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THE 

No 62,543 

Police group 

give Stalker 
his job back 



SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


The tong ordeal of Mr John 
Stalker, suspended deputy 
chief constable of Greater 
Manchester, ended last night 
when his police authority 
decided to reinstate him anrf 
take no action over a report 
recommending that he face a 
disciplinary tribunal on 10 
counts. 

The decision, taken after six 
hours of deliberation, ended 
what for Mr Stalker and his 
family has been a private 
agony played out in the public 
spotlight for almost three 
months. 

He will go back to work 
today with no more than a 
rebuke. The authority voted, 
by -36 to six, in favour of a 
resolution that Mr Stalker 
should be “more circumspect” 
in his political and criminal 
associations in view of his 
high office. 

But the resolution also de- 
cided not to take any disci- 
plinary proceedings on two 
counts brought under the 
heading of discreditable con- 
duct; those of- unwise associ-* 
ations with criminals as a 
result of his long friendship 
with a Manchester business- 
man, Mr Kevin Taylor, and 
one that he may have risked 
causing the public to doubt his 
impartiality in carrying out his 
duties by attending a fund- 
raising ball for the local 
Conservative Association. 

The eight other counts, 
arising from allegations that 
he misused police vehicles on 
five occasions, were also re- 
jected. The authority decided 

Holiday 

Monday 


Weekend 
of sport 



Full report on the 
first games of the 
Football League; 
pins full holiday 


race cards 


Scraping 
the barrel 

m 


How Houston’s 
oil barons are getting 
used to plunging 
incomes 


— lid — 

• There is £16,000 to. 
be won in The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition today. 

• The daily prize is 
doubled to £8, 000 
because there was 
no winner yesterday 
and there is the usual 
weekly prize, also 
£ 8 , 000 . 

0 Portfolio lists, 
pages 16 and 21; rules 
and how to play, 
page 27. 

TSB chance 

More than two million mem- 
bers of the public are missing 
out on the chance to invest in 
the Trustee Savings Bank 
Family Money, pages 22-25 

City degrees 

Degrees awarded hy the City 
University and Open Univer- 
sity degrees for the South, East 
and West Midlands and York- 
shire regions are published 
today Page 27 


By Peter Davenport 
that no disciplinary proceed- 
ings need be taken but that in 
future the authority would 
scrutinize the use of police 
cars by senior police officers. 

Last night Mr Stalker, who 
had wailed in his solicitor’s 
office with his wift^Stetta and 
two daughters Francine, aged 
17, and Colette, aged 21, said: 
“I am absolutely delighted. It 
is a vindication ofwbMlknew 
would happen one day- But it 
seems that it all began a 
million years ago, it’s been a 
very, very long time. ” 

Asked whether he would 


• — - - — - 

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Jm 


Mr Stalker, faced 10 tlisci- 
plinary offences’ 

now be seeking compensation 
from the police authority, Mr 
Stalker refused to comment 
“I have been exonerated com- 
pletely. My good name is all 
that matters to me.” 

Mr Stalker said he would be 
hack at his office desk at 
Greater Manchester police 
headquarters at 8.45am today. 

Clash on 
Chinese 
border 

Moscow (Renter) A - So- 
viet Foiagn Ministry spokes- 
man yesterday answered a 
report from the Chinese em- 
bassy here that “something 
happened last month” on the 
Sno-Soviet border by saying 
all was. now quiet on his 
country’s eastern front. 

A Chinese embassy spokes- 
man, when asked about a 
Japanese newspaper report 
that one Chinese soldier was 
kilted and another injured in a 
| gun fight with Soviet troops 
on July 12, confirmed: "Some- 
, thing happened last month”. 

He said Moscow and Peking 
had exchanged protest notes 
about the incident. 

Leading article 7 

Mr Gennady Gerasimov, 
the Soviet spokesman, replied: 
“The Soviet-Chinese border is 
I very long, over 7,020 kilo- 
metres (4,360 miles), probably 
the longest border in the 
world. Everything is quiet on 
this bonder ... When ques- 
tions arise or incidents happen 
I they are quickly settled. Now 
there are no unsettled prob- 
lems.” 

When pressed to say 
whether there had bees any 
problems on July 12, he said: 
“You heard my answer. 1 have 
nothing else to add at 
present.” 

The Peking correspondent 
of the Japanese newspaper 
Yomiwri Shimbun had quoted 
an unidentified East E uropean 
source as saying “extreme 
tens ion” followed the clash on 
the border between the Soviet 
Union and China’s far western 
Xinjiang province. _ 

The source, quoting an un- 
named Chinese official, said 
13 disguised Soviet border 
guards fired on three Chinese 
border guards 

Western diplomats here 
commented: “Gerasimov 
could have denied it but from 
that kind of formulation 
(wording), it sounds as if 
“something did indeed 
happen”. 



Ernest Saunders: Contracts 
with subsidiaries, 
takeover battle against the 
Argyll group for the Distillers 
spirits company. 

The appendix also showed 
two new contracts with 
subsidiaries of Guinness 
< which, from the same date, 
would take Mr Saunders' an- 
nual pay to around £350,000. 

The details were lucked 
away in small print at the back 
of the document, which was 
primarily intended to tell , 
shareholders why Mr 
Saunders had radically altered 
plans for a joint Guinness- 1 
Distillers board outlined dur- 
ing the takeover. Guinness 
now intends to establish a 
single board without Distillers 
representation on which Mr 
Saunders will act as executive 
chairman. 

Chief rewarded, page 27 


v*-- * * • 


• ••• 





He denied that the in- 
vestigation would sour his 
relationship with his chief 
constable, Mr James 
Anderton, -who sent the allega- 
tions to the police authority 
that began the inquiry. • 

Mr S talker added that he 
believed he and Mr Anderton 
would work together welL 
“We are both professional 
men and I would hope he 
would be glad that I am back 
to be his deputy again. As for 
as ihe rest of the force is 
concerned I have had such 
overwhelming support I fchow 
they will be glad to see me 
bade.” 

The decision by the Greater 
Manchester Police Authority 
was taken after they had 
questioned Mr Colin Samp- 
son, chief constable of West 
Yorkshire who conducted the 
investigation into Mr Stalker, 
for more than two hours. At 
one stage one Labour coun- 
cillor branded his document a 
“Mickey mouse report”. 

Later Mr David Moffett, 
acting chairman of the La- 
bour-controlled authority, 
said that the investigation had 
not been a waste of time and 
that they had thanked Mr 
Sampson for his ngwrt al- 
though they rejected its central 
recommendation that Mr 
Stalker should face an in- 
dependent disciplinary tri- 
bunal on the 10 counts. But 
Mr Moffett added that as a 
result of the investigation Mr 
Stalker’s police career would 
be “discoloured”. 

Continued oa page 2, col 6, 

£ 175,000 

rise at 
Guinness 

. : JfyRicharti Lander 

Mr Ernest Saunders, chief 
executive of Guinness, is to 
receive pay rises totalling 
£175,000 a year, bringing bis 
pay to about £350,000. 

The rises are in three parts. 
Mr Saunders has already re- 
ceived £100,000 more from 
the company itself; bringing 
his pay there to £275,000, plus 
£50,000 from one subsidiary, 
and a further £25,000 has bom 
proposed from another 
subsidiary. 

An appendix to a company 
circular released yesterday 
showed that Mr Saunders 
received his salary increase on 
May 1, shortly after Guinness 
won a protracted £2.5 billion 


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The Princess of Wales, watched by tire captain. Conn 
the periscope of the nuclear-powered submarine Trail 
waters of the Clyde during her private visit to 


ay as it sailed under i 
basest Fastens. 


Wet start 
for Bank 
holiday 

The start of the Bank holi- 
day weekend was marred yes- 
terday as torrential rain and 
heavy traffic brought chaos to 
main roads and motorways in 
the Midlands and the south. 

A 15-mile traffic jam built 
up on the A34 between Bir- 
mingham and Oxford as thou- 
sands of holidaymakers pa- 
cked the road with cars and 
caravans! - 

On the M25 outer London 
ring-road,' the wet _ weather, 
earned a 12- vehicle- crash and 
brought traffic to an eight-mile 
halt in Rickmansworth, 
Hertfordshire. 

In the west, there was a five- 
mile tailback on the M4 at the 
Severn Bridge, and major 
delays on the MS southbound 
following a spate of accidents. 
In BristoL more than half an 

Carnival day 3 

Forecasts 16 

inch of rain fell in 20 minutes. 

A record number of holi- 
daymakers were heading for 
Mediterranean resorts to es- 
cape Britain’s gloomy wea- 
ther. But the one million 
people expected to attend 
London's Notting HD1 Car- 
nival - tomorrow wifi need 
umbrellas after rain was 
forecast 

A spokesman for Gatwick 
airport said that it should 
break passenger records, with 
86,000 travellers expected to- 
day and 81,000 tomorrow. 

“It will be our busiest 
weekend in the airport’s his- 
tory. People seem to be escap- 
ing the dismal weather with a 
flight to the sun,” he said. 

Heathrow Airport is expect- 
ing an average of 100,000 
passengers and 1,000 flights a 
day throughout the weekend. 


South Africans 
stockpiling to 
beat sanctions 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


The South African Govern- 
ment has been stockpiling 
“literally thousands of items” 
of strategic goods over the last 
decade as a protection against 
economic sanctions, a senior 
Cabinet Minister has 
disclosed. 

Speaking at a. function in 

era Transvaal, the Minister of 
Manpower. Mr Pietie Du 
Ptessis. also said a special 
committee had been estab- 
lished in the Department of 
Trade and Industries to pro- 
mote “unconventional trade” 
- a euphemism for sanctions- 
b usting. 

Mr Du Plessis repeated 
earlier warnings by the Min- 
ister of Trade and Industries, 
Dr Dawie de Villiers, that 
sanctions meant “economic 
war”, and that a blackout 
might have to be imposed on 
all information about South 
Africa’s trade so that 
“we ... do not assist the en- 
emy by talking too much”. 

Mr Du Ptessis said the 
Government had “learnt from 
experience how important it is 
to safeguard its sources of 
supply. Thorough provision 
has been made in this regard, 
which includes protecting the 
flow of technology and know- 
how on a variety of products. 

“The Government is not 
unaware of what our enemies 
are pfenning, and has con- 
sequently, for more than a 
decade, been engaged in a 
programme of stockpiling 
strategic goods — literally 
thousands of items — in order 
to safeguard our economy 
against sanctions.” 

Mr Du Plessis’s remarks 


Barclays Bank calls in fraud squad 


By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

Scotland Yard is investigat- 
ing a £440,000 fraud at a 
branch of Barclays Bank in 
Whitehall- in which forged 
signatures were used to au- 
thorize payment of money 
from a company’s accounts to 
a forger abroad. 

The theft was spotted after 
three payments totalling 
£440,000 had been made and a 
fourth for £600,000 was await- 
ing action. The signatures 
authorizing the payments had 


been checked already and 
were found to be false. 

The loss is being investi- 
gated by the fraud squad and 
yesterday both bank and po- 
lice sources denied earlier 
reports that the money had 
been taken by breaking a 
computer code. 

. The bank said in a state- 
ment that its computer system 
was in no way involved nor 
were any staff. The statement 
said: “The fraud involves the 
possible forgery of a 
customer’s written authority.” 


Mystery surrounds Ovett sportswear company 


Hone News 2J ] 
Overseas 45 1 
Aft* 19 4 
Arts 8 I 

Bartbukado. 2 

murages is J 

Bridge 1345 ! 
hostess 27-25 : 
Chess 2J3 : 
Ceart 15 1 
Crerawortsl3,W ' 
Diary $ 1 

it * * 


Leaden 7 

LrttMS 7 

Obituary 15 
RdfeioB 15 
Services 15 
Stem* 2 
Sport 27-30J2 
Taartrcs^te 12 
TV 4 Radio 31 
Vims 15^7 
Weather 16 

Wills . 15 


By John Goodbody and 
Nicholas Beeston 

Hie sportswear company of 
Steve Ovett is the centre of a 
j mystery on the eye of the 
| British runner leaving for the 
European Championships. 

The Brighton offices of his 
Ovett Sports have been un- 
attended for four months, the 
premises are up for lease, 
pigeons nest on the window 
sills and the post lies un- 
opened on the mat. 

It is not the first time that 
Ovett, the Commonwealth 
5,000 metres champion, has 
had trouble in business. Ovett 
Ltd, the predecesssor of Ovett 
Sports, went into voluntary 
liquidation in 1984 owing 34 
creditors £37,700. 

Ovett immediately formed 


a new company. But it has 
received complaints from cus- 
tomers about the quality of 
goods and the punctuality of 
delivery. 

The company bad already 
secured the 1985 London 
Marathon contract to supply 
official souvenir clothing be- 
fore the voluntary liquidation 
of Ovett Ltd was announced. 

But Mr John Distey, a 
director of the London Mara- 
thon said: “We were a bit 
disturbed by the standard of 
the service to which we would 
like to feel our punters are 
entitled Goods were as de- 
scribed but there were prob- 
lems in delivery. It was not as 
good as we would have liked.” 

The concession returned 
this year to Bourne Sports, 



Steve Ovett whose company 
telephone is not answered . 

Britain’s biggest mail order 
specialists in athletics goods, 
who say the contract is worth 
about £100000: They have 
tried to order rain suits from 
Ovett. But Mr John Bourne, 
the managing director, said 


“The phone is not answered 
anymore.” 

Ovett, who flies out tomor- 
row with the rest of the British 
team to Stuttgart, declined 
yesterday to answer questions 
at his Brighton home, which 
has been pul up for sale at 
£180,000. Mrs Rachel Ovett, 
his wife, said: “Neither Steve 
nor I have any comment.” 

In November 1984 Ovett 
sent a circular to creditors 
telling them that although 
Ovett Ltd bore his name “it 
was run by a consortium of 
businessmen in London for 
the last two years” and that 
the new company would have 
the 1980 Olympic champion 
as the majority shareholder 
and controller. 

It announced: “We would 
like you to be aware that Ovett 


Deaths feared 
for 70 years 
at Chernobyl 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


reflect the attitude of tub- 
thumping bravado, openly 
proclaiming the merits of a 
siege economy and daring the 
world to do its worst, which 
has been typical of speeches by 
Government Ministers since 
the State of Emergency was 
declared on June 12. 

. Oae-of the items. that Sooth 
Africa is known to have been 
stockpiling for many years is 
oil, the one natural resource 
which the country lacks. It is 
believed to be stored in 
woTked-out coal mines. 

Press freedom 5 

Botha Interview 6 

Although' information on 
the procurement and stockpil- 
ing of oil has long been an 
official secret, which it is a 
criminal offence to reveal, 
half- yearly figures released by 
the South African Reserve 
Bank show that the Govern- 
ment has been malting big i 
strategic purchases of oil. 

About half of South Africa’s 
liquid fuel requirements are 
now reckoned to be met by its 
own expensively developed 
oil-from-coal plants, although 
these are extremely un- 
economic given the low (nice 
of oil on the world market. 

Despite being subject to an 
oil embargo for some years. 
Pretoria has managed to en- 
sure an adequate supply of 
crude, even surviving the fill 
of Lhe Shah oflran, which cut 
oft 96 per cent of its supplies at 
a stroke, forcing it to seek oil 
where it could. The South 
Africans have shown similar 
resource in getting round the 
arms embargo. 


The scale of devastation of 
the nuclear disaster at Cher- 
nobyl was worse than experts 
in the West had calculated. 

As more details emerge 
from reports from the Soviet 
Union, an awesome picture is 
growing of an even bigger 
catastrophe just averted. 

The reports were prepared 
as a brief for member coun- 
tries of the International 
Atomic Energy Agency before 
a meeting in Vienna next week 
to review the lessons of the 
accident. 

Soviet scientists now cal- 
culate that 100 million curies 
of radioactivity were spewed 
into the atmosphere. The 
amount released by the bomb 
over Nagasaki was 1,000 mil- 
lion curies. 

Yet only 3% per cent of the 
radioactive waste substances 
which had accumulated in the 
reactor at Chernobyl was re- 
leased. More than one-third of 
the fall-out is believed to have 
spread within 18'/: miles of the 
plant 

All the gaseous radioactive 
contaminants escaped, carry- 
ing with them about 20 per 
cent of the caesium in the 
reactor and 10 per cent of the 
i iodine. 

Though the temperature 
rose to 2,000 degrees centi- 
grade, the zirconium cladding 
of the fuel remained intact, 
preventing the worst night- 
mare of a meltdown of the 
nuclear fuel. 

But it was the delay in large- 
scale evacuation of the 
surrounding area which ac- 
counts for the Russian es- 
timates that an extra 6.530 
cancer deaths may eventually 
result from the accident over 
periods of up to 70 years. 

Test series 
victory a 
step nearer 

New Zealand moved on by 
- 115 runs from 142 for four :o 
257 for eight in the third 
Cornhifl Test against England 
at the Oval yesterday, during a 
day shortened by had tight and 
rain. 

John Wright, who had been 
63 not out overnight went on 
to make 119, bis fifth Test 
match hundred, and the first 
by a New Zealander at the 
Oval. Wright a left-handed 
opening batsman who joined 
Derbyshire in 1977, may al- 
ready have done enough to 
guarantee New Zealand vic- 
tory in the series. 

In the Britannic Assurance 
County Championship, 
Gloucestershire and Essex, the 
two leading teams, played out 
.a draw at Colchester, leaving 
Gloucestershire at the top of 
the table. 

Repents, pages 29, 32 


The figure is the first public 
forecast made by Soviet 
radiologists, which the report 
says could be higher. The 
document explains the lack of 
more detailed data about the 
exposures to people, and de- 
scribes continuing measure- 
ments of people and soil, 
plants, food and water sup- 
plies to get more precise 
figures. 

One reason why the Soviet 
experts say the estimates of 

long-term fatalities could be 
too low is that figures are 

Cloud over Britain 2 
Diagram 2 

Anti-nuclear protest 2 

based on so-called external 
radiation, the dose received 
directly from the cloud, 
contaminated surroundings 
and estimates about particles 
that were inhaled. 

The report docs not cal- 
culate how many additional 
cancers may come from 
consuming foods contami- 
nated with long-lived radio- 
active substances. 

But the 382-page report said 
top soil was being removed 
from 1,000 square miles 
surrounding the plant. It was 
being treated as radioactive 
waste for burial at a secure 
waste disposal site. 

Some evacuated areas are 
expected to form a quarantine 
zone for over four years. 

When the decision to evac- 
uate was taken, the measures 
listed in the report describe 
the largest civil defence opera- 
tion that expens in that field 
in Britain can recall. 

In the first few hours radioi- 

Continned on page 2, col 4 

Fleming in 
court on 
Monday 

Miami (Reuter) - John 
Hewing, wanted by Scotland 
Yard for questioning in 
connection with a £26 million 
gold robbery, will appear on 
Monday before an immigra- 
tion court which will decide 
whether to deport him to 
Britain, court officials said 
yesterday. . 

If the judge decides to 
deport Mr Fleming, he could 
be put on a plane to London 
next week, the officials saidL 

Mr Fleming, aged 45, has 
been held by immigration 
authorities since being taken 
into custody on Wednesday at 
Miami airport after he was 
expelled from Costa Rica. 

He is sought by Scotland 
Yard in connection with 
Britain’s biggest robbery, the 
theft of three tons of gold and 
a pile of diamonds from a 
Brinks- Mai warehouse on 
November 26. 1 983. 


According to police sources 
a computer was used for the 
transfer of funds but only after 
the signatures had been taken 
as genuine by bank staff 
dealing with the company, 
which generates many inter- 
national transactions each 
day. 

The fraud squad asked a 
detective inspector, who 
heads a specialist group han- 
dling the financial misuse of 
computers, to examine the 
case for any sign of computer 
fraud. He found no evidence. 


TELEVISION 
TRAINING 
CENTRE 

Diploma in Television Journalism 
News and Current Affairs, 
Newscasting and Presentation 

Diploma inTelevision 
Studies 

Television Direction 
and Production 

also Diploma in 
Photographic Studies 


Spoils Ltd has developed a 
completely new range of 
sportswear, designed in 
collaboration with Steve 
Ovett, which is to be launched 
into the beginning of 1985.” 

But sports stores such as 
LiUywhites and Olympus, 
with more than 100 outlets, 
have not stocked his goods. 

The company has con- 
centrated on mail-order deliv- 
eries but none of the three 
leading athletics m agazine s, 
Running, Athletics Today and 
Athletics Weekly a .vertise the 
goods. Mr Tim Green, the 
advertisement director of 
Athletics Weekly, said yes- 
terday. “We have never car- 
ried ’ advertisements from 
Ovett Sports Ltd because of 
the way the company started.” 


Apply to 
TELEVISION TRAINING CENTRE 
FULHAM STUDIOS 
101 Farm Lane 
London SW6 1QJ 
Te!ephone.01-381 4000-381 4411 


V- 




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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


* £ fr 


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Firm ban on ‘loyalist’ 
flags to end factory 
worker intimidation 


Workers in Northern 
Ireland’s largest manufac- 
turing company have been 
ordered to take down 
“loyalist” flags and political 
posters in an attempt to end 
sectarian intimidation on the 
factory floor. 

The management of Shorts 
aircraft manufacturers made 
the order after lime cards of 
seven Roman Catholics were 
stolen and three posters dis- 
played naming them as alleged 
Provisional IRA sympath- 
izers. 

Elsewhere in the province 
more than 1,000 workers in 14 
DHSS offices were not work- 
ing yesterday as sympathy 
walkouts continued with Prot- 
estant and Roman Catholic 
workers supporting colleagues 
who have received threats 
from republican and loyalist 
paramilitary gangs. 

In a letter to the 7,000 
employees. Sir Philip Fore- 
man, chairman of Shorts, said 
that anyone refusing to lake 
down flags, political posters 
and emblems or those replac- 
ing them would be disciplined. 

Sir Philip said that he was 
aware of the strong feelings 
some people had on certain 
political issues. 

But he added that the 


By Richard Ford 

company’s future and jobs 
were at stake if the factory was 
to become a political cam- 
paigning ground, or they al- 
lowed workers to be 
intimidated for their religious 
or political beliefs. 

His letter brought strong 
criticism from the Democratic 
Unionist Party who described 
it as “craven capitulation”. 

But it was welcomed by the 
Social Democratic and La- 
bour Party and the province’s 
Fair Employment Agency. 

As some workers left the 
factory last night they claimed 
the management was attempt- 
ing to intimidate them and 
that the issue had been publi- 
cized try a republican element 
who wished to see the factory 
dosed down. 

Hie state-owned company 
made an operating profit for 
the first time in 10 years in 
1984-85. 

But it relies heavily on 
orders from the United Steles 
where a strong Irish- American 
lobby has attempted to slop 
contracts going to the East 
Belfast firm alleging that its 
discriminates in its employ- 
ment practices. 

This week damaging pub- 
licity occurred shortly before 
the Fam borough Air Show. 


Yesterday’s statement was 
an attempt to restore the 
company’s image and reassure 
potential customers as well as 
indicating to its workforce 
that the management was 
acting decisively. 

The management at Shorts 
acknowledges that with two 
million feet of shop floor h. 
will be difficult to prevent 
emblems being erected. 

Mr Jim AHister, of the 
DUP, described the ban on 
flying the Union flag as 
“outrageous”. 

Under the province’s Flags 
and Emblems Act it was an 
offence to interfere with the 
flying of the Union flag. 

The company’s move was 
welcomed by Mr Brian Feeny, 
Social Democratic and La- 
bour Party councillor. 

The DHSS offices in 
Omagh, Carrickfergus, Ar- 
magh, Strabane, London- 
derry, Portadown, Luigan, 
Dungannon, Ballymena, 
Magherafelt and Belfast were 
closed yesterday as workers 
stopped work. 

An IRA car exploded as 
army bomb disposal experts 
were about to cany out a 
controlled explosion near the 
main police station in 
Londonderry. 



World Chess Championship 

Tense tenth game 
seems set to end 
in overnight truce 

By Raymond Keene, Chess Cotrespaadeat 

The tense tenth game of the 
World Chess Championship 
at the Park Lane Hotel, central 
London, has been adjourned 
in a situation which is widdy 
regarded as likely to be drown. 

In fact, many experts arc 
predicting that a truce will be 
concluded overnight without 
further play today. 

The opening, a Queen's 
Gambit Declined, duplicated 
that of the 23rd game of the 
match between the two play- 
ers last year. 

However, on his 13th move, 

Karpov introduced a new idea 
which led to a speedy clear- 
ance of the central pawns. As a 
result of that a whole scries of 
exchanges took place but 
Kasparov ' was left exerting 
nagging pressure with his 
Bishop against Karpov's 
Knight* 

The latter phase of the game 
witnessed a sequence of 
manoeuvres on Kasparov's 
i trying to break into the 
:k position with his King. 

However. Black's well co- 



te 863 
15MM5 

16 fed* 

17 0x44 

18 Bc4 
IftRfcfl 

20 Qg4 

21 R»J5 

22 Rcdl 


Mr Neil Kimrock, the Labour leader, serenading his Greek hosts with Welsh musk while | 
holidaying in Corfu. He was a dinner guest of the local Socialist Party in Paleokastritsa. 


College 

maybe 

privatized 

By Lncy Hodges 
Education Correspondent 

The Cntnfield School of 
Management, Bedfordshire, 
may become the first univer- 
sity college to be privatized. 

The college responded pos- 
itively to suggestions by the 
Department of Education and 
Science on possible privatiza- 
tion. 

‘ But whether it is privatized 
will depend on the Treasury's 
agreeing next month to an 
endowment equal to two years' 
government grants. 

Sir Keith Joseph, former 
Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion and Science, wrote to the 
business schools asking for 
their reaction to proposals by 
Professor Brian Griffiths and 
Professor Hugh Murray, of 
the City University Business 
School, that postgraduate 
courses should be privatized. 

The professors* paper said 
that Britain's 27 business 
schools had failed, and that 
radical change was needed. 

Cranfield is the only busi- 
ness school to be directly 
funded by tbe department 
Cranfield's difficulty is that 
if it were privatized it would 
have to charge commercial 
rates for its master’s degree. 
At present the college pays 
£1,600 a year to educate 
student and the remaining 
£4,400 is made up by the 
Government The school has 
more than 50 academic staff 
and 250 fall and part-time 
postgraduates. 


Police fear 
disruption 
in key jobs 

By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 

Correspondent 

Government policy in turn- 
ing more police jobs over to 
people who are not police 
officers is leading to growth in 
the white-collar union Nalgo, 
according to recruiting figures. 

The Police Federation, 
which represents police up to 
chief inspector, has spoken in 
the past of the risk of employ- 
ing people in key areas who 
have the right to industrial 
action. 

Jobs where disruption could 
have a serious effecL include 
computer operations, com- 
mand and control support 
functions, and communica- 
tions. Some key areas are said 
to be run almost completely 
by employees who are not in 
the police. 

Nalgo claims a (0 per cent 
membership increase in nine 
weeks. It says that it has 
gained more than 1,200 mem- 
bers among police clerical 
workers, scenes-of-crime staff 
and fingerprint specialists. 

The union now represents 
13.000 of the 37,000 police 
support staff outside London 
Mr Tony Judge, the fed- 
eration’s information director, 
said: “We believe that police 
civilian employees should be- 
long to their appropriate trade 
union”. 


Britain after the Chernobyl disaster 

Cloud cover reveals victims of fallout 


Path of the Chernobyl cloud 


The Meteorological Office 
and the National Radiological 
Protection Board have discov- 


ered why the hill forms of the 
West of Scotland and Cumbria 
were the worst victims in 
Britain of fallout from the 
Chernobyl disaster. 

They have produced re- 
gional maps showing how 
different parts of the country 
were affected day by day 
between May 2 and 8. 

Tbe results, published in die 
current issue of Natan, the 
scientific weekly magazine, 
show where and why some 
places had higher concentra- 
tions of radioactivity than 
others. 

The maps are a record of the 
dond cover and rainfall pat- 
terns across the United King- 
dom, obtained by a new 
network of radar weather sta- 
tions, combined with tbe 
measurements of radioactivity 
levels in the air, rainwater, 
milk and grass. 

Data has been assembled to 
link general rainfall and local 
heavy thunderstorm patterns 
with each region of the coun- 
try. The scientists still express 
surprise at the large area of 
Europe affected by the dond. 

They trace its main path 
through southern Europe for 


Saturday May 3 
.184X1 GMT 



How the radioactive dond spread from Russia and where rain fell on Britain on May 3, 

four days, before it tamed signers have underestimated 
north to cross Britain. When it the vulnerability of the compo- 
seemed to be on its way across nents used in reactors. 


the Atlantic, it doubled back to 
deliver a second fallout of 
material particularly affecting 
the north-western part of the 
country. 

The figures should help 
topredict whether grass cut 
now can be used for winter 
fodder. 

In another report in the 
same issue of the magazine 
calculations show why nuclear 
designers need to revise then* 
methods. Two European sci- 
entists, from West Germany 
and Sweden, say that de- 


Thetr calculations, based on 
findings after the Three Mile 
Island and Chernobyl in- 
cidents, show a “probability of 
one such accident every two 
decades is 95 percent” for tbe 
374 reactors in operation. 

• Engineering contractors at 
Fa! beck, Lincolnshire, and 
Elstow, Bedfordshire, were 
turned away for the fourth 
time yesterday by anti-nuclear 
demonstrators campaigning 
against the proposed siting of 
low-level radioactive waste 
dumps (Mark Dowd writes). 


About 150 protesters from 
Lincolnshire Against Nuclear 
Dumping gathered at Folbeck 
yesterday morning to shoot 
down contractors hired by 
Nirex, the government nuclear 
waste agency. 

At Elstow, more than a 
dozen members of the local 
protest group held hands 
across the gateway of tbe 
storage depot preventing en- 
gineers from starting work. 

At Kfllmgfaolme, in South 
Humberside, anti-nuclear 
demonstrators have started 
discussions with Nirex of- 
ficials. 



A 70-year aftermath is 
feared at Chernobyl 


The death toll from Chernobyl, and how the Soviet scientists 
estimate the long-term fatalities. 


Continued from page I 
©gists and other doctors were 
rushed from as for away as 
Moscow and about 1 ,500 peo- 
ple were examined for signs of 
acute radiation poisoning or 
contamination, identifying 
those whose survival de- 
pended on bone marrow 
transplant and other 
specialised treatments. 

By the evening of the day of 
the accident. 129 patients had 
been flown to Moscow hos- 
pitals. They were followed 
next day by 170 more. 

All but two were workers or 
firefighters at the plant. The 
first bone marrow transplants 
were done within a week of the 
accident. 

But it was another 36 hours 
after the disaster before a 
caravan of some 1,100 buses 
began evacuating the first 


100,000 people from an area 
of 18% miles around the 
nuclear power station. Il was 
done in three hours. 

A total of 5.000 doctors and 
nurses in 230 teams were 
drafted into Chernobyl region, 
or staffed the reception centres 
for evacuees. 

More than 18,000 were 
referred to clinics and hos- 
pitals for more intensive scru- 
tiny. including chromosome 
studies of children. 

The children and pregnant 
mothers are the most vulner- 
able groups, and the addi- 
tional leukaemias would first 
occur in those victims. 

The pattern that would 
follow would be an increase in 
leukaemias fora period of five 
to 25 years after the event, and 
in other cancers from 10 to 70 
years after. 


£7m campaign 
aims to 
boost Today 

A £7 million campaign to 
increase the ailing circulation 
of Today was announced yes- 
terday as Lonhro, Mr Roland 
‘Tiny" Rowland’s trading 
company which owns The 
Observer, assumed control of 
the newspaper from Mr Eddy 
Shah (Mark Ellis writes). 

The promotion to raise the 
circulation, estimated to be 
less than 400.000 a day when 
nearer a million is needed to 
break even, will begin in the 
autumn. 

Lonrho increased its slake 
as Mr Shah reduced his 


Tory debate on Parkinson revived 

By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


Mrs Margaret Thatcher was 
given a reminder yesterday of 
the political risk she will nin if 
she recalls to high office Mr 
Cecil Parkinson, the former 
Secretary of State for Trade 
and Industry, after the 
publication of a magazine 
interview with Miss Sara 
Keays. his Conner mistress. 

She said little new, but the 
foci that she is prepared to talk 
about the affair and the preg- 
nancy that led to , Mr 


Parkinson’s resignation may 
be enough to keep him from 
recall 

Miss Keays’s conversation 
with Professor Anthony Clare, 
the psychiatrist and broad- 
caster. in the September issue 
of Good Housekeeping, conies 
as the Prime Minister prepares 
what is likely to be her last 
Cabinet reshuffle before the 
general election. 

It is also little more than a 
month until the Conservative 


Party conference, at which Mr 

Parkinson is expected. 

The interview discloses 
Miss Keays’s continuing bit- 
terness over her treatment by 
the Conservative Establish- 
ment. 

It will give fresh ammu- 
nition to senior party figures, 
such as. Lord Whitelaw and 
Mr John Wakebam. the Chief 
Whip, who believe that any 
recall is best postponed until 
after the election. 


Stalker 
gets his 
job back 

Continued from page 1 

Mr Stalker however be- 
lieves that the inquiry, the 
most for-reaching and search- 
ing into the private life of a 
senior police officer, will en- 
hance his career. “My whole 
life has been pulled apart 
dissected, and then put back 
together again.” 

Mr Stalker’s ordeal 
on May 29 when he was 
off the sensitive inquiry into 
an alleged shoot-to-kill policy 
operated by the Royal Ulster 
Constabulary four days before 
he was to return to Belfast. It 
led to speculation that he had 
been the victim of a deliberate 
smear campaign to have him 
removed from the investiga- 
tion as be was on the verge of 
uncovering unpalatable teds 
and detailing the involvement 
ofM15 in a surveillance role in 
one of the three shooting 
incidents that were the sutyect 
of his investigation. 

However Mr Sampson's in- 
quiry dismissed any connec- 
tion between the allegations 
and Northern Ireland. MI5 or, 
as was later suggested, the 
Freemasons. 

Mr Stalker accepts that he 
will never complete his report 
into the RUC; his role has 
been taken over by Mr Samp- 
son. But if be had been 
allowed to complete his report 
he would have recommended 
more than 40 changes in RUC 
anti-terrorist operations. 

It is acknowledged that the 
investigation into Mr Stalker 
and his friendship with Mr 
Taylor began after a police 
informer in prison made 
allegations, subsequently 
proved to be spurious and 
unfounded, that the deputy 
chief constable was the con- 
tact for members of 
Manchester’s “Quality Street 
Gang" who, he claimed, were 
involved in gun-running to 
the IRA. 

Mr Taylor has admitted 
that, although he has no 
criminal record despite being 
under active police investiga- 
tion, he has associates who 
have records, including some 
members of the “Quality 
Street Gang”. 

Much of Mr Sampson’s 
1,500 page, seven-volume re- 
port concentrated on tbe 17- 
ir friendship between Mr 
Iker, aged 47, and Mr 
Taylor, aged 54, which began 
when their daughters attended 
the same convent school. 

In particular, it looked at a 
holiday they shared in 1981 on 
board Mr Taylor’s luxury 
yacht off Miami and four 
soda! functions they attended 
at which Mr Stalker was said 
to have had unwise associ- 
ations with criminals. 

Throughout the investiga- 
tion Mr Stalker protested Es 
innocence. The strain, how- 
ever. took its toll on his family 
with his mother being admit- 
ted to hospital and his father 
also being taken ilL 


ordinated Knight and Bishop 

prevented any unwelcome 
intrusions. Kasparov sealed 

bis 44th move after 

six 

minutes’ thought and when he 
left the stage he was greeted 

with loud and lengthy ap- 

plause by the audience. 


Moves: 




Kasparov White. 


Wraffi 

Black 

White 

Stack 

1d4 

<6 

23Qxe4 

fixe* 

2 C4 

e6 

24 Ba6 

W6 

3 Nc3 

Be7 

25 BxcS 

Nxd5 

4 M3 

NIS 

26B8S 

Nf6 

5 Bg5 

h6 

27 f4 

R&8 

6 Bxffi 

Bxffi 

28 KB 

KS 

7 b3 

04) 

29 Kt3 

Ra7 

8Rd 

c6 

30 Rd&ch 

Re8 

9 M3 

Nd7 

31 FfateSdi 

nX6o 

10(H) 

dxc4 

32 Ke4 

Ke7 

11 Bxc4 

«5 

33 Be* 

Nc7 

12 h3 

axd4 

34 KeS 

Kid! 

138x64 

c5 

35 KB 

NbB 


Full points 
scored by 
19 players 

After two rounds of the 
Uoyds Bank tournament in 
the Great Eastern Hotel cen- 
tral London, 19 players have 
scored the full 2 points (Harry 
Golem bek writes). 

Among the leading players 
are grandmasters Chandler, 
Plaskett, of England, de 
Firmian, of the United States, 
Agdestein, of Norway, and 
Hjartarson, of Icdand. 

There are 184 competitors 
in ihc Lloyds Bank. 

Results from round 2: 
Manor 0. Chandler 1: Plaskett 
1, Rodgaard 0: Agdesiein 1, 
Wells 0: Howell 0, Hjartarson 
1: McDonald 0. Thipsay 1; 
Rechlis 1, Watson 0: de 
Firmian l, Gallagher 0; 
Gerber 0, Murey 1; Ernst 0, 
Fein I: Dunningion 0. Hebden 
1: van der Sterren I, 
Nieuwenhius 0; ArkeU 1. Lev 

a 


New talks 
on fishing 
argument 

By Mark Dowd 

The Ministry of Agri- 
culture, Fisheries and Food is 
to arrange a meeting at Cher- 
bonrg within the next fortnight 
aimed at settling the fishing 
dispute between Cornish and 
French fishermen. 

The more comes after the 
dashes last weekend when 
trawlers from France caused 
£5.000 in damage to the Celtic 
Mor, a Cornish fishing vessel 
More than 170 crab and 
lobster pots were lost when tire 
French vessels ignored marker 
buoys, cutting the lines of the 
Celtic Mors static gear 
equipment 

Mrs Daphne La wry, sec- 
retary of the Cornish Fish 
Producers' Organization, 
which represents 220 reg- 
istered fishing vessels, said 
yesterday that a two-hour 
meeting attended by ministry 
officials, a French maritime 
attache and local fishermen 
had been “very constructive”. 

Tbe local fishing industry 
was, she said, vital for the 
future of Cornwall.* 1 When you 
think of the state that Corn- 
wall is in, with its high level of 
unemployment and tbe demise 
of the tra industry, it's excep- 
tionally important that onr 
fishermen receive every bit of 
help they can get” 

A “gentlemen’s agreement" 
was established, between the 
fishermen hi May: Cornish 
skippers would send a telex to 
Paris each week, informing 
the French of their plans. 

a Repeated infringements 
since then, particularly from 
six named boats based at 
irbourg and St Malo, have 
forced fishermen to press Mr 
John Glimmer. Minister of 
State, to take op the matter 
with his French counterpart. 

Fishing boats could not 
always rely on tbe protection 
of die Navy. Mrs Lawry arid. 

Most of the weekend's diffi- 
culties she said, had stemmed 
from the foct that Navy protec- 
tion vessels had gone off watch 
until Monday, leaving the 
focal fonts exposed to the 
“blatant” actions of the 
French fishermen. 


Science report 


Shopping by post? 

Play it safe 

Readers who reply to cash with order advertisements in 
national newspapers or Colour supplement? are safeguarded 
bv the National Newspapers Mail Order Protection Scheme. 
This covers all categories of goods and services with the 
exception oh those advertised under classified headings, 
perishable foodstuffs, horoscopes, luekv charms, gardening 
and medicalproducis. 

The MOPS protection guarantees that your money will be 
refunded if a member advertiser stops trading and does not 
deliver your order, or refund your paymenL 
Advertisements covered by the Scheme may include the 
MOPS svmbol or the initial fetters MOPS in their la voul 
For full details send a 9 xG stamped ^wnoNAiNWsmpa 
addressed envelope to: 

The National Newspapers* Mailorder 
Protection Scheme. 

16 Tooks Court. London. EC4A 1 LB. 

Ploy it safe— took for the symbol WM OmaxoiKiKM Vm| W 


Eye-test clue to diagnosing premature s enili ty 

V 4 CtiA/nal I*' n ■ rflf nrtn ilfri ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■■ • ^ 


By a Special Correspondent 

A series of new eye tests 
may lead to doctors being able 
to distinguish Alzheimer's dis- 
ease, a disorder of mental 
deterioration, from other treat- 
able illnesses that cause confu- 
sion. 

The advance reported in tbe 
New England Joamal of 
Medicine, comes from doctors 
who described the discovery of 
an apparently unique visual 
nerve degeneration in victims 
of Alzheimer's disease, a cause 
of premature senility. 

Millions of people in the 
w-OTld suffer from the fflaess. 


which in some unknown way 
affects brain cells. Symptoms 
in cl ode memory loss, dis- 
orientation and changes in 
personality. 

Bat if the unusual type of 
nerve damage producing spe- 
cific visual disturbances is a 
characteristic only of Alz- 
heimer's victims, it could give 
doctors a way to separate the 
illness from other mental 
problems. 

That is important because, 
even though there Is no cure 
for Alzheimer's disease, it is 
sometimes confused with 
treatable Alnesses. Accurate 


diagnosis may offer little hope, 
at this point, even for those 
who are in early stages of the 


The discovery was made by 
a team working with Dr Oral 
Miller, head of neuropath- 
ology, at the University of 
Southern California. 

Alzheimer's disease Is so 
difficult to diagnose that doc- 
tors often are not sure they are 
correct until after a post 
mortem examination. 

In their study, doctors 
examined the optic nerves, 
which cany visual messages 
from the eyes deep into the 


brain. They found specific 
dam age to those nerves in 
Alzheimer's victims but not in 
healthy people. 

However, they did not check 
people with other fonts of 
brain disease. Dr Peter Da- 
vies, an expert on Alzheimer's 
disease, of Albert Einstein 
College of Medicine in New 
York, said that the signifi- 
cance of the work will not be 
dear until that is done. 

He said: “Tbe real issue 
here is not distinguishing 
Alzheimers from normals, it's 
picking out Alzheimers from 
any one of 40 other diseases.” 


Another co-author of the 
"search, Dr Alfredo A. 
Sad on, of the Estelle Doheny 
Eye Foundation in Los An- 
«des, k testing Alzheimer's 
rictrms to see if the nerve 
degeneration causes measur- 
able abnormalities in vision. 
That wlH be necessary' if the 
condition te to serve as a 
signpost to the disease. 

.The actual nerve damage 
can be seen only during post 
mortem examination. The op- 
tic nerves of 10 Alzheimer's 
victims were checked and 
degeneration found in eight of 
than.. . 


Wapping 
dispute 
talks start 

Negotiations between News 
International and five uriions 
involved In the Wapping dis- 
pute resumed yesterday in 
London after three months 
(Mark Dowd writes). 

Mr Tony Dubbins, general 
secretary' of the National 
Graphical Association, and 
Miss Brenda Dean, general 
secretary of Sogat '82. joined 
representatives from the en- 
gineering union. AEU. the 
electricians’ union EETPU. 
and the National Union of 
Journalists, for two hours of 
exploratory talks aimed at 
resolving the eight-month 
dispute. 

The company was repre- 
sented by Mr Bill O'Neill, of 
News Corporation, a parent 
company of ‘News Inter- 
national. who indicated that 
Mr Rupert Murdoch and Mr 
Bruce Matthews would not 
participate in the discussions. 

Mr O'Neill, said that the 
previous offer of £50million 
compensation plus the Gray's 
Inn Road premises, rejected 
by the priming unions in June, 
was off the table. "In other 
words, we are back to square 
one,” he said. 

A further meeting is 
planned for next week. 

The company has also 
agreed to meet ’Sogat. NGA 
and AEU officials at Congress 
House 

next week on claims over 
holiday pay. 

Man jailed for 
Mars threat 

A man who posed as an 
animal rights campaigners to 
blackmail the makers of Mars 
bars for £50.000 by threaten- 
ing to contaminate their prod- 
ucts with botulism was jailed 
for two years at Reading 
Crown Court yesterday. 

Kevin Worrell, aged 25, of 
Sackviilc Street. Grimsby. 
Humberside, pleaded guilty to 
blackmailing two Mars 
employees " and demanding 
money with menaces in April 
and May this year. 

Paper fights 
TV ban 

Sunday Sport was given 
approval in the High Court 
yesterday to challenge a tele- 
vision advertising ban. 

At a private hearing. Mr 
Justice Turner granted the 
new newspaper leave to seek a 
judicial review of the Indepen- 
dent Television Advertising 
Association's refusal to accept 
its advertisements which fea- 
ture bare-breasted women. 

Fire in prison 
dining hall 

v Thirtv-five prisoners, and: 
three officers were treated m 
Penh Royal Infirmary for 
smoke inhalation last night 
after fire broke out in the 
dining hall at Perth Prison, in 
Tayside. Scotland. . . - • . 

The fire was brought under 
control but 207 inmates had to 
be evacuated from the block. 


t 







if it * it 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


Police move to carnival 
centre to halt crime 
over 


HOME NEWS 



In an attempt to curb petty 
crime during the Notting Hfll 
Carnival tins Bank holiday 
weekend the police central 
control unit will be set up in 
the heart of the festivities for 
the first time. 

A million people are ex- 
pected in this small part of 
west London for one of the 
biggest street parties the cap- 
ital has seen since VE Day in 
August 1945. 

The police have moved 
iheir central operations nerve 
centre from Scotland Yard to 
the Sion Manning School, St 
Charles Square. 

Called “Gold ContnoF, the 
temporary station opens to- 
night when many of the bands 
and floats move into the area 
in preparation for Sunday. 

A computer will link “gold 
control”, headed by Mr John 
Newing, the deputy assistant 
commissioner in charge of 
police operations during the 
carnival, with the “silver*' and 
“bronze” divisions scattered 
around Notting Hill. 


By Angella Johnson 

With a much-extended 
route bounded by Kensal 
Road, Ladbroke Gardens, 
Westboume Grove and Chep- 
stow Road, they are using the 
computer to identify likely 
trouble spots. 

Organizers are encouraging 
people to arrive and leave 
early to avoid troublemakers. 
Revellers are also being asked 
to leave expensive jewellery, 
cameras and large sums of 
money at home. 

Although the police have 
taken a back seat in the 
planning of this carnival, they 
are calling up 7,000 officers to 
help to trap muggers and 
pickpockets. 

One of the difficulties they 
face will be trying to stop drug 
sellers. 

The Central London Young 
Conservatives are p lannin g an 
anti-drugs campaign aimed at 
young people. 

Its members will be dis- 
tributing National Health Ser- 
vice leaflets along the main 


un- 


route of the carnival and in 
local shops. 

Mr Matthew Palmer, chair- 
man of the Young Conser- 
vatives group, said; “We have 
noticed that in the past the 
police have been povreriess to 
act against drug pushers 
ing the carnival for fear i 
actions would provoke 
necessary hostility. 

“We aim to highlight the 
dangers to young people and, 
hopefully, stop them felling 
prey to the peddlers — if even 
one person is deterred by our 
campaign then we will have 
achieved something.” 

Mrs Rhauni Laslett or- 
ganized the first carnival in 
1965 when a single float and a 
few hundred people danced 
along Golborne Rood. 

‘At that lime north Ken- 


sington was a melting pot of 
different nationalities who 



Ladbroke Grove Stn 


had moved into the area only 
to see it gradually disintergrate 
into a slum. We needed 
something to cheer us up and I 
thought this was the ideal 
solution,” she said. 

Mrs Laslett, now aged 67 
and confined to a wheelchair 
by multiple sclerosis, still tries 
to attend the event 

“Every year I pray for a 
peaceful carnival, but I have 
to remind myself that, like any 
child, it is apt to go its own 
way regardless of what the 
parent had intended at birth. 
“1 only hope the good spirits 
have had over the past few 



Iranian 
‘was not 
handling 
bomb’ 


By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 


Mr Toby Wilson, of Sotheby’s, yesterday with Elvis Presley’s Rolls Boyce car, which is expected to fetch more than £85,000 
next Thursday at the anctioo house's sixth annual sale of rock V roll mem “ 


_ , . , .. - -- roll memorabilia. The 336 lots include items sne has John 

Lennon s jacket, seen won by Mr Wilson who is also holding the first gnitar owned by George Harrison, when he was a 
member of the Beatles pop group. The models are wearing Beatles printed dresses. The sale items will be on view to the pub- 
lic on Tuesday and Wednesday next week at the Grosvenor Gallery in New Bond Street (Photograph: Graham Wood). 


we 


past few 
years will continue and people 
behave themselves.” 


Airports’ 
duty free 
hotline 


Smoking 
actions 
to soar 


Doctors in death 
case dismissed 


SO 


Science Correspondent 

Compensation cases against 
tobacco companies by smok- 
ers' or their famili es are likely 
to increase rapidly as new 
scientific evidence about the 
risks of smoking emerges, 
health experts believe: 

The latest evidence, pub- 
lished in The Lancet today, 
details the effect of “passive** 
smoking by parents on the 
birth weight of their babies. 
Such research is likely to be 
used in court actions as more 
individuals decide to sue. 

Lawyers at. A greeting in 
London this week to discuss 
product liability law and 
smoking thought that cases 
involving children's health 
had a strong chance of success. 

The Health Education 
Council and the British Medi- 
cal Association said yesterday 
that an increase in claims 
against tobacco manufacturers 
was inevitable: 

in what may be the first case 
in Britain, a man aged 31 from 
Liverpool is planning to sue 
because, he claims, he has 
developed a rare circulatory 
condition through smoking 
and might lose a leg. 

In Australia, a woman aged 
38 suffering from cancer won 
the right this week to sue a 
cigarette company. 

Up to 100 cases are pending 
in the US courts, but no one 
has sued successfully. 

However, in Sweden a court 
awarded substantial damages 
three years ago in the case of a 
woman non-smoker who died 
from lung cancer as a result of 
inhaling the smoke of col- 
leagues over 18 years. 

Three of four medical ex- 
perts agreed that her cancer 
was directly attributable to 
others’ cigarettes. 

The latest study in The 
Lancet, involving 500 Danish 
women and their babies, 
showed that exposure to 
smoking by the mother re- 
duces the rabies* birthweight 
and that passive smoke from 
the father had almost as large 
an effect 
Dr David Player, director of 
the Health Education Council, 
said yesterday: “The scientific 
evidence is growing stronger 
all the time. 

“We are particularly con- 
cerned about the effects of 
smoking on the unborn child 
and on children who become 
addicted to cigarettes before 
they are old enough to appro- 
date the dangers.” 

The BMA said: “We are 
sure that there will be many 
compensation claims. 


Two consultants suspended 
after the death of a boy 
following an operation to 
remove a blemish from his lip 
at a private hospital in Glas- 


gow have lost their National 
Health: 


Service jobs. 

Last month Mr Martyn 
Webster and Mr George 
Vaughan were suspended for 
six months by the General 
Medical Council (GMQ after 
being found guilty of pro- 
fessional misconduct 
Now Mr Webster's contract 
asa consultant plastic surgeon 
with the Greater Glasgow 
Health Board and Mr Vau- 
ghan's contract with Lothian 
Health Board as a consultant 
neuro-radiologist have been 
ended. 

The Greater Glasgow 


Health Board said yesterday 
that any doctor suspended for 
professional misconduct auto- 
matically had his contract 
terminated. 

James McAlpine, aged 
seven, died after clotting ma- 
terial introduced to cut off the 
blood supply to the blemish 
entered the main arteries. 

The operation was carried 
out at Ross Hall Hospital, 
where Mr Webster had a big 
financial stake at the time. He 
recommended the hospital to 
the boy’s parents and was 
criticized by the GMC for 
failing to give an accurate idea 
of the risks involved. 

. Hie consultants win he able 
to reapply for health board 
posts at the end of their six- 
month suspensions. 


Scooter 
help for 
patients 


By Angella Johnson 

An innovative scooter is set 
to speed people with a foot or 
ankle injury back to work. 

The 10 scooter was invented 
by Mr Michael Reid, an 
engineer from Christchurch, 
Dorset, after he suffered a 
broken ankle in a boating 
accident 

“I wanted to use the toQef 
witbont the aid of □ arses and 
so one day dragged myself 
across the ward kneeling on a 
chair. It was then that the idea 
came to me for an adjustable 
scooter which would make me 
mobile,” be said. 

He left hospital after five 
days and now his scooter is in 
demand by hospitals for pa- 
tients and doctors. One nenro- 
snrgeon has used it while 
performing a brain operation. 

•• • 


Four appear 
on jewellery 
theft charges 



Scorecard 
identifies 
heart risk 


A cheap way of identifying 
men with a high heart attack 
risk has been devised by 
doctors, it was announced 
yesterday. 

Instead of expensive el- 
ectrocardiograph tests and 
measurements of blood cho- 
lesterol levels, a simple scor- 
ing system is used. It means 
that more than half of those 
likely to have an attack during 
the next five years can be 
identified and advised to 
adopt a healthier lifestyle or be 
offered treatment. 

The potential life-saver was 
devised using information 
from 7,735 middle-aged men 
helping the British Regional 
Heart Study, financed by the 
British Heart Foundation. 

Professor Gerald Shaper, 
who heads the study team at 
the Royal Free Hospital, 
north-west London, said: 
“The system requires mea- 
surement of blood pressure, 
an estimate of the number of 
years of cigarette smoking, 
knowledge of previous angina, 
heart attack or diabetes, and 
whether either parent died of 
heart trouble”. 

“Those patients scoring 
1 ,000 points or more are in the 
top 20 per cent of the risk 
score. More than half (53 per 
cent) of new heart attacks in 
the next five years are likely to 


take place in this group.’ 
Writing in the British J 


Mr Reid, back at his work 
near Christdmrch, trying 
out his invention 


’ Medi- 
cal Journal, he said that the 
addition of blood cholesterol 
and electrocardiograph tests 
only slightly improved the 
chances, to 59 per cent, of 
predicting who would have a 
heart attack. 

Professor Shaper said that it 
was difficult to provide guide- 
lines for screening women as 
there was no British data on 
which to base a risk score. 


Duty free shops at the main 
airports offer big savings on 
more than 3,000 products, 
according to a recent British 
Airports Authority survey. 

Bat, because there is 
ranch confusion about relative 
prices, comparative quantities 
and allowances available, 
many people EkO to take 
advantage of the wide range of 
discounts. 

To overcome that and in- 
crease sales tiie authority fa to 
launch a 24-hour duty free 
answering service, with the 
assistance of TV-am’s travel 
expert, Alison Rice, to tell 
would-be shoppers what sav- 
ings are available. 

The service also offers 
information about differences 
in botde sizes, alcohol content, 
perfmne strengths, allowances 
in particular countries and the 
cheapest places to buy certain 
goods. 

The advice line can be 
reached on (01) 439 1543. 

• The travel trade fa increas- 
ingly picking op the bill for 
promoting overseas tourism in 
Britain. (John Winder writes). 

Taxpayers are having to pay 
a little less to attract the 
foreign holidaymaker as the 
British Tourist Authority fa 
persuading more British com- 
panies to join in publishing 
tourist leaflets and mounting 
travelling exhibitions, accord- 
ing the authority’s accounts 
presented to Parffament yes- 
terday. 

Government funding of the 
authority, by the Department 
of Employment, dropped by 
£172,000 in the accw 
year 1985-86 to £17,11 
turnover rose by 3 per cent to 
£29-8milfion. 


Robber twins 
influenced by 
elder brother’ 


Identical twins staged arm- 
ed raids on three banks and a 
post office under the influence 
of their elder brother, it was 
claimed at the Central Crim- 
inal Court yesterday. 

Mr Peter Shier, for the 
defence of Mark and James 
Veal, amid 20, alleged that 
MrStephen Veal, aged 25, 
their brother, “put pressure” 
on than to carry out serious 
crimes. There was not enough 
evidence to arrest him, Mr 
Shier said. 

Mr Shier said that the 
twins, of Moreton Tower, 
Lexden Road, Acton, west 
London, had no criminal 
records and had tamed to 
robbery “through loyalty or 
fear” of their brother. 

Mr Stephen Veal had plied 
his brothers with drink and 
drags before the raids and had 
taken most of the £8,300 
proceeds, Mr Shier said. 

Passing nine-year youth 
custody sentences on the 
twins, who admitted the 
charges, Mr Janies Crespi, 
QC, the recoder, toM them: “I 
accept that you were in- 
fluenced by your elder brother 
but these were despicable 
offences”. 


Edinburgh Festival 


TV chiefs attack censorship 


By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 

Senior television executives small boys, jumping off play- ston Churchill last year would 

ground steps, playing at being 


from the independent and 
public sectors launched a four- 
day forum on the industry 
yesterday with a concerted 
attack on attempts to impose 
stricter censorship on 
programmes. 

Mr Jeremy Isaacs, chief 
executive of Channel Four, 
and Mr Michael Grade. BBC 
controller of programmes, de- 
fended the need to protect and 
encourage artistic creativity in 
articles m the magazine of the 
Edinburgh International Tele- 
vision Festival. 

Mr Isaacs said that tele- 
vision censorship was 
founded on two misconcep- 
tions: that any one phrase or 
scene in any one programme 
would harm anybody and that 
the public wished to be pro- 
tected from such words and 
images. 

“Both are bosh. Apart from 
an epidemic of broken legs on 


Six Million Dollar Man. I 
know of no one who has ever 
suffered any damage from 
watching any television pro- 
gramme, anywhere, ever.” 

There was, however, no 
good reason for broadcasters 
to be set above the law of the 
land. “Nothing ever shown on 
British television since its 
inception could ever have 
been successfully prosecuted 
under the Obscene Publica- 
tions Act, 1 959. Nothing that I 
can imagine anyone ever 
wanting to show on account- 
able public broadcasting ever 
will be.” 

Mr Isaacs welcomed a 
recommendation by the Pea- 
cock committee on broadcast- 
ing. which said that pre- 
publication censorship had no 
place in a free society. 

The Obscene Publications 
Bill introduced by Mr Win- 


have had a devastating effect 
on television. The Biffs defeat 
had been an important victory 
for the preservation of edi- 
torial independence inside a 
responsible and effective 
broadcasting structure, he 
said. 


The Iranian killed in a 
bomb blast earlier this week in 
west London is now thought 
by anti-terrorist branch detec- 
tives to have been working in 
his basement, some distance 
from the device when it 
exploded. 

Post-mortem examination 
and forensic science evidence 
suggests that the police may 
abandon the theory that Mr 
Bijan Fazeli aged 22. might 
have been handling a device 
destined for the Iranian con- 
sulate near by, and con- 
centrate the search either for a 
pro-Khomeini bomb team or 
some faction within the exiled 
Iranian community. 

But until further forensic 
science tests are completed on 
material taken from the bomb 
site detectives are keeping an 
open mind on the reasons 
behind the blast. 

Mr Fazeli, son of a well 
known activist against the 
Khomeini regime, died after 
being pulled from the nibble 
of his father's video shop in 
Kensington High Street on 
Tuesday. Twelve people were 
injured. 

One of them, another young 
Iranian, was also in the base- 
ment of the shop w hen the 
bomb exploded and he has 
been interviewed by the po- 
lice. Nothing he has told 
detectives suggests that Mr 
Fazeli was handling, or near, a 
device at the time of the blasL 

The witness, in his twenties, 
was working with Mr Fazeli in 
an office and had a lucky 
escape. Shortly before the 
blast he left Mr Fazeli to go 
into another office in the 
basement where be had left 
some food. 

He had reached the office 
when the bomb exploded: 


In a reference to the Pea- 
cock report, Mr Grade said 
that new technology offered 
the opportunity of change, but 
he was more concerned about 
political influences. 

“The greatest directive of| 
change will continue to be 
political . . . election nerves 
are already bringing the famil- 
iar charges of bias and 
impartiality out of the politi- 
cal woodwork." 

Mr Troy Kennedy Martin, a 
film and television writer, 
opened the festival with a 
lecture severely criticizing the 
quality of television drama. 


Hunt after 


prisoners’ 
bus escape 


By Our Crime Reporter 


BR offers railcard Docklands 
to cot fares supertram 


By Michael Bally, Transport Editor 


‘too small’ 


British Rail hit back at 
coach and car competition 
yesterday with a new railcard 
that cuts fares in the Soulhr 
east commuter area by a third. 

It costs £10 and offers a 
third off standard fares, cheap 
day returns and Network Sav- 
ers for up to four adults. 

Children will be charged £1 
return and discounts arc also 
available on the One Day 
Capitalcard. 

The new Network Card, 
which comes into operation at 
the end of next month, does 
not reduce fazes on commuter 
season tickets. 

It can be used after 10am on 
weekdays and at any time on 
weekends and Bank holidays. 

Mr Chris Green, director of 
Network SouthEast, said it 
was the most important 
marketing initiative for many 
years in the London com- 
muter area. 

It was designed to boost 
leisure travel throughout the 
network, stretching from 
Weymouth to Oxford, and 
King’s Lynn to Dover. 

On the Inter-City network 
British Rail faces a new chal- 
lenge from coaches with fare 
cuts of up to £10 between 


London and the Midlands and 
North-east by National Ex- 
press from next week. 

The London to Newcastle 
upon Tyne return fere drops 
to £14 compared with the 
cheapest train fare of £44, and 
similar fare cuts will apply to 
15 other north-east destina- 
tions including Middles- 
brough, Sunderland, 
Darlington and Durham. 

On the London to Bir- 
mingham run. National Ex- 
press is dropping the peak 
return fare from £12.50 to 
£10.50, and the ordinary re- 
turn from £1 1 to £9.50. 

Although the cuts will affect 
British Rail, they are aimed 
primarily at London Buses, 
which launched a service be- 
tween London and Bir- 
mingham at fares similar to 
those of National Express 
some months ago. 

In an attempt to capture 
more young people's business, 
British Rail is offering anyone 
buying a young person's 
railcard during September and 
October a £5 cash bonus. 

The card offers a third off 
fares to people between 16 and 
23. 


By Onr Transport Editor 


The first supertrain for 
London's Docklands Light 
Railway was delivered from 
West Germany yesterday — 
far too light for the job. 

Booming business and 
industrial development in 
Docklands means that traffic 
forecasts have been sharply 
increased since the railway 
was planned. 

Largely as a result of the 
Canary Wharf skyscraper of- 
fice development and the new 
Tube link between the light 
railway at Tower Hill and 
London Underground at Bank, 
annual traffic is now estimated 
to rise to 44 million passengers 
a year compared with an 
origmai estimate of six 
million. 

The trains will have to he 
enlarged to carry about 350 
passengers instead of 200, and 
frequency along the line fa now 
planned at two minutes in the 
peak compared with an earlier 
seven and a half minutes. 

The new train, similar to 
others In service In West 
Germany, fa folly automatic 
and driverless, but will carry a 
train attendant 


Police officers were search- 
ing last night for two prisoners 
who escaped on their way to 
court by coach yesterday when 
men attacked and overpowered 
prison officers. 

None of the prisoners was in 
a high security category and 
because they were on remand 
they were not in prison 
uniform. 

Six prisoners escaped from 
the coach near Bristol Zoo as 
It made its way from Bristol 
prison to Weston-super-Mare 
Magistrates’ Court One man 
was captured almost immedi- 
ately and others were found by 
the police in a few hours. 

In all, nine prisoners were 
on their way to court, escorted 
by five prison officers, who 
were attacked in what prison 
officials believe, may have 
been a planned escape. - 

Six prisoners were hand- 
cuffed together and one was 
handcuffed to an officer. They 
freed themselves with a key 
taken from an officer. 


Firemen 


penalized 
for action 


Appeal over girl ‘raped by father’ 


By Jill Shaman 


A leading specialist in child 
sexual abuse has appealed to 
social workers for information 
about a girl aged 12 whom she 
believes has been raped by her 
father several times. 

Mrs Michele Elliott direc- 
tor of Kidscape, an organiza- 
tion set up last year to provide 
practical advice to children on 
the clangers of sexual abuse, 
has asked if any social workers 
suspect they have had contact 
with "Lucy". 

Writing in the social 
workers' journal. Communin' 


Care. Mrs Elliott says that the 
girl contacted her more than a 
year ago after she had spoken 
on a London radio pro- 
gramme about sexual abuse. 

Lucy told her that her father 
had made her pregnant and 
she had had an abortion. 
Subsequent calls over the next 
few months indicated that the 
girl was still being abused. 

Mrs Elliott last heard from 
Lucy a year ago when her 
father apparently grabbed the 
telephone, shouting at the girl 
to hang up. 


The latest figures on child 
sexual abuse show a substan- 
tial rise of reported cases since 
1984. Figures from the Nst- 
tional Society for the Prevcn - 1 
tion of Cruelly to Children 
show a 90 per cent increase 
between 1984 and 1985. with 
reported cases rising from 
1.500 to 2.850. 


Seven firemen who took 
industrial action in protest 
over dangerous understaffing 
at their station have been 
found guilty of neglecting their 
duties at a disciplinary 
hearing. 

The men, from Banbury. 
Oxfordshire, were cautioned, 
by Mr Maurice Johnson, chief 
fire officer, at the end of a 1 0- 
hour hearing on Thursday, 
which was seen as a test case 
by the fire service and union. 
It has raised union fears of a 
clampdown on strike action 

Yesterday Mr Bob Burrell. 
Oxfordshire Fire Brigades 
Union secretary and one ol 
the seven, said: “We were all 
given cautions, the lowest 
form of penally, because we 
can't appeal against that**. 

The dispute started last 
June when the seven under- 
took emergency rails only for 
an hour after a driver took 
time off because of sickness, 
reducing the crew to four men. 


Child sexual abuse cases] 
represented only 1 per cent of | 
all NSPCC-maintained reg- 
istrations in 1980. but that I 
rose to 14 'per cent last year. 


Officials 


Four people accused of a 
£250,000 hotel theft on the eve 
of the Grand National were 
remanded in custody yes- 
terday by magistrates at 
Southport. Merseyside. 

Graham Walker, aged 34. of 
Queens Drive. Liverpool Jef- 
frey Taylor, aged 53. and Rita 
Taylor, aged 48. his wife, both 
of Compstall Road. Rotnily, 
Stockport, and Christopher 
Alfieri, aged 28, of Leicester 
Road. Sale. Manchester, are 
charged with the theft at the 
Prince of Wales hotel in 
Southport, in April 

It is alleged that they stole 
jewellery belonging to Mrs 
Georgina Webb Bronfman, 
the wire of the American head 
of Seagram, the Grand Na- 
tional sponsor. 


resign 
at RSPCA 


Deadline set today over sports ground safety 


By Clive White 


The Oval where the third 
Test match began on Thurs- 
day, is one of 52 sports 
grounds which have recently 
been designated by the Home 
Office and require a local 
authority safety certificate. 

Five other Test grounds 
were also required to apply for 
certificates by today’s 
deadline. 

The Popplewell inquiry, 
which was instigated after the 
fire disaster at Bradford City's 
football ground in May last 
year, recommended that all 
stadiums with a capacity of 


more than 10,000 people 
should be designated and 
required to obtain a certificate 
if the;/ wished to continue 
admitting spectators. 

The Oval where 13,500 
spectators watched the open- 
ing day's play at the Test and 
which can bold crowds of up 
to 17,000. will have any 
necessary ground work carried 
out at the end of the season. 

Mr Ian Scotl-Browne, the 
secretary of Surrey County 
Cricket Cub, said that it had 
applied for a certificate. 
“Everyone was happy” with 
the ground’s safety, he said. 

As at Lord's, where a certifi- 


cate is also required, the 
•und is visited regularly by 
prevention and building 
control officers. Other 
grounds affected by the recent 
order include Headlingly, 
Trent Bridge and Edgbaston. 

Football League grounds in 
the first and second divisions 
have been designated since the 
Safety of Sports Ground Act, 
1975. and last year third and 
fourth divisions dubs were 
also covered by it 
The Football Grounds 
Improvement Trust, which 
caters specifically for the 
needs of the professional 
game in the British Isles, has 


awarded grams totalling 
£22 million since its forma- 
tion in 1975. 

The Football Trust, whose 
responsibility is wider, will be 
making £500.000 available to 
non-league dubs for safety 
improvements. 

Many of them will over- 
come excessive costs by dos- 
ing sections of the ground, as 
Wolverhampton Wanderers 
has done. 

Bath will be sharing its 
gound at Twenon Park with 
Bristol Rovers, a Football 
League club, this season. 


As a league dub, Rovers has 
qualified for a 75 per cent 


grant from the improvement 
trust towards the £80,000 
improvement costs at the Bath 
ground. Safety certificates 
there will be isssued match by 
■match. 

Several leading Rugby 
Union dubs, including Car- 
diff, Llanelli Leicester and 
BristoL have also been des- 
ignated. Bui most of the 
leading rugby grounds have 
been well maintained. 

Blackpool Borough, one of 
three more Rugby League 
dubs required to apply for a 
certificate, will have their 
£70,000 rebuilding work paid 
for by the local council 


Half fail 
drink-drive 
breath tests 


Fifty per cent of motorists | 
who volunteered to be breath- 
tested in London this week 
were above (he legal limit 
However, none were ar- 
rested because the tests were 
part of a police campaign to 
convince drivers that even one 
drink can be enough to iafl. 

More than 300 lunchtime 
drinkers in east London have 
been tested at the start of the 
six-week campaign. The 
volunteers did not have to 
identify themselves, but were 
offered booklets.' 


A branch of the Royal 
Society for the Preventions 
Cruelly to Animals is to be 
controlled temporarily by its 
head office after the resigna- 
tion of five local officials. 

The branch's life president, 
secretary and treasurer were 
among those who decided to 
resign at Swindon. Wiltshire, 
after a “final demand" by 
headquarters for an annual 
quota payment of £4.250 to 
offset costs involved in run- 
ning a small team or inspec- 
tors. 

Mr Jim Hall aged -48. a 
branch fund raiser who re- 
signed. said that the money 
should be spent instead on 
subsidizing veterinary' sur- 
geons' bills. He said £10.000 
was now owed to head office. 


V 



- \ — 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


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Amnesty International denounced 

Harare says it 
will detain 
rights abuses 
informants 

From Jan Snath, Harare 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


* * * * 


Amnesty International, the 
human rights organization, 
has been denounced as an 
’'enemy of Zimbabwe", and 
anyone supplying it with 
information will face deten- 
tion without trial. 

The denunciation and 
threat came in Parliament 
from Mr Enos NkaJa. Minister 
of Home Affairs, whose 
responsibility includes the is- 
sue of detention orders, and 
from Mr Emmerson Munan- 
gagwa. the Minister of State 
for Secu rily. who according to 
yesterday’s issue of par- 
liamentary reports delivered 
lengthy attacks on Amnesty. 

**I would like to warn all 
those who send reports to 
Amnesty International to be 
careful from now on." Mr 
Nkata said. “If I do find any 
one agent, or anybody. I will 
confine him to detention and 
see what .Amnesty Inter- 
national will do." 

Mr Munangagwa said that 
Amnesty was an enemy of 
Zimbabwe because it “cham- 
pioned the cause of subversive 
elements in Zimbabwe". 

Before the end of white rule 
here, the organization gave 
wide publicity to allegations of 
detention and torture by 
Rhodesian security forces of 
black nationalist leaders, inc- 
luding both ministers. 

Since the outbreak of guer- 
rilla unrest after independence 
in 1 980 in western Zimbabwe, 
Amnesty has focused atten- 
tion on the alleged ill-treat- 
ment of detainees of Zapu. the 
opposition party. 


Mr Nkala said that Am- 
nesty had "fallen into dirty 
hands". Both men alleged that 
it had published false rumours 
fed to them by a disgruntled 
minority. 

Mr Munangagwa claimed 
that the Government had 
established that atrocities, 
said by Amnesty to have been 
committed by security forces, 
were actually the work of anii- 
govemmenl guerrillas. 

Two of Amnesty’s claims 
have been vindicated by 
courts here recently. Last week 
four men charged with the 
murder of a ruling party 
senatoTin 1984 were acquitted 
after a High Court judge ruled 
that they had been tortured to 
obtain confessions. 

Early last month Mr Kern bo 
Mohadi. a Zapu MP. success- 
fully sued the Government 
after the High Court accepted 
that he had been beaten and 
partly drowned while in cus- 
tody last year. 

In April the Catholic 
Commission for Justice and 
Peace in Zimbabwe, the 
country’s watchdog body, said 
that cases of torture reported 
by Amnesty were “very 
similar" to those its own 
investigations had unearthed. 

Mr Michael Auret. the 
chairman of the commission, 
and his director, Mr Nicholas 
Nbebele. were detained in 
early June. They were later 
released on the instructions of 
Mr Robert Mugabe, the Prime 
Minister. 



Rebel attack repulsed 

From Charles Harrison, Nairobi 


Ugandan government troops 
have driven off more attacks 
byjebels who recently crossed 
into northern Uganda from 
Sudan and launched a large- 
scale attack on the town of 
Gulu. 

The Defence Ministry in 
Kampala said yesterday that 
1 0 rebels were killed in clashes 
at Bibia, dose to the Sudanese 
border town of Nimule, 20 
miles east of Gulu. The Ugan- 
dan Army suffered only minor 
casualties, it said. 

Substantial reinforcements 
ha5e been moved to Gulu in 
an-effort to capture or wipe 
out the rebels, said to be 


former members of the Ugan- 
dan Army who fled into Sudan 
when President Museveni’s 
National Resistance Army 
took power last January. 
According to the Defence 
Ministry, two rebels captured 
at Bibia said that the aim of 
the attack was to use Gulu for 
further attacks on Kampala. 
President Museveni says that 
he has no confirmation of 
rumours that the former 
Ugandan dictator. Idi Amin, 
now living in exile in Jeddah, 
Saudi Arabia, was behind the 
attacks with General Basilio 
Okello, the army commander 
ousted in January. 


Bishop Desmond Tutu daftnfng yesterday that South African Government ministers engaged in “Tutu-hashing” to gain 
pnb&dty with what he called scurrilous allegations that he was trying to encourage sanctions against Pretoria. 


Palestinian 
papers to 
stay shut 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Two east Jerusalem news- 
papers shut down by the 
Interior Ministry last month 
have lost appeals. 

The High Court of Justice 
yesterday accepted the Minis- 
try’s evidence that the publica- 
tions, ai-Mhkaq and al-Ahf, 
were financed by the Popular 
Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine and represented a 
threat to state security. 

Classified evidence for the 
case was supplied by Shin Bet, 
the counter-intelligence ser- 
vice at the centre of a con- 
troversy over how it fabricated 
evidence for inquiries into the 
killing of two captured 
Palestinians in 1984. 

The editors of the two 
newspapers appealed against 
the closure, saying that al- 
though they held radical view- 
points they were independent 
and self-supporting. 

Mr Mahmoud al-Khatib, 
the editor of al-Mitkaq v \ 
claimed the closure of his 
newspaper was an attempt to 
silence the Pales tinian oppo- 
sition in the occupied terr- 
itories and force Palestinians 
to accept the terms of the 
Camp David agreements. 

The Interim Ministry's 
spokesman here. Mr Yitzhak 
Agassi, said: “Israel cannot 
allow freedom of expression to 
be exploited for enemies who 
have declared war on Israel, 
encourage terror and want to 
damage relations between 
Jews and Arabs." 


Pretoria accused of retreat 
from promised reforms 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


The official South African 
Opposition in Parliament yes- 
terday accused the Govern- 
ment of retreating from a 
promise of bold reform to the 
“ideological orthodoxy" of the 
late Dr Hendrik Verwoerd, 
who was Prime Minister from 
1958 until 1966. 

Speaking in a special no- 
confidence debate in Par- 
liament in Cape Town on a 
motion calling on the Cabinet 
to resign, Mr Colin Eglin the 
leader of the Progressive Fed- 
eral Party (PFP), said the 
ideology had been “modern- 
ized slightly, updated here and 
there". But it was still essen- 
tially the same, and had been 
confirmed at the federal con- 
gress of the ruling National 




ie PFFs spokesman on 
law and order, Mrs Helen 
Suzman, said the state of 
emergency regulations had 
been drawn up by "men drunk 
with power" who paid scant 
regard to clarity of language 
and none whatever to the laws 
of natural justice. 

There had been shock when 
the Minister of Law and 
Order. Mr Louis Le Grange, 
had disclosed to Parliament 
last Monday that some 8,500 
people had been detained 
during the emergency, but that 
figure represented only the tip 
of the iceberg she said. 

The educated guess of the 
PFFs own monitoring team 
was that close to 12.000 people 
had been held since the emer- 
gency was declared on June 


12. That meant that more 
people had been detained in 
eight weeks of the present 
emergency than during the 
eight months of the previous 
one from July 1985 to March 
1986. 

Meanwhile, two Johannes- 
burg newspapers. The Star 
and The li'eekly Mail, yes- 
terday foDowed the Cape 

The United Church of Canada 
has decided to sell off its 
shares worth SCan 28 minion 
(£13.5 million) in companies 
with direct investments in 
Sooth Africa (John Best 
writes from Ottawa). The 
United Church is Canada's 
largest Protestant denomina- 
tion with dose to a million 
members. 

Times in running reports 
which have been heavily cut 
in previous editions to comply 
with emergency restrictions 
on the reporting of army and 
police activity. 

At a court hearing in Pieter- 
maritzburg earlier this week, 
counsel for the Government 
conceded that these restric- 
tions bad been improperly 
promulgated. Legal opinion is 
that the restrictions are 
accordingly unlawful until re- 


issued m the correct form, 
which has not yet been done. 

The Star yesterday re-ran a 
story it had carried on August 
I about an inddent at a black 
school in Soweto. It then ran 
underneath the much fuller 
version which “can now be 
published". 

It was an account of how 
five pupils had been savaged 
by police dogs at two schools 
m Soweto at the end of July. 
One of the pupils, Martin 
Maroga. gave this account in 
the uncensored version of the 
inddent published yesterday. 

“I went to the toilets and 
was returning to my class at 
about 9 JO am when I saw 
soldiers with dogs. They called 
roe, but when I saw the vidous 
dogs I dedded to move further 
away. 

“I was getting away when 
one of the dogs pounced on 
me and and I fell to the 
ground. The dog dragged me 
towards his handler. As 1 lay 
there, the dog bit me and one 
of the soldiers kicked me on 
the body and the arm." 

In the earlier censored ver- 
sion. Martin's account was cut 
off after “when I saw" and the 
words “report restricted" in a 
black box were inserted in 
place of the rest of his 
statement. 


Africa leaders delay sanctions 

terday. but put off announcing 
what measures they planned 
to take. They recognized that 
some countries were in no 


Luanda (Reuter) — Leaders 
of nine southern African 
countries reaffirmed their 
commitment to sanctions 
against South Africa yes- 


posmon to impose sanctions. 


Desert (Envoy in 
hides 50 
Stealth 

fighters I arrest 


arms 

cache 


From Mohsin Ali 
Washington 

The United States was re- 
ported yesterday to already 
have about 50 radax^ehxHn* 
Stealth jet fighters fally opera- 
tional under a top-secret 
programme. 

The Pentagon declined all 
comment on The JPatougaw 
Post report. The Air Foret 
does not even acknowledge 
that this plane exists, despite 
widespread reports tint a 
Stealth aircraft on a muting 
mission crashed near Bakers- 
field, California, on J&iy 11. 

Several squadrons of Ste- 
alth fighters are bidden in 
hangars in the Nevada desert 
near Tonopah, south-east of 
Reno, to avoid detection, the 
newspaper report sail They 
fly at night there under the 
control of the Air Foret's 
Tactical Air Command. 

Originally the Ak Force 
planned to buy 100 Stealth 
fighters, but is expected to 
settle for about hall that 
number because of high costs. 

After the July 11 crash, the 
Air Force sealed off the area, 
including die airspace, so that 
no unauthorized planes would 
fly over the crash site. 

Stealth planes hide from 
enemy radar with special 
shapes and materials^ that 

absorb or deflect radar si 
rather than bounce them 
to radar screens. 

The plane's basic purpose is 
to sneak up on a target at 
relatively Ho* speed, launch a 
missile or “smart” bomb, and 
return home before the enemy 
realizes what has happened. 

The fVashimgtoa Post said 
that the Air Force was also 
devetopmg Stealth cruise mis- 
siles and a new Stealth missile 
designed to leek oat radars. 

• OSLO: The Soviet Union 
has almost completed work oa 
a 4j6QQ-yard airstrip foal wffl 
strengthen Moscow's abifity to 
strike at targets hi the United 
States without using nodear 
missiles, according to a report 
and photographs published 
yesterday (Renter reports). 

The Norwegian Foreign 
Policy Institute, a govern- 
ment-hacked research group, 
said the Schagut strategic 
bomber base oa the Kola 
peninsula was befog desfered 
specially for Moscow's new 
Blackjack Joug-range strategic 
nuclear bomber. 

The Kola pentesala, dose to 
Norway's Arctic bolder, coo* 
tains the largest concentration 
of nodear missiles in the 
Sonet Union and flic coastline 
is packed with naval bases. 


US curbs 
on Cuba 
tightened 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

President Reagan yesterday 
tightened the US economic 
embargo against Cuba by 
dosing loopholes that allowed 
Havana (o obtain US dollars 
and American goods by 
"unlawful means." 

In a proclamation Issued 
from his California ranch, Mr 
Reagan also announced mea- 
sures to prevent the Cuban 
Government from “trafficking 
in human beings" by charging 
citizens and residents of the 
US thousands of dollars to 
finance the indirect travel of 
their Cuban relatives to the 
US through third countries. 

Mr Reagan ordered a crack- 
down on US trading with 
“Cuban front companies" 
based in Panama and else- 
where which tried to evade the 
US trade embargo. There 
would be closer controls on 
organizations promoting tra- 
vel to Cuba as well as the 
sending of money or goods. 

The State Department said 
the Castro Government ctm- 
trolled all currency sent to 
Cuba, and gave Cuban recipi- 
ents only a small share of the 
value of money or goods sent. 

The presidential decree said 
that, after the US Interests 
Section in Havana stopped 
processing visas for people 
wanting to visit relatives in the 
US, the Cuban Government 
had exploited a loophole 
which allowed them to obtain 
visas in third countries. This 
often involved payment of 
bribes of up to £30.000 
(£20.000) to Cuban and other 
foreign officials. 

To slop such exploitation, 
US visas will no longer be 
issued in third countries. 


Clash over arms orders 

Peru investigates 
gun-running ship 

From A Correspondent, Lima 


The Peruvian Government 
has intensified an investiga- 
tion into an alleged case of 
contraband which has opened 
a window into the murky 
trade of arms running. 

Dues point to shady busi- 
ness connections stretching 
from East Germany to Miami, 
and from southern Africa to 
Central America. 

The investigation follows 
the impounding by Panama in 
mid-June of the Danish ship 
Pia Vesta, after it was turned 
back from the port of Callao. 

The ship contained 32 
heavy-duty tracks, 1,500 anti- 
tank missiles and 1,500 auto- 
matic weapons, which were 
listed in the manifest as 
vehicles. 

Panama was notified of the 
caigo by President Garcia of 
Peru, who bad been alerted by 
the Peruvian Navy after it 
failed to capture the ship. 

The arms merchant behind 
the deal was Mr David Dun- 
can, a Miami business man, 
who has explained his role in 
the sale to the Miami Herald 
and Lima’s weekly publica- 
tion, Careras. 

The source of the weapons 
and equipment was East 
Germany. 

Peru has since recalled its 
ambassador in East Berlin in 
protest against the lack of co- 
operation from East Gennan 
authorities in the inquiry. 

According to a senior 
intelligence official in Lima, 
five shipment was originally 
contracted by officers of the 
Peruvian Navy to re-equip its 
Marine Corps. “They had 
good intentions", the source 


said, “but they did not bother 
to get authorization from the 
President" 

General Jorge Flores, the 
Peruvian Minister of War, has 
denied repeatedly that the Pia 
Vesta shipment was for the 
armed forces. 

The Peruvian forces have in 
the past had complete auton- 
omy to make their own arms 
purchases, except for large 
orders, under the shield of 
“national security". Under Se- 
nor Garcia’s administration, 
however, military spending 
has come under closer 
scrutiny. . 

The intelligence source said 
that the Peruvian Navy called 
off the deal when American 
intelligence New the whistle 
on the shipment It warned 
Senor Garcia and then al- 
lowed the Pia Vesta to slip 
through its fingers. 

There had been speculation 
in Lima that the shipment 
might have been intended for 
left-wing guerrilla groups- 

The shipment bad left the 
East Gennan port of Rostock 
supposedly bound for Angola 
or Mozambique, the source 
said. But a confusing welter of 
third parties, shipping bro- 
kers, front companies and 
altered bills of lading make it 
hard to trace the complex 
series of transactions. 

• The Peruvian Senate has set 
up a multi-party commission 
to investigate the entry into 
Peruvian waters of the Pia 
Vesta after hearing the secret 
testimonies of the Navy, In- 
terior and Foreign Ministers 
about what they knew of the 
episode (Reuter reports). 


Berlin call to arms I Gadaffi offers 

terror aid to 
Palestinians 

New York (AP) — Libya was 
ai the disposal of the Palestin- 
ian people for terrorist train- 
ing because there was no more 
sacred struggle than theirs. 
Colonel Gadaffi. the Libyan 
leader, said. 

In an interview with the 
NBC-TV network. Colonel 
Gadaffi was asked whether he 
was still acting as host to 
Palestinians, such as the ter- 
rorist leader, Abul Nidal. 

The interview. NBC said, 
was held on July 28 at his 
home, which he claimed was 
bit during the US air raid on 
April 15. 

Asked whether the raid 
"scared him and caused him 
to lay low", the Libyan leader 
said: “The aggression has 
made us more decided, even 
more convinced, that we 
should intensify our fight . . 



Virgin Islands’ 
poll follows 
drugs charge 

Road Town, British Virgin 
Islands (AP) — The nme- 
nember elected Legislative 
Council of this British colony 
has been dissolved and a new 
one will be elected before the 
end of the year. 

The Governor,. Mr David 
.Berwick, made this un- 
expected announcement late 
on Thursday, six days before 
the council was to debate a no- 
cosfidence motion against the 
Chief Minister, Mr Cyril 
Romney. 

The announcement was 
linked to Mr Romney's control 
of a company allegedly used 
for laundering narcotics 
money. Mr Romney, however, 
was not implicated hi the 
operation, authorities said. 

Until a new elected body is 
sworn into office, Mr Romney 
and his three ministers wiQ 
ran the Government. 


Rome — Police are m- 
vestigatitig a cadre of anus 
found in the home of* former 
Philippines Ambassador to - 
the Holy See. wbo was sr* 
rested here yestertby (fitter ' 
Nichols writes). 

Mr Btenvenfcfo Damoco ■ 
held the post for three yens' . 
until his resignation last- April ; 
He was a dose friend of » 
fanner President Mateos. • ,, 

Delhi tackles 
dowry deaths 

Delhi - India has tried to : 
curb growing' incidents of 
bride-bunting by increasing „ 
the penalty for . "dowry 
deaths io life imprisonment : 
(Kuldip Nayar writes). 

In Delhi atone, officials pm . 
the deaths of women harassed . 

by their husbands, in-laws or 
both u> commit suicide at 107 : 
in one year. ; 

Afghan blast 

Islamabad (AFP) — At least 
15 people were killed, and ; 
about 30 injured by a. rebel . 
bomb blast at Jalalabad air- * 
port in eastern Afghanistan on 
August 1 1. sources dose io the 
Afghan guerrillas said here. 

Storm deaths 

Taipei (Reuter) — Seven- 
teen people were killed and six 
were missing as Typhoon 
Wayne swept across central . 
Taiwan, flooding wide areas 
and destroying hundreds of!; 
homes. . . 

Test success - 

Washington (AP) — The US 
Air Force conducted a fourth. ; 
successful test of its ASAT J 
anti-satellite weapon, fired,; 
from an F 15 fighter. 

Antwerp bomb 

Brussels — Belgian police * 
are baffled by a bomb explo- ' 
si on at a Belgian trade union ' 
office in Antwerp: 

‘Ivan’ remand 

Jerusalem — A further re- 
mand until October 1 has been ... 
granted to hold Ivan John 
Dentiaqjuk in custody here, . 
while the charges arc com- 
pleted accusing him of being . 
“Ivan the Terrible", the 
executioner of Trebtinka. 

Football toll : 

Dhaka - Three people were 
shot dead aid' more titan 100 
injured when police opened 
fire to quell a fight between 
football tons over a goal in a 
match between two villages. 

Bomb ploy 

Detroit (AP) — A man - 
escaped with an undetermined 
amount of cash after he 
strapped a fake explosive de- 
vice to a 10-year-old and 
ordered him to go into a bank ’ 
and demand money. 

Valencia fires 

Valencia (Reuter) - Seven 
forest fires broke out in 
Spain's Valencia region, des- 
‘ ^ more than 1.200 acres - 
of forest and scrubland. The 
fires reached within 25 miles • 
of Benidorra. 


Two INLA suspects released 


British soldiers dressed as Indian Sepoy troops d ist r ibutin g 
leaflets to West Berlin drivers yesterday to announce the an- 
nual British Tattoo, from September 25 to October 2. 


Paris — Two of the., four 
leged Irish members of the 
outlawed INLA organization, 
arrested in Paris at the end of 
July for carrying arms and 
explosives, were released from 
prison yesterday (Susan Mac- 
Donald writes). 

George Kevin McCain and 


John Gornley were freed on 
bail of 20,000 francs (£2,000). 

With Harold Flynn and 
Wflliam Browning, who re- 
main in prison, they lad been 
charged with offences relating 
to the carrying and transport- 
ing of arms and explosives and 
the use of false documents. 


Fast trains 

Stockholm (Reuter) — Swe- 
dish State Railways ordered a 
fleet of 130-mph trains to go 
into service by .1989 and 
provide the world's fastest 
travel on conventional tracks. 

Insider job 

Madrid (Reuter) — Four 
men have been charged with 
stealing £3.7 million worth of 
Treasury bills from the Bank 
of Spain. The four face charges 
of selling the bonds in the 
stock market with fraudulent 
title deeds. 

Correction 

Ernie Bradford was the author 
htaUa and not 
The Knppilkui of Maha, as 
stated in a r epor t from Valletta 
on August 21. 


Washington view 


Mexico’s drug nightmare plagues US relations 


Lee in lightning visit to Malaysia 


From M. G. G. Pillai 
Kuala Lumpur 

Mr Lee Kuan Yew, the 
Singapore Prime Minister, is 
to have talks with Datuk Seri 
Dr Mahathir Mohammad, his 
Malaysian counterpart, during 
his Six-hour lightning visit to 
Kuala Lumpur today. 

Visits abroad by Singapor- 
ean leaders have' increased 
recently as the country tries to 
retain its markets amid signs 
of a falling economy. Mr Lee 
has just ended an official visit 
to Brunei and was the first 
Asean (.Association of South- 
East Asian Nations) leader to 


call on President Aquino of 
the Philippines. 

Bandy two decades ago, 
Singapore was described as a 
“Chinese island surrounded 
by a hostile Malay sea". But 
that description is no longer 
valid as its pragmatic leaders 
have carefully cultivated their 
Malay neighbours. 

Singapore’s close alliance 
with Brunei — it trains the 
sultanate's police and civil 
service — stems from an 
underlying suspicion in Bru- 
nei of Malaysia’s and Indo- 
nesia's eventual intentions 
towards it. 


Asean countries, however, 
are showing great reserve at 
Singapore’s increasing trade 
and investment links with 
China, and some observers 
believe Mr Lee’s visit is 
intended to reassure them. 

Singapore and China have 
no diplomatic links, and Mr 
Lee insists that these could be 
established only after Indo- 
nesia re-established its links 
with China. 

Neither Malaysian nor Sin- 
gapore officials would say why 
Mr Lee is visiting Kuala 
Lumpur. 


X,. 

• • i 


The United States has al- 
ways been uneasy about Mex- 
ico. But in recent months 
gradually mounting alarm 
over toe long-term stability' of 
the prickly southern neigh- 
bour has given way to panic in 
some quarters. 

The nightmare of an over- 
populated. indebted and res- 
entful country being slowly 
engulfed by drug-driven cor- 
ruption has begun to assume 
reality. America fears it may 
soon be confronted with a 
crisis on its own doorstep that 
makes Nicaragua pale by 
comparison. 

Drugs are the immediate 
issue. The kidnapping and 
torturing of a US drug agent in 
Guadalajara has made it dear 
that things are very much 
worse than the Reagan 
Administration, eager to set up 
a joint drug-control operation 
with Mexico, had feared. 

For not only was the timing 
deliberate - a message sent to 
President Miguel de la Ma- 
drid by the Mexican drug 


underworld even as be was 
conferring with President 
Reagan — but it is increasingly 
clear that the Mexican Gov- 
ernment is powerless to con- 
front and smash the drag 
dealers. 

Such is toe corruption in the 
police and provincial govern- 
ments in Mexico that topes 
here of only a week ago that 
“Operation Alliance" would 

From Michael Binyon 

deal a devastating blow to 
cross-border drug smuggling 
now appear embarrassingly 
naive. 

The Drug Enforcement 
Agency , furious at toe recent 
attempts by Mr Edwin Meese 
and his officials at the Attor- 
ney-General’s office to play 
down US criticism of Mexican 
corruption, has revealed some 
alarming facts. 

Almost half the cocaine, 
heroin and marijuana seized 
by police in. Guadalajara is re- 


sold to drug dealers for huge 
profits. The police who. tor- 
tured and killed a US drag 

agent last year were those who 
would have killed Mr Victor 
Cortez last week, had he not 
been rescued by other agents 
and frantic intervention by the 
US Embassy. 

US drug agents, officially 
working in Mexico with Mexi- 
can permission and co-opera- 
tion, are now in danger of their 
lives. Their families are being 
evacuated and they were sum- 
moned back to Washington on 
Wednesday to discuss their 
future m Mexico. 

American anger is rising. 
An unusual public challenge 
has beat issued to President 
de la Madrid to bring the 
corrupt police to justice. But 
this In tom 1ms fuelled wide- 
spread latent resentment in 
Mexico at bullying by the 
powerful neighbour. Mexico’s 
sorer- eigutv is again at issue. 
Questions are being asked 
whether US agents should be 
allowed in the country at alL 


Drugs have become a burn- 
ing election issue that has 
worked the US into a lather of 
bewildered frustration. 

Hose sums are now beh^> 
offered by film companies for 
the story of toe 13-year-old 
Californian gjri who, with 
chillingly Stalinesque 
righteousness, turned in her 
drag-taking parents to toe 
police last week. 

But drugs are only (me 
element in toe Mexican ‘night- 
mare. The others are bank- 
ruptcy, massive illegal im- 
migration and a fertile 
breeding ground for com- 
munism. 

With a population of 88 
millioo already, a capital with 
an estimated 18 million that is 
already the largest and most 
polluted city in the world, the 
pressures in Mexico seem to 
be rising. W’fll the US even- 
tually have to install elec- 
trified fences, watch towers 
and alsatians along toe border 
to stem toe tide of desperate 
refugeesfrom poverty? . 


It Is politically unthinkable. 
But it looks more fikely than 
President Reagan's dark' vi- 
sion of a tide of Nicaragnan 
refugees swarming north add 
beating on toe doors iff Texas. 

Mexico is the bottom line in 
Mr Reap art obsessive worry 
over Nicaragua. The right 
wmg, vociferously represented 
by Senator Jesse Helms, is 
already trumpeting the apo- 
calyptic forecasts, calling for 
action to save Mexico before it 
is too late. 

The Administration, ea g e r 
for co-operation and not 
confroo (ration, is devoting 

more and more of its of&cfojs' 

time to Mexico's financial and 
economic problems, v 
But. unfortunately, the leg- 
acy of past high-handedness in 
Washington still casts a 
shadow and makes Mexico 
suspicious of US motives. 1 
This bedevils the already, 
touchy relationship, and 
ipakes level-headed co-operu- 
bon in solving the intertwined 


4 


-w. 



IK'Sfri 

'Wes 5|) 

Slealtl, 

*KlUi>rs 




<r * * * 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1 986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 




Tamil guerrillas deny ceas efire 

Colombo forces kill 10 rebels 
amid fears of bombing wave 


From Michael Hamlyn, Delhi 




JHi* 

St 


Shan | 


Peace talks in the battle- 
weary republic of Sri Lanka 
yesterday, moved nearer a 
possible conclusion, and att- 
ention is now shilling to India, 
where only the. Government 
of Mr Rajiv Gandhi has the 
power to compel the adher- 
ence of the Tamil guerrilla 
groups to any settlement. 

At the same time, there were 
reports from the island that 10 
rebels had been killed in an 
encounter, and there was an 
offiaaTwaming of a possible 
renewed bombing campaign. 

Last night the prospects of a 
ceasefire, which had seemed 
to be coming closer, again 
receded as spokesmen for the 
rebels in Madras made clear 
that they would agree to stop 
firing only if the Sri I 
Army agreed to stay he hind its 
barbed wire. There is little 
prospect of that happening, as 
Sri Lankan government of- 
ficials have always made it 


plain that the troops would be 
expected to continue to patrol. 

Indeed. Sri Lankan officials 
and politicians indicated yes- 
terday that they expected there 
would be a resurgence of 
terrorist activity as the groups 
showed their displeasure with 
the possible settlement. 

Mr Lalilh AihulathmudalL 
the Minister for National 
Security, told the Sri Lankan 
Parliament of intelligence re- 
ports that the principal guer- 
rilla group, the Liberation 
Tigers of Tamil Eelam, plans 
to intensify its attacks. “Peo- 
ple should be alert." he said, 
“because this group might try 
to explode bombs in Colombo 
city and make confusion.’* 

■While he was speaking, 
reports were coming in of a 
confrontation between gov- 
ernment troops and rebels 
near the town of Nadunta- 
durai. According to a ministry 
spo kesman, 10 rebels died 


when they opened fire on an 
army patrol seeking two 
Sinhalese who were said to 
have been kidnapped. The 
Ministry said weapons and 
ammunition had teen reco- 
vered. 

Also yesterday, rebel sou- 
rces claimed that in the north- 
ern town of Jaffna a bri- 
degroom. married earlier in 
the day. was killed when the 
Army shelled a residential 
area. 

However, there were further 
encouraging noises from the 
talks being held in the Sri 
Lankan - capital between the 
Government and representa- 
tives of the Tamil United 
Liberation Front (Tulf). Mr A. 

AmirthaJingam. general sec- 
retary of the Tulf, and Mr 
Athulathmudali both ex- 
pressed some satisfaction, at 
the way the talks were going. 

Mr Athulathmudali said 
that he was encouraged by the 


s,or mfe 


Bonn looks Kenya Protestants 

in ballot protest 


* on refugees 

From Frank Johnson 
Bonn 

The. controversy over the 
huge influx of asylum-seekers 
from the Third World into 
West Germany in recent 
, months looks set to soon reach 
4$ some sort of dimax. 

In recent days villages in 

- three parts Of the country have 
■ banded together to try to stop 

c more refugees entering their 

- communities. 


Nairobi (Reuter) — Kenya’s their human and constitu- 
Protestant churches have tional rights." 
made a rare sortie into politics Hie NCCK appealed to 
by attacking an open voting Kami and Parliament to find 
system approved for par- an alternative method of 
liamentary elections. voting. 

The system, under which Mr John Kamau, secretary- 
voters queue behind the can- general of the NCCK, yes- 
didate of their choice, was lerday said that the clergy 
endorsed on Wednesday at a were concerned that congrega- 
delegates’ conference of the lions might be reluctant to 


rce parts bftbe country have Kenya African National seek spiritual guidance from 
irided together to try to stop Union (Kanu), the country’s pastors who voted differently 
ore refugees entering their sole political party. from them, 

immunities. The National Christian The open ballot system is to 

_ . Council of Kenya (NCCK), apply only in a preliminary 

Ana Here rranz Joser which represents 35 reformed round of voting to eliminate 
rauss. the Bavarian Looser- churches and about six mil- candidates who do not win at 
iuve. leader, has denounced |j on Kenyans, opposes the least 30 per cent of the popular 
ere Hans-Dietnch Genscher, system on the grounds that it vote. Secret voles would be 
e Liberal Foreign Minister, could deter churchmen and held in run-offs where more 
r not having been senous laymen from votin g . than one candidate q ualified. 

ough in his efforts to pro- --The pastors, because of the Kanu has said the aim of the 


Strauss, the Bavarian Conser- churches and about six mfl- 
yative. leader, has denounced | ion Kenyans, opposes the 
■ Hans-Djetnch Genscher, system on the grounds that it 
■ *he Liberal Foreign Minister, could deter churchmen and 
• for not having been serious jaymen from voting. 

» 1 . . « enough in his efforts to pre- «Th c pastore, because of the 

lun RP JP 11 “* e ,n ^!S H S *heSorial position they hold in society. 
Democrats for having become fed that they cannot openly 
• frightened .that the asylum-, participate in the election 
seekers may frustrate their because this will mean openly 
. chances of winning the Janu- taring sides in the choice of 
• :.l ary general election. candidates." the NCCK said 


than one candidate qualified. 
Kanu has said the aim of the 


vent tne intiux. ana toe bociai position they hold in society, qaeueing system was to elinu- 
Democrats for having become fed that they cannot openly nate corruption and intimida- 
friynened lhatthe asylum-, participate in the election tion of voters. 
sKkers may frustrate their because this wfll mean openly Church and state in Kenya 
chances of winning the Janu- raking sides in the choice of were last in serious conflict in 
ary general election. candidates," the NCCK said mid- 1984. after a Presbyterian 

It has emerged over the past in a statement minister said prayers in his 

few days that people have “If many church leaders or church for Mr Charles Njonjo, 
taken the matter into their other Christians refrain from the disgraced Constitutional 
own hands. At Moench- taking part in the elections. Affairs Minister, and for all 
neversdorf jn the north, they will have been denied political detainees. 


efforts being made to solve 
problems. But there were still, 
many obstacles to overcome. 

Reports of a possible 
ceasefire came when an ex- 
tremely senior group of Indian 
central government ministers 
hurried to Madras, the capital 
of ihe Indian state of Tamil 
Nadu, for consultations with 
the guerrilla leaders. 

Mr Burn Singh, the Home 
Minister, Mr Shiv Shankar, 
the Foreign Minister, and the 
senior Tamil in. the Govern- 
ment, Mr P. Chidambaram, 
held a meeting with the lead- 
ers of the Liberation Tigers 
and their principal rivals in 
other groups, under the aus- 
pices of Mr M.G. 
Ramachandran. ihe Chief 
Minister of the states 
A member of the rebel 
groups said that the ministers 
sought an assurance from the 
militants ihat they would 
cease operations for a month. 

US bid to 
take off 
in Japan 

From David Watts 
Tokyo 

Tbe United States is to send 
a high-level business mission 
in search of access to Japan's 
latest trading auae ce&bre — a 
new one trillion yen (£43 
billion) airport. 

The Americans, who claim 
they are being locked out of 
the project; mil be given a 
seminar in late September on 
Japanese contract practices 
and the possibilities of foreign 
firms getting work. 

British firms wfll not be 
Invited, but it is open to British 
and European firms to seek a 
similar presentation. 

Though tbe Americans, 
from President Reagan down, 
are churning this as the latest 



. * y .. I * 

41 : 


1 1 it nevCTsaon. jn me noun, 

dill Dill k Geiselhoeing (Bavaria) in the 
. _ v south, and at Dreisbacb near 
the French border, villagers 
' have .put tractors, across the 
: roads, and "blockaded a form 
• •' where asylum-seekers were to 
be housed. 

"" ’ r A bonus for East Germany 
n -.1 n I r is that the influx, some 5GJJ00 
nOlUU pit 1 ; for ibis year, stirs up racial 
. trouble in West Germany. 

The more conservative poB- 
K ' •■■ ■ ticians here want tbe problem 

resolved by a simple change of 
... the West Gennan constitution 
to remove the provision 
which says that anyone enter- 
ing from East Berlin has an 
\ i automatic right of asylum in 

\ West Germany. 

The provision was made 
- when it was- assumed that 

" anyone getting into the coun- 

• try via that route would be a 

German. 

• LONDON: Ship-to-sbip ra- 
dio stations in Britain and 
West Germany are still trying 
I is' to contact the West German 
1 •* freighter. Aurigae, said to have 

abandoned more than 150 
Tamil refugees off Canada 12 
days ago (Trudi McIntosh 
writes). 


political detainees. 


11-year sleep ends 



Dr Savimbi, speaking at his guerrilla headquarters, warns President Katmda of Zambia that 
be will retaliate if the Angolan Government is allowed to attack Unita from his country. 

reb^daim 6 ^ seve^S* Ullltft CljllIIlS CllCI111C3.1 

their number have been killed 

made chemical weapons in war waged against it 

battles against Angolan gov- ° ° 

ernment troops. President Kaunda of Zambia Dr Savimbi said weapons 

Dr Jonas Savimbi, the guer- had given Luanda permission supplied by Washington had 
rilla leader, said from his 10 use Zambia for attacks on helped his forces withstand 
southern Angolan head- adjacent Unita-heid regions. the Government’s dry-season 
quarters at Jamba that Unita “If we are attacked, from offensive, launched in May. 
was facing a big offensive by whatever quarters, we have to He said his well-trained army 
the Luanda Government’s retaliate ... We are railing on 28,000 men controlled a 

Cuban-supported forces. President Kaunda: 'Don’t do third °f Angola. 

“The Russians are using that’.” he said. Last year they drove back a 

chemical weapons against our He denied South African big government push towards 
infantry,” he said without involvement in the August 9 Jamba, 
elaborating. He claimed that rebel attack on the southern Dr Savimbi, who has de- 
some of his men bad been town of Cuito Cuanavale, in manded the withdrawal from 
killed or blinded by chemical which 12 government radar .Angola of more than 30,000 
grenades and bombs. bases were destroyed. Cuban troops to be followed 

There are believed to be Tbe Government has ac- by elections, praised President 
several hundred Soviet advis- cused Pretoria of sending its Reagan for providing him 
ers seconded to Angolan and troops into battle for the small with arms after a visit to 
Cuban units supporting the but strategically important Washington in February. The 
Marxist Government town, 185 ririles north of US supplies are said to have 

Dr Savimbi said recent Angola’s border with South included Stinger surface-to-air 
intelligence suggested that African-ruled Namibia. missiles - 


President Kaunda of Zambia 
had given Luanda permission 
to use Zambia for attacks on 
adjacent Unita-heid regions. 

“If we are attacked, from 
whatever quarters, we have to 
retaliate ... We are calling on 
President Kaunda: 'Don’t do 
that’," he said. 

He denied South African 
involvement in ihe August 9 
rebel attack on the southern 
town of Cuito Cuanavale, in 
which 12 government radar 
bases were destroyed. 

Tbe Government has ac- 
cused Pretoria of sending its 
troops into battle for the small 
but strategically important 
town, 185 ibiles north of 
Angola’s border with South 
African-ruled Namibia. 


Dr Savimbi said weapons 
supplied by Washington had 
helped his forces withstand 
the Government’s dry-season 
offensive, launched in May. 
He said his well-trained army 
of 28.000 men controlled a 
third of Angola. 

Last year they drove back a 
big government push towards 
Jamba. 

Dr Savimbi, who has de- 
manded the withdrawal from 
.Angola of more t^an 30.000 
Cuban troops to be followed 
by elections, praised President 
Reagan for providing him 
with arms after a visit to 
Washington in February. The 
US supplies are said to have 
included Stinger surface-to-air 
missiles- 


Russia blamed for Australian 
talks obstruction returns to 

From Mohsin AH, Washington LL Cll3Xg0S 




pat:- : 




Doctors at China’s Shijiazhuang Air Force Hospital wel- 
coming 12-year-old Xie XiaoU as she wakes from an 11-year 
sleep. Xle, who was one year (rid when she fell into a coma 
after an accident, can only dream of her lost childhood. 




Abductors free colonel in Santiago 


s l s 


■ k * Santiago — A Chilean Army 

colonel who was kidnapped 
on . Monday was released late 
on Thursday night in a street 
in ihe Nunoa area ofSantiago. 
... (Lake Sagans writes). 

Colonel Mario Haeberie. 
who is in charge of protocol in 
> the Santiago garrison, was 
. ■ . kidnapped by at least seven 

armed men in front of his 
l • home in Santiago. • 

After several contradictory 
telephone calls to the media, 

• the Manuel Rodriguez Patri- 
otic Front, an armed group 
opposed to the Chilean mili- 
tary Government, acknowl- 

'y Two British 
rt >i# children stay 
' 1 in Spanish jail 

- ■ , Madrid — Hie two young 
* ’ ■ daughters of a Lancashire 

divorcee, Mrs Marlene John- 
1 - - . son, are likely to 'remain in 
prison in southern Spain with 
their mother until next 
month, informed sources said 
' here yesterday (Harry 
’ . . - Debelius writes): 

, . Her two sons, aged nine and 

14. are also expected to re- 
t ; \ ' main until then at an Algjeciras 
\ ‘ hoys’ school, where Spanish 
authorities placed them after 
.-•* their mother’s arrest on Au- 
' gust 10 in the Spanish North 
' •*. African enclave of Ceuta, 
opposite Gibraltar. 

‘ .r* Police arrested Mrs John- 
son and another British 
. r , woman, Mrs Margaret Muller. 

. -• said to be her aunt, aft a- they 
•r ‘ • allegedly discovered 80 lb of 

, . * " • . hashish in the camper vehicle 
... .\ ■ in which the women and the 

■ -'.four children had entered 
• *" ,, L ' . * Ceuta from Morocco. The 
. women were held on drugs 
• charges. 


edged that they were holding Santiago and the surrounding 


Colonel Haeberie. 


On Wednesday night the out this week. 


area have continued through- 


Govemmeni restricted cover- 5 However, public scepticism 
? of the kidnapping to towards the Government is at 
tciai bulletins from its own a record level and its spokes- 
ormation agency. That - men have had a hard time 


information agency. That - men have 
restriction continues, in spite convincing many Chileans 
of Colonel Haeberle’s release, that the arms cache and the 
According to an official kidnapping are the work of 
statement Colonel Haeberie . extremists and not designed to 
has been taken to the mililaiy justify a slate of siege. 


of Colonel Haeberie’s release. 
According to an official 


hospital for a check-up. 

His kidnapping followed 


On Thursday ambassadors 
in Santiago toured a display of 


government announcements die weapons and expressed 
that it had found a huge arms concern at the size of the 
cache in the north. Announce- cache, which included more 
menis of similar discoveries in than i .400 M 1 6 rifles. 


and most spectacolar example 
of Japanese protectionism, it 
appears that the disagreement 
has more to do with Japanese 
methods of letting contracts 
than determined efforts to 
exclude foreigners. 

In Japan those responsible 
for a project deride which 
companies which will be in- 
vited to tender. The winner 
comes from these firms, hot is 
not necessarily the one potting 
in the lowest bid. Personal 
relationships built up over 
years often have more to do 
with the outcome. 

Since the airport has been 
under discussion since 1968, it 
is a fair bet that those letting 
contracts and the heads of 
firms seeking the work have 
been drinking together, play- 
ing golf and exchanging sum- 
mer and winter gifts ever since. 

