Skip to main content

Full text of "The Times , 1986, UK, English"

See other formats




>,4 


Vi 


''■n. 

CS 

"■l 


'"'3. 


■S? 

■m 


■feii. • 

** «?*<!. a 


CVCIINO 

tom i mint 
French 

ar up for 

olorado 


WTc * i i.'i r ... , 


,llv li 
'kfinrf i ^ 

£jt <45 

,fl ‘ V§f* 

^TPMfel* 
['• ln "'ll. fcJ 
* M ihai 

■ :?*>»»; 

ss?a* 

‘■“ i,!V ‘ fcxn,^ 

rft f biijj,. 

! B ^jS 

r «Vfc-» 


f 7 ‘ "' u-cufj 

:T^: ' , • 1*1 !5f IK 

r: ; Efc 
s "« :fci 

1 ^'~S i!i~ 

'> -I 

i *< W-j 
i s .: r » i! iijc. 

• --r-ic iffc'j 
.-.^kkwc'c 


V 


■■■■*.“ *SB 

1 — . ws •iildrese 
•: f* it'i 

... 


i »r>l' .t zca/s 



lit* ;?n &c 


1 

■Ts-Vr. ‘a 




'■ 1 "■ -*■•■ 


Ar 

is 

rampst* grra 

n • > ; 

: •. * 




•arnaMc tee* 

„ 





. :p s 3 

' . „ 


;V» ?-'■ 3 

. 



T 

•_ 



‘ _, ---i ■■ ^2 

Gloucesfi 

atteraf 

lureTi® 

. --.•*** 
■'■‘ ...-SI* 
>■* •• 

• * __•«■?* 
:■ • 


,.<s 

•• •«-*. 

: - V I 

; . \ 

I '■ _ i 

: :\ 7^ 5 : 

. .-»■■•■ 




«:-4» ^ 


l!«rl 

•ki< !‘.«s ,Jl 

' ,r ‘ .. 

4 ’ * *t i* 4 '* 4 *•’ , • » 


.‘. 4 . 

• k T ' • 


l'IJ 


■+ " > -■ 

' -v 


THE 


No 62,542 



TIMES 


FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 





V" 


r i -y : 

■/ : / 
■ ,l *“V 


...t 1 * -v 


system 

ignored 
at Chernobyl 


• The Chernobyl disaster was blamed 
on staff turning off an emer ge ncy 
cooling system daring tests on the 
nuclear power plant's fourth reactor 


• Moscow’s Ambassador in Tendon 
indicated that British farmers will not 
receive direct compensation for their 
losses from the Soviet Union page 5 


i Experts considering the Soviet report 
at a meeting in Vienna described the 
catastrophe as the accident th at 
not have happened 


• A Hong Kong delegation trying to 
stop the bnilding of a Chinese unclear 
plant dose to the colony toiled to meet 
senior leaders in Peking page 5 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


The Soviet nuclear disaster 
at. Chernobyl in April was 
branded yesterday as the ac- 
cident that need not have 
happened. The verdict comes 
from experts examining the 
report prepared by the Soviet 
Union for a meeting next 
week of all member govern- 
ments of the International 
.Atomic Energy Agency in 
Vienna- 

One of the specialists de- 
scribed the report of the 
catastrophe as “the most Sank 
and comprehensive account 
possible under the circum- 
stances. But it is frightening to 
discover the extent to which 
safety systems had been re- 
moved and safely procedures 
breached for the purpose of 
conducting an experiment-” 

Yet an over-riding question 
remains. British scientists are 
completely baffled as to why 
their Soviet counterparts 
wanted to conduct the experi- 
ment that led to disaster. 

Apart from the fact that 
there was no need to try it out 
at a working nuclear power 
station, they can see “no 
reason, purpose or value in the 
experiment at all”. 

* It will certainly be among 
the issues raised in Vienna by 
the British team, which in- 
cludes advisers to the Depart- 
ment of Energy. Atomic 
Energy Authority, the Central 
Electricity Generating Board, 
and the National Radiological 
Protection Board. 

But the chain of events 
which ensued nteo revealed a ' 
fundamental flaw in the de- 
sign of the RBMK type of 
reactor. The accident hap- 
pened when the reactor devel-. 
oped a head of steam that 


caused fuel elements to burst. 

A subsequent effect was the 
release of hydrogen, caused by 
a chemical reaction between 
hot zirconium and steam, and 
followed by the burning for 
several days of the graphite 
part of the core. 

But it was the steam explo- 
sion that triggered the disas t er , 
and is the cause of design 
changes proposed. 

Behind the event lies a 
peculiar characteristic of this 

UK farmers ruled out 5 
Plant dismantled 5 
Peking failure 5 

Leading article 11 

design and known as the 
positive void coefficient. 

The remedy wfl] be to 
modify the control rods and to 
use fuel that is more highly 
enriched: going from 2 per 
cent content of uranium-235 
to 2.5 per cent. One of the 
CEGB experts said there 
should be no difficulty making 
the change, but it would be 
expensive. 

The flaw would not have 
been exposed if the scientists 
at Chernobyl had not con- 


ducted their extraordinary 
experiment. It was a relatively 
simple idea. The test was to 
discover if a turbine, tem- 
porarily disconnected from 
the steam supply that was 
driving it. had enough energy 
left as it was running down to 
generate sufficient electricity 
to keep the auxiliary services 
of the reactor working. 

To try the idea, the manager 
of the plant allowed the power 
of the reactor to drop and then 
safety systems to be switched 
off. an emergency cooling 
water supply shutdown and 
control rods removed. 

Operators tried to keep the 
reactor running by manual 
means instead of using the 
appropriate automatic sys- 
tems. The deliberate removal 
of the safety and emergency 
systems meant there were no 
normal monitors to show 
early signs of a dangerous rise 
in the temperature in the 
reactor, leading to a runaway 
explosion. 

Then signals from the re- 
actor that would have promp- 
ted a shutdown if the 
automatic systems were in 
place were ignored. 


Moscow lists six 
nuclear errors 

JFrent A Correspondent, Moscow 
TheUbernobyrnucfcar ac-' fences, mid VeT the reactor's 


Tomorrow 


The big 
one 


DLQCQEIB 


The Times Jumbo 
crossword for the 
bank holiday 

A question 
of reputation 



How much weight 
should be given to 
Count Nikolai 
Tolstoy’s allegations 
against Harold 
Macmillan? 



• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
won yesterday by Mrs 
LR.Woodbine of 
London, S.W.8. Details, 
page 3. 

• Portfolio list page 
21; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 16. 

• Tomorrow, £12,000 
can be won - £8,000 in 
the weekly 

competition and £4,000 
in the daily. 


OU degrees 

Degrees awarded by the Open 
University. London and south 
west regions, are published 
today Page 27 


Home News 2-4 
Overseas 5-7 
App» 18 
Arts 12.13 
Birthsjieaths. 
mirages 14 
Bridge 1 + 
Business 17-21 
Chess 2 

Comt 14 
Crosswords 8.16 
Diarj 10 


8-JO 
II 
II 
14 
26 
14 

270032 
31 

TV & Radio 31 
Labs 1437 
Weather 16 
Wills 14 


Features 

Leaders 

Letters 

Obthnry 

Motoring 

Science 


****** 


cident had occurred mainly 
because staff had turned off an 
emergency cooling system 
daring tests on the station's' 
fourth reactor. Soviet nuclear 
energy officials said yesterday. 

They said the death toll 
from the April 26 accident in 
the Ukraine had risen to 31, 
and more than 200 people 
were suffering from acute 
exposure to radiation. 

Mr Yuri brad, head of the 
State Committee on Hydro- 
meteorology and Environ- 
mental Control said 135.000 
people, including 45,000 chil- 
dren. had been evacuated 
from areas around CbernobyL 

The officials were speaking 
at a press conference devoted 
to a government report on the 
accident to be presented to the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. 

Mr Andronik Petrosyan ts, 
head of the State Committee 
for the Use of Atomic Energy, 
condemned as “highly irreg- 
ular” the tests by Chernobyl 
staff to see how long power 
could be maintained after 
switching over to a diesel 
generator. 

“The fourth unit was 
functioning for almost 12 
hours with the (emergency) 
cooling system turned off, and 
that is against ail regulations.” 
he said. 

Mr Valery Legasov, a senior 
official at the Academy of 
Sciences, described this error 
as the most serious of the six 
that the staff committed. 

He said staff let radioactiv- 
ity levels in the reactor core 
drop, thus weakening its de- 


opacity foil below levels 
needed to conduct the tests. 

They also overloaded the 
main circulation pumps and 
cut automatic blocking de- 
vices. 

Finally, the staff turned off 
mechanisms protecting water 
levels and steam pressure. 

These five errors were seri- 
ous, Mr Legasov said, but the 
accident could have been con- 
tained if only staff had not 
switched off the emergency 
cooling system. • 

Mr Petrosyants said two 
people were killed in the 
accident and 29 more died 
later from exposure to radi- 
ation. The previous official 
death toll was 28. 

Mr Leonid Ilyin, vice-presi- 
dent of the Academy of Medi- 
cal Sciences, said 203 people 
had radiation sickness, 22 of 
them very acutely. 



Lonrho 
takeover 
move on 
Today 

By Michael McCarthy 

Lorntio, Mr Roland “Tiny* 1 
Rowland's international trad- 
ing company which owns The 
Observer, was believed last 
night to have gained a control- 
ling interest in Today, the 
daily newspaper launched this 
year by Mr Eddy Shah. 

It is the beginning of the end 
of Mr Shah's bold attempt to 
be the mould-breaker of Fleet 
Street as the first national 
proprietor to dispense with 
traditional priming unions 
and embrace new technology. 

Mr Shah, who is on holiday 
in Europe, win remain as 
chairman of Today for the 
time being, but sources on the 
paper indicated that be will 
review the position when he 
returns. He has reduced his 
slake in the troubled publica- 
tion from 51 per cent to less 
than 25 per cent to avoid his 
purchase of a local newspaper 
group in Warrington, made 
yesterday, being automatically 
referred to the Monopolies 
Commission. 

Mr Shah's Messenger 
Group has taken over the rival 
Warrington Guardian group 
of 13 free and paid-for news- 
papers in a £5.3 milli on cash 
deal. 

Mr Shah is understood to 
have disposed ofhis unwanted 
shares in News UK, Today * s 
parent company, over the past 
few days. He had said that it 
would be “the logical course” 
to dispose of them to Lonrho, 
who in June rescued Today 
from the brink of collapse by 
taking a 36 per cent stake in 
the newspaper and provided a 
vital injection of£13.5 million. 

Although Mr Shah has 
avoided the Monopolies 
Commission, a takeover of 
Today by Lonrho would auto* 
mati tally he referred. It would 



On top of the world: Ian Botham, recalled to the England 
Test team, celebrates with a new world wicket-taking record 



Mr Shahj clinched new re- 
gional dead, 
be the second time Mr Row- 
land has been subject to such 
scrutiny, as his takeover of 
The Observer from the US oil 
company Atlantic Richfield 
was subject to a long inquiry 
by the commission in 198L 
Lomto's presence in and 
influence on Today have been 
increasing since the company 
appointed its own managing 
director, MrTeny Cassidy, to 
liy to get the newspaper out of 
the increasingly deep financial 
trouble. 

Mr Cassidy is thought to be 
planning an autumn relaunch. 
But if Lonrho gained full 
control a question mark must 
hang over the future of 


ana 

Today's editor, Mr Brian Mac* 
Arthur, 

Mr Shah clinched his own 
takeover deal in Warrington 
yesterday. 

He gained the Warrington 
Guardian group in the face of 
a rival bid from the northern 
subsidiary of Read Inter- 
national. 

Last night, Mr Cassidy, 
managing director of Today, 
refused to confirm or deny 
that Lonrho now bad a 
controlling stake in the paper. 
He said: “Mr Shah will be 
making an announcement 
about his shareholding tomor- 
row and I suggest you wait for 
that.” 


Botham in 
record 
comeback 

By John Goodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 

Ian Botham yesterday pro- 
duced the cricketing come- 
back of the year. The Somerset 
all-rounder, recalled to the 
England team for the third 
Test against New Zealand, 
captured three wickets to set a 
world xecpKlpf 357 wickets in 
Test matches. 

Botham, who was banned 
on May 29 for two months 
from all international and 
first-class cricket after admit- 
ting he had smoked cannabis, 
had taken three for 36 when 
play ended at 142 for four 
because of rain. 

Botham, mercurial and 
controversial, had Bruce Ed- 
gar caught by Graham Gooch 
with the first ball of Ms first 
over to the delight of support- 
ers, who had held up placards 
outside the Oval before play 
started to hail Botham's re- 
turn for his first Test of the 
summer. 

He then trapped Jeff Crowe 
leg before with the last ball of 
his second over to overtake 
the world Test record of 
Dennis Lillee, the Australian 
fost bowler, of 355 wickets. 
Botham's figures then were 
two wickets for eight runs and 
he went on to have Jeremy 
Coney caught by Gooch. 

Botham's performance 
came amidst new controversy 
with The Sun suing the Test 
and County Cricket Board 
because Botham has been 
banned from writing articles 
for the newspaper on this 
winter’s tour of Australia. 

Sport, pages 27—30, 32. 


‘Stockton’ 

editor 

resigns 

By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

Mr Harry Phibbs. editor of 
the Tory' student magazine 
that accused Lord Stockton of 
being a war criminal, resigned 
yesterday. 

He also apologized un- 
reservedly to Mr Normas 
TebbiL the party chairman, 
and undertook to retrieve and 


Diary 


10 


hand over to Central Office as 
many as possible of the 1.800 
copies of New Agenda 
distributed. 

In return. Central Office 
agreed to drop writs for libel, 
misrepresentation and breach 
of contract against Mr Phibbs 
and Armagh Graphical, of 
Ilford in Essex, the magazine's 
printers. 

The agreement follows Mr 
Tebbit's angry denunciation 
of an interview by Mr Phibbs, 
published in the quarterly 
magazine bearing the Conser- 
vative Party imprint, in which 
Count Nikolai Tolstoy, the 
historian, repeated his allega- 
tion that the then Mr Harold 
Macmillan was responsible in 
1945 for sending bock 40,000 
Cossacks to certain death at 
the hands of Stalin. 

Mr Phibbs. aged 20, said in 
a statement: “While I stand by 
my personal position on the 
substance of the Tolstoy inter- 
view, 1 recognize that it was 
wrong to include the inter- 
view, without permission, in 
an official party publication 

Continued on page 16, col 8 


Britain resists base rate 
cut to protect sterling 


Football ban follows police report 

By John Goodbody, Sports News Correspondent 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

National Institute for Eco- 
nomic and Social Research, 
fell by nearly a cent to 


Mark Falco. the Tottenham 
Hotspur forward, has been 
banned for two matches and 
fined £1.500 after being re- 
ported to the Football Associ- 
ation (FA). in an 
unprecedented action by the 
police, for making inflam- 
matory gestures at Aston Villa 
supporters. 

A police inspector even 
considered arresting Falco to 
charge him with a criminal 


offence when he celebrated 
two goals in Tottenham's 4-2 
victory on May 3 by putting 
three fingers up after the third 
goal and four fingers after his 
Fourth. 

Mr Glen Kirton, an FA 
official, said: " The Villa 
supporters reacted by throw- 
ing coins and trying to get 
onto the pilch. It could have 
been a serious incident and 
the police were concerned.” 


The fine on Falco is the 
biggest ever imposed on a 
player found guilty of this 
charge. He has admitted the 
offence but will appeal against 
the sentence next Thursday. 

• Dave Watson, the England 
international was yesterday 
tranfeired to Everton from 
Norwich City for a fee be- 
lieved to be£l million. 

Report, Page 32 


The Bank of England, con- 
cerned about die pound's 
vulnerability on the foreign 
exchanges, said no to cheaper 
money yesterday. 

There were hopes in the 
London money market that 
the Bank would ' permit an 
early cut in base rates, now 10 
per cent, after the reduction in 
United States interest rates 
late on Wednesday. . 

But the Bank, through its 
money market dealing opera- 
tions, signalled that it was not 
yet ready for a rate cut. And 
the official caution appeared 
to be justified by the pound’s 
performance. 

Sterling, hit by the gloomy 
economic forecast from the 


$1.4955, and by nearly three 
pfennigs to DM3.0568. 

Other central banks also 
declined to cut their discount 
rales. 

Central bank officials in 
Tokyo and Bonn indicated 
that they would be cautious 
about rate cuts in spite of the 
continuing rise of the yen and 
the mark against the dollar. 

But lower rates could come 
in Germany. Japan and Brit- 
ain next month, in ihe run-up 
to the annual meetings of the 
International Monetary Fund 
Hopes dampened, page 17 
Comment, page 19 


Tax reforms by 
Alliance hit 
the well-to-do 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Drivers get breathalysed without fear of arrest 




. By Thomson Prentice 

Science Correspondent 

Police are offering motorists 
the chance to take a breath test 
without the risk of arrest. 

In a experiment which be- 
gan in London this week, one 
volunteer in three has been 
over the legal limit. 

The volunteers are likely to 
be at a safe distance from their 
cars when tested. A mobile 
police unit in the St 
Katharine's Dock complex, 
near Tower Bridge, yesterday- 
invited lunchtime drinkets to 
sample the breathalyser. 

“Quite a few people have 


been surprised to find that 
they foiled the test They' 
thought they were below the 
limit.” Sergeant Dennis Mann 
said. 

“We are trying to help 
people understand more 
about how alcohol affects 
them, and to encourage them 
to think twice about drinking 
and driving.” 

One man who had four 
pints of beer passed the test 
while his companion, who had 
drunk only half as much, 
failed. 

Police Constable Stuart 
Fairclough said:“An 


individual's physical build, 
weight and general health can 
account for the different 
results.” 

The experiment is being 
confined to three London 
boroughs — Tower Hamlets, 
Hackney and Newham - but 
may be extended by the 
Metropolitan Police after its 
six-week ran. 

The police team, from the 
traffic department at Bow, 
east London, have been offer- 
ing the tests to lunchtime 
commuters near underground 
stations and public houses and 
restaurants. 


There were more than 
10 1.000 convictions related to 
drinking and driving in Brit- 
ain in 1984. and over 1.000 
people a year are killed as a 
result of drinking and driving. 

Volunteers, whose identi- 
ties are not sought, are asked 
to complete a questionnaire 
on how much they have had to 
drink in the previous few 
hours. 


They are then offered a 
pamphlet containing feels 
about the effects of alcohol on 
performance, the alcoholic 
content of different drinks. 


and the way in which alcohol 
levels are calculated. 

Woman Police Constable 
Rita Daw said:“We have car- 
ried out about 100 tests so for, 
with about a third of them 
producing failures. 

“Many people seem glad of 
the chance to see for them- 
selves whether they are over 
the legal limit for drinking and 
driving.” 

Sgt Mann said: “We aren’t 
looking for convictions. We're 
simply trying to remind peo- 
ple of the risks to themselves 
and others if they drink and 
drive.” 


The Alliance yesterday don- 
ned its hairshiri as it unveiled 
a radical package of tax and 
benefits reforms that would 
hit Cxmilies earning above 
£10,000 a year- the bedrock of 
its predominantly middle 
class support - to pay for big 
increases for the unemployed 
and low earners. 

Families with one bread- 
winner and two children 
grossing £30.000 a year would 
be about £1.250 out of pocket 
a year, though the changes 
sought in the scheme to tackle 
poverty would not be im- 
plemented all at once. 

The poor would gain hand- 
somely with, for instance, 
jobless couples with two chil- 
dren picking up an extra £700 
a year. That would jump to 
nearly £1.000 a year for the 
same family with one member 
earning £7.000 a year. 

The plan, the “biggest pro- 
posed redistribution to the 
poor put forward by any 
party”, is set out in an SDP 
policy paper fleshing out 
commitments given in the 
Alliance document A Partner- 
ship for Progress. 

It proposes merging the tax 
and benefits system, replacing 
family income supplement 
and supplementary benefit 
with a single “basic benefit”, 
abolishing national insurance 
contributions by employees, 
scrapping the married man's 
allowance and introducing 
separate taxation for married 
women and a £4.50 a week rise 
in child benefit, while making 
it taxable on the income of the 
caring parent, usually the 
mother. 

Weekly pensions would be 
raised to £41 for a single 
person and £63.25 for a cou- 
ple. lopped up by basic benefit 
of £3.70 or £5.75 and their 


scope extended lo nearly 
everyone over retirement age. 

Yesterday party leaders ac- 
cepted they are relying on the 
“altruism of Mr Above 
Average” to fund the drive 
against poverty, which, they 
say. has been carefully con- 
structed to devote cash to 
those most in need, without 
adding to public sector 
borrowing. 

Mr Dick Taveroe. chairman 
of the SDP taxation reform 
and benefits working party, 
said: “If you want money for 


Details 

Leading article 


11 


such reform to deal with 
poverty, you have got to start 
asking for some sacrifice from 
people who are not that much 
above the average." 

The SDP also said that its 
plan to bring the tax and 
benefits system together, 
through much greater co- 
operation between the Inland 
Revenue and the Department 
of Health and Social Security, 
and possibly a merger, would 
mean fewer bureaucrats and 
administrative savings. 

Under their proposals em- 
ployed and the unemployed 
would be entitled to the basic 
benefit. Thai would be 
progressively withdrawn from 
people in work as their in- 
comes rose. 

The party estimates that the 
extra cost to the Exchequer of 
£3.2 billion will be covered by 
the extra taxes on income plus 
about £500 million from 
changes in capital transfer tax. 

It proposes a personal tax 
allowance of £2,100 lor all to 
be paid as £799 per head to be 
set against tax. 


High security after 
jailbreak attempt 

By Michael McCarthy 

at his disposal, had alreadv 
made one attempt to break out 
of jail in London while await- 
ing his extradition hearing. 

On the night of May 1-2 he 
attempted to saw through the 
bars of his cell at Penionviile 
prison with a saw that had 
been smuggled into him. It is 
understood he had made 
considerable progress when he 
was discovered by prison 
officers, 

Mr Cornwell was being held 
in the remand wing of the 
prison where security is less 
strict; remand prisoners are 
allowed to have food brought 
in from the outside and “to 
wear their own clothes. 

Last night the Home Office 
confirmed that he had tried to 
escape. Mr Cornwell has been 
on the run from Australian 
police for 10 years. 

The Cornwell cose, page 3 


A narrowly foiled escape 
attempt was the reason for the 
unprecedented security which 
surrounded the extradition to 
Australia on Wednesday night 
of Mr Robert Cornwell, alleg- 
edly the leader of that 
country's biggest drugs gang. 

Mr Cornwell arrived in 
Ausrralia early today, having 
made the journey in a Royal 
Australian Air Force aircraft 
normally used for transport- 
ing VIPs, including the Prime 
Minister. Mr Bob Hawke. 

He had been flown out of- 
Wormwood Scrubs prison in 
London by helicopter and 
taken directly to the RAF base 
at Brize Norton in Oxford- 
shire, where the RAAF air- 
craft was waiting for him. 

Such measures were consid- 
ered necessary because Mr 
Cornwell, said to be a ruthless 
criminal with unlimited funds 



VC 





11W1V1C, INC, WO 


THE T1M£S FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


Police chief 
may have 
his future 


settled today 


By Peter Davenport 

The immediate future of Mr wanted the affair settled at the 
John Stalker, the suspended meeting, with Mr Stalker be- 


depury chief constable of ing seal back to work as 
Greater Manchester, may be quickly as possible. 


decided today. 


M I don't believe he has been 


Members of the Greater devious in any way. At the 
Manchester Police Authority very most he has been a bit 

h M h mmi* fA itAn^idav tha .«!.>« 1 ’ 


are to meet to consider the naive.' 


report by Mr Colin Sampson, But others on the authority 


Chief Constable ofWest York- back Mr Sampson in the belief 
shire, which recommends that that the only impartial way of 


Mr Stalker should face disci- 
plinary proceedings on 10 
counts. 

They have been told that 
they have three options: to 
take no action and effectively 
reinstate Mr Stalker, to disa- 
pline him themselves, or to 
agree to an independent disci- 
plinary tribunal 

Last night there were indica- 
tions that some influential 
members of the authority were 
ready to reject that central 
recommendation, with some 
wanting to send Mr Stalker 
back to work immediately 
with a stiff rebuke. 

Labour councillors, who 
hold a majority on the author- 
ity. may form an alliance with 
magistrates in the shared be- 
lief that Mr Stalker has already 
suffered enough. 

Mr Tony McCardelL La- 
bour chairman of the auth- 
ority's policy committee, said: 
"I think there is enough for us 
to go on in this report to make 
a decision tomorrow.** 

Mrs Audrey- Walsh, chair- 
man of the magistrates' group 
on the authority, said she 



Ministers want early 
end to deaths inquiry 


resolving the issue to ev- 
eryone's satisfaction is for it to 
be aired before an indepen- 
dent tribunal. 

There is a growing feeling 
among some dose to the case, 
however, that any finding < 
which amounts to a verdict of 
"guilty" against Mr Stalker 
would make his position as 
deputy chief constable un- 
tenable with such a question 
mark over his judgement. 

Mr Stalker's lawyers have 
appealed for him to be allowed 

S.fhfeSe t iX^2 S rc£ Mr Faezali (right) being consoled by i Mend yesterday. 

Officials ofthe authority say T^*-.**— 1, T-, 

that such a move would be a ITzIIIIHTI 1)011111 CO 

breach of statutory proce- AJ. M il ■>!■■ ■ UU1UD VU 

voiem it. emberS By Nicholas Beeston and Stewart! 

The allegations against Mr Scotland Yard confirmed mourners, who placed flowers 
Stalker fall into two categories yesterday, that an explosion near where his fatally 
discreditable conduct in rela- which killed an Iranian and wounded son, a student at 
tion to his long friendship injured 12 others in a Ken- North London Polytechnic 
with a wealthy Manchester sington High Street shop was who was working at the shop, 
businessman. Mr Kevin Tay- caused by a bomb, but detec- was dragged out of the rubble, 
lor, and disobeying orders in lives have not decided Men and women wept as 

’ : whether it was planted or Mr Fazeli. dressed in black, 

being manufactured. bugging friends and col- 

Mr Reza Fazeli, the shop leagues, who threw flowers 
owner who returned from over him as a sign of 
Paris on Wednesday, said moumingMr Eazdi, a former 
yesterday that the the bomb film actor in Iran who fled to 
could only have been intended Britain during the revolution 


Iranian bomb confirmed 


where 


which killed an Iranian and wounded son, a student at 
injured 12 others in a Ken- North London Polytechnic 


businessman, Mr Kevin Tay- 
lor, and disobeying orders in 
relation to the alleged misuse 
of police vehicles. 

Mr Stalker has always pro-: 
tested his innocence 


Men and women wept as 
Mr Fazeli dressed in black, 
hugging friends and col- 
leagues, who threw flowers 
over him as a sign of 
moumingMr Fazeli, a former 
film actor in Iran who fled to 
Britain during the revolution 


as an attack by supporters of seven years ago. said there was 
the Khomeini regime. His no question of retaliating. 


Government ministers 
want an early completion of 
the controversial investiga- 
tion into allegations that the 
RUC operated a "shool-to- 
kilT policy now that the 
confidential report on Mr 
John Stalker, deputy chief 
constable of Greater Manches- 
ter, has been completed by his 
successor as head of the 


inquiry. 

The Government is anxious 
that Mr Colin Sampson, Chief 
Constable of West Yorkshire, 
should finish the report and, if 
required, that legal proceed- 
ings should be stalled. 

Officials recognize the dam- 
age that the controversy over 
the removal of Mr Stalker 
from the inquiry has done and 
accept that it will be difficult, 
if not impossible, for them to 
counter the claims that his 
removal will somehow lessen 
the authority of the report. 

The Director of Public 
Prosecutions in Northern Ire- 
land, Sir Barry Shaw, has the 
interim report which was 
completed before Mr Stalker 
was removed from the inquiry 
into six killings in the prov- 
ince. He is considering 
whether charges should be 
brought against anyone arising 
out of the shootings in the 
autumn ofl982. 

RUC officers are pleased 
that the Mr Sampson’s report 


By Richard Ford 

nisters on Mr Stalker apparently says 
stion of there was no connection be- 
vestiga- tween the claims made in 
that the Manchester and Mr Stalker’s 
iool-to- investigation into the killings 
iat the in Co Armagh. 
on ^ Northern Ireland sources 
1 chief see the report as a vindication 
anches- 0 f their insistence that the 
d by ms government security agencies 
of the and the RUC had nothing to 
do with the removal of Mr 
Stalker from the inquiry. 

While Mr Stalker was 
r™T7f- conducting his inquiry it was 
clear in Northern Ireland that 
roceefl " some RUC officers were hos- 
a,™ tifo to him and critical of His 
wow? methods and ability. 

Stalker He vm criticized privately 
me and for not understanding the 
[ifljcjjh pressure and scale of the 
them to terrorist threat facing the 
hat his RUC and the means by which 
t lessen subversive organizations had 
jorL to be countered- 
Public The Stalker-Sampson in- 
em Ire- quay is into three shootings in 
has the which five unarmed terrorists 
h was and a nationalist youth died 
Stalker within a matter of weeks in 
inquiry November and December 
e prov- 1982. 

ridering RUC officers were cleared 
old be of murder in later court cases, 
i arising but during the hearings it 
in the emerged that in two of the 
shootings officers had lied to 
pleased conceal details leading to the 
s report shootings. 


shop is a centre for propa- 
ganda against the Khomeini 
regime. 

Mr Fazeli was greeted by 
more than 100 anti-Khomeini 


Mr Fazeli said that he had 
become a potential target after 
the release of his satirical 
video The Mullah’s Show, 
which ridiculed Ayatollah 


Staff in 
‘threats’ 
walkout 


Strike pay Vent 
to the Militants’ 


Protesters 
claim legal 
loophole 


Fleming 

awaits 

decision 


Protesters at a proposed 
nuclear-waste dump at 
Fulbeck airfield, Lincolnshire, 
believe they have discovered a 
legal loophole which could 
halt the plans. 

The pressure group, 
Lincolnshire and Not- 
tinghamshire Against Nuclear 
Dumping, says that legal 
precedent set in the Critcfaell 
Down case thirty years ago 
means that local farmers must 
be given the chance to buy the 
land if the owner, the Ministry 


Mr John Robert Fleming 
was last night in a Miami 
detention centre waiting for 
immigration authorities to de- 
cide if he will be sent to 
England. 

He is wanted for question- 
ing by British authorities in 
connection with the £26 mil- 
lion Brinks Mat gold bullion 
robbery in 1983. 

Mr Fleming arrived in Mi- 
ami on Wednesday from 
Costa Rica and was detained 
by immigration agents who 


of Defence, chooses to change 1. ruled he would not be allowed 


its use. 

Nirex, the Government 
nuclear-waste agency, does 
not have the power for com- 
pulsory purchase of the land. 
Therefore, if the fanners chose 
to buy the airfield they could 
block proposals for a nuclear 
plant, they believe. 

Nirex is to send a delegation 
to Fulbeck next week to 
discuss the legal question. 

The 600-acre site was com- 
pulsorily-purchased by the 
ministry from local farmers in 
1942 for use as a wartime 
airfield. 

Under the terms of the j 
agreement, before any change 


into the United States. 

An immigration depart- 
ment spokesman said he 
would be brought before an 
immigration judge within the 
next three days. 

On the flight from Costa 
Rica. Mr Fleming said he 
feared the United States and 
British officials were intend- 
ing to send him back to 
Britain. 

“I really don’t want to go to 
England at the moment , he 
said Mr Fleming mentioned 
several countries including 
Panama, Morocco, Malta and 


By Richard Ford 

More than 2,000 Depart- 
ment of Health and Social 
Security staff in Northern 
Ireland stopped work yes- 
terday in support of Roman 
Catholic and Protestant col- 
leagues who have received 
threats from paramilitary 
organizations. 

The spontaneous action af- 
fected np to twenty DHSS 
offices as concern grew among 
Civfl Service anions at the 
increase in telephone threats 
from people claiming to repre- 
sent the Provisional ERA and 
Ulster Freedom Fighters. 

Offices in Greater Belfast, 
Antrim, Newry and Newtown- 
abbey dosed for most of the 
afternoon, while 1,000 staff 
walked ont at DHSS head- 
quarters in Belfast 

A few utiles away in 
Lisburn, Co Antrim, the 
DHSS office was dosed all 
day after a telephone threat to 
a Roman Catholic employee 
on Wednesday. 

About 120 staff threatened : 
to stay ont until the Ulster: 
Freedom Fighters withdrew a ! 
warning to Roman Catholics 
to leave the office. At a 
housing executive office near 
by, staff returned to work after 
a brief walk-out 

Protestant and Roman 
Catholic dustmen employed by 
Lisburn council were refusing 
to collect rubbish from the 
nationalist Poleglass Estate, 
on the outskirts of west Bel- 
fast, after drivers were threat- 
ened by Roman Catholics 
wielding burling sticks. 

The Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary was investigate s farther 
allegations that Roman Catho- 
lics working for the bousing 
executive in Kflkeel, Co Down, 
had received a telephone 
threat from the Ulster Volun- 
teer Force: 

Despite serious concern at 
the scale of intimidation, there 
is a suspicion that some of the 
threats may be "copycat" 
activity. 

Mr Rhodes Boy son, Min- 
ister of State, Northern Ire-' 
land Office, said that while the 
walkout might be playing into 
foe hands of those making the 
threats, it showed that work- 
ers were standing together. 

Mr Jim McCesker, general 
secretary of the Northern 
Ireland Public Service Alli- 


— By Mark Dowd 

Strike pay, possibly accoun 
amounting to several thou- and Cc 
sand pounds, hag. been used to martyr 
line the coffers of Militant accural 
organizations, according to entire!) 
leaders of the Gvil and Public cash be 
Services Association (CPSA). The 
Whitehall’s biggest trade acting 
union, already the subject of a John E 
ballot-rigging inquiry by the into all 
Electoral Reform Society, has ing the 
been plunged into further John A 
controversy by repents that its of Mill 
treasurer, Mr John Raywood, Mr 
has been commissioned to “These 
investigate allegations of the true. H 
misuse of strike funds during that ai 
the six-month dispute at the been si] 
DHSS office in Newcastle “At i 
upon Tyne in 1984-85. proof tl 

Almost £1 million was alio- its way 
rated by the union's London The 
headquarters for strike pay CPSA's 
and a hardship fund during a in New 
dispute which wrought havoc said: “I 
with the DHSS computers. reports. 

A report presented to the cerned, 
CPSA's national executive on funds t 
Tuesday by the union’s main Mffitan 


proof that only £96 has found 
its way into Militant funds? 

The chairman of the 
CPSA's central office branch 
in Newcastle, Mr Barry Fuge, 
sai± “I am astonished at these 
reports. Asfar as Tm con- 
cerned, not a penny of branch 
funds has been paid to any 
MiKtant groups.” 


Reforming 
SDP hits 
hardest at 
well-off 


World Chess Championship 


By JiB Sherman 

The Social Democratic 
Party's proposals, announced 
yesterday, for tax and social 
service reforms would strike 
hardest at high earners hot 
even those on the national 
average income of £8390 
would stand to lose. 

The scheme, designed to j 
help the poor by redistributing 
Britain's wealth, goes same 1 
way to alleviate problems 
faced by single parent fam- 
ilies, pensioners and those on 
state benefit. But a married 
man with no chfldren an an 
average salary will gain noth- 
ing. In fact, such a man, 
earning £150 a week, would 
lose £5 a week. 

Those earning £10,000 a year 
would lose £257 a year and a 
couple earning £15,000 stand 
to lose £43X68 a year.Tbose in 
the higher income brackets 
wiD lose the mast. 


Draw regarded as 
psychological 
Kasparov ‘victory’ 


ByR*yniaiMlKee^C^essCoiTesjH»deM 
Gaiy Kasparov, the world Grandmaster Jonathan 


chess champion, easily neu- Sped man. who had predicted 
iralized Karpov's pressure in a draw early on in the game. 


the ninth game ofthe World 
Chess Championship at the 


said: “Karpov was forced to 
repeat moves , and Kasparov 


Park Lane Hotel, central Lon- also repeated moves to try and 


don, on Wednesday night 

Karpov, playing White, 
moved quiday at the start of 
the game with some dear idea 
of strategy. 

Bui Kasparov resorted once 
more to the Grilnfeld Defence 
- a favourite ploy which had 
brought him simple draws in 

games one and three, but 
which led to disaster in game 
five. 

The main improvement for 
Kasparov's side came on 
move 7 when the champion 
captured a pawn. Karpov 


consolidate his game against 
the time limit.” 

The score is now Kasparov 
five points, Karpov . four. 

The last 12 games will be in 
Leningrad. 


The moves: 


A childless couple earaisM 
15,000 a year will get £780 


continued to play quickly and 
confidently as if this innova- 
tion was no surprise to him. 

But on move IS Kasparov 
produced an excellent move 


£25,000 a year will get £780 
less. A couple with two chfl- 


Whrfa Black 
Id* Nffi 
2e* rf " ‘ 

3 Nc3 o5 

4 Btt &7 

5 83 CS 

6 dxc5 085 

7 Rcl dxci 

8 Bxc4 WM 

9 M3 Qxc5 
ID Bb3 NcS 


tow aw 

ri (MM QbS 
12D3 as 
13W4 8d? 

14 Qe2 fart 

15 van e6. 

16 8d2 QbS 
17RW1 Bc6 
l8Be3 085 
19852 QbS 
2D Bb 3 0a5 

Draw agreed 


dren and one partner earning I5„.e6, which stopped Karpov 
£200 a week gains £3.94 a dead in his tracks. 


By Nicholas Beeston and Stewart Tendler 

Scotland Yard confirmed mourners, who placed flowers Khomeini. “The penalty for 
yesterday , that an explosion near where his fatally seeing one of these videos in 


seeing one of these videos in 
Iran is death.” 


The Iranian embassy re- 
peated a claim that Bijan had 
been planning to plant a 
device in the Iranian con- 
sulate near by, but had blown 
himself up by mistake. 

“If a terrorist had wanted to 
plant a bomb at the shop he 
would have placed it outside^ 
so why did it go off in the 
shop's basement” 

Yesterday afternoon bomb 
squad police sealed off Lower 
Regent Street after staff at the 
Iraqi Airways office reported a 
suspicious package in the post 
but it contained no explosives. 


accountants. Hard Dowdy 
and Co, said: “We discovered 
many i items which were in- 
accurately recorded in, or 
entirely omitted from, the 
cash book kept at Newcastle”. 

The union now has an 
acting general secretary, Mr 
John Ellis, pending an inquiry 
into alleged malpractices dur- 
ing the election in July of Mr 
John Macreadfo a supporter 
of Militant 

Mr Ellis said yesterday: 
“These reports are largely 
true. However, the suggestion 
that almost £1 million has 
been siphoned off is nonsense. 

“At the moment, we have 


week, and a couple earning 
£100 a week woald gain 
£1254. 

The losers are mainly 
penalised by the abolition of 
die married man’s allowance 
which the SDP estimates will 
save nearly £5 billion a year. 
Those savings are reduced to 
£3-2bn by the affects of 
integrating national insurance 
and the new combined £2,100 
allowance. 

Overall the party estimates 
the proposals will cost about 
£500m to implementThe 
lower paid stand to win from 
increased child benefit, which 
will go op to £11-50 from the 
present £7. 

However, the new benefit 
wjU be taxable as part of the 
income of the caring parent 
Where there are two earners 
the increase wiD be cancelled 
out 

An unemployed couple with 
two chil dren wiD gain £14.05 a 
week. The party also suggests 
replacing family credit and 
income support with a baste 
benefit eligible for both those 
in and out iff work, withdraw- 
able as income risesJSingle 
adults would get £32 and 
couples £52 a week. 

The curren t bask supple- 
mentary benefit rate is £29.80 
for one person and £4840 for a 
couple. Those on long term 
rates; die sick, the disabled 
and single parents get£37i90 
and £6Qj65 for acoople. . ■1 

Payments for children at j 
present depend on the age iff ! 
the chikL A family with a child | 
under 10 gets £10.20 while for 
a child of 16 die payment rises 
to £18.80. 

The repent suggests that baric 
pension rates go up £230 for a 
single pensioner to £41 and np 
£1 JO fora couple to £63.25. It 
also proposes a personal de- 
ment of £3.70 for a single 
pensioner and £5.75 for a 
couple, withdrawable against 
other income. 

The present contributions 
requirement for pensioners 
would be replaced by a res- 
idence test 


Thereafter, White (Karpov) 
coukl make no progress at all 
and had to settle for a sterile 
pursuit of the Black Queen 


Six grandmasters 
in bank contest 

With 184 players, the 
Lloyds Bank tournament be- 
ing held in the Great Eastern 
Hotel in London is more 
popular than ever and stron- 
ger because it contains six 


with his Bishop. A draw was grandmasters and 28 inter- 


agreed on move 20. national masters (Harry Gol- 

Experts regard this easy half ombek writes). 


point as a psychological vic- 
tory for Kasparov, who now 
plays with the advantageous 
White pieces in game 10- 

slags W 

OlAlIiJP-il 


The grandmasters did well 
in the first round. Chandler 
beat Ravi, of India, in an 
effective style. Hjararson, the 
winner ofthe Commonwealth 
tournament, also won. beating 
Tilak. 

Other results: Afek 0, 
Agdestein 1; Pavlovic 0, 
Hodgson 1; Kudrin ‘A. Ward 
Vfc Depasqualc 0, McDonald 
1; Watson 1, Hamed 0; Britton 
0. de Firraian 1; van der 
S terpen I. Emms 0: Muir 0. 
Ernst 1; Hebdcn I, NijBoer 0; 
Lavie 0, Conquest I: Upton 0, 
Phskett 1. 


Baker in 
teacher 
cash talks 


have beat welcomed by the 
Child Poverty Action Group 
and Age Concern, although 
both fra the party has not 
gone for enough. 


Maxwell’s 

Chinese 


■Ay 


newspaper 

By Robin Young 


Mr Robert Maxwell yes- 
terday announced the latest 
addition to his Mirror Group 
Newspapers. 

From September 1 he will 
be publishing the European 
edition of China Daily, the 
Only national En glish lan guage 
newspaper produced in the 
republic 

The paper has a daily 

circulation of 100,000,- selling 

to English-speaking tourists 
and business visitors. 

Mr Maxwell proposed that 
MGN should help to produce 
a European edition when 
visiting China last year, and 
yesterday Mr Peter Jay, his 
chief-of-staff announced de- 
tails of the deaL 

Some 6,000 copies will be 
printed in London each day, 
and distributed throughout 
Europe. In Britain, 3,000 
copies will be on sale at 80p. 

Mr Chen Li, the deputy 
editor-in-chief said that the 
newspaper received a grant 
from the Chinese government. 



By Locy Hodges 

Education Correspondent 

Talks on funding for the 
£2.9 billion Coventry agree- 
ment with teachers' unions are 
to .be held between local 
authority employers and Mr 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education and 

Science. 

. The employers have com- 
plained that too much was 
given away at Coventry and 
nothing was given in return, 
except for an agreement for 
talks on a number of issues. 

|~ Thqy are hoping to hold a 
fhQ meeting of all focal educa- 
tion authorities in England 
and Walesafter the talks with 
Mr Baker, the first of their 
kind since the Coventry agree- 
ment was struck. 

. One observer said: “It is a 
matter of speculation whether 
the meeting of all education 
authorities will be a bkxxfoath 
or yet another occasion on 
which John Peatman (Labour 
leader of the employers) is 
carried out of the room in 
triumph."" 

The first negotiating session 
on the detail of the Coventry 
agreement takes place on 
September 1, when unions 
and employers will attempt to 
reach an interim agreement on 
the number ofdays teachers 
should be required to cover 
for absent colleagues. 

Future talks will be threat- 
ened -if no agreement is 
reached. Local authorities, 
particularly the Inner London 
Education Authority, are keen 
fora settlement because ofthe 
disruption to lessons. 

. The Ilea, which is badly 
affected by the action, of 
militant teachers who have 


Remand on 
secretary 
sex charge 


Joseph Hanson was re- 
manded in custody for a week 
by Eating magistrates yes- 
terday accused of procuring 
the secretary Miss Sarah Lam- 
bert and of obtaining cash or 
services by deception. 

Mr Hanson, aged -41, of 
Garratt Lane. Earlsfield, 
south-west Loridonjs charged 
with procuring. Miss Lambert 
to have unlawful sexual inter- 
course with him by falsely 
pretending that he was Robert 
Simmonds, the managing 


director of a property develop- 
ing company offering employ- 


ing company ottering employ- 
ment to Sarah Lambert at a 
salary of £12,000, with £1.500 
clothing allowance plus a 
company car. contrary to Sec- 
tion Three of the Sexual 
Offences Act 

Three of the deception 
charges allege that he obtained 
£352.07 from Miss Lambert 
by claiming he was 
Simmonds, that he would 
employ her as a personal 
assistant for a bona fide firm 
and that she would be 
reimbursed. 


He is also alleged to have 
dishonestly obtained by 
deception a chauffeur-driven 
Daimler and hotel 
accommodation. 


DHSS swoop 
at sea resort 


refused to provide any cover, 
does not want to be forced to WUI 

penalize teachers for refusing about £187,000. 
to do so, in spite, of -legal tv* » 

opinion from Mr James J-WlVCF ClCflTf 

Goudie, QC, that it should. XT . , 

o ..« i , -m Anthony Neal, aged 3: 

aCOtu&II SCitOOl Erin Close, Hstree HilL Bi 

hit hv ctriko ^ a former News Ii 

nHDysmrc national driver, was dean 

About ZOO pupils were sent Thames magistrates court 
home or had their lessons terday of slashing the tyi 
disrupted yesterday when one ofthe firm’s Tonies, 
their school became the first in ‘ • 

Scotland this term to be ATTK41T1 iTAA 
affected by a teachers’ strike. rT klTO 

Two teachers at Dalziel An Irish woman held fb 
High School, Motherwell, hours by Bristol police ui 
Strathclyde, walked out after a Prevention of Terroi 

threat to stop their pay for Act was reunited with 
refusing to take the classes of boyfriend on board the £ 
absent colleagues. ish ship Kraka last night i 

The teachers, both members being released. . 
ofthe Educational Institute of 9 

Scotland, were following StPlHIHIff ftltf 
union guidelines that the? olc FP u, S uul 


A five-week investigation of 
benefit claims in the Cornish 
seaside resort ofNewquay, has 
found 173 false daimems. 

Mr Colin Watson, the man- 
ager of the DHSS office in St 
Austell, said yesterday: "As a 
result of stopping benefit pay- 
ments to some people, we 
estimate that we win save 
about £187,000.” 


Driver cleared 


% ■ $ 


Anthony Neal, aged 33, of 
Erin Close, ElstreeHilL Brom- 
ley, a former News Inter- 
national driver, was deared at 
Thames magistrates court yes- 




terday of slashing the tyre of 
one of the firm's Tonies. 




.... , ance, said that it was op to but was “working hard to 

Algeria as places he believes communities to offer break even and make a 
he could live without fear of| widespread condemnation of profit”. It was editorially 
extradition to Britain. I th*?h™£ w independent 


of use can take place the 
ministry has to offer the land 
back to either the original 
owners or the dependents. 

Mr Douglas Hogg, Conser- 
vative MP for Grantham, has 
already approached Mr John 
Biffen, the Leader of the 
House of Commons, asking 
for his comments. 

The protester have barred 
engineers from the airfield so 
for this week to prevent £32 
million tests on the site. 

But Miss Susan Gitting. of 
Nirex. said the question of 
whether Nirex can actually use 
the land for a dump would be 
relevant only if it was the 
chosen site from a shortlist of 
four. 


Britain. 


independent 


Mr Peter Watson (left) and Mr Chris Dixon, both aged 23, 
co-ordinators of life Ride UK, taking refreshment after 
arriving in London yesterday at die e ^ oftheir 2,000-ntile 
cycle around the country to raise £50,000 for Intermediate 
Technofogy. A final ftm ride wDI be held at Oapham 
Common on Monday morning. - 


Woman freed 


An Irish woman held for 36 
hours by Bristol police under 
the Prevention of Terrorism 
Act was reunited with her 
boyfriend on board the Dan- 
ish ship Kraka last night after 
being released. 


Joyrider sentenced to driving lessons 


By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 


A teenage joyrider who led 
police on a 15-mile high speed 
chase, mooting pavements 
and narrowly avoiding col- 
lisions, was sent to a probation 
hostel yesterday after mag- 
istrates heard he wonld be 
taught to drive. 


Andrew Witts, aged 19, was 
put on probation for two years 
with a minimum of six months' 


residence at a careers project 
hostel in Bristol. 

There he will be encouraged 
to use money earned imder the 
government-sponsored job 
training scheme for proba- 
tioners to pay for driving 
lessons, the court was told. 

Mr John Holmes, his solic- 
itor, said: “I woald appeal to 
you not to disqualify him for 
this offence - so that his 
driving can be regularized. 

"It would be to die benefit of 


the public if he were not 
banned and were allowed this 


opportunity to learn to drive 
responsibly,” 

Mrs Barbara Davis, 'presid- 
ing magistrate, told Witts: 
“Think of the people you could 
have killed _ policemen, and 
innocent families with 
children.” 

But she said he would be 
banned for only three months 
so he could take the careers 
project hostel place. 


Inspector Leonard Taylor 
said that a few hours after 
Witts took a car for a joyride 
in Gloucester, police saw him 
and gave chase. 


driver to fen back to avoid a 
collision. 


should not take classes of 
absent colleague -for more 
than three days. 

“We want Strathclyde Re- 
gional Council to appoint 
temporary teachers for three 
days of an absence,” Mr 
Norman Bissell. the union's 
Strathclyde convenor, said . 

“More schools in other 
parts ofthe region will sow be 
bit- unless the- education 


The London Festival Ballet 
is to present the premiere of 
The Nutcracker by Peter 
Schaufuss, its artistic director, 
as the finale to a seven-week 
provincial tour in the autumn. 


Garden plants 


Illustrations of garden plants 
carried on page 2 of The Times 
yesterday were taken from The 


Wins was finally stopped- authority sees commonsense 


He reached speeds of 
80mph as he headed towards 
Stroud, mounting pavements 
and overtaking cars on the 
inside, the inspector sakL 


byatree, 

IBs solicitor- said Witts 
accepted his driving 1 was 


on this issue of absent cover.” 

Dr Malcolm Green, chair- 
man of the local education 


Vanishing 

topher 

Shannon. 


Murray at £1 


Garden .by. Chris- 
rlcketl and Fay. 
published by John 


appalling and that he deserved authority committee, said that 


At one st 
polled along< 
out towards 


se a police car 
le but be veered 
it forcing the 


a severe sentence. n was not 

He admitted reckless driv- supply tem 
ing, rafting ,a car without cause. of a 1 
consent, having no insurance He appd 
or licence arf breaking into 10 accepts 
the Gloucester Civil Service cover be , 
Club and stealing &7- fourth day 


it was not always possible to 
supply temporary teachers be- 
cause of a lack of resources. 

He appealed to the unions 
to acorns compromise that 
cover be provided for the 
fourth day of illness. 





Pa 




£. 


war 


V.. *.* 

v ■» .’ : r “ 


h&sSBL 


-i 





• Ps - Vc ho&i 

•^spiirov 

•'■■-"’a 


'Jv# 


■:ft 


s '\grai 

:n bant 


x t 

*.il 

i « i 


ikcr in Remajj, 
*aeher secret! 
>h ini ks sex elms 




piiss> g 

.11 *« ri¥ 


Dtiu-r** 


\> 0\W" 






The Cornwell case 


The rise and possible 
fall of an Australian 
organized crime boss 

From Stephen Taylor iq Sydney and Michael McCarthy 


Bruce CornweD, the man 
extradited from Britain to 
Australia this week amid un- 
precedented security, is alleg- 
edly orie of a new type rapidly 
joining the Anzac soldier and 
the flying doctor in the canon 
of Australian mythological fig- 
ures — the organized crime 
chief 

. Organized crime has in- 
creased rapidly in Australia in 
the past 10 years, with the 
same vast increase in drags 
trafficking that most Western 
countries have experienced. 

It has forced itself oo public 
attention with the breaking up 
of one big drugs syndicate and 
the report of a royal commis- 
sion which alleged that the 
influence of the new breed of 
gangster was extending into 
the highest readies of public 
life. . 

■ The “Mr Asia Syndicate" 
was shown on its destruction 
in 1981 to have been importing 
many millions of pounds 
worth of heroin from Thai- 
land and Burma into Austra- 
lia, not hesitating to murder 
anyone who got in its way. 

It had spread its operations 
to Britain where it finally 
came io grief when its leader, a 
New Zealander called Terry 
Sinclair, had one of his 
lieutenants murdered and 
clumped .in a Lancashire 
quarry. 

• Sinclair was convicted of 
the killing and died in unex- 
plained circumstances in 
Parkhurst prison last year. 


possibly attempting to escape 
by using drugs to feign a heart 
attack. 

The disclosures of the ex- 
tent of Australian drugs-based 
organized crime winch the 
"Mi* Asia" trial provided were 
pul m the shade by the 
Costigan report in late 1984. 

A senior barrister. Mr Frank 
Costigan, QC, spent four years 
turning what began as an 
inquiry into a fringe union 
into a royal commission 
which afie ld that organized 
crime seriously threatened 
Australia's stability. 

His report led to the setting 
.up of the National Crime 
Authority to try to combat the 
new breed of gangsters. 

The “Mr Asia" case and the 
Costigan report iDumiziate the 
alleged activities of Mr 
Cornwell, aged 40. who has 
been referred to in the press as 
Australia's "Public Enemy 
Number One". 

Several drugs gangs have 
tried to fill the void left by the 
breaking up of the "Mr Asia" 
syndicate; Mr Cornwell, from 
Gosford, north of Sydney, is 
believed to be the leader of the 
most successful. 

One of the unpublished 
volumes of the Costigan re- 
port called Tor a separate royal 
commission to be held into 
Mr Cornwell's activities. 

Mr Cornwell conceals a hair 
lip beneath a thin moustache 
and is known as "the 
Snapper" because he is reck- 


Psychopath rules 
may be tightened 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


Tighter controls governing 
the discharge of psychopaths 
from hospital are being 
considered by ministers after 
concern was expressed about 
the release of patients who 
then commit new offences. 

A report by a group of 
officials from the Home Office 
arid the Department of Health 
and Social Security says it was 
not wholly satisfied with the 
handling of cases within the 
existing mental health law. A 
patient could be discharged by 
a mental- h^fth review tri- 
bunal even though he is still 
considered a risk to the public 
by the Home Secretary, the 
group said. ” 

Moreover, the period of his 
detention in hospital may bear 
no relation to the period he 
would have served had he 
received a custodial sentence. 

: Of38 psychopaths admitted 
to special hospitals and dis- 
charged by a mental health 
review tribunal between 
September 30, 1983 and the 
end of 1 985, fourare known to 
have committed subsequently 
a serious offence. 

The group says in a consul- 


tative document that concern 
could be met by ensuring that 
offenders suffering from 
psychopathic disorder were 
sentenced in the normal way 
by the courts. 

In cases which caused great- 
est concern it could be ex- 
pected that the court would, in 
future, often pass a life 
sentence. 

.. That would ensure that the 
offender would not be released 
other titan by. the Home 
Secretary. 

■ The group recommends 
amending Section 37 erf the 
Mental Health Act which 
allows a court to send an 
offender to a hospital willing 
to take him. . 

Instead, the group suggests* 
.new provision which would 
enable the court to sentence 
the offender to a specified 
period of custody in hospitaL 

Offenders Suffering From 
Psychopathic Disorder, from the 
Home Office. C3 Division, 50 
Queen Anne's Gale. London 
SW]A OAA or DHSS. MHC 
Division. Room C516, Alexan- 
der Fleming House. Elephant 
and Castle, London SE1 6BY. 


Red and white triangle 
warning on TV sex 


Channel 4 is louse a red and 4k 

white triangle as its warning 
symbol on films containing M % 

scenes of sex, violence and M 

bad language. A - six-month M 

experiment with the symbol, WBMV 

to be monitored by Channel 4 Special Discretion Required 

and the Independent ■ 

Broadcasting Authority, will yesterday when the network 


Special Discretion Required I 


begin in mid-September. launched a £40 million fine-up 

The symbol, warning view- of new programmes for the 
ers to use their discretion autumnit includes important 
about whether to watch the new documentary series, more 
film, will appear on the full new drama and a festival of 
screen with the words “special comedy featuring almost 100 
discretion required" before comedy films. 


the film, starts and will be 
shown again at the end of each 
commercial break. While the 
film is on. the symbol will be 
superimposed in the top left 
hand corner of the screen. 

Channel 4 said yesterday 
that only about half-a-dozen 
films would warrant the sym- 
bol each year of the 500 shown 
by the. network and any 
-controversial films always 
went out late at night. It mil 
first be used on the film 
Themroc. a comedy with sex- 
ual overtones. 

The choice of the symbol 
was announced by Channel 4 


Channel 4 will extend its 
broadcasting hours at the 
weekend by going on dr at 
9 JO am and giving viewers an 
extra seven hours of pro- 
grammes over the two days. 
Programmes in the extra 
hours will indude Brazilian ! 
and Pakistani drama, inter- 
national affairts, repeats of the 
popular Treasure Hunt pro- 
gramme and the documentary 
series Heart Of The Dragon 
about contemporary China. 

There will also be pro- 
grammes specially fin- fannies, 
children and teenagers. 


Softly, softly move for rare bird 


harrier tikes to nest in open 
headier and we believe she 


The eggs of a rare bird of The eggs were first removed harrier tikes to nest in open 
prey, found hi the Clyde to safety and replaced with heather and we believe she 
submarine base, have been normal chicken eggs and the was not happy to accept a 
saved by gradually moving pallet was placed on the site, restricted field of view. If we 
thefr best to a new site. The next day the pallet and did not remove part of toe wall 


T : 


• i c y'-'. 


toejr best to a new site. 

The nest of the protected 
hen barrier lay in toe path of a 
new road being built at a 
missile store site at Conlport, 
Loch. Long, as part of toe 
expansion tit the Polaris base 
to take Trident 
The Property Services 
Agency, which is controlling 
toe development, agreed to an 
experiment by toe Nature 
Conservancy Council after toe 
nest was found by a surveyor 
on June & 

. As. work .on the road was 
postponed. Mr Andrew 
Moore. . an NCC assistant 

K officer, and Mr Den- 
son, a world expert on 
hen harriers, bu3t a 4ft 6ifl 
square copy of the nest site on 
a pallet, camouflaged with 
peat and heather. 


The next day the pallet and did not remove part of toe wall 
toe new nest were moved 12 and disguise the re m a ins she 
feet up a slope ami conserve- would probably not have re- 
riouists watched as the mother turned to toe nest." 
retmed to sit oa toe hen's On June 15, the pallet was 


The move was repeated 
daily for toe next two weeks. 
To keep toe harrier's view 
from the nest as dose as 
possible to the eripniL young 
spruce trees along the path 
ted to be cut down. 

One tree was always kept, 
near the pallet, mimicking the 
original site, and even a red 
marker ribbon which the sur- 
veyor tied to toe tree was kept 
After five days rangers re- 


150 ft away in a cleared site in 
a plantation of lodge pole 
pines and larch trees. 

The real hairier eggs were 
returned to toe nest, and on 
June 29 an inspection revealed 
a young f hfrk with two eggs 
Still to be teE-fr* 1 - ‘‘This had 
never been done before to our 
knowledge,” Mr Moore said. 

Harriers, which are a 
Schedule 1 protected species 
under the 1981 Wildlife and 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


HOME NEWS 


oned to be as slippery as a 
snapper fish. 

From small criminal begin- 
nings as a street tough, he is 
thought to have been malting 
millions of dollars out of drugs 
by toe end of toe 1970s and it 
is- suggested that the drugs- 
related activities he controls 
have a turnover to be reck- 
oned in billions of dollars. 

For 10 years he has been on 
the run from Australian police 
and is thought to have supped 
in and out of toe country 
frequently using false pass- 
ports. 

Before going underground 

he led a flamboyant social life. 

Among his auegeri business 
partners have been Mr An- 
drew S lathis, said to have 
swindled Bfehopsgate, toe 
Australian insurance com- 
pany be controlled, of 
Aus519mfllion before fleeing 
to Greece, and Mr Bany Bull, 
named by the Costigan. report 
as a “leading fight" in the 
Australian drugs trade, who is 
in prison in Austria awaiting 
extradition. 

Investigators from the Na- 
tional Crime Authority, at 
whose request Mr Cornwell 
was returned to Australia, say 
privately that his criminal 
empire is massive and in- 
cludes cold-blooded “con- 
tract” killers, lawyers, 
accountants and financia l 
consultants who are respon- 
sible for “laundering” the 
funds acquired through its 
drugs activities. 

Thousands 
head for 
Super Prix 

By Craig Seton 

More than 100,000 spec- 
tators are expected to watch 
the first Monaco-style motor 
racing on public roads in 
Britain daring . the Bir- 
mingham Soper Prix which 
starts oa Sunday. Eight miles 
of crash barriers have been 
built around a 25-mile circuit 
and speeds of up to 180 mpb 
will be reached during the two- 
day event. 

' West Midlands police wUI 
| have 1,000 -officers oa duty in 
I an attempt to avoid traffic 
duos with 50,000 cars ex- 
pected to enter the dty, which 
has only 234W0 parking 
spaces. 

The council sponsored a 
parliamentary Bill to win per- 
mission to dose public roads 
for the event and achieved a 
four to (me majority in favour 
of toe Soper Prix in a referen- 
dum tit residents living in the 
area. 

Birmingham's labour-con- 
trolled council plans to hold 
toe event every year to boost 
toe city's flagging economy 
and hopes to recover Its invest- 
ment over five years. • 

Tins year's main event win 
be a 51-lap round of the 
Enropean-based Formula 
3000 championship with about 
20 other events for a variety of 
cars. ' 

There has been considerable 
opposition to the Saper Prix, 
from local residents and 
church leaders who have de- 
cided that some of their Sun- 
day services will have to be 
cancelled because of the noise 
and congestion. 

Tap water is 
‘best buy’ 

Two-thirds of toe popula- 
tion say that tap water is good 
enough to drink, and that they 
would never pay for mineral 
water, according to. a new 
NOP survey. Almost a third 
subscribed to the view that 
mineral water is "drunk by 
people with more money than 
sense". 

Nonetheless, NOP, who 
interviewed L949 people in 
June, found that a quarter had 
drunk bottled mineral water 
within the past year. Fear out 
of 10 of those drin king mineral 
water bur it at least once a 

month, and half named Perrier 
as tbe brand they drank most 
often. 



Bruce CornweD, right, handcuffed to a policeman, is led to a waiting helicopter at the start 

of his journey back to Australia 

View obscured at crossing death 


The death of Oxford 
University student, whose car 
crashed into a 70 mph express 
train at an open level crossing, 
remained unclear last night. 

British Rail experts told an 
inquest at King’s Lynn, Nor- 
folk, that the red warning 
lights were later found to be 
working normally at Wigg- 
enhad Street Germans 
Crossing. 

Motorists were given 27 


seconds warning by a train 
travelling at that speed, they 
said. 

But Mr David Dennis, who 
went over the crossing a few 
hours earlier on the morning 
of July 1 1, told the jury that 
tbe warning fights began flash- 
ing only when he was almost 
up to the crossing. The warn- 
ing siren did not sound at alL 

Frances Brown, aged 19, of 
Genchwarton. near King's 


Lynn, died of multiple injuries 
when her car and the train 
crashed. 

Police Constable Peter 
Lenan said her view of toe 
t rad: would have been (to- 
scored by a thick hedge and 
railway and form buildings. 
Two of tbe flashing warning 
lights were also obscured by 
the hedge. 

A verdict of accidental 
death was returned. 


Baptists 
claim tarot 
readings 
are ‘evil’ 

By Tradi McIntosh 

A baptist church minister in 
Fakenham. Norfolk, has pro- 
tested that a clairvoyant tell- 
ing customers* futures at a 
local department store is dab- 
bling in "devil worship". 

Some baptists in the town 
have threatened to boycott the 
store. W J Mdiss, until the 
clairvoyant. Mr Stephen 
Alexandre, aged 40. leaves. 

The Rev Peter Lane, the 
baptist minister, said in a 
letter to Mr Tim Atdiss. ihc , 
store’s managing director, that 
he considered tarot cards 
“evil" and a “form of devil i 
worship". 

He wrote: “We believe that I 
no good can come from this j 
and pray that you will have j 
second thoughts about it.” I 

But Mr Alexandre, from i 
Wilmslow, Cheshire, who has 
been reading tarot cards for 
the past 11 years in many 
countries, said yesterday: 
“There is no way I am 
involved in any form of dc\ il 
worship and l consider tarot 
readings a form of science." i 

He describes himself as a j 
professional clairvoyant and 
astrologist and said he was I 
delighted to read customers' J 
futures free of charge. 

“People come to see me out j 
of curiosity, boredom and 
those who need answers to 
problems they have, particu- 
larly personal relationships. 1 
never profess that I am talking i 
to dead people." 

Yesterday men and women 
from as for as Oacton-on-Sea 
queued with special tickets to 
receive a tarot reading Mr 
Aldiss said that one woman 
drove more than 130 miles. 

He was disappointed by the 
church's reaction. “We ar- 
ranged for the tarot sessions as 
a form of entertainment for 
our customers." Mr Aldiss 
said yesterday's first session 
had been so successful that 
another one will be held today. 


— ^cld — 
Mother of 


nine 

celebrates 

A grandmother from 

Wandsworth. Mrs Louisa 
Rose Wood line. 64. ws 
yesterday's « inner of the Port- 
folio Gold prize of £4,ftfH). 

Mrs Woody itte. a mother of 
nine who has 30 grand- 
children. said: “I'm absolutely 
delighted with the money, 
though it hasn't qnite pene- 
trated yet." 

Mrs Woodiine said she will 
spend the money on her 
Camilv, especially her daugh- 
ter Louisa, who recently had 
her handbag stolen from her 
car. 

Readers who experience 
difficult) obtaining a Portfolio 
Gold card, shun Id send 'a 
stamped addressed em elope 
,0: Portfolio Gold. 

The Times. 

PO Bov 4(1. 

Blackburn. 

BBI 6AJ. 

Refugee aid 
of £100,000 

Mr Timothy Raison. Min- 
ister for Overseas Dewlnp- 
menr. yesterday announced a 
grant of £100.000 to help 
Afghan refugees in Iran. 
Projects include expanding 
health sen ices and providing 
food, shelter and Intel assis- 
tance and help with the 
completion uf temporary 
reception centres, Ius» year, 
the British Government 
granted £200.000 for Uglian 
refugees in Iran. 

Pool gas leak 

Sixteen children were taken 
to hospital yesterday after 
inhaling chlorine gas. which 
bad been pumped accidentally 
into a swimming pool at 
Dudley Leisure Centre in the 
West Midlands. 


HOW TWO BUCKETS, 

A RUBBER BALL AND SOME 
STRING GOT ERIC MURRAY 
HIS HOME BACK. 


Aim miner uic 1701 nuuiiK auu 

moved a secthm of ft stonewall Countryside Act. have histori- 
by hand to allow the pro- cajjy been persecuted because 
cession to conturae. of their supposed dietary pref- 

. Mr Moore said: “The hen erence for game birds. 


“ft was February last year when I fell 
over. I’ve got arthritis, you see, and 
its difficult to bend down. I dropped 
a tin of beans and fell trying to pick it upL 
Of course, then I couldn’t get up. It was 
just me and the beans, stuck there on 
the floor? 

In Britain, 189,000 old people 
can’t get in and out of bed without 
help. 695,000 can’t cope with stairs. 
1,056,000 can’t walk without help. One 
household in seven is inhabited by an old 
person living alone. 

The consequences of frailty can be 
devastating to the old. A five inch kerb-, 
stone; turning a key, a patch of uneven 
ground; the ability to manage everyday 
obstacles like these can easily make the 
difference between living at home, or not. 

Help the Aged funds Day Hospitals 
where people like Eric can receive the 
individual therapy to give them the ability 
and the confidence to retain their precious 
independence. 

After treatment to improve balance 
and co-ordination, including practice in 
bending down and picking the ball from 
one bucket to another, he was confident 
enough to go home 

(^THOUGH THS £ A CASE USTOKY. THE MAMS HAS BEEN CHANGED TO PROTECT PWVACY, 






Except that they were able to 
help further. By wrapping string 
round it to thicken the handle, Eric can now 
hold a saucepan so he can eat hot food again. 

The entire quality of life for millions of 
old people depends upon simple, practical 
measures like those the Day Hospital 
provides. 

In addition Help the Aged supports Day 
Centres, helps fund minibuses, provides 
emergency alarm systems and supports 
hundreds of other projects to combat the 
loneliness, isolation and frailty that so many 
people suffer; just because they’re old 

To find out more about our work, or 
to send a donation, please write to: 

Help the Aged, Freepost T5A, « 

I St. James’s Walk, v \ ^ 

London ECIB IBD. 

Help the Aged 

hast HWThoPrraomia 



J 


s 

tc 

N 

d- 

n 

fc 

l\ 

C 

n- 

ri 

at 

Vi 

o 

VL 

l\ 

IT 

T 

w 

IT 

li 

1c 

V 

P 

H 

O' 

T 

tl 

u 

fir 

li 

a 

ai 

al 


T 

Vi 

in 

ai 

in 

le 

it 

di 

“[ 

ct 

te 

pi 

b 1 

u- 

w 

R 

IT 

P* 

IL 


T 

ir 

K 

a> 

tl 

b 

ti 

P 

si 

0 

I' 

c) 

A 

b 

f< 

c 

< 

k. 

C 

c 

li 

h 

tl 

r« 

0 

11 

» 

n 


• . 
i ~ 


tu 
I * 


tiOMt NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 




100 held in 
police cells 
despite Hurd 
commitment 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

Almost 100 prisoners on cizcd in an editorial 
remand are being kept in 


are 

police cells in spite of attempts 
by the Government to clear 
such cells and its plan to 
abolish, in the next session of 
Parliament, the law allowing 
such detention in the case of 
offenders. 

Throughout this year m 
London and the South-east 
prisoners remanded in cus- 
tody and awaiting trial have 
continued to go to police 
station and magistrates' court 
cells where they are held in 
conditions that are regarded as 
poor even compared with 
those in remand prisons. 

The Home Secretary cleared 
the cells amid widepread criti- 
cism bv the new year, but a 
fortnight later the cells again 
began to be filled and, at one 
point, the total held reached 
227. 

Earlier this month the figure 
was about 175: yesterday the 
Home Office said it was 89. 

An official said: ■‘Unfortu- 
nately it has been found 
necessary to have prisoners 
who ought to be in prisons 
located in police cells. This isa 
very serious problem and the 
Home Secretary [Mr Douglas 
Hurd] has concerned himself 
with the matter. 

•‘It is a continuing commit- 
ment of the Home Office's 

prisons department that there 

should be no routine use of 
police cells, but this has not 
been found possible, despite 
efforts, in the South-east” 

The continuing sending of 
remand prisoners to police 
cells has been strongly criti- 


in an etmonai in the 

latest issue of the Solicitors’ 
Journal. 

It describes the keeping of 
several thousand, “if not tens 
of thousands”, of remand 
prisoners for pan of the rime 
in police cells as a “blot on the 
penal system”. 

“Right-thinking people gen- 
erally should be appalled at 
what is happening here to 
quite a substantia) number of 
people.” If similar numbers 
were held in similar con- 
ditions in Saudi Arabia there 
would be an outcry, it says. 

The system is capable of a 
cheap and simple remedy, the 
journal says. Non-violent pris- 
oners could be released two or 
three days before the end of 
their sentence to make room 
for those to whom magistrates 
felt they could not grant toil. 

“It is pure thoughtlessness 
by. and the indifference of, the 
authorities that this situation 
has arisen and is being 
perpetuated.” 

Under the criminal justice 
Bill to be published in the 
autumn the Government in- 
tends to abolish section 1 34 of 
the Magistrates' Courts Act, 
1980. by which magistrates 
have power to order offenders 
to be detained for up to four 


days in police cells. 
That 


power achieved pub- 
licity when used by mag- 
istrates for drink-driving 
cases. The Government has 
said that, if a sentence in- 
volves sustained overnight 
detention other than in a 
prison, it should not involve 
police cells or police officers. 


Poverty 
affecting 
a third in 
Scotland 


in 


More than a third of people 
Scotland are living is 
poverty, or on the poverty 
line, according to report pub- 
lished yesterday by the Low 
Pay Unit. 

In the past year the number 
of low-paid workers in Scot- 
land has grown by 50,000, 
with nearly half the country’s 
workforce earning less than 
£1 id a week, the Council of 
Europe's “decency threshold'', 
it says- 

The unit believes that the 
new Wages Act has weakened 
the Wages Council system of 
legal minimum pay in shops, 
hotels, public houses and hair- 
dressers, with young workers 
losing legal entitlement to 
minimum wages and con- 
ditions. 

The unit estimates that 
250.000 adult workers will 
soon lose entitlement to paid 
holidays and skill differ- 
entials. 

“Lower wages means lower 
spending and a depressed 
demand for local goods and 
services. 

“Competition based on 
wage undercutting de- 
stabaiizes the business envi- 
ronment, hinders planning 
and investment, and discour- 
ages employee-training 
programmes”, the report says. 

Trade unions and local 
authorities in Scotland will 
discuss low pay at a con- 
ference in Stirling tomorrow 
organized by the Low Pay 
Unit and the Scottish TUC. 

Mr Campbell Christie, the 
STUC general secretary, said 
yesterday: “Encouraging low 
pay will not revive the Scot- 
tish economy, it only gen- 
erates hardship and in- 
efficiency.” 

Breadline Scotland Low Pay 
and Inequality North qf the 
Border by Robin Small (avail- 
able from the Low Pay Unit, 9 
Upper Berkeley Street, London. 
W1H 8BY; £2.50). 



The word “bolshoi" means 
“big" In Russian, and nothing 
less than one of the world’s 
biggest marquee’s has been 
bmlt at a cost of £400,000 for 
performances by the Bolshoi 
Ballet in London next week. 

Mr Peter Wrightman (left), 
director of the Entertainment 
Corporation, which brought 
the company to Britain for the 
first time in 12 years, and Mr 
Yuri Grigorovieh, its artistic 
director, were yesterday 
dwarfed by the towering 83 
metre by 63 metre interior of 
the 3,650-seat marquee. 

Workmen took two weeks to 
build the green and yellow tent 
in Battersea Park, sooth Lon- 
don, which includes a f nil- 
sized stage and a one metre 
deep by 22 metres long or- 
chestra pit dog oot of the 
ground. 

The site was provided free 
by Wandsworth council, which 
also spent more than £26,000 
on power and landscaping. 
(Photograph: Suresh Karadia) 


Conservation spending 

Nature reserves cost £2m 

By John Winder 


The Nature Conservancy 
Council spent £2,060,000 on 
acquiring 65 new nature re- 
serves in 1985-86, it is dis- 
closed in the council’s annual 
accounts presented to Par- 
liament yesterday. 

The council also concluded 
201 new management agree- 
ments and leases at an initial 
cost of £2,334.000 and was 
negotiating more than 1,000 
others. 

The new agreements will 

increase the bill for annual 
payments from £445,000 to 
£1,425,000, while those under 
negotiation, subject to 
availability of funds, will cost 
£10.5 million over the next 
two years. 

The council has also in- 
creased grant aid to the vol- 


untary sector by £423,000 to 
£1 ,239,000. including the 
innovation of a schools grants 
scheme. 

That is to aid establishment 
of nature areas in school 
grounds to encourage practice 
and understanding of nature 
conservation. Already £66,000 
has been spent on 222 school 
projects. 

The council welcomes an 
increase in grant-in-aid from 
the Department of the 
Environment for 1986-87 by 
about £9.4 million to £32.1 18 
million. 


It says the figure is maxgin- 

JOV 


ally below that needed to cany 
out the full “preferred 
programme” the council set 
itself in the five-year corporate 
plan which started last year. 


(UNAL ABBEY NATIONAL Ao^_ 

.«ml ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL At^. 

_ abbey NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATO*. 

. NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAi , 

IONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABt>. 
mBBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL. 
i NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY N. 

<AL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL AB* 

JBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATk 
IONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEt 
. ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION. 

. ATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY S 
AL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NA 
NAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL abbey NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL . 
Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATi 
JNAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBFv NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL A 


EY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAT*'' 
IONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL 
iEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY N 
IONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION/ 

IEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY 1 
IONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION 
EY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY 
’ON AL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION. 

EY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY I 
INAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAHONA 
Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NA 
NAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL k 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlOft 


NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATK. 
\L ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL AE 
M 10 NAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIO 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL AE 
TIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIO 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL AF 
TONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIC 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL A 
TIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATI 
. ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL 
JVTIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NA - 
.4AL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAHONA* 

. — o£Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY N 


.aTONAL ABbt. 
aL ABBEY NATIONAL k. 
jBEY national abbey na» 

IONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE 
„ ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATO! 
ATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY » 
AL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlONA 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY PL 
lAL ABBEY NAT BBEY NATIONAL 
NATIONAL AB r WAL ABBEY NA 

IAL ABBEY NA BEY NATIONAL 

NATIONAL ABL ANAL ABBEY NA 

AL ABBEY NATi. .BBEY NATIONAL 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY W 
\L ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlONA 
VTIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY P 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


'ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE’ 
'BEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAT 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


"L ABBEY NATIONAL A’ 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


•ATONAL ABB** 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


\L ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION 
VTIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBF 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAT 
*>NAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL A r 
■’EY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY ' 

• ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION' 

•ATONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL P r 
"EY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NA 
.i IONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL Ab* 

. ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL. 

^Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY Pi. 

>NAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABb 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATO. 
ATONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY I 
AL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL 
. NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAi 
JNAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL A 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


£Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIO*’ 
.TONAL ABBEY NATIONAL AB8EY NATIONAI 
.BEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY * 
ATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlOf 
BBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE* 
JATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIC 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE 
PHONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATK 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATK 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATO. 

\BBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY 
1ATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlONA 
BBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NA, 


”“«=Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIC 
’ AL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABt 
ATONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBl 
'ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlONA 
BBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE 
ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAI 
3BEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE) 
ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAI 
BBEY NATIONAL ABBEY P1ATONAL ABBE) 
■ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAI 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE> 
.TONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAI 
.L ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBF 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlONA 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


^vitONALABbt. 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


. ABBEY NATIONAL A. 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


VTIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABek_. . lONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL AB8F 
IBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION 
TIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABF 
IEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIO* 
ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL AT 
Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAT* 
NAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL 
NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY N/ 

L ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION/ 
TONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY .NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY 
BBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATH" 

NAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABF 
"Y NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY N' 

ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAI 
’TIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABP r 
~ v NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAT 1 ' 

* ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION ' 

•■*L ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL A pr * 

'TONAL ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 


ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 
ABBEY NATIONAL 


tiEY NATIONAL ABBEY NA) . 
.ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE . 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION 
ATONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY K 
J, ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlONA. 
JATIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY Hi- 
AL ABBEY NATO BBEY NATIONAL 
NATIONAL ABB NAL ABBEY NA 

AL ABBEY NAT 3EY NATIONAL 

NATIONAL ABB NAL ABBEY NA 

AL ABBEY NATk JBEY NATIONAL 

NATIONAL ABBEY ml IONAL ABBEY PW 
L ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATlONA' 
VTIONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY N 
ABBEY NATIONAL ABBEY NATION 
’ONAL ABBEY NATIONAL ABBE* 

SEY NATIONAL ABBEY NAP 
' *. ABBEY NATIONAL A* - 
' “TONAL ABBFv . 


Just £500 nets you a big 8%. 


If you leave your money in an Abbey National Higher Interest Account for 
a year, that 8 % grows to 8 . 16 %. This is the net compounded annual rate when 
your half-yearly interest remains invested 

Or you can take your interest as a monthly income. 

We ll happily pay it into any one of several Abbey National accounts or 
vour bank account. 

INSTANT ACCESS 


1 1 

. To: Dept HIY, Abbey National Building Society, FREEPOST, 201 Grafton Gate East, 

I MILTON KFiNES MK9 I DA. 

1/We enclose a cheque for & 


Account at my/our local branch in. 


_to be invested in a Higher Interest 


Should you need your money instantly, it s yours, subject to 90 day's’ loss 
of interest Alternatively, give us 90 days’ notice or leave a balance of £10,000 
or more after withdrawal and you’ll enjoy instant access without losing a penny. 

There’s no limit to how much you invest And getting Abbey National’s 
Higher Interest couldn't be easier. 

We've even provided a larger than average coupon for you to fill in. 


Please sendme full details and an application card LWe understand the rate may vary. 
I/Wfe would like*. A. fhe interest added to the account half-yearly □ 

B. to take advantage of the monthly income facility 1 1 

Full name(s) Mr/MrvMiss . 

Address 


1*13 


Postcode. 


..Telephone. 


Signature! sL 


l: 


JDate. 



HIGHER INTEREST ACCOUNT 


but that it will provide for 
further strengthening of 
permanent staff and enable 
the council to meet commit- 
ments in the main work areas. 

The grant-in-aid is just un- 
der £1 million below the top 
figure the council asked for 
and reflects the Government's 
anxiety to present a good 
image’ in conservationist 
terms. 

The council is asked to 
present three figures to meet 
its requirements: the mini- 
mum, a Public Expenditure 
Survey Committee figure and 
a top figure representing all 
the work the body thinks it 
can achieve in a given year. 
Nature Conservancy Council Ao 
count 1985-86 (Stationery Of- 
fice: £3 20). 


ahbey national hi iu»ing .societv. abpey hoi se. baker street. LONDON NV1 


Junk food 
is patient’s 
life saver 


By Thomson Prentice 
Science Correspondent 


The hearty appetite of Mr 
Adrian Fox, a Welsh 
businessman, may save his 
life. Mr Fox, aged 36, is eating 
four square meals a day to 
prepare himself for a heart 
transplant operation. 

His doctors have prescribed 
“junk" food as part of the 
process of- gaining 28 lb te 
buOd up his strength. 

Mr Fox’s weight dropped 
from 17 stone 71b to 10 stone 
after he had stomach surgery 
two months ago. 

He is to be assessed for a 
heart transplant at Harefield 
Hospital, west London, by Mr 
Magdi Yacouh, die cardiac 

surgeon, as a last resort for his 
serious heart condition. 

“The most important thing 
is to make him fit and looking 
good for his meeting with Mr 
Yacouh in October," one of 
Mr Fox's local doctors. Dr 
Rhidiaa Dowdle, said yes- 
terday. 

“He needs calories and 
protein most of all, and junk 
food gives him those. 

“Marathon runners in die 
days before a big race cram 
themselves with junk food." 

Mr Fox, who is married 
with two children and lives in 
Treforest, Mid Glamorgan, 
said: “After mg stomach op- 
eration, my waistline shrank 
from 42 inches to 32 inches 
and I looked like Coco the 
Down with my old dotbes 
on." 

He mm weighs 1 1 stone 71b, 


Driver fleeing 
from police 
dies in crash 


An inquiry was la unched 
yesterday into die death of a 
driver in a high-speed crash 
after a police patrol tried to 
stop him for not wea ri n g a 
seatbelt 

Police saw Mr Simon 
Hansford, aged 24, of the 
Grove, Hartley Wintaey, 
Hampshire, apparently driv- 
ing a Ford Granada without 
his seatbelt in Cambertey, 
Surrey. 

When Mr Hansford 
stopped at a red traffic fight, a 
police officer tried to talk to 
him, but be drove off at speed. 
As the car headed towards 
Wokingham, Berkshire, <m 
the A321 it lost control on a 
bend and hit a parked van. Mr 
Hansford had to be cot from 
the wreckage by firemen but 
fPar! 


died at Frimley Park Hospital. 


‘Banbury 

Seven’ 

hearing 

starts 


Seven firemen feeing dis- 
missal for taking industrial 
action appeared before a 
three-day disciplinary hearing 
yesterday ai Didcot. Oxford- 
shire, accused of neglecting 
their duties 

More than fifty firemen 
who turned out tosuppon the 
"Banbury Sewn” could also 
face disciplinary action for 
wearing their uniforms at the 
demonstration without 
permission. 

The seven are the first 
emergency workers to be 
penalized for taking industrial 
action and Mr Alan 
ToiterdelL national officer for 
the Fire Brigade Union, said: 

“The disciplinary codes 
should not be used in indus- 
trial disputes. Our members 
were taking action to secure 
changes in the problems of 
undermanning: matters of 
public concern." 

As the hearing began fire- 
men throughout the county 
answered 999 calls only. But 
the union emphasized that the 
public was not being put at 
risk. 


Remand over 
second death 


An unemployed man who is 


accused of murdering Mrs 
Henrietta Osborne, aged 86. in 
Pimlico, south-west London, 
last year, was charged at 
Horeeferry Road Court yes- 


terday with a second 


David McKenzie. 
of Page Street Pimlico, was 
further remanded in custody 
accused of murdering Mrs 
Barbara Ann Finder, aged 76, 
at her home in Prince of Wales 
Drive in October 1984. 


Bullion case 
man in court 


Brian Perry, a businessman 
accused of handling cash pro- 
ceeds of the £26 million 
Brinks-Mat gold bullion raid, 
was further remanded in cus- 
tody until August 29 by 


Horsefcrry Road Magistrates' 
Court, in Lor 


>ndon. yesterday. 

Mr Perry, aged 48, of Main 
Road, Biggin Hill, Kent, is 
charged with assisting in the 
realization of £98,000 worth of 
stolen gold bullion on or 
before August 12. 


Killer weed 
spreads south 


A giant hogweed with a 
painful sting that could kin 
delicate people is spreading 
last from Scotland. 

Scientists at the North East 
Agriculture College in Aber- 
deen are investigating the 
rapid spread of heracleum 
mantegazzianum which grows 
10 ft tell and has stung for- 
estry workers and children in 
Scotland and Yorkshire. 


CID chief 


Del Supt John McConnell, 
aged 53, is to be the new head 
of Sussex CID, succeeding 
Chief Supt Jack Reece, who 
retires next month. Mr 
McConnell has been at county 
police headquarters, Lewes, 
since 1982, when he became 
deputy head of CID. 


Girl murdered 


A baby-sitter aged 15 was 
found murdered yesterday in a. 
bouse in Lea per Street, Derby', 
the _ home of Mrs Linda. 
GiUiganand her son aged five. 
The girl, not being named 
until relatives are told, had 
been “savagely attacked”, the 
police said. 


Blast victim 


An electrician died yes- 
terday after an explosion the 
night before at Cottam power 
station in Nottinghamshire. 
He was named as Mi* Eric 
Batty, aged 45, from Pudsey. 
West Yorkshire, who suffered, 
53 per cent bums. 


Name change 


A prize-winning police alsa- 
rian at Harrogate. North 
Yorkshire, has tod his name 
changed from Ali to AJique 
after complaints by some 
Muslims that they found his 
former name offensive. 


Car deaths 


Four_ young hotel workers 


were killed yesterday when 
their Ford Capri {dunged out 
of control into a ditch on the 
A429 between Coventry and 
Kenilworth. Warwickshire. > 


Company in court over 
T-shirt ‘bower boys’ 


The Weelabix skinh eads 
who appear in the television 
advertisements for the break- 
fast cereal landed a T-shirt 
company in trouble yesterday. 

It .depicted one of the 
characters dressed as a 
“bovver boy" on the front of a 
shirt Smoking a cannabis ciga- 
rette with the words “Weed- 
abix — • It’s neat weed mate”. 

In the High Court yes- 
terday. Loud Clothes, which 
sold the shin, and the maker. 
Dealer Trend; agreed to with- 
draw the shins from sale. 

In an action brought by 


Weetabix and its advertising 
agency. Allen Brady and 
Marsh, the two companies 
gave their consent to Mr 
Justice Hafftnann to be bound ■ 
over by the orders. 

They also consented wr an 
order banning them from- 
selling other T-shirts which' 
represent to children - that ’ 
Weetabix promotes the dis*.' 
tribution of drugs. - ' •• 

The companies agreed to 
pay Weetabix a total of £412 •; 
damages and to destroy H to - 
silk screens used to print fhfr - 
shirts. 


\u 


S3 




IHH 


Ma i 


Gurl 


relev 


4 




1 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


S 

■•8 


Australia toughens its 
sanctions to ‘bring 
Pretoria to its senses’ 


Australia ' yesterday an- 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 


stands 



- , — -- to benefit 

. V . nounced a package of sane- significantly as a result. In 
tions against South Africa 1984/1985, 21,847 passengers 
• which go beyond the measures flew the route with SAA, but 

«£ agreed by the majority group only 8,600 with Qantas. 



t£2 


' i'; at the .recent Commonwealth • The South African Tourist Foreign Minister, that the ain 

mini-summit in London. Commission in Sydney is to of sanctions was not to brim 

M MrBob' Hawke; the Prime be dosed, enforcing a ban on South Africa tofts knees but u 

Minister, told Parliament that tourist promotions. - its senses. 

• :• the Government was implem- * A ban on imports of agri- Bat Mr John Howard, thi 

‘ -c-.. V enting the II sanctions agreed cultural juoducts and some L«tder of the Opposition. wh( 

- . '\v betaken Australia, Bahamas, minerals will be imposed six opposes sanctions, said that i 

fr. Canada. India. Zambia and months after the completion was easy for Canberra to adop 

r jjov Zimbabwe- - and rejected by of customs negotiations. ’ a “2h moral lone when 

'<■ 1 .; Britain - and was taking an Australia’s total imports unIlkc Britain, it had little u 
. ji- v„ ; additional two independent from South Africa in the first *«*• . u . , . 

v- measures. I j months of the financial dus week in the bud- 

' Theseamount to the closure year amounted to $Aus 145 . f?* he wen } on. fo* Hawke 

' '-t of the South African Trade million (£58.4 million) of Government had demonstra- 
• ■ - '‘ Commission office in Mel- which $Au$ 31 minion would iea P* 15 willingness tc 

bourne, and the allocation in have been affected fry the compromisea moral pnncipk 
- the budget of$Aus5 million regulation. for rconomie ends by agreemf 

(£101 mijgon) in assistance to •Australian consular fadl- ' 2l^S°FrSSi“ ^ uranmnj 

• South African refugees: OP ities in South Africa are to be -wS.; to? 

' •” «ul ? tJ ?L this restricted, but not withdrawn. . f £L 

. „ National Congress. _ cSdtaSSTS fofonnS 

"‘S’ Mr Hawke announced thai sources said they would prob- ImSlJL.??.* iTS 

the following measures agreed ably mean that South African 5i PI ^!S 8 !!l?. t Ki eC1S1< ^ b SJ 

|> in London will also follow-* 0 dtil. wanti^o *£ Sec^ fo* 

•South African Airways isto- Australia as tourists offer Government.” headded. 

5 have ils landing rights ter- business would have to obtain Some economic analysts be- 

■ L- COncj fjiw minaied. ending the weekly visas in third coontnes. b u t Jieve ^ iD ^ 

- . .“"Gj Johannesburg-Sydney flight. mpeant .migrants Auslialia lo benefit 

. • ■ ’*>. Under the bilateral agreement couJd still make application m lrade sanctions against 

: v ^ one year’s notice has to be Africa. South Africa, as they are 

PUS" ■ ' P '■ \ ■ .. •Other sanctions indude a competitors on the minerals 

Thereafter the weekly ban on new investment in market. 

, . ;s Qantas flight to- Zimbabwe South .Africa, which Mr In the short term, however. 

' "Sir: will be Australia’s only (tirect Hawke implicitly acknowL the effect will be to ihe further 

a ' r link to southern Africa, edged was unenforceable, a detriment of Australia’s trou- 

- -''m-.' ■ and the Australian n a t i o na l ban on new bank loans, and an bled economy. 

Paper prints censored news 

... . From Michael Hornsby, Jt>hajvnesburg 

South Africa’s oldest news- dairy company in Job— alleged that eight armed men 
paper, the Cape Times, yes- annesburg. jumped from a police vehicle. 


■ - TZ- 


n i j» paper, uie t .ape times. 

BulI ioacas JSS, 1 ? 2 L ”2 

ilk femd man “*iffiT5*!£ , E 

u two months because of re 

■ «<« ... 4 ' ■ tions imposed under the 

afk*nt s ' ok - « <» 

1 ment conceded in a Sup 

Sm f vT -.Vr Court hearing in Pieterm 


end to all government assis- 
tance for trade ventures be- 
tween the two countries. 

Mr Hawke repeated the 
maxim of Mr Bifl Hayden, his 
Foreign Minister, that the aim 
of sanciions was not to bring 
South Africa to hs knees but to 
its senses. 

. But Mr John Howard, the 
Leader of the Opposition, who 
opposes sanctions, said that it 
was easy for Canberra to adopt 
a high moral tone when, 
unlike Britain, it had little to 
lose. 

Only this week in the bud- 
get. he went on. the Hawke 
Government had demonstra- 
ted its own willingness to 
compromise a moral principle 
for economic ends by agreeing 
to rescind the ban on uranium 
sales to France. 

“What the Government 
said was ‘forget the morality, 
lei’s take the money and run.’ 

] have no trouble with 
supporting that decision, but 1 
do have trouble with the 
selective morality of this 
Government." he added. 

Some economic analysts be- 
lieve that in the long term 
Australia stands to benefit 
from trade sanctions against 
South Africa, as they are 
competitors on the minerals 
market. 

In the short term, however. 



paper, the Cape Times, yes- 
vw tenday gave hs readers a 
^ glimpse of some of the 
information it' had been uo- 
inc able to report oyer the past 
two months because of restric- 
tions imposed under the state 
';i of emergency. ; 

Counsel for’ the Govem- 
!*' ment conceded in a Supreme 
Court hearing in Pietermaritz- 
;L burg, in Natju. this week that 
?. two of : the restrictions had 
r been improperly promulgated 
and were no longer binding. 

The two restrictions, now fti 
’ abeyance, prohibited joumal- 
; ists from reporting on the 
actions of the police and Army 
and from entering any area 


annesburg. jumped from a police vehicle, 

Police break into I.D bundled him into a van and 
Mkhia Senior Secondary accused him of being an 


w ■ wutii. umrai ulwuj 

Ruler to 
spreads si 


School in Nyanga black town- 
ship outside Cape Town, 
where refugees from squatter 
camp fighting are sheltering. 
Men and bo vs loaded into 

Leaders of nine southern Af- 
rican states meet in l-namla, 
Angola, today to discuss re- 
gional co-operation and 
progress in their efforts to end 
South African apartheid (Reu- 
ter reports). 

trucks and taken 10 a police 
-station where a man in a face . 


arsonist. 

Jnly l<k The head of the 
School of Economics at the 
University of Cape Town, 
Professor Francis Wilson, and 
his wife are questioned by East 
London security police for 
four hours after being de- 
tained while conducting inter- 
views and taking photographs 
for the South African College 
for Higher Education. 

July 15c Police arrest 57 
pupils from the Uitsig, Belhar 
Number 2, Symphony, Flor- 
ida and Ravensmead High 
Schools, all.Coloured (mixed- 


America agonizes in aftermath of massacre 

Debate on 
gimlaw 
revived by 
shootings 

From Mohsin Ali . 

Washington 

The Oklahoma hi **^ w at 
Edmond post office on Wed- 
nesday has retired America's 
gun law controversy, one of the 
nation’s longest, most emo- 
tional and dirisree rows. 

On a hot sranmer day 
Patrick Sherrill, aged 44, a 
postal worker facing dis- 
missal, lolled 14 co-workers 
before shooting himself. 

Americans were horrified as 
television reports said that his 
body was found with two .45- 
cabhre pistols, an mused 32- 
cafibre handgun, and a 

mail Hag of m^nniinifww; . 

The mass murder was the 
third worst one-day massacre 

in the US . On July 18, 1984, Armed FBI agents (above left) moving in on the Edmond post office where Patrick Sherrill 
21 people were shot dead m a (right) killed 1 4 people. Residents (below) gathered only hours later for a memorial service. 
McDonalds restaurant in San — _ 

Ysidro, California, by an us- 11 81 f 
employed security guard who 
was killed by pofiee. 

On August 1, 1966, 16 
people were IdUed and 31 
wounded by a sniper firing 
from a tower at the University 
of Texas at Austin. He was 
shot by police. 

The nation has never rtaOy 
recovered emotionally from 
the assassinations of Presi- 
dent Kennedy, his brother 
Robert, and Dr Martin Luther 
King, and the 1981 attempt on 
President Reagan’s life. 

Yet Americans remain bit- 
terly divided over calls for 
stricter gun control laws. Mil- 
lions still deeply believe in the 
frontier spirit of the right of j 
every American to cany arms, j 
Symbolically, President 1 

Reagan, despite the attempt on tiooal debate gripped the corridors of the Capitol trying The UHL signed into law 

Denmcrat-cwtrolled HoKeof to peranade congr^sm^ Present Reqpui in Mi 
stringent gHn control laws. Representatives. In the end it to ease restrictions made the first rutin chanees 

ot ^f s *<rted 292-136 to ease several In the end both sides the 1968 gun coutro?*! 
**“ *“1^? restrictions on the 1968 gun claimed a measure of victory. ^ afteTthe assassii 

guns that kOL It has been control Act. The NRA won the right to H 0 ns of Dr Kino and Rnh 

widely reported that Mrs The House »n«»nHin«i an have firearms transported in Kennedy 

baD “ s ? Uil « “*««**» c ommrce and an The NRA is one of the «m 

jfflervory-handled pistol un- handguns across state boon- easing of record-keeping re- feared lobby groups in t 

R«dv # 1 h» da ^T’ ^ f ,, , ^ , ^uirementefor gun dealers. anmiry. Much of its power 

■ 7** The handgun coutrolgroups based on hs huge iund£whi 

wife of Mr Reagans press intense lobbying by the power- won a vote for retaining the it uses ruthlessly to snoDort 
secretary, who was severely ful National Rifle Association ban 00 interstate handgun gjm^ ^ 

wounded during the preskten- and rival handgun control sales, although (he ban on Congressmen challenui 
^ S ^ r and shotgun u»e freS 

lobbied hard for stricter gun Edward Kennedy, Mrs Brady sales was lifted. They also won **targete<r with vast cai 
„ and dozens of muformed an amendment to prohibit pafcn funds being made ava 

muy last April an emo- ooikemen who roamed the possession of marhine-mms. 



tiooal debate gripped the 
Democrat-controlled House of 
Representatives. In the end it 
voted 292-136 to ease several 
restrictions on the 1968 gun 
control Art. 

The House an 

18 year-old ban mi selling 
handguns across state boun- 
daries. 

The vote followed the usual 
intense lobbying by die power- 
ful National Rifle Association 
and rival handgun control 
advocates, including Senator 
Edward Kennedy, Mrs Brady 
and dozens of muformed 
policemen who roamed the 


corridors of the Capitol trying 
to persuade congressmen not 
to ease restrictions 

In the end both sides 
claimed a measure of victory. 
The NRA won the right to 
have firearms transported in 
interstate commerce and an 
easing of record-keeping re- 
quirements for gun dealers. 

The handgun control groups 
won a vote for retaining the 
ban 00 interstate handgnn 
sales, although the ban on 
interstate rifle and shotgun 
sales was lifted. They also won 
an amendment to prohibit 
possession of machine-guns. 


Hie BiB, signed into law by 
President Reagan in May, 
made the first main changes in 
the 1968 gun control law 
passed after the assassina- 
tions of Dr King and Robert 
Kennedy. 

The NRA is one of the most 
feared lobby groups in the 
country. Much of its power is 
based on its huge foods, which 
it nses ruthlessly to support its 
aims. 

Congressmen challenging 
the NRA are frequently 
“targeted”, with vast cam- 
paign funds being made avail- 
able to their opponents. 


where “unrest” was occurring, ' ■ Schools, all.Coloured (mixed- 

without official permission. • • St- race) districts near Cape 

The Cape Times gave the w ? om . Town, for being outside class- 

detained. . ; ' rliirinn crh/wl k/ivirc 


ci dents ft had been.uhabte'io" JnljrTsMrTvor Sias. a fine- Last week of July: Police 
report: .arts student, is detained for raid homes of conscientious 

June 18: • Police arrest two weeks after photog- objectors belonging to the End 
and/or detain 999 members of raphing a veld fire outside his Conscription Campaign, ques- 


tooms during schoofhours. . 
Last week of July:. Police 


*4 M-ftCJ > 'li 

t •*- 

* * - * . 


; and/or detain 999 members of raphing a veld fire outside his 
the Commercial, Catering and 1 mother's home near Somerset 
Allied Workers' Union at,a ' East in the Cape. Mr. Sias 


Conscription Campaign, ques- 
tion and photograph occu- 
pants and confiscate material. 


(IP chief 


Details on Tamil refugees ‘feared 
Gurkhas German expulsion’ 

TPiPdCPfl From Frank Johnson, Bonn 

. w* The. Help and Information whom the East Germans were 


(,'irl mur^ 


flcJi^ Hlad’if 

pnth’i' 


I ( * *■ 


Viffli ’ 11 


■ ; . 

11,1 , r M ! 

• , *hirt ul 


By Oar Foreign Staff 

The British Army for the 
. first time issued precise figures 
yesterday on the number of 
Gurkhas who made represen- 
lations to avoid being dis- 
charged from the Army after 
. the incident -in which two 
officers were injured during a 
scuffle. 

, They show that in the 
!* support company- of 1st 
• Battalion: 7th Duke of Edin- 
burgh's Own Gurkha Rifles, 
123 soldiers were considered: 
for discharge as a result of a 
failure to co-operate in an 
inquiry after the incident in 
May. 

Of these, 36 made represen- 
tations against being dis- 
charged. and in 12 cases the 
discharge was rescinded. 

There are three cases which 
are still undecided.* - 
The representations were | 
made through the Gurkhas* 
officers and went : up to Briga- 
din'. Ray Pett .Commander 
Gurkha Field Force in_Hong 
Kong.. - , 

These figures mean that m 
21 cases the representations 
were rejected^ and that 108 
Gurkhas hate -been dis- 
charged and- sent ■ -back to 
Nepal ’ 

Army sources said that the 
three- undecided cases re- 
mained open because of pri- 
vate and compassionate foe- 
tors concerning the individ- 
uals. but they were not 
prepared 10 go into details. 

It remained open to those 
who had been discharged to 
make formal appeals up the 
chain of command. 

Mr John Stanley'. Minister 
of State for the Armed Forces, 
next week visits Hong Kong. 

It seems- likely the issue will 
loom large in the discussionsr 
In the incident in Hawaii 
two officers were injured, one 
of them Captain Chandra 
Kumar Pradnan. a Gurkha 
officer, and the other the 
company commander. Major 
Conn Pearce. 

The trouble occurred when 
the Gurkhas returned 10 their 
ten! area about lam after a. 
celebration at the end of an 
exercise. They are thought to 
have had an altercation with 
Captain Chandra, in which he 
was injured. 

Major Pearce is thought 
then to have emeiged on the 
scene and tried to restore 
order, during which he suf- 
fered head injuries and broken 
ribs. 


Organization of Tamils in 
West Germany said yesterday 
that the 154 refugees who fled 
to Canada on a West German 
freighter did so because they 
feared that the Bonn Govern- 
ment would send them back to 
Sri Lanka. 

The organization called a 
press conference to give its 
explanation of the voyage that 
ended in the refugees being 
picked up from lifeboats by 
Canadian Coastguards. The 
j voyage appears to have drawn 
more attention in Europe to 
the Tamil refugees’ plight 
even than the killings m Sri 
Lanka itself. 


enabling to reach West Berlin 
in recent months, that they 
feared the West German Gov- 
ernment would clamp down 
on asylum-seekers and refu- 
gees in general “They feared 
that they would be sent back 
to Sri Lanka, and that would 
have meant death for them,” 
he said. 

Mr Nadesalingam said the 
boat people also wanted to 
escape the restrictions placed 
on them in West Germany. 
“We are not allowed to move 
from our town of residence to 
another town without per- 
mission of the authorities, 
even if one of our relatives has 


One detail has particularly suddenly been taken ill/* 


impressed itself on the West 
Goman public the claim that 
tire freighter captain charged 


Earlier, a more militant 
Tamil exile organization, the 
Tamil Tigers, called a press 


his passengers DM 50 — more conference here to deny press 
than £10— fora bo ttle of Coca allegations that it was in- 


Cola. 

The Help and Information 


volved in the illegal voyage to 
Canada. 


Organization chairman, Mr • DELHI: The Indian Home 
Tharmalingam Nadesa- and Foreign Ministers met 


iingam, a former journalist in Tamil mi 
Sri Lanka afro has been in dras yes 
exile in West Germany since them to 
1977, said of the boat people: United L 
“They panicked.” egationa 

There had been such an Sri Lank 
outcry in the West Geiman Colombo 
newspapers and on television solution 1 
about the number of asylum- problem 
seekers from the Third World, writes). 


T amil miirtazrt groups in Ma- 
dras yesterday to persuade 
them to support the Tamil 
United Liberation Front del- 
egation currently talking to the 
Sri Lankan Government in 
Colombo in a search for a 
solution to the island's ethnic 
problem (Kuldip Nayar 


Marrow 

donor 

delayed 

Moscow (Reuter) — The 
Soviet authorities have prom- 
ised to let a Jewish woman 
emigrate to donate bone mar - 1 
row to her brother, but her 
father-in-law is refusing to 
sign documents which will 
enable her to leave, her hus- 
band said yesterday. 

Mr Viktor Fleurov, a physi- 
cist, said emigration officials 
had informed him that they 
were granting permission to 
himself, his wife Inessa, and 
their two daughters to leave 
the Soviet Union for Israel. 

Mrs Fteurova, a sociologist 
aged 37, has applied to emi- 
grate to give bone marrow to 
her brother. Mr Mikhail 
Shirman. aged 31, who is 
suffering from leukaemia in 
Israel 

Mr Fleurov, aged 38. said 
that the emigration officials 
had said the family could not 
leave until his feiher had 
signed documents stating that 
he had no financial claims on 
his son. This procedure is 
routine in the cases of people 
wishing to emigrate from the 
Soviet Union. 

Mr Fleurov said his father 
was refusing to sign the papers 
because be did not want him 
to emigrate. But he added that 
I he blamed the emigration 
officials for the hokbup be- 
cause the need to sign the 
papers was “routine non- 
sense”. 

Wurlitzer loss 

Dekalb (UPI) — The Equity 
Life Assurance Company has 
foreclosed on the beleaguered 
Wurlitzer organ company be- 
cause of its inability to meet 
its July mortgage payment, a 
company spokesman said. 


Repercussions of Chernobyl disaster 

Moscow rules out Delegation 


British farmers 


By Marie Dowd 

British farmers are unlikely The 
to receive direct compensa- Union 
tion from file Soviet Govern- vative 
ment in the wake of the culture 
Chernobyl disaster after an million 
announcement yesterday by The] 
its Ambassador in London, to con 
Mr Leonid Zamyatin. annour 

Mr Zamyatin said that in- believe 
dependent experts had shown seeking 
that radiation levels in Europe nations 
had not been high enough to bill c 
cause serious damage. Govern 

He added: “Tell me, who is A sp< 
going to provide compensa- said: “1 
tion for what has happened in expectii 
our territory?" Soviet l 

Restrictions on the move- it clear; 
ment of sheep in Wales, is w 
Scotland and Cumbria have Govern 
left formers with an estimated Fans 
bill of £1 .50 a week for every of Agrii 
sheep which had to be re- end of J; 
tained on forms. Because assuran 
lambs were prevented from be unde 
roaming freely on hills, they The T 
became too fat to attract expects 
special premium payments. pursue i 


fails in 
Peking trip 


The National Fanners' 
Union believes that a conser- 
vative cost to British agri- 
culture is in the region of £10 
million. 

The Foreign Office declined 
to comment on yesterday’s 
announcement, although it is 
believed that lawyers are still 
seeking avenues within inter- 
national law for passing the 
bill on to the Soviet 
Government 

A spokesman for the NFU 
said: “Farmers weren't really 
expecting cheques from the 
Soviet Union. We have made 
itdearal! along that our claim 
is with the British 
Govern ment” 

Fanners met with Ministry 
of Agriculture officials at the 
end of July when they received 
assurances that losses would 
be underwritten. 

The NFU, however, said it 
expects the Government to 
pursue its claim with Moscow. 


US frees 
Japanese 
held over 
war protest 

Washington - A Japanese 
graduate student, detained by 
immigration officials on his 
return to New York from 
Holland because computer 
records showed that he had 
been arrested during a protest 
against the Vietnam war in 
Japan in 196S. has been 
allowed 10 remain in the US 
(Michael Bin>on writes). 

Bowing to a wave of public 
indignation, the Immigration - 
and Naturalization Service 
said it was no longer seeking to 
deport Mr Choichiro Yatani. 
who teaches psychology and 
Japanese at the Slate Univer- 
sity of New York. 

Spy hotline 

Tacoma. Washington (UPI) 
— A free “spy line" telephone 
service introduced at army 
bases in North Carolina, 
Texas and Washington has 
already paid off with tips on 
suspected espionage activity, 
an intelligence official said. 

Ships collide 

Washington (AP) — One 
American died and two others 
are missing after a Yugoslav 
freighter and a small .Ameri- 
can fishing boat collided on 
Lake Michigan. 

Moscow ‘first’ 

Bern (Reuter) — Mr Pierre 
Aubcn will pay the first 
official visit by a Swiss For- 
eign Minister to the Soviet 
Union next month. 

Suspects held 

West Berlin (Reuter) — , 
Three people are in custody .’ 
after a city-wide search for . 
guerrilla suspects believed to 
be planning a bomb attack on 
two US military installations. 

Bitter harvest 

Belgrade (Reuter) — Roma- 
nia lost three million tonnes of 
wheat and barley, more than a 
quarter of this year’s harvest, 
because of bad management. 
President Ceausescu said. 

Test-tube 4 

Tel Aviv (Reuter) — A 34- 
year-old woman gave birth to 
test-tube quadruplets after 
more than 16 years of 
infertility. 

Track kills 11 

Izmir, Turkey (AFP) — 
Eleven people, including nine 
women, died when a speeding 
truck plunged into a ditch. 

New satellite 

Moscow (AFP) — A new 
Soviet satellite. Cosmos-1771, 
carrying equipment for study- 
ing space, has been success- 
fully launched. 


From Robert Grieves folly launched. 

Mi* Church rescue 

Toulou* JAW - F^ 

tion of the Days Bay unclear . a 

power station 42 mfles north- mountaineer practising for the 

east of the colony left Peking r « cued fr °® 

top of a church tower. 

the Government that it might Cov rAOIcfrr 
consider their argument >JCA 1 C & WlC1 

The 12-member delegation / .& 0Vld ” Ke ' Rhodc 5*““* 
of the ioint committee to (AP) _ A man accused of 


Toulouse (AFP) — Peter 
Patched, aged 21. a British 
mountaineer practising for the 
Pyrenees, was rescued from 
the top of a church lower. 


Japanese to dismantle 
experimental plant 

From David Watts, Tokyo 

Japan is to dismantle its cut the thick concrete and steel 


Deng still in the pink at 82 

From Robert Grieves, Peking 


Mr Deng Xiaoping (right), the Chinese 
leader, celebrates bis 82nd birthday today 
mtfcont the fanfare oftfce personality cult that 
marked the reign of Mao Tse-fcmg^ founder of 
the People’s Republic. 

While Mao lived, and particularly daring 
the turbulent years of the Cultural Revobitioa 
(1966-76), huge posters, battens, banners. 
Little Red Books, and gigantic portraits bore 
foe likeness of foe Great Helmsman. 

Butter Deng, foe Sft-tall peppery politician 
from SkJzmm province who smrived two 
periods of exile in foe c oun try si de to take 
power in 1978, has defiberatdy played down 
his role in palling China out oftne dark ages of 
ideology and setting it mi foe modern road. 

- No banners, no large portraits in Tiananmen 
Square, no museums at his birthplace chron- 
icle his life; In fact, Mr Deng no longer has an 
official title of leadership. He is listed simply 
as chairman of foe iiraoaaoas-soundiiig bat 
powerful Central Military Commission. 

While Mao lived, the Prime Mnustm, Chon 
£n-Iai, and other leaders deferred to his every 
word. Mr Deng relies on collegiaiity, Bot only 
among his trusted advisers, but also among a 
new generation of technocrats that he is 
helping to promote to power. 

Mr Deng is partially deaf, speaks in a 
slightly starred Sichuan accent that is hard to 








follow, and likes coW showers. He delights in 
telling geests that he stfll chaift-aookes Panda 
brand ci g aret te s, enjoys a drop of tiqsor, and 
does not mind looking at pretty girts. 

His long absences in recent years lave led to 
flurries of speadatiou that he was either dead 
or dying. This spring his son, Mr Deng 
Pnfong, who was crippled when he was thrown 
from a window by Red Guards during foe 
Cultural Revolution, was asked by foreign 
correspondents if his father was in good health. 

“Let me put it this way,” he said. “We’ve all 
had two colds each this winter. He hasn’t 
caught one." 


first experimental nuclear re- 
actor at a cost of about 10 
billion yen (£43.5 million). 

The work is expected to 
begin on September 1 and will 
take six years to remove a 
12. 5 00-kilo watt reactor which 
used British technology. 

The reactor, which las been 
out of service for 1 0 years, was 
built in 1963 and generated 
140 million kilowatt-hours of 
power during its life. 

Britain played a vital role in 
Japan's eariy development of 
nuclear power generation, but 
today the Japanese largely use 
American technology. 

The work will tackle first 
the roost highly radioactive 
parts of the reactor at Tokai 
Mura, north-east of Tokyo, 
after extensive research by the 
Japan Atomic Energy Re- 
search Institute on the tech- 
nology needed for the dis- 
memberment of nuclear plant. 

The institute has spent bil- 
lions developing the ability to 

K2 survivor 
back to face 
amputations j 

Vienna — The two survivors 
of the K2 mountain tragedy. 
Here Kurt Dicmbcr^er and 
Herr Willi Bauer, returned to 
Austria yesterday (Richard 
Bassett writes). 

Herr Diemberger said he 
had slept well for the first time 
in weeks and that be was 
reconciled to losing some of 
his . fingers and toes. 


into blocks using remotely 
controlled robots. 1 

The Government and pri- 
vate industry are hoping to 
gain sufficient experience for 
the 1990s when several of 
Japan’s more than two dozen 
reactors will be reaching the 
end of their lives. 

The fuel rods and control 
rods have already been re- 
moved from the reactor core. 
During this fiscal year the 
work will consist mostly of 
putting up scaffolding and 
opening up entrances for the 
machinery. 

In 1987 the pan of foe 
reactor with the highest radio- 
activity will be removed. 

The estimated 14.000 tots 
of radioactive waste will be 
buried in drums, but the 
authorities have not indicated 
where. Within the last year 
Japan has been forced by 
South Pacific countries to 
rescind plans to dump nuclear 
waste in their oceans; 


consider their argument 

The 12-member delegation 
of foe joint committee to 
shelve the Days Bay nuclear 
plant, arrived here on Sunday 
but failed to get an opportunity 
to put their case directly to 
members of China’s powerful 
State Conncfl. 

The deputy director of the 
Pelting'S Hong Kong and Ma- 
cao Office met on Wednesday 
with the delegation which, led 
by the Rev Fong Chi-Wood, 
said It had collected more than 
oae million signatures 00 a 
petition against the plant. 

Daring its visit foe delega- 
tion made several unsuccessful 
attempts to meet China’s top 
leaders, according to a delega- 
tion spokesman, Mr Anthony 
Ha. Instead, they met low- 
level bureaucrats mid also held 
meetings with members of 
China’s National Nadear 
Safety Administration. 

“We are very disappointed, 
we wished to see people from 
the State Council directly,” 
said Mr Fung, “But we have 
good confidence that the top 
leaders are seriously constd- 
ering changing their minds.” 

The Daya plant, China's 
first nuclear power station, is 
scheduled for complefioa in 
1991. Almost 75 per cent of 
the electricity it generates will 
be supplied to Hong Kong. 

Its two 900-megawatt re- 
actors win be bmlt by 
Framatotue, the French com- 
pany, while the conventional 
equipment and turbines will be 
imported from the General 
Electric Company. 

In a related development, 
Mr Jiang Sbengjie. director of 
foe National Nuclear Safety 
Administration, told the 
China Daily this week that 
China has the capability to 
store radioactive wastes and to 
dispose of spent fueL 


Argentine plane protest 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 

Argentina’s mission to the . Argentina “once more re- 
united Nations yesterday jects Britain's attempted pro- 
delivered a formal protest to lection zone” around the 


the Secretary-General about 
British warplanes flying low 
over an Argentine fishing 
vessel in the South Atlantic on 
August 1 1. 

