benny Goodman 
records is a mid- 1 930s perfor- 
mance of “And the Angels Sing" 
with a bravura trumpet solo by 
Ziggy Elman. I didn’t realize, unto 
I beard a 1985 klezmer record 
containing the same tune, that the 
music was all stolen by Benny and 
Ziggy straight from the Jewish 
storehouse of musical themes, but 
I suppose that as they were both 
good Jewish boys, that's all right. 

I have to be careful here about 
the distinction between Jewish 
and Yiddish. Jewish means every- 
thing from the Old Testament to 
Israel's latest entry in the 
Eurovision Song Contest; Yiddish 
refers specifically to the East 
European small town culture 
which led to tbe creation of the 
Yiddish tongue last century and 
put all those words like nudnik 
and schlemid in SJ. Perehnan's 
writings which I could never 
understand as a lad. It's odd that 
Yiddish culture seems to have 
implanted itself much better in- 
America than in Britain; most of 
the Yiddish words that have come 
into common usage have an 
American flavour to English ears. 

What I can never quite under- 
stand is how Yiddish is always 
claimed to be a separate language. 
Tbe handiest guide to Yiddish that 
I know is an American book by 
Arthur Naiman called Every Goy's 
Guide to Common Jewish Ex- 
pressions, and Naiman illustrates 
his subject right at the beginning 
by telling a Jewish joke. It's about 
a vampire which invades a 
princess's castle bedroom and 
creeps across the room towards 
her, fengs dripping. The princess 
wakes, shrieks, and holds up a 
silver crucifix. The vampire 
smiles and says: “Svei gonusht 
helfen". 

If you're not Jewish, says 
Naiman, you will feel a helpless 
outsider for not understanding the 
punchline. Nonsense, say I; a 


simple knowledge of German will 
tell you at once that it means “It 
won't be any help" (Es wind gar 
nicht helfen) because most Yid- 
dish phrases, like the word Yid- 
dish itself, are German ones 
pronounced slightly differently. 
There is very little Hebrew in 
Yiddish. The Americans like using 
the word shlep, for example, to 
mean “drag around", but how this 
differs importantly from the Ger- 
man word “schteppen" (to drag_ 
around) beats me. 

The difference between German 
and Yiddish. I think, is ail in the 
overtones and assumptions, rather 
than the words. It is often said that 
Jewish humorous anecdotes are 
the only ones in the world that end 
with a question. By the same 
token, German funny stories are 
the only ones that end with an ■ 
explanation of the joke you had 
just heard. I have a paperback of 
Jewish funny stories published in 
Germany, by a German, in about 
I960, and put out perhaps as a sort 
of late war reparation to the Jews. 
The most notable thing about the 
stories is that they tend to go on 
longer than anyone Jewish or 
English would tell them, past the_ 
actual punchline, so that the 
German listener actually gets the 
point in each joke. German words 
are there to do a job and it 
efficiently; Yiddish words, even, if 
ostensibly the same words, always 
seem to have a shrug, a wink, a lot 
unspoken behind them. 

Recently I heard Ronnie Scott 
telling a new Jewish joke, and -if it 
was new to him, it may wdl really ■■ 
have been new. It was about two 
shipwrecked Jews who were ft- 
rally rescued from their island 
yeans later. The rescue party - 
couldn^ help noticing that on thri 
otherwise deserted island the two - 
men had built not one, but two 
synagogues. 

“Why tbe second synagogue?" 
asked the rescuers. The Jews 
looked at it askance. 

“That’s the one we don't go to," 
they said. 

1 t h ink that’s funny, and find'it 
hard to say why - once you start 
to try to explain the network of 
Jewish snobbery, or comparative 
religion, indeed once you start 
explaining a joke, you Stan sink- 
mg. I would find it even harder to _ 
say why that joke is peculiarly : 
Jewish, or even Yiddish, though 
I m sure it is. Recently I read a 
fostory of the Jewish joke by 
Chaim Bermant, and I can't say 1 ' 
was much wiser at the end than at . 
the beginning for all his expf*ha-- : . 
toons. Maybe what I need nowis a 
festival of Jewish jokes ai the' 1 - 
Pu rcell Room, where people just 
mu jokes and nobody -urfes- to’-- 
explain them. 


Vur : 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


A BALANCE OF DISADVANTAGE 


Philosophy as end or adjunct 


In extending the Soviet 
Union's unilateral morator- 
ium on nuclear tests until the 
end of the year, as he did on 
Monday, Mr Gorbachov was 
playing to his international 
audience. It was, as United 
States spokesmen were quick 
to note, a propaganda ploy, 
and an obvious one. But it 
should not on that account be 
underestimated. 

When Moscow first an- 
nounced its moratorium just 
over a year ago, it was met 
with a wave of goodwill 
around the world From Eu- 
rope to China, governments 
and parties with diverse sym- 
pathies hailed it as an appro- 
priate and thoroughly praise- 
worthy way of commemorat- 
*, ing the anniversary of 
^Hiroshima. Scant consid- 
eration was given to how 
cheaply the Soviet Union had 
bought such political advan- 
tage: the Soviet testing pro- 
gramme was complete; the 
A merican one still in progress, 
i And the test ban. reinforced 
by successive extensions, has 
ifiad an effect The strength and 
Adepth of that effect became 
apparent only last week when 
the US House of Repre- 
sentatives voted to ban all but 
the least powerful nuclear tests 
planned for next year so long 
as the Soviet ban was still in 
force. As a policy statement it 
is unlikely to receive further 
endorsement, least of all the 
approval of the President As a 
reflection of a changed mood 
among Americans — those 
same Americans who had been 
so dismissive of Mr 
Gorbachov's initial announce- 
ment a year ago — it is a 
salutary reminder that propa- 
ganda p:qys used often enough 
and consistently enough have 
their advantages. 

But it was not only a 
propaganda ploy. And the 
Soviet leader’s television ad- 
dress was not only, indeed not 
primarily, intended for foreign 
consumption. There are other 
means — international press 
conferences, . . official 
announcements and magazine 
interviews - the Soviet propa- 
ganda machine likes to employ 
for that purpose. 

No, Mr Gorbachov’s mes- 
sage was addressed above all to 
his fellow countrymen some of 
whom were perhaps concerned 
that their leader was prepared 
to sacrifice too much to place 
relations with the United 


States on a more amicable 
footing. And the long and 
painstaking justification he 
gave for his derision illus- 
trated the difficulties any lead- 
er, and not only the leader of 
what is still a very dosed and 
uniform society, has in 
prosecuting his policies. 

For Mr Gorbachov's mora- 
torium, while avowedly an 
international success, was in 
some respects a liability at 
home. Not for its first four 
months, perhaps, when the 
domestic economy was such a 
priority; nor yet after its third 
renewal when the Chernobyl 
disaster had been used by 
Soviet leaders to demonstrate 
the dire effects of nudear 
technology unleashed. But as ' 
the months went by and the 
American tests continued, the 
moratorium was bound to 
arouse criticism. 

Some of that critirism sur- 
faced in Mr Gorbachov's ad- 
dress, which carefully 
balanced attacks on the United 
States with a defence of the 
moratorium. It had paid off 
internationally, the Soviet 
leader said. It did not jeop- 
ardize Soviet security; if there 
came a point when it did; the 
testing programme could 
swiftly be revived. Soviet se- 
curity interests were para- 
mount. To extend the 
moratorium was no expression 
of weakness, rather it was a 
reflection of the Soviet 
Union's sense of responsibility 
for the preservation of peace. 
And if the United States went 
ahead with its Strategic De- 
fence Initiative regardless? 
Moscow would have its own, 
undefined, alternative. 

Declaring a unilateral mora- 
torium was always going to be 
easier than rescinding it with- 
out a US response. The first 
action could be interpreted as 
that of a peacemaker, the 
second would be interpreted as 
a reversion to war-mongering 
and negate all the benefit To 
that extent the initial declara- 
tion was a. risk. It was also a 
risk in relations between the 
military and civilian sectors of 
the Soviet hierarchy. If the 
American administration 
could argue cogently on mili- 
tary grounds that a cessation of 
tests would damage national 
security, then so could the 
Soviet top brass. 

Nonetheless, this was a risk 


the Soviet leadership must 
have calculated. It may even — 
to judge by Mr Gorbachov's 
polemic and his insistence on 
the collectivity of the decision * 
— have been subjected to keen 
debate in the Kremlin. And 
here economic as well as 
political realities will have 
played their part. 

Recent Western analyses 
have suggested that the Soviet 
Union is facing a reduction of 
30 per cent or more in its hard 
currency revenue this year 
solely as a result of the fail in 
world oil prices. Even greatly 
increased sales of gold and 
other goods would be unable 
to compensate for this fall, and 
Western currency movements 
could increase the loss by half 
again. Nor would a dramatic 
rise in oil prices necessarily 
help because of the delayed 
pricing mechanism Moscow 
applies to its oil sales -to the 
East European countries. 

Such an unpredicted short- 
fall in revenue is likely to 
handicap Soviet moderniza- 
tion plans so long as the Soviet 
Union is not self-sufficient in 
either food or technology. 
Some believe it will force — 
indeed, may already have 
forced — harsh choices on the 
Kremlin, choices between 
maintaining military develop- 
ment at its present level and 
fulfilling promises about living 
standards made in the current 
five-year plan. 

It is not that past Soviet 
administrations have been 
reluctant to leave such prom- 
ises unfulfilled, but rather that 
the Gorbachov leadership, 
more than any before it has 
equated the greater content- 
ment of the people — the 
“human factor”— with the 
image of the communist sys- 
tem as a whole. 

This was a dangerous course 
to take, and one which may 
already have forced the Krem- 
lin into compromises, of 
which the extended mora- 
torium on nuclear testing, its 
more flexible approach to 
verification and its latest ini- 
tiative on inspection of mili- 
tary manoeuvres are only 
isolated examples. This much 
Mr Gorbachov has been able 
to deliver, but not — to judge 
by his television address — 
without opposition. How 
much more is his to offer must 
now be open to question. 


DANGER: MICE AT PLAY 


The Conservative cats are 
away — in Tuscany, in France, 
in Dulwich. Serious political 
infighting has finally ceased 
for the Summer holidays. 
Hence the Conservative mice 
are at play — the one side 
distributing illiterate publica- 
tions in which a distinguished 
former Conservative Prime 
Minister is branded as a war 
criminal, the other side being 
forced to the embarrassing 
extent of a court injunction to- 
halt publication. 

On one level, the internal 
Tory row over New Agenda, 
the magazine of the Federation 
of Conservative Students, is a 
classic silly season escapade. 
There is something faintly 
absurd about an official 
Conservative Party journal (in 
which the name of Mr Leon 
Brittan, amongst others, is 
consistently misspelt) being 
stripped of its Conservative 
. Party markings and con- 
fiscated through court action 
initiated by the holidaying 
party chairman. 

It is. at best, low farce which 
reflects well neither on the 
FCS, whose magazine editor 
Mr Harry Phibbs broke Party 
rules by foiling to have his 
copy approved by Central 
Offioemor on the Central Of- 
fice machine itself which, 
knowing the unreliable .track 
record of the FCS, could surely 
have’ done more to discover 
what was being concealed 
from it. 

Once the magazine had 
entered the - public domain, 
however, the Tories had little 
option but to restrict its 

A case for delay 

From Sir Andrew Gilchrist 

Sir. May I suggest that you are 
over-hasty in condemning Mr Ian 
Stewart's distinction between the 
State, the Crown and the Govern- 
ment as “inappropriate and 
. inadequate" (leading anide. Au- 
gust 13). 

Under the British Constitution 
the Government is a political 
mechanism with the duty of 
handling the day-to-day business 
of the country: and the Crown is 
the name for a kind of repository 
or holding company for the prop- 


publication as much as they 
possibly could. After all, Mr 
Phibbs, a vigorous young pub- 
licity-seeker,. had refused to 
obey his eldeis* instructions 
that the issue be withdrawn. 

In the past such offenders 
could be taken behind the 
traditional Conservative arras 
and given a good talking to. 
Such experiences were almost 
a training session for later life 
under the Whips. Alter- 
natively, the matter could 
normally have been allowed to 
drop with the weary shrug that 
student politics is, well, stu- 
dent politics. Remember the 
time when the Secretary of 
State for X let off a fire 
extinguisher at the Monday 
Gub rally in 1957, ho, ho, and 
soon. 

This case, however, cannot 
be dismissed as just another 
student rag in political dis- 
guise. The subject in question 
was the allegation in Count 
Nikolai Tolstoy’s recent book. 
The Minister and the Massa- 
cres, that the then Mr Harold 
Macmillan was responsible for 
the deaths of 40,000 cossacks, 
handed over to the Soviet 
Union and promptly massa- 
cred, as a result of post-war 
bargaining between the allies. 

In New Agenda the attribu- 
tion of this responsibility went 
for beyond the careful weigh- 
ing of historical evidence. A 
verdict of “Guilty” was pro- 
nounced in true blue capital 
letters on the cover. The 
relationship between the war- 
time allies in the latter stages 
of the Second World War has 

cny which the Government makes 
use of in carrying out its duties. So 
far so good, as any competent 
constitutional lawyer will confirm. 

To define “the Slate" is less 
easy, but fortunately it is un- 
necessary. In the British State the 
ultimate and irreplaceable source 
of political power and of title to 
property is the Monarchy, so that 
after making all necessary deduc- 
tions in respect of the Govern- 
ment. the Crown and (perhaps) 
the Church of England, there is 
dearly one single institution un- 
questionably marked out as being 
(to take a legal analogy) in the 
position of residuary legatee. 


not yet been fully explored, . I will not predict now how the 
and MrTolstoy’s book about judges (especially the judges of the 

whfc^he et 0 SnTf^ Doctor of the Church 

article was based) interview is From Mr Patrick IK Gill 
only one contribution. Sir, ^ floods of tears which John 

' M . Henry Newman is reputed to have 

These are _ matters for shed at the sight of his old vicarage 
historians. It is undignified at Litilemore were as nothing to 
and worse that they should be the waves of disbelief that swept 
exploited for the purposes of over me as I read your leading 
scandal mongering in a Stu- article (August 12) referring to this 

dent magazine, published with g»t lSth^eniuiyOmiuanl figure 
T __j as the very chief formative 
Oie imprimatur of Lord influence on con temporary 

Stockton s party and accompa- Christianity" and “the 'invisible 
nied by a recommendation feiher' of the Second Vatican 
that he be stripped of the Tory Council", 
whip if he failed to give a reply The traits or contemporary 
satisfactory to Mr Phibbs. Christianity. Catholic and Prot- 

_ ‘ . . . estanu could be summed up in the 

There are certain now to be philosophy of liberalism and the 
renewed calls for the suspen- supreme authority of conscience. 
Sion of the FCS similar to yet Newman had' completely op- 
those that followed the vi- posite views to the prevailing 
olence at its annual conference attitudes on these matters. ■ 

at Loughborough University 0,1 his ““I* - 

tap* Ttin-iT- That njmiirt nrnhahlv mom to become a cardinal in 
year : Jfia 1 wouM probably , g79 Newman defined liberalism 

be a mistake. Tory studpits j„ relision as the doctrine that 
tend to divide into the ultra- there is no positive truth in 
wet and the ultra-dry. There religion: 

ought to be as much room for For 30 - *W- SO years I have resisted to 
the FCS students who believe ■&?*„£ 

in the legalization of incest and Holy Church need champions 
the privatisation of nuclear againsi ii more surely Lhan now. 

weapons as for the rival Young — 

Conservatives who believe in Waste Of resources 
limitless welfare budgets and From Mr John Ford 
the promotion of Peter Sir. There has been much recent 
Walker. publicity about proprietors of bed 

. -r.i rv-e ■„ and breakfast accommodation for 

But if the FCS is to enjoy the lhe hom eJess making exorbitant 
Tory Party s protection and profits form public funds, but the 
patronage, it will have to kept ■ problem extends to the private 
wi thin the party rules. Accord- j rented sector, too. One lin- 
ing! y. the FCS ought to ask I employed client of mine and his 
itself if Mr Phibbs has obeyed j family are living in a two-bed- 
it« own rules - and Central 1 roora furnished flat costing £130 
3C t SLw ! P* r week - which is paid out of 
Office should ask whether the i hniieine henpfit frnm thf> I oral 


From Mr Tom Cross 
Sir, Professor Ayer's letter (August 
12) on what he sees as a threat to ‘ 
die study of philosophy projects a 
natural concern at the decune of 
the discipline but fails to examine 
why this should be so. 

He continues to hold firmly to 
the view that it is essentially a 
critical activity operating within 
an empiricist framework, which 
quite logically leads to its being 
seen as an adjunct or aid to other 
disciplines. As a form of intellec- 
tual grammar it has, therefore, no 
identity of its own and cannot 
itself make any contribution to the 
sum of human knowledge. 

Traditionally. philosophy was 
seen as the derivative Ime of 
human thought from which 
particular lines of enquiry could 
develop and be pursued with a 
factual rigour which would estab- 
lish their truth and extend man's 
knowledge of both the world and 
the larger cosmos. 

In its adherence to positivism, a 
singular promotion of Professor 
Ayer, it has abandoned this func- 
tion and left such enquiry as there 
is into ultimate reality to what is 
assumed to be the competence of 
specialist disciplines. They, lack- 
ing an holistic view, spend their 
rime usefully refining their areas 
of interest but foil to forge ahead 
into the literally unknown which 
was once the principal concern of 
philosophers. 

If philosophy is to endure and 
grow as an academic study it must 
from time to time re-examine its 
roots and be clear as the 
direction it is taking. There are 
many who would argue that in the 
history of philosophy there is 
evidence of a rhythmic movement 
in human thought from the specu- 
lative to the critically sceptical and 
back again to speculation. 

Philosophy's present difficulties 
are to be .seen in its failure to 

Courts in S Africa 

From Dr C F. Forsyth 
Sir, Michael Hornsby's article on 
the South African judiciary 
(“Pretoria’s thin red legtl line”, 
August 15) missed the crucial 
point It is true that the South 
African Government if frustrated 
in the present litigation over the 
state of emergency, may seek to 
rely upon other legislation to 
achieve its ends. But it does not 
follow that the courts are bound 
meekly to uphold what the Gov- 
ernment may do in those circum- 
stances. 

The statute clear beyond doubt 
• and free from all ambiguity is yet 
to be drafted. And for as long as 
some semblance of rule by law 
remains, that ambiguity and un- 
certainty may be used by the 
judges to protect the rights of 
individuals. Under the South 
African Constitution the judge's 
role in this area will always be - 
limited but still very significant 
So the important question is not 
how will the Government re- 
spond, but whether the judges will 
have the courage and the wisdom 
to resist whatever draconian plans 
the Government may have in 
mind. 

I will not predict now how the 
judges (especially the judges of the 

Doctor of the Church 

From Mr Patrick IK Gill 
Sir, The floods of tears which John 
Henry Newman is reputed to have 
shed at the sight of his old vicarage 
at Litilemore were as nothing to 
the waves of disbelief that swept 
over me as I read your leading 
article (August 12) referring to this 
great 19th-century Christian figure 
as “the very chief formative 
influence on contemporary 
Christianity" and “the 'invisible 
father' of the Second Vatican 
Council". 

The units of contemporary 
Christianity. Catholic and Prot- 
estant. could be summed up in the 
philosophy of liberalism and the 
supreme authority of conscience, 
yet Newman had completely op- 
posite views to the prevailing 
attitudes on these matters. • 

On receiving his official sum- 
mons to become a cardinal in 
1 879. Newman defined liberalism 
in religion as the doctrine that 
there is no positive truth in 
religion: 

For 30. 40. 50 jears I have resisted to 
the best of m\ powers Ihe spirit of 
liberalism in religion. Never did 
Holy Church need champions 
against it more surely ihan now. 

Waste of resources 

From Mr John Ford 
Sir. There has been much recent 
publicity about proprietors of bed 
and breakfast accommodation for 
the homeless making exorbitant 
profits form public funds, but the 


FCS needs a more attentive 
watchdog. 

The Trustee Savings Banks 
belong to her Majesty the Queen. 
Yours faithfully. 

ANDREW GILCHRIST. 

Arthur's Crag. 

Hazelbank. By Lanark. 

Awful warning 

From Mr E. F. Sonhtoie 
Sir. “Toxic" is a much better word 
than “poison" (letter. August 18). 
It is shorter and it includes an “x" 
for the benefit of Scrabble plavers. 
Yours faithfully. 

EDWARD F. NORTHCOTE. ’ 
Rat 22. 

1 2a. Cambalt Road. SWlj. 

August 18. 


housing benefit from the local 
authority. 

It is uncommon for local 
authorities to use their powers 
under the Rent Act 1977, sections 
68 and 77. to have rents deter- 
mined by a rent officer or tribunal 
at much reduced levels. I suspect 

Lost awakening? 

From Mr George Bell 
Sir, Oliver Hinch's graveyard 
workman (August 7) was possibly 
an immigrant from Golconda, 
Hyderabad, where the mausole- 
ums of the great departed are 
protected by a large notice in 
English: “U is forbidden to live in 
the tombs". 

Yours. 

GEORGE BELL 
32 Sutherland Place, W2. 


observe where the pendulum 
stands. 

Yours faithfully, 

TOM CROSS, 

19 Higher Heyes Drive, 

Kingsley, via Warrington, Cheshire. 

From Dr Robert Beazer 
Sir, Your correspondent. Profes- 
sor Sir Alfred Ayer (August 12), is 
surely right in rejecting the belief 
that philosophical enquiry is. a 
luxury which cannot be put to 
practical use. One important 
application could be in the teach- 
ing of medical ethics. It would be 
encouraging to *hinir that in future 
there might be provision for the 
extension of philosophy teaching 
into the medical curriculum. 

Increasingly doctors are asked 
to make sophisticated moral 
judgements for which their train- 
ing does not equip 'them. The 
problems arising from the 
Wamock report, the Gillick judge- 
ment. the issue of euthanasia and 
public discussion about the fair 
allocation of health care resources 
amongst others pul a heavy 
responsibility on the individual 
judgement of doctors. They rarely 
fed adequate to cope. 

Having taken a degree in philos- 
ophy before reading medicine I 
have become involved in teaching 
medical ethics to young doctors 
training in the Oxford region fora 
career in general practice. They 
feel the subject is important, 
difficult and inadequately covered 
in their undergraduate yens. 

This is an unhappy omissio n if 
society rightly continues to expect 
doctors in these matters to be 
thoughtful and informed. En glish 
language philosophy has moved 
from the previous fashion of 
fastidious detachment from real 
moral dilemmas and I suggest it 
now has an important expanding 
practical role to play here. 

Yours f aithf ully, 

R. BEAZER, 

The Wychwood Surgery, 
Milton-under- Wych wood, Oxford 


appellate division who will have 
the final word) will answer this 
challenge. Suffice it to say that 
while the judicial record over die 
past 25 years has been one of 
appalling subservience to the 
Government, there are signs of a 
new awareness in the judiciary of 
the importance of their role. 

A new fearless attitude on the 
part of the judiciary towards issues 
of civil liberty would -of course 
mean that many detainees will be 
prised from the grip of the security 
forces and that while in detention 
they will be protected from ill- 
treatment at the hands of their 
gaolers. But its consequences may . 
be far more profound than this. As 
the new South Africa begins its 
slow and painful birth the ques- 
tion arises whether anything at all 
will be saved from the ruins of the 
old order. 

If an independent judiciary, 
survives, and it would be a boon 
' for the new South Africa ifit did, it 
will be because the judges now win 
for themselves a reputation as the 
protectors of liberty rather than a 
reputation as the servile hand- 
maidens of a doomed govern- 
ment 

Yours faithfully, 

C. F. FORSYTH, 

Robinson College, 

Cambridge. 

In an age when fundamental 
beliefs of the Christian Church are 
under attack, even at episcopal- 
level; Newman's own testimony is 
a remarkable contrast: 

From the age of 15, dogma has been 
the fundamental principle of my 
religion: I know no other religion. 

His understanding of con- 
science was theocentric— to him it 
was “the voice of God, whereas it 
is fashionable on all hands now to 
consider it in one way or another a 
creation of man”. He even warned 
of the great counterfeit, which 
masquerades under the title of 
conscience — “the right of self- 
will" — which is so evident among 
many Christians, lay and clerical 
today. 

The contemporary Christian 
Church needs “ a miraculous 
conversion of heart. A proper 
understanding of the life and 
works of John Henry Newman 
could provide that conversion and 
also provide the Congregation for 
the Causes of Saints with ample 
material towards the case for his 
canonisation. 

Yours sincerely, 

P. GILL 

13 Castle Meadows, 

Coity, Bridgend, Mid-Glamorgan. 

that the reason for not doing so is 
the awareness that such actions - 
would jeopardise ' the 
landlond/tenant relationship and 
might discourage private land- 
lords from making accommoda- 
tion available, thus rendering 
more people homeless. 

It all seems to emphasise the 
tragic waste of public money on 
short-term expedients, the col- 
lapse of public-sector housing and 
the failure of central Government 
to establish any strategy for 
providing a decent home for 
everyone. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN FORD (Solicitor), 

116 Wilberforce Road, N4. 

New passport 

From Mr John Temple-Smith 
Sir. Mr Miles Cato (August 14) 
must clearly be one of those 
fortunate holidaymakers who can 
take a personal secretary with 
them on their travels, thus reliev- 
ing them of the need to carry a 
passport on their person. 

Speaking as a lesser (bur no less 
liege) subject of her Majesty. I 
have no love for the present 
passport How often, lying back on - 
my mattress on the sun-drenched 
Riviera, have I cursed ihe ob- 


True and false 
wage effects . 

From Mr G. K Lawrence 
Sir, Alec Nove, in his article, “Low 
wages don't work” (August 8), is 
correct when be comments upon 
the lowness of British wages when 
compered to our more successful 
competitors, but he is confusing 
cause and effect when -he infers 
that high wages are not a strong 
contributory cause of unemploy- 
ment. 

German and Japanese labour 
have consistently - been less 
demanding in the frequency, and 
especially the' magnitude, of their 
wage demands and in feet - in 
nominal terms UK wages have 
risen at a much higher rate than 
those of our rivals. 

Professor Nove touched on the 
core of the problem in observing 
that sterling has depreciated whilst 
the mark and yen have appre- 
ciated, but he foiled to draw the 
valid conclusion. In -pressing for 
higher nominal wages, British 
labour has ended up with lower 
real wages. It has also, as a result, 
suffered more unemployment and 
higher inflation; the' divergence of 
our respective exchange rales has 
seen to that 

Higher nominal wage pressure 
vis-brvis our rivals has led to cost 
inflation, lower competitiveness, 
balance of payments deficits, pres- ' 
sure on the exchange rate, govern- 
ment countervailing action in 
raising interest rates, and possible 
fiscal contraction.. 

The eventual and inevitable foil 
in the exchange rate restores some 
competitiveness, but import infla- 
tion is generated real incomes foil 
and unions demand even higher 
nominal wages and the whole 
destabilising process continues, 
with governments having to in*:, 
piement fiscal and monetary ac- 
tion usually inimical to 
employment and economic 
growth. 

It is true that more dynamic 
management, improved market- 
ing, more innovative product 
development, better product 
reliability and delivery, a more 
efficient infrastructure and an 
educational system more attuned 
to business and technical training 
are all critical if Britain is to 
achieve the prosperity of Ger- 
many and Japan. But since we tire 
behind those countries in those 
aspects we cannot expect to re- 
ceive the equivalent real incomes; 
we must maintain our wage levels 
within the boundaries of our 
labour productivity, otherwise un- 
employment will persist and even 
worsen. 

The exchange rale adjusts to 
provide ns with the real wage our 
productive competitiveness war- 
rants- at any particular level of 
employment Attempts to achieve 
higher real incomes through wage 
pressure inhibit our competitive 
position and create a destabilising : 
economic climate hostile t to 
employment. . 

Yours faithfully, . 

G. V. LAWRENCE, * 

Richmond College, 

Spinkhill Drive, 

Sheffield, South Yorkshire. 

August 11. 

Short shrift 

Front Miss Judith M. Burnell 
Sir, Date: August 14, 1986. 08.37 
- British Rail regrets the Victoria 
service from Orpington has been \ 
cancelled. Reason: shortage of 
staff 09.30 — office post not 
arrived; enquiries to sortmg office. 
Reason: shortage of staff 12J0 — 
Westminster Underground sta- 
tion. London Transport regrets 
that passengers may experience 
delays on the District and Circle 
lines. Reason: shortage of staff 
1 5.00 — enquiries to Gas Board as 
to why last quarter’s taU was 
estimated; “We now only read 
meters twice a year”. Reason: 
shortage of staff 17 JO — British 
Rail regrets the Orpington service 
has beat cancelled. Reason; short- 
age of staff 18.30 — The Six 
O ’dock News from the BBC: “And 
now for a round-up of today's 
headlines; unemployment has 
reached a new record level — ”! 
Yours faithfully, 

JUDITH BURNELL 
104 Colfege Road, 

Bromley, Kent. 

August 15. 

Gilded cage 

From Mr Philip M. Corrdl 
Sir, I hesitate to introdnee a 
serious note regarding the legacy 
of £5,000 to a parrot (Fourth. 
Leader, August 16) but I would 
point out that the bequest would ' 
doubtless fell as the biro would be 
unable to give the executor a valid 
receipt for the money. ; 

It is more usual for a weekly 
sum to be left by win, few the j 

lifetime of an animal, to its i 

appointed custodian. In some 1 

cases however executors have j 

been known to entertain sus- y 

picions when animals thus &- j 

voured apparently achieve < 

extraordinary feats of longevity. j 

Yours faithfully, j 

PHILIP M. CORRELL , 

4 Maidenhead Road, ■» 

Stratford-upon-Avon, j 

Warwickshire. j 

August 16. - . j 


ON THIS DAY 


- AUGUST 20 1917 

Our Special Correspondent was 
Hubert Walter. 


THE COUNTRY OF 
GOOD WORKS; 

SWITZE RLAN D'S PART 
. INTHEWAR- 

(From Our Special 
Correspondent.) 

ZURICH. 

With the exception of one or two 
. lurid moments, the history of 
Switzerland during the war has for 
the outer world been uneventful 

Blessed beyond words by having 
been spared the armed violence of 
the enemy, she has from the first 
devoted heraelf, while mobilizing 
her army against airy possible 
invader, to o ff er in g her thanks to 
Heaven and maintaining her tradi- 
tional attitude among the nations 
by doing good to the unhappy and 
innocent, victims whom the fortune 
of war brings within her reach. I 
am not speaking here of the 
interned prisoners, now nearly 
30,000 in number, to whom she 
affords a chance of rec u pe r ation in 
her health -giving air. It is to the 
unofficial good works of the Swiss 
people in regard to the homeless 
civilians and broken soldiers pass- 
ing through on the way back to 
this own countries that I would 
draw attention to-day. 

The number of French civilians 
from devastated districts who have 
returned through Switzerland to 
France up to the present exceeds 
230,000. Day after day the trains 
come through. I have just wit- 
nessed the arrival of the 476th. 
And day after day since the tide of 
miserable humanity began to flow, 
at all the stations on the way — at 
S chaffhaus en, Zurich. Berne, Lau- 
sanne, Geneva, and wherever else 
the .team stops — ami at any hour of 
the day or night, a crowd of Swiss 
people have-met those trains and 
done. their best, by food and gifts 
and cheering words and singing, to 
express their sympathy with ihe 
P»mgTTg«re in the early days this 
spontaneous outpouring of loving- 
kindness, from lack of experience 
and organization, and from the 
very warmth of feeling which 
inspired it, tended to be not only 
overwhelming to the recipients, 
but extravagant Now, though the 
warmth of feeling remains — some 
men (often very busy ones) and 
many ladxeshave not failed to meet 
a single train — the organization is 
perfect, and the systematic relief of 
the rapatrea, civil and military, has 
become a disciplined habit. I have 
seen several trams stop at stations 
and have marvelled at the sympa- 
thetic faces of the spectators, who 
have witnessed the scene so many 
times that afcfmst one might expect 
to . foul _ 3 hem . to have become 
. indifferent- Bid: the zeal with 
which the authorized workers dis- 
tribute coffee, soup, tobacco, and 
chocolate, and the school children 
ring their hymns of hope and 
patriotism, remains unabated, and 
those who have no active work to 
do can at least raise encouraging . 
cheers. Nor mast we forget the 
devoted kdies who accompany the 1 
trains all the way. 

A “CHEERFUL” TRAIN 

The incident which happens 
needy every day of the week at 
Zurich station seems to me one of 
the most pathetic that I have met 
during the war. I do not weep - 
readily, but on this occasion I was 
on the verge of breaking down - 
twice, and. there were more wet : 
eyes on that railway platform than - 
I have ever seen at a funeral. And ; 
this, it seems, was a particularly 
“cheerful” train. Its freight this . 
day consisted of 77 old men, 280 
woman. ‘ 75 children, 40 babies 
under four, and four dogs. Their 
homes, of course, have long ceased . 
to exist. But they have not lost - 
everything they possessed. 'When. •„ 
after the train had been emptied - 
and disinfected. I walked through 
the carriages I saw in the luggage 
ra cks all that remained to them 
after the Germans had done with . 
them. Over each seat was £ small ' 
bundle, containing, in a rug or 
bla nk et, something that the refu- 
gee had fekcould amply not be left ' 

behind. Sometimes it was a dock, 
often a broken tqy; one grandmoth- ” 
er had brought merely the six 
umbrellas of the family. Not all the 


oldest woman that I saw was. 93. 
But in the previous train there had 
been one of 99, who confidently 
asserted her intention of Irving yet 
two more years, in order that she 
might see the final destruction of 
the Boche, who has robbed her of 
all she bad in the world. 


board mSmg its presence l&hi 
the hip-pocket of ray lightweight 
trousers. How often have I envied 
US tourists their pliant, plastic-, 
covered passport's, snugly 
conforming to the curves of the 
body. 

If (he EEC bring? -us pliable 
passports more power to it 
Yours faithfully, 

JOHN TEMPLE-SMITH, 
Jeffcoates, ■ a 

Hempion, ? 

Deddington, Oxfordshire' ■: Jj 

August 15. ' . 


Totally improper 

From Mr. H. T. Sowden 
Sir, Perhaps Mrs Cheny (August 
15) Is a bit' unfair, to take her 
husband to taskfor asking for his 
breakfast egg to be boiled for a 
“foil four minutes”. I suspect he 
recognised that while the boiling 
was in progress she would be 
making the coffee, keeping an eye 
on the toast, searching for the 

marmaTnHp and dishing out the 

fibre. Hardly an emptyfb nr min- 
utes. 

Yoora&rthfiiIly« 

HARRY SOWDEN, 

Larch Cottage, 

Pilgrims’ Close, 

Westhumbte, 

Dorking, Surrey. 

Exception to rule 

From -Mr Ronald Denis 
Sir. This - morning I drew- up 
behind a car which had a label on 
the back window which said “All 
■ property is theft" • L- 

1 said ib the driver as he got.out 
““Is that your car?" He said: “Yes": ^ 


Yours faithfully, 
/^RONALD DAVIS. 
1^20 Brunswick Terrace, 
Mgps&'e, Sussex. ; . . 
^%ngusi8. 

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14 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


COURT AND SOCIAL 


SOCIAL 

NEWS 


Princess Alexandra will open 
the extension to the New Vic- 
toria Hospital Kingston upon 
Thames, on September 24. 


Princess Anne will reopen Dil- 
lons bookstore in Gower Street 
on September 25. 


J. 


Princess Anne, President of the 
Save the Children Fund, will 
attend the film premiere of 
E/eni at ihe Cannon Theatre on 
September 25. 


Princess Alexandra will open 
jf BBC 


the new studio building of 
Radio Kent at Sun Pier. Chat- 
ham, on September 17. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Reginald Bevins, 78; Mr — 
M. Clay. 59; Lieutenant-General 
Sir John Cowley, 81; Mr John 
Emburey. 34; Mr Anaiole 
Fisioulari, 79; Mr Rajiv Gan- 
dhi, 42; Mr Roy Hay, 76; Sir 
John Plumb, 75; General Sir 
Nigel Pdett, 79; Mr Johnny 
Prescott. 48; Mr Brian Rees, 57 r 
Baroness Robson 
Kiddington. 67. 


a 


Forthcoming marriages 


MrO. Dixon 
and Miss CS. May 
The engagement is announced 
between Olaf, son of the late Mr 
O. Dixon and Mrs M. Wright, of 
Leamington Spa, and Caroline, 
daughter of Dr and Mrs W. D. 
May. of Swindon. 

Mr R-J. DowseU: 
and Miss ILA. Forsyth 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, only son of Mr 
and Mrs L. R. DowsetL of 
Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, and 
Elizabeth, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs R. T. Forsyth, of 
Melbourne. Australia. 


Mr J. Fowler 

and Miss P.A. Calvert-Jooes 
The engagement is announced 
between John, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs John Fowler, of North 
Balwyn, Victoria, Australia, and 
Penelope Anne, only daughter 
of Mr and Mrs John Calvert- 
Jones, of Kew, Victoria, 
Australia. 


Mr A.SJM. Smith 
and Miss CJVL Roope 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, elder son of the 
late Colonel A. P. Smith, OBE. 
and of Mrs Priscilla Smith, of 

Lauder, Berwickshire, and 

G are. only daughter of Lieuten- 
ant Commander and Mrs Mi- 
chael Roope, of Cleeve, Avon. 
Mr AAL Stevens 
and Miss U5. Hopfinger 
The engagement is announced 
between Alan, elder son of Mr 
R. George Stevens, of Bourne- 
mouth, Dorset, and Mrs J. P. 
Stevens, of St Brelade, Jersey, 
and Lynn, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs H. B. Hopfinger, of 
Coventry, West Midlands. 

Mr H2V. Young 
and Miss SJ. NkhoHs-Marty 
The forthcoming marriage is 
announced and will take place 
on October 18, between Hugh 
Young, of Stanmore, and San- 
dra Nicholls-Marey, of Hendon. 


Mr RJL Gyselynck 
and Miss H.P. Taylor 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs A. J. Gyselynck. 
of Henley-on-Thames, Oxford- 
shire, and Helen, only daughter 
of Mr and Mis J. W. P. Taylor, 
of Bolton, Lancashire. 


Marriages 


Mr J.WJL Mackenzie 
and M«SS ELI. Huitoi 
The engagement is announced 
between James, youngest son of 
the late Brigadier Mackenzie of 
Gairioch and of Mrs Mackenzie 
of Gairioch, and Emma, eldest 
daughter of the late Mr Robin 
Raikes and of Mis Robin 
Raikes, 3 Denham Green Place. 
Edinburgh. 

Mr AM. Morris 
and Miss N A. Hemming 
The engagement is announced 
between Alan Morris, of Aspley 
Heath. Bedfordshire, and 
Nicola, only daughter of Mr and 
MrsS. J. Hemming, ofHartwell, 
Northamptonshire 
Mr MA. Newman 
and Miss RJB. Aylward 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark Andrew, elder 
son of Mr and Mrs E. B. 
Newman, of Dowlais, Merthyr 
Tydfil and Rebecca Bridget, 
daughter of Dr and Mrs Manse! 
Aylward, of Cefh Coed-y- 
Cymer, Mid-Glamorgan. 


Mr R. Peat 
and Mrs N. Mareozi 
The marriage took place in Paris 
between Mr Robin Peat, youn- 
gest son of Sir Henry Peat and 
Mrs Lena Townsend, and Mis 
Nancy Marenzi. younger daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Alan 
Phillpotxs. 

Mr GJVL Potter 
and Miss KM. Smedtey 
The marriage took place cm 
August 9. at All Saints', 
Woodhara, Surrey, of Mr Gary 
Michael Potter, eider son of Mr 
and Mrs W. G. Potter, and Miss 
Katherine S medley, younger 
daughter of Sir Harold and Lady 
S medley. 

Mr M-J. Allen 
and Miss LEJ. Holland 
The marriage took place on 
August 2, at the Parish Church 
of St Mary, Theydon Bois, 
between Mr Michael Allen and 
Miss Louise Holland. 

Dr J. Milford 
and Miss F. PeOatt 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday August 16, in Harare 
Cathedral between Dr James 
Milford, son of Mrs Jean Mil- 1 
ford and the late Mr Michael 
Milford, and Miss Frances 
Pellatt, daughter of Mr and Mis 
Apsley Pellatt, of Marondera, 
Zimbabwe. 



tvuenaei cron, director oi me rvanonai youth Theatre, raising a glass to the group's thirti- 
eth anniversary yesterday with the actors (clockwise) Ian McShane, Simon Ward, and Pan- 
la Wilcox, who all learned their stagecraft with the company, at a luncheon at the Shaw 
Theatre, London yesterday (Photograph: John Manning ), 


Science report 


New process for making alloys 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 

A new way of making the compound on some suitable 

surface, or of preparing a film 


special alloys needed in map^ 
netic memory systems in 
computers, or as catalysts in 
chemical processes, has been 
invented. 

The method, developed in a 
research programme between 
University College of North 
Wales, Bangor, and two Dan- 
ish universities, opens a route 
for large-scale production of 
exotic materials which are 
difficult to create by estab- 
lished technologies. 

Elaborate precautions are 
needed when cooling a molten 
preparation to precipitate out 
this type of alloy, so as to 
prevent the molecules from 
forming crystals. 

The formation of ultra-fine 
alloys, in an amorphous or 
non-crystalline state, is done 
by depositing a vapour of the 


or thin ribbon of the substance 
by a process known as the 
Liquid quench technique. 

The method perfected by Dr 
Stuart Charles and Dr Steven 
WeDs, in Bangor, with col- 
leagnes in Denmark is de- 
scribed in a paper published in 
Natan. The research was 
done with a grant from the 
Danish Technical Research 
Council. 

Tim alloy they made was an 
amorphous preparation of 
iron, cobalt and boron. The 
scientists suggested that ft was 
a good iHnstration of the 
simplicity of the development 
in which a chemical method 
was used «»■<*■* of liquid 
quenching. Hie established 
process was liable to faults in 
the part ofthe operation where 
very rapid cootirq; occurred. 


To prevent the normal 
formation of crystals when a 
liqcud cooled gradually, the 
temperature of the melt had to 
be reduced suddenly but 
evenly to below the so-called 
glass transition temperature of 
the material 


The new invention depended 
on a chemical reaction from 
which the amorphous alloy 
was formed taking place below 


the t ransiti on tem- 

perature. The first reaction of 
the three elements was carried 
out in water at room temper- 
ature. 


The alloy created was an 
ultra-fine foyer of iron and 
cobalt alloy, which was made 
possible under the new con- 
ditions because boron atoms 
were present in the particles. 
Nature, Vol 322, 1986, p622- 
623. . 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr Raymond Turner to be 
director of design at London 
Regional Transport responsi- 
ble for all aspects of the design 
of products: environment and 
information systems. Mr Ron- 
ald Taylor to be in charge of 
LRPs architectural services 
group. 


University news 

Essex 


The following 
nounced: 


promottan a are 


leaderships 

Dr R E Goodin, dep artm e n t 


government: Dr R C Hlder. chemistry. 
Mr AND McAidey. 


...... .. economics: Dr M 

N Shaw, law (ail effective October X. 
1986). 

Senior lecturesMns ’ 

Mrs D Ado. department of an history 
and theory: Dr E Benton, sociology: 


Mr D H V Brogan, history: Dr A ft 
ilhetnancs: Dr M T WHson. 


Holt, raal 

ministry tall effective from October l. 
19861. 


Dinner 



BWTHS, MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS aad M MBHfflUM 
14 a fine + 15* VAT 

(minimum 3 lines) 


Announcements, auhcmicaied by tbe 
of the 


name and permanent address 
sender, may be sent to: 


THE TINES 
P0 BOX 484 
linia Street 
Et 9XS 


t. telephoned (by telephone 
cibcrs only) to. H4I1 3824 


nibs- 


Announcttncnis can be received by 
telephone between 9.00am and 
S.30pcn Monday to Friday, on Satur- 

E between 9.00am and 12 noon. 
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awing day by IJOpm. 


FORTHCOliM HMRMGES, WESDM6S 
etc on Court and Social Rage EC ■ Boa 
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Coon and Socnl Page amw occme nu 
can not be accepted by tdepbooc 
Enquiries Kr 01-822 9963 
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Please allow at least 4S boon before 
publication. 


will aha cYoihc her pnna with 
salvation: and hrr saints ’Shall shout 
aloud (or Kry 

Psalm 152: 16 


BIRTHS 


On 18th August at St 
George’s Hospital. Tooting, to 
Pamela (rote Churchill) and David, a 
son Alexander. 

COLES On August 16th. to Jennifer 
(nte Archibald) and Anthony, a 
daughter. (Lydia Harriet Grace). 

COSBY - On August 17th. to Debbie 
i nee Beedon) and Trevor, a daughter. 
Lauren Michele, al Royal Bucks 
Hospital. 

CURREY On August 7th al St Richards 
Hospital. Chichester, to JiU (nte 
Scott) and Gordon a daughter. 
Patricia. 


CUKZON On 16th August. 1986. M 
The Garden Hospital. Hendon, to 
Ruth (nte Union) and David, a son. 
Andrew Linton Nathaniel. 

DAVIES - On August i6Ui. at Queen 
Charlotte's. Chiswick, to Bridget and 
HutfL a daughter. Emma Jennifer. 

DENnCE n ACCJUHA - On August 
14th. at the Westminster Hospital, to 
Giulia and Domenico, a son. 

FMDLAY ■ On August 16 th. at Queen 
Charlotte's. Hammersmith. to 
Henrietta (nte Burton) and Alastatr. 
a son. Angus. 


MUSTER On August 17 1986. at The 
Heath Hospital Cardiff, to Wendy 
Uite Ashcraft) and Roger a son. 

FRASER - On Friday. 18th August 
1986. to DruslUa. wife o s the 
Honourable Hugh Fraser, a 
daughter. Elofce. 

CEORCE - On 17th August, at tbe 
Wellington Hospital, to Caroline (nte 
Sweet) and David, a son. George 
Jocelyn, a brother for Stefan and 
Abaca. 

COWER. On August Utti. at BMH 
Munster. Germany, to Patricia (nte 
Ruddock) and James, a son. Rtdiard 
Henry Ronald. 


GRANTHAM On August 13th 1986. to 
Cecilia and James, a daughter. 
Habeoa. 

HATCHETT - On 19th August, in All 
Saints Hospital. Caiaibam. to Elaine 
and Bernard, a son. David James. 

LAKE/CALLAGHAN - On July 29th. 
at Addenbrooke's. to Anne and 
Nicolas Richard, a son. Thomas. 

LEBER ■ On August 15th. al Si 
Mary’s. Paddington, to Deborah (nte 
Traversi and JoeL a son. Simon 
Michael, a brother for Miranda 
Hannah. 

MANS - On August ISth. to Jane aod 
Mark, a son. Thomas. 


McFarland - On 27U1 July, to Delia 
1 nte Sharp) and Alan, a son. Robert 
John Frederick, a brother (or Emily 
and Elizabeth. 

MEEK On lBUi August 1986 al Queen 
Charlotte's to kxu (nte Davidson) 
and Bob a son Charles Francis Rob- 
ert brother far George and FetfcUy. 

MYLREA / LOWNDES - On I 6 U 1 Au- 
gust in Luxemburg, to Paul and 
Frances, a son. Thomas. 


OWEN - On August 18th. 1986 at the 
Birmingham Maternity HaspitaL to 
Yvonne and Charles, a son. Joseph 
Patrick. 

PARSONS - On 18th Augustin Salis- 
bury. to Simon and Angela, 
daughter. Alexandra Charlottes 
sister to Jana and Edward. 

ROBERT - T1SSOT - On August 15th. 
to Sydney. NS W. (o Sarah (nte 
MacMuDen) and Andrew, a son. 


■OSS - On August 14th. to Amanda 
(nte George) and Alec a son. David 
George, a brother for Ian. 

SMGLETON ■ On August I6tfa. 1986. 
at Kingston Hospital, to Joanne (nte 
Clarke) and Robert, a daughter. 
Rachel. 

SWANNELL - On August 18th. at St 
Thomas’ Hospital, to Patricia and 
Robert a daughter. Charlotte Alkla. 


TATHAM • To Simon and Sarah, at the 
Matilda Hospital. The Peak. Hong 
Kong, on August 9th. a daughter. 
Isabel Rose, a staler for Frederick. 
TAYLOR - On August 16th to 
Farnboroogh. to Yvonne, (nte 
Forbes) and Eamotan. a daughter. 
Eleanor Kathleen Mary. 


MARRIAGES 


T HE EAR L OF RADNOR : HRS A C 

Ft I Til . The marriage took place 
recendy between the Earl of Radnor 
and Mrs A.C. Pettit 


DEATHS 


ASKEW -On 18th August 1986 in tils 
96th year, peacefully al home. 
Herbert Royston Askew Q.CL- Be- 
loved husband or Dorothy and dear 
father of Shirley (Dawson) and 
grandfather at John. Greta and 
Celia. Funeral Service al Golden 
Green Gnematoriuin (West ChapeD 
on Friday. 22nd August at 12 noon. 
Family flowers only but donations 
may be sent to the Distressed Gentle 
Folk Aid Association. Vicarage Gate 
House. Vicarage Gate. London W8 
4AQ. 


■AGNAIL On August 16th 1986 
peacefully. Margaret Waterhouse 
(Peggy) nte BENTLEY. Behaved wife 
of Gascon and dearest mother of 
Harvey and Richard. Private crema- 
tion thanksgiving service at All 
Saints Church. Milford -on-sea on 
Saturday August 23rd a! 11.30 ant. 
Donations If desired to Macmillan 

Cancer Trust. C/O Diamond and Son 
FD. 9-11. Lower Buckland Road. 
Lymlnglan. (0690) 72060 


BEESLY - On August 16th in hospital. 
Patrick, dearly loved husband, 
father and grandfather. Private cre- 
mation. Service of Thanksgiving to 
be announced later. Donations, ir de- 
sired. to Imperial Cancer Research 
Fund, c/a Diamond & Son FD. 9-11 
Lower Buckland Road. Lyndngton. 
Hants. Tel (0590) 72060 
HESTON - On 16th August 1986. 
Alan WDmot of HanUwrsL 
MungmdakL Penrith. Cumbria, and 
formerly of Formby, Merseyside. 
Dearly loved husband of Peggy, so 
sadly missed by all his family. Ser- 
wce and interment of ashes. 2 JJ 0 uro. 
Friday. 22nd August at St 
Ken agents Church. Mungrisdale. 
Family flowers. but perhaps dooa- 
ttons, for St Kendgems Restoration 
Fund, i Alan was church warden), 
through Richardsons Funeral Direc- 
tors- Roper SL Penrith. (0768 
62070). Memorial Service early 
October in UveipooL 


BUHHNGSOn 1 6 th of AugusL 1986. at 
Kiniver Nursing Home Teignmouth. 
Leslie. Stuart EUbUngsCBE. Beloved 
husband of the late Ruby, formerly 
of Plymouth and Bovey Tracey and 
former controier of Norcross. 
Funeral service at Weston Mm era 
maiorlum. Plymouth, on Tuesday 
the 26th August at lx am. Family 
flowers only, donations if desired to 
Uie RN1J. C/0 Coombes and Son. 73 
Fore Street Bovey Tracey. 

BOGUSZ - On August 16th. suddenly 
in h» garden. Edward, dearly loved 
husband of Anne. Funeral Service at 
The Sacred Heart Church. 
Wadhurst. on Friday. August 22nd. 
1130am. 

BOOTH • On 13th August. 1986. sud- 
denly. Wilfred (Tay) aged 73 years, 
of Maldavale. London. Funeral Ser- 
vice at St James' Church. BarKham. 
on Friday. 22nd AugusL al 1pm. fol- 
lowed by interment. All enatdries 
please- M CJLLOvearove. 114/116. 
QbtfMti Rd. Reading, to) 0734 52016. 


CHARLES WORTH - On Augut 16th. 
Vio (nte Rutherford), much loved 
widow of the Reverend John 
Chariesworth. late at Turvffle. very 
peacefully with her family. Funeral 
at Cambridge Crematorium. 4 JOpcn 
on Thursday. August 21SL 
CNWREL. Satanxm (Ocfo) - Beloved 
husband of trta and fathrc of Kalla, 
suddenly on 19th AugusL deeply 
mourned by relatives and friends. 
CLARK - On Augiat 16th at Ramsey 
Hospital. Daphne Hamilton of Ga- 
rage Fiat. Pauttons Hoar. Ramsey. 
Hauls. Loved stater of Peggy Ooaton. 
Funeral Service at SouthwuidonCre- 
matuiluin West CbapeL Friday 
August 22nd at 1046 am. No flow- 
ers. but donations If desired to 
Cancer Research, may be sent to A H 
Cheater. Funeral Directors. Ronuey. 
CUVE - On 130i AugusL 1986. to 
London. Sonia Anne Otve. beloved 
daughter of Nadia Rees, and mother 
of Natasha and Dasha. Funeral 
private. 

CROWVHEN - On Angus! 1701. 1986. 
peacefully at her borne. TV r*NaM 
ReynoUston. Swansea. Marjorie 
Mary (nte Harris) widow of Joseph 
Crowther F-R-CJ5. much loved moth- 
er of Judith and grandmother of 
Caroline. Amanda. Philip and 
Thomas. Funeral Service at St 
Andrews Church. Penrios. on 
Thursday. 2 1st AugusL 1986. al 
3pm. 

CRIIWYS - On August 6th. In hospIM. 
Lilian. Adored wife of Richard, very 
precious mother of EUzabetb and 
Yvonne and beloved grandmother of 
Anne. Nathalie. Sarah. Nicholas and 
Judia. A Funeral Service was held oa 
August 14th at Breakspear Cremato- 
rium. RufsUp. Donations may be 9ent 
to the Parkinsons Disease Society. 36 
Portland Place. London Wi. 
DAVES On 17th AugusL 1986. Doris 
of WhUediff. Beer. Devon. Dear wife 
of John and mother of Antony. Peter 
and Fiona. Funeral service at the 
Parish Church. Beer, on Friday 22nd 
August at 2.00 pm. 

HARRISON - On 17th AugusL to her 
96th year, peacefully at Cleverly 
House. London, aflrc a lifetime of 
service and devotion, tocboflng 
many years as secretary to Lady 
Louis Mountbotfen. Maud Alice 
Harrison. O.B.E_dearty loved etater 
of Winifred Bonded of 9 Woodvate 
CrescnL Endon. Stoke-on-Trent- Fu- 
neral Sendee at St Paul’s. 
Kidghlsbrfdge at 11am. on Wntoes- 
day. 27th AugusL No flowers, 
donations to be sent to PubUc Affairs 
□ML SI John's Ambulance Brioade. 
l Grosvenor CresenL London wix 
7EF. 

HECKLE - On Augiat 18th. 1986. Her- 
bert Rea. aged 86. much loved 
husband of Joan and ndherof Pfcdip 
of Trevale. Trebetherlcfc. 
N. Cornw all. 

HORSFELD - On August UtOx. peace- 
fully. after a short Btoeso. Margaret 
Chrisana Catherine, aged 86 yean, 
widow of Derrick Kingsley, beloved 
mo liter or Brenda and Canon and 
grandmother of Maras. Harvey. 
Kingsley and Drummond. Funeral 
Service at Pentrafoeias Church. 
Ctwyd. at 2~30pm an Friday. 22nd 
AugusL Flowers and enquiries to 
Williams A Davies. Ponton. 
Penfrefoelas. teMM9 082 410. 
JAMES - On August 17th. John Henry, 
aged 96 years, of Green Farm. 
Quedgeiey. (Bos. husband of the tola 
Gertrude, and a much loved 
grandfather of Janie. Enquiries. Gtos 
617892. 

JARRETT - On 18Ui August 1986. at 
Wallingford. Community HosgttoL 
after a short illness. Joan Barbara 
(nte Love), widow of William 
Trenchant JarretL aged 63. Funeral 
Service on Friday. 22nd AugusL al 
3pm. al St Agatha’S Omrch. 
Brigh hveH-Cum Sofwcfl. 

KITTS - On Sunday. August 17th. 
1986. suddenly at his hone to 
Cardiff. Rodney WfUfora. Dearly 
loved husband of Carol and adored 
father of David and John. Fune ral at 
Cotwyn Bay Crematorium an 
Friday. August 22nd at 1pm. Family 
flowers only- Donations to British 
Diabetic Association. 10 Queen Anne 
SL London Wl. 

MAWI - On August I8to. at The Purey 
Oust Nuffield HospttaL after a sudden 
illness. Vivian Matuunte Finlay) also 
known as vivan Stuart aged 72 
years, mourned by her daughters. 
JiU. jenny- Valeri*. Vary, and tun 
Kim; mother-in-law of jack and Lee: 
and grandmother of Louise. Nicola. 
Simon. WdUam. Edward, Kbsty. 
Sally and John. Ftmera) Service and 
cremation, at York Crematorium. 
Thursday. August 21st al 4pm. ' 
Family flowers only by rcouesL do- 
nations to The Burma Star 
Association. York, or St Leonard's 
Hospice. York. Plate provided al the 
crematorium. 


MAUDE On August X6th. 1986 ai 
Amesbury Abbey wmshire. His Hon- 
our John Cyril Maude Q.C. aged 8S 
years. Beloved husba n d, father, 
grandfather and great-grandfaQwr- 
Requlan Mass followed hy fooeral at 
All Saints Wartiour Castle. Tlsbazy. 
WObtiire at 1 l~30am on Tuesday 
26th AugusL No Sowers, donations 
If desired, to tbe Barristers Benevo- 
lent Association. 3 Raymond 
Bonding. Gray's ton. London WC1. 

MUJIROn August 17th. peaoefuBy at 
home after a tong Olness bravely 
borne. Kenneth Desmond Mtoor 
R.TJL Retired, aged 69 years. Dear- 
ly loved husband of Anne. Funeral 
2-30 pm. Thursday. 21st AugusL 
Buriey Parish Church. No flowers by 
request but donations if wished to 
Briti sh Heart Foundation. 

PERM (nte Adams) on 16th AugusL 
1986. In Royal Mndoi HospttaL 
Sutton peaceffdfy. after a courageous 
tight against cancer. Anne Charlotte 
aged 41 yews. Beloved wife of 
Frank & Mother of Raco. Nadia. 
Sonia A Anna. Funeral Service at SL 
John’S Church. Betmoid. Sutton on 
Friday 22nd August at 946 am. 
Family Bowers emty. Donations if 
wished to The Royal Maraden 
HospttaL Sutton. 


■tCCARDMXJWTT - On August iStiu 
1986. suddenly at home. Count 
MfchaeL dearly beloved h u sband of 
Monique. Funeral private Memorial 
Service taler. 

RUSSELL - On August 17th. X986 
Mary Le CTen of Northern Farm. 
East Woodhay. Widow of LtOolGLG. 
Russell BSO. King EdwanTs Horae. 
Funeral at Oxford Crema to cl u m. ll 
am on Saturday. August 30th. Flow, 
ers to Ca m p Honson. Newbury. 


RYAN - On August 17th. 1986. peace- 
fully at Mater HoapttaL DubUn: Peg. 
beloved wife of Charles (Doidel) and 
mother or Pip. MfchaeL Bunny. Paul 
and Elizabeth. Funeral on Friday. 
August 22r»d. at 12 noon, at tbe 
Churdi of Our Lady and St Thomas*. 
Sheffield. Flowers to GAt NLUmL 
Abbey Lane. Sheffield. 

SMITH - on August 17th. George 
Archibald Smith. LLJL. aConu 
Mayor of Croydon 1986/86. btewed 
. husband of Kattdeen and devoted 
father of Geoffrey and Monica and 
teandfetlMT Of Patrick, suddenly af- 
ter awtramtog. Ftmeral Service al St 
John the BaptisL Dole Road. Parley 
on Friday. August 22nd as 10.00 am. 
Floral tributes to J-B. Shakespeare 
Ltd. 67 George StreeL Croydon by 
8J0 am. 


STOMR-On 17th AugusL 1986. peace- 
fully at OaM chn ith. Dorset 
Winifred Wake, aged 93 years, tost 
surviving cbOd of Dr. Alfred Hughes 
Twining, of Satco mb e. SJDevon. and 
widow of LLCoLOF£toehr Rf. 
Cremation al Bournemouth 
Crematorium, at noon on Monday. 

1 st September. Enquiries and flow- 
ers to Miller Bros, and FJPJfcitler 
Ltd. Funeral Directors. 119 
Bargates.Christdnirrii. Tel 488439. 

WALKER - On 18th AugusL 1966. 
suddenly at home. Wing Commander 
peter Malcotoi 

walker jLF.CJ»JLF.(redretO. the 
dearly loved husband of Befle and 
super footer of Katie and Peter. Re- 
quiem Mass, at the Church of the 
Holy Redeemer. HtyhcUffc. Dorm. 
on Friday. 22nd AugusL al 2^0 pm. 
Prior to cremation at Bournemouth. 
Flowers to Moodvs Funeral Dtrec- 
torsAOB Lymington Rd. HJqhdiffe. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


LANCASTER- A Memorial Service for 
the late Sir osbert Lancaster. CJBJEL. 
will be held at SLPaul’s Ctrarrh. 
Ooveni Garden. London. WC2_ on 
Thursday. 2nd October, at noon. 

SACMERMitnaH Moses. There win be 
a Manorial Service for Mr Michael 
Sacher - On Tuesday. 2nd Sepumber 
at 6.00. pm at the West London Syna- 
gogue. 33 Seymore Place, wt. 


IN MEMQRIAM - PRIVATE 


PANRy • To conunemorate the Hfe of 
Oirver James Parry, bora Longhorn. 
Cka. 2001 August 1886. died New- 
port. Gwent 17th December i960, 
on this (he centenary et tm birth. 

PORIMAM. Gerald WUHani Berkeley, 
eighth viscount - Today MS' Birth- 
day. darting Geny. who died 
November 3rd. 1967. His c o urag e 
during yean of in health. Ms real de- 
votton and acme of fun. will never be 
forgotten- *A dean heart and a cheer- 
ful spirit*. Nancy 


Army Board 
Lord Trefgaroe, Minister of 
State for Defence Procurement, 
presided at a dinner given 
yesterday at the Royal Hospital 
Chelsea, by the Army Board of 
the Defence Council in honour 
of Major-General Sani Abacha, 
Nigerian Chief of Army Staff 
Among those present were: 

General Sir Nigel BagnalL Mr John 
Hlelioeh. General Sir Roland Guv. 
General str RKbarti Trant aad Sir 
Oottn Fielding (Army Board): Tbe 
Ntge rta n High C o n wua stoner- Malar 
General Earl Caihcarc. Barooen 
Young. Lieutenant-General Sir John 


Read. Lieutenant-General Sir Johnl 
Chaabie. Sir PhtUb Foreman. Sir 
David Hunt Sir Adam Thomson. Mr 
Ivor St an b r ook. MP. Mr Eweni 
Fer guM on. MatorGeneral Andrew 
Watson. 8r»adier Bashir Ayodde. Mr 
Gerald BoxaU. Mr Peter Canneffl. Mr 
David Gardner. Mr Peter MeLougbUn.1 
Mr David WUUams. Mr Gordon 
WHson and Colonel Donfmoa Dveris. 


Latest wills 

Professor Owen Hood PliO- 
lips, QC, of Heaton Drive, 
Edgbaston, Birmingham, Bar- 
ber Profosor in J impru- 
dence, Birmingham 
University, 1946-74, and a 
chief instigator of the setting 
np of tbe Ormrod Committee 
on Legal Education left 
£187,773neL 

Mr Henry Robert James 
Sprints, of Fountain Court, 
Bramsbaw, Hampshire, left 
£3,011^47 neL 

Mr EKas Todros Levy, off 
Marty’s Yard, north west Lon- 
don, who as an opponent of I 
apartheid sought self-imposed 
exile in Israel then England, 
and became an award winning 
architect left £74,382 net 
Mrs Marie Ann Rudiger, of | 
Tiliingboumc Gardens, north 
London,left £707,521 net. 

Mr William Arthur Ward, of 
Writtle, Essex, left £617,219 
net 


Gray’s Inn awards 


Gray’s Inn announces the 
following awards for the aca- 
demic year 1985/86: 

Motor manta by wata B te 

oaten OoU. AUsKnST H^SlSSf 
Tbe Mould: duncan Matthews (Mag- 
dalen Cotl. Oxford). 


Jacqueline AKferton (University Cod. 
London. Wadnam Cotl, Oxford); lain 


St 


la WAIVMI/i 1 

Purvis (Clare Coll. Cambrldge- 
Edmund Hall. Orfordl: NeU W; - 
Ojrtcesler UiUv. OueensCnn. < 
ir: i:#)^Sarah Gating (Trinity CoH. 


Commercial prize; t No award: 

- Davies 


Enhanced second. E Huw 

(University Cod. Cardffn. _ _ 

Chancery prize; 1 lain Purvis; En- 
hanced second. Carole Atkinson (Lan- 
caster Unlv). ^ 

Common Law -prise: 1 Duncan 
Matthews; Enhanced second. Chris- 
topher Butcher. 


The Btr ken head: Duncan Matthews. 
The Homers; Christopher Butcher: 

David w right njvenwol Unlv): 
Charles Lewis flWs OM. Caro- 
Dvbora Price .mutity Hafl. 


JeCTord 


li: RusseD ) 


(St John's college. Cambridge). 

tore shnrnia (LSE). 


Shaw: Ktabare , . 

HUberv: Tracey Elliott (BtffltiMham 
LTniv). _ _ ^ 

The Steen: Rosemary Brown (Trinity 
OoU. Oxford). _ . _ 

The Blundells: Linda Weirder ITrtnuy 
Hall. Cambridge); Anna-Rose Lands 
(BalUol Coil. Oxford). 

The MeNalR SanihCarilng. 

The John G C Phillips; Bernard 


Thdrogood (Leeds unlv). 

The Albion Richardson: Penelope 
-eland (Trinity Hall. Cambridge). 

• Gokue: Jonathan Nash (Si John’s 
I. Oxford) 

Roy WT 
ine Hewitt 


Mor eland | 

TMHte 

The SirH 
trorabratne 


WHson: Al exande r 
(LSE). 


The Sir Baymond Ph UMgy t > Gerwyn 
.. Oxford 


Samuel (Jesus Coll. OxfordL 
The Rodney Bax: Andrew Prestwich 
(Birmingham Unh). 

The Dingle Pool Surlnder Bhafcar 
(LSE). 

Tbe WtiidMk Rufina Weerecabw 

TSwKrsJ & Slid: tain Purvis. 
Society's awards: .Jain Purvis: Ned 
Watson: Richard Stondy (St John's 
.Coll. Oxforth Alan Prim (King’s ONI. 
London); Karen Morris i Edinburgh 
Unlv). 

Mndttf on bta- Ihutf resaUs 

Lady Shaw prize: enratue Scott 
(Readbni Omvi . 

Macasfcfe Andrew Presiwtch: Chris- 
topher Buicher. 

IBM Junior awards to mc ai iiaBi in 
The Bacon: Candida WhiUonw (Mag- 
dalen Cotl. Oxford). 

The Holt; Sinwn Devonshire (Mag- 
dalen Cotl. Oxford). 

The uthwatt: Joraer Evans (Magdalen 
owl oxford). 

Tbe Discretionary mze; Rosalind 
NKhotson (Magdalen coil. Oxford). 
Efltnm amdc 1«S5 ‘ 

The Hoiker Juniors: Christopher 
Butcher: Duncan Matthews; surinder 
8hakar. 

The Cynthia Terry: Elizabeth Long 
■New Hall and Peuriwusc. Cam- 
bridge!. 

The Tapp Moot Prizes 
Mienaeimas 19SS: Nerys jettord. 
Hilary 1986: John Nash. 

Easter 1986; ftomsotssier Wtng. 
Trinity 1986: Duncan Mattigrws 


f 


1 


OBITUARY 

JUDGE JOHN MAUDE 

Successful lawyer with an actor’s flair 


Judge John Maude, QC one 
of the livelier and more 
colourful lawyers of recent 
times, died on August 16. He 
was 85. 

John Cyril Maude was born 
on April 3, 1901. the son of Sir 
Cyril Maude, the famous Ed- 
wardian actor. He was educat- 
ed al Eton and Christ Church. 
Oxford, and called to the bar 
ofthe Middle Temple in 1925. 

He was counsel to the Post 
Office at tbe Central Criminal 
Court from 1935 to 1942 and 
then for a year junior counsel 
to the Treasury at the Central 
Criminal Court. At the out- 
break of war. he joined the 
General Staff at the War 
Office as a temporary civil 
assistant The following year, 
he became an officer in the 
Intelligence Corps, serving in 
this country and for 12 
months in Washington as 
security officer for various 
British missions. Returning to 
England in 1942, he was 
employed in the War Cabinet 
offices. 

He look silk in 1943 and 
was appointed a judge of tbe 
Mayor's and City of London 
court in 1954,- having already 
served as recorder of Devizes 
and, later, of Plymouth. From 
1945 to 1951 he was Conser- 
vative MP for Exeter. He bad 
a Lambeth MA conferred on 
him by the Archbishop of 
Canterbury in 1948 and was 
Chancellor of the Diocese of 
Bristol from then until 1950. 
That year, however, he re- 
signed the office and soon 
after was received into the 
Roman Catholic Church. 

At the bar, “Mr Maude, 
QC” was well known for his 
almost theatrical charm of 
manner. Tall and slim, with a 
habit of fidgeting with his wig 
reminiscent of Birkett in his 
famous cases, he commanded 



PI 


complete attention when he 
rose to speak, his mastery 
enhanced by the calm, deep 
and resonant voice that may 
have been another bequest 
from his father. It was not 
unusual for him to be simulta- 
neously involved in two cases, 
defending in one, prosecuting 
in the other’ going from court 
to court along the Old Bailey 
corridors and s n atc h i n g his 
meals in the barristers' room. 
Yet he would often triumph in 
both cases. 

His skill in cross-examina- 
tion prompted tbe then Re- - 
co refer of London, Sir Gerald 
Dodson, to advise a jury not 
to be “‘carried away by his 
eloquence: “It is well known 
that he has the ability to - 
charm the birds out of a tree". 

There was one occasion, 
however, in 1967, when he 
was rebuked by Lord Justice 
Winn for words used when 
passing sentence earlier in the 
year. Reducing the appellant's 
sentence. Winn gave as an 
ancillary reason that “this 
man may reasonably be suffer- 
ing under a sense of grievance 


due to the attitude the judge 
[Maude] adopted in passing 
sentence, addressing him as if 
he were some rtnof/ft*, not a 
member of the public « all 
but some inferior type who 
could really only be dealt with 

on a desert island. 

“It is not the practice in iha ■ 

country to transport, let afoae . 
put people oa adesen island**.-. 

Yet Maude was far from : 
unfeeling towards people os 
the wrong side of the law. It,: 
was typical of him to' spend 
many hours in prison with hj*:.;. 
diems, and when be retired iq ’ 

1968, after 43. years* assoda- ; 
tion with the criminal law, be : 
revealed that he had “never, 
really liked punishing peopfeY 
He was also of the view that ' 
the jury system was superan- 
nuated. Juries, he maintained, - 
were often incapable of fating 
together the jigsaw pieces of ■ 
complicated evidence, in state ~ 
ofthe assistance they received. ' 
from counsel and the judge. : 
Furthermore, jurors were to- ’ 
dined to believe that a witness 
must be telling the trnd) . 
merely because he “seemed \ 1 

nice, decent sort of fellow^” 4 " 
and for no other reason. - - , - 
Maude retained dose asso- * 
ciaiions with the stage and* ” 
before being appointed to the 
bench, was for a number of . 
years director of the OM Vic ; 
Trust and chairman of the ' 
British Drama League (which 
became the British- Theatre - 
Association in 1970). He also j 

g ive time to the Middlesex: 

ospitaJ on whose board he 
served from 1951 to 1962. 

He was twice married; fast, • 
in 1927. to Rosamund Mur-;. 
ray, from whom he obtained a , 
divorce in 1955. and, second, - 
to Maureen, Marchioness of 7 
Dufferin and Ava. There was jl^' 
one daughter of the first 
marriage. 


H'Ih 1 


L* 


i 

ri - ' 




MR J. B. MILLAR 


MrJ.B. Millar, OBE, died 
yesterday at the age of 76. His 
early career was mainly in the 
shadowy world oflntdligence, 
where he did very important 
work, not least in enabling 
many Jews to escape from 
Nazi Germany. After the war, 
he served in various capacities 
as a broad casting administra- 
tor, above all in helping 
-Ghana to develop its own 
broadcasting system. Later he 
extended this work to other 
countries of the new 
Commonwealth. 

James Broom Millar was 
bora on January 8, 1909. His 
father was the Scottish archi- 
tect Thomas Andrew Millar, 
and he was educated at 
Ketvinside Academy. and • 
Loretto before going to St 
John's College, Cambridge: 
He became fluent in French 
and German, and at the time 
when he went down from 
Cambridge was encouraged to 
join the Consular Service, asa 
cover for Intelligence work. 

He did not at first take up 
this offer, but. went instead for 
a time into the City, as a 
stockbroker; and in tins work 
he prospered. By the late 
1930s, however, he was serv- 1 
mg as a consular official in 
Botin, and it was while he was 
there that he arranged for 
many Jews to leave the 
country. 

At the outbreak of war, be 
was transferred to Copenha- 
gen, and was there when the 
Gormans invaded in the 
spring of 1940. Some of them 
broke into his office- while he 
was destroying documents, 
but were in too much of a 
hurry to pay attention to what 
he was doing. As a diplomat 


he was immediately flown 
home. 

His next posting was to 
Zagreb in Yugoslavia, where 
he established useful contacts 
inside the Reich and was able 
to report on German disposi- 
tions and troop movements, 
white also assesang enemy 
intentions in the Balkan the- 
atre. In April, 1941* When 
Hitter invaded Yugoslavia, he 
was one of the British party, 
led by the head of mission Mr 
(later Sir) Ronakl Campbell, 
which tried to escape by 
destroyer but was captured by 
the Indians. 


5 r.^ 


a «3tj* 
w * 


e-i-' 


In due course the captives 
Fie Duke 


were exchanged for the 
of Aosta, who had fallen into 
British hands. : -and after his. 
liberation Mfllar was em- 
ployed in giving support to 
Yugoslav resistance, operating 
first from Cairo and later, after 
the Allied invasion of Italy, 
from Bari. 

At the end of the war he 
joined the BBC Since his 
views, unlike those traditional 
in his family, had become 
sympathetic to Labour during 
the war, he was quite at home 
in the postwar political di- 
mate. 

He was seconded for a time 
to the Gold Coast, where he 
advised the colonial govern- 
ment on extending radio com- 
munications within the 
colony. When the Gold Coast 
became Ghana in 1957, he 
was invited back by its inde- 
pendent government, and 
then served as a much-ad- 
mired and popular director of 
broadcasting in the new state. 
For this work he was made 
OBE, though he deserved 
higher recognition for other 


services, necessarily unac- 
knowledged, that he rendered 
during his life. 

Rooming the BBC in 1960^ . - 
he was. first, bead of French- 
language services and then . 
director of programmes for ^ 
Scotland. This post he hdd , 
. untfl his ‘retireinent in 1 969. , i 

But his African friends had > 
not forgotten him, and his : 
career in broadcasting was for » 
from over. He was invited to 
Sierra Leone to work on a T 
Commonwealth development » 
scheme that required his spe- 
cial knowledge; and in April, 
1973, the government of the 
Mid-West region of Nigeria - 
asked him to launch a tdevi- » 
sion station in Benin City. 

- His -success in these ven- " 
tures attracted the notice of ; 
the government ofBranei, and ; 
Milter went out as that ■" 
country's first director . of . 

. broadcasting. Once again, his. •’ 
drive and tact enabled him to"; 
launch in record time a new , 
television station which pro- 1 
vided the first all-colour trans- ~ 
mission in the region. He used - 
to say that it was this achieve- [■ 
ment that brought him most ! 
satisfaction. 

Millar was witty and ea^ 
■going; a great enjoyer of liffej ... 
but fundamentally serious. ■: 
and with a genuine dedication i 
to tbe public service. ' 

In 1949, he married Count- 
ess Maria Lo Faro, but they :: 
were soon divorced. His sec- . : 
ond marriage, in 1956, was to " 
Margaret Room, but die died -: 
in 1984. Ax the end of his fife • 
his closest companion has - 
been Dr Phyllis Auty, an old - 
friend from Cairo and Bari 
days. 


,&• ’• 


IM 


•V 

J.-CI 

•ja " 

j;.v 


folia ( f>j 




L'iicnsM’h 




» C\r’ 


,l -.i 

IV 


PROF JANKO LAVRIN SONIA CUBITT 


Professor Janko Lavrin, 
Professor of Slavonic Studies 
at Nottingham University 
from 1923 to 1953, died on 
August 13. He was 99. 

- Of Slovene extraction, 
Janko John Lavrin was bora 
on February 10, 1887, and 
educated in Austria, Russia 
and,, briefly, in Scandinavia. 
He had been a journalist in 
Russia for some years before 
the First World War. during 
which he was a war correspon- 
dent, attached, first, to- the 
Serbian Army and subse- 
quently on the Salonika front. 
Later, during the Second 
World War, he worked for the 
BBCs European service as a 
broadcaster and language 
supervisor. 

He came to England in 
1917, joined the staff of 
Nottingham University Col- 
lege two years later, and two 
years later stiB was ajjpoinied 
to the chair of Russian lan- 
guage and literature. He 
proved himself an enthusias- 
tic and thoughtful teacher, 
though as a critic and inter- 
preter of Russian literature be 
had tbe defects of his qualities. 

The key to this style of 
criticism is to be found in the 
sub-title he favoured for his 
earliest volumes, which were 
on Dostoevsky and lbsen. He 
called each of them “a psycho- 
critical study", and the phrase 
seemed, perhaps, more preg- 
nant .and promising in the 
early 1920s, when the books 
appeared, than 1 it does today. 

Lavrin was an informed 
student of Russian literature, 
more particularly of the work 
of the great figures of the 
nineteenth century, and he 
had a feiriy extensive knowl- 
edge of foreign literature gen- 
erally; while, he acquired, in 
the course of time, a -com- 
mand of English that was 
always adequate: for his 


purpose. 

But, intelligent thoujfo his 


habit of appreciation was, he 
seldom rii s iin gutKhwi as clear- 
ly as some of his readers 
would have wished between 
the values ofliteratureand the 
psychology of authorship. In 
discussing the character and 
temperament of authors - 
their inner conflicts and spiri- 
tual aspirations, their inhibi- 
tionS' and a ubfimalfans .of 
impulse - he was inclined to 
assume that psycho-analysis 
was a more powerful critical 
searchlight than experience 
has- shown it to be. v 
However, his books were 
always illuminating. Ihe early 
study of Dostoevsky served as 
the basis of a sounder study 
published in 1943, and the 
inquiry he pursued in Tolstoy 
and Modern Consciousness % 
published in 1924, was elabo- 
rated in a more balanced and 
effective way in Tolstoy: an 
Approach, issued 20 years 
later. His study of Gogol 
<1926) was the first full-length 
study of i& kind in English 
and brought home to the 
reader in this country - the 
essential features of Russian 
criticism of that writer. 

In Studies in European 
Litermure(l926). Lavrin dealt 
with a dozen nineteenth cen- 
tury authors, among them 
Balzac, Heine, Turgenev, 
Nietzsche and Ibsen, all of 
whom he : decribed, a shade 
disconcertingly, as 
“romantic'": One of the most 
useful of his small books, 
which appeared at a timely 
moment, was An Introduction 
to the Russian Novel, pub- 
lished in 1942. In recent years 
he compiled and edited vari- 
ous collections of Russian ' 
-short stories, and. many of his 
works were translated into 
several languages, including 
Japanese. 

■' He married- Nora Fry, an 
artist, in 1928. She died test, 
year; and there wore two sons 
^ofthe marriage. 

S 


I 4 * 

- 


T-, 


lo-.. 


N, 

i<r . 

V 

ff*s. 


; Eo, 

ate- 


iv M ' 




f. 


Mi 




The Hon Mrs Roland ' 
Cubitt, OBE, better known as " 

Sonia Cubitt, died oa August '• 

16. She was 86. . ~ 

The younger daughter of ■ 
George and Alice Keppel die 
was bora on May 24, 1900. ^ tS*.! 
Her mother was, of coarse, * 
Edward VlTs mistress in'W' 
later years,' and Sonia de-"; ; 
scribes in her book EdwmBan :- 
Daughter what it was like,-asa 
child, to be oir friendly tenus 
with the King. She would can *!'i 
him “Kingy" and slide pieces.-; 
of buttered bread down hh- 
trouser-legs: a game that he « 
seems, most surprisingly, » 

have encouraged. 

One of her godmothers was ' 

Mrs Ronald (Maggie) 
Greviile, well-known hostess., 
and the owner of Potesdfea £ 
Lacey; the other, Countess . 
Torby, grand-daughtef »,* 
Pushkin. $onia*s godfeihefjT 
was the countess's morganatic' 
husband. Grand Duke Mi- 
chad of Russia. Her sister, t 
V iolet, later Trefosis, was tM^ 
francophile authoress whoi*- , 
came Vita Sacfcville-Wesfs 
lover. 

Before the First World War » 

Sonia and her toother once - 
had the experience of crashing " 
on a high curve, while riding - 
together in a bobsleigh m 
Switzerland. - 

During the Second Worn > 

War, Sonia was very active vs " 

St John’s Ambulance; running.-- 
for a time a first aid post * - 
Portsmouth. After the 
she became St John’s nursing 
superintendent., for Hamg- .. 
shire, and from 1957 ,1^19.70 - : 
was county president Shew® ' 
made OBE m 1959. - , : M 

As well as £datitdipdy> 
Daughter she also r wrpw.r*^ 
fictional work, Sister pf th* 4 . 

Sun. . 