Foreign firms waking up to 
tbe project at this late date 
could scarcely expect to make 1 
any impression on final de- 
risions, especially from thoo- 
sands of miles away. 

There are some right Brit- 
ish firms registered as in- 
terested in the new airport that 
will be bnilt in Osaka Bay off 
the Sennan area, bat few are 
pursuing work actively. 

“They’ve put their names 
down on a piece of paper, but 
! that doesn’t mean anything 
until they do something about 
it," a British official said. 

It is now too late for foreign 
firms to take part in tbe firat 
part of the project, the creation 
of a 511-hectare artificial is- 
land, but British firms should 
be competitive in supplying 
airport equipment which 
would not be needed for years. 


From Mohsin Afi, Washington 

The United Stales yesterday But he added that the 
accused the Soviet Union of United Slates and its Nato 
effectively obstructing pro- allies had recognized from the 
grass at the Stockholm Euro- beginning in the Western pno- 
pean disarmament conference posals the need to exclude 
on the key question of inter- from inspection legitimate 
national on-site inspection of sensitive installations such as 


military activities. 

The Slate Department 
spokesman said that, despite 


ships, aircraft and garrisons. 

• STOCKHOLM: Delegates 
at the Stockholm disarma- 


the highly publicized Soviet jnent conference yesterday got 
“agreement in principle” ear- down to private discussion of 


lier this week on the on-site 
inspection of military ex- 
ercises. Moscow is now appar- 
ently maintaining that such 
inspections would not include 
broadly defined “‘closed 
areas". 

“Nor have we seen any 
serious Soviet co-operation in 
drafting the vital details and 
modalities which would give 
practical effect to on-site 
inspection", be said of the 35- 
state Stockholm conference on 
confidence-building measures 
in Europe: 

He said: “We cannot accept 
inspection modalities that 
would restrict access to train- 
ing areas nor one that would 
restrict access to areas nor- 
mally opened to indigenous 
public" 


new proposals launched at the 
talks tins week by Warsaw 
Pact countries, delegates said 
(Reuter reports). 

A series of private meetings 
discussed Soviet and Polish 
proposals, the latest in a series 
of moves which have injected 
a mood of optimism at the 35- 
nation talks, they said. 

No details were revealed. 
But Western diplomats were i 
sceptical about the extent and ! 
value of the East bloc 
proposals. 

The talks, grouping the 
United States. Canada and the 
European states except Alba- 
nia, have until September 19 
to agree on confidence-build- 
ing measures which reduce the 
risk of war from the Atlantic 
to the Urals. 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Bruce Cornwell, one of 
Australia’s most wanted men, 
arrived home in a VIP jet 
from London yesterday and 
was immediately taken to 
court, where it was announced 
that he would face 22 charges. 

Police marksmen were po- 
sitioned on the roof of 
Sydney’s Central Criminal 
Court during Mr Cornwell's 
brief appearance. The charges 
relate to the alleged importa- 
tion of narcotics, and false 
passports. 

Counsel for Mr Corn we U, 
aged 41, who was handed over 
to Australian investigators in 
Britain where he was arrested 
last year, said he had con- 
sented to return to Australia 
and would be denying all 
charges. 

In Canberra yesterday Mr 
Mick Young. Special Minister 
of State, said the VIP Boeing 
707 bad been used because the 
Government had been ad- 
vised there would bean un- 
acceptable risk to civilians if 
he had been put on board a , 
normal commercial flight. 


Pravda accuses US on arms leaks 


Moscow (Reuter) — Pravda 
has accused the US of using 
recent supposedly confidential 
talks in Moscow between So- 
viet and American arms ex- 
perts as a political tool 
Pravda said that no sooner 
had the talks, led by President 
Reagan’s arms adviser, Mr 
Paul Nitze. and the chief 
Soviet arms negotiator, Mr 
Viktor Karpov, ended earlier 


this month than Administra- 
tion officials “began spouting 
all manner of comments, both 
at official briefings and in 
private”. 

“The US Administration is 
making confidential Soviet- 
US consultations on nuclear 
and space arms into a political 
tooL Obviously this can only 
harm the businesslike ex- 
change of views and harm it 


considerably." it said. Pravda 
added that there were hints in 
Washington of “new pro- 
posals" in a recent letter from 
President Reagan to the So- 
viet leader, Mr Mikhail Gor- 
bachov. 

“Tbe US position, however, 
really presents littie of what is 
good and more than enough of 
what is unsatisfactory,” the i 
newspaper said. 


Scandals of drug trade put growing pressure on Bogota 


Kurds 
predict 
Gulf war 
offensive 

By Hazhir Teimourian 

A Kurdish leader. Dr Abd- 
onahman Qassemlou, pre- 
dicts that Iran will launch a 
huge offensive against Iraq 
next month, at about tbe time 
of the sixth anniversary of the 
outbreak of war between the' 
two countries. 

Dr Qassemlou — main lead-' 
er of tne seven-year-old Kurd- 
ish insurgency In the north- ' 
western highlands of Iran — 
said, during a brief visit to 
Britain last week, that Aya- 
tollah Khomeini was unable to 
resist the symbolism of such 
occasions, even If it robbed the , 
offensive of the element of 
surprise. 

He believes that the offen- 
sive will fail to achieve its 
intended breakthrough into 
Iraq. He thinks It will be 
launched simultaneously in 
the southern and central sec- 
tors of the 700-mile front, with 
the goal of cutting off the 
province of Basra from 
Baghdad. 

“Iran’s oil revenues, which 
are almost the only source of 
Its foreign exchange, have 
been slashed this year to about 
a third of their level last year," 
he said. "So the regime has 
decided that if it does not do 
something desperate about the 
war with Iraq now. in the 
future it wfll be completely 
disabled by the general crisis 
it is suffering from, and es- 
pecially the economic crisis.** 
Dr Qassemlou believes the 
lack of popularity of Ayatollah. 
Khomeini's Islamic Republic 
has now reached its height. 

“Ninety-five per cent of die 
3,000 or so military bases and . 
outposts that the regime has 
set up in Iranian Kurdistan try 
to let us understand that, if our 
guerrillas do not harass them, _ 
they will not bother us. In fact, 
we have trouble only with that . 
remaining 5 per cent where 
religious fanatics still manage 
to dominate the men.“ 
Recently his guerrillas, 
j which he says number about - 



From Geoffrey Matthews, Bogota 

Just a fortnight after taking sought by the United States, 
office, toe Colombian Govern- was astonish in g l y freed on bail 
meat of President Barco is by a provincial judge and has 
being confronted by the daunt- since predictably disappeared, 
ing problems posed at home Only a month ago. after a 
and abroad by the nation's Jong legal battle, he had been 
ruthless drags network, as extradited to Colombia from 
events over the last week have Spain. 

nodfiriiQe<L Colombia has long been 

First, two Colombian sensitive about its image 
women were arrested at abroad which, it feels, is 
Charles de Gaulle airport in nn Fah- ly stained by the stigma 
Paris after 43 kOos of cocaine of the Latin American cocaine 
were found in their luggage trade, whose main brains and 
after their arrival on an Air organizers are widely consid- 


France flight from Bogott. 
The haul, with a street valne 


ered to be Col om bia ns . 

There are fears that the 



estimated at £53 million, is Paris arrests wfll now cast a 
reported to be die biggest shadow over Bogota's tra- 


nncovered at a European 
airport. 

Then, a ranch-decorated of- 
ficial of the Colombian police 
anti-narcotics squad was. as- 
sassinated In Bogota by a 
baby-faced contract killer. 

Finally, one of Colombia’s 
top drag barons, whose extra- 
dition was being strenuously 


ditionally good relations with 
France. 

Such drug seizures show the 
network's dear strategy to 
cultivate Europe as a cocaine 
market which could eventually 
rival the United States. 

It nses “mules" (the popular 
vernacular for drug couriers) 
who are obviously small fry 


President Barco: court's 
decision embarrassing. 

who, at most would earn a few 
thousand dollars from those 
who comnnssrooed them for a 
"run". 

Fernando Triana Ramirez 
came even cheaper. “Yes, sure, 
Iadmitit, 1 killed the man, but 
when I shot him I only thought 
of the 100,000 pesos (about 


£330) I was going to get," be 
said. 

Fernando is aged 16 and 
looks even younger: tbe kind of 
wide-eyed innocent youngster 

who helps his parish priest 
officiate at Sunday Mass in 
churches throughout Col- 
ombia. 

Last Sunday, a Smith and 
Wesson revolver in his two- 
handed grip, he coolly shot 
dead Captain Lots Alfredo 
Marana at point-blank range 
in Bogota. 

Captain Manuta, aged 33, 
was a member of tbe police 
anti-narcotics squad who 
apparently had been leading 
an investigation which was 
dosing in on tbe operations of 
one of tbe drag dans. 

But Fernando never saw a 
centavo of the Mood money. 
He was captured within a few 
blocks of the street comer 
where be pumped four bullets 
into Captain Marana, a sitting 
target m his car which had 
stopped at a red traffic light. 

The murder site in northern 


Bogota has been dubbed Dr Baqnero is believed to 

"death comer". have been considering a US 

Last month a Supreme request for the extradition of 
Court Judge, Seflor Hernando Jorge Lois Ochoa Vasquez, of 
Baqnero Borda, was_ assassin- the legendary Ochoa rian 
a ted nearby when his car was widely regarded as one of the 
ambushed by four armed men, country's most powerful drag | 
one of whom police suspect fiefdoms. 
was Fernando. Was hingt on had sought to 

Two years ago the former extradite Ochoa from Spain 
Justice Minister, Senor Rod- where he was detained, but 
rigo Lara Bonilla, was simi- last month he was handed over 
larly murdered in the area. to Colombia instead. 

Senor Lara's death led to Today Ochoa is free and is 
implementation of a Colon- believed to have fled to Brazil 
bian-US extradition treaty after having been released on 
Specifically designed to bring baft by a customs authority 
international drag traffickers court in the port city of 
to justice. Ever since, jurists Cartagena on the minor 
charged with processing extra- charge of illegally importing 
ditions have received regular 127 Spanish fighting bulls, 
death threats. His release has sparked a 

It has been alleged But the national iqmiar, with the 
bloody siege of the Palace of strong suspicion that the judge 
Justice here by terrorists of involved was either bribed or 


the M 19 movement last 
November was instigated by 
the drags network, which un- 
doubtedly has links with 
M 19. Eleven judges were 
killed in the siege. 


threatened into his decision. 

The embarrassed Barco 
administration hat ordered a 
rigorous investigation Into the 
affair, which has dampened 
relations with the US. 


President Khamenei: threat 
to Gulf oil exports 

10,000, have succeeded in 
rolling bade the areas under 
the control of government 
troops, perhaps because tbe 
Government has switched 
more troops to the south. 

Referring to the foil of five 
army bases to his guerrillas in 
recent weeks, he said: “1 fear 
waking up one morning to bear . 
that our commanders have' 
decided to march on Tehran in 
my absence.” 

Fluent in eight languages. 
Dr Qassemlou is by for the 
most educated leader the 
Kurds have had in their seem- 
ingly endless pursuit of na- . 
tional liberation from the rule 
of Tehran, Ankara, Baghdad l 
and Damascus. 

He knows, though, that bis 
Democratic Party of Iranian 
Kurdistan is merely a regional 
force that could not dream of ■ 
toppling the central Govern- 
ment without the co-operation 
of the dominant Persian na- 
tionality in Iran. But he says 
that he finds the centrist 
opposition under the former. 
Prune Minister, Dr Shapor 
Bakhtiar, in Paris, unwilling 
to accept tbe idea of autonomy 
for the country's national 
minorities. As for the left, bis 
experience of them has con-' 
vinced him that they are not ■ 
democratic. 

His main source of aid at 
present seems to be the Gov- 
ernment of Iraq, which is 
trying very hard to suppress 
its own Kurds. 

“In practice," said. Dr . 
Qassemlou, “we and the Iraqis ' 
find that we have an enemy in 
common, bat we started our 
war with Tehran before the 
Iraqis did, and we are likely to 
be still fighting long after the 
end of the Gulf war. It is a 
great help to the Iraqis that we 
should be holding down ■ 
200.000 Iranian government 
props, and Iraq's involvement- 
in the war certainly reduces 
the pressure on ns. But we are 
dependent on no one". 

Iran threatens 
further action 

Tehran (Reuter) - Presi- 
dent Khamenei said yesterday 
that Iran might have to re- 
spond to Iraqi attacks on its oil - 
terminals in a way that might 
jeopardize all Gulf oil exports, 
even though it wanted friendly 
relations with Gulf Arab 
states. 

He told a prayer meeting at 
Tehran University that Iran 
had not yet utilized its full 
retaliatory strike capacity ra- 
the Gulf war. 

In another development, 
Tehran radio said two di- 
visions of volunteers from the - ; 
western province of Lorestan - 
had left for the war front. 



— v . 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 





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SPORTS 
DIARY 

Simon Barnes 

A show 
to catch 

.Batsman goes forth to bau and a 
vital innings it is loo. Bui as he 
steps out, he sees ihe lady of his 
life disappearing behind the pavil- 
ion with a man from the wicked 
world of racing. One of life's 
eternal moral dilemmas is upon 
him: should he hit his wicket and 
immediately son oul his private 
affairs, or should he play up and 
play the game? “All I ask. of 
life ..." he sings, as he is pum- 
melled by the bouncers and 
bcamers of outrageous 

fortune yes. Tim Rice, the lan 

Bolham of the musical, has 
teamed up with his old partner 
Andrew Uoyd Webber and writ- 
ten a new one. It is called Cricket. 

it lasts 25 minutes, was per- 
formed at Windsor Castle before 
the Queen and will be performed 
again at the Lord's Taverners Ball 
in November. Plans are afoot to 
make a record and perhaps to 
stage it in London, either by- 
expanding it or putting it on at a 
small venue as a little gem. 
Meanwhile Rice is busy celebrat- 
ing yet another triumph: “I’ve just 
scored the 1 .000th run of my 
carcer.“ he said. It only took 157 
innings, as well. The f.OOOtft run 
came in a boundary: “A sort of 
hook." he said: “ii went like a 
bullet." Cricket remains, as ever, 
such sport as dreams are made of. 

Matesmanship 

"I'lt never forget the day I punched 
David Specdie in the mouth . . . 
The hate / fell .for him had been 
Ji’Sieringfor weeks. / told him if he 
o/niied his mouth again. I’d put 
my fist in it Kerry Dixon on a 
fellow Chelsea player. Isn't it nice 
to have the football season back 
with us? 

Fickle fortune 

Remember Steve Daley? No? 
Well, he was once the most 
expensive footballer in England, 
signed by Manchester City from 
Wolves in 1979 for £1.5 million. 
The man responsible was that 
well-known financial incontinent 
Malcolm Allison. The move was 
not an unqualified success. Daley 
played only 47 games for City, and 
scored but four goals. He then 
went to America for four years, 
came back to play for Burnley, and 
then Walsall. This season, now 
aged 33. he is turning out for Rhyl 
of the Multipart League. Today 
his side are at home to Barrow. ! 
am sure it will be a match’ in a mil- 
lion. 

BARRY FANTONI 



■Great. He'll probably come back 
and break a load of records' 

Crawlman 

How pleasant it was to see serious 
sport back on the television after 
all this World Cup and Test match 
nonsense. The world swimming 
championships brought back to 
our screens the tasteful delights of 
synchronized swimming. Those 
interested in taking up the sport — 
surely every one of us — will be 
happy to know they can buy an 
underwater loudspeaker for a 
mere £1.40. It is called a Nautilus, 
and you mount it 1 8 inches below 
the surface of your pool. You can 
hear a voice under water 30 yards 
off and music wherever you swim. 
The makers arc quite swamped by 
the demand, they tell me. 

None given 

You may think that the top 
thoroughbreds are the fastest 
horses in the world, but they’re 
not. The real speed merchants are 
quarter-horses famous for their 
enormous rumps and for their 
astonishing speed over a quarter 
of a mile. The Jockey Club has just 
approved what are thought to be 
the first quarter-horse meetings in 
this country. They will take place 
on a private gallop at Codaiming 
in Surrey on August 31 and 
September 28. 

Mind bending 

Anyone who has reservations 
about taking up synchronized 
swimming could always try arm- 
wrestling - yet another booming 
sport. A UK-Caribbean tour- 
nament will be held on October 
4-5 at Bruton Recreation Centre, 
sponsored by Red' Stripe lager. 
The pursuit will get another boost 
when a Sylvester Stallone film. 
Over the Top. all about arm- 
wrestling. comes our wav in 
February. The Englishman most 
delighted by this is Clive 
“Iron fist" Myers, six limes British 
arm -wrestling champion and run- 
ner-up in the world championship 
in I9S5. "People think the sport is 
nothing but brute strength." he 
said/This is not true. For a start, 
there arc 25 different techniques 
\ou can use to get the better of 
your opponent The sport is 80 per 
rent mental." 


6 We are not up for sale . . . We have beaten 
sanctions before. We will do so again* 


Bruce London: To what extent 
have events in the rest of Africa 
weighed with you as you contem- 
plate the future of your own 
country? 

President Botha: South Africa is 
part of Africa. We are in fact part 
of a first and a third world. The 
white people of this country are 
not colonialists or temporary so- 
joumere. We understand the 
development problems of Africa. 
We also understand the tragedy of 
Africa. 

The fact is that of the approxi- 
mately 440 million black people 
living in Africa (excluding South 
Africa. Namibia and the black 
states that obtained their indepen- 
dence from South Africa) only 
approximately 42 million live un- 
der a multi-party or democratic 

system of government. 

This means, again excluding the 
aforementioned states, that only 
about 9.4 per cent of black people 
in Africa know the freedoms of 
democracy. As we all know, 
Zimbabwe is moving towards a 
one-parly state. If that happens, 
only about 7.6 per cent ofblacks in 
Africa would live under a demo- 
cratic system of government 
It is the big lie that a black 
government in Africa is of neces- 
sity a majority government I 
challenge the world to contradict 
me. It is a sad feet that only a 
minute percentage of blacks m 
Africa have obtained democracy, 
liberty and justice. 

One of the criticisms levelled 
against yon and your government 
is that you fall to abo&h 
apartheid in its totality — some- 
thing that, it is contended, yon ' 
could do at the stroke of a pen If 
yoQ really wanted to. 

The real issue is not really 
apartheid — whatever may be 
understood by that term. 

The real issue is the system of 
government to be evolved in 
South Africa. To what extent will 
this future government conform 
to civilized norms, to democracy. 


to the rule oflaw. to free enterprise 
and trade, to an independent 
judiciary, to a free press and to 
freedom of faith and worship? 

However, the issue that every- 
body seems to debate but that 
nobody cares to define is: what is 
apartheid? 

In the United States there is an 
organization called the National 
Association for the Advancement 
of Coloured People. Is this apart- 
heid or is it the acknowledgement 
of cultural and ethnic differences? 
The Congress of the United States 
has an exclusive black caucus. Is 
this apartheid? The reference to 
Indians in the Canadian constitu- 
tion — is this apartheid? 

And is it apartheid when in 
Britain black members of the 
Labour Party agitate for blacks to 
be' in Parliament in proportion to 
the black membership of the 
Labour Party? 

If apartheid means political 
domination by any one commu- 
nity of any other, the exclusion of 
any community from the political 
decision-making process, unequal 
opportunities, injustice and in- 
equality. racial discrimination and 
encroachment on human dignity, 
then I reject it out of hand. 

With the benefit of hindsight, 
do yoo now believe that foe orig- 
inal apartheid concept was a 
mistake and a misjudgement? 
Apartheid as we understand it 
existed in South Africa from 
previous centuries under British 
rule. 

The policy since 1 948 known as 
apartheid had its positive sides. A 
system of independent govern- 
ments was made possible and 
millions, almost half of the black 
peoples of South Africa, acquired 
political rights and a say in 
government which they never had 
in previous centuries. 

A large black middle class 
developed during this period and 
blacks also progressively partici- 
pated in third and second-tier 
government. 


As the South African 
government pro- 
claims that it has 
made preparations to 
resist international 
sanctions, President 
P W Botha, in an 
exclusive interview 
with Bruce London, 
explains his refusal 
to offer concessions 
to black militants 

In 1948 when the National 
Party came to power, paternalism 
and particularly colonial paternal- 
ism was the order of the day. 
Colonial paternalism had a racial 
connotation and whites for some 
400 yeans had governed blacks all 
over the world. South Africa 
inherited colonial paternalism and 
this entailed the governing of 
blacks by whites. 

In the aftermath of the visit by 
Sir Geoffrey Howe, is it not true 
that yon do need some kind of 
foreign help to get a process of 
contiliatioa under way? 

No. To those who want to 
meddle in South Africa's affairs I 
say, you can be of help to solve 
your own problems. The republic 
of South Africa knows Africa 
and is not up for sale to foreign 
interests. 

Do yoa have any real lines of 
communication with substantial 
black leaders, including those 
from the African National Con- 
gress? 

There are many black leaders with 
their own proven constituencies in 
South Africa. 

We find, however, a peculiar 
variety of viewpoints with regard 
to negotiations. First, there are 
those who are at present willing to 



negotiate with the government, 
and who are already doing so on a 
regular basis. Many fruitful results 
have been achieved in this regard 
— the abolition of the pass system 
and influx control, for example. 

Secondly, there are those who 
will negotiate with the govern- 
ment only after all reforms have 
been implemented up to the point 
where their negotiation position 
starts. What then is the sense of 
negotiation? 

Thirdly, there are those who are 
not at all interested in negotia- 
tions. but only in the transfer of 
power to a radical power clique. 

The government will, however, 
not be forced into negotiations 
with radical elements or those who 
make unreasonable demands. Di- 
alogue should be an instrument of 
hope, peace and freedom for all. 

Do you accept that the African 
National Congress is a major fac- 
tor in the future of South Af- 
rica? 

The ANC is excluding itself from 
being a major factor becauseof its 
pro-violence stance and its clear 
commitment to revolution. It 
knows the majority of South 
Africans rejects its policies. 

This is why the ANC is cur- 
rently following a strategy of 


barbaric intimidation — which 
constitutes the worst kind of 
armed propaganda. It tries to gain 
control O'er the lives of innocent 
civilians. I am not prepared to 
enter into negotiations with peo- 
ple or organizations who support 
violence to achieve political aims 
and who call in foreign agencies to 
support them. 

I cannot see any positive result 
from negotiating, under present 
circumstances, with the ANC. 
whose leadership is currently 
dominated bv the South African 
Communist Party. The lessons of 
history are clear. Nowhere have 
negotiations with communist-con- 
trolled organizations for the 
broadening of democracy suc- 
ceeded. I cannot see that it will be 
any different in South Africa. If 
they abandon violence we can 
prexxed with discussions. 

Should Mr Mandela abandon 
violence as a means to obtain 
political ends he can be a free man. 
Mr Mandela is therefore, in effect, 
being jailed by the South African 
Communist forty and its affiliate, 
the African National Congress. 
For obvious reasons it suits them 
that he remains in prison. 

What has been the response to 
your appeal to the genuine 
nationalists with the ANC? 
Information of this kind is of a 
confidential nature and I am not 
prepared to divulge it or to discuss 
this matter. 

How do yon regard the likes of 
Chief Mangos nthu Butbelezi and 
Archbishop-elect Desmond 
Tntn? 

I talk to numerous blacks in our 
country'. Some differ from me, 
others agree with me. Black lead- 
ers wish to bring about change 
through peaceful constitutional 
reform and not through revolu- 
tion and violence — we talk to 
them. I am very hopeful for the 
future. I am convinced that peace- 
loving South .Africans will even- 
tually agree on a constitutional 
solution. 


There is little common ground 
to be found between the tevoto- 
tionan aims of the ANC und those ; 
who seek peaceful reform. South 
Africans, even those who oppose 
m> government, realise this. If a 
time that the outside world also 
realised this and reconciled itself 
with the realities of South Africa, 
Do you see self-interest as the 
overbearing consideration as ftr; . 
as the world's response to 
South Africa at foe present time it 
concerned? 

Self-interest is indeed an im- 
portant motivating force for marw_ 
lobbtes and countries who 
vocate sanctions against South 
Africa. There is no low between -• 
states — only interests. 

If those countries that favour 
sanctions against South Africa 
rraiiv have foe interests of black 
South Africans at heart, why do 
thev not support economic growth 
and' development which is foe 
oniv way to eliminate disparity in 
quality of life between Mack ami.-, 
white in South . Africa? Why do 
thev impose sanctions which 
could only lead to unemployment, 
frustration and hardship? 

I have said before that foe 
campaign to impose sanctions 
against South Africa is a cynical 
attempt bv some to gain a black 
vote in America at foe expense of 
black employment opportunities 
in South Africa. 

South Africa, through its ex- 
ports of steel, coal and agricultural 
products, is a pow erful competitor 
in the international market. Some 
pro-sanction countries will benefit 
substantially if it could be rifrm- 
nated as a competitor. 

W'e do not desire sanctions, but 
if we have to suffer sanctions for 
foe sake of maintaining freedom, 
justice and order, wc will survive 
them. Not only will we survive — 
we will emerge stronger on the 
other side. 

W’e have beaten sanctions be- 
fore. We will do so again. 

© Tha Amwtan. Sytftwr T9BB 


John Grigg weighs the evidence in the controversy over the forced repatriation of Cossack prisoners 
at the end of the war and concludes that it was wrong, though not for the reasons now insinuated 


Mac and the 
massacres: 
good intent 
but a bad 


decision 


Whether or not Harry Phibbs was 
right to use a Conservative house 
magazine to publicize views ex- 
tremely damaging to a living 
Conservative ex-premier — and he 
now admits that he was wrong to 
do so — there can be no doubt that 
the incident has stimulated dis- 
cussion of an important historical 
issue which has hitherto suffered 
from a degree of censorship self- 
imposed. or deliberately induced, 
in large parts of the media. 

When Nikolai Tolstoy’s book 
The Minister and the Massacres 
came out in April many news- 
papers were either slow to review 
it or did not review it at all. A 
newspaper feature and broadcast 
interviews with the author were 
cancelled at foe last moment 
Some anxiety on legal grounds 
may have been understandable in 
advance of publication, but much 
more surprising was the reluctance 
of many newspapers to review the 
book when it was safely published 
and the danger of writs evidently 
past 

It could not be said that the 
author was unknown or the book's 
subject of Hide account. By every 
normal standard it should have 
been generally and promptly re- 
viewed. Instead, either literary 
editors themselves or the people 
they asked to review it tended to 
show a curious evasiveness. It was 
as if word had gone round that the 
book should be ignored, or at least 
played down. 

Perhaps that is what did hap- 
pen. Friends and relations of Lord 
Stockton — who is, of course, the 
minister charged in the book with 
responsibility for sending thou- 
sands of Cossacks and Slovenes 
needlessly to their deaths in the 
late spring of of 1 945 — may have 
fell that it would be a mistake for 
him to sue. but that much might 
be achieved by discreet lobbying 
and arm-twisting. If so. the tactics 
certainly worked fora time. 

But the issue will not go away, 
and Phibbs has been instrumental 
in bringing it to the notice of many 
who might otherwise have been 
scarcely aware of it In retrospect 
it may appear foal it would have 
been better for Lord Stockton's 
reputation if he had either taken 
the author to court or adopted an 
unequivocal attitude of '‘publish 
and be damned”. 

In one respect, at least he is on 
stronger ground than his critic. He 
is a genuine earl, whereas Tolstoy 
is a bogus count — in foe sense that 
his title is valid neither in this 
country nor in its country of 
origin, where all such titles were 
abolished before he was bom. 
Why ihe bearer of one of the 
world's most illustrious names, 
which no revolution can deny 
him, should think it necessary to 
maintain such a trivial anomaly is 
puzzling indeed. Bui foal is by the 


way, except that his insistence on 
his Tsarist title may indicate a 
point of view not wholly irrele- 
vant to his historical judgment. 

To what extent, if at all is his 
case convincing? Is the argument 
of The Minister and the Massacres 
well founded, or isil as flawed and 
tendentious as some allege? The 
hostile view is presented most 
strongly in a review of the book by 
Robert Knight that appeared in 
the Times Literary Supplement on 
June 13. This has been followed by 
an exchange of long letters be- 
tween author and reviewer of 
which the latest appears in the 
current issue. 

To ray mind, the controversy in 
foe TLS is a war of attrition in 
which neither party gains very 
much ground- But of the two, I 
think Tolstoy so far has the 
-advantage on one crucial issue. 
His contention that Stockton, then 
Macmillan, knew what he was 
doing when he paid his brief visit 
to foe British V Corps at Klagen- 
furt on May 13, 1945, and that it 
involved both callousness and a 
departure from agreed Anglo- 
American policy, seems to me to 
hold its own against all that 
Knight can throw at il 

Briefly, there were about 40,000 
Cossacks and 30.000 anti-Tito 
Yugoslavs in V Corps area in 
southern Austria at foe time in 
question. Not all of foe Cossacks 
were Soviet citizens: more than 
2.000 of them had been living 
abroad since the early years of foe 
Russian Revolution and had ac- 
quired foreign nationality. Neither 
they nor foe Yugoslavs were 
covered by the pledges on repatri- 
ation given to Stalin by foe 
Western Allies at Yalta. 

Yet they were all handed over, 
to foe Red Army and Tito’s 
partisans respectively, and foe 
victims included many women 
and children. It took much duplic- 
ity and some violence to enforce 
the transfer. What was done would 
have been treated as a war crime if 
ii had been perpetrated by foe 
losing side. 

Macmillan wrote at the time in 
his diary: 

. . Among the surrendered Ger- 
mans are about 40,000 Cossacks 
and 'while' Russians, with their 
wives and children. To hand them 
over to the Russians is condemn- 
ing them to slavery, torture and 
probably death. To refuse, is 
deeply to offend the Russians, and 
incidentally break foe Yalta agree- 
ment We have derided to hand 
them over . . ." 

It is quite dear from this that he 
authorized foe transfer, though it 
did not in feci take place until foe 
end of foe month. 

John Keegan, writing in the 
Daily Telegraph, insists that what 
Macmillan gave was “political 
guidance" rather than a 



Cossacks from a settlement which the Germans established in Italy and (right), their leader. General Timopbey Doraanoc: 
they thought the British forces in Austria would protect them but were sent home to certain death 


'•directive”, and disputes 
Tolstoy’s thesis on this narrow 
semantic ground. But surely there 
is not much distinction in the 
difference, granted that the point 
at issue was political and Mac- 
millan, as the British 
government's senior repre- 
sentative on the spot — a minister 
of cabinet rank — foe most 
authoritative local figure on a0 
political matters. Guidance from 
such a source must have been 
regarded as almost tantamount to 
a directive. 

Knight argues that Macmillan 
did not necessarily know it would 
be against Anglo-American policy 
to hand over Cossacks who were 
not Soviet nationals. But Tolstoy 
quotes a telegram from him to the 
Foreign Office, dated July 27 
2944, in which he says that he 
understands there is a distinction 
between male Soviet nationals 
and “men of Russian nationality 
who are not Soviet citizens and are 
caught serving in German military 
or paramilitary formations” — 
who would be “regarded as pris- 
oners of war”. His understanding 
of foe matter was confirmed in a 
Foreign Office ruling on February 
19. 1945. 

The evidence that Macmillan 


authorized the return of the 
Yugoslav refugees is rather less 
clearcui but still bard to dismiss. 
In his diary he refers to them, but 
does not mention any decision to 
transfer them, as he does of foe 
Cossacks. There is, however, 
strong circumstantial evidence, 
too complicated to. set out here, 
that he advised handing over the 
Yugoslavs as welL 

Why did he give foe advice he 
did. at any rate concerning the 
Cossacks? Here Tolstoy, to my 
mind, goes completely off foe 
rails, in suggesting that he was 
acting in secret and sinister collu- 
sion with foe Russians, for reasons 
that the author hints at without 
daring to specify. 

Two passages should be enough 
to give the flavour of this conspir- 
acy theory. Referring to a sup- 
posed approach by Smersb (later 
NKVD and KGB) to Macmillan 
before be flew to Klagenfurt, 
Tolstoy writes: 

“This there would have been little 
point in doing unless there were 
reasons to feel confident that 
Macmillan might prove receptive 
to a suggestion that screening 
provisions should be set aside. For 
if Macmillan’s likely reaction had 



Macmillan: he acted ruthlessly, bat for the sake 
of his country and in the interest of a 
long-term European settlement Although 
Tolstoy is right on at least one crucial issue, 
some implications in the book go 
far beyond what the evidence can justify 


been an unknown quantity, , there 
must inevitably have appeared to 
be a strong risk — indeed likeli- 
hood — that he would fed obliged 
to insist on implementation of his 
instructions from the Foreign 
Office to screen and retain old 
emigres." (My italics) 

And at foe end of foe book there 
is an innuendo that Macmillan 
was under continuous Russian 
blackmail throughout his years of 
power: 

“Perhaps the most disturbing 
factor . . . concerns not wuat lay 
behind foe Minister Resident's 
actions in May 1945. but in what 
followed. For throughout Mac- 
millan's terms of office as Minister 
of Defence. Foreign Secretary and’ 
Prime Minister, foe NKVD (sub- 
sequently the KGB) presumably 
had foe best of reasons for 
knowing the whole of a story 
which in the West it has taken 
forty years to unraveL” 

In writing this Tolstoy seems to 
me to go far beyond anything that 
the evidence can justify, and to 
make a personal attack that is 
profoundly defamatory. 

if Lord Stockton were to sue on 
that point, it is difficult to imagine 
any jury that could feil to find in 
his favour. Of course it would be 
undignified for a man of his 
eminence, and tiring for one of his 
age. to subject himself to cross- 
examination in court But he has 
proved that, even in his nineties, 
be has foe intellectual and physical 
stamina for such a test 
His unwillingness to take legal 
action is more likely due to 
another cause, and to guess what it 
might be we should consider what 
actually were his probable motives 
for acting as he did in May 1945. 
Professor Norman Stone seems 
near to the truth when he reminds 
us (Daily Mail, August 21) of foe 
historical context, “At that time, 
the Red Army military machine 
was ten times more powerful than 
Britain's and before Stalin with- 
drew his support for them — his 
part of foe deal for the return of 
foe Cossacks - foe local Com- 
munists were within a hair’s 
breadth of power in France and 
Italy." 

It is also true that at foe time 
British public opinion was on foe 
whale very pro-Russian, and thor- 
oughly unsympathetic to those, 
such as foe Cossacks, who had 
fought with foe Germans. In a 


BBC interview with Ludovic Ken- 
nedy (broadcast in December 
1984), Lord Stockton said of the 
White Russians: “It was harsh in 
some ways . . . Still they were on 
the Germans' side and working 
with foe Germans . - . you must 
remember the conditions of the 
time. Russia was. after all. our 
great ally.” All foe same, he sought 
- unfairly, it would seem — to 
ascribe foe . prime responsibility 
for what was done to Field- 
Marshal Alexander, the Supreme 
Allied Commander. 

My own belief is that Lord 
Stockton took what he knew to be 
a brutal decision — his diary shows 
that - for reasons of Realpolitik. 
regarding it as both expedient 
locally and essential for the future 
of Europe that good- working 
relations should be established 
with foe Russians. That was foe 
mood of foe time. He was exceed- 
ing his instructions, but men of 
initiative have often done so. and 
have subsequently been com- 
mended for doing so. in our rough 
island story. 

Unfortunately, for him. the 
perspective changed with foe on- 
set of foe Cold War, while foe 
return to more normal and civi- 
lized conditions m foe West made 
consciences more tender ihan they 
had been in 1945. In foe third 
volume of his memoirs (published 
1968). he does not include the 
diary entry quoted earlier (and 
published later), but he docs say 
that it was “a great grieC to him 
having to hand foe Cossacks and 
White Russians over. The “great, 
trier was not recorded at the 
time. 

What he did was wrong, and in 
his heart he probably now knows 
all too well that it was wrong. 
Hence his reluctance to admit the 
whole troth perhaps even to- 
himself, let alone publicly. He still' 
takes refuge in irrelevant ref- 
erences to Yalta, or to exchanges 
of prisoners, or to Field-Marshal 
Alexander. 

Ifhe were to seek redress against 
Tolstoy for the dark innuendoes, 
foal are made in the hook. he. 
would have to admit ihar he acted 
very ruthlessly, and ultra vires,- far 
the sake-of his country and. asi» 
hoped, in the interests of a long- 
term European settlement. Thai • . 
admission he cannot quite bring 1 , 
himself to make. 

© Thw Nmpipm, itrc 


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1 UriLO &r\i U iVJL>A k n.UOU^ i /j j. 




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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone:. 01-481 4100 

MR SHAH’S REVOLUTION 


Mr Eddy Shah's decision to At that point the theory 
cede overall control of the went awry. News Inter- 
newspaper he founded, Today, national, faced with a strike by 

to th P i ntmisrtinfia I printing Un IQIIS, UTOVed itS 


to the international trading 
company, Lonrho, is a sad 
event and one which ends an 
important chapter in the his- 
tory of the newspaper in- 
dustry. In three years, Mr Shah 
.has launched — and seen 
completed — a. revolution. 

A Mr Shah had. Jong been 
-foreseen. Down the long de- 
cades when Britain's national 
newspapers were produced on 
outdated machines using anti- 
quated methods, nothing was 
more commonly predicted 
-than that some entrepreneur 
would eventually see the prof- 
its to be made by producing a 
national paper with the most 
modem techniques — and then 
'set about doing so. It was 
'assumed by such prophets 
.that, if he were to evade or 
rdefeat the print unions, his 
newspaper would inevitably 
succeed. 

Other newspapers would 
.have to switch to his methods 
— which would certainly mean 
delays and probably involve a 
period of strikes and disrup- 
.tion. In that breathing space, 
the new newspaper would 
establish itself It would doubt- 
less also attract — by the use of 
colour — customers who had 
previously not been news- 
.paper readers at all- 

Thai was the theory and Mr 
Shah appeared to incarnate it 
His announcement of the na- 
tional newspaper forced exist- 
ing papers to take action or be 
driven out of business. 


four titles to the Wapping 
plant two months before Mr 
Shah’s paper hit the streets. 
Since then unions have shown 
greater realism in Fleet Street 
baigaining. 

This meant that Today 
would need more than lower 
production costs in order to 
attract readers- For ihe new 
non-newspaper-reading read-' 
ers failed to appear in suf- 
ficient numbers. The Today 
company, therefore, had to 
produce a- newspaper that 
enough existing readers 
wanted to read as much as, or 
more than, the titles to which 
they had become accustomed. 
It failed to do so. 

No-one should be surprised 
by that Although it is difficult 
to dissect the different qual- 
ities and characteristics that 
combine to make a 
newspaper's '‘personality", 
that there is such a thing 
cannot be doubted by anyone 
who has seen the same person 
read, first, the Telegraph and, 
then, the Guardian, both of 
which are papers of quality 
even if the quality varies. 

The news is much the same 
in both; very probably, the 
features deal with similar or 
even the same topics; only so 
much differentiation can be 
imported by a different type- 
face and layout Yet the one 
produces howls of firry where 
the other induces a peaceful 


smile of satisfaction. And vice, 
of course, versa. 

That kind of relationship 
between newspaperand reader 
cannot be established over- 
night Simply throwing to- 
gether talented people and 
telling them to get on with it 
will not be sufficient either. It 
is far from dear exactly what 
does establish it. Probably the 
main factor, at least initially, is 
chance — the coincidence that 
what pleases a particular editor 
will also appeal to millions. 
Over time a newspaper may 
discover these mysteries by 
trial and error. Only one thing 
is certain: a successful news- 
paper personality will never be 
assembled in response to the 
instructions of market 
researchers. 

That is probably why, when 
Today came under threat, 
outside investors did not rush 
to the scene. They had learned 
in the previous months that 
the pickings that seemed so 
easy a year earlier were not 
really available. Those who 
did show an interest were 
existing press proprietors who 
might gain from access to the 
publishing facilities of another 
newspaper. Thus Lonrho has 
disavowed any intention of 
printing the Observer on 
Today’s machines, but the 
possibility is there and must 
influence the unions in any 
bargaining. . . 

Newspapers win be a more 
profitable and secure business 
as a result of Eddy Shah. The 
daily mystery of a newspaper 
remains. 


THE LONG MARCH BACK 


-at-- 
^■^HtTcal 


Consider "the contrast. 
Seventeen years ago Soviet 
and Chinese troops clashed 
over a small, periodically sub- 
merged island in the Far East 

The then Soviet leaders 
broached with the United 
States the risk of using nuclear 
weapons against China. The 
West sensed the realization of 
■ its worst fears: outbreak of a 
nuclear war over which the 
Western world had no control. 

Five weeks ago; a Chinese 
borderguard wak&lled and a . 
'second injured m aSTncident 
involving- a Soviet frontier 
, patrol. Bekipg and, Moscow 
.exchanged diplomatic pro- 
tests, butiihe encounter; went 
.an; 

tempted 4 ^ 
capital out of it and when the 
first reports emerged, the out- 
side world evinced little con- 
■cem. 

- This episode more than 
anything else illustrates the 
sea-changc that has taken place 
in Si no-Soviet relations in 
recent years. And the fact that 
Peking, and Moscow co-op- 
craicd to suppress news of 
their armed engagement shows 
just how serious both sides, 
and not only the Soviet Union, 
now arc to set aside their 25 
year old rift. 

News of the recent 'clash 
places the Soviet leader's his- 
toric expedition to the Far East 
in a rather different light. He 
was not only launching a new 
Soviet initiative towards 
China, which was bold by any 


standards, but was also en- 
gaged in a mission of reassur- 
ance. 

Speaking in Vladivostok, 
the Soviet leader addressed 
himself specifically to the fron- 
tier question. He conceded to 
the Chinese the principle in 
which the 1969 border dispute 
had originated: the demarca- 
tion of the river boundaries. 
He held out the possibility of 
significant troop reductions on 
the Soviet side of the border 
and in Mongolia. And he also 
"spoke " of plans to build a 
railway linking the Soviet 
republic of Kazakhstan with 
the Chinese region of III This 
is ah area .of ethnic and 
linguistic -homogeneity which 
has been subject to territorial 
disputes for more than a 
century. It was on this sector of 
the border that the Chinese 
soldier was killed on July 12. 

For those Chinese apprised 
of the recent clash, the Soviet 
leader’s meaning was clean 
Moscow wanted the whole 
incident forgotten in the in- 
terests of improved relations 
with China — a cause the 
Soviet leader has made very 
much his own. His approach 
to foreign policy has allowed 
dogma to take second place to 
expedience, in theoiy as well as 
in practice. And this approach 
has been extended even to 
communist apostates. 

Now. the dispute with China 
in all its phases — ideological, 
territorial and military — is 
being slowly overtaken by 
events. Trade is increasing; 


communications are being up- 
graded and visits are multiply- 
ing. For Moscow, as for the 
West, a more open China 
makes an attractive market 
prospect. Moreoever a non- 
aligned China, which is the 
direction in which its foreign 
policy appears to be moving, 
makes China worth cultivat- 
ing. 

Until now, however, 
China’s interest in the persis- 
tent Soviet overtures was hard 
to assess. Its need of additional 
trade and r improved security 
was clearly less than that of the 
Soviet Union. Its relations 
with the United States and 
Japan have now stabilized. 
The Chinese leadership is 
ideologically more flexible at 
home, but not so 1 flexible 
abroad that it is prepared — yet 
— to relinquish its three de- 
mands on Moscow: with- 
drawal from Afghanistan, a 
halt to support for Vietnam’s 
occupation of Cambodia and a 
reduction in troop strength on 
the border. On these the 
present Chinese leaders re- 
main adamant 

Nonetheless, senior Chinese 
leaders, including Deng Xiao- 
ping. have shown more than a 
passing interest in Mr 
Gorbachov’s proposals. Their 
dismissals have been less 
categorical; their references to 
his speech more sustained 
than could have been ex- 
pected. Is this China’s way of 
signalling that its long march 
back to more normal relations 
has begun? 


FOURTH LEADER 


“The chapter on The Fall of 
the Rupee you may omit,” 
says Miss Prism, recommend- 
ing a course of light reading for 
her pupil. Cecily; “It is some- 
what too sensational" 

What would she have said 
about The Fall of the Bowler 
Hat? For fallen it is, and none 
so poor to do it reverence. The 
advertisements for the forth- 
coming flotation of the Trustee 
Savings Bank have featured 
the bowler as the distinguish- 
ing marie of the banker, but 
that was only by way of 
suggesting that all those who 
buy shares will be, in a sense, 
bankers. In feet, it appears, 
bankers do not wear bowler 
hats any more. Nor do stock- 
brokers. Nor do politicians. 
Nor publicans, butchers, 
judges, surgeons, grocers, bai- 
liffs, proctors, raffish men- 
about-town or civil servants. 

The bowler hat remains 
standard issue for the hunting 
world, but there it serves a 
serious purpose; a fall from a 
horse with an unprotected 
head could result in addling of 
the brains, though we know 
some curmudgeons who argue 
that anyone who gets onto 
what Kai Lung called “The 
treacherous apex of an un- 
certain steed” must have 
brains addled bey-ond further 
danger. The army, off-duiy. 
also continues to wear the 
bowler, for what purpose we 
do not profess to know. And 
there (unless you count the 
brown bowler of the on-course 


bookmaker) it ends. The 
bowler hat made Britain great, 
the Empire was won by men in 
bowler hats, die Industrial 
Revolution would never have 
happened without the bowler 
hat, the Barons at Runnymede 
wore bowlers to a man. 
Speaker Lenthall defied 
Charles I with a bowler hat 
precariously perched on his 
wig, the unbeatable Arsenal 
teams of pre-war football 
played in bowler hats — but 
we cannot go on, such is our 
distress; the long and the short 
of it, and for that matter the 
round, is that the bowler hat's 
day has come and gone. 

We had better face the 
implications. When the ravens 
leave the Tower, or the apes 
the Rock, these bastions, 
according to legend, will falL 
What win the bowler bring 
down with it, to perish in its 
ruins? The English, for one 
thing, relied upon it to distin- 
guish them from foreigners: 
who ever saw, at least without 
giggling, a German, a French- 
man or a Japanese in a bowler? 
How now shall we recognise 
one anothei? And is the 
authority hitherto conferred 
by a bowler to be no longer 
exercised at all? And since the 
special flourish accompanying 
the raising ofa bowler to a lady 
denoted a special regard for the 
tender sex. is chivalry to die 
with the bowled .And the 
humble clerk who went to the 
office with his luncheon sand^ 
wiches secure (and well venti- 


lated) beneath his bowler — is 
he now to be nothing but a 
figure in an old Punch cartoon? 

There is only one solution: 
we must promote some other 
object to the status and signifi- 
cance that the bowler has lost, 
to serve as a focus of pride, 
dignity, rectitude and, ul- 
timately, power. 

What shall it be? The solar 
topee? Gone the way of the 
bowler. The moustache? Too 
difficult to standardise. The 
blackthorn stick? Too rural. 
Knee-breeches cravates, mon- 
ocles, swords, ghetto blasters, 
digital watches — all seem all 
too inadequate for our high 
purpose. What shall it be? 

TTie cummerbund. It is 
smart visible, easy to don, 
uniquely shaped, and gives off 
a strong sense of all the 
qualities possessed by the van- 
ished bowler. Moreover, it 
need not be expensive, it 
provokes no mirth, it erases 
class distinctions; it is just 
what we are looking for. 
Fainthearts, will say it win 
never catch on: their ancestors 
said as much about the bowler. 
Besdies, we have a plan: we 
shall persuade Sir Bob Geldof 
to wear it. and the rest will 
follow. 

When one door shuts, an- 
other opens. As Last Post 
sounds for the bowler, glasses 
are being charged for the toast 
of the future — a future bnght 
with hope, confidence and 
renovation. Gentlemen: the 
cummerbund. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Writing off the 
Gadaffi factor 

From Professor Paul Wilkinson 
Sir, I write to express concern 
about the increasingly complacent 
attitude expressed in some quar- 
ters (see, for example, The Sunday 
Times leader. August 10) regard- 
ing the threat of Libyan-backed 
terrorism. 

It would be unwise to assume 
that the recent lull in attacks 
against US personnel and installa- 
tions m Europe and the Middle 
East is due to Gadaffi's abandon- 
ment of terrorism as a weapon of 
foreign and domestic policy or its 
abandonment by the terror gangs 
the Libyan regime has been assist- 
ing. 

Despite the strenuous denials by 
the Cyprus Government of any 
Libyan involvement in the recent 
terrorist attack on RAF Akrotiri, 
the circumstances of the attack do 
point to -a Libya-backed group. 
More worrying still is the 
announcement by the Togo Gov- 
ernment (reported in The Times, 
August 1.3) that they have uncov- 
ered a major Libya involvement 
in a plot to blow up the US 
diplomatic mission in their coun- 
try. 

Western security authorities, in 
their increasingly complex tasks of 
terrorist threat assessments, 
would be foolish to write off the 
Gadaffi factor. Libyan-backed ter- 
rorism is more likely to be shifting 
to more accessible targets, some- 
times still using Libyan 
“diplomatic” facilities outside the 
Tokyo summit states' territory or, 
where this is no longer expedient, 
utilising channels and networks 
other than the Libyan Peoples’ 
Bureaux. 

Yours sincerely, 

PAUL WILKINSON (Chairman 
of Trustees, Research Foundation 
for the Study of Terrorism), 
University of Aberdeen. 
Department of Politics and Inter- 
national Relations, 

Edward Wright Building, 

Old Aberdeen. 


Good for business 

From Mr Alec Maisner 
Sir. Mr Longmore (August 19) 
suggests an exchange scheme for 
Civil Servants and bankers with 
business companies, in order to 
bridge the gap of understanding 
which exists between them. He 
will be interested to know that the 
Industry and Parliament Trust 
has. for the last 10 years, been 
engaged in improving the under- 
standing between industry and 
Parliament 

Our main activity is a fellow- 
ship scheme under which par- 
liamentarians are attached to 
companies for 25 days over a 
•period of a year orso m order to 
gain practical experience of the 
world of business and industry. 
Over- 40 companies (including 
some small businesses and two 
banks) participate in this scheme 
and some ISO parliamentarians 
have graduated as the trust's 
fellows. 

Independently, the Whitehall 
and Industry Group organises 
similar attachments for senior 
Civil Servants. The gap of under- 
standing between business and 
bankers has yet to be tackled — 
although, given the close involve- 
ment of banks in business and 
industry. I am surprised that this 
gap exists. ' 

Yours faithfully, 

ALEC MAISNER. Director. 
Industry and Parliament Trust, 

25 Victoria StreeL SWI. 

August 19. 


Taking care of art 

From the Chairman of the Muse- 
ums & Galleries Commission 
Sir, I folly support the letter 
(August 9) from the Chairman of 
the National Art-Collections Fund 
and would add one point. The 
commission and the NACF have 
long urged that national and 
independent museums should be 
able to recover VAT on their 
acquisition purchases (as local 
authority museums can). 

As the Contemporary Art Soci- 
ety is acutely aware, the present 
system gives artists a 15 per cent 
advantage to export their best 
work, and dealers a similar in- 
centive to sell abroad. 

Yours faithfully, 

BRIAN MORRIS, Chairman, 
Museums & Galleries Commis- 
sion, 

7 St James’s Square, SW I . 


Medium and message on campus 


Jnnk on the line 

From Mr Brian Harrison 
Sir. People quhe unknown to me 
keep ringing me up at home, 
announce themselves as “John" 
or “Mary” and try to sell me 
things I don't want 
This is not just an intrusion: it is 
also (because I do a lot of my work 
at home) a tiresome interruption. 
Yet people seem to get much more 
bothered about unwanted items 
amvmg through ihe post which, 
after alL one doesnT have to read. 
Yours faithfully. 

BRIAN HARRISON. 

1 55 Gloucester T crrace. W2. 
August 16. 


Out of the mouths 

From Mrs Hearher Freeman 
Sir. Professor Crystal is quite right 
to be. against parental bossiness 
when children are beginning to 
speak (Monday Page. August 1 1). I 
was reminded of an exchange with 
my three-year-old: 

Son. “I were painting. Mummy” 
Self “I was painting” 

Son (triumphantly) “No. you 
wasn't. Mummy’ / were " 

T ours fiuihfully. 

HEATHER FREEMAN 
Woodman’s Cottage. 

Thoriey. 

Yarmouth. Isle of Wight 
August 15 


Front Dr Paul Dean 
Sir. Your report ( August 1 9) of the 
measures proposed by the 
Committee of Vice-Chancellors 
and Principals to improve aca- 
demic standards must depress 
anyone concerned to maintain 
quality in higher education. 

Undoubtedly there are many 
poor teachers both at undergrad- 
uate and postgraduate levels, 
partly because of the un- 
discriminating expansion of the 
1960s. Their shortcomings range 
from inability to communicate, 
despite good intentions, to actual 
negligence or idleness. But to 
encourage the students to report 
on their lecturers is to suppose 
that one can simultaneously leant 
and mature, and judge the value of 
the information one receives: and 
I doubt whether this is possible. 

Moreover, undergraduates un- 
fortunately tend to accept the 
dons' estimate of their own pro- 
ficiency (What other standards are 
available to them for compari- 
son?) 

Postgraduate complaints proce- 
dures certain ly need improving, 
but it is absurd of the committee 
to claim that inadequate super- 
vision of research can be dealt 
with during the course. Those who 
have tried it will know how far 
they arc likely to get in the face of 
official complacency and the herd 
instinct and they may fear that a 
student who complains too much 
is not certain of having justice 
done to his or her work. 

To be fair, we must admit the 
possibility of students abusing the 
proposed assessment system in 
their turn. It all goes to show the 
dangers of importing a model of 
industrial management into 
communities whose proper con- 
cern used to be the pursuit of 
knowledge in a spirit of collabora- 
tion. 

Yours faithfully. 

PAUL DEAN. 

57 Deane Avenue. 

Cheadie. Cheshire. 

August 19. 

From Professor (7- P. G. Butler 
Sir. It is of course true, as the 
Committee of Vice-Chancellors 
and Principals point out in a 
report due for publication in the 
autumn, that “appraisal of courses 
by students is widely used in the 
United States”. Let us hope that 
the CVCP report will also dem- 
onstrate that there is a causal 
connection between such ap- 
praisal and the sort of improve- 
ment in “academic standards" to 
which we can all aspire. 

If say, the mumble factor 
among lecturing staff is reduced in 
response to student criticism, well 
and good: the presentation of 
what's taught is something the 
consumers can judge, at least in 
part, and help to make more 
effective — or at any rate more 
entertaining. 


Consumers' opinions of course 
content , ort the other hand, are 
helpful primarily in contexts 
where the supermarket principle 
obtains. A diet of nothing but what 
you fancy will do you precious 
little good, unless your fancy 
coincides to a large extent with 
what is considered, by those who 
have spent their working lives 
finding out, to be suited to your 
needs. 

The fen that a practice is 
widespread, whether in the US or 
in Ruritania, may mean that it is a 
Good Thing. Bui if it is to be 
emulated, its advocates should 
furnish hard evidence of the 
benefits attributable to the prac- 
tice thus far— Le- in this case, the 
benefits which, despite all good 
intentions and initiatives in the 
right direction, have hitherto 
eluded the academic community 
on whose behalf the CVCP pur- 
ports to speak. 

Yours faithfully, 

GEOFFREY BUTLER, 

Newbury, 

Beechen Cliff, 

Bath, Avon. 

From Dr M. P. Rogers 
Sir, Far from being “revolutionary 
snuff” (your Education Correspon- 
dent, “Will universities rise to the 
challenge?”. August 20k many 
academics at present do seek the 
views of students on courses and 
teaching and (at least in my 
university) some senior members 
of staff sit in on lectures of junior 
members, during their proba- 
tionary years. 

Yours faithfully, 

M. P. ROGERS. 

Brum ana. 

5 Station Road. 

Heddon-on-the- Wall . 

Newcastle upon Tyne, 

Tyne and Wear. 


Study of philosophy 

From Mr T. St John Eve 
Sir, The answer to the questions 
raised by Sir Alfred Ayer (August 
12) and by Mr MacDonald Ross 
(August 16) may lie in the schools. 

Logic and rhetoric, with a 
suitably graded GCSE paper, as an 
option for secondary school pu- 
pils, followed by a study of basic 
philosophy, with an advanced- 
level paper, in the sixth form 
would be valuable for all adoles- 
cents proceeding to tertiary educa- 
tion. whether practical or 
academic. 

A substantial number of univer- 
sity aspirants could be expected to 
select philosophy as their subject, 
ensuring the future viability of 
university departments of philos- 
ophy. 

. Yours faithfully, 

THOMAS ST JOHN EVE, 

4 Mobberley Way, 

Bebington, 

Winal, Merseyside. 

August 18. 


Nuclear dumping 

From Mr Julian Fane 
Sir, Your second leader, “Green 
but not pleasant” (August 19) 
suggests that our case has no merit 
but deserves a hearing. 

The Scientific Committee of 
LAND (Lincolnshire and Not- 
tinghamshire Against Nudear 
Dumping) have produced a paper 
on the Fulbeck site and will be 
producing a further report this 
autumn on our views on how the 
nation should deal safely with low- 
level nuclear waste. 

You refer to the Special 
Development Order democrati- 
cally passed through the House of 
Commons. I would add to the 
democratic views, that the Not- 
tinghamshire and Lincolnshire 
county councils, as well as all the 
district councils and parish coun- 
cils of these two counties, have 


voted against any dumping of 
radioactive waste in either county. 

When Nirex have finally agreed 
monitoring arrangements with the 
county council; when the Govern- 
ment have answered our letter of 
request to allow LAND to apply to 
the local planning authority to do 
our geological survey (if we feel it 
necessary); when the Government 
have made the statement asked For 
by our MP about the Criche! 
Down prindple (which may make 
Fulbeck a non-starter); and. fi- 
nally. when the Minister of Power 
has appointed the two indepen- 
dent directors of Nirex, members 
of LAND will feel a great deal less 
antagonistic towards Nirex. 

Yours faithfully, 

JULIAN FANE (Chairman, 
LAND). 

Fulbeck Manor. 

Grantham, Lincolnshire. 

August 19. 


BBC building plan 

From Mr Stuart Upton 
Sir. The BBC, having abandoned 
the Foster Associates' plan for a 
new £100 million headquarter 
building for radio on the site of the 
old Langham Hotel in Portland 
Place, has now purchased a site in 
White City to take its place. 

It is widely rumoured that the 
White City site is to be born from 
a building contractor's package 
deal without the client having any 
direct influence in the selection of 
the architect, rather than from the 
drawing board of an architect of 
flair and imagination. Surely this 
major development to house a 
great national creative 
organisation should represent the 
best possible image of British 
architecture to the rest of the 
world. 

The building will have to be 
paid for with public money from 
the licence fee and the public have 
the right to know how that money 
is being spent and invested. These 
days there is conclusive evidence 
that firsi-class architecture is not 
only cost efficient but an invest- 
ment for owners and a stimulating 
environment for those who work 


within the building to encourage 
them to produce of their besL 
Youis faithfully, 

STUART UPTON, 

Stanhope Securities Ltd, 

10 Bruton Street, Wl. 

August 21. 

Uncollected tax 

From Mr J. A. P. Greene 
Sir, The PAYE system of deduct- 
ing tax from workers' pay has been 
costing the Government millions 
of pounds in uncollected tax. 
Workers who never send in a 
declaration of income, and are not 
required to do so, make millions 
of pounds in secondary jobs, 
which is not declared. 

This is a new twist in the PAYE 
system, as many workers think 
that tax on a secondary income is 
automatically deducted, together 
with the tax on the pay of their 
full-time job. This can hardly be 
called dishonest, as they are never 
called upon to make a personal 
declaration. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN A. P. GREENE, 

28 Vyner Road. 

East Acton, W3. 

August 14. 



AUGUST 23 1932 

The Nazis, under Hitler, had not 
yet gained pouter but the writing 
uias on the wall A putschist, the 
description given to Lieutenant 
Heines, is one who supports a 
political revolution. Beuthen is 
now in Poland and is called 
Bytom, 


NAZI DEATH 
SENTENCES 

From Oar Own Correspondent 
BERLIN. AUG. 22 
Five Nazis were sentenced to 
death today at Beuthen by a special 
summary Court. Nine Nazis in all 
stood in the dock, and the trial, the 
first coming under the provisions 
of the recent “Terror Decree' 
which prescribed the death penalty 
for terrorist acts resulting in loss of 
life, concerns the killing by several 
armed men of a Communist named 
Pietzuch in his bedroom at 
Potempa. near Beuthen. The de- 
cree came into force at midnight on 
August 9. and the crime was 
co mmi tted an hour or two later. 
The silence in which the Court's 
judgment was heard was broken by 
an uproar led by a uniformed Nazi 
leader in Court who himself had 
been sentenced to 15 years' ixnpris 
onment in 1928 for the “execution” 
of a Rossbach Free Corps man 
“suspected” of Communist sympa 
thies and treachery; the tumult 
spread into the streets uutside and 
had to be quelled by the police: but 
its echoes mil long ring throughout 
Germany. 

This trial . . . arose from events 
in Silesia, where political passions 
run particularly high among the 
large agricultural and industrial 
populations. In some ports the 
Communists are strong and aggres 
sive. The Socialists and Comoro 
nists for their part regard the 
appointment of Lieutenant Heines 
to the Nazi "High Command" in 
Silesia as a direct provocation 
largely responsible for the bitter- 
ness of feelings in this area 
Lieutenant Heines, Rossbacher, 
Kapp and Hitler putschist, now 
Nazi Deputy, was amnestied after 
serving some two years of his 15- 
year sentence, and is regarded on 
the Left as the incarnation of the 
belief that to kill someone believed 
to be a Communist is not murder. 
He was in Court throughout the 
trial. 

NAZI GREETINGS IN COURT 
The gruesome story of the crime, 
as told in evidence, has already 
been transmitted; Pietzuch was 
beaten, shot, and kicked to death 
by men who entered the room in 
which he, his brother, and his aged 
mother were asleep. The accused 
were not cast down, but exchanged 
friendly glances and Nazi greetings 
with the Nazi generalissimos 
present in Court 
To-day four of them, including 
the local Nazi Detachment leader, 
were sentenced to death for “Man 
slaughter from political motives,' 
and a fifth, the headman of the 
village, for having instigated the 
crime. Another received two years' 
imprisonment, and the remaining 
three were acquitted for lack of 
evidence. 

The President of the Court sard 
was proved that the accused had 
gone to Potempa to murder 
Pietzuch, and the crime must be 
punished with the fullest severity 
of the law. The decree of August 9 
must receive full application, as the 
crime had been committed 90 
minutes after its effective 
promulgation. 

As the President finished. 
Lieutenant Heines, who was wear- 
ing Nazi uniform and was 
accompanied by a number of other 
Nazi leaders, jumped up and 
shouted, “Hie German people will 
future pass other verdicts. The 
verdict of Beuthen will show the 
way to German freedom. Hail 
Hitler!" There, was an immediate 
uproar, spectators, and even Press- 
men (as it is not surprising to learn 
view of the way the reports in 
various newspapers have been 
coloured by political sympathies), 
joining in the shout, which spread 
to the street outside. Here thou- 
sands of people were gathered, and 
the police had to dear the 
neighbourhood with truncheons. 
As Lieutenant Heines left the 
Court he received a great ovation. 

The disturbances around the 
Court became so serious that police 
wearing steel helmets and armed 
with carbines and automatic pis- 
tols were called out, and they drove 
the excited crowd from the vicinity 
of the Court. Previously Lieuten- 
ant Heines had had the local storm 
detachments paraded before him 
outside the Court and had them 
marched off to their quarters. 
Disturbances were also reported 
from other parts of the town, the 
windows of many shops and of 
Socialist newspaper offices and 
buildings being smashed. 
NEWSPAPER THREATS 
The local Nazi newspaper had 
threatened the Court that if it 
“dared to pass a single death 
sentence a storm will be raised 
throughout Germany and the re- 
sults will be incalculable." The 
court has dared ... 


Gilded cage 

Front Mrs Dora Hodge 
Sir. Your Fourth Leader (Augusi 
16) is wrong m suggesting that 
£5.000 is an extravagant legacy to 
ensure that a parrot should con- 
tinue 10 live in the manner to 
which it is accustomed. Inflation, 
and the fact lhai parrots have a life 
expectancy of 80 to 90 years, must 
be taken into consideration 

( om forcible accommodation 
consists or a very large cage, at 
present cosung ovcr£ 1 00 and with 
a life of about 10 years a smaller 
cage is also necessary for travel- 
ling 

Boredom is a killer so a 
compatible (to the parrot) human 
companion is essential to give 
time and affection as demanded 
The stimulation of a love/hate 
relationship with a dog or cat is 


also good. Plenty of activity and 
noise — musical or otherwise — 
inside the household, and plenty 
of activity to watch outside, such 
as a busy road or a children's 
playground is also an advantage. 

Vou mention bird seed and 
water — both necessary items, but 
at the bottom of the list My parrot 
(aged 21) likes fresh orange juice. 
Ribena. and an occasional sip of 
Guinness (from the tankard). 
Only the best will satisfy 

He can tell butter from Flora, 
brown bread .from white, choc- 
olate biscuits from plain, cauli- 
flower from broccoli The lesser 
foods arc dropped untasted to the 
floor of his cage He can even 
recognise different tins, and de- 
mands a taste when he sees one 
that he likes being taken from the 
store cupboard 


Among the foods that he de- 
mands arc: grilled sausage, garlic 
sausage, pate.- red beans in chilli 
sauce, curried rice, potato chips 
dipped in salad cream, broccoli 
stalks, lemon, orange, banana, 
pineapple, tinned apricots, grapes, 
apples, raspberries, strawberries, 
peas, tomatoes, lettuce dipped m 
French dressing, dry salted pea- 
nuts. ensps. cereals with milk and 
sugar. After Eight minis, and other 
expensive chocolates. 

A happy, healthy, and con- 
tented parrot is a time-consuming 
and expensive luxury, but well, 
worth while if the parrot approves- 
of you. 

^ ours faithfully. 

DORA HODGE 
9 Marlow MilL 
Mariow. Buckinghamshire. 

August 16. 




8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


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Television 


Powerful emetic 


Watching paint dry would 
hare presented an attractive 
alternative to last night's ma- 
jor offering, the second mega- 
lamp of Arthur Hailey's 
Strong Medicine (TVS). 

Passing over die apparent 
boastfulness of the title (which 
rivals that of my favourite LP, 
JS. Bach's Organ Works), one 
can only suggest that all 
available copies of this gluti- 
nous test-tube opera should be 
buried in a lime-capsule as a 
salutary warning to the pro- 
gramme-makers of the future. 

As the tranquillizing theme- 
music oozed over the opening 
credits, one found oneself 
(slightly) agog with questions. 

Would Celia's humanitarian 
concern scupper her blossom- 
ing career? (Answer: No.) 
Wonld BQJ remain faithful to 
Jessica? (No: he was caught in 
a cliche with his secretary on a 
yacht) Would Noah give up 
dope? (No: he was led oft 
raving.) Why did the sinister 
Vince so much resemble Jef- 


frey Archer? What on earth 
was Bobby Ewing doing in 
Boston? Why were all these 
brigfat-as-paint actors driving 
vintage cars and listening to 
early- 1960s pop mnsic? (Un- 
answerable.) 

Mr Halley's dialogue had 
the effect of inducing an 
uncanny sense of precognition 
in the viewer parlour games 
could have been constructed on 
the principle of guessing the 
next line before it was spoken. 
Still, when Celia trekked over 
to Cambridge, England, to 
meet peptide-happy Ben 
Cross, the latter's father knew 
which side of the Atlantic his 
bread was buttered. 

‘‘You’ll fancy a cuppa, 2 
expect. I've got the kettle on.** 
(English, you see.) His 
mother, however, remained 
mute and unresponsive, imper- 
vious to blandishment and 
staring steadily before her. 
One sympathized from the 
depths of one’s sofa. 

Martin Cropper 


Not at all elusive 


One definite plus point about 
watching Michdangdi plays 
Beethoven (tomorrow. Chan- 
nel 4. 8. 1 5) is that al least you 
can be sure of the elusive 
genius appearing. 

Arturo Benedetti Michel- 
angcli - wartime fighter pilot 
turned Italian resistance hero, 
mountain climber, racing 
driver, skier and (his many 
fans would maintain) pianist 
of unmatchable vision in cer- 
tain fields — recorded these 
live concert performances of 
three Beethoven concertos (I, 
3 and 5) in 1979. shortly 
before his sixtieth birthday. 
Channel 4 is showing them on 
successive Sunday evenings. 

Filmed in the Musikverein, 
Vienna, with the Vienna Phil- 
harmonic conducted by Carlo 
Maria Giulini. the pro- 
grammes are visually attrac- 
tive but essentially straight- 
forward in presentation. 
There are some disconcerting 
close-ups (conductor and pi- 
anist arc seasoned exponents 
of the “infinite suffering min- 
gled with tenderness** school 
of facial expression) and the 
sound, with piano and wood- 
wind unnaturally prominent, 
is not entirely satisfactory. 


But Michelangeli's inter- 
pretations should be heard by 
all who relish robust un- 
compromising individuality. 
In the First Concerto the 
passagework has a hard, angry 
quality, even in the slow 
movement there is little at- 
tempt to cultivate a con- 
ventionally pretty legato 
touch. When the camera con- 
centrates on the keyboard you 
can see that Michetangeli does 
the opposite of caressing the 
keys: rather, he stabs at them 
in semi-staccato style, crush- 
ing the grace-notes abrasively 
and giving a deliberately 
rough-cut feel to the phrasing. 

The VPO's playing, by con- 
trast. is as suave as one would 
expect — no rough edges 
permitted here — buz even this' 
establishes an interesting ten- 
sion with the maverick in their 
midst. There is no question 
about where this performance 
reaches its climax. After 
Michelangeli's huge, daring 
first-movement cadenza — full 
of wild modulations and 
chords tumbling out by the 
Usztian fistful — even Giulini 
can scarce forbear to cheer. 

Richard Morrison 


The announcement recently that the 
Booker McConndl Prize had re- 
verted to its original name of Booker 
Prize has left the literary world 
surprisingly unshaken. Yet in an 
appalling year for publishing — a year 
which has revealed that only Ameri- 
can tourists buy books — the backers 
of Britain's most famous literary 
award can do no wrong. From now 
until the short-list is announced on 
September 24 (the lost date by which 
an entry can be published), there will 
be a bottleneck of new and eligible 
fiction attempting to cash in on some 
much-needed publicity. 

Now in its seventeenth year, the 
Booker's avowed aims are to cele- 
brate the best novd of the moment 
and to encourage cveyone to take an 
interest in serious fiction. How much 
it succeeds is questionable. Often our 
best novelists (Greene, Fowles and. 
this year. John Le Carre) will not 
allow their books to be submitted. 
Often the judges have a habit of 
overlooking the best novel (glaring 
omissions from recent short-lists 
have teen Martin Amis. Angela 
Carter and Peter Ackrovd). Long after 
the lights have dimmed at the 
GuildhalL what tends to be remem- 
bered is not the judiciously selected 
winner but the scandal involved in 
his or her selection. 

Who can forget how Malcolm 
Muggeridge bowed out as a judge 
because everything he read was so 
monstrously sexual: or how John 
Berger, so outraged to discover that 
Booker owned plantations in Guyana 
(though they had been nationalized), 
gave half his prize away to the Black 
Power movement (which had all but 
petered out two years before) and 
kept the rest (inspiring the quip that 
you are either morally outraged or 
you are not)? Then there were the 
incidents of naughty Brian Aldiss, 
who leaked the process by which 
certain decisions had been made: of 
Selina Scott, who so winsomelv 
enquired of a Booker judge whether 
she had read any of the books: and of 
a chairman. Professor Cobb, who 
pretended not to have read anything 
al all. 

Despite — or because of — such 
ballyhoo, the prize has indeed whet- 
ted the public's appetite for fiction. 
While the first winner, P.H. Newby— 
who has another novel out this 
autumn — increased his sales by a 
modest 1.500 copies; a nomination 
on today's short-list can create a 
demand of anything from 7,000 to 
15.000 extra hardbacks. When there 
is a clash of such Titans as Burgess 
and Golding, followed by a public 
squashing of sour grapes, then a 
Booker Prize winner can sell over 
30.000. Even last year's Maori 
masterpiece. The Bone People. •. man- 
aged to sell 30,000. 

Small wonder, then, with present 
sales fallen into the sere, that Booker 
is regarded as big business. It is now 
by no means uncommon for agents to 
stipulate that the publication of their 




Three of the best: PD- James (left), lifting crime into literature 
with A Taste for Death; Paid Bailey, drawing a fine relationship 
between father and son in GabrieFs Lament; and Timothy Mo, 
plundering history out East in An Insular Possession 

For the next month the whole literary world will be in its 
customary ferment over a prize which is increasingly seen 
as the saviour of British publishing; but who will be short- 
listed (and why)?: Nicholas Shakespeare investigates 

Boosting up with Booker 


author is conditional upon his sob- 
mission for the prize: Publishers play 
an even darker game. They present a 
list of their maximun four, but keep 
one or two of their stronger can- 
didates on a reserve list in the hope 
that the judges will exercise their 
prerogative and can them in. In the 
past this lias been a wily and 
successful rose. Not so today. 

Numbering 120 — 17 more than in 
19S5 — this year's entry is the laigest 
ever. With so much reading matter 
there has been no rush for extra 
volumes. As a result several publish- 
ers stand to catch a very nasty cold. 
For instance, it might come as a 
surprise to .Anita Brookncr. a pre- 
vious Booker winner, that her 
publishers. Jonathan Cape, have not 
entered A Misalliance. But then nor 
have they entered the multi-syllabled 
Lisa Si Aubin de Teran (though her 
novel is one of the few to have been 
requested). Similarly Faber & Faber, 
past masters at the Booker game 
(“Everybody says it's a silly game”, 
admits Desmond Clark, their market- 
ing director, “but everybody plays 
it”), are putting a lot of their money 
on Vikram Seth's prose-poem The 
Golden Gate — this in the canny hope 


that it cannot fail to tickle the fancy of 
the poez-chaimian of zhe judging 
panel. Antony Thwaite. The trouble 
is that Vikram is not on the list either, 
nor to date has he been called in. 
Other surprising omissions include 
Janice Elliott's Dr Gruber’s Daughter 
(Hoddcr) and Ronald Frame's .-1 
Long Weekend with Marcel Proust 
(Bodley Head). 

For the grand debacle on October 
22. the ideal Booker scenario is either 
a Buigess/Golding humding resulting 
in a famous winner, or the emergence 
of a complete outsider who has 
written a book the public likes 
reading This year the famous num- 
ber Anthony Burgess. Fay Weldon. 
Piers Paul Read and Beryl Bain- 
bridge. There are also previous 
winners like J.M. Coeizee and Stan- 
ley Middleton. At the moment none 
of these is considered a front-runner. 
Currently heading the field are 
P.D. James (.-I Taste for Death). 
Kazuo Ishiguro (An Artist of the 
Floating World). Timothy Mo (.-In 
Insular Possession). Paul Bailey 
< Gabriel’s Lament). Julian Barnes 
l Staring at the Sun ) and Kingsley 
Amis (The Old Devils). 

Were Ron Pollard of Ladbroke's to 


involve himself in some pre-short-list 
punting. he might also lip Maigarei 
Atwood (The Handmaid's Talc), 
Howard Jacobson ( Redback). Robert- 
son Davies (HV/af *5 Bred in the Bone). 
Colin Mackay (The Song of’ the 
Forest). Caryl Phillips M Slate pi 
Independence). Carolyn Slaughter 
(The Innocents) and Amitav Ghosh 
(The Circle if Reason). 

In a departure from precedent the 
judges are meeting on September 2 
for a pro- shon-lisl discussion. “The 
chemical reaction of five minds at 
work can sometimes alter strong 
opinions already formed.'* So says 
Martyn Goff, chairman of the admin- 
istrating body, the National Book 
League. “Bui in my experience, 
■unless I'm very naive, the judges have 
always been honest.” He takes refuge 
in comparing the Booker with us 
French equivalent, the Prix Gon- 
courL “Only three publishers have 
ever won the Goncourt And alt three 
have members on the Academic 
Goncourt who are their authors.” 

Whoever wins eventually — and* 
why not P.D. Janies? — there is too 
much invested in making a success of 
things for it to be Booker bedtime just 
yeu 



THE SUNDAY TIMES 


ALL THAT’S BEST IN BRITISH JOURNALISM 



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MACMILLAN 
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EGON RONAY ON CAVIAR 

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5 PAGES OF SPORT 

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Sunday isn’t Sunday without the 
Sunday Times 


Promenade Concert 


RPO/Temirkanov 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 


It is refreshing to find a 
violinist as surely placed in 
the fast stream of the music 
profession as Anne-Sophie 
Mutter offering something a 
bit different. Dvorak’s Violin 
Concerto is not far removed 
from Brahms's or Tchai- 
kovsky’s in mood or time, of 
course, but it is much less 
often played. The thematic 
material is perhaps less tautly 
argued, but that is part of its 
charm. 

In any case, this perfor- 
mance often made a virtue of 
that structural nonchalance. 
The atmospheric transition 
from Allegro to Adagio, for 
instance, where a horn-call 
settles on a long-held note 
over which the violinist adds a 
stream of wistful arpeggios, 
was elegantly phrased by both 
players. It payed the way 
perfectly for the Adagio tune 
proper here it is the violin 
which has the lowest part 
(played on a wonderfully 


smoky-toned G-string by 
Mutter) while the woodwind 
supply the descants. 

Yuri Temirkanov was rat- 
her more successful solving 
this passage's notorious bal- 
ance problem than he was 
generally keeping the en- 
semble together. One wonders 
whether his flowery, baton- 
less gestures cany any better 
over the footlights ai the 
Kirov Opera than they did to 
the back desks of zhe Royal 
Philharmonic. The Adagio 
had one particularly muffed 
rallentando. but Temirkanov 
was least in touch with Mutter 
in the finale. She seemed to 
want the Czech dances to 
bounce along a good deal 
more mercurially than he was 
prepared to follow. 

Nevertheless Mutter gave 
ample evidence of her growing: 
maturity. The hint of gypsy 
glissandos in the opening dou- 
ble-stoppings was a shade 
mannered, but the precision of 
the demi-semiquaver flour- 
ishes that followed gave a 
foretaste of her magnificent 
dash through the finale: a 
stunning spiccato demonstra- 


tion executed at lightning 
speed. Even more pleasing 
than the fireworks, however, 
were some well-calculated 
delicacies. A real pianissimo 
was employed at one point in 
the first movement, and some 
sweet-toned high-register 
playing tit up the Adagio’s 
climax. 

The concert began with 
Liadov’s pleasant if incon- 
sequential orchestral “folk- 
tale” Kikimora . the scope of 
which seemed exactly tailored 
to Terairkanov's talents. It 
begins in quintessential Rus- 
sian gloom with lugubrious 
woodwind harmonies, but by 
the end has cheered itself up. 
More or less the same thing 
happens, at six times the 
length, in Tchaikovsky's Fifth 
Symphony. Here, Temir- 
kanov indulged in some 
extravagant rubatos, as if wor- 
ried that without his aid the 
music would sound too cooL 
Jeffrey Bryant's horn sola 
however, was a model of 
beauty achieved without fuss 
or pretension. Maestro: please 
note. 

Richard Morrison 


Edinburgh 

Festival 

Oslo PO/Jansons 

Usher Hall 

After the unfonunaic Fugenc 
Qihgm of the night before, ft 
was almost a shock to hear a 
Tchaikovsky performance w 
positive and professional 
Even grien that now- the 
orchestra was the Oslo Phil- 
harmonic under Manss Jan- 
sons a ream whose Tchai- 
kovsky recording has been 
much admired, it was still 
surprising to find so much 
energy and freshness being so 
well placed. Mr Jansoflvts 
evidently a stickler tar disci- 
pline. and in this performance 
of the Second Sy mphv>ny.as*t 
the start of ihe concert in 
Weber's Kunwiihc Overture, 
he had the orchestra respond- 
ing quickly and with absolute 
unanimity. 

indeed the fiiwJc might 
have risked becoming an ex- 
ercise in bandmastenhip. had- 
it not been that the rhythms 
marched through such rich. : 
dear chords, with every, in-, 
strument separately focused 
even though all were sounding 
together. The effect was. 
mechanical, but juicy, and 
suddenly made sense of 
Stravinsky’s admiration for 
this work, since here, nearly 
40 years ahead of time, is the. 
pne-echo or Petrushka. 

The middle movements of 
the symphony were no less 
lively and exotic: they were 
also nicely contrasted against 
expectation, with the march 
lightly ironic and delicate and! 
the scherzo robust. Bui what 
was excellent all through Ihe 
performance was the char- 
acterful beauty of the wood- 
wind playing: the first bassoon 
has a masterly control of 
phrasing: the oboes and clari- 
nets mesh together closely and 
naturally; and there is much 
charm m the piccolo. 

h would have been interest- 
ing to hear this orchestra in 
some home-grow n music, and ; 
it seemed on paper perverse of 
them to offer not the Grieg 
Piano Concerto but Beef-, 
hoven’s C minor. Emanuel 
Ax's performance, however, 
brought ample justification.. 
The key to his approach 
appeared to be to play the 
work as chamber music. His 
pianissimos were often ex- 
treme. yet commanded such 
attention that no derail was 
lost, and in phrasing and 
pedalling he also achieved a 
communicative subtlety to 
make this seem a more than 
usually tylozartian concerto. 

The other musical events of 
the day included a morning 
recital by Catherine Dubose 
devoted to French songs. She 
is not the most colourful of 
siYigers. but her clarity, 
vulnerability of tone and 
artlessness were well suited to 
a Chahrier group and also to a 
selection from Debussy's Ver- 
laine settings. This was a voice 
that needed much more sen- 
sitive accompaniment. 

Then, at the other end of die- 
day, there wias a late-night 
popular concert given by the 
Scottish Chamber Orchestra 
out in Prince's Street Gardens 
under the unlikely direction of 
Peter Maxwell Da\ ies. One is 
not going to bear him again. 1 
suppose, conducting the Or- 
pheus in the l iidcni /ir/i/ Over- 
ture or the “Thunder and 
Lightning” Polka, still less the 
Fireworks Music with' pyro- 
technics to match. And. 
though critical niceties rather 
go by the board on .such 
ampli'fied and noisy occa- . 
sions, thanks must go. 1 o 
Glcnlivet for sponsoring this 
dram of festival craziness. - 

Paul Griffiths 


Radio 


How three can crowd the listener out 


“Sing Something Simple” 
goes the song and. as so often 
happens, conceals in a crash- 
ing banality a bit of very good 
advice. When he wrote Barnes 
People lack in 1981. the 
playwright Peier Barnes went 
for what, in one sense, is the 
very simplest form of radio 
drama, the monologue — 
seven monologues to be pre- 
cise: each most carefully 
wrought and for which some 
of the more emininent gran- 
dees of the British theatre had 
been engaged: Gielgud. Ash- 
croft, Guinness, Clem- 
ents . . . they certainly did 
compel the auention. 

Barnes People // followed in 
1984. These were seven duo- 
logues and I said at the time 
that an increase of 100 per 
cent in the cast — grandees 
again - seemed to have 
reduced the effectiveness by 
about half 

Now in Barnes People III 
(Radio 3) the linear pro- 
gression continues: stilt under 
Ian CottcreU's direction on 
four nights of this week and 
four of next as well trios of 
immensely distinguished 
players have been and will be 
heard. What started as one 
voice addressing the listener 
as if he were the sole recipient 
of a confidence, or from 
another point of view as an 
example of the magnetic art of 
story-telling, has grown into a 
scries of extended, folly- 
dramatized sketches or little 
plays. 

The effect has been to draw 


a sort of ring around the action 
which puts the hearer on the 
outside, listening in. Perhaps I 
•ought not to complain, for is 
this not what plays do any- 
way? Of course, but still I wish 
that Mr Barnes had stuck to 
solos. In that vein. I am sure, 
his focus was sharper, his 
voice more incisive: while two 
of this week’s pieces were crisp 
enough (After the Funeral, in 
which two pimps commis- 
erate with a third whose 
livelihood they have just bur- 
. icd. and The Peace of West- 
phalia. where two soldiers 
view with murderous dis- 
favour the bringer of the news 
that an end to the Thirty 
Years* War is in sight), the 
other two seemed relatively 
strained and commonplace. 

There was a reminder of 
that first Barnes series in the 
voice of Peggy Ashcroft read- 
ing Ronald Frame's The Blue 
Jug (Radio 3. Tuesday: pro- 
ducer Patrick Rayner). For IS 
minutes we were held in 
willing thrall by the reflections 
of an ageing widow gazing at 
her painter-husband’s work, 
but gradually concentrating 
her attention on a homely. 
bcautifuL' blue jug. container 
in its time of wine: flowers, 
paint-brushes - emblem ofa 
past which will outlive her 
only to be forgotten. 

Some of the endearing lu- 
nacy of British life came to the 
surface in Susan Mailing's 
The Yawn Chorus, which was 
the third of thefour-part series 
Picnics (Radio A Sundays, 
repeating Wednesdays: pro- 


ducer Mary Price). Ms Mar- 
ling had pursued an outer 
Birmingham conservation 
group into a beleaguered patch 
of woodland to mark an 
anniversary and take in the 
dawn chorus. There was rel- 
ative silence for the first robin, 
but after that, if this^seleciion 
was representative, ihe chorus 
was more of human voices 
punctuated by the odd cele- 
bratory champagne-cork and 

set above a continue of 

masticating jaws. 

They chewed on pikelets, 
which my dictionary tells me 
is an olde world© name for 
your common-or-garden 
crumpets, and sandwiches 
"made with wholemeal bread 
of course”. Of course — but 
what was that I seemed to hear 
as the party broke up about 
not forgetting the UHT milk? 
So these good folk dispersed to 
their daily business with 
cheerful goodbyes, leaving the 
woodland now exposed in its 


prison of houses and Jittered 
with miscellaneous ^garbage 
which was whai the dawn had 
also served to reveal. 

I welcome a new series of 
After Henry (Radio 4. Sat- 
urdays. repealing Mondays: 
producer Peter Atkin), which 
sounds as if the same lovely 
cast win act out the formula 
that worked so very well 
before: Sarah (Prunella Scales) 
does what she can with the 
problems of widowhood. Chief 
among them the .continuing 
existence of her mother. But I 
shy away somewhat from Yob 
Can't Be Serious . . , (Radio 
4, Tuesday), 

Steve Race turns good 
phrases and delivers them in 
style, but a series in which an 
author reads straight from his 
own abouwo-be published, 
book cannot help but sound 
more like promotion than 
broadcasting. 

David Wade 


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TIMES 


August 23 - 29, 1986 



A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


Birth of a monocled myth 



Percy Topiis, rogue male, died as he lived: with his tongue 
sticking out. But if he was a deserter and a killer, he could 
hardly become a television herb. So has Alan Bleasdale 
re-invented him? Byron Rogers investigates art and reality 


W hat makes H so 
terrible is a 
succession of 
little details. It 
was a summer 
evening of the sort Georgian 
poets had written about and 
which many men had thought 
they would never see again. In 
a small village four miles from 
Penrith people were coming 
from evensong; There was a 
walled rose-garden. It was 
June 5. 1920. a Saturday. 

If you had b«n coming out 
of that church you might have 
noticed the lone man walking 
along the road. You might 
even have seen him exchange 
a few words with a man 
tinkering with a motor-bike at 
the road side. But you would 
not have forgotten what hap- 
pened next 

Two men appeared over the 
wall of the rose garden with 
pistols in their hands, and the 
motorcyclist had straightened 
and he had a gun. too. The 
three of them began firing at 


the walker who broke into a 
run. . and then felL rolling 
down a grassy slope at the edge 
of the road. In the churchyard 
people had fallen among the 
gravestones. - 

The two men . were police- 
officers, the motor cyclist the 
22-year-old son of the local 
chief constable. When they 
reached their target they found 
him with his tongue sticking 
out at them where his teeth 
had closed. He was dead. 

It was an expression they 
never forgot (later a police 
surgeon cut out die longue for 
decorum's sake), and it is one 
that the millions who watch a 
BBC TV series beginning a 
week tomorrow, The Mon- 
ocled Mutineer ; are not likely 
to forget either. It was Percy 
Toplis's last gesture of pure 
cheek. 

He was 23 years old. and for 
six weeks he had been on the 
run, charged with murder, and 
had already shot his way out 
of one ambush. He was a 


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deserter from the British 
Army, whose short life had 
been remarkable for the 
amount of petty crime he had 
managed to pack into it And 
now, 66 years later, he is about 
to become a folk hero. 

“I don't think he was a good 
man. but unless my touch has 
■gone, he is one the people 1 
write for are going to appre- 
ciate and love", said Alan 
Bleasdale, author of The Mon- 
ocled Mutineer. 

“As soon as I read about 
him. I loved his anarchic 
humour. He was a cynic from 
the age of seven, the common 
man who refused to care. But 
then with the background he 
came from he couldn't afford 
to care. Vernon Scannell has 
these lines: 'Whatever might 
cry out / is hurt or dies’” 
“What fascinated me was 
that here was a real anti-hero 
of the First World War. when 
it was thought that that wasn't 
possible: and I saw the events 
of the war through his eyes, 
when all the rest of his class 
was just cannon-fodder. 

"Mind you. I have 
fictionalized fact. I hope I 
have been true to the spirit of 
the soldiers at the Front, but 
my T oplis is not the man who 
walked the earth.” 

A childhood friend 
remembered that 
man. “Today he 
would have been 
one of those 
intellectual socialists. Then, 
be had no chance at alL Mind 
you, he was a bit of a tearaway, 
was Percy." The quotation is 
taken from The Monocled 
Mutineer, the book on which 
Bleasdale based his series. 

Topiis was bom in Mans- 
field. Nottinghamshire, and 
tbe tearaway in him made an 
appearance when he was 11. 
Youqg Topiis turned up at an 
outfitter's, saying he had been 
sent by a lady whose name and 
address he gave, and took two 
suits out on approval. Dressed 
in one. he pawned the other. 
He was birched for that. Three 
months later he was up before 
the Chesterfield bench, ac- 
cused of stealing the money he 
had got for selling newspapers. 
Once be brought a bottle of 
laudanum to school and put 
his class to sleep. “You'll end 
up on the gallows”, said his 
headmaster. 

At 13 he was down the pit as 
an apprentice blacksmith, an 
occupation he was to claim for 
the rest of his life. At 14 he was 
given 10 days jail for not 
paying the railway fares for 
himself and a woman who was 
with him. Old men who knew 
him remembered him for his 
skill at playing the piano in 
pubs, and for his loneliness. 

He got a month for stealing 
a purse and then at IS was 
found guilty of something 
Bleasdale and the co-authors 
of his biography feel obliged to 
gloss over. He got two years* 
hard labour (“paying court to 
a young lady. She objected to 
his attentions . . .”). The rest 
of us might call it attempted 
rape. 

Then Percy Topiis was 
given a stage on which his 
talents could be viewed in a 
quite different light. In 1915 


Percy Topiis went to war. An 
orderly in the Royal Army 
Medical Corps, he survived 
the Battle of Loos. But then, 
amazingly, he got leave on the 
grounds that a non-existent 
wife bad died in childbirth, 
and in London began, the first 
of the adventures which were 
to make him notorious, lie 
bought an officer's uniform on 
credit and as Captain Percy 
Topiis DCM went home to 
Mansfield where he was feted 
as a hero. He was given the 
local defence volunteers to 
drill, and singling out the two 
managers of the pit who had 
tormented him. pm them 
through their paces until both 
men collapsed, exhausted. 
The Card had been bom. 

The rest of his military 
service is mysterious, being 
punctuated by periods of 
desertion and impersonation, 
according to his biographers. 
In 1 9 1 6 they claim that he was 
in Malta, dressed as a major, 
and in the same year, posing 
as an officer, spent periods of 
time in London. But in 1917 
he was in the RAMC again 
and was posted to the notori- 
ous reception unit at Etaples 
where troops in transit for the 
Front spent on average about 
two weeks of training. 

This enormous camp, hous- 
ing about 20,000 men, was 
noted for the conditions and 
the harsh discipline. The men 
were not even allowed to visit 
the local town, though the 
instructors came and went as 
they pleased Wilfred Owen 
remembered the look on the 
men's feces which he had seen 
nowhere except in Etaples, the 
look of men who knew they 
would soon be dead. 

“It was not despair or terror. 


it was more terrible than 
terror, for it was a blindfold 
look, and without expression, 
like a dead rabbit's.” 

Topiis deserted again from 
Etaples (his ability to do this at 
will is a comment on the Army 
bureaucracy which could not 
cope with the vast numbers of 
men arriving or dying). But he 
was back in September. 1917, 
when a mutiny broke oul 
The scale of this is a 
stumbling block Tn the Topiis 
-legend His biographers see it 
as something almost on the 
scale of the French mutinies in 
the same year, which threat- 
ened to break down an entire 
army. 

B ut all that is known 
for certain is that it 
lasted just six days, 
and was basically a 
protest against con- 
ditions in the camp. Against 
the allegations of mass rape 
followed by the executions of 
at least ten men, all Judge 
Anthony Babbinglon in his 
authoritative For The Sake of 
Example (Leo Cooper), an 
account of the executions in 
the British Army, was able to 
establish was that just one 
soldier had been shot. 

But Topiis was there, and 
after it was over, was a hunted 
man. He was arrested at one 
point by Army Intelligence 
but escaped tunnelling out 
under the wire of his com- 
pound. In 1918 he sought 
refuge from his pursuers in the 
Royal Army Service Corps, 
presumably on the grounds 
that the army was the last 
place where they would look 
for a deserter. That same year, 
in Nottingham, he was ar- 
rested for passing forged 
cheques and was given six 


6 The common man 
who refused to care 5 



Abut Bleasdale, who adopted the book for television: “As 
soon as I read about him, J loved his anarchic humour” 


months* hard labour. On his 
release he joined the RASC 
again, though still posted as a 
deserter, and there now began 
the penultimate act of his 
short life. At Bulford Camp on 
Salisbury Plain he got in- 
volved in the black market, 
selling Army petrol. 

Again he came and went at 
will. The men who served with 
him remembered that he 
would turn up just to play 
soccer and then vanish again. 
They also remembered the 
different uniforms, usually 
those of officers, and the 
revolver he carried. In Decem- 
ber, 1919. he stole an Army 
Sunbeam car. and dressed as a 
sergeant major, took a woman 
to the Pump Room at Bath. 
He was recognized by two 
military policemen, made a 
run for it, and was finally 
arrested on Temple Meads 
Station in Bristol but again 
escaped. 

Then in January a Salisbury 
taxi driver was found shot 
dead in his car. His last known 
fere had been a man in 
sergeant major's uniform. Tbe 
man-hunt for Topiis now 
began, and in the six weeks it 
lasted there were 107 reported 
sightings, from Wales to Scot- 
land. 

O n the night of June 
I, 1920, a farmer 
in the Banffshire 
Highlands saw 
smoke rising from 
a shooting lodge which he 
knew to be unoccupied. 
Contacting a gamekeeper and 
a policeman, the three of them 
got to the lodge by midnight. 
Topiis at first tried to bluff it 
out and then produced a gun. 
shooting both the policeman 
and the gamekeeper. The 
farmer, who had flung himself 
on the floor, watched him 
disappear, and listened in- 
credulously. for Topiis was 
beginning to sing: 

Good-byee. 

Don't sigh-ee. 

Wipe the tear, baby dear, 
from your eye-cc. 

On June 4. a village con- 
stable came on a man dressed 
in the uniform of an Army 
corporal reading a paper be- 
side a road near Penrith. The 
man told him he was on his 
way back to his depot. But. 
later, the policeman had sec- 
ond thoughts and. on his 
getting his bicycle out. he 
returned to where he had last 
seen him. 

He began to search a dump 
of trees, calling out “Coo-eee. 
are you there?”, a bizarre 
greeting when you are search- 
ing for a suspected murderer. 
And a man stepped out and 
pointed a revolver at him. “If 
it's Topiis you're after. I’m 1 
your man.” He told the con- 
stable to drop his truncheon, 
and. backing away, added that 
he was the smartest lawman in 
England. 

The amazing feature of the 
last act was that the Chief, 
Constable's unemployed son. 
Norman de Courcy Pany. was 
in on it armed with a gun he 
had brought home from the 
Western Front This was not 
commented on at the inquest 
and Bleasdale. who has met de 
Courcy Parry, now in his 
rollicking 80s. liked the irony 
of an upper-class tearaway 
being in at the end of a 
working-class tearaway. 

The papers were full of it 
The World's Pictorial Nevus. 
alongside its main feature, 
“My Life as Vampire Queen", 
by Theda Bara, had “the 
daring adventures of Percy 


Topiis with a beautiful young 
motorist". It was a story of 
confidence trickery and seduc- 
tion. By the following week, 
Topiis had even knocked 
Theda Bara off the front page. 

Only the Manchester 
Guardian had misgivings. The 
shooting, it wrote, “was not by 
any means the best end to a 
bad business.” But the police 
claimed that Topiis had shot 
first and the inquest jury had 
returned a verdict of justifi- 
able homicide. 

It is hard to know what to 
make of Topiis. The biog- 
raphy tries to make him into 
the leader of the Etaples 
Mutiny but is not convincing 
But then the man wrote 
nothing down, except fora few 
terse entries in the diary which 
was found on him. 

Of the inquest verdict on 
the dead taxi-driver, which 
had judged him guilty without 


a trial, he had only this to say. 
“La verdict. Rotten”. But he 
had a gun. He knew how to use 
it, and was to do so. All that is 
lacking is a motive. 

Bleasdale makes the taxi- 
driver into a racketeer, and 
has one of Toplis's friends do 
the shooting He docs this on 
the cheerful premise that peo- 
ple are not going to watch five 
and a half hours of television 
about a murderer and rapist 
(he finds him not guilty of 
repeats well). The biographers 
also do their best, query ing the 
evidence and the verdict. 

This way a myth starts. 

© Time# Newspapers, 1986 

A/an B/easda/e's four-part se- 
ries. The Monocled Mutineer, 
starts tomorrow week (BBC I. 
9.05 pm). 

The Monocled Mutineer, by 
William Allison and John 
Fairley (Quartet. £2.50). 


ISATURDAYI 


Incredible hulks: 
The 10 best relics 
of our seafaring 
past, all open this 
holiday — page 10 


Arts Diary 

14 

GankniBR 

10 

Bridge 

1.1 

Opera 

14 

Chess 

13 

Radio 

13 

Concerts 

14 

Review 

13 

Crossword 

13 

Rock & Jazz 

14 

Dance 

14 

Stmppinn, 

11 

Drink 

11 

Television 

13 

Eating Oat 

II 

limr> Cook 

11 

Films 

14 

Travel 

ID 

Galleries 

14 

TV films 

13 



hopes 
rest on him. Will you 
give him a future? 

Fa Karan® Darbo's family are proud of him, hopeful for bis future. 
His father and mother cultivate groundnuts and rice in rural Gambia. It is a 
hard hfe, cultivating and harvesting the crops bv hand. Tbe cost of seeds is 
hi g h aod tbe weather can play havoc with tbdr Income, which raid v rises 
above subsistence level (Pie average per capita income in The Gambia is 
just£90ayear). , ■ . 

Pa's parents are determined that be gets a good educawm so that he 
can hdp his family and tbe community out of the cycle of poverty that 
bedevils fife here -nearty a third of tbeclsldrea die before the age of five. 

He is oow enrolled at Dumburu Primary School. 

ActknAid warns yum to hdp supply a child's education by becoming 

a sponsor and committing yourself to hdpmg families like Pa’S. Not just 
win tbe chOd^ education bis with tbe many other uses of your bdp that we 
can supply to bis community: toots, seeds, equipment for the school. 

As an ActknAid sponsor you commit to paying £7.92 a month - 
every penny of which is spent oversea* to benefit the sponsored 
child and the local cenuna&ity It is the price of a small loaf ofbread a 
day for us. It is the price of a better, more hopeful future for a family Kite Pa’s. 

\JKe operate in nine Third Vitold countries. You receive full details of 
ihechibi you ate sponsoring and an explanation of the work you are 
supporting in the driJd's commuraiy 

Sponsoring a child gives vou tbe chance to make a direct personal 
response to foe problems of the third World. It gives one child and one 
family the hope of a better finure.lt costs pennies per day 
Qm you really say no? 

Aiffinn Aid, Hamlyn House, Airway, London KB SFG. 

[Toucan give anoeber child that chance... 

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TRAVEL 


Cakes and ale, but no oysters 



BES' 

OF BRITAIN 

As part of our 
occasional series, 
Michael Watkins 
discovers the quiet 
charms of Whitstable 

There are resort towns in this dear, 
dear land which behave with all the 
contrariness of a pantomime horse 
— forelegs heading in one direction, 
hindquarters in another. The prob- 
lem being that while the annual 
summer invasion is economically 
desirable, it is emotionally resented, 
leading to a schizophrenic charac- 
ter, part whore, pan prude. 

Impervious to these consid- 
erations, Whitstable is unaffected 
by such unhealthy passions. It is not 
a matter of arrogance or stand- 
offishness so much as unawareness; 
Mafeking may have been relieved, 
but the news hasn't yet filtered 
through to this comer of Kent. In 
Cakes and Ale Somerset Maugham 
wrote: "Blackstable (Whitstable) 
consisted of a long winding street 
that led to the sea, with little two- 
storey houses, many of them 
residential but with a good many 
shops ..." To all intents and 
purposes, it hasn't changed. 

It seems a very lived-in town, 
unprecious and unprecocious. 
There are few braying accents. 
Range Rovers or green wellingtons; 
instead, as Maugham observed, 
there is “a clean, honest and 
ingenuous look". It may have 
outgrown itself as a fishing village, 
but it has not sloughed off its 
protective skins of loyalty to its 
standards. 

Surrounded as it is by hop-fields, 
beer is the local tipple; it is preferred 
to sweet sticky drinks with foreign 
names. It must also be a charitable 
place to support Oxfem. Save the 
Children, and Red Cross shops 
within a few yards of each other. 
God-fearing too, going by the 
billboards: “The Coming Of The 
Lord Draws Near", “Jesus Christ 
Will Judge". 

I wonder how He will judge the 
silver-haired occupants of Tilly’s 
over-60s coach tour all the way from 
Wales. Not harshly, surely, for their 
excursion has hardly delivered 



of boiling whelks, clouds of seam 
rising from fishermen's huts; while, 
on the open sea. still as gravy, an old 
Thames baigc lumbers by. 

This is ihc Whitstable I like. 
Vou'U notice 1 say "like", not 
“love"; for Whitstable does not 
encourage sentiment it doesn't give 
a hoot whether you care or not. 
There's little enough in the way of 
hotels. Guide Mkhriin recom- 
mended restaurants and all the rest 
that make life supportable. In this 
Garden of England so publicized 
abroad for the delectation of tour- 
ists. 1 dare say Whitstable is 
considered a bit of a bramble-patch. 

Take Lionel Cottage in Sea Wall. 
Well don't take bond Cottage, 
take the ancient sail loft next door 
so drunkenly lop-sided, already 
defying all known laws of gravity, u 
will fall flat on its tar-blackened race 
any second. The Royal Native 
Oyster Stores — "Royal Free fish- 
& Dredgers Incorporated 


gardening. 


S unny side: W. Somerset Maugham's ‘Blackstable’, with its 'long winding street that led to the sea, with little two-storey houses' 


them at Sodom or Gomorrah. They 
have come for a set lunch, perhaps, 
at the Bear and Key, which sits 
solidly in place as it has done for the 
last couple of centuries at least, 
offering hospitality and maroon 
sofas so waliowy that your knees 
come up to your ears as you sit. I eat 
at the bar while a fat infant pushes 
vinegar flavoured crisps into the 
fading grin of the pub's Cheshire 
cat. 

Whitstable rings true: if not with 
the tinkle of finest crystal, then 
certainly with a dependable note. 
How dull! How yawningly predict- 
able! Poor old Whitstable could 
never set the world on fire. Yet in a 
way, this is precisely whai 
Whitstable did: from Whitstable the 
first steamboat sailed to -Australia; 
the Whitstable-Canterbury railway 
was the first steam-drawn passenger 
train in the world; in Whitstable the 
first council houses in the world 
were built. In Whitstable one of the 
world's leading novelists and play- 
wrights was infected with the bitter- 
ness that served him well enough in 
terms of feme and fortune,- if not in 
durability. Not bad for a dull little 
borough. 

On the death of his father in 1884 
Willie Maugham went to live with 
his uncle, the Reverend Henry 
Maugham, vicar of All Saints 
Church in Whitstable; and if one 


Human Bondage that he loathed 
Whitstable. one would be misre ad- 
ing the events of those formative 
years. It wasn't Whitstable that 
Willie loathed: it was his uncle he 
detested — rather unfairly and 
ungratefully, as several of his biog- 
raphers have substantiated. 


the air in the graveyard. oblivious to 
the life and times of the Reverend 
Henry — was approached by a 
Norwegian woman. She was an 
admirer of Willie's, she had come to 
pay respects to his uncle, knowing 
precisely where his tombstone — 
almost obliterated by the elements 


The Vicarage was pulled down to , — lay. Together they uncovered it. 


make room for bright modern flats 
known as Maugham Court in 
Saddleton Road. All Saints Church, 
however, stands as it has in one 
form or another since it was 
consecrated SSO years ago, largely 
rebuilt in the Victorian idiom 
during the incumbency of wicked 
Uncle Henry. 45th priest in charge. 
Except that poor Henry appears 
more defamed than he deserves; ill- 
treatment reaching beyond his life 
span, as this tale illustrates, told to 
me by Waller Court, faithful 
parishioner. 

Three years ago Walter — sniffing 


TRAVEL NOTES 


since when the Norwegian lady 
pays for its upkeep, visiting 
Whitstable in the late summer each 
year. 

There is another clue to times 
past in All Saints, a wall plaque to 
Edward James NichoUs. “Freeman 
of Whitstable Oyster Compy. 
Churchwarden 34 yrs. 1848-1921". 
Not only could he have engaged 
young Willie in halting conversa- 
tion. but he must have known 
Whitstable in its heyday as a world- 
renowned oyster fishery with 190 
oyster boats.' 

A lead which had me scurrying 


down to the harbour to find that the 
oyster fleet has contracted to one 
surviving smack, the Gamecock. 
Perhaps we do not appreciate 
oysters any more, perhaps they are 
too rich for our blood; which is a 
turnabout from 100 years ago when 
someone took the trouble to record 
the annual food consumption of 
London which included 270.000 
oxen and 310.000 barrels of oysters 
— about 250 million. In the 1 3th 
century eggs were six times- dearer 
than oysters. 

Where Newcastle colliers used to 
unload, gravel is being lipped into 
waiting holds. Nothing else, just 
gravcL A trawler, F44, squats 
bulldog-like. pugnacious, on the 
tidal mud: mud so black and loose 
you could spread it on toast. A 
group of lady water-colourists 
immortalize the scene, dabbing at 
sketch-pads in the simpering strokes 
of Millais. There is a hungry smell 


rofSheppey 


reads into Cakes and Ale or Of £3.50 respectively. 


A double room at the Marine Hotel, Tankerton 
is £49 per day including breakfast and VAT 
(0227 272672). 

Sailing enquiries from Whitstable Yacht Club, 

Sea Wall, Whitstable (0227 272942). 

Information and advice from South East Tourist 
Board, 1 Warwick Park, Tunbridge Wells. KentTN2 
5TA (0892 40766}. 

W. Somerset Maugham's Cakes and Ale and 
Of Human Bondage, published by Pan at £2.50 and 


Foretold] 



enes 

1 793" — is as empty as a politician’s 
promise, windows smashed, its iron 
pillare weeping rust on to the 
pebbled beach. Upon which the 
solitary shape of a man huddles in 
his folding aluminium chair. Ther- 
mos clamped between bis knees. 
“Aren't you cold?" I ydl wind 
snatching my daft question away to 
the Isle of Sheppey. “Yes", he leeth- 
chauers back, a stoic deserving the 
George Medal for fortitude. 

To find a bed I head for 
Tankerton, a mile along the beach. 
Where once were three hotels today 
there is one. the Marine, run by nice 
people from Madrid. From ray 
room f watch a convoy of trawlers 
sail towards the fishing grounds 

Neither will things change: at 
least, that's the way I see it. 
Whitstable simply hasn't the stom- 
ach to conscript slick commercial 
know-how which would probably 
make space for amusement arcades 
a waxworks museum, a putting- 
green and sex shops 

It is simply too honourable to 
exploit its Maugham connections: 
in the Visitor Information guide 
Willie isn't mentioned once; the 
bookshop. Pirie & Cavendcr. stocks 
five Maugham paperbacks depleted 
to three after my visit: the propri- 
etor of the yacht brokerage agency is 
not aware that Maugham ever came 
near the town. William Somerset 
Maugham is commemorated in a 
modest brass plate at The Play- 
house, and in the heart of a 
Norwegian housewife. 

Apart from which, there's really 
an awful lot of rivalry along this 
coast: what with Heme Bay. Mar- 
gate, Ramsgate. Perhaps — very 
sensibly in my opinion — 
Whitstable just doesn't want to 
compete. 

Ip LM.1H* 


Choice of 
toil in 
the soil 

There is no conwnsos about 
Bank Holida) . gardening. 

Some gardeners feel they hjj'e 
achieved nothing unless the* 
have toiled through the pam 
threshold, others are tatigued 
retrieving fallen rose petals. 
Heavy Duty Gardeners 
Trim beech hedges now, 
stimulating new but neat 
growth which will stay on ■ 

hedge through the winter. 

It is also time to prepare the 
ground for a new lawn. Jhc 
area should be vigorously dug. 
perennial weeds taken out and 
stones removed. Break do*ti 
soil lumps, level the surface 
and rake it to a fine, e ven tilth. 
Short active-interest jobs 
Espalier apples and pears 
usually need some extra prun- 
ing. A germ! rule is lo take 
back this season's growth from 
the trunk to three leaves and 
to cut the shoots from sure 
branches ro sis healthy leaves. 

Ciaro RaMrt* 



Monbretia: a good source of 
colour at this time of year 

Fuchsia cuttings if taken * 
now will make a good start for 
next year. Snip two inches ■ 
from a non-flowering shoot, at 
a point below a leaf. Remove 
the bottom leaf, and plant in a 
small pot of equal proportions 
of peat and sand. 

Instant revisionists 
If your garden looks woll 
but rather too green and • 
lacking in colour, visit your . 
local garden centre to see • 
what's in flower now. You 
could still plant out some 
annuals (late lobelia or French 
marigold) or invest in 
perennials such as gentians 
which are late blooming. 
Deckchair horticoltora lists 
Make out your bulb order . 
for next year. 

Francesca Greenoak 


OUT AND ABOUT 


1 Mary Rose, Portsmouth; 
Ftlletted galleon (1510), a 
laboratory cross-section pre- 
pared by the scouring tide and 
mounted, for display at enor- 
mous expense, along with 
intimate possessions of 
drowned crew. 