The Foreign Ministry in 
Buenos Aires said that a note 


Falkland Islands, 

The incident occurred in 
Argentine-claimed waters 
only seven miles outside 
Britain’s 150-mile exclusion 
zone around the Falkland* 
Senor Dante Caputo. the 


had been sent to Senor Javier Foreign Minister, said die 
Perez de Cuellar complaining Bri tish planes bad made a 
that British jets harassed the series of aggressive moves 


trawler Rokku Maru. 


against Argentine trawlers 


running a prostitution nng 
involving students used the 
university’s register as a 
recruiting catalogue, court 
documents claimed. 

Navy’s return 

Singapore (Reuter) - Royal 
Navy ships on a world tour, 
headed by the carrier Illus- 
trious, made an emotional 
return to the spot ofTMalaysia 
where the Prince of Wales and 
Repulse were sunk by Japa- 
nese aircraft. 

Cabby threat 

Dubai (Reuter) - Taxi driv- 
ers in the Gulf emirate of 
Dubai who do not dress 
“correctly” have been told 
tbey will lose their licences for 
two months. 

Tobacco suit 

Melbourne (Reuter) — A 38- 
year-old Melbourne woman 
won the right to sue Rothmans 
of Pall Mall and the American 
Cigarette Company for dam- 
ages over the cancer which is 
killing her. 

VIP arrest 

Moscow (Reuter) — The 
former Soviet Deputy Foreign 
Trade Minister, Mr Vladimir 
Sushkov, has been arrested in 
connection with a smuggling 
scandal. Izvestia reported. 

Aids tests 

Helsinki. (Reuter) — Fin- 
land is to introduce Aids tests 
for all pregnant women in the 
capital in a campaign to halt 
the spread of the killer disease. ; 

Crime protest 

La Unifrn. Spain (Reuter) — 
Three Civil Guards and a 
demonstrator were injured in 
a protest against street crime. 

Deadly drink 

Lisbon (Reuter) - Six Cape 
Verdian fishermen have died 
after drinking methyl alcohol 
from barrels netted off the 
Atlantic islands. 

Cancer rally 

Budapest — More than 
8.000 cancer specialists from - 
all over the world met in ~ 
Budapest for the annual con- 
gress of the International 
Union Against Cancer. 



j~ip 


Washington mayor to 
be investigated 
over use of expenses 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 


The controversial mayor of 
America's capital city, whose 
administration has been mir- 
ed in charges of corruption 
and incompetence, is being 
investigated by a grand jury 
on suspicion of using Wash- 
ington city funds for personal 
expenses. 

Mayor Marion Barry, an 
ambitious Made politician 
who is only the second mayor 
since the District of Columbia 
was granted limited "home 
rule” by Congress, refused to 
comment on the allegations. 

But the District government 
has turned over to investi- 
gators. led by the US 
Attorney's office and the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation, 
records of travel and enter- 
tainment expenses made on 
his behalf. 

Last week he voluntarily 
reimbursed the city with 
$4,791 (£3.194) for expenses 
that lacked documentation. 

Mr Barry is campaigning 
hard for reflection to a third 
term this year. Hie investiga- 
tion. coming on top of mount- 
ing criticism of wrongdoing by 


his administration, may lend 
ammunition to his opponents 
who have been unable so for to 
mount a credible challenge. 

The mayor came under 
scrutiny two years ago during 
a separate investigation into 
drug use by city workers. At 
the time a whiff of scandal 
surrounded the conviction of 
Karen Johnson, a framer en- 
ergy specialist, for the sale and 
possession of cocaine. 

Mr Barry testified be had 
known and visited her at her 
flat, though never received 
cocaine from her. 

Since fie took office in 1979, 
10 senior and mid-level Dis- 
trict of Columbia officials, 
including Mr Jvanhoe Don- 
aldson. the former deputy 
mayor, have been convicted of 
crimes relating to their official 
duties. Mr Donaldson, a for- 
mer close associate of the 
mayor, is now in prison. 

Mr Barry has been accused 
by Washington newspapers of 
using city funds for his pditi- 
cal trips. His office admitted 
that his expenses records were 
in "disarray’'. 


Documents subpoenaed by 
The Washington Post showed 
that during the past seven 
years more than $120,000 has 
been set aside in two separate 
funds for the mayor’s cererao i 
nial and other official ex- 
penses. 

The city of Washington has 
undergone an economic and 
building boom during the 
Barry administration, but 
there have been frequent com- 
plaints of city mismanage- 
ment. The overcrowding in 
District prisons has been so 
bad that courts have ordered a 
ban rat new admissions. 

But criticism of Mr Barry's 
administration has been mut- 
ed because of the sensitive 
racial situation. 

Washington is America's 
largest predominantly black 
city, and many residents fear 
criticism will be racially ex- 
ploited and win strengthen the 
resistance of many members 
of Congress to gjvingzfuli self- 
government to the little Dis- 
trict of Columbia enclave, or 
even possible statehood. 


Troops stop attack 
by Uganda rebels 


men had chal- 
his Government He 
said be had heard rumours of 
a pact to overthrow his Gov- 
ernment between the former 
dictator, Idi Amin, who was 
ousted in 1979, and the former 
army commander. General 
Basilio Okello, who fled last 
January. 


From Charles Harrison, Nairobi 
Government troops have about 1,200 
driven off an attack on Guta, 
the main town in northern 
Uganda, by members of the 
framer Uganda Army which 
was overthrown in a coup last 
January. 

President Museveni said 
that 30 of the attackers and 
three members ofhis National 
Resistance Army were lolled. 

Government forces were 
warned in advance of the 
dawn attack on Wednesday, 
but the fighting lasted several 
hours and the situation in the 
area is still tense. 

Last week there were small- 
er attacks by former army men 
who recently returned to 
Uganda from the Sudan, 
where they fled earlier this 
year. 

President Museveni said 



Three die 
in Sind 
violence 

From A Correspondent 

Fawrhi 

Sporadic violence contin- 
ued in Pakistan's southern 
province of Sind on the third 
day of anti-government agi- 
tation. 

In the town of Degri the 
Army was called in after a 
clash between police and dem- 
onstrators in which three peo- 
ple were reported killed, 24 
injured and 23 arrested. 

In Karachi, police used tear 
gas to disperse crowds. Agi- 
tators bloated the highways 
linking Sind with other parts 
of the country. Train traffic 
was also disrupted. 

Apart from some minor 
incidents in Rawalpindi and 
Multan, the Punjab province 
has remained quiet 


Little Son dazzles tribes of Israel 


From Ian Mraray 
Jerusalem 

Tbe bad jokes were tasteless 
but very much captured tbe 
mood. "He doesn't look very 
Swnsdsh." said the American 
voice In the crow d by the 
Western (Walling) Wall. 
“He's going to be a rabbi and a 
chief. That wfll make him a 
real chief rabbi." 

Tbe cameras rolled, Hie 
press pressed and the solemn 
words of the Bar Mitzvah 
ceremony were drowned by the 
buzz from the carious crowd. 
Tbe only calm and dignified 
person there was the lad aged 
13 at the centre of it alb Lntie 
San Bordeaux of the proud 
family of Chief Crazy Horse, 
who led the Sioux tribes to 
their victory over General 
George Custer at the battle of 
little Bighorn in 1876. 

More important to little 
Son than the Sioux blood of 
his fathers, however, is the 
Jewish religion ofhis mother, 
Mrs Armuona Greenfield. It 
was for this that he had cone 
from the rity of Spokane in 
far-off Washington to tbe holy 
city of Jerusalem fra bis 
initiation into adult respons- 
ibility. 

It was, ia fact, fa is sec o nd 
Bar Mitzvah. Tbe first was a 
fortnight ago ia Spokane for 
the b en efit gf her fondly aid 
friends. Yesterday’s one was in 
lam me a s u re Ira the benefit 
of E] Al Airlines, tourism to 
Israel, and the press. 

Rabbi Yosef Green, assisted 
by Mr Nachman Kidman of 
El Al, fed tbe boy to the table 
laid out for tbe ceremony up 
against the walL Little Son 
was not dressed in the 
feathered costume be had 
worn on Monday when he 
skipped down from the El Al 
jmnfao in ho bockskms, but he 
was wearing a bine and white 
lama (skull can). 

He was asked to lead the 
prayers fra the Jews in Rnssia 
and Arab countries who were 
miable to visit the wall them- 
selves, bat his piping voice 
could not compete with the 
whirr of the camera shatters. 

While soldiers with gans 
over their shoulders poshed 
through for a better look, he 
was asked to pray for peace. 
Twice, like the caO of the wild, 
there came the high-pitched 
nlalatioe of Sephardic women 
praying, and he looked round 
from the roll of the Hebrew 
Sc riptu res to glimpse the 
source of a sound so like an 
Indian war whoop. 

fa a naming series of inter- 
views bet w e e n parts of the 


w-'W. • r:\ ■ 



Little Sun Bordeaux, with Rabbi Yosef Green at his side, ; 

Jewish manhood in a Bar Mitzvah ceremony at the sacred Western Wall in . 


ions of 
erasalem. 


ceremony, the boy said firmly 
that he was of the family (da 
Sioux chief but that he would 
rather be a rabbi, even thongb 
he was proud ofhis Red Indian 
heritage. 

Later, at a press conference 
in the lnxnry hotel wbere he is 
staying, his mother admitted 
that her relations with the 
Sioux tribe were now "zilch". 
She left Little Sun’s father, 
married a Cheyenne Indian 
and left the reservation life she 
does not like. 

She produced a book show- 
ing a photograph of little 
Son's namesake, who she said 
was his great-great-grand- 
father. There were no written 
records at the time Chief 
Crazy Horse was alive, so 
there was no way of browing 
w a ri l y what his retatumship 
was. 

She said the boy's father 
knew that he was descended 
from the Crazy Horse family, 
even if there was no proof that 


be had ever had any c hil dren 
ofhis own. 

She insisted that Little Son 
was the true grandson of Chief 
Dallas Eagle, who had himself 
told her tint he was of the 
family of Crazy Horse. There 
conld be no qaestion that Little 
Son was going to be a great 
man himself and would be 
eligible to be chosen as chief 
tme day. 


But Little Sun professed no 
ambitions to lead the tribe. 
His grandfelher had tridhin 
that one day he would be a 
great man, he said, and be- 
cause he was half Jewish and 
half fndfow he had had to 
choose. 

"1 have picked to he a 
rabbi.'’ he said, and the man 
from El Al nodded his 
approvaL 


Peres hopeful of 
peace progress 

From Our Own Correspondent, Jerusalem 


ID 


Save your energy 
RUm the coupon. 


■he way you heat your home 
-L can be a massive waste of 
energy. And money. 

But it needn’t be. WeVe come 
up with the solution. 

If you already use electricity 
for heating, or if your home 
doesn’t have any kind of central 
heating, your Electricity Board can 
tailor the most efficient and 
economical heating system to suit 
your needs. 

And die advice is free. 

We caO it making your home 
Energy Wise. 


Step 1 


Well visit you free of charge 
and check the insulation of your 
roof space, cavity walls, and your 
hot water cylinder Also, your 
chimneys and outside doors will 
be checked for draughts. Then 
well advise you on how you can 
save energy by making your home 
snug and warm. And how much it 
will cost 



Step 2 


Well also check how much 
you’re paying for your electricity 
currently ana explain how, with a 
minimum of effort, the Economy 
7 lariff can save you money by 
jitalising on cheap, less than 
‘price dectridty for heating 
and not water 


Economy 7 lariff And how 
little they cost to buy, install and 

maintain. 


■four first step: dial 100 and ask 
for Freefone BuiidElectric, or fill in 
the coupon for more information. 


Step 4 


Step 3 


Then well check any existing 
heaters, and explain the benefits 
of modem slimline storage 
heaters and where best to position 
jjjeiiL How you can save money 
by operating them on the 


Finally, well explain how to 
convert your hot water system 
with a special immersion heater 
and controller to make the most 
of Economy 7 cheap hot water If | 
your lagging needs improving oi; 
if you really need one of the new 
range of Economy 7 cylinders, 
well advise on that too. 

You can act on all this advice 
all at once, or step by step. Either 



way, you’ll know what it takes 
make your home Energy Wise 


to 


Post to: Electricity Publications, PO Box 2, 
Felrham, Middlesex TW14 0TG. 

My home and I would like to 
become Eneray Wise. We are 
mainly heated by: 

EHI Electricity' CU Otheri^ 

Name 

Address 


Postcode 

ENERGWG 


DB/S81 


your home Energy Wise. The Electricity Council. England and Wales- 



After months of frustration 
his attempts to shift the 
Middle East peace process 
forward, Mr Shimon Peres at 
last feels that thing s are on the 
move again. 

With six weeks to go before 
he is due to hand oyer as 
Prime Minister to Mr Yitzhak 
Shamir, he can look forward 
before then to taking part m an 
important summit meeting 
with President Mubarak of 
Egypt and to welcoming Mr 
George Shultz, the US Sec- 
retary of State, who has sig- 
nalled that he is now prepared 
to make a long-promised Mid- 
dle East tour to add his 
powerful support to the moves 
for peace. 

Mr Peres now expects to be 
invited to Egypt for the sum- 
mit meeting during the first 
half of next month, and is 
hopeful that Mr Shultz will be 
in the area at the same time. 

The summit, Mr Feres 
promised on television, would 
be “a forwarri-ioalting mee- 
ting" which would focus on 
further efforts for peace in the 
region. 

The aim of the summit is to 
mark the end of the long "cold 
peace" which has existed be- 
tween Israel and Egypt despite 
the Camp David agreement It 
will follow tbe signing of an 
agreement on how to arbitrate 
the sovereignty of about 15 
border areas, including the 
resort of Tabs on the Gulf of 
Aqaba. 

But at tbe meeting Mr Feres 
is bound to press for maxi- 
mum encouragement from his 
Egyptian hosts to persuade 
King Husain of Jordan to 
follow him to the negotiating 
table. He will also try to 
persuade tbe Egyptian Presi- 
dent to follow the Jordanian 
example and end all co- 
operation with the Palestine 
Liberation Organization. 

It is often said here that the 
road to Amman leads through 
Cairo, and with tbe road to the 


Egyptian capital unblocked, 
the road beyond now looks 
that much more accessible. - 

At the same time, the Prime 
Minister’s nidi to fit in as 
much as possible before he 
hands over has irritated Mr 
Shamir , who is currently For- 
eign Minister. 

He has - protested that 
arrangements for the summit 
have been made without any 
reference to tbe Foreign Min- 
istry, and that during his visit 
to Alexandria to see President 
Mubarak this week, Mr 
Avraham Tamir, dtiector-gen- 
eral of die Prime Minister's 
private office; did not even 
call on the Israeli Ambassador 
to Egypt, Mr Moshe Sasson. 

Mr Feres made no excuse 
for this beyond saying: “Cer- 
tain meetings have to be 
arranged quietly in order to 
avoid peculation." 

This increases the suspicion 
that when he swops rote with 
Mr Shamir, Mr Feres may well 
try to continue to run his own 
foreign policy without ref- 
erence to his rival, even 
though he wfll then be the 
head of government. 

But Mr David Kimche. die 
Foreign Ministry director-gen- 
eral. has said that the summit 
will bring about a new era in 
relations between the two 
countries. 



Mr Peres: in a rash before 
handing over power 


Bomb kilts 
Irish 
officer in 
Lebanon 

From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

A lieutenant serving with 
the Irish contingent of the 
United Nations peacekeeping 
force was killed yesterday by a 
booby-trap bomb apparently 
intended for Israeli occupa- 
tion troops. 

Lieutenant Angus Murphy, 
from Tuam in Co. Galway, 
was on foot patrol with two 
other Irish soldiers on a dirt 
track between the villages of 
At Tin and Haddatha on the 
edge of the Israeli occupation 
zone when the explosives, 
hidden beside tbe; roadway, 
blew up beside them. . . 

The two other soldiers were 
wounded but were fast night 
said to be out of danger. - 
Lieutenant Murphy, a$xl 
25, was the son of Brigadier- 
General Murphy, the comm- 
anding officer of toe Irish 
Army’s. Western Command in 
Galway, and liis death is 
certain to raise further ques- 
tions in Dublin about the 
worth — and the human cost — 
of keeping Ireland's contin- 
gent in the. UN force in 
southern Lebanon. ■ . 

The significance, of 
yesterday’s bomb .death — 
Lieutenant Murphy was the 
127th UN soldier Ip die on 
active service in southern 
Lebanon — lies in the resur- 
gence of guerrilla 'activity 
against the Israelis and, their 
Lebanese militia allies inside 
and south of the UN zone, and 
the increased danger in which 
this places UN troops. 

Shortly after the bbrob ex- 
ploded at 7 am yesterday, Irish 
UN troops found two ‘heavily 
armed men in the wild .area of 
hiUs . and scrubland,, both 
weighed down with bomb- 
making equipment. 

In the somewhat doubtful 
security of the local ‘Lebanese 
gendarmerie; station to which 
they were taken, the two 
identified themselves as mem- 
bers of the "Lebanese Na- 
tional Resistance". One came 
from Haddala itself and the 
other from Sdon. far -to the 
north of the UN zone. 

It was undear whether they 
were, in fret. Lebanese or 
Palestinian. Nor was it known 
from which guerrilla grpup 
they came. - 

Immediately news of 
Lieutenant Murphy’s death 
became known in Tyre, lead-, 
era of tiie Amal Slua militia 
expressed their regret at his 
dreib, e vufegee that r- if Ainal 
was responsible for the bomb 
— it bad nqt been directed.at 
the UNI But if the more 
extreme Hezbollah "Party of 
Gpd" was behind the explo- 
sion, this assumption might be 
more difficult to sustain.- . 

. After Shia militiamen, and 
French un troops at Marra- 
keh last week fought a pitched 
battle in which four Amal men 
were killed and 18 French 
soldiers- wounded, the UN 
peacdceepingforce in south- 
ern Lebanon has been in a 
state of constant alert. 

Irish and Fijian troops were 
attacked in the aftermath of 
the conflict with, the French, 
and yesterday Fijian soldiers 
discovered two more roadside 
bombs in .. their zone of 
operations. 


EEC butter 
foils to sell 
at 3p per lb. 

From Jonathan Braade 
Brussels 

EEC batter has proved too 
expenbeatjttt^alb. 

Animal-feed 'manufacturers 
have bought tody 65 tonnes of 
the 50,090 tonnes of ageing 
batter on sale, ft was bought 
from dairies three years ago 
for more than £2,000 a tonne. 

But a tonne of hotter costs 
■are than£250a year to store, 
and officials hopedibe sale at . 
g ive -away prices would allow 
the EEC to cat fas losses and 
reduce the amount instore. 


Court rulings raise opposition hopesL 

Chileans press for justice 


Organizers of the oppo- 
sition "Day for Justice" this 
week in Chile were almost 
cheerful as they celebrated 
recent court rulings that repre- 
sent important c h a n ges in the 
courts’ approach to cases 
involving the Government's 
critics. 

For the past two years. 
Judge Carlos Cerda has been 
investigating tbe disappear- 
ance of 10 political prisoners 
in 1976. Last week he indicted 
four generals, eight colonels, 
26 other officers and two 
civilians. Among them is Air 
Force General Gustavo J ‘ ' 
a former member of the i 
military junta. 

On Wednesday evening the 
court of appeal o rder ed the 
suspension of Judge Cerda’s 
investigation until tbe court 
decides to accept or reject the - 
defence lawyers’ arguments 
that all suspects are eligible for 
an amnesty declared in 1978. 

The Day for Justice on 
Wednesday was organized by 
human rights and opposition 
groups, including the National 
Assembly of Civil Society, the 
biggest opposition group, to 
protest against tbe apparent 
collusion of Chilean courts 
with the Pinochet regime. 



From Lake Sagans, Santiago 

It became a day of hope 
early in the week when NACS 
leaders were released oh bafl. 

Hundreds of people gath- 
ered at Santiago’s central 
courts on Wednesday . to 
present a demand that judges 
assume a stance 1 independent 
of the military Government. - 

Police dispersed small 
groups who staged lightning 
protests and tried to bold a 
religious service outride the 
hospital wbere Sefiorita 
Carmen Gloria Quintana is 
still in grave condition after 
being severely burnt-in pro- 
tests last month. 

Since the 1973 military 
coup, civilian and military 
courts have virtually ignored 
the thousands of habeas cor- 
pus pleas filed on behalf of 
people arrested for political 
reasons. 

Political prisoners report 
routine torture, ' sometimes 
resulting in death. The Roman 
Catholic Church in Chile has 
documented 650 cases of peo- 
ple .who disappeared after 
their arrest by soldiers or 
political police. ■ 

The mother of Sefiorita; 
ReinaJda Pereira, who was 
arrested , when she was six 
^ months’ pre g na nt with her 


first child, cried as she ex- 
plained what Judge Cerda's 
rulings means to her. 

"No thing has ever been 
clarified before, but now we 
have a small light of hope," 
she said, emphasizing how 
important it is for her to know* 
what really happened to - her 
only daughter and her unborn 


Another important judicial 
about-turn came two weeks 
ago when a. -military court 
ejected the Army’s version of 
how two young people. Sefio- 
rita Quintana and. Sefior 
Rodrigo Rojas, a photog- 
rapher who had been Irving m 

the United States, were burnt 
during a .protest in Santiago. 

The Army maintained that 
they had acciden t ally set fire 
to themselves, but the court 
accused tbe lieu tenant in. 
charge of the military patrol 
involved of using unnecessary 
violence, resulting in the death 
of Sefior Rojas and severe 
injuries to Sefiorita Quintana.. . 

Breaking with the. tra- 
ditionanrondad unity of the 
Chilean, armed forces, police 
and Air.Fbrce representatives 
voted with.two civilian judges ' 
against -foe Army’s - repre- 
Sentative on the bench. 






THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



as poll shows 


■ 

—Hi, 


.-v 











Anzus pact 




■ ■ * :'v 

. ' -ul’i; 1 

v 

'■• l. ; ‘f, 
- *&&,'• 

- .Sfi 

- i,; 

- ' uiat; 


• • ' '«». 

■ 1 ■ 
••'“IV 

ilij, 

*’• It-,. 
- * •> 
' j s-Ttr. 
"* ‘ X 
• ■"•t. 


. From Richard Long, WeHmgton 

New Zealand’s Labour 
Government received a-blow 
to its antinuclear policies 
yesterday when die Defence 
lacpriry ' Committee made 


public:a. polI showing 52 per 
cent of the public in favour of 
continued membership of the 
Anzus alliance. 

New Zealand has effectively 
been drummed out of the 
tripartite alliance with the 
United States and Australia, 
because of its refusal to accept 
via is by nuclear-armed or 
nuclear-powered warships. . 
.The review committee, set 
up by the Government last 
year to analyse public opinion 
on defence, recommended an 
enhanced bilateral defence 
relationship with Australia to 
compensate in pan for the loss 
of the American connection. 

This would satisfy in pan 
the 72 per cent of those polled 
who want collective security, 
and would not conflict with 
the 73 per cent who want the 
country to remain nuclear- 
free. the committee said. 

Tbepoll is the most detailed 
ever undertaken on defence 
views. The Opposition leader, 
Mr Jim Bolger, said it showed 
a vote , for realism and com- 
mon sense, and that the 
Government had no mandate 
to take; the country out of 
Anzus. . . 

But Mr David Lange, the 
Prime Minister, pointed to the 
69 per tent of those polled 
who opposed, visits by nuclear 
warships, citing this' as sup- 
port for his Government's 
policies. 

The. committee chairman, 
Mr Frank Corner, a former 
foreign affaire secretary, said 


the committee did not urge a 
return to full Anzus member- 
ship because of the divisions 
this would bring to an already 
divided society. Instead it had 
opted .for the “Hobson's 
choice” of an enhanced 
relationship with Australia, 

• But the committee chided 
the Government for “mis- 
takes” in negotiating with the 
Americans over the warship 
visits- Future inquiries should 
precede rather than foDow 
major policy changes, it said. 
Anzus had been “widely 
misrepresented” by those 
occupying “positions of high 
authority”. 

Mr Lange, who had de- 
manded explanations for 
these comments, had his let- 
ters published as an adden- 
dum to the committee’s 
report, along with its replies. 

The poll found 37 per cent 
in favour of Anzus with 
nuclear ship visits, 44 par cent 
in favour of Anzus without 
nudear ship visits, and 16 per 
cent opposed to Anzus. 

The Government's prob- 
lems came when the 44 per 
cent grouping made a choice 
between Anzus and no Anzus. 
The result gave the final 52-44 
per cent vote- in favour of the 
alliance. Newspapers here 
interpreted this as a vote for 
Anzus. 

Mr Lange questioned the 
methodology involved in the 
second-choice a option and 
claimed that the eight-point 
majority was inside the poll's 
margin for error. The pollsters 
promptly replied that the 
methodology was quite 
proper, and that the margin 
for error was only Z5 per cent 


US crowds 
flock to 
holy image 

Fostoria, Ohio (UPI) — An 
image of Jesus Christ said to 
appear each sunset on the side 
of a storage tank near Toledo 

has drawn a nightly pilgrims 
of the curious and the devout 
to a soybean-processiDg plant. 
- The lifesize image ora long; 
haired, bearded-man, dotted 
in a White robe^a-nd ! the profile 
of a young child appear on foer 
sidebfa 30 fthighsoybean 03 
storage tank owned by Archer 
Daniels Midland, witnesses 
say. - •* : 

Company officials attribute 
the apparition to a combina- 
tion or shadows, tight and 
steam vapours from the soy- 
bean-processing plant 
On Wednesday night, hun- 
dreds of cars again lined Ohio 
Route 12 outside the plant, 
causing a traffic jam. 

“It's a miracle," one person 
said. “Just look'at the people. 
Everybody needs a miracle” 
Hundreds of people, some 
with children in their arms 
and -others cm blankets, gath- 
ered m the ditches along the 
roadway to view the appa- 
rition, which witnesses say 
appears only after sunset 
“It’s just rust on fotrtank," 
said a plant employee. 

The Rev James Barik, a 
Roman Catholic .theologian 
and pastor at the University of 
Toledo, said be believes natu- 
ral causes are responsible for 
the image. 


Ex-rebel 
leads new 
India state 

• Delhi (Reuter) — A tribal 

guerrilla leader who fought the 

Indian Government for more 
than 20 years was sworn in 
yesterday as Chief Minister of 
India's newest state; 

The Mizo National Front 
leader, Mr Laldenga, became. 
Chief Minister of Mizoram as 
part of an agreement signed on 
June 30- to -end foe guerrilla 
war, the Press Trust of Jhdia 
said 

Under foe, agreement the 
stale's ruling Congress (I) 
Party formed a coalition gov- 
ernment with foe MNF, wife 
Mr Laldenga as ChicfMinister 
pending new elections. 

The pact ensured statehood 
for Mizoram, which waspre- 
viousty governed as a territory 
by the central Government 
The statehood Bill was ap- 
proved by Parliament in Delhi 
on August S. 

India’s Home . Minister, Mr 
Buta Singh, told Parliament 
before the Bin was passed that 
at least 575 of an estimated 
700 guerrillas had “handed in 
their weapons. 

• Curfew enforced A strict 
curlew was enforced in the 
Gujarat .city of Baroda to 
prevent violence between 
Hindus and Muslims after 
seven people were killed in the 
past 36 hours. The Press Trust 
of India said “an uneasy 
cairn” prevailed in the dry 
yesterday morning. 


Baseball fever fires 
Japanese emotions 

From David Watts, Tokyo 


Only two things cut through 
the torpor of fete summer m 
Japan: the buzzing . of cicadas 
and foe tension of the annual 
senior high school baseball 
championship. • • - 

The sky is a uniform, pol- 
luted grey fid that .traps be- 
neath it temperaures in the 
90s with humidity to match. 

A few minutes* walk reduces 
clothes to a sodden mass. Here 
and there Japan's ubiquitous 
salarymen dock out of it Into 
electrical shops to watch the 
bigh school final in progress. 

There is nothing directly 
comparable in Britain. The 
metallic plonk of baseball on 
metal bat replaces that of 
leather on willow and for 
Japanese is' jnst as emotive. 

The closest parallel might 
be a notional schoolboy Test 
match drawing teams from 
every corner of the country. 

Bnt foe atmosphere of a 
Ten match, even . today, is 
qoite -unlike foe sort of hys- 
teria that boiled over yes- 
terday when the championship 
went to Tenri. a high school . 
from westernMapan, for. the. 
•first time m its 12 appearances 
among the last 49 ' at foe 
Koshien stadium in Osaka, 

At times it appears everyone 
is in tears - winners, losers- 
and some of foe spectators. 

Anyone who thought a 
Japanese incapable of 
down his emotional, 
could be forgiven for th miring 
the crowd yesterday was Latin 
rather than- Oriental, were it 
not for die precision of foe. 
chanting.; " . 

It is a contest that leaves 


hardly any Japanese un- 
touched: not only are there 
young heroes battling - for 
supremacy in a country that 
sets great- stare by disciplined 
-team effort but they are all 
hometown boys. 

The swea 
goes back to Iris boyhood 
ambitions on foe baseball 
diamond, foe housewife to the 
days when she -was in the 
stands cheering a boy-friend, 
or even cheerteadksg on foe 
toochline in a brief orange 
uniform. . 

This year foe 68 tb cham- 
pionship kept alive the samu- 
rai spirit through a young 
pitcher who earned on dog- 
gedly despite h painful elbow 
while the batter hit him all 
over foe field. 

But reminders of the disci- 
pline on which success is 
based were never for away, 
several players were dismissed 
from' foe contest and then- 
manager resigned after they 
were caught smoking. 

The final confrontation was 
suitably close for two teams 
who had fought their ..way 
through foe starting field of 
3,847 teams from Japan's 47 
prefectures since foe end of 
June. 

Each prefecture sends one 
team to Kosbieit with foe 
exceptions of Tokyo and Hok- 
kaido, which send two, for a 
total of 49 teams. They arrived 
at the stadium on August 4 for 
foe ftnaL exhausting run-in to 
the moment yesterday when 
superb fielding and throwing 
by Tenri earned it a 3-2 

victory- 


Iranians 

breakup 

‘terrorist 

networks’ 

- Tehran (Rentier) — Iran’s 
internal security chief yes- 
terday announced foe break- 
up of several “terrorist 
networks” finked with Iraq, 
including one held responsible 
for a car bomb explosion in the 
holy city of Qom last week. 

“Those who brought foe 
bomb from Iraq and those who 
planted it in Qom have been 
arrested,” the Information 
(Intelligence) Minister, Mr 
Muhammad Muhammad! Be- 
jshahri, told Tehran radio. 

Thirteen people were killed 
and 100 injured in Saturday's 
blast outside a Shut Muslim 
shrine in Qom. 

Another car bomb killed 20 
and burned at least 80 In a 
central Tehran square oa 
Tuesday. 

"The Iraqi intefifeence sys- 
tem provides facilities and 
huge amounts of money to all 
coaUter-revolutionaiy groups 
. . . and they jriay their role in 
the bombings,” Mr Reyshahri 
said. 

He said foe same network 
was responsible for at least 
four previous explosions in 
Qom and one in Tehran 
Mr Reyshahri said a plan 
by a different group to explode 
bombs at a Friday prayer 
meeting in Tehran and four 
economic centres last month 
was foiled and its members 
arrested, together with a third 
group involved in previous 
explosions in Tehran. 



Memorial to murder that awoke a nation 


Mrs Aquino, left, tmveQing a marker at Manila airport, 
where her husband died. On her left is Mrs Goretta King. 


Aquino in tribute 
to her husband 

From Keith Dalton, Manila 

PresideniAquinoledtensof yellow confetti from two Air 

Force helicopters. Families 
came to the rally in yellow T- 
shirt5 waring balloons, flags 
and streamers in Mrs Aqu- 
ino's campaign colour. 

• Peace talks: Mrs Aquino is 
making the first attempt in a 
decade to try to negotiate an 
end to a Muslim war in the 
southern Philippines. In 15 
years of sporadic fighting, 
more than 60.000 people have 
been killed. 

Mr Agapito Aquino, the 
President's brother-in-law, 
has flown to Saudi Arabia for 
preliminary peace talks begin- 
ning in Jeddah at the weekend 
with the chief Muslim rebel 
leader. Mr Nur Misuari, chair- 
man of the More National 
Liberation Front (MNLF)- 
Mr Misuari, who is said to 
control a 5.000-strong rebel 
army, ordered a ceasefire two 
weeks ago. His chief inter- 
national supporter. Colonel 
Gadaffi, the Libyan leader, 
has offered Mrs Aquino his 
assistance in ending the guer- 
rilla war on the island of 
Mindanao and the Sulu 
archipelago. 

As the President's special 
emissary. Mr Aquino said his 
top priority was to “convince 
the MNLF that the Govern- 
ment is sincere in its desire to 
find a lasting solution to the 
war in Mindanao” where most 


thousands of Filipinos in 
observing yesterday the third 
anniversary of the murder of 
her husband. Benigno. by 
unveiling a granite marker at 
the airport tarmac where he 
was killed. 

The 6 fi-long slab, bearing 
the silhouette likeness of his 
prostrate body, was imbedded 
at the spot where Mr Benigno 
“Ninoy” Aquino fell dead 
after being shot in the head, 
allegedly by a member of a 
military escort. 

“The nation was awakened 
by that deafening shot,” Mrs 
Aquino later told a huge 
crowd at RizaJ Park in the 
city's centre. "Thanks to all of 
you, his offering of his life was 
not in vain." 

Mrs Aquino and her family 
accompanied by Mrs Coretta 
King, widow of the assas- 
sinated American civil rights 
leader. Dr Martin Luther 
King, had earlier attended a 
memorial service at the Santo 
Domingo Church. 

"It look three, long years 
before we could see the fruits 
of Ninoy’s sacrifice.” the 
Archbishop of Manila. Cardi- 
nal Jaime Sin. told 8.000 
people who gave a standing 
ovation to the woman who 
ended the 20-year Marcos 
regime. 

Chants -of “Cory, Cory” . 

erupted as the Rizal Park of the country's five million 
crowd was showered with Muslims live. 


Bank code 
of Marcos 
uncovered 

Honolulu (AFP) - Mr 
Ferdinand Marcos, the ousted 
Philippine President, and bis 
wife Imelda used an elaborate 
code to pass messages to 
overseas representatives abouf 
secret foreign hank accounts; 
it was reported here yesterday: 

The Honolulu Advertiser 
said it had obtained copies of 
documents presented to the 
Philippines Commission o» 
Good Government which con- 
tained details of these codes. - 
The paper said foe docu- 
ments, copies of which were 
sent to Mr Marcos at his exile 
home here, included descrip-' 
dons of clandestine commu- 
nications, codes and false 
names used when he was 

President. 

These showed that they 
opened secret accounts with 
the Swiss Credit Bank in 1968. 
making deposits and with- 
drawals under foe names Wil- 
liam Saunders and Jane Ryan. 

If they wanted to nuke 
withdrawals from the accounts 
they sent a "happy birthday” 
message to a representative in 
Zurich. Switzerland. 

This agent would then con- 
tact his representative In Hong 
Kong, who would then presum- 
ably travel to Manila for 
in st ruc ti ons. • 

• HONOLULU: Mr Marcos 
underwent a 40-minnte cata- 
ract operation on his right eye, 
a spokesman for him said 
(Reuter reports). 



Whatevever happens, 
you’re guaranteed to be 3*25% up. 


No matter whether interest rates rise or fell during the 
next two years, you're guaranteed a frill 3-25% above our. 
share rate. 

/fight now that means you'll be earning an interesting 
8-50%" net pa which, with twice -yearly interest paid into 
Premier Guarantee, compounds to a healthy 8-6&V> net pa. 


8 - 50 % 

8 - 68 % 

MONTHLY 

INCOME 

■ 

NET PA 

NET COMPOUND ANJO AI KATF 

OPTION 



Or, you can opt to cake your interest as monthly income 
at a guaranteed 300% above our share rate which will 
currently give you 8-25% net. 

' Either way, all you need invest is a minimum of .£2,500. 

If you need to take some money out, well need just 60 
days' notice to protect your interest 

Kou can have immediate access to your money bu t you 
will forfeit 60 days' interest on the amount you withdraw. 

But, whatever the fete of interest rates might be, 
Premier Guarantee makes it crystal dear that you'll be ahead. 



Birmingham 

Midshires 


Building Society 


We oxtor i cheque no. fori 

(mnumuin investment £ZSOO jtobe otveMcd in Btnnin^un) Mubhtro Pnrtrucr 
Guarantee Account. 

I KSH MY' INTEREST TCI BE PUD IN THE WAY SELECTED BBjDV I plrw lick bn* l 


tVrtREST PAYMENT METHOD 

tATlUN 

IdECTLD 

Radw me inaMuMM) rmiiroe. u< ‘ternl. AOTwnt ur 
B>tou>ytiam>liAh»<tVutc Awmbl 


Octfcnlmkv icah lo an on 1*1 muerGmr.nmcc Account- 


RuliWKcwcrtt aunm-our "Baik AccismibfCfrdA lomfcr 


Paid i** \nd» tpincunbv dxtpif .pn rtttnRihc man a 

ClOarmer 



■MHUilA 

Name oi Payee , 
Bank 


Code. 


Branch Name 


Bank Account No - - . _ 

Please send men* your Prenbcr Guarantee Account leaflet. 
Name 
Address 


Pent Code 


TTtcSoom *-01 adotontedge twSpi erf your ch«;uc woOnri seven flayv T , 


We’ve got together. You’ve got to gain. 

Birmingham Mktehires Building Society has been created by the merger of Birmingham and Bridgwater, and MkJ&hires Building Societies. 

dad AitonogjfonBo Oftce POBtnBl -W-mtuUthddSora * u l iuUu npwnttM IB- M [090J)~ltno 
MmwntwirftftcBijrfiJh^focicocijWicota.’o md Inrnaor, ftoceettaa Sehemc Asw&cttert ■U.ftWmffltan tesowslqexcraof AWinfltlkin Merew me*. un un 





8 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


***** * 


SL 


SPECTRUM 


j 

s 

tc 

N 

d- 

n 

fc 

it 

C 

n- 

r< 

ai 

y« 

o 

n 

it 

rr 

T 

u 

IT 

li 

lc 

Y 

P 

H 

O' 

T 

tf 

u 

fr 

tf 

C( 

at 

al 


T 

v, 

in 

ai 

in 

le 

it 

d; 

“i 

CT 

te 

P' 

& 

tf 

w 

R 

rr 

P 1 

li 


IA 

I- 


k m 
I • 


« -4 

• 41 


Jews who hate the Jews 


A miniature 'holy 
war" provoked by 
Ultra-Orthodox Jews 
.of different sects in 

Israel has more to 
do with money than 
the Old Testament, 
writes Ian Murray 

I n ihcir big fur hats and striped' 
Sunday coats, ihe most ex- 
treme Ultra-Orlhodox Jews 
are known as "zebras'’. Their 
fellow Jerusalemites consider 
they are a bigger problem than the 
Arabs. 

Recent opinion polls show that the 
aggressive behaviour of these deter- 
mined enemies of Israel is seen as a 
real danger to the safety of the state. 
According to one poll, they are 
“unacceptable" to 67 per cent of the 
national population. 

The Ultra -Orthodox community 
is also growing much faster, propor- 
tionately. than the less religious or 
secular "Jews. There are now more 
than S5.0G0 of them among the 
330.000 Jews in the city, and they 
have grown by 30.000 in the past 
decade. This means that they need to 
find housing away from their tra- 
ditional quarters centred on the Mea 
She’arim district. 

Fears that the Ultra-Orthodox will 
rise in force and impose their rules 
on everyday life has led to mass 
demonstrations against the building 
of a synagogue at French HilL a 
modem suburb to the north-east of 
the city. Without a synagogue in 
walking distance, an Ultra-Orthodox 
Jew would not be able to live there. 

Secular protection societies have 
been set up. protests have been 
organized and recently a mass 
demonstration was held at the 
Knesset, sponsored by the religious 
kibbutz movement, backed by the 
Chief Rabbis and addressed by 
President Chaim Herzog - ana 
Anatoly Shcharansky. The Soviet 
dissident told the crowd: "We have 
overcome the pogroms and fires 
from without Now we must put out 
the fires from within " 

The Chief Rabbis, though, did not 
attend. A mixed choir of religious 
and non-religious kibbutz members 
was due to sing there, and the leaders 
of the Orthodox community dared 
not be seen in such company. The 
Ultra-Orthodox have got the Chief 
Rabbis running scared.' 

It is wrong to classify’ all the Ultra- 
Orthodox as being the same. There 
arc dozens of different groups, which 
adds to their extremism. Rafi 
Da vara is the official at Jerusalem 
City Hall who has to referee between 
them. “They all compete", he ex- 
plains. "They cannot allow anyone 
to be more extreme than they are. so 
they all keep with whoever makes 
thc’most demands." 

The most extreme total no more 
than 5.000 and live in or around Mea 
She’arim. They are members of 
Ncturai Kartah ’who have developed . 
a flair down the years for outrageous 
protests and actions which keep, 
them at the forefront of public 
attention. 

Their founder. Rabbi Am ram 
Blau, once asked President Nixon to 
free the community from Israeli 
control. Followers have won exemp- 
tion from national service, have 
refused to pay income lax. issue their 
own passports and have their own 
"foreign minister”, a white-bearded 
rabbi from New Jersey called Moshe 
Hirsh, who has .a brilliant flair for 
publicity. 

They are in regular contact with 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 

ITHES 


Photographs by Laooerd Fread/Mapruri 



‘Despite the tiny rooms, families of seven children are usual in Ultra Orthodox families. It is a very limited existence, especially for youngsters* 


lion and recently received a thank- 
you letter from Yassir Arafat for 
expressing their condolences after 
Israel's bombing raid on the 
organization's Tunis headquarters 
last October. 

They have prevented the building 
of a new football stadium for 
Jerusalem, and threw stones at so 
many cars using a road near their 
district on the Sabbath that a £15 
million bypass had to be builLA 
freelance photographer used to be 
contacted by them every Friday 
evening and tipped off as to where 
Ihc stone-throwing would be heavi- 
est. His pictures of armed police 
charging into harmless-looking 
groups were bought by the “zebras" 


and posted off to America, where 
they helped to raise sympathy and 
funds. 

According to Rafi Davara. a main 
reason behind all the aggression is 
the need to raise money to feed the 
community. The men rarely work 
and the women cannot earn enough 
to keep them. They rely heavily for 
survival on donations and, in some 
cases, on government money. 

Neturai Kartah honours its prin- 
ciples. and members do not accept 
social security money from the state 
of Israel, which they do not acknowl- 
edge. Their financial needs are 
therefore even greater. This leads 
them into protests which fuel the 
publicity they need for fund-raising. 


especially among conscientious Jews 
living overseas. 

Although the group is tiny, its lead 
is followed by tens of thousands of 
Jews on many of the issues which it 
takes up. It wins support because of a 
deep feeling that the community 
stands by the religious ideals which 
helped Judaism to Survive and led to 
the establishment of the state of 
Israel. 

A mong those influenced by 
Neturai Kartah are the 
small religious parties 
which have members in 
the Knesset Keeping the 
religious parties happy has in turn 
become a preoccupation of the main 
parties, who know that they can 


never form their own government 
without this extra support. 

The sale of pork, playing soccer on 
the sabbath and serving kosher food 
in the army all become national 
issues which a major political party 
must wrestle with if it is to stay in 
power. And although it may seem 
ridiculous to the outside world, the 
'burning of bus shelters by the Ultra- 
Orthodox protesting at pictures of 
girls in swimsuits has to be taken 
seriously by the political parties. 

According to Rafi Davara at City 
Hall, there is a further reason for the 
Ultra-Orthodox aggression over this. 
He believes that the pictures of the 
women represent a real danger to the 
small community, which is so pro- 
tected from modern life. 


T he big pendulum 
dock looks down 
on the tiny square 
showing its motto 
in Hebrew and Eih 
glisb. “This Torah clock is 
not under Zionist influence", 
it says. The dock has 
stopped, and time itself ap- 
pears to have . stood still 
around it for a century and 
more. 

It stands atop a jeweller's 
shop at the corner of Ein 
Ya’acov Street facing a 
fluorescent orange poster 
proclaiming “Nazhmism Is 
Racism". This is the heart of 
Mea She’arim, the Ultra- 
Orthodox dtadel half-a-mile 
or so outside the old dty 
walls, where the writ of 
Israeli law does not ran, but 
where many of those arrested 
for defacing and burning 
Jerusalem bus shelters live. 

The old walls round the 
district manage to keep out a 
great deal of the twentieth 
century, with the help of 
large numbers of posters. 
These urge residents to “kill 
the tax collectors" to refuse 
autopsies, and to make sure 
nobody enters the area im- 
modestly dressed. Men most 
have their heads covered. 
Women must have skirts 
below the knee and high on 


• v. •: • 



“From kindergarten at the age of three, boys spend at least 10 hours a day in study" 


the neck, and show no arms 
above the elbow. 

Inhabitants are mostly 
supporters of Neturai 
Kartah, an Aramaic phrase 
meaning “guardians of the. 
dty" founded 70 years ago 
by those who believe that 
Zionism is contrary to bib- 
lical teaching because there 
can be no Jewish state until 


the coming of the Messiah. 
Content to live under Turk- 
ish and British rale, the 
group saw in Zionism a 
profanity which became a 
reality with the creation of 
Israel. 

For this reason, the group 
encourages the PLO to bring 
back Arab rale. If that were 
to happen, they believe, the 


Messiah would come quickly 
to save them, for there is no 
celestial urgency as long as 
Jerusalem is ruled by Jews. 

In recent years, the group 
has become readier to resort 
to stone-throwing, arson and 
other violent methods to' 
defend their way of life. 

For boys, that way begins 
when they enter the hater 


(kindergarten) from the age 
of three to start learning 
simple Hebrew Bible texts. 
By the time they are seven, 
they are learning civil and 
ceremonial law in Aramaic in 
their first yeshba (Bible 
• school). 

They stay there until their 
arranged marriages, at about 
the age of 18, when they 
enter their adult yeskita, 
where they -spend most of 
their rest of their lives in 
study. From the holer on- 
wards, they spend at least 10 
hours a day over their books. 

Mm do not work, and for 
the most part the women 
have to look after the chil- 
dren. Despite the tiny rooms 
and bouses, families of seven 
children and more are usuaL 

Television is frowned on, it 
is rare to hear a radio, and a 
newspaper stall nearby has 
been burnt out more than 
once. The owner believes it is 
to stop newspapers being 
read as mnch to protest at 
any pictures of girls they 
might contain. 

It is a very limited exis- 
tence, especially for the 
young people, who have no 
real outlet for their normal 
energies beyond joining In 
demonstrations. 


(TIMES 1 


SATURDAY 



£12,000 to be won 



Monocted mutineer paid McCann as Topi* 

Tearaway Toplis 

Wanted for desertion (on numerous occasions) and 
impersonating an officer (occasionally), Percy Toplis 
crammed a remarkable amount of petty crime into his 
23 years. Toplis, anarchist and anti-hero of the First 
World War, is set to become a folk hero in ‘The 
Monocled Mutineer', Alan Bleasdale's latest work for 
television 


Heritage 

afloat 

Historic ships 
to visit 


Bank holiday 
Jumho 
The big 
crossword 


Carnival of the heart and soul 


Can you always get your copy of The Times ? 


Dear Newsagent, please deliver/save me a copy ofThe Times 

NAME 


ADDRESS. 


The million or so visitors 
expected on Sunday and Mon- 
day at the 2i5i Notting Hill 
Carnival have to thank Carib- 
bean slave plantation workers 
for the origin of the event, 
which was a celebration of the 
sugar cane - harvest before 
being assimilated into their 
owners’ Shrove Tuesday 
festivities. 

Trinidad leads and inspires 
the Anglophone calendar, 
which extends through the 
other West Indian islands to 
Toronto. London and New 
York, ‘in all these places. 
Trinidadians form the core of 
carnival participants, and tak- 
ing part in the carnival itself is 
only the culmination .of 
months of activity. 

No sooner have one year's 
discarded costumes been 
swept from the streets than 
plans begin for the following 
year. To Trinidadians, car- 
nival means fun. obviously, 
but serious and potent fun 
which subsumes high creativ- 
ity and the liberation of the 
spirit from the constraints of 
an often mean, hum-drum or 
unequal daily existence. 

To city administrations, 
carnival means big bucks and 
subsidies arc normally forth- 
coming (£100.000 from vari- 
ous sources for London, much 
more in Trinidad, but nothing 
in New York). 

While carnival committees 
are talking sponsorship, 
organization and community 
politics, thousands of individ- 
uals arc preparing for the 
various categories of com- 
petition which take place not 
only “on the road” (at two 
judging points on the carnival 
procession route) but at the 
preceding gala weekend. 


The Notting Hill carnival, which opens 
on Sunday, owes its colourful origins to 
Caribbean slaves and sugar harvesting 

'SAsjL-*** 



Wonder full; joy is of the essence for Notting Hill revellers 


This year the location was a 
complex of circus tents behind 
Wormwood Scrubs prison. 
Throughout Sunday evening, 
accompanied by booming 
soca music (a fusion of soul 
and calypso), a succession of 
pretenders to the titles of King 
and Queen of the Bands, and 
Best Male and Female In- 
dividuals sashayed their 
glittering costumes across the 
stage. (Band in this context 
means Costume Band, a group 
of up to ISO masqueraders 
united by a common theme 
and designer.) 

Anyone can join a band 
simply by turning up at its 
“camp” (usually a school or 
church hall) a few months 


before camivaL putting up the 
money for a costume (£25. 
say. subsidized in some cases 
by modest arts council grants) 
and “playing ’mas". . 

in Trinidad, top designers 
like Peter Minshall create 
complex tableaux of up to 
1.000 people and receive na- 
tional acclaim. In London the 
scope is more limited. but the 
costumes still arouse intense 
rivalry - and controversy. 
Sunday's crop at Wormwood 
Scrubs ranged from modest 
renditions of traditional 
characters such as Pierrot the 
Fancy Sailor, to 30-foot-high 
phantasmagoria in bamboo, 
silk and tinsel. 

Some of the structures were 


so extensive that they needed 
wheels and runners to support 
them, but the real art is in 
creating a costume, (ike 
Minshall’s beautiful “Callaloo 
Dancing Tic Tac Toe Down 
de River", which moves with 
its wearer to the music that is 
the fundamental heartbeat of 
carnival. Numerous costume 
bands follow a steel band, and 
last Saturday's Panorama was 
for these players of the pans. A 
steel band needs anything up 
to 50 dedicated amateur mu- 
sicians, a tuner, a leader, an 
arranger/director and. if pos- 
sible, a sponsor. 

The Panorama competition 
was preceded by the 
Brassorama. contested by 
“brass" bands 1 which usually 
consist of a four-piece brass 
section with electric guitar, 
bass and keyboards and as- 
sorted percussion. 

The bands play soca. tbe 
main features of which are a 
hard bouncing beat a limited 
range of melodic formulae and 
flaring brass interludes which 
inspire listeners to raise their' 
arms .to the sky and "move 
their waists". . 

Brass bands also provide 
the backing for the calypso 
singers. Competitions for 
calypsonians are judged on the 
basis of musical arrangement, 
presentation and, above all. 
lyrics, which must be new 
each year. In addition to the 
amateur London calypso- 
nians. there are several mem- 
bers of the international 
calypso circus in .town. These 
singers and an isles travel 
from one carnival to another 
and will be heading for Brook- 
lyn next week. 

Philip. Sweeney 

Q TTbmw He w aptmUd. 1888 


I sold it through 
the grapevine 

Soundalike singers with yesterday’s 


songs are selling everything from jeans 
to cars to beefburgers, as advertisers 
discover the power of rock and pop 


Pop music sells —and not just 
records. For years, advertiscre 
have recognised tbe potency 
of cheap music as a hidden 
persuader. But now the ad 
music industry is taking off. 
The whole history of pop and 
rock is being harvested. 

One of the centres of this 
new industry is in Islington, 
north London. There, with all 
the perfection expected in a 
recording studio, the voice or 
Kate Robbins, a cousin of 
Paul McCartney, snaps and 
whimpers from gigantic 
speakers. Her 30-second track 
features a threatening rhythm 
and strutting, contemptuous 
vocals in the manner of Grace - 
Jones. It is not immediately 
apparent that Ms Robbins is 
hawking hair conditioner. 

The soundtrack for a new 
Cream Silk commercial is 
being mixed. Listening with a 
laid-back intensity are Karl 
Jenkins and Mike 
Ratledge,members of (Soft 
Machine until its demise, four 
years ago and now the most 
spectacularly influential 


bands discreetly revealed 
their O-levels or better. Jen- 
kins points out that he htS4 
classical music background. 

But rock, in a& its vari- 
ations. is the domiiwm form 
in their work. At first this 
seems bizarre - why should 
ancient soul classics sett jeans 
to teenagers? In the past every 
previous new musical wave 
usually consigned the. pre- 
vious wave to oblivion. 

What has happened is that 
with ageing rockers still popu- 
lar. vastly increased air time 
and the bland qualities of 
most of today's music, the 
young can recognise music 
from tbe past 30 yea re. 

Pop and rock find their way 
into ads in a variety of ways. 
Coca-Cola's worldwide hit 
*Td Like to Teach the World 
to Sing" in tbe early 1970s 
came from ah almost un- 
known song called “True 
Love and Apple Pie" which 
the company bought in to use 
as a radio ad 

In other cases the lyrics are 
changed to fit the product. 



Jean genius: Sixties serenade for Levi lover in a launderette 


SOUND INVESTMENTS 


Coca Cota: l*d Ute to Teach tha World to Sing/New Seekers 
British Caledonian: Caflfomia (Caledonia) Gfcts/Baach Boys 
Edam cheeses; Great Bans of Fire (Cheese)/ Jerry Lee Lewis- 
PirefiHyms: Riders on the Storfn/Tne'Doars 
DHL cwHfers: Ain t-NoMoOntain High Biough/pfana Ross 
Farleys rusks; Wake Up Little Susie (SnoazyWEverly Brothers 
Wimpy buigera; Come on Over to My Place/Driftere 
Youngs sea food: The Youngfs) Qnes/CWf Richard 
National Westnrinsten Pinhafl Wizard/The Who 
Rowntraes jelly: Stakin' All Over/Johmy Kidd 
The Guardlim: Puppet on a Strinq/Sancfle Shaw 
British Raft Every Breath You Take/Tha Police 
Bassetts jelly babies; What do you wanf/Adam Faith 
Renault 5: Speedy Gonzalez/Pat Boone 
Eucryl toothpaste: Tobacco Road/NashvHle' Teens 



Rocking back to happiness; from left, Sandie Shaw, the 
Everly Brothers and Adam Faith, golden oldies dusted oft 

producers rof advertising mu- frequently with excruciating 


sic They have been respon- 
sible for the “Wonderful 
World” and “I Heard It 
Through The Grapevine” re- 
creations which transformed 
Levi jeans. More recently 
they backed the Renault 21 ad 
with Jade Bruce singing “1 
Fed Free.” 

It was clear from the begin- 
ning that using the original 
Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye 
records would cost too much. 
So Jenkins and Ratledge had 
to produce exact replicas 
down to the recording hiss. 
They hired old-fashioned 
valve equipment to duplicate 
the production techniques of 
the originals. For “I Feel 
Free” their rock contacts 
enabled them to employ tire 
original singer — Bruce — but 
with a new and not quite 
identical arrangement 
They are a tad turn pair. 
Now aged 41 and 42, they are 
both heavily moustachioed 
and long-haired in the man- 
ner of the Woodstock Genera- 
tion, and they are both 
instantly defensive at any 
suggestion that advertising is 
an activity inferior to rock ‘n’ 
roll or indeed to anything 
else. And, just like in the old 
days when "progressive* 


results — as with . British 
Caledonian’s use of "Califor- 
nia Girls" as “Caledonian 
Girls” or Edam Cheese's 
downright bizarre “Great 
Balls of Cheese". 

But rewriting tends to de- 
value tbe impact of the 
recognisable song. It seems to 
be more potent to retain the 
original mare or less intact. 
Last year, for example, Pirelli 
made tyres seem haunting 
and fascinating with a re- 
creation ofThe Doors' "Rid- 
ers on the Storm” and DHL is 
selling a delivery service with 
a version of The" Supremes* 
"Ain’t No Mountain High 
Enough.” Elsewhere. Farleys 
Rusks has taken on “Wake 
Up Little Susie", Concorde 
Wine is using "Let the Good 
Times Roll" and Wimpy is 
selling burgers with "Come 
on Over to My Place". 

An advanced form of this 
type of ad has been used by 
Renault, British Rail. 
Bassetts and Eucryl. They sell 
respectively the Renault 5. 
train tickets, jelly babies and 
toothpaste by stringing- to- 
gether snatches of recreated 
pop songs. 

Bryan Appleyard 

©Ttaw Nawapwwi Lid, 1M6 



s CON CISE CROSSWORD NO 1035 

ACROSS 

I ApusApus birds <61 

$ Chinese daic (6) 

9 Pan- African body 
<U.1> 

9 Gated ski course (6) 

10 Cleansing stream (6) 

11 Russian Emperor (4) 

12 Extra work period (S) 

14 Communist (6) 

17 Temper by heal (6) 

19 Pet ink (8) 

22 Gullible people (4) 

24 Sexual urge (6) 

25 History records (6) 

26 Lucrative (3) 

27 Respectable (6) 

28 Vitality (6) 

DOWN 

- 2 Old triple time dance 
(5) 

3 Leverage point (7) 

4 A person (7) 

5 Assess (5) 

6 Knightly tournament 
. I5l 


BHSiaaH 3B2B 




EiJ-l-TT 

7 Artist's area (71 
«3 Cricket score (3 j 

15 Opening!?) 

16 In jhc name of God 

17 Cellulose fibre (7) 


Jllflll 
■ ■ ■ 


n 


18 Designatinfpcni 
. 1 7) . 

26 Suhl3) ; 

21 Dp above! is I 
23 Soviet pmon so 
IS) 


Demob .13 


SOLUTION TO NO HIM 

ACROSSt 8 Encyclopaedia 9 Awe in Acoustics fr 
Younger 16 Gckw«s 19 Togas 22 AniiscmmMZen' 

■ ^Scramble 4 Colony 5 Mas -6' Ad 
IP*- 12 Ego_ 14 Ultimate 15 Eva 16 Gratia 17 Detest 

Sermon 20Garebo 21 Singer ZSScm : T***?! 










■CrirtHrir* SL 


tJriii l iivlcS fRIDAl" AUG via i 22 i^ou 




ll 


UK-^S 

,, a Pew 

t>; .. Boss and secretary 

often spend more 
: • ; of>>^ time together than 

'' u Jn with their spouses. 
Heather Kirby 




FRIDAY PAGE 


woman 


ftwagnph* by Rot Qnr*«mr 


Another warning for the 
high-peak climbers 


' *'*'.+.**& 

. .w 

' - 1 *, § Mi 

•••?'. 'mS 
■■■■*?$ 

• 

■ ‘Sc r-LS 

■■ 


V ■• . Sr 
■■ 

• s- . p - 

• ^ 45 

- s r^. 

•; 

' - 


■i 




talked to four such 
pairs about their 
office ‘marriages' 


Like nurses. the importance . 
and scope of whai secretaries 
do varies from the incon-* 
sequential to the life-saving. 
And like nurses, whose pro- 
fessionalism is often obscured 
by the ahgcls-in-black-stock- 
ings imagery., the worth of a 
top secretary gets scam regard, 
thanks largely to the lingering 
image of dolly birds enjoying a 
romp behind the filing cabinet 
at the office party.. 

The two are not of the same 
breed, yet the image of the 
latter must have caused some 
discomfort to the former when 
h was recently suggested by a 
City recruitment consultant 
that a secretary's relationship 
with her boss is like a mar- 
riage. The fact remains, none 
the Jess, that the higher up the 
ladder the boss climbs, the 
closer must the relationship 
become. 

Diana Duggan, a director of 
City Recruitment Consultants 
and herself a former secretary, 
says: “The average boss-sec- 
retary relationship occupies 
more hours of the day than the 
average - husband-wife 



Business partners: John Dehnitz with his secretary Rita Buckley (left) and Peter Gammer with Angela 


•O^triHVEsruars 


•r 6 





... 


relationship and is very much 
like a marriage. In fact, in 
many ways, his secretary will 
be closer to him than his wife 
because she knows honestly 
what his standing is within the 
company. 

“So our role cian be likened 
to a marriage bureau. We 
remove the dangers of a ‘blind 
date' by eliminating those 
secretaries who. though good, 
will not suit a particular client 
He won't for instance, want to 
employ someone with an in- 
terest in amateur dramatics if 
he knows she has to work late 
two or three evenings a week. 
It's our job to see that the boss 
and his secretary don't end up 
with an office; wdivorce'-T 

A good secretary, she says, 
can command £10.000 to 
£14.000 a year, has no com- 
pany car but is often ferried to 
and fro by her boss's chauf- 
feur. is given such perks as 
first-night theatre tickets and- 
is often on first name terms- 
with the rich and famous. 

Peter Gammer, who heads ' 
Shandwick Communications, 
a public relations company 
with 500 clients, endorses 
some of those views. “My wife 
would certainly support the 
statement that 1 spend more 
time with my secretary Angela 
Lello than 1 do with her. I 
begin work at 7 and finish at 7. 
Angela, is here by 8. but she 
always leaves after me. 

“A relationship which 
works has to involve a 
combination of closeness and 
aloofness. To get things done 
at speed you have to have a 


healthy respect for each other. 
A good secretary can make 
sure that you keep the home 
situation to the fore, give you 
a nudge that you have can- 
celled 'that dinner date twice. 
She acts as your conscience. 

Tlf I have had a beastly 
week I will buy her a bunch of 
flowers, but that is about the 
extent of my chivalry. I never 
take her out for lunch because 
I should think she has fer 
better things to do.** 

Angela, who is 42 and 
married with three sons, says: 
“There is a subtle difference in 
the office ‘marriage' between a- 
boss and his secretary — your 
emotions are not involved. It 
is very important to get on 
with the wife, however. You 
are the link between office and 


‘No doubt that 
chemistry 
is important’ 

Z JOHN DEBNITZ 


home; and have to be able to 
put it" very nicely that he is 
going to be late for dinner. 

“Secretaries have to be a 
little subservient. The boss is 
always right, but ifyou believe 
he is a little wrong, there are 
many subtle ways in which 
you can deal with that!” 

John Debnitz. aged 36. the 
managing director of Valin 
Pollen, a financial commu- 
nications company, says of his 
secretary Rita Buckley: 
“There is a strong understand- 
ing between the two of us. 
There is no question that 


chemistry is important in a 
close working relationship, 
but it is not an emotional love 
relationship. 

“I lake considerable trouble 
over buying presents for her 
and every two weeks f go out 
and buy her a box of choc- 
olates. There is an element of 
an ally relationship between 
your wife and your secretary. 
My wife knows fill! well there 
are things 1 may forget so she 
wouldn't hesitate to call Rita.** 

- Rita says: “John very often 
takes me out to lunch at a 
good restaurant, the same sort 
of place he would take ‘a 
client" Her boyfriend often 
has to bear with her cancelling 
theatre at the last minute 
when work goes on late, but 
she says there are compensa- 
tions. “John treats me very 
much as an equal person. He 
is willing to listen to my point 
of view and take it into 
account" 

Sir Peter Parker, chairman 
of the Rockware Group (for- 
mer chairman of British Rail) 
has taken his secretary. Gwen 
Cowan, from one boardroom 
to another for 30 years, but he 
does not agree with the mar- 
riage analogy. 

■ “Gwen is part of the family 
apd it is confusing to bring in 
fancy words like marriage", be 
says. “It is much more like 
brother and sister. If the 
relationship has been fun all 
along, it will last 

“I have very few depart- 
mental walls in my life: you 
could call me an industrial 
fanner. Fanners don’t have 
office hours, their whole life is 
what they do. and I live like 
that Gwen and I know each 
other and trust each other 


utterly. She orchestrates my 
work. People say you can't get 
Peter because Gwen won't let 
you. but she has to see to it 
that I am coping with the right 
things when there is 360 
degrees of pressure." 

Gwen, who is married to a 
retired civil servani and is a 


‘It’s more like 
brother 
and sister’ 

SIR PETER PARKER 


founder-member of the Euro- 
pean Association of Pro- 
fessional Secretaries, says: 
“You do tend to live in each 
other's pockets for a consid- 
erable part- of the day. The 
■longer you-are with them, the 
more you get inside their 
mind You know their re- 
actions to certain situations, 
so when people say ‘Do you 
think he might..?’, you 
instinctively know when he'll 
want you to get out of that 

“The _ boss-secretarv 
relationship could not work !f 
you didn’t have a good rap- 
port with his wife as well. 
Personal things like remem- 
bering to get the wife’s or 
children’s birthday presents 
are put to one side in the life of 
a top busjnessman." 

Cal am MacaskiU, the op- 
erations director of the Hali- 
fax building society, has bad 
the same secretary. Elaine 
Schofield, for 15 years. “A 
boss-secretary relationship is 
like a marriage in that it 
requires excellent commu- 


nication and willing co- 
operation". he says. 

“1 buy her modest presents 
at Christmas and on birth- 
day’s. but it's more than my 
job’s worth to take her out to 
lunch. Halifax is a small 
village! I rely on her to 
organize my daily business life 
entirely, and in terms of | 
business decisions 1 will con- 
' suit her as a consumer. 

“Men who employ sec- 
retaries as status symbols are 
indicating their own im- 
maturity and bolstering their 
own delusions of grandeur." 

“He is a very easy man to 
work for" says Elaine. “When 
you have been together for a 
long time, your relationship is 
so dose you think like one 
another, so you don't have to 
ask a lot of questions all the 
time. 

“If I am left for days on .end 
to make decisions about him 
and his life, he lends’ not to go 
bananas if I make the wrong 
one. He is a very thoughtful 
and generous man and some- 
times hd has to resort to a gift 
voucher because he runs out 
of ideas for me." 

© Tin** Nmnpapara Ud, 1986 


British climbers Jnlfe Tallis 
and Alan Rouse, like many 
modern day mountaineers, 
were not carrying oxygen 
when they died of exhaustion 
in a storm on K2 earlier this 
month. 

According to Dennis Gray, 
general secretary of the Brit- 
ish Mountaineering Council, 
this tmdoobtedly contributed 
to their death. It is a tragic 
reminder of the dangers 
climbers lace when they see it 
as “more challenging" or 
“more rewarding" to attempt 
very high peaks without a 
backup oxygen supply. 

As a recent article in The 
Lancet pointed out, climbing 
without oxygen could not only 
put dimbers in immediate 
danger. They may also risk 
longer-lasting effects. The au- 
thor Dr John West, from the 
University of California, says 
that there is growing evidence 
to suggest tut climbing with- 
out oxygen can canse perma- 
nent brain damage. 

A study of 21 members of 
Che American Medical Re- 
search Expedition to Everest, 
published in 1984. showed 
that after three months at 
5400 to 8848 metres, mem- 
bers had co-ordination and 
memory abnormalities which 
lasted for op to a year. 

In another study, six Polish 
climbers who went higher 
than 5500 metres m the 
Himalayas showed immedi- 
ate signs of brain disfonction 
as well as changes in mood 
and memory which lasted 
several weeks. 

“Many doctors believe that 
professional boxing shonld'be 
discouraged because of the 
possibility of brain injury. 
Perhaps the present fashion 
for climbing to extreme alti- 
tudes without supplementary 
oxygen falls Into the same 
category". Dr West says. 

Rugger bugs 

As rugby 

training gears 
up for the new 
season, play 
ers are being 
asked to hon- 
our a 

“ gentleman’s agreement" on 
a simple health measure . 
Doctors in the department of 
microbiology of St Thomas's 
Hospital ; London, are asking 
teams not to field players who 
have signs of a skin in fection. 

The Lancet reports that two 
seasons ago : five members o] 
the St Thomas's scrum devel- 
oped impetigo, after plaving a 
team which had the infection. 
But the problem didn’t stop 
there. 

The condition, caused bv 


c 


MEDICAL 

BRIEFING 


) 





Streptococcus pyogenes, led 
to inflamed glands m one 
player and an acute kidney' 
injection in the other. 

The doctors suggesr that 
scrum players are prone to 
injection because they are in 
frequent dose contact with 
other players and because 
their skin is often damaged 
during the game. 

They say "the obvious pre- 
ventative measure is the 
enforcement of a gentleman's 
agreement not to field player 
with skin sepsis". 

For players who suffer a cut 
or graze they suggest that the 
disinfectant chlorhcxidinc 
should be applied after the 
match and .(or a couple of 
further days, ,-ln alternative 
would be an alcohol based 
disinfectant or iodine — also 
useful against other 
infections. 

Speedy recovery 

People with 
foot and ankle 
injuries may 
soon no 
longer need to 
rely on 
cumbersome 
crutches to get around, 
thanks to an imaginative 
patient 

When Michael Reid, 
managing director of John 
Reid & Sons (Slrucsteel) 
Limited. Christchurch. Dor- 
set found himself in hospital 
with an injured foot and 
discovered how awkward- 
crutches can be, he devised 
the “orthopaedic scooter", 
which has now gone into 
production. 

The scooier. on which the 
sufferer patient kneels, keeps 
the injured fool elevated 
(doctors say it heals better 
this way and patients say it is 
less painful) and allows easy 
mobility. 

One orthopaedic surgeon 
who asked for an early model 
was Professor Angus Wallace 
of the University Hospital. 
Nottingham. He liked the 
idea so much that he has 
started a clinical trial to see 
just who might benefit most 
from the device. 

His impression so for is 
that the scooter will not 
replace crutches entirely and 
that it is not suitable for 
people who have to 'efimb 
stairs or for elderly people 
who may have balance prob- 
lems. But he feds that pa- 
tients who have had a crush 


injury or surgery to the foot 
could benefit greatly. 

Professor Wallace also 
thinks that there appears to 
be a group of patients for 
whom the device can enable 
an carh return to work - 
including one of the three 
surgeons who have tried the 
scooter — he used it while he 
was operating. 

Breath of stress 


W 'W'WW Peop j e fee 

ing a stressful 
situation are 
SAAAA/ very ofteu told 
that taking a 
few deep 
LaAAjJ breaths “will 
help them to stay calm". But 
for people who unknowingly 
suffer from a condition called 
hyperventilation s> ndru me. 
this may be the worst possible 
advice. 

For these patients hyper- 
ventilation can bring on un- 
pleasant symptoms such as 
giddiness, palpitations, 
breathing difficulties and 
nausea. 

The problems arise be- 
came deep breathing at rest 
forces the carbon-dioxide 
concentration in the blood to 
unusual I > low levels and this 
affects the brain. 

Doctors now suspect that it 
may be quite common. Sev- 
eral studies have shown that 
young adults — and women in 
particular — tend to be most 
at risk. 

According to Dr George 
Perkin, consultant neurolo- 
gist at ffac Charing Cross 
Hospital, London, stress is 
the trigger. But many suffer- 
ers remain completely un- 
aware that they are 
responding to stress by mer- 
breatbing. ' They and tbeir 
doctors fear, quite wrongly, 
that something is seriousiv 
awry. 

In a series of patients with 
hyperventilation * syndrome 
attending the hospitaL sug- 
gested diagnoses included 
epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, 
migraine and a brain tumor. 

Happily, says Dr Perkin, 
once the correct diagnosis is 
made and patients under- 
stand what is happening, 
many can control the 
situation. 

Some need help with under- 
lying psychological problems 
but for many sufferers relax- 
ation therapy, which con- 
centrates on teaching 
improved breathing tech- 
niques, works welL 

Lorraine Fraser 
and Olivia Timbs 


Home is a tear-stained paradise 

„ : ' _ _ _ Raoul Shade 



* * * 


Victims of the long 
El Salvadorean civil 
war are finding 
comfort in the aid of 
a young girl far from 
her English roots 

FAR FROM the landowning 
set in East Yorkshire where 
she was raised. Annabel 
Robinson has discovered “a 
paradoxical paradise", m El 
Salvador, among the destitute 
. victims of the civil war. 

Red-haired, freckle-faced 
Annabel lives in a refugee 
camp on a lush hilltop, under 
the shadow of Guazapa vol- 
cano. the most bomb-pum- 
melled land mass in this tiny, 
war-devastated country. 

_ At night the refugees often 
lie awake on their camp beds, 
the walls of' their flimsy 
wooden buildings rattling as 
the bombs foil like thunder 
just three or four miles away. 

Yet 27-rvcar old Annabel is 
adamant: “I love it here. I. 
can't imagine anywhere more 
beautiful or anywhere 1 would 
rather be." 

The people she has chosen 
lo live with, and care fori have 
fled from their homes on 
Guazapa. most of them peas- 
ant women and children — 
campesinos — whose menfolk 
arc either fighting against, or 
have been killed by, the 
government army.' All have 
had their homes destroyed. 
Many have seen a neighbour 
— often a dose relative — tom 
to pieces by a bomb. 

One woman at the camp 
received a note from Guazapa 
last month telling her one of 
her two sons — she still does 
not know if it is the ten or the 
14-year-old — had had his eyes 
gouged out and his face 
skinned by government 
soldiers. ' • * 



Smiling through pain: Annabel and a young charge 

How does one deal -with her. Yet her year with 
people in such agony? “You ; Salvadorean country people 
can offer practical help: for has shown her a dominant 


example, drive them down to 
the church human rights office 
to denounce the crime. But the 
most important thing is just to 
be with them, listen to them 
cry with them." 

ANNABEL'S JOB at the camp 
is to organize, reading and 
writing classes. 'The children 
have never been to school 
before, and the illiteracy rate is 
more than 90 percent. “My 
students range in age from 
three to 75. The children can't 
tell the time but every time a 
plane passes overhead, they 
know exactly what type it is. 
what size .bombs it drops, 
what kind of machine guns it 
carries." 

One eight year old boy. lo 
whom Annabel is particularly 
attached, lives at the camp 


quality: an extreme gentleness 
combined with extraordinary 
resilience. "The kids have had 
such terrible lives but they're 
always so cheerful and their 
mothers are always fussing 
over me. helping me in any 
wav they can.” 

If Annabel loves the people 
she lives with, they adore her. 
Her treatment of the refugees 
is natural, simple and unerfy 
lacking in that condescension 
sometimes found in the .self* 
conscious do-gooder. 

“They're nuts abotil her. 
You’d have to go a long way to 
find another like Annabel” 


bearded man. often found 
driving around the dangerous 
Salvadorean countryside in a 
bright red Honda scooter. 
Father Michael has been im- 
pressed. above all by her 
enthusiasm to “sene the 
poor", not just providing for 
them but sharing their lives. 
Father Michael is in charge of 
all Jesuit refugee work in 
Mexico and Central America 
and it was to him that Annabel 
applied for a job. 

She had long thought about 
working with refugees. "How 
can anything worse happen to 
anybody than to lose every- 
thing and have to go and live 
in a camp? 

. “Tve always wanted to be 
with the people who need help 
most desperately, the people 
wbo've reached rock- 
bottom": says AnnabeL Here 
I've found them.” 

The lunatic right — many of 
them in the Salvadorean army 
- see Annabel's camp as a 
hotbed of guerrilla activity, 
and the death squads' could 
make an appearance at any 
moment But .Annabel — . like 
the two American nuns she 
works with — seems quite 
fearless, loo busy in work to 
spend time worrying about her 
chances (entirely plausible) of 
adding her name id that of the 
50.000 or so killed in El 
Salvador’s six year old 'dirty 
war'. 

She knows that eventually 
she will leave the camp, but 
she has no plans to abandon El 
Salvador. “I'm much more 
needed here, for example, 
than I would be in Nicaragua. 


says Sister Margaret, one of . the trendy place for foreigners 
two American Roman Catho- lo go. 


lie nuns who live at the camp. 

Father Michael Campbell- 
Jofanston. a British Jesuit, is 


with his grandfather. His . also amazed at the affection 
grandmother was killed, to- the English girl has managed 
gethcr with his father, mother to generate among a people to 
and three brothers and sisters whom, at first glance, she 
m a bombing raid in Septem- must have been so alien. A tall 


"I don't want to be any- 
where else but El Salvador. I 
want to go home to visit, but 
that’s alL Here I'm really 
needed. I love iL I've found 
my thing." 

John Carlin 


THE COMPLETE HOME FURNISHING STORE 



ITS OUT TODAY! 

THE NEW CATALOGUE 
WITH £5 VOUCHER INSIDE 

From 52 Habitat Stores or send a cheque for £!i0 made payable to Habitat Designs Ltd. 
P.0. Box 25, Wallingford, Oxon 0X10 9DQ or Credit Card holders can phone (0491) 35511. 







10 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 



J 

s 

lc 

N 

d- 

n 

ft 

W 

C 

n> 

rt 

ai 

Vi 

o 

n 

il 

IT 

T 

w 

rr 

li 

k 

Y 

P 

H 

O' 

T 

li 

u 

fi- 

ll 

Cl 

ai 

al 


T 

VJ 

in 
at 
i t. 
le 
it 
d< 
“i 
ci 
te 
pi 
b- 
t f 
w 
R 
tr 
P 1 
h 


T 

ir 

w 

a* 

U 

b 

li 

P 

si 

o 

> 

CI 

.A 

b 

f« 

c 

C 

k 

C 

Ci 

li 

h 

li 

f« 

o 

n 

n 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Not on the 
agenda 

Harry Phibbs. who yesterday re- 
signed as cdiior of the Conser- 
vaiivc student magazine .Vcnr 
. \gcndo after accusing Lord Stock- 
ton or war crimes, has fallen 

uncharactcristioilly silent after 

reaching an agreement with Cen- 
tral Office to make no further 
comments on the matter. I view 
this development as unfortunate, 
having hoped he could shed a little 
light on some information that has 
came to my attention. 1 gather that 
in the past he has been late paying 
the printers. Annagh Graphical of 
Ilford. Essex, who threatened not 
to prim the latest offending issue 
unless he came up with the cash. 
Silence, meanwhile, has been the 
order of the day at the Smith 
Square headquarters of the 
Federation of Conservative Stu- 
dents. where the Central Office 
switchboard has been instructed 
not to let calls through to the FCS. 

Staffa life 

The tiny Scottish island of Staffa. 
best known for harbouring 
Fingafs Cave, has been bought by 
an American businessman. John 
Elliott jun picked it up to celebrate 
the 60th birthday of his wife Elly. 
A nice piece of transatlantic co- 
operation. this, for after J.E. jun 
had put up the bulk of the 
£1 75.000 asking price and handed 
over the island to the National 
Trust of Scotland, the NT recip- 
rocated by making EIlv Elliott 
steward for life. Situated close to 
Iona and inhabited only by puffins 
and other birdlife. Staffa's other 
claim to fame is that Mendelssohn 
wrote Overture to the Hebrides 
after a visit in 1829. 

• After England's 1984 whiter 
wash by the West Indies cricket- 
ers. and the "blackwasb** during 
the return series. I hope we fare 
better against the New Zealanders 
this week and next; failure to do so, 
suggests one reader, would result 
in a sheepwash. Quite. 

Dressing down 

Could the reputed rift between 
Mrs Thatcher and the Queen have 
sartorial origins? In her book 
Great Royal Disasters Lesley 
Cunliffe relates how, after both 
had worn the same shade of blue 
to a banquet. Downing Street 
asked the Palace if it. could be told 
in advance what the Queen in- 
tended to wear, thus avoiding the 
embarrassment of duplication. 
The brisk reply, according to the 
book, advised Mrs Thatcher not to 
concern herself, as “The Queen 
does not notice what other people 
are wearing.” 

BARRY FANTONI 



•My new secretary? She's fine. 
The problem is finding space 
for her solicitor and parents' 

Making waves 

■The waters around Radio Four’s 
celebrated Desert Island have 
become decidedly more turbulent 
.under the captaincy of Michael 
Parkinson than ever they were 
during that of his genial ' prede- 
cessor. Roy Plomley. 1 gather that 
Parky has 'responded to a sugges- 
tion by his producer. Derek 
Drcschcr. that he should interview 
the conductor Andrew Davis less 
than enthusiastically. Who. 
Parkinson wrote back, was this 
man Davis, and what was so 
remarkable about him apart from 
the fact that he (Parkinson) had 
never heard of him? The dis- 
patcher of musical exiles was 
equally cun with me when I put 
the matter to him. "I don't wish to 
discuss private letters with a 
newspaperman, and 1 think you 
have a hell of a cheek to ask about 
it.” 


To arms 


John Roper, formerly SDP chief 
whip, is in the front line to be new 
commander at the Institute of 
Strategic Studies, the military 
think tank which computes the 
activities of the world's armed 
.forces. The current director. Rob- 
ert O'Neill, is leaving this autumn 
to become, appropriately enough. 
Chichele Professor of the History 
of War at Oxford- 


Carve-up 


I have always found airline food 
pretty execrable, as 1 am sure you 
nave, but ours is clearly not a view 
shared bv the staff of China's state 
airline. According to a Hong Kong 
newspaper the wholesale theft of 
food by cabin crews is so rampant 
that passengers have to pay up to 
£10 each to get it back. One flight 
from Peking to San Francisco was 
cancelled after the crew demanded 
extra pay to return the passengers' 
food trays. I can't understand why 
this should be since the fare is 
described by foreign passengers as 
no better than the usual airline 

SUIT. PHS 


Real penalties for foul play 


The proposal by the Solicitor- 
General for Scotland that football- 
ers who commit violent fouls on 
the pitch should be prosecuted 
may make a reality of one of the 
few hopes that still exist tor 
preserving football as a civilized 
sport. 

Lovers of football who watched 
the 1966 Wortd Cup recall bitterly 
how Pele's artistry and genius 
were destroyed by Bulgarian and 
Portuguese footballers, without 
any effective punishment, through 
brutal and deliberate assaults as 
criminally and civilly actionable 
as any committed in the gutters of 
inner cities by common criminals. 

In his memoirs' Pe|e wrote of 
ivvo of the most blatant incidents 
as follows: 

“I had been the target of 
merciless attacks from Zhecev of 
Bulgaria throughout the entire 
game . . . The referee, Jim Finney, 
gave neither me nor any of the 
others on our team the protection 
we had a right to expect from an 
official in a game. 

“My legs ached as a result of 
Zhecev's constant tripping and 
kicking, and our directors there- 
fore decided I should stay out of 
the next game, with Hungary.” 

And on the next page: 

“Mora is. of Portugal, had a field 
day fouling me. and eventually 
putting me out of the game. He 


by Edward Grayson 


tripped me. and when I was 
stumbling to the ground he leapt 
at me. feet first, and cut me down 
completely. It wasn’t until I 
actually saw the films of the game 
that I realised what a terribly 
vicious double-foul it was . . 
Brazil went on to play with 10 men 
and ended up eliminated.” 

In the Football Association 
yearbook of 1967-68 I wrote: 
“What is now required at all levels 
of the game is an awareness that 
those who break the laws of 
football on the field and the laws 
of society off it should be branded 
equally as criminals and wrong- 
doers. 

“The player who commits a foul 
can maim an opponent for life and 
deprive him of bis livelihood; a 
grave foul can kllL If the players 
and the dubs will not control the 
lawlessness which besmirches the 
game's good name, then it could 
yet be controlled for them. The 
motor car emerged as a potential 
benefit to mankind: it became a 
potential killer.” 

Soccer has in fact been a killer 
on the field even longer than on 
the terraces. In 1878, in a man- 
slaughter case arising from an 
amateur game. Lord Justice 
B ram well laid down a rule of law 


which has stood the test of lime. In 
R v BradsJtaw he said: “Indepen- 
dent of the rules, if the prisoner 
intended to cause serious hurt to 
the deceased, or if he knew that in 
charging as he did. he might 
produce serious injury and was 
indifferent and reckless as to 
whether he would produce serious 
injury or not. then the act would 
be unlawfuL In either case he 
would be guilty of a criminal act 
and you must find him Guilty ” 

Ninety years later these prin- 
ciples were applied at Maidstone 
Assizes on November 20. 1 968. A 
fatal blow was struck during a 
game at the Eastern Gas Board 
ground at Colchester which re- 
sulted in a conviction for man- 
slaughter (R v Southby). 

In 1977 they were applied for 
the first time to a prosecution 
concerning a broken leg on the 
rugby field (R v Billinghursi ). It 
will be applied again later this year 
or early next year for the first-ever 
jury trial of an international rugby 
player who has been committed by 
' magistrates in south Wales for an 
alleged assault against an oppo- 
nent during an amateur game. 

' The courts have been inconsis- 
tent when sentencing for convic- 
tions in this particular penalty- 


area. In 1980 Judge John Clay 
imposed a custodial sentence on a 
rugby player al Croydon Crown 
Court who had smashed an 
opponent's face in three places. 
The Court of Appeal reduced the 
sentence from six months to two 
because of special circumstances. 

The spokesman for the Attor- 
ney-General's department was no 
doubt needlessly cautious in the 
absence of his ministers on holi- 
day when he said on Wednesday 
that the department would be 
considering whether the remarks 
of Peter Fraser, the Scottish 
Solicitor-General, “have any im- 
plications for England and 
Wales”. 

Sir Michael Havers, the Attor- 
ney-General. will be familiar with 
the principles and citations quoted 
above. So. too, will all police 
officers who love sport. They will 
recognize and understand that no 
game provides a licence to commit 
crime. 

If the qjubs and governing 
bodies cannot control their 
players' corruption of a great 
game, the law can and. indeed, 
must do it for them, in the interest 
not only of the game itself, but also 
of the great majority of players 
and their hero-worshipping idol 
aters who sustain it. 

The author, a barrister, has written 
extensively on sport and the law. 


After 21 years in the House of 
Lords I still find that it can 
surprise me. The other day Lord 
Grimond rose to ask the govern- 
ment to reconsider its decision to 
celebrate in two years lime the 
Glorious Revolution of 1688. 
WhaL I wondered, was a former 
leader of the Liberal Party, the heir 
to the Whigs, doing in opposing 
the commemoration of English 
liberties? 

Lord Grimond explained. To 
celebrate the anniversary, he said, 
would offend all Irishmen, and 
many Roman Catholics. In any 
case, did not the revolution apReal 
to bigotry and succeed through 
treachery? Catholic peers shot up 
from the benches to remind Lord 
Whitelaw of the slur that had been 
.cast on their ancestors, and a 
former Education Secretary ob- 
served that the revolution was a 
squalid affair in which rcljgious 
prejudice ousted a rightful king. 

One peer told the House that 
happily the revolution came in 
time to reprieve his five-times- 
great-grand father from hanging. 
By then Lord Whitelaw had had 
enough. He said there might be 
two views on whether or not that 
was a good thing: 

By this time. I fancied I could 
hear Macaulay turning in his 
grave. Had he not written his 
famous history to vindicate those 
events? As he would have said., 
surely every schoolboy knows 
what the revolution settled. It 
settled that England should be 
governed by the rule of law. _ . 

No longer could the king over- 
ride the law by using his prerog- 
ative. No longer could he suspend 
the law wholesale. Parliament 
alone could alter the law. No 
longer could the king — or for that 
matter. Parliament — dismiss 
judges. Within a few years it was 
settled that they were to hold their 
commission quant diu si berte 
gesserint (so long as their persona! 
life was not scandalous) and no 
longer durante bencplacito (at the 
king's pleasure). 

No longer could he punish 
juries for bringing in the wrong. 
verdicL No longer could the king 
keep a standing army without 
Parliament's consenL If he did, 
the soldiers would be free to 
mutiny because Parliament would 
not renew the Mutiny Act. 

Finally the revolution brought 
to an end the long conflict between 
king and Parliament. The king 
could govern only through Par- 
liament. which would sit for three 
years and must meet each year. 
When the Act of Settlement: pul 
the Hanoverians on the throne, we 
had at last a constitution 
safeguarding the basic liberties of 
the subject. 

Was the revolution simply an 
example of Protestant bigotry? 
Those who think so may have 
forgotten what James II was like. 
James was honourable, blinkered 
and obstinate. He refused advice 
from those who had enabled him 
to succeed to the crown. In the end 
his main adviser was the French 
ambassador. Five years before his 
accession, a stupendous battle was 
fought in Parliament to exclude 
him from the throne. That great 
man. Halifax the Trimmer, op- 
posed the bill in the Lords and 
won — Charles II. as ever a musing 


The tercentenary of the 1688 revolution 
may reopen old wounds, but Noel Annan 
argues that it is something to celebrate . 

Glorious it 
was for British 
liberties 



When the blinkered, obstinate James Q (left) was replaced by 
William m, it ensured that the rule of law would prevail 


and ungrateful, saying the debates 
were “better than the play”. 

Bui when James came to the 
throne in 1685 he acted exactly as 
the Exclusionisis had foretold. 
The Tories who had kept the 
succession for James voted him 
the customs revenues for life and 
hence enabled him to pay his 
army. But they would not repeal 
the acts that excluded Catholics 
and Dissenters from political life. 
Nor was this strange. Dissenters 
still represented the political force 
that had cut off Charles I's head 
and in the end imposed a military 
dictatorship. 

Catholic France and Spain. 
England's ancient enemies, were 
absolutist monarchies and Cath- 
olicism the ideology that under- 
pinned them, much as today 
Marxism underpins communist 
regimes, in October 1685 Louis 
XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes 
and oullawed Protestantism in 
France: so when James dismissed 
Halifax, to whom he owed his 
throne, and eased out the high 
Tories who were the bulwark of 
the Anglican church, men won- 
dered what was in the wind. 

They had not long to wail. Since 
the law prevented James getting 
what he -wan ted: he -would suspend 
iL By using his dispensing power 
he nominated Catholics to the 
army, the bench, the town 
corporations and the magistracy. 
Three Oxford colleges were pul 
under Romanist rule. Finally he 
commanded the Anglican clergy 
to read from the pulpit a Declara- 
tion of Indulgence suspending all 
laws against Catholics and Dis- 


senters. Seven bishops petitioned 
him not to force the deTgy to break 
the law. He had them imprisoned 
and tried. The jury acquitted 
them. 

It was the birth of the prince 
later to be known as the Old 
Pretender that made men acL 
Until then the heir to the throne 
had been Mary, James's elder 
daughter by his first wife, married 
to a Protestant prince. Now there 
would be a Catholic heir. It was 
not simply a Whig revolution. In 
England Tories and Whigs acted 
together, even those Tories who 
cared most about legitimacy: of 
the seven bishops five were later to 
become Jacobites, but not all 
opposed James. 

You may argue that James was 
only trying to establish full re- 
ligious toleration, but that was not 
how men saw it at the time, not 
even the Dissenters. Nor does the 
evidence support iL You may 
argue that it was not a real 
revolution but an aristocratic 
putsch. But men had seen what a 
real revolution looked like after 
Charles I’s execution and did not 
like it: and the mob in London, the 
West Country and Yorkshire rose 
to support William of Orange 
when he landed with his army. 

Were the revolutionaries 
squalid? Lord Sunderland cer- 
tainly was. Macaulay thought 
John Churchill (later the great 
Marlborough) was for command- 
ing James's army and subverting 
his officers and men while all the 
time he was in communication 
with William. 

But Winston Churchill argued 


that his ancestor had never dis- 
guised his opposition to his 
benefactor's policies and realized 
it was up to him io save his 
couniry from a second civil war. 
and indeed James, to his credit, 
thought the same. Spain. Austria, 
even the Pope, supported Will- 
iam's expedition. The revolution 
was glorious because not one 
Englishman lost his life. 

How different from the other 
revolution whose bicentenary will 
be celerated in France in 1989 
with far greater splendour than 
ours! President Mitterrand has no 
qualms about reopening old 
wounds. 

I was once watching Wales play 
France at rugger al the Slade 
Colombe. The occasion had been 
made poignant by the fact that 
Queen Mary had died and the 
Welsh team ran on to the field 
wearing black armbands. The 
French crowd joined in our Na- 
tional Anthem with emotion. Bui 
when the Marseillaise was played, 
brisk conversation broke out all 
round me. “Why should 1 sing the 
words to that tune.” said my host 
“to which my ancestors had their 
heads chopped ofl?” Orleanists, 
Bonapartists." Communards, 
Dreyfusards, have long been dead, 
but for years their ghosts haunted 
the republic and weakened 
France. To this day Frenchmen 
aigue whether Robespierre be- 
trayed the revolution or was 
betrayed. 

But Lord Grimond had a poirn. 
If the revolution in England was 
glorious it was not so glorious in 
Scotland and disastrous in Ire- 
land. In Scotland it was purely a 
Whig revolution. In the Lowlands 
the adherents of the Scottish kirk 
beat up the Tory Episcopalians 
who often joined the Highlanders 
in becoming Jacobites: 

In Ireland it was worse. After 
the defeat of James’s Irish and 
French armies. Catholic lands 
were confiscated. Penal laws di- 
vided the mass of tbe people from 
their Protestant rulers, who re- 
fused to recognize in law that 
Catholics existed. England rujed 
Ireland as a colony in which 
Protestant manufacturers were 
ruined hardly less thoroughly than 
the Catholics. 

England was luckier. William 
relaxed the way the law operated 
against the Dissenters and soon 
Catholics coukl worship as they 
pleased in private. No one cared 
when England's greatest poet was 
a Catholic. 

The Glorious Revolution was 
not a revolution of the intellect 
like the French revolution, which 
inspired every class in society with 
ideas for or against iL But it made 
England the ideal of intellectuals 
on the Continent and even after 
1789 Britain was admired for its 
civil liberty. legal equality, tolera- 
tion, moderation, lack of cruelty, 
even its taste for the odd and 
eccentric. 

That is. why we should celebrate. 
If France has the confidence to 
honour the ideas of 1 789, surely 
Britain can honour the days when 
the elementary liberties of the 
subject against the state were 
established and dictatorship died. 

© Tlmw W wpfMM. 1W6. 

Lord Arman is a former vice- 

chancellor of London University. 


Why Zia could afford to gamble 


Karachi 

By strength of nerve, an ability io 
foresee how his subjects will react 
- and noi a litile luck - President 
Zia of Pakisilan seems to have 
overcome the most serious threat 
so far to his quasi-democratic 
regime. 

Pakistanis would prefer full 
democracy. This has been dem- 
onstrated by their enthusiastic 
turn-out at elections and their 
clamorous welcome when Miss 
Benazir Bhutto returned from 
exile in April. But determined 
government action has deterred 
the great mass of the Pakistani 
people from supporting the anli- 
govcmmcni agitation which began 
last week. T rciops were rushed into 
central Sind to quell the revolu- 
tionary fervour, in the middle- 
class suburbs of Karachi police 
broke up demonstrations by seiz- 
ing the leaders and beating’them. 
in full view of American television 
cameras. Other would-be agitators • 
look the him. 

At the height of the trouble. 
General Zia left on pilgrimage to 
Saudi Arabia, apparently leaving 
Muhammad Khan Juncjo. his 
pnme minister, in charge. But few 
were fooled. Juncjo is basically a 
cypher, a man of little experience 
and no freedom of action: no one 


was in any doubt as to who was 
orchestrating die government’s 
policies. But their success means 
that when General Zia returns 
home today he can say that it has 
been a victory for Junejo's civilian 
administration. 

The government has been lucky 
in facing a divided and jealous 
opposition which has made tac- 
tical errors. On August II. for 
example, when Junejo announced 
a ban on demonstrations on 
Independence Day. three days 
later. Miss Bhutto was not dis- 
mayed. Any other day would do 
just as well, she said. 

Bui the political heavyweights 
of her partv. and of the other 
groups within the ten-party oppo- 
sition coalition, the Movement for 
the Restoration of Democracy, 
saw this as feminine weakness and 
insisted on going ahead with the 
demonstrations on the day. For 
the first lime Miss Bhutto was 
forced into acting illegally, and 
was promptly arrested. 

This was the moment of greatest 
danger for the Zia regime. It was 
widely expected that since Miss 
Bhutto's return, and the great 
displays of support she has re- 
ceived’ any attempt to lock her up 
again would invite public retribu- 
tion. 


Zia took the risk, despite the 
fears of his American patrons in 
Washington who issued a state- 
ment disapproving of his action. 
Pakistan countered by accusing 
the Reagan administration of 
interfering in its affairs. 

Opposition protests against the 
arrest were real, but disorganized. 
The government picked up the 
first and second rank leadership of 
most parties in the MRD. forcing 
them into cany ing out their threat 
to start an immediate agitation if 
arrests were made. 

Until that moment Miss Bhutto 
and her supporters had been 
planning a campaign of agitation 
to begin at the end of September. 
How effective it would have been 
one can only conjecture, but at 
least it would have been planned. 
The agitation started on indepen- 
dence Day was not planned, and 
although it could 'have led to 
widespread unrest there were in 
fact few violent incidents. 

Worst; affected was the Sind 
countryside, but that is an area 
renowned for violence and 
lawlessness. "When a Sindhi 
comes into money." it is said, “he 
does one of three things. He gets 
married again, he buys a video 
player — or he has someone 
killed." • 


When the American news agen- 
cies competed with one another 
earlier this week to paint a picture 
of Pakistan in flames they were 
over-emphasizing events in Sind. . 

Incidents continue in Sind: 
railway services have been dis- 
rupted and government property 
attacked, but it seems that the 
troubles there could degenerate 
into a worsening dispute between 
the indigenous Sindhis and Urdu- 
speaking immigrants from India. 
This could well happen if the pro- 
government Muslim League, led 
by the eccentric Pir of Pagara. 
lakes to the streets in counter- 
demonstrations. 

The problem facing Miss 
Bhutto when, or indeed if. she 
regains her freedom, is the inabil- 
ity to apply pressure on the 
government without acting il- 
legally. And it is getting difficult to 
encourage Pakistanis to fete 
armed soldiers on the streets. 

Pakistan may be a poor country, 
but it has a far higher standard of 
living than that of India. The 
growing middle classes have- a 
stake in continuing stability. They 
are unlikely to risk il or their 
lives, in the turmoil of revolution.* 

Michael Hamlyn 


David Watt 


Can we ‘green’ 
the consumer? 


The Lincolnshire v illagers who arc 
resisting the possible choice of 
their vicinity a* a dumping- 
ground for nuclear waste inspire 
mixed feelings. Most people. I 
imagine, instinctively side with 
them on two points: first that 
nudear materials are nasty, dan- 
gerous things that one would 
rather not have inserted under 
one's scat even at a depth of 
several hundred feet: and secondly 
ihat the bland assertions of 
officialdom on these matters are 
not to be trusted, having been 
proved wrong too often. 

On the other hand, it is interest- 
ing to note that this sympathy 
lacks a certain clement of warmth. 
Conservative commentators, in- 
stead of concentrating on the 
government's threat to sacred 
Torv territory as they would have 
done 20 years ago, are lut-tutling 
over the amazing impertinence of 
the protesters in resisting a de- 
cision propcrlv endorsed by Par- 
liament. The left, which latches on 
these days to any “green" issue 
with the'word “nuclear" m it is 
not panting to fink arms with a 
mainly middle-class Conservative 
lobbv in the shires. 

Behind these hesitations a 
deeper shift of opinion is discern- 
ible. part political, part cultural. 
The highly publicized existence of 
“green" movements in various 
developed countries conceals the 
fact that in most of these countries 
genuine concern for the country- 
side is actually in retreaL The 
intensive mechanization of farm- 
ing has. of course, depicted the 
rural population and this, in turn, 
has tended to reduce the political 
power of the farming lobbies. 

They still have quite a lot of pull 
in countries such as France and 
West Germany where the small 
farmer retains his place and where 
these vested interests arc deeply 
entrenched in the institutions, but 
even there it is waning fast In 
Britain, the situation has already 
been transformed. The changed 
character of the Conservative 
Party under Mrs Thatcher' reflects 
the steady erosion of the old 
landed interests and the growth of 
suburban power. 

Another factor is the’ general 
reaction against the interests of the 
producer and a corresponding lilt 
towards the mass consumer. The 
trade unions have notoriously 
acquired a reputation as conspir- 
ators against the public interest 
and have suffered a calamitous 
drop in influence as a resuh. The 
formers are tarred with tbe same 
brush. The common Agricultural 
policy of the EEC looks exactly 
like the producers’ ramp that it is; 
the price of land, and rural habits . 
such as hedge-grubbing, battery-: 
hen rearing and stubble-burning, 
have created an exploitative image 
very different ‘from the old 
Ambridge ways. 

The consequence in this country 
has been a subtle degradation of 
the postwar consensus about the 
relatively high importance of the 
countryside as a longterm resource 
rather than as a mere commodity 


like any other. And since si much 
of the my stique has departed, the 
various interests are left with a 
much dearer field. 

Our island is only very slightly 
more crowded with people than h 
was 20 years ago. But in spite of 
minority agitation in the opposite 
direction, there is certainly more 
pressure and probably, in the end, 
more freedom now than then to 
build motorways and sink coat 
pits in famous beauty, spats; to 
plant power pylons and spruce 
forests in hitherto inviolate glens, 
and television relay stations on 
top of every natural eminence; to 
nibble away at the green belt; to 
“fill in” attractive villages, with 

gimcrack developments: to cover 
every headland with caravans: and 
to rape the landscape in the name 
of forming efficiency. 

We are not alone in this. Other 
nations long renowned as refined 
and beauty -conscious are doing 
likewise. Go to Tuscany and look 
out from its hills over mushroom- 
ing apartment blocks and messy ‘ 
ribbon developments; take the 
“bullet” train from Tokyo to 
Osaka and try 1 to catch, in 200 
miles of industrial shim, a single ' 
unspoiled glimpse of what Hoku- 
sai drew, sec what modern form- 
ing and suburban sprawl are 
accomplishing in the lie de 
France. 

The rise in personal expecta- 
tions and the spread of spending 
power have put the responsibility 
for growth in all the industrialized 
countries into the h^ndsofa mass 
culture, primarily urban in its 
preoccupations and assumptions 
even when it is operating in a rural 
environment. 

There is no point in trying to 
turn back the clock. People are 
determined to have cars and drive- 
quickly in them, to own new ■ 
houses in the suburbs rather than 
renovated ones in the towns and 
cities. Even country dwellers want 
to have council houses and super- 
markets and abundant electricity 
and TV and every other urban, 
amenity; formers and developers T 
want to make money in one place 
and spend it elsewhere. That is the 
popular, democratic age wc live in 
and it has its own virtues and. 
satisfactions. 

The trouble is that it leaves such 
a limited constituency for -the 
future. Il was Harold Nicolson. 1 
think, who said that one of the 
chief characteristics of an aristoc- 
racy is the desire to plant avenues 
for one's children. The Victorians 
managed, though with difficulty, 
to transplant some of these aristo- 
cratic virtues of taste, moderation 
and historical responsibifiiy to the 
new middle class.. .. 

Our task, which is infinitely 
harder, is to spread them virtually . 
to the entire population. They are 
now the masters and the spenders 
and one feels as one looks around 
these islands in holiday time that 
if they cannot find, and accept the 
costs of. a belter compromise 
between growth and amenity, our 
grandchildren's inheritance will be 
miserable indeed. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

A frolic around 
the Fringe 


A completely new method of msp- 
maJting has been invented . in 
Edinburgh. It is used by Fringe 
groups on their leaflets, and it can 
prove that any theatre in Edin- 
burgh is only two minutes walk 
from Princes Street — in fact; it is 
so flexible that it could prove any 
theatre in Britain is only two 
minutes from Princes Street. 

Except that theatres on the 
Fringe are not called theatres but 
venues. A venue is any church hall 
with added seals, stage and lights. 
If it also sells coffee and sand- 
wiches, it is called a complex. 

If there is a queue outside, these 
are not people waiting to buy 
tickets. They are people who have 
already got tickets watting for the 
previous production to finish so 
they can go in. They will need lots 
of coffee and sandwiches, which 
they can buy inside, thus malting 
the complex profitable. 

Should the queue be a really 
long- one it will need entertaining 
while waiting for the previous 
production to finish, and this is 
when the buskers arrive. They 
have to bring their own coffee and 
sandwiches with them. You can 
always tell buskers in Edinburgh 
from Fringe performers because 
the buskers are so skUfuL 

If you see people in the street 
with white faces, outlandish cos- 
tumes and bundles of leaflets, 
these are not buskers: these are 
performers from shows which 
have not yet had an audience and 
are desperate for publicity. Un- 
fortunately these are the only 
Fringe performers ever seen in the 
streets, so the ordinary residents of 
Edinburgh are now con vinoed that 
all Fringe performers: , 

Wear white . make-upi, and 
historical costume from a period 
which never existed. 

Cannot speak, but only sing out 
of tune. 

• Make langorous mime gestures. 
” Throw lots of leaflets in the 
street, all to be deared up by the 
council, which is why the rates 
have gone up again. 

This explains why no Edin- 
burgh resident ever visits a Fringe 
show. They seethe Fringe only on 
the first day. in the' cavalcade 
along Princes Street which ac- 
tually is more like the parade they 
used to have in Rome after one of 
Caesar's successful campaigns. 

“The pipe band of the 5th 
Legion is in fine form today ... I 


see we have captured many pris- 
oners from among the wild mime 
artists who occupy the frontiers of 
the Empire . . . how savage and 
how sad they look ... I couldn't 
see them lasting five minutes 
against a good tattoo ...” 

The Fringe companies that per- 
form in churches have to vacate 
them from time to time to make . 
way for services. This almost 
certainly explains the well-known 
episode in the Bible about Jesus 
and the clearing of the Temple. 

1. And Jesus entered the Temple 
and found many people there,' 
busy with the changing of money. 
And he was wroth and said: What 
do we have here? 

2. And the money changers said.' 
Well, we have a Polish version of- 
Hamlet at noon, then there's a 
children's show at 2.15, and at. 5 
there’s a musical based on the 
Apocrypha ... 

3. Jesus said. Be gone! Out of the 
Temple! And he scattered all that ■ 
were there within. 

■ 4. And the crowd muttered; 
saying; This must be the fire 
officer from the the council who is 
not satisfied with the scaffolding 
in the auditorium; somebody give 
him some coffee and sandwiches ■ 
while we get it fixed. 

The fire officer can close a ' 
theatre for almost any reason - for 
having an unsafe coffee um. for 
not having enough leaflets for 
- having an audience with inflam- 
mable clothes, or for not having a 
joke about Diego Maradona in the ' 
show. (Every show in the Fringe 
this year has to have a joke about 
Maradona.) But their favourite 
reason for dosing theatres is for 
not having illuminated Exit signs. ' 

. No Fringe company ever has 
illuminated Exit signs because 
they would min the artistic black- 
outs. So when the fire officer 
comes, they switch the signs on for . 
him and switch them off. again 
what he’s gone. And that is why, , 
during the many fires that sweep 
Fringe theatres, the audidn&e ' 
never knows where the exit is; and 
always rushes into the lavatories. 

Where another, very small 
Fringe show is already going oiL •, 

You can easily find it. It’s only, 
two minutes from Princes Street -1 

Meanwhile, next week, most 
Fringe performers will be giving 
U P theatre for ever and going into;, 
the coffee and sandwich business - 
full time. • 




11 NVe 'Srp 

% 



ft*.,-: 






■ " r it** 




< m 

* Kj ' \ 
b 0 

v h *> 

" V C 
... ■*•; 

'.'■ r J;.: 

../Vi 

•- £.■ 

;; : ^ss 


r ■> 


■»!■- 


• -r« 

• *■» 

•■' S', 

'"~Ci 

■-:?:> 




vr 


? r . , . Miles Kingtffl 

:> I i c a round 
Fringe 


i*- "i iU 


. ~ A > C>\J 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


V; 

L. V.. 


•yX 

.. : >?i • 


TAX AM> DISPLEASE 


The Social Democratic Party 
and its leader Dr David Owen 
like-.- to be thought of as 
hardheaded, . rational and 
reformist: Their Labour Party 
roots also demand that the 
Party should; be caring, es-- 
pedally about the poor, and 
other ' supposedly ill-treated 
groups such as women and 
single parents.. The Party's new 
proposals for integrating the 
tax and benefit system neatly 
combine the two in their 
declared twin aim of 
redistribution and simplifica- 
tion.. But they are likely to 
proye the most contentious of 
all the policies Dr Owen will 
find himself promoting and 
defending at a general election. 

-The logic of integrating the 
two is' undeniable. The inter- 
play of a wide range ofbenefits 
and an unrelated tax system ■ 
with an extremely low starting 
point for income tax-has led to 
injustice, bureacratic duplica- 
tion and to the maximisation 
of the poverty trap, which can 
leave the poor little or no 
better off when they earn 
more. Separate means-testing 
has also meant that many of 
the poor fail to claim benefits 
and it has increased the clam- 
our for expensive universal 
handouts such as child benefit 

It is hard to defend the 
present separation of 
employees’ national insurance 
contributions from income 
tax. Lord Beveridge was keen 
to identify welfare state bene- 
fits as a right, paid for in. 
contributions and thus free 
from the alleged stigma of 
charity. But the inadequacy of 
some baric benefits and the 
blurring of the. distinction 
between contributions and 
payments from general tax- 
ation has left NICs as an 
anomalous hypothecated tax. 

They are also a regressive 
tax. There is a ceding on 


income liable to contributions, 
and a gap between that and the 
threshold for higher-rate in- 
come tax. Thus those with 
incomes in between enjoy a 
lower marginal tax rate than 
those on more modest in- 
comes. 

- Putting the two together in 
one way or another has been 
on the political agenda for at 
least fifteen years and has not 
been the monopoly of any one 
parly. So why did Mr Norman 
Fowler, in his recent review, 
follow so many predecessors in 
refusing these attractions? .. 

Inland Revenue comput- 
erization has been a long- 
running excuse. But this 
obstacle should be out of the 
way before any new Govern- 
ment has tiie chance to push 
through such complex 
Jegislation.Cost is a more 
enduring problem. No govern- 
ment- wants to save money 
because poor citizens fail to 
claim benefits. Making receipt 
automatic through the tax 
system, however, would reveal 
the true and frightening bill for 
the present structure of wel- 
fare. 

Removing the fiction that 
national insurance contribu- 
tions are not a tax on income 
would also make it even 
plainer to taxpayers just how 
much of their income is taken 
by the Government. It would 
reveal the extent to which 
desirable welfare depends on 
excessive taxation — in this 
case, an effective standard rate 
of 38 per cent. And there 
would be more indignant los^ 
ess than grateful gainers from 
chang e . 

The SDP is to be congratu- 
lated. It can build i structure 
to give improved benefits in 
future to those in need at less 
cost than the Labour Party, 
which is still wedded to 
universal benefits. Alas, the 


SDP has chosen at the same 
moment to propose increases 
in a range of ousting benefits 
from basic pensions to help for 
single parents. And it has been 
so anxious to make sure that 
none of the needy lose that it 
proposes a host of special 
arrangements. Even child 
benefit — now to be taxed in 
. some rircumstances — would 
be raised high enough to 
ensure that those taxed at the 
standard rate would lose noth- 
ing. On the SDFs own calcula- 
tions, which wiQ be subject to 
highly critical scrutiny, the 
overall gross cost would be 
£43 billion a year. 

That has to be paid for. And 
Dr Owen is commendably not 
pretending, like the Labour 
Party, that it can all come from 
the rich. It wil], indeed, come 
from the very middle class on 
whose defection from Mrs 
Thatcher his electoral hopes 
depend. Any family whose 
single earner brings in more 
than £13,000 a year would 
lose. 

On the SDFs costings, a rise 
in nominal tax rates might be 
avoidable. But the SDP 
scheme would then require 
some undesirable tax changes. 
In particular, il would abolish 
the married man’s tax allow- 
ance without introducing fully 
transferable allowances be- 
tween between husband and 
wife as envisaged, in the 
Government’s much pref- 
erable proposed reform of 
allowances. Dr Owen would 
effectively penalize die family 
with one earner, whereas Mr 
Lawson would make it easier 
for one spouse to look after the 
famil y frill-tune. 

That will not go down well 
in suburbia. Dr Owen may 
find that proving be is not Mrs 
Thatcher is not wholly to his 
advantage. 


POWER WITHOUT RESPONSIBILITY 


SO Moscow’s considered ver- 
dict on the Chernobyl disaster, 
which has so far cost 31 lives;, 
left more than 200 people with 
severe radiation stefcness, 
blighted-an untold acreage of 
land and- raised the biggest ; 
question mark yeTovef foe 
future of uud raF pow er fo fois: 

gross human error. That" ver- 
dict does' not go nearly far 
enough. 

Tbeoffirial Soviet report on 
ChemobyL presented in Mos- 
cow yesterday, offers a thoiv 
ough. technically competent; 
though perhaps incomplete, 
account of the immediate 
causes of the accident It charts 
the first errors at the reacton 
the heroic, if doomed, at- 
tempts of engineers to correct 
them; the multiplying mal- 
functions and foe final, hor- 
rific fire. 

That even these details have 
been published is cause for 
some gratitude and not a little 
surprise. The Soviet Union 
has not usually been so heedful 
of international opinion or so 
considerate of international 
forums as' to dissect a home- 
grown disaster in public. But it 
might well not have done so, 
had not foe radioactive fall-out 
been detected hr Western Eu- 
rope and public outrage in the 
West forced an explanation. 

The danger now is that once 
the immediate .causes of the . 
disaster are accented — if they 
arc — the more far-reaching 


will be left unasked. These are 
the questions the International ' 
Atomic Energy. Agency must 
eventually address, if not at 
next week's meeting, then in r 
the near future. 

First, leaving aside the rights 
and wrongs of experimenta- 
tion at nuclear power stations, 
i js d^ar;,l&atr . Soviet 
ineers at ^tireSchernobyl 
reactor No.4 bad no apprecia- 
tion of the risks their work 
involved. They,- like most 
people in the Soviet Union, 
had taken the safety of nuclear 
power for granted because they 
had no information to the 
contrary. Before Chernobyl, 
nuclear safety was not an issue 
in the Soviet Union. Yet 
without an appreciation of the 
potential risks, nuclear power 
workers cannot be expected to 
exercise the necessary degree 
of responsibility. Will they in 
foufre be better informed? 

Second, the design of the 
Chernobyl reactor - which is 
by no means unique in die 
Soviet Union — permitted the 
combination of circumstances 
which proved so destructive. 
But some of those circum- 
stances had been envisaged by 
Western engineers and such a 
combination would hot have 
come about at a reactor in the 
West. (That, is not to say. of 
course, that anuclear accident 
of the order of Chernobyl 
would not be possible in the 
Wei at all). Will there in 
future be provision for a 
regular international exchange 
of information on the deign 


questions raised by Chernobyl 

BACK TO THE BEAT 


and functioning of nuclear 
power stations, in which 
potential problems and minoF 
accidents are reported hon- 
estly by-each side? Should 
there not be common stan- 
dards of design and safety? 

Third, once the accident had 
occurred, it took three days, 
and an international outcry for 
the Soviet authorities to con- 
cede that anything untoward 
had happened. Some of the 
delay can be explained by the 
Soviet Union's traditional se- 
cretiveness and by embarrass- 
ment on the part of a country 
with both a deep inferiority 
complex and a claim to the 
status of a superpower. Butthe 
rest probably resulted from a 
combination of fear (on the 
part of the workers and of- 
ficials involved), bureaucracy 
(which set up complex proce- 
dures for foe divulging of 
information on nuclear mat- 
ters), and poor communica- 
tions. Can the Soviet system in 
its present form guarantee that 
such a delay — whatever the 
cause — is not repeated? 

After Chernobyl, it is up to 
the Soviet Union to convince 
the rest of the world that it is 
ready to assume the 
responsibilities incumbent 
upon a nuclear power. The 
detail given in the official 
report on. foe disaster suggests 
that it may be ready to make a. 
start. But foe Kremlin should 
not be allowed to think that 
this is enough. Constant pres- 
sure will be required. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Protest at nuclear dumping plan 


Mr John Stalker is an able 
police officer. He stands ac- 
cused of no unlawful conduct 
after a gruelling investigation, 
during which he has necessar- 
ily been idle, while foe in- 
vestigating officer, Mr 
Geoffrey Sampson, has simi- 
larly been kept from his duties 
in West Yorkshire. 

Nothing that has emerged 
detracts from his performance 
of foe essential work, of foe 
deputy chief, constable of 
Greater Manchester. Here is a 
strong and resourceful police- 
man who has given — and will 
continue to give — exemplary 
service as an. administrator of 
police. A primary' public in- 
terest in the Stalker case is bis 
speedy return to active service. 

To that end the Greater 
Manchester .police authority, 
in its meeting today, may be 
tempted to ignore foe recom- 
mendation made by Mr Samp- 
son for a tribunal, and to deal 
with MrStalker in its own way. 