She married the. Hon. f&’ lJ ; 
land Cubitt iri 192a but 
were divorced in 194ft- -WJ''' 
were two sons and one daujP 1 * 
ter Ofthe' marriage;' ; 

*1 




,-v; 


is i. 


ir. 




t." 1- 







! °fl\ \ 

Cl Qr 


15 


THE ARTS 






Television 

Who to 


EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 
Cinema: David Robinson 


mSL Revelation from China 


. -tJhe most important piece to 
.** i jcortr was the victim's head” 
■> ■‘^.'served the detective in tones 
tXX* wdinreheaxsed uoocha- 
• .X't'nce. Once recovered from 
' 3 ^ie ThameSr the elusive Inst 

• of the anatomical pgsaw 
V’KBzle confirmed that Chris- 

' .•* ..V.tbd Boyce had been stran- 
i./^^led; what it could not do was 
the dmiBistances of 
"onnder which ware , to 
.-j ,;' , X l( 'scoBie the key issue of her 
- vasbaunTs trial. 

<r**7 No One Speaks for the Dead 
.*» i, Thames) examined this and 
. ~" :i !vo other cases where men had 
J ^X.Vwnglfid women, freely ad- 

■ ^ihted the (tiffing and then 

. "leaded guilty to manslan- 

: ■' V-^ter on' the grounds of 
'* provocation. In each case, dm 
! efeace successfully traduced 
, .fise victim’s character in court, 
r> MiS.' ; nd the prosecution failed to 
1 - ; pall witnesses to rebuttal. The 
octets were accepted and die 
'• > .'.f^UUers received sentences of, 

' u^^-ispectively, six, six and four 
ears’ imprisonment. 

This wefl-researcbed if 

• L-.f father tendentious docgmen- 

■\'.<jry interviewed those wit- 
. B esses, who earnestly descri- 
■- f h, *ed the victims as kiud- 

• (carted, generous, compas- 

■ . " ’^ jonate — as people, in other 
... .. '■'■jords, who deserved neither 

f S?Jie original violence nor the 
^fXnrensfc vilification. There is 
f'’y>vioo5ly something rotten m 
: '%be state of justice if this can 
' '^jCott, bnt to Marne the 


B. M 


The big revelation of the Edinburgh 
International FQjn Festival — this 
year ce lebrat ing ns fortieth edition — 
comes from China. Two new films 
confirm that Yellow Earth was no 
flash in the pan, but that there really 
is a conspiracy to supplant the old 
cardboard heroes and viflams' of 
official Communist mythology' with 
flcsb-and-blood people. 

Like Yellow Earth, both Jianzhong 
Huang’s A Girl of Good Family and 
Nuanxin Zhang’s Sacrificed Youth 
treat the fives of remote commun i ties 
practically untouched by modem 
civilization. The new artists recognize 
these ancient cultures as sources of 
Chinese thought and character. Even 
the most primitive and oppressive 
traditions are viewed with com- 
passion -rather than the sweeping 
condemnation required by earlier 
Communist dogma. 

Set to 1948, A Girl of Good Family 
is the story of a young woman sold in 
marriage, according to custom, to a 
six-year-old husband. A curious 
attachment — neither parental nor 
marital — grows up between the 
kindly wife and her bed-wetting 
spouse; and, when she falls in love in 
a normal way with a young man, the 
adultery wounds both partners in the 
unlikely marriage. Such exotic 
relationships have never been de- 
scribed on the screen before, but 
Huang realizes them with subtlety, 
credibility and (particularly in the 
naive stratagems of the jealous little 
boy) a lot of humour. The place and 
its customs are described with ethno- 
graphical care and breathtaking 
images. 


‘U AR 


There are comparable qualities in 
Sacrificed Youth, the work of a 
woman director, which recalls the 
experiences of students in the years of 
the Cultural Revolution, sent out to 
do manual labour in rural areas. 
Arriving in a Dai village wearing the 


so slander half the population: 
be real problem sturdy is toe 
ype of man who becomes , a 
edge. 

For ton, one had to turn to 
tost of toe current Max 
- -C. Jeadroom Show (Channel 4). 

. "'tand wicked between the mo- 
Muc pubescent fantasies of 
pop promo videos, Mr 
...^ J cadroonT s compater-enhan- 
face conducted a “mas- 
. --Vr^ara-to-mascara** interview 
•. -..tab a not-unheafthy-looking Sleeping BeautV 
- Tarnation of Boy George "***“■* 

delirious, ecstatic ... I Playhouse 
• • - nnsider myself to be perfectly 
While Gorge en- 
‘ "^-iTgized his forthcoming book, 

* ‘vux indulged to a dazzling 
l awn. “Ah yes”, he sighed. 

-■ ^Renaissance Man”. 


drab cotton suit which was the Party- 
approved uniform of those times, the 
heroine is shocked by the country 
girls’ bright clothes, nude bathing and 
unabashed flirting with the village 
boys. In time she relaxes to their 
eatierw2ys,ffiough finaIfy the aggres- 
sive, unrestrained emotions of her 
hosts prove too much for her. 

These films provide the rare thrill 
of discovering a new society and the 
private sentiments of the people 
within it, and inspire regret that 
channels of communication with _ 
Chinese cinema are at present so 
errati c. Sadder still however are 
current reports of a damp-down on 
more progressive filmc and their 
makers. 

America's independent film -mak- 
ers, always strongly represented in 
Edinburgh, seem currently to be 
compensating for the commercial 
cinema’s preoccupation with action 
fantasies or the sexual initiation of 
retarded schooDrids by concentrating 
on films about intimate; mature 
human relationships. 

Bill Sherwood's Parting Glances, 
which opens soon in London, is a 
good-looking well-made and sophis- 
ticated low-budget feature with res- 
onances a lot larger than its 
immediate subject Set among New 
York yuppie society, it centres on a 
homosexual couple (played by Rich- 
ard Ganoung and John Bolger) and 
their friends, in particular a gifted, 
cynical musician dying from AIDS. 
The film’s unusual merit is its sense 
of relationships — not only homosex- 
ual — that have been toughened and 
ripened by long duration, and of love 
that can withstand even boredom. An 
ingenue (Adam Nathan) who tries to 
crash his way into the central affeir 
finds these rooted relationships far 
too strong to breach. 

Gus van Sant’s Mala Nodie like- 
wise triumphs over penury of re- 


sources. using its grainy 16mm 
images with expressionist flair to 
convey a vivid sense of a place (a 
slum district of Portland, Oregon) 
and its people. Homosexuality figures 
here too: the protagonist, a tattered 
young storekeeper, fells hopelessly for 
- a young Mexican illegal immigrant, 
who in return teases, exploits, abuses 
and bullies him. Van Sant’s picture of 
the Mexican boy and his friends, 
living a hungry, fugitive existence 
which has turned them as fierce ami 
untrusting as alley-cats, sticks in the 
mind long after the film. 

The best part of Lizzie Borden's 
Working Girts is also a sense of 
environment: a Manhattan brothel, 
during the course of one normal 
working day. The neo-documentary 
style is effective enough, but we seem 
to have seen these women who lead 
nice bourgeois private lives out of 
hours, and the customers with ibeir 
infantile sexual fantasies, rather often 
. before. A much more original and 
lively female- portrait features in 
She's Gotta' Have It, an all-black 
production, directed by Spike Lee. 
The heroine is a sophisticated and 
self-aware young woman whose urges 
impel her to a carefree promiscuity — 
with disconcerting effects on the egos 
of her three rival lovers. 

Working to association with the 
National Film Archive, Edinburgh 
has made a genuine historical 
rediscovery in Bernard Vorhaus, who 
was interviewed at length about his 
career by Geoff Brown on this page 
tost week. Vorhaus — still enviably 
vigorous at 81 and dearly ready to 
return to work at the drop of a 
shoestring budget — is in Edinburgh, 
modestly ddighted to be brought out 
of his 35-year exile in the .wilderness 
of St John’s Wood. 

The halfdozen films already un- 
earthed by the NFA show that the 
admiration of David Izan — who first 







y* 


A study in durable relationships: toe gentle cold shoulder from Richard Ganoung (left) for the boy 
(Adam Nathan) who tries to break into the central affair of Parting Glances 


reminded tbe world of Vorhaus's 
existence — is not misplaced. His 
modest British thrillers, with titles 
like Crime on the Hill, Dusty Ermine 
and The Last Journey, reveal a 
distinguished talent Vorhaus was far 
ahead of his contemporaries in his 
bold use of locations (stretches of the 
Great Western Railway figure in The 
Last Journey) and his fluid, dynamic 
cutting. He reveals great skill for 
character, and made rich use of the 
great acting talent offered by tbe 
London stage in tbe Thirties. The 
films are as enjoyable in their way as 
early Hitchcock, and augur well* for 
next winter’s National Film Theatre 
retrospective. 


Opera: John Higgins 


Dance: John Perdval 


Some credit is doe to Frank 
Dunlop for looking off the 
beaten track for a company to 
bring The Sleeping Beauty to 
this year’s Edinburgh Festival 

I ; . Martin Cropper findi s g 0 ? e ** 

1 irMn' been to Britain before. The 

•V " “ Warsaw- Ballet is one of tbe 

s Summersqppe 

has given outstanding talents 
the i 


\ K l 


,()NM 


p yjS/Zagroset : / 
;: r‘, Elizabeth Hall 

a -- j.- ■— . . .. . - i i 

-ew of the many pieces by 
vf-nwl WeiU encountered by the 
— -ondon Sinfonieoa during the 
decade can have had 
c the chilling impact of 
’ tat composer's Das Berliner 

■ • •! equiem, written for radio in 
*.^•928. During its course it 

- .parodies popular marches, 

'aJtzes, even a Bach reefra* 
.• ;ve, but not so much for the 
„ ake of making bitingto witty 
” .7 , oliticaj comment as tor that 
. ; 7 jt uttering a genuine, despair- 
■; 7 tg lament 

For this is grim, deathly 
, ; r.liusic, partly inspired by tbe 
■; ; .olitica] murder of the padfist 
• 1 .“;,iosa Luxemburg, partly by 
. he consequences of the First 
■' /.Vorid Wan and all those 
, ; ;..arodies conspire to form a 
itualisuc. starkly defined pro- 

- '■ ession. It made quite a 
• ontrast to the lighter, though 
n their way equally penetrat- 
ng, songs of Happy End, also 

(’[leard here, though both works 
ye re sung idiomatically by a 
v ram consisting of Maureen 
-Jrathwaite, Linda Hirst, Alex- 
. -nder Oliver, Stephen Roberts 
nd Terry Edwards. 

It is difficult to think of 
anything more violently op- 
Y; .' ; iosed to these works, both in 
angnage and intent, than the 
Y- music of Webern, Ravel or 
. vlartdk. Perhaps that is why 
Y be Bartok that appeared in 
" >; .*et another adventurous pro- 
. .' .ramme was Contrasts, 
v j hough the title derives simply 
-.rom the three diverse timbres 
\ if darineu violin and piano 
tsed in the work. 

The selected bare bones of 

• his orchestra, Nona Liddell 

■ _ . violin), Michael G>Hin$(dar- 

. net) and John Alley (piano), 
et the tone for the remainder 

* ' )f the concert, for Bartok’s 

aster movements demand tbe 
! iame biting brilliance and 

r mic .precision as WeilL 
■ was a relentlessness 
■';tbout the opening march that 
■; #as nicely counterbalanced by 
*’Ae innocent wit of the last, 

■ whirling dance while, m be- 
’•* . ween, foe nocturnal mor- 
■ 11011085 of the slow move- 
nent evoked somethin be- 
rond the relaxation indicated 
- .n its Hun^rian title. 

If crispness was the pre- 
dominant characteristic* of 
' this ptoyipg, in Ravel’s In- 
troduction and Allegro a 
slightly larger team, spear- 
headed by the controlled de- 
.gance and virtuousity of 
Helen Tunstairs harp-playing, 
;aimed for unusual clarity, 
.helped by the hall’s relatively 
thy acoustic That was also to 
■' fie advantage of Webern's 
■ Five Orchestral Pieces, Op 10, 
aphorisms of immense depth, 
given here with a clear beat 
-from Lothar Zagrosek and, 
partly in consequence, with a 
natural feel feu* line, gesture 
- and, critically, colour. 


to the international scene, 
Nijinsky among them. 

The present company has 
no dancers of top class, in feet 
its qualities, although respect- 
ably have to be seen by 
international ' standards as 
what used to be called provin- 
daL To put it in perspective, 
both Royal Ballet companies 
generally put out stronger 
casts in thus work, but by no 
means invariably. . 

The production of The 
Sleeping Beauty is new, pre- 
miered in April. Piotr Gusev, 
who staged it, has impeccable 
credentials. Now 82, be once 
danced both Prince Desire 
and the Bluebird in Leningrad 
under the direction of Fedor 
Lopukhov, who probably 
understood Petipa's choreog- 
raphy better than anyone else. 
Besides. Gusev's assistants in- 
cluded Irina Kolpakova, re- 


membered as an Aurora of 
rare quality with the Kirov 
Ballet. 

So the set dances are given 
in authentic versions 
where they sometimes differ 
in detail from those femfliar in 
British productions, it is not 
necessarily we who are right. 
In the yriiwut dance, - for 
instance, it is refreshing to see 
children again as well as 
adults, and Gusev’s version 
has some very pretty touches, 
.including the childre n dancing 
under arches iff boughs held 
by the men. * 

On the other hand, Gusev 
seems not very fond of tra- 
ditional mime, and he treats 
Tchaikovsky’s score to some 
savage cuts. He avoids all the 
usual explanation about the 
witch Carabosse and her anger 
by adding a sequence during 
the overture in which the good 
fairies are seen arriving for 
Aurora’s christening and are 
admitted by tire master of 
ceremonies who rudely pushes 
Carabosse away. After that, 
Gusev cuts straight to the 
ferries’ usual entrance, miss- 
ing out all tbe processions 
which help build atmosphere, 
ft is odd, too, that the feiries 
apparently stopped some- 
where between tire front door 
and the great hall of tire palace 
to put on cloaks and find their 
attendants. 

There are some nice tou- 


ches, such as having the baby 
held aloft at the point when we 
usually see tbe Lilac Fairy so 
honoured. How convincing 
also, when Carabosse vanishes 
in a puff of smoke after her 
spell has worked, that the four 
princes make a solemn pact 
and go off in different direc- 
tions to look for her. But 
omitting the hunting scene 
altogether not only inflicts 
another wound on Tchaikov- 
sky but means that. Prince 
Desire’s arrival on the^scene 
seems to happen by pure 
accident. 

Jadwiga Jarosiewicz’s de- 
signs seem made with a view 
to economy that hardly ac- 
cords with tbe ballet’s sump- 
tuous expectations. Mirrors 
and candles do provide some 
glitter in the tost scene. The 
placing of the thrones looks 
wrong in every scene, making 
the king and queen either peer 
askance at tbe dancers or gaze 
steadily out at their backs 
while the feiries Mess a child 
they are not looking at 

We could have done with a 
few more players in the pit 
than the 61 which the Scottish 
Chamber Orchestra provides. 
However, they played very 
attractively under Bogdan ‘ 
Oledzki's conducting, and it is 
good to hear a proper harp 
cadenza before the Rose Ada- 
gio, allowing Aurora's four 



Honest effort: Mariosz Malecld, Ewa Glowacka 


suitors time to introduce 
themselves to her before they 
dance together. 

Ewa Glowacka and Mav- 
lusz Malecki as Aurora and 
Desire gave performances that 
were honest enough though 
not what one might hope for 
an international festival. 
What I found disconcerting 
about them and the other 
dancers was their inconsis- 
tency. They would do some 
things rather well, then la pse 
with a poor stretched fee, a 
half-hearted movement or the 
arm. There are some obvious 


veterans among the cast who 
cany themselves with dignity, 
and some rather young faces 
that have an eager promise, 
provided that they get the 
right teaching. 

Of course, for all its long 
history, the company had to 
start a^in from scratch after 
the Second World War, under 
Leon Woicrikowski’s direc- 
tion. It rather looks as if their 
stylistic limitations may 
spring from that There is a 
spirit about the dancers which 
one would like to see devel- 
oped and improved. 


Queen of Spades 

King’s Theatre 

The comfortably refuibished 
King’s, until somebody really 
does take the decision awaited 
these many years to Stan 
digging a hole in the ground 
for an opera house, remains 
Edinburgh's main lyric the- 
atre. But no opera has been 
heard in it during the festival 
until this, the second week. 
The visitors are the Maly 
Theatre of Leningrad and with 
them they bring Tchai- 
kovsky's two Pushkin operas. 
Eugene Onegin and Queen of 
Spades, plus Slonimsky's Ma- 
ria Stuart. 

The impression made on 
the opening night by Queen of 
Spades was no more than 
modest. There were all too 
many signs of travel fatigue. 
Shoddy and erratic lighting, 
noises off including a pleni- 
tude of prompting, huge inter- 
vals which turned one of the 
tautest short stories in the 
Russian language into a four- 
hour opera, all probably made 
S.L. Gaudasi nicy’s production 
look rather worse than it really 
is. Too many things went 
wrong, but some of them were 
probably not right in tbe first 
place. 

There was for instance the 
body of servants grovelling 
around the Countess as she 
prepares for bed in the central 
act. To fawn, as the Tchai- 
kovskys, Pvotr and Modeste. 
required in the libretto, is one 
thing; to grovel is another. It 
destroyed the musical ap- 
proach to the Countess’s 
dreamy recollection of the 
good old days when songs 
were songs and dear Greuy 
was still composing. Even so 
LP. Bogachova (initials only 
throughout in the programme) 
stiU managed to give the 
performance of the evening as 
an iron matriarch of dignity 
and authority — memories of 
Edith Evans’s marvellous 


performance in the Thorold 
Dickinson film. 

It destroyed too the tension 
of Hermann waiting in the 
gloom behind the curtains to 
wrest the secret of three cards, 
which will win him a fortune 
at the gaming tables, from the 
old lady. Not that A.T. 
Kapustin in the role was a 
great tension-builder, except 
in the Tod Slaughter manner. 
Altogether he had an un- 
bapppy and clumsy evening 
both vocally and dramatically. 
Notes were lost — so too 
apparently was the pistol with 
which Hermann confronts the 
Countess — his boots squea- 
ked, props got in the way and 
the tenor too often sounded 
dusty and dry until the final 
scene. The Hermann of both 
Pushkin and Tchaikovsky, 
ice-cold in his ambition and 
pathetic in his obsession, is a 
rather different figure. 

Better performances came 
from the women. V.S. Yus- 
venko (assuming that the first 
of the two Lisas listed on the 
programme was singing) had a 
true streak of apprehensive 
melancholy running through 
her soprano, which has rich- 
ness when not pressed too 
hard; unlike some of her 
colleagues she is an accom- 
plished actress. N.I. Roma- 
nova was a blessedly accurate 
and musical Pauline. Among 
the men N.D. Kopilov’s 
Prince Yeletsky was ad- 
mirable: his vocal lone and 
good manners could be used 
as an example in an evening 
which was generally far too 
rough for festival standards. 

An exception has to be 
made for the Maly orchestra, 
under V.V. Kozhin, which 
really got to grips with the 
score, part pastiche and part 
high psychological drama, 
which Tchaikovsky wrote for 
this illusuous opera. With 
them go the hopes for the next 
two works, plus a prayer for 
rather more hours of pre- 
paration. 


Stephen Pettitt 


The worst thing that can 
happen to a writer has just 
happened to Nicholas Mosley. 
It is the kind of disaster, as he 
puts it, that you simply cannot 
believe will ever happen to 
you. In order to do some 
research onihe Spanish Civil 
War, the background to a new 
novel, he recently set off for 
Seville, to look at the river, 
where a scene is set He parked 
the car and was away twenty 
minutes. When be came back 
the car door, had been 
wrenched open and all ’ his 
possessions, inducting 1 2D 
pages of the new book and all 
his notes, were gone. He has 
no copy. He stayed in Seville 
just long enough to put a 
quarter-page advertisement in 
tbe local paper, offering a vast 
reward for their return, then 
came homfc “For a time”, he 
says, “it makes you think 
you’ll never write agam.” 

What is lost is part of the 
fourth book in an immense 
inter-related work, of which 
volume three, Judith, has just 
appeared. The new novel is to 
be the last- at least it should 
be the last, if it worts out as he 
had planned, and if he can 
bear tbe hateful process of 
beginning it all over again — 
but it will also be the longest,' 
taking some of the characters 
back m time. 

Mosley entered the world of 
bis quartet, and what be calls 
being “obsessed by the way 
actors transform themselves 
tty little acts”, through the film 
business. After Harold Pinter 
and Joseph Losey made his 
novel Accident into a movie, it - 
was suggested to him that he 
uy his own hand at scri p t- 
writing. Two films that he 
wrote were made. The Ass- 
assination of Trotsky and 
Impossible Object — and they 
provided him with fun, but he 
quickly felt the film world was 
not for him. “I wondered: 
what are we all up to? And 
when I finished toe first book. 
Catastrophe Practice, I saw it 
must grow; it was like a sketch 
for something else, and . I 



Caroline Moorebead 
meets Nicholas Mosley 
(right), -whose novel 
Judith, third in a vast 
series of four, has 
recently been published 

Life as a 
likeable 
concern 

needed to write lots of novels 
to say what was going on.” 

As the novels grew, and 
spread, he went on trying to 
express something he says he 
finds extremely hard to ex- 
plain, but which goes some- 
thing like this: only some 
things, like death, betrayal and 
drama, make good stories; 
ordinary life, simply carrying 
on, is boring. To make it 
interesting, you have to con- 
vey excitement. “I thought”, 
says Mosley. “I would write 
about the secret things grow-, when he was a child. “As a 
ing: once you’re conscious of writer, 1 was taken over by the 
some thread in die midst of ” * 

this, then there is something 
hopefuL” 

And have people under- 
stood? Mosley, who is a tall, 
thin man, who stands with his 
shoulders hunched up, like a 
watchful bird, and of whom a 
friend once said that his 
struggle for complete intellec- 
tuai honesty made him “al- 
most a saint”, laughs: “Ah no. 

No one understands what I'm 
on about at alL Perhaps I'm in 
the dark mysd£ Perhaps, 
while I'm writing about some- 
thing growing secretly, I my- 
self am growing secretly. It's 
extremely hard to put into 
words without sounding like 
something out of Pseuds* 

Corner.” 

The sequence of novels, 
produced quickly, for Mosley 
works hard, writing, rewriting, 
all day, most days, was broken 
in .tire early 1980s by two 
> 


books about his parents. Rules 
of the Game and Beyond the 
Pale. He had long thought of 
writing something about his 
father. Sir Oswald Mosley, but 
had imagined it might be no 
more than a short memoir, 
“and that tells you nothing 
about anything"- When his 
father died in 1980, however, 
a vast quantity of papers and 
letters came his way, many 
more than he knew existed 
and some to do with his 
mother Cynthia, who died 


vision of tbe story. Some of 
the family felt that it was 
wrong to put in so much 
personal stuff. But I felt it was 
a potent, story, showing tal- 
ented and passionate human 
beings, and that if you show 
than can't see that you belittle 
them.” 

Nicholas Mosley was nine 
when the British Union of 
Fascists was launched and a , 
master at school nicknamed 
him “Baby Blackshirt”; he 
was 16, and at Eton, when his 
father was sent to prison. Was 
it hard to write, not just of his 
parents, but of a father like 
Mosley? “It’s always amaz- 
ingly hard to write about 
yourself I suppose my own 
rather was such a strange 
figure, so complex and 
controversial to have as a 
father, that over the years I 
had to come to terms with it or 
I would have been in a bad 


way. When I was younger I'd 
been scared ofhim. But I caroe 
to age al a moment when he 
was interested in talking, and 1 
was very dose to him all the 
time he was in gaol, and just 
afterwards, when we didn't 
talk about politics. By the time 
I came to write the books, 
there was no more agonizing.” 

Nicholas Mosley himself 
has tried politics. In 1966 he 
inherited the - barony of 
Ravensdale from bis aunt 
Irene: “And so for a lime I 
went to the House of Lords 
and called myself a Liberal 
Peer and did the stuff up to a 
point. By nature. I'm a total 
non-potitidan. You’ve got to 
love intrigues and talk and 
wheeler-dealing and the cor- 
ridors, and I was hopeless at 
all that. You can't go in and 
just be a rubber-neck.” He left 
before his maiden speech, not, 
he says, because of his stam- 
mer out because he felt itwasa 
cheat and that he was a writer, 
and being a writer made him 
always “the observer, looking 
for patterns at the back of 
things”. He adds: “Perhaps 
when Tm too old and flaked 
out to write a decent book HI 
put my nose in again” 

Neither politics nor film- 
making, then; but a return to 
what has proved an extremely 
satisfying balance between fic- 
tion and non-fiction, broken 
by long hikes across Hamp- 
stead, where he lives, garden- 
ing, and family holidays with 
five children and six grand- 
children in Majorca where, 12 
years ago, he bought a derelict 
farmhouse. In Beyond the 
Pale, Mosley wrote of his 
attempt to “create an attitude 
by which the darkness in 
people (there is always dark- 
ness) might be made to seem 
not so much evil as somewhat 
ridiculous: evil may then be 
exorcized: ridiculousness be- 
comes life-giving”, ft is this, 
and tbe writing about life “as 
some kind of likeable going 
concern”, that matter now. 

• Judith is published by Seeker 
& Warburg at £11.95. 


Promenade Concert 


BBCSO/Atherton 

AlbeiJ Hall/Radio 3 


Someone at the BBC has the 
wisdom to keep on plugging 
the music of Luigi Dalla- 
piccola, even if not many 
people (as yet) care to listen. 
Last year his Canti di 
prigionia were powerfully 
delivered by the BBC Singers. 
Now that work's stage coun- 
terpart. the 1 948 one-act opera 
// prigioniero. has been given a 
stunning concert performance 
by the same choir and the BBC 
Symphony Orchestra under 
David Atherton. It is one of 
three Dallapiccola works in 
this year’s Proms. 

The story is brutally simple. 
An Inquisition prisoner is 
subjected to psychological tor- 
ture worthy of our own sophis- 
ticated century; his jailer 
encourages him to believe that 
revolution is imminent, that 
he will soon be free. He is 
allowed to escape, groping 
through a dark labyrinth be- 
fore breathing the fresh night 
air, nttering a heartfelt “alle- 
luia” and walking straight into 
the arms of the Grand Inquis- 
itor. who leads him tenderfy 
but firmly to the stake. It is 
“torture par I’esperance” to 
quote the title of the short 
story on which the opera is 
based. 

Dallapiccola had an under- 
standable obsession with free- 
dom. having suffered perse- 
cution in both the Austro- 
Hungarian empire and in 
Mussolini's Italy. But this 
opera's power lies in its 
transcending of time and 
place: when the Prisoner 
speaks (not sings) the final line 
- “La Jjberfe?” - the implica- 
tion. that every perceived 
offer of “freedom” is trickery 
and illusion, directly chal- 
lenges u$ to assess our own 
world’s condition. 

Musically, tbe work is stron- 


gest when in full, tormented 
cry. The screaming brass 
chords that punctuate the 
Mother's anguished soliloquy; 
the exultantly whooping horns 
as the Prisoner escapes; the 
evocation of the great bell of 
Ghent ringing out freedom (in 
feet it is the Prisoner's own 
death-knell): these are mo- 
ments of raw power. More- 
over, a rich vein of irony runs 
throughout, with mirthless 
parodies of ecclesiastical into- 
ning and an aria of mock- 
revolutionary fervour. 

The opera is uneven; the 
drama sags as the prisoner 
wanders through corridors 
(one could imagine Berg, 
whose music resembles Dalla- 
piccola's in its pragmatic seri- 
alism, making something 
more obsessive of this). But 
the brilliant use of off-stage 


brass and choruses (amplified 
effectively here) is one of 
many inspired strokes. David 
Atherton seemed a little in- 
spired himself, too, marshal- 
ling huge orchestral forces 
superbly. Excellent solo per- 
formances came from Lucy 
Shelton, Dale Duesing and 
William Cochran, three sing- 
ers who were not afraid to put 
vocal resources at drama's 
disposal. 

Earlier, the ensemble Lon- 
tano, directed by Odaline de la 
Martinez, had given Berg's 
Chamber Concerto a re- 
strained, rather sweet-toned 
performance, not alwavs im- 
maculately co-ordinated but 
notable for the impassioned 
lyricism of the violinist Mark 


Richard Morrison 


CHI ® TER A 

THEATRE £ 








1 ( 


i by Charlotte Bronte 

5 adapted for the stage by Peter Coe 


LfiSSHSSiiSfl 


Sponsor*) by 


NISSAN 


-1 


1 









THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1 986 


Ban on 
animal 
growth 
hormone 


Prickly problem for hedgehog island 


Letter from Washington 


The practice of giving hor- 
mones to form animals to 
stimulate growth is to be 
banned because of anxiety 
over residues which could be 
absorbed by consumers. 

The decision to stop the use 
of so-called “growth 
promoters", which have been 
used for more than 10 years, 
was taken by Mr Michael 
Jopling, Minister of Agri- 
culture, Fisheries and Food, in 


spite of intense opposition 
from some farmers. 


from some farmers. 

The ban, which comes into 
force at the end of this year, 
brings Britain into line with 
the rest of the EEC 

The European Commission 
prohibited the addition of 
growth hormones to animal 
feeds, or the implantation of 
slow-release hormone cap- 
sules. after concern that some 



Old splendour at 
the new Willard 


The Willard is back. Argu- 
ably the most famous hotel in 
America, where presidents 
dined, Washington society 
intrigued, the mutt julep was 
invented and a last-ditch 
attempt was made to avert 
the Civil War, the moon* 
mental landmark a stone's 
throw from the White House 


is emerging from 18 years of 
abandonment and dank 


-V ' 


.:v‘ , . :* 3-4 v, 


VS?-" . ' ' ; ; 



BUT : -v. 
• W- 


synthetic preparations in use 
in Italy for veal production 




were linked with cancer. 

The Government has de- 
cided to adopt the EEC mea- 
sure because advisers to the 
Ministry of Agriculture be- 
lieve Britain would lose a £400 
million export trade in meat 
and meat products to other 
EEC countries. 

Previous British delega- 
tions, led by Mr Jopling and 
supported by the National 
Farmers' Union, insisted that 
the EEC ban could not be 
implemented in time. Britain 
was given special dispensation 
until the end of 1987. 

According to the Meat and 
Livestock Commission, the 
cost to farmers without 
growth hormones would be a 
loss of up to 7p a kilo 
iiveweight on steers. There is 
also concern that non-EEC 
meat producers would have an 
unfair advantage because they 
are not subject to the ban. 

An NFU spokesman said 
yesterday that it supported the 
derision to implement the ban 
because of the threat of UK 
beef exports to Europe. 

' He said detailed NFU re- 
search had concluded that 
there was no scientific ev- 
idence to support the theory 
that hormones were harmful 







Dr Kevin Woodbridge, a GP on North Ronaldsay in the Orkneys, with some hedgehogs he is helping to airlift to the mainland because 
they are threatening the island's birds by eating too many eggs. It is hoped the creatures win be found homes. (Photograph: Tom Kidd) 


Man killed in 
London blast 


By a Staff Reporter 


Tories in 
move to 
gag editor 


TUC ballot pact 
may avert clash 


A man was killed and 1 1 
people injured when an explo- 
sion blew out the front of an 
Iranian newsagents and 
bookshop in London 
yesterday. 

The explosion, the cause of 
which is still unknown, hap- 
pened at 2.20 pjn. as after- 
noon shoppers thronged 
Kensington High Street in 
south west London. Police 
kept the area totally sealed off 
late yesterday as bomb dis- 
posal experts were called to 
the area. 

A spokesman for North 
Thames Gas said last night 
that no evidence had so for 
been found that the explosion 
was caused by leaking gas but 
added “We are keeping an 


open mind on this". He said 
there was a smell of gas just 
after the explosion." 


Fireman sifted through the 
rubble of the ground floor 
shop and basement to rescue a 
man in his middle twenties, 
but he later died in hospital as 
a result of serious multiple 
injuries. 

A Scotland Yard spokes- 
man said the eleven injured 
were six men and five women. 
Hospital spokesmen said most 
people were hit by flying gla ss 
and were suffering from shock 
but were discharged a few 
hours later. One woman was 
in Charing Cross Hospital last 
night with fractures and 
lacerations. 


Cantmned from page 1 
and the federation, which is 
dominated by the 
“Libertarians", young people 
from modest backgrounds 
hostile to State interference in 
the conduct of private and 
public affairs. 

Speaking from his Sussex 
home, the former prime min - 
ister, who occupies a hallowed 
place in the Tory Pantheon, 
said that he had never heard of 
New Agenda. 

Last year, the federation 
was brought to book by party ; 
chiefs over allegations of 
rowdiness and vandalism at 
its conference at Lough- 
borough University. 

Vocal young Tory, page 2 
Leading article, page 13 


Continued from page 1 

However, the public will 
still be presented with remind- 
ers of past divisions with the 
National Union of 
Mineworkers and TASS, the 
white-collar engineering 
union, attacking the new' 
resolution, though failing to 
win the day. 

The conflict centred on a 
motion from the Union of 
Communication Workers call- 
ing for the right to an individ- 
ual secret ballot “before being 
asked to participate in indus- 
trial action". 

The compromise wording 
limits this to ballots before a 
strike. 

Mr Alan Tuffin, the 
communication union's lead- 
er, said: “What is important 
we have avoided what could 


have been seen as the move- 
ment saying we will have 
nothing to do with ballots 
before strikes. 

“That clearly would have 
damaged the Labour Party, 
and Mr Kinnock came out 
firmly on that right and this 
composite resolution will en- 
dorse that" 

Mr Ron Todd, general sec- 
retary of the transport union, 
said that he was “quite happy" 
with the new wording 
• Secret ballots are becoming 
an increasingly common fea- 
ture on the industrial 
landscape. 

Figures from Acas, the 
conciliation service, show that 
in 1985, the first full year for 
which data are available, bal- 
lots were used 94 times by no 
fewer than 37 trade unions. 


abandonment and dank 
decay. _ 

Today the Willard will 
open its doors and invite to 
its restored mrn-of-the-cen- 
tury splendour presi dents, 
monarchs, prime ministers 
and all those willing to pay up 
to 52,000 (£1,333) a night to 
stay in a hotel that has been at 
the centre of American 
history. 

For the Willard is not jnst 
another expensive hotel in a 
city now brimming over with 
them; it is the cornerstone of 
President Kennedy's dream 
to rescue Pennsylvania Ave- 
nue from the squalor and 
urban decay of 25 years ago 
and make it a grarions artery 
connecting the Capitol and 
the White House. And with 
the reopening of the hostelry 
that has stood on that site for 
150 years, that dream is 
almost realized. 

The preservationists' fight 
was almost lost The old 
owners gutted the crumbling 
art nouveau pile, auctioning 
oft furnishings and artefacts 
before dosing down. Devel- 
opers wanted to turn the site 
into a car park. Restoration 
plans were mired in bureau- 
cracy and a financial 
morasse. Only when Mr Oli- 
ver Carr, Washington's rich- 
est builder, teamed up with 
Intercontinental hotels was 
restoration feasible. 

It has cost Mr Carr a 
staggering sum — $120 mil- 
lion. But with a tactfully 
dovetailed office complex 
next door to help the cash 
flaw, he has been able to 
reach for authenticity, with 
inlaid marble floors, ornate 
moulded ceilings, veined 
false marble pillars, all care- 
fully copied from the original 
designs. 

The famous lobby, which 
gave the name lobbyists to 
those waiting to snare presi- 
dents and co ng re ssm en, still 
keeps the two doors of the 


ten* pre-Civil War days 
when Northern politicians 
exiled one way and South* 
ernets the other. 

The old bull's-eye windows 
and slate mansard roofs marie 
the skyline. European crafts* 
men, imported because Am- 
erica, unlike wawamged 
Europe, has few people 
trained in historic preserva- 
tion, have recreated the 
gleaming, oak and polished 
brass banqueting rooms. And 
with some boHct-proof glass 
and secret security measures, 
the owners hope heads of 
state wffi again be dining 
there. 

Today's bufldmg is the 

twelfth renovation of Henry 
Wfllanfs ambitious hotri, the 
first in America to introduce 
bathrooms oneach floor. 

President-elect Franklin 
Pierce took up residence in 
. 1853, staying there until he 
inarched to the inaugural 
srand with Millard FHlrooie, 
who promptly moved into his 
successor's old quarters. In 
1864, Ulysses Grant and his 
son stayed there, and years 
later Calvin Cootidge appre- 
hended a burglar in his room. 

But it was the Civil War 
that made the hold famous. 
The last great ball for North 
and South before the apoca- 
lypse was held there in 1859, 
with 1,800 guests. 

Months later, as Jefferson 
Davis was sworn in as Presi- 


dent of the Confederacy, 
delegates from 21 of the 34 
states met in the Willard to 
head off war, but in vain.The 
stirring words of the Bank 


Hymn of the Republic were 
written by Julia Howe in the 
Wfllaxd as she heard march- 
ing soldiers singing John 
Brown’s Body 

The Times’ distinguished 
special correspondent, Wil- 
liam Howard Russeii, wrote: 
“Hie great pile of Willard's 
hotel probably maintains 
more scheming, plotting, 
planning heads, more aching 
and joyful hearts than any 
bufloing of the same size tw 
hdd in the world." 

Today, the last guest to 
vacate ! 8 years ago will arrive 
in Washington from Florida 
to be the first gnest to sign the 
hotel register. 


Michael Binyera 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


humour in popular and contem- 


Royal engagements 1 ' 

. Princess Anne visits' the 
Royal College of Defence-Stud- 
ies, Beigrave Sq, SW1, 10.30. 

Exhibitions in progress 

Contemporary Caribbean art; 
Museum and Art Gallery, New 
Walk, Leicester; Mon to Sat 10 
to 5 JO, Sun 2 to 5 JO (ends Sept 
28). 

The Photographic Arc pic- 
torial traditions in Britain and 
America; Hunterian Art Gal- 
lery, Glasgow University; Mon 
to Fri 10 to 5, Sat 9J0 to 1 (ends 
Sept 13). 

Watercolours, etchings and 
engravings by Pat Gregory; Re- 
gent Centre, High St, Christ- 
church, Dorset; Moo to Sat 
10.30 to 5 (ends Aug 29). The 
end of the Pier Show: seaside 


porary arts forms Athenaeum 
Gallery, Princess St, Manches- 
ter; Mon to Sat 10 to 6, Sun 2 to 
6 (ends Sept 21). . 

David Shilling: The Hats; 
Salisbury and South WOtshire 
Museum, The King's Close, 65 
The Close, Salisbury; Mon to 
Sat 10 to 5, Sun 2 to 5 (ends Sept 
29). 

Last chance to see 
landscapes and nudes by 
Edward Piper, Oriel 31, High St, 
Welshpool, Powys, 11 to 5. 
Musk 

Jubilee Showcase: Conceit by 


Organ recital by Andrew 
Teague; Parish Church, St 
Peter's, York Place, Brighton, 8. 

Gloucester Three Choirs Fes- 
tival: Recital by the London 
Mozart Players; Tewkesbniy 
. tobey, 3; Concert by the Festi-' 
val Chorus and Royal Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; Gloucester 
Cathedral, 8. 

Concert by the fttterson 
Quintet; Pomp Room, Bath, 8. 

Recital by Hortus Muskus 
with John Kitchen; St Paul's 
Cathedral, Dundee, 8. 


New books — hardback 


The Deputy Literary. Edtor*s selection of interesting books pubfehed this 

W06kl * 

The Jane Austen Han dbook, editor J. David Gray (AttVone Press, £29 JO) 
Crossing the Shadow Line, Travels in South-East Asia, by Andrew Eames 


Weather 

forecast 


(H odder & Stotgftton, E1ZS5) 

The P ion eer s: Tne Early British Tea and Coffee Planters and theh Why of 


Life 1825-1 900, by John Weatherstone (Queer, £20) 

The Shaping of Ifidde Earth, by J.R.R. ToSoen (Ann & Unwin, £1455) 
The Prince and the Paranormal; - «-*— « — • - — ■ 


by John Date(W.H. Allen, £11.1 
The Vanishing Garden, by C 


psychic bioodbwoflhe Royal Family, 
pher Bricked & Fay Sherman (John 


Anthony Neal (trombone) and 
Elizabeth Burley (piano); Ju- 
bilee Hall, Aldebergh, 6.15. 



Talk 

What's in a Name?: Lakeland 
placenames, by Jenifer Taylor. 
Lake District National Farit 
Visitor Centre, Brecfchole, Win- 
dermere, l JO. 


The Vanishing Garden, by Christopher Bricked & Fay Sherman (John 
Murray, £15) 

Freedom and the Brgfah Revolution, edited by RjC. Richardson & 
G-M. Ridden (MUP. E19S5) 

M a ng aiBt The Comple te Story, by Gerald L Posner & John Ware (Queen 


A ridge of higti pressure 
over Britain wfll decline 
during the day as a warm 
front approacbesW areas 
from the Atlantic. 


M o ng o hu The Complete Story, by Gerald L Posner & John Ware (Queen 
Anne Press, E12J5) 

Semites and Anti-Samites, by Bernard Lewis (Wektonfefd. £15) 

Uvea of the Great Twent i et h Century Artists, by Edward Luc&Smith 
(Wodenfted, £20) NS 


Anniversaries 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,129 


General 

Famous bears: stories and 
mobiles for 6 to 10 year olds, 
1030 to 11.45; Teddy Bears’ 
Picnic for 3 to 5 year olds. 2J0 
to 3J0; Art Gallery, Gvic 
Centre, Tunbridge Wells. 

Grimbo and Other Shadows: 
puppet plays for 5 to 1 1 years 
olds; Niccol Centre, Brewery 
Court. Cirencester, 2J0. 

Eastbourne Show: show 
jumping, 9, flower show from 12 
noon plus dancing displays, 
concerts and puppet shows; 
Gildredge Park, Eastbourne, to- 


The pound 


day 9 to 8, tomorrow 10 to 6 JO. 

Weymouth Carnival: side- 
shows, air displays, fireworks 
and a procession of deccftnted 
floats; The Seafront, Weymouth, 
10 to 10. 

European pottery and por- 
celain figures; Adeane Gallery, 
The Fitzwilliam Museum, 
Tnunpington St, Cambridge; 
Tues to Sat 10 to 1 and 2 to 5, 
Sun 2. 1 5 to 5 (ends Aug 3 1 j. 

Carnival Exhibitions: paint- 
ings of the Leeds Caribbean 
Carnival by Jennifer Connie; St 
Paul's Gallery. Stowe House, 5 
Bishopgate, Leeds; Mon to fri 
10 to 5, Sat 10 to 12 (ends Sept 
13X 


Births: Beniamin Harrison. 
23rd president of the USA 1889- 
93. North Bend, Ohio, 1833. 

Deaths William Booth, foun- 
der of the Salvation Army, 
London, 1912; Paul Ehrlich, 
biochemist, Nobel laureate 
1908, Bad Hombtug vor der 
Hofae, Germany, 1915; Federico 
Garcia Lorca, poet and drama- 
tist, Granada. 1936; Lev Trots- 
ky, as s a s si n ated. Mexico, 1940; 
Bernard WHliam Griffin, Arch- 
bishop of Westminster, 1944- 
56, Poteeatb, Cornwall. 1956. 

Russian troops invaded Czec- 
hoslovakia, 1968. 


Visitors road code 


Lj yialiL 

II i r > v. ’T\W71 


eK7 Roads 


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London and South-east: AJ2: 
Roadworks eastbocmd just past 
A1 1 roundabout, Wanstead. 
A309: Kingston bypass down to 
one lane only westbound near 
junction with Oaygate Lane. 
A240: Lane restrictions in 
Kingston Rd, EweLL at the 
junction with Ruxley Lane. 

M& Con- 


traflow E of Birmingham be- 
tween junctions 4 and 5 (M42 
and A452). M5: Major road- 
works between junctions 4 and 5 
(A38 Bromsgrove and A38 
Droitwich). Ml: Contraflow at 
junction 20 (Lutterowrth). 

Wales aad West: M4: Lane 
restrictions between junctions 
44 and 45, near Swansea. A396: 
Temporary lights in use near 
Howdea Bridge, Tiverton. A55: 
Contraflow either side of 
Bodelwyddan bypass, Qwyd; 
delays. 

The North: A1 (M): Lane 
restrictions between Barton and 
Burtree, W of Darlington. M18: 
Contraflow between junctions 6 


A Highway Code for overseas 
visitors to Britain has been 
produced by the Department of 
Transport as pan of European 
Road Safety Year. 

On the Road in Great Britain. 
an illustrated booklet designed 
to reduce the road risk for 
visitors, is available in French, 
German, Italian, Spanish and. 
English from the Department of 
Transport, Building 3, Victoria 
Rd, South Ruislip, Middlesex. 

-m 

Times Portfolio C 
follows: _ 



ux a condition of 

9 rat eomprUea a 

companies whose 




mm 


fibers from each 

card coatatPS a 
MTS. 

tee figure In pence 
tee optimum moyet 




Portfolio US. 

4 The daily c 
announced not da 
dividend will be 

Hvldend will be 
y and the weekly 
announced each 


















ES i j' gw~j-j 

_ 


A practical- guide to help 
college teachers update- and 
further the skills of those work- 
ing in the professions, has 
recently been published. ' 

The first in. a new series of 
occasional papers resulting from 
research on new courses and 
teaching meifaodfrcutied out by . 
the Further- Education Unit of 
the Department of Education 
and ■ Science's PICKUP (Pro- 
fessional, Industrial ,l and 
Commercial Update Pro- 
gramme): Learning from 
Experience, by Anna Garry and 
John Cowan, is available free on 
request from Publications Des- 
patch Centre, Department of 


Abroad 




Honeypoi lane. Cannons Park, 
Stanmore, Middlesex, HA7 
IAZ. . 



































17 




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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



THE 



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SPORT 28 
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Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 




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3.0872 (-0.0038) 

Trade-weighted 
72.0 (+0.3) 


De Beers 
price dips 

Shares in De Beers Consoli- 
dated Mines, the Sooth A£ 
' rican diamond mining and 
marketing group, feUfro 
$6.80 to $6.13 yesterday in 
reaction to disappointing in- 
terim results for 1986. 

Earnings from diamonds 
rose 42 per cent to R447 
mtl!ion(f 1 14.2million), but 
analysts had expected much 
more. Pretax profits rose from 
R530 million to R707 million 
and eps rose 20 per cent to 1 18 
cents after a sharply higher tax 
charge up from R127 million 
to R218 milh'on. The interim 
.dividend was raised from IS 
to 20 cents. 

Pretax ■profits at Gold 
Fields of South Africa, 
.jumped 29 per cent from 
-R2253 million to R29&2 
million in the year to June 
. 30.Tbe eps rose from 246 
cents to 31 9 cents and the final 
dividend went up from 80 to 
10S cents, making a total of 
160 cents, one-third up 
1984-85. 

Seccond half net profits at 
Impala Platinum, fell slightly 
to R90.9 milli on despite 
1 booming worid prices due to a 
strike which cost R4S million. 
Net profits for the full year to 
June 30 rose by 33 per cent to 
- R 192.7 million wmle annual 
. dividends were unchanged at 
■ 135 cents. 

Tempos, page 18 

Rentokil up 

Rentokil has reported interim 
pretigLprofits uftAperpentto 
£13-1 miffion emturnover 8 
per dent higher at £76.8 mil- 
lion. The dividend is in- 
creased by 15 per cent to 
l.Q25p. 

Tempos, page 18 

System rise 

Systems Designers, the soft- 
ware design company, yes- 
terday announced interim 
pretax profits up 3.5 per cent 
to £3-3 million for the six 
months to June 30. The 
dividend is raised by 0l05p to 

02p. 

Tempos, page 18 

Cardo victory 

Carclo Engineering has won 
control of Bruntons 
(Mussel burghX the Scottish 
i steel wire manufacturer, after 
‘ Roben Fleming, its merchant 
bankers, bought 50.85 percent 
shares of Bruntons at 72%p 
each. 

Fulham offer 

• The offer by SB Properties, a 
Marfer Estates subsidiary, for 
.F ulham Football Club has 
been declared fully uncondi- 
tional. Mr David Bulstrode, 
chairman of Mailer, has been 
appointed Fulham's 
chairman. 

Tap success 

Tap" supplies of 2!fc per cent 
Treasury index-linked stock 
2013 have run dry. 


Comment 19 Start Pro 21 
Tamms IS WaU Street 18 
Cm pay News 18 Maaer Mricts 19 
Staa Market 19 Unit Trusts 20 
Foreign Excfa 19 Commodities 20 
Traded Opts 19 USM Prices 20 


WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 



confirms 
London leads 



By Richard Thomson, Ranting Correspondent 

London was confirmed as 
the world's dominant foreign 
exchange market yesterday 
when the .Bank of England 
published figures showing that 
turnover on the City’s foreign 
currency market is outstrip- 
ping turnover in New: York 


1 Tokyo by more than $40 
billion each day. 

In the first survey ever 
conducted to discover the size 
of the City's foreign exchange 
trading, the Bank found that 
turnover in London 
amounted to SI 15 billion a 
day, equivalent each week to 
the entire British annual gross 
national product. 

Adjusting for double count- 
ing, the turnover in London is 
a daily S90 billion. This 
compares with about $50 bil- 
lion in New York, according 
to figures published yesterday 
by the New York Federal 
Reserve Board which carries 
out regular surveys of its own 
market. 

The annual turnover in 
London of more than £20,000 


billion is equivalent to 10 
times the iota! annual volume 
-of -world trade. Although no 
-absolute figures exist for 
-global foreign exchange turn- 
over, experts believe that Lon- 
don accounts for about 25 per 
cent of the total. 


The US survey showed that 
turnover in New York had 
almost doubled since the last 
survey, in 1983, showed daily 
turnover at £26 billion. The 
Bank of England believes that 
foreign exchange turnover in 
London has been growing at a 
similar pace. 


for foreign exchange turnover 
yesterday showing that it was 
rapidly catching up New York 
in volume following a 400 per 
cent increaseover the last war 
to a daily total of $48 billion. 

The Bank of England survey 
was based tin the dealings of 
347 banks and licensed de- 
posit takers, and eight brokers 
in London over a 10-day 
period last March. 

The New York survey was 


carried out over the whole of 
March .and included 123 bank- 
ing institutions and nine 
brokers. 

The Bank's survey showed 
that trading between sterling 
and dollars was still the domi- 
nant transaction in London, 
making up 30 per cent of all 
types of foreign exchange 
deals. It was closely followed 
by doDar/mark transactions, 
making up 28 per cent of the 
total, followed by doUar/yex 
and doDar/Swiss franc deals. 

The 10 largest banks to- 
gether bold more than 36 per 
cent of the market's turnover, 
and (here were 24 banks with a 
market share of more than I 
per cent each. The Bank does 
not, however, believe that this 
represents an unreasonable 
concentration of power. 

Spot transactions accounted 
for 73 per cent of the total 
turnover, with forward trans- 
actions at 26 per cent. Options 
and futures trading was grow- 
ing but still made up an 
insignificant proportion 


BPCC shares halt 
on expected bid 


By Alison Eattie 

The shares of British Print- 
ing & Communication 
Corporation and Philip Hill 
Investment Trust were sus- 
pended yesterday pending an 
announcement, expected this 
morning, that BPCC is mak- 
ing an agreed £330 million bid 
for Philip HUL 
The offer by Mr Robert 
Maxwell, chairman of BPCC, 
comes after shareholder dis- 
satisfaction had been voiced 
about the poor performance of 
Philip Hill Barclays de Zoete 
Wedd Investment, with the 
backing of 56 per cent of 
Philip Hfll shareholders, had 
put forward a plan to trans- 
form the. trust ..into a UK 
eqmtYfofieXrfoiked fund. The' 
plan now looks like being 
overtaken by Mr Maxwell's 
offer. 

The offer is expected to be 
at 97 per cent of net asset 
value, which is around 343p a 
share. Philip HiS shares were 
suspended at 323p- 
Morgan Grenfell, the mer- 
chant bank acting for BPCC 
because its usual banker H21 
Samuel has conflicts of in- 
terest, was sounding out 
Philip Hill shareholders and 
sub-underwriters yesterday to 
see if there was support for 
such a large increase in 
JBPCCs equity. 

The Philip Hifl board, 
beaded by Lord Keith of 
Castleacre, fully, supports the 


bid. The City was last night 
expecting that there would be 
just sufficient support for the 
bid to go ahead. 

BPCC is expected to liq- 
uidate Philip H3Ts assets to 
raise money for the company's 


Mr Alan Breaker, chahman 
and chief executive of 
Group, has written to 
shareholders attrfcW Mr 
Robert Maxwell's “ohsti 
tree tactics” in attempting to 
Mock the proposed acooisiti ^ 
of Dealers' Digest, the US 
financial publishing and 
database operating concern. 


American expansion. The ac- 
quisition of an American 
printing and publishing com- 
pany is imminent and nut! 
American acquisitions are 
planned. 

BPCC bought the 
Bisbopsgate Trust two years 
ago and liquidated its assets as 
a means of reducing gearing. 
The company announced 
doubled interim profits erf 
£27.55 million this week. 

Philip HflTs disappointing 
performance was blamed 
largely on the company’s 1.7 
per cent stake in JBeecbam, its 
largest holding. 

BPCC shares were sus- 
pended yesterday at 298p, 
valuing foe company at £752 
million. 


Mount Charlotte stops 
talks on merger 

By Onr City Staff 

Mount Charlotte ■ Invest- news of a possible deal was 


meats, the hotels group, said 
yesterday that it had broken 
off talks for a £500 million 
merger with Pleasurazna, the 
casinos and leisure group. 

The managing director of 
Mount Charlotte Invest- 
ments, Mr Robert Peel, said: 

Despite the obvious short- 
term benefits to earnings, in 
foe medium and long-term 
there is no reason why Mount 
Charlotte's earnings per share 
cannot outdo the likely earn- 
ings growth of a combined 
company. We want to remain 
independent" 

The companies last week 
announced the talks after 


Leaked.. 

Mr Peel said that this had 
put considerable pressure on 
Mount Charlotte as the small- 
er partner. 

Mr George Martin, manag- 
ing director of Pleasurama, 
said: “I am disappointed. We 
have wasted a lot of time and 
effort 

Mr Martin said Mr Peel had 
been “somewhat indecisive." 
He added: “One of his con- 
cerns was that he wanted to 
merge with a company like 
Pieasnrama, but did not want 
to put a for sale' sign over 
Mount Charlotte. And yet that 
is exactly what be has now 
done." 


US growth 
rate slows 
to 0.6% 

From Mohsin Ah 
Washington 

America’s gross national 
product (GNP) expanded by 
only 0.6 per cent in the period 
from April to June, compared 
with estimates of 1.1 per cent, 
the Commerce Department 
announced yesterday. 

Lower investment in stocks 
and a worsening foreign trade 
imbalance were to blame for 
the sluggish growth rate, the 
department said. 

The weak economic perfor- 
mance, after strong growth 
during the first quarter of 3.8 
per cent, reinforced some 
analysts' ' concern that the 
American economy may be 
stalling and could need more 
stimulus to avoid slipping into 
a recession. 

Earlier this month, foe 
Reagan Administration re- 
vised its forecast for economic 
growth in 1986 down to 3.2 
per cent from the 4 per cent 
estimated in the February 
budget. 

Yesterday's announcement 
came as the Federal Reserve 
Board's policy-makers were 
gathering to review the eco- 
nomic situation. 

Analysis speculated that the 
board was likely to consider 
further cuts in its discount 
rate, last reduced on July 10, 
to try to bolster economic 
activity. The discount rate, the 
interest rate charged by the 
Fed to member banks, stands 
at 6 per cent. 

At foe same tune, foe 
department reported that cor- 
porate profits were up by $5.6 
billion (£3.76 billion) or 4.1 
per cent from first quarter 
levels. 

During the first half of this 
year, GNP increased at a 
yearly rate of 22 per cent. 

To achieve the latest 
Administration forecast of 3-2 
per cent expansion, the econ- 
omy would have to grow at a 
4.2 per cent rate during the 
second half of this year. 

The increase in GNP be- 
tween April and June matched 
the 0.6 per cent expansion in 
the fourth quarter of 1982 and 
was the lowest rise since the 
third quarter, of 1982 when 
there was a 32 per cent 
decline. 

The dollar lost ground on 
the announcement, the pound 
closing in London at Si .5030. 



Standard 
gives Pao 
two seats 
on board 


Harry Blundred: First in the driver's seat with a management-led buyout of Devon General 

Ex-conductor buys the buses 


A former bus conductor 
emerged yesterday as the head 
of the first management to»m 
to purchase a load bus com- 
pany from the National Bus 
Company. 

Mr Harry Blundred, chair- 
man and managing director of 
Devon General, led a team of 
five senior managers in mount- 
ing a successful buyout for the 
Exeter company. 

Devon General is the first 
local bus subsidiary to be sold 
under the current privatization 
programme and is also the 
first NBC company to be 
bought by gristing manage- 
ment. Last mouth National 
Holidays was sold to the 
Pteasurama Group, whose 
£25 million offer was signifi- 


By Teresa Poole 

cantly higher than the 
management's bid. 

The company made its mark 
in the industry by pioneering 
Britain's first large-scale ur- 
ban minibus project in Exeter 
in 1984. It has more than 200 
minibuses providing high fre- 
quency “hail and stop” ser- 
vices In Exeter and Torbay 
and recently ordered another 
50. 

The success of these 
developments led to a return to 
profits iu 1985 after several 
years of losses. The price for 
Devon General has not been 
disclosed, but is believed to be 
more £3 miOjon. No other firm 
bids were received. 

The new management team 
will have to cope with the 
deregulation of die bos in- 


dustry in October. Mr 
Bhmdred, aged 44, said Devon 
General had already reg- 
istered to ran buses on 90 per 
cent of the existing routes and 
was confident the company 
would cope with an effective 
loss of £600,000 in subsidies. 

Unlike some NCB subsid- 
iaries with a higher proportion 
of unprofitable rural routes, 
Devon General has increased 
staffing levels ova* the past 
three years from 700 to more 
than 1,000 and is still recruit- 
ing. If the company remains 
profitably a profit stowing 
scheme will be introduced for 
employees in abont two years. 

Almost all the manage- 
ments of NBC's 70 
subsidiaries have expressed 
interest in staging buyouts 


Yorkshire 

forecasts 

£8.25m 

Yorkshire Television, the 
independent television con- 
tractor whose shares are being 
floated on the stock market 
next week, yesterday issued a 
“pathfinder'' prospectus, 
which revealed the sharp 
improvement in profits that is 
expected for this year. 

For the year to the end of 
September, pretax profits are 
forecast at not less than £8.25 
million, ahead of City expecta- 
tions of about £75 million. In 
the seven months to the end of 
April, the company made 
profits of £6.7 million com- 
pared with £4.2 million, be-; 
fore exceptional items, for the 
whole of the previous year. 

The buoyant forecast means 
the company is likely to be 
valued at about £45 million 
when foe offer for sale derails 
are announced on Friday. 
Previous City estimates were ! 
nearer £40 mulion. 

The company is making a 
particular effort to encourage 
local viewers to buy shares 
and is offaing a special rate of 
commission to financial inter- 
mediaries Who certify that 
applications bearing their 
stamp are residents of the 
YTV region. 


Hanson recoups $930m 


By Our City Staff 

Hanson Trust has sold the .make estimated total annnal 

'profits of more than $120 

milli on. 


United States company, 
Durkee Famous Foods, to 
Reckitt & Cblman for $120 
millioD (£80 million). 

The sale of Durkee- part of 
SCM, the corporation ac- 
quired by Hanson for S930 
million in January — means 
that Hanson has now re- 
couped foe entire purchase 
price of SCM. 

But it is still left with the 
businesses of titanium di- 
oxide, Smith-Corona type- 
writers and paper and some 
industrial operations, which 


Durkee's turnover is run- 
ning at $210 minion a year, 
and profit before tax at $13 
million on a pro forma basis. 
Reckitt & Cblman said the 
purchase was part of its strat- 
egy to build up its presence in- 
the US. 

Durkee matches RT 
French, Recltitt's existing 
American speciality food busi- 
ness, in size, product rang: i 
and marketing strategy. 


orrespondent 

The three shareholders who 
rescued Standard Chartered 
Bank from a bid by Lloyds 
Bank last month have been 
given directorships by Stan- 
dard, but Sir Yue-Kong Pao, 
the Hong Kong entrepreneur 
who took the biggest state in 
the bank, is to control two 
directorships. 

Sir Yue-Kong, who bought 
IS per cent of the bank to help 
thwart Lloyds, has been ap- 
pointed group deputy chair- 
man while his brother-in-law, 
Mr Peter Woo. has been made 
a director. 

Mi Roben Holmes a Court, 
the Australian businessman 
who recently raised his hold- 
ing to 8 per cent, and Tan Sri 
Khoo Teck Puat, the Singa- 
pore entrepreneur who bolds 5 
per cent, have also been 
appointed directors. 

At the same time Standard 
announced a 19 per cent 
increase in its interim divi- 
dend. from I0.5p to I2.5p, 
despite a slight fell in interim 
pretax profits compared with 
the same period last year. 

The pretax result dropped 
from £133.8 million to £131 
million, hugely because of a 
sharp deterioration in the 
performance of foe bank's 
African and Far Eastern 
operations. 

Lord Barber, the chairman, 
denied speculation foal the 
new shareholders were plan- 
ning to break up the bank by 
floating off its more profitable 
operations. 

Sir Yue-Konjg had been 
given control of two scats on 
the board because of his larger 
shareholding. Lord Barber 
said. But alT three sharehold- 
ers were valuable because of 
their standing in their own 
countries, where Standard has 
interests. Lord Barber added 
that none wanted day-to-day 
involvement with the bank's 

'management. 

Standard's pretax profits 
'over the six months to June 30 
were hit by heavy provisions 
(for bad debts, up from £45.6 
million to £67.4 million. A 
large part of the increase 
occured on business in Singa- 
pore, Malaysia and Hong 
Kong 

Tropical African results 
deteriorated largely because of 
conservative accounting, but 
British and US profits 
improved. 

Racal chief 
confident 

Sir Ernest Harrison, the 
Racal chairman, told 
shareholders at the annua] 
meeting yesterday that he was 
still confident of meeting the 
company's profit projections 
from its Vodafone cellular 
radio venture. 

The £5 million profit this 
year is projected to rise to £20 
million next year and £36 
million the following year. 

Racal has invested around 
£100 t million in foe operation 
and it has 45,000 subscribers 
against an original projection 
of 40,000 at this stage. 



MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


NewYoffc 

Dow Jones 1866.70 +282T 

Tokyo 

■ Ntkkal Dow — . 18792.61 {+195.17) 

Hong Kong; 

Hang Seng 1935.69 (-14-431 

-Amsterdam: Gen 298.1 (+M r 

r. AO 1185-4 


20802 (+29.7) 


.'Commerzbank 
Srassafe: 

General 

Parke CAC 

.Zurich: 

.SKA General 520.96 (same) 

London storing price* .. Pag»2t 


813.79 (-1 
-381.4 


OH 


INTEREST RATES 


tendon; 

Bank Base; 10% - 
2-month interbank 9tt-9"»% 

- 3-month efigtbJa bHbS***-*®* 


V, 


Prime Rate 8% 

Federal Funds 6V»* 

3-month Treasury Bffls 555^53* 
30-year bonds itJtFto^aa* 

CURRENCIES 




tendon: 
a SI .5030 
£ DM3.0872 . 
£SwFt2.4882 
FFrlQ.0551 
-£ Yen230.48 
£: Index: 72.0 


Now Voric 
£$1.5020- 

f DM2.0555* 
Index: 1104 

ECU £0.682164 
SDR £0809987 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Thom EMI 
Peerless 
Cosiain Group 



Matthew Brown — 
Vaux Breweries _ 
Rp , 

_485p 
— 40Qp 
625p 

English Trust 

143» 

BtueCkde 

551 p 

Hunter ~ 

Mount View Est — 
Rainers 

— . 290p 

760p( 

— 201 p 


+15p 

+12p 

+13p 

is 


FALLS: 


Btegdenteds, 
Vtowplan — 

Standard 6 Chart 
Bestwood 
Tay Homes 
Reed Executive 



GOLD 


London Rxtng: _ 
AM S37£50 

e $375.00-375^ 


dose $375 
25025) 

New Yortc 

Comex 537520-375.70* 


5.50 (£249.75- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


BnmfSept) pm S14.10 bbl(U. 60 ) 

‘Denotes latest tracing price 


Pension chiefs face ban on 
recommending their plans 


By Martin Baker 

The pensions hnlusliy Is 
heading for a period of anoma- 
lies and potential illegalities. 

A surrey by the Association 
of National Pension Fond 
Managers (NAJPf), published 
yesterday, shows that a 
considerable number of the 
1,015 schemes surveyed will 
have to amend their r ep orting 
and financial practices to con- 
form with legislation. 

In addition, a bizarre side- 
effect of the new Acts affecting 
pensions may seriously ham- 
per the ability of pension 
managers and trustees to ad- 
vise employees to take qp their 
own company scheme. 

The NAFF sur r e y, which 
covers foe pension provisions 
of 6.7 million employees in the 
public and private sectors, 
shows that 84 per cent of 
schemes provide for com- 
pulsory employee member- 
ship. The Social Security Act 
1986, yet to be implemented, 
will prohibit this. 



Norman Fowler: sponsors 
Social Security Act 

A farther need for revision 
was found among deferred 
pension arrangements. If an 
employee leaves a company 
scheme and opts to leave his 
pension “frozen," or deferred, 
foe Social Security Act 1985 
provides for animal increases 
of 5 per cent or foe rate oTprice 
inflatio n, whichever Is the 
smaller. 


At the time cX the survey, 
conducted before foe Act came 
into force, only 38 per cent of 
schemes surveyed bad already 
made these provisions. 

One potential difficulty for 
pension managers Is the com- 
bined effect of the Social 
Security Act 1986, sponsored 
by Mr Norman Fowler's min- 
istry , and the Department of 
Trade-hacked Finanrial Ser- 
vices Bill. The 1986 Act iriD 
give employees the right to opt 
for a personal pension. 

The onus, according to Mr i 
James, will be on “the com- 
panies which mast seO their 
own schemes to their 
employees." The Financial 
Services Bill, on the other 
hand, win impose a duty on 
investment advisers to recom- 
mend the better performing 
pension products to 
uutividaals. 

They may, therefore, God it 
difficult to recommend an 
average company scheme to 
employees of that company. 


From £5j000 in Feb 1979 

to £25^91 in Mdr 1986 

How much have your savings grown over the last 
few years? 

We turned £5,000 into £25,391 in just over seven years 
. . .that's the remarkable performance ot our GRELLA 
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revertlinq fh*t olovet 20 funds of this type invniiqnled. 
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<!iowth loMnrch 1986 

DONTMJSS THIS OPPORTUNITY! 


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To: GRELLA Equity Fund, FREEPOST (GR 629), Cirencester, Glos. GL? 1BR. 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


Ansett has 
go-ahead to 
fly in New 
Zealand 


Gold dealers optimistic 
despite price falls 


APPOINTMENTS 


The New Zealand Govern- 
ment has given the go-ahead 
to the Australian airline 
Ansett to fly main internal 
routes in New Zealand in a 
consortium with the transport 
operator Newmans and finan- 
cier Ron Brierfey. 

The move was opposed by 
Air New Zealand, the national 
carrier, which currently has a 
near-monopoly and which has 
made a counter bid seeking 
permission from the Austra- 
lian Government to operate 
on Australian domestic 
routes. 

The decision, which was 
announced by die New Zea- 
land Trade and Industry Min- 
ister David Caygill and Civil 
Aviation Minister Richard 
Prebble is seen as a continu- 
ation of the drive to open up 
the economy and provoke 
more competition. 

The ministers said that 
foreign investment in any 
domestic airline was being 
restricted to 50 per cent until 
New Zealand airlines were 
able to invest in the country of 
origin. 

Ansett Transport Industries 
Pty Ltd of Australia intends 
taking a SO percent interest in 
the joint venture. The other 
partners are Newmans Group 
Ltd and Brieriey Investments 
of New Zealand. 

The ministers said when the i 
airline is established it would 
have to be based totally in 
New Zealand. 


Zurich (Reuter) — Gold and 
platinum prices dropped back 
yesterday in a further partial 
reversal of last week’s dra- 
matic gains, but dealers and 
analysts in Europe remain 
confident that precious metals 
will soon move higher. 

One dealer at a leading 
! Swiss bank said: “The upward 
trend is still in tact”. He added 
that the slight falls in prices 
since Friday were the normal 
reaction of the market to rises 
which many saw as overdone. 

Another said^PeopIe are 
not quite as enthusiastic as 
last week, but we are still 
optimistic." 

Gold shot up to $399 an 
ounce early last week, its 
highest level for almost two 
and a half years, largely on 
(ears that South Africa, the 
world's leading producer, 
could cut supplies in retali- 
ation for possible Western 
sanctions. 


$7 overnight to bam yes- 
terday morning at $371 an 
ounce in Zurich. It was later 
fixed at $37230 in London, 
$4.25 down on the previous 
day’sdose, but improved to 
dose at $375.25. 

One London dealer said 
that although gold prices 
could move lower over the 
next few days, overall market 
sentiment remained bullish. 

Platinum, which led last 
week's rally, was also weaker 


yesterday, shedding $5 to be 
fixed in London at $530.50 an 


But the South Africans have 
denied any such intention and 
the bullion price has since 
fallen back, shedding another 


fixed in London at $530.50 an 
ounce, down from last week's 
peak of $565. 

The Julius Baer-KK Swiss 
Investment Research Index, 
based on interviews with 100 
Swiss analysts and dealers, 
showed 40 per cent still be- 
lieved gold would go higher 
against 15 per cent who fore- 
saw a faH This represented a 
slight drop in the ratio of 
“bulls" to “bears" from last 
week. 

Mr Hans Kaufinann, gold 
specialist at Bank Julius Baer, 
believed worries about South 


African supplies were of little 
relevance to the long-term 
picture. 

More important were the 
chances of a resurgence of 
world inflation, and with the 
Reagan Administration 
pursuing a relatively expan- 
sionary monetary policy ibis 
looked increasingly likely, he 
said. Gold is often sought as a 
hedge at times of rapid con- 
sumer price rises. 

Even after the foils of recent 
days, the gold price is still way 
above the $328 at the end of 
last year and $347 just before 
South Africa declared its state j 
of emergency on June 11 

However, dealers noted that 
the political situation in South 
Africa had produced one vic- 
tim on the gold market — the 
kniggerand. With institutional 
investors fighting shy of the ; 
South African coin, the price j 
was $3 to $4 below the gold 
price yesterday compared 
with the traditional few 
dollars' premium over gold. 
But dealers said speculators 
already appeared to be step- 
ping m. 



Japan investors bet on new boom 


Tokyo (Reuter) — Japanese 
investor are on a shopping 
spree in the Tokyo stock 
market, betting that the flex- 
ible Japanese economy will 
restructure itself out of trouble 
into a new boom. 

Mindful of how Japan 
pulled itself out of the oil price 
rise crisis in the 1970s, inves- 


tors are confident that Japa- 
nese companies, hit by a 
strong yen and under pressure 
abroad to reduce exports, will 
shrug off their current troubles 
and bounce back in the long 
term. 

The Tokyo stock exchange’s 
Nikkei Dow Jones average 
yesterday readied a dosing 


record for the fourth 
successive day, ending at 
18,792.61 points, a rise of 
1,439.13 in nine days. 

Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, the 
Prime Minister, has been 

dressing that la pan rannn t 

expect to continue with huge 
trade surpluses, estimated at 
over $70 billion this year. 


Standard Chartered PLC 


n 

IL ^ 


n 

u 

Liuei 

imoi 

latemenl 

j 






£ * The Standard Chartered Group profit before taxation for the 

i jjv*£| halt year to 30th J une 1986 is £ 13 1.0 million. 

Six months ended Six months ended Taelve months ended 
P.vjm Financial Highlights 30th June 1986 Wfli lune 1*»85 JUr December 1<W5 


Trading profit 


^,'1 Profit before taxation 
if.I'A — fimun exdudinp S 


J — Group excluding Sranbic 
j — Sranbic 


Earnings per share 
Dividends per share 


£m 

£m 

£m 

113-6 

97-5 

205.4 

118.4 

115.0 

2323 

12.6 

18.8 

35.6 

131.0 

133.8 

267.9 

70.2 

60.2 

132.7 


In announcing the interim results, the Chairman, Lord Barber, said: 
"The 2% reduction in Profit before taxation reflects die reduced 
contribution from associates stemming from adverse movements in 


exchange rates, particularly the South African Rand and the Nigerian 
Naira, and the dilution in die Groups shareholding in Stanbic from 53% 
to 39%. Other salient features are: 

Trading profit has increased from £97.5 million to 
£113.6 million -up 16.5%. 

Aggregate charge for bad and doubtful debts has increased 
from £45.6 million to £67-4 million — up 48%. 

Profit before extraordinary items has increased from 
£60-2 million to £70.2 million — up 16.6%. 

Earnings per share have increased from 38-7p to 
45.1p— up 16.5%. 

The Group continues to feel the effects of exchange rate fluctuations, 
particularly the weakening of the LIS. Dollar and of currencies linked to it. 
If the 1985 half year results of overseas operations were restared at June 
1986 races, profits before taxation would be showing an increase of 
£19.3 million or 17%. 

The weakness of the U.S. currency has had an adverse effect on the 




results of International Banking Division, London, but despite this, UJC. 
profits were maintained at the higher levels recorded last year; Chartered 
Trust, die Group s consumer finance arm in the U.fC, has already announced 
a 46% increase in interim pre-tax profits to £5.9 million. A strong 
performance has again been recorded in North America where the Union 
Bancorp group has posted a 15% increase in profits after tax for the six 
months, and notable improvements have been achieved in both the Middle 
East and South Asia and in Europe. Although underlying performances 
in Tropical Africa have been most satisfactory, adverse currency factors 
have left profits lower than last years when translated into Sterling. The 
economic difficulties affecting a number of countries in the Asia fcdfic 
Region, particularly Malaysia and Singapore, have continued to depress 
results from die region; however; the recovery in Hong Kong is continuing. 

The loan loss experience previously noted in die Asia Pacific Region 
has continued into the first half of 1986 with Singapore and Malaysia 
being hardest hit. The shipping sector shows little sign of improvement 
and this has adversely affected profits in Hong Kong. 

In South Africa, Stanbic has reported unchanged p r ofits before 
taxation; however, due to our reduced shareholding and the continued - 
weakness in theRand, the Group s share of Stanbics pre-tax profit has 
declined to £12.6 million, representing under 10% of Group pre-tax 
profit. 

The lower charge for taxation results from a higher proportion of 
profits earned in die U.K. and a reduced rate of U.K. corporation rax. 

In my letter to shareholders of 21st June 1986 1 indicated that the 
Directors expected to recommend in due course the payment of dividends 
in respect of die year ending 31st December 1986 totalling not less than 
35 pence per share, an increase of 14-8% over 1985. In view of the 
growth in earnings per share an interim dividend of 12.5 pence per share 
(1985 — 10.5 pence) has been declared for payment on 3rd October 1986 
to shareholders registered on 11th September 1986. 

Total assets employed have increased by £0.5 billion from £28.8 
billion to £29.3 billion as underlying volume growth of 7% has been 
constrained by die weakness of die U.S. Dollar and related currencies in 
which the Group mainly trades" 


• t - < ; <•-•**: 3 . \ *. 

.w.' , .1* 


Notes 


.... 

■f' A’ I 

*** V „ 


(unaudited) 


Six months Six months Twelve months 

ended ended ended 

30th June 30th June 31st December 
1986 1985 1985 



£m 

£m 

£m 

Trading profit 

113-6 

97.5 

205.4 

Share of profits of: 




Stanbic 

12.6 

IS.S 

35.6 

Associated companies 

4-8 

17.5 

26.9 

Profit before taxation 

131.0 

133.8 

267.9 

Taxation (Note 3) 

56.6 

68.4 

125.6 

Profit after taxation 

74.4 

65.4 

142.3 

Minority interests 

4.2 

5.2 

9.6 

Profir before 




extraordinary items 

70.2 

60.2 




1. Regional analysis of profit before taxation ( after allocation of central expenses ) 

Six months Six months Twelve months 

ended ended ended 

30th Jane 30th June 3isr December 

1986 1985 1985 


£m £m Era 

United Kingdom 69.0 58.2 135.7 

Europe 5-1 (0.4) 2.2 

North America 32 J 28.6 49.6 

Middle East and South Asia 5.5 (1.1) 2.3. 

Asia Pacific 3-7 22.4 - 3 L8 

Tropical Africa 18.7 27.7 44-7 

South Africa 12.6 18.7 35.6 


Era 

135.7 

2.2 

49.6 

2J. 

31.8 

44.7 
. 35.6 




|I| 

i>*y 

i 



Extraordinary items I Note 4) (5.3) 



Profit before taxation 13 1.0 

133.8 

267-S 

3. Taxation 



The charge for taxation, which reflects die estimated effective rate for die yeas 

is based on a U.K. corporation tax rate of 36.25% (1985 

- 41-25%) and comprises: 

• • ■ Six months Six months 

Twelvemonths 

ended 

ended 

ended 

1 30th June 30tfa June 

31st December 

1986 

1985 

1985 

Eta 

£m 

£ra 

. Company and subsidiaries 51.9 

Stanbic and associared com parties 4.7 

51.6 

102.3 

16.8 

23.3 ■ 

56.6 

68.4 

125.6 

4. ' Extraordinary I terns i net of attributable taxation refid) 


Extraordinary items comprise: — 


£m 

Costs relating to bid defence 


7.0 

Provision against trade investment and other items 


08 



78 

Attributable tax credit 


25 

5.3 

5. The financial information induded herein for the twelve months ended 31st 
December 1985 is based on the full Accounts for 1985 which hare been filed with 

1 the Registrar of Companies, and on which die Auditors give an 

unqualified report 



& l §.r 





*- , St . * ^ 

T ~ 


■ :*sss§ 



A or t ht; ! Tc-> !y i c in .iv.nJ.tl A troin 1 li< Sccu-Uiry. St.irJ.tr.l Li).*: :<. u J I ’! I * Hi •»! 10ps-4.it.. I oihIom (XTN 4PI 


TEMPUS 


Davidsons: Mr Pete Whit- 
ing becomes managing direc- 
tor. paper and board division. 

Weatherall Green & Smith: 
Mr Dennis Redmond becomes 
prcsidenL 

IBL: Mr Ashley West joins 
as group finance director. 

Business Help: Mr Femley 
Parker becomes chairman. 

British Gas (Eastern): Mr 
John Kffboum is made direc- 
tor, corporate planning and 
management services, from 
September 29. 

British Alcan Sheet: Mr 
Malcolm Shearer has been 
made managing director. 


Rentokil dismays with 
repeat performance 


Kfith decks 

Lloyds Investment Man- 
agers: Mr Keith Jeclcs joins as 
a director, marketing. 

Thomas French & Sons: Mr 
Panl Collins and Mr Ray 
Binnioa have joined the 
board. 

Dataserv Inc Mr Philip 
H in deraker has been ap- 
pointed to the board. 

Dataserv Ltd: Mr Michael 
Payne becomes a director 
responsible for DP Sales and 
Mr Stephen Swiatek becomes 
a director responsible for GSD 
Sales. 


Is the rot setting in at 
Rentokil? For the second 
consecutive time the group's 
results have foiled to please 
the market. 

Interim profits were up 9 
per cent at £13.1 million, but 
were considered disappoint- 
ing. Forecasts for the full year 
are being cut This is a similar 
pattern to that displayed in 
1985. . . 

News on Rentokil in the 
last year has not been es- 
pecially encouragi n g. The 
shares have underperformed 
the FT All-Share index by 
17.5 per cent over that pe- 
riod. The interim results bear 
Witness to a poor perfor- 
mance in property care in the 
United Kingdom and an 
increasingly competitive 
market for umber preserving 
in the United Kingdom and 
the Far East 

Property care has been 
badly affected by the reduc- 
tion in home improvement 
grants. 

Despite these difficulties, 
the core of the business, 
contract services, is doing 
well. It accounted for about 
75 per cent of British profits 
in 1985 and is also a useful 
contributor to overseas earn- 
ings. 

Its otherwise bright growth 
prospects are, however, being 
clouded by the Office of Fair 
Trading's investigation into 
pest control, launched earlier 
this year. 

The deliberations of the 
OFT wfll not be known for 
some time but its presence in 
the market and eventual re- 
port are bound to affect 
RentokiTs pricing policy. 

Pest control is a very 
profitable area for the group. 
Margins axe in excess of 25 
per cent and profits last year 
were about £8 million. 

The rest of the year is 
expected to show some recov- 
ery in the problem areas but, 
barring a bo nanza. Rentokil 
will be bard pressed to make 
£30 milli on this year. Before 
last year’s disappointment, it 
had been hoped the company 
would make more than £33 
million in 1986. 

On a forecast of £29 J 
million (9.4p) the shares are 
selling on a 12 per cent 
premium to the market 


RENTOKIL SHARE PRICE 


FTA 500 SHARE 
INDEX 


Bad figures, 
OFT inquiry 

launched 


v -4 ‘7*.'?^"*' 130 


' SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAfi APR MAY JUN JUL AUG 


per cent, the first increase in 
three years. 


In July, it announced that 
les of rough gem and 


sales of rough gem and 
industrial diamonds by the 
Central Selling Organization 
in the first half of 1986 were 
45 per cent higher in dollar 
terms and 62 per cent up in 
rands on a year earlier. 

At the same time, Julian 
Ogilvie Thompson, chairman 
of De Beers, told a world 
diamond gathering that trade 
stocks were bade, to normal, 
production and demand were 
in balance again and the 
future looked rosy. 

Then De Beers dropped the 
bombsheD that its margins on 
diamond sales actually 
shrunk in the first half to 1616 


per cent from 35 per cent in 
the second half of 1985 and 
19 per cent a year ago. There 
is no explanation for this 
strange behaviour at a time 
when the almighty De 
Beers/CSO cartel appears 
once again to be in the 
driving seaL 

Nor is there any reason 
given why De Beers' tax 
charge should jump by 72 per 
cent to leave earnings per 
share a paltry 20 per cent 
higher. Instead, there is 
merely a bland reassurance 
that the upward trend in 
diamond sales should con- 
tinue in the second half. 

There are possible explana- 
tions for these figures. Mar- 
gins could foil because of a 
chang e in the mixture of 
diamonds sold between those 
that come from De Beers' 
mines and those brought in 
by theCSO. 