Open 10. 30am -5. 30pm sum- 
mer, 10.30am-5pm winter, 
dosed Christmas. Entry £2.50 
adults, £1.50 children, £6.50 
family (0705 750521). 

2 “Botha", Exeter: Oldest 
surviving powered boat in the 
world (Brunei, 1844), occa- 
sionally still in steam. Ele- 
mentary hunk of iron with 
comers and giant flywheel. 


Life in the old ship yet 



There was a time when old 
ships which offered no profit- 
able carrion for the 
shipbreaker were left to 
moulder away in peace in 
forgotten creeks, till their 
nails rusted out and then- 
timbers floated away piece- 
meal on the tide. But today 
energetic teams of resurrec- 
tionists scour the backwaters 
and had the weary hulks back 
to the world, to be vexed with 
hammers ami blowlamps, and 
to be set trading once more in 
their berths with a new mer- 
chandise of postcards, book- 
marks and tea-towels. 

Some are so fragile that they 


would disintegrate except un- 
der Laboratory-controlled con- 
ditions, while some, like the 
British paddle steamers 
Waveriey and Kingswear Cas- 
tle, are still in active service. 

Until the 1950s only a 
handful of old ships were 
reserved for their historical 
iterest anywhere in the world. 
Today there are many hun- 
dreds, ranging from clipper 
ships to barges, from open 
boats to the Queen Mary. 

Here is a selected guide to 
10 of the best around the 
country which are open to the 
public. 


£ 



7 Discovery, Dundee: Captain 
Scott's icebeig-proof Antarctic 
exploration ship of 1901. tim- 
bers two feet thick. 

Open to Sep 7. 1 lam-5pm 
Mon-Fri, I Iara-6pm week- 
ends. Entry 75p adults. 50p 
children (0382 29122). 

8 Victory, Portsmouth; 
Nelson's immense oak flag- 
ship, most spectacular of all 
historic ships. The princely 



DORSET 
Lyme Regis 
Distance: 11 miles 


creeping across the harbour on 
chains. One of the Exeter 
Maritime Museum's un- 
equalled collection of more 
than 80 vessels. 

Museum open 10am-6pm 
June-September, 10am-5pm 
rest of year (except Christ- 
mas). Entry £2.50 adults, 
£1.30 children, family ticket 
£7 JO (0392 58075). 

3 Osprey, Windermere: 
Dainty steam launch of 1902, 
immaculate teak and brass: 


gleaming tea-urn built into 
engine can boil a gallon in 20 
seconds. One of the Win- 
dermere Steamboat 
Museum's collection of lake 



vessels from 1 780s onwards. 
Open July 1-Sep 7, I iam-5pra 
weekdays, 1 lam-6pm week- 
ends. Entry £1.50 adults. 85p 


children. £4.00 families, £1 JO 
OAPs (09662 5565). 

4 Peggy, Castletown, Isle of 
Man: Island magnate's little 
racing yacht/trader/ smuggler 
of 1791. miraculously intact 
after being walled up for 100 
years in eccentric boathouse. 
Boat and house now open to 
public May-5ep, 10am-5pm 
weekdays, 2-5pm Sun. Entry 
50p (0624 75522). 

5 Catty Sarlc, Greenwich: Su- 
perb fine-lined sky-scraping 
clipper ship, restored to mint 
condition. 

Open 10am -5. 30pm everyday 
except Christmas. Entry £1.20 


adults, 6 Op children. (01- 
858 3445). 

6 Belfast, London: Battle- 
scarred 1938 cruiser, 13,000 
tons, bristling with six-inch 

m 




cabin where the hero lived 
and, far below, the dark recess 
where he died. 

Open I0.30am-5pm week- 
days, I -5pm Sundays, every 
day except Christmas. Entry 
£1.20 adults. 90p children 
(0705 750521). 

9 Great Britain, Bristol: Top- 
hat funnelled, many-masted 
ancestor of all seagoing metal 



This section of the 
Dorset Coastal Path. 

Includes some of the 
grandest cliffs in England — 
notably the famous Golden 
Cap. There are several stiff- 
ish climbs, rewarded by 
marvellous views, landward 
and seaward. 

Take the Chanaooth road 
out of Lyme Regis, an ele- 
gant and largely unspoilt 
little resort. Join the path 
where it crosses a field 
opposite the cemetery. 

Signposting is good through- 
out this walk so there should 
be no problems. Through 
woodland to the first range of 
cliffs, overlooking The Spit- 
tles — the remains of old 
landslips — and on into the 
seaside end of Charmonth 
with its famous Fossil Beach. 

TJreWI*orAug2{Dgnnnt VaHtfkKkKfal a prints toad. TlwmutotoEyrisJordatxxjkltxgin bytnmmorskie in Snore^am 


Over the river Char and op 
towards Stonebanow HflL 
Cain's Folly, below, is an- 
other area of massive land- 
dips: keep away from the 
cliff edge. Next high-point, 
in every sense, is Golden 
Cap, the tallest (617 ft) and 
loveliest cliff on the entire 
Channel coast. 

Downhill . to Sea town, 
where the Anchor inn sells 
Palmer's (Bridport) Ales. 
Another long climb to 


Thorncombe Beacon and 
more spectacular .views 
across Lyme Bay. - Down 
again to Eype's Mouth and 
turn inland, taking the minor 
road through Eype ami right 
for Bridport. 

Don't miss Palmer's Brew- 
ery with its thatched build- 
ings and undershot 
waterwheeL An hourly bus 
will return you to Lyme 

Nigel Andrew 


guns, in Pool of London. 
Open 1 1 am -5 -5 0pm in sum- 
mer. Entry £2.50 adults, £1 25 
children (01-407 6434). 


Swan Hellenic Cruise to the Aegean 
and Eastern Mediterranean, 
including Jerusalem and Nazareth. 

Depart 25 October 1986. Prices from only £902. 


For those with an 
enquiring mind, this is an 
excellent opportunity to 
enjoy a holiday with a 
noticeable difference. 

We shall spend 13 nights 
at sea, taking a voyage of 
discovery in company with 
four guest lecturers, who 
will explain m relaxed 
informality the history and 
'background to all we shall 
see. Their expert knowledge 
is yours to share, and will 
turn each site visit into a 
memorable experience. 

Our programme starts 
• with a flight from London 
to Dubrovnik, to join the 
cruise ship Orpheus. During 


the cruise we visit Crete and 
some of the Greek islands. 
Western Turkey, Israel and 
Cyprus. Art, history and 
legend will fill our days, as at 
every port of call excursions 
visit tne major points of 
interest - be they delicate 
frescoes or beautiful mosaics, 
Roman theatres or Minoan 
remains. 

The price includes all 
excursions and ail tips on 
board and ashore. Naturally 
the price also includes return 
flights to and from the 
Orpheus and London. 

For full details, please 
send the coupon, or tele- 
phone us on (01) 831 1515. 



fcrt of the crowing mid of IteO. 

Swan Hellenic Cruises, 77 New Oxford Street, London WCIA IPP. 

NAME „ 

ADDRESS 


.■47'ATOUW 



Hie 
TRAVELLERS 
ALMANAC 


A cornucopia of travel 
ideas, our Almanac brings 
together in one brochure a 
whole host of holidays and 
travel experiences all over 
the world. A selection of our 
unusual journeys at unusual 
prices is shown here. For the 
complete programme^ ring 
us on (01) 486 8080, or 
send the coupon. 



A Long Weekend in Abania £185 

A tow Days in Cairo 

£295 

A Long Weekendtn Petra 

£395 

A Journey to Victoria Rais 

£595 

Peking and Moscow 

£595 

Madagascar 

£795 

Paru, inducing 

Madiu PJcchu 

£795 

A Journey to Lhasa 
(Nepal fc Tibet) 

£995 

□eflntobarjeefrw; 

“H55 

Kubtai Kharis Xanadu 
Revisited 

£L495 

Karakoram Crossing - 
China to Pakistan 

a795 


VOrAGES JL1ES VERNE 

10, Glentworth Street, London NW1 SPGLTfet (d) 486 8080 
Please send me the Travellers Almanac 

Name 


Address. 


BefiT/TAABH 



ships (Brand, 1843), still be- 
ing restored. 

Open I0am-6pm summer, 
10am-5pm winter. Entry 
£1.50 adults. 90p children and 
OAPS (0272 20680). 

10 Warrior, Hartlepool: Pax 
Britannica embodied in iron 
4% inches thick. Victorian 
battleship so invincible in its 
day that it never needed to fire 
a shot in anger. Major restora- 
tion project destined for Ports- 
mouth next year. 

Open to public 2-5pra Sat. Sun 
and Bank Holidays until Aug 
25. Entry £2 adults. 50p 
children. 

George Hill 


CHILTERN CRAFT SHOW: 
More than 140 exhibitors of 
traditional, rare, rural and 
idiosyncratic crafts. Acres of 
parkland with running deer, 
picnic area, children's comer 
and refreshments. 

Stonor Park, Henley-on- 
Thames, Berkshire (0391 63 
587). Today, tomorrow, 

Mon, 10am-6pm. Adult £1 .80, 
child 70p. Car park free. 

TRADITIONAL PUNCH & 

JUDY: Authentic performances 
of the puppet play in the 
grounds of Haddon, probably 
.toe best preserved 14th- 
century manor house in the 
country. 

Haddon Hall, BakeweU, 
Derbyshire (0629 81 2855). 
Today, rtoon-4 ,30pm. Adult 
£2^0, child £ 1 . 10 . 

THROCKMORTON 
CHAPELRY OUTDOOR 
SOCIAL: A 17th-century 
afternoon with recorders 
playing Purcell and Bach, a 
harlequin, period display of 
artefacts from Worcester 
City Museum, 17th-century 
pottery, local residents 
from tne 40 houses In the 
village in period costume. 
Church and moated island, 
Throckmorton, near Pershore, 
Worcestershire. Further 
information from DrHanrison 
(0386 82633). Today, 2.30- 
6pm. Adult 25p, chin lOp. 

DOLLS’ HOUSES: 

Exhibition includes a sea 


OUTINGS 


captain's house bunt for his . 
daughter in 1886 and a post- 
war bungalow comptete 
with bowling green. 

Smith's Galleries. Neal 
Street London WC2. Today- 
Aug 30, Mon-Sat 10.30arr^ - 
7pm, Sun 11 am-5pm. Adult £1, 
child 50p. 

BOURNEMOUTH KITE 
FESTIVAL: Amateur and 
professional kite fliers with 
a number of stunt flights 
including displays of 
parachuting today bears. Take 

your own kite if you prefer. 
Hengistbury Head, 
Bournemouth, Dorset 
Tomorrow lOanwnid- 
aftemoon. Free. 

RE-ENACTMENT OF THE 
BATTLE OF BOSWORTH 
FIELD: Tomorrow sees the 
Plantagenet Society's version 
of the 1485 battle, with lull ' 
costume" armour, weapons. 
Also displays of falconry 
and hawking. On Monday, 
displays of birds of prey 
and folk music only. 

Bosworth Battiefltod Visitor 
Centre, Sutton Qieney, Market 
Bosworth, Leicestershire 


(0455 290429). Tomorrow. 
Mon, 11am-5pm. 

Tomorrow, Adult £2, child £1; 
Mon, AduJtEI, child 60p. 

HOVINGHAM 18TH- 
CENTURY FAIR: The entire 
village and grounds of 
Hovmgham HaJl given over to a 
period costumea fair with 
stalls, craft demonstration's, 
flower festival, 18th-century 
music in the church, maypole 
dancing, brass band, 
fortune toller, pugs and 
drummers (ferrets and 
rabbits), sheep dog and duck 
-demonstration. 

Hovingharo Vfflage. Norm 
Yorkshire. Further information 
53 82304). Mon. 2-6pm. 
*park£ 1 . 


Judy Froshaug 


Amsterdam Poster 

For a free copy of an 
a tt, j , i m p nmnr tfcBrig- 
fcJViDujiHHalbjrAfflfel® 
together with our 
brochure on individual 
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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1 986 


c \, 
;°iJ ii 

th e , 

"■ss 


SHOPPING 



GUEST COOK 


The right stuff from Provence 


Sivesti Karada 

- .. . v 




In the last of our summer series, 
chef SIMON HOPKINSON of the fashionable 
Kensington restaurant Hilaire, confesses that 
his off-doty pleasures include shopping in 
markets! and cooking for friends 




Ten green bottles; ail fined op and ready to be poured and mne of them are readily available 
on supermarket shelves; there is a mystery bottle (for right) included in the 

Splashing out on water 


> vVhat better than a drop of the 

(/ i' oft stuff to quench a summer 

, Z : hirst? Sales of mineral water 
. ' k il? ,n Britain have surged up to 92 
1 rtidion litres a year, but is 

' — -■% Vouled water just a foshion- 

T ible fad? 

' ^ We lined up 10 green bottles 
■ .i. l the colour favoured -by the 
V- jiggesi selling brand. Perrier— 




fa nd Robin Young, wine editor 
of Taste magazine, to risk 
[ heir palates at a blind tasting. 
.These are the results. 

■> Safeway Highland 
Spring, carbonated mineral 
■ yater, 37p per litre 


i immediately identified by RY 
1 is “one of those cheap car- 
bonated jobs" because of the 
/ >ig bubbles. The own label 
' ■ • vas later compared with 
vanded Highland Spring at 
I3p and pronounced exactly 
-be same. Why pay extra? 

" iSuthertand Spring 
- " Voter, still natural water, 55p 
Scotland) 

5escribed on the label as the 

• deal water for a good malt. 

- nil both tasters thought its 

lavour was like iron filings, 
ft Brecon, carbonated 
latural spring water, 39p 
' Wales) 

•Soft, velvety, but with a 
smony aftertaste that doesn’t 

• ■ iuite marry'’, JMcQ. “Jf you 
■ - yam a citrus flavour why not 

: -'T-.idd a shce ofkunon?”RY. 

.1 Salisbury Scottish 
ipring, carbonated mineral 
rater, 37p (Scotland) . 

, y, .The most refreshing glass so 
’ l " ^"ar" thought JMcQ. “Livelier, 
sper. zingier .than the 
butaUttle ^bt^Wy - 

I Perrier, naturally 
arbonated natural mineral 
—water. 47p (France) 

‘A good steady stream of 
" "mall bubbles zooming uptike 
f^-hampagne. Good for giving 


.ifost egg-straordinary idea of 
- /he week — Daylay’s packs of 
f eady-flavonred hard boiled 
( ggs, 45p for two. They come 
'^eady-shelled, salted, plain, 

' am or smoke-flavoured and 
nok as unappetising as a. 
■eeled golf ball. Texture and 
asce robbery. Boll your own. 
“jT 7'hree new booklets introduce. 
. ; ou to bargains straight from 
i. he factory: The Factory Shop 
‘ j iuides cover Derbyshire ana 


Two experts turn 
from wine to test 
. popular bottled 
waters, overseen : 

by Beryl Downing 

your palate a kick start”, 
JMcQ. ‘‘At least k tastes of 
more than just bubbles, which 
is all you get fitim the highly 
carbonated ones”, RY. 

• Vichy Saint Yorre, . . 

naturally carbonated natural 
mineral water. 60p (France) 
Correctly identified immedi- 
ately by JMcQ because of its 

' salty mineral flavour — ‘‘the 
sort of thing you drink when 
you are on a health diet”. It 
was not the sort of taste RY 
wanted to acquire. 

• Ba daft, naturally 
carbonated natural mineral 
water, 49p (France) 

Recognized immediately by 
both. “This is ' the water I 
drink most of”, JMcQ. “It is 
the wine trade's mineral water 
because the bubbles are quite 
soft and h-ls less disturbing to 
the system when you drink ft 
with food.” Hey both asked 
whether it had come out of a 
plastic bottle because they 
thought k not as good as 
restaurant Badoit which 
comes out of glass. 

• ApoBinaifs, naturally 
sparkling mineral water, 64p 
(Germany) 

Identified correctly by RY: “A 
definite mineral taste, pleas- 
: antly salty”. “A classy mineral . 
. water with vigorous bubbles. 
Nice with a Sunday roast.” 

nBs'.- .TT.7 ■ , "~* :r 

• San Pellegrino, 

carbonated natural mineral 
water, 63p (Italy) 

“A spiral of zingy bubbles and 
a minerafly. character” RY. 
“Soft like filtered water, but 


again with a citric aftertaste”, 
JMcQ. 

• Mystery bottle 

“Lots of tiny pinhead im- 
mobile bubbles — mine tastes 
dirty”. RY. “Mine tastes hor- 
rid. like a muddy fishtank”, 
JMcQ. The bottle contained 
London lap water with a dash 
of soda water. 

The best tastes were: 1 
Sains bury Scottish Spring, 2 
Perrier or Badoit in a glass 
bottle (for less refined palates, 
plastic win be undetectable — 
Badoit sell fire plastic to every 
one bottle in FranceX 3 
Appotmaris, 4 Brecon. 

Both tasters thought bottled 
. water definitely worth paying 
for, particularly if you live in 
_ an area with highly rfiwniwi 
water. 

D rink highly minmlbwl 
waters for health, lively spar- 
kling waters on their own (if 
yon can stand the burps) and 
gentler waters with food and 
wine. 

Naturally named 

Not all bottled waters list 
the contents on the label, so 
here is a glossary to help 
you to choose: 

Natural Mineral Water" 
means from a spring where the 
mineral salts content may 
be beneficial to health. 

"Spring Water" means 
from a spring for which no 
therapeutic claims are 
made. 

"Naturally Carbonated 
Natural Mineral Water", or 
"Carbonated Natural 
Mineral Water 1 ', or "Naturally 
Sparkling Mineral Water", 
according to the country of 

S n. Tl5s means water 
enough natural carbon 
dioxide to make it bubbly. 

Its gas mayfre drawn toff and • 
reintroduced to provide a 
constant level 
"Carbonated Mineral 
Water” means that carbon 
dioxide is added on the 
bottling line as for any fizzy 
drink. 


NEWS LINES 


Nottinghamshire (lace, glass . 
dress fabrics), £1.95, Leicester- 
shire (pure woof underwear, 
children's clothes, shoes) 
£U0, Staffordshire (the 
potteries lingerie and skirts) 
£1.95. All from Gillian 
Cutress, 34 Park Hill London 
SW4. Add 25p p&p for one 
book. lOpfor extra copies. 


By virtue of an all-consuming 
passion for food, 1 don't mind 
“busman’s holidays”. Invari- 
ably, when I am the guest at a 
friend’s bouse for a weekend, 
or several days, I find myself 
preparing “a little something”. 

This is always enjoyable, 
even more so. if one happens 
to be staying in a remarkable 
house in Provence, with acres 
of landscaped garden, herbs 
everywhere, a good swimming 
pool, a smashing kitchen and a 
stock of decent wine. 

Recently, ! had the pleasure 
of staying in such a house, 
while on holiday with a friend, 
in France. Arles market on a 
Saturday is the place to shop. 
“Best rabbits I’ve ever seen”, 
my host exclaimed. My friend 
and 1 duly set off for the 
market (she also happens to 
cook for a living). 

It is important to make a 
definite list of ingredients 
before you go, oryou may find 
yourself cooking enough food 
for a week. Everything is 
irresistible. Quickly, you find 
yourself saying. “Ob, look at 
those” or “Have you smelt 
those melons?” and “Look at 
the price!”. . 

It seemed sensible to' walk 
from one end to the other, 
looking first and deciding 
upon the best stalls to buy at 
on the return journey. Lunch 
would consist of fish soup, 
rabbit for the main dish and a 
compote of summer fruits to 
end with. 

The fish for the soup, when 
you buy it in Provence or the 
South of France, comes 
“ready packaged”. That is. it is 
all “small fry”, such as baby 
rascassc (scorpion fish), wee- 
verfish. gurnard, mullet, mus- 
sels. John Dory and the odd 
chunk of conger eel for good 


Books on tape are the latest 
way of fending off frustration 
in commuter traffic: you can 
now dip into Dickens as you 
drive. The subscription charge 
is £10 a year, hiring charge is 
75p per tape for the first week 
(including return postage) and 
7p per day after that. For a 
catalogue send £1 to Trav- 
ellers Tales, Great 
Weddington, Ash, Canter- 
bury, Kent (0304 812531). 


measure (although this would 
be more common to a 
bouillabaise). Ail it requires is 
rough chopping. 

Having gathered everything 
together, plus beautiful plum 
tomatoes, green almonds for 
the table, butter from a block 
weighing several kilos, shal- 
lots, leeks, bread and olives, 
we returned home. 

If you have never en- 
countered the aroma of freshly 
baked bread, together with 
freshly picked leeks in the 
close proximity of a veiy hot 
Renault 5, you haven't lived. 

It was a joy to prepare the 
soup, as the house filled with 
its aroma. The rabbit, jointed 
and marinated in olive oil and 
wild herbs from the hedge- 
rows, was grilled over 
vinewood in the garden. 

The fruits were tossed in a 
light sugar syrup, then left in 
the refrigerator to chill thor- 
oughly. They were served with 
crimefraiche. 

We enjoyed lunch in the 
garden. The sun was blazing 
hot and we were thankful for 
good “brolly shade”. We 
drank local red wine, chilled. 
Delicious. When lunch was 
over, I felt that this had been 
one of the best meals 1 had 
cooked. Not a restaurant 
lunch, but one that took no 
apparent effort, was eaten in 
great surroundings, cooked in 
a good kitchen but. above all, 
was put together from the best 
ingredients or, as my host 
might have put it, “the right 
stuff”. 

The soup should include, if 
possible, some of the follow- 
ing: mullet, monkfish, gur- 
nard, eel, John Dory, roscosse 
and weever. Don’t be templed 
by any shellfish combination: 
it’s expensive and gives the 
wrong flavour. 




i | 

:! 


T ;. ■ .■ 
■ 



. 2£>3 











Food forces: Simon Hopkrason finds “everything is irresistible” In French markets 


Fish soup 

Serves six 


(3-4H>) mixed, 
Mediterranean 


5 or 6 Seeks depending 

on size 

2 onion slices 

1 whole head garlic, doves 
separated and bruised 

6 strips orange peel 

Whatever herbs you like 
(except rosemary or dill) 

1 butt? fennel, chopped 

10 ripe tomatoes, chopped 
1 tablespoon tomato paste 

Saffron, salt and pepper 

1 or 2 chopped fresh 

chimes 

Vx bottle white wine 

15cml (K pint) good ofive oil 

Heat the olive oil in a good, 
roomy stewpan and add the 
tomato puree. Cook until well 
browned and rust coloured 
(takes a good five or 10 
minutes). Chop the fish 
coarsely and add together with 
the tomatoes, leeks, onion, 
garlic and chillies. Stir around 
gently for five or ten minutes. 
Add the white wine, orange 


peel, fennel, herbs, saffron and 
some seasoning. Top up with 
cold water until covered by an 
inch or two. Bring to the boil 
and simmer for half to three 
quarters of an hour, skimming 
when necessary. Strain 
through a fine sieve into a 
clean pan, pressing well on all 
the fish and vegetables. Taste 
to adjust seasoning. If you do 
not think the flavour is strong 
enough, reduce, by simmering 
for a while until the taste is 
more developed. Serve as it is 
or with rouille. croutons and 
grated gruy£re. 

Rabbit marinated in olive 
OH and wild herbs 

Serves six 

2 really good farmed rabbits. 
skinned and jointed 

300ml (’/? pint) extra virgin 
olive oil (French or Italian) 

Wild thyme and rosemary 
or garden varieties 

6 or 8 cloves of unpeeled 
garlic 

10 chopped shallots 

Salt and pepper 

Small glass of any wine 

Mix all ingredients together in 
a large dish and marinate the 
rabbit in a cool place for 24 


hours, turning occasionally. 
Grill it over charcoal, pref- 
erably in the garden, under a 
grill in the kitchen or roasted 
in a very hot oven on the top 
shelf. Each piece should take 
about five or eight minutes to 
cook. It should be well 
browned, almost black on the 
outside and pink and juicy 
within. Serve with salad and 
new potatoes. 

Compote of summer fruits 

Serves six 

Strawberries, raspberries, 
cherries, red, black 
and whit ecu rrants. 

blueberries 

Lemon peel 

Sugar syrup 

1 bayteaf 

Choose whatever fruits you 
like. Pick them over carefully. 

1 don’t believe in washing 
them. Mix together some 
sugar, water and lemon peel, 
with a bay leaf, and two cloves 
if you like, and boil together 
for a couple of minutes. The 
syrup should be light and not * 
too sweet Leave to cool for 
half an hour and pour over the 
fruits. Serve ice cold with ■ 
whipped cream. 


EATING OUT 


The name Romd Britannia is 
inappropriate as well as 
clumsy. The northern side of 
London’s Finsbury Square 
looks like a 1920s commercial 
block in Si Louis or Minne- 
apolis. But inside, a different, . 
more recent America is 
evoked — that of a Hyatt hotel 
atrium, where see-through 
lifts whizz up and down the 
polished marble walls, ferns 
and birches thrive in the 
ecosphere and a waterfall 
makes a noise like a drain. 

Once you’re through this 
bogus plein air and into the 
restaurant itself you feel in a 
third America, the America of 
culinary colonization. The 
Roux brothers’ version of a 
fast-food, fixed-price res- 
taurant displays a whole 
gamut of failings that a ham- 
burger joint could never be 
prone to. Hamburgers do not 
raise gastronomic hopes. 

Much has been made of the 
method of their operation — 
the cooking i§ done at a 


Food that doesn’t travel 


centralized kitchen on the 
other ride of London and the. 
food is then preserved by a 
technique oT vacuum packing 
called sous-vide (fluent French 
speakers translate this as bofl- 
in-a-bag). It is heated up, 
garnished, arranged on the 
plate at the restaurant 
Two sautes, one of chicken, 
the other of veal, were poor, 
like larted-up leftovers: the 
chicken was violently stained 
with saffron, scraggy and 
served in an ill-tlavoured 
pistou; the veal was lumpy, 
unappealing to the eye, 
cooked with floury butter 
beans. A cold scallop mousse 
was OK, another cold starter 
of potted tongue was a re- 
minder of old-fashioned tea- 
time — not bad. if under- 
seasoned. Maybe pan of the 
fault lies in the reheating: a 


Quality can easily 
suffer with 
pre-packaged 
meals, says 
Jonathan Meades 


summer pudding was sound 
and there was nothing wrong 
with the cheese or bread. 

There is. however, some- 
thing wrong with the practice 
of selling a wine, a Duboeuf 
FJeurie. in a 50cl bottle even if 
that capacity (two thirds of a 
normal bottle) is advertised 
on the list — I simply don’t 
believe that most lunchers 
would notice, and engrossed 
lunchers would very likely not 


notice till the thing refused to 
yield a fifth glass. I write as an 
' engrossed luncher. 

The place is airily attractive, 
and the all-inclusive set lunch 
at £ 1 2.50 is a good idea but at 
the moment, nothing more 
than that for, with two bottles 
of the aforesaid Eeurie and 
two gin and tonics, the bill was 
£49. 

The Grill St Quentin is 
entirely different; here a lot of 
the dishes come out of cans. 
Not any old cans but those of a 
company called Comtesse Du 
Barry. A fish soup gleamed 
with the sheen of preser- 
vatives. a cassoulet was nota- 
bly un-succulent and 
composed of dry sausage and 
fibrous confit; I don’t know if 
the rouille sauce was or wasn’t 
from a tin; it was certainly 
incorrectly made. 


Far wiser to eat the grilled 
meals and excellent chips: a , 
massive cote de veau as thick - 
as a phone book costs £6.20 .. 
and is accompanied by three 
sauces which are (well) made 
on the, premises. It is for 
dishes such as this that the.t.1 
local French population turns 
out in force. 

It certainly isn’t for the 
light, unpleasant “Mogadorau" 
chocolat”, or for the service • 
which is brusque to the point- ~ 
of hostility. With one aperitif. - 
one digestif of lawn-mower „ 
fuel posing as Framboise, and - 
a bottle of far-too-young Ban- . 
doL the bill was £46. 

Roux! Britannia, Triton 
Court, 14 Finsbury Square. 

London EC2 (01-256 6997). 
Monday to Friday noon- 
2.30pm. . •_ 

GriH St Quentin, 136 
Brampton Road, London SW3 
(01-581 8377). Every day '* • 
noon-3pm and 7pm-mldnJghL 


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DRINK 


A little whine on 
cheap bottles 


TIMES GUERNSEY FISHERMAN’S SWEATER 


i *The role of the supermarket 
i wine buyer at the inexpensive 
end of the wine spectrum is 
> not a happy one. The pressure 
i to keep prices down is im- 
mense and the Great British 
, Public do not always keep up 
' with those afl-important ster- 
ling and vintage fluctuations. 
Trying to track down large and 
consistent quantities of wine 
priced at £2 and under is now 
obviously a nightmare for the 
supermarket buyers. 

Sainsbury’scan only muster 
14 wines below the magic 
figure. Tesco’s wine buyer 
Adrian Lane, on the other 
hand, has more than 30 wines 
listed at under £2 a bottle. 

But the problems of 
purchasing well at this low 
price level must be infinitely 
aggravating. Take Em Gedi. 
for instance, a good Israeli red 

that I recommended in this 
column in the spring No 
sooner had this £1.59 
screw-top special appeared on 
the shelves than Tesco cus- 
tomers were bringing it back, 
complaining about the harm- 
less but unsightly tartrate 
crystal deposit that the wine 
started to throw as soon as the 
warm weather began. Where 
else could Tesco manage to 
find 75cl-worth of a decent 
£1.59 red? 

France almost provided the 
answer. Not in the form of a 


i Blue and Ruby Glass finings , 
tor table silver. Crystal 
glass, wine glass and all 
table glass repairs. 

Aldridge, 

2 Ivy Rd^ E.17 
Tel: 01-539 3717 


conventionally bottled wine, 
but a I -litre Terra Pak called 
simply Vrn Rouge. It isa fresh, 
palatable, crimson-purple 10.5 
per cent mouthful, which has 
been slightly rounded off with 
sweetness. Priced at £2.29 a 
litre, Vin Rouge works out at 
the equivalent of £1.71 for 

7 5cf ErtcBmunont 




Nearly all of Tesco’s wine 
sales .are in the own-label 
sector of which Liebfraumilch 
followed by Lambrusco (both 
red and white) are their biggest 
sellers. But there are some 
exciting wines to be had if you 
hunt for them. An exceftent 
and cheap red wine is Tesco’s 
’82 Bairrada from Caves 
Primavera (£2.09). This garnet 
red Portuguese wine has a 
light balanced herbaceous 
fruit with a distinctive rustic 
finish. 

Finer still is Tesco’s *84 red 
Chateau neuf-du-Pape Les 
Arnevels from J. R. Quiot at 
£4.79 with soft juicy peppery 
fruit Of the white wines on 
the Fine Wine List the star is 
the luscious ’76 Cotea ux du 
Layon priced at £3.49, with an 
elegant honeyed waxy taste. 

Jane MacQnitty 


P revious offers for Times 
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T his classic Fisherman’s Sweater is 
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TONIGHT at 7.30 

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SCHUBERT Symphony No 5 

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4 

































































THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


13 


T 


1 


l ! 




27 

St. 

371 

IB 

25' 

<K 

7a 

5* 

>se 


4S1 

4» 

153 


3?1 

583 

122 


Paperbacks 


REVIEW 


* Transport 
to other 
cultures 


FICTION 


Leader lines: Foot views of the 
Prime Minister, who receives 
much attention from the 
cartoonists: looking vexed, by 
Garland (below left), as 
Snow White by Peter 
Brookes (centre), at work 
by Cummings (top right) 
and relaxing by Trog 


Jacques and Hta Master L 

Milan Kundera (Faber. £3.S 

Milan Kundera hss taken the 
4 c har a ct ers from Diderot's Jac- 
ques leFataliste and imagined 
them in a play of his own. 
Jacques and tus ynacf »»T tell 
three love stones which are 
played out alongside, and 
intermingled with, the 
narration. 

Their view of love is un- 
sentimental and there is great 
zest both in the presentation 
of the stories and in Simon 
Callow’s translation, but the 
play itself is very slight to 
support the weight of the 
message which Kundera ex- 
plains u the preface. He wrote 
it in Prague m the Seventies. 
, where, be says “Faced with the 
* eternity of the Russian night, I 
lived out the violent end of 
modern culture founded on 
the individual and his reason, 
on plurality of thought and on 
tolerance'’. As a statement of 
that viewpoint, the preface is 
far more effective than the 
play itself 



Cartoons, writes David Driver, pop up everywhere and 
they look so simple — that is the ait. Peter Maddocks 
in his book How to be a Cartoonist (Elm Tree 
Books/Hamish Hamilton, £5.95), details methods and 


techniques and talks to 20 leading cartoonists about 
their approach and working day. The title of the book 
assumes that die art can be taught, but you cannot 
teach how to observe and comment 


Shrewd sense of place 


Among the Cities by Jan 
Morris (Penguin, £4.95); 
Journeys bv Jan Morris 


The BatUe of Pollock's 
Crossing by JL Can- (Penguin. 
£1.95) 

Pollock's Crossing lies on the 
edge of a desolate small town 
lost in the middle of de- 
pression bound America. It 
marks the reverse side of the 
American dream. Here in 
1930 two respected members 
V of the community, the store- 
keeper and the banker, are 
suddenly hunted down and 
murdered by the local people 
because they have “dared to 
be different". 

They lose the fight for 
freedom. This is seen through 
the eyes of a naive school- 
teacher from Bradford who 
has arrived to teach in the 
local school for a year and, as 
be thinks, to partake in the 
great life of America. His 
bafflement at the contrast to 
his expecations is developed 
in a quirky style which is 
fanny at first but then turns 
bitter as the machinery of 
American small town confor- 
mity goes into action. Carr 
describes painfully and pas- 
sionately how heroism flickers 
and then dies beneath the 
blank and brutal sky of South 
Dakota. 


Anne Barnes 


Jan Morris has an uncanny 
sense of place and these two 
collections of her travel essays 
are surely among the best of 
her books. She writes in the 
introduction to Among the 
Cftks that she has put together 
some 37 pieces, mostly with 
an urban background, “to 
form a retrospective 
exhibition ... of a lifetime's 
work”. The pictures range 
from Beirut in 19S6 to an 
overblown Vienna in 1983. 
Journeys on the other hand, is 
united not by the theme of 
place but rather of time, for 
this collection presents some 
of Jan Morris’s longer pieces 
written in the present decade. 

There are a variety of 
moods in these essays. Her 
articles on Bertin and Moscow 
in the late 1950s are crisp, 
professional, and sometimes 
obvious. She is exuberant in 
Rio de Janeiro in 1961. Con- 
versely, she has a precise, 
knowing insight into the qual- 
ities of Bath (1974) with its 
Roman past, its text-book 
Georgian architecture, squalid 
backs, and an understandable 
“fantasy of greatness". Her 
essay on TrouviUe ( 1 964), that 
delightful watering place on 
the Normandy coast with its 
undertones of the Second 


CHESS 


Dangerous dazzle 


Kasparov, the reigning world 
champion, is often bracketed 
together with those other 
imaginative demons of attack- 
ing play. Alekhine, Bronstein 
and TaL David Janowsky 
stands out as another su- 
premely aggressive tactician. 
Janowsky’s best games exhib- 
ited a dazzling spirit, but be 
was deficient in the depart- 
ments of strategy, endgame 
play and stamina. 

His elan made him dan- 
gerous to the greatest with his 
victims numbering Stetnitz, 
Lasker. Capablanca, Alekhine, 
Tarrasch ... but in a series of 
games against a more stable 

S ndmaster be was liable to 
. Between 1909 and 1910 
Janowsky contested three 
matches with Lasker. The 
score was 17 wins, 3 losses and 
5 draws in Lasker’s favour, 
but the honour of the most 
brilliant victory must go to 
Janowsky. 

• White: Janowsky; Black; 
Lasker. Four Knights' Game, 
Paris 1909 (6th Match game). 

f *4 *5 2 NO MCt 

3 Ne3 NM 4 BbS dS 

5 S* Bd7 6 0-S M 

7 tot «sd4 S NnM 0-0 

> Nda2 ItoS 1ON03 M 

11 NxM MS 12 W MS 

Lasker often chose this diffi- 
cult line. Black surrenders the 
centre and accepts a spatial 
inferiority, but his position is 
resilient. 


is oa 
17 tool 


1# M 
IS N* 
IS 


ter 


Missing a good defence: 
17-.Qb8 18 c4 Qa7 with level 
chances. Now Janowsky 
shows his great attacking skilL 

IS NAS 


A coup which shatters 
Black's fortifications. 


is . 

20 NX07 


IS I 
21 • 


US 


If 21 ... dxe5 22 fae5 Ng4 
23 Rxd7! wins. 


22 «OS 

an 


a * 33 Ran toit 
29 Qxll7 R1«2«- 


B lack’s Rooks are no match 
for White’s Queen. 


a m 

RMS 

V HI 

aE 

n QtaS 

Hc5 

29 QMS 

•MS 

30 M 

iffl 

St M 

eS 

St K03 

Md 

S3 Bjk* 



Black resjps 


• The World Championship 
continues at the Park Lane 
Hotel until the end of August 
Thereafter, The Times Com- 
mentary Room will switch to 
the Great Eastern Hotel, 
Liverpool Street London 
EC1, for the second half, 
where the moves will be piped 


in directly from Leningrad. 


Enquiries on 01-408 19 


Raymond Keene 


BRIDGE 


Knavish deception 


A successful deceptive play is 
always satisfying for the de- 
fence, whether it consists of 
one telling false card, or a 
more comprehensive piece of 
camouflage. 


Declarer won the lead in 
dummy with the +A and 
returned to hand with the OA 


to finesse the 4Q. East 

of s 


This hand occurred in the 
Danish International Trials. 

Teams. Love alL Dealer 
West 


♦ A Q 6 4 

<0 42 

O K 10532 

* A 9 


a k2 

O AC 07 55 
O 7 

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W E 
S 


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♦ 109853 
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played the Knave of spades. 
Swallowing the bait South 
attempted to return to hand 
with a diamond in order to 
repeat the finesse, but West 
ruffed the OQ. The defence 
then made a club and two 
hearts, to defeat the contract 
South had given insuffi- 
cient thought to West’s bid- 
ding. To justify the 
introduction of a second suit 
at the three level, he must 
have at least nine cards in 
hearts and dubs. If the #J 
was a tine card, that would 
leave West with three spades 
and therefore only one di- 
amond. On that basis. South 
should have cashed the-4A- 
It is curious how often the 
possession of die Knave is ihe 
key to a successful deceptive 
stroke in the trump suit. 


Opening toad 4K 


Jeremy Flint 


• y 


Empire and of Proust, also 
comes into the category of a 
skilful miniature. 

But die can also excel in a 
full-scale, set-piece essay on 
Manhattan (1979). She de- 
scribes the dark side of the 
world-city, its crime, stre ss 
and violence. But she is quite 
objective and emphasizes and 
elaborates on Manhattan’s 
artistic vitality, its cosmo- 
politanism, and its increasing 
mellowness. Manhattan, she 
writes, has become “in its 


maturity the most truly dvi- 
>ftl 


Used of the world's cities”. 

It's true that she overwrites. 
But this is compensated for by 
her shrewd comments on the 
physical setting of her chosen 


cities. Thus she sees in 
Alexandria (1966) not the 
eclectic, Mediterranean city of 
Forster and DuneU but a place 
relaxed in blood and religion 
to Baghdad and Amman. 
Again, she writes of Dityens’s 
Presidential Palace jn Delhi 
(1975) that it was “the greatest 
single artefact of the British 
Empire, perhaps its greatest 
work of art, and there are still 
men alive in Delhi who spent 
their working lives building 
it." 

Skilled as she is in invoking 
these distinctive physical 
qualities, what gives her writ- 
ing its special edge is her 
historical sense in general and 
her tough-minded sense of 


power in particular. “1 am 
rather an addict of power”, 
she writes. “I do not much 
enjoy submitting to it or even 
exerting it, but I do like 
observing it." 

It follows then that some 
cities, some countries, are up 
and others are down. Thus she 


writes an essay on Hong Kong 
time, 1974, 


Noble notebooks 


r of the IQng by 

r (Methuen, £4.50) 


Anthony Short 

If you want to gel ahead, get a 
gimmick — as a Hollywood 
producer once said. The same 
may be said about Shake- 
speare prod actions. There is 
nothing like a good gimmick 
for generating a bit of excite- 
ment- But one clever idea is 
not enough to sustain an 
entire production. Two years 
age Anthony Stor delivered a 
memorable Richard HI on 
crutches and his book Year of 
the King describes everythmg 


that went into making it one 
of the great performances 
rather than a mere case of 
“Love the cratches — *hsuw 
about foe play”. 

The book is fascinating. It 
is w ri tt en in diary form, with 
notes on his research, his 
mental and physical prepara- 
tion for the part, rehearsals, 
acting theory, laced with 
amusing anffHnfr s and acute 
observations, with the 
author's tal ented sketches 
and caric a t ures. 

Annabel Edwards 


at the precise time, 
when a general recognition of 
its ultimate retrocession to 
China begins to spread [ike a 
slain ihrougb the colony’s 
consciousness. In the same 
year, she sees Singapore, the 
city of Raffles and Lee Knan 
Yew, as a great city-state, an 
economic force of the future. 

Yet her essay on Singapore 
is characteristically domi- 
nated by something that hap- 
pened decades ago. In a 
“masochistic moment" she 
goes to the room in which 
General Percival surrendered 
a great imperial army to the 
victorious General Yamashita 
in February 1941 Did many 
British visitors come here, she 
asked? Very few. But “seldom 
a day went by without a 
coachload of Japanese tourists 
stopping at the factory gate, 
while their guide pointed out 
the historic windows and the 
Canons clicked". Here we 
have one of the most revealing 
images in Jan Morris's 
impressive retrospective. 

David Rees 


ON THE AIR 


Amoral 




W‘- & 

partners . mi 


m crime 


FILMS ON TV 


Of the 250 or more mobster 
movies made in Hollywood 
during the first five years of 
the Talkies, many are now lost 
or forgotten. But alongside 
Little Caesar and Scarface, 
w illiam Wellman's 1931 film 
The Pubfic Enemy (Channel 4, 
tonight. 1 0.55pm- 1 2.30am) 
stands as a classic of the genre. 
Known largely lor the typi- 
cally dynamic performance of 
James Cagney the film is 
nevertheless memorable for a 
number of reasons. 

The story charts the rise and 
demise of partners in crime 



Starry shot Harlow and Cagney fa The Public Enemy 


Tom Powers (Cagney) and 
ward Wo 


Matt Doyle (Edward Woods). 
Public Enemy is let down in 
places by moralistic 
sentimentality, notably in the 
sickly sweet scenes with 
Tom's doting, simpleton 


mother. But the film’s abiding 
quality is one of pure, amoral 
energy. 

Wellman’s direction is fast, 
furious and full of sympathy 
for his go-getter antiheroes. 
He plates Tom and Matt’s 
delinquency within a clearly 
defined social context 

Doomed by Hollywood 
censorship, which insisted 
that crime cannot pay, Tom 
meets an obscene, grisly end. 
But his life is endowed by 
Wellman and Cagney with a 
perverse dignity. 


RECOMMENDED 


Geoff Andrew 


The Outlaw Josey Wales 

(1976): CBnt Eastwood's finest 
a western rich In action and 
humour (1TV, today, 930pm- 
12.05am). 

The Ufa md Death of 
Colonel Bfimp (1943): Powefl 
and Pressburger's tour de 
force charting the Gfe of a 
typtcafly British miStary man 
(BBC 1, tomorrow, 3-o.40pm). 

Dark Victory (1939): Lush 
Bette Davis weepie. in which 
she (earns she has only a 

"4,Thure, 

1.25pm). 


Dramatic views of an MP 


The autumn schedules, with 
their glossy heavyweight se- 
ries, loom oa the horizon but 
for the moment one-off, set- 
piece dramas provide the pick 
ef the pr ogr am m es . 

Best is Long Live The King 
(ITV, tomorrow, 9.39- 
1030pm), a multi-layered 
Douglas Livingstone pfaty 
about the reseketion tr a uma s 
of a Latov MP seduced to 
tire easy dub atmosphere of 
Westminster. 

John Stride ddtos a fine 
performance as tire blustering 
Tommy Rivers, a poiftfcian of 
the old school whose 


TELEVISION 


into 


» a 

mixtmre off wisecracks, hefty 
laughs and twinges of 


Stride makes his second 
appearance as a tnb-thmaping 
no rt h e rn Latov MP hi Barn 
in toe Gardens (BBC 1, tomor- 
row^ .05- 10. 40pm), Peter 
Nichols’s deadly fanny sapa of 
metaphorical faurity conflict h» 
a rambling mock-Tador house. 

Constance Chapman fairly 
bobbles as his batty newty- 
whfowed mother who scram- 


bles the 
Bristofiam 
The cast o f Murder by the 
Book (ITV, Thors, 830- 
930pm), a starched piece of 
Agatha Christie country boose 
detection, is d i sting u i s hed by 
Pe gg y Ashcroft and Ian Holm. 
The mistress of arime writing 
faces tor sternest literary 
murder— how to dispose of her 
“wretched, insufferable” cre- 
ation Herade Poirot, with his 
Jet black hair, waxed mous- 
tache and excruciating 


Bob Williams 


Day trip into the blackest summer 


The Beane (Radio 4, Mon, 
8.15-9.4Spm) is a remarkably 


RADIO 


ambitious drama production, 
Windsor and 


starring Frank 
narrated by Ray Gosling, tell- 
ing the story of a brewery’s last 
day trip to the seaside, in the 
momentous summer of 1914. 
A group portrait of people 
caught at foe turning point in 
history, it has tire nearest thing 
on radio to a “cast of 
thousands". But foe focus is 
on individual predicaments 
and perceptions — particularly 
the dim awareness that the 
workl is about to change 
cataclysmically. 

Over the weekend Radio 4 


has some good stuff as usuaL 


The new late-night comaty 


programme is called The 
Ikm Pound Radio Show (to- 
night. 1 1.30pm-midmght). 
Written and presented by 
Andy Hamilt on and Nick 
Revefl, the show gets its name 
— they say — from the sum of 
money the BBC had lb pay the 
audienoe to come and listen to 
the recording. 


In Space for Living (tomor- 
rw, 10.15- 


row, 10.15-1 Ipm) Alun Lewis 
examines the huge problems 
and foe equally huge possibil- 


ities of living in space. Sci- 
entists would love to have 
more people floating around 
up there, but first they will 
have to work out satisfactory 
ways of taking a shower or 
“going to foe toilet" m zero 
gravity. 

For children there is foe 
return of Cat’s Whiskers ev- 
ery weekday morning (Radio 
4 VHF, 9.05-1 Oam). Paul 
Nicholas is again in charge of 
tiie of stories, games, 

jokes and .features which last 
time out — in the Easter hols — 
did rather wefl. 


Nigel Andrew 


Times Jumbo Crossword 


Prizes of £50 will be given for the first five correct solutions opened 
on Monday September 8, 1986. Entries should be addressed to The 
Jumbo Crossword Competition, The Times, 1 Pennington Street, 
London, El 9XN. The winners and solution will be announced on 
Saturday September 13. 


ACROSS 


DOWN 


I Proverbial formula for mollifying an angry 
heckler for instance (1,4.6, 7,4,5) 

15 Relation, who may support one’s job- 
application (9) 

16 Tom such a flatterer? (4-3) 

17 Fixing fuel supplies, be mends gate first (3-6) 

18 Subtle character of a trainee drug-dispenser 
(9) 

19 Action tried in a higher court? Capital! (5-4) 

20 Girl mother of heavenly twins back in the 
Orient (7) 

2) Traditional to bind about union leader, with 
calumny (11) 

23 Between both sides one endless line of 
customers for drink (7) 

25 Eating away — Holmes's giant rat of Sumatra 
for instance? (7) 

26 Define “skunk” — very difficult question (7) 

27 It may get you out. away before the interval 
(3-5) 

29 Report line broken by an intruder (10) 

33 Small measure by University Board is not 
subject to amendment (9) 

35 Endless retribution with a flower (7) 

37 Following sunset it's rosy, past midnight, blue 
(9) 

39 A sort of orange peach provided by the 
duenna (II) 

41 Trapeze artist Jules led round the ring with 
Jack (7) 

42 Showed testimony suffers from French 
extraction, many conclude (7) 

44 Does wrongly after a couple of pages are set 
side by side (7) 

45 As a Muslim, is one accepting the post? (7) 

47 Obstinacy of various priests in French church 
(ID 

48 Goddess not guilty like the Greek hero (9) 

50 Roman England after introduction of general 

nerve-centres (7) __ 

51 Arc the ropes on end? This creature finds the 
question completely pointless (9) 

53 Hat reiuraed to one not roughly but with 
studious care (10) 

55 Secret communication reduced to the mini- 
mum (8) 

57 Paint fish beside the harbour (7) 

59 Breathing space when Londonderry work 
complete, say? (3-1) 

62 Scrap divine characters in the Old Testament 
(7) 

63 French opposition to this journal a mis- 
fortune? (M) 

65 A diplomatic type of case. . . (7) 

66 . . . calling up the end of the grammarian's 
one (9) 

68 Entries in the White King's book (9) 

69 Not guilty — I've lost no carrot! (9) 

70 Endeavours to hide king in a Cornish resort 
(7) 

71 This area contributes to our liquid assets (9) 

72 Original light-hearted ecstasy of a thrush's 
song (3. 5.4.8. 7) 


1 A point about trains running side by side (7) 

2 New Channel Islands film is of a feature of 
bureaucracy (1 1) 

3 They were all for one and vice versa (5.10) 

4 Scrambling one-nil. ran so crooked a course? 
(36) 

5 What about the farmer’s pen ultimate crop? (5) 

6 Tell, as tellers sometimes do (7) 

7 In a French part of East London uranium is 
like caviare to the general (9) 

8 It’s comparatively pleasant in Venice, really 
15) 

9 Tested solution — bound to include upsetting 
acid (8) 

10 Fish dub needed structural support (5-4) 

11 Use a gas in order to soothe (7) 

12 Badge of office of this worker in one (5-6) 

13 A way to go on horseback — not side-saddle 
(7) 

14 Mrs Thrale receives a Bible version from a 
farm-worker (9) 

22 Gearing out of a single allowance (1 1) 

24 Like a Roman magistrate dispersing a riot 
among equals perhaps (I I ) 

26 One leaving the non-stop train — mistake the 
trainer made (4-5) 

28 Criminal appears pale (5) 

30 No middleman to be accepting change of term 
(9) 

31 A pious bird at first, the Golden Hind (7) 

32 Darling children her charges (4) 

34 Brachycephalic vegetable? (5.4) 

36 Dives today with John Stuart on a Scottish 
island? Thai's about right (1 1) 

37 Senior councillor goes round south to a 
Berkshire village (ID 

38 Unhappy lot to be born then (9) 

40 Clothing is standard with a sort of pale 
exterior (7) 

43 Therein trippers wandering abroad expect 
their guides to be skilled (1 5) 

46 Scholar and soldier appearing at Epiphany (4) 

47 Girl mouniain-dimbing in highland dress (5) 

49 Notice composer's first song confused the 

connoisseurs (II) 

52 What a word — “mimsy”! (II) 

53 One to supply the thing Hamlet needed (9) 

54 Like a notebook a Cockney's head holds 
nothing else perhaps (5-4) 

56 Trier with difficulty always the one to win the 
game (9) 

57 Constant factor whereby a fisher of men 
caught Eugene (9) 

58 Without solemn promises a fellow's right to 
give one a living (8) 

60 Let Eric reshape the network (7) 

61 Poems found for example in eastern stories 
( 7 ) 

63 Game Ferdinand and Miranda played with 
the Spanish cheese-mould (7) 

64 Country mansion let out in Washington (7) 

67 Upper-class car. one constructed of gold (5) 

68 Scoffs ersatz sheep's head (5) 



Concise Jumbo Crossword 


There are do prizes for this crossword. The sohrtioa will appear on Monday Angus* 25 1986 


Name 


Address — 


ACROSS 

1 Preamble to 1791 French 
Constitution (1 1.2.3.633) 

15 Inappropriateness (9) 

16 Threaded (7) 

17 Tool (9) 

18 Habitable van (9) 

19 SnaiL whelk (9) 

20 Enduring strength (7) 

21 Lavishness (11) 

23 Canal punt (7) 

25 Imagined (7) 

26 Archetypes (7) 

27 Questioning (8) 

29 Sudeten torrent (5.5) 

33 Smarten up (9) 

35 Track competitor (7) 

37 Shunned citizen (3.6) 

39 Sovereign (6.5) 

41 Foolishly sentimental (7) 

42 Greek (7) 

44 Gold analyst (7) 

45 Imitation satin (7) 

47 Triangle sides opposite 90 
deg (f I) 

48 Coiffeur establishment (4.S) 

50 Repealed chirp (7) 

51 Wanned leftovers (9) 

53 Certificate of office (10) 

55 Indian bread (8) 

57 Jelly sweet (7) 

59 Mothball tree (7) 

62 Contusions (7) 

63 With sincere intention 
(2-4.5) 

65 Pocket fabric (7) 

66 Account (9) 

68 Drunken celebration (9) 


69 Traditional paint (3.6) 

70 Slanting writing (7) 

71 Frees from restraint (4.5) 

72 Grade Fields -bouseptant 
song (7. 1033,5) 


DOWN 

1 Slopped talking (5.2) 

2 Second-sighted (11) 

3 Commandingly (IS) 

4 US citizens (9) 

5 Progeny (5) 

6 POsy (7) 

7 Muzzle aligning needle (9) 

8 Woodcutter.^) 

9 Redistribute forces (8) 

10 Medieval merchants head- 
quarters (9) \ 

11 Compose for print (7) 

12 French satirical opera (5.6) 

13 Encounter (7) 

14 Unrequired (3.6) 

22 At expected time (23,6) 

24 Irrelevant statement (3.8) 

26 . Signature souvenir (9) - 
28 Practice (5) 


30 Insincere (9) 

31 Ostrea shells (7) 

32 Buzzer (4) 

34 According to sc h eme (23.4) 

36 Citizen's basic cniiitemcnis 
(5.6) 

37 Unfair (3.8) 

38 Require deep rest (4.5) 

40 Arouse (7) 

43 Far-reacbing legal power 
(4.3.2.33) ^ 

46 Fold into (4) 

47 Scram (3.2) 

49 Doctor’s listening tube (If) 

52 Overseas service period (7.4) 

53 Male fowl bead growth (9) 

54 Whale perfume source (9) 

56 Expecterof worst (9) 

57 Desirable bachelor (4.5) 

5* American courgette (8) 

60 Phlegmasia alba dolcns (4.3) 

61 Computer print record (43) 

63 Oral nourishment (7) 

64 Axe spear (7)- 

67 Striped African ruminant (5) 

68 First Baron Vcrulam (5) 


SOLUTION TO NO 103Q (fast Saturday's prize concise) 
ACROSS: 1 Northclrfle 9 Upgrade 10 Terse 11 Who 13 
Lute 16 Tuft 17 Yaffle 18 Lace 20 Talc 21 Bolero 22 
Mope 23 Rate 25 Its 28 Union 29 Termini 30 Pelargonium 
DOWN: 2 Ought 3 Thaw 4 Crew .5 Into 6 ForrSufa 7 
Kuala Lumpur 8 Septicaemia 12 Halter 14 Eye IS 
Afloat 19 Capsize 20 Tor 24 Adieu 25 Inca 26 Sine 27 
Bran ... ... • 


The winners »f prize concise Kn ‘1030 ore: 

.lnpvfa Tir/ckcf, Ilanftrd Hehnoi. ChUde Okcford Dorset: 
and F.R. /it*. Berkeley Close, Chippenham: Wiltshire. 


SOLUTION TO NO 1035 
ACROSS: 1 Swifts 5 Jujube 8 0AU .9 
SJaJom 20 Douche II Tzar. 12 Over- 
time 14 Commie 17 Anneal 19 .Nick- 
name 22 Mugs 24 .Libido 25 


Annals 26 Fat 27 Decent 28 Energy 
DOWN: 2 Waltz 3 Fulcrum 4 Some- 
one -Judge 6 Joust 7 Bohemia 13 
Run 15 Orifice 16 1DN 17 Acetate IS 
Nbtniifcc : -20 Knife 21 Afoft 23 Gulag 




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DUCK SNOOP: Sir Peter Scott, war 
hero, artist, international sportsman, 
conservationist and founder of the 
World Wildlife Fund - celebrating its 
silver anniversary this year — is 
the subject of a documentary. 
Interest the Boy In Nature, on (TV, 
all regions, Wednesday, 9-1 Opm. 


THEATRE 

HORSEPLAY: Anthony Quayte 
and Margaret Courtenay lead the 
cast of Bandy Dick, Pinero's 
horserating comedy in a Compass 
Theatre production directed by 
David Gilmore at the Yvonne Amaud 
Theatre Guildford (0483 60191) 
from Tuesday. 


TIMES CHOICE 



A. N. OTHER: A. N. WBson's ninth 
novel. Love Unknown , (Hamish 
Hamilton, £9.95}is a tale of three 
young women whoGved together 
and now have gonetheir own ways. 
Set in London and Fontainebleau, 
it is written withthe author's 
customary teasing humour. 


OPERA 

ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: The new season 
starts with a revival of John 
Copley's production of // 
trovaiore, Jane Eaglen has 
the role of Leonora, with 
Kenneth Collins as the 
Manrico, Arm Howard the 
Azucena, and Neil Hewlett 
as Count dl Luna. James 
Lockhart conducts on Wed 
and Aug 30 at 7.30pm. 
Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 

SOUTH BANK OPERA: Paul 
Griffiths acclaimed the new 
Harrison Birtwistle opera 
Van Tan Tethera, which plays 
tonight and Thurs at 
7.45pm conducted by Elgar 
Howarth. Opera Factory 
London Sintbnietta also 
presents a modem seaside 
production of Cost fan tuttei it 
plays on Mon, Wed and Sat 


at 7pm, conducted by Paul 
Daniel with Anne R idler’s 
new English translation. 

Queen Elizabeth Hail, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01- 
928 3191). 

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL: 

The Maly Theatre of Leningrad 
company have a last 


Onegin tomorrow. On Mon, 
Mane Stuart, a rarity by the 
contemporary Russian 
composer Sergei Slorrimsky. 
Afl perfo r mances start at 
7.15pm. 

Kara's Theatre, Edinburgh 
(031 225 5756). 

NEW SADLER'S WELLS: 

After a final performance 
tonight at Bath's Theatre 
Royal (0255 65065), the 
company's highly 
acclaimed Mikado visits 
Sunderland, with 
performances on Tues through 
to Aug 30. Bany 
Wordsworth conducts a lively 
young cast led by tan 
Combqy, Christopher GiDett 
and Deborah Rees. All 
performances start at 7.30pm. 
Empire Theatre, 

Sunderland (0783 42517). 

DANCE 


MOVING BEING: Geoff Moore 

directs Mabtnogion, a 
spectacle based on the 
Arthurian Romances, with a 
cast of actors, dancers and 
musicians, opening tonight 
until Aug 30. 

St David’s Hall, Cardiff 
(0222 371236). 

WARSAW BALLET: Completes 
its week at the Edinburgh 
Festival today with two 
performances of The Sleeping 
Beauty. 

Playhouse, Edinburgh 
(031 225 5756). 

THEATRE 

IN PREVIEW 

ROOKERY NOOK: Classic Ben 
Travers farce, directed by 
Mark Kingston, with Peggy 
Mount, Tom Courtenay, Ian 
Ogjtvy, Lionel Jeffries, Nichola 
McAuliffe. 

Shaftesbury (01-379 5399). 
Previews from Wed. Opens 
Sep 2. 

FOR KING AND COUNTRY: 
Revised version of John 
WSson's play originally titled 
Hampr, with Paul Clarkson and 
Marc Siden, directed by Alan 
Strachan. 

Greenwich Theatre (01-858 
7755). Previews from Thurs; 
opens Sept 1. 

OPENINGS 

NOEL AND GERTIE: Sheridan 
Morley’s corrugation from the 
works of Noel Coward and 
biographies of Coward and 



by Yukio Ninagawa in an open- 
air production. 

FESTIVAL FRINGE: 

Continuing until Aug 30. 
Telephone bookings, unless 
otherwise specified: 

031 226 5138- Information: 

031 226 5257/5259. 

Opening this week: Edwina: 
Sharon Kennet as the 
Countess Mountbatten of 
Burma. Burton: Christopher 
Morgan in a portrait of 
actor Richard Burton. 

GALLERIES 

OPENINGS 

R. TAGORE: Wide selection of 
paintings and drawings by the 
Indian poet, philosopher and 
artist 

Barbican Centre, London EC2 
(01-638 4141). From Thurs. 

DRYDEN: Work by Ernst 
Dryden, the famous 
commercial artist of the 1920s 
and 1930s. 

National Theatre, South Bank, 
London SE1 (01-928 2033). 
From Mon. 

JAPANESE BOOKS: Novels, 
poetry and printed albums 
demonstrating how beautiful 
20th-century Japanese books 
can be. 

British Library Galleries, British 
Museum, Great Russell Street, 
London WC1 (01-636 1544). 
From Tues. 

HOUSE & HOME: Tribute to 
traditional Caribbean 
architecture. Commonwealth 
Institute, Ken si ng ton High 
Street, London W8 
(01-603 4535). From Thurs. 

SELECTED 

FROM TWO WORLDS: 

Contemporary work by artists 
of non-European background 
working in Britain. 

Whitechapel Art Gallery, 
Whitechapel High Street 
London El (01-877 0107). 

SEASIDE ART: A fun summer 
show of popular seaside art 
from Bamforth postcards to 


BOLSHOI BALLET: Completes 
its Birmingham week today, 
and plays' Tues-Aug 30 in a 
specialty erected b»g marquee 
in Battersea Park. Programme 
features many short display 
numbers plus Les SylphWes 
and the middle act of 
Spartacus. 

Birmingham Hippodrome 
(021 622 7486). Battersea Park 
tickets from Keith Prowse or 
First Call (01-741 9999 or 01- 
240 7200). 

SADLER’S WELLS ROYAL 
BALLET: Continues at 
Cambridge until Sep 6. 

Today's programme is The 
Sleeping Beauty; then 
Copp6ka Mon-Thurs. On Fri 
comes a mixed biU including 
Balanchine s Prodigal Son and 
Tchaikovsky Pas oe Deux. 
Bmttey’s Flowers of the Forest 
and MacMillan's Quartet 

The Big Top, Jesus Green, 
Cambridge (advance booking 
Central Library, 0223 68848J: 

STEVE PAXTON AND KATIE 
DUCK: Two American dancers 
present evenings of 
collaborative vrork at the ICA, 
Tues-Aug 30. On Tues, Thurs, 
Sat the programme indudes 
Paxton dancing to Goldbert 
Variations. 

ICA Theatre, The Mail, London 
SW1 (01-930 3647). 


Gertrude Lawrence; with Lewis 
Fonder and Patricia Hodge 
(above). 

Donmar Warehouse (01- 
240 8230). Opens Tues. Press 
night Thurs. 

MARLOWE: Stove Harley plays 
Christopher Marlowe in this 
melodrama with music. 

King’s Head, 115 Upper Street 
London N1 (01-226 1916). 
Preview today. Opens Tues 

SELECTED 

ROMEO AND JUUET: Kenneth 
Branagh's production stars 
himself and Samantha Bond. 
Lyric Studio (01-741 231 1). 

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO 
NIGHT: Jonathan Miller's 
quirky production of O'NeDTs 
doomy masterpiece. 

Haymarket (01 -030 9832). 

OUT OF TOWN 

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL: 

Continuing untB Aug 30. Credit 
card sales and reservations: 

031 225 5756. This week's 
performances indude: 

Miss Julie: Royal Dramatic 

Theatre of Stockholm, directed 

by Ingmar Bergman. 

Lb Sapoteau: Theatre tie la 
Salamandre, directed by Alain 
MBianti and author Giktes 
Bourdet in a nonsense- 
language farce.Medeac Toho 
Company from Japan, directed 


Athenaeum Gallery, Pnrtcess 
Street Manchester M2 
(061 236 9422). 

FILMS 

OPENINGS 

HIGHLAfOER (IS): Muddled 
concoction abouttwo warring 
immortals who range from 
16th-century Scotland to 
contemporary Manhattan. 
Directed by Russell Midcahy, a 


Warner West End (01- 
439 0791). From Fri. 

ALIENS (18): Sigourney 
Weaver ana a combat team 
return to the horrible planet 
featured m the 1 979 hit ABen. 
Odeon Leicester Square (01- 
930 6111). From Fri. 

EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL 
FILM FESTIVAL: Andrei 
Tarkovsky's magisterial The 
Sacrifice (today) and the 1924 
classic Greed, with Hve music 
composed byCarf Davis (Sun). 

Details from Fflmhouse, 88 
Lothian Road, Edinburgh 
(031 228 2688). 

SELECTED 

DESERT HEARTS (18): Donna 
Deitch's beautifuSy controlled 
drama set in Reno durmg file 
late 1950s. 

Screen on the hfiS (01- 
435 3366). 

SUGARBABY (15): Heavy- 
weight lady's passion for a 
handsome train driver by 
German director Percy Adkxi. 
Everyman (01-435 1525). 


01-221 8336). 

ROUND MIDNIGHT: 
Edinburgh's intimate jazz 
festival closes with the 
Dewey Redman Quartet 
(tonight) and the Trio Con 
Tromba, including the fine 
Swedish pianist Bengt 


Queen's Han, Edinburgh 
(031-6682019). 

TRAD AT KENWOOD: 

Engtish Heritage and Lord 
Montagu, impresario of the 
incident-strewn jazz festivals 
at BsauHeu in the 1960s, r 

B resent Chris Barber, Acker 
ilk and Humphrey 
Lyttelton (tomorrow) and Kefth 
Nichols, Kenny Baker and 
the Pizza Express AU-Stars 
(Mon) in an urban glade. 
Kenwood Bowl, Hampstead 
Lane, London NW3 (01-928 
3191). 



BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 

OPERA NORTH: Booking 
opens this week for autumn 
season touring 
Leeds, Nottingham, 
Manchester and HufL Sep 27- 

Leeds Grand Theatre, 46 
New Briggate, Leeds 1 
(0532 439999). 

BALLET GULBEMOAN: 

Five Portuguese baHets from 
Portugal's leading modem 
ballet company to mark 600th 
anniversary of the Arwlo- 
Portuguese Treaty with music 
ranging from Liszt to South 


American folk. Oct 21 -25. 
Sadler’s Wells, Rosebery 
Avenue, London EC1 (01- 
278 891 6, 01 -278 0855). 

LAST CHANCE 

TWENTY FOR TODAY: 

Work of 20 young portrait 
photographers, with 
portraits of Bob GeWof, 
Johnny Rotten, Patricia 
High smith, Meivyn Bragg, Ju&e 
Walters and the Bishop of 
Durham. Ends Mon. 

National Portrait Gallery, St 
Martin's Place, London WC2 
(01-930 1552). 


For ticket arafiabflity,' petfonnance and opening tunes, . 

telephone the numbers listed. Opera: Hilary Finch; 
Dance: John Pfenaval; Theatre: Tony Patrick and Martin 
Cropper; Galleries: Sarah Jane Checkland; IDws: Geoff 
Brown; Concerts: Max Harrison; Rock & Jazz: Richard 
Wflfiams; Bookings: Anne Whitehonse 





RUSSIAN NOTES: Andrew Davies 
conducts the Toronto Symphony 
Orchestra in two concerts of 
Russian music in Edinburgh. The first 
includes a Prokoviev symphony 
and the second Stravinsky's The 
Soldier's Tale. Usher Hail (031 
225 5756) Tuesday and Thursday. 


RED REBEL: Barbara Sutowa plays 
the title role in Rosa Luxemburg, the 
story of the German Communist 
revolutionary, who was murdered by 
right-wingers in Berlin in 1919. 

It is given solemn treatment by 
director Margarethe von Trotta. 
Lumiere (01-836 0691) from Friday. 


GALLERIES 

PAST MASTERS: Angtartu* Johh, 
Roger Fty, and Edward Wadsworth 
were among the notable members 
of the NewEhsMt Art Club for which 
a commemorative exhibition is 
being organized at Christie's, Siting 
Street London SWT (01 - 
839 9060) from Wednesday. 


CONCERTS 

MAW, MOZART: Jane 
Glover conducts the London 
Mozart Players In Nicholas 
Maw's Sonata, Mozart's 
“Jupiter" Symphony; 

Tamas Vasary solos in 
Mozart's Piano Concerto 
K456. 

RoyaJ Albert HaH, 

Kensington Gore, London SW 
j01j58Sr821 2). Today. 

SPANISH NIGHTS: Alicia de 
Larrocha is at the piano for 
Falla's Nights inpie 

Baudo also^cfm^^e 
Phflhairnortia Orchestra in 
Chabrier's Esparm, Bizet's 
L 'Artesienne Suite and Falla's 
Three-Cornered Hat State. 
Royal Albert HaJL Mon, 
7.30pm. 

MAINLY MOZART: John 
Eliot Gardner conducts the 
Monteverdi Choir and 
English Baroque Soloists in 
Mozart's Kyrie K341 and 
Requiem. 

Royal Albert Han. Tues, 
7.30pm. 

SEASONAL MADONNA: 

Jonathan Harveys Madonna 
of Winter and Spring has its 
world premiere by the BBC SC 
under Peter Eotvos. 

Royal Albert HalL Wed, 
7.30pm. 

ENIGMATIC ELGAR: 

Bernard Haitink conducts toe 
LPO in Elgar's "Enigma" 
Variations and Shostakovich's 
Symphony No 10. 

Royal Albert HalL Thurs, 
7.30pm. 

HERO’S LIFE Richard 
Strauss's Bin Heldenfeben by 
the LPO wider Bernard 
Haitink, and Beethoven’s 
Piano Concerto No 3 with 
Murray Perahia. 

Royal Albert Hail. Fri, 

7.30pm. 

ROCK AND JAZZ 

READING ROCK: Saxon, 
Hawkwind and John Waite are 
the headliners. 

Today and tomorrow, 

Richfield Avenue, Reading 
(information: 01-439 8425). 

SUMMERSCOPE JAZZ: 

Clark Tracey, son of Stan, 
leads a vigorously creative 
hard-bop quintet m a concert 
shared with Simon PurcaiJ's 
stySsticaityslmter JazzTraia 
Tonight, Purcell Room, 

South Bank, London SE1 (01- 
9283191). 

GREENBELTARTS 
FESTIVAL: T-Bone Burnett, 
David Grant, Denetce 
Williams, Andy Pratt, Bryn 
Haworth and the Vktient 
Femmes’ Gordon Gano own 
up to their faith at this 
Christian celebration. 

Today and tomorrow, 

Castle Ashby Park. 


Hillbilly revivalist 
of country music 






H e strode through 
the Soho streets on 
stack-heeled, nee- 
dle-nose boots, ev- 
ery bit the Hollywood cowboy 
with his string tie and fawn 
Stetson. The fruit and veg 
stall-holders in Berwick Street 
inveterate know-alls, stopped 
barking and stared. Dwight 
Yoakam, six feet-phis of right, 
blue denim, has a steely look 
and a purposeful manner. He 
might have said "Make my 
day”, and no one would have 
laughed. But he walked on, 
and into the offices of his 
British record company, to 
receive the fluttering atten- 
tions accorded a visiting 
American star-in-the- ma Icing 
Unknown a year ago, 
Dwight Yoakam is a new 
country music herb coping 
stoically with his burdensome 
description as "the Hank Wil- 
liams of tile J 980s”. Williams, 
the first hillbilly musician to 
put country music is the pop 
charts, was 29 and already a 
legend when he passed from 
this world, a victim of alco- 
holic poisoning, in the rear 
seat of his Cadillac convert- 
ible. Yoakam. the same age, 
with a similar fondness for 
Cadillacs, is just starting out 
on the road to the Country 
Music Hall of Fame and a 
place beside Williams, Jimmie 
Rodgers and other 
rhinestoned immortals. 

Country music breeds fierce 
cultural politics, and 
Yoakum's galloping success 
has been accelerated by con- 
troversy. Many Americans re- 
gard country as next only to 
Godliness and The Flag. In 
1965, a famous exponent, 
Buck Owens, was forced to 
run newspaper advertise- 
ments pledging fans he would 
perform no song that was not 
country, “and I shall not 
forget it”. But country today is 
more widely popular and less 
high-principled Good ’ol boys 
even play synthesizers. 

Enter Yoakam, an angry 
young man whose recent de- 
but album Guitars. Cadillacs, 
Etc, Etc ; lovingly maintains 
the old bar-room themes and 
fiddle-and-guimr arrange- 
ments but has still sold 
250,000 copies and reached 
the top of the American 
country charts. Having once 
rejected him for Jus tra- 
ditionalism, which it deemed 
uncommercial, Nashville, 



leaned and booted 
Dwight Yoakam , 
has succeeded by 
championing 
good old sounds 

country music's recording 
centre and Establishment, is 
now astonished and resentful. 
However, rode audiences like 
his rebellious image. Now his 
fitness to join country's pan- 
theon may be judged from a 
few British dates which began 
yesterday at the Peterborough 
Country Music Festival. 

Not the hick his name 
suggests, he proves to be a 
thoughtful, even loquacious, 
former theatre and history 
student at Ohio State Univer- 
sity. But when first en- 
countered, newly arrived from 
Los Angeles, where he now 
lives, be was slouched deep in 
jet-lag, and his pale, rather 
handsome face languished in 
the shade ofbis Stetson, which 
be tipped bade and forth like a 
prop but never removed, per- 
haps to disguise his thinning 
hairline — a less happy point 
of similarity with Hank Wil- 
liams, who was seldom photo 
graphed without his white 
cowboy hat after being discov- 
ered wearing his toupee back 
to from. 

Y oakam, that improb- 
able name, as res- 
onant as the yelp of 
his singing voice, is 
actually a corruption of the 
Germanic “Joachim”, and he 
can trace his family history 
back 200 years to settlers in 
Shenandoah Valley in Vir- 
ginia. He was bora in a 
Kentucky hamlet, Betsy 
Layne. in the foothills of the 
Appalachian mountains, the 
wellspring of hillbilly music. 
Ma and Pa Yoakam grew up 
defending his hillbilly back- 
ground. An as yet unrecorded 
song, Readin', Ritin‘ and 
Route 23, is about his parents* 
efforts at setf-improvement. 
Route 23 being the main road 
out of Kentucky to southern 
Ohio. 

His family, not especially 
musical, were -religious, and 
practised a cappella singing in * 
church. “I was raised- in the 
Church of- Christ, a fun- 
damentalist group, and Sun- 


“Hc paid for Columbia's 
building”, Yoakam aied. 
“You cannot be disrespectful 
of the very thing which cre- 
ated your existence and hope 
to exist very much longer. 
You got to dance with who 
brought you to the dance, or 
pretty soon you better look for 
another way home.” He raised 
bis hat a tantalising inch, then 
jammed it bade firmly. 

His own future holds more 
promise. He has been signed 
to record up to nine albums by 
WEA Records, which has 
relatively few counfry acts, yet 
still fought off competition 
from various rock labels. “I 
realized the others were going 
to inhibit my ability to access 
country music's traditional 
audience”, he said crisply. 

WEA drinks rock fans will 
buy his records, and has 
activated its promotional ma- 
chine. Whether be can justify 
the ballyhoo remains to be 
seen. It is notorious that 
country music has a cold, cold 
bean. But as a gushing Ameri- 
can critic has written, “he 
don't ride side-saddle on 
anyone's horse”. No, sirree. 

Michael Watts 


day morning, Sunday night 
and Wednesday night, every 
week of my life until I was 
grown, meant church. We 
sang extensively what I call 
hillbilly hymns, things tike 
The Old Rugged Cross that 
were brought over by the 
Protestants and embellished 
by the American Calvinist 
movement” 

Now he sings about drink- 
ing, dying and losing, 1 the 
eternal preoccupations of 
country musicians, even in 
Nashville. The difference is 
that there the twang has been 
processed out of records and 
the average age .of a country 
fen, market research reports, 
has increased to 39. “Nash- 
ville has lost youth”, Yoakam 
snapped, “because their music 
always starts in offices' and 
then trickles down to the 
streets”. A recent business 
decision has greatly affronted 
the most die-hard fens. 
Columbia . Records has 
dropped Johnny Cash after 28 
years, allegedly for declining 


ARTS DIARY 

' l« I ■! — — • ■ I M ^ 

Crystal 

ballot 

After appallingly chauvinistic 
arguments such as “women 
can’t keep secrets” the Magic 
Circle . arrived at a rather 
startting compromise at their 
meeting this week to discus 
the 80-year exclusion of the 
fairer sex from the world's 
premier magic association. 
The Circle has agreed to hold a 
postal ballot of its- 1,400 
members to see whether 
women should be treated u 
something more than helpers 
in ftriinet stockings. This de- 
spite some fairly exaggerated 
ideas from the floor of what 
women’s role in magic should 
be. Colin Francome, the ma- 
gician who was prepared to 
ace excommunication for his 
heretical proposition that 
women should be treated as 
equals, is flabbergasted by the 
decision. “It’s a 
breakthrough**, he says 
flunlly. “Who knows, we 
might even win” 

Filmboers 

Not exactly renowned for its 
interest in work) affairs, 
Hollywood has suddenly wo- 
ken up to South Africa’s 
troubles in a big way. Apart 
from Richard Attenborough’s 
film BUcaAskihg for Trouble 
there are now half-a-dozen 
other films in preparation or 
production including a Colin 
Welland piece. Dry White 
Season , currently being filmed 
in Zimbabwe, a “biopic” on 
Mrs Winnie Mandela and 
another on South African 
activist Mrs Helen Suzman, 
the aunt of actress Janet 
Suzman. Sanctions or no sanc- 
tions, there’s no reason why 
you can’t make money out of 
conflict Es there? 

• Who says publishers 
don’t hare a way with words? 
Carmen GalUL on the 
rumours this week that her. 
feminist publishing house 
Virago is up for sale: “It's not 
only mi true— it's not 
true” A double negative, 
sorely? 

Photo call 

Though they were friends for 
35 years and dedicated major 
musical works to each other 
there is virtually no photo- 
graphic record of the friend- 
ship of two of our greatest 
20th-century composers, 
Benjamin Britten and Sir Mi- 
chael Tippett Thai presents a 


the Mean FJdcwr (Wed), 
and too Half Moon (Thurs) 


Tippett and Britten 

problem io the organizers .of 
the first Brittm/Tippetl Festi- 
val, which opens in London is 
a month’s time and runs until 
December though vimrnUy 
every source has been tapped 
they have no proper photo- 
graphs of the pair. If any Arts 
Diary reader has such a pic- 
ture I shall be happy to pass it 
on: meanwhile there is a wide 
range of performances from ' 
Rattle. Bream, Shiricy-Quifi 
and many others to fa* 
forward to. 

Saints on ice 

With the 1,000th performance 
of tiie squeals-on-wheei* 
musical Starlight Express-doc 
on September I, Andrew 
Lloyd Webber notes ia * 
private memo to director 
Trevor Nunn that it Ms an 
the feast-day of Si Drithehn- 
Driihelm. he - rcreafc, *W5 
noted for redling . psahw 
while standing in r the Ri«r 
Tweed -even when the water f 
contained chunks _oT;i* ' 
“Maybe there Is something >? 
his example which .. the 
.will recognize”, writes 
Webber. What docs 'W 
mean? Is it praise of timRfor 
another change ofeari? ;; 

Christopher WSsofl 










THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1 986 


15 




COURT 
AND 
SOCIAL 



COURT 
CIRCULAR 

BALMORAL CASTLE 
!-> August 22: The Queen was 
! : represen led by Colonel the 
? honourable Lincoln Alexander 
4... tlieutenanvOovernor of On- 
tario) at the Funeral of General 
r Sir Charles Loewea (formerly 
Aldc-de-Camp General to Her 
Majesty) which was held in 
•• •Tnoity Chapel. Canadian 
Forces Base. Borden, Ontario 
this afternoon. 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
August 22: The Princess Anne. 
Mrs Mark Phillips. Patron of the 
1986 World Sowing Champion- 
ships. today attended ibe 
Championships at the National 
Water Sports Centre. Hotera 
Pierre point. Nottingham. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived upon arrival by Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
Nottinghamshire (Sir Gordon 
Hobday* 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Marie 
Phillips, attended by Mrs Mal- 
colm Wallace, travelled in an 
aircraft of The Queen's Flight 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
August 22: The Princess of 
Wales today visited HMS 
Trafalgar (Commander T. D. 
Elliott RN) at sea. 

Her Royal Highness, attended 
by Miss Anne Beckwith-Smrth 
and Lieutenant-Commander 
Richard Aylard. RN, travelled 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight 


The President of Sierra Leone 
celebrates bis birthday 
tomorrow. 


■ Bridge trials 
round robin 

The first match in the first 
•.'■ round robin of the trials to 
determine the British team for 
next year's European Bridge 

■ Championship took place al the 
Young Chelsea Bridge Cub. on 

‘ . Thursday, when I. N. Rose beat 
■ ~ J. M_ Armstrong 17- 13 and A. 
' P.SowterbeaiS. Rshpool25 - 5 
... causing a change at the top of 
. . the table. 

Two further matches were 
- played yesterday and the second 
round robin will be completed 
by tomorrow evening. 


Latest mils 


»- ■, • •*. 

1 !;ii; 


Lady Mariana Frances 1 jlhm 
Orr, of The Steps. High Street. 
-Ralley. Warwickshire, wife of 
• Sir Alan Stewart Oit, a former 

Lord Justice of Appeal, left 

estate valued at £121,045 net. 
Mr Nigel Hector Mirnro Stock, 

• • of Sandy Road, north west 
London, the actor, who played 
- ,Dr Watson to Peter Cushing’s 
; Sherlock Holmes, fefl £52,766 
net. 

Mr John Peter Winclnrarth, of 
: ‘ Tredegar Nursing Home^ Easl- 

' ' bourne. East Sussex, the eede- 
SMStical lawyer and former 
... -^Church Commissioner,- left 
; \~£2l6,23I net 


Birthdays 

TODAY: Mr Geoff Capes. 37; 
Dr Carl Dolmetsch, 75; Mr 
Alexander Gilmour. 55: Sir 
William Gorell Barnes, 77; Sr 


QC 

Mr< 


83; 

Gene 


George Harvie-Watt, 

Sir John Hoskyns, 59; . 

Kelly. 74; Lord Kissin. 74; Mr S. 
Kitchen. 73: Brigadier C. A. 
Langley. 89; Mr James Quinn, 
67; Mr Willy Russell, 39: Sir 
Roy Strong. 5J;Mr Peter Thom- 
son. 57: Lieutenant-General Sir 
Richard Vincent. 55; Sir Brian 
Young. 64. 

TOMORROW; Lord Ashby, 82; 
Mr Paul .Barker. 51: Mr Alan 
Booker. 53: Sir .Giles Bullard, 
60. Mr Charles Causley. 69; Mr 
Carlo Curley. 34; Sir Michael 
Franklin. 59: Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel Sir John Johnston, 64; 
Commander Sir CHve Loefanis, 
84; Sir Helenas Milmo. 78; 
Major-General W. J. Officer. 83; 
Air Chief Marsha] Sir Hugh 
Saunders. 92; Brigadier F. £. 
Stafford. 91 : Air Chief Marshal 
Sir Augustus Walker. 74. 


Forthcoming 
marriages 

Captain M-J-Bemuon, RA, 
and Miss SJ- BeO 
The engagement is announced 
between Marcus, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs T. H. Bennion. of 
Stockton Heath. Cheshire, and 
Susan Frances, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs ft. £. Campbell, of 
Woodbridge, Suffolk. 

Mr PJV. Fryer 
and Miss JJL Hardy 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs W. H. Fryer, of 
Newton M earns, Glasgow, and 
Jane; eldest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs K, Hardy, of New Milton. 
Hampshire. 

Mr P.W5. Madfey 
and Miss J.C- Btyth 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul William Stuart, 
younger son of the late Mr R J. 
Medley. MBE, and of Mrs S. M. 
Madley, of Cyncoed, Cardiff 
and Joanna Caroline, only 
daughter of the late Mr W. N. 
Blyth, Jp, and of Mrs P. Bfyth of 
Roxton, Newton, Swansea. 

Mr H. Maxwell 
and Miss E. Reid 

The engagement is announced 
between Hamish. younger son 
of Mr and Mrs W. P. Maxwell, 
of Turriff Aberdeenshire, and 
Kirsty, onj^ daughter of Dr R. 


M. Reid, 
M. K. 


Aberdeen, and Mrs 
Reid, of Benhobn, 


I C inrarHiii^hit p 

Mr JJfLTasho . 
and Mis* LCJVL ran dot Break 
The engagement is annonneed 
between John Harold, -elder son - 
of the late Mr Ernest Tasbo and 
of Mrs Sheila Tasho, • of 
Harpenden. Hertfordshire, and 
Irene Cornelia Maria, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Johan- 
nes van den Broelc, of 
Holarobra. Sio Paulo, Brazil. 


Russell Stannard 


A matter of believing 


Who does not sympathize plain what is observed. It is in 
with Philip, the disciple who. doing this lhat it cannot help 
1 bui ‘make reference to that 


uon of religious belief. The 


asked Jesus to show him the 
Father? Or with Thomas who 
could .not believe in the 
Resurrection until be had 
himself seen the risen Jesus? 
Seeing is believing. And 
particularly does that seem to 
be the case today where, under 
the influence of modem scien- 
tific thinking, we do not 
expect to have to believe in 
anything until wt see the 
evidence for ft. 

But is it really true that 
scientists believe only, what 
can be directly experienced? 
How about gravity? Release 
an object, a comb. say. and it 
fells to the ground. Why does 
it fell? Gravity. But we cannot 
see gravity — not gravity 
itself. 

The reason we believe in it 
is that acceptance of the 
existence of gravity helps ns to 
explain many of the phenom- 
ena that we do see: all falling 
objects (not just combs), the 
motions of the planets, and so 
on. 

Pick up the comb and pass it 
through your hair. It is now 
capable of attracting and pick- 
ing up a small piece of paper. 
How does it do it? Electricity. 
Can we see electricity? Once 
more the answer is no. Belief 
in. electricity, like that in 
gravity, comes about because 
such an acceptance again al- 
lows us to explain a wide 
variety of phenomena that can 
be seen, whilst tbe cause itself 
as before, remains unseen. 

How about the composition 
of the comb — what is it made 
of? Quarks and electrons, the 
infinitesimally small constit- 
uents of atoms. Being so 
small, they too cannot be seen. 
Again we find ourselves 
believing in tilings that are not 
accessible to us directly. 

This is not to deny lhat ■ 
science is fundamentally 
rooted m careful observation 
of the world; to this extent 
seeing is indeed believing. But 
there is more to science than 
describing merely what is 
seen. Science seeks to go 
beyond appearances and ex- ■ 


chgi 

belii 


OBITUARY 

SIR DAVID SCOTT 

Green-fingered veteran of diplomacy 


which, by its very nature, 
must remain unseen. 

Science is not alone in this. 
Recently, turning over the soil 
in my garden, 1 inadvertently 
cut through a worm. Auto- 
matically I thought of it as 
being in pain. But was it 
really? Both sections of the 
unfortunate, worm’s body 
were writhing. Was I to con- 
clude that both were in pain, 
the worm now having two 
minds? Or does a worm have 
no mind, no feelings? It is 
impossible to say. Minds, 
thoughts, feelings cannot be 
seen. 

Indeed, if I am to be strictly 
accurate and pedantic, I can- 
not claim to know for certain 
that anyone, apart from my- 
self has mental experiences - 
and 1 don't just mean having 
doubts about the minds of 
animals. 1 could in a perfectly 
consistent manner account for 
all the behaviour of other 
human beings using only 
physical terms such as quark, 
electron, gravity and 
electricity. 

Of course, in practice I do 
no such thing 1 recognize that 
such a description, whilst 
having specialized uses, does 
not do fufljustice to what I 
observe. There are certain 
contexts in which there is a 
need to switch to a more 
appropriate -explanatory 
framework - one dealing in 
mental concepts such as 
thoughts, feelings, motiva- 
tions, and so on, rather than in 
physical ones. There is a need 
to speak of a meeting of minds 
as well as an interaction 
between physical bodies. Un- 
less we are able to switch 
naturally and effortlessly from 
one explanatory framework to 
the other, as the occasion 
demands, being prepared to 
supplement physical explana- 
tions with mental ones, much 
of the significance of what is 
going on around us would pass 
us by. 

It is with such thoughts in 
mind we approach the ques- 


rriigious believer accepts a 
need for a third explanatory 
framework - one that deals in 
spiritual entities, like God. As 
with the concepts associated 
with the physical and mental 
frameworks. those of the spir- 
itual description refer to lhat 
which must remain hidden 
from direct observation. 

Just as unseen gravity re- 
veals itself through phenom- 
ena such as felling objects, and 
unseen minds reveal them- 
selves through the physiol 
movements of human bodies, 
so the unseen God reveals 
himself through the created 
world, through the lives of 
other people, and for Chris- 
tians. pre-eminently through 
the life of Christ. 

Jesus, in bis response to 
Philip's request to be shown 
the Father, said: "Anyone who 
has seen me. has seen tbe 
Father". It is as though some- 
one asked me, ' as a pro- 
fessional physicist, to be 
shown gravity, and I replied: 
"Anyone who has seen the 
comb falL has seen gravity”. 
Literally speaking, it is not 
true. But at a deeper level - a 
level at which one thinks of 
revelation through some 
mediating agency, rather than 
by direct apprehension - it is 
true. 

Finally let me add that this 
recognition of the spiritual 
dimension is not simply a 
matter of gaining a deeper, 
more satisfying understanding 
of what is going on. Such a 
recognition alters one's behav- 
iour, attitude, and quality of 
life. 

Someone sensitively 
respecting other people's feel- 
ings, or those of animals, 
treats them differently to 
someone who regards them 
merely as physical objects. 

In the same way, acceptance 
lhat we are spiritual beings, 
and children of the same 
Heavenly Father, brings 
about, in its own way, a 
reorientation of one's life and 
attitudes as profound and far- 
reaching . 

Tie author is Professor of 1 
Physics at tie Opea University 


Sir Davjd ScuiL KCMG. 
OBE died in the early hours of 
yesterday morning, at the age 
of 99. He gave valuable ser- 
vice to British diplomacy, and 
in his later years distinguished 
himself as a gardener. He was 
the senior living old Etonian 
and officer of the Royal Scots. 

David John Montagu 
Douglas Scott was bom on 
March 7. 1899. the second son 
of of Admiral Lord Charles 
Montagu Douglas Scott, and 
grandson of the 5th Duke of 
Buccleuch. His mother. Ada 
Mary Ryan, was Australian, 
and pan of his childhood was 
spent in Australia, where his ‘ 
rather was Naval C. in C. 

He was in College at Eton, 
and ended his career there as 
Captain of die School. But be 
was not an outstanding schol- 
ar. At Christ Church. Oxford, 
he got a degree in Greats, but 
his talent was for languages, 
and be spent the next two 
years learning French. Ger- 
man and Spanish in prepara- 
tion for tbe Foreign Office 
examination. In this he was 
very successful, taking second 
place among ihe candidates of 
his year. 

He joined the Foreign Of- 
fice in 1911. having already 
obtained a reserve commis- 
sion in the Royal Scots. This 
enabled him 10 be one of only 
two members of the deport- 
ment to be released for active 
service at the outbreak of war 
in 1914. 

Serving in France and Flan- 
ders, and at Salonika, he was 
wounded in 1915, and was 
also out of action for a time 
with typhoid and jaundice. In 
the course of his military 
career be was mentioned in 
despatches, and also made 
OBE and Chevalier of the 
Legion of Honour. 

In 1918, he married Doro- 
thy Drummond, who died in 


1965. Their only son was later 
killed in action in the Second 
World War. 

Soon after his return to the 
Foreign Office, Scott became 
assistant in the Consular De- 
partment. and it was there that 
his true life's work began. The 
Consular Service at that time 
was still regarded as the poor 
relation of the Diplomatic. 
David set himself 10 put it on 
a proper footing. 

He took an immense 
amount of trouble to gel to 
know members of the service 
and to make them feel that in 
him they had a friend who was 
at all times ready to listen, 
sympathise and help. The 
successful fusion of all 
branches of the Consular with 
the Diplomatic Service and 
Foreign Office was largely due 
to him. 

In 1938, he was made an 
assistant under-secretary, with 
supervision of ibe North and 
South American departments 
- a big responsibility which he 
discharged with his usual skill. 
He was made KCMG in 1941. 

Two years later, when the 
new comprehensive Diplo- 
matic Service was approved 
by Parliament, Scott was ap- 
pointed deputy under-secre- 
tary in charge of 
administration. In this capaci- 
ty his talents were severely, 
but successfully, tested in 
consolidating in one whole the 
previously quasi-independent 
branches of the service and 
finding suitable occupants for 
the many posts left vacant by 
the vicissitudes of war. 

He retired in 1947, but 
continued for many years to 
serve on the selection board, 
and also acted as chairman of 
an annual course for new 
recruits for the British, and 
other Commonwealth, foreign 
services. 

On his mother's death, he 
had taken over the Dower 


House at Boughton. North- 
amptonshire residence of his 
cousin, the Duke of 
Bucctcuch. There he became a 
great gardener and plantsman, 
with a passion for growing 
trees, shrubs and woodland 
plants. 

When already in his sixties, 
he took on two neighbouring 
acres of park adjoining the 
Dower House, which had 
degenerated into a wilderness. 
This he cleared, dug and 
planted entirely by himself. 
Die soil was alkaline, the site a 
dour north feeing slope. 

His activities in the last 
years of his life were greatly 
stimulated by his marriage in 
1970 to Valeric Fmnis. al- 
ready a celebrated horticultur- 
ist and flower photographer. 
They made an impressive 
learn. Scott often won awards 
for favourite shrubs at the 
Royal Horticultural Society's 
shows. 

Their adjoining gardens of 
rare alpincs were much visit- 
ed. not least by horticultural 
students. Scon's natural 
warmth of personality and 
interest in people enabled him 
to make friends wjihin every 
generation, and most of all 
with the young. He was as 
much David to them as to his 
remaining contemporaries. 

He was also a gifted casual 
sketcher in pen or pencil 
whose letters 10 friends often 
ended with a rapidly drawn 
hawk. During his 'life he 
acquired a valuable collection 
of modern paintings, which 
adorned first his office in 
Carlton House Terrace and 
then the walls of his home at 
Boughton. 

To the end he had an 
extraordinary capacity for rec- 
ollection, so that to be in his 
company was 10 experience a 
piece of living history. 


MR GEORGE RAINBIRD 


Marriage 

Mr C Jago 
and Miss S. Fenwick 
The marriage took place on 
Friday, August 22, at Chelsea 
Register Office of Mr Chris- 
topher Jago, son of Mr and Mrs 


Hugh Jago, 
Fenwick, da 
Mis Douglas 


and 


Miss Sara 
of Mr and 
Lwick. 


Serrice dinner 

North Irish Horse 
Colonel Lord .O’Neill presided 
at a dinner given by the officers 
of the North Irish Horse at 
Templepatrick yesterday. 
Lieutenant-Colonel S. J. M. 
Jenkins and Lieutenant-Colonel 
M. J. Whiteley were among 
those present. 


University news 


Oxford 

The foO owing pri ze s and 
scholarships have been 
awarded: 

John Pearro Manorial ortzrs in 
Sorotty 1906: Helen Patterson. 
Woifccn CJR ware. Jesus C. 
Bristol-Myers prize hi Cardiology 
1966: Jnkdaap Jagdersh PudlL Cor- 
ot* Qirtsti etttepe. 

Goodaer schoiaisbdd R M BnceweU. 
Magdalen C. 

junior maitwnatJcsl p ilm*: Miriam 
Josephine Brod. OmwiS G P J 
Moody. St Edmund Hath A Young, 
wadiwn C. 

Cravm Frttovmtijp: R 0 Hawley. St 

John's C. , 

Dcjgr^sttjgarshltt S-CR Swain. 

boq Hrtor n a nid i achol a rilUp r 966- 
87: Marina Carter. Si Antony's C 
-<Mh3u*ctniaa Tan* 1986 ana Mary 
Telia 1997); J W Lazar. Baud c 


(Trinity Term 1987 }- 
QjnlnHioo prtte 1986: R.L 


QirM aaRh Emily Q D Kearns. Si 
pin: P A 


Hilda's C. 

Wroolter 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and Lx Memoriam 


, .. 

.rt -;f 

.—-.I-' 


B«ras. 

DEATHS ml M 
MaSte + WhVAT 

(minimum 3 lines) 

AnoouncenKfltt. vntmlicoicd bv ibe 
miw and permanent address of the 
render, may be rent 10 c 

THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
Loaded El 9XS 


" ' ' ] or telephoned telephone 
t-- I cibcre only) ia tWft *24 


mfas- 


Antwufirentcfits on be rccehcd by 
Wimbonc between 9.Q0am and 
5.30pm Monday 10 Friday, on Smbt- 
benreen 9.003m and 12 noon. 


9.00am 
* Fridiy. on 
. . jm and 12 

1411 4Mt saht For publication the 
day by IJQpro. 


rom w co M is mhmges. __ 

etc on Court and Social Pate tb a fo* 
+ Wh VAT. 

Court and Social Page annouecncats 
■ cm no* be accepted bv telephone. 
Enquiries lo: 9953 

(after LQJOsmV or send w 

1 PwntiibM Stmt tendon Ft MX 


Pl«e allow at (art 48 hours before 
pubtoauoiv. 



rhau««Wnrr. my «n. Or Krone *n uw 
' VHrtM » In Christ Mus 
S Timothy a: 1 


BERTHS 


AIROH - on August 2 ml. at The 
,i'Ww Suffolk MoapttaL Bury SI Ed- 
; , immh. ib Eliabcth Maty aide Font) 
' and Ian. a daughter. Kate EUobeOv: 


J! 


MULIUN MR I II On Augurt 19th. 
i to Sarah (nde Dowson) A CMWo- 
r Dher. a nao (Rupert Christopher). 


■ On August 21st. to Lorraine, 
a son. Samuel Thomas. 

On Sunday. i7tfi August 1966 
to Shauoeiia and Richard, a non 
jaanes Eden. In Sydney. Australia. 


Vu 


On August 17th. at 
Mount Tamet Hospital. Duttln. to 
Gemma onto CTOafy) and James, a 
daughter. 

- On August lSlh, 1966. at 
The John RadcHffe Hospital, to 
jwje twfo Attorwge) and Sam. a 
sugnter. Joanna Margaret. 

■VXB- On August 15th. to Catherine 
a»d Roderick, a son. PtiOtp James 
Henry, a brother for 
Thomas and Nicholas. 

J* - On August 22nd. at Louise 
MWBareL Aldershot to ABm» (Me 
Doa J and Anthony a son. Edward 
Wick Thomas. 

WSTAGE - On X7th August. 1986. at 
HtosNagbrookr Hospital. Hunttng- 
.ten to Karen (nee Scottexfl-Perta) 
■and John a son. Alexander John 
Maximilian. 

MltLAW On 20h August al St 
-“Wee's Hoscna London, to Lindsey 
n» Oliver} A Michael, a son George 
deary diver, a brother tor Amelia. 


marriages 


■jew s CJUMMtt - The man-tape 
** Ware on Augurt 16th. at 
wjenose College ChapeL Oxford, of 
t Marx Andrew, son of Mr and Mrs 
I Andrew of iceston. ksm. and Mho 
Ktoria Canning daughter of Dr and 
J M Canning of Poulton-M- 
*“*■ lAOtt- The bride, who was 
Ivon away by her rather, was 
itewMhy MtmCtairr Andrew and 
U» Katherine Conning. The best 
■an was Mr. David MocKay Blair, 
ho Service was conducted Vr Bio 
J*.* The reception was 
' J*d at The Randolph Hood. Oxford. 

he two enmea wot t* 
mad. 


DEATHS 


On 

su d den ly while visaing friends. Kay. 
widow, or Frank Newton and mother 
of Karen and Lynne. Funeral Service 
‘ an Tuesday. »d September. II 
at Amentum Oetnatorfcan. Flowers 
to Cooks Funeral Sendees. 72 Brand 
SL Chesham. Bucks. 

■ trout - On Angus! 20th. 1966. sud- 
denly. Peter Robert 
luatiand of Mary and dearly loved 
father of Joereiyn and James. Funer- 
al at 2-3o pm on Friday. August 29th 
m £l Peter-s Church. Upper Slaugh- 
ter. Flowers to the church or 
donattons to the N-A.CXC- 98a Lon- 
don Road. 8L Avars. Herts. 
BMITOM On August 19Ut 1986. 
Anthony Charles passed peacefully 
away after a short Otness. Sadly 
missed by Ms wife Paottna. family 
and frtends. Funeral Service to be 
held at Ea st n o ms s toad park crema- 
torium on Frtday August 29th al 
12X0 noon. No nowem by leanest. 
Donations U dtdred to the Princess 
Alice Hosotce. Esher. C/O. David 
Greedy. The House Of 
Oowtnorne. Berks. (05*4) 773741 
CARVER - On 2ist August Francis 
Keneim Mackenzie, peacefully ai 
homo. Loved and loving husband of 
Peggy and father of Richard and 
Vlr^nja. Funeral 2.00pm. on August 
26th. al St Leonard's Church. KervlL 
Family flowers only. Donations if 
desired to the Dorothy House 
Foundation c/o of D. Bewlay, 49 
Rounttwnd. Metkaham Wats. Tel 
Mefltshara 702621. 

CtXAVHJEY . On August 16th. 1966. 
Ernest Leslie Ooostps. peacefully ai 
home. Loved by oO. and will be sadly 
missed by his famRy and frtends. 
Service at Chefeca Old Church 
104Sam.en August 29th. 1966, and 
cremation at Oolders Green 
Cre mato r i um, at 12.30pm. 

CtOWt . On August 19th. 1966, 
peacefuSy after a long iHnne. Hazel 
Gwyaneth Plcton. of Sutton. Surrey, 
widow of Derek and dearly loved 
mother of Valerie and John, and 
grandmother of Carmine. Robert. 
Victoria and James., Service 
MorOake Crematorium. Friday. 29th 
AogmL at 2pm. Flowers may bo sent 
lo WATneUm & Son Lid. Sutxon. 
MWION > On August I9(h. suddenly. 
Paul Owen <OUo Deutscfft father of 
CSttan. grandMlw of Ewan A Kate 
Cumndop. Dearly loved htnband of 
Sheila MacOoogalL Cremation at 
ThomMB Crematorium. Cardiff, on 
August, 3»Ov. at 12-90 pm. 
EASTMAN Lawtord Edwin (Captain 
retired) of Homestde. Uc ktn gh all . 
Rtptdr. Nr Tewkesbury on AngsM 
20Ui In hospital aged 92 years. Be 
loved husband of Rtwda Frances. 
Funeral al Ripple church an Wednes- 
day August 27th at 2-30 pm. Family 
flowers only but donations In Heu far 
Ripple church and the Chest Heart 
and Stroke association. To H W Tpy- 
lor and son. 19 High SL Upton on 
Severn. Worcestershire. 
SSMOTOMXTOH - On 2lst 
August- 1986. peaceful. Bertha 
Easinaton-Bonon (nie Wctiards} aged 
95 yean, widow of cave Esetogton- 
BoMon. very much loved by aD who 
knew ha*. Funeral Service fa 
John’s CMrecti. WanslPrt. Esux. fa 
2.15PfR. os Thursday. 28th August, 
followed b¥ cremation al pontoon 
Wood. Harlow. Family flowers only 
Mease, donations If desired to Oxfam. 
Enquiries and donattons to R M 
Levey A Son. fil Chapel MO. 
Sltastedfssex. tef ELS 0279 
815219. 

EVMIS On Jaty 21SL 3986. to baspl- 
toL Sylvia Theodora, aged 87 yearn. 
She wffl be sadly mined by aH her 
toady. OemaUan at Bournemouth 
Crematorium. Stnmden Avenue, an 
Friday. 2901 August, at 2 pm. Flow- 
ers or donattons as preferred, for 
Save The Children Fund, may be 
■eni lo Harry Tombs Ltd (FD). 
31/35. Tower Road. Boscombt. Tab 
402021 30340 

HAYWARD. John Lucan - PttKeftfty 
al the Royal Star and Garter Home 
on 19Ui August 1966. aged 87. 
Malar RFA taler RAF and Colonial 
Service. Explorer and traveller. Re- 
m c u dwr cd with a ffe ction by Louise 
and penny Dyson. MkfaeUr Jarre&L 
and soke WtgMrSoycott. 


j HOCKLEY - on August. 20th. merd- 
fWty fa home Peter Wiffiasn Hockley . 
Commander. OA£_ RN.. aged 59 
years . Most bripved and loving 
friend and mentor of an Ms family. 
Husband of Valerie, son of Evelyn 
land the late Harold}, father of 
Graham. Christopher and A 
(MausonX poooa of Jennifer and 
Ifeter. Funeral at SL Paul*. Odton. 
Orpington, an Friday. August 29th. 
at 2 pm. fallowed by cremation. 
Fbmfty downs only pl ea—. E 
non*, tf desired to. The British 
Diabetic Association, c/o Francis 
ChappeB & Sons . 332 Crafton Rood. 
Farnbo rough. Kent. TE1X06B9) 
83277. 

KNMMM - on August 21sL 1986. 
peoccfuBy at Brieriyn Rest Home 
Hove. Thomas George (Johnnie) 
aged 89. Company dir e cto r, fanner. 


gmUetnan. Deeply loved and 
mounted by hi* children. Con. Batty 

and Ken and Ms grand and great 

g rand ch i l dren as wefl as ids 

and Mends afl over the world. 

Funeral fa The Downs Crematorium. 

Bear Road. Brighton (near the race- 

course) al 3 P.to. Friday. 29th 
August FtoitRy flowers only please. 

but donattona wel co med far the 

totored Jockeys Fund, c/o Attree 

and Kent 108 Church Road. Hove. 


Martin Wronger law 
Foxton. Mudakn C. 

Martin Wronker law prise ftmd: C M 
Ptoden. Marorteto C (J u r tsp r u donce): 
Altooo J StoCerL SomervflieC (Tort): e 
G Johnson. Christ Church (Land 
Lawk m IN R Evans, a John’s C 
(Trusts). Stobon M Hesdy. Brasenase C 
(AdmUdMrative Law). 

Slaughter wad May orfas (Co n tra ct ): C 
J Doing. Exeter C. 

Richards Butler prtae Oniernattonal 
Tradek aj N Coats. St John’s C. 
Norton. Rose. BoOeren and Roche 
_ . Lawk R N Panworth. 
Chinch. 

j r and Johnson prize 1966: R A 
Crass. Kehle C. 

Vlnerfan s cb o isrihto 196& R D 
C! boons. Llncobi GTS Piit-Payne. 
Worcester C. ... 

fare ert Goss prtae 1966: D W Stratas. 

John Morris prize 1986c T 8 PUt- 
Payne. Worcester C. 

St Catherine of Alexandria prise 
1 98fi: N I Moir. Wyciine Maa. . 
George Webh Media' Senior prise 
V98<x M A VeteSviS John’s C; 6 O 
Brook Cowan, saertoo C 
Htilenjr Foundation prim 1986 to 
Greek Studies of tile Ancient /CXaatical 
Period: C J Mowpego. New CoBege: S 
C Todd. Cambridge UrUversHy. 
Zabarolf travelling scholarships: N 

Aneaga prim 1966: PP Dee 

Joseph Schocht memorial pete: N 
Cohen. Pembroke C 
Pusey and Olerton senior prise: D G K 
Taylor . st Anne’s C 
Arnold prize In Moden 
C-Howeo. Llnooin C. 

far John Rhys sudenaMns tn Celtic 
Studies-. M Hughes. BA (Aberysl- 
rOTiUbwC Sharon Mac d o nald . fa 
Catherine’s C. 

Geoffrey Rhoades _ commemorative 
bursary-. Katncryn J MOMgcancry. fa 
Johns C 


Frtre estilbNton far Indian Rudies: S 
Das. Si Antony's C. 

Mariorte. Countess of Warwick, trav- 
etiing binary: Heater F Motion. 
Exrter C. 

Hatnead Khotarredp tn Music: A 
F ro a te y. Christ Church. 

Cambridge 

University Classical 
scholarships 

The craven schofanhln and > Henry 
Arthur Thomas Prize: T C Borland. 
Trinity Han. 

The Waddtnqtoii scholarship and a 
Henry Arthur Thomas prize: H B 
Freeman. Trinity C 
The Davies Scholarship and a Henry 
Arthur Thomas stbrt A to^taiT 
Stdrury Sussex C. 

The Po raon reho terdrip and s.Moiiy 
Arthur Thomas Prtne: I D Jordan. 
Sidney Sussex CL 

College elections 

Professorial fellowship: Prar L D HalL 
BSc PhD. (BrMoO. Hottsl Smith 
protra m c “ nwdiclDfa cbonH 
October 1. 

Official fellowship in oqorlaffcin with 
a college lectureredp In German: M R 
Ogden. MA. October l. 


Official fellowship: Dr A K Dixon. 
Unlv. lecturer in the dep oi t mew i of 
radiology. October 1. 

London 

Professor Dorothy Wedder- 
buns, principal of Royal 
Holloway and Bedford New 
College has been appointed a 
’Pino Vice-Chancellor, to lead a 
review on the University’s pol- 
icy on continuing education. 

Dr Alan Betts is re-appointed 
Deputy Vice-Chancellor respon- 
sible for communications 
technology. • 

Dr Bruce MacGfllivray and Sir 
David Innes Williams arc re- 
appointed Pro Vice-Chancellors 
responsible for medicine and 
dentistry and bioligical sciences 
respectively. All are effective 
from September I. 

Suderfud Polytechnic 
Dr Mi chad John O’Carroll, who 
was professor and head of 
Teesside Polytechnic's dep 
mem of mathematics and sci- 
ence, has taken up his 
appointment as Pro-Rector. 


Mr George Rain bird, a well- 
known figure in the publishing 
world, who founded his own 
firm and later became a 
director of Thomson Publica- 
tions. died on August 20. He 
was 81. 

George Meadus Rainbird 
was born on May 22, 1905, in 
London. He started work at 
Carnages, in Hotborn. and in 
his twenties was sent to revive 
a Gamages-owned store in 
Cheltenham. During the war 
he worked in the West 
Bromwich engineering firm of 
Brockhouse. so impressing the 
firm's advertising agents that 
they asked him to open an 
office in London. 

Naturally enthusiastic, he 
was a compelling salesman; 
and be began lo commission 
books (one from Compton 
Mackenzie) for his clients, 
who soon included many im- 
portant firms. In 1951, he 
produced a successful series of 

g iidebooks for the Festival of 
rilain. This decided him to 
enter publishing, with Ruari 
McLean, his art director, as 
partner. On a combined capi- 
tal of £600, and with an order 
for two books from Collins, 
Rainbird, McLean Ltd, was 
set up. 