Mr Stalker has not yet 
spoken in his own defence: he 
is surety owed that much by 
his. employers. The^ might 
wish to reinstate him immedi- 
ately. Such . action is frilly 
within their competence. In- 
deed foe . police authority 
might already feel some resent- 



ment against further external 
involvement since what was 
originally a matter of provin- 
cial good house-keeping has 
been swamped by foe over- 
attention of metropolitan 
conspiracy theorists. 

Yet councillors and mag- 
istrates on foe authority would 
not only do a general service 
by accepting a tribunal but 
matters having got this far. 
also serve Mr Stalker's in- 
lerestsC A tribunal is needed to 
clear air befogged by innu- 
endo.' There must be every 
expectation that pulled out of 
their' Mancunian . context 
many of foe facts of Mr 
Stalker's attendance at balls 
and birthday parties will lose 
the. sinister aspect they have 
acquired. A tribunal wilL 
surely, look more carefully 
than Mr Sampson appears to 
have done at communications 
between the chief constable of 
Greater Manchester and his 
deputy. 

If a tribunal under the 1984 
Police and Criminal Evidence 
Act is constituted. Mr Stalker 
will stand comparison with, to 
take a jeccDt. example. Mrs 
Wendy Savage - a public ser- 
vice professional subjected to 
simultaneous trial by press 


\ 


and formal process. Tribunals 
are costly. They should be set 
up quickly and required to do 
foeir work at pace; But their 
final justification is that as well 
as dispensing justice,, they 
educate foe public by showing 
them in detail something of 
foe private fives of public 
institutions. 

A Stalker tribunal ought to 
be charged not only with 
maintaining foe highest stan- 
dards of police conduct. It 
must be prepared to touch on 
policing, policy. At what point 
is an officer in but not of the 
community he is supposed to 
be policing? Where does 
community policing — en- 
joined on foe bobby on the 
beat — end. and ill-advised 
association with- people of 
uncertain background begin? 
Does foe Manchester Conser- 
vative Party's annual ball 
qualify as a legitimate commu- 
nity event? 

Beneath these is deep water. 
It covers foe boundary of 
policing and politics, and leads 
to debaic about control and 
accountability through organs 
of local govern mem* In his 
iriaj Mr Stalker has. invol- 
untarily. a wider public pur- 
pose to serve. 


From the Rev H. C. Middleton 
Sir. 1 was dismayed to find that 
your leading article of August !9 
described myself and some of my 
parishioners as hooligans. The 
previous day a most peaceful 
demonstration had taken place at 
FuJ beck airfield with men. women 
and children ofevery^eand class 
present. 


From Sir Julian Rose 
Sir. Your leading article of August 
19. entitled “Green but not 
pleasant**, is both equivocal and 
provocative. It calls into question, 
in the starkest of fashions, the 
fundamental precepts of human 
liberty and freedom of choice. 

The fact that large sections of 


TOs fact alone should give the ^ pubn ?£? v f 


Government more cause for con- 
cern than any other protest. The 
question that needs asking is what 
motivates such a diverse group of 
people, maoy of whom have never 
demonstrated before, to actually 
spend a full day engaged in such 
uncharacteristic activities? 

It is too simplistic and untrue to 
dismiss it as “the not-in-my- 
backyard" attitude. Contrary to 
your leading article, local people 
have tried to obtain as many facts 
as possible by attending and 
instigating public meetings and by 
writing to Government ministers 
and to Niiex (Nuclear Industry 
Radioactive Waste Executive). 

Such facts as have become 
available do not reassure local 
people of the safety of burying 
low-level wastes in clay pits. 
Indeed Drigg. in Cumbria, is an 
extremely- bad advertisement for 
the nuclear industry and is criti- 
cised in the Rossi report. 

The fact is that our Conser- 
vative member of Parliament and 
our county council are totally 
opposed to the proposed scheme 
of burying nuclear waste. Those 
who gathered at the demonstra- 
tion were expressing the same 
opposition. 

What they are actually asking 
for are more real facts: not for a 
scheme to be rushed through, but 
for real and proper research to 
take place. For example, some 
countries are exploring the 
possibility of the deep burial of all 
categories of radioactive waste. 

The Government should take 
such opposition seriously. When 
ordinary decent people ofall walks 
of life take to the streets or the 
country lanes to peacefully ask for 
more research, more facts, and a 
real assurance of safety, then 
surely elected representatives 
should listen. 

It is ironic to remember that 
without a similar protest in the 
past by some ’‘upper-class 
hooligans" not only would we not 
have a woman prime minister, bnt 
she would not even have the right 
lo vote! 

Yours faithfully. 

H. C. MIDDLETON (Rector of 
Fulbeck, Caythorpe and Carlton 
Scroop with Normanton). 

The Rectory. Church Street. 
Caythorpe,Graniham. Lincolnshire. 


concern about the wisdom and 
safety of burying radioactive 
wastes near populated areas, and 
have shown themselves willing to 
stand behind their beliefs, can 
hardly be described as 
“hooliganism" or indeed "a 
breach in the fabric of lawfulness". 
To lake such a view is to 
encourage an ultra-blinkered 

assessment of the predicament 
which the creation of a nuclear 
cycle has placed upon both present 
and future generations. 

If you would allow your 
perspectives to be broadened in 
order to make a feller appraisal of 
this issue you might well reach the 
conclusion that what is 
“unlawful" and contrary to the 
wider process of democracy is the 
development of industrial pro- 
cesses which produce, as part of 
their function, long-lasting toxic 
poisons which remain persistently 
hazardous to both man and 
environment for thousands of 
years: poisons which, in effect, 
man has rendered non- 
degradeable. meaning that nature 
has no power to recycle them. 

Is there something wrong with 
people who increasingly feel seri- 
ously at odds with this approach 
to the trusteeship of our planet? 
And would it not be more 
pertinent to put into question the 
responsibility and motivation of 
those who propound the rightfol- 
ness of such exploitation? 

Yours sincerely. 

JULIAN ROSE. 

Path Hill Farm Cottage. 
Whitchurch. 

Near Reading. Berkshire. 

August 19. 

From Mrs Anne Tayler 
Sir. If Nirex wants' the people of 
South Kitlmgholme. Fulbeck. and 
Esiow to accept its word that the 
dumping of nuclear waste materi- 
als in their midst is perfectly safe 
its course is a ample one. It can 
move one or two of its top 
executives, with their wives and 
families, into the areas concerned 
to live among the local inhabitants 
for a couple of years. 

Yours etc. 

ANNE TAYLER, 

8 North Street. 

Nazeing. Essex. 

August 19. 


Minority status 

From Mr Aleksa GavrUovii 
Sir. At first glance, drawing an 
analogy between Kosovo and 
Northern Ireland (Dr Kindereley’s 
letter. August 12) seems logical. 
The same could be said about the 
conflict between Catholic Croats 
and Orthodox Serbs in Croatia. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina daring 
the Second World War. However, 
the position of the Serbs in both 
cases needs better understanding. 

The policy of the “Independent 
State of Croatia" demanded a 
Catholic “purity", which resulted 
. in forced conversions and massa- 
cres of the “schismatic” Serbs on 
an apocalyptic scale. 

Yugoslav Albanians, predomi- 
nantly Muslim, have been 
demanding an ethnically pure 
Kosovo. The exodus of the Serbs 
from the region is the result of a 
long period of systematic terror in 
which the Serbian population has 
been left without any protection. 

The Orthodox Serbs have never 
in their history been bigoted or 
had policies based on religious or 
ethnic “purity". Various political 
forces and trends have today 
isolated the Serbs, just as they 
were in the past, when at the 
beginning of the modern era they 
found themselves wedged between 
the Ottoman westward push and 
the Austro-Gerraan . eastern 
aspirations. 

Yours faithfully. 

ALEKSA GAVRILOVIC, 

3 Rowley Avenue, Stafford. 
August 13. ' 

Study of philosophy 

From Mr Ian MacKenzic 
Sir. It is indeed unfortunate that 
you should publish a letter by 
Britain’s most respected philos- 
opher. A. J. Ayer (August 12). 
extolling the virtues of a philo- 
sophical training immediately op- 
posite a sadly typical article by 
Britain’s most widely read philos- 
opher (due lo the platform with 
which you provide him), Roger 
Scruton. 

Ayer mentions the theory of 


knowledge; Scruton simply de- 
dares most of France’s recent 
leading intellectuals to be 
“charlatans”. . 

Ayer praises the benefits of 
logic: Scruton dismisses the 
thought of Roland Barthes be- 
cause he died in a car accident of 
Foucault because he died of Aids, 
and classifies Althusser's mental 
illness as Stalinism. Derrida’s 
intellectual worth is shown to be 
diminished because he leaches at 
Yale — doubtless an inferior 
institution to Scruton's poly- 
technic. 

Finally, before proceeding to a 
specious analogy between post- 
structuralism or deconstruction 
(although he spares bis readers the 
conventional philosophical terms) 
and totalitarianism, your col- 
umnist describes the French Nou- 
vclle Droite as “crusty" and 
"slight". So much for what is 
perhaps the most widely-debated 
topic in current philosophy: self- 
reflex ivity! 

Yours faithfully. 

IAN MacKENZIE. 

Universite de Lausanne, 

Faculte des Lettres. 

Section (Tanglais. 

BFSH. CH-10IS Lausanne. 
Switzerland. 

August 12. 

Grouse about the bill 

From Mrs Angela Thomsen 
Sir. On page 16 of The Tunes last 
Wednesday (August 13) a headline 
[in some editions] declared “MoD 
accused of massive over- 
spending". On page 2 of the same 
issue we were told that 21 brace of 
newly shot grouse were flown 
from Blackpool to London by the 
Red Devils and that a team from 
the Parachute Regimen! raced up 
the Thames in bftats to deliver the 
birds to the Savoy. 

Who foots the bill for this 
particular silliness, 1 wonder? 
Yours faithfully, 

ANGELA THOMSETT, 

The Applegarth, 

Osmotherley, 

Northallerton. North Yorkshire. 
August IS. 


Anxiety over 
Rock guard 

From General Sir William Jack- 
son 

Sir, I am writing to you both as a 
former Governor of the Rock and 
as one of the founder members of 
The Friends of Gibraltar's Hen- 
ftagt- 

On August 1 you gave front- 
page prominence to the with- 
drawal of the British ceremonial 
guard from the frontier gates 
because, in the words of the 
Governor's announcement, it is 
no longer appropriate between 
European Community partners 
and Nato allies; 

Over the past three weeks, 
however, there has been little 
reference to the mounting bitter- 
ness and anxiety caused in Gibral- 
tar by the British Government's 
failure to insist on the simulta- 
neous withdrawal of the Spanish 
guard, which is still being 
mounted. 

The three major political parties 
in Gibraltar, who do not often 
agree on anything, are united in 
opposition to this genuine but, as 
It proved, gratuitous gesture. Sir 
Joshua Hassan. the Chief Min- 
ister, who equally rarely dissoci- 
ates himself publicly from HM 
Government's policies, has had to 
do so on this occasion. 

The people of Gibraltar see the 
unilateral removal of this symbol 
of British sovereignty as confirma- 
tion of the widely held view that 
there is an AnglonSpanish ploy to 
let the process of “osmosis" 
gradually change the red, white 
and blue of the Union Jack flying 
over the Rock into the red and 
gold of Spain. The cynics suggest 
that the removal of the frontier 
guard is one of the preliminary 
steps in a sell-out. 

The Governor’s guard will go 
next as an economy measure: the 
C e remony of the Keys will be 
Slopped because h is anti-Spanish; 
and then the sovereignty flag on 
top of the Rock will be hauled 
down as no longer serving any 
useful purpose! 

It is unfortunate that Madrid 
has not seen fit, so far at least, to 
remove the Spanish ceremonial 
guard from its side of the frontier, 
where it is just as inappropriate 
between two European and Nato 
partners. By not doing so they are 
fuelling the natural fears and 
suspicions of the Gibraltarians, 
thus making the normalisation of 
relations between the Rock and 
Spain, envisaged in the Lisbon 
and Brussels agreements, all the 
harder to accomplish. 

Yours faithfully, 

BILL JACKSON. 

West StowellPlace, 

Oare. Marlborough. Wiltshire. 
August 18. 

Clergy’s future 

From the Bishop Suffragan of 
Basingstoke 

Sir. Mr Derek Wilson (August 1 9) 
may have some grounds for 
complaining about the quality of 
the Anglican parish clergy, though 
their energy and devotion never 
cease to encourage me. The secu- 
lar remedies, however, that he 
suggests are not likely to be 
sufficient to cut away what he calls 

energy of the body ecclesiastic". 

The only effective cure is a 
spiritual one and is associated 
with that doctrine of priesthood 
which Mr Wilson despises. Unless 
and until the clergy are seen 
primarily as, and are allowed to 
be. men of prayer, accountable to 
God not man, the Church will 
continue to be hampered in its 
task of “bringing many sons to 
glory" 

Yours fajthfeDy. 
tMICHAEL BASINGSTOKE, 

I The Close. 

Winchester, Hampshire. 

August 1 9. 

Upstairs, downstairs 

From Dr H. A. Fitzhugh 
Sir, I am very sorry for the 
problems caused while our con- 
tractors replace the lifts at Lan- 
caster Gate Underground station 
(letter, August 18). 

The work at Lancaster Gate 
should be finished in 18 months, 
six months less than would for- 
merly have been needed, as a 
result of improved management 
of such contracts. 

The 85-year-old lifts and their 
machinery have to be cut up for 
removal and new lifts and 
machinery installed. Unlike sta- 
tions at which lifts can be kept 
working m one shaft while those in 
another are replaced. Lancaster 
Gate has only one shaft. 

Yours faithfully. 

HENRY FITZHUGH, Marketing 
& Development Director, 

London Underground Limited. 

55 Broadway. SWI. 


A liberal education 

From Professor Charles Handy 
Sir. Shirley Letwin (feature. Au- 
gust 14) is. of course, quite righL It 
would be absurd to abandon the 
best traditions of a British liberal 
education in pursuit of a narrow 
vocational ism. 

No, one wants a nation of 
technicians, but nor do we want a 
land run by culture-vultures. To 
think that all was well when liberal 
British gentlemen ran the world, 
and our businesses, has to be 
romantic nonsense. 

What wc want, surely, is a 
nation where everyone is good at 
something: where everyone feels 
capable, competent and creative 
in some respect where enterprise 
is not a dirty word, nor wealth a 
social crime; where intellect, ideas 
and cultural understanding are 
properly admired, but not im- 
properly deferred to. 

To achieve all that needs a huge 
re-think in education everywhere 


.and not just the protection of foe 
bastions of a genuine liberal 
education. 

What we now need to foster in 
all our homes, as well as in all our 
schools and colleges, is the spirit of 
enquiry: the desire to learn in 
order to be belter able to contrib- 
ute. create or achieve something, 
and the selfconfidence which 
comes with than foe self-discipline 
which has to accompany such 
learning: the willingness to experi- 
ment. be it with an opinion, a 
computer program or a piece of 
design: ana. perhaps above alL foe 
importance of developing a set of 
values and principles which can 
inform one's choices in life. 

Such things, if well learnt and 
well practised, will promote both 
our enterprise and our civilization 
and even our sport; they can be 
learnt just as well in the history 
class as in the engineering depart- 
ment or in the kitchen at home, 
and preferably in all three; - 

What is certain, however, is that 

r 


they are not acquired by sitting 
and listening, but have to be 
accompanied by active doing ol 
some sort: that knowledge alone i! 
not enough and that conventional 
examinations tell only a tiny part 
of each individual's story and 
deter so many more than they 
encourage: 

A good liberal education maj 
do most of these things, but 1 
prefer to call il all education foi 
capability and 1 want it foi 
everyone, not just for foe more 
intellectual or. at the other ex- 
treme. for the so-called non- 
academic. 

To polarize foe debate between 
vocationalism and liberalism is lo 
miss a huge opportunity and one 
which many of our schools at least 
are now eager to seize. 

Yours faithfully. 

CHARLES HANDY (Chairman. 
Education for Capability). 

Royal Society or Arts. 

John Adam Street. 

Adclphi, WC2. 



ON THIS DAY 


AUGUST 22 1907 

FROM A MOTORISTS 
NOTE-BOOK 

—At the beginning «»f this ywr 
The Times published an article on 
speed on the highways, licit and 
illicit, which waa Cumulate enough 
to receive foe approval of the 
official organ of the Motor Union 
as well as to express forcibly the 
feelings of the non-motoring pub- 
lic. It was then remarked that 
many motorists drive far too fast in 
urban districts, but drat it was 
generally agreed that these offend- 
ers rarely live in the neighbourhood 
they affhcL The recommendations 
of the Royal Coremtssiun were 
significantly died. Speed, these 
recommendations advised, was not 
only to be controlled by pnoecu- 
lions for reckless driving as provid- 
ed for by Section I of the Act of j 
1903. but also “in towns and] 
villages and at dangerous comers, 
steep hills, and himilar places.] 
where caution is required, by a 12- 1 
mile speed limit where adopted by 
the local authorities.” as provided 
for by the proposed new Art. The 
passing of the new Act has been 
deferred: but it (teems that the local 
authorities have not remained 
passive on (hat account. If it were 
not possible to secure at once a new 
12-mile limit easily, they have in 
many cases decided to try U> obtain 
the old 10-mile limit with difficul- 
ty. Such has been one nr the results 
of the last she months uf motoring, 
though these months have been 
more unfavourable to the progress 
of motoring and more free from the 
dust nuisance than any like period 
since the inception of the move- 
ment. This has happened in spite 
of urgent warnings from the jour- 
nals whose authority i s devoted to 
the larger interests of the public, in 
spite of the calming influence on 
public opinion of the report uf the 
Royal Commission, and in spite of 
the general belief that much would 
depend on the behaviour of motor- 
drivers when the last 10.U00 or 
15.000 cars took to the rood . . . 

When a speed limit has been 
sanctioned, it » certain that the 
case for it must have been strong 
enough to withstand a searching 
ordeal of disparagement at the 
hands of tire energetic Secretary of 
the Motor Union, Mr Rees Jef- 
freys. When, therefore, out of foe 
wealth of this personal experience, 
and with the responsibility* of his 
official position, Mr Jeffreys pub- 
lishes an article entitled “A Crisis 
and the Remedy”, the incident is 
sufficient to give pause to tire most - 
insouciant motorist "If proof were 
needed.” be begins, “that members 
of the general committee of the 
Motor Union recognize the gravity 
of the crisis into which a few selfish 
and inconsiderate drivers have this 
summer plunged the pastime of 
touring, it is to be found in the 
-manner in which member after: 
member, assembled at Southport, 
rose and solemnly supported the. 
recommendation of the Highways 
Protection Committee to place 
responsible agents on the roads in 
certain towns and villages.”. . . 

A week ago The Times published' 
a letter from a correspondent who 
bad wished to obtain the names 
and addresses of the owner of a 
motor-car which had run down his* 
son and his bicycle. He was 
surprised to find that not only had 
he to apply to the clerk of the 
county council where the car was 
registered, but that he was required 
to forward a fee of Is. before he 
could obtain the desired informa- 
tion. His better course would have 
been to apply to the Chief Consta- 
ble of the place where the mishap 
occurred: and he would have found, 
that, if his evidence were prima 
facie likely to inculpate the motor- 
driver, he would only have to 
promise to supply H at the right' 
time and the policy would do the 
rest. The reason why the Legisla- 
ture refused to allow foe registers 
of numbers and owners to be open 
to any chance inquirer was the 
well-grounded apprehension that 
such easy means of identification 
would lead to blackmailing. This » 
the sort of thing which cannot be 
too carefully guarded against. In 
foe light of recent developments ' 
protection from promiscuous pub- 
licity is more than ever desir- 
able . . . 

A journey into the Midlands led. 
the present writer several days ago 
through the city of Coventry. He 
found himself contending with the- 
throng collected by the Gndiva 
pageant and procession, and was. 
thus cogently reminded that the 
city of cydes and motors was still, 
at heart the city of a thousand' 
yean. Interest in foe memories and 
traditions of the Middle Ages was. 
however, inconveniently united to', 
a stolid indifference to the passing 

motor-car, and progress was prae-; 

ticable only by help of the gentle 
art of ramming. On the return 
journey two days later, however, all' 
had settled down to work again, the' 
factories were in full activity, the 
grey box-seated cars were rushing 
out for test runs. It was difficult to 
remember that one of the peculiar!- ■ 
ties of the motor-car industry in 
Britain is foe wide extent of its 
geographical distribution, reaching 
as it does from the banks of Loch 
Lomond to places so southerly as' 
Guildford arid Famham, 


Pot lack 

From Mrs Enid Wells 
Sir, The other day a friend and I 
stopped at a well-advertised venue 
in Kent for a “farmhouse cream 
tea" This turned out to be a tea- 
bag in a bright red plastic two-cup 
size . container, accompanied by 
two tiny plastic containers of milk; 
cream in a little red plastic pot 
butter in foi! and strawberry jam 
in a plastic bubble (with straw- 
berry' fields less than 100 yards 
away). The scones at least ’were 
home-made. But what a travesty 
of a traditional farmhouse tea. 
Yours faithfully. 

ENID WELLS. 

Weirieigh Cottage. 

Mat field. Tonbndgc, Kent. 

August IS. 





12 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


J 


p 

H 

O' 

T 

rt 

u 

fr 

ti 

a 

ai 

at 


I 


T 

v« 

in 

ai 

in 

le 

it 

d< 

**i 

ci 

te 

Pi 

b* 

if 

w 

R 

nr 

P* 

Ii 


T 

ir 

w. 

a> 

if 

b 

ti 

P 

si 

o 

h 

C! 

.A 

b 

ft 

c- 

C 

V. 

C 

c 

ti 

h 

it 

fi 

o 

li 

« 

n 


* 4 - 

a _ 


i IT 

lu 


► u 
I* 


THE ARTS: 1 


Television 


Heights 
of hope. 


Fairy-tales can come true: it 
has happened to us. as Equi- 
nox. Channel 4's admirable 
new science series, dem- 
onstrated last night. The pro- 
gramme, compared the opti- 
mistic dreams of city living 
from early in this century to 
the real conurbations of the 


n> 

A 

f 

present 

r\ 

B 

f 

With a heady blend of old 

ai 

1 

fantasy films, documentaries 

y. 

1 

from New York's world fairs 

o 

V 

and modern actuality, we were 

u 

o 

■ 

invited to compare the visions 

li 

■ w 

with the cities created after- 

rr 

1 * 

wards. Here were skyscrapers. 

T 

* “ 

described as temples of com- 

w 

f ** 

merce. the answer to getting 

ti- 

1 

the highest rents from the 

ll 

a 

world's most lucrative crumb 

1c 

t 

a 

of real estate. Manhattan 

Y 

i v« 

Island. 


Techno!og> leapt to meet 
the new challenges of high-rise 
living. We explored the ques- 
tion of the skyscrapers' doors. 
Le Corbusier’s drawings sel- 
dom showed tower-block doors 
in detail: the downdrafts cre- 
ated by the buildings made it 
impossible to open a con- 
ventional door at the bottom of 
the 70 storeys. The Americans 
found the solution — the 
revolving door — and also 
invented fast elevators, es- 
calators and many other solu- 
tions to problems which 
stumped European metropolis 
creators. 

The programme began with 
the flair and confidence which 
is becoming characteristic of 
this valuable new strand, but 
occasionally lost itself in the 
fascination of its own material. 
Pessimistic contemporary vi- 
sions of the city, like the films 
Blade Runner and BraziL 
would hate been a valuable 
addition to the thesis. 

Some fantasies persisted 
but never left the drawing- 
board — like helicopters, 
pedestrian walkways and la- 
bour-saving kitchens. Other 
aspects of the future were 
evidently unimaginable SO 
years ago. No woman was ever 
seen pursuing a careen instead 
women were idealized only as 
domestic drudges who would 
be freed by automation for a 
life of leisure. 

Such nonsense was far from 
the scenario of Strong Medi- 
cine (ITV). the first half of 
Arthur Hailey's saga of a 
woman's rise to the top of the 
pharmaceutical industry. 
“Cute! Is that how you see my 
work?" snarled Pamela Sue 
Martin, the termagant refugee 
from Dynasty. Here was proof 
that the feminist male can be 
more strident than the female. 


Celia Brayfield 



The simple pleasures of the past: Ravilious's Church under a Hill 


Galleries 


Eric Ravilious 
1903-42 

Towner Art Gallery, 
Eastbourne 


As Nikolaus Pevsner used so 
eloquently to remind us. the 
English ness of English art 
embraces far more than is 
dreamed of in cosy farmhouse 
kitchens or is ecstasized over 
by enthusiasts for antique 
steam trains, shaggy dogs and 
the gentle curves of the South 
Downs. All the same, those 
arc not bad places to start a 
definition, and looking at the 
works of Eric Ravilions cn 
masse, as at the retrospective 
show presented by the Towner 
Art Gallery. Eastbourne, until 
September 7. one can easily 
slip into the happy fallacy of 
supposing that that is all there 
is. 

In a wav this is nearer the 
truth than the opposite 
assumption, which is that 
Ravilious. like Betjeman, is 
very charming and all that, 
but ultimately minor and 
peripheral True, his subject 


matter does include a large 
number of cosy country interi- 
ors. and he did have a passion 
for elderly and abandoned 
machines. He also had a very 
Saturday Book sort of nostal- 
gia for the simple pleasures of 
the past: even in 1938 the 
coloured lithographs in his 
book High Street, published 
(naturally) by Country’ Life, 
must have been more than a 
little backward-looking, with 
their images of an almost 
Edwardian way of life and 
shopping. But at the same 
time one should not underesti- 
mate the rigour and pro- 
fessional discipline with 
which he embodied his vision 
in drawing and watercolour 
and wood -engraving. Just be- 
cause his wort is so easy to 
approach, that does not mean 
that it was too easily arrived 
aL 

Of course Ravilious also 
had the unhappy distinction 
of being the only Official War 
Artist killed on active service 
in the Second World War, and 
that does put him into a 
slightly different, if not nec- 
essity in these pacific days 
any more fashionable, cate- 


Though nostalgia may well 
have a lot to do with a liking 
for Ravilious. his work comes 
over remarkably fresh and 
undated, and should find 
many new admirers with this 
show, which after Eastbourne 
goes on to Durham. Sheffield 
and BristoL but sadly not to 
London. 


John Russell 
Taylor 


ENO'S 1986/87 SEASON OPENS WEDNESDAY* 


Tkova tore 



IL 


Verdi 


Jane Eaglen Leonora Conductor James Lockhart 
Kenneth Collins Manrico Re-staged by Keith Warner 
Ann Howard Azucena Lighting NkkChelton 
Neil Hewlett Count di Luna 


* then Aug 30, Sept 2, 5, 10, 12, 17, 20, 25 all at 7.30 


EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 
Fringe theatre: Irving Wardle 




Enraged expressions of self 


•O' - 


ITI Go On 
Assembly Rooms 


Also booking 

The Marriage of Figaro 
The Mikado 
Madam Butterfly, Aida 
Cavalleria Rusticana/Pagliacci 
The Rape of Lucretia 


English National Opera 
London Coliseum 
St Martin's Lane 
London WC2 


EhD 


Box Office 01 -836 31 61 
Credit Cards 01-240 5258 


7/, vY 


UONDOH 


My first response on arriving 
for this one-man Beckett 
show, to be greeted with a jolly 
brass band medley, was that I 
had wandered into the wrong 
theatre. The second surprise 
was the spectre of Barry 
McGovern in the likeness of a 
wicked old clown, dodging the 
follow-spots and taking gloat- 
ing possession of his captive 
audience. It all seemed a great 
lease until be wound it up by 
defining what was to come. 
The show, he said, consisted 
of “waiting alone": at which 
point the Beckett fist con- 
tracted like iron. 

77/ Go On. a Dublin Gate 
Theatre piece devised by Mr 
McGovern and Gerry Dukes, 
is assembled from passages of 
the postwar trilogy Molloy. 


Malone Dies and The Vn- 
namcahtc. Apart from the 
basic interest of releasing 
these claustrophobic mono- 
logues into theatrical speech, 
the justification for adaptation 
is that it reveals the unifying 
impulse that drives through 
the trilogy. The pattern is one 
ofruthless self-dismantling. In 
the world of Alex Molloy. 
Beckett is still dealing with 
characters and comic situa- 
tions: Malone, soliloquizing in 
the morgue, still has a fictional 
identity and is not above 
cracking a joke for literary 
effect. In The Unnameahle. 
everything has gone except the 
defiant self, and a vast anger at 
the swindle of human exist- 
ence. 

These are the familiar 
boundaries of Beckett's work, 
but Mr McGovern succeeds in 
stretching them far beyond the 
usual limits. His Molloy. 


clambering on a bike with 
crutches over the handlebars, 
and falling foul of giant police- 
men and gentle lady dog- 
owners. could be a figure out 


of Flann O'Brien. Flashing 


nutcracker snarls and grins o 
triumph when he hits upon 
the mot juste for the latest 
humiliation, he conveys the 
specifically Irish comic sense 
of thrivmg on poverty, 
destitution and physical col- 
lapse. The more hopeless the 
outward circumstances, the 
greater his relish in dwelling 
on them and the more im- 
placable his determination to 
bang on to his bad luck as a 
proof that his mind is his own. 

As Molloy. he sports a 
workhouse overcoat lined 
with back numbers of The 
Times Literary Supplement. 
For Malone, be goes into a 
shroud: first seen in back view 
crouched over a vault and 


then swinging round with t. 
great flourish. e\« glinting 
with malicious fun. very much 
alive in the tomb. In this 
section there are no events, 
only the stories with which 
Malone whiles away the time, .. 

and the variety of rhythm and ' 
emotional contrast hie extracts 
from the lines came as- a 
revelation to me above aB the - . 
ability to undercut poet ty with 
brutal dismissals of poetic lick 
This finds its full develop- 
ment in the final section, 
where the verbal quest for 
truth is cast overboard along 
with everything else, leaving 
the self endlessly defining 
itself in enraged expression 
with the very instrument it is 
striving to discard. The trans- 
formation of the performer 
from the clown of the opening 
scene to the stripped Japa- 
nese-like virtuoso of the end? * . 
ing is awesome. 


r. :*»!.» 


ft' 






4 


Official theatre: Sarah Hemming 


Lander 

Portobello Town Hall 


gory. His war works are 
without exception very fine, 
everyday yet magical and 
evocative pictures of a new 
world above the clouds or. in 
his submarine lithographs, be- 
neath the waves. His indus- 
trial design for Wedgwood. 
Stuart Crystal and other, in 
the Thirties, enterprising com- 
panies (including such esoter- 
ica as the Wedgwood Coro- 
nation mug for the abortive 
crowning of Edward VI II. a 
design happily salvaged with 
slight modifications for that of 
his niece) have an un- 
sentimental crispness and ele- 
gance which keep the' bogy of 
quaintness comfortably at 
bay. 


The first music-hall entertainer to re- 
ceive a knighthood. Harry Lauder was 
something of a phenomenon. Bom in 
Portobello (hence the venue) and ending 
up in a mansion, he was one of those 
curious, ambiguous Scottish figures re- 
spected by many, remembered with 
affection by many and dismissed with 
scorn by others. My hazy image of him 
previously stopped at a' slightly eccen- 
tric-looking figure, outrageously over- 
clad in tartan, on dog-eared record- 
sleeves that contained idiosyncratic 
renderings of songs like “Stop Yer 
Ticklin’. Jock" and “Deoch and Doris”. 
For me then Jimmy Logan's show was 
educative, for others it was dearly 
evocative. But Logan is aiming at more 
than nostalgia, making it his task to go 
behind Lauder's image and uncover not 
only the man. and the reasons he domted 
his image, but the whole era that he stood 
for and was pan of. 

Beginning with a rehearsal at which 



Logan as Lauder to the manner bom 


Lauder holds the stage even while 
explaining his music notes. Logan 
demonstrates how he was a showman of 
the old school: thorough, determined 


and doggedly professional. The produc- 
tion. written by Logan himself, then goes 
on to reconstruct Lauder's life and, 
though contrived and overly stage- 
managed in places, it neatly uses a'- 
musie-hall structure to move in and opt 
of Lauder's life-story. allowing him to 
hold the audience with a combination of' 
songs, stories, repartee and anecdotes., 
the while establishing a picture not only 
of Lauder himself but of the changing 
music-hall world in the.cariy pan of the 
century. 

It is a warm, affectionate, wons-and- 
all portrait, and Lpgan (directed by Clive 
Perry) plays it to the manner born, his 
own ability to hold a stage perfectly 
matched to portraying Lauder's cha- 
risma. In his exploration of Lauder's - 
rags-io-richcs lift and attitude to his own 
achievement Logan also touches on 
broader questions - the possibility of 
escape from the class sy stem through 
show- business and the. images and seif- w 
images of the. Scots and the way that : 
these arc used: Louder here takc$ .oht* 
board the cbaige of making mileage opt 
of cliches. - 


Opera: Paul Griffiths 


Eugene Onegin 
King’s Theatre 


Bv all accounts this was a 
smoother night for the Maly 
Theatre than John Higgins 
experienced at their produc- 
tion of The Queen of Spades. 
but it was still far from happy. 
On two scenes. Tatiana’s letter 
and the dueL the curtain failed 
to rise at the right moment, 
and the noises off suggested 
that the efforts to change sets 
were becoming somewhat 
heated. 


Under such circumstances 
it would not be fair to make 
any final judgement on the 


company: one must just hope 
that the' technical problems 
have been sorted out by the 
time of their third production, 
the new Maria Stuart by 
Sergei Slonimsky. which 
opens tonighL It is hard, 
nevertheless, to fee! that fewer 
hitches would have made this 
Onegin seem any the less 
quainL 

The production is appar- 
ently quite new: the director 
Stanislav Gaudasinsky came 
to the company only in 1980. 
However the make-up, cos- 
tumes and groupings and 
most of all the unself- 
consciously romantic acting, 
look one back at least a 
quarter of a century in theatri- 
cal history. The orchestra 


sounded a bit whiskery' too; 
though here the main im- 
pression was one of geographi- 
cal more than chronological 
distance: the wobbly bassoon, 
the pinched oboe,, the tight 
buzzv cellos and the lopsided 
trumpet all spoke for the 
Russian tradition at its earthi- 
est. without much benefit of 
fixed tuning. With so many 
hazards on stage, though, one 
must congratulate Valentin 
Kozhin on conducting, the 
orchestra and himself so 
coolly. 

Among the cast, Vladimir 
Ognovenko proved himself 
the most accomplishedsinger. 
delivering G rein in’s aria with 
a firm, smiting warmth, and 
with a variety of colour that 


was conspicuously absent in' 
Other, performances- .. LX 
Kazarnovskaya's Tatiana, -for i 
Instance, bad just two fciridsof . 

vocaJbeHavidBahroughoudtr. - 
very Russian- throbbing,'.- '*• 
mezzo-ish lower register an4n, 

bright top. Sht sounded cither 
matronly or wild, arid never .* 
girlish. - Nikolai Kopilov as * ‘ 
Onegin was further reduced to 
only one lone: the dim. almost;, - 
swallowed voice that left very. { 
little room for expression.-^* 
LF. Ostrovsky (again the pro-' ' * J 
gramme was deficient m first .Vi* 
names and patronymics) sfto- : 

wad some fighting . spirit- as ’J 

Lensky.. but the level of his 
performance, as of the whole \ - 
evening, was of a merely j- 
provincial adequacy. . . , ii 






Promenade Concert 

BBCSO/Atherton 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 


I doubt whether any other new 
piece m this year's Proms will 
have been received by an 
audience as large as that which 
heard Peter Dickinson's Piano 
Concerto, first given in 1984. 
on Wednesday. But then not 
all of them will have been so 
cunningly packaged. The BBC 
Symphony Orchestra prefaced 
it with Elgar’s Introduction 
and Allegro and followed it 
with Rachmaninov's First 
Symphony, both marvellous 
pieces and both given here 
with plentiful warmth, space 
and emotion under the 
evening's excellent conductor. 
David Atherton. 


Yet it would be wrong to 
dwell on these at the expense 
of the Dickinson, given with 
equally impressive under- 
standing and confidence by 
the orchestra and the soloist 
(and dedicatee) Howard Shel- 
ley. for it is .a work both 
rewarding intellectually and 
compelling aurally. 


Dickinson's reputation rests 
perhaps too heavily upon the 
lighter side of his craft, which 
in numerous delightful small- 
scale pieces metamorphoses 
material by other composers 
into things quite different 
often tinged with a whimsy 


21 August — 6 September 8pm 
Sim performances 3pm A 8pm 
The p re mi ere of one of 
America's foremost theatrical 
ensembles 

THE 

WOOSTER 

GROUP 

peasants 

The Road To 

Immortality 

fpart2J 

"Extra or di nar y 
entertainment, warmly 
recomme nde d" 

— The Observer 
"She e r tbmatrk imOtr . flft 
DonodwdnuaiM" 

— Glasgow Herald 
"S h oul d bo se e i i " 

— TbwArf 

box offices 748 3354 

CREDIT CAROS S 379 0433 


nrverside studios 


influenced by the.Hkes of Satie 
but flattering his models 
rather than savaging them. In 
this concerto, though, he is 
deadly serious. The music 
pays due homage to ragtime 
and blues, and Dickinson 
typically sets one sort of music 
simultaneously against an- 
other, much in the mannerof 
Ives. But the result is an 
organism suffused with its 
own flavour, owing at the 
same time everything and 
nothing to other composers 
and other languages. 

Dickinson begins his 25- 
minute single-movement 
structure with three clearly 
defined sections (everything 
in this work is dearly denned) 
that slowly and inexorably 
build up a grim tension, with 
an increasingly elaborate pi- 
ano cadenza beard against the 
steady dirge of the horns. To 
dissolve this — it cannot be 
resolved - there is an almost 
shocking major chord, where- 
upon die music launches itself 
simultaneously into a fast 
toccata, played by the piano 
accompanied try-bongos, and a 
slow blues, played by the 
strings. Then comes another 
obvious punctuation mark, in 
the form of a tam-tam stroke, 
and then more blues, this time 
decorated. 

What comes next is the 
work’s coup de thi&re. , a 
scherzo which combines all 
the themes in the form ofa rag 
and has them played by a 
second pianist in the orchestra 
while the. soloist and the rest 
of the orchestra make their 
own comments. The visual 
effect of this is actually quite 
disturbing; To wind down 
from this undoubted high 
point Dickinson - amply sums 
up what he has already said, 
with the blues, now har- 
monized in plain D major, 
having the Iasi significant 
word. 


Stephen Pettitt 


Fringe dance: John Percival 

Familiar favours 


As Miles Kington has made 
clear on other pages over the 
past few days, the byways and 
fringes of Edinburgh at festi- 
val time can offer unexpected 
pleasures. But even his 
serendipitous flair might quail 
at the prospect of trawling 
fringe dance productions for 
new talents. Sometimes in the 
past h has worked, which is 
why one perseveres, but the 
minor blessings I found this 
year were all known names. 

Those who want to try their 
own luck might welcome a few 
tips from an'old hand who has 
sat through more bad dances, 
poorly performed in Edin- 
burgh's lesser halls, than he 
cares to remember, and only 
rarely tiptoed away before the 
end when it became obvious 
that there was no hope at all of 
things getting better. 

Rule No 1: Experience 
shows that there is more 
chance of good dancing and 
even of good choreography if a 
show or its instigators come 
from the USA. Rule No 2: 
Groups hailing from a rep- 
utable British- dance school 
usuaully offer at least com- 
petent dancing, but this is no 
guarantee of choreography to 
match. Rule No 3; Avoid like 
the very .devil groups who 
coyly give no idea at -all of 
their provenance.. 

The best fringe dancing | 
.found this year came from 
Shelley Lee (American, known 
in Britain as the founder of the 
former Basic Space company) 
and Scott Clark (American, 
known -in Britain for his 


teaching and dancing at the 
School), both at the 


Laban 

Chaplaincy Centre in Bristo 

Square. 

lee's Dreant Dances, part of 
a crazily ambitious long-term 
project, have ended now. - Well 


crafted, they probably meant - A 
more to the dancer than to Htr ’ 
audience.' but were^performed 
with delicate control of nu- 
ance. Clark's dances for him- 
self and two colleagues are 
fluent not quire as varied as 
the eclectic choice of music 
might suggesL but verv well 
performed. ~ Dark has a. 
scrubbed, cropped, slightly' 
bow-legged look to him like a 
young GI. Julie Blackman and 
Jonathan Thrift perform with ~ - 
presence. 

The last number on their - 
programme, a trio by Vera 
Blaine, Clark's former teacher 
at Ohio Uni varsity, is given 
again two and a half hours , 
later in a quintet version to 
end the programme by Instep. . 

an all-woman group of Laban 
graduates. They work hard , 
and optimistically, but their' - 
programmes show more dis- 
cretion than talent. Both these 
shows run until the weekend. 

Scottish Dance Theatre is- . 
playing at the Lyceum Studio • 
until the festival ends, with a 
change of programme next 
week. Three of its five dancers 
come from the Scottish Ballet. - * 
which guarantees performing 
standards, and Pauline Lav- - 
erty's playing as a 'bored, . 
frustrated, angry woman in . 
the last piece is excellent 

Unfortunately, by. then ' 
many spectators had left per- • i 
haps driven away by the 
programme's dreary content * 
Called Theatrum Humanicae, 
it looked more like a threatre 
of inhumanity. Peter Royston. 
the group's founder, seeros 
drawn more to theatre than 
dance and his ideas are a Jot * 
!«s original than he probably 
thinks, while his awnmerfor- ■ 
mances are self-indulgcntly . 
heavy. 



f V 




THE MOST ENTERTAINING SHOW IN TOWN' 

rf u*« , _ , Trv . 


BARBICAN THEATRE 

01.628 8795/638 8891 


'GtT HAPPY, SEE THIS SHOW' 


//iinh 




THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


13 


THE ARTS: 2 


Cinema: David Robinson reviews a legendary film released in full at last 

Visconti’s magnificent obsession 


Ossessione (PG) 

Renoir 2 - 

Highlander (15) 
Warner West End 
(from August 29) 

Target (15) 
Leicester Square 
Theatre 


It has taken 44 years for 
Ossessione — Visconti's first 
film and a. landmark in cin- 
ema history — to achieve a 
commercial release in this 
country. From time to time 
• - since the Fifties there have 
J been National Film Theatre 
screenings, but these were 
generally the mutilated ver- 
sions that went on release after 
the film's initial suppression 
by the fascist authorities in 
1942. The version at the 
Renoir is intact at 140 
minutes. 

Visconti and his co-writers 
(Mario Alicata. Antonio Piet- 
rangcli. Gianni Puccini and 
Giuseppe de Santis: Moravia 
also did some revision) con- 
sciously intended the film as a 
manifesto, a demonstration 
against the bland, approved 
escapism of the so-called 
"white telephone” cinema. 
The major literary influence 
on the young subversives was 
the verismo of the Sicilian 
writer Giovanni Verga. and 
Visconti's first plan was an 
adaptation of Verga's Gra- 
ntigna's Mistress. This script 
however was returned by 
Mussolini's censor marked 
"No more bandits!”. 

Adaptations from foreign 


originals seemed to have a 
better chance of approval and. 
after trying treatments of nov- 
els by Alain-Foumier. Her- 
man Melville. Julian Green 
and Thomas Mann. Visconti 
settled on James Cain's The 
Postman Always Rings Twice. 
which had already been filmed 
before the war in France. 

The essential story is un- 
changed from the novel: Gino. 
an unemployed drifter, arrives 
at a highway pull-in and is 
given work by the owner, an 
amiable but gross middle-aged 
man married to a young and 
beautiful wife. Giovanna. 
Drawn into an obsessive love- 
affair. the young couple mur- 
der the husband to get him out 
of the way. 

Beyond this the film departs 
signifiantly from the novel. 
Cain develops an artificial 
notion of providential justice. 
Visconti's film finds that trag- 
edy and destruction lie in the 
characters of the people them- 
selves. in human vulnerability 
to passion and human com- 
pulsion to betrayal. Just as the 
couple betray the husband by 
murdering him, so their own 
downfall will be effected by 
betrayal. 

Less concerned than Cain 
with the mechanisms of the 
police investigation. Visconti 
introduces an entirely new 
and slightly mystifying de- 
ment with the character of 11 
Spagnolo. a romantically in- 
clined market huckster. To the 
extent that the codes of the 
time permitted. Visconti 
shows II Spagnolo as a victim 
of obsessive love for Gino just 
as Gino is possessed by 
Giovanna. The elaborate pat- 
tern of desire and betrayal is 
completed when II Spagnolo, 
finally spumed by Gino. de- 
nounces him to the police — a 
crucial scene missing from 



Mara Zampierf s dominating Lady Macbeth 


Opera in Europe 

Licence unlimited 


Macbeth 
Theatre Antique, 
Orange 

Verdi assigned Macbeth to the 
genere famastica. and that 
remark may well have given 
the cue to the Romanian 
director Patrika Ionesco, who 
allowed himself unlimited li- 
cence in an extravagant and 
elaborate staging of the work 
in the enormous Roman the- 
atre at Orange. Such a vast 
arena constitutes an open 
invitation to indulge in 
spectacular effects, and Io- 
nesco did not deny himsdf. 

Billowing stretches of doth 
(suggesting, incongruously, 
surplus parachute material) 
covered the stage for the 
blasted heath, ringed by a set 
of gal lows having some resem- 
blance to lampposts. Symbols 
of power and decay prolif- 
erated: a huge crown, borne by 
servitors in the manner of 
waiters carrying an immense 
wedding-cake: at the back of 
the stage- a semicircle of vast 
tombstones, reflecting the 
message of the gallows: an 
abundance of witchlike mo- 
tifs. including a parade of 
ercseent moons looking like 
melon-slices on poles: and. 
projected on the back wall of 
the theatre, the image of a 
dagger to accompany Mac- 
beth's inner musjngs. Much of 
this was entertaining, but all 
too often there was descent 
into complete absurdity. 

Musically, the performance 
demonstrated rather more 
consistency in its attention to 
Verdi's opera. Thomas Ful- 
ton the voung Mem phis- bom 
conductor who is now asso- 
ciate at the Metropolitan in 


New York, confirmed his real 
quality, discernible in his 
Boris at Orange last year, with 
a reading which was taut, 
vigorous and incisive. 

On stage, the performance 
was dominated by an extraor- 
dinarily fine assumption of 
Lady Macbeth by the Italian 
soprano Mara Zampieri. It 
was characterized by judicious 
use of a powerful chest reg- 
ister. together with the ability 
(also an attribute of one of her 
illustrious predecessors in the 
role. Margherita Grandi) to 
manage a finely-graded dim- 
inuendo. fining the voice 
down to a slender thread of 
sound. Zampieri possesses a 
formidable vocal technique, 
allied to real histrionic ability, 
so that her Lady Macbeth was 
a creation of impressive en- 
ergy and authority who. very 
properly, took complete 
charge of the proceedings. In 
the interval it was announced 
that she was suffering from an 
unspecified malaise (it could 
easily have been exhaustion 
from the heat as she had not 
spared herself) and. although 
there was no sign of an vocal 
impairment, she elected not to 
attempt the high D flat at the 
end of the sleepwalking scene. 

Among the other rewards of 
the evening were a thoughtful 
and detailed characterization 
of the title-role by the ever- 
reliable Piero Cappuccilli: a 
solidly-sung Banquo by John 
Tomlinson: splendidly so- 
norous work by the Choeur 
National Bulgarc Svcloslav 
Obretnoi; responsive piawng 
by the Orchestic National de 
France: and. finally, a remark- 
ably robust and ringing 
Macdulf from the Japanese 
tenorTaro Ichihara. 

Peter Orr 


every known print of the film 
until this one. 

The motivation and con- 
flicts of the characters are 
developed with subtle com- 
plexity. but the real novelty of 
the film in its lime was the 
relation of the people to their 
setting. "I wanted, above all. 
to tell stories of living people 
among things, not of things 
per sc." It is Visconti's use of 
locations in the Po Delta and 
Ancona, the stark unlovely 
realism of the seedy pull-in 
with its unwashed dishes and 
unmade bed. the dust roads in 
the flat, unvaried landscape, 
that have earned Ossessione 
its reputation as the seminal 
moment of Italian Neo- 
Rcalism. 

Visconti's approach to re- 
alism comes less from Verga 
than the pre-war French cin- 
ema of Came. Duvivier, 
Chenal and above all Renoir, 
with whom from 1 936 he had 
worked as assistant (Mira 
Liehm's indispensable new 
study of Julian cinema since 
this film. Passion and Defi- 
ance. cites a fascist newspaper 
of 1943 which condemns 
Ossessione for "imitating the 
French kind of realism that 
must not be transferred to 
Italy: the movie is a concoc- 
tion of repulsive passions, 
humiliations and decay”.) 

It is currently fashionable to 
question the film's place as the 
source of Neo-Realism, since 
the socio-political preoccupa- 
tions later characteristic of the 
school are absent — not 


surprisingly given the dimate 
of the times: as it was 
Visconti. Alicata and Puccini 
were imprisoned by the secret 
police during shooting. The 
film's influence upon both 
Rossellini and De Sica is 
however undeniable. 

The triumph of Ossessione 
is that it reappears now not as 
an archive revival but as a 
film with all its power intact. 
None of the principal perfor- 
mances has dated. Gino is the 
handsome, sexy, 24-year-old 
Massimo Giroui. As Gio- 
vanna. Clara CaJamai. a popu- 
lar star in femme fatale roles, 
seizes the opportunity of a 
more rewarding character. 
There is. too. a startling and 
affecting performance, in the 
role of a young prostitute, by 
Dhia Cristani. a gifted actress 
who later chose to restrict her 
work to dubbing other players’ 
voices. 

The hard fact that today’s 
commercial cinema has to 
face is that the great power of 
patronage lies with the young 
teenage audience, and that 
they call the tune. Highlander, 
which’ had its premiere at the 
Edinburgh Film Festival last 
night and opens in London 
today week, is symptomatic of 
this economic reality, one of a 
growing group of films in 
which huge resources of 
money, technology and crafts- 
manship are lavished on 
scenarios more suited to strip 
cartoons. 

Highlander is a mishmash 
of synthetic mythology, about 


a group of immortal beings, 
variously representative of 
good and evil, who can only be 
destroyed by beheading. They 
meet from time to time 
through the ages, to fight for 
the prize of universal intelli- 
gence. which must never pass 
to Kurgan the Evil, whose 
neck is held together with 
safety-pins after repealed at- 
tempts on his immortality 
(“Who wontster live frevya?” 
asks a pertinent Queen song 
on the sound-track). 

The sword-fighting shifts 
from 16th-century Scotland to 
1986 New York, with little 
rhyme or reason: but — to 
show that we can do this sort 
of thing as well as the Ameri- 
cans — the photography 
(Gerry Fisher) is spectacular 
and the special effects (the 
credit titles list an army of 
wizards) are astonishing and 
faultless. The film is cal- 
culated for an audience which 
demands only an unrelenting 
succession of visual effects, 
backed by an overpowering 
sound-track. ■ The director. 
Russell Mulcahy. comes 
appropriately from the world 
of pop video. 

The most baffling special 
efTect of all is how the Nean- 
derthal face of Christopher 
Lambert, who plays the High- 
lander hero, is maintained in a 
constant state of three days' 
beard-growth. Presumably 
this is where the skill of the 
credited "prosthetic make-up 
artist” comes in. 

It is hard to know what 



Performances undated even no#: Massimo Girotti and Dhia Cristani in Ossessione 


possessed the distinguished 
Arthur Penn to take on such 
stufff as Howard Berk's and 
Don Petersen’s script for Tar- 
get The initial premise is 
novel: when a Dallas business- 
man and his distanced teenage 
son take off in search of the 
wife, kidnapped during a 
European vacation, the son 
discovers that his seemingly 
boring, conformist Dad has a 


hair-raising past witfi the CIA* 
which now begins to catch up 
on them. 

After* this H collapses into 
the corniest conventions of 
espionage melodrama — Euro- 
pean streets packed with sin- 
ister pursuers, crazy cap- 
chases. crazier coincidences, 
femmes fataies, a vengeful, 
Wheelchair-bound master- 
mind. double and triple 


agents, and a CIA boss you 
know from the start is the real 
■villain because he acts so 
badly. Gene Hackman and 
Gayle Hunnicutt play the 
parents: the worst thing is that 
Matt Dillon, fast growing to be 
one of the best young Holly- 
wood actors, is given a role so 
dumb that ii makes Charlie 
Chan's Number One Son look 
like Einstein. - 



Popular songs and arias by 
the world's most famous 
operatic stars including:- 

JOS£ CARRERAS 
AGNES BALTSA 
MONTSERRAT 
CABALLE 
GWYNETH JONES 
SIMON ESTES 
SHERRILL MILNES 


OPERA FOR 
AFRICA 

A live recording 
from Arena of 
Verona, 

August '85 

£049 1 


LP/CASS ....as seen on BBC TV. 


DOUBLE LP/CASS 


OFRA HARNOY 

A NEW TALENT 
A WORLD PREMIERE 

QFRAHARNffrS2ND RCA RELEASE FEATURES 
AN0FEN3ACH WORLD ffiMEE RECDUOttG 
AND A8RHL1ANT NTERPaETSTlC:! C? 

THE RRST5A1NT-SAENS C0NGF70. 

E 4” 


LP/CASS 

THE COIffiACT OK OWES WTH AN EXTRA REG0F £4449 

MUSIC TOtAflOVSJCY'SWWTlOJtSCN A ROCOCO THEME I 1PESGD RC/I 



OFFENBACH 

WORLD PREMHE RKORDNGCONCBnO 
FOR CELLO + ORCHESTRA 
GrmXti Symphony Orrhestra 
Erih Kunzel; Conductor 

SA 1 NPSAENS 

CONCERTO N°1 H AMWOR FORCEUO - 
ORCHESTRA Op.33 
Vaond Symphony Onhestra . 
foul freeman: Conductor 

TCHAIKOVSKYoNcoMRacrcHScoNiy | 
UWAnONSONAROCOCO THEME FOR 
CELLO + ORCHESTRA OpJl 

Wcroria Symotay Ordietra 
PauJ freeman: Conductor 


OPERA 
RARITIES 
FROM CONIFER 

Erato and Hungaroton are the 
most enterprising companies in 
the field of opera recordings 
today: Here are just ten of their 
recent releases of some 
fascinating and lovely works. 

c 5 49 

PER LP/CASS 





TCHAIKOVSKY YOLANTA 
2LP SET 


Plus these other releases 
from Esa-Pekka Salonen 
available from CBS Records. 
NELSEN: Symphony N°4 
LI/T0SLAW5W: Symphony N°3 

JOUVET +7DMASI Trumpet 
Concertos (Wynton Marsalis) 

BOJTO: Nerone 
CHABRIER: Le roi 
malgre iui 
HANDEL: Atalanta 
PAtSIELLO: The Barber 
of Seville 

PURCELL: King Arthur 
RAMEAU: LesBoreades 
RESPIGHI: La Fiamma 
SALIERI: Falstaff 
TCHAIKOVSKY: Yolanta 
VIVALDI: Catone in Utica 



THEARTOFNOSEe^s* 99 
IN VISIBLE SILENCE ®WlF.'CA; 


BlUyJOEL 
: THE BRIDGE 


££■49 COMMUNARDS £ 


>LP/CASS. COMMUNARDS 


:^99 NOW 


LP/CASS BHfMH 


£££99 PRINCE 

W LP/CASS PARADE 


llP/CASS 


GEORffi BffiSO N£g4® 


WHILE THE 
(TTY SLEEPS 


LP/CASS 


THE 

BEST OF 
BLUE NOTE 

VOLUMETWO 

£^P49 


INCLUDING: 

IKE QUEBEC, 
ART BLAKEY 
DEXTER GORDON, 
HORACE SILVER & 
SONNY ROLLINS 


DOUBLE L P 



BRITAIN'S BIGGEST V©£0 SALES AND RENTAL DEPARTMENT! 
GREAT MUSIG~.ON VIDEO 


UUWWQK-MWHJMBfT 
IflJRMCK- THEGOU£CTION 
BMSQKraiO-TlEMAH MHENDMX-JMIPLAY5 



videos 


THE 
CURE 
SWUNG AT THE SEA 


PUBLIC E ft 8S 
ABASE (TO 
VIDEOS 



U2 C ‘ 

UNDER A' 
UtDOOREDSKY 


GAWNUttMl- 
MCROMUSt 
GARY HUMAN -TDURNG 
PBNCFLE 

SAK1NIUMAN-: NEWMAN 
HUMAN 

sremAJC A.-qw.gu B 
TMJONGHEABS^SltiP : . 
MAKMGSENSE 
StEGORT ISAAC -THE ■' 
aXXRftfil 
saamrauni-EP 

UMO- LABOUR OF LOVE 
PW.Q3UK- HD JACKET 
REQUIRED 


BERKELEY 
ftJTLES -All TOJ NEED IS CASH 
SEANDAU BALLET -LIVE 
CNB BRITAIN. - 
OTMFRP'irNf 
WAjmfeAKBB-IWaCUP 

THEPlANBSnON 
OBJURE CLUB- A KBS 
AG©SS THE OCEAN 
GENE5K- THE MAMA TOUB 

&V6 PRESLEY -’66 SPECIAL 

JAMB BROWN -UVE 

ttIQNDOH 




OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR • TIL MIDNIGHT • SUNDAY TIL ELEVEN 



■•ssss* 


N°1 PICCADILLY CIRCUS W1 • 01-439 2500 



ATTHE OLD SWAN & EDGAR BUILDING 


by operating them on the 


- IXlttttC yuur nome Energy W ise. The Electricity CounciL England and Wales. C/O 


m - ; ........ 

| ^thtSTPinochet regimeT ™' Imtativcon thebe 






14 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


J 

s. 

lc 

IV 

d- 

n 

fc 

It 

C 

n> 

n 

ai 

yi 

0 
u 
It 
rr 
T 
w 
rr 
li 
lc 
Y 
P 
H 

O' 

T 

lb 

u 

fr 

lb 

C( 

ai 

ai 

1 

T 

v; 

in 

ai 

in 

le 

it 

dt 

cr 

te 

pi 

b* 

tb 

w 

R 

rr 

P> 

II 


T 

ii 

w 

a> 

ii 

b 

ii 

P 

s> 

o 

b 

c. 

A 

b 

ft 

c 

C 

l. 

c 

cl 

li 

h 

tl 

ft 

o 

n 

V 

r» 


i 

i - 


• _ 
i w 


> * 


i- 

i* 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BALMORAL CASTLE 
August 21: By command of The 
Queen. Mr Stanley Martin (First 
Assistant Marshal of the Dip- 
lomatic 'Corps) this morning 
called upon His Excellency 
Monsieur Mama-Sani 
Aboudou-Salami at 30 Sloane 
Street SWl in order to bid 
farewell to His Excellency upon 
relinquishing his appointment 
as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from Togo 
to the Court of St James’s. 


Birthdays today 

Mr P. H. B. AIlsop. 62: Mr Mare 
Bohan, 60; Lady (Edgar) 
Bon ham -Carter . 93; Mr Ray 
Bradbury. 66; Professor Sir 
Colin Buchanan, 79; Dr Rob 
Buckman. 38; M Henri Cartier- 
Bresson. 78; Major-General Earl 
Cathcart, 67; Sir Richard 
Catling. 74; Professor Sir Cyril 
Astley Clarke. 79; Mr Steve 
Davis, 29; Mr Somerset de 
Chair. 75: Miss Margaret Doug- 
las. 52; Baroness Ewan-Biggs, 
57; Mr Max Hebditch. 49; Mr 
Donald Mac Leary, 49; Sir 
James Menter. 65; Sir Anthony 
Tuke, 66. - 


Science report 


War and peace role for 
revolutionary laser beam 


Liverpool’s prize 

A formerly derelict group of 
dock warehouses was awarded 
Europe's top prize for architec- 
tural conservation yesterday. 

The Albert Dock complex in 
Liverpool has won the Mer- 
seyside Development Corp- 
oration the Gold Medal and 
European Prize for the Preserva- 
tion of Historic Monuments, 
awarded by the FVS Founda- 
tion in Hamburg. 

The restored complex in- 
cludes the Merseyside Maritime 
Museum, a television studio, 
shops, and the site of the Tate's 
planned northern gallery. 


Marriages 


Mr J.H. Andrew 
and Miss J.L. Small 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. August 16, at St 
Peter's Church. Scremerston, of 
Mr James Houston Andrew, son 
of Mr AH. Andrew and the late 
Mrs Andrew, of Byways, Hert- 
ford. and Miss Jane Louise 
SmaiL daughter of Colonel and 
Mrs J. I. M. SmaiL of Berwick- 
upon-Tweed. Northumberland 
The Rev Philip Whitehead 
officiated, assisted by the Right 
Rev Edward Norman. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Angela Reese. 
Miss Charlotte Burns. Julia 
SmaiL Claire Brotherston and 
Kate SmaiL Mr Mathew Feney 
was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon is being spent 
abroad. 

Mr S.Q. Ball 
and Miss S.K. Lock 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. August 16, at All 
Saints Church. Marlow, be- 
tween Mr Stephen Ball, son of 
Mr and Mrs T. T. Ball, of 
Windsor, and Miss Sian Lock, 
daughter of Mr and Mre T. G. 
Lock, of Genards Cross. 

Dr R.G. Mitchell 
and Miss K-A. Appleby 
The marriage took place on 
August 20. at Marylebone Reg- 
ister Office. Westminster, of Dr 
Robert Grieg Mitchell, son of 
the late Mrs Joan Helen Mitch- 
ell. and Dr William John Mitch- 
ell. and Miss Karen Asia 
Appleby, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs S. Maxwell Appleby, of 
North Feniby. East Riding of 
Yorkshire. 


European Bridge 
trial selections 

The four leaders in the trials to 
select the team to repre s e nt 
Great Britain in the European 
Bridge Championship next year 
continues at the Young Chelsea 
Bridge Club. London, with a 
double round robin. 

The team Sunday which fin- 
ishes on Sunday a dear 15 
points at the head of the table 
earns automatic selection with a 
third pair to be chosen by the 
British Bridge League selectors. 
If this does not happen then the 
whole team of six will be chosen 
by the selectors. 

The carry-over scores are 
based on 40 per cent of their 
results against the other three 
leading teams and 20 per cent of 
those scored against the two 
eliminated teams. 

Standings 

1 J M Armstrong. G T Kirby, r S 
Brock. A R Forrester, with a score 
I'M. 61. s earned forward: 2 S 
Fish pool. D J Greenwood. A 
Cdlderwood. D SheK. 172. S2J3 d. 3 
A P Sowter. S J Lodge. Mrs S Landy. 
Mrs S Horton. 169. 46.4 cl: 4 I N 
Rose. R Smotskl. R M Sheehan. M J 
Flint: 1S7. 48.4 cf. 


Latest wills 

Lady Greta Lyons, of 
Wappenbury Hall, Wappen- 
bury. Warwickshire, widow of 
Sir William. Lyons, founder of 
Jaguar Cars, left estate valued at 
£4.433.491 net 

Mis Jeannie Fettes Hoskins, of 
Kingsway Court, Queens Gar- 
dens. Hove. East Sussex, who 
through her agency Celebrity 
Service became an informative 
pan of the London social scene, 
left £105.985 net She bequest 
£1.000 to the Saints and Sinners 
Cub. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments indude: 
Mr Ian Powe to be director of 
the Gas Consumers’ Council, 
which comes into being 
tomorrow. 

Legal 

Mr Justice Bingham to be a 
Lord Justice of Appeal. 


Apothecaries’ 

Society 

The following have been elected 
officers of the Apothecaries' 
Sodety for the ensuing year 

Martjr. Mr W F W SoWhwood Swtar 
Warden. Dr J F Fisher: Junior 
Warden. CMonei F G maid. 


Since ihc first laser flashed 10 
life 25 years ago. none has 
come along that is more 
radical in design than the free 
electron laser. PEL lis unique 
features endow the device 
with great power and 
flexibility. 

A dozen free electron lasers 
Operate in laboratories around 
the world, but researchers are 
racing to exploit their poten- 
tial and to build others that are 
bigger and belter. 

Rapid advances are pushing 
them to the forefront of efforts 
to create intense light beams 
for a variety of revolutionary 
uses in medicine, chemistry, 
pharmaceuticals, electronics, 
energy production, and beam 
weapons. 

Dr Charles A Brau. a 
pioneer at the Los Alamos 
National Laboratory, in New 
Mexico, said free electron 
lasers provided the best 
chance of "achieving the ab- 
solutely incredible power you 
need for the laser propulsion 
of rocket ships." 

“Over the next decade, it's 
going to have a profound 
impact on basic science and 
application engineering." said 
Dr John J. M. Madey. a 
physicist at Stanford Univer- 
sity. who is among inventors 
of the device. 

O level 
maths for 
boy, eight 

By Craig Seton 
An eight year old primary 
school boy who loves Donald 
Dock cartoons and Enid 
Blyton books heard yesterday 
that he had become the youn- 
gest pupil In Britain to pass O 
level mathematics. 

John Adams sailed through 
tiie examination to get a B 
grade and is now studying to 
take A level maths, probably 
next year. 

One of seven children, from 
the Leicestershire village of 
Asfordby, near Melton 
Mowbray, he passed the 
examination a year earlier 
than Roth Lawrence, another 
maths "genins” who gained a 
First in maths at Oxford 
University at the age of 13. 

He said: “It is brilliant I 
expected a B pass. I think an A 
was a bit too high for an eight 
year old. I was not worried — I 
just like using my brain 
against problems." 

John could read newspapers 
at two and was tackling al- 
gebra and computer problems 
at three. He wants to be a 
mathematics professor and to 
go to Oxford University. 

John, a pupil at the village's 
Captain's Close primary 
school, prepared for his 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS. MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS mi M MEMOKUM 
£4 a fine + m VAT 

(mini mum 3 lines) 

Announccmcmv auihenlkaied by (be 

name and permanent address of the 

sender, may be son ue 

THE TIMES 
P0 BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
El 9XS 

or telephoned [by telephone subs- 
cibcis only) uk U-4S1 3824 

Announcements can be received by 
telephone between ‘J.OOam and 
5 30pm Monday to Friday, oo Satur- 
day between n.OQam and 12 noon. 
(flf-481 4800 oafy). For publication the 
follo*ing day by 1.30pm. 


roHTHCOWKG BMHHUGES. WED0U6S 

etc on Court and Social Pax KB a Rue 

+ IS* VAT. 

Court and Social Rage annouccments 

can not be accepted b y telephone. 

Enquiries Irr 01-82 Z 9S53 
(after 10 . 30am L or send uk 

1 FqNng a n Street Londea El 9XH. 

Please allow at least 48 hours before 
publication. 


For I know mM my rraw m er liven*, and 

Ifuf hr ituiD sUnd AI me latter day upon 

Uw wth. 

JOh 19. 25 


BIRTHS 


ARMITAGE On August 19Ui. to Barba- 
ra and Robin, a daughter. Catherine 
Olivia Rose, a sister for Mend. 
BARNARD - On 16th August, at Bristol 
Maternity Hospital, to Hilary (nee 
Stride) & Jonathan, a son 
(Christopher Ratcliff*}. 

BOWERS - On 27th of July, at 
CuckflcM Hospital. Sussex to Jackie 
I nee Goddard) and Jon. a son. David 
Stanley. 

CALLAGHAN - Qn 29th July. 1986 at 
Addenbrooke's Hospital. Cambridge, 
to Anne Lake and Nicolas Richard 
Callaghan, a son. Simon Thomas. 
(MERRILL • On August 19th. In 
Singapore to Jaye (nee Collins) and 
Nik. a daughter. Rosannah Elizabeth. 
HANNAN - On August 18th. in 
Cahlomia. lo Kristine and PauL a 
son. Nell Walker. 

HILL - On 18th August, at Nether 
Edge. Sheffield, to Charlotte wee 
Huggmst and Peter, a daughter. Alice 
Elizabeth Warmt. 

HOTHAM - On 20th August, at Dalton 
Hall, to Daisy, widow of Peter 
tCiaphaiM. quadruplets. 

HUDSON ■ On tom August, to Jean 
and Harry, a son. Hmu Rhys, 
brother for Sian and David. 
JENMNGS ■ On August 17th. to Carol 
and Nicholas, a son. Canton William 
Hay. at home In Toronto. Canada. 
JONES - On Augiot 9th at King's Col- 
lege Hospital. London, to Krystyna 
(nee Turiewicz) and Philip, a son. 
Edward Henryk EUls. 

LAIRD CRAIG - On August 20th. to 
Rocky and Adrian, a sister, (or Rob- 
ert and Mary. 

M cDE RMOTT / OARER - on August 
14th. to Isabelle fate Darter} and 
Kdlh EUfcler. a daughter. .Stephanie 
Albertlne hies. A sister for CaUla. 
Sebastian and Charles- Henri. 
MICHELL - On August lSBi. to Louise 
and Mtcnael. a. daughter. Alice 
Charlotte, a sister fW Victoria. 
MILLER On 14th August 1986. to 
Julie <nee Clarke) and Chns. a 
daughter. Natasha. 

NETTELFIELD • On 1311) August- 
1936. in New York City, to Betty ann 
and Jonathan, a Uau^iler. Joanna. 
REEVES On August 19Ui- to Tracey 
■ nee Poneri and Tret or. a daughter 
A maxima Jane. 

ROACH - On 271h July, to Katie and 
Stewart, a daughter. Catherine 
Sarah Rebecca tv 


19th August to peter A 

Penny faie Davies) a daughter Vic- 

toria Emily Louise a sfe 
Alexand ra. 

STEPHENSON - On August 4th. to 

Hilary mee George) and Richard, at 

St Mary's. Manchester, a son. 
Edm und Richard George. 
STEWART • On 16th August 1986. to 

Tokiko in£e Naito) and Alexander 

(Sandy) a daughter. Fiona. 
WmGUEY - On 21St August. b> Venetla 
and Nicholas, a daughter. 


MARRIAGES 


de VERE s HURST • The marriage took 
place In London, on 19ut August 
1986 between Anthony de Vere and 
Rosemary Hurst. 

McMONACLE s KELWAY - On August 
16th. hi London. Dr Timothy 
McMonagle and Dr SaHy Ketway. 
THOMAS : FAMET - On 16th August 
at Yraland Conyers, Lancashire. 
Paul tstwyn. son of Mr and Mrs G. 
Thomas of Carmarthen to Rosalind 
Henderson, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J. M. Fairey or Yraland Conyers. 
Lancashire. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


WROTTESLEY x MUX - On August 
22nd- 1936. at SI. Augustine's. 
Edgbaslon. Birmingham. John 
Wrottesley u Manorle Mary (Biddy) 
wilder, stfll living in Warrington 
Crescent London W9. 


DEATHS 


■ On August 19th. 
peacfuUy in hospital, nw n i o ne 
Baddeley. Funeral sendee at SI 

Mkharis Church. WBstard. on Saw- 

day. August 30th. 3.00 p.m. Flowers 

lo St Michael's Church, or donations 

lo Actors Benevolent Fund. 6 Adam 

Street. London WC2- 

BHHHJ C OMHE - On 17th August 
1986. a fine oenOeraan who died 

suddenly whilst at home. Eric 
Holman, of 1 Sandover House. 
Ormond Rd. Richmond. Surrey. Fu- 

neral In Richmond Parish Church. 
Tuesday August 26th at 2pm. where 

friends and parishioners are all wel- 

come to Mn the family service. 
Donations and retiring collection in 

lieu of dowers, to the Church 
Missionary Society. 

BOSS. • On August 2lsUrte HQda 

Gordon, peacefully at Emsworth. 

Much loved mother, grandmother. 

yeai -grandmother and friend. Fu- 

neral at Compton Church, at 2pm. on 
Monday. September 1st. Flowers to 

T.Oouzens & Sons. Church Rd. 

Westbourne. Nr Emsworth. Hants. 

CURHMCTON - On August 19th. 

1986. at the Johnson Hospital, Spal- 

ding. Ronald George of me Willows. 
Wigtoff Road. Suttorion.'Nr Boston. 

aged 78 year*. Donations, if desired 

to the Pa rt rtna o n Disease Sodety. 

c/o. J WUison. Funeral Director*. 40 

Wimover Road. Spalding. let (0776} 

29)5- 

DUNN - Peacefully on I2lh August. 
1986. LLCot-friin Jane Anderson 
Dunn. QjV.RA-N.C-. of Abbey 
House. Malmesbury. A funeral 
service was held Haycombe 
Crematorium. Bath. 
HAMLTON-CMniL Peter LedOe - 
Dearly loved father of Samantha, on 

17th August, 1986. peacefully ai hie 

home after a long illness. Cremanou 

at Woking Crematorium. on 
Tuesday. 26th August, at 3pm. 

Flowers to Cyril H Lovegrove. 

Funeral Directors. Chapel of Rest 

Suntnnghlll. Berks. 

HAMDSON ■ On August 15th. at 4 
Rowdale Abbey. Pickering. North 

Yorks, the Rev. Cedi Ham$on. aged 

75 years. Formerly Headmaster Of 

The Kings SchooL Peterborough and 
a Vicar of Aislaby. Whitby. Beloved 

husband of Phyllis Service at SI 

Lawrence Church. Rosedaic Abbey 

on Monday. September is at 1pm. 


. Morpeth. DrimralsdaJe House. 

78 Newgate SL suddenly on August 

19th. aged 63 years. Dr David, be- 

loved husband of Margaret Stewart 
trwtn uwe MacSweenX dear firtber of 

Morag Ann Elspeth and MaxweiL 

Public Service In MoTpetb United Re- 

form Church, on Saturday. August 
23rd. at lOASam. followed by pri- 

vate cremation. Friends please meet 
at cburch. family flowers only, dona- 

tions In lien to British He 
Foundation. 393 West Gate Rd. 
Newcastie-upon -Tyne. . 

ITKM Tamara - Loving and much 

loved widow of Stanley, peacefully 

at her home, on 20th August. 

KHJPATRKK -.On August 20th. 1986. 

at Araefeury Abbey. Wilts. Peter 

John Walter Kilpatrick, tormerty of 

SUpperfleld House. West Linton. 
PfeMesMre. b el oved husband of 

Angela and dear father of Ann. CoUn 

and David. Funeral Service at 
Amesbury Parish Church, on 
Tuesday. 26th August at 2.45pm. 
Family flowers only. 


On August 20th. 1986. 

peacefully at Hays. SedgehOL WBts. 

Bridget Mary, aged 89 years, widow 

of Captain R.O.T.G. Meyrick. of 

Sheafhayne Manor. Yarcombe. Dev- 

on. Cremation at Salisbury, on 
Wednesday. August 27th. at 
12.45pm. Flowers to Bracher 
Brothers. GOUrMbam. Dorset tel 
074762494. 


Suddenly at home an 
l9Ui AngusL WfUsm Beecrefl 
PtacfcetL very precious husband of 

VMeca Elizabeth, darting daddy of 

Stephanie. No letters or flowers 
please. Donations, if desired, lo 
Ramblers' Association, l Wands- 
worth Road. London SW16. AO 
funeral enquiries to Ebbutt Funeral 
Service. Oxford 3767. 

RAINBMP - On 20th August 1966. In 
hts 82 nd year. peaceftaBy at home. 
George Meodus Ratatrird. dearly 
loved husband of Lena, sadly missed 
by his children, grandchildren amt 
yeat-yandchlklren. Funeral Sendee 
at Whtchford Church. WMchfOnL Nr 
SWuston-an -Stour. ' Warts. at 
11.30am on Wednesday. 27ttt 
August Flowers to Allen & Sons. Fu- 
neral Directors. Moreton-ln-Mash. 
Cl os rteJ 0608 50633). 

SHORLANMA LL. Kathleen Mary - 
Aged 88. suddenly In Oxford on Au- 
gust 19 Ui. Widow of Cason Lindsay 
Shorland-Ball. and beloved mother 
of Gill Timer and Jay Boyce. Funer- 
al Service In Leafidd Parish Church, 
at 2.15 pm. on Friday. August 22nd. 
Memorial Service to Retford. In 
October. 

TALBOT - On Augut 20th. 1986. 
peacefully, after a long Illness. Ann 
fate Btckersetiti aged 67. dearly 
loved wife of the MM David Talbot, 
formerly of 20 Chestnut Walk. Lime 
Common. Bra Hffl and The Grey 
House. Little atevereU. Wllto. Funer- 
al at Penhursl. Nr Battle at 2pm. on 
28th August. Details: NinfleW (0424) 
892244. Flowers to Mummery. Fu- 
neral Directors. Bra Hill or donations 
if desired lo the TEAR Fund. 11 
Station Rd. Tedtontfnn. Middx. 

TURNER - on August 21st 2986. 
peacefully at Woking. H.Gordon 
Tumer.c.BX.. much loved and 
missed husband of Margery and 
father of David and Gavin. Quiet 
funeral at Woking Crematorium, at 
10.30am. Saturday August 23rd, 
Family flowers only, donations lo 
Baltic Exchange Charitable Socrity. 


Lasers work by stimulating 
clccirons ihai normally orbil 
around the nucleus of an atom 
of a carefully chosen maierial. 
which dcicnnines ihe type of 
light they cmiL 

In contrast to regular lasers, 
the free electrons are not 
bound to atoms. Like the 
electron guns in television 
sets. FELs fire free electrons 
and accelerate them. This 
freedom results in all kinds of 
unique qualities, such as the 
ability to “tune" to any wave- 
length from microwave to the 
ultraviolet - and researchers 
arc vying to extend its range 
up the dcctromagemic spec- 
trum to include X-rays. 

These new devices can de- 
velop enormous power since 
they are more efficient. Where 
conventional lasers often 
work with an efficiency of a 
few percent. FELs have al- 
ready achieved efficiencies of 
42 per cent and are heading 
for 70 per cent or higher. 

The potential for creating 
huge bursts of laser light has 
attracted support from the 
Stars Wars research pro- 
gramme. A Si billion FEL test 
facility is being built in the 
New Mexico desert. When 
finished in the early 1990s the 
site will be staffed by hun- 
dreds of technicians. 


Just cooling the device will 
require more than 450 million 
gallons of water a year. It will 
tv the biggest and most power- 
ful laser on Eanh- 

The device operates on a 
simple natural principle an 
electron whose path is bent by 
a magnetic field will emit a 
photon or particle of light. 

Dr Madey successfully tried 
his novel idea on electron 
accelerators at Stan ford 
L'niversitv. There, an accel- 
erator boosted electrons to 
near the speed of light and 
fired them inio a magnetic 
“wiggfer." where they were 
forced to emit light, creating a 
laser beam. 

Medical researchers at the 
Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital and Stanford Univerisiy. 
among other institutions, are 
exploring their use for surgery. 

The Lawrence Livermore 
laboratory in California and 
the Los Alamos laboratory in 
New Mexico are racing to 
perfect a giant new type of 
FEL. the winning design to be 
built in the New Mexican 
desert. Both laboratories arc 
federal facilities devoted 
primarily to the design of 
nuclear weapons. 

A'nr York Times Scicnct 
Service. 



John Adams, aged eighty yesterday, after bearing he had 
passed O level maths with a grade B. 


examination with half an 
hoar's extra work each night 
with his father Ken, aged 46, a 
maths teacher and his mother 
Pat, aged 41, a former bank 
worker. 

Mr Adams, who passed his 
own O level maths two years 


earlier than the nazal age of 
16, told The Timex “We are 
absolutely thrilled. John mast 
have the same sort of brain as 
Rath Lawrence, bat in every 
other way he is just 
ordinary boy who lores foot- 
ball and snooker. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


ALFORD - A Memorial Service tar 
Colonel Jonathan Afforti will be held 
on Thunday.9Ui October at 3.00 pm 
al SL Martin's- In-lhe-FteUs. 
Trafalgar Square. London. 

FULTON • A Memorial Service for 
Baron Fullon of Fainter «rtH be held 
at the Meeting House. University of 
Sussex, oo 24» October. 1986. at 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr A.GJD. Ogflvfe 
and Mrs NJLJ. Stevens 
The engagement is announced 
between Adam, elder son of Sir 
Alec and Lady Ogilvie, of 
Uodfield, West Sussex, and 
Natasha, younger daughter of 
the late Mr H. J. M. Moor and of 
Mrs Moor, of Shaftesbury. Dor- 
set The marriage will be taking 
place in Abu Dhabi, United 
Arab Emirates. 

Mr RJP. Emerton 
and Miss EJ. Caster to n 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard Paul, elder son 
of Mr and Mrs Philip Emerton, 
of Herons Creek. Wargrave, 
Berkshire, and Elizabeth Jane, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Ronald Castenon, of Ailestree, 
Derby. 

Mr M J*. Gargan 
and Miss KJEL Everitt 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, only son of Mr 
and Mrs Kevin Gargan, of 
Blundeilsands, Liverpool, and 
Katherine, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Malcolm Everitt, of 
Wilburton, Ely, 

Cambridgeshire. 

Mr SJF. GuRford 
and Mia SC Carter 
The engagement is announced 
between Steven, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs P. O. Guilford, of 
Kettering, Northamptonshire, 
and Susan, eldest daughter of 
Mr and Mrs T. M. Carter, of 
Beverley, Yorkshire. 

Dr IJVL. James 
and Miss JJL Faulkner 
The engagement is announced 
between lan, son ofDrand Mrs 
Thomas James, of Norton, 
Swansea, and Jane Elizabeth, 
daughter of Hugh and Anne 
Faulkner of Beaconsfield, 
Buckinghamshire. 


Mr 3JS. Lambert 
and Miss CV. Taylor 
The engage mem is announced 
between James Scott, son of 
Captain and Mrs T. P. Lambert, 
of The Old Vicarage. South 
Stainley, near Harrogate, North 
Yorkshire, and Claire Virginia, 
daughter of Mr Christopher 
Taylor and Mrs Tom Come and 
stepdaughter of Mr Tom. Corrie, 
of Leighton Hall, near Shrews- 
bury, Shropshire. 

Mr P.N. Matthews 
and Mias T J. Da vail 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, elder son of Mr 
R. Matthews, of Breach! ey, 
Kent, and Mrs D. M. Matthews, 
of East Moseley, Surrey, and 
Tracey, only daughter of Mr 
John Davafl, of The Dower 
House, Bumingford. Hertford- 
shire, and the late Mrs Patricia 
Davafl. 

Mr J£. Stanaarf 
and Miss SJ. Steward 
The engagement is announced 
between John, eider son of Mr 
and Mrs D. Stannard, of New 
Hampshire. United States, and 
Sarah, eldest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs K. Steward, of Thorpe4e- 
Soken, Essex. 

Mr ILN. StansSdd 
and Dr V.C.S. Meadows 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs William Sransfieki, 
of Great ChishflL Hertfordshire, 
and Victoria, eider daughter of 
Mr and Mrs William Meadows, 
of Mflvenon, Somerset. 

Mr MJ.V. Wade 
and MissCE-Hanby 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs G.S. Wade, of 

Path, Western Australia, and 
Clare, only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs A. G. S. Han by. of 
Lougbton, Essex. 


University news Ausn r 


Cambridge 

Election 

Prof D BeU. Henry Ford a Professor 
of social sciences. Harvard Llntver- 

vty. to be Pin Professor of American 

Ktofory and Institutions for the 
academic year 1987-88. 

Appointments 

Lecturers 

Ana lorry: M V SofroNew. BSc. 
(LcyolaX MD. (Ludwig-Maxi millans 
UnKL D PhU. (OxfordL July 1 lor 
mree yean 

Earth Sciences: M T Dove. BSc PHD. 
larmutgrurm; □ GubMns. BA. PhD, 

<ChurcMn O. October l for three 

ITX. 

enui Studies. Chinese Studies.- M E 
rti MA. PhD. iCiUcagoj. October i 
tar three years. 

Awards 

The Corbett nitre 1986; L t Rentoid. 
art on c. 

The Haltom prize 1986: T C Borland. 
Trinity Hall: H 8 Freeman. Trinity c. 
The Qem Maxwell studentship 1986: 
CM Cheng. SI Edmund's House. 
The bum Slater Prise in Psychiatry 

19B6; C Brawn. BA. Downing c. 

Frank Smart Studentship in Botany 
tor one year from Ociaoer 1: J 
Cavelier. Trinity c 
John Stewart of Rarnoch scholarships 
in ©reek and Latin and annual book 
prizes- M R Gale. Cl non c R K 
GUKon. Sidney Sussex C: J R 
Hodgson. Klngn C: E A ThurtOw. 
Newnham C 

College elections 

New Hd 

Honorary fellowship: Prof GEM 
Ansrombe. MA. FBA. October i. 
Pre-etecied .into a supernumerary 
fellowship: K T Mullen. BA, lOxfofdL 
PhD- October 1. 

New Han research studentship (serial 


Dee Corporation r es ear c h scholarship 

in titologt c al sciences i pathology) for 
one year K E Senior. BA. New Hall. 
October 1. 

Dee Corporation Research scholar- 
ships for one yean c s hul ba. 
Trinity HoD (biochemistry); A H 
Hobbs. BA. New Hall < classics j: L 

williams. BA. New Hall (Spanish). CS 


Reader. BA. New Hall (philosophy): H- 
wing. ba. New Hail ispamsfa s J 
King. BA. Fltzwimam C (history): JtS 
GUbert. BA, London Untv {earth 
sciences): M-l Sepulveda. BA. Chile 
(zoology h S J Persaud, London Utov 
(pharmacology), an effective from 
October 1 

Pullers' Company schooHeacher com- 

moner fellow for the Lent Term 1987: 
N J Maggs. MA. (Oxford). Taumaa s. 


Honorary feiiowanips: Dame Elizabeth, 

Lane: Mrs Shiney williams. MR. MA. 

(Oxford). 

Unofficial fellowship S V VeduccL 
BSc. PhD. (London!, research asso- 
ciate. department of anatomy. October 

Bye-feflowsNpc E E Mason. MA. 
DPtUi. iBastei. formerly C lecturer in 
German. October l. 

me Ron h m spuffora. 
UttD. (Newnham Ci. Ma. pud. 
(Leicester). FRHKIS. formerly C lec- 
turer in history. 

American Friends of vtstang research 

fcUowstup in (he Arts for Michaelmas 

term 1966: S J W Broad*?, MA. BPhfl, 
(Oxford). PhD. (EdaiDuroni 
Ann Horton Visiting research tallow- 
snip In the arts (or Lent and Easier 
terms 1087: C J Vdtnun. BSc. PhD. 
(Massey). 

Stony Sussex Conga. 

Fellowship m Class A and a C 
irrturertus in Economics J C Palma. 
B6c.H3Wl.pPtil | . (Oxford), UMV 
faculty of economies 

4Pfl POuBca. 


OBITUARY 

HERMIONE BADDELEY 

Mistress of revue who never lost 
talent for straight acting 


Hermione Baddeley, ac- 
tress. who died on August 19 
at the age of 79, began her 
career as a girl of precocious 
dramatic power, in her early 
teens, and went on to be an 
unexampled artist in the flow- 
ering of intimate revue. There, 
she was irrepressible, with a 
virtuosity never richer than in 
the Herbert Farieon produo 
lions at the Little Theatre 
during the late 1930s. 

She knew everything about 
rapid make-up and the use of 
properties. Though she held to 
the Faijeon texts, in later yean 
she could be unpredictable. A 
partner. Henry Kendall, re- 
called that again and again he 
had to stand shaking with 
laughter, his back to the 
audience, hoping for some cue 
that would return him to the 
script. 

Though she often acted in 
films, Hermione Baddeley 
was happiest in the theatre, 
developing from what Basil 
Dean described as a small 
child, dark and thin, with large 
eyes set in an impish face, to 
the ample and exuberant 
"Tone", rarely the same in 
consecutive scenes. Yet. mis- 
tress of revue though she was, 
and in her heyday so socially 
fashionable that someone 
adapted to her Kipling's line, 
"I am Town; I am all that ever 
went with evening dress", she 
longed to become again the 
straight actress that she was 
originally. 

Born m Shropshire on No- 
vember 13, 1906. youngest of 
four sisters - of whom her 
immediate senior was the very 
successful actress, Angela 
Baddeley - she was educated 
privately and at an early age 
joined the Margaret Moms 
School of Dancing. Then she 
travelled for three years with 
the Arts League of Service. 

She had a few small parts in 
London before her over- 
whelming success, under Basil 
Dean's management, as the 
disorderly slum waif in 
Charles McEvoy's The Likes 
of 'er (1923). In this she had 
the celebrated scene where, as 
a curative exercise, the girt is 
encouraged to smash a pile of 
china plates. Presently for 
Dean, also at the Si Martin's 
(1924), she was the murderous 
young half-caste in 
Galsworthy's The Forest. 

When everyone was seeing 
her as the dramatic actress of 
the future, she defected to 
revue: The Punch Bowl (Duke 
of York’s, 1924), The Co- 
Optimists (1925), and four 
productions by Cochran. Oth- 
er things also: she was in a 
medley of comedies, forces, 
and musicals from which the 
only valuable part to emetge 
was Sara in Bridie's Tobias 
and the Angel (Westminster, 
1932). 

After a long run in The 
Greeks Had a Word for It 
( 1 934), with her sister Angela, 
revue largely possessed hen 
Beverley Nichols’s Floodlight 
(Saville, 1937), and especially 
the Farieon shows at the little 



(1938-40). Off stage she was 
now intensely involved in the 
West End social round. 

In Nine Sharp and The 
Little Revue , Herbert 
Farjeon’s wit was matched 
exactly to her bravura in such 
characters as the valetudinari- 
an wintering at Torquay, a 
Windmill girl in "Voila les 
Non-stop Nudes", and an 
agitated ballerina. When she 
was ill, Faijeon had to engage, 
briefly, five understudies to 
cover her parts. 

So it went on: her partner- 
ship with the more astringent 
Hermione Gingold in Rise 
Above It (Comedy, 1941); her 
work in Leslie Henson's The 
Gaieties (Winter Garden. 
1945) after a long period with 
him abroad, entertaining the 
troops for ENSA; and, in 
1948. Alan Melville’s A la 
Carte (Savoy). 

Occasionally, before this, 
she had contrived to return to 
the straight theatre, as the 
warm-hearted Ida Arnold in a 
version of Brighton Rock 
(1943) and a double role in 
Grand National Night (1946). 
During 1 949, she and Gingold 
amused themselves briskly in 
the revived Fallen Angels. 
behaviour which the author. 
Nod Coward, seeing it in 
Plymouth, thought intolerable 
but to which, when.it did well 
in London, he gave a polite 
Messing. 

Hermione Baddeley found 
nothing important in various 
{days of the 1950s, but in 1953 
she had her last revue tri- 
umph. a production called in 
Hammersmith At the Lyric. 
and. at the St Martin's, Going 
to Town. Here, a housewife, 
television-bemused, she could 
cope with domestic aflairs 
only during a “technical 
hitch". 

On her New York debut in 
1961, she was the mothering 
Taste qf Honey: at the Spoleto 
Festival, Italy (1962)^ and on . 
Broadway (1963) critics 
praised her moving creation of 
Flora Goforth, blend of bitter 
sadness and high comedy, in 
Tennessee Williams's The 


PROFESSOR BRIAN COLLINGE 


Professor Brian Colliiige, 
who befd a personal chair in 
the department of physics at 
Liverpool University from 
1970 to 1982, died on August 
8. He was 64. 

Collinge was bora in South- 
port on September 27, 1921, 
and, following education at 
the local grammar school, 
served during the war in tbe 
Signals Research and Devel- 
opment Establishment, Minis- 
try of Supply. 

In 1945, he entered the 
physics department ax liver- 
pool University as an under- 
graduate, and, after his 
appointment to the staff of tbe 
department in 1949, remained 
there until his retirement 
His chosen field was the 
development of electronic 
equipment for research, and 
he was well known and re- 
spected nationally and inter- 
nationally by physicists 
carrying out research in 
nuclear and high energy parti- 
cle physics. 

He was an excellent admin- 


istrator and a skilled chairman 
of committees, serving the 
university wed in both capaci- 
ties. In a wider field he acted 
as an adviser to the Science 
Research Council's Daresbuiy 
and Rutherford Laboratories, 
and was prominent in the 
working parties which led to 
the Flowers Report on univer- 
sity computers and to the 
setting up of the National 
Computer Board. 

It was, however, the physics 
department at Liverpool 
which claimed his alleg iance 
in spite of many attractive 
offers from elsewhere, and its 
development since the war, 
both in research and teaching 
owes much to him. 

During this period research 
in physics was becoming 
steadily more dependent on 
sophisticated electronics and 
computer techniques, and 
Collinge was always at tire 
forefront of developments. He 
built up a strong electronics 
support group within the de- 
partment and was often able 


$ 


1 


Hermione Baddeley in two phases of her life: in 1935 (left), 
and in the nde of Alderman Mrs Beddows in the 1974 (deri- 
sion adaptation of South Riding. 


Milk Tram Doesn V Slop Here 
Anymore. 

She came back to London in 
1966 to take over the radio 
actress in The Killing of Sister 
George, transferred to her 
mascot theatre, the St 
Martin's. She had two other 
testing London parts; the ap- 
palling Mrs Peachum of The 
Threepenny Opera (1972) and 
the Mother in a revived and 
for too verbose piece. Mother 
Adam (1973k at Hampstead. 
Later, she worked generally in 
Hollywood and for American 
television, but in 1 982 she was 
on Broadway in Anthony 
Shaffer's play, Whodunnit. 

She had made her film 
debut in Guns of Loos in 1 928, 
and though the cinema came 
second to her stage career she 
was often effective in charac- 
ter parts, exploiting her gift for 
comedy and making a special- 
ity of cheery lower-class wom- 
en. During the 1 940s and early 
1950s she was in such films as 
Kipps, Brighton Rock (repeal- 
ing her stage role as Ida). 
Passport to Pimlico. Quartet 
an d Scrooge. 

She was nominated for an 
Oscar in 1959 for her portrayal 
of Elspeth, the actress friend uf 
Simone Signoret. in Room at 
the Top. It was a comparative- 
ly small part which she made 
vivid. She was the housekeep- 
er, Ellen, in Mary Poppins, 
and later films included The 
L'nsinkabU' Molly Brow and 
The Bkidc Windmill. She 
became a fomitiar face on 
American television through 
her appearances in popular 
comedy shows like Bewitched 
and Maude. 

Her borne during the last 20 
years or so of her life was in 
Los Angeles, but she used to 
re-visit England at least once a 
year. 

Both her marriages, to the 
Hon David Tennant and, 
later, to Captain J. H. Willis. 
MC, were dissolved. There 
was one son and one daughter 
from the first marriage. Her 
autobiography. The V-nsink- 
able Hermione Baddeley 
(1984), was generously warm- 
hearted and cheerfully vague 
about dates. 


DR ERIC DINGWALL 


A. 0. G. writes: 

Your admirable obh 
notice of Dr E. J, 

(August 14) is not altogether 
correct in stating that he sever 
married. 

Of his first wife, Doris 
Dunn, whom he married in 
1918, he once remarked that 
he lost ho* in the London 
Underground about 1930 and 
had not seen her since. 

With his second wife. Dr 
Margaret Davies, he passed in 
the 1960s and 1970s what 
were undoubtedly the happi- 
est years of his life in their 
beautiful home at Crowhurst, 
Sussex. 

Her death some eight years 
was a crippling blow from 
..Jch he never fully recov- 
ered. She epitomized a side of 
Dingwall that was not always 
recognized - the unobtrusive 
yet practical fondness that 
underlay his sometimes com- 
bative personality. 

A work by which Dingwall 
himself set great store was 
Abnormal Hypnotic Phenome- 
na: A Survey qf Nineteenth 
Centurv Cases (4 vols; 

1 967/68'), which he edited and 
' substantial part wrote. 
No-one knew tbe early liter- 


ature of hypnotism better than 
he, and in these volumes his 
bibliographical interests, his 
interest in conjuring and men- 
tal magic, and his interests in 
the unusual, the abnormal, the 
paranormal and the psycho- 
logically peculiar came togeth- 
er to make up what is in many 
ways his most characteristic 
achievement 

MR JOHN 
BINNS 

Mr John Binns, formerly 
MP for Keighley, and the first 
local man to represent the 
constituency, died on August 
6 at the age of 72, 

After long service as a local 
politician, which included be- 
ing Mayor of Keighley in 
1958/59, he was elected La- 
bour MP in 1964 and held the 
seat until 1970. 

In 1973, he left the Labour 
Party in protest against what 
he regarded as its inexorable 
drift to the Left, and later 
helped to form the local SDP. 
In 1982. be unsuccessfully 
contested Keighley's West 
Ward as an Alliance 
candidate. 

He leaves a widow and one 
son. 


to supply the research teams 
with equipment well in ad- 
vance of, anything available 
elsewhere. 

This support was an impor- 
tant factor in maintaining the 
position of eminence which is 
now held by the department in 
the fields of nuclear and 
particle physics and, more 
recently, m solid state physics. 

Collinge contributed many 
papers to scientific and techni- 
cal journals, and numerous 
developments of his group 
were included and acknowl- 
edged in publications by other 
members of staff. 

His many friends will re- 
member him for his sympa- 
thetic and kindly nature and 
the enthusiasm with which he 
approached the solution of 
any problem, scientific or 
otherwise. He had a lifelong 
interest in birdwatching and 
the natural world, and was an ' 
expert gardener. 

He is survived by his wife 

Betty, and two sons. 

THE YEYELUA 
OF IFE 

Her Highness the Olori 
Yetunde Sijuwade the 
Yeydua of Ife. wife of the 
Ooni oflfe, died in London on 
August 1 7. She was 56. 

She was the eldest daughter 
of the late Bishop Oyebode of 
Ibadan, and trained as a nurse 
in Britain. 

She married Prince 
Sijuwade - the present Ooni - 
in October, 1959. As his 
consort she gave active sup- 
port ip her husband in the task 
of ruling the ancient Kingdom 
of Ife. at He Ife. which is 
regarded as the cradle of the 
Yoruba race, and her influ- 
ence was felt in the field of 
social work throughout 
Nigeria. 

Mr Peter bung, QC, who 
overcame the disability of 
losing both legs during th* 
Second World Warm practise 
successfully for over 20 years ^ 
at the Montreal Bar, died on *■ 
July 26. He was TO. . 

For many years he w as a 
governor of McGill Universi- 
ty and acted as its solicitor. 
Despite the loss of his legs, he 
learned to walk and cv* 0 
dance, ski and play tennis on . 
artificial limbs. 














16 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


J 


lc 

Y 

P' 

H 

O' 

T 

i) 

u 

fr 

tf 

Cl 

ai 

al 


I 


T 

Vi 

in 
ai 
in 
le 
it 
d< 
“i 
a 
te 
pi 
lr 
t Y 
w 
R 
tr 
P* 
1l 


T 

ir 

w 

a* 

il 

b 

ti 

P 

si 

o 

c’ 

A 

b 

ft 

c- 

C 

k 

c 

d 

ti 

h 

ti 

fi 

o 

u 

p 


• 


I O 
A n 


• .p 

I o 


# — 
l 




> k 
t it 


Russia tries to 
exploit its 


‘test ban ploy’ 


The Kremlin sought again 
yesterday to extract political 
advantage from the decision 
of Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, the 
Soviet leader, to extend the 
country’s unilateral mora- 
torium on nuclear tests until 
the end of the year. 

At a press conference in 
London yesterday, Mr Leonid 
Zamyatin, the Soviet Ambas- 
sador. challenged Britain and 


n- 


: Soviet moratori um, the exten- 

n 

■ 

B 

sion of which Mr Gorbachov 

ai 

a 

1 

announced on Monday. 

VI 


t Mr Zamyatin said 

b 

'1 

Moscowwas paying both mili- 

u 

« 

r lary and economic costs for its 

1 ! 

1 

move, but believed it was vital 

rr 


‘ to help “accelerate the 

T 

I : 

elimination of nuclear 

IV 


. weapons.” 

rr 

B 

• ri*. 

He expressed “deep concern 


to the announcement. “Politi- 
cal will and state wisdom is 
required in Washington in 
order to renounce the arms 
race and give up attempts to 
gain one-sided nuclear 
advantage,” he said. 

He made it clear that the 
signing of a comprehensive 
nuclear test ban treaty would 
be at the top of the Soviet 
agenda for any summit meet- 
ing between Mr Gorbachov 
and President Reagan. 

The Soviet Union was pre- 
pared to enter into discussions 
over a nuclear test ban with 
both the US and Britain, Mr 
Zamyatin said. 


By Rodney Cowton 

This was seen in London as 
being very lamely a repeat 
performance of a press con- 
ference which officials of the 
Soviet Embassy in Wash- 
ington gave on Wednesday. 

it was interpreted here as an 
aaempt to drive a wedge 
between Britain and the US 
over the question of the 
moratorium on nuclear tests. 

It was pointed ont in Lon- 
don that there is no possibility 
of Britain unilaterally joining 
in the nuclear test mora- 
torium. The position of the 
Foreign Office is that it sees no 
advantage in unilateral ges- 
tures, such as an unverifiable 
moratorium on tests, and that 
what is required is a properly 
negotiated agreement contain- 
ing effective verification 
procedures. 

It is argued in London that 
the Russians must realize that 
there is no possibility of 
reaching agreement on a com- 
prehensive test ban treaty 
while President Reagan is in 
office because he believes that 
it is essentia] for the US to 
have a test programme for its 
weapons. 

On this basis it is said that 
the current Soviet emphasis 
on a comprehensive test ban 
treaty can only be a propa- 
ganda ploy, and that it will be 
a sign that the Soviet Union is 
starting to be serious about 
arms control when they drop 
this ploy. 


Three hurt in French 
mail train rohhery 


From Susan MacDonald, Paris 


Three people were injured, 
one seriously, when 10 
masked gunmen held up a 
mail tram near Aries early 
yesterday. 

However, the alert had been 
given by a local person who 
noticed the stopped train with 
shadowy figures moving aro- 
und and the robbers found 
their way blocked by a police 
van as they tried to escape. 

The gang opened fire on the 
police, hitting only the van, 
and then ran across open 


fields, leaving the mail sacks 
behind. 


When they came to a road 
they fired on passing cars to 
make them stop and motorists 
were forced to abandon their 
vehicles which were used as 
getaway cars. 

One motorist was shot in 
the jaw and yesterday under- 
went an operation and two 
Post Office employees were 
treated for injuries received 
when they were hit 


Today’s events 


Royal engagements 
Princess Anne arrives East 
Midlands Airport, 12; and then, 
as Patron, auends the 1986 
World Rowing Championships, 
National Water Sports Centre, 
Holme Pierrepont, Nottingham- 
shire, 12.35. 

New exhibition 
Building Conservation; 
Weald and Downland Open Air 
Museum, Singleton, nr Chich- 
ester; today 1 2 to 6, tomorrow to 
Mon 1 1 to 6 (ends Aug 25). 

David Smith: lighthouses; 
Postemgate Gallery, 6 Pos- 
temgate, Hall; Tues to Sat 10 to 
5.30 (ends tomorrow). 

Last chance to see 
Watercolours by Maurice 
Dyson. Carla Steen and 
R.A. Brown: Niccol Centre, 
Brewery Court, Cirencester, 
Gtos, 10 to 4.30. 

Mixed exhibition with Sculp- 
ture in the Garden; Dower 
House Gallery. 108 High St, 
BerMuunsted. 10 to S. 


Music 

Organ recital by Paul Derrett; 
Tewkesfeaiy Abbey. I. 

Concert by the Beilin Oboe 
Quartet; Pump Room, Bath, 8. 

Recital by the Choir of Si 
John's Church. Bangor. Maine, 
Canterbury Cathedral. 12. 

Harp recital by Lucy Carolan; 
St Andrew & St George’s, 
George St, Edinburgh. 3. 

Concert by the Band of the 
Scots Guard; Redoubt Fortress, 
Ea stb o urne . 8. 

Recital by the Renaissance 
Singers; Winchester Cathedral. 
I. 

Piano recital by Paul Coker; 
Parish Church. St Cohunb Ma- 
jor. near Newquay, 8. 

Concert of sacred English and 
Italian music by The Sixteen; 
Christ Church, Oxford, 8. 
Gloucester Three Choirs Fes- 


tival: Organ redial by Thomas 
• Cathedral. 


Trotter; Gloucester 
tl: Concert by the David 
M unrow Anniversary Ensem- 
ble; Painswick Church, 2.30; 


Concert bythe Festival Chorus 


and the Royal Liverpool Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; Gloucester 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,131 



ACROSS 

I Pays- favourite back, setting 
the pace (8). 

9 Belabour one to whom la- 
bour is abhorrent (8). 

10 Cover the floor (4). 

11 At intervals — very fre- 
quently, about a year (5,2,5). 

13 Tried to ramble to the end 
of the street (6). 

14 Buff performance (3,5). 

15 Fine plan, yet spoilt (7). 

16 Shake and trick a fellow (7). 

20 Troops — their leader fol- 
lows rules (8). 

22 Ruined girl discarded (6). 

23 Doesn't use raw ingredients 
in this recipe (5-3-4). 

25 A measure of port (4). 

26 There isn't a second lost 
arranging a Rugby League 
team (8). 

27 Lovingly propose to a lady, 
having lost bean (8). 


6 Business man is not coy 
when it comes to an order 
( 6 ). 

7 Horse pistol (4). 

8 Dishes. May 16 perhaps? 

( 8 ). 

12 Admiral redeployed, as if 
ranks cared (7.5). 

15 Drone’s dropping zone? (8). 

17 Fussy chap’s wife (3,5). 

18 Ghostly aspect Raleigh dis- 
plays (8).. 

19 Boss starts to employ new 
technical apprentice (7). 


“ — i 

21 Call in the Spanish to^ pro- 


vide protective cover 
24 It’s wrong to be put up (4). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,130 


DOWN 

2 Race into the fray, following 
round course (8). 

3 Swindle, as the tumbril- 
driver would the arisio 
(4.3. 1.4). 

4 Housing orientals under 
canvas (8). 

5 Tie-breaker — at end of a 
dramatic run? (4-3) 


anaoija HLaaiaoaata; 

ciriqeJhcicib! 

. innsQHcna tjcinanl 

aaaasciafii 

tioauaas rinnnnrara 
□ h b 13 n a □ 
Lianna unHQtiacia 
n a □ n h iti 

fJkJGEIQQGlEa itfOHBa 
tii 1 3 a n a n □ 
I'jHdDiiHa i iQnonEJGi 
0 a □ □ 0 n □ h 
iiiQBOB aHOHSHDHH 

enaamcioa 

WEHnramara uinnacia 



.... 




Mops, buckets, pigeons and pnnks~a trial nm for the Branson dean-op Britain campaign in Trafalgar Square yesterday. (Photographs: Peter Trievnor) 

The Branson clean-up brigade go into action 


By Angella Johnson 


The first members of Mr 
Richard Branson’s dean-np- 
Britain brigade were oat in 
Trafalgar Square yesterday 
for the trial ran of a project 
aimed at making the famous 
London landmark a brighter 
and friendlier place for 
visitors. 


They will be among 20 
young unemployed Londoners, 
hoping to bring a little colour 
to the square when they move 
in to act as “VIP Hosts” to 
hundreds of tourists on Octo- 
ber 21. 


Wearing bright red 
jumpsuits and armed with 


information leaflets about the 
square and London, the young- 
sters aim to act as friendly 
tourist guides while at the 
same time helping to 
encourage people to keep the 
area dean. 

Yesterday the first “VIP 
Hosts" came informally 
dressed with their mops and 
buckets to give the square a 
cursory clean np in 
preperation for the big day. . 

The project is organized by 
Community Services Volun- 
teers, one of several agencies 
and groups taking part in UK 
2,000, the Government spon- 
sored environmental scheme 
headed by Mr Branson, the 
millionaire airline owner- 


Mrs Elizabeth Hoodless, 
executive director of CSV, 

said:“The idea for this 
particular project came after I 
had visited Trafalgar Square 
with my young son on several 
occasions. We found the place 
particularly hostile and 
alienating, devoid of signposts, 
a tourist information centre or 
policemen. 

“The only people to give 
visitors directions or advise 
where to go for help are the 
bird seed sellers or official 
photographers”. 

When the project starts, 
appropriately on Trafalgar 
Day, Mrs Hoodless hopes it 
will humanize the square, 


making it a friendlier place to 
visit 

Mr Lesley Walters, who has 
been selling seeds to feed the 
pigeons in the square for over 
20 years, says he answers 
thousands of queries each 
week. 

“Mostly they want to know 
bow to get bases and where 
Buckingham Palace or the 
Tower of London is. Bat the 
majority of questions are about 
how to get to the toilets, which 
are in the Underground 
station.” 

The youngsters will not only 
be expected to act as tourist 
gables, they will also be 
helping to keep the square 
cleans They will be on duty 


from morning to dusk with 
personal radios finking them 
to foe London Convention and 
Visitors’ Bureau and will be 
able to call up the police for 
help if necessary. 

The Manpower Services 
Commissian is funding foe 
campaign and youngsters tak- 
ing part are to be pud £69 par 
week. 

Other projects being consid- 
ered for UK 2JD00 include a 
National Junk Day, a scheme 
to dean np beaches, tidying up 
Lambeth Palace and opening 
it to foe public, and turning 
Tpasaaooft station in the 
North East into a tisitors's 
centre. 


‘Stockton- 

student 

editor 

resigns 


settlement. Party chiefe are 
ith the 


pleased with 

supportive line taken by Mr 
John Beicow, the PCS chair- 
man. 

They believe that the tough 
action taken against Mr 
phibbs will persuade rank and 
file members of the . 14,000- 
strong organization to stop 
rocking the boat. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Cathedral, 8; Serenade concert 
by the English String Orchestra: 
Gloucester Cathedral 10.30. 

Redial by Marias Argiros 
(oboe) and Caroline Oemmow 
(piano): Jubilee Hall, Alde- 
bcrgii.6.15. 

Talks, lectures 

Hie MacTaggait Lecture, by 
Troy Kennedy Martin; The 
Assembly Rooms, Festival Sq, 
Edinburgh. 630. 

James Hutton, by Prof Don- 
ald McIntyre; Royal Sodety of 
Edinburgh, 22-24 George St, 
Edinbargh, 5. 

General 

Book market; Northgate Hall, 
St Michael’s St, Oxford, 10 to 5. 

Island steam extravaganza: 
traction engines, vintage cars, 
fair organs and craft stalls; Isle 
of Wight Steam Railway, Rail- 
way Station, Havcustrect, Ryde, 
Isle of Wight, today until Mon 
10 to 6. 

Haydock Park steam carnival; 
Hay dock Racecourse. Haydock 
Park, Newt oo-le- Willows, Mer- 
seyside, today until Mon 9 until! 
dusk. 

Bears: stories, songs and 
masks (for 3 to 5 year olds), 

1 030 to 1 1 .30; Computer games 
(for 8 to 13 year olds), 3 to 5; Art 
Gallery, Civic Centre, Tun- 
bridge Wells. 


Top Films 


-Purple 


The top box-office films in Lon- 
don; 

1(1) Hannah and Ho- Sisters 
2 ( 2) A Room With a View 
-) Pretty In Pink 
The Color 
Cobra 

The Karate Kid Part II 
Desert Hearts 
Sid and Nancy 
Police Academy 111: Back in 
Training 
10(9) 9% Weeks 
The too fBntsinfha 

1 The Karate Kid ' 

2 Cobra 

3 Pinocchio 

4 Police Academy lib Back h 


til 


naming 

5 The Color Purple 


Food prices 


Discovery, the first of the 
English desert apples, are now 
arriving in the shops at 40-50p a 


lb. Crisp, sweet and juicy with a 
green skin 1 


bright red and green skin they 
arc a comparatively new variety 
discovered by chance in an 
Essex orchard in the early 1960s. 
Their season is short, tasting 
only a month, and they are best 
eaten slightly chilled. 

Home grown damsons 40-50p 
a lb are another new arrival. 
Plum prices are tailing to be- 
tween 20 and 40p a lb and 
blackberries are down at 40-50p 
a half pound. Imported William 
pears 45-55p a lb, Greek sultana 
grapes 50-70p a lb. honey tan- 
gerines 40-55p a lb. medium to 
large pineapples 75p-£130 each 
and new crop lychees £2.20- 
£230 a lb. 

Brussels sprouts are now in 
the shops at 3(M0p a lb for 
English or Dutch. There are also 
parsnips 25-35 p a lb. leeks 50- 
65p, sweetcom 30-40p a cob. 
stick beans 40-60p a lb, marrows 
25-35p each, courgettes 25-35p a 
lb. cauliflowers 35-45p each and 
carrots 1 2-22p a lb. 

Lemon sole averaging £2.09 a 
lb and Dover sole £3.39 a lb are 
down in price in most regia ns 
this week. Other good fish buys 
and average prices per pound 
are fresh boned herring 84p, 
plaice fillets £1.89 and haddock 
fillets £1.76. Scottish salmon 
continues to be plentiful at 
around £2.50 and £330 a lb. 
There is a wide range of turkey 
products this weekend from 
boneless roasts and fillets to 
burners and sausages. Frozen 
grade A turkeys between 60-89p 
a lb, fresh oven ready turkeys 
98p-£l.04 a lb and traditional 


form fresh 95p-£U0 a lb. 

tiers -on beef m- 


Promotional of 
d udec rump steak at £1 .99 a lb at 
Asda and £2.19 a lb at Tesco, 
and topside £1.78 a lb at 
Sainsbuiy. 


Travel news 


Ran 

British Rail are running some 
extra Intercity trains during the 
late summer Bank holida 
weekend. Passengers are ad- 
vised to check travel details at 
their local station. 

Today: Normal weekday ser- 
vice supplemented by some 
extra Intercity trains. 

Tomorrow and Sunday; Nor- 
mal service on most routes, 
although engineering works in 
the Carlisle area on Sunday will 
mean some alterations for peo- 
ple journeying between England 
and Scotland. 

Monday: No rush hour trains; 
some extra Intercity trains in 
the evening; extra trains to 
seaside resorts. 


Roads 

Wales and West: M5: Outside 
lane dosed northbound between 
junction S (M50) and 9 (A438). 
A 5: Traffic reduced to a single 
lane on Maerdy River Bridge, 
Maerdy, Corwen. M5: Hard 
shoulder and nearside lane 
dosed northbound between 
junctions 25 (Taunton) and 26 
(A38 Wellington). 

Tire North: M6; Various lane 
restrictions on both carriage- 
ways between junctions 32 and - ] 
33 (Preston/ Lancaster). M63: 
Various lane restrictions on 
both carriageways between junc- 
tions I (Barton Bridge) to 
junction 7 (Ecdes interchange). 
MCI: Lane closures ax Walton 
Summit, at the junction of 
M6I/M6. 

Scotland: Edinburgh: Single 
line traffic in Grove St. 
Fountainbridge; expect delays 
between Grove St and Lothian 
Rd. AS 16: Single fine traffic 
with temporary lights (24 hours) 
one mile S of Oban. A7I3; 
Single line traffic with tem- 


porally lights (24 hours) one and 
a half miles ! 


S of DahneHington 
at Mossdale Bridge, Ayrshire. 


Weather 


A depression will moveE 
towards SW England and 
its associated fronts will 
move NE to become slow 
moving over Northern 
Ireland, N and E Eng- 
land. 


6 flni to midnig ht 


London, SE, cantnd S England, 
East Angfia, Channel Islands: 


Cloudy, outbreaks of rain, perhaps 
* “ -We *ghe 


heavy at times; wind variable 


max temp 19C (66F). 

SW England, Wales: 


Ifidands, 

Bright Intervals and scattered show- 
ers at first becoming cloudier, rain 
at times; wind SW Bgnt or moderate, 
becoming variable; max temp 18C 
(64F). 

E, NE, central N, NE England, 
Lake District We °f Man, Borders, 
SW Scotland, Northern Ireland: 




Dundee, Abe r de en , 
Moray Firth, NE 


Bright or sunny 
<; wind 


intervals, scattered showers; 

NE backing N light or moderate, 
locafly fresh; max tamp 16C (61 FT 

Glasgow, Argyll, NW Scotland: 
Sunny intervals, isolated showers; 
wind NE moderate, tocaify fresh; 
max temp 17C (63F). 

Shetland: Bright or sunny inter- 
vals. scattered showers; wind NE, 
backing N moderate or fresh; max 
temp 14C (57 F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Sun- 
day: Brighter, drier weather In N 
parts spreading S, some showers, 
mainly near E and N coasts. 