The higher tax charge prob- 
ably reflects higher sales 
within South Africa from De 
Beers' own sources. 


De Beers 


After winning the hearts and 
minds of the mining world 
with spariding diamond sales 
figures seven weeks ago, De 
Beers quickly feU from grace 
yesterday with a set of in- 
terim. results that contra- 
dicted all its bullish noises on 
the state of the diamond 
market 

Consider this: in ApriL De 
Beers said its huge stockpile 
of diamonds had peaked and 
was starting to folL In the 
same month, it raised the 
price of gem diamonds by 7(6 


But it is the De Been 
silence which deafens after 

over thepas?^ months! As 
a South African company, it 
needs all the friends it can get 
Yesterday, as its share price 
slumped by around 10 per 
cent, it lost a good number of 
them. 


Systems 

Designers 


When 34 analysts non up to a 
briefing on the interim results 
of a £100 million computer 
software company, there 


must be something special 
about iL 

On the foce of it. Systems 
Designers results for the six 
months to June can only be 
described as pedestrian. 

Pretax profits rose 3J per 
cent to £3.3 million, on 
turnover up 14 per cent to 
£29.2 million. The under- 
lying trend, however, gives 
no cause for alarm. 

There are two key reasons 
why growth has been less 
than spectacular. One is the 
impact of a weak dollar on 
die results of its US subsid- 
iary, Warrington Financial 
Services, supplier of settle- 
ment systems for financial 
institutions. Divisional pre- 
tax profit was down 7 percent 
to £1.6 million. 

The other reason for the 
sluggish performance is the 
group's decision to invest 
heavily in research and 
development in its other 
division. Systems Con- 
sultancy Services. 

The amount of the expen- 
diture is not disclosed, but 
was enough to check growth 
from 28 per cent last year to 
16 per cent in the first half of 
this year. 

Systems Designers will re- 
main in the forefront of 
software technology. Its Gnk 
with Digital Equipment 
Corporation (DEC) to de- 
velop and market Ada prod- 
ucts (software for military 
applications) worldwide 
opens up a market estimated 
to be worth more than $800 
minion (£544 million) in the 
US alone. 

In US financial services, it 
is moving out from its base in 
settlement services in the 
“back office" to the “front 
office" with dealer informa- 
tion systems. 

High spending on research 
and development this year 
and a less favourable tax 
treatment' of US earnings 
next year, pushing up the tax 
charge from an estimated 29 
per cent this year to 35 per 
cent next year, will mean that 
shareholders will need to be 
patienL 

The price-earnings ratio is 
nudging 20, and is unlikely to 
be reduced much next year. 
But for those who can wait 
until 1988, there could be a 
pot of gold from projects now 
in development 


Japan loan 
threat ‘off 


WALL STREET 


Tokyo (Reuter) — Japanese 
banks have dropped a 
controversial demand 1 that 
any future loans they make to 
Mexico be tied to tax breaks at 
home, banking sources said 
yesterday. 

The demand, made earlier 
this month by Mr Yoh 
Kurosawa, deputy president 
of the Industrial Bank of 
Japan, threatened a $12 bil- 
lion (£8.05 triHion) rescue 
package for .Mexico and 
alarmed the United States. 

The Japanese banks are 
being asked to provide about 
$900 million of the $6 billion 
Mexico is seeking from its 
international bank creditors. 

The banking sources said 
the Japanese banks decided 
not to go through with the 
threat, although many of them 
sympathized with Mr 
Kurosawa's remarks. 


Early setback for Dow 


New York (Rente) — Wall 
Street shares fell in early 
trading yesterday after a bout 
of profit-taking. Bonds, which 
rose m reaction to a lower 
figure for the United States 
gross national product in the 
second quarter, provided no 
support 


The Dow Jones industrial 
avenue dropped 10.13 points 
to 1,869.24. Declining issues 
led advancing issues tty a 


margin of seven to four on a 
volume of 15 million shares. 

IBM led the active issues, 
rising to 135%. Fruehanf 
was unchanged at 47 7 b and 
MoW fell % to 34%. 

The transportation average 
was down SJS points at 
748.13, ntOitks feU 0.11 
points and stocks were down 
3.61 points to 717.18. 

The Standard and Poors 
100 index was 0.75 points 
down at 231.21. 


'S’ 


Dai Nippon in 
$550m deal 


Japan's biggest printing ink 
firm, Dai Nippon, has bought 
the printing ink division of 
Sun Chemical for $550 mil- 
lion (£369 million). This gives 
Dai Nippon die biggest share 
of the US printing ink market. 

The printing ink division 
accounts for 64 per cent ofSun 
Chemical's business. 

With the Son Chemical- 
purchase Dai Nippon is ex- 
pected to control about 13 per 
cent of the world market after 
an aggressive series of pur- 
chases in Europe and the US. 



AAm g Company ___ 

BCQ 

Citibank Sampt 

Consofeteted Crts 

Continental Trust 

Co-operative Baric 

a Hoars & Co 

Hong Kong & Shanghai. 

Lloyds Bank 

Nat Westminster 

flore t Bart c of Seated. 

Citibank HA_ZII 


t MonpfC fe*e Rite- 


Gil 


LOW) 



























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* A ■' Jr \ h ' »■«/• 

F V* 1 ‘ n 

i V V 



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scih;ick 


- ■ .. •."O 

1 

• i *’« 


. v !;,• • .. . 

... i • 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


19 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 







* e 181651 *** • In mines, De Been . 

rates next month gave guts a receipts. 67- cents to 613 cents 

much-needed boost yesterday. Sears at (21%p and Gas disappointing earnings. PA© 
Grnns stretched to more than “A” shares at 1 075p gained 3p with figures eariy next month 
Mlf a point, enabling the and I Op, while jewellers slipped 5p to 508p and GEC 
Government Broker to ex- continued to sparkle after the overshadowed by the threat of 
of rema “" combined English-Zales deal increased competition from 
mg £500 million m per cent announced on Monday. - Plessey and Racal on defence 

Treasury 2,007 tap stock. Rainers was particnlariy contracts shed 4p to 186p. 

The FT-SE 1 00 index closed strong at 20 Ip up I2p. - Construction shares were 

down 4.6 points at 1, 604.4 and Co nfirma tion that merer supported ahead of the divi- 

and the FT-30 share index lost talks had collapsed hit Moont dend season which begins next 
5.8 points to end the day at Charlotte at 94p and ' Kt£k ^ ®ne IOp 
U67.6. Pfeasnrama 3l6p, both about Wgher at 548p. Costain at 

Earlier, the index-linked 6p down.- fieddtt added 6p to r 4 ®^ *°d Gamac at 464p 
“iaplef*20l 3 ran out. Helping 771p after the acquisition of ^Poorvcd 9p. J ^Mowiem 
the mood was a firmer pound, mt . ■ ■ — — — ndded another 6p to 396p after, 

which closed up 0.0105 at • Shares in Blue Circle recent comment. 

$1.5030 after a gloomy set of staged a recovery yesterday on S ecb P??? I ^? !ent 

United Slates gross national news that outline planning snmulateo^ by a favourable 

product figures showing a permission had bees awarded 
slowdown in growth to only to build 5,000 bosses on 
0.6 per cent in the second the site of a former qnarry at 
quarter. - ’ Chafford Hundred, near 

Wall Street opened lower on Gr ays h Essex. BC! owns 60 
the news, knocking a few percentoTtne^iteano 
pence from the leadingjhitish co#M makemore dao ^ 
internationals l»tp Glaxo at million pretax over die 10 
968p down 27p and ICI 7p yeare it wOl take to complete 
lower at 997p. Jaguar wase the development, 
another casualty at 495p down j “ ■“ 

31 p on further consideration Durkee Famous Foods from 


circular from the stock- 
brokers, de Zoete. Unitech 
was particularly favoured at 
195p up 7p, but Baca! gave up 
6p to 180p after the annual 
meeting. 

Thorn EMI attracted 
investment demand at 49lp 
up 9p amid rumours of an 
upgraded profits forecast 
Good profits and a one for five 
scrip issue lifted Aerospace' 


ilp on lurtner consideration lwucc ramous rows uom Fnrineerine 4 o to 74o 
of Monday’s statement The Jenson Trust, 2p better and 5<S up 5p 

session began cautiously as. J°OP- . • . • and Supra Group at 7 5p up 7p 

BFCCand PU B, HiD Invest- Io oftowKdan ffm ateSiof HattiSmB 
in e n t Trust c onfir med merger Mattnew - mown redounded 


merger 

talks. . 30p to 495p on revived hid 

. Both shares were sus- talk and Vanx was also sup- 
pended, but fears of an early ported at 400p up 20p. 


this week. 

Mrs Fields was hoisted 8p 
to 133p after comment on the 
figures. Fruit and vegetable 


liquidation of the PHIT port- Standard Chartered slipped wholesalers such as~*AIbert 

folio if 


the deal is successful 
sent a small shudder through 
some equities. 

Beecham for example, 
where Philip Hill holds a 
substantial interest fell ini- 
tially to 393p rallied to 403p 
only to slip back again with 
Wall Street to 393pa net fell of 

8p. 

Oils continued to -reflect 
optimism for the future trend 
of crude prices, with BP 15p- 
higher at 625p. Stores re- 
flected another cheerful retail 
survey from the Confedera- 
tion of British' Industry and 
hopes of tax cuts next year 


8p to 729p after disappointing Fisher at 180p and Glass 
first-half profits 2 -per cent Glover at 20Sp jumped 6p 
.lower than last year. Other each after an encouraging 
banks eased in sympathy. circular. 


RECENT ISSUES 


COMPANY NEWS 


• HAT CROUP: BET has ex- 
tended its £95 million bid for 
HAT until 3pm on September 8, 
after receiving acceptances for 
1.103,685 HAT shares (1.44 per 


conditional contract for the sale 
of its freehold site at Cowley 
Mill Road. Uxbridge. Middle- 
sex. occupied by Auto Diesels 
Bntby, for £1.6 million cash. 
The sale is conditional upon the 
purchaser obtaining p lanning 
consent for site development. 

• JW W ASS ALL: Results for 
the 53 weeks to February 1 (52 
weeks to January 26k Final 
dividend tp (lp). Turnover 
£48,000 (nil). Earnings per share £2,909,698 (£3.013358). Pretax 

4p (3.6pX The 700,000 ordinary profit £49.533 (£88.496). Tax 

shares issued by way of rights £7,497 (£5,668). Profit after tax 
excfu ‘ 


cent) by the first dosing date. 

• MOLYNX HOLDINGS: Re- 
sults for the six months’ to June 
30c no interim dividend (nil). 
Turnover £1,160,000 
(£972,000). Pretax profit 
£160,000 (£98,000). Tax 


have been excluded from the 
calculation. 

• TASK FORCE GROUP: Re- 
sults for the six months to May 
31 in £000& No interim divi- 
dend forecast Final dividend 
l.lSp. Turnover 2,795 (1,985). 
Pretax profit 294 (1 50). Tax 125 
(66).Profit attributable 169(84). 


£42,036 (£$2328). Earnings per 
sbareZS3p(5.I4p). 

• BARRIE INVESTMENTS 
& FINANCE: The extraor- 
dinary meeting, held on August 
1 9. at which resolutions approv- 
ing the sale of' the group's 
property at 187-211 St John 
Street, Lorn 


don EC1, were to be 

Earnings per share 3J2p (1 .tip), proposed, was adjourned due to 
The board reports that figures unsolicited higher offers re- 
show the company to be well on ceived for the property since the 
schedule to meet the full year — 

fo recast of £600,00 0. 

• STEWART ENTERPRISE 
INVESTMENT COMPANY: 

The formula for asset value per 
ordinary share, «»iriii*iari for 
the purposes of determining the 


notice of the meetingwassefiito 

shareholders. 

• J BIBSY & SONS: The 
company has agreed in principle 
to acquire the agricultural busi- 
ness of Hamlyn Milling from 
Hanson Trust. Hi 


sale facility price at the dose of ’ slightly over £300,1 


amlyu earned 
|,000 in pretax 


EQUITIES 


Beaverco7l45p) 
Borland (i25p 
Chelan Man . . 

Coated Electrodes 
CoBnedlpp) 

Evans Hteshaw (120p) 
Fletcher Dennys (70p) 
GT Management (210p) 
Guthrie Coro (IfiOp) 
Harrison rtSOp) 


HHe Ergonom (S2p) 
Hughes Food (2Dp) 
149+5 Lon utd Irjv (330p) 
191 MS Cash & C(l5op) 
70 Marta Dev (tfop)_ 


150 Morgan Grenfell 

120 +1 IKSiriSoS" <I1IW 

117 Tandy tnds (112p) 

72 Thames TV (I90p) 

208 +3 Tfebet & Britten (IZflp) 
164 Trees ZHWfl 2018 *®7 
164+1 Unto* (63p) 


24 
433 +7 
79+2 
98 
438 
32 
145 
120 
157 1 ! 
145 
237 
132 

£41*4 

67 


asset value pins the propor- TIONS: The company an- 
tionaie share of the net pre- nounced on August 19 that the 
mium arising from the sale of cash offer of S18.7S per share 
__ - ■ * r- made by Auto Auctions, its 

wholly owned subsidiary, to the 
holders of those shares in 
Sandgate Corporation not al- 
ready owned by Auto Auctions, 
expired on August 14. Purchase 
has been effected and payment 
made for 755,205 Sandgate 
shares. Another 224^276 
Sandgate shares are expected to 
be acquired shortly, after deliv- 
ery of the share certificates, 
which has been guaranteed. 

• TOTAL ERICKSON RE- 
SOURCES: The company an- 
nounced CanS2.9 million 
profits in the first half of 1986, 
which represents only four 
months of operations at the 
Mount Skukum gold mine near 
Whitehorse in the Yukon, whidi 
is 37 per cent owned by Total 
Erickson. 

• AEROSPACE ENGINEER- 
ING: Results for the year to 
April 30 in £000s. Dividend 


related rights on August 6. is 
42Jp per ordinary share, 
radoding a net premium of lp 
per ordinary share arising from 
the sale of related rights. 

• TURNBULL SCOTT 
HOLDINGS: The company an- 
nounces that in accordance with 
a pre-determined formula con- 
tamed in the agreement for the 
acquisition of all Hurry &. 
Partners* capital, a second 
tranche payment has been sat- 
isfied by the issue of 1,590 
ordinary shares and 1,590 non- 
voting A ordinary shares in the 
capital of TS. 

• ANGLO NORDIC HOLD- 
INGS: The company announces 
that its subsidiary Anglo Nordic 
Properties has entered into a 


108+2 

u 


Yatverton 
RIGHTS ISSUES 
B8A Gp N/P 
Barker & Dobson Ffp 
Cttyviston N/P 
CototcM F/P 
Expamet F/p 
Forward Tech HIP 
Rock N/P 
Television. 8th N/P 
Top Value F/P 
Yortanount N/P 
(issue price in brackets). 


15+1 
13U +*i 
26-2 
206 
168 
3+1 

3<2 

17 

80-3 

76-1 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


T te s e Month Startup 

Sep 88 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jui87 

Sep 87. 

Dec 87, 


Previo us day 's total open 

I Moflui tunxsottar 


Hun 

Sap 66 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 _______ 

USTrenuryBond 

Sep 86 

Doc 86 

Mar 87 



<S$ 

Low 

9058 

Cl— 

9CL41 

EetVoi 

587 

_ 90.71 

9050 

90 JO 

9080 

7119 

_ 90.74 

9053 

90.74 : 

9073 

158 

- 9053 - 

9058 

9052 

9086 

27 

_ 9042 

9043 

9038 

9045 

24 

„ 90.18 

90.18 

9018 

9020 ' 

10 

interest 15346 






93-85 

93lB8 

9177 

9357 

101-05 

100-16 

NT 


9354 • 9185 

8184 9176 

9164 9357 

Previous 
101-31 
101-14 


day’s total open In 
Mie 

9194 


us day's I 

100-30 

100-14 


9184 

8164 


900 


312 

144 


Nopsn interest 6879 

101 -29 


9784 


101-14 




Sep 88 _ 
Dec Sr _ 
Mar 87 _ 




101-04 
NT 
NT. 


120-25 
12021 
’ NT 
NT 

18256 

lBBiOO 


101-18 


121-28 

121-28 


101 . 


afc i 


a day’s 1 

12032 

120-21 


101-16 

101-21 

101-21 

lopanbi 

121-2B 

121-23 

121-16 

121-16 


1316 
230 
0 • 

0 

15670 
14423 
748 
O 
0 


18350 

.16620 


Previous days total hopan nearest 2420 
18220 10250 151 


16530- 16555 


Long Q8I * 

Sep«6 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 _ 

Jun 87. 

FT-SE 190 
Sap 86 — 
Dec 80. 


FfcstDeafiass Lest Destaga Uat DadareOon rnrffamaaiir 

Aug 4 . . Aug 15 Nov 6 Nov 17 

Aug 18 Sep 5 Nov 20 Oacl 

Sap IB Sep 10 Dec 4 DaclS- 

cat opdens ware t a ke n not me 19/00/86 Homes Protection, London 5 Nonham 
Group, ADaoo Investments. Arratred Conauner O ec tro n tes. Sheraton Securities 
l u tem alkwa L CASE Group.Suicflffa Speetanan. Wfckiey. American Elecmaic Cowpo- 
nerts, 8tormguiirlH»riey Group. Bristol Oi 3 Minerals. Penttand MdUsMas. Bsricar 3 
Ditoon,Pr8swlcti.HoWnBS. RSJ4. fcitsmational, Ryan MameHonel, H.Yauig Hold- 


■RADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Ings, Stroud Rflay Drummond. Ecobrie Hoktegs. 
Put and CaftAmstrad Consumer Bectrooics. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


8TERL1NQ SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


asr 


NYorit 1^85-15035 
Montreal 25772-25662 
Ama’dam3j4077-3A887 
Bruaseis 6181-84.18 ■ 



C^gan 115043-115445 115075-115242 


7pram-17(fls 

154-IXprera 

65-l60dta 


a4JML47pnmi 
0L3ML22prero 
1 >4-1 X prom 
18 -iaprem 

_ Kprem-Xda 

.1115-1-1175 1.1130-1.1140 

Rsnkfun347B2-35962 35651-35694 

Lhbon 21759-22057 21562-22057 

Madrid 199.45-20057 1B952-19950 

M8an 21 2080-21 32J8 2123 83-Z129.7S 2-5dte 

Oslo 105759-115207 115059-115207 4~4*dta 

Paris 105310-105818 105499-105671 ZHtSpnm 

Stlcnfcn 103497-105842 105886-103642 %-Xr 

Tokyo -2904543078: .-2302523054 IV? 

VSmna 21 5921 T9 - -215921.73 

Zurich 24847-25067 2 48882,4927 IVIpmm 

t Mi teM k u f i s ap — < mm ITT li n e re»et T 2 J(«l S | ’ a i a meT1J-7H9. 


129-156prem 

068-043prem 

3V3Xprwn 

45-36prem 

Xpram-Vcfia 


129e05dte 
6-1 Odb 
l2V13)4db 
SVSXpram 
VXpram 
52«prwn - 
255lltprem 
avmprem 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Greece drachma 
Hong Kong doBv . 

tST- 


, 115879-115973 Danmark 


KuvmttdkiarKD — 

Malays* doflar 

Mexico peso. 

New Zealand dote . 
Sawfi Arabia riyai _ 
Singapore dote — 
South Africa rand _ 

UAEdkham 

TJoydsBank 


. 1850-1850 West Germany 

— n/a s>«tz*UKi 

i 0532904360 


mpiil a il byt 


1.56p (l^p), with a proposed 
one for five capitalization mak- 
ing 2.85p (Z4p). Turnover 
12,983 (12,949). Gross profit 
2,940(2,500). 

• PROPERTY HOLDING & 
INVESTMENT TRUST: The 
Greycoat offer will close on 
August 28 unless the ordinary 
offer is then unconditional as to 
acceptances. The cash alter- 
native is also final and will dose 
at the same time. The current 
PHIT share price is !33p and 
Greycoat says its offers are 
worth more than this. 


Canal attack 

Mr John Whittaker, chairman 
of Highams, the textile com- 


idding for the Manches- 
ter Ship Canal Company, has 
attacked the canal company’s 
directors for considering a 
joint retail development at 
Barton Cross near Manchester 
cite ce ntr e with, the South 
African-owned developer 
Capital and Counties. Mr 
Whittaker says the site should 
be retained mid developed by 
Manchester Ship Canal itself 
He says the South African link 
could brmg opposition to the 
project . 


COMMENT 


Ambitious Maxwell 
lines up his cash 

Underwriters permitting, Robert the non-Maxwell shares in BPCC. 
Maxwell is about, to lay his hands on The job of doing the Gty rounds fell 

another £330 million of new equity this time to Morgan Grenfell backed 
capital at BPCC without putting up by Rowe & Pitman. Hill Samuel, 
any money from his own private often BPCCs banker, was ruled out 
interests or losing no min a l control. because it acts for Philip Hill and Lord 

Taking over the underperforming Keith is also a former chairman. 
Philip Hill Investment Trust looks a Philip Hill shareholders, the largest 
cheaper and quicker way for the of whom are the British Coal pension 
BPCC chairman to fund his expan- fund. Eagle Star, the Prudential and 
sion plans in the United States than a the Kuwait Investment Office, were 
conventional rights issue. And it looks unquestionably dissatisfied with the 


convenient for Lord Keith of 
Castleacre, the veteran City 
strongman who chairs Philip Hill. 

The City’s response to the plan to 
underwrite the BPCC shares offered, 
smoked out by The Times market 
report yesterday, will determine 


ormance of the trust, hence their 
support for a plan inspired by 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd Investment 
to transform it into a British equity in- 
dex-linked fond. 

But dissatisfaction docs not auto- 
matically make them willing recipi- 


whether it suits disgruntled Philip Hill cuts of BPCC paper. Some, wary of 
shareholders. It may not be ideal for Mr Maxwell’s individual approach to 
outside holders in BPCC either, but private and public companies, will 
none should be in that position unless elect for cash, though BPCCs similar 
happy to play things the Maxwell way. 1984 takeover of Bishopsgate Trust 
A cash price of around 97 per cent worked out well enough, 
of net asset value is the going rate for BPCC is about to buy a US 
invest ment trusts. It would leave publishing company and it would be 
Peigamon Press in control of BPCC no surprise if this turns out to be one 
with just over 50 per cent instead of 75 of the biggest names in the business, 
per cent now. The reason for The rest of the trust money will go 
Peigamon increasing its stake last into a war chest for further US 
March, by injecting titles from the expansion. 

private Pergamon Press into BPCC, . . - ... ... 

now becomes more obvious. - break-up of Muhp HU! will 

Btvv , . . ... . involve an intended institutional 

EPGCscapntahzauon will mo* by placing of its 1.7 per cent stake in 
nearly half to £1.1 bdlion. taking it a Beecham - by far its largest holding 
httle nearer to vb- Maxwell s dream of bIamed for ^e trust s lacklustre 

\ £3 , oSi?" lo £S bimon company hy performance. Thus the sale will mark 
the 1990s. a double departure for Lord Keith, 

The deal was not sewn up yesterday, who has also just tied up the ends at 
although there was no shortage of Beecham, where he was temporary 
enthusiasm from the Philip Hill chairman, by appointing a million- 
board. Phit shareholders and the sub- dollar American successor. But the 
underwriters of the takeover needed enduring banker has been pre* 
convincing about the near trebling of maturely retired before. 

A search for miracles 

The most important Australian The budget statement talks of a firm 

budget for many a year just about monetary stance and the possibility of 
passed muster, but left that troubled lower interest rates in the same breath, 
economy still in search of miracles. It proposes halving the next national 
The first, perhaps, will be achieved by wage increase (based on inflation in 
Treasurer Paul Keating if he meets his the first half) from 4 to 2 per cent This 
Aus$3.5 billion 1986-87 target for the “discounting** is much milder than 
budget deficit. . the wage freeze proposed by the 

This, set against an outturn of opposition and the Confederation of 
Aus$5.73 billion for 1985-86, looks Australian Industry, but it has still to 
more impressive than jt is. The itmon acceptance, 
projected Aus$3 billion of spending Non-form growth is forecast to slow 

cuts is supplemented by a hotch-potch, from 4 to 2.5 per cent, but even this 
of tax increases and timing changes looks optimistic to most observers of 
which leaves the structural deficit not the Australian economy, 
greatly reduced. - ■ ... The first test of the budget, after a 

The other deficit, Aus$ 15 billion on period of severe pressure on the 
current account — 6 per cent of gross Australian dollar, was in the foreign 
domestic product — remains, as does exchange markets. Dealers liked the 
an unacceptably high projection of 8 deficit figure and marked the dollar up 
per cent consumer price inflation for to 64 US cents. But, on closer perusal 
1986-87. Improvements in either will of Mr Keating’s calculations, it was 
be slow to come through. shaded bade. 


— 3574035812 Franca 
. 101050106050 

— 2560+25733 

— 5570055100 

— 3222032283 Hong Kong 


3515035383 Portugal 
&4515-&4815 Spain 


[HOFEXaadExM. 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 





Stes 



PUIS 



Seri— 

Oct 

J— 

Jfe 

Oct 

J— 

_££ 

ABied Lyons 

300 

45 

55 

65 

7 

9 

12 

r336) 

330 

27 

35 

4b 

16 

22 

2b 

380 

10 

20 

28 

3b 

37 

40 

BP 

500 

130 

142 


1 

3 

— 

reufl 

550 

80 

93 

107 

4 

10 

18 

600 

. 3b 

53 

7b 

17 

■& 

32 

Cons Gold 


64 

75 

84 

10 

18 

27 

P471) 

460 

34 

47 

54 

71 

40 

50 

500 

12 

25 

— 

5S 

70 

— 

Cowtaulds 

260 

17 

30 

38 

11 

16 

19 

1*270) 

280 

10 

19 

27 

24 

27 

30 

300 

4 

12 

— 

38 

41 

— 


330 

2 

6 

— 

68 

69 

— 

Com Union 

280 

30 

35 

41 

4 

7 

.9 

(•308) 

300 

11 

24 

30 

11 

14 

19 

330 

4 

14 

20 

30 

32 

3b 

caueAWire 


45 

59 

75 

6 

10 

15 

fMt) - - - 

325 

28 

41 

57 

13 

20 

25 

350 

10 

25 

37 

71 

32 

37 


375 

5 

13 

— 

•45 

48 

— 

DtstHere 

soa 

143 

_ 



2 

__ 



(V28) 

650 

97 

— 

• — 

b 

— 

— 

700 

50 

— 

— 

10 




GEC 

180 

15 

22 

28 

6 

9 

11 

(*190) 

200 

7 

12 

18 

17 

20 

22 

220 

3 

5 

— 

36 

3b 

— 

Grand Met 

327 

58 

■M 

_ 

2 

— 

— 

("378) 

355 

3b 


— 

8 



— 


— 

48 

57 

— 

16 

IB 


382 

22 

— 

— 

18 

— 

— 

ICI 

900 

112 

144 



5 

n 

— 

(1004) 

950 

TO 

104 

122 

14 

20 

27 

1000 

38 

70 

87 

30 

40 

50 


1050 

16 

40 

60 

60 

60 

75 

LandSec 

300 

31 

4 D 

48 

4 

7 

8 

C324) 

330 

11 

20 

29 

12 

14 

18 

360 

3 

10 

1/ 

38 

36 

38 

Marks&Spen 

180 

El 

3G 

43 

1* 

3 

5 

f20S 

>■ 

. 14 

22 

30 

4 

7 

10 

220 

4 

11 

16 

16 

17 

2Q 

Shell Trans 

750 

135 

150 

158 

1)4 

8 

15 

tens 


87 


120 

6 

14 

21 

850 

45 

65 

8b 

2b 

32 

45 

ii7 '■ 

240 

47 

El 

60 

3 

6 

8 

rz?3) 

260 

29 

36 

43 

6 

9 

13 


17 

25 

32 

14 

19 

22 


Seri— 

sep 

D— 

MV 

S«p 

Dec 

Mr 

Beecham 


47 

57 

67 

3 

8 

12 

(-401) 


25 

38 

4b 

12 

20 

23 


8 

22 

32 

27 

37 

42 


- 480 

2 

12 

u 

Li 

6/ 

70 

Boots 

. 200 

sa 

38 

44 

2 

5 

7 

P224) 

220 

15 

23 

22 

11 

13 

15 


6 

12 

19 

21 

25 

21 

BTT) 

280 

f7 

30 

40 

a 

15 

20 

C2B6) 

307 

5 

17 



27 

33 


333 

1* 

6 

— 

50 

52 

— 

Bass 

- 700 

ri 

76 

85 

5 

13 

25 

r760) 



43 

-55' 

2b 

3U- 


800 

6 

25 

40 

60 

bo 

lzH 

Blue Ode 

550 

18 

40 

58 

20 

25 

32 


GOO 

S 

18 

32 

bb 

bb 

55 

G50 

1 

5 

20 

10b 

10b 

106 



80 

90 

till! 

6 

16 

37 

i680) 

Vrnfl 

50 

& 

80 

17 

im 




25 

40 

60 

50 

65 

BB 


700 

J5_ 

25 


90 

100 

130 

Doors 

300 

68 

78 

84 

IK 

4 

5 

raeoi 

330 

38 

48 

60 

3 

7 

10 

380 

14 

25 

38 

12 

16 

20 

GKN 


16 

79 

rm 

9 

12 

16 

f289) 

280 

7 

17 

27 

21 

24 

28 


2K> 

9 

17 

39 

39 

44 


330 

1 

4 

9 

t» 

IB 

89 


900 

90 125 


13 

35 

— 

0»5) 

950 

5S 

80 

25 

33 

52 

60 

1000 

30 

65 

65 

55 

78 

B5' 


1050 

7 

48 

t±m 

LjM 


Hanson 

135 

48 

_ 

_ 

i 

- 

- 

Cl 78) 

150 

31 

w 

— 

i 

— 

— 

WO 

21 

30 

35 

IK 

3 

7 


180 

7 ■ 

15 21% 

/ 

9 

i* . 


200 • 

2» 

7' 

12 

22 

LlB 

26 


Ml Mi 

Sari— Sapt D»c Maf Sap Pac 


500 15 . 35 48 28 35 45 

550 3 17-30 60 85 68 

800 1 7 IS 107 110 112 


Thorn QU 

420 

75 

87 

100 

2 

7 

12 

(*482) 

460 

40 

b8 

70 

b 

13 

20 

500 

13 

34 

44 

18 

78 

34 


550 

3 

12 

— 

6b 

'67 


Tosco 

300 

110 

_ 

— _ 

2 



(*400) 

330 

80 

88 

_ 

2 

3 


360 

53 

62 

75 

3 

/ 

10 


390 

27 

38 

50 

7 

12 

17 


8ari— 


NOV 

Fab 

AO0 

Nov 

Fab 

BrtAaro 

480 

33 

45 

68 

7. 

13 

70 

(*4 88) 

500 

4 

28 

43 

1b 

30 

37 

560 

1 

12 

23 

62 

67 

(0 

BAT Intis 

360 

50 

60 

73 

1 

5 

8 

C406) 

390 

20 

40 

5? 

2 

13 

17 

420 

2 

18 

32 

13 

to 

21 


460 

K 

6 

— 

53 

60 

— 

Barclays 

460 

30 

52 

65 

3 

13 

16 

C489) 

500 

4 

2b 

40 

17 

32 

40 

550 

2 

11 

22 

65 

70 

75 

But Telecom 

180 

19 

» 

34 

IK 

5 

8 

(*202) 

200 

3 

15 

21 

5 

13 

18 


.% 

7 

11 

23 

28 

30 


160 

9 

20 

23 

1 

6 

11 

(*170) 

180 

IK 

90 

15 

15 

16 

IB 

200 

1 

3 

6 

34 

35 

36 


300 

67 

75 


1 

2 


330 

37 

45 


2 

4 

— 


38V 

8 

22 

— 

6 

13 

— - 


300- 

52 

60 

70 

1 

3 

5 

T348) • 

330 

22 

30 

40 

3 

90 

14 

360 

3 

13 

20 

15 

to 

to 

LASMO 

too 

78 

35 

40 

1 

5 

7 

(*128) 

110 

TO 

28 

3b 

1 

7- 

11 

120 

13 

20 

27 

3 

10 

14 

Mkteid Bank 

500 

40 

52 

70 

1 

8 

15 

CSX) 


5 

1 

25 

12 

0 

IS 

65 

28 

67 

35 

67 

PAD 

460 

5?. 

60 

75 

1 

6 

10 

rsi^ - 

500 

15 

32 

47 

3 

18 

22 

■tt 

2 

1 

14 

4 

28 

43 

93 

45 

92 

47 

Racal 

'18 0 

n 

30 

38 

2 

5 

8 

rw 

180 

5 

18 

84 

6 

13 

16 


1 

9 

15 

u 

24 

25 

RTZ 

500 

92 

in 

114 

2 

5 

10 

r597) 

550 

42 

62 

72 

3 

17 

25 

BOO 

7 

37 

50 

11 

42 

55 


650 

IK 

18 

27 

B5 

80 

9b 


V—IRwto 50 8 11% 14% ‘1 3U 6 

(•58) 60 1* Ki B 4* 7» 9* 

70 * 3 — 13 1456 — 


Siri— Aw Hw Mlf AW NW to 


Lonrtio 

£213) 


200 10% 26 33 2 7 12 

218 IS 16 - 10 16 — 

236 1 8 — 27 31 — 

240 — — 11 — t- 37 

2S5 % 4 — 46 49 — 


Seri— Aug Mow Feb tog Hoy Fab 


Tr.11*%1flB1 106 2*18 «• - - 

(*S106J 108 ht 1% 1* 

110 'is a w 1 3 w IX 81 3 


1711**03/07 

(wig 


114 5K "n — hi x — 

118 3* 4X **ia V* 1* 2X 

118 1*’a 3% 4* * 2X SPta 

120 T ia 2*» 3 r re. 1% 3% 4Jt 

122 “.s 3* 5X 

124 1»ie — 5X 8 — 


- 


Aug Sapt 

Oct 

ra 

C-IT'J 

E3 

a 

FT-SE 

1525 

85 

107 

130 

145 

2 

10 

14 

18 

Index 

1550 

6? 

to 

110 

124 

b 

19 

25 

32 

(1609) 

1575 

42 

66 

to 

107 

11 

30 

32 

42 


1600 2453 

55 

70 

90 

20 

38 

-42 

54 


IBS 

8 

40 

to 

75 

37 

45 

tJ 

to 


1650 

3 

- P7 

42 

— 

bb 

b8 

63 

««« 


1675 

2 

15 

to 

. — 

78 

78 

83 

— 


Aug— 119,11 


To— HUracta 20795. C— *13448. Pi—M. 


•Undaifylng aaoatty prin. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Some noticrablr e as ing in 
.period rates occurred, bat this 
whs nurinly confined to the 
longer end efthe market as the 
difficulty in taking oat the 
shortage kept the shorter 
dates firmer behad money 
costs. Eurodollar deposit rates 
moved down as the US GNP 
revision for the second ^Barter 
hit die dollar and kroaght 
hopes for a discount rate cut 
farther to the fore, hut dealers 
said markets remained feoty 
qmet 

Cteerir^BKtalQ 
Finance Ho— «10 


9* 1 ® 

Smntft 99 


% 

10 LOW 9% 
ifO«Bcount %5 

InSS 9<Hi 
3 mm 9 *m 

Ha (Discount %) 

1 mnth 2mntti 

3mnlh 9*xf-9 a J7 Smntt 9»»^Sa 

T—fa BHa (Discount %) 

ImottilO'a 2 moth lOto 

3mnth 10 *b 8narth 9>“» 

h—M 

Overnight open lOdosal OK 
1 week 10X-10 6im8i 9"ir6ha 

1 mnth 10 ^’A gmnth antaOiM 

3mnth 9969 11 m 12mlh 9 "w-9*m 

Local Authority DapMBs(%^ 


2 days 9% 

Imnh 9X 
6mnttl 954 


7 

3mm 9X 
12nth 955 


Authority Bonds {%) 

1 10X-l6 2mm 


1 motti 
3 mnth 10V4-W 
9mnft 10&-9J1 

Staring COsftM 
1 iWtt 9»^9“ia 
6 mnth 9H5K 

1 mnth 1 HSl7 


2mnft 1 0X-954 
emmh 1014-914 
12lMh 954-9% 

3 mnth 8X-9S 
12mth 9*»9 >hi 

3mntfi 5.70-855 


6ramti 6.10-655 12mdi 6.1065S 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6KrS>* 
3 mnth 6145 


Ml PV PM 

OB Oatoa 

1 rarih 6 3 ia9 , t# 
Bmrth 6X-8 
can 54 


7 days 4*4* .. _ .1 twtt 4*ur4’» 
3mnh 


4>t+4>H 
ftaoch Franc 
7 days 

3 mom FijT 1 * 


7 days 1V1* 
3 mrah 4'ia4*n 

Y— 

7 days 04% 
3mmn 454-4* 


Smtti 

eri 714-8)4 
1 rnrtfi 7*i a-7 1 i« 
6 mnth 7X-7V 
cal 2)4-114 
Imran 

6nm0> 4 , i*4 t a 
cal 4X-3X 
1 mnth 5-454 
firman 4"»*48 w 


GOLD 


GohtS3755O37550 
Knioarramr (par conft 
SaKitoSsSo (£24950*5050) 


ECGD 


Flxad Rata Staring Export Finance 
Schama IV ^iaga rafarane# rata Mr 
Interest period July 7, 1986 to 
5.1886 tadu&K -10509 par 


‘4 


Solicitors 


Accomitante-S^S 


.Accountants - Solicit 




Accountants^ 

Professional 

Partners or Partnerships — 
Need Capital? 
Unsecured? 

Partners in professional partnerships of four or more, can now 
obtain unsecured loans from £15,001 to £100,000 (practice loans 
from £60, 000 to £2m) in a highly tax-efficient way. Interest rates are 
extremely competitive from 11.75% (3 month LIBOR plus 1.75%). 

^ Raise or increase partnership capital 
^ Raise merger and acquisition finance 
sk Re-arrange capital structure 
5k Buy-out a senior partner 
5k Unlock individual capital 
5k Finance pension contributions 

Return the coupon today for details of this special Berkeley 
St. James’s Scheme, developed in conjunction with Scottish 
Equitable Life Assurance Society andHFC Trust and Savings 
Limited. 


■ ^ 

n : Berkeley St. James’s Financial Management Ltd, 

FREEPOST, London SW1H9BR. Telephone: 01-222 8785. 

Please send me details about raising or replacing partnership capital. 


« 

i 


NAME. 


F1MBRA 

BIS1J 

TT7F T7P|40\TP ,BEkKELEY ST. JAMES S . 

i'^j^Tr lELcrnUlNE — financial management ltd. I 

— — — ' & * 


ADDRESS, 


























BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 



THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Bril Otter Cmg VM 


NX HA tac 
Prat Sham 


Goto & Gan 
k» Latsuro 
Proa Sneiw 
Urn* Enmf 
Ufaofl Tam 
Amer Grows* 

Amir beara _ 
Amnr SraXHir C01 
Atari QroMti 
EuroSraoUr 
Far Em 
H ong Kong Prf 
M QftMtl 
Japan Pert 
Jnnn Senffar 


1932 2081 
1M ,3.1b 

iiao ISU 

*7.4 SOB 

ISA 1U 

iaa i7.7 
ou ru 
aw aw* 

412 434b 

07.7 1042 
687 829 
22-9 24.4 

MB 784 

1B.1 172 

sail 5/jm 
25.1 384b 
374 392 
837 B82 
185 175 
825 884 

84.7 672 


-05 423 
*031041 
-14 225 
.. 309 
-05 257 
.. 091 
.. 153 
.. 154 
*05 048 
+05 322 
-0.4 Ml 
+0.1 039 
-05 1.74 
+ 0.1 020 
+05 OJB 
-02 247 
.. 147 
*15 .. 
-O.T .. 

+05 3.71 

.. 4.14 


HUl tom Tn* 707 80S +0.1 6-07 

MinodM 52 a sum -05842 

, TOt Of Our Hun SOB 644* *0.1 159 

$NCM(9»nuM HI 7U ..240 

fSTSeer Hu* SU MB .. 1 M 

Rtf Emm Tint 895 8I.1« -05 054 

M &dw» 814 544 +05 1-03 

EOurrriLAW 

BL Ceorga Haa Corporation St Camay air 
190 

O203 S53Z31 

UK Grow* MW U74 1984 +04 346 

Do tnoonw 1285 1385 *08 340 

Htfrar be taunt 2444 2802 +04 446 

00 neon «64 3094 +04 448 

QHRAOd tasm 101.7 1074 +0.1 248 

0o bom 874 815 +0.1 246 

NBi JUrTKAemm 1314 1424 *04 050 

fOr East Ttf tatan 1804 1704 *20 045 

Euro TB taunt 1SL4 1885 -ftl 14* 

GmM Hub 3374 3934 *14 356 




BROWN SNFLEY 

9-17. Pmnroum fkL l b u na mi i 

0444 4S8144 

Rnanori 1344 1330 

Stnalnr Co'» ta 3285 2453 

Do boom 1484 1674 

Hgh Kona MB 705 

tacoma 7S5 814 

Man Ponloao he 804 644 

oo Ace . 101.7 ioe_7 

North American 388 E34 

Ortani 884 864 


Bd Offer Chng Ytt 


Bid Offer Owb Vtt 


Be OBar Chng no. 


*04 248 
+0.7 ., 
+04 046 
+04 6.72 
+0.1 449 
*04 317 
+05 .. 
-0.1 143 
* 1.1 022 


The Stock Exchange London EC2P 2JT 
01-988 2888 


Ganaral Inc (4 
Oo Atan W 

In com e Raid A 

Oo Amen $ 
toss tec® 

Do Accra K} 
Scalar Me p) 
Oo Aeon p) 


2064 2207 .. 311 

336.1 3539 .. 3.18 

984 1045 .. *» 

1744 1834 .. *78 

1305 13850 +35 143 

1744 1B15 +52 143 

21152 1143 .. U9 

£1149 1271 .. 278 



C8FUM) MANAGERS 

128. HMl Hottora. Lmtan WCIV OPT 

01-2*21,48 

CS Japan Rind 864 1015 +0 

CANNON FUND HUMORS 
1. OyffipC way. lYBntriey. HAS ONB 


277.1 3945b *14 343 
3224 KM« +15 352 
5150 228.7 +05 Q2S 

1627 1825 +05 OH 

«.1 B22b -0.4 ISO 
SQ5 044 -0.1 150 

814 845 .. 050 


FOr EM 
North Anatom 
Gktoal 


UK QTONfll AC CW 1475 1984 *05 SAG 

Do Income 1282 1384 +08 448 

Ktfnr be taunt 2445 2804 +04 448 

DO neon i«4 3894 +04 448 

GHsfF bad tatan 101.7 1070 + 0.1 258 

Oo Income 874 214 +0.1 248 

MlArarnKAmn 1314 1424 *04 050 

FOr East TK tatan 1804 1704 *20 045 

Euro Tat Acorn 1584 1984 -0:1 14* 

Conan True 3374 3934 *14 346 

F4CUMT MANAGEMENT 

1. Lam ftaOMjf M, London EC4fl 08A 

01-883 4880 

US SB—tf Ort 724 774 -04 Q57 

Capital RaU 1084 1144 +12 048 

ferae Raid 78.1 8«J +02 457 

RvEaaamHM 785 844 +04 031 

Omran man* 724 784 +14 354 

FM tabraat 574 624 +0.1 940 

Nabob Rat Rind 38.1 404 -04 448 

Baopaao boon 817 885 +14 349 

Fa 8fWE8TM«T MANAGERS 

WO. wen George St Outgo* 02 2M 

041-382 3132 

nabnead an be 435 484 -. 140 

DO-Aceua 444 47.1 .. .. 

beam Oh be 405 424 .. 540 

00 ACMIt 422 444 .... 

Srovfe Can be 48-1 514 .. 140 

Do Actual 487 514 .. .. 

nOQJTT M1HNATONAL 
mnr waft. Tmemga. TWO tor 
0732 382221 

American 10*4 1125 -0.1 043 

Amer Emrity toneme 335 311b *0.1 449 
Anar tadd Sta 435 33J -0.T 174 

F8r EM M 364 377 *05 372 

OIB A Road W 315 325 +0.1 851 

Growth A boom 855 1(D5 +04 484 

JVwSpecWSta 485 315 *07 .. 

JtyraiTGl 161.1 IMS *24 .. 

Mroeoad tot Tat M74 i6U +13 slot 

Kenan EaAr 795 865 *04 940 

ProtaMtauta Stfl 329 35.1® +02 242 
sooth EaUAfeTB 31.1 33.1 +05 051 

SpacW Sta 1824 1747 *04 141 


PO Btn 55i Baba Mama London ECS 7JQ 
01-821 0011 

CapW 3635 3884 +04 148 

Seams 2794 299.1 +04 444 

North America* 2904 3115 +04 089 

CATBt ALLEN 

1. King IIOM St EC4N 7AU 
01-823 6314 

(3h Hust 1015 1065b +051140 

SKSSft5?SS25S B ^ EOF 

2. Pont Sheet. London EC2Y5AO 
m -ana ibis - 

few Fund 3974 447 

Ffed tat 1444 .. 990 

Deposit 1004 .. 9.70 

CHMUmCanOM-ONZSTMEHTTUMO 
Z Fore Serai. London ECZ7 8AO 
01-588 1815 


< 8q?S3on I 


5 Quahy 8q. London BC3A BAN 
01-038 5BSB 

America* Exampt 13545 3814 .. 158 
Japan BtampS UZ32 4364 .. (LBS 

AmPropwty TU 3107804 b .. 540 
RoprotyTVust 820324 .. 840 


a. London MM Bdo*. London was, London 


Amor 8 Ban be 
-Do Accra . . 


2224 2384b 
3274 3414b 


Amor Hriitamd be 2100 2234 





mm 


Li ii 











rrj 


-05 090 
-02.050 

433 1.14 

Oo Acorn 8174 3314 +25 1.14 

Capitll Tit be 2065 Z214 +25 IBS 

00 HOCUS 2504 2084 +29 195 

Com 8 GOT be 874 824S -05 541 

Oo Aoeun 1154 1234 -05 541 

Extra be Tel be 1684 1884b +02 442 

Oo taariiu 1124 1325b +02 459 

been* Hint 1144 1214 +05 437 

Do Aoeun 1205 1274 .. 447 

H tauwth R9 tac 1 BE 2 1755 -08 .. 

Do Accra 1835 1935 -®4 .. 

Jmn & Qtol tac 835 BOS +05 047 

DO Accun 945 1005 +05 007 

Martoriy tacoma Ft) 815 884b .. 448 

Ftaconry 1345 1425b +05 1-BS 

Oo Accun 1*0.0 1555b +04 155 

Eurepann ho 814 838 +05 044 

Ptxham End. Durktag. Sum 
0308 WHBWff 

FP Gouty Dbt 1889 2094 +09 241 

Oe Accun 329.1 34&3 +07 241 

FP Fixed tat DM 1145 1914 +03 540 

DO Accra 1304 1387 +03 590 

OlWWtf dp DM 1728 183.4 +05 1.71 

Do Accra 1784 1895 +02 1.71 

FUNDS M COURT 

Pufcflc Tirana Kingwty WCZ 

01-406 4300 

CapMI 3*94 3814 .. 341 

Gran be 1485 1495 .. 774 

Hgh YMd 218.1 2203b .. 558 

OTUMTHANAOEm 

8th Hoar. 8. DtmsMru Sg. London BC2M 4YJ 
01-383 267S DMflng 01528 8431 


P; 

Fun 

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NORWICH UT MANAOna 
PO B ert 4, N eraeft NRT 3N0 
0903 822200 

□roup HUtt E124S 13.70 +045 358 

htflTrra 1314 1385 +04 15* 


OFFOMDMHI TRUST lUNAaEMNT 
56, Cannen BtreoL Lenripi K*N GAC 
dlri hm 01-238 39B8WPWWO 
btantadanol Growth 1*2* raw + 

Marina A Growth 003 845 * 


sty Choc vm 


SCHNOOet IPRTTWJXT 
Entatotga Hum, tatowwft 
0705 8J7733 


WBri dra daRac 
Amam Growft 
JmOMi 
Batman Omnh 
IKbmb 
Padfl c grow th 
buroa 


Orowth Fund he 
DoAeeunt 
beoma Fund 

"onW 

Una Dust be 
Oo Accra 


+14 148 
... +08 340 

854 914 +14 148 

324 3<5 -01 040 

884 TOO +25 OOO 

68.1 724b +17 007 

634 577 *04 1.16 


Sfl.1 80.1 
334 397 
93.0 574 
975 1034 


914 97.1 
1374 1467 
120.4 128.1 
134.1 1+27 

134.1 U27 
1275 1385 
2307 3344 


+15 126 
+04 747 
+04 214 
*05 1M 


+04 110 
+04 110 
+04 3.70 
+05 158 
*05 158 
+04 244 
*07 244 


WHri^lMnTRMT 

*8. n on 6m at Hanity » Htamaa 

0*OT 579*83 


• - vi i- ’ T '- A »r. , r, r rr 


bd OiMth 
lncome i 
WorMM H§C 
Amu Orch^ 
urn GtraoCrt 
Far Era ww* 
Bunoaan GJh 


276.7 2964 
1894 203.1 
1314 1024 
707 754 
814 874 
787 845 
814 654 


+19174 
+14 444 
+44 144 
*04 0.71 
+04 OS7 
+14 045 
+14 141 


PMUFKUMTT 


UNtriRUSTS 
aogato. London EC2 


967 IBUb -0.1 100 
139.4 148.1 -0.1 3JM 

794 855 .. 600 

1785 1845b +05 150 
1725 18*5 +14 050 


-0.1 050 
-0.1 150 
*9 A B-HJ 
+15 040 
*25 040 
*07 040 


Batata. Surrey RH2 8BL 
073724242* 

UK booms *04 925 

UK Growth Accra 48.7 614 

Do DM 487 514 

Barnaul Growti 6*5 575 

Probe Growth 564 804 

gMUW nro BTHAWA O Btt 
4 . MaMSa Cnmceta. EtMaagh 
031-226 3482 

Amorican Raid 718 787 

Capital Raid 935 1004 

Growth a no Raid i2rs 1353b 


*04 4u47 
402 143 
+05143 
.. 143 
*04 .. 


10. Fanctaaon St, London EC3 
01-823 8000 


hwi Oat Rato 
bton a a iu nal Rund 
nro o u c aa Rato 
Snor Jap Ctfa Ffl 
Tdkyo Ftaai 


Ptannwl HIV 
Europaanbe 
Do Accra 
Qanoral tac 
Do Aaaxn 
Gtt YWdhc 
Do taun 

X TMO Inc 
Accun 


131.0 1314 1M 

935 904 +04 158 

1155 1214 +14 140 

1804 1887b +14 149 

214.0 2Z74 +17 149 

1M4 1175 +05 141- 

1834 1086c +06 951 

885 814 +05 551 


*05 851- 
+06 951 


Raid 1087 114.1 
■I Find 1985 2104 

I Ftand 224 3*0 

CD'S Rid 374 400 
Kl 1845 1070 

» 1474 1525 

ill 1164 mi 

II 2937 3035 
»Jmn 2100 223.1 

27.0 2 SB 


UK Cap Fnd be 
DO Accra 
bmma Raid 


US 6 Ganmal 510 635 -0.1 OOO 

Tech a Ml 835 eaa - 0.1 150 

Japan a Gaoerto 1775 2905 +34 am 

Far Em B Gan 1254 134.1 +15 

Eumpaan Raid 2S80 1745 *15 040 

Germany Fond 704 754 *07 050 

OAHTHOHCRMOMANAOeiS 
1 St Mary AM. London EC3A 8BP 
01-023 I2i2 Daahg 01-023 5788 DsaOng 01-823 
5808 

AnroranTrat 885 995 -04 000 

Aumrai hub 185 185 .. aas 

Brttob Trit Accra 584 005b *65 140 

Do DM 490 527b +05 140 

Commodity SIMS 939 57.7 -04 1.47 

Etaopaan Tiuit 52.7 505 +64 032 

Cora booms Huat 481 Si4 +03 5.19 

Rtf EasHrii That 14&4 1587 +25 000 

Road tanroat Raid 185 28.1b .. 971 

On Truas 275 286 +04 831 

GtotM Raid A c c ra 1825 1844 +14 0.19 

DO DM 1730 185.1 +09 0.19 

Odd Stim Host ill 130 -67 214 

Hadgad Anwricaa 310 335 +0.1 0.10 

Hbn beoma That 1394 1484b +62 851 
Horq Kong HUB 284 305 -04 1.10 

booms Fund 735 71.1b +64 358 

bauanos Agancba BML92 5045 +0.19 206 

Japan That 182.1 1715 +50 tu» 

Managed Bumpt 2717 284.1 +14 241' 

oa A Eharoy HM 324 34.8 +6.1 178 

SpacU SBa HUB 934 100.1 *65 078 

UKM'CaRacTM 711 732 +64 163 


Amor Orawdi tac 
Du Accra 
Raid bwTBtae 
Do Aoeun 

T vwd me 
Aoeun 

tat ftnemry be 
Do Accra 
Juan Growth he 
Do taaaa 
Smolw Ctfa tnc 
Do Accra 
UK Eq anwdi toe 
Do Accra 
Wortrorida Taeh tac 

IVi Irrnrw ■ 

'la cicor trust n 

Rarer Houro. Cope 
01-08 2800 
boraa Raid 
b t am ad onb 8 Ban 


602 705 
205 214 
256 276 
1244 1325 
2075 2265 
1035 1104 
1090 1181 
1084 1122 
10S5 1125 
161.1 1705 
2105 2211 
281 295b 
485 494 
389 *14b 
382 415b 


MM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
n. Db wmx roSti. London B3N 4YR 

EtMtyEaSopt 4083 4244 *65 348 

Do Acct«I* 5145 5370 +0.8 349 

UK Marian F et tu s a 785 814 -0.1 151 

Do Accra 795 8*2 -01 151 

Japan Rabt ma n o a 1*24 151.8 -04 601 

Do Accra W25 1624 -03 QOI 

US spactol PMtoroa ME 71.1 -6.1 006 

On Accra 885 714 -0L1 OOO 

Goto A Puooua Mol 435 47.7o -07 155 

Da Accra 454 «94o -08 15S 

us Spactol be 576 nzm + 0.1 45* 

Da Accra 624 674# +0.1 464 

Rmxaan Part Inc W 1 925 +05 058 

Do Accra 874 82-7 +05 058 

HA UNIT TWWT HAHMBEM&T 

99 - 100 . SanMng Rd. Matoawna.. Kant MEW 1XX 

0822 874751 

MLA Oanarsl 311 »0 *6.1 114 

MLA Mnaaonai 585 595 +04 088 

tOAGSIMt 23.7 23-18 .. 1035 

MLA tacraa 414 417b +03 614 

MLA European 31A 332 +64 056 

BAMUUFE MMMRMNT 
R^Mytanwata 

Growth UBS 717 774b .. 250 

Gta 8 Ftaad tat 1124 1184 . . 749 

HU riicotna Unta 1114 1194 . . 561 

Mm YMd GM IM 572 595 .. 9.78 

MTarowlh Uria 1385 1474 .. 038 

N American IMS 71-0 7J2* -- 044 

FCr East UuO> 974 1086 .. D.12 

Snaftr Cos FiaB 874 714 .. 148 


MNCAPUMT TRUST 

Unicom Haau 251 Rrafcad Rd. E7 

01-214 95M 

Mancap 1355 1435 +04 449 


117.7 1285 *14 053 

81.0 BS.6* +0.7 441 

985 10398 +06 891 
1925 208 A +59 OOO 
1X14 1414 *1.7 1.10 

811 7448 +04 146 

1105 1122 +1.7 OIO 

874 935 +OJ 4.78 


51-89. Btord hr. Mara Enex, 01 2DL 
01-478 2377 

Hotaun BOAT 3274 4224 *07 35S 

B aopain"* 101.1 1076 +05 058 

HmSTcra™ 26SUI 4UMJ 

KSESS ESP* £S & *04 ow 

tfKSEro ’W’SK* ^5 aS 

Hotoorn Soec SdS 845 6868 +05 206 
Hribun UK Growth BIO 86.18. +0.1 208 
Hataem SR HuB 1294 1804 *05 247 


outlet WAWMjBB9ITCOjg*My„ 

31-45 G m e i ron Sr. London EC2V 7LM 
01-600 4177 

arowOnnl OT.1 4574 .. 248 


St SwHtaB LAM. London BC4P 4DU 
01-280 6*56 

NC America be 2384 30358 *14 152 

DO Accra 3102 33008 +15 152 

NC Energy Rro 1325 141.1 -05 27V 

NC Income 974 904 +0.1 357 

NC Japan 1974 20R9 -08 061. 

NC SmShr Goa 1*03 M04 *11 158 

NC Sira Drop Co-1 1S74 1995 +0.1 042 

NC Exempt rat £1290 1345 .. 852 

NC Amer Prop *1 167 1119 .. .. 

NC Rroperty 1684 1682 .. .. 

nOWANUHfT TRUST 

S3 Kng W ftm Street. London EC4R BAS 




MStCUtV FUND MANAODIS LID 
33. King VMM SL BC«fl BAS 
01-280 2880 

Amro Growth 985 102.1 

Do Accra 999 1065 

Amro booms 925 534 

Do Accun 545 579 

Eroopaan GrowOi 132.1 1*0 5« 
Do Accra 1317 14841 


I Aw, EC2R 7BE 


4294 438.1b 
2484 2515 


LEtlAL A OBRaLINT 7RUFT 
MANAGERS 


-04 1.47 

*04 042 
+04 119 
*24 050 
.. 172 
*04 841 
*15 119 
*05 H9 
-17 21* 
+0-1- HI 


6 FtaytoU HoadL I 
0277 23*634 
Eguty DMrbuaon 
uo Accra 
Do beexoa 
Eiaapeen 
Fro Eamrn 
on Hub 
fen M r*tQ«l 
Natural Ffiui 
N Awiii fca n Hub 
UK SdsoM SHb 


LLOYDS SANK UtgritfU l T BA N AOP tS 
RagMran DpL GorSsg-Bf-Saa. Wormtog, W. 
Raw 


2729 2914 
420.1 * S7 
585 64.1b 

73.1 7658 
1194 1274 

79.1 8X7 
823 BSD 
515 575 
77 a 8348 
634 877 


*25 248 
♦4.1 133 
+03 440 
-11 098 
+4.1 027 
*02 0J8 
♦15 143 
+11 147 
+05 UO 
-03 157 


Do Accra 
EH ARml 
Do Accra 


Oo Accra 
Jroan 

_ Do Acc ra 
fltoway 
Do Accra 
Exempt DM 
Exampt Accra 


910 102.1 
999 1062 
922 995 
545 574 
132-1 1*058 
1317 14848 
2395 25*5 
3895 4145 
887 895 
M5 1009 
829 885 
815 974 
2597 2712 
3205 5414 
2014 21*0 
2019 2195 
1962 2074 
208.4 2214 
2334 MOM 
3614 37258 


-tt 2 179 
+02 *45 
+0.1 449 
+17 1.08 
+04 156 
*02 27* 
*04 2.7* 
*04 749 
+04 759 
+15 550 
+05 550 
+18 ISO 
*35 180 
+09 100 
+19 OOO 
+02 247 
+02 247 
+05 266- 
*105 258 


i-TTT 




Ej; 


ft ■!» 

f 


Do Accra IMa 285 305 


(SaTOCsnacTM 71.1 782 


+0-5 941 
+05 552 
+1.1 652 
*14 022 
*14 022 
*12 OCT 
*11 OCT 
*15 020 
+ 1.1 120 
*17 1.71 
*05 1.71. 


Cto Accra 1714 1625 +1.1 852 

Japan Income 2613 279.4 . +14 022 

Do Accra 2674 281.4 +14 022 

N Amaricroi bag 485 635 *04 OCT 

Do Accra 575 614 +11 057^ 

Paaflc Incoma 1311 1449 +14 020 

Do Accra 1555 1835 +1.1 020 

So* Co s tac 795 86.1 *17 1.71 

Du Accra 947 1004 *05 1.71. 

britanma ran 1 trust 
74-76 Fhteury P a -mam London BC2A 1JD 
01-598 2777 004*1051-838 0*78/9 ManeyCMdfr 
0800510433 

Growth GOt 318 805b .. 041 

Ml Recovery 1032 mi +18 258 

SnUor CD's 1389 1484b -04 132 

UK Growth 37.6 *11 -11 2ir 

Ena too 55.1 588b +11 752 

Get 203 274 „ 758 

Inc A Growth 1939 2087 .. 441 


Bata Hoad. C IH M n ti 
02*2 521311 
UKBafenoadbc 
Do Accra 
IK Orowflt Accra 
UK HU bene 
N American Accra 
Rtf Eas te rn Accra 
European Accra 
UK Mi 8 Fi be 


+55 050; 
+15 241 
*11 171 
*05 178 
+04 153 


735 *0.1 257 

7*1 +11 292 

117 *11 1.72 

609 *09 119 

7098 +04 158 
1111b +14 050 
805b *04 178 
583 +®Jt 64* 
011 *09 759 


OKMEntMMRUNRMMMBNSKr ; 

MnehoHTO Haa. 77, London Wax London EON 
IDA 

01-680 8830 f 

tod Growth 814 885 .. 15V 

American (kowth 834 811b .. 191 

American toe 885 735 .. 543 

European G row* 22*0 2395 .. 125 

Goto a MtaroBB 365 387b .. 171 

Japan Orowai 1845 1784# .. .. 

ORE UNIT HUMMERS __ • • 

Rowd Eaenanga. EC3P SON 
01-608 9903 

OH 0 ftaad tot 1229 1275c *15 178 
Growth Equity 1885 2114 +18 251 


Do Accra 
Energy M 
Do Accra 
-Exbb home 
Do Accra 
German GOi toe 
Do Accra 
Income 
Do Accra 
tori Tech 
DO Accra 
Japan Growth - 
Do Accra 
NAoar 8 GOO 
Do Accra 
Promo Baton 
_ Do Aeon 


1806 1935 
3214 3*97 
617 5*28 
519 605b 
1644 1811 
2785 2974 
805 744 
885 744 
2804 28*9 
52*1 5805 
1865 1975 
1934 2087 
905 919 
918 974 


-11 240 
.. 244 
+07 547 
+1.1 827 
+09 0-08 
+05 058 
+18 45* 
+14 454 
+14 048 
+14 028 
+14 102 
+14 102 




mi 1102# *04 190 
1114 mo# +03 ISO 
1884 1485 +19 109 


EmaOer Cos A Rac 1984 2026 
Do Accra 2T1-9 2265 

WorWwXW Growth 2084 2217 
Do Accra 290.1 3110 

UK Growth Raid 475 509 


+19 058 
+04 108 
+05 159 
+05 149. 
+1.1 190 
+14 190 
+11 152 


1229 1275c +05 170 
1965 2114 +15 251 

2736 2634b .. 292 

1402 1432 +04 147. 

M74 2837 +14 112 

2584 2745# .. 14S 

~ - -02 179 

+15 158 


SnMtor CompMbS 2122 2259 
Erapawi Hast 2939 2705 


LONDON# MNCHERa 
Wtmiada Par*. Bator EX5 IDS 
0882 52155 

Grownd Hast 439 484 +11 350 

Income That 37-i 33.7 +12 620 

toaxiHotm Trust 375 *05 +03 060 

American 33.1 382 ..200 

Japan «u 524# +07 voo 

nraoftat 289 314 .. 240 




45 . Clarions Sq. 
031-226 3271 
American Fuat 
Do Accra 
Do naMraunrt 
AmaaOror Rial 
Do Accra 
Brash Ravi 
Do Accra 
European Fund 
Do Accra 
JtajBiRBd 
Do Accra 
Saans PPP 


2889 202 
2309 2711 
1002 1717 
1029 1064 
10*7 1114 
6D34 8429 
9130 M65 
30*4 3844 
3203 3114 
3511 3724 
3814 37*9 
1885 1784 


+17 248) 
+45 249 
+14 230 
+27 143 
+35 123 
+35 US 
+12 448 
-05 181 
-19 191 
+2* 041 
+24 020 
-35 .. 





BUM ALLIANCE 

Sun Aftancs Hr Hontaen, Suatax 
0403 59293 

Equtor That Acc 3982 *125 

N Am HUB ACC 8&B B39 

Ear Esn That Acc 917 M4 

<Wbddato* Bond 511 934 


T8RLMT IUHUS 
Karon Ham*. Amtoero. Ha 
0264 58789 O ia bigi; 026* 
Amrotcwi Inc OTS7 

Do Acom 1318 

Em beoma be 1127 

Oo Accra 1311 

Ganroal U* be 197.1 

Do Accra 2517 

« 8 Fixed tac sm 

Do Accra 082 


+15250 
.. 1.19 
+17 180 
.. 893 


Do Accra 1785 

tod too 3315 

. DO AcedUJ 4094 

g eto d ari Gups tac 807 
Do Accra 817 

Mamrb naa . *35 

Do Accra 482 


at* SP10 1PQ 
B3*32AK 
1242b +04 l.tt 
1315b +13 I.W 
1195b -11 848 
1435b .. 548 

16778 +04 290 
27838 +06 250 
82.1b +11 131 
810# +11 138 
2274 +18 *48 

3584 +19 448 

1*44 +15 129 

1904 +05 129 

3511 +14 172 

4395 +1.1 172 

67.8 +13 174 

ME +04 174 
4U -as tin 
411 -02 253 


— M OH Raid <79 885 ..BJBD 
US Groit Dona Fa 4514 314 *11 .. 

mmORTRUBTHANABERSlTB . 

Wtadsor Netbl 8K Ktagnny, London WC& 

860 

DM08 8381 

cone 5 Rarity 411 814 +11774 

Income . . 910 984TO .. 579 

Srowdi 605 63,9 - 414 225 





Last Thursday of month. 


TAHO E I IHBWmHAQHM 
TAgb^MHl Q — txri ia a Rd. A y bob u y Budce 

■Amro Esgb 7*1 785 *14 159 

AustraOw 184 174 .. 110 

Coaaodty 815 734 -15 173 

Energy 30.1 321# +17 232 

Fquky _ 1235 1321 +07 147 

Cia cpaon Spec SM 1087 1122 *17 156 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 









INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


15 8‘j 

GO 45 
130 93 


355 183 
180 131 
620 4*3 

tS i£ 

124 119 
95 61 

7D B9 

2 S , $§ 

123 58 
ZT, 12 
53 31 
ISb 7* 

460 278 
30 1* 

34 18 

43'.- 41*, 


A A hi Qp 
ATA SeUct b n 
Abbeyaaro 
Aeeraeen Stk Hu 
Acom axigj 
MCri 
AMptaig 
AIM 

Angftj Secundu 
AnriMie 


flerrikrid rtWra) 
Bennea 8 Forora 
BeMOfis emps 
Berkeley 6 Hoy 
Beneroy E«p 


358 178 BrooMioum 288 

163 11 s bora (ChroM} 148 

3*5 230 ftyroatOerata 293 

S 2'] Bub naeciewe S 

*2 73 CCA Geaenae TO 

ISO 125 CMLMtos 180 

38 S 3 - CPS Como B\ 

*2 28 CPU Con# a 

135 130 CVD 180 

320 85 CBadotoanOr 85 

99 a Camobch 85 

ISO BB CBnnon SUM toy 129 

360 213 Central TV 325 

120 64 Chancery Secx 104 

111 83 Checkprat Europe 111 

ia 123 ensues Man 125 

16 7 Own Mathoda 7 

253 120 Cheshire W 2*0 

17 8*2 CHer 11 

+0 31 cayvbton 35 

G03 5G5 OtyW+on 7% 885 

115 ro Orcromra ra 

183 152 Orom Hoocw 1B3 

23 • 11 Cknriu GdM 20 


laL'iM iii'il'. ir 


#-*3 18 85157 

2.1 95165 
35 3517.1 
*2 31 85 16 

-2 .... 25 

25 14 894 
.. 77*7.1 .. 

*15 94 35 145 

*6 33 14 218 


.. *4 IN 319 

84 14 77 
b .. 1*4 35 183 

-1 .. .. 17 

.. 114 11 11 

*8 75 17 11.1 

89 19111 
.. 14 25 189 

7.1 34 189 
b .. 57 17 11 

04 11 85 
18 34 274 
+2 .. .. 138 

♦V .. ..255 

44 

8-2 85 14 238 


15 *2 105 

140 84 115 
-2 55 33189 

*1 

-1 1.T 55 109 

-10 85 13 87 

318 15111 
» -. 129 16 17 

*5 10 11 
• +20 55 1.7 112 

.. , 35 24 217 

-3 115 *5114 

II 34 *9 11.1 

39 19 184 

.. 14 2*3 35 


1966 ' 

Hgh Low Company 


Rat Ctytpiim % R|8 


39 *9 139 
39 29 112 
175 89 127 

21 05 135 

31 26 205 
35 439 .. 
U 22255 
-- * .. 14 


15 20 65 
34 25225 


80 67 88 

95 S3 CcM Enaaald <2 

UO 111 CBM 120 

108 50 CDtavon toe 50 

175 110 Crap FtaancM 155 

50 30 Compact! 48 

118 7* Camusanb 108 

86 38 Cm Tom bra 38 

3*3 208 CendMmwm 2G0 

10a as Coweta • §g 

1*3 115 CPU 118 

415 38 Cromjrixan 3tt 

79 50 Cnmraek 50 

114 98 Graiuwldc 108 

138 75 Croton Lodge 80 

KB G3 Crown ba O 

87 75 Quo* BD 

73 43 DBETedt *8 

178 116 DDT 1S3 

140 78 DJ Sac Atonna 113 

81 63 Cuoui -83 

21 E 165 Derla* |DY) H6 

83 66 Deroi A Bowes m 

29 20. DsSrottttadtoi 28 

145 13*' Dobtar 142 

57 « Datoror 48 

138 105 Droicoro „ 188 

116 75 Denmans EMe 75 

186 70 DswayWraan 88 

228 120 DMaoB 205 

460 3*5 Drock 430 

24‘j 181 DuntOP 301 

32 99 Eaoe 49 

148 102 Eataig Ebct Opdca 128 
31 9 Eeefiric V'i 

325 2*5 Edtn Rind 2(5 

*3 22 £dn Sara 25 

379 0*4 EMMM* Pops *A* 37* 
148 115 Bsennn House 115 

100 61 Decrone Data P 90 

33 25 B«>e* !5S 

15 7 Ento na maroa Frod 7 

215 140 Eowu 147 

250 138 Ffl 246 

2*8 151 FKB OP 22S 

1*0 138 F h H Ouup 140 

SO 65 raedMC * • 55 

« 16 Fro jaa croo K 9i ‘» 

133 1S3 Rafii tun} 133 

74 72 F tat tf br Droaga 72 

«0 31 Rextoffl ED 

208 100 FbgK 202 


50 CotaMta 


80 38 FtaydM 44 

05 « Fora A Wom an 66 
220 1« Ranch Qrito ITS 
103 65 FtasMiaKia 94 

a 

1 I M s 

® .72 (Steen Lyons 83 
186 IDO GBXn Mm ISO 

17 II GHiart House 15 

80 32 Oobtf Gp *3 

I6B K Godwto Vtamm 121 

ra* M noorta a a d Print 120 

S ” ssMssr a 

n "4 SSJgTSto 5 

1 a 

s § 

21 a 133 Hanwy S Thump in 

5 ? a 

sat?* S3 

1*6 l*3'j H anderaon Prana i*4*j 
<15 IBS ZOB 

1 ? i 

113 ms Hodgson ias 

133 105 HaSn Hydroman 133 

JS HA Xr*— 12* 

3*0 200 Howard Grans 336 
a* 22 'J HUaa Food 24 

* ™ ^ 
issr 5 ^ a 

31 18 Mae 17 

i « s 

^ ISroSSTr*' =22. 

W 118 W roTiSy ,70 

148 10 s JimanAJeM 123 - 

l« 2 JtttograapAa 1,0 

-JS nS ftS RB * >ir J5 

3^ 253 KLP - 303 

90 67 Kam (Join) 77 

220 KtawiSacx 286 

i§ 3 

113 B7 LPA tad 80 

53 37 Uidbw 83 

135 TO Larifaw Thoman 1® 

*3 32 Lawn tor 42 

1,8 ,00 Lowmro 106 

91 TO Lodge Cars 73 

,40 95 Lon 6 dydsalda 115 
1W 133 LoritoBacx 190 

62 17 Lusandar P«t 2* 

8 * 77 M 6 C>ch t Cany 79 

2*S 1BD MMX Crap 295 
160 101 MOuBln 9 Hnr iia 


*1 ... .. 185 

.. 45 5.1 «U 

75 *8 115 
b .. 27 29117 

b+19 1U 19 175 

*1 28 214 
-5 37 *0 , . 

.. 24 81 121 

b .. 10 6u0 114 

#.. 11 85 114 

.. .- .. 810 
.. 12 7.4 106 

11 29 175 

.. *3 35 110 

55 85 89 
+2 30 10 106 

*9 *1 129 

b+13 18 95 75 

.. 35 19529 

.. 21 3011* 

-2 19 *0 135 

.. 110 35 209 

b .. 57 24 215 

b .. 1.1 27189 

.. 123 29165 
.. 123 12169 

II 11 11 127 

28 21 145 

r-4 

.. 30 20 179 

45 37 155 


79 58 Pacflb Sabi 83 

156 130 PUMnroaaa 150 

580 206 ParkfletoOp 495 b+S 

00 10 Par* M Lafx 58 

E3 2S Paxton 30 -t 

162 80 Rapa &oup 161 b*1 

1*8 S3 Rsricom 140 *7 

38 28 Paridna LI) 


39 28 P«ri*» (J)_ 28 

FVraorB Computtf .. 

200 136 Itotans ©taduag 141 

27 14 Psbtman 18 

. 34 28*2 FVaBtoy Radto 30*a b+V 

118 a* pw pro a 

73 31 nwappb 63 *4 

128 56 Pbn tnaM 1M b .. 

50 23 Ranee *3 b .. 

171 119 Raton 151 b+1 

283 116 Nyptoe «i +i 

2*3 BO PUyUKh Marina 90 

156 63 Powroftto 83 

,48 no Pnn tau xn no # .. 

g* 2 Property TB lOp S'« 

& 2 Dote 51. 

308 150 Quanto . 218 b .. 


308 150 QuatM . 

43 18 Rtdo Cty -A' 

48 33 Radb Oyda 48 

191 86 Radua KB b .. 

40 13 Rwco CM 15 

IDE 86 Ramus DO 

SZ 22 RandroraAb 49 

n 4a Haw Trine control S3 

42 15 Rtobnt Manx 18 +1 

190 TO HMl BUS 153 *2 

67 30 Rodarood TO 

86 03 Wi. S Noton as 

290 148 Rudds (0) 283 

139 112 SAC 119 

126 TO Sanger* Photo 9* -2 

46 u Bappnfca Pro 16 

130 10* Savage iss +1 

178 136 Bcanro 149 

195 120 Scot HroXsUs 158 

110 71 Sscunguwd ,10 

89 7 SetodlV 23 

330 171 S handw tofc 333 

335 SSSPa Ghora Drug atm 335 -10 

60 68>> SMTOOn Jonas 60 

54 22'j QiarMort Sac 49b *1 

230 168 Sherwood Corn) 230 +1$ 

146 146 atrisU 145 • 

101 50 Spnax 69 

173 128 Store Cowing 148 -8 

220 135 Stodair mraSnto 190 

205 ,31 SUMS Food IB 

m 138 smribona MO 

131 S3 Snowdon Bridge 105 

37 33 sandnett 33 

ISS 113 SSsi 0ui 157 • 

31 11 SWHasaatns 11 

99 96 Space RaiMtag » 

ISO M tSpstoa Taw 148 

a 48 StotolAdD 66 

36 20 Spmmm 24 +1 

98 >7 Spue 94 

71 95 SpCnti 63 

220 86 MriHtMNI T7D -3 

TO 22 SQMkn 2069 

103 71 Storing Pub 103+8 

rr.Mtfft 3 :: 

I2S 108 Sntadan ft Hnp MB 

230 175 Synmwcomp 1 M .. 

235 IN T&SSMS 220 

200 110 T06 CbWBS 170 

134 It* TMD Adrrot 116 

WiOT T-VAM 16Tx 

112 106 THkFtyua 112 +2 

18* B TBy Homac 139 -10 

1*8 96 Tech For Qua 103 

365 1M Tech Comp 325 -10 

206 113 Hriacrap&g 123 . 

IBB 1,3 TalSanbi ns 

136 70 Htotmax 127 +1 

272 ’t 180 Therm sdendlc 233 

81 83 Hnpac TO b .. 

66 Sir ,r, 

.a ii laareajs , & 2 ? 

4TO ?TO Trend lot nuxJ 448 +6 

68 65 Ttbon 70 b .. 

260 140 Tins Tea* ‘A* 240 

TO 43 Utd Crotnric 75 

549 420 Utd Friandy M +8 

136 93 IM Rtcharae 96 

94 W Usher IFtanty 84 +2 

*00 SO MewgMl 50 -fi 

106 66 Wayne Kerr 76 

MB TO VWubar Bootro B -9 

« if Vtytyac 17 

95 8B Won Vprtnhba 88 b*2 

98 • 43 WtritMOrYn Food! 51 

168 150 Wbrira 170 

r> r. maim Sys 7>. -u 

-« 

SB 48 Wan 82 +1 

iTO 16, weraetbr 1TO +2 

^8 88 Wte >Ull,>W » #:: 

i» 118 i SSriw amro- iS 4 b " 

M * Ytowrtroi 85 

97 30 to* Mara 77 -1 

67 25 York A Equity 67 +3 

10*i» n't DO . CBS 

27 IS Zygsl DyaoMcs 23 


+3 

ss 

-S' 8 


1+10 *7 

-2 29 

I .. 1*9 
1+1 ,7 

Mb 
19 
^ 4-0 

y. m 

M3 39 
99 

.. 10 

+2 39 

-2 .. 

+2 


ii an n—MHB 

s-asr 1 

48 Suecaa Auto 


3.1 29 289 
89 

19 192,9 

7.1 117 255 
67 291*8 
17 *0129 

.. 29 22 179 

.. 79 29 23* 

.. 17a 1A 139 

79 79 12 
.. 29 39 119 

• .. 10 89125 

19 19180 
48 .. '289 

-6 17 1.1 189 

b-6 2.1 T9 89 

1* 82 89 
.. 42 22 21.1 

89 *4210 
BA 19 159 

29 10 16 

. . 29 2.1 111 

• .. 54 79 57 

-4 117 184 59 

70 84 172- 
$9 19289 
13 19189 
29 59 ,88 
+2 8.1 29 280 

-3', 04 15 215 
89 ' 891*0 
.. 6 .. 825 
8.6 29 179 
49 40 162 

+2 29 29 (39 

•II ii* 209 81 
b-6 7.1 49 109 


39 7.1 199 

17 54 20 

+0 

. 89 10 187 

<9 

-8 258 .. .. 


s assr**** 1 § 

93 SO Marina Dm 98 

ITO S2 Moron (Runahq 1B0 
35 8 Maxnn 18 

116 101 AMdrCty 103 
i» » Mayhewa faod i ta 
263 195 i tonao w From 250 
^ Maoa Taeh iss 

98 TO IHtanram 99 

19 8 Memory Camp ,3 

TO 21 Mamc au be Moga S3 
MB ,40 Mra ra - O wtin M3 
380 350 Mbndom Who 360 
U6 85 Mead BuMril 120 
102 7, Manse 82 

95 68 Mdtaoi (Jama 73 

3SS McKribn 650 

220 1,8 MKrotaaaa m 

47 22 ItoMtoC 88 

183 82 Mdand Mam in 
385 231 Utdaunanro bns 37S 
in 105 MarardBroM in 
230 ,30 MaaWertd 175 

47 13 uianna 

1SB 108 MOargBSOp 136 

124 82 MamA Crane ' ran 

168 US Menmypa us 

50 25 Malay (Fog 50 
23 'a 16't Mans fMand B 

115 S3 Mats Advonlstag 63 
172 125 MusMtoi 172 

387 237 NMWCara 300 

31 13 Naw a m Re* 18 
5 1 Do wtrts 3 

20 14 Mw EMMfld naps 15 

93 75 DO ld% E8S 

2 , , 0 'j Ntoau 11 

144 91 Ndrank 142 

190 ga 'Naraain 58 

135 n Norscot HONK 115 

48 14 NBI SM S Gan 20 

76 36 Oadetotaspec 36 

94 32 Ontoech 32 

37 22 optomanc* a 

Sm 180 Manna 1 LAria 273 

» 23 Ownars ADK+d 33>r 

■m as pct ioa 

255 168 Raw Systran 205 


49 

• +2 14 


-1 49 

+f 232 


89 

U 

-2 17 

-10 20 

-- 57 


2.1 49 240 

39 59 75 
*3 291*8 
09 29 169 
24 159 *2 

.'I II tit 

0 119 ■■ 

49 09184 
tO 17 13 
34 89129 
.. -.49 

29 89 52 


O 19 Hi 
91- 13 IS 
*0 40129 


ITO 

116 

16Ti 

112 +8 

138 -10 

103 

325 -10 

123 

115 

127 +1 


*3 69 89 
59 34149 
11 19 279 

*7 11 1*5 
33b 24 657 
17 11 18 

43 .. .. 

87 29T79 

29 89 MO 
.. .. 19 

39 39189 
19 23 U 

44 29109 

84 17 81, 
64 09 129 

29 11 11.1 
39 39120 i 


13 29 1*7 

14 

49 89 ISO 

14 14 169 

19 17 39 
79 89 111 

20 69 112 

.. .. 137 

1, 11 

09 09 .. 
29 84816 
18 28 821 

21 19189 

11 87 2*9 
.. .. ZB 

*3 84179 
17 89119 
49 27139 

39 25202 

S3 19414 
28 09813 
69 63 89 

1.1 24 111 

49 U 277 
so mms 
as 19 ii 

67 39 111 

75 19119 

40 22125 

6.1 32 1*9 

50 97129 
17 *0104 
43 27 85 

28 17 18.1 

29 20 221 

10 12 U 

20 

*0 *3 1*2 
*7 12 10.7 

&0 35343 

29b 29 229 
.. .. 012 
*0 74 205 
.. .. 368 

21 12 219 
43 20239 
29 17 73 
24 21 200 




ft 



•tea % P/E 

39 

32 219 

319 

*1 379. 

