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TIMES 


No 62,550 


SATURDA’&AUGUST 30 1986 


Disarmament f 
progress signs 0 ; 
on two fronts * 


• In Stockholm the Soviet Union has 
accepted the principle of Nato and the 
Warsaw Pact inspecting each other's 
military exercises by air 

• In Geneva a UN disarmament con- 
ference official said that verification, 
the last obstacle to a chemical weapons 
treaty, was being overcome 


By Rodney Cowton, Defence Correspondent 

Fresh signs of progress were an important step ahead of a and a 
disclosed yesterday in summit meeting between count 
disarmament talks in Stock- President Reagan, and Mr Hoi 
holm and Geneva. Mikhail Gorbachov, the So- ficesa 

In the conference on con- viet leader. the W 

fidencc and security building While the West welcomed compi 
measures in Stockholm, the the Soviet concession an- inspec 
Soviet Union made the a nounced by Marshal Akhro- out us 


In the conference on con- 
fidence and security building 
measures in Stockholm, the 
Soviet Union made the a 
gesture that may be unprece- 
dented in sending Marshal 
Sergei Akhromeyev. Chief of 
the General Staff of its armed 
forces and First Deputy Min- 
ister of Defence, to announce 
its acceptance in principle of 
Nato and the Warsaw Pact 
inspecting each other's mili- 
tary exercises by air. 

In Geneva. Mr Mifjan 
Komatina. secretary-general 
of the 40-nation UN disarma- 
ment conference, asserted that 
the last obstacle to a treaty on 
chemical weapons — the 
establishment of verification 
procedures to eliminate cheat- 
ing — was now being 
overcome. 

The Stockholm conference 
is in its 20th and final session, 
and effectively has until 
September 19 to reach agree- 
ment on a package of con- 
fidence-building measures. 

Both East and West have 
indicated that they would 
regard such an agreement as 



?/• 


IlAflli" ‘^® ness 
^ shrouds 

uotk: § raves 

of Nyos 

a From Garin Bell 

Nyos, Cameroon 

I II I I There is no bird song in 

1 f ll B A y Nyos. Nothing, save leaves 

rustling in a gentle breeze. 

• The West has pnt forward a com- disturbs the eerie silence of 

promise proposal under which military Jfl ? 0 h 

5* 0 ' ,t using 

neutral vehicles and aircraft Virtually all life was 

• A Soviet Minister said little progress SlXSS 

“ bee ?, n “f. e *»y snperpow^s at from* b g y *^ 

this week's talks on the world's mam re- amic ^ and seeped through 
gional disputes Page 5 open doors and windows. Of 

, . the 700 inhabitants, only six 

Ddeot survived. 

and aircraft of the inspecting .The death toll on the high 
coumnr plateau is now estimated at 

However, the Foreign Of- 1500. but Nyos clearly paid 
flee said that to bridge the gap .heaviest pnee for its 

the West had put forward a proximity to what the locals 
compromise, under which caJTnhe bad lake", 
inspections would be carried The ^ bloated 

out using vehicles and aircraft corpses discovered yesterday 
of neutral or non-aligned — — — 


and aircraft of the inspecting 
country. 

However, the Foreign Of- 
fice said that to bridge die gap 
the West had put forward a 
compromise, under which 
inspections would be carried 


Marshal Akhromeyev: 
Agreed to inspections. 

meyev. it was pointed out by 
the Foreign Office in London 
that the Russians were 
demanding that any inspec- 
tion should be carried out in 


countries. The response from 
neutral stales had been 
encouraging. 

The delivery of the Soviet 
proposal by Marshal Akhro- 
meyev was seen by Western 
diplomats as being of particu- 
lar significance in demonstrat- 
ing that the Soviet armed 
forces supported Moscow's 
recent concessions in negotia- 
tions. ft was suggested that he 
may be the most senior Rus- 
sian military officer ever to 
play such a role. 

He appealed to the con- 
ference to set a limit on the 
number of troops taking pan 
in military exercises. 

He said that Nato's Autumn 
Forge series of exercises this 
autumn would involve some 


the vehicles or aircraft of the 300.000 troops, and added; 
country being inspected. -Suppose that a similar ex- 


• There is £16,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition: the weekly 
prize of £8,000 and 
another £8,000 in the 
daily competition, 
double the usual 
amount because no 
one won yesterday. 

• Portfolio lists, 
pages 18 and 23. Rules 
ana how to play, 
page 29. 

Gurkha brawl 
officers cleared 

Mr John Stanley, Minister for 
the Armed Forces, said in 
Hong Kong that allegations 
that British officers insulted 
the Gurkhas during exercises 
in Hawaii last May were 
"wholly without foundation" 
Page 7 


whereas the West felt thatihe were conducted by the 

greatest confidence in an effec- Warsaw Pact at the same lime, 
live inspection would be 

achieved by using the vehicles Continued on page 18, col 7 

Rabies European 

woman gold for 

is dead Whitbread 

By Jill Sherman By John Good body 

The British woman bitten Sports’ News Correspondent 

by in f ^ bi3 ‘°,"r^ kS Fatima Whitbread, the new 
ago died of rabies yesterday worU rcCDrd ho|der for lhc 

.. . lll LL , . , , women's javelin, yesterday 

of in BrirabfSS won Britain's fourth gold 
case of rabies in Britain since medaI al ^ European 


woman. 


Championships in Stuttgart 
with a throw that reached 


admitted to a hospital in 76 31™ etresT 

^iss Whitbread, who came 
S seco°d in the 1983 World 

?1 Championships, third in the 


rabies soon after her arrival in 
Britain two weeks ago. 