High Tides 


TODAY 

London Bridge 

Aberdeen 

Avonmoutb 

Belfast 

Cardfff 

Devonport 

bom 

Fatmoofli 

Gteagow 

■ ■I UK, II 

iSS“ 


WT PM HT 
7 5 4.35 7.1 
4.5 4.06 42 

102 1008 135 
3-7 158 33 

12.T 953 114 
54 855 55 


8.8 155 || 


Wg.ihB- kjjw and cloud: c- 
dooay: o^vercast tkotr. 



hal i; mts lmlg: r-ratn: mumtw; m- 
Utummetorm: nettowere. 

Arrow s snow wind direction. wtmf 
■ww^fmptO Circled. Temperature 



5 2 855 . 

45 359 45 

4.1 251 4.1 

55 1258 5.4 

75 9.15 72 

9.1 855 ■ 94 

5.7 551 55 

9.8 153 03 
26 

45 240 45 

7.0 9.06 7-2 
7.0-. 757 7 2 

3.8 852 4.1 

55. 758 . 5.7 
22 358 24 

4.B 214 4.8 

6.3 157 83 
45 156 4.6 

94 8.15 95 

5.6 654 53 

45 217 45 

1«=A2S08ft. 


557 am 859 pm 


„ _ , 9.01am 9.19pm 

Last quarter August 27 


Around Britain 


Lighting-up time 


London 859 pm to 558 am 
Bristol 8.49 pm to 558 am 


Top video rentals 


in 

20 

3(2 

4(4 

5(5 

8(7 


fi 


Goonies 
No Surrender 

Trod 

Weird Science 
Police Academy 2 
The Legend of Bane Jean 


Mad Max: Beyond Thunder 

dome 

Cocoon 

Explorers 


10$| 
Supplied by 


The pound 


Bank 


Bank 


AwftataS 255 240 

Austria Sod 2245 2155 

MglianFt 6855 6355 

CanadaS 2145 2055 

Den ma r k Hr 1202 1152 

FMandMMc 7.79 759 

Franco Fr 1058 1050 

Germany Dm 350 353 

Greece Dr 21200 20050 

Hong Kang* 1155 1150 

Ireland Pt 1.15 159 

Italy Lira 220050 200050 

Japan Yen 24200 22850 

Natfwtuds Gld 3585 2406 

Norway Kr 1151 1051 

Portugal Esc 22250 mso 

South Africa rid 550 450 

Spain Pta 20750 19650 

Sweden Kr 1071 10.16 

SwfcMriandFr 258 244 

USAS 1-56 14S 

Yugoslavia Dar 83200 58050 


Rates lor sms* denomination bank nows 
only as suspited by Barclays Bank PIC 
OlHarent rates apply to travellers 
cheques and other foreign currency 
business 

Reta3 Price todec 3845 

London: The FTtodax dosed dowi 15 at 

12871 



TUnn Portfolio Gold rules are as 
follows: 

1 Times Portfolio is free. Purchase 
or The Times is noi a condition or 
taking pan. 

2 Times Portfolio Hst comprises a 

group of public companies whose 

shares are listed on the Slock 


11 IT for any reason The Times 
Prices Rage » not pubUstied in Uie 
normal wav Times Portfolio win be 
suspended for that day. 


_ Haw te Play - Dafly DMdand 
On each dayyour uniflue set of eight 
numbers win .represent commercial 


Exchange and quoted in The Times 
Stock Exchange prices page. The 
companies comprising that Ha wim 
change from day to day. The list 
1 which is numbered X - 441 Is divided 
Into Tour randomly distributed groups 


mid Industrial shares published in The 
Times Portfolio list which will fee 


of It shares. Every Portfolio card 
contains two numbers 


from each 

group and each card contains a 
unkiue set of numbers. 


I appear 

on ihe Stock Exchange Prices page. 

In the columns provided next to 

your shares note the price change 1* 

or -L tn pence, as published in that 
day's Times 


After I toting the price changes or 


ymmejgM jUutres.for that nay, add up 


3 Times portfolio •dtvtdend' wU be 
the figure in pence whkti r e presents 
uie optimum movement in prices (Le. 
the largest Increase or lowest loss) of a 
combination of efcpil (two from each 
randomly distrflnitedgrotai within the 

44 shares! of the 44 shares which on 

any one day comprise The Times 
Portfolio list 

4 The daily dividend win be 
announced each day and ine weekly 
dividend win be announced each 
Saturday In The Times. 

5 Times Portfolio list and details or 
Uie dally or weekly dividend win also 
be available for inspection at the 
offices of The Times. 




overall 


to give you 
Pius or minus l-f or . 


Check your overall total against The 
Tim« Portfolio dividend puSushed on 
the Stock exchange Prices page. 

If yoormerall local matches The 
Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won outright or a share of the total 

prize money staled tor that day and 

must Claim your gnn as instructed 

DoOW 


How re 


ifotM total 
Add 


- Weekly DMdand 

‘ record your daily 


b If the overall price movement of 
more than one combination of shares 
«tuab the dividend, the prize will be 


your weekly &SSK W“* 
If your total matches the published 
weekly dividend figure you have won 


eauaDv divided among me claimants 
holding those combbubona of shares 


outng tu or a share' of Irie prtz* money 


fQC that week, arid must dabn 
your prize as Instructed below 


7 AU claims are subject 10 scrutiny 

before oaguoiu^Aiiy^TtiriM Portfolio 


tampered with or 

hvronvcuy^MjUited In any way will be 


T an p h o n e l>jf < nw < SjnMo data 
HIM 9S4-S3272 between IflMani and 


8 Employees of News International 
ok: and Its subsidiaries ana of 
Europrtnl Croup Limited {producers 
and drsuibmors of the carry or 

members of. their Immediate .ant turn 

are not allowed 10 piay Thna 
Portfolio 




BUUdttt Tbs TUnaiaiMIlMM 
Nn eUHrnx san bo aasapnd a na w thaw 


9 AU parurioantt wtu. be sUMect to 
0 Rules ,AJI instructions Oil “how 


ihese 


part of these Rules. The Editor 
reserves the right to amend the Rules 

, 10 in any dispute. The Editor's 

deefesoa Js final .and no correspoo 

dene* wni bo entered into 


You must nave your card with you 
when you telephon e 
If you are unable to telephone 
someone otto can dam on your aettair 

out thcr must nave sour cam and nut 

The Times Portfolio claims Une 
between the supuaua tunes 
, no responsibility can be accepted 
for failure (o contact the cblmmke 
for any reason witutn the stated 
hours 

.The. above instrucnons are an- 
pu cable. 10 both dally and wwekv 
dividend claims 


Edbitargh to 559 am 


Itanchestsr 853 pm to EL32 am 
fanzanca 858 pm m 553 an 


Sun Rain 

hra in 

EAST COAST 
Scatbon * JS 

BridUngton 24 - 

Cromer 9.8 

Lowastaft 85 • 

Clacton 10.7 - 

Southend 


Max 
C F 


SwiRain Max 
hra h C P 


Manmte 

sou™ C 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c, 
cloud; I. blr; r. rain: s, sun. 


C F C F 

r 1254 Guernsey c 1661 

r 1457 Inverness c 1254 

r 13 SS Jersey C1783 

Bristol C1763 London c1763 

Cardiff clBBI MTichster r1559 

Erflnbwgli c 1254 N oe rcatt la CT457 

caasgtnr 1 1359 H YiWawa y r 1355 


Anniversaries 


Births; Clamde Debussy, 
Sai nt-Gcrmain-ea-Laye, 1862; 
Jacques Lipchitz, saripior, Dru- 
sidninikai, Latvia, 1891. 

Deaths: Richard m, reumed 
1483-85, killed at the ba 
Bosworth Field, 1485; 
Howrt . 

Paris, 1 806; ' Warren 
first governor general oroetgaL 
1772-85, Daylesfbrd, Oxford- 
shire, 1818; Robert Cedi 3rd 
Marquess of SaHsbaiy, prime 
minister. 188546, 1886-92, 

1895-1900, 190002 , Hatfield, 
Hertfordshire, 1903; Michael 
Cdfias, Irish patriot, assas- 
smaxed, Beal-na-Btath, Cork. 
1922; Sir Ofa'm Lodge, physi- 
cist, Salisbury, 1940; Mjdnd 
Fokine, choreographer. New 
York, 1942; WJIUain Morris,- 1st 
Vhcmt NrfEdd, Henley-on- 
Thames, 1961 

Paris ms ti berated, 1944, 


COAST 
FoBmstono 8.4 
Hasdnss me 
Eastbourne 115 
Brighton 105 
Wringing 02 
Uttehmp ln &9 
BognorR 10.3 
Soilflisn 106 
SaMtom 97 
Shanhfln 

Bo Bm am M i * 
Poole 115 
Swnago 85 
W oyi B O M ft 115 
Exmwdh 95 
T ni ua mo uili 102 
Torquay 122 
Falmouth U5 
Penance 85 
SeayWaa 08 
Jersey 8.7 
Guanaay 115 
WEST COAST 
Newquay 115 


16 61 
16 61 

17 63 

19 65 
21 70 

20 68 

18 68 


doody 

bright 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 


I1HRVL.MIRJU 


19 66 
19 66 

19 to 
W 54 
18 64 
18 64 
19-86 

20 88 
18 66 


sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

oriont 

bright 

sunny 

sunny 

any 


19 66 

20 68 
19 65 
19 60 
17 63 

17 63 

18 64 
17 63 

17 63 

18 64 

19 68 
18 64 


a«iy 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

Sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 



Co&timrtd frrtft ptgt J 
and in the free of dear legal 
advice as to its potential 
consequences for the Cosset. 
vatfve Party. - 
“I intend to 



\t' 


produce* new 

magazine under anew title but 
this will be entirely indepen- 
dent of the Conservative 
Party.” 

Mr Phibbs’s statement, 
cleared by his sofititor and 
lawyers acting for Mr Tebbti, 
came after an hoartong meet- 
ing yesterday between the 
national committee member 
of the Federation of Conser- 
vative Students and Mr Mi- 
chael Dobbs, chief of staff ai 
Central Office and personal 
assistant to the party 
chairman. 

The affair has proved 
deeply embarrassing to the 
Tory party while, at the same 
time, reviving criticism of Mr 
Tebbit for allegedly over- 
reacting' 

But it was said that the 
gravity of the allegations 
against Lord Stockton, aged 
91. was so serious that Mr 
Tebbit, after consultations 
with senior party members 
including Sir Peter Lane, 
chairman of the National 
Union Executive Committee, 
had no option ^ 

Legal advisers to Central 
Office said that the article 
constituted a malicious libel 
and had the Macmillan family 
decided to take action, the 
party and Mr Phibbs would be 
liable for damages running 
into six figures. 

The claim in the article that 
Lord Stockton was “lying” 
over his involvement in the 
decision to send tack the 
Cossacks and, in the 
accompanying press release. 
that he was a “war criminal” 
opened tbe door to the charge, 
the lawyers said. 

Next Thurday’s meeting of 
the FCS national committee 
will be asked to endorse the 


I . 



i 5 .;' 


t ’ • 




IVii!" 




Wntol 


\ k i 1 ;'} 


19 86 sunny 
■fodta are Wednesday's nguras 


m - 17 63 sunny. 
7.7 - 18 61 sunny 

„ 135 - 16 61 sunny 

DouglM 115 - 16 61 swny 

ENGLAND 

BlannAta? 9 A - 19 66 sunny 
Bristol (Ctrl) H.6 - 19 86 sany 

Certain 5.4 .10 17 63 100 
UndM 11.3 - 21 70 sunny 

•tend ta rt ar 7.1 .08 18 64 sumy 
WcO-n-Tyne 25 5S 18 61 atowra 
Ne&totfnn iw 51 19 66 sunny 
WALES 

Angtatey 120 • - 17 S3 «unny 
CercSfliCm) 135 • 16 64 sunny 

OutaynBey 105 - 18 61 ststny 

Taoby 115 - 17 68 aumy 
SCOTLAND 

Aberdeen 7.8 • 15 S9 bright 

Brtnt w r y h 05 52 15 56 bright 

gata fata mu h- 25 56 16 61 bright 

Otoagmr 65 - 17 63 sunny 

KHosa 4.9 51 15 59 sfcotara 

Lerwick 75 .01 13 55 taowsrs 

FttatwfcX 65 - 17 « bright 

Sto rno wa y 73 - 14 S7 bright 

Tire* g.1 . 15 M sunny 

Wh* 8.7 .02 13 88 showera 

N0RTHE9W RELAMD 

95 - .18 64 trtQM . 


foils 


II... 




.‘S 



■Wgweaagt a ta UW 


bv lAntfoo Post 

mu Limned of 1 Virginia 

Lnnflon cr 9XN mm. August 2Z. 

s « ntwmwr at 
U»e 


Abroad 




WDOAY: c. dewt a, drlzzfc; f. Mr. tg. toff r.raln: 

C F 
a 27'81 
f 30 86 
S SO 08 Cfltfu 
S 36 97 " 
f 18 64 
8 31 88 
S 58100 
1 28 84 


Alex'drta 

Algter*' 

AmsTdcn 

JUbans 

Bahrain 


Babul 



Banauda* 

Btarita 

BetdaS 

Baum* 

BnwMla 


C 22 72 

c 1 5 S9 ftaWrtd 
1 31 88 HonoK 

:b sag? 

e 18 84 Jeddah 


B Abas' 

Cabo 

CapeTa 

CVSnca 

CMcaoo: 

Ofchurati 


I 18 


I 20 68- 
s 14 57-L 
» 35 95 Ustam 

s 28 82 locanw 
s 27 81 LAneaia* 
a 28 82 LmnwabB 
c 8 46 Madrid 


C t 
l 18 6a 

1 18 61 

a 32 90 Malta 
r 12 54 MatoTna 
» a 84 MastoaC 
8 26 79 Manl* 
f 29 84 Mttan 
1 19 KMaauwr 
8 25 77 Moscow 

* 21 TO Munich 

* 21 70 Nairobi 

<3? m!ugB 

issas*- 

S 38 97 cue 

'•SSSL 

ssa t - 

8 23 73 

8 26 79 

C T 7 63 mod* J 


9. sun; an. Miwv; t ttwodar. 

c F C F 

8 28 82 Rata* a 28 E 
8 24 75 Satan*#* t .17 g 
a 31 88 SFiteW a IT g 
I 15 SSSaqMflO' r If 
8 21 70 S Panto* c 18 W 
f 32 90 Seoul 
■ 25 77 
8 24 75 

r 14 Ersuaatoia 
8 19 66 - ■ - 


s 30 86 TahHhr 
d 28 62 Tanarito 
f 25 77 Tokyo 


f g fl 
1 ei to 

a 18 SA 
8 »“ 
• 31 53 




' dinotoi WMoMdsyi v# 


1 Cat rr flMnvv * 

• 27 « Toronto* • ». U. 
1 16 6i •nmim » 21 55 

o 20 ta iftotato S.3|* 
a 30 88 vauL'sar 8 » » 
f 18 64 Vaatoa .1 g g 
t 18 61 Vtaato'- - t » g 
f 11-82 MMH- C-lfS 

r SO 68 WaPnlta -f jf s 
9 «109 Ztofefe , *T* ® 














^..*51 

(U A~\ “?&'$ 

ti-. . > hi;. *■• , ...A ; 




L"VS- r* 

SI 

:■ '■■ 'i 

S**, 58 

..I/-: ^ 


• - .» 
.** rO 



a;*. • 
• ■ " *1. 



' ■ 


V. 

\ 

it.;-./ 

: W? 


:: - 

£ * 

■ ; w . 

7' •• 

: ♦' 



" 

«5 ’ 


. ..f? - r f. 

• •• fc s' 

A 




■ «:■ - , 




on 



• ' " 

: xx . 1 1. 

■ JIj+s 

■■ 11 ..1 
■ . : • it* 

I:., 


' ^ ?. 


»’ ...„_■ *■ 

' ! “" ■ ■ *" "J;> 

■ 

* ' /“'is. 
y, - 4 »' 

•.m VvTis 

• . . '* 7 V- • 


? -r •• 


• " *.x. 


s i 


A 




. V ,->- 

ve-.*' 
j :s- 

- •' " V 
». V'* ' 


.. j Hr!* 1 * 11 v 

j : , • i'.’- p ,--<T ; 1 


• - 

• ; 
1 r 

'..ff 


FT 30 Share 
1267.1 (-1.3) 

FT-SE 100 
1606.8 (+2.2) 

Bargains 

20734 

USM (Datastream) 

125.39 (+0.69) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4955 (-0.0090) 

W German mark 
3.0568 (-0.0244) 

Trade-weighted 
71.7 (-0.2) 

Investment 

inquiry 

The operations of Mc- 
Donald Wheeler of Canter- 
bury. Kent, a collapsed 
investment supermarket, will 
be investigated by Kent police 
fraud officers after a meeting 
between the receiver and the I 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions. The receiver’s investiga- 
tion has been running for 
several weeks. 

The company bad managed 
up to £25 million for 1.000 
clients. The police inquiry is 
expected to last up to 12 
months. 

Payout jump 

Johnson Group Cleaners, 
Britain's largest drydeaners, 
announced interim pretax 
profits up 5 per cent to £4 
million on turnover down 3 
per cent to £44 million. The 
dividend was raised 19 per 
cent to 5p. The large increase 
is to reduce the disparity 
between the interim and final 
dividends and is not an in- 
dication of the likely increase 
for the whole year. ' 

Tempos^ page 18 

Profits rise 

Garfunkels. the restaurant 
chain, reported pretax profits 
of £1.5 million for the' six 
months to the end of June, 
compared with £1.2 million 
for the same period last year. 
Turnover rose from £9.7 mfl- 
lion tef £12.4 million. The* 
dividend waSTmaidtamed^at 
0.2 15p. = • 

■ Tempos, page 18 

Hotels’ £63m 

Queens Moat Houses, the 
hotel cham, reported interim 
pretax profits up 55^peroettt*at 
£6.3 million. Turnover rose 
from £35.6 million to £42.9 
million. Interim dividend 
is 0.9p (0.765p last year). 

Tempos, page 18 

YK Pao goes 

5ir Yue-Kong Pao has re- 
signed as adviser to the Hong 
Kong & Shanghai Banking 
Corporation board. The bank 
and Sir Yue-Kong's World- 
wide Group remain partners 
in a number of shipping 
ventures, and Sir Yue-Kong 
Pao has agreed to continue to 
advise the chairman on ship- 
ping matters. 

Paribas letting 

Ladbroke Group has let the 
former Debenham and 
Freebody headquarters in 
Wigmore Street, West End. at 
a record rent for the area of 
£30.50. per sq ft to Banque 
Paribas Capital Markets. 

Hotels hit 

A .shortage of American 
visitors has “had a severe 
impact on hotels' summer 
trading, the Scottish and New- 
castle Breweries annual meet- 
ing was told yesterday. 


cut m base rate 

By David Smith. Economics Correspondent 


Hopes of an early cut in 
base rates after the overnight 
reduction in the US discount 
rate faded yesterday following 
a clear signal against such a 
move by the Bank of England. 

The dollar and the pound 
both fell when it became clear 
that the authorities in West 
Germany and Japan were in 
no burry to follow the US 
Federal Reserve Board in 
cutting rates. 

Money market rales in Lon- 
don fell yesterday morning 
after the Federal Reserve low- 
ered the discount rate from 6 
to 5.5 per cent — the lowest 
level for nine years — late on 
Wednesday. 

The US move added to a 
mood of base rate confidence 
in the money markets which 
has been fostered by good 
figures for public sector 


borrowing and the pound’s 
rise back above $1.50. 

But the Bank of England, in 
its money market dealing 
operations, gave a clear signal 
that it was not ready for a rate 
cm yet And, according to Mr 

David Morrison, currency 
economist at Goldman Sachs 
in London, lower base rates 
may only be possible if there 
are prior cuts in Germany and 
Japan. 

Yesterday, the German and 
Japanese authorities gave ev- 
ery indication of holding out 
against such a move. 

After hasty discussions be- 
tween officials at the Bank of 
Japan and the new finance 
minister, Mr Kiicbi 
Miyazawa, it was agreed that 
Japanese monetary policy had 
already been relaxed enough 

In Germany, the central 


Small fall in UK 
external assets 

By Our Economics Correspondent 
Britain's net external assets, visible trade, more than offset 


which have increased sharply 
since exchange controls were 
abolished in 1979. slipped 
slightly last year, the first fell 
after five successive big rises. 

External assets exceeded 
liabilities by £80.4 billion at 
the end of last year, according 
to the annua) Balance of 
Payments Pink Book, pub- 
lished today by the Central 
Statistical Office. The figure at 
the end of 1984 was £81.3 
billion. 

At the end of 1979. when 
exchange controls were lifted, 
net externa] assets stood at £12 
billion. 

The Pink Book shows that 
Britain had a current account 
surplus- of £3.6 billion last 
year, compared with one of 
jrUJbOBoa in 1984. _ ' " 

■ The 1985 surplus was made 


by a £5.7 billion surplus on 
invisibles — the earnings of the 
City, shipping, transport, tour- 
ism and transfers. 

The figures show that there 
has been a continuing increase 
in net investment overseas by 
British residents. In 1983 
there was a net outflow of £4.7 
billion, in 1984 £6.3 billion 
and last year £7 2 billion. 

In spite of this, partly 
because of valuation changes, 
Britain's net external assets 
declined. 

Britain continues to benefit 
from trade with the United 
Slates, running a visible sur- 
plus of £2.4 bulion last year, 
compared with £ 1 2 billion 

The unde deficit of manu- 
factured. and .semi-manufac- 
tured goods declined slightly 
Iasi year - to £3 billion from 

« i «.«• •_ < no a ■ 


yj^gf a_ £11 _ billion-deficit on J3.9 billion. in 1984. 


change in monetary policy 
was imminent. The result was 
a weaker dollar, particularly 
against the mark, exacerbated 
in later trading after com- 
ments by Mr Robert Dole, the 
US Senate leaders who sug- 
gested that a further US 
discount rate cut might be 
necessary. 

The dollar slipped from 
DM2.048 to DM2.044, just 
above its record low, and from 
153 JO to 153.15 against the 
yen. 

The pound, however, hit by 
the National Institute for Eco- 
nomic and Social Research 
forecast of a £6 billion current 
account deficit next year, lost 
nearly a cent against the 
dollar, closing at S 1.4955. The 
sterling index fell from 71.9 to 
7J.7. 

Growth is 
still slow 

The latest cyclical in- 
dicators for the British econ- 
omy confirm that growth over 
the past 12 months has been 
sluggish. But official stat- 
isticians say it is not possible 
to teO whether this slow 
growth will persist 

The four leading indicators 
display a somewhat conflict- 
ing picture. The coincident 
indicator has been flat over 
the past 12 months, but there 
have been recent rises for the 
longer leading indicator, 
suggesting a pick-up in 
growth. This indicator LS, 
however, highly sensitive to 
movements in share prices. 

Capital spending by British 
industry fell slightly in the 
second quarter, according to 
separate figures released yes- 
terday. In 1980 prices, the 
total spent fry manufacturing 
industry fell from £1.82 billion 
to £1.73 billion. 



At Hamleys: Mr Peter I 


left. Sir Philip Harris and Brian Griffin (photograph: Graham Wood) 


Harris buys a toyshop for £30m 


Profit-taking ends 11 days 
of share boom in Tokyo 


The Burton Group yesterday sold the 
world's most famous toy shop. Hamleys 
of Regent Street, for £30 million to 
Harris Queensway, the carpets and 
furniture retailer beaded by Sir Philip 
l Harris. 

Burton Group acquired Hamleys a 
year ago as part of its £560 million 
purchase of Debenhams. 

Sir Philip plans to revamp the 
flagship Regent Street store, open a 
number of new shops in Britain, and 
take the Hamleys name abroad. 

Goldman Sachs, which handled the 
sale, had interest from around the world 
but narrowed the field to four main 
contenders — Harris Queensway. Wool- 
worth Holdings, a private Middle 
Eastern investor, and the owner of FAO 
Schwarz, the top New York toy store. 

Eventually the bidders were reduced 
to Harris Queensway and Woolworth. 
By Wednesday evening Harris 
Queensway had agreed the deal. 

Mr Geoffrey Mulcahy, chief exec- 
utive of Woolworth, said: “We derided 
that the price was too much. I was not 
prepared to overpay for it Qeariy the 
business is worth different amounts to 


By Teresa Poole 

different people." Woolworth, which 
has chosen children's goods as one of six 
areas to focus on. is the largest toy 
retailer in Britain with almost 10 per 
cent of the market 
Hamleys is represented in London, 
Bath. Birmingham and Croydon. In the 
year to the end of January', it made 
profits of £2.3 million 
Sir Philip said: "We bought the 
business bemuse it has got a fantastic 
name and good sales." He added that it 
had been “milked for cash" by 
Debenhams and would now have 
money invested in it 
Under the first phase of the expan- 
sion, the Regent Street store will receive 
a £750.000 facelift and a computer 
system will be installed. By the end of 
the year there will be one new Hamleys 
store, probably in the South, with three 
or four new purpose-built ones in major 
cities by next autumn. There are no 
plans to pul Hamleys shops within 
existing Harris Queensway outlets. 

Sir Philip hopes to expand Hamleys 
through large out-of-town sites selling 
toys, children's wear and sportwear, 
adjacent to existing Queensway 


superstores. There wilt also be develop- 
ment overseas, either through store 
openings or by franchising the name. In 
addition, discussions will take place 
with Great Universal Stores, which 
owns 23 per cent of Harris Queensway, 
about selling Hamleys goods through 
the GUS mail order catalogues. 

Sir Philip said “This will be the 
prestige in the Harris Queensway group. 
In two years' time it should be making 
profits of£l0 million. 1 ' Hamleys. which 
does not own the freeholds of any of its 
stores, has net assets of around £5 
million including £800.000 of cash. 

For Burton, the sale is pan of a debt- 
reducing exercise after the Debenhams 
takeover. Net borrowings have fallen by 
around £100 million to £250 million 
since January, helped by this sale and 
the £19 million disposal of the Lotus 
shoemaker. Bunon plans to sell the 
Debenhams Inc chain of shoe shops, 
based in New York, which will end the 
programme of disposals. 

The sale made little impart on the 
shares yesterday. Harris Queensway lost 
4p to 232p, Burton gained 2p to 308p, 
-•and Woolworth dropped Sp to 650p. 


Shares on the Tokyo stock 
exchange fell back yesterday, 
the first decline m 1 1 days of 
booming prices and volumes. 

The morning session saw a 
fall of 297.11 yen from 
Wednesday’s record high as 
profits were taken on electric 
power and monetary stocks, 
such as Sumitomo Bank and 
Nomura Securities. 

The market had opened 


-■ In a volatile afternoon ses- no further reduction in pros- 
sion. share prices fluctuated poet at present. There is, 
rapidly but the market closed however, speculation that a 
on a upward note with a further cut will come by the 


Maxwell 
buys more 
of Extel 


BET makes two final bids 


record 2.3 billion shares being 
traded. Wednesday's volume 
had also set a record. 


middle of next month. 

The day’s trading on the 
stock exchange did little to 


g* w-t . 1 BET, the industrial services 

/|T mi ‘V’lfM conglomerate, yesterday 
raised its bids for HAT and 
Mr Robert MaxwelL pub- Brengreen to£lIl mflUonand 
lisher of the Daily Mirror, has J 32 : 2 n “ u « >n r fP«^ ve, y 


The yen strengthened to a dampen fears that, sooner or 
new high against the dollar, later, it is going to come down 


closing at 1 53.03L 02 yen 
stronger than on Wednesday, at a time when the outlook for 
The reduction in the Ameri- the Japanese economy is 
can discount rate strengthened patchy at best — especially in 
the belief that Japan would view of the disappointing 
follow suit, but a Bank of economic performance across 


hard from an unrealistic high 
at a time when the outlook for 


higher amid expectations of can discount rate strengthened 
lower interest rates after the the belief that Japan would 


reduction in the US official 
discount rate. 


Japan official said there was the Pacific. 


Low oil price steadies US inflation 


increased his stake in ExieL 
the beleagured business and 
sporting information group, 
from 23 per cent to 26.4 per 
cent. 

He intends to continue buy- 
ing until he reaches the maxi- 
mum permissible 29.9 per j 
cent, even through he is ! 
ineligible to bid for Extel until I 
next spring. ■ 

His immediate goal is to try I 
to block Ex id’s proposed $40 1 


declared them both final. 

It also announced that it 
was acquiring from Hawley 
Group its 8.6 per cent stake in 
RAT and its 27.1 per cent 
stake in Brengreen. 

Mr David Telling, chair- 
man of HAT, was not im- 
pressed by the improved offer 
and rejected it as “wholly 


By Alison Eadie 

inadequate". He said he was 
deeply suspicious of the 
relationship between BET and 
Hawley, which might lead to a 
break-up of HAT between the 
two parlies if BET won. 

No Hawley directors were 
available to comment. 

HAT believes that Hawley 
had made insufficient profit 
on its stake to justify it as a 
pure arbitrage transaction. 
BET categorically denied 
there were any secret deals 
being plotted with Hawley. It 


said it wanted to buy HAT as 
an entity, and it was RAT 
which was breaking itself up 

The revised terms of the 
offers are 73 BET shares for 
200 HAT shares, worth I44.5p 
per RAT share after stripping 
out the final BET dividend. 
BET has also added a cash 
alternative at 1 35p. 

For Brengreen. BET is offer- 
ing one of its won shares and 
45p cash for nine Brengreen 
shares, worth 49p per share, or 
an all-cash alternative at 50p. 


American consumer prices 
were unchanged last month as 
lower energy prices kept infla- 
tion in check, the Labour 
Department announced 
yesterday. 

The good performance 
came after two successive 
months when consumer prices 
increased. So far this year 
prices have declined at an 


annual rate of 02 per cent 


The department said that 


The department said the energy prices had fhOen 162 
consumer prices, as measured per cent in the past 12 months. 


by the Consumer Price Index 
for aD urban consumers, were 
unchanged in July after a 
seasonally adjusted increase 
of 0.5 per cent in June. 


the largest drop on record and 
a key contributor to lower 
price inflation. 

Cheaper fuel oft, gasoline 
and natural gas more than 


Low inflation has been one offset higher prices for many 
of the bright spots for the food items, rent and other 
struggling American economy, shelter costs. 


USSR shake-up for Gatt 


Wall Street 
Comment 


18 Foreign E\ch 19 

18 Traded Opts 19 

19 Unit Trusts .20 


Stock Market 19 CamBoodiiies 20 , 
Co Mens 19 USM Prices 20 ! 
Mone^ Mrkts 19 Share Prices 21 , 


From Alan McGregor 
Geneva 

The Soviet Union looks like 
galvanizing the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade by its formal request to 
participate in its round of talks 
which begin at Punre del Este, 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Uniguay'on September 15. While the normal process 
Russia has had informal for admitting a country - 
contacts with members of the particularly one with a siate- 
92-nation organization since run economy — to Gatt could 
the end of 1 982. be protracted, a possible short 

While in Geneva in March cut to granting the Russian 
Mr Mikhail Pankine. the So- request is indicated in the 
viet minister for foreign trade, draft declaration text, in- 
said the new round “could tended for ministerial ap- 
have universal and global proval at Fume del Este and 


New Yoric 
Dow Jones 
Tokyo 
Nikkei Dow 
Hong Kong; 


RISES; 

— 1876.83 (-ASO)' B.P 

. Jameson Chocs. 
. 18675.60 (-260.64) BrooKmount — 


Hang Seng 1941-36 (+0.08) 

Amsterdam: Gen 299.0 f+2.11 

Sydney- AQ 11794 (+1.8) 

Frankfurt 

Commerzbank — 2068.7 (-75) 
Brussels; 

General 859.59 (+32.72) 

Paris: CAC .. 3997 (+5.5) 

Zurich; 1 ■ - 

SKA General 525.fi (+1.3) 

London dosing prices _ Page 21 


B.P 635p (+10p) 

Jameson Chocs. 125p (+1 Op) 

BrooKmoum 323p (+25p)" 

MK Sectrte 3B8p (+20p) 

Tl Group 497p (+34p) 

Evered 2l8p (+I4p) 

Thomas RoWnson — 38ip(+11p) 

Unilever . — 1920p(+40p) 

Centura Oil . — 139p(+13pl 

Union Discount 683p (+10p) 

Provident Fin 338p (+13pj 

Morgan Grenfell 448p (+I0p) 

n Produce 


T4"i * i>| i • to block Extel’s proposed $40 

1^ lntm tlOn otilfroA ( £27 million) ac- 
iUliaUUU quisition of Dealers Digest in 

*gr*TS t r 5 ** fig ^The < acquisition needs sin.- 
eneTgypnces had fallen 16-2 p| e majority approval by 

shareholders' W^ill be d<£ 

dded at an extraordinary 
Li ? 10 l0Wer meeting next Friday, 

pnoeiiiflatioiii. Extel shares closed 3p 

Cheaper fuel oft, 8***®* higherat 406p. Extel chairman 

Mr fib* Brooker wrote to 
offset higher prices for many shareholders earlier this week 
rant anA other urging them to vote for the 
shelter costs. Dealer Digest acquisition and 

Z to take no notice of Mr 

rvw f ^ 44- Maxwell's ’’obstructive 

OF VTfltl tactics". 

British Printing and 
While the normal process C° inm im ical k , a s Coipora- 
for admitting a country - V?"- w , 5 ? os f chauTQan ? Mr 
particularly one with a state- Max we 11 , a Iso an n o u n cedyes- 
nin economy — to Gatt could ! erc ^ y ^ . teemed 

be protracted, a possible short '/revocable undertakings from 
cut to granting the Russian per rent of PhjJ'P Hill 

request is indicated in the Investment Trun sharehold- 
draft declaration text, in- ers £°_ ® In- 
tended for ministerial ap- wonh ^19 million in rash, 
proval at Pume del Este and , Mr Brooker strrased that 
tabled here last month by £- e JV sl ^ on 
Switzerland and Colombia. Digest, the financial publish- 
_ ing and database operation. 

This says that the coming would benefit ExieL 
round would be open to n would extend the range 
countries that notify a regular aD d coverage of Extel's finan- 
tneeling ot the Gan council of ci«ti services, provide opportu- 


implications." tabled here last month by 

u ... - j mi, orront-ioi Switzerland and Colombia, 

He then said; It is essential ... 

to ensure that the round This says that the coming 
should be of open character round . would be open to 
and all countries concerned countries that notify a regular 
could participate in if' meeting of the Gan council of 

Mr Pankine made the point, their intention to negotiate the 
however, that major Western terms of their accession, 
trading countries appeared But acceptance of this pro- 
unenthusiasuc about admit- vision in the text can be 


FIMBRA 

IBISIJI 

BERKELEY ST JAMES’S 
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT LTD. 

I INCREASED MY FUTURE 
PENSION ON LEAVING 
SERVICE FROM £5,000 P.A. 
TO £130,000 P.A. 


My colleague Bill Coulson aged 58 was able to increase bis 
future pension from £14,000 PA. to an estimated £37,000 
PA. In fact most of my colleagues dramatically improved their 
benefits on leaving service. 


At Berkeley St James’s we specialise 
Management, and we can help you. 


Financial 


ting the USSR 


blocked by the United States, 


nities for collaboration, 
develop Extel's database op- 
erations and (>rovide a sound 
base for Extel in the American 
i market. 


Whether you are about to leave service or have already left 
contact us to see how we may help you. 


....... 448p +1Qp) 

293p +13p) 


EEC suspends sugar action 


INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-month Interbank 9*-8"ie% 
3-month eligible MlteS ^ *3*$' ■»% 


FALLS 

Scottish Agric. 

Bestwood 

Tay Hornes 

Scottish * New- — 
Haris Queensway . 

Boots 

Dawson Irrtnl 

Templeton Galb- — 


221p(-7p) 

580p(-15pi 


580p (-15pl 

13&(-7P] 


— 1«0p -6pi 

r;M 

: -WB 


Prime Rata 8%> 

Federal Funds 

3-momh Treasury Bills 5-37-5.35%- 
30-year bonds 1(71 Vi-101 3 is" 

CURRENCIES 



London 

New Voite 


t. $14955 

£=51.4960* 

.'A 

E. DM3.0368 

$: DM2.0435* 

• '•* 

£. SwFr2.4623 

$■ Index: 11 tL3 

I-fi 

£• FFr10.0124 


£ Yen22903 

ECU £0.684574 

'A 

Vi 

£ Index 71 7 

SDR £0.807711 


GOLD 

London Fixing: 

AM $331.75 pm-S380.7S 
Close $382.75-383.50 (£255.25- 
256.00} 

New Yoric 

Comex $382.75-383^5* 


NORTH SEA OIL . 

Brent (Sept) pm $14,70 DM($13J5) 
* Denotes latest trading pries 


The European Community's 
Competition Directorate has 
suspended interim action 
against British Sugar, threat- 
ened after complaints by Na- 
pier Brown, the sugar 
merchant. 

A warning of punitive mea- 
sures was given by the EEC 
after Napier Brown told the 
- European Commission last 
year that British Sugar had 
abused its dominant position 
on (be British market in an 
attempt to drive its rival out of 
the retail sector. 

The EEC has the power to 
impose heavy fines on com- 
panies that indulge In unfair 


From Jonathan Braode, Brussels 

! trading practices to restrict 1st sugars 
i competition. Britain. 

1 British Sugar has reserved British Si 
Hs position over the accusation dertaken no 
; that it has been acting un- 
fairly. But it recognizes EEC prevents th 
concent at the insufficient buying fri 
margin between its prices for according tt 
‘ industrial and retail sugar. directorate 


packets 


It has agreed to supply 
standard industrial sugar to 
Napier Brown on terms that 
allow competition in the retail 
market It has also promised 
not to try to damage the 
commercial position of Napier 
Brown's shareholder. 
Whitworths, which sells 
brown sugar and other sperial- 


British Sugar has also un- 
dertaken not to seek an agree- 
ment with any client that 
prevents the customer from 
buying from Whitworths; 
according to the competition 
directorate. 

The EEC directorate says it 
will keep a watch on the 
British sugar market for the 
next few months to make sure 
that British Sugar lives up to 
its promises. "Should British 
Sugar's undertaking or its 
implementation prove to he 
inadequate, farther measures i 
will be considered,” it adds. 


T 22/8 

To: Berkeley St James’s Financial Management Ltd 
Freepost London SW1H 9BR 
(Telephone 01-222 8785) 

Please send me details on how to improve my pension 
expectation on changing jobs. 

Na ...... ............................ ........... .. . ...... . ....... 

Address 


Telephone. 





16 


mJSiNtaS ajnl) MNANOs 


x ri£ i isyLtS riu£>A V auGuSi 11 x^oo 


J 

s 

tc 

V 
d 
n 
fc 
It 
C 

ti- 

lt 

ai 

y 

o 

u 

tt 

tr 

T 

w 

IT 

li 

lc 

Y 

P : 

H 

O’ 

T 
lY 
u 
Tr 
t Y 
c< 
at 
al 


T 

v; 

in 

at 

in 

le 

it 

d< 

“i 

ci 

le 

pi 

tr 

ti 

w 

R 

tr 

P< 

It 


k a 

I i 


I ri 
lil 


I » 
» 

<“ 


tu 

k* 


Unit trust 
investment 

■ at record 

By Martin Baker 

! Investment in unit trusts 
rose to a record £27.9 billion 
last month. 

1 Net investment for the 
month was £389.6 million, 
according to figures released 
.yesterday by the Unit Trust 
Association (XJTA). 

1 This is down on June's 
record levels, but sales were 
more than double those for the 
same period last year. Net 
investment in unit trusts has 
now outstripped building soci- 
ety net investment for the last 
three months. 

■ Mr Tony Smith, secretary of 
the UTA, said he was en- 
couraged by a good set of 
figures. “Sales are down on 
last month, but that is a usual 
seasonal fluctuation," he said. 

Total net investment and 
unit sales this year have now 
exceeded the figures achieved 
for the whole of last year. 

The £27.9 billion invested is 
spread across 907 unit trusts. 
The UTA's figures cover 137 
companies. 

The number of unitholder 
accounts rose by more than 
40,000 to a new peak of more 
than 3 million, although no 
information on the numbers 
of individual accountholders 
is readily available. Many 
individuals hold more than 
one unit trust account 

The figures have been swol- 
len by the entry of life 
assurance companies into the 
unit trust market Some have 
unitized existing funds under 
manag ement whilst Others 
have launched new funds. 

Mr Smith said that the 
insurance companies had un- 
doubtedly had a good effect on 
the figures. 


Bestwood lifts 
Barrie offer 

Bestwood has increased its 
offer for Barrie Investment 
and Finance, and has won the 
backing of Barrie's board. 

The terms are two new 
Bestwood shares for every 59 
Bamie shares. The increased 
cash alternative is worth 1 7p a 
share. 

In order to provide the cash 
alternative Greig, Middleton 
and Co, the broker, has agreed 
to make a separate offer to 
purchase new Bestwood 
shares at 500p each. 

The increased share offer 
places a value of about £19.5 
million on Barrie based on the 
middle market value of 575p 
per Bestwood share 


Boeing’s rivals disagree even before the battle begins 

European-US challenge 
to the king of the skies 


By Edward 
Townsend 

Boeing, the world's biggest 
aerospace company, this week 
produced its 5.000th commer- 
cial Jet as the aviation industry 
is in the throes of realignment 
to cope with the challenges of 
the next century. 

While Boeing was celebrat- 
ing its milestone at its Seattle 
headquarters, talks were 
proceeding between Mc- 
Donnell Douglas of the 
United States — Boeing's big 
rival — and Europe’s Airbus 
Industrie consortium on fu- 
ture collaboration in the 
production of a new genera- 
tion of long-haul aircraft. 

McDonnell Douglas and 
Airbus plan a project that will 
didodge the Boeing 747 
jumbo jet from its un- 
challenged position as king of 
the skies. 

The talks, which by all 
accounts have gone beyond 
the exploratory stage, are tak- 
ing place at a critical time, 
particularly for the British 
aerospace industry. 

British Airways has just 
agreed to fit Rolls-Royce en- 
gines to its new fleet of Boeing 
747-400 aircraft, planes that 
Boeing hopes will prolong the 
life of the type well into the 
next century. 

But at the same time. 
British Aerospace is agonizing 
about further involvement in 
the Airbus programme, and 
has already told the Govern- 
ment that it will need 100 per 
cent launch aid if it is to take 
part in developing the long- 
haul A3 30 and A3 40 Airbuses. 

Airbus hopes the latter will 
provide the 747 with much- 
needed competition on the so- 
called “long, thin" routes. 
After the agreement to pro- 
duce the 150-seat A320. for 
which BAe will make the 
wings. Airbus says the A3 40 
will complete, for the time 
being, the group’s family of 
aircraft 

Boeing, which has com- 
plained about what it alleges is 
Government's subsidization 
of Airbus, has been doing well 
recently. So far this year it has 
collected firm orders worth 
more than £10 billion, an 
achievement sealed by the BA 
order — the largest in civil 
aviation history — which calls 
for the supply of 16 long-range 
747s and options on a further 
12 . 

No doubt with the Mc- 
Donnell Douglas-Airbus talks 











Rivals in 
the ain While 
Boehts cel- 
ebrates the 

production 
ef to 5.000th 
commercial 
jet (its new 
747-400 is 
pictured 
abated 
McDonnell 
Douglas 
and Airbus 
Industrie, 
which plans 
the A320 
(pktnred 
right), may 
collaborate on 
a new air- 
bus which 
conld dis- 
lodge the jum- 
bo from Its 
hitherto un- 
challenged 
leadership. 


and the forthcoming 
Famborough International 
Air Show in mind. Boeing this 
week capitalized fully on its 
Seattle celebrations. The 5.000 
aircraft were made in only 29 

J ears, it said, with Boeing the 
irst airframe company to 
announce a plan to develop a 
jet-powered airliner, the 
prototype 707-120 costs more 
than the company's net worth. 

The 5,000 Boeings, almost 
all of which are still in service, 
have flown about 63.2 billion 
miles — equivalent to 340 
round trips between the earth 
and the sun. 

Boeing's corporate commu- 
nications department also es- 
timates that since 1957 the 
company has turned out one 
aircraft every Vh working 
days; the 5,000 total is 55 per 
cent of the world production 
of 9,000 jets. All but 1,400 of 
the 9,000 are still in service. 

The best selling Boeing by 
far has been the 727. with a 


„ • ; »>, ■■ '* , y 


. ; . . ■ i- 


ttSim- 

•rX-~r ' 1 — a— 

. f \- ; .■ ; - 



world fleet of 1,832, followed 
by the 737, of which U75 
have been sold. The 707 
remains in service as the 
airframe for the E-3 Airborne 
Warning and Control System 
(AWACS), which Boeing, in 
collaboration with Britain's 
Plessey, Ferranti and Racal 
companies, is trying to sell to 
the Ministry of Defence. 

Behind-the-scenes talk at 
Famborough is certain to 
include speculation about an 
Airbus tie-up with McDonnell 
Douglas. The problem, how- 
ever, is lhai neither company 
seems prepared to abandon its 
own plans for a long-range 
aircraft in favour of collabora- 
tion. 

McDonnell Douglas has its 
own MD-1I on the stocks, a 
tri-jet able to transport 330 
passengers 7,000 miles, and 
hopes to launch it as a 
programme later this year. If it 
obtained some firm orders, 
the American company would 


Keep it in the family 

A national firm of Chartered Accountants 
with strong representation and 
substantial experience and expertise 
in helping the expatriate and his family 
in minimising their personal taxation liabilities 

We may be able to help mitigate: 

Income Tax-Corporation Tax-Inheritance Tax. 




r 


For further information on Personal Tax Planning and our complete”! 
range of services please complete the coupon and send to: | 



NA MF. 

COMPANY. 

ADDRESS— 


L 


Alternatively, if you require further information 
regarding our practice, please contact 
Patrick Rushmore. 

maciimtyre Hudson 

Chartered Accountants 


J 


be in a much stronger position 
than Airbus and might back 
away from collaboration. 

Airbus, meanwhile, is say- 
ing that the A34Q. due in 1 992, 
a year later than the MD-1 1, is 
technologically superior and 
that it and McDonnell Doug- 
las would benefit by pooling 
resources. 

The British Government 
remains on the sidelines. After 
funding BAe in the form of 
repayable launch aid through- 
out the Airbus programme, it 
would lose considerable re- 
spect in Europe if it failed to 
tack the remaining additions 
to the family. 

Ministers apparently favour 
the link with McDonnell 
Douglas, without stating a 
preference on which of the two 
aircraft should be developed, 
on the grounds that it could 
give Airbus a bigger riiare of 
the huge American civil air- 
craft market 


( TEMPUS ) 

Johnson spruces up 
for more expansion 


Mention drycleaning and for 
most people, the first name to 
come to mind is Sketchley. 

Just as big, with nearly a 25 

per cent market share is 
Johnson Group Cleaners 
which yesterday announced 
interim results to June 30, 

Drydcanmg services, of- 
fered at 71 1 shops throughout 
the country, comprise 70 per 
cent of the group’s British 
turnover. The other 30 per 
cent covers textile rental. 

A dominant position m the 
home market makes it diffi- 
cult to expand further by 
acquisition and that is why 
the group decided to expand 
in the United States where 30 
per cent of its business now 
is. After a spate of ac- 
quisitions, 1986 is a year of 
consolidation. 

Overseas business means 
that currency becomes a 
significant actor. The ad- 
verse movement of the dollar 
lopped £3 million off turn- 
over and £400,000 off profit 
in the first half of this year. 

The effect of currency and 
unseasonal weather caused 
turnover to fell 3 per cent to 
£44 million compared with 
last year. 

Pretax profit on the other 
hand was up 5 per cent to £4 
million. This was hugely due 
to a drop in interest charges 
from £1.6 million last year to 
£1.1 million this year. Gear- 
ing is down and net debt at 
the end of June stood at 43 
per cent of equity. 

Unless something irresist- 
ible turns up meantime, 
Johnson plans to set off again 
on the acquisition trail in 
1987. While it may make an 
acquisition in textile rental in 
Britain, its main thrust will 
be to buy further dxydeaning 
outlets in the US. 

The full year’s profit is 
likely to be a little more than 
double that of the first half as 
there is a slight seasonal bias 
towards Christmas. For 1986 
as a whole, therefore, it 
should make £8.5 million 
pretax compared with £7.8 
million last year. 

The tax charge for the 
current year is likely to be 
considerably higher than that 
for 1985 and will average 
around 37 per cent This 
implies ear nin gs per share of 
4tp, putting the shares on a 
prospective multiple of 13.7. 

There is unlikely to be 
much action in the next six 
months unless there is a bid 
approach and the shares look 


on 


the 


expensive 
fundamentals 

An interim dividend of 5p, 
a 19 per cent increase on last 
vear's, was declared. This is 
intended to reduce the dis- 
parity between the interim 
and final dividends and 
should not, therefore, be 
taken to be an indication of 
the likely total increase for 
the year. 

Last year's final was 16.3p. 
If this is unchanged, then the 
1986 dividend will be 2 Up, 
putting the shares on a yield 
of 5.4 per cent. 

Garfunkels 

Restaurants 

A menu which attracts the 
tourist trade to prime central 
London locations has been 
the recipe for success for 
Garfunkels. Although recent 
additions to the group, which 
include the Strikes chain, are 
not yet firing on all cylinders, 
the chairman and chief exec- 
utive, Phillip Kaye, is the first 
to acknowledge that there is 
limited longer-term growth 
potential in the original' 
Garfunkels chain. 

He is now looking to the 
provinces for expansion. At 
the half-year stage, there wane 
a total of75 outlets, 10 of 
which had not started trad- 
ing. There are plans to open 
another 10 restaurants, eight 
of which should be operating 
before Christmas. 

Being able to choose the 
right site in the provinces is 
not as easy as choosing the 
right site in London, a city 
well known to the group. 

Quality control is es- 
pecially important in 
Garfunkels restaurants where 
the salad tar concept was a 
pioneering development. Be- 
cause of the need to dosdy 
supervise all these outlets, it 
was decided to make all tire 
restaurants outside London 
Deep Pan Pizza outlets. 

These are doing well as is 
the newer London chain, 
Big’uns, which $eOs spare 
ribs. The seventh Big’uns 
outlet is opening soon. It may 
take some time, however, 
before tire average London 
restaurant goer is adept at 
eating spare ribs. 

The cost of refurbishing 
new acquisitions is usually 
met from cash flow. Alt 
not averse to borrowing, 
group has tended tocall anils 
shareholders to finance ac- 


quisitions. However, the re- 
cent purchase of five new 
outlets was made for shares. 

Dividends appear to be 
paid rather gnidringly al- 
though the group* rec o rd 
shows that money left in tire 
group is put to good use. 

A profit of £4.4 mHiion is 
achievable this yearfeamings 
per share of 8.8p). The shares 
arc on a premium rating but 
deservedly so. 

Queens Moat 
Houses 

The decision taken 12 years 
ago to shun the bright lights 
of the capital may have 
seemed coy aithe time, but it 
has provided John Bairstow's 
Queens Moat Houses hotel 
chain with firm foundations. 

About 90 per cent of tire 
group's business is of local Or 
commercial origin and with 
only one hotel in central 
London. Queens Moat is 
virtually free from the vicissi- 
tudes of the tourist market 
and consequent traditional 
seasonality of the hold trade. 

The chairman's optimism 
contrasts sharply with 
yesterday's statement from 
Scottish and Newcastle. S & 
N's summer hold trading has 
been severely hit by the 
absence of American viators. 

Yesterday’s interim pretax 
profits from Queens Moat 
were 55 percent ahead at £6.3 
million. The rate of under- 
lying growth was nearer 30 
per cent. 

It takes lime for newly- 
added hotels to make a useful 
contribution to profits. There 
was. for example, little bene- 
fit in these figures from 
acquisitions made in tire 
latter part oT 1985. 

Increased competition 
from those wishing to copy 
Queens Moat's safe formula 
is pushing up the price of 
provincial • hotels. The 
differential between building 
anew and buying going con- 
cerns has been eroded. As a 
result. Queens Moat is pfen- 
ning to open two more hotels 
by the end of this year and 
several more 4n the next few 
years. The acquisition of 
suitable., well-sited, estab- 
lished hotels will continue. ’ 

Refurbishment costs in the 
current year will amount to 
£8 million; rising to £20 
minion in 1987. which in- 
dudes the cost of adding 
conference-facilities, 


Decline in United 
Packaging profits 


By Amanda Gee Smyth 


Pretax profits of United 
Packaging, badly hit by the 25 
per cent devaluation of the 
Zimbabwe dollar, declined 
slightly in the year to April 30. 
They were £1.12 million 
against £1.29 the previous 
year. 

But higher returns from its 
British operations enabled the 
USM company to maintain 
pretax profits above £1 mil- 
lion for the third successive 
year. Operations in Zimbabwe 
have in the past accounted for 
about half lhe company's 
profits. UP — a stretch wrap 
and twine group — have 
always discounted its Zim- 


babwe earnings in formulating 
its dividend policy. 

Remittance to Britain of 
part of its blocked dividends 
there will be about £80.000 in 
the current financial year, and 
about the same remittances 
are expected over the next few 
years. 

UP*s Botwswana company 
sawa small profit at the end of 
its first financial year, and this 
is freely remittabfe to Britain. 

A final dividend of l.85p per 
share is proposed, making a 
total dividend of 3.25p per 
share for the year, represent- 
ing a 20 per cent increase over 
last year. 


Dowty pays £5.9m for 
Waverley Electronics 


By Teresa Poole 


Dowty. the engineering and 
aerospace group, yesterday an- 
nounced the £5.9 million ac- 
quisition of Waverley 
Electronics, a private manu- 
facturer of advanced naval 
sonar systems. 

Waverley is best known for 
manufacturing the equipment 
which decodes signals from 
sonar submarine hunting 
devices. 

The purchase will 
strengthen Dowry’s expertise 
in underwater warfare equip- 
ment and extend its range of 
sonar products. It already has 
a company which manufac- 
tures sonar devices, and 
Waveriey's expertise in signal 
processing will mean that the 


company can offer a complete 
sonar system. - 

Waverley. based at Wey- 
mouth, Dorset, made pretax 
profits of £500,000 on turn- 
over of £5.4 million in the year 
to February 28. 

The consideration wfl] be 
£4.6 million cash, with the 
balance an issue of shares. A 
further payment of £200,000 
cash will be made, subject to 
Waveriey’s performance in 
the year to March 31, 1987. 

Through its joint venture 
company with- CAP Group, 
Dowty recently won a contract 
to develop and produce an 
advanced submarine com- 
mand and control system for 
the Ministry of Defence. 


APPOINTMENTS 


The Thomas Cook Group: 
Sir Kenneth James becomes a 
non-executive director. 

Europ Assistance: Mr AE 
Dunlop has joined the board 
as managing director. 

Brookes & Veraons PR: Mr 
John Hutchinson has been 
made account director. 

Austin Rover Group: Mr 
Fred Coultas has been named 
as director, engineering 
operations. 

Everest & Jennings; Mr 
John B Chant has been made 
development director, Mr An- 
drew C Dick production direc- 
tor and Mr Richard H 
Downing financial director 
and company secretary. 

Illingworth, Morris: Mr 
Harry E Lack has been named 
as chief executive, Crombie 
division. 

Hertz Europe: Mr Robin 
Daries becomes division vice- 
president, sales. 

Pannell Kerr Forster Mr 
John Grogan has been made a 
partner. 



Fred Coultas 
Terminal Display Systems 
(TDSh Mr Michael Baker has 
been made engineering direc- 
tor. Mr Trevor Henmungtoii, 
international sales director, 
Mr Frank Jones, commercial 
director and Mr Mike Law- 
ton, marketing director. 

Jaeger Mrs Sheila Reiter 
has been appointed m a n aging 

fJiiwtftr Ai tarlieswear URL 


WALL STREET 


Shares ease slightly 
in early trading 


New York (Renter) — Share 
prices eased slfefafty in early: 
trading yesterday, following 
the long anticipated discount 
rate cut. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average, which was down 
about five points shortly after 
die opening, trimmed its loss 
to 3JQ at L878 later. 


The utilities average was 
margiiiaHy op at 219J1, a rise 
of 0.16, while the broader New 
York Stock Exchange 
composite index slipped 0.05 
to 143.59. 

USX Corporation led active 
shares, np tt to 19%, and IBM 
rose *i to 139?*. 




AMR 

ASA 

ABad Signal 
AIM Sirs 
AlBsCMmra 
Alcoa 
Arrow Inc 
AmYdaHs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
AmCyran'd 
Am BPwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motor* 
AmSTmd 
AmTetoph 
Amoco 
Armco Steal 
Asareo 
Ashland Oil 

At Richfield 

Awn Prods 

BtaSTMNY 

Bankanwr 

BkafBston 

Bank of NT 

Bath Staei 


Brian 

_ ra 

BrfctMyara 

BP 

BuriTonlnd 
Btffton Nti 


. iSp 

Can Pacific 

CafcrpHsr 
Cetanes* 
Central SW 
Champion 

Chase Mm 
ChmEfcNY 
Chevron 
Chryatar 


Ctarttl . . 
Coca data 


CTmtBGas 

CtnbtnEng 

GotiwwiEo 
CansEdfe 
GnNatQes 
Cons Power 
CntrtData 

Coming Ol 
CPC inti 
Crane 
Cm Mar 
Darri Kraft 
Deers 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 

Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 
DuPont 
Eastern Air 
Eatm Kodak 
Eaton Cora 
Emerson B 
Exxon Cay 
Fed Dot Sb 


1 Dot St! 
etiA 


54% 
32% 
41 % 
509k 
3% 
36% 
12 * 
IK 
93 
87* 
68 
31* 
84* 
92* 
2 * 
37* 
23* 
65* 
BK 
13 
55* 
55% 
34* 
51* 
12 % 
41* 
67* 
8* 
61* 
54* 
47* 
34* 
79% 
38% 
37% 
53% 
71* 
64* 
10% 
48 

219* 

95* 

25 

42 

48* 

48* 

41* 

55* 

17* 

39* 

41 

143* 

40* 

29% 

34* 

52* 

31* 

12 * 

23* 

60% 

89* 

30* 

44* 

GO* 

23* 

41* 

18* 

98* 

48 

54 

17* 

SI* 

79* 

8* 

57* 

89* 

85* 

65* 

82* 


53* 

31* 

41* 

50* 

3* 

36* 

11* 

19% 

92% 

87* 

84* 

30 

61* 

92* 

2 % 

37* 

23* 

64% 

BK 

13 

55% 

54* 

34 

50* 

12 % 

41* 

07* 

8* 

59* 

54* 

47* 

34* 

79* 

38 

37* 

sa* 

70* 

65% 

10 % 

45* 

213* 

35* 

at* 

40* 

48% 

42% 

40 

54* 

17* 

38 

40% 

143* 

40* 

29* 

33% 

50* 

30* 

12 % 

22 

59* 

69* 

30* 

42* 

60* 

25* 

40* 

17% 

87* 

45* 

55% 

16% 

SO* 

79* 

8 * 

56* 

68 % 

85 

65 

81* 




flrastoiw 2454 
Fst Chicago 30* 
FWIntBngj 84* 
Fst Pern C 8* 
FOrt 62* 

FTWactwe 43 
GAFOorp 33* 
GTE Crop 56 
Gen Crop 73% 
Gen Dy’mcs 73* 
Gen Electric 76% 
Gen Inst 21* 
Gen MBs 88* 
Gen Motors 74* 
GnPbUtpy 24* 
Genosoo 3% 
Georgia Pnc 33* 
GSMe 43% 
Goodrich 39% 
Goodyear 34* 
Gould me 18* 
Grace 48* 
GtAd&Tac 25* 
Grtmd SI* 
GrumenCor 25% 
Gulf » West 67* 
Heinz HJ. 46% 
Hercules 53* 
HTett-Pfcrd 43* 

Bar sn 

tnparaoa 56 

tnSnd Steel 17* 
®M 139% 

WCO 11% 

im Paper 67% 
tat Tel Tel S3* 
IrvinQ Bank 52* 
Jhntn&Jhn 73* 
Kaiser Alum 16* 
Kerr McGee 28* 
CMc 88* 
52% 
84* 
2* 
75* 
49* 
25* 

- — ....... 46* 

MamBeCp 2* 
Mspco 45* 
Marine Mid 51 
Mrt Marietta 45% 
Masco 29 

McDonalds 66 
McDomea 84 * 
Mead 55% 
Merck im 
MmstaMng ill* 
MoW 08 34* 

Monsanto ' 71* 
Morgen jj*. 94 
Mtnoroie 40* 
NCR Carp 53* 
NLhndure 4* 
Nat Distils 35% 
.NatMedEnt 24 
NatSmendt 9* 
Norte* sm 79% 
NWBanerp -38* 
OcddntPat 27* 
42* 
47* 
43* 
PacQasa 27 
Pan Am 5 % 

Penney J.C. 78% 
Pmwz&ll 53* 


Kl 
Kroger 

LT.v.corp 

Utton 

Lockheed 


- 

tWWthWwjfl ilijnf tBui ni^owpSwkiaklTitaiS'iUiiMriu 


24H 

30% 

63* 

7* 

60% 

43* 

33 

56% 

72* 

72* 

re* 

20 % 

89* 

72* 

23% 

3% 

32% 

44* 

38% 

33* 

18* 

48* 

25% 

31 

24* 

65* 

48* 

54% 

42 

70* 

25% 

57% 

17* 

136* 

11 * 

87* 

62* 

53* 

70* 

16* 

27* 

87% 

53* 

64* 

2* 

76% 

48* 

25 

45 * 

2* 

45% 

50% 

43* 

28* 

65* 

83* 

54* 

118* 

1®* 

34% 

71 

93* 

39% 

53* 

4* 

34% 

23 * 

9 * 

79* 

38* 

27* 

41% 

47 * 

44% 

26 % 

5* 

77* 

52% 

32 * 


tt ^ 


19 


Pfizer 
PhetpaDga 
PNtoMra 
PMHps Pet 


PPG kid 
PrctrGmbl 

P0SE5G 

Raytheon 
RynidsMet 
Rockwell kit 
Royal Dutch 
Safeways 
Sara Lee 
SFESoptC 
SchTberger 
Scott Paper 
Seagram 
SeeraRbck 
Shan Thins 


8k 

Sony 

StiiCal Ed 


Stevens 
Sun Comp 
Teledyne 
Temeco 
Texaco 
Texas E Cor 
Texas bnt 
Texas UUs - 
Textron 
TrtvksCor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 
UnBevarNV 
UnC sited® 
UnPacCor 
Utd Brands 
OSGCwp 

UtdTwhnol 

USXCorp 

Unocal 

JknWaBar 

wtneruntt 

Walla Fargo 

hsea 
Tsar 


Xerox Corp 
Zenith ■ 


66 * 

18% 

75* 

10 

63* 

66* 

77% 

47* 

62% 

43* 

42* 

87* 

66 % 

m% 

30* 

31% 

57* 

59 

45% 

53* 

53% 

90 

19* 

38% 

76 

47% 

SO* 

38* 

51* 

321% 

40* 

31* 

28* 

117* 

36* 

55V. 

48* 

99* 

53% 

225 

22 

58* 

28* 

39 % 

45% 

19* 

20* 

48% 

61* 

110 % 

57* 

34* 

73* 

42% 

57% 

85* 


68 % 

18% 

74* 

9* 

82* 

65* 

78% 

45* 

81* 

43* 

41* 

88% 

ess 

70% 

29% 

31* 

57% 

58* 

45* 

52* 

52* 

8856 

19 

36* 

75* 

46* 

49* 

36* 

50% 

323% 

39% 

31 

27% 

114% 

86% 

55 

47 

99% 

52* 

220 % 

21 * 

55* 

28% 

S* 

17* 

20 % 

49 

61 * 

100* 

57 % 

34 % 

73% 

42* 

90 

25 % 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AUiWjj 

AfcnAium 

AkjwnaSB 

CwPactte 

Comnco 

OonBattvst 

Hkr/StaCan 

HdWBMkl 

bunco 


22* 23 u 
41* 41% 
13 12% 


15 

12 


u% 

12 % 


CO 

ThmsnN'A - 
verity Corp 
WtkrHnm 

wer 


23% 23 
27* 26 
27* 27* 
34* 33* 

S* 

38 38 

a a» 
21 20 * 

32 *is. 


USX bid speculation 


Mriboume.(AP-Dow Jones) 
— Mr Robert Holmes & 
Court’s- investment in 
America's biggest steel com- 
pany,. USX ’Corporation, fe 
tased-on a. belief that its shares 
are undervalued, his spokes- 
man said. 

Mr. .Holmes fl Court has 


notified USX that he is plan- 
ning to acquire as much as IS 
per cent of the company. 

. The move fuelled specula* 
tion that Mr Holmes & Court 
may be selling his. stakes in 
Australian Steel and iBraken 
Hill Proprietary Co tdiaunch 
a takeover for USX- 










...lEVl-Vc - 


1 


P s Pruce s 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


cx Pansi 




•*U 


Uur.isi! S 


:K : 

• .. “P 

• ' -.S; : 




WALL STREET 


liarcs case slip 
in early tradin' 




V 


v hi, I 


STOCK REPORT REPORT 


Early rises cut back but 
oils and buildings shine 


Share prices made a bright at 472p, both up 8pi 
sian vesierday. cheered by the Stores were fern at first, but 
US Federal Reserve's decision failed to hold the sains. Boots 
to cut its discount rate by half fell 7p to 2 12p, stificoncersed 
a point to the lowest level for with the growing opposition to 
nine years. the proposed acquisition of 

However. the Flint. Barton Group added 2p 

buoyant mood was short-lived to 308p following confirma- 
as the Bank of England tion of the sale of Hamleys for 
quickly dampened the eothu- £30 million. The buyer, Har- 
siasm by giving a wanting that ris Queensway, fell 6p to 232p. 
it was not prepared to sanction Breweries were over- 

an early cut in domestic rates shadowed by a rather gloomy 
at present statement on current trading 

So, although most dealers from Scottish A Newcastle, 
now expect a reduction some- mainly because of ibe reduc- 
lime next month — perhaps tion in American tourists, 
after Japan or West Germany S & 

reduce their rates— early gains N. which earlier this week 
were soon trimmed as inves- made a bid for the Midlands- 
tors decided to stay on the based Home Brewery, lost 6p 
sidelines in front of die long, to I8Gp. 
holiday weekend. On the takeover scene, in- 

The FT 30 Share index creased and final offers from 
slipped by 13 points to BET for HAT Grasp and 
1367.1; while the broader- Brengveen boosted the shares, 
based FT-SE 100 index dosed HAT; at 139p. and Bren green, 
22 points up at 1,606.8. But 48-5 p, both added 3p, while 
there were still some useful Hawley Grosp, which ao- 
rises in one or two sectors. cepted the higher terms for its 
Oils continued to benefit own holdings, added 2p to 
from the brighter outlook for I06p. BET gave up 2pto408p- 
crude prices. BP advanced London & Midland 
JOp to 635p and Shell I7p to Industrials was a late feature 
8S5p. Century Oils, supported at 207p, up lOp. on talk of a 
by a favourable circular, bid from Williams Holdings, 
climbed 1 3p to 139p. Elsewhere in firm engineers. 

Building shares made good TI Group, at 497p, jumped by 
progress on hopes that mort- 34p on unsubstantiated re- 
gage rates will soon be reduced ports that Citicorp was about 
again. Among the best were to mount a consortium offer. 
Costain, at 556p, and Tarmac, involving Hoover of the US. 

GPI offer 1*** 

GPI Leisure Corporation, 
whose main investment is a 49 EUU,, “ a * 
percent stake in the Aostotel 
Trust, which owns 267 Austra- bbb D esign i67pj 
lian hotels, is offering 100 Beawrco (I45p) 
million ordinary shares to the gw*?™ 1 P25 p 1 
public at Au^l each, in one of c£mu a!SwS P (B 4 p 
Australia sbiggest pubbe flota- coiine (iiop) 1 
dons. Alexanders Lame and Evans HaBshaw (i20p) 
Cntickshank is tandling 30 
per cent of the issue in Guthrie corp nsop) 

London. Harrison (150p) 


at first, bat 

aias. Boots 


EQUITIES 
Angfa Sets OT5p) 

BBB^esIgn (l?p) 


Coiine fllQp) 

Evans HaBshaw (I20p) 
Retcher Dennys (70p) 
GT Management (21 Op) 
Guthrie Corp (ISOp) 
Harrison (150p) 

HiBe Ergwrom (92p) 


Evered Holdings, which has 
a substantia] interest in TI, 
gained 14p to 218p in sym- 
pathy. Tbermax improved 5p 
to 133p, as Suter increased its 
stake to above 14 per cent. 

Extei put on 3pto406p as Mr 
Robert Maxwell lifted his 
holding to just under 30 per 
cent by buying a further 1.3 
million shares m the market at 
424,75p. 

. The move was not 
unexpected and strengthens 
his band in opposing Extd's 
planned acquisition of the 
Dealers’ Digest which is to be 
put to shareholders next 
Friday. 

Thomas Robinson was 
hoisted 1 Ip to361paflera 14 
per cent earnings expansion, 
but losses unsettled Scottish 
Agricultural Industries at 
221p. down 7p and Dale 
Electric, 12p lower at Sip. 
Bestwood dipped ISp to 58tip 
as the company improved its 
offer for Barrie Investments, 
unchanged at 16.5p. 

Unitization and takeover 
hopes continued to support 
Pacific Investment Trust at 
126p, up 3p. MK Electric 
attracted strong demand at 
36Sp. up 20p and Smiths 
Industries also did well at 
266p, up by 6p. 

Jonas Woodhead, where 
Carclo recently increased its 
stake, added 4p to 66p. 
Owens Moat hardened by 


Hughes Food (20p) 

Lon utd Inv (330p) 

me cash a C fioop) 

Marina Dev (11 Op) 
Morgan Grenfell (SOOp) 
Omndach (33p) 

ShrakJ (72p) 

Stanley Lesttofl (110p) 

Ttendy Irids > (il2p} 
Thames TV (190p) 
Tbbet & Britten (i2Qpt 
Trees 2WU/I 2016 a§7 
UrWJock (63p) 
Wlndsmoor (106p) 
Yeteerton (38p) 


].5p to 75.5p after a 55 per 
cent profit improvement and 
a one-for-five scrip issue. 

The booming coffee price 
boosted Eastern Produce by 
13p to 293p. Associated Fish, 
in which Er has a substantial 
stake, jumped 7p to I02p, 

Attwoods gained 9p to 187p 
after favourable comment, but 
an adverse circular knocked 
iOp from Dawson Inter- 
national at 242p. 

Expansion - hopes stimu- 
lated British Benzol at 76p, a 
rise of 5p. 

Merchant banks 
returned to favour, with Mor- 
gan Grenfell rallying by IOp to 
448p. The profits recovery 
helped J Jarvis to a 25p rise to 
420p. but disappointing re- 
sults clipped Sp from 
Garfhnkelsat I32p. 

Discount bouses reflected 
the trend to cheaper money 
with Union IOp higher at 
663p. 

Provident Financial was 
wanted for a similar reason, 
np 13p to 338p. Cattle's 
(Holdings) added a penny, 
helped by the 36 per cent 
profit increase. 

Anlt & WTborg was 3p 
dearer at 47p following the 
Japanese approach for the 
printing inks division. The 
interim figures are due today. 

Gilts took heed of the 
Bank's caution, to finish an 
eighth lower on balance. 


23 -»j 
431-4 
80-2 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

B8A Gp N/P 

15 

98+2 
448 +10 

Barker & Dobson F IP 

13*1 +*4 

27-5 

Crtyvismn N/P 

26 

155 +5 

Colorofl F/P 

205+1 

120 

Expamet F/p 

178+2 

156 Vr 
147 
237 

Forward Tech N/P 

5 

Rock N/P 

4 +>7 

144+4 

Television Sth N/P 

21 +2 

£41 

Top Value F/P 

80 

66 

107 

Yorkmount N/P 

75+2 

U 

(Issue price in brackets). 



LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Tiro* Month SiaAig . 

Sep 86 Z 

Dec 66 

Mar 87 ' 

Jufl 87 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Previous day's total open i 
Three Month Eurodollar 

sepre 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jut 87 

USTrouway Bond 

Sep 88 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 •- 

awrtGMt - .. 

Sep 88 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 : ... 

Jun87 — — ...... 

LonaGat 

Sep86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jur»87 

FT-SE 100 

Sep 88 

Dec 86 


9087 
9089 . 

90 JO 
90-54 

m 

test 15271 


sSo 

Low 

9046 

doe* 

9048 

9031 

9QJB 

90.37 

9089 

9087 

9088 

9070 

9070 

9073 

9054 

9084 

9087 

— 

— 

9017 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


ftBVfeue day’s tc 
94JI5 94JJ1 

94.06 94.04 

94.01 9156 

93.83 93.76 

Previous day's 1 
102-11 101-22 


day’s total open fen 

94JH 9485- 

94.04 94.09 


.101:30 101-25 

101-35 101-28 


Previous day's t 
-07 121-25 


Ptwtous day's 1 
163JD 16289 


First Dsaflngs Last D— ops LastOectoi 

Aug 4 Aug 15 Nov 6 

Aug 18 Sep 5 - Nov 20 

Sap 8 Sop 19 Dec 4 

Cafl op t io ns were taken out on: 21/8/88 Beniamin 
Holdeigs. Heine Industries. Ida Ora. -Parfcdale HoWm 
Stores. Johnson firth Brown. Brito*, McCorquodale. 
Simms & Jefferies. Renlshw, Barker & Dobson. 

Put Umted Leasing. 

Pul and Cafl: Sun Ufa Assurance Society. 


1-32 __ 212 


122-03 8215 

122-01 654 

121-26 0 
121 -ZB 0 

« open Interest 2492 
1SL80 380 

166-55 0 


For S sttmnn t 
Nov 17 
Decl 
Dec 16 


sgssr 

N York 1A$4(M.500S 
Montreal 2-0787-2-085S 
Ams'Oama 445204897 
Brussels 6223-63.77 
Cphgen 11.5635-118154 
Dutofr) 1.1080-1.1145 
FrankJi*t38535-3.0774 
Lisbon 21530-217.68 
Madrid 199.42-20034 
Mian 21005^212271 
Oslo 1092B3-10OT22 
Paris 10X068-1 OJWl 5 

Sfkttm 1 03065-1 0L3387 
Tokyo '22831 -23a DO 

Vjerria 21 -S4-2t.fl9 - -- 

-Zu ri c h 24880-24784 




jm 




OSI-OASprem 

(L3WL28prWH 

IJMXprem 

IB-I^xem 

IV-Kpram 

19pram-10cfs 

IK-lltpram 

83-177<*s 

44-64dis 

1-406 

3Vr-4"fefc 

4 X-3Vi pram 

i^xpST ■ 

9K-8'/.pnm 

.IX-iXpram . 


i.45-1jeprem 

0.7tWLS5Sem 

4- 3Sprwn 
45^prem 
2%-1xpram 
iajram-Z7cfis 
4V3’/Vpram 
244-491 tea 
128-21 9da 

5- 9dte 
12-I3%dte 
IIV-IOKpram 


25*-2&praf 

3X-3Xpram 


Stateag Mn comperadsMi 1975 wm down te7T7 (rte)Ts range 714-71 J). 

I OTHER STERLING RATES " . DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


ArganttnaustraT _ 
Australia doiar — 

Bahrain dtoar 

Brazfl cruzado ■ _ 

Finland maria _ __ 
Greece drachma — 
Hong Kong dollar — 

kidto rupee 

Iraq Orest ______ 

Kuwait tfinarKD — 

Malaysia dollar 

Mexico peso 

New Zeeland dofetr . 
SaurfiArSfaieriysi _ 
Singapore doiar — 
South Africa rand _ 

UAErfirham 

TJoyds Bank 


— 14595-14651 
_ 24484-24590 

CL562S&5665 

20-81-20.74 

_ 0.7300-0.7400 

— 7^225-7^625 
200.0-20CX) 

11^794-11.6888 
1&55-18J5 

_ 04335^4x6 
_ 28923-3^965 
_ ioeao-i07oj) 

__ 3XJ7282J3877 
_ 558305.6330 
_ 3^144-3^182 

38689-3J3JEI7 

-54835 5-5 235 


Ireland 

sss*— 

Austrafla 

Canada 

Sweden 

Norway- 

Denmark, 

WSst Germany 
Switzerland __ 
Netherlands — 
France 


Hong Kong 
Portugal — 

Span 

Austria 


18445-18475 

2.1480-2.1490 

2801028020 

0.6105-0.6112 

18912-18917 

68825-68875 

78050-78100 

7.7450-7.7500 

284832.0493 

1.6490-1.6500 

28090-28100 

6.7050-8.7100 

15325-15385 

— 141280-1413.00 

4288-4243 

78045-78055 

14520-14580 

13380-13380 

1444-1446 


Malaysia 
moves fast 
to buoy 
ringgit 

MGG Ptiiai 
Kuala Lumpur 

Bank Negara, the Malay- 
sian central bank, has moved 
quickly to stop the fall of the 
Malaysian ringgit, which has 
been hit by rumours of a 
devaluation and heavy selling 
by overseas banks. But bank- 
ers here say that the worst is 
not over yet. 

Other sources say that the 
government is likely to resist 
any attempt to depress the 
currency further. 

Bank Negara does not nor- 
mally comment on its currency 
transactions bat it is believed 
to have bought between 80 
millkm and 100 m jtli im ■ 
ringgits, possibly through the , 
London brandies of Malay- 
sian banks. 1 

It was reacting to an escala- 
tion of the pressure that has 
plagued the ringgit for 
months, after a large sale of 
Malaysian currency in London 
last week by the Hong Kong 
and Shanghai Bank. 

Many overseas banks, 
ic finding at least one in 
Anstralia, were no longer quot- 
ing a rate for the ringgit, and 
this added to the softening 
effect on tbecuirencv, bankers 
said. 

The central bank's prompt 
action is reported to have 
caught the Hong Krnig Bank 
short of ringgit, causing a loss 
of between $300,000 and 
$400,000, according to market 
sources in Kuala Lumpur 
yesterday. 

Bank Negara had been 
attempting to stabilize the 
currency at 258 ringgit to the 
US dollar. But a week ago, the 
dollar was as high as 2.70 
ringgit. Its action has 
brought prices to about 2J59 
ringgit 

Bank Negara took the mar- 
ket by surprise, especially 
when ft orchestrated the move 
on a public holiday last Fri- 
day. But it has hindered 
speculators in the past by 
ordering local banks to Unfit 
currency swaps with offshore 
banks, and ft was this that 
caught Hong Kong Bank short 
of ringgits. 

The rin ggi t has lost consid- 
erable ground against major 
currencies in the past year, 
failing about 40 per cent 
against the marie, about 45 per 
cent against the yen, 27 per 
cent against sterling and, in 
the past two years, about 10 

per cent against the US dollar. 

Rumours of a devaluation, 
coupled with the high Malay- 
sian commodity prices, have 
been parity responsible for the 
pressure. But these have not 
been helped by increasing 
worries internationally over 
Malaysia's stewardship of its 
fiscal affairs. The latest Is an 
investigation into 24 of the 
country's 34 deposit taking co- 
operative societies, with re- 
ports indicating that die 
problem could be more serious 
titan was origmally thought. 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


COMMENT J 


Tokyo and Bonn hold 
key to cheaper money 


For the second time this summer, the 
United States has thrown down the 
interest rate gauntlet And for the 
second time, it appears, the gesture 
has been ignored- Yesterday, in what 
was the best display of co-ordinated 
international action on interest rates 
for many a month, the West German 
central bank,the Bank of Japan and 
the Bank of England all decided to 
pretend that the US discount rate cut 
had not happened. 

The Federal Reserve Board, in 
deciding to trim the discount rate cut 
from 6 to 5.5 per cent late on 
Wednesday, again achieved a timing 
surprise even though a reduction had 
been expected at some stage. Most 
analysts were looking for a cut next 
month, possibly preceded by interest 
rate moves elsewhere. 

The trigger came on Tuesday in the 
form of the revised second-quarter 
gross national product figures, show- 
ing an annualized rise of 0.6 per cent. 
They coincided with the Federal Open 
Market Committee meeting, so the 
prompt rate cut looks logical enough, 
although if every change in file 
discount rate were so limed it would 
be a dull world. 

So what happens next? The 
comparative lack of reaction to the 
discount rate cut in the foreign 
exchange markets, with the dollar 
somewhat weaker against yen and 
mark, but stronger against a pound 
affected by the gloomy projections of 
the National institute, suggests that, 
initially, the United States has failed. 

The strategy of US Treasury* Sec- 
retary* James Baker and Federal 
Reserve Board chairman Paul 
Volcker — to bump Japan and 
Germany into expansionary action — 


clearly requires, the co-opcration of - 
the foreign exchange markets. This is 
why, in order to work, changes in the- ’■ 
US discount rate need to do more’*' 
than take people by surprise on;’; 
timing. Exchange rates are not likely- ’ 
to move if the prospect of a cut some 
time has already been allowed for. 

To some operators, the latest drop 
in the discount rate, to a nine-year ' 
low, is the end of the story. The 
Ltaited States can increase the' verbal 
pressure for reductions elsewhere hut ‘ 
it has used up the weapons in iis own . 
interest rate armoury. *; 

This may not necessarily be so. . 
Because Wednesday’s rate cut came 
early, it could leave room for another *» 
reduction next month, as we approach 
both the first anniversary of the 
historic Plaza meeting of the Group of :- 
Five, and the annnual meetings of the 
International Monetary* Fund. 

Japan and Germany may be willing ’> 
to hold out against rate euis now. and 
argue in terms of such lactors as their 
own domestic monetary targets. But. : 
come next month — when finance '» 
ministers and central bankers are *' 
faced with a trip to Washington and *; 
face to face browbeating — the mood . 
may be rather different. 

And Britain? The stock market’s i 
early excitcmeni yesterdaj gave way 
to mild depression when" it became -; 
clear that the room for cuts in base 
rates, high as they arc. is limited by - 
continuing exchange rale weakness. 
The economy appears to be so ' 
becalmed that even a fair wind from - 
across the Atlantic is insufficient to 
get things moving. The best hope, here *■ 
too, is cheaper money in Germany * 
and Japan. 


TSB’s £ 12m City giveaway 

Lazard Brothers yesterday unveiled £25 million at normal rates for 100 per 
the long-awaited underwriting terms cent underwriting cover. 

They should give potential investors ?h* nS-rnL!'’, ’ 

cause for cynical reflection. It is no 5?5* ’ 

revelation that the City looks after * 

itself, but in this case the TSB appears ( accor ^ ,n B lo . l ^e Government! no - 
to be offering an entirely unnecessary ^ "® l . 

handout to financial institutions for JjWj million ' 

the sake of observing City traditions. 1?.^ * JS? 

Lazard has had to make the best of q u "jes about the offer, it is clear that 

the TSB board's insistence that the 1 ' 

issue must be underwritten. That has H * 

been whittled down to between 75 and “iJSiT ’ 

80 per cent of the issue being fully * n * mtx }\ - 

underwritten, (excluding the loyalty !” L?! 

bonus shares to be given later) while ’ 

the total commission has been cut to !!, vT,?IhLm2i i * 
1.175 per cent from the usual 2 per over themselves to get m on this one. - 

cent on issues of this size. It must look like money for nothing. . 

The total figure breaks down into On the other hand, one might 


been whittled down to between 75 and 
80 per cent of the issue being fully 
underwritten, (excluding the loyalty 


The total figure breaks down into 
0.3 per cent for the merchant bank reasonably ask. who cares? Again, 
underwriters — Lazard always ac- because no one owns the TSB. only in- 
cepted it would have to take a coming shareholders theorctically lose 
discount— while the stockbrokers will if a little money is spent on "some 
take 0.125 percent. The usual 1.25 per needless underwriting. And out of’ 
cent sub-underwriting commission £1.25 billion, a piffling £12 million is 
has been cut to 0.75 per cent. Lazard not likely to be begrudged. By 
calculates that in all, assuming the spending it the TSB may gain some 
issue is worth £1.25 billion, the useful friends in the City where 
underwriting costs will come out at mutual back-scratching is "the tra- 
less than £12 million, rather than the ditional way to do business. 

ctric plunges into Booker in 
sits final dividend £ f; 7in buy 

. Booker, the food disirihu- 

on Ils ,ion, a S ribusint *» and health 
construction acll\ itlCS. nroriumc nmim L,,. 

m DAVI ES & METCALFE: group. 15 bu>mg 

lividend 4.75 fl (same). Invest- Conditional agreement has been Stanlcj Middlcbrook (Mush- 
nent income 58.71 million ft reached for Betigische Stahl- rooms) for a maximum price 
£16-87 million), against 55J6 Industrie to subscribe for 1.01 of £6.7 million, 
nillion fl. million new ordinary shares ai Middlcbrook, based near 

iPARKOALE HOLDINGS: 12to each, or a total of £1.2S Selby, Yorkshire, is Britain’s 
. onuacts have been exchanged million. BSI already owns third lamest nrodueer i>f 
■rith British Land for the pur- 45X500 ordinaries and follow- muThro^li JSSafolti P 
hase of nine freehold shops in m B the subscription will own SSlSSSSSJic??!; ™ “ 

f ork. Nonh Yorkshire, for atwn 29.9 per cent of the million poundx a year 
1.96 million cash and for a enlarged voting ordinary cap- M iodic brook made pretax 
hop at I Peter Lane. York, with itaL A new five-year agreement profits in 19S5 ot £504.000 
acant possession, for £150.000 will give the company access to The purchase price is £5.2 
ash. Contracts will be cx- BSPs product range for the million cash, plus a deferred 
hanged soon for the purchase railway industry and. in return, pavmem of up 10 £ 1 .5 million 
f a further shop m X ork for BSI will promote Davies's prod- denendine cm nrofiic this v.-w 
135.000 cash. Target UK Cap- ucts in Europe. -M B P J 

h hnMc . crATTiCu i#-n. ami ne\L 


Rates npplM br Sclavs Bank HOFEX and EiteL 


AHed Lyons 

rsssi 


Cons Gold 
C474) 

Courtaufefa 

C2631 


Com Union 
1*302) 

Cable a Wire - 
f342) 


Oct Jm 

5 a 


12 123 125 12a 


90 102 120 
47 65 B5 

18 40 52 

74 S2 92 


TfxxnEU) 


Grand Mot 
f37B) 


Land Sac 
C324) 

Marta& Spar 

f2l0) 

Shea Trans 

r88S) 

Mouse' 

r285) 


Boo to uun 

f3B5) 


— — IX 

— — 4 

— — 8 
22 28 6 
12 18 18 
S — 38 

— — 15* 

— — 8 

50 57 — 

— — 18 


BfttAaro 

(*501) 

BATInds 

r4i5> 


Brit Telecom 
P8Z) 


— — ■) Cadbury Schwppa 


120 147 — 

75 107 127 
40 74 87 

20 42 80 


750 137 148 160 


87 103 12) 


UdDrofca 

C348) 


MidandBank 

r537) 


47 82 

22 37 

10 20 
21 28 
10 16 
6* 9 

19 23 

9 15 

3 8 

82 — 
53 — 

28 — 
56 68 
28 38 

13 18 

37 42 


^MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Rates fell smartly in busy 
first-boor trading yesterday 
following the US discosnt rale 
, cut Sterling certificates of 
deposit were paiticnbriy ac- 
tive, and trading was seen in 
the area of six months to 12 
1 months. Once the Bank of 
England indicated its oppo- 
, sltion to any immediate cut in 
British rates, the periods 
started to back op again. Day- 
to-day money stayed 
expensive. 

Ban Rates % 

Clatong Banfea 10 
finance House 10 

Discount Market Loem % 

OvBTTigfn Higft 11 Low 10 
WeekfaafcTO-g'fc 
Treasury BOs (Discocn %) 


Reporting a full-year loss. 

Dale Electric International. 

ba ^ C L?r ™ ey -; c N £ rlf | dividend 4.75 fl (same). Invest- 
Yoikshire, is halving us ftral mem incQme 58.71 milUon ft 
dividend to 1.5p. This cuts the (£16.87 million), against 55J6 
total payment for the 12 million fl. 
months to April 27 last from • PARED ALE HOLDINGS-. 
4 5p 10 3p. Contracts have been exchanged 

' Dale tumbled into a pretax B ™ sh **** f ° r ^ P» r - 
loss of £960.000, compared ^ 
with 1 1 prom of £544,000 last ^ ^ cS and Vor l 
ynie. T uroover edged up from sh0 p at 1 Peter Lane. York, with 
£36.1 million to £37.95 mil- vacant possession, for £150.000 
lion. There is a loss per share cash. Contracts will be cx- 
of 10. Ip. against earnings of changed soon for the purchase 
3. 1 7p. The board explains that of 0 &£her shop in York for 

£135.000 cash. Target UK Cap- 
ital Growth Fund now holds 
600.00C ) shares in ParkdsTt ,5.6 

JTpTul MICHAEL 

this year, pretax profit expanded , °* I6.5p a share by Cletes 

from £1.1 miUiiMto£13naSDa C rf!f d ‘of£’ 

on turnover np from £43.46 minim? i>r" 

miltioa (o £44.11 rnOlion. With Z ~ 

earnings per share np from « ,na ry shares (55 per cent). No 
1 SdDto ” I>D. the interim acceptances have been received 
ihldb^ BMftS and Cteves has not acquired. 
0.72p to 0J2pTTbe board is nor affeed to acquire, any shares 
confident a boot prospects for the 
rest of the year. 

the downturn occurred almost 
entirely in the generating set 
activities in the Dale Electric 
of Great Britain offshoot and 
in Thailand where there were 


2mrafi Wm 
S mithVii 


I 2 mnth 6*ia 
, 3 moth 91t 


1 rrmtti 9 r ’i»-91t 2 mnth 9'%.- 9/, 

3mnih 9 ,J af-9"w 6 mnth SX-9 'm 
T rade Bite (Discount %) 

1 mnih 1 CFi» 2 mnth 10*» 

3 mnth 10'u ' 6 mnth 9* 

Interbank (%) 

Owrnl^Jt: open 10b dose 13 
1 week 10V10* 6 mnth 9>>«-B>ia 

imntti 10-9 l5 (f Siteti 
3mn0i 9fc-8"i* I2mft 


l -oc tri Aut h ority Itepoaite ffc) 

2days 954 7 (Jays & 

1 mnth 9% 3 mirth 9)4 

6 moth 9 s i» 12imh 9 >m 

Local Atehorffir Bonds (%} 

1 mum 1054-10 2 mnth 10K-8K 


Mar Seo Dec Iter 


360 

42 

52- 

63 

390 

22 

35 

43 

420 

9 

23 

30 

460 

2 

10 

SO 

200 

17 

29 

38 

220 

93 

18 

24 

240 

4 

11 

16 

280 

19 

32 

42 

300 

7 

20 

33 


vaal fleets 
(■BO) 


18 28 K 
3 17 20 

1 B 13 
105 112 122 
55 67 80 

10 43 55 

IX 23 30 

10SA 13 16% 


100 100 

2 5 

B 14 


1 mnlh 1054-10 
3 mnth 10V954 
emrth 104K 


6 mnth HW* 

IZmth 9VVflSi 


1 mnth 3 mnth 9 >, i*G a n 

6 mnth 914-844 72mth 9'ir9»M 


Dale Electric plunges into 
loss and cuts final dividend 


COMPANY NEWS 


and to concentrate on iis 
construction activities. 

• DAVIES & METCALFE: 
Conditional agreement has been 
reached for Bergische Stahl- 
Industric to subscribe for 1.01 
million new ordinary shares ai 
l-6p each, or a total of £1.2S 
million. BSI already owns 
452.500 ordinaries and follow- 
ing the subscription will own 
about 29.9 per cent of the 
enlarged voting ordinary' cap- 
ital A new five-vear agreement 
will give the company access io 
BSP s product range for the 
railway industry and. in reium. 
BSI will promote Davies's prod- 
ucts in Europe. 

• SCOTTISH AGRI- 
CULTURAL INDUSTRIES: 
First half of 1986. Interim 
dividend 4p (6.5p). Sales £49.8 
million (£51.8 million). Pretax 
loss on ordinary activities £1.4 
million (profit £800.000). Loss 
per share 9.4p (earnings 14.2p). 
With with no early improve- 
ment predicted for SAPs fertil- 
izer business, the year will bp a 
difficult one. the board says. 

• LIBERTY LIFE ASSOCT- 


Lvuuuvui a wm )Hva)>iuo nn me m 

rest of tbe year. offcr - 

• INDIA FUND: Up to 75 per 

the downturn occurred almost of the shares rawed have 
Mtintiu In i)w» ftArtAratina «p 4 been allotted to applicants 

applying through selected deal- 
acuvities ui the Dale Electnc ers. brokers and banks or MemU 
of Great Bmain offshoot and Lyn ch Internaiional. The 
in Thailand where there were remainder have been allotted as 
total losses of £1.61 million, of follows: number applied for, 
which half related to bad debts 1,000 to 1 9.500- allotment. 100 


since the announcement of ATION OF AFRICA: Half-jtar 


Doiar COtW 

1 ninth 5S5-590 
6mrth SS0-5.85 


3 mnth 5^4-5.79 
12imh 530-5.65 


Blue arete 
(*556) 

f625 


20 100 100 100 


90 100 115 
55 75 SS 
30 48 60 
15 27 40 


60 90 120 
1 3 5 


75 115 — 

45 80 115 
25 60 90 
10 40 65 


28 34 

9fr ITS 
3* 10 


65 110 120 130 


3 SS 
7K 12 


Tr11%%1991 

(-E709) 

Tr11«% 03/07 
P£120) 


FT^g 1525 
tortax 1550 
n608) 1575 
1600 
1825 
1650 
1675 


7% IQS 2% 6 3X 

3 — 10S 12* — 


Maw Mar Aug 

22 31 2 

14 — 13 

8 — 31 
— 9 — 

4 — 50 


2* ■» IS IS 
1*1' IK 2S » 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days &-5»« 
3mmh MS 


7 days 4S^S 
3 mnth 4 1 w4*u 
French Franc 
7 days 7S-714 
3 mnth 7S-7S 
I Stos* Franc 
7 iteys 10S-10 
1 Gmnffi 4», 9-<*i8 
Yen 

i 7 days 5 , ib- 5 , » 
3nwh 4S-4S 


cafl B»-5« 

1 mnBi 8-57. 

6 mnth 55% 
cafl 54 

1 mnrti 4 ?is-4Si 9 
6 mnth 4 , i*4*i« 
cafl 7S5X 

1 mnth 7S-7X 
6 mnth 7V7X 
o» 2rtr-1S 

1 imm 4%-iV. 

6 mnth 4^»4 *ib 
cafl 5X-4K 

Imnth 54S 
firrmth 4”iB-4»t, 


(in both areas) and to foreign 
exchange losses in Thailand. 

Big efforts are in hand to 
control working capital 
requirements. The problems 
of Dale Electric GB and 
Thailand apart the mne other 
group companies increased 
their profits. The group is 
tackling its loss areas energeti- 
cally and the medium and 
long-term view is positive. 

Dale Electric GB showed a 


per cent; 20.000 to 99.500 — 90 Thomas Robinson Group, which 
per cent: 100.000 to 199.500 — is based m Rochdale. Lan- 
70 per cent: 200.000 io 499.500 cash ire, jumped from £136,000 
— 50 per cent: 500.000 to to £1SS million la the first half 
999.MJ0 — 40 per cent: over l of this year. There Is a tax 
million — 25 per cent. charge of £40(h000 (nil last 

• COMMERCIAL BANK OF timelandratioiialication costs of 
WALES: The recommended £2 million (nil). The integration 
offer made by the Bank of and rationalization of the recent 
Scotland is now unconditional acquisitions is progressing weG 


to June 30. Interim dividend 
150 cents (125 cents). Net 
premium income R430.9 mil- 
lion (£110.9 million), against 
R338.1 million. Net taxed sur- 
plus R35.6 million (R26.4 mil- 

On turnover more than doubled, 
from £8.66 million to £1835 
million, pretax profits of the 
Thomas Robinson Group, which 
is based m Rochdale, Lan- 
cashire. jumped from £136,000 
to £1.55 million In the first half 
of this year. There is a tax 
charge of £40(h000 (nil last 
time) and rationalization costs of 
£2 million (nil). The integration 


in all respects. The offer and 
loan-note alternative have now- 
dosed: acceptances have been 
received for 19.12 million or- 
dinary shares (79.68 per cent). 


and prospects for the remainder 
of the current year are encourag- 
ing. Robinson is an engineer and 
machine maker. 


profit for the first quarter Of including acceptances not com' 
the current year, a momentum pleie in all respects. 


■w I'm 2K 


’» Z><» 354 2% 4% 


tea Srart Oct Nov 

68 112 130 147 
63 00 110 125 
40 70 85 107 


Sept Oa Nov 


August 21. 1388. Total contracts 29021 . Cats 19104. PateOl7. *0a0erty»8 security pneo. 


GoteS382.7S383.S0 
KiugerrantT (par coin): 
Sm75^a3S(E254.7S255.7S) 
So w aap'tnewt 
S 91 J5E50IE81.0M1 .75 ) 
■Exctoctes VAT 


Fncsd Rate Sterling Export Fl runes 
Scfwne IV Avaraga raferarea rate (or 
imerasi parted July 7, 1986 to 
August 5. 1986 feiduswa: 10.008 per 
cere. 


which the board believes can 
be maintained for the full 
year. The Thai operation is 
now trading positively. 

• DEWEY WARREN HOLD- 
INGS: Hair-year to June 30. Net 
brokerage income £1.32 million 
{£1.56 million). Pretax profit 
£269.000 (£799.000). Earnings 
per share I.3p (10. Ip). The 
board gives a warning that the 
full-year pretax profit on or- 
dinary' activities will be less than 
for ihe first six months. 

• WERELDHAVE: Six 

months io June 30. Interim 


lion). Net taxed surplus per 

%r share 203.2 cents (170 cents). 

• J JARVIS & SONS: Year to The board expects the net taxed 
March 31. Total dividend 10p surplus per share and ordinary 
<I7.5pL Turnover £26.S4md- dividends for 1986 to show a 
lion (£18.26 million). Pretax -satisfactory increase" over 
profit £55.000 (£706.000 loss). |Q S5 . 

Earnings per share lO.lp (59.5p 

loss). Improved financial eon- o BASF: Half-vear to June 30. 
trols have been implemented. Pretax profit DM1.391 million 
The board savs that there is an (£451.17 million), against 
encouraging level of building DM1,719 million. World nei 
activity. Following the losses sales DM22.727 million 
incurred Iasi year, there have (DM24.01 1 million). Given a 
been a number of board stabilization of ihe oil and 
changes. The company has been foreign exchange markets, 
seeking to sell a number of BASF expects business to de- 
developments and investments velop well in the second half. 


“satisfactory increase" over 
|9S5. 

• BASF: Half-year to June 30. 
Pretax profit DM 1.391 million 
(£451.17 million), against 
DM1,719 million. World nei 
sales DM22.727 million 
lDM24.0l | million). Given a , 
stabilization of ihe oil and 
foreign exchange markets. 
BASF expects business to de - 1 
velop well in the second half. 


THE “SHELL” TRANSPORT 
AND TRADING COMPANY 
PLC 

NOTICE IS HEREBY given Ital a 
balance ot the Register wd be 
struck on Wednesday. 3rd Sep 
(ember, 1986 tor Ihe preparation 
ol (he halt-yearly (tender'd pay- 
able on the FWST PREFERENCE 
SHARES for the su months ■ 
ending 30th September, 1386 
The dnndend will be paid on 1st 
October. 1986 

For Transferees to leeewc this 
dividend, then transfers musl be 
lodged with the Company’s 
Registrar. Lloyds Bank Pic. Regis- 
trar's Department. Gormgby 
Sea, Worthing, Sussex, not later 
than 3.00 p.m o ft Wednesday. 
3rd September. 1986 

By Order of the Board 
DM Chesteman 
Company Secretary 

Shell Centre 
London SE1 7NA 

22nd August, 1988 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABM 10.00* 

Adam & Company _...10.00 # » 

BCCL lO.OQ'a 

Citibank Sawnst 10.75% 

Consolidated Cn±s 10.00^ 

Continental Trust- 10.03% 

Co-operative Bank.... 1000 % 

C. Hoare & Co..- 10.00% 

Hong Kong & Shangha 10.00% , 

U-Oyds Bank 10.00% 

Mat Westminsler lOOfa 

Royal Bank of Scotland ...... 10.00 p i 

TSB iom 

ttilan* NA lo.oor, 

t Mongage Base Rate. 


V 







busine; 


the TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


i - 


Bd CHtfl» Omg VW 


Bd CHWr Qmg YW 


Bd Oflar On; YM 


Bd Odor Ong YU 


80. HOUMMSTBa BO 
03*6 717373 fljnttno) 


Ga^nnU 1184 

Kgnjnc Busty 3UI 

WWW— on Bwu 19*4 

Amman Granin 1530 

A*h PboOc *90 

AttMa a Elms 107 


Comm A Enargy 


Buricaan Capnd 993 


Grata* 

JBsmn 

UK-Grewth he 
On Accum 
USfmmng C 


Co'S 354 
■M 101.7 


+10 958 

•as 501 

+03 *67 
-as 152 
*0.1 303 
-M 2.18 

.. 152 
-OS 2.18 : 
+10 100 
-05 20* , 
+17 I 
-ai 2.17 
-02 151 
-OB 058 1 
-05 MS! 
+0.1 205 


Fhancbi Sea 
OoU t Gen 
rm Ledum 
Prog Snares 
IMv Enragy 


ALUJDDIMMR UNIT TRUSTS 
AMd CHmir Cm Swindon Sid 1EL 
0793 610386 S 0793 25291 
Rrer'Truh 2212 2960* -G2 

Granin t ham 1315 1432 -013 

GOMU Trust 2312 2402 -05 

Bdancad 33*7 377.7 -12 

Aeewn Trust 550 S 5862 -12 


tuner SmTOv Go’s 
Aura Grow* 

EuroSmaUr 

Far EMt 
Hong Kong M 
M Grown 
JQB W.. 
Jtoen SflOler 
Exempt 

Exempt Manat 


1912 20*5 
T80 192» 
1175 1255 
47* E05 
II* 185 
185 17.7 
655 712 
4SJ) *60* 
412 *8Sd 
972 1037 

36.7 825 

22.7 2 42 
6*6 860 
182 172 
535 5T4d 
281 2BO« 
375 *0.1 
835 89.1 
185 >70 
82 3 882 
647 87.7 


-12 4.78 
+0.11058 
-00 277 
.. 203 
.. £57 
.. 051 
•0.1 153 
-02 15* 
.. 056 
•05 32* 
.. 621* 
-02 020 
•25 1.79 
+0.1 020 
.. 076 
.. 247 
+42 147 


Mgh income That 755 60S -Ol 856 < 
(at & fixed tat 535 560B +05 665 


7H 01 few TfU8» 607 sue +02 108 

Special Ska That 7*5 792 412 £*) 

Nth Amer Trust 595 60S -05 108 

Far Exsram That 855 91 4» +03 05* 

MOmdi 515 5*5 -Ol 153 


EQUITY 0 LAW 

SL Geerge Ml Cor p oration St Country CV1 


TBO 

0203 553231 

UK Grain Aeon H75 15&6 
Do ham 1272 1380 


GdtThat 
fit vhoera me 


mwIncMan 2*45 290* 
Do ham 197.1 2086 


GdtB/Rmd A cam 1022 1075 


God -Secs Trust 


BROWN BMPLEY 
517. pwnnoothi 
0*4*43814* 
Honu 

Smetar Go's Act 
DO ham 
Hgh ham 


NpiAmerTWAavn 1335 WOO 
Far EM Tit law 1847 1752 
Ein Tst Acam 1609 171.1 
Gmraf That 2365 2515 


-03 3*6 
-05 046 
+02 *66 
+02 426 
+02 283 
+00 223 
-08 0*2 
+42 037 
+22 1.02 
-08 355 


Tamm Bar Sinara 1712 1*2 
Tarawa Bar USM 3SU 56*2 


U Hayednta H*e#i 


Mm PortfOiO he 
Do Aec 

Non Amman 
om 


13*5 1332* 
227.7 2*42 
1462 1575 
6S2 70S 
787 812 
604 642# 
1012 Ki&&® 
509 835 
882 9*2 


-05 028 
+0.1 571 
+02 *84 
+4.1 3.10 
+02 .. 
-Ol 123 
-04 022 


FACUMT MANAGEMENT 
1. Laurence +>aifl*y ho, London i 
01223 4680 . 

l?S Dindfr Co'a 712 785 

Capua Fima 1073 11*7 

Inam Paid 79.1 8*2 

Far Eesturo Fund 79.1 6*7 

OvraMc taecne 727 772 

Rod iraa r aat SOI 82 2 

Natural Res Fknd 372 *06 

Eraegaan ham 812 872 


-02 027 
+05 05P 
•Ol 468 
+04 051 
-02.356 
-12 800 
-03 *26 
+Ot 004 


JOT Raw 1252 

PxcUsc Tn* 1677 

Anar Sod Ses BS2 

Secs OIAiiw Tat 2181 


BUCtCHASTER MANAGEMENT^ 

The Sock Batoanga Londoi BSP ZJT 
01-588 268 


oat Grann 36* 

SrnsBgr Co'S >205 

2nd SoaBsr Ctf# 163.* 

Racovm Trust 81.1 

MraMnACnoy 795 

0- utt Earmngs 1815 

EmwSinWhrCo's 2300 

USA ExMipt That 34*5 
AftBunwor eecunmes 
I3t. Rreoury town** London EC2A 1AY 

01- 028 9876 01-280 BS40/1/2/3 

Cant* Growth tac 585 625 -02 128 

DO Acam 853 880 -02 127 

Eaaaen 6 htf 1*72 1574 -a* 076 

Do EN WWntrsm 789 6*2 -0.3 0.76 

Fhence 6 Property 6*9 69+ *ai 2.15 

ait 8 Rued Income 482 50.7* -02 62* 

Da Accum 812 062* -03 821 

Eairty ham 732 789* +0.1 *26 

Da Accum 17*2 187 M +02 *27 

Hlen YMt maxim 737 782 ..720 

Do Accura 1932 206.6 -lit 720 

tad hewna 79.7 M2 +06 2.19 

Do Acorn 609 685 +07 2.17 

Do B% wundnd 73.1 701 +06 2.17 

Manaosd Fiaxt B34 862 +02 ... 

Prafaram hewne 29.7 317 .. 980 

On Accum 98.0 1022 +0.1 9.80 

Smaoer Co's Accum 127.7 1365 +03 its 

WWW Penny Share 82 102© -Ol 072 

PwdDto Tst UX TOO BOM -0.1 158 

Poitkao Tst jsoen 1102 ii«5h +oa ood 

Pomote Tst US 895 724* -02 129 

Pon t jao Tst Euope 1172 121.1* +07 020 
PwttoSo Tst HK *25 445* -04 010 


Genera he (fl 
Do Acasn I* 
MlfMC 
Do Acasn S 
MMO 
Da Acesn (2 
Srasaer he W 
- Do Acasn (5 


2095 2207 
335.1 3622 
1D1J 107.1 
1782 1872 
1302 1362* 
17*0 1812 
El 122 1123 
21128 1271 


.. 118 
.. 118 
+22 *54 
+4.1 45* 
.. 123 
.. 123 
.. 2.79 
.. 279 


160. West Qaarp* St Btagow 02 SPA 

IM1-332 3132 


0377-817238 
Special Oh he 
Dp ARum 
fWaxray That 
Cum Growth he 
Do Accum 


CSHM) MANAGERS 


IS. High Hohean, London WCTV 8PY 

01247 114a 


01-2*211*8 

CS Japan Fund 


CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
i- Otympc Way. wrartMay. HAS ONB 


Far Em 
norm Amencan 
Global 
Eunpean 


2765 29*2* -02 329 
3225 343M +0.1 321 
217 7 2315 +12 029 

1515 1615 -IS 057 
*02 525* +0.1 ISO 
509 5*5 +02 150 

612 855 +02 050 , 


DOanend Q8i he 432 482 

Do Aeon 445 <7.1 

ham ante *05 *Z 2 

Do ACCum 422 +49 

Samoa Co's+nc 401 615 

Oo Acorn 407 512 

HDELirrMIESNAIKMAL 
Rlvar WMl T ancridpa. TW9 IDT 
0732 382222 

American 10*5 1122 

Amor Equity hwm 322 35.1* 
AIM Specai au *92 532 

FO- EM Inc 352 377 

Graft Aral feu 315 322 

Growth* heome 952 1025 

Jaw speda ate *85 sis 

Jnpvn Trust 161.1 1825 

Itanagad ht TB 1*72 1584 

Has fern Equity 782 352 
Protetsttna (3i 322 35- le 

South EM AM TB 31.1 33.1 
£towcta EM 1822 1747 


Fhmaa That 
tooomeAOrasSilDC 
Do Accrsn 
H gh hcwne Trust 
Extra mam 
ArarCteDh - 

Ref ■ GBt 
OH Trust 

Fboed kitsm: That 


raced mi 
G ee 


1 


PO Bos 551 Baris Mato London ECS 7JQ 
01-821 am 


nnnn 

279.6 299.1 

267.7 3072 


North Anancen 267.7 3072 -35 028 

CATER ALLEN 

1. Khg Win a EGAN 7AU 
01 423 6314 

cat Trotf 1025 109.6a +021022 


OOgs^^q. London EC3A SAN 

American Exaavt 135*2 3812 
Japan Eaanwt £«2X2 *362 
Am ncpwiy TB SI 07895 ri 

P rop si ty Trust 730320 


Cisopaan 
Eiso CTwiair 0 m 
J apan Thai 
Japan Spec*! Sto 
PMBcSrraSrCo* 
Sng*m 8 Malay 
North Amarion 
Amer Smnasr Coa 
Amor H aw ty TB 
KB0h hcwne Exempt 
SmsMCae Exempt 
Eva Ewmpt 
Jspai Baaptn 
N Amsr 

GtatMl Tech Ex Bl 


3. Gtenflntas SL E 
031-225 2981 (Da 
M Ex 1221 

P'M Pam he 
PmI Pm UK 
BG Aruanca 
BG Energy 
BG hcwne Gmti 


I Bt3 0YY 
-226 6066) 

4828* 

i ms 

i 2537 

I 4712 

i sms 

I 179.1 
I 1335 + 
i 20*9 + 


CENTRAL BOARD OP FWANCE OP 

CHURCH OF ENGLAM) 

Z Fwu Street London ES2Y 5AO ' 
01-588 1815 

knr Fund 3972 

ROM W 14*4 

EMpodl 1015 


BG Technology 


CHAHm E8 P FH CtAL BWESIMSHTF 
2. FWa Street London K2Y 5AO 
01-588 1815 

heome 38*14 

acosp 8102781 

Deposit 1005 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

29/26 ARjaraerlB StreeL London W1X*A0 

01-491 0295 


485 902 
Auatraean 17.4 188 

Japan A General 1207 ia«s 

t+qti Income **B *7.7 

trarrwuna Trust 79.7 B52« 

hcwne G» Tb *52 482* 

GAB A Fixed ht 20* sis 

Gtood UsrtOB 335 353 

Specai ficuenons 362 412 

BARCLAYS IMCCRN 
Unewn Houes. 2S2. RoraM Rd E7 
01-534 55*4 


1202 mum +04 o.i7 


4*8 *7.7 ..653 
79.7 BS30I +0.1 155 
*52 482* .. 339 


CLBUCAL MEDICAL 1 
HAHAGER3 
Non wr PMu -BrlBal 
0800 373398 
Amer Growth 
Eotsrr Tift ham 
E u rop ea n Growth 
General EqUCy 
Gat & Fixed ht Gth 
on A Fixed he 


229 2*4 
41.7 4*4 
294 315 
382 40.6* 
302 312B 
S3, A 262 
25.4 262 
380 384 


-O T ISO 
.. *70 
+04 250 

-at 250 

+02 320 
+07 920 
-at 250 
+81 090 


ntAMLMOTON UMT MMUQBMEMT 
8 London Ml BMa. London Ws 
EC2M 51*0 
01-628 5181 

Amer 6 Gen lac 2204 »**• 

DDAscwn 2252 2394* 

Amer Tumtrnd he 20B5 22 X 2 . 

Do ACCUM 216-0 2295 

Capita Tst he 2088 2215 

DoAcetsn 2508 2063 

Com 6 GH he 87 A SZ5a 

Do Accum 1182 1238 

Extra he TB he 1388 7085* 

DO Acasn 1718 1825* 

ham That 11*2 1214 

Do Accum 1202 1278 

hi Growth Fd ho 16*4 17*5 

Do Accum me 19*2 

Japan A Gen he 9*0 loao 

DO Acasn 965 101-1!! 

Monda y ham Fd 815 882* 

Hecmwy 133.S 1410. 

Do Acasn MA4 13*8« 

Ewopaan he B22 68 J1 

•• DoAaan - 822 865 
FriEMDSPnOVIOBrr MANAGERS 
PWjmEnA DwWng, Bunsy 
0808 8SS035 


-22 048 
-23 048 
-2.1 1.15 
-15 1.15 
+04 155 
+04 156 
+04 538 
+08 558 


NLA Tower. AOWKWnba (had. CKjdon 
01-686 4386 01-828 8011 



5325 5694 -12 

«! 10*3* -02 
1B&3 2004 -17 

137.1 1*&M +14 

1282 1375 +15 

383.1 3883 +05 

294 306* +52 
445 480 +03 

628 655 -02 

814 858 -08 

12XT 13UM +55 
354 37.7* +04 
304 32.4 -55 

18*J) 1(H8 -05 

B9.4 952 +0.1 

025 B75C -Ol 


America 
Aust Acasn 
Ds hcwn e 


Exempt Trust 
Extra Income 


500 

General 

G* A Fixed me 
Japan 6 CM he 
Do Acc 
Growth Acasn 
hcotn* that 
Lotas* Trust 


HaXNriry 

Trustee Bund 


Un* Tech Acasn 522 S3& 
Do ham G1.7 6&5 

WOrtdMde Trod 153-3 1885 
■V Tst few Fund ACC 3217 3*22 
Do he 2084 2215 


882 917 -09 1-38 

122.7 1305 -11 154 

87.1 92.6 -35 15* 

684 727W .. 107 

*234 *504 -15 *01 

742 785 -0.1 5l38 

2292 2435 +07 3.10 

2820 278.7* +04 316 
1372 1*39 -0.1 316 

544 572* +04 856 

182.7 1043 +2-8 045 

1B45 1988 +25 80S 

1788 1895 .. 258 

ma 3*98a .. 378 

792 842 -04 141 

1395 1485 +02 254 

1900 2021 -04 244 

1055 1117 +0.1 293 

522 5564 -02020 

81.7 630« -0.1 020 
1S85 1B3DG +0.1 057 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
161. Chesnridn. London EC2V 6EU 
01-728 1999 

Energy Trust 454 482W 

Extra nam 1614 171.7G 

187 6 1762* 
685 562 


FP Fboed ht DIB 
Do Aaron 
SnmrosWp Ost 
Do Accum 


1985 £075 
3085 3485 
1151 1224 
1314 1395 
1714 1611 
177.1 I860 


RR PIM) MAHA&BIS 

32 Oussn Annex Gate. Lwxhn SW1K SAB 
01-222 1000 

UEU Brit A trsaes 13*8 1*35 +02 170 

IB1 he PhB 565 695 . . 970 

181 Cepsa Growth 55.0 588 .. 240 

HMSUara Tst Fnd 665 734 +05 3*0 


2tL Fenchurch SL London EG3 
01-623 8000 

Amer Growth he 6*2 880* -07 


Get Strategy 665 382 

Growth hHWmm 2800 297519 
heome • Growth 394 43.10 
Japanese 6 Padflc 2064 2197 
Net Amer GrowSi 1014 1005 
me Raceway 1095 11840 
Smaller Co s 2104 22*2* 

Gtabd Inc IB 575 814 
special au ACC 2775 2965 


+85 384 
-04 S48 
-14 256 
-. 153 
-05 264 


HJHDS IN COURT 

ass^sr «*"*»= 


fVi Aeon 

Fund CwTB Inc 
Do Aeon 


3485 3815 
1482 1*618 
2131 22020 


Mi Yield he 
Do Acasn 


BS4 m . 5 -07 

203 217 +0.1 

257 275 +02 

125.4 1335 +14 , 

2088 2224 - +15 


+88 082 
-05 1.14 
-05 188 
-24 157 
-0.1 522 
-07 LBO 


aruMTHAMUom 


Bth Floor. 8 Devarnttre 8a London EC2M *yj 
01-283 2575 Oestog 01-826 9431 


UK Cep Fnd he 
Do Acasn 


cnomi unit trust smncES 
Crown Horn* Woking GU21 IXW 
04802 5033 


DO Accum 
ham Flsxj 
Pension Btanpt 


HWi ham Trust 2385 255 2 
Growth That 2187 23150 
American That 1283 1372 


US S Genoa 585 625 OSO 

Tech A Growth 632 67.7 -05 120 

AHO A Generar W 4 3008 +44 0.10 

Per Em 8 Gan 1272 1381 +20 040 

Bmpean Fund 2805 2787 +35 020 , 

Gammy Fund 715 785 +15 050 

OAmNOME FUM9 MAHMBU 
8 St Mary Axe. LatxMn EC3A 8BP 
01+33 1212 DeeBag 01-888 5788 Dating 01-823 . 