*4 

13 318 

19 

29 5*2 

09 

OB 774 

39b 13 4*0 

15b. 04 .. 

39 

52 32.1 

07 

15 507 

312 

5.1 279 

39 

a9 429 

as 

02 .. 

128. 

84 183 

149 

49 319 

19 

09 

1A* 03 .. 

*0b *0 352 

09 

08 829 

*7 

13 42, 

64 ■ 

19 575 

69 

354*1 

ZO 

23 827 

20 

1* 832 

28 

24 589 

21 

113 834 

11 


1*9 

49 30, 

17 

1,9 89 

82 

19 889 

7 A 

49 3,4 

129 

*2 319 

19 

1.1 .. 

34 

27 614 

62 


11 

33 409 

19 

27 6*4 

33 

23 600 

39 

32 629 

34b 26 019 

20b 09 .. 

29 

14 BU 

175b ooaaj 

34 

39 639 

12 

*8 29 4 

49b 29 439 

-39 

14 .. 

11 

22 659 


lain Mro'i I'. I.V 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47*. 3* r . Amrfcaa Eqireai 
71 31 Aigyta 

49 2, BOUHtod ' 

,6* lit Bdraatb Arrow 
22H I3>a Doty Mai 
20V* 12V DO -A' 

166 131 BKtra 
r+3 SO Eng Hub 
347 ,87 Bm 
1“ « I xptore aon 
750 373 Rrai n a a in * 
8* 77 Frau Op 
m TO Goods to L M, 
900 *80 Headenaa Arab 
218 193 EH 
«40 330 MAI 
290 UO MAO 

383 2S2 M e rosn b e Maura 

m » Pecfflc hr Ha 
27*2 10 Do Wanam 
206 152 GmNt Naw Court 


+3 &o 
a .. TOO 
a .. mo 
80 

+12 *3 

80 , 
19 . 
+10 83 

14 

29 

1 173 ; 

T3L9B 
-8 229 

... J 11 
»-3 200 . 

.. - 05 
-•» 

-1 100 i 


v EXCHANGE 
GWJoytroobandCorapott 

SUGAR (jRmn K Cmakow) 
FOB 

Oa 12&M4J 

Dec 134JD-%& 

Mar 14&»459 

May 1SUM8.2 

Aug 1542-52.B 

Oct 1585-57.0 

Vofc ,.MK 


l ±*i' 


COMMODITIES 


Tim Monhs . 347^3*ao0 

** — m 

Tona — uo 


Cash 74200-74200 

ThreaMofflhs. 7459074690 

V* : 2750 

Tone - Easier 




Cnti 

— 2510*2520. 

Tim Months . 

— 28302540 

va 

270 

Tone — 

.BaraiySaady 





Ittagwt 

»:OBtflH,S53Spper kgbi ‘ 

S^np iSfiirippvkgot 

'cwMUMJ 

GB;ftga.7H99pp8rkghtf .- 



131^308 

133.0-32J 

1 

131.0-295 

131*395 





LONDON . 
KTATOnmiNES 

2 per tonne 

Montti ' Open CUB , 
Nov 118.00 ITMjf 

P«b • 12BJ50 mW 
Apr 17590 T0O.1fl« 

ms .18690 18390;- 

NOV 85bl0 8090“ 

. UotlGEO" 

. . . . .4* 

BFEX, 

GJU FMgta FttoaeiLId ■- 
rapott 310 per Index paM 
traighttadra M 

• HJgh/Low Ckw< ! 

Oct 88 7209-7109 T«9- 

Jan87 7459-74^0 7449 


Vot 122 toll 
Opwi Interest: 2030 


TANKER REPORT 
NWLow O091 
Aug 86 13SS5/3S8J 


mm 


up £5 on 180*8 


mnK^msssmi .... esssssssss 
































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


From yoor poroobo card check your 
nEht share pnee movements. Add than 
npto give ww your overall total Check 
ihk against the daily dividend figure 

S atisfied on this page. If h matches yon 
^ wot outright or a share of the load 
tiafly prize money stated. If wn are a 
vrimter follow the claim procedure on the 
j»dc of yoorcardL Yon most always have 
.your card available when cfanmrng. 


Equities mark time 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began August 11. Dealings end August 29 . §Confango day September 1. Settlement day September & 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 




E E— 

tu a 



m 
E3C 
E l 

EiEE K3v”i " , WISS ig3 i 

tai 






OUfcOWMB) 505 

DvwEjJA) ZB 

MM Mo) T73 

Oraon* tOng 230 toi 

SWIM 330 

VBrtfsXHmofw 5n 

Vkfti* DrfS 77 

toSanoaOM 155 

HMWiBagn m . • 

kAxMrrf 252 

SA BWimUl 158 

SCC< 4 NM 187 •- 

Vtaw «» h 

WMBIB 'A' 255 

DO T 275 

.WbenHIn 218 

W W MW SO 541 

Yooog -X* 320 


-5 1W 4.115.1 
-« 21.7 23 153. 

u 1.8 art 

+4 AB 14T7J) 

■430 204t> 4fl 152 

• 42 74 S.1 133 

• .. «4 Z71U 

- 11.4 £3 T7J 

-1 78 <8 124 

»+2 U 150.1 
.. 103 3.1 125 

.. 2SJJ *302 

44 28 UIU 

88 44 U 
-4 60 28 .. 

I .. 3L2 28158 

1.1 UIU 

1-8 MLB 83 113 

420 1*4 4.1 184 

-8 11.1 <2 122 

.. 11.1 4.0 72.7 

.. 108 «8 27.7 

.. 127 23 188 


580 m 
280 177V 
HZ 76 
18 11V 

1SZ 64 
368 284 
316 210 
243 178 
57 87 
225 180 
352 2SS 
343 250 
258 MO 
79 58 
180 «7 


Cay Baa 

Qy ntt 
Dria Baa 


DOWD 310 

Doming 8 Ufa 5* 

Otetow 178 

EtcncmaM 303 

BKmbti 66 


258 W7 Famrt &M Ite 

156 104 Farm* MB 

51 24 Foward TbgO 38 

22K 158 Q£C IN 

1« BO Gro*-nor IB 

114 K> HUM Bset 58 

153 50 Bt 50 

350 225 M Signal A Control 260 

848 175 Joow81M 848 

290 85 KOM 258 

323 238 Uo RWngw «fc» 253 

218 124 Loom* 204 

423 Z7D MXEMct 350 

3 S iS£= 4 3 

82 filVMtaDBS 50 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note Of yoar daily totals 
for . the meekly dividend erf* £8,000 in 
Saturday's ne w s p a p er . 



BRITISH FUNDS 


MV .. 25 7.1J1 

1«P« .. 12# 6361 

101V .. 121 S3H 

JOC'a .. WZ 9450 

97i«# .. 28 . 7.137 

100V .. 10L4 2546 


3S.:: 

MV .. 
wo +v 
1MVto*> 
NJZV +V 
101V 4*V. 
105V- 


258 318 MnlMOmr 288 

397 213 Me 281 

74 52 AradHs SB 

ITT ta ft a*co» TTO 

550 331 gKBMMB SW 
377 284 BOggatodga Hoc* 343 
184 m Barrie Sn wo 
a 22 Mrrfvnco MV a 
192 128 0 Bln aw 170 

83 S3 Baas rae® M 

975 875 Bbcttys 905 

728 SB BtaaC&S 548 

275 335 BraaonMOBue IM 258 
91 81 Br DrwMng 76 

29 16 BtMtJMkM 23V 

73 37 Bi'u iB 81 

732 84 Bryw* 122 

27 11 AMt 6 MM 11V 

iM 150 ni afd Hooay in 
728 85 Cw»AMim MV 
125 80 CMMr (Vp 725 

574 *« cc«aa> 548 

473 298 Countryalda 473 

781 124 Cnuen (Darafe) 153 

W £ l5 

104 83 Eto, 102 

93 73 Fab M 

71 54 Do 'A* - 88 

172 51 FadtmMf H* IM 

68 54 Fkw Op 82 

M .#0 GaMM 87 

131 108 am 2 Dandy Old 121 
386 254 GUtMPPUr 380 
135 88- HAT 138 

346 58 Haul Par 235 

79 42 Hawdan-Bhjort 88 

252 148 Haywood Waul 220 
825 428 Hgm 6 HA 828 

190V 128 bSck Jetaan IM 
433 *5 jRWUltBa 421 
486 296 LatagLD 430 

484 MB Do n ■ 4H 
122 78 Umm (MMM7 ra 
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312 ZOO Stead N (to* 
» ZB Goto PH _ 
129 at ammnftm 

440 271 K0H 
7V *V IOC O* 

54 28 IH0 
28 11 KCA Ortotag 
243 86 LASM0 
300 130 Do UNto 
48 18 NMlMMlZ 


166 US stoobm 

jga& 

19 41 T W oootni 
280 80 TWonGaop* 

2*0 125 Uaarnar 


Gnxi 
tor VM 

fta* Oigo part* ■* P'S 


14 44 1Z.1 
29 48 . 

+3 235 35112 

.. I .. .. 

43 388 40 
* 1T4 138 O 

. Wft JW .. 

88 M0 108 
1+1 . ■ ..115 

*2 MO ?* 66 

86 54M7 

1* 

115 

r.lbMT 24 
♦12 .. .. 181 
75 85 4Z 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


S3 57 15 148 

U8 +5 108 75 115 

B 58 75 .. 

SO -2 MB 85 175 

*01 ., 259 88315 

aa 15 48123 

208 to-3 171 82103 

48 6 ■ . 95 75 84 

210 88 41 88 

210 58 41 88 

158 -4 75 48 90 


+2 143 55 88 

.. 107 50 191 

88 45125 
to»V 27 73 138 
75b 95 M4 
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• .. 43 40 214 

-V MB 63 .. 

•♦2 181 45 181 

♦v so a* .. 

.. (15 DJ1U 

88 45103 
.. 7.1 SO.. 

.. S3 25 11.1 
r . . 95b 5T 145 

-3 M5 35182 
.. 07 7.7 91.1 

21 5.7 85 

•♦4 7.1 65 209 

+8 69 92 177 

+5 75 15 278 

♦1 10 15 .. 

58 58 73 
00 13 59 

-3 6! 53 127 

IA 88 75 
. . 125 7.1 192 

• 41 75 .. 

-1 64 90 110 

.. 175 87 90 

.. 100 3.4 8.1 

.. 60 4.7 40 

•♦1 21 13 88 

♦2 47 *0 133 

-JO 1 . 157 10 255 

-4 128 45 149 

• . . MS 53 11.1 

5.7 41 135 

• -4 109 27 192 

• 05 67 139 

28 12188 

.. 120 72 70 

84 46104 
to . . M3 72 124 
.. 24 09 310 

to .. 18 48 88 

+1 .. 
♦Z 5.7b 33 180 
+2 900 44 .. 

♦V 82 75 .. 
♦»* 0 12 .. 
♦1 75 30 *64 

to.. 132 54 115 
+2 207 42 100 

+3 27 28 84 

54 £7382 
+4 105 6817.1 

.. Bib 37 1*0 
98 43 75 


90 177 AObayUb 
26V 22 AM* i AM* 
MV 3 An dan 
*06 223 Sradaaxk 
pi? am name 
336 228 COm Unon 
301 228 EQOdy A Lm> 
431 213 FAI 
B5* 701 Oan ACOOart 
B5* 720 (UE ■ 

7t)B *9* ma»lCE 
3*8 267 Hogg FManapn 
268 231 IMM 6 Gan 
224 173 London 6 MU 
*33 257 Li* Wd few 
6SV 28V Mata 4 IttM 
a» 220 warn 

3*8 223 PUTS 
15V 12 Mart 
9*2 718 maOMdto 
*53 361 ftatuga 


<20 328 aadgatakGto 
474 3*6 SMatartwrasn 
445 390 snaga Mdga 
772 520 501 Man 

S m su Ula 

120 Trad* tadaemKy 
474 364 MMa Fabar 


LEISURE 


220 IM 
171 M 
58 34 

225 156 
410 325 RTS 
S2V 49 QUA 
61 as 
126 93 

191 84 

103 32 
180 137 
TBB 130 
391 276 


6* 43 

226 134 
360 160 
79 81 
IBS 128V 


k *A 136 

Hanhaa 160 

mc IM 

48 

1» 



120 

us • .. 

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144 

130 -5 

310 ■ -5 

368 -Z 
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160 to-10 

7D 6.7* 81 t97 

165 to.. 7.1 30 107 


-5 540 

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142 
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-25 790 
-5 260 

-V 282 
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88 U .. 

♦V MO 35 .. 

» .. 680 35 .. 

• . . 15 92 26.7 

+3 <20 SO .. 

-1 174 3J .. 

88 38 .. 

+3 348 45 207 

+2 41.1 50 239 

-• 348 7.1 7 4 

»-l 197 42 130 

-4 |IJ 4.4 339 
♦4 85 43 79 

a 248 57 126 
220 48 .. 

-2 11 4 *0 «0 

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.. 629 43 .. 

+10 37 1 <3 574 

♦2 180 50 .. 

.. 368 45 67.4 

♦1 157 43 173 

-3 157 37 172 

»+10 1O0n 2.4 21.4 
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+5 3S9 99 .. 

46 20 65 
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r on Pag* 20 



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-V 670 131 .. 
♦V 460 72 .. 

2D0 528 :: 

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54 37328 
-V 628 109 .. 
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.. 120 7.1 43 

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+N 260 39 500 
-V 125 M7 .. 
-7 180 265 .. 

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-25 *60 127 .. 
— V 666 MS .. 
.. 5*0 181 .. 

*2 180 273 .. 

43 108 52 

-2 670 180 ." 

-8 230 131 .. 

171 81 .. 

.. 30 20 .. 

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MV 2»V Abac* 72V 

84 M Mod Lon 60 

93 70 Apaa SS 

W3 155 AtUgonSm 165 

138 B Batgrna QB 

302 218 EMtan (P) 262 

496 357 Sradtard 430 

186 144 Brlud 168 

170 138 Bitxton 157 

46 38 dhlWtSm 41 

233 218 Cap t CdUMM 233 

290 zoo Cantoi fyoc 273 

196 16S CamroMncM 190 

*85 410 c n a aM rflaM *55 

B70 780 CALA 870 

171 111 OaUHdrtl 161 

279 16* Coma* 265 

20 14 CmnM Saca 1*V 

140 M County 6 Maw 117 

193 117 CnatrV 193 

260 175 CUtam 260 

735 *70 DmtW 650 

19 I Dana 17V 

175 135 Emaa 6 Agaocy 133 

120 47 Eganon Thu 69 

120 105 Eswaa Dm 115 

1C WO Citaaai Prop 181 

112 83 Ewa Of Loada ID7 

70 36 FhvOUa 61 

206 170 Fhxnon W6 

192 W8 Or portaod 160 

27* aa omnort 2*o 

18V 11 MtoSoM Op CUN 

400 20* HMtooCourmy«*M3TO 
485 490 H at mu anon 446 

415 417V Do A- 423 

2*8 130 HanowrOruo* 2*5 

32E 233 Iba iton gw 218 

3B0 Z70 ta*» 37S 

155 155 JMIMI IBS 

320 ZTO Utan WOp 290 

76 5* Lind Har m 78 

3« 276 Land Saoatlai 325 

M JM UnlttolTM 660 

266 1*7 Do5V% 242 

266 218 Un 6 Pmr Shop 260 


030 04 .. 
20 28118 
£8 34 170 


84 3.1 130 
17.1 81 MB 

128 10 17.4 
43 20 14.1 
81 82185 


175 151 len SHOP Prop 
ass 208 ban 
360 275 HEPC 
*26 » Mdnamay 
116 105 McKay Saca 
» 44 M ta WlMBl 
200 125 ItotMM Moon 

£ .S SKS'ST 

tPS EM 

108 62 Muddow (A6J| 

20 16 V MoDUpal 

130 73 Nw* davandfab 

. 86 43 FVtodal* 

282 255 Poacboy 
250 72V PIMM tMaa 
230 176 FVop 6 Rav 
153 107 Prop rtdgt 

’Sv^v zsjt*" 

330 160 Ragtoton 


40 32 448 
0.7 DJ .. 
16 11 239 
12-1 87158 

57 50119 
.. -.80 

10.1 51 124 

84 32 224 

3.1 10451 

58 £1 ” 
136 81 278 
138 32 269 
50 20 236 

15.1 64 103 

81 23 610 
28 1 5 810 
100 34 14.7 
1.7 22*32 

140 43 21.7 
187 1 6 242 

82 38 . . 

87 28 228 
70 44 209 

184 30 237 
187 48 21.1 


in 14* Grand Sacs 
M M Stood** 

56 43 Town Cenw 

280 ISO TTaftart nik 
1*8 16 UK Land 
9V 523 IMIM 
UB 673 Wtanar 
670 475 Wat ntad 
a 17V Wat* (Joa} 
175 142 Wan AGount 


52 

31 

36 

.. 09 

r-3 57 

to . . 1*0 

♦» 7.1 

74 

.. 170 

.. 1.7 

to-3 20 
.. 131 

♦2 84 

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• ♦2 36 

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♦1 58 

73 

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• .. 00 

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*2 158 


.. 21.4 

•10 278 
-20 243 
► .. 07 

11.4 


SHIPPING 


ITS 159 .. 
1.1 38 .. 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


250 138 AE 
166 76 Applaysd 
141 70V Arewa ’ang 

33 V 24V BSG 

Banal Bn* 

■n awHCOI 

Br CwX^as 

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Gms (Frank Q) 
GacarM lloior 
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232 +1 
130 +2 
122 


26* -3 

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Ml +4 
223 

201 to -1 
106 »-1 
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444 +1 

«* -28 
118 
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322 +0 

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7.4 32 131 
70 50 88 
32 18 182 
18 35141 
.. I .. .. 
11.1 39 168 

220 48 183 
60 30 135 
78 35 .. 
87 28 84 
84 58 87 
78 38150 
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46 1021.1 

70 35 .. 
<3 57 85 
250 KL4 .. 

35 44 188 
9B 88 .. 
127 28 183 

81 81 90 

30 27158 
151 47180 

70 40 100 
157 20107 
84 50 11.1 
84 90 84 

41 47 HA 

31 41 140 
14 £0 110 


312V 167 
396 238 
366 216 
84 SB 
8CQ 460 

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12V 5 
41 28 

221 180 
578 428 
163 as 
3*6 132 
360 360 


Br Commartwaabh 

Canoona 

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lJm w 
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Ocaan Tramport 
P 6 D DM 
Rudnn (Nna) 

TWO* 

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70 +1 

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70 

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32 +1 

216 

300 -5 

1*1 

316 to -2 
370 


7.1 20151 

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+1Z 7.1 30 *10 

+1 4.7 07 1£7 


4.7 07 12J 
31 4 40 84 
51b 70 53* 
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. . . . 34 

68 40 89 
ZL9 40 140 
7.1 SO 220 
50 17 185 

128 35 51 6 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


206 145 GtoW BOOdl 1*8 
*5 32 HaadwaSbm 39 
218 168 LMrtwtHMM 175 
82 62 H— bold 6 liana 6* 
1W 82 Pfcsrd _ 106 

157 118 Snag 5 Rtfur 1« 


273 ISO Sljto 


90b 30 1£7 
143 87 82 
87 15 ■ 

82 47 80 
44 60 180 
82 56 70 
11A 7.7 U 


228 to .. 6.4 20 37 .9 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 



167 W4 Accord 
260 185 Anoeftx* 

gg 

■S *50 
3B3 290 
123 -78 
378 330 

210 a 

360 lSS 
988 404 
14 V 820 
060 445 

138 JtZ 

*55 M 
403 260 


126 62 AnOOr 

30 8 Man&WO* 

33 10 Ad a me Ramw 

526 516 Br Pu a u n an 
iri S BnsOOl 
356 323 Br Bemad 
210 M Braoi 

419 258 Bwurti 

103 48 cwacscapa 

’I Vo SSSrt. 

152 83 Bssvma 
« 2* Sorter EPtoW 


573 m> 
300 136 
1GS 97 
106 M 
144 123 
127 60 
76V 53V 
315 190 
1T6 74 
278 IM 
57 42 

00 75 

110 68 
113 H 
57 33 
£10 90 

08 47 
190 132 
185 138 
122 U 
03 72 
115 71 
22 10 
150 B* 
*7 30 
IK 109 
182 133 
70 48 
140 67 
IM 05 
20S 83 

350 235 


MtolU 

Alton Bra# 

££» 

Br Mobtor 
Duknar 6 Ufflb 
Corah 
Counaiichi 
CmRtnc WI 
Dnson 
Diem 
Dire MB 

FosMr (John) 

Gaafcoi nnaataB 
Hcttg Ptoilicn 




Snalllaw (H) 
Swud FW»y 
Taxored Jcoay 
Totuto nc m 
Toaito 
VorByda 


380 to -ft 

S ■?. 
10 * +1 
133 

83 

262 -8' 
1ST • +2 

3 *5 

S -2' 

96 


121 -1 
75 


«1*i -1 

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59 -1 

118 • -2 
143 to-1 
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269 


107 30 192 
100 4.1 131 

89 42 81 
80 79129 
00 60 80 

7.1 7B 210 
57 7.7 . . 

90 30 80 

2.1 10 12.7 
89 30107 
0.7 10 35.4 
07 127 51 
40 80 80 

79 01 7.1 

48 30 184 

43 50 78 
&4 4.1 102 
10 40120 
14 1910S 
82 109157 
B8 69159 
.. a .. 50 
09 50 170 
20 S3 96 
7.6 80 09 
04 40120 
30 66 94 

49 35 70 

80 00 8.1 

80 4,614.7 

57 8.1 B0 

100 30 01 


TOBACCOS 


625 +15 *0$ 78 SO 

18 +1 - 

3*8 +6 280 U 120 

130 to . . 80 72 30 

304 +4 182 47 110 

56 +4 X8 70 704 

128 +5 7.1 58 U 

IB -V Ml 80 48 

40 +4 .. .. .. 


431 30$ D«T 

1ST 127 H etoan i i * V 


+2 173 40 IOC 

>+1 80 BO SB 


to Ex dividend a Ex aB b Foreea* dividend • imam 

E arn passed I Prfca at susponsion o Dmdend and 
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snare utt t Tax-fraB .. No var&cani data. 










































































22 


w 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 




MORTGAGE & 
FINANCIAL ADVICE 




» MORTGAGES. 100% advanced up to 
£120,000. main income plus, ixseconoary 
Income • hx Jo int incomes taken • non status 

• REMORTGAGES For any reason, eg: 

• Home improvements. Business Reasons 

• Educational expenses* Large Leisure Purchase, 

( boat, caravan, etc) • Second House, fUX or 
Overseas. Matrlmonal settlement 

• Consolidate Existing Borrowings , 

• COMMERCIAL MORTGAGES 

. Shops, Factories, Etc 

• PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT 
AND BUSINESS FINANCE 



Fishin\ 
shootin’ an’ 
history 






■gpvjjl 


■ After nearly 300 years in the s ame 
ownership, the Downton Castle estate m 
Herefordshire, five miles from Ludlow, 
is to be sold in seven lots. It is expected 
to fetch £2 million for the whole. Once 
20.000 acres, having been assembled by 
Richard Knight, an ironmaster of the 
1 8th century and ancestor of the present 
owner. Denis Lennox, the estate is 
now 1 ,823 acres and includes the main 
house. Pools Farmhouse, a Victorian 
house with 1 % acres of garden, including 


a swimming pool, brick bam and 
tennis court 


6 Lovacijne. 

ioncicn 

ECS 


Robson 


Limited 


PdrAcfviCC. 
Vort? jjc 
fir.zr:*s. Life 
Assurance 
. . Pennons. 

, ‘ 

• ACT' iCd. 5 peel j: . 

jrc 


01-623 3495 r?r £ypj:n:v5 ere 


p=Winkworth=v 

MORTGAGES^ 

TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


tennis court 

The estate also includes Pools 
Cottage, a five-bedroom house with two 
acres, four farms and CophaH 
farmhouse, which has spectacular views 
and stands in four acres. There is 
woodland, pheasant shooting and double 
bank fishing on the River Teme. The 
agents are Bklwells of Cambridge. 



The striking brick Pickenham Hall, centre of a 3,500-acre estate that includes 

part of a Norfolk village 


HAMPSTEAD NW3 



Magmfleant detached 5 bed housa of modem character and 
elegance. Sat In exclusive resxtoflbai estate with extensive 
security systems. 4 reception rooms, luxury kttchen/b'&st rm. S 
bedrooms. 3 baths B en sutte), doutde garage. Superb meaty 
and sought alter location at edoa of Hampstead Heath. Oners at 
region of £725,000 Freehold. 

Tel: K.M.S. Ltd 
01-486 1192 
(during office hours) 


NORMANDIE 


ESTATES- LTD 


STRATHMORE COURT 
PARK ROAD 
REGENTS PARK 
NW8 

A selection of superbly refurbished 2. 4. and 5 bed 
flats with spacious receps- and panoramic views over 
Regents Park. Majority of beds, have en-suile lux. 
tiled baths, fitted robes etc Excellent fully fitted kits. 
Guest cloaks. New 99 year leases. 


6 A REEVES MEWS. LONDON W1Y3PB 01-629 3243 


3*4 times tKome or 3 times joint 
income 

100% mortgages available up to 

£100.000 

No evidence of income required for 
loans up to £250,080 for qualifying 
Applicants 

MIRAS facMty available over £304100 
Re-mortgages for quafifytag purposes 

Ring 01-235 0691 

For foil Information 
Open until 8pm today 


Winkworth 

F inancial Services 
25a Motcomb Street 
London SW1 


|Gascoigne-Pees 

I A Lf A ^ 


4 badraomed ftat in 6 
floor purpose buft 
block with Iftsand por- 
foregs. 2targa 
receptions. 2 bath- 
rooms (1 BfBuitB). 
Separata cloakroom. 

Largs My flttad 
tutchan. Garden and 
oft-sVBBt parfcmg on 
gound. Lassa 141 
years. Shares In 
freehold. 


PBCtnOMOBOM. 

TEL: 01-603 7799 
(AFTER 4 PM). 


TWIXT KINGS 
ROAD & RIVER 


1= — Sl A KacL Horse Agency 
PUTIEY dflftghtfii terraced house with afl ongmal fee- 


turns. tounge cSrxng room, kitchen, uttty. 4 bedrooms, 
mom ' Gas Ca £1553500. Gascoigne 

P0BS 01-8/0 7575 


Gascoigne 


PARKHILL SW4 


Unique carefully planned, and most attractive 1 
bedroomed flat. Light and spacious, fully 
modernised. Secluded roof terrace and access to 
large communal gardens, also offering off street 
parking facilities. £64,950 


Ring Folkard & Hayward 01-675 5436 


Conveyancing 

£280 by City Solicitors 


VAT and dtetawsetnents) lor buying or soring your home 
the usual way on prices up to £80.000. Rmg tor quotes on 
higher figures. 

BARRETTS SOLICITORS, 

49 0USI MCTOflM ST, UW00N EC4 
TELEPHONE: 01 -24a 0991 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


QUEENSGATE SWT 


Newly converted raised 
ground floor 2 bed flat, 
excellent condHwn. in a 
substantial stucco 
fronted property. Close 
to Kntghtsbridge and 
Hyde Park. 87 years 
£185.000 


Joint Sole Agents: 

Alex Neil Cbestartoes 
(H 221 2080 01 B37 7244 


WESTMINSTER 3 Bed Flat. Beau- 
tifully refurbished to highest 
standards, nrw Ulctwn & bath- 
room. interior-decorated 

designed throughout, new car- 
pels A curtains. Westerly 
aspect, light rooms. 1 win* 
small balcony Probably fines! 
Westminster Hal available to- 
day Lse 1 Z« yrs. oners invited 
at £172.000 To view telephone 
PUpel Tyne on Ol 388 3310 


154-156 Upper Richmond Road 
East Sixes Loodoa SW14 8DP 
01-878 7575 


QffEHT GARDEN. 

WCZ. 2 superb fins in Neil 
Street. 2 bedrooms, root tense, 
long leases. £13f.M0 & 
£1353*. 


E JL Shaw 
& Partners 
01-240 2255 

(Canal Garden n m l ri hlt ) 


WMm ■ 


Superb 2-3 Recap 
Rooms, 3 Beds, 3 
Beltons, Roof Terrace, 
Long lease. Garage. 

M«nnB 


Best Gapp 730 9253 


ELS WORTHY RD NWS. MagnUI- 
CWU Ini del mats wim large 
pmaie garden S.W bant. 
Spectacular recepOon/CUnlng 
room wuh corniced ceilings and 
dramatic Mack martde fire- 
places 3 good she beds. 2 lire 
baths, quest elk. superb all 
white rai-in kitchen Caa C/H 
75 yr lease £323.000. View to- 
day 280 6083/328 9846 1T1. 


a Luxury VfcL s e mi <4 (loon). 
2/3 «Me beds. 1/2 receps. Idl 
/b'faa room. bam. cloakroom, 
studio. 004 6 entrance phone. 
Interior designed. Conservation 
area. Front & rear ga rdens. 
Original features 3mls City 
FH. Ctra* A curtains met. Of- 
fers £130.000 TeflOl 986 8333 


HOBART SLATER 



12A CADOGAN PLACE;. 
BELGRAVIA:".'-' • 


Tel 245 9246 


rrmmTFum* 


Luadgn VI. 


l*a Gcorman « floore Lfcad Grade t 
tans* 5 double beds. 1 tnsuta. 2 


taws* 5 doubt* beds. 1 ensues 2 
hftosr b*fcs» ctoataoem. Genov 
tauten Formd dnsmg and dong 
leams. Rmnng pennsson to use as 3 
beds and &3«^ fc[L4Q ' any gatom. 

O0n mand C245J0B 
tar prinle ole. 

Tart 01-607 1432. 


;ei 


An Author’s unusual studio 
house ananged over 3 floors, 
in a quid and pnvate cobbled 
mews. Reception kitchen. 3 
beds, bathroom, roof terrace, 
parking. FH £205.000. 

Alex Neil 

01 221 2000 


Super bly mod p eriod ho use 
in fashionable location. 2 
dble bedrms, Ige lux 
bathrm. dWe recep rm. 
Newly extended tot/b'tst rm. 
Patio gdn. Ideal tatfal in- 
vestment- £137.500. 

Tri 381 5960 pn. 

788 9295 Wakworik. 


Beautifully refurbished 
garden patio fiat 2 
bedrooms, L shaped 
reception, kitchen, 
bathroom. 93 year 
lease. 

£85,000 

POUT1 & CO: 

01-499 9876 


!>!.; ! t I 11 


Rra Bwr betcony tt. wdb new 
cwr garnets. 2 bedrooms, i wan 
en so4e tiiowar. Bstfuoom. Ele- 
gant dnwng room. Mod F/F tat- 
cDcn. To lodufe cunams wxf 
apeis. GCR Commeot Tube. 
Long tease, reduced tor eariy 
cunxifatioti. 

ner^n. 

Tel: 067963 588 


Monks Orchard, in the de&ghtfiil 
village of East Hendred, new Wantage, 
Oxfordshire, is a Grade II fisted 
Jacobean house with Edwardian 
additions set in IK awes of gardens, 
which look up to the Dowrts,lf that ts 
possible. The house has three 
eceptron rooms and four bedrooms, and 
there is a three-room cottage and 
bam. BuckeB and Bafiard of Wantage 
are asking £200,000. 


A bit of old England 


By Christopher Wannan 

Property Correspondent 


River retreat 


■ Orford House, in Chiswick MaR, 
opposite the Chiswick Eyot on the 
Thames, was built by John Belcher in 
about 1687 and named after the Prime 
Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, who later 
became Lord Orford. This semi-detached 
house has a half-timbered facade and 

a rose garden leading down to the river 
and mcxxlng. The house is now for 
sale through Aytesfbrd's Kensington 
office at £800,000. it has two fine 
reception rooms and five bedrooms, with 
a conservatory opening on to a waited 
garden. 

■ The Okf Vicarage at FBmwefl in 
East Sussex was origmaSy the vicarage 
to St Augustine’s Church, and was 
designed - like the church —by 
Detimus Barton in the mid-ISOOs. 

This stone house, with an oriel window 
at the front, has three reception 
rooms and five bedrooms and stands in 


gardens of an acre and woodland of 
five acres. Geering and Cobra's 


free acres. Geering and Cotyeris 
Hawkhurst office are seeking 
£225,000. 


Monks’ retreat 


HAMPSTEAD & 
H1GHGATE 


ST JOHS won. 

Executive apartments dose to 
Regents Part. Wei priced tor to- 
ol stops & transport. 2 double 
bids. 2 targe receps, 1H 


rages. 99 year teases. Pneac 
^0000-050000. For further 
deals please contac t 01-734 
1128. Harinjdon Co Ud. 4tb 
floor, 3 Ottort S. W1X IRA. 


OMCVILLC PLACE St Join Wd 
. border? vast thm rtmditf bedr 
flat £94.500 
T. HOSKINS 730 9937 
ANTMM HD, HWX. ExcepCWiWI 3 
bed. 2 bath flat. £J 26.000 
SffMn 794 0600. 
AKKMflllGffT RD, Mm. Soaoous 
2 bed. 2 bath lux OaL 
£128,000. SMKCTO 794 0600 


■ The Crutched Friars at Little 
Welnetham. West Suffolk, is a Grade II 
listed Tudor house which contains the 
remains of a building founded in 1274 by 
the House of Crutched (or Crossed) 
Friars and is dedicated to St Thomas the 
Martyr, murdered in Canterbury 
Cathedral in 1 1 70. A buttress and part of 
a wall in ashlar and flint of the chapel 
of St Thomas stands in the garden. The 
house is befieved to be the earliest 


example of a domestic monastic buSding 
in Suffolk. 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


Modernized recently, the house has 
three reception rooms and five bedrooms, 
with outbuildings and grounds of 
about four acres. Bedfords of Bury St 
Edmunds are asking more than 
£ 200 , 000 , 


CHELSEA ft 
KENSINGTON 


S. KEN 


MLDcm aura a bed*. 2 
baths, CH. Lar9<- hall, rtoak 
room. through reception, 
conservatory, utility, lined 
kiictH-n/momlnq room, paraoe. 
uiIrriorA-xlmor extensively 
tnoomused and decorated, in- 
cluding npiv dpuqner (umture, 
carpets, etc Outstanding invest- 
ment al £189.600 No agents 
please Td Ol 455 0667 


MIRPilLAD Luxur y 3 

bedrorened mataonrtte with bal- 
cony in heart or village.. Large 
reception. lilted kitchen. 
IwUxAhower uni I * gas central 
nearing 84 year lease Offers In 
excess of £ 130.000. No agents. 
Tel Ol 794 3626 


S I N CLAI R ROAD W14. urttfu 
spacious luxury 2 bedroom flaL 
22ft reception, fined kitchen, 
bath-room, fitted carpets. CCH. 
1 18 yrs. £62.000. tarty view, 
tag i-nenual. Leslie Marsh & Ok 
O l 603 6181 


BLOOMSBURY superb 2 bed nadu 
2nd floor. S facing Stylish new 
development nr Brtnsn Muse- 
um Luxury IT klL bid CH.12S 
yr ne. £123000 Frank Harrs 
& CO 387 0077 


tv modernised tnienor 
decorated 4 bed . 2’: balh bar , 

OUk- reerp 2711 X I2fl. Lon ext I -V 

with bauiensullr Carden, pauo. STjowo WOOD SpacStotho flat 


rear if Mr me carps and rurtv 
£230.000 Tel Ol 731 1841 be- 
fore 10am or art 6 OOom 


In p/b, otooklng comm gdns. 
Entrance halt, fit UL bath. Lae 
86 yrs. £67,990 to include car- 
pets. curtains and a 4’ 6- •put 
away' bed. Ol 286 4837 


Lge 4 Room 1st 
floor flat with 
balcony. Needs 
decorating. 146 yrs. 

£16<M)00 


01-581 8977 (T). 



CHELSEA SW3 

Urgent private sate of luxury 
w aac mne U B. Large recap- 
tion. 3 beds. 2 boms, 1 en 
suite. My equipped Mtcftan, 
roof terrace. C/H, l/lt 80 yt*. 

£198,000 neg 
Tel: 01-623 2228 
or 373 4737 



Few of England's old country' estates 
remain intact today, most having been 
broken up over the years, which makes 
the Pickenham Hall Estate near 
Swaflham in Norfolk one of the finest 
and a fascinating examples of social 
history. 

The 3. 547-acre estate has its mansion 
house, its landscaped gardens, its park- 
land reputedly designed by Humphrey 
Repton. and a river running through iL 
But what gives it an added interest is that 
it owns most of the village of South 
Pickenham. including 16 cottages, the 
old school bouse, village post office and 
playing field. 

Guy Moreton. the present owner, and 
his family have lived on the estates since 
1925 and the family trust has decided, 
with some reluctance and after a court 
case, to endorse the decision to sell. 
What has also upset the family is the 
charge of feudalism raised in some 
quarters because of the ownership of the 
village. 

It is a charge which Mrs Moreton, who 
has a firm hand in running the house and 
estate, strongly rejects. Most of the 
villagers worked or still work on the 
estate and many have been there for 
generations. But they have security of 
tenure and their future is safeguarded. 

When the Moreton family acquired 
the estate there was no indoor sanitation 
or running water in the village. It 
sounded more feudal then, but things 
have changed, though the number of 
workers on the estate has steadily 
dwindled. Now the main house and 
gardens are maintained by three dailies, 
two gardeners — and a resident butler. 

Mrs Moreton. nevertheless, hopes that 
the new owner will carry on running die 
whole estate, employing the existing staff 
and. she adds, “someone with brains and 
a bit of money will be all right It will 
need hard work, too." 

A bit of money is an example of 
English understatement and Andrew 


Macpherson, .of Knight Frank and 
Ruticy's farm department admits: “It is 
hard to put a precise value on such a fine 
piece of England" 

He expects the estate as a whole to go 
for anything between £5 million - which 
represents roughly the sum of the parts — 
and £10 million, which represents the 
value of the estate intacL including most 
of the contents of the hall and the form 
stock. 

Pickenham Hall is considered one of 
the last great country houses to be buih 
before the First World War and it is the 
third house to stand there since Tudor 
times. After the Restoration of Charles II 
the Chute family owned the estate for 
about 200 years and in 1829 W. L 
Wiggei Chute commissioned Dunthome 
to build a Paltadian house to replace the 
Tudor house on the site. 

It was faced in Roman cement and 
’ pilastered with a fine Greek Ionic 
portico. After the Chute family sold it in 
IS80, this house fell into disrcpair.G. W. 
Tavior bought it in 1 902 and instructed 
the architect, Robert Weir Schultz, well 
known in his time, “to save as much of 
the house as was reasonably possible and 
to incorporate it into a larger house to be 
built of red brick with white cornice and 
good chimneys'*. 

Little of the house was saved, except 
for the bare walls of the central portion 
and the library. Several of the rooms are 
panelled and there is fine joinery and 
plasicrwork throughout the house, which 
has five reception rooms; a library and a 
billiard room. 16 bedrooms and a 
number of staff rooms, including the 
butler's flat 

The estate also has a large stable block, 
built at the same rime as the house, 
kennels, three farmhouses and 30 cot- 
tages (including those in the village). 
There is a sunken garden, a Chinese 

S rden with trees and shrubs imported 
>m that country, and walled vegetable 
gardens. 

In addition to the forming, there is 
excellent pheasant and wild fowl shoot- 
ing. the whole adding up to a little bit of 

old England. 


UWQUC PERIOD mvtn&te horn* 
4 60i44r beds 3 taOKUtma two* 
oak Mitnel Bvlitgarca beautiful 
leaded Ughl My windows. 
£226.000. Weekend* A me 
nlngi phone 01-943 1607 A 
day* 01-947 8981 







WIMBLEDON 


mrr 




(deal family hse in 1 acre. 



VKJLAOE WH I M Victorian * 

S/D 6 Bed hotae on 3 floors. SISiSjo 

limwccaN* order thronsMoL £S7 - SO ° B ® Sford 219877 

£396.000. 879 3393 Sunday 

Viewing cn. mm m 

SWX9 Detached Oottege. 2000 n , ■■■ , , , , ■ 

Caro®.. « Ob* Beds. 3 Recent- EAST ANGLIA 

£330.000. 879 3393 Sunday 

V,BWtaBm - RORROLK. Wen* next the Sea. 

Peaceful 2 bed beamed cottage. 
lllu~ ~l m . _ Carefully restored. Lux kitchen 

PROPERTY TO LET jnd iwi"<»ni FuUy carpeted 
r nunniu cch wmi patio, pth*: 

urnuun sasjsoo tm-. 103201 7 loess. 


BLOOMSBURY 3 Rata svaU In , 

small character P/B Mock, each I 

wiUi 2 beds & walled paUo. low- ] WAPFWG on the river 1 double 


WS Attractive, apactnus. Baht 
Mews toe In pnvate cobbled 
nna Recently mod tn emeu 
eoad. Lge recep. ML elk. 3 beds. 


" U O UBATL 3-< bed hse In 
tnncndl countryntotown cul- 
de*ac setting, an Award 
Winning developmenL Wafled 
gdna front A tt. Newly deem'd, 
new epu, mi t, bath. CCH. imac 
cord. Gge. easy reach BtiUi vil- 


Mil Pretty converted Via. t 
bed RaL Superb recent 19X17 
Ortgum cornice d> rm*. CCH. 
Share F/hokL 5 mm Clap 
Common * Junction. £49.960 
ono. Tel.777 0600 X 293 Iwork) 


or ground though not dark 4> 
dmgy CH. 98 yr Be front 
£85.000 Frank Harm & Co 
387 0077 


bedroo m . flat- Cheaper than 
new releases. Double balcony 
onto river. Dried kitchen, park- 
ing space. £138.000. Tel Ol- 
609 2148 or SOS 666a 


tame. ciiy. we & doadasdi. 
F/H £103.000. 01-852 668a 


woodworm, rrt. damp guaran- 
teed. Cm CH. Parking space. 
FH. £266.000, Ol 373 6163 


XAPHAM COMMON Quiet 
charming RaL 2 good seed 
beds. K/b. sen w.c.. och 
£ 69.500 Tek Day 603 2323 
ext 3409/ Eves 720 8*62 


docklands fiat wim Thames _ 

view New luxury 1 bedroom. I WlfcaLET PARK By Ram H10 


MMM VALE; 3 storey mews 
nouse Fully refurbished 10 a 
high standard 4 double bed 
rooms. 2 reception room. 2 
bathrooms, fully fined Mfchcn 
1 Philips ail aonuaocn to re- 
main! Double garage. Roof 
garden Patio off 2 bedrooms 
r ree hold £265.000 Private 
sale TeLOl 28*3706 


balcony over the River with all 
modern leal urea in heart of 
Mapping. Private sale Earty 
completion £132-000 Ol 627 
3287 or 0860 386001 


Purpose bulh flat. 2 dbi beds, 
lounge, kitchen, mod bat h room, 
seperale w.c. superb condition. 
96 year lease £S2£oa Tei 01 
908 2677 


WZ QUEENSWAY SUi foar flat, 
in modem block. ItfT. caretaker. 
CH Needs some redec (Price 
Reflectsi £86.000. ono 01 S89 
9292 Day 74 L 2477 Eva. 


HYDCPARK SQAIIREW2. Interi- 
or designed newly retort) rust 
floor flaL overlooking square 
gardens. Large recep, 2 double 
beds, fined EH and lux bath Ga- 
rage Lift and porter 66 yr 
loose £169.500. Ol 684 7263 


•AMMLM-UNim 400 N fl 

oft ice/shoo plus 3 bed maison- 
ette. reep. ML badt/WC. 
covered yard and Wt Perfect 
cond £120.000. 01-741 4610 


ARSONS UROL Light, split 
level 2 dble beorm RaL Large 
living CH. Long lease Seconds 
from tubes A buses. £79.980. 
Quick sale 01 731 5627 


FUJMAM. Pretty 2 bed fUK. 20 R 

Harden Fully mod CCH. 

£66.000. Tel- 01588 2721 
i work) or Ol 73Z 0007 ihome) 

ARB YOU SOJUlia London prop- — 
rrty suiiaMe for investment? 

Call Ihe exports on Ot -458 3680 «n , — Wll Studio. Stunning Views, 

anytime E/PH - K * 8 Pwier 

guiet locaiton Farr pnee for £42 950 Tel: 01-221 -9083 
mark sale £139.500 Freehold. 

01-229 0836. 


•tOOteSBUmr small unmod 1/2 
bed flat above shops. 09 yr be 
Character feature, £49.000 
Frank Hama A Go 387 0077 



•ATTOtSCA. VHaortan terraced 
hotde wdh ongnd features. 4 
bedrooms, bathroom A w.c . sep 
Tin - ; eLAPWABI SOUTH VkMTtMi ut *•.«" Exoowtetr tt tasty torn 

CH ■ I2t noor - 2 Bedrro ftaL Lounge. for 6._ new b utming. CT RaL 2 

xii F.F.KIt/Batlv. Sep WC. OCH 3 *>eds. 2 baths. d teelO MBgfc. baL 

Tfjy*” 01-228 Mtn, Tube. Common Off si poner. video security * entry. 

9977 or 01-733 2327 Pfcg. £61 .BOOTH; 01-67&5968 Bit & parWog. fibOOpw 01-466 




BMWTOK: Modem 5 bed de- 
tached bar Larger than average 
looms. Fun gch. and dtd gUi- 
Ing Coe and gardens- £88.000 
otto Te»06C2) 77549 



Ffn 





MKW FOREST - BURLEY. Altrac- 
Uve large detached country 
house in a marvaiioua ppuuon. 
surrounded tv and with direct 
access to mr Forest. tRepWered 
SmaU HoUUa®. Halt warn, 
drawing rm. dining rm. 
games/tamlly rm. study, kit. 5 
bedrms. 3 bamrms. OU CH. Lge 
mature gdn. triple gge. 4 loose, 
boms. 2 lack mu. milking par- 
foar. various other 
outbuildings. 6 paddocks m ail 
lust over 6 acres, price 
£328000 F/H McNeil Gilles- 
pie Smith. 96 High SL 
Lymtngton 105905 77922. Open 
Sunday lOApnt 


Ill—LEY PARK 1920's wd 
maintained house 5 beds . 
lounge, duung rm. «uay. b/nst 
rm. 2 ktichem. iiut Hr atet y. 
utility. 2 baths. - Front A rear 
gdn. dot gge Would easily con- 
vert Into 2 s/c unds. FuUy 
centrally healed. Convenient 
shorn transport Freehold. 
£165-500. Tm Office - nr» 

0923-777001. lor velwtag. 


**LEY 2 bed character coitags. 
Walk to town. «x cond Moving 
abroad For rettabte sale. 
£69.9604uux 0491 574071 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 




Flab and bouse s to view a an 
exentng new environment. 
Tetepbooe Parris A Qutrfc Ol 
987 4473, 


UPPER HARLEY STREET Lge 

flat 4 bedroom 2 recap. Jacuzzi. 
Parking. Aa n mi a b l e base. F/F 
carpets, drapes and asm l Utnc e s . 
£24X00. 01-936 8517 


COTSWOLD 

VILLAGE 

FARMHOUSE 


RRtCC OF WALES Drive SWl I 
2nd floor 4 bed vie manRon 
rui. original reanitw. FuUy 
modonbed. Gas CH. Oak Mch- 
an. FuDy Wed laUi rewtred 6 
reptumhed. FuUy carpeted. Bal- 
cony Low ser v ice eharge. 
£146X00. No Cham. 622 1971 


■ARKS. 2 bed tax p/b flat nr 
Common. 2d R rec. bale. 2 
bams. 120 yr lease £88.900. 
01 878 6457 or 094975 301 


UTTU VENICE BnqhL Spa 
aous. I bed mansion flat In 
nresuge location Sitting room 
17^ IS 1 dWe bedroom i lined 
wardrobnl. fitted hll/bla* 
room, liled hathraom/shower 
u nil & seperate we Lease 66 
VT3. £72.960 Td Ol 491 4456 
i weekdays I04pfti>. No agents. 


INVESTVSB EH LONDON redden- 
liai property? Can me experts 
on 01 -458 3680 anytone 


Wll bn maculate bright 3rd Hr 
tut. 2 beds. 2 baths, long lease. 
£96X00 TU: 01-229 8783 


MARIA VALE «V9u SupetD newty 
rrfurbd raised ground floor 
apart in prestigious neweonver 
Eton Magnnkcni tveep room 
With Wevi -toeing Icnave lead 

ntg down Hi glortous communal 
garden 3 excellent beds. 2 lux 
baths, wrll-glaniicd kitchen, gas 
C/H ISO year lease. £156.000 
for muck sale view today 289 
6683/328 9846 iTL 

AUGUSTINE RD, W14. within 
ydt of Brook Green, exe 4 bed 
laoilty lew limy rNtob. 2 recep 
rms. cellar dk/wc, lux Mt/b'fst 
rm. b alh tt shwr rm West frog 
gdn £275.000 mid (nr cuts A 
cl rev. View today ring Whitman 
Porter 603 1 1 33 open 10 2pm 

LITTLE VENICE Randolph Cm 
real Octignuul views A access 
to 3 oerr communal gdn & own 
pnvate Root Terrace 2 Beds. 
Lux IV II. Lge High celllnged 
Recep. Immacutaie order 121 
years £166X00 Weekdays 
499 9981 07 

WIMPOLE ST W1 Huge 4 bed 
nxmKd/2 reception maisonetle 
to let. furnohed/ untunusned. 
18 month leasr initially, further 
five >ears plus if required Rem 
£4.500 PA. plus rates. F.F 
£4 00Oono Reply u BOX HOT 

CHISWICK W4. Superb seircfian 
of recently converted 15 2 bed 


DOCKLANDS - CITY - BOW. 

Selection of period A Nrw 
Houses & Flats dose City and 
River £35 £250.000. Phone 

Mrttowalfc fteadenruL Ol 790 
9632 or 0860 71 1364. 
HAMPSTEAD GARDEN SUftURB 
Mvii Freeflow Edwardian 
cottage In excel cond 2 beds, 
garden iron! and tear, gas C.H. 
Opts. £97.500. Howard Estates: 
Ol 289 0104/6555 - 
LAOBHOKE GROVE Wll. A » 
pere 2 bed flat in tins 
convenient kxatkm. Use of 
Deaudiul communal gardens. 
Long lease £99.930 Emma 
Pim LP.F 938 

ERC BEDROOM semi d. Period 


MUNSTER FULHAM Much tawed 
Reportcm Howe. Modernised 
*82. 2 beds. 2 recep. study Lae 
dining rm. Kitchen /EMIR 
rm. Utility Small garden. 
£137.700 Quack sale viewing 
today TefcOl 385 8246 


By Bishops PV. River 4r lenms 
cm. send ueL 5 beds. 3 bairn, 
dbl rear, dining rm. catnerva- 
totv. Ok. cellar ♦ untie cedar 
60- s lacing gdn. GCH. 
£316.0 00 FH. 01 736 0406 


doubt the mm tuptnor ana 
ongtnai 1st floor nai soatmtiig 
Over 1X00 H R with a south 
tacSng balcony overlooking 
gdna. Magnificent recep. 1 bctL 
Ut and bath. 66 yernx. 
£185X00 Plaza Dunk Ol 
581 7646. 

W* - EXCEPTNNMLLT OgM it 
spacious 3rd floor maaonette L 
shaped reception 34* * i8x 12*. 
A dbl bens, exiemive atttr star- 
age /am bed Kitchen, bath. FA 
F OCH. Long be. £226.000. No 
agenta Tei: 01370 2646. 

WE. Brtghl sunny 1 bed flat In 
excellenl location, dose Ken 
HkRt St and parks. Needs some 
attention but ready hi move 
Into. £114X00 ono. Tel: 246 
1477 or 437 0269 for viewing. 
VENUE COURT. SW3. 
£179X00 buys 3 bed*. 2 baths, 
dble receo. (or 147 ym. very 
fair value. Sole Agents Graham 
MartV 01 SSL 4103 



EDWARDUM (SMC fronted s/d. 
brnnac cond. Many ong tea- 
tores. 5 bedh 4 recs. 2 bathrms. 
100* rear gdn. F*Nd £175X00 
Votkcr A v outer 761 6223. 



3 Rroepa. Lux KiL Utility 
Rm, Cflam. 4 Beds, 2 Bathe 

1 1 aa-suiieL Obie Gann. 
U OMe Gtettas. 
tnatine gdn, £130000 ono. 

0993 842468. 


CHELTENHAM DM tax 6 bed. 2 
recep house Large mule room. 
Gas 04. superbly decorated, 
beautiful country views, h acre 


COUNTRY 


la n dscaped gardens, twin ga- 
rage £185X00. Fhld Repent 


RICHMOND ft 
KINGSTON 


■ t l lREUHU UCH Fine stone 

txxH home In village 7 relies Pe- 
terborougn C oni m ine , a flats 
vacant possession one with a 
bedrooms. Post-Office- shoo. 
Barn wuh potential. Offers ovw 
mOXOa Phone 0733 63921 


gardens wuh Lake in benuhtoi 
country side cnjsoo. 994 yrs. 
UehW Regent EHMe Agents. 
0242 577866 



New 2 Bedroom houses 
& Hals. Gas CH. Town 
Centre location. Prices 
from £42,000. 

Tut 

Baiter Haase Sales 
0228 38133 


HHREL CALDY mod M4MF 
houee. porch, lge halL through 
taunge. Btatno room., aMng 
roam. 21 ft kllchen/hteakfasL 
laundry. 2 baths. 2 ci hak reoma. 


Immaculate. Double garage. I 

acre garden. £159X00. Tit 051 
620 1060 


Estate Agents: 0242 577866. 

CHELTENHAM. Ssactaui pnd.tlr 

2 bed ant Ut Jacobean Manor , m.unirmmi_L 

house AH In II acres of formal I >?*» C. 


tOCRAMFRM DetacMd bouse, 
lounge. diMng room, kitchen, 
breakfast room. 5 bedrooms. 5 
boihrooms. garage. Gas CH. 
FREEHOLD £350.000 Gas- 
cogne Pees 578 7675 


TRUCLV IMMAC U LA T E 2/3 Bed 
furnished Vtctoraa conversion, 
video entrance phone. 22*x 
14*6 Lounge. fuBy fitted spot- 
less kitchen. Balh/WC A Sep 
Shower / WC. secure mrUna. 
4 mins stroll Richmond Sta- 
tion*. Im me diat e poas cap oo. 

Low out Goings. 96 yr*. 
£107X00 Tel. 01-4269611 



HANTS^DOESET, ft 
LO.W. 


HERTFORDSHIRE 


unmocerntepd 3 bed ro om flaL 
preMigr building. 49 years. 
£146X00. 244 8189. 


Abuse, three reception roams, CtVOUCM EMD ht 3 hftl . . 
four bathrooms, large garden m CTa~i? 

diilel Chiswick W4 location cl to "J" *^**^2*!^** ?° *■ **• 


tubes £255.000 
T HOSvTNS 730 9937 
Hm, DcIMhnui small i bed base 
mcnl flat, pretty Da Do. long 
L/H. rinse lube/shops. VJow 
ouioouigs. fully fined idlchen/ 
microwave indudrd. £50.000 
Tel- 01-495 0679 aav 
BROOM eREEM LONDON VKVn- 
inuallv pleasing spanous family 
flat 5 rooms, green outlook sun 
able Immediate occupatm 
£119.000 Tel 01-603 29b0 
ROTTING Hm, Wll. Penthouse 
I bed Hal Cvtemlve views. 1IIL 
ooner. garden Needs some ro 
I urban men I £65.000. 

Marins Ol 723 8599 
MVEHBC FLATS around Mari- 
na overlooking R Thames A 
hew Gdns £48.780 £1 10.300 
Roberts 6 Home Ol 847 2239 


flats Outstanding quality Aexc I HfESnoWDIE PARK RD Wll 


posn Pnces Iran £56 950 to 
£72 000 view today Whitman 
Poctrr 994 1000 


untnodemlsed house far m- 
version la 4 tuts, lorer garden 
Freehold £175X00 244 8199 


WHI level mats, dose to B- R. 
tunc and park, onguiai retains. 
£64 000 tel 272 4608. 
HARLEY ST. W1 Splendid 4 bed- 
room penthouse in prestige mod 
block Roof lerracr £325X00 
Holman* 370 6781 

MAYFAIR by Creeo Pfc. 

unmodern 2/3 bndr not Vast 
reception 9 years £65.000. T 
Hoskins: 730 9937 
PBEUCO Aldenwy SI 1 bed bal 
cony rial BrouUhd siting 
room. £96.000 Long Leave 01 
630 9451 Eves A Weekends 
WEST HEM. <SI Paul * Court i 
Chornutig 5 bed nun with gdn 
A Dkg. £1 13.000 130 yr Ibnr 
Phone Ol 676 1896 m 
PIMHJCO Aflrocilve studio, long 
leave, low ottlgoinos. 2 mins 
lube. £47X00 01-834-8107 
RfYERSVE 3 brdr flat £200 
pw One year only T Hoskins. 
730 9937 

HAMPSTEAD Supcro selection of 
flats Open Doer Ol 794 6601 


OVAL. Brlgni VOC 1/2 bed flu. 
2/3 reception rooms. Fully 
modernised CH. VQ travel. 
£55.000. Ol 682 2449 


We are property tinders for 


BATTERSEA Un modernised 4 
brdrm house with planning per- 
misuon for 2 Hats. View Today 
£85.000 Tel! 0856409916 or 
01-987 7601 Or 01-373-9478 
FCCKHAM RYE Exr tacaflon. al- 
trecbve 1 bed flat, character 
lounne. o/iooklno common. 
GCH. carpets, often above 
£40.000 01 299 5650. 
BARNES tWli 2 bed Collage 
Peaceful position Modernised 
C.CJH Small garden. £105X00 
TN 01 9434739 Evenings. 
BATTERSEA SW11. Eland Rd 
Spacious f r eeho l d 3 bed use 
with 45' gdn £143.000. 
Soames A Co 331 0077 
ITS A STEAL! Spadow 2 bed- 
room fiat In South London 
Sguare Private porldng. Need 
Quick sale £61.000 362 0715. 


LAST ORE (end o( terrace) unsaid 
of 3 new marma style. 
Thames sMe houses Us metur- 
esque conservation area by 
SMMttrion Lock. 19 mis West 
Ena 3/4 beds. 2 baths, double 
g ar ag e son direct rtver 
rrontage/moortag*. £159.000. 
View codas' 0932- 244596, 


ASCOT: 

Hm pm m. 

3 bedroomed house, 10 
sables and grooms 
quarters. 3 acres. 200 yds 
TOm Winder Breti Put 
OffHJS OF £22MM 
TB. 

OR I 


COWES LO.W. Luxury 2 douMC 
bedroom llat In prune postdon. 
very lame run srenened baxo- 
ny overtooMng hotflour Fined 
kitchen ana carpets to remain. 
£77.000 Tei 0l-63« 7304 


BRMEXENDON BREEN actually 
on tno green, detached 4 bed- 
room name. 2 receptions, h 
aere garden* £166.0flO/Norrt» 
* Duvall. 0990 562661 


•Will 4 miles Shaftesbury 
Charming detained period cot 
logo. 2 orta. 1 recepOon 
Kitchen /diner Bathroom 
Lovely mature h acre garden 
£65X09 Td.074 786 668 


KHRCY HEATH 4 bed. 2 both on 
1 W* Of land £385X00 for 
f urther d eU4» Td^ao 8990 m 

ELiniKB 4 bed. 2 Mb Wtm mag- 

pUKw tf views £380X00 Fbr 
f urther d etansTti^CO 8990 fTl 
Oilia S bed detached. 3 
rettp*. £265X00 hr further 
details Tel: 980 8990 tT» 


HEW: Cosy terrace cottabe near 
gardens and luoe. 2 receps (l 
optional shop usej, 2 bedrooms 
■one charming DaDeryi. barn- 
room. extra, w.c./snowrr Oi 
New roof Pmewoed frotwro 
throughout, small oar On FH 
£86X00 Tetxi 940 4236 


WMOSOR Lintgue position ate 
cem Casiie Grounds. 2 Bednn 
Oeoraon Cottage lo row of 4 
Ongtnai feature* £135X00 
TW 0753-669866 


DORSET BLACKMOKE VALE 

. Thaiched period cou 4 ben. 
Bath. 2 R rents, ingtenook. Fit- 
ted kiL Pantry. Shower /WC 
Coneerv CH. An awe. O/bidgs 
£115.000 Tei 02566 658 


DEVON ft CORNWALL 


TED Om UT O efc 


Town Hoiae. 4 beds. 2 baths, 
spacrou * thru drawing room/ 
diner leading to garden, cloal, 
roo m , utility room, oarage, gch. 
Cte to shops/ BP/ River 
£129.500 Tei 01X79 7906 


hTg g acu M*«'l SOUTH DEVON COASTS IdylW 


HRKli OtarmlDg . cottage. 
GCH 4 bed, satin 1 aav. with 
mature apple trees and Mad. 5 
mu Luhwarth. Further raaoro- 
itanrcad Oftew £90X00 plus 
Tei 10305052024 tor details 



Largo detached - bungalow 
Beautiful sea views new 
tana ae a ans £50X00 Tel: 
«3BS61 32317 


country wiling Lux- 8 W. 
ground floor apartment m re- 
furbished 17th century manor 
house £44X00 Tel: (0626) 
873553 


KESTOH Oty is imiet yet send 
rural. Modern 4 bed detached 
house wfti* above average dy- 
ing . space Pretty, seetuded 
garden. Offers around 
£166X00 tor quick sale. Tel: 
Ol 290 6632 Mays) 


busy people 01 370 3758 CT» am. FH lerr Via hse 3/4 beds. 


reocuff iq swio deugnifui l 
bed 4Ui floor flaL imtnar 
£85X00 Hobnam 570 6781 


2 reepta. kit/bfH rm. batarm. 
New roof email gdn Nr trans- 
port £79 960 274 0600 


KRtSSTON RBI. bar ga i n lawn 
Me 2 recep. a bed. 2 bath quick 
sale £1 16X50 01 549 0701 


RENTALS APPEAR ON 
PAGE 27 




4 V. SrUP' 


£ . 
i- . • \ 




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Y 



iril: ‘ilMfcS WfcjuNEbDAY AUUUSl 2U 15*86 


23 



PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 



CXDUNTRYPROPFRTTF.Sl 



ii 4 




§ I the best address in Wheatley. 


old v 


■ ■ ■■■-,. 









(Ludlow 5 Miles) 

DOWNTON CASTLE ESTATE 

1825 ACRES 

Principal house, 3 Farmhouses 
’ and 4 cottages. Riverside house 
for restoration 

1400 acres farmland, 375 acres 
woodland 

Excellent pheasant shoot and 5% miles 
doable bank fishing on River Teme 

FOR SALE AS A WHOLE 
OR IN UP TO 7 LOTS 

■fcumpiftgton Road, Cambridge C82 2LD »: (0223) 841841 


LINCOLN 

4 mites, Newark 11 miles. (Fast trams to Kings Cross) 
Ridgeway House - A superb detected family house 
situated on a magnificent elevated plot with unrivaflad 
views across * cotm&es. Pt gas C/H, pt dWe gtaz, dbie 
gge. 4 recep, kit. utility. 4 beds. 2 baths. EJjS.DOO. 
Agents Earf & Lawrence Prudential, 

343 High Street, Lincoln. 

(0522) 22215 


27, ABSEYGATE STREET, ^ 
BURY ST. EDMUNDS, 
SUFFOLK 11*33 1UM tm 
Tt (0284) 07300 ^ 


.... ,;J 

Dstncme mod. res rinse ttn»n centre. DC, CM tewc carpets, hi*y toed 
W etc. PnsuWe games im. fVasjrt gdn. CaK tar M SataUs. 


WATFORD 

Newly constructed 5 Bed detached house in tree 
ftned road 5 mins from awn centre: within wafting 
distance of underground & main fane station (Euston 
19 mins). 2 Excellent grammar schools. Open fire in 
lounge. Choice of Kitchens. Famfly & en-suite Bath- 
rooms. Gas C/H. £275,000. Teh St Atoms 07Z7 
52026 or Eves 0727 36847. 


FACING BRIGHTON MARINA 

Magnificent Grade I Regency mansion. 3 Luxury vacant 
flats. 4 flats sold on tong lease. One flat let U/F. 
Balconas/Terrace. Gas CH. Impressive Entrance HaiL 
Otters over £200.000 Freehold. 


Apply David Armour & Partners, 
e Farm House, Poynings, W. Sus 
Tel: (079156) 207 


Sussex. 


BATH 

AWARD-WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

Renowned far Quality • City Centre Flats 
Best Luxury Development of {985 
Beside the River Avon - Landscaped Gardens 
Fully Fitted Kitchens - Luxury Bathrooms 
A few splendid Bats still available 

PRICES: mm424SJM 
Brochure from: 

UTHODOMOS LTD 

SSiMitf I NMhnn Cm Gnu Sim Ink B*i «R 

Tel: Bath (0Z25) 60487 or 60006 


GEORGIAN BATH. 

Tbr Cbm 1 . Stamm* (round floor flat hi new Grade 1 fasted 
convection; tan. rtc [25ft x 20fi) wiili French dOOis onto 
cxdusvc roof tenace. Magnificent vim Master bedroom 
with en mite bathroom. Seome nine of bedroom - and men 
bathroom. Gas C/H. Fatty fined kitchen. U1QJDCQ. 

Tel: 0225-316596. 

Vfcwtag possible today. O’). 


HENLEY (OXFORDSHIRE) - RIVERSIDE 

Detached 26 year oU bungalow with tinsel Towpatfi/Rntr hom- 
age and wntm yards of main shops. Halt, doak. bww room, 
dining room. AEG- NEFF Metal /breakfast room. 3 bedrooms, 
bathroom, Gas CH. dole S tuple abgng. detached coach-mss 
(Garage/ workshop) Beautiful gardens- Mere around £211X000. 

Apply Howard Son & Gooch 
(0491) 571157 


THE POINT 
ESTATE 

RBOSCOLTN. ANGLESEY. 



BRODIES 

, l.snd am! Ij.siaje Xe^-jy Dcpartmen;. 


CKR-STCHiJRCH 

»PF KJHl 

r-> Mir 
. * -r.lv 

n*w:.!fr 

- *.1 w 

.- MU 


• ' x: 

- ■ 

tuC*4l v 
* w 


>|b “ 

v • C . S . 

firf, *!« • t*i - "l 1 




A ROMANTIC AN D ANC IENT CASTLE 
DATING FROM THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY, 
ON THE VERY EDGE OF THE SEA 

FINE ROOMS, MINSTRELS GALLERY, 
MARVELLOUS PANELLING 
NATURAL HARBOUR. WOODLANDS. 

WALLED PARK. COTTAGE 
SPORTING RIGHTS OVER ABOUT 3000 
ACRES 

ABOUT 17 ACRES 
Often over £1 30000 


BRODILS VV.S JMthnii’ Crescent. Edinburgh'* - 
Erjc^HA.T^lLT.hC'rci'c'l-c^S^n'! - 


SCOTLAND 


LOCHMVER 


stone bufl house (2 puttfc, 3 
bedrooms), outbuildings. 3 
tumtaftad chalets. Bar/Rw 
taurant potential. 

GBMGftnni- ON - SPEY 

Ideal hofidny home in qukn ru- 
nt stetton. stone btik 
house, 3 public 3 bedrooms, 2 
attic rooms, 2/3 sens garden, 
oultouiMtngs. Derate 



NORTH EAST HERTS 

Fine heavy timber framed XVtth Century 
Hall House in about 2 % acres. Superb posi- 
tion, 2 miles Mil. 5/6 beds, 2 baths, 2/3 
recep t, kitchen & utility, stabling, garag in g 
for 2. 

£195,000 

Watsons (0279) 52361. 


On MtaitsiRi'. Srofenbar 17th 
T96& MT EoqUrtn to: 
Derek Tonvros & Son, 
Chattered Surveyors. 

4 \laim Street, Stockport 
Tet 061-477-3195 
Sofiators: 

Bfiafl A Company. 
Centem House, 
D&utsgate, 


Teh 061-634-9933 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 








* ’ 




A • 


NEAR GUILDFORD. 

Beautiful country house in quiet rural hamlet 
adjoining heath and common land. 6/7 beds. 2 
baths. 4 receps. Self-contained 2 bedroomed 
wing (ideal Granny annex). Garaging and out- 
bu Mings. Lovely 3 acre grounds. Guide 
£300,000. Tel Cubitt & West (0483) 60565. 


WEST WALES 

Motoranyto Swans**. Ram 
Mpuytea a^arti 

edge nnsner^^ 

Valey. De&fttufy fuffetied to 
odranaly Man sonata. 2 tipMs 
b atrom^ wgfl, ttri an/dine r. 
doafcs. hxtoootn nj garage. 
Smfl pichn gmtov mat te 
seen. Riatty wtetnedota 
oa x poio n . fttfy benched. 
£49j5M 

Phone avertings: 
(0633) 62857 or 
(023887) 673 


W-ir: s 

* v 


Sixty-thrcc acres of woodland and 
gardens- and only seven acres for 
development... that’s the Marina 
del Este. 

A little over an hour's drive east of 
Malaga, the Marina, with 326 berths, is 
positioned with exquisite care around a 
sheltered bay- with enticingly luxurious 
apartments in a garden setting. 

For more information, please contact our 
London sales office at 150 Regent Street, 
W1R 5FA,TeI: 0M39 6288 or the Marina 
on 010 34 58 640 400 (7 days a week). 


Bite. 


Unorac Fimfcxr id Grind*. SpaH. 



SOMERSET 

FROME 

UNIQUE 16TH 
CENTURY 3 
BEDROOMED TOWN 
HOUSE. 

Folly renovated to original 
tfwunt dmacter. New 
ldichen. Quarry Tiled 
Boms. Fully carpeted. 
GCH. Inghmoofc open fire- 
place. Nr Bah yet I bow 
London. 

08^50. 

Eoqmries 

0373 73388 03 


HADLEY WOOD 

An exqnisne period residence abutting Hadley Wood Golf 
Club set in magnificent Barden* of HALF AN ACRE 4 beds. 
rpqiiir drcssine /hwhroo<n_3nd bathroom. 4 rttran 
Idt/brakfiHt rood, drakroam, ihxm haB. aonbie ^rage, 
£450,000 leaschoM (990 yean) aprttyror tins and sunilur qual- 
ity properties: nie Menu: 

ALAN SHEARSBY 
91 449 4247/8 

AGENTS FOR HADLEY WOOD 


£69.500. Tet 05693 350. 

TAJLYWAM SWDtT LOe dH r/h 
hie in 1 acre wtoi DWUng. a 
0«e belt*, f/r UL a Teem tt. 
Coobnv. LowebP Canity hone ■ 
toew tor ml bum hae Mr 
£56.000 eno. 0*96 7733*3 
Octane lOaia/otter 7pn0 


on 3 talk, n uk) « 00 A 5 mormw. 
Use Mo room am tong room, 
UOWI ***y. 3 wwoonn. «•*■«* 
tsnwmt 

Ns 4 b* mm. I mrwto ten sb 
Mts. 

Aon* Mht* tmwSs Cmad psk- 
M spaa + 2 open parksg spas, 

t»»w» 

Pwa 760.000 

Ammtd hr afe ib neams Iwg 
4raa 

WanaMc J WTTH 
TS BIO 4126755*3 TAX CH 473325 


COWU Lmr un-modembed 
name in urapwN nuane. exeel- 
KM pofe-nual. BM KnO 

owner, » hoMay home. Offer* 
in e*ee» of £2&00a Tel: oi 
870 8330. 


EXCemoiUUL Country Cotraoe. 
immaculate- Lovely poaUion. 
ConvenierH M6/M4. Bristol 14 
ItUKS. Lotiooo a hour*. GWSAOO 
TM:l0373t 8751 IT 





L8BSE DCTMHCO KOUSC wttn 
ouratler. 4 udroon*. 3 nm 
■maMMlnra Full CH. Lara* 
oaroens. £600000934 493630 


A AVON 


-STONE BARN Nr AMl/Dnw 

- eoarwr. 3 acre* or more, au- 

- pern view*. 3 taeOa. taath * 

.-. emuUe. ball, tatpe suuno 
■i rni/exwMetf beann. 

. klt/brnkfaft. C/H. D/O tot. 

166.000. TH 098a 33M». 


SURREY 


FABfWAH. casne Street. Comer 
vahoh area. Luxury tint floor 
flat. U300 anme foot. 2 
nwB.s beifc. 2 win Futty 
mwo kUcMn. tndwuna rmroe. 
freezer . aunwasber. Fully car- 
Deleft GCH. Ook 10 BB. 99 Vt 
■ease. Inmnliar PMSKsUm. 
£95.000. Trl 1 103621 SMI 11. 


STYLE HOUSE 

In prime position, fraiging 
downs. 3 mnuies from the 
snaps and staoa fteceptco 


HOOK HEATH. WOKMB. Oenage 
style spacious period (amuy 
houM I mile On. Master bdrm 
Ixuh dressing rm. 4 furtbar dbi 
b e dims , 2nd bamrin. 5 recent*, 
huge r/f kitchen. Co*. Loe oou. 
£226.000. Tet <048631 4697 



CMOHNsroLD Offer* around 
X12SDOO Situated in an exefu- 
nt private road lust of the 
Vffluqf Green. DM 81 H 1 * vouttv. 
erty rose oarden. Chararter 
rotLage. 3 Bedroom*. 2 Recpt 
Bms. ao services. Tet; 
GodatmtDB <04868128683 


WITHD modernised wtng of 
rountry hie set In B acre* on 
North Downs. 3 mt» from M25/ 
3S 4 beds S batna. recent. Idl/ 
b-fstrm. uUUly, OMe flW. Omck 
sale £185.000. Retgaie 43431 . 
after 3 pro/ early am.<TV 



HOYt (1 HOIflt LONDON l 
tLECAHT AUNNV. RC6ENCT, 
BALCONY FLAT. 1ST PLOOIL 
Fdrmthed ny Hamas Oppo- 
site tee and lawn*. 3 
bedrooms Drawl do / Dining 
room. HIM kitchen, bath- 
room and stlowipr room. CM 
e/h- Very gulrt. Parking 
spar* uti and caretaker 
Outgoing*- ctear per 
annum . 05 400 MC CON- 
TEXTS. tam bkan 1 

occupation. (037 3) 779560 


HOVE ua ntOMT - Luxury 3 
bedroomed flat tt prestigious 
mansion flyie Mock, liniouety 
vUualrd on U»* King! Espla- 
nade. Superb slews. 3 
bathroom* it eneuileK imorc*- 
atve ludL large fully fined 
kitchen, large lounoe wtui al- 
cove dmmg area*. £79.780. 
Tel: (0611 9601080 or 01-445 
3384. 


HAtnrmaL. * b e dreum house 
Kodhig to peach. CCH. igr sdna. 
£95X00 |0345) 60BSV7 


FARMS & 
SMALLHOLDINGS 


NTH NORFOLK 8 miles inland 
from Cromer. deOgntiuHy posi- 
tioned epoclou* 3 dbie bed 
bungalow, full C/H. age. ma- 
ture garden providing aeeli wmn 
A open landscape. £73.000 
wllb option 1/4 O acres fenue 
adtttmng land. 0893 761333. 


LAND FOR SALE 


KLSY - MONTH VORK5 Ap- 
proximately 9 acres of 
residential land with full plan- 
ning approval For details 
TeM 03031 707864 anytime (T) 


FRANCE 


SOOTH PONOOCNC 1ft n cent, 
manor nouse. igv n r. 5 huge lire 
oiarev recep! ion rooms. B bed- 
rooms. 9 bathrooms, a shower 
rooms. Every court o*1. 20.000 
sq.m, grounds Swimming pool 
F orm and row nearoy. Write 
lo C.F.A. du Vmwr. Ralryrar. 
34480 If Buumi or phone 
France 63 22 03 83. 


MRDOOMCfNlUKTOHC UKrty 
OM Dor d ogne property. 5 
roomed House auatched lo 
barn. Trancuil sefbrig. Pan rr- 
tloced. Wim good poiennal. 
LltLSQO. Tel: 0337 464783. 


OHMAUO near st.Tropra studio 
& bathroom. 2Bm / & balcony. 
1st floor, furnished, rural eo-es 
laic. 10 mins sea. £ 20.000 own 
phone 94 49 20 30 


HARBELLA 


3 OR4 BED HOUSES. 
BEST POSSIBLE LOCATION 
ONMARBELLA'S 
GOLDEN MLE. 
UNRIVALLED 
BEACHSIDESITE 
HOUSES WITH SPAQOUS 
ACCOMMODATION 
& SUPERB ROOT TERRACES 
WITH VIEWS OF THE SEA 
& MOUNTAINS. 

Prices from 

£80,000 




VILLARS— SWITZERLAND 


Im^iDe an exdusive resort, just 70 minutes from Geneva. . .Sunshine. . . skxixig 
. .skaisra^. . .swimming. . .golf. . . horwsridiog . . . superb iestauran(s& shops. 
International schools. . . aU set m wooded slopes with snmniiig mountain view. 
All this- and more -yon wiD find at VILLARS -a historic village with 
a sophisticated yet friendly atmoqihese. 


LE BRISTOL 



COSTA DEL SOL 

Superb ineenmeot, holiday/ 
■esfckmial boms. Bztensive 
fin of new/ male properties, 
tram £3W5SO. Finance OciE- 
ties available. Weekly 
inspection fiigbia. For colour 
brochure: Iberica Prupertie* 
Ltd. Gempian Hse. S. Barths ? 
Mpe*s. Brirhuu, 8N1 1HG. 
0273 29907/8. 


New investment oppoetunity in Swiss Real Estate 
A mrigne concept in srieo fully icrviccd opaninenB with all ibc fireiliiies of a h»un boKtendoor pool. 
I SNtaafa.barLiataBnm.cie. I to 4 room apanmmt* born 5F l30JXXL-liplo8MS*nnfiiiancra%aitabic 

at bromaUe kipil 

MEET THE SWISS DEVELOPERS AT: 

THE MAYFAIR HOTEL, STRATTON STREET. LONDON Wl. 
10 AM - 8 PM 28TH & 29TH AUGUST 
10 AM - 4 PM 30TH AUGUST 

THE CALEDONIAN HOTEL, PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH 
10 AM - 6 PM 31ST AUGUST & 1ST SEPTEMBER 

HILARY SCOTT LTD For details and appointment: 

4P Upper Bkhnam* Ran4¥)ta, taaoittndcVIhnSA. 

Leaden SWH7IX ' ■ TB WM VMm, SwtoreW. 

Tdepboae 81-876^555 CJ TetephonesM«412S053S3l 

TctaVZTtBfl M Telex 456213 GESECH 


GENERAL 


CAYMAN BUUW lor Me 70 

acre* fruit farm. All necessary 
machinery A good water. Coo- 
l arL Ben Ficlduig. P O Box 
1677. Grand Cayman. Brtusti 
West indies or nboneOloi 809- 
9473349 



PORTUGAL 


ALOMtVK COUNTHYSIDC. Idew- 
ly burn a bed haute. B.OOO 
wiuare rncircs land. Sea views. 
Cl 4- 060 Details phone: Read- 
ing 107341 67B09 level. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


ROYAL WINDSOR, lirteresmxi 
flats and bouse, tn Riser 
Thames boaiyard Fully fur 
nhbrd and eauipprd. smire 
and malnuilnnnre. 1 or g bed 
roomy Telephone 0785 862 


HOVE Corner Mouse. Jim ron- 
\ mrd uuf urn gmd ftr nai . 2 loe 
bay windowed rm*. filled 
ij(/dmer A bauirm- Utility rm 
8 storage \ nose yea. shoo* A 
Have Sin. Orpe A MU sedoded 
gdn. Ural Company £70ow 
pxr 0273 732140 Lies best 


wmm 


VILLAS 


apartments from £69.000, 
chalets (rom E 2 K. 000 . 
Monage up to 70a at 
625% inL 

93, Parkway. 

London NW1 

or tsl 01-085-8811 
OdNmM SOHCtttHS. 


Km Usbon. 60 Hectares wHh 
oM nouw. lenmy court, row 
shed for SO. pasture, fields. 3 
force growth greenhouses. Me. 
Vineyard*. Wlnr cellar, iron 
and shit liw. Compel 01 99f 
8561 mminfp). 



WUJEUmH. HMonc town 
cenire conversion scheme Pro. 
vrfmg. 3 luxury naamenu 
and 3 UMHiduai conages. Or- 
deas and nuai view*. From 
CSS. 060. Dennis Pococh a 
□rewett. Oboes 4771 


MAUKMIiffY- immarutalr c 
lath penod house pre*en<]y 
Burreseful AnlKtue Shoo with 
exrrllent llunq aeeOmadpilon . 
garden and worubep 
C89.BOO penuh Pororh & 
Drntnn. 06002 0771 


MORTGAGES 


¥~*\ 


MORTGAGES ft 


1 ^ _L'J ; 1 1/7 \ ( l * 


1025% 

m% wmsMES nfluuBtc. 
3 Xjolnt tncoffld or 
3.75 x mm + 1. 

Any puipou. Frog adme. 
TW 01-247 3123. 

urufiagiM lip. 

71, Lmiaa Frafl E gta Ngg. 
Laadog El 6»T 


2SK stab of Vaienen. fully 
favrtshaf, large farad UMMn, 
large terracB and barbecue 
Dveitooiong tfra sea. 3 dU 
7<BUiroomt i a n nNe. Fadtoes 
Incboe SquBd corns. Terns 
cons and Smmrang port. Only 
SO mans from sm* bay. Pro 
kKfaidng Cs £S5flOQ. 

Tffl: B1-37D 5246. 