1984 Olympics and second to 
her rival Tessa Sanderson in 


Pr?<L.nhl rwS'it.Tsi 1 tasI month's Commonwealth 
Portsmouth s Quan Alexan- Q ames ^ ihis time defeated 

dra Hospital but was seriously Pelra Fdke of ^ Germany, 

dlonamvaL the former world record 

XSESw holder, who reached 7132 

Health Authority said the melres _ 

Miss Whitbread's winning 
tt &ikd to imiww 0VW ,he throw is exceeded only by Ihe 


next 14 days. 


world record of 77.44 metres 


Doctors did all they could to s 7e set on Thiusday. 
alleviate foe worst symptoms Miss Sanders^ 


missed 


The United Nations Disaster 
Relief Co-ordinator In Geneva 
said that 1.746 people died in 
the gassing. In Yaounde, 
President Paul Biya of Cam- 
eroon has declared today an 
official day of mourning. 

bore mute testimony to the 
suddenness with which the 
i volcano claimed its 
victims.The man was pros- 
trate by the door. His wife had 
managed to clamber only 
partly out of bed and still held 
their baby daughter in her 
arms. 

According to French sci- 
entists surveying the area, 
death from asphyxiation was 
instantaneous. 

Inside the bree2e-blocked 
houses, the sparse furniture 
and personal belongings have 
been left untouched, like some 
terrestiai Marie 

Celeste-Outside, mounds of 
black earth sprinkled with 
chemicals indicate where the 
villagers were buried quickly 
to prevent outbreaks of 
disease. 

Survivors who staggered 
and crawled to safety spoke of 
a wave of searing heat, a 
struggle for breath, nausea and 
collapse. Many of them en- 
dured an agonizing two-day 
trek fror” their remote ham- 
lets before reaching help. 

One of the few visitors to 
Nyos yesterday was M 
Haroun Tazfeff. the eminent 
volcanologist leading the 
French investigation into the 
tragedy. 

Asked whether he consid- 
ered the area to be safe now, 
he said: "Certainly noL There 
could be another sudden over- 
flow at any moment We are 
acutely aware that we are 
risking our lives by being 
here”. 

One of his colleagues said 
vestiges of the toxic fumes 
were still lurking at the bottom 
of crevices and could take 
several days to dissipate. 

The scientists are analysing 
the volcanic activity in the 

Continued on page 18, col 2 



Mrs Helen Suzman, the leading Sooth African Opposition 
MP, talking to a boy injured in the police shooting in Soweto 
this week in which 21 people died. Yesterday she demanded 


an official Pretoria Government inquiry 


PngeS 


after illness 


By Robin Young 

Mr Stuart Young, the youn- plele 1 
gest person ever to be chair- which 
man of the BBC, died jshed u 
yesterday aged 52. Righ 

He had been ill for more long il 
than two years, having bad been in 
major surgery in 1984 tor an — 
undisclosed medical con- ObitB 
dilion. — 

As recently as three weeks of the 
ago BBC executives were grief ai 
insisting that there was no yesterd 
reason, including illness, why He 1 
Mr Young should not com- emorc 


TV share rush 


The offer for sale of 25 per i| v have been gi 
cent of Yorkshire Television jabs as a preca 
was substantially oversubscr- sure as have 
ibed when applications for the close contacts ii 
shares closed at 10.01 am But the auit 

Page 19 sized that there 

Walters task j human contact. 

Mr Vernon Walters, US ;*2L , !£ i 5lu 
ambassador to the UN. leaves JJJ 
today 10 try to convince SJSwJ 2 !. 
European leaders of Colonel «M #t 

Gadafffs continuing support au ^ or ? l J , 
for terrorism PageS J" 


rontrolbb'c spasm 5 and afar ^ Cram moved clo5CT 

rtftho forr, yesterday to his revenge race 
uJhaw JJ*™ with Sebastian Coe, winner of 
ily have been given protective , he goo metres title, when he 


First-round talks held 
over Wapping dispute 


jabs as a precautionary mea- quallfiri for Sunday's 1.500 
s “ re ^ .^. t he wora ans ^ elrcs finaL Cram. troi.bled 
close contact s in Zam bia . ^ by a raIf nrain since his tw0 

gold medals in the Common- 
sized that therewas no known wea ] t h Games, tested to the 

full his damaged leg. which he 
hU Ai? had strained again in the 800 
All medical equipment used melres final. He won his heat 

in 3 min 4067 *■ Coe ' wice 
to stand for 24 hours and was ni««n.v m „; nn nie* 


m .. : T.7r Olvmpic champion, also 

thoroughly sterilized, the qu ^i ifi ^ 

authomy said. H r . 

Zola Budd. 


In the past 10 years there 


Hunts file 

The millionaire Hunt brothers 
of Dallas have filed for chap- 
ter 11 bankruptcy protection 
for Placid Oil and Penrod 
Drilling Company in a bid to 
prevent seizure of their assets. 


On This Day 

A war .dispatch from France 
on August 30. 1914. was 
published uncuL The censor 
even added sentences to 
strengthen its conclusions 

Page 9 

Record value 

Old 78 rpm gramophone 
records can be valuable today 
— at Bonhams’ Chelsea sale- 
room recently six tons of them 
were auctioned 
Family Money, pages 24 to 27 

1 Aston results 

Degree results from Aston 
University and the Open 
_ University Scottish region are 
published today Page 29 
5 — 

? Home News 2-4 Leaders 9 

.* Overseas 5.7 Le tiers 9 

® 4 ppts 17 Obitury 17 

m Arts 10 Religion 17 

U RfrthsjleaUn. Scokn 17 
17 Science »*» 


have been only nine rabies Thursdays 3.000 metres, and 
cases in Britain. All were fatal. Kirety wade, the double 
In each case the disease was Commonwealth champion, 
contracted abroad. both qualified for the women s 

No one has contracted the * 500 metres final while in the 
disease in this country since *P en ? metres hurdles. 
I9Q-) Britain had two qualifiers in 

Three people in the world Jonathan Ridgeon and Nigel 
are known to have survived Walker. Walter was second in 
the disease, but two suffered his semi-final in 13.54 sec. 


permanent serious brain dam- 
age. The third, a young boy. 
recovered completely. 


Results, page 29; 
Darid Miller and 
Pat Butcher, page 34 


News International 
management and print union 
negotiators held a lengthy firsi 
round of talks near Gatwick 
airport yesterday in an at- 
tempt to find a formula to 
solve the seven-month dispute 
over the company's plant at 
Wapping. east London. 