American Traat 884 fl&l -44 040 

Atonian Trust 178 mn -U9 OM 

Brtddi TB Acasn 587 8140 +04 158 

DO D« *62 S3JIO +02 128 

ConxnwHy Shan 537 874 -03 147 

Bsupaen Than 634 572 +07 051 

Brae ham That *83 515 +02 5.17 

Fhr Eastern TUB 150.1 1605 +15 040 

FUted htweet Raid 282 2810 . . 972 

Git Trust 274 286 +0.1 622 

Global Raid Acasn 1832 19*9 +05 0.19 

Do Ost ■ 1745 11157 *05 819 

OoU Shan That 124 128 -02 2-17 

Hedged American 315 333 +05 810 

High ham That 1387 1*08* +05 579 

Han Kang Trod 283 302 -02 1.10 

heome F*d 737 7800 -81 328 
hannee Aganctai ENL98 5044 +803 249 
Japan tub 1637 17*1 +14 800 

Managed Exempt 27*2 2857 +15 240 

OaiBrergy Trod 322 3*5 -81 178 

SpaiwdSUThjB 937 1084 +83 078 

UK SmtrCa RecTB 71.1 782 .. 153 


01-626 9431 

987 10350 .. 800 I 

1395 1*94 -81 340, 

795 852 .. 808 

1807 19950 +48 150 
1735 1854 +1J 090 


M Recovery he 1034 1107 +05 151 

Da Acasn 1092 1165 +05 .. 

Japan Growth he 1092 1154 +35 050 

Do Acasn 1088 1152 +35 .. 

Smdtar cere me 101 Jt 1714 +07 2 i« 

Do Accam 2112 2235 +08 .. 

UK ED Growth Inc 285 3020 +04 073 
DoAccom <74 *»8 *05 .. 

WMdmfe Tech he 394 4250 +06 141 
Do Acasn 387 *2.io> +04 .. 

LA CUNTT TRUST MANAGEMStr 


-08 040 
-04 120 
+44 810 
+24 040 
+35 050 
+15 050 


CRUSADER IMT TRUST MANAGER! LTD 


BAHW3 FUND MANAGERS 

PO Box 158, Bedtartoin. Kent BR3 > 

01-858 9002 


Hdgxtti. Sisray RH2 8BL 

07S&2 42*2* 

UK hcwne 495 525 . . *47 

UK Growth Accum 486 518 -0.1 243 

DeDHt *86 518 -81 243 

European Grown 5*5 881 +05 153 

P**ic Growth 388 885 +05 .. 


Auarsta 

Exaam 
Er*sty h a m 
Etsnpe 
Growth A he 
Jxpu speaa 
Japan sunraa 
First 'Europe 
F+st Japan 
first N Amor 
Brat Shtata Co * 


51.1 633 
580 824 
vti) 680 

1285 1385 
817 585R 
1087 1184 
9*2 1087 
1125 1194 
934 100.4 
*87 53.1* 
62.7 874 


-12 020 
-12 050 
-0.1 550 
+14 090 
-0.1 250 
+04 050 
+1.4 050 
+08 080 
*08 030 
-85 150 , 
+81 270 I 


EFM UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
* MahEa Crescent, Edntwgb 
031-228 3*32 
American Fund 785 788 . 

Cental Fund 9*7 1087 

Growth 6 he Fisid 1265 1552* 


BA flfl MGTON MANAGEMENT 
18 r anc hmen SL London ECS 
01-623 8000 


Hgn Del Fund 1074 1144 
I nU Hn aP a nal Fund 1972' 2114 
Reawscea Fund 222 238 
So* Jap Col Rid 372 394 
Tokyo Fund 1874 2005 


-81 2.16 
+04 189 
.443 
+02 680 
+85 147 
-82 042 
-81 .. 


Phoned h* 

Eraopom he 
Do Acasn 
Gaunt me 
(X) Accum 
GatYiMd he 
Do Accura 


Fkgn Yield he 
Do Acasn 
Joan ham 

Do Acasn 

N Amman Inc 
_ Do Acasn 


Do Acasn 
Sorir Co's he 
thl Acasn 


1510 1384 
9*4 994 
1164 1218 
1562 1882* 
2111 2285 
1111 1188 
1818 1912c 
082 914 
1717 182.7 
9862 2802 
2881 2822 
*95 624 
572 607 
1584 1*54 
>584 10*4 
794 011 
9*7 1008 


.. 348 
+86 155 
+04 155 
-04 340 
-04 340 
+ 1.1 852 
+1.7 952 
.. 552 
-81 152 
+04 022 
+04 032 
-04 057 
-07 057 
+04 020 
+14 029 
.. 1.71 
.. 1.71 


(ExjAmerfl 
(Ex) Japan (5> 1162 120.1 .. 818 

(Ex) Paata (U 2337 3032 ...023 

Ex) SnMar Jap (4) 2164 2251 .. 810 

Brand £7.1 Ml +81 340 j 

EADLE STAR IBET TRUST MANAGERS 
Bath Road, Cnahenhwn, OhucesMr 0153 7LQ : 
0242 521311 j 

UK Betaicad he 865 724 -81 257 

DO Accum 604 74.0 - ai 243 

UK Grom Acasn 024 883 -m 1.73 

UK Hjpi Me he 642 885 -02 815 

N American Acasn 962 707* -02 140 

For Easton Acasn 1074 11*8* +15 0.00 
Eunpesn Acasn 814 074* *89 877 . 

UK Get 0 n he 5*4 664 +ai 623 

Do Acasn 584 802 +81 749 


1974 2004 +54 0.00 
1502 1552 +24 853 


Phew House. Copdixl Axe. EQR 7BE 
01-588 2800 


01-588 2000 

tarot Fund 4292 *381* 
hosneax ia 6 Gen 2*84 2515 


LEGAL! QBtERALUNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 


5 ReyMtah Rae8 D rentw wxl Essex 
0277 


Ew*y D td rib u HWi £714 2383 
Da Acasn *2*5 *534 


-02 1.47 
+87 831 
+82 117 
+14 800 
.. 972 
+81 822 
+05 819 
*05 819 
-02 2-17 
*02 810 


Do Acasn 
Do h am 
Cane sen 
Far BMem 
GO TTOd 
M Managad 
Nans* Res 

N Amen can Tbrat 

UK SpadMStt 


*2*5 4514 
597 635* 
7*0 711* 
1215 1294 
797 M2 
027 805 
532 564 
772 127* 
930 674 


-12 224 
-14 224 
-02 *91 
*09 1197 
*14 027 
+88 848 
*85 122 
-86 149 
-05 141 
-02 158 


LLOYDS SANK UMTTRUSrMAIMflERS 
Repsnra Dpt Gwhg-By-Sae. Wontaog. W 

Suscsn 


0*44 *591*4 
Boned 
Dp Accum 
ErWOTk* 

Do Acasn 
Extra ham 
Do Acasn 
German Get ho 
Do Acasn 


1602 1927 -02 3.17 

3204 343.1 -08 217 

585 5*0* -02 258 
588 085* -02 228 
1638 1625 -14 523 


CSratrCiRKTB 71.1 782 


GOVETT {JOHN) UMT HAfMSEHBIT 
Mnchuter Mae, 77. London VIM, London BSM 
IDA 

01-689 5820 

tnd Grown 92.1 674 +14 147 

American Growth B37 675* -05 042 

American he 694 7*1 ^,02 3M 

European Growdi 2297 24*5 +44 82* 

Go* 6 Mhseh 854 38J3rn -87 179 . 

Jspai Growth 1684 1774* +17 .. 


Do Accum 
M TMi 
Do Acasn 


taxi Growth 
Do Acasn 
N Amer 6 Gen 
Do Acasn 


2764 2911 
704 717 
704 757 
2655 2827 
5225 3585 
1981 1894 
1944 2074 
91.1 974 
914 977 


-14 523 
-27 533 
♦14 04* 
+14 04* 
-LI *56 
-24*56 
+12 028 
+12 028 
+04 042 
+88 802 


1014 1089* -12 090 
110.1 1177* -12 0« 
1374 1*74 +12 006 


HVTAMNIA UMT TRUST 

7+.7H Fhsdunr Pavement London EC2A UD 

OMSB 2777 DMhxfOl-630 0(78/9 MoneyGuide* 

0800+J10-333 

Growth GO 594 905* .. 041 

hO Recovery 1032 1101 .. 249 

Smatar Co s 139.0 1*65* +81 121 

UK Mowlh 374 394 -82 SL1S 

B»* toe 644 565* -03 748 

GK 263 Sm ->«5 741 

he & Growth 1920 2019 -04 *23 


ENDURANCE FUND MANAOEMBtT LID 
Athih Centre. Hexagon Home. 29, Waetem 
Hoad. Homhra BMV3LB 
0709-98986 


ORE UMT MANAGERS 
npS.Bgang* EC8P 
01-688 9903 


Do Acasn 1*35 1534 

Semper Cos B Bee 1894 2025 
00 Acam 2114 2280 
W tSM w kh Growth 2073 2217 
Da Acasn 2912 3iU 

UK tonwn Fund 472 507 


+12 046 
+12 80S 
.. 149 
-. 149 
+14 079 
+14 879 
-81 142 


1187 1184 +25 802 


OR 6 Rxed M 
Growth Eqiriy 


EQUITABLE UMTS ADMNSTRATKM 

31 Fountain SL th n e hed ra 

061-236 5685 

Equable PaBcen 755 782 -81 323 


Suita Converter 
Ewdpeen Trust 


1232 1282c +04 888 
1980 2107 -04 242 

2788 2864* +84 248 
1884 1472 -14 129 

2*92 2655 +14 812 

2904 2764* +88 14* 
2125 2281 +02 179 

25*9 2712 +12 1JS 


LONDON A MANCMSTZR 
Mouth Park. Boar EXE IDS 
0392 52189 

Gmraat That 481 452 

taewns Trod 37.1 387 

hra mxn cnel TTOd 580 40.7 

AHMcan 334 35.1 

Japan *94 535i 

Trod of tav 280 31.1 


-02 340 
.. 670 
+02 860 
+02 240 


494 535* +89 140 
204 31.1 +81 240 


1986 

F*gn Low company 


Gross 
ON Yld 

Pr*» Ch 'ga pence * P/E 


1986 

HgB Low Confmnf 


«V Yld 

Mot CTt'pe pence % R/E 


HB Low Company 


_ ra Yld 
PBce Ch*ge prana * P/E 


15 9'.- A 6 M Gp 

60 *S ATA Saiacsrai 


AObayerest tZO 

Aberdeen Stk Hea 38 


108 32 Acom Comp *0 

275 103 As Can 215 

123 ms Ampring 106 

297-204 ARM 275 

152 152 Angaa Securitas 152 

121 100 Anita 100 

158 131 Apoloiroe 153 

250 - 215 App HotograpWCS 545 

250 106 Do vwms 205 

335 163 Aspen Comma 323 

IBS 131 Aspre* 136 

620.4*3 Atjorey SB 

so 16 assoc Energy 36 

333 168 ASO IM 

122 122 Adas Eoupmam 122 

95- 81 Automatic 00 

ra B DM Desun 70 


04 54 157 
21 34 11S 

84 88 17.1 
81 84 10.6 

.. ..34 

24 14 689 

7.7 7.1 . 
04 34 154 

2-3 14 21.1 


85 68 BTS Gro 

123 58 Beared mMim 
27'* 12 Benrxxi 6 FWs> 
S3 31 BanoneCriepe 
15'.- T>. Berkeley S Hay 
91 31 BeriweMy Exp 

230 139 Berkeley Op 
3D 14 BO uofekas 

M 10 awnocMncs 

43'r *V» BM 
135 89 BUhChanM 
220 165 Bxiabed Toy* 
144 130 Bortand 
27 19 Brew m ikwr 

210 95 Bnxal 

200 13S Brim 
130 75 tanama Sec 

250 IBS Br BtOOdStDCk 

59 50 Br HM 

358 970 BnMkmoin 
163 115 Brown (Charta) 
345 230 Bryant (Derakl 
9 2 '1 BiSa Reaouces 

32 73 CCA Gaeraiea 

1S3 i» CML Uero 
36 S’, CPS Camp 




4 4 14 339 

84 84 74 
1*4 24 194 
.. .. 87 

114 81 8.1 
74 17 11.1 

86 94 181 
14 ZO 166 
7.1 34 164 

5.7 87 9.1 

84 88 68 
08 24 264 

.. .. 114 

.. 210 
.. ' 44 
34 14 2*3 


80 38 Floyd Ol 44 

as 0S Ford A weuon 87 

220 146 French Com 165 

103 65 FraoKiBfcB 94 

665 420 BtarSmHi'A- 888 

14S 94 Gettacd 144 

ISO 93 GeaJCOd) 93 

47 30 Gee/Roeeri 40 

83 72 ab b on Lyons 70 

165 100 Gfcba Maw 150 

17 11 Gtoart Horae 19 

GO 32 GtaMGp *3 

106 as Godwin Wmw, 121 

1» SB GOaOMridPlW 120 

rn 98 Gould (Uunanto) 107 

91 30 GrxnylB BtxUca' 60 

125 118 Green (Emuot) 125 

38 19 Greamrich r^ba 32 

115 81*1 (Rosraare 0q SO 

*5? *27 1“ 

92 58 Hampden Homecare 71 


PtakBehGp 

PaU M Lraa 


210 133 Mnayl Tiara* i®> 

205 196 Fhvokxtk Europe 233 

48 28 HtxHh CM 41 

440 383^ Heevftree 440 

3S0 2S3'l DO 'A' LV 300 

145 143'i H anderaon An 145 
413 IBS t+OOPata 200 


200 m 

27 14 

3* 28'r 
118 24 
73 31 

125 86 
SO 25 
178 115 
283 115* 
245 90 

156 83 
143 110 
S*. 2 
5>< 2 


Partrara U 
Fareonal Computa 
Petare (Mfchaai) 


44 68 88 

13 34 1*2 
81 10 270 

.. • .. 25.6 
.. ..48 

47 3JI14S 
83b 24 657 
17 81 80 

*3 .. .. 

37 28178 


Pet rk 

sn£d 


28 98148 
.. .. 4.1 


PrmgTMiOp 


38 as 188 

IB 23 53 
44 28 109 

24 18 881 
54 08 128 

28 81 11.1 
86 38128 


Raft) cay -A- 

e»»c*to 


18 4+iaa 
64b 1* 188 
10 28 168 


t+OB-PaM 

fSTtata 


88 281*7 

- • ... 88 
48 88 158 
14 14 112 

18 6.7 88 
78 88148 


1.1 68 108 
10 68 78 


t j yd wra ra t 12 s 
Protection 125 


38 28 178 

48 37168 


2.1b 18187 
128 68 87 
*0 78 98 

5.0 18 178 
38 24 2Z0 
118 *0 104 


3* *6 1T.1 
26 18164 
14 2*3 3-0 



42 

27 

CPU Como 

27 



.. *3 


195 

130 

CVD 

169 




320 

Hh 

CMedoun Off 

9U 

+5 

28 



99 

62 

Camowdi 

bb 


*6132 


140 

m 


132 

+3 

3.6 

2.7 106 


asu 

213 

Central TV 

330 

+3 

170 




M 

Oonerav Sera 

106 

+1 

3.1 


I 

114 

63 


+1 

at 



126 

1» 

Chakra Man 

129 

+1 

74710 

— 

16 

7 

Cham MeJhoSa 

7 


ao 

*20 .. 


253 

120 

Cnnhlre W 

238 

-2 

52 

22 25.3 


17 

9 

Oto 

11 



.. 10 


*0 

31 


3* 

-1 




003 

5» 

OiyWKXT 7ft 

MO 






70 

Cvcrareii 

72 





16* 

IS 

Ctrta Hoapra 

164 


M 

M22J 

t. 

23? 11 
*0 26 
S3 67 

Cfemra Grtc 
duff 0* Hdn 
Carina Ehcfiadto 

20 

32 

92 

+* 

M 

&1 10.7 



53 

Cam Emma 




124 

111 

Cobra 

12* 


19 

3.1 136 

ra. 

106 

50 


50 



ITS 

110 

Camp Fnanara 

155 


ai 

20 265 


so 

30 


*8 



. . 00 


116 

74 

Cretin tarns 

104 

-2 

is 

1,7 aw 


60 

38 

Com Tom Ins 

40 


7.1817 6 26.6 

*■ 

343 

31)0 

Coro uuuwaro 

290 


57 



106 

65 

Cowtft* 

93 


37 


n 

143 

115 

CPU 

116 


25 



415 

JOK 


330 


7 4 

22 23 * 


TB 

50 

Cranbroak 

50 


67a 1.4 132 



96 

CreiLiw*fc 

106 


7,6 



138 

75 

Graton Loan* 

00 


20 



103 

63 

Own tod 

63 

« .. 

90 

65115 


9T 

75 

Cnros 

60 


10 

13 130 

- 

73 

43 

QBE Tsoi 

*6 




■ 

178 

11b 

DDT 

1W 


i.7 

1.1 116 


140 

79 

DJ 5ae Airam 

HQ 

m-7 

2.1 

20 £4 


91 

63 


66 


14 

£1 96 


216 

1ft5 

Bs»!os (DY) 

IM 

-f 

*A 

15 21.1 


83 

to 

Dun S Bowes 

62 


19 

*4 200 


29 

20 


25 


04 

1.6 143 


1*5 







97 

40 

□qtota 

*9 


29 

6.0 95 


138 

105 

Oenaxn 

138 

, , 

28 

£1 19.1 


115 

75 

Dsnatatt Bse 

75 


b4 

73 17 


160 

68 

Drawy Wanwi 

7b 

+3 

107 

14.1 5.1 

• 

226 

130 


155 


70 

33164 


*60 

3*5 

Droek 

*20 


56 

10 2&I 


24 

10- 


20 

ra'.v 

03 

15 154 


52 

38 

Eartia 

44 

+1 

U 




HQ 

Eatng Beat Open 

130 


XI 

2* 226 


ai 

9 


29 

•2 

04 



32S 246 

Edhtond 

3*5 


94 

331*3 


43 

3? 

Eon Secs 

29 



.. 623 


379 

24* 

aonogr Peon A' 

37* 


90 



1*6 

IIS 


118 

-2 

48 

09 117 


100 



83 


X3 

23 136 


33 

25 


a 



15 

7 

Bmvuiiiiud Prod 

0 


14 

175 36 

* 

215 

250 

140 

136 


1*7 

24S 

■ .. 

/.l 

*0 100 


2*0 

91 

FKB Gp 

276 

• .. 

18 

1.6 2*4 


1*2 

38 

f 4H Grots 

14? 





90 

SB 

Ftadbtai' 

55 


as 

7.1 118 


42 

m 

IB 

a 

raiuauuuk 

FieSlMrel 

29'; 

130 


1.7 

39 

50 214 


73 

73 

Ftotarar Dsjsjwx 

73 

. _ 

40 170 


50 

31 

Ftosineii 

90 

-3 


.. 03 


208 100 

Ftogaa 

SM? 


stw 



340 200 Howard Gram - .336 
24 22') Hurana Food 23 _ 

H 8'i Hundred aw 0b 

IBS 115 Hunaar SM* 153 

255 IBB HudMretTacit 230 

2W IBS «5r3i ITS 

31 IB tanec 17 

«s s s 
^ * sspsar 

350 233 J 8 Pathology 315 

190 lie Joven Vmr 170 

SB 2 Jeeee n e 9 

1*8 105 Jctwan 8 ,lorg 123 


68 18 208 
OJ 38 168 
04 47 05 
38 24 198 
Zl 08 27.7 

37 >8 110 
&0 178 2.T ’ 
. . . . 108 


120 73 -Umdones Pam 120 
ra a ,$m mw sb 

3B§ 293 KLP 305 

90 87 KantLtoM) 78 

3M 238 Kenyon Sec* 200 

83 55 Kew* Sw m u 73 

113 S7S KfaukrTraodk 73 

87 LM tad 80 

37 Laxliw . S3 

7D LRdtM Thcmson 106 

S Lease ih ei'j 

108 LOMMr 108 

73 Lodge Craw 73 

3 S Uxiaoyd Me 11 s 

133 Lorih Bed 190 

17 Lumdarnt 23 

77 MS CJEh & Cany 80 

las ran- como 250 

101 MeUrfkn 8 Her 113 


78 *0 97 

07 17 aw 
38 18 318 
78 48 150 
.. e .. tt3 
68 *8148 
6 . 1 b 3.1 138 
38 48 98 

47 18177 

53 28 177 
1*8 58127 

17 28 107 
14b 18 133 
38 *8 78 

48 88 78 

54 10 mu 
.. .. 208 
38 38 13.1 
28 *0 112 
88 78104 
38 18187 


issr 0 


Sure Drag SW 


119 

94 

21 +2 

128 
W 6 
in 

103 

22 -1 

34Q +3 


28 93 162 

.. .. 173 

Ol at .. 
08 08 .. 
28 38 372 
68 28 22.1 
2.1 18 200 
51 37 2*3 

.. .. 23 

A3 34 173 
57 39118 
*3 27 138 
38 38200 


54 &>i 

101 99 

173 128 


Swramd Comp. 

tmo 


fSTcauu, 


4T| +4 

229 

'Sf t 5 . 
1*8 
100 


137 -3 

TBS 
35 

157 • .. 
tt 


55 Magnets: Mraart 
64 htamaw 
90 Mem Dev 
92 Karen (Ronald) 

8 UaxtonN 


101 MlyUr Qtjr __ 

93 Mayhawg Food* 129 

199 Meadow Farm 260 

139 Uedri Tee h 138 

75 M o bwimb ga 

3 Memory Conn 13 

21 Memeren toe wo* 29 

140 Mrairiar-Swain 145 




S3 Mtcnael ganm 79 

360 Mcrofikn 860 

lie AMctottaae 120 

22 MK ro wtec 40 

02 lAdbuid Mon* 173 

231 Ihfeunmar km 379 

185 inward Brow 180 

130 MBg Wgdd 175 

13 HWD05 

108 MoetgMa Go 135 

82 Morta A Crane 120 

149 Monotype 1*6 

®. MOtoylRM 50 

15'. Momapmtoa) 22'r 

93 Moss Aomntsmg 89 

125 MRMrtn 175 

237 NMWGomp am 

13 New Cl Net Rea t« 

1 Do Wrms . 3 

14 NAM EngtaM Props 16 

75 Do 10% ' EBS 

10% Nhtao 11 

91 Nerem imi 

ISO 53 Homan 03 

13$ 83 Norecot Hoet* ns 

46 14 ARr Sa S Gen Z> 

75 35 OdfuU inspec 3S 

34 27 Onvrisch 3 J 

37 22 O u ta n et ic* 29 

293 180 Oetiame & Uafc zrt 

»- g 35»» «nseo 33 % 

143 85 PUT 113 

25$ 188 PecerSynemt 20 a 


-2 



+10 

86 

26 210 


100 

63 63 


40 

73 50 

1 .. 

14 

1.7 219 

+2 



-- 

*7 

20 213 

" 

*3 

43 213 


l.t 

06 17.1 

+10 

54 

£1 227 

mB 

U 

33 114 


40 

43 211 


Z32 

.. '21 


50 203 1.7 

l .. 

19 

23 1*3 


63 

24 194 


63 

53160 


S3 

36 133 


1J 

Z3T&2 

+10 

26 

(14 607 


17 

*6 96 

-1 

10 

*3173 


5.7 

■30 794 


33 

10 270 


33 

20 362 


70 

43 62 


.. 1 



20 

16250 


IS 

63 160 


11 

*2240 

ra 1 J 


. . 90 


33 

5* 73 


*3 

23152 


86 

25 163 

-a 

2.4 

17.1 17 



n 72 


0 

110 .. 

-a 

*3 

31 1B2 

*6 

10 

10 66 


34 

20 123 

-2 


. ** 


20 

63 52 

-5 




*3 

is a a 


21 

56 15 


40 

*1 120 

-S 


ra- a. 


iib™ 


98 18*20 
28 08 318 
88 88 98 

1.1 28 198 
48 1827,1 
28 18 258 
OS 14 64 
$7 3818.1 
78 48 113 
40 28128 

5.1 38 14,7 

38 27 123 
17 *810* 

48 £7 98 
.. -. S3 

28 27 16.1 
Z3 2822,1 
38 62 9.1 

28 

*0 48 147 
47 73 107 
68 34 26.1 


1 'b&h, 

13 11R Swmdon Pr Hap 

» W TTSaSS* 

200 110 TDS Craeta 
13* 11* TMD Adroit 
157M58*j T-V AM 
114 108 Task Fore 
18* 52 Tey Homes 
146 30 Teen For Bus 
365 19* TediComi 

209 US Tiaueamputng 

188 113 TO Sir* M 
138 70 Thertnax 
273 'j 180 Therm S cta t tNt 
83 63 Threpac 

i“»w SSfe" 1 

•to ii 

470 ZTO Trencnerecod 
88 85 Tneon 
260 1*0 Tyre Ten 'A' 

,75 *3 1* Ceramic 
9*5 <20 UMFiteniay 
135 S3 W PiMrag 
9* Bi uaner (Frraia 
100 50 Vtowptai^ 

106 68 Weyne Kerr 
id 79 WBOber D a mp 
19 1* wataae 

* 86 m Ypdanta 

99 <3 WMtwoms Rtoca 
180 ISO Vrickes 

10 **. HriWraSyet 

90 40 Wtatd 
179 i5t . Mtoroeoar 
220 1GS Wd o> Loeher 
98 « Wyfco 
4 4 Xyare 

t5B 118 YMotriraRanar 
30 35 Y rirra mi 
97 30 York Mount 
67 25 York & Goaty 
104' 60'. DO 8% i 

27 10 2ygal Oynaneei 


280 28 227 
.. .. 502 

48 78 1B8 
.. San 
21 1 . 1 230 
48 28238 
28 17 78 
24 2121.1 
U 4.1 .. 
28 22188 
88 58198 
77 7,7"HL0 
48D 18427 
21 18122 
28 28 378 
14 18 . . 
38 18 212 
38 48 124 

4.1 98 88 

47 38284 
18 48 297 
68 27188 
7.6 17 208 
18 23 148 

188 78 21 
54 72 128 
248 '48 .. 

48 62 48 

84 78 98 
18 34 UL1 

2-1 28 68 
33 38 11 4 
04 24 112 
78b 88 122 
28e 5.7 101 
28 17 21.1 

. .. 338 

13 68 161 
28 06 602 

1.1 18 S2.7 
79 48 104 
38 20 198 
37 54 104 


Bd Oner Ong me 


Bd Offer Cmg vw 


Bd oner Ong YU 


D-J Otter . Craig . van 


OtHMIEtr MAHON UMTTlKBT 
MMAGER3 

PO Box **2 32 Si Mrayrat+H, London ECSP 
3AJ. 


912 64.7ri +61 883 
1033 1058 -12 088 
M*1 2173 +08 237 
»3 *08* +08 887 
*2.7 BS8H -Cl 985 


St Vincent US Bn 748 78JO -12 07B 


HAMBROSKAMCUHirTItUSTMAHAGSItS 
Planter UT Adran, 2 riayVxgn ro. B urn wo o d 


tan 2i7ti8 

Hemfaros 9ra0r Go'e 1308 T383G +21 187 
HamraNAmra 883 727 -08 091 
HmtXOt Jip IFF 1272 733. 1 +02 044 

Hamtra ScaraRn 03.1 884* +08 087 
H ara re 0 > axopwaa >98 HM8 +14 087 
Hanttxm CanMhn *78 508 -04 127 
Umbras E«ety he *37 005 -04 <82 

Manures High he 588 625 ..580 

ttarntm* RM AHi 588 ML2* -61 28* 
Hanbna M Sto <38 333 +6? 03* 


MAGsecuans 
Three Obw. Trerar 
01-6/8 *460 
Amer 8 Gen he 

Do AC3XX 
Awrar neroian 
Do Arrnm 
Am Sraafiar Co* 

Do Accsxa 
ApxtS Gen he 
Detain 
Como A Gen toe 
ft— Acom 
Caeaaund Growth 
Canvraraon Growth 
Do he 

Owneea Fried to: 

Do Accum 
Europe* 8 General 
Do Ac cren 
extra rtatfK 
Da Ac art 
tor Eastern he 
□0 Accum 
FM 01 tar he 
Do Aec 


is, Rayleigh ftiHumn 


Do Karo 
OR 3 Fried H 
Do eccixn 
Goh heome 
Do Aeeraa 
not uetma he 


Hoi heome he 
Do Acorn 
hU Growth toe 
Do Acorn 
too toe Ire 
Japao 6 Gen he 
Do Acom 
Japan SMdtar Me 
MhUM 8 Gen he 
Da Acom 
FtacQvary Find he 
Do Acam 
Seam Gen he 
Do Aca m 
S no ar Cm toe 
Do Ac on 
TVnm Find he 
Do Aeon _ 
Ctoahcea toe B) 
DO Acom Q 


NAAOF (0C< 
Do Aeoxn 


-28 187 
-03 127 
-38 065 
-34 088 
-06 032 
-05 032 
+02 080 
+02 080 
-43 332 
-04 382 
+Oi 328 
+05 387 
-Ol 811 
+02 583 
+080 331 
+29 074 
+3-1 074 

-AI BM 
-04 586 
-Ol 145 
-0.1 145 
+05 252 
•07 262 
+02 4.11 
+080 4.11 
+03 987 
+04 087 
+0,1 288 
.. 288 
+03 337 
+0.7 937 
-23 188 
-003 188 
-02 819 

+a.i tun 
+aa ®8i 
-ai aoi 
+A 8*)0 
+001 *10 
-08 33* 
-1.1 33* 
+<5 380 
+002 IM 
+18 289 
•002 289 
+ 1.1 *88 
+am 43B 
+071000 
+221089 
.. 979 
.. 9.79 
.. *37 
+07 *10 
+&1 8.10 


I NORWICH UT MAHAOeRS 
ng S ox *. N omejt WH 3NO 
0fi03 622200 

ssw» ‘ssjks 


0 PPB 9 WJ MIW TWrar MANA MGM fr 
68. Cspxcn Streec. tonnen EC*N 1*6 
Oeetagi 01-230 3885/8/7/8/9/0 
hto road o na i ftra-tn 1*2* i52* 

bnaaeSGrowM M.J 6*7 - 

WondwxJe Rec K5 915 + 

American Gnmffl 323 3*9 - 

Japan Grmi B4 TOO 


-01 388 
+03 188 
-03 O00 
.. 080 


Etroean Grown 89.1 7*0 

UKOoMh M2 803 

Peoic Growth S8 578 

Mgb home 323 U7 

Practical heome 5*0 »5 

Do Acom 97.7 10*0 


89.1 7*M +1.1 087 


•34 138 
.. 737 
+01 21* 
+03 It* 


9OW0P«UMTT RU8T 

Btotprtat WW** torieffto*! 
ona 837733 
Arnanc an h* 

Do Aoenm 
Auuwwi »fi 
Do ACeum 
Etnpean toe 
Do Acxran 

Gw s fixed me 

Do Actum 
Goa] Fund he 
Do Acom 
heome 
Do Accum 
u heertt 
Do Acorn 
Jap Sm* Col Ac 
Snoepotw « Matey 
OoAceum 


Fmanedl 
Cjc mccffta 
CM ham* 
Do Accum 


Japan 

weMv t Stogapon 
Pricwc nc 
OoflrarweM 

PrH Snare Fa 

uk Carer* 

Soso* 5» 
Te*tw*W7 
we« wcome 
wpnowide Gepra* 


’&S< 


361 9 3959 
roe 4 in ?* 
5*1 S-’F 
M3 1C98 
816 -858 
11*1 izi»ra 
Z2S 3IC 
IMS W*9* 
133 7 131 6« 
'"I Mira 
MB "*•* 
WO 18 7* 
4*9 «'8 
57.8 ffr.9« 

us 1 issara 
TS3 01 
1498 MOO 


•39 Ito 

•09 tot 


•na -rr 
-04 OH 
•C9 t» 
. *P9 

ora 
uo 
-•? 5» 
*33.809 
1391 
-C? 1*7 
•95 051 
- 0 .t a to 
*02 )K 
«MO 
. 308 

288 


KARL TRUST 
252 HtohHota 
01-408 8441 


01-408 )441 

Grawh And he 
Do Aeeun 
ham Fuad 
M Early he 


“oiSU' 

UM That he 
Do Accum 


912 870 

137.0 145-7 

130.1 1278 
13*0 1*28 
13*9 1*28 
1372 1353 
2203 23*4 


Simmer CD* he 

Oo ricar* 

Sptcal Sto he 
Do Acarw 
Tokyo FtrxJ he 
DO ACOM 
US Smalar Od 1 Ac 


UK tarry he 
DoAceim 


I H UM TONUMTMANaOHMLItt 
mThdum 19 Ftnburr C+ora Under. CC29* 
70J 

01438 4781 

FiiEMtOon 574 5T 0 -85 017 

jE^riaw 96A- 509 +01 DBt 

ShAIBMfcaao *23 S3. -Zfl C* 

Paaac Teen S3* 970 -03 088 

tET 591 818 «D1 281 

LoTtCMi WO 477 -02 208 


penpmMLUMrnmT 

40. Hen SqaeL Hortey On Themee 

0*91 978000 


Pararera 6 Cberty 
Extra heome 
Far East G0> aoow 
E xtra l"C 
Osaea SmtoCo 


31 UMT TRUST MANAWKI 

• London (CM SBP 

Smaller Cci 83 ? & 7 


yvonfwue Rac 
Alter Growth 

me cmraocon 
Far East Qrwft 
European Gtn 


2717 2958 .. 07* 

1804 3022 -09 428 

1513 1624 ,. 13a 

705 784 -04 071 

610 873 +01 057 

788 8*8 +A1 085 

6lJ 85J .. 1.41 


9C8MTAj!AWtT»IAN4»WT 
JUS BMBChunh 91 IflndPB GE3H I 

01423 5779/8711 


Do ACC 
Euro Tat he 
Do ACC 
GhbM Oh he 
Do ACC 


219 

354* 

. 3.19 

SM.1 

2M 

. . 521 

273 

sam 

1.00 

273 

mom 

. 100 

a* 

313 

103 

29LS 

314 

.. 10® 

1190 

1248 

.. * DO 


TOUCHE MMNANT 
MemndHOuae.2 

SAT 

01-3*8 1250 
AtMncmt.GraMb 


PiaM»DOBlLWriWtC*ri 


owra Teen 
heome Growth 


FftOUHCWHT TRUSTS 
222 SOKoara. London GC2 
01-2*7 7644/7 

h temwiiraiti 117.7 «62 

Mi tocrena 613 HJi 

Crew 6 G*t 968 ltoira 

Far niton 1928 2065 

NorrilAfltofcan 1315 1*14 

Spocal Sto 69.1 7*41 

TOrtogy 1106 1193 

Extra tacooM 872 938 


scornaHEOumrau 
20 St AnfeBM Sq. BdhboMh 
031-558 9101 

tod heome Urate 1508 i»9 

Do Accura 3333 337.6 


Japan OcmVI 
Man EOuuy he 
Do Acom 
Oieto Gnmoi 
Sotato Coe 
StwoWOppa 


<14 Ml -02 OH 
51 a uie . sm 
43D 460 «C2 DID 

90 1 840* . *30 

478 51 >« . in - 

532 988 ■. 912 

748 312 ■ IX 

2*8 282 .. 838 

mo U7 as® 

873 885 *02 196 

732 RM *02 150 


TYNDALL IMNAOffiS 


■tot UMT TRUST tiANAOSH 

11. DeaxanreSq. Under. EC2U 4TR 

DV256 82 60 /8 762 

Entty Exe mpt +0S* 4ZS8 -19 130 

Do Ar* ran 3110 S3S8 -12 330 

UK Mahal Faatrees 770 62.1 +02 181 

Do Accum 79.2 9*3 +0-2 1.91 

Jotoi HariOnoto o e wo isu +1.7 ODi 
do Accum 14*8 15*2 +16 OOi 

US Spoon Fextrees S3 708 -03 QUO 

Do Acom 88.1 71.3 -03 000 

Goto & Precoux Met 43.4 +7.ic -OO 127 

Do Acora 4*7 488c -0.6 127 

US Special he S78 BIJra -08 486 

Oo Accum 600 eeara -08 *36 

European Pert he 883 9*i +13 nss 

Do Accum 08.7 9*3 +13 08* 


+13 03* 
+18 08* 


PRUDENTIAL UMT TRUST I 
51-88. Hant ML Horn Era 
01-478 3377 

Hotoore EquRy 385.7 
RHW 1 1020 

Motoorn Conan 526 
Hofeom Htab me 85 8 
Kohom few 1013 

Japanese 1060 

n American 75.4 

Hohom Spec Sto 643 
Holxxn UK Grown 601 
Htflxxn G h Trust 1907 


-1^ 329 
+19 D3Q 
+02 084 
+02 821 


scorniKURBMsntpmi 
», si Arromwi So. td a w gi 
031 225 2211 

I2( Eqraty >828 «*• 

temsn 1478 1597 

PeOdC 1959 2009 

European 2**7 Ml I 

8C0T1MH MRUM.IMMSIMIMT 
KANAOERS 

Its. Vtocenl SL Gtacgmv 02 5W 
041-248 6100 


16 Cmn NO 
0272 7327*1 


-05 1.90 
-07 tae 
+10 005 
+21 OX 


700 +02 891 

1088* . . 080 
1127c +19 005 
802 -03 066 

664* -02 207 

BSJM -02 210 
2013 +19 248 


UK Sra» Got Eq 
European 
N ximriao 


1889 177.9 
119L1 1288 
1*88 1589 
207 1 2204 
1124 11B.6 
1887 3008 


-03 289 
+10 606 
-01 240 
+26 1.00 
-08 1 JU 
+13 038 


Oo Acorn 
Far Enxtam 
On Accum 
Fto 8 hop 
Do Acam 
on CAretai 
Do Acom 
oatfeKrew 
00 Acam 


Matt Yield 
Do Accra 


HAU M TTRtWMA H A BEMNT 

99-100. Sanding Rd. Makkaana. Kaat ICI* 1XX 

0822 67*731 


WA General 
AOA htoBMO 
MIA GAUM 


MIA European 


330 3*9 -0.1 214 

589 502 .. 000 

219 2U« +021027 
412 437ra .. 314 

313 33.1 -AI 073 


OULTER MANAGEMENT COWPANT 
31-45 ametram SL London ECW 7LH 
01-800 4177 

Quadrant General *801 4BM - Jg 

Ouranm mooora 2333 »04 .. 3M 

□uadrera tnd Fd 388* 4009 .. 196 

Quadrant Rrorawry £56 2 2728 . . 289 


SCOTTISH UMT TRUST 
29. cneitaM SO Edhorasin 
031-226 *372 

F’eoSc 714 78* +08 030 

Worts Growth 378 *05 . . 1.01 

N Amman 3*0 38* -04 018 

heome Futtf 4*4 478* . . *84 

European 449 *78 +07 083 

NAmeTnc 281 289 -01 299 

UK Growth 309 33.1 -Ol 

Extra Inc 313 33.7 -Of 537 


Do Accum 
tod Earwig* 


527 584 

44 a ci? 

3nfl 33t 2 m 
XT* 5936* 
399 0 907 8* 
98*7 7U7 1* 
1729 1H0C 
1885 1M5C 
529 «» 
833 00 Tra 
1»9 1300 
1459 *308 
1108 11*0 
1801 1853 
SM 570 
1172 INI 
2XL8-M0 
731 7090 
1981 188* 


IUMUUFZ MANAGEMENT 

aO^reWtay- toevenasa Hn 


IW ROTH8CHLD ASSET HAMUBMMT 

St O mNna Lina. Lonfe.' SC*P *0U 
01-280 3*36 


Grown Unis 
Gto 5 Fixed fee 


74.1 78J* 

113.1 117.1 


memos Unto 1154 122.6 
YWd OR UK 575 305 


Grow® Urea 
N Amencan Unto 
tor Ecu Ihta 
Batata Gas toad 


1409 1*07 
718 780* 
MS 1062 
678 722 


+1.4 2.76 
+08 72* 
+3.1 548 
+03 874 
+2.* 037 
+05 044 
+28 012 
+07 1J4 


NC Anwhe toe 
Do a cam 
NC Eflragy RM 
NC toemae 
NC Japan 
NCSwtata Cos 


28*2 302M -12 13 
30BS 32SM -14 123 
1318 1*02 -09 281 


87.7 932 
1998 2128 
140* 1498 


NCSmBrEmoDCare 1083 2003 

NC Eamvt Oh Si 29.0 i3tJ> 

NC Amor Prep *1157 1210 

NC Proparty 1383 18&2 


-06 281 
-02 382 
+28 0 01 
+0.1 180 
+1.1 032 
.. 852 


scomm widows 

PO Box M 2 EtMxxgn EHl 6 SKI 

031-863 6000 

P«| Eq he Ml 2 2M0 

Do Acam 2881 2 B 2 


MMUU* UMT TRUST 
; Unicom Hsc. 2S2. Hondord RtL E7 
01-234 06** 

Menem 13*6 1*34 -02 448 


ROWAN UMT TRUST 

33 Krna VMna StreeL London EC4H 9AS 


NmCURYFUM) MANAGERS LTD 
31 Ktag Wta SL BUR SAS 
01-290 2660 

AoerGrowth OL3 1013 

Do Acam 981 1094 


Do Accura 
Eraopeen Growth 
Da Accum 


□a AoaxTt 
GR • Ftxed 
Do Aeoxn 


Do Aoaxn 
Japan 
Do Acorn 
fta oo re ry 
Do Acam 
Exempt Ota 
ExmraK Aeon 


9S3 1013 
981 1094 
513 552 
5*2 578 
1338 1*14* 
1378 M83* 
2382 2539 
380.1 4128 
885 904 
1003 1018 
028 080 
918 973 
2900 2785 
3224 3428 
202-1 21*9 
2068 2198 
19*8 2073 
2081 2213 
2314 2*06* 
X15 3726* 


High YWd 0 
Marta PI 
Ftxad tatom 
HMi hares 
Fra Eaat (2) 


2338 2173 .. 16* 

mo 731.0* .. 2W» 

1695 1733 . . 850 

40*0 *128* +63 131 
1733 17*0 +18 2» 

1»5 1253 +1.01OZT 

2*88 XU .. at! 


SMAWn. FUNDS MANAOEHCHT 
30 Oy Rd. Lanoan EClY 2AY 
01-6X0011 

Anta Tech A Gen 1015 1068 
PeotlC 2018 2198 

See tocrena Find 1085 T BOS* 

spaaai sramona 2 o*o ma 
MGrowdl 333 381 

Amencan Mrjun 728 773 

SraM COU 382 *18 

Japan Tech 6 Gen 1178 126.0 
hHiWtoisi hcorara 565 »5* 

Enran 5362 573.7 

UK Gaoarel 333 356 

Euro Growth 353 37 8 

Euro mcome *2.1 *5.1* 


-09 084 
+27 000 
-02 *15 
- 2.0 1*8 
•07 010 
-03 0.31 
.. 1.97 
+06 0.08 
+03 60* 
.. 225 
-04 161 
*1.0 032 
+08 *00 


UK PMJWDEMTUT MANAGERS • _ 

UK Horae Carte SL SaXaOury SPi JSM 
0722 3382*2 

IK tarry 1123 1193* -06 .. 

PecttcBMfei 1791 190 3* +33 

nSw IU8 1K0* -15 

VAHQUARD TRUST 
65 HoBxxn Ulema EC1» 2EU 
Oenarel EnqutoM 91-238 3053 Sttaq Ltoa 01- 
23S 2488 

Growth he 187 6 199 Be +01282 

Do Accura 372 B 2904c +03 252 

HtaiYWri 2001 219.3* -06 500 

Do Accum ZtOT J24 2 -00 500 

SpactaSto 417 444* 41222 

DO Accum *20 4*7 -0.1 222 

Thmo* 13*7 U33 -08 402 

Do Acorn 2053 2105 -09 *07 

Amer 6 Gran 61. T 850 -08 ill 

Do ADCran 51 1 05 0 -Co 139 

Master Rotncko C8l 74 8332* 405 ZK 

Do Accum CUM 6350 408 297 

AOtog Mm Am |S) 1t89 1202* 2*0 

Do Aoran 1129 1203 249 

Far East 4 Gen toe 429 M3 +12 002 

Do Accum 529 582 *12 862 


ROYAL UFE Fac «*AMA flm eMT 
New Hal Puce. Uvarpoot L89 3H8 
031-227 4422 

Eqaky Tran 913 858 

M Iran 748 787* 

GUtThta 26 S SG3 

U3TTOM 325 3*5 

Padflc Basin Tsi 4*8 474 


SIMON A COATES _____ „ 

1. Unden Wta BHto. London EC2M 5PT 
Or -580 M+4 E« X7 

Special Bto IS *87 526 .. 0J5« 


-02 281 
48 133 
+03 812 
41 un 
+81 629 


STANDARD UR 

Georg* SL E«ibra|pl EH2 2XZ 
031 225 2552 

fecome uran 293 278 41 337 

0OACOT IMto 278 268 43 337 | 


WARDLEY UNIT TRUST MAHAOERS 
Htodhy Houea. 7. DevOMhew So Lmom CO 
01-329 1532 

Amencan Trim 8*8 090 4S17D 

Far EH 6 Gan I68G88 +19 0911 
M Grown 7A2 790 *03 «» 

tocrena Trust 839 »t 540 

Japan Growth 1418 IBS +1.7 010 

GrftSl Oompentat. 5835 117 8 46 200 

Taenmioar 359 M* 020 

Ausnto 393 412 49 180 

UK Trail 1309 1X3 +07 7*0 

Erecpeen arawh 995 602* 41 030 
Horn Kong 238 252 41 1*0 


UK Treat 
EtrnpaOl Growth 
Hang Kong 


45 1 79 
•10 030 
•03 OH 

940 
+1.7 Q.tO 

46 2 m 
020 

45 180 
+02 2M 


20 CMan 9 l Louden GC2 
01-620 0311 

Eoofey Dtst 1180 1238 

Da Aoaxn mi 1738 

Meet tocrena Thro bos 994 

op Accun me 1134 

US Grown, 57.1 406 

Do ACOM 578 62.1 


4.1 131 

+81 445 
48 086 
-07 096. 


M&XJ1ND BAJK GROUP UMTTRU6T 
MAJUGOn 

CoraamadHsoStaartt NaaOShaOWd SI 3RD 
07*2 709842 

CepWheone 756 80 a -03 235 

Oo Acoxe tow 1102 48 335 

CoramxHy 6 Gan 1981 1133 

Do Accra t*98 1595 


ROYAL LONDON UMTTfKIST MAHAOERS 


STEWART. IVCKV UMTTRU8T 
HAHAOBa 

*5 CtartOM Sq. Edktoxgh 
031-229 3271 
Antofeam Fund 229 8 3*14 
DO Accum 25*4 27T8 

Do WxkiMl 1 SOO 1094 

Austreken tood 981 »59 

DoJUXOm HOT 1072 

British Fund 807.7 603 

Oo Acaan 016 5 btlb 

Qxopeen Fhnd 3086 3287 

Do Mam 32*6 3*81 

3878 3613 
3596 3181 
1685 1763 


Em M(0lhC . 

Do Aeoxn 
GBAtoradfac 
Do Acaxn 


Mob YWU 
Do Acam 


Jepen.8 P s ofc 
Do team 


Do team 
N American lee 
Oo Accum 
Erao Qh toe 
Oo i fn rt 1 
Sneer (he fete 
Do Aeon 


43 035 
-03 235 

44 814 
48 814 

583 681 7.78 

673 724 41 7.7S 

554 578 +84 885 

905 9*5 +07 666 

1328 1829 -03 552 

2595 2767 44 552 

1650 1766* 44 379 
2733 291-5* -87 379 
3118 3317 +83 009 


Royal union Home. Oatt n e ei e r 001 IRA 
0209 578115 


0106 576116 
American Growth 687 9*4* 48 080 

CfePU Aeon 1781 1B95 -08 218 

GR (name 565 589* +0* 167 

•ign heome 795 8*8* -is *8* 

Merer* 6 Growth 994 1 DBS* 43 438 

Japan Growtb 1018 1077 +13 OM . 

SpacMSte 1068 1134 44 136 1 


Japan tond 
. Oo Accum 


Do Accam 
Sams PPP 


-16 232 1 
40 332 
-13 332 
-33 1 32 
-43 136 
+43 *32 
+46*32 
+48 080 
44.7 069- 
+81 080 
+81 030 


WAV0K2T ASSET MANAGEMENT 
to CnsriotW Sq, tantxxffi 
031-225 1951 

A ue t n dran Gold 176 i»0 48 OiS 

Pactoc Beam 1*3 MS . 020 

Canaan Bel Gth 556 99* 097 

(few MM fM 1827 107.0 +05 7.1 


WtsmODAU UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
2 Honey Li EC2 BBT 
01-808 M8Q/6 

Sht DM On FuM 679 880 +01000 

US Go<* Band Fd 6610 313 41 


+13 00* 
44 136 


SUNALUANCE . 

Sin Mrara Hra* Htwltan. Santa 
(MO 56293 

Equity Th« Acc 3889 4113 
NAm TBTO ACC 504 531 
tor BM ThTO tax 914 973 
WcntMde Bead aoi -833 


WINDSOR TRUST MANAGERS LID 
MBndaof Houea. 83. Ktogony. London WC2B 

680 ■. 

01-405 6391 

COrwSEarty *6i S13 77* 

ham* 529 503* 41 SJO 

GiMB 585 526 41 233 


-U 250 
-86- 1.19 
+86 083 
89* : 


328.1 3*76 

112.1 1195 
13*3 W33 
13*5 1327 
1493 1582 


+83 809 
+84 089 
-14 135 
-18 135 
+17 1.07 
♦31 187 


1127 1203* +84 312 
1283 1263* +03 312’ 


•SAVES PROSPER . 

28 Wriston Ra. Romford RMI 3LB 
0631 Quean SL Bratoegh DO 4NX- 
(RomtordJ on»«9n Or (tan) 031-326 7361 
h S8S 738 41 048 

1X02 1093 41 28* 

493 484 41 138 

438 468 45 *13 

111.7 1194 +89 048 


Y38 UMT TRUSTS LTD 
Karate Home. AMMhHaMAVIO IPG 
028* 56786 Dee tag e: 0204 0*32/3/* 
American he • T 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Wednesday’s taring 


MURRAY J« 9 l fIU HEUMnRUlT 
JMNAGBWEIir 

Ohsgow 02 2UH 

0*1 221 9252 


1178 1264* -13 381 
2578 279.1 +85 186 

2153 2287 +16 899 


RATIONAL PROVBENT ilVESTNENr 


**. Graceetxach St EC3P 3HH 
01-833 4200 Ett 209 

1902 2128 .. 280 

DO ACO»« 3217 3*23 41 2SS 

Nn Omraeee 5989 «sa2 +03 ojo 

Do Aeoxn 7317 7785 +04 070 

tortoat Acc 983 1028* +12 MS 

Aamricrai Aec 585 825 -08 180 

taopata A« 8*6 583 +05 080 

Wortttrtda Ac* 512 9*6 41 140 


+05 050 
41 140 



1083 41 28* 

*84 -81 138 

49 *13 
1194 +89 049 

037* 42 837 
6*4 -.223 

41J . -48 800 
1072 .. £B1 

676 +031871 

1924* 42 537 
1783 42 437 

963* 41 689 
625 +03 263' 

1284 .. 819 

1118 +15 .. 

EP.9 +02 .. 
318 . 287 

989 41 .. 

1978 -04 270 

1303* +81 281 
1825 43 386 

1825 -04 *37 

058 ..152 

1798 +84 *20 

97.4 43 282 

1688* 43 273 
778 47 153 

987 .. 138 


Do Acam 
Extra heome he 
Da Acaxn 
Grata* lh* toe 

Oo Acaxn 
GRSFtMdhc 
Da Aoaxn 


Accam 
PaeNome 
. Do taro 
Ml he 
Do Accum 
fhhowd Oppe toe 
Do Aocun 


: 0204 0*32/3/* 

TtSS 1238* 49 1.11 
1218 1297* 48 1.11 
1128 1188* 41 589 
1358 1*3.7* 41 8» 
1588 1687* 48 Ul 
2981 27*8* 47 281 
904 628* +05 029 
968 906* +86 829 
2135 2273 46 *46 


• Ex dMdsiRL c Cunt dhndant), k Cum 


3333 35*2 
1798 1873 
1917 1934 
381 36*4 
411.4 *877 
838 877 
587 7*2 
435 *03 
4*7 <7.6 


46**9 
-18 449 
+27 829 
+28 039 
+18 132 
+1.7 132 
41 1.74 
.. 13* 
45 200 
48 208 


O xm n a m Rd. Aytaebrey Bucks 


738 766 43 008 

180 178 43 0.10 

683 733 43 133 monthly 

880 320* 41 282 - V 


g *** _ 

Ewcparai Spec ! 
Exn income 


mo 1328 -. 347 
1058 1124 +82 1JM 
1118 1204* 44 686 , 



f+gn Low Qxtytny 


dra YM 
ipraroe % 


AmarThta 


iTtaaare 

Br Empire Soc 


Do Cap 
3M Drayton Coos 
13* Drayton torB 


<20 Qeyton Japan 
178 Dundee Lon 
09 Etta Arner AaM 
119 EdbbuMi 


136 BqpahH 
75 EndjShSctt 

to POD A — 

142 P 6 C Pacfetc 


ra* 


1*8 *4328 
18 08 .. 
14a 03 .. 
80b 40 383 
08 08825 

47 62428 
64 18 875 

85 65 4*1 

SJO 23533 
20 14 822 

28 23868 
£1 18 960 

81 13 . . 

145 *5306 
87 118 08 
S3 15 974 
74 *9 31.7 

128 43 333 
14 1.1 . . 

66 £7810 

57 06 .. 
81 S3 413 
68 28 981 
33 £3800 

24 22069 

24* 25 8*9 


Gown St rate g y 


20b 09 
28 16 966 
178b 80 263 
64 26568 

63 <4 381 
46b 28*36 
S3 14 .. 

U 22 02 



1996 

Hjgn urer Crenpany 


Gros# 

(tor YB 

Price Digs pence S P/E 


91 TR Acmes n 

9§ TR Oty OtLOQ DH110 
IS IRMlOat 200 
HM'J TR Nafcxal Rea 111 
to TR Ncrto A m ertce 97 
HB TR Pacta: Beato 103 
i*o to Property IS* 
904 TR Teal 103 

139 TR iraeteee IS* 
135 Tranph Bra 153 

237 Thagmotion 289 
000 Throg Secured ClpSSO 
I57h Irani Oceanic ri» 
112 ThbinB 1*0 

S TUi lev H UK 90 
USDabamuro 299 
33 VSdng Rarexacae 38 
sa Waareool 81 

BOh. Winn 103 

206 Ybomtn 345 


33 3.7 318 
83b 5 7 287 
67 £9*62 

69 03 218 

2.6 2 7 498 
14 08 . 

57 81 408 

26 25468 
60 37368 
61b 63 267 
118b *2 3*2 


55 25*99 

45 29 401 

158 17.6 61 
03 62 57.7 
29b 61 177 
£2 38 419 
*6 *5 SM 

15.1b 44 366 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47J« 34's 
71 31 

49 21 
154 116 


American Express 
AroyW _ 


mm Arrow 
Daily Mai 
Da -A- 


Big Thro 
Exco 

wtefMton 


Rm Gp 
Goode |D 6 IQ 
Honoreson Admin 
ICH 


Paafc toy Tst 

Do WlmHe 
Saw New Court 


29 




1*6 


60 


E21 

• - 

TOO 


tin*. 

• -*« 

700 

17 132 


+1 

96 




43 



- 

80 



-2 

36 


7*0 


93 

13 3*4 

» 

+5 

64 

74 92 

1*3 

+7 

ft 

1 7 *01 

830 

s +10 



196 

*3 

126b 77 69 

360 

+3 

236 

00 100 

JSU 


51 

2*304 

273 

• . . 

200 


128 

*3 

05 

04 • 

Jb'f 



19* 

+1 

liui 

6.1 11 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON CMMOHTY 
EXCHANGE 


G W Joynson sod Co rspflrt 


SUGAR (Hob C. caamtow). 

FOB 

oct 1222-215 

Dec 137-2386 

MV 151.2-51.0 

May 1S>548 

Aug 153.6-584 

On 164lG«2J 

Wot 8*22 


142JL39JM 

13240-25.0 

135.0O-2SJ) 

13K0GGKG 


COCOA 

Sep 

Dec 

Msr — . 
May — - 
*r 


COFFEE 

Sop 

Nov 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

Jfy 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
UnBMctal prtcras * 
OfftcWnsimarllgms 

Me»io£ per OMriric toon* 
SBusrki pn e o pro troy o u ii ca i 

RMtaH WOK A C& UtL repost 
COPPER GflADEA 

Cash 8805088150 

ThW Months . %*003&*.00 

Voi : 8000 

Torn Stmfler 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 851-00-853JX) 

Thw Months. 871 JXM72JM 

Vol 600 

Tone steady 


Three Months . 

35430-364.00 

uw ... 

pa 

TftftO 


ALUMINIUM 


Cash 

788.00-769.00 

Thn» Months. 

7B1J0-78ZJ« 

VW _ 

-2500 

Ton* — _ — 

Steady 

MCKEL 


Cash 

— 2525-2530 

Three Months . 

— 2560-2583 

VW _ 

24 


Steady 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Pb Contact 
p.pwkBo 

Month Open close 

*>? l*iq. 9TjS 

1<aa 
Unq. 1052 
}Aq. 9E5 
^ ■ Urttf, 885 

J** 1 Unq. 985 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 

£ per tonne 


Open Close 
115.0 114J 
125.5 1253 
1700 171-0 
184 9 18*9 

BO.O 800 

VO). 1101 


MglUalvohO 


HCaTANDUVESTOCX 

COMMISSION 
AtrongcMMocR prices >t 


SOYABEAN 

Oct 

Dec 

Fob 

Apr . 

Jun 

Aug — _ 


_ 132JW10 

- 1295-29.3 

- 131-5-305 
... 1325-315 
„ 1305-295 
.. 1305-285 


GASOIL 

STO. 

Oct 

NO* 

Dec 

Jan— — . 


isn c-irt on 
1355-35 OO 
137.75-375 
141540.75 
1435*2.75 


LEAD 

CBSh 26750-26850 

Tbraa Months . 28950^88-75 

WBI 2250 

Tone StBMSar 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 52000-52550 

VW Ml 

Tom Mo 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash 55700-55850 

Threa Months . 55550-5M50 

VW __2050 

Ton* StSiMer 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 3*800-34750 

Three Months - 3545D35450 

VW 11 

Tone ______ Quiet 


repraiMhiOae rueiLeto on 
21KAggnl 


GS: Cattle. 96.1 Op per kg fw 
GSi^erol 4fk98o per kg eat d 
^ HwlTB J4p par kg hr 


LONDON NEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Lha Cattle Contract 
P- per Mo 

Month Open' Qom 

qS K23- mxt 

Sep Unq. . g& 

Oct Unq. 98 

NO* Unq. 99 

Unq. 99 
'JSI Unq- 99 

Jon Una. on 


BFFEX 

GALLFiWglit Futures Lnt 
report $10 per Index poM 
tnrigtttindu 


Unq- 985 
Unq. 985 


Unq- 995 
Unq. 994 


High/Low 
Oct SB 780.0-740,0 
Jan 87 7900-787.0 
Apr 87 825.0-812.0 
Jut 87 75857584 

Oct 87 84558210 

Jan 88 

Apr 88 

jW88 


Unq. 995 
Unq. goo 


VofcAOOtois 
Open interest 1937 


en gtudandWatea: 

CatBe nos. up 5.7 %. are. 
prtca,97.02p(+04l) 

Sheep nos. dwwi 14 %. are. 
pric«lS0.7dp(-t*4) 

Rg nos- up 34 aw. 
pries, 79Jrap (-0.76) 


TAMKER REPORT 


LONDON GRAM PtmKES 
Cprotonna 


mgpflXNr Oust 
Aug 86 13*0-1340 13*0.0 


Must Barter 
Ct08* Cknra 
• t04.90 


SILVER SHALL 

Cash 34840-347,00 


Canto nos. down 35 %. tvs 
pri089346p(-4.22} 

Sheap nojkup MS xra. 

pries T4252 (-1328) 

Pig nos. up 0.0%. aw. ' 
pnea.7447p(04) . . 


Now 107.00 ■ !Q 7 ,iq 

J9n 110.40 109 50 

Mar 11340 111.75 

May 115.75 naso 


Sep 88 — 

Oct 88 *— 

Dec 88 — 

Mar 87 ~. 

Jun 87 — 

VW: 25 iota 
0 panmtoreat4i 


VWUfflK 

Wheat.,— 2B2 

B««lf 828 


Spot nwhflt DommanaryL 
TanKar.mdax: ■ . , 

1465.0 down 25W2W86- ' 








1 



THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 19 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 





From your portfolio cart! check your 
eight shore price movements. Add them 
up to gi'C >ou your overall toiaL Cheek 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
have won outright or a share of the lota) 
daily, prize money anted. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on' the 
hack of vour card. You must always have 
tour card available when claiming. 


Equities steady 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began August 1 1. Dealings end next Friday. §Coniango day September l. Settlement day September 8. 

§Forward bargains are permitted ontwo previous business days. 




Cifn*r 



No- OMbpoy 

Gimp 

btts 



id mna ESEcai wm 
iH itM-ii'.i'riigi EE 11 

Djga 





"S 2P22 ™ +n uw 45119 

m SB Rhm 85 no djj mjj 

2g ww*«w 22 •+! 7.1 urns 

“5 2aSL®™“ 225 - “* ** m 

0 3<W SdnOM 0ft .. m2 SO 122 

69* 4i5 Sam eras 712 -a 484 u u 

4'8 813 Wan OSS *+HJ 529 aOBU 

Tf. *3** ww not ; m +» 77 “ 7T 

wt 220 wtenxt an • jj 2a w 


BREWERIES 


333 4 ttl OIU 

7£ .. 212 29159 

83 12 T* 28.1 

W « 40 UM 

488 2069 40102 

IS •* 3 79 5JMS9 

SOS a .. in 271K9 
S® .. 119 Z3 17J 

aw -a u u .. 

173 .1 72 40124 

28 4„ to 32 ISO 

3*0 +S 10a 30 129 
514 — as* 4o no 

77 — 29 99189 

153 89 44 99 

as oj» zs .. 

iw *+1 S2 29 167 

S « “ 

in •-* mi so no 

.MS ~S U4 42352 
W -g 11.1 42 123 

a* -2 11.1 41124.. 

2W .. 109 42 272 

JfJ .. 127 23128 

315 104 S3 217 


U4 BMmar (H F 
*09 BmoMom 


5SW" 


SIBw*W 

Scot 4 Hw 


- WWvmoMn 8 I 
YoumW 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Please be sure to take account 
of any munis signs 


Weekly Dividend. 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8.000 in 
tomorrow's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


- 114 49 219 

+3 WL7 89144- 
-2 0.1 02 102 
4 U U 17.1 
♦* 129 £9149 

.. '102 39124 
+4 W9 79 .. 
.. 52 

.. 109 89 122 

-1 44 79 177 

.. 37.1 4.1 127 

43 309 54 72 

.. 142 25 242 

49 87139 

802 

» .. 39 82119 

49 6D1&4 

-1 .. .. U 

-V 49 37 rr 

99 29141 
*8 Km 44 109 
I .. 82 19127 

82 8911.1 
I .. 89 87119 

UD 29227 
47 49159 

4* 25 29129 

25 49 79 
.. *7 10111 

.. 84 77 Z79 

-1 93 73 149 

.. 29 21 335 

-a 79 21 rass 
>+3 84 29192 

879 

24 39119 
> ., 1U1 48 149 

42 184 21 172 

-2 7.1 29 139 

4 B 2S94 89144 
-1 TO® 2312.1 
-1 160 23HJ) 

82 49 89 
.. 62 79 19 

>~2 102 25 143 

142 74 42X12 

.. 119 39189 

■Mil 54 42 239 

i4i 72 sn 181 
1 .. ai 0.1 .. 

.. 179 42 TIB 

>41 82 24 128 

.. 14 42 .. 

i-1 83 79 189 

4« 229 57122 

45 157 19 174 

.. 83 53 132 

+» 75 32112 

49 49 23 
.. 184 82 79 

-2 709 29 152 

+7 182 97140 

42 123 43 109 

42 8.1 59 172 

39 24 212 
41 4 99 89 174 

49 134 29121 

... 123 37 149 
42. 79 44 122 

.. 122 29184 

+1 19 21 84 

-2 109 8.1 289 

.. .<150 42102. 
-8 - 104 -37180 
14 17' 89 
89 . 89115. 
19 20141 
-9 a? asm 

41 21 11189 

42 54 29 212 


530 

1* a -* 
t wo 

1ft v> 
*7 

3® 8-2 

213 a .. 


213 

323 -8 

318 *43 

an -2 
51 -12 
MO 

35. a .. 
910 a 42 


38 r 
IB* a-2 
131 
80 

m 47 

lira #4t 

2*8 

250 

255 42 

20 * 

380 420 

m 48 
230 
59 

133 43 

*3 a .. 
48 

zre 

04* 42 

2D 

5*3 a-s 


(US 41 
CIS* 4* 
25fi 
1 170 

194 

nvi -* 
Ml 
34 

170 -2 

*93 


913 A 

206 -a 


M **?. 


1*8 a .. 
477 

280 #42 

73 
90 
270 


FINANCEANDLAND 


2*6 Ml ftMuwm 

18* 128 MkM Huna 
179* M >7 AmoaoMa 

*£ "i° B SS3. to 

283 194 (MOW 
43 18 cmm» 

as* 1 ? Emv * S» 


ra* 17 bm s b«i ra- 
ws 192 tejl SUM 133 

W 153 U*H 182 

7B 82 NjHamtMt « 

m wo Do 9% CM 

1*9 TM Ifew ntt bal 137 

220 205 TaaroMon 205 


19 09 .. 
32 29 81 


£19* 4'* 17.1 09 747 

2*0 .. 57 24379 

M* ij 42 209 

133 41 89 81 192 

182 .. 999 49 38.1 


nnacW Ttaara ippiw aa Fugo 20 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


49 38* 

208 WO 
*25 231 
2*7 190 
158 108 
111 ?ft 

132 102 
1« IW 
100 57* 
136 re 
308 2*3 
160 133 
180 112 
21', 15 
163 127 
13S IDO 
3*5 172 

133 111 
298 215 
168 ITS 
*63 330 
101* 7ft 

10*73* 
410 333 
118 « 
158 -110 
B1 82 
178 128 
330 216 
73 SB 
233 178 
IS 97 


AKZO WV Boaor 
AM CoW» 
Aran* 

Anenor Cnmlca 
BTP 

BayarDMSO 
Bfoam 
torn! Chama 
Or Burnt 
CandnB (W) - 

Qwati 
O0«a Bid* 

Do -A' 

anr(Ho*o> 
UDOB 
Do DU 

BH 9 Emcand 


Hurt* DM50 
Imp Oban ino 

ar 

Eh* . 


4* 400 

• ai 
.. UUJ 
51 
84 

♦I* TOT 
-1 .103 

89 
47 

.. 51 

.. 107 

41 85 
99 

.. 09 

-1 105 

0 .. 

I .. 89 

0 .. 47 
.. 139 

42 94 

143 219 

41* .. 

1 .. 499 

43 119 

» 54 

+1 29 

41 99 

-1 97 


.. 999 
11.1 49259 
49 21 125- 


CINEMAS AND TV 


488 -328 CM MM STB a-9 139 as 127 

20B 208 Kannadr Broofcaa 238 -2 24 15 122 

an 312 LadtnAt 348 181 49 185 

5(5 447 Lon PWfc HOMtt 620 .. 149 29189 

100 78* Mom cnartona 53* #-* 11 U 154 
105 97 pm* 01 w Head* « a .. 8i 24 155 

79 58* Quaana Mm 75* +1* 29 30 184 

*05 588 Savoy HOMtt "A* 888 50 14 149 

81 56 SMS 63 # .. 19 29 TS9 

aa Ml TraateonO* Fona 152 a-S 79 52151 


270 179 AirablV-A* 
52 27 Gramn 

9*0 178 HTVN/V 
373 283 LWT Worn 
350 188 SCO! TV 4- 
273 1*8 TVS NjV 
48 31 TSW 
237 m Thantt* TV 


949 .. 199 99 tU 

49 29 67 82 

218 114 52 89 

373 43 213 57 139 

320 +2 150 4.7 105 

2Z3 r 49 143a 64 119 

4S 19 59124 

287 -. -- .. 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 




-* 

95 

-* 

64 

-* 


-* 

100 

-* 

99 

-* 

102 

-* 

94 

-* 

65 

-* 

105 


95 

-■a 

65 


£i 

-"* 

90 


63 


90 

-<a 

65 

■* 

6* 


BO 

■<a 

84 

■* 

99 

-*• 

9.1 

■* 

iao 

■<B 

so 

<1 

83 

■* 

•90 

■* 

04 


DRAPERY AND STORES 



49 2711.1 
39 51242 
SB *3 1M 
99 £9 299 

80 05589 

0L7 13 3*9 

151 51 257 

69 22 219 
92 23389 
51 79 79 

1Z-1 39 143 

17.1 85156 
99 42205 
67 62 79 
89 32104 
13 13 130 

49 12 251 

79 19 179 
85 81 108 
139 29 282 
84 29 189 

81 24184 

23 23 94 

57 88187 


HO 179 AAH 

239 Mo AGSlMaareb 

727 » AM 

671 S3 AW 

170 80 AaroiKWI 

258 172 Mm 

30 207 MtxnUWM 

157 144 AkKMBB 

273 (30 AmtarM . 

403 155 Appttdoa 
47 32 Aianaoa 

32 23 Annour 
440 355 Ash A LACay 

91 99 Aantav 

5H) 212 Ass Or Eng 9% 
83 37* Aurora 

373 263 Am AMAier 

&£ SET 1 - . 


182 

us a .. 

581 

92 *43 

218 -*4 

SIS 
188 


386 277* BOC 


« gSS'jew 

310 216 BMiar pSte 


BtttmRttd 
Barrow HApDwn 


WS f *3 
S** -* 

3*3 

60 . *7 

200 

408 >2 

89 

228 #42 

280 

183 43 

18* 

350 

262 42 

105 

148 

a*2 *7 

2B0 

24 

IBB 

84 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


M 

12? ra* 



+2 

60 

S3 61 

B2 



.. 48! 

19) 


tSOb 75 .. 

t»* 



a* mm 

son 


179 

05 .. 

cn 


105 

67(12 

240 




209 

60 a 

480 


261 

67 7.1 

42 

47b 

-45 

100 

2*282 

328 

+15 

269 

09 41.1 

67 

+1 

29 

66 150 

m 

+1* 

£ 

M 

59 .. 

E37 

on 

■ft 

60 .- 
6911J 

cioe 

+1* 

69 

£1 .. 

esift +1* 

SOB 

44 

187 


68 

35112 

7B? 

+3 

281 

75 6C 

BI 

-3 

22 

35 M-1 

xib 

- +2 

Mttn 6? 0£ 

sn 


199 

£1 01 

00 

.10 

55 .. 

470 

a .. 

177 

6016* 

M8 

+2 

195 

60 TZ4 

780 

S 

2*0 

37 11.4 

427 


260 

50 82 

355 




125 



- . , t 

537 


asr.i 

69195 

ZT7 




817 


275 

5l3 54 

£114 


000 

85 99 


Esjn 

OKk Arrow - 

asraw 


+8 

7.1 

15 264 

r. 

29 

42 

a 

84 

03 

1.4 325 
87 105 

+3 

394 

22 .. 

-y& 

m 

30 15.1 


ELECTRICALS 


119 

64 

2£0 

31 

12 

175 

00 

05b 

02 

1 09 

“8* 

61 

15 




179 

83 

Vj 

181 

117 

99 

152 

24 

67 

45 


205 WO 

S 2* 

25 !8 

256 171 
m 34 

2^3 

MS. 1«7 


2*'.' 9* Bouton (Mm 
353 258 Bmator 
23* 1ft BOMttrkie 

130 75 BaanMA a ftp 

^ ^re Iwn 
■ *5* 33* Branvwn 
SO 35 BntendGp 
T9S 110 BfSJon 

liSSW* 
s « sar-- 

423 298 BRMnia 

’s n 

*9 K BmfeeTSBf 

ISO 148 BmatTwH 
30 19 &MIU0H4 
74 « Bnrtons (IMS) 


89 M Buna A H dttSDn 
106 66 CantaRtEDO 
SB a* CK4ft>Jrd 
30 58 CUM 
440 253 CwaoBra 
120 » C»n»>gi 
38* iftCcmSai 
8 4* CTO 8 SMv 


10$ H CtanbHtn « I 
sw 183 Caanar Cans 

8*0 310 CMmnne 
%$8 293 CMBHMlW 
U as- Chnsnr HM 


ISO 

111 

135 a-i 
mb a .. 

149 • .. 

240 a .. 
42 r 
130 


2T2 -7 

17* 

w * 

f * 

& 

1M -V 

» -V 


11.1 49 UJ 
99 69299 

H U 127 
3-0 107 
89 U 102 
112 81 185 
99 87 192 

181 5.1 lij 

99 69 85 
09 19 79 
aa 1.1 144 

aaa^ 79 ug 

114 53 . . 
14 82100 
89 29129 
29 49 92 
84b 1.8 287 
229 69119 
89 86 82 
14.1 AS 125 
89 25 202 
709 80114 

. . . . 184 

195 52 118 
10J 4.1 99 
99 49 149 
29 29175 

39 99129 
2S7* 89 69 
19b 78 .. 
107 991U 
35 59 87 
80 87169 
17.1 AS 184 
I .. .. 
19 44 312 

75 79 84 
79n 72 84 
81 49Z75 
2149 42 183 
in 15*33 
86 40 1*9 
34 19318 
50 45127 
81 45129 
85 40109 

7.1 49 100 

SO 1.1 ISO 
Mb as 87 

20 05 252 
M um 
17.1 40 164 
HM 40189 


175 59 135 
32 37 Sl* 

81 432SO 
DO 14 247 
7.1 47 83 
74 81 195 
14 1 J 684 

11.1 .. .. 
43 3912.1 
100 30142 

19 1.0 199 

82 89381 

20 60 72 
HU 7.1 89 


119 +3 

ss a-i 


—^Sold — 

O Tlrari r'f- i papin 1 iittit ad 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+31 points 

Claimants should ring; 0254-53272 


109 10183 
107 85 112 
4343 94 
81 09 272 
09 07 72 

09 20192 

109. 59 ISO 
XT 10267 
.. .. 112 

2.1 02 19.1 

59 14 324 

95 38 124 

04 115181 

10 09 .. 
19 4« 79 
29 0S2O9 

. 81 54 124 

41 23130 

85 20192 
lO 15 084 
*9 *9140 
am 39 155 

80 20189 

81 19 M9 

24 25159 
IJOb 29 185 
81 39 115 

82a 62119 

39 42 119 
17 29 80 
19 04 .. 

0.1 4B SO 
17.1b 89 539 
179 79 BlB 
14a 02 22.1 
154 42134 
14 09 262 

40 19170 
07 U U 

81 02 320 
0.1 n 85 15.2 
209 72 62 
70 79 139 

.. ..49 

Zb 85 235 
19 84 124 
STS SO .. 

75 29139 
75 44 U 
72 37149 

81 22 209 
.. .. 180 
40 24 MJT 
7.1b 15 254 
314 54132 
27 80 183 
07 19 B9 

81 15134 

89 4 ono 

07 89222 

MO 40181 
25 85 30 
260 61 359 

81 85 120 
29 09163 

79 27 800 

80 49140 
67 50 62 

81 50181 

39 OB 291 

129 SO 80 

40 8017.1 
22 24 189 

120 44 HO 





3*1 75 
ns - » 
li'4 13* 

ra* » < 
m 2M 
$40 283 
130 TOC 
185 WO 
204<<134<I 
180 154 
305 n§ 
MS 128 
238 1U 
ra* a 

M* m 
MB 181 
3» 239 
164 89 

231 174 
SO* M* 
1U 55 
119 79 
Zt5 210 
124 K 
263 177 
IBB 128 
740 3H 
ISO 120 


ESSw. 

MDMGkn 


S 5' 

178 US 


SSd Srai 

WUMfSM 
W nru T r y a 8 I 
•ttttn Eq 
VowoM 




-Z 1870 
a*! ».« 

S82 

+2* .. 
#■*2 79 

-t 109 
.. 71 

• . . 29 

-2 « 

-2 44 I 

a«2 i2.i . 

»* i.i 
-1 10 
.. 61 
*1 149 

-1 4.1 

30 

*! 43 

79 

-9 39 

70 

:: , Si 0 

17.1 

99 

.. 159 

39 
14a 
43a 
*5 29b 

47 


i9fl& 

H*?> Law Conpsny 


912 200 
u ra 
120 30 
44b 271 
7* 4* 
54 38 
SO u 
M3 « 
300 130 
48 IS 
M3 91 
31 21 
69* 43 
885 658 
IBS 133 
97 IB 
23* 11* 
153 41 

m so 

219 125 


OttMN Hat 
Ootf bat 
a Utt mre »* 
CKO 
•CC 04 
MOOD 

kca Mm 

LASMO 
DO Una* 

Naw Union CM 
P a t foccn 

Praavar 
tor* Dutch 
5na* 

Saottna 

Eaanpi 

Tnton Caropa 


unvi 
i]n u* 
O y? -. 


14 44 171 

20 *9 .. 

•B 239 54 114. 
1 . 

-1 43 331 44 

t-2 17* Ufl 43 

i4S no 

aa ico wo. 
l-l 103 

.. Z» 30 
«1? HO 30 17 
-7 BB 502*0 


+2 71*120 rs 

168 

+J 75 55 42' 


INSURANCE 


Don Uan 
Eouty t Law 

RU* 

Om Aoodwa 
ORE 

ManC E 
HOQO HeUrann 
laoal A Qan 
unmiitti 

Lon LM Inv 

waran 6 McLan 


S«M«q 

Sun I4a ~ ” 


-3 09 62 .. 

MO 3b .. 
>•1 rao 92 .. 
B .. 95 22387 

-2 447 53 .. 

-5 (74 U .. 

41 99 37 .. 

-/ 3*9 Li ado 

. . 41.1 49 3*9 

-14 34* 79 7.1 
» .. 87 42118 

-5 11.7 AS 33.1 

-9 95 44 78 

-4 349 57188 

• V 220 49 .. 
-1 114 40 12.0 

129 42200 
.. SO 43 .. 
-7 37.1 45 890 

.. 109 80 .. 

-9 386 47 S7.1 

*3 187 43 17.4 

157 97 W2 
a . . 100a 2* *1 a 

S 250 3* St* 
-6 339 99 .. 

49 80 99 
-A 186 90 19* 


59 N 
ISfl 177 
107 75 

305 325 
403 303 
3? Wi 
283 IS 
*8 34 

35* 1M 
no im 
713 178 

SO X 

580 953 
234 01 
218 16J 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


■ w TOi Cfc 53 0? 13 14* 

□ anm 143 -3 190 70 179 

Intty Uamaai 93 59 77 . 

Harraon CraaDakl 34b -4 788 til’s 

inenupa 403 *7 75 9 8 * 319 

Jack* (Wr4 U 19. 4* <23 

L«m 209 a-1 1*1 8 3 10 2 

Ooaan wtron *7 a-i 38 • i 

Pawson iecn 2H B« 40 70' 

Do A 713 aa 40 '0 

Pn*v Paco 151 -4 7-5 30 70 

Sana DaTOy 44 *1 

Sttai Brm 95b 23 9 <1 121. 

Toraf Mmato 1J1 -2 *19 

Vm Caw 210 IQO 40101 


i appasowPnaM 


LEISURE 



1*4 

M 

Bair I WA 'A 

1» 


100 

7.4 

100 

220 

171 

WS 

M 

Boosay 0 HavAaa 
Bram wwur 

15S 

104 


79 

49 

232 

187 

59 

3* 

Cwnpan 

*0 


14 

8« 

125 

225 

150 


TIKI 


00 

*4 

112 

*10 

375 

FM4 Liain 

361 


03 

26 

169 

67' 

49 

ORA 

SO 




420 

81 

129 

65 

93 

Hwibiaijw Brooba 
WMMlravO 

70 

1» 


63 

55 

*59 

67 

131 

94 

MJA» 

110 

a .. 

7.1 

0.1 

10* 

103 

32 

JAniMM 

43 


63 

109 

160 

180 


LM 

144 





IB 

130 

MaomMv 

130 


79n 

61 

07 


77B 


319 

• .. 

111 

35 

135 

an 

326 

RaaBy UMM 

3B 


101 

44 

161 

6* 

*3 


40 




264 

220 

380 

134 

155 

Saga Haadws 

130 

170 

a .. 

#♦10 

09 

.14 

69 

70 

115 

161 

72 

51 

lomwwn Hoaoor 

71) 

67a 

91 

127 

IBS 

t26*ZaOWS 

IBS 

a .. 

7.1 

35 

105 


MINING 


7 A 67 «2 
90 U 199 
57 22330 

iso urn 

114b 20 150 
20 87100 
120 47 183 
160 B0 161 

39 15169 
27 *7 102 

143 67 103 

40 30 113 

66 17 234 

49 94 79 
25 49 79 
52 41 60 
69 39 .. 
69 67 214 
aa 40 ia* 
61 117 S3 
65 10 07 

119 64 02 

181 47 144 
0.1 02153 

10.0 93 67 
1.1 81 610 
103 W» 124 
1-0 02 39.7 
14 81 509 
139 61184 
181 57 67 

ISO 3JM.1 


W< 3't Ang Anar Cod 
10*830 Ang Am 
57* 31 Am Gam 
58 33 AATT 

40 22 An j brm l 

At S 09 'A' 

MB 12D Avar HHan 
425 231 dpocn 
180 BO Brartan 
21* ft BUMS 
.358 238 CRA 

90 41 Can Boyd 

534 *09 Con* GOUMUS 
131 314 Da Baao 
200 JfflS DaMnai 

0* 4* QoorttoaWn 

n* 7 DnaKnaai 
7* 2* Outm 
256 150 E DMgas 
59* 23b P bwffSo 
205 120 BOB 
195 85 EUaig 
9H 200 E Raw Odd 
4* 2* e nop 
0 4* FS Com 

213 93 PSDW 
75 17 oaavor Tin 

ft 4* OM* 

10 6 OanbUrg 

10* 5* GFBA 
478 313 CMHalBMIl* 

83 35 Gopin0 

% 85 QraorMlcn Ra* 

375 165 Groontti 
U9 Bi l i am pia w Ataas 
ft 4* ttonnony 
350 175 HartM 

91 *7* Jams 
IS* SV Owe ss 
ft ft Xtaol 

180 65 nests 
lft 6* Ubanoa 
■sio 170 UxMia 
157 6* I9M 
» 15 Mattyaan Unng 

123 60 Manama 
37 14* MaMS Era 

20 5* ktangui 

g s* imSIb 

855 450 Unons 
S* a* NawVtta 
142 73 M# BRttan Hb 

44 as* urn mart 
22* 1ft OibmAn 
128 95 PatahMTbi 
289 20* NroWMaatf 
25 9* Rand Mttaa Lbf 

445 ITD Rand Mnaa Wop 
SB 18 Rautoram 
322 225 BMaon 
701 511 mx 
7*1 4'a H ra w raup 

10-3 ft a Hama ft 

188 88 5A LaM 
31 M’» StkSIWMl 

559 273 SWontm 
MS M Sungai Baa< 

IN » Kunon 
509 300 IMW 
89* 31* «W naala 

544 233 VMM P 0H 

105 GO VWdonam 
80 35 VOpata 

• 17 io* wuha Canary 

545 2 U wato n 

310 Ufl Wamm Ataaa 
29* IS Ktt a awi Daap 
in iw wanam iam 
205 108 *tt»t Band Cans 
uo 80 wron Croak 
17* 7*1NMia» 

56 2D WI ligal 

IF) 1ft Zambia Coppar 
59 N Zbnopan 


461 

*25 54* 72 .. 

449 181 .. 
271 61 .. 

142 56 .. 
.. 142 54 .. 

.. 475 31.7 .. 

*5 760 265 .. 

4-W 260 225 .. 
.. 282 205 .. 


45 35.0 79117 

.. 160 44 .. 

4-10 40 29 .. 

4.** BM 184 .. 
** 128 160 .. 


+15 180 39 

89 84137 
+10 149 114 .. 
+10 280 (88 .. 
+* 


+* BOO 112 
+■• WO 120 
+* 480 72 
+20 .. .. 
.. 209 629 


+18 549 292 .. 
.. 64 37 329 

+•» 589 10.7 .. 
-3 170 72 .. 

+1 345 6* .. 

+* 990 189 .. 
a +* 400 69 .. 
.. S3 © 34.1 .. 
+* 115 139 .. 


+W 100 80 
.. 239 77 

+1 .. .. 
♦1* .. .. 


.. ISO 57 67 
+1 551 117 .. 

+4 

41 *4 12 U 

+* 360 39 609 
128 195 .. 

.. 160 265 .. 
+* 119 63 .. 

+U 


*75 48.® 129 .. 

+* 550 14.1 .. 

+10 549 161 .. 
+3 150 272 .. 

49 109 62 
+* ...... 

+19 979 179 .. 
4« 250 182 .. 

171 61 .. 
*8 30 81 .. 

.. WO 02 .. 

49 

+* 176 169 .. 

+2 1.1 39 .. 

.. ..a .. .. 

+3 97 8 9 - 



99 49 197 

89 49 89 
64 92 67 

54 IO 362 
14 99 119 
61 89 WO 
49 61 64 


61 61 109 
83 29279 


30 

17 

274 214 

98 

55 

90 

49 

4M 

♦SS* 1 

141 

103 

195 

120 

170 

2! 

IB* 

122 

154 

108 

101 

£ 

B 

29 

138 

75 

ta 

T03 

998 

703 

83'. 

: 3? 

303 

m 

149 

JQ*j 

EDO 


3JP* 2n 

133 

94 

41 

30 

329 


W6 

183 

1U 

t 

i6b 

43 

ftTD 

345 

900 M 

120 

M 

90 

08 

X10 

193 

224 

183 

248 

ISO 

284 

BO 

43 

1! 

221 

1« 

587 

3*9 

ira 

116 ' 

250 

95 

535 

£9 

OB 

33 1 

ft 

ft 

00 

*1 

IBS 

118 ' 

112 

91 

281 

n ■ 


m 

349 

3*0 ' 

2*3 

200 ' 

WS 

ira < 

22 

»* ■ 

80 

00 ; 

144 

78 ’ 



86a 79 01 


U 

60 134 


15 

25507 

+1 

87 

67 187 

a .. 

05 

U 09 

Ba 




63 

87 135 


69 

80 M5 

• .. 

14 

1.1 313 

• .. 

• 1.4 

15 292 

a .. 

85 

25 281 


24 

52140 


39 




105 75 

#♦5 

»5 

81 161 


14 

87 91.1 

+5 

181 

08 60 

u 

03 

72124 

-1 

3bJ> 

sane 

a+T 

£5 

2521 j 


04 


♦i 

68 

25 207 


05 

45 147 

+4 

75 

67 120 

-1 

79 

79 95 


265 

.. 462 

. , 

67181 


105 

35 M* 


39 

33 279 


17.1 

7.0 12 

a .. 

60 


+2 

. . • 

.. SJB 

+2 


60 188 
25 314 

■ +I 







142 

62105 

W.+M 

300 

60184 


.. b 



43 

63 £3 

a .. 

105 

8017.7 

+<* 


74 

-* 



44 

4.7 119 

• +2 

It 

60 M.1 
88 124 

• *4 
*2 

58b 15 265 
18* 05 70 

• n 

167 

60 119 


99 

64 167 



. 275 


ai 

61 679 

• .. 

29 

33 MJ 



MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


-1 1075 49 154 

75 90 89 
... 89 19 160 

+1 15 84 144 

.. .. I .. .. 

11.1 9*159 
.. 22-6 45 185 

-2 GO 97 149 
79 95 .. 
•-1 67 8* 82 

# 64 59 07 

# .. TJ 87 149 

61 

4S 49 15 fl.l 

•+7 79 39 .. 

44 43 M 109 

a+8 259 161 .. 

*3 U 63102 
+23 37 as .. 

*2 187 80 89 

61 61 09 
30 27 ISO 
+7 181 49 107 

a+1 79 60 1M 

-2 157 39105 

-t 64 S3 119 
.. $4 09 84 

.. 61 49185 

84 68 Ml 
+4 12 81 129 


312*187 MWK Be MRS 285 -9 71 27 146. 

OB# 2S8 Br Coun cil l a W ffl MO -3 7.1 2 7 18 J 

368 213 CoMon 229 -3 71 31 *00' 

84 56 Rflttr (Jamaa) 72 +2 4.7 6 5 131 

603 460 oratt 500 #.. J1.4 43 64- 

76 64* Jacob* m 70 516 73534. 

12* 5 Lytt 0* +1 08. 

41 26 Mbsay Dock* 32 34 

221 160 CKaanTranraen 216 +1 08 49 100 

576 428 P A O DU 505 -1 28* 4 5 14 5' 

169 U ftunanroi (W*tw) 138 7 1 62 Si 4 

348 132 npnook 318 a. sa nus- 

990 380 TIAMUI ScoR 370 12* 35 515 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


208 MS Sanar Booth MS 
45 32 i n aa um Sun* X) 
218 188 Lambwl HowUlb 175 
82 62 MtwbOH 6 Burton 6« 
114 82 nm 106 

157 118 Soong C Faflar mb 


S73 150 ElyftJ 


86b 30 117 
M3 87 92- 
67 18 . 

82 47 03, 
44 69 103 
62 58 79 
114 77 S0 - 


226 •.. 64 20 275 ■ 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


187 184 A dart 
980 198 AKK B 


64 V 202 
60 6003 
53 29 179 
149 65 17.4 
S66 69167 
11.1 81 207 

11.1 99 191 
91 89 235 
209 69105 
HM> 65 149 
tZ9 61 .. 
160 ZB 165 
M9 1.1 .. 
99 £0179 

07 O’ XI J 
71 A 62119 
280 02149 


SBS* AMd raw 205 

135 Afefe B<«s 240 

97 BfettlioH) 152 

80 BaUofen (A] 104 

123 8r 131 

00 Bawl Lianb •* 

.- 53* Cotab 75 

100 CawHAds 201 

.2 w 1 “ 

196 OsMOO 242 

42 Damn 45 

25 Dm ira 45 

68 FOBfr (JottO 75 

n Oosui Broadttom 00 

» Hemng Funtagsa 37 

» tngran (Harold 145 

47 Jarona (S) 70 

132 Lanom 100 

138 Laads its 

6* unr 115 


71 AllaS^tHugh) 
10 LbirSi 
*4 MM« 

90 RkM 


jw SET 120 

15 Brow us 

« Sniattmsw (R) 69 

W ftesmay -05 

S JbWi roaJw ttr 143 

85 Tom m aona IBS 

j 79* Toond 03 

235 YOfWyda 260 


a.. 107 30 too- - 

.. IDO 40163 

89 43 61 
£3 79 122 
66 65 B6‘ 
*1 7.1 76 213 

♦1 67 70 . 

+1 93 36 86 

#*1 2.1 1 3 132. 

a-10 89 8? 130 

-1 07 16354' 

57 187 £1 
♦1 50 67 65 

79 01 71- 

+5 43 io 107. 

49 65 75.. 

4-2 64 40 10.4 

00 63 120 
-2 14 12 100 

+1 02 100 139- 

69 60 158 

.. a .. 60. 

+3 69 4*173 

-* 2J 50 95" 

a 79 09 00 

-2 64 4311* ' 

IB 00 34 
a+6 63 34 74 

8 .. 06 50 B I 

60 66147. 
.. 57 61 07' 

100 00 bi- 


TOBACCOS 


431 

908 

BaT 

415 -1 

173 

4? 105 

167 

137 

Rahman* -0' 

18i • 

95 

90 57 


• ExdMdenda Ex al b Forecast dtvklond • rnwrerf 
poymmpassodf Prira at suspension aDiwclend and' 
yw • ap«cM psymam k Pfe-margra < 90 «& rf 

HJrocwt eemmss o Ex oftar r & itahts * Ex scrip or 
sham spit t Tbx-froe .. No skmftcan! data. 7 




































































































ENERGY IN THE HOME/1 


( FOCUS 1 


By Frank Brown 


Fifty ways to stop 
billions going 
through the roof 


Tomorrow sees the opening of 
Energy World, an exhibiuon 
of 50 energy-efficient houses 
created to promote good hous- 
ing design, and to increase 
awareness of the savings and 
greater comfort that energy- 
efficiency can offer. 

The four-week show at Mil- 
ton Keynes is the biggest event 
in Energy Efficiency Year. It 
puts the spotlight on energy 
conservation — a many fac- 
eted subject which affects the 
nation at every level from 
government to the man in the 
street, or rather at home 
grumbling about high fuel 
bills. 

. According to the Energy 
Efficiency Office, Britain is 
bottom of the international 
energy-efficiency league. The 
nation wastes one-fifth of its 
total energy consumption, the 
equivalent of £7 billion a year, 
which is more than our in- 
come from North Sea oil. This 
could be saved if the cost- 
effective energy-efficiency 
measures available now were 
implemented throughout the 
country. 

Of the £7 billion, some £3 
billion arises from wastage in 
Buildings, and £2 billion from 
domestic homes. Much of this 
money could be saved by 
measures that require modest 
dr no investment Moreover, 
many of the savings could 
result in greater comfort 

But they are not being 
implemented on anything like 
the scale required because 
there, is a widespread lack of 
awareness, interest and 
information on ignorance 
about the benefits of energy 
efficiency. We lack the skills to 
manage the energy we 
consume. 

In the domestic sector, for 
example, the Government 
provides more than £400 mil- 
lion in beating allowances to 
underwrite fuel bills in 


low-income households. 
Much of this money is for fuel 
used on inefficient heating in 
poor housing. 

Two years ago. the Energy 
Secretary, Peter Walker, an- 
nounced a major initiative to 
overcome these problems with 
the aim of lifting Britain from 
bottom to top of the inter- 
national energy-efficiency 
league. 

Whether this ambitious 
objective will be achieved, 
remains to be seen. Numerous 
awareness campaigns and in- 
centive schemes to encourage 
the use of energy-saving mea- 


Incentive schemes 
show good results 
and require only 
small investments 


sures have been introduced 
and are producing results. 
Probably the best known in- 
centive scheme in the domes- 
tic sector is the Homes 
Insulation Scheme, which pro- 
vides grants to householders 
towards the cost of installing 
for loft insulation. 

The Energy Efficiency Of- 
fice gives help to voluntary 
organizations to. set up local 
projects for carrying out in- 
sulation work in the homes of 
the elderly and the dis- 
advantaged. The work is done 
by unemployed people under 
the Community Programme 
. run by the Manpower Services 
Commission. 

The Government has also 
provided financial assistance 
for combined heat and power 
generation and district heating 
projects in various parts of the 
country. 

Energy standards are being 
prepared and published. The 


johnManfwig 


British Standards Institution, 
for example, has published a 
code of practice for energy 
efficiency in buildings - BS 
8207 — together with an 
associated design guide. In 
addition, the Department of 
the Environment is revising 
the energy-efficiency pro- 
visions of the building 
regulations. 

Energy utilization and con- 
servation is also being studied 
in schools. The Department of 
Energy organizes seminars for 
teachers and provides educa- 
tional materia] for school- 
children of all age groups. 

Awareness has also spread 
to the building societies, as 
exemplified by the Anglia 
Building Society's sponsor- 
ship of Energy World, and 
Abbey NazionaTs participa- 
tion as a house exhibitor. 

Even the Inland Revenue is 
sympathetic in that certain 
energy-saving improvements 
qualify for tax relief! 

After Energy World, the 
Department of Energy will 
step up its campaign in the 
domestic sector with a mas- 
sive Moneigy (“get more for 
your money: get more out of 
your energy”) mail and TV 
campaign. Every household in 
the country will be canvassed. 
A free magazine, Monergy 
News, will give advice on 
energy saving measures and 
carry special offers on energy- 
efficient' products from 
advertisers. 

Awareness of the need for 
energy-efficiency is still poor. 
A recent survey of architects 
carried out by the magazine 
Building Design found that 
only a quarter of the firms 
questioned felt they were 
reasonably skilled in energy 
conservation. The rest admit- 
ted they were almost com- 
pletely ignorant of energy 
issues. 


Energy savers: Hughes Homes, above, StepneD Homes, below left and PCKO House, below 
right; and below, a Hasfam Home made predondnantly In glass - 


* 


Architects can 
now ‘tune in’ 


A lot of work has beendooc to 
encourage energy efficiency 
but die growth of enemy- 
oonsriousness among archi- 
tects. builders and house 
buyers has been hampered by 
the lack of a commonly ac- 
cepted way of 
quantifying standards for 
measuring how energy-ef- 
ficient a given house is. 

Visitors to Energy World* 
however, will be aWe to 
compare the relative .fuel 

efficiencies of she house on 
show, because each one has 
been rated according to its 
energy performance on a com- 
mon standard. The rating 
used is the Mfiton Keynes 
Energy Cost Index (MKECI). 

This is based on an estimate 
of a house's total annual 
running costs per square me- 
tre under certain standard 
conditions of occupancy and 
use. It is presented as a figure 
bet w een 90 and 250 — the 
lower the figure, the lower the 
house's Ukdyniuniag costs. 

The estimate takes into 
account foe house's location 
and orientation as weH as its 
size and fabric, and so goes 
further thaw cu rrent building 
regulations, which con- 
centrate on the materials and 
methods used in construction. 

A house buOt to current 
building regulations would 
have an MKEO rating of 170. 
The performance standard foe 
Milton Keynes Development 
Corporation his set nr foe 
houses at Energy World is 120 
— about 30 per cent better. 

The MKECI differs from 
current building regulations in 
that it does not specify which 
measures should he used to 
meet the standard. Thus, it 
gives architects and builders 
greater degree of flexibility in 
design and construction. 

The index does not predict 
actual energy consumption, 
but is rather hire the fuel . 
economy rating of a car. The 
miles per gallon figure as- 
sumes certain speed and driv- 
ing conditions, but does not 
predict actual fuel consump- 
tion as thre depends mainly on 
how people actually drive and 
take care of their cars. 

The MKCEI is estimated by 
using a special computer jhd- 
eram on a IBM or similar 


personal computer. The pro- 
gram can also help witithfittae 
by telling in architect 


tores wiB be foe most effective 


He simply keys in the 
various enogy-retaud param- 
eters of foe house he is 
dfrignfog , including external 
factors such as the type of sod 
the house is. built rev foe 
house's oricnrasiocLand how 
overshaded h is. The com- 
puter then produces foe index 
in a few seconds. 

The architect can “tune" his 
design to achieve foe. op^ 
timum index figure in wrmxof 
cost and efficiency, by chang- 
ing any parameter value in tire 
J ! ■* — : — v je — on. 


the index figure. 

The MKECI program bat 
been developed by foe Milton 
Keynes Development Corpor- 
ation after many years' experi- 
ence in developing energy- 
efficient housing. It has ben 
field tested and it will be 
further tested next year, when 
the 12 months' monitored 
performance of various 
houses on the Energy World 

Common measure 
is finally possible- 

site win be compared against 
their respective index ratings. 

The Index has been enr 
dorsed by the Budding Re- 
search Establishment of 
the Department' of the 
Environment, but it does have 

its critics. Some sectors of the 
building industry argue that 
the building regulations relat- 
ing to foe enetgy efficiency of 
braiding fabric should fust be 
tightened before a more vari- 
able cost index is formulated. 

In terms of amending or 
augmenting the building 
regulations, the Department 
ofEneray plans to issue a draft 
discussion paper this autumn 
with a view to amending or 

aAHnfl jA-tlM»fnri «ripg huilHinj 

regulations. 

According to the DoE, the 
changes would come into 
force in a year’s time, and the 
possibility of a cost index 
acceptable tobouse designers, 
builders and buyers alike, 
would follow some time after 

fhnr 


’ What you see iii there will totally 
revolutionise your thinking on the homes 
of the future. 

Not only does that mean they can offer 
very economical running costs, but they 
can also give a high level of comfort and a 
: fresh air environment, even in winter 

The secret of these houses is that they 
are all-electric. 

Built by Prowtmg Estates and/East 
Midlands Electricity the houses incorpor- 
ate the latest electric heating systems that 
are designed to make the most of Economy 
7 night time electricity — which costs less 
than half price compared with today’s 
standard domestic rate. 

On top of this they have a high level of 
insulation complemented by an electrically 
operated ventilation system incorporating 
heat-recovery 

The proof of the efficiency of these 
houses is that they have satisfied the 
organisers of Energy World that they offer 
exceptionally low running costs. 

Plot 25 is full of surprises. And there 
are others in store for you on Plot 22c; 
another all-electric home— built by Barratt 
in co-operation with the Electricity Supply 
Industry ; 

, If you’d like to find out how electricity 
can help you build houses of the future 
today visit plots 25 and 22c at Energy 
World, or dial 100 and ask for ' 
Freefone BuildElectric 


BUILD! 


The Electricity Council, England and V^ates, 




1 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


%ch ite c > 

nmv ;tuis 






Traditional 
buildings are 
hard to beat 


FOCUS 


ENERGY IN THE HOME/2 


IMTON KEnCES ENERGY 
COST INDEX 


MEASURES THAT COULD BE INCLUDED 
IN A LOW ENERGY HOUSE 


TteMCEahn^BOmniwai 


nt dfrua rnniM 


SomII dooWc or MpK-tfKad TSOmrn M outitan 

•mdMwitlimAtns 

BM*oang>«tMta I 


l« - ■ ■ i ■ f 1 


lc 


The Energy World Exhibition qoiddy. The cast concrete 
provides a ra-e opportunity to house, however, heats up 
see the different ways of quickly but absorbs heat and 
creating a house that is energy- therefore cools slowly 
efficient, cheap to run and A good example ’of the 
connwiabte to live in. .traditional approach to en- 


._-_ n v UJ CD- 

. I be MJ houses on view are a .ergy-efficrent design is the 
Showcase of the latest thinking Pilkineton House. 

in rnmnuiffimanmi a.j a l:. .1 . . 


r-’a'i-X 




in energy-efficiency. And it is 
interesting to note that tra- 
ditional brick-buih houses 
outnumber ’ those built by 
more modem techniques. 

■ Of the ■ 32 firms at the 
exhibition, 18 are exhibiting 
brick-built homes, 12 are 


showing timber-frame homes, 
and two feature homes ’of 
pdured-concrete construction: 
All have insulated ground 
floors (a requirement not 
specified in the building 
regulations) as well as in- 
sulated roofs and walls, and 
double glazing. 

Nearly 90 per cent are 
heated by ga& Of the rest, four 
are 'all -electric, including the 
house -with the lowest energy 
cost index, and two use soud 


-- - 




- :: 




A big three-bedroom de- 
tached house costing about 
£ 100 , 000 . h is constructed 
from products in widespread 
use, and has an energy cost 
index rating of 81.1 - less than 
half the value. achieved by a 
bouse built to standard build- 
ing regulations. 

Most of the improvement 
has been achieved by a 
combination of high stan- 
dards of insulation, maximiz- 
ing solar gain (heat from the 
sun), double glazing with high- 
performance glass and using 
high-efficiency boilers. 

The design, based on 
Pilkington's 10 years' experi- 
ence in energy-housing 
projects, is intended to show 
that there need be no mys- 



■rxjtlMahfh 

•ummtrtuj.mil 


■ : ■.■-.3 


IW.T0N KEYHES 
■ENERGY PARK 
STANDARD 


W*. 





Hfebefflciancr 


Hmidcdb- 

gtandwn«M« 


tfmughcnt 


Sourer WDC 


Co ?n!o^ 
J s lln allv{ft 


fuel as their main source of tique, or cost penalty, in 
7 — achieving good-quality design 


Landscaping can 
. cut heat losses 




TrTfiS 




r.. 

• ■wj.. 


heating. None uses ofl (Opec 
please note). 

‘ Many make use of passive 
solar measures such as south- 
feeing conservatories and liv- 
ing areas. Some have land- 
scaped gardens that provide 


at low cost. 

The use of traditional 
construction methods fin- 
cheap energy-efficient bousing 
is demonstrated by the Milton 
Keynes Development Corpor- 
ation. which has - built a com- 
plex of flats, houses and 
bungalows on a site near the 
exhibition entrance. 

Costing between £23,000 


***iucir> mat provide tv.Tg' jujj.uw 
shelter from the wind. One * aiKl wOOO, they range from 
plot makes use of wind- °" 5 -bedroom flats to fbur- 


'‘--Si: 
_ '"** ?’3 
''•■■■» *■ 
- -••• “L jt, 

"“'rzsist 


generated electricity. 

The houses on show illus^ 
treie' two main schools of 
thought. 

• One is to nse traditional 
methods and materials com- 
bined with careful design that 


bedroom houses. They incor- 
porate numerous energy- 
savmg features which, with 
close attention to construction 
details, site layout and scheme 
planning, have led to running 
costs being -20 per cent less 



The timber-frame house ' 
on the left, buflt by Laing, 
is the most energy-efficient 
building at the exhibition. 
Its heating and hot-water 
costs are only £80 a year. 
Other houses, like the one 
above right, by PCKO 
Architects, make the most ' 
of the sun by having large 
areas of double glaring 


■HBHn I 

Living in the showcase 


bined with careful design that “““S'" .P* cent less 
makes maximum use of natu- Iff 1 ! ■ coin P® ra bIe properties, 
ral resources such as sunlight 1 Mrporauon says. 

I "-.I U «• . 1 




ral -resources such as sunlight 
and shelter, to complement a 
basic cavity-wall construction 
of brick outside and concrete 
building blocks inside, the 


.Poured-concrete houses, as 
their name, implies, are made 


by casting the house walk on- 
site and filling the wall cavity 


: 32 

• .-<_•* 6 . 7 ^- 


(.-uiiuiiig uiuwiu* rnsiae, me - wau ut»iw 
cavity being filled with insula- w «h ■ insulation. This weD- 
tion. The result' is a structure P^^en technique can be ap- 


uon. me resun is a structure \ “- umi H uc tan oe ap- 
fibat acts like a storage heater P” 6 ** to contract work for local 
it absorbs heat, radiating It authorities and housing 
internally, and is slow to cooL associations, as well as to 


-••• v ;a 
:■» a* 7 

• “ 


Mowlem house has 24 energy- 
saving features, including a 
sun space/conservatory, con- 
trolled ventilation with heat 
recovery, lobbies on outer 
doors, double glaring and 
good insulation in the roof 
wails and floor. 

A German-developed vari- 
ation on the concrete tech- 
nique is embodied in the 
Muhitfaerm Easibuild house. 
Its shell has been made by 
pouring the concrete into 
moulds of Polystyrene, which 
subsequently provide the 
insulation. 

The technique provides 
high-energy efficiency without 


. 4£«n a. 


construction procedures are 
simple and labour require- 
ments modest The result is a 
dose-tolerance shell that en- 
ables external and internal 
finishing to. be completed 
quickly. 

The environmental in- 
dependence of timber-frame 
houses is exemplified in the 
all-eleciric, three-bedroom 
house and two-bedroom flats 


built by Laing. Their airtigbt- 
ness coupled with their 
humidityHcontrolIed heating 
and ventilation systems en- 
able them to be energy-ef- 
ficient without relying on the 
sun.. • 

The house has an energy 
cost index of only 41.1 — the 
lowest in the exhibition — and 
its annual heating and hot- 
water costs are only £80. 

Other, houses also_. yield 
handsome savings for their 
occupants. The equivalent of a 
free family holiday every year 


again 

Plot 25 


ailVS?asyBK 

is to use more modem meth- . f four-bedroom house depending on any particular 
ods that make houses in- P U1 “ W Mowlem,for example, orientation. It can be used for 
dependent of the environ- 15 on the low-eneigy dwellings of any size or cost It 
menL They have a weft- passive smar housing the com- can also be used to extend 
insulated inner sheH-of either 1979 .for the- buildings with minimal struc- 
tj mb«i jor^casLffflacr^K. “P«i- lural disturbance and without 

outer skin is of brick, render- gwntar estate in Milioh” occupamsTtavihg to evacuate 
ing or timber dadding. The Ke y nes - the house, 

inner shell is airtight, making At about £100,000, the The company claims the 


ing or timber dadding. The 
inner shell is airtight, making 
heating and ventilation easier 
to control. 

The timber-frame, house 
heats quickly, but also cools 


Energy World is co-sponsored by the Anglia Bidding Society and wffl be mien for 
^fflergy world Bnsmess exhibition from September 26 until October 1 


is claimed for the energy 
■ savings provided by a four- 
bedroom timber-frame house 
built by the Abbey National 
Building Soriety. It makes 
maximum use of energy-sav- 
ing features such as insulation, 
window size and siting. 

Heat loss through the walls 
is prevented by earth berms - 
protective banks of earth 
against the walls - which also 
keep the walls cool in summer. 
Wind speed is also reduced by 
careful siting of trees and 
shrubs. 

Another advantage of tim- 
ber-frame houses is that they 
are quicker to build. One 
house at Energy World, the 
ASPP New Tudor, was erected 
and finished in a fortnight. 

But despite their advan- 
tages, timber-frame houses 
have had to overcome bad 
publicity in the early-1980s 
when there were numerous 
complaints of damp walls and 
other defects. 

These problems were 
caused mainly by building 
workers, who were not famil- 
iar with timber-frame tech- 
niques. Though this method 
of construction has been used 
in Scandinavia and elsewhere 
for many years, it is new 10 
Britain. 

With the advent of the 
government's Monergy cam- 
paign to cut energy consump- 
tion in homes, and the 
associated drive for more ’ 
energy=efficient houses,' 
Bri tain’s timber-frame in- 
dustry seems to linking up 
with Scandinavian and other 
overseas producers to start a 


big sales drive. Energy World 
will be a natural platform for 
promoting their techniques. 


With its 50 fbeJ-effitient 
houses, the Energy World 
Exhibition represents the first 
phase of the MB ton Keynes 
Energy Park - the new city's 
most ambitious project in en- 
ergy efficiency. 

The first iff its kind in the 
1 world, it is a 300 acre (125 
■ hectare) site that will hare 
employment areas, housing, 

! ’ fts kiand and community facil- 

i fries designed to promote en- 
ergy efficiency, internationally 
as well as in Britain. 

This seven-year project be- 
gan in 1985. It will eventually 
boose 3,100 people and pro- 
vide 2£00 jobs. It will help 
residents and businesses to cm 
their energy costs, and give 
them the most modern com- 
munications and information 
services. 

The venture is being carried 
out by the Milton Keynes 
Development Corporation 
with the support of private 
companies, government 
departments, local authorities, 
the energy utilities, and tele- 
communications authorities. 

A wide range of housing is 
planned, including ones for 
sale and plots for setf-bmld- 
ing. There will also be shel- 
tered boosing for the elderly, 
and shared-ownership boosing 
for tenants wishing to buy a 
“share” of their house. Com- 
munal facilities will include 
shops, schools, meeting halls 
and a local park. 

Businesses win have a 
choice of ready-built premises 
or sites for those who prefer to 
build their' own accommoda- 
tion. Construction of the first 
commercial properties will . 

start soon. 

Buildings and landscaping 1 
are being designed to 'ent "'] 
energy costs In a minimum. 
Every bunding design will ( 
have to meet the same exacting 1 
standards In energy efficiency j 
as the houses in Energy 1 
World. j 

Residents . and businesses 1 


win be encouraged to nse the 
most efficient energy re- 
sources, and the most energy- 
efficient equipment. Heat 
pumps and combined heat and 
power systems for serving 
groups of bnilduigs are being 
considered 

As part of the park's role in 
promoting energy efficiency, a 
monitoring service will be set 
up to assess the effectiveness 
of new energy-saving tech- 
niques and to compare the 
energy usage of buildings on 
the site against the predictions 
made by their rating on the 
MKECI (Milton Keynes En- 
ergy Cost Index). 

In addition, commercial en- 
ergy-management and build- 
ing services management will 
be offered, including the re- 
mote control of beating, light- 
ing and air-conditioning. 


Teleshopping is 
on the cards 


particularly for s mall and 
medium-size companies. 

Opportunities for energy- 
efficient transport are also 
plan n ed including an Energy 
Track for experimental en- 
ergy-efficient vehicles. 

From the outset, the park 
will have the most advanced 
telecommunications fariljtfrs 
from both British Telecom and 
Mercury. Businesses will have 
a wide choice of voice, data and 
video services. 

Residents wfll have a cable- 
TV service offering seven 
entertainment channels, FM 
radio and the local-community 
. channel with Protovideoton, a. 
combination of teletext and_ 
photo quality images. 

Long-term plans include 
enhancing the provision of 
local information by up- 
grading the cable-TV system 
with interactive services such 
as tetebanking, teleshopping 
and an electronic mailbox. 


e The Energy Park will also 
sene as a large-scale demon- 
- stration project for energy 
« efficiency. In the heart of the 
a park will be the Energy Cen- 
K tre, which will be the focus for 
9 all the park's activities, and a 
permanent international 
1 information, education and 
1 recreation complex for 
I promoting the understanding 
1 and efficient use of energy. 

A visitors' centre will ex- 
plain the concept of the En- 
ergy Park and provide advice 
and informatiuu. An exhib- 
ition area will use the latest 
display techniques to entertain 
and inform visitore on the 
subject of energy. Exrra de- 
tails will be available at a 
permanent trade centre. 
There, people will gel access to 
sources of information from ail 
over the world. 

The complex wfll also hare 
an education centre which will 
provide programmes for 
schoolchildren, teachers, 
householders and energy pro- 
fessionals. In addition, it w iU 
be linked to an exhibition park 
where visitors will be able to 
see large-scale displays in an 
attractive site next to lakes 
and parkland. 

The Energy Centre will also 
be an administration base for 
companies in the park, and 
will provide management and 
business services. The entire 
complex will be managed by a 
company which will also be 
responsible for monitoring the 
projects in the Energy Park. 

To foe ns attention on the 
Energy Park and stimulate 
energy awareness, the Milton 
Keynes Development Corpor- 
ation plans to follow Energy 
World with a .series of ex- 
hibitions on other aspects of 
energy. These include a 
demonstration of energy ef- 
ficiency in business, and a 
large-scale exhibition on 
transport at which the latest 
fiiel-eff»cient vehicles will be 
pat through their paces. 



£' 





SB? 


s A V E • Y OUR-ENERGY 



Visit Lot 15 and discover how Super Homes buift the most energy efficient house* 
•for Laing at the Milton Keynes Energy World Exhibition. 

. Then find out how Super Homes can save time, money and energy for you. 
You II discover how the resources and products of Super Homes can assist you in 
responding to today’s challenges of the market place. 

The Super Homes 3 bedroom- house is 43 .9 on the Milton Keynes Energy Cost Index 


□ I wouldlike an invitation to meet Super Homes at Energy World during 
Business Week (Sept 26th - Oct 1 stj 
O Please send me more information on Super Homes 

Name.: ; : — _ Position 


Company, 
Address _ 


-sasrttssisassss- sssKasasssrss. 




D 


SUPER-HOMES LTD - 1 DGLTjC AVENUE ; ROOKSLEY ■ MILTON KEYNES BUCKS MK1 3 8 LD 


WeVe built 50 of the world’s most energy- 
efficient houses, they’re all fully furnished and 
they're open to the public for 4 weeks to show 
you exactly how energy can be saved in the 
home. 


There's also street entertainment 
restaurants, bars, barbecue. 


ITONuKEVNES 


. . ' ~ ‘v 6 vviawam nouse ano 

plenty of free parking space. 