After a few years, with some 
money in the bank, the part- 
ners decided they could pub- 
lish for themselves, and set up 
George Rainbird Limited for 
(his purpose. Among their 
books were a limited edition 


of Joyce Cary's The Worse’s 
Mouth , with illustrations by 
the author, and the first book 
of drawings by Augustus John 
ever published. None was a 
financial success, and the firm 
reverted to having its ideas 
winnowed and marketed by 
others. 

After about ten years 
(McLean left the firm in 1958) 
Rainbird began lo expand into 
international markets. The 
first success was Tutankha- 
men in 1963. Remembering 
the Caemavon/Coster discov- 
eries in 1921, he realized that 
the Egyptian government had 
never allowed the treasures to 
be photographed in colour by 
modern methods; and in-F. L 
Kenett he had the man to do 
it 

After some adventures, and 
the full deployment of 
Rambinfs formidable charm 
and drive, the project was 
accomplished. The book sold 
over a million copies in many 
languages and established the 
firm once and for all as serious 
publishers: another result was 
that the treasures themselves 
were brought for exhibition at 
the British Museum. 

His next big success came 
when he saw how to publish 
the Reverend W. Keble 
Mania’s Concise British Flora 
in Colour (1965) after it had 
been turned down by seven 
leading publishers. He also 
commissioned a number of 
Nancy Milford's later best- 
sellers. 


Rainbird had vision, allied 
to a genuine love of books. His 
culture, if not wide, was 
deeply his own. not swayed by 
convention or snobbery. He 
was generous, and never for- 
got his friends. 

Like other builders of busi- 
nesses, he subordinated every- 
thing to his work. His greatest 
interest outside books was 
wine. He became a close 
friend of Andre Simon, and 
succeeded him as chairman of 
the International Wine and 
Food Society. 

Rainbird was himself the 
author, with Ronald Searie. of 
A Pocket Book ofH ine{ 1 963), 
reprinted in 1973 as The 
Subtle Alchemist; Sherry and 
the JVines of Spain ( 1 966); An 
Illustrated Guide to nine 
( 1 983): and An Autobiographi- 
cal Bibliography ( 1 985). 

In 1965, a majority interest 
in bis firm was sold to Lord 
Thomson of Fleet, who later 
bought tbe whole of the capi- 
tal. In 1970, Rainbird became 
chairman of all Thomson 
Book Publishing interests, a 
position from which he finally 
retired in 1982. 

He was thrice married. 
From his first marriage, to Eva 
Warner, there was a son and 
two daughters; from his sec- 
ond. to Joyce Trindcr. two 
sons and a daughter. He is 
survived by his third wife, 
Lena, whom he married in 
1972. 


THE VERY REV SAMUEL CROOKS 


Oa August 20Th. a) Bextiffl- 

ofeSea. after a long and painful 

llfatese. Teresa Mary Emilia, aged SO. 

much loved wife of Bernard Neswn 

sod mother of Pets- Nettsoo ifamter- 

ly Natiafaet). Funeral enquiries to 

Mtiramery F.O.. BexMti. 0424 
210418. Family oowera only. 
PARSONS - On 21* August 1986. 
peacefully at her home. Little 
GUtiooa. Ouxiey Graen. shortly after 

her lOtthfarOwfay. Atice Esmeralda. 

youngest child of second Baron O’ 

NeUL widow of John ft 

Funeral Service, 
raoietorhau. Ruhttp. 

Wednesday. August 27m. « S.ifiora. 

FerOtty dowers only Bhiore hut tf 

desired, do na tions lo The Royal 

Society FOr The Protection of BlnK. 

SCOTT, MONTAGU DOUGLAS - On 

August 22nd. far David Moaiagu 

Douglas Soon. K.CJH.G.. O.B£_ 

husband of Valerie. pracefUBy al 

hone in Ids lOOtfa year, cremation 

Private. No Memorial Service at Ms 

own wish. No flowers please, fact do- 

nations to ihe Northamptons hi r e 
Association of Youth Clubs. 
H ere wa r d Wake House. Northamp- 
ton. would be most gratefully 
received. 

T A I ROT On August 21 si. Richard 

aged 79. For S3 years dearly loved 

hoetaand of Shtett. Funeral private. 

Service later ai fa Barthoieniews. 

Rogato. on Friday Sett 12th at 

■XOO.pm. if wished dona ti o n s in ay be 

sent to La Court Cheshire Home. 
Lias. Ham. 

OMON - On August 200 l peacefully 

at Fowey. George Roy. aged 83 

years. Funeral private. 

YOUMB Patricia Edith Am of 370. 

KatfMey Road. Cambridge and Leo 

on SefenL Died al her homo, on 

Wednesday 20th August 1986. after 

■ long illness mart bravely norm. 

Donations if desired may be sent to 

Si Thomas’ Renal Association, fa 

Thomas’ HosMUL London. 


Services tomorrow 

Thirteenth Sunday 
after Trinity 


ST 

8.30 HO 11 
Service, ihe 




8 tfCr 

9.30 M: 11 Sunq euch. MteM Brevis 
(Jordan). Ego sum pants vtvus (Pate' 

the Rev A M AOcfiln: 3-I6 E, 
Sea (Rose). GoUesUuui Reotfe 

YORK MfeSTORl 8. 8.46 HC: 10.10 
Sung Each. VU aO l morwi nesh keep 
silence fBatrstow), the Rev Ian Enecy; ■ 

11.30 M OretandfcfE (BatstowL O 
what uieb- war (Harris). Ctenoo John 
Troy. 

ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL: 8. 11-30 
HC. MSh Ben Atnfltrlt altera 
(Lassos). O quam gkn-tosum (Victoria): 
lO SO M. Juttiate and Te _ 

Rev R J C Otartras: 3.15 E l 
O give inanfcs (Purcell). 

11 AO 


= jtp»_ ab bey; a. _ 

HC: 10-30 M. TW Spiritual Houm 
< Brack] ess). John Farrann 3 E OUctt- 

slSLS'fS! 

raj* W Hfy A W_b oTuWit oJ O 

me Rev Davtd CampbeO. 
JTHWARlt CATHEDRAL: 9 HC: 
1 1 Sung Fi l ch . Fantasia in fear parte 
(Gibbons). Kync Eleison 
(Ctovlenjbung) Bach. AUabrevo 
( Bach), c anon J ohn Hind: 3 EL 
WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL: 7. 


ST JAMES'S. PfccadlBy. WI: 8.30 
HC 11 sung EuchTeEP. 

ST LUKES. Chrisea. Swj: a 11.20 
HC. CSfatham to D>. Almighty I 
nwraftll Cod (Goss): 10-30 Mott 

Prayer. Dss s w»i«m: 6 jo E. no 

rneTaus the nighi (DreseX me Rev D R 

ST MARCAflET-S. Westminster, 
swi: 8.16. 12.18 HC: ii M. Canon 
Tremor Bees on. 

ST MAHTIN-BM.THE-F1E1-DS. WC2: 
ap.as HC. Uie vicar. 1130 Morn 



mar us atmsruz 


9. 12. 5.30. 7 

ST GEORGES 

work s. > 0 . 1 



. _ 1030 SM: 3JO\. 

CATHEDRAL- South- 

18. 6 LM: 1 1 HM. Dm 


Stodan. 

CHAPEL. WelUnston Bar- 
1: 11 M. Ihe CMfati: 12 


(RAF Church} 
~ 11. M o snl n g 


MWUIIW 

ftwr. Te Drum (Wee! 

(Stdwem. Fair* ia the heaven (Harm 
me Rev R N KmwaW. 

A1X HALLOWS BY THE TOWER: IX 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 

FtRTQH - a Memo ria l Service far 
Baron Fuitoo of Fafaner. win be heW 
« the Meeting House. Unlversny of 
Sussex, on 240i October. 1986 l ai 
5.00 pm. 

IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 

CAVSTM. Herald Edwtai. MA_ OAE. 
Who died on May 8th. 1982. 
Remembered «4Ui enduring have es- 
pecially on (Ms, his birthday. August 
24th. CatMoen. Claries and Hay. 
KEAN, watiace - Died August 23rd, 
1982. Darting hutiand of EsOier. 

Never more lhan a tbWKfet aw«y; » 

mirefanting pfaf. Loved father o £ Ms 
sons. Jonathon and Oebam. and 
brother Herbert. 

STACPOOLE. Edmond PaUiUr. CAE. 
1902-1980. Treasured, chenehed 
and everiortng me m o ries of my dear 
and devoted nufaand Enid. 


_ (Victoria). Hie Rev j & w 

- 6 E and 8 (Harwood In aj. 

How 'beauteous are tbe feet (Stanford), 
the Vicar. 

ALL SOULS, iangham Pttce. wi: 
9 SO HC: 1 1 . Uto Rev Jofui $t«t 6-30. 
ihe Rev Ian Bentley. _ 
CHELSEA OLD CHURCH. Old 
Church Street SWI SL 12 HC: II M. 
J H L cram: 6 E. David 

CHRKT CHURCH. CHELSEA SW3: 
8 HC 11 Morning Prayer and HC. 
Preo H Loasby. 

GROSVENOR CHAPEL. South 
AudJg farart II Sung Euch. tha Rev 

’ TRINITY. Bronuxoo Read. 

m/sj tgjfoVsuiB 

HOLY TRtNrev^ PTO« canon 
the Rav Oswald 


PAULS: W: 8 . 9 
HC: _} 1 Solemn Euch. the -Rev Bob 

STPlTi tRS. Eaton Square. SWI; 
B .15 HC iio FaroBy Maos 11 Solemn 
, O Guam Gferiosum r 


itaassss^ 

Rev R austin. 

ST SIMON ZELOTES. Milner Short. 

sw a a. 7 -OE HC: 11 M: 6.30 E. 

ST STEPHEN’S. CtoucesW Road. 
SWT: ,8. 9 LM: II HM. ktuo 
Paschaas (LmuA. the Rev Graham 
Morgan: 6 Solemn Evensong an 
Bene dicti on, the Rev Perry Butler. 
ST VEX) AST. Foster Lane. EC* 11 
Euch. Mesae Bame (FOure). 
ue de Jean Racine (favA. 
LUMBA-S CHURCH OF SCCTT- 

Pont Street SWI: II. the R«v 

D Hugh DavMfan: 6J0. the Rev John 

A30. D tiw 0 R^foatnrth Glfugitien - ' 
THE ASSUMPTON. Warwlciifarert. 
WI: 0. 10. 12. A & LM; 1 1 SM. Mian 
p quam gtortosum (Vinoria). Caudent 
In cod Is (VUloriai. O quam gHcmum 

'Krm*StREET. WI: 7-30. 830. IQ. 
12.15. 4.16. 6.15 LM: 11 HM. Mlm 
ad modum nmoe. Centate Donuno roe 
Klerk). Regts regum rectiartme (Bril- 

TK£ ORATORY. _ BroOTWoJI Read. 
SWT: 7. 8. 9. 10. 12.3a *30. 7 LM: 
II HM. Mass to itio tempoK (Monte- 
verdll. AveVtrgo tOuerreror. 330 V. 


r ery Re 

Crooks, OBE, who devoted 
his 15 years as Dean of St 
Anne's Cathedral, Belfast, to 
raising over £1 million for its 
restoration, died in z motor 
accident on August 21. He was 
66. 

Wrapped in his Canterbury 
cloak and wearing his Balacla- 
va, the "black Santa" was also 
to be seen every year outside 
his cathedral for the ten days 
before Christmas braving tbe 
weather to raise many thou- 
sands of pounds for local 
charities. 

Samuel Bennett Crooks was 
born at Killough, County 
Down, on January 20, J920, 
and educated at Down High 
School Downpatrick, and 
Trinity College, Dublin. He 
was ordained in 1943 and- 
went as a curate to St Anne's, 
where on and off he was to 
spend most of his 42-year 
ministry. 

He was soon appointed 
Dean's Vicar and, four years 
later. Vicar ChoraL In 1949, 




HOLY TRINITY. Sokdo Street. SWI: 
8.3 0- 12-10 HC: 10.30 Em*. Cocoa 

ST ALBAJOS. Bfeolte SL £Cl: 9 JO 
SM. 11 HM. Jusmorpew (HaydIU. 
Jew. the very though! tBairflow), H 

Holwfll: 3.30 LM _ 

ST BARTHOLOMEW THE GREAT. 
SmttnfieKL EGA 9 HC: II M. the 
Rw fari 630 E. the Rec tor- . 

ST BKTDETS. Ftert Street. ECO: U M 
and Eurft. BeacdKtus (Soldi, the Rev 
Percy. Coleman: 630 E. (he new 

PM»eaehGonfeti> 
SW8: lOHC 11 Sung Euch (Harwood 

in AL ADeMa. (OStKLHWI dheiputi 

(Byrd), the Rev Joan Vine: 6 E and 

Benediction 


QbavH res (Byrd). 

ST ETHELOTEDA’S. 

SM. Meese du ptoux ... 

(Marc de Ramo. Laudato 
Pomlmun (Ftoranl Sehmitu. 
AMERICAN CHURCH IN LONDON. 
wi: H. the Rev Ron F AuSanT^ 
cny ^TEMPLE. Hotbom, Ed: 11. 

htowerofl: 6.30. the Rev Stoarl 
KE^^GTON UPC. 

Wfcll. 6 l3D. Dt K 

REGENT SQUARE I 

URC. TavSock Place, wci: 11. me 
Bet Mr* C Morgan. 

ST JOHJVTS WOOD UBC. NWA; O.m 

ihe ftec John Mi 

WESLFV^C^g. Ca^ROM. EC2: 

WE^MnJSTCR CHAPEL. Bucktog- 
hom Gate. SWI: 1 1. 63a Die Rev Jon 
Bush. 


Pueri 


Allen fared. 
Sack. 


Thad Jones, Amencan jazz 
trumpeter and composer, died 
in Copenhagen-on August 20. 
He was 63. 

After coming to prominence 
during his lengthy tenure as a 
featured soloist with Count 
Basie's orchestra in the 1950s 
and early J 960s, Jones collab- 
orated with the drummer Mel 
Lewis in tbe foundation of a 
big band which began with a 
regular Monday booking at 
the Village Vanguard club in 
New Yoit 

The jointly-led band proved 
to be of outstanding quality 
and lasted for 13 yearn, per- 
forming in concert halls and at 
jazz festivals all over the 
-world, until Jones left the 
United States in 1978 to make, 
his home in Denmark. 

Bom in 1923, at Pontiac, 
Michigan, Thaddeus Joseph 


he moved to St John's, 
Lagan bank and Orangefteld, 
where the present handsome 
church building was erected 
during his incumbency. In 
1963, he became Rector of 
ShanJdll, Lurgan, and while 
there was appointed Archdea- 
con of Dromore. 

He returned to St Anne's in 
1970 as Dean and Vicar of 
Belfest and set his bean on 
completing the cathedral's res- 
toration. Fund-raising pro- 
gressed apace and, after just 
four years, the south transept 
was completed and dedicated 
as a chapel of unity, while the 
organ was rebuilt and placed 
in a recess above the chapeL 

Crooks worked tirelessly at 
raising money, often in the 
most ingenious ways. Once, 
on his return from holiday, he 
announced that he was off on 
a "golfing expedition". It was 
an expedition that took him to 
every golf club in the province 
winning promises of spon- 
sored tournaments at some of 
which he himself acted as a 
caddy. 

THAD JONES 

Jones look up the trumpet at 
the age of 13. An older 
brother. Hank, was an accom- 
plished pianist, while a youn- 
ger, Elvin, became a 
drummer. Each served a mu- 
sical apprenticeship in Detroit 
before going on to achieve 
international renown. 

After service with US Army 
bands in the Second World 
War, Jones arrived in New 
York in the early 1950s. His 
gifts were quickly recognized 
by Charles Mingus, who en- 
rolled him in his 'experimental 
Jazz Workshop band. Later in 
the decade, Jones proved to be 
among the handful of impro- 
visers capable of understand- 
ing the idiosyncratic 
compositions of Theionious 
Monk, and his recordings with 
the pianist's quintet and big 
band remain among the finest 
work of both men. 


His labours bore fruit by 
June,- 1981, with the comple- 
tion of the cathedral, the 
consecration of the north tran- 
sept, and the dedication of the 
Royal Irish Rangers* ChapeL 
He was appointed OBE and 
retired in September of last 
year. 

Samuel Crooks was the 
essence of good company and 
one never met him with a 
frown. He was a big man in 
every way, and, in a torn land, 
his fearless faith drove him 
onwards in his reconciling 
endeavours, earning him hon- 
est respect from the many and 
the inevitable verbal ’barb- 
from the few. 

The epithet “The people's 
dean” was richly deserved, for 
he made St Anne's a cathedra] 
for all the people of Belfast, 
and his constant witness lo the 
love of God drew through its 
doors many who had no active 
connection with the church. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Isabel, whom he married in 
1935, a son and a daughter. 


Meanwhile, however, his 
successful induction into the 
Basie organization had re- 
newed an association with big 
bands which was to persist for 
foe rest of his life, his leader- 
ship duties with the Jones- 
Lewis orchestra and 
subsequently with foe Danish 
Radio Big Band further ob- 
scuring justifiable claims on 
lus behalf to a standing along- 
side the finest trumpeters of 
his generation. 

Following Count Basie's 
death in 1 984, Jones took over 
his former employer's band 
until illness halted his activi- 
ties in May of this year. As a 
composer, his legacy includes 
a ballad entitled “A Child is 
Born”, which has entered the 
standard repertoire of modem 
jazz. • 















- _ Ec 


;B 


;.c 


! Cl 


:: Th 
<*» 
• . coi 


•- bi 
tC 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 



Motor racing ‘round the houses 9 at 180 mph 


By Craig Seton 


The sound of church organs 
will give way to a crescendo of 
noise from supercharged rac- 
ing cars in large area of 
Birmingham 1 early tomorrow 
morning when the first “round 
the houses" motor racing on 
public roads in Britain begins 
in the city. 

About 35,000 tickets have 
been sold for the two-day Bank 
holiday event, but police and 
organizers believe that np to 
150.000 spectators could 
crowd into the city to watch 
high speed racing over a 2J5 
mSedimit 

The Super Prix is a £1.5 
million gamble by a city 
dogged by high unemployment 
sad manufacturing decline, 
but which is determined to 
forge a new image as a venue 
for international events, up to 
and including the Olympic 
Games. 

The Labour-controlled city 
council hopes that a successful 
Super Prix vriE give a boost to 
its bid to stage the 1992 
Olympics, against competition 
from five foreign cities. 

Organizers believe that the 
Super Prix circuit, on a route 
dose to the city centre, could 
see some of the fastest street 
racing in the world, involving 
speeds of up to 180mph during 
what they hope will become an 
annual event 

Eight miles of crash barriers 
and wire fences will protect 
spectators and booses along 
the route, where grandstands 
for 16,000 have been erected. 

Mr John Charlton, the 
chairman of the city's road 
race committee, said: “The 
Super Prix will be a spectacu- 
lar festival for the people of 
Birmingham. The race will 
bring all sorts of benefits in 
terms of finance for die local 
economy and tourism. It is 
very exciting." 

There has been opposition 
to the race from some res- 
idents who said their lives bad 
been severely disrupted by 
months of worii to erect crash 
barriers around the circuit 
Local church leaders have also 
cancelled some services tomor- 
row because they believe that 
the noise and congestion will 
make worship impossible 

The main event on Monday 
wifi be a 52-lap round of the 
European-based Formula 
3000 championship, one step 
down from Formula 1 Grand 
Prix racing, but there will be . 
about 20 events, including 
practices and qualifying heats, 
over the two days. 



Drunken 

airline 


passengers 

increasing 


import Editor 


Drunkenness among air 
passengers on charter Bights q 
" perceptibly increasing" Brit, 
ish Midland, one. of tfac 
country's top independent air- 
lines, said yesterday. ' 
it said lhaL passengers ufa 
appeared 10 be drunk would 
be refused entry to'£htnft; 


and anyone gelling drunk 
while in the aircraft risked 
being put off at the nearest 
airport. 

The warning came after a 
drunken brawl among youths 
from Northern IreMsd ou a 
BM charter flight fo Mahga 
last month, .' 

Two passengers wens In- 
jured and two youths arrested 
during the night flight -fom 
Belfast . '. 

The airline refused to allow 
the youths back on -to the 
plane for the return fligbL An 
official of; Aer Lirigus; Holi- 
days. which had chanettdihe 
flight had to fly to Malaga to 
accompany the flight Spanish 
police held the. youths until 
help arrived, but ho charge* 
were made. 

Mr Ken Smyth, Aer Lingus 
Holidays Northern Ireland 
manager, said yesterday he 
was in favour of banning 
drunks who were a “serious 
problem”. 


The twists, turns and straights of tire Birmingham Super Prix course, with the shape of racing cars gene by (left) and one of today's Formula 3000 cars (right). 


1960s dream becomes 52-lap reality 


By John Blonsden 


There .is nothing new In 
street racing, only street rac- 
ing in Britain, and it has taken 
an Act of Parliament to make 
h possible. 

In November 1984, the Lord 
Mayor of Birmingham pre- 
sented a Birmingham Road 
Race Bill in which permission 
was sought to dose the dty 
streets for racing on two days a 
year. 

The Act received Royal 
Assent last October, and the 
outcome is a two-day pro- 
gramme of racing tomorrow 
and Monday, staged by die 
British Racing and Sport Car 
Clnb, and sanctioned by the 
RAC Motor Sports Associ- 
ation. The main event, on 
Monday afternoon, is the 
Halfords Super Prix, a 52-lap 
contest for Formula 3,000 
single-seater racing cars. 


Having achieved 

overwhelming support in a 
local referendum, the Bir- 
mingham City Council ha* 
backed the project with enthu- 
siasm. 

The original concept of stag- 
ing street racing in Bir- 
mfnghani dates back to I960, 
inspired by a group of racing 
enthusiasts and entrepreneurs 
headed by Martin Hone. 

They failed, hot staged “on 
the street" parades of racing 
cars through the city as a “first 
alternative” in the late 1970s 
and early 1980s. It was the 
enthusiastic public response 
which laid the groundwork for 
a renewed ana successful ef- 
fort to torn Birmingham into a 
fully-fledged racing venue. 

The roughly L-shaped 2J»- 
mile circuit takes in port of 
Birmingham's excellent net- 
work id dual carriageway 


roads and link roads. Its 
combination of I80mph 
straights and tight corners wilJ 
almost certainly make it the 
fastest of the world's street 
circuits, with an anticipated 
average lap speed well in 
excess of lOOmpb for formula 
3.000 cars. 

These cars represent the 
final stepping stone for drivers 
aspiring to a Formula One 
grand prix career at world 
championship level, and are in 
effect slightly detuned ver- 
sions of the Ford Cosworth- 
powered three fide cars which 
dominated the Formula One 
grand prix scene for many 
years until the emergence of 
the latest turbo-charged cars. 

Although born in this ooun- . 
try, Formula 3,000 has become 
a truly international contest 
However, the vast majority of 
tiie cars — mainly March, Halt 


and Lola — are of British 
manufacture, as of course are 
their Ford Cosworth engines, 
while under the F3.000 regula- 
tions all the cars are required 
to race on British Avon tyres. 


Union’s legal threat to 
Royal Dockyards sale 


“I have actually seen people 
being carried on board be- 
cause they were not in a 
positions make it undertheir 
own steam ” be said.“Dnmks 
on board an aircraft cannot 
look after themsd vet and if 
there is an emergency tbapmj 
other passengers at ride.” ■ \ 
Under various civil -avi- 
ation Acts, the captain of ah 
aircraft has power to acceptor 
refuse a passenger, or- take 
steps to remove on&cattsTng a 
nuisance. 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


On each day, an intense 10- 
bour programme of track 
events will begin at 9am, with 
tomorrow devoted mainly to 
practice and qualifying, plus 
two beats of a Formula Shell 
Thundersports Trophy race, 
and Monday involving races 
for Thundersports, Formula 
Ford 1600. Formnle Libre and 
Renault 5 Turbo cars, the 
latter including an entry by 
former twice world champion 
Sir Jack Brabham, who has 
business interests in the Mid- 
lands and is anxious to have 
his name linked to what is seen 
to be a most enlightened 
breakthrough in the evolution 
of motor sport in Britain. 


Union members employed 
at the Royal Dockyards at 
Devonport and Forsyth have 
a right m law to participate in 
choosing the new owner, 
according to Lord Denning, 
former Master of the Roils. 

In a confidential document 
sent to Lord Trefgame, Min- 
ister of State for Defence 
Procurement, Lord Denning 
wrote of possible new legal 
obstacles to a scheme to force 
through the privatization of 
the dockyards by next April. 

Lord Denning hastold Lord 
Trefgame that the 18 unions 
involved have a legal right to 
participate in choosing the 
new owner of the yard. 

Strong union opposition to 
the sale is likely to impede the 
privatization timetable and 


could wreck the scheme. 

Lord Denning said that if 
the Government insists on 
going ahead, as it apparently 
intends, the unions would be 
entitled to challenge its action 
in the High Court 

He argued in the 26-page 
document, a copy of which 
was passed to 77ie Times, that 
to slay within the law the 
Government must first seek 
the unions* views on the 
management options and the 
merits of all the bids. 

The Ministry of Defence is 
iti the final stages of receiving 
bids to take over the yards and 
hopes to announce the winner 
at the end of November, with 
the transfer to commercial 
management being completed 
by April 6 next year. 


- British Airways said, yes- 
terday that passenger 
drunkeness was a problem but 
it did not believe it was 
increasing. Captains yttpefoi- 
pected to -act firmly against 
drunks for tfe.protec&uaof 
other passengers, BA sfidL .. 

Britannia, Britain's biggest 
charter airline, said if had no 
evidence of increasing 
drunkenness, but continued to 
take a strong line where it 
occurred. . 



THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solution to Pnmie n« 17,12$ Soionoo io Pnzzie No 17,131 I Today’s events I In the garden 


O □ Q D J 0 □ H 

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□ □ □ h a a H a 
iTCiEnnas iaciooaaa 
ODD □ □ a 

uaEnnana ask-iaa 
a am a a 
iianawi ftnaa^rana 

□ an ana 

.jra.-nam ijaanaaa 


a £ bi 

□ ns Lsnannanca 

k-iSHQ n □ a on 

h ynsonansynsQ 

□ □□□go n 
Moraans fjaaanaan 

si p ci □ a □ 
rjuasnan aananyH 

□ □ ti a n a 

Msonaann iynenaa 

□ 0 a n n 0 q 


Roads 


I Royal engagements 
Princess Margaret visits the 
Taste of Moray’, Brodie Castle, 
Morayshire. 12.15; later, visits 
Elgin Museum, Morayshire, 
3. 15. 


Saving seeds of many plants 


Weather 


in your garden is quite worth- 
while. Many will breed true, or 


^n^annaBncip a 

.iinonannsaHnaanaa a □ □ □ □ iisoa 

tjjranag ^BBanraqaia b h asgaasHn 


The Times Crossword Pnzzie No 17,132 

A prize of The Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
co ™*t solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times, Saturday Crossword 
Competition PO Box 486. J Virginia Street, London, El 9XN. 
/ he winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday’s competition are: Mr A J 
Den mark, Hewitts, Henfield W Sussex: Mrs N L Muirs, 
Prospect Rd. Bangor Co Down; Mr E J Barnett, Cedar Drive, 
Hatch End. Pinner. Middlesex. 


The winners ofcompetition No 17.120 (August 16) shouldfaive 
included J H Toms, Station Road, Marlow, Bucks. 


New exhibitions 
Prisoners’ Art, South Tran- 
sept. St Paul's Cathedral, EC4; 
Mon to Sat 10 to 4.30 (ends Sept 

Mnsic 

Jazz by the Clark Tracey 
Quintet, Purcell Room, South 
Bank, SE1. 8. 

Concert by the City of Lon- 
don Wind Ensemble, Kenwood 
Concert Bowl, Hampstead 
Lane. NW3, 8. 

Talks, lectures and 
films 

Heartbeat of a Volcano: 
Succession on Lava (film); Geo- 
logical Museum, SW7, 230. 

: Titian: the early works, by 
Felicity WoolC National Gal- 
lery, Trafalgar Sq, 12. 

General 


while. Many will breed true, or 
reasonably true — peas and 
beans for example, also onions 
or leeks. If you wish to save bean 
seeds, mark one or two good 
plants and let all the pods npen. 
Don't just leave it to the end of 
the summer and pick a few 
undersized pqds. Mark one or 
two outstanding onion or leek 
plants and leave these in the 


ground to flower next year. 
Sweet peas, many herbaceous 


Sweet peas, many herbaceous 
plants like oriental poppies. 
lupins, delphiniums, phloxes 


and, of course, lilies, are all well 
worth saving for seed. 


Railway Extravaganza. Sou- 
thall Railway Centre, Merrick 
Rd. Southall, Middx, today II 
to 6, tomorrow 1030 to 6, Mon 
1 1 to 6. 

National Waterways Festival: 
celebration of the heritage and 
ecology of canals and rivers, 
gathering of 400 boats and 
entertainments, Boston Manor 
Park. Brentford. Middx, today 
until Mon 1030 to 530.0 


worth saying for seed. 

Some lilies produce buIbOs — 
tiny bulbs in the axil of the 
leaves - which should be gath- 
ered now and sown in boxes of a 
seed compost and kept in a cold 
frame all winter. 

Female plants in asparagus 
beds may be carrying their 
berries now. Remove them be- 
cause if the seeds fall and grow, 
the resulting plants may be very 
mixed with mostly thin, mis- 
erable stems. Finish trimming 
hedges; beech and hornbeam 
hedges trimmed late will keep 
their brown leaves throughout 
the winter. 


Gardens open 


Tomorrow’s events 


■ ■ m u 


ACROSS 
1 Visitor, say, thought in 
American way f7). 

5 Supplier of TV programmes 

io South or England(7). 

9 Missouri-style mission in 
another state (5). 

10 Rural justice, to ruler, is less 
profound (9). 

11 Order the cad to break off 
tile engagement (6). 

12 Polly's fragments (8). 

14 Languish, perhaps, in an- 
cient kingdom (5). 

15 Times leader twice seen 
reforming state (9). 

18 Accident in which 100 ma- 
chines crash (9). 

20 Intimidated firm to form 
union (5). 

22 Instruments for a number of 

sailors (8>. 

24 l uggage returned to a place 
in Greece (6). 

26 Still produced stuff and 
nonsense (9). 

27 I am a success as a six-foot 
grown-up (5). 

28 Return to seat after dance 
etc. changed (2-5). 

29 Observe warship from the 
Lizard (7). 


The Duchess of Kent Patron, 
The National Society for Cancer 
Relief, attends a country fair, 
Floors Castle. Kelso, 
Roxburgshire, 1230 


Last chance to see 

Wendy Bosanquet, Karen 
Massarik, Carol Johnson and 
Philip Stanbrkfge: paintings and 
pottery. Wood Wharf Art Gal- 
lery, 28-30 Horsefeiry Rd, SE10; 
12 to 6. 

2 1 8th Annual Summer Ex- 
hibition, Royal Academy of 
Ana, Piccadilly; 10 to 6 


DOWN 

1 Top contract right in Savoy 
hit (5.4). 

2 Insisted upon nice editor 
(7). 

3 Laggard's stupid instructor 
(9). 

4 Reader's support for edi- 
torial section (4). 

5 A daring fellow, the Profes- 
sor (10>. 

6 Scarlet woman from 5 dn 
(5). 

7 Such novelty comes to noth- 
ing if it's pointless (7). 

8 Exaltation produced by es- 
capades (5). 

13 Observer's position is to 
hold firm on feature (10. 

16 Adverse criticism? Not as a 
rule (9). 

17 Culminate always m sound 

• effort (9). 


Mnsic 

Organ recital by Nicolas 
Duncan, Westminster Cathe- 
dral. SWl, 230. 

Music by Slap Jazz, Riverside 
Studios. Crisp Rd. W6, 12. 

Concert by the Phtiharmonia 
Orchestra, Crystal Palace Con- 
cert Bowl, SEI9. 8. 

Recital by Katherine 
Stanifbnh (cello) and Meredith 
White (piano). St Giles 
Cripptegaie. Fore St, EC2. 4. 

Recital by Jane Davidson 
(soprano). Burgh House. New 
End Lane, NW3, 3. 



The pound 


Anniversaries 


Births: Sir Astky Comer, 
surgeon. Brooke Hall, Norfolk. 
1768; Georges, Baron Order, 
zoologist and statesman. 
MombelianL 1769; WH tiara Er- 
nest Henley, poet and critic. 
Gloucester. 1849; Edgar Lee 
Masters, writer, Garneu, Kan- 
sas. 1869; Sir Haary Tizard. 
scientist. Gillingham. Kent. 
1885. 

Deaths: Sir William Wallace, 
Scottish patriot, executed, Lon- 
don. 1305: Charles Augustin de 

l -I. - r* ■ « AA/. 


19 He was shown Christmas 
present duriog visitation (7). 

21 Justify bellicose tirade (7). 

22 Flier’s com piece circuit of 
field in the US (5). 

23 Suck to beat soundly (5). 

25 Sunny smile in summer, for 

example (4). 



Jumbo Crossword, page 13 


Coulomb, physicist, Paris, 1806; 
Rudolph Valentino. New York 


Rudolph Valentino. New York 
City. 1926. 


TugewvMDor 

Rates far smafl de no m ina tro n ban* notes 
only aa auppfiod by Bardayo Bonk PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other rareipi currency 
business. 

Ratal Price Index; 384.7. 

Leaden The ft index closed up *2 at 
izni 

The Dow Jones rawew average dosed 

up (LSI «t 1,887.80. . 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


17 

SPORT 27 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 31 


SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Reel 


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STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1271.2 (+4.2} 

FT-SE100 

1607.1 (+0.3) 

Bargains 

20846 

USM (Datastream) 

125.5 (+0.11) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 

1.4900 (-0.0055) 

W German marie 
3.0426 (-0.0142) 

Trade- weighted 

71.3 (-0.4) 




CYCLING 


ours rivals fi 
jettison Hina 


-- r'oPaLG 


Coalite bid 
deferred 

Tbe Coalite Group is to 
defer posting its offer docu- 
ment for Hargreaves until the 
European Economic Commis- 
sion has considered the pro- 
posed merger. 

The acquisition, involving 
two companies with coal in- 
terests. may require authoriza- 
tion under the Treaty of Paris 
because of European Coal and 
Steel Community rules. But 
Coalite says the offer docu- 
ment will be posted by 
September 3 whatever the 
decision. 

A Hargreaves spokesman 
said it had received a number 
of approaches since Coalite 
launched its £81 million bid 
last month, but these could 
not proceed until the Coalite 
offer document was 
despatched. 

Ratio eased 

Tbe Bank of England an- 
nounced yesterday that the 
cash deposit ratio for banks 
will be reduced from 0.S per 
cent to 0.45 cent of eligible 
liabilities from October. This 
is because of the proposed 
change from mid-month to 
end-month statistical 
reporting. 

Sirdar buy 

Sirdar has bought all the 
issued share, capital of 
Eversure Textiles, a manufec- 
turer of ready-made curtains, 
for an initial £6 to3Eon east 4 
A- further payment may be 
made depending on future 
profits. .. 


Kr - f * 


• 

- H.. ’ 

-» 

.i--"' *f.V 


• ' ‘ ‘ 

• • - r 


"... t. 

’ ,_-.r 


5 95.6% say yes 

Higgs and HLtPs <3fer to 
acquire Southend Estates 
Group has been declared un- 
conditional. Acceptances have 
been received for 95.6 per cent 
- of the ordinary shares. 

Prime rate up 

The National Australia 
Bank will increase its bench- 
mark prime lending rate from 
18.25 to 18.5 per cent and its 
base lending rale from 17.5 to 
18 percent on Monday. 

Christy issue 

Christy Hunt plans to raise 
about £650.000 through a 
four-for-five rights issue of 
2.81 million shares at 25p 
each. 

Oldacre AGM 

Oldacre Holdings has post- 
poned its September 18 an- 
nual meeting because 
of Unigate's recommended 
takeover bid. 

Oyston’s bid 

Ovston Estate Agency has 
declared its bid for Midlands 
Marts wholly unconditional, 

Ruddle offer 

The offer by Grand Metro- 
politan for G Ruddle, the 
brewer, has been declared 
fully unconditional. 


. v i* 




of W L 

for 


Tempos 18 
WaQ Street 18 

Co News 18 

Comment 19 
Stock Market 19 
Money Mrfcts 19 


Foreign Excb 19 
Traded Opts 19 
Unit Trusts 20. 
Commodities 20 
USM Prices 20 
[Share Pres 21 


Guinness chief 
rewarded with 

£175,000 rise 


Mr Ernest Saunders, chief 
executive of- the Guinness 
drinks and consumer goods 
group, has been rewarded for 
Bis success in taking over the 
Distillers spirits company 
with extra pay likely to total 
£175,000 a year. 

Tbe increase is made up of 
£100,000 from Guinness it- 
self, making bis salary there 
£275.000, plus £75.000 a year 
in new and proposed contracts 
with subsidiaries of the group. 
His total payment from the 
three sources would then be 
about £350,000. 

The increases were revealed 
in an appendix to a circular 
from Guinness's president. 
Lord Iveagh, to shareholders 
yesterday. 

The circular explains -why 
the company abandoned pro- 
posals made during the 
Distillers takeover to set up a 
Joint supervisory board under 
the chairmanship of Sir 
Thomas Risk, Governor of 
the Bank of Scotland. 

The joint board would have 
overseen two separate operat- 
ing companies. However, 
Guinness now intends to 
establish a single board with- 
out Distillers representation, 
on which Mr Saunders will act 
as executive chairman. 

The circular shows Mr 
Saunders' salary increased 


By Richard Lander 
from £175,000 on May 1. In 
addition, on the .same day he 
entered into a contract worth 
S7 5,000 (£503001 a year with 
tbe Bermuda subsidiary of 
Arthur Bell, the whisky firm 
bought by Guinness last year. 

A further contract from 
Guinness America worth 
$37,500 (£25.000) a year, 
backdated to May I, is also 
proposed. 

The appendix also shows 
that Mr Victor Steel, who 
becomes managing director of 
the Guinness beverage group 
in the restructured company, 
had his salary increased bet 
monthby 50 per cent to 
£150,000. 

The circular's purpose is. to 
justify the controversial 
changes to the board structure 
before shareholders vote on 
them at an extraordinary 
meeting on September 1 1. 

Guinness says the changes 
were necessary because the 
situation at Distillers was far 
worse than it realized during 
the takeover battle against the 
Argyll group. 

It argues that the direction 
of Distillers' many operating 
companies was confused and 
ineffectual and that the com- 
pany had no effective con- 
sumer marketing structure m 
its vital overseas markets. 

The circular addsTIn view 


of what is now known, it has 
become apparent that the 
board structure proposed at 
the time of the offer was 
misconceived-, as it would 
have been too unwieldy and 
unresponsive to provide effec- 
tive direction and control-" 

The board says it was most 
reluctant to depart from state- 
ments made during the offer, 
but that it had legal advice 
that it had to fulfil its fiduciary 
duties to Guinness and its 
shareholders by considering 
what was in the company’s 
best interests at the time. 

Guinness said it had now 
drawn up detailed plans to 
restructure and rationalize 
Distillers’ operations and to 
create a "coherent inter- 
national marketing 

organization". 

The Stock Exchange 
stressed yesterday that 
Guinness had agreed to let 
shareholders vote on the elec- 
tion of each of the new non- 
executive directors following 
"extensive discussions with 
the Slock Exchange." 

In addition, Guinness had 
agreed that a three-quarters 
majority would be needed to 
dissolve or remove the powers 
of the non-executive commit- 
tee, which will be able to hire 
and fire the chairman and his 
deputy. Comment, page 19 


Opec to press Britain again 
for aid in forcing up prices 


By David Young, Energy Correspondent 


The Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries is 
planning to make new infor- 
mal approaches to Mr Pater 
Walker, the Energy Secrertary, 
to seek Britain's co-operation 
in hs efforts to send world oil 
prices back upwards. 

Mr Rilwani Lukman, the 

r.valfs'on 

minister. Sheikh AH Khalifa 
AJ Sabah, are coining to 
London-after the next schedr 
tiled meeting of Opec on 
October 6. 

Mr Lukman and Sbeiklr AH 
Khaliia have been the archi- 
tects of many of the recent 
Opec initiatives which have 
attempted to hold the 
organization together in the 
face of pressures put on each 


member country by the foiling 
oil price. 

While forma) talks at gov- 
emrnen Mo-gov eminent level 
on the issue of oil production 
levels have been ruled out by 
Whitehall, Mr Walker is pre- 
pared to welcome both min- 
isters for informal discussions. 

, The United States Energy... 
Secretary, - Mr ' John 
Herrington, -and the Norwe- 
gian Energy Minister. Mr 
Arne Oiea, will be in London 
at the same time and. will 
discuss the present world oil 
crisis with Mr Walker. 

: AD four foreign energy min- 
isters will be in Loudon for the 
annual Oil and Money Con- 
ference in October. 

Opec now accepts that Brit- 


ain is not going to change its 
policy and imerefere with 
company production sched- 
ules in the North Sea. How- 
ever, the oil producers* cartel 
would welcome any sign from 
Britain that it shares the same 
overall interest as Opec of 
raising oil revenues. 

•• Norway, which yesterday 
announced a 25 percent cut in 
the tax burden on oil com- 
panies operating in its sector 
of the North Sea, has said that 
it will decide by September I 
how h will co-operate with 
Opec 

Its tax reforms, designed to 
keep foreign oit companies 
interested in operating in 
Norwegian waters, will be 
implemented next year. 


C&W Walker 
to merge with 
Greenbank 

C&W Walker, the engineer- 
ing contractor which absorbed 
the private Multiple In- 
dustries in January, is to 
merge with Greenbank the 
engineering equipment group, 
byway of an agreed takeover 
oner valuing Greenbank at 
about £15.6 million. 

The combined group will be 
renamed Walker Greenbank 
and will be chaired by Sir 
Anthony Jolliffe, who joined 
tbe Walker board at the time 
of the Multiple deal. 
Greenbank's chief executive, 
Mr John Loveday, will as- 
sume the same role in tbe 
combined group- 

Greenbank estimates pre- 
tax profits lor the first half of 
this year at not less than 
£520,000 against £506,000. 
Walker forecast £600,000 for 
the period to August against 
£92,000 last year. 

' Walker is offering a 36-for- 
35 share swap, valuing 
Greenbank shares at 623p. 
Investors in Greenbank, can 
also accept Walker preference 
shares or via underwriting, 
57.6p cash. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


NewYwk 

Dow Jones 188730(+6.61) 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow — 1844131 (-23429) 
Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 1945.03 1+4.67) 

Am s ter dam : Gen 295.9 (-3.7) 

f.AO 1183.8 (+4.4) 

2091.0 (+223) 


Commerzbank 

Brussels: 

General 

Paris: CAC 

Zurich: 


865.07 


402.' 


:usa 


.325.60 (same) 


SKA General . 

London closing prices Page 21 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10 % 

3-morith Interbank 9 ,b i< 5 - 9 , 3 ib% 
3-monfl eligible bfllsi9 J <8-9%% 
buying rate . 

Prime Rate 8 % 

Federal Funds 554% 

3-montt> Treasury Bflte 537-5.36% 
30-year bonds 99X-99 u io 

CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: $1.4900 
£.- DM3.0426 
E SwFr2.4518 
E*. FFr9.9681 
£Yen228.49 
£: !nde*73,1 


New Yoric 
£$1.4840 
$: DM2.0415 
$: index: 1103 

ECU £0.686361 
SOR £0.807711 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 
Grand Mat 
Lucas 


ATCOlacrtrta'A’ 
Greenbank 
F&H Group 
United Packaging 
Wanders 
Samuetson 
Unigroup 
London 8. CorrL 



Consurtants Comp. 

FALLS: 

Christy Hunt 
Tav Homes 
Tl 

Fobet 

Burton Group 
Cable 4 Wireless — 
Stainless Metal 

Ayshira Metal 


GOLD 


London Fbdnff! 
AM $384.65 


257.00) 

New Yoric 

Comex $37330-37430 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Sept) „ $13,65 bbl . ($14.00) 
•Denotes latest trading pnee 


Shake-up at Flextech 
after profits fall 


By Richard Lander 

Flextech, the USM-quoted the whole 
energy investment company 
which has been badly hit by 
tbe slump in oil exploration 
activity, is to undergo a 
restructuring. This wifi in- 
clude a partial offer by an 
investment syndicate and a 
£1.7 million share placing 
with the same group of inves- 
tors. The company will also 
have a new brief to expand the 
scope of its portfolio. 

The shake-up was an- 
nounced at the same time as 
Flexlech’s results for the year 
to May 31, which showed a 
drop in pretax profits from 
£3J million to £2.1 million 
and an attributable loss of 
£877.000 after a £2 million 
provision against a foil in the 
value of investments. 

The new group of investors 
is led by Mr James Mayne, 
chairman of the Habit Pre- 
cision Engineering group. The 
Syndicate is making a partial 
offer for 2.7 million shares, or 
14.9 per cent of the present 
issued capital, at 55p a share. 

Irrevocable undertakings for 


offer have been 
received from seven institu- 
tions. but these will be scaled 
down if other investors want 
to accept. 

The syndicate mil then 
increase its stake to 27.7 per 
cent by buying 3.2 million new 
shares at 57p. Mr Mayne will 
become chairman while two 
other new investors, Mr 
Montague Koppel and Mr 
Roger Luard, wifi also join tbe 
board 

Flextech has minority 
stakes, in seven unquoted 
companies supplying services 
to the oil exploration industry, 
where activity has slowed 
dramatically in recent months 
because of the collapse of oil 
energy prices. 

The company does not in- 
tend to abandon the energy 
sector, but will look to invest 
funds in other areas such as 
retailing, distribution or other 
service industries. 

Flextech shares, which have 
fallen as low as 31p this year, 
rallied I3p to 63p yesterday. 



la London yesterday: Mr Paul Fox, managing director of YTV. right, and Sir Derek 
Palmar, chairman, alter announcing tbe issue price 

Yorkshire TV valued at £41m 


Investors will pay I25p a 
share to become shareholders 
in Yorkshire Television, 
maker of programmes such as 
Emmardale Farm, The Glory 
Boys, The Beiderbecke Affair 
and Hampton: The Secret 
Hospital . 

The offer-for-sale price was 
announced in the full prospec- 
tus published yesterday, valu- 
ing tbe company at £41.2 
million. 

Intermediaries acting Un- 
people living in Yorkshire will 
receive commissions from the 
company at the rate of 5 s per 
cent on successful applica- 
tions. 

The prospectus includes a 
profit forecast for tbe 12 
mouths to September 30 of not 
less than £8-25 million, which 


By Alexandra Jackson 

is higher than City, 
expectations. 

Earnings per share on this 
forecast, assuming "a 41 per 
cent tax charge, are 14.8p. The 
balance sheet at rite end of 
July contained £12^1 million of 
cash. 

A quarter of tbe equity or 
8-23 million shares is being 
made available to the public. 
The reasons given for the issue 
are to widen share ownership, 
particularly among employees 
and inhabitants of the York- 
shire region. No new shares 
are being issued under the 
offer for sale. 

The vendors providing the 
shares for the issue are York- 
shire Post Newspapers, which 
is disposing of its 10 per cent 
shareholding, and WH Smith, 


Bass and Pearson, which are 
reducing their various 
shareholdings to 21 per cent. 

Yorkshire Television is the 
last major televison company 
not to have its own quote or to 
be part of a quoted company. 
The market opened its arms 
wide to receive Thames Tele- 
vision and TV-am this year. 

Yorkshire Television holds 
the Independent Broadcasting 
Authority's contracts for the 
Yorkshire rejtioq which in- 
cludes 2.2 million homes. 

The company is an im- 
portant producer of television 
programmes for FTY. It also 
sells programmes overseas 
and has a growing involvement 
in the supply of programmes 
Tor cable and satellite 
distribution. 

Tempos, page 18 


Now Vimto 
invades 
the USA 

By Carol Ferguson 

Vimto is moving into Amer- 
ica — and the Inst production 
run was due off the canning 
line this week. 

. JN Nichols (Vimto k which 
reported Its interim results 
yesterday, is exporting the 
concentrated syrup of the soft- 
drink to a caimer in America, 
which formerly canned Vimto 
for re-export to Saudi Arabia 
before the Saudis decided to 
can it themselves. 

JN Nichols maintains that 
Vimto has at least one advan- 
tage over Coca-Cola, 
America's favourite drink: it is 
available as a cordial as well 
as in aerated form. 

But Coca-Cola need not 
worry that its position is being 
challenged in its own hack 
yard. It is far beyond the 
resources of this tiny Man- 
chester company to launch 
Vimto in a big way in the 
United States. 

Pretax profits for the six 
mouths to June 30 fell by 11 
per cent to £24? million on 
turnover up 14 per cent to £14 
million. Changes in the pat- 
terns of sales were the main 
reason, not only at home but 
also in principal markets 
overseas. 

The poor English summer is 
still affecting business, while 
the collapse in world oil prices 
appears to have imposed some 
restriction on consumer spend- 
ing in the Middle East, But 
sates in Africa are doing welL 

The statement accompany- 
ing tbe results is optimistic 
about 1986. Its new ac- 
quisitions, Independent Vend- 
ing Supplies and Cabana 
Holdings, are doing weD. 

The group has no debt and 
cash holdings and quoted 
investments worth £7.7 million 
at June 30 were little changed 
from the year-end. 

Tempos, page 18 


Extel resists Maxwell 
pressure to negotiate 


By Martin Baker 


The Extel Group yesterday 
rejected the possibility of talks 
to agree a negotiated offer for 
the company with Mr Robert 
Maxwell chairman of the 
British Printing & Commu- 
nication Corporation. 

ExleTs shareholders re- 
ceived a tetter from Mr Max- 
well pointing out that Betel's 
directors could ‘institute 
conversations” whenever they 
wished. 

The letter also criticized 
ExtePs proposed acquisition 
of Dealers' Digest, the Ameri- 
can financial services and 
publishing company, as ‘Very 
expensive”. 

Exiel. however, regards the 
proposed deal as “an exciting 
opponunity' as it is an estab- 
lished business in a key growth 
market.” 

The offer for Dealers’ Digest 
is central to Mr Maxwell's 
wish to buy Extel. MrMaxwell 
increased his shareholding in 
Extel to the permissible maxi- 


mum of 29.9 per cent earlier 
this week. 

Mr John Gillum, director of 
NM Rothschild, the merchant 
bank advising Mr Maxwell 
saidr'We wish to put maxi- 
mum pressure on the Extel 
board to negotiate." 

But Mr Alan Brooker, 
Extel's chairman, com- 
mented: “Mr Maxwell was 
told six months ago that we do 
not want to talk, and we still 
do not want to.” 

Extel’s proposed purchase 
must be sanctioned by a 
shareholders'' meeting next 
Friday. 

Mr Maxwell is unable to 
make an outright bid for Extel 
until next ApnL 

A year's ban on such an 
offer was imposed by the 
Takeover Panel after an ap- 
proach from Demerger 
Corporation was said to have 
been made in concert with Mr 
Maxwell. 


Pound falls 
to record 
low against 
the mark 

By David Smith 
Economics Correspondent 

The pound fell in London 
again yesterday, in spile of an 
extinguishing of hopes of an 
earh cut in base rates. Against 
the mark, it reached j record 
low. 

Mr Saio&hi Sumita. the 
Governor of ihe Bank of 
Japan, said the Japanese econ- 
omy did not need a discount 
raie cm in match Wednesday's 
reduction in the United States. 

Money market traders be- 
lieve that the greatest pressure 
for a base rate cut is on West 
Germany, with the mark 
showing' .strength against the 
pound and the dollar, and also 
within the E M S . 

The West German central 
bank's ipuncil meets next 
Thursday and some analysts 
expect at least a token easing 
of interest rates However, the 
German authorities have 
shown themselves to be reso- 
lutely against such a move. 

The pound, in spite of the 
fact that base rales appear 
unlikely to come down 
quickly from the current 111 
per cent lew!, lust ground 
again. The sterhnu index fell 
0.4 to 71.3. 

The pound tell by 1.5 
pfennigs to DM 3.1142 2 in Lon- 
don. its lowest ever closing 
level. It also lost 55 points to 
close at Sl.4‘1. 

In New York, it continued 
ihe slide. losing 1.35 cents to 
dose at S 1.4840. 

Dealers in London attrib- 
uted the pound's fall to a 
mood of gloom over Britain's 
economic prospects 

The Bank of England an- 
nounced the issue of £500 
million of existing stock, in 
spile of the fact that gilt-edged 
stocks were down by a quarter 
of a point. 


Washington — There was an 
unexpectedly strong rise in US 
durable goods orders last 
month. New orders received 
rose by 4 J per cent, or $44 
billion, the biggest increase 
since November 1984. 

Defence orders again pro- 
vided the basis of the increase, 
with orders for defence capital 
goods up by 463 per cent. 
Excluding defence, durable 
goods orders rose by 1.1 per 
cent. 

The increase came as a 
contrast to recent weak eco- 
nomic data in the US and the 
White House said it reinforced 
"our belief that the economy 
will be further strengthened in 
the coming months." 


The “taplets” comprise 
£200 million of Exchequer 1 1 
per cem 1**90: £150 million of 
Conversion 10 per cent I ^*>6. 
and £150 million of Treasury 
9?4 percent 2002. 

' In the money markets, rates 
rose by an average 1 » point. 
The three-month interbank 
rate closed at d ,s ir- ,J . u per 
cem. 


Building societies face 
tougher rules on ratios 

By Richard Thomson, Basking Correspondent 


Building societies mil have 
lo adopt a more complex 
system of assessing tending 
risks to comply with new 
guidelines on mamtaining ade- 
quate capital, according .to 
proposals published yesterday 
by tbe Registry of Friendly 
SocKficSa 

The registry also opened up 
the possibility of societies 
raising capital through per- 
petual floating rate notes — 
bonds with variable interest 
rates and no final maturity. 

The guidelines propose a 
system of varying risk 
weightings for different areas 
•traditional mortgage tend- , 
tng and new areas of business 
opened up by the new Budding 
Societies Act, due to become 
effective in January 1987. 

There will be two main 
measures of capital adequacy. 
The “gearing ratio” - similar 

to the one nsed by banks — will ’ 

be made available to tbe 


public. Measures based on a 
detailed assessment of a 
society's risks will be nsed by 
supervisors to check on a 
society's capital adequacy. 

Each sodety will be re- 
quired to maintain a ‘^buffer” 
of 03 per cent of capital 
between the minimum accept- 
able capital level and tbit 
preferred by tbe registry. 

Mainstream mortgage tend- 
ing will be divided into four 
risk classes carrying capital 
requirements of 1, 1-5, 2£ and 
4 per cenLClass one, the safest 
aria, includes loans more than 
five years old on which there 
have been no additional ad- 
vances. Class Tour, the riskiest 
area, includes various types of 
commercial mortgage lending. 

In new business, unsecured 
tending will require a capital 
ratio of 20 per cent of loans 
outstanding, although this 
may be halved over the longer 
term. But loans to mortgage 


holders would require a capital 
ratio of only 15.5 per cent 
initially. 

Other areas, such as rent- 
ing, property development, 
and guarantee and foreign 
exchange services would also 
attract separate capital ade- 
quacy requirements. 

Mr Michael Bridgenun. the 
Chief Registrar, said that most 
building societies had ade- 
quate capital to cover their 
current operations under the 
proposed sy stem of calculating 
capital ratios. 

However, as societies under- 
took more types of business, 
the new ratios would have to be 
checked to ensure they stayed 
within prudent margins. 

The societies have until 
September 24 lo reply to the 
document. The system will be 
established to coincide with 
the new Act. 

Comment, page 19 


Europe: go 
for the encore. 

Following spectacular growth in 1985 
European markets have consolidated in the 
first half of this year. Many financial advisers 
are now looking again towards Europe for 
dynamic growth. 

The Oppenheimer European 
Growth Trust 

aims to capitalise on the obvious benefits of 
low interest rates, low. inflation, dramatically 
reduced energy costs and the general climate of 
political stability. European markets arc still 
relatively cheap. 

Currency Gains 

In addition to the healthy outlook for 
stockmarkets, clients will benefit further it’ the 
pound continues to weaken against major 
European currencies, for example the Swiss 
Franc has appreciated 15°/o against Sterling 
so far this vear. 

Oppenheimer was one of the first to forecast 
the major European potential in late 1984. 
Our European fund was the top performing 
of all authorised unit trusts in 1985 and is 
currently up 59.9% over the 12 months to 
1st July- 

For a copy of our latest Euro-| 
pean brochure cal! 01-489 1078 
or write to Oppenheimer at 
66 Cannon Sl. London EC4N 6AE. 


paw 

m 


Oppniliriiwr 

FundUnueiMwatlto 


A mender company at the Mercsra*? House Gioup. 


i 





BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 



Prices edge higher in 
lacklustre trading 


New York(Ap-Dow Jones)— 
Stock prices* edged higher in 
lack lustre trading yesterday as 
investors focused their baying 
Attention on special situations 
and economically sensitive 
groups. 

: The Dow Jones industrial 
average spent most of the 
session locked in a tight 
trading range, ending the day 
hear its highs with a gain of 
6.62 points to 1,887.80. 

In the broader market Stan- 
dard & Poor's 500-stock index 
climbed 0.53 to 250.19 and the 
New York Stock Exchange 
composite index rose 0.27 to 
143.88. 

Advancing shares out- 


Sea Containers plunges to 
$26.5m interim losses 



TEMPUS 


numbered declining issues by 
an eight-to'Seven margin, as 
volume fell to 119 million 
shares from Thursday's 135.2 
million. 

The stock market declined 
to go along with hood 
priceS'Wbkh spent most of the 
day at sharply lower levels on 
news that Jnly durable goods 
orders rose 4.3 per cent 

Mr Alfred Goldman, mar- 
ket analyst at AG Edwards & 
Sons in St Louis, said investors 
had been showing an inclina- 
tion for owning economically 
sensitive cyclical issues for the 
past few weeks. “That is the 
market's way of saying *we will 
have an economy next 
vear’.”he said. 



Sea Containers, the Ber- 
muda-based container ship- 
ping group, yesterday 
announced losses for the first 
six months of this year of 
$26.5 million (£17.7 million) 
on revenue of $271.8 million. 

This compares with profits 
of S 10 million in the same 
period of last year on revenue 
of $246.3 million. 

After payment of preferred 
dividends, losses for the sec- 
ond quarter were $8.5 million 
or 79 cents per common share. 

In the six months to the end 
of June, its container asset 
leasing company lost Si 0.9 
million and Sealink S2I.3 
million, making a total loss of 
$32.2 million. 

Mr James Sherwood, the 
president, said earning from 
ferries and ports in the second 
quarter of this year were in 
line with expectations at $2J 
million compared with $1.4 
million in die same period of 
1985. He expected the third 


By Amanda Gee Smyth 

quarter to be profitable be- 
cause Sealink British Femes 
earned most in the summer. 

There were no figures for 
H overspeed, which was pur- 
chased for £5 million this year, 
but it is expected to make a 
profit in 1986. 

Container asset leasing 
activities were unsatisfactory 
and the main contributor to 
losses, derived from the col- 
lapse of a charterer early in the 
year. 

Mr Sherwood said this char- 
terer had four of the 
company's 11 ships in its 
service. The two largest of 
these have left the fleet but the 
company still has one Stricter 
class vessel unemployed. 

Although container utiliza- 
tion was satisfactory and most 
of the units recovered from 
defaulting lessees had been re- 
leased, these lease rates had 
declined for standard dry 
cargo units and chassis to the 
point of incurring losses, he 
said. 


Leasing of special equip- 
ment such as refrigerated con- 
tainers. tank containers and 
other dry cargo types and 
container cranes had not suf- 
fered significant rate erosion 
and remained profitable. 

But he said results from 
container, chassis and crane 
leasing would be much weaker 
than hast year. The outlook for 
container shipping looks poor 
and directors intend to make 
an assessment of this activity 
at the end of the year. Con- 
tainer leasing competitors 
were also suffering from over- 
capacity and inadequate 
freight rates. 

He said that shareholders 
should expea the company’s 
earnings to be substantially 
down from the S40 million 
achieved in 1985. The Seaco 
division is stiU in difficulties 
although the new Orient Ex- 
press Ferry between Venice 
and Turkey is doing well after 
a weak start. 


The price is right for 
YTV’s share sale 


Sino-US venture back in business 


AMC Beijing Jeep Corpora- 
tion. the troubled Cbinese- 
American joint venture which 
was forced to shut down 
■ production for two months 
this year because of foreign 
exchange problems, an- 
nounced yesterday that it was 
back in business and consid- 
ering the production of two 
new models. 

Mr Don St Piene, the 
president of the joint venture, 
said at the venture’s facilities: 
“We’re here to stay. The 
Chinese Government and 


• NEW COURT NATURAL 
RESOURCES: The board plans 
to raise about £1.7 million by an 
underwrinen rights issue of 
36.66 million ordinary shares at 
Sp each on foe basis of one new 
ordinary for each ordinary held 
and one for each warrant held. 
Year to March 31. No dividend 
(i.65p). Turnover £3.83 million 
(£4.59 million). Loss, before lax 
and extraordinary items. £15.74 
million (£1.59 million profit). 
Loss per share 47J8p (earnings 
3.76p). 

• ML HOLDINGS: The com- 
pany has conditionally agreed to 
buy Slingsby Aviation and Hy- 
dro-Bond Engineering. Slingsby 
makes complex aviation and 
marine structures using 
composite materials, while Hy- 
dro-Bond makes pressure-resis- 
tant underwater electrical 
connectors. The maximum 
price for foe acquisitions, 
depending on future profits, is 
£3.11 million. 


From Robert Grieves, Pricing 

American Motors have given 
as the framework to 
continue.” 

The venture was forced to 
stop production of the Chero- 
kee four-wheel drive jeep in 
June because it did not have 
enough foreign exchange to 
buy more of the knockdown 
kits from Detroit which it was 
assembling in China. 

Mr St Piene said that in 
September bis officials will 
propose to American Motors 
in the US that the Peking 


COMPANY NEWS 


• SAKAI CHEMICAL: The 
company plans to issue S3S 
million (£2333 million) in guar- 
anteed notes, due 1991, with 
warrants to subscribe for com- 
mon stock, through an inter- 
national syndicate managed by 
Nikko Securities (Europe). 
These notes are expected to 
cany a coupon of 3Vi per cent 
and the issue price wiu be 100 
percent. 

• AMERICAN MEDICAL 
INTERNATIONAL:, The 
group plans a reorganization 
and cost-reduction programme 
so it can focus on its core- 
business — acute-care hospitals 
in the US. The plan includes foe 
closure of AMrs group health 
services division, foe elimina- 
tion of the divisional hospital 
management structure, together 
with consolidation of regional 
offices from- 1 1 to six. This will 
cut costs and eliminate operat- 
ing losses by more than $80 
million (£53 million) in 1987. 


operation start assembling 
Comanche trucks and YJ 
vehicles, which would cost 10 
to 20 per cent less than the 
current price of $20,500 
(£13.667) fora Cherokee jeep. 

Beijing Jeep, which began 
operations in May, 1984, em- 
ploys 4,000 Chinese workers 
at an average monthly salary 
of 190 yuan (about $40). 

American Motors has an 
equity share of 313 per cent 
or $16 million, while Peking 
Auto Works has a 68.7 per 
cent stake, worth $35 million. 


• RENAISSANCE ENERGY: 
Despite a downturn in the 
second quarter, there was an 
increase in net income from 
CanS9 18.000 to CanS1.46 mil- 
lion (£702,000) in first half of 
this year. The board expects 
improved results in foe second 
half, particularly in the fourth 
quarter. 

• GREENWICH CABLE 
COMMUNICATIONS: The 
company has acquired an op- 
tion to purchase SO per cent of 
the ordinary capital of DRL for 
£60.000. DRL provides training 
courses, creates film and video 
sales and training pro g rammes 
and produces a wide range of 
company literature. 

• NSS NEWSAGENTS: 
GaJlaher’s offer has been ac- 
cepted for 31.41 million or- 
dinary shares (97.8 per cent). 
The offer and foe loan-note 
alternative are extended until 
further notice. 


Making programmes people 
want to see and buy is the life 
and soul of Yorkshire Tele- 
vision. according to its 
managing director Paul Fox. 

The quality of the YTV 
product is proven but. as yet, 
the company's portfolio of 
programmes is quite small 
compared with some of the 
other majors. 

Yorkshire Television was 
praised in the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority's 
Mid-Term Review of Area 
Contractors last month. Al- 
though the IBA report gives 
no indication of intentions 
for the 1988-89 review of 
franchises, YTV directors are 
encouraged by the authority’s 
remarks. 

The relationship with the 
IBA is cruciaL The flow of 
advertising revenue is the lift 
blood of the company. It 
accounted for 90 per cent of 
total turnover in 1984-85. 

The Yorkshire Television 
network serves 5.8 million 
people. Consumer spending 
in the area is, contrary to 
popular opinion, rising at a 
greater rate than the national 
average. YTV bucked the 
national advertising trend in 
the first six months of this 
year. Revenue rose by 25.8 
per cent compared with the 
average of 233 per cenL 
YTV’s market share in that 
period improved from 8.9 per 
cent to 9.1 percent. 

Programme sales this year 
will have been affected by an 
earlier cutback in budgets. 
They will probably fan short 
of the £7 million made in 
1984-85. In the longer term 
this is obviously a strong area 
for growth. 

The change of levy rules 
which came into effect in 
April will benefit the com- 
pany this year. Its impact in 
the future will depend on the 
mix between United King- 
dom and overseas earnings. 

YTV is watching develop- 
ments such as cable and 
satellite television carefully. 
New ventures such as Music 
Box, a pop video programme, 
are promising. The group's 
cadi balances should enable 
it to take advantage of 
opportunities. 

The offer-fbr-sale price of 
12Sp puts the shares on a 
prospective p/e ratio of 8.4 
times and values them at a 
discount to the sector. 

This seems fair given that 
two other television com- 
panies were floated this sum- 


mer and that Yorkshire TV, 
although undoubtedly a fine 
company, has nothing very 
special to make it stand out in 
a crowd. The issue will no 
doubt be oversubscribed and 
the shares should go to a 
respectable premium. 

JN Nichols 
(Vimto) 

There is something essen- 
tially local about the soft 
drink Vimio. More than 60 
percent of its British safes are 
in the North. It comes, 
therefore, as a surprise to 

lean) that the “changing pat- 
terns of trade” which caused 
interim profits of JN Nichols 
(Vimto) to fall, occurred in 
Saudi Arabia. 

Turnover was up 14 per 
cent to £14 million in the six 
months to June 30. but pretax 
profit fell by 1 1 per cent to 
£2.8 million. 

The peak ordering time is 
six months before the annual 
Islamic festival of Ramadan, 
which is celebrated two weeks 
earlier each year. In 1986 it 
took place in May. 

In 1987 it will tall in April, 
giving a peak ordering tone in 
November 1986. This year 
the bias in JN Nichols’ profits 
switches from the first half of 
the year to the second. 

The company exports the 
Vimto concentrate to Saudi 
Arabia where it is canned and 
bottled. In terms of turnover, 
the impact on the first half is 
slighL But concentrate sales 
are significantly more profit- 
able than sales in ready-to- 
drink form, and the impact 
on profits is 
disproportionate. 

In the second half, JN 
Nichols should do much 
better, despite the weather m 
the North. For 1986 as a 
whole, the company should 
make at least £S million 
compared with £4.8 million 
last year. This puts the shares 
on a prospective multiple of 
13 at foe current price of 
225p. high enough despite its 
liquid resources of £7.7 
million. 

Berkeley 

Technology 


London and reporting in 
dollars. But for inves- 
tors prepared to make the 
effort to understand a com- 
pany which is a ftitfe out 
of the ordinary. Berkeley 
Technology should repay 
study. 

This is the view of Nigd 
Russell, investment trust an- 
alyst at the stockbroker James 
Capcl. His 25-page review of 
the company will have 
arrived with his clients in 
time for them to read it over 
the holiday weekend. 

Despite the name, Berkeley ; 
is predominantly a financial 
services company which 
makes most of its money 
arranging development cap- 
ital for fast-growing high-tech 
companies, mainly in the US 
West Coast silicon valley. 

In 1985. it arranged S72 
million (£48 million) parings, 
for which it charged a gross 
fee of$7.8 million, equivalent 
to 10.8 per cent, of which 5 
per cent is charged to foe 
investors. If foe present first 
half is anything to go by, it 
should have placed another 
$95 million by the end of this 
year for fees of more than $10 
million. 

Rather than go in at the 
very early stages of the 
companies’ development, 
Berkety wifi typically be foe 
last stop for raising capital 
before notation. 

Now capitalized at £150 
million, foe company num- 
bers several British 
investment trusts among its 
biggest shareholders. 

Increasingly, the proceeds 
from public offerings of 
successful investments 
should provide a steady 
source of spied for reinvest- 
ment 

Berkeley is on a prospec- 
tive p/e. multiple 
of 20.3, making it more 
expensive than the more 
conventional fund manage- 
ment groups such as M&G on 
a multiple of 20, Ivory and 
Sime, also on 20. and 
Henderson Administration 
on 11 

Mr Russell acknowledges 
that an upward rerating is 
unlikely. But he believes that 
the prospects for strong earn- 
ings growth will make the 
shares highly attractive. Since 
his earnings forecast makes 
no allowance for profits on 
share disposals, he could be 
right 


UN 1 IT LINKED INSURANCE INVESTMENTS 


. Weekly 

M Otter enga Wee 


me Money fleam 17U 1M +4L5 .. 

19* Inv Trust Aaam 3859 *052 *4.7 .. 

Lite M fleam 3SS.0 376.6 +5.8 .. 

me Mgh Inc Accot 33S.D 3525 +1.7 .. 

Ufa Property Accujn 178.1 1S7.4 +0.1 .. 

Crown bl» A 4308 .. .. 

Bmwki EMy 470.1 4844 +7 A .. 

CBS Managed 1B2J 1*13 +53 .. 

Grotttfi fleam 179.1 1835 .. .. 

EABLESTM M8UMMOE 

EMfi Hoad. Q i M tanli a m . QftrUw 033 710 

0242 91311 

Snn FM 101.8 1083 +0.1 .. 

Buecnpftm 12231203 +19 .. 

fldeetamous F»m 1403 M89 +10 .. 

Fertonserw ftma 1443 1913 +4.1 .. 

EAGLE S7M/MDLAND 
1 TnrasdneedM St London BC2 
01-588 1212 

EagwiMend UM 1543 1589 -0.1 438 


04*4 33377 

UK EqrtMS FM 4223 4453 +1 8 

Kara Fund +024 4233 +1.4 

Property Fins 2608 Z743 +0.4 

Fixed baerur Fund 2309 2523 +13 

mdn-Urtort See Fa H77.i 1127 +23 

GU Depost F«*ia 174.1 1812 +0-2 

Nffi Amenta Fun*) 236 0 24 32 +0J 

Far East Fund 2763 291.0 +63 

Bxop e Fund 222.7 234 4 +53 

h rama ftotal Fund 2804 296.1 +43 

Wood Fund 3413 358.1 +23 


Paham End. Dortang RH 4 104 
0308 MBP S* 

LKcCstfi Accum 1179 1212 
UK Ed ACCUJi 1745 18 X 7 

a i ii na np Accum 1629 170.6 
UbAwdHAnm 1309 1369 
Ld*lnd)crU*d Act 101 6 107.0 
UtaMnad accum 154.0 1622 
LfeOseos Eq floe 1663 1757 
Ufe-ftoparty Aeon 1353 1439 

at iwniflninniT 

16 Flnsdin Ocua. London EC 2 M 1 

01-828 8131 

GT PW Bond Raid 18 X 3 19 X 0 
gt nan Hon View 190.7 2 dqb 
GT Pirn Far Eos 2304 2423 
GT Plan North floor 1482 1589 
GT POn UK 3 GE 2 * 4.7 257.6 
GT Ban Wonawioe 2893 3082 


20/24 AAMcomfce 
01-685 0411 
Managed 
UK Eq um 
Freed Wt 
(raw -Lusted 
Casn Deposa 
Property 
Memaaoral 
American 
Japan 

Japan &j* Co’s 
European 


114.0 1208 
1289 1*3 
1163 122.1 

993 1051 

104.0 1103 
1053 1113 
1023 1079 

*1 1001 
1383 1459 
1320 1389 
1101 1153 


GOISftflL PORTFOLIO UFE 
Oraibroc* Bl Cnodwm Hew 
0592 31971 


PpctWo Fd flee 
Da W 
Do In* a 
UK Equity 
Osaas Equejr 
Smzltr 033 
oat nua 

Do B9 

Ford mt Oep 


409.7 
3003 _ 
4099 431.2 

197.6 20&1 
144 7 1524 

112.6 1189 
1213 1289 
110 8 1198 
1109 «89 
1833 1720 
1483 1543 


GRESHAM UNIT 

2-6. Ponca ol Wan Road. Bomwmomti 
0202 782122 

Managed Bond 4149 4373 +*X 

Money Fund 1845 1*42 +1.1 

EquCV Fund 3390 357.9 +ZI 

fiaod tmarast Fund 150.4 1305 +1.1 

Preparty Fund 211 0 222J 

Grarwn Fran Pn gtun 
Aroenem 8 Ganam 2849 2983 -3i 

income 3415 3509 -3.1 

Mnnuam Grwtn 3028 3189 -01 

caoai Fund 384.1 404.7 *2i 

neooven' Am 238 1 2603 +05 

Jbt * General 1589 164.4 


GUMOMN ROYAL EXCHANGE 
Royal Ertftange London EC 3 
01-383 7101 

Asa PrepBds 3802 3889 

Managed mod 313 1 -W* 

Do tain 370.6 3801 

EMrlnU 4053 4289 

00 flows 4800 5059 

Filed bit Waal 2435 256.4 

Do Accum 3*2 303.4 

bid banl 377 5 397.4 

Do fleam 4489 4703 

am Amur ami isza m j* 

Do fleam i«23 1301 

Parte mat 21&1 2205 

DO AOCuffl 2327 SMS 

1359 1430 
1608 1889 


inoei-bWBd MW) 1003 1059 


Property Hd 
Do Acom 


Do Accum 
Deootfl WtaJ 
On fleeun 


1000 1137 
1379 144 8 

162.7 inj 


HENDERSON UMMSTTUnOH 
30 Fmstajnr Square. Lemon EC2A ID* 

01-638 5757 

Won income Fi*d 25* 5 2607 *22 

Edged Fiaid 34.4 99 7 +09 

CapSBl OrOHdi he 238 2 251 * +10 

TemnWqgy firt 1B53 1915 +0-7 

NMni Reeomes 107.8 i(38 +29 

Special 5dd0im 281 6 2973 +3* 

Norm America Fund 2403 253.7 -18 

Far East Field 3883 3788 +10 1 

Managed Fund *955 311.9 -2.5 



















































W U H 


I 11 a- ^ X*. 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 




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Mining shares surface as 
other sectors mark time 


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, s' 2 ■ 


By Our City Staff 


Stock markets ended the 
second leg of the long holiday 
account on a subdued note 
vesterday. 

’ The Bank ■ of 
England's caution on interest 
rale cuts and the reluctance of 
West Germany and Japan to 
follow America's lead and 
reduce their borrowing costs 
were restraining factors as was 
the approaching bank holiday 
weekend. 

So most .sectors marked 
time, apart from the occa- 
sional speculative flurry on 
takeover talk. 

The FT 30-share index 
closed 4.2 points higher at 
1J171.2. while the broader- 
based FT-SE 100 dosed just 
0.3 up at 1.607.1. 

It was left to mining stocks 
to provide the only worth- 
while movement as metal 
prices rebounded on fears that 
South Africa may reduce 
production in retaliation for 
sanctions. 

■ Gold shares re- 
bounded by five or six dollars 
and platinum shares featured 
Rnstenbnrg at 1.078 cents up 
60 cents. 

Closer to home, leading 
industrials barely stirred from 
their overnight levels. Lucas, 
which has failed to join in the 
recent market rally, improved 
Sp to 53 1 p as a few speculators 
took positions ahead of the 
Famborough Air Show next 
month. 

Grand Metropolitan found 
favour with American, inves- 
tors. rising by 8p to 386p. 

Among composite insur- 
ances. Royal stood out with a 
IQp rise to 829p. 

Gilts lost- three-eighths on 
fading hopes of an early 
interest rate cut At the dose, 
the Bank of England an- 
nounced £500 million of new 
tranches of existing stocks. 

Oils were stimulated by 
Norway's decision to reduce 


taxes in an attempt to promote 
drilling activity in the North 
Sea. BP added 5p to 640p, 
ahead ofthc interim statement 
next Thursday. Century CKls 
continued to benefit from a 
favourable “buy'' circular, 
from Savory Milne; ending 4p 
higher at 141 p. 

In quiet stores. Barton 
dipped 8p to 300p as reports 
circulated that several direct 


after heavy losses, but Arthur 
Wood improved 3p to 66p on 
the recovery in profits. 

Recent comment lifted F & 
« Group by 8p to 150p and 
asset-injection hopes excited 
Continuous Stationery at 70p, 
4p better. 

Comment on 

Thursday's figures lifted 
United Packaging by 9p to 
!Q4p. Marley, reporting next 


• Glen International has taken a 10.83 per cent stake In 
Indnstrial Finance and Investment Corporation, the GSM 
company whose shares were suspended ar89p last month after it 
forecast a loss for the year. At that stage APA, an Australian 
Efe assurance company, came to the rescue by agreeing to take a 
Stake of op to 50 per cent in the financial services group. Mr 
Terry Raznsdeo, the Glen chairman, described Hfco as ~a very 
interesting situation" that Glen could make the most of. 


tors had resigned from the 
Welbeck Finance subsidiary, 
acquired with DebenhamsJast 
year. 

Cable and Wireless was' 
another weak spot ai 324p, 
down !8p, as Wood Macken- 
zie reduced its profits forecast. 
Extel picked up 4p more to 
41 Op as Mr Robert Maxwell 
urged shareholders to reject 
the Dealers' Digest acquisition 
and requested bid talks with 
the Extel board. 

London & Midland jumped 
ISp to 22Sp as it confirmed 
reports which started late on 
Thursday of bid talks with 
Williams Holdings. Ayrshire 
Metal tumbled I Op to SOp 


week, eased 2p to 118p, but 
Maulers attracted speculative 
support at 308p, a nse of lOp. 

Profit-taking knocked 5p 
from Thomas Robinson at 
356p and TI Group at 491p. 
Losses upset Fobel at 39p, 
down 6p. but John Crowther 
continued to reflect a 
favourable circular from de 
Zoeie, up 5p to 168p. The 
figures are due next month. 

Holmes Protection gained 
5pio 1 30p on revived bid talk. 
Samuelson — a dour market 
since the chairman's profits 
warning — recovered by 20p to 
I90p. 

Speculative demand 
boosted Unigronp by lOp to 


RECENT ISSUES 


!02p. but Dawson Inter- 
national continued to suffer 
from a recent “sell" circular, 
dipping by 4p to 238p. 

An encouraging review 
prompted a ISp rise in UDO 
Holdings at ISQp. London and 
Continental Advertising ad- 
vanced by 8p to 93p after 
comment, but lack of recent 
support left Stainless Metal at 
168p and Tay Homes at l24p. 
both down 8p. JN Nichols 
(Vimto) softened 5p to 225p 
following a 12 per cent earn- 
ings reduction. 

A partial bid from a syn- 
dicate helped Flextech to a 
13p gain to 63p. Green bank 
jumped I Op to 58p followi 
the agreed terms from C & 
Walker, which closed l.Sp 
lower at 60,5p. 

Pearl Assurance, reporting 
next Wednesday, improved 
1 5p to I473p. Davies & Met- 
calfe -A" puv on 5p to 80p on 
further consideration of the 
Bergischc-Stahl deal. 

Consultants (Computer & 
Financial) was wanted at 
II2p. up 8p and Calcutta 
Electric hardened 3p to 78p 
after the figures. There was 
speculative interest in Berke- 
ley Group at 2 33p — up !2p — 
and Arcolectric A 5 Op — up 
lOp — but rights issue news 
unsettled Chnsty Hunt at 35p 
and New Court Natural Re- 
sources at Up, down by 6p 
and 3p. 


EQUITIES 

Anafla Secs . 

Asf£y<U pj 
B 8 B DeSgn 
Beovefco 
Borland (ll . t 
Chelsea Man f125p) 
Coated Bectrodes (84p) 
Cotine (llOp) 

Evans HaRshaw 
Fletcher Dennys 
GT Management (210p) 
Guthrie Corp (150p) 
Harrison (150p) 

HOe Ergonom (92p) 


155+3 
198+2 
70 
150 
145+2 
128 
82 
124 
117 
73 
210 
171 +2 
163 
93 


Marina Dev (llOp) 
MorgwGranfefl (SOOp) 
Ommtacti 


Hughes Food ( 20 p) 

Lon utd Inv (330p) 

ms cash a c nobp) 

Dev (llOnr 
Granfefl 

ShWd (72p)^ 

Stanley Leisure (11 Op) 
TV-AM (130p) 

Tandy (rate (1 
Thames TV (l__„ 
Tfobet & Britten (120p) 
Trass 2H%|/| 2016 s*97 
Untiock (63p) 
VWndsmoor (106p) 
Yetverton (38p) 


23 
431 
60 
98 
450 +2 
27 

1ES+10 
120 
157 +'» 
147 
237 
144 
E41fa 
66 
107 

>4 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

B&AGpNjP 
Barker & Dobson F/P 
Cftywiston N/P 
Colon* F/P 
Expamet F/P 
Forward Tech N IP 
Rode N IP 
Television Sth N/P 

Top Value F/P 
Yorkmount N/P 

(Issue price in brackets). 


13-2 

13V 

24-2 

205 

175+2 

5 

4 

21 

80 

74-1 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


■T-. Three Month sterfkig 

SflpBS ZH- 




s.‘ r:J, 


Dec 66 ,.. 

Mar 87 

Ml 87 . 

Sep 87 

Dec 87 

Previous day's total open interest 15233 
- Month I 


Open' 

9044 

Mflh 

Low - 

Clam 

EstYM 

90.44 

9086 

9088 

607 

9083 

9084 

90.77 

90.77- 

1910 

9080 

90.83 

90.77 

90 78 

65 

9089 

90.71 

9089 

9088 

5 

9080 

9080 

9080 

90.43 

0 

NT 

— 

— 

90.07 

0 


• ' * - Three Month Eurodollar 

• • i. ■ Sap 88 — — ... 

... Dec 88 — 

• ’ — Mar 87 

■ %• Junfl7 




US Treasury Bond 

Sep 66 .. 

Dec 86 


Mar 87 


9404 
94.06 
9359 
93 JO 

101-15 

100-27 

NT 


Previous day's total open Interest 20659 
84 j04 94 JO 9482 1088 

94.06 94.00 94.02 3450 

94.00 9334 9335 361 

9181 93.75 93J5 289 

Previous day's tots) open I rtatBl 6895 
0 -M ICm-16 6505 



101-15 

100-27 


101-35 


100-1 

10002 


99-30 


495 

0 


Htt-sS,:-’' io'1-a* 84' 

101-35 101-36 2 

— . 101-35 0. 


121-24 

121-22 


16100 

16520 


PrevKws day's total open hnerest 17160 
21-06 


121-07 8534 

121-06 2291 

120-31 0 

12031 0 

Previous day's total open Merest 2471- 
HJSO 16280 218 

18575 1 . 


121 - 
121-06 


151J 
16520 


i. ■"* 

, 

-.r- 

mt* 

' . V s-r 


First Dealings 

Aug 4 
Aug IS 
Sep B 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Last (Maps 

Aug 15 
SopS 
Sep 19 


Cal opttona ware lakwaut ore 22 / 8/86 Cronito Group, STC. 
& Sroe, TV AM. Dewey WsrrervAmfrad Consumer Bacflr 
Murray. Barker A Dobson. Comtech. URramar, Vaal Reef. 

Put Sound Ddftston. impato. Ttahook. 

Put and Cafl: Sound Diffusion. Rowntree. Impala. 


rOf JVUiUliMlL 

Nor 6 Nov 17 

Nov 20 Decl 

Dec 4 _ Dec 15 

Rowntree. Hyman, iwry 
Bwflronlca. Goode Dunam 4 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AMD FORWARD RATES 


S2S3- 


N York 1.4885-1-5010 
Montreal 28704-28B49 
Amsdaml427H4563 
Brussels 62885145 
CpbqoR 11.4893-118833 
Dubln 1.1050-1.1115 
Frankfurt 10387-38634 
Lisbon 21486-21785 
Madrid 19885-200.12 
Mbn 209149-211389 
Oslo 108822-109418 
Paris 98606-100388 
StTdiim 102411-103144 
Tokyo 228.18-23002 
Vfsrea ■ 2T38-Z1J5 - 
Zurich 2451928695 


122 

14805-14905 
28704-28733 

34311-14366 

6283-63.12 

114883-118059 

1.1055-1.1065 

10401-38443 

21486-21680 

19686-19883 

208349-209788 

108822-1018789 

9861388788 

102411-102554 

22884-22872 

21832142 

2453224571 


056-053prem 

0.42-083pram 

1K-1%pram 

20-13pr©sn 

2V-1pra(n 

ISdte-IOpram 

1%-1Kpram 

7B-170tfls 

52-100db 

1 -Sds 

3%-4Wdte 

ZMKprara 

K-Kprem 

154-Xprem 

fflWSJiprem 

1%-lKpram 


3monHis 

147-1.42pram 

083-08Sprom 

4K-3’Aprom 


314-11 
14dte-31prem 
4K*4nrem 
236-43200 
133-21 4<fie 
4-Sdis 
11%-125Ctfe 

5K-4Xpram 

IK-Xpnan 

3-2Xpram 

SMKprem 


StarBng lades BjagwiadiaMi 1975 wsa dawn at 718 (day's range 718-718). 


OTHER STERLING RATES - DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austral* 14581-1.4838 

AustiHa defer ^ 246232467$ 

Bahrain drar 058264)8865 

Brazi cruzado* 2059-2072 

__ 07298-07378 

78126-78525 

— 1988020180 
, 118710-118782 
188S-1B8S 


Ireland 


assr. 


maria. 


Ausfrafla . 
Canada. 


Qreeca drachma _ 
Hong Kong defer . 

India rupee 

Irsqdmar . 


04340-04 Sin 


Kuwait dkwr KD . 

Malaysia rifer 3891318975 

Mexico peso 102Q.00-1070.00 

New Zealand defer 10593-10740 

Saudi Arabia riyal — 5801088410 

sngapore defer 12111-12156 

South Africa rand . 

UAEt&tom 
Uoyds Bank 


Sweden 

Norway 

Denmark 

West Germany 
Switzerland __ 

HiMlmrlanrlw 

rtouionancis • 
France 


Hong Kong . 


18470-18500 

2.146642.1480 

2801628035 

08087-08074 

18902-18907 

| 68800-68850 

. 72850-78900 

, 77100-77150 

.2040028410 

. 18445-1.6*55 

I 28000-23010 

68775-68825 

. 15320-15135 

. 1406.0-14088 
■ 42194226 


RatasaopfiBed try Barclays Bank HOFEXndExM. 


.. n" CiT 




LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


.;rV ; % 

Series 

Oct 

Jm 

fer 

Oet 

Puts 

Jan 

Apr 



Series 

Gale 

Sept Dee 

Mar sap 

Pum 

Dec 

Mar 

Vi Alked Lyons 

• ;;; cm 

300 

330 

360 

45 

25 

11 

55 

35 

18 

67 

47 

29 

5 

15 

33 

8 

18 

35 

TI 

22 

38 

Jaguar 

rSfca 


500 

550 

600 

13 

2 

1 

32 

18 

5 

45 

25 

13 

29 

70 

118 

80 

7S 

120 

43 

B 0 

120 

- : -.s bp 

(-64® 

550 

600 

650 

95 

52 

18 

108 

70 

43 

123 

90 

57 

1 

12 

37 

7 

18 

40 

15 

28 

48 

Thom EM) 
(*487) 


42D 

460 

500 

550 

75 

37 

10 

87 

55 

30 

97 

67 

42 

2 

5 

18 

65 

8 

14 

27 

85 

10 

18 

33 

• ~ -~* 5W Cons Gold 

' ' T489) 

• 420 
460 
500 

80 

45 

20 

90 

60 

37 

100 

70 

47 


15 

32 

60 

23 

42 

67 





— 


17 

40 

Tesco 

f*03) 


300 

330 

380 

390 

110 

80 

88 

— 

2 

2 

4 

— 

' ’ Courtauftta 

.... ,* <-261) 

260 

280 

400 

16 

Z7 

17 

11 

37 

27 

11 

25 

42 

18 

28 

44 

20 

31 



25 

40 

50 

8 

12 

18 

ii 











330 

i 

6 

— 

72 

73 

— 


■ 

Mm 

Aup 

NO* 

Feb 

Aup 

Now 

Fab 

‘ . Com Lfrajn 

... f303j 

280 

300 

330 

26 

6 

Th 

34 

23 

13 

39 

29 

IB 

3 

12 

33 

7 

16 

36 

10 

20 

38 

Brit Aero 
('498) 


460 

500 

550 

40 

6 

1 

55 

33 

15 

" 72 
50 
25 

1 

7 

SS 

9 

27 

62 

18 

35 

67 

Cables Wire 
r324) 

300 

325 

350 

375 

40 

IS 

5 

3 

50 

35 

21 

10 

65 

50 

33 

7 

17 

33 

55 

11 

21 

40 

60 

17 

30 

45 

BAT fads 
P415) 


380 

390 

420 

460 

55 

25 

Sft 

ft 

65 

42 

22 

6 

78 

56 

37 

ft 

1 ft 

13 

50 

5 

13 

25 

55 

9 

18 

32 

Drstflers 

- . C7501 

600 

650 

700 

160 

112 

65 

E 

E 

1 & 

4 

8 

5 


Barclays 

(•*89) 


460 

500 

560 

32 

3 

2 

50 

22 

10 

62 

37 

20 

2 

13 

G 2 

13 

30 

67 

17 

35 

72 

’ - 

. . nwi 

180 

200 

220 

14 

5 

2 

22 

12 

5 

28 

18 

6 

IB 

39 

B 

20 

38 

11 

22 

Brit Telecom 
1*192) 


180 
20 0 
220 

14 

1 

ft 

22 

10 

5 

28 

17 

8 

1 ft 

11 

30 

6 

17 

31 

11 

21 

33 

: Grand Met 

" . CM 6 ) 

327 

355 

360 

as 

40 

53 

60 

1 » 

7 

13 

15 

Cadbury Sctmppa 
(168) 

160 

180 

200 

9 

1 

1 

19 

9 

3 

24 

15 

6 

1 

13 

33 

1 ? 

35 

10 

19 

36 







~ l ~‘ ' 








1 

1 

2 



fCI 

_• - * P004) 

900 

950 

1000 

1050 

120 

75 

40 

20 

147 

707 

74 

42 

127 

5 

12 

8 

20 

28 

(*370) 


330 

380 

43 

13 

so 

25 

— 

3 

10 



60 

55 

60 

74 

Lsdbroke 

C348J 


300 

46 

55 

68 

1 

3 

5 

■ '* - ■** Lana Sec 

C323) 

300 

330 

360 

29 

11 

2 ft 

38 

47 

4 

7 

9 


360- 

2 

14 

20 

17 

25 

27 

9 

16 

40 

40 

40 

LASMO 

(-125) 


100 

27 

35 

40 

1 

5 

7 

Marks A Span 

.180 

200 

220 

33 

39 

47 

114 

3 

7 

17 

5 


120 

90 

18 

24 

3 

14 

14 


5 

12 

18 

.IS 

19 

MKfland Bank 
CS37) 


500 

42 

67 

72 

1 

8 

15 

32 

87 

...i*'" 1 ” • Sues Trans 

C883) 

7SO 

800 

850 

137 

87 

53 

145 

160 

1 

6 

11 


600 

1 

12 

22 

65 

65 

58 

82 

18 

25 

40 

PSO 


460 

45 

53 

07 

1 

7 

22 

62 

too 

12 

27 

55 

- r - Trafalgar House 

; ■ (‘292} 

240 

260 

280 

47 

28- 

17 

53 

35 

23 

60 

43 

3 

6 

6 

11 

9 

15 



550 

500 

1 

1 

ii 

4 

22 

50 

98 















- •* * 

Series 

Sap 

Dee 

Mar 

Sep 

Dec 

War 

riTsj 


190 

200 

2 

1 

15 

8 

20 

13 

6 

28 

13 

28 

15 

28 

Beeciiam 

("393) 

360 

390 

420 

460 

42 

22 

9 

2 

52 

35 

23 

10 

63 

43 

30 

20 

4 

12 

30 

68 

8 

20 

37 

70 

12 

25 

43 

73 

RTZ 

• cm 


500 

550 

600 

650 

105 

55 

9 

1 ft 

114 

67 

43 

23 

124 

§ 

30 

2 

3 

8 

50 

5 

13 

30 

67 

10 

22 

45 

85 

Boots 

*. . C- 212 ) 

200 

220 

240 

15 

8 * 

3 

28 

18 

IT 

34 

23 

14 

4 

18 

31 

8 

17 

32 

10 

20 

34 

Vaal Reefs 

CS31 


50 

60 

70 

13ft 

4 

* 

16 18ft 
9K 12 
4ft — 

1 2 ft 
1ft 5 
Sft 10ft 

4 

754 

STR 

260 

18 

30 

40 

6 

15 

18 










cm 

300 

333 


8 

30 

45 

45 

28 


Series 


How 

Mar Ado 

Now 

Mar 

Bass 
i r 740) 

700 

750 

800 

58 

20 

8 

75 

45 

25 

65 

55 

40 

i 

13 

33 

60 

23 

43 

60 

Lonfho 

1-206) 


200 

21 & 

236 

240 

255 

6 

1 ft 

1 

ft 

21 

15 

8 

4 

32 

2 

14 

32 

9 

19 

14 

Bfae&rc* 

. rsse) 

- ,.o' 

550 

600 

650 

20 

7 

1 

44 

22 

6 

62 

33 

22 

18 
46 
95 ' 

23 

48 

98 

30 

50 , 
96 



9ft" 

si 

53 

41 

** ’ DaBws 

("635) 

550 

600 

650 

700 

100 

65 

40 

15 

115 

85 

135 

108 

5 

12 

13 

33 

27 

50 


*P 

9BVW 

*SL 

Mow 

Feb 

A 09 

Now 

Feb 

55 

32 

BO 

55 

40 

70 

55 

80 

75 

115 

Tr 11*% 1991 
C*IO 0 ) 


106 

108 

2 J w 

ft 

3’n 

1 » 

2 V 

■» 

■» 

ft 

1ft 

1 * 


300 

330 

360 

72 

42 

16 

82 

54 

28 

88 


3 

5 


110 

’lB 

ft 

1 »i* 

1 ft 

2 ft 

2 * 

(•366) 

84 

40 

3 

10 

6 

14 

9 ' 
18 

Tr 11*% 03/07 
(-£119) 


114 

116 

5*i« 

8 '« 

4ft 

** 

•» 

“i« 

1*15 

2 ft 

GKN 

- " 1*2671 

260 

280 

300 

330 

15. 

6 

9 

29 

17 

8 

4 

40 

28 

19 

10 

9 

21 

30 

69 

14 

25 

39 

69 

17 

28 

41 

69 



118 

120 

122 

124 

1 '* 

ft 

■w 

3ft 

2 *>W 

1 ft 

1 J>* 

4‘>t> 

Sft 

2 ft 

fa? 

V* 

3 

5 

2 ft 

3ft 

4ft 

5*4 

3ft 

4ft 

5ft 



















r«ii} 

950 

43 

80 

60 

40 

15 

25 

55 

70 


*pa S«Pt 

Oct 

Now 

***** 

oet 

New 


1000 

1050 

10 

65 110 120 130 I 

FT-SE 1525 

87 

112 

128 

145 

122 

105 

92 

77 

1 

8 

15 

25 

34 

46 

55 

78 

14 

23 

33 

43 

67 

87. 

82 

20 

30 

42 

57 

TO 

Hanson 

ri63) 

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135 

150 

160 

■180 

200 

51 > 
36 

20 

9 

3 

33 

19 

10 

38 

23 

12 

1 

1 

1 ft 

6 

20 

3ft 

8 

21 

Sft 

13 

24 

nm T|75 
1600 
1925 
• 1650 

1875 

40 

20 

10 

3 

1 

. 72 
53 
40 
24 
17 

85 

70 

55 

42 

25 

4 

11 

28 

48 

73 


August 22. 1985. . Total contract! 15409. Cafla 11577. Puts 3832. ‘Underlying security prire. 


MONEY f/lARKET 
AND GOLD 


BaseRatas% 
Cteoifng Banks 10 
Finance House 10 


Discount Market Loam % 
OvernrgW HWc TOX Low 7 
Wet* watt To 

(Discount %) 


ia». 

3mrtb 9'A 


Zmnft ¥*, 
3mmt« tPw 


1 mnm 2mndi ! 

3mntti 9>»9Xi 6mmfi 9 ] >t-9 , >« 

Trade Bffla (Discount %) 

Imran 10'w 2mnthlOX 

3mnd) 10 'm 6mrrth9« w 

tmartwrik (%) 

Overnght open 10K ctosa 9K> 

1 week IDX-lOMi 6 mnft 9X-9X 

1 mrwi lO-S^ie 9mntfi 

Smnfli 9 lb w-g»i0 12mth 9"i+9*w 
Local Authority Depeehsrx.) 

2 days 10 7 days 10 

1 mat! Bit 3mnth 9M 

6mnth 9H 12mtti g% 

Local Authority Bonds <%) 

1 mnth lOSi-10 2mnth 10K-9K 

3mmh 10SV-S% Smrtei io4V 

9 mnttl 1t»» 12tmh 9KrO% 


1 mnth 10 ... 

6 mnttl 9*ifr-9>ift 

Defer CDs (%) 
lirmth 580885 
5 mnth 580875 


3 mnft 9X-9H 
IZmtt 


3 mnth 586580 
I2mth 585880 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Defer 

7 days fl-S'Jw 
3 mnth 5 >1, i»-6 I7 m 
Deufschraak 
7days.4*ia-4’ie 
3 mnth 4V4K 
French Franc 

relays 7MA 
3 mnth 7K-7*u 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 10*-1QX 
3 mnth 4V4’/ 
Yen 

7 days 5 , is-5'w 
3 mnth 4<Kr4% 


tali Mi 
1 mnth S’N^'Jib 
6 ninth 5 , *it- u i4 
cal 5-4 
1 mnft «%•*% 

6 mnft 4 , i#-4 i T« 
can 714-6% 

1 mnth 714-7*14 
6 mnft 7"»-7K * 
cal 254-1)4 
1 mnth 4«r4K 
Bmrah 

can 5K-4X 
imnlh 5 ‘i4-4«»i ( 
6 mnft 4"e4 , ii 


GOLD 


GokhS38SL5038380 
Kr 
fi 


,73) 


TREASURY BILLS 


ES328M aliened: El DOM 

: 297,89% received: 68 % 

Last week: £9787% receivaet £40% 

Avga rate 892347% last wk £9,3436% 
NenwotfcClODM replace C 100 M 


ECGD 


Fixed Rata sterling EsPOft Finance 
Scheme [V Average reference rate far 
interest period July 7. 1956. to 
5 . 1988 inefcawe 10009 per 


sr 


John Brown 
links with 
Oslo group 

By David Young 

Energy Carrespondait 

John Brown Engineers and 
Constructors has formed a 
partnership with Aker En- 
gineering of Norway 10 create 
two joint companies in Britain 
and Norway for the manage- 
ment, design and engineering 
of offshore projects. 

Initially the new companies 
will operate only in Britain 
and Norway, but will later 
offer their services in other 
markets. 

John Brown-Aker. the Brit- 
ish end will be based in 
London and will be 55 per 
cem owned by John Brown, 
which is a member of the 
Trafalgar House Group. Aker- 
John Brown, the Norwegian 
end will be based in Oslo with 
the Norwegian partner having 
the majority SS per cem 
holding. 

The British group has been 
involved in over 20 North Sea 
projects since 1974 and has 
also been involved in several 
projects in the Norwegian 
sector. 

Aker has been involved in 
eveiy major offshore project 
carried out in tbe Norwegian 
sector of the North Sea and is 
a world leader in tbe develop- 
ment of semi-submersible 
production systems. At 
present 37 Aker-designed 
semi-submersible systems are 
in use, five of them in the 
British sector of the North 
Sea. 


Hong Kong 
writes off 
£1.8bn debts 

From Stephen Leather 
Hong Kong 

Hong Kong's banks have 
written off more than 
HKS20.3 billion (£1.8 billion) 
out of HKS47.S billion loans 
classed as doubtful debts in 
19S3 and 1984. 

The banks still had problem 
loans worth at least HKS 1 8.96 
by the beginning of this year, 
despite tbe massive write-off 
which followed a series of 
corporate failures in the crown 
colony. 

Hie plight of the Hong 
Kong banking sector is high- 
lighted by a report from KK 
Yeung Management Consul- 
tants. a corporate rescue 
company. 

The report blames the losses 
on insensitive overseas 
management for pressing for 
bankruptcy proceedings with- 
out considering alternative 
arrangements first. 

Tbe number of winding-up 
cases increased 24’ per cent to 
1,403 last yearand bankruptcy 
cases were up 52 per cent to 
940. There were 14 collapses 
in 1985, Including Overseas 
Trust Bank and the Tung 
shipping group. 


COMMENT 


Guinness puts its 
case to shareholders 


Tael and delicacy* has not been a 
feature of the approach of Ernest 
Saunders to shareholders in his quest 
to start sorting out Distillers and take 
it back to the top of the league. The 
revelation, in the new Guinness 
document to shareholders, that Mr 
Saunders received a £100.000 pay rise, 
plus a $75,000 a year contract from 
the Bermuda subsidiary of Arthur Bell 
on May I (with more to come), 
underlines this deficiency. 

The row over board structure did 
not surface until six weeks later. The 
total earnings of Mr Saunders do not 
seem excessive in the rarefied strato- 
sphere of international business pay. 
But the timing, before the proposed 
(but now abandoned) iwo-lier board 
was due to be constructed, does not 
suggest a reverence for form. 

And that is what the document is all 
abouu Its purpose is to persuade 
shareholders to vote for a different 
board structure. Under that, Mr 
Saunders would be chairman and 
chief executive of a unified board and 
four new non-executive directors 
would be elected to form the core of a 
non-executive directors* committee. 
That would have the power to sack Mr 
Saunders and. strictly in ihc future, to 
fix the remuneration of executive 
directors. 

The structure is a good one. Indeed, 
after the Slock Exchange and others 
pushed Guinness to appoint a strong, 
non-cxecuiive committee, it looks a 
model for any company in which the 
roles of chairman and chief executive 
are combined. 

Nor can there be any argument that 
this is a far better board and 
management structure for the job 
than the pseudo-federal arrangement 
pm together when Guinness agreed 


terms with Distillers to fight off James 
Gulliver's Argyll Group. 

The point at issue was always that, 
in its share-listing documents at the 
time of the bid, Guinness had 
committed itself to the holding com- 
pany system with Sir Thomas Risk, 
the Governor of the Bank of Scotland, 
at its head. There was, therefore, a 
conflict between what Guinness had 
formally promised and what was 
actually needed. 

The circular does not take this 
argument much further. Lord Iveagh, 
as president of Guinness, writes of the 
board's responsibilities in the "excep- 
tional circumstances in which it found 
itself.” Those circumstances were that 
it had to change Distillers radically 
and needed to move fast and with one 
voice onlv. 

The circular lists various ghastly 
features that Guinness found at 
Distillers, such as its lack of an 
effective comsumcr marketing struc- 
ture for its dominant overseas mar- 
kets. hut these would have come as no 
surprise, for instance, to Mr Gulliver. 

Put simply, a mistake was made. It 
may have seemed convenient at the 
time, although the Scottish lobby and 
Distillers were long estranged. The 
directors are not threatening to resign 
over the issue, which is healih\. 
Shareholders, most of them former 
Distillers' shareholders, must decide. 

They will have to choose between 
what is good for their pockets and 
what is good for high formal standards 
in public companies. Bui since the 
main point of those standards is itself 
to protect the interests of sharehold- 
ers, they may well think it illogical to 
oppose' a board that, however Mr 
Saunders may be cast in the lan 
Botham role, has in the end openly 
recognized its error. 


Wisdom and mortgages 


Building society chiefs left for the long 
weekend with briefcases bulging with 
a document from the Registry of 
Friendly Societies, outlining a new 
system of capital ratios. They have 
one month to respond. 

The Chief Registrar. Mr Michael 
Bridgeman. makes clear that a new 
system is needed partly to cope with 
societies dabbling in new permitted 
kinds of business. More immediately, 
mortgage markets have changed. 
Lending used to be about safety. That 
is no longer so true. “The calculus (of 
the ratio of capital to lending) 
therefore seeks to reflect the general 
increase in risks on mortgage lending, 
and the increased need for societies to 
have capital to buy time for 
adjustment". 

This is wise. The method involves 
dividing mortgage lending into four 
risk categories — more even than 
banks must do. But societies will 


always be predominantly exposed to 
the home loans market, so special care 
is required. 

Reserve ratios are fierce on new 
kinds of business. Provisions of 20 per 
cent on unsecured loans and on rented 
housing financed long term. 40 per 
cent on rentals financed short term, 
and 10 per cent on foreign exchange 
services, bespeak caution. They are 
likely - as probably intended - to 
deter societies from rushing in. 

Societies may also need to raise new- 
capital but, unlike joint-stock banks, 
they can now really only do so by 
accumulating reserves. As predicted 
in this column, the Registrar will 
consider some form of perpetual 
floating rate note to count as second- 
ary capital. With the whiff of fees in 
the air, surely merchant banks will 
rapidly devise some suitable 
instrument. 


Fashion groups 
in £l.lm talks 

French Connection is hold- 
ing talks with Western Group 
abort buying it for £1.1 million 
cash. French Connection will 
repay £200,000 nominal pref- 
erence shares at par and 
£200,000 loan stock in the 
Western Gronp from its own 
resources. 

Western runs a chain of ]9 
fashion shops in the Midlands 
and the North. 


Bankers Trust Company; 
Mr Cob Stenham is leaving 
Unilever, where he is financial 
director, to become executive 
chairman of the bank's busi- 
nesses in the United King- 
dom, Continental Europe, the 
Middle East and Africa. He 
will also become chairman of 
the new global policy commit- 
tee. which will develop and 
coordinate strategy for non- 
US business, a managing 
director of Bankers Trust 


APPOINTMENTS 


Company, and a member of 
the bank’s financial services 
management committee. 

Mega: Mr Julian Coombes 
has been appointed financial 
director. 

Saatchi & Saaichi Com- 
pany: Mr David Ne» lands is 
to join the main board as 
group finance director. 

IC1: Dr KA Taylor is named 
vice president, research & 
technology for 1C1 Advanced 
Materials. 


British Man-Made Fibres 
Federation: Mr CD Myers 
has been appointed director 
succeeding Mr Donald 
Anderson. 

Vauxhall Motors: Mr Peter 
Batchelor has become director 
of marketing with responsibil- 
ity for marketing Vauxhall 
and Opel cars In the United 
Kingdom. 

Noble & Lund: Mr Stephen 
Finch has been made a direc- 
tor and deputy chairman. 


FREE PRIZE DRAW 


Will you turn £500 of penny shares into 
£1,000 in just six weeks? 



At9amon Wednesday 
1 3 th February 1 987 we’ll prove, coo- 
dusively. that iti sedUpoesible redouble yourmoney 
in just six weeks with our penny share sweepstake. 

In onler to do this, we'll enter your name in our 
next Free Prize Draw, More details on bow to enter 
the draw later. 

THE EXPERTS” EXPERT 

Stockmarket Confidential for SMC fbr short) is 
a rather inauspicious looking news shed which is 
■eat, by first dass post, wry Wednesday evening 

Despite its innocuous appearance it is eagerly 
read oo Thursday morning by a handful of hmaftors 
up and down the country. 

Some ofthese investors will be professional 
stockbrokers, heads of industry and other leading 
financial experts. Between them they may control, 
literally, millions of pound* 

sometimes wtUiaaimleajtlsOQ orSI . OMwith 
which to speculate. 

Bui what erery reader of Stockmarfcet 
Confidents 1 hOA in common is the desire D distwv r 
what is likely to happen on tbe stoefanarket that 
coming week. 

Bluntly, they want to know which shares are 
going to go op, and which shares are going to come 
sown. And they wantto know why. 

THE SECRET OF 
INVESTMENT SUCCESS 

The an(y way tomake money on thestockxnnrket 
istohuvereliableadviceandtheabmtytomovB&ist, 
before the word gets around and prices rocket. 

In Stockmarfcet Confidential w make baying 
and adlingreconimimdHtionAoflb- sound nwtBtmwt 
analysis and. moat important of all, suggest one or 
more “Hot Tips" for the week. 

Each Wednesday (+eningyonwTl] be sent by 1st 
class mail your latest issue ofSMC. Ifyoudon'taet on 
our-Hoffips" quickly you may 'miss tbe boat-other 
SMC sutoenbew will haw already pnshedpneesup. 

loull discover that vay often the beet 
investments are the H penhyBharE& n , . . Ftntosfor 
instence, which rOcktted&omlSptofilp. . -Ryan 
Hotebfrom8pto28pi . .HollisBro&froio9pto77p. . . 
just three examples from a long list of successful 
“penny shares* - 

WHY fOU CAN ACT WITH 
SUCH CONFIDENCE 

Bach weak the editor ofSMC chains nriwte 


HOW WE WILL DOUBLE 
YOUR MONEY IN SIX WEEKS 

As we’« already explained, it ia possible to 
doubleyoor money by investing the prize, if you win, 
in penny shares. 

All you need to do is enter our Free Prize Draw 
by completing and returning the coupon . 

Hyou wm, you 'll rec»Tf£500tospend or inwest as 
you pltise We'd suggest that youmvrstil in any one of 


FULL PROFIT RECORD FROM 

2 1st MAY - 6th AUGUST 1986 

II - * all very wwll knowing what to bay— tbe 

real necret i* knowing what to sell. This is our 

foil ••seD" record shift tbe 21 St May 1986. 

1— ■ 

•aflMfHi 

■rtrifen 

lUle 

PritduunfGroap 

7!p 

llSp 

61% 

DnnMUHoUinM 

IMp 

soap 

37% 

BrwnHrovelndBAtrire 

Top 

I19p 

46% 

Jobss nbodhemd ASone 

38p 

SOp 

27% 

BcatHdCoKrarMich. 