Further talks are expected 
next month, after the TUC 
Congress has ended. The 
negotiations, described by one 
union official as "intensive'’, 
started at Ham at the 
Copt borne Hotel and lasted 
until the evening. 

The chief negotiator re- 
presenting News Inter- 
national. Mr Bill O'Neill, flew 
in from New York and went 
straight into the negotiations 
with the leaders of two print 
unions whose 5.500 members 


As recently as three weeks of the BBC. where there -was 
ago BBC executives were grief and display at the news 
insisting that there was no yesterday. • 
reason, including illness, why He was appointed a gov- 
Mr Young should not com- enter of the BBC in 1981, and 

chairman in 1983. He chaired 
the BBC through an excep- 
tionally difficult period and 
proved a sturdy champion of 
the organization. 

He launched a public, 
though unsuccessful, cam- 
paign for a £654icence fee, and 
opposed advertising on the 
BBC. 

Mr Alasdair Milne, the 
director-general of the BBC 
said yesterday: “We are afl 

devastated by the news of 

Stuart Young’s death. When 
he became chairman three 
years ago it was obvious that 
. he counted it the greatest 

Mr Alasdair Milne: We are honour of his life, and his 
I all devastated. Continued on page 18, col 7 

[ talks held Refugees 

ing dispute ship held 

Reporter jjV SDaUl 

were dismissed when they w r 
went on strike at the beginning From Harry Debdins 

of the year. Madrid 

JESsyafe&a ass 

pN^’^befSto 

the talks that he was looking 
for an improvement 

management’s offer last June if 

. After meeting, the two sides SSmfSfSSSkcSSripSS 
issued a joint statement, * .. ~vrt a, i « paimas in 



By a Staff Reporter 

International were dismissed when they 
ind print union went on strike al the beginning 
Id a lengthy fiisi of the year, 
s near Gatwick Mr Tony Dubbins, tbe gen- 
day in an at- eral secretary of the National 
I a formula to Graphical Association 
i-month dispute (NGA). said before going into 


. After meeting, the twosides ^ nl f“?^SkeSpSS 

talks took place today between th jf? n f^ ish 0*^1 hea{ j_ 

News International and the qi ^ S £E? 

five print unions on the “J/rV nnri 

ine I UC were present. The ,■ \\r**~ * pm . -> rantsin 

J^k, adjorSrd and wU! 

4 JS S s d^“ 5B 53T 

make no further comment. "S should be taken. 


West protests at shots fired in Berlin escape 


marriages 17 Science 
2 Brnfeir 15 Spon 2MBJ4 
5 Biainess 19-27 Theatres.dc 14 
Y, Ch«s 2.15 TV 4 Radio 33 
—COW* 17 l : Bisersilies 29 

Crossword* 15.18 Weather 
£D»n 8 Wills 

a , ■■ ■■■■ ~ ■ ■ 

» # * w * <r * 

HU 

£ 

P«a. 

DM* 


From Frank Johnson 
Bonn 

The United States. Britain 
and France have protested 
about the shots fired by East 
German border guards during 
an escape from East Beilin 
yesterday. 

An bast Berliner smashed a 
seven-ton lorry through bar- 
riers at Checkpoint Charlie 
and reached West Berlin. 

The three Western allies, 
who have occupation rights in 
western Berlin, said the shots 
were a denial of the principal 
that citizens should be allowed 
to move freely between sectors 
— a principle denied by East 
Germany when the wall was 
erected 2 5 years ago this 
month. 

The ma n . aged 32. his 
woman companion, aged 28. 
and a child aged eight months 
were unhun. The woman and 
the cjiild laid down on the 


floor next to the driver’s seat 

They were taken by West 
Berlin’ police to the refugee 
reception centre. Their names 
were not immediately given, 
but they gave as their reason 
for getting out of East Ger- 
many their “dissatisfaction 
with conditions'*. 

East Germans have used 
many ingenious and dan- 
gerous methods of escaping to 
the West. 

Bui yesterday's was prob- 
ably the most astonishing use 
of a method previously 
thought to be impossible. 
When two men iried to smash 
through in a bakery van in 
1966 they failed to reach the 
western side. 

Checkpoint Charlie — or 
Fricdrichslrassc as it is known 
to the Easi Germans — is the 
main crossing poinL over the 
Berlin Wall, for foreigners, in 
cars, coaches or on foot. 

A vehicle leaving must pass 


at least four barriers, and 
some times more depending 
on the time of day. 

Yesterday’s escape hap- 
pened just after midnight The 
lorry, from an JEasi German 
state building firm bore the 
words Amo (runs Berlin — 
Bamransportc. and was load- 
ed with gravel. 

It was fitted with a steel 
plate of a kind used to fix to 
snow ploughs. This, and the 
gravel, gave the lorry — in the 
words of one American in 
West Berlin — ihe weight of a 
small tank. 

Ii smashed through the red 
and white steel boom, which 
resembles the barrier used in 
public car parks, which is 
lowered by the East German 
border guards as an outgoing 
\ eh ide approaches. 

Then it smashed through 
two low-laying yellow and 
black booms which are used as 


out-going vehicles pass 
through the customs. 

At this poinL five foot-high. 
steeL sliding doors automati- 
cally came together in front of 
the lorry and barred its way. 
But the doors only block the 
carriageway for vehicles leav- 
ing East Berlin, The driver 
therefore swung into the par- 
allel carriageway used by ve- 
hicles coming in the opposite 
direction. 

Then its smashed through 
the last boom — a few feet in 
front of the American obser- 
vation hut — which is the final 
barrier before the West. 

The tony sped past the 
astonished American sentries 
and did not stop for about 
another 700 yards. West Ber- 
lin police said the whole 
incident lasted a matter of 
seconds. 

Three shots were fired at the 
vehicle by East German bor- 
der guards as it went through. 


The speed of the lorry was 
described by the West Berlin 
police as “immense". 

Repair work at the crossing 
point began immediately. 
About 30 extra members of 
the East German security 
force known as the Vopos 
arrived within minutes. 

They stood by as other 
soldiers swept away broken 
glass. 

It is assumed that even 
more barriers wilt be put m on 
the East German side. 