So, come to Energy World, you'll have a 
great time and you could save yourself a fortune. 
August 23rd - September 21 st 10.00 a.m. 
ou p.m. daily. Admission: E3. Under IB’s 
^id senior citizens: £t Under 5's: free. £7 
haniily Ticket. (Sony, no pets.) By car: Ml 
Junction 14. By British Rail: Euston 


urants. bars, barbecue. it’ll pay you to see it. SSSSSsSSSS “ 

Ogmised by Milton Keynes Development Corporation and sponsored bv the Annte r, RnriM y 





f 








24 


THE TIMES FRiDa*' AUGUST 22 19»6 


\ 



J 

s 

lc 

N 

d 

n 

ft 

rt 

C 

li- 

re 

at 

y« 

0 

IL 

It 

IT 

T 

u 

IT 

li 

Ic 

Y 

P 

H 

O' 

T 

it 

u 

fr 

it 

Cl 

at 

al 

1 

T 

vi 

in 

ai 

in 

le 

it 

di 

“i 

ci 

le 

pi 

b- 

if 

w 

R 

it 

P< 

lL 


lu 

U 


% *. 

IS< 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


^qustin Rover-in the Wests Endl\ 

' 


UWtrn^T'O 1 


'fufftietYic/ng* 

720m-64Qi 


IONTEG< 

from £5,450- 


m 


fr om £4,5 99 

^\MEIKO 

[BgS^from £3,595- 
'"lln-thfi-njad prices indude 
12 months' mad fond licence 

Pri re sttjea ts msmtaaonrii mama 
Austin roubi P.A.ABn&Co.UiLSl Ptitaod &nsL Landon 1KI 
,jrnrr»ran7i reta**** qi- 434 oetn 
_ taJUJdfcJ AlsQBtBMAHaa>.limaiidiSqBaAlJnftinWC1H8iPi 
9 Dnlpten Square. Loadon SWT. 

^ P. A. Allen 





PEUGEOT 
205 CABRIOLET 

Immedtete delivery 
Choice of colour 

Charters 
of Aldershot Ltd 
0252 21246 


ESCORT LG CL n»V Mw, X rag 
82 low ruling*. Mm mot. ste- 
reo ramo CWMII*. TIT. IR» 
door, in immar - no 

ruM- C3.DOO. Tel 01-352 7928 
inni or 01-225 1066 lOt 


PCUCEOT 20S GW - C rag. 86 
iDfr i-i.OOO miles. Graphite 
grey FSH C6.-XSO. Tel: Moid- 
skmr i0622i 861838 


LOOK! OonierUDle Peugeot 208 
CTi Delii ery mileage H 5W- 
Ceolfrev Slzzey Auiamotntes 
• 04031 700661 

LANCIA DELTA 1600 GC GT 
Reg Dec 84 16000 mb. 5 dr 
S/R Manual. Lady owner 
Imnur £4.650. 09904 3417. 


I NORTON WAY MOTORS 
0462 678191 


VOLVO JMODL 1984. while with 
. exlra inm. E soeed. radio and 
towtur. owner driven from 
new. show room condition. 
£5.000 no Oilers. Tel <02781 
783475 


GRANADA GII1A 2J H ESTATE. 

C rrg. 12.000 mis. 1 yr Ford 
warranty £i 1 . 495 . Richard 
Motors 021 643 3338. 


GNl 

1986 1.000 mis only. While 
with Black hood Many extras. 
Quad sound. £8.495. 061 928 
4444 Oil. 061 928 7878 Hm T. 

SCORPIO USD. S/L/susnenslon + 
oilier extras. £11.280 0332 
673273 r 03316 3918. H 


WE HAVE FOR 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Rsisf RR 1 ° FhsaM Goto 

Fkmr 35M WtmsW tt 
NG Mm Tnta H vitas 

HG H hNM IMS an ntae 

HENLYS 

OF 

NORTHAMPTON 

IU HR Mil 

Open al day SuMay , 


C U R E ON CX23 QT1 TURBO C 

reg Odober 8fi. Swanm*n grey ■ 
20.000 miles. Owner emlgrai- 
Ing. £8.760. TrtaH) 01 618 
2006 iWOI 2S1 4981 


ASTRA DIESEL Van/Car Aug 
84 32.000 miles. Lwni Yellow. 
Very good condinon. £4.100- 
Tel: 0342 712 069 


STRADA 83 - A reg. Sunroof, 
while. Eirnnac. 24.000 mdes 
only. Low profile lyres. 
Panasonic cassette. £3.800 T«1 
: Ol 236 0862 idayj Or Ol 828 
0039 i alter Soon 
CAINLLAC SAVILLE W reg. ev- 
ery extra.- ligM Mue/Mue 
leather ini. ewe rond. £3.700- 
ono. PX p«& 0666 605773. 


“ON THE ROAD 11 

GRANADA 2M GHIA «X4 MET PAINT 
E13.968A8 

GRANADA SCORPIO 4*4 MET PAINT • 

El 6,298.74 

PHONE NOW 
WHILE STOCKS LAST 


k 


AM ^ 1 1 1 1 i I q1790 1B31^M 

BCommercial Rd El I 




ion ford 


HONDA PRELUDE AX 

AM. 8 Reg. Aug 85 

Ar GOnd , Bee snared. Wi- 
dows & mmors, Sihbo ndm 
cassette irtB 4 spatters. Ligtt 
nta&flc bits, blue manor. 
CtMv phene. 1 amt. Per- 
tea common. 9,000 nils. FSH. 
£10,900 
01 937 1412 


VOLVO 760 GLE 

Tur&o Mercooiar. 1988 C 
Rag. Metallic Blue. Black 
■aether trim. 6.292 miles. 
Coat in excess at £18£00 
new, my price £13.950. HP, 
lease. PX welcome. 0865 
391802 answer phone, 0885 
391428 Hm, 

Geo tt Heritage Car Sales. 


RANGE ROVER RAPPORT Spe- 
cial lengh trued 200 edition. 
1978. V8 engine, excellent con- 
dition. Brown over sable. FSH. 
long mot & lax. all extras In- 
cluding overdrive, oil corner. 
* t a un t ta steal exnausL 
wood race wheels, new (ryes. 
Btaupunki Slerco + * way 
speaker 'system, front roobar 
and bgtu guards, eye catcher 
with 5 rows ol seal s and estate. 
Promot ion al vehicle, company 
maintained. 2 own ers £ 6.795 
ono. Tel- Ol 724 6777 or Ol 
379 3*81 Day. Ol 368 6022 or 
Ol 995 3797 eie/wkds. Mr 
Hammond. 


RANGE ROVER July 1983 metal- 
lic Blue. 4 door, many extras 
only 17.000 genuine miles, lull 
senice record. £9.600. Tel- 
0486 62704. 


RANGE ROVER VOGUE. Manual. 
1985 1 Ci. Grey Stereo Aircon- 
diUnlng. Offers around 
£18.000. Tel: 1041 1 3320068. 


HONDA ACCORD 231 EXJ AUU. 
SJOOO mb 86 £9.650. 

PX /Warranty 0825 790575 T 
OPEL MONZA. Met. Blue. Aiflo. 
Aug. 83 "A". 61.000 miles. 
£5.200 Tel: 021 559 3381. 


RANGE mat 
V0G8E ADTflL 

Kw 84. Postal n Hue me- 

tric «fflt grey tnn Onr* 
19.000 aria. Xt mantas wy. 
£13595 

RANGE ROVER 

AUTO 5 DOOR 

19 Heg 83. Rasta! in white 
with mi trim. 1 owner. 49.000 
irries. Tgwta. 12 months wty. 
£9995 

WHEELERS GARAGE 

0685 2014 Day 
0295 720409 Eras 


VOLVO 750 OLE. -85 Auto. Me- 
tallic Blue. FSH. ah extras ina 
air road. E8J75 for outck sale, 
□own land 171) 86134 


VAUXMAU. NOVA A Reg May 
84. 36.000 miles. Wen mam- 
tamed. • A k»'..*ly utoe car. 
£J-2BO. 0342 712 069 


tpeoaUty. We are never know. 

ingty undented. Duasford 
Laadreters Ltd 0228 888839 


MOTORS WANTED 


ALWAYS 

REQUIRED 

Executives, Saloons and 
Sports, to* mange, dean 
cars wflti btstay. Tap 
prices, finance settled. 

Call Tonks: 
021 427 3235 


QUALITY CANS raouteed- 
ProfitM offer on inspection Oft 
lance no oiuen. -HP a/c» 
settled 01-7W05«7 AnyUmeT 


CO CARS. Light Vans. Fleet or 
single. Tel. □! 841 6468 Cash A 
Collection T. 


Any distance Cam waiting. Td 

Storm- <0474821 2009. 


BJVLW. 




DEREK 

WOODMAN LTD 

THE NORTH WEST’S NEWEST 
BMW DEALERSHIP 
NOW OPEN AT VICARAGE 
LANE, BLACKPOOL 

0253 697101 


CASTLE IN YORK offer. 

GAM mis. BMW 628 CS) Manual. 
Aiproe white. Green ton. Mansi 
sunroof, spue steering wheel. 
Alloys, from & rear soatre. Rafio/ 
siereo. ruUlaps. l owner, servtca 
Fusiory An outsmntlng car with a 
ctcnsited number £18.495 or 
straight sale basis £17.500. 
Castle Motas. 90 ftaadffy. York. 
Teb 8904 B48S6G or Sntfay. 
Brin MOv 9785 354. 


CASTLE IN YORK 

Otter 19B8 BMW 732 i Auto Spr- 
o# equotnem. Biobb meattc. 
AB5 Sratfmg system. EH amchaM 
(ruIkw. elec smool 8 windows. 
Bfueswr Tara nu stem system 
Uudftaus & noamats 9 .000 mis. 
£19995 or nraon sale bass 
£17950. Castle Mom 90 Roa- 
dn Yarn. T6: 0904 6«G5fl6 or 
Soaday. Bran M4to 9785 354. 


CASTLE IN YORK 

otten 

.1985 BMW 528 1 Auto. Bronze 
metal kc Elec vnmtows. dec glass 
sunroof. TTU aaoys. Full start & 
spate M 8 Ptnaips stereo 
rata/suroo easssne. 1 6.000 mts. 
£13.495 or srraght sate bass 
£11.750. CasOe Motors 90 
Ptecadlty. VarK Tel: 0904 646S66 
or Sunday, Bran Mfflar 9785 354. 


NEW BMW’S . AU models to or- 
der. 320 in in Mock. Large 
discount. Tel 0227-793010 tTt 


BMW. WANTED 


I2S1 1986 4 door Delpnin 

MH/ftUTk leather . LSD.. 

A B.S. power steering, an 
cond. r crural locking, eleetrle 
roof, eieclnr window*, worts 
vat*. hHrcuUtghl wipe wash, 
cnine roniroi. compuier with 
TIC. M Tech suspension and 
steering wheel. Phillip* Stereo 
radio cassette 3.800 miles. As 
new U&OOO. Tet 04865 
22721 weekday* 


3231 B reg "84. Henna red. 8 
speed manual gearbox- electric 
window*, electric sun roof/ 
wing mirrors, central locking, 
head Ugh I w«h wipe, as new. 
one non-smoking owner, low 
mihw £8.300 No offer*. Tef 
Ot 397 4461 (daysl or 0737 
247393 revest 


325L Nov 86. swiicrtiawe aula 4 
door, meiiniir blue. pa*, central 
locking, electric Iron I windows. 
limilM slip tfilf. sport* steering 
wheel, rear blinds. M-tecti sus- 
pension. Trio quad siereo. Tins 
spec new Cl 5 .500. best offer 
over £13,000 TelOV -3987086 


3231 *A* 84 25800 ms. Henna 
red. auto iraRsnrmsion. abs 
braking system, electnc win 
dnws. wing mu top* and 
sunroof, alloy wheel*, sports 
«ui. stereo radio. Iron I A rear 
spoiler CB.7SO Tel-0827 B62B2. 


7351 SC: V. reg Polaris grey 
23 OOO ml*. Cruise control, al 
In wherts. colour keyed iron! 
spoiler, alarm. ABS. eleerte sun 
ropl 1 owner Full service 
history Excellenl condition 
C12.450 Tel-01 947 8160 


BMW &2M. 1984 Baltic Blue. 
IV- kx- inm. low milage. 2nd car 
hioh spectficabon me elec Sun 
mof. TRX Radra/Sb-reo. Crwn 
Tints Immac Con £10.900 Tel 
01 936 4865 or 08444 7692. 


&2K auto 1979 Met silver Blue' 
velor PAS C/Lork Elef SR. 
HrUorv Low mileage M O.T 
May 87 Taxed Loiely condl- 
' iioii CS -ISO rash ono -Ol 422 
9SI I X3487 or 0628S 27238 


320 AUTO. 1982 iVI Metallic 
•elver Sunrool. PAS- 27,000 
mis. All mtv kc sheets. Impecca- 
ble condition £5.450 TeLOl ' 
638-8161 


BMW 32Si C0NVCRTIB1X Brand 
hew. del Miles only All extras, 
diamond mark /Black leather 
ABS Braking Rlhg. 01-377 
I-U9 Monday onwards 


728 i Aula 1984. A Reg. Met 
8Hgr/\ Hour 06.500 mb Ex 
rellenl rand Air Con. elec 
windows/ roof [Vew lyres -su- 
rra Ci 1.500 Ol 49 1 '7029. 


32S P A-S. All rlertrtc. sunroof, 
special suspension, sport* seal*, 
umed glass, gun metal grey. C 
rrg. 1 year old. 4.30a mile*. 
Cl 2.400 Tel. 0628 73941 eves 


MC2S Reg June 'TO6.IO. white, 
air cond. anil thefl. 3.000 mile*, 
.showroom condition £35.000 
ono TH >04851 210815 


323i 4 DOOR, March 84. mei ill 
ver. 20.000 miles. 1 owner 
PAsi. Merinc hood/ window*/ 
mirror* and central locking. 
£8.600 TH 0372 62202 
3201 Apr 85. white. 2 dr. 5 Vd. 
superb. C7.450 odd dr JutVf 84. 
Lam*, a ar aulo. PAS. eve 
Co 230 ono 2 yean warranty 
0272 682*12 anytime T 
BMW 3tC, I °83. S deer 5 speed 
Metailir Sapmre Blue, sun root 
*trrro/radM cusseltc. I owner 
CJ 250 Ter 052784 305 
BMW B20i AUTO reg. 28.000 
nules. red sun roar CJocking. 
E wipdpw* lint- C S.300 
TiTOl 007 2607 
3231 CABMO. Luv pack UKi air 
fund Sthn/Crcy 11.000 ml# 

CIS 995 Tef 01 874 7863 eve* 
A w'f-ndsor 43! 0666 'Or iTT 


GZB CSI. Auto, low mitrage (un- 
der 5-0001. 86 C reg. must be 
an- cond. Tel (0511 4244211 (Ol 


BMWS1 instant valuations na 
uonwide Call John Davies now- 
on 0452 23466 fTl 


PORSCHE OFFICIAL 
CENTRES 



PORSCHE 


944 

Lux 1984 white, 32,000 
mis, FSH, Berber sports 
seats, colour coded 
wheels, very reluctant 
private sale. 
Excellent condition 

£14,650 

Tel: 0924 490591 (day) 
sr 494732 (eves) 


PORSCHE 944 LUX 

1985 a Rea fl.TDO Mdes. MttHic 
KAh*i GoEtffaK. POM GCH. 60 
Senes Tyre*, wide wneds. Ga- 
raffai Ahsn^sfv Smero. Warnny 
Mi March 97 Gnm Raasan Far 
Sale 

Beat This Price 
£15,750 ono 
Tel: '0282-691887 

(Bantey. Ukl] 


PORSCHE 911 SC Black. 1982 
immarulaie rondlihin Grey ex- 
CCUtlte Interior Full Por*che 
service hislorv £17.000 
Phone Of 373 8618 


911 SC SPORTS COUPE, x reg. 
tsh. cruae. elec sun root/ win 
doW mirror* spoiler*. 
ateoluMiy superb condition. 
C14J00 Tel 01-771 7812 


924 LUX *84 20.000 miles, ex 
cond.. Pdm. alarm, metailir 
MinlKiMft/nssrUr £9800 
ono. Tel: Ol 8S7 6024. 


►44 LUX Guards red. Full service 
history 7S.000 mites.' ExeeUeui 
rondiuon C9.2SO Tel: 0936 
73582 evening* and weekend* 


1*80 928 AUTO FSH. MetalUr 
SUu’ Eaceilem Condition 
co.sooono Tel: 01-441.4068 


CHRISTURNEROflers: 1981 911 
SC Soon Coupe. Guard's Red. 
DaH. brown leather. £13.995. 
Also 1982. 928 S A Mo** Green 
m--i. ruu tan H-aUwr. CiB.aao 
TN- Ol 4&| bOOO T 
944 Bode sum On 92 « Turbo 
BY Daw Stunning looker, real 
performance economy FSH 
PDM C8SOO ono Reading 

0734 665 TO 

911 CARRERA TAMA B rrg. 

Mark- 30.000 mile*. FSH. lull 
tp-t.ainm, c20.900.ono Tn 
<0634> 81 3124 

PORSCHE 944 -A' Reg While, 
extra*, i owner. FSH. immaru- 
lalr £12.200. Tel: Cardiff 
488400. Home 04403 4622 
911 SPORTS TAROA, 1980 
Grrrti Mi-iaUK- FSH. U2 h 250 
Slepnen Robert* 256 T421 day 
0689 38?o6 eve*/ Wend* 


928 S 

1982 Y Reg. Platinum Sil- 
ver, fid Black leather trim. 
2 owners. Complete Maftin 
service history. HP. lease, 
PX welcome. £15,750. Tefc 
0865 391 802 answer 
phone. 0665 391428 Hm. 
Geoff Heritage car Sales 


928S 

1962 Crystal ween, beige 
Mde trim. 31 .000 mis. elect 

sunroof 6 sews, air cond, 

alarm 6 SH. Suport 
condition. 

Cl 9^95 

mams cooper cars 

Leataagtai Spa 

0926 20502 


944 

1984 manulactwd. LWJ. 
PAS, 12000 irts with swwce 
lustory. axed lent example & 
supra vafcra at. 

ES.750 
Please ring 

Bell Motor Co 
(0533) 774271 
or (0664) 813277 


924 S 
1986 

Guard's Red. 5000 mles. 
Efecmc Sunroof. Radio 

Cassette. 

£15,495 

mm Munms 

Teh 01 458 4204 
(01 444 7378 Sun) T 


M4 A REG. 1984. 6 

White, mark and white ptav 
uiw interior Sport* mirror*, 
roar Uurhng. allays. Panasonic 
4 sneaker cassette All usu al r e- 
Iinemenl*. 30.000 mb. FSH. 
Immarulaie IhrouRMMlL 

£13.760 ono. Tel:iQ224) 
861822 


KJRCHE 928 9 - uTOth October 

1989 1986 M«UHi Black wiui 

red leather MD 86 sene* a 

Extra* all In. Not yet licenced. 

Approx 8.700 miles View M 

Luton Airnon iCuMorreu. ongi- 

nal pore DM 140.000 1£43.750 

approvi Selling price DM 
80.000 <£25000 aoDTOXl. 

Phone . 0544 230808 


944 LUX 86. black, many extras. 

10.000 mile*, mint sell £18.750 
ono. 01-486 7627 oilier. 


COLLECTORS CARS 


196C MCB ROADSTER Beauti- 
ful. much knrd. Blue. 2 
Owner*. Superb Engine, very 
good Body work needed under- 
side. been standing several 
"month* £1 .350 Esher Surrey 
Ol 580 3373 fofboy 


1973 MM ROADSTER Very 
good condition, i lonuly owned 
from new- Lora of garage 
1 anility forre* sale. Benunda 
hard top. MQT. All Senice 
Record* 67.000 mile*. £3.750 
Tel. 01 7892018 


TRS 1973. Pimento red. HT/8T. 
24.000 mite*. ««l an original 
tyre*, spare and tool* noi uwa. 
Many extras including alloy 
wheel*. Link- reauirea to bring 
up la ratirourse. £670-00. Tel 
i09904t 3031 Surrey 


ALPHA ROMEO 2000 CTV 
Sertanr 1974. 66.000 MU#* 
Totally sorted. Superb Condi- 
tion. i oi ihe beii amiwie 
Many mare* £3.200 TeL 
Ox ted 1068331 8480 


BMW CABRIOLET 2002 1074 M. 
Main new part* £2^00 
I m itcl-nK plwne 0246 566201 


1973 TRIUMPH TRS Con*. Rr 

mull 3 MW* ago. IxmiiIIIuI 
i.4.400 TH 0753 867962 


MG MIDGET Mk 2, B reg BBC 

win 1 wheel-.. H/S Ino* 00.000 
nnk-t nun 2 owner--, imnwi 
-x ohri 0372 62202 
KFY3 "54 Z.-ph - 1 Zodur 14 ODD 
nils "irrinu* otler» 3 el i07l>4» 

6«d24 

PORSCHE 911 3 L CVuma Tama 
HHirilii-illf 1 A7o LtLdUO Tel 

OHOJ3 40HH 


MGB LE ROADSTER 
(1981) 

Buna Gone Stan fratan 
amnon. Damians "Wtom 1 cu 
horn new. onot t'JDO ndes Cm 
Be non Unu « Keel 

£5j499 

Phone: 

089 272 3968 


TR6 

150bhp, Triumph 
signal rad, body of 
chassis rebuild as 
new. 

£7,750 

Other similar cars 
available. 

CLASSIC CABS 
(ULLEY) 

Tel: (046276)542 


JAGUAR MARK VII 1455 bn 
maculate and onguuL 68.000 
mile* Full M O T. £4^XX1. 
0565 50602 


VOLVO ES 1800. 1973. Reg OOI 
1999. yr* MOT. beautiful 
throughout. £3860 Alter 6 
p.m. or week-ends 01 -771 6095 


JAGUAR 3-45. 1966. Manual 
with ovenmve. wire wheels 
Taxed and levied, bi very good 
rondiuon. £1.760 ono. Tel: 
10427721 621. 


SUNBEAM ALPINE Sports 1968 
White. Red Interior. H/S Top. 
3600 Ma on new engine. Gen 
oral cond good. £2.996 
073683-637 Nr BaanftBoke 


VOLVO PI 800 9 SPORTS 1967 
12 Months MOT. Red. Excellent 
condition. £ 1.800 for outek 
sate. TH: 0636-669988 fW. 
Yorksi 


V.w. AND AUDI 


LISTERS 
FOR QUATTRO 

BS C court QUATTRO 

&UHME — £13,456 

86 C COUPf mmm Red 

£1X258 

86 C 88 QUATTRO 


Graphte 

EWJ50 


85 C 98 OUATTHO tt» 

Bod . 

GOlfCC CONVERTIBLE 2000 

miles E9J50 

86 D 211 QUATTRO Graphite 


UNIQUE! 
GOLF GTi 

5 Door D Rag, 500 
mBes. Stratos 

Blue £9^00 

Tel: 0378 75732 T 


UNIQUE! 
GOLF GTi 


5 Door D 
mBes. 
Blue 


500 
atos 

.C9J500 


Tel: 0378 75732 T 


ALL WHITE Golf GTI Conreniblp 
1984 reg. 10.000 mile*, as new 
■plus *ter«o. CT.3SO ono. Tel 
•0883] 45965 or 01-248 1133 


CTI. vt Peg While. 37.000 mltei. 
full wn m* hivloty. quad siereo. 
£4.400 Teteoftone 01-577 
5068 iDc 01989 5409 lEL 


VW POLO C Rrg Aug 85. Blue 
4.500 mile* wile's Car. a* 
new LxrpUenl slereo/radto. 
£3.900 Trl. 0342 712069 


eOLPGTlZ-84 1 own. silver, lull 
<H>ec. superti gng rond. 19.000 
ml*. C6.100. 09904 3771 


EOLF GTI CONVERTIBLE with 
Kamci Xi noay mi. 1983. FSH. 
»w mileage, sierro. new lyre*. 
exTHWiil* ronailion. C6.6O0 
ono Trt 0474 367793 name 
01 403 3407 offiro 
NENSWORTH CARAC* >otHcM 
lh dealer i have over SO new- 
Ooll GTl’v 5 & 5 door model* A 

con Com crow* ntan/aula* in 
Mark 41 pre utrrea&e price 
0982 872182 Open Sun 
GOLF GTI. Mk II. B req 1964. 
Alla* gr*** • link 6/roof. FSH- 
30 000 mite* v good rond 
(.6.000 Tel 01 B91 efieO. 
GOLF CONVKRTIBU 18001. B 
leg 18.000 mite* 1 owner. *11 
vrt. £7.750 Trt 06477 264. T 
COLF Bit i nun'll art. 3 4 & door 
. niodrk in *torf rtlmrr of «f 
ours 07o22 27421 T 
1087 GOLF GTTS Canvertmln 
* Ifli- lull V W tiiHi rJnv-dl4K 
romil prirf- ICC 01 202 8890 
GTI SOnr Stark, surro Marrh 
'At?, esrellenl rntUliliAn CT2S0 
nno Trt 0785 7)4322 
MEW COLF GTi »dr rvrrt import 
I Ull sn« f G. L A 14#7 e\|rJ» 
Taved CO 376 10428731 5205 
NEW VW AND AUDI model*. UK 
GT i at di YfHinl. rated 4r|fvcTV 
ptiomiv 025 126 4676 


90 QUATTRO E7 sun roof. 85. 
14.000 mi*. £9.690. 
PVw-arraiUy iwuu* 52594 


SAAB 


900 OLS Aulo. S3 V. Beige 4 
door P A3. Stereo radio cas- 
sette. 34.000 Rule*. V G C Mof 
and Tax £3.400. No offer* 
Tel .Cl 359 6811 


SAAB 900 OLS SALOON: 1984. 
B. reg while. 14.000 mi* Sun- 
roof. stereo. Wen maintained 
£6000 ono. Tel.01-989-2690 


REGISTRATION 

NUMBERS 


KnRi O Offers around £4.250 
tfC? O ONO 


0502 71034 T. 


r*p tr On Renault GL Estate 
UV V MOT and Road Tax 
£6J» a TeL 0224 324212. Day 

Taliphime Mo. 0224 121234. 


nnn 1 avallablo for mune- 
IVlU 1 diote irarafer. Best 
offer over £4,000 secures. 

0909 4 7 20 0 2 


Motoring by Clifford Webb 


Fiat’s Mickey Mouse marks 50 years 


The Fiat 500 Topolino 
“Mickey Mouse" is celebrat- 
ing iis 50th birthday. Anyone 
who has survived ihe rush 
hour Grand Prix in any major 
Italian city wifi understand 
why the ceiebrations are being 
undertaken so enthusiast' 
icaliy. 

’ This is the car that taught 
generations of young Italians 
their “foot on the floor” 
driving technique. With so 
little power at their command 
only death staring them in 1 the 
face would persuade them to 
. lift off the acceferaior. 

The man who designed 
Topolino — and who many 
would say has a lot to answer 
for — has' just been talking 
about its creation. Dante 
Giacosa, aged 79. was 29 when 
Scimitar Agnelli, the leg- 
endary head of the Fiat em- 
pire. told him to make a 
people’s car that was cheaper 
but would out-perform similar 
Goman and French models. 

A prototype called “Zero A“ 
ran for the first time on 
October J7, 1934. . It reached 
51 mpb but the very basic 
569cc. four cylinder water- 
cooled engine was extremely 
noisy. A stronger crankshaft 
with bronze main bearings 
made it more acceptable but 
no one who has ever driven an 
early Topolino would ever 
describe it as “quiet". 

The Fiat 500 was launched 
on June 15, 1936, under the 
banner “the world's smallest 
mass-produced car”. It was 
'1016 feet long, had a top speed 
of nearly 53 mph and would 
carry two adults and some 
luggage. It was the first Fiat to 
use unitary construction in 
lhax the body shell doubled as 
the chassis. 

The true Topolino went out 
of production in 1955 after 
some 500.000 had been sold. 
It was resurrected two years 
later with a new body and the 
engine moved from the front 
to the rear. It is the latter rear 
engine version which most of 
us are familiar with. It was 
replaced in 1976 by the bigger 
four-seater 126. 



The Fiat 500 Topolino k 

Road Test 

Alfa 75 

The ’ “wolf in sheep's 
clothing" description has been 
misused so often that I hesi- 
tated before applying it to the 
Alfa Romeo 75. But in this 
case it really is, apt because this 
is a classic example of a rather 
ordinary looking car with 
outstanding performance and 
handling. 

It was launched in Italy 
back in May 1985 and called 
the 75 to mark the 75th 
anniversary of the founding of 
Anonima Lombards Fabbrica 
AutomobiL I tried a left-hand 
drive model briefly in the 
mountains above Milan and 
relumed full of praise for an 
outstanding driver’s car. But I 
had to wait a further year 
before a right-hand drive ver- 
sion reached the UK and 
another two and a half months 
before getting my hands on 
one. 

This is just the car to sweep 
away the boredom of today's 
congested roads. Only 14.2 
feet long — that is several 
inches shorter than most fam- 
ily cars — and powered by a 
2.5 litre V6. it responds to the 
slightest touch of the whip like 
the thoroughbred it is. What a 
pity that a company capable of 
marrying all that power to 
such a well-balanced chassis 
should be struggling to keep 
endemic losses under control 


Mickey Mouse** In 1936 
and may vet end up sharing 
the same bed as Ford. 

But there are weaknesses in 
Alfa's approach that Ford 
could iron out and . sad to 
rcpon many of them are 
present in the 75. There were 
too manv minor rattles and 
squeaks ‘for a car costing 
£ 1 1.649 and being sold as an 
up-market sports saloon. 

The pedals are set too high 
and at a very awkward angle. 

Operating the clutch is 
particularly cumbersome. The 
dashboard warning lights for 
unsecured doors appeared to 
be poorly adjusted and coukl 
only be extinguished by re- 
slamming already closed 
doors. 

But the biggest complaint 
from drivers and front seat 
passengers alike was reserved 
for the centrally mounted 
handbrake. Shaped like three 
sides of a square it would be 
more at home as the multiple 
throttle control on the flight 
deck of a fourengined airliner. 

It is too big and intrusive. 

Putting the car into reverse 

IN BRIEF 


gear with (he brake oh is to 
nsk a nastN pinch between the 
gear leaver and that ghastly 
brake handle. The gearchange 
is notch', and dated compared 
to the latest *Tmger«lighi" 
boxes on rii-al products. 

AH these shortcomings are 
separately of a minor nature 
but when they occur together 
the effect can be very depress- 
ing for the owner. The tel 
thing .Alfa needs at this mo- 
ment is for in otherwise 
impressive cars to he talked 
down by disgruntled drivers. 
There is sail a great deal of 
latent goodwill for this famous 


Vital statistics 

Modot: Alfa Romeo 75 

Ctoverieaf 

Priom £11.649- „ 

Engine: 2492cc V6 
Performance: 0 to BO mph m 8 
seconds, maximum spaed 130 

Social consumption urban 
21 .7 mpg. 56 mph 41 £ mpg. 75 
mph 3i mp3- 
Length: 14.2 feat 
Insurance: group 8 

old marque. That goodwill 
needs to be nurtured by cars 
which massage the ego of their 
owners, not irritate them. 

The 75 sticks to rear wheel 
drive at a time when most of 
its rivals' have jumped on the 
front wheel bandwagon. But 
this is a layout which Alfa has 
brought to near perfection; 
The absence of siecring with a 
mind of its own - the bugbear 
of other high-powered front 
drive designs — makes it very 
reassuring to drive at speed. 

A lower powered l.S ver- 
sion is also being imported. 



nw.'Urs 


Alfa Romeo 75 Saloon: A wolf In sheep’s clothing 


• The new Escort RS 
TurbO which has jnst gone on 
sale is a more refined and 
manageable car than its 
predecessor. 

The new model I tried 
recently has undergone de- 
tailed changes to the 1597cc 
CVH engine, which has 
considerably improved the 
turbo lag. 

The suspension on the old 
model was a one-off designed 
with competition work very 
much to the fore. It has now 
been replaced by a modified 
version of that used on the 
well-tried Escort XR3. The 
viscous coupling limited-slip 
differential has also been 
“softened" to make its 
contribution less dramatic 
and the final drive ratio has 
been reduced to improve flaei 
consumption and provide 
more relaxed high-speed 
cruising. 

It is said to be capable of 0 
to 60 mph in &2 seconds and 


has a maximum of 120 mph. 

• The Government is at last 
prepared to do somethin 
about the misuse of tire 
Orange Badge Scheme which 
provides parking concessions 
to disabled and blind people. 
It has issued a discussion 
paper and asked for views on 
bow. best to tighten np the 
present regulations. 

Copies are available free of 
charge from Department of 
Transport, C10/05. 2 Mar- 
sham Street, London SWIP 
3EB and comments are re- 
quested by November 14. 

• General Motors boasts of 
so many industry firsts for its 
new Gennan-boift Vaoxhafl 
Carlton (it will be called Opel 
Omega in Germany) that it is 
a pity the company did not 
have enough . confidence _ in 
these claims to let motoring 
journalists try the car before 
asking them to write glowing 
reports three months before it 
goes on sale ' here 


JAGUAR A DAIMLER AUTHORISED DEALERS 


THERE'S EVERY SIGN YOU'LL APPROVE. 


Whmy whiya lUMVFreqiiiiedqrinw 
Used Care Program* a mas one Wag - yauVe one to a dedskn nfy 
tabeiHflda. 

~AnOtaaareBiHiwtlPdWelMCm mb B5 hp inBKgmaOiens i iie 

piKjiageofferoi 

We fed 0*RACseKpertlse In repair, reowery and rescue ataipklE 
fteir tectmlcal knowledge of motoring at home andatnad is Ihe pofen 


aroptonert to our hot com whWi Includes parts, bboiLOwmyu 
acQMiiiPda uuii. rqtecgnent vehfOe raittl and legal caste when 

3,, "ScaHSft al cos sold are Ihoragtfy checked aid veoedbyJlgar 
framed tedweans, so Bie dances are RS ower yarn never needioase. 

Bin taken as a st^ita our untoEed stroke doesrt stop wtai . 
jour motonng pleasure be#ns. 



^ WADHAM 
i J @” STRINGER 

ffljfijw. — Specialist Cars — 

| W: ftefcome ewpmjcs arpo&ig DoaooiiabgB* rad New I 
amjite*xrt« 2 .(teiMmnnKui ib mi twr tn l n niwwnii 

BWMtallIM m— I K 

C114M 

MWtateUUU*UoMi ■ 

8ucMmS4taot«rQn • C1I2S0 
M « M te— ft wwlte « OtaW 
Oxitex C<MU 

) JtgnrSmanign 4&M*opw 
■xnsfftx* CT7_**5 

itanriMtaiuramr 

wfti teixtii mm tu»on 

out 

IJOJraute | ra*gi vta Cartw ay 

HiNhigiMwUW 
enArContaotTMtoMI, 

asw 
ssisr 
GRESUer 

GrerLrCon c » 

J5 (B) Haag* Row tap 
QnMOon.RM9rai 


.4 T.Citewi rtuteii M 


K (C) DMrM,OBtaMDHMi 

mm 

MW)rantart.fGn«.ngmran 

man 

■BBiWrtl— taetal ft^ 

M IB Jtew Ul HE. MmgiaKV 

CRMS 

w W Ntate US HEXotaMkmtai 

eras 

M (A) taurUS HEJMROIIBKHMI 



SSIQINl^.. 

tatMaWGin 

HlQItagilMtliiitMHLIlM 

tag*. raw 

K (C) RpqcRnw BmuL 


HiajnUVlIC 

MtataaOirateai 

M (BI JUHriUB 

TOBW 


wrar 

ngqtteMF 

CnpMteS>«r 


WMW 




For further deuik contact 


Buster Guardil342878l620{5unda>-sl or 
Group MarkeijngnnOTOS 26441 HWeekday^) 


— RO^ 

MOORES 

1K6 Jaguar XJS VIZBiotSuin 

s*er/imihenvtrim. 5700 miie& 

ex-Oasmtansrac Wa.wt 
1966 JMuar XJS 16. Seivtn 
rgd'sawKgreyim, uncferS-C 
irtta BOA 

1986 Joguta Sovereign 42 
Sledteawlle gray rni.3j000 mde* 
C19SD0 

ContKiBaiBaeaK 
HutfcterafigW (04U) 659021 or 

(0484) 535251 


JAGUAR & DAIMLER 


JAGUAR XJS 5.3 

19B5, 8 Fill SBC msf W 
concttmmn g. Con^xiar. Stoeo 
raoo cassette. Green meQIle 
Mi Cream leaner nlenor. 
31.000 mfts. FSH. 
Pfanns condtui 
E14J90 

Tot 0744 29810 
CIUUIGE SERVICES 


197S DAHWUR 09420 Hww 
r\i,Hlnil rn rut Hum i £3.450. 

.\»mi • hnttr ol 3 D8420 Umou 
■MIHH ■•ihI 3 Pniunv. 
I imniiuiie* DOT A Stnimng 

WQxKt?* ^ w 

PW9GHE CARRCNA TMWA, 

hlHHl* niuipment. 3.700 milr* 
‘•„ -, n - l ' rT *' i' outo uacco 
Irt 0303 7B2H67 


DAIMLER SOVEREIGN 
4 1 

1984 Private registration 
atnrtaDle Rnstndtn primrose 
yenow. One at e thousand 
over made. Blade vinyl roof . 
Factory Road sunroof. All 
usual refinements. CTB500 
aOroad forces 


Gotngafr 

Tek0202 760370 


XJS CABRIOLET 3.6 

B Reft, grean/doestei Wengr. 
eomorar. w coMdnrong, many 

extras 3 years trartamy. Dwto 

2&anm«B. 1 mm*. Excellent 
mutton. Season for sale, 
tnaght new one. 

eisjoa 

TEL flm 582064 

10$ 


JAGUAJt 4J SOVEREIGN Brag 
■ivm 84 1 ftronor'* Ctf Airtw 

•ruin BurguiHtv Air 

raiuiiimntng 27.000 ante* Ex- 
irttenl ronOiltoa FuUv 
nurouriirtl Cl 3. 500 or nratmt ■ 
«m Ring 0223 8606&T 
Hte*tntte> 


1982 JACUM XI 53 *uto t* 
lufm inwrardUl* rtmaititm. 
34 000 nute*. niMorv C9.9SO 
Hurt 12 mown* waraniv 
1 H OI i&2 886 7 iDiiiro Hauro 
n at 874 otTa inr a 


MCUJUt DAIMLER 1083/86 
ltkimp n 45 Hltah- r«<KK> 
1.4.995 C 1 9 000 tu lOl'FdK 
l'\ Trl Ol SM 9H33 ESteX I ri 


DAIMLER 
SOVEREIGN 4.2 

1981. Yellow, leather 
interior, 44,000 miles, air 
conditioning, all electric, 
immaculate. £5,500. 

Tel 01-950 9194 


LZ SOVEREIGN 1963 <C> auto, 
rotioil blue, full ssectflcalign. 
Managing dirortora c*f. FSH. 
12000 mile*, a vran further 
manufacture* .warranty. 
£16.500. Trt 041-604-2842 


XJS HE. 8 rag. 1 8.000 ml*. Ante- 
KKte. I owner. FSH. £16.996. 
RK-hard Makm 021 643 2336. 


CABBHUT VI2. 86 model. C 
reg, low mileage. WIMte FSH. 
C21.995. Richard Motor* 021 
643 3336 


UH2 Convertible. Claret. lira 
rag 20/6/06. Air cond. 2.100 
mto. £26.996. 0202 89442T T 


lUUMLCR/SOV m Reg. t/W, 
w rule/ red lea Cher, caxx/radio. 
S/R. Onturaio*. recent over- 
ItauL 33400 mite* £2.960. 
Trteehone Ascot >09901 21562. 


CAR ACCESSORIES A SERVICES 


WAKEY’S 



CAR SPARES AND REPAIRS 
JAGUARS (Xlfl SPECIALITY OTHER SPARES AVAILABLE 

PORTSMOUTH (0705) 830412 

3HI H*» Ardraa, Po rtrany B. 


CONTRACT HIRE AHD VEHICLE LEASING 


AUSTIN RQVER 

Metro Ctty 

Maestro 1300 L_ 
Montego 1600 L 

Rovw 216 SE __ 
BMW 

IIS 


E120JS1 

£158J7 

£10.16 

£19954 


£24550 SCO 


RENAULT 

5TL 

5TSE 


25QTS 

25GTX 


£132.10 

£174.46 

E28CL37 


520 

CTTROEN 
BX 16 RS 
BX IBRD 


£279.07 

E306J95 


C18WS 

£19554 

BX 16H8 EST £20024 

BX IBRD EST S211 JR 

VOLVO 

240 GL - £252.10 


SM TURBO 

GM - VAUXHALL 
ASTRA 12L 


£317/44 

£25189 


740 GL EST 

740 GLT 

740GLTEST 


£32957 

£38666 

£406.17 


E38SL57 

E1GK67 
CAVELtal 1.6L __ eies^7 

CARLTON 1UL E22M1 

CAVELIER SRI £24354 

FORD 

ESCORT £171.71 

ORION 1.4GL — L £19fL54 

SOIRA 1.6L E2Q9.H9 

W3i £214.66 

GRANADA 1.8GL - BMX 


These rentals are atowabte in ha against tax 
and indude the fotoMting 

* Fed m ainte na nce and aB mech a nic a l repair* 

■ Repla c e m e n t veMcta B off the road ter more than 
24 boors 

* AA Boahase Relay 

* Road fond Neensa 

* Al tyres, exhaiat, batteries etc . 

FOR MORE DETAILS ON ANY CAR OR 
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE, CONTACT US NOW ON 

061 236 0271 

CONCORD CONTRACTS PLC 


CAR CRAFT 


JENSEN INTERCEPTOR 

RESTORATIONS AND 

CONVERSIONS TO 
D80PHEAD 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


sea ore BI WIUI e reg. rowo- 
rofl, 2 own*. FW. *terog. o/r. 

unmrtl U 7.995 Trt- lOoSdi 
243Del / •OAaa i Sol £66 
MR2 1989 9.000 M*. hmiiScu 
late. 'White. AU Extras * Alarm. 
C0.99& ono >01 01 288-3979 

i*x>n 44?i ihi oi-aaaonBO- 

LOTUS CARS, roe flte taKi na - 
uonwnir nnh mw* Pttonr 
Lotus NortaUt 0605 407766. 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


LEX MEAD MAIDENHEAD 

1979 CO ASTON MARTIN DBS V8 

fiesta Red, Maonofia hide. Automate, air con- 
ditioning, PAS. Pioneer racflo/cassette wtfh 
remote control seeker. Comprenendye service 
hirtory. 53^00 recorded miss — : Cl<995 

FERRARI 308 GTS1 QV 
Wue. ‘dark Bbe hide, 1 owner, full 
recorded mies £31.950 

MaMwihoad SL6 8DD 

undayv: 0344 54294 



HAIM 

— Sprculisi Cjri — 

ff.iial!* jppoiAUi! Lt!vrsi'>ui< 


Rota-Hopce Stw Spirit 

1984. Light oyatec /cama qa 

ftuw ijijd Aon(ioMHy.50,Q0Q 

m4e*,FSH £43^00 

Alton Martin VS Saloon 1984. 
Suttafli red/magnota hide 

pped red, one cwrat 27,000 

mles. bjl AM sartnee ' 

Lotas &brtTtoto'l& 86 . 
Sever frost/deep blue Nde/ 
«*oi* one OMtar. 5,000 mBes. 

fitted ate cond. s/renL r/aereo 

P»Bsn 

Mercedes SOOSEC 1985 
(OclJ. Otamond btue^AiehUe. 
one oww 1 1 600 nties. aX 
««W £34^00 

Mercedes 280SL1984.Whiic/ 

tflue uDholetaryi one owner. 

38.000 rates ftBJHO 

Jsetrer XiS 3£ Cabriolet 

1985. Samr/Uacklyda, one 

rawer, 10000 miles FSH 

.£17,850 

Sunday. 0803 605256 



LOTUS OHmt U to monihs 
am Stunning r*4 7.000 m. 
BBS HWK, HaH ImUih' 
sntvnp hill. Imnuruiate 

£14.900 OIIO. TrtOMQ 
7933W / 01 S94 16GB 


PAMTwm ire "S’ rro. w}ub, 
i»nn«< hMitwr nitennr a ? !Krr 
J«t rttgtnr >4.500 km Braun- 
lul rotteHUon throughout. 
U 3-000 Trt .0275 TiSSSTta 
T795S0 


TOKXTUnOTirta tighibiur, 
St’Otemnn' 1996. l?.OQomUn. 
165 mwi. rxnHkm ertnamon. 
6‘wi gwng tNMa, ciuoa 
Trt <07321 61063 


TOOtANI two 34* OT 1074 J<|- 
'••t 63.000 nute* hmutl' 
Bterk {nor Lxcrtirnt C|4.oon 
a*no Prnate sate 04867 2384 


TVH TASaUM ZSO) 1962. white 
with grin trim, goto toot. nt al- 
loy*. rter window,, vinrort. 
37.000 mite*. UK A MOT one 
tedy owner tram new. £6.999 
one Ter 01 3e7 4784 and 
1070481 78644 Of 74909. 


CONVEHTWUC VgtwiuU Cava 
Mi I St Main opjter ttemorar.' 
Cnrmiite red. rihui, Moo mlv 
itinvlnl njtcjmv £9 90 s 
l.*udl Main Drain- loriHiie* 
PaumrinsCdw. Cnritlhanw 
Irti 0344 T 777 77 

ramAM s«* ere 197 a Red. 

35.000 mite* EMrttetH (91 Kh 
lion £14 000 l*o otter*. Tol. 
06333 7992*, 

MT ONO Turbo K Aug os. g 
Reg. Fun w a rr anty . Huge rav- 
ing nogs q«» eciooio t. 


ASTON MARTIN 
VANTAGE 

Late 83. 84 Spec. Storm 
Red. Cream HWe. 5 Spd 
Manual. Air cond. PKmeer 
stereo. 1&000 mites. Ful 
Htetory. Superb... £38^60 

01-654 9514 Days T 


ASTON MARTIN 
VQLANTE 
CONVERTIBLE 

Oectnc Wue oreair hood «td m- 
fcnar R «0 nuatta aid?. 
38000 mies Praam condtan. 

£31.000 ono. 

Tab 01-858 6281 . 
OR CAR PHONE 
0836*231437 


1986 

FERRARI 328 GTS 

Rosso Oorsa with 
leather. Low 
Qraypaul unnoe history. 

£39.000 

TEUWW 617715 

Anytime 


DURUNGS 6AHA6E LTO 

SOLE NAVIOR ttEALH FOflttBfT 
TF 1700's avatabie for 
fnspaefton & ctemoostration 

OmoaaMm ear avaVtUt 

A — - I U-4* ■ -M 

w Hrammne owvcry. 
lfiNnM,SEVcnas,8aT| 
wissa ] 


(07 


welcome on 

2] 882241 


MORGAN + 6 
CONVERTIBLE 

1984 BBm. Ran* Red 1 
owner. 6,800 nttas. FSH. 
A truly cteBtC spots ev 

£11.996 ' 

John Wilson Autos 
01-651 0951 


CAmut aararo 9u »S5: 
nwr cm rsH CeUflitte i4«uD. 
nutev Oimnwr awancawt- 
*■<*»■ groteyiMiwt MOV ttsta* 
Owner going annus, 
wnet Berfomunrt- pu* * V** . 

CBJHoora Trt 0945 


J 


Com inaed on 





















































































































M • m * 



ROLLS R0YCE& BENTLEY AUTHORISED DEALERS 


Ibr the jGbo^u^d care 
chooseMann^ertOTu 


1986 Bentky Turbo ‘IT.. 
HwnjYRed 7S0 mScsr £68,950 



1986 RoBg-Royee SRvcr 
Spirit. Deep Ocean Hupf 

4g000 mdes £57,950 

•985 RoDs-Rofor SOrer 
Spirit. Oce» BK*/Bewr..lM»0 
mSes: £48^60 

1984 Rolls-Royce S3v<er 
. Spirit. Ccni/Bdgc 8.000 odes 
£47,950 

1984 Rolls-Royce SHvtr 
Spirit. Deep Ocean HuoBdgc: 
15.941. odes £46£00 

1984 Rofls-Roycr SOver 
Spirit. Forest GrartBci^ 
22jOOO miles: £45.500 


1985 Bttitkv**’. GfOijun 
SSiw'Ught Blur iZJOO'nde: 
UtASQ 

1984 RoHs-Royee Silver 
Spirit. light Ocean Blue'Dak 
Bloc 23050 raks £43,950 

1985 (B) Bentley ‘SI Rail 
BhWBrigr: 18.745 ado; £42,950 

1982 Rolls-Royce Sflv«- 
Spirit Light Ovner/ReA UfiQO 
miles: £34)950 

1981 BaBs-Royce Sifter 
Spirit. Lipfas Oyster over Dade 
O wia/Ptey . 26,849 rates: 
£32350* " 

1981 Bexifky Malsvute. 
G mm/Oeigc 46j000 w3csz 
£29300 ~ 





2 

na 


jO 





1 


1 'ft 

I 

f 'v 

il 

1 fl I 


* Jn.blOZ-'^l Kuriautant 

The moo beautifbl Indian Restaurant in Kew 
Auihentic North Indian Cmstne 
Opening Hour 12*3.00 6pm- Midnight 

214, Sandycombe Road, Kew 

Telephone: 01-948 8487 


SLVD* SHADOW ■ Nov BO in 
SKIT Sand A Cb«tnui 
(owWvorfc wun brtgr luer tme- 
f» Air roM. 1 non-smoking 
owner- 69 OCO n«. Superb 
condition £l7.fiCOonoX>l 397 
9221 Wortt/0737 B52314Heme 


BOCTLCV MIHSANNC 11M6 

1983. 7.000 MUes Sud oc»f 
Walnut lonofeMv Gum- 


MANNy 

EGERTOIM 


Kor further information please con on us on 01-499 8342. 


SIVAERS OF NBV ROLLS KHCEAMDBEMlLEy MOTOR CMS 

1986 BENTLEY EIGHT Vermillion red — 

available shortly RO JL 

1S86 SILVER SPIRIT Dark oyster with 
mushroom leatherpiped red. High specification. 
Rec. mites 3,550 £53,950 

B OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 

THSPH0NE HESTON 10772) Wtl 

5DUTT0N-F0RSHAW 
- People with Drive 



Hr 

THE^S&HMES 

CLASSIFIED 


The Times^Saasffied cofamms are xead by 
13 million of the most affluent people in die 
country. The following categories appear 
regularly each week and are generally 
accompanied by idevant editorial articles. 
Use the coupon (below), and hud ont how 
easy,fostmdecoiioracaliTi»tondYertsenr 
The Times Classified. 

— MONDAY— = = 

Education: Ltaiversity Appointments, Prep & 
Public School Appointments, Educational 
Courses, Scholarships and Fellowships. 

( La Oemedefo Crane and other secretarial 
appointments. 

—TUESDAY— 

Compote* Horizons: Com p ote Appoint- 
ments with editorial. 

Legal Appointments: Solicitors, Com- 
mercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, Private & 
Public Practise. 

Legal La Creme for top legal secretaries. 
Public Sector Appointments. 

=WEDNESDAY= 

La Creme de la Creme and other secretarial 
appointments. 

Property: Residential, Town & Country, 
Overseas, Rentals, with editorial. 

Antiques and Collectables. 

— THURSDAY ™ 

General Appointments: Managem ent and 
Executive appointments with editorial. 

La Creme de la Creme and other secretarial 
appointments. 

— ’ FRIDAY 

Motors: A complete car buyer’s guide with 
editorial. 


I ' [ w-T f o ■ 1 1 x-i .1U.ni*->vT>i »J i.M'"inii. 


franchises etc. with echtoriaL - 
Restaurant Guide. 

—SATURDAY— 

Overseas and UK Holidays: VOlas/Cottages, 
Hotels, Flights etc. 


THE WORLD EAMOUS 
PERSONAL COLUMN, INCLUDING 
RENTALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY. 




Fiu in the coopon and anacb it to your advertised enL 
wntien on a separate piece of paper, allowing 28 tetters 
and spaces per line. * 

Rates air: Linage £4.00 per line (min. 3 lines): 

Boxed Display £23 per single column cenii metre; 

Court & Soda] £6 per lint 
AD rates subject to 15% VAT. * 

jjend te SMrieyMatgofc. Gmap Qassi&ed Adrcrtise- 
awrf Manage^ lores Nncsmpes LfiL,PO£oK48V 
Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 




1986 BENTLEY 
TURBO R 

In PadGe Bfeie with tight Bbre ‘ 
Mb and dark Bfcre cotour 

' Only 230 rates 
hanon resoiutiay 
•mmaeutete 


SHADOW H. 1979 WMM wtttl 
Mack 1M prior Extras - Clanen 
«ptpo raaio/eaa*MtP. win- 
«wl clc. FSH 42.000 miles. 
Mini com £ 17 . 000 . t«l- oi- 

969 7164 iwrekntds/evesi. 


SHADOW HH ■ ■ 1979. 68.000 
muc*. fSH Blue on utver 
with re nt e titn g learner Interior. 
1 owner from new Looks and 
time, IMP new. £14.950 TM ■ 
0302 874909 


HOTLCf 8 1986 Georgian SO- 

vrr. Blnr MOP. blto. W/W 

lyrps. Under a.ooo ndtes. 

. C44JXO. Tel: 0904 702872 


IBM SHADOW Blue. Magnolia 
MOP. 56 COO mile. Mini Or 

viewed M be asorecuMde. 
£J7.7SO. Tel. 07875 2314 


LA BONNE 
FRANQUETTE 

5 Mgb St, Egtam, Sonny 

Tab 0784-39494 

Menu incJusn 
- evenings. 5 courses 
induing sdected wines £20 
An extrAonirary 
Nouvtiie experience 
★ Business & SunJay 
(undiaons 

* Convenient M25. 
Headnow, Windsor. Ascot 
* Man A30 posJtmn-Car Park 



133 WEMBLEY PARK DRIVE. 
WEU8LEY. MIDOX. 

(W WEMBLEY COMPLEX) 

OPBI DAILY LUNCH 8 OMBi 


91-982 2243 A 01-902 2391 





TO SOUES Bentley J 979. 68X00 
miles. FSH. A superb car. 
£17.600. Tel: 0342 712 069 


1973 SHADOW S Saver/Hue. 
66.000 miles- £9.900. Tet 
0707 B74 832. 


SILVER SMUT IMS. GanwA 
Setge interior. Cold mascot. 
£28.950 Tel: 0202 707412. 


n.vn spout issz. i&ooo 
miles. Immanilale. car phone, 
plver fox. £36000. TCI07B26 
62686 


uo U77 ROLLS ROTCE Saver 

Shadow IL Honey Gold wtot 

MaoooUa leainer. tow mnespe. 
£18.950 01 968 6536/6 or 
0288 3428 (T>. 

ROLLS HOYCE SMOT 1<W6. fin 
toRed id Ocean blue, ma service 
bauory. Immarump n w ooqho ut 

£46600. HP tXMNDtr. TM Rom- 
lord 756202. 01534 8744 T 


ROUS ROVCE A 
BENTLEY WANTED 


ALL MOHO.6 KQUKD. Too 

Brice, (or Wo condition cam. 
0245 76671 177. 


RESTAURANT GUIDE 

Appears once a month on thin pap 
If you would like to advertise your 
RESTAURANT OR WINE BAR 
please call us on 


01-481-1920 
in time for 

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 26TH 




Open Mon-FmfayrUP-Z Mon-SK6-tl3Q 
Spifheni Opera nO-IL 

H& Krughtsbndge, London SWI. Tel:01-584 9777. 


Bengal Lancer 

From dawn to distraction 
there’s culinary action 

Trj oor unusial menu The firs!: 


real Indian 
Brasserie 
in Lf;rdnr. 


AUTHORISED DEALERS 


MERCEDES BENZ IN DERBYSHIRE 



International Cars of Chesterfield 
New and Used Safes 0246 208771 ^ 


1986 YT 500 SE 

Latest spec, diamond 
blu«/bhia velour, a/coo. 
asr. a/w. 1.900 miss. 
bnmaoutatB. S32J2GO. 

1988 *0’ 380 SEL 
Smoke aBvar/BrazB vb- 
lour. Full spec- FSH. 
20.000 mis/ As new. 
£2l99S - 

BARGATE 

MOTORS 


450 SLC 

79, aotanttc, maaftc red. Iwry 
vdoor. a#oy sunrool. ra- 
Docuseto. mtout dasfi. ar 
comliljcnng. Qntefi gtass, heul- 
bmp wasfi wps, Sxjrjtar dam, 
non snekSS car. Avsrage rote- 
AH- Om ssceeMaaM car 
tfarougbouL Wat be seta 

cpz .000 ona . 

TEL: (0709) 545075 
(PRIVATE SALE) 


MERCEDES 
(G WAGON 4 WD) 
280 GE 

4 Speed ten 1984 R Reg Long 
best 9 snw E'Sh tin S4r 0*k 
Swrctai 20 ODD rts *» an Sww 
“»rs tabo 


LEFT HAND 
DRIVE CARS 

Tti BM UB M B CvrieH Co 
NBC8N3 

M 9BSL LMO Sl&ffiD 

NEW ZBO LHD £t<L950 

B1 2805 E LHD £7550 

56 18S8L LHO nO950 

II 7451 Tivtu US £6950 

76 835 CS LHO ^500 

74 2102 Com LHD £1500 
PORSCHE 

*4*4 LHD £12500 

II 111 SC LHD £10950 

STOP PRESS 

79 SHADOW C LHD £10650 
83 HAN6E ROVER LHO £0550 
Men LM Rbtas (9 UMU Fmni 
£4950 

Shnmg IMMi 

Tet 01-485 1015 

Tttec 262795 TRANS 



Ivan Page-Ratcliff 


SBB-SEC M«/Uu£. tnde. mn del 
560 SEC MC wtW. Me 
428 SE Arac White. Hue Ms, jts, 

SL Sural red. raw «bl oust 
230 TE Duraond Mue Mo. ssr 
266 £ Demon blue, wkxir. ita 
236 E Diamond (kiukt/t, ssr 
Hi £ 2-3-76 Smote sdw. ssr 
190 E Auto SqnH red. a/c. a/mnd 

9aW la Tax Ftm Mbs 

ua/ma 

WbNfsK 861547 TX 849462 


JAGUAR Xi|S 

3.6 COUPE 

1985 Silver erfth Black 
hide. Trip Computer. 
20.000 mUes. FSH. 20 
months Jaguar Warranty. 
C1&950 

01-952 6171 T 


450 SL SPORTS 

Amo IHs* Green 1W wtfl 
Green mm WeW wn. PA®. 
Had * sob tons, at randaert- 
ng. Etoanc miom. Cemnel 
fcOUng HeMamo WWtl WpB. 
Sunoim gtas* FUdo/Cw- 
BMta Qsor«Tv» Rag No Low 
redaaga wff fsh C14495. 

0602 413438 Bf 
0602 613001 T 


500 SEL 

1986 (New Model) Pajet 
Maroon with light 
Brown leather, dec seat*, 
alloy wheeh, only 2.000 
mis. £34.99S. Contact 
Alan Kidd. Dicksons of 
Penh Tet 0738 39993. 



1986 2.3-16 

Blue black, leather, air 
cond, elec seats. 
SAoof. 1,900 miles. 

U.K registered, 
immaculate condition. 
£24,500 

Tefephnae: D2B2 7S0 743 


as TOO LIKE IT. « Umr 
Portland Stmt, wi, (636 
9904: OxtOrt Onu tubal 
■ M A BMnU E MMK, 16 om 
C«i« SlTML Wl 1680 3126: 
Oxford Qma ttlfcrl. 

MMOC Bi n — H T. 233 Rrgenl, 
SUreL Wl 1499 6176: Oxfom 
Owe tube). 


MERCEDES 


SAMAM 2*0 C - 1981. TTiletk- 
metaiur Elec sunroof . wtadoure 
6 aertel Cruel, co n tr o l, alloy 
wheels & Btauounkl stereo. Full 
Mercedes service history. 
47.000 mites, tncl. orhaie nv 
1st ration worth £2.000. Firm 
£6.960 secures- 1011 346 9106 


S3 A MOSEL. Air con. cruise. 
A BS Too taec. 50.000 miles. 
Fun service Msiory. surer /blue 
velour. Cxrelieni throughout 
nrectrmo chairman's can. Tel: 
0623 514902 (ofOce boom • 
Mrs Ptrteruvg 


500 SEL 1st R to Aug 86. Oiam- 
pagne Metallic. Burgaixty 
■earner Interior, all reotures. air 
rood, alarm etc- To me! phone. 
34.000 Ms £36.980 073583- 
637 Nr Bmingslolce 


460 SLC It- rrg . With special 
piafei Brown car plus vetor. 2 
owners LlobeaiaMe caodutonl 
E3ec S/if A WdL W a rr ante d 
7S.OOO ftiUea. £6.996 Ttf:OI 
229 0059 or 0669 20941 


330 T* ESTATE 1983 T* IT* 
Fawn. Genuine nor owner. FulL 
service history, tmmanitate 
condition. Many auras. 
£8.960. Tel: 01 390 7232 office 
hours. 


230 TE 1984 Auto. Silver Blue. 
Extras Inc sunroof- Immaculalr 
condition Low mileage. 
£10.260 Tei- <07031 613 883 
or 567 046 lEvrs/Wenasi 


SOS SE - Nov 83. Srtver blue. 
39.500 miles. FSH. Oeclrtc 
Mrnroof. air condlttaned. 
£16.600 ono. Tel: OI 878 2372 


500 ’ SEC, A RES. Petrol 
Slue/Grey vekmr. 26.000 mis. 
£36.960. Tel: 0202 707412. 


200 (W UAL 1986. 8.000 mis. 
auto Charapamw Metallic, tier 
s'roof 6 windows, central toe* 
mg. front arm rest. Ulumjnated 
vanity mirrors. HWW. rear 
headreMs. BiaupunU Torrocuo 
4 speaker sound system Re- 
mote took alarm. Atnotioety as 
new. £16X00. Tel- Ol 621 
8231 or 0992 32709. 
MERCEDES 460 SLC 1980. 
AMC colma coded Mack body 
work, new BBS wheels with 
P'7**. Ftecnfc sunroof, windows 
etc. private number, rtcepbpn- 
al. £14.996 ono. Home 0937 
73779 Work 0924 383212. 
450 SLC T9. 56.000 mis. met 
Wur/Oeige velour, auto, electric 
s/roo( f umed wtndows. an 
cona. quad stereo, alleys. PAS. 
headlamp wash wipe. FSH. 
MOT. taxed. £10-950. Tel: Ol 
9360151 tdayt 969 6620 levn: 
LHD 1979 MERC E DE S 3S0SLC 
m wnue with blue 'Hour interi- 
or tow mlleagr. 1 owner, 
pnsnne expampfe. Ol 968 
6536/6 Of 0388 3438 fT>. 
NEW 388 E Auto *86 O reg. Met 
Blue Dec S/R A windows. 4 
headrests. Broker stereo etc. 
B<-y oiler on £23.980 Tel: 
0763 B64681 or 01 574 7477. 
SOO SCC Creg 12X00 mte. ABS 
Braking. Ptum/teathrr trim 
E5>R Concourse cond. Offer, al 
£36.000. TeL 041 321 7948 
Ofl. 041 632 5628 Hm. 

380 SL 1981 Model. Inca Red 
with beige trim Hard A Soft 
Tops. Mws. Rear Seat- Ouse. 
Service History. Cla.b&o Tel: 
<0843) 43889 home/290084 T 
I80E 8S C Auto/PAS. 1 owner. 
19.000 rah. history. Electric 
windows and sunroof. £1 1 .996 
ono. 01-668 8160/ 764 9999.T 
LHD SOO SEC 1984 A Rrg. 
White. Fully loaded. 28.000 
Km FSH As new C39 .760.01 

485 6668. Ol 586 0678 T 
LHD 500 SEC 1986 C Reg Fully 

loaded. 12.000 km, FSH. Met 
Blue As new. £34.750 Tel- Ol 

486 5658. Ol 686 0678 T. 
NEW 560 SEC. Bh»e Black/ ■ 

&«" me hide Full spec -let price. 

■ Tel: 01 874 7866 ev es A Wends 
or 01 431 0666 iOl m 
480 SLC 80. Thistle Green. AIT 
con Learner. 60.000 mts. FSH. 
£10.950. Td 082 921 262 T- 


in icraptitous 
vurTOBhdinRV 

FROM CROISSANT, 
TO KEJEHf 

TRY OUR 
FAMOUS 
BOMBA Y 
BREAKFAST 
FROM $ AM 
lid LATE 


There is also large Cocktail List 
11 Greek Street, London Wl V 5LE 
Telephone: 01 434 1149 


OFF ANY LUS'CH OR DINNER 
FOR TWO WHEN YOU REDEEM 
THIS VOUCHER 


THE ONLY OASIS OF 
LUXURY IN BAYSWATER 




900 SC 1983 A Re* SMencBd 
condition MU) car. £16.495. 
AO conceivable extra Suns Ol 
346 2081. Off OI 745 4450. 

INI 280 SE. new shape. Blue/ 
Hue vetour. 4 dOOC. ESR. 
C/tockmg. rad/cam. 70.000 
mis FSH. £7.250 04896 348. 

1886 420 SL Sports. MM 
Blue /Blue Int. many extras 
3.000 mis. optional car- phone. 
£29.960. 04896 348. 

1*0 B Rrg. Boor. Superb Comb 
lion. Barbo/ Cumene. £8.750 
Teh 0773607427 or 607481 

SS C 288 SE. Hue/v efour. stereo. 
S/R. aulo. le.ooo mis. l own. 

_ £18.995 Andrew 030260086. 

SCO SEC drthetv murage. LUC 
dealer supplied, offers. 0435 
31414. 

ISO SL 78 Aulo/Pas. Pennin e 
car. hisiocy. bargain £8.996 OI 
668 8160/764 9999.T 

500 SL 84 8 Astral SUt w with 
leather Mm 4 rev teal 83*00 
mllrL, £38600. 0203 0632S T 


MERCEDES WANTED 


THE GANDHI 


Finest Indian Cuisine. 
Exquisite Tandoori and Chefs 
specialty seasoned to your own taste. 

Open 7 days, 

12 noon - 3 pm/6 pm - midnight 
57 Westbonrne Grove, W2 

Tel: 01-221-9396 

Air conditioning 
Private function room available 


LONDON ROAD 


(ROMFORD) LTD 

Mercedes Benz main 
dealers. Underwrit- 
ers tor late and tow 
mileage Mercedes. 



MOTORS LEASING 


“London’s most elegant Indian Restaurant*’ 



RESTAURANT 

“A matter of tradition and taste" 

At Papadams the mystique of good cooking is a 
numerations and rich tradition, combined with 
meticulous care and highly exacting standards. 
Loach lime Btrffci 125 Great HtcfaGeM Street, 

£SJ0 London WI. 

Open 7 Days 3 week Telephone: 01-323 2*75/ 
Ijam-ppm/opm-l 1.30pm 01-323 2879 



HEE FOOD not TIE TOP Of THE WORLD ft LMD OF THE GUHOUS 
THE FIRST RESTAURANT TO INTRODUCE 
NEPALESE FOOD TO LONDON 
NATRAJ y° uf H** 1 « front al » Pworama ol tha 

irninnu MnretmBnrBn9e.Al»BtaBf«linr«cM*pto- 

tms ol tba meumams ind Bxantote of aneiam 

Nap a t g i * omgmanahip. 

FULLY LICENSED OPEN DAILY 12 3 & 6-HTMTSHT 
93 nURLOTTE STBHT LONDON Wl 
(NEAREST TUBE 600DGE STREET) 
01-637 0050 01-636 4995 



D1 -575 6377 
Not imports. Sceosad credit 
brokers. Warranty 6 sennemg 
earned out by yow local dealer 


FORD 

CONTRACT 

MOTORING 


XR3i New model 
under £42* per week 

Please ring for 
further information 

01-441 7089 


MOTORS LEASING 


What do Pttocini, Peronl 

and Pasta have in common ? 
Yotr can find them all at 
Parco’s Pasta on the Park 

7hee>tfit*^newrest3uf3irwfiereihe 
Spaghetti C^era Company perform 
hve^tolonC^era every nigk 

Carte abf^ to Panu*... The Paaa 

a pcrfea_-Ti« Compaq isCaptivax>c»i 


PLEASE 
COME ANO ENJOY 
OUR EXQUISITE 
THAI CUISINE 


KHUN AKORN 

jll'i! KFsT-U-k-W.! 


136 BROMPTON ID. 

kmchtsikdce. 

LONDON SWI 
T&: 01-225 2688 

TIME OUT 

By Ltedsey' Barths* 

”ll ’ s iht' fxd that makes 
this new restaurant an 
ABSOLUTE .MUST 10 
nsu. The hard is so 
complex, neh. tony and < 
delicious that it is qutte 
unlike onv other Thai 
fitad I’ve tried in 
London. This n Thai 
food at its most regal: it 
is prim’ at around £20 a 
head far a targe meal 
but really is guile 
outstanding “ 

HARPERS A QUEEN 

By Lloyd Gro ttmaa 

"A fine example of 
upmarket ethnicity I 
took forward to a return 
visa. “ 

3 COWS! SET LUNCH 

£9.50 

OMN 7 DAYS A WOK 
LUNCH ANO OMNSt 


— Jffi . ■ ■ 

LACE PLATE 


RESTALRANTBQAT 

becoming one of 
tomJon‘% moM popular pn- 
ine canny i court 4 »r tf 
appointed ban Uui win 12 
and often tnyb qi lahiv cut- 
»nr freshh ptrtund on 
board uhibl cruising llte 
man picturesque oraches 
of the Rigans tonal 
Ideal for pntatc parties and 
tmsfuns mterunung. 

For more ipAirtnaiiua and 
brartium rres Ol-’gft 3428 
Embarkation pomi. non Nl 
8tomfield Rd 
LiiUe Venice. U9 


Turkish Restaurant 

(Next to ABC Cinema) 
let 229-3537 


GABY’S CeatiKDtal Bar f 

| Best vanety of I 
i continental and Middle- , 
I • East foods I 

| 30 Charing Cross Road. I 
■ London WC2 5 

1 Tefc 01-836 4233 I 
| Open 7 days a week J 


AKROTIR1 

H 40 AWwvfie Road 
E cuoftam SW4 
(W| Hm^MGJDn-UXn 

_ J» . ' T * 4730ni 

GREEK , 
CUISINE 

CaMlmbt 


A taste of Jamaica 
at CJNDIE’S JAMAICAN 
RESTAURANT 

-A D ctng manu mb M fax 

tawwit, aifm 
•PlreW Lobster 
*CnttaSw4PNMi 
■MitKii. muen more 

Hmiln’i JraaNcm 
Reituruf 

W Me KM Bad. SE14B3 7M7 


EDUCATIONAL 
COURSES REVIEW 




MERCEDES 5Q0SL 

19« 22.000 i»388 all ex- 
tras including air 
commonlng. Perfect con- 
dition. Private plate. 
E30.000 o.ruo. or trade tor 
best B.M.W. M63S Of 635. 
Cast) UMf way. Prtvole 
sale. 

TetDiys 01 568 4699 
e«s SI 585 2454 


He Riche 
Contracts Ltd 

CONTRACT HIRE & VEHICLE LEASING 


LEASE YOUR 




Most models, 
immediate defivery. 
From £79 pw 

Belgravia 
Vehicle Leasing 
01-519 5730 


380 SEC . 

'Crag. Maraon/Cream laattef 
mewr. fidly loaded, stereo 
cassette. *r eondifaxm. sun- 
roof, ABS, AUoy wteets. FSH. 
T6JOO mdes, perfect am&xn 
as new. £3l.75a . 
Tefcft-748 5327/ 
6614 week days 
01-748 8488 aayttsn 


280 SL 

1984 (A reg). 3W00 miles. 
Metallic Lapis ttue/cream 
beige leatfwr interior. 

Dearie BtHKOOf. Cruise 
control headlamps, wash 
and wipe. Canon stereo 
radfe/caeoaas. Excalem 
c oninoa 

PRICE: £14,6Sa 

TEL J C WALL 
DAY40742) 349311 


280 SE 

. 1983 (A). 

Signal Rad with Brown ve- 
lour. sunroof, heatfta^ 
wasb/wpe, alloy wtaeis. Full 
service history. Only 10.000 
mis. £15.895. Contact Alan 
KMd. Dicksons of Perth. 

Tel: 0738 39993. 


Z30 It B re* As non. 7 XXXI 
ml*. 1 own,,. 6 tprM. Ivory 
with brown Iran, etertnr win- 
oown, «ai (turn, rear mui 
lasts, rear (sang chfMrtn'a 
woi, rront arm rnL Mad ri>- 
snainls. Din roof, bursar 
rearm, retoy wtwets. teuttseu- 
late condition duougnout. 
tli.775 76 «&S7> 45795 



r TRANSLEASE 




CAR-VAN-TRUCK 
CONTRACT HIRE 

LEASING AND FLEET MANAGEMENT 

180 Lower Addscombe Road, Croydon. 

01-656 6821 


COMFUSCD al Itw uuip uxurr ol 
urlialr Snrmanal Courur-i.' 
Esprit advirr rWLC P,unnns 
irr ComulUnrv Suilr 1 . 1 
Mlllnn ltd C. imtHKior Trl 
tWSatPMOC 

A 8CTTU CHANCK jr .U n In 
rN al ludrariKlriit rullnx-. 
Ailixr FREE PjIrrnhviiT 
&unr 1. 1 MiUoji Rd umreukfp 
nossrotjoo 


' COURSES 


C6LUMCHAM TUTORS Km 
xmnlnii RAC ClfT 01 
"O and m \ m pi,k. Too tmults 


tiition 



NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


POCM1AHP5 - CTTY - BOW. 

SrKciion of wrtaa 4 Sew 
Homes A Flats cm, city and 
Ibvrr. £55 - £ 250.000. Phone 
MtOOwalK RSMIrmul: OX 790 
9852 or Pd60 7ILSM. 


DEVON & CORNWALL 


Lao H o g fur CaruMi p rajutln T 

'i OK nrrd Cornwall Proorny 
MM DrUiK- 0657 876383 


SOMERSET & AVON 


MD SOMERSET \ery Htoy 
uonr-tniut nouir tn mull vil- 
Iw iQok main it nr Mgiton. 
London i': noun. hhuiirM 

Srhool) 3 Mi. 5 reception, 
knehrn Urdu ago. 2 hum. CH 
wod outbuikbmpk aerr. very 
omu <«ciudm garden. 
EK50G Trt Otta SOSOS. 


STONE BARM Nr A36I /OH An 
boarder. ? acres or mote su- 
em» nnri, 3 Mv bain + 
omuiip. KdL large sitting 
rm/r-vpnvd bramt. 

Mt.brtvakiaU. Cfif. DfClan. 
£65.000 T01 0984 23409. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


W6 3 tod room luxury house, 
new tune, totin m. crap per 
month Tel 01 385 6447 (After 
19 30 Mure A Wh/mdsi. 


CULLERA 

25K souin of Vaienu. hilly 
hmsnea. urge htw tateben. 
large leirace anti barbeew 
untoteing fee sa. 3 m twts. 
2 bztinmms i mute. F««ras 
■neUe Saasb emits. Teius 
Wan and Swramra pool. Only 
^nwfrw^n^^tBy. Pm , 

Tel: Dl-375 5246. 


DOMESTIC & C ATERING 
SITUATIONS 


ATTRAcmre wAmmscs r*. 

bulled tor bun City Wine 
Bal/Rnlauram Muabeabfeib 
•Koj-k eflirtrtiUy under nrev 
nute Com raminw pwmtlal. 5 
luninumrs plus 2 pi mingy mo 
Trt- ** Phil 

IB 405 216b 

CHALET GJHt Reg fw prnUr 
Chortei Leruer Der-Tunl An- 
DK- with details ol cooking exp 
in writing w> Annobel rial 5, 
34. Nn«n Pure. London swe 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


RTTEBMATTOMAL LADY tg, 

Swha Passpon. dsnamir ore 
naniHH Seek, situation as 
Chef/MailroN* da Mahon 
Avail 1st Septeintoi tor 
viKKl/long term enqageMenl. 
hann to work fen small/Urge 
narnre Home/at>road. 

. landrsea Convervlnl in 
Engthh/Firnrh. German. Iial- 
ton. Moamvh «*blv 10 BOV 
1 1 7-3 

tet KU&CMT male aom ar bsl 
qraouaiH iron univereiiv m 
Boston Lsa BA in potmcal 
sclent e/modern luslen . widrtv 
read currrnt of loirs Seek, prof 
as fun or part time ireurdi os 
vruani to Mem Oct oi 
Parnamml. London hm 
ordered Rrotv to BOX H0$ 
Tne Tunes. Advert Dnn Vir- 
ginia SI. London E 1 ODD 






























































26 


thf. TTMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 



Going swimmingly: Don Rodocker and his company's bail-out pack 

lifeline for the diver 


By Ian 

A former deep-sea diver’s company 
which started with a payroll of only three 
is, it says, now leading the underwater 
safety Reid with a new system. 

Gas Services Offshore, an Aberdeen 
firm established in 1981 by Don 
Rodocker developed an emergency 
ball-oat pack to give deep-water divers 15 
extra minutes of precious emergency air 
supply should disaster strike beneath the 
waves. , _ 

All divers carry emergency baD-out 
packs but at present these allow only 46 
seconds of gas at depths of 500 metres 
barely enough to reach the safety of the 
diving bell, their underwater ba se. ■ 

The Gas Services team, now grown to 
35 , has come op with a secondary life- 
support system to give 15 minutes of air 
to aid a diver in difficulty if his 
support is cat 

The company claims the new system rs 
the most significant breakthrough in 
dher safety in the last decade. A 
company member, Moyra Hunter, said: 
“We have spent two years developing it 

and are confident it will do very welt We 

hope that it wiD set a standard the 
indnstry will follow." 

Official recognition came last month 
when the Minister of State for Energy. 

Alkk Bnchanan-Sunth, launched the 
new system. . . „ 

Gas Services Offshore was originally 
set np by the 40-year old Rodocker 
because he recognized that the expensive 
helium used by deep-water divers was 
“bubbling off* and going to waste. The 
potential for savings was enormous, 


BRIEFING 


A Jack 

fro* ring in mind, that the annual helium- 
oxygen consumption in the North Sea 
alone is 80 million cubic feet, which is 
worth £10 million. 

The company first came up with a new 
recovery system. Using this dosed-' 
circuit system, gas breathed can be 
gathered and transferred to a reprocess- 
ing unit on the diving-support vessel via 
the diver’s umbilical link. Once treated 
ami purified, the gas cen be re-used. 

The company has already won wide 
recognition for its systems. Gas 
Services equipment now operates in 
countries as far apart as South America, 
the Middle and Far East, the Gulf of 
Mexico and the Falklands. Turnover of 
the company has leapt from £110,000 in 
1981 to £2,700,000 in 1985. 

The world market for diver-gas recov- 
ery systems, however. Is small ami half 
that market has been tapped. So the 
company is moving into other fields of 
development, of which the secon da ry- 
life-support system is only one. 

In an advanced stage of developments 
qnH due for launch this autumn is a new, 
low-cost, remotely operated “swimming" 
vehicle for underwater exploration. 
There are many vehicles of this kind on 
the market but Don Rodocker is hoping 
to score with price, selling at about 
£10,000, a fraction of current equipment 
costs. 

The company’s knowledge of diver 
medicine is also being pnt to use in the 
field of hyperbaric oxygen units, used 
mainly in multiple sclerosis treatment. 


MR FRIDAY 


■ British venture-capital investment in 
British companies nearly doubled to 
£277.5 million in 1 985, according to 
the British Venture Capital Association s 
annual report In contrast the propor- 
tion invested by members in US com- 
panies was down sharply -- from 25 
per cent to 12 per cent ot the total at £38 
miirion. 

An increase in total investment is 

partly because of the growth in member- 
ship of the association. Membere in- 
vested a total of £325 million in 635 
companies, with most going toven- 
tures receiving risk equity for the first 
time. The proportion of funds chan- 
nelled into start-up businesseshas de- 
clined from 18 per cent of the total in 

1984 to 12 per cent last year. 



. 

*1 warn yon. getting this contract ’ will 
not be easy for yon — I'm teetotal 


Country matters 
for the Small 
Firms Service 

By Sally Watts 

The Government’s Small Firms Service 
(SFS) has a regional face. 

In the eastern region, which covers 
Bedfordshire. Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, 
Suffolk. Hertfordshire and Essex, Ron 
Lvnch is the acting manager, based at 
Cambridge. He finds many small enter- 
prises grow out of existing regional 
activities. 

Mr Lynch ays: “East Anglia is moving 
fasu with high-technology industries 
following in the wake of Cambridge’s 
science park. There are businesses that 
stem from farming, such as food or 
services and repairs. And small hotels 
and guest houses are increasing in 
number in the tourist areas, especially on 
the coast.” 

He has a staff of 11. who receive a 
grounding in business problems, with 
training courses, updating and talks by 
experts. There are 28 small- firms coun- 
sellors, and business-advice days are 
held at area job centres. 

Most of the inquiries to SFS - which is 
sometimes called the GP for small 
businesses - come from enterprises with 
fewer than 25 employees. Last year the 
centre dealt with 23,500 inquiries. 

Anyone starting or running a small 
business, who dials 100 and asks for 
Freefone Enterprise, gets advice, fol- 
lowed where necessary by leaflets and 
face-to-face counselling. The first three 
counselling sessions are free; after that 
each session is £30. The Government s 
business and technical advisory service 
is aiw available, and it, too, is free at the 
start 

England's 10 SFS centres - started by 
the Department of Trade and Industry 
but now part of the Department of 
Employment - last year angered 
285,000 calls and provided 37,500 
consultancy sessions. (Scotland and 
Wales have their own centres, linked 
with development agencies.) 

The most frequent problems have 
been financial ones, particularly how to 
improve cash flow and how to prepare a 

business plan to secure a bank loan. 

This usually takes two sessions with 
one of the SFS team of specialists, who 
are paid a retainer to counsel budding 
entrepreneurs. Applicants must say what 
market research they have carried out, 
describe the background of the new 
business and those involved with it and 
set out their existing financial back-up. 
The first session is to sort out the 
answers, the second to polish up the 
application. 

Mr Lynch has found that many 
beginners are worried about premises. 
Most of these are on a long-term lease, so 
the best bet for a young business is a 
small workshop or “seedbed”, where lets 
are short-term. 

The SFS is often asked to find out what 
grants or loans are available. For help 
with a technical problem, a meeting is 
usually arranged with an expert of the 
technical advisory service. 




BUSINESS FOR SALE 


KH1GHTBRIDGE 
PROMOTIONS & 
MODELLING AGENCY 

Wall established suc- 
cessful business for 
sate. Excellent location. 
Funher details: 

Reply to BOX H21 


MALAGA 
SHOPPING 
CENTRE 
FOR SALE 

Prime position. Invest- 
ment or own business. 
Offers around Elm. 

Tel: HI 393 5553 


CHESHIRE 
TROUT FARM 

and Fishery for sale. 
Leisure facilities on 11 
acres with plentiful water 
supply. Pools for 
Rent-a-Hod, fly and worm 
fishing. Capacity to 
produce 35 tons per year. 
Planning permission 4 
bed house, mobile home 
on site. Excellent situa- 
tion offering further 
potential for develop- 
ment £120.000. 

Tel: 0270 841108 

for further details. 


MID WALES notrt/lreefeouse' 

Main invl pavilion in prime I 
itMirrJ area. 9 lelllnb rooms. F 

SuM.iiriMi weL tel load 4 re* 

uuunl trade. T/O approx 
Ido OOO P-J Owners 

arroniodaimn & Mlltf [Jaf F/H 

111*5.000 Bi-pTy Id BOX EM. 1 



B 


.eedsto 



payment 


Good customer relation - 
are vital to any 
business. But what if 

yoa’re having to wait .~- !r 
months and months ’Zr*'-' 
for payment? 

International Factors 
havetheanswetWe — »• 


approved invoices 



with 80% advanced _ _ 

immediately. - * 

Stop chasing bite- 
let us do it (ex yoo. 

Politdy and tactfully We’re experts at getting 

the money in. without 

r^Tl International your good relations 
lSJ Factors being jeopardised. 

-==== = = == = = =t1 

tv. h*o~tvWnl Fscim-s Limited. R0. Btrt 240. Sovereign House. 
ften'sRwd. Bright® BN13WX. Tdeptoaeim 21211. 

I m to pa pad to stew papum - please tend deist oT your semes. 


10 O’CLOCK 
TYPE SHOP 

55ft frontage, video 
library/general 
store, very large 
estate, long secure 
lease. £120,000 per 
annum turnover. 
Possible off licence. 
Fixtures and fittings, 
goodwill and all 
stock £40,000 ono. 
0795 533411 


DESIRABLE 
FREEHOLD 
BUSINESS/ 

private residence, de- 
lightful village in mid- 
Dorset, feshion/pifts and 
seir-catering flat and pri- 
vate luxury apartment. 
Health reason Tor selling. 
£135.000 ono. 

03003 238. 


I RETAIL PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SHOP FOR SALE 

Ifct sale me goodwill, lean, assets. 

1 ana stock a! Dues Pnom™** a ! 
- 26 Gearqe Street Lunm. 

| PnrmHis only are Imue d id apply 
tor tuflnei nilnnunon to 
. Mss Canfiae RkscH at , 
Cristate Far*. Wtaitegid Head. 
OaUey.Ayiestay flocks. 

TeL 88447 8874 


ROOFING 
CONTRACTOR 

Genuine reason for 
rant sale. Turnover 
£300.000. For further details 
please contact 
David Watsoo. 

“ rt S r « 168 


£500 
WEEKLY 

Spare time in 
property, capital niL 
Property. 

Aston House. Hope 
S30 2RA. 


TOTS. GAIKS. CAROS, SMUO- 
nrr, roiKern Prime sile. Ew"i 
mar hr I town Turnover 
C200.000 + pot annum. Good 
prof ll 1 .. long \atiuMe WW 
CfeS .000 + SA\ Loan available 
for Mulatto- applicant*. 0206 
S4 W 8 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 

FAR EAST 
CONTACTS 

Companies or 
individuals who _ 
wish to expand their 
business to ever 
growing markets in 
Asia write to Julian 
Lucken. Scous 
Farm. Bratton, 
Westburv. Wilts. 
BA13 4RD. All calls 
02214 68123. 

DEVON 
COUNTRY 
HOUSE 

in own wooded grounds 
secluded, only 40 miles 
from M5. Unique 
situation, sheltered with 
breathtaking newt 7 
beds. 4-5 bathrooms, 
ideal exclusive 
retirement home. 
Propositions invited 
from persons of 
substance. Principals 
onlv. 

Telephone 03633 MS. 


SHORT TERM 
BUILDING AND 
BRIDGING FINANCE 

on Industrial Comm er ci a l end 
Residential Development at 
Prune Rates 

Mownum £250,000 
Apply ta 

HIR5CH 

Europe's leading 
Financial Consultants 
Please address inquiries to: 

Hirach International 
(Financial Sendees) Ud. 
15 Berkeley Street 
London W1 

Tel: 01-629 5051-3 
Telex: 28374 


BUSINESS- FOR SALE | fl YES YOU CAN! 


if you want m buy a busi- 
ness Venture Capital Report 
provides 500 speahe opi 
tunnies each year. For 
sample and tte details; 

VCR, 

20 Baldwin Street, 
Bristol 1 

Tel: 0272 272250 


Name. 
Trie . 


TREE NURSERY 

West ot Ireland. Forest tree 
and snrub nursery, land- 
scaping and forest 
contracting business 3 bed 
bungalow. 26 acres. 14.000 
so ft Doivtnene tunnels. T/o 
£70.000 £50.000 + SAV (ap- 
proximately £50.000). 

010 353 7848088 


A business you csr. run easily 
from Home, wfl unlnwed 
potential, regulai meat or- 
ders, higti Bfottt margins, 
positive casu flow, mmsnal 
ovemeafis. no stock require- 
ment5. no 'sel'jnfl 
racsssav. am! over glDQp et 
day pratt. (MOT slimming/ 
healffii. For full c?l*!s sene a 
9*4 sae to The Marketing Di- 
rector Sarrur. House. High 
Street. Tur*ey. Bedford 
UK 43 SDB 


SATELLITE TV 
FOR CRUSE 
SHIPS. 

We supply transmit + 
receive satellite Tv 
systems to cruise 
snips for live chat 
shows, conferences + 
TV reception at sea. 
Major marketing effort 
now requires funefing. 
Investors invited for 
equity participation. 
Exciting potential. 
World wide venues, 

KJBenson, Chairman, 
Ocean Sateffite 
Televi si on Ltd, 
Avmar House, 

61 Brvshfleid St, 
London El 6AA. 
PhonttOI-247 5899 (O) 
0279 814785 (H) 
Telex 21250. 


INTERNATIONAL 
DOG BREEDING 
KENNELS 

Famous international dog 
brewing Kennels requires 
development capitaL Partner- 
step considered. .Apply in . 
confidence to agent and \ 
sobdtor. 

D.C-F. Hutdtoreen. 

24 HU Road. 
Cambridge. C82 1DH. 

Teh 0223 64422. 


Ccmorn 

Address- 


.ftromte. 


Telephone 


J The perfect partner for the growing business 
^ Amnbatfik IJ ^ Bj,4GlcI * 8/0/88/8 

— — — — — — 


BELGIUM. El I nr I LfS ■ Flem 
i*fi \T4< nno* mealies* «• fuU 
-IIKMI for saw* ! 6 T fl farm 
l, ill, .r-niencd fivl "IIIIWV 
sinre !'1> III prr^iil onwr 

min , • ninnies ,niNflino or 
pul iIh ii.ii riMauuni runrt-rl 
lull o i I'.ur* I'-’oni til'd huW 

M .,illt .1-1 people. To I— -eld 
.tlNtliHH, lii.tttr- ll*~- "IW a“ 

I tit mini , .iiki «iiiidhv-ii' nuf 10 

.,n p.ttl, iiHIIPtlli’ltl t2.T0 OOO 

I nil <lrl.til% a-.diUM*” lr""». v 

Ui-tit.lrlltt Ol t»J° 

DORSET, wrtl .-.(jMi-noft & 
itiitiili t.-Mi.w-ri ,»nolr*»iH- Iruil 
A • -pl.ti'I'- ijit-- CM-rlH1H 
lit. .t.| ii,hi.i A a»rounl' T/O 
■.-•k.sf.i ii a ui 

r: ■- j rjp > r . i p j 

■»! •« iit \ Mr ht-t-c FrivtHiM 
UaSC'OO .QJl.'i, hi, ilrfli Hfl 
Bt/.’4S5 Fiir:n«'rrtrtflii'*;nitv 
li>- a <‘n WiiHlv^tn Olufr 


investment 

OPPORTUNITY 

id :bp «vjrr 
‘ md-Dlf- *i!fi flr.n»>JK 

a laftfnant.iul ttah-i lI'Hiimi 

Reply to BOS H45 
or phone 
(09328) 67386 

ilnuTMBiT OPPORTURrrv 

•LSOOCiO L.ijn t jpiljl 1 ,-r 
Ci, in I, f.rrli. ip.tlK>lt E,Mn^on 
/Idunrh !•>(' n*>"» PifwltKI* 
ior rrt. , 'f/ , 'r v .*-^'i 1 nm r e*.. 
r.inii-Jnit null, Tr|. 01 

l&ia 

BARN A- 2 MB INCOME unlino 
Ultiplr llil<?,ITMl>ail Il"< 

IhiIv Mnlrf' Orm StB 
\irimM n.»l Kt'«I til tnjn 

, 114 . ctHf, l\r ANT 

GOLDEN ORPORTUIOTY io tom 

* mi- it'iMii* i|tflii.l«, KM i™ i" 

illiKfu. 1 l, .lUi-.tilV r*IJWl-nrrt 
thru n>« ii Hiimiii-ai^ nui >»ho 
Pua ,/ 1 Ifii- lins*- rapiiril- '.iwir 

ia« 1 i,<tmi\ mil* 11"* riiuitiriallv 

,rn !<-■• .u.^inu ■iir.Min iiKlir. 

in cmiiiin Gmn TIkhu <n Ot 
AJ? -iScl UPP Pr'.'lwf I h- In 

imuiHm.il lid. Wuldour 

fjlirrl. Londtf* Wl\ sTt 


H0LB0RN BASED 
TYPESETTING 
AND ARTWORK 
STUDIO 

using Sea rite xt 
equipme nt seek s 
merger or office for 
entire undertaking. 
Established income 
£130k per annum. 

Reply to BOX E75. 


PHONE 0753 31222 m ■ , 
IN FIVE MlNUTES,YOLTLL HND OUT IF YO U 
GOULD RUN Afl MIlliON BUSINESS. 

Wfe are talking about a business of your own And a^succeffi ratetiiat is 

additional £150,000-£200,00a _. . . - 

OK? If you are dill reading, the business we^e offenng is runnfrg 
your own company in one of the fastest growing induces. E ntre s 
the largest publrdy owned franchisor erf computer retail centres 
with over 300 open' or under development worldwide. 

Computer experience is not necessary but you must be 
used to managing peopleThe standard we demand 
Owners are as hidi as the rewards can be. But hawng hdped ^hem 
to set up in business we support them more fully than any 

If you are determined to succeed phone our Franchise Develop- 
ment Manager on 0753 31222 (during business houn* 

Experience shows that within five minutes, we canteHifyoure 
likely to make a success of running an EnW CbmjwtCT Centre. How? 

’foull find out if you phone Do it now That's 0753 31222. 


CenrRC 


Gompursi^ 

X M ireas’ J 



17 Bath Road. Slough 5L1 3UL 


Afepsina 

. franchise is 

'yoivopporamity 

: Fersina is part 
of the Oestrum 
international group. Fersina 
have ovar 28 years experience In 
the high performance uPVC window 
w growth industry. We provide the fid pfenning 
business, technical, marketing, staff selection and 
training back-up on a continuing basis which you 
would expect from a targe successful company. 
Apply now for information on'one of the tew 
exclusive re main ing areas, 
j Telephone 022&-728310 and ask for F ranchi si ng 
Dept, National Franchising Manager. 


I THE 

SUPERIOR 

PACKAGE 

A4 FULL COLOUR 

PROMOTIONAL leaflets 

worn — — 

£160 

INTERESTED? 

For a SUPERIOR DEAL 
contact JANE co send 

aid our price guide cn 

0 225 704311 

SUPERIOR GROUP 

nesewas • PHor ogw HBts 

■ COLOUR PUNTERS . 

t vtanswntfii 


‘ ParimCesmtmakinalGm) 
cestnmi House, industry Road, 

tartan. BatiE»ey,s wfi sio gp 

CELLULAR MOBILE PHOMES 

Car Phones from £699 
Probably the best buys in the UK with the best 
technical backup 
Immediate delivery 
Telephone Ipswich 0473 

LONDotTARMOirCOMPAliY 


FOR SALE 
CLEVELAND 

largo warehouse facility. Contacts mrtiaily to. 

Chip Chase Nelson & Co 
Chartered Accountants 


89 hfigh Street 
Yam, Owe tend 


TS15 9BG 


GROUND FLOOR 
OPPORTUNITY 

We seek dstrbum UvoisIkM 
the UK d market on range of 
health and beauty products. 
Successfd apoheanb wU need 
auaitaWe E2£50 tor meal sudr 
purchase Expected eatings n 
the first year c£50.Q00. 

Aim ckmi otfira bows Eileen oa 
021 6437149 or «nte ta 

Marefl Health 
& Beauty Limited, 
Warrick Ckanbero. 

14. Coparattn SML 
B2 4RH. 


INVESTMENT 

OPPORTUNITY 

Company presently 
distributing fasteners, 
approx, turnover £500.000 
requires invBStment lor 
provable expansion. 

Reply to BOX H26 


LOANS & INVESTMENT 


FINANCE 

Available for 
commercial properties, 
hotels, licenced 
premises, businesses 
etc. also building, 
development and 
project finance. 

Can 

0803 25479/25470 
(24tar answer pboae) 


FACTORING Inc unWasml ad«N 

on in, aifc Ijflonnqor n 
cru ahln pco««ti u*KJt»> 04024 
451 78 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


i MANUFACTURER of r, . million 
■IT, Ml/r •, ■11111114 l»H>CIrtjnK* 
inn.^iii Iim/^uni, rguirmml 
lui it,,, .. hoith. dun--, halite, 
A i.-t«j|ir icnlrP' wclij, OIK 
TRIBl TOW? Willi n^nlina 
htiMlinv. ram.K-h Hint- BCHt^t 
•t.il l»i hmltli innmdirvc 
v* min. 1 i'llirilT**JHir.4ll» fn. 

■ ri,nl Ii, lull ftwlioiial ntt-dld 
Vklllr III midi . OltlHKrtrr JIMni 
lulh-,1 .IHMih l It? J titlin'] 4T-J 

tr,r,rtl imiliT»:r of silt*, ntT 
MTont 1 Hi Id teln Diri-tlor 

B-.'\ r-2 

SALCOMCC Sonin CV? on Ixnld 

mu ,.i> • .« i<- SctH'h jW 

w ... irf, b*.kh D min, „4lF 
'■Hr? 'X*'' HrfliKlnm Mihsljnlul 
Hill ...111-- HT'BIV lo BO> ELO 
FAMOUS WATCH mjnnf.iriurrr 
>. niM-- in nriptra- or am- of Ibcir 
Inin, fn, ri.-l.nh l.+'Mvinr Ot 

.-■riH 115* ____ 

£4iM CANCELLED lmtmi or 
llr* Iiibiiil, flutnintj uoultl Mill 

\i,in iniHiKiiH Tpi Oe*i 79S 

.,hJH 

SANDBLAST CLASS EMCfUV- 

CRS ,t'F\ iiiwni pwIumvoS 
i-Ajnliiainl rusInlTOT h*ri tar 
, in.i -|Hi TH .O7ri<».04»»Jl 


TELEMARKETING 

American expert 
available for con- 
sultation to develop 
business to business 
or business to con- 
sumer programmes. 
Modest retainer 
against percentage 
of increased orders. 

Let’s talk 
Ring Mr. Wallace 
in London at 
01-629 5987 


WOULD YOU 
LIKE 

to sen your services/ 
product to the British 
brewing industry. A 

company with 
contacts up to Board 
Lever will do this for 
you. Please contact 
BOX H87. 


re ONLY CMftDCHTUUL PA/ 

Arinmirerator nrnwYir muon 
jim DnlNr/mniih M, *j 
Mp-dfc-i Fiwii i-nold fitprpwnl 

IHiMiims rtKtil* 111 London/ 
•tfir.urt Tri Ol 58fe 0130 


THE CARTWHEEL INH 

Mi ni M EADOW. BLAIRGOWRIE 

Very prosperous Public House Business I n busy 
East Perthshire town enjoying steady summer 
and winter trade. The business promises cpm- 
rjrise Public Bar with Gents and Ladies ToSets, 
Large Loiinge Bar with Gents and LatflssToilets, 
spirit store, cellarage. The iuxuri^pr^etors 
flat comprises Large Lourm. Doubte ^Joom 
wtth en suite toilet Second Doubte B^rowrv 
Luxury Fitted Kitchen, Luxury Fitted and Tiled 
' Bathroom,* Utfflty * Room. Roof Garden. 

Rateable Values: £8200 (Public House) - 
£437 (House) 

For tartber partta&reandto 
Messrs. NBtet, Gcmud ate Cawdagbaa, Soifctas, 
14 Alba Street, Btafrgewrta. 

Telephone Blairgowrie (0250) 3468. 


MERCHANDISE 

DEVELOPMENT 

Ex Managing Director 

(buying* major retaagroop 

Pic now avaiaUa to assist 
in merchandise 
daroiopmantforaretaHor 
or importer in any area of 
nontextfio merchamfise. 
Contiderabte experience 
. in own txrancfing. Can 
writ IUR time or part Sme 
or on a consultancy baas.. 
Contacts worldwide. .. 

. Jtaply to BOX H68 , 



SURREY 
FREEHOUSE 

BETWEEN DORKING 
AND GUILDFORD 

Large oak beamed bar, cocktail bar, 34 seal ratan- ; 
* ram, large cellars, spacious kitchens, 10 living 
rooms, 2 baths, set in 2 acres- opposite village 
green and church. 

£200,000 p/a turnover exe. vat. Lots bo re scope. 
12 years unexpired lease for sale sac fixtures and 
fittings. £1904)00. 

Tel: (0306) 730737 or 731087 


COMPLETE TELEX SYSTEM • 

£899 + VAT 

PORTEX is a portable/desk top telex system com- 
plete with full sized keyboard and printer ready lor 
use. Call us for details: 

B.C.S. limited 

01-582 6060 


COMPANY WUH NEW OFFICES 
IN THE N0B1H WEST 1 

WiD anon behaifoftmsmessestxindiyidBalswdawlohe 
reprcseniKl in the xna oa tow cost bua. AB reptocnBsd- 
eted in stricdsi confidence to: 

TJL Hanson &C ol» 

St James's Chambers, St James^ Street, 
Accrantton, Lancs. 


COMPANY 

PROBLEMS 

Are credSon homtf 
Are suppliers ins 
proforma or CW07 
Am baWs about to levy the 
stock? 

Are On hanks insisting you 
sign more personal 
guarantees? 

It the answer is yes to any of 
these oiestions you need ow 
help, if we cannot help you 
save your company wo ican ad- 
vise you on liquroahOR. 
Comad us today. 

Ross Walbw ft Associates, 


Warwick, CV35 SDR. 
(0789) 8 41292 
or (0905) 779617 


PMESTlOe IWAYFADt AMWUCM 

BurUnqKHi phon«. WwanJW; 
wardmq wf\TC*1. Ol StW) 
IIS VISA MATTERS E S Gudcon 
LSlawi-or 17 BuiuroteSI Lorv 
rion U l Ol 486 0613 

PC A CLONES ■ hefp. Iron 
inq & imlalUHan £13 v/hr TM: 
Ol -730 896B 13* hourn. 


COMPUTERS & 
COMPUTING SERVICES 


TELEX AND 
E-MAIL 

Are you selling or 
using equipment to 
connect via a tele- 
phone to telex and 
E-mail. Put yourself 
or your customers on 
the best service. High 
speed error protected 
data links from 
business micro or 
stand alone printing 
terminal. 

Tefexcha 
0785 81 


OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES 

WORLDWIDE 

INCORPORATIONS 


ASTON COMPANY 
FORMATION LI D 



COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 


LOCK-UP CABAOKuiveUiicPIto 
Prtwtwroudh cU * SFjSS:/^ 
van>9» untouctofl E7.490 vuj- 
some sranc f or ren tal yfewtfi; 
Prior CHLSOOSTCfor freehold 
to nSKtrinmai jWd oj 
19-4®°n. AmOW & CO- 3J3 
Warwick Rd. SoflbuH. TW: 031 
70* 3630. 


DISTRIBUTORS 
& AGENTS 


ELECTRONIC 
RUST CONTROL 
SYSTEM 
REVOLUTIONARY 

method that protects 
the vehicles body 
INSIDE and OUTSIDE 
Dealers & Distri butors 
WANTED 

coll 

RUSTR0N1CS LTD 
0874 730233 


IMPORT /EXPORTS 


DO YOU WANT to ntoort to to* 
USA. ExtWfKmvd US/CK com- 
pany ta WoUps tor new 
product*. Tel: JM£ Pwrann °r 
Caresw Ltd. on 01-381 3083. 


SPECIAL- 

DEALS 


AVAILABLE 
TOGETHER WITH 
FIRST CLASS 
SERVICE AND 
SUPPORT. 

HUGE RANGE 
IN STOCK. 

CALL TODAYS 


41-42 DOVS Sll 
LONDON W1 
TH: 01-408 1516 


OFFICE 
& 


JUST DESKS' 

I, Period and iwrfnctioto 

I podcstal desks, raruendedn. 

II Writhe “**»■ Payeotwl* 

and Dok chain . 
write far details to 
PUtetol Caiea WridM 
-Jae Deks- DU ?OM. 
■m Ch—tk Sew*. Laadaa NW» 
Tdk**aee: W-725 7976 




OLIVETTI MZ4 
20 MB £1,695 

includes toyfewd tiwtaor 
DOS Buss amana < B B4tK HAM 
Mufe *ott accounts « EZT1 
Many oner nacDms Msaea 
AS pnees exetude VAT 

Phone tar deMt- 
Comteat(0M3) 371371 
VBG1 S75 3763 - 


mbw Aiwseere. fz ca». icMB 
XI rw Jbn FIO. 1 »r vtarran- 
b nnd I or deutta Buetness 
mu Ol 3S9 3151 


TELEX SERVICES 


TELEX TRAKSTIL OmMMtr 
v>ilii Ram turnon- Coy to uay f 
■|» C4.AI6 Offer, united. Trir 
■Q3Q0I 581 Ail 5CZSO 


SUNRISE AUTOS 
CAR HIRE 
OPERATORS 

AfromtwoJoperatbrs 
'soogta irroughout UX 
■ Nov Nissan flange. 


Seu&UX 
North U-K. 


7B650T 

40855- 


yoraoc/stiowrooro Ml Md*W 
M4/M5 senes quarjuiteedm- 
cone plus c om m lo taiUodmv 
products to bkto/hotrt/diiiihs 
inclustncri. Tetcotwoc 0389 
61190 - 

HOTELS & LICENSED 
PREMISES 


POTte) THA TCHffl FW1Y 
LJCSiCB) ffiEBWUSE 

SAMri n aaaflnc teBtn Dew id 
He UV M dung igom tocMn-fl 
^nrntUWHis WTt uer 4 
bottle sues. sw» Ssm A£»W 

rnSOOD F H GmM etc Rri 

UCBfCH) RESTAURANT 
WITH LETTING ROOMS 
MS know WnM «««1 « * 
iroam enstovi on me eawei m- 
«sv tea Dnan 3 mi tts mm 
me cord DeBcted nemd tmtoT 
actt c a mt e «W ■« xweni 
MOra* Mil w a wow m wag 
UdKP. 8 ueflnwns imtn torn 
mm atw urns may * 
or ant kmi I JOT « Mi CriiriX 
T 0 £81 000 [U £137500 FH M 
CM lODl 

Cherry & Cherry 
IB Sutetaratay West 


(0392) 73881 


NORTH DORSET 

LONDON 2 HOURS 

M mpojtag Gwvin rasstmee. W 
pAury beatwra. Unit reawux 
looms bM attires. LaBora.'fmiess 
nte. Stait oovws. Extromriy aol 
VponKd tta> Kcaday tea- 
a™**- Enwwe nature aqHixti 
5taMpg'for25 RMdamlwiI ms- 
jnm.ip-4B tS» *ms.~SuiaUi 
»/Resulsffl*J or. Rea 

AgrisehriCM 
I Tats (0272) 322440 



HOTELS SOUTH WEST 

2 botes PorT.jsac12 bedroom, 
near tartew. ES2JOO. -. 

15 bedrooms, tar. restaurant 
Eiiarop.F/H 

Hotel brard tB bedroums. 
anUeci viw. ftfiMW F/H. 
Hotel CeroaHort 10 bednwros 
£77,500 Fffi 

Ho M Hymouft.lO.tedwom;.* 
cate. Ai year trade. E130 jOOO F/R 
Tompla & Temple 
. Pfxon Lane, . 
Tavistock, 
Devon PL19 8DH 
- (0822) 96951' 


WINE BAR_ 

•.South vyiltshire- 
Popuiar wine bar - 
andtristro in city 
centre market - 
place. Lease, busi- 
ness, FF&E far _ 

sale: £100^00. 

Myddelton 
& Major . 
0722 337575 


LEGAL NOTICES 


I! r 


f' 2 i 

1 i I ' 
g 

.t 1 

K 

i! 

i 


r" j • 


/ ■ 


; r 




LI 


I 

f i 


EACIX STAR OROCP EMU 
NIXR1NG INSt-KANCE LMITED 
ANDUOESTAN I NSCRA NCX 
COMPANY LIMITED ' 

ApollraUon tw bmi made to 
top Secrctarx of Sale far. TMde 
and Industry byE*gi* star Group 
EnsttM*nnq hasuraitod Undlrd to 
.tiartsfM- uw rutita And'oMtoil tots, 
under bH Its contracts, of fnsur 
nm ' to Eaok- Star Insurance 
Connnor Luml«t with effect- 
Train l SrwPmBcr soe* 

Copies ol tot- «Utetfii%l=te(nrt« 
ocd particulars of Ihr crarisfrr are 
naUbtt (or In^nlMi, al 1 
Ttuvadiiordip Slrort, London . 
EC3R 801 and at office* ot Eanle 
Star Insurance Comoatu UmHrt 
Hi toe United klnqdoni feetween - 
toe Hours of 9.00 a m. and S OO 
pm cn any day other I han a Sat * 
onlay. Sunday or plMir holiday 
until so Sewcmher 1996. . . 

Written reoresentoiwns con •' 
renunq the' iramln afev he sent ; 
to toe Secretary ot State for 
Trade and InduMrj.-. Dwrennir - 
of Trade and Industry-- Insurance 
Dttbton. 1018. iietona Slreet. 
London SW to ONO hetora 31 Oc. 
toiler 1986 The Seerrlary ot 
Stale for Trade and industry will - 
not determlnr toe apullratlon im. 
til afl nr eonstoenng . aiur - 

reonreentaikans made to nm be . 
fore mat dam 




f i 


r^i 


n. 





f 



I || BMP AC Hf IIIIT lIR VIfX 

'•** taa| 

. nnooe^tra®! B9SOZ . 

POINT or sue A dBBt ayi to i 
vnlm 4 riyrenr vac lormtoo 
"\iferic5lol; Ol 6B6 48U ' 




IN THE~H{CH COt-RT . ' 

Of JL^TICC 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
NO. 006150 of 1986. 

IN- THE MATTER of-Cttvstanm " 
Public UmHed Company 'farmer ’ 
is Inter, iwon Video iHatomau. ■' 
.Pubbr Limited Com pany ) . 

ANO IN THE MAn tW of- tor— - 
tompanm Act 1986 
NOTKX IS HEREBY 1 CtVEN— 
mat tor Order of The High Court ' 
ol Justice- iQunnn DKiweni 

dated atttn Jute- 1986 rtmfirmnq ' 
tn me rannOMion of file snare ■ 
pretn t um 'atrounl of Inimtaion - 
video iHoMtow .PtiMrr Llnutod 1 
drama,- antoaniina to 
E1 -OMl 666 and i2i the redaeUan *. 
Of Its caauai from ca.46s.aoo so . 
C34S.IZT 90S and toe Mlnuleap 
prosed » toe Court snowing . 
with rff p eci to me raotlal of me 
rom parts' as altered' toe srseral 
nailiruiars reoutred by toe-afeose ' 
Rmlkmd Art were mastered by 
toe Reonlrar of Oerapanies on am 
August- 1986 . 

Dated tins ljtb das of au«uh . 
1986. ' 

-OJ freeman A- Co- 
as Fetter Lanr 
London EC4A 1 NA 
SoncHOrs for toe aCmve named- - 
Company 

. TftEVENA MEREDITH WINES , 

LIMITED ' 

NOTICE IS HEREBY C3V EN pur 
yuan! to Section S 88 -of toe 
Gomoomes Art 19BS toat a 
MEETING of me creditors of the ; 
ttotf named CptraMns *m be 1 
held at llie offices of LEONARD 
CLtmS. JC CO satualFd al 30 
EASTBOLRNE TERRACE t2nd . 
noon London WS 6 LF on 
wednesdav the 37to da, of Au 
gust 1986 at AOO o'riorh ut toe 
afternoon, for toe purposes pro 
sided tar in seraom 389 and 
BH 

Dated, toe la Or da, of AdmI 
1986 • 

... ‘.JM Tran* 
-Dfrortoi 


> 1 


1 1 


v. i 


IT.*- -5. *0. m 










>v-'- 


vou 

NESS. 




CARTWHEEL IfrtP 

:Mh; * ••-VR, 


AD daaifitd. a hate a w t 
an be accepted- by telephone 
(CMCpl AfflWuOCCTDOUfl. "The 
dttdlne k SDOpu -2 (fays poor 
Ut puMcHHC lie ShflOpm Moo» 
(fay for Wednesday). Should 
you wish to- send an xtartise' 
mem in writing please include 
your daytime phone number. 

customs! services - DC- 
WUTTMBtT- if you ha«e any 
queries or pieMens retains to 
your ad venocmcftt once it has 
appeared, pfoase contact oar 
OatanKT Service Dqwitncm 
by tdqptawc on 01-4H 4100. 


I^v ANNOUNCEMENTS 

mmmat. Mtfrnunr. hm toT 

i.'^O ui»9>wSf«Cl(«fc8Franr». 

ffltRiW MM* «*» for ImO OM 
, propio fan boprosioea oy your 

ntinTf wn>. Please mrtod* a b «m 
U tWkJ W T» National e*fwv«ie* 
m Fund for VvAoed. NeiV Bread 
arm how. 95 New Broun 
aii sum.' London CC3M |NH 

sranuuM. 1 mum* m **«. 

TWrr 

is ^ 

J-.;'*. BIRTHDAYS 
'.''V 

' - SHAMS Hun. 12m Mrtftdsy 

5 Domntc fcmr from Mom. Dad. 

X Mrlwlaa amt Nannv 

' TIM WIUI much kno today Joar 
--,. and Sharon 

: Vf acknoweedgements 

, ^ mu. ■ Audrey Sarah anf Patrick 

HtB and (HH fanAy. tbaok mU 
J u l t ld a WmBhr ummnonr. 
. v ay toward* the Atmualr Cancer 
StekT .8rg*on croup fund, wucti 

gw lty I has reached £10(0. 

Jit - - - 

% SERVICES 

.. £». .. ■ — mi , m 

■_ ana hhc evs lm troftsaand 

* cumcatuni iBm documents. 

. ' Deleft* 01-631 5388. 

tarMUWAV. London's nun for 
7^ Us proftssronal onanatched people 
■3Ui3 2343 Char 200 agents month 

"5 ly 24 hr Into tape. 997 7994 
COMPANY «OLF Day* organised 
*tu > tor suit or customers. Any 
■ It location. Tel 0734 872722. 
.«•*■• inuMIW, Ln» or Marriage. 

- “' AM aan. areas. Dateline. Dept 

- <3161 23 AMKKkKi Road. Lon- 

- .don tvs. Tel: 01-938 lOil. 


•• . FOR SALE 

**5f**** g*W; Vldao Produc 
non. LQmpfncfii at newjuUablP 
w**. Tet 

WJ NW m thejSSSoi^S 
1678 Motor credit cants. 

“""“CAW*. 

ty- Pure siBc/Pur* Wool 

Prtxws«4r. Oi -743-7488 
*•**» °* e *** t o Ms. An Die- 
tun and spoil. T*I 439 1763. 
__Afl mat o rcredH cu s. 

runas/FUuuta. CMtcn. 

«r Can you buy cheaper? 8 * 
S LUL Ol 22? 1947/B-J60 


ANTIQUES & 
XftlECTABLES 


BROWNING 
ANTIQUES 
.01-699 7198 

Pm 1820 quality fumftun 
wanna and a& ami>yw 
furniture. 

HONEST PRICE PJUD 


LATE IITS century oak draw- 
kstf tahte. 4-x 6*6. extends UT 
£600 ono TCO0734) 47SS16 

■OVAL BOULTON Tdsi Jn~ 
Figurines. nnuk ot. want- 
ed. Ol 883 0024. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


Geroane cedMCUopa on oxer 
100 new 4 rmored Instru- 
ments. Lnmaded after sales 
aerxKe. Free analogue. 30a 
Hiehgaie n. kwl ai-267 
7671. Free catalogue. 


KOTTUHCCY. £p*nfl a wee* re- 
Utong m oor on late beach 
hotel, then a wot endamg on 
our yarM W r U» toe m. 
H/B. free w/jport*. other rom- 

bmainm pot*. 01 396 1005 


» »TCUI tn B ON fligMs/boto 
to tor ope. USA A moat detUon- 
0004. OpMnul Trmeh 01-730 
2201 A8T a iata atol 


1ST A CUB CLASS mami 
Huge PN WBto Starwood 


AFRICA SPCCUUCTS, Key 
tram, sa Reu uon sr. wci. 
Ol 406 1496. ABTA/UTA. 


cheapest mans w/wtoc . 