BBNAUWAOCHA PUEBLO House 
in bMuinui mnumaiu village, i 
bedrooms. tMlhrocm. lounge, 
kin-nan. srorruie ibiM. tnower 
room, uivety view* of m and 
mouimuns. oommutuai ■wuti- 
ming pool in oeroeru. Fuuv 

lumutied. c 40.000 

0843 42520 


com HJUICA MoTBira 2 bed 
Iwuoay vui*. Lge lounge/OiiKr. 
F/nued kiirnen Bainrnom-Ve- 
ronua oieridoMng valley Lge 
palm onromunal pool. M(M 
' from (own centre and beams. 
• Gotf. tennis netaw. Bme fur- 
pohtnss £20000. 0004 48874 


Aflzere/Vafais/ 

Sviitzertaod 

Omw Is eeBng 

NEW APARTMENT 

Qato sMe. 3 rooms, soflMac- 
Ag bdeony. sutm area flOnF. 
Pnct Sb 225JXXL-. 

L Bsoet, tm Mdafle 2. 
CH - 1972 tern 


T* SWISS SKOAUSTS Com- 
rtwe rouge of properhe* in over 
60 wiMer/toRBMr revonv Eff 
yertuer. V'Ulan. Lake Lucerne. 
Berme Oueriand nc. Compel 
Hilary Scxki property. 4Z2 Uu» 
tw Richmond Road WesL 
London SW14. Tel: 01-876 
6585, 


OWES SELLS 4000 AC 

High vMri fann in mnoa USA. 
Sptanms mansion, alagantty 
famwiett park, pond wdti 
osacti. privsta Bnflng ship. 
Moawn tenang dqutpmML 

10000 l bins. Bto. 

Fortfttaisd UsnmttM Md 


REPUBLIC OF GREECE 

PUBLIC REAL ESTATE COMPANY 
AUCTION SALE OF PROPERTY IN 
BRUSSELS 

The Public Real Estate Company of Greece, intends to put up for sale, 
the property situated in Avenue De Tervuren and Avenue Marquis de 
ViUalobar in Brassete, (BJC38) owned by the Greek State and invites 
Sealed Written Offers to be sent to its office at the Permanent Greek 
Representation to the European Community in Brussels. Avenue de 
Corteaberg 71, 1040 Brussels, up to 13th October 1986. The nun of 
60,000,000 BF is fibred as the starting price for the property to be auctioned. 

In the event of an offer being deemed acceptable, the submitting party 
wfll be notified in writing and requested to present within 5 (five) days, a 
letter of credit from an accredited bank in Belgium, to the value of half the 
sum offered for the purchase. 

The property to be aoction e d comprises a plot of 8.163 sq meters and a 
total built surface (areas of wiii use, auxQliaiy areas and anxilliary build- 
ing) of 1,267.62 sq meters. It is a stately mansion of excellent construction, 
a fine example of the Northern European Achxtectural style of the Inter- 
War period. The property is being sold as it stands. 

Additional information and technical specifications can be obtained 
from: Messrs. Alexandres Kritikoa & Panayotis Kalouhs, at the Permanent 
Greek Representation Office in Brussels. Tel: (010322) 735-8085. 

Athens June 12 1986 The Chairman of the Board. 


When you need a bigger house, 
we’ll give you a bigger mortgage. 


At NatWest there is no ceiling on 
the size of the loan available. You don’t 

3 e to be a NatWest customer. 

For written details just 
pop in to your nearest 
NatWest bank or write to: 

the Home Loans 
Manager; National 
Westminster Bank PLG 
Marketing Department, 
FREEPOST 2, London 
EC2B2ED. 


A NatWest 

TheAclion&w* 

Security and insurance is required. 

Loans ill Iqcci io status and coodn ions. 



















































-\ 

• ? ’ 


THF TTMT-S WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986_ 


LA CRfiME PE LA CREME 


lA 


K 



Pot of gold, no. 



ayear,yes 


KS 


SFCRETARY / PA 


MANCHESTER 


Charterhouse Investment 
Management is establishing a 
new fund management service in 
Manchester and we are looking for 
an experienced Secretary/PA to 
assist the Senior Manager. 

need to have a 
high standard is' 

of personal Si 

presentation, ^ 
together with proven \ 
organisational skills, an ability to work 
on your own and be able to use your 
own initiative. A friendly, helpful 
manner, particularly on the telephone, 
is essential. Excellent shorthand/audio 
and typing skills are expected as well 


as an interest in learning word 


processing. 

Ideally you will already have 
been working at director level in an- 
* investment/ stockbroldng environ- 
ment or other similar financial 


~7 institution. 

1 In addition to an excellent 
rax salary, we are offering BUPA 
23 days' holiday and non- 
$£* contributory pensioa Witten 
applications, accompanied 
by a fell CV should be made to: 
Tina F&rker, 

Assistant Manager, Personnel 
Charterhouse Investment 
Management 6 New Bridge Street, 
London ECiV 6JH 



CHARTERHOUSE 


A MEMBER OF THE ROW BANK OF SCOTLAND GROUP 


v///» 


/MBXA&ADVHTnSfJG 


ADVERTISING £11,000 


Senior Secretary/PA to 
Marketing Partner 


You musi be young, confident with 
solid advertising experience to wort; 
as a secretry to the joint chief execu- 
tive of this top 20 ad agency. Age 22- 
26. Skills 80/60. 


Salary to £13,000 


BROADCASTING 


£9,500 


The busy chairman of this large TV and Radio 
organisation needs a second secretary to organise 
his varied public life. Excellent presentation. Age 
22+ . Skills 100/60. 


Robson Rhodes is a major firm of 
chartered accountants with a recently 
expanded Marketing Department at our 
City based office. 

Currently we are seeking a top level 
secretary with excellent secretarial and 
organisational skills to work for the 


partner of our Marketing Department. 
The ideal candidate should be weS 
educated and be able to communicate at 
all levels — shorthand and good word 
processing experience is essential, with 
a minimum typing speed of 60 wpm. 
Previous marketing experience is an 
advantage but not essential. The 
position is busy and varied and will 
require the abfflty to work under 
pressure. 

Applicants should send a detailed cv to: 
Miss Jan Wilkinson. Personnel Officer, 
Robson Rhodes, 

186 City Road. London ECIV ?NU. 


£8,500 


The company secretary of a top PR consultancy 
needs a secretary to help her with office admin, , 
payroll, company cars, pensions, office equipment ■ 
etc. Age 21-23. Skills 90/60. , 


These are just three of the jobs we are handling at 
present, we have many more va c a nc ies in the ere- 1 
atm fields, theatre and publishing. If you have 
good secretarial skills, give us a ring to discuss all ! 
of the possibilities. 


01-491 8775 


RDBSOn RHODES 


Recruitment Consultants 


RUN THE SHOW 
- C £13,000 


A highly eflkaent and capa- 
ble PA is required to run the 
office of this successful and 
expanding turn of architects 
located near Sloane Square. 
As the linchpin of this busy 
oflee you mil be responsi- 
ble for ail administrative 
matters, including recruit- 
ment of secretarial staff, 
maintenance of the brand 


new office, purchasing ol I 
equipment and systems and II 


equqjment and systems and 
provide secretarial support 
lor the MD. 

The role rs varied and de- 
manding and you should be 
accustomed to working at a 
fast pace and meeting high 
standards. Previous office 
administration experience 
would be an advantage. 
Age 25-45 Stabs 90/60 
West End Office 
629 9686 


Li 


YOUR MOVE INTO 
PERSONNEL 
BL5BQ 

If youVe mastered the ba- 
sks of se cret ar ia l work in 
your first job, your next 
move coufci be assisting one 
of the busy Personnel Offi- 
cers in this large 
international company 
based in tin Qty. 

You wifi be responsible for 
u rg u niseig and controlling 
the temps on a weekly ba- 
sis. involving lots of 
telephone Sason between 
departments and agencies. 
You should have good skits 
and word-processing experi- 
ence. but more important 
win be the confidence and 
personality to ded with can- 
didates and senior 
management in e test-mov- 
ing environment 
Age 19-23 Skills 90/60 

CITY OFRCE 
726 8491 


Elizobeth Hunt 


NO SHORTHAND? 

C.£1 0,000 

Join Oils leading W1 investment bank as secretary to 
an executive in charge of marketing. He needs a very 


sidy and subsidised lunch. 60 wpm audio 
WP experience needed. 


OUT & ABOUT 

£8,600 

Join this well known organisation closely connected 
to conservation of the countryside, as secretary to a 
director Help set up and attend UK conferences and 


enjoy seeing projects through from beginning to end. 
You should enjoy working very much on your own 


You should enjoy working very much on your own 
initiative. 100/50 stalls and WP experience needed. 

, Elizabeth Hunt Recruitment Consultants. 

V 18 Grosveoor Sheet London W1 0V240 3531 J 


DRAKE 


PERSONNEL 




HIGH POWERED 
FINANCE 

to £11,000 


\fULTOINGOq 


THE SOLICITORS COMPLAINTS BUREAU 
- VICTORIA 

SENIOR PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

SALARY - o£1 0,500 


qt 

■£» wOrtthrW Jtt- BBanJ uaw 
aertw cpnrano Mn afcft M 
antKUtt buna «jh « t» 
oo Hyde Rvtwu eta teganol 


ITALIAN 


Personal Secretary with 
impeccable English, able 
to speak Italian fluently, 
to assist Manager. City 

£9jM^£ie/)eo 


a hwdhr. Mnm Umq 
wur « see sfett. KUn 




SPANISH 


English and Spanish 
Shorthand are needed tor 
ultra-bilingual [ob with 
established firm setting 
up new WC1 office. 

EW08-E12JJB0 


A Senior Personal Assistant is required to work for the 
Drector of this newly tanned body w hi ch wB respond to 
complaints trom the puMc. 

You will provide a hi! secretarial support service and play 
a vital administrative role. The position involves the use of 
a Wang Word Processor ana although an experienced 
operator is preferred, training can be provided tor toe right 
appfcant 

You should be an experienced senior secretary able to 
work on your own intoatfve, with a good telephone manner 
end a good grasp of toe English language. You must be 
able to work carnty under pressure and use ascretjon 
where highly confidential material b involved. 

Benefits mdude a current salary range maxfcnun of 
£11,610. 23 days annual holiday, staff restaurant and pen- 
sion and season ticket loan schemes. 

To apply please send a typed CV. with cov8riftQj6tt£r to 
toe Personnel Officer. The Law Society, 113 Chancery 
Lane, LONDON WC2A 1PL. 


Secretaries/ 

Typists/WP 

Heaven-sent 


II 018363794 || 

22 dehi Ona had. LoodOB WCZHflUK 



opportunity. 

Free food and wine and Free 
prize draw for office staff 
Meei Office Angels people in 
a relaxed no-sell 
environment. Leoni’s Quo 
Write. 26 23 Dean Sum 
6-8pm August 21 sL . 


Advertiste 
Sloane Street 
c£1 0,508+ 


Leading prestigious 
Estate Agents seek a PA 
with poise ana self- 
confidence. An exceUent 
opport u nity to use your 
aammisftatwe ability and 
do more than just S/M 
and typing assisting a 
busy Partner ■ 


Poise & Style 

£ 11,000 J 


Office^ 



This is a lop-level job for a poised and very 
professional BL Assisting* Senior Pari tier in one of 
Londons leading estate agencies you will play a 
high calibre role, handling confidential manage- 
ment matters and dealing with all aspects of the 

.] 4 rM l . 


company’s administration. Approx 50°u admin 
con lent, the position is busy ana quite pressurised. 


con lent, the position is busy and quite pressurised. 
Good skills (90 '601 and senior level experience 
essential. Please call 01-109 1232. 


Recruitment Consultants 


Stuck in a rut? 


Have you been wondering where a secretary of your 
calibre can go from here ? Are you making the most of 
your secretarial skills and your valuable commercial 
experience ? 

\f you’ve been asking yourself these questions, why not 
seriously consider joining our exclusive temporary 
team? We can offer a constant flow of senior level 
assignments, excellent rates and a professional and 
personal service. 

If you re in need of a change, don’t put off until 
tomorrow what you can do today - ^ 

call us now. 

Kerena Henderson 
on 01 439 0601. 


MacBlain 

—MASH 

Temporary 

Secretaries 


3rd Floor, Carrington House. « 

130 Regent Street. London WlRSFE 
(Entrance in Regent PI. above Iberia Airways.] > 


Venture Capital £13,000 (neg) 

Exciting challenge for a bright exarienced PA to help 
newfy appointed M0 set up the European Venture Capital 
arm of leading Merchant Bank in the West End. S/H/- 
Typing/WP skills essentia! for handling correspondence. 
French or German an advantage for liaising with Conti- 
nental offices. Age range 24-30. 


USA Finance House to £12,000 

Your step to a City career— organise and attend road 
shows, handle correspondence, telephone orders and run 
the department for two busy Institutional Salesmen with 
a junior to help. You will have the opportunity to earn the 
business and develop broking skills but to felly S/H/- 
Typtog/WP experience essential. 

Age nod 20's. 

<u||St Hmm tatopbeiM 
Jennifer Setmes, 

Finsbury Secretariat LtcL, 

;r| 1 7, CmndWi Square, W1 

01-631 0481. 


BRIGHT START 


The personnel division of this well respected mer- 
chant bank in EC2 requires a junior secretary to 
join their busy team. In addition to day to day 
secretarial tasks you will become involved with 
the graduate recruitment drive, arranging inter- 
views, liaising with agencies and providing sound 
back-up to two senior secretaries. You should 
have a good telephone manner, be able to com- 
pose your own correspondence and thrive in a 
beak working environment. Age 18-23. Competi- 
tive salary together with generous banking 
benefits. Please telephone 588 3535. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Upmarket Temping 

to £10,000 


This summer; join an exclusive and 
upwardly-mobile elite. The pick of London’s 
prestige jobs. Rewards that pay full 
recognition co excellence. And something 
more. Longer-term career growth. FmantiaDy 
our pay structure reflects your development 
So too our training unit, where without 
charge or obligation you can bring your 
self up to date on the latest in WP Find out 
more about upmarket temping. Call today- 
G1-493T^T 


GORDON YATES 


Rfuuuxni CocwMOPg 


SPANISH 

Dmaor busa Sac Wing* cm wm te m Hm wtM. naumta an mad W c 
intfn a >00 ppm y n — mtili a GO pan. 8 unto nm Mature. WP, 
naxaUt dt cm i ao oaoenaa T tacer al antra itaasy U eamp dh an 
amtus teomB. Es tamad anar in bntre p wi wpai eitUJQd 

JAPANESE 

This onshfaa Mri reotets a Ml groomed Japam sprttafo See Is work a 
tftw 8«w*ss Sava Centre otMng sac rentes ta Bar greats. Be tyswi Ux. 
tu »aJ a rassxnrtt* Bttete am neeassaQr Hobs W or iZX-aXL c £&80 * 


FRENCH 

AarenenoM —r a Be r dm la mowfe Swaotr l 


hanouf Veus ami I 

pm bene Boanena omwaeis g_ansj. ate o/Uctyto. HP at h m del 
I irm al trsRape. 22 are EMJjOO 

DK3USH WITH FRENCH 

Tan peaUanwi «i feasnamM Ftaw mantra an recteaot sae.tappy (a we tag 
Frans iron ame to wne. Vqd wll Ion good nis aad knareMaa of We WP 0BH 

Doptav) Pimw BwancanaeMteai Baoanqr-t-ifteBttaappRnek 
c£12JN0 + pot* c25 ya. 


e£l2JW) + pota t25pt 

GERMAN 

WW toxnnad recap /M MW foam Genrem nqMbr U ta*. Mas nctuda 

SOW X M— 1 & CWWbibu wo* Evemnea pntf SfrMOO + boo. 

DANISH 

firano* natuno si U» Of tacks a retefiad & ncrtcactd sec. T>8 ft a war 
npcmnty tar a Darafi m/i wu Rtas ■fwa rete— rt decssn as mtiaa 
taton; on response 6 two dutas. E1D.00Q Bag. 

BOYCE BILINGUAL 
01 236 5501 

tata0«t H BW pSon-Pri 9-5JO) Off AST 


IDRAKE 

PSSONMEI a 


TOP PA IN VI 

£12^00 

Da you camdar yotrsafl a 
protassuHl PA? P you do, 


COLLEGE 

LEAVERS 


Do you confer yoosafl a 
profesaooai PA? p you do, 
than on Etas pretipitoJ Mki 
mawry company a PA to 
Itnr ftwwsl braaor Hu's 
rattmlv hm to tte oosrtaon 
and noeds a ettafiOM wdt- 
lAmareP. ptrsmota. tep- 
endaola and wfl-arouasHi 
PA won lot; ol MBhs Id 
help ease tan into ns pos- 
tal If you taw «w*m 
typing, stwtfwm) and WP 
rites, then Hoot hastate to 
os Natafce Dn*cr m 01-734 
0911 


We are currentiy soaki ng 
juitor secretaries twttoor 
witoout sbortoand) for 
position s In the lotiowtng 
sreas;- 


BAHXM6 UM 

PERSOMa fUN 

CBWWTBt S Om 

uwsmsim tun 

P08UC RELATIONS C7JB0 

carenoomr mam am 

Per m cteaS please telephone 


629 8863 


■HODGE; 

IrecruumentS 


rlirxxt+ Salas promotion/ 
tnatkeang oo. have gust won 
major account and we look- 
ing for a dynamic PA/Exec. 
Most to* tots of RKtaove 
anti confidence to attend 
meetings and brief clients/ 
OKxtacwn. SH 90, typ. 
K+ WP exp. pret Age: 
24+ 


nun Smafi. fan ativetts- 
aig/ conference co. teoun 
si oroan sed Rasp/ Sen 
Typ. 50+. no SH or WP1 
Age: 21+ 


CUN Mvertbng agency 
(one of (be top toil, are 
looking tor PA to two Basti 
Daectefs n ttor tee twen- 
ties. Mafia experi e nce 
preferable. Duties ndude 
personnel, dent cont ac t, 
presentations, ret. tide 
sec sec wait Wang. 
Type 55+ Auto 
r useful. 


£9JN+ Prostgns 
precious stone com- 


pany. reqtire Sec to 
mn n msKttnq de- 


partment far two men 
Preferably 2nd jobber 


Preferably 2nd 
SH 100. typ. 1 
20 + 


DAVIS CO 

SECRETARIAL 


01-734 6652 


S cm TMUM. RtCRUItMCNT 


MARKETING PA 
SECRETARY 


£11,000 pa plot 
superb benefits 


Our client leads the 
field in the sphere of 
luxury travel and 
leisure services. Their 
two senior Marketing 
Executives require s 
truly efficient PA 
Secretary to assist 
them at the West Bid 
HQ, a hectic but 
stimulating office 
location. In addition 
to audio/WP and' 
secretarial duties 
(shorthand is highly 
desirable), there are 
important customer 
presentations to be 
organised, together 
with social evening 
functions geared to 
new client business. 
An ideal age is 
25-35 


Please contact 
Rosalie Preskett. 


iOI-491 1868; 




PERSONNEL 


£10000 + 

rimmhston + cat-t-f 

Jo* »» ol koodoos kaehg red 


W« London. t» nnaaK 
w i iwnw *tee yon bn 
smmrg i tnan of nootehn 


dtwtares unn ■ Bre an. 
Vooite OBOdta tore pwms w- 
HMimUKai 
5*0 sune'jod » Booaoo atev 

buRrmra f - 


Out of Town 

£8,000+ Benefits 

Interesting opportunity for a 
prafBssnnal. sfeubte secre- 
tary to fan ooropany based in 
Ftnsbufy Park. WM assist 
managers n keytioad depart- 
ment Excritam promotion 
prospects, pafiicularty m cus- 
tomer sennong. Stalls 90/50. 
relocation to City m 1987 




W tqi«i2£J 



SPECIAL INVESTMENTS 


£12,000 


The very busy Chairman of a small successful public com- 
pany in WI needs n first class P-A. ns assist him. This is a 
very busy position and you must be prepared to work at a fast 
pace. Responsibilities include organising the Chairman's pa- 
pers for meetings; keeping clients informed and running the 
office in the Chairmans absence; personal work and involve- 
ment in his various interests together with secretarial support 
Skills 90/60wpm. 4 A’ level education required. Age 27-40. 
Please telephone 434 4512. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Ai 


Executive Search 
£9,500 + Benefits 


IA 


[SECKE 


An tomortant aspect of txx 
■dntmca&on ami reoustrat 


to our eftants d too 


and mxuftraant of sareor pwsonnel 


You can nin this imrotwng Md as a secretanr (100/60) coterie of usteg mittethre. 
displaying enthusiasm anti w te n i g ence aal iwomwioo to progress. Ybuwiflnacd 
sound comtwfciat awareness, an excellent telephone manner and apnb pmsan- 
tabon and a confident and matin personality. 


A major firm of managem ent consultants and chartered accountants, we otter 
exceSent conditions arid a dynamic and successful emfmnnMnt 


A 


Please telephone: Charlotte Corby, 
Recruitment Officer, 
on 01*831 7130 ext 4075- 


Semi) 


Arthur Young 

Your next good idea 


Personnel 

Officer 

Up to £ 15,000 


Our diet# is a progressive, commer 
cial city organisation. They need to 
recruit a true professional to head up 
their personnel department. Your brief 
in this generalist rota uM include re 
cruitment, training, counselling and 
salary administration. 

It is an advantage to be a graduate 
and/or studying for the IPM. however, 
most important is several years sound, 
practical personnel experience that ui 
dudes recruitment. 


Ideal age for this appointment is 27 40 


Please write in the first instance m 
duding your current c.o. to Sarah 
HazeU, HaedLStaton Associates, 8 
Golden Square, London Wl 


HAZELL STATON 


Pint 

B3 


Tel: 01-439 6021 


MEDIA ■ FINANCE - ADVERTISING - SALES ■ PERSONNEL 


71 


PROPERTY 
to £11,000 

Enjoy n wrong, busy amironmont working for 
toareskfental partner of this praaftaous SW1 


PRIVATE CLUB 
to £12,000 

Use your efficient confident approach aM 


estate agent Lois al dtant contact end tele- 
phone work. Smart offices. State 90/60 + 
audio. Age 25-30. 


use your efficient, confidert approach arid 
outatxng peraonafity to the U working for too 
Chairman of this kdertnUanaBy famous dub. 


COHSERVATIOH 
to £10,000 

Good orgarisationta and a dmta to ative ca- 
p abttt fas are necessary to work with the 
dynamic founder of (ta cha ritable organ- 
isation. Otey media contact bookkeeping, 
own correspondence and press Meases. 
Rusty shorthand/SO typing and WP experi- 
ence heipfutt. Age 2S+ 


Chairman of this Jntematianaty famous dub. 
You need state of 80/60 a mature and team- 
spirited manner and toe afaifity to iaise at toe 

highest levels. Age22-25. 


BAHK OH FREHCH 

£ 12,000 + 

Stay cool in this tast+noving sales department 
of e U.S. Investment Bar* by usmg your fluent 
French ctsdy. Working for toe head of toe 
team, dixies wB indude general correspon- 


dence, trawl arrangements and sates checks. 
Numeracy and 80/8) stab essential. Age 25+ 


_ 437 6032 

AOentaMy -Hyro wam to temp whte we seach for toe right job for you, rmg Fiona N0WI 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS ' 


Secretary to the Personnel Controller 

C.E9250 


The Costain Group, a mafrx international organisation is currentiy 
seeking a secretary with experience at senior management level to 
join the Group Personnel Department near Waterloo. - 
Initially to cover maternity leave, but envisaged to become a perma- 
nent position, we requrie a secretary, preferably, witti experience in a 
Personnel Department, with excellent skffls 100/55 to run thks very 
busy office (training where necessary on the WANG w.p.) The secre- 
tary is responsible for the upkeep of the computerised Personnel 
records. The work is varied and of a confidential nature. ' 


<T. Vt 

Hu 


We offer a wide range of benefits including 23 days holiday,' a 
subsidised restaurant, profit sharing and pension scheme and sea- 
son ticket loan scheme. 

Please write with full career details or telephone for an application 
form to: Mrs. P. MaJby, Richard Costain Limited, 111 Westminster 
Bridge Road. London SE1 7UE, Telephone 01-928 4977. 


f ERS. 


INTERESTED IN 
WINE? 


BOOKKEEPER/ 

SECRETARY 


IDRAKE 

-PERSONNEL' 9 


To . p FI.IL 


a stimulating, varied posi- 
tion working as PA to the 
MO of a busy wine Com- 
pany- The person must be 
able to accept responsibil- 
ity end to work on awn 
initiative- Qualifications re- 
quired are shorthand and 
typing with knowledge of 
word processing. Euro- 
pean languages ara useful 
and an interest end taKwrf- 
edgs of wine is e distinct 
advantage. Company of- ! 
fere e x ce llent , salary and - 
benefits. Age 22+ . . 


With good typing 
and shorthand 
skills required for 
busy West End art 
dealers. Age 
20/30. Salary 
negotiable. Apply 
In .wrffinp sending 


MIDDLE 

EASTERN MARC 
£ 16,000 


■5 Tvwrvng jpo 

mi « 7te umo Afit 
town company, motati v 
* range af ntanaBOflal 


Please contact Miss Rae 
on 01-928 4851 


- Mrs Catiey 
20A Market Hill 
Buckingham 
MK18 1JK 


diMtaBm«S ska as tend 
prwr^.ttWrtngftriat*- 
WJ«« Mvngv Hoar 
tiijrwa nwMadtoiaa. 
wrawai tiiras pte nudi 




JSSTwraanto^oSHf 


^ v : •- 
V ■ • -• 













ecu!;' . 


c . 

. ,';-sreh ! 






riTMHHiillJrrifH fTIRfli 


RECORDS YOURS. 

Administrative Assistant 

Would you Bee to set up and than 
maintain new administrative proce- 
dures for the world's leading music 
publishers? 

In this newly created role in our rep- 
ertoire office, you will ensure the 
smooth running of the office and pro- 
vide suppot to our senior 
management Much of the 
department’s work involves copy- 
right negotiations and renewals - for 
which your efficient storage aid re- 
trieval of information will be highly 
valued. 

Educated to A level, you Wffl be me- 
thodical, self-motivated and familiar 
with, or interested in, computerised 
fifing systems. You will also have the 
interpersonal skills to communicate 
effectively with senior management 
(the position reports to the General 
Managed and with copyright owners, 
and be able to work enthusiastically 
within a small team. Training in the 
use of computerised systems will be 
given: experience in the music busi- 
ness will be an asset. Age range: 25- 
35. 

This appointment offers a most inter- 
esting environment and excellent 
career prospects. 

Please write with full personal and 
career details to: 

Babara L_ Scott 
Personnel Officer, 

Chappell International Music 
.Publishers Ltd 

129. Park Street, London W1Y3FA. 

Chapped International 


SECRETARIAL PARTNER 

required by smaB high growth West Bnd group. 

' Atte to contrfoute fully to the development of the 
business. Good secretarial and word processing skids 
essential together with mature personalty and 
business aptitudes. Good salary plus profit sharing. 
ExceSent offices. 


Telephone 01 -631 1110 



Seminar Organiser 

c.£9,000 

Use your administrative experience and excellent 
organisational skills to coordinate over 100 busi- 
ness seminars a year for Dun & Bradstreet the 
world's leading supplier of business information 
services. 

As Seminar Organiser with our Business Education 
Division, you will deal with over 2000 delegates 
annually, ranging from junior staff to director level, hi 
addition to handling the administration of events, you 
will also be responsible for analysing appraisals and 
suggesting new ideas. 

Educated to 'A’ level standard, yod must have an 
accurate typing speed of 50 mm. A mature attitude 
together with an analytical mind and the ability to 
work under pressure .are essential. 

The salary is competitive and accomp&iied by 
luncheon vouchers and all the benefits associated 
with a major multinational. 

Please telephone Harrash Cameron on 01-377 4456 
for an application form, or, alternatively, send your 
1 full cv to him at Dun & Bradstreet United, 26-32 
Clifton Street. London EC2P 2LY. ’ 

Dun & Bradstreet Limited 

VMB a company of 

2M> Dun & Bradstreet international 


TV Advertising 

£ 10,000 

What -works on TV? This company keeps 
archive material on thousands of past 
campaigns. Providing a vital service to big 
agency researchers they set a fast pace — 
working in informal, creative surroundings. 
As unflappable team secretary you will play 
a central role — creating order from chaos, 
labelling and listing videos, handling four 
things at once. Good typing requested Age 
21 +. Please telephone 01493 5787. 


GORDON YATES 


Rccrqipnpx Ccw taflM 


MANAGING 

DIRECTORS’S 

SECRETARY 

c. £13400 P-a. 

A vacancy exisa far ■ seamy to ike Managing Director of an 
expanding loam campon?. The sjjptam. «d 1S-3&. wo* 
have aueflem secretarial sidOs (100/60 wpm) pins indio and 
have previous experience at director JewL Year approach ad 
appenaoe must be of the biggest csIKbte. 

App&atiMS la writing only adoring a 
rectal photograph to: 

Group PersoneJJ Manager, 
150/162, Edgware Road, 
London WL2DT. 


PERSONALITY PA 

Required for International MD in Victoria, 
good s/h and WP ess. 60% client liason. 
Must be a good oiganisor. Salary £9,500. 

Telephone Vivette Bell or Carol Wisby 
01-947 0319 or send cv’s to 

TOP FLIGHT SECRETARIES 

26 The Broadway Wimbledon 
London SW19 


01-5849033 

necRtflntfMi - 




01-5848931 

swans essoin 
resysaanoi 

UMWSWt 


[social SECRETARY W1 
I UP TO £10300 1 


lit Ul .lr i'll . j , 


about bb 30% of yoor time wi be toert on your own 




TRAVEL/PR 

Or £8,000 

This is an unusual opening working as part of the mar- 
keting team, withm a well established travel organisation. 
As weR as providing full secretarial support duties will 
also include implementing and organising promotional 
campaigns, assisting with production, advertising and 
raising with agents. For a secretary with good skills and 
work experience, this is a demanding bit rewarding role. 
Nr farther details coatact Tracy Farias 

Of 631 154T Aec-Cbra' 

Price -Jami eson 

MMnWMMM&nmiVJLUHMMMMi 


TEMP TO PERM £10,000 

Prestigious City Bank seek aa efficient PJL for their Re- 
search Department. Total involvement and QezMty for 
someone with fluent French, good «>wth.Tvl typing and 

COHERENCE ORGANISER c£8,000 

Co-ortfinate. attend and analyse C Pnfa rences as an Adrnmia- 
tator in this Multi- National Tn iiirfiw and 

integrtty coupled with A’ levcfa, 50wpm typing + 9 months 
experience are needed for tins casts petition. 

262 Regent Street, London W1 
(By Oxford Circus). 01-434 2402 



Leaver 


£7,000 + 

Lovely opening within a small company of immense 
quality; where graphic design is bothproduct and 
inspirational force, for the most part you w3J work 
with a PR executive, handling client contact and 
helping to organise functions etc. Thereafter; you 
will act as secretary to the Chairman on his days in 
London. Excellent benefits inc profit share and 
share options. Skills 80/50. Please telephone 
01-409 1232. 

■■■■■MB SeuraHmcni Ccasultnals ■■■^■i 


to £10 v OOO 

A sodafiy confidant and professional secretary for 
senior manager witti this top record label. Constant 
Raison with artists, managers, lawyere etc Secre- 
tarial sWlte 90/60 + W.P. (Wang preferred). 5 weeks 
hoSday and great pedes. 

GLOSSY MAGS 


Exciting position as PA. to the puto- 
'A fesher 0 i this busy magazine house, 
working In a sales environment with 
. lots of scope to develop into marketing 
assistant Someone young (19++) and 
nveiy with 80/50 sfcifis. 



SENIOR SECRETARY/P JL 

South Harrow 
£8^00 pa 

Wnfdng fw 2 Oiddoial Mmgtag Ofmctoa a UC Oduo rtsad Office 
VMots ttatias, experienced utn; age 30-50. 
Ttfaptom or sand C-V. tt- 

Annette Woslan, 
pioneer Concrete HotcSngs Ltd, 
Pioneer House, 56-BO Nortfxtft Road, 
South Harrow, Middlesex HA2 OEY. 
Tel: 01-423 3066. 


n 

M 



■ A. i 

JEXE0 


Hi 


£10,000+ 

Bit of a hectic fob with 
Pronotian/Advatising Ca fet 
Soho bulthey are towly peo- 
ple whs reward talent 
ganouely. fireal iob for a H 
of a toughie with good 
organisational skills and 
80/55. tod-WMlM. Bo- 

nusftssa-montwy pwsaalaiy 
reviews. 

MtetoUk 
ee 134 0838. 


MANAGER/BUSINESS 

CO-ORDINATOR 

To run well established private agency in SW15. 
Recent relevant experience vital, plus a pressing 
need to earn a nanimam of £13,000 in the first 
year, ability to oversee staff of 3 plus wine & dine 
new clients. 

Send cv to Miss Vivette Bell 
26 The Broadway Wimbledon SW19 
or ring 01-947 0319 


UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL 

Employee or employer. If you want to deal 
with the best recruitment consultant 
in London phone: 

Gina Nelson on 01-434 0030 
She is great 


Secretarial Opportunity in 
Management Development. 

c£8,500 

We need a Secretary to work principally for our Management Development 
Manager (UK.) who provides a most important Management Development 
and Training service across our UK. Group. The office is alongside the 
Temple tube station. 

The interesting responsibilities involve handling very confidential material 
and regular contact with staff at an levels. One of the tasks is assistance with 
the overseas transfer of expatriates. 

Candidates should be experienced shorthand secretaries who enjoy 
working in a busy department and acting on their own initiative. Training on 
the Phftps 5020 word processor can be provided. Preference would be 
given to non-smokers. 

The large organisation benefits include attractive subsidised restaurant, 5 
weeks’ holiday, interest free season ticket loan, discount on Company 
products etc. 

Please send c.v. stating present salary to Mrs. Den Rush. Central Personnel 
Department, Philips Electronics. 8 Arundel Street, London WC2R 3DT. 


PHILIPS 


ATTENTION ALL SENIOR PA 
SECRETARIES WISHING TO WORK 
IN THE RICHM0HD AREA. 

The following vacancies are available now 

SENIOR LEGAL SECRETARY 

Very senior shorthrod M g w with word proc — l o g . 
Must have legal experience. Sadary £11,000 upwards c*S 
company benefits. 


CHAIRMAN LEVEL SECRETARY 

Interviews now. Working tor c ha ir me n and deputy chair- 
man. Shorthand end WP essantiaL Salary fell ,000 
upwordB. 

MARKETING SECRETARY 

Exciting po sit ion for the right person, Stitt required - 
shorthand. WP and marketing experience. Salary £11.000 
upwards. 

SECRETARY TO FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Senior stonhand secretary with WP. Must nave a Anendal 
bactonxnd. A very involved and intere stin g position. Sri- 
ary Cl 1.000 upwards plus benefits. Smart end modem 

OfflCBS- 

Contact either Marina Young or Jan Edwards on 948-2211 

Alfred Marks Recruitment Consultants 
27c The Quadrant 
RICHMOND • 

Surrey 



ALFRED MARKS | 


In Search of Excellence 
£11,000 

This is a high quality position in a 
professional environment. Our diem, a 
well-established name in executive search, 
requires a Secretaiy/Administraior to co- 
ordinate their small consultancy team while 
handling all office admin and management 
affairs. Authoritative, confident and career- 
orientated, you will have supervisory skills 
and senior level experience. Typing 50wptn. 
Age 24+ . Please telephone 01-493 5787. 

GORDON-YATES 


PERSONAL SEC - PROPERTY 

Top City firm of Surveyors seek a bright effi- 
cient Mcrataxy with good skffla and a sense of 
htimonr to join their expanding emti p a m i 
working for the Managing Director. You wul 
get involved in all aspects of his day to iky 
work organising a busy achednle and doing 
some admin The successful applicant should 
hare 100/60 minimnm and will not be looking 
for a 9-5 job. Age required 23-30. Salary 
£10,500 + perks. 

Call Caroline 726 2711 
No Agenda 



Press & PR 

£ 12,000 

Used to a fast-mewing media/PR environment? This is 
a multi-faceted job as Press Officer in tbeatre/film 
design. Responsible for marketing, advertising and 
promotional events you will need Lbe creative flair to 
prepare brochures, press releases etc while organising 
consistent liaison with theatres, media and colleagues. 
A car drives you should also have good typing skills 
Age 27-32. Please caD 01-409 1232. 





rj| 


«j 

a 

nriTim. 

■ 



Shooting Star 

£10,500 

Are you a high achiever? Get into the fast 
track with this remarkable City-based com- 
pany They deliver hi-tech solutions across 
the leading edge of die world's financial 
markets. Your role is pivotal As PA to both 
MD and Financial Direaoryou will organise, 
co-ordinate and administer — helping to 
maintain sense and structure alongside 
continuing rapid expansion. Skills 90/60. 
Age 20+ . Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


Rtotrianeor Gomfara 


RECEPTIONIST £9,500 

This prestigious firm of consultants based 
in beautiful offices in SW1 need an 
immaculate receptionist to join them. 
You will work alongside their existing 
receptionist and share equally all 
responsibilities. Age 25-33. Typing 40+ 
WP training. 

CQBB0U) AND DAVIS 
RECRUITMENT LTD. 

35 Braton Race W1.OT-493 7789 


£12,000 + BANK 
BENEFITS 

anwady epwc uu g uu gdMWnBi antin g wwfw w .caiwiBpwwti 
to oat wi Mfe anz ocSH a pmon neL Sttt 1 00/70. for 25 ■ XL 

430 1551/2653 


Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd 


The Institute of Chartered 
Accountants in England & Wales 

PERSONAL ASSISTAHT 
TO DIRECTOR 
EDUCATION AND TRAINING 

£10,000 

The Director of Education and Training wishes to 
appoint a Personal Assistant. This major department is 
responsible for the implementation of all matters 
concerning the selection, training and examination of 
students seeking to gam the quaht ration of Chartered 
Accountant It also deals with post-qualification 
requirements. 

The Personal Assistant's wide-ranging work covers the 
normal tasks of busy personal secretary at senior level 
and will in dude the preparation of briefs and initial 
drafts for the Director on a wide rangB of subjects, 
progressing work in hand within the department han- 
dling personal and confidential correspondence and 
making conference and travel arrangements. 

A high standard of secretarial 
skills is essential and the written 
work involved will probably call 
for a graduate, ideally with ex- 
perience in the field of education 
and/or accountancy. 

Applications, giving persona/ 
and career details to 
Mrs. M. Owens, Personnel 
Officer. Chartered Accountants' 
Hal/. Moorgate Place, 

London EC2P 2BJ. 

(Telephone: 01-628 7060) 



KEffiUSDfclhUfr 


RUN THE SHOW £12,000+ 

The team is small but the deals are big in this 
international finance company. Based in lux- 
urious Mayfair offices, good PA support is 
essential but 40% of your job will be adminis- 
tration and inter-company liaison. A 
knowledge of book-keeping is helpfUI. Age: 
25-40 Skills: 90/60. 

COLLEGE LEAVER £7,500 

Join this small friendly firm of property agents 
to help establish a new department Working 
for a dynamic boss and his assistant you will be 
encouraged to use your initiative - handling 
client enquiries, organising and attending re- 
ceptions as well as giving secretarial support. 
This is an ideal opportunity for a young enthu- 
siastic person to get their career off to a flying 
start. Skills: 50 typing. 

“ RECRUITMENT WW 

hC 0 M P A S Y TEL- 01-831 1220 


SO LONG SHORTHAND 


Does racr u amen t and personnel appeal? This 
tearing international consultancy seeks a com- 
petent secretary and admiirfstratDr to take on a 
nil and varied rote and liaise extensively with 
senior staff and candidates. 60 wpm typing, 
audto & wp needed. 

MARKETING £10,000 

Our dient is a forward thinking company, happy 
to re-structure arrangements to develop tnrivkf- 
ual talents. They seek an energetic secretary for 
this tngh profle position to marketing, a rapkfly 


expanding area. Luxurious offices, superb 
^rt sdub w id excaOent benefits. 100/80 + wp 

Please aril Defc&fe Berimrifcfa. Abbs AM, 
JM Otteree or Blm Hchardm 8 an - EL30 am. 






mmtawDsaomim 


ENGLISH SECRETARY 

To work in Cologne 

A prestigious International La* Firm in Cologne requires 
an experienced shorthand se cr e ta ry (120/80 wpm mini- 
mum] to commence jonedmdy. German l anguage not 
required. Excell en t salary negotiable. 

Phone 01 794 8852 evenings or CV’S to: 
Doris Beane?, 

Bodou OppeohofT & Sch neide r, 
Hoboustaufeuriug 62, 

5000 Koto 1 
Telephone 0221-20910 


SECRETARY/ADMINISTRATION 
ASSISTANT C. 10K 

Well presented/spoken Secretary required to work 
with a friendly team of young executives in the City. 
Must be able to use own initiative and cope with 
responsibilities. Accurate typing and WP essential 
Excellent salary and prospects. Age 25+ . 

Please contact Mic helle Sierfes 
on 01-283 8787 


CfluounE mo 

★ COLLEGE LEAVERS * 

Aa secretary to two young managers m tha international 
cosmanc house, we can guarantee that you’ll certainty be 

busy and nave a kh ol ton No wo days wtt be foe same and 

can stetude anyfomg from telexing and lypmg to dealtog with 
buyer* <vx) sigjptors. Salary c£7.000 + axcefeni parts. 

46 Old Bond Street, London W1 

01 -499 8870 

CAHIHJIfE KING SECRETARIAL APP0INTMBITS 



skills, you’ll find our placements are distinctly' 
different! Ring or drop mio aov of our offices 
TODAY. 

Permanent Permanent Permanent 
POSH! to £11,000 

Tcp calibre Secretaries can sail into varied and 
challeiwing positions with this fomous Company. 
Good Shorthand wiQ earn you excellent benefits 
and half yearly salary review. Ref: 562/33013/BI. 

SHIP TO SHORE! to £10,600 


with Uns world famous shipping business. Your 
Admin/Sccretarial sltiDs and excellent command 
of English will be invaluable 10 this •Captain* of a 
young and lively •crew’. Ret 562/33001/BI. 

BRIGHT SPARK! to £9,100 

T our car and drive will take you places with this 
chant)' Promotions Company. Liaise with celeb- 
rities and use your Administrative skills to get 
thoroughly involved. Ref: 55I/33005/N2. 

PHONE OR CALL IN NOW! 


19/23 Oxford St.. Wi 
131/133 Cannon Si.. EC4 
185 Victoria Si.. SW| 

22 Wormwood Su EC2 


Tel: 437 9030 
Tet 626 8315 
Tel: 828 3845 
Tel: 638 3846 


RtTiuitnwm Cunsuliants 


PA/SECRETARY 
£ 10,000 + 

Faw el Foreign EfcHwo* Bmter» 
wormy taqtm an eltcieni a 
comww PwStc <a Md earn toe 



Customer Services 


We specialise as suppliers of books and 
journals to government & industrial librar- 
ies and have an important vacancy for a 
person interested in customer liaison work 
to become the assistant manager. Duties 
are varied aid prospects of quick promo- 
tion are good. Accurate typing and an 
interest in figure work and business essen- 
tial. Library skills and some knowledge of 
german or french an asset Ideal age be- 
tween 28-35. Full training will be dven. 
Pleasant environment, canteen facilities. 
Salary negotiable. 

Please sand a bnaf ev tcMr GLHaydan 


EXPANDING, LIVELY PR COMPANY - Specialists 
in the high-tec industry seeks additions to if s young 
staff of 25. 

If you are looking for a varied, responsible and hectic 
career with good prospects. 

If you possess keyboarding/secretarial skills/experien ca- 
lf you are a good organiser & administrator with a firm 
command of English. 

If you are able to work under pressure yet still exude 
good humour and efficiency, then you may be me of the 
people we're looking for. Previous PR experience not 
essential. Non-smokers welcome. 

For further details, please phone, or send CV to: 

Nina Tinsley, Wicfces Associ ates International, 
Tofwortft Tower, Surbiton, Surrey, KT6 7EL. 

Tel 01-399 5244 


TRAVEL 
PA/SEC £10,000+ 

The two young directors of this expanding travel com- 
pany require a fluent French speaking PA/Seoetary 
with speeds of 10Q/60 wpm. You must be bright, per- 
sonable and used to taking responsibility as directors 
are often abroad. Also ability to work under pressure 
and longer hours when necessary is essential. Smart 
Kensington office and travel benefits. 

Write with full CV. 10 :- 
Ftona GOlect, at Mark Warner 
20 Kensington Ctonch Street London W8 4EP 


e io f ooo 

For the PA ready to move into a total admin- 
istration role. WeU known management 
consultant seek an assistant to administra- 
tion partner. Job requires high degree of 
c omp etence and leadership. Age 25+ . 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 

17 flea St. Lad* EUY IAA Ttt 0J-5U 10J4/005S 


MATURE SECRETARY £10,500 

Chy Accountants require a mature Sec 30 - 50 yrs to 
wok for a veiy charming gentleman who is the Senior 
Company Partner. Fufi PA duties organising meetings, 
lunches and client visits. Skills 90 wpm s/hand and 50+ 
typing rag. Training given on AES WP systems. 
Hours 9.15 to 5.15. 


Tel 8. Cocfcrane or 01-606 2411 
CAS Pen Cons 


SKI PA 

ttactixs of exclusive ski co 
require PA witti good com- 
mgweabon skills and 
mmaiive. This Is a challeng- 
ing opportunity with good 
Mure jHoepects. Safety 
£8.000 + expense A/C. 
Write ta John Denham, 
e/o 

L ft R Leisure, 

127 Albeit Bridge Road, 
London SW11 4PL 



Coottnaed oo uext page 





























26 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


LA CREME DE LA^EME 


20 + FROM SECBETAS7TO EA. c&io,ooo 

This substantial British banh offers an ideal posi- ments and deal tactfully with sensitive issues.The 
tion for a young.ambitiOus Secretary who enioys Company has a reputation for its friendly atmos- 
a job which 15 a little bit out of the ordinary. The phere and policy of staff development Skills of 
Manager of the East European desk makes fre- 90/50 plus WP required. Salary 
quent business tops abroad so needs a PA who to £9,000 plus banking benefits, 
can run hisoftlce.handlecompJex travel arrange- including mortgage subsidy. oi"250728l 


1 '■> 




: 'w jf, ■ 

■ ■ V-?. 


FiNcrsse 


■PPOWTHCKTS lIO 


RECEPTION IST/TYPI ST 
£7,500 

We are a temporary help service organisation 
with a reputation lor quality and 
professionalism. To join the friendly team at 
our West End based European headquarters 
you should have relevant experience, an 
immaculate appearance, good 
communication skills and accurate typing. 

Please telephone Sandra Hitching: 

01-493 7848. 


■■■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

LIAISON 

OFFICER 

£ 9,000 

Gri MV from you iwwmcr 
«« no a careen Tfa «u- 
vwwi COnvaoy IBS offices 
tttougnauJ ms UK and ton 
neetfa tffWoranwad adoin- 
sra* who «xM owy 
nvelWfl as mm Acawa Ad- 
nwwfrann. and who las 
enxnenee on Die WP or com- 
purer are) a current Orman 
bcenco. Although aula types s 
a mnor pat of ihe no n is 
■mpoiuni So. d you wan «• 
«*« pi aspects and a varad 
ph. dm 1 besutp. cal Pen-Ha 
Pro now on 01-834 0388. 


SECRETARY/PA 

For Managing Director 
of West End Property 
Company. Excellent 
secretarial skills, 
shorthand, numeracy, 
234-, salary £9,000+ 
a-a.e. Friendly 
atmosphere. 

Telephone: 

Miss Roberts on 
01-491 7452 


PUBLIC 

RELATIONS 

Dynamic PR agency in 
West End seeks to re- 
cruit a secretary. 
Excellent typing skills re- 
quired (50 WPM) but no 
5/H. Knowledge of 
Wang WP an advantage. 
Call Joanna Fowler 
on 01-734 6030 

Salary nog aae. 

No agencies. 


PA/SEC 

PROPERTY 

£ 11 , 000 ++ 

Dfroaor of teacSng latsua/ 
entertainment co requires 
go-ahead assistant to 


merit project and handle 
important negotiations in 
tns absence. WP experi- 
ence required tor imnimal 
confidential work. Excel- 
lent co benefits • 5 weeks 
hoto, STL. restaurant, 
some free travel. 

Pteaw phone Claire 
01 626 5283 
Staffplan Rec Com. 


EXECUTIVE PA 

New South Kensington Estate Agents of- 
fice requires a top level PA for their 
Manager. Experience and efficiency es- 
sential as the successful applicant will be 
responsible to the Manager for the run- 
ning and administration of this high level 
residential sales office and extensive cli- 
ent contact. Salary £10,000 pa. 

Telephone 01-727 0530 

ref JMH 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE 

to £11,000 

Property Devdoper with 
small modern onus ns 
quires a P-AVSecretary 25- 
35 with send skills 
(100/60). Excellent English 
Superb orgamsauouaJ abil- 
ity. mimeracji and a great 
deal of initiative. The envi- 
ronment will be ■ demand- 
ing one and calls for a 
responsible and am bilious 
person. 

Please ring Mrs 
I-Araold oa 
01 235 1145 
(No Agencies) 


LE6AL 

SECRETARY 

Rwwred try smal frwnty 
Mayfar Law firm, age 20 to 24 
you wM be Mil ptasataad and 
educated to d lead ‘O' level 
sfandanl You mif need lots of 
moahue and a sense of hu- 
mour and ml defriatefy not be 
afrsd of hart work. Promts 
legal excenence, acasata 
typing, shorthand and WJ* ex- 
penence. Exce lert sata ty ta 
the right person 
Please leteiihone Hatan on: 

01 491 4729 • 

No .Agencies please 


aunSTBE WATSON LIB 



H Hare; 1Z4 Hlpm St, W1 

THE TOPS Bi 
ADVERTISING 
C. 612,5001 

Ihs ladH B HBt ry M dot wit 
Ole mm paces n Im Xtohd 
tuns, requres to tM PA/Sec. 
S 1 1M w w U h to 
Charm Srosh cresoretm. *n 
and rots of llO/SOilinatfcr db 
wy toahto and anMwa rob. 

01 935 8235 


MOWTABI LOOSES 
VAL DISERE 

Are looking for talented cooks 
and meticulous housekeepers 
to care for an exdusrve clien- 
tele m beautiful chalets. Winter 
88/67. Driving fecence and ba- 
sic French would be useful. 
CV/Photo. 

Apply Patricia K0y 
Mountain Lodges 
RP. 37 

73150 VAL DtSERE 
FRANCE 


The Royal Marsden Hospital 
Downs Road, Sultan, Surrey 

RESEARCH 

SECRETARY 

Salary £9.658 pa Inclusive 

We require an enthusiastic experienced Secretary to 
join a leant of researchers in the new Cancer Psy- 
chiatry Research Unit at the Sutton branch of our 
world -famous hospitaL 

The Secretary will be responsible to the Director of 
the Unit for co-ordinating and organising the re- 
search work of the whole UniL 

Accurate shorthand, audio and typing skills are 
essential and word processing experience would be 
desirable, although training win be given where 
necessary. By the way. the successful candidate will 
have excellent organisational skills and the confi- 
dence and maturity to comnnmicaie with patients 
and staff at all levels. 

Informal enquiries will be welcomed by Dr. Steven 
Greer. Director, on 01-733 0289. 

Application form and job description are available 
from the Personnel Department at the above ad- 
dress or teL 01-642 Nil Ext 469/409. Closing 
date 3rd September 1986. 


PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 

Managing Director of fast growing financial 
publishers located in the West End seeks Personal 
Assistant Interesting and varied work, good typing 
essential. Experience neede^prefera^m punishing 

Apply in writing only with fuQ CV to: 

Rosters Ltd, 

60 Wellbeck Street, 

London W 1 M 7 HB. 


£ 11,000 

Banking or 
corporate finance 
exp? 

You have good 
shorthand/WP + 
‘A’ levels for the 
Vice President of 
a City bank with 
plush spacious 
offices. Free 
lunches. 

City 3778600 [ 

Wea End 439 7001 p — j! 

Secretaries Plus 


TRAVEL PR 
PA/ SECRET ARY 

Come and join otr small, 
friendly West End khv 
adtancy^ specialising n 

If you're ntneteenlsii. adapt- 
able. super-efficient, have 
excellent SH/Typ aid spell- 
ing, can cope in a hectic 
atmosphere, are eager to 
lean and be part of a busy 
team, you'd be most 
welcome. 

Good salary are 
Some travel perks. 
Non-smokng office. 
Call RBA: 

01-437 9475/7445/7448 

NO AG E NCIES 


Secretary 

Personnel 

We are a substantial Public Limited Com- 
pany with worldwide operations. Our 
Headquarters is based in the West End 
of London and we have a vacancy tor a 
very good Shorthand Secretary to work 
in the Group Personnel Department. 

The person appointed will join a small 
team and will be involved in all aspects of 
secretarial work including word process- 
ing and some administrative duties. 

The successful candidate probably 
around 20-25, win have a minimum of two 
years experience and will be a qualified 
shorthand typist with ‘O' level In English 
and Maths. 

As well as a competitive salary, benefits 
include Luncheon Vouchers, Pension 
Scheme and Discount BUPA. 

Applications enclosing a detailed curricu- 
lum vitae should be sent to: Miss S. 
Neale, Group Personnel Department, 
Trafalgar House, 1 Berkeley Street, 
London W1A 1BY. 


£14,000 

An American new to 
London is here to bead 
up his firm's new invest- 
ment programme. 

He needs a PA Secretary 
to help set op the office 
and co-ordinate their ac- 
tivities throughout 
Europe ■ this is an excit- 
ing challenge for a self- 
starter aged 28 - 32. 


01-629 9323 


MARBLE ARCH 
ESTATE AGENTS 

Bright, versatile, highly 
organised and motivated sec. 
100% commitment to young i 

itmumtiiig alw Iwm 

Terms to suit. 

STUART WILSON ! 
01-235 0725 


PERSONNEL 


EXECUTIVE 

ORGANISER 

£ 10,508 





MAYFAIR 

PROPERTY 

Audio with S/H 20+ . Jain 
a lively youig mem work- 
ing in a PA roto-To £8 ,650 
+ all banking to n arifo. 
Please call NUd. 
h totp ree ag e Free Cions 
01-439 2308 


SUMMER ^ 
TEMPORARIES 

We Heed Yoa 
Yea Need Ud 

We DONT oner hohday pay 
Wft strings JOactedP 
We DO offer 

* Top rates to match your 


Our clients tart wtafo need 
s ec re ta ir es who are stalled on 
Wordstar md-Ofenttl wort 
processors. Come rnMneet 
our busy, energetic team who 
■* caret to year needs with a 
variety of booJmgs. 


Senior 

Secretaries 


Ir1 


PROPERTY PA 
27-35 to £144100 

The Senior Partner of a ni^riy 
respected, web known prop- 
erty company beaea m 
prestigious SW1 offices 
needs to recruit a few otass 
shorthand sec/PA. Utmost 
loyalty end JSscrotion 
essential coigitod with 
exceflem organtseoonal 
abtftww, smart appemnwc* 
and ahnable nature. 
Plena tefepfane Lyn BaM 
88 01-439 3054 
(438 0482 after &38pai) 
FaitbfoU Perstmel 


FIRST EQUITY 

New securities company in 
- the Cttyrequire a 

Secretary/Becepbornst 
with experience of Word 
Perfect Attractive salary 
plus bonus. 

Phone Simon Cowan 
01-3883111. 


SEC/PA 

EXPORT DIRECTOR 
FASHION COMPANY 

Berman/ French. SH/Typng 
essential. Salary according 
to age and experience. 
Phone 

01-253 9333 ext 210 
(No agencies) 


Juggler 

£11,500 + 
benefics 

A long ouMishod ««■ 
pony with j household 
runic, bated in the .Wes* 
End, is sccLmc « 
accomplished PA 'Secre- 
tary to work tor one of 
their main board directors. 
He holds a wide range of 
outside dincaonhios. as 
. well as sHuag oa dump 
guild and outside com- 
mittees; and needs a PA 
who is weU versed in the 
sfcdk needed ro operate in 
this diverulied out wry 
senior lend en nr onmoit- 
Tact. discretion and 
wranlrr with the diary. 

atom; whh impeccable sec- 
retary skills (lOOrbOk air 
essential to provide a 
sophisticated Put involv- 
back-up. Age range 

01-4371564 

MacBain 

Sc Asyxxmes Ltd 
Rrcrajancm Consultants 
I JGReseni Street, 
London VI 


GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

(Non Secretarial) 

_tor anal proteawH assocSdWr 
ramMUDemoortSstorS 


beistso/silMraxxians. sorang Ore 
asm. ComX ml CommoBBs: «- 


etc. PrefeneO ips 40 - s/50i SlUy 
ncSSJM Hi 


■anq^c Encrtro MacMa. 
m. Btiw Stori. Laadro VL 

B1-9K B&tl. 


HO SHORTHAND 
£ 9 , 500 +++ 

Do you hare saretr fares, 
charm, and personalty? H 
90, we have trie |ob tor you 
worlang tor e partner in a 
presd^ow West End prop- 
erty company. As wel as 
audto se cr e tarial dudes, halt 
yur time wit be spent in 
organising runeraus fonc- 
ftona and cocktnB parties. 

Bond St Bureaa 

22 South HoBon St, Wi , 

. ■ (Roe Cone) . 

629 3632 B29 5560 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


TELEPHONIST ft RECEPTIONIST 
- CITY 

£7,000 + + + 

A fast growing shipping Company with headquarters in 
attractnre modem offless by the river now needs a 
second tetephonist/rBceptionist to operate the elec- 
tronic switchboard (x lines) and to receive visitors for 
our hunched plus head office staff, 
we appreciate that the first impression that our cus- 
tomers win have of the Company wifi be of you and 
therefore the ideal applicant for this busy position will 
be a bright young person with a good voice who Ikes 
meeting people in person and on the telephone. 

We would prefer some. experience of working in an 
office environment but not necessarily as a telephonist 
or reception 1st We need enthusiasm, confidence are! 
willingness to carry responsibility for the public face of 
the company. 

in exchange we offer the basic salary plus free lunch, 
health insurance, season ticket loan and clothing 
allowance. 

If you believe you have the right qualities please ring: 

Miss Terry Brennan on 01-248 9666 


SECRETARY 

Wanted now for a very busy shipping 
company in NW1, a 20+ secretary with 
excellent skills (60 typing 100 shorthand), 
answerable to the technical manager. 
There is an office girl to help with filing and 
office duties. Salary starting at £7,500 
depending on age and qualifications. 

Phone Christopher Dale on 01-935 3005 


RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY 
£8,500 20+ 

Prestqiau City property company seeks a socsll* poised, wel 
presorted receptnost/secretary. Greet tiro influential efionts in lux- 
urious aunnufings, answer the bosy swtuttxnnl and Info out on tin 
seoe u r ia l side (typing speed 45WPM). A faufaUy, bright, pnrimaund 
attitude would be tin key to this enjoyable position. 

Call Monique on 01 734 2567. 


PART-TIME ASSISTANT 
ADMINISTRATOR 
REGENTS PARK 

The British Cardiac Satiety is looking for an IntBiB- 
gent responsible person with a secretarial 
background to assist the Administrator. 

Duties include the organisation of scientific meet- 
ings, compiling a survey of British Cardiology, plus 
various other tasks. 

Hours to be discussed. Salary a.aJ9. No medical 
experience required. 

For more information please telephone HBary 
Fitzgerald on 486 6430. 


XkStriUfrM 

VRccniitnicnt 


CHELSEA 

Starting October, Audio/- 
WP secretary/offrce 
admin to work for small 
friendly Architect/design 
studio. Must be flexible 
and willing to take 
responsibility. Salary 
£7.500 to £8,500 ac- 
cording to experience. 

Contact Sarah 
Purcell Miller Tritton 
64 Bury Walk 
London SW3 6QA 
Tel: 01-351 6851 


KI1UUUL SfMlOft stcrcune 
rvptore yrxir nmiiM polmlul 
in Uv Cjiy "r w currmrry 
mruUng anniMis wwane 
who arv kwn la qaln fjpfn 
mcc wnik* carniaq JMl* 
avnuqr ubiin ana qi»ol 

frlngn imMits m our rompa- 

nn Th^ ladowlm ur wmc 
ninral numpln o< Mnlnm 
aidiuw- PcnaniMl C 1 OCOO 
MocUKMiro £9-11 OWJ Bank 
inn OT.SOO. PR 1P.500 If you 

Iuif VHjrul wfn*urlal kUUk 

ana prpfwaoli' WP r\pn«w<> 
Dih h ithrrp vaur (MW Uio-s 
ail Senior Srrrriirm 01*06 
l«l 

w wit nucaw «.mo - w 

duMlr KaMuni Wlh mwnfnt 
■n ihn audio /copy ivihiki rate. 
b«tMna la prruarr rounr mair- 
mi for a world tea diT in in* 
(KM of bmnm naming Frrr 
luneti dally FrHndiv crowd. 

Victoria bated Pkwte caU Ol- 
009 1253 I> Wort Shod. 
KOnWHST m<MM Proirv 
signal m-r-WMinnJ b imnM by 
oir Bfi-Uigtou* Wesi End cltenl 
ExcHlnu tetephonc mannor 
and nnoiuiMr. as wail as prr 
sHsus exvrrttnc*. is mwiuM. 
Tspmg <& wpm Age- 
Pteasr rail Ol^tWtVHl Hated 
SIMM Associates Lid 
ABMM/SCC 0*0°®* - «nigni 

in ntuoMHl iibdiuIuh nr 
Krourgiop Hrti Siren Lois of 
aMdmnlwl and admin dial, 
lame Graduate yrctefTM. 
Tvplng sowpm. Pteas* tele 
pfinuc 0»-A*>S STBT Cordon 
Van Consultancy 
SECOND JOBBER, or urv ronfi- 
<tenl Cofteg- teaser wim audM 
and snurtnand sktBs for pramr 
iv drirtoaers in Pall mall 
re COO Cad lOb'i cr 

4MTIHI "*n( Eidi Swrrlar 
in Hit- Eng Secretarial 
CartMlUntv 

MAYFAIR intetTMUwnul iratbitg 
company v*rks s««Ur» Jo 

nrtn with '' P ^ 0, V. 

IreOrt- UfMipFnri'fi T\pni nx 
trained Hrs»6 STO1 MOOO. 
rniirwrd otlrr 5 mlhs TH Ol 
491 (H77 lor furltter mfo- 
PA AUDW SEC nsunrcd bv Prm 
r.Sdof '"wn Mavfa.r 
Sunnon interne mo aim rhal 
Minna wnrUOd Lais of arinvn 

aSSa-SSy rnmncnr oi 

MW5 

4 RUUC I fWST nouoit bv Pub- 
innmq Companv lor iaru>d 
MteUiW rote t£.rm Rim 
ZtHSn s«>9 ar Uiwjuagr 

«- pi* » «n» 


E 12.000 + + Awls, funds and 
iiurdmenK arc this new 
Dwnor'i mnonsiwbltes when 
hr mm in September Ibis team 
of higMy regarded and raireme- 
tv successful portfolio 
managers As ns secrMary. you 
wm need lo dp rUTCfTirty 
eflKlnl and caeabte. able lo 
’ handle more than ihe . usual 
HJCierr of spcrriartal dimes and 
nai e admin tsiranve ncpmefice 
Skills lOO/bO and IBM display 
whirr pspeneiKP prefenrote. 
Age 25 JO. Package includes 
esceltenl hnwllls. Tel. Senior 
Secretaries OI «W OOPS 


FAST FORWARD YOUR UFC. 

Looking foe a carver step? More 
rrspcnrjmniv? Better pay? we 
al Sen lor Secreiar tes realise Ibe 
rnrnoruiice ot finding Ihe ngm 
pogion in that second lob. If 
sou nave outgrown your first 
seereianai rote and hair 
reached a crossroads tel us help 
sou ma*e me rtam choice, we 
deal Wiih a variety of compa- 
nies. from established legal 
lirms lo advertising, the arts, 
am media. Phone us. now Se- 
nior Secretaries Ol 5B9 Jd2Z 

PHPP C RTT £10.000)- exc 

mlv -\ semor level posnion 
h*. arisen (or this well known 
firm ol Chartered Surveyors. 
Based in then- lovely Mas fair 
Olliers, you win be working foe 
one of meir Investment Part- 
ners who is describ-d as a 
charming grnllman In nts rhir- 
lies Duties will mcluae setting 
up hn many meelunn and lun- 
rfiemi appnnl ments. basing 
with ciiencv and general tv gtv- 
mg uamn secreiarul support. 
TeteDhone Caroline king Appls. 

Ol aog aoro 

ADMINISTRATOR - Coordinate 
40 salesmen, supervise 3 lu 
mors. In e on Ihe phone and 
keep vour head in this busy 
kmgnisbndoe office. Snort Hand 
typing needed CO.SOO ♦ Donir. 
es Call Vn BoOOiClO i or jao- 

TW*l meg Lndi. Herreurtes 
Pius Tne Seereianai 

Consul! anh 

SECMETARV/ BOOMMXPOI 

ct.12.OCO Join llm Mayfair 
oavrti Finance Company as 
secretarv/admniislralor lo mnr 
Managlnq Director A sound 
iwgy seeping ban- ground and 
DO wpm ivpmg abililv needed 
Training given on Ihe latest 
rornpnlers Please telephone 
Ol aao 35M/5S31 >knl End' 
or 01040 3551 iOU i EJIxa- 
hrtn Hum Ftecrullment 
Consultants 

COSMETICS AND TRAVEL 

f.'OW L.vertlrni opportunuv 
lo rerene lirvl rla«s seereianai 
■raining with ims major travel 
onunisaiwn The Chalrmah 

nretfv a runiar serr clary so you 
viiu learn an about office proce 
duri-. al senior level Good 
prosper Is for someone quick 
and enlhuvusnr Skills BO/-15 
Piegse telephone CdrolltK King 
APPfs Ol-dOO 8070. 

SPANISH IM MAMMCMSMfni lo 
Cl 0.000 Why commuie when 
ynu ran wart local Lv and use 
V'jUr gnnd spoken SHKjnr-ti as 
wiwarv W Ihe oncf-alions 
managi.i of this Internal tonal 
Cnmpuler Company T 100/CC 
skills needed Please irteohane 
Ol .’40 ASI 1/3631 ikyesl find I 
«f OI 2X0 T-a51 iQIVi. Pna 
••'hi Muni ftemuUTtenl 

I '- >-sullanl-- 


PA TO FAHUOMI UlAUOiW 

Cl l .OOOIsh. in the heart of Hie 
wed End's faMan dHtrtcl tbto 
TBrChc tusawortUaud wMcn 
even Mrs Thauner would baulk 
at. Its masatvef So youH need to 
be able » take some off lua 
shoulders wflb a -anile on your 
face. Lot* ot meeting*, chentv 
■nary. Your English will have to 
be lerrlf dong wflh you key- 
board skat*. CaU MKM 
Krmog tm dd OFTTCE ANGELS 
Rec Con* 01-639 OT77. 


AOMUOSTRATTON RECEPTION 

arc you very well presented, 
well spoken and (airly inieui- 
qenl. IM evpanding 
professional to Ul WI Seeks 
such a person lor Uuer brand 
new reception Oompulemed 
swiichbord «*n»cnmce and 
some typing required. Clothing 
allowance for other wear Age 
34 18 years ta.300 ♦ more de- 
lads oi 5W 1044 Meredith 
Scon RecTuiunenl 


are currenlly seeking log call- 
brr secs lor a variety of 
samulalmg and rewarding posi- 
tions in and around London If 
you nave any of uie following 
languages French. German. 
Italian . Spanish, rail us mime 
dwtelv for lurther dlraal -1 
Met row Emp Aav ■ The lao- 
guage SneciaiMisj 6M I4fl7 


SEC PA lar ulev/nurkpling <ti 
reclor of h-ading 

commuo teal tons Co Good ne 
mg audio and w P esnenlial 
combined wiin sound adnun 
skills and atuuty in deal with 
Denote al all level's working 
within a IM moving environ 
rttesil LI 0.000 neg Rrm SSI 
INS Wen on SlaTT Cansulanls 


■DOOR AUDIO SEC - required lo 
work for this wisl-eslaMisned 
Property Company Working 
lor Iwo OHKjMim Managers, 
you will arrange mrcnngs. oia 
nev type reports and generally 
become lotally involved To oe- 
come pari ol I his friendly, 
rrtaved envuanmenl you need 
Iasi arrigate audio lyping and 
an ocgirused pfolpvioflal an- 
proarh Salary InLIOOOO Age 
3<MS Please rail Ol 4Crt 1333 
The wort Shoo 

HECTIC MARKETING. Asm ems 
Liny- public company based 
near Liverpool Street in Iheir 
nusy marketing depi -mu will 
be dealing with promotion and 
advrrlivinq agencies diary ho- 
tel and travel arrangements 
Audio and copy Ivpmg with WP 
exp Lerv lively environmrni 
E8.SO0 S- e\C benefils. 
Comae] Sarah Ward Fleet Pern 
Her Con. 404 49M 


OFFICE MAMADtJt wnh good ko- 
to 3d* Small Chelsea 
Pnooerty Management Co. 
look* for a wetkeduoaed. 
'harming, eonfioenl and re 
UHMMcai person so run the. 
otflce Negouaion and cMcnte 
need lo be taken rare of and the 
bark- up office admin run 
smoothly. Super offices mw 
oeopte rCIQOOO. Joyce 
Gomes) Ol 589 SSO7/O01O<reC 
enrol. 

CtILLECE LEAVER - Exhibdinns 
lo CT.SOO Gel vour rarerr oil 
lo a grand start with ihisinend- 
lv e«hm,tions rnmiuim 
Involved m nroanisuig nmics- 
shows, you will be gaining esc 
evn in .1 field where non see r .1 
rei-r dm We potent r. a regiuv 
Skills HO/SO wpm Sv neroy Ihe 
rerruiimenl rceisuliunry O) 

ev5~ 

If UTPB. cUMM. Verms 
and rmndm computer con- 
suUancy In WI need* Q 
divnwnal setTrtarv lo wort for 
two mamyev A Item hand H 
needed w organise the team and 
ptervly of cmwIMUk to be In 
votved in mamr prueru. 
TVutng 60 wpm and Wpnpert- 
encr Age S4-S5 Tetertione 
Angela Mortimer Lid 029 9680 
i Rec Canal 


Secretaiy/Receptionist 

Wbittiogdale Ltd. Be^s a young secretin;/ reception- 
ist to join its pypanrHng young team in a busy 
environment 

Applicants should have nkilh of 90/50, WP expeei- 
eoce/ training, and be abb to irorir accaratefy to 
dumffinng The position requires a smart person with 
good telephone manner an would suit someone with 
1-2 yearn experience or an exceptional coDega leaver. 
Age 18-22. 

Please reply with fall C.V. and current salary toe 
Bevedey LMvies, Whittingdale Ltd, 2 Honey L a n a, 
IwnHrvn EC2V 8BT. 


CTTT mac PA ClO.OOOCdy HQ 
Of famous markrlmg firm srrks 
Ute bnghteSL ouirtest. 
srmbngrsl. prcwn-rr^islanl 
teerrury as num ter In sca-ral 
tiigh-flywv STL Bonus. Subs 
rrslauranl Call Suite Dormer 
OFFICE ANGELS RFC Com Ol 
621 «6J 


MAIDENHEAD TO £12408 for. 
Offu-r Manager with good sw 
rrurial skills and WPr vp Musi 
Dr prmarrd lo lan rompany in 
Lcukton and hrtp ergaiuv rrtev 
ralion Sound admin isiralivr 
background rsartmal Jay gar 
Caiwis ' SJoano Square i LU Ol 
730 5148. 


RANKERS PA Ct0.2Sa Tminr 
rote lor 22-Z8 VT ok) handling 
Ihr affairs of 3 European wo. 
w P\ Not lor an immalurr per- 
son v*tv cvlmsnr (ravel 
arrangentenis Call Hrlesi Rick- 
ets OFFICE 4NGELS R« Cons 
01 4J0 2531 


CUSTOMER SUPPORT £12800 
Supervisory 1 POR hi puUistnnq 
systems Carrrr onenlrd 25-35 
j-r old meal. Daletw*- control 
data files rvp v rial Great pros- 
peefs Call viJura Thomas 
OFFICE ANGELS Rrc Cons Ol 
S3>3 0644 


RUSTY S. H CITY £8 1*00 Fi- 
nance Mnor supervising 
takeovers nee ds comnuRwl PA. 
a vers docreel person with casv 
manner with r lie ms LVs 
Leans eir Call huw Dormer 
OFFICE 4 NOELS R« Cons Cl 
to2! 9363 


SEC CC3 CP 500 Famous nwr- 
rbani bank »*« an VuOic PS 
lo min proiecl team of 6 Forget 
Lnl typing Acrurary r* kina 
Here Oraanrv- nwuc diary- loo 
BL PA Lvs Subs ranleen Call 
Clive Rinqro-e OFFICE AN- 
GELS Rec Com Ol 0777 


A SUCCESSFUL highly dioig 
fled Amenran Corporal ion 
■nvravnl in r-al i-Jjlr roraput- 
rry. rrtading and ncallh care is 
setting up a new European 
heaKiurim in Ihe Wist End 
An evcrttefil PA r- needed lo 
brov kfe fuff serreiariai Nick up 
lor IM Company Allornv tou 
wifi be cflirrenl h.yve go-id am 
immsiralivr j^iIiIhs and skilly 
ol 100/00. WPcvpcre-nrrisc-.. 
senijal Aoc r&-4S Salary up lo 
£11.500 senior berreianes 
■ Her Cetw P I 49<* Crtrr 
HICH SP IR I TS: w me nurlfiifia 
company m WI r. loukiim lor 
an cnihuuasiac ronlidem and 
rtlinml seereiarv fer iwe sail-, 
executives in a small bie,v loam 
toil win Im- mvoiveO wilh P R 
arm ilies cirjnmrr. an -1 >'«| 
control a» well a-. orq,mranq 
travel and lunenes skills el 
10 O/OO. 2 y ears ey-pmence and 
some French Salary Lu 500 
£10.500 Please rliwi 454 4S1? 
Crone Oortnl Rerruilmenr 
Censunanis 

PUSUSHIMG -nn sfkiniund> 
HR OOO This sman luuaisfuna 
house speruliung in general in 
leresl and id on uo> r. 
seeking .■ P A ir, r.irry oul _ . .,r 
iid admin onenlaii-d lunriu-n 
With IMS iH aumnr r.ini.iri vou 
wilt ofsnirr ecu, |ei ran-, end 
Kaunrh parlies and will m- meal 
I-. iiHom-o in .i rote where 
initially e is uul Typing al 

55-spm 5 audio abUiiy ri-uil 
Svn-rgV I hi r*rrinlniem rnii 
siillanrv Cl e-57 >*533 
YOUNC WORKAMOUC - «X! 
V..1H- rompaliv dn-rlar vcl.-. 

oulgrsng cnnlntetit rhararirr lo 

leak alter all liatrl/nieefinip/ 
diar-. appoml-Tienls and in 

sales mi-seni juans to flienl> 

\ MU Will pud wind Cngle n .ind 

grind skills •W/o O- Vp 21 • 
Salarv- lo ClfiW Plr.iv iri 

pi 4fj> 1212 Thr work shop 

PHOTOCRAPHK AGENCY. W.sl 

lint. i.-innl— hr |. ten 

iifranonr t/lipiu io tunk .iiur 

S leung rnnsullafils Phuni- lu 

u.tp Oh 01 4 In." | 


FRENCH SI-UNGUAL SEC far 

head of Reanrarcti in Cay Bank. 
Skllby of IOO/5S. Busy, vaned 
posilhm for nuture and flexible 
person. 22* £10000 ♦ be Ms 
lib Link Language 84a 9743, 


MAYFAIR ESTATE AGENCY 

Seeks smart, adaptable, weq 
spoken Rercpilumsl with typing 
experience Salary negotiable. 
Telephone Mrs Churchman 01- 
493 0676 


CHEAP MORTGAGE A Benefit* 
galore for audio sec In reciting 
hanks -Big Bang" £9.000 Da 
sic. Phone 01-588 9851 Aim 
Warrington Sec Careers 


COLLEGE LEAVER or 2nd tabber 
lo AM plnr of Stockbrokers aa 
PA Sec £7.000- plus bonus. 
Phone 01 588 9851 Aim War- 
nngion Sec Careers. 


ITALIAN RfTEHWR DCSMtoERS 

U0/60 SEC Kalian useful cus- 
tomer ikitson Fabulous studio 
L9.000 aae Call Natalia. TED 
agy 01-736 9857 


TEMPORART WORK Audio Le. 
gal Secreunev Eaceilefil rales - 
WP expenenre an advantage 
Ol 49t last Ltncotm Legal 
Agency 


WP SECS for Merchant Bank. 
Some Admin. Benefits Inc] 
cheap mortgage and free lunch. 
£9.000 Phone Ol 580 9861 
Ann Warring! on sec Career*. 


MARKETING /ADVERTISING 

CrtSOOr A bnghlourgMna per 
««in who has bags of inillaliv* 
will thrive in in is up and com. 
i no Mart rf ing Company 

AvrJing iwo laniaslk bosun 
wilh a varied work Mad. vour 
•Julies will include general sec. 
rel.in.ri hack UP client 
rrsejtch/v islf. .mo helping 
with prr-v. refeayes. Tv-ptnq as 
wpm age SO- Telrohone Car 
ofine King -Voces- 01 -199 8070 


RCCEPTWNIST 12 to - 6 3Apm. 
to hour week C6.SOO * bene- 
Ills Wed groomed and wen 
spnken person for large image 
rnnsnous leaal practice clove lo 
51 Pauls II sou mild wrlromc 
» rjlor. with tari ana charm, 
help arrange conference book- 
ing*. and are 25-* years please 
call Tina Crokcr 01-930 S733 
Crniatnm Staff Agency. 


SHORTHAND NOT ESSENTIAL. 

Just good audM amt w.p. as sec- 
retary to the Finance Director 
of an ECS i nsu r an ce company 
£10.000 Call 377 8600 iCHyi 
or 439 7001 iWe*B Endi. Secre- 
taries Plus - The Secretarial 
Consul tanls- 

GHAPMC DESIGH ORH - IT 

ccpbon/sec sought 8v dynamic 
small design ransuflancy nr Ov 
font Qrrus. Languages useful 
Typing 50wpnv Age 21+ 
Ptease lelephrine Ol -493 6787 
Gordon Yates Consultancy. 


Continued from page 27 

SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


ISLANDS IN THESUN 

AUQUEPSEPTBUOtOCTOBER 

FLY DIRECT TO CORFU. 
CEPHALONtt. ZAKYNTHOS, 
CRETE AND SWATHOS. 
BeauMviasandappartmaiis. 
P ose to porous beaches. 
fflE windsurfing in Ciwe 




IUOS ISLAND 

HOLIDAYS 


N0N-SECRETAR1AL 


LETTING’S 

NEGOTIATOR 

required for friendly Hampstead office. 
Experience preferred but willingness to 
learn and work bard without dose 
supervision more important. Car 
owner/driver. Excellent package for the 
right person. 

Nathan Wilson & Co.. 

64. Rosslyn Hill. NW3. 

01-794 1161 

/Ref non secretarial BT). 


frnfl lo ■rfwnifflf ■tf’II mom Glf-tl 
.iTtfi ^rmmillKS Cwnnwrui or 
ru.il ai-lirtn tur i qrouml 
.in>i itofiiurip *nimi*si m p- o pl v 

r- ViiUiJij rnnMdrr ^ 

Irwnr.- Ijy-iai Currerviiikkinr 
Lite Of 7«J SfJA 


KEN9INCTON PR O PER T 7 CO. 

run- .in inintetluh- • ac.iitey tor 
.1 will csiw-nn-d well woken 

ns gninii'J, ii-ii-pnonivt ■ Mnn 
•ii> n* .ililr in ha-.- conlidrnily al 
all li-iif* and type ill wpm. 
f C7 <y\’* Ple.i'4' call Lvn 
Kami Oil Ol Li 1 ? 3054 Fait tit old 
r*ri-..»miS 


H 


I TsNphaneHaalm 

(0403)59788 


CORFU ft PAXOS 

We Rwatoa m VHi HoHays 
and have seNcttU a ipalty rain 
al beach vtilas. and sedated aX- 
tages m ahse gnwes da» to 
some of the finest beactes on 
the Bland. 


lalacarkA 



CORFU VILLAS we sun have 
ov allaoillly Sunday 51 Aug. 7 
Sept lor 2 wkv. Beautiful villas 
nr uie beach <** Gatwnck. Pan 
Worfd HoHdays. Ot 734 3S62 


magic prices nifpits « 
holidays Freedom HetkUys. 
Ol 741 4686. ATOL 452. 

GREECE. LitaKMH islands, cheap 
flights, villa renBIs etc 2 mm 
HO ts Ol 434 IM7 AWL AUO. 

" RHO D E S lux atari nob from 
£189 to 27 Aug. 3.7.10 Sept 
Si lama 070&8t>281 4“ 


UX HOLIDAYS 


UN EX P E CT E DLY FREE Charm 
ing period cottage. Ehn «. 
Dmvnfand views. London 1 hr. 
All amenities. East Meon 595. 


COTSWOLDS 


mMCHCome- nmfsm arau. 
period character cottages. Meal 
centre touring. SMa 4-6. TM 
0242 602 124 

ROYAL T CT B U H V- TranguO 
l ai inya i it- cottage avail 
Aug/Sepr 056652 5SB- 


LONDON 


DRISCOLL HOUSE HOTEL. 200 
single towns. 066 pw PB. 172 
New Kent Rd. London. SE1 
4YT 0! 705 4175 


SCOTLAND 




PUBLHHMC: WORDSTAR see's 

ivh mil issi rcauued for long 
and short term aaugnmenFs. 
oho letup to perm. Top rate's 
P.W1 satin- weel Ring 561 1245 
Wellon Staff Consultants 


DtSPLAYWRITE 3ur> with S/H 
required for uiternalional W t 
i Jo Long term loo rale's paid 
same week Ring 581 >254 

Wellon Staff Consultants 
SOUGH PA's 1 100/601 W'c have 
top assignments for your IOP 
skins Call Moira on 01229 
9244 Otficr Overload Any 


VILLAS WITH A MACK TOUCH. 