68 n 

top 

28% 

Squirrel Horn 

36|> 

36p 

34% 

Airflow Streamline* 

Mp 

Sip 

111% 

MiUtttiUba* 

163p 

ZISp 

29% 

Bnlnelndiuurfe* 

61p 

HZp 

30% 

MlirkeflSenere 

93p 

124p 

29\ 

KreplVut 

Utap 

2 ia P 

1360% 

AjG.But 

=50P 

355p 

37% 

BobmM.DwtgiM 

IDSp 

I28p 

14% 

Bestobell 

397p 

5Mp 

39% 

SWmRM4 Predetu 

lSJp 

190p 

20% 

Berrtelm .A Finance 

lOp 

I4tap 

43% 

(formerly Abwood MaeUacTwela) 








HOWTO MAKEMORE MONEY 
ON THE STOCKMARKET 
Claim this unique 3 part guideFREE. 

• Learn new techniques, use the little 
known wrinkles the professionals 
use to maximise their stockmarket 
profits. 

• Discover the most profitable wav to 
■stag’ NEW ISSUES, pick PENNY 
SHARE winners, and gear your in- 
vestments for maximum growth. 

• All this and more is pa eked in your 
three part guide. 


our “Hot Tips" for that week- Because ifyoc do, and 
your£500 of shares aren't worth Cl ,000 within ai* 
weeks well make up Lbe difference m cash. 

That "mi ght .we're soconfld+m thatonr 
advice to sonnri wrbelievethai5 500 w!U he worth 
jT jjjS (n hurt sue weeks! 

Ei'eryorwte welcome UJ enter this Prer Prize 
Draw.Nopunhase'tsneceasary. AfuD UsicfPreePrize 
Draw winners and full mica are available on receipt 


of a saj. Winners’ names an? published in SMC. 
The dosing date efthe draw is 3 1 st December 19S6. 

FREE! TEN TRIAL ISSUES 

Of couzae, share prices can go down , as we\\ as 
up. Bui we don't want you to risk a penny of.vour mvn 
money until you’re convi need that you will make a 
profit by acting on our advice. 

So ifyooret urn the completed delayed action - 
direct debit below, well rush you the oriel ten issues 
afSMC absolutely free. This way you can profit from 
oar experts’ valuable advice for ten whole weeks at 
no lo yourself. 

Ifyou decido not La continue with SMC, (hen just 
write to oursu beer ipt ion department and cancel youi 
direct debit before the payment data 

IbursubscriptioiiwillbepaidautORiaticallvby 
direct debit at the current price of £36 per quarter. U 

this price should change we will give you su weeks 
advance warning. 

LOSE NOTHING 

tour ten week free trial has uonsk, so complctt 
the coupon today —you thn*l need & stamp 

SIOCiaURKET CONFIDENTIAL 

tHKk* l:*IMunmrrSm*. 

UninWlNrn) KrcturadNe 73K!49Lu»*.i 


flnnnfial wpMM«Hwtcpnn1mrnrmflt»n, wnlirii>tM 

Bouroe& and diseuss the latest CHy whiepeiw At the 
and of tbe meeting they will have choean lire three 
hottest tips and decided whether or not losall shares 
previously recommended- 

Wb guarantee that noneof these tips will be 
looked bjr the SMC Editorial Board, or published, 
unapt in SMC. 


^FREETRIALORDER 

I Ptooesendto: 

I " STOCKMARKETCONFIDENTIAL 
FREEPOSL Romford, Essex RM6 1BR 

I Please send many FREE | — 1 

issues and FREE I J 

I STOCK MARKET GUIDE 

iTnal subscfihtTvonlyj 

I Please enter me in the 5 1.000 I 1 
FREE PRIZE DRAW I J 

I lf 1 decide to subscribe 1 will pay t be 
torrent price of just £36a quarter by 
direct debit. 

SM86C3 


NAME l CAPS'. 
ADDRESS — 



SIGNED 

TUTP 


Tfr. 






-SORT CODE. 


ACCOUNT No 

Utkaavu ,Kkm ■ 

DISBCTDkufl i WC ICANDAXEt-U'emthcn^ouunuirimher 1 
notice inwnUneuehmpeiomytmracciHiiKwiihyautairr 1 
mnbafirrUw itauslntnJUHl^iiirtnl} dKmftrruB- ■ 
raecificdannuntawiuchiiuvbedelHiedtiiofMa>iU)w<i«twm ■* 
rfStoochnrt PuM lent lnn»Ll mind by direct dehu. m 

Bankam^decliacitttUwaiaaatodiarcediraadehltsbiR'ruin ■ 
tvpuafaramaiatborthwicurrrwBnouiiu F 


V 





BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


£ H SL 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


B4, Oiler Omg tw 


So Otcr O+g rv 


fta £»■<• Ov»j <ks 


MDEY owr must MANAGERS 

HO. Bcunwraoum BH8 BAL 
03*5 717373 (Lmfefen*) 


04 & Ft*od 
me Earn 
wononCB Bate 
Anatnftpi Growth 
Won Paste 
teems A Earns 
Copras flaurve 
CCnm A Energy 
Ewman Capid 
General 


tlBl izasc +03 BjH 
9S£ 99.1m +0A 499 
145 7 2093# +2.1 433 
155.1 164.9 +12 130 


<96 633 
1033 1103 
_ 68.1 60S 
> 730 78.1 
1000 1003 


KGrowih me 
Do Mean 
5'Emetong Css 


T3S2 1443* +03 194 
834 883 +02 . 


US'] Bnq p nq Co 

fc^lJloi nOSWI 

uamnsuce 


972 10*2 
1391 1493 
56.4 692 
1316 205.1 
S52 69.3 


ALUEDDUttfAR UNIT TRUSTS 
AJbM Dtxibto Cgrtn Swmdgn SN1 
0793 810366 8 0793 28291 


fittl TruH 
Growth & income 
Camri Tiuat 
BAnew 
tecum Trust 
Araeraan income 

H^l Incgma Tet 


Equity beams 
Han Y«0 


Hqn Y«0 

Govt Secs Trust 


Japan Fund 
Pacific Trust 


Amor Sod Sts 66.7 713 

Secs CHAiner Ts 2103 2304 
Aid Asset Value 2253 233.6 
G*1 Grwn 383 403 

Snufler Col 1186 1203 

2nd Smaier GO'S 1533 1E33 
Tl gc o yety Trust 81.1 88.4 

Mm **t 8 Cmdty 80.7 853 
0 seas Earnings IBT.I 1923 
Teavwogy Tst 88 7 942 

(rconw Gsnct t 2«£ 131.7 
Exemai Smaller CO'c 230 5 244J 
USA Exempt Thai 3443 3652 


2219 2382m 
1342 1433 
2313 2*13 
3549 3733 
SS1 1 S883 
311 353m 
2499 2812 
1372 146.1 • 
1*33 1GZ3 
909 319 
88 4 941S 
1217 131.7 
IB5.Q 1573 
66.7 713 


2259 239.5 
383 409 
1186 1263# 
1539 1639 
81.1 88.4 
817 859 
IBT.I 192 3 


-£8 398 
+19 316 
+1.7 236 
+13 322 
+33 101 
+17 4.15 
+29 4JB 
+1 7 497 
+12 338 
•03 9.1* 
•29 085 
+26 0.01 
+11 081 
+09 138 
-02 091 
+1 J 125 
+09 283 
*17 2.72 
+2.1 243 
+03 216 
+15 231 
+1 4 3.fl? 
+21 0.95 
+18 817 
+22 296 
+11 1.12 


Nat Hon Inc 

Pref Snares 

1922 2050 
IBP 192# 

+0.7 *76 
+0410 36 


1189 

1266 

-03 2.73 

F+tanood Sea 

467 

49 B 

2.12 







173 

-OJ 152 


66 B 

71 2 

-01 1® 


481 




413 

41 1# 

•06 0*5 


98.4 

108.0c 

+13 3® 


no 

6U 

-0.1 5.18 


7iJ 

2<3 

-03 039 

aim Growth 

«o 

693 

-03 1 78 


166 

179 

*0 7 0.19 

Far &Jt 

S2B 

563# 

+01 0® 

Hong Kong Pit 

2S.I 

.176 

718# 

401 

247 

*03 1.47 


812 

968 

+13 


182 

17 3c 



824 

B63 

+0.9 3.71 

Exempt Market 

6*7 

67.7 

4.14 

BROWN SflPlEY 




9-17. PfentiWK Hd. Haywards Heath 

0444 486144 


124.9 

1338# 

+ 13 2® 

Snow Co's Acc 

2287 2460 

+13 


Hon Income True 757 BOB +09 306 
CM & Freed Im 532 56.7m +0J 837 


CM & Frxed Im 532 56.7m +03 837 

T« 01 Mr Trust* 611 65 I# *111x6 

Spocai &» Turn T44 7?2 . £4i 

HA Amer Trust 600 09 +03 156 

te Eastern Trust 850 sue +06 095 

km Ortwin 5l3 549 +07 103 


EQUITY 6 LAW 

St Georg# Hie Cor patamn St Coventry cvi 

iso 


UK OmwA Amen 1474 1503 


Oo income 128.1 1362 

H*ne» Ae Aetstm 245.1 2807 
Do income 1973 ZC9 B 
G+B/F-red Actum 1023 107.6 
Do income 87 4 910 

501 Amer Tst Accwn 1344 142.9 
Per East Tst Accum 13*3 174.9 
Euro TK Aeeun 1618 1731 
General Tnffl 2313 2513 


*09 3<6 
+05 346 
+10 4 66 
+06 496 
-0.7 254 
*06 264 
•05 041 
+10 136 
+4 4 101 
*03 323 


Do Income 
High Income 

Income 

Man PcmOflo Ac 
Do Acc 

Norm American 
Orient 


147.1 1582 +0.8 0.96 

636 705 +04 572 

753 815 +04 463 

609 65 0* +05 3.13 

1033 109.7# +15 
563 830 -04 133 

36.9 915 -07 133 


FA C UNIT MANAGEMENT 

1. Laurence Poutne* ha London EC*n 08A 

01-633 4680 

US SmaUar Co'S 71 9 765 . . 021 

Capital Fund 1075 114 B +3.4 03 

Income Fund 714 853 +0 8 4 61 

Far Eastern Fund 772 CZ6 -0 8 03 

Overseas Incan 729 78 0 -19 Ml 

FboM M«H E60 632 *12 901 

Naum Res Fmd So 4t fl -02 4.1! 

Euroown Income B25 813 +3 1 39 


BUCXMASTER MANAGEMENT 

Tne Stock Exchange Lcrdon EC2P 2JT 

01-588 2868 


FSMVESTMENT MANAGERS 

190. West Georoe SL Otago* G2 2PA 

0*1032 3132 


ARBUTHIIOT SECURITIES _ 

131. FxnbUTY Pjvamqm Loncoti EC2A 1AT 
01-628 9970 01-280 85*0/1/2/3 

Carol Growth « 58i ffli +17 1£B 

Do tecum 613 69.6 -08 '57 

Eastern A no 146J 156.4 c +09 078 

Do 6V> Withdraw# 784 638 +05 078 

Finance A Property 652 6B2c +1.1 2.1* 

G* A ErxeC income <8 6 SI 2* +09 B.15 

Do Accum 82.7 870# *12 115 

Eoixty income 73 B 789m +04 AJJ5 

DO Accum 1748 187 0* A85 

Htn YWd Income 740 79ie 756 

Do Accum 184 0 207 46 +19 786 

Ml Income 79 S 650 +1.7 113 

On Acorn Bl ? 87 3 +19 113 

Da S*. Wttndrwl 738 789 *16 213 

Managed Fund 634 668 +14 ■ ■ 

Preference income 29 7 31 7 +0.1 980 

Do Acorn «l 102.7 +04 980 



2139 225.1 

+4.4 IM 


A3A 

46 4 

+13 i.n 

DO Accum (4) 

3420 359.9 

+7 0 3 09 


44j 

47 1 

-to .. 

fetcomr Fund 13) 

101.6 1071 

+34 4 84 

Income Gin few 

407 

42.8 

+115® 

Do Accum Ol 

17B2 1879 

*4 1 454 

Da team 

*37 

449 

+u 

mi Inc 12) 

lWB 1366# 

+M 143 



su 

+18 1® 

Do Accum ® 

174 0 1816 

+53 143 

Do Accum 

487 

51a 

+ 16 

Smauv me (Si 

Ell 46 1 2 17 

+023 2 77 

FI DBJTT INTERNATIONAL 



Do Acoxri (51 

no® 11® 

*0 15 2 7? 

River WjBl Tonandge TW9 1D» 


CS FUND MANAGERS 


0732 362222 




125. Hun Haftom. London WCiV 6PY 


irw 1 

1125 

•03 061 




Amer Eguny income 

33 1 

®5# 

+15 *J8 


CS Japan Fund 972 1034 

CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
l. ptg ngc way. Wemntey. HAS ONB 

Grown 2798 29* I* 


Do Accum 
Eoixty income 
Do Accum 
Hicn Yield Income 
Do Accum 


2798 29* 1* +27 3D* 
322.4 3430* +3 1 322 
221.8 23S.9 +109 028 
1522 1619 -01 156 

49 4 520® +16 1.50 

51 8 55.(c +1.0 I4U 
61.9 659c *1.7 ISO 


Far East Inc 

G4I a Fixed H 
Grown a mar# 
Japan Soecul S4s 
Japan Toot 


Managed mt Ta 
■in income Eon 


Pt«<esMeai Cm 


35 E 379 

fee 3i.4 329 

am 963 1034 
I S4s 482 51 6 

1514 1629 
Ts 1484 157 9 
Entity 794 B54 

Qn 33.4 356* 


Sonin East An Tm 3T3 33 3 


+0J 370 
+03 892 

+10 <90 

+05 

*92 

*31 001 
+04 529 
+04 257 
+07 0*9 

+15 100 


On ACCUT* Bl a 67 3 '►i-o Z.13 

Da 5-. Ufcndrwl 738 789 *16 113 

Managed Fund 63 < 568 -l* . . 

Praterenoe income 29 7 31 7 +11 9OT 

Do Acorn 5fil 102.7 +04 980 

£re*e* Co S Accum 128.0 136 8 +12 1.71 

nr+ia Penny snare 9 6 '02# . . 0 72 

Pe-dclm Tsl UK 782 81 0* +1 f '|8 

Porda+J Tm Japan 1098 '13.7# +0 7 040 

Ptjmcuo TM US 70 8 73 1# -0* '-M 

Partcw Tsi Europe 1198 124.1# +35 000 

Panfa+o Tot HK 433 UM *18 010 


CAP9L /JAMES) HANAOEMEHT 
PO Bo> 551 6 Bews Media London ECS 7 JO 
01-621 0011 

Captai 3864 3924 *45 143 

Income 279 7 2992 +22 4 84 

North American 289 ' 3093 -2.1 046 


FLESHNO (ROBERT) 

8 Cnnoy Sd. Undon EC3A BAN 
01-638 5858 


Cap-mi 3865 392.0 *44 143 

Income 279 7 296 2 *22 484 

North American 289 ' 3093 -2.1 IBS 

CATER ALLEN 

1 . King WHum SL EC*N 7AU 
01-623 6314 

Q4I Trust 102.1 1013* +041095 


Amman Exempt E35+2 361.9 
Japan Eiarntn £*232 *366 
Am Property TM 510789 0 * 

Properly Trust £20320 


434 

M6 

152 

£5 

4 +13 

> +19 

858 

91 

8 +20 

326 

J* 

9 -01 

6*7 

69 

1 *16 

691 

84 1 

7* 

57 

3# +29 

9 +06 

553 

59 

2 -03 

340 

542 

38 

37 

a +io 

7 +08 

MO 

10 * 

3 +14 


U4 


54. 

9 

<HI 

1 

129 

5 1 

138 

l 1 

tt» 

7 1 

in 

4 1 

237 


2*0 

1 + 

53 

3 








FRAMJNQTCM Ultfr MANAGEMENT 
3 London W4I Bldgs. London Wi9. London 
EC2M 5NQ 




BAIUJE OOFFORD 

2. GWnhnbs St Eo-noixgh EH3 BYY 
031-225 2581 (Dealers 111 -226 60661 


Inil £• 122) 

Japan E> I *3) 

UK Ex |31| 

P sal Pens few 
PM Pens UK 
BG America 
BG Energy 

PG income Grvrth 
BG Japan 
BG Technology 


4*3 1 462 am 1-09 

454 4 4739 1.90 

2385 2517 -14 142 

448 0 4716 
199 0 2096 

1689 1797c -09 126 

1480 155.4 *65 131 

193 3 205 7c +37 524 
209 1 2225 -14 100 

1408 1494 -01 187 


ONTRAL BOARD OF FINANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 
2. fan Street London EC2Y SAG 
01-588 1815 

felv Fund 3979 

Food H 144 4 

OepdH 1004 


01-628 5181 
Amer A Gen Me 
Da Accum 


222* 2364* -34 0.48 

2274 241 6* -17 048 


Pe^p 


Amer TunwiM Inc 2108 224 2 


Do Accum 2184 2326 

Capital Tst kx 208 2 221 4 

Do Accum 250 6 2664 

Corn A GW Inc 67 4 924 

Do Accum 1160 1234 

Extra few Tm me 159 4 18941 

Do Accum 1726 183 64 

Income Trust 115.0 1 ZZZ 

DO Accum 1208 128 4 

fen Grown Fd hie 164.6 1750 

Do Accrfen 1E2S 194 4 

Japan A Gen Inc 920 978 

Da Accum 930 968 

Mutiny Me Fd 81 6 HL6i 

Recovery 1338 1424« 

Do Accum . 1456 15444 
European Inc 626 EG 4 

Do Atom 626 664 

RUENDS PROVIDENT MANAGERS 
ftmam End. Domra. Sunn 
0006 685055 

FP Equity Dm 1964 2087 

DO Accum 3272 347 3 

FP Fried Ml DM 114 7 122.0 

Do Accum T30.6 1364 

StewardsUp Dot 171.7 1822 

Do Accum 1772 1881 


CNAHTTira OFFICIAL INVESTMENT Fie® 

2 Fore StreeL London EC2Y SAQ 
01-568 1815 

Income 384,14 .. SOS 

Accum £116781 

Deposit 1010 .. 950 


1208 1284 
164.6 1750 
1B2S 194 4 
920 978 
930 988 


BALTIC TRUST MAMA OCRS 

25/78 Anermarte StreeL London W1X HAD 

01-491 0295 

American 474 60 6 -12 076 

Australian 186 17 Be -05 317 

Japan A Germl H72 125.4* -04 a 17 

I nji Income 44 5 476 -04 605 

Irtsmaasnel Trust 797 653# -Ot f.flfi 

income Grawm Tst 458 486# *03 199 

GWS A Pnsa mt 204 219 +01 057 

GUPal Mirfeecs 33 0 35J -0.4 Z II 

Sceoas Scuannns 385 414 -12 158 

BARCLAYS UNICORN 
Uncpm House. 252. Romford Bo E7 
01-534 S5J4 


CLEMCAL MEDICAL UNIT TRUST 
MAMAOERS 

Narrow Plan. Bnttol BS2 QJH 
0800 373393 

Amer Growth 23.1 245 

Equity HQ1 Mocme 414 A4.Bc 

European Growdl 294 315 

General EreWy 384 41B# 

am a Fixed mt am 3ft? 3i.7# 

a# A Fixed few SSA 289c 

Mdax Securttwa 255 284 

Japan Grtmnh 35.1 37.4 


-04 140 
+05 4.70 
+16 200 
+03 2-60 
+12 320 
+04 950 
+01 230 
+12 190 


America 56 6 921 

Ausi Accum 1233 '31.1 

03 income 675 930 

Caorial 684 72 j 6 

eStW Trust 424 4 451 4 

Extra Jrecma 746 794 

Franca) 2293 2*39 

SCO 2629 279.6 

General 1374 146.1 

GJl A Fixed few 542 570 

Japan A Gen Inc 1779 1892 

Do Ac; 1800 1914 

Growth Accum 1794 189 7 

I rconw Trust 3292 3502 

Lasure Trust 79.1 64 1 

Soecal Snuuwns I3B4 >488 

Recovery 1® 5 2027 

Trustee Fund 1052 ill 9 

Km Tech Accum 532 58* 

Do Means 525 559 

WariCwwe Trust 1528 1625- 

B Tst Iny Furw ACC 3215 3420 

Da few 2089 2215 


MB 921 -0.1 147 

1233 '31-t -17 154 

875 930 -12 144 

684 724# +17 306 
424 4 451 4 +3 7 4D1 

746 794 +0 7 357 

2293 7*39 +19 310 

2624 279.6# +35 115 
1374 1411 +12 315 

542 570# +04 9.61 
1779 1892 +28 0 06 

1800 1914 +29 0.06 

I.H 1897 +14 239 

3292 3502# +24 378 
79.1 84 1 -04 1.41 

1394 >488 +22 233 

190 5 2027 +12 244 

1052 1119 +08 243 

532 565# +1 A 020 
525 554# +14 020 
1525 1629# +14 047 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
161. CtwaaMde. London EC2V 6EU 
01-726 19» 

Energy Trust 454 411* 

Extra Income 1624 172.7* 

Fxanaai I87J 1774# 

On Smtagy 565 582 

GrawM Investment 2811 2479 
Income A Growth 39.7 422# 

Japanese A PeoAe 2027 2155 b 

Ntn Amer Gnowsi 1024 109.4 

feW Recowv 1112 1172* 

Smaller Co s 2115 2244* 

Good Me Tst 581 61.9 

Soecsi SOS Acc 2775 2452 


159 4 199 4# +22 455 
1726 183 6# +21 445 
1130 1222 -I 3 435 


4rl 


' j j.i u'li jl . iJBiU g ^1 


i" 




i 't w y »■ 






81 6 086# +0.6 4 86 
133 8 1422# +02 165 

1456 1545# +04 i 66 
626 664 *'4 043 

626 664 *14QW 





m 




LlU 


1983 2087 
3272 347 3 
114 7 1220 

138.6 1364 

171.7 1822 
1772 1881 




FUfOS IN COURT 

Pubfec Tiustee Kmgswav WC2 

01-405 4300 


Copaai 
Ows few 
High V-*M 


3495 3815 
1412 149 9 
215.1 2202* 


OT UNIT MANAGERS 

Bn Poor, a Devon shea 5a London EC2M <VJ 
01-283 2575 Oeatng 01-625 9431 


CROHN UWT TRUST BBTVICeS 
Crown House. WoWng GU21 1XW 

ii.-iww 5033 

hwi fewome Trust 2386 2552 +7.1 5.12 

Growth Trust 2115 2313# +32 110 

Amancsn Trust 1315 1385 +1.1 172 


UK Caa Fnq few 
Do A ccum 
Income Fund 
Henson Exempt 

I nte meto nN _ 

US A GeeW 585 629 -0.7 Q® 

Tech 8 Growth 635 680 -02 120 

Japan A General 27DB 289 7 *4 4 110 

For East A Gen 126 7 135.6 +5 8 0 40 

European Fund 2844 2834 +90 030 

Germany Fund 724 775 +25 090 

GARTMORE FUND MANAGERS 
2 Si Mery Axe. London EC3A B8P 
01-623 1212 Oeafenc 01-623 5766 Denfeng 01 -623 


965 1033* +03 3® 
1394 1417 *03 3® 

793 855c *0 7 8® 

1712 1867* 411® 
1740 INI *34 040 


BARING FUND MANAGERS 

PO Bor 156 BacMiram. Mm BR3 - 

01-656 9002 


AuSiraLa 
Eastern 
Equty fewome 

Europe 

Growth A tnC 
Japan SpeoaJ 
Jacan Sunrise 
F*sf Eixope 
Ffed japan 
First N Amer 
firet SmaMr Co s 


614 611 
SIS 62Se 
554 EDO 
130.1 1383 
6?9 66 5* 
1 ®c 1159c 
970 M3 
1150 1+23 

90 3 915 

502 526# 

629 674 


CRUSADER UNIT TRUST MJkNAGERS LTD 
Ragan. Surrey RH2 B8L 
0737 42*24 

UK fewome 492 525 +QJ 

UK Growth Accum 486 514 +0J 

Do Dei 486 514 +U 

European Grown 552 519 +IJ 

PaohC Growth 583 589 +1J 


+05 4w4? 
+02 243 
+02 243 
+12 153 
+12 .. 


+34 m 
-or am 
-02 120 
*4 4 110 

+58 040 
+90 0® 
+25 040 






BA RHINGTON MANAGEMENT 
i0 Fencmacti St London EC3 
01-623 8000 


EFM UNirTRUST MANAGERS 
4. MeivAe Crascem. EdMtxugll 
031-226 3492 

American Fund 73-7 784 
Capaal Fund 9*4 1019 

Growth A Me Fund 1265 (355* 
Wan Dai Fund 107.6 1111 
mwr n mon a i Fund 1985 2123 
Resources Fund 223 234 
So# Jap Co's Fnd 37.1 395 
Tokyo Fund 1825 1955o 


542 581 
495 521 
1534 1635 


thamee m» 

European me 
Dc Accum 
Genera! few 
Do Accum 
GmT Told few 
Do Accum 


Writ y-»ia me 
bo Accum 


Do Accum 

Japan income 2494 2735 -06 OJ 

DO Accum MI 8 Z75.7 -0.6 0J 

N American few *96 527 -03 0J 

On Accum 574 61 1 -03 O! 

Pacific Income 136 1 1428 -0.1 OJ 

Do Accum 1532 IM 7 -0.1 OJ 

Smir Cos Irw 801 853 +12 11 

Do Acqxh 95.0 101.1 +1.6 1.1 

BRITANNIA UWT TRUST 
71-76 Finsbury Pavement London EC2A 1JO 


1326 141.1 +1.7 344 

954 1®.1 +1.9 143 

117 7 1232 +24 143 

1569 1666# +2.4 249 
214 0 277 I +34 299 
1150 1185 +13 9® 

185 4 1910c +21 9® 
84 6 9Z2C +14 5® 
1724 1835 +30 5® 


(Exl Ama* (21 
(Ex) Japan (3) 


1603 1552 
(Ex) Japan (3] 1214 1210 

(Ex) Pacific (4) 2964 3064c 

IEx| Smotfar Jap (4) 2121 2194 

EurOfeMO 275 292 


+02 216 
+20 1 ® 
*05 453 
+1.6 5® 
+24 I® 
-12 042 
-16 .. 
+25 1® 
♦28 3® 
+45 117 
+24 132 
-64 HO 
+17 837 


EAGLE STAR UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bom Road. OfeHtaanm. Gloucester GLS3 7U0 
02*2 521311 

UK BebMced few 884 735 +05 257 

Do Aaaen 635 74.1 ^03 257 

UK Growdl Accom 83.1 88.6 +17 1.72 

UK High few Inc 850 603 +1.1 5.10 

N Amertcen Aoajm 68.7 71.1* +05 1® 

Far Exstern Accum 1054 1120* +23 1® 
European Accum 834 STIi# +25 178 
UK Get A FI Me 547 583 +03 154 

Do Accum 583 611 +13 7 39 


58® 

Amman Trust ®7 954 -04 0® 

Australian Trust I7.g ig.i -03 135 
Brook Tst Accum 575 614* +23 IBS 
Do Dot 500 538* *21 115 

Commooav 5hare 5a 6 50* +06I4S 

European Trust 54 2 517 +13 031 

Extra Metferw Trust 485 52 1 +13 5 14 

Far Eastam Trust 1534 1635 +12 a® 

Freed «wast Fund 2 62 26.1 972 

Gil Trust 273 284 +04 824 

Gtotai Fund Acorn 1780 1904 -2.1 0® 

DO Dot 1717 181.6 -15 0® 

Oota Snore Trust 124 134 -13 2« 

Haagad American 314 339 +07 010 

wgn Incoma Treat 1*0* isa«# +21 5.76 
Mong Hang Trust 285 303 -03 f.ffl 

feWfe Fond 742 795* +10 326 

hswanee Agencws E*69fl 5049 +125 244 
Japan Toot 1617 1721 +44 0® 

jAenaged Exempt 2747 2862 +39 239 

On 3 Enorgy Trust 324 34 7 *12 1 75 

Soereal &is Trust 938 IMS +1 3 178 

UK SmlrCsRec Tst 717 758 .. 1® 


+06 1 45 
+19 031 
+1 3 5 U 
+82 0® 
. 972 

+04 124 
-21 020 
-14 0 ® 
-13 2® 
+07 010 


GO VETT (JOHN) IMT MANAGEMENT 
WMdwsmr mm. 77. London Was. London EC2N 
IDA 


01-588 6620 
im) Growth 
American Oowdi 
American few 
Eixopean Growth 
Goh 8 Minerals 
Japan Growth 


BT5 972 +07 1® 

63 7 684# +05 191 
710 75.1c +12 531 
2312 2472 +74 0® 

356 382* -05 1.78 
1629 1742* -14 . 


74-78 Finsbury Pavement London EC2A 1JO 
01-588 2777 Deatrg4i-638 0478)9 MonoyGuda 
0800-010-333 


BOUHANCE RJW MAHAOEMBfT LTD 


Admm Carore. Hexagon House. 28 Western 
ROM. RonAcxd RM13LB 


Growth Gat 

feiti Recovary 
Smaaer Cos 
UK Growth 
Extra me 
G# 

Me 1 Growth 


59.7 606# +0.1 041 
104 1 111 0 *23 167 


Rom. Romkad 

0708-86966 

Endurance 


1107 1184c +23 342 


1392 1485# +02 I® 

374 *04 +0.1 218 


55.1 MU# +17 7.62 
284 279 +02 763 

1909 2087. *22 4 31 


EQUITABLE UHTTB A D M MI8 TRAHQK 
35. Fcunam SL M a ncha a tr 
® 1-238 9685 

Freamwe PMcan 788 784 +07 322 


GHE UWT MANAGERS 

RoyN Exchange. EC3P 30N 
01-688 9903 

OR 6 Fixed bn 1233 ! 

Growth Equty 1990 J 

GuertMA 2786 : 

N Amencan leoi i 

PMAe 2473 s 

Property Share 2S9 1 i 


1233 1282c +1.1 6® 
1990 211 9 +26 201 

2788 238 7# +52 257 
1*01 149.1 +04 127 

247 3 268i +44 0.12 


Smaa# Companies 2135 2272 
&F0PM*1 Trust 2554 2713 


I 275.7# +1.7 144 
5 2272 +25 1.78 







• Ex tjundand c Cun cnrxamd k Cum 
stock spkt 6 Ex Stock spfet re Cum an 
(any two or man ot aboral n Ex afl (any 
two or mon o' Btxwvt. Dnawwj or 
vabiabon flaw (1) Monday (2l Tuesday 





mtm 








Iir-L-aclv? li'Ju-j 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 



INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


mwe 

Gross 

d» 

Ch'ga pence 

YW 

% pie 

63 


43 

55, % 

156 


SJ 

4SS 


5.1 

U 279 

58 



■ .. 259 

a 

-2 


.. AS 

1® 

ms 

47 


iu 

-2 

13b 2 A 640 

26 


1.7 

11 69 

t . . 


43 


143 


37 

29 179 

16 




U'r 

• .. 

19 

99 149 

X 




65 




116 


39 

39 188 

43 

• . . 

10 

39 59 

151 

■ .. 

44 

29109 

1® 


£4 

1.6 39.1 

90 


5.* 

69 129 

80 

-3 

ZB 

33 10.7 

110 

• .. 

30 

39 129 

5'- 




S'. 




218 

• . • 

13 

29 14.7 

a 


. . 1 

1 .. 09 

48 


U 

69116 

101 

• 

1.4 


15 


1J> 

17 39 

n 


7J5 

89 149 

46 

+2 


ss 


£9 

39 112 

20 




13S 

■2 

0.1 

01 .. 

TO 


16 

IB . 

68 


£9 

13 379 

283 


6 0 

29 2£1 

117 

+1 

£1 


84 


31 


21 




131 

♦3 

*j 

39 179 


-9 

57 

4.0 11.7 



4-3 

£7 139 

108 


39 

39 209 


-1 



340 


13 

19 4£0 

335 


£9 


m 

-3 

16 



-■» 

1.1 


2® 

+S 

4J 

19 27 7 

1® 

+10 

£9 


K 

+4 

18 

U 59 

148 


5.7 

39111 

i» 

+15 

75 


1® 


4J 

22 l£5 

156 

+1 

11 

39 UB 

1® 


3U 

3J129 

a 


1.7 

49 104 

153 

13 

• +4 

U 

29 19 
12 

«« 

-2 

2.0 

£7 157 

1® 

+2 

29 

19 224 

58 


35 

62 9.1 

a 


• 

29 

94 


AO 

49 M2 

» 


4.7 

72 117 

ma 

+8 

10 

3.0 24 0 

2089 

in 

a 

+1 

£9b £8 2£9 
9BJ 

83 

1® 


AS 

79 IM 
360 

IM 


S.1 

11 239 

215 



£0 339 

I/O 


29 

17 73 

113 

-3 

24 

21 215 

15/ 

*'1 

6* 

<1 

lit) 


3.5 

29 162 

i® 

■12 

08 

M 189 

1® 


7T 

77110 

320 

+3 

4 Bb 

14 431 

1® 

+5 

SI 

Ifl 127 

115 


£9 

£5 370 

1® 

1 

14 

1 1 

231 

-4 

30 

10 219 

m 

• 

86 

43124 

44 


41 

13 89 

141 


47 

39 214 

38 


16 

42 297 

1® 

-2 

56 

37 186 

446 

•10 

70 

17213 

70 

• 

18 

29 149 

240 


188 

76 11 

73 

-2 

E4 

74 1£3 

543 


346 

*5 

105 

+10 

40 

44 61 

B3 

*1 

04 

77 99 

53 


IB 

34(01 

m 


21 

26 89 

93 


39 

35 114 

16 


0* 

26110 

m 

■ -2 

79b 90 119 

SI 


29o 5 7 101 

173 


29 

1781 1 

7 

+ ■ 


34 1 

SO 


13 

65 181 

450 


26 

06 892 

64 

+5 

1 1 

1757 1 

1® 

+4 

79 

4 4 IBS 

181 


36 

30 196 

70 


37 


2001 

148 

• 

23 

10217 

a 

75 

1 

'9 

Z534T 

£95 

20 



27 




£4 

17 .. 

• .. 

19 

22 339 


14 

£0 393 


154 

49 294 


B2 

19 .. 


09 

£5 739 


89 

11 182 


11 

02 .. 

+1 

£5 

39 419 

+1 



• .. 

99 

39 279 


32 

52 159 


1.1 

17 499 1 


11b 59 309 


3.7 

1.7 609 i 

-a 

T.7n 

59289 

•+1 

7.1b 44 349 

• .. 

39 

12 .. 1 

+1 

110b £6 E£1 


213 

5.T 20.1 


09 

14 83.7 

*2 

17 

10 3/9 


49 

74111 

-2 

1.1 

04 .. 


49 

14 6X9 


17 

£9 31.4 

+2 

7.7b 29 729 


49 

2.5 BOS 


19 

19 852 


09 

T.4 97.4 


17.1 

43 40.4 

•+l 

89b 13 216 

• .. 

124 

11 279 

+2 



■ “ 

£1 

£1 S£1 

■ +1'e 


IMDRVfl 

• +2 

49b 32 409 

♦5 

18 

29 669 

+2 

19b 

1.8 939 


£8 

£S®7 


32.1 

81 170 

*1 

1£1 

£3117 


72 

£9 543 

+4 

249ri 

16 34.7 


29 

£5 519 

r 

06 

14 


IK SI 
122 B5 
2K IM 
113 l®*r 

101 n 
IM 118 
186 MO 
118 WJ-i 
17a 1® 
lfiS 136 
305 237 
370 3® 
207 157-1 
143 112 
94 79 

288 217 
62 33 

74 53 

i® eo-i 
3® 288 


TR City 0* Lon DMllC 
TH km 1 Gan 202 
TR Nau# Res m 
TR Norfi America M 
TR Pact»c Beam 164 
TR Pnwarty 164 

th Teen i® 

TR Trestaos I6t 
Temple Bar 153 

Tbonfenonen 286 

Tlirog Swairad Cap 3M 
Tran* Ocaanc 200 

8*M 1® 

Tnrtmreet few 90 


13 38 310 
13b 5 7 25 7 
5 7 24 43.6 
59 IS 234 
26 2.7 487 

H 11 . 
57 31406 

26 25 486 

80 37 360 

8lb 53 267 
11.9b 42 342 


TrxAo+eel few 
US Deoenoea 


+1 85 ?4 501 

40 £9 401 

158 >7 6 Bl 
-1 93 32 57 5 

„ £9b 81 177 

+2 2 2 13 453 

1-1 4.6 45 580 

* - 181b 4 4 854 


W FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


«7\ 

1 3*> 

AOtancai EJRSM* 

DO- 




T1 

31 

MM* 

44'; 


1* 

31 a 8 

49 

£1 

BousMad 

a 



784 

154 

116 

BmnnM Arrow 

146 


60 

4 1 in 

22'. 

13'- 

De4| TM 

E2T. 

• +';- 

700 

33 152 

ar- 

1 12'. 

Do 'A 

ns 


TOO 

37 134 

ise 

131 

Bectre 

145 

+1 

53 

41 3J5 

' ISO 

90 

Eng Treat 

iss 

+2 

4.3 

29 1*5 

247 

187 

Excd 

227 


60 

£0 148 

>08 

86 

Emxoixiio.1 

98 


33 

34 1£3 

750 

9* 

375 

77 

Fremflrwion 

Bo« Co 

740 

88 


93 

14 

13 344 

74 12 

143 

75 

Gooda (DAM) 

143 


24 

17401 I 

900 

4M 

Henderson Adnen 

830 

1 

173 

22 104 ' 

218 

163 

tCH 

186 


129b 

77 19 

44» 

320 

MAI 

380 


223 

60 100 

290 

IM 

MAG 

=50 


61 

24 304 

362 

352 

Mercxn+H House 

2fT4 

• +2 

20Q 

73 52 

126 

76 

Pretc few Tat 

124 

-2 

05 

04 

27' 

' 16 

Do wararei 

26- 


2® 

1S2 

9re*i New Cow? 

104 


100 

61 61 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON COMMOOfTY 
EXCHANGE 


G W Joymson and Co report 

suewn (FrowC. CxamOcow] 
FOB 

Oct 131 .6-31 2 

Dec . 139.8-3S.-1 

MS' 153^-53.4 

May 1577-S7A 

Aug ieawi.0 

Oct 188.6-65.6 

Vof 


Feb iaaj)M 8 .G 

Mar 133.0-22.00 

Wir 135.00-25.0 

May 135.00-25.0 

Vofc 1567 


Three Months 36600-358,00 


ALUMMWM 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Un official pric— 
OfOcM Tomorar flgoras 

Pries ta E par matrie fam# 
Silver in pance p#r tny owe* 
RtxMt Won 1 Co. Ltd. report 
COPPER GRADE A 
Cash 876.00-878.00 

Three Months 890.00-890.50 
VtH 7800 

Tone Stesttar 


^8h 771.00-773^)0 

Three Months 757.00-758.00 


Baroty Steady 


Cash 2540-2550 

Thre* Months 2576-2580 
Voi 42 

Tone StSMly 


MEAT AKO LIVESTOCK 


copra 

Sep 

Nov 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

jy 

Sep 

voi 


SOYABEAN 

Oct 

Dec 

Feb 

** 

Jun 

Aug 


COMMSSON 

Average MMaek prices «t 


npresenWh* maiketa on 

22 od August 


G&Catte 9540pperkglw 
w awep 149 3lppar kg est 


GASOIL 

S8P 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Jan 


Cash 

Voi 

Ton* 

ZINC HIGH GRJ 


Cash 

564 00-56600 

Three Months 

564 50-56500 

Voi 

960 

Tone 

SWaOer 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 

34700-348 00 

Three Momhs 

35500-35600 

Voi 

10 

Tone 

Oust 

StLVB? SMALL 


Cash 

34700-84800 


d 

CWM 2061 

ffliftgs 7326ppffl-koV# 


England sndWatML- 
CaW9 nos down 110% me 


Shew nos down 358% me 
nice 15l61p(-1Q29) 

Pig no* oown 182 N me 
price 7526p(-328} 


Cattle nos down 31 4% ave 
price SSfllpi-OBQ 
ilieop noa up 2 7 N eve 


I LONDON MEAT FUTURES 

Month 

EXCHANGE 

Pig Contract 
p.p*rMb 

Open Close 

Aug 

9 SJ 98.3 

Oct 

103.1 103 1 

NCW 

105.0 105.0 

R« 

9&5 98-5 

Apr 

990 SS.S 

Jun 

93.5 99.0 

VoL-p/a 

Pig M#« veto 

LONDON MEAT FUTURES 

EXCHANGE 

Live Cattle Contract 

Month 

p per kilo 

Open Close 

5iS 

96 5 9 &S 


980 980 

Oct 

98 5 985 

NOV 

99 0 990 

Feh 

99 0 99 0 


99 0 990 

Jun 

99 0 990 

vet n/a 

LONDON SRMI FUTURES 

Month 

Epertormo 

WhWt Bultry 

pose CIOS* 

Sep 

10350 104 SO 

Nov ' 

109 40 107 25 

Jan 

11075 10980 

Mar 

11330 11185 

May 

11585 1138 Q 

Volume 

Wheat 


Barley 

Oil 




LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 

E panama 


Open Ctowr 

11700 11800 
129.50 12600 
174 00 174 50 
188 50 189 00 
8500 8000 
\tt 789 


BJFFSX 

GJLI. PreigM PuhmsUd 
report *10 par tadu poml 
freight (n<MK 


Hqh/LOw C 3 kMf 
Oct 88 760 0-746 0 7480 

Jan 87 7900-7750 7780 
Apr 67 8250-8200 8205 
Ju !«7 760 0-750 0 7475 

Ocl 87 — — B 250 

Jan 88 - 847 5 

Apr 88 - 8275 

Juisa - ai 85 


vot 213 lots 
Opetimterest 1976 


TANKER RO»Olir 


Hrgh/LOW Close 
Augg 13500 

Sep 86 1200-1200 1(000 

0«86 . 1237 5 

Dec 88 12 X 50 

Marfl7 1112 5 

Jun 87 12000 

va tiws 
Openmwesi 4 ( 


Spoi market commentary 
Tanker «we* 

>433 5 down 18 5 on 6* 3*6 


Quo 20 5 or 21 *8/86 







































THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



~<8M- 

From your portfolio card check your 
®ght share price movements. Add uicm 
up io give you your overall total. Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 

B urnished on ibis page. If it matches you 
aye won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated- If you am a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming- 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Shares quiet 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began August 1 1. Dealings end next Friday. § Contango day September 1 . Settlement day September 8. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 



No. Cnpmt 


Wagon Ind 


Coinin' 


Gaia it 
Cmp Ion 


Mol cwA) reran 


Industrials S-Z 


MoumJviman 


Industrials 5 -Z 


tzz.'.r ij 3 i 
IE EEEOEoSiaB 1 

IE 


Industrials S-Z 


IE I 


Ell 


ESI 


Sutcliffe Spcakman 


Prudential 


Prop Hides 


Tarmac 


Coni Summary 


Btmlborpc 


ASDA-MF1 


Plvsu 


Appiedore 


Regalun 


Ransomr Suns 


Bluebird Conf 


Gen Accident 


Cray Elect 


Aran Energy 




iUiU.'I* 


Industrials A-D 


Industrials A-D 


Properly 


Industrials L-R 


Industrials L-R 


Foods 


Insurance 


Industrials E-K 


Industrials E-K 




Please be sure to take account 
of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your 
for the weekly dividend of £& 
today's newspaper. 




BRITISH FUNDS 


1986 

Hc*i Lm Ccktkw’V 


Pnce Oiqe penes *« PIE 


448 280 RWM 338 .. 1SS *6 118 

SO SB Ftaa Bros 65 ..OS 031*3 

1JS 102 HcMdUd Uim IX 8.. 7.1 S3 1X8 

380 280 RM Bnk Of SCM 328 .. 1*3 <4 98 

b Vi Saigon iu xa 

894 419 Stand Chan 70S -3 48.4 88 8.7 

BIB 613 Unon 663 • 5X9 8.0 8X8 

»>■ *3'. VMa Fargo «7*b 

320 22 0 NMnot Z73 • . . 7.7 26 1*4 


' 

E 


348 ABed-L*ona 333 

620 Bass 740 

38 BMtfven B2 

85 Baunom 188 

375 OtMn (IIWH ) 4 95 

144 Butter (HP) 152 

40S BuumMU Brew 583 

*10 Qrt fUMmw) SOS 

126 DMSSD (J AJ 207 

165 CrsanaS WMtoy 170 

163 Q«M King 231 

27S Giimm 343 

*05 Hardys & Hassons 31* 

89 77 

IS 0to8 IS 

173 Wsn5a8 191 

77 Mwacn Thompson no 

217 MoRand 262 

131 SA Oe wanss 170 

163 Scat a MM 179 

353 Vwx 388 

223 WMtnad A' 286 

228 Do 'S' 268 

<88 wmraad ear 216 

*10 WoK r tini p ei 6 0 643 

IBS Young w 316 


.. 1X6 

-a 21.7 

-I 12 

*6 

.. 20.00 

• .. 76 

• .. ISA 

.. 114 

116 
-3 73 

+3 X0 
+3 10X 

.. 2341 

as 

u 

-14 eo 

• X2 

9.1 

+6 

• -2 100 

-7 164 

.. ll.l 
.. 11.1 
.. ioe 

■»2 1X7 

.. 104 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 




258 

218 


297 

216 


14 

52 


188 

125 


5EC 

331 


377 

284 


164 

114 


33 

22 


1S2 

128 


S3 

63 


978 

875 


736 

926 


275 

235 


91 

61 


29 

16 


73 

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229 97 1X1 

717 72 774 

92 62 113 
75 12 712 
42 42 32 
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200 22 152 

165 17 141 
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6.1 52 172 

33 24 212 
620 63 17.4 

134 22 199 
123 37 149 

72 46 1X2 
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12 XI 545 
109 61 290 
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104 17 160 
14 1.7 92 

66 35135 

12 XO 20 
07 05 175 

29 12 192 

54 24 212 



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126 75 
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286 212 
5*0 283 
130 102 
189 120 
20*4 134V 
ISO 194 
205 118 
165 199 
238 1SE 
fish a 
144 68 
196 167 
375 299 
154 6B 
231 174 
50*5 Mb 
110 55 

116 76 
235 210 
12 * 82 
2B3 177 
186 128 
740 393 
160 120 
388 426 
B4 SB 
44 28 

93 434 

89 58 

178 739 


timraiMI 

KKf 5 


191 -2 

KM «+12 
£19 
£904 


WBM (Janet 
WKaniHkfcM 
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WWW 
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Mntvunlll 
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Young M 


133 n-2 

£7884 +24 

180 
187 
128 

231 6+3 

804 -*4 

112 -I 

773 

363 +5 

117 
178 
45 
76 

265 

94 *Z 

220 


133 

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33 

73 -1 

71 -* 

ISO +2 


10.7b 96 75 
16 15 202 

962 29 174 

75 26 137 
168 *7 115 
7.1 ' 66 109 
U 12 234 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 


246 211 MMMrti 
164 126 Alihan Hum 
177P. 71 4 Aiaatagssa 
310 110 6WIM Tsctl 
28 IB Cmimmb 
3E3 194 OmOwtr 
43 16 Ceranaway 

294 17 Own 6 Gen 
195 732 hrory 1 Sans 
194 153 MKN 
78 62 Wfi™ Loans 
93 90 Do BN 


16 09 .. 
12 23 60 


17.1 16 722 

5l7 24375 

13 46 264 
63 61 162 
63b 46 262 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


48 394 
209 160 
425 291 
247 180 
156 106 
111 764 

132 102 

169 112 
500 574 
138 82 

306 245 
189 135 
160 112 
214 15 
183 127 
131 KW 
2*5 172 

133 111 
298 215 
168 113 
*53 330 
1014 TP. 

104734 
*10 333 
118 99 
160 119 
91 62 

176 129 
330 216 
73 36 

333 178 
153 67 


AKZO M/V Be* 
eaad Ceram 
Amerahara 
Area* Cnamfc 
BTP 

Bayer DM 50 


» 0 emd 
Canning (W) 


DO W 

Ctay (Horace) 
Croat 

Da OK 

Bo 6 EraWd 
Evode 

F a s eaiiWeu 
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tap Own 

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SMA BPO 
SutdHt Scawmon 
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Tarawa Own 


8454 -4 400 

199 «-2 16 

419 .. 109 

229 0.1 

13 5 64 

£1004 + 2*4 700 

119 -4 109 

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118 .. 61 
298 .. 107 

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152 66 

1 B 4 -1 0-9 

143 ..109 

120 •-! 

212 • .. 92 

116 • *7 

231 I 2 J 

156 +2 64 

383 « . 212 

£32 +14 .. 

£10 • .. 489 

386 -2 112 

100 • .. 64 

160 +2 X 8 

84 ..32 

136 17 
181 -IX 

54 *3 

226 -2 11.1 
138 • « 


Ftaan cia f T raeTi ap p ear on Page 20 


FOODS 


150 «+6 

25 

330 +2 

316 *+2 

104 +2 

542 B-2 

3*5 • 

14 

328 

185 

90 • 

'U 3 

105 

168 4-1 

170 

225 

203 

173 

263 • *3 
178 -4 

270 • .. 

229 e -7 

1« -X 

183 • .. 

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92 

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275 +4 

105 • .. 

95 

565 -5 

243 -2 

105 
212 

220 -10 

34 • +•, 

284 • .. 

180 +2 

150 • .. 

259 +2 

383 r -7 

408 *4 

155 -1 

221 
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43 XO 

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67 XS 
59 48 
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164 48 


1X3 X9 
12 19 

159 58 

59 29 
29 19 
4.7 X8 

60 XO 

48 59 
94 19 
74 27 
39 ZB 
50 52 

179 12 
39 18 
7.6 12 
19 09 
66 19 
27 59 
114 49 
56 12 
69 49 

ao ii 

17.4 45 

79 19 
46 XO 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


301 228 
431 713 
954 701 
954 720 
708 484 
3*8 287 
288 231 
224 173 
436 257 

348 223 
ISA 12 
942 716 
453 381 
997 788 
420 328 
474 348 
44 $ 390 

S 620 
772 
550 120 
474 m 


Com Union 

On ACCOM 
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Hogg H uUm ob 
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Until • Men 
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303 +1 

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279 

83 * +7 

644 +7 

474 -1 

321 9-2 

263 +6 

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£ 48 '+ 

248 -2 

619 +7 

£ 14 S +■• 

664 +7 

999 +3 

632 +13 

999 -a 

427 +3 

417 ■« 

SM *7 

894 +10 


89 52 .. 

TOO 66 .. 
899 12 .. 

89 29 289 
447 63 .. 

179 67 ..- 
99 67 .. 

349 4.1 2 ij 

41.1 49 246 
84 9 7 A 7.1 
117 42 122 
11.7 44 3 X 5 

89 44 7.7 
249 5 . 71 X 6 
230 49 .. 
114 49114 
129 61 204 
629 42 .. 

37.1 42 579 

199 49 .. 

369 42 882 
167 42 172 
157 97 172 

IXOn 24-215 
259 39829 

339 32 .. 

42 ZO 63 
7 X 5 10200 


58 31 

758 127 
107 75 

395 325 
406 303 
97 a>J 
283 183 
48 34 

2 SS 190 
280 190 
213 126 
50 30 

880 555 
224 61 

218 158 


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r on Page 30 


LEISURE 


220 126 Boose* 6 Htwkaa 156 

17) 38 BnailWMr 104 

56 3* CMVBI 46 

228 158 OvysaW 180 

410 325 Run Leoura 358 

82^ 43 GRA 50 

01 65 Hem^ar Brocks 70 

126 99 Hortxon TraMl 120 

131 84 U LaMM 172 

KB 32 Atari «ma 45 

180 T37 Lee HI M2 

189 130 ModnAnMr 130 

381 278 Ptaewrae 323 

393 328 ReeAy UnaM 368 

9* 43 HMy Lmetn 46 

228 134 Sags HcAdsye 196 

388 156 SnaMidp 190 

72 51 iMMea Houpur 70 

165 128b Zaras 185 


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• +7 11.1 64 133 

.. 161 44 15.1 

25-4 

• 68 49113 

•+X0 64 19 119 

&7« 61 1X7 
7.1 19 109 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERTG 


+3 

71 

41 7Q&. 


020 25 165c 

-7 

2000 72 2XB . 
75 18 *Sff 



19 48.1 

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48 

20 24 1- 

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95 

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120 

55 21 3" 


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66 

23 2X9 


88 

40 219 


57 

4.4 104" 

.. 

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18 lie 


39 49 59 
6 A 04 74 
19 69102 


m 


CINEMAS AND TV 


433 328 Grand Met 989 •+« 765 19 7X9 

296 208 Remedy Brookes 236 24 10 122 

391 312 LadDrone 3*6 .. 161 *9 >66 

5*s 447 Lon Park HDUK 520 . . 143 28 168 

100 79'. Max* Oanode S3 •-'; 2.1 23 152 

105 67 Pmce CM W HaWb 86 • 21 24 159 

79 56'r Queens MOM 78'.- +1 27b 15 189 

405 358 Sawiy HOWS A 388 50 1.4 1*5 

81 55 Saws 6* «+1 18 29 159 

209 141 Trusmouse Fone 151 •-! 79 52 189 


270 176 AnWa TV W 
52 27 BwpW 

2*0 176 KTV N/V 
373 253 LVYT 1*Jg» 
350 188 Sea TV V 
273 M9 TVS H/Y 
*6 91 TSW 

237 223 iham TV 


2*8 .. 119 56 139 

44 +1 29 66 63 

220 +2 114 52 100 

373 .. 219 57 1X0 

318 -2 150 *7 1X5 

223 r .. 1*XD 64 11 0 

46 .. 29 58 124 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 



358 780 48 Baa 333 

T8I 120 m samara; 173 

142 36 amend 13* 

99 *3 Auncni CcmpuMra 55 

96 93 Aden 94 

308 205 fidjnec Camp 265 

58 46 Au ao FdWrty » 

720 140 Au® Sac 178 

370 240 ESCC 271 

138 6* BSH 88 


333 -3 714 34 2*5 

173 • -3 31 13 1’6 

134 03 0X508 

55 6 S 3 09 93 

94 38.9 

265 41 IS 85 

» 179 

178 23 1JT21 

271 -i 1ST 5.8 753 

88 +3 24 3 5 IS 


280 

178 

239 

ISO 

127 

95 

671 

553 

110 

80 

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172 

3*3 

207 

157 

1*4 

275 

133 

403 

155 

47 

32 

32 

23 

440 

355 

91 

39 

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212 

83 

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373 

263 

89 

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283 

135 

455 

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332 

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151 

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1*8 

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100 

5*2 

214 

620 

310 

335 

235 

205 

140 

123 

76 

153 

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105 

174 

1*7 

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189 

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I'——, 


SHIPPING 


3T2 j1B7 Assoc Br ran 
396 238 & C o m mon —Mtfi 
368 213 CMadoa* 

94 36 Fignar (Janus) 

603 480 Gran 
76 54 -j jambe (9) 

12b $ M 

41 26 Mgney DedM 

221 180 Ocean Transport 
576 <20 PlOOd 
185 88 Rmcman (HUM) 

348 132 Tnm* 

380 3U Turnora Scon 


7.1 X7 146' 
7.1 X7 111 
7.1 9.1 *0O 

*7 65131- 
219 43 6 4 

610 73 3 X 4 . 

" " 3®' 

99 49 IlS" 
229 AS 14S* 
7.1 5X 2Q3- 
5J 17 194- 
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SHOES AND LEATHER 


3H 

290 

FI 

325 


306 

1*5 

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1*8 



*5 

32 


39 




188 

Lantttt Honor® 

175 




62 


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118 

Strong & rue 

148 




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226 • 

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TEXTILES 


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Do 'A 
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jsrcas r* 

Nana umm 

Odipia 

Noramaft Swad 

Tnmy am 

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44 22 202 

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.. 63 XU 174 

142 42 174 

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.. 71.1 X 4 SL 7 

11 1 69 161 

a +i 6 i as zsj 
. . 2 X 0 66 168 

. . 100 *& 1*0 
• .. 1 X 0 41 .. 

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69 XO 174 

.. 57 4.7ST7 

.. 21 * 52 119 

.. 2 X 9 82 1*0 


579 305-1 
300 136 
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106 86 
144 123 - 
1 Z 7 80 

76 ’, 63 V 
315 1 M 
176 » 

278 - 196 
57 A3 
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110 88 
119 88 
57 33 

210 SO 
88 47 

190 132 
IBS 198 
123 84 

S 3 7Z 
115 71 
22 10 
168 94 

47 .30 
155 109 
182 133 
70 48 

140 57 


ASed Teat 
AM® Bros 
Beam (John) 
BaderaUA) 


Dura MM 
Fomr (John) 


swm w*m 
Stroud Way 
Texnsad J ersey 


109 ', 75 V Toocai 
350 235 YMOyoe 


.250 +2 

182 
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107 19196 
1X0 4 0 166 
69 46 61 
82 79 1X2 
89 65 86 
7.1 7821.5 
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9.3 66 89 

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69 67 1X9 
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57 1X7 G 1 
60 67 65 
73 61 71 

43 89 »3 
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64 4 0 104 
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82 108 159 
66 .69 1S3 

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39 99 54 
43 35 74 

66 69 8 1 
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109 19 8.1 


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431 

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22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


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GUARANTEED! YEAR 
BUILDING SOCIETY RETURN 


Bmttng societies and houses 
reortsentto most people fee safest 
Aid ma reward*® investments 
they can make. Now the Mumum 
[merest Bond brags the two 
together. 

tavestore wiU have then 1 money 
divided to secure a 14.65% net* 
guaranteed I year return on ttwv 
account wth a (eadmg Soaety and 
the tatance placed m a fund 
nvested soWy n resderftai 
propety. 


Thi» is datricfly Runted 
offer. Cad 0272-276954 for 
a Reservation Number 

_^AIBASC1M MMPn mOQQ 

IJiumsztyMedioilGaimflJd 

FWIFOSI. BflQIOi, BS1 5BR TV ZStfO 

muff 

MX* 


■ TEL'. 


IAXRATE 

AGEIS3 


% AMOUNir 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


Adam & Company. 
BCCI 


10 . 00 % 
10110% 
10.00% 
10.75% 
10.00% 
10D0% 
10 . 00 % 
10.00% 
10 . 00 % 
10 . 00 % 

Mat Westminster 10.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland — 10.00% 

TS8 10.00% 

Citibank NA_ 10.00% 

f Mortage Base Rue. 


Citibank 
ConsoSdated 
Continental Trust — 
Co-operative Bank- 
C. Hoars & Co. 


Kong Kong & Shaigha. 
LLoyds Bank. 


Edited by Martin Baker 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


Raising a glass to the 
start-a-business scheme 


/■ ^ Brown when he spied a For 

( CASE STUDY ) Sale" sign on the first floor of 

v ' Leaden hall Market in lhe 

heart of the City. Il was Ihe 
perfect location for a res- 
taurant or wine bar. 

“I was going to fund it 
myself but in the three years 
between finding die site and 
opening the doors, the costs 
tripled. It was a difficult site. 
No one had ever used the first 
floor before and I had to gel 
ebange-of-use permission 
from the City of London. So 


The Business Start-op 
Scheme is now five years 
old'and ready to yield its 
tax advantages, Vivien 
Goldsmith looks at a wine 
company which matured 
into a good investment 


Stockbroker Nick Brown was. 
stepping into uncharted wa- 
ters when be persuaded 25 
friends and relations to invest 
in bis wine company with the 
lure of tax relief under the 
Business Start-up Scheme. 

Now five years on, the start- 
up scheme has been super- 
seded by the Business 
Expansion Scheme and mil- 
lions of pounds have been 
pumped into fledgling busi- 
nesses by those keen to get tax 
relief at the top marginal rate 
on their investments. 

In the two years of the start- 
up scheme (198 1-82 and 1982- 
83). £18 million was invested 
in 250 companies. Only £5 
million went directly into new 
businesses; the rest was chan- 
nelled in through approved 
funds. 

The saga began for Mr 


wanted to take their friends to 
"their” wine bar or restaurant 
for lunch. 

Mr Brown abandoned sell- 
ing shares to institutions for a 
year to concentrate his en- 
ergies on the wine-bar busi- 
ness. "I'm not sure 1 would 
have got the money from 
investors had 1 not taken a 
‘hands on’ approach. I had a 
lot to lose myself. 

"It was one long learning 
curve. 1 looked on it as a 
sabbaticaL After that we got 


‘It was one long learning curve. 
I looked on it as a sabbatical’ 


there were legal planning and 
fire-escape problems.” 

In July 1981 the company 
was formed as a business start- 
up and the Leadenhail Wine 
Company opened its doors for 
business in November of that 
year. 

The 25 investors — former 
Oxford students. City chums 
and Mr Brown’s father — put 
up £80.000 and the bank 
advanced £70,000. There were 
a large number of sharehold- 
ers with the minim um holding 
of £1.000. But at least they all 


professional management. In 
a cash business you nxd a 
basis of financial controls. The 
professional manager did 
much better than me.” 

Since those early be ginning s 
the business has expanded. 
There is the original first-floor 
wine bar and second-floor 
restaurant, another restaurant 
called Bullivanls opposite in 
Leadenhail Market, Phil pots 
Restaurant in Phil pots Lane, 
and Pomeroys in fetter Tan* 

, Each expansion was fi- 
nanced by a rights issue. "I 


make a market m the shares.” 
says Mr Brown. The last rights 
issue was at £5.50. The stares 
were originally issued at £l. 

Now that the minimum 
period of five years for retain- 
ing the tax relief has passed 
and investors can sell their 
stake without any tax penalty. 
Mr Brown is keen to increase 
his holding in the company. 
He is poised to take his stake 
from 37 percent to over 50 per 
cent by taking up a portion of 
his shareholders’ equity at a 
price determined by an in- 
dependent audit of the 
company. 

Turnover is running at £1.3 
million and should rise to 
£1.75 mil ion by the end of the 
year when it is planned to 
open two new restaurants. "1 
don't think we win use the 
BES route as there are prob- 
lems with the property content 
of the business in qualifying.” 

Finding the right sites is the 
major obstacle to expansion. 
I j»a rignhaii Market was prime 
because it is in the most 
densely populated ward in the 
City and close to Lloyd’s. 
Brokers, stockbrokers and 
bankers are the biggest lunch- 
time spenders. Accountants 
are not nearly so flamboyant. 



Eat, drink and make merry profits: The Leadenhail Wine Company rs situated in the non 
densely populated part of the City, right next to its biggest lunchtime spenders 


The venture west to Fetter 
Lane has flourished on bar- 
risters and journalists. But Mr 
Brown is vary of moving east 
to Dockland. 

Mr Brown, who was just 29 
when the business began five 
years ago. believes the com- 
pany may head for the USM. 

Only three of the original 
investors have sold out al- 
together. the rest are hanging 
on for even better things. "It's 
been a very good investment.” 
says Richard Williams, a 
director at Hill Samuel. He 
will be keeping a stake in the 
company after letting Mr 
Brown buy half his shares. 


HERE’S ONE 


INVESTMENT THATS 

FUTURE-PROOF 


You get twin guarantees when you buy the 
new 4th Issue Index-linked Certificate. Guarantees 
that make these Certificates future-proof. 

To start with you are guaranteed that the 
money you invest will be inflation-proofed for 
five foil years. And that means your money is proof 
against price rises in the future. 

Then on top of that you get Extra Interest of 
4% p.a. guaranteed for five full years. And that’s proof 
against other interest rate changes in the future. 

What’s more, the whole return is tax-free at 
all levels. Y>u don’t even need to enter it on your 
tax form. 

If you have anything between £25 and £5,000 
to invest, pick up a prospectus and application form 
from your bank or post office. 

Do it soon and start foture-pioofing your money 

Because whatever the future holds, one thing 
you will know for certain is that with these Certifi- 
cates your money is going to have more buying power 


ft) 

NATIONAL 

SAVINGS 


That’s guaranteed by 

NATIONAL SAVINGS 


Making it work 


C INVESTING" ) ( BORROWING ) 


Success does net always come 
easily with the business 
expansion scheme. The com- 
panies are usually young, or 
perhaps have no track record 
at all. And changes in the law 
will shortly allow them to 
advertise, so tread warily. 

An investor will probably 
find that the BES company 
has few assets. Your money 
nil! flourish only if the 
management of the company is 
dedicated to making the busi- 
ness a success. The managers 
must also of coarse have the 
talent. 

Charles Fry, whose com- 
pany, Johnson Fry. sponsors 
BES companies, says: “What 
we're always looking for Is 
people.” 

A BES sponsor weeds 
through companies seeking 
capital and normally does one 
of two things. Either it selects 
and invests in the best pros- 
pects or it leads investors to 
the companies, without 
committing its own cash. The 
sponsor usually charges an 
introduction fee to the 
company. 

Although intermediaries 
mean extra expense of some 
sort, but their presence is an 
extra indication fiat the com- 
panies they have selected will 
perform reasonably wefl, both 
industrially arid as 
investments. 

Nothing can be guaranteed. 
The Electro Risk Capital I 
fund had to report that of 32 
companies originally lent 
money, only 12 remained. The 
others had gone hi to liquida- 
tion or were sold off. 

The hare details of BES tax 
privileges may already be 
familiar. Income-tax relief at 
highest rates is given on np to 
£40.000 invested out of in- 
come. To qnalify for relief the 
investment mast be made in 
the tax year for which it is 
churned, and the company 
must carry on a trade thought 
fit fora BES company. 


Raising money under the BES 
if you choose to do il yourself 
r i usually as exhausting, os our 
case study shows. 

The Inland Revenue is gen- 
erally sympathetic to wou ki- 
be tycoons looking for BES 
finance. 

The firet step is to make 
sure that the company will 
qualify under the BES rules. 

Tax regulations are fine- . 
quentiy mystifying to the un- 
initiated. and the BES 
qualifying rules arc no 
exception. Fortunately, your 
local tax inspector will help. 

According to a Revenue 
official: “A concrete proposal 
put before an inspector should 
elicit provisional advice.' 
What the inspector will not do 
is draw up a BES company for . 
you." 

With an accountant, a law- 
yer. a friendly lax inspector 
and above all someone with 
income to invest, it is possible 
to engineer your own tax 
relief. 

But what if you have to 
convince a professional 
lender? 

A book by Annabel Reerel . 
an accountant, entitled The 
Realities of Raising Business 
Finance, considers this ques- 
tion. and analyses what the 
lender should expect from a 
borrower. 

The book Is short and 
contains practical advice, 
mainly in the form of ques- ■ 
tions and check lists. 

It reflects the author's opin- • 
ion that knowledge of the , 
market and mrakeiing ex per- . 
rise are crucial to the success 
of an enterprise. . 

At£l4.95(£l<L25. including 
postage), from Management 
Update. 43 Brodick Road. 
Wandsworth Common. Lon- 
don SW 1 7 7DX. The book is a 
linle dear for those tiying to 
scrape the pennies together. 

mb ; 


% 


• L:\-TED ISSUE 




8*55 



THREE YEAR TERM SHARES 


★ IMMEDIATE ACCESS 

with 90 days’ loss of interest on amount withdrawn 

★ GUARANTEE OF 3.30% 

above Personal Deposit rate wtech is variable 

★ MONTHLY INCOME 

available at 8.05% net 

t Gross equvaient yield to basic rate tax payers of 1SL04% 
touts MCMadOOreauY MstowraiTtoB^BB&aocwstoscoakan 

To Wdl hMiuaiuBj IMtoB B O Ototy .FretgxaCW 

Tat 01-531 3231 CM hr sanrtea). TT2M 

l'W&0fK*»t3'«quel0rt . .<nmnuftt£2 HWI »OCMna3 Year 

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Rowe send (uOwr ManaMn on your 3 V«ar TOnn Shares 3 

Nwrefcl 

Address- - — — — 


PcbiCoob — 


Spimnew 


Walthamstow 

Building Society 


MORTGAGES MORTGAGES 

RE-MORTGAGES 

PHONE- (0202) 887171 
PHONE: (0202) 841948 

WHICH SERVICE DO YOUUEED? 

1- House purchase with deposit 

2. 100% home loan. 

3. Re-mortgage facilities. 

4. Business finance with house purchase. 

5. Second Homes. 

6. Debt rescheduling. 

7. Mortgages in retirement 

Ring or return our coupon NOW. Anybody can 
benefit you don't need to be a teacher to apply. 

TAKE THE DIRECT ROUTE, 

RING OR WRITE TODAY. 


TEACHERS’ BUILDING SOCIETY, i 
HANHAII RD„ WIMBORNE, DORSET HH21 1AG, 


OJf* Aljenview House, Hanham Road. Wbnbome. 
Dorset BH21 1AG Tel: <02021 887171 

Name... 


Address, 


..Age. 


- Post code . 


Please send details of mortgage feefltoes. 
I am . Interested In number.. .above, 


Daytime 

T/phone.. 


TO 


i 









THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


BUSINESS AND FlNANib 




FAMILY MONEY/2 


WbenJt helps 
to have a home 
across the seas 

■ Portnran BuStfing Society hastfils 
weak launched an account exclusively for 
expatriates- As usual, the not returns 
are better tfien resident Britons can find, 
although the variable gross rate of 
10.5 per cent per annum Is less than the 

gross rates on many on-shore 
accounts. 

Themirdmimirtvc^tnieminthefiew- 
account ts £500 and withdrawals can be 

capital thresholds although returns 
can to as high as 1 1 .25 per cent 

Mortgage guarantee 

■ How refreshing to see a bank with 
confidence in the stock market when 
there are so many professional 
“bears" airing their doubts- Black Horse 
Life, the wtioffiHJwned subsidiary of 
Uoyds Bank, is prepared to guarantee 
mat its unit-finked investments wtn pay 
off the mortgage loan at the end of the 
term, providing investment 
recommendations are followed. 

The plan works Bke the more common 
endowment plans; the loan remains 
outstanding until the end of the term 
when ft should be repaid by the 
investment return of the policy, 
interest, currently at a nominal 11 per 
cent, is pay able throughout the fife of 
the mortgage in addition to premiums on 
the policy. 

• r.v. Uoyds says that six of its funds are on 
‘ the recommended Dst self-belief is an 
admirable commodity. 

Pension sales fears 

■ Business is booming for the Hfe 
assurance arid pensions industry. The 

- Association of British Insurers has 
■ - issued figures which show total new 
%. annual premiums for the second 
- s >. quarter of this year of £478 mUfion. That 


MtmrnsrMwfow: 

WWaiMXMfW 

f&JMWrtUrt 



compares with £375 for the same 
period in 1985, 

A large slice of the fife assurance - 
business was a reflection of the 
increasing popularity of endowment 
mortgages. Lenders have tuned their 
rates down in fine with, or in some 
cases below, the repayment rates. 

But are we getting what we want? The 
Consumers Association is anxious that 
; should not.be sold by the 

behardto§imkofar^re'*^ UK 
i napp ropriate way to get people to make 
a decision about an Important 
provision for their future," says 
Rosemary McRobert of the 
Consumers’ Association. 

The association wants to see cokf- 
caffiog banned in the Financial Services 
Bill, or at least an extension of the 
“cooling off* period which allows 
consumers to change their minds after 
buying a product or service. 

BES ripples 

■ A0 is traditionally quiet in the 
Business Expansion Scheme during 
summer. The period after the holidays, 
when we are heading for the half-way 
point of the tax year, is the favourite 
time for new schemes. 

So Johnson Fry has caused a ripple m 
the pool with the launch this week of rts 
second BES fund. The vehicle works 
on the "unauthorised" principle; Investors 


are given Johnson Fry’s appraisal of 
Hr® companies and can choose for 
themselves where to place their cash. 
Charges of 4 per cent are levied on the 
* i that receive investors' 

jm Investment is El ,000. 
• Details: Johnson Fry. 36 Jermyn 
StreeL London SW1Y 6DT. . 

Cheap farmland 

■ WM they or wont they? The 
theories as to whether house prices win 
fan are multiplying rapkfty. The latest 

snt comes from the Halifax 
Society, which recognises the 
record fevete achieved by housing but 
dpes not foresee a widespread taflL 
Farmland, however, presents a totally 
(Efferent picture. White residential 
property spare, farmland is at its 

theCoLmtry Landowners^S^^Si. 

In the last three months alone the total 
value of owner-occupied farms in 

England has faflen by £2.65 blfflon. An 
accusing finger for tne reduction Is being 
pointed at EEC farming quotes. - 
Homeowners should consider 
themselves lucky. 

Riches in prospect 

■ Gold is fighting back. The 
connotations of me word 

l closer to 


were 
pellets 


of chicken man newly mined gold. All that 
changes with the marketing of the new 
Australian gold coins, set to rival the 
Krugerrand. Mass circulation is 
planned for eariy 1987, although no 
details are available as to which 
financial institutions are to sell us our 
nuggets. 

The units wfll be the standard 1 oz 
(endearingly named Welcome Stranger 
after a great find last century) V*. 
and a tenth of an ounce, ana the price will 
of course fluctuate in line with the gold 
price, plus a few per cent extra to account 
for minting and delivery. 

• Details: International Gold 
Corporation, 6 Carlton Gardens, London 
SW175AE. 


’’Vx- 

■>V. 


TSB and the missing millions 


More than two million people 
are missing oat on the Trustee 
Savings Bank flotati on. 

Some 4_2 million TSB cus- 
tomers were informed by a 
massi ve mails hot the* they 
would be entitled to priority 
status in the sale of the bank 
on or abont September 12. But 
the TSB estimates that fewer, 
than 12 milli on have both- 
ered to register their priority; 
these people win forfeit their 
ivileges unless they act be- 
fore September 5. 

Applicants with priority sta- 


& 


tus can apply for a lower 
minimum amount of shares, 
and it is certain that they win 
receive some shares even if the 
issue is heavily over-sub- 
scribed. Half the issue, which 
will amount to more than £1 
billion, has been set aside for 
priority applicants. 

Some of the 2 milli on who 
have not applied win not want 
to participate in the sale 
because they, do not approve; 
others may simply have 
forgotten to register or per- 
haps lost their pass books. 


What can these people do? 

The TSB says they should 
phone or write to their branch, 
which will seek reco rds of 
their account A TSB official 
said: “Branches are under 
immense pressure at the mo- 
ment It would help a great 
deal if customers could 
remember the last tune they 
used their account It would 
also be wise to leave at least 
two dear days for registering 
priority, more if the customer 
is contacting the branch by 
letter.” 


If you cannot even remem- 
ber where your branch was, 
the TSB mailshot may be able 
to help you. Each letter carried 
the sorting code of the branch 
where the account was held. 
Any TSB branch will be able 
to look at the code and teO you 
which branch to write to about 
priority status. 

It is not the end of the world 
if you fell id register. Even, 
those with privileges will be 
able to apply on non-priority 
Lion fot 


application forms. 


MB 


The Inland Revenue is not 
. ■ renowned for its generosity, so 
the recent removal of Capital 
Gains Tax (CGT) from gilts 
might be thought surprising. 

A gilt is an IOU from the 
' ~ government, which promises 

- ~ to repay the face value (usually 

£100) of the stock at some 
- agreed (bite in the future —for 
example, 10 years hence. In 
the meantime It wiD also pay a 
fixed return or dividend each 
year of, say, 9 per cent. The 
• : p. investor who buys the stock 

- V. will be guaranteed the return 


Removing 
CGT from 
gilts offers 
few gains 


Yon may be wondering how 
it is possible for the return to 
be a fixed percentage of a 
fluctuating capital value. In 
fact, tiie retain is set at a 


of bis money, plus the fixed 
- . — interest or dividend payments percentage of £100, the aom- 
every year— provided he hoUa ^nml value of fte gilt Thus 
.:.- v it to the maturity date. a fixed-interest gift the 

, However, gilts are traded on “interest” or more properly 
the Stock Exchange and when 
interest rates rise from, say. 9 
per cent to 11 per cent, the price 
at which yon 4onld sell your 
£100 worth of 9 per cent stock 
in the market foils to reflect 





Few individuals 
vnH benefit 

the fact that investors can get a 
better return elsewhere- If yon 
wanted to sell yonr 9 per cent 
stock, yon might get only £97 
for it depending on the ma- 
.. 4 turity date. 

The attraction of a fixed 
percentage income will vary 
according to the competitor! in 
the market. If interest rates on 
deposits are higher than the 
fixed percentage, money will 
naturally be put on deposit 
_ rather than go into gilts. Bat if 
' * interest rates foil, the fixed 
~ percentage return becomes' 
■ more attractive to investors. 

Dealers pot a value on the 
relative attractions of gills, 
and this is the market value, 
which goes np and down like a 
share price. 


income, will not vary as it is 
based on an nwrynig nom- 
inal base. But the right to boy 
the return, the market value, 
will vary. 

The possibility of buying at 
one raise and selling at an- 
other means the possibility of 
profits and losses. Until re- 
cently a profit made within one 
year of purchase of a gilt was 
in theory liable to CGT. Now 
that theoretical liability has 
been removed. 

However, to benefit from the 
change in the law you must 
have what a Save & Prosper 
spokesman describes as “a 
fairly chunky bolding of {pits 
and probably shares as well” 
to take yonr potentially tax- 
able gains above the £6J0fl 
limit Yon must in fact have 
more than £5,000 of gilts in 
“wonunar* teems. 

And if yon are dealing for 
yourself, yon wfll have to 
watch out Under the infamous 
“accrued interest scheme" the 
monies you receive as the fixed 
return on the gilt wfl] be 
treated as income and so be 
liable to income tax at yonr 


highest rate. Reasonable 
enough, you might think. It 
seems obvious that the fixed 
return is mcome on an invest- 
ment and so should be liable to 
income tax. 

It used to be the Revenue's 
practice to treat accrued in- 
terest (which is reflected in the 
capital value of the gift just 
before the dividend is paid out) 
as a capital gain. A wale, jast 
before tike payont was subject 
to CGT at a flat 30 pm cent, 
compared with the top income 
tax rate of 50 per cent This 
means of di s guisi ng income as 
capital was known as “bond 
washing” anti! the Revenue 
devised its scheme to mend the 
fiscal net. 

We can now build np a 
picture of the individaal who 
wfll profit from the taxman's 
CGT benificence. There can 
be very few such investors: 


It was done to curb 
^bond washing 9 


“chunky” individuals whose 
portfolios are groaning with at 
least £630 capital gain, who 
have £5,000 worth of gills, who 
buy ami sell witiiin a year 
without being caught by the 
accrued interest scheme. The 
Revenue is being generous, but 
in an extremely selective way. 
Unit trusts, a common method 
of gilt investment before the 
dampdown on ‘bond washing*, 
wfll not benefit 
The most likely practical 
effect of the Revenue’s gift to 
the nation is that a number of 
gilt and fixed-interest unit 
trusts, excluded from the 
exemption, wfl] opt for tax 
treatment as companies. 

MB 


10 %. a. MONTHLY 
INCOME! 


* , ■ 




„ S’ 

11 • ■ 

. -Vr/ 


you a high monthly income which has 


mcome tax. 

Look at the table showing how the income 
from £10,000 invested in May- 1981 has risen 
from £82.72 per month to £178.57 per mouth. 
And the results, taking half yeuriyipc(gne,are 


In addition to producing the income 
own fa 
£10,000 i 


To take full advantage of this exceptional 

opportunity complete and return the coupon 

without obligation right away. 

taeoUK produced Cram £10,000 inverted in Bfav IBM 

wfcfcdnwingHHbpA ncMK. 

I Average Monthly Income- Afory-Affoy i 




‘Assumes yoor Capital Goins Tax allowance of £0300 

is aot exceedctL AO Figures are based cb an awiBge 

annual grevrth rate achieved, including re-invested 

»couk. and ou an offer to bid basia.lt should be . 

remembered Oat past per fo r ma nce omooC neces- 

sarily beulcen as a snide to tbe future and unit vabu* 
can fad as well as use. 


guaranteed 

TAX FREE* 


Please send me full details of this outstanding 
investment opportunity by return. 

Name 

Address 


Date of Birth 


Postcode 


Teh 


I may consider an investment of £ 


MR11 


R J TEMPLE & COMPANY 

Head Office: Temple House. 37 Grand Parade, 
Brighton BN2 2QA. T«: (027S) 673336 

Lietaaeddnlta in securities. 



Our Hpmom etfrw will ocly vfek you If invtod to do anj 


I 


A high guaranteed 
monthly income 
from gilts. 




rv' 



I 1 1 l\A/y Pbrtfolio30 is a service for investors which 

X XVJ V V • combines the advantages of two recent tax rulings: 
# Since July 2nd, all gains from British Government Securities 
(known as gilts) arc exempt from Capital Gains Tax. 

Within certain dearly defined limits, a regular return can be taken 
from gilts by convening the interest that accrues day by day into a 
capital gain which can be paid without deduction of tax. 

Portfolio 30 offers you a convenient and efficient way of investing 
up to £5,000 * directly into gilts. These are held by an independent 
custodian and you would be the beneficial owner 

You can fix. your return for a period up to 10 years. 

You can choose to receive regular payments either monthly, 
quarterly half-yearly or annually 

Gilts are one of the most secure investments and cany the backing 
of the British Government We inviteyou to send for a personal 
quotation, which will show* the precise return we can guarantee you. 





I Ta Buriow Clowes & Partners Limited 

I Wamfhid Court, Throgmorton Street. London EC2N 2AT. 

Telephone 01-256 6tS3 or 0625S7Z296 

Please send me details of PORTFOLIO 30 together with a personal quotation uf 
the income I can expect io receive 

Income required: Monthly G Quarterly G Half-yearly G Annually G 
FVrxvl nf imrermera I „ (minimum Syvan/maximufn 10 wars) 

Amount available for investment £ (maximum £5.000) 

NAME 


Qill'Qpecicdisls 

Lamed DrelrTt to Srtmtm 


I 
I 
I 

I 

I "I/you are seeking a high return and haw more than £5.000 to invest | 

please 6ck the box and wc will send details of suit able investments f~1 


ADDRESS. 


1 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 






t m 




FUND 

An All-Out Capital Growth Investment for You 


F 


ramlington European Fund aims for 
maximum capital growth through invest- 
ment in shares quoted on the principal 
European stock markets. 

Europe is now one of the most popular 
areas for investment But It is a diverse and 
complex market; for investment success strong 
links with the continent are highly desirable. 
Framlingtons axe with Credit Commercial de 
Ranee, enabling us to combine CCFs expertise 
and knowledge of the European market with 
our own eminently effective approach to long 
term capital growth. 

THE FRAMLINGTON APPROACH 
Our special style is to concentrate on smaller 
companies and try to identify those with really 
good growth prospects before the rest of the 
market recognises their promise, aiming for 
exceptional capital growth pe rfo rmance. 

The results of this have been good, especially 
over the long term. 

OUR RECORD 

The two previous Ramlington funds which have 
most closely followed this approach have been 
Capital Trust, investing in UK. shares; and 
American and General Fund, investing in the 
USA Both have done well. 

Over the ten years to 1st August Ramlington 
Capital Trust was one of the two best performing 
of ail the 280 unit trusts monitored by Money 
Management over the period. It turned an 
original investment of £1,000 into £12,017. 

And over seven years, our American & 
General Fund (started 1978) was one of the 
two best performing unit trusts out of the 28 
investing in North American shares. It turned 
£1,000 into £3,886. 

OUR EUROPEAN LINK 
The manager of the fund is Philippe Herault, who 
has been seconded from Credit Commercial de 
finance. He is our link into Cep's research, while 
working in London with the other Ramlington 
fund managers. 

The fund has a bias towards smaller com- 
panies: it is, for example, authorised to invest 
in the French Second MarchL 


In geographical terms the current emphasis 
of investment is on Finance (24 per cent), 
Germany (23 per cent), Holland (15 per cent) 
and Switzerland (13 per cent) with smaller 
holdings in Sweden (8 per cenr), Spain (9 per cent ) 
and Belgium (6 per cent). The fund has powers 
to invest in Britain but will nor do so for 
the present. 

LUMP SUM INVESTMENT 
Hbu can make a lump sum investment simply 
by completing the form below and sending it 
to us with your cheque. Units are allocated at 
the price ruling when we receive your order. 
The minimum investment for a lump sum is 
£500. There is a discount of 1 per cent for 
investments of £10,000 or more. 

MONTHLY 
SAVINGS PLAN 

S tarting a monthly savings plan is 
equally easy. The minimum is £20 
per month, with a discount of 1 per 
cent for contributions of £100 or 
more. Accumulation units are used and are 
allocated at the price ruling on the 5th of 
each month. To start your plan, complete the 
application and send it with your cheque for 
the first contribution. Subsequent contribu- 
tions are by the direct debit mandate which 
we shall send to you for your signature. 

Investors should regard all unit trust invest- 


ment as long term. They are reminded that the 
price of units and the income from them can go 
down as well as up. 

By 12th August the price of units had risen 
30 per cent to 65 .Op, compared with 50.0p 
when the fund was launched on February 1-i. 
The estimated gross yield was 0.S5 per cent. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
Applications will be acknowledged; certificates for 
lump-sum investments will be sent by the registrars. 
Lloyds Bank Pic, normally within *)2 day’s. 

The minimum initial investment is £500. Units may 
be bought and sold daily. Prices and yields will be 
published daily in leading newspapers. When units are 
sold back to the managers payment is normally made 
within 7 days of receipt of the renounced certificate. 
Savings plans can be cashed in at any time. 

Income net of basic rate tax is distributed to holders of 
income units annually ou 15 July. 

Tbe annual chaige is 17* ( + VAT) of the value of the 
fund. The initial charge, which is included in the oiler 
price, is 5%. 

Commission is paklto qualified intermediaries at the 
rare of lju% (plus VAT). Commission is not paid on 
savings plans. 

The trust is an authorised unit trust constituted by 
Trust Deed. It ranks as a wider range security under the 
Trustee Investments Act, 1961. The Trustee is Lloyds 
Bank Pic. The managers are Framlmgton Unit 
Management Limited. 3 London Wall Buildings, 
London EC2M 5NQ. Telephone 01-628 3181. 
Telex 8812599. Registered in England No S95241. 
Member of the Unit Trust Association. 

This offer is not open to residents of the Republic of 
Ireland. 


TO: FRAMLINGTON UNIT MANAGEMENT LIMITED, 3 LONDON WALL BUILDINGS, 

LONDON EC2M 5NQ 


1 wish to invest 


LUMPSUM 



in Framlington European Fund 
(minimum £500) 

L 



1 enclose my cheque payable to Ramlington Unit 
Management Limited. I am over IS. For accumulation 
units in which income is reinvested, tick hoe D 


MONTHLY SAVINGS 
1 wish to stan a Monthly 5avings Plan for 


m Framlington European Fund 
(minimum £20) 

I enclose my cheque for £ for my first 

contribution (this cm be for a larger amount than 
your monthly payment). I am over 18. 


Surname ( Mr/Mre/Miss/Ti de )_ 
Full first 




Signature 

Darn 


(Joint applicants should all sign and if acccessar r gnt details separately) 


T23/8 









- r 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


MURRAY EUROPEAN FUND 
Consistently one of the best 
performing unit trusts in its sector 
up 176.6% over 3 years* 


A So 


% 

% 




A meter 
could be 
neater 


We aim to scale Europe’s 
highest peaks for the 4th year 


WATER 


mm 






' % meremeaxrSjamtB l-8/86af£f00insaial*HHefirTi* bat basis. fwmaBrAsacBMflt 


' Ptaiaetl Stoop and FTB1. 



The stockmarkeis of Continental Europe have given excellent returns on investment over the past 3 years. 
During that period, MURRAY EUROPEAN FUND increased by an impressive 176.6%*. 


WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER 
INVESTING INEUROPE 

L The economic oudock is improving with: 

•Low Inflation • FaJlineOil Prices 

• Rising Domestic Demand • Healtny Trade Balances 

2. Corporate profits are benefiting train the political wffl to 
restrain wages and imp rove competitiveness. 

3. The European markets are historically under-represented in 
international portfolios. We believe they warrant more 
attention. 

4. Mam of the markets seem undervalued by international 

comparison. The riang trend seems set to continue. 

/ The investment advisers to Murrav European Fund \ 

are MURRAY’ JOHNSTONE LIMITED. Their 
expertise in global investment management is 
acknowledged in their link up with Yamaichi Securities of 
Japan, and with Kemper Financial Services of Chicago. 

The success of Murray Johnstone Limited has ted to 
them being entrusted with" some £5,000 million of funds 


THE FUTURE REMAINS BRIGHT FOR THE 

EUROPEAN MARKETS AND NOW IS THE 
TIME TO INVEST 

As a mark of our confidence in the European markets, we are 
offering an attractive bonus on any in v estme n t over 
^2,500. This offer doses on 3 1st August 1986. ACT NOW! 

Complete and return the coupon rodas and we will issue a 
contract note immediately and send you your unit certificate 
within six weeks. 


under management. Their proven stock selection process 
has taken MURRAY EUROPEAN FUND to the very ton 


Charges: Initial: 5% (included in the offer price) 

Annual: of 1 % per month 

Price and Yield: On 21st August 1986 the offer price was 275.1 p and 
the estimated yield was 1.05%. You should, of course, remem ber nut the 
price of units and the income from them can go down as w efl as op, and 
you should regard your investment as a medium to long-term one. 
Distribution: Income is distributed annualh on 5 1 st October: 
Dealing: Units are nnr malh bought and sold doth (excluding bank 
holidays). Current prices and yield are published in the Financial Times, 
Daik Telegraph and Glasgow Herald. 

Selling Units: To sell vour units, sign the certificate and mum it to the 
Managers who will sendyou a cheque normally within seven days. 

Trustee: Qvdesdale Bank PLC 


has taken MURRAY EUROPEAN FUND to the very top 
of the performance tables over die last 3 years. 


Bonus Offer closes 31 st August 1986 


APPLICATION FORM- 

To: Murray Johnstone Unit Trust Management Limited F..n w (\i,w\Hk"\i~. xnki 

FREEPOST, Glasgow G2 2BR (No stamp required) 

Telephone: 041-221 9252 I .Address 


L We wish to invest _£ | (min. £5 00) in 

Murrav European Fund at die offer price nilingon receipt of this 


arm buropeanrund at the oner price nilmgon receipt ol this 
application and to include a bonus of 1% extra units ifl/wc invest 
£2500 ormore by 31st August 1 986. 

L 1 We enclose my ourcheque money order payable to Murray 

Johnstone L’rat Trust Management Limited! 
lam We are over 18. 


Sipumrriv) 


Ifyou would like the income from your investment automatically 
reinvested, please tick here □. Join: applicants should all sign 
and attach mrir names and addresses on a separate sheet 
This offers not open to residents of the Republic ollrdand. a 


Ifyou would like information about any other Murray Johnstone Unit Truss please tick the relevant box. 
Murray . American □ Murray Equity Income □ Murray Far Eastern □ Murray Smaller Companies □ 



g] MURRAY 
S JOHNSTONE 


M&G SECOND GENERAL 



30" BIRTHDAY 


Over the last thirty years you probably could not 
have held a unit trust with a better performance than 
M&G SECOND GENERAL 

£1,000 invested at its launch h June 1956 would 
now be worth £67,208 with all income reinvested, 
compared with £8,104 from a similar investment in a 
building society. To have maintained its purchasing 
power over the period, £1,000 would need to have 
grown to £8,748. 

The British Stockmarket has been strong for a 
number of years, which is why many investors are 
now looking at overseas markets for new investment 
opportunities. But concentration in one particular 
area can produce very volatile investment results, 
and this year’s high flier can often be next yea's poor 


SECOND GENERAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. 

Value oTELOOO Invested on 5th June 1956. 


Date 

M&G 

SECOND 

F.T.Ortsnary 

Index 

Buikfing 

Society 

5 June ’56 

£1,000 

£1,000 

£1,000 

31 Dec ’66 

£2£96 

£2,47*2 

£1,699 

31 Dec 76 

£7,812 

£3659 

£3,437 

5 June ’86 

£67,208 

£21,042 

£8,104 


NOTES: All figures include reinvested ricomenet of basic-rate tax. 

The BUkangSobetyfi&ires are based on an extra Interest account offering 
lVs% above the average yearly rate [source: Bufldng Societies 
Association). M&G SECOND GENERAL figjres are reefcatton values. 


To celebrate M&G SECOND’S thirtyyear performance 


performer. You should be wary of short-term per- 
formance claims, such as the ‘‘Over 50% growth in 
just five months” quoted recently for a European 
unit trust 

M&G has two International Funds which solve the 
problem by spreading your investment effectively among 
the major stockmarkeis of the world. 

The M&G International Income Fund aims to 
provide a high income, and one that can be expected to 
increase over the years, from an international portfolio of 
equities. 

The M&G International Growth Fund aims for all-out 
capital growth by investing in the major stockmarkets of 
toe world. 

If you remain optimistic about the British Stockmarket 
and want a balanced portfolio, look at M&G SECOND 
GENERAL which aims for consistent growth of income 
and capita] from a wide spread of shares mainly in British 
companies. 


The price of units and the income from them may 
godownaswellasup.Thi$meansthatunittnistsarea 
long-term investment and not suitable for money you 
may need at short notice. 


INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. Vabe on lscAu^at 1986 of 
£XOOQ Invested at the launch of two In te rn atio na l Funds. 



Launch 

Date 

M&G 

Unit Trust 

Bidding 

Society 

International 

Income 

May ’85 

£1456 

£1,098 

Internationa] 

Growth 

Dec ’67 

£11,632 

£4658 


NOTES: AM figures include reinvested income net of basic^ate tax. IT* 
BuMng Society figures are based onan account ofteringa 

extra above the average yea rlyrate (source: BufldUigSoaeties 

Association). M&Gfi&irasarereafeatxxi values. 


FURTHER INFORMATION On 20tti August 1986 offered 
prices and estimated g-oss crarent yields were 

income Accumulation Yield 
I n ter na t i onal Income 61-7p 63 3p 5-15% 

International Growth 796-3pxd 1282-Op 1-56% 
SECOND GENERAL 750-8pxd 1482- lp 3-60% 
Prices and yields appear daily m die financial Times. The 


SPECIAL OFFER CLOSES 31st OCTOBER 


I AB applications lor £1,000 or more received by 31st October, 1986 wffl be given an extra 
l%afloc a tion of units, ineneasrogto 2% forappUcadomqf £10^)00 ormore per Fund. 

To: M&G SEGURfnESLMITED, THREE QUAYS, TOWER HH1, LONDON EC3R6BQ 
Please Invest thesum(s) indicated below in the Fund(s) of my choice (minimum nvestmeot in 
each FUraL £LOOO) in ACCIMULATlON/HCOflE units (delete as applicable or Accumulation 

' "'be 



1 JUHG 

UBOIDUDOns j 


Next distribution 1 Dec 
for new investors 1986 


You can buy or sell urate on any business day: Contracts for 
purchase or sate will be due for settlement two to three wehs 
later. Remuneration © payable to accredited agents: rates are 
available on request The Trustee for International Growth is 
Barclays Sank Trust Co. Unfed and tor International Income 
and SECOND GENERAL g Lloyds Bank Pic. The Funds are all 


widerranBeinvestmefltsandareauthpnsedbytheSecrataryof 
Stats for Trade and Industry 


M&G Securities Limited, Three Quays. Tower Hffl, 
London EC3R 6BQ. Tet 01-626 4588. 

Member of the Unit Trust Association. 


date 

v-'i : 


THE M&G GROUP 


Most water authorities will 
help you to decide whether 
you would be better off with a 
meter. In the Thames Water 
Authority region, for instance, 
anyone whose rateable value 
is * more than £500 would 
probably be better off with a 
meter. 

The authority’s booklet 
Domestic Metering In forma- 
tion. allows yon to work out 
your bill under two different 
systems more precisely. 

" Thames says a three-person 
household would use 18.000 
to 38.000 gallons a year, 
whereas Severn Trent, in its 
booklet Should You Have a 
Water Meter In Your Home?. 
estimates consumption for the 
same household at between 
27.000 and 43.000 gallons a 
vear. 



Timeshare 
action to 
calm the 
public 


You are likely to 
be a high user 


The booklet shows likely 
savings in the Severn Trent 
area, using figures worked out 
according to water usage and 
rateable value. 

If you use an automatic 
dishwasher and an automatic 
washing machine, you are 
probably a high water user. 
You are likely to come into the 


low user category only if you 
have neither of these ma- 
chines, do not use a garden 
hose and no one in your 


property has more than one 
bath a week. 

It is probably safer to as- 
sume that you arc a high user 
when making the calculations 
to allow for a margin of error. 

Water authorities differ 
slightly in how they charge for 
metered water. Thames, like 
most makes no charge for the 
meter itself beyond a £20 
deposit which will be de- 
ducted from the first metered 
bill. The consumer has to 
install the meter or find a 
plumber to do iL This should 
cost no more than £50. How- 
ever. if the meter has to be 
fitted outside the house be- 
cause there is a branch pipe to 
a garden tap. the installation is 
likely to cost more than £100. 

In the Thames region the 
annual charges are made up of 
a £13 standing charge, a £15 
meter-reading charge and a 
£1 8 standing charge for sew. 
erage — a total of £46 a year. 
The meter will be read once a 
year, and consumers will be 
asked to take a reading them- 
selves once a year. 

The volume of water used is 


charged twice over — once for 
water supply at 103.65p per 
1,000 gallons, and again for 
sewerage at 96.2p per 1 ,000 
gallons; it is pr es ume d that all 
the water supplied to a house- 
hold will eventually find its 
way out in some form. 

There is an additional 
ebaxge, probably of less than 
£2. for “environmental 
services”, such as water qual- 
ity regulation, recreation and 
fisheries, which are still based 
on rateable value. 


We may all hare 
to have them 


In the Severn Trent region, 
on the other hand, there are no 
standingchaiges. But there is a 
minimum charge of £12, or 
£16 for large houses where the 
supply pipes are larger. 

You may be unwise to 
swatch to a meter now if the 
savings are only marginal and 
do not cover the £50 installa- 
tion cost in the first year, as we 
may all be forced to have 
meters before too long. 

Vivien Goldsmith 


The timeshare Industry has 
managed to produce some 
good news. Last week «• 
highlighted some instances of 
the hard-selling carriage-dock 
largesse; this wed; wc can 
report some welcome action. 

A consortium of major 
timeshare developers, iudud- 
ing Barrett, European Ferries 
and Wfaupey, has produced a 
set of trading standards to 
**1111)- public concern*'. The 
standards mention sock wor- 
thy hat vague concepts as 
“reasonable aid fair market- 
ing and sates techniques", bat 
by for the most significant 
development Is the voluntary 
imposition of a life-day' coet> 
ing-off period once a purchase 
contract has been signed. 

The Office of Fair Trading 
has been doing its bit, too. A 
set of guidelines for those 
tempted to boy bas been Issued 
from Sir Gordon Sortie's of- 
fice. If followed, they win 
ensure that the timeshare . 
buyer understands the bargain ' 
before signing on the dotted 

line. 

The practical points are to 
sign nothing and to pay noth- 
ing on the first meeting. Nor 
should potential customers ac- 
cede to pre ssu re s to sign at - 
once to obtain a big discount. 
Hie gifts, too. should he 
ignored. And the offer should 
be considered at some length, 
with a solicitor to advise on 
what sort of liabilities you may 
be incurring. MB ' 


Commercial leaseholders beware 


Business tenancies may be less secure 
than they appear — so leaseholders 
beware. A recent tittle-publicized court 
case has shown that even the most 
insignificant breach of the terms of a 
lease could result in you losing valuable 
rights which could be worth thousands oi 
pounds. 


In many business leases, the lease- 
holder is granted an option entitling him 
to renew his lease often on very 
favourable terms. These options are over 
and above any rights he may have under 
the Landlord and Tenant Act, 1954. But 
the law relating to options is very strict as 
one leaseholder. Morton Music, discov- 
ered u> its cost, in a High Court case last 
month. 


In 1982, Morton Music had taken on 
a 15-year lease of a hotel front Bass 
Holdings, the landlord. The lease con- 
tained an option which entitled the 
tenant to renew the lease for a further 
term of 125 years. The option was 
conditional upon the tenant having paid 
the rent and having “performed and 
observed" the covenants m the lease. 

In 1985, Morton Music served a notice 


on the landlord asking to take up its 
option for the further term of 125 years. 
But the landlord would not accept the 
tenant's right to exercise the option. 

The matter went to court and among 
the various points at issue, the landlord 
claimed that the tenant had not “per- 
formed and observed” the covenants tn 
the lease, because it had twice applied for 
planning permission without Bass’s 
consenL 

There was indeed a covenant in the 
lease that a tenant must not apply for 
planning permission without the 
landlord's consenL But as the tenant's 
solicitor explained: “They were only 
applications for outline consent and they 
were in any event refused.” 

The tenant lost the case. It was held 
that if at any time a tenant has been in 
breach of a covenant not to do some- 
thing. then he will lose his right to 
exercise the option. 

The tenant's solicitor commented: “It 
was a very beneficial option to the tenant 
which was worth a lot of money. 

“There was one minute breach of a 
negative covenant and the tenant is still 


debarred. It is very unjust A tenant 
cannot put one foot wrong." 

The landlord's solicitors said: “The 
fact that the judge selected one unusual 
bread) as a main ground for his 
judgment does not detract from the 
general unhappy realtianship which 
negated the option.” 

So what can tenants do to protect their 
options? The answer seems to lie once 
more in the hands of the lawy ers. 


- Solicitor and property expert John 
Samson commented: “This case dem- 
onstrates that tenants should get legal 
advice well in advance of the time they 
first start thinking about exercising the 
option. They can then see ifthey can put 
their house in order. Some breaches of 
covenant can be put right without any 
adverse legal effecL They should also 
■make sure that their solicitor has 
registered the option as otherwise it . 
could well be worthless.” 


Morion Music's solicitors have de- 
rided to go to the Court of Appeal. 


Sue Fieldman 



I 


INSTANT ACCESS ALL OF THE TIME -AND NO PENALTIES! 

Now with even higher top rates AND instant access to i : 

i — — ■ - 1 * * » > ■ I "IV 1 !" 


money, at anytime, without penalty. That's the simple, no- 
strings promise of Moneyspinner Plus. 

The minimum investment is £500. We've raised the 
interest to 8.00% net p.a. for £10,000 -and a balance of 
£20,000 or more now earns our highest rate level of &25% 
netpA 

interest is added annually in October oryou can receive 
it as monthly income. 

Send the coupon to us FREEPOST, Newcastle and start 

AMOwrwvgrro 

£500 or more 730% 1038% without delay! 


[ TO: Mike McCarthy 

Northern Rock Bufldlng Society FREEPOST 
I Gosfbrth, Newcastle upon Tyne NE3 1BR 

| tfWeendo»e cheque for £ 

j to be invested in Moneyspinner rtus. 

1 (PteKGtkk) 

□ Interest to be added annuaSy to the 
account 

I Q Interest to be paid monthly. 

I Please confirm the application. 

. Nfoanwh^m v investments to start gamir 
interest up on receipt 


£ 5 , 000 or more I 735 % j 10 . 63 % 


£20,000 or more 


iBK J 

' ll 


FULL NAME/S:. 


1. • ) il • i 




:wi. 



HU 


■ v :* ■' 1 ' 1 































f 




THE TIMES SATURDA Y AUGUST 23 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


This adwtsemem s putfishaf by N M. WiscWd & Sms Urited on MRflonawSNaraflPLC 

The E)*reaoraoi laws News PLCmthBpasore«pondhiehrihBinfaniiaiii»iconiaBi«linrtteatfreiilS8n0t. 


Facts — and damned statistics 


C ANALYSIS ) 

Retail prices, 
employment figures, 
public sector 
borrowing requirement 
and cyclical indicators 
— what do they mean? 
David Smith, 
Economics 
Correspondent, 
unscrambles some 
official statistics 

There is a secret world inhab- 
ited by a small and select 
bunch of people. It is a world 
where there is no appreciable 
variation in the seasons, 
where human actions can be 
reduced to hard figures and 
where the past is subject to 
frequent, and often substan- 
tial. revision. 

It is the world of the 
statistician, one in which, by 
and lar§e. we tend to believe. 

OfficiaJ statistics are gen- 
erally taken on trust, even if 
we now discover that the 
roaring balance-of-payments 

Some people believe 
opinion polls 

deficit that forced Harold 
Wilson to devalue the pound 
in 1967 has, because of revised 
data, become a surplus. Or. 
that for many official statis- 
tics. the admitted margin of 
error is more than 30 percent, 
plus or minus. 

At least with official figures, 
a form of quality control 
operates and an honesty about 
the likely scale of under or 
over estimates. 

With many non-official 
statistics, often compiled on 
the basis of evidence from tiny 
samples, this is not the case. 
And yet we believe it when we 
are told that the average 
VauxhaN Cavalier-driving 
young executive, married with 
two children in Basingstoke, 
earns £22,200 this year, com- 
pared with £19.700 last. Some 


L' 




tit*: .miW: 




Streetwise: But how successful is the statistical analysis? 


people even believe those 
classic pieces of non-official 
statistical trivia, opinion polls. 

For non-statisticians, the 
concept of seasonally-adjusted 
figures is a source of much 
innocent amusement For the 
statisticians it is anything but 
Seasonal adjustment factors 
are often derived from equa- 
tions of fearsome complexity. 
■Even so, they can go wrong, 
usually when actual events do 
not conform to normal sea- 
sonal patterns. So far this year, 
we have had the coldest 
February since 1947 and, un- 
usually, a March Easter. 

Of course, before the num- 
ber-crunchers can move on to 
sophisticated matters such as 
seasonal adjustment they 
need to have reasonably reli- 
able figures to begin with. The 
Centra) Statistical Office, 
which produces monthly 
industrial production figures, 
recently began to have doubts 
about the accuracy of the 
information it was getting 
from industry. 

The figures looked plausible 
but in almost every case, had 
to be revised upwards on 
receipt of later dan. Fortu- 
nately, help was at hand. 
Every month, the Confedera- 
tion of British Industry polls 
about 1.700 companies on 
how they are doing and how 
they expect to be doing in the 
near future. 

So. the Central Statistical 
Office decided to use some of 
the CBfs figures — not on 


actual output but on expecta- 
tions — to produce bias adjust- 
ments to revise up the 
industrial production figures. 
These figures have thus be- 
come a mixture of history and 
forecast. 

Embarrassingly for the of- 
ficial statisticians, their first 
stabs at adjusting the figures 
up in this way proved over- 
optimistic. and the statistics 
have had to be revised down. 
Unluckily, the introduction of 
the new method coincided 
with an unexpected pause for 
industrial output. 

Good statistics require re- 
presentative samples, for only 
in the rarest of cases are 
figures compiled on the basis 
of a complete sample. Even 
where they are, problems can 
arise. The Department of 
Employment has recently 
taken some flak for introduc- 
ing a two-week delay in the 
compilation of the unemploy- 
ment statistics, after the 
monthly “count”. 

This has the effect of cutting 
the jobless total by 50,000 to 
60,000 and is justified, accord- 
ing lo the department, by the 
fact that under the old 
method, people m work were 
recorded as unemployed. 

The Unemployment Unit a 
pressure group for the un- 
employed. has discovered 17 
changes since 1979 in the way 
that the jobless total is cal- 
culated. Adding the effects of 
these changes back in to the 
published total gives an un- 


employment level of 4.3 mil- 
lion. if those on special 
employment and training 
measures are counted as un- 
employed. or 3.8 million if 
they are not. 

Inevitably, though, what 
gets the hackles up most are 
the official estimates of the 
inflation rale. The retail prices 
index is. without a doubt the 
best statistical series produced 
by Whitehall. Every month, in 
over 200 towns, researchers 
stroll out with their clipboaids 
from unemployment benefit 
offices and record the prices of 
more than 600 goods and 
services, making a total of 
more than 130,000 separate 
price observations in alL 

The index, unlike other 
government statistics, is never 
revised; the first version is 
also the final version. Yet. a 
lot of people do not believe it. 
Movements in the retail prices 
index, they say. simply do not 
match their own experience. 

For once, this is the fault, 
not of this particular statistical 
series, but of the general 
problem with statistics: 

Another reason 
for distrust 

averaging. Almost by defi- 
nition, no one's experience 
will exactly match the average. 
Indeed, in the case of retail- 
price inflation, ft is well nigh 
impossible anyway, because 
the index indudes both coun- 
cil house rents and mortgage 
payments. 

A second reason for 
distrusting the index is that 
people tend to notice price 
rises but not falls. 

Gearly great care has to be 
taken with official figures. A 
special advisory committee, 
appointed to look at ways of 
improving the retail price 
index, has eschewed major 
changes in the index, like 
leaving mortgage rates out of 
the calculation. Given the sort 
of tricks that statisticians can 
get up to, this is to be 
welcomed. 


TteOacfflSot Twu& 


HI* WLM Turner & 
fl&MV Klewall plc 

OFFER FOR 


AE 


PLC 


VALUE OF T&N OFFER: 

(part share, part cash) 

260 p 

AE SHARE PRICE: 

235p 

AE SHARE PRICE BEFORE OFFER: 

182p 

CLOSING DATE OF OFFER: 

Friday, 29th August, 1986 

unless extended* 

\feiue of ofler b based on share pries of Turner SNwafl at 330pm on 22nd August, 1986. 

AE steB price and AE share price befoe offer are prices at SSOpm on 22nd August, 1986 and on 190i June. 1986 respecBrefc 
*tf the offer been decterad iDcotStionai as to acceptaices on or by aft Augu&, 1986, 
the pat share, part cash offer will reman open ter not less than fourteen days thaerttfir. 


INTEREST RATES ROUNDUP 


Bani n 

Current account - no interest paid. 
Deposit accounts — seven days, 
notk» required for withdrawals: 
Barclays 4.375 per cent, Lloyds 4.30 
per cent. Midland 435 par cant, 
NatWest 4375 per cant. National 
Girobank 4.35 per cant Fixed term 
deposits £10,000 to £24399 : 1 
month 6.75 per cent. 3 months 
6325 per cent 6 months 6375 per 
cent (National Westminster); ^ 
month 6.26 per cent. 3 months 
538 per cent. 6 months 5387 per 
cent (Midland). Other banks may 
differ. 