• KASSEL: A young East 
German couple escaped to 
West Germany early yes- 
terday over the heavily forti- 
fied inter-German frontier, a 
federal border police spokes- 
man said (Reuter reports). 

He said the couple, who 
lived in a village dose to the 
frontier, had managed to scale 
the border fortifications and- 
barbed wire barricades. 

Photographs, page 5 


Labour 
faith 
in job 
creation 

By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 

Job creation, not “crazy" 
Treasury rules laying down 
stria financial targets, would 
be the guiding light for invest- 
ment decisions in the 
nationalized industries under 
a future Labour Government. 
Mr John Prescott, the party’s 

employment spokesman, said 
yesterday 

Mr Prescott was responding 
to a report that party leaders 
have told the chairmen of 
state-run firms that they will 
have to restore thousands of 
jobs axed since 1980 in return 
for extra funding, if Labour 
regains power. 

Confirming that the talks 
have taken place, he said that 
the present curbs encouraged 
the public sector to get rid of 
workers and prevented them 
from implementing new 
projects. 

“if you change these things 
(rules) as we propose you can 
take on more labour" Mr 
Prescott said on BBC Radio's 
World ea One. Someone could 
be kept in work for the £6.000 
a year it cost to support them 
on the dole. 

But Labour did not want to 
issue a blanket directive to 
state industries idling them to 
take on more workers and so 
plunge them into losses. 

Instead, the accent would be 
on drifting the balance from 
the Government's emphasis 
on efficiency to one in which 
nationalized -firms spear- 
headed Labour's drive to cut 
the jobless total by one million 
within two years of taking 
office. 

High-level sources in the 
party said yesterday that ft was 
“absurd" to suggest Labour 
amply wanted people pul 
bade on the payroD without 

Continued on page 2, col 7 


Next week 

Who wins 
the votes of 
Thatcher’s 
children? 

Ski 


I -Tv, 


2 'T* l j; /. 


One vital factor unites 
the six million people in 
Britain aged between 
18 and 25 — all of them 
have reached voting 
age since Mrs Thatcher 
came to power in 
1979. Now her fate could 
be in their hands. 

In a series starting on 
Monday. The Times 
publishes the first 
detailed assessment of 
their views on the 
next election — on the 
politicians, on the 
issues, and on their 
hopes and fears for 
Britain — and fellows up 
the statistics of an 
exclusive Times/MORI 
poll by talking to 
them in depth. 

• Which party leader 
do they trust? 

• Who gets the blame 
for unemployment? 

• Is there a backlash 
in favour of law ami 
order? . . 

The surprising 
conclusions may force 
politicians to reassess 
their electoral strategies 


plele his period of office, 
which would not have fin- 
ished until 1988. 

Right up to tbe end of his 
tong illness Mr Young had 
been in touch with the affairs 

Obituary 17 


Shares and pound 
perform strongly 


ByRkhard Thomson 


- The dock market per- 
formed "strongly . yestenfay. 
while sterling rose by one cent 
against the dollar aftergJoomy 
economic news from the 
United States and Japan an- 
nounced a record trade sur- 
plus for last month. 

The FT-30 share index rose 
by 25.5 points to. dose at 
1311.9. as British and US 
institutional investors rushed 
for shares on the last day of the 
trading account 

There is still optimism that 
interest rates will fall in the 
long term, although there is 
little likelihood of a drop in 
the near future. 

Consumer shares were 
strong in expectation of next 
week’s money supply figures, 
which are expected to show a 
further rise in . consumer 
borrowing. 


Japan reported a record 
trade wirplas for last month of 
$8-67 billion, compared with 
$7.81 billion m June and 
$5.46 billion in July last year. 
The current account surplus 
also hit a record $8 billion, as 
exports rose to $18.51 billion. 

Meanwhile, currency mar- 
kets faltered on news that the 
US trade deficit last month 
was $18.04- billion (£12.10 
billion) far higher than ex- 
pected and nearly $4 billion 
larger than the previous 
month. 

The dollar, which had 
opened firmly, fell back 
sharply against most cur- 
rencies in London. It finished 
down ooe cent against the 
pound at $1.4870. 

Dollar suffers, page 19 
- Japanese surplus, page 19 
Market report, page 21 


=CHRisrriE's= 

GENEVA 

Important Autumn Sales 

At the Hotel Richemond, Geneva, 
8-13November 1986 



Art Deco dia mond, peadand coral pendant by Carrier 
Sold in Geneva, on IS May 1986 forSFr 154,000 (£60,510). 

Jewellery, Porcelain, Art Nouveau, Art Deco 
and Booklmdings, Silver Gold Boxes and 
Objects of 'Sfeitu, Pabeige and Russian 
Wades of Art, Watches and Fine Wines. 

Closing date: early September 1986. 


For information and valuations: 


Ch ri stie^ 

8 Place de la Taconnerie 
1204 Geneva 
Tel: 4122-28 25 44 
THexr 413634 



, .... Cfarisriefe 
8 King Street, St. James* 

London swiYsot 
;iek 01-839 9060 
Telex; M6429 


' "i" ~ i 





4 


) : 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


New Ulster initiative 


aimed at sectarian 


equality in workplace 


By Richard Ford 


. The Government is plan- 
ning a series of measures 
aimed at -promoting greater 
fairness of employment and 
equality of opportunity be- 
tween Protestants and Roman 
Catholics in Northern Ireland. 
1 The Fair Employment 
Agency, which has already 
received additional funding, is 
to be given greater power and 
authority to investigate allega- 
tions of discriminatory 
Employment practices. 

- Mr Tom King, Secretary of 
Stale for Northern Ireland, is 
likely to act within a matter of 
weeks on the recommenda- 
tions of a -report, from a 
steering group set up by Mr 
Douglas Hurd, his prede- 
cessor, into bow the Govern- 
ment could better promote 
equality of opportunity. 

' Among the measures 
considered will be a 
"Strengthening of the guide to 
companies on manpower pol- 
icy and practices, and the 
possibility that all public sec- 
tor employers will have to 
introduce a monitoring sys- 
tem to provide reliable and 
ongoing information about 
the make-up of their 
workforce. 