A villa, a pool and a beautiful 
view. What more could yon 
want? Choose from Tuscany. 
Sardinia or RaveUo - Ute lovelf 
or parts of Haly where Ihe mass 
market operators don't go Or 
combine a villa holiday with a 
stay in V Mure. Florence or 
Rome Free brochure from 
MagK of nary. Dept T. 47 Shep- 
herds Bush Green. WI2 8PS 
Tel. 01 749 7449 124 Im 
servicei 

TUSCANY - Marina Ol 
Pietrasanta Drtrghlfut villas, 
steeping 4/6 people, aval) 23 
Aug for 1/S wity Self drive or 
wilh fils villa rental from £560 
pw other dates avail. Resort 
Villas 061 855 9094. AST A 
ATOL 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ONE FABULOUS ALGARVE VUla 
left' 28 August for 12-14 days. 
Steeps up to 10 Sensational 
news, staff and pool Super 
gnrp ct. 750 p w Other houses 
avauaote Sejri/On The Algar- 
ve Alternative. 73 SI James SL 
London SWi. Tel.Oi -491 -0802 
ALGARVE. Lux villas with pools 
A opts Avail Sept/Od. Ol 409 
£858. ViUaUorM. 


3NN8UKH Luxury 2 bedroom 
(Ul In modern complex with 
pool, sauna, solaria and gymna- 
sium. central location. CMJOOO 
Tel 0224 684597 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


SDH MltPI b u s h u nm an/ 
farmer requires cheerful adan- 
abfe lady, some secreunal Allis 
and nousetweiiuig abtbty. to live 
bias family Driving Itcense es- 
sential. TeL 04893 2859 Or 
2881 during office bourn 


GOOD NK.IV6 FOR you and yoiifx- 
Need a helping hand? We win 
take care of your home, vour 
(amity or your pets at a 
moment's notice. Can 
Homrcarera on. 01-590 6788. 
CHALET GMLS-Over 21 . rooking 
experience essenllaL French 
Lanqpref Please appfy with Cv 
Snow Place Chalets, 10 Cleve- 
land Way. El Ol 790 2424 
CHALET CBtL Reg for prtsMi 
Outlet Vertaler. Dec-Aprtl. Ap- 
ply id writing to AmufteL Flat 
5. Nev era Place. London. SW5. 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


OR KMNNT male aged 22 Just 
graduated I rarn university in 
Boston USA. BA Ui potmcal 
snence/modern mstory. widely 
read curmu dun. Seeks post 
as tuft or part time research as- 
sistant lo Member of 
Parttamrni London area 
prefer ed Reply to BOX H06 
The Tunes. Advert Drat. Vir- 
ginia SL London El 900. 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


COLLECTORS CARS 


Ground up rebuild Just complet- 
ed. a very good example. 
£3.750 DrtaBs 0386 852 787. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


COSTA DDL SOL i20 mlro Puerto 
Banin MarbrUai Super use OP 
Orach 2 twin bednro & 2 baths 
ensulle subo gdn. s/poah. res- 
taurants. supermarket Award 
wrarana oeiekuHtienl. Maid 
-ervirr tram L20Q pw Owner 
Ol 586 4554/885 2521 
MARVELL* LovrtV villa in large 
garden with pool 1 double bed- 
rooms -T hauiroonn Near sea. 
Available now taoo per week. 

Tel 055 286 767 
MARBELLA. Lux Milan with 
POOh-6 atm. Aug lo Oct. 01409 
2858 ViUaWorM. 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


MORGAN 4/4 2 -sir 1985 ABoy. 
sifier/dove pres 1 . W/W. grev 
leather, tonneau etc. C 11 JK 0 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


WINTER SPORTS 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


SKI BLADON LINES 

86/87 BROCHURES HOW OUT! 

47 Resorts m Sm ntz ar ia nO . 

Austria. France & m 
The Skggest Choice Ot 
ExGanKk. Lutm. Maoctafter, 
Glasgow S EmnUmh 

01 7852200 

Maoch. Dep*. 0422 78121 
ABTA 18723 ATOL 1238 


SKI WEST bumper brorhurr out 
non parked with aU Ute I Op re 
sort' Sunday fbohls tbeal the 
iratlte'i and anwingl> low 
‘ piKvs starting al C39 Ring tOl I 
7B4 lw vour copy 
ABTAD92MI ATDL1385- 


GENTLE PEOPLE 


Me sarong a lesnrcaM Di- 
rec®f n enand fte operation 
to the UK. H your atrtiutes 
mdode a sense of humor, 
deaesan. sengtHty to others 
and ptatetaW good soaN 
eontads. «e maU 0c to 
sdieduta an ntanew n Lon- 
don Dus ne* wth ZeUa 
Fechar 

Gesute People ol Boston. Hew 
York and San France ca « si 

estatokshad « gmoton for 

tigNy ahicsad. cuBned ind- 
pN sknMr to ExeaUNe 
Search » otters the nust tfcn- 
nM m n tod the tqn 
SBCti fflrao for al as mem- 
bers by itatang corarinaJ 
persona Uraductans. Mah- 
nos aba moo at our 
receirtriris.and social erow. 

CaB 01-435 5426 
a( any time to arrange 
» amuratnetti. 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


BIG BANG 

Where will you be 
when it happens? 
Trainee position in 
Europe's leading bro- 
kerage for individual 
25 +* with ambition 1 
and flair. j 

John Kilbum-Toppin 
01-499 7800 


8MADUAT15 three trainee exec- 
utives aged 21+ returned Car 
ettabtahed London cansuaan- 
Anbrmdlrd first year 
Nmun <-4-12.000 Tefcphom- 
01-828 246? 


Mthtg Agetm regntre a *rtf 
motivated and commisNofi or* 
mated imooiw for bwy 
Offlte. Telephone 681 8136. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


COURSES 


A LEVEL 
ECONOMICS 

Rttrit8santtieUm.CamA.E8.. 
Oxf/Cam floardr mtensim 
prap ara flon n material & tsch- 
mmes. 10/17 «ek A ! year 
causes. 

Beg i ni I A IM ftor courses 
Lan Boom can be eoratinal wtft 
aftsttar Stanford 'A 1 Mt- ' 

asy/w 

Wtoni Iam. 

LMdM W1D 4AA 
Tit 9B 1269 (24 beers) 

STSSIhrBiBln^^ 

1 Year C— i n m afl subfertv 
OWUct Cambridge Seminam. 

4 Ha vrt ha rne Way- Cambridge 
C84 1 AX. Ten 02231 313464. 
(Anawenng ServKc 24nrsi 
W01CEY HAUL: Home study for 
GCE. Degree*. Profanom. Pro- 
specim DrwAL2. Wotsey Had. 
Oxford. 0X2 6PH. Tel 0868 
62200 C24 b»l. 


EDUCATIONAL 
COURSES REVIEW 


OMFIMCD at the wide 
private Secretarial 



“O’ AND LBVaRESirS? 




We can help yon improve 
yoor grades at 


iji j j 'ii/T-YhIM I 


53 Queens Gate, 
London SW75JP 


ftvwffl euJop oar effective smell 
group Snoop over a teim or a 
yeat Tour racoess is our success 
- and etodcans hare beea mc- 
coafing with us fiir 36 jens. 

Bing for an annfaitieeQt fcodajL 

01-225 0577 

PtfodpiL Dt Webael tyntr 


COLLDfGHAM TUlMB. Ken- 
•tnglOfl BACCIFE 01-570 6739 
O - and 'A' 1 eveH. Top revuUa. 




SALES A MARKETING 


NEGOTIATORS 

Postons - Central London fastest growing 
Estate- Agents' require another six trainee 
negotiators who, within a year, will be 
earning in excess of £20,000 pa and drive 
a Golf GTT of^-series -BMW. Starting 
salary duraig training period £6jOQQ pa. 
Must be aged 19-26, well educated and 
bold current driving licence- 

Telephone 01-727 0530. 



'■UV >.1«*IVM ; 


























































Liiva^^rr 

It s all at 

TRA1LFINDERS 





PLEASE MELT The Natfontf Bt- 
nnoicnt Fund for aw Aged to 
prendr -YCNS* moadiNS for 
UwnwruiUn in raoditioa* 
ate aiiMb. £60 bw> ■ m» 
chow. DohOom please to Tut 
Vemtnrt TOnypandy. Chair- 
man. MB; A- 55. New Bread sl, 
London EC2M 1NH. 

Ml MKMOUE Mnk unmu. 
pioBc cont aa yew mother ta 


NEWSPAPERS 
(1690*S-1 890’s) 

* Origin*** 

Beauhftjfly Pres«rved * 
FROM C1SL0D EACH. 

om - 31303 

E JONES 

43 DUNOONALD ROAD 

COLWYNBAY 
CLWYD 1X23 7RE 



M fw a MJTrn Bogus, and 
Amenao Heritage Ohm ftU- 
ltoH_PWCW - UoBheort. Hfrtry 
V. Black Prim*. Sioux, vuwa 
Bre aca. Ring Stew* Hughes 
nnfetsHy weekends or eve- 
nings one 01-439 1190. 




RENTALS 


Horner Hill 

LIMITED 


INCORPORATING 


BWlfeH 



femw/US* BQft 01-337 SWO 
Lorn fes fA 01-603 1515 
M/faws Cta 01-938 3M 
Gowmrenr Lnssoif/BoMM 
«n HTA ATQL 1*58 





SALE 

Cnfei Coda nodes. Km. SmOter 

Gttck btanfe, Tlie AJgne. Monoa 

70223**0 IMS £229 
252627293031 fog rise EB» 
L23ASM5J. . 

mju 2 s« im tm 

v*l in ad ml us Mtm 


MnMlMMM 

Aha on *» mb. tadwe 

awsHUU* CM) Cad BooMgi 


RENTALS 


For rentals ir\ Sussex, Surrey, Berkshire and S.W London 
Homer Hill Ltd. incorporating Mays Rentals offer the widest 
range of quality houses and flats. 

Telephone; 037284 381 1. Telex; 89551 12. 


Hampton & Sons 



CHESTERTONS 

— K ES1DKNTIA L ^ 


TOWER BRIDGE, SE1 ^ 

Spaowfi mourn* bum Gty mmacumfy flocorawi and 

SSSFiao ShH? na * y 2 t * ns - ®* age - v"* **""* 

■■i-Wwii Btacc rt-5» jam 


PIMLICO, SWI 

AvCTMBde stfaani ol flats to la from E1S0 Her week hr 1,5 beds b 
Bb runbo) ana. Plaau phone fta*( Scaritn d wt on tab yen. 

PWn otflcc n-CM Mtt 


UNFURNISHED FLATS TO LET 

MoM. Fifls comsa 4 m 5 rooms, 2 bathrooms. s aa arae ouftR 
CoMoA MS {* md otw Uh faBed flatten Tnaw staons ten am 
nSuflkBud and newly npMfl. Vitwns 263 5060 Letn^D^onment 
Bid* Perk DfflcK *1-212 SOU 



COOKS auutable for shooting/ 
fUNng lodtn in ScDUsnd for 
Snu oa. Now. Foe man infoc- 
RBUon: MMT1 5300. 



US lawyer 17 BuWrode SL 
London Wl Ol -HJ6 OBI 3. 



I iocMng OrIms A DocoraHon 
I Spink fc Son Limited 

I 5-7 nine Street SLjtmeFs. 

I London SWIY6QS. 

W Hi- 01 -950 1 US 12* honn* Ji 

2 V - f l 


CH«um LAMnun m tm 

Original Picture shop 33 
Moosap smu. swa evening 
nmkm Hdind wh a Bon- 
ner. not nocwarOy luo dm. no 
premium. Write or Telephone 
01^22*2696 


arm toumc clasmcal 

COmoacer of Tonal music Is in 
urgsnl need Of Mrooaae Tel: 
R. Gross 01-9404680 



An ensMnd nfae mMaaw, &»nd 
9u ol maenctePiBgaad Wane 
■hw •ncarioaBhihirnueagei 
orim mow tosnSHr cbsse* 


m» m* bsks v sgmseng and 
Hn 

DRMeocIbMduKSM. 

T.uaaon 

QMMrML si toeekifl# Op* 

7 nges HJB n 3U SM hou PUIQ 
BMiit»m.an»ttuB igtante 
Sneoai aha meiWMRuUem 
W1 lot 7ngb8.an *H 



A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 


6 Arlington Street, London SW1A 1RB - 01-493 8222 


SUPERB HOUSE (SHARE) 
IN CHELSEA 

Beautiful large double bedroom, with TV, 
balcony overlooking park, and an suite bathroom. 
Beautiful targe twin bedroom with TV and b athroom. 
Use of whole house, kitchen, drawing room etc. 
FiA Centra] heating throughout 
£55DPW & E450PW PERBEBROOM 
ALL INCLUSIVE. 

FOR DETAILS PLEASE RIIK: 

01 589 1939./ 3635. 



BRUCE 


22 cl Mid luutmarked RMrx 
wacti braccKis- 1 mem. 1 U- 
dJes. Value new £9-000. 6eU 
bMh Mr £ 3.000 ono. wui sepn- 
ral*. Tet 0489B 82939 aft 2pm 




mm 


HOUDAY FIATS 

& houses available. 
£200 ■ £3jOQD pw. 
Personal Service. 

01-458 3880 or 
0836-592824 ■ 
anytime (T). 





BRUNSWICK GARDENS, WO. 

DeSgWful 1 bed flat, sitting room, fitted kitchen, 

bathroom £280 pw. 

HOLBEIN PLACE, SW1. 

Lovely Interior designed flat consisting of 2 beds. 2 
bathrooms, double reception room and 

kitchen. £450 pw. 

LOWNDEN SQUARE, SW1. 
Stunning flat Available furnished or unfurnished. 
Large drawing room with high oefling. Dining room. 
2 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. Kitchen. __£700 pw. 


Quraishi 
Constantine 


FbrthhtMst 

rental sefactionof 

QUALITY 
FLATS A HOUSES 

m prime London areas 

270 E*tM Coart Hud SWS. 


01-244 7353 


JEAN WILLIAMS LTD 

PtMUCO swi. tawMswa <Bd*y house, dsc and fum to Won 
**rnJard . S te 3 i«*pa, 3 bafra. Sttuaw 5 mm tub, «)xl 
vttorta Slaton. ESSO pw. 

KR^n^aEll.inimaodbds3Mhse Lounga/dmer, 
Kit ail machines, smal patio gen. parting. Famdy only. £170 

^PWOTOH. pwnoolgng iMrhwl iMMatnad Modi 
with porter. 2 dWe bed flat 2 buns, ige racop, garage. 050 

^YBIUOGE. Baaudhdy retumisned cfaracwr property 

wttwi waUodgcki. Ctose waKon-on-Thames shops and m- 
ton. 4 bads. 3 recaps. 2 bams, oaraae. £2*5 dw. 







TO LET - Fantisted er mfiinilsM 




An nnaw mod*m dabded «e«»i raMkn sttnod la ■ tm «*»• wti*i nsy 
wmWMCtaaKa ol canmrunrton, *C5 and eta* to 31 mows. The spans 



FULHAM SW6. 

Si tuaied in preniriow re»- 
dentoi ttreei re Future, i 
stuiwim maisonette in superb 
order. Fnnb decor. Stripped 
pine flooring Sman modem 
fimriiue and excellent hghi- 
in* One bedroom. Double 
reception. Bathroom. New fit. 
ted kitchen. 2 beautiful 
terraces. £200 pw. 

Tel: 01-225 1972. 
HYDE PARK W2. 

Superb Bat in period conver- 
sion within walking distance 
of fink and underground sta- 
tion. 2 double bedrooms. 1 
with adjacent pano and 
ensuhe bathroom. I twin bed- 
room. Furtber bathroom. 
Cloakroom. 3 rrceps compns- 
m» drawing room, srody. and 
stunning cbning room. Band 
new ki t chen + utility room. 
Furnished wnh llair to bsh 
standard throughout £400 

P TeL* 01-727 7227. 


RBKUFFE SQUARE SW10. LOWNDES PLACE SWI 



(iKOR(i'K KNKilH - The I.etlin^ Agcnl 


HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 
TO LET 

Wc have an BKnsive portfolio Of personally inspected 


one bedroom Oats al fl 75 a week M five/si 
ai £1.500 a neck for terms of six months or iomnr. Company 
KnafXKS air generally lequunL 


For ■ mined me and profesnonal aticnuoo. 

Tcfeptwac mher our 

Hampstead Office: 01 794 1125 
Or KniglitsbridKe Office: 01 589 2133 


\ia\a<;kmkm i:\pkrtisk 


To Let 

Abbots Drive, Wentworth 

Modem detached bungalow oh pnvau mad* up road In tfw 
fogWir sought after area, convenant (or London. Cmboitoy 
ate. wed flood and fomahad with Ha*. Road Kitchen wen hob, 
ovens, dish washer etc. Utrfay Room with washer/dryor. 
Low'S 0 / Dong Room. 3 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. WC. Carund 
Heatmg. Double Oarage. Super garter* profesatontty mem. 
tamed. Avertable 1 year rarnwafin. £950 pan - nw 
PIsbm ring Sharon Metcar on 0635 30622 


ACCOMMODATION WANTED 

The CASSL Accommodation Service places 
only young professional men and women in full- 
time employment under 3 year contracts for the 
entry into the Institute of Chartered Accoun- 
tants in England and Wales. 

IF YOU HAVE REASONABLY PRICED ACCOMMODA- 
TION AND WANT RELIABLE RESPONSIBLE TENANTS, 
CONTACT THE ACCOMMODATION DEPARTMENT, THE 
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT STUDENTS' SOCIETY OF 
LONDON. 18 BEDFORD SQUARE, LONDON, WCIB 3JA. 

Telephone: 01-631-4905 
B&B/FuH Board Accommodation not suitable. 


nduflet Emma Htf. CtoHaucm. Study. Rttcd Karim UtBy 
mm. Lour*. Stas kr Master Bataan «Ai En Sum Batman < 


tarn. Dang ftoom. longs. Stmt kr Master Brikaom « 
flitter BedraouE, Double Sriite. Cura Hamag. 


woKenn mw, nwu - 

tl Mb Madrto Arch. Deifoiuftu 
.dct runrtsiied coach IwioM. 
BaauUAiOy neduihriMcl » to- 
' corporate TUI mod cons. wMM 
rctahrtnv Oh World charm A 
awracter. Ownpdn.09e.3dMe 
beds, bsttotn. cloak, ipc. dtnina 
rm. ml Access io private pool a 
Jertoia crls. Outstanding coun- 
try location. Heal for company 
let, C1J90O pan. 0202-296993 


LEFKAS 

ZMUG 23,15 SST 
(teSBaai feoh Greek tee. Wridart. 
tahpa, Bxa & Bop 

DJERBA 

2SJi MK B S8T-0CT 
Frw w/s. tennis, superb food, hra 
whe. CUnUntds Hr cr 4* ta- 
lly by sxady txactm. - 
fletea & iriofog koUws tor te>- 
gies. caoptas a mns. 
LUNABSCWE ATDL 1933 

01-441 0122 

M IKS 


BARGAIN FLIGHTS 

Sydney £455 £755 

Auckland £415 £745 

Jo-Burg £306 £499 

Bangkok £209 £356 

Cabo £135 £210 

Now York £139 E32D 

LOB Angeles £21 S £308 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


natal : E1.BM pxmt - a rf i uHl wl - aag. 
£1,350 9** - MnhM - a* 


Tateptaona Ian Pkmtey 0635 30822 


To Lot Furnished 
EAST MOLESEY, SURREY 

DMadinf famfly itntem ri smnht riter loeHion. Excateat accomnoda- 
fon eicksna. Entrance Hrfi. Drag Roan. Sara Room. Urge Good , 
actenffliwMW ftoom, Shower^takrooro. Bmraun, 4 Bedrooms. 
Large Gnge. Gas Central Heating. 

Ruttf £1000 pnua - nrgntHflte. ndudes hi garden t i ak rt wra 

Tefephone 0635 30622- Mr L Phmiley 




NW3 Spacious & tastefully furnished 2nd 
floor flat 2 beds, 2 receps, bath. Co let 
£215 pw 

NW6 character bouse, v. px»d dec order, 4 
beds, recep, ff kitchen with dining area, 2 
baths, gdo. £330 pw 

Greene & Co 625 8611 



KENSINGTON SW10 
LITTLE BOLTONS 

Super, spacious self contained 1st floor furnished apart- 
ment (Bleeps 2/3). Double bedroom, lounge/dming 
room. 


01 995 5573 




rSTATE AGENTS 


EMU count SO mu 4a hoar, lame reeapton room, ih tedmoms. 
JLrtien^btthitMni. tegs roof lance, bwgey. El2S pa AhMumuM 

JlMttoa GOOVE W4. tamntate IH doer tet t/3 beds. 1/2 ntm 
•farihreoms. flrthr Wad Mcten. Only CISC pw. Company M raaond 
CtAPIUII COMMON. NOflTH SUE SW. Enamous sen»4inHl«d Vic 
man bnrty house. Stuuwg raws acmss Common, targe mu racoom 
reom. hatter 1st tutor mmwn roan. 5 double bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. 
Bantam cettr. gas central teatmg. E400 pw. Company tat 


Fulham 

; 01-736 5503- 


W1 area to suppiernert masasa) bernand and 
expansion programme. Please reply: 
LONDON HOTEL APARTMENTS LTD 
74 Seymore Strut Londoa W1 
T«l: 01-724 1746 
Tlx: 21180 HOTLON O 


Putney 

01-789 5004 


EXPRESS RENTALS 

EXPRESS RENTALS CAN HELP YOU 
FIND HOUSES, FLATS AND BEDSITS 

EALING. Finished bedsit, las own cooker and phone £50 pw nd 
KtUKMN. Spams s/e, OL tft stutho only E68 pw 
NOmMG MU. 2 bed. t/f mas. wth gdo £90 pw nd. of rata 

01-883 5457 


LONG/SKORTLET 

Properties from 
£100 - £3,000 pw. 
Personal Service. 

01-458 3680 or 


h :k 


anytime (7) 


ALKANIC. f«o. Malaga etc. 
□unend Travel ATOL 17SJ. 
01-681 «M1. Haratum 68641 
W cma. Lowest fans «, 

I n»jor«jie«iuiea camera. 01 - 

684 7371 auta 

AamsCAN VACATHMK. Hottett 
Under The Sun. m 657 

78H5 

HOMO HOM £488. Bangkoli 
£369. Sln» £457. OUMrFfah 
hs 01-684 6614. I 

SYD/IKL £ 6,8 Perth £545 Ah 
ma l or cam era 10 Aua A NZ. Ol- 
684 7371 ASIA. 

Si .?f WC * £4*6. 01-684 

7371 ASTA. 


TAKE TONE OTF la Parte. An- 
sierdara. Brofoele. Bruses. 
Gwrva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dubhn. Rouen. Bou- 
logne * Dieppe, -nine Off. 2 a. 
Chester Close. London. Swix 
780 01 236 8070. 


barnard 

marcus 


atsawn nt7. Spsdoits aid 
vd doc tom ad Itaor ire ctoca 
10 W 1 bed. Reap. K 
and B. GCH/CHW. E225 pwTfo's 
only. 

Ptaritoa Office 

Tel: Bt-834 7316. 

in HBH HOWE, drier aid writ 
jura 2 dbte bods with enawa 
taste. &mi m Reap, ig# 
ttASn. GCH/CHW. £500 pw. 0?s 

Unfair Office 
Tel: 61-493 6889. 



NEAR AMERSHAM, 

Bucks (Baker Street 40 minutes). Attractive 
converted bam. 4 beds. 2 receps. 2 baths. 
Small garden. Close to aQ amenities. Well 
furnished. Centrally heated. 

£525 per calendar month. 

Tet Berkhamsted (04427) 72455. (T). 



MAYFAIR, W1 

Seteooii irt hay flnasted hood- 
ous sMta. nuwd in qwK 
leahixW loaMn sat off Qtovb- 
ow Si These apMnsnk am sa 
« a newly reflaboted Wock 
apprawacd Mrougfl hanfeoni 
■rougM m nes and o mvtted 
coumard. Mb m. Uh wMwcd 
in a buy Stanford aid wxM bo 
•deal (or kmt marine swhng 
Uayter based acconanoomon. 
Rrnals 07S050pw 



SELF-CATERING 


Wl. Lunuy a bpdroonwd apart, 
mem in Urgency Craconi 
Nvwbr nmmtuheo. iteriffuBy 
lunuthed wHir antiques. Entry 
hail, attractive recciMJon. mad- 
era well equipped kitchen * 
bathroom. CH. CHW. Entrance 
phone. Lin. aa hr security. Ac- 
cess to private gardens A 
ornate Mnm& courts Parking, i 
■mmue trim liOe. £386 aw. ne- 
gotiable. Long let- Company let 
only. Phone : 01 631 043S 


FWJUUW sm. 3 bed brauufouy 
riirntshed luxury flat wtih at- 
iracthe^ balcony. large 
kitchen/bTeaWast rgam. lovely 
drawing room, mw bathroam- 
Wl Metope. GCH. 6 m to rube 
and shops. Company lei ore- 
rerred. 6 moniM ■ 1 year. £275 
per week. Tel: 01-736 4S29. 



TO LET FURNISHED 
AGEMEMNON ROAD, NW6 

Victorian terraced house bitMs IdgMy sougM after aroa. CfoMto 


gansan. Wed tttad and prasantetT Including washing machine, 
colour TV etc. Rental £2 h 5 p.w. tncflistvs. Avartabte 1st Septem- 
ber for 1-2 yesra. For hither detain ring: 

Sharon M orca r on 0635 30622. 


COOTES 



idor: Ids cen:r.i! a'Oiis 

a 'sc avail C ICO £ i OOUn -v 
01-32R 825V 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 


teorne tad Modem jmw my. mute. Sfenr md Mt Funom. 
Bjwuss.6mmtb.lwnw. Jade. Paww. GUU. Paawnp, . Pnctrin. 
I Sin. DM DWh. Toys and Teddy Bern sfc. AMauafiPm 1»«b 
Quote* Prahy a emw. sum. mswern ousts, snom Cas- 
W. u«. Lriww. ril Uasottejwno. Ou imach wm ft tarewntnts 


tenwtwaa* te warn tor Jawlteywid 

”*«* gsasi *-* — 


UtTUUrvm ON mghto/hoe, 
to Europe. USA a akM dcsthM- 
uonv DUdomot Travel: 01-730 
3201 ABTA LATA ATOL. 


HOC* SPIOAum. Key 

Travel. 60. Red Uon ST. wot- 
Ol 406 1496. ABTA/1ATA. 


CMEAKST rUBHIS W/IWIDC - 

Beta Travel. TW 01 3B6 6414. 


Asrr a Momo w r tour 
of SICILY Excepuenol value 
iMewasoci Grand Tour. «pe- 
via fly desmned la sefaty wide 
usies. with seaUM# dady mile- 
age. Organ urra Tuesday 30 
SW. 7.14 taOfl £298 UkJ 
dav tmtiis Gai wick. 7 nights 
H/B id 3/4 alar hotels, airport 
law. entrant* fen Special of- 
fers Oka to TAORMINA, rod 
la rat- notet sots H/B. beach 
hotel C31S H/B. aenuone £171 
B * B. aHTer 7 nlgMa. some Hep 
daws. ISLAND SUN 01-222 
7462 ABTA/AYOl 1907 
SPAM ramVBAL fiMUZl 
rnoib nuoor 01471 0047 
ATOL 1WO AflWA'ta 





fc .IV . 








itreel. 

the best 



r^1 







1 B:! >J 









1 ■> m'::'' ^ * j 1 


JAB ABTA 1 

IfftrrmiiPMI 


IPpJS 


staff still avail. Soren of France. 
Marbella. Algarve. West Indies. 
CmiuiimvLd! Vinasoi 2489181. 




Ol 580 

August 

SELF-CATERING 

BALEAEICS 


ae for 2 

ne 0302 

MENORCA VHIas. aornc wire 


Most dates avail from £155 
Celtic- Holidays. 01 309 7070* 


Club Air 

124 hr*! ARjJ 1772a 


"LIGHT- 

9100. 

imuesf 

SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 

Pitot Fngm 01 631 01 

Aid 1893. 

eftEECE, TURKEY. CAV 


Ret. Lowes fans fr £99. 
Biggies. 755 8l9l AMI 1895 


OlMH. II 







I MIAML JAMAICA. H.YORK. |» 

1 WoridwMe cheapea fares. 1 

JV CLUSAZ. Av MJ Aug/SetH. Su- 1 
pen Frenrt chalet farmhouse 1 


m\ 


1 oar brochure now Tunisian 1 
[ Travel Bureog 01-573 4411 | 

Conti— cd on page 26 | 



CARLTON MLL NWS. Spacious, 
sunny, garden mawonetle. 3 
mins American School. Port or 
folly (washed. 7 beautiful 
rooms 1 3/4 bedrooms). 2 bath- 
rooms. modern Ml Chen, utility 
rewon. all mod cubs. £440 p.w. 
tori dally cleaning Long lei. no 
agencies. Tel Ol 624 1347. 
KEXSMGTMf SWS 2 spacious 
tatnuy homes, all machs.. new- 
ly decorated. 1 nun. rube;. 
Duplex 3/d bedims & thing, 
did tog. study. k/PkM. 2 w batos 
6 gdns. £360 Fiat 1 bedim, liv- 
ing (2 hidden bedu. pauog. 
w/din. £lSO tnc gas. 570-1362 

WWW O LE ST Wl Three proles. 
«nreal people required for 
O /Rooms in large ilwo recep- 
tlenu mahgneiM let pan 
furnished. CB&O0 net week <xd 
ex Wife. Reft. 1 ntontlw depcgh 
amt t month rental tn advance 
essential. Reply BP BOX Hll. 

CHCLSCAt RfdeWfo Gartens. 
Large Luxurious Studio. Fully 
Equipped ThroiKJhouL £120 
pgr week. Tel: 01 363 0489 
CSWSWKX. MarvellOUl stews 
over Thames. FUHV fum 3 cm 
flat. Ample quiet grounds & 
Dbg. £130 pw. Ol 994 4294 

lews Lovety lumfeMd naL 1 bed. 
2 reran, open fire. CH. Weekly 
Cleaner. £120 p.w eXCi.Ol 486 
7244 Ext 262 /eves 624 2999 
raaucaswt Soorwui 1 bed flat 
with sunny pano. £96 p.w. 6/9 
months. Tel 01 235 6060 

Ex242 

MB1HI03E MLL newly dec 2 
4PUM* beds. Study, lounge / 
diner, kit. bathroom £160 pw. 
no snarers 226 0420. 

***»u very large lax 1 oed naL 
ch. 20 mu* ewy. p«r couwe 

/snarers £570 nan knrrnoi- 
730 3456x259. l2J&BOOpm 
SC I3fc Lewtuiam / BUekneWh 
border 20 mins Qtanmi Cross 
Luxury, large. 1 bed. i/e ru. 
£400 ocm. Tel: 01-3186690 
SELECTION OF QUALITY houses 
and (la* in w«*i A Oh London, 
from £120 ■ £4O0pw. Tet Prop- 
erty Services. 01 996 4176. 
•37 MU The number to remem- 
ber when seeking best nemai 
properties In central and prime 
London areas £ist>/ ES-OaoSw 


SOUTH KCHSUKTOM 2nd floor 
mansion rial nr tube with Irtgn 
ceilings and long windows into 
bay 2 dble beds, lye recep. 
while ML w/dryer DMe gla*. 
top. porter, video entrance 
Phone. Go Lei 6 months ptus 
£235 pw Goddard A Saudi Ol- 
930 7321 


HOLLAND PARK Oegeni urge 
1st floor dal nr tube. Recep • 
tong French windows A Par- 
auet flooring. Bed o looks 
private tennis duo Co Long Lei 
£225 pw Goddard & Smun 01 - 
930 7321 


KOUMLIML Charming rtewfe- 
decorated 1st (loor Rat Ctose to 
lube and buses. 1 dble bed. sm- 
Me bed. recepUon/duer. (ully 
ruled k lichen and booirooin. 
Available 1 year + £195 pw. 
Tet' 01 499 8030 


PALACE PROPERTIES 

We haw a avert) sdecaon o( per- 
sonalty inspected lunashed and 
larturaslmd propertes n many fine 
Resdennal dotnas. ranging flan, 
stso gw to Qjno (w. 1 

SHORT/LON3 LETS 
MANY HOUDAY FIATS 
AVAILABLE 

Tet 01-486 8926 


SW10 Coroous interior desKmed 
Mews house. 2 beds It ensuKei. 
2nd bath. Ukhrn all mactunes. 
double recepL garage, every- 
tmiw new L375 pw. Marveen 


THE LOMB/MORT LET Special. 
•sts. We nave a forge selection of 
luvury IJJ4 bedroom (lats 
wui mold service. Interior de- 
s«ned and centrally tooted. 
Angela WUllams Ol 268 3659. 


F.W. OAFri (Management Ser 
vices) Lid rcoutre properties in 
Central. Sonin and West Lon- 
don areas (or waiting 
applicants. Ol 221 8838 



IS Plaza Estates Ik: 



HARHOWVT STREET WL 
Modom. 2nd S 3rt Rgor 
masonetffi. 2 beds, bathroom, 
fitted kaeften. ncopbon room. 
Long ta. E220pw. 

ST. 6GQRGES HELDS W2 
UnmacMae RM Mil balcony. 
Bedroom, bdtraom. open plan - 
wfl eqtmped Mcten. recepbon 
room, long Kt ElBOpw. 

01 724 3100. 


D1-724 31CO 01-53? 7o-!5 


HW» ■ Large, urtpil. newly deco- 
rated mu (unushed. double 
bearoomed mansion rial wnn 

, lorae sitting room. 

hiichen/dlner & batnraom. 
Company let only £120 pw 
«Cl. Tet 01 90? 8734 


INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVES 
Urgently require (lou a houses 
in central Loudon tram £150 lo 
£2.000 gw. Please cad Salty 
Owen or Lorraine Campbell on 
Ol 957 9684. 


mAYTAM. studio Rat lunuuied 
by mterior designer. Rec/brd. 
Wl and oalh. £175 gw. 936 
3781 fTX 


POLHAM Super am door studio 
Hal in new block with HR. 
swimming pool, sauna and gym 
Mid parking CO let £135 pw 
Coddvd & Smith 01-930 7321 


SINCLAIR ML W14, bright new 
com 3rd fir flat 2 toe dbie 
brdrim. mod recep. ff ML 
batnrm ClbOpw Co let 6mm% 
t Around Town. 229 9966 


mn Lge beaut house 5 beds. ? 
halts H ensuUri. rik room. 3 
recep. lge Ml. ak machines, oa- 
rage. odn. 3 nuns lube and 
shops. Avail now. kma Co let 
req 2 yr min. £380 OO pw neo. 
tori gardener Ol 459 0606. 


HAMPSTEAD HEATH* Sanettv 
modern, luxury. 2 bed £ 1 bed 
Bats. Every fociltty 
OlO/riM pu Cal)- Cb Let 
4357663 or 435 4137 


HENRY A JAMES Conrad us now 
on Ol 236 BBol for me best ae- 
leclion of furnished flan and 
Houses lo mu in KiugMsondge. 
Chetwa and Kensington IT) 


SUPOISOft PLATS A NOUSES 
avail a read for dintonuts. 
executives Long & shod lets In 
all areas. Limnend & Co. «5. 
Albemarle S( W l 01-499 5334. 


HAMPSTEAD NWS Fabutous 
newly dec 2 bed rial Large 
recent Dir value. £2?9pw Na- 
than Wilson A Co 794 1161 


MCHMOND/HEW 4 geds. mod. 
fum. town foe. Nr lube, long 
let. £265 pw 01-9X7-1566. 


NMDITSM0DGE, CHELSEA 

Belgravia flats * houses re- 
qun«d for American CompaoMs 
from £200-£?.000pw. Higfi rat- 
tore properties also av-artabie 
now Burgm Estate Agents 
681 5136. 


AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seeks 
lux nat/howsr up to £ 800 pw 
Usual fees req PMlura Ku A 
LewH. Sauv M the Park. Chel- 
sea office. 01-352 Bill or 
North of the Park. Regent's 
Park office. 01 586 9682. 

KENSINGTON weu-deraraMd 

otto furnished s/r flaL Large uf- 
Ung room with gas tog rm. k/b. 
dlnmg hail, double bedroom, 
ample cupboard space. CH. **■ 
metafile. quiet terafiHH 
required. £] lOpw 01 -5756831 
KOTUNCTOM WU dose Hlllon 
Hotel. lubeA snaps. Long Com- 
pany lei only sought lor newly 
bum. decorated & furmsnrd 
Mews house. BM/klKhen/ 
sail tog fhaiti/garage 
£250p/week 01748 0226 
MOTIMMAM. Nr BR. 26tnln. 
Ch K ante Street, s/t- 2nd V. 
sd ton 2 bed. hll. bain rm. 
OToohinq Cons, woodlands 1 
yr m Sun quit arm rota*’ 
£245. prm IM- Tel Ol 060 
3854 

Wio Large 6 Rm MaaoMfle. 
Odn. ovrriooks park, otnei 
road Fully luted Kitchen. £590 
PW EWI Tef. 01-9694678 
WANTED Room/Ftii to snare 
near lu be/LSC Contact Dsn 
636C 93. Long Beam. CA 
90613 <?13i 438 6124 
A SUP ERA newly dee 4 bedim. 
W. Km, furnished ftai for CM- 
*L £180 pw. TH Ol 748 1536 


CENTRAL LONDON with gif 
street parking. Lux run. Ltv rm. 
ini. oath + shower, upstairs 
open hed/drws nn. Cverynung 
provided- £160 p.w. Company 
lei TN. Ol 586 0919 

CHELSEA SWS. An extremely al- 
iraebve 2 be dn o wn rial with 
large roof terrace, fully 
equipped kitchen with an ma- 
chines. v-idro security, goner. 
CO let £250 pw Ol 244 7353. 

FULHAM »KL Outsnmdtng 4 
bed roomed house n Cnmnury 
R4 Newly decorated and 
modernised JLMOpw lor long 
Company let. Property Ser 
vim; 01 996 4176. 

KJnGMrTSBRSME exrpUew new 
dec one dble bed doL Large re- 
rept ion. ktt/breok rm. Access 
gdro /tennis courts. Co le« only. 
Min 6 months. £280 p.w. 
TelOt 481 3104 

LANDLORDS 1 OWNER5. If you 
have a ouahty property to lei 
I ell us about II. We offer a pro- 
frasionN and rename service. 
Ovunshl Constantine. Tel: Ol- 
044 7353. 

SWS. Extremely attractive mol 
vonriir off Fumam Rd close to 
tube t bed. balhrootn. recep- 
tion. kitrtien. large roof terrare 
and bay-wry Ei75pw- Sullivan 
Thomas. 73! 1353. 

ASNLEtCM ESTATES specfoUse 
ui renuna 6 letunp in me West 
End A onirat London, from 
simple iludws to luxurious 

apartments. Contact 409 039a. 

CHELSEA SWA. Elegant 3 bed 
nw intnanswnHockinTiM&i. 
near Aver £375pw Long 
Company let. Property see- 
MCriL Ol 996 4176. 

FULHAM, Property fumbOied 1st 
door oat Avail naw 2 Mb i 
sleeps 3v silting rm. fitted iql 
bathroom £115 pw Phone 
Mary 01 736 7)33 ext 33 m 


5WX8 ua nuns Waterloo] 
Owning 2/S bed tue ail ante 
mites E650DCm End Sept for 1 
yr Trt. 01-870 5633 alter Bpm. 


WKiDAT LETS We hate a num- 
ber of flats A nouses available 
for Shan irrim lees In Central 
London. Bennam & Rones 938 
352 2. 

HfHSNNntJM Carden flat wtth 
6Wt Soum taring garden 2 
Beds. Dble Rrcm. kh (an aonb 
fmrtsl. Mod Barn. £t topw. 4«3 
2091. Eves 870 4705 IT}. 

LANDLORDS We urgently re- 
gure i wine rangr of ptopctIks 
for overseas applicants. Active- 
W seeking London homes. 
BenMm 6 Reran 038 3623- 

REBENTS PARK / Portland 
Pure Superb, modern. 2 bed 
dal available now Prigs pw 
fori. Please contact 01-936- 
9058 for details. 

5 KEN, ThurtOeSaSW7 Elegant 
luxury tuny l urn s/C rial, own 
entrance, bull touae /single. Co 
let only Min 6 miiis. ClXtrw 
6B4 3373. 

SLOANC SO Ready ctunw 


CENTHAL LONDON flats. IMXBC5 
rooms, shares avail. Long & Hal 
let. sunhng 936 1846 «T7 
CHELSEA . 3 bed. 2 CUUt garden 
not. £350 per week Andre 
Lanavnre. 491 7822. 
CLAPHAM C O MM ON oierioofc- 

ing. I urutTU iim sun cou p le. 

£80 00 pw ncl iOl 350 0636 
CROYDON. S/C garden rial with 
ptVMM-. Only £«J pw ReMAI 
Code. 01 686 7576. 
ISUHerON. DMtohtful luxury 
opart mente available from 
£100 pw. PtvotK 833 3561 (TL 
LETTWOS NEBOYIATON warn 

rfl. Neman WUutn A Co 01 
794 H61 See Non secretarial 
Megialr hjrte got The man Iuk- 
unous tong/inori lets 1/6 beds 
bral prires Ol 936 9512 ft}. 
PARSONS GREEN Pretty s/c flat, 
suit couple. Convenient £400 
PCni Trt; 01 9464935 fEveU 
5 T,.fAME5i Picadllly. Lon Let 
£350 per week. Tel; 01 930 
3085 nes. No Agents 
BUTTON. Large bedsii own fridge 
A cooker. Only £40 pw Rental 
GUMe; 01 686 7876. 

Mf6 Lin piea a terre £309 pent 
Hffl- Contact s.m Brack 748 
7366 eves or 689 2299 office 
WE CAM HMD you Mtf cotitMnrd 
or shared ocnxn in SauUi Lon- 
don. denial Guide; oBo 7576 
WJ LET PLATS AND HOUSES 
Comaci Rfriford or Mick. Davis 
VVOO He 6 ca 402 7381 
WEST Itel A se4eriJo<i or ritarm- 
«» r/T 162 Bed agts/Macv. 
C138-l7SnwHK- 01-675 1896. 
■raOMJEDOML Fum 3 bed howe. 
garden, garage £t36pw Rem 
6CU6 Ol 666 7576. 
W H — iXP OH Nr Comm, a Tube. 
2 BMvnn Lounge. K A B. 
£500 pm 0626463115 


PROPERTY 
APPEARS ON 
PAGES 22 & 23 
















































































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RACING: BELL 0 TT 0 EARLY 2,000 GUINEAS FAVOURITE AFTER IMPRESSIVE DISPLAY IN ACOMB STAKES 


Primary poised for the Ebor 


By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 


Stoute passes £2) 
barrier with 


It takes a good three-year- 
old to win the Tote-Ebor at 
York. In the past ten years 
only three have done so, but 
the three in question. Crazy, 
Protection Racket and Sir 
Montagu, all fined the bilL 

Crazy went on to finish 
fourth in the St Leger and 
second, the following season, 
to Petoski in the Princess of 
Wales's Stakes, while Protec- 
tion Racket won both the 
Doncaster Cup and the Irish 
St Leger afterwards. 

In France it took a horse of 
the class of Exceller to prevent 
Sir Montagu from winning the 
Prix Royal Oak (French St 
Leger) after he had run away 
with the Ebor for his late and 
great trainer, Ryan Price. 

Now, in napping Primary to 
win Yorkshire's most famous 
handicap. 1 believe that I am 
selecting another good three- 
year old. Guy Harwqod, who 
incidentally trained Crazy, be- 
gan by running Primary this 
season in the Guardian Classic 
trial at Sandown. 


Unfortunately things went 
'hen Gf 


wrong that day when Greviile 
Starkey lost control of the colt 
alter hurting his arm coming 
out of the stalls. So that run is 
best ignored. After that Pri- 
mary finished fourth behind 
the smart Nisnas at Lingfield 
at the beginning of May. 

Primary was not seen out 
again until he won a handicap 
at Bath very easily at the end 
of last month. The talk that 
day was that Primary would 
not only win there, but win the 
Ebor as welL Backed down to 
7-2 from 6-1. he duly landed 
the gamble on the Somerset 
track which in turn triggered 
off the plunge from 16-1 to 4-1 
in the ante-post market for 
today's race. 

My idea of the main danger 
is Daarieom, another pretty 
decent three-year-old, who 
probably came up against 
something a bit special when 
he was beaten by Startino at 
Leicester. His conqueror is 
considered good enough to 
take her chance in Thursday's 
Galtres Stakes, 



group one double 


By Michael Seely 


The Michael Jarvis-trained Just A Flutter, seen here bearing Classic Tale at Newmarket, is 
fancied to extend his un beaten record in today's Gimcrack Stakes at York 


win as the race was not 
valuable enough. 


Of the older horses 1 like 
White Mill the besL But I find 
it significant that with his 
weight increased by a 71b 
penalty lor winning at Ayr he 
will now be meeting Primary 
on 41b worse terms than he 
would in future handicaps, 


Goodwood was proof of his 
complete recovery. 

Nevertheless, a line through 
Bonhomie, who was conced- 
ing him 61b that day, gives 
both Mashkour and Nisnas 
the slight edge. Of those two, I 
just prefer Nisnas, who strikes 
me as being a sharper and 
easier ride. 


Significantly, Michael Rob- 
erts has picked Daarieom in- 
stead of Alec Stewart's other 
runner. Just David, who has 
been penalised for winning at 
Goodwood, whereas 
Primary's weight does not 
include a penalty for his Bath 


Harwood, and his jockey 
Greviile Starkey, also have a 
good chance of winning the 
Great Voltigeur Stakes with 
Allez Milord, whose only fail- 
ure so far was in the Derby in 
which he apparently pulled a 
muscle. His subsequent vic- 
tory in the Gordon Stakes at 


Then, of course, there are 
also Authaal and Moon Mad- 
ness to consider. Neither have 
encountered such stiff oppo- 
sition before but both are 
unbeaten this season. 

With Rich Charlie, 
Mansooj, Chime Time, lust A 
Flutter, Morewoods and 
Wiganthorpe all standing their 


ground, the Scottish Equitable 
Gimcrack Stakes looks every 
bit as open. 

While conceding that both 
Chime Time and 
Wiganthorpe have a good 
chance of keeping die prize in 
Yorkshire I still prefer Just A 
Flatter, who accounted for 
Classic Tate first time out ax 
Newmarket Afterwards he 
strolled home at Thirsk, seven 
lengths ahead of Sari hah, who 
had run Wiganthorpe to three 
lengths in bis previous race 

Back to five furlongs again 
after twice failing to last 
further, the Windsor Castle 
Stakes winner Carol 's Trea- 
sure now looks a good bet to 
win the Roses States. 


With nearly three months of 
the 1986 Flat raring campaign 
still left, Michael Stoute became 
the first British trainer to smash 
the £2m barrier of prize money 
earned during a season after 
Shardari and Untold had given 
the Newmarket trainer _ a 
magnificent double by winning 
the Matchmaker International 
and the Yorkshire Oaks on the 
opening afternoon of the Ebor 
meeting yesterday. 

Walter Swinhara was on 
board Shardari, but not for the 
first time this season tbe stable 
jockey made the wrong choice in 
tbe Oaks. As Swinborn rode 
Cbhnspin, into fourth place, the 
strong right arm of Greviile 
Star key forced Untold past Park 
Express in the dying seconds of 
a thrilling race. 

-It's been a merrdlons 
season," said Stoute “bat there's 
been a 1st of hard graft and a lot 
of team work. As for Walter's 
choice it was my difficult. Alter 
all Colorspm had won tbe Irish 
Oaks so easily. I didn't try and 
influence him, as I didn't know 
the answer myself." 

-Beech Horst's 49 victories 
and 1X2 p fagj n gs in Europe have 
now earned the trainer 
£2,047,465. Stoute has won 
righr of the 17 group one races 
run in tbe British Isles and 
including the win of Ivor's Image 
in the Italian Oaks has now 
collected nine in this category. 

Shardari Is now 7-1 second 
favourite to Bering for tbe Prix 
de P Arc de Triompbe after a 
superbly pliant display in the 
day's big race. 

Triptych also battled her 
heart ant in a desperate last- 
forlong struggle, but was finally 
beaten tbreeqnarters of a length 
with Damister finishing six 
lengths away third. 

The tactics planned by Stoute 
to exploit Shardarfs stamina 
over a distance short of his best, 
worked to perfection. Tony 
Kimberley did a perfectly timed 
job of pa remaking on DDustan 
and as Swinborn swept into the 
lead on Shardari halfway up the 
straight a fast tune had already 
been assured. 

“The strong gallop helped us 
a great deal," said the winning 
jockey, “it took the edge off 
some of the others, but I never 
realized how dose Triptych bad 
been until I watched the video 
recording." 

The Aga Khan is certainly 
also enjoying a magnificent sea- 
son haring established 
Shafarastani and now Shardari 
as stallions. "I wasn't too wor- 


ried about the distance as York 
has snrit a long straight," the 
Aga said, "Shardari will now go 
for the Arc, but although we 
warn Shahrastani to run again, 
there are now shareholders to be 
considered, so we are waiting for 
a little longer before reaching a 
decision." 

Patrick Bincone was fall of 
admiration for his gallant run- 
ner-up. “Ten furlongs, twelve 
farioms, hall comes the same to 
her. Her next race will be m the 
Arc and if it comes up soft. I'd 
fancy her chances of turning tbe 
tables on her home ground. At 
the moment rve got her with me 
in DeanviDe and she goes swim- 
ming in the sea every day." 

Untold’s victory was tbe end 

of a happy story for Bob Cowell, 
tbe filly’s breeder and also for 
Sheikh Mohammed, who 
bought the three-year-ohl after 

she had finished runner-op to 
Midway Lady in the Oaks at 
Epsom. Out of that remarkable 
brood mare Unsuspected, Cow- 
ell has now bred three consec- 
utive pattern race winners in 
Shoot Clear, Sally Brown and 
Untold. Sally Brown captured 
last season's Yorkshire Oaks for 
the stable. 

As far as next season's 
classics are concerned a new 
favourite for the 2,000 Guineas 
was established when Pat 
Eddery produced Bcllotto with 
an electrifying burst of speed a 
furlong and a half from home to 
beat Merce Cunningham by two 
lengths in the Aeomb Stakes. 
Classic Tale, the 6-5 favourite 
found little when asked to go and 
take his chance and came home 
in fifth place. 

BeUotfn is certainly an excit- 
ing prospect for Khakd Abdnlla 
and Jeremy Tree. Bought for 
$700,000 at the Keeneland July 
Sale, the Mr Prospector colt 


excelled himself in giving 71b 
and a convincing beating to the 
highly regarded runner-up 
“He’s a lovely horse and has got 
a marvellous temperament," 
said the tramer, “I should think 
die plan now is one of the 
autumn two-year-old races i 
then finish for the season.” 

Eddery went oa to record his 
134th winner of the season by 
giving himself and Tree a double 
when cruising to a comfortable 
victory oa tint remarkable old 
veteran. Valuable Witness in the 
Lonsdale Stakes. Starkey also 
had a second winner on another 
Khaled Abdnlla horse. Osten- 
sible, who got the better of 
Rosed ale in the Melrose 
Handicap. 


YARMOUTH 


32 44M IOEOUQA 

33 -000 OUR 


A Hite 4-6-0. 


(B) D Date 3-7-13. 


. L ffiodo (7) 14 
Qnckta 13 


Going: good to firm 
Draw: high numbers best 


7-2 Easy Line, 4-1 Kamaress. 5-1 Henry's Venture. 13-2 
r, 8-1 Pointed Lady. 10-1 Eucharis, 12.-1 Hopeful Katie, 


Low Key. 8-1 Pointed Lady. 19 
I Able Maybob. 20-1 others. 


2.15 B0TTON BROTHERS HANDICAP (Ladies: 
£1,324: 1m 6Q (10 runners) 

1 3003 HBRADURA(H)M Prescott 5-11-0 — Maxine Jotter 6 

2 0221 NEWQUAY G Harwood 3-10-11 (4a») 

Amanda Harwood 4 

3 0091 TAMADS C Nelson 4-10-7 JamAflmonlO 


4 2132 HYQKDi (B1 D Martov 4-0-13 

9 -000 WMDY HOLLOW M Francs 3-94. 


. Hetenle Hortay 3 
Jo Winter 1 


3.45 FRANK STONE EBF STAKES (3-Y-Cfc £3,173: 
6f)(6) 

4 10-4 AUCAASEHfC-tQH Thomson Jones 8-12 R ISOs 4 

5 1-34 PILOT d (D) R J WManu 8-12 _____ PRafahsoa 6 

6 8300 GRSI DOLLAR (SB (D) B Gutty 8-11 RCumt5 

7 0200 FLYAWAY BHDE (B) (USA) I Baldteg 8-0 JMaBNasI 

13 0 THE ROMFORD ROAR W Pearce 8-7 DMdwB>3 

15 0200 RAmfSVIRONAB McMahon 54 QMIMd2 


11 DOB GENERATION GAP J Totter 491- Tracvy Bate* (3)7 

12 0044 MOMMGHEYO IV Chapman ifrM 


2-1 Mot Jet, 11-4 Ataaseh. 7-2 Ryaway Bride, 6-1 Green 
a Romford Beer. 


□alar, 10-1 Raffles Virginia. 33-1 The l 


Lyme Robson ( 
CaOaRadbandf 


13 0002 QUICK REACTION M Rvan 36-12. 

14 300 MOOOYBINTF Dun 3-8-12; Jane Amwtaga (3)8 

16 300 SPARKUN PEHFOHHER Miss B Senders 897 

Tine Pie S 


11-4 Newquay, 100-30 Hyoldn. 9-2 Taxiads. B-1 Quick 
Reaction, 3-1 Herradura. 12-1 Hlgham Gray, 14-1 others. 


4.15 HALL QUAY MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (2-Y- 
a£S64:7f)(15) 

4 APPRQACHMQ STAR R Sheatinr911 MRanmer4 

7 4 ECHO VALLEY C Brittain 8-11 —7 

8 0 ESTA BONITA (USA) R Boss 8-11 E Guest (3) 10 

9 3 POLLIES BERIXRB (USA) MWlMdraon 3-11 


Yarmouth selections 


By Mandarin 


2.15 Newquay^ 2.45 Absolute Jfeaven. 3.15 Easy 


Line. 3.45 Pilot Jet. 4.15 Echo Valley. 4.45 
Horowitz. 5.15 Sheer Luck. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

2.15 Herradura. 2.45 Nightdress. 3.15 Eucharis. 
3.45 Pilot Jcl 4.15 Echo Valley. 4.45 GrimesgUL 

5.15 While It Lasts. 


11 

12 

14 

13 

18 

19 

20 


0 HUNT BALL 


0 BJOMA (USA) t 
■BFEiil 


(USA) J Baking I 
U L Omani 8-11 


3-11. 


IVORY HELDS (USA) M SKWtB 8-11 
LIZZY HARE (USA) L Cumari 3-11 _ 

2 MSX EL KHASHA8 8 Ms 8-11 

42 MKIB OF AVALON tUSAVBFIH Cedi 3-11 - NDay 12 
0 MOMENT H THE SUNfU&A) B Hantxcy 8-11 



21 

23 

24 

25 


33 NASRAS H Thomson Jones 8-11 
SAIHIE JOE (HI) L Rggott 9-11 
N SPEED8W0 M Ryan 3 11 — 
SPORTOF HONORS (USA) A 


Aje ~?SL n . 


_ MFtaowdS 
MG8e> 11 

(USA) A Stewart 3-11. MBanmrl 


11-4 FoOtes Bermres. 3-1 Mate Of Avalon, 4-1 KOsk B 
Waste*. 6-l_ Echo vafay. 8-1 Hunt Baa, 12-1 Natans, 14-1 


Esta Bonna. 20-1 others. 


2.45 PLEASURE BEACH SELLING STAKES (2-Y- 
O: £640: 5f 25yd) (7) 

0004 CAUSEWAY FOOT (BJN TWderB-11 A Muncy 4 

003 GREENSWARD BOY K hoy 8-11 W Woods (^3 

0200 ABSALOU1E HEAVEN R Stubbs 8-8 OMdnfaS 

0000 GAME LIGHTS) Mrs N Macaulay 8-8 —7 

0 NATIONS ROSE R Stubbs 8-8 — AMmr 1 


4.45 EVE MAIDEN APPRENTICE STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£1,315: 1m) (10) 


3 02- HOROWITZ L Omni M 

4 4000 MR AOVISER (« (USA) F Our M. 

5 00 HUBAH D Dzfe SO 

7 0 PRAB0E OYSTER BHanbuy 90— 

teisonSO 


Dabble Price 9 


10 0340 SURE LANDING C Nelson! 


“aj’SSI 


0030 NNbfTBRESS (B) IBF) D Mortey 8-0 G DuHekf 2 

TREASURE M BrWatn W. 


3443 PEGGY’S’ 


12 00- DANCER-DO A Janris 8-11 

13 40 ENTOURAGE M SkUU 8-1 1 

14 0044 CMMESQIJLJ tfndtey 911 
T (BF) W 


— C Rosier 
■ AF lmn l flu 
HAGS 


4 

. S 

GStosS 


9-4 Pe^r'*' Treasure, L Greensward . Boy. 4-1 


! Causeway Foot 12-1 Absabute Heaven, 13-1 


_ ABson Harper 10 
15 043 NO RESTRAINT (BFjWHastingc^ass 8-11 

' DBtoGSam7 

IS 0020 ROStS Mrs N MacauteyS-TI — 1 


64 Horowitz, 4-1 Entourage, 11-2 State Lamina 7-1 No 
Restraint 8-1 Grenesga. 12-1 others. 


3.15 LONGSHORE HANDICAP (£2,060: 71) (16) 

5 1001 EASY LM P Hastam 3-8-7 G Franc* 12 

8 000 HUMBLE BEAUTY A Jans 3-9-5 S Hancock (7) 1 


5.15 COBHOLM FILLIES HANDICAP (£1,710: 1m 
3f 110yd) (11) 


1 0001 tiP-TAP A Hide 4-9-10- 


9 0431 KAMAKSS M Brifian 4-9-5 (6ex) — 

10 4/0-0 TANG DANCER D W Chapman 5-9-4- 

11 2-00 LOW KEY WMussen 3-34. 


P Robinson 9 
.. DNdwBa5 
IWtatemll 
RHflb 2 


3 0400 GONE OVERBOARD 


(USA) It 
HD (USA) 


A Stewart 3-8-8 


:tf a&sss 


16 0004 POINTED LADY (USA) R Armstrong 3-9-3 HHflb 

19 0113 HBMY^ VENTURE (USANBF) □ W Chafnnan 4-9-2 

A Proud 4 

20 1200 ABLE MAYBOB HCqftCTidga 442 M Rtamor7 

22 3030 HOPEFUL KATIE (PMBFfD LnsBa 49-1 „ JWKama 8 

25 0204 POKERFAYESIB) (USA) BMcfttehcn 7-6-12 

GDuMaMIE 

26 0240 EUCHARIS (B) A Httfa 46-7 W Woods (3) 3 

29 0030 3HAHREEN 1C) G Bbsn 56-1 MLTbomasIS 

30 0030 NORCOOL (B) R Mcbois 36-1 — 10 


4 -001 SHEER LUCK 

5 -004 MGHLAM3 BALL G 
8 0323 TEMPEST TOSSED 


3-9-7- 


3-8-7. 


2 


8 -023 CARVERY A Hide 36-12- 


12 0040 ADHAM B Hanbunr 366. 

)□ WChac 


i w Chapman 5 


Armstrong 36-1 

PStmttnm01 

WW ^HSf 


56-7— 

366- 


. DMehoRsB 
PRaHnaonA 


3t 0003 BALKAN (C)JL Hams 666. 


N Day 8 


13 0000 BOLDER* (BF) 

14 0002 GREENMLL'S GtRL 

15 3241 HGHESTNOTEG 
7-2 GraentMs GbL 4-1 Tip-Tap, 9-2 WMe It Lasts, 6-1 

Canety. 3-1 Highest Note, 10-1 Tempest Tossed. 14-1 others. 


'LINGFIELD PARK 


to firm 


Going: 

Draw advantage: doubtful 
INDON 


10 3300 QOLDEN SLADE (D) M McCourt 4-8-6— R We<niiam7 

12 0100 LYRIC WAY (BHD) BHfls 462 A Clark 10 

13 126 ALHAHOSE J Sutdiffo 3-7-13 R Fax 3 

15 4000 LUCKY STAMUST R Holder 4-76—-. N Adams 2 


5.40 EBF FIND 

6f) (10 runners) 


STAKES (2-Y-O C & G: £1.612: 


18 103- FREMJS FOR EVSl (D) J Hltch-Heyes 4-7-7 — 4 

3-f Bertie Wooster. 4-1 Bowl Over, 96 AI Amead. 6-1 
Steady Eddie. B-1 Aimarosa. 10-1 Raja Montana. 14-1 others. 


4 

5 

6 
10 
14 
20 

24 

25 
29 
32 


2 ABLE SAINT R 


0 BUY MINTS ACT J 


Armstrong 8 
rrjsutoisfe 


8-11 


8 11 ... 


040 CAPITAL FLOW ffl) R Hanron 8-11 . 


. PTuk5 
. RFmS 


00 DAUNTING PROSPECT PCrrelel 8-11. 

IRISH SAILOR P» Mnehea 8-11 

230 MAUDiaiB R Akahurst 8-11 


B Rouse 2 

■B 


7ft SIDEWALK APPRENTICE 
HANDICAP (£873: 1m2f)(8) 


SELLING 


SAY YOU Pat MrtcheU 8-1 1 . 
3 SMJAAB M Attwta 8-11 . 


PBnriwaa4 

ACM1 


THE GRUFTER L Holt 8-1 1 - 


. R WembwnlD 
ABonrifi 


2 0321 ANGCS VIDEO (D)R Holder 4-9-10 (Sex) _ A 

3 000- TROJAN GOO RAkteUst 4-9-7 

5 0001 GRAND CELEBRATION (USAKDJ R 


ZANUSSI UNE D ArtXitfmot 8-11 


N Adams 7 


7 0000 TQDA F0RCA AVANTIg^A □ 


2-1 Able Saint, 7-2 Muarfdlb, 4-1 smjaab. 7-1 Capital Bow, 
8-1 Buy Mum's Act, 10-1 Daummg Ffospoct, 14-1 others. 


D( 

. 4 166-1. 1 Jaap 4 

It 000- ESS-JAY-ESS B Stevens 3-8-4 S Wbtotam (5) 7 

12 0000 BLAflfTSWINNEffl] Pat MitdieB 4-84 ___ R Taipei 

13 0002 GEORGIAN ROSE (B) K Ivory 366 GUashfi 

15 0000 SHEER CLASS (B) J Long 36-1 J Strolling (5] 5 



il-4 Grand Celebration. 7-2 Georgian Rose, 9-2 E&s-Jay- 
Ess, 6-i Angtes video, 3-1 Trojan God, 12-1 others. 


Lingfield selections 


By Mandarin 

5.40 Able Saint 6.5 Ozoputmin. 6.30 Bowl Over. 
7.0 Angies Video. 7.30 Inshirah. 8,0 Soto Singer. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
5.40 Able SainL 6.5 Ozopuimin. 6.30 Bertie 
Wooster. 7.30 Inshirah. 8.0 Foundry Flyer. 


7.30 PULB0R0UGH NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: 
£1,997:7i)(6) 

1 102 STRIKE RATE (8F)fl Hannon 9-7 B Room 4 

3 101 WSHRAH (USA) H Thomson Jones 9-1 (5ex) 

A Murray 2 

4 0303 CASTLE HEIGHTS R Armstrong 8-12 P Tote 6 

6 0223 WISE TIMES M Usher 8-11 MWigbamS 

11 040 TREVA D Oucteon 8-6 — BCrmateyS 

17 404 KMNfitP STAR (B)R Holder 7-7 S Omani 


6.5 UPHAM STAKES (£2£19: 1m 4f) (8) 


3-2 Inshirah, 3-1 Wise Times. 7-2 Strfta Rate, 6-1 Trava, 
B-1 Castle Heights, 10-1 Mendel Star. 


1 3024 LEADING STAR I 
5 4120 DANrSHGARM Stoute 


466. 


. A Cleric 1 


10 . 


8 10-1 OZUPULMM L Cumani 36-7 
7 3101 WASa REEF (DI JDwHOP 36-7. 

a ““ 


B RouseS 
,RGuest3 


AMnrayT 

610 WINDS OF US^tf (USAHS) H Ceol 36-7 R F«* 5 


8.0 LEWES MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£955: 5f) (13) 


11 620 KOLGONG HEIGHTS B Hantwry 363— BCrowteyZ 

12 0000 NORFOLK SONATA R BOSS 36- 


1 4000 ASTAR1E G PntchanJ-Gardon 8-11 .. 
3 2400 CHESTA LEAP R Hannon 8-11. 


13 4110 SARYAN (D) N Caflaghan 36-3. 


_ N Adams 6 

—4 


3-1 Leading Star. 7-2 WnsU Reel. 4-1 Ozupulmin. Winds Of 
Light. 5-1 Damshgar. 8-1 Saryan. 12-1 ortiwa. 


4 0404 FOUNDRY FLYER (B> A Btetey 8-11., 

5 4300 GUK1AAM0UR BOSS 8-11 

6 600 GM5ETTE (B) P Walwyn 8-11 


A Murray 12 
SDomor2 
11 


7 0300 JACOUI JOY (BIKlwry 3-11 

8 0 KMGSFOU) FLAME MH; 

9 oaoo HAMiTS valentine m 


8 - 11 . 


8-11 


EGuesl(3)4 
N Horn 7 
. QMngailO 
.R Ceram 9 


6.30 ARUNDEL HANDICAP (£2.725: 71) (11) 


1 0414 AL AMEAO(C-DMBF)CBenstead 66-10— B Rome 8 
iSONGNVB 


10 0000 PRIVATE SUE C Austin 8-11. 
12 4020 SOLO SMGEHP Cole 611... 


flWembamS 
, BCraaaleyi 
T Quran S 


2 0000 SAILOR'S SONG N Vigors 46-7. S Dawson 6 

3 3010 STEADY EDDE(C-D)'PMBChe4 46-4 (6ex) — 5 

5 4-10 RAJA MOULANAfDjM Aitxra 36-12 A Bond 11 

6 3241 BOWL OVER (BUG) P Mafun 36-1 1 AMcmyl 

7 0220 BERTIE WOOSTER (BJi “ 


F Bradwal 13 


15 0000 THAI SKY (B) Pat Mtchell 8-11 

17 440 WMSONG MELODY (B)PCundaf 8-11 BRouaafi 

IB BAD'S AUBY (USA) M Albina B-1 1 — A Bond 1 


l(BKD)LPiggott36-1t BCrmateyS 


9-4 Solo Singer. 3-1 Giuaea Man. 5-1 Mnsong Melody. 6-1 
Crests Leap. 8-1 Astarte. i2-t Gnsette, 14-1 others. 


DEVON & EXETER 


4 OOP- BARGBU0 SON (tMUNKemU* 9-106 Geame KnlgM 

5 0-11 BMTAfOICUS (C-O) N B Thomson 10-106 (8«x) 


Going: good 

230 IDE NOVICE HURDLE (£742: 2m 11} (18 
runners) 

1 0-31 BANK PARADE KMUJO Davies 5-11-1 E Murphy 

6 OP- FHJ4 SERVICE (B) (NZ)D H Barons 5-1 5-10 
m£ JO Roberts 5-10-10— 


6 F4-3 SIR LESTHIffilJ D Thomas 10-106 — CWnraa 
"LFGHofc 11-106 — 


8 0P6 THEWURZB.. 

9 033- BLACK EARL I PWWdte 9-106 


□ Morris (7j 


CGny 


PDavsr 


GOLDEN TnANGLE 


PWdMb 
C Brown 


103614 TONZENBEM(C6)NRMMchB«1S-lM T r . 

11-10 B ntann iais. 11-4 Fiontedolr, 9-3 Lucyfor, 8-1 
Ttnsenberg. 12-1 Sir Laser. 16-1 others. 


100006 SMELDAIG ffiO KBohqp 5-10-10. 
006 TOWERING G ThO 


Thomer 7-10-10- 


ASSAGLAW1 0 Sherwood 4-10-7 

00 CLOUD DANCER GCDoidga 4-10-7. 

*4-10-7- 


. SEaria(4) 
RHnstni 


NOVICE SBJJNG HURDLE 


4 FREE SKY J M Bradtey 
00- FBI TAW PJHoKb *-10-7 


SSbanaood 
_ D Browne 
— G Dairies 
P Hobbs 

20 406 RAZZL£OAZZL£BOYWRW8Banre4-rO-7_ A Jones 
Z1 TAN BTTKW Dun 4-10-7 R Strange 

22 THE BAKEWELL BOY RG Frost 4-10-7 J Frost 

25 000/ MEANT DC Turner !M 0-5 Miss M Timer (7) 

23 0/M MSS SmCLAMPD Room 3-106 CGray 

27 2F-F MSSTULLUUH(B)Bforsey 8-106 PCroacher 

26 0 RHQOETTEGCDoidge5-106. BPoweO 

30 204- HONEYCROFT R G Frost 4-10-2 CHopwoodfl] 

31 PIC6-PATH T B HaMt 4-106— Samantha (taster (7) 
116 Assagtawv 94 Bar* Parade, 11-2 Free Sky, 10-1 

Honeycroft, 12-1 The BakeweO Boy. 14-1 Miss Tuflutah, 


4ft HEAVITREE 
(£554: 2m If) (10) 

063 OR CORNELIUS (KG A Ham 5-116. 
000- WCELrnca.Y PA Bowden 5-116-, 
00- SIDELAND B PaHng 5-116 
:(usA) 




R Demis I 


P-00 TTERAPamet 


I DR Tucker 5-116 — S 


IWviWW 


036 DAHS1ANCER K Qinnfriq ftar>-Bttwm4-1t-<L. AWabb 
000- MAOW WARRIOR (BlffTOM 


I A Borrow 4-1 16 J Norat (7} 

11 006 REL2A COCCWEATfi) W G Timer 4-106 CMano 

12 SILVB1MERE GOLF JMflrwiey 4-106 GOniea 


13 060 SPEIO IT LASS (» R Champion 4-106 __ D Monl» (7) 
■ i (B) J Fraiconw 3-106 S SmOi Eccks 


15 R AUNTETTY (BF) 

54 Aunt Etty, 7-2 Dr Comefius. 4-1 D a n ada n cer. 6-1 Spend 
It Lass. 10-1 Srtvennere Golf. 14-1 others. 


Devon selections 

By Mandarin 

2.30 Bank Parade. 3.0 Lord Laurence. 3-30 
Fionnadoir. 4.0 Maori Warrior. 4J0 Kamag. 5.0 
God's Path. 


430 YOUNGERS SCOTCH BITTER HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£1.896: 2m If) (15) 

1 2-U2 AMAHIlSSfflF)GBBBl(flngB-1l-l0_ AChartteaP) 


OF-3 MARINERS DREAM R Hofishead 511-10_ PDavar 
11/0 BEAU NAVETWG Tumor 5116 C Wanan (7) 


OOP- WAWd BOB LEISURE (B)Q RGandoWo 5116^^ 

406 KAMAGJC-O) D HoUy 9116 MrP»«« 

234 CAPA (OR RJ Heater 5116 A Webb 


3.0 YOUNGERS SCOTCH BITTER NOVICE CHASE 
(£1,563: 2m Gf) (13) 

1 P-W BUY BRUSH DHoBy 51912 UrPKamer 


5 

6 

7 006 BALL’ 

8 424 GETTMG 


■STflRRJHodoas 511-2 Wbvtee(7) 

PLENTY (C) F Goman 7-1512 

. TncyTteaar(7) 

9 006 CELTIC BEU.WRW*ams 5106 A Jones 


2 UB-U CtfflOLV BEAR (NZ) NGAyUfle 51912 

3 064 GOLDEN MATCH Mrs S Hombrow 51912. N 


GJHTOH CORNER P Hayward 9 

JOE FLASH K W Dun 7-1912. 


10 490 BOROBI ffiM C F LlMOn 13-106. 

12 000/ CHN3F BLACKFOOT (C4R J A Old 7-106 . SI 
surd B-1 


91912. 


. C Mann 


6 029 LORD LAURENCE DRGandoHb 7-1912. 

7 F40 MASTER BOON DR Tucker 7-1912. 


R Strange 
- P Barton 
.P Leach 


13 /02- SARATWO L G Konsrd 9193 BPowaR 

14 U19 REDGHAVE GIRL mjKBWlop 4-106 SEarieW 

15 009 MISS MALMOWSW J Craprava 9106 JSathani 


16 DOS/ ALUMNUS TP Tory 911 


8 090 NORTHERM GALA TBHaleit 7-1912 DWoonacatt (71 

9 0PP- PfWCEBUSKMSFGaiman 11-1912 Ttecy Tbrncrm 

11 P*6 SWEET SOLICITOR JS King 7-1912 SMcNaM 

12 OOF WBXS OflaEARE 0 F GBanl 191912 RUhean 

13 P9F CHEVIT1NOWG Umar 9197 JNI 


9-4 Amanfes. 91 Mariners Dream, 4-1 Capa, 91 Kamag, 
91 Getting Plenty, 191 Saratfno. 191 others. 


5.0 DAWUSH NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £547: 2m 
1t)(7) 


14 4F4- RADBOW SPRMGS D R Tucker 9197 R Sparks (7) 


Evens Lord Laurence. 4-1 Golden Match, 91 CudOy Bear, 
rings. 12-1 others. 


91 Sweet Solicitor, 191 Rainbow Sprtegs. 

3ft0 MOUSE TRAP HANDICAP CHASE (£1,422: 
2m 11) (8) 

2 439 RONNADOIR (C-O) F T Whiter 91 1-10 Ife C Brooks M 

3 029 LUCTFARJS Kino 19116 SKcNaM 


2 

4 

5 
8 
9 

12 

13 


B BEDROCK K Bishop 197. 


GAY CARUSO F Jordan 197. 


GOO'S PATH D R Bssmrth 107. 


>MCPipfr197 — 
TRT Judes 197. 


FIERY SUNSET Mre A TUckar 192 

IVY MAY JM Bradley 192. 


8-11 Melendez, 91 God's Path, 7-1 Gey Caruso, 191 
Mombefgta, 12-1 Bedrock. 191 others. 


York results 



15 ran. KLU.hd.nk.6LG 

WeyML TotK £830; £3,10. £4.90, 1 
OF: £10590. CSft £16268. Tricast 
£1.387.06. Imin IZtMeec. 


41. «, shhd. 2L A Moore at Brighton. Tate: 

W. OF: £89.6a 


dungM 

. . 9 Glow AgAi (6th), 

4 Toll Bar, FH-resaig I 


Jackpot E2677JJS. Ftaoepot: £21805. 

Folkestone 


LAL Ur ™Y^' 

Fountains Croc©, 


OobKE oood to Ann 
1.45 (Bf) 1, ATTEMPTING (M HOs, 109 


BokJ Difference. 14 ran. %i, sh hd. 21. sh 
ha 1KL PKBJeway at Newmarket. Tone 
£650; £2J®, £190. £3.10. DF: £17.00. 
CSF: £3509. Trtcest: £324.22. Imtn 
2661 sac. After stewards' knpriry, result 
Stood. 


30k Bolder (M Roberts, 6-J)^ 


260 (71)1. BELLOTTOj 
lb 2. Merce Craratogbem f 



i CMstbn (P Broomfield. 9-1) 

;94 Car faff. 5 Stretch, 12 r 
ran), 16 Lady Lucina 33 I . 
Dabach DeSraiL Sunley PipJectB. _ . 
Glory m. 50 Rngers Crossed (5th), Shoot 
The Moon, Able Abbe (q. 14 ran. NR: Littto 
Uxhotta. w. 7L H s. iw. b His at 

Lambourn. Tote: £4.70; E1JO, £160. 
£3.40. DF; S12JO. CSF; Z232S. Alter a 
stawarda' Inquiry the result stands. 


£4.60; £140. £260. £5^0. _ 

CSF: £3667. titan* £441.72 

2 Eaaric Source (G Baxter. 94ta£ 
3.lfelJSjG Cteffleid, 291). ALSO RAN: 9 
2 Shadfyarna, 152 Perfect Foil. 
Pertumene. 20 Battle Queen. Emma's 

Whisper (6th). Kandawgyl. 33 Ph* Swal- 

low Mth). RsnkstjBflt (ah), aranteh Mel- 
ody, nsserands. For You And Me. 14 ran. 
3. 4L 1 KL H. 21. P Walwyn at Lambourn. 

£1SO. £5X0. DFr 

£8^0. CSF: Cl lit. 



Ptecepot: £11096. 


D’Arcy hurt in 

Folkestone foil 


i. TotK £3.40; £160, 
CSF: £1327. Intel 


220 (60 1.2U1JUKMGHT (Paul Eddery. 
94 tov): i Sytte FawOy (W Newnes. 9-1fc 


3.10 tint 21110^1 ^8HA«JA»JWR 


(J Reid. 5- 
i. 9-1L ALSO 


Swrinbum, 136 

«:3.c 

HAM: 7 Rtnah. 12 Bedtime, 
mart (Stm, 16 Roravarti, 20 KackaL 25 
Aswwd Reid, 33 DBiistan, Ur John (4thL 
50 WyKa (Gth). 12 ran. %f, BLKI.hd.3LM 
Stouie at NownwfceL Totte 22A& £160, 
£1 .60. £980. DF: ESJO. CSF: £940. &nln 
Ofl 2850c. 


3, Grange Farm Lady (M ffimmw, 33-1 L 
ALSORAN: 192 Bafts Of Budapest 7 
Avalon. 8 Rad River Boy. 10 Report'Em, 
16 Royal Berio. Co0yweston(5th), 33 Last 
Cry, Wykehamist. Casa Rosado. Cascad- 

tea. Miss Hicks (6th). Shades Of Autumn 

UM. IS ran. NR: Hamer. 1 VU. 6, 2JM. U 
2JU. P Wrtwyn at lambourn. Tote: £2^0: 

£1.40, 22M £1850. DP. £10.70. CSP 

£1324. 

1. KITTY CLARE (Paul 
SaodkJ fTVfflJaama, 
r (P Rowison, 3-1). 


Lte te WaR^yrn B91). ALSO RAN; 4 


lav White Hi 

Coteage. Divine 

Gtories. 121MB 


timioe Bold . .. 

', Aflakan, 10 Past 

I), Husnah, Bemnq 

(4th), 25 rtwfiera.% ran. 

3LGHanreaaBtPu 



Bt PUbOraugh. Tote: £840; 

£2.60, £3JZ0, £960. DF; £5630. CSF: 

£832*. Tricast El ,477.23. ante 58.Q7sec. 

4.15 (1m 41) 1, UNTOLD (G Starkey. S- 
1); Z Park Expram (J Rekl 9-Zb 3. hrort 


(SCtedhan. 1911- ALSO RAN: 94 
109381 


£3424. Sold Mra C F Miar 3,100 gns. 

325 (im 4B 1. JABARABA (T Lang, 9 
1J?3,Sfadrtaioiea«30u»itfii36tert: 
3, Jilib P Cook, 151L ALSO RAN; 92 
Dashing Ltaht (4th), 14 Mr GardteerjStti), 
llTSrbwr, HottiiriStffithL 7raiL 


16 Coral I 


<» coibrspte (40fl. 10938 GuA Nook. 9 
Fteir Royaie (SttO. 12 Quaen Helen (Mi). 
14 Gesoteh. 16 Reiuaanato. 25 Spun 
Gold. 100 Three TimesA Lady. 11 ran. kL 
M. 41. 1KL S. M Stoute at NawmarkeL 
Tote: £558. £128 £1.60. £590. DF: 
£920. CSF: £28.68 2min 30J7aec. 


a. U.6L2WL6L LCottrenatt. 

_ la: £5L98 £140, £1.70. DF: £240,1 


Tote: £298 
£547. 




9-2 Spicy Stay (4th), 7 Destroyer 

16 Brightner (5m). 6 ran. 2H Ki, 5L 

10L 201. J Tree at Becfthampton. Tote: 
£150: £1-30. £340. DF: EjlJJO. CSP. 
£l723.3mn2&38sec. 


^ 8JS5(7f) 1. WAR WAGON (PTufc, 12-1); 
2. Odoan Beaa (T YffiBsms, 92); 3. April 
Fool(T Lana 14-1). ALSO RAN: 4 lav Blue 
BriBant{4tf5. 6 Hauteay Lady (5th). 192 
Mr Rrae. 8 Marcradea. Count Bertrand, 
25 Miami fifties, Hying Zed. 33 Sharp 
Shot Pommas Chateau. Tagore, Steel 
Pass. Naughty Nighty fflBt). 15 ran. NR: 
Solstice dm. KL a, «L li, nk. R 
Armstrong at Newmarket Tote: £27.78 
£4.70. £1-90. £5Ja DF: £27.10. CSF 
£6047. Trtcasc £891 ,4a 


Raul D’Arcy fractured an 
elbow and injured a knee in a 
first-race fell at Folkestone yes- 
terday. D’Arcy took several 
lacks after his mount Able 
Abbe, slipped and fen in the dip 
half a mile from home in the 
first division of the Danes 
Maiden Fillies’ Stakes. 

In a separate incident a few 
seconds earlier, Carlton Glory 
fell and her jockey, Billy 
Newnes, was fortunate u> escape 

injury as he rolled dear of the 
pursuing horses. 

The stewards held an inquiry, 
interviewing Paul Cook and 
Tyrone Williams as wefl as 
Newnes. After watching a video 
re-run, they were satisfied the 
fells .oecuned independently 
and were caused by the fillies 
losing their footing. 

P ete r - Walwyn and Paul 
Eddery landed a treble in later 
races with Zulu Knight,- Kitty 
Clare and Khakis Love. 