MONEY FUNDS 

Amd Net CNAR Tetejjhone 

MkenHune 

monthly me. 631 713 01638 6070 

Bol ScoVand 60S 7.18 01628B060 

Barebw Higher Rate 

Deposit Account 


Deposit Account 
£1.000-0.999 
£ 10.000 Saver 
Cater AlencaR 
Cabank 


663 6.79 
7XB 7.19 
7.10 7 M 


01 626 1567 
016261567 
01568 2777 

0T 2«M222 
01236 6361 


Money Mkl Plus 725 750 012*01 28 2 
HPC Trust 7 day 7.75 720 012366391 

Henderson Money 
Market 

Cheque Account 6.95 7.18 01 638 5757 

(.4GKnhM.Dep.7-25 7.38 013883211 
Lloyds MICA 720 7 40 01 626 1500 

M&GHCA 687 7.10 016284568 

MtfandHICA 

£2.000- £9 599 675 652 074220 999 

£10X00 and over 7.00 7.19 074220999 

Nat West High 
1m Spec Reserve 

£2,000- £9 599 6X8 7 05 017261000 

£10X00 6 over 7X0 7.19 01 7261000 

Oppenhevner Money 

Management Account _ , 

undSxtOXQO 7.10 730 012369362 

over £10X00 729 7.49 01236 9362 

Royal B ol Scotland 

Premtum Account 7.10 729 031 5570201 
S&PCafl 6X0 7X3 070866966 

Schroder Wagg 

£2X00 to £9599 673 6X4 0705827733 
overnaOOO 651 7.13 0705827733 
TuBet 8 Rfey cal 726 7.42 012380952 

T 5 R 7 day 7.16 7X4 012360952 

Tyndaflca* 716 7X9 0272 732241 

, Tyndal 7 day 7.00 7.19 0272732241 
UbT7dBY 6X1 7.08 016264661 


TyndaBca* 
Tyndal 7 day 
0uT7day 
Western Trust 
1 month 


726 7.42 01 2380952 

7.16 7X4 012360952 

716 7X9 0272 732241 


1 month 7.01 724 0752 26U61 

CHAR- Compounded N« Annual flats. 
Banes are the latest avertable at the me ol 
gwig to press. Research D. Berm 

National Savings Bank . 
Ordinary accounts — if a minimum 
balance of £100 maintained for 
whole of 1986, 6 per cent interest 
pa. for each complete month where 
balance is over £500, otherwise 3 
per cent Investment Account — 
10.75 per cent interest paid without 
deduction of tax, one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
investment £100.000 . 

National Savings IncmneBond . 
Minimum investment £2.000. maxi- 
mum £100.000. interest 11.25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
na id monthly without deduction or 
tax. Repayment at 3 months’ notice, 
penalties m first year. 


National Savings Indexed Income 
Bond 

Start rate monthly income for first 
year. 8 percent . increased at end of 
each year to match increase in 
prices as measured by Retail Prices 
index. Cash value remains the 
same. Income taxable, payed gross. 
Three months' notice of withdrawal. | 
Minimum investment of £5.000 in ! 
multiples of £1,000. Maxim tan 
£ 100 . 000 , 

Nation^ Savings 4th Index-Linked I 
Certificates 

Maximum investment — £5.000 ; 
excluding holdings of other issues. 
Return tax-free and linked to , 
changes In the retail price index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cent In the 
first year, 325 per cent in the 
second, 3.50 per cent in the third. 
4.50 per cent in the fourth, and 6.00 
per cent in the fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased in August 1981, £148.42 , 
incl u ding bonus and supplement 
July RPf 384.7 
National Savings Certificate 
31st issue. Return totally free of 
income and capital gains tax. equiv- 
alent to an annual interest rate over 
the five-year term of 7.85 per cent 
maximum investment £5,000 
General extension rate for holders 
of earner issues which have 
reached maturity is 8.01 

National Savings Yearly Plan 
A one year regular savings plan 
converting info 4-year savings cer- 
tificates . Minimum £20 a month, 
maximum £200 . Return over five 
years 8.19 per cent, tax free. 

National Savings Deposit Bond 
Minimum investment £100 . maxi- 
mum £100,000 . Interest 11.25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
creefited annually without deduction 
of tax. Repayment at three months’ 
notice. Half interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 

BuBdbig Societies 
Ordinary share accounts - 525 per 
cent Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cent over ordinary 
share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered. Indi- 
vidual building societies may quote 
different rates. Interest on aB ac- 
counts paid net of basic rate tax. 
Not redaimable by non-taxpayers. 

Foreign currency deposits 
Rates quoted by Rothschild’s Old 
Court International Reserves 0481 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made for switching currencies. 
Sterling 9.01 per cent 

US dollar 5X0 per cent 

Yen 3.78 per cent 

DMark 359 per cent 

French Franc 6B5 per cent 

Swiss Franc 4X2 per cent 


HOW MR. S.C.T. CHOSE 
TEHE SHARES THAT 
ROSE BY 551% IN 
JUST NIUE MONTHS .- 

(with modest capital and the help of 
The Penny Share Guide) 

Yet another delighted PSG reader! 

Read just a few issues of The Penny Share Guide if you 
have a few pounds to spare. Our subscriber mentioned 
above claims NO special skill or experience. He just 
followed the expert advice we publish every month, 
starting with his own modest capital of £1800. Clip the 
coupon for details of HOW he id it, and news of the 
specially-reduced first year membership offer as well. 
How much is your money earning at present? 


I To: The Penny Share Guide Ltd. 3 Fleet Street. . 
I London EC4Y1AU 

l YES; please do send me free details of the PENNY SHARE j 
1 GUIDE, without cost or obligation. ^ , 

| Name. block i 

1 Address inrtRi | 

I PostCode PtIUE * 

1 


STILL TAX-FREE 


I 


£130000 


COULD GIVE THEM A NEWSTART 


£1 today could mean 
up to £130,000 when your 


Protect your family now - because you may never find a 
better chance than this. 

You may already be insured, but if you haven’t looked 
at your insurance in the last few years you may find your 
family under protected. You may even have insurance that's 
about to run out. 

You may have protected yourfamily against the 
money worries that could be caused by your own death. But 
what would happen if your loved one’ died - would you be 
protected? 

Whatever your needs, you’ll find this high value -low 
cost plan ideal. 

It gives you “term insurance’’, long recognized as 
giving more pure protection foryour money than any other 
kind. That’s because the money you pay into your plan is 
used to provide maximum protection foryour family in the 
event of your untimely death. 

Special introductory offer. 

And. since it’s so easy to put off an important decision like 
this, we’ve made it especially easy to apply You pay only £1 
for your first month's protection - and you apply direct 
through the posL 

Immediately your application is accepted, you're 
covered for up to £65.000- seethe figures in our ready 
reckoner. 

Easily afforded and still 
tax free. 

Now this remarkable plan is available from fust 20paday- 
and any money paid out is entirely tax free. 

What’s more, the total cover doesn't decrease from 
year to year as you get older; it stays at the high rate shown 
against your age today for the full 10-year life of the policy. 
This gives you the unusually high protection listed in our 
ready reckoner (see right I - so good that we let you have 
your policy for examination over 28 days 

During that 28-day period you are fully protected, yet 
you may return the policy if you are able to find another 
company offering you better value for money-or indeed for 
any other reason at all 

If you decide to keep it. you have the option to convert 
this 10-yearplantoa longer one with savings included in it. 
or even a plan to repay your mortgage. 

SuiLifeofCcnada 

2. 3 & 4 COCKSPUR ST . LONDON SWIY 5BH 

Sun Lit* Atturjnie C-Mepany ol Irc'Mpcrjte.J » ■: jnodj n IV.*. .r, j linurrd rotirpanv 

A mutual -roiRHnv arce be or c - t' ^million 


Total security for all your 
unify from iust20p per da 



Sun Life of Canada would give yourfamily double protection. 

Twice as much 
for accidental death. 


protection, how would their families cope? Sun Life of 
Canada wou id give you r fami ly double p ro tec ti on - twice as 
much money when they need it most, and that could mean 
up to£!30.000 lust what you’d expect from a company that 
pays out over two million pounds a day in claims. 


— 

TOW. COW 

TOIOWUU 

act UTMOST 

mirmm 

M F 

20-292032 

30 

33 

31 

34 

32 

35 

33 

36 

34 

37 

35 

38 

36 

39 

37 

40 

1 38 

41 

I 39 

42 

I 40 

43 

1 « 

44 

K 42 

45 

1 43 

46 

a 44 

47 

B 45 

48 

46 

47 

49 

50 

48 

52 

49 

50 

52 

53 

51 

54 

52 

55 

53 


54 


pen j- 



LOOK! YOU PAY LESS - 
GET MORE CASH. 

PLAN |" WAN ( PLAN - 1 PLAN PLAN 

A B C D E 

" £10.000 £20,000 E3&000 £50000 £65.000 

£20,000 £404)00 £704)00 £1004)00 £1304)00 

AMOUNT YOU PAY MONTHLY 


Apply today! 


Check through the ready reckoner now. and see how little it 
costs to give your family the protection they deserve 


Normally there’s no medical. lust fill in the coupon below 
and tick the plan you have chosen^ 

Them, j nst send it to os with a cheque for £ I, no 
matter how much Insurance you want That gives you 
one month's protection, as soon as we accept your 
application. 

Don't foraet to tick the box in the coupon if you want 
an application form for your wife or husband lfyou haveany 
queries, telephone our hotline number 01-930 2976 and 
speak to Sally Dexter or Melinda Smith. 

Post your application to Sun Life erf Canada Dept DM. 
FREEPOST. London SWIY 5YX. There’s no need fora stamp. 



I 


£1 INTRODUCTORY OFFER APPLICATION ^ 

pl? 356 senc * me - without obligation, a policy for rhe convertible term assurance plan I have selected which will be 
1 mine to examine for 28 days I enclose £ I for my first month's cover and understand that no salesman will call. 

SURNAME! MR.' MRS 1 MISS 'MS I niriTriiimiffmii-mnnniT.ii r . 

I BLOCK CAPITALS PLEAaEl PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS; YES NO 

I MAIDEN NAME IF APPUC ABLEl D? -OJ have a bank current acCrtJTU’ □ □ 

mcTNiuK 1 A»e theitanv risks or special dangen-ct-nnecteduiih your r — 1 1 ■ 

FIRST NAMES occupation, hototw* sponsor pastimes* [_{[_] 

ADDRESS— - Hj 't I 0 * 1 undergone an> hospital ini-esrisauon or operation r— — i < i 

other than tor removal ol wisdom teeth lonsrl* or appendix J j j 

1 Have you during the lest hie years receded am medicil idwrce i — 1 1 — ■ 

* " ~ I'Cdtmcnt or piescnHipn from a Joctor other than lor colds -5 | J | 

— ■ ■ POSTCODE 4 Atey-'.u rurtCTiilvefpenencin^anvsvmpronrfsuihich might | 1 1 I 

su§e*si th*[ art noi in iKi>dph>si:alandmcni 4 l ionUiTii.ro ] || j 


DATE OF B!PTK__ 

I WISH TO APPLY FOR: D ' y M0NTH 

PLAN TkkBoxAQBQcn DQ EQ , A1278AI 
Make your cheque for £ l payable to Sun Life of Canada. 

Please do not send cash. 


PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: YES NO 

D? --OJ have a bank current account’ □ □ 

t Are there a nv risks or special dan gersccn netted v.iih your I— t r— i 

occupation, hototwes sponsor pastrmes 1 | j j | 

7 Hj.e ,ou ever undergone an> hospital lnvestiganon or operation i i j 1 

other than tor removal ol wisdom teeth tonsr!-, or appendix | j j 

1 Have you during the last me >v?ars received am medical advice I — 1 1 — i 
treatment or prescription from a doctor other than tor colds' 5 J { | 

i Arey-su Current IveipenerHTiru; an vsvmproms which might I— ■ i — | 

surest rh,[ you art not m fteodphy si :al and mental coodirii.n 5 j j j j 

D r 'CV here it you do nor smote 

iKouj answer r-. Yes to an. Question in most cases we hope to be aWe in ene , 

vou the benefit of the terms <j< >how n in the rate rati'c Please jivelull details on 
a separate sheet of paper together with the name and address ol your present 
doctor Then aien and date the -jheet You should null «nd usy'ourEI lor your 
nib! man in s 

t ne V>wiiia. r i nn r4 «|i * i tntda la.rtisafatoJ i « i mdfi it lfr(Mfcm4**nr*i4 




l CONSENT to the Company seeking medical information from any doctor who 
at any time bas attended me concerning anything which affects my physical and 
mental health or seefeng information horn any insurance office to which a 

proposal has been made for insurance on my fife and I authorise the giving of 


Tick this bond you wouWflke an appfteauon (mm for your husband wSe 


DEPT: DM. FREEPOST. LONDON SWIY 5YX 

/<b^«nbwi«OBtelBn^ l „ fteUniWK - 

A i M4CM*H.Vit KLaa fe lSVn> ^ 








- A: 


THF. TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 


PERSONAL RENTALS 


Get away from it all 
through a hole in this page 

lust cut out this coupon, send it away and we'll send you our free 
brochure on Far Away Holidays. You could escape far away from 
Winter to exotic places like Africa, the Seychelles, the Caribbean, 
the Far East and even the Amazon. 

Cut this coupon now or simply cut along to your travel agent 
YES. Please send me a full-colour brochure. 

Mr Mrs/ Miss ' ' 

Address 

Postcode 

To: Silk Cut Far Away Holidays, P.O. Box 46. Hounslow. 
Middlesex TW4 6NE Tel: 0730 65211. m * 






* HOLIDAYS 


FALKLAND 

ISLANDS 

Five 17 day tours of 

island between Nov. 
1986 & Jan 1987. 
Special faciSties for 
scuba divers on 8th 
Nov. departure & a 
naturalist leader for 
the wfldlife& 
watching group, 15th 
Nov. Price £2.450. 
Itinerary on request 

ABTA 60340 

CHURCH ‘T.TVratENHAMl 

01-892^506/8164^ 


wmdem low cost Sons 
rna bast - art in caa pnnti B 
i ssjm cams an is n 
hog th vatu m tm 

otn to 

SYDNEY £374 WB 8 

PWTH 2374 CSSS 

AUCKLAND 2390 048 

BANGKOK BOS 005 

SMGAPORE E9» £*78 

HONG KOW £248 ME 

DELM/GOMBAY £231 C374 

fOLOMBO E237 2418 

ISTANBUL 2152 2187 

NJUR08I £242 1309 

JtTBURG 2206 2420 

UMA 2253 2495 

LOS ANGELES 2195 2385 

MBH YORK Cl 49 2296 

GeCVA £75 £8 4 

WA3HMGTWW £174 2321 

Baltimore 

42-48 EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON WB EEJ 
Empa/USA (Mu 01-837 5400 
Long Had U 8 01-603 1515 
IstlHusmass Cfeis 01-838 3444 


ETiIiTi] 


1 :4 hr 

BROCHURE 

tn-*n nfti 





Sunshine! 


fm 


The unspoilt charm of the Family Islands. 

Combine the exdtonent of Nassau and Freeport their 
jittering nightlife and historic interest, with a romantic break 
in one of the Family islands. 

Enjoy the seduded. intimate-style accommodation, walk on 
deserted beaches, swim in crystal dear waters and enjoy the 
trianfly atmosphere generated by your Bahamian hosts. 

You may not want to do it afl. but FROM 

it's nice to know it’s there. W 

See vcurfcxal travel aftau or contact ft 

The Bahamas Tiwsl Office. /4i £4-f ll 1 

230kia«dStiwL 

. London W1X4PQ 1U: III -&!9 5=38. 


ABcante 

Malaga 

Faro 

Balearic* 

Canaries 


fr £79 
fr £89 
fr £89 
fr £99 
fr £139 


MBeaerialbeBahamas. 


TURKISH DELIGHT 
HOLIDAYS 

Inclusive holidays 

26 AUGUST 
Pension UnsaL 1 
COLU DENIZ 
2 wks fr £329 i 
01-891 6469 

ATTO ATOL 2047 , 


cosrcvrrm on nwui/hi* 

14 Europe. USA A mW dcsllna 
Moos. DtattonUI Travel 01730 
2301 ABTA IATA ATOL. 


asT a club class njorric 

Hupp Durounn SunworM 
Travel KI3T27I 26097 
/27109/27S38. 



Travel, so. Red uon st. wet. 
Ol 40S 1496. A8TA/IATA. 


•MAIM, JAMAICA. N.YOBK. 
worldwide c h eapen fare* 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke SI 
RKtimoau ABTA 01-940 4073. 

TUW5UL Perfect Machos tor 
your summer nottdoy. Can for 
our brochure now. TuntNan 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 

All. US C1HES. Lowe* tares on 
malar scheduled c an te n . Ol- 
564 7371 .ABTA. 

17 DAT BBVA7E U4k Holiday 
Tour n» Details TeL 03S4, 
375320. 


CRUISE A SAIL ABROAD 


JsJeven sea§ 

> C.R.U.1.S.E 

C.L.U.B 

CALLING ALL OtUISEBS 
Join our EXCLUSIVE 
SEVEN SEAS CRUISE 
CLUB and oixa imperial 
dimunb on aft Cruise 
Stumor AT LEAST 5% 
PLUS Regular news on iV 
new cruises any special 
offers and Iasi minute 
availability. PLUS 
EXPERT ADVICE cm itin- 
eraries save money now 
and call us for more 
information on the 
exclusive 

•SEVEN SEAS CRUISE 
CLUBT 

Victoria Travel. 

I 8 HcocU HomL Bared Greta. 
Simita4wm.M58NE 
TeL 121 445 5466 


rilRHEV lux 40- yactn loc 
w/surf. w/rtU SlnMes wrt- 
come. Med SaH 0904 37502 


GENERAL 


TANK TOMB OFF la Pom. Am- 
sterdam. Brussels. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne 6 Dieppe Time on. 2a. 
Cneslcr Close. London SW1X 
7BQ. 01-236 8070. 


Italy-off the 
tourist track. 

Beautiful, tranquil 
Raveflo lies ins: along the 
coast from busy, bustling 

Sorrento. Two worlds - 
yet only one hour’s drive 
separates them- Magic of 
Italy offers you villas with 
swimming pools and 
hotels in Ravello, 
'«&" away from the mass 
tour operators. Moke a 
Magic choice nog. 

01-749 7449 (24hrs) for 
FREE colour brochure. 
Magic of Italy Ltd., 47 
Shepherds Bush Green. 
^^^Loodon W12 8PS. 

The 

Magic of 

iBiS-Mly 

[The best company when 
I you're on holiday. 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


Expfcya's ortgtod 2-3 week 
adventures include walking n 
Berber w Ha gas m Morocco, 
settng feluccas in Egypt, 
e xplorin g tBraoL Jordan A 
Syria, and axptorahons « 
Rwanda. Zaire, Sahara. 
Spain, Mexico and Central 
Asia. Plus many more. From 
£325. Contact: 

EXPLORE 

Explore Woridwtda (DT) 

7 High St. AklerahoL Hants 
fit Q2SZ 319448 (24 hra) 


Bciu Travel. Trt Ol 3M 6414. 


CKAP mom Worldwide. 
Haynurtet 01-930 1366. 


D B O OM IT FAMES W«WwMr. 
Ol -434 0734 Jupiter Travel. 


MSCOUNTED * BMB FAMES. 

D.T C Opto sat. 0755 867036. 

DISCOUNTS 111 /Economy OCk- 
eta. Try UO HO. FLIGHT- 
MOKtRS 01387 9100. 

. acrd/VW acrapled. 

ones. iuwn, canawv*. 

Aun/SeuL ■vaitablllty 109231 
771266. Timowsar HaUdsn 
ABTA ATOL 1 107. 

LOW COST VUBMTS . Moot em- 
pean deMnaUom. Yatoxantar 
01-402 4262/0052 ABTA 

61004 ATOL I960 
SYD/BKL £618 Pnlti £646. AO 
maMr rmm lo Au3 * HZ. Ol 
584 7371 ABTA. 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY ft MADEIRA 


ILMJUFE SOUTH Loa Ogantes. 
luxury aportmenL Ween 4. ora 
view, close to all emopmee. Ma- 
rocdtale avrallattttly. details 
phone (day) 0686 27000 leve- 
ntngsl 0597 3648. 

KMDHFK. Brarti JOL pool, bar 
ul ecp s 2-4>. HreorWrr. From 
£88 pw 109031 892101. 


SELFCATERING 

FRANCE 


POUND 



Un. Apu 6 Tnmu lo III Ml 
price rangn 6 an age orouue. 
1 .2.3 6 4 tedr m s avail Tel 
rnurrli vilta .4 Apartments. 
■OS82I *96775/419898 ABTA 
ATOL 1821 


SE LFCATERING 

SUBSTANTIAL Private Vital, 
some wiui Stall, all wHK own 
pools avail al cheaper pnm in 
BralAOrf m Al*»rve. Maroeoa 
A South of France Palmer «, 
Parker. Ol «93 6725 


COTE D’AZUR - 

2 exqutettB 5 bedroomad 
vSas with large pods and 
domestic service. Grass 
or St Paul De Vence. 
From El .200 per week 
uitl end of September. 
Tel : Monaco 93 25 55 99 


LA O IIW Avail Aug/Se«L So 
pert French Ctvalel (jrmlKHMf 
nc Annecy. S/C apt 2-6 per- 
huh. Tel 0242 602 124 or 603 
CM DAY; 602 776 EVE. 
cm GROUNDS Loire Chateau 
sleep! 6 rural peace wooded 
walks. Aug 30 on 0734 
744443 

OOLF OF 8 W W te< N . Modern 
Breton collage, autet tom loc» 
Uon. waters edge, steeps 4-6. 
hum £ID pw 0925 27358. 
BRITTANY A DORDQONC Coast- 
al cottages, sios a/io. 30/0 ♦ 
Sew. ElSOp-w 0225 336761 
SB* FRANCE COraronaMe sntaU 
Mr. Peaceful MB village. Avail 
mid Sept. 0369-70366 


SELFCATERING 

GREECE 


Corfu 

31 August. 24 Sept 
and «rov in Sepfember 

Breuttui Whs by me So. Hottls 
also aaftHe thraunTmui August & 
Smtcntw 

Rmg Pan World 
Holidays 

Opet S« 91-734 2562 
(Sou 91-736 2464} 


CORFU VBLA5 Wr SOU nave 
avaUaMUty Sun 31 Aug 7 SejO 
for 2 was. BeaulUul villas nr Ihe 
Dracti n Calwick. Pan WorM 
Holidays open SM 01 734 2562 
CYCLADES. MyXonas. Pants. 

Naxos. tos «c vutas. 
Ta vernos. A p» nmn i tamplv 
cheaper Simply Super l Simply 
SOnon Holidays. Ol 373 1933. 
Wtrrrr. Urspohi i s land s , cheap 
mghis. villa rentals rlc Zeus 
Hois Ol 434 1647 AMI. AilO. 
TMOBC tux apart now from 
£189 pp 27 Aug. 3.7.10 Seta 

Strime O706-B62B14- 


SELFCATERING ITALY 


I PHIL, secluded Hamlet cot- 
tape, sleeps 6. tong or short let. 
from £76 per week. Tel >03001 
825038 


SELFCATERING 

PORTUGAL 


CM FABULOUS ALGARVE vHfa 
Jell! 28 Anousi toe 12-14 days. 
Sleeps up lo lO smuimmi 
slew* stair and pool. Super 
price £1 .750 P.w. Other ho*ra-> 
asatlaHe Sept/Oct The Algor 
1- ARrrnallve. 73 61 AmnS. 
London SWI Trt.OI-*9l«OS 
ALAARVZ. Lux villas with pooh 
3 opts. Asad Sew /Oct Ol 409 
2U38 Vlltawartd 


*MAUA*GGZD* 

* ALGARVE *MBCRCA* 

28. 29. 30. 31/8 & 1. 4. 5. 6. 7 & 
lira Seat tand-pektd Has. ho- 
tels. FGghts Heathraw. Gatwdt & 
Manclwmr Tha speoatet Ub 
bDUhl u y jpcnadL 

Sonauentice 

0V937 1649/9327 124ln> 

4814410. 8198 ATTO KXXS&m W 


! LOW COST FANES lo U-S-A. Ml 
| lor Travel Ol 485 9237. IATA. 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled nights 
01-724 2388 ABTA ATOL 


UWV FANES WORLDWIDE - 

USA. S. America. Mid and Far 
tax. S Africa. Trayvale. 48 
Margaret Strew, wi. Ol 380 
2928 (Visa AcceMedi 
MU A rraotcH paradise 14 
mghis. from only £666. Call 
Airfares tniemalMnai 0602 
504 684 124 hrsL 'ABTAL 


PBOLS-POOLS-PBOLS 
FUOTS! RJGRTS! 

We £■ tore a tew asnofas IBs 
«rib pniRB pooh an tte Mjbw. te 
wt« JS VRb Btj Mana Hotcas on 
9c Costa Verde tor legh season. 
★ Son* Auo/Sept a^Wiy 
* Fkgha irooi £96 

FOBTUVILLAS 
08926 64245. aw t m 


ALCWAVE Gars retro. Privately 
owned luxury vIHa with pool. 
Sleeps 6- maid service Avan 28 
Aug - 1 1 Sept tod. Other dplea 
avail. Telephone 0626 583 667 


AbOANVC Vftamouar. 2 bed. vtf. 
la wah own pool aval table from 
mid SepL TeLOaSB 716971. 


SELFCATERING SPAIN 


Opea as we ekends tec 
Monday IB AM - 2 PM 

- 

! A M D T ■ 4 V E l ES 55 


LEFKAS 

2&AU6 23.16 SB»I 
Unspot kah Qnfc Us. WMsal. 
BoaovL Bare & Bop 

DJERBA 

2U0 AOS 9 SHT-OCT 
Fiat w/l teKB. svsb tood. fiw 
tree. CUs. hosts 2* a 4* ka- 
wy hy NBd» headcs. 

A am 9 iNng hoidzys tor an- 
gles. cosgtos & rentes. 
lUNMISCtff ATDL 1933 

01-441 0122 


OZNZ 

PERTH - 'ct-,)r£62V 

SY D/MEL/B R IS m !r£63 5 
AUCKLAND nn.Y£7>5 

OI-242W55- 

'REHOT R_A\’ EL : \ eta . iat.v, 


4ALACA, CANAK Ol 441 

1111. Trawetwtee. Ahta. aioL 


BONOCC O 189 Regent SI. Wt 
Tel Ol 734 5307 AHTA 


A. AFRICA From £466. 01-684 
7371 ABTA. 

' FALKLAND ISLANDS. Pronto- 
Uooal lecture loth Sent, (or 
winter 19B6/7 tot«. Phone 
TwtcVenwgdd Ol 892 7606 

I for information A tovfuilon. 

LATIN A— naTA Low col 

I flMita eg. Rto £486 Una 
£496 rtn. Also Small Group 
Holiday Journeys. Icn Peru 
hum £3S0l JLA OI-747-310B 


STOCKS 

is NW a l**d. arty 1 haw tram 
, the Wat End. dose to H25 and 
Ml. Studs has 18 svtrb 
mdMu aBy desigriaJ te WoonB 
ndwtoq tow pastora. a twautdul 
rcstaurani phis twres. squash. 
SRiomag. owaia. sena and 
sobram. twgesi Jacoza n the 
country and map teem horse 
ncSng. flora £97.75 P{). p«r 
Bi o teod. 

Write or phone lor a brochure; 
AlAwy. Nor Ttng Herts 

T«l 0442 85341 


ACTIVITY HOLIDAYS 


WONDERFUL WALKS, warm 
welcome with Wild Wales 
Walks. Peivy Mil Fawr <Tl. 
Cynwyd. Corwen. Ctywd. 
104901 2226 


NMNNSLLAi Luxury iPBtoot 
avadahie. 2 bed. 2 bath, pool 
superp views over Gta raltcr and 
Puerto Bane F ram £220 pw 
Tel. OS1 -227-1737 / t0704t 
212686. 

LA MANQA CLUB 2 bedim, a 
bain, bungalow on Golf course, 
sleeps a Oott. Tennis. Souash. 
SaMtoo £lr AH year (acillUCS 
0663-828280 

JAVEA. Beatnilul (tot sleeps 4 
Beach 2 ratra Avail a«er 18Hi 
Sept £125 pw Tel. 927 
295512 Afire 7pm 

COSTA BLANCA New opt. 8ips 6. 
Beach, bool, goll Avail now 
From £8Qpw. 0442 40638 

■ARBtll.A LUX villas with 
poofeA ipb. Aug to Oct Ol 409 
2B38 vmaWnrtd. 

BUINN E1 IJ1 LUX Vina al Aloha 
Nr Port Ban us. T/rourL s/pool 
FT LiaO p.w. 10483) 273472. 


WINTER SUN from S91 fori week 

SdfcaKringviHahofldays mdusive of Rig* for i or2 
weds from Gatwids. boon and Manchester in Bie 

AgmiUiBaiale)FteitnriilBa,OroddSait 


Long stay hobdaysa! Badi WRa CMs bran £7 per 
person per^ week including viBa and flight. 

cm .* on £0223) 353222 (24 fa) 

Beadfr (HoBdags) Ud. (Dept t). 8 Market Paosoge, 
rxmhfidge CB2 3QR iraodvdiWOtJBB«a» uiymmuTa 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


CANTERBURY 
Fnro Iwn te Bsyals 
16tt - 19t6 October 1986 

Tils a 4 Or break ««h Ml bond r 
Oh buAM centre, from when you 
tyadott fade m» take you to places 
wth a ueanh ot owes. Tour starts 
and bib a vt%xa Coach sawn 
London. Oetatt/btWaag (arm Iran 

CQBVTRY T6BBS 
38 BGH STREET, 
mOUUI, CJUTTEBBSRT 
KIT CT3 1AB 
6227 720S87 


WINTER SPORTS 


■ CHALET PARTIES 
'i.'HEnt EVERYONE 
IS WELCOME 


FVt t (0252) 616”89 l24hr»I 
ABTA 5504 1 ' ATOL 209b | 


SKI BLADON LINES 

86/87 BROCffilRES NOW «m 

47 Resorts m Ssntrertand. 
Austm. France & Italy. 
The Btggesi Chorea On Stas’ 
Ex Gatmck. Luton. Manchester, 
Qasgm & EOntugh 

Oi 785 2800 
MwilI l Dopa. 0422 78121 
ABTA 16723 ATOL 1232 


MU WIST Dumper brochure out 
now tucked with an toe loo re 
writ, taputay flitoiu >bewl toe 
traffic* i. and afnannqly low 
pofrt vurling al £» Ring <Ot > 
785 9999 for your cony 
ABTA69256 ATOL! 383 

ACTIVITY TRAVEL FanLnUT W 
nrurnure oul now. Tel 01 sat 
5115/031 225 9457 <24 In' 


ILK. HOLIDAYS 


%. DEVON. Sea Soaciou* family 
nil Srgt on lor 2/6. £84 £I5« 
pw Ol 794 0237/01 074 6650 


AUTUMN BREAKS 


NWSEBOAT near WIDOW 
Sleep* 4/6. aU rood con*, gar 
den. Raiung. boating. From 
£146 9 W. Trt >0990) 24228 


CORNWALL & DEVON 

MEUDON 

HOTEL 

MIMOUTH. SOUTH CDRNWUL 

TEL- 0324 250541. TELEX-45478 

IMPULSE BREAKS 

Treat yout«fl » a rnU aeservefl 
break oi taurcus surtoundoigs. 
with sopetp and tocora 
smn Re gra rareflett by Ihe 
beacDCss ttepficem stxw 
gas and pmaie teach. 

Write tt ohone tor tranure 

Takes break 

Youdoaervatt • M* 


m .m w « 


DEVON AT ITS BEST 

UteMked^Barbai 
qateadgsef ELTO . Lcnaact 

"** *1, e~1i[^f ran-ic.L*.^. .L.A- 

cj ’±c Male Vijfcy. Scitcterm* ssx 
mSaHtCm^xJ, fobs*, city in*- 

cfxslnfct- 


I On your own? 

I Over 30**^ 


Why 

holiday alone? 

Oui getea choce ol uo-irvjryet 
n:4*:avy ,io>oad anc uravonc 
D>0dH5 cunwniy am ad mere 
l3il«5 than men Hete> us to 
even in.' aatancc Brachurr from 

to- Saif ^ 

41 Watford Way 
London NW4XM 

ai-202 oassutm) 


DISCOUNTED fares 
arete nbtn 
Jotuafl* a OK £490 

Ntacta £Z75 090 

Ctao £150 £230 

L» OK £240 £360 

O^Bvn £250 £350 

BtaAok £220 £350 

d£ 2T £420 

Afro Aaten TravN Ud 

waw 

Late 8 Qouo Bad—t IWopmo 

Nicx/v SA/oaets 


LOWEST FARES 
Pans CS9 N YORK £275 

FrpMurt OO IA/SF £3» 
Lanas £320 LWffll £320 
tSrobl as SngRiore WJO 
Jo burg £*80 Banda* E33S 
CtaO £205 Katmandu £4*0 
Dst/Bom £333 Rangoon £350 
Hmg Kong £5lD Catooro C425 
PIRN cad 
SUN I, SAND 
21 S-aftm 9L London R1 
01-4M 21WW4P esp 
MAJOR qCMDS ACCEPTED 


ART A ARCHAEOLOGY TOUR 
OF SICILY. CxRpttaaot value 
tote-ieasou Grand Tovar, spe- 
cially dedtaied to saUNV wide 

torn, with se nsible dotty mde- 
age Oeporturee Tuesday 30 
Set)L 7.14 A 21 Oct £298 tod 
nay mghis Gatwtcfc. 7 mghta 
H/B ui 3/4 star holeta. airport 
taxes, entrance fees. Special of- 
fers also to TAORMINA, tad 
1st car hotel £268 H/B. beach 

hotel £21 B M/B. penuone £171 

BlB.aH lor 7 nights, same dcs 
dates. ISLAND SUN 01-222 
7452 ABTA/ATOL 1907. 

ABCFARE trecULWI Sydney 
o/w £420 rtn £760. AraMand 
o/w C4SO rrn £770. jo-bung 
o/w £306 rtn £499. Lao An«e- 
ta»o/w £316 rtn £405. London 
Flight Crotra 01-370 6332. 

ONE CALL lor some at the best 
deals to mghta. apartments, ho- 
tels and car hire Tel London Ol 
636 5000. Manchester 061 B32 
3000. Air Travel Advtsw 
Bureau. 


from 30th August. Lovely 
house. 5 b e d rooms. 2 hath- ' 
rooms. kUrtwn. During room, 
lounge. TV. tomb c ourt, b roch. 
Use of pool. £500. 02375 262. 


CONS MR COUNTRY MANOR 

House. Plenty Is do. see and 
eat. Special £89 per week, din- 
ner. BAB. Tel. 0822-332442. 


CORNWALL Aiiiuma Break. 
Poireath WcO equipped house 
by sen. Sfeepv 6-10. TelcWMnr: 
0993 850369 


JKVON/DOMCT BOROCR Hitts 
and sea. Relaxation, interest. 
Good rooking In oM farmhouse. 
Own col TV. Only ton S2929. 


COTSWOLDS 


STRATFORD UPON AVON. Qittel 

pen near theatre. Sips 4. TV. 
CM. 0789 750720 


DORSET, HANTS-, & 
Law. 


BoMtimnl Uaared/Bgnta I 
ABTA IATA ATDL 145B1 


CLEAR OFF 

m 1/9(0W) £69 

aga 28/8 £99 

i 28/8 £119 

H» 5 /S £129 

tes 91/8 £129 

arte 31/8 £134 ' 

! 30/8 £135 . 

'a 38/8 £169 


AB classified ad v TTBsetneim 
can be accepted by ideptaoe 
fcrrrpi A ua o u aaj it cd u L The 
deadline re 5.00pm 2 days prior 
lo pabheauon (ic 100pm Mon- 
day for Wednesday^ Should 
you wish to scad an advertise- 
ment in wriima please tndude 
your daysiote phone number. 

customer aanncEs de- 
partment. If you haw any 
queries or probl ems rchniag to 
yow ad vcriisenjcnt once h fore 
appeared, p hene contact our 
Customer Services Department 
by Idcpbooe on 01-481 4100. 


announcements 


lively MM wKh good general 
kno w ledge & last WMHM to 
ro oto e w to oar now TV otriz. 
S end your name and oddram 
tar Oeurils no:- Quiz DcM. Gra- 
nada TV. MaixJ i iltrr . M60 


McGowan morn Mi April) u 
lo be n a pttsed today or at 
Edtatdradu'o. Ely Ptara. Did- 
cone aboard from Marian and 
Michael. JudKh. Timothy and 
Attra. 


jota the fight- Support. 

Quest tar a Test tar Canes-. 
Vtoodbsy. Harlow Road . 
R nydon . Harm. (027979-22331. 


FOR SALE 


SERVICES 


NEW YORK, MEW YORK 

ftewn (ms tram £255. 
Ha i tbwM dtps bmo during 
peak periods & ottw *orid 
ante desuatnas. Most eco- 
nonRal tares. 

Creative Travel 
Tel 81 907 7574/ 
907 0492 

(OpBB SU BMTttS) 


■EM LOW FARES 


ryji 

£270 
£315 
£330 
£730 
£755 
£580 

LTD 

|2 D O PMM 5TRHT. LOMDOR WI 
T* 01-00 3521/8887 


BREAKAWAY. London's ctitti for 
profesdonal mtottalched people 
23-03 Over 200 events month- 1 
ty 34 hr info tape. 997 7994. i 

COMPANY COLT pays organised 
tar staff or customers. Any i 
tocattan. Tel 0734 872722- ! 

WNKN M LONDON rent a TV or 1 
vKtco by day. wk or taanttv 
TOPS TV 01-720 4469. 

rKDMW, Love or Marriage ' 
AO ages, areas. Datettne. Dept 
■ 0161 23 Ablngaon Road. Lon- 
don W8 TeL 01-938 lOll. 

PORTFOLIO: Free daily camput- 
et 1 check. Any number of earth, 
t ie tor details. 62 Caastobury 
Drive. W attorn. WD1 3AC. 

ASCOT BOX to krLRepiy Boat 020 


Contact 

tha team with the best 
experience WortdAMde 

ACtUEVEMEHTS 

DEPT TT, WRTHGA1E 
CANTERaURY CT11BA 

TEL: 0227 4S2618 


SROBRsd M mahogany, hood 
built dining table Unused Sid 
natotul home or rieoant WW 
room QMixh to nearly iT. 
(Mto Id r Can seal 16. IBP 
Utmai Regency rcprOddCtldn. 
Filling, sudd brara. Accen t 
£1500. Number or mcMnp 
Prince of Wales chans, baud 
carved and poltehcd- ABW- 
used. C19S each- Also 2 WraOar 
namt Mitt *oHd mahogany ta- 
blca. unuMd. seating tv to lO or 
12 Tel 01-203 6027 

siuafri of Neman The 
utttnuie replica turtriMro *e 
ciatfets. One ot EnMtotth 
Urged roueettons of l7Ui A 
18Ui cratin’ period style lund- 
lure £2 nuOtan stocks tor 
tmmedtale deb very Netttethd. 
near Henley on Thames 104911 
641115. Bournemouth t0202i 
293680. Topmatn. Devon 
■0592871 7443- Berkeley. Oos 
10463) 810952. 

FHM T quaHly wool carpels. Al 
trade prices mid under, also 
available 1O0V extra, taw 
room see remnants under lull 
normal price. Crianceey Carpeto 
Oi 405 0463. 

TIM RMS 17SS-10M. Other 
HI lux avail. Hand bound ready 
tar prese nt ation Msd 

-Sundays'* £12.60. Rcroeiaher 

When. 01-668 6325. 

TICKETS FOR ANY KVKNT. C®. 
SUritghl Exp- Chess. Las IWS- 
AU theatre androorts. . 

Tel: 821-6616/8280496. | 

A. Lx / Visa / Diners. 

HBTMDiAr DUE f Ohe someone 
an origtoal Times Newspaper 
daled the very day Dies' were 
bora. £12.50. 0492-51305. 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES. COb- 

Me setts ete. 

dcOvertas. Trt: 10380) 860039 

IWUISL 

SEATFMDCDS Any event Inc Les 
MB. Covent Odn. HtariRW to 
Last NtaM of the Proms. 01-828 
1678. Major credit cards- 


nr 0 * Kmghtabrtdoe. Britt* 
via. Ptmttro. W«trtBn3« 

Luxury MUM »d iua d«« 
ante lor tone or short ML 
Please ring tar cu rrent n»>. 

t M SWI 01-828 82SI 


WMTT A JAMES Contact usnuw 
on Ol 235 8861 fur the ttori W- 
lerttou of ruixHBhe d nan and 
houses to rent In KBkWBIIJlr. 
Cnetuna ond Kensmguto iTl 


INC me 3 bedroom Ikm*. 
G/H. exUmdUUrfli and/br 
pels wjrow £130 pw Um. 
Express Rentals 883 6487 
0X7 BUS The number to remrai- 
ber when re ek ing best renta l 
progenies to central and pom e 

London anera £160/ £2JXMpvr 
U3XQMMHT seeks ruro prop- 
erne* in besl lontsmi era 
GABBAN 6 OASELEE (usual 
fees reoulredX Ol 889 5481 
m MB BE NT5 PK ltd 2 beds. I 
reep. h&b. sectotted. Overiow- 
tog fen. Co (Hra Lett- £190 
pw Tel: 01724 9312 
3 BED ROOM HURLEY HOtW 
odn adds ta Uu om i- Ct 16 pw tor 
Rental Glddr Ol 686 TB7b 
FUTL HOUSE* AMD S HA M E* 
in South London am as Rental 
GUMe Ol 686 7876. 

NORTH LONDON I urn bedML £36 

pw tm UVCL Exuros nettem 

883 0457 

FURLCY lux 4 bed. 2 bath de- 
tached toe. Odn. Gge. Scenic 
views. 568 8552/0273 728349 
sirzRuviA, wx= studio nat toe 
own prof man. OS pw to e CH 

+ I tom. TeLOl HS36-4822 

STOKE N PW NCTONi 2 n/s fe- 


tumiM FLATS S WWW 
aCada non for 

CMWIhn L«n"j tv Mwrt letatn 
jP area* Lipffwto 
AlbriTUrir St W 1 01 499 SSSa 

HCKMOND/KEW 4 rod*, mg.; 
(tan town tiw N «w£**Y- 
Ir) £266 pw OI W IS66. 

CARLTON IRLL NW*. S^artauv 
rutuni garden iMMirtir. 3 
SSiAnSlran -ichool *>»rt «r 
fulty fittuahM. T heatahta 
rooms ,3/4 bedronmsi. 2 bath- 
rooms, modem hiKhen. uriHjy 
room, att nod cons V.446P W 
uki ri.Yh- rinafrino ImM trt- no 

nronts 7W Oi 624 1347 

American oanmwsjfe 
tux Du/Mire UP Id CiJOOpw 
Lsurtlrev teq Pta UIPS KM* 
Lewis. South of the Park Chrt- 
sea otIKC. Ol MS 8lllor 
North -ol lie Parti Rcg enrs 
Rart, omen. 0I-5B6 

N. NORFOLK A COTSWOUMj* 
properties -of >nv^4ruta1e ooBJ- 
tv available October to. Marc h. 
Mmi minn a weeks let Steeps 4. 
Fun CH Details Ol pore and 

avoUaorfnv IromHeart cj En- - 

gtaod emumrr iQOeM 861000 ; 


ROYAL DOULTQN Toby Jugs, 
figurines- a nfmaM etc- «*nt- 
ML Ot 8S3 0024. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


years old. exem pt condition. I 
£6.000 ono Tel: 0734-712166 


Genuine reduatoos on mn 
too new a, restored totra- 
mentt. Unrtvatted after sales 

service. Free catalogue aoa 
Hlahgate Rd. NWS. 01-267 
7671 Free catalogue. 
■ EC M bn ON grand. Excettml 
condiuon. Rosewood. 6IL 
£5000 ono. Ol 5B6 4981 

SPECIAL OFFER! 

Real a piano worth £1700 from 

£24.95 per toQMh- 

r***- 

■ 100 % of renub refo ntto i on 

io Ixaaifcr porehw 
credit id mother ptttno 


matasio aharelge nu m hoc roe. 
£35 pw IOC. T*Ktt-2S*47Sl. 
STRKATKAM One bed IWWly 

dcr i/c DU £80 pw Inc rates 
Rental Qulrtr Ot 686 787ft. 
SUTTON CH bedsM SWI couple 
£47 pw MBs included RaroN 
GuNST Ol 686 7576 
5W7 Hr lube. A tt r a cti v e nitty fro- 
embed sett contained 1 bed™ 
opt- £150 pw TeL- Ol 244 7127 
or 0273 756731 


SURREY 


W IT — Itt Spacious modern 
DeLHse. a bedims. 2 baths, 
cloaks, fan got OL dot oarage, 
mscapod guns, ciao.ooo.ooo 
TeL 0932 86441 . 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 
TO LET 


I ■ SWTZBDJira 

N8Mad* Pan 

U LateOwma 
L M uub I b I p i— aria 
rorotaf— araUHtt; 

aU— « URSDL OBBF 
nL DON — % JNL Darol 
EM h 8i UN — % 4L. Nk 

tkwm rmmsmm 

HCVACSJL 

K4UUKB«-teraDI 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo' Bure. Cairo. Dubai. 
Istanbul. Sinpporc. ILL Delhi. 
Bangkok. How Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. A The America*. 

Fhuningo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Araue 
Load— W1V 7DG. 

■1-439 0182/61-439 77SI 
Opca Sahrofay IUW3J0 


taxing al our grtsate beach 
hotel, thra a week cnasmg on 
o> yacfil far £* 20 . toe m. 
H/B. free w/sporta. other com- 
btnattam poas. Ol 326 1006. 


Holldays/nigMs. brochures/ to- 
slanl bookings- Ventura 
Hobdays Trt 061 034 SO» 

ROMS turns £488. Bangkok 
£369. Ship £467. Other FE rfi 
lee 0166* 6614. 


SCOTLAND 


■DRAY Furnished Nngle storey 
rotlage. dps 2/4. Qtact spot on 
me Moray roost- nr sea 6 pod 
course. Md R Jesoiita. The 
Farm. Lower Auchenreotn. Nr 
Socaben. Moray. 0303-820583 

ROYAL D W Ji l t Lair booking 
bargains Perfect tar gab or Ed- 
inburgh touring. 4 days DE M 
In CMs elegant hole! from only 
£76. THE BELLEVUE HOTEL 
103681 62322. 

WYt DeUghtful modernised col- 
ugp on Lora SnuorL no under 
12V. 031 4493600. 


collages in Darrel. Preferably 
■eu than 10 miles apart. 3 dou- 
ble b e ta omul and 2 double 
bed m oms- For 5 adult couples 
wire well behaved pets. Details 
,o Mr Freeland High willow. 
Forest Road. East Hmley. Sur- 
rey KT2« 5BA 


L Y MU tCT C m. Sager Cottage. u» 
of nealed pool. 3 beds, sleeps 6. 
Aug 23rd onwards. £90 • ISO 
pw Tel 0590 72068. 
tenants. Semi detorhed 
thatched cott. sips 4 £60 P w 
30/8 on No pels 0260 73335. 


FITNESS & HEALTH 


RELAX Df UNASHAMED 
LUXURY AT 

MfSTYNS 

Mi odusffe HeaD and Coumry 
Dob n Be bean d Conrottl Lux- 
, lbv sates sd «i 120 acres oaorg 
cara m el- pace and seriusion E*- 
| ay faddy, w raoWe squ ash and 
trins courts, tncov movrvnq 
mi um. gvmnasum. twwry 
dne aid rasuan Regrei no cM- 
l SW 01 D6TS 

M OtMs aad brodtam tran: 


SOMERSET & AVON 


JU.FOCTOM PARR 

Gm^an Ifanoon ra 50 acres g»- 
dere. ana pad Wortsnorth* 
home. SooJIood (ofganicaBjf 
green vegetables, free ransie ebbs, 
horae- made trad. pda. sow dej 
Also seft-catmng accamraodatun 
wafiaMe. 

Retaed. tnendfr d mo apb att 
Brochure 

Td (027874) 211 


SUSSEX 


low lor holiday lets S leeps 5/4 
£160 pw Tri.0243 512948 


Cma&i Oat 
SL Breed Dtatu 
WadetaWge 
CoromaB 
P127 71 £l 

TdapboM (QZ08) 813106. 


TdiBTW5a««*B»t* 

c mu9oi 

SoaS Motm . N. Prrao EZ3* SHQ 

LATE REDUCTION 
£122 pw DIN B&B 
£56 3 fights DIN BAB 
SPORT & LEISURE 

mSUBE Kd ndom awn. Janas 
free saum. sotaisn rare gym 
games rooms 

SP Qgr • s crct gen o.si rfmj 
tents (drag * 14 muie 
VIEWS ■ d Danmoc r lrpm l? ten 
greunds near OrtnolP 
CMlDRSf 2S-7SS 
THE MMlin HOUSE HOTEL 
TEL 0837 3853. 


conrnsBBRT lodge 
HOTEL AA RAC 
Lyranmith. Devon. 

Fonnar Victtfipn wcaraga 
dose Lynmouih Haroour & 
Exmocr. TracttbOffal homo 
axjkjng. chcxcr Of menu. 

EnsirtB a*8iiaae. 

From n&fiO SB 6 EM. 

Teh (0598) 52388. 


NXORNWALL 9 bettrtwmhoure 
gardens, sea ie»V E1Z0 9 » 
No pels 30/8 on. 026* 73335 


HEART OF ENGLAND 


romaortaMr tonar^e Val 
Irv Sleep* 5 Carden From 
£50 B. Tri 0989 64599 


LAKE DISTRICT 


ltalUELAMB SrU Cslrrlnq cot 
me. Quirt f. elc Grev Abbey 
Broch. 10946' 3773 


LONDON 


KEH5MCran W1X Lux Serviced 
ax-. Col tv Lruroen Lid IS 
Uguv Cm. v » i l oi obi 3094 


EAST ANGLIA 


WALES 


MID WALES 

DOVBY VALLKY 
PtsrdulaU MhCnMwyKuv- 
baw iB brandd aoteror. level* 
rows and »ilks cumfcrtaUr and 
bull B U P toyb e re: »pro« moiafr 

and eiTUBBi oaronb. 

SPECIAL MINI BREAKS 
Bed bitoklate md evesiqe neoL £16 
per p— PW ngdtt. Pro n el f y ut. 

RHIWlaASVABM 

Telephone (0664) 2796 


WELSH MUM • Bed and 
broakfau and self calertng in 
country home on the bank* ol 

the Rtver Wye Cran i n g, robing 

6 trekking. 4 mdev from fam- 
ous Book Town ol Hay on- wye 
Doga allowed. From £10.00 per 
perron pee ntghl. Tel : 0*974 
616 


ANOLESEY. Holiday Cottagn 5 
Wlmmk overlooking ana. 

Own healed awl mntt ng poof. 
IrnnK courts, bossio. snooker 
table tennK. OOi(. Ireah water A 
rev runmo sandy beach Sept 
vacancies Trt 0*07 860789 
Ptasdartan Treorddta Bay 
CHUB— FARM HOUSE. Sips 
8 comfortably IdyUle setting be- 
tween mountains and sea. Tel: 
Port Dtoorwic iQ gaai 670232 

rung collages al Lbrsyfran from 
Aug SO Brochure : 09913-473 


YORKSHIRE 


m anor country, se-ir c«er 

in I Tin Century Barn and 
Dovecote, hpcurfousty convert- 
ed lo sleep a +2 tar September a» 
Cl 37 pw Trt 0848 S77472. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WANTED 


Oomposer of Tona l nunst is in 
urareu need or Patronage Tel: 
ft. Gross 01-940-3680 


square, (or room 20 IL squat*. 
Trt: d)621l 41536 
NAT WEST OBCNET Best seats 
wanted. Trt Ol 223 
8173/6423. 


SpinlL 

x Buy 

Oriental Art 


SffKBBSoroftLjiacrt. 
tandmswmQi 
lUrpkair 01-918 1 — (W korot 


£25 PER OZ 
For Sfl»er Articles 
£250 PER OZ 
Psid For Gold Artides 
URGENTLY 
WANTED 
Any Dianoad 
Jeweller 

Td Mr Hart 
61-960 8930 
or write lo 
361 Harrow Rood 
London W9 
We cover ail England 


FOR SALE 


ULMDl TABLE full Sir com- 
plete with ac resumes. Mode hy 
George Wright EKCCIK 3H Cta»- 
Otthui £2300 . 07372-42963 


UAROROOM TABLE 7*6” tor 
4 6“ Seals 8/ IQ. Oak wllh red 
•rather Inlay and gtata Ud 
£825- TCI 0737 6 1376.1 Surrey) 


HURVY HURRY TO TOTS^O col 

TVs Irotn £50 to UOO. 91 
Lower Stone SL SWI 730 
0933. 

FKUMES/ FREEZERS. Cooker*, 
etc. Gao you buy dirapgrY B * 
S Lid. Ol 229 1947/8*68. 


RESIST A CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 

Wool ms Baiters 
ham £335 per sq yd + VAT. 
B0% wool Hawy OoRDSte WKon 
£1335 per sq yd + VAT. 

Cortaefest Has 
075 per sq yd + VAT 
i B»y attar goad rateBaa. 
148 WfffrfswHte Britfoe Rd 
Pztssbs firass, SHt 

Teh 01-731 3368/9 

Free erintol apart Uag. 


YACHTS, PLANES A 
SPORTING 


OM (or two half rtiaretf avratt- 
abtr Wert Sussex shoot, part 
Down land. 10 day* ptt» 6 guest 
days, about £130 per gun per 
day. 2000 birds reared. Writ* 
giving personal information lo 
BOX HOT. 


ANIMALS & BIRDS 

BLACK Flat coat Retrieve male 

pmH ready now. Ooerrtvaw 
(0932871 3521. Surrey. 

FOOD & WINE 

('Champagne^ 

GIFT SERVICE a 


BUUtBXLLA LUX 3 Bed AM. Pool 
on Terr AttMartite. Panoramic 
View*. Urgent safe. £76.000. i 
Tel: 01 317 8068/311 XlOO I 


a CULLERA 

25K south Of VaJenda. fatty 
tnridKd. urge fioad tatetea 
1 dm terrace and bartwcire 
OHitaokino the sea. 3 dbl beds. 
2batmnms1 ensote. Facdfas 
ndude .Squa sh coals. Teau 
casts atiSmranwa pooL Only : 
20 metres tram sandy lny. Pace 
riduring Cv QSjOuL 
Tet BV378 5246. 


Hake a near of or muter WL^ 
trtoettt 1 C. 
PHONE=«33Wgg*7^" 
. WX Bom SO- ASHFORD -KSir 


HOME A GARDEN 


FREE! Btonri new Bulb Cata- 
logue. 6* cotourl ta pag e*. 
Hundreds of colour pictures of 
Uttbs and flowora Pto uortid 
growing lunta. With 38 consec 
HM gold medals al Chetma. 
you're assured of De bHL 
wrap Ron Worn. DeM T12. 
LnavrMon. WaUUrd. WP2 
7BH. Or Dhoor 0923 672071 j 
t24 hcs). 


jBrenss urnswm 
COMPANY 

EsaUrtad 17BS 

mstound UK. Plerte_eo«aa 


GENERAL 


fifi -CT front s oo ner M® Mg 
lamps, tow bar. front and rear 
Igatp grills, many mrr extras. 
13.000 rodes. Offers around 
£15.000 TeL 0636 61264. 

LAMCM DELTA 1600. CC CT. 
taro Dec 84. 16.000 tab. 5 ta 
SM • Manual. Lady owner, 
tnte £4-650. 09904 3417. 


BJVLW. 


3231 *» T 84. 2&300 ms. Haw 
nro auto tranMTttsnofv. ABS 
braking system. elstCrtc win- 
dows. wtng mi rrors and 
sunroof, alloy wheels, sports, 
seat, stereo radio, front A rear 
spotlrr £8-750 TeL 0827 8628Z- 




7351 SEAraa aeries 8.000 RUs. di- 
ver. BBS from and rear spooer 
£19000 ono tncOl STS 6543. 


I m. mu in Modern family how-; 
in «iM aurnrtive mews Ur. 

Living area. 4 beds, nvmerine. 

shower rm. patio qdn. toftol. 
£820 PCT11 Trt 0745^13310 

LAMDLOnrtt. OWhKJt* » yon 
have a ourtltv property m lei 
tea us about a We afrar a bto- - 
fevMOturt reliable service 
GurabM cumtaniine tel Oi 
244 7353 

CEKIBALLY LOCATED WI. 3 
Bedroomed flat In pr eri Wum w 

block. Avatt now tor ton g O p- 
lei. £$ 2 Qpw. Teh Ol 881 2787 
KAMPtTEAD spactons. ceniratty r 
IWMedfUl TV Mo wty d ecofto- . 
CCL Near Tube £90 pw Expreto ■ 
Remats 883 3467 
HAMPSTEAD Family roe Sheds.-. 
2 bath. 2 retep. large ktt/dlner,- 
garden. Heath SO yds One year \ 
£350 p w TeL 267 .4881 
MDE SELECTION of houses. 
Ilab and bedsits m N London..' 
Express RcntaK 885 5*57 


200 [W 1241. I486 8.000 mb. 

■uki Ounw-ioie urvilln: Dec 
s'lUKA uiiKVms reiilral lock 
■ tna front .um rm kj urn touted : 
trailv irurrors livvvv rear 
headrests BttrtipuuM Torromo 
.4 speaker sound vysirm Re 
mole scour jLkiu XlnalutelV » 
new £15.000 Trt Ol 621 
8221 or 0992 32709 


BUSINESS SERVICES ■ 

H Unm HAYFAK ADDRESS- 

Bur kngifin phone lrte\ and lor 
warding un ins Ol W 2S8) 

PROMOTION, 
PUB LICITY A 
MARKETING 


ADVERTISING GIFTS 

PRINTED MATH rOUR MESSAGE 

100*5 Of 

Business Gift Moot 


I Ask for Cotow Catalogues [ 

01-446 8411 (24 >» 7337) 
Tatac 28732 bucpcn Q | 
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TRUSTEE ACTS 

NOTICE rv hericrv tpven pursuant 
(Ov27rif the TRLSTLC \rl 1925 
that an pet von I wvm u a CLAIM 
aoannf or au BS1 LRW m the 
ESTATE Of trill at the deceased 
perron's whose names. MOriws 
and f ir srr lpU fUis ai e si nut below 
I n herein- regum-il lorotul panic 
ulan m Milling of htv rlatto or 
uneip-a to livr privau nr perrons 
mentioned m rnaiian 10 the de 
reared Demon ranieincd before 
Ihe dale specified alier which 
dale (bh estate of me deceased 
will be dirtrunord in lh« penanal 
repmenlaiivm among fhe per 
-sons ' enhlled I tin rtn having 
regard ouh to the rial ms and m 
teierts of- which uwv have had 
police . ; 

MOHAMEDFOL AD MUHAMAD 
ALf FATTAL deceased late of 3 
IVVtb Slrrrt. London SW 12 
ttted on the 26lh Jjnuan lRBA 
Panic uiais to Messrs LB Marks 
ft Company SoteHOm acUna lor 
tor admintrtraiiMs whose address 
iv PO Box MS. 5 BiPslrnde 
strm. London W1A SAX «Rrt 
KS» not taler than lftUi Orloher 

1936 

CROWE. SYDNEY ROBERT of 
Chlttcn Acre. Breech Lane. Wal 
jOhottullie-Hin. suirrev Margie 
LMriMYller iRrtiredi died -on 
13lh M» 198c pariicuUiv to 
Naharro Natlwnson 'Rrl 
3/CEB). 76 Jetmvn sued. Lon 
don SWI V «sR. sol w Hots. 
brttae 314 Oftoher |9H6 
MENOES. M.LK^’ U3VA of IB 
Veroori Court. Heudou 1ft al. Lon 
dotv NW2. Driwunaker iRrthrtfl 
died on 22od Umurv IRBo Par 
liculara to Nahrirro rvaihaman 
fRpf: 3/GEBi. 76 Jeraiv n Street. 
London StolY 6NR. solicitors. 
before: 31* October 1986 
SMITH. DOROTHY LO\ EDAY 
of Langston Howe, union under 
Wvrhwood. Oxtord. widow died 
on iota August |98* Partniiiars 
to ' Muno ' Nafhansoa »Rer 
3/CEB I. 76 Jcfnrvn Slim. Lon 
dOU SW1Y .WdL bottcuan. 
betore- 31 Ortobiy 1986 
LECH TOUXR MRS BRENDA 
CARLTON. 19 KYabi Grove Lon 
don NWS Ohm zaih January 
1986. PerUculdi* lo Biddle a Co 
l Gresham SUM London EG2A 
T8L More 51 vl QrlOhiT 1986 


TUITION 


J tffH BE S UWDSMPBI6 
COWWiY. 


GL7 lOB ToL (028S) 2202 


SHORT LETS 

LUXURY SERVICES FLATS, 
central t,ondon man caas pw. 
Ring Town Hie Apts 373 3433 
SWIO large 1 bed Itat. AvrUUe 
now for 4 weeks. ClfiO p.w 
Inc TetOl 3S1 00X6 i 


FLATSHARE 


COILECTORS CARS 


Auto. PAS. W_'J- era Sanve 
owner 14 mots oaenner 
£11000 Tel: OI 642.0934. 


MERCEDES 


private: tuition an wteiv 
leveM/JW» O/A levrtv CSC re 
l Non Ol 435 2910 


EDUCA1T0NAL 
COURSES REVIEW 


A BETTER CHANCE al A A O lev 
eN at udrpendenl roiiegm 
Advice FREE Paferuosirr 
Suite 1. 1 Milton Rd Cambridge 
0933626*00 


■3 A 38060. Airran. enroe. mi UCCC 

.IBS Too M>er 5C.OCO ntflev LUUK3W 

FUN service IHSIorr SUvec/blur ^Mn^^BHWMroomwataroa 

velour L-iceUent throughout „ 

i retiring rtvsdrinon"» carl. Tet OOUJMHAM TUTOR*, tfeo 

alit at a(Wi irfinrd hn l iTfl AHwtfftn RAC CirT Dl 


0623 914909 id lice hours) 
Mra Pickering 


rtngtan BAC CtFT Ol iTOO’W 
"O- and "A" levels. Top revulb 


on PROF. 29 . seeks 1 bed flat 
tor aroupd 6 months in central 
London. SW 1/3/10 prefer ed. 
Up to £80 pw Tet3703670. 


announcements 


THOWURSOF 
UTS 4 DOGS 
JK ABMWMBD UCH YEM 
PLEASE IBP US TO BSP 


lord Wkdtey ! 


Trt: 083 882BS 


Cancer 

Together we can beat it. 

Wr fund over one third of 
all research into the proven- 
nun Jnd euro of cancer in 
the Ulv 

Help ns by sendinga dona- 
non or make a legacy lo. 

Cancer 

Research M* d 
C ampagnfff^l 

J (‘jrlt.m H- «■%.- R-rU “ 1 

itlrpi n Oft l ! nnd.m SW1Y CAR ] 


Before you write your Will 
think about committing suicide. 


WI IMI NAM VM vein, avail- 
able Irani JOUi Aug Luxury 
rcHivntuon. Old Hint and liw- 
■ oiiw SwvVft ■» col-bed. 
Bauuuom wito balh shower 
WC Will bv mu area Col TV 
\h*-o Oownstam rlkrm. 
Wnhnr.driic. CW rr pod cur- 
pel-, ruri.rocd cmiio ♦ garoen 
rr £175Biern>4r0l SRt 077 1 


NORTH HORfom Barn ana m 

Ijv. bom slrro 6 > roll. TV. 
gnh W. (ron in. braulllul I oca 
non near live river vvensum 
From Cl 40 p w Trt 0328 

79289 


An attempt at suicide is 
a cry for help- So ts a call 
to The Samaritans. 

The difference is that it's 
a cry that wilt always be 
answered, must always 
be answered. 

That's why we re making 


our own cafl for help. 

Please remember us In 
vourWiH. 

Please can Steugb (07530 
33713 or write to; David 
Evans. The Samaritans. 

17 Lh bndge Road, Sough 

5 li 1 SN for further details. 


lux roe. Gdn. nr BR/tdbe. l F 
£90 Or 2 F» rttr £96 P.W each 
tori Ol-STl 4563. 

FULJUUn - GUI to share hot f»L 
Own roam. Nr Utte CSOpw 
axel Trt: 736 1816 idler 6pm 

MGHOATE Atuacuve sunny no. 
Spacious pccom tor l prar pm 
nr tube £45 Cid. 883 8290 


SALES & MARKETING 


REDUNDANT SALE MANAGERS 1 
& EXECUTIVES. R hur Pri ce 
Carr Bristol 102721 277332 


DOMESTIC ft CATERING 
SITUATIONS 

ATTRACTIVE WAITRESSES re- 
quired foe boxy Cfty Wino 
Bar/RestaurauL Mint be able to 
work efficiently under pres- 
star. Good eiomtogo poerattol. B 
niarhtiRM plus 2 esentaga. <n» 
werkendsl TeL Murray or ftertl- 
ip 405 2156. 


DOMESTIC ft • 
CATERING 

Sm/ATIONS WANTED 

MWl HER* KELP Nan Smoker far 
young couple wlffi 3 Year old 
and new born baby ReaMmctas 
arc brtween Suffolk Coart. Eo- . 
rope and USA Saury £SS per 
week Refs to Mrt Peter Dnnfeh 
r/o 4 Oak HID Way NWS 7LR. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


W» 3 bedroom kaettra house, 
dove lube, long let £780 per 
month Trt Ol 385 6*47 l After 
19 30 noun a Wk/endsL 


DEVON ft CORNWALL 

LBBkhta «— • Cto te p repwRaT 

YOU need oocnwaitsj Prooerty 
mug Details: 0637 876383 


SOMERSET ft AVON 


STOW MR Nr A36! /Devon 
boarder 2 acres or more, su- 
perb views. 3 beds. baOl * 
muiie. tun. large rttnno 

rmlKPDM room*. 

klt/DTraMart. C/M- D/CMe 
C66.00Q Tel 0984 23402 


fr 

CA 

I 


From GCE to LLB 

From home-study 
to full-time courses 
From start to finish . 
Wolsey Hall 
will see you through 

Ittnd HmeSfadf CCE 1 )' and A' knds. . 
Degrees (London BA. BSc Ecun. BD, Lt.B; .- 
Vbrvick MBA). Professional Exams (A A I. . 
I0B. Inst. Ex^ Inst. M, HCIMA. Lau Sex.), 
’fiteorul College (GCE) Small gruupaiid . 
indhidual tuition for "O' and A' levdi 
(including retakes). Intensive revision 
courses and Oxbridge entrance. 

Rr a free prospectus please phone/*- w me. 
stating llie exam and met I it id oi luiiuxiiiai 
require to: 

The Registrar; Dept AL6,WoIsey Hall, 
Oxford 0X2 6PR. 

THt (0865) 52200 (24 hours) 



CHRISTMAS & HEW TEAR 
BREAKS 

WHY NOT 
ADVERTISE 3?0UR 
CHRISTMAS & 

NEW YEAR-BREAKS 
ON QUR UK HOLIDAY PAGES ON . 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 
13TH & I4TH SEPTEMBER 

CALL 01-481 1989 
EXT. 154 


i- ■' 

tz r- 

\iy 


fl If'.: 

4 E » 


1 

I 3-5? 


t£ > •- 






u 


%-i 



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*t: : 



i ; 

(*.;• 




Mar.- , 


» '* * 



•*« ’"'X 

iu?ir s 

' 1 


7‘ 1' 




THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


SPORT/UNIVERSITY NEWS 


27 


UNIVERSITY NEWS 


HORSE TRIALS 


% 


Degrees awarded by the City University 


V- fhc following decrees are an- 
■bounced by foe Giy University: 

MEng 

Qtctrical&BNtnRde 

> Engineering - 

. v .^Maineo., . . . .. 

/ Control, IastnnnentRfion & Sys 

tuns Engineering 

11 a*-. 1 $ JaaWns. 

■ \ Aeronautical Eugintuing 

!' » • ' " Lynch 

BSc 

■'V'- Civil E ng i neerin g 

!. ft P_W R Jraepck 


P P PMWPfc R M Upton; P 

Pm A P Giiiii; l ■Snan 
ftw r C Mte fl n an: N E OarEr^ 1 " 

Comparer Engineering 

^CDLitMteTLN^C 

CteifiMn 

wm 

gcwcTu: l 
Shaw. 

Oan 3; R Cyrus. 

Control* Instrumentation & 
Systems 


Computer Science 

OWtP l Appleton. O Oucy, p 3 
L 1 V p, V l caan. w F 

OanrCDta 2)i E CbOnoon. A Methur. 

RIW 

i AirlMlW lK t TNWrn 

Applied Physics 

Ctaa l P S Bretza. W L Prwurt 


PKC 


•tones. 


2 

. auford 
i (Alley: 


... _ Chrtstoft p fl 
S Dwyer: C M Graves* T J 
D Lewis: P J Rust; J P 



cot* 

<6kki«Sc 3 pb 
it Renpart: l 

an Jfc A A A_ 
\ T maneh: N 


■ 7**wai«»l«ias»; K Y N* P 4 


O Amenhnu J 
n P 
P ' 

Hussain: 

A 


A<nthou: D A AntotUMeK 
:.?*! M FiettL D Rapadopooks 

Mechanical Engineering 

,'3n tr J M Cushing: Q Fhmw $ 

:<Oupenas: _ J B Mbrdm; a 



^ — 1 ©* ft: L J Aenstuiw. 

“» 2jw* ft: M R DuucIk L J 

ffes a fc c Bentzen. 
b* P T ztngwiro.sanansunL 

Aeronautical Engineering 

SKA** 1,5 « n C “ W1 N ° 

2 PS 9r ° Camwiam s M 

ciG L£" f ViS3£'i 

M ftlenardbum: t u 
K s Andreadakb: P EvancSJ 

ff , ?5jS&f^ D MJ <, « wD 

Air Transport Engineering 

S V 

sssfsv 


Applied Physics 
with Elec tr o n ics 

Ham Dow. G ssmuh. 


Bowler. A S dm 



Chemistry 

tee^j^^b^HCiSrise. A C Grady. 
WM SAM HoMdns. P M KeOy. 


Economics 

3 * Sm!?7>?'p M Jam. 

gnn i (Dto 2): a J C fUton. 1 B Bbxfa. 

BiS , ®SVp p iis^. 

Philosophy 

ssi@;%grs%. 

Psychology 

On i (EH* 1): H FunakL R I 
Matthew^ A J Osman. B cml w j 
P uddicjM^e. S P Rote. C P Tixgocw. 

fcH^ CAnlD ^ AC 

Sociology 

Economics and Accountancy 

tea be s L Mamett. 

Omlffin l>: J A BUUnw. R L Cook. 
C T Daman. A Twam D 
Gowbrrg. H T B tee. C A J Liams. N 
Makwana. D C Matoucv. H MWry. A 
M Platt. R schnelderman, C 


Industrial Chemstry 
° ■ 


E BaCttnL A R 


.. Ho* 

D W6L 



D M Anon: m"j 



Electrical Engineering 

m 


H P M Atniey. 
- — M c ShonMHs. 
Ccorthkn. 


=555^5 _ 

uS^Meroir: A M 


Electronic Engineering 

( is P A Hart: K C R Lee: A W 

m 8 ™ : p M 

- 7 a Vnnnid*e: K-L U: r j Minow. m e 
■B ason: A MotiazeD: M J R Neal: M 
Joiet H P Sheldon: C M Smtihcman. 
m SCC Counter. P Downtra: M- 
Emmanuet M Eituie v R joaen J 
PapamkMwl; A Singh; 

. _ Mowrts; c Mens: B V 

^^Jadendr: A M Taylor. 

Electrical and Electronic 

Engineering 

■ up L Dorw D G wwmui. 

» j rptwft:v LAymnTw Ptnctr 
J Fllnti S T Goodman: j E 



Mathematical Science 

J r 2 n^ t * LPBM * tSA 

3sS R DearrulCJ Palmer-. E YF 
tow C A Wright. 

Mathematics and Computer 
Science 
It R EUAUV. . 
p'swaT 151 M F ctwnv - p S 
s to hj 7 L OMv Ot A Leend-e. S 

Statistics 

xhu u k m mw. 

Statistics and Computer Science 

Om 2 OMv 7): C A j Luck. 

Actuarial Science 
COM fcKS Cotemam. O G Grant. P 
MUchencr. n L Poon-Attso. C a 
SU nmom, M V Trott 
am 2 (bt* 1): E HadJKoiotanllnoii. 
CJ A Kina. A Shah. P Staunton. 
Out 2 (MV 2}:S Harm. M H KUticaML 
R J N Ramcharan. J- E Wilson. 

Cta 3:S BEGhaavhiLM-FPaAa.jp 
Snow. 

PUK J WBmeL 


Biological Chemistiy 
Class 2 (Dw «! P c Hurst. R J 

Lewis, 

CUss 2 (Div T)r. N Abderabbani. 
JSJassal, CJ Ragoonanan. M J 
Webb. 

Class 3: C Osujl 

Cbearical and Administrative 
Sciences 


P A STY 


Oats 7 (0 tv 1): - 


S Barclay. K L 


Abdevz.FChu.JM 


Pariri n. C'J I fUlIry! tf£ S 

R Vanne-. J w o willwtv 
(tel 3E T M S Tngku^urlaM 
Plus C r Chew. 

Economics and Sociology 

a 2 (phi 9: w wx cnens. 

Philosophy and Sociology 

ten 2 QMv 11: M a Neocleou*. 
ten 2 (Db ft: T A Phi tops. 

Sociology and Pothxal 

Economy. 

T 

ram z (Dh aji s j wngM. 
Sociology and Psychology 

2 (Mr l)r J M Uddle. 


F liaii • ' J - Ca * fl DJkHow. C 

P RC 

E P Ross. ... 

Thomson. _ 

(tel * D w Hancock. H M 
HuicJiiMon. H Kay 
rat M Murphy. 

Property Valuation 
and Management 

Sf (CHvj): G*E f &jkw\ A Crm J 
B Da ve. J C Kjd. D A PetUler. N A 

83 0 ? 1 (Of* 2); S^A t todpet t. Y K 
Chan, n A Ford. M A FOmalcr. J H 
Hwtwhaw. A Jamil Derus. R Kumar. 
AS M L yph-_D A S Pickax ance. T D 
Rjctiards. L D Room, c a J vench 
Cun A W i M Jones. M G Kenneth, fi 
£ MOfliUay. D xtMowsw/LJTiie. 
pass: r n«n 

Banking and Inter narirwml 
Finance 

tent: D Fafl. B A Turner. M M 

CteSt?CDiw l)t j p Band. 6D BdOwr. 
M PUJlhTf- ri Burt^R LtelhS^VD 
S Gunasekera. S C Gurney. J M 
Marlow. R c minyworlh. $ m 
P alliMer. J C Rex am™ D C Stead. K 
Steed*, P R Stott. M Taylor. P M 
while. 

te 2 (tHw 3): j H Crick. C 
GoofiattM. M Lcighion. M O I 
Paiienoo. D w scon. W W 
Takundwa. c H Tcttey. T R Vernon. 
M S Ztnyaraa. 

tSC RateUTe. 


English riders in 
strong challenge 


English riders mount a north" 
ern raid this weekend on the 
fourth Scottish Hone Trials 
Championship at Thiriestane 
Castle. Lauder, in Berwickshire 
with dressage today and the 
cross-country and show jump- 
ing in action on Sunday (a 
Special Correspondent writes). 

Virginia Leng, foe world 
champion and holder of foe 
Scottish title for the past two 
years with Night Op, fields a 
strong hand, with both this 
horse and her Olympic, world 
and European partner Priceless, 
winner of the British national 
championship ax Gaicombe last 
weekend. For Priceless, ibis is 
his first visit to Scotland. 

Captain Mark Phillips, fresh 
from hosting and running the 


successful British open 
championships at his home last 
week, takes his two top hones. 
Distinctive and Cartier. Distinc- 
tive is on the short list for the 
Polish three-day event in 
September and this talented 
young gelding has been consisp 
tentiy placed this spring though 
with only one cross-country 
outing this autumn. And Cartier 
is undoubtedly a coming star. 

English riders will not have it 
ail their own way. however, for 
Loma Clarke, world and Euro- 
pean team gold medal winner, 
and Fan Stark ride seven horses 
between them. The event also 
hosts a national championship 
with teams from Scotland, En- 
gland. Ireland, Wales and “the 
rest of the world”. 


Optometry 

ten fc R A Harper. B V Jarman. H 
McKIn^JA PoaUny. A R Rudnlcka. 

dm iWjJ: j a Block. S M 
CamlUrrL S J Comfsti. LCCUUmLJ 
Ex a. RAtontaiMn. M Heoand. T C 
Hove. G C Homfc*. r C Jackson. P a 
J ohnson. J MacManua. V S Man. a H 
MtHrr. l a Murdoch, o A Nbton. L □ 
Partridge. R D Pair!. K C Philips. T 
Robertson. H T stxan. n Stiahsavan. j 
E.Stohes- g M White. C P R wmiaras. 
Clan 2 (Mr 2h S J Andrews. S R 
Beak. WH Calvert. DKN Chin. K Y 
Clements. S J Daniels. V Dauanl. S 
Farthing. JR Flnegan. D Fries. JRj 

K MM. M Paw. M K M Purba. P A 
Reeves. M W Rossi, a E Shanks. D R 
-Sinicin, w b Templeton, i M Under- 
wood. l M, waison. A E west. D A 
williams. K P Woodbridoe. 

Wara Js K Y H Chan. TTK Morton. 
Y-K No. E M stringer. 

Ordtaary: J P Barry, b C Chian (wtm 
menu. J Evans. 


Economics with Nursing Studies 
tens 2 QH* tji t C Hacrocks. S L 
jontfff, 

with Nursing 


Business Studies 
test tn Boreham. N a CS arrcKL L w 
tewan! A J C 

BTauk&js 

Fcirateln. R A Fisher. J Gutman, r s 
H nUdmon. R M D Jackson. J m 
J ones. E J Keeling. T P Kenned! 
Landau. A M Loader. C N Pike? 
Rlcnanlaon. S Shah. J L Smun. 

SS?2'^oft ® > v 1 c%r Boe y. W . 
Chew. MR HardtoQ. P A Harness. N 

H HJWfcfiL 

Business Computing Systems 

tera K L W Berwick. N P Bridget 
2 (Mr 1)1 J M Huraey. N 


SQUASH RACKETS 


The master’s challenge 




tera 2 (Mr l): D K Flaherty. J A 
Purchase. 

Sociology with Nursing Studies 

tera 1 roll »| S M neither, 
tera 2 (Mr ft: R E Aatbury. C J 
Bneo*. 

Social Science and Nursing 
Studies 

tens 1 (DM 1)s K VI Bradley. 

Systems and Management 

1): A J Beer. S P Blake. A 


c“S&g"c 'Davies. T‘ K Hardy. K 
I0iaxvl4twnacunl. L W-W Uauw. M 
8 C Musorave. S A RoHnsan. A M 
SergeanLA G Shave. R M wxmond. 
ttes 2 COM 2)S W G SI B Adams. M 


Yeung isac Yu 

Music 

ten 1: H A Fairaaon. E H NanUveU. 

& e J Okrzeu. 

u 2 (ON I): N Barnes. T N Drake. 
R H Exam G D Gampell. M p 
raxidan. R DKirueln. T A Needham. 
S Nolan. CF Piaclto. L A Povey. K 
Rerirs. S C Slock. 

(tes 2 (0* 2 )! j Hughes. L Uxenbera. 
R SrodUnsky. R E Thomas. J R C 
Worrell. 

Ctau 3: L E LonqhuraL 

Clinical CommmncatioQ 
Studies 

ten 7 (DM l): M ChanuetL R v 
Jones. K R Mmtv. j q W Uhams. 
Out 2 (Ohf 7): A H Bird. S E Owlson. 
A M Evans. M C George. K J Reeves. 
C m Rucker. L a m C Staler. T j 
Jlh. 

2ME Martin. 


by year L 
squash gradually loses belief 
that the one event which would 
derate the sport to front page 
news will ever happen (a Special 
Correspondent writes). It is now 
five years and four months since 
Jahaagjsr ciwp has l»»— 
beaten and the last Incredible 
indications were that the world 
champion is going stiD further 
away from the field than ever. 

However, many of the world’s 
leading players are about to get 
their first chance to hare an- 
other go at him since the British 
open at Wembley in ApriL The 
elapse of these four-and-a-half 
months bare slightly increased 
the extent to which hope spring 
eternaL Those with a bead for 
heights will have some reason to 
assess the extent of the chasm at 
the top as h is now. 


There is the chance to do this 
because Jahangir, aged 22, is 
defending his Pakistan open 
title; sponsored by the Civil 
Aviation Authority, from today 
until Thursday in his borne city 
of Karachi. His expected oppo- 
nent in the final is Ross Thorne, 
the leading Australian. 

He will have to beware of 
another Pakistani. Qamar 
Zaman. aged 35. the former 
world number one who chose 
this tournament last year to 
wreak vengeance on those who 
annoy ed him by leaving him out 
of bis country's world champion- 
ship team. 

Three leading Britons are also 
participating. They are Phil 
Kenyon, the British national 
champion. Hiddy Jahan. the 
Pakistan-born English inter- 
nationaL and David Lloyd. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Holiday 
isle’s red 
carpet 
for fans 

From Keith Macklin 
Douglas 

The Isle of Man has mu had 
lhc brightest of summers, so it is 
not surprising that the red carpel 
is being laid out for several 
thousand visitors from the 
North of England who will 
descend on Douglas this 
weekend. 

Supporters of Halifax and 
Castteford. and a smattering 
from Wigan and other Rugby 
League towns, will he here 
tomorrow to watch foe second 
Rugby League Chanix Shield 
game between the champions 
and the Challenge Cup winners 
at the compact and tree-lined 

Douglas Bowl. 

The match is sponsored by 

Okells. foe Isle of Man brewery, 
and if questions are asked about 
the choice of this quiet and 
pleasant holidux island as a 
venue for the first of Rugby 
League's trophy finals, the an- 
swers are ready. The players and 
supporters get a weekend away, 
the players at the island's ex- 
pense. while foe sponsors get a 
higher profile for their prndux-t. 
and the 13-a-side game breaks 
new lerritory . 

The sponsorship is a novel 
one. in that it is a ease of wmnfcr 
takes all the £5.000 pri/c money , 
plus a half share of the gale, 
from an expected attendance of 
between 4.000 and 5.IM0. The 
losers get (he consolation of 
their hall' share of lhc gate and 
an cvpenses-paid holiday. Last 
year lhc cup winners. Wigan, 
beat the champions. Hull Kings- 
ton Rovers, to pocket the pnrr. 



South, E&W Midlands and Yorks 


RACING: THREE NATIONAL HUNT MEETINGS 


CULLER A 


in.x.The following Open Universrty 
■ I*,,. ^degrees are listed with the 
•wL^fcxception of fixst-dass honours 
“''degrees which were published 
; ^ on May 22: 

. ** Region 02: Sooth 

drat 2 (ON 0: S Adamson: A R A«C 
C Alexander P J Aslttt: J A AusunTP 
□ Baird: T V Baker: A T Barton: D P 
Blow: A W Bolton: S F Burc P 
Butcher: G N Casswrtk J M R 
Channel: J Cross: J Darlington: S 
Dean: K J Dradngian: M J Baby: B A 
Fisher: B D Flint P J Goddard: B M 
Great 'R A R Crwaflrtd: M HanUno: 
VI w HencMt J M Htvhor: T HUl: E 
Hoham: S C Jamer: B J Ktna; j M 
Lralnr. I r Udstone S PUnp C 
Louoner: B P P Lynctc P M H Mice J 
M Marshall'. P G Mown: A C 
Mulligan: E Norris: p F O'Connor: L D 
Pearson: K M Pedcn: C Raner. J A 


Nteben: A P Lamond: T A LandeH: a 
m Lane: B J Lang: i e LapsronL n c j 
L anqtey: A H Laoglots: J Langlais: G J 
Laraway: B nr Lawrence: S E 
Lawrence: C G Lawson: G Lawson: G 
E E Leach: ROW Lean E A M Lee: C 
Leeks: g D late J O S Levlck: R D 
Lowlngtofi: 

UstienE • 


Ronwr: R J Boar. R G Saunders: M S 
Seales: A E Seaman: A J Shaw: M 
'Shemnoham: B Strnmons; 8 J Slee: S 

f Slocfc F S M TaUdngton: J M 

~-~Towmend: R W Wallen B J Wane!* 
r F Whiimlll: P Wood: p M WotttoM. 

" ' 'ilBra«*m/t* BrvanL a F C f?^raei^ 

iSifW B S Cox: P terbM^^D C 
'Daly; A V Dtfaalo: S FI 

JTKVflK I 

■ lavady: : 

Ions X. ._ _ . 

^ounL P uvesev: N A Mackenzie: J 
Marsh: p MKUewood: c N Monk: J M 
— — S Mordaimu C Murgatroyd: P H B 

S Morx CIA PantUn-Handtey: G 
tott P M PtJinimorK Z PlcioBrtj 
-- Ml: E J Rekh S M Rtcnandson: .. 

'toper: LJ Runyant A J Sparkto V-A 
'. SandUh: C P Tvrtw S M Webb. . 

. 'Jtora ». C Bancroft D". Elide: M E 
'.'•tanners: P M Ptnu i t ShrubB. 

" teSM Abbott M T Abbott S M 
__LAdanw; W ApnOK B G AlnL' L N M 
- ' Akterton: M G AUcora: R L Alien: SL 
: J B AIUson-Beer: K AUnmu J V 
; M J Anderson: c V 
;B Andrews 
: JR Arrattagt; 



Buckley: M C Bueno Det Carvto: J 
Bum: a Bums: S P Bourn 8 R 
Canhanu D C Corn S M Cam V W 
CuTadtne M Carswell-. S A Carter: M 
L Carter: B R Cater: A Chalmers: h O 
Chambertaln: G N Chapman: H I 
Qiarttoo: R ChlRon: D M Ctarke: j D 
Cteveriey: B C Cock mote: P M Cole: 
S R Cole: B D Coles: T A Cottlen M v 
Cotton: K D Cooper: C M Copesraice: E 
D Corbett J Corbett P Comes: G J 
Cotternt K C “ r - * - 
Malta: m E 


SBC Davey; R Davies: J G Davies: H 
May- Davies: R K Davies: J C Davies: E M 
hide: Davies: M S Davis: B L Davis: V M 



«A=D Abbott JO Abdena: S L AUani: 
M R Allen: EMM Anderson: R 
Anderson: D AnoUage: R Ashmore: M 
R v Asotnalt A VAtock: M R Avery: 
N H Bailey: R C Baker: P Baldwin: P 
w BamtHwy: R H Bameti-Hunwimv: 
I H Barton: M Bauson: B BeitM. c j 
Beny: A M Bewera: J Btnjdiam: S E 
Bishop: C Bowman: H E Blytn: c 
Blythe: P BOardman: R D Booth: D C 
Booth: W J Braund: A W Briggs; □ A 
J Brooks: S R Brawn: W G Browne: j 
C w BryaussM P Burdett J A Burgbi: 
T A Bustuieit A Butler: M E CatowTti 
J Campbell: J Camod: P W CartUdge: I 
V ChacksneKt R J ChamDertaln: A j 
grappeUiA J Chick: J M Quids: T C 
Diurcti: j p Chu ' “ 


EP 


TomtowooTo’^lcker^ m 'want 
White: p a Wiggins, 
ten k E Armstrong: P J Casper: M M 
rield: A Fletcher: O Lawson: “ 
Penman: P Shephard 

r. V Airtan: 


: S Appievani: 
I Arnold: K 


damp: R n 
ark: F Clarke: 
Is DB 


^ kT ^SJSV?L 

iSP'Win 

1 J Decamps: M L D 

gb£n-W£k PT 

P Drabble: O I 

- it M L : 

K 




■As J R L,_ 

J Akroyd: S J . 

R ArmJtage: A . . 

M BaintMidge: D Baker: j a 
B aiderson: S D Bail: K Banner: I w 
Band: K A Barker: P Bairacloach: D 
Barra ns: R Bartics: E Batty: B M 
Betrae: J Betk: J Befkadl; F K Bed: S D 
Bellamy: F H Benner: A Bennett: J E 
Bennlson: B J Bentley: R J Benzie: j 
M Her rs ford P Berrtman: D 
Btckerdtke: D Btekerton: R BkKneU: R 
G tori: J BUckbum: J Blackburn: H 
Blackett: P Blair: R G BtaOierwick: M 
T Boddy: P Botdodc C T Booth: M 
Boskovic W S Bosiock: K H J 

Bonomer. J Boyir: K s Bradley; M w 
Brant: P M Brasier: D BngneiL' D 
Britton: J C Brooksoank: C 

Broom head: A L D Brown: A P 
Brown: A Bueno: j Bull: L M r 
E C Bunting: M H Bug 
E A Butler: P Butter**™.. » , 

Caldwell : a E Calvert: P K • 

CA Campbell: p e “ 

Cartwnoftl: L J 
CaultkHd: G M 

Chapman: p L N 

Chamon: P L Clamp: 

Clarke: A I Clay: B E 
□eland: N dough: K I 
IeTK cotton: K J 
K II Cooper: D 
r. G W Crees; C 
B A Curtis: J 
L A Davies: 


CARTMEL 


Going: good to firm 

2.0 LINEN it WORKWARE RENTAL SELLING 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£628: 2m IQ (10 runners) 

2 OPS- KMMEQ Ron Thompson 10-11-12 Jama Thomson (7) 

4 31-2 FOREWARN (B) (C-W (BF> C Hofenu S-1 1-9 — C Mann 

5 200- BlflAS CREEK TO J5 Wisofl *-11-2 COnM 

6 0B4 SCOTTISN GHSN (B> R E PMacoCk 8-10-12 

PGDoimsB{4) 

7 11F- SON OF IIANADO (C-O) J Wade 6-10-1 1 KJonss 

12 mi! KINO'S HOLT N Waqaott 7-10-3 

13 001- SUNNY REEF JCO&wmS-10-2.^ 

B M com 


16 OOP- BUSHY BAY (B) I 
18 404- BAVAL^RIpYc 


Mmtwmhb 
... TPwneMO) 


. Chapmn12.1M_ SWkhsafo 

^ . Y«jmsn9-1fi-9 ... C Hawkins 

20 0 8JJGTT b MoRan 7-104) KTstMaa 


17 204- SPECIAL SETTLEMENT (USA) R Alan S-lO-t 

NOougnty 

18 14F- SMART IN BLACK G Hichams 4-104 JHansen 

21 00-0 ABAUQHT Mrs M Thomu 6-10-0.. .. R Chapman 

3-1 Tingle Bell. 7-2 Smart to Back. 4-1 Clear »v Bust 
6-1 Red Duster. 6-1 Baton Match, 10-1 Special Sememam. 
Rabtnus. 12-1 others. 

3.45 MURRAY ATHOL JUVENILE NOVICE 
HURDLE (3-Y-O: £872: 2m If) (15) 

1 CASUAL PASS Q Hchantt 10-10 PTncfe 

2 BANTEL BUSHY J Berry 10-7 N Doughty 

3 COLONEL HALL D Yeoman 10-7 C Hawkins 

4 DEARHAM BRIDGE D MoKm 10-7 .. .KTeehn 

DEE-TEE C Pathcr 10-7. .. . B Stony 


5-2 Forewarn. 7-2 Scottish Groan, 5-2 KtodlwL 11-2 Son Of 
Manado. 8-1 Band. 10-1 Bras Creek. 14-1 Sunny Reef, 
16-1 others. 


Cartmel selections 

^ Mandarin 
2.0 Son Of Manando. 2.30 Melerek. 3.10 Clearly 
Bust. 3.45 Casual Pass. 4.20 Bumannoch House. 
4.55 Rockolla. 

2.35 LAKELAND PENNINE HANDICAP CHASE 
(£2^16: 3m If 30yd) (8) 

1 WJ1 TARGET MAN W A Stephenson 6-12-2 (6ex) 


MOVING PERFORMANCE Mu Z Green 10*7 

H Meoghraf 

PAULS SECRET Denys Smth 10-7 ASmSfi) 

PETENCOHE J W Retfletn 10-7 ... SChwUon 


04 LADY ST CLAIR Denys Snstft 10-5 

UTS G M Moore 10-5 


C Oram 


r R Lamb 

M0 BURGLARS WALK Dems Sowh 6-1 0-13 c Grant 
JMCChapman 9-10-13 


R Beams: D A Beaton: G M 
. .. W Belcher: P Bell: D S BeU: E 
BellChambera: C J Benoen: G v 
nsom.T Benson: J R Bennead: J 
M A Befrtoge: C W Berry: J 
ley: F L J Binding: L F Birch: J* 
idem W J Boden: D BolU: T P 
A L Botoe: R W Button; A D 
‘ m: N C Bower: S Bowley. M 
M C Brake T Bramble: E C 
.P V Brian: C A Brian: J C 
. : A Bri Kendra: j S Britton: S 
Brooks: 1 M [Brawn: J S Brown: J R 
--sbtoidie: a E Buckley: G M Bidterd: H 
11 VI 5 Butonan: P Cftmt*: P T Buncr 
M Burch: C Burch: C ButdittL J 
— ‘ 3uroc« C P Burke: C j Burunson: C 

«,i1 vp.Binr C J Burrow es: p a Burton: B 
. W Bush: 5 M Busk P C Butcher: A R 
. BuDer: L C Buttemekt B P Cable: S M 
pbetk P carpenter: P M Carson: P 


— U^ltelen R j Carter: f^Cashmore: M 




■3iarlesworUi: 



H K Charles: J 
M Civil: I dare: 


L L R 



P Slater: L J. Sutler: B G Strata; A 
Sndttu D L Smluu J T Spilth; P M 
SmlUi: E R smith: M K South; R K 
Smtlh: J F W Smith: D N Smith: W H 
Smith: J D Smith: C E Smith: B Smith: 
M D SneUgrove: J E Snoxeth D R 

E B - S 


r Southway; L M Sparrow: 
K DC J SBDtieoK.A R 


.E MCIirteCM CJUrkcri: P J 
V Y Co: G R Cobh: T Corfey: R 
__ K R A Cole: R G Coleman: J 
■^BlUng: P R CoJUns: J E CoBom R L 
ir^Cook: M S Cooke: S A Coomtw: B 
M HOwpcr; L W Cooper: A 
P CtJTdaSfc M E ConUdc P 
A R Cowan: B v CoweiL m 
R H Crawford: J M Creed: G 
-.CCfrMu JBOoncA E 
K B Ootik L Crunro: A J 
r. J M Cull: R M Curlte: R 
us&a: J R Datoiefcth: M M 
cfn V J Davies; a W Davies: J G 
lk P Davis: C Dawson: M P 
wu JEJ3av: J A m CW: P A 

. vT DSDotebn: N G Dodd? K 
Pougm-Bate: O J G Downey: D j 
Draper. C A Drummond: E Dray: B 
O Dudley: M R W DuUra; A G Dunne: 
H A Dyer. C L Eason: G R Edgar: B W 
"TP Edgerlon: S M Edwards; R M 
l: D Edwards: E G Elian: J 
□Its: Et R Ellis: H E CUteOK N 
Inter: P J EJsey: M I r 



Stephens: 
wares H 

Stone: M 

JTn D' 
waUu D S 




m 'Etheridge: A R Evans: H M Evans: G 
-dEvaro: M E Ewart K G Ewlns: S C 
.xUPEyre: P C Fa^an: M A FenneU: C D 


. R Ftahor: R A 

P Flint A Forties: R A 
E Forshaw: B J Forward: 




FromG 

} ijii *' 1 * N P 

- * • iYB F orrester: R l ronraw: o j rurwarni 

il « 1 Tilt ^ RHForaetsC A O nuhertoghanc 4 S 

• f.M E«W. R 1 FokrtL J A FranklilhJ F 

• i ! » V* * .mFrayne: F A FreckMoo: B J Free- 

. .el III leapne: J P Frencti;N F Fwneairc L M 

j »(»in- 


, srl J p French: N F FumouncL M 

w! „U 1 G.«achert v R J GatUChan: V M Gone. 
- ,t PI J Gardiner: M Gardner; D A 

Mcolne: j q George: W M Gibb: M J 
Gibbs: D J Gibson: P J Ctoson: D R 


^ , -Gtbson: w j caKhrtsL H C (Umaw J 
t*» ‘ 1 CoJUsmlU,: E J OoWhOTW: 

. Goooale: S L L Goodllffe: J 

1 ' . «■!’ Vt 11 * GosneiL C A CoSttow; J A Gough: J 

, ^ • I Vli . Gough: N J Could: R F Gouhon: a 

W 1 * . GOWara: H G D Goyder: J M Grady: J 

. oramge: D Orarahaw: G K Graves: L 
K Oruy; C A G Gray: C A Green: K I 
Green: j R GrUttn: E F Grtfllru A A 
Crtlfin: A Griffiths: C B CrUBthK D 
tjrtffllhs: H M Grime: S P Guest K P 


Gurmlnp: a Hadflekk A O' 
v EHafij r j Haflam: J J H_ _ 

Hannam. R j Hanson: M G Harding: 
* - B Hare: W JM 


|SffiS- J R L D 8 §2?^it^f^5 

” M 

.. . D 

R P Sutton: M 

- M Swire L M 

; M A Talbot: R M TWbWC J W 
: E I Taylor: J M Temple: R G 
M R Thompson: h d 
u M P Thompson: M D 

H nil: A c Yotato: J T 

rotmle: P Townsend: L TrttwUo: P a 
T rueman: M Truman: K J Tutu B J 
Urnuhart: J G UI11n« P A Van Hoey 
Smtui: E Van Wyk: T C Varttoesi: P M 
VaaUe: J H T Vernon: M Vince: A 
Vyvyan: K j Wr--‘-»-; A H Wallace: A 
M Walsh; K P Walsh: M C WaiUKK S 
A Wsnotaii; v. A wand: K M Warner: 

L A Warwick -Evans: R F Waters: J H 
Watts: C C watts: 1 E C Watts: S R 
Wayne: R M Weir: P G Wells: C E 
■West T Wharton: D W Wheeler: R L 
Wheeler: C C Whdare J white: A T 
White: T H White: D W WMtney; P 
Whittle: S A Wickham: M F Wicks: S 
A Wicks: R E Witty: T O WUcra- 
jones: j c vines: wcvrtiidnsosuDH 
A WQUnson: J M WTOdnsoo: N A 
Williams; E Williams: J Wilson: R W 
Wise: P W W Wiseman: J N Wood: D 

W Wood; D Wooff: L D Woolf: J . 

WooUaaton: CFWorraH: A PWootlt suthertond: J M Sutton: Ts 
s c Worth: a E vftkftE M R Wk* N gwrafen P W Swains: R E 
A Yemen: P J Yertimr; A C Young, d Taylor: H R Taylor: c T 

Tnvlor: N Tavtoi " " 

Region 04 West Midlaads ^ 

ten 2 QMv O: R C Allen: D M 
r - » E Harrow; J Baruckk R j 


Mifcr: A. W MUte-. J F Motion J 
Moloney: E A Moore G Morgan: J 
Morgan: B E Moss: B A Mottram: K 
Mowbray: D J Muir: P D Murran: A L 
Murray: I A Myras: K M NeUL J E 
NeuteC D F Newoombe: J R A 
Newnham: A J NtchoUn S Noefc J C 

JH Owen: ft Gpwen: E 1 
Owen: M J Patfravy A M 
PanveL M Y Parekh: P L. r . 

Pvlces: R D Pandmon: D A Mrriev: 
S Paichen; M K Payne: M C Peacoc k: 
E N Peaganc F J Peagam: G E Perks: 
D C Pernen J L Perry: D PcasaE: D J 
PtUlllmora: S J Pickard; PEC 
Pickering: C J Pierpomt JS Plant: S 
M Poole: D E Porter: H Pohinoer: D 
Powell*. D T Preece: L P PrkWey: E M 
Procien S Proul: H a Quigley: J 
Rarlf ocxL C M Raine; M P S Ramsden: 
k J RatcUffe: P Raywnrth; P F 
Rcdfrrn: KN Hnlmin: R Reed: B F 
Reer. J P Regan: P K Rex-ejU: M D 
HchattA J Richards: I j. Richard: 
son: S J fttchardsotu Y 4 RICknrd: P 
Roberts: J Roberts- Thomas; M Rock: 
M Rodgers: v M Ross: K Rowlands: K 
M Roy: S S Roy: G Salmon: L Sargent: 
r A Scott JR Sedgwick: R T Sharpe: 
GSJuw G H Shaw; AJM Sheararu L 
L SheraoM: C M Shmnons: L SUnnson: 
j E Simpson: J M SUcMr. M L 
Staler: R L SmaiKac C J Smart D R 
smith: R w smith: J M Soley: C A 
Soeara G R Stanley: E St anley : J V 
Stenyen C SbttbnUt M w Stapleton; 
V M Steel: T RStringer: E U Strong: S 
P Sudhir: P _J Sugden: A. G 

- - amon: H T 

E TansweH: 

x; 1 ^ J tldi^^uEJ TTllw: R 

Id;. C V A Tomklnson: C E 


Anthony: . 

Baxter; r Brant K J 

calculi: d L Carver; C .CogoreS 
Cross: A A Douglass: F J GSUunst S 
C Hailstone: A T Haines: C L htetfc 8 
A Kerr; C W Lees: G P Llebrawood: L 
W Llltler: D Miner: F P D Morgan: j B 
Redfern: K E Sawar* P L Staples: F 
M Stephenson: C.E Tailor: .B..R H 


Temple; M P Vaughan: ' 


' Williams. 





Harris: A Harris: T M Hart: i B 
Harvey: J HastilOw. D Hawkins: E V 
nyWRK K D HAwonlv. E R Hayntaiy. 
M Haynes: B E Henry; M J mwett 
RJH lhBen: v HBttenk J W hWbkJ 
.•HtogtoMHl: L Hill: I M HUton: P A 
. •' Hmflfe D Hlichcock: □ R Hobson: E J 
- Hole: D M HoDidmf: D A L 

Hatton: A HonJev: N M N Hoottnc C 

J Hope; J A 

Howard: 


7 (Mr B): D AdsheOd: J B 

Aiklnsr H A Bay lev. D, Bell-Hall: A N 
Biagg: B Bradbury: FMOiatwlniT R 
Q3 [man: S Cook* T E Deit B (Xxfley: 
M L Faolley: R G Fleid: M Jf^HUe: S 


Tompkins: R 8 Toowe L Townsend: 
B P Trace: E L YrawsdateA P 
Twlbut B T Twin M J Underhill: N 
C Vale: J P Van llee ma berg er : A Van 
West M M Vance: D Vaughan: G P 
ventress: C D vicar: P R Vincent L K 
Walken R I watoen ft waiktote: F V 
WaiKlatn B ft Wallace: BLJ WaiUs; T 
Walters: F E watton: J E Warran; L B 
Women 2 j Wasldewwict: . A E 
Watkins: H M Watson; M E M WBtt M 
D Webb: A J wedge: M j Wedgwood: 
J M Westwood: EC WtiUehouse; K 
wtoitaken T WMtunaun: M E wuian: 
G M williams: 8 m vrauams: V 
wnuams: M P wuilamo Davies: P E 
WUmshurst: E M WtogOeM: J W 
wbbart H N wood: A .Woodley: R G 


. t Le Few 

Lee: A LeMham: M N Leeson: M E 
Leigh: E M Leslie: F R Levers: L A 
Lewis: B H A Lewie B G Udsten G 
.Ue: R H uwrtl: D L Lovett D 
: R J W Lucas: CCT Ludfond- 

am 

D MarshaU: F M Martin: D G L 
McCracken: C McDowelt A McEwan: 
P B MCKeown: P R McNlcholar C G 
Meadem J R B Medianat M J Mee: E 
Meuar. P J MUIer. M V Mlttt J E 
Mllwartt S W MU want B G Minioa: B 
Morris- Smith: A M Mounsey. B A 
Morphy: ft C M Neale: M HJ Nelson: 
T W Nesbitt G P Newbrook: D 
Newbury: R E Newton: J M Norman: 
M Norton: M L Nunn; a M O'Boyle: M 
C O-Cratto: D J Oiurtll: P A Ollvra: A 
P Oppe nh e ta ner : J H Orchard: P J 
Osborn; R I Osborne: A Osborne: M K 
Owen: B. Paling; G Palmer: S A 
pabnen J Palmer: a Paraudam J C 
Parker. R D Parkinson: E H Parkin- 
■oru M G Pam E n Parton: a m Pask: 
j E Peacock: R R Pearson: B A Peers: 
J Peet S Pmgeiley: G W Penty: J M 
pettuck: D Phetan: M J Phmips: B G A 
phiipott B F pitting: J Pladdys: S M 
Plant a H R Plant B Preston: R 
price: O C Primrose: R-M Pugh; p 
Pursotove: R M Pursglove: T W 
purvte R W Rafferty: r m Raison: P 
D Rawson: G C Read: D R Rcaney: S 
M Reed: M T Reeve: C E RcStoridt P 
R Richards: D J Roberts; N S 
Robinson: O Robinson: J H Robinson: 
O R Robinson: 1 C Robtnson: B G 
Rogers: E J Roofce: V Rosas: D E 
ROUSK M H H Rowan: S Roy: A 
Sal lay: P Sapsford: E A Saxton: A 
Scarnorourau A L Scott: M J 
scuffham: W N M Semnje: A E 
Sheldon: K Sherratt: C M awrvey: E 
' Shorrock: K Sim moods: H A Simon: 

Sim peon: A stvasubramaniam; j M 
‘ B Staler: L Stetter. O Smith; D 
- :D.K Smtth: A L J Smith: M J 
Uth: A Sparrow: D M 

SfwWJFSwrwLM 

_ ttdwusraTWaiUort; jTi Stocken 
D Slorer: S Sutton: P Sutton; C D 
Swan: K j syretL P Taylor: C H 
Taylor: C F Teague: M ATrauWc B 
M Tebbelt R G Templeton: V J 
TeUwrion: A F Thomas: P S Thomas: 
M Thomas: J A Thompson; S C 
Thrall: G A Tierney: F H TUfont L 
is t v Todorqyfc: K J Tomkins: B 


I W _ . . 

*JCra«or«gDP< 

R M HalTi 

fflaifVnssi 

Harding: A P Harrison; I 
I Harrison: J Harvey: 

- - p f Hay: J r 


*& r e 

i P^MuTtton: 

XSSfi 

C M 


4 02-0 OUR BARA BOY (QM 

swtcWim 

6 024- BLACKHAWK STAR J K Ofemr 12-10-12 K Jones 

i 8! a«aMBiaeBag=iB 

w 4W FUTTERMERE R E Peacock 15-10-1— P(rtkmnag(4) 

13 P/22 MEUERBCGM Moors 11-1041 MHmnond 

^ 15-8 Matorsk. 11-4 Target Man. 7-2 FVttennera, 6-1 Our 
Bara Boy. 8-1 Btoddawk Star. 12-1 others. 

3.10 TUDOHBUHY HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,738: 
2m If) (11) 

CFaMsnt 
D Hood (7) 
— CGranl 


2 UPTOWN RANDirSl 

DO BRAMPTON LYNDLm 102 G Marker (4) 

PARXES SPECIAL JPvkes 102. RtMtaurp) 

1 1-10 Uptown Ranob'5. 4-1 Casual Pass. 6-1 Lady SI Clair. 
8-1 Bantel Bushy. 12-1 Pauls Secret. 
14-1 others. 

4.20 RACING POST TOP OF THE NORTH NOVICE 
CHASE (Qualifier: £1,446: 2m If) (9) 

1 30-1 BUNRAHN0CH HOUSE RF Fisher 5-11-7.. N Doughty 

2 0-10 FRENCH NEPHEW (BF)0«iysS«iMn 5-11-7. .CGnra 

3 PM PRINCE BUBBLY MAwon fll-7 H Madw^ 

5 004- 8I0N00N1G A Cahetl 6-11-4 Pruett 

S £CT 525KL!S??^! S «. J B — SKentewaO 

7 FOO- WGH DROP F S Storay 6-11-4 B Storey 

wsB-11 ‘ 


8 00-0 MARINE CHoanas 8-11-4. 


CMana 
S Earle (4) 
0 Hood (7} 


9 130- PRICE OF PEACE CJBeB 8-11-4 

ID PF3- SAWYER'S SON Mrs P fliflOy 7-11-4. 

_ >54 Bumannocti House. 100-30 Price Of Peecs. 84 
French Nephew, 8-1 Pmce Bubbly. 12-1 Maran. 14-1 others. 

4.55 EBF NOVICE HURDLE (£885: 2m If) (9) 


M Alston (7) 


TBIJC^T 

2 11-4 CLEARLY BUST(CriqC HotatesB-12-1 

3 14/0 RABBBU8 Denys Smah 5-1 1-10 

8 41-2 TINOUE BELL (U G M Moore 4-1 1-3 M 

10 032- BATON MATCH (C-0) M C Chapman 81 1-2 


Spencer: M R 
Sackhot^M 


Harvey: J 


Paieia: T 

S¥Sffi J r L 5SSSS:51^SS: 


young. 


tens: g D&ra«oru| Regum 05i East JVfidlBllds 


Fox: R E GreeiU J E Hi -- _ ... 

Heath: O T Holley: M C Hough: H H te».2 , 
JnmmsDM Meade: ACWTHorriraJ 
A Pratt: C J Wxgtt: R Trollope. Carne: P 


Mi M Adams: M P Alien urch: C M 


_ --' n?.ftb|Se:J A Ingram: CP Irate* . _ 

A J Jacto?n: Jk Jackson: A J Jackson: 

_ »K A Jackson: M A James: H L James; 

a ' — M >\- Y» ^ B M Jeffcott: P H Jefferies: i 
r+%! iVV ?-M Jennings: P G Jennings 



Barnett; A Bam K*. J Barratt: J' B 
Bartlett: A J Batchelor; H RBate: A.J 
Bales: M j Beamish: W B ea rds ley; M 

j^?rjBA^AB* CYr 

J LrVliWu W Inlun * 



J A Jones: B N G Jonee: B V 


I 



Kenwottny; D E Kerrigan: A 




Black: B a Blakerauu A O Bunn; ! 
Blayney: j M BtocicMge P 
Bfockswen L M Bloomer: D E mount 
M Biowert J K BhreSriL J L 
eoddinotam t BooUu P Bouncer. G 
Dowdier: M K Bowens E Bmlcs: GJ 
Brace: G L Bradley: A Brfuuugan. L D 


Adams: G Ambus: D 
! Barker: J R J BUM tb HM 

__ jlchbum: J F Fletcher: C L 

neicher; G G Gay: I Gould; B L 
Harris: P J Hmeyr J K Holland; P A 

* Awes: E M Layward: E J 

P K Lonsdale; M H 
; J M Mudge J Ntohods: E C 

SUber. J F Ward: B J Watkins: E ’ A 
Wauon. P L Whitaker P E 
Woodhouse A J Woods 

ten 2 CM* U> J . . ^ 

Foun tame. M F Fox: O Ml ... 

B ooms, j R jvms: R A Law H J S 
Mien. JM1HM.N R Proud. K_M 
RKhards R M £ Rasa. R M Ward 


ten 3 k m 

Jones. A A 
w interior! 


ft N Gow A M 
N Stnures D ft 


Tobin;. 