The Civil Service, the larg- 
est employer in the province. 


introduced such a system alter 
an investigation by the Fair 
Employment Agency and it 
has now been extended to the 
industrial part of the service. 

When he announced that 
decision in the House of 
-Commons last June. Dr 
Rhodes Boyson, Minister of 
Slate at the Northern Ireland 
Office, said that in the private 
sector "consideration is being 
given to how the approach to 
equality can be made mare 
complete. ’ consistent and 
effective". 

Another measure that has 
been discussed is whether 
contractors for the public 
service, who are obliged al- 
ready to sign the agency's 
declaration that they are a fair 
employer, should be requested 
to do more to ensure equality 
among their workers. 

It is not dear if the Govern- 
ment will support the idea of 
linking the placing of con- 
tracts or grants with a more 
positive approach to fair 
employment. However, it re- 
mains opposed to any reverse 
discrimination or quota 
system. 

The emphasis being placed 
on promoting feir employ- 
ment in a province where 
unemployment is 22 per cent 


comes at a time of growing 
alarm among ministers and 
officials at Irish American 
lobbying on the issue. 

One source said: "We are 
now being bracketed with 
South Africa over there and 
that will have disastrous 
consequences.” 

Irish American lobbyists are 
modelling their efforts on the 
"disinvestment" tactic used 
against South Africa, and 
legislation has been passed in 
Massachusetts and New York 
giving companies until Janu- 
ary 1 to adhere to a set of 
principles, or face the sale of 
shares held by state 
authorities- 

Similar legislation has been 
introduced in six other states. 
The principles are similar to 
the Sullivan Principles, which 
led to the disinvestment of 
shares in companies operating 
in South Africa. 

A Northern Ireland official 
described the campaign in 
America as “relentless" He 
added: “This is psychological 
and is a real threat. Northern 
Ireland obviously has a mas- 
sive image problem and for us 
to be put in the same category 
as South Africa makes it 
worse." 



m m m M h 



~ ***« 4V 

lit ' i \l I Ml' 

as* x * v aiaa> ■■■>■ 


Kinnock faces test 
of unity as TUC 
conference looms 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 


BENTLEY'S 

NiC-MT CLUB 







Charges 

follow 


*i »* i«» r. •»' £ — • — 77; 

“• - ^4 


4T' , k 


club raid 


Attempt to ease flags issue 


The aircraft mannfacturer, 
.Short Brothers, last night 
-attempted to defuse die tense 
-situation which has arisen 
over Its demand for the im- 
mediate removal of "loyalist" 
flags, bunting, emblems and 
posters from the factory floor 
(Richard Ford writes). 

In a letter to all 7,000 
employees, Sir Phflip_ Fore- 
man, the rhahman, said Hwt 
.the Union Flag would fly every 
day from the company's of- 
.firial flag pole and that pic- 
tures of the Royal Family and 
'poppies could be displayed 
“sensibly". 

The letter was more concil- 
iator}' than that issued eight 
days ago, and makes no 


reference to booting being 
taken down immediately, or 
workers who put op emblems 
faring disciplinary action. The 
company appealed to its staff 
to remove the emblems vol- 
untarily. 

No timescale is put on their 
removal but it makes dear the 
issue is one of flags or jobs. 
Sources in the company say 
that only a few militants are 
behind the attempted 
intimidation of Roman Catho- 
lics, who make up about 14 per 
cent of the overwhelmingly 
loyalist workforce. 

In his letter Sir Philip 
admits that in some areas 
there is now more bunting but 
denies his instruction was at 


the behest of the Government 
or the Fair Employment 
Agency. He insists on the 
removal of other flags, em- 
blems and posters from the 
Arm, hot says: “We are a 
British company owned by the 
British Government, the Brit- 
ish Government is the 
company’s largest customer 
and we are proud to be 
British." 


Up to sixty people arrested 
on Thursday night in a police 
raid on an east London dub 
will appear before magistrates 
this morning charged with 
drugs offences. 

Some are likely to remain in 
custody until next week while ^ , 
analysis of substances found (*4|! 
in the raid continues. -:T J 

The raid on Bentley's Club ^ 
(above), in Canning Town, 
east London, was made by 1 60 
officers, as a police helicopter 
hovered overhead. 

The club's drains were 
blocked to prevent drugs being 
flushed down the lavatories 
and sinks. 

About 100 people in the bar 
were searched (left), and some 
ammunition, allegedly forged 
passports, an ammonia spray 
and a number of knives were 
found. 



Nuclear protesters to 
blockade dump site 


• uadi 

Actress m ^ 


cancer 


By Trudi Mcmtosh 


With the opening next week 
of the Fare borough Air Show, 
at which Short Brothers wfl] 
be attempting to attract poten- 
tial customers. Sir Philip gives 
a warning that unless the issue 
is resolved quickly customer 
confidence will be lost. 


Ambush of Catholics I Labour is 


‘was foiled by police’ ahead in 


Police foiled a plot by the 
. Eloyalist" Ulster Volunteer 


■ An officer recognized Stan- 
ley Gray, aged 17, as he ran 


Force to murder a car full of from the house. 


Today poll 


At least 1,000 anti-nuclear 
dump protesters are planning 
to blockade the main access 
road to a proposed nuclear 
dump site at BradweH, Essex, 
on Monday. 

Mr Les Pipe, a spokesman 
for the Essex Against Nuclear 
Dumping Group, said yes- 
terday that hundreds of peo- 
ple, from “barrow boys to 
barristers" will join the block- 
ade to prevent the first at- 
tempt by Nirex, the 
government nuclear waste 
agency, to gain access to the 
site. 


attempt to surprise the 
protesters. 

“We believe they will try to 
go m under cover of darkness, 
so we have doubled the num- 
ber of protesters and look-outs 
around the site and at the 
main entrance." Miss Tracy 
Latimer said. 

“We only want a peaceful 
confrontation but we are pre- 
pared if they change tactics." 

About 1 80 protesters 
formed a human chain across 
the entrance to the Fulbeck 
site yesterday preventing 
Nirex contractors from getting 
to the site. - • 

Organizers said no prior 
warning was given by local or 
Ministry of Defence police at 
the site, but a motorist warned 
the protesters after he saw a 
police convoy on the A 1 half a 
hour before the contractors 
arrived at the site. 