Blinkered first time 


6.15(61) 1. GREEN RUBY (J WHams. 9 
1); Z Careless Whisper (G Carter. 33-1); 
3. Roper Row (J Lowe. 192). ALSO RAN: 
5 lav Cras Bay. 11-2 Boot Polish (5thl. 7 
Mam J6tti) , 12 True Nora. Rambling 
River Throne Of Glory. 14 Tobermory 
Boy, 16 LeGfffinfes, 20 DeMm Do. Baton 
Boy (4(h). Karan's Star, 26 Rosie Diddna. 


425 (1m 2fl 1, MARSH HARRS! (P 
“T.awm 


COOk, 7-$; 2, Minus Men (R Moras. 10- it 
3. Harbour Bazaar (N Adams. 151k ALSO 


RAN: 11-4 tev Lord It Over, 5 fire 

12 Gregorian Cham.. Turner*: (Oht 14 
Turn - ran Back Jack. 20 Dancing Barron, 
25 Pdkarirty, 33 Jaaziel, Pause For 
Applause (5th). Tattys Pride, Pal On The 
Back, ~nw Wooden Hu> (4th). 15 ran, 1KI, 


YARMOUTH; 245 Game Ught, Night- 
dress. 345 Flyaway Bride. 446 Mr 
Adviser. 

YORK: 2n awniah Gtteeoa Cborch Star. 

230 All sir. 3.10 Badartak. 346 

£SImIK 540^S!»I«S ffltJNte 

Way. 7ft Sheer Cteas. 7^0 Meraflp ter. 
an Grisette. Thai Sky. Wtesoog Mekrtf 


• Midway Lady, the winner 
of this season's 1,000 Guineas 
and Oaks, has been retired . 



£5.68* 6fl (21 rarart___ 

OQ BURCROFT(RLaelH Wh4J^*r91l • • • ■ " HtTrYiiS Tr 

nm nPtMQPUSiCaB M LteteW) C 9-itc >n 911 ■ - BDOIgjW 

no asgita'gr" 1 "' 

s j H ! 


Tele vised: 2.30, 3.ttk 3^5. 4.15 


102 

103 

106 

107 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

119 

120 
121 
122 
123 
I2S 
136 


PatEtteiyj 


1 

7-2 Rayai RBQM8. 5-1 Wtedmorie. 6-1 weoOn an. 8 : l 
Surv^^i^iSu^.Spam^CaMor. 14-1 Sarate a Trara, i9loftera. 


York selections 


By Mandarin 

2.0 Royal Rabble. 2.30 Mytcns. 3.10 PRIMARY gapj*3.4S Just A 
Butur. 4.15 Nisnas. 4.45 Carol s Treasure. 5.15 Restore. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
10 Lady Sunday Span. 2.30 Atoka. J LI01 OaaAom. W5 Mansooj. 
4.15 Conquering Hero. 4.45 Bom to Race. 5.15 Money s Secret. 
By Michael Seely 

2.0 Woodman Weaver. 3.10 Lady's Bridge. 415 ALLEZ MILORD 
(nap). 


.» \ 


230 ANDY CARP HANDICAP (£8,974; 1m If) (17) 

1 ,11 

209 093010 TAHJWOAR(USAJ (8) (HHAfl* W«n| R Johnson HoogWen 4 

210 3016 MY GENERATION (M Bortanl W Hatera-tos 36-13- W 

11? SB HHWWotBW— t«“s|SS 

218 0-00040 PATO (Uni Manftew S^I MWMw a 4-34...^ - G CHterpT » 

219 000021 AIJ-FA«(mpM^(SD«P^Pftetem991 

220 301121 SAMHA AM (te (O B ZZZ 

221 0113*3 ATOKA (CaKG) (R K*S*°* r * k V) ,TT i SiSl ? 

222 912420 ACCUUMATIONjtos D ™***?**? W M " “ ' jbmu 

223 146000 MY TOW T OM (Mra P Lrawa) C Bnnail97-12 JLOWtU 

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225 


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226 00Q0n 5HBJmAN(W8(DSowwt>y)KStori«4-76. 

91 Mytana. 11-2 All Fair. 91 8-1 ^ 

Sairtuian, 191 Sudan Mohamad, SatWacdon. 12-1 others. 


ImSJSI, £2212. good to 
1 1 1 Ascot 2nd m Dafioa 
(921 2V 3/4L 3rd to 


nrm, juw ir.o rani. iw*ra«iuww*" jr-Si ^ui CT 

ffl-7)^ £11728 tem, Jiw 28 24 «mU ^ 

Saoputerin (94) at Pontefract tim2l . 
of tore ewnt tottero. P !2 



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when course 
14 ran). 


3.10 TOTE-EBOR HANDICAP (£42,880: 1m 6f) (22) 


301 

302 

303 090121 FIVE 


400214 STATH.Y FORM (BF) (Mra 
329001 LUND YLUX TO (St J O Con 
■I^^HFAtmiMbsiD) ffin* 


304 361233 BA0AR8AK 

305 90201 CHAUVE 


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R Hannon 4-910 (7ox) L Jonas fe I 

a«n> Sted Co Ltd) M Stoute 4-96 p«t). 

B Thomm22 

NMR Johnson Houghton 3-95 — 7 

P Opprateaknar) G Wragg366 — PorriEddaiy 4 



310 

312 

313 

314 

315 

316 

317 

319 

320 


1-44813 SAFE RIVER 
1VQ221 ISLAND SET 


114/033 SPECIAL 
2212 


— PAARKOMI 
241221 HO^te 


fER (USA) (S FradkofAl 
ET (USA) (P Moncnafl) 
VINTAGE IQ UMudn 


WRSarlabumtl 
R Cochran* 17 


L Cumani 4-90.. 

i4ancna6)L Cumani 4-90 (4ex), TNeaS 

(J Mudodi) Jimmy F4zgaraW9913 — T Lucas 18 
A AI MeMoum) A Stewart 3-911 ““ ‘ 


M Roberta 15 


Ffia^lY | (CAiOt 


M-1001 LADY’S 
121 JUST DAVE. 
<11000 ROHnStMlti 


ti Derby) G PnehsrrFGoirion 4-84 WRranl 

AbduBaJG Harmed 34-7 OStraAay 2 


■ G Harwood 3-97 ■ 
■(Piiiaaori) I Banana 44^7 
I III I Ml Mill I* IlM 




P Cook 12 

w Caraw 20 


321 

322 

323 

324 


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KknTMdrall 

401134 COHMANDBI ROBERT (ROgdartJHanaon 444 JN Brawn (5) 3 


09000 0 KMQ OF COMEDY (LLaanirtC Homan 444. 
H 07&54-4_ 


SWbHwoftbS 

TWMamalB 


323000 MLT0N BURN (Q) (A nchtedR .... 

004311 WHrn£MHX(DJonaa)H Candy 4-7-it (7ex) 

7-2 Primary. 11-2 WMe MB. 91 Htt> Tension. 191 Five Fwttvngv Russian 
Noble. 12-1 Daartum. Just DnricL Kudz. 14-1 Newetfs PraK Special VteSge, Stately 
Form, 191 others. 


FOWt KUDZ(M)2%l2ndfo7iiit l iin , p r 4BatNflwm»rti«tnm6Jfi CS190, oood 
July 10. 5 ran). mBSUN NOBLE (84) 3rd and STATELY FORJi (95) 4th behind I 


totem. 

thedb- 


aMMiad Vouchreto (9R in s photo at Ascot. ROMOSM (7-HJ) 21 wny W» tmd dual 

VENTURE (8-6) 8th dm 4f. £10051. firm. June 18 15 ran). ISLAND SET (91) beat Vln- 1 


10.8 

tege Port (7-11)0 m Goodwood (1m tern. Aug2. 8 ran).DAAItKOteg7^1SI 


SION (910) oaw3l winner from Past GarimffUSfaiAyrp 
26.Sran).PHlMAWY(9^oaay2tBatliwinnorftoniKteg 


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2nd 1 0 Staillno (912) all ote—rartlmdi.glSSliflood totem. JtdyJ4.Bran), 

*“ ' ‘ (96) 01 Ayr (Ira St £?S03. good to tern. July 


Jidy2B, 1 2 rani WHITE MU. 
VINTAGE (92) a short head I 
Salacflon; MOi TBOKM 


■ 5L £2725. firm, 


■yaa a t B wi n naraomiqnoJBd(B4)(imiM 


1 3rd ol 8 (1m 31, £8504, good to tern. July 21. 8 ran). 


3.45 SCOTTISH EQUITABLE GIMCRACK STAKES (Group II: 2-Y-O: 
£33.318: 61) (tl) 


401 

402 

403 
405 

407 

408 

409 

410 

412 

413 

414 


on WCH CHA«JE(9D) (RE A Boe Lid) CNobon 95. 


3101 MANSOOJjm AFStafi N Qtopan M — 

1133 AMGO SUOO 0) u) K Brasssy 90 

021 BALTIC SHORE (USA) jShBikh Mohammed) M I 


JfIMH 


. R Cochraea 7 
S Wbitworth 1 


i Mohammad) M SlOUta- 90 - W R Swfatara 5 

11211 CHMETWEf&fH (A downing) Ctinkter 98 MBkt*4 

mill CROFTHTS CUN: O) JD BarwAnfl Capt J Wlson M — JuieBowkarO 

11 JUST A FLUTTER flM (FWison) M fevfs 90 ThraaS 

11 NOREWOOCS(lKAKO) (G Stravteridga) I BaldteflWI PatEddaiyO 


320 SONG trJESTm Mason) Jirany Fftzgnkl 90. 

011222 WBISI£YDAlCTARRim6I)jC Woods) GMoM , 

011114 HHQAW1H0HPE (B) (D) (Mbs s Easterby) M W Easterby 90 — WCaraon2 


S Cartben 11 
D Casey I 


7-2 Rich Charlie. 4-1 Wteamhoroe, 92 Just A Rutter, 91 Morewoods, 91 Baltic 
Crater's C8na, Mansooj. 12-1 others. 


Shore, Cham Tana, 191 1 



9 ran).MANSOOJ (911) and debutamiDCH CHAF-E(911) ware out of 


$ tser- 


110, 10 ran).H 
Salacflm WKMffTHORPE 


4-15 GREAT VOLTIGEUR STAKES (Group H: 3-Y-O C & G: £33,705: 
1m4f)(7) 

W1 1-1101 ALLEZ MNCRDflKAunu Brody) G Harwood 97 GStaikayl 

^ ® O'Brian (iral 97 CRochaS 

M4 13-1103 CONQUERsMG ifeiO (USA) (ED (R Saimterl M Stoute 97 WHS«rinbuni7 

1-31134 MASK OUR (USAMP) (PrincaA SatroariVlTCaci 6-7 SCarttanA 

w ?””i*^” ^faw ^Qy^^R°riolOJDurtop97PatEddaiy2 

f95 l?!? 31 NKNAS (D) (F Satnwfl P Cote 97 T Qrtan 5 

510 1041 01 WASSL TDUQ1 (USA) (SheHi A AI Maktomi) W Ham 97 W Carson 3 

uS^Moon.Sftdnms, 3-1 Maz Milord. 91 AuthaaL 91 Mashkour, Nisnas, 91 
Wassl Touch, 191 Conquering Hare 



445 ROSES STAKES (2-Y-O: £7,895: 5f) (9) 


211103 CAR OL'S TRE ASURE (D)Q*sC Lane) B HBbl 

212 BAfiOTiwtiraran^^jHwi«9i» 

03014 JOE SUGDBI (OWBF) Or Mriml R WMrakvB-11 

CMBL BOm W&f p fiL) M Mc COmmckTH 


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Pat Eddery 4 
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11203 NUTWDOO 


(R Trussal Jr) B Hanbury 98 Q Baxter 3 

-^' W K , on 98 W R SMnbort) 6 

LkQE EkSn98 A MacMy 9 


_ ^ L* ^raTa Treasure, 7-2 Quel Esprit 5-1 Dream Launch. 6-1 Bag O "Rhythm. 91 
Bom To Race. Nutwood U.12r1 Whippet 291 Joe Sugdan, 25-1 Fm . 



5.15 WYKEHAM HANDICAP (SYO : £3324: 5fi (12) 

1 iSSTo IWSi D .!f^l 7 , 


MUD SSOANSTA 
<00-303 MUMMY’S 9 


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20038 0 LOCHRMMPPMR 
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‘ ~~ G PrOdtanFGardon 8-8 

SCauthanl 
SParfcs — 1# 
CocwotWiZ 

P Waldron 9 

7-13 JLemtt 


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M w Easterby 7-12 WCsneai 
Sp Griffith* < 

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M McCormack 7-7 — TWBHamr 


Tjr.Rnu l *5S?'r ■ 6 ~ 1 Nteton Dan. Paimaracri Wails, 9! 
TatJtay. toman Start 191 God’s htift. Webstars Feast. 12-1 others. 



Today’s course specialists 


Toimc m . YORK LINGFIELD 

TRAI»®tS; H Cacfl 19 mnnera from » 
“■ P Cole 28 from 11A 

TnYW? iii L VI 9 0fS . 3 ■'! anl 19 aB-ML 24^%! I RaMnn 17 hmtn to mgk. - 

S* Edd^55 wtenraa tram 
275 rideSjauHk W Carson 51 bran 26s, 

QWrai 7 tram 99. 17 


IBJMfc; T Chum 7 from 39, 17.9%. 

YARMOUTH 
TRAECR& H CacH 64 wlmera from 181 
nnwre %8%: A tewart 8 from 3s, 
awgLjawa ni as t ram 173. ».a%. 
JOCKEY& A KknbMey 11 winners from 
S3ridea.20.B%;ML'nnmBail from 107. 
108%: NDay 9 from fla 100%. • 


twre , R for. 14 tram 162. 7.7% 

(only two quaMare). . . 

DEVON 

THAItfeiUc f Wteter IS wmnarafrbm® 
nmwre ^5%; o Bsworth 21 from 

JQCKEWfc PLaach 2T rwnnare from tgf - 
ridre 17.1%; S Smith Ecctaa 12 from 77.' - 
l&6%; B Powell 15 from 88. 


/ 



J 







'WZ&rrri 










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t j ^ _ i 




* 1 
*^•-1 (.*_ 


. .."i ' ? j ■ 

*te f'.-, '■■> 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 

CRICKET: TWQ -LEADING TEAMS IN CHAMPION SHIP SUFFER HEAVY DEFEATS ON THE EVE OF THEIR MEETING 


to 


44 all out 


as 




over 



** - . _ 
<*■*« -»• 

'ir-.i--, 

m: a 


d*fa 


COLCHESTER : 
ampionshire (24pts) beat Es- 
sex (8) By 102 runs. 

The scorecard almost defies 
credibility. Essex, requiring 
only 147 runs to leap-frog over 
Gloucestershire to the head of 
the Britannic Assurance 
* Gcumty Championship table, 
crashed — there can be no 
‘ 'Jto, other word -to 44 all out. the 

lowest score this season. They 
bad to be content with reduc- 
ing Gloucestershire's lead to 
14 points. The two counties 
f » :-.i meet here today. 

Essex succumbed not so 




1 


By Ito Tennant 

North- last mndb longer. He took two 
fours off the first over and one 
off the second, bowled by 
Cook,' whereupon he was 
beaten by a grabber. 

East, adopting the same 
tactics, fen to a drier and 
Border, in his -last inning * for 
Essex--te flew to Australia 

the 1^39 runs he had pre- 
viously scored for his adopted 
county this season. He was 
priced by Cook, who had 
Handle caught in the anfiy next 
haH - 


Fletcher was also caught at 
" off a lifter from, 
and again a wicket 


' 'c x . ' ; much to Northamptonshire's 

• stuck, effective though it was, 

• as to the pitch. On Monday «U the following batt. Foster 

' • ;i, , afternoon the ball was turning was leg-before pushing half 

• 5 sharply? yesterday it was pop- r * ^ 1 “ 

ping and coining through ax 




•* as 


•n*trr 

*A> -•*, 


■i i i- ■ . 

t* i >L<! 

r tft-r.: .. A *, 

1 . v: • 

‘•'•C r*.i • 

- **■ Mfj-, • 

■M •- ; 

it-. 

. . m. .. 

■ % 1 * ■'<• 

1 • 

■lv I- • 

: l« t ■ 
-•M**- ic 

-W j- .... . 

■*-* i ’ - . 

: t ■ 

-tel:. ; • 

* ’•*- " 

W • - . . 


. t varying heights in addition. 

. ‘ v. The left-arm spinners, Childs 
' and. Nick Cook, bowled from 
• one end and the medium 
pacers exploited a patch at the 
^ other. 2t was at times an 
unplayable pitch. 

. - Northamptonshire were a 

,. w i ;. T run ahead at the start of play. 

They soon lost Larkins,. 
' . ■- n'&'-j, stumped by East, as he tried to 

,T '_ bit Childs off his length. The 
ball turned almost square. By 
' lunch,. Boyd-Moss, Bailey, 

'■ Lamb and Capel were also 
.. oiiL Only Lamb could be held 
accountable for his dismissal-. 
He top-edged a sweep to short 
fine-leg, who had been moved 
there especially for him 
(nouiably by Fletcher, not 
- -'3 Gooch). 

::J • <*"* Off the first ball after lunch, 
v ^ Waterton was caught at point, 

. J again the ball turning. Nortb- 
.' amptonshire were then 125 for 
. • ; v seven, 90 nms to the good. An 
.i important stand followed, of 
< 5 43 between Harper and Nick 

Cbok. In retrospect it was this 
which put the game beyond '• 
Essex. 

. Essex had no shortage of 
time in; which to score, their 
nms although Gooch dearly 
felt the pitch was not going to 


7** 


forward. Pringle collected a 
pair, caught off a glove; Childs 
was ran out responding to 
Lever's poor call; and, finally. 

Lever had his middle stomp 
uprooted. The innings had 
lasted 20.1 overs. 

fkWTHMnONSHMEHret timings SQ2 
(AJ Lamb 81. R J BaSoy 63; Foster 5 lor 

Second k 

"QCOokcPndienltX 

WUridnsstEastbCMds 

RJBoyd-MonRwbMnnte- 
A J Lamb c Hart* b CWkST— 

R J Bratov c Prichard b CWte . 

DJCapeJc Fletcher bCWWs- 
R A Hwper et East b Chflds _ __ 

tS N V VKHerton c Goocb b CMUb _ 11 

NGBCookfcrabPrmri* 23 

NAMatendernMout „ 3 

A Walker cFMdwrbCMte _ 2 _ 

Bdras (b 7. t> 3) ,io Easy does it Miller en 

Tow — - - 1B1 

FAIL OF WICKETS: 1-23. 2h6D. 3-50. 4- 
65. 5-86, 6 Of, 7-127, 8-168. 9-176, ID- 
181. 

BOWLWG: Lever 4-0-1 1-0: Foster 8-0-27- 
0; Chftf* 302-881-8: AcSeU 94080; 

Pringle 14-4-382. 



SPORT 29 

HORSE TRIALS 


Gloucestershire 
losing ground 


Storyteller 
easily 


on final approach | pas ^]^ s 


By Richard Streeton 


NUNEATON: Warwickshire (20 
points) beat Gloucestershire (3) 
by 163 runs. 

For the second successive 
match, Gloucestershire, the 
championship leadm, found an 
awkward pitch worked against 
their efforts to complete an 
arduous task in the fourth 
innings. Norman Gifford, the 
Warwickshire captain, left them 
to make 269 in just under five 
hours. 

Nobody was able to stay long 
enough to play the long, domi- 
nant innings the .situation re- 
quired and Gloucestershire were 
dismissed for 205 shortly after 
tea. Frankly they were never in 
the hunt on a pitch which helped 
the seam bowlers and on winch 
the bounce tended to be low. 

The entire day's play bore an 
uncanny resemblance to the 
third lay at Cheltenham in 
Gloucestesb ire’s previous 
match against Middlesex. Once 
again, after rain disrupted the 
second day, Gloucestershire 
spumed any batting bonus 
points they might have secured 
and declared behind their 
opponents* first innings total, 
the time 266 adrift 

Warwickshire then collected 
easy runs against the occasional 
bowlers before they declared in 
their turn. Even on *hk w piii 
ground, the target given in a 
minimum of 75 overs was hr 
harder than the 357 in 90 overs 
that Middlesex had set 
Gloucestershire. A gallant at- 
tempt Was dutifully mad* but 
success always looked beyond 
reach. 


before be was undone ty the 
ball's low bounce as he tried to 
pull against Muntofi. Bainbridge 
then pushed a low catch to 
gulley in the uaa over. 

There was still hope for 
Glouoestershire while At hcy 

with peritids aPtmrenainw and 
with the score on 87 was fourth 
out as Small returned to the 
attack. The former Yorkshire 
batsman dabbed a catch to 
second slip in the fist bowler’s 

first over. Soon afterwards 
Small had Stovpld leg before as 
the batsman pushed forward. 

With half of the side out for 
98, there was a him of despera- 
tion as Lloyds swung his bat 
freely against Gifford. For a 
time it worked and 47 runs were 
added in seven overs before 
Lloyds holed out to deep mid- 
wicket A reflex catch by Moles 
at forward short-leg brought 
Gifford RusselTs wicket. Walsh 
hit Kerr for a huge six over long- 
on before the off-spinner had 
him caught in the deep. 

Curran's strokes included 
three leg-side sixes against 
Gifford as he scored 57 to 75 
minutes, but the left-arm spin- 
ner eventually had him held at 
silly point via bat and pad. 
Gifford is now only 10 wickets 
shon ofbecoming the 10th post- 
war bowler to reach 2,000 
wickets in his career. The match 
ended when Lawrence gave 
Kerr a return catch. 

WARtncaumne Fkst bnim 381 lor 8 

yCa Sfor ‘ 


(Photo: Hugh Rontledge). 


Surrey spurred on by Clarke 


BSEX: First innings 337 (Q A Qoocti 87. 

d 72. B R Karts 88 ; N A 


P J Prictam ..... 

MaHendsr 5 tor 110. N G B Cook 4 tor 7ft 
Saoond knrwB 

*G A Gooch ftwbN <38 Co* 12 

P ) EEastcLombb N QBGook 1 

J Prlctnrd c WMorton b MaBntBr — 9 
A R Border b N G B Cook 6 


ti- 

ll-. 


BR Hards c Lamb bNGBOook 0 

KWR RaKbftr c Lamb b Malandar ~~ 1 
DRPringtecHafperbNGBCook _ 0 

N A FosSr bw b IMandar 0 

J K Low b Mafcndar 

JHCMkte runout 

□ L Acfiekl not out . 


ExtrBS(b2 I b1.nb7) . 
TdW. 


, 10 
44 

FALL OF MCKET& 1-13, 2-14, 831, 4- 
31.5-32. 5-35.7-35,836,9-44, 10-44. 
BOWLING: IMMndar 9.1-822-4; NQB 
Cook 184-144; Harper 1-880. 

Umpires: D Uoyd and N T Pfawa. 


Smrey strengthened their po- 
sition in third place hrinad 
Essex and Gloucestershire, the 
leaden in the Britannic Assur- 
ance county championship, 
when they beat Somosethy 178 
runs at Taunton, yesterday. 
Their seventh victory, which 
s. had been made certain by mid 
o afternoon, had been much the 
doing of Sylvester Clarke, who 
took five wickets for 31 as 
Somerset ooBapsed in 343 overs 
in making 166. 

There had been no play on 
Monday, and after Somerset 


• s *r *• 
M .-.X ' • 


YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


» -X-»T ” 


- 

vm,w * 

rt*. ■ -< ’if -V 


I".' - 

rvactr- 

. M. 


- V. If*. 
« r.cr 


Middx y Hampshire 

AT LORD'S: 

MkHtom (4pts) dmw mfO 


Second 
WN Stack btewtay 
AJTMaernotoW 


TtrstkifcrfHK'' 
ndbwSva' - 


.-t ’v'EAC* STAGES I"::' R 0 Butcher Ibwb Mam 


. .D 
.U 


J D Carr c Tony b MkkSaton . 

C T Radiay not out 

Extras [w 1) _L_ 

To»J (3 wkts da^ 

FALL OF WICKETS' 


.49 

111 
_ 4 
- 56 
— . 5 
— 1 


Worcs y Leics 

ATWORCEGTBt 

MtnwaamAkv (20pts) MW Latomtar- 
shkaP)bf4wickats. 

IH Ck9 T PWtC. Ffcat kwjnoa 209 (T J 
Boon63;PJ NaufportSlor 7$T . V 


^^H—ISacanP tankas 
J C BaUarston* t*Fridpeon« 
R A Cobb b McEwan^H 
PWHaycHKfcbMM 
*D I Gower b NwJ 
JdWWakarbl 


IckbPridgaon 
o ucdmh — — 




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t •: - 

x- * ' * 

• - • 

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, • t Lu«C- 

a n’** ■’ 5 

. , 5 • : «i 

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0: Cowley 9-1-381; Smith 188480; 
Parks 181-680; MSddMon 88181. 
HAMFSHRE: first Incfogs 158 tor 7 pec. 

CGQmenklgenotout 70 

T C Middleton c Radtey b Emburay — 22 
R A Smith c and b Edmonds ______ 2 

VP Terry c Butcher b Emburay 2 

TMTHimM not out _______ — 28 

Extras pb $ — 5 

ToM (S wkts) _129 

FALL OF WCKETS^-40. 2-51, 878 
BOWUNG Hpghes 8813-0; COwans 6- 
819-0; Edmonds 188541; Bhburey 18 
5-38-2. 

Umpires; R A WWte and PB Wight. 

Somerset? Surrey 

AT TAUNTON 

Surrey (ZOpa) butt Somorsst {4) by 173 

SURREY: Hrst Imkigs 427 for 9 dec (3 S 
CSnton 147. A JSterart 78. CJ Richards 
70 not put) 

Second brings torfatted 
SOMERSET: First Innings 

B CRose not out 43 

•PM Roebuck not out 31 

Bgras(ti4,in,wl.nb3) — 9 

ToMjnowkidec. 14 overs) 83 

BOWLING; Ctarfce 81-11-0: Thomas 48 
180: POcock 1-1-80: Faikner 1-880; 
Stewart 88340; Lynch 1-080. 

Second kmfcigs 

B CRose bTTwmas ... - 3 

■PM Roebuck bCtefre 9 

N A Felton c Lynch b Cterko 8 

dsbOa 


-Z 
25 
- 6 
_ 2 
14 
4 

28" 


Derbyshire v Yorks 

AT CHESTERHELD 


Detbyshin (4pfs)drsnr with YorfcaMeDL 
VOntSHME; Fbtt bmkMS 177 (M A 
Making 5 lor 48) 

Second tnrtngs 

MD Mono cMsherb Barnett 33 

A A MeicadeKiwbFinnay — 7 

SN Hartley not out 41 


P E Robinsan not out . 


- ■ ,5 SSaUW^»a»a 

- *,• - at 1-1M:Mwu 18834-1; Trerttett 8818 - WKRBenjaminc Rhodes b PfiSion 

n . , . LB Taylor bNewpot . 

G A R Hants notout _ 


Extias(fc7, nb2,w2) , 
Total Ot wkts dec) 


- Extras (to 4, nb 2) . 
Total, 


1 

2- 
__ 0 

— 8 
114 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-6, 2-22. 825,4-43, 
5-52.857.7-110, 8111, 8118 18114. 
B0W191& Prfdnon 18833G; Newport 
1288384; UtEman 184383; Weston 
7-8148 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-191 831. • . 
BOWUNG; Fmnay 188281; Warner 88 
24-0; Barnett 80-481; Monts 8832-0. 


J Hartley 
r8044k 


OEHYSHne First Inrtkns 88 br no wkt 
dec fBowing; Oemda 81-W4): P J I 
81-&0: Shaw 81 -12-0; FWchari 
Extras.b4.Bi7.nb9) 

Second innings 

"KJ BamattcMoxonbP jHardey __ 3 
M Maher c BMrstow b Stww __ 19 




Hanis5-0 -180; WOey 8280). 
Second Imangs 

TS Curfia liw b Boreambi 

0 B DDkwein bTayfar 

D M Smfth few b Banjambi 

GAHtakcWNUcssebTaytor _ 
*P A Neste c Gower b Oe Rettas . 
ON Patel not but 


MJWastonb Beniamin 
|SJ Rhodes not out. 


— 4 

- I 

, 78 
84 
. 16 
43 


Extras (to 8, rt> 3) . 

Toad (6 wkts). 


IV A Retards b Clarks ._ 

. R JHawlefttiCtartaBb Pocock _ 
,V •■■r I T Botham c C#nton b FSItham 

V J Marks nai oat 


tT Gord e Lynch b Clarke 
J Gamer erakner 


bPooocfc 


,16 

34 

37 

IB 

27 

_2 

0 

— 9 
168 


9 
5 

_ 11 
199 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-5. 829. 8B5. 498, 
8174 8188. 

BOWUNG: Taylor 17.1-1-88* Da Prates 
1 1.88381: Beitemfci 17-1-783; Hands 8 
1-180: Boon 1-840. 

Lknpires: 0 O Ostear and R Pataar. 

Sussex y Kent 

AT HOVE 

Sussex (23pts)bagtKenf(5)by 6 wickets i 
KENT First brings 191 (ACSPsi*4lor 
32) and 145 (A P(9«Xt 5 tor aST 

SUSSEX: RratUwbw252jCMWe8s 82; 
" r101?RMatoon4torS^ 


GHDHey5for101. 


Second tonhiM 
mbOiey 


N S Tsrior c Stewart b Cteke 

R V J Coombs not out 

Bdras(b3.to1,w1.it)4) . 

Total L__ ; 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-3.822,3 

882. 882,7-133, 8158 8168. 10-1B8. 
BOWLING: Clarke 1281-31-5; Thomas 8 
1^-1 : Butcher 2^M4-ft Fefthum 80-41- 
1; Pocock 81-51-2. 

Umptes: C Cook and J W Holder. 


RIABdioncAMecmn 
A M &raeP c Cowdrey b Alderman _ 15 
PWGParkarnotout- 

A PWSSs c AsMtbDttey 

CM Wete c Marsh b Alderman 
N J Lantern not out 
Extras (nbl) 



A E Warner c P J Hartley b Dennia — 84 

MAHoUngcUonmbDamte 18 

RStnumanatout — 7 

Extras (b 5, lb 5. nb 5) 15 

Total(7wkt4 244 

FALL OF WICKETS; 84,845.855.475, 
5-93,6-200,7-221. 

BOWUNGt Dennis 148582 PJ HarflM 
17-2-57-4; Fletcher 148480; Shaw 188 
381; Carrick 9.44-38-0. 

Umpires: A A Jones and B J Meyor. 


CHAMPIONSHIP TABLE 


Gtoucs 

18 
19 

Letts HQ 
Notts 09 

Nwthants(l&i8 
Kentffi 18 


By Peter Maraon 

bad made 49 nms before declar- 
ing in the morning. Surrey’s 
forfeiture of their second in- 
nings left Somerset a target of 
345runs to win in 95 overs. Yet, 
when Thomas bowled Rose, and 
Clarke brought down Fehon. 
Richards and Roebuck for two 
runs in 11 balls, Somerset's 
timings had been grievously 
damaged. Botham hit a six and 
six fours in a spirited .counter 
offensive, and there had been a 
valliant effort from Marks and 
Gamer, too. ' 

At Lord’s, where Middlesex 
bad set Hampshire a generous 
target of 224 runs to win in 54 
overs, Greenidge, made by his ' 
standards a conservative 70 not 
out, and Trcmfett 28 not out as 
Hampshire made 129 fix' three. 

Made Nicholas, Hampshire’s 
captain was disappointed. *Tm 
not going to blame anyone in 
pubhe, but if people want to say 
.that one man was tnring to win 
the match and theother was not, 
they could be right-” In an 
^attempt to achieve a positive 
result; Hampshire had declared 
overnight at their total of 58 for 
seven, three runs on- Slack and 
Miller survived the opening 
overs from Marshall and Con- 
nor in Hampshire’s initial 
thrust, though Slack (49), and 
Butcher had both been taken by 
lunch, when Middlesex were 
1 16 for two, a lead of 11 3 runs. 
Miller then made his way to his 
first handled in the c ha in pion- 
ship and Czrr.too, enjoyed htifa- 
sdf against some friendly 
bowling in which Faria’s lobs 
and Smhh’s teg breaks were hit. 
for 104 runs in 19 oven, on the 


way to Gatling’s declaration at 
226 for three. 

Worcestershire beat 
Leicestershire at New Road, 
Worcester by four wickets. Set 
to make 196 to win in 53 overs, 
Smith made 76, and Patel 43 not 
out, and Hide 34. as Worcester- 
shire moved to their fifth suc- 
cess. In the morning, 
Worcestershire, too, had de- 
clared at their score after a brief 
flourish on Momtey. Leicester- 
shire had 81 runs in the book as 
they moved off in their second 
timings, but they made a poor 
start, losing Balderstone in the 
fifth over, and Willey, Gower, 
Whitaker, Boon and Cobb, the 
last three to Mcewan for 1 1 nms 
in 32 balls, by lunch, when 
Leicestershire limped m at 67 
for six, a lead of 148. De Freitas 
and Whiticase did well in a 
lively stand before both players 
finished off 


Warwickshire batted for 55 
minutes as Smith and Moles 

scored 102 together. 

they were fed easy runs, 
stand was interesting as it 
continued a remarkable se- 
quence for these two. 

In the past six championship 
innings they have launched their 
side with stands of 161 and 155 
against Somerset; 77 and 57 
unbroken against Kent; and 60 
and 1Q2 unbroken in this game. 
Moles, who is 25. and a former 
Birmingham League player with 
Moseley, has now scored 453 
nms (average 64.71) in his first 
six county matches. 

A calamitous start for 
Gloucestershire cany when 
Tomlins was caught behind 
from Small’s fifth ball. Ro- 
manies out-scored Athcy in a 
promising second-widaet stand 


tee (A J Mohw 100; Uowta L 
Sacond Innings 

PA Smut* not out 

A J Mote not out 


-124) 


Exsras(to 2 , wl ) . 
Tote (Owkt tec). 


.70 
-29 
- 3 
.102 


ssssssstsrsssssat 

32-0. 

GL0UCE8TERSMRE: Fkst tontoos 115 
for 2 Hoc (Romates 87 not out; Bowing: 
Smte 7-816-0; SmMi 80-33-0; Mutton 
11-8281; Ferrate 9-4181; Kan- 7-1-18 
0:Gifk)rtl80-8QJ. 


Second Innings 

toe DSmafl 


KPTomlnscHumpagab 


P W Romanes b Minton 

J Athey c KaKcnarran t> Smafl _ 36 


c Karr b Ferrate , 
towbT 


CWJ 
PBa 
A W 

K M Curran c Fanaira bGtftocd 
JWUoytecSntihb Gifford _ 
R C Ruwal c Motes b Gifford _ 

C A VNabbc Smafl b Karr 

D V Uwranoa c and b Kair __ 
D A Grawnay not out 
Extras (b 
Tote. 


0 

41 


By Jenny MacArthur 

Richard Walker negotiated 
the difficult intermediate course 
st the Oner Jonas Everdon 
horse trials in Northampton- 
shire yesterday with practised 
ease, and won his* section on 
Storyteller II by four points 
from Emma HoJtby with Maple 
Tobrouk. 

Walker, who came seventh at 
Gatcombe Park horse trials last 
weekend on Accumulator, wb 
held up during his round for 
i several minutes due to an 
accident at fence six where 
Jason Varey's Liffy Malone had 
to be put down after brtakinga 
leg. Princess Anne, who com- 
peted in the sa me section on 
Tod, had a good round and 
finished in eighth place. She said 
afterwards that she was raking 
Tod to the Scottish champion- 
ships this weekend. 

The other intermediate sec- 
tion was won by Lucinda 
Henson on Half Moon Bay who 
had only seven time faults on a 
course which contained a num- 
ber of difficult fences, notably 
fence 17, the Ruddles Muddle. 
Sophie Manindale. four points 
behind, took second place on 
Metal some Moor, and Nigd 
Taylor had a rewarding outing 
on the seven -ycar-oki For- 
midable. a hone he hopes will 
replace his former advanced- 
section horse. Hard Scuffle, to 
finish in third place. 

In contrast to the intermedi- 
ate course, the novice one rode 
well with large numbers finish- 
ing clear and within the time. In 
section one, John Williams had 
his first win with the five-year- 
old Busman’s Holiday. He was 
surprised how quickly the 
course rode — he finished 25 
seconds inside the time — and 
attributed it to the excellent 
going. 

The New Zealander, Ross 
Ren wick, winner of section 
three with Mrs Sue Nock’s 
Talisman V, was pleasantly 
surprised at the way the six- 
year-old gelding has taken to 


2 .wi.nbi> . 


i 

_ 8 
57 
-31 
_ 7 
.19 
_ 1 
_ 0 
_ 4 
205 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-3.871, 871 487. 
898. 8145, 7-175, 8200. 9205. 18205 
BOWUNG; Snte 183 - 483 ; Steth 8817- 
0; G«ord 181-583; Ferrate 88181; 
Mutton 9831-1; Kerr 81-831-2 


Johnson cuts loose 
as Notts march on 


fell to Newport who 
the innuqss by taking three 
wickets in eight bells. 

Derbyshire made a good ef- 
fort to make 272 nms to beat 
Yorfcskfre at Queens Park, 
Chesterfield. Morris, Miller and 
Warner afl made runs as Derby- 
shire fen 28 runs sbon at 244 for 
seven. Derbyshire’s declaration 
overnight at 68 for no wicket 
meant that Yorkshire started 
out leading by 109 runs. As 
Barnett bowled at medium pace 
to batsmen encircled by a ring of 
fieldsmen in the dose raiching 
positions, and Moms, Barnett's 
partner impersonated Wayne 
Daniel, among other bowlers, so 
Yorkshire’s batsmen helped 
themselves to all the runs 
Bairstow would need before 
making his daHttgg 


Nicholas takes break 



TOtai (4 wkts) 


FALL OF WICKET: 1-0. 2S2. 855. 463. 
BOWLING: Dfltoy 118-1-47-2; AMenran 
11-8382. 

UmpteK J Bteanshw and O J Constant. 


18 

P) 19 
WanwidcetlS) 19 
Somers* (17) 18 
Lancashire 
;i«» i9 

(1) 19 
Gtam 18 

19851 



intandtes 
i total Mutes 
drawn match whan scons 


2 10 44 54 178 

4 12 55 50 177 

2 11 45 48 171 

5 9 33 59 156 

4 10 87 58 148 
7 8 37 48 147 

3 13 46 43 137 
3 12 43 38 129 

* 12 38 40 127 
0 B 83560 121 

5 12 31 37 84 


Mark Nicholas, the Hamp- 
shire captain, win miss his find: 
match of the season when 
Worcestershire visit Bourne- 
mouth today in the Britannic 
Assurance County Champion- 
ship. Nicholas has strained a rib 
muscle and Paul Terry, who was 
only recently restored to the first 
eleven after a run of poor form, 
win take his place as captain. 
The county also have doubts 
Nigel Cowley, who has 
a back injury, but 
Smith, who Iras twice 
broken fingers this season, is 


ready to return. 
Wit! 


for 


7rth Graham DiDey away on 
England duty, Kent have called 
up . Chris Pom for the game 
against Surrey ai Daitford, 
while Duncan Wild is recalled 
by Northamptonshire for their 
home match- with No 


ted. shire to replace Allan Lamb, .game. 


who is also at the Oval for the 
third' Test match. 

M i d d les ex await news on the 
fitness of Wayne Daniel, their 
fest bowler, who is carrying a 
strained achifles tendon, before 
their championship match 
against Yorkshire at 
Headingfey, if he cannot play 
Graham Rose will come in 
With Gatting, Edmonds and 
Emburey with the England 
party, Middlesex win bring in 
bats m en Keith Brown and off- 
break bowler Jamie Sykes. 

Somerset include two new- 
comers to county cricket for 
their match against Sussex at 
Taunton, Mark Harman, an off- 
spinner from Frame, and 
Darren Foster, a fest bowler who 
was born in London, both of 
whom are 22 years odd. Brian 
Rose is resting and misses the 


By Peter Bad 

TRENT BRIDGE: Nottingham- 
shire (17pts) beat Lancashire (3) 
by seven wickets. 

Nottinghamshire made short 
shrift of an over-generous target 
yesterday to edge closer to the 
championship leaders. Asked to 
score 295 in a minimum of 89 
overs, they swept home with 
embarrassing ease, winning with 
13.5 overs to spare against a 
depleted, lacklustre Lancashire 

anar If 

After Broad and Newell had 
given them a solid start with a 
century partnership, Johnson 
put Lancashire to the sword, 
hitting an undefeated 120 to 
become the youngest Not- 
tinghamshire player ever to 
score a thousand runs in a 
season. His hundred came up 
off 101 balls, and contained 17 
fours, most struck with fluent 
arrogance. 

Judging what target to set was 
undoubtedly a difficult decision. 

The wicket was stiD green; 

«giin«« that, with Alloti missing , 
Lancashire had only Patterson 
to exploit it as it offered little for 
spinners. The injuries to Rice, 
who broke his finger on Sunday, 
and Robinson, who had braised 
his bands on Monday, were 
further arguments for 


giving Fairbrother 
and Abrahams a chance to reach 
their thousand for the season, 
which Fairbrolhcr took and 
Abrahams spurned, Simmons 
was seen to have miigndged 


le fear that Patterson, in 
Monday's mood, could kill the 
game by knocking over three 
early wickets was unfounded. 

This time his hostility was Totejstea) 
muted and. with that threat 
removed. Broad and Newell 
settled in comfortably. 

From the beginning they were 
only marginally behind the ask- 


ing rate of 33 an over, a pace 
ideally suited to Newell's cau- 
tion. Sven the toss of 20 minutes 
fin- bad light was no hindrance. 
Broad moving purposefully to 
reach his 50 out of 75 in 73 
minutes. 

By the time Broad departed, 
mu-cueing a drive to mid-off; 
the paucity of Lancashire’s re- 
sources had been demonstrated 
and Johnson took over with 
relish. The bowlers were allowed 
only two further successes, New^ 
ell finally felling courtesy of I 
Warren Hegg, the 18-year-old 
third team wicket-keeper whose 
summons to The Oval for last 
week’s NatWest Trophy semi- 
final had proved unnecessary. 

This time the call to arms as 
Maynard joined Fowler and 
Mendis on the injury list was 
less dra m at i c, bat more produc- 
tive as he arrived in time to 
catch Newell down the teg side 
in the final over before tea. 
Birch’s stay afterwards was 
brief, but by then the die was 
cast. 

LANCASMRE Ftet tarings 324 tor 8 
tec ( G 0 Marefls 108: G Fowter 57) 

Second kmtnas: 

N H Fartrnthsr ntt 2B 

J A Abrahams c Franco b Birch ____ 2 
SJDStiaughoasxy notout — 12 

Tote) [ 1 wM dec ) 42 

FALL OF WICKET: 1-13 

BOWUNG; Bkch 81-4-1; Johnson 5-8 

19-0; Nmol 2819-0. 

NOTTUIGHAMSHME: Rrat tarings 72 tor 
2 tec (Bowling: Paunrson 81-20-2; 
Mddn son 82-280: Hsyhtiret 58280; 

Ftea y 1-8409. 

Second tarings: 

B C Broad c Hayburst b Snxnons 68 
M Noma c Sub DPMtsreon ______ 61 

P Johnson not out 120 

JD Birch c Fritoy b MaUnson _____ T5 
RTRotxnsonnoiout - 23 

Extras (b 2, wl.nb 7) _______ 10 


eventing. He was bought in the 
spring from David Tallow as a 
potential working hunter, but an 
accident on the road which 
blemished his knees, halted his 
career in the show ring and they 
decided to try him at eventing. 

The easy time allowed kept 
New Zealand's Olympic gold 
medallist. Mark Todd, in fourth 
place in the same section with 
Bahlua. a horse he bought a 
fortnight ago. Three others fin- 
ished on the same score, so the 
order was decided by each 
rider's proximity to toe op- 
timum time for toe cross coun- 
try. Todd, who rarely hangs 
back, was too far inside the time 
and dropped to fourth place. 

On his other novice horse. 
Comic Venture, it was the 
dressage that kept him iust 
outside the platings. He had 
thought that toe six-year-old 
gelding had done a good test, but 
the judges thought otherwise. 

fli W ii u ta fl W BiHtmn ra i. StoryMtorJ 
(R Wxflrar) 4& 2_M«pto Tobroj* (E 
hotofl 50: 3, Better Country (J Coopt) 

56. 

Section Four: 1 . HsV Moon Bay (L 
Hanson) 39; 2 . Mttesoma Moor (S 
Marantelp) 45; 3, Fonnkteblo (N Taylor) 

NavtoaSscSon Oim: 1, Busman's Hofltey 

Sactton Taw i. Kaycaa (M 
Last Cnanco (D Dobson) 2 ft 3. 

Spark (J Trica-Rolpti) 31. 

Sactton Ttsas: I.Ttesman VfR Ramrfck. 
NZ) 30; 2. Sir Romano (C Holland) 31; 3 , 
W*nid(JPDolo)31. 


235 


FALL OF WICKETS: VH1.8173. 8206. 
BOWLING: Pattaraon 17-4-59-1; 
Maktason 15-2-57-1; 0’Sh*jghnosiy 12- 
>680: Fotey 141-380: Stamens 82- 
281; Hayturst 6 . 1 - 858a 
Umpires: K E Palmer and B Dwsaaton 




% i 


* * l * 





FOR THE RECORD 


BOWLS 


^ D Kfcarand C 
Staipson (Owton Lodge, Domam) 2C. B dark 
ano A Eueity (BaawSod. Notts) 10: S Roma 
and N Buptim (Sttnatass. Comwas) T7. E . 
Prceand BArchar (Taunton Dean. Somnot) 
ifcM P<^aitaAC a»dra<Wattom.HMteag 

BBnaHdOTMMBMIiU 


GOLF 


SPEEDWAY 


TENNIS 


C Manning 

®£3 C * K 


xi A Cn>M (WoOonJ. 

I Tam (Gosfortti, NorSunb) 19; 


NORTH AMEMCA: Top raBnayteur 
PGA: JUS unless sated): 1 . G Norman (Au»), 
S844.729: 2. B Twxy 606«S 3 A bean 
437A15: 4. H Sutton 416855; & 8 Lmger 
(VVGL38aa91; aPStm«rr347JB4.-7. TKite 
W43& 8 . C Paata 338.774: 9. F Torn: 


MWONAL LEAORC: HmcasUa 38, EXSBf 

JUNIOR GRAND PRDC <M Exattrt 1_ A FM 
jEwrart Upa; uattegtay (Exaial 12: 3. 


Bush) 11; A Wright and J Money 
MxkH) 25. Jail Dm and John Dele 
ivauxnal FM. Sunay) 16: P HatttM and 0 
Demon (Newton Abbot Dewxtt S 

endCTancock( 

and B Taylor 

SnxftsndiM* ^ 

18: RMeWte and E^angar (Chandoe PteC 
Budte) 20. 0 Rhys Jones and D Bryant 
jOBvacton. Sornerate » QnarwrBnali; 
janor and Staipson 26. Rowau and Stepbons 
SO; ItenMta and Jamas 22. Dolby and 
CawdOB lOntangM and Money 25. tedeett 
andDansonl 
and 


Itennm and Ja 

tees loilteiwi an 

Damon 17 feko and Taylor 2a»cliofls 
Hanger 18 Monday: Second mad; 
th andl Maddox lOfirretr and Orar 15 
BUcaandTsytaft SumraeraandBortteWi 
13, Nteofls and Hanger 3a Bomr and 
HaWHB Rh^ Jonas ted Bryant 22 Miw 


CRICKET 


BRISTOL. SKOod teat ' 

{D Ripley 75L Young Sri Lanka3787 (A 
uunBonhe 161 R Soza 123 H TAeterawo 
121 notate) Match drawn 


. 278 for 7 tC Gtad*" 70 I 

Reteadrag Worcateannra 231 Ipr 7 (DA 
LMMSS R K flhrgworth 56 not exx) 

Essex won by 47 tuns 

MNOA COUNTIES CHAMPfONSHlP' CMpnt 

Dorset 217 tor 6 _dec (pP Uatenen 77 A 
Kanneey saand SSIor 7 Oodotts»wa 2 Ca(M 
BMundnM C Stone B(or».MaKh drawn 
SuBbtt 


Bury St 


ittoigeniqo M S A Mc&w to R Hatoart 
not out) bncrinabre^Stor |(P A TOdfl i 


Wlatxre i^SditaSa (DJMMercer'54 


« 


jinto the right wavelength jw the Fosters 
tonterwty at Newquny yesterday ■ 


R C Coopar 44 Match drawn leSoax 
NbRhunSer&d 174 and 186 CuntMtend 
1 78 far 4 dec (D Hodgwn 52) and 1M lor 4 [M 
VtooteSn Ctenbadandan&stamtinsion 




314.563; i 
275638, 

2S0L248; 18 K Graah 236846: 17. M O'Maari 
230.988; 18. JCooh 223,471; 19, D Hammond 
05:083: 20. PAznmr 218237. Olbar (Mteon 

LPGA: 1 P Bradley S48249B: 2. J Matte 
241524 3. B Ktag 228897. 4. A Atootl 
2T75 11 5. J Gaddee 1S3J52; 6. M-fl 

Zhnmeman 1X3*8 : 7 c Johnson 189549; 

8 PShaehan 162819. 9. V SWnoer 154.798. 
ID A Ckemno (Japan). 14&1S5. 11 J 
Stephenson (Ausj.141 542. 12. S Palmw 
130816 13. J EXOtanm 127.220; 14. B 
Paarson 118263 16. D Uassay 10EL531 it J 
Roeanlhal 1011719: 17 M Spms-Onte 
37794 18 0 Wteutl 92S20; 18 ' ~ 

91 627 20 L How 74982 

CAIOHFP Wetab pio taw fante c 

f c 13ft P Partai (Bkw AmraJ 
500) T^lWoowwnPsttbutf 
(£1 S00) 139 t G Farr 

(rtflOOLS Gooch (RteynL7ia 
. Dams (Uanwem). ra tTTPrlco( 

70 141: D Vaughan (Vato of L 
73 142: M MoSjrd {Uhabi 75 
Cddy) 71 71 Dueweflyn] 

Evans (Barriwm Broom) 70 72 


SUTTON COUDnOA Gatt Foundattaa on- 
def-15 teoninnintalps Boys 15ft A Wesson 
78 7 7 lift J Griffiths 

79 Si 18* C ftxsar 

I FH«) 79 GMK IB* F MfcKay 

CTwntwry Aynhra) 82 80 IBftAUacDon 
aw (Andover Hawn) S3 to lift 0 Speak 
fCunao* Lancs) 85 84 


WHITE FLAWS: tmamatlenel LMSA Pro-*nv 

Lmdtafl scores: tie US> lit c Wtewy 7i 
’O B 70 280: J RaKfitfW 78 70 73 71 C 
Jarman 76 72 70 72 291 L Hew* 76 73 
T 70 292: L Adams 78 73 72 69 M 
Sateoa"’? T 4 74 73 X Young 72 74 73 
T . * 

\ 


SWIMMING 


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YACHTING 

Brown stays in 
ranningfor 
championship 

The third race of the Laser 
UK National Championship be- 
ing held at Uttlehampton under 
toe burgee of toe Arun Yacht 
Club was sailed in a light and 
variable breeze, which delayed 
toe start of toe fleet of 1 8S boats. 

Ax toe wmdward mark. Richard 
Lott (Parkstone YC) led from 
Mike Budd (Leigh and 
Lough ton) and Paul Lovesey 
(Solent AO Stars) on the second 
beat. Following a big wind shift 
the lead was taken by toe 
Brazilian. Peter Tanscheit ahead 
of Lott and Budd. 

Tanscheit retained the lead on 
the third beat with Neil Free- 
man second ahead of Lott, but 
Andrew Brown had worked his 
way up to fourth At the line. 
Brown finished first ahead of 
Tanscheit and Freeman with 
Budd fourth 

Brown, winner ofthe first race 
but 14tb in the second, is the 
favourite for toe championship 
although Freeman, who has 
been third in each mr*- a 
strong!) placed 


RESULT 1 A Brown 
126260 2 P Tanscheit 
Freeman jDactett. 17 
aMUMghtoifl 128124 


HOCKEY 

Dixon gives 
England 
first victory 

From a Correspondent 
Amsterdam 

England won their first match 
of the women’s world cup 
tournament here yesterday 
when they beat their old rivals 
Scotland, in Pool A 

England, fielding a changed 
side hoping for better fortune, 
moved Dixon to left defence in 
place of Rule and brought in 
Holwell 10 improve their 
c han ce s of converting penalty 
comers, which had been a big 
weakness. The plan paid off 
when England gained an early 
penalty stroke following a 
Hohveu strike at a corner which 
Dixon convened, her third in 
the competition. 

Much ofthe match was a dour 
straggle, with England rarely 
looking likely to make a further 
addition to the score. Scotland 
pressed forward in toe second 
half but England’s defence were 
never really troubled and they 
held on fora victory which kept 
them in fourth place ahead of 
Scotland in toe pool The win 
should give them heart to tackle 
toe lively young Canadian side 
in their final pool gam* today. 

The Netherlands, who began 
toe fifth day of the competition 
as dear leaders in Pool A. lost 
their 100 per cent record when 
they were beaten 2-1 by Canada, 
while Australia stayed in 
contention for a place in the 
semi-finals by beating Spain 3-1. 
The fete of oath Australia and' 
Canada now depends upon toe 
final round matches agamst 
Scotland and England 
respectivdy. 

Ireland, fielding their only 1 1 
fit players after being mauled by 
toe United States bn Monday 
moved away from toe bottom of 
Pool B with a superb 3-1 victory 
o v er Argentina, who hyf been 
joint leaders wito New Zealand. 
Despite being without Meoown, 
tbar outstanding forward, titty 
' played attractive hockey ana 
scored three glorious gnak 

jttSSJLT& Pool A: Australia 3. Span 1 
Swtlane 0- Canada 2. n» 


3,1 

(Ltegtl 


• Polykratis (Chm Rutter) and 
Posscdyno (Tony McGkrac) 
challenge for the £17,91 2 Pnxde 
Mcautry (6Q, at Deauville to- 
day Comrade In Arms and the 
speedy Panob look toe pick of 
their opponents 


v 





■8 


30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


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Commercial success and entertainment keep the fens happy while United chase that elusive prize 





Time warp: Matt B 


by bolds ahrft the trophy the last time Manchester United won the League in 15167 while Maiz^^Edwards (right), the dob’s present chairman, is hoping for a quick 



Atkinson walking on a knife-edge 



Manchester United have not 
won the League title since 
1967 despite spending a 
small fortune on an array 
of players and five 
changes of manager. In the 
second of a four-part series 
David Miller looks at their 
prospects for 1986/87 

• hen Bobby Charlton played 
in his first FA Cup final at 
the age of 19 against Aston 
Villa in 1957 he had not that 
season been sure of his place 
in the team. At Old Trafford there were two 
other exceptional inside forwards, as they 
were then called, in Violet and Whelan. 

Violet could also play centre forward, as 
well as Hidekguti, Don Revie or Ronnie 
Allen or. later, Johnny Byrae; yet Matt 
Busby still bought Taylor from Barnsley for 
a then astounding £30,000. At outside left 
there were two brilliant dribblers. Scanlan 
and Pegg. It is not new for Manchester 
United to have more players than they are 
able to fit in a team. 

It was easier, of course, for Busby in 
those good old days, because there was a 
bad old maximum wage. He paid it to 
anyone in the first team squad, irrespective 
of age. which was unheard of at the time; 
the Central League reserve team used to get 
attendances of five figures and the com- 
petition to get into the first team was 
feverish. Because there was less tactical 
organization than now, it was simpler to 
make team changes, opting for a particular 
individual who was on form. 


There was resentment of United’s finan- 
cial power. Duncan Edwards, bom within a 
bus ride of Wolverhampton Wanderers, 
signed for United, and died following the 
Munich air crash, aged 21, leaving several 
thousand pounds which he could never 
have saved out of a weekly maximum wage 
of £1 8. In the national mourning after the 
crash. Bob Lord, the chairman of Burnley, 
who was to football what Les Dawson was 
to television but without the intentional 
humour, bluntly stated that United should 
not expect the rest of the League to come to 
their aid in selling players. 

Ron Atkinson has too many players. He 
goes out and buys them rather in the way 
Jackie Kennedy, when she became Mrs 
Onassis. went out and bought shoes: by the 
dozen, on a w him. Even his chairman, 
Martin Edwards, thinks he probably has 
too many. Just look at the bloodstock list of 
Atkinson's five years at Old Trafford, in 
alphabetical order Barnes, Brazil, Daven- 
port, Colin Gibson, Terry Gibson, 
Gidmac, Moses, Olsen, Robson, 
Sievebeck, Stapleton. Strachan. 

And still no League title. When United 
squandered a 1 0-point lead last season — 
which I predicted when Robson was first 
injured late in 1985 — it was widely 
expected that this summer Atkinson would 
suffer the fete of McGuinness, O' Farrell, 
Docberty and Sexton, all sacked for foiling 
to regain the title which Busby last won 19 
years ago. But no, Atkinson continues. 

Pan of the reason is that United, in 
company with only three other dubs over 
the past 25 years. Spurs, West Ham and to a 
lesser extent Liverpool have kept 
entertainment ahead of prize-winning as a 
priority. Sexton was dismissed because the 
Old Trafford public was not happy. 
Atkinson stays because, to an extent, they 
are. The chairman recognizes this feet. 
Gate receipts of over £4 million helped to 
prove the point. 


T 


“I'm not ignoring the w inning of 
trophies," Martin Edwards says, “but we 
could win the League yet stOl bore the pants 
off everyone. Of course the public want 
trophies, but it’s not the be-all and end-all 
of what we try to give them. The chairman 
should never say, "If we don’t win the 
League, the manager’s out.’ You have to 
judge thingsat the end of the season. It does 
depend partly on whether the supporters 
are happy. You can win the Cup and come 
second in the League, and be unhappy. 

“Obviously, it’s been a long time to go 
without the League title and the longer it 
goes the more the pressure builds up on 
everyone at the dub. But to keep harping 
on about it doesn't help the management or 
the players.” ^ 

I he feet that Edwards and his wife. 

1 Susan, own 61 per cent of 
Manchester United share capital, 
and that his safety as the first 
chief executive chairman in En- 
glish football was £85,000 in 1 984, tends to 
make people consider that if United fell 
short of their primary target, it is as much 
the chairman's responsibility as the 
manager’s. After all, that's how it is at ICI 
or British Oxygen. 

Edwards, however, denies that he con- 
trols or influences Atkinson’s team affoirs. 
He claims he doesn’t speak to the manager 
any more than the majority of dub 
chairmen. “Ron would say, I think, that 
I'm not an interfering chairman,” he says. 
“He sinks or swims depending on his 
success.” 

.Some of the controversy surrounding 
Edwards lies in the feci thai be receives a 
percentage of the dub's working profit and 
also of transfer fee income when in profit 
In business practice, this is not an 
uncommon occurrence, yet the morality is 
in question in sport though I have always 
been one to advocate better commercial 
administration of football clubs. Edwards, 


dected to the board at 24 under the 
chairmanship of his father, Louis, in 1970, 
became chief executive in 1982: since when 
Busby has left the board in controversial 
circumstances to become president, and 
old-time directors Bill Young and Alan 
Gibson have departed to make way for 
younger business or professional men. 

Public cynicism about United's internal 
affoirs, and sensitivity among officials 
within the dub, was increased by television 
exposure of certain malpractices in 1981. 
Edwards defends his relatively recent 
bonus incentive and malms the reasonable 
claim that much of United's huge commer- 
cial success arises from shrewd ground 
development which other dubs in, say, 
London, could have established more 
readily than they have at Old Trafford. 

“People overlook that in the transfer 
market we are net buyers, not net sellers,” 
he says. “Any bonus on transfer profit — 
now one per cent — is decided by the board 
in my absence, not by me. It could be 
nothing. All I'm interested in is making the 
dub successful It’s not a matter ofluck that 
we’re so commercially profitable.” 

hat profitability comes, in part, 
from 650 executive box during 
seats with a view of the pitch and 
a further 850 executive’ dub 
members. The working profit in 
1984 was £1.7 million; yet in 1985-36 the 
current account was £2.7 million over- 
drawn on the purchase of the Gibsons, 
Davenport and Sievebeck, pending the 
August 1 transfer of Hughes to Barcelona 
for £2 million. “We weren't going to sit on 
the Hughes cash which we knew was 
mining ,” Edwards says. 

The question on the field, therefore, is 
whether Atkinson has the knowledge to 
blend and get the best from his profusion of 
supermarket talent This, up to now, is 
doubtful never mind that he had several 
injuries last season. United won the FA 


WCICMJC 

T 


Cup in 1983 and 1985 without ever looking 
truly consistent in the League. With the 
departure of Hughes, and possible continu- 
ing problems with Robson’s fitness, this 
season more than ever will test Atkinson’s 
judgement of balance and integration. His 
virtues are those he showed as a positive 
though limited wing-half with Oxford 
United and as manager of West Bromwich 
Albion: a whole-hearted enthusiasm for 
attack. 

“The danger with having too many 
players is that you can have discontent 
among those out of the team,” Edwards 
says, “but the advantage is that when you 
have injuries like last year, the a dd i t io n al 
players help you to get through.” 

The slightly cruel feeling is that Atkinson 
will need injuries this season to help him 
sort out a formation. Edwards, however, is 
more worried about the long-tenn effect of 
an absence from European competition. “It 
didn’t make too much difference for the 
spectators’ point of view last season,” he 
says, “and there’s never a guarantee that 
you will survive for several rounds. But it 
does produce revenue and its loss may 
cause us to cut our doth accordingly, when 
we are already hard-pressed to compete for 
players with the top foreign dubs. When 
Hughes still had a year of his previous 
contract to run, it made sense to give him a 
new five-year contract containing mi 
option for him to go if he wished, so as-to 
protect our transfer fee value.” 

The board, interestingly, must dedde 
what is Edwards’s transfer fee bonus when 
the Huj^ies fee is' fed into the 1986-87 
accounts. It would be better for everyone’s 
equilibrium were United at last to win the 
title again. 


C 


TOMORROW 


J 


Glasgow Rangers: will the tide run 
royal blue for Graeme Souness? 


SPEEDWAY 

England 
given 
a scare 

By Keith Macklin 

Although there was never any 
real danger that England would 
be relegated from group A to 
group B of the World Team Cop, 
the illness which gave a throat 
infection to Neil Evitts caused a 
last-minute scare. 

Evitts, the Bradford rider, was 
unable to take part in the final 
leg on his home track and when 
Simon W'igg ran out of steam in 
bis final race and Lance King 
swipi through to put the United 
Slates into second place behind 
Denmark, England were in an 
unhappy position. Mercifully. 
Sweden had a nightmare time on 
the Odsal track and they 
dropped down into group B. 

However, it was not a happy 
meeting for England in seven! 
ways. Their total of 29 points 
was spread out among four 
riders, with no outstanding 
performance. Kelvin Tatum 
scored eight, Simon Wigg, Chris 
Morton and Jeremy Doncaster 
got seven each, and Marvyn Cox 
was scoreless. 

In these circumstances it is 
surprising that Eric Boocock 
and Colin Pratt, the joint En- 
gland managers, want to stay on 
in their positions for at least 
another season. Boocock and 
Pratt must be either masochists 
or gluttons for punishment, or 
perhaps they have seen some- 
thing in English speedway 
performances that Others have 
foiled to spot 

It could be that Boocock, 
always an optimist as rider and 
manager, has worked out that in 
speedway, as in most pro- 
fessional sports, soccess- comes 
and goes in cycles. England, 
Sweden, the United States and 
now Denmark have succeeded 
each other in dominating the 
sport, and Boocock and Pratt 
most be hoping that England's 
turn cannot be too for away. 

On Saturday week England's 
riders have their final chance to 
salvage something out of a poor 
season by making a show in the 
world individual championships 
at Katowice. 

Denmark are confidently 
expecting to fill the first two 
places with G undersea and Niel- 
sen, and it is bard to see anyone 
stopping this pair taking the top 
two p lacings for the third time in 
a row. The best England can 
hope for is a series of respect- 
able down-field scores. 

Chris Morton, the Belle Vne 
rider, has turned to an on usual 

source for help in his prepara- 
tion for Katowice. He has called 
in a martial ails expert named 
Master Toddy to give him a 
programme of diet and exercise, 
together with powerful menial 
concentration. 


FOOTBALL 


QPR hesitate over 
fee asked for Lee 


Queen’s Park Rangers, in- 
terested in signing Sammy Lee, 
the Liverpoolamf England mid- 
field player, have been unable to 
agree a fee with the Anfield dub. 
Lee, aged 27, has had talks at 
Loftus Road, but Rangers are 
believed to be holding bads 
because of the estimated 
£223,000 valuation placed on 
him by last season’s L eague and 
FA Cup winners. 

A fortnight 3go QPR also had 
a £200.000 offer turned down 
for Trevor Hebberd, of Oxford 
United. The player said be 
preferred to stay at the Manor 
Ground. 

• Middlesbrough’s fund-raising 
match against Manchester 
United at Ayresome Park to- 
night was in the balance last 
night because the official re- 
ceiver had not opened the 
ground that was closed three 
weeks ago when the club were 
wound up in the High Court. 

However, the Football League 
have accepted a rescue package 
and Middlesbrough hope to 
complete legal negotiations be- 
fore their opening home game of 
the season, against Port Vale on 
Saturday. 

• Jimmy Quinn, Blackburn 
Rovers' Northern Ireland for- 
ward, has been advised to 
continue training in tfae hope of 
breaking down a troublesome 
fool injury. 

• Wales may have to turn down 
invitations to play in Turkey 
and the Middle East because of 
their programme in the Euro- 
pean Championship. The Welsh 

must travel to Helsinki to meet 


Finland in their opening 
qualfying match on September 
10. but then have a six-month 
break before playing the return 
fixture at Wrexham. 

However, Alim Evans, sec- 
retary of the Welsh FA, ex- 
plained: "We have been offered 
a game in the Middle East next 
month, but it looks as though we 
will have to turn it down 
because the suggested dates are 
not suitable.” 

On top of that Turkey have 
offered to play Wales in March 
in an attempt to gain experience 
of the British style of play before 
tackling England and Northern 
Ireland in their European 
Championship group. Once 
again, however, the date is 
incompatible with the Welsh 
schedule. 

• Dave Watson, the Norwich 
City captain, is to have a 
meeting with the club chairman, 
Robert Chase, following the 
rejection of an estimated 
£700.000 bid from Everton. 
Watson signed a new three-year 
contract with Norwich a month 
ago. but was told the dub would 
consider a reasonable offer if 
any of the country’s big dubs 
moved in for him. 

• Cardiff City will start their 
fourth division campaign on 
Saturday without Alan Curtis 
and Chris Marustik, both Welsh 
internationals. Curtis, capped 
34 times by Wales, sustained a 
depressed fracture of the cheek- 
bone in a pre-season match and 
is out for at least two weeks, 
while Marustik has damaged 
ankle ligaments and will be in 
triaster for around ten days. 


Romania 
walk off 
in protest 

The Romanian football team 
walked off the pitch in the semi- 
final of an international tour- 
nament in Jakarta, complaining 
die Malaysian referee was bi- 
ased in favour of the hosts, 
Indonesia. 

The Romanians left the pitch 

one m in nfy ffxfin time nfttr 

making a series of oorapMats to 
the referee. Tbe score at the time 
was 1-1 after the match official 
had allowed a disputed goal to 
Indonesia in tfae sixth minute of 
injury time. 

The 254100-Strong crowd at 
Jakarta’s Sanayaa stadium 
bedded and booed wbea tbe 
East Europeans strode off to 
give the hosts a place in the final 
of the Independence Cup. 
Indonesia now meet Algeria, 
who beat a BrazSKao side 1-0 in 
the other semi-final. 

Although police went on to the 
field when some of the crowd 
invaded tbe .pitch, there no 
serious distm-honces. 


• Aston Villa, missin g Andy 
Gray. Mark Walters and Neale 
Cooper through injury, coaid 
also be without Paul Elliott for 
Saturday's home game against 
Tottenham Hotspur. The cen- 
tre-half has still not recovered 
from an ankle injury, sustained 
in pre-season trainix& 

• Gordon Owen, the 27-year- 
old Barnsley winger, has signed 
a two-year contract with Bristol 
City and is expected to make his 
debot at home to Bury oa 
Saturday. 


WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP ROWING RESULTS FROM MONDAY 


Lightweight women 

SINGLE SCULLS (wmws of hosts to 
final remainder to reperfime): Host 1: t, 
A Herron (US) 7min 2. R Do 

Fauw (Bel) 7 f :4Z&. ft P Baker (M2) 
7.4929; 4. M Sava (Rom) 73222: 5. H 
Hatfin (Gan) 75435: 6. A I 
7:5626. Heel 2: 1. H 
757.66; 2, M Mftuauw (Nath) &035; 3; 
B Crockrord (GB) 8:8.06: 4. V 
Sammertnuflr (Austria) 83.40; 5. V 
Schreitier (Mex) 8)11.65; 6. A Buof (Swtc) 
& 19.62; 

doubles SCULLS (Winner to Ena!, 
remainder to repechage): Heat 1: 1, 
United States 7:119® 2. Netherlands 
7:20.13; 3. Denm ar k 739-33 
4. Austria 7:3957; 5, Canada 7:44.72. 
He* 4 1. Britain [G Bond, C A WOod) 7: 
18-81: 2. Belgium 7:20.39; 3. West 
Germany 7:40.87; 4, RepuHc of Own 
7:41.43: 

COXLESS FOURS twinner to final, remain- 
der to repechage): Ha* 1; 1. France 
7-2.18; 2, Canada 7:4.04; 3. Ireland IN 
GaUegher. M Ryan. C Caffrey. N Ryan) 
7:7.0ft 4, west Germany 7:12.43: He* 2: 
1. Britain (A Forbes, G Hodges. L Clark. J' 
Berne) 7: 0.63; 2. Australia 7:5-50: 3. 
United States 7:842: 4, Republic of Ctwra 
7:24.61. 

Men 


DOUBLE SCULLS (first tfvee to semMrial, 
remainder to repechage): Heat 1: 1 . Soviet 
Umm.63l.21:ftNetnertanas.63ftS8:3. 
East Germany. 6:4.16:4. Finland. 654.74: 
5. Norway 6*231; Ha* 2: 1. Italy. 
630.42: 2. Bulgaria. 832.14; 3. Canada 
634.73: 4. Austria 63731 : 5, US 8:41 .43: 
He* 1 1. Czechoslovakia. 63332: ft 
Cuba. 6:3438; 3, Switzerland, 63533; 4, 
Brazil. 6:40-20: 

coxless pairs (heat winners into finals, 
remafcxfer to repechage): Haiti: 1. Soviet 
Union. 6:4$i}7; 2, Roman*, 6*4639; 3. 
East Germany, 63530; 4, Yugoslavia, 
657.47; ft Israel. 738.47. He* fclTtaiy. 
6.483ft ft Roland, 65130; 3. Holland, 
6563ft 4, Bred, 737.75; 5. Bdgaria 
7:15.44. Ha* ft 1, Britain (A OW and M 
Cross), 652.47; 2. United Stoea. 65351: 
3, Austria, 7:00.27; 4, Switzerland, 
7-03.18; 5. France. 737.63. He* « 1. 
Spain 6:53.75: 2. We* Germany, 657.44; 
3. Canada, 656.71 ; 4, Argentina. 75237. 

SINGLE SCULLS (wirrar to semMind. ' 
remainder to repedwgefc Ha* 1; 1, P 
Kasppinen (Rn) 72137: 2. P Both (Fra) 
7.-3003: 3. F PaSengN (Switz) 7: 3ft11; 4, 

E Arrillaga (Me*) 73635: 5. H Ketoerman 


7:2139; 2, Canada, ft 2647; 3. United 
Stales. 737.01: 4. We* Germany. 
738.raftCuba, 737.42; 6. Italy. 7:4632. 
Ke*21, Britain (A Holmes, SRedorave, 
PSwemyL 7:14.17; 2. SovietBnion, 
3. homarUR. 7:1738; 4. Bad. 
72639; S. Greece. 6:1131. 

C O M ESS FOURS (fret three to semi- 
finals, remand* to repechage): He* 1: 1, 
E Germany. 621.11; 2. Italy. 62136; ft 

Yugoslavia, 62331:4. Sc3i, 82536; 5, 

Sweden. 62638. Hot £l. West Ger- 
many. 622.15: 2. Czechoslovakia, 
627.78: 3. United Stales, 628.72; 4, 
Switzerland. 62327; Ha* 3: 1. Cenreta, 
62324: 2. Sowet Union. 625.77; 3, Britan 
(GFauBess. R Ireland. M FUd, H Hatton), 
63538; 4, Argentina. 6:4230. 


QUADRUPLE SCULLS, 
ner to final, remainder to 
1: 1. East Germany. 6:1 
6:1.67; 3, Spa*. 6331; 

~ “ JcafiTs 


(Nedit 73735: He* 2. 1. F. Hu ten (Swe) 
7:1734; 2. V Radev f&rf) 7; 2233: 3. A 
LevuiSon (BeO 7: 2630; 4,. S Fernandez 
I 7:29.17; 5. C Gondomenoib 
t 1, Ml Kotov 


Poland, 624.18; 4. France, &25A3; 5, 
Britain (R Prietos. J Carman. C Greena- 
way. ft BoArtt, DGw). 62257. He* Z 1. 
New Zealand. 6:15.02; 2. Czechoslovakia. 
6:17.61; 3. United States, 62433: 4. 
Canada 652.01. 


(US) 7:30. 

He* 4. 1 . V Yatocltt (USSR) 7:1630: 2, H 
Habennem (EG) 7212ft ft 6 Marrero 
(Curie) 7: 25.60; 4, R PoweR (Aus) 7*027; 
5. R. Stator fYug) 7*837. 

COXED PARS (wfcmer to final, rsnetoder 
to repechage): Hen 1: 1. East Germany. 


i 


> (win. 
*He* 

ftT&ieda. 

. . . . . . 4, Bntam (N 

BM J Oh. S UrtOn. L HMctalL ft 
1225: 5. Switzerland. 6:12.72. He* & 1, 
Czechoslovakia. 6:1.45; 2. Italy, 6238; 3, 
Poland. 8- 837: 4, United States, ft153ft 
He* 3: 1. Netherlands, 6235; 2. Soviet 
Unton, 6:325; 3, Norway, ft 634; 4, 
Yugoslavia. 6:1821. 

EIGHTS (winner to final, remainder to 
repetoage): He* 1: 1, Soviet Union. 5: 
44.08: ft Australia. 5:45.4ft ft New 
Zealand. 5:46.11;- 4. East Germany. 
5:47.Bft S. France. 53383: ft Czecho- 
slovakia. 554.1ft He* i 1. ttoy. 5:4327; 
ft Wrist Germany. 5:4438; ft Urfitad 
States. 5:498ft 4, Utaki (J Spencsr- 
Jrinaa, P Broughton. J Garrett J Maxay, T 
□Ron, M Buckingham, S Peel, R San- 
T Vaughan). Ml 49; 5, Canada. 
1; 6, Netherlands, 63.17, 

$ 


YACHTING 


Howlett’s agony and ecstasy 


David Hewlett, principal 
helmsman aboard Robert 
Bottomley’s Decosol Car Care, 
hobbled ashore at Torquay ea/iy 
yesterday, the delight of winning 
the 335-mile second heat in the 
Three Quarter Ton Cup World 
Championship, hiding tbe pain 
be had endured for 63 hours 
after twisting his knee badly at 
the start of this race on 
Saturday. 

Tbe Rob Humphreys-de- 
signed Decosol which is forced 
to race with its name covered to 
avoid protest under rule 26 
barring oven commercialism, 
was placed second at the start of 
the final 53-mile leg back from a 
mid-Channel mark south of 
Foote. It was 10th at the 
previous buoy off Start Point 
but recovered to finish in Tor- 
bay at 3.36 am, five minutes 
ahw»d of Graham Walker’s 
Indulgence. 

Tbe second-placed British 
yacht, winner of tbe first inshore 
race on Friday, now leads the 
series overall with 76.25 points, 
0.75 ahead of Decosol with a 
leading Danish entry. 
Frontrunner, third on 73. 

However, this situation could 


By Barry Pickthall 

change today if the international 
jury allow a request from Robert 
Bottomley to re-open the protest 
against Root Runner, which 
failed to answer a recall after 
being judged over tbe line at the 
start of the first race. Originally, 
the jury was not satisfied with 
the evidence given by the spot- 
ter on the committee boat, and 
gave the Danish crew the benefit 
of doubt. But photographs now 
available may prove the yacht 
was dear of the line when the 
gun fixed. 

If this is the case, and the jury 
overturn their original decision, ■ 
Decosofs position in that race 
will be pushed up to third and 
give the British boat an overall 
lead in tbe championship. ■ 

Tony Canning’s Lion lost a 
place on tbe final leg to finish 
fourth, and now holds fifth place 
overall one ahead of Rodney 
Arnold’s Showdown, which 
overtook six boats on this final 
off-wind leg by setting a blast 
readier and sailing above tbe 
-rhumb line instead of attempt- 
ing to fly a spinnaker. 

Others feu badly, the most 
spe c tacular tumble being tbe 
Swedish' crew on Zorro. who 


foiled to note an amendment in 
their sailing instructions, and 
went for the wrong finish line off 
Torquay Pier, ana lost 10 places 
sailing back out to Toitny to 
finish correctly. 

David Hewlett was still in 
considerable pain last night and 
is was doubtful whether he 
would be able to steer Decosol 
in today's second inshore race. 
The skipper, Robert Bottomley, 
was also faced with finding a 
second substitute for Matthew 
Sbeahan, who suffered a recur- 
rence of black-outs during this 
last offshore race. Last night, he 
jrot in a request for two sub- 
stitute crewmen — David 
Robinson, a sailmaker, who 
steered the boat during the 
British trials, and Peter 
Weedbn, who wfll be brought in 
as a replacement for Sbeahan. 

RESULTS: Three Qaartar Too Cop: Long 
Offshore lac* 1. Decosol Car Care 
(B -Bo tto mley): Z Indulgence {G.Wafcari; 
ft Froovunnflr(NJoppeson.Oanawk):4, 
Don (A. Canning); 5~Fk jrscftarior (C-Rugs. 

' Gonna wLOnr MMt ptecee: 7. Show- 
down (RAfnold); 9, Wn “ 

; 11, Scenario Act 


• Of Cowley 

! (ARtton); 1ft 


(RAF 
Juno 

7ft2S pts; ft DecosoL .. .. 

Fron tii einar. 73; 4, Horecftaden, 88; 5, 
Uon. 65; 7. Showdown. 56 pts. 


Overaft 1. Indulgence, 


BASKETBALL 

Cash boost in 
the basket 

British ha<dci;ihgH hne re- 
ceived an £870,000 grant from 
the Sports Council — the largest 
ever given to the sporL The 
money will be spread over tbe 
next three years and is aimed at 
promoting and developing the 
game in Britain. 

The sort’s governing body, 
the English Basket Ball Assoa- 
aiion, will receive more than 
£630,00, with some of the aid 
being given to the English 
Schools Basketball Association 
and the En glish Mini-Basketball 
Association. 

The money will be used to 
help appoint development offi- 
cers throughout the country and 
to encourage the game’s growth 
at grass roots. 

The British and Irish basket- 
ball federations will receive 
£136,000 and the cash will go 
towards helping their men's and 
women's squads for the next 
Olympic Games in Seoul in 


• Gloucester Rugby Cub have 
been deluged with players hop- 
ing for a place in tbe squad for 
tbe new season. More than 70 
have joined tbe battle for the 
coveted places m the two teams 
- and as many as 55 are turning 
up for training sessions. The 
assistant coach John Fiddler 
said: “It must be a record - it’s 
certainly remarkable. I've never 
known so many players in- 
volved in tbe pic-scason 
trials. n .. 

'\ 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 


County C ham pio ns hip 
11.0, 110 overs minimum 
CHESTERFIELD: Derbyshire 
Laics 

COLCHESTER: Essex v Gloucs 

BOURNEMOUTH: Hampshire 

Worts 

HARTFORD; Kent vi 
LYTHAM: Lancashire i 
NORTHAMPTON; NorthantS \ 

TAUHTON: Somerset v Sussex 
HEADINGLEV: Yorkshire 
Middlesex 


C O M— n COUNTIES LEAGUE: Fm- 
rntar dhWo* Cofaham v Chkntmd. 

LEAGUE: Pn 


LONDON SPARTAN 

dMriGK Edgwara v Hanweft Pennant v 
ScuShga*. 

HALLS BREWERY HELLEMC LEAGUE 
Prantar il nil ton. AbtoQdQn United v 
Thane; FaWwd v Pegasus Juntos: 
Houratow v Raynors Lane; Moratown v 
Abingdon Town; Monls Motors v 

Shotwoo* 

Wantage v 


a™, 

by Glamorgan Perm 

wthantsv Notts ufne group united 


MMOR COUNTES CKAMMONSWtTto- 
quar Down v ComwaO. Noapait Stvop- 
shbavWKsHre. 

SECOND n CHMUHONSHR Biter V—S 
Glamorgan v Kant BMafc Gtoicestar- 
stwe v Worcester shi re. Southampa*: 
Hampshire v Sussex. Hnckier- Leicester- 
shire v Derbyshire. MddMoe CC: LArv 
cednre v Northamptonshire. Harefiakfc 


MtiOessxv 

shire v WarMctohfce.' HmhmiJ OC 
Swreyv Yorkshire. * 

FOOTBALL 

Kick-off 7.30 unless stated. 

SKOL CUP; Second mS Aberdeen v 
AUoa; Afetoi v Fortsr (630); Celtic v 
Akdte qwfctank r St Johnstone; ttea- 
banon vScHnn Abase DanfmCM vSt 
Mkreri; H&anui v East StWng; IGCnar* 
node v Ayr Mottwrenl vAitorbath; Morton 
vDincte« Parte* v East FBe: Queen of 
the . South v Dundee United; 
SwihouMfntjrv Rangers. 

YAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Seoond «*- 
vWon norite Coffer Roar « Avetoy.- 
Secood dtebfc w seadte FeMiam v 
Moiesay: Petorsfietd * Horsham; fluafip 
Manor v Southall. 

BASS NORTH-WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Fast titfatoK Boofe « 
Conajstorc Petrth v Accrington Stanley; 
Roddiffe Borough v Gtoseop. 