G Tosdevlne: A W Toyne; M A Trroi: 
A V Tremor: A M Tt iiv pw: C A 
Trim: A R Tunstall: N B Turnbull; P 
D Turnbull: S R Turner: G E TyerK M 
C Vaughan: J Vuittamjn T J 

walker: □ E walker; A D waller: J L 
Wallers: G Watton: T War die: r R 
Watson: B Webm h m webeter: G a 
wetohonan: V a Weller: F M wells: S 

s 

wnhlman: K ft WUcooc G Mwjijti N 
WWOssson: J M WitUraon: S Wlllann: 
c G wmem D A wuiiunc G_N 
WlluaraK F J Wilson: B M WUson; S J 
Wilson: J A WKK A P withers:. K A 
wocxud: e A wrw. w w wngtit: T 
A Wright: J Youuk P H 2k»mek. 

Rcgioa 07: Yorkshire 

Chw » (Mv Q: j Bedford: D F BonOey: 
J HBullocJc M Butler: C EChunnan: 
S Cohen: P Cowood: H L Crahb: A M 
Daxtsworth: B Dawson; T S Dawton: 
J V Ot Bruyn; fi P Dobson: S C 
Dunkeriev. J M E&mts J F FeNey: M 
R Finch; E Fursn P A Holden: S B 
Huntley. J D N IMerMn; M J Inghanu 

S C Johnston. J ft M Lane: J UnOley: 

E MarKeehnle: H MerteU J S 
Mtflin. R W Matthews: M I M 
McGraui. H E Moriey: p 8 Rcrwbnd: 

E O Salt. J Skinner; Q S Spinks G 

Thompson. G J Want. P waison: w I 
West M E Wilson 

tess 1 Ote B): J Beecher. W HBowes. 
E R guttle. A Carr J Child; D Clayton. 
B ft uook B H Courtney D J Damm. T 
S DhUIOrt. N H Dow M D Early B 
~ R N Hattfi- S W Harper R M 


Mitujttx tc M P Pay C E Palm. F □ 
Pearson w p Peck. D A seou. L 
Steal D P Smith AStogdcn R Stoker 


wssssv cm 

Hlndmarch: J M Hotden: J . . 

P Hotrovdi K Hoirovd; P Hotrovd: j 
M ! Hooklnson: G B Horsndu B 
Howarth: A M Howttt; A J Hoyle: V L 
Hoyle: S J Huckerby: R M Hunt F 
Hunter: A C Molts: C H Jackson: L 
Jackson: M F Jackson: S E Jackson: ' 
B Jackson: P . w jwtueson: P 
~ J Jenkins: E Jennings: N . 
nnuigs: J Johnson: A Jones: D A 
nee: D H Jones: A C Jones: G 
, rdan: j a Kane: D A Kjnkam: Y 
Kay: A P Kaziaudunas: R JC Keene: 
T M KeUen: J Kennedy: A P Kenr G 
Kerrigan: C L KUllck: C King: K A 
Kttson; M Knapton: S Landom I 
Langley: F A Latham: P J Loach: M C 
Leadill: M Leask: J Lee: R Leedale: J F 
Lehany: G R Leivers: D Lennon: S N 
Lewis: E A Lidster: J E Lliaba: A 
Lockwood: A J Loooe D w Longley: 
i w Lubbock: J S Lumlx J Lundy: M 
Lupton: O M MacDonald: P W 
Machln; P j Mack: M MacKinnon; P 
H MacNamarau D A Mag 

C C March: A K Marsh: I 

M Martin: V m MartUv C J 
MartUidale: A Mason; J M McDonald; 
M M McDonald: J A McEhmnney: I M 
McGregor: P L McIntosh: J E McLeod: 
D Meade: T M Meoahp: J S MeUiulstu 
A F Meuon j D Mellor: L Merrinoton: 
R Metcalfe: H R Mitten B MhchellT j S 
Mitcheh: PMC MttcheU: A Moore: M 
A Moore: J R Moore: B Moore: A M 
Morgan: A M Mosley: M E MUllew W 
B MurHon; A Murphy: A Murray: J m 
T Murray de Boom: R Musgrave: M 
Mutch: G Myers: B J Newtend: C 
Nichotb: K w Noble: M Nutbrown: I E 
CTDonoghur: P A Oakley: L C Oates: J 
C P Olley: P G Otter: A E R Owm e 
p Owen: JIM Oxley: L Padfleld: M 
parfetL P V Parker: L Parking: A J 
Parkinson: D Parrish: M Pawlowski; j 
Pawson: P Paynter: D Paynten P E 
Paynton; K M Peacock: KE Pearson: 
D PWko: C P Poraaington: M L 
Perkins: A P Petttgiew: K Petnrtey: C 
A PlUlhps; E Pigooll'. P Pike: M 
Pinchbeck; S A Pinner: K E Platt: S K 

Randatt: J M _ Rawnaey; a T 
Rawnslgr: B A IhME Rees: F M 
ReM: j Richardson: T M Richmond-. D 
J Ricketts: D A Wider: B M Riley: P 
Rimmer: H G Robertson: A D 
Robertson: M J Robinson; R Roe: B J 
Roe: P H Rone: J L Rooke: P J Roscnc: 
N D Rosier: C W Ross: F Rothwefl: S 
ROOOv p j Rowland: C Rudland; D T 
RntnflU; W G Ruahton-. J C 
Rutlwrroord: M E Sanderson: E A 
Sanderson: O J Sander: M P 
Saunders: H R Scholes: J A Scott: BE 
Selby; v Senior: P Sentor: A Sergeant: 

E A C shannon: P Stiamlen: L K 
Shaw: s M Shaw, j snaworom: M J 
Sheridan: V I SUbcrbera: S Simpson: 
M Sketton: E M Skerretb A M Stinger: 
C B Smerdon: P C Smith; j gsrMSv. T 
smith; M Smtth ; A Smith: G T Smith; 
T D A Smith: P N Smith; S Botomous; 
“ _ "" H Soencer M E 

. Spooner: M a 

Stensiield; J S Stood: 

P M Stead: M A Steer. I Stewart: J A 
SUwarU j Stewart: j stockky: K M 
Stokoe: n Striker: a y Suggate: P 
Sufiey: P A Sullfvbn: S f ' _ 

J Tams: 5 TasMr. M E_Tay!e*: J C 
Taylor. E v Taylor. T Thomas: S F 
Thompson: P M Thompson: N Thom- 
son: S N Thursoy-Coombes: N J 
Tilkuson. M C M Todd: J E Todd: E J 
Topun: P A C Turner: I m Turner: 
N D Turner G Turner R B Turner: C 
D Twyman. G S Utley. M variey; f 
V aade. J C Wamman: M Walker; P 
WallM. K Wautt: P ft waiters: E R 
Ward, c ft waig. J M wtrevl 
wsyUn 
wesL 

Wharton. . . _ 

house. M J Whitaker M P White: R J 
Whiletev H WhHeman. N WWthamv. 
D W whiling: MOW .Whyte. E J 
wOde M ft wiiisy J M Wiikmon. v 
WiUenon C A wiittams A R 
Wiiitams. B Williamson. K J Wu 
loiigiiby J WUson. S R WUson. J R 
WinlerooUMn M Wong. M w wood. 

A wood S M woodward H E 
woodward P^wooiwncpL E w 
WrMhl R C Wright M A Yeung. J 
Young A H zaiewska 


12 124- PfHCBOFlJOVE 0 Moflatt 8-10-12 

15 0/2- WO00FGCXER BOY CJB«8 6-108- 

16 000- UNQUAItOEO F S Storey 8-10-5 


SttW.PI 

. KTg 


. S Eerie (4) 
_ B Storay 


1 0/P- CASILE TRACK E J Alston 5-11-0— 

2 040- CHANGED PERSON J Wadt 5-1 1-0.. _ . , 

4 000/ PALLETAIT (BIN Waggon 6-11-0 REamstaw 

6 000- PfUNaUETTERMCRCJBrtl 5-11-0 RBeggan 

7 O- ROCKOLLA W A Stephenson 5-11-0 R Lamb 

10 000- NORVAL G flcnaias 4-10-11 — Nonori 

11 (KM CASSE AVOM Mre M Thomss VtM _P Chapman 

12 0- MANOR SECRET PJBwan 5-10-9 - — 

13 00- ROYAL SECRET Mrs G RevNey 6-10-9 PWtan(4) 

11-8 Norval. 2-1 RockoOa. 5-1 Prmco Mottemich. 

8-1 Manor Seam, 12-1 Changed Penan. 14-1 others. 


HEREFORD 


Going: firm 

2.15 CHERRY NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) 
(14 runners) 

1 0-01 DISCOVER GOLD (0) K S Bridgwater 5-1 1^_ 

2 00- 

3 000- 

4 000 f 

6 32-0 

7 022- 
9 030 

10 O04> 

11 008- 

13 OOF- 

14 3- 

15 noo 

18 

19 3P/P 


3.15 ACONBURY NOVICE CHASE (El ,454: 2m) (6) 

1 -112 KARNATAK(Q)JLSpemg 5-11-11 SMorsbead 

2 FFflJ BELY BUMPS C L Popham 8-1 1-0 SMcNeM 

‘ "" ' 1 .. A TcKiS 

RDoteeeoOp 


ARMORADRT Judas 4-10-10 JwfrBWemy 

BVRNBB GROVE ORGenooHo 7-10-10. T Wooley 

OCMWAMBTONFJYOnSgr 5-10-10 R~ 


HAOOAK (USA) B Ptfng 5-10-10- 

KWACERO P Hamer 810-10 

MOBEE D L WUams S-IO-IO-M 


IS 


— C Evans G) 

— Mr P Hamer 
. A Gardner (7} 


NEEDWOOD LEADER (B) J M Bradby 5-10-10 G Daviea 

SNAKE mvfflF Jordan 4-10-10 CSBOb 


OOP. QAME FLORA (B) F Wniwyn 4-10-S- 
■H DISTANT SOUND H Didon 5-105 — 
EASmt ROSE U Tate 7-1B5 


SPARKY SPROUT T A FOrstar 5-104— 

TAMWORTH TRACK W G Moms 8-106- 


. K Mooney 

— C Jones 


.L Harvey 
W Morris 


11-4 Annorad. 3-1 Oame Flora. 4-1 Discover Gold. 
8-1 Kmacero. 10-1 Mobde. 12-1 Spaliy Sprout, Byrnes Grove. 
14-1 others. 


Hereford selections 

By Mandarin 
2.15 Sparky SpronL 2.45 Haddon Lad. 3.15 
Official Dress. 3.45 Professor Plum. 4. 1 5 Scottish 
Bavard. 4.45 Celtic HamleL 


2-45 HOAR WITHY NOVICE SELLING HURDLE 

(£572: 2m) (11) 

OOF- FRISKY HOPE B ft Gunbidge 4-11-8 Mr J Cambidge © 

0- FULL OF ALE J R JanUnsi-n-B H Jenkins [T) 

0-PO JKMMrSSHAMLES(USA)(B}8Preece«.1l-8 

8 HaUnd 


3 0-00 BUIE CAP Mrs JBanuw 13-11-0 MaaQi 

7 03-2 LOR MOSS A F Letgiaon B-11-0™ 

8 F3P- OFFICIAL l =*TSS M Oiwar 5-11-0. 

11 400- U8ERTY CALLING P Hayward 10-104 — PCraucher 

6-« Kematak. 2-1 Lor Mm. 11 -2 Official Dress, 10-1 Blue 
Cap. 12-1 LHjerty Calling. 16-1 BBy Bumps. 

3.45 MALVERN HANDICAP CHASE (£2,075: 2m 4f) 

4 1DP- PROFESSOR PLUM T A Forster 13-11-7 MDeviaa 

8 DM NATIVE BREAK (USA) (DO) Mia W Sykes 9-10-11 

S Nonhead 

8 IKS 8PANBH 000 tnCLPopnani 11-10-1 SMeNeM 

15 334) BLACK EARL I r Wards 8-100 PDever 

11-8 Professor Pun, 188 NOM Break. 7-2 Spantett God, 
8-1 Black Eari. 

4.15 ABERGAVENNY HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£1,234: 2m II) (5) 

3 043 SAILOR MSS DHavdn Jones 5-1 1-7 OMcCeert 

E 02-4 WELL COVERED (M (BF1 ft HoSnshaad 5-11-4 PDever 

7 44-0 SCOTTSH BAVARD j Webber 7-10-11 OMemaoh 

11 -014 SUP UP (C) f Gray 6-11-2 EMurpS* 

13 000- ROYAL OPPORTUNITY (0) K Cam 6-10-0 _ J Mhani 
13-8 Saior Mss. 2-1 Weil Cawed. 7-2 Scotttsfl Bavard. 
8-1 S8p Up. 18-1 Royal Opportunity. 

4.45 BORDER HANDICAP HURDLE (Amateurs: 
£1,132: 3m If) (17) 


0-11 AMERKXJD Roberts 8-11-12 pex). C Brooks ( 

344* PRMCES5 HECATE PDavis 11-11-10 MNeT Dane] 
0-1F RIVERS10E DRIVE JO Dams 7-11-7^ MAnwtao*< 
033/ SCOT LANE (IM Urt M Bern 13-11-6. Was D Kay j 

00-0 BLACK R00 A Turned 9-11-4 “ 

002- DANCE OF UFE P Hamar 7-11-2 


. JBmyj 


04-0 FLYING OFFICER (B)M Pipe 9-11-2. MfanHHMxM (7) 
JtertranS-li-1. Cl' ~ 


OPO- IONG wogg^ Mrs A RMdB 4-11-8. lb DWMtoH(g 


TRHtEWG Bvitelt 4-11-8. 
VWLSARUTH W J Price 4-11-8- 


6 

8 
10 

11 09-P COMEDY PfttNCSS M Tate 4-1 1-3. 
13 
15 
18 
22 


. SJ1 

■ IBM Rtohartte 


ALDINGTON BELL C C Tnattne 3-104 WKmx 

3 HADDON LAD F Jordan 3-104 C 

0 JOLLY PRMCE H J Manners 3-l0-5_ 

TESTAROSSA J 0 Denes 3-1 WJ. 


- W Morris 

Evens Fid Of Ale. 3-1 Haddon Lad. «-l Comedy Princess. 
8-1 Aldington Ball 12-1 Traraw. 14-1 others. 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 
7 
B 

9 0R1- DOUBLE SWNGJ Harriman 5-11-1. CHan*n»n(ft 

10 0P-1 CELTIC HAMLET PDCundeS 7-11-0 — SCoutoy (7) 

11 410- STAR ALLIANCE R Morris 8-10-12. Mss L Wattsee (7) 

12 122- LEAN ORT D L WMams 8-10-11 T Granttsen (4) 

13 420 PASS ASHORE WMOtver 7-10-11-. MHcharda(7) 

16 003- UTOPIAN G Hoeil0-4 C J Lamsden (7) 

17 040 UFT WGH DR Tucker 7-1 00L Mss J Southai (7) 

19 403- MOLES CHAMBER Mrs V McKm 12-10-1. M Bradstocfc 

20 330 HOUNSTTMIT MGR Prest 6100 TEdwarda 

22 OD-P SAUCY MOP (pf B Preece 6-HHJ— R8ewn(7) 

15-8 America. 7-2 Rlvenide Drive. 11-2 CeWe Hamlet. 
8-1 Pass Ashore. Lean Ort, 18-1 Dance Cri UIb, 12-1 Flying 
Officer, 14-1 others. 


Swuuforth: CWSjii 


l u k warn, j « waring: , a 
lino: P Webb. M Wetter R A 
. M E Wert. R Westwood. C 
non. m E Wheeler. K Wheel 


MARKET RASEN 


Going: good 

2,15 SCUNTHOTPE SELLING HAMUCAP HURDLE 
(£809: 2m) (16 runners) 

1 /IS- PRIVATE CTAFTJ04J1 A BaMng 9-12-0 — M Pepper 


7 21F- SAM DA VMC1 J W Biunftl 7-11-8 
9 10P/ PAM0NA Mis GRavday 811-1— 


t') 

s« 


* > 

A 

t v 
.* 

A 

k 




r « 



Th tiw ^Portfoiio Geld nils are as 

«r 1 -rCf n 6 Portfolio is free. Purchase 
Times is not a cotMUQoa ef 
taking pan. 

1 g.Tmea PortfUKo list ..... 
group of public jeemtuasies — 

«wras are listed on the Stock 
' Exchange and quoted in The Ttmee 
stock Exchange .prices gage. The 
rom parties comprising UuffttflT Wiil 
change from day to day. Trio Ust 
rwnicn is nutneered l - 44> is dtxlded 
into four randomly dtetnouied groups 
roll shares. Every PortMto card 
contents two numbers from each 
.group and cacti card c oa t elns a 
unique set o f numbers. 

prauono ‘dividend* wffl be 
S* “ Bence winch 

si 

“ »*4 sher e* wh ich o n 
«»? .day co mp r i se The Tttms 


4 The dittto dividtspd wl ll_.be 
announced radi day and the weekly 
dividend will be announced each 
Saiurday fcn The Times. 

6 Times Portfolio list and dctaOsof 
the dally or weekly dividend wtD also 
beavaUabie tor Jnwectkm at the 
offices of The Times. 

fi If the overall price movement of 
more than one comutnanou of snaras 
equals !nc drvtdend. Ih* prt*e wtu be 



— S old ~ 


equally divided among the claimants 
holding those combinattora i ' 


of shares •? 


7 All ctetma are sutUect to savOra 
benre payment. Any Tunes •po rtfo lio 
card (hat is defaced, tampered with or 
hMemwny prauod to any way win be 
draiared xoW 

8 employees of News nuranaUonai 
tec and Jte sdbstoiarie s and of 
Europnni Group . Limited (Producer* 
and distributors of t he . carol ...or 
members of ifudr diumiuu uraiues 
an no! allowed to ribs' Ttows 
Portfolio 

. 9 All parUetpaute wm be suMeri to 
these Rides All pHUuctions on “how 


publish 

Portfgii 


how to claim wither 
m Times 


pus and 

binned m 

' fi^i cards will be de em e d Jobe 


Hi The . Tunes, or 


pari of thrito Rutes ’ Tlje Editor 
reeencs the right to amend the Rules 

10 In any dtebute The Editor's 
on Bftnal and no rormson 

will be entered tmo 

11 V for any reason The Time* 
Pnr** Page » gM ' 

normal way Times 

suspended for trial day 

How to jby - Drily Pl te ttemi 
On each da> your unique set of right 
nwubm will rap eeseat commercial 


and industrial shares published In The 
Time* Portfolio usi wiucn wd appear 
on the Stock Exchange Prices page 
tn ihe columns praxlded pen to 
your shares note Uie price Change f+ 
or i tn Pence as publish ad to that 
a»l Times 

After Ustmo the pnea changes of 
your etohl shares for mat day add. up 
all ewu snare change* lo give you 
your overall Kttai plus or minus or 
i 

Check your mers Q tom agabtsl The 
Time* Portroiio dixidma PuousMd on 
me Stock Exchange Price* page 


_ tola! matches dm published 
■ dhldend figure you have won 
outrtohi or a share of the prize money 
suited (or (hat week and must claim 
your prat as instructed below 


if your 
weekly dh 
outrtohi oi 


4 838- QCUMRATOHfln P H U dbod 11*11-1 — JAkataate 

5 3-00 SPARKLER SUPERB PA Pntctatt) 9-10-13 — 

6 HP- WAIlSTON BELL Earl Jones 7- 1&- 12— J DDoyls (4J 

7 000- MUTARTCROWN (81 fQ Mrs CEvviS 9-1811 

CDeonte(7> 

8 00-0 CAUFH J A flkwr 5-1M_^ S Karris (7) 

9 082 MONSANTO LAO H fiemAn 6-1 M — 

10 00-0 (RIANGEHU. (C-O) MSI G Ross 1 1-106 P Dentes 

11 OOP- DBRONKMGJG Thom 7-186 . — 

12 000- BALKAN JL Warn* 6-106 J A Harris 

13 000- BYR0C BOY RCtm 9-186. RMcGUn 

14 008- RUSH WE BAM WJ Matte 4-186 MBosler(4} 

1$ 404- VALQROSO (C-D) G R OWtoWJ 6186 GWGaiy 

16 480 ARNAB L WwtfMti a m 5-103 JBarim 

18 006 MNATWE MiSsW A Svpnensoti 183 DCondaB 

11-4 Monsanto Lad, 3-1 Vteonuo. 7-2 Private Craft. 
5-1 Balkan iM GrongehB. 12-1 Mtoeture Mtss. 14-1 others. 


Mr J Osborne (7) 

M Sam Da Vinci, 2-1 Mighty Dimsw, 1MKJ0 Qugensway 
Boy. 61 Pamnaa. 

3.45 YORK BAR JUVENILE NOVICE HURDLE 
(3-Y-O: £1^71: 2m) (7) 

3 11 ROD MELODY (C-B> J M Jtetarson 169 MM 

7 P HIGH BAZAAR RDWoodhonse 166. J A Hams 
9 0 TAKE THE BISCUIT fl W 5tubt» 164 — 

10 HARSLEY SUPNSE N TmWer 10^ .. U Dwyer 

12 0 Wire PICKER K A Morgan 161 ... KRyan(7) 

13 PLATINUM START Kersey 1W _ 

16 VITRY C James 161 . — HlnSLawrenea 


4-7 flttjo 
Biseutt. 12-1 Hop 


5 'i L , H 2? By Su V*»e> 8-1 Taka Tfft 
. 20-1 others. 


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Market Rasen selections 

By Maodanq 
2 IS Mmature Miss. 145 Tin Boy 3 IS Sam Da 
Vinci 3 45 Ribo Melody 4 IS Kepi On Ice 4 45 
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1 D0-1 TIN BOY ntWT Km 7 128 SSUston 

2 -OOF COWTRYSPARK P A Pntcnard 8-1V3 DCbkm 

3 FP8 RQNYSQL fiKA Morgan 711-3 Kftyan(7) 

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3.15 BMW SERIES CHASE (Qualifier £1,874 3m) 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1936 


RACING: LEADING TRAINER STOUTE POISED FOR ANOTHER BIG CATCH IN GOODWOOD’S FEATURE MILE 


Scottish Reel can step 
lively with conditions 
turning in his favour 


By Mandarin 


Scottish Reel, syndicated as 
a stallion this week for £ 1.4m, 
can further advertise his value 
bv winning this afternoon's 
Waterford Crystal Mile (3.10). 

Denied a chance of viciory 
in Goodwood's group two 
feature when the meeting was 
abandoned last year, Michael 
Stoute's game and consistent 
miler should have the yielding 
conditions underfoot that he 
needs on the Sussex track 
todav. 

Alter beating Teleprompter 
in the Lockinge Slakes at 
Newbury. Scottish Reel was 
sent to the Goodwood July 
meeting, where the four-year- 
old took on his stable compan- 
ion Sonic Lady in the Sussex 
Stakes. Though no match for 
Sheikh Mohammed's brilliant 
filly, today's nap kept on 
bravely to take second place. 

Despite being flattered by 
his proximity to the winner as 
Greville Starkey was allowed 
to dictate terms in a slowly run 
contest, this was a first-class 
performance as Pennine 
Walk, Bold Arrangement and 
Efisio all finished in arrears. 


Of Scottish Reel's oppo- 
nents. both Sarab and Hadeer 
are also at the peak of their 
form. Sarab has won three 
group three races on the 
Continent in succession for 
Paul Cole. Hadeer has also 
been excelling himself recently 
for Clive Brittain, notably 
when displaying tremendous 
courage to beat T ruly Nureyev 
in Newbury's Hungerford 
Stakes. 

Supreme Leader, Brittain's 
other runner, has lost his 


early-season sparkle and 
Sharrood's recent second to El 
Desperado at Saint-Cloud 
docs not look quite good 
enough. 

The chief threat to Scottish 
Reel may be posed by Then 
Again, who failed to slay a 
mile and a quarter behind 
Wassl Touch al Haydock after 
showing fine speed to win a 
mile handicap under top 
weight at Newmarket. 

Visitors to Goodwood will 
start the day by watching 
Sadeem, one of Guy 
Harwood's St Leger hopes, go 
on trial in the March Slakes 
(2.00). This lightly raced 
three-year-old won Ascot’s 
Churchill Stakes narrowly and 
more recently looked far more 
convincing when romping 
home in an amateur riders' 
event at Newmarket. 

Celestial Storm and Al 
Kaahir possess the best public 
form. After finishing a close 
third to Chinoisene when 
favourite for the Exiel Handi- 
cap on this track earlier in the 
month, Luca Cumani's three- 
year-old failed by a length and 
a half to give Power Bender 
161b at Newmarket. 

Not only is Celestial Storm 
thought likely to be suited by 
this afternoon's longer dis- 
tance, the value of his latest 
run was given a boost when 
Power Bender won again at 
Yarmouth. Al Kaahir showed 
an abundance of stamina in an 
eight lengths victory at 
Newbury, but Sadeem is ex- 
pected to make the necessary 
improvement. 

The other televised race, the 


Lismorc Stakes (2.30) looks a 
wide-open affair. Backers of 
Our Jock look assured of a run 
for their money. Ron Smyth’s 
consistent four-year-old 
hardly knows how to run a bad 
race and surpassed himself 
last time out when finishing a 
close fifth to Green Ruby in 
the Stewards' Cup. carrying 
9st.71b. 

Newmarket’s feature races 
are both for two-year-olds. In 
the £12.000 Danepak Bacon 
Stakes (2.0). the best public 
form is held by Brave Dancer 
and Lauries Warrior. 

Brave Dancer, a comfort- 
able scorer al Salisbury, is 
fended to continue Guy 
Harwood's magnificent sea- 
son. But the likely favourite is 
Lauries Warrior, who showed 
much improved ability when 
capturing an apparently 
competitive nursery al Brigh- 
ton by eight lengths. However, 
there is a strong whisper from 
Whatcom be for Ibn Bey and. 
Cole's previously unraced 
Mill Reef colt is my choice. 

The Philip Comes Nickel 
Alloy Nursery (2.30) is an- 
other fascinating affair. With 
Geoffrey Wragg's stable in 
such magnificent form. Most 
Welcome will be strongly 
fended to defy top weight, 
especially after the style in 
which his nearest victim at 
Newmarket. Cape Wild, won 
at Yarmouth this week. But I 
shall take a chance with the 
Yorkshire raider, Einstein, 
who still appears to be reason- 
ably treated, despite a 71b 
penalty for his recent win at 
Redcar. 



Reignbeau 

to make 


Invited Guest lives 


Irish trip 
payoff 


up to trainer’s 
exalted opinion 


From our Irish Racing 
Correspondent, Dublin 
Geoff Lewis, who has done so 
well this season with Reignbeau. 
appears to have found an ad- 
mirable objective in which to 
hilly exploit the talents of this 
three-year-old. He is sending 


him to Ireland to^^ for the 


Guy Harwood's improving Sadeem, who is fended to 
complete a treble in Goodwood's 


March Stakes 


Trip right for Mill On The Floss 


Sieve Cauthen is in action at Deanrille this afternoon when be 
rides MiD On The Floss for Henry Cecil in the Prixde Poroone. The 
13¥f-fnrlong trip should suit her well, but Mill On The Floss win 
need to be in top form to contend with Walensee (Eric Legrix). 

Lester Piggott has his first overseas runners when be saddles 
three horses at Ostend tomorrow. They will all be ridden by Tony 
Ives. Toluca Lake has Get on Geregbry (Gary Carter) and Tina's 
Beauty (Peter Bloomfield) to beat in the Prix Negresco (7f). 


Geordie's Delight is joined by John Dunlop's Innishmore Island 
(Pat Eddery) in the Prix Bayenx (lOf) and Vague Melody has just 
five local opponents in the Prix Kloostera (9i). 


The big race of the day is the Grand International d'Ostende (1 10 
which carries a first prize of £13,800. British trainers provide three 
of the six runners, Chaamiere (Ives), KaDcoor (Richard Quinn) and 
Boon Point (Eddery). 


seven furlong Coyle Hamilton 
Patriotic Handicap at the Phoe- 
nix Park. 

Reignbeau led from start to 
finish to win the Hofincisier 
Handicap at Goodwood, beat- 
ing Diggers Rest, who ad- 
vertised the winner's merits by 
going on to win at York on 
Thursday. The ground at the 
Phoenix Park has softened up 
considerably, but this should be 
no problem for Reignbeau. who 
won a handicap at Epsom in 
heavy ground earlier in the 
season. 

Reignbeau is just one of five 
English-trained runners contest- 
ing three Phoenix Park races 
today. Ian Balding runs 
Dunninald in the Oldtown Stud 
Fillies' Stakes, but she was easily 
beaten at Thirsk last time out 
and hardly measures up to the 
standard of North Tdsiar. who 
first time out over this course 
and distance landed a gamble by 
eight lengths. 

Petrovich. Luqman and 
Measuring join issue in the 
Orchards! own Send Stakes with 
London Tower and Bermuda 
Classic. Luqman has twice ran 
well in group races in Italy this 
year but he may be fully 
stretched by Bermuda Classic, 
who had no luck in running last 
Saturday at The Cunagh behind 
Wise Counsellor. 

On this day last year Leading 
Counsel won the Persian Bold 
Stakes as a prelude to a classic 
success in the Irish St Leger. He 
has not been on a racecourse 
previously this season but Vin- 
cent O'Brien now brings him 
back to action in the European 
Racehorse St Leger Trial. 


Invited Guest maintained her 
unbeaten record with* runaway 
victory in the group three 
Waterford Candelabra Stakes at 
Goodwood yesterday and looks 
a classic prospect m the making 
for Robert Arm strong , the New- 
market trainer. 

Producing a fine bunt of 
acceleration. Invited Guest 
came from last to first in the 
final three furlongs to win going 
away tv 2% inatbs from 
Golden Braid. The daughter of 
Be My Guest is now 16-1 for the 

1,000'Gnincas with Mecca. 

The .success came as no 
surprise to Armstrong, particu- 
larly as the filly has been 
wonting at home alongside 
Linda's Magic, who ran well in 
York's Lowther Stakes on 
Thursday. 

Armstrong said; “I toM Steve 

Cautbcn in the paddock that 
when he pressed the button 
things would happen fast and 
Steve said afterwaids I was dead 
right. She was most impressive, 
and is so relaxed she will stay 1 Vfe 
miles.” 

The filly will new seek to keep 
her unbeaten record intact in 
either the Hoover Fifties Mile at 
Ascot on September 25 or the 
Prix Marcel Boussac at 
Longchamp on Are day. 

Ininsky was virtually friend- 
less in the market before the 
Tote Bookmakers Handicap, 
drifting from 1 1-4 to 9-2, but the 
top weight ran out an easy 
winner. 

Striking the from two and a 
half furlongs from home, Guy 
Harwood's colt was always 
holding the chaHengp of Pat 
Eddery's mount. Piciograph, to 
win by 2H- lengths. 

Harwood's assistant, Geoff 
Lawson, said: "That's the first 
lime Ininsky has settled. He was 
suited by the East early pace and 
it was a good effort tinder all that 
weight. 

Silent Majority landed his 
fourth win of the season when 
just holding off Astartc and 


Jackie Blair m * three-way 
photo finish for the British Car 
Auctions Handicap. 

The consistent sprinter wjft be 
kept busv by his Newmarket 
trainer. Bill O'Gorman. Nest 
week the adding fanes up for a 
£ 10.000 sponsored nice - at 

Sandown, then travels » Swe- 
den for a £20.0® prircover j*) 
furlongs in Stockholm. 

A! Newmarket. Geoff Won 
who saddled three, winners at 
York on Thursday, was cm the 


National Hunt 
cards page 27 


Petoski retires 


Petoski. the winner of last 
year's- King George VI -and 
Queen Elizabeth Diamond 
Stakes, has run his last race. His 
trainee, Dick Hern, said yes- 
terday; "Petoski will not run 
again. Negotiations are at an 
advanced stage for h» p u rc ha se 
by the National Stud, where be 
win retire shortly.’ 

Lady Beavenwook's four* 
year-old. who was also success- 
ful in the Princess of Wales’s 
Stakes at Newmarket in- 1985, 
has failed to win in three outings 
this season, and could only 
finish sixth behind Etencing 
Brave in this year's' "King 
George” at Ascot 


Blinkered first time 


0000*000:230 Extol 4.10 JWHSWW. 

I h 


NEWMARKET) 1 .30 RteSinhett.: 

tottgo. a.o Fust Summer, Joker Man. Ito 


Stop gjftj^ 4W 


IAS Uttresn- S-U A» 

other Swam. Sprauh Sttpper. 3.15 


Boynton. 1 45 Tenaasenm. 

■ 


6.13 Bom Free Agate Remain 
Free. 7.15 Aset And wetoema 


GOODWOOD 


£5472. firm. Aug 7. 10 ran). EXERT (7-7) rod BARRACK STREET (9-7) behted. 
=18-11) «l 4th to Cree* 


Televised: 2.0, 240, 3.10 


Draw: 5f-6f, high numbers best 


2 JO MARCH STAKES (3-Y-O: £1 1 .394: 1m 6f) (7 runners) 


TYROU1E 

LOCO (9-12) behind (61. £7059. good.J 

to Gra y Dame (9-0) at York (61 Group 3. __ 

SPECIAL (9-1) beat Dancing Sarah{7-10) a neck at Chepstow (Gf. 
rank 

SetecSore AMIGO LOCO 

3.10 WATERFORD CRYSTAL MILE (Group II: £38,440: 1m) (8) 


5th and AMIGO 

Barter 4M 5th 
15. 10 ITO). MYRA'S 

firm. July 24,5 


101 024121 ALKAAHffl 

103 811 SADEEM 

104 182 CELESTIAL 


IB (USA) (H AFMaktoum) H Thomson Jones 9-1 ... 
(USA) (Sndkh Mohammed) G Hanwood 9-1 . 

U. STORM (USA) (BF) [R Duchassots) 


_ A Money 5 
a Starkey 7 


107 3-11140 MUBAARIS 

108 T10-432 R0B8AMA (USA) (Shaikh A Al Maktoum) J Dudop 8-11 

111 111022 FLEETING AFFAIR (Mrs S Lakin) G Harwood 8-8. 

112 1300 WCOLA WYNN (C Harper) □ Bsworth 8-8 


LCunsniB-11 

WRSMntwmS 
8-11 W Ryan 1 


302 240-212 SCOTTISH REEL 

303 023000 GflEY DESIRE (M Bnitan} M Bmtain 99 
H 4-20411 HADEER (W &8dfey1 C Bnttmn iMM 

1 40-8111 SARAB (CMP) (FSaknan) P Cote 588] 


304 

305 


306 1-41200 StYAH^AL^jfl 

307 113300 SUPREME LEADS? I 
^■043002 5HARROOD (USA) fl 


308 


(Dana Stud LM)J Ountap 4-60- 
■ M Lamas) C Bream 4-60 _ 
W Ham 3-8-6 


M SlOUtS 4-04. vr R Sartabnm 4 

KDartayS 

• - G Baxter 3 

TGnina2 


6-4 Sadeem. 5-2 Catesttal Sown. 98 Al Kaahir. 6-1 Fteefrig Affair. 10-1 Mubaaris. 
Robbama, 20-1 Nicola Wynn. 


.BTbomnn5 
.PRoMuonG 
_ W Carson 1 
- GStxfeey7 

84 Scottish Reel. 4-1 Hadear.S-2 Sarah. 5-1 Sharrood. 10-1 Supreme Loader. 12- 
1 Titan Agasi. 14-1 Grey Dane. 18-1 Siyeh Kalem. 


310 01-1012 THBI AGAIN (D) (R Shannon) L Cuman 3-6-6 


short head at York (1m 61. £3233. good. May 13. 5 rank SADEEM vary, assy 
amateurs' event, previously (8-9) beat Danisbgar (B-9) hi at Ascot (1m 41. £7 
June 21.4 ran). CELESTIAL STORM 2nd in Newmarket lOf h eap last time, p 


141. bn, 


. othcapu 

CM) 1 vsi 3rd to i stabtemate Chinoisene m h'cap hate (lm2f. £20713. firm. Aug 1. 13 ran). 


ROBBAMA (66J 3 2nd al 4 to Kenenga (SB) at Pontefract (1m 4t. £2236, good to firm, 
i). fleeting AFFAtfi (8*7) 5 to Voracity (9-7) in Brighton h eap fim 41, 


FORM: SCOTTISH REEL (9-7) 1541 2nd to Sonic Lady (67) here (81 Group 1, E15522S. 
good to firm, Jujy 30. 5 ran). HADEER (98) beat TroetyNurayev jB8) a neck at Newbury, 
GREY DESIRE (63) 6lh after not gotten a dear run (7f, £21708. good. Aug IS. 11 ram. 
GREY DESIRE 7th to Last Tycoon over St on Thursday. Barter (9-6) %I2nd to Green 
Desen (6-1 1) here (fif Group 1 . £39208. last July 10, S ran). SARAB (9-10) beat Esquro 
(9-5) a neck at Phoenix Park (81. good to sofLJdy 51 earlier (67) beat Lining (9-10) V>i at 
Baden-Baden (8f, £12712, goonTMay 25. 7 ranL SHAHRODO (B-9) 21 2nd to Uo Des- 
perado (88) « Saint-Cloud pm 21. £3429& good to fton, July 14.10 ran). THEN AGAM 
(60 neck 2n d to W SssI Touch (8-B)« Haydock (1m25f, £8129. good. Aug 9.6 raid. 
Selection: SCOTTISH REEL 


S e l ecti on: 


i. Aug 61 
CELESTIAL 


STORM 


Goodwood selections 


140 RICHMOND-BfltSSAC TROPHY (Handicap: amateurs: £3,830: 
1m 2f)(9) 

064031 MARJMNfC-D) (Mrs J McDoogaM) I tokteg 7-11-7 T Reed 8 

301113 BLBIDBtS CHOICE (D) (M CTCwmor) J KHW 4-10-11 _ 


By Mandamt 

2.0 Sadeem. 2.30 Our Jock. 3.0 SCOTTISH REEL (nap). 3.40 
Blender's Choice. 4.10 Mukhabbr. 4.40 Entrancing. 5. 10 Hendeka. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Celestial Storm. 2.30 Barrack Street 3.10 Scottish Reel. 3.40 
Seven Swallows. 4.10 Kyvendale. 4.40 Cromwell Park. 5.10 
Hendeka. 

Michael Seely's selection: 3.10 Scottish ReeL 


461 

403 

404 
406 
406 
409 

411 

412 


301113 BLBIDBtS CHOICE (D) (M CConnor) J King 4-10-11 -Tltanon Jones 7 
330010 RUNMNG FLUSH (Q (D) (N Capon) D Oughun 4-10-10 PGneao Capital 9 
001001 KT1YAR(STindafl] S Meter 4-104 (7ex) RH u ttte ao nS 


200600 BIG PAL (D) (Mrs G Harwod) G Harwood 11-167 
000004 DBtRYRING (D)(T 


i{D)(T South) 0 
100000 SEVBI SWALLOWS (D) (MV G 
003443 DOaYUBnfl A Moore 4-67 


4-164., 


H VaodenierS 
ASdwttcl 


414 0041000 HA*IAfiH(MraJ«3l0p)WHoiden367.. 


H CaBngndge 5-612 , JRyw4 
R Van Der Krvsts 2 


ANoWl 


62 Ma*nan. 7-2 Blenders Choice, 61 IWiyw,61 Dotty, Running Flush, 161 Big 
Pal, 14-1 Derryrtng. 161 ottiera. 


2-30 USMORE HANDICAP (£12,681: 61) (17) 

201 000211 MANMSTAR (C-D) (S Brewer) P Matan 6611 

000400 AMIGO LOCO (B) U U) K Brassey 567 

110412- HANDSOUK SAILOR (R San^tei) M W DKlHBOn 36 
000410 OUR JOCK (0) (Lord McAlpvie)R SmyOi 466. 
0-00000 ARDROX LAD (C) (D) (Sheikh H Al Nwayan) M 


204 

205 

206 
207 


G Baxter 11 


S WhNanttt 8 

-12 


W Canon 16 


206 

209 

210 
212 

213 

214 
217 


WMnB)J Bostey 5-62 

M Ryan 661 

A Ingham 660 


620120 BRIDGE STREET LADY 
00-0040 BARRACK 5TRHET 
610300 PRECIOUS METAL I 
000000 YOUNG MCA (C-D) (J Boswatt) L 
122004 TYROLUE (D)(LfldyD'Avigdor-GoWsm«J) N Vigors 4-611 
010-001 MYRA'S SPECIAL fa) (Mrs J Siegsn J Sutdrfte 3-8-10 __ 
033000 AMEGMN0 (C) (Dp*) (J Watson) M McCourt 664 

xaiA MANX (D) (Bar Equument ( 


Blansftanj 6-63 

WNmuS 
GStaikay 14 
P Robinson 9 
_ R Corant 2 
6613 I Johnson 4 


4.10 FEDERATION OF BRITISH RACING CLUBS NURSERY 
HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £2^75: 51) (8) 

502 2011 KYVEMMLE (D) (M George) M Ryan 67 P Robinson 7 

503 321220 ABSOLUTION BJIJC Wn^Q K Brassey 92 SWhttwortbB 

020022 JA1SALMB1 (B) (D) (BF) (Lady Scon) D Bswralh 60 W R Snmbumi 

2200 JAH BLESS (Mia M AndBrson) P Haynes 612 B Thomson 6 

303111 MUKHABBR (H AM4akkmm) C Bonstoad 68 (7og WCano>3 

14 VIVA ROMM (C-D) (J Li) Pgi MttChfiU 60 LRteno(7]2 

000 WNEBi LASS (Mraan LKQ M BnUaki 7-12 KD*1ey5 

034 SPARKLMG BflnT {BF) (Mrs J Douglas) C Kogan 7-11 A Proud 1 


505 

506 

509 

510 

511 

512 


Goodwood results 


Going; good 
2J0(lm) 1. WMSKY(G Starkey. 62): 2. 
Plct u g np h (Pa Eddery. 1S8jt-fav); 3. 
Fhhoaefp Cook. 61). ALSO RAN: 15-8 
p-fcv Local Steer (4jft). 6 Steeple Bel. 

2VJ.3L 31. 10LG Harwood at Pufcorot 

Tok £370: £1.40. £170. DF: £6.00. C 

£1264. 1nm42-68sec. 


10 pjp . StLEHTMAJOWtr (R Carter. 


64tav1 , 

3. Jackie Bair (J Leech. 12-1). 

RAN; 7-2 Muse Machine. 5 Duffer's 
Dancer (4th). 6 CMole(SlhJ. 10 Capubtity 
Pound. She Knows h Afl, 12 First 
Experience. 33 Snared (6«i). 10 ran. Nk. 
nk, nk. 4l 1L W O'Goimro at Newmarket 
Toter £2-50. £1.60. £3.70. £6.10. DF: 
£2870 CSF: £21.46. Tncest £175.19. 
Iran 0ia9sec. 


330(71)1. INVITED GUEST (S Cauthen, 

4-t); 2. Goidea Brod (P« Eddery, 61k 3. 
kww (W R Swmtium. 4-5 fav). ALSO 
RAN: 6 Neale (4th). 25 Candle In The 
«8nd.40 My knagawiion pBfl. 6 ran. 2W. 


a. 2L W. sh hd. R Armstrong at 
“ I.70.E253.DF: 


NewntarteLTott: £438, £1.70, 

E1330L CSR £28.15. Iran 3047aeC- 
4 l 0 (1m 4ff 1. ALDMO(M Roberts. 16 
1L 2. Daigadlyr (W R SwrOum. 4-lt 3. 
Ptyrnooth Hoe (Par Eddery. 61 fav). AL80 
RAN: 7-2 Kathy w (630, 13-2 Misaaff. 10 
Team |5ftL 20 Pounelta (4thL 7 ran. lOL 
lid. 3L 4. flL A Stewart at Newmarket 
Tote: £2470. £1.70. DF: £2690. CSF: 
£44j7.2ran3883sec. 

430 (1m) 1, DARING DOONE 


tavt 3. HeMta (Pat Eddary. 4-1). , 


E (M 

Ftabera.1 1-IL 2^Sk*an (G StarkejfJW 


RAN: 7-2 Sunda^Ctwnes (8thL 4_Bto 


220 0-00010 GLEN 


, S Dawson 1 
RlfitelO 


64 Mukhabbr, 4-1 Kyverdate, 61 AbsoJutior, 61 Jasaknor. 161 Jah Bless, 

4.40 SHIPS DECANTER STAKES (3-Y-O: £2,758: 1m) (4) 

602 1-4004 CROMWBJ. PARKJB) (G MR^ M Ryan 98 PRaMraanl 

603 030000 WEST CARRACK (Exors S Ctom) A Ingham 68 RCwant4 

E (FR) (A Balzartnn M Janus 


604 323002 DANCMG EAGLE (FH) (A BNzartnf) M . 


i 9-3. 


WR 


K Barley 15 


t Co Ltd) J Fax 662 (Sex) 

JWKnsG 

221 0-01410 IRISH COOKIE (D) (Lord Matthews) I Matthews 461 GKckSe7 

222 0-00003 CRONICS OUAUTY (Crank Garues Lid) Q Lews 67-12 R Fax 3 

224 233203 FORMATUNE(BU (A Sofronmi) D Aftxjtnnot 4-7-8 RStnw! T7 

225 030000 EXERT (BMPHB Hager) RAkahunt 4-7-7 N Mam 13 


606 12-000 BiTRANCWG (C) (Lavvia DiKhess of Norfotti) J Droiop 62 n W Caracn 3 
7-4 Cromwd Park. 61 Entr an cing. 62 Dancing Eagle. 61 West Carrack. 


5.10 COWDRAY STAKES (2-Y-O: £2.658: 7f) 01) 


4-1 Our Jock. 61 Myra's Special, 61 Formatune, 61 Crank's Oueflty, M an imstar. 
161 Amigo Loco, 12-1 Aneghina. Glen Kefla Manx. Tynotts, 14-1 others. 


FORM: MANMSTAR (60) beat compleat (67) Kl over course and (fistance PREOOUS 
METAL |63] 2^1 back 5th (£4877, good to Ann, f 
31.1 3rd r "*■ 


4) naad 

' JOCK (612) 1*1 5tfi to Green Rul 


(612) In the Stewards' Cup here 
. -4 ) belted (64. £37825, good. July 29. 24 
MANX (60) beat Hidden Brief (612) 1KI at Brighton next time (6f. 


AMEGtflNO 186) and GLEN KELLA MANX 
rani. GLEN KBIa 


1 

2 

3 

4 
6 
8 

10 

14 

15 

16 
22 


i Mohammed) H Oectt 63. 
' )J Dunlap 611. 


t Lid) C Horgan 611. 


. W Ryan 11 
-TOum 1 
13 


ARTRIL DODGER (FR) (SmWi Mohammad) W Hern 611 W Crown 8 

CHARTTY DAY (J Dunlop) J Dunlop 611 WR9mnbum2 

0 HOLLYWOOD NAN (Mrs R Bowes) S Meter 61 1 1 Johnson 7 

44 LOVE TRAM (V) 04 Oberstein)D Lakig 611 S Whitworth 10 

RAWOM ROVER (CAM (R Bonmrinte) B HUs 611 B Thomson 6 

0 REEF OF GOLD (Capl M Lerws) M Brtrain 611 PRoUw»4 

WHTTSTABLE (lBA)”iA SpoeXnan) G Harwood 611 G Starkey 5 

GOOOMGHT MASTER (A RueseQ A Moors 8-8 HCucutg 


84 Hendeka, 7-2 Artful Dodger, 61 Reef Of Gold, 61 LowTtaiTi.VVhltBtable.161 
Angel City. 161 Random Rover, 161 Charity Day, 261 others. 


NEWMARKET 


ii 


1 SAFETY PMJD) (Lord Porcheswr) W Hasdngs-Bass 
LUCRATF (FH) (Mrs J McDougan) 


Televised: 1^0, 2.0, 2^0 

Going: good 
Draw: no advantage 

1.30 'MAIL ON SUNDAY* HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £4,259: 7f) (14 runners) 

2 011212 RNSTHIPE (DJfflF) (M Jays) R J WBams 67 Thnt12 

161000 KING OF SPADES (Aran fndusvns) N Vigors 62 P Cook 10 


Oil EMSTra i (D) (Mrs M Btgnskie) M Camacho 88 (7ex). 
— 1MCK (SanOnoor TaxMes) M H Easterby7-11 


3 

5 

7 

8 
9 

11 

13 

15 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 


JReitf 14 


631000 VAGUE LASS (J Rose] W Wharton 94). 

102043 AMBROSUU (USAXO) (A Krtslman) M Jarvis 611 

206312 RASWHH1.(B)1D)CBF) (G Hughes) WJarvq 610- 

00034 SOMETHING CASUAL mmufiF) (Mrs C Btetsoe) A Hxto 610 RGuwt2 

011-000 AFRICAN REX (FH)(J RatWte) W Jarvis 67 M HRs 5 


10 
14 
;5 

17 121311 SPITTM 
19 12 NAIVE CHARM 

21 0231 FOUH LAFFSfA 

9-4 Enetein, 7-2 Lucratif. 62 
SHuattor, 161 Tough N Gentle, 12-1 
FORM: MOST WELCOME 
(61. £3477, 

beat LAST . .. 

GOING SITUATION p 


) I Batfng 61 . 


MHEastarbyi 
R Roes 7-9. 

7-7. 



Mick, 61 Clear Her Stage, 61 Ongoing 
■ Pm, 161 others. 


P Hutton (7) 1 
RCochrro* 9 


AVE PS*KDS (Mrs W Taylor} R Armstrong 64_ Al 

310042 CARIBBEAN SOUtto (D)(BF) (Mrs C Brstan) C Bnitan 64 TMral 

400002 MAJOR JACKO (J Homan) R Hannon 63 B Rovae 8 

003411 NH)S EXPRESSA (D) (N Jones) C Tinkler B-3 (6ex) M Wood 13 

000230 BON ACCUEH. U Ross) H WMmg 61 — 3 

PERSIAN DEUGHT (A / 


BST WELCOME (60) 41 mUan wMnar here from Cape VWd (60). winner since 
’. good. Aug 2, 12 ranL MOON INDIGO last of 7 latest start (61). earlier (611) 
T DANCE (8-1 link at Sandown fit. £4201, good to firm. July 4. 8 ran). ON- 

j. ...... jt- ... . « Pontefract (&. &S70. 

_ . . _ . . _ iM winner trexn Ghanayim (8- 

l)(6f. £991. good. Ji4y2B. 14 ranL SAFfiTY PIN ]61lT unchallenged for 41 Doncaster 
' " 18 ran). LUCRArtF (66) bear Micro 

r26. 7 ranL EmSTTOi (611) much 

_ . lut»r (8-5) (6f, £41 17. good. Aug 9. 

0 ranL improved setting plater SPfTTM IMCX (69) scored 4ih wm of the season m a 
head from Domino Rosa (6(Q in Notbn^wn nursery (5f, £1506. good to Em, July 28. 7 
ranL 

Sele ction : EB4STEM 


i ii |di. uii, odd a. iiincn. in mu. wuxi » nn it r 

deteai ol Othet (60) (61. E21 39^aood to firm, July 3d. 1 
Lore (67)1 »l 81 Warwick ;J5f. E3M2. good » firm. Ji4 
Improved when 5 lengths Redcar winner from Gay's F 


40-21 


ri utter 7-12.. 


I Cambean! 

(67) here with SOMEnSNG CASUAL (6 


AMackmrr 

060 SMILING BEAR (USA) (M EpStaai) W Hastings-Bass 7-12- Dale Gtaou (f) 6 

61 Emerald Wave. 62 Raisinhefl. 61 Pinstripe, Something Casual. 7-1 Neds 
Express*. 6i Persian Dekght 161 Ma|or Jacko. 12-1 Cambean Sound. 14-1 others. 
FORM: PINSTRIPE (60) VI &id to Then 
m ll back 3rd (8f. £ii92i. good to firm, 

Black Sophie (8-1 1) at Brighton (71. £3013. 
runner-up to Raja Moutma (61 1) « Catterick 

WAVE behind last (roe. prt 

£3666. firm. July 16. 14 ranL 

(61, £2792, good. Aug15. 16 
1J t W at Redcar (7t. £2784. good. Aug 8. 7 ran). SMILING BEAR (94)) 51 Gth to Royal Loft 
1-11) at Doncaster (61 mdn. £851. good. Now 8. 19 ranL 
1 CASUAL 


3 J) LAGRANGE SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O: El ,626: 1m 41} (9} 


19, 11 ran). AMBROSN (67) 3KI 3rd to 

in. Aua 0, 7 ran). RA18UBCLL (63) head 
(7f, £884. firm. June 6, 13 ran). BliRALD 



2 000330 CHERRY LUSTRE (B Stevens) B Stevens 611 

3 000 RRST SUMMER (B) (K Flacheri M Jarvis 8-11 

4 00-00 JOKBI MAN (BlfP Rshor) K tmssw 611 

5 460003 NO STOPPING (B) (BF) (Ll Cd J Deacon] R Hannon 811 

6 060300 GAY APPEAL (A Larsson) C Nateon 8-8, 

7 030000 LAST POLONAISE 

8 090040 USAKaTY(M 

10 0 NOT SO SHARP (Cap! 

12 068 VENUS SAGA (MSP I 

7-4 No Stopping. 61 
Saga 12-1 FraSummer. 14-' 



fT Swutman) M Btensfard 88. 
M McCourt 68- 


G Sexton 5 


Buteer-Long) P Hasten 88- 
Curd) Mrs J Reewey84‘ 


R WtmbamZ 
- TMknl 
B C n u wa l y 7 


61 CHeny Lustre. 61 Last Potontesa Venus 


Newmarket selections 

Ely Mandarin 

1-30 Smiling Bear. 10 Ibn Bey. 2.30 Einstein. 3.0 Gay AppeaL 3.35 
Green Veil. 4.5 Forflite. 4.40 Captain's Bidd. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
1 .30 Pinstripe. 2.0 Lauries Warrior. 2.30 Most Welcome. 3.0 Not So 
Sharp- 3.35 Green VeiL 4.5 Roman Beach. 4.40 Stoneydale. 

By Michael Seely 

2.50 Einstein. 4.40 CAPTAIN'S BIDD (nap). 


£35 M1DW1CH THAME MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O. £3,762: 61) (9) 

2 

4 


0 GREEN VEIL 
0 KMG 


00 LYRICAL 


(Sr R McNpfne) G Wragq 60. 
AWJard) J Hndey 68r 


G DaflMdl 
_ Mm2 


BC Bens tead9-0 

muwm (H Ai-MaktoiroiP Watwyn 6CBB 
SffiATgRwher) M « 


.BRounS 


GWragg60, 


160. 


0 NEARLY GREAT 

a PomENTOus 

00 TECMfOCRAT 

RUW1 VALLEY (H Serrate) P Hasten 611 


Paul EildteyS 
Tire* 3 


ATumeaWL 


oooo SONS (HSaundarstJaidger 611 


„ G Saxton 4 
. RWHwC 
TWUamaS 
— DMdory7 


1341 Groan VeU. 5-2 Portantoua, 9-2 LyrlcN Low. 13-2 Nearly Great, 161 Semis. 
161 others. 


4 JS STANLEY HOUSE HANDICAP (£4,006: 1m) (9) 


2.0 DANEPAK BACON STAKES (2-Y-O: £9,068: 1m) (6) 


3101 BRAVE DANCER (G Zandona)G Harwood 9-2 
021211 LAURIES WARRIOR 


til LAURIES WARRIOR JL James) R Boss 62 

01 PUNTA CALAHONDA (D Faukner) N Bycroft 611 . 

0 BIN SHADQAO (USA)" (A M Jaftaf 

IBN BEY (F Salman) P Cola 88. 

002332 LACK A ! 


IBN BEY JF Salman)! 

» STYLE (BF) (T Ramsden) A Batey 88 . 


ACIaifcl 
_ J Raid 2 
.PCaokS 
That 


. GDafWd5 
1 CoctwM 4 


| C Bonstead *-9-7. 


080210 ALQMIUSA 

11044 MY KIND OF TOWN (CJ (A rtwWt) R J WHafflS 34 
000001 nJSAJSl(n(R Richards} CBriran 4-66 {5ekL«. 

2-1030 TOP WING (K AFSaid) J rtteSy 665 

080004 ROMAN BEAOI AM (R Cattfiam] W MB9M 863- 
030 NORTH OCEAN (USA) (S Fradltofl) L Cumani 3-62 


.BRooral 
T htei 5 


0102 TRAVH. MAGIC (Mrs M Maddro) B HaNwry 66 
31 FORFUTE (USAMpi (R GoOteD) 0 DOUflb 6613, 
0-40000 DUHLonwG [R ustein) G Pmcharp-Gordon 3-8 


60- 


TWStenS 
™ MHHIS2 
MWtatenr 
_ R Gusat 4 
J Retd 6 


G Pntchart-Gorton 6612. 


Frol Eddary 9 
— GtMMD3 


5-a Brave Dancer, 61 Lauries warrior. 61 Bin Shaddad, Punta Calahonoa. 12-1 

Km Bey. Lack A Style 


7-2 ForfKe. 4-1 Travel Magic. 61 Fus&er. My Kind Of Town, 61 AMrm. 161 Top 

Wing- Nor* Ocean. 12-1 Roman Beach. 14-1 Ouniamg. 


FORM BRAVE DANffiR (60) bMl Hig jughnffis (60) 41 at Salisbury (7f, £5654. 

motors Mate 


4.40 BERESFORD HANDICAP {£2,071: 5f) (12) 


Aug 14. 7 ranL LAURIES WARRIOR (66) easy 81 winner from Otore Mate (66) m I 
ton nursery (71, £4534. good to firm. Aug 5. 6 i*B|. PUNTA CALAHONDA (611) beat 
LACK A STYLE (6 11) head » Ayr (71. £2485. good. Aug 5, 5 ranL BIN SHADDAD (60) 


4\i 5th to Arabian (71, £3919, good. Aug 1. 14 ran). 


setecttBRiLAURSSi 


2.30 PHILIP CORNES NICKEL ALLOYS NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y- 
0: £10,316: 6f) (12) 


108002 STONEYDALE 8)) (J CresswettlN CaQaghsi 4^-10. 

680000 FUCCMI (0) Ui DonaU»n) R Armstrong 4-68 

000003 DAV1LL ©) fC Blaekweil) J Wlnser 4-6< 

100440 FOOUSH TOUCH (B) (D) (M Chandto) K Stone ' 


. GDuflMdS 


AMetUomll 

Tires 4 


141/400 PRINCESS WENDY (D) (A Smith) NB 
MM UttfiSATA (G Greenwood) A Tumrtl 


4-8-1 . 
10 


. CDwyarG 
M HDQer 2 


R Wearer 10 


1 MOST WELCOME (6D)(EMoter)G 

0100 MOON INDIGO (Bl (R Refunds) C Britten 

042312 LAST DANCE (J Norman) R Hannan 60- 

01312 ONGOING SITUATION (Mrs W McAkree) D 

712312 TOUGH N GENTLE (USAJff]) (S FW) L 


67." 


613. 
60 

31 CLEAR HER STAGE (Q) (Mra J StsjaO J SuxcMMa 88 


Paul Eddery 10 

GOutiieMfi 

Jfldd9 


B RewM 12 
RCodnmS 
.. T W me 4 


100000 FARMER JOCK (B) (0) (Mra N Macaiiey) Mra N Macaulay 4-68 

Paal Eddery 12 

080000 SANCtUAfln (Mrs C Dskson) R Akehuttt 3-66.——™— R McGMn 3 

100680 SKYLWlfe (Mrs JTjnelJrt* J Reevey3-65 BCraaaieyt 

0004 MOZARTjELodMBHanbury 38-4 ^ ^ M HMs 7 

623040 FHHIOHT BOTJDXBR (M<W 5 C Jjmea 4-64 B Rouse 1 

020414 CAPTAW'SMDO(d)(H renting) HWhitmg 68-1 * Woods (3) B 


62 Foolish Touch, 61 Fremont Boy. 4-1 Stoneydale, 61 Mozart 61 PucctoL 12*1 
Capiams 8Md. 14-1 others. 


Khatoun (483. 1* Ekwerica. SO Al 
Zahwa. Gtode (5tM. Popthom. 9 ran. 1)H. 
4i i. L ll. 2L A Stewran at Newmarket 
Tate. £1220; £3.00. £1.46 £1.40. DF: 
£24 80 CSF: £3361. 1m in 435388C. 

5L0(Bt) 1. MUMMYTS LUCK (Pat Eddery. 
4-5 lav): Z Trojan Mta(W Carson. 7-2): 3, 
S8» Hope (WR Swmbum. 11-3- ALSO 

RAN; 4 Home Device (4th). 12 Always A 

Lady (Ml- 16 Lady's Mantta (5th). 30 
Treble Top. 33 Gold Minone*. B ran. St) 

hd. 1KL 71 m 2. R Hannan « 


MariborauglL Tote £350: £120. £1.40. 

£120. DK r - — 


£3.60. CSF: £525. 1mm 

15.08SO& 

Jeekpob not wen. Ptacepob E57JKL 

Newmarket 


Going: good 


2.15 (7Q 1. DRESS M SPfUNG (M 
r. 361); 2. OcBge fl^Rpttnson,36 


Rjmmer, __ 

It 3. Steepfine Duchess (G Carter, 161 
ALSO RAN: 7-2 fav Jotanstan Boy. 5 St 
Dreaming. 6 My Cup Of Tea, 7 Dorsde 
(fthL 162 Som An' Dance Man, 10 
fhghisnd Tale (Sh). Naughty Nighty. 14 
Anthony Gerard. IBWindmgPato.aOMan 
In The Moon. 13 ran. KL 2*1. sh hd. a *1. 
G Bfcmi at Newmarket Tote: £69.70: 
£1820. E&50. £3.10. DF: £153 8a CSF: 
£682.79. Tricast: £11,87088. Imin 
2822S8C. No bxL 

245 (70 1. ROMAN GUNNER fP 
Robmson. 3-1 tevt 2. Arden (W Ryan, 7- 
1): 3. EktckraMaN tugi (G Outfield: 261). 


(4th). 12 In 

Brentano. 


RAN: 6 Slip Cteior, 10 Glor y Line. 

xJ Chanter 


„ ^ Wood 

Iritama De Cast&e. Jack Straw, 14 

_ Mr Carman. Surf Board. 20 

Dancer To Foaow. ra^tand Land, James 
Stanley, (ted Timber (Gth). 16 ran. NR: 
Milan Fair. KL W. 1L II. 2. G Wregg at 
Newmarket Tote £4.10: £120. SZ60, 

£2220- OR £3220. CSF: £2481. Imin 

2&58sec. 


118 (1 m 6f 171yd) 1. VINTAGE PORT (T 
Oumn, 15-2); 2, Ben’s Bbdte (A Madcey. 
25-1t 3. Very Storclal |R MomTid). 


Ssfi_RANB:;64 fav Run H^pth). 4 


13-2 Dhoni, 7 Agatfnst. 
25 Kingswtck. 9 ran. 2L 


Prmce 

12 

nk. 1L 21 1L 
£5.30: £1.60. £4.10. £220. 
CSR £13050. 3mfai IBBGsec. 


« Epsom. Tate 
. DRE8820. 


645 (60 1. HALLGATE (J Reid, 7-4 faj 


2. Treasure Kay (B Thomson, 64V 3, 
“ :. 11-2). ALSO RASk 12 


FNeor 


te (T hres 

(5th). 12 Hidden Brief (Bth). 18 
Charge Along (4th), 25 Sh Tire One Out 7 
rm. »L 5L a hd. 5L Miss S Hail at 
MkJdtoham. Tote £3.10; £1.9a £1 .10. DR 
£4.00. CSR £5 j 4& Iran 1233BK. 


4.15 (SQ 1. CATHERINES WELL ^(G 


(RFox. 1 


Carter. 1611 fav): 2. 

3. Dream Chaw . 

RAN: 5 Dark Promise (etn) 


(L Jobns«y ._ 20-1^ 


Margam (5 th). 16 Crete Cargo. Merdon 

Melody (4th). 40 Jousdng BoyrMuhtarta. 9 
ran. 1L 1W. 3L 2*1.1 W. M W Easwtiy at 


Easwrtiy . . 

Shemiff Hutton. Tote: £1.90: £1.10, £3.10, 

£4.00. DR £8^0. CSR £746 lute 

14.40soc. 


4«45 
How Ii 


)1.(B9toHIZ 

Tl 


ALSO RAN: 13-2 Mftry Attacte. 


% 


Moore Brass Wh). 25 Grand Tar. (6th). 
(w4.7rm 1KL3L l.dd-ht, 


Super Lunar{ 

3L L PiggotL Tote. £1.70: £120. £220. 

£420. CSR £527. Info 
16.46STO. PtacefMC £27920 


Bangor 


Going: good to firm 


22 (2m eh) 1. Crtep And Keen fK 
T-ILS. 


Dootan. 11-4); 2. Parson's Pnd* 


Postdate (161). Athens Star (7*4 
ll. 7 ran. Nft Steve * 


O, 


Bracken. K 
Tote: £3.80: £1^0. £2.00. DR £5660. 
CSF: £20.99. 

220 (2m hdfe) 1. Headin’ On (A 
O'Hagen. 5^ fawk 2. Mondsra Trophy 
(14-1E3, HakwredtU-l). 3t 31. 1 1 ran. M 
WEcfiS. Toa- £3.40: £1.50. £m£S.70. 
DF: £13). £3m £5.70. DF: £3850. CSF: 
£37.10. 


10 (3m eh) 1. Sprats KB (M Dwyer, 5-2 
fav); Z Snob Value (12-1); 3. Gray Rose- 
Bey (261). liy. 101. 11 ran. Jimmy 


Bey (261). 

Fogareld. Tote £220: £t.10. £3-1! 
£4 (67 OF: £24.70. CSF: £2767. 

3J0 
Crank. 

Simon 

Oakland Jason. D McCain. Tow £2.60; 
£1 JO. £120. DF: £2 40. CSF: £5.73. 

4J)( 2m hife) 1. Adaantown(M Ptenan. 


£24)5. 

4L30 (2m 4t Rdte) Taraogrera 8est(P 


3. Moment (61) 3. 71. (fist 5 ru. R _ 

Peacock. Tote £150: £1.10. £250. DF: 

£2.70. CSF: £885. Ptacepob £1630. 


NEWCASTLE 


Going: good to soft 
Draw: no advantage 

1.45 ACOMB APPRENTICE HANDICAP (£1,518: 
1m) (20 runners) 

3 8003 BEUABANUStCWBWASlNttWWnW^ . 

4 -213 HBUO GYPSY (DJCTTnktar 665 -W Goodwin SlS 

7 0401 TRADE MGH IWAers 7-63 (Sex) RWckwWM 

8 1000 RAPIO ACTION (QGM Moore 562 DCaseymS 

9 2020 GOLD CMP JWWtttt 362. AGonaMfijl 

10 2022 O > OVST0N (C-0) JB*ny 1061 JCanML(3)B 

11 0310 HEAVBILYHDOI%R(D) Denys Santth 360 

ANhenjmX 

N Leach (G 18 


2.45 NORTHBW HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £5.781: 1m) 

(9 

3 608 CHMTBiDfHnfflIG Hutlro67 BMerffll 

12 24TI CANADIAN STM GB(D)MJante 7-8 (4^^^^^^ 

14 am BOLD SEA ROVER MHEsttartiy 78 MRyS 

15 0310 TAYIORMAOEBOY (OP) Deny* SnNh 7-7 _ 

18 BOB GOIJCT ANCONA EBdte 7-7 

18 04M S UFHEM: KWODOMH IIOll n « h eed7-7 A Pu ihre n (7)2 
64 Canadian Star. 62 BoM See Rover. 62 Taytomade 
Bay. 61 Ctwrhno, 161 Gaktan Ancons; 


3.15 THOMAS LONSDALE GALLAGHER 
HANDICAP (£4,454: 1m 2Q (13) 


12 0000 SMELE HAND (C) D Chepmro WM3 ~ N 

13 1240 LITTLE NEYrtNGTON (D) N Bycnjft 5612 

MRttMnaiR 

14 3220 MAWDLYN GATE BQJSIMson 8612 

Mfiw niinntti 

17 4440 znra’imfqMaCuo^^ 

Ji4iBwkv(9|il 

19 0324 SHARON'S ROYALER Wlitalar 368- KftwMwwT2 

20 4010 8ALNB»40(D)^) Derive Smte> 368 PW(3)4 

22 0000 C2LSSANDRA l SDI«MRHIMakar564 

pfl X3 

23 080 GOOD N SHARP GCWrert 682 — .NMg(ri»tf 

24 0000 UL1RGSSAM(CMqSNaiHa362^— JOeln7 
26 0220 'OUMJTABttSSWK Slone 460 — i — PBteta) 


1 Sill HANDLEBAR OH JWWWts <*612. NOMMMUenl 

3 3333 OOLDW FANCY IWcMrs 662 RVtakm(7)7 

S 3040 PEARL RSHER (USAMn J RancoiM 8612 MBttChS 


PEARL FBHER RBAMIQJ FrancoiM 8612 

8 9001 LAKMO(D| JnrtyRt 2 giraid 4611 — R Brown (7) W 

9 3240 ORES) D«W SiMttl 6611- LCteroockS 

10 3834 FOREMAST PClNar 866 M Fry 12 


Z7 4000 MASTER MUSK M BnttNO 67-11 . 
MANIX TClMf 67-11 . 

.abumpEri 


20 MM 
SO 0000 


a 


IBS 


F1U-J 


I R HoAosheed 4-7-11 _ A 


13 4D41 HOtCSTTDtt-R VHh4Nnr368S>A.^ PMeHse—4 
W 2911 SPMNQFUOHTffM AJantt867pM). DMtahH 

17 0000 COMMON RMM MBiUn 886 SWetwte 3 

18 0101 B0toARCHnmUFMtare|D»60(My884I.- 

CMlf( 

20 DM BOYNTO N W W BBey 6742- 

2 t oooo icncoMQpi8RtoaDMed42-n 

- - ACMhMW(7)9 

84 088 SANTOPAIJRE(BF)W Storey 4-76 - — JOa«n(S)* 
61 Bold Archer, 61 Spring FNM. LaWno.7-1 Honest Ted. 
61 Hartoeteer. Goktan Fancy. 10-1 Foremast. SenBto***. 




7-2 Help Gyp^^l O I Oystoa 61 Bate Banus. Trade 


High. 61 Mawotyn Gate. 161 Bainanno, Gold Chip. 


Newcastle selections 


By Mandarin 

1.45 0 1 Oyston. 2.15 Bad Payer. 2.45 Canadian 
Star. 3.15 Bold Archer. 3.45 Bold Fury. 4.15 
Sbergor. 

By Our Newmaricet Correspondent 
2.(5 Just One More. Z45 Canadian Stir. 3.45 
Bold Fury. 4-15 Pokey’s Pride. 


145 GALLOWGATE SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£1,383; 6Q (16) 

1 0002 ALLEXANJ0«3AJrottsM_ ! DlflcMtalO 

2 2 BOLD FURY ( BP? F ttate m 612 G French 12 

8 4000 DUKE OF MOJ- Tl ira Pl P Rohan »12 S Atari* 14 


5 080 MOLOCH «K Stone 612*^ 

6 nn MOTOR MASTER W Pesrea 612. 


, LCtenmcfcO 


8468 TBW^M MBg |WcfcsBl6g. 


, HConiarienU 
. S Webster B 


2.15 ARMADA NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: 
£2,031:51) (13) 

1 120 FULL OF PRIDE 


13 3011 COOPBt RACING NAIL (C D) J Bany 8-9 

ACamKIDH 

18 0000 H0B0UHHE5 KATE R HoEnsbead 8-9_—. SPnksI 

17 08» HKPOIIAI. BUNRISE M WEaatety 69 T Lucre 3 

18 0000 MARSHALL MELS RVfTXtakar 86 > ACMhene(7)t1 

19 0000 MSS BLAKE MBrttn 88 — MBnb13 

20 0040 MUSIC TEACtgR (P) A M Robeon 69— J It— itM* 4 

22 2330 PUNCLE CREAK G M Moore 69 D Casey (7) 4 

24 0000 SISTER NANCY GOWroyd 69 G Brown 2 

25 0000 SPRMG QAR0SI (0} N uainberiHi 69. KHedgneT 

28 -000 VITAL STEP TFaraufst 80 MMmrerS 


2 0304 BRUTUS (D)JS 

r ONE MORE E Bdki 88 


5 4040 JUST I 


M H EMarby 67- 
“92. 


— . MBbcbl 
M Roberta 10 

6 0200 FIRMLY ATTACHED T Barron 80 L. N%w13 

7 040 AMOrmSI SEASON « Denys SroRi 88. DNkhofc*4 

8 0108 ABTBULMAP(D)HSAttlb»67 SPtafa7 

9 2241 SPANISH SUPPER D) <D)WHaigh 87 JH Brown « 3 

12 3121 BAD PAYERffll M W toHtetay 63 GCaitarHl 

14 2403 UWAC NORTH MG 


62 Bold Fury. 61 Goopsr Rscng NM. 62 Ataxarw. 11-2 
l r. 61 Marshal Drflk, 161 Punde Creak. 


Motor Master. 


4.15 NEWGATE MASEN STAKES (£t^66: 1m 41 
60yd) (7) 


I MOORE (B) 


I Bny 82 

MCaremtenTI 

15 1080 nwows ADDITION (D)K suns 61 -.LCharoecfc 9 

18 1033 PASW HA (C-DX BF) TFTOIrest61 ! TlteJiMi (T) TT 

17 100 THEGRMilTONfflf R WNtakar 61 DdcKwroi« 

18 0000 P£NBREA8Y R Kobrwtxsacl 60 n (TJ II 


HH MA(C6M BF)TFroirest61 4 CM 
GRANrtT0frmfRWMBkar61__ E 

BREAST RHMtaahead 88 Ai 

11-4 Sportah sapper. 61 Futt Of Pride. 62 Bad Parer. 61 
Unpac North Moor. 72 Pashniina. 10-1 Bratus. 


2 KARAKTER REFERENCE A Juris 4-96 _ DNkhata 1 

3 046 AUERSBERGW Storey 363 SWebfteT 

5 -423 HKSH KNOWLB HHs363 CRutHr(3)4 

8 8220 POKEY’S PWDE fi Sheether 363 HNnreS 

.10 O SBteRATE LIVES WPowoe 683 HCMrerionB 

11 SHERGOR^FgH Cedi 3-63 NDayS 


13 2330 TAPW 


i RMA) M Jarwte 38-3.- ML1homae2 


1611 Shargor, 72 Tap 'em Twtee.-4-l High KnoWt 61 
Pokey’s Pride, 161 Auwsberg. 161 oSnre. 


WINDSOR 


to soft 


6.15 NEL BRITANNIA NURSERY HANDICAP 

(2-Y-O: £2,905: 6Q (12) 

2 143 SNALMAGMTH(BnH1)»meonJones67AMriRlsy4 

..... 6 Barer t! 


Draw: 5f-6f, high numbers beat 

=JjP, 


41 (D^JOirity 60. 


5J5EBF GREAT PARK STAKES (2-Y-O: £1 ^72: 61) 
(20 runners) 


i 

3 

T 

6 

9 

11 

12 

13 

15 

17 

IB 

21 

22 

25 

27 

28 
32 

34 

35 
37 


1 CRY FOR THE CLOWN (D) A Batey 841 R 

31 HOHAPA (DIM BrManS-4 K 

Q. REY W Hastings-Bass B-11 R 

FLOPETM McCormack 611 

O RJJTEAUjUSM M SWUW611 A Ktataerixy 2 

00 HOME £STA P Haynes 611 ANteay5 


04 UBRAN8TARH 


B 2034 BOfrii FREE AGAIN ®) L Piggott 613^ R Cochrare t 

9 31 JOVICK ffi) G Laris 6T> P.CrelcS 

10 4114 OBEY ta BtF-no at MR Hannon 613 LJenw(B)W 

12 0314 I0B»N PRESS (OlDAltMhnat 88 JHeMS 

16 322 MISS 1SLVEAGH A Beiey 61 ,AJGmO)l 

18 0303 xmt EDCE P Mrichel 7-12 Q Carter (3 n 

19 0024 BLOFFA P Cundel 7-10 ; J Lowe 7 

23 0001 JABE MAC J Hdt 76 HMkmZ 

2S 3304 REMAM FRS (B) C N WKsns 7-7 RStaM(S)3 

28 2400 SARASOTA RAkNUSt 7-7 TtMttwwi 


611. 


BTARHCrody 

LOW OF CANEWDONA MOOTS 611 

00 MONTYS GUNNER R Braztagnn 841 

■ MINUS J □ouglas-HanH61T 

SAN JUAN S»K3B Stevens 611 


SUfVH MOI N Vigora 611 

ATE P MaUn 611 . 


« SUPREME STAT 



11*4 ChMbmg. 7-2 Javick. 61 Rsnaknaghitti, 11-2 Bom- Fire* 
“1 Ktoron Prees, 14-1 oflwre. . * 


Again. 61 Gray WteffTTger, 161 , 


6.45 BRITANNIA ARROW HANDICAP (E3.06& 1m 
3f 150yd) (8) 


000 WttIT FARM BOY P Cundsfl 611 . 
AUfflE SYBIL J Francome 88. 

2 DEAR GLB6U (BfJ M Pipe 88. 


OCMAXERE N Vigors 88- 

GThomer88_ 


S Dawson 20 

■ pUy— B 

RUSMANWALTZ (USA) R Armstrong 88— _ — U 
TAIANA (FR) J Durtop i-R Q Baxter 12 


4 202D FOLK DANCE I Bridm 444 

8 0040 THE FOOTMAN RStuBbS 4-613 

9 610 PBItSUH KNtOHT W MuOQn *8-11 

11 1223 DIVA ENCORE R Ajmnrcrx) 3-8-9— 

12 2000 PUR8Y J Tatter 588 


. PGqakt 

— A Mercer 4 

■JWEI 


0 POLLAN BAY G 
0 RUSSIAN WALTZ 


13 2lte WELSH MEOLfrDHeyrin Jones 488D 

14 3200 MnSALAnS Norton 


16 0000 HOOH JESTER M Ustwr 67-7. 


. WCtaere3 

— _l(T)8 
. JLewe7 


. DMdtayf 


7-2 NorapSL 4-1 Tatana. 61 Bureau. 61 Linn Star. 61 
Russian Waite. 161 Suhfaz Moi. B Ray. 14-1 otters. 


„ 3-1 Encore, 7-2 Fata Dance. 62 Pubby. 6i Pertekm 
KnighL 61 Mn BatadL 161 WMsh Med tay, 161 others. 


Windsor selections 

By Mandarin 
5.25 Libran Star. 5.50 Mind The Time. 6.15 
Jovick. 6.45 Diver Encore. 7.15 Topeka Express. 
7.45 Lyphlaw. 

By Qur Newmarket C or respondent 
5.25 Cry for the Gown. 5.50 Nice Present (US 
Ibnalmaghith. 6.45 Diva Encore 7.15 Topeka 
Express. 7:45 Bananas. 


7.15 BRITANNIA UNIT TRUSTS HANDICAP 

(E2.673: 1m 70yd) (15) 

5 04» COUNTRY GENTLEMAN (BP) J Duteop 367 

W Canoe M 

^ 860 DRAGONARA BOY W KMOnge-BBSS 38-4 

RUMSOII 

12 «J0 FAIR ATLAHTAM Usher 3-6(L_____ l R Sfreit ll 

s a TOutaBi 

21 WO muinpmwl 


m 22S5 



5J50 SUMMER SELLING STAKES (£971: 1m 70yd) 

(20) 

I 0008 FORT DOOCSNEIQMUadgwick 468 R Crater (S)1 

4 443- UP TOWN SOY J Holt 444 N Adroit 

5 006 SHELLEY MARE RHosd 48-11 PCWkB 

6 0 CWEF RUNNER JJenkxts 466 ; — 11 

7 008 ECXflPPED FOR DUTY (USA) P Buber 488___; — 10 

8 3342 JUST CANOiO D A WUson 488 ; TWMrareUI 

g 0 MOO tHE TIME JOJanidra 488 J WMmm 19 

10 0230 POCO LDCO A Oavison 488 ; — 5 

II 0002 SPARKPORDLAD ^DSsworih488 


I 23 OOOO AQABA PfUNCE P COMM) 888^ 

» 0000 REST ANO WELCOtCMrereJ 

28 0200 MARSOOMH^Md 
27 0000 f=UOQENViJBWP i— 

29 0400 MSS MFTAL^ioboS S Matter 48.1 




« ‘stll 




oft 




mark again, winning the 
Lockwoods and Smcdfoys. 
Maiden Slakes for the second 
year in succession when ttw >l 
favourite. Roman Gunner, fol- 
lowed in the footsteps of Stag? 
Hand. 


33 0000 KRAAMC BttateM 684 


"renrtel H HMMNH innli.^ 

36 02W MONTICELIJ C Britain 67-1i! 


. JLBWtl 


Ur ™ W’ 6 "™*'. 4 -', Country Grottenwt.~M W 
Heights. 61 Fudge. 61 MoMteoB. 1M athras. 


WS MD SPINNER STAKES (3-Y-O: £959: 1««2 


DebbtaWhre8ey(7)B 

13 0120 IT* UTE^^Mte LBawer388_ — 2 


3 2341 BANANWflSMODQUtoW PttttiEddMYj 

. SB8CT10N W Hern 611 WCrasWM 


17 0000 TOP FEATHER D Marts 4-65 RCnctaaBeU 

18 3000 COUNT AUIAVIVA M fllarahrad 384- WNewweM 

19 3202 FLEUR DE TWSTLE A Deriaon 388 RFaxtt 

20 800 MUMGD0NJHlBSttwn5 384__ — — 20 

21 006 W FIZTCAL W R Wring 38-C R Sheet IT 

21 -004 SEAG0DAnca384 


4 36 FINAL j 

5 MO KAASMCBttmtred 611 _:i ~jl 

S «I!S G Baxter* 

11 WOaORHaad6n„„^, .TWMM18 


55 -000 SEA TROUP«M Keynes 388— 

27 0000 BUIE FANTASY B Stems 3-7-11 

28 0000 CSILLAGfB) P Beley 3-7-11 __ ... 

29 on WCEPRESSrr ((5 a) R Anratrong3-7-11 — RMh4 


RUdh(?12 

. A Mackey 15 
J Lowe 3 


^ ’ 1 n-TI _ T IMtaM M 

s sss ses?,! 

a ™ ffissssrisisYfiSKN: i-**-** 


17 0202 MJmiYAff^R Jmwn 


7-2 Sorakfard Lad, 61 Ftaur Do ThWte. 61 JUStCutfd. 6 
1 The Ute61 Poco Looo. 161 IfcTawn Boy, 12-1 Other*. 


19 0 RCVANORAWRwarowU 

22 8 TAlUQOHHQ-Nroi6fi ^ 

6* FWWya. 118 Bananas. 4-1 L _ 

, 61 Make Peace. 12-1 Rnoce BeCl6i : «IM» 


SWlhMM* 1 

,, 6i-PWl 


Course specialists 

GOODWOOD 


ivnoers, 1&7>: J SuteWfe 16 from ion 
14-7^: I atthfl 18 bom 135, 11.9%, ^ 
JOCKEYS: A 


T7UUNERS: L Cumanl 17 wlnnera from 57 
ramera. 29.8%; H Coco 28 from 97. 
28 8*V W Hem. 37 from 148. 25,0%. 


9 winners (ram 73 

nrire 045%; T WKame 12 from in. 

.108%; T tree 48 hom 478. 9,5%. 


JOCKEYS: G Sterkm 41 wimars from 202 
ao^V W Canon 48 tram 271. 


ndes. .... . 

17.0%, WR Swinbum 16 from 113. 142%. 

NEWMARKET ; 
TRAMGRSc O Oouteb 7 whiners from 42 


WINDSOR 

TOADanS: M-Stouta IS winners tram 62 
runner*. 24£%; RJahnaon Houghton 15 
from m, 21,7%: w Hem iSTrom fia. 
20.7V 

JOCKEYSrW Canon 28 wlnnara horn 20S 

rates. 13.7%; R Cochrane 10 htnt K)7. 
93% (only two quaWer^. 


^ NEWCASTLE . • 

P uu,l,! ^ H.Ceen » winnea WJ»* 
reramre. 37.9V BHttd 11 MWISL208V 
A^n«7 from aa, i64V . — 

JpCKEY&Nttey9wmne«eo«3Srid4iv 
27 (rom 208, 38,1%!. R ’ 

wmwrton 12 tram 114. W5V 


g™^saurcHiNca:' vm 

^ \f*“^ SjWteg.Donwi» ■ 
Hotsten p*s St Lejpr 


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CRICKET 


the stand-in again 
stands out on the day 
of the dogged top dogs 



. ^COLCHESTER: Essex (8pis) 
’^. irew with Gloucestershire (5). 
**•'' Gloucestershire’s last two 


vynismen survived the closing 
'.^19 balls to deprive Essex of 
, M..)- ^ Victory in a gripping finish to 

-.frr ihis important championship 
Snatch. Gloucestershire rc- 


■\a 


... 

“ l- "A 


P 


, A nam the table leaders by 11 
^[flwjxnnts but second-placed Es- 
r^ ^ex, who have two matches in 
must remain the 
"avouritcs to win the title. 

. Bainbridge batted tor four 

- - u, " lours for 53 not out to lead 
■i ^ Gloucestershire's resistance as 
‘ • u>bey concentrated for five 

V, i y. r lonrs on avoiding defeat 
' Sainbridge was joined by the 
ast man, Lawrence, as the 
spinners, Childs and 
eld, frantically tried to 
-■ *. S eparate them. Stnrounded by 
r ’ i .'-lose fieldsmen, Lawrence had 
:nJ.;o play through the final over 
" fib (.iom Acfield and somehow be 
~ /S urvived. 

. H*. In truth, Fletcher, the wily 
: . be 

'>'>his result. His prime objec- 
^ve always had to be to 
' -,^ireventaGloiK»sterehirewin. 

• ^-iast completed the third cen- 

- - J»h >uy of his career before Essex 
■ declared, leaving Gloucester- 
‘ -a^hire an academic ta r get of 

• .* 01 in 86 overs. 

'' s v On a pilch giving slow turn 
q.. here was no chance of 
“Untfrdfiloucestershire achieving this 
«?=c«scs - “get and by late afternoon it 
: *'$® v ;ipenied odds on that they 
:7-^ould be beaten. A 25-minme 
‘v old-up for rain as the final 
tour started was one inn- 
••cb prance for Essex but 
Jain bridge's resolute innings 
was the main cause of their 
“t-iS ‘■ASDiCtf^eing frustrated. 

. Fletcher, perched perma- 
*m: is ; iV j'V - v tcntly at silly point, con- 
~ ' '’ tantly changed his bowlers 
«• ■i>’rVl\ i r®d field placings and was 
- "-ispecially well served by 
. • l. 1 '"?. - - ‘ Tnngie and Childs. Essex, who 
'^^"^ave five matches to play, 
^^oday meet third-placed Sur- 
"ey at Chelmsford. 

; Vi S i.CNS3ti jlouceslershire, with only 
* -i.;.: hree games left, are at Old 
,v 'rafford playing Lancashire. 

* • Gloucestershire were realise 

" ' •y-w'-c from the first over, with a 

",'v; -raw always their sole am- 
»'• • -v-iiion. When Childs had Ro- 
^ • ’jy.'iaines held at silly point in 
l. • -■ - v C-^Je last over . before lunch 
... rloucestershire were 23 for 
V '.'.^ge from 18 overs and Ro- 
‘laines had foiled to score 
11 ‘ ^ ' 51 balls. 1 

_ '\\££ Tomlin* turned Prince’s 


By Richard Streeton 

first ball after the interval 
straight to backward square 
leg. S to void lad scored only 
one when he gave a hard 

chance to first dip 
Pringle. After these alarms 

'~.35B Mwaai 

«*»vDertvs«fa(Trtjm 

73. SonafM t y Eaww ( Taitebufc North- 

“SEgras 

(Trent Brtdgafc Sussex v Hxmpshlra 
frora). S*pwrer ia Esmk vGcmkx'- 
w> (Ottkiafordt GknaatKsNn v 
Wareestsfsh.nl (Bristotk Hampshire v 

Bainbridge and Stovokl set- 
tled down and doucestershire 
crawled to 50 after 40 overs. It 
was not, in fact, as doll as it 
might sound. 

Pringle broke the stubborn 
third-wicket stand and put 
Essex, in control when, with 
successive balls, he had 
Stovokl and Curran leg-be- 
fore. Stovokl played bade, 
Curran was half forward, each 
time the ball cut back sharply. 
Pringle was given five slips 
and a gully and the hat-trick 
ball utterly beat Lloyds out- 
side the off dump but passed 
safely through to the 
wicketkeeper. 

Lloyds joined Bainbridge, 
who needed 24 overs to enter 
double figures. At 82 Lloyds 
was caught at backward short 
leg, trying to sweep Acfield, 
and at lea Gloucestershire 
were 90 for five. AUeyne 
fought hard for 35 minutes 
before be was leg-before to 
Pringle as he played back. Ten 
minutes before the final 20 
overs were due to start Rus- 
sell was caught behind trying 
to force Aenekt on the back 
foot 

It rained as Russell walked 
off and the other players 
followed him. The shower 
passed but returned after the 
covers were removed and the 
players were taken off again by 
the umpires. There were 16.4 
overs left when they were able 
to restart 

Walsh restrained himself 
for six overs and then leapt 
out u> lift Childs over his head 
and was stumped. Graveney 
resisted sternly until he was 
caught at forward short leg 
and Lawrence - arrived to 
participate in the nail-biting 
dosing stages. 


Essex, resuming at 98 for 
three, batted a further 55 
minutes at the start It was an 
entertaining period of play 
with East's aggressive and 
chanceless batting a gain the 
main feature. He was 55 
overnight played hixnsdf in 
for half an hour and then 
administered a knock-out 
punch by hitting Graveney for 
two sixes and two fours in the 
same over. 

East who on Thursday bad 
hooked Lawrence for two 
sixes, twice pulled the left-arm 
spinner over mid-wicket 
drove a four to the p*™- place 
and then hit another four 
through the covers. He nar- 
rowly escaped running himself | 
out as be readied his hundred 
by pushing a ball from Walsh 
to Curran at mid-on. Essex 
declared after the next ball, 
from which Pringle was run 
out seeking a second run to 
Lawrence aid long leg. 

East batted for three hours 
and 10 minutes, faced 167 
balls and hit four sixes and 
nine fours. It followed his 82 
in the first innings and com- 
pleted a memorable match for 
a man standing in for Gooch 
as an opening batsman. 

This game has underlined 
the splendid, all-round merits 
of the Essex team. Should they 
emerge this year as title win- 
ners. East's pugnacious and 
prolific stroke-play at Col- 
chester will be remembered as 
a significant reason for their 
success. 

Second hninm 
JP Stephenson c Lloyds bQrxvsney 29 
O E East not out inn 

DJPncfttfrfc Russel b Graveney 5 

B RHvdtoe Curran b Graveney 7 

A w Ufa* c Curran bQrweney 16 

n R Prtnqto nm rart 11 

Extras (tt> 2, n(> 2} 4 

Total pwfctxdwa T72 

FALL OF WCKET& 1-73. 2-7S, MB. «. 
142.5-172. 

BOWLING: Walsh 13-4-3-40-0: Lawrence 
6-0-27-ft Graveney 1*4-734 Uoyd* 12- 
2-30-0. 

OLOUCaTERSHHBE: Ftat tarings 183 (J 



SHOWJUMPING 


Lewis takes chance 
to place them 
all in the shade 

By Jenny Mac Arthur # 


Old hands: Former winners Schockemtihle and Deister prepare for the Hickstcad Derby 


Annette Lewis and her exu- 
berant 1 2- \ ear-o Id gelding. 
Tulein. left Britain's top riders 
in ihe shade at Hickstcad yes- 
terday for the second lime this 
year when they won the Silk Cut 
Derby Trial after a 10-horse 
jump-off. 

In the June meeting at 
Hieksiead the pair won the 
opening class from a similarly 
high-class field but Miss Lewis, 
who is only 21 years old. 
admitted that yesteniay's win. 
which relegated two of ihe 
world's best riders. Nick Skelton 
on Rallies Apollo and David 
Broome on Mr Ross, to second 
and third places respectucly. 
was particularly satisfying 

~But I'm an outsider.** she 
commented afterwards, "there's 
no pressure on me — 1 can take a 
chance and sometimes it works 
and sometimes it doesn't." 

Until this year the chief 
memory of Miss Lewis and 
Tutem at Hickstcad was of the 
pair plunging down the 10ft t*m 
Derby- Bank and crumpling on 
landing two years ago. "He just 
look one look and leapt." she 
said. 

Miss Lewis, who admits to 
being scared of iomorrow*s 
course, said she will make up 
her mind today whether to have 
another crack at the Derby. She 
is reluctant to overwork her 
brave partner, who is due to 
compete in the senior British 
team at Litgc in Belgium next 
week and then at 
Donaueschingen in West 
Germany. 

Skelton's ride in tomorrow's 
Derby wit] be Apollo, on whom 
he was second m IQftJ. For a 
second ndc he will probably 


have i Nic. an lnsh»bred hone 
bought from David Bowen m 
the summer. He was fourth in 
the Dinard Derby in France 
earlier this month and yesterday 
had just four faults. At nine the 
horse is nearly half the 3ge of 
Rallies St James. Skelton's great 
partner, w-ho. his ruler said 
yesterday, is not competing 
because he is getting too old for 
such a long course. 

Vesierda>\x I.Vfcmv course 
included the Derby Bank but 
only the comparative) v easy side 
— t lie sheer drop lies in wait tor 
tomorrow's competitors. The 
Devil's Dyke was also included 
in a simpler form but even so 
managed to catch out several 
riders, one of which was Robert 
Smith with Sanyo Vista. 

The most trouble occurred at 
the suit treble across the centre 
of the arena. Michael Whitaker, 
who had four faults on his last 
year's winner. Warren Point, hit 
ihe last part of the combination 
on Owen Cnegory. his second 
horse, on an otherwise irouhle- 
free round. The I"-yejr-old 
gelding, like Ihe lh-vcjr-oid 
Ryan's Son ridden by John 
Whitaker, has been specially 
prepared for the Derby and both 
horses gaic their riders a re- 
assuring uulitif* yesterday. With 
West Germany's Paul 
Schnckemohlc on Deisicr. his 
14S2 Derby winner, also m griod 
form — they finished sixth 
yesicrday — tomorrow's Derby 
looks to Ims e an entry wunhy of 
its 25th annivers,in. 

RESULTS: SA Cut Dwtiy Trial 1 T b *,n 
(A Lpwisi 0 in 39 Aactia 

S ~ Shenotil 0 U1 41 0i' 3. xtr Hess lO 
eamei D n 41 13 sax Cut SpMd 
SIMM 1 . lift? Gentu-. iG OU.-: J'C t>4 10 
2 PPPlPMurpHyi 6004 3 La<M]U!<Jn|J 
Sarqcnll £5-10 


W Uoyds52; J H CMMx B tor ! 

Sacoraf Imtan 
P W tanataw c Bridire ECMkta 
KPTuAxc Prichard bPrinOM — 
PBatabridnanotaut 
AWStovddBiw 
KM Curran tow 


v Prtogle 
rf»rtngfe_ 


J W UMdsc Prichafl b AcfWd , 
MWABeyne tow Pringle. 


C Russel c East b Acfleid 


: A Walsh st East b Charts 


•O A Gnumy c Harria b CNkto . 
DVLBwrancanotout. 


Extras(b4. b3,nb 5i . 
Total {Bwfcts) , 


- 0 
23 
53 
23 
- 0 
11 

- S 
_ 2 

- 4 
-2 

1 


— -12 
— T39 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-23. 323, M3, 4- 
83, 6-82. 6-112, 7-122. B-129. 9-137. 
BOWLMGe Lever S2=J4-ftr Foam T-1-O- 
0; CMk£i 41-21-37-3; Acflald 32-12- 54-2: 
Pringle 124-27-4. - 
Umriw: D Uoyd ant NT Ram. 


Surrey lured into 
the danger zone 


: u 


» V 


..'n'jA’z SEUJrjf 

» i'lVCT* 

: l -.s* 

» ; • 

,;e» 

I,:*. W. t\ - 

v . 1 -. ' Hartford Kent (6 points} drew 
u ith Surrey (6). 

‘•* l . The final day’s, ptay at 

. i -r Vartford ended in extraordinary 
7 “ rrcumstances. Surrey, needing 
Vci-.W off a minimum of 28 overs, 
mbairassed Kent by taidiig 100 
' r . v; v ffthe first 1 1 before the proper 
. ■ owlets came on, look some 

ickezs and forced Surrey to 
... -rs rvSbandon the chase. In the end, 

• 4 -i iu unty almost lost 

, -j, Surrey’s target was to have 
c y.‘; ren 294 in a minimum of 57 
vers. No sooner had Kent 
,.f J-odared than heavy ram fciL 
/hen they resumed, Surrey 
‘\j-iade a bold attempt to score ai 
. tore than 10 an over and, fora 

^■hile, succeeded. Stewart made 
’ rapid century. 

x* Tavane and Benson, who 
ally are joke bowlers, were 
^ iven the new ball and, although 
' ■* . ich took a wickeu Lynch and 
,»<■ -"tewart were soon striking so 
‘ - ^ lany boundaries that Under- 

. - . l ‘i^-ood and Aklerman had to be 
•• ••-■' I,'- roia^it on. Surrey were then 
* ' 22 for two off 12 overs. 

Surrey, to their credit, kept 
ling and, inevitably, started 
*■. «in* wickets. At the start of the 
• at 20 overs they required 146, 

‘ •< in off the first of these Lynch 
^ras bowled by Alderman. 

“ Jesty was stumped, Richards 
night in the deep and Thomas 
. i . m out going for a highly 
• nprobable single. At this stage 
1 owdrey brought back Benson 

- ' ■> keep Surrey interested. Stew- 

' . ■ ' ' X who had readied his half 

•. :nuxry in 14 minutes, com- 
. leted his century in 70 minutes. 

- ... ith six fours and seven sixes, 

^ .^ffore holing out to Benson. His 
ores against Kent this season 

- ‘ . ave been 55. 166, 61 and now 


Bylro Tennant 


r: -LSN' 


moved Medlycott, 
wicket of the season, 
three oven remaining. U 

doer which was 
... . at mid-on. 

Somehow, the ninth wicket pair 
survived, Clarke finishing on 
the attack by hitting Alderman 
for three sixes. 

Earlier, the cricket had also 
been contrived as Suney bowled 
Lynch and Richards to give 
Kent save for a declaration. 
Surrey had taken their first three 
wickets for 57, whereupon Tay- 
lor and Aslett steadied the 
innings before the bowling was 
changed, enabfing them to set 
Surrey a target 

Katll: Rrst taring* 379 ( Bmn 123, 
Taylor 88) 

Second 

MR Benson c Otaton b ... 

N R Teytor c Canton b Lynch 
C J Tatar* cJerty b Thornes 
SGHHubMedtyocitt 



CHAMPtONSHIPTABLE 

0 MM Pie 

9 41 80 245 
8 47 59 234 

8 747 58 217 

5 10 46 60 186 
4 10 45 59 184 

6 9 46 56 184 
2 11 48 57 183 

4 13 57 S* 183 

2 12 46 49 175 

5 10 37 61 162 
4 11 31 62 157 

7 9 37 47 148 

3 13 48 43 137 

3 13 48 38 132 

4 13 40 43 131 

9 9 36 59 127 

. . 5 13 32 41 39 

198S poadons in bnufaats 
Yorwilra Mel inductee right paints tor 
drawn rmtoh when scores fUehed level. 

No play yesterday 

HEADMQLEY; Yortaim* Mats) draw wUt 
Mttfemx fBJ. MdtoewaSTw H Stack 
105 not oat; S J Donnie 5 tor 71. S 0 
HnKriar 5 tor 90k Yortartra 216 tor 8 dec 
U D Low 65 not or* SP Hughes 4 tor 92). 
TAUNTON: StmeiM flp&t dw hM 
Sus«xfl3.Somerae«333W J MwttllO. 
B J Harden 108; ACS npoB 5 for 81k 
Sussex 66 tor 1. 


Sussex ( 
WsnritoflH 19 
Somsrxei (17119 
Lancs (14) 20 

Mttttasexfl) 20 
Gtam(ia 19 


CYCLING 

Hinault 
sews up 
the Coors 

From John Wilcocfcson 
Niwot, Colorado 
Bernard Hinault virtually 
sewed up his vktory in the Coots 

International Classic yesterday 
when he won the 14th stage time 
trial to posh his overall lead to 
2 % minutes over his American 
team colleague Greg LeMond. 
Phil Anderson, who had been in 
second place, coaid finish only 
seventh in the hilly 8% ntile time 
trial and dropped to third place. 

Hinault retires fiom raring in 
November bid will continue to 
work for his team sponsor 
Bernard Tapie, the French en- 
trepreneur who is expanding his 
Interests in the United States. 

Fourth-placed Andrew 
Hampxtcfl suffered from _the 
efforts be made hi a sole 60-mOe 
breakaway on Tbarsday, finish- 
ing only sixth. 

Ia the women's race, the 
American Inga Thompson won 
her third time trial of the race to 
beat the defending champion 
Jeaanie Loago, of France, by 25 
seconds, thus dosing ber overall 
deficit to 32 seconds before 
today’s final road race on the 
inlamons Morgnl-Ksmarck cir- 
cuit at Bonlder. Both races finish 
tomorrow with short circuit 
races at North Boulder Park. 

Mok Sttpe 14 (S3 mle Ume trbil): 1. B 
Hnauil (m. IBmta 03aac: Z G LaMomt 
(US). IBPr: 3. R Alcala (Max). 16.09: 4. J 

Barnard (Fr)18J0; 

n (US) 1831. OnraB: 1. B 
340r 01mm Mmc Z G 
X « 2mm 31 sec; 3, P 
s), at 237: 4. A Hwnaswn 
5, J Pierce (US), at 4^6. M 
■t *33- Woman: Stops 8 (83 
1.1 Thompson JUS). I9irin _ 

: 3, n 

A U 


SWIMMING 


Gross nets another gold 



I Loom (Fry, at 
(USSR), _« 2033; 


EnzanaiWffWG). at 2041; 5. A Yakovleva 
I. » 20:41; 6, M Harris (N23, « 
Own* 1. Lonoo 11 nr sSrin 

zasec 2. Thompscxi a 35 sec; 3, S Ehius 
(US) at 6:13; 4. M Cantas (K), at 629; 5. 
Hams, at 7^2. BritUfu 18, C Greenwood 
M 15:47; 33. L Brambanl at 2723; 47. M 
Btomr at 14)731: 51, S Thompson 
12234. 


Madrid (Renter) — Michael 
Gross, of West Germany, and 
Igor Polyansky, of the Soviet 
Union, two of the classiest 
swimmers on view, won a 
second gold medal at the world 
championships here yesterday, 
Tom Jager. of the United States, 
proved the fastest sprinter of the 
tournament when he won the 
inaugural 50 metres freestyle; 
and East Germany’s all- 
conquering women took their 
title tally to 12 in 13 events. 

Kristin Otto highlighted her 
all-round power by winning the 
200 metres individual medlev 
after earlier golds in the 100 
metres freestyle and sprint free- 
style relay, plus a silver in the 
1 00m butterfly. She then an- 
chored the East German 4 x 
100m medley relay to victory 
over the US to take her gold 
medal haul to four. Four years 
ago she won the 100m back- 
stroke gold at the fast world 
championships. 

Gross left everyone trailing 
hopelessly in his wake as he 
rippled to victory in the 200m 
butterfly to make his second 
successful title defence of the 
championships. The lofty West 
German, who had earlier main- 
tained his hold on the 200m 
freestyle crown, swept home in 1 
minute 56.53 seconds — a time 
bettered only by his own Imin 
56.24sec world record. 

Polyansky showed similar 
superiority in the 1 00m back- 
stroke to complete a double he 
began in the 200m event on 
Tuesday. He clocked a world 
championship record 55.58sec 
to dethrone Dirk Richter, of 
East Germany, who had to settle 
for silver this time ahead of the 
Soviet powerhouse. Sergei 
Zabolouiov. 

The nerve-jangling 50m free- 
style was prefaced by two false 
starts; but once they were away. 
Jager seized the initiative and 
sped home in 22-49sec. well 
dear of the shaven-headed 
European record holder. Dano 


Halsall. of Switzerland, and 
Man Biondi. of the ITS. 

Dendeberova had turned well 
over two seconds dear of a fifth- 
placed Otto into the final free- 
style leg but the East German 
surged past. “I’m very pleased 
with my third gold.** Otto said. 
“1 did not expect iL Now I've 
won medals in three different 
styles — bock, crawl and individ- 
ual medley.** Her gold tally was 
to rise to four by the end of the 
evening in the medley relay. 

East Germany romped to 
their fifth one-two sweep of the 
championships when Astrid 


Strauss and Katja Hartmann 
monopolized the women's 
800m freestyle final. They dis- 
posed of the challenge of Sarah 
Hardcastlc. the British 
Commonwealth champion, who 
finished fifth, in the second half 
of the race and turned the event 
into a two-way duel. 

The East German assault was 
top much for the rest but it 
failed io destroy the oldest 
world record in the swimming 
book - the 8mm 24.62sec set by 
Tracey Wickham, of Australia, 
in Edmonton in August 1978. 



Waltz by Strauss: victory cruise in 800m freestyle 


GOLF 

Hayllar 
steals 
the lead 

By John Hennessy 
For all the presence ’of sis 
Curtis Cup players it was the 
little-regarded Christina Hayllar 
who stole the lead on the 'first 
day of the British women's 
stroke- play championship at 
Blairgowrie yesicrday. Her 
round of 71. three under par for 
the Lansdowrnc course, placed 
her one stroke ahead of three 
players, including Paineia John- 
son. 

Miss Johnson’s companions 
on 72 were Susan Muurerafi. 
also an England international, 
and Stefan ia Croce, aged 16. 
winner for Italy of the British 

B rls' championship last week. 

!iss Hayllar. aged 21. bncflv 
distinguished herself at the start 
of the year in the Roehampton 
Gold Cup and the Avia Four- 
somes and has since regained 
the Hampshire championship 
but otherwise it has been a 
season of travail and dis- 
appointment. She failed to qual- 
ify in both the English and 
British match-play champion- 
ships, and none of her four 
rounds in the English stroke- 
play dropped below 80. How- 
ever. happily for her. her driver 
behaved for the most part 
yesterday. Twice she hooked, 
but only once she paid the pnec. 
for the 17th is a par live and she 
was still able to make her par 
with a chip and pull. Her 
position now has all the makings 
of a humbling reaction today 
but one would be delighted to be 
proved wrong. 

Miss Hayllar owes her po- 
sition to a strong finish of par. 
par and birdie for the fast three 
holes. Miss Johnson. Miss 
Muorrraft and Miss Croce all 
dropped a shot on either in or 
17 and none could match her 
birdie three ai the 338 \ard 1 8ih. 


D G Asiett c Jesty b Richards 
IT next 


C S Cowdrey 
RMSfeonnotout 


out . 


22 
86 
6 
0 

.67 
.24 
.26 
■ IS 
214 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-34, 244, 34?. 4- 
146. 5-178 

BOWLING: Ctsrtia 6-0-144; FMham S-O- 
38-1;Thom» 8-1-15-1; MKMott 8-V35- 
1: PtoeocK 4-0-20-Q; Lynch 6-0-48-1; 
RjcDanto 5-0-34-1 

SURREY!: Hrat tarings 300 tor 5 (te f 
chllBn ' 


Weather hampers progress 


Extras(b8 I 8>4,w1,nb2)_ 
ToM(5 wfdsdac) . 


Lynch 11 
Second 


na| 


Stewart 81, 


A R Butcher c EMaon b Bmaoa 12 
G S CSrton st March b Txvart — 1 
M A Lyndi b AUarawn — ... - 47 


A J Stewart e Aden bBeraon 105 

TE Jes|y «1 Marsh b Underwood 4 

C J Richards c Tavari b Underwood 4 
p J Thomas nxi om 0 


M A FMham not out . 


K T Meriycon few b AJdarmwt . 
ST darks not out 


Extras (b Z lbZrb2). 
Total ( 8 wkta ) . 


.25 
- 9 


6 


.246 

FALLOF WICKETS; 1-9, 2-33. 3-148. 4- 
158, 5-164, S-164. 7-108, 6-201 
BOWLING: Tbvat* 6-0-84-1; Benson 7-0- 
562; Dale 3-0-21-0; Underwood 8-1-37-2; 
AVtorean KHH13-2: S6«or* 1-0-2-0 


Alderman returned and ns- umpires: B Dudfeston md □ Ovtoar. 


Because bad weather had 
affected so many matches in the 
Britannic Assurance county 
championship programme yes- 
terday,^ the status quo was 
maintained in the case of 
Hampshire, Worcestershire, 
Leicestershire and Nottingham- 
shire, four counties still to show 
interest at the top, though there 
had been a hiccup at Queens 
Park, Chesterfield. 

Derbyshire had drawn with 
Leicestershire and, in part, that 
had resulted from a refusal by 
Chris Balderstone, 

Leicestershire's acting captain, 
to accept Kim Barnett’s scheme 
of things in attempting to 
achieves positive result In this, 
Barnett had proposed asking 
Derbyshire to make 250 to win 
in 60 overs. No play had been 
posable in the morning, and 
when a start was made after 
lunch, Leicestershire began at 


By Peter Marson 
190 for four, 188 runs behind. 
James Whitaker bad taken 
guard at 1 11, and he went on to 
make 1 75 before Warner bowled 
him. Finney took another five 
wickets, the last four in eight 
balls, and his seven for 54 was a 
best performance as 
Leicestershire's innings closed 
at 293. 

At Dean Park, Bournemouth, 
Hampshire had set Worcester- 
shire a target of209to win. Hide 
made 81, and Marshall took 
three wickets and Mam two as 
Hampshire came in at 160 for 
five. In the morning there had 
been a delay of 75 minutes 
before Worcestershire could be- 
gin again, 133 runs behind at 
1 04 for eight. Weston was there 
still as Worcestershire made 
another 16 runs for the loss of 
Newport and Pridgeon to Maru, 
who finished with four for 33. 
Marshal] took three for 30. As 


OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


Derbyshire rLeics Lancashire v Glam 


AT CHESTERHELD 

dm with Latest*- 


r. * 


fflBTSHME First tarings -378 tar 9 <*C 
EWwnerSti. J Efctorraffl, AHS56) 

JBamrtffflS^Agnaw 15 

Maher not out . . 6 

■HU not out 8 

, Extras (b 2. bl.wl.nbQ IP 

Total (1 vi*t) 


ATLYTHAM 
Lancashire fSpts) drmr n4M Glmnorgmt 

ffl- 

LfiMcamiE Hist tanmpi 192 (J Abra- 

tams9Gk 

Sscond tarings 

M R Chtdmck frEMrrick bmrfli 
ANHeyturatbOitoog 


Hampshire v Worcestershires 



J Mnfoins b Ofttorcg 
NH FtafbrotMrbOMCtaB— . 
S J O’Shaughrwwy mX out 
M Stanrora b Ontes? 