Mr Stewart Boyle, national 
energy campaigner for Friends 
of the Earth, said in London 
yesterday that all the groups 
would be increasing their vigi- 
lance. 

He believed the Govern- 
ment would resort to a High 
Court injunction rather than 
try undercover tactics to get to 
the sites. 

Miss Susan Gittins, a 
spokeswoman for Nirex, said 
yesterday that it would be 
reviewing its options, includ- 
ing court action. 

She said Nirex wanted to 
avoid any confrontation with 
the protesters. 

“We hope we can gain 
access by discussion rather 
than recourse to other 
options." 


Roman Catholics in an am- 
bush on a housing estate, 
Belfast Crown Court was told 
yesterday (Richard Ford 
writes). 

. The plan, by five alleged 
loyalist terrorists, was said to 
have been uncovered when 
Royal Ulster Constabulary 
officers burst into a house in 
north Belfast as the UVF gang 
prepared their mission. 

The men fled from the 
■ house leaving guns which had 
been used in two murders and 
five attempted murders. 


Jvlr Gray was yesterday 
refused bail. 

• In Londonderry 200 work- 
ers employed in the city 
council’s depots staged a walk- 
out in protest at the Pro- 
visional IRA murder of a 
Protestant electrician. 

Mervyn Bell, aged 22, was 
killed on Thursday night. The 
Provisional IRA claimed that 
he was shot because he was 
doing work on an Ulster 
Defence Regiment base and 
had continued to do so in spite 
of warnings 10 stop. 


A Mat-plan poll published in 
Today, puts the Labour Party , 
three points ahead of the 
Tories, with the Alliance well 
back in third place. 

The poll held between Au- 
gust 22 and 27, gives Labour 
38 per cent support the 
Conservatives 35 per cent and 
24 per cent for the Alliance. 

On their sample of 1,385 
electors. Labour would win 
311 seats at a general election, 
the Tories 287, the Alliance 
28, and others 24. 


Nirex engineers are due to 
arrive at the site at tlam but 
Mr Pipe said the blockade 
would be set up from 6am. A 
protest camp has already been 
established near the site. 

“We have nine action 
groups in a 30-mfle radius and 
we are planning an indefinite 
picket, 1 ’ Mr Pipe said. 

Brad well is the fourth site 
being considered by Nirex for 
dumping low-level nuclear 
waste. 


British Gas pic 


Notice published under Condition 5 of the 
Authorisation granted and Direction given 
by the Secretary of State for Energy 
to the British Gas Corporation 
under the Gas Act J986. 


The poll held after Soviet 
admissions that the Cher- 
nobyl nuclear disaster was the 
result of human error, said 60 
per cent of Tory voters want 
the British nudear power 
station programme halted. 

The survey found that 29 
per cent of those interviewed 
want Britain's nuclear power 
stations shut down; 56 per 
cent want existing power sta- 
tions kept, but no new ones 
built. I 


Protesters at the three other 
sites, Elstow, near Bedford, 
Killingholme in Humberside 
and Fulbeck in Lincolnshire, 
have so for prevented Nirex 
engineers from gaining access 
to the sites. 

But many action groups, 
including Friends of the Earth, 
fear Nirex will switch to 
tougher tactics from next 
week. 

A Humberside Against 
Nuclear Dumping Group 
spokesman said yesterday that 
Nirex could try to get on to the 
site this week at night in an 


hospital 


The former Coronation 


Street actress Pat Phoenix is 
being treated for cancer. “She 
has been a pattern for a few 
days." Mr John Jackson, 
director of the AMI Alexandra 
Hospital. Manchester, said 
yesterday. 

“She is able to receive visits 
from a limited number of 
personal friends at her own 
request." She had not under- 
gone surgery, he said. 

Her manager, Sara Randall, 
-said: “The doctors are quite 
pleased with her progress. 

The 62-year-old . actress 
played the part of Elsie Tanner 
for more than 21 years: '■ 

In March she was admitted 
to hospital suffering from 
pleurisy and a hiatus hernia. 
Then earlier this month doc- 
tors ordered her to *eave 
her summer show in Scar- 
borough, after she collapsed 
and cracked a rib. She played 
in the comedy For Love Nor 
Money at the Floral Hall for a 
week before collapsing in her 
dressing room. 


Mr Neil Kinnock's new 
model Labour Party will be 
put to a severe test this week 
when the Trades Union Con- 
gress descends on Brighton. 

The key eve of conference 
question is whether past di- 
visions can be put aside in a 
politically convincing display 
of brotherly love, as Labour 
leaders and most of the TUC 
chiefs hope, or will the .con- 
ference explode in the kind of 
damaging internal strife that 
has cost the party dear so 
many times before. 

As last week's union com- 
promise on the vexed matter 
of secret ballots before strikes 
so amply demonstrated, the 
great bulk of the TUC general 
council is determined that 
nothing should stand hi the 
way of the conference becom- 
ing a dulcet preelection tally 
for Mr Kinnock’s benefit. 

But not every left-winger is 
prepared to bend with the 
breeze like Mr Ron Todd of 
the Transport and General 
Workers' Union in the cause 
of political expediency and the 
return of Mr Kinnock to 
Downing Street. 

As the latest issue of Cam- 
paign Group Nevis, the news- 
paper produced by the 
increasingly isolated hard left 
faction of Labour MPs," dem- 
onstrates, the militants are 
still ready to battle for their 
cause under the unforgiving 
spotlight of the television 
cameras. 

Mr Peter Healhfield, gen- 
eral secretary of the National 
Union of Mineworkers, sets 
the left's agenda, arguing that 
trade unions should brook no 
legal interference in their 
activities, even if such laws 
stem from the benign -dis- 
positions of the Labour Party 
acting in conjunction with the 
TUC. 

He says of the joint docu- 
ment People at Work New 
• Rights. New Responsibilities : 
“My impression is - that it 
indicates the intention of a 
future Labour government to 
> interfere in the internal affairs 
of trade unions. 