OREATMEUB WMTBW iJEAffltFre- 
inter dteWom DmWi v BMefant 
Exmouth w Lisle aard: Fro mo . v 

aBBanussexsuASs: 

VteteatL 


UNITED 

LEAGUE: Premier dMriorr BrecMay v 
Long Buddjy; Hoibeacb. v Bourne; St 
Hams v Stodokt S and L Corby * 
BoC iw alL 

OTHERSPORT 

BOWLS: Gateway Championship* fat 

Worthing). 

CROQUET: N or th ern championships (at 
Bowden}; Edinburgh tournament; 
Soteforicfc tournament 
GOLR McGragorTrophy {at RaddMe-en- 
Ttontt EGA Trophy (BCamousUi^Burtiia 
FernUy Foursamu. 

TOWtott W orld chMnptotBh^tt (at Hotme 
Plerrepont). 

SWTM MM Q. Britain v Canada (at Crystal 
Palace NSQ. 

TENW& Brnah junior Championahlto (at 
Eastbourne* Footes Audi tournament fit 

as Mfo 0 " •*“* °*- » 

YACHTING: Owner Ton cup to Tor- 
Q^Threequanar Ton tS* to 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

£20,000of 
cheer is > 
offered to 
winners 

By Keith Mftcklfc 

The richest prize ia Rugby 
Leapt history of £2fr.MQ 
be *irard«d to mx t senoo's 

winaers of the -new-styic 
championships uf premier, 
ships, spnasond by Slates 
Bitter. 

For (he first tim next seasoa 
there wffi be a second divtooa 
premierahip play-off on the%6i 
of the fonfliar first, dMska 
premiership. The top right 
teams in the second divkhm wiU 

take pert end next May ip*y 
tstors wfll epjoy* feast of iNg^r, 
with both premiership feuds 

ptaytd coasccvltYely a* fee same 
venue oa the saute day. 

The brewery will pump 
£400,000 into the League's cof- 
fers during the next three yean 
of sponsorship, starting with 
£120,000 in the first year. The 
first champions wfll bank 
£20,000 and the nmnere-op 
£8.000. The first dhfefou 
premiership winners wfll receive 
£9.000 and the rnoKn-n 
£1500. The first and second 
places in tbe second division wifl 

pick up £10,000 and £4,000 ud 
the premiership top two £4,060 
and £1.500- A farther £60JW0 
will be placed doting the first 
year in groond improvonents 
and safety funds. 

David Wighain, the ineomiBg 
chairman of the League said fo 
Rancovn that the sponsncsUp 
represented the progressive pol- 
icy of rewarding skills and 

en ter prise among the dnha. The 
greater spread of sponsorship 
prizes would provide greater 
incentives for successful dobs In 
both divisions, and would lead to 
higher standards of play, white 
the top dubs will receive re- 
wards commensurate with their 

ftap jf . 

Corals, the bookmakers, have 
nade Wigan favourites to win 
tbe first division championship, 
with York tfae favourites in the 
second division. 

Chase by 
St Helens 

St Helens, who have been 
disappointed recently in several 
efforts to sign Australian stars, 
have net lost heart. They are 
now turning their attention to 
Brett Clark, the half back who 
plays for Western Suburbs, tbe 
Sydney team. 

Although Clark, aged 21, is a 
Sanaa hail and recently dis- 
placed Dench Fox, the Great 
Britain halfback in the Western 
Suburbs side, St Helens worid 
expect Clark to fill their prob- 
lem position of stand-off half. St 

Hriens are also negotiating for a 
front row forward from Sydney. 
He is Fat Jarvis from St Gcotge. 

Papua New Guinea caused a 
;■ shock in international 
league by scoring their 
first international victory in 
major competition, beating New 
Zealand 24-22 in the Worid Cup 
series. 


TENNIS 

Gomer on 
her own 
for Britain 

Mahwah (Reuter) — Only 
Sara Gomer lifted the gloom 
that han^ over the British 
women's players in the run-up 
to the US Open at Flushing 
Meadow next week as Anne 
Hobbs and Annabel Croft were 
beaten in tbe opening round of 
the $150,000 (£100,000) New 
Jersey tournament. 

Miss Gomer kept her nerve 
wed to win tbe final three points 
of tbe deciding tie-break to beat 
Camille Beqjamiuofthe United 
Suites 6-3, 3-6, 7-6. but Isabelle 
Deanongeot gained a 6-2. 6-2 
victory over Miss Hobbs and 
Katerina Maleeva* of Bulgaria, 
the eleventh seed, defeated Miss 
Croft 6-3, 6-3 with her usual 
steady play from the baseline. 

In contrast to Britain’s declin- 
ing fortunes. Miss Demongeot 
was one of five French players to 
go through. France were led by 
Catherine Tanvier. ranked 68th 
in tbe worid. who upset Betsy 
Nagdsen, of the United States, 
6-4, 5-7, 6-4. Tanvier look 
advantage of three unforced 
errors for a service break in the 
ninth game of the third set and 
finished off a player ranked 34 
places ahead of her with a 
backhand pass. 

Pascale Paradis lost her first 

five games but then the French 

girt rallied to eliminate Andrea 

Holikova. of Czechoslovakia. 1- 
6-4, 6-2. white tbe other 
French players. Nathalie 
Herreman and Nathalie 
Tauziat, won in straight sets. 
Herreman won her last 11 
games for a 6-4, 6-0 triumph 
over Janine Thompson, of 
Australia, and Tauziat took tbe 
last four games ofeach set in a 6- 
2, 6-2. victory over Leigh 
Thompson, tbe American 
champ ion. 

RESULTS Hr* remit: A Mtnw (Aus) W 
" Yana# (Japan). 5-7, M. M * 
iwraw (FOMA Hobbs (G0L62.M: 
Hoflkc* (Cq, 

6* S Gomer Kffl) » C Brawiun 6- 
ft^ 7« K MaiemfBuQbra CreR( 

6-3. 6-ft R MarsBcova (Cz) M G Kim 

6*1.ft-i:LGanona(lt)KAU»riN - 
i. n Herreman (ft) bt J Thomps*; 

£4 C jotesato (Swuzj bt PriH*! 



0nmmiNMENTS 


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CINEMAS 


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84- TyOc 


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&208AS. EKffiS THUS 2801. 


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Mr CSOSOMWi- 


..V 













THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


31 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Davalle 
and Elizabeth Larard 






'.OOCMfaxAM 

Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough and Debbie 
Greenwood. Weather at 
&5S, 72B. 7.55, &2S and 
S55; regional news, 
weather and traffic at&57, 
7.27, 7JS7 and BJ27; 
national and international 
news at 7.00, 7 JO, 8.00, 
8J0 and 9.00; sport at 

7 JO and (L20; and a 
review of the morning 
newspapers at 8J7; plus 
t* Beverty Alt's fashion tips; 

7 ; cy and the latest pop music 

‘ charts at 9JM. 

: r ta, j,SjJO DucSayDo-RighL Cartoon 
JSiJ series about a 1920$ 

mountieSJ25SBas. 
Adventure serial about a 


Vt:i 
.. ‘ w 




.and Adrian 
Brown. News with Gooff 

8jM,&30 and 9L00; sport 
at M0 and 7.40; exercises 
at 6-55; cartoon at 7.25: 
popnn»cat7JS;Gytes 
wendrem traces the origin 
of Punch and Judy shows 
at 8^; special guests are 
Sir Anthony Quayte and 


MS 




*=» 



young man who runs away 
from a circus, (fl (Orade) 
Newsround Special 
Defivary presented by 
John Craven, this week 


T. J- 


9J55 ine Adventures of 
Buflwinkfe and Rocky. 

Part one of a six-part 
cartoon, (r) 

T*.»MQ Hartbeat A new approach 
f-s, iSf; 1 to art, with Tony Hart and 
f-.' iJ* Gabrielle Bradshaw, (rl 

£.*• T 4 10-25 The Adventures of 

V'-hiC. BuBwWde and Rocky, (r) 

r,:; na « 1030 Hay School (rt 

•j. -1 °?£^|^0 l 5O Gharbw. A programme of 
' , ( Eastern music presented 
by Samma Mir. Among 
*■ those performing are 

Renu Kassam, 
i Sudra. Samma 
and Ustad Gtadam 
ustata Khan. The Great 
Indian Dancers perform a 
Bhang ra dance. 11.15 
Coetex. 

r .,_^ News After Noon, with 

Chris Lowe and Sue 

*^1 





_ presented by 
Timmy Maliett Tha special 
guest is Arabella Warner 
of The Wide Awake Club. 


ITV/LONDON 


9-25 Thames News headBnes 
followed by Survival; 
Sataria Last Leap? The 
Ufa of the Atlantic salmon, 
(r) &5D tflka. Further 
adventure® of a young 
man taking a Upland 
retedeer to the Paris Zoo. 
1M0 Step by Stop. The 
story of Paul Gauwi, who 
created his own mime 
conroanv. 

1035 Rrab«aXL5. Adventures 
in space, (rt 11.00 
Cartoon. 11.25 Wattoo 
Wattoo. Cartoon 
adventure. 

11J0 About Britain. David 
Richardson's guide 
i the world of 



<'s. And if you think that 
SnSSgvrtfflS then 

gettinamy message aooes to 

K Why does it improve on 
wock7FxonetWng.it 
moves Bw a greyhound, not 
Dke a funeral procession. For 

another, ft was shot in 
Austrafla where the plot is set, 
and not In a British studio 
with windows that offered 
painted views of Down 
Under, And, for another, it has 

tfpsomaiwcwHe, and Miss 

Harrow convinces us that she 
has come off second best in a 


appeared to have had only a brief 
and nodding acquaintance 
with it These are afi gains. The 
losses are Tony Motphett’s 
screenplay which is not a patch 
on James Bridie's (more fatet 
praise), and a wholly inadequate 
performancebyPster 
Coiwens in the old Michael 

WBffifM rote of the dsus ex 
mschffn. Part two of Under 
Cftprtoorn tomorrow night 
•Stunt Paterson’s IN 
TOWTIQN(BBC2.9J25pm)is 

woukH» sui^&»shattored in 
a hospital bed whie, an 
around Mm, ostensibly on a 
mission of good cheer, area 
bunch of vituperative juvenile 
delinquents on the verge of 
an almighty pimch-tD.bven the 


van that brings the 
youngsters to the hospital 
springs a punch*®. And 
D^tnisinanfmpiaccabtemood 
because it carries off an old 
lady bang in the raddle of a well- 
wishers 1 chorus of We three 
Kings of Orient are. This west! 
play is extraordnarily wb 9 
acted, especially by Angie 
Murphy as the most hopeless 
of tne teenagers. 

• Radio choice: Peter 
Barnes's The Real Long John 
Sftw (Radio 3, 9J5pm) has a 
serious core ruraing through its 
sub-Hancoddan 
impersonations ot RLS’s one- 
legged buccaneer; and 
Howard Shefey plays Peter 
Dickinson's piano concerto ' 
wit/t the BBC SO in tonight's 
Prom (Ratfio 3, 7.30pm). 

Peter Davalle 



Wrtl 



'■aa? 


st ■ 




Carpenter, tedudes news 
headlines with subtitles. 
125 Regional news. The 
weather detaOs come from 
Michael Fish. 1 JO Chock- 
a -Block. A See-Saw 
programme for the very 
young, (r) 1.45 Ceetex. 423 
, „ . Regional News. 

jrJTt ^^4^5 wStTMYour Father Gets 
tC r tt| » £ Home. Harry and his 
„ dn -va< neighbour, Ralph, clash 
,a over a new swimmfrjg-pooi 

In the back-yard 
4A5 HddLHekSMsbeen 
looking forward to Klara's 
visit, but doesn't know that 
her friend is too iH to take 
such a long journey, (r) 
5.10 Fame. More mamas 
concerning the students 
and staff of th® New York 
drama school (r) , 
r° *5 6.00 News with Nicholas 
Wftehefl and Frances 
. .. . ^ Covsrdale. Weather. 

.'^kSfe-MS London Plus, presented 
1 **-1 at by Gavin Ester and Linda 

Mitchell 


12.00 The LftOe Green Man. 
Adventures at a visitor 
from outer space, (rt 12.10 
OwBackyard. (t) 

12J0 Heir. Trevor Sortie 
demonstrates perming, 
and introduces Yvonne 
Wffiams, a black hair 


Q# 

Stfld 


1JM News with Alastdr 
Stewart 1 JO Thames 
News. 1J0 Man in a 
Suitcase. Adventure 
series (rt 

demonstrates the use of 
massage for problems of 
ageing, and how it can 
relieve the symptoms 
which remam after a heart 
attack. 3J90 Take the High 
Road. 3L25 Thames News 
headlines. 3J0 Gone and 


BBC 2 


6-55 Open (Mvere&y: Here's 
Looking at You. Ends at 
• - 720. 

9 JO Ceefaz. 

12L45 Open IMvwsity: 

Resource UtttzatkNL How 
two successful British 
companies are saving 
mergy. 1.10 Patterns for 
Living: Tha issues that 
arise when the mentaBy 
hanrficapped seek 
empk^motL 1 J5The 
Physics of Matter: Probing 
the structure of sofids with 
microscopes usteg x-rays 
and neutrons. 2 jOO 
Pnetex. 

5J5 News Summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

5J0 King's Coteriiy: 

HeatWancL The last of the 
repeated series of fflms by 
award-winning 

cameraman SEmon King, 
wtxj spent a year 
observing landscape, 
habitat and animals in the 
south of England. 

LOO FfercKfcfc . 

Jim Baker and. 

McCourL Comedy 
advemure wfth a sporting 
background about a 
footbati coach who, after 
being (fismissed from his 
pubfic school takes a job 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Channel 4 Radng from 

York. Brough Scott 

introduces coverage of the 

‘ 'Capo Handkip 
;theTata-Ebor 
. , k10);the 

Scottish Equitable 
GimcrackStake £3.45); 
and the Great Vofflgeur 
Stakes (4.15). 

4J0 Dancfe* Days. Another 
episode of the drama 
serial set in Rio de 
Janeiro. 

5J0 The Abbott and Costeflo 
Show/ Abbott and 
CostBto are judges in a 
beauty contest and accept 
bribe money thinking It is a 
gift towards the rent from 
a friend. 

LOO Famiy Ties. American 
domestic comedy series. 
ricOntnel 


^ t, 


Daughters. 
The Little G 


Green Man. A 


■*‘rsr» 


•k-.V 




’ IVnj — 

/ ‘re 
* " -**!“■ 


.rcpo2:i 


7 JO WogaiLAmoi 


cslasv 


tonight's 
are HoBywoodand 
roadway actor E. G. 
Marshall, star of The 
Defenders; Chapman 
Pincher. one of the best- 
informed writers about 
international espionage; 

and pop singers John Parr 
and Meat Loaf . who sing a 
new number entitled Rock 
and RoU Mercenaries. . 

1 i- u v« ic 7A0 Lame Ducks. The last in 
*■•1 . * <:ri t the present sertes^abdut a 
qBUi" group of people t^mgTb'''' 
escape tiie rat-race. 

8.10 Dallas. The mutifr 

heralded Martinique press 
conference proves to be 
unsafe for J A Meanwhile 
in DalaeDr Kenderson 

confesses all to Sue Blerc 

white Pamriecxtes about 
Christopher's future, and 
Jenna continues to cause 
I f 1 ) Min concern. (Ceefmri 

9.00 News with JuRaSomervUte 
and Frances Coverdate. 
Regional news and 
weather. 


400 


shown at noon. 410 The 
Moontina. Cartoon sertos. 
AJO Do It presented by 
Sheeiagh (Sbey and 
Norman Tipton. (Oracle) 
445 Razzmatazz. Pop 
music show. 

5.15 Whose Baby7 Quiz show 
WHh Trevor Brookmg, ‘ 
Nanette Newman and Ken 
Dodd. 

5L45 News with John Suchte. 

400 Thames Neaia. 

425 What it’s Worth. 
Consumer advicei 
Penny Junorandl 
Stafford. 

6J5 Crossroads. 

7 JO When There’s me. In the 
last of her series Dr. 

Miriam Stoppard — - - 
discuasas the treatment of 
patients in tiospHals. 

7 JO Coro na tion Street 
8J0 Ww United Kfegdom. 

Bstfrom 


1 by Sean 
Cunraigham. 

7 JO Designers. The last In the 
series examines the role 
and stetus of dedgnere in 
Industry. Plus an account 
of how the Hoover 

r marketed a new 


400 


of the Sun, Team 
of the Moon. Kings for a 
Day: In the seventh of his 

eight-part series about 
South America, Jack 
Pizzey goes to Rio, where 
he dtecovers the reality 
behind the apparent 
mingling of races at the 
annual camivaL He fotiows 
the carnival preparations 
of two rival teams: a Made 
group from the stums and 
a team sponsored by a 
white entrepreneur from 


400 


Beauty contest! 


7BB 


her oi 
for Brit 


9J0 The 
first 


Mystic Warrior. The 
of a two 


two-part epic 
about the Red Indians' 
struggle for survival, tetts 
thestoryofAhbteza.a 
youth of the Mahto tribe, 
growing up in the early 
1800s. The Mahto are 
faoed wfth the 
encroachment of the white 
settlers and hostflfty from 
other tribes. Starring 
Robert Bettran, Devon 
Ericson, Rion Hunter and 
Victoria Radmo. (CeefexL 
11 JO Rhode. Ida enlists 

Rhoda's help in ending her 
affair with her doctor. Tr) 
11J5 Weather. 


8U8ffl IThe Return of Sheflock 

— msmermstr 

Napoleons. The last In the 
senes, in which Sherlock 
Holmes is drawn into a 
den ol international crooks 
while investigating the 
destruction of busts of 
Napoleon. (Oracle) 

llOJO News at Ten with Leonard 
Parkin and Pamela 
Armstrong. Weather, 
(otiowed ay Thames news 
headlines. 

11400 Crime fee. The last in the 
series of Investigations 
into tin Mafia, (r) (Oracle). 

1 11 JO Mann's Best Friends. 

PJton&ack^as^r^ 

martaet trying to bring 
order to a (fisorgarazed 
household, (r) 

12J0 World Chess 

Ctwnplonstiip. Kamarov 
v Karpov at London s Park 
Lane Hotel 
11220 Night Thoughts. 


9J0 <r A*S*H. Corporal PH 
WaBceris plans to marry a 
local Korean girt and take 
her with him when he Is 
home in two 
'time are resisted, 
not only by officialdom, but 
by his attended wife. 

9-25 ScreenPlay: In Traction. A 
Hack comedy by Stuart 
P^rran. starring Robert 

md Cx&StePiMjrsai 
(See Choice). 

(10.15 KartyGoestoEifinburgh. 
Russefl Harty with Ms 
nightly report on events 
and exhftations from the 
Edinburgh Festival 

Newsntaht The latest 
nationafand internation al 
news including extended 
coverage of one of the 
main stories of the day. 
Wfth Peter Snow, Donald 
MacCormick and Olivia 
O'Leary. 

1 11 JO Weather, 
til J5 Open Unhwts ft y. 
Romanticism: An 
ex a mination of the 
Romantic response to 
nature in poetry and 


1445 


land 

Subordnacy: Rhesus 
monkeys dwnonstrate the 
retatiornhtos involved fa a- 
hfefarchy.(r)Endsat 
12J0. 


6 JO Flashback: On 
Test The fourth in the 
series which shows how 
remand television was 
used to document family 
Tife includes fam dips 
about the 1930s, the 
decade to vAtich the 
National Government 
introduced the Means 
Test There is an extract 
from a fflm drama of 
Walter Greenwood’s best- 
selling novel 'Love on The 
Dote' and from 
Anstey's classic 
to Eat (r) (Oracle) 

7.00 Channel 4 Neva with 
Trevor McDonald. 

7 JO Comment Wfth Ns views 
on a matter of topical 
importance is Jack 
Macarthur from Scotland. 
Weather. 

5 Times. The 
Denis Mitchell's 
documentaries based on 
five different museums is 
about the Kettfem Island 
Industrial Muaeun. - 
Sheffield. The p ro gr a mme 
lives an account of the 
r of cutlery and tool- 
j and features the 
River Don Engine, built by 
'Brothers of 
, which once 

drove a raffing mB for the 
manufacture of armour 
plate. (Oracle) 

430 Opteions: The Triumph of 
Capitalism. In the second 
in a series of four 
discussion p rogrammes 
about thenatireofr' 
modem capitalism 
Professor LeaSe Hannah 
of the London School of 
Economics asserts that 
anyone, reganfless of their 
beckground, can be an 
entrep reneur. 

400 Uidar Capricorn. The first 
of a two-part drama set in 
colonial New South 

WaJes.Starrkig Lisa 
Harrow, John Halam and 
Julia Blake. (See Choice) 
11.00 Schubert I Was Bom a 
Stranger. A film, by the 
expe ri ment al Viermesa 
(tirector, Ulus Leber, 
which explores the 
personality of Schubert 
The first part focuses chi 
two son®: The Erl King 
and The Dwarf; the 
second concentrates on 
last part of Schubert’s fife 
tiirobghfejater 

12.10 S^bGoS C ontinuing 
Ns anthology ot poems 
the poet Christopher 
logue, wfth Liana Aukin, 
reads two poems about 
burials: Elegy by Robert 
Bridges ana Tract by 
WHHam Carlos Wffiams. 
Endsat12J0. 


_ i 


On long wave. VHF stereo 
variations at and 

455 Stepping. 400 News briefing; 
weather. 410 Farming. 

425 Prayer (s) 

430 Today, inti fin. 7 JO, 

430 News; 445 
Business News; 455, 7 J5 
Weather 7 J0, BJ0 
News. 7.25, 425 Sport 7w45 
Thought for the Day 
443 A Night to Remember. 

Parts of the story of the 
Titanic (r). 457 Weather; 
Travel 
400 News 

410 In the Psychiatrist's 
Chair. Or Anthony Oare 
talks to Mrs Wendy Savage, 
the controversial 
gynaecologist and 
obstetrician (r). 

440 Tha Good Wbman. A tale 
about the headless Irish 
Dullahan. Read by Aingeal 
Qrehan 

10JO News; Pieties. Susan 
Mariing listens to the 
dawn chorus, in a subuti of 
Birmingham (r) 

10J0 Morning Story. Parting 
Shot by Malcolm 6ibtey. 

Read by John Westbrook 
1045 Daily Services te) 

11 JO News; Travel; 

Earthquake UK. David 
Addis traces the history of 
earthquakes in Britatelri 
MM Last Words. Sir Pater 
Parker reveals to Ron 
Abridge his three secrets of 

12 J0 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice, with 
John Howard. 

1Z27 I'm No Longer Sorry I 
Haven't A (Sue and Why 
Should I Be?. Humphrey 
Lyttelton chairs the panel 


Rushton. Graeme 
Garden and Tim Brooke 
Taylor. 12J0 Weather 
1 J0 The World at One: News 
140 The Archers. U5 

2 J0 Nsw^^oman’s House. 

WHh Susan Mating 
3J0 News; The Afternoon 
Ptay. Three Points of 
Contact by Charfes Ryder. 
With Nichotas Fn^A fete 

447 Letort^mtito^^r 8 ^ 

David Been flies a 
personal report on rural Efe 

4J0 News 

4u06 Dancing a Hornpipe in 
Fetters. Suzanne Burden 
reads from the journals and 
totters of Fanny Kemble 

415 ^outivEast&rope 


Journey. Jusan Hale 
reports from SpNL 
Yugoslavia, where the 
eStormna between tourism 
and industry is acute (r) 
445 Etinburgh Extra. Paul 
ABan reports from the 
Ecfinburah Festival and 
Fringe 

5J0 PM. News j 
4501 
Weather 
400 News; Financial Report 
430 Trivia Test Match. 

General knowledge 


t and WWa Ruahton 

— W 

7 JO News 
7J5 The Archers 
7 JO Safe in our Hands? 

National Health Setvios 
series. Tonight the politics 
of pr eve nti on, prioriti es 
and prescribing 
7.45 Never the Same Again. 
JenniMVstaBcstoa 
family who tost a 12-year-okJ 
In a road accidental 1983 
415 Up and Away. The 
technical dreams and 
economic realities tor 
-aircraft in the 


400 Thi 


430 


st century 
ilrty-Minute 
Leawngby Dave 
Sheasby, ' “ 

‘ ‘ *). 


Theatre. Vi 


with Patsy Byrne 


OuLPMSntih 
on TBs Night of the Beef 
.roganon incident 
445 includes 

comment on Romeo and 
JuSet at toe Lyric, and the 

AmOssasskme 
10.15 A Book at Bedtime. All 
the Brave Promises (8). 
Read by Helen Horton. 
1430 The World Tonight 
.11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

11 JO The Mischief Makers. 
Studies in talent and 

.(3) Frank Harris 


12J0 


perversity. 
News; Wo 


Weather. 12J3 


VHF(*vaflabteln England and S 
Wales only) as above aroept 5J5- 
400am Weather. Travel 1.55- 
2J0pm Listeting Comerls). 5JO- 
Sj 55 PM (continued). 11J0- 
12.10am Open Utivwtety. 11 JO 
Trials of Butwan. 11J0 Acts, 
Actions and Meanings. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF only: 

435 Open University. Until 
6J5am. Open Forum: 
University W 
On medium wave i 
455 Weather. 7J0l 
7.05 Concert Francois 
Couperin (Concerts 


11J0 


royaux. Suite NO 4), Mozart 
(Horn Concerto No 2: 
Hermann Baumann, soloist). 
Schumann (Arabeske, 

Op 14 Barenboim, piano), 
Chaus son (Poeme. Op 
25, with Penman. viohnL 400 
News 

405 Concert (contd): Soar 
(Wand of Youth Suite No 
2). Francaix (Le$ vacances. 
wrth the composer at the 
piano). Dtiinanyi(Vanstans 
on nursery song: 

Untos, piano, with Budapest 
SO). 400 News 
405 This Week's Composer; 
Franck. Les Beatitudes: 
Prologue. No 4 end No 8. 

With soioisis Andre 
Jonqueres, Xavier Depraz, 
Mona Kerys, Marcel 
Huytbrock, Jean Brazzi; And 
l@sDjmns.with 
Oftizjiano and PhilharmoEtia 
1400 Mendelssohn: Incidental 
music to Midsummer 

Night's dream. Pius 

Symphony No 4. BBC 
WBlsh SO (under Jorg 
Faartwr) 

Edinburgh International 
Festivakroung Uck Kim 
(vxAi). Emanuel Ax 
(piano). Part one. Mozart 
(Sonata in G. K 379), Webern 

(Four pieces, Op7). 

Faure (Sonata No 1) 

12 J0 TroHope on Tradesmen; 
readkigs by John Rowe 

1420 Edinburgh Festival 
(contd): Beethoven 
(Sonata in A,, Op 47 1 JO 
News 

1J5 The Essential Jazz 
Records: presented by 
Max Harrison 
1 JO Der Bettetstudent 
Nicolai Gedda. Rita 
Streich, Kart Bennea 

Hermann Prey m 
excerpts from MiBocker's 
operetta, sung in German 
430 Schubert Lindsay String 
Quartet play the Death 
and the Maiden quarts 
410 American piano music: 

Alan Gravlj plays 
Barber's Excursions and 
John Adams's Phrygian 
Oam 

4.00 

A live transmission. 4J5 
News 

400 Midweek Choice: Revel 


7 JO 


wq 

23: LeonhardL soloist). 
Reger (Suite in G minor. 

Op 131d No 1: Riebl, viola), 
Beethoven (Sonata in C, 

Op 2 No 3: Barenboim), 
Komgold (VtoUn 
Concerto, with Heifetz, 

), Barber 
.Not) 

Voices: Wessex 
Chamber Choir. Tippett 
(Five Spirituals), Brahms 
(Wamm 1st das LtcW). 

Finzi (Haste on. my joys, etc) 


7 JO Proms 84- BBC SO 
(under David Atherton), 
with Howard Shelley (piano). 
Part one. Elgar 
(Introduction and Allegro), 
Peter D ickinson (Piano 
Concerto) 

410 Six Continents; foreign 
radiobroadcasts. 
monitored by the BBC 

430 Proms 88: part two. 
Rachmaninov 

(Symphony Not) ' 

425 Barnes' People W: Ian 
Carmichael, Paul 
Eddington and Anna Massey 
in Peter Barnes's The 


Real Long John Silver 
8.45 Smetana: Endellron 
String Quartet play the 
OuanetNo 1 

1420 Anne Quefffitec: piano 
recital. Haydn (Sonata in 
E minor, h Xvi34), Debussy 
(La serenade 

intarrompue and Ce qu'a vu 
te vent d'ouest). Uszt 
oatefle sans tonalriB, and 
rancoisdePaute 
marcham surlesflots 
11 J0 Maw and Copland: 

Orchestra ol St John's 
Smith Square (under 
Lubbock), with unda 
Hirst (mezzo). Copland 
(Prelude, from 
Symphony No 1. and Ouet 
City, and Maw 
(Nocturne). 11.57 News. 

1400 Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF 

News on the hour. Sports 


Moore 7 JO 

Ken Bruce 11.i 
1.05pm Gerald Harper 


Berry SJO Ray 
igei Dempster 430 
Jimmy Young 

arperZJSAnneka 


Rating) 


430 


York (£58,000 Scottish Equitable 

Guncreek Stakes) 405 John 

Dunn 7 JO Fofc on 2 430 Jim 

McLeod (Scottish Dance Party 

from Auctindemty Centre) 9.00 

Listen to the Band 10J0 Jimmy 

Jewel Remembers. Jimmy Jewel 
looks back over tis career 
1415 Tony end Stod Swmgmasurs 
1430 Mcnael Femstam [new 
series] 11.00 Round Midnight from 
Edinburgh 1.00am Ntghtnde 
3J0-4.0O A Little Night Music. 


C Radio 1 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

5.30em Adrian John 7.0 Simon 
Mayo 430 Simon Bates 1 1.00 
Radio 1 Roadshow with Peter 
Powefl from St Austen 1430 
Newsbett (Frank Partridge) 

1445 Gary Davies 400 Steve 
t43Q 


Wright! 


r Davies 4001 
l NewsbeaUFrank 


_ :(Frank 

Partridge) 445 Bruno Brookes (Inti 
Top 30 album chart) 7 JO Jamce 
Long 1400-1400 John Peel. VHF 
Stereo Ratios 1 a 4- 4.00am 
As Radio 2. 1400 Aa Radiol. 
14Q0-4J0am As Radio 2- 


WORLD SERVICE 


BjM Newsdesk 430 Monden 7.00 Uwi 
7.01 Twenty Four Hours 7.30 
Deveiopflmiru 8.00 News 8-09 Reflec- 

tions 415 Oewcal Record Review BJO 
Brain or Boom 1986 400 News 401 

Review ol BnMh Press 415 Work) Today 

UOFaiancial News 440 Look Ahead 445 

A Land ol Song 1400 News 10J1 

Omntous 11J0 News 11X9 News About 

Braun 11.15 On The Bos 11.25 A Letter 

From watos lOO Msndon 12J0 Ratio 

Newsreel 12.15 Nature Notaboak 1225 

Farming Worid 12.45 SpoTO Roimtiaj 

1 JO News 1J9 Twenty Four Hours 130 

development S6 200 Outlook 245 Re- 

port on Robgx» 3J0 Ratio Newsreel 215 
A R tier’s Guide to Repnesiwn 230 

Patterson 4J0 News 4J9 Commentary 

4.16 Courterpokn 445 Sports Roundup 

7 M Good Books 400 News 409 Twenty 

Fora Hours 430 State of the Nation 400 

News 401 Network UK 415 AXHim Time 

445 Recocting ol Weak 1400 News 10J9 

world Today 1425 A Letter From Watos 

1030 Financial News 1040 Reflections 

1445 Sports Roundup 11 JO News 11 J9 

Commentary 11.15 Good Books 1130 

Top Twenty 1200 News 1209 News 

About Britan 1215 Ratio Newsreel 1230 

Patterson 1 JO News 1.01 Outlook 130 

Waveuide 1.40 Book Choice IAS Pano 

Rod 200 News 209 Review ol Breisn 

Press 215 Network UK 230 State ot the 

Nation 200 News 3J9 News About Braam 
215 Worm Today 4J5 Reflections 4J0 
nnanctol News 5J0 News 5J9 Twenty 
Four Hours 5J5 World Today. Al timas ia 


===i RrafiJMjpwwea Today 


435-7 JO Go Rx ftl 11.55-1200 
News and weather SCOTLAND SJSpei- 
7 JO Reporting ScottondNORTHBU) 

WBANOAZfceflpni Heidi 4.4W8 

400 Intide UtBtor8J5-7J0 Writ TB Your 
Father Gets Home 1US-1200 News 

and weather ENGLAND 4SSpoa-7JO Re- 
gional news maaezmea. 

S4C Btaria 1 JOfeu Dandn 1 Pays 
S3iS 1 J0 Modtihtagk;200 Goto 

Goch a Malwen 215 Rating 435 SF 
tonta. Ptaaae* 5J0 GortewSr Gwyn 430 
Rats In Particular 400 Brooktide 
430 Fam4 Ttoa 7 JO Nawydtion Satth 

"UORartBanl 


430 

Ruol 


7 JO pa La. Pa Fodd 400 1 

ynwytityntJ5RbKl3 

lions: Trt- 
moGonunatittos 
Closedown. 

ANGUA^S^ 

man 1425-11 JO Wheels 12&-1J0 

S.154L45 Cmfid Camera 400-&3S 

About Amfia rue Band of tha Year 

1215am ISral Always Remember, 

Ctosadown. 

central 

4S0 wuzztos 1415 Jack Hobom 

1445-11 35 Roots of Rock n’ Rol 

.123000-1 JO Ten Green Botttos 
IJONews U0-2J0 Hart to Hart 215- 

545 Whose Baby? 400 Crosonads 

425-7 JO News 1030 StresUJfe 1U0 

Trias from the Darktide 1130 Band 

at tha Year 1435am JoMndar 235 

Ctosadown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


SCOTTISH A» button ax- 


CHANWEL g^g^^^ 

200-230 Whose] 


i but the Best 


MSlW* 

Feta the 0nil3D Band of tha Ytar 

1236am CtosadiMm. 

ULSTER AtoLorwtonmxoappt 

Sesame Street 1450-11 JO Max 


130 LraKhtime 1JO-2JtfCo«Ttry 
Practice 330-4J0 Look Who's Tafltiig 
215-44SBev«tyH8Wfies‘B34 
435 Cartoon 1130 Baudot tha Yaar 
I ff te a m News. Ctoseaown 

Tire As London except 425ren 
JLK2 Sesame Street 1430-11J5 

Tritiums 1230pm-1 JO Coast to 
Coastfcopto 130 News 130 Nothtng but 
the Best 200-230 Whosa Baby? 
330-4J0 Yoram Doctors &154L45 Pop 
the Querikm 9J0-435 Coast » 

Const 1 130 Band of the Year t235am 
Company. Closedown. 

GRAMPIAN 

Thing 930 Nature of Thtap 9^5 
Sesame Street 1450-11 JO FotkTstos 

i230pa>-1J07hafs Hollywood 130 

News 130-230 Country Practice 5-15- 

5.45 Star Ctwlce5J0-435 North To- 

night IIJOBandof me Year123SaD 
News. Closedown. 


oapt l . TS eei 

Besthaieh e a n N e tim ch 460 C a r too n 
1400 Undenhe Mountain 1035 Rexy 
1435-11 JO Thafs Hollywood 
1239pitJJ0 John Bartday at Home 130 
News 130-230 Country Practice 
200-4J0 Hart to Hart 5.15446 Prilora 
Game 400 News and Scotland To- 

day 415-435 Light in the North 1 530 
Mppy Sweeties Tt JO Lata Call TUB 

Crime inc. 1205am Ctosadown. 

Street K>3S Jadtsons 1450-11 JO 
Cartoon 1230pta-1 JO Gtocvoe 130-230 
Tuckers Witch 415445 Whose 
Baby? 0J4435 Nows 1130 Band of the 
Yaar 1235are Ctosadown. 


HTV WALES 

«35 Sesame Street r 
Watos at Six. 


T5W As London except 935am 

Sesame Street 1036 Shmt Sto- 
ry; 1450-11 JO Max the Mouse 
l23ttom-1J0 Gardens For Al 130 News 
130-230 Country Practice 415 Gus 
Honeybun 530-445 Crosstoads 400 To- 
day South Wtast 430-7 JO 
Emmenttie Farm 1130 Band of the Year 
1235am postscript, Ctosadown. 


BSBPIBS%SS M 

1035 Professor KJtzal 1035-1 UO 
Unicom Triea 12Mgm-l jjo toce of Ufa 
130 News 130-23QCountryPr*c- 
tioe 3J0330 Country Ways415-5u«S 
Whose Baby? 400-535 Lookaround 
1130 Band of tha Yaar 1235am 
Ctosadown. 

TYNE TEES toLtmicnw- 

I Title lcca cape 425am News 
930 Seaanw Street 1035-11 JO 
Jazz l230pm-1J0 The Year W*s~. 1980 
130 News 135 Vtoare the Jobs Ara 

130-230A Country Practice 415-445 

Short Story 400- 435 Northern Ufo 
1130 Band of the Year 1235em Peapto 
Matter. Closedown. 

GRANADA^SgT^ 

Reports 430 Secret Vtfay 935 
Mount Chepaka Easter Rodao 1410 UnF 
com Tales 1030 Wuzzais 1 1J5 
About Britain 1130-1200 Connacttans 
1230pm-1 JO Mr4 Mrs 134230 
Granada Haports 130-230 Rendaii 4 

Hopkrt (Deceased) 330-400 Short 

Stray 415-445 Never the Twam 400 

Granada Repons 630-635 Iris n 

Your Right 1130 Band ol the Year 

1240— Ctoaedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

Starftoat 450 Boast otKkus 1045- 
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Here 415445 Benson 400435 Calen- 
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- TraMSat 8. Sat MM & 

Buna 4 A 7, UT A BUN 


PONm AN WAItPIOUWtCtoOft 

240 8230 CC 379 6666/6433 
LEWIS PATRKXA 

F1ANOEH HODGE 

NOEL and GERTIE 

August 26 - Sept 20 


nJ “ate tfoftMN So ^ool 

DAVE CLMDCl 


TIME 

CUFF RICHARD 

A S THE ROCK STAN* 
TIIE PORTRAYAL OF ‘AKASH 

LAURENCE OUVIER 

Mcn-Fri TJ3D ttol Mai 2^0 Sat C 

' ft B-30. 

6gmg.«ATre 8 TILL AVAILA BLE 

row TdiAv re rn tiNwai a. 


42ND STREET 


BEST MUSICAL 

fMMMDHMMMMIU 

VOM 

MUSICAL 


voted 


AHUM 

EVB* 8.0 Matt W«d SuO. 

Sat 5.0 & 430 
Cram 8el« 930 6123 . 


ouemese s sm 8203 cc aoo 

9648 CC 3796433 ft CC 20 W/7 
nay 240 7200 Evge 8 Wed mat 3 


■5S 


HUM. 


At GarrKk Th ifli 30 Aug 
Open® «t Duettos Th 2 Sol 


HUH OF YOSKB 836 8122 CC 

836 9837/741 9999/240 7200. 

Eves 8 Thu 3 Sat 3 A 830 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 


STEPPING OUT 

HR Comedy by RKJiare Harris 
Directed to Julia McKenzie 

"TRIUMPH ON TAT sat 

•uwwirqwiaF shly-to 


I "A W BCT P U aM r 1 D Tell 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


roan* itar cm« a cc 866 
2238 KP 741 9999 Grp Saha 930 
6123 Men to Fn 8 Sat 8J0 Mat 
Tbun A sat xoo 


DOUBLE DOUBLE 


'A domic of wtnduaitiv os 
•twertwnnwnt Doable DouMa-ls 
unnexUDW* Times C Sunn. 
-Stuns the mxueoce” s. Too 


Guam i 836 4601 cc 379 
6053 o CC 20 hr/7 ttto 200. 
720a Ojji 8. WM mt 3.SM 9 


dpt 


SCX. PLEAS 
IKfeHIISII 
torture Th % 


LEN D ME A TE NOR 

TILLS THE THEATRE WH 
THE SOUND CNT LAUGHTER” 
& Exp 

An American Ooiimty to 
Ken Ludwig 

Dtrecud to Da*M Cttmore 




Betti Honey- 
TCL From AUD 

AND COUNTRY 


by Joan wona 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9 301. Evto B. 

itaNw«moainniK 



tat OOP. "Athto f la y , I 


HAYWUUHUT TtNATWC MiYaL 

BOX Office end CC Ol MO 9832. 
Firm Can ao-nr 7 day CC taoounos 
Ol 800 7200. 


-A «uwrb London staoe Oebut- 

Fttiandai Thnea 

JACK LEMMON 

**as fine a ttape actor at ha u a. 
screen one" Today 

LONG DAY'S JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Eugene OKJHC 
" Jonathan MDaT brttUam 
pradocitoa" Standard 
Cvw only Moo-Sal 7 JO 


HER MAJmm. Haymarkel 
. 930 4025/6606 2046/2856 
Tktatniaeto 379 6131 
Fim OH CC 240 7300 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

MtauDL^wraD 

9nii Slew 


Mata to AHCBEW llOYO 
WEBBER 

Ltoreno w RICHARD 
STILOOE & CHARLES HART 
Directed by HAROLD PRINCE 
Ouena 9 Ocl 


Kuecrs HEAD 226 1916. STEVE 
■MABUEY m MARUiWC. A new 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
037 2056. CC 730 8961. 379 
6433.741 9999 tMJUre teri. Ttn» 
can so Hr 7 Day CC aao 72oa 
Grp sain 930 6123. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEOROE HEARN 
A OEMS OUILLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 


S.TN 

Mon-FTI 7 JO. Matt Wad 2 DO 
Sat 2 JO A £.00 

Stum mnsataMiL at deer 
Moft-frl *.Sat maia 
SCATS imLAVAOJUNj; 
FOB TODAY’S PERFOMMANCC. 
New booking lo Ajnll 1987 


23ii. Prev*. from sew l. Eva 
7.05, Wed matt 3JSO. Sal matol 
OD. Odoh SCM 8 a* 7 XL TOC 

■omc OF M OBIAWDA ALOaI 

to Lorca. wuiTOterifete 



LYRIC THEATRE SM 


Aw* W1 01-437 3686/7 Ol-Uto 
1660. 01-430 1060. 01-734J 

6I66/7 

CULM BUUCK&.Y 

“A nnrnara & Joyouay 

c o mi c pemrnanot- F. THnm 

The National Theatre*! a nt e tme ej 
nratne n oa or 

ALAN Avcnounrs 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 


“HBarious-. 1 * S. Times 

“A rare evening of 

comic ■xhuaraaoa*' nraee 
Era 7.30. Matt Wed end Sal 3,0. 
Gran SaM 01-930 6123. 

Reduced Brice matt Stndren o> 
OAP^niMw 

raiT. MIL MNR 7 DAY 

GCBOOKMHMHttOni 
(MtoOKMMQ 

WINNER OF AUL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNIUI 
JAN *87 


LYTTELTON V 928 2262 CC 
iNationai Theatre’s pno c ew em 
1UR) Today 2. IS ftw price 
mao a 8.00. Tomer 8-00 (net 
7.o8 as primed In leaflet) then 
Aug 26 & 27 IlMIHUarr by 
Srhnterter. uendan to Tom 
SKwnanL 


HAYFAM SCC 629 3036. Mmaj 
Thu 8 Frl/Sal 6AO A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD m 

-lire IM Thritar tar yaanT S M| 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

"An nWMMd wraner** 8 Exp, 
MSHHOtkMBl" Tlmef 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


MPMUIB Air Crawl 236 86 68 cc j 
701 9999. Ftnt CUI CC 200 7200 
120 Hre 7 Day) Mon-Frl B. Sat 6 * 


METAMORPHOSIS 

staged tor 

Steven BE RKOFF 

“THE atOST exemw o 
THE ATRICA L CVZMM M THE 
W1XT DOT CLUU& 

UnnUM Soaoa 
(PrNMan food & drink) 


NATIONAL THEATRE Sti Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

See SE PARATE ttWTIH Ei mwfcr 
«JVn/LYTTKLTON/ 
Hiuk ocrcBem cheap 
scare daw of rare an theatres 
Irani to am. restaurant (928 
2039). EAST CAR PARK, Info 
633 088a AH CORD 


NEW LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
006 0072 OC 379 6433 Ewes 7.08® 
Tue A S N 3-0 0 6 7.46. 

THE ANDREW UPTD WTO 
/TJ. EUBT HIHCAL 

CATS ■ 

APPLY DAILY TO NOX OPPKti 
Cram : 

01-930 6123. 1 

MAY 89 assy. 


C OF WALES 01-930 _ 

/2 CC Hotline 930 0840/6/6 _ , 
Kales 930 6123. Kean Prawse! 
^019999/3796433. FW Can M| 
hr 7 day 240 720a *| 

TOC-TAPPRM mb’ D. MN1 | 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 
_ SEVEN BROTHERS” 


aunt **■ 92ti 2263 CC (tJ* 

thmnl The«re*s open Nag*) 

Toni 7.10. then Sect 1 lo 4 


BIREL to Werfri. version to SN 

Be l li min i. Tomer 7.16. then 
AU0 29 in 28 PNAVDA - A PM 

“ ^sas ^ 29 * 30 


"» DEFY AKTONE NOT TO 
ENJOY TT* p-TImea- 


7.3a Mat Thur tt Sal 3. 


486 3431 CC 379 6433 

CC Homne 496 1933 


MEAM TDday 2.30 St 7.48. 
R OB H O AA HJETTTwra-50 0, 

7.46. EXIT R U HR AOE ram 

tnnchttrne FrL ThttSun specttl 

doable Ml Bpm EXIT W 


PALACE THEATRE 037 6834 

CC 457 8337 or 379 6033 u 
PM Call 24HT 7Day CC 240 72001 
Cm Sales 930 6123 


LES MISERABLES 

IF YOU CANT GET A 

TICKET- STEAL ONETsm 

Eves 7 JO Matt Thu & Set 2.30 
Lateeamm net admitted 
mud the Interval 

■EAT THE TOUTS RY ENQMR- 
■Ntt POR RETURNS AT THE BOX 


PHOENIX 836 2294 Rt 340 9661 
741 9999. Pint cab 24 tire 7 days 
340 7200. Crv Solas 930 6123. 
Eves 7.30. Thur mat 3. Saadi a. 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

to T.S. ELIOT 

'Wf OUT ALL THE FLAOSPOR 
JOHN DEXTER AMD THE MOV 


Sun Times 


PICCADILLY THEATRE Air Con- 

ditioned. 027 4606- credit cant 
Hoffines 3196666. 701 9999. Grp 

6123 . 

iTWNAL YEAR 


DAVID 

ESSEX 


FRANK 

FINLAY 


MUTINY! 

••SPECTACULAR MUSICAL— 
Review Hrara 
Eves 8-0 Matt wed 3 A Sal 3 


PHMCC EDWARD Bex Office 
730 8961 Fim Can 2« Hr 7 Daw 
ce Bookmo 836 3460 arp Salas 
930 6123 

Mao-Sal a. Mat Thurs A Sat 3.00 

CHESS 

“A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW” Newnweei 


Nre^b 


Quonra 01-734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120. 24hr CC 200 7200 
Grp Sales 930 6123. 

“THE BEST MUSICAL IN 
LONDON" con 


iRT HNtrere 01-836 1043, Sm- 
|dal CC NO. 379 6433. Evyl 8LO 
nues 243 Sal so ana so 

Upd ABATHA WUW Cl 

THE MOUSETRAP 


<0789) 295623 or^EHHIHI 
01-379 0033 ROYAL SNAKE- 


llilnpuulfc 

JdM Tenwu 


Tomer 


730. 

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7.3a Su I SO. Or«i— ftl sat 
7 JO. tore Itabs EMty 
TonNhl 740. Tomor 1.30. 
Htt imwi Tomor 730. Sat 130. 
Haver Fn. Sal 730. For special 
meai/m«Ure ocvtt and hotel 
wop over nap <0789 ) 67362. 


^WWro E RFUL ST AR^ MM 

WONDERFUL TOWN! 

~IT R IPPLES WITH 
EXCITEMENT- S. Times 
“JUST WONDERFUL” n FTP . 
Mon-Sal 8 Matt Wed 230 Sat Si 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1703 
Pram Tamar Cmn 8pm CSat 
matt from Ana 30 at opm) 
OURSELVES ALONE fay Anne 
Drviin. Dir to Sfmen Curas. 
I* Part «n 2SL 


MVOY 01-836 8888 OC 01-379 
6219. 836 0479 EvnUnta 7.06. 
Matt Wed J. Sal 3 A 830 
GTH YEAR OF 
MICHAEL FRAYN'S 
A WARD- WINNING FAROE 
CHR ISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PADOKX 

M ICHAE L COCHRANE 
COLETTE TIMOTHY 

CLEESON CARLTON 

NOISES OFF 

Okr to MICHAEL 8LAKEMGRC 


■HAFTBHHWY THEATRE OP 

COaCEDY. Ol -379 BS99 CC Ol -579 
,6033/701 9999. Flttt CaB 244ir 
t^oo 7200 tiltg tel OTP Sales 930 

The Theatre of Oonwcty Co 

tar. taSS'Cra. reap 

TDM IAN 

COURTENAY OGOVY 

PEGGY MOUNT 
and LIONEL JEFFRIES 
to 

ROOKERY NOOK 

tor ben TTOvers 
Otkim to Marti KtoBMon 
Mon-FTI 8 Wed Mat 3 Sat 5.00 A 
8-30. Reduced prise provierai 
from Aug 27. 

Opens tsrot 2 at TJOm 


WAR THEATRE 388 1394 
Matt— si T— Mi Ttastti 

MHHTHDINEK A muskaa 
vereton of Macbeth. 

Eva 7 30 MttS Stt 230. 


836 2660 CC 836 
0103/5190 701 9999 First Caa 
24 Hr 7 Dto oc 2*0 7200 
Ora Sate 930 6123 

"CABARET 

nmln| in tta WaM End" Std 

Burring 

WAYNE S LEEP ^ 

Directed a chomHpMM to 

Ob |M|Pf 

Mon-FTI 7.48 MSI WM 3.00 
Sal 430 & 8.16 

MCUIIMX INCREASE 

BEST VALUE M WEST END 
ROOKRM NOW TO JAN *S7^ 


THfcA'IRfc oF COMEDY 
(COMPANY 

“The very best of Bruatatt comic 
talent" Dally Mas 
See separate entries under: 


VAUDEVILLE Box Office 6 CC. 
836 9987/5645 Find caB CC 20 
hra 240 7200 fake fee). Evgs 8-0. 
Mats Wed 230. Sal 60. 830. g 



WOMAN IN MIND 


a AT 74 


VAUDEVILLE. WC2. 8ml Office 
and OC 01-836 998T/50«5. fW 
Call (CC 20 m 01-240 7200 BBfl 
lee). Eves 7ja Eves 73a WM 
MRS 23a Safe 5.0 A 8.15. 



■TOiTajaLra 

UQCHT THOObUOULVl 

P4jOTAWJrTTQver2 QOPrrtsf 

IRUKT DO iAT^re 


VICTORIA PALACE Ol-EM 1317 
Eves 7.30 DUB WM A Sat 2-OS 

CHARLIE GIRL 



CHARLIE GIRL 

AkODOOfc On FIRST CALL 20 Un 
7 Days. (Bhv Fed 01-240 7200 A 
ALL USUAL AQZMTS 


Air Condi naned. 

8363028/3796863/3796058 
Ota 836 3962 
Eves 8 . Sals 5 A 8 JO 

tar A L ta if .d E a as sn 

FAYE DUNAWAY 

■OffiriMM* (D MalO to 


to Daiald Freed 
Directed to HAROLD PHfTKH 
“A stunulauno nUy. ntaam 
and Tunes... -Fun of. 

Demon, concern and amM" 
nw i imh« 


twi Ol 

5/839 4455 CC Ol 
5/64X3. 741 9999. Orta W 
53962. Man-Fn 8.00. wed Mta 
S.OO. sets BOO 6 830. 


(Guardian) 


PATRSCIA HAYES 


PATSY ROWLAIBS 


'WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

to LB. Priestley 
Dtrecied to Ronald Eyre 
“vow will hot tow X remit 

PLEASURABLE EVENMS ANT 

K M LONDON • ON THE 

WORLD" S. Express 


wemnwivK 01-834 otefru. 
re 834 0048. Flret call cc 24 hr 7i 

dan* »«) 7200 & cc 74 ll 

9999/379 6433. Grp Sda 9S0I 
6123. Eves 7.48. Wed Matt 5. 

6 A 8.13 ~ 

VntMMI PORT E R 


Murder Mystery 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP 

**T 1 te very task ■< Ttalaai i" 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY 4TOPPAT 23 Dertaa 
SL WI ANDY WARHOL 499 
4100 


4HHTHM LBBKARY CLRusMtt SL 

■WCl. 


Manat ST AlMUSTME OP 
NRTO 054-4*0), Mon - Sal 

106. Sun 2306. Adm tree. 


HAYWARD ■ 

■Bank. SCI. 

PAMTMM 


I960 


South 

1V1AN 


KM. Unto 6 OCL Adm. 
£230/£l.$Q. Receded Into 
Ot 261 0127. 


amMa GALLERY, 7 Graftal su 

■ Bond St- Wl. 629 S67S.MBM 


(IASI- 1973) 30 AU« - 2 Sept. 
Men-Frl 963a 


PARHM OAUXRY 1 1 MetCWMie 

■ SLLnmteaewi.Ol 255 8144 . 


ERNRHfTHH riUNTMCL 


ROYAL ACADEMY, PICCADIL- 

LY, Ol 734 9052 Open dally 
lti6 toe Svki reduced rate Sun, 

rauu l.os) H UMM ER rXIRRi 

TMM Until 24th Auoust CZAO. 

Cl- 60 cone, rare « taoktog Ol 

701 9999 


TAT E OA LLEHY. MUBunk SW1. 

tauprr flamAcaNi Prrere m 

ird i ta s Unut 31 Anp. 
STEkHEN COXl AoMR Indtan 
taMptora (Hra Art tarirak 

Unto i9oa. Adm free. wkdayL 
ro^eo. Sun 2AS0. Reouded 
Into. 01 821 71 — 


CINEMAS 


[CAMDEN PLAZA 485 2403 M) 

* NANCY (IB), ntm at 1.30 

■ 330 6.15 6 8 0S. 


361 3742 
- - JRLiisinnn 

ao 2.30 0 35 6 40 8 50 


I CURZON MAYFAIR CuTTOO SI 
099 3737 First CNI 24Hr 7 Day 
rc 240 7200 IBM Feel Maggie 
Snum. Denholm EUhhl JutU 
Dench In A ROOM WITH A 
VIEW [PO) Film at I 30 INM 
] Sunl 343. A IQ A B jO 

ALSO AT CURZON WEST END. 


*CWtZON WCSTDto Shaftesbury 

Avenue Wl 439 0006 Hire 

CaU 24 Hr 7 Day tr coo 7200 

ffita Fee) Maggie Smith. 
Denhottn Etogti. Jum Dencn m 

A ROOM WITH A VIEW [PGL 

FUm at 1.30 INM Sun). SOS. 

6.10 A BOO. 


onih Natumi Ha) 

tore. 727 4003. sn AND NAN- 

CY (181 230 Utot Sum 4.40 
fcB0 _ 900 L-Nlgnt 1I.1S 

‘ C OM ED Y 


i pci a 


«ui 


Advance 


■LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

930 8252 l£nqt/930 7615 124 
nr Access/ visa/ Anm Book- 
mgsi wan rvmey* moccno 
nn Plus OUtHRH 8KAR3 A NEW 
■COMNINR (U) Com Drops DM- 
IV 1.20 3 40 6.00 8J». AU 
prom taokaMe lo advance. 


LIMBERS CINEMA 379 3014/ 
836 0691 SB A NANCY U8L 
FUm at 1.30 3.50 6.13 8.45. 


MOMMA .WHOirraRHHIOE 235 

022S “OUT OF AFRKA’WC) 

DnUyd-O 6.0 9.0 MUST END 

THURSDAY 28* AUGUST 
Woody Altai Michael GUnc 

Mta Fa rrow T UUSIAH AND 

N« HS1W"115) OPENS 
FHNMY XM AUQIMT M 
venn- nookmpj now open 


HAYMARlUT (839 

7W7) Wait Pttncy *3 FAHTAS1A 
lU) Sep proas Dally 1 50 5.00 
8.10. AU seres bookable to 
advance. Arenas and Vbs 
UMPtione bookings weKdme. 


OMOH LEIC ES TE R 

■9M Will Info 9 » 4250 / 

4259 H ANNAH AND HER 
SW1ERS (I5i Sep props Doom 

yq. ftoty 2 . 00 . s^a boo. 

a*dU Card Hat une lAccem 

/Visa /AmExi 839 1929. 3d 

taur rarviee. C 2 J 0 seats avau- 

able Monday au peris. Ad prags 

bdOtaMe tn affiance. Tnerewill 

benoBGOPerfomw Aug 36. 


VKON MARBLE ARCH 1733 
■Mil' THE KARATE KR> - 
PART N (PC) ta Progs Doors 
open Daily s.ta. 635. H.OS. Re- 
duced prices for under 16 H. 
Student curd hMdrrs. UB40 
iMHders. Q.A.P-t Matuwri 
only CARE BEARS MOVIE D - 
A NEW CRN (RATON (U) 
Doors open Man - Sal 1 . 1 S. All 
seats 2130. 


SCREEN AT THE ELECnPC 229 

3694. DESERT HEARTS UB) 

530. 6.15. 7.10. 9 06. Seatt 

bootable. Plenty or free parking 
nearby. 


Otari line d oa page 30 



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WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 1986 


THE 


TIMES 


First published in 1785 


****** 


' j 1' ' ' " ■ . . i . 'ire 


pays for 
mdiscretion 


et tough 


The lurbulenl match be- 
tween Hibernian and Rangers 
on the opening dayof the 
season has resulted in both 
dubs being fined and the 
Rangers' player/manager, 
Graeme Souness. being sus- 
pended for a further three 
matches. 

The incidents in the game 
which led to Souness being 
ordered ofF and eight other 
players cautioned, were de- 
scribed yesterday as “the most 
serious 'witnessed in Scottish 
football in recent years” and 
the fines and suspensions 
indicate that the Scottish 
Football Association will in 
future deal out even more 
severe punishment if violent 
play is not curbed. 

Rangers were fined £5,000, 
Hibernian. £1.000, and 
Souness given a further ihree- 
malch suspension in addition 
to the automatic ban which 
caused him to miss the game 
against Falkirk. These were 
the decisions of the SrA 
disciplinary and referee 
committee who met to in- 
vestigate the stormy game at 
Easter Road. 

While some may feel that 
the fines and suspensions 
amount to little more than 
slaps on the wrist, Hibernian 
believe they have been hard 
done by. saving they were the 
innocent party in the in- 
cidents. Their manager, John 
Blackley, indicated last night 
that they will appeal against 
the findings of the committee. 

Rangers, who have accepted 
‘•full responsibility for their 
part in the misbehaviour and 
have apologised unreservedly 
to the SFA.” may be only too 
glad to have a disgraceful 
episode in their history forgot- 
ten. Campbell Ogilvie. their 
secretary, said: “The disci- 
plinary measures imposed by 


By Hugh Taylor 
the Scottish Football Associ- 
ation have been accepted by 
Rangers Football Club. The 
club has no intention of 
appealing against the de- 
cisions of a governing body.” 

The indignation of the SFA 
at the unruly behaviour of the 
players at Easter Road was 
made plain in a statement 
read after the meeting by the 
president, David will, of 
Brechin City, who is a solic- 
itor. 

He said: “Having spent 
most of the close season 



Souness: three match ban 

stressing that every effort was 
to be made to stamp out 
violent conduct and serious 
indiscipline on the field, the 
Association was appalled to 
learn that the first day of the 
new season had been marred 
by one of the most serious 
incidents witnessed in Scot- 
tish football in recent years. 

“i! is a relief that we are able 
to record that actions by 
players which would have led 
to a riot had they occurred on 
the terracing did not spark off 
catastrophic crowd trouble. 

“The Association wish to 
make it dear that the behav- 


iour of the type witnessed will 
not be tolerated in the Scottish 
game.” After fining Rangers, 
the committee pointed out 
that “this was the third major 
inddent in which players of 
that club bad been involved in 
the past two seasons.” 

A year ago Rangers were 
fined £2,000 after a deplorable 
match with Aberdeen and a 
few weeks before that, some of 
their players and a few of those 
of Heart of Midlothian were 
gi ven extra suspensions after a 
violent game. 

Souness, whose introduc- 
tion to Scottish League foot- 
ball has been disastrous, bis 
expensively built team having 
failed to impress, is under- 
stood to have been severely 
criticized in the report of the 
referee supervisor at Easter 
Road for the inddent which 
left George McCluskey of 
Hibernian requiring nine 
stitches in a knee wound. That 
tackle led to the dismissal of 
Souness but not before there 
was a melee involving 21 
players in the centre cirde 

The committee has also 
dedded that two penalty 
points will be added to the 
current records of all players 
involved in that inddent — 
“that is to say, ail players then 
on the field, with the sole 
exception of player number 
one of Hibernian . He is Alan 
Rough, the Scottish inter- 
national goalkeeper, who had 
the good sense to remain on 
his goal-line, looking aghast at 
the fighting. Souness, then, 
now finds himself on nine 
penalty points and one more 
booking will cost him another 
match suspension. 

One of the three matches 
the player/manager will miss 
is the Glasgow derby match 
with Celtic at the end of the 
month. 


CYCLING 


Pierce is the revelation 


With five days remaining in 
the Coors International Gas- 
sic. there are French leaders in 
both sections of the race. 


Bernard Hinault has an 
advantage of Imin 16sec over 
Jeff Pierce, of the United 
Slates, with Phil Anderson, of 
Australia, in third place in the 
men's section. And Jcannie 
Longo. the 19S5 world cham- 
pion. is almost two minutes 
ahead on Inga Thompson, the 
American who came third last 
month in ihe women’s Tour 
de France. 


There was no racing yes- 
terday when the two race 
entourages moved down from 
the high Rocky Mountains to 
the foothills. This change in 
elevation from 10,000 to 5,000 
feet should be to the advan- 
tage of the European-based 
riders, who already occupy 


From John Wilcockson, Colorado 

seven of the top 10 positions 
in the men's race. 

Tne revelation of the past 
week has been Pierce, who is 
regarded as one of the best 
American performers at high 
altitude. His solo attack on 
Monday's Vail to Copper 
Mountain stage allowed him 
to finish with Hinault and 
Anderson in the front group. 
Imin 44sec ahead of the top 
two American cyclists, Greg 
LeMond and Andrew 
Ham ps ten. who both missed 
the key move 24 miles from 
the finish. 

Other victims of the elev- 
enth stage, which crossed the 
] 1.316-ft high Fremont Pass, 
were Moreno Argentin, of 
Italy, and Bruno Comillet, of 
France, who finished four 
minutes behind the day's win- 
ner, Maarten Ducrot, of The 
Netherlands. 


As p famous 
athlete, you 


£ 50,000 
to endorse 
a product you 


wouldn'tuse. 


-;;;!®0iyOU ;/ 

siepforse it? 

"vr A-';. ^ 

■ ; •"/ :v - 




It^d^question of Scruples. 


fjj TOEE fg,^: % 


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Ducrot attacked on the 
descend of the Fremont Pass, 
11 miles from the finish to 
arrive 13 seconds ahead of the 
Hinault-Anderson-Pierce 
group. 

Many of the Europeans, like 
Ducrot, lost time during the 
early stages of the Coors 
Classic and have now fully 
acclimatized. But Argentin, 
who last year won the bronze 
medal in the world champion- 
ship road race in Italft said 
after his defeat on Monday: “I 
found it hard racing m the thin 
air and I was unable to follow 
LeMond. I will now con- 
centrate on preparing for the 
world championships." The 
professional road race in the 
world championships takes 
place on September 7 ai 
Colorado Springs, al 7,000 feet 
above sea level. 

In the women's section, 
Longo and Thompson are 
both in contention for victory, 
and they will also be the main 
contenders for the road race at 
the world championships. 
Other challengers are coming 
into form, including Madonna 
Harris, a Utah-based New 
Zealander who won Monday's 
stage. 

LATEST POSmONS: Man: 1, B 
Hinault (Frt, 28hr 26min 55sec; 2, J 
Pierce (US) at imin 16sec; 3, P 
Anderson (Aus) at 237; 4. Q 
LeMond (US) at 2:47; 5, A 
Hampsten (US) at 3:42: 6, D Shapiro 
(US) at 4:43sec 7, j Kuum (Nod at 
4:48; 8. M Argentin (tt) at 5: 22: 9. B 
Comiflet(Fr) at 531 ; ID. V Piva Ofl at 


636. Womeic l , jJ Longo (RJ. 


08min 46sec; 2, 1 Ttompson (US) at 
Imin 55sac: 3, ** *■*“ — 

4. S Silers 

7, M Berolund (Svw) at 637; 8. 
L Schenk (US) at 738; 8, C 
Greenwood jGB) at 830; 10, U 
Enzenhauer (WG) at 8:41. 


Clark triumph 
over Hoste 
and his wrist 


Although nursing an injured 
wrist, Danny Clark (Ever- 
Ready) maintained 
Australia’s hold on the Glas- 
gow end of the Kellogg's city 
cri tenures series by snatching 
’victory right on die line on 
Monday. 

He just squeeezed out Frank 
Hoste of Belgium with whom, 
three laps earlier, he had 
bridgeda 10-second gap estab- 
lished by John Herety (Percy 
Bilton-Condor Cycles) and 
Chris Whorton (Allison 
Bread). Steve Joughin, the 
Moducel sprinter, crossed the 
gap too but pulled his foot out 
of a pedal while preparing for 
the final dash to the line. 

Herety, aghast at the sudden 
arrival of the speedy Clark and 
Hoste, bad to be content with 
third place but it gave him the 
overall yellow jersey with 
22pts ahead of Joey 
McLoughlin (ANQ and Clark 
both with 20pts. 

Clark's brilliant timing was 
a triumph fora man sidelined 
for a week after crashing in a 
motor-paced race in Zurich. It 
was the fourth successive year 
an Australian had won at 
Glasow. 





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it'!" if* 


Putting their backs into it Mitchell (US, foreground) and Shibaewa (USSR) in their women's 100 metres backstroke heat 

First gold 
medal 


ROWING 


Bird and Johnston lift day 
of gloom for British crews 


By Jim Railton 


Britain's first two crews in 
the repechages, the men's 
lightweight eight and the 
women's coxed four, were 
eliminated from the com- 
petition at the world rowing 
championships in Notting- 
ham yesterday. But the gloom 
lifted for the British when 
Pauline Bird and Fiona John- 
ston finished second in. their 
repechage, behind the domi- 
nant East Germans, to qualify 
for Saturday's finaL 
The championships are now 
at a crucial stage, when 
competitors progress to semi- 
final rounds or directly to 
finals. Failure to do so simply 
means the end of the road, for 
another year at least. 

Britain's state of affairs 
before yesterday’s events was 
already a healthy one. Four 
crews had made the weekend's 
finals — the women’s right, the 
lightweight women's double 
sculls and coxless four to- 
gether with Steve Redgrave 
and Andrew Holmes in the 
men’s coxed pairs. Yesterday 
Bird and Johnston made it 
five so for, and today should 
provide more. r 
The first major casualty 
yesterday was Ruggero 
Verroca, Italy’s world cham- 
pion in the lightweight single 
sculls. He finished fourth in 


his race with only three to 
qualify. It came as no great 
surprise, however, as he has 
been in and out of hospital 
here, receiving treatment for 
an abcess. and was as weak as 
a kitten. 

Britain's taste of gloom 
came with the elimination of 
the men's lightweight eight 
They did not have the best 
lane, but were last all the way 
and a length or more short ofa 
final place. The women's 
heavyweight coxed four in the 
next race were outclassed and 
last in their repechage. 

In today'srepechages the ac- 
tion once again will be fierce 
with sudden death threatening 
all. Four British crews have 
their heads on the block and 
the axe is neatly poised in each 
case. 

The heats of the men’s 
heavyweight rights on Mon- 
day provided some spectacu- 
larracing worthy ofa final in a 
normal year and they were 
charged with atmosphere and 
surprises. In the heats, Italy 
surprised by taking first place 
with Britain fourth, almost 
three lengths behind. 

Today, the men’s rights 
repechages will be hotly con- 
tested. With two crews able to 
qualify for Sunday’s finaL 
Britain are drawn against 


France, the 
Australia, 


United States, 
and Czecho- 


slovakia. Zt just might be 
flat-out race, but the chances 
are they will have to read 
every game plan and ploy 
down the course. The other 
repechage contains New Zea- 
land, Canada, The Nether- 
lands, East and West 
Germany. Neither race has the 
suggestion of an easy touch. 

Beryl Crockford also has a 
tough day ahead. She must 
finish in the first two to 
qualify in the lightweight sin- 
gle sculls, but is up against 
Adair Ferguson, Australia's 
world and Commonwealth 
Games champion, and Rita de 
Fauwe, of Belgium, who beat 
her in Lucerne. 

Britain's youngsters in the 
coxed fours and quadruple 
sculls are certainly up against 
it, but the experience here will 
prove a good investment 

Because of the possibility of 
adverse weather conditions 
today and with an eye on the 
wind direction, racing will 
start at 730am. There were 
complaints from coaches that 
the wind yesterday affected 
the inside lanes and among 
those who complained were 
the British lightweight men's 
eight 

Resnlts, page 30 


BOWLS 


Clevedon masters ditched 


Ted Hanger and 
Nicholls, of Chandos 


Ron 

Park, 


Buckingham, beat David Bry- 
~ ' 520- 


ant and David Rhys Jones 2( 
19 in the third round of the 
Gateway English Bowling 
Association pairs champion- 
ship at Worthing yesrerday. 
This is a title Bryant and Rhys 
Jones have won three times 
since they first played together 
21 years ago. 

It sounds a dose match and 
it was dose. Yet after 10 ends 
there was nothing dose about 
it as for as those unreliable 
things, the statistics, went 
Hanger and Nicholls led 16-1 
and were bowling well enough 
to be worth every shot of that 
lead. The Gevedon masters, 
no matter what they did, 
seemed unable to stop them. 

The situation had not 
significantly changed by the 
lfr-end mark. Hanger and 
Nicholls led 20-6 and time was 
now on their side. But on the 
seventeenth end Bryant and 
Rhys Jones scored five, when 
Bryant removed Hanger’s sec- 


By Gordon Allan 
ond bowL Two shots to 
Gevedon on the eighteenth 
would have been five if 
Hanger had not drawn a 
saving third bowl — and in 
retrospect that three-shot dif- 
ference could be seen as 
cruriaL 

Four shots on the nine- 
teenth and twentieth left Bry- 
ant and Rhys Jones needing 
four to win on the last end. 
Bryant put the jack in the 
ditch, giving them the chance 
of three shots and a possible 
extra end, but a measure ruled 
outlhe third. A fitting finish to 
a fine match. 

The other Somerset pair, 
Brian Archer and Ernie race, 
of Taunton Deane, lost 17-16 
on an extra end to Neil 
Stephens and Steven Rowse, 
of Stenalees. The Cornishmen 
drew level lfr-16 on the 21st, 
after hanging on to the 
opposition's coat-tails for the 
whole match. 


Worthing, can now return to 
the beach. He and his brother 
Jeff, from VauxhaU Park, lost 
25-16 to John Morley and 
Arthur Wright, of the Albert 
Gub in north London. 


John Gale, who interrupted 
a holiday in Miami to play at 


Qiff Simpson and Dave 
Kilner, ofOwton Lodge, Dur- 
ham, maintained their 
impressive form with a 20-10 
win over the Nottinghamshire 
pair Alan Euerby. and Brian 
Gark, of Bestwood Miners 
Welfare. Gary Denison and 
Phil Hacked, of Newton Ab- 
bott, secured their place in the 
quarter-finals when they beat 
Give Tancock and Mike 
Jeffery, of Atherley, 
Southampton, 23-15. 

Brian Taylor and Gary 
Blake, of County Aru^ Nor- 
wich, were consistency 
personified in their 20-6 vic- 
tory over Ian Maddox and 
Marcus Smith, of Ledbury, 
Herefordshire. Their total 
comprised three threes and 1 1 
singles. 

Results, page 29 


gained by 
Biondi 


Madrid (Renter) - Matt 
Biondi gained his first world 
swimming championship gold 
medal when he won the men's 
100 metres freestyle final here 
yesterday. Britain's Sarah 
Hard castle won a bronze 
medal in the women's 400 
metres freestyle. 

Biondi, aged 20, who has 
already won a silver and two 
bronze medals, added the gold 
with a good time of 48.94sec, a 
time bettered only by his own 
world record of 48.74sec in 
June. Stephan Caron turned in 
a fast second length to over- 
take the American. Tom 
Jager. and take the silver 
medal by a nargin of just 0.06 
seconds. 

But the French European 
champion was nearly a second 
behind Biondi, who had ear- 
lier won silver in the 100 
butterfly and bronze in the 
200 freestyle and 4 x 200 
freestyle relay. 

The stylish HeBce Friedrich 
collected her third gold medal 
in as many days, outclassing 
her rivals to win the women's 
400 metres freestyle. The 16- 
year-old East German cruised 
smoothly home to win by 
more than a one' and a half 
seconds from her compatriot 
Astrid Strauss, with the 
Commonwealth champion, 
Sarah Handcastle, third. The 
British giil had led at the half- 
way point, but was not strong 
enough to hold on. 

It was East Germany's sixth 
win in six women’s races and 
completed a treble for 
Friedrich, who won gold med- 
als in Sunday's 4 x 200 metres 
freestyle final and Monday’s 
individual 200 freestyle. 

East Germany won a total 
of three gold medals on Mon- 
day, settmgaworid record and 
scoring a sensational men’s 4 x 
200 metres relay win in which 
they defeated the fancied Wrsi 
Germans as well as the United 
States. 

SiJke Homer, aged 20, a 
Leipzig sports student, sup- 
plied the world record in the 
200 metres breaststroke, giv- 
ing East Germany their fifth 
title in five women's events. - 

Michael Gross, the West 
German winner of the 200 
metres freestyle, was edged 
out of the 100 metres butterfly 
medals as Andrew Jameson, 
of Britain, snatched the 
bronze behind an American 
one- two. Jameson had set a 
Commonwealth record in the 
heals. “1 beat Michael this 
time and I was pleased with 
that I was very nervous at the 
start but I'm pleased to get 
third,” he said. 


Worthing will 
be focus of 
world in 1992 


Norman Thomson, presi- 
dent of the English Bowling 
Association (EBA), an- 
nounced yesterday that Wor- 
thing has been confirmed by 
the International Bowling 
Board as the venue of the 1 992 
world championships (Gor- 
don Allan writes). They will 
probably be held in June and 
at lea&t 30 countries are ex- 
pected to take parL 
The cost to the EBA of 
organizing the championships 
is estimated at £500.000. To 
raise £125,000 of this, they 
will be asking every bowler in 
England for a contribution of 
£1. A limited liability com- 
pany with a board of directors 
comprising businessmen and 
bowls administrators has been 
formed to co-ordinate plan- 
ning of the event 
The BBC have been given 
first refusal on television 
coverage. Sponsorship — that 
other essential ingredient of 
modern sport — will be sought 
in due course. 

Worthing staged the world 
championships in 1972. The 
next championships are being 
held at Auckland, New Zea- 
land in 1988. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Hagler yes 

to Leonard 


Marvin Hagler, the un- 
disputed world middleweight 
boxing champion, has agreed 
to meet Sugar Ray Leonard, 
but not until March of next 
year. Leonard, the 30-year-okl 
former welterweight, and ju- 
nior middleweight world 
champion, has been pushing 
Hagler to agree to the big- 
money fight for the past three 
and a half months. 

Although Leonard retired in 
1982 because of a detached 
retina, a bout between the two 
is certain to arouse a great deal 
of interest and could have a 
total purse of as much as $15 
million (around £10 million). 
Leonard, the former Olympic 
champion, made a brief return 
to the ring in May of 1 984 with 
a lacklustre victory over 
American Kevin Howard and 
immediately retired again 

Little’s job 

Brian Little, the former 
Aston Villa and England foot- 
baller, has taken over as 
manager of Wolverhampton 
Wanderers after the dismissal 
of Sammy Chapman. 



Aiming hi gh 


Severiano Ballesteros, Greg 
Norman and Bernhard 
Langer, the world's top three 
golfers, will all play io the 
£210,000 Panasonic European 
Open at Sunningdale from 
September 11-14. The three 
will be playing for a £35,000 
top prize. 


Tough test 


Becker: No. 1 seed 

Becker tops 

Boris Becker win be the top 
seed at next month’s West 
German Open following the 
withdrawal of Mats Wilander, 
of Sweden, the world No. 2 It 
will be his first grand prix 
tournament on home . soil 
since winning his first 
Wimbledon title last year. 
Ranked third in the .world, 
Becker, who is based in Monte 
Carlo, has often said he feds 
under intense pressure in 
West Germany, wilander, for 
his part, is planning a two- 
month break from the- game 
after the US Open which starts 
next week. .. 


Twelve regional finalists 
will be able to test their skills 
against four of the country's 
best bowlers — Ron Keating, 
David Cutler, Jerry Bates and 
Daniel Dennison — when the 
last stages of the Croxiey 
Script/EBA Champion of 
Champions bowls tournament 
are contested at Hemel Hemp- 
stead between August 30-31. 
The 12 have qualified from 
among 1600 dub and county 
champions. 


Jack’s back 


Sir Jack Brabham, three 
times the- former grand prix 
world motor radng champion, 
heads the list of celebrities for 
the Birmingham Renault pro- 
am event on bank holiday 
Monday — first-ever saloon 
car race at the new city centre 
track. ■ 


Scotland 
dismay 
at Kiwis’ 



By Paul Martin 


Scotland are now reserving 


their position Oft whether to 
take part in next year's World 
Rugby Cop, in response to the 
reinsta tem ent in the New Zea- 
land team of 18 *TebeT° play- 
ers who toured South Africa 
this year. This follows ex- 
pressions of equal -dismay 
from Ireland, where Harry 
McKibbern, tire repress* 
retire on the International 
Rugby Board, predicted h 
Belfast that a dedsfo on 
whether to withdraw from the 
event would now be a “dose 
run thing”. 

Both countries are nneittho- 
szastic anyway over the con- 
cept of a World Cup, bat hare 
gone along with the overall 
concensus. “We are reserving 
our position as any an km is 
entitled to do,” said BUI 
Coonoo, vice-president of the 
Scottish Rugby Football 
Union. “We agreed to take 
part, but we are at liberty to 
change our minds when some- 
thing untoward happens.** 

Mr Conaon said tint Scot- 
land will press for an explana- 
tion at the IRS's special 
session in London this Octo- 
ber where the “rebel” tour 
issue wiD be “thrashed oot” 
Mr McKibbern said the New 
Zealanders, to forestall pres- 
sure on World Cop participa- 
tion, would “have to come 19 
with a jolly good reason” for 
their actions since the Sooth 
Africa tour Mew op. 

He described the selection 
of so many “rebels” as 
“amazing*' and believed opin- 
ion would row “harden.” He 
said that he had began to 
wonder what control the New 
Zealander board had over 
their players “ and whit 
games (hey are playing at.” 

The New Zealand selectors 
were criticized for taking a 
“myopic view of the need to 
beat AnstraKa” by John Ken* 
daB-Carpenter of England, 
chairman of the World Cop 
Company. He stressed the 

need, though, for participating 

nations to hold back on de- 
risions while New Zealand 
made tether investigations 
into the players* amateur sta- 
tus. * 

The; view is growing in 
Britain 'that the New 
Zealanders* apparent leniency 
towards terse players who 
defied them can ha part be 
explained by the lack of action 
against British players who 
were allegedly paid substan- 
tial sums to don a brand of 
footwear. '“We are a bit 
exposed,*’ Mr Kendall- 
Carpenter punted oot became 
the British rugby authorities 
could not act ou the boots 

affair . 

Nevertheless, South Africa, 
not New Zealand, remains the 
principal villain to world 
ragby administrators. The 
IRB meeting in October wiD 
almost certainly now approve 
measures to expel or suspend* 
member nation. South Africa 
could not, however, be disci- 
plined at tills meeting. As 
matters now stand they conH 
only be dealt with at the next 
animal general nwrtiwg hi 
March 1987, unless yet an- 
other special session is sum- 
moned —and that Mr Comma 
considers most unlikely. 


Australian 

forwards 

criticized 


Tiraarn, New Zealand (Ren- 
ter) — The Australians 
sowed six tries to two to beat 
South Canterbury 33-11 yes- 
terday, bat were Ear from 
impressive against the knriy- 
ranked provincial side. 

The match was marred by 
h a n d lin g errors, offsides and 
missed scoring opportunities 
and the Australians' tries 
came from pressure rather 
titan imagination. Their for- 
ward technique was faulty — 
badly-topped lineout baQ, pow 
racking and frequent scrum 
infringements - causing Greg 
Hand, the Sooth Canterbury 
captain, who scored one of 
their tries, to rate the visitors' 
forward effort as inferior to 
that of Ota^o and Cauterbury, 
their provmcfo] neighbours. 
“And they are nowhere near# 
hard,** Hand said. 

Alan Jones, (be Australitf 
coach, conceded some failings 
in hes second-string team's 
performance, but 
their disopGse in 
conditions.“It was a very un- 
tidy game,” he admitted. 

Australia's next match, the 
10 th of their tour, is against 
New Zealand in the second 
international at Carisbroofe* 
Dunedin, on Saturday. Aus- 
tralia won the first match 13* 
11 

TFAUfraiwfrrtte A Lead K I W3- 
tiww, M Burico, C Moftoft, MCodc 
SJtmw, B Smith; J NdMnwy. g 
gfiSSt « Reynold* (capti, « 
McCaL J Gardner. G Barrow. M 
McSrin, « Murray. South C*^ 

8 CWtao&R C Oargwt. | 
j tortea,.. S tood. P'ftm 

r ~ m>a 





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