0 JMaWnsoncMoms 


b North. 


tWK Hegg at Dawte b North , 


IFoSayrunout , 


LEiCESTERSHnB nrst innings 
CBatomumec Mahm bMvwnwn 29 
ACobbcBarmKbHnnw 24 

• PriarfawbFnm 1 1 

J Whitaker bWamar 175 

■' JBponbWamar 6 

D Borim Ibw b FtartBy . 

A J0e Rntas b Rrm» . 

) lUminaa tan K p 


j'." OWwOTl not Out . 

p Aanewhfiiinsy 

Btaylorb Finney 

Extras (b 2. b5. wl. nb 11) , 
■ Tow 194 5 overs) 


- 21 
_ 11 
— 2 
_ 5 
— 0 
_ 0 
_ 19 
.299 


lU- r Of Wra^-7-38. 2-61. 3-121, 4- 
2. S-&H.B-288, 7-288, 8-293, 9-293, 13- 

JWUNtt >toUng MQhwtson 

•1^0-1; Ftanay 1734^54-7; Wbnwr 
-®4 a* Jem-oacquw 18-1-70-0. 

nptaa: J BMensbaw and A A Jones. 


50 
16 
.17 
.3 
27 
- 1 
.6 
.4 

... , . - 1 

B P Patterson c Hickey b North 4 

Extras (b 12. b&npi) 21 

Total (9 wkts dac) 149 

FAU OF MCKETS: 1-35, 2-83, 395. 4- 
99. 5-102. 8-117. 7-138. 8-143, 8-1*9. 
BOWUNO; Htotey 5-1-11-0; Berwick 12- 
7^0; Ontong 31-1244-4; North 244- 

(SLAMORGAR First brings 164 fcir 8 doc 
(BOWLING: Patterson IO-3-TS-O; 
MWtason 12-3-22-1: Htytwd 30-12-0; 
Stannons 21-4-653; Fofley 28-8-42-4). 
Second tarings 

"H Morris c Abrahams b Stamens _ 49 
J AHCrOtanscHsggbFoDcv — — 7 

ALJOOWbSkntnons . 8 

GCHolmwcMsIdnsonb Simmons „ 16 
M P Mayntnt b Simmons . 
RCOmongstr "“~ 

J Derrick tfL. . 
tT Oavlesc Ftotey b Staxnons . 

P D North not out. 


. AT BOURNEMOUTH 
Hampshire (Sots) draw with Woimster- 
store (4). 

HAMPSHIRE: Rrst tarings 237 (V P Terry 
74; PJ Newport 5 tor 74; 

Second tarings 

CGGraenfefne Hkk b Newport 42 

VP Tony b HcEwtn 23 

RASmihrunoul 5 

CLSmrthnotout 6 

M 0 Marshall c Weston b Pridgeon — 0 

TMTramMnitoiit 1 


g a Hick c Graeraage b Maru — 
D B D Ofc/wra b Mvsol 
□ N Ratri not out 


■P A Noato tow b Marshal). 
MJ Weston not out , 


Extras (to 11,. no Z), 
Total (5 wtas) 


Extras (to 14) 



8 R Barwfc* not out 

Extra* (to® 

Total (SwttS) 


U 

Total (4 wtoe dec) - - - Si 
FAU. OF WICKETS; 1-71, 2-81.3^5.4- 
88 . 

BOWUNO: Pridgeon 44MS-1: Newport &■ 
tMI-1; McEwan 4-0-21-1. 

WORCESTERSHIRE: Rn» tarings 

LK Smith c Parks t> Marshal 2 

T S Curts & Jamas 33 

SMUcpinncTaiTybMxrehafi 7 

G A Hick c Paris b Mantua 0 

DBffOIMmc James b Connor. 8 

*P A Neale c Terry b Maru 6 

ONPriric Prate b James 26 

MJ Weston not out-- 18 

tS J Rhodes c Parish Maru 5 

PJ Newport cGwrictaeb Maru 2 

A P Pridgeon cTnjmwb Marti 4 

Extras (to 4, nb 5) — — 9 

Total (64 owe ra) -120 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-4. 2-1E 3-18, 4-29, 
646. 6-85. 7-92. 8-103. 9-111. 10-120. 
BOWLING: ManhaS 22-11-30-3; Connor 
10-3-23-1; Maru 14-4-33-4; TrsnUen B-1- 
13-0: James 12-4-17-2. 


- 31 
26 

- 10 
— 2 

- 17 
-_13 
160 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-9, 2-20, 2-128, 4- 
130. 5-134. 

BOMJNO: Marshal 12-3-32-3: Connor 6- 
3-22-0; Mvu 17-349* TirarteM 9-1-34- 
0; James 2-0-12* C L Smith 1-1*0. 
UmpxBElMJ ffitGhen and Kj Lyons. 

Northants v Notts 

AT NORTHAMPTON 
Nonhmts (4pts) drew *ttfi Notts (5) 
NOTTMGHAMSHme BW hnings SB ( 
Braad 92. Fraser-DsrfineSI; Harper 4-50) 
Second mines 

BC Bread eUaflendvbNGB Cook 43 
. 53 

— 1 
, 18 
™5 
■ 118 


MNewBinotout. 
PJotxmnbCook , 
J OBircn notout. 


Extras ( to 4, nb 1 ) . 
Trial(2wktsdec). 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-87. 2-72 
BOWUNQ: VriBoer 7-1-19* Capat 7-1- 
28* N G 9 Cook 10-2-33-2: Wm9-1 -34- 
0. 

NOflTHAMFTONSHWfcFrsl inrings 158 


notout — 27 

20 

2 


W Larkins not out 


Second tarings 

w b Marshall . 


T B Curw c Qraeriitoe b I 
D M Smith c Terry bMaru 


Extras (bl, lb 1) 

Tbtal(Owtf) 

BOWUNG: Saratov 6-1-13* Frasor- 

DarSng 74V29* Hemtrings 1-PfrO. 


48 


Hampshire started out with a 
lead of 117 runs, Grecnidgc 
moved off at a great pace to 
make 42 out, of 91 for four which 
was the point at which Terry 
issued bis challenge. 

Northamptonshire had set 

lo wm l After 'Seo^f had 
made a brisk 27 and Larkins 20, 
more rain fell to usher the 
players in to an early tea, and 
play was abandoned soon after- 
wards. Northamptonshire's ini- 
tial task had been to avoid 
following on. and this they did 
when another 21 runs had taken 
them to 179 for eight. 

Jack Simmons made an he- 
roic effort 10 bowl out Glamor- 
gan at Lytham. Set to make 178 
to win in 45 overs, Glamorgan 
lost eight wickets, seven to 
Simmons for 79, in making (56 
in an exciting finish. 

Lord's opens 
its doors to 
the villagers 

Club and village cricket 
by Mike Beny 

Grass roots cricket, in the 
shape of the respective finals of 
the national dub championship 
and the national village 
championship, takes centre- 
stage at Lord's this weekend. 

Today's final is for the title of 
William Younger dub cham- 
pions. an award that brings a 
winner's purse of £1.000. and 
sees Stourbridge seeking io 
maintain the recent domination 
of Midlands elute in the 
competition.They meet Wes- 
ton-super-Mare. bidding to fol- 
low In the footsteps of Old Hill, 
their Birmingham League neigh- 
bours. who lifted the trophy in 
each of the last two seasons, and 
Shrewsbury, who were the 1983 
wiimers- 

In Smith, their skipper and 
Brewer, Stourbridge have two 
spin bowlers who are both 
nearing their 50th birthdays. 


BASEBALL 


NORTH AMERICA: National LaaguK Son 
Francnco Gams 7. PMadrtpn* Pluses 6. 
San Dmo Prates 6 . Montreal Eopos 9. 
Cwcmnafi Rada 9. $1 Lows CartHwl* 4; 
Atlanta Bravos S. Crncaga OR Z. Amarican 
Laague Boston Rad Sox 24. Cxwaland 
Indians 5: Cadtama Annals 6. DMM Tigars 
1. CMcaao WN» 5ox 4 ,torxi» Btao Jays 3. 
Kansw Otif Royals 4, Tatas Rangers 3. 


CRICKET 


TOUR MATCH: Caatondgra Sn Lankans 214 
lor 6 (R Juranapatfiy 631 v Nanoral Assam- 
non ri Youn Cnrtwura. 

MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPIONSHIP: 
LMdn*ortfc Dunam 164 tor 7 dee ana 80 tor 
1 dec Henfnnsftra 62 lor 3 dec and 78 tor S. 
Mann drawn. 

SECOND XI CHAMPIONSHIP: Soetteapton: 
Sussex 1 83 and 179 tor 8 dec: Hampswei sz 
and 205 tor 9 |RR Savage 651. Mdct: drawn. 


CYCLING 


TOW OF THE NETHERLANDS (Dutdi unless 
stared): Fourth atape H52kmr 1. E 
vandaraerden (Bet). 3hr 22mm «8MC Z P 
Pmtare. ttll behmd: 3. H Oaaras. OJ oowd. 
4. M Maerwns (Beq. 5. M Hramans G. T 
FWfcC 7. J-P van Potnwi: (L M Vamota rBeft 
9. W Devos i Set), ia F van de War (Ban. 
same tttna Wlh Stag* (15km, Now Wal* 1.G 
Knetemarm. Pimm 22sec 2. G Jsktxs. 01 
behmd. 3. G SoBeveld. 05 wan 4. 
Vanderaorden. 0.8 behind; S. P 
S»vartoaagen.O.12b«vrto;B.Jffcrt*ra,s«m0 
rone. Ovan* 1. .lata**. 224705; Z 
Knatemam. 0 15 banmd. 3. SoBewM. 024 
behind: «. Pietars. 0.42 bertno. 5. J Lammets. 
0 43 bMMid: 6. T Foote. 067 behind 


FOOTBALL 


SAN FERNANDO. Trxtttrat Concxcal pM* 
e Unrteo Sam 5. Januca 0. 

: Ejhflratao match: Brew 0. 
Rumlnonse (£&} 1. 

FOOTBALL COMBWATlON: Norwich 3. IpSr 
mcha 

WEST GERMAN LEAGUE: FC Hembwg 1. 
Sdnfte 1; EiKractt Franklun 1. FC Nuern- 
berg 0: Werrier Bremen 1. FC KaiseratauMm 


GOLF 


CARNOUSTE: Brittab ) 

Lcedtaa second rouod scone: 142. . 
5ErtL71. 72. 14S.KFasMm.7S. TO. 1«: A 
Hoowtson. 73, 73. 147: J ROgagOa 72. 7S; B 
ShBrtds. 70. 77. 1 48: G Orr, 73, »; J Ptdergen 
(pent. 77. 71. J Unaneral. 73. 75. F CJrw (Spt 

74. 74. A Rogers. 76. 72 14& S Itenanaon. 

73. 75. WBadon.75.74 15ft RMu^rit. 76^ 
74: A Tumbul. 73, 77. 1S1: P Pnce. 00. 7V. S 
Lovey (NafliL 74. 77: S Holden. 74. 77; K 
Welter. -78. 73: P vowia. 7S. 78: E ttcharo- 
son. 76. 75. 152: M Macara. 75. 77; JPwsre. 
78. 7a B Jackson. 71. 8L J Coe. 60,72; J 
Metnlfe. 78. 74. 

lUtSTIANSTEAra Wranad’* chamknMpa 
tOfl unless Mated). 142 ; B £**8.715.72. 1*4: 
M Wemeraten (SweL 72. 72 ttontey 


FOR THE RECORD 


SWIMMING 

MAOMD: World charapioRsMpa: Austrate 8. 
LHwrd Slates 7. The Netnerwids 12 Canada 
6: Hungarv 15. West Germany a Ftaai 
peeidORKi Austrate: 2. The Nemronds; 3. 
Unoed States. 4. Canada: 5. rimoary: 6, WBs 
Genranv. 

Man; Stha tewrtyt* Anal: t. T Jager (US). 
22 49. 2. D HalsaKSwU). 2280. 37 m Bond 
lUSt. 22 85. 4. Peng S«nq Ang (Sm*. 23 03. 
5. S Votary [Swdi) ?a06. 6. P JdiafBson 
(Swe). 23.10 7. J Woatie SC). 23.12; 8. G 
PngocU I USSR] 2327. 100m backatroke 
flnat 1. 1 Pohraitey (USSR). 5S.&8sec: Z D 
RttWar (EGL S6A9. 3. S Zabotatnau tUSSRi. 
5657: 4. m Tewhsoury iCan). 56(2: 5. F 
HoHmerster ANGL 5687: 6. F Beimaai (EG). 
5702; 7. D veeaA (USV 5723. 8. M 
ftaodeittaiigri (US). 5724 Women: 800m 
traartytaltoat i.AStramslEG 1,828 24.2, K 
Hartmann (EG) 828 44; 3. □ Babasfwtf (US). 

824.04; 4. jr- “ 

Hardcasde 1 

8.4550. 7. J 

65088 4 x 100m raersty ratty: 1. East 
Germany IK Znraemtan. S Gerascn. K 
Grassier. K Oltol. 4mm W B2sae world 
chanwonsh® recordh Z United States. 
4 07 75. 3. The Netherlands. 4 10 70; 4. hay. 
4.1227, 6 Soviet Unon. 4:T?52: 6. Brigutt. 
4-1154, 7. West Germany. 4: 13.64: BTFwica. 

4 T5 75. 

Quat ra ra tor ton e r Man: 400a fraantyto: R 
Hentel (WG). 3n»t S23SnK K Bowl(GBL 
3-8310; D Jargereen (LE). 3*361. V 
S Mar ryssnr 3*362: F lacono (FO. 
3 S3.76.E basher (EG). 3:54.72. SLodZHiwskl 
(EGL 3*4.70. P Hottwitz (Swe). 355.M. 
Ijapaitewiytt : U Oassier (EGL 15:19.31, fl 
Hentel (WG1. 1531.39: E Pmm (USSfll. 
iS^rei-DJorgemrandiSL tSJHOLEPew: 
(YuoL 1534 50. V SntAov (USSRL 15-2*04, 

5 Bamstefc (h). 1*2885. F lacono (M. 
1S2955. 200m boOerky: U Grass (WG). 

1 :59.29; M Gary (CiL 1 :5SLfl0; T Pontmg (Can). 

300 57: A Mom WZL 200.73. B Khelsen 
(DanL 30099. V Cemy |CanL 301.44: R 
Sdiattans (IVQl 30183: W Wywa (PoO. 

301 £0 200m bmatftrate: j Szaoo (Hutbl 
2-1780, S Snnttav (USL 31788; V U«ws 
|Can). 310.45; T Pata (Fr). 319 IB: A Yokoctt 
(Parti. 31937: P ReSteDd (CdL 3.19*0 A 
Moomousa (GB) 21980; H WadehAd (WGL 
230.it. 4 > loom te aw ytt rattn East 
Gemwra. 32146. UntedSOttS. 32223; 
West Germany. 32284. So*wi Umon. 
32305 Sweflen, 3-23.12. AuStraka. 32138: 
The Netnatttnos. 32365; France. 32429. 
Wgrixteri dhnrtaQaMliyaig round: Laadtag 
atetega later 10 ewest 1 . G Uugrans tUSL 
635)(6 w. 2. fr Kon«heng(Ch™L 684.423. 


CUKINNATL Otto: ATP champtomtopa: 
Thud round: TMrd round: K Cu tier , US) M J 
Nyslrom |5*cl. 6-7. 6-1 7-6. T VMuscn 1USI 
W J B Svenswn (SweV 6-4. 6-2. E SancHtt 
(So) tit J Hlasek (SwiCL 7 6 6-t J Connors 
(USi at J canter (US). 6-4 64. K Camson 
I&WOI In D FV>far lUrul 7-5 6-2. S ECC an 
(Swel bt D Pete iLJSt. 6-3. 36. 6-3. M Pwiiiar* 
(Swi W C Van Remind fSA). 63. 7-b. 
MWriander|Swe)biHcieiaPeno(A>gi 6-3.6- 
2 . 

EASTBOUMS: Predeirial pntor grasacourt 


5 Haase 

558.76. a, .... 
(Chraj. 5379ft 7. G 


to'SStt 

51321: 11. C 
.. _ Man (Can). 
Morgan (GB). 487 74. 

kui memer E Dendetterowa 


J Mondragon (MuL 52923. 9. 
S1726; ittl' vamaodhi (Jaunt. 
^Kon (Aus). 510.00; 120 E 


75. 7ft Wfc A IWwtts. 75. 
' 75. 71. 147: □ OomA 
71; J Forest 72. 75. C Srarp. 74. 
Dtonah (Aus), 75 72. 


lUSSm. 3 17.79: K tort (EGL 318 19. N tung 
(Rom) 21834; KOllO (EG), 218.45; BSetwc 
(WG). 21860. M Gngrone (USL 21383 M 
Muo^Notn) 21945; T Bogornkwa (Bui). 

TENNIS 


SPEEDWAY 


MAHWAH,Nera Jeney: UMtad. 
Classic woman’a 1 


Janay: uratad Jancy 
» to ra tt am eut i Second r 


Bank 


NATIONAL LEAGUE; Ednourgn 45. Hackney 
33: Gtaugw 37. WMQNddA 41 . 

KMQCK^HJT CUP: Quarter totst sseoad tag 
Petertoroufin 45. Betwfc 33 (Pattooroupi 
mi on aaanqate 61 -75) 

c araaengs Trophy: 

i.iraenwaffifiogbect 


irack “Meriogged. 


ioasMp wial: 


I^IHPM«tax»(Bn. W. 4-6. 6- 

2: R Whne(USiri S Maseann (US). 6-4. S-7. 6- 

? ? i 1 *® WSL 6-3.3-GI6- 

2. A Moulton (US] bt 1 Budraow (Crl. 6-2, 6.5; 
J Dune (CS) bt M Par (Aitjl. 7-5. Mi D 
Batestrat ( Aut) tit c Jotesant fkmn. 8-4. 6-2. 

l- H SiAow (C*j« 0 Van Rena 
M. 6-1: E Rwiach (SAJ U K Rmatt 
W.M, 


(SAL 

1 . 6 - 1 . 


[CheaMtaL 6J. 6-3 II and under: A Snca 
iChenwet m D Huh (Lines). E-4. 6a. 0 
Roberts iSouto Wain) 01 CBa4eviN<yioUc) 6- 
3. 3-6. 6-4 Qstm Mn 14 and raidar B 
Grtaims (SuttoAl bl C Humohwys Dawes 
(Cranta). 7-5. 5-7. 7-5. R V-tatel ILjixsI bl C 
Ha» tDorsen. 6-t 6-3 

ROWING 

NOTTINGNAM: World dwifcmlnpi: Men's 
Bgidwaight starie acute: Hast i: 1. 0 Editing 
(Deni. Thun 966 sec 2 P Anfonw (Ausi. 
7 1129. 3. j Moetoenen (S*e> 7 13 9ft 4. r 
HB ben (Aus) 7.M29; 5. B Genewn iWG). 
727 44;6.MEmtelNmhL7 39;3 Heat 2 t 
G Fiono OJSl 7 1038. 2. P Saeumiiata (Nor) 
7 11.54.3. W Van DeSe^h o m (Beq 7 ti 77. 4. 
p Tasersai (Can) 7.12 51. 5. J Vorroes (Hun) 
71526. ft H Crania Baocnho (Port 72298 
Men's cwdaaa (tahtwatatat tours: Ham l: t. 
Spo«. 6 1126: Z NewZeraana 615 36. 1 
Ausoata. 615-77. 4. Demuri. E t? 17 S. 
Netherlands. E-1B89. 5 West Gernuwty. 

6 23 66. KMt 2 1 . GB (C Bam. P Hamm, N 
State. S Forbesl 6 10 79. 2 hriy 6 It 34: 3. 
Austna. 6:15 09. 4. Canada. 6 19 10 S. US 
62T26. G. Finland. 62957. HM'i HgM- 

Ooobtt aadtt: Heat ft t. GB iG Smeti. 
A WTMMq) 63337 z Italy 634.42 3. 
Netherlands. 63584; A. west Germany. 
63663: 5. US. 6-4187. 8 SMSCtirit 
6.45 65 Haet&l. Franca 636 33. ?. Meneo. 
63696. 3. Canada 6 37 93 4. Dorrnori. 
6 4 1-59: S. Sweden. 6*833: 6. Portugal 

7-3.38 Waraert-stextes scute: HwtV.OA 
Pmsaoj (Ront) 735SS; 2. J Hanue lEGeil 
733 17; 3. M Georanva (BU) 734 93. 4. £ 
Gusttnson (S«rt). 7.3985:5. LWraht (CanL 

7-4758.6. A IMgerfAus). 746 S7 Hiattol.A 
2- A Doumtthcra 
tus® W»»l * Hauebrouch I Ben. 

7 4005- 4. A Coma (Hi 7-4&61. 5. H Van 
Eartoy teJNetni 751 S9. ft I Pan |DfrU 
753.02. Men's double sesflt: Heat 1: 1. East 
Cemmy. ft91; 2 USSR. 622.42 3. toy. 

. 4 . Cnratt, 625.13: 5. Austria. 
6^.62 6. Cuba. 631 61: Heat ft l. Sratrar- 
(and. 62123 2. Nemerianos. 82031. 3. 
Bute™. 62283: 4. Caemrattwataa. S 23 80, 
ft OS, 628.45, ft Ftattnd. 62950. Meal 
mma pan Heat i : i. USSR. 534 73. 2. E 
Gwram. ftwaa- 3. luL. 63833 4. US. 
6415 1; 5. Romania, 6*1 Oft ft Austro. 

1;l.YuM5ttna 6 3907. 2. 
BrarS, 6.4337: 3, GB ?A CMt. u Cross). 

6 4568; 4. Spran 6^99. 5. Canada 6 5006. 
ftA/gmni 6f2JtQ Man's tangles scuta: 
Heal 1M.PM Koto WG). 6Sf75: S. P 
KraKtaten (Fat). 7:\ 31. 3. V Raw* 

73.M. 4. E Marrero (Cuaa). 7 5 07 5. 9 
AnOtaseniDin), 7 ft42.ft S FemanderiArgi 

7 16 47. Heat ft 1. F Mutton (Swe). 6.56 07.2. 

V VaKxicha (USSRL 659 10:3. HHabernum 
(EGL 7:0006: 4.B PtMMl I Am). 7 CO.t?. 5. G 
Sprawer lUSJ. 74 88; 6. A LMm <Beh. 
ft35J4. (ten's candasa tours: Heat 1: I. W 
Germany, 558.56: 2. US. 40127. 3. E 
Germany. ftOrei, 4. USSR. 605 19 ft 
Tugnsuw. 60606: 6. Argentatt. 6.17 01. 
Non ‘a quadruple ands: toat 1: 1. USSR 
544.64; S. Czechostowtaua. ft48 12. 3. Po- 
lena. ft49 63: 4, Spam, 5 51 0 1 . 5. E Germany. 
50100. 6. SanOsriand. 6055 Heat ft l. 
Cars:?,. S-46S7. S. Nethertamte. 5.4T32. 3. 
Italy. 5-4656. 4. tonmv. 5 48 8r. S. Yuocaio- 
wa.5Sl29rftUS.ftS9.70. 


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rut times Saturday august 23 iy#6 



FOOTBALL 


Breaking the Mersey 
pionopoly is least 
of the problems ahead 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


As the global season came to 
a dose seven weeks ago, a 
squat figure sat astride the 
world. To the delight and 
relief of many, Diego 
Maradona proved in Mexico 
that one gifted individual 
could lift a side above less 
talented opponents and' up 
towards the highest of peaks. 

With his triumph of man 
over ^machine. Maradona re- 
kindled a flame of hope that 
had all but been extinguished 
Optimists imagined then that 
his performance, witnessed by 
an estimated audience of 500 
million (one in nine of the 
world's population), might 
usher in a new age wherein 
method would be dismantled 
byskill. 

But as the domestic season 
opens today, another equally 
familiar and altogether more 
sinister figure stands over the 
game. Like some spotty-faced 
bully who delights in throwing 
bis weight around the school 
playground the football hooli- 
gan threatens once again to 


substantial saving, particu- 
larly in view of Gordon 
Taylor's recent revelation. 
The secretary of the Pro- 
fessional Footballers’ Associ- 
ation said that half of his 
union's funds, £200,000, is 
currently out on loan to clubs 
such as Middlesbrough, Swan- 

New managers 

Twenty-one Football Lesgoe dabs 

start the season with new managers. 

They mdnde London's “top two" - 

Arsenal having appointed their for- 
ms' plays, George Graham, (non 
Mihcall, and Tottenham now man- 
aged by David Pleat (ex-Lntoa). The 
new bees: 

FIRST DIVISION: Arsenal - George 
Graham; Coventry - George Carts 
(director- manager); Leicester — 
Bryan Hamilton (Gordon MQae now 
general manager); Lotos — John 
Moore; Tottenham — David Plea L 
SECOND DIVISION: Brighton - 
Aten MnDery; Mfflwall — John 
Docbsty; Sheffield United - Billy 
McEwan. 

THIRD DIVISION: Carlisle - Harry 
Gregg; Fulham — Bay Lewiugtou 


tr 

cr 

1 ilk 

spoil ihe fun that could lie 
ahead for everybody else over 

ai 

al 

I 

T 

> 

1 

1 Q 

• 

the next nine months. 

The hooligans, mercifully 
unobtrusive during the World 
Cup finals, have already 
started their campaign of 

vs 

I 4a 

loathsome behaviour. As well 

in 

1 

as locking the door to Europe 

at 

V G» 

for a few more years, the 

in 

1 

g 

nauseating louts have cast a 

1 c 


long, black shadow of fear 

it 

a *4 

across the threshold of a new 

di 


season. That they should do so 

**i 

• 1 * 

once more is particularly 

CI 

■ 

ll fr 

disappointing 

le 

a «i 

Recent statistics suggested 

P' 

■ 

that the thugs had belatedly. 

b' 

1 rs 

but encouragingly, learned 

fr 

4 

> fr- 

they were fighting a losing 

w 

1 S 

battle. The number of arrests 

R 


last season was cut in half and 

IT 

a 

the bill clubs were forced to 


— Brian 


foot in order to protect their 
more reasonable supporters 
was subsequently reduced by 
some £2 million. 

The figure represents a 


Mathias. 

FOURTH DIVISION:] 

Miller; Cardiff — Frank 
Colchester - Mike Walker; Preston 
— John McGrath; Soothend — David 
Webb; Stockport — Jimmy Metis; 
Swansea — Terry Yorath; wolves — 
to be appointed. 

INTERNATIONAL APPOINT- 
MENTS: Scotland — Andy Rox- 
burgh. Wales - Mike Fngfand re- 
appointed (new as part-time 
manager). Italy — Azelte Vknd 
(Emm Bearzot now “supervisor na- 
tional teams”). N Intend — Billy 
Bingham (who remains part-time N 
Intend manager) was given per- 
mission to take a £l90.W0-a-year 
coaching post with Saadi Arabian 
chib Al Nasser. 

sea City and Wolverhampton 
Wanderers, who could not 
otherwise afford to pay the 
wages of their players. 

Taylor admitted: “Hooli- 
ganism is the main priority 
this season and the way ahead 
will be difficult unless it is 
solved.” In pleading for finan- 
cial assistance from the gov- 
ernment, he pointed out that 
Italian dubs, for example. 


receive £40 million from the 
pools, almost seven rimes as 
much as the total granted to 
those in the Football League. 

Even if the troubles inside 
and. increasingly, outside the 
grounds become less frequent 
and less ugly, it seems in- 
evitable that attendances will 
fall still further — especially in 
the first division. Anera small 
rise, the top dubs will prob- 
ably be watched by their 
smallest ever aggregate crowd 
(the previous smallest set two 
years ago. is 8.711,488). 

As Chariton Athletic, who 
share the Selhnrst Park sta- 
dium with Crystal Palace, and 
Wimbledon move up with 
Norwich City, so the number 
of first division spectators is 
sure to go down. Their home 
crowds last season were 
250,000 lower than the ag- 
gregate of the three dubs they 
have replaced. 

A genuine challenge to 
Merseyside's monopoly 
would revive interest, but the 
prospect is unlikely. Liverpool 
are the favourites to collect 
their ninth title in a dozen 
years, particularly if Dalglish 
does not remain reluctant to 
select himself In the 25 games 
during which he did not play a 
full part last season, they 
dropped 31 points. 

As well as the prolific Rush, 
about to begin his last season 
at Anfidd before joining the 
exodus to Italy, they are 
armed with a surplus of fire 
power. Molby, for example, 
last season contributed 14 
goals from midfield Their 
defence, in which even 
Lawrenson is not assured of a 
permanent position, has no 
apparent weakness apart from 
the inconsistency of 
Grobbelaar. 

Everton, the most consis- 
tent side over the last three 
years, have lost Lineker, the 
scorer of 30 League and six 
World Cup goals, but they 
claimed the championship 



Deadly duo: Cottee (left) and McAvennie, of West Ham, primed for another campaign 


without his help in 1985. Yet 
they have temporarily lost 
several other senior repre- 
sentatives through injury and 
in spite of the arrival of the 
expensive Watson from Nor- 
wich, their first few steps may 
be uncharacteristically 
tentative. 

Manchester United lean as 
heavily as England on the 
influence of their captain, 
Robson. His fitness is of 
paramount importance and, 
although their rearguard 
continues to be surprisingly 
effective (in conceding only 36 
goals, the defence was the 
strongest in the first division 
last season), their front line, 
now without Hughes, would 
appear to be too weak. 

West Ham United's spear- 
head was one of the most 
fearsome in the land. 
McAvennie and Cottee 
claimed 46 goals between 
them and a similar striking 
rate would take them back 
into contention. But for fix- 
ture congestion, they might 
have finished last May with 
more than the Southern 
Crown. 

Arsenal and Tottenham 


Hotspur, for differing reasons, 
ended up with little more than 
disappointment. Arsenal 
scored too few and Tottenham 
conceded too many. The fresh 
men in charge, George Gra- 
ham and David Pleat respec- 
tively. must correct the 
imbalance if they are to fulfil 
the expectations of dubs 
whose recent success does not 
correspond to their wealth. 

Nottingham Forest, filled 
with stylish and attractive 
promise, are expected to be 
candidates lying on the fringe 
with Chelsea and Sheffield 
Wednesday, both of whom 
have gained a reputation for 
being inhospitable hosts. The 
rest of the field wiH be more 
concerned with avoiding a 
trap door that has been 
extended. 

The bottom two will go 
through it automatically. The 
dub above them will play off 
against those finishing third, 
fourth and fifth in the second 
division for a place among the 
elite next season. Hie wel- 
come change in the antiquated 
system will dearly introduce 
added tension and excitement 
at the season's end. 


Evasive Pleat proves he has 
adapted to the big time 


CLIVE WHITE ON THE CHANGES FOR THE SEASON 


The an of discretion, or some 
would say downright prevarica- 
tion. that is normally associated 
with the big time in football has 
obviously not been lost on 
David Pleat- 

In the time it takes to adjust to 
spending £1 million, Luton 
Town's forthcoming manager 
has become Tottenham 
Hotspur's rather more evasive 
one. That much became appar- 
ent when Pleat was asked yes- 
terday if his two expensive new 
signings, Richard Gough and 
Mitchell Thomas, would be in 
the side to open Tottenham's 
new season at Villa Park today. 

They will probably both 
play." was as much as Pleat 
would reveaL as if he would 


By Nicholas Hairing 

contemplate leaving out either 
of the new defenders after a 
season in which Tottenham left 
so much to be desired. Of 
Gough, bought from Dundee for 
£700,000, and who made his 
debut in the 2-1 win over AC 
Milan in the Barcelona tour- 
nament this week. Pleat did 
elaborate “He will always get up 
to score goals but I wasn’t 
influenced by the way he played 
for Scotland in the World Cup 
as I didn't think he had a 
particularly good toumamenL 
He is 24 but very mature." 

Gough is expected to line up 
in the centre of Tottenham’s 
defence alongside Gary 
MabbutL with Thomas, a Pleat 
prottge at Luton, at left back. 


That will almost certainly mean 
the exclusion of either Graham 
Roberts, who is doubtful in any 
case, or Paul Miller — who 
kicked him in the Milan match 
— or both. 

Yesterday’s occasion was the 
unveiling of Tottenham's 
spectacular new team coach, 
which has cost Holsten. their 
sponsors, £150.000. Equipped 
with kitchen, bar, televirion and 
video, it should certainly lessen 
the depression of travelling back 
from away defeats, even if it 
may provoke jokes about 
Tottenham's defence having 
enough gaps to drive their coach 
through, should Gough, Mitch- 
ell er al not be up to standard. 


• First division to be reduced to 
20 clubs and second division to 
be expanded to 24 over next two 
seasons by the following 
method: bottom three dobs in 
the first di vision to be relegated, 
top two in second promoted. 
Gub finishing nineteenth in the 
first division to enter play-off 
with dubs finishing third, fourth 
and fifth m the second division; 
winners to compete in first 
division the following season. 
Play-offdraw: Second division's 
fifth club v First drvisi on 19th; 
Second division third v fourth. 
Winners to meet. AD ties two 
legs. 

• Bottom two dubs in second 
division, instead of three,, to be 
automatically relegated and top 
two in third division to be 
promoted. Gub finishing 20th 
in second division to enter play- 
off with third, fourth and fifth- 
placed teams in third division; 
winner to compete in second 


division . Play-off draw: Third 
division fifth v Second division 
20th; Third division third v 
fourth. Winners to meet. All ties 
two legs. 

• Bottom three dubs in third 
division, instead of four, to be 
automatically relegated and top. 
three from fourth division pro- 
moted. Gub finishing 21st in 
third division to enter play-off 
with fourth, fifth and sixth dubs 
in fourth division: winners to 
compete in third division. Play- 
off draw. Fourth division sixth v 
Third division 21st; Fourth 
division fourth v fifth. Winners 
to meet. All matches two legs. 

• Play-ofls to be retained there- 
after but will be contested only 
by four teams from the lower 
division in each instance. 

• Bottom dnb in fourth di- 
vision to be relegated to GM 
Vauxhali Conference League, 
whose winner will be promoted 


BOWLS 

Richards 
recovers 
to regain 
his title 

By Gordon Allan 

Wynne Richards, a Welsh- 
man from the mid-Surrey dab, 
yesterday won the Gateway 
English Bowling Association 
singles title at Worthing for the 
second time. He beat David 
Taylor of British RaQ, Carlisle 
21-18 m the final after being 11 - 
18 down. 

Richards, who first won the 
title two years ago, is the seventh 
player since the championship 
started in 1905 to win it more 
than once. He joins a distin- 
guished band comprising David 
Bryant (six times). Percy Baker 
(four), Peter Line, Bill Irish, 
Chris Ward and W F Wade (all 
twice). 

At 18-1 1 down. Richards drew 
the shot with fab last bowl. More 
important he gained the mat, 
changed the jack length from 
long to medium and proceeded to 
reel off six winning ends. Taylor 
put a bowl on the jack on the last 
end bat Richards drew it off 
perfectly and set Taylor an 
insoluble problem. 

Richards’ achievement — and 
that of anybody who wins this 
title — can be measured by the 
fact he had to win 16 matches to 
become the champion: ten at 
county level, six at Worthing. 

In the semi-finals Richards 
beat Peter Towers, of Liskeard, 
21-16 and Taylor beat Roy 
Hedges of Bristol 21-18. 
Towers, a milkman by trade, 
played some express deliveries 
(otherwise known as firing 
shots), to beep Richards on 19 
and in suspense for four ends. In 
his match. Taylor led all the way- 
bat did not shake off the 
tenacious Hedges until the last 
bowl had gone in. 

Northumberland, the holders, 
play Leicestershire and 
Worcestershire play Wiltshire 
in today’s semi-finals of the 
Middleton Cup (county 
championship). Leicestershire 
have won the cop once, in 1964. 
Worcestershire and Wiltshire 
have never been in the finaL 

RESULTS; Singles quarter-finite P 
Towns (Liskeard) w E Persons (Wor- 
tfimo) 71-8: W Richards (Mie- Surrey) bt D 
Denson (Newton Aotxn) 21-15: R Radges 
(Bristol) bt D Rutter (Chnstchurtfi, Caros) 
21-16: D Taylor (Bnnsh Rail. Cumtma) tt A 
Moore (Spencers. Mfflkshamj 21-11. 
Semi-finals Richards w Towers 71-16: 
Taylor bt Hedges 21 ■ ifl. Rnafc Rcnanfc bt 
Taylor 21-18/ 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL. CRICKET AND OTHER FIXTURES 


Kick-off 3.0 unless stated 

Ffrst division 

Arsenal v Manchester Utd 

A ViBa v Tottenham 

Charlton v Sheffield Wed — — 

Chelsea v Norwich 

Everton v Nottingham F 

Lecesterv Luton 

Manchester C v Wimbledon 

Newcastle v Liverpool 

Southampton v OPR 

Watford v Oxford 


Second division 

Barnsley v C Palace 

Blackburn v Leeds 

Bradford v Plymouth 
Brighton v Portsmouth 
Derby v Oldham 


Thud division Fourth division 

Blackpool v Chesterfield Exeter v Orient 

Bolton v Swindon Hafifax v Aldershot 

Brentford v Bournemouth Hartlepool v Canfiff 


Huddersfield v Sunderland 

HufivWBA 


West Ham v Coventry 

GM VAUXHALL CONFERENCE: Bath v 

WSIKng: Boston v Dagenham; Cheltenham 

v Barnet Enfield v FnckJey; Kettering v 

Altrincham; Maidstone v Weymouth; 

Northwi ch v Kridennuaiei. Nineaton v 

Sutton: Scarborough v Weaklstane: Staf- 

ford v Runoom: Teftord v Gateshead. 

VAUXHALL -OPEL LEAGUE: Prin te r DE 
wfeorc Bishop's Stanford v Slough; 

Bognar v Hitatwi; B ro m ley v Harrow. 

Baricfog: riAttare^?ovi^^»Siow 

v Wycom be; Windsor 8 Eton v Worthing; 

Wokingham v Tooting & MrKftant. Di- 

vision One O Be ri c a y v Uxbridge: 

Boreham Wbod v Epsom and Ewsl: Grays 
v Bracknell: KJnosbury v Starnes; 

Leatharhaad v Tilbury; Lewes v 
RnChtoy: Maiden- 

d : 


Ipswich v Grimsby 

Reading v Mi&waM 

Sheffield Utd v Shrewsbury . 
Stoke v Birmingham 


Basngton 


n; Oxford City t 

Walton and Harstiam v Kanptoi Wem- 

bley v Leytonstone UtardL OMskm Two 
North Barton Rovers v Hartow. Chester* 

v Berthamstect Coffer Roar v Vauxhel 

Motors; Kernel Hempstead v Saffron 

WakJon; Letcfiwort h v Haringey; Rainham 

v Agertfort; Roysfon v Hornchurch; Trtng 

v Reybridge Swifts; wake v Awtoy; 
Wrvenhoe v Chesham; Wbhrarton v 
Ctepham. DMeioa TWo South: Banstsad v 

Newbury; Chalfomv Horsham; Ctwrtseyv 

Southafl; Eastbomw v Marlow; Fattfam v 

Egham; Blackwell Haath v Whytetoafe: 
Nungerfort v DorWngr Mel Ponce v 
Wekalg: Pe te sfield v Harefiefc* Ruafip 
Manor vGcmftertey. 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Bangor v Mattock: 

Buxton v moon: Choriey v Worksop; 

GOON v Southport; Norwich v Oswestry; 

Hyde v Caernarfon: MacdflsMd v More- 

cttttbe; Marine v Burton; Rhyl v Barrow; 

South Liverpool v Gainsborough; 

Workington v Mosaley. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier OivssroiE 

Bedwonh v Aylesbury; Bromsgrave v 

Chelmsford: Dufiey v Hartford (at 
Hednesford FCL Fareham v Cambridge 
Cite fisher v Redditch; Folcestone v 
Alvechurch: Gosport v Sbepshed; King's 

® v Basingstoke, Salisbury v Corby; 

rtftaS v Crawtar Witney v Worcester. 

Ndtend Division: Banbury v H a l eso w e n; 

Bridgnorth v Leicester: Coventry Sporting 
v Grantham; Gloucester v Hednesford: 
Leamington v Steam: Merthyr Tydfil v 
Buckingham; Mite Rovers v Rushden: 
Moor Green v Stawtridge: VS Riwby v 
Sutton Coldfield: WeUngborough v Forest 
(keen Rovers. Sontbem Dhrisforc Canter- 
bury « Rubflp; Chatham v Woodford: 
Dorche s ter v Frith and Belvedere: 
Dunstable v Burnham and 
Gravesend and Nonnffm v 


FOOTBALL COSBINAIIOW Bristol Rws 
v Chelsea (280); FMnem v Southampton 
0.0); Luton v Arsenal (2% Oxford Utd v 
Reading; Portsmouth v Brighton (230): 
OPR v west Ham (24): Tottenham v 
Charlton (Z0). 

SOUTH EAST COWT1ES LEAGUE: First 
dvlsteK Arsenal v Cambridge U feted; 
Chariton v Chelsea; Firfham v Gibnaham: 
MNwall v Ipswich: Nonwch v Orient; OPR 
v Portsmouth: West Ham v Watford. 
Second tUvtekxc Boranemouth v Brant- 
ford; Brighton v Bristol Rovers; Crystal 
Palace v Coleiwstar: Luton v Northamp- 
ton: Oxford United v r “ " 
ton i 


RUSH LEAGUE: Lombard Utetar Cup: 
Ards v Dundeia; Ballymena v GJenawn: 
Bangor v RUC: CtetonvOft v Gterttoran; 
Coleraine v Portadown; Crusaders v 
Dotflny: Lame v Cantata Lin field v 

NORTHERN COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 
Premier dtvtskxx AKreton v Pontefract 
Collieries: Boston v Harrogate: 
Bridlington Town v Thaddey, Denaby v 
Armtfwrpa Welfare; E astwood v Betpec 
Giasetev V Sutton Town; Long Eaton v 
Bentl ey’ V ictoria: 

Bncfllndton Tiuirty. 

DRYBuROUGHS i 

One: Brandon v Spa nn ymo or ; Chester-to- 

Street v Whitley Bey; Dunsett v Crook; 
n v North Shields; Fenyt* v 

Teniers; Peteriee v Bryth; 

Gretna; Whitby v Bonop 

•oood dhfefeK Ashington v 
BWncfeanc Bifinghsm Town v Evenwooct 
Durham City v West Auckland: Esh 
WXrtng v Gfo&Porougti; NortaaSsrton v 
Akwncfc Norton v Langley Parte Bhutton 

Comrades v Shkdon; Sockton v Seaham 

Red Star: WWngion v Ctentend Bridge. 

GREAT MILLS WESTBttfc Premier D»> 
vMoce B a rn s t a ple v To rringfon; BUatord 
v Chard; 8ns»l M. Farm v Mfoohend; 
Oawtttfi v Chippenham; Uskahrd v Tarev 
un; Mangotsteto v Esnoum; Maaotom v 
Weston Super Mare; Pautan v Rome; 
Pfymouth Annie v Ctevedon; Hadatock v 
BncrttiCftyiSaUashvCtendOwiL 
BUUffiG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Braintree v Gorteaton; Buy v Wisbech; 
Chatters v StowmarKat Ctateon v 
Fe&xsfow; Cofchester Utd Reserves v Gt 
Yarmouth: Harwich and Pericaston v 
Soham; Hteton v By; Lowestoft v 
Brantham: March v TTgoont Newmar ke t 
v HavertJb Tiptree v Sudbury. 


Bristol C v Bury . 

Chester vCartisfe 

Mansfield v Doncaster 

Middlesbrough v P Vale 

fat Hartlepool, frpm) 

Newport v GMngham 

Notts Co v Wigan 

Rotherham v Fuitam 

WalsaU v Bristol R 

York v Darlington 

ESSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: Senior cS- 

viafom Bowers v Stansted: Chafms fo rd v 

East Tterrocte Coggeshal v Brentwood; 

East Ham v Brightfingsea; Eton Manor v 

Convey bland; Halstead v Woodford; 

Makton v Font Puriteet v WHh em; 

Sewbridgeworth v Burnham. 

COMOMED COUNTIES LEAGUE: Pre- 

rafer dNWos Ash v Chipstead: Chobharn 

v Farteigh; Frirrtey Green v BAe 
(Weybricfga): Goditafrig v Maiden Vale; 
Hanley WMtneyv Gotham; Horley vCove; 
Malden v Famfanr; Menstham v Yrgirxa 
Water Westfield v Crantogb. 

CRICKET 

TOrd Corah* Teat Mattel 
THE OVAL: England v New Zealand 
Britannic Assurance County 


Hereford v Wrexham 

Lincoln v Colchester 

Peterborough v Southend 
Rochdale v Crewe 


Scunthorpe v Northampton 

Swansea v Stockport 

Torquay V Burnley (7.30) 
Trantnere v Preston , 
Wolverhampton v Cambridge . 


Scottish premier division 

Celtic v Aberdeen 

Dundee Utd v Hearts 

Falkirk v Dundee ; 


Hamiton v Rangers — 
Hibernian v Motherwell . 
& Mirren v Clydebank - 


Scottish first division 

Brechin v Morton 

Dumbarton v Forfar 

Dunfermline v Clyde 

E Fife v Airdrie 


BfUDGE: Nottnghainshrm v 


Essex v Surrey 

CAHDn 2 : Gtamorgai v Kent 
BOURMaaoUTH: Hampshire v Yorkshire 
OLD TRAFFORD: Lancashire v 
fU ffl ws M Bi sh he 

LEICESTER: Leicestershire v 

Nort ham p t on shi re 
TRENT 
Derbyshire 
HOVE: Sum 

Worcester: Worcestershire v 

Warwickshire. 

Ctebcot apumoa final 

LOOTS Stourbridge v Weston-super- 

Mare 

OTHEH SPOUT 

boxing: ibf super-ieatherwelam 
Championship (Oaho v Michael; 
Manchester), 


KSmamock v Montrose 
Partick v Queen of Sth . 


Scottish second division 

ABoav Ayr , 


Arbroath v Stenhsmuir 

Bentfek v E Stirling 

Cowdenbeath v Stirting _ 

Meadowbanfc v Rartfi 

Queen's Park v Str an raer , 

St Johnstone v Albion — 


John 


ATHLETICS: Brian v France 
events (Cry aal Palace). _■ 

Bi JkJi Marathon Champion. 


BRASS NORTH WEST COUNTIES: Boode 
v Netherfiefo; " 

Otheroa 

Aecrmgtor Stanley; Fleetwood v Curzon 
Ashton: Leak v Roasendate: Leytoid 

Motors v Gfossop; Radditi v Kkkby: St »*»«E ™ALS: Scottish c 
Helens v Penrith; Stafybnde v {Hem. 


TOMORROW 

CRICKET 

imI |_twm 

Essex v Surrey 
BOURNEMOUTH: Hompshkev Yorkshire 
OLD TRAFFORD: Lancashire v 
Northamptonshire 


aanter Ftostenod vCuttm “UfcSimAltiSat S* ^ ‘ 


Jianping 
championships 


TRENT BRIDGE: 
Derbyshire 
HOVE: Suss 


Notting hams hire v 


l Oxford Unttsd v Rearing; Sauttramp- 
i v Swtndon; Southend v Wmbtedon. 


iratE GROUP UNJTQ3 C0UNTE& Pro- 
alter dMtiom AfifothB v Rhundc Ariesiey 
v Spalding: Bakfock v Brack ley; 
Lynartxiy v Hoi beach; S and L Corby v 
Kempston; StotteU v Long Buckby 
Modton v Desbomugh. League to Cffpr 
Bourne v Nun Spencer Burton P W v 
Romwteh M Blackstone v Ford arts. 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Preuder 
division: Amersham v Southgate: 
Baridngside v De consflel d. Beckton v 
Nonhwood: Corinthian-Casuals v 
Hanwel: Edgware v Dan sen; Rmtffatr v 
Bnmsdown; Ulysses v Pennart WaBham- 
AbbeyvReadbia 

HALLS BREWSIY HEUEMC LEAGUE: 
Premier tfivtetoic Abingdon v Pegaeus; 
Hounslow v Fartord: raynes Lane v 
Sharpness; Shortwtxx) v Morris Motors: 
Supemanne v Bicester VMng Sports v 
PenhB: Wanmgford v Moreton; Yet* v 
Abmadon. 

SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: Prat tfi- 
visfon: Arundel v Burgess HB (2.15); 
Hadshsm v Mfotxrsi & Ease; Horsham 
ymca v wiwehawte Lancing v Ctacn- 
ester Peacehaven S Teisoombe v 
Shore ham (2.15). Ponfieid v Eastbourne: 
Three Bridges v LfflJahempton: Wide v 
Haywards Heath. 


lOLF: Glasgow Open (Haggs 
GasttefcBriiish women's open amaare 
urieGCL 

_ . Outon Park meeting. 

ROWING: World Championships (Holms 
Ptemepom. Nottingham). 

TENNIS: British Vor 
(EBstboume) 


: Sussexv Mkfdssex 
HX3BASTDN: Warwickshire * Somerset 
WORCESTER: Worcestershire v 
Gtemorgen 

rbm VrOumzws iiOOTDamap 

AMERSHAM: BucliinghBmshira v 
Oxfords hire 

gSWIOfc Suffolk v Bedfords hi re 


jufeor c ham pio nsh i ps 


Boost for York 


Forge VWtoy v Yriysygerwn 

OTHER SPORT 

ATHLETICS: Brttti v France combined 
ev ents (Crystal Patacei 
AMERICAN FOOTBALL: Ptay-ofl semi- 
fingfc B tf Pitngh8m Bufls v Fytde Falcons- 


York Rugby League dub 
should soon be £200.000 the 
richer after yesterday’s 
announcement that their Haxby 
Road training ground is to be 
auctioned at the city's Cbase 
Hotel on October 2. The sale 

was made possible last week. raargowneGG) ' ' * 

when York City Council de- motSctcung; O uhon Park meeting, 
cided to allow a housing POWBtBOATINft London Grand Pnx 


EOUESTRtANtSAfe Sic Cut Junpkig 
Derby Maetng (Hckstead). 

HORSE TRtALSi Scccsh crtam pi on sM ps 
(Lwderi. 

GOLF: Glasgow Open (Haggs Castle); 
British women's open amaaur str okepiay 


devdopment on the two acre 
site. It should save the second 
division dub — which has lost 
£ 1 80.000 in the last four years — 
from bankruptcy. 


(Royal Victoria Docks). 

CROQUET: HurtnghamW atkud 
TENNIS; Brrtrth jufeor C ftam prOftStep* 
(Eastooume) 

ROWING: Wortd qtarylorignipe (Hotew 
PiorroponL ” 


to the Football League provided 
ground facilities sid financial 
structure are approved. 

• Prize money to be decided 
when new sponsor is 
announced. 

• Contribution to League's 
mutuality pool reduced from 4 
per cent levy on gate receipts to 
3 per cent, thereby allowing big 
dubs to retain wealth. 

• New television sponsorship 
worth 6.2 miDkrn pounds over 
two seasons. First division dnhs 
to receive 50 per cent, seoend 
division 25 per cent, and third 
snd fourth divisions 25 percent 
shared equally between them. 

• BBC and ITV to screen 14 live 
league games, both Littlewoods 
Challenge Cup semi-finals and 
the final and recorded highlights 
of midweek league and 
Littlewoods cup ties. FA Cup 
coverage and weekend recorded 
highlights yet to be decided 
Confirmed league dates: Sept 
21: Everton v Manchester 
United (BBC); 28: Manchester 


United v Chelsea (ITV); Oct 26: 
Manchester City v Manchester 
United (ITV); Nov 2: West 
Ham v Everton (BBC); 16: 
Liverpool v Sheffield Wednes- 
day(lTy* 23: Everton v Liver- 
pool (BBC); 30: N ewcastie 
West Ham (ITV); Dec 7: Man- 
chester United v Tottenham 
Hotspur (BBC); 14: Liverpool v 
Chelsea (BBC). 

• League 

Littlewoods worth two 
pounds over three seasons. 
Contribution to mutuality pool 
from gate receipts to be reduced 
from 20 percent to 10 per cent, 
thereby enabling big dobs to 
retain wealth, winners prize 
money increased by 3,000 
pounds to 75,000 pounds; other 
prize money to be decided. 

• Luton Town's ban on visiting 
supporters comes into operation 
on Tuesday for game against 
Southampton at Kenilworth 
Road. Leag u e have ordered 
Littlewoods Challenge Cup 
home ties to be played on 
another ground. 

• Club contribution to FA Cup 
pool to be reduced from 33 and 
a third percent to 10 per cent, 
thereby enabling big dubs to 
retain wealth. 

• Two substitutes to be permit- 
ted in FA Cup and Littlewoods 
Challenge CUp ties. 

• The -future of S c re en Sport 
Super Cup, contested last season 
by those dubs affected by 
European ban, and Full 
Members' Cup, open to first and 
second division .teams , still to 
be decided. (Last season's super 
cup final between Liverpool and 
Everton will be played at 
Anfidd on Septemeber 16 and 
Goodison Parte on September 
30). 

• Freight Rover Trophy, with 
three years' sponsoship 
outstanding, continues, 

British Cup shelved for this 
season because of heavy club 
commitments in Scotland. 

• League management commit- 
tee restructured to consist of 
four representatives from first 
division, three from the second 
and One for the third and fourth 

Philip Carter.of Everton, is the 
new chairman. 

Preston North End and Old- 
ham Athletic to play -.home 
games on artificial surfaces this 
season like Queen' Park Rangers 
and Luton Town before them: 

Bristol Rovers to share 
ground facilities with Bath, of 
GM Vauxhali Conference 
League, at Twenon Park. In 
Scottish League, Clyde and 
Partick Thistle w9! share facil- 
ities at Firhili -Park. Chariton 
Athletic and Crystal Palace al- 
ready operating ground-sh armg 
scheme at Seftrarst Park. 


TEAM CHECK 


Arsenal v Manchester UW 

Something special wW be 
expected of Ron Atkinson s 

men thte season: after test 

season’s openmg burst fourth 
place was tantamount to 
failure. ArsenaTs new man- 
ager. Graham, faces simitar 


Manchester 
Wimbledon ' 
Wmbtedonstirsti 
baptism could bevel _ __ 
tasting, though mteoB oea 
wiH be daunting eno^Bb. Am 

Bassett the managgr^MB . 
ager. Graham, faces stimtor chosMttoroaGorttefthte ' 

demands. Olsen and Sfvebaek, from from 

the World Cup Danes, are ^aScK- City fMd new bq« 

dropped. 

Aston VHIav Tottenham 
voia. obliged to make an im- 
pression this season after the 

money that Tomer has 
spam, counter Tottenham's big 
signings with thefr own in 
Thompson and Keown; Cooper 
is injured. The perfor- 
mances of Tottenham's Gough 
and Thomas -and the 
mana ger Ple at— wiB be viewed 
with interest 
Chariton v Shaft Wed 
Chariton, who return to the 
first division after 29 years, wffl 
do wen not to bid a prompt 
farewell. Shirtfiff. a summer 
signing, confronts his oM 
teammates, as does Pearson. 


The format is new, albeit 
marginally. So is the League 
president (it was disturbing 
that Philip Carter, the fresh 
incumbent, should immedi- 
ately threaten to introduce yet 
another cup competition) and 
the personnel at more than a 
few dubs. Yet the game still 
frees dangers that are old. 

Middlesbrough are the lat- 
est to join a growing list of 
those who are on the edge of 
collapse. For almost a quarter 
of a century the League has 
stayed in tad, a feat that 
Taylor concedes is “ a 
miracle". But the financial 
troubles lor the smaller dubs 
will be entered since their 
share of the spoils has been 
diminished. 

The number of pro- 
fessionals has gone down (by 
one-fifth in the last five years), 
the number of fixtures has 
gone up and the resources are 
being stretched beyond 
reasonable limiL Football, 
kicked mercilessly by the 
hooligans and ignored increas- 
ingly by the public, is about to 
embark on yet another chapter 
in its fight for survival. 


Wednesday, fifth last sea- 
son. hope that Hirst, their sign- 
ing from Barnsley, wffl give 

them that extra punch. 

Chelsea v Norwich 

This should be a stem fast 
of Norwich's resources after 
the sales of Watson and 
Woods and of the wisdom of 
their new p ur chases. Crook 
and Putney. Hoffins. the 
demanding Chelsea man- 
ager, win not be safifled with 
seventh place this season. 
Everton v Nottm Forest 
Even without SouthaO. 

Reid, BraceweH.Van den 
Hauwe and others, Everton 
look equipped for the top. Wat- 
son, their £900,000 buy, 
makes his League debut for 
the dub, as do rawer and 
Langley. Clough, the Forest 
manager, win rely again on 
excellent home produce. 
Leicester v Luton 
Bryan Hamilton, Leicester's 
new Irish manager, has bokfly 
dropped Northern Ireland's 
World Cup player, O'Netfl, and 


Chnstte and SwMtegtwl 
have yet to agree arms wtih 

Hopkins, from Bkfftinghnt, . 
Newcastle v Liverpool 
Liverpool start the dtiuttt 
of their trtta possfoty w*ow 
Grobbelaar, ever-present 
for 31 7 games. KHootand 
Walsh are stffl mjured but 
Rush, sold to JuremuE. re- 
mains awntebte. Newc&stls, 
who surprised evaryon* with 
last season's fomt, may be 
without Cterke. th*r centra 
beck- . . _ 

Southampton v OPR 
Some improvement ran] be 

axpecteo from Smith's Bittn- 
ers team this season. Tfteir 
squad includes Seaman and 
BrazR the* summer buys, 
but not Fenwick, who is av 
hired. Another England • 
player, Shitton, is back. in ao- 
ttonforSouthwnpfflMter 
injury. Clarke, the tosh World 
Oggayer, makes Ws 

Watford v Oxford Utd 

Two dubs who provide the 


rom Wigan, his debut For Lu- 
ton, an awkward start to life 
without Pleat, their former 
manager. 


LEADING TRANSFERS 


£33 WUJONrianRuto-- Liverpool 
to Jtiventus 

£2.75 MLUON: Gary Uiwker - 
Everton to Barcelona 
£2 MfUJON: Marie Hughe* -Man- 
chester United to Barcelona 

£900,000: Dave Wateon— Norwich 
City to Everton 

£725^00: Terry Butcher — Ipswich 
Town to Glasgow Rangers 
£700,000: Mchwd Gough - Dun- 
dee United to Tottenham 
£600*000: Chris Wooda - Norwich 
City to Glasgow Rangers 
£450400: GanyTbompaoa- Shef- 
field Wednesday toAstooVBa 

£4OU)0Q: Stave Wicks - Queen's 
Park Rangers to Chelsea. 
£400,000: CoBn Ctariw - Bourne- 
mouth to Southampton 
£350,000: Neafe Cooper - Aber- 
deen to Aston VBa 
^TWjW MMlDtNNt Connor nm»H 
to Aberdeen 

£250,000: David ffinf — Barnsley to 
Sheffield Wednesday 


£250^ MtcheO Thomas - talon 
Town to Tottenham Hotspir 
£225,000: Dadd Seaman - BJt- 
Cfty to Quean s Perk 


£200,000: Barry Venison— Sunder* 
land to Liverpool 

£200^)00: Erto Stock -Aberdeen to 
Metz 

£200,000: David Hlrat - Barnsley to 

Sheffield Wednesday 

£170400: CoBaWest- Watford to 

Glasgow Rangers 

£150000: Nad Adams - Stoke to 

Everton 

£140000: Tony Woodcock - Arse* 
nal to Cologne 

£125000: Martin Keown - Arsenal 
to Aston Villa 

£120000: Alan Bratir - Coventry 
City to Queen’s Park Rangers 
£120000: Keith Edwards - Shef- 
field United to Leeds Urwetl 
£100000: Xavto Langfoy - Wigan 
Athletic to Everton 
£100,000: Steve Wtrfsh - Wigan 
Athletic to Leicester City 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Continued from facing page 

SATURDAY 


BBC1 •»£ES5.1MJ0pm 

Sports Nam WMbs.SCOT- 
LAND6.t5^tara Scottish Nrara 
and sport Normemi relamm-55- 
SJOBpm Northern totem Rada 
(offrout from Grandstand). S.15-&20 
News. l2.l0-12.Uan HaMktesand 
WaatherClDsa.ENatAins.'fSUaiiai 
London -Sport. So u th -Wte« t-Spot- 
Sght Sport and News. Aiotbar&xjtah re- 
tfoite-Bsgtan sl News and Sport. 

CHANNEL as London ex- 

viwn ncL ^ ti joan-1200 


CHANNEL 

ajO-W0O Las Fftncas Qtex-vous 
iJMpaKXOO Minted All Goes East 
2J0O00(toNMCainaia1240iwd- 
^jl a Mtwna Bast Rtends l2J0aw 1 

htvwest ^^v,,^ 

Mouse 935-1000 Rotxmocy liMpn 

Gintentao Tima 1 JO-200 wfcst Country 

Fanning £30 Fim: Carpool A30 
Carapbato5J»Sur«MS|wctel6ro- 

8J0 ABm Martmt 124» nUnfoH 

Ctosadown 

HTV WAI FS NovanaticsxA 1 
'U jaas p rogr a nwnas aia 
[for HTVWUsL 


Tter abaw i<aZ15pni-M5 Ftot Bh» 

Max 1200 teMnfgU Doors Ara Open 
1 -Main Ctosadown. 

SCOTTISH A* London sx 

J pVV . L 1 cart; lt30am-T2JD 
Tanshawks 2A5pm-A4S Bel’s Scot- 
tish Open GoH 1200 raUnfoM Golf VIM 
mm Late Cat. Closedown. 


Tananawks 4£bara&00 Sports Re- 
sults 124» atoSht At Home -John 
OaJcsay 122SsmNms. Ctosadown. 

YOBt«H!RE„* S »a_ 

Return 


to Traasue island 7.00-7.1 . 
Qrurabteweeds 1200 ratonight- 
6-OOwn Music Box. 

As Lmnion e re ep t 


BORDER 


it 


-1Z00 


S T* 


Scsrtst 2 ASmhM 9 GoH 12 jOO l 
Mgtt Gott^ uao an Ctocsdown. 
TVS As London except 

— 11J0MH IZOOTenehawks 
1200 MUtegkt Doors Ara Open 

IJOww Company. Ctos a down. 

GRANAD A As London ax 


cepe ii JOm-tzoc 

Terrahawhs 2.15pm345 Bmson 
SOS Return to Treasure island 7.00-7.30 
Qumbtowaeds 1200 raMWaM Tan 

Yaara Alter to Concert iXStera Tffas 

from the Osrtcskte 1 JO Ctoaadown. 

Tenohawfcs 1X00 nteMgtt I am me 

Bues 1 JXtem ffoetry oTttw Faopte. 

Ctosadown. ■ 

GRAMPIAN . .A?tgndpnex_._ 

— • ce«: Il.ttOaei 1 ZO 0 

Tfljtoiigs2A5pm-4.«5Bers Scoi- . 
feh Open Go?15L00 midnigMGoU 
1Z4(teB Reflactttans. Ctosadown. 
TSW As London except 

-LgJLil Tli-12.00 Gaalong Gang 
1200 mkMght Rock of the Ssvm- 
ites 1208am Postscript, Ctosadown. 

CENTRAL a« Loreoftto- __ 

to Treasure 

land 1 J0-7 JO Grunbleweede 1200 

fteR»ra:Wa« Point Story 5A8a- 

Idoo Itodna 11.ro WhAB Hear games 
C^nsy) lASemCtowttam. 

ANGLIA As London i 


. as London except 
■ 1L30sm-12bof5aOugs 


120Omtdnfoht -Thirty Hoaywood 
1220m At the End of the Day, 

Ctosadown. 

HTV W EST « Lon** a* 

* . m i * Ti_anM>. ts nn 

TetoPugs iMOr^^tRiSr™ 
Frame lUOsm Closedown. 

HTV WALES no 


_ ■ vartation jMI pn>. 

gsnmwere the aame as those tor 

SUNDAY 

sBsi sss'sraau,^ 

Woatttef: Close. 3CaYLAMD12.HI- 
12.15sn News Headton and Waadwr: 
Close. NORTHBtN RtELANDI^W-^ 

^ CrahB Pai ^ 

Cut*!. 11 JO- 12.40am The Btscfc 

and WMa Madia Show. 12^0-1245 
Nam Hendfcnes snd Wemtiar Ctasa. 

200 fisnr They Who Cars too* r 

i.SJftOo Atoton Market 1200 


CAP Starts: 1230ora Irish Anote 
zE2 + 1 AS ChengtegTimes JL» 

Gantanors' Calanov' Roadshow 2.40 

Carnatic Music 320 SmUfo' Through' 

5.15 kind of David Barglas MOGoM 
7J0 Nawyddton 7J0 Caa am Gan 8J». 
PwySy'nPenbyn?ajOBydC«Tdd 

9.15 Maupassant 10.15 Fan: Angels wttb 
Duty Faces tUSan Gtosadoan. 

CENTRAL 

9J&-10JX) Fargface 1 JMpm Gar- 
denma Tima 1.30-240 Hare and Now- - 
230 An: Cany On Haniy 400 Mind 
Your Language 430 CampbBSs SM Sur- 
wwal Special u»-430 Attxon Martiat . . 
lino RMMght Jopfindsr 1 JWsm 
Ctosadown. 

11- 3&-.12j» South west Week 
Scaracnxw and Mm 

K toflZaflF arrclyi't Life Wcndartur 400 

■ 

Du* Fac tory 127Sa«n Postscript, 

wawown. 

GRAMPIAN 

AsMounUS S esame Street 

»iiSgSlS^3r ,0,,, ■ 

830 Albton frfortMt 1230 uteMglit Re- 
Oacttons, Ctosadown. 

T YNE TEES 


facial 3-15TJHooK- 

gtertdteghlEpllofloe. 

Mouse SJ^IOAOSmsTto the IW .. 

^gCM^eteMOSunitwaispfeaai - 

— -tnipiftinteot Action Line 9J0* 
10.00 Smurfa 1 JOpmAto Muhem- 

Rte Ah Goee EeatgAKtoo candto 

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ing non-Leagu® »dei m th* 
restructured g»ne. Brtft vM be 
hard-pressaa to matte an 
impact on tt» chan^pfoftsWp 
but, as Oxford proved test 

season, there are alternative 
its. Watford’s Jacket! 


help of injections. 

West Ham v Coventry 
West Ham. London's sten- 

dard-bearers. open with the 

same side which wot sbvot 
of their last eight fixtures- To 
improve on last seasons 
best-over placing of nuro tney 
will have to spfit the 

Merseyskters. Cow^jnow 

maraud by George Girts, 
will again be everybody s 
favourite for relegation. 

Clive White 




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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1 98 * 




-V. 

■si 

■ •'SSjC 6*5 Open Unhrer oi ty . Unfl BOO. 
.. ' i\ ij B50 Tm Clangers (r)8*0 Hie 

FHtfflV-NeftS. frt SJL<> tfe® 


BBC 1 




sA 


Farafiy-Ness. (r) 8*5 The 
Saturday Picture Show 



television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Davalle, Elizabeth Larard 


31 


IV-AM 




'-iifeS • 






Hi 




. 


hr! 


v -«»■ 

>„n 

' -ti tv ' 


guestis UK 

cafe, better known as 
Gordon Kaye; Cheryl visits 
Spain and works her way 
back as an air hostess; 
naturalist Michael Jordan 
explores Wainey Island, 
near Barrow In Furness; 
Gary Davies reviews the 

European charts; plus 
Godzffla and the fetest 
videos. 

1055 Grandstand introduced by 

Desmond Lynam. The 
spiting programme is as 
Wtowsrllja and 3.15 
wicket: The Third Test 
England v New Zealand 
from The Oral; i.io 
Football; 1.00 News 


. ^WwSnBS 

news «t 7 JJ 0 ;regioSl 

J5grtat7J»;SSSo 

^ Awake Club 

witn Tommy Bovd. 
^ebete Warner and 
James Baker. 


itv/london 



— and Z35 Swimming: 
World Championships; 
25 £®and 3. (Seeing 
from Goodwood: The 
March States (2.00). the 
Ltemore States {236) and 
Waterford Crystal' Mile 
{3.10k 2JD5 and £15 • 
Rowan: Women's World 
Championship; 4.40 Pinal 
Scorn. 


•t-. ^vSJDS News with Moira Stuart 
Weather. 5.15 Sport and 
7 regional news. 

. The Montre ux Rock 

• . zm V Poefrual Thn H*m 1 


e ■ ; r . ^ 


. I 1 -- PIT' 



Festival. The fin* 

programme introduced by 
Mike Smith, starring 
Frankie Goes to 
Hollywood: Art of Noise: 
Befouls Some: Bronski 
^esiHa,. Beat Bghtti wonder; Elvfs 

:. *. CosteBo; ELO; Paul 

■ Hardcasfie; Marilyn - 

Martin: Beady tor the 
. World; and Bonnie Tyler. 

*" >-^6.10 The Dukes of Hszzard. 

Two convicts escape from 
>: the state prison in a 

* laundry van and demand 

Vi w': the Dukes 1 help in 

— cross’ ‘ 

. Fane 

.. slant 

and Jeff Bridges. A semi- 
spoof remake, with sexual 
overtones, of the 
memorable original of 

1933 about a giant ape 
which terrorizes New 
York. Directed by John 
GuflJerntin. (Ceefax) . 

, . _ 9.10 What the Butler Saw. Les 

Dawson's weekly preview 
- ■ - ■“*< of programmes on BBC1. 

. l * :9.2Q News and sport With 
c Moira Stuart Weather. 

1 ^tf-35 Laugh Attack. Comedy 

; -’p show in which David 

7- -V ajj CopperfieJd, Duncan 

Norvefle, Jeff Stevenson 
and Roy Walker and 


11-30 

Vicious^, 

12J@ News with Trevor 
McDonald. 
Safct&Gmavsie. A 
review of the sporting 
world with Ian St Join and 

IZwgSWlWW™ 

Centre. 

1-® A kwotf . There is a wave of 

BS-SSSSS 91 " 

Hawke's former Vk im 
friends; Archangel asks 

Hawke to find the key to 
the mystery and to free the 
trapped people. 

2.15 Comedy Classic: The 
Cuckoo Waltz. From the 
popular comedy series of 
tea 1970s, starring Diane 

Keen, David Roper and . 
Lewis Coffins, (rt 

2*5 World Champ; *- 
Boxing. From I 
tee IBF World; 

lerweigtrttittefigtrt. 

’.wjssssssss: 

"(Service. 



Sunday 


BBC 2 


6"3> Ope n University, Untfl 

1.55 F8acTheVaBeyof 
OwsngL (1968) starring 

^nesFranciscusanif 
Richard Carlson. 
Adventure about some 
co wboys who tfecover a 
prerostorfc monster in a 

SS5&E2S 

O'Connolly. 

3J0 Hie Sky at Ntoht Patrick 
Moore talks about the 


‘ t • ■ ~ 

1 « , 

i i : ' . 


: -2nT- 
• :-«rc 


«O*OHAtm£VlSI0NVA 


Jessica Martin give thefr 
impressions of famous 
personalities. The guest 
star is Rory Brwnner. 

J-05 EvftaPeron. Starrfrig Faye 
’ne Dunaway and James 

Farentino. The conclusion 
::;ksi of a two-part 

dramatization of the Ofe of 
. . ".'Aji the powerful and 

„ pfamorous Argentine, (t) 
.«.1-40 Late Night in Concert 
Anne Nightingale 
introduces the jazz sextet 
Simply Red, who were 
recoroedat thisyear's . 
Montreux Jazz FestivaL 
Numbers indude their hits 
‘Open up the red box* and 
Holding back tee years.’ 
12.10 Weather - 


; ;c: l*b. 

. : *T 
.■ jac 


Sports results. 

5JOO News with Trevor 
McDonakL 

MS The Gmmbleweeds 
Show. Comedy sketches, 
with music and 
_ impersonatforrs. 

5J5 John Stiver's Return to 
Treasure (stand. The final 
episode, in which Jan to 
sentenced by a kangaroo 
court to hang the foSowing 
^y. He enfists the help ex 
theEngflshalcohoBc 
pnson doctor, Leach in an 
escape plan. 

7-30 f^Afivs. Comedy show 
with music. 

B.15 Summertime Special The 
final programme in the 
series of variety shows, 
hosted by Gary wamot 
with special guest Jimmy 
CrrckeL 

9-15 News and Sport 

9-39 FHnc The Outlaw Joaey 
Wales (197Q.CBnt 
Effitwood dfrects and 
stars in this Civil War fikn 
about a fanner seeking 
revenge on a gang who 
bum las Missouri farm and 
murder his wife and chBd. 
Also stars Chief Dan 
George and Sondra 
Locke. 

1245 LWT News headlines, 
fotowed by AlJanen. 

The American Jazz singer 
In concert 

1JD0 FlncTheAbomtaaMaDr 
PWbes (1971) starring 
Vincent Price. Spoof 
horror movie about a 
efisfigured musical genius 
who devises a series of 
horrible murders based on 
the ten curses of Pharaoh, 
for the surgeons who 
fated to save his wife. 
greo»d by Robert Fueat 

2J3S Night Thoughts 


, 3^0 tridwt Third Test Peter 
WSst mtroducss the third 
day’s play between 
England and New 
Zealand, from The Oval. 

6.10 Around the World In 
Seven Minutes and Four 
Times on SstesSay. a look 
bade to the days of Pathfr 
and Movietone newsreels 
with Bob Danvers Walker 
and Leslie MftcheB. (rt 

7-00 World Chess Report 
presented by Jeremy 
James. Bfll Hartston s 
reviews tee week's games 
between Kasparov and 
Karpov. 

7*0 News View. Moira Stuart 
with today’s news and 
sport Sue Carpenter 
reviews the week's events 
m pictures with subtitles. 

_ Weather 

&20 HwRoBtag Stones. David 


CHANNEL 4 


1- 15 Channel 4 Racing from 

Newmarket The 1.30. 
„ 240 and 240 races. 

2- 50 FRm: The Crusades* 

(1935) starring Loretta 
Young and Henry 
Wilcoxon. A spectacular 
Cecil 8 DeMiUa epic about 
Richard the Ljanheart 
f’S SSS^WeM (Oracle) 

640 Right to Reply. This week 
from Edinburgh, David 
Glencross of the 
Independent Broadcastino 
Authority and Michael 
Grade. Director 
Programmes and 
Controller, BBC1, answer 
wewars’ critidsm that 

SBec^Sr^^ 

640 The Stamp of Greatness. 
LauneVemry stars in a 

dramatization of the Me of 

Robert Bums. 

7.00 News summary The Sons 
of Abraham. Part 12 of the 
senes looks at the history 

_ _ of the Abyssinian Church. 
740 A Fearful Silence. An 
investigation into domestic 
violence against women in 
Britain's Aslan community. 
The programme shows 
how the police, the law 
and other agencies can 
help in dealing with the 


640 


problem. 

Nawhart 


BBC 1 


fi* 5 Opjn University. Until 
6S0. 

SSb^“ and “ 0 » s 

940 TMs isthe Day. A religious 
service from a viewers 
home in Rugby. 10.00 
Aston Magazine. Ghazala 
Amin presents a 
M pregramme of musice. 
1050 Aristocrats. Robert Lacey 
meets the Duke of 
Westminster, (r) 

11.20 Cameo. A Berkshire trout 
stream in spring. 11 JO 
Three in the WW. The 
second of six films 

depleting the lives of three 

British wild animals 
follows Sbak the Red Fox, 
a lone cub in a dangerous 
wortd.(r) 12L00 Burnt 
Bunny. 

12,05 ®fi[" Extra, A programme 

leatumg young people of 
“hwvement Wim sign 
1 «w - n9ua5fl grtwpretation. (r) 
■tzas Farming. Reports from 
FWbeck m Lincolnshire, 
and SeilafieW and Drigg in 
Cumberland about the 
Possible effect on 
agn culture of nudear 

1-00 News headines 1.05 

Bonanza. Western series. 

W 150 Cartoon 2J0 
. __ (r) (Ceefax). 

3.00 FSm: The Life and Death 

of Colonei Bflnq> (1943) 
starring Debwan Kerr 
andAnton WaJbroofc. Fine 
British classic which 
traces the tile and 
romances of an 
Englishman from the Boer 
War to the Second World 
War. Directed by Michael 
PoweiL 5*0 The Pink 
Panther Show. Three 
cartoons, (r) 

6 JX> wnd Britain. Last or the 
present series, m which 
sand lizards hatch live in 
the studio and Michael 
Jordan visits the remote 
British islands of Rona 


TV-AM 


655 Good Morning Britain 
begms with Sunday 
Comment 7.00 Are You 
Awake Yet? 7J5 WAC 

Extra includes a report on 
the Duke of Edinburgh's 
Award Scheme. 

850 KeByon Sunday includes 
news at 8J2 and 9.00; a 
review of the mommg 
newspapers; and topical 
features. 


ITV/LONDON 


American 


Hepworto talks to the 

FOTmg Stones about theft- 
tire and times; featuring a 
film of the making of their 
«« toto* :video at Bstree. 
ai ° Ftet Oreyenne Autumn 
fl 964) starring Richard 
widmark, Carroll Baker 
and James Stewart A 
•John FOrd westemepic, 
based on a true story of 
the 1 870s about Cheyenne 
Inmans who are moved to 
a new reservation 1 500 

miles away. Wanting aid, 
they begin a trek back 
home but the cavalry halts 
tee migration and battios 
feflow. 

11-35 Cricket TWrd Test Richie 
Benaud introduces 
highlights of the third 
day’s play between 

England and New 
Zealand. 

1256 F3m: Horror at 37,000 
Feet (1972) starring Buddy 
Ebsen and Chuck 
Connors. A supernatural 
power Is set loose from 
the stones ofanokf - 
English abbey wWch is 
beteg freighted to America 
on a transatlantic Jet 
Directed by David Lowafl 
Rich. Ends at 1.25. 


domestic comedy series. 
MO The Organization. Part 
five of toe drama serial 
first seen in the 1970s, set 
in the public relations 
office of a large 
organization. Starring 
Donald Sinden. Anton 

>iaoo sssssas- 

teams up with Belker to 
find out what hindered a 
police drug transaction 
that abnost cost the life of 

■ his partner. 

1055 Film: Hie Pubic Enemy 
1 (1931) starring James 

Cagney and Jean Hartow. 
Classic gangster 
melodrama which had 
great influence on the 
development of the urban 
American crime film, about 
tee the son of a New York 

pofcceman who begins a 
life of crime In the shims of 
World War One and grows 
up to become a notorious 
gun-runner. 

I2J0 Light Fantasticfc. A 
detailed look at the 
development of the 
animated film, with cflps to 
iflustrata the different 
techniques andfeatiaing 
the wont of Norman 
McLaren. Ends at 1 JO 


V \ 

• ' 


‘ \ 


105 


: ^ Radio 4 ' 

t J, StwwJ txvVHF. 

hJULg.55 supping 650 News briefing. 

^ :- :E - P| wude. Music (^ 

- viJO News; Farming. 650 
- :!T:-' Prayer. 655 VraMhen 


Travel 

i - -^-OO News. 7.10 Today’s 
* Papers. 7.15 On Your 
(-;■", Farm. 745 In Perspective 

— — “TTi (with Rosemary Hmtin. 

' " — T50Downtoauih.755 
s:C 3__ Wtwthen Travel 
^ 1 News. 6.10 Today's 
„.1r- Papers. 8.15 &orttxi 4. 

• 657 Weather; Travel 
- i-OO News 

.-. C05 rm Sorry. I haven't A 
Clue How To Set Out A 
' S Panel 9® me W 

•'•60 Newsstand. Martin 
-•Jv Wamwright reviews the 


j'#95 Talktag PoBtiM. Geoffrey 
*?. Goodman examines 
^ democracy in the political 
- par - Js Contributions 
•i • fron! eminent poHticsl 
'J. --'.t figures. 

. .; : ;,'30 Loose Ends with Ned 
- Sherrin and stucBo 


Brest Oceanographic 

Centre. 

11 JO The MBton Pound Radte 
Show (new series). A 
lucky fetener wffl receive one 
milkonpounds-.. 

! 1250 News; Weather. 1233 

VHFfavaaabkKn England and S 
WtiteojWv) m above except 555- 
6.00am Weattwn Travel 155- 
230pm Programme News. 450- 
650 Options: 450 Never the 
Same Again 430 Not Another Oat 
Programme. 550 Modem 
European Authors (Maixjel 
Vazquez Montalban) 530 Back 
pn Course. 

C Radio 3 } 

OnVHF andmedfam wave (stareo 
onfrr OQ VHFVTett match on MW 

635 Open University. Organic . 

chemistry. Unffl 655am 
655 Weather. 750 News 
7.05 Aubade: Bach (Wise 
Virgins ballet suite, anr 
Vraraon). Rubftistafti (Valse- 
cajxlce: Leslie Howard. 

Piano), Mathias (Clarinet 
Concerto, with Gervase 
de Payer). Bfiss (Melee 


■ ■’ -30 Prom our Own 

. Corespondent Life and 

. * ^ politics abroad. 

00 News; A Small Country 
- . .iKit ‘feam™ McMumn 

reflects on Fife in the 
""o':- courrtryskfa. 

.. v ' *27 After Henry. Comedy 
* -;S> series by Simon Brett 

, ?S&S u,Scate - 

, 30 News 

-J.f° Journeys. Tom 

Salmon travels to 

J>Tt' Buckfasttetahandthenonto 
-. = Dartmoor. f55 Shaping. 
, .-;; , .?0 News; The Afternoon 
• .. „ Play. Free by Nick Dear. 

-» M News; Travel; 

• * .• International 
. - Assignment BBC 
‘ , •», rarrKporetents report 
r*^- 30 Saturday Fwti^K 
wppfng Down in Kent 
‘ • Hie East Endera who went 

. hop p«^ing in Kent tor 

' iE fSL wa S { i du, ’ n B tee wars. 

*5 I Should D^r So (new 


fantasque), Seiber 
(Serenade), Ravel 
razade mvith 
n. soprano). Granados 




: i \ 


*Wh Mtefiaal Wflfiams 
■ Robb Wilton (1) The 
.. Portwgeist/r). 

. y® Hw Living Worid. WBdife 
‘ i 5‘ and oouneyskle news 
. Aspects of the Fringe. 

■' Smigs, sketches and 
■- y tor^up comedy from tea 
f^*prgh FastivaL 550 
- ' S^PPteg- 555 Weather; 

r : . 7 Travel. 

‘ S RountMip. 

- • ■: s tefiw Psychiatrist's 
.V - S®* 1- - Of Anthony Clare 
■ '— rf S* 5 to ^7 Horwyford, 
tennfr headmaster. 

' S’ss’K 01 " 

Michael Hwdem 
goJoanGtaenwoodfr) 

fatefs Half Dozen. 

Richard Baker with 


i!^et'rmSc}^950 tf, ’^ t 
Nqws 

9-05 Stereo Release: 

Mozart - aSonata in B flat " 
K333: Zacharias, piano), 
Haydn (Symphony No 56. 
wtifi Derdc Sotomons. wobi), 
Tchaikovsky (Nutcracker 
Suite), Beethoven (Sonata in 
B flat Op 22: Wild, piano) 

I On medium wave onfyr- 
1055 Test Matoh: third day of 
the Third Test England v 
New Zealand. On medium 

wave until 6 j *5 
I On VHFonfy:- 
|1150 Edmbtirgb Festival: 

Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra members (under 
Bemas). Scottish 
■ Philharmonic Singer 
soloists Barry, 

Cesengery, Rippon and 
Bartai (speaker). Part 

one. Janacak (Rikadla. 

Children's rhymes) and 
Kurtsn (Messages of the late 
Miss R VTroussova) 

11*5 Trollope on Tradesmen: 

I iz.u a concert jeontn): 

Stravinsky (Concertino), 


Goehr (Sonata about 
150 News 
Orchestra 
with 

— . pianaJPait one. 
LsztfTotentanr Plano 
Concerto No 2) 

1*5 Hortarnta Blue: . .. 

Manikum reads Nk 
Service's story 
2.00 Hansel undGreteb 
HumpercBnck'sthree-act 
opera, sung in German.With 
Schwarzkopf and 
Grammar in the title roles. 
Karajan conducts tile 
Philharmonia 

550 Jazz Record Requests: 

_ „ jrite Peter Clayton 
MS Critics Forum in 

EAtountip includes The 
Scottish Entightenment and 
Panting In Scotland 
whibitfens, and John 
.. .. Hone's play Douglas 
6*5 Organ music Roy 
Masoey plays GunmanTs 
March on theme by Handel 
Op 15, Smart's Poettode 
to D, and Mendelssohn's 
Sonata No 1 
7.15 The Phantom of 
Marseilles: Jud Dench 
performs the Cocteau 
monotogue 

730 Proms 86: London 
Mozart Players (under 
Jane Glover), with Tamas 
Vasary (piano). Part one. 
Stravmscy (Dumbarton 
Oaks), and Mozart (Plano 
Conc»toNo 18) 

830 Musical Times Past 
Music-making in the last 
century . With Fritz Spiegl 


|l1_25 The Jazz Pianist 

jecordings made at tee 
International Piano Event at 
tee 1 985 Pentfley Manor 
With Charles 
Fox. 1157 News. 1250 
Closedown. 

(" Radio 2 

On medium wave. Stareo on 

waas 

aaar 

Scoreboard 730pm 
AOOjm iDaye Bussey 550 

Jan Learning 

Sounds of the 60s 1150 
Aflbum Tfeie (with Peter Clayton) 
150pm i Huddwinks starring 
Rgy 130 Sporton ^Includes 

iSJW 'StaSwnilSh LirerpoS* 
bBfwKttig at Newcastle and 
Wmbtettonatl Manchester CityJ. 
Cricket ad ComhiB Test The 

from Goodwood. 
And Rowing: (Women's finals 
day In the World Championships). 
650 Jimmy Young presents 
1 TwosBMt750 Ttvee to a Row. 
From Bath Coflege of Higher 

-is^ 7 ^ wh " w ‘ 

i entertainment vrah British 
Aerospace and Radio 2. 

Introduced by John Dunn. 9.10 


_ and Sula Sgeir. 

630 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

6*0 Songs of Praise from 
SkJmouth in Devonshire. 
(Ceefax) 

7.15 Howards 11 Way. Starring 
Maurice Coibouma. Jan 
Harvey and Duide Gray bi 
a repeat of the final 
episode of the last series 
(CeefcuT boating feteify- 
855 That’s Life. Consumer 
affairs magazine. 

850 News with Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

955 Play: Bom in the Gardens 
by Peter Nichots. The 
eccentric Maud, and her 
bachelor son. Mo, five in a 

run-down Tudor mansion. 
Maud's husband has just 
died and her other two 
children, a Labour MPand 
a sophisticated journalist 
try to get Maud and Mo to 
change their way of life. 
Starring Constance 
Chapman and Barry 
Foster. (Ceefax) 

10*0 Choices. Should we 
incorporate death into our 
way of life? Habbi JuEa 
Neuberger discusses the 
issue with four guests. 

11-20 Hie Black and White 
Media Show. An 
examination of how 
television influences 
people's views of Britain's 
racial minorities, with 
contributions from BBC's 
Director of Programmes, 
Michael Grade, and 

1230 a nUWnyHWy ' W 


935 Watt Disney Presents, 

Three Orphan Kitten, (r) 

935 Woody and Friends. U 
Cartoons (t) 9.45 Roger 

I Ramjet (r) 

1050 Morning Worship from the 
Church of Assumption of 
Our Lady. Englefieid 
Green, Surrey.1i.00 
Getting On. Pensioners' 
rights groups in Britain, (t) 

(1130 The Writing of Spitting 
1 Image. Documentary 

about the satirical puppet 

show, (r) 1250 Foromer 
Researching the fives of 
the very rich. 

150 Catweaztejfr) 130 
Edu ca t i ng Biin 
CofTtouter programme. 

ZOO One God... Three Gods. 
A comparison between 
Judaism and Christi ani ty. 
2J0 LWTftew. headlines 
Wtowed by FBnt The 
Spare Tyres (1969) 
starring Terence 
Alexander and Judy 
Franklin. A married couple 
toes to remove two old 

tyres from theu- garden. 
Directed by Mwhael j 

Lane. 

Galapagos: Man Came to 
Eden. Hunan betogs nave 
destroyed the islands* 
'totdWe. but are now trying 
to save the endangered 
weoesthera. 

6*0 AppMl. Patricia Hayes 
appeals on behalf of toe 
Sknon Community, which 

rescues London's 
homeless. 

7.15 Winner Takas Ail. General 
towwtedge quiz game 7*5 
Eden(Orade) 



John Stride and Sheila Gish in P«» NjSoPsptayBoS^fe 
Cardens (on BBC1, at 9.05pm) 


BBC 2 


6.50 Open University. Until 

155 Sunday Grandstand 
introduced by Stave Rider. 


CHANNEL 4 


1230 Irish Angle The first AS- 
d Fool 


The programme is as 
follows: Rowing: World 

Championships from 

Nottingham; Swimming: 
Women's World 
Championships: Show 
Jumping from Hick stead: 
The Silk Cut Derby; 
Cricket Essex v Surrey. 
650 Foley Square. Angel 
Gomez is arrested and 

piled tor robbery. Alex, 
despite strong warnings 
from Jesse that her 
involvement in the case 
could cost her her job, is 
determined to prove his 
innocence. 


O" tonfl wave. Stereo on VHF 
SSS Shipping. 6JM News briefing: 
Weather. 6.10 Prelude 
(s). 

630 News; Mooting has 

Broken, (hymns). 655 


930 Strin^ Sound.' (BBC Ratio 


Madden 350-450 
Music. 


10.05 Martin Kbtoer 
— ' 150 Steve 

Little Night 


12.0Sam DaveGeti^ 150 Steve 


csniury. wan Fritz Spiegl I s ■; — - ^ 

8*0 Roms aepaittwa Maw I l HadlO 1 ) 


750 News. 7.10 Sunday 
Pjpera. 7.15 Apna Hi 
GharSamafhfye. 7.45 Be8s 
an Sunday. 750 Turning 
Over New Leaves. 755 
WCather; Travel. 

850 News. 8.10 Si 
Papers. 8.15: 

fftefolous news and views) 
850 Joanna Lumtey 

appeals on behalf of 
Friedreich's Ataxia 
a m W»atear; Travel. 

950 News. 9 .10 Sunday 
Papers. 

9.15 Letter from America by 

Alistair Cooke 
930 Morning Service from 
Westborough Methodist 
Church, Scarborough 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition 

11.15 Pick of the Week. 

Highlights of recent 
programmes, presented by 

_ Margaret Howard 

12.15 Desert island Discs. Stan 
Barstow in conversation 

150 The WOrfd This 

Weekend: News. 155 


Return to 
9.15 News 

130 ^^wgUve the King 
Ln'togstone.Tommy Rivers 

has confidently held his 

parkamentary seal at 
“addey for 20 years but 
when he has to face a re- 
sebetfon committee he 
hacomes uncertain about 
Ws future Jtars John 
Stride, John Duttine and 
Judy Loe. 

1030 Hw Real World: Stud 
Poker. Documentary 
about the way scientists 
are attempting to breed 
successful racehorses. 
1150 LWT News headlines 
followed by Dear Friends. 
Benny Green gives a 
musical tribute to the 
music director Peter 
Knight with contributions 
from Sir Harry Secombe. 
CteoLatoa, John 
Dankworth and Jack 
Rothstem. 

1255 FBm: The Mart Who Sided 
Down Everest (1975) 
Japanese documentary 
about cfimberYtachiro 
Mlura's attempts to fulfil 
ms Mb's ambition of skiing 
down the upper stapes of 
Everest Directed by tsao 
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Regional Tl mi facing /' ujh 1 



SATURDAY AUGUST 23 1986 


England lacking 
in fortune 


and inspiration 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


THE OVAL: New Zealand 
have scored 257 for eight 
against England. 

ll was like the morning after 
the night before when the 
third Test match against New 
Zealand, sponsored by 
Comhiil. was continued yes- 
terday. With Botham unable 
to inspire them a second time, 
and the weather causing long 
interruptions, England man- 
aged only to reduce New 
Zealand's first innings from 
142 for four to 257 for eight. 

Of the 59 overs that were 
bowled (one more than on 
Thursday) Botham had only 
eight, in which he took no 
wicket for 22 runs. Now, too, 
be dropped Wright, who was 
on his way to his fifth Test 
hundred and New Zealand's 
first at the OvaL Geoff 
Howarlh's 94 in 1978 had 
been their best score there 
until yesterday. 

W right was 90 when 
Botham might, perhaps 
should, have caught him at 
slip ofT Emburey. a low right- 
handed chance. Wright was 
out eventually for 1 19 to the 
344th tell he received. Need- 
ing only to draw the match to 
win the series. New Zealand 
are making absolutely none of 
the running. 

This, of course, has put the 
onus on England, and al- 
though the odd ball has turned 
they have found progress hard 
to make. Whether the pitch 
will look quite as harmless 
when Hadlee bowls on ft we 
shall know soon enough. 


Dilley's bouncers got him 
nowhere yesterday, but that, 
again, is not to say that 
Marshall's would have been 
equally innocuous. 

To be fair, afternoon and 
evening interruptions would 
have made it hard for much 
stronger attacks than 
England's to achieve and re- 
tain a momentum, and the 
umpires, with their infernal 


Scoreboard 


NEW ZEALAND: Brat Innings 

J G Wright b Edmonds 119 

B A Edgar c Gooch b Botham 1 

J J Crowe tew b Botham ■ _ 8 

M D Crowe Ibw b Mey 13 

*J V Coney c Gooch b Bothmn 38 

EJGraybOBey 30 

R J Hadtee c Remh b Etkaonda — — 6 
J G Brecmwil c Attooy b Eraburay 3 

IT E Blair] not out 27 

DA Stfrflog not out 5 

Extras (b 1, w 1, m> S) — . 7 

Total (8 wfcts) 2S7 

E J ChatMd to bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-17. 2-31, 358, «- 
106, 5-175, 6-192. 7-197, 8-2S1. 


BOWLING (ID (fatSfc Mtoy 23-4-7*2; 
Snud 18-5-36-0; Bothmn 19-3-S8-3; 
EndMjey 31-15-39-1; Edmonds 22-10- 
29-2; Gooch 4-1-16-0. 


N French, G R Oflfey, G C Smafl. 
Umpires: H D Bird and D R Shepherd. 


light meters, added to the* 
frustration by appearing less 
concerned than they should 
have been to keep the game 
going. Late in the day. when" 
making an effort to get play 
restarted. Bird summoned the 
police to escort him onto the 
field. Dear man that he is. he 
is so accident prone on these 
occasions. 

Rain in the night had 



RUGBY UNION 


Guilty 
feelings 
on All 
Blacks 


By David Hands 


Mixed feelings accompany 
New Zealand's team into the 
second of their three match 
international series against 
Australia to Dunedin today. 
On the one hand, there is the 
natural desire of a nation, 
whose pride has traditionally 
been its rugby, to beat the 
opposition and level the series; 
on the other, the feeling that 
the selectors have erred to 
restoring so many of the 
Cavaliers' team which made 
toe unauthorized tour to Sooth 
Africa just three months ago. 

The adjective “callous" has 
been tossed aroand freely in 
the many tetters written to 
New Zealand papers tins week 
after 10 of toe rebel touring 


party were brought into the AB 
Blacks team following a two- 
match suspension. The tra- 
ditionalists to New Zealand 
consider that pmushmeat far 
too lenient, to which they 
would have toe snpport of 
many to the British Isles. 

They would have stuck by 
the “baby" AH Blacks who 
beat France and lost by only a 
point to Australia to Welling- 
ton a fortnight ago. Tfear 
opponents, representative of 
that portion of the country 
which favoars contmaed sport- 
ing links with South Africa 
(whatever their government 
may believe) consider toe 
Cavaliers have served their 
punishment and- certainly the 
selectors, with no obvious 
guidance from toe New Zea- 
land Council, have freedom of 
choice. 

In that respect Calm 
Meads, coach to toe Cavaliers, 
appears as strong as he ever 
was in relation to his co- 
selectors, Brian Lochore and 
Stan HOL Bat the Coaac3 
insist that their findings os the 
rebel tour are still incomplete 
and that they will make a toll 
report to toe International 
Rugby Football Board in 
October. 

In purely individual hams 
the- New Zealand public was 
surprised to find Stone, the 
basiling centre, replaced by 
Taylor; that Reid should come 
hack so quickly after injury to 
smpUnt Fitzpatrick and that 
Hobbs should have ousted 
Brooke-Cowden from the po- 
sition of flanker. One change 
which was mooted has not 
occurred: SheHord, the num- 
ber eight, broke a bone in his 
hand last weekend and Brewer 
retains his place on his home 
ground. 

Since Brewer was made 
captain of Otago when only 20, 
there is speculation that he is 
an All Blacks captain in the 
making* Certainly he and 
Cooper, the Otago toll-back, 
will be keen to do wefl against 
an Australian side winch has 
introduced toe smaller, faster. 
MEUer to their hack row 
instead of Reynolds. 



Jersey 

conference. 


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Low duty and no VAT combine to cut costs 
all round. A 3-night conference in a 3-sun 
hotel can cost just £87.25 per head. Or ina 
luxury 4-sun hotel, up to £111. Costs which are 
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cocktail party and a gala / 

dinner on the final night V 1 * 1 

Add the attractions 

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Jersey Q.Or ring 0534 76512/78000. 




First published in 178S 


SPORT 



V 


•mr 


•4 



slowed down the outfield yes- 
terday morning. But for tin's, 
even more runs would have 
gone to third man than did. 1 
still find it quite incomprehen- 
sible (except when Hilditcft of 
Australia is batting) that it 
should be considered more 
important to have two long 
legs than one third man. 

Quiet periods were more in 
New Zealand's interests than 

England's, and for the best 

part of an hour nothing very 
much happened. Botham had 
a first unrewarded spell; Small 
was erratic: Gooch contrib- 
uted four tidy but not 
exactly testing overs, and 
when Edmonds bowled there 
was lime to ring toe other side 
of toe world while Lamb 
kilted himself out to field at 
dose short leg. 

The first wicket feU in toe 
fifteenth over the day. Gray 
being yorked by DiDey after 
adding 69 with Wright In the 
40 minutes after that the 
umpires had some difficult 
decisions to make. First 
Hadlee was given out caught 
at the wicket as he pushed 
defensively forward to Ed- 
monds. though French was 
slow to appeal; then Bracewdl 
was given in when Atoey. at 
short leg. picked up what he 
thought was a catch off the 
face of toe teL If errors there 
were. Hadlee's favoured En- 
gland and Bracewell's New 
Zealand. When, soon after- 
wards. Bracewdl was given 
cut playing much the same 








Women 
ready 
to poll 
ahead 


. j Simon 
Barnes 



- 




. ■?’ • 



At American oarsman, stft- 




Mr Right: John Wright on his way to New Zealand's first Test hundred at the Oval (Photograph: Hugh Roadedge) 


stroke as before. New Zealand 
were 197 for seven with toe 
new ball imminent 
By now toe fight was poor 
enough for Gatling to need to 
be careful when he uscxl his 
faster bowlers. Haring held 
them back for a quarter of an 
hour before lunch he gave 
them the new ball immedi- 
ately afterwards, but to no 


cost 32 runs, prompting 
Gatting to bring back Ed- 
monds and Emburey. Three 
overs later, at 2.25, rain 
stopped play. _ 

The offending shower was 
quite heavy while it lasted. 
Once it was over the sun soon 
came out which enabled toe 
umpires to conduct another of 
those operations in which they 


cause they had said they 
would. And by toe time they 
did so there was more rain in 
toe air. 


effect. Botham had first use of convey the unmistekeable im- 
it this time, ahead of Small, pression of wanting to delay 


but only for two overs. Wright 
readied his hundred here- 
abouts. after batting for six 
and a quarter hours. The first 
eight overs with the new tell 


toe resumption of play far as 


long as possible. Although by 
4.15 toe ground was cleared. 


4. 1 5 the ground was deared. 
toe)- bad to wait until 4 JO to 
make another inspection, be- 


To alleviate their boredom 
the crowd, including the mem- 
bers. rehearsed toe Mexican 
Wave, with the repulsive 
refinement of throwing their' 
rubbish into the air as their 
hands went up. When toe 
members do that at Lord's the 
whole earth will shake and the 
pavilion rumble and Father 
Time will come crashing 
down. 


Between 5.00 and 


when play was stopped for the 
Iasi time. New Zealand re- 
ceived 100 balls, made a 
miserable five scoring strokes 
and lost Wright to an un- 
accountable delivery from Ed- 
monds. Pushing forward 
down the line of middle and 
.off Wright seemed to have 
every contingency ' covered. 
The only trouble was that the 
ball bowled out of the front of 
the hand behaved as though it 
wasa Chinaman, turning from 
leg enough to beat Wright's 
bat and hit the off stump. 
Wright, remember, is left 
handed. 


ofwhaiwasqriteobriottsly his 
second breakfast of the day. 
was looking oat over the 
waters of Holme Pferrepout. at 
the hectic six-brae motorway 
of rotting but* as practices 
conti nu ed ! (hiw#o«t the rest 

day at the world rowing 
championships. On and on be 
chewed. A women's crew 
passed, and a thought HaaSy 
percolated to the surface of his 
coasooosoess. “What’s a cuts 
girl like that doing in a sport 
tike this?" he asked the room, 
patently bewildered, ih 
really 8toop*d. w 

Yen would bare thought 
that women's rowing would 
carl op wader the overwhelm- 
ing weight of popular prej- 
udice, scatters without and 
scoffers within. But it gets 
more popular by the day. At 
colleges and dabs, and at 
major championships, like the 
Olympic Games and like the 
world championships, there 
are note and wore women 
evqjrw h ere you look. Not 
sipping Pirams and befog 
adorable, either, not at Nobae 
PSerrepont. Henley It amY, 
The world championships ate 
all about bu sin ess. To wear a 
tracksuit that does not even - 
tang of sweat would be r t- 
n ied as overdressing h. 7 ' 



ROWING 


Last gasp 
wizardry 
by Cross 
and Clift 


There are women 
rowers everywhere 


By Jim Raman 

Britain's coxfess pair, Mar- 
tin Ooss and Adam Clift, 
qualified foe tomorrow’s finals 
but they left their strike late in 
the wood championships at 
Nottingham yesterday. With 
20 metres to go they were in 
fourth place into Yugoslavia, 
Brazil and Spun ahead. 

The British stroke. Cross, 
looked desperate but the 
magic push came in toe trick 
of time and they beat toe 
Spanish world bronze medal 
winners by 33 hundredths of a 
second. This is taking brink 
manship too far. 

The Soviet Union's world 
champions took toe first semi- 
final round in the fastest time 
of the day, just ahead of East 
Germany, with Italy in third 
place The British pair were 
toe slowest qualifiers and will 
have to find some more magic 
to be among toe medal 
winners. 

The men's lightweight semi- 
finals provided drama from 
toe start. The Dane, Bjarne 
Eltang, who won the 


Diamonds 1 at Henley Royal 
Regatta, controlled toe fust 
semi-final with Australia's Pe- 
ter Antonie in second place. 
The experienced and former 
multiple world champion; Dr 
Raimnnd HaberL of Austria, 
appeared to stop when the 
hooter Minted, announcing 
the Dane's arrival at the 
finish, and Sweden's Jorma 
Moetonen shot through to 
take third place. 

The two British lightweight 
crews were in splendid, ar- 
rogant and determined mood, 
and not only won their races at 
toe expense of the Italians on 
both occasions, but were .the 
fastest of the day and broke 
the Holme Pierrepont course 
records in their events. 

The British lightweight 
four, the Commonwealth gold 
medal winners, in an exciting 
race appeared to explore high, 

medium and low rates but 
they were level- with the 
Italians with 500 metres to go. 
The pack were dosing in and 
the situation was dangerous. 
But without warning the Brit- 
ish suddenly shot up to 40 
strokes a minute and caned 
the field for a splendid victory. 

I trust .they will not be 
experimenting with rates in 
tomorrow's finals. 

Britain's lightweight double 
scullers, Allan WhitweU and 
Carl Smith, were as steady as a 
rock. The Italians ted them 
most ofthe way but the British 
machine wore them down in 
the last 500 metres. It was a 
mature victory against an 
Italian crew Who included no 
less than Francesco Esposito, 
who has won toe double sculls 
world championship five 
times. . . 

By the end of toe day 
Britain almost achieved their 
objective, reaching eight 
finals. In an exciting race in 
toe coxless fours they missed a 
qualifying place by a length in 
finishing fifth. Thev cave their 


SPORT 


Davis is 
toppled 


Steve Davis, three times the 
world snooker champion, lost 
to James Wattana. a local 
amateur, in the Camus Thai- 
land Masters snooker 
championship in Bangkok 
yesterday. Not satisfied with 
that, Wattana then went on to 
beat another former world 
champion. Terry Griffiths, of 
Wales. Davis, the world 
No. 1. went down 2-1 while 
Griffiths, after toppling 
Sakcbai Sin-Ngam, a Thai 
professional, 2-0 in toe other 
semi-final was beaten by the 
same margin. 



Spaid signs 


Mike Spaid, an England 
basketball international has 
signed for Portsmouth . for 
£10,000. Dan Lloyd, the 
Portsmouth coach, said terms 
had been agreed with Hone! 
and Watford Royals for toe 6ft 
I lin centre, who wasat Hemel 
for two years after signing 
from Crystal Palace. Man- 
chester united have also been 
in toe market, and have signed 
Derek Phillips, a 6ft lOin shot 
blocker from St. Louis, who 
has been playing on the 
Conti nenL 


Holtom: out of toe running jj’g £ 


Holtom out 


Back again 


Mark Ring, toe Cardiff cen- 
tre. and leuan Evans, the 
Llanelli wing, who were both 
ruled out of international 
rugby last season because of 
injury, have been named in 
the 56-strqng Wales squad, for 
training at Cardiff Arms Park 
on September 7. The only 
omission from the parties that 
toured the South Pacific and 
Italy in the summer is David 
Jacob, toe Neath centre, who 
has retired from toe game 
because of a recuning back 
injury. 


Aiming hi gh 


tor ZEALAND: Q Cooper J Kffwftn, J 


Najib Da ho. one of a family 
of six brothers and eight 
sisters, hopes to join Dennis 
Andries tonight as one of only 
two British boxing world 
champions. Aged 27, toe 
Moroccan-born boxer meets 
Barry Michael, of Australia, 
the holder of (he International 
Boxing Federation super- 
featherweight title, in 
Manchester. 


Mark Holtom, the British 
high hurdles record holder, 
has withdrawn from the Brit- 
ish athletics team for the 
European championships, 
beginning in Stuttgart on 
Tuesday. Ruled out through 
injury. Holtom was chosen to 
run in the 400 metres hurdles, 
but is not expected to be 
replaced in the team. 

David Sharpe. Britain's 
world junior 800 metres 
champion, will however, be 
joining toe squad in Stuttgart. 
Originally selected as a non- 
travelling reserve, he has been 
called up as cover for either 
Steve Cram or Sebastian Coe. 
who has just returned to 
competition after a virus 
stopped him competing at toe 
Commonwealth Games in 
Edinburgh; 


The first national amateur 
rugby league, to be launched 
next week, is to be sponsored 
by Matthew Brown, the brew- 
ers. The agreement, worth 
£35.000 over two years, will 
promote the new ten-dub 
Slalom Lager amateur league, 
with toe champions guar- 
anteed automatic entry along- 
side professional dubs into 
toe Silk Cut Challenge Cup. 


In the bag 


Frank Warren, toe boxing 
promoter, has been successful 
in his bid to secure toe 
European light-welterweight 
title fight between Terry 
Marsh, the champion, and 
Tony Laing, ■ the London- 
based Nottingham boxer and 
British title-holder. The con- 
test will take place in London 
on October 29. 


Keeping busy 

John Whitaker, one of the 
world's top show jumpers, will 
be competing in Canada and 
Sweden over toe next three 
weeks. Next week he is one of 
four British riders taking part 
in an event in Stockholm, 
before crossing the Atlantic to 
take part in toe Calgary show. 


High rewards 


The Royal and Ancient paid 
out a record £619.595 in prize 
money at last month's 115th 
Open championship at 
Tumbeny. Between them, the 
top 30 collected toe lion's 
share of £481,709, with' Greg 
Norman, the champion, win- 
ning £70.00 0. 


best with Canada, winners of 
the Stewards' Challenge Cup 
at . Henley, snatching third 


The people who tan ap 
actually know what they m 
touting about as well, at least 
when it cooks to rowing, or 
they would not be thereat *1L 
And of coarse, there are 
women rawmg everywhere yes 
look, and that is one of the 
more noticeable omissions at 
Halley. 

For two yean now, women 
have raced in lightweight as 
wdntenyMptilrajoiis. 
The more does away with 
Aanmnaa ste reotyping fora 
stint. Men’s fightweight row- 
ing began u 1974, and it was 
tune the women caught op. 
The British- women's Hght* 
weigfct jfcmr has made ft 
through tntbefbat today, and 
they are aU feefiag very good 
aboat ft. Tnm» their coach Jim 
Chut, is dancing on the 
ceiling with flagrantly un- 
concealed tension, hot that is 
part of the coach’s job. It 
makes the crew giggle, 
nrnqr. 

Yon cannot say they have 
not earned a few laughs. Their 
training involves two two-hoor 
outings every day of their lives. 
On top of their proper jobs, of 
course: these are antoeatic 
s tragg l ing and impoverished 

amateurs. Marvellous spirit, 
people say, and kt them ge* on 
with toe excitement of being 
contenders at the highest level 
and trying to pay toe rent at 
the same time. The crew was 
selected from a pool of 78, bat 
irffl they win? “We have the 
power. We have the 
technology," Lin dark said, 
lightweight crews all race at 
the same weight “It’s all down 
to technique and the spirit," 
she said. 

The spirit is marvellous. 
“Hoars and weeks of training, 
all for a tew minutes on 
Saturday," mod Alexa Forbes, 
who rows bow. “And it's 
anybciy's race. Saturday wffl 
be wonderful ... or sriddaf 


“Yon rely on their 
femininity” 


lin Clark, who rows at 
three, won gold at the last 
world championship. Td been 
dropped from crews. They fold 
me I was too fight, and they 
toM me l was too old. Lets 
face it Lin, they said, ymt just 
can’t more a boat" When it 
comes to motivation every 
little bit helps. “We're all 
working class people, and 
there's still abig dass thing hi 
rowing," she said. “But it jast 
doesn’t work at international 
leveL We set on the water ami 
smash heft oat of them with 
their posh voices," Every little 
helps. . 

Jim Clark, toe coach, 
ontwitched himself long 
enough to say: “Yon most find 
a different way of motivating a 
women arew. With a mu's 
crew, it's all man-tinman folk 
and macho pride. Yob (cfl 
them they’re the biggest, 
they're the strongest Motwat- 
mg a women's crew must be 
done in a gender way. Yon rdj 
on their femininity.” 

That would doubtless give 
ms crew another howl of 


to do the business on the waw 
today, no ofte will he compute 
mg. The American chap with 


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