“Many of us were brought 
up on the concept of trade 
unions as voluntary combina- 
tions of working people 
protecting their interests. 


Trade union democracy, is 
about the members of these 
organizations determining for 
themselves what is in their 
rule books. Thai is 
fundamental 

“ ... For the state to inter- 
vene with one rigid formula is 
neither democratic nor 
constructive. We fear that the 
main aim of the new 
TUC/labour Party policy is 
to dictate to unions what 
should be in their rule books." 

Mr Heathfidd goes on to 
sav he is “sick" of bearing 
about the need for ballots 
before strikes, arguing that in 
some cases, for instance the 
miners' strike, they are in- 
appropriate because they give 
workers the chance to vote 
iheir fellows out of a job. 

But it is the News Inter- 
national dispute at Wappine 
over the dismissal oT 5.500 
print-workers that seems cer- 
tain to generate the most heat. 
More than 1,000 of the work- 
ers will lobby the conference 


on Monday in support of a 
resolution from the National 
Graphical Association reject- 
ing a decision by the TUC 
general council last February 
not to order the EETPIL' the 
electricians' union, to instruct 
its members to cease working 
on Mr Rupert Murdoch's 
titles. 

The issue is a highly emo- 
tional one throughout the 
union movement and could 
lead to a rebuff for the TUC 
leadership, and the kind of 
stormv public scenes that 
might' damage Mr Kinnock’s 
image as the author of a new 
kina of workplace harmony. 

But the power brokers, 
through the well-meaning bat 
woolly advocacy of Mr -Nor-, 
man Willis, win try to ensure 
that the scene is set for the 
Labour's leader's triumphal 
entrance on Tuesday. 

The general council has 
already decided to throw its 
weight behind strike ballots 
and against the NGA move. 

’■ Blackpool and the Labour 
Party conference is the next 
step on Labour's long journey 
of political rehabilitation. Mr 
Kinnock will be praying for a 
fair wind on the south coast 
this week. 


Labour puts faith in 
jobs not ‘crazy’ rules 


Continued from psgel 

giving. them anything useful to 
do. ■■ 


Mr Prescott denied that he 
was advocating “subsidized 
overmanning" as a solution to 
tite unemployment problem. 

Conservative Party sources 


reacted with glee at what they 
see as Labours latest gaffe and 
ministers are certain to hit 
bade, accusing it of fanning a 
return to bloated firms unable 
to pay their way. . 

Mr Richard Hickmet, MP 
for Glandfbrd and Scun- 
thorpe. whose constituency 
indudes a big steel works, said 
that the policy switch would 
“sound the death knell" for 
the British Steel Corporation. 

“It would be an absolute 
disaster for BSC and sted- 
making in this country if 
nationalized industries were 
obliged to increase staff for 
political or social reasons. It 
holds out false promises for 



ihe unemployed in steel 
areas*" he Said. - 
• The Nationalized In- 
dustries Chairmen's Group 
yesterday described the report 
m The Guardian that Labour 
Party leaders had told its 
members to restore axed jobs 
as “mysterious" (Edwaid 
Townsend writes). 

Mr Jim Driscoll, director of 
the group, said: “To the best of 
my knowledge it is untrue that 
■ chairmen have been ap- 
proached individually or 
jointly. There has been no 
‘instruction' from the Labour 
Party to the chairmen." 

He said that chairmen were 
agreed that any targets must 
be expressed nnambigiously 
and in a qualified form. 


• Neither of the two big state- 
owned transport concerns. 
British Railways and British 
Airways, had received any 
approach by the Labour Party 
on job-creation yesterday (Mi- 
chael Baity writes). 


Schedule of Maximum Contract Prices 
Until further notice: 


The maximum unit charge for firm contract supplies 
of gas will be 36.2p/therm. 


The maximum unit charge for interruptible contract 
supplies of gas will be 30.6p/therm. 


In each case the unit charge represents the maximum 
charge per unit of gas for each type of supply 


The actual charge per therm for supplies of gas to 
individual customers will be determined by 
negotiation and generally may be less than the 
amount stated above. 


This Statement does not apply to charges for the 
supply of back-up gas pursuant to Section 19 (4) of 
the Gas Act 1986. 



BAe stands by the Airbus 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 




Geoff Cooper, aged 34, whose attempt to row around die 
world ended after a day and a half yesterday when he broke 


H I f'-Kl 1 1 1 1 r^inij P:li'ilPl JfiTi I iTiTTn j 1 


General Statement of Policy regarding willingness to 
enter into Negotiations for Prices of gas supplies 10 
Contract Customers 


Cornwall on Wednesday, in his 16ft craft. Water Rat 


British Gas declares its willingness in all cases to 
enter into negotiations for prices for the supply of gas 
to all contract customers or potential contract 
customers. In these negotiations British Gas, taking 
account of the relevant circumstances, will not set 
prices so as to restrict, distort or prevent competition 
contrary to the public interest 

For the three years from- the date hereof and subject to 
changes in the value of sterling or major changes in 
oil prices, taking into account price movements in 
competitive fuels and the individual circumstances 
of the demand, British Gas intends to limit increases 
in its maximum firm contract prices to about the rate 
of inflation. 


Strike at key sea ports 
fails to make impact 


British Aerospace said yes- 
terday it had no intention of 
withdrawing from the Euro- 
pean Airbus Industrie con- 
sortium and that reports that 
the Government was no longer 
prepared to fund the pro- 
gramme were “premature 
speculation". 

Hie company, which makes 
Airbus wings and has a 20 per 
cent stake in AL, has been 
engaged in informal dis- 
cussions with the Department 
of Trade and Industry over the 
viability of the next two pro- 
posed Airbuses — the A330 
and A340 — but has yet to 


submit a formal proposition 
for launch aid. 

Wing development for the 
two new aircraft, designed to 
complete the A1 family of 
twin-engined airtiners, is the 
biggest prize in the project and 
would demand considerable 
nse of high technology. 

BAe has not officially cal- 
culated the cost, bed it would 
range from £350 million to 
£500 million. 