Ben? Train. Tet 01 385 6414. 


CHEAP FU8HTS WdndwMe 
HtfinyW 01-930 1366. 


P gCO OHT FARE* Wondwta* 
01-634 0734 Jap der Trpd. 


e 1 .^* •»V*SMWfc#A 1 !/»? 


RENTALS 


Ui>i v a i i> iLWS / afOK 1 


for the best 
renal ssiactkm of 

QUALITY 
FLATS A HOUSES 

i in prims London area* 
279£ukOmt Aa< Affi 


WANTED 

Si^erior properties 
for tong/short Co 


UTC. Opens*- 0783867038, 


LOW COST FAKES to L’ S. A. Ma 

kw Tiairt. <n 4B5«ST. IATA. 


tALASA. CWUMa. Ol 441 
till TiairMtr Aota. AKM. 


MOROCCO. >B9 Rcgntl SL Wl. 
Tel O) 734 6307 AST A. 


SPAM. Portugal. OtnapeN Ant, 
Blpglev 01 735 8X91. ATQL 


IMTZtH IB Scheduled (ltgua 
Ol 784 2388 AST A ATOL 


01-458 3680 or 
0836 592824 
anytime {T). 

PALACE PROPERTIES 

We MMs a stgMfb salecbon of per- 
sonaOy nqHcttd baasbad ml 
uatensMd praoerbes c many fas 
Resdndal dstnes. ranong (turn 
£150 PR is £2 jOOD p mT ' 

SHORT/LONQ LETS 
MANY HDUDAY FLATS 
AVAILABLE 

Tel: 81-486 8926 


FANTASTIC 

VALUE! 

Souft Kensnqtoo. ODMCMs W 
floe* ftt P 8 rtaaettiK 2 iSifa .1 
sob bans, q * neap. F/F mcOsl 
2 tads (l arajssi Bseony. Kr | 
Hyde Part. t&E Co fat. 

Ariesford 1 Cs 

61451 2383 


LONG/SHORT LET 

PropdrtiM from 
■ £100 - £3,000 pw. 
Personal Senrica. 

01-456 3680 or 
0836-592824 
. anytime (T) 


PRIMROSE HHL, 

RW3. 

IMUBd ptrod imSOMR. 
rmpnng id ongaaf aenna. 
■« n BtogiF toepaen aaadMn 
PHD 'Tha Parti'. 3 ns. z 
bat*, mun na. aiaeie m. 
tnoy. MenmaPMmned. 
CSflflpw. 

LMs VwtiM Offifafa 
m-ascesL 



atmw cil MM M MU . Self r.w. CAFF iManapmnl Ser- 
cant. (uS tom 6 carvetod. CH imi Ltd itpaif propertJea in 
stMtofc4hce.SuU2/u.Lse ®to Cmral. South and wot Lon 

studio room. Lx tor studio / ol- don areas tor waning 
lie*. Kau/anwr Xu Bam. See appUcanis. 01-221 8838- 
wc CXIOpw tod. rales. Our 
Prooereaes. 132 Lower Rend. 1 

sere, m ol 237 6862*6573 

on 01-236 8861 for the bm se- 
lection of lurofshed flats and I 
houses to mu in Kni^itsbndge. < 
On u s and kerauigton fT) , 


T£f.llSFWin«! 




BARBADOS, t own a bmuUtat 
nita & cottage on (he west 
! Coast of Bu-twum. tody Railed. 
| Have varamnes late August, 
i September a October. For bra 
en u re * get unai attention can 
Nam Saorotr Office 021 233 
1200 Home w/e 021 454 0912 
AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sidney 
o/w £420 HP C760 Auckland 
Or w £420 rtn CT70- Jo’ourg 
o/w C306 rtn £499 Uw Ange- 
leso/w C2t6resi £406 London 
FlagM Centre 01-370 6332. 


Bctgratu flats * Mum re- 
quired for American Companies 
from £200-L2.000 dw. High cal- 
ibre pc open lei atao wallaaie 
now. Bigycp niter Apenta 
881-5136 


Pinner sms. mkouidmi. 
fully emapped flat. 
RerentAh/Mth. t doubto/l 

-satgle bed Cl lOpw. CO teL Tel: 

Ol 878 7786. 


mail. * read, lor dfptaanat*. 
executives. Long * abort lets in 
all areas. Uptnend t Co il 
AJ benurte St wl ol A99 8334. 


Person only £66 per week in 
elusive. References legurM. 
Tel i of 789 6522 


varagoge Cato Superb i dbir 
oedrm flat weU furnished. CO. 
irl. £146 pw. 01-937 6182. 


ST JOHN'S WOOD Luxury Spa 
nous 1 Bed Flai. Designer 
Decor. Company LM £150 pw 
Tel: 01-5862078 


a SVSTcM 


Jewellery 
Td Mr Hart 
8I-M8M30 
or write to 
361 Hangar (trad 
Leaded W9 
We. cover iff Engfand 


RESISTA CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 
VMabrBubui’ 
from 055 par w~|d + MT. 
80%'wool tatty Domestic ffftion 
£1355 per sq JO + VW. 

• Cortantatt Has 
075 per sq )tf + Vfl 


HOLIDAY FUTS 

A houses' avadaUe. 
£200 - £3,000 pw. 
Personal Service. 

01-458 3680 or 


aBythne (T). 


MU MRU 3 bed uuL with 
towage * garden- Newly fur- 
nished. £200 pw. Oversea* f 
company let. TbC 01-969-1004 
ihomet or 01 -203-1958 uUnrax 


TENNIS 

Spirits of 
Gomer 
and Durie 
boosted 

Mahwah (Agendas) — Jo 
Durie and Sara Gomer. of 
Briiain. gave rheir airitt a 
much-needed boost before next 
week's US Open at Flushing 
Meadow with third round vic- 
tories full of fighting spirit in the 
SI 50.000 nOOOOO) United Jer- 
sey Bank classic. 

Miss Durie, the sixth seed, 
began in wayward fashion as she 
slipped to a 4-1 deficit against 
Mercedes Paz. of Argenuna. But 
then she found her rhythm to 
march toa 7-5. 6-4 victory. Miss 
Gomer was forced to fight even 
harder to beat Beverley Bowes, 
of the United States. The young 
Briton won a see-saw match 6-3, 
3-6. 6-3 to join Miss Durie 
among the final 16 on a day 
when the seeds had another 
good day. 

Helena Sukova. of Czecho- 
slovakia. served and volleyed 
with authority to trounce Dinky 
van Rensbuig. of South Africa. 
6-0. 6-1 . Other seeds to win were 
Robin White. MHisa Gurney 
and Alycia Moulton, of the 
United States, Catherine 
Tanvjer. of France, and Dianne 
Balestrat. of Australia. 

• Ivan Lendl, the current No I 
ranked player, overpowered Hie 
Nastase. of Romania. 6-2, 6-2, 
in the first round of the 
SI 50.000 (100.000) Hamlet 

Challenge Cup invitation tour- 
nament in Jericho. New York. 

I Lendl, of Czechoslovakia, re- 
mained sionry-fa ced through- 
out the match as Nastase 
entertained the fans with con- 
stant charter and gestures 
Nastase seemed more serious 
in the second set He 



ROWING 


Cobra strike that 
other crews fear 


ByJimRaDton 


Nastase: old antics 

These antics could not heir 
Nastase. as the defending cham- 

S on celebrated hb No 1 ranking 
r the US Open, announced 
yesterday by winning the the Iasi 
15 points of the match as 
Nastase's 40-vear-old legs faded. 

US Op«l 98508: Mtot 1. 1 Und. (Ctt 2. 
M vwrosr. (Sattt 3. B Beck*. (Wfi); 4. S 
Edturg- (Sw#). 5. V tooaft, iFrr, 6. J 
Connors, tUSL 7. J H y s uon v fSweV 8. H 
laconta. (Fry. 9. J McEnroe. |USk 10. A 
Gornot. (Ecu); 1 1. M Ppmfars. (Swe). 12. T 
Tiiasna, (ftt 13, A j»nyl (Swe). 14. T 
Mayottt. ILfSf IS. B GCmil (US). 16. M 
Wee* (Cj) 

Warnan: l. M Nltfratilova. (US) 2. C Evert 
Uoya lUST. i S Grai. (WGk 4. h 
M snaUvova. (Cz). S. P Shmw. (USR S. C 
Kohflg-Wach. (WG): 7. H Sukova, {Cif 8. 


B CMUS8K. IUSV a. M Maleeva. (Bui). 10, 
K Rmart. jua 1 1 . G Sahara. lAiafc 12. 2 
Garrison. (USL 13. S Bene. (USF 14. C 
b^^tgito). 15. K JototoHUS); 16.C 

• Mats W dander and Jookim 
Nystrom. the Swedes, and 
Jimmy Connors, the American, 
moved into the third round of 
the $375,000 (£250.000) aTP 
championships in Mason, Ohio, 
after tough second round 
matches. 

Wiiander. the top seed, won 
in straight sets 6-4. 7-5 against 
Mike Leach, of the United 
States, but was forced to fight all 
the way as Leach took a 4-1 lead 
in the second set. Njstrom was 
given an even touger contest 
after losing his serve three times 
in the first set before rallying to 
beat Bany Moir. of South 
Africa, 4-6. 6-t. 6-2. 


Briiain. seeking their besi ever 
result in a world rowing 
championships, already have a 
fine springboard with five crews 
contesting thisweekeiKfs finals 
and four waiting in the wings for 
a final call in today's semi-final 
rounds. It is important to the 
host country to serve their 
country well, a good result over 
this weekend on Nottingham's 
Holme Pierreponi course 
should ease their way to the 
Olympic regatta in Seoul by way 
of next vear's world champion- 
ships in Copenhagen. 

Britain has the potential, 
analysing the draw, to reach 
nine finals by late afternoon 
today and after that some will be 
in the gold rush, although a 
medal of any colour by the end 
of the weekend will be welcome. 


with East Germans and Roma- 
nia. 

Britain's hghvwcicht double 
scullers, \jfan WhnwcM and 
Cart Smith, must be in optimis- 
tic mood after their \ iciw\ in 
Lucerne and a win in (he heats 
over the French world cham- 
pions, Luc Cnspnn and Thierry 
Renault, by a whisker once 
again here. The world cham- 
pions are drawn m the other 
semi-final round leasing the 
British double to take on the 
United States, West Germany. 
Italy. Switzerland and Trie 
Netherlands. 1 expect ai the scry 
least a final place from the 
British in this event. 

The British men's lightweight 
eight's guts ran out to produce 
the lightweight four so much is 
expected from them. In ibis 


Martin Cross and Adam Clift. rour ) d * he United 

of Britain, in the cmless pairs Slates lightweight four arc ex- 
meet today crews from Spain, gee™* 10 be m the hunt early on. 
Argentina. Canada. Brazil and Britain. Canada and Italy are 


meet today crews from Spain, gec™* m tne nunt early on. 
Argentina. Canada. Brazil and Britain. Canada and Italy are 
Yugoslavia. You can never pre- favoured lw final berths, 
diet what this exciting British "If Bn * ,sh p 1 *-*" s _ heusy- 
crew are likely to do. apart that w e , Sh* coxless four Lk'l- the 
they sprint somewhere in the semi-final round of jit 


last half of the race, but their 
competitors are nev er sure when 
or where. 

Their lethal charge is feared 
by the worW's best crews. They 
brought the Soviet Union, world 
champions, to their knees last 
year and would have snatched 
the gold with just one more 
stroke but the course ran out. 
They often lie back in the field 


weight unless four face the 
toughest semi-final round of ail 
the British crews m action 
today .despite avoiding itu- Wesi 
German world champions who 
look as if they will he deposed. 
The British lour also sidestep 
the Soviet Union and Ljm 
G ermany. Britain, uhn finished 
tenth last year, and aredospeiate 
for improvement pertups will 
be looking for a kill at the 
expense of Czechoslovakia with 


1 ney onen lie oacK in tne ueia i. n N - n j 

oeririherai tumn H^riL^Thk 0 OI V m P lc gold medal winners in 
? c !?^£ ra .l _ Ih « eight on board) m confident 



uiympic goia meuai winners in 
- -l_ . ■ ■ the eight on board) m confident 

a cobra and the venom is in mood 

plentiful supply from Clift. So.' all is poised for the 

Their main opponents today penultimate and final stages of 
are the Spanish world bronze the world rowing champion- 
medal winners, w?ho shadowed ships which will be attended tw 
them m last year’s world Princess Anne todav Spevuiorii 
championships. But ajina! place will be pleased to read that the 


more than beckons. The Soviet weather forecast is favourable 
Union s Olympic and world and it is intended to keep m thv 


champions - the Pimenov 
brothers — are drawn in the 
other semi-final round along 


RUGBY UNION 


Cowley in pursuit of enterprise 


mmm 


m 


m 


FLATSHARE 


EAST DULWICH. 2 mtns BR and 
MMM.. 3rd twraon (ar b boow 
room to larw hooto w|||i gar* 
On. £46.00 on- Wtokptm MBs. 
T« day: 01-579 6076. 


NAMFSTEAD. F to abr lax ftoL 
£250 P-C.OT Trt Ol 222 4858 
(DaysL Ol 372 6030 lEXsl- 


C12.B0 RefiwiWKr 
-688 6333.. 

.KKm FOR ANY EVENT, C4B. 
L'StorBpm -exp. Chart. Las -Mo. 
>Ai mcatra and worn. 

TH 821 6616/8280495. 

.. AXx /_V|u / Dtnm- 
. WTHDAY DK T Ohf someone 
.an ortguia). Ttaw NewisMMr 
•toted toe very day they went 
. Oora. £1250 0492-31303. 


- ANNOUNCEMENTS 


We cant 
care for the 
victims of 
cancer unless 


**— 




S2 


22E 


Cancer Relief 


HOLLAND FARK young girt to 
Miarv lux mod Mews. Own 
room. \Narfv/<try majitno. 
T Roof totrare. £56 p.w. 
e\ciu» Tet-2g i 7307 after 6JO 
p.m. or 0773 833968 wtoLemis 
LUX CEOROAN me in anrxtlve 
Camoerweil So. N/S F to look 
. after me %wnlch owners uk as 
omraonai nM-Mor*. o/rC 73 
prw exit. Mrs (tote 01-701 3433 
FLATMATES Setocttvr Shansg 
Well esiab introductory service. 
Pise tel (or tppe 01-589 S481. 
313 Brampton Road. SW3 
NWS. O/R- to tuoe. Prof F. M/S. 
£4260 o-w tor. HnUM. TO 
Hraiher 609 9895 alter 

6.15am. 

INARM VALE i person to share 
comf or table oat wm one other. 
p/R. 2 mins ro tubes; £200 * 
bills prm. 01-328 4456 Eve. 
FULHAM - on to share tux nat. 
Own room. |W lobe. £50pw 
eacl. Tef 736 1816 after am 
KKMMTE Attractive sunny on. 
Soactous mm tor 1 prof pen 
nr luhe £45 Lad. 885 £290 
WM Nr Oaottam N. Tube. New. 
iv decoraled bouse, o Jr. £46 to 
£60 pw Tel: 01-385-1565 


Success in schools ragby. as in 
most spheres. leads to breed 
success. Bat hard work aad 
enterprise are of equal signifi- 
cance. Clive Griffiths, Cowley's 
distinguished coach, is taking 
his highly promising squad for 
pre-season training to the Bryn 
Ddu Outdoor Pur sui t s Centre in 
North Wales. 

The side will be stre n gth ened 
by the return of Darren Yates, a 
powerful prop who toured 
Australia with the triumphant 
Lancashire schools team, and 
the probable return of Chris 
Honey, another tourist and a 

talented full bucfc-'GrffBths also 
refers to the acquisition of “—the 
flying twins", the Dalferos, 
whose Italian family settled in 


Schools Rugby by Michael Stevenson 


the St Helens urea three years 
ago. He expects an enterprising 
and exciting season. 

Wydiffe set out next week on 
a demanding tour or Famui, 
returning on September 13; aa 
ambitious brochure with 
contributions by David Hands, 
Rugby Correspondent of The 
Times. Andy Ripley and J V 
Smith among others, can be 
purchased from the college's 
master-in-charge, Keith 
Richardson. He is quietly con- 
fident about the season ■!»*■* 

Paul Kitoritz. master-in- 
charge of St Edwards, Oxford, 
reports with disarming frank- 
ness that M _the 15 have enjoyed 
losing seasons hi recent years 
and. with no old colours return- 


ing, this trend seems likely to 
continue." He has taken over 
from Joe McPartlin. who will be 
able to spend more time with the 
Oxford Unmristy side. 

Wjrral Grammar School 
ended last season in a blaze of 
glory, winning the Winul 
Schools Cup for the seventh 
successive year and the compet- 
itive Skates 15-a-side festfvaL 
Their master-io-charge, Mike 
Briers, is taking his squad on . 
tour to The Netherlands where | 
they will play three matches 
before returning to compete in 
the Hall University schools 
tournament. He believes that the 
strength of his ride will be its 
experienced front five; pins the 
Cheshire 19-group half-backs, 
Ratcliffe and Twhinglwm. 


racing schedule. That should !v 
reassuring for paying cuMumers 
not to mention the competitors. 


Honeyghan’s 
title bout 
tops good bill 

New York (AP) - Loyd 
Honeyghan. of Britain, will be 
the top of a particularly in- 
teresting bill when he chal- 
lenges the undisputed world 
welterweight champion. Don- 
ald Curry, of the United 
Slates, in Atlantic City. New 
Jersey, on September 27 . 

Supporting jhe Curry- 
Honeyghan title bout will be a 
lightweight contest over 12 
rounos between the unbeaten 
Greg Haugen and Terrence 
Alii. Haughen will be defend- 
ing his North American Box- 
ing Federation title against ah 
opponent who has been 
beaten only four times in 26 
bouts. 




mzTwmrr, 


SALE 

! Oca. Corfu. RbOOK. KOL Snafcr 
Gmk BMl Tla Algm. Urtona 
** Ms 

2 2212*** - 099 

252627393031 *0 099 £229 

UXi&SJU. 

10.U.I2 Sm 098 5229 

Uto. toi M Ml toW hoWRi 



REV LOW FARES 



amrrAMV/soUTH of rvuutcc. 

Aug/Sral For too rtgtil ,01« 
- ran Curat into 0378 6H 56. 
•RTTTANY A DOROOCNE CoM- 
-a) rmngn. sm 4/10. 30/8 ♦ 
Set*. £160 pw 0220 336761. 


AMERICAN VACATIONS Lvaoirto 
Itio 10 Hw- USA Td Ol 657 
7859 

HONS KOaa C488 Bangkok 
C369 Sing C457 OU*r Ft nl 
in. 01 584 6514 

stain pmrnMML omdegc 
FTKJ tos Ftonor 01471 0047 
ATOL 1640 Acmc/VlH 
SY0/MEL~C618 Pxrth CS46 AH 
TOUto (arttors to Air. A NZ OL 
584 7371 ART A 
8. AFRICA From C465 OS 584 
7371 ARIA 


MJUIS SAW SOT 
tt Ufl find Ml Writed. 
PS. BOOS £ Bop 


HOLIDAY 

DEADLINES 

“he Classified Advertisement Department 
mil be dosed on: Monday 25th Assist 

Advertisements for the issues o£ 

TUESDAY 2dTH AUGUST 
. WEDNESDAY 27TH AUGUST 

MUST BE PLACED BY 
TODAY 5.00pm 

SS TJSEYOUR ACCESS. VISA jK 

DINERS OR AMEX: CARD. 


4; :»■ 


2228 MJ6 « S9T-0CT 
fme wis. toraiL soot foodi'das 
Mb aOLftoate ?* or 4+ te- 
ar t« war flatoas. 

WM i rrtoang noh&yc far sa- 
rfes. coofts & tuikfas. 
LIHURSCAPE ATOL 1S33 

01-441 0122 

24 M 


BARGAIN FLIGHTS 

Sydney E45S C755 

Auckland £415 £745 

Jo’Scjrg £306 £499 

Bangkok £209 £355 

Cako £135 £210 

New Yodc M39 £3S0 

Los Angeles £216 £3» 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Barg. Cairn. Dubai. 
tsuabaL Singapore. KJ- Ddto. 
Bangkok. Hoes Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. & Tne Anenos. 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Sbaftesbary Amine 
London W1V 7DG. 

•1-439 0192/91-439 7751 
Open Sanaday IflLOO-lAOO 



mt 


TANS THIE OFF to Parte. Anv 

Mertam, BnAtov Brugto- 

Cmni. 8rrnr. Laiteanne. Tha 
Hague. Dublin. Rouan. Boo- 
Itow A Dlnpr. Tlmr O If. 2a. 
(Mm a cm. Lomton SWiX 
780. 01-236 8070 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


OTLLAS WITH A MASK TOUCH. 

A MU*. * pool *n« a Msutttul 
»W> WftH roDTP COUM you 
wanr? Choov from Tuscany. 
Sardinia or JUn-mo - I1W toicli- 
rr oartioi K*ly toe nu 

marker mraicn dom go. Or 
combine * MU* noHday neito a 
stay in Venire. Hocenee or 
Rome Free oracnore (ram 
Mask or ILUv. Deol T. 47 Shep- 
rwrtfs BUM Green. Wia BPS 
Tel. 01 749 7449 (24 bn 
service! 


SELF-CATERING 


rn 


TT 


m 




Is oumaad n W Maifaenanm 
tin anas are less dimW 
and wees are kmr. Ufa Iwa ae- 
mD nita accommodiUofl m Corfu, 

Cren. or Mn and oaaltor pnires 

or couples can choose tram par 
faOT Ptowws, isaally a wa- 
in cast Ml of our tinea veto are 
do me sea qr wfaft pools. Sways 
Ml neti seretcfl, vd SQRKWW& a 
coc*. Wfadso have some posJtert 

comfortaftte hones w8i pools a 
me PortuguBw Mgarve sdi va 
m n Scotwtw 
Brochure CV TfBWlJT) 

43 Cnfocen St London SW3 ffft 
OlSiT BS51/584 88S3 
588 0132 (Brodara 24 ini 

tool MO 1 *. 


LUXURY VILLAS eilb poob and 
Mali ojn av *n swim oi France 
Marwaa Atoane Wau n»»es. 
ConUiK-nloJ ' UltoOl 245 9181 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


OMC FA8ULOU3 ALQARVC Mfla 
left! 28 4U9U9 tor 12 14 days. 
Sieves on to 10 Srnsaltonai 
a lews sull and goal. Sumt 
price U .750 P.w. Other tvotBes 
avauabie Srw/Orl The Afgar 
se AHrtTUlhe. 73 S James Si. 
London swi Tel«l -491 -0802 
ALSARVC. Lux xillto s«1Ul PMs 
& APIS A141I Sepl/Oci 01 409 
2838 ViiuMond 


m 


s- 



SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


M AimgLLA. Lux \Hlto with 
pooh tapis. AuouOn 01409 
2838 MHaWcna - 


■WINTER SPORTS 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


MENORCA 'itiw Mxne . wiui 
poote anarlmmft u,ena« 
Mtol 4otn to all (rani L1S3 
I rKft Holm**' Ol 3Q970>OA 
0oz2 077071 or 0622 677076 
.*4 MS *14* 1772 


SKI BLADOM LINES 

K/87 BROCHURES NOW OUT! 
47 Resorts at Swtasrlgntt 
Austria. Franc* & flay 
The Biggest Chocs On Shs! 
ExGKwk Uam ttznchasnr j 
Gbspo* & EdnDuyt) 

01 785 2200 
■tends Dept 0422 7B121 
AST A 15723 ATOL 1232 


SKI WEST bumoei brochure out 
nto, p*i LM o iin^n Uw lop re 
hoi N cunoto rugrin 'beat the 
Dalftr 1 ) . and ^rao/ingte hn\ 
pme-umunq at C59 Ringrfll 
785 99°9 to) idu i on 
181 \a92S*, irm 1583 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


morcat. imniun. mpm*, 

houv -Jeep, "» d\d>l KM 1-cert* 
non Sin fe-tseciM*. f to 9 * to 
DruuiniH DMrnei jM latMdeus 
ied,inmh T« OSS6 
0*S\ 883073 Ol 040 I'B 
Mon I ii rare mirob orto 


MCE. ipwest. laics ft ' lift 
Hiorn -is 8101 Liai IB93 


SUPER 




ifu 





n 



K Dank v. a Nyam 
pauchoi M E pas 


& MARKETING 


MB 













































28 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


l 

J 

s.- 

u 

N 

d- 

n 

fc 

U 

C 

li- 

re 

ai 

Vi 

0 

U 

u 

rr 

T 

u 

IT 

ii 

lc 

Y 


o- 

T 

ll 

u 

fr 

it 

« 

ai 

al 

I 

T 

v; 

in 

at 

in 

le 

it- 

di 

**i 

cr 

le 

Pi 

b- 

it 

w 

R 

IT 

P< 

II 

I 

T 

ir 

v, 

a* 

it 

b 

ti 

P 

9 

O 

b 

c! 

A 

b 

fi 

c 

< 

L. 

C 

c; 

ii 

h 

U 

fi 

o 

u 

w 

p 


l 


t J. 



I •- 



» • 
f - 

• » 



>u 
k . 



• -C 



« *■ 

I 

■ •I 




RACING: CAUTHEN LIFTS RITZ TROPHY WITH FOUR WINNERS ON YORK’S FINAL DAY 


Iosifa can make 
successful 
step up to group 
company 

By Mandari n (Michael Phillips) 


Following that eye-catching 
performance at Goodwood 
last month when she won the 
New Ham Stakes by seven 
lengths. Iosifa is napped to 
make a successful return to the 
picturesque West Sussex 
course today and win the 
group three Waterford Cande- 
labra Stakes. 

While conceding that the 
form of an ordinary maiden 
race is sometimes hard to 
analyse, the way that Iosifa 
put her rivals to rout suggested 
that she should be followed 
even when stepping up in class 
as. indeed, she now does. 

Folies Bergeres and Tecana, 
who finished third and fourth 
respectively at Goodwood, 10 
lengths behind Iosifa, have 
run well before and since; 
Folies Bergeres when beaien 
only three-quarters of a length 
by Echo Valley at Yarmouth 
on Wednesday; Tecana when 
fourth to Canadian MilL 
Hiaara and Linda's Magic al 
Newmarket So the fact that 
Iosifa left them for dead at 
Goodwood indicates she may 
be something out of the 
ordinary. 

The only other two-year-old 
this season to make a similar 
impression on me was 
Bellotto when he made his 
belated debut at Newbury last 
•month. And look what hap- 
pened when he reappeared at 
York on Tuesday and put his 
stamp of authority on the 
Acomb Stakes. 

Iosifa' s first run at New- 
market behind the more 
experienced Twyla was also 
highly-promising, bearing in 
mind how slowly she started 
and the trouble she got into. 
Even so, she still managed to 
finish a length in front of 
Candle In The Wind, herself a 
winner at the big Goodwood 
meeting. 

Today's field is further en- 
hanced by the presence of 
Golden Braid, Invited Guest 
and the Queen's Neule. All are 
unbeaten but none, I feel 
managed to cut such a deep 
impression as Iosifa did at 
Goodwood and so she is 
napped to instigate a treble for 
Michael Stoute and Walter 
Swinbum, which should be 
completed by Dalgadiyr (4.0) 
and Slim Hope (5.0). 

The runner-up to Hauwmal 
over today’s course and dis- 
tance three weeks ago, 
Dalgadiyr can go one better in 
the Taylor Woodrow Team 
Charity Stakes while Slim 
Hope will not need to have 
improved much since finish- 
ing a close fifth to Riot 
Brigade at Yarmouth to beat 
Mummy's Luck in the Lon- 
don and Edinburgh Insurance 
Company Maiden Stakes. 

Mumitiy’s Luck was beaien 


four lengths by Startle here at 
Goodwood on his debut. Even 
allowing for the feet it was the 
Acomb he was contesting, the 
way that Startle ran on Tues- 
day — he was beaten 20 lengths 
- suggests that his Goodwood 
victims were moderate. 

Otherwise at Goodwood it 
should pay to follow Guy 
Harwood and Greville 
Starkey. The successful 
Pul borough duo can begin by 
winning the Tote Bookmakers 
Handicap with Inipsky and 
then complete their double 
two hours later with Skean 
(4.30). Ininsky’s last two races 
have encouraged me to think 
that he can give 211b to Local 
Silver, who will be wearing 
blinkers for the first time. 

Skean's pedigree, which is 
virtually speed through and 
through, suggests that the mile 
of the Hanningtons Charity 
Maiden Fillies’ Stakes will suit 
her far better than the 10 
fiirfongs over which she has 
been beaten twice already. 

Incidentally, today's pro- 
gramme has been sponsored 
entirely to help raise money 
for the Stable Lads Welfare 
Trust and the National 
Association of Youth Cubs. 
Deserving cases both. 

At Newmarket, that great 
Yorkshire character, Mick 
Easterby, who was under- 
standably on cloud nine on 
Wednesday after 

Wigantborpe's Gimcrack 
Stakes success, will have every 
reason to cany on celebrating 
if Catherines Well wins the 
Buxted Handicap. 

Since the weights for this 
race were published, Cath- 
erines Well has won valuable 
sprints at Newcastle and 
Ripon. On the latter course, 
she won the Great St Wilfrid 
Handicap by four lengths with 
a 71b penalty. So with only a 
61b penalty now, she is effec- 
tively lib better in than she 
was last Saturday. 

I expect her to prove more 
than capable of coping with 
the recent course and distance 
winner, Margam, and Dream 
Chaser, who will be blinkered 
for the first time. . 

Hallgate, who finished third 
to Catherines Well in the 
Northumberland Sprint Tro- 
phy, should go well in the 
Hillsdown Holdings Hopeful 
Stakes without being quite 
good enough to give 91b to 
Treasure Kay, whose overall 
form this season at Sandown, 
Newbury and Ascot makes 
him the likely winner on these 
terras. 

Finally, it will be a bold 
person who opposes Lester 
Piggott's unbeaten colt, 
Genghiz, in the EBF Blue 
Peter Stakrc. 



mm 


h :>■/«' '■ *•>831;, 

s, 


Last Tycoon (nearer camera) overhauls Double Schwartz to win the William H31 Sprint Championship at York yesterday 

Last Tycoon’s champion show 


By Michael Seely 

Yves Saint-Martin, 15 times 


glorious compensation for his 
unfortunate travelling experi- 
ences on Tuesday and for his 
bad luck in the July Cup when 
producing Last Tycoon with a 
perfectly-timed burst of speed to 
snatch the William Hill Sprint 

Doable^Schwartz and^Green 
Desert on a rainy afternoon at 
York yesterday. 

It was a magnificent perfor- 
mance. And Last Tycoon has 
now shown himself beyond a 
shadow of a doubt to be the 
fastest horse in Europe, let alone 
the British Isles. 

Robert Collet, the three-year- 
old's trainer, was modestly 
triumphant afterwards. “I 
wanted revenge for myself, the 
owner, Yves and the horse.” 
Then talking about Last 
Tycoon's Cast-finishing fourth to 
Green Desert at Newmarket, he 
said: “I'm not blaming Yves for 
what happened. They were 
knocked sideways at the start in 
a falsely-run race. But we had to 
come here to prove our point.” 

The 38-year-old trainer, who 
captured the 1979 St Leger with 
Son Of Love and who also 
saddled Kind Mask to finish 
third to Sharpo in this race in 
] 982, now plans to ran the Irish- 
bred colt over longer distances. 
“We wouldn't have come here if 
we'd won at Newmarket," he 
continued, “so plans are now in 
the melting pot. Richard 
Strauss, the owner, comes from 
Dallas and would like to have a 
runner on Breeders' Cop day at 
Santa Anita.” 

Though naturally dis- 


appointed, Charlie Nelson was 
delighted with the courage and 
spirit shown by Denble 
Schwartz. “I had been thinlring 
about the Vernons Sprint Cup," 
he said, **but if the winner is 
going to miss the Prix de 
i'Abbaye, we might now try and 
keep him fresh for Longchamp.” 

Talking about Green Desert, 
the beaten favourite, Michael 
Stoute commented: “He was 
done for finishing speed over the 
minimum trip and is obviously 

better suited to six furlongs.” 

The other pattern race, the 
group two Lowther Stakes, re- 
sulted in a gallant victory for 
that tough and consistent filly, 
Polonia, whose only other via f 
to England ended in defeat in the 
Coventry Stakes at Royal Ascot. 

After John Reid had driven 
the Irish two-year-old past the 
post half a length in front of 
Interval, a spokesman for Jim 
Boiger's stable sank “There was 
never any doubt about Polonia 
miming here. She doesn't mind 
firm going, but the only dif- 
ference between Ascot and a 
road, was that Ascot had grass 
on it,” . 

Pbloma's victory certainly 
paid further tribute to the value 
of the form of the Heinz 57 
Pboenix Stakes. Wjg anihor pe. 
fourth behind Minstrelia m 
Ireland, had already won the 
Gimcrack on Wednesday and 
here Polonia, who finished third 
in the same race, earned herself 
a tilt at the Cheveky Park 
Stakes after first going for the 
Moyglare Stud Stakes at the 
Carragh on September 13. 

Jeremy Tree, the trainer of 
Interval, the highly-promising 
runner-up, was defigjited with 
the performance of his filly, who 


appears to have more scope for 
improvement than the winner. 
“Pat Eddery said she ran very 
green and took a long time tp 
realise what was expected of her. 
She's been off the coarse for a 
long time with sore shins. I don't 
know where she’ll go next, but 
we might take on the colts in the 
Mill Reef as the fillies appear to 
have the upper hand at present.” 

The hero of the afternoon was 
Steve Cauthen. The 26-year-oJd 
American landed a 229-1 four- 
timer and captured the Ritz Gab 
charity trophy awarded to the 
leading rider of the meeting by 
winning on Presidium. Bali 
Magic, Digger's Rest and 
Startmo. 

After showing ns exactly why 
he has been champion for the 
past two seasons with a brilliant 
display of virtuosity, Cauthen 
said: “I'm certainly going to 
have a crack at a third 
cha mp ionship. After ill, it's a 
lot of fts- In a way it's a reverse 
situ a ti on to last year when I was 
in a dear lead from Pat.” 

Canthen's first success at the 
meeting was for Henry Cedi in 
the opening City of York Stakes 
where he sent Lord Howard de 
Walden's Presidium dear early 
hi die straight for a convincing 
victory. “We’re now going to 
have to try and find a group 
three race for him," said COdL 

Then talking aboot has St 
Leger hopes. Bonhomie and 
Mashkov, the five-times cham- 
pion trainer went ou *Tm 
looking forward to the race. 
Bonhomie needs a strongly-run 
race and had to do too much of 
the donkey work at Goodwood.” 
And. if Shahrastani does not' 
take his chance at Doncaster, 


Bonhomie is the form horse in 
the final dastic. 

Canthen's fiwl winner of the 
afternoon and Cedi's second 
came when Staitino went to the 
front early in foe straight in the 
Galtres Stakes and galloped 
home to a convincing victory 
from Katanga and Boushamile. 
The trainer now plans to run this 
rapidly-improving filly in die 
Park HOI Stakes at Dohcaster. 
Both the second and third are 
also under orders for the fillies* 
St Leger. 

Canthen's other two winners 
were both trained by Geoffrey 
Wragg. The jockey had his 
hardest ride of the afternoon 
when driving Bali Magic home 
to win by three-quarters of a 
length in foe Moorestyle 
Convivial Maiden Stakes. Talk- 
ing about John Pearce's home- 
bred colt, foe trainer said: 
“Steve said he ran very green 
and lazOy. He certainly got the 
message at the finish. We might 
have a go at foe Champagne 
Slakes at Doncaster next.” 

Perhaps Canthen's finest ef- 
fort of the afternoon was when 
producing Digger's Rest mth* 
perfectly timed late run to win 
the highly competitive Bradford 
& Bingjey Handicap. Wragg 
said; “Digger's Rest is a very 
useful hone but everything has 
to go right for him in a race. I 
thought Steve timed it perfectly 
today.” The trainer concluded 
by saying that Digger’s Rest 
might now be trained for the 
Cambridgeshire, providing he is 
not allotted too much weight. 

Wragg completed a memo- 
rable treble when Pat Eddery 
brought Witchcraft heme two 
lengths dear of Gaffland in' foe 
Great Yorkshire Ha ndi ca p . 


Prince Yarid 


G Harwood 388- 


} 4-8-9. 


_ G Stake* 3 
Pel Eddery 2 
, PCook 1 


(p) (Mrs CBnrienefl-6ruce)M Stoute 10-8-7 WRSwMnmiS 

(B) (USA) (D) (StaMi Mohammed} W t 


Televised: SL30, 3.0, 3.30, 4.0 
Going: straight course good; round course good to firm 
Draw: 5f-6f high numbers best 

2L30 TOTE BOOKMAKERS HANDICAP (£3,200: 1m) (5 runners) 

103 0-40034 MN5KY(HH 
106 14-0000 PKIDGRAPH 
110 00-2230 FLYHOME (D) (I 
112 2004134 STEEPLE BELL . 

114 (MM4 LOCAL SU.VS1 (B) (USA) (D) (Shafch Mohammed) W Ham 3-8-1 W Canon 4 
15-8 Local Silver, 3-1 Simple Bal, 4-1 Flybome. 9-2 tninsky. 6-1 Ptctograph. 

POWfc WmSKVJM 3W 4Ui of 13 to Granny's Bank (6-1) at Newbury (1m. £8555, 

good. Ain 15). rtCTOGRAPH no show when favourite at Goodwood, saner (9-10) 

Baulked 21 out artwn 3KI Stb to Far Country (M) at Hampton fim. £2616. Arm. Jtiy 16. 
10 ran). FLYHOME 9th at Epson, at Sandown (7-9) had run 1 hi 3rd to Swah Katem (8- 

1 [Mini. £13344. good. May 26.21 run). STEEPLE BELLSI4ih last time. Pnwtoraly (6-4) 

31 3rd of 9 to FM Country td-1 ) at Ascot (im. £31 66. good. July 25). LOCAL SILVER om- 

pacad 4th nera last tuna prewusly (94) all out to best Sticky Groans (8-11) 21 in 

Nw«^yriwgangnura854. good to am, July 18, 12 ran). 

3 JO BRITISH GAR AUCTIONS APPRENTICE HANDICAP (£3,200: 51) 

J10) 

202 101120 MUSIC MACHINE 


100 TAYLOR WOODROW TEAM CHARITY HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£3,200: 1m 40 (7) . 

i Al Maktwen) H Thomson Jonas 9-7 — A Murray 2 

I (MWakfcnan) H Cedi 9-3 SCarthenS 

r Drake) LCumani 81 Pal Eddery 3 

)A Stewart 98 M Roberta 4 


401 213-411 
402 1 114 KATHY W 

403 112 PL' 

404 001124 AUDIO 

405 313002 
408 801010 IbMJTO 
408 3-02040 P0UNH.1 


O'Av 

(Aftli 


N Vigors 6-8 


8-7. 


, WRSwfnbnni7 

PCook a 

W Carson 1 


5-2 Misaaff, 3-1 Dslgacfiyr. Kathy W, 6-1 AkKno, 6-1 Plymouth Hoe, 16-1 Pourwtta. 
20-1 Tehran. 


i Gala (10-5) In 


FORM: MSAAFF (10-5) put head In air when winning hum Mawdhn G 

amateur's event at Ayr (1m 2f. £1831 , good 1o Arm, July26, 6 ran). KATHY W (9^2) 9 4tfi 
to Apply (8-9) at Newbury (1 m 21 . £540&good to firm, July 18. 8 ran), with POUNELTA (8 
5) beaten another J4I in 6th. PLYMOUTH HOE (9-3) K1 2nd of 3 to Wassi Reef (9-3) at 

r<1m 41, £2602. good to soft. 



2) at Windsor (1 

10 to Hauwmal I 


<3)1 


206 

207 

208 

209 

210 
211 
212 


MACHINE (DUA Filer) P Hastam 5-0-9 

203 013114 SILENT MAJORITv(tn(B Firestone) W O'Gorman 3-3-3 R deter 7 

205 033340 . CLEOF (USA) [MtS D Zurchar) L Cunani 3-8-0 S Quant 4 

020000 CAPEAHBJTt FOUND (D)(M Pound) NByOOft 3^-10- II (Bchardson (3) 3 

000-000 SHE KNOWS IT Aa 08 (S Harm) MRpe 4-8-10 J Carr (3) 2 

030000 JACKIE BLAIR (Bl(Dl (Jack Bair Ltd] M McCormack 4-8-7 _ J Leech fa) 6 

001000 FIRST EXPEMENuE iy) 31) (J BH) P Ffeknte 4-8-5 LRIggM3)10 

004-013 DUFFERS DANCER (P) (R Artouttret) W P eer ca GKtog9 

G Pnrrirerij-QonJon 3-7-12 _ AMgal Mcbarde (3) S 
S MMatam (5) 4 


30-4000 ASTARTE (C Andaman) Q PrttdwnJ-Gordon 3-7-12 _ 
0-00000 SHARAD (V) (D) (J tochoJson) B Stevens 6-7-7 


9-4 Music Machine, 11-4 Slant Majority 5-1 Duffer's Dancer. 8-1 Cleata. 
10-1 Jackie BfeW. 12-1 First Experience, 14-1 Astana, 19-1 others. 

FORM: MUSIC machine beaten t a vou rt te at Cettertck. earner {9-1 Z) made ell to beat 

Chine Gold (104) 2SI at Yarmouth (54 25yds, £1643, good. July 29. 13 ran). SBJENT 

MAJORITY (8-12) 3*1 4th to Posmdyno ffi-7) at Windsor (51, £2666. good. Jidy 7. 11 

rat) CLEOFE comma back n distance, at NewmarKm last month was 61 3rdr7-12) to 

Mummy’s Favourite (9-7) (7i, £8025. good to linn. July 10. 12 ran). FIRST EXPBHEnCE 
fttnaa 2 starts, earner (7-12) made alto win aiWQK Brtiampmn. with SHARAD (7-7) 6 *1 
back m Stti (51. £2567. firm. June 23. 9 ran). DUFFER'S DANCER (8-11) 1 XI 3rd to Tanlan 
(9-9) ai Pontefract (61, £1850. good to frm, Aug 7. 13 rant 
Selection; FIRST EXPERIENCE 

130 WATERFORD CANDELABRA STAKES (Group Ilk 2-Y-O fillies: 
£19.654: 7f) (6) 

303 0401 CANDLE M THE WIND (to (C WnghQ D Lakig 8-7 WNawnesS 

305 1 GOLDEN BRAID (D) (9r M SoMQI BUdkig 6-7 Rat Eddery C 

306 11 MVTTH3 GlEST (D) [Krtdm > Gor u or a non) H Armgrong 8-7 . S Cauttnp 4 

307 31 IOSIFA (C-O) fSi&ti Mohanmed) M Stoute 6-7 W R Swtntwn 2 

309 110004 MY MAGINAiKM (Rddvala Ltd) P KeUniay 8-7 B Rouse 3 

310 1 METTLE (D» Ouaen)W Ham 8-7 woman 

84 taws, 3-1 Nettie, 7-2 bwHed Quasi, 6-1 Golden Braid, 14-1 CamSe fci The 
wind. 16-1 My imagnaiuon. 


Goodwood selections 

By Mandarin 

130 Ininsky. 3.0 Silent Majority. 3.30 IOSIFA (nap). 4.0 
Dalgadiyr. 4 JO Skean. 5.0 Slim Hope. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent. 

130 Steeple BeH 3.0 Silent Majority. 330 losife. 4.0 Kathy W. 4.30 
Helietta. S.O Slim Hope. 

By Micbael Seely 
330 IOSIFA (nap). 4.0 Dalgadiyr. 


4-30 HANNINGTONS CHARITY MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£2,070: 1m) (9) 


MO AL ZANYU (Smad SdiaU) M FettwstorvGodlqr 8-11 . 
08002 BHKNATOUN para StodUAJDurtop Ml. 


DARMG DOCVEMra W McMpM) A Stewart 811 

0 BLOOUOCE (V uDonoghu0)b Bswortti 811 

m OLADE p Mncmaayl P Kftctiefl 8n — — 

042 HHJETTA (BR JFIK 


P Waldron 8 

— W Canon 3 

M Roberts 8 

WRSwWNaml 



Stud Ltd) L Cunani 811- 
‘ ■ 811- 


502 
S05 
507 
509 

511 

512 
516 
518 
520 

64 BH Khsnun, 5-2 HMetou 4-1 Skean, 81 Sunday CtWms, 84 fortng Doom. 
281 others. 


5-00 LONDON & EDINBURGH INSURANCE COMPANY RIAiDBM 

STAKES (2-Y-O: £1^70: Gft (8) 


G Haotood 811 _ 
(BF) (R Sander) B HBs 811. 


A McQoae 4 

Pat Eddery 5 

— R Guest 6 
. GSMny 7 
SCau9wn2 



111 3 Newmarket unnrar from Acconpanifit (8-8) pf, £4480. good. Aug 2. 4 rani 
(OSJFA’S 71 course and danance defeat (8111 ol Pwi HetenajO-llleoUd have been 
doibiro (makfen £51 19. good to firm. Jub 29. 1 1 rant MY DHAGMATIcm (88) 2KI4th 
to Latuche (8-8) at Newmarket (7T. £9683. good to firm. Aug 9, 8 ran). NETTLE (8-8) 51 
Salisbury winner from Last Dance (81) (6f, £3184, good to soft. Aug 13. 10 ran). 
Setacnore IOSIFA 


604 

613 

615 

616 
619 
622 

623 

624 


GOLD MH0RES 
2 MUMMY'S LUCK (R Khan) R 
0 SUM HOPE mmiMm 
■ TREBLE TOpTuIwH 
34 ALWAYS A LADV (GM 


PIAchM 811 . 
811. 


M9touta811, 
•11. 


HOME DEVICE (R 
ODD LADY^ MANTLE (Duka of 
TROJAN MSS (Sir M~ 


LHd»88_ 


HBa86. 


J Dunlop 88. 




_ AMcObn*7 

— Pat Eddery t 
, WRSaiManl 
PCook 5 

— P Waldron 2 

— SCardhend 
BROOM 4 

— W Canon 3 


Device, 


12 

(«h). 


Yarmouth results 

Going: good to firm 

115 (70 1. FALLING LEAF (G DuffMd, 
20-1): Trojan Son (N Day. 13-2); Red 
Hero (T Lucas. 25-1) 3 ALSO RAN: IDO- 
30 tav Woodpecker. 82 Kaiqoorita 
ti-2 Good Pootl 10 Mugath. " ' 

Dollar Seeker. 16 AJkxish. Knl 
33 Alaskan. Alcatraz (i 
Cuvee Charlie. Jurna 
Raider. Select Company. Squggto, Tropi- 
cal Boy. 20 ran. I'M. V.L nk ll. KL M 
Presoon at Newmarket Toa: £39.10: 
£8730. £3.00. £6.40. DF: £64.60. CSF: 
£136.62. 

2j 50 (m 2f) 1. POWER BENDER (A 
Murray. 2-1 lav); 2. Al Zumumid (P Tuk. 
11-11, 3. Gamerish <G Dutfieid. 13-2) 3. 
ALSO RAN; 6 Sittmg Bull (5thj. 8 Regency 
square (4<h). 9 Breadand Lady (Oh). 12 
Brave And BoUL 1G Farm Club. Mareoom, 
25 Sharoan, 50 Mr KewmdJ. 1 1 ran. 1 hi, 11. 
hd. ZVA. 3L G PntEtiard-Gorcton at 
Newmarket. Tore: £350: fi.50. £2.40. 
£1 60. DF. £12.30. CSF: £22X3. Tricaat 
£110.61. 

3.25 (71) 1. SNO SURPRtffi 
Coohrane. 14-1). 2. Tb w witc h (T Ives. 


« fav); 3. Last Stand (M HBs,*7-2). ALSO 
RAN: 8 Homnq M, 7 Fourwalk (0B1). 9 
Onentai Jade (5th). J6 OCormefl street 
w). 7 ran. ii, a, 0, m 31 . r rose « 
Newmarket Tote: £8.70; £2.30, £1.60. EJR 
£6.90. CSF: £3338. NR: Good Buy 
Badey'a. 


m V4 mu (■ nnaiiuniL i - ii, nuu 

RAN: 7 Mowsoon (5thL 12TonQUto(4tn). 5 
ran. 1L Hd.15i.3aM Stouts at 
Jtewmarket Tote: £220: El.lft £!■«. DR 
£330. CSF: £3.79. 


e 


Gtawww (A Murray, S-2 Favl. ALSO 
Q ‘W , , H8 to Ifth). 7 BeccadflM (4tfi). 
id irn hy. 16 Lon Garoicz. Mac's Maestro 
fgJtag Deganeraie. Freddrt Ashton, 
go"*" Topaz. 11 ran. ii. U HI HI. 21. M 

£1.50. £3.00. DF: £830. CSF: £24,36. 

435(1r^. WBJLJBE WILLBE(G Cwier, 
281): a mader Lass (R Fox. 20-1t a 
PhflOMBhcef (M Wigham. 182). ALSO 
RAN: 4 tav New Evidence (6ttl). 82 Owing 
It Afl Away, 5 Chariton FOnga.Mtfrt. AvadS 
16 Real MoonshinQ (5th). £ FbmCurtam. 
Bam Talk Rockal. Capfesis Jade. 1 2 ran. 
1L 2 VjL 2K.L nk. 1aL C Bnttakl at 


NewmarioeL Tote: £3030; £830, £3.70. 
£2.00. DF: £295.10. CSF. £34344. TncasC 
£3,65430. 

Ptscepob E3423SL 

Lingfield - Wednesday 

Going: good to flrm 
830(7f) 1. Sailor* Song (SDaweon. 14- 
1k 2. Berm Wooster fl-i) : 3. Golden 
Sfede (9-1). Al Amead (7-2 bv). 10 ran. nk. 
sh hd. 10 ran. AlfflOTOSe. N Vtara. Tote: 
£1430: £230. £1.80. £430. Dft 4430. 
CSF: £8238. Tricast £48534. 

73Um201. Grand CuteUatkm (Evens 
tart; 2. Blair's Winnie (3811:3. Trojan God 
(181). 6 ran. VL Iffl- R Sinuson. Ton: 
£230: £1.10, £230. £240. D ft £40,40. 
CSF: £28.14. 

730 (71) 1 . Menrfei Star (S Dawson. 28 
It 2. wfea Timas (i 1-4): 3. Strfte Rare (8' 
1). tasierah 6-5 lav. 6 ran.1l. ^l. R Holder. 
Tote: £2230: £530. £130. D ft £3930. 
CSF: £8268. 

03 (50 1. GHetaa Mou (N Adams, 108 
30); 2 Grisere^-I^ 3, Aaterta ““ “ 


Soto Singer Z- 
Tote: £430: 


_ . ..ran. II, 1LR 1 

£2.10. £4.10. £430 DP, 

£3330. CSF: £4 337. 

Ptecepefc £77-55 


Today’s course 
specialists 

NEWMARKET 

TRAMERS; H Cecfl. 91 winnere (tom 346 
nmnera, 26L4%; M Stoute. 56 tram 346. 
102%: J ButcSfto. 16 from 109. 14.7%. 
JOCKEYS: S Whitworth, 8 winners from 
54 rides. 143%; & Dawson. 10 team 71. 
14.1%; A Clerk, 9 from 73. 123%: T 
WtSiama. 12 from 111. .103%: G Baxter, 
35 from 345. 10.1%; T Ives. 45 from 476, 
93%; M Hffls. 17 from 1 97, 83%. 
GOODWOOD 

TRAINERS: L Cumani. 17 winners from 57 
runners. 293%; H Ceal, 28 from 97, 
28.9V. W Hero. 37 from 148. 253%. 
JOCKEYS: Q Starkey. 41 wmnere from 
202 ndas. 20.3%; Pat Eddery. 53 from 
279. 193%: w Canon. 45 from 27i, 
17.0%. 

BANGOR 

TRA1NBIS: J Jentens. 9 winners from 23 
nawers. 39.1%: O MoCam, 10 from 52. 
19 -2%: M rs W Sykes. 7 from 37. 189% 
JOCKEYS: S Morshead, 14 winners from 
66 rxtes. 213%: P Scudamore. 12 from 
62. 19.4%. (only two qualifiers) 


York results 

CMnp good to firm 

23 cmr OF YORK STAKES (£4361: 71) 
PREStDOIM b c by General AssemUy - 
Doubly Srre (Lord Howard de Waf- 
dan) 4-84 S Cauthen (100-30) 1 

Qua S i m pei ca b f by Young-Genem- 
tton - Htoh Finale (Mrs A Mutooa) 4*4J 
Reid (181) 2 

Raaotmw ch c by Nodouble - Ractette 
(K AbduOte 3-9-0 B Thomson 181) . 3 

ALSO RAN: 9-4 fevTanouma' 
HcribroakaSumM (4th). 10 1 
14 Soughaan. 50 BneraU . 
ran. Nth Maravfita. 2XJ, 1 »L hd 3L 2»L H 
Ceca at NewmartceL TotR wte £3-30; 
£1.10. £260. £288 DR £303a 
h £4348. Imin 2232aac (course 
record). 

230 MOORESTYLE CONVIVIAL MABXSi 
STAKES (2-Y-O: £5353: 6Q 
BAU HAOiCbcby Hatttet-Mtes Bal (j 
Pearce) 93 S Cauthen (Evens favj 1 
Yaws Judge eh c by Try My Best - 
Gakter SHojSir Kemeth Bud) 9-0 N 
Connorton(l6-1) 2 

Msfd b or hr e by Young Ganarafion - 
Briitpanny (Hamaan Al Maktoun) 80 
Paul Eddery 02-1) 3 

ALSO RAN: E Literfcaa Sunerta (51h). 8 
Atowy Park. 11 Wood CNsaL 12 All Stmti 
(4th), 20 RumboogiB. 25 Rock Chanteur 
era. 50 l chi Ban Son, 
14 ran. NR: Premier 
«t. nk.5W.HL 1V4L G Wragg at 
NewmarkeL Tole: win £200: paces 
£130. £5.90. £280. DR £4330 CSR 
£2394. Imin 1257sea 

3.10 WtLUAM HRJ. SPftiNT CHAMPfON- 
SWP (Grotto t £49818:50 
LAST TYCOON be by Try My Best -Mffl 
Princess (R Strauss) 3-83 Y Samt- 
Martln(7-2) . 1 

Double Sdiww t i b h by OoUbfe Rjrm- 
Cass/s Pet (R Sangaer) 888 Pa 
Eddery (5-Z) 2 

&uen Desert b c by Dandg - Foreign 

Af Maktown) 3-9-2 W 


Keoanga chi by Kria - Cataipe . 
Howardde Wakten) 887W Ryan (11-2) 2 
fle b f by Re da Bourtxm - 
(ETUrner)3 


Narration (ETUmar)387RGuertf281) 3 
ALSO RAN: 

9 Bantam, 

It's Now Or 
(481), Myth. 25 Zurnumidah. Prelude. 13 
raa 9f, 1L 2KL 71. %L H Cedi nt 
NawmarkaL Tote: wte £230; places 
£1.70, £1.80. £730. DF: £830. CSfi 
E15A3. 2ftin30J2s8C. - 

5-15 GREAT YORKSHRE HANDICAP 
' - (£3366: 1m 4f) 

WfTCHCflAFT b e by Grundy - Broom- 
stick Comer <E Moist) 4 & 4 Pa 
- Eddery (81) V 

GeHland ch a by Gulf Iteart -Sunkuid 
Park (Gavto ^Gordon) 5 810 S CMd> 
(11-2) .2 

chg by Doon- Even Tint (N 
)988 DNldwis (181) . 3 

ALSO RAN: 7-2 far Vouchsafe. 4 Con- 


15H, 2L II, nk. G Wlagg at NowmarkeL 
Tota win £3Jft paces Cl.10. £230,. 
£330- OF: £7 JO- (Sr £3135. Tricast 
E24637- 2mSi 3237sec. 

Jackpot £72245. PtacapOt £4430. 

. First acceptors 

VERNOMS SPRINT CUP (Oft AcusMa. 
Bermuda Ctasstc, Bridesmaid. Clantime. 
Double Schwartz. Eastern Song. Rmj 
Landing. Green Desert: Gray Desk*. 
Gwytfion. Hadeer. Halfeam Usr Tycoon 
Lead On Time. Luqman. Maroubla. Mete- 
oric. N o mina t ion. Fttot Jet, Polyknrtrs. 
Possedyno. Precious Metal. Pramisra 
Cuvoe. Hasp-act Roaring Rwa. Rose Of 
The Saa. Rotherflaid &eys, Sit This One 
Out. Sonic Lady. Sparry. Staftar. 
Tanouma. Ummosm. Touch Of Grey. To 
be run at Ha y d ock. September 8 


NEWMARKET 


Courier (Maktnan AIMaktown) 

R Swinbum (9-4 fav) 

ALSO RAN: 82 

KiM 8 ran. 4H, TSH. 41, 3f, hd. 

R Cofiet in France. Tote: win £330; pfeoes 
£1.40, £130. £1^X Dft .Em CSR 
£1183. 57/47MC. 

335 BRADFORD 6 BINGUY HANDICAP 

(£20382: InO 


(USA)-Lorafene(S(rPOpp0nf»imeO 
884 S Cauthen (15^) 1 

Turfeh b c by Czaravidi - HU It Rich 
(Hamdan Al Maktnum) 3-8-5 Raul 
Eddery (181) 2 

Tnriy Rare gre by Atffrmed -The Rarest 
Monamroed] 444 W Swinbum ^ 

ALSO RAN: 5 In King's Head (9M. 8 
Come On The Okies. 10 Aventino (4th), 
Moores Metal. Signore Odone. Shyer 
Trip. 12 Bold And Beautiful (Ai 
Resouroaftd Fteoon. 20 Ouaflteir nyor. 25 
Oriental SoWer, 50 Tbp Ruler. 14 ran. KL 
nk. »Lftd.shhd, G wragg at NewmakeL 
Tote: win £6-70; pieces £2-70. £2J0, 
T2.7D. DF: S38.10. CSR £86.11. Tncatt 
£566.07- Imte 37.79SOC. - 

4,15 LOWTHER STAKES (Group ft 2-Y-O 
FfflteS £15336: 60 

POLONIA b f by Danzig - Maas (H de 
KwlatkosU) 9-0 J Ren (5-2) 1 

Intarual chf by Habitat -IntennteVonfK 

AbfluBa) 811 Pat Eddery (7-2) % 

Linda's Magta br f by Far Nonfi - 

Pogonip (Jfivy) 811 S Cauthen (81) 3 
ALSO RAN: 2 fav Hiaam (6th). 12 
Beauchamp Buzz. Chasmg Moon b eam s . 
14 Saa Dara (5th), 25 wn Lily uihL 
SmdsrLady. sran. SH.2yu.nk.hcl.lSLj 
Bdger in Ireisnd. Tots w £3.40: places 
rOS. £1.70. £130. DF: £9.30. CSP 
£12.19. 1mm 103Bmc. 

435 GALTRES STAKES (RKes 8 Maras 
£7343: lm 41) 

STARTMO b f by Bustfm - Western - 
star (Mrs J MeAlfeUrl 887 S 
Cauthen (8840 fev) 1 


BANGOR 


TM; 245* 3.15, 3.45, 4.15 

Going: flood _ 

Draw: no dsprificant advantage 

2.15 BEAUFORT SEUJHG HANDICAP p-Y-a £1,998! TMttfuraaa) 

I -S5? 


000600 

Efe Hett& P 


000000 ttMjqOT Y WlQ WTY 
1-00000 DRenMSPMNQ 

809 ANTHONY OOMAI 
940038 WN0MGMW(R 
322242 MTCOPOPWAl" 
id 890004 MQHUMDTAUEa- . 
30 809030 OCTHA(M Britten) M 


82 Doratfe. tM Htf 
Cup Of Tea. 12*1 


*®WRH0*ftg9TOM 



SSsSsS 


Newmarket selections 

By Mandarin 

2 IS Still Dreaming. 2.45 Ronuua Gunner. 3.1S Rim High. 3.45 
Treasure K*y. 4.15 Orthennes WcIL 4.45 Genghu. 

By Our Newmarket Corrtspoodenl 

2.13 My Cup Of Tou i45 Jack Straw. 3.15 AgRtirisl, 5-45 Filkw. 

4.15 Merdon Melody. 4.45 Genghiz. 

Michael Seely’s seieclion: 4.15 OthcrinesVML 


Z45 LOCKWOODS A SMEDL0TS HAIOBI STAKES (&M84: 

i »«««» « ww”CkJ80™ 

i l Cunani t| 


"nASRiSSuwjKwden) ABitayM — : — - Ptenejfinart 
I 0L0RY UME (USA) (F Sakta^P Cole 90 ^ ■■ ■ ■ . 

0 MQWANO U»P HundUO D 


MPPiSteunSM) 
i-nmdweocBtfl 


■ JACK STRAW (PI^W 

JAMES STANUEYpTSeWWWWJiM^ 



11 

12 
16 
17 
20 
22 

24 

25 
28 

29 
31 

7-2 Gtorv Line. 4-1 Arden, 81 W&swrightoncuo. 81 Sip Dancer. 

Gunnur, Oeoano. 12-TtoSSraDeSrtfe. 181 OtIWS. 

,7ih and DANCER TO rOUflW(8WWn»iera«Mind 

firm. July 30. 10 ranv 

_ _ -ii) at NOtenghamfB. 

^ 119. fern. June 30. 8 ran). 

Selection: MJP DANCER 

3.15 HARRIS GROUP HANUCAP (E3J256; 1m 6f 171yd) (9) 


S3 SUP DANCER 

2 SBuSvMQHTBliaiE nttwpSre UdSMOkw CenJO Wfo 80^ ^ 

182.1 


3 2/20108 
8 08*110 
10 
11 
12 

13 

14 

15 
17 


■KMGSWKK 

Fto AGAT warg 

Hat FOXYMBM 
000022 VtHTAOEl 
023120 JACKDAW] 
01 RUNHKWj 
8023 0H0MH 
340010 VBtYO 
030413- BEN’S] 



ISC Ltd) J Ranoone 887BHB 
Mta|G Prik*er8«ordon380 - 
lHuepoBLCunen38l?^ 
^WdnnR Ahehmt 43-T2- 
^HaWTOwedSA-IZ 


"7333 


E Lembron) W Hokfcn < 


«-4 Ftay Praise, 82 DbonL 7-1 AgtoMet. 8l Vwy SfWMt, 


ATanpMns) M TaapUne 873 AMeckay 5 

9-4 Rtn 
181 VSntegel 

limi.Juiy22.il raropHONI (81 1)4i Goodwood 3rd to Jwt David 
1 to (km. July 30. i 


easy 1W wemer from Mmshmey | 
l DHONI (8l1)4lGoodfeood 3rd to. 
good to 'Ann. July 30. 7 ran). 

Selection: MNOSWICX 

3JS HULSOOWN HOLDIHQS HOPffUL STAKES (£ft39& 6t) (7) 6 


1 30*103 HALLGATE (D) I 
6 030000 STTIMSONCCH 
B 080400 CHARGE ALONG (□ 

11 11322-0 RLLEOft (W JOncUg 

12 128010 aCIEOMCf&OM 

15 181*23 THgASUREKATI 

16 812002 MODEM BRara 


MfetSHM 3-9-3^ JRM3 

D Lang 380 R C o u l>i — 2 

JMnier 4-811 PAobteeoel 

GPriKtarn60Rtan3«8 O 0eteeW7 

Abdul^ W Ham 3-88 i Ttew4 


i YateS) PMahki 388. 
■ RB0M386.^H 


. • Teaman! 
Peel Eddery 5 


81 Treasure Key. 82 HeMgete. 7-2 Meteoric, 1V2 Fteeor, 81 Charge Along. 
■181 Hidden Brief. 381 S4 Tlfe One Out 


FORSfc 

benBA 

oneoutHHHH 

31). CHANGE ALONG 7th to! 
Ftam landing (B-QatHaydock 
htedMtaer Wonderful hereon I 
■■H £11631. good to soft. 



CT9627, g ood to fern. June 7, fi ran). FtLLEOR be- 
HMMMBitoTOteda-99 2HI2nd«> The Bun SUta 
IS. 16 ranL ATEDBiC (813) beet Zaiipe (80) 1 %l 




)et gretowo (51. £11745. flood toflrm, Juiyl 


,19 rad). 


4.15 BUXTBD HANDICAP (3-Y-O: E4^33: 6f) (9) . 

RflQim(rjohMey)PCote87-~ 
me Awmfe) r JMbm w_ 
£ Hnfl( Htdee) R Hotewheed 9-2- 


RrtOOO DREAM CHA9QRI 
000242 CRETE CARGO ■ 
132302 DARK PBOWSEJ 
303311 CAT HERM EStra 


. LJohneey(7)9 
— R Cochrane B 
,SMlta4 


. (D) (HDpdircmo Rw±m) M W Eanetby 80 

GCwtflvP)9 

12 812200 MOtDON MELODY (D)(J State) R Staether HO M L Thome* 7 

16 0080 JOUSTMGBqY (USWpTor^jRAnreaunflM __T_Qtenna 

22 20000 MUHWM (HAI-MaktoUBO C D i ne fe wl 7-7 — — TUBaenS 

54 Catherine* We*. 82 Mernm. 1V2 Dark Promtee. 7-1 Afemnaa. 81 Crate 
Cargo. 181 Preem CTi a e er. U-l other*. 


HI (841 at B« 
TiybeatffedrePto 
DAHitPROaUSeM 
beat Qu TOe Reef] 
wrnotgigj 
nerlrom 


l-11^annay«M 


■t al Nawcsstis (■■ 

| W ow oouna and dfeanoe, wiffi I 


I bea 

1(7-8) 


getting a dear njnttieiS^ jood. Aug y OranLALAMROSE (88) 
mSKy;a^{81 y ffit g8<S good to aoft. Aug 21.23 an). 


S(8i2)7tt>ef- 
1 w York ww 


445 EBF BLUE PETER STAKES (2-Y-0: £3 l 38& 6f) (7) 

1 

GRAND TOUR (L Schott) Wt 
NOW VBIY T0UCHBIG (R J Hindtey 811 . 

MUTAHY ATTACHE (USA) [Shaikh MohammAd) HCed 811. 


1 

2 

5 

8 

9 

10 

12 


The*3 


SUPat LUNARj 


81 Blanton Reserve, 181 Moore Brass. 


I Tour, Super Lunar. 


• Polonia and Interval, first and second in the Lowther Stakes at 
York yesterday, are 25-1 with Corals for next year's 1,000 Guineas. 
Other prices: 14-1 Forest Flower, 16-1 MinstrcUa, 20-1 Canadian 
Mill, 25-1 Gayane and losife. - 

• The Tote's on-course cash turnover for the three-day Ebor 
meeting was £787,845 — an increase of 37 per cent on last year. 


Ayr weights 

AYRGOLD CUP HANDICAP m BoKn 
Knight 4-10-0. Ednica 4^-8. imperial Jade 
484, Haflgate 3-9-3. Governor General 8 
83, Al I* Forglvefl 882, SI Signor 4^82. 

Romance 481, Meteoric 3813. 
_ «ar 8813. Rowing Rw» 3812, 
Dancing Zeta 8811. Lun Bid 3811. 
Sundeed 3811. Handsome Safior 3811. 
Dawn’* OaUH 8810, Menu 68S, 
POtaedynoWs. Sit ThteOne Out 3-88. 

Ow Jock 487. Phift) 487, Lochonica 
386, Ho Mi ChMi 486. HSun Brown 8 
8-5. Touch Of Grey 385. Respect 385. 
Barrack Street 38S. Prince Sky *84. Al 
TUJ 68L Predous Metal 384. Gtaen 

1. Powder Bhw 481. Catherine* Weil 



1. MW’I . . 

O. Jam Russsll880. 

Hay Street 5-7-13. Tyrotee 4-7-13. 

Song 87-13. Oh Boyer 87-13. 
Manton Dan 87-13, LocbMum 7-7-1 i 
Ferryman 10-7-11, Quinta Reef 87-11, 
Cornpteat3-7.il, Padre Pta 5-7-10. Vb«bv 
M 8fe 87-10, Boot PoMl 4-7-10, Native 
Skier 4-7-9. Chummy‘a Pet 878. Fflflpt 
Toro 87-8. Numtamatlst 7-7-7, Gtan Kelfe 


Manx 87-7. Vttesh 87-6, Brook's DF 
l e mma 878 Stay's Choice 878 ' 

■ AmeflWno 87-4 Gold PriMpect 4-78 
Spiky Lad 878 Duck rS« 4-78 
RWb Soane 87-4. kwh Codoe 4-78 
. Jotost 3-78 Air Coin man d 878 Ram- 
bling River 878 Taranga 87 8 Young 
Jason 87-2, Fringe Of feaven 4-78 
Ames- Pal 4-7-2. Debbie Do 87-0. 
M argam 878 Throne Of (Rory 5-5-13, 
ftorfione Mews88i3, Mataura Beta 58 
13. Booty 8813, Heart Of Glass 8812. 
Ptaytax 88-12. Jerrovian 38-11. 
nsrawni* KIWIS 8810. God's fete 88 
10,MreWw3diiov*38-10,FofTWKune*-8 
10. Goose HV 86-10. 

Danckw Tom 889. Baton Boy 888, 
DantaM&rah 888 idle Timas .485. 
Gokfen Gulkter 884. emerald Eagfe 88 
3. Misier March 3-83, Beadwood COi- 
gag w» 388, Sowt 

Spoken 88ft Pine Hawk 58-1 ft 
SonnaneBs 88-12. Uttta N awl Wflta n 5-5-9. 
Hany Hul 858.Mtemi Dotohte854;To 

t» run K Ayr, September 19. • 

Blinkered first time 

gooqwoo ftftaoLoai atwc slofm 

Ejqnerienoe. 

NEWMARKET: 345 SH TMS One Out 4.15 
Orateft Chaser, 


Going: good to firm 

£0 MARCHER SOUHD SELUNG HANDICAP 
CHASE (£840: 2m) (8 runners) 

A 4W» FBNCar LAD M Tate 811-7 ; PScudaiem 

I S22 TSSSS 2SBX£a2*Snz- ***** 

6 2+P PABSOIfSFWBE (C) KG WWfl f W a 1 1 -11-4 

11 -F3F CROPAWI05»K'lM)ta81813^I!I?I?KSS 

12 .800 P0UNTAM VALLEY P Oaris 7-187 P Dtwr 

J3 MP FOSTPYNEW B Mann 11-187 rnw 

14 -fl22 ATHB«S STAR (D)JMBrMley 11-10^ QDartBS 

15 P08 OUWEH HATOT Mrs B Wartngl 1-10-7 ^JRoSh 

81 Athens Star. 81 Crisp And Keen. 81 poetdvne. 

81 Princely Lad, 81 Stow Bracken. 181 ParaonTPridS 

2J0RUTHIE NOVICE HURDLE (E885: 2m) (11) 

1 PC- HEADW ON MWEddey 811-1 ! AOMegen 

2 0/8 M0NCLARE TROPHY P J Bevan 7-11-1 _ GMcCMrt 

3 0F8 PEAT M rs A Hewitt 811-1 MWBaot 

4 008 fflETTY TOUGH D L WMems 811-1 rWHien 

5 280 RAPE) OUNNBI (USA) J A Edwards 81 1-1 „ PBeram 


3-30 EVET8NG LEADER HANDICAP CHASE 

(£1,676: 2m 4f) (6) 

1 401 RV^UAL BLACK (BMC-D) D McCain 1W2-1 1 


P Driver 12-11-3. 


.COM 


81 


3 082 FOGGY BUOY I 

4 0ft- WlGGMBM Mrs A'Hawht 7-1810 - 

5 0ft- OMQAND JASON Mrs W 6yku 8}87« n 8 MeilMeO 

6 822 SIMON BOUVAR J HyMVHQM 7-186 

litenBR ftfA l 

7 3 Op CAIMQEEN HU. JS Krig 18180 81 

84 Foggy Buoy, 81 knportei BfeCK 82 Mflfltwn. 

8f CwrigoM HU, Oakland Jaoon, 


9 8 FAIR YOUTH CC Trietfine 4-1812 


11 PP- PffKAITHLY 
13 880 UNDBITHE 


J R Jenkins 4-T815L 


A Sham 
— J White 


i J RytofvHeyes 81812 

16 PR- PRETTY FLY AH Briaboume 81810 H Mabom 

17 088 CAKTOWN GnL R W Hartop 4-187 R Geest m 

18 208 HALLOWS) J R Bosley 4-10? * n Till twill 

10830 Capo Tow n art, 82 Hwdh‘ On, 11-2 Under Tha 
Stare, 7-1 Mondara Trophy. 81 HalowBd, 181 Fair Youth. 

3.0 CHESTER CHRONICLE NOVICE 
{£1,319: 3m) (11) 

1.08P PUTTgnnUE Wfl E Ife ecoc k 7-11-1 POTOmsmIM) 

3 2m NORTH DOWN Bftewo 1811-1 : — 

4 -U4F SAILHG BY(B J R Jankins 811-1 . 


Bangor selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Princely Lad. 2J0 Rapid Gunner. 3.0 SpWB 
HilL 3.30 Foggy -Buoy. 4.0 KJosterbrau. 4.30 
Tarqogan's B est, 

U®fTWOO° GREEN NOVICE HURDLE 
P-Y-Q: £685: 2m){6) 

1 JJWWTOWN M C Ptoe 181 g 

DM AM A OOUjWa W JOIW T8tt_ S J W* 


4 
■ 5 
8 
.10 


HENRY PADWICK H Doit. 1812- 


* j l L foMlIW 1812^.. 38 

2SS2SK5SLP EPiaMi* i8 ift^ pppmh* 

■ M» HARLHXIM R C PUtfl t87 


CHASE 


luffiSjfysjLftft Ktoat " >faCTt> - •** **** nsf* 1 

81 MG8 Hartefluirt 181 Dbn And A Dofiar, Megpte Bertie. 

EXPRESS HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£1,559: 2m 41) (5) 


5 080 SSfORMA OMhCO MrsM Babbage 811-lN Babbage 

6 34F- SNOB VALUE GB Bartow 7-11-1 TT 

7 441 SWEET SOUCTTORJ & Wng 7-11-1 -_5I 

Us 7-11-1 — 


8 PP8 TIXALL BOV j A-Ednenk • 

9 P8I SHUTS NU. ( 

10 PPfi* fl* STYLET I 


, w tome (4) 
« Dwyer 
R Drank 


1 048 MSTBtPITT 
s 8 a BALUCHI 

3 Ml Ti 


6 W MODVBm 
8 OOU- LE BAA0N 
84 . . 

PW.281 Is 


-11-13, 


.. HFeemP) 

GLMriroP) 

BEST PH)) R E Peacock 8114 (go 
p^oilimnrt 


Ctariltey 81(M)«.J I 
a*. 81 BakiehL8T Morwrv 81 UMR 
Rouge. 


11 4441 ORAYffiJSEfotY EH Owmilin 81810 

OCtarie* Janes 

12 PM SPARTAN NATIVE A W JCnftS 8181(L_™. S J @W1 
11-4 Spartan Native. 7-2 Sprons Mt 4>T Sweet Scacttor,' 

Snob vakw, 7-1 Grey Row-Bay. 12-l SaHng By. 16-1 atnara. 


OffCIAL SCRATCHING8: AB 
Gtoy, Chinaera. Babadao. f 
S g™3?> .Own, Who Deres. 
BBrieyctate. Usurping, Morgans Cognac. 




'ti 


55 \ 





sr -a xt » » * be 


j exc i Livir^ r i AUuOai zz ly&o 


CRICKET 


■ *-v* . 

... , 

'' trm . 


**L 


■ * **■« ‘V : 1 


'. . . a . ; A>J v 

t _ \i ^v.lj l 



Vw;i, 

- -JS' 


Childs’ play 
takes Essex 
to brink of 
leadership 



, By Richard Streeton 

J %& COLCHESTER: Essex, to his original end and bowled 
lT *i> with men second innings - unchanged the rest of the 


J* wickets in hand . lead 
^■Gloucestershire hr 226 runs. ■■ 
: Essex seem likely to move' 
to ihe top of the championship 
table today, provided that the 
rain, which brought ihe close 
■32 overs early, allows the final 
'.. day to be* completed. Essex 
« y*V' ’first gained a first innings lead 
'0«f 128 runs after John Childs, 
.their left-arm spinner, took 


jnntngs. 

He immediately dismissed 
Stovold and. Tomlins in 
successive overs and estab- 
lished a stranglehold on his 
opponents which was never 
prised loose. Stovold aimed a 
forcing shot towards mid- 
wjeket and a leading edge gave 
mid-off a catch. A sensible 
innings by Tomlins finished 



y -- 0* * v -eight for 58 against his former with a skied bat and pad catch 
county. Then they reached 98 accepted by die wicketkeeper. 


-’i,>4 or 


three in their second 


r-'-ji-'-'C Innings. 

ilds 




- *h - *• . . 

ti*. 

*fi*ur. — • 

t *’ - 

’ * > ' 1 
*v. 


Childs kept six men close to 
SiJ %..the bat as he destroyed 
■ Gloucestershire's qwd hopes 

-■--T^'^'of winning, which would en- 
them to retain their 

‘ 


Whether Gloucestershire 
would , have reached the fol- 
low-on figure of 162 if a 
chance given by Lloyds had 
been accepted before he had 
scored must remain ' conjec- 
ture. Lloyds swept against 
'^harrow lead in the table. Only Childs but Lilley. halfway to 
; v •; 48 hours earlier he took eight the long-leg boundary, was 
. ‘ p* J:ror6l in a losing cause 3gainst unable to hold the awkwardly 
' Northamptonshire. Overall it swirling ball Lloyds was also 
'was a compelling day's cricket. 

:*p ...... Gloucestershire were dis- 

1 , ^Sivmissed for 183. Lloyds being 

.. • - 'isZgHv, their top scorer with 52. He hit . 

• » eight fours and was missed off poor piece 1 

* . ^iCfiilds as soon as he came in. Three ti 

V “ When Essex batted any ,n '**• 

- ' v < ; r^-cri tic isms of the pitch were 
^'^i^put in perspective as Stephen- 
» .-...^^-.son and East shared an un- 

^1 troubled first wicket stand of 
v 73 in 28 overs. Graveney. the 
• - ^..^Gloucestershire left-arm spin- 

. and captain, did not bowl 


.- i- r. -J;*-. 

HI 

ti.'iF-'je-j*?* 

1 i.:,t i*. 

East goes for the boundary at Colchester, where be was 5$ not out 

Lynch keeps Surrey in hunt 



limy by 
valuable 


14 ' * i! 6 - 5 . 


iTa 

■I M.\ ... 


r. Relapsed. He then took three 
'■-’'.’...'.^nickels before the end. 

* .Stephenson and Hardie were 
caught in the gully and in 
between he hid Prichard 

*'»«!. rijQgCaughi behind trying to square as soundly as anyone. He hit 
■ - •- ---■ «, J'cul. Childs through the covers for 

It takes nothing away from a 


nearly caught in tire gully off 
Pringle but went on to ride his 
luck. He and Curran added 37 
before Curran was out after a 
ofcrickeL 

times Curran had 
failed to make proper contact 
as he tried to pull Childs 
against the spin. When he 
succeeded a fourth time a 
mistimed stroke went straight 
10 mid-off. Curran tuned bis 
back and retreated to the 
pavilion without looking over 
his shoulder to see if the catch 
was completed. 

Gloucestershire still needed 
25 to avoid the follow-on 
when the youthful Afieyne 
joined Lloyds. AUeyne baited 


By I vo Tennant 

DARTFORD: Surrey have de- 
clared their first innings 79 runs 
behind Kent. 

An aggressive cenn 
Monte Lynch and 
other contributions enabled 
Surrey 16 make the kind of 
progress they required to further 
their championship ambitions. 
They declared 79 runs behind, 
putting the onus for a positive 
outcome on Kent.' 

The widely forecasted rain did 
not reach Dartford until five 
o'clock. Conveniently, Lynch 
ted just completed his century, 
made in 210 minutes with 14 
fours and a six, and the play as 
stayed on long enough for 
Surrey to reach their fourth 
batting point. Surrey declared in 
the knowledge that more than 
that would be needed today. 

Kent added 15 runs to their 
overnight total for the loss of 
Marsh, whose 47 included ten 
fours, and EQison. Clarke took 
both wickets, which gave him 
some reward for his persever- 
ance. Only 37 runs came o AT bis 
28 overs on a good batting pitch. 


By lunch, Kent, or rather 
Alderman, had dismissed three 
Surrey batsmen. Butcher was 
well caught by Marsh, pushing 
tentatively outside off-slump. 
Clinton was beaten by late 
movement and Jesiy edged 10 
first slip: 53 for three. 

H was cloudy and cool but 
there was not that much help for 
Alderman .and Ellison. Id the 
afternoon, Surrey batted consid- 
erably better and, indeed, scored 
their runs at quite a pace. 
Stewart, who made 55 and 166 
against Kent last month, again 
looked an England batsman in 
the making. It is difficult enough 
being Peter May's godson but 
when your father is assistant 
manager of the tour to Australia 

Lynch is always a joy to 
watt*. Various sweeps, hooks 
and drives were perfectly exe- 
cuted. After Stewart was out, 
somewhat unluckily chopping a 
ball on. Lynch continued to 
pepper the boundary boards, 
partnered by Richards and then 
Thomas, who belted seven fours 
in an unbeaten 47. 


KENT: First mngs 
MR Benson b Fetttwm . 


NR Taylor bwbFettftam 88 

C J Tavari tow b Pocock 32 

SG Hrttt C Clarita b Famtam 2 

OG Asian b Thomas 17 

*C S Cowdrey St Richards b PDCOCk ■ 10 

R M Ebson c Butcher b Ctartra 32 

f5 A Marsh d Pari* 47 

C S Date not out 0 

Extras (b IS. to ft nb 11 ) 28 

Total (8 wkts dac) 379 

Score at 100 overs: 311 tor 8 . 

D L Underwood and T M Atoarmm CM not 
bet 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-212. 2-232. 3-234. 
4-269. 5-291. 6-303. 7-372. 8-379 
BOWLING: Clarke 28 1-1647-2; Fettnam 
24-3-110-3, Pocock 26-7-61-fc Thornes 
17-4-65-1; Butcher 6-2-27-0; Madtycctt 

14- 3-62-0. 

SURREY: first ttmtoos 

A R BtochercMarsnb Alderman 8 

GSCWxontowb Aldermen 23 

A J Stewart b Ekson fit 

T E Jesty c Tavart b Alderman 11 

M A lynch not out 119 

tC J Richards c EJkson b Underwood 21 

DJ Thomas not out 47 

Extras (to 5. nb 5) 10 

Total (5 wkts dec. 71.4 overs) 300 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-22. 2-41. 3-53. 4- 
149.5-204. 

BOWLING: Alderman 17-1-89-3; EKson 

15- 1-61-1; Underwood 224-6-70-1; Data 
13-2-59-0; C S Cowdrey 40-160. 

Bonus points: Kent 6 . Surrey 6 . 

Umpires: B Dudtoston and D Oetaar. 




-skilful exhibition of flight and 
* V- a ’« "—spin by Childs to suggest that 
i-4.. ^^Gloucestershire did .not al- 
^ “ -7— ways bat with the necessary 
’ ■ ^judgement Those. who believe 
... the modem player tends to 
■ '1 r- a— panic mentally when the ball 
- ■•: , r~is turning had their view 
" confirmed, as more than one 

-Gloucestershire player fell to a 
*7/- stroke that was unnecessarily 
: ambitious. 

Childs tossed the ball high 
. ... . and often gave it an extra 

“tweak" to bring additional 
- - : turn, it was by no means an 
• ■i.-W^lunplayable pitch, as. Essex 


•- -• -*• : ‘ *asho wed later. For C&flds.: who _ 


one four and Lloyds pulled 
and snicked two more against 
Foster. Three, runs were still 
required when Chi Ids- took the 
wicket of AUeyne and 
Graveney in three balls, 
AUeyne moved out and hit 
across a .quicker ball. 
Graveney pushed forward and 
Lilley at point managed to 
knock the ball up and Fletcher 
dived from silly mid-off to 
hold iL One ball remained of 
the over and Walsh settled the 
arguments whether Fletcher 
would or would not invoke the 
fbHow-on by on driving it for 
four: - - • 5 


ipshire bowlers flourish 


With Malcolm Marshall in 
ihe van. Hampshire's bowlers 
reaped a rich harvest in wickets 
as Worcestershire's batting 
failed badly in 37 overs before 
rain brought abont an early 
close in mid afternoon at Dean 
Park. Bournemouth, yesterday. 
Worcestershire lost seven wick- 
ets for 88 runs in a halting 
advance to 104 for eight, and 
they begin again this morning 
133 runs behind. 

At Northampton. Noc- 
tingbamshire had batted on in 
the' morning, and Hernmmgs. 


» ? ■»! V- 1 

V.- ■* 

< • « ■ * • : 





By Peter Marson 

all of whom fell to Fraser- 
Dariing as the batsmen edged 
forward by 31 runs. Bailey 
countered by playing his attack- 
ing strokes, but shortly before 
the first foil of rain. North- 
amptonshire had lost their fifth 
wjckeL that of Wild, at 93. 

When the batsmen made their 
return. Harper foil to a catch in 
the gully by Birch off Saxelby, 
and Fraser- Darling took his fifth 
wicket when Ripley fell to a 
catch behind. In the meantime, 
Bailey had made a half century 
off 62 balls. He was 61. and 
Northamptonshire. 115; .for 
seven after 38 overs when more 


-Ifall against the. county which 
. '-^released him in 1984. - 

Essex envis^ Childs. »s ^ ^ pjonshjp inmneL Foster 


ilds's chance to be- 
come the fiTSl bowler for 22 
yeaTs to take all 1 0 wickets in a 

.. . . **the successor^ East.bdt .? 

» *?.“§ihree wickeiscostmg 37tr3s ‘ ■ 

. four championship games ^ lunch to end tBetnmngs. 

'■ . ^iLplast year was hardly an auspi- 
' ~'\uSedoos start During the winter 
• .... -t. Childs had his approach run 
and action slightly modified 
% ..both by Fred Tumusand Don 
‘ • Wilson, the head coach at 
Lord's. This year he is the 
pleading England qualified 
-r-';. -bowler in the averages and 
- ‘'T^'.-Tnow has 66 wickets at 17.59 
■'.‘'-.■""each. . 

‘ l- 4* Childs began at the opposite 
,v.- end to the one be used 
overnight, when Gloucester- 
---shire resumed at oo for two, — *--- 


UoydswfbTally «ugbt at ¥?*** ■**; »** 

^ 44 runs in 1 1 overs before the 

i nnine ? dos ^ at 328/ Taking .rain. fell Shortly before iea/ 
nst Foster, wno thus - four wickets for 50 in 29-oveis. Whitaker made 11 1 not out in 
Harper " had - been Leicestershire's innings of 190 
Northamptonshire's best ‘ ‘ “ ‘ 

bowler. The fast medium bowl- 
ing ' of Fraser-Darling then 
proved to be too good for Geoff 
Cook. Larkins and Boyd-Moss. 


for four against Derbyshire at 
Chesterfield, yesterday. Derby- 
shire had declared overnight at 
their toial of 349^ lor nine. By 
lunch, when Leicestershire 


came m at 67 from 34 overs for 
the loss of Cobb and Potter, the 
batsmen ted had rather better 
luck than the bowlers- There 
had been rain here,too. and at 
lunch Leicestershire were 67 for 
two from 34 overs. Balderstonc 
24. Whitaker 13. 

Yorkshire had lost Moxon in 
making 8 1 off* 23 overs in the 
last passage at Headinghley, on 
Wednesday. In the morning 
yesterday, the advantages 
clearly belonged to the bowlers, 
and as Daniel and Hughes made 
the ball - move around. 
•Yorkshire’s batsmen were deep 
in trouble. Metcalfe, made one 
run before foiling leg before to 
Hughes, and he was the first of j 
five batsmen to foil to Daniel 
and Hughes for the addition of 
17 runs. Love inspired a recov- 
ery, though, and he had made 65 
not ont when Bairsiow declared 
at 216 for eighL 


YACHTING 

Night life 
a trial on 
the ocean 
wave 

ByBany Pickthafl 

Twenty-six crews competing 
i in the Threequaner Ton Cup at 
Torquay faced a miserable nkht 
at sea fast night, the discomfort 
of sitting on the weather rail to 
help balance their yachts made 
worse by a cold south-westerly 
wind and driving rain that 
would have ensured all were 
chilled to the bone by midnight. 

They are competing in the 
133-mile short offshore race 
which carries one and a half 
points towards the world 
championship but few relished 
the prospect when this fourth 
heal finally got under way at the 
third attempt yesterday 
morning. 

“It’s enough to make me want 
to take up caravaning as a 
sport." Graham Walker, skipper 
of the British yacht Indulgence, 
the points leader, said of the 
prospect and by this morning 
others will be wanting to agree 
with him. 

There was a time w hen racing 
yachts were designed for living 
on board and overnight races 
were a pleasure but today the 
rules favour lightweight day 
boats, not the crews that have to 
sail them. 

Mike Peackock’s Juno, 
steered by Andrew* Hurst, got 
theibesi of the start yesterday 
but halfway up the beach Niels 
Jeppeson's Danish challenger 
Frontrunner. Indulgence and 
DecosoL skippered by Robert 
Bottom ley. w hich so for have 
made this series their own. were 
fighting off a challenge from the 
German yacht Flurschaden for 
the lead at the initial weather 
mark. 

In the end Frontrunner lived 
up to her name, edging out 
Indulgence by a two-second 
margin. followed by 
Flurschaden and DecosoL and 
this group were last seen dis- 
appearing into the first rain 
squall as they led the fleet on a 
tight fetch towards the Skerries 
buoy off* Start Point. 

Brazilians 
finding 
their form 


\»i lu-wnts 


*D A Graveney c Flatcher b CWcte 

be« n 8 some debate in the g 0 'SSSUSmZZ=Z 

ranks, apparently, as to which extras z to in 

.end would prove more helpful - Total (56J owsi 
‘ 7 ’.io him. In the day's sixth over 
‘ Bain bridge moved out against 
him. played the ball down 
T-hard and jt spun back for East 
‘ ao bring off a stumping. Soon 
: 'afterwards Childs moved. back 




ESSEX: Fust tortnos 311 <D E £*« 82. P J 
Pnchard 65; C A Wash 6 tar 83). 

- Saoond tartfrns 

JP Stephenson c Lloyds o Graven ay 29 

DEEastnoiotrt 55 

OJ Pnchard c Russell b Graveney — S 

BR HanSe c Curran b Graveney 7 

A.W LBey not out 0 

Extras 2 

Total {3 wMs) 98 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-73- 2-78. JW 8 . 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE: F&st inrtngs 
P W Romanes c Prichard b Childs .-. 22 

KP Tomlins c East bCMds 43 

WCflussaBc Pnchard b Childs 9 

PBaartmctgest EastbCfato — 10 

A WStDvSdcAcfistob Childs 9 

KM Cunanc Stephenson bCWds 14 
“ ’ b Foster „ 52 

— 7 
_ 0 
_ 5 

— 0 
-12 

163 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-41. 2-61. 3-78. 4- 
95. 5-100, 6-137. 7-1S9. 8-159. 9-183. 10- 
183. 

Lever 6-2-19-0: Foster 1244-53-2: CWds 
22 - 6 - 68 - 8 ; AcfeB *- 0 - 8 - 0 ; Prinpta 12-2- 
32-0. 

Bonus points: Essex 6 . Gtoucester sh xe 5. 
Umpres: 0 Uoyd and N T Ptews. 


Qieers for man at the Oval 


TA CNTOS .Sussex, with nine 
first innings wickets in hand, are 
267 runs Behind Somerset. 

Again. 1 was greeted in the 
morning by the familiar BBC 
announcement that rain was 
spreading from the West but 
again, some sun was shining 
through my lonely Taunton 
room. Again, the weather took 
some trine to catch up with its 
forecast. 

We had no rain until nearly 
lunch time. By then, against 
Somerset's 333. Sussex had 
scored 66 for I. It was not. 
however, altogether a dull 
morning. Frqm time to time a 
cheer, assisted by transistors, 
reminded us of the progress of 
Botham at the Oval. 

During the afternoon the 


By Alan Gibson 

umpires still chatted between 
prolonged showers to go out and 
. inspect the wickeL But at four 
o’clock, when it was drizzling 
again, admitted there was no 
more chance of play. So again, 
today, it will be up to the 
ingenuity of the captains if they 
are lo comrive a finish. Fortu- 
nately. we have two ingenious 

SOMERSET: Fist Innings 

JG Wyatt Ibwb Jones 3 

•P M Roebuck c SpeigW bCM Weis 39 
N A F Biton b Jones 0 

I V a RtcflanJs tbw bC M Weis 41 

RJ Harden bPIgon 106 

V J Marks c Spe&it b C M WeSs 110 

IT Garde sub bftoxr 5 

J Gamer c Spegm b Pigott 0 

MD Harman not out 8 

N STeytor b Ptoort 12 

D J Foster bw 5 Pigott 0 

Extras (b 1 . to 2 . nb 41 -_7 

Total 333 

Score a: IDO overa: 282 tor 4. 


men available. But no amount 
of ingenuity, not even from the 
habitat of Rutherford and 
Leavis. or to name a respectable 
Cambridge man. Bernard Man- 
ning can prevent them spread- 
ing rain from the West, or more 
importantly, staying in the 
West. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-9. 2-9. 3-61. 4-108. 
5-295. 6-305. 7-305. 8-315. 9G33. 10-333. 
BOWLING: Jones 1 *-3-33-2: Ptoott 27a- 
4-81-5. C M Walts 31-4-77-3; N%s 28-5- 
760; G»oen *-1-130; Lenham 2-0-130; 
Sonbog 12-1-350. 

SUSSEX: Flrat tenrngs 

R I AiWian b Marks .7. 15 

A M Green not out 27 

-PWG Parker not ouL 19 

Extras (nb 5) ... S 

Total (1 vrirt. 17 overs) 66 

FALL OF WICKET: MS. 

Bonus points: Somerset 3. Sussex 1 . 
Umpires: C Cook and JW Holder. . 


Neal Freeman, disqualified by 
the Aron Yacht Club protest 
committee for hitting a mark 
daring the fourth race of the 
Laser UK championships, left 
the fust two places to Peter 
Tanscbeit and Ricardo London, 
of Brazil, both of whom are 
be ginning to show form after 
coming to terms with British 
conditions and gale starts (a 
Special Correspo n dent writes). 

The fifth race of the series was 
sailed in a dying southwest 
force 3. the 190-boat fleet-show- 
ing considerably more discipline 
after the previous day’s multiple 
protests. Chris Bridle led to the 
first mark followed by Peter 
TborWLof Sweden, bot by the 
end of the -first lap Frank Bleyer 
from West Germany led the fleet 
to finish first. 

Peter Tanscbeit u n pro v e d 
from fifth to second, a suf- 
ficiently good position to give 
him tire overall championship 
lead ahead of Andrew Brown, 
the former leader, with only one 
race to be sailed. 

RESULTS: teRMWaaNk 1. F (WQ) 
121715; 2 .P TmctNtt (Bra) 787; 3, M 
Budd (Mowtoo VCR 128124; 4, N Wtaon 

Wjr Lock) 122411 

St WiMfcidm Road, U Ma la utotou . 

Wi * 



•: ■- '• 



YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


Northants v Notts 

AT NORTHAMPTON 
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE: F rat Innings 

BC Broad tow b N G B Cook 

M Newel b Harper 


Unlucky 13: Martin Oowe yields to Dflfcy yesterday (Photograph: Hugh Kentledge) 


P Johnson cG Cook b Harper 24 

’JO Birch cVWdb Harper 3 

D W Rtoxtafl c Ripley b WaBw —i. 5 

tC W Scon bw b Harper 40 

C Fraser-Daring b Waiter 61 

K P Evans c Baley b Maflander 1 

E E Hammings tow b Cape! 31 

KSaxatijv not out 16 

J A Afford Ibwb Cape! 4 

Extras (D 4. to 7, w 1 . nb 1 0) 22 

Total 328 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-77. 2-108. 3-126. 4- 

137. 5- 178. 6-231. 7-264. 3584. 9-320, 10- 
328. 

BOWLING: Maflendar 25-4-81-1; Capal 

3 1. 5 - 9 - 84 -£ Waflcar Z2-6-55-2: WtcTZo- 
21-0: Harpar 29-12-50-4; N G B Cook 13- 
5-26-1. 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE: first Inotogs 

•CCookcBirchbFraser-Oertnq 3 

W Larkina e Evans b Frasar-Oaring ... 2 
R J BoyO-Moss Ibw b Frasar-Dstng _ 9 

R J Batfey not out 87 

DJ Capal b 8 asratoy 17 

DJ wide and bFrasar-Dflifing 12 

R A Harpar e Bacli b Sax^by 4 

♦DHjpteycSeoBDriaiarntetog . — 1 

NG B Cook not out 10 

Extras fc 4 . to 5. w 1 . nb 3) 13 

Tola) (7 wkts, 50 Q vara) — 158 
NAMaHenderandAWaSwtobaL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-8. 3-31, 4-66, 
543. &•» 7-112. 

Bonus pants: Northamptonshire 4, Not- 
tinghamshire 5. 

Urrpm; J H Hampshtoe and R A White. 

Yorks v Middlesex 

AT HEADiNGLEY 

MIDDLESEX: First tomnas 252 [W N Stock 
105 not out S J Denns 5 for 71, S D 
Fletcher 5 for 90) 

TORKS WRE first Innings 

M D Moxon e Carr b Daniel 5 

A a Metcalfe bwb Hughes 39 

S N Hanley b Daniel 39 

P E Rotxnson c Carr b Hughes — 0 

JDLDverxaout 85 

P Came* tow b Daniel 5 

I G SwbSow c Downton b Hughes 0 

TOLBairejow tow b Huskies — 42 

S J Demxs c Darnel b Rose.— 4 

C Shaw notout 7 

Extras |b 2.k>S nb3) ..JJO 
Total <8 wiae dec. 89 overa) — 216 
S D Ftetcner not bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14. 2-84. 3-88. 4. 
92. 5-97. 6-98. 7-193. 8-206. 

BOWLING- Oenlel 17-9-334: Hughes 34- 
10-92-4; Rose 18-2-34-1 
Bonus poms: Yorksrare 6 . Middlesex 6 . 
Umpres; J A Jameson and R Julian. 

Minor Counties 

Torquay: comwafl 165 (E G waieoek 73; 
PGCotftina five tor 81) art 13 for one: 
Devon 151 tor tour dac (N R Gaywood 77) 
Match drawn. 


Lancashir e v Glam 

atlytham 

LANCASHIRE: First Innings 192 p Abra- 
hams 99). 

GLAMORGAN: Rrst innings 

*H Moms C Chadwick b MaWnson 0 

J A HopWns c Simmons b Foley _ — 38 

A L Jones tow b Simmonds 35 

G C Holmes c CtiaowsA b Simmons .. 19 

M P Maynard b Fofley 4 

R C Ontong c and b Simmons 28 

J Demok c site b Foley 0 

IT Davies tow bFoUey — 

P D North not out 

S R Berwick not out — 

Extras (b 1. b6. * 1) ... 


Garcia shows 
his authority 

With the wind' rising to a good 
force four and in driving rain. 
Xavier Garcia (Spain), the 
reigning world champion, had 
to fight hard to record his 
second win of the week, in race 
five of the International Op- 
timist Dinghy championships 
sailed on Plymouth Sound from 
the Mayflower Sailing Gub (a 
Special Correspondent writes). 
The powerful Spanish contin- 
icnt relished the stronger winds, 
>ui Tony Gunstone (Bewl Val- 
ley SO held Garcia ail the way 
to finish a second, with Richard 
Pye (Dray cote Water SC), an- 
other British helm, third. 

In race six, sailed immedi- 
ately afterwards, and again in 
heavy rain, Garcia asserted bis 
skill and sailed right away from 
the fleet 

RESULTS: FWh me* I.XGaietotSp): 2.T 
Gunstone (Bewl Vtofc^SC): SLJT Pye 


TENNIS 


Crisis building up 
. over pension 
plan for players 


By Richard Evans 

Harold Solomon, one of the for 
most militant and experienced 
members of the Association of 
Tennis Professionals board of 
directors, was still denying yes- 
terday that the rumoured sack- 
ing of Mike Davies, cxecuthe 
director, was a fait accompli. 

Nevertheless, there is no 
doubt that men’s professional 
tennis is heading for what could 
turn into the biggest crisis since 
the ATP boycott of Wimbledon 
in 1973. 

The issue, which was first 
revealed in these columns as 
long ago as last January, centres 
on the players' demand for 
Grand Slam funding for a 
proposed pension plan. In other 
wools, the ATP wants some of 
the huge profits being realized at 
Wimbledon, the French and US 
Opens and. to a much lesser 
extent the Australian Open, to 
be pui towards a pension fund 
for all those lesser players who 
do not become Bcckcr and Borg- 
stvle millionaires. 

"This is not an attempt to 
make rich playere richer** said 
Matt Doyle, the tow-ranked 
Irish American who was re- 
elected to the ATP presidency at 
a meeting in Cincraatii this 
week. “But we insist that it is 
perfectly reasonable for the big 
championships which rely on 
the rank and file to make up 
their 128-man draws to contrib- 
ute towards their future 
security." 

Davies' job has been put in 
jeopardy because, in the view of 
Solomon. Ray Moore. Mike 
Estep and Doyle, the former 
British Number One has not 
been sufficiently hard-nosed 
with the Grand Slam tour- 
nament chairman over the pen- 
sion issue. In particular there 
was unhappiness at his perfor- 
mance when Doyle and three 
other members of his board 
lunched with Buzzer 
Hadingham. the All England 
club chairman, during Wimble- 
don. Like his other Grand Slam 
colleagues. Hadingham has been 
unmoved by the ATP demands. 

As Solomon, in cahoots with 
Cliff Drysdalc, was responsible 


ousting Butch Buchltolz, 
Davies’ predecessor, there is no 
doubt about the Board's ability 
to gel rid of people who do not 
do thrir bidding. 

However, in Davies’ case 

there are practical problems 

such as his $ I Sfl.Onfl (£‘>8.0001 a 
year coturacl which sull has IS 
months to run and the fact that 
he is chairman of Ihe Pro 
Council. Davies uus elected 
chairman of the nine-man 
governing body, of which three 
scats arc held b> ATP members, 
last year and ean legal h remain 
in the chair until mid-I^ST 

The word “hoscmi” has not 
been pan of the ATP lexicon 
after the upheaval ejuxed in 
1073 hut there* are now dark 
rumours circulating about the 
threat to down rackets on ihe 
middle Sunday of the L'S Open 
which starts in New \ urk next 
Tuesday. 

If nothing else the very 
suggestion of a boycott will 
bring home to Randy Gregson. 
the USTA president and the 
other Grand Slam chairman, 
lhal ihe ATP ate sets serious bn 
this issue and that their wishes 
air not totally unreasonable. 
Whether or not Da v ics surv is es 
to lead the fight, one thing seems 
certain: Boris Becker’s booming 
serve is not going to he the only 
explosive sound in the game m 
the coming weeks. 


MASON. OlH» ATP CtuwipHMMlvp Second 
rouM XI IVviodtv I {Wi M r*. 

* 7 !• iC.-iO > ■* ’ n -J 

Ti IitVIi) >&MI PI S CV'if-i-n ilir ■ i ; ■ j 

NvOicifli |F.*ol Dl P Mr* I'jfli |.p 6-4 6.' U 
Pl-piIcts |£m> 1 tx kJ hL<m*“. 0-.' i- ' 15-I 

E SVKlW.' W C Sh\Ti ,-vS< U r f> 3 K 
C.ni i'.IA:n'Mn,v,v'iu i)l 4 J 

Hta'C* IlL-i PI J iU-jl I s -.’ P 4 C .ji 
Rm'-curg / .uii niMhi^r ,usi t J »• h 3 r 
WAu-api iU;:i m j tu.Tjin .u .i ■ fK. : k 
Cuupn iltSi M H >WS]iKe lU’ii I n a J : t D 
PjWlUElWSCoM'lJ-PIf-iirr HiVijfVn .1 
I An)* PI H SrtMnon IU1.I l< 1 ■r-.l i f-vr-P' .m 
iSneHMl DPi3iViL':i 

D! M F lepm-pi |US-l b-4 6-0 J C .imr» IL 1 i 'Ll M 
Funttl l US* 54 7-6 

MAMWAH. Now Jrrwy lAutad Jonov Bonk 
Classic wwnon's DumomonC Socontt 
round' M Guwt-v illS> M I' Ui'jrj u iDrj 6 - 

3 4-6 6 2. B While iUSi oi -i XllV-Ch iU:M 6 - 

4 5-' M 5a*a Oon'ii iCDi pi U Bo**- , iUSi 
MWfr. 1 * Mpiprjn iU'.-iW i PuOV^ j iC.-i 
526-2 JDufrf'iGB) Pi MF c i*' D 
Bau-ni4i iAuw w C JpIim.i«i iScii.-i 6-4 o-.’ 
NV.in Noslrai».liUSi W A l.'rm-.njn iH^l VC 
ICI. C Tonvii'l ifl I M N rjUf'JI |Ff I ?•> y-7 6 - ’ 
H bl*crj (Cmx D Vjn Rrn'.pui^ i SAi fell n. 
I.EflcinachlSAIWSRinjl-tilUjlO > 5 - 7 u-l 


BOWLS 


Thomson trimmed by 
persistant Hedges 

By Gordoo Allen 

Roy Hedges, of Bristol beat field, of Norfolk, and 21-9 over 


14 

— 17 

— a 

— 8 


(Spy. berth race 1. Gam: 2 . Subnts: 3. 
Pye: 4. CBy; 5. F Btencte (Bowl Vstoy 
SC): 6 . D Baksr (Frampton SC). Ovorafc T. 
Guwtono 9pts; 2, Pye 25^.- 3 Gorca 27. 


.Andy Thomson, the 1981 cham- 
pion at 21-5 in the second round 
of the Gateway English Bowling 
Association singles as the rain 
set in al Worthing yesterday. 
Thomson has not been having a 
good year — remember the 
Commonwealth Games? — and 
Hedges is as shrewdly persistant 
player as can be found 
anywhere. 

Hedges, an indoor inter- 
national in the seventies, gained 
early control of the mat and 
never lost iL He preferred a 
medium length but bowled well 
enough to a four length jack on 
the odd occasion it was re- 
quired. In foct. he gained his two 
winning shots when he trailed a 
maximum jack. The previous 
end had been tied — a compar- 
ative rarity in singles. 

Cliff Simpson who won the 
pairs title on Wednesday lost 21- 
19 to David Taylor of Carlisle. 
Simpson scored three shots to 
lead Taylor 19-18, but Taylor 
scored three on the next end to 
win. Simpson, who maintains 
he does not care for the singles 
game, last qualified for Wor- 
thing in 1979 when he went out 
in the first round. 

Wynne Richards, the 1983 
champion, advanced to the first 
round beating Simon Davies 
(Welfond on Avon) 21-15 and 
Jock Lana who played for 
England 30 years ago. 21-11. 
Tony Aiieock. another leading 
light, beat Steve Halmai 21-9 
and Dave Kemp (Bacton 
Stowmarkei) 21-12. Kemp plays 
the Federation code and so does 
Brian Thorpe, of Otiey. a village 
near Ipswich. Thorpe led Dave 
Rutter, a Cambridgeshire player 
from Christchurch 17-7, but the 
rest of the match turned into the 
victory procession by Runer to 
win 21-19. 

Eric Parsons, who played on 
the wing for Chelsea when they 
won the league championship in 
1953, had two wins on his home 
green: 21-19 over Mike Shing- 


Jim Simmonds. of North- 
amptonshire. Keith Hawes, 
whose wife Lorraine plays for 
England, and Alan Jeffery, from 
'the Isle of Wight, made solid 
progress to beat Tony Holliday 
21-15. 

RESULTS: Fhst imMD McCattM (Essex 
County) 22. K Maddodis (Derby West 
End). 6 ; P Towers (UsKeato) 22. T 
Andrews (Amptefl. Beds), is. A Jattenr 
(ShsnMn. I0W) 22, W C Jonss (Hereford) 
11; A HoflUxy fBtfom. Kara) 21. T 
Emmons (Tosco. Harts). Z E Parsons 
(Wonting) 21. M StungfoU (Hmgnam, 
Rec, Norfolk). 19. J Simmonds 
(Tnrapsion, Nonhants) 22. A Ratcktte 
(Wmscornbe. Somerset). 8 . D Denson 
(Newton Abbot) 21. K Davies (Rainworm. 
Notts) 17: D Holt (Bolton. Lancs) 21. P 
McGianness (Denham, Bucks) 7. A 
AllCOCk (Che#enh 3 m) 2 ). S Hahnai 
(Raddmgtpn. Middx). 9: D Kemp (BacLtor. 
SuftoHc)22. D Dawson (Atoen Park. Yorks) 
6 . W Hicnanfc (Mid Surreyi 31. S Dawes 
(WMtord on Avon) 15. B Thorpe (CWey. 
SuftolM 22. M Powe* (Heralordl 6 . 0 
Ruttei (Ctvstdiuai. Cams) 2t. T Chap- 
man (Henwtgtord. Hunts) 10. L East 
(Desborougn. Berks) 2i. J Southgate 
(Newmarket Ave. Cams). 16: G Burgess 
(County Groimd. Worcs) 21 . p Smoen 
(Wessex. Dorsen. 17; P Metcalfe (Swm- 
ton. Yorks) 2t. B Wckscn iPress Steel 
Fisher, Oxon). 17. D Shearer (Kern 
AThletics, Beds) 22. P Butler 
(Soutttooiene. Sussex). 13: A Thomson 
(Btackneam and Greenwich. Kent) 21, J 
Garrett (Sphflx. Wanwcxsi. 8 ; R Hedges 
(Bristol Somerset) 21. C Baker (Cows, 
Medina IOW), IS: M Himhes (%ston. 
Leas) 21. T Wxson (Filing SooaL 
Donum). 20: R Robertson (Monks Road 
WMC. Laics) 21. M Stratton (Perkins 
Engines. Hunts). 10: A Smith (Arda^i. 
Gkxics) 21. J Searle (Greentnk, Dorset). 
18: A Nhnmo (T/e Green. Essex) 2l, R 
Burch (Madeira. Devon). 18. S Ogrivle (St 
Georges Hasp. Nontuurtbi 21 , R Bennett 
(Looohfwougtr. Laics). 8 : P Hobday 
(Atexandra. Harts) 21 . E RawcMte (South- 
oort. Lancs), 15. E Dayus (Worcs Coop) 
D Han (WL MdBX). % A Moore 


(HPL. M 
[Spencers. Moksha 
Richardson (Aylesbury Town. Bucks). 17: 
K Hawes (Bracknek. Berks) 21 P 
Gould rtt (Ptessw. Notts). 12; J Hopkm- 
son (A&reron Traders. Derby) 2l. J 
Woreoale (Roebuck. Herts). 9; C 
SompsonJOwton Lodge. Durham)21. H G 
Roach [Stenatees. Comwa«). 9: D Taylor 
[BR. Cumbna) 21 . A Bedy (Mail Carr. 
Spalding). 12. Second round: Towers 21. 
McCatme 19: Jetfery 21 . Hoi way 15. 
Burgess 21. East 9: Parsons 21. 
Skiunonds Sk Denison 2i. Hon 8 . Adcock 
21. Kemp 12; Richards 21 . Laito ii. 
Robertson 21. Hughes 13. Rutter 2i. 
Thome 19; Metcaiio 21, Smith 17; Nimmo 
21. Nearer 13. Hedges 21. Thomson 5: 
Ogdne 21 . Hobday 1 f: Moore 21 . Dayus 7. 
Hawes 21. Hopkmson IS: Taylor 21. 
Smpeon 19 


Total (8 wfrts. 67 overs) 184 

OJ Hickey to baL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0.2-70, 3-94. *-9*. 
5-1 14. 6-1 14, 7-144. 8-144. 

Bonus potms: Gtamorgen 5. Uncasfkre 4. 
to date. 

Umpires; B J Meyer end R Palmer. 

Hampshire y Worcs 

AT BOURNEMOUTH 
HAMPSHIRE: first Innings 237 (V P Terry 
74c PJ Newport S tot 74)7 

WORCESTERSHIRE: First Innings 

LK Smith cPwteb Marshal.. 2 

TS Curtis b James — -^.—33 

SM McEwsn c forty b Marshall 7 

G S Hick c Parks b Marshal „™,0 

D B D'OTiuiera c James b Connor 8 

’P A Neale c Terry b Maru B 

D N Pate) c Paras b James 28 

MJ Wwttn not Out — 7 

TSJ Rhodes c Parks b Maru — , M ,.9 

PJ Newport not OUt 0 

Extras (lb 4, nb 4} _8 

Total (8 wkts. 47 own) 104 

APPridgeonttbBL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-16, 3-16, 4-0). 
5-45. 6-85. 7-92. 8-103- 
Bonus prints: Hampshire 5. Worosstar* 
shire 4. 

Umpires: M J Khtoren and K J Lyons. 

Derbyshire ? Leics 

■ ATCHBTBTFEUJ 
DERBYSHIRE: First tnntngg 378 tor 9 dec 
(A E Warner 91. J E Worm 62. A M 56; 
BOWLING: Taylor 24-7-57-3; De Freitas 
31-6-1002; Be^amin 202-700; Agnew 
34-8-133-3: Potter 1-04-0). 

LEICESTERSHIRE: Frat innings 
•JCBaldarstonec Maher bUonenssn 29 

R A Cottoc Barnett bfinney 24 

L Potter tow b Finney — i 

J J Whitaker no! out Ill 

T J Boon b W&ner 6 

P Bowler not out 7 

. Extras (02.10 4. wl.no 5) ._12 

Total (4 wkis. 70 overs) 190 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-39. 251, 3-121, 4- 
162. 

Second XI 

HINCKLEY: LNceStershh’* 60 iC F B D 
Rudd five tor UJ and 168 (Rued lour "tor 
59). Derbyshire 145 (M I GkSey five tor 59. 
N J Prmgle tour tor 19) and 64 tor one. 
i won by raw wfckats. 


FOOTBALL 


INTERNATIONAL MATCHES: FMtno 1. EM 
Germany 0; Sweden a Sown Unon 0. 
UTTERNATTONAL TOURNAMENTS: BMCeto- 
n: Font: Bareetona 1. PSV Etokwo 
OTM rd place piay-oft: Tottenham Hotsnr 2 
iFaeo. Mabtxmj. AC M*an 1. Zortelt Fkat 
Zurich Grassjoppera 3. AS Roma 1. PNy-efl 
Nr third pMa: Bayem Munch 1. Rumnense 
0 

EXHIBITION MATCH: BoafDTOfBhO. NapOB 
CZECHOSLOVAK LEAOU&Ptestka NSn 2. 
Sonenwns Prague 3: DufcJa Prague O.Soara 

Prague 5. Bank Ostrava 4. Tatran Preaov i ; 
Stawa Prague 2. ZVL tohna ft BH Cheb 2. 
DAC Dunatska Stress 1: Dynamo Cseke 
Budspnee l. spanak Tmawa Or Sigma 
Oiomouc 1. OiAla Banska Syrova 2. Skoda 
Pttenl.TJViftowcen 
SKOL CUP- Secant round: Aberdeen 4. auob 
0. Alcwn 2. Forfar 2 (am. score after so 
<nmu»e 1-1. Forfar won 3-1 on oenafWS): 
Cette 2. Airdrie ft C^oeOMk 3. Sr Jomstone 
0. Diantanon 1. Snrang 0: Duntennkne 0. Si 
Mcren ft Henan t. Earn Sen to 0: 
Ktettmockl. Ayr 2. Wcoon 2. Dundee Siam, 
score attar 90 rrWxrtes2-2). Mstnerwex 4. 
Artjraam ft PM 0. Eaw FUa l : Queen of tea 
Souto 0. Dundee urwee 1: Sanncxaamtr 1. 
Rangers* 

OTHER MATCH: NOttmgham Forest 0 Mos- 
cow Torpedo i 

BUSH LEa3i£: Gksnwan 0. Royal Utsar 
ConsUtMiy 0. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE : BM DaBow Cup: Fw« 
rani' Aheenutth 1. Rerkktcn 1: Camtnoge 
Coy l. Cnebnstord i Owsrabie 0. woodtord 
D Mte Oak 2. Sunon CckKeid V. Shapdnd 
Charterhouse 1. VS Rugby 0 
VAUXHALL-QPB, LEAafe S ecoAd to wai e n 
north: CtXfiw Row 1. Aveiey 1. Seoontf 
dknalan eouttc FWtam ft Mtoesey 0. 
PrtwslwM 2. Horsham 7. RuEfo Manor 2. 
Soutnali 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE. Premier dhrf- 
start Eogwara 2. HanweK 1. Pennant 2. 

hauS'h&lemc league. Praotar raw- 
fcoru Atwoeon Unaed 3. Thame a Faxtord 5 
Pegasus Jumora 3 Hte*sitee l. ftaynera 
LaneftMaeon l. Abnooon Town 2. Moms 
Mcacn 3 Btcaswr o. Supemrome ft 
Shorwood 3. WaUngtom 1. Vitwg Sports ft 
Wamuei Pemi '■ 

GM VaUXHALL COWERENC& Kmamg 
Tom Z Barn ft Maame Lkwea i 
weuattone ‘ft Norfhwttn t Fnefctay 1. 
ScwooreupnO BoaonO 
MULTIPMT LEAGUE: Bangor Cay a teflon 
l Rhyl 0. Souttwl 9- South Lwerpooi.l. 
MoreeamO* 1. WorWngttm 0. Hrawcft ft 
wonoopt). Qansoorougn* 


FOR THE RECORD 


JAKARTA: Independence Cupe Atoena 

l.indoneMO 

SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: Fk* dntatan: 
Peaeenaven and Tescomoe i. Easmome 
Town 1. Shoraram 0. Lmtanampton D 


EQUESTRIANISM 


SWIMMING 


MAMD: World Cta 


en*a 


Patton*. pre Xp ifc u My rouod; (top 12 qualify 
lor that)- 1. tin Chen (Ctwa) 41*90; ft A 
LateeAnt (USSRl 40824; 3. W WytaM. (US) 
40557. 4. M Mdchett (US) 39936. S. 1 Kovara 
(Ron) 385.77. 6. A Stasidewch IUSSR)381 6ft 
7 lu Ww (Crwu) 372.48: 8. V Beoooe (Au&l 
371.4ft 9 K tiKBtmm (EG) 367.44. 10 8 
kjjwr (EG) 3BS.p: 11 H Novotna (fa) 
35044. IP. 0 Filler (Can) 35661 GB 


WESTON: Pony Club National 

ChampioneNp:-lkahatiu OraeMoe Chanea- 
onaNp: 1 Nortfi WofliSV 870. 2 New Forte.i 
860.3 WytypVMn 644 Junior Individuals: 
t M Pnesi <5ou»i Durhsmi 763. 3 C Bowk’v 
lOucvnl 7Sa 3. C Omen (New Fo>eatP ?bb 
Townaand Tharanaen Showjumpwg Cham- 
plonaMpa: Meyned wen by 3 ol .1 second 
irom me Lunsnck alter a dourtt dear round 
Idlowed tw a lump t>W- 3 West Kent 
Meootiam 3 Penates Horeamananra warn 
■ward. Meytiett. tndMdual. C Brawn i Mrvrwui 
SanurMHMualch»nptoA;5 KaBard(G>OM 
Hum) 51 pa 


GUDING 


ttmgary n-6: AusrM bt Canada 9-6 Piay- 
tof tor teyantfi to ninth ptaeea: Norway to 
Bergnan 10-9 

(ftoHim tor huh): hoc 400 nanra 
traeatyta: R Henkel (WG) Snun 5288sec. K 
Bo«JiGB)3 53 1ft D JofMftsan fUS)3 5361. 
V Smjaov (USSR) 35362, F tonne |F0 
853 76. U OoBStar (EG) 354 7ft Sven 
Lodnewski (EG) 3-54 79. P Anders H camera 
(Swe)355.14. Non-ouaShers tactuded: T Day 
(GB) 3-5947: M tM* (ke) 4:1292. 2&0 
meter s braaatsMke: J Szaho (Huni ftwi 
l730sec. S Bentley (US) 2.1788: V Davis 
(Cam 2.18 45. T Pan (Fr) £ i9 16: A Yokocm 
(Port) 2:1927. P Restrepo (Coll M958 A 
Moomouse (GBl 2 10 6ft H Wedekoxl (WG) 
220n 4 x 100 Bmam freestyle relay; East 

Germany 321.44 US 32223. WBU Gwmany 
32234 Sonet linen 323B5. Sweden 
323 12. AusVaka 32338: Naflerlands 
32355: Franca 32*3& Woman: IMniatan 
bmstsirak* T Bogomkwa IBtol 108 77 
(wtrti cnamporahte racom S Hoamer (EG) 
1 09.*ftSG»aStti(£6l 1 1035 iLempnew 
(Beq 1-10 82 A HtosoniCan) 1.11 15.Moai 
Va#e fill 1 11.97 J Hai fu&l 1.11.83. C 
Ounuu (Cam l il 1-SpL SOO meters auaDfiera 
K Hartmann (EG) 6.36 99. S Hwocasae igbi 
837 *5^Baoasn«i(USl 83959 A Srauss 
l£GJ 83862. J McDonald (Aus) 844 85 S 
Pura iRomi B46J8 J ean Meer (Netn) 
8*667 TBnjceiUS]84855 


SPEEDWAY 

BRITSH LEAGUE: Raateng 36. Wafvemamp.' 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: Long Eaton 45. Exanr 
32 nhmt)iBdcn44. Rye iSimH. 


DUNSTABLE: Dey tour.uik 2Sft4km triangle 
to Banbury and Bury Si Edmund* (39 
atarfaraJS hnnhersi i. A ftm Dncuc 
97 tSkph ipOOpta. 2. B Benorai DCkSOO 
WJ9*pn55Spis 3. C Garlon. pecu-, 
g239inanS27DU- 4 S wnuBPMasiA 101 
9i 93k pn 970 ms. 5M Wells L& 91 OLpn 
90rpt5. Omaf; 1. Wan 3»94 2 wnu 2Jb3 
a^WB2421. 4. Campbell 2316 5 GMeunta 

~ HORSE TRIALS 

JAGUAR PONY CLUB CHAMPIONSHIP; 
Teem rexutta: i. North Wanucksnee 150 S (J 
Scon. S Pen C Baanmafl. T Reeve) ?. n 
H erefent 161.5; 3 Vats of Aytaseurv. 199. 4. 
Naagn. 2065. 5. Brockfesby. 207 5 6 
NewnuifeBi and Thutow. 208.5. Juntar Mi- 
jduatctw m plo nal i ipi Wtonara; Seettan A; T 
Reevn (N Wanecks). 435. Sacbon a k 
Wytoew (Ctxddngfau farmer’ll 4? 5 Sec- 
Ben CsSPemiNVVarwska). 45 5 Section D: 
B CuMt iBrastei), 49 


Old parade 

The leading 16 Welsh dubs 
take pan in ihe Snelling 
Sevens tournament at the 
Rodney Parade ground. New- 
port tomorrow. Newport, who 
w on the trophy Iasi year for a 
record tenih lime, have a first- 
round tie against iheir old 
rivals. Cardin; 


r 


\ 






30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 22 1986 


Arsenal expect a return to the good times as yesterday’s hero faces his toughest challenge 


J 

s 

ic 

IV 

d- 

n 

ft 

l\ 

c 

n- 

rt 

at 

\i 

0 

ll 

It 

rr 

T 

w 

rr 

li 

Ic 

Y 

P 

H 

O' 

T 
1 Y 
u 
fr 
if 
a 
ai 
at 

1 

T 

Vi 

in 

ai 

in 

le 

il- 

d' 

“i 

cr 

le 

pi 

ta- 

ll- 

w 

R 

ir 

P* 

lL 


i o 
« . 


I - 
i v 


*- 
i * 


Cautious Graham will 
build for the future 


The League Championship was 
last won by a London club 
1 5 years ago when Arsenal 
clinched the League and 
FA Cup double. In the last 
of a four-part series David 
Miller talks to the man whose 
task is to bring the title 
back to Highbury. 

P ut yourself to the test. Try to 
recall the names of the Arsenal 
team which won the League 
Championship and FA Cup dou- 
ble IS years ago — the last time 
the dub won the League title. Unless you 
are an Arsenal supporter, it is probable that 
you can better remember those of the Spurs 
team which achieved the same feat 10 years 
earlier. Arsenal were not a widely loved 
team, for the reason that they were built 
around efficiency rather than 
entenainmenL- 

On the evening after the World Cup 
Final in 1 966. 1 chanced to meet Bertie Mee 
in a West End hotel and asked his opinion 
of the match. He had just succeeded Billy 
Wright at Highbury. “Not a bad spectators' 
match." he said a shade dismissive!^, as if 
to suggest he would not be designing his 
team exclusively for the benefit of the 
Highbury season ticket holders. We were 
moving into the era of functionalism, of 4- 
3-3 formations. 

When Arsenal clinched the double at 
Wembley, coming from behind in extra- 
time against Liverpool to win with a 
memorable goal from Charlie George, their 


formation was Wilson in goal, a rearguard 
of Rice, McUmock. Simpson and McNab 
behind a midfield of Storey (replaced by 
Kelly), Graham, George and Armstrong, 
with Radford and Kennedy as the front 
runners. And the man of the match? It was 
that elegantly precise Jeeves of the turf, 
who delivered the ball toTiis colleagues on a 
silver salver, George Graham. It -is to 
Graham that the club has now turned for a 
manager in the hope of recapturing that 
championship which has eluded London 
clubs since they themselves last won it. 

“The feet is,” Graham reflects with a wry 
smile, "that if Arsenal had a bad match, I 
was usually the one who was dropped. It 
happened to me at most clubs!” While 

Storey went around mugging the oppo- 
sition and George was the erratic darling of 
the terraces, Graham was the calm, 
intelligent voice of the team. 

It lends to be overlooked that Graham 
scored a goal every other game in 72 
appearances with Chelsea and then 60 goals 
in his 227 matches for ArsenaL Sub- 
sequently he moved to Manchester United, 
Portsmouth and Crystal Palace. It was, 
coincidentally, with Palace under the 
management of Terry Venables, who was 
controversially linked with the Arsenal 
vacancy after the dismissal of Don Howe 
last spring, that Graham's managerial ideas 
look shape. Venables reinforced the opin- 
ion that it was not necessary to have 
famous names to play effective football. 

“If you look at the Arsenal side oF7] and 
the Everton team that won the League two 
years ago,” Graham says, “you find that 
neither of them had more than three 
players who at that time bad international 
caps.” 

He likes-to think that he will justify his 
somewhat surprising appointment having 
arrived back at Highbury after three-and-a- 
haff years of steady but relatively un- 



•*. A 

Cup of. joy: Graham (left) joins die celebrations after Arsenal's 1971 FA Cup win 


propitious management of inner-city 
MHIwalL in the manner of Howard 
Kendall: a similarly studious former 
midfield player who went to Everton from 
the second division with Blackburn. Gra- 
ham took Millwall from near-relegation in 
the third division to ninth last season in the 
second. 

With Millwall, he says, he learned to 
organize and delegate. “Without being 
pushy, I think I'm ready for the job at 
Highbury. The media have built up the 
pressure that's now on me and 1 admit I 
thought Arsenal would go for someone 
bigger. I didn't think I had any chance, but 
there are not a lot of managers around with 
a track record.” 

Alex Ferguson was offered the post, I 
understand, but was at the time unsure 
about his own intentions. It could be seen 
as a sign of Graham's temperamental 
stability that, with all the expectation 
which he inevitably now shoulders, he has 
so far not bought a single player, eschewing 
the common display of instant action. 


Efficiency most 
come first 


Again he refers to Kendall and the initial 
inexpensive purchase at Everton of men 
such as Van den Hauwe, Reid, Sheedy and 
Sharp. 

“Eventually, it win be my squad at 
Highbury ” be says, “but for the moment 
I'll wait to see how things develop. 

“It's an old adage that when a dub is not 
getting where it wants, either the manager 

Don Howe, having played for him, but a 
change of personality and ideas may itself 
produce a difference. Like him, I aim to be 
a coaching manager.” 

Where, everyone will want to know, win 
Graham place the balance between func- 
tionalism and entertainment? He is 
unhesitating. 

“The first quality in a team has to be 
efficiency,'' he says. “After establishing 
that you hope to add flair. There is a 
limited future for a dub as big as Arsenal 
. being attractive but in the middle of the 
table. I agree that in *71 we were not always 
attractive but the team had all the qualities 
that foreign teams admire about the 
British, fitness, resilience and the will to 
win, qualities which make our televised 
football so popular with other countries. 

My job is to find the bafl-playing qualities 
to add to that.” 

The alternative policy to Graham’s, of 
course, is to find attractive players and 
make them efficient, but there are not too 
many talented players available. His 





The big gun: George Graham — out to make his name in tine hallway of fame 


prediction will sound to some like a 
formula for the same Highbury pattern but 
Graham is optimistic that he has inherited 
some good young players: such as Adams, a 
central defender who may keep Caton out 
of the team — “Hell be better in time than 
Butcher” —and Quinn, a big Dublin boy, in 
attack. 

This will be. I suspect, a make or break 
autumn at Highbury for Rix and Williams 
in midfield. Rjx should have matured after 
replacing Brooking in the 19S2 World Cup 
side — but did not Williams has to prove 
he can adapt to Graham's new directions, 
but his temperament does not suggest he 
wilL 


For the moment, there is always Nicho- 
las. “He made his reputation with Celtic up 
front and that's where he win be now” 
Graham says. “He has not anywhere near 
fulfilled his reputation.** If Nicholas can do 
. that, it will help make Graham's reputation 
but the new manager will not panic. 

“I don’t think the directors are impatient 
enough to be putting any sort of time limit 
on me,” Graham says. “Of course Til gel 
stick while I’m building. But I'm not going 
to rush.” More famous managers than he 
have taken the same objective approach. It 
will be an exceptional achievement if he 
can shift some of the power in the game 
bade to the south. 


FOOTBALL 


Welsh ‘misunderstanding’ over £3m Rush cover 


Liverpool are asking the 
Welsh Football Association to 
provide insurance cover of £3 
million when Ian Rush, their 
star forward, plays international 
games. But the dub's chief 
executive, Peter Robinson, has 
acted quickly to clear up a 
“misunderstanding” — that the 
cover was for temporary as well 
as permanent injury. 

Alun Evans, the Welsh FA 
secretary, said in Cardiff yes- 
terday that he was concerned 
that the governing body’s insur- 
ance brokers would have to pay 
out £3 million per week in the 
event of Rush being injured 
playing for Wales. He claimed 
that a letter from Liverpool gave 
the impression that the cover 
was required for “permanent 
and temporary disablement”. 


Mr Robinson said: “We re- 
ceived a letter from the Welsh 
FA asking us for the transfer 
value of lah Rush and we "have 
quoted a figure of about £3 
million. There is no question of 
them paying us £3 million a 
week as cover if Rush is injured 

— it's all a misunderstanding.” 

This will come as a big relief 


the first division newcomers, at 
Maine Road. 

• Luton Town's goalkeeper. 
Andy Dibble, yesterday asked to 
be put on the transfer list 
because be is unhappy at being 
out of their first division team. 
“I think I can {day for Wales if I 
am in regular League football 

and being in the reserves is no 

to tire hard-ujTwdsh FA, ‘who * good to me,” jaidDibWe, who 
are feeing large insurance pre- Luton £150,000 from Car- 


mi urns for stars of the calibre of 
Rush, who is on loan to Liver- 
pool from Juventus, Barcelona's 
Mark Hughes and Everton's 
Neville Southall. 

• Manchester City have agreed 
to pay Birmingham City 
£120,000 for Richard Hopkins. 
The winger will make his debut 
tomorrow against Wimbledon, 


diff two years ago. His request 
will be considered by Luton 
directors. 

• Chariton Athletic and Shef- 
field Wednesday, who meet 
tomorrow at Seihurst Park, 
yesterday agreed to cut out the 
middle men in the move of 
Peter Shirtliff from Wednesday 
to Chariton. The clubs were 
poised to let an independent 


tribunal settle the fe&but today 
they agreed a price of £125,000 
for the foil back, so they will not 
need the tribunal. 

Shirtliff will make his 
Charlton debut against his for- 
mer dub but Bob Bolder, the 
former Wednesday goalkeeper, 
is likely to have to wait for his 
first match for Chariton. Alan 
Curirisfaley will miss the match 
— which marks Chariton's re- 
turn to the first division after 29 
years — because he has not 
recovered from an achiiles ten- 
don injury. 

• Stoke City reported a toss of 
£126.000 for last season at their 
annual meeting despite cash 
injection of over £400,000 from 
the dub's directors. Sandy 
Gubb, the City chairman, said 
that directors pumped £410,000 


into the dub to keep it afloat as 
it was hit by felling attendances 
following relegation from the 
first division. “Without the 
generosity of the directors we 
would likely have collapsed,” *■“ 
admitted. 

Geoff Manning, the dnb 
director, said yesterday that 
football had been through a bad 
patch but the future looked 
encouraging. “We were caught 
up in the general decline of 
football,” he said. 

• Brighton, of the second di- 
vision, have launched a fund- 
raising dub. the money from 
which will be used for team 
strength ing. It will be limited to 
Z500 members, paying £104 per 
year each for the chance of 
winning cash prizes, cars and 
holidays. 


i 


eiV*. 






‘JOHN SILVER S RETURN TO 
TREASURE ISLAND’ 
TOMORROW on ITV 

A stunning tale, by John Goldsmith, 
of gold, greed and cut-throat 
treachery, filmed in the Caribbean. 

Brian Blessed, Christopher Guard, 
and Kenneth Colley head an 
outstanding cast 

Devised by Robert S. Baker from an idea by Ivor Dean. 


X 


ANOTHER 
EXCEPTIONAL 
DRAMA FROM 


TN ASSOCIATION WITH 


PRIMETIME 


TELEVISION 


Manager with a 
sense of humour 

Non-League football by Paul Newman 


Neil Warnock. the colourful 
new manager of Scarborough, is 
determined not to let the pres- 
sures of working for the success- 
starved Yorkshire dub spoil his 
sense of humour. “My chairman 
has so much confidence in me 
he's already- guaranteed my job 
until September,” he said. 

Supporters al the Athletic 
Ground have had little to smile 
about in recent seasons. After a 
highly successful spell in the 
1970s. including some famous 
victories in the FA Cup. Scar- 
borough were expected to be one 
of the leading lights in the 
Alliance Premier League (now 
the GM-Vauxhall Conference) 
when they became founder 
members in 1979. 

Yet in their seven seasons in 
the league Scarborough have 
finished only ! 1th. 3rd. 7th, 9th. 
I3lh. 6th and 15th. In the same 
period they have reached the 
quarter finals of the FA Trophy 
only once, in 1 982, and failed to 
go beyond the first round of the 
FA Cup. 

Attendances have dropped 
from an average of more than 
2^00 six years ago to 666 last 
season. 

Wamock. however, had no 
hesitation in accepting the job 
as manager. "The set-up here is 
fabulous," he said. “The dub 
own their ground and social 
club, they've got their own shop 
in the town. aiull-time commer- 
cial manager and superb facil- 
ities. When I try to sign players 
the first thing 1 do is to bring 
them here and show them 
around the place. They don't 
need any convincing after that." 

Wamock. a chiropodist (“I 
gel used to the corny jokes if 
you'll pardon the expression.” 
he said), works for Scarborough 
on a pan-lime basis. He became 
available earlier this year afxer 
resigning as manager of Burton 
Al bi on ( Multipart League after a 
dispute with his board of direc- 
tors over their refusal to sanc- 
tion his proposed signing of a 
■player. 

Last year he took Bunon to 
the third round of the FA Cup 


and he has paid £2,000 to bring 
one of the key players of that 
campaign. Stuart Me 11, to 
Scarborough. 

There are eight other new- 
comers, most of them with 
considerable Football League 
experience: Mike Brolly and 
Tommy Graham from Scun- 
thorpe United. Barry Gallagher. 
Paul Kendall and Cec Podd 
from Halifax Town. David 
Kaye from Chester City. Steve 
Richards from Cambridge 
United and Andy Harrison from 
Kettering Town. Only two of 
Iasi season's first team, Neil 
Sellars and Neil Thompson, 
remain. 

“1 was forced to make big 
changes because most of the 
previous team had left or 
wanted to go." Wamock said. “I 
just hope the supporters will be 
patient. My aim this season is to 
bring some stability to the dub. 
I can't bring success overnight, 
but I believe I can lay the 
foundations for the future." 

The difficulties Scarborough 
face in a highly competitive 
league have been underlined by. 
their first two results, a 3-0 
defeat at Nuneaton Borough 
and a goalless draw at home to 
Boston United. 

• The Multipart League are. 
pressing ahead with their plans 
to form a second division next 
season, despite opposition from 
their two “feeders” the North- 
ern Counties East and North 
West Counties leagues. 

• Cheltenham Town’s plans to 
develop iheirground as a multi- 
sports complex have been ap- 
proved in principle by their 
local council. The scheme in- 
cludes tennis courts, a hockey 
pitch, a running track and a 
gymnasium. 

• John King, the new manager 
of Runcorn, nas appointed Gra- 
ham Heath cote, one of his 
former playing coHcagies at 
Altrincham, as his assistant. 
King's former assistant at Al- 
trincham. George Rooney, has 
joined Rhyl (Multipart League) 
in a similar capacity. 


GOLF 


Robertson hoping 
to bow out in style 


By JohnHennessy 


The British women's 
strokeplay championship, to be 
held M Blairgowrie Cram today 
until Sunday, has taken on the 
character of a celebration, since 
six members of the victorious 
Curtis Cnp team are in the field. 
The two mu voidable absentees 
are Karen Davies, who rem a ine d 
behind in the United States to 


scholars hip at the University of 
Florida, and JH1 Thornhill, who 
is talons a holiday with her 
glowing family. 

The remainder include two 
people with a special purpose. 
For Belle Robertson this has 
been an annas mirabilis, ante 
apart from the Curtis Cup she 
has again won the Scottish 
championship and comes in 
Blairgowrie to defend a tide she 
won in her fiftfedf year. 

This, then, will probably be 
her swansong at full inter- 
national level, though her vic- 
tory in the Scnttish 
championship she will 

represent her country for the last 
time in the home internationals 
next month. Nothing could bet- 
ter put the seal M a glittering 
career than successfully to de- 
fend this week the tide she wen 
at Formby last year. 

Bat standing formidably in 


her way. among others, is Pa- 
tricia Johnson, who alone se- 
cured a maximnm foer points in 
the Curtis Cup and who alone, 
among the team, got to the last 
eight of foe United States 
amateur charxqrumslup. She has 
for some time seemed a player of 
exceptional potential and she 
has returned from the United 
States with that potential folly 
realized. 

Her spedal incentive at 
Blairgowrie is that she has this 
last chance this season to wfe a 
championship at borne. Her two 
English titles have vanished, the 
matchptay because of the in- 
spired golf of Susan Shapcott at 
Prince's, the strokeplay because 
it dashed with foe Cords Cop. 
The British matchplay tide 
eluded her at West 


because of, again, the expertise 
on the day of her opponent, this 
. time Louise Briers, of Australia. 

A strokeplay tourna ment is 
ideal for this Curtis Cnp re- 
union, since the ent and thrast of| 
matchplay would ran counter to 
the team spirit engendered by 
Diane Bailey in Kutsra. 

The. Lansdowne Course is 
rather fhan the 
which is 

not available. 


SWIMMING 

Gold and 
silver 
again for 
Chinese 

Madrid (Reuter? - China 
extended their remarkable run 
ofsucccssm the diving events at 
the world swimming champion- 
ships yesterday by . taking the 
goto and silver -medah in the 
women's high board com- 
petition. 

Chen Lm. a 16 year-old 
Peking schoolgirl outdated the 
field to win the goto ahead of Lu 
Wet, her. compatriot, with 
Wendy Ws land, of the United 
States, the ddending champion, 
and Olympic bronrc medal 
winner, third. The result gave 
China a dean sweep of the 
women’s diving after the spring- 
board 1-2 of Guo Min and U 
Yihua earlier in the sleek. 

Chen led throughout the com- 
petition. apan from on the first 
round when she chose to per- 
form one of the simpler com- 
pulsory dives. On three of her 
eight dives, Chen performed 
superb ibrcc-and-a-lwif somer- 
saults and her total of 449.67 
points gave her a 27-point 
winning margin. 

Wyland began tire final round 
in fifth place, trailing Alfa 
Lobankina and Anzhela 
Stasutevkh, of the Soviet 
Union, as well as the two 
Chinese. The American cham- 
pion had tong since been forced 
to concede that her title was 
heading East, but she vaulted 
into bronze-medal position with 
an excellent hack two-and-a-half 
somersault dive while her So- 
viet rivals feltcrcd. 

Stasulevkh. never out of the 
top four all afternoon and third 
from round five onwards, 
fluffed ‘ her final effort and 
slipped to fifth. Sixth place went 
to Kerstin Inselraann. aged 15, 
of East Germany, with Ildiko 
Kovacs, of Hungary, seventh 
and Michele Mitchell, the 
Olympic silver medal winner, 
of the United States, eighth. 
Mitchell never recovered from a 
disastrous sixth dive, -when she 
flopped into the water to record 
the day's lowest score of just 
243 points. 

The race swimmers resumed 
battle after Wednesday's rest 
day and there was a psychologi- 
cal boost fbrRainer Henkel, of 
West Germany, when he beat 
Vladimir Salnikov, the defend- 
ing Soviet champion, in the 
heals of the 400 metres freestyle. 

HcnkcL fastest man at the 
distance this year, won the final 
beat in 3 minutes 52.98 seconds, 
beating the Soviet veteran by 
0.64 seconds. But both qualified 
easily for tonight's final m which 
Salnikov, who is 26, will at- 
tempt to win the title an 
unprecedented three times in a 
row. 

Salnikov was fourth fastest 
overall behind Henkel. Kevin 
Boyd, of Britain (3:53.10) and 
Dan Joeigensen, of the United 
States (3:53.611. Boyd’s time 
beat Andy Astbuiy s British 
record of 3:5X29. 

Adrian Moorhouse. Boyd's 
team captain, disqualified in the 
100 metres breaststroke final 
after touching first — he was 
judged to have used an illegal 
turn — cut it fine in the 200 
metres qualifying heat. He made 
sure he was fully within the rules 
yesterday but had to settle for 
second place in his heat in 
2: 1 9.60 behind Alexandre 
Yokochi. of Portugal, and sev- 
enth overall of the eight 
qualifiers. 

Mary Meagher, the world 
record-holder, made an un- 
certain sian to her 100 metres 
butterfly title defence when she 
was beaten in her heat by 
Catherine PI ew inski. of France 
and qualified fourth 
averallJenna Johnson, a fellow 
American 100 metres freestyle 
silver medal winner. led quali- 
fiers in 1:00.48. Meagher 
clocked 1:01.00 while Kristin 
Ouo, of East Germany, the 100 
metres freestyle gold medal 
winner, also made the final in 
1:01.54. 

Tania Bogomil Dva, of Bul- 
garia. set a world championship 
record of 1 :08.77 in the women's 
100 metres breast stroke heats to 
take top qualifying place ahead 
of Siike Hornier, of East Ger? 
many, who beat her to the gold 
medal in a superb duel in the 
200 final on Monday. The time 
beat the 1:09.14 championship 
best set by Ute Geweniger. of 
East Germany, in 1982. Hoerner 
(1:09.46) ana Sylvia Gerasch. 
also of East Germany. (1:10.35), 
the world record-holder, were 
second and third overall. 


CANOEING 


Barton beats defending champion 


Montreal (AP) - Pladdlers 
from Hungary, Romania, the 
Soviet Union, and East Ger- 
many dominated the first day of 
the world canoe-kayak com- 
petitions. staged for the first 
time in North America. The 
Romanians qualified in all six 
events they entered while East 
Germany and Hungary went 


five-for-six. Canada was one for 
six. 

East Germany, would have 
had a perfect day bad it not been 
for two false starts by its K-4 
women's 1 , 000 -meires team, 
which disqualified the defend- 
ing world champions. That en- 
abled Canada's K-4 team to 
advance to the semi-finals, but 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

Third ComM Test match 
THE OVAL England v New Zealand 

Britannic Assurance - 
County Champtooship 
CHESTERFIELD: Derbyshire v 
Leicestershire 

COLCHESTER: Essex v 

Gloucestershire 

DARTFORD: Hampshire v 

Worcestershire 

LY7HAM: Lancashire v Glamorgan 
NORTHAMPTON: Northampwv 
Shjrg w Nottinghamshire 
TAUMT0N: Somerset v Sussex 
HEAOINGLEY: Yorkshire . v 
Middlesex 


(at 


OTHER SPORT 

GOLF: Youths ■ dismpton rtil| 
Camousttfl); Scottah Op«nJ«t 
Casttefc British woman* wwsur 
pby OhampmshiptSt HuiigowrMfc, 

SHOWJUMPING: file Cut Deftly (It 
Htckstead). 

TENNIS: ProMntis! Jumor thamplonaWp 
tai Easffioums). -• • 

ROWING: world ctiampiomMp {at 
Notongnam). 

SPEEDWAY; mown rt dere C hamp*** 
sftp final (u CWo^MmtoMiUwPw; 
Brnm&sm v tong Eaton. eSnburgh » 
Hackney, Glasgow v WtmbMon; Knocfc- 
oot Cur* Petawough v fienwcK. 


they are considered a long-shot 
Another surprise was the win 
of Greg Barton, of the United 
States, over Fernec Csipes. of 
Hungary, the defending cham- 
pion, in the qualifying run in the 
men's K-l l.OQO-mdrc event. 
Csipes. however.- qualified for 
the semi-finals because be was 
one of the top three finishers 


ENTERXAI^^ 


Crated fate page 3I 


CINEMAS 

LDQEsrmt swam ukatme 

43DS3S9 <EiMU/930 TMS iZ4 
hr A cm*f MM/ (UnLv Boot; 

mteu TARGET tiai sod pnw 

Dauv 3-30 GJO 623 Lw 

mom snow Fn«su it osom 

AU proas hookaMf in ad id nr* 


570 3014/ 

836 0091 SID A NANCY US) 

Frtm al 1.30 3.SO e IS bos 

EMM Thun STARTS Fr* 2*9 

_ Aim rosa unmrauNc men 

MW Cm* KdUHTSntOGE 235 

4223 “OUT OF APIHCA-rpC) 

nautl&o 60 9.0 MUST oo 

THUNSOAY SBtk AUGUST 

• Wo«v Allan Mirhart Chnr 
MM Far row “H ANNAH MO 

» sismrvim okw 

FRIDAY 2M AUGUST Ad 

- iiw nopMMB now com 


lOUMH 

UM WO 4230 . 


HAVMMKCT i83A 
76971 Wall naira’* FANTASIA 
•L > P1WB bail* 1.50 aoo 
810 All MraB DodUni* in 
udwimT Arm* and Ana 

BOOMrnW wgromf 

aonm _ 

iWO OIIJ. 

H ANNAH 

«STt** il3i Sr® »m* Dnnn 
■Won OMtV 200. 800. BOO 
Lair Nadu Snow rn « <ui 
Door* op#* n ta«m. Cr#dii 
Cara Hot luw* iArr#w nu 
'*«wE.v 839 1929. » hoi* w 
Mr# ■ AH tMUlr m 

adVMKf TBrn* vnii 0(>no2oo 
mi on Tun Aup at. 


nneoH mahli arch >73* 
301 1 i THE KARATS WO • 

FAUX H (FBI Props Lmora 
WWiiOwll 305 5 35.8 03 H7- 
dinvd dthi-i lm uinki lu's. 
Snith'iii i.wd nnWra* IIHO 
ntHwr* O A P ‘ MMinn"* 
Onlv CARS KARS MOVIE U > 
A NEW OENEBATtON IUI 
Onnr* open Moti 601 I 13 W 
Wins tl Ml 

RCNOm AST pooa fipp Wrtvrtl 

J4 Tilton 

1 ROUGE <15i Film ol 1 anil ro 

6 an 8 AS FNtNa THl US 
3H1H r rum f HI -”>TW MAN- 
NAN AM NCR SISTERS <tSr 

3 \ nnliili 1 , l.rsl AWbUfWK 1 

OSSESSMNE ilT.t Film o< 
as:, '.ijn n io sMrs 
ROOK VOtt INF- 1H Ills. 

SCREEN AT THE EUCTKIC 
Sow* DESERT HEARTS ilrit 
8 15. 7 MV a«5. 
toonkotih> PH>nM rt irw-poiloim 
itr.utrv 


ON BAKER SWtJJ. 
N5 3777 li OUT OR AHUCA 
IPCI I IS. a;:! T is. 
AFTER HOURS- 10: JU. 1 #5... 
"45. >4 48 Ln H** Vm*" 

HonV.infr 

SCREEN ON ISLMtfrON «W*N ‘ 

*25 JS3P. Mnm SiwIM'f* , 

THE COLON PURPLE il» .' - 

5 11>. JJ.JA Jirul, 

«l».nm- -► . 


SCREEN ON THE MU W 

i.Rjo.*iTS7 DESERT MUUri*. 

■vhi son. * -is. 7 » 

ii is iir-HAt araf*. 

Pn,*»toto- ah cotwliiianrAi. 



Sts 






<* 


4 


* 

< 4 ... 



■ V' l v •- 
Sr ’ -- 

FI, . 


V 



■ y 






***** * UUAAI X A AUviWk/l M, i>uu 


Jl 


Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Davalle 
and Elizabeth Larard 





Ceefax AM 
0 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough and Debbie 
Greenwood. Weather at 
635. 7.25. 735, 6^5 and 
S35; regional news, 
weather and trafffc at 637, 
737, 737 and 8£7; 
national and international 
news at 730. 730. 830. 
83Q and 9.00; sport at 
730 and 830; pop music 
with Steve Btaefcnefl at 
732: and a review of the 
momir 

837. PEjs. Alan 
Trtcftmarsfi's garden 
phone-in and Glynn 
Christian’s weekend food 


V Summertime 1 

■ 9.05. 

- , ' 30 Dudley Do-Right Cartoon 
series, set in me 1920s, 
about a reluctant Mountte. 
!\ (r) 935 saas. Adventures 

of a young man who runs 
! * , away from a circus, (r) 

». (Ceefax) 

► 30 Newsround Special 
Delivery, presented by 
John Craven, on tour m 
south west England. 

- -35 The Adventures of 

L ~: BuBwinkle and Rooky. 

Part 5. (0 ia00 Hartbeet 
A new approach to art, 
wrth Tony Hart, Margot 
Wilson and Liza Brown, (r) 
^ • 1035 The Adventures of 

Bullwinkle and Rocky. 

I*'- Part 6 (rj 1030 Play 
!' • . School, (r) 

'130 Cricket Third Test 

- j England v New Zealand 

JJ5 News After Now* wrth 

V Moira Stuart, includes 
news headlines with 
subtitles 130 Regional 

■' news. Weather. 135 Mop 
:r.I and Smtff. A See-Saw 
programme for the very 


TV- AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 

presented by Anne 
Diamond and Adrian 

Brown, with guests, Faye 
Dunaway and John 
Ajderton. News with Geoff 

Meade 630. 7.00. 7301 
830, 830 and 930; Sport 
at 830 and 730; exercises 
at 635; cartoon at 735; 
pop music at 735; Jimmy 
Greaves’ TV Highlights at 
835. 




845 




Test 
of 


1- 


Further cover 
England vl 

(continues on BBC2) 4.18 
Regional News. 

!' v 130 WarcTBJ Your Father Gets 
. Home. Alice meets a hippy 

> guru and decides to join 
' 'r. pis farm colony. 430 
HekS. A serial about an 
■••r... orphan girl, (rt 

• .- >35 The Montreux Rock 

Festival. Highlights from 
this year s festival indude 
performances from 
V Genesis, Code Robin. 5- 
•' .. star. Sam Harris. BBfy 
-. Ocean. OMD, The 

Outfield. Chris Rea and 
v. Status Quo. 

- 330 News with Nicholas 
WKchell and Frances 
Coverdale. Weather. 

' 535 London Phis. 

. . ;7.00 Wogan. Terry Wogan's - 
. . Quests are comsdan 

Duncan Norvelle; Nashville 
guitarist and story-teller 
Tom T. Hall; Hollywood ' 
actor/writer Steven 
Berkoff; and actor 
Christopher Tnnothy. 

Music is provided by 
... Frankie Goes to 
Hollywood. 

: -.-735 Les and Dustin's 

Laughter Show. The 
comedians' guests are 
Dame Edna Everaga, Les 
Patterson and Dean Park. 
-3.10 Dynasty. (Ceefzd)'" ; ;" T ‘ 
V 330 News with JuDa Somerville 
• and Nicholas WltchelL 
Regional news and 
weather. 

v 930 In at the Deep End. Chris 
Ssrte learns auctioneering^ 

• - in the course of which he 

takes advice from 500- 
words-a-mlnute American 
tobacco auctioneers, 
among many others, and 
which culminates In his • 
presiding over an auction 
at Sotheby’s. 

.1030 Omnibus at the Proms. 
Anne-Sophie Mutter Is the 
soloist in a performance of 
Dvorak's Violin Concerto, 
with The Royal 
Philharmonic Orchestra, 
conducted by Yuri 
Temirkanov. The concert 
opens with the symphonic 
poem ‘Kikimora’ by the 
Russian composer. Ana to! 
Lyadov. 

1.10 Film: Countdown (1987) 
starring James Ca an and 
Joanna Moore. Drama 
about the American- 
Russlan moon race, made 
two years before the real 
manned moon landing. 
Directed by Robert 
Altman. 

230 Weather. 


Timmy Maitett with guest 
Ftoeta Benjamin. 


I TV/LONDON 


935 Thames news headlines 
followed by W8d, WHd 
Wdrfcf of Anfmals. A look 
at the racoon in Its natural 
habitat- (r)93QMBu. 
Adventures of a young 
. man delivering a Lapland 
reindeer to the Paris Zoo 
10.20 Mexican Imfian 
Legends. Totted.! 
and Aztec l 
1035 Little Rouse on the 
Prairie 1135 Wattoo 
Wattoo. Cosmic cartoon 
adventures.. 

1 1130 About Britain. David 
Richardson explores the 
world of tne monks and 
nuns of Turkey Abbey. 

[ 12.00 Toetime and Claudia. For 
young children 12.10 
Rainbow. Learning with 
puppets. 

11230 is Democracy WericEng? - 
The third in tne series 
about politics discusses 
prime ministerial power. 

1.00 News at One with Alastair 
Stewart 130 Thames 
news. 

130 Rim: A Place To Go* 
(1964) starring Rita 
Tush Ingham and Mike 
Same. A parable about 
events in the lives of a 
family who live in Bethnal 
Green, in east London. 
Directed by Basil Dearden. 

3.00 Take the High Road. A 
drama series set in the 
Scottish highlands 3^5 
Thames news headlines 
330 Sons and Daughters. 

4.00 Rainbow. A repeat of the 


I Ba l ancing the Body The HfeoW 
Arts, BBC2, at 930pm 


• WHAT DO THOSE OLD 
FILMS MEAN? (Channel 4, 
930pm) puts rare bits of 
celluloid into a social context and 
is undoubtedly the charmers 
current oddbaJUt gives the 

impression of having been 

edited in the dark, mth 
faWng haphazardly on to I 
screen, with the narrators 
positioned under a thick pile 
of carpets, and tha music 
director teiflng his vocalists to 
la-la or dum-dJ-dah the words 
because they have lost their 
bits of paps'. In spire of 

offert^aboutpest- 
revolutionary Soviet films, Is as 
unaccountably speibindir 
as the rest' 

pleas for se , _ t 

(“Try to see your wife as a 
comrade, and a friend" and 
"It is not unknown even for a 


CHOICE 


Commiaiist to mistreat a 
woman in Ms service") and its 
depiction of an emerging new 
bourgeoisie amed to tradmonal 
domestic mores ("let's go 
and offlalize our marriage and we 
can open a shop") 

• Other highlights tonight 
Arme-Sophie Mutter playing the 
Dvorak Violin Concerto at last 
njgWs Prom (BBC1. 1030pm); 
Christopher Cook comparing 
Carol Reed’s 13m version ot7?w 
Third Man vtfh Graham 
Greene’s original story (Radio 4. 
4.05pm); and Michael 
Pennington's one-man show, 
Chekhov in Sberfe (Radio 3. 
9.15pm), using the playwright's 
own words 

•Recommended weekend 


viewing: Douglas Livingstone's 
fw <e the King 
/, 930pm) makes 
ing political and 
ms a b o ut L ab our's re- 
.. . i policy for sitting 
MPs, and gives John Stnde Iw 
second opportunity to play a 
Labour MP role to this same 
time-slot (the other is m Petar 
Nichols's Bom m the Gardens, 
Sunday. BBCl, 935pm which 
I have not seen but, given 
Nichols's track record, it 
cannot be humdrum). Best of the 
weekend movies: Powell and 
Pressburgefsvisua&y ravishing 
mfctary satire The Life and 
D&$th of Colonel Bfrnp (Sunday, 
BBCl . 3.00pm). and John 
Ford’s elegrac western 
Cheyenne Autumn with a 
dream of a cast 
(tomorrow .BBC2, 9,10pm). 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


[635 Open OnIverafty. Science 
730 Weekend Outlook. 
Ends at 735. 

9.00 Ceefax. 

.1.45 Grandstand. Steve Rider 
introduces Rowing: 
Norwi ch Union WOrid 
Championships (130); 
Racing: Tote Bookmakers 
Charity Sweepstakes 
Handicap (23S):British 
Car Auction Apprentices 
Guaranteed Sweepstakes 
HancScap (3.00V, 

Waterford Candelabra 
Slakes (330); Ts 
Woodrow Team i 
Guaranteed! 

Handicap (430k 
S wi mm ing. World 
Championships (235k 
Cricket: ThWTest (3.05k 
lntemadORa) Show 
Jumping from Hickstead: 
The Sflk Cut Derby Trial 
(335). Crtelret ThWTest 
(4.05) 

6.10 FBm: The Famify Rico 



programme shown at 
12.10. 4.15 The Moomins. 
Cartoon series, (r) 435 
Scooby-Doo. Cartoon. 
430 Your Mother Wouldn’t 
Like It The first in a new 
series of satirical comedy 
shows with music, 
produced by Junior 
Television workshop, 
which pokes fun at 
everything from smoking 
.toRambo. 

5.15 The Pariour Game. 
Celebrities challenge each 
other in games of toe past 

5.45 News with John Suchet 
630 Thames Weekend 
News. 

6.15 Police 5 with Shaw Taylor. 
630 (Sty Safari Trie final 

episode looks at the wild 
animals who have fled toe 
countryside into London, 
their rural habitats having 
been destroyed by modern 
farming methods. 

730 Danny Baker 

on . . . Fame. Danny 
Baker interviews London 
celebrities about fame. 

730 Arthur Haley's Strong 
Medicine. Part Two. 
Concluding yesterday's 
film drams about a young 
woman determined to 
succeed in her career. 
(Grade). 

930 Tales of toe Unexpected: 
The Boy who Talked with 
Animals. Nine-year-old 
David is no 


child... Jr) 

1030 News at Ten with Leonard 
Parian and Pamela 
Armstrong. 

1030 Spitting Image. Satirical 
comedy series. Followed 
by LWT News headlines. 
1130 FHmrSharky’s Machine 
(1981) Burt Reynolds, 
thriller In which he stars as 
vice squad detective Tom 
Sharfcy, investigating an 
undercover drugs 
operation which results in 
the death of an innocent 
bus passenger. Burt 
Reynolds also directed. 
130 World Chess 

Championship. Kasparov 
v Karpov. 

135 The Early Beaties — 
1962-65. Rare archive 
film, (r) 

230 raght Thoughts. 


Carter. 

_ Jigster drama al 
Mafia head whose 
loyalties are divided 
between his family and his 
^mg^^ctedbyPaui 

7 30 Top Priority. Cartoon, 

730 Ebony. A magazine 
programme for Afro- 
Can bbearrs, introduced by 
Vastiana Belton, which 
includes a report about the 
black community of 
Harlem in New York, and 
looks at preparations for 
London's Netting Hill 
Carnival. Music is by 
Trinidadian calypso singer 
David Rudder. 

830 The Great Egg Race. 
Presented by Howard 
Stabfeford. Teams from 
Lichfield, London and 
Yorkshire try to make a 
machine that can destroy 
a rival while both are 
balancing on a horizontal 
pole. 

830 Gardeners’ World. Geoff 
Hamilton, John Kelly and 
Margaret Waddy with 
advice on preparing next 
year's garden; plus tips on 
pruning fruit trees; how to 
ensure a good show of 
daffodils m spring; and 
guest expert Ken Muir on 
growing and freezing 
strawberries. 

930 My Music. Steve Race 
introduces toe musical 
quiz in which Dens 
Norden and lan Wallace 
chaflenge John Antis and 
Frank Muir. 

930 The Heafing Arts. Part 
seven reports on 
nutritional cures and the 
use of exercise for 
healing. It features the late 
Moshe Fekfen krais, who 
developed an exerdse 
system which he befieved 
enabled the body to 
realize its full potentiaL 
(Ceefax) 

1030 Harty Goes to Edinburgh. 
Russel] H arty’s final 
review. 

1030 NewsnJght 
11.35Weather. 

11-40 Cricket Third Test Richie 
Benaud introduces 
highlights of toe second 
day’s play between 
England and New 
Zealand. 

12.10 International Show 
Jumping. Highlights of 
today's Silk Cut Derby 
Trial, introduced by David 
Vm Ends at 1235. 

In 


CHANNEL 4 


230 ~Channe! 4 Racing from 
newmarket Brough Scott 
introduces coverage of toe 
Lockwood's and 
Smedley s Maiden Stakes 
(2.45); the Harris Group 
Handicap (3.15k toe 
Hidsdown Holdings Select 
Stakes (3.45); ana the 
Buxted Handicap (4.15) 

430 Dancin’ Days. Julia and 
Carlos spend a happy 
Christmas together in the 
country. But there are 
Important decisions to be 
made. 

530 RevkL Video review show. 

535 Solid Soul. This week's 
guests Include Junior and 
choir. Precious Wilson. 
Zuica and Don Estus. 

6-15 The Chart Show. A 
comprehensive guide to 
the latest pop music this 
week features news of the 
network charts and the 
reggae charts. 

730 Channel 4 News with 
Trevor McDonald and 
Nicholes Owen. Weather. 

730 Book Choice. Writer and 
editor Kathy 

CShaughnessy discusses 
The Misalliance, a new 
novel by Anita Brookner. 

830 What toe Papers Soy. A 
look at the week's papers 
with George Gale. 

8.15 Bandung File. A new 
international magazine 
series, primarily tor Asian 
and Afro-Caribbean 
audiences, returns. News 
reports Indude a roundup 
of events in South Africa 
and Pakistan; toe history 
of the Netting HHi carnival; 
and a feature about steel 
bands. 

9.00 The Cosby Show. 

American domestic 
comedy show. 

930 What Do Those Old FBms 
Mean? Another in toe 
series of silent films which 
this week examines the 
changes in everyday life 
caused by the Soviet 
Revolution. (See Choice) 
1030 The Golden Girls. 

American comedy series 
about four middle-aged 
women who share a . . . 
house in Miami. (Orade) 
1030 Budgie. The feckless 
Budgie meets Inky 
Ballarrtine who involves 
him In a new flnandellaric, 
capital investment 
Adam Faith. 


|( Radio 4 


j 


l On long wave. Stereo on VKF 
•535 shipping: 630 News Briefing; 
Weather. 8.10 Farming. 

635 Prayer (s) 

630 Today, ind 630, 730. 

830 News. 6^5 
Business News. 635. 735 
Weather. 7.00, 830 
News. 735, 835 Sport 835 
Letters 

8.43 A Night To Remember. 

Episode 5 of me Story of 
me Titanic (1% 837 Weather; 
Travel. 

930 News 

935 Desert Island Discs. Jane 
Lapotaire in conversation 
with Michael Parkinson (r) (s) 

935 I Should Say So (new 
series). Witn Michael 
Wffcams as Robb Wilton (1) 
The Poltergeist 
1 1030 News; International 
Assignment. BBC 
correspondents report from 
around toe world 
1030 Morning Story: A Slip of 
the Pen by Shea* 

Hodgson. Reader: 
Tuddenriam 
1035 DaHy Service (New Every 
Morning, page 106) (s) 

1130 News Travel; A G&m»e 
of the Burning Pain. Final 
eposide of a dramatization of 
Charles Allen's bookwtm 
Claire Bloom (as Charlotte 
Canning) and Prunella 
Scales (as Queen Victoria) (r) 
(s) 

11-48 Natural Selection: 

Stoddart Down Under. 

With Professor Michael 
Stoddart 
12.00 News; Does He Take 
Sugar? For disabled 
listeners and their families 
1237 Don't Stop Now -It’S 
Fundation. Comedy 
Cabaret 1235 Weather 130 
The Worid At One: News 
1.40 The Archers. 135 


230 News; Woman's Hour. 
Includes an Hem on the 
impact of radio on children. 
330 News; The Tortoise and 
The Hare by Elizabeth 
Jenkins, dramatized by 
Hasiam Tennyson (2) (r) 

430 ftews 

435 Film of the Book. The 
movie version of The 

Third Man. With Christopher 
Cook 

430 Kaleidoscope. Lest 
night's edition reputed 


530 PM. News magazine. 

530 Shipping. 535 
Weather 

630 News: Financial Report 
630 Waterimes. Events and 
sporting activities in, on 

or unitor the water. With Cliff 
Micheimaraand Dffly 
Bariow 
730 News 
735 The Archers 
730 Pk* Of The Week. 

Margaret Howard's 
selection of the past weak’s 
programmes on BBC 
radio and t el evi s ion 
830 BBy and Seamus. The 
story, in their own words, 
ol two man — one Protest a n t 
one Roman Catholic - 
who became entangled m 
Northern Ireland’s violent 


paramffitary 

845 Devon Jotiney. Tom 
Salmon travels from 
Buckfastieoh to Dartmoor 
(s) 

330 Letter From America by 
Alistair Cooke 

945 Kaleidoscope fn 
Edinburgh. Paul Alan 
presents news and reviews 
from the Fringe 

10.15 A Book At Bedtime: AB 
the Brave Promkses (ito. 
Reader Helen Horton 
1039 Weather 

1030 The world Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Aspects Of the Fringe. 
Songs and sketches 
from the Edinburgh Festival 
Fringe 

1200 News; Weather. 1233 
Stepping. 

VHF (available in England and 

S.Wales only) as above except 

535-630em Weather. Travel: 

135-2. 00pm Listening Corner (SL 

530-535 PM (continued). 


underworld. 


V. 


Radio 3 ) 


On VHF and meefiure wave, except 
for Test Match on MW only: - 
635 Open UnrvBisity. Realism and 
interrogative text Until 
635am 

635 Weather. 730 News 
735 Concert Berwaid 
(Memories of the 


■ ■ •WwWX HOCK. FASShfVi US- 

8-00 Wales Today 835-730 Gama. 

Set and Match llfiOam-1235 Nawe. 

SCOTLAND 03ipBi-7.M Reports 


Honegger (Concerto 
camera: Los Annies CO and 

soloists), Grieg (Four 
Lync Pieces. Op 71: GMs, 
piano]. Nielsen (Little 
State lor strings). 830 News 
835 Concert (con tdL 
Shostakovich (Piano 


Concerto No i 
Bemstein/NYPO), Britten 
(Phantasy Quartet, with 
Janet Craxton, oboe). 
Copland (Four Dance 
Episodes. Rodeo). 9.00 

935 This Week' 5 Composer. 
Franck- L'Oroanrste. 

Chant da la Crouse. Noel 
Angevin (Toumemtre. 
organ), and String Quartet in 
Dma|or(Fitzwilliam 
Quartet) 

1030 Langham Chamber 
Orchestra(under 
Handtord). Haydn 
(Symphony No 85), 

Saber tBesardo Suite No 2). 
Rawsthome 
(Divertimento) 

On medium wav* only: 

1035 Test Match: Third Test 
England v New Zealand. 
Second day. On medium 
wave until 630pm 

On VHF:- 

1035 French Clarinet Music 
John Denman (clarinet), 

Paul Fan (piano). Milhaud 
(Sonatina), Poulenc 
(Sonata) 

1135 Tenor and guitar. Neil 
Jenkins and Timothy 
Walker. Burgon 
arrangements of three 
foft songs, end his love 
songs Lullaby and For X. 
and works by Beethoven and 
Tippett (Soogs for 
AchiOes) 

12.10 Pled Piper David 
Munrow with music of 

1230 i&CsStttsh SO (under- 
George Malcolm, piano). 

Pan one. Mozart (Las paths 
nansbafletmustc). 130 
News 

135 Concert (contd): Bach 
(Cantata No 202). and 
Mozart (Plano Concerto No 
23) 

230 Two Octets: Paragon 
Ensemble. Stravinsky 
(Octet 1923). and lam 
Hamilton (Octet 1983) 

240 SAelus: RPO (under 
Beecham). Symphony No 

335 Beethoven: Peter Frank! 
(piano). Gyorgy Pauk 
(vKJbo). Ralph Kirshbaum 
(MHO). Vrnlm Sonata in A. 

Op 30 No 1 , and CeQo 
Sonata in D. Op 1 02 No 2 

430 Choral Evensong: from 
St Mery's Cathedral, 
Edinburgh. 435 News 

530 Mainly tor Pleasure; with 
Jeremy Siepmann 

630 Antonio Lauro: BBC 
the 

guitarist and 

composer 

730 A Kind of Carpentry: 

Graham Fawcett's profile 
of the American poet Galway 
Kernel] 


Blake (celiol. Peter Buckoke 
(dOjWe-bassi Pieyel s 

Theme and Variations, Dawd 
CoOms's Three 
Fantasias, and Rsssira s 
Duetto 11.57 News 
12.00 Closedown. 


( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave- Stereo on 
VHF. News on the heur (except 
8.0pm). Sports Desks 1.05pm, 

232, 332, 432, 535, 6.02, 5.45 (m! 
onjgk&SS. Cricket Scoreboard 

4.00am Colin Berry 530 Ray 
Moore 7.30 Nigel Dempster 930 
Ken Bruce ll.uO Jimmy You rig 
incl legal problems answered ay 
Andrew Phillips 135 Gerald 
Harper 2.05 Anneka Rice 330 
David Hamilton 5.05 John Oumi 

7.00 Hubert Gregg 7.30 Music 
From The Movies presented by 
Bryan Forbes and Nanene 
Newman 8.39 Cinema 
Scrapbook. Chris KeSy with 
soundtrack excerpts lorm 1959 

9.00 Tne Organist Entertains (with 
Nigel Ogden) 10.00 Vilem 
Tausky conducts the Langham 
Orchestra 10.30 Hinge and 

Bracket 1 1.00 Round Midnight from 
Edinburgh 130am Steve 
Madden presents Nightnde 330- 
430 A Little Night Music 

( Radiol ) 

On medium wave Stereo on 
VHF 

Nbws on the hall-hour irem 
630am umri 830pm then 1030 and 

12.00 mOnrght 

530am Adrian John 7.00 Simon 
Mayo 9.30 Simon Bates 11.00 
Radio 1 Roadshow with Peter 
Powell from Torquay 12.30pm 
Newsbeat (lan Parkinson) 12.45 
Gary Davies 330 Stove Wright 530 
Newsbeat (lan Parkinson 1 5.45 
led Out (Janice Long) 730 
j Peebles 10.00-2.06 The 
Friday Rock Show With Tommy 
Vance, featuring Magnum. VHF 
Stereo RADIOS 1&£- 4.00am As 
Radio 1 . 10.00pm As Radio 1 . 
12.00-4.00am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


830 Newsdttk 830 Mancftan 7.00 Nm 
7.00 Twenty Four Hours 7.30 A OacaU of 
Has 745 Merchant Navy Programme 8.00 
Nw 838 Rettecttont 4.15 btvfap tones 
Brass Ensemble 130 Muse Now 930 
News B-09 Rmnew ol Bnbsn Press 618 
World Today 930 Financial News 9.40 
Look Ahead 9.45 Lake Wobegon Pays 
1930 News 1Q31 New Waves on Short- 
wave 10.15 Merchant Navy Programme 
1130 News 11.09 News About Bmam 
11.15 Soortswond 11.30 Mendun 1230 
Radio Newsreel 12.15 Jau For The 


730 Proms 88: BBC SO 
(under Serge Baudo). 
with BBC Singers. Cynthia 
Buchan (mezzo). Kim 
Begley (tenor) and Pierre 
Thau (bass). Bettoz 
(Romeo et Julietta) 

9.15 Chekhov in Slberia; 

Michael Pennington 
speaks the writer's own 
words 

1030 BBC Philharmonic (under 
Bryden Thomson). With 
David Wilde (piano). Thomas 
Wilson (Piano Concerto). 
Thea Musgrave (Concerto 
for orchestra) 

1130 A Man, a Woman and a 
Double-bass: Lowri 


A Perfect Spy 330 Recto Newsreel 2.15 
Eccentric Travellers 400 News 439 
Commentary 415 Soane* w Action 5.45 
Sports Roundup 745 About Bmam 930 
News 839 Twenty Four Hours 830 
Science in Acton 930 News 931 Network 
UK 9.15 Musk Now M5 For Whom The 
Befi Tcfts 1030 News 10.09 Wona Today 
1035 A Letter From Northern Ireland 
1030 Ftoancw News 1040 Rettocoons 
1045 Sports Roundup 1130 News 1139 
Commentary 11.15 From The Weeklws 
1130 Lab Piano Music 12.00 News 1239 
News About Bran 12.15 Radio Newsreel 
1230 About Britan 1245 Racorttog of 
the Week 130 News 131 Outlook 130 
New waves on Shortwave 1.45 A Perfect 
Spy 2.00 News 239 Review of Britan 
Press 2.15 Network UK 230 Soviet 
mteiectuais Driemma 230 Soviet Poetry 
330 News 3.09 News About Britan 3.15 
World Today 445 Reltectvxw 4S0 Fkian- 
col News 530 News 539 Twenty Four 
Hours 545 World Today-AB tiroes in GMT. 


11J0 Ptinc A 19^reer-okrs 

Plan. The wst showing of 
a Japanese fifm about a 
newspaper delivery boy's 
obsession and sense of 
alienation in contemporary 
Tokyo. Stars Yu|i Honma. 
Directed by Mltsuo 
YanagimschL (English 
subtiffes) Ends at 1 JO. 


1030 -nmc^^s. B«- 

LAND [42tom-445H*kS 445-536 - . 
The Montreux Rock Festive! US-840 

Home H . S Ot 12 5 5 News. Bf- 
GLAND 835pm-730 Regloral nows 


CHANNEL 

Street 1035 Short 1030 S»y 


rs. 1136-1130 Orphans of 
130330 



no®; ______ 

the WHd. iJdpm News. 

Hhn: Whispering Smith Hite London. 

330-430 Country GP. 6.15-545 Star 
Choice. 830 Channel Report 6.15 Cine- 
dtan Documentary. 535 Jane's Dia- 
ry. 630 Horses for Comes. 730*730 
iWs My Boy. 1130 Prisoner : Csfl 
Block H 1230 Fim: Rktos of Destiny. 
130m Closedown. 




Anne-Sophie Matter Omnibus at| 
the Proms. BBCl, at 1020pm 


TvS AsLondon< 

Sesame StrseL 1035 Short Sto- 
ry- 1030 Say No® Strangers. 1136- 
1130 Orphrms of the WuTl30pro News. 
130330 Fine WMsparing Smttn 
MtaLondon.S3tM30CamtryGP.S.16- 
545 Star Chotai. 630 Coast ® 

Coast 030 Human Fedor. 730-730 

That's My Boy. 1130 Pnaonen Cett 

Block H. 1230 Film: Riders of Dastay- 

130em Company. Cksedown. 

Aa London except 
935em Seeame Street 
1030 cartoon. 1 035-1 1 30 Poseidon 
Ffles. 130pm News. 130-330 F*rc The 
Magnet". 5.15-545 %>Mina Alstera. 

836 About Angls. 730-730 AH)ton Mar- 
ket 1130 Ffcn: This Wonder** 

Croak. 130mn Lost and Rxnd. 
Closedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Street 1025 Smurfs. 1040 Mk*. 
fl 35-1130 Smal Wander. 130pm 
News. 130330 RkicPrekidB® 
Fame*. 5,15-545 Drams. 600 News. 
730^30 Alton Market 1030 Your 
Say. 1045 Spirting knages. 11-15 like 
Hammer. 12.15am Closedown. 

HTV WALES g gg jg|. 

1035 Sesame Street 530pro-7.00 
WWas atSbt 1030-11.15 ftspni 
eaxtico. 


S»rf 

Racing. 420 
Khraaa535Tan- 

a 630 Rev®. 545 Soto Sou. 6.15 
rt Show. 730 NewydrSonSaith. 730 
Am y Coraa 135 O Bedwar Ban. 

■35 Paiu maan. 850 Kata and AHa. 

930 What do These Old F9ms Maan? 

■L50 Under Capricorn. 1145 Atchie 

Balkar’s Place. 12.15am 
CtosedDwn. 


Sesame SreeL 1050 Sea Urchins. 
1130-1130 Cartoon. I30pn limcritkne. 
130-030FSm:JphnafldJu6e.5.15- 
5.45 Dltrrant Strokes. 630 Summer BS- 
tibri. 6.15 Sommer Sport. 530 
Password. 730-730 Albion Market 
1030 Witness. 1035 Vincent Price's 
DrecUa. 1130 The MeCtonens. 1135 
Spktino knege. 1225m News. 
Closedown. 


Robostory. 10.16 Rainbow Thane. 
1040 TMs is Me. 1130-1130 Survivai. 
130 News. 130-330 Fibre Anne of 
the Mm. 5.15-545 Mr Smith. 830 
News. 830 Heart of the Country 
730-730 Alton Market ItOOFBiic ctu- 
dbie of Tenor. 1240m Jotonder. 

140 Closedown. 

S COTTISH 

Beatheicheari Neonach. 830 Incred)- 
bie Hulk. 1020 Captam ScarteL 1045- 
1130 Guinness Book of Records. 

130pm News. 130 The Baron. 230420 
BoTs Scottish Open. 830 News end 
Scotland Today. 6.15 Light in tto North. 
030 Whose Baby? 74OT30 Albion 
Market 1130Acnopoas Nowl 1230 
Btfs Scottish Opwt I230aro Late 
C sk Closedown. 

ieBDERgaSSS™. 

1025 Professor KtizM. 1035-1130 

5.15-545 SportkigAll ! 

Lookaround. 630Tske the High 
Road. 730-730 Aftttm Market 1130 
1200 Go«. 1235am 


TYNE TEES 

030 Sesame Street loEte-1130 
Gttones Book of Records. 120pm News. 
1 35 Lookarotod. 130330 rent: 

Sma* Vbca 630 Northern Ufk <30 Me 
*my Gin. 730 Albion Market 1130 
TX 45. 1230 Hen to Hart 1 30am Coun- 
trysxta Chnsban, dosedown. 


Reports. 930 Uttie Rascals 935 
Specewateti. 1035 Mika. 1035 Jaycs 
and the Whaaiad Warriors. 11.05 
About Britain. 1130-1200 Connections. 
130pm Qteneda Reports. 130 Weak 
in View. 230000 Hotel. 330-400 Invita- 
tion® Remember. 5.15-545 m Lov- 
ing Memory. 6u00 Granada Reports. 830 
Me & my GW. 7.00-730 Aibam Mar- 
ket 1130 V. 1135 Film: jaguar Lives 
140am Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

Stoy. 930 Question of^uth. 13.15 
Oenree. 1045 FOX Tates. 1130-1130 
Settler Yoa Dreams. 130ptnNews 
135 Help Yourself. 1303.00 Fdm: Gene- 
vwvs. 5.15445 Sporting AttSOra. 

630 Cekndsr. 630 Who s me Boss? 
730-730 ARton Market 1130 
Sweeney. 1200530am Music Box. 

GRAMPIAN 

Thma 930 Beathaichean Naonach . 

935 Sesame Street. 1250 Struggle Be- 
neath the Sea. 11.15-1130 Tovtown. 
130pm Nsws. 130 Guinness Book of 
Records. 230-330 History of Grand 
Prta. 5.15-545 Judi Goes on Hobday. 


1130 TJ 
ScomshOpen, 
T230sm News. Closedown. 

TS W London except 935am 

-L225Z. sesame Street 1225 Short Sto- 
ry. 1030 Sty Non Strangers 1130- 
11.30 Orptwis ot the WUd. 13ttam Newt. 
130-330 Rbn; Girts at Sea- ^3- 


Sportsweak. 730-730 AJbmn Mar- 
ket 1032 Film: Frankenstein. The True 
Story, pan two. 1230am Postscript 

Closedown. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


BAtmCAN HALL 6Z8 879S/658 
8891 Ton-1 7 *6 CM y at 
. Leodan SMmU. ton Watson 
rend. Mori Kennedy uoUn 


EVENTS 


\]0 


amm nniHAiH 

Motor racing August Bank Hoii 
nav z any* Grand Stand «eato 
on uan and fintah line 2 ntaMs 
1 st riaw arrommodauon. 2 
howuiib- sune on trade 
Free clMmpaene and (nod. 
Price C3S7 yer person Credit 
Caidtarrepied Ring Pwcr Ben-, 
nett Ml on 3S&6071 for 
detain 


EXHIBITIONS 


tite. OMAN flUUXDIY. 31 A 
B nil on Ptore. WI 499 4701 
PrevnK YOUNQ MAS I CHS 
ewil September 20th 
Mon Ft| 10-530 


OPERA & BALLET 


CO U SE U M S 836 3161 
CC 200 5258 

EMOUSH NATKMHL OPERA 
0 T nw tw r /The 

auar— s. n tss^. 

TirtetnuMn 01 579 6433 


theatres 


ffSkPW 636 761 1 or 340 7913 
° C J”i 1 .9Wy«» 7358/T79 
1 total. 950 612S First 
,. ^^ 2 " 7 «m£C3«j7aooibii9 

feei KOW BOOKING TO FEB 
X9B7 

, ME AND MY GIRL 

THE lambcth walk 

. ■* at T 30 Mato Vswl M 2 30 

-4 tot a to 4 8.00 

rtwiumnsmw 
w TOWN" S Lxsrou 
^ Th— fro *4, ri o n d m wnri 

&56 sere «r 579 &s6s 
LmiHrti 1 ram sept 9 

Barbara cook 

SKS’OS 1 ™** TO S 01-656 
1 -40- irar-oid manel- Trftoe* 

•ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

.* from Ihe Ctilrtinler Feunal 
4 ,. Ttieem* 

stwrum 

• SUB QUATRO 

_Lroni% uo (he m«ht me rngv.' 
dA/nmu-weM End MU CaW* 

• .7 ' l ‘ r L r ‘ MOkino on Firsi 
• t -II ni wo 7300 <Mto reel 


■tto Ol 836 3878 CC 379 6666 
76453 Group Sales 836 3962 

JOHN SHEA to 
THE NORMAL HEART 

In- LARKY KRAMER 
"MACMmCCNTT* Times. 
"NOTHING SHORT OF 
SENSATIONAL** $£xp 
E\e% 8 Mato Thor A &a i 4JO 
LAST 3 WEEKS 


AMBASSADORS Theatre Wmi Si 
WC2 01-836 6111 Postal hku 
ont\ umll I Sept lor 

Rgri Shdinrtir* juJSoJS 


Open* 1 Ocl. EiM £730, 
CIO SO. U2 50 Mato (Wed/ 
Sdl) CBOO. (.7 -GO- £9.80 


APOLLO THEATRK «37 2663 
434 359a FirU CaU 01-240 7200 
Tickrlmaaler cc 379 6433 
MotvFn 8.00 Sal 4.30 & 8.16 
Thun mats 300 
PAUL SCOPKLD 
“MASTERLY” CT 
HOWARD ROLLINS 
— MAGNIFICENT” DJ*M 
Winner 1986 Tony Award 801 
Play 

I'M NOT RAPPAPORT 

“WONDERFULLY FUNNY” 
DXxp 


APOLLO VtCTORIA S6 83 866S 
CC 630 6262 Timennactn- <r 379 
6433 Id call cc <34hrl 240 7200 
• 819 FePi Crp Sale* MO 6133 
£in 7 43 Mato Tuo A Sal 3.0 

JimLWBL 

AWYTHWa AROUND M EVERT 
DMW P OIOH" D EXP 

STARUGHT EXPRESS 

Muuc «■ 

ANDREW LLOYD WEB8EB 
Lirio. 6> RICHARD STTLCOE 
DU cried by TREVOR NUUN 

AP«.r PASLY TO DON OPPM 
FOR RETURNS 

NOW BOOKMS TO aSMCH 1987 


BARtWAN Ol 6Z8 8796/638 
8891 CC iMMV-Sun 10am- 

8pmi ROYAL SNAMCSPEARE 

COMPANY ■ 

BARBICAN 1MEATWE tOB*L 

MOO A Ttoto 7 30. Mmor2003 

730 THE MERRY WIVE* DP 

WINDSOR. 27 28 Aug 

THE PtT lent Mon A Tuts 

7 30. lomoc 2 00 6 7 JO 
PMUSTMES by Maxim Ceriv 
27 28 lug IK DEAD MON- 
KEY. 29 SO Aug final prrb 
REAL DREAMS. 


BLOOMSBURY Cordon SI WCJ 
387 9639 rr 380 1«3 bm 

Bum The lr*B Band In 
BENT BRASS. 


CO M EDY THEAT RE 930 2S7B 

JOHN ALDCRKW 

GWEN SUSAN 

TAYLOR PENHAUCON 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

bt Htctifuto Harms 

Mon Thu 8 Fil/SM 630? B 30 

now: half price pre 
VIEWS AND FIRST 
NIGHT 

(la y* 1 R ipe) 

NO PERT Alia ZS 


CMKNES1ER CC43 781312 
JA NE ETRE /A FUNNY THUM 
. HAP PEWP ON THE WAY TO 
THE FORUM E\m 730. Mato 
Thu & Sal 330 


V 928 2282 CC 

•Naitoooi Theatre^ traafl and*- 

tortuml Ton-L Mon 7 JO. 
Temur £30 6 7 3 0. umd Aug 
29 a 30 THE AMERICA* 

CLOCK tor Arthur Miner Pra 

uew«srM«.s* aaijaswi 

64 2 30 4 730 OocraSeW9 

M 7 OO. T he n Sepl io TH E BAY 
AT NICE and WRECKED EC8S. 


CRfTUUUM AIT Cond S 930 3216 

CC 379 6668/379 6433/741 

9999 CSro* 836 3962. EV» 8.00 

T hu m al 2-10 Sal 330 A 830 

■■MTU It FARCE AT ITS BEST* 

O MaH 

The Thea ire of Comedy Coraoany 

ROT HU DO RALPH BATES 

WBCDSOR DAVIES 


COTTEROX 

ROGER 

HITTER 


RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

wmen and dtrerled by 
RAY COONCY 


POMMWN THEATRE Box omce 

Ol 680 8845/01 636 8S38/9 Or 

Ol 380 9562/3 ALL ErteDhonr 
CC booking* FIRST CALL 24hr 7 

dm on Oia» 2428 NO BOOK- 

MG FEE CTO Sales ’ 930 6125 
DAVE CLARK’. 

TI ME 

THE UL1MMTE EXPED IEN C E 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS -THE ROCK STAR- 
TH£ PORTRAYAL OF -AKASH* 

LAURENS OLIVER 

Mon-Fn 7 3D Thu Mai 2 30 sat b 

SOME SEATS STHA, AVAILABLE 
FOR TODAY'S PERFCHBUNCE. 
SPECIAL CONCESSIONS AT E7 
ONTNURS MATINEES FOR 
OAP3, UMOk STUDENTS A 
UNDER ira. 

Now Boottog to AyrB <87. 


DONMAR WAREHOUSE 240 
8230 « 3T9 6668/6433 
l*ri tow par fa at 
-root SMPLT OBCAT 
SHOW” What On 
SIDE BY SIDE BY 
SONDHOM 

EikI. mat Tomer Sl Sl 

4 8 7. BUTS TOMQR ft SUN 
ALL SEATS 12 


DRURY LAKE THEATRE ROYAL 

Ol 856 8108 Ol 940 9066/7 CC 
3746433 Firti call 24 hour 7-d«V 
et Bkg* 340 7200 Old booking reel 

— 


A SHOW FOR ALL THE FWLV 
Wlowr NMItobnl 
MovtoM Am 6 tor S9M 
\«N 

BEST MUSICAL 

5TAJUM8D DRAMA AWARDS 

i«ed 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 
loll’d 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLAYS ft PLAYERS 


AWARD 

Figt 80 Mato Wed 50. 

SOI SO a 830 
Croup Sale* 930 6123 


UKHOUSECev Odn 

240 8230 CC 379 6565/6433 
LEWIS PATRICIA 

P1ANDER HOOOE 

m NOEL and GERTIE 

August 26 - Sept 20 


DUCHESS S 836 8243 CC 240 
9648 CC 379 6433 * CC 24 nr/7 
day 240 7200 Evg»a wad mu 
Sal 5 * e 

WO SEX. PLEASE. 


HAMPSTEAD 722 9301. Em 8. 

_ SM Mato 4.3 01. OB SERVE THE 

ISONS oruismt auwcHo to 


At Qarrtctc Tit BB 30 Aug 
Opera U Duchess Th 2 Sect. 


DUKE OF YORKS 836 5122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999/240 7200 
C«T* 8 Tnu 3 Sal S ft 8 JO 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Standard Drama Award 1884 

STEPPING OUT 

Hit Comedy Dv Richard Hams 
Directed by Juba McPferoSe 

“TRIUMPH ON TAP" s» 

**LAU OH YO URSELF SILLY" TO 
-A PCRPECr DEuerr- D th 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FORTUNE (A Jr Csari) S cc 056 
2238 KP 741 9999 Cm Sales 930 
6123 Mon lo Frl 8 Sal &30 Mat 
murs A Sal 3.00 

Rate KaWi 


DOUBLE DOUBLE 

“A rteaue of whoounioy 
emerutfnmem Oouaw Doable Is 
UPOcMBW“' Times E Sum. 
“Stuns the audtenee - S Tad 


GMHfiK S 836 

6433 * CC 24 . 

7300 


4601 CC 579 
hr/7 day 240 


has to I hnbiM Th fttpi 2. 


437 1892. CC 379 6433. 
8Kg lee 1st Call 24 ft/ 240 7200 
Crp Saiet 930 6123- E\et 8 
Mats Wed 3 Sal 4 
Andrew Uovd Webber Presents 
sorts LAWSON 
IAN FRANCS 
RONALD KOLSATE 


LEN D ME A TE NOR 

“A Ettiupiur Tmxs 
FILLS THE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOLKD OF LALCHTER” 
S Exp 

An Amen ran Comedy to- 
ken Ludwig 

DUreted by DKU CUmore 


SREENW1CH THEATRE 01-838 

7753 7 45.Mai Sal 


2 30 


DKKOBON, 


CAYLE HUHWCUTT. **SMt a n 
CaMtog~ Times In TIE MISS 
FEfECfotCKFR C ONT ES T by 
Brth HFII ley “A CraoW D I 
TeL From Aim 28 FOR KMC 
AND COUNTRY by John ta’itson 


HAVatARKCT iNUim Kora*. 

BOX outer and CC Ol 930 9832. 
Tub Call 24 nr 7 oay CC Motne 
Ol 240 7200 
□irerl from Broadway 
A Mibeib London stage debut” 
Flnanrlai Tunes 

JACK LEMMON 

As line a stage art or as he to a 
screen one" Today 

LONG DAYS JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

Bi Eugene OTseril 
Jonathan Millers brtillaju 
nroduriien - Standard 
t sea pnh Mon Sal 7 30 



HER MAJESTTS. Haymartcet 
930 4025/6606 20*6/3836 
Tirkot master 379 6151 
First Call CC 240 7200 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Starring 

MCNAEL CBAWFORD 

Sarah Sieve 

Bngilnan Barren 

Muar to' ANDREW LLOYD 
WEBBER 

ubreue to Rjolard 
STU.COC A CHARLES HART 
Deeded trv HAROLD PRJNCE 
Opens 9 Oct. 


LYTTELTON -F 928 WP CC 
rNalional Theatre^ prascmiion 
toagei Tool. Mon 7 45. Tamer 
2 16 How price mat) A 7.45. 
then Sew 2 to 4 A mat Saw 6 
■B M U TTON BEACH g wtou ra s 
by Nefl Simon. Today 330 
Lyltelton Buitet 

Vs-IOl / ' 

C2 60 


MAYPAIB S CC 629 3036. Mon. 

mo a Fn/su eao a aso 
RICHARD TODD to 

•Tha SaW TMkr tor yean’* 8 M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

**ao unabashed winner” S Exp 
“Sensational" Timet 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


KDMTS HEAD 226 1916. 8TEVE 
HARLEY in MARLOWE. A tt«w 
Mitolral 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
437 2056. CC 73* 8961. 579 
6433. 741 9999 in bkg lee). FUN 
Call 24 Hr 7 Day CC 2*0 7200. 
Orp Sales 950 6J23. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

CEORCE HEARN 
& DENIS QLTLLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

'—A PALLADIUM ROAR OP 
APPROVAL” S-Tel 
Mon-Fn 7 30. Mato Wed 2.00 
Sat 250 4 600 
5Mnt roneenwns atab. at door 
Mon-Fn A Sal mats 
SCATS AVAILABLE FROM C7.50 
New hooking to April 1957 


MP MUUD Air Cond 236 5568 CC 
741 9999 Fust Call CC 240 7200 
124 Hr* 7 Day) Mon-Fn 8. Sal 6 * 
8.30 

KAFKA'S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

staged » 


CUmtto. 
limited Soaton 
(Prc-toeetre rood ft drtnk) 


NATIONAL THEATRE SUi Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See SEPARATE ENTR IES under 

OUVIEl*/ LYTTELTON / 

Earn pent cheap 


seats days o t part s at) theatres 
Iron l O am. RESTAURANT (928 

80551. EAST CAR PARK, Info 

653 0680. ABB COND 


LYRIC KAMMERSMmi 01-741 
231 1 Pmt from Sepl S Era 
7 45. Wed mats 230. sal mats 
4 O Opens Se« 6 al 7.0 THE 
HOUSE OF BOHMIM ALBA 
to. Lorn, wun Patrkb Hip, 


STUDIO: Eies 8pra. Sal mats 
4 is ROMEO ft JUUET with 


LYRK TKATRE snannburv 
Ate WI 01437 3686/7 01-434 
1550 Ol *34 1050. 01-734 

5166/7 _ 

rw at n mn » 

~A antiiani A joyously 
«mk pen oi nia pfe" F Tima 
in 

The Naaonal Tneatreto acaanuM 
produrtien of 

ALAN AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-Heartbreak mglv funny - Cdb 
-Hilarious “ fi Times 
-A raie evening ol 
«mJr xsiutoraiion- Times 
Eim 7 39. Mato wed and Sal 3D. 
Croon Salrs 01-930 6123. 

Redured pntt Siudcnl A 
O AP Stan d-by 

FIRST CALL MNR 7 DAY 

“"ss'Bi asss?”" 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
JAN *87 


NEW LONDON Dnny Lane WC2 
406 0072 CC 379 6433 Cues 7.45 
Tne ft &M 300 A 7 AS. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
rr*. ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 


D«e HotegM -405 1567 0T 


01 930612. 

MAY 3D 18*7. 


TO 


OLIVIER V 928 22S2 CC rNa- 
wavd Thealreto open etogei 
Toni 7 15. Tomor 2.00 Hew 
brtce man ft 7 is. men Aug 25 
Io 28 PHAVDA - A Fleet Street 
Camarif by Howard Bremon 
Ei>d David Harr Aug 29 ft 30 
last peeh YONADAB. 


ohm AIR Resents park 

AS6 9431 CC 379 6433 
_ rr Hotline 486 1933 
ARMS AMD THE MAN Today ft 
Sal 7.43. Sal Mai 2 -SO Petor 
Whitbread la EXIT BURBAGE 
Today lunthlnne ipm. ThB 
Sun . uerial double HD 8nm 


PALACE THEATRE 457 6854 
CC 457 8327 or 379 6433 
F« Call 24 Hr TDay CC 240 7200 
CTO Sate* 930 6125 
THE HUOGAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONETetd 

L\rs 7 20 Mato Thu ft Sal UD 
Laterdmen, rtol admitted 
__ umu ine uuenai 
BEAT THE TOUTS BT EMQUtR- 
M6 FOR RETURNS AT TIE BOX 
OFFICE 


PHOENIX 836 2294 cc 240 9661 
741 9999 Ftrst can 24 nr> 7 days 
240 7200. Crp Sales 930 6123 
Eves 7 J Q. Thur mat 3. Sat* 4 ft 8. 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

by TA ELIOT 
OUT ALL T 


PtCCAIMLLY THEATRE Air Con- 
ditioned. 457 4fi06. Credit Card 
Hofflnn 379 6565. 741 9999. Crp 
Sales B36 3962/930 6123. 
2ND SCNIATKMAL YEAR 
Must end 20 Sept -poor to C&A 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 




Review Magazine 
Eves 8 0 Mato w«t 5 ft Sat 

•to part Bank Hal M ia day 


PRINCE EDWARD Bern Ortlce 
734 8981 First CM 24 Hr 7 Days 
ec Booking 836 3464 Crp Sales 
930 6123 

Mon-Sai a. Mai Thur* ft Sal 300 

CHESS 
“A GRAND MASTER OF A 

SHOW” Newswee k 


PHMOC OP WALES 01-930 8681 

/2 CC Hotline 9300844/8/6 Crp 

Sate* 930 6123 Keuh Prewse 

741 9999/5796433. Flrsl C*9 24 

hr 7 «to' 240 7200. 
TOC-TAMnSa 6000' D. Mail 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 

gg&qegL, 

“I DEFY ANYONE NOT TO 

*^Ev5fS 1 »tSrv»ir' ,i EShortor 

Na part Baa*. Hal Basteg 


QUEEN’S 01-734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120. 24 hr cc 240 720a 
Otp Sales 930 6125. 

THE BEST MUSICAL IN 

iSSSSftes. 

”A_wqiMDERFU. STAR” Matt 


T -TOWN! 

-nr RIP PLES WITH 

EXCTTEMEVr- S-Tfmes 
■JLST WONOERFCL” DXXP 
Monftai 8 Mats Wed 2 SO Sat 8 


■OVAL COURT S OC 730 17*8 
Eves Bpiti cSat mats Irani Aim 
SO al 4pmi OURSELVES 
***> Anne Devlin. Dir by 
.SunonCurtto t »U part Aa» 25L 


STRAIBl 836 2660 OC I 

4143/3190 741 9999 Fnl Call 
3« Hr T Day tC 240 720 0 
Crp sue* 930 6123 

CABARET 


ir-srsKi-s? 


— te a to tha Wart Bad” SM 

Starring 

_ WAYNE SLEEP 

DlrariPd ft cttoreowapiMd by 


Mon-Fn 745 Mai Wed 3-00 

HoaSrFKicg ftaiE ASK 

GSS^KWffiS.9 


SAVOY 01-856 8888 CC 01-379 
6219. 836 0479 Eveomw 7M 
Ma» Wed 3. Sat 8 ft a jo 
STH VWS OF 
MICHAEL FRAYN’S 
A WARD- W INNING FARCE 
CHW tHtQRHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PADDfCK 

M ICHAE L COCHRANE 
COLETTE TIMOTm- 

GLEESON CARLTON 

NOISES OFF 

Dir by MICHAEL BLAKEMORC 


COMEDY. OJ-379 3599 CC 01379 
*435/741 9999. Flrtt CaU 24-hr 1 
240 7200 >N9 fee] Crp Setn 930 
AS 95 

The Thrairt of Comedy Co 

QPLHT EWftV OCOLVV 

PEGGY htOU4T 
and LIONEL JEFFRIES 

ROOKERY NOOK 

by Ben Travers 
Directed by Mark Klngaon 
Mon-Fn B Wed Mat 3 Sal 600 ft 
8.30. Reduced price ami 
from Aug 27 

Opera Sept 2 at 7,00pm 


SHAW TNU1M 508 1594 
Kadaoai Yarth Tbaatra 


verflon « Marbetn. 
tip 7 30 Mah Sat 330 


IT HUUmiTS 01*836 1443. Spe- 
cial CC NO 379 6433. five 80 
_ Tue* 2 45. Sat BO and BO 
34th jrr al AfiATKA CH Wfa 

THE MOUSETRAP 


STHATPOKO-IIPaiMVON I 
■•07891 298623 or TKkrtmasMT 
01-379 6433 ROYAL SHAKE 
SPEAK COMPANY *1 Hapail 


Tom0iL Tomor. Mon. Tue 
7 JO Wtotor*» Trie Tomor 
1 SO HMaftJtdMWcd7J0. 

Sama Thaatoa Row TontohL 

Tomor- Mon. Tue 7.30 Kto» 

man Tomor 1-30 Inn Map 

Wed 7.30 For 6KUI 
meal/iheetre deai» and hotel 

stop over nnq iQ789i 67262. 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

”Tnc \m be*) of Bntam'i comic 
talent" Dady Mail 
See ygaraie entnet under: 
C WTETO Oto THEATRE ! 

SHAmiBURV THEATRE 
OF COMEDY/ 
WHITEHALL THCATBC/ 


VAUDEVILLE, WC2. Bom OrtKe 
and CC 01-836 9987/564S. not 
Call (CC ?4 ta-v 01-240 7200 Bkg 
lee). Etc* 7 30 Eve* 7.30. Wed 
Mat* 3 30. sau SD ft 8 IS 
SUSAN SIMON 


JOANNA VAN BYSSDHOH 


NOEL COWARD'S 

BLms SPUrtT 

“HHI class, Amur, micl- 

LJCENr AND THOROUBHLT 
ejubtaKPTT Over 200 teerta 
MUST EM) TtmOBimift 


VAUDEVILLE Boa Office ft CC 

836 9987/5646 Flirt call OC 24 

Hf» 240 7200 Ibkg leci Eves 8 0. 

Mato. Ww 230. SM 6 0. B.S©. 

JUL IA M cKEWZBf 

MARTIN JARVIS 

HlUt BLYTHE 

JOSCPHIKE TTWSOSf to 
ALAN ATCKBOUBTS New Flap 

WOMAN IN MIND 

QMS SEPTEMBER S AT 7JM 


VICTORIA PALACE 01-8X4 1317 
Eve* 7 30 Mato Wed ft sal 2.45 

CHARLIE GIRL 


Fatodara Frt ertRe Stapdaed 
JOC BROWN 
CYD CHARtSK 
DORA BRYAN 
NICHOLAS PARSONS 


CHARUE G IRL 

Pha n e m an agy s«cc 
Ftoaflj i BtoPTIIM 
AIJO book on FIRST CALL 24 Hr* 
7 Days. (Bkg Feel 01-240 7200 ft 
ALL LSCAL AGENTS 


WESTMINSTER 01-814 0283/4 
rr 834 0048. Flirt can ec 2* hr 7 
day* 240 7200 A rr 74 1 
9999/579 6*33. Grp $a|« 930 
6123 Eva 7,49. Wed Mato 5. Sal 

NYTCEE E DA VTO PORT ER 

peter 

WALSH ^ BYRNE 


Murder Mystery 

MADLY NIGHTCAP 


-HURRY to the WEXTWNSTEft*' 


“MUCH B C 1I IR THAN AGATHA 
OUHSTIE" Whelm Om 


WHfTXHALL SWl 01 930 

7765/839 4455 CC Ol 379 
0565/6433. 741 9999 Cn* Ol 
8363962. Mon-Fn e OO. wed Mat 
300 Sait 6.00 ft 83 0 
“The kenMBswnier 

i Guardian) 

JAMES ORDUr 
PATRICIA HAVES 
BILL MAYNARD 

BMAM MURPHY 
PATRICIA ROUTLEDGC 
PATSY ROWLANDS 
PRUNELLA SCALES 


TIMOTHY WEST 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

By J.B. PrtaMey 

Direrird by Ronam Eyre 

*2«U WILL NOT FIND AMQRE 

— jSURASUE EVEN WO ANY 


VWWBLOMM-OITIB 
WORLD - S. Express 


WJR1RWMS Air Condtlh»ed 
83a 3028/379 6565/379 6033 
Cep* 856 3967 

Eve* 8. tob S ft UO 

Ter A Limited Semen 

FAYE DUNAWAY 

“Ekci rn*in o" id Maui n 
CURE A BRAVO 
„ By Donald Freed 
reeved by HAROLD P IN T E H 
“A aumuiaiiM way. literate 
•nd «,itty“ Tone*. -Full of 
passion, ronrera and oiuraflr" 
Cllv Limits 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY d-OFFAY Derinq 
&l V* | ANDY WARHOL 499 

4 1 DO 


BRtTISH LIBRARY Cl Rravn St 

WCI. The Intonuttoul THE 

CITY M MAPS end a ectabra. 

Ha* et ST AUBUST1NK OF 

HIPPO (354-430). Mon Sol 
10-5. Atm 2 306 4dm free 


HAYWARD GALLERY. South 

nSS? ,MAV 2l5 

PHOTOCAPHY ft SURREM^ 

*M Lnlil 5 Orl 4dm, 

Cf ®2(C*SO Reeorded into 
Ol Tol Ol 27 


LEMSTER FINE ART. am Tlnor. 
S Clil lord street. London, tot 
Tel Ol 437 4SJJ 

acORC TAPPERT ft RlCtlARD 
iOECLCT - Two ArUrta ml Um 


nton rn lOem 
appoinmieni only 


MXDtCl CALLERY, 7 Cnihnn SI . 
Bond SI . to l 624 So75 Patnt- 


(liSl-18731 00 4lN 
Kian-Fri 91» 


PARKIN CALUWY 1 1 Motrombe 
SI London Sto i Ol 238 8144 
MIX ED OUH BmON OF MOO- 
CRH BRITISH PAIHTTHC&. 


ROYAL ACADEMY. PTCCADtL 
LY. Ot 734 9052 Open daily 
it>6 1 nr Sun 'Fedureo rale Sun. 
Willi I 4Si SUMMER EXMR1. 
TfON l nui 2* th august C2 aa 
L! 6 0 ro ne me « booking 01 
741 9999 


«ra»6n (Maw Art fttrteak 
Until 19 0(1 Admiree tokdays 
to-5 50 Sun 2-5 SO Recorded 
IMo 01 821 7128 


CINEMAS 


CAMDEN PLAZA 486 2443 SID 
ft NANCY 1 18) Flint at 1 30 
3.S0 o 15 ft 846 


CHEUtt etNCMA Ml 3742 
AN IMPUDENT BOIL M5i Film 
412. SO 4 36 o 40 8 50 


CURZDN MATFABT CurMtl SI 
499 3757 Flirt Cali ?4 Ht 7 DJV 
rr HO 7200 .Big ree, M«w 
SfiMin. Dninoim Eilnii Judi 
peneh m. A ROOM WITH A 
ymvfPOl Film al I 30 i koi 
Stun 3 45. 6 to ft fl 40 
ALSO AT CURZON WEST END. 


CURZSN WEST END Shanertwry 
•\vmiu< tot 45Q 4805 rirrt 
Call 24 Hr 7 Oay rr 240 7200 
■Bkg Fuel Maouv Smilh. 
Denholm EUUoll. Judi Denrn in 
A ROOM WITH A VTEW {POV. 
r ilm al t 30 ,Ka| Sum. 3*9. 
6 10 ft 840 


BATE ffimw , Koiuna HIU 
Cate 727 4043 Sto AMO NAM- 
pT i|3i 2 JQ enai stun 4*0 
650 9 00 LKKUII II 15 4d 
vanre upokmn 


Coafnnwd on page 36 


Story-book stuff 
as Botham lifts 


England’s spirits 




THE OVAL Sew Zealand 
hare scored 142 for four 
against England. 

It was 35 though Ian 
Botham himself had written 
the script when the third Test 
match against New Zealand, 
sponsored by Comhill. began 
yesterday, and that in doing so 
he had made full use of his 
author's licence. After New 
Zealand had been sent in. he 
took a wicket with his first 
ball, another in his second 
over, and finished with three 
for 36. passing in the process 
Dennis Lillee's world record 
of 355 Test wickets. 

As we all hoped it might, 
though there was no certainty 
that it would, his return to the 
England side dragged them 
out of the doldrums. Without 
him. it would almost certainly 
have been the story as before. 
In 47 overs Dilley. Small. 
Edmonds and Emburey took 
one wicket between them in 
not entirely unfavourable con- 
ditions for bowling. 

There is no way now that 
Botham can be left behind 
when England leave for 
Australia in six weeks' time. 
His form yesterday was so 
much better, his attitude so 
much more sensible than 
when he played his last Test 
match, in Antigua in April, 
that it was hard not to think 
his recent suspension, far from 
damaging his Test career, 
could have saved iL One 
oulswinger. followed by some- 
thing that dipped in un- 
commonly fate, showed him 
at his very best. 

On a day when there was so 
much rain about we were 
lucky to get as much cricket as 
we did. Play began 35 minutes 
late, and ended 35 minutes 
after tea. There was a good 
crowd to see our great white 
hope. His bowling for Somer- 
set in the last fortnight has 
hardly been that of a front-line 
member of the England attack, 
but there was never a cricketer 
like Botham for rising to the 
occasion of a home Test 
match. 

Had Edmonds not dropped 
Gray, a straightforward 
chance at mid-wicket off 
Emburey, New Zealand would 
have been 115 for five a 
quarter of an hour before tea, 
and in trouble. That apart, 
England fielded welL and 


By John Woodcock Cricket Correspondent 

a land looked much better organized Smal 
four than at Trent Bridge a fort- only 
night ago. nl, 

lan This is Botham’s 85th Test “z 

ritten match. Lillee played 70 for 
ITest Australia. Hadlee, who has . 

iland. taken 332 wickets for New 
began Zealand, is playing in his 66th. 
ing so The others to have taken more 
>f his than 300 wickets are Willis, 

New Gibbs and Trueman. It was 22 
in. he vears ago, also at the Oval, T“y 
i first that Trueman became the first “"Ir 
xond man to take 300 wickets in 7 j”; 
three Test cricket. Whether Botham 
ocess will be the first to 400. only 
ecord time will tell. To doubt it ?vzr. 

could be the best way of 
night ensuring that he is. uipps 

tainty New Zealand may have had At 
toihe Richard Hadlee to thank for New! 
them being asked to bat Hadlee- Half 
thoui phobia is known to strike noon 
tainly batsmen on the first morning most 
:fore. of a match. Having included when 
Imall. two spinners by leaving out Crow 
took Willey. England’s decision to rathei 
m in field to h 


.-’p 


Small 10 overs had yielded 
oniv 1 7 runs. 


Scoreboard 

NEW ZEALAND: First Innings 

J G Wright not out 63 

B A Edgar c Gooch b Botham — 1 

UJCfWH»lbwb Botham 8 

M D Crawelbw b Dttoy 13 

*J V Coney c Gooch b Botham 38 

E J Gray not out 15 

Extras (nfa 4) 4 

Total (4 wfcts) 142 

R J Hadlee, J G BracawelL fT E Blain, D A 
Staling and E J ChatnaU to bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-17, 2-31, 3-59. 4 - 
106. 

BOWLING (to date): DSey 122-41-1; 
Sma9 12-4-25-0; Botham 11-1-36-3; 
Emburey 15-6-26-0; Edmonds B-3-14-0. 
ENGLAND: G A Gooch, C W J Athey, D I 
Gower, A J Lamb, "M W Gaffiag, I T 
Botham, J E Emburey, P H Edmonds, fB 
N Fraoch, G R OiHay. G C Smai. 
Umpires: H D Bind and □ R Shephard. 

forfeited the chance of Ed- 
monds and Emburey exploit- 
ing a wearing pitch in the 
fourth innings of the match. 
This is the seventieth Test 
match to be played at the Oval 
and only the ninth in which a 
captain winning the toss has 
pul the opposition in. There 
was a case to be made either 
way vestertlay. and Botham 
brought Gatting his reward. 

In the event the pitch had 
some movement off the seam 
and the ball swung a little, 
anyway for Small and Dilley. 
Small bowled a good opening 
spell. Dilley a respectable if 
somewhat unrelaxed one. 
Nothing much was given 
away, that was the great thing, 
so that when, to popular 
acclaim. Botham replaced 


Leading Test wicket- 

Player Career 

IT Botham (England) 1977-86 

D K Lillee (Australia). 1970-84 

R j Hadlee (New Zealand) 1972-86 

R G D Waiis (England) 1970-84 

L R Gibbs (West Indies) 1957-76 

F S Trueman (England) 1952-65 

D L Underwood (England) . — 1966-82 

Kapil Dev (India) 1978-86 

BS Bedi (India) 1966-79 

Imran Khan (Pakistan) 1971-86 

J B Statham (England) 195065 


takers 

Tests Wickets 
85 357 



• BOTHAMS 357 Test wickets 
have been distributed among 
opposing countries as follows: 136 
v Australia (in 29 matches); 59 v 
India (14 matches); 61 v New 
Zealand (14 matches); 33 v Pakistan 
(7 matches); 10 v Sri Lanka (2 
matches); 58 v West Indies (19 
matches). 

His first wicket came in his tost 


Test match, at Trent Bridge in 1977 
(G S Chappell, Australia); his 100th 
in his 19th Test, at Lord's in 1979 (S 
M Gavaskar. India); his 200th in he 
41st Test at the Oval In 1981 (R W 
Marsh, Australia); his 300th in Us 
72nd Test at the Oval in 1984 (P J 
Dujon, west Indies). 

(Table compfled by Simon Wride) 


SPOTLIGHT ON 
BRITISH 

BUSINESSMEN 

The 1986 British Businessman Survey Is now available. 
Based on a universe of approximately 1^000 businessmen 
and women amss Cheat Britain it providesa wealth of data 
relevant to the business community. 


Italsopnrraiesavalual^a^aatiKrilarivemsj^mtothe 
personal and working lifestyles of today's British 


The survey, the eighth in a series, was conducted as 
previously by Research Services lid, part of Burke 
Research Services Group. 

The Business Media Research Committee (BMRC) 
representing The Daily Tfelegraph, The Economist, The 
Financial Tunes and Times Newspapers sponsored the 
research together with other leaefing media and noiHneda 
sponsors izxfadii^ British Airways. 
Eight advertising agencies also 
supported the research and were 
- represented on the BMRC by 
; Foote, Cone & fielding. 

> Fbr your aw of the fuD rgxal 
of this most comprehensive 
survey, complete and retain. 
... the coupon below. 


'VYifcyW* . Svvv ,^ 


Tb: BURG Secretariat, Research Services lid, Station House, Hanow&osd, 

J Wjmbl^r, Middlesex HA9 6DEL Telephone: 01-903 1399, lekac 923755 J 

. Please send me the folk wing: - s 

| ] 0 g 6 Businessman Surrey | 

_ first copy at £75 i 1 


on Decision Making Imrivanoit 
First set at £100 

, .. additional setsat£35eadi 


- Name 

■ Company 

| Address _ 


£ | 

cm | 

□ I 

Report [ 

3 I 

TOTALS □ | 
TT 22/8/86 " 


Botham’s first ball, pitched 
marginally short of a good 
length. left Edgar and was 
edged to second slip where 
Gooch caught it with some 
trepidation. Off the next ball 
Jeff Crowe survived what 
looked a technical chance to 
Emburey. low to bis left at 
third slip. It would have been 
a very fine catch. Crowe was 
leg-before to the last ball of 
Botham's second over, a 
breakback that umpire Shep- 
herd thought would just have 
clipped the leg stump. 

At lunch, after 20 overs. 
New Zealand were 35 for two. 
Half an hour into the after- 
noon England came by the 
most important wicket of all 
when Dilley had Martin 
Crowe leg-before, hitting 
rather loosely at a ball well up 
to him. Wright was still 
soldiering on. and for the 
fourth wicket he and Coney 
added 47. Coney making 38 of 
them in 41 balls with no little 
authority. 

One ofT drive for six by 
Coney off Small was a splen- 
did stroke. Coney was begin- 
ning to tuck into Botham, now 
on his second spell, when the 
star of the day forced a 
mishook out of him. This was 
a calculated piece of bowling 
by Botham, who is known not 
to think much of Coney’s 
hooking powers. Gooch at 
second slip held a lobbed 
catch. 

Soon afterwards Edmonds 
put down Gray whose ob- 
duracy was such a factor in 
New Zealand's victory at 
Trent Bridge. Normally the 
best and safest of catchers, he 
seemed hardly to lay a hand 
on the ball, though it came to 
him at a nice height and pace. 
He may have lost it against the 
background of the members 
(women as well as men) in the 
pavilion. 

Wright's was just the in- 
nings New Zealand needed. 
He played and missed a time 
or two, but there was no 
disgrace in that. Give him 
something on the leg stump, 
well pitched up. and he will 
turn it to advantage. He 
reached his fifty in the 51st 
over, his seventeenth for New 
Zealand. Half an hour later 
the rain closed in, though it 
was a long time before play 
was abandoned for the day. 

Boost for York 

York Rugby League Cub 
should soon be £200.000 the 
richer after yesterday's 
announcement that their Haxby 
Road training ground is to be 
auctioned at the city's Chase 
Hotel on October 2. The sale 
was made possible last week 
when York City Council de- 
cided to allow a housing 
development on the two acre 
site. It should save the second 
division club — which has lost 
£180.000 in the last four years — 
from bankruptcy. 


RACING 


French win 
big sprint 

Last Tycoon strengthened 
his claims to be considered the 
fastest horse in Europe by 
winning the William Hill 
Sprint Championship for 
France at York yesterday. 

Steve Cauthen won four of 
the six supporting races on 
Presidium. Bali Magic, 
Digger s Rest and Startino. 

Report, page 28 


Tyson gets 
his bout 

Mike Tyson will challenge 
Trevor Berbick for the World 
Boxing Council heavyweight 
championship if he beats 
Alfonzo Ratliff over 10 
rounds on September 6 in Las 
Vegas. Nevada. The challenge 
would probably be held in 
November, according to Bob 
Greenway. sports vice-presi- 
dent of HBO, who would 
televise the match as pan of 
their series of heavy-weight 
title bouts designed to crown a 
single champion next year. 

Tyson, only 20 years old. 
has moved up to the WBA No 
I ranking in just IS months, 
during which period he had 26 
contests, and won them alL 24 
by knockouL 

Critical blow 

Wolfgang Rosl a West Ger- 
man television technician, is 
in a critical condition after 
being hit on the head by a 
discus during an athletics 
meeting in East Berlin. Rost, 
who was struck while women 
discus competitors were 
wanning up. is believed to 
have a fractured skull. 


)w 








Catting a dash: Coney takes four off Botham (Photograph: Hugh Roatledge) 

GOLF 

Persistence is rewarded as 
Nobilo shows true colours 


Frank NobUo's second at- 
tempt on the PGA European 
Team Torn has been margin- 
ally more rewarding than his 
first The New Zealander 
discovered that precocity was 
an insufficient ingredient for 
immediate success when, four 
years ago, he hastily departed 
these shores following four 
tremulous weeks. **I had won 
on the Australian Tour and I 
felt I was ready to play 
anywhere." said Nobilo. “The 
experience knocked me for six 
and I went home with my tail 
between my legs." 

Nobilo returned for this 
season but he has for the most 
part competed in the shadow 
of his compatriate, Greg 
Turner, wbo won the 
Scandinavian Open earlier 
this month. All that changed, 
however, on the Haggs Castle 
coarse in Glasgow yesterday 
when Nobflo compiled a first 
round of 65, six under par, in 
the Bell's Scottish Open. 

Nobilo, aged 26, is now a 
more mature golfer. He has 
learned the importance of 
being patient As a qualifier 
from the PGA European Team 
Tour school last November, he 
often has to wait for an 21th 
boar caft for a place in the 


By Mitchell Platts 

tournaments. In fact, as he has 
no chance of playing in any 
one of the next three tour- 
naments, NobOo will return to 
his Auckland home on 
Monday. 

Even so, he was surprised to 
have scored such a low score. 
What galvanized Nobflo’s 
round was an inspired spell 
with his potter. Out in 33, with 
the assistance of an eagle three 
at the fourth, where he holed 
from 30ft, Nobilo proceeded to 
coax home putts ranging from 
6 to 35ft for four bodies in 
succession from the 12th. 

“I decided it was time to 
return here because unless yoo 
compete against the best play- 
ers, yon might as well gjve up,” 
said Nobilo. **I played Rngby 
League as a youngster, then 
plumped for golf rather than 
tennis. Fm glad 1 did and as 1 
believe that the European 
Tonr is producing better young 
players than the American 
Tour, then I'm sure that this is 
the place to be.” 

Nobflo’s expenses this sum- 
mer have taken care of the 
£7,493 he has so far woo. But 
the experience has been 
invaluable and he could con- 
firm his place in the New 


FOOTBALL 


Thanks a million — Watson 


Everton completed the £1 
million signing yesterday of 
Dave Watson. Norwich City's 
England centre half. Manager 
Howard Kendall finally got 
his man at the end of a 
fortnight of on-off negotia- 
tions when Watson put pen to 
paper after further talks at 
Villa Park, the home of Aston 
Villa. 

Everton immediately 
rushed the registration forms 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


for their record deal to League 
headquarters at Lytham St 
Annes so that Watson can play 
at home to Nottingham Forest 
when the new season starts 
tomorrow. 

• Scotland can look forward 
to the likelihood of an exciting 
Skol Cup quarter final dash 
between holders Aberdeen 
and premier league cham- 
pions Celtic. That is the most 
likely outcome following the 


draw for the third and fourth 
rounds of the Skol Cup made 
in Glasgow yesterday. 

DRAVKTMvd round: Dundw v Montrose. 
Ayr w Dundee Urtted, CaMc v Dumbarton, 
Horunon v Hfcs. MoOwnnll » Cfydefcank, 
Fbriarv St Mirren, Aberdeen v Clydo. East 
Hfa • v Rangers. Ties to be played 
Wednesday, August 27. 

Fourth round: East Fife or Angara v 
Dundee or Montrose. Mottwrana or 
Clydebank v Fbrfar or Si Mhrran. Aber- 
deen or Chde v Cettc or Dumbarton. 
Hamilton orkta v Ayr or Dundee United. 
r»es to be played on Wednesday. Septem- 
ber 3. 


Injured Cram 
has doubts 


m¥»riIQr 


By.CUffTtmpJe 


Steve Gam yesterday re- 
jected suggestions that the calf 
injury which has hindered his 
training recently 'would keep 
him out of the European 
championships, which begin 
in Stuttgart on Tuesday. 
"There is no question of me 
not going to Stuttgart and 
racing at least tin 1,500." be 
said. "But I've still got to 
decide whether the injury will 
allow me to run the 800 as 
well" 

There was an alarm when 
Cram's damaged calf muscle 
stiffened up on Wednesday, 


Zealand team for the Dunhfll 
Cap next month by continuing 
in the form he showed yes- 
terday. 

Roger Chapman, the former 
Walker Ciq> player, showed 
signs of returning to form 
when he gathered six birdies 
in a 66, but Sandy Lyle once 
again straggled after a good 
start. Lyle fad three birdies in 
succession from the second 
and he needed two more at the 
16th and 27th to complete a 70 
following an indifferent spell 
halfway through his round. He 
relied heavily on his potter, 
holing nine angle putts in all, 
and said: “I was a little 
despondent with the way 1 
played in the middle of the 
round and the score was a fair 
result” 


LEADING SCORES (GB unless 
stated): 65: F Notdo (NZ). 68: R 
Chapman. 67: B Waites, D Cooper. 
68: J Heggarty, H Baiochi (SAj, P 
Walton (lreXN Ratdiffa (AusL«£ W 
MaBey (US). G Brand Jun, D 
Feherty. R Stewart (Can), A.Sowa 
(Arg), C Moody, O Moore (Ausk R . 
Lee, G Marsh (Aus), C Mason. 7& P 
Carrigffl, P Carsbo (Swel, S Lyle, J 
Bland (SA). 71: P Curry, SLuna(Sp). 
P Harrison, J Anderson (Can), L 
Stephen (Aus), D Hutsh, M McLean, 
R Drummon, N Crosby (USX S 
Stephen. 




1 .000m race in the Dairy Crest 
Games at Birmingham. "It 
had been fine immediately 
after the race, but on Wednes- 
day it was stiff again and so I 
didn't train at all as a 
precaution.” 

- David Sharpe, his training 
partner, the nominated re- 
serve for the 800m, was put on 
standby and may still travel 
out to Stuttgart with Cram and 
the rest of the British team on 
Saturday, while Cram intends 
to train hard for several days 
now to try to get an indication 
of the seriousness of the 
problem. 

The task facing Cram is not 
helped by the competition 
timetable, which involves him 
running five races, with four 
of than on the first four days 
of the championships, as fol- 
lows: August 26, 2Q.40hrs 
800m heal; August 27, 18.55, 
800m semi-final; August 28, 
19.00, 800m final; August 29, 
18.40, 1500m heat; August 31, 
16.50, 1500m final. 

“What I'm most concerned 
about is the possibility that if I 
try to contest both events, by 
the final afternoon I may not 
be able to run at all," he said. 
*Td rather win the 1,500 than 
the 800, and I'd rather come 
away winning (me rather than 
coming away with nothing at 
all. 

“But it's just impossible to 
tell how it will stand up to the 


races until f try. 1 remember 
during the Commonwealth 
Games in Edinbutgh. which I 
went into realty fit, that by the 
end of a week of heats and 
finals I was suffering all sorts 
of aches and pains." 

Another setback for Cram is 
that Norman .Anderson, his 
regular physiotherapist who 
has helped him through simi- 
lar problems and was with 
him in Edinburgh, is currently 
away on holiday and will not 
be in Sumgait either. “Of 
course. I'm still getting good 
treatment, but Norman knows 




he planned his holiday we had 
the understanding that if I was 
still needing serious treatment 
a week before a major 
championship, then I prob- 
ably wouldn't be going 
anyway.” 

With Sebastian Coe having 
completed his own prepara- 
tion for Stuttgart with a win 
over 1,500m in 3min 35.09sec 
in Berne on Wednesday night, 
which was probably not as 
quick as he would have liked 
following the virus infection 
which kept him out of the 
Commonwealth Games, the 
long awaited 1 986 showdowns 
between Coe and Cram seem 
still further blighted by medi- 
cal problems. 

But to focus attention solely 
on these two great runners as 
the best in the 800/1,500 fields 
in Stuttgart is to risk Ming 
into a regular European 
championship traq?. where 
historically the little known 
but rapidly improving rival 
has been perfectly capable of 
snatching the gold medal. 

After CHaf Beyer, of East 
Germany, in 1978 and Hans* 
Peter Ffcrner, of West Ger- 
many in 1982, both untipped 
800m champions, both Coe 
and Cram will be anxiously 
watching men like Peter 
Braun, ofWest Germany, who 
has nm lmin 44.03 sec this 
year. The medical problems 
are perhaps not the only ones. 


TR 

^ « Kill I 



r> 1 8 Bf. 

STn 

% 1 1 1 








j •I-"!',** A* : « t 1 








Til* 1 iT"" lFTI 




I iQ 1 1 H 


V hi f' 1 



• i •"* i ■ * • • 1 1 • 


1 f TVj ‘ r 1. l l ? 1T l 4 :lV*‘ r ; u: i 











mSuESSMSm 


SHOWJUMPING 



I !S4StfL. Derby target for Whitakers 


Gough: speaking out 

Gough threat 

Brian Clough, the Notting- 
ham Forest manager, has 
threatened to resign at the end 
of the season if a team sponsor 
cannot be found, “ft is acutely 
embarrassing that we are one 
of the few first division dubs 
who do not have a sponsor 
and 1 can't for the lire of me 
think why. I don’t care if the 
money comes from the Rat 
Earth Society. I'll even lake a 
donation from No 10,” 

Cole drops out 

Billy Cole, the shot putter, has 
had to withdraw from the 
British team for next week's 
European athletic champion* 
ships in Stuttgart because he has 
mumps. 


Neil Redfeam, the Lincoln 
City midfield player, has 
signed for Doncaster Rovers, 
who paid the full £17.500 fee 
set by a transfer tribunal. 
Lincoln are to appeal to the 
FA that Doncaster reimburse 
them Redfearn's wages since 
the tribunal sat on July 14. 

Fulham out 

Fulham have officially 
withdrawn from the Rugby 
League second division. Don- 
caster. Carlisle and 
Workington, who were not 
due to play Fulham, will play 
28 games and the other 14 
clubs 26 games, plus two 
points -for each scheduled 
game with Fulham. 

Longer top 

Bernhard Langer has re- 
placed Severiano Ballesteros 
at the head of the latest Nissan 
world moneywinners list for 
PGA European lour members. 
The lending six in the final 
rankings will qualify for the 
Nissan Cup in November. 

LEADING MONEYWINNERS: 1. B 
LanqK-.E312.498: 2. S BaMesteros. 
£301.129; 3. A Lyle. E141.400; 4, H 
Clark. £103^33; 5, N FaWQ. 
EKL292; 6, G Brand. £88.905; 7. i 
Woosnam. £83.983; 8, R Rafferty, 
£75.533: 9. G Brand jun. £71.970: 
10. 0 SeBberg, £71 , 285 . 


Two . of Hickstead's most 
famous protagonists, John 
Whitaker with Ryan’s Son and 
Paul Schockemohler, from 
West Germany withDeisfer, 
descend on the Douglas Bunn 
Sussex ground this weekend 
for the Silk Cut Derby the 
richest and most spectacular 
event in ihe sport in Britain. 
This weekend marks the 25th 
anniversary of the Jumping 
Derby -and the 15th anniver- 
sary of Harvey Smith’s V-sign 
- ‘ made after wihning on 
Mattie Brown. Smith, the 
winner of the MiOstreer Derby 
in Ireland last , weekend and 
the Swedish Jumping Derby 
in July, competes this week- 
end, on Sanyo Shining 
Example. 

The money — £60,<XXT for 
the DeTby of which £20,000 
goes to the winner - is not tire 
only lure for this /year’s 
impressive field which in- 
cludes Michael . Whitaker. 
Nick Skelton and David 
Broome. The course, includ- 
ing the 10fl 6in drop off the 
Derby Bank and .the notorious 
Devil's Dyke, is one of the 
most.chalienging in the wradd. 
There have been only 22 dear * 
rounds In its history, the. 1 test . 
being ■ Whitakers, winning . 


By Jenny MacArthnr 

round with Ryan's Son in 
1981 The additional £5,000 
which' the sponsors have of- 
fered since 1984 for anyone 
completing a double dear 
remains unclaimed. 

Whitaker's chances of re- 
peating bis 1983 feat look 
good- Ryan's Son’s pro- 
gramme for the ' year has 
revolved round the Derby and 
Whitaker has been careful not 
to over work the 18-year old 
horse, who was runner-up last 
year. “1 just take him to the 
shows he likes,” he said 
yesterday - such as Dublin a 
fortnight ago where the old 
horse appeared to be jumping 
better than ever. Two dear 
rounds- in the Nations Cup 
were followed, the next day. 
by sixth place in the Grand 
ftix over- a course which 
Whitaker rated second only to 
Aachen in size. 

Scbockem 6 hi er, who won 
the Derby last year on 
Lorenzo, 8 horse he has now 
sold, has a record to match - 
Ryan's Son with Deister, They 
won in 1982, were second 
equal in 1983, and fourth for 
the last two years, while also 
adding three successive Euro- 
pean titles. 

.The rider who the. two 


favourites will need to watch 
is Michael Whitaker, John’s 
younger brother. Depending 
on his performance in today's 
Dertnr Trial — from which the 
top 30 qualify for Sunday's 
Derby - Michael could well 
have two Derby entries both 
with a good -chance of win* 
. ning. 

Owen Gregory, the winner 
in 1980. now aged 17, knows 
- the Derby course inside out 
and, like Ryan's Son has beat 
groomed specially for this 
competition. But MiciaeTs 
second ride. Warren Point 
could well be the one to 
provide trim, with his second 
win. Warren Point won the 
Derby Trial last year and was 
third in the Derby in his fits! 
attempt despite taking an 
instant dislike to the Derby 
Bank and haring to be 
sympathetically coaxed down 
by his rider. 

The Bank holds.no fears for 
the Irish who are particularly 
well represented 'tins. TySf- 
Their entry indudes. Jd®* 
Mackcn, and John L*dins- 
ham, the former winners*.® 
well as Captain Gerry 
with. Rockbarton fresh tmrj 
their win in the Du&fin’.GW® 
Prix. r •