Ministers are said to have 
serious doubts about the 
commercial prospects of the 
two new jets, but other Air bos 
partners, notably the French 
and West Germans, are known 


to be more optimistic. Airbus, 
which is based in Tookmse, 
says that in the next 20 years 
there coaid be demand for 
1,120 aircraft in the Long- 
range sector corned by : the 
A330 and A340, worth $100 
billion (£68 billion). 

BAe has a number of op- 
tions available to ruse its 
share of the £1.6 trillion A330- 
346 programme, indwfiog us- 
ing its own fonds or borrowing 
in the City. But if prefers 
government launch .aid be- 
cause of the attractiveness of 
repaying the money in 
tranches pins a levy cm aircraft 


Agdestein is 
Lloyds chess 
champion 


The first prize in the Lloyds 
Bank tournament went to the 
Norwegian grandmaster. 
Agdestein. who won with 8 
points out of 9 (Harry 
Golombek writes). 

He was half a point ahead of 
the English international mas- 
ter. Hodgson, on 1'h. 

Next came Chandler, Condie 
and Hjaxtarsofl. on 7. Seven 
players. Plaskett, Watson. - 
Rechlis. NijBoer, Kudrin. 
.Bimbpim. and Barua. shared 
sixth place on 6U>. 

Resulls from round 9; van der 
Steffen 0, Agdestein 1; Chandler 
I, Akesson 0; Hjartarson I, 
Prasad 0; NijBoer fc, Plaskett fc; 
Condie I. Anand 0; Ker 0, 
Kudrin I: WollFO, Watson 1. 


By Peter Evans, Home Affair s Correspondent 


Rebel miners 
are official 
trade union 


For the three years from the date hereof, having 
regard to the individual circumstances of the 
demand. British Gas intends to continue to set 
interruptible gas prices in relation to competitive 
fuels which are interchangeable with gas. 

This Statement does not apply to the supply of 
back-up gas pursuant to Section 19 (4) of the Gas 
Act 1986. 


Dated the 23rd day of August 1986. 


A 24-hour strike by im- 
migration officers at key pas- 
senger ports made little 
impact when it got under way 
yesterday. 

At Harwich, the stoppage by 
more than 30 members of the 
Society of Civil and Public 
Servants was countered so 
successfully that thousands of 
ferry passengers faced only 
minimal delays. The story was 
the same at Dover and Pegwell 
Hoverpon. near Ramsgate. 

Limited action by other 
officials at Ramsgate and 
Folkestone was expected also. 

A spokesman for the soci- 
ety. whose members walked 
out in protest at the com- 

f julsory transfer of four col- 
eagues to Heathrow Airport. 
had claimed at Harwich that 
passengers would be delayed 
for at least an hour as a result 
of the stoppage. But manage- 
ment brought in extra man- 
power from the rival 
Immigration Service Union. 


A spokesman for the union 
said: “The strike has had no 
effect Passport control is 
about three people down but 
w« are making up for that by 
whisking arrivals through 
quicker, while still checking 
their passports. 

“Anyone who looks sus- 
picious has been put to one 
side and dealt with later so as 
not to interrupt the passenger 1 
flow." 

Holidaymakers arriving 
from The' Netherlands. Den- 
mark and Sweden were forced 
to wait only several minutes 
longer than normal' Spdkesr 
men for the two ferry com- 
panies. Sealink and DFDS. 
agreed that full sailings from 
the Hook of Holland. Esbjerg 
and Gdieborg had operated to 
schedule and passengers put 10 
no inconvenience. 

The society is threatening to 
take further industrial action 
unless the transfers are 
withdrawn. 


The Union of Democratic 
Mineworkers officially be- 
came an independent trade 
union yesterday when the 
certification officer granted a 
"certificate of independence". 


. The UDM was formed by 
the amalgamation of Not- 
tinghamshire NUM. South 
Derbyshire and the Durham- 
based Colliery Trades and 
Allied Workers on December 
6 when it became a listed trade 
union. 


But objections to its in- 
dependence were made by the 
NUM and the pit deputies 
union. Nacods. which said it 
was not independent because 
it was unf Un ' the wing of 
British Col 


Mr Peter McNestry. general 
secretaiy of Nacods. said: 
“The timing is political be- 
cause it was .CToal Board 
chairman Sir Ian MacGregor's 
last day." 


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TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


IMENEWS 


to 


urges 


mm 


V / ByFrancesGibb, Legal Affairs ComspondeitfV * 

Barristers are being niffld to The adoption of the code, section as possible of mem- 

* ^ c J a . n uL f 611 J’J°f e<iures “ guidance rather than Jjers of chambers, it says. 

V that btack candidatesare cho- mandatory,. ought to reduce -• Cham bees are also urged to 
• v ' ' sen for vacancies in chambers the possibility of dtscriroma- set up a system for regulating 

• v. and also ^t their share of lion taking place and lessen the distribution offtorieis 

Unrfs, under a new code of thc imprcssron ofdiscriritina- among pupfl barristers. No 
aiui«d.at ending -ra- tion which is sometimes per- brief should be diverted from 
: : ctived by black feristers.-te t%4amsieritisdnetogot6, 

• ’ C P C * at ^ c. without a derision made with 

. published m this week s Law Mr Scott says that the latest his pupa master. The pupil 

• . Society Gazette, Mr Justice questionnaire on applications master should also give an 

• Sco“ rays that the Bar does for vacancies in chambers, in, SSirion of de- 

. D9 l advocate “reverse dis- 1984-85 shows that the mnp- ersion to the pupil. 

cnji'patjon . _ bers of black appoinanemsls Mr Scott says that some 

^ >t tnere is nothing to n sing.. Out of 40 new. tenants barristers* clerks have ob- 
’.‘v ®® se between rival can- joining specialist chambers,-, jeered to this' guideline on the 
/: didates for a pupillage or 1 0 were not whiter On October ground that it interferes with 
yfrancy, s et s of L 1983, only one barrister in their discretion'- to aiipran* 


section as possibfe of mem- 
bers or chambers, it says. 

- Chambers are also urged to 
set up a system for repdating 
the distribution of briefs 
among pupfl barristers. No 
brief should be diverted from 
the barrister it is due to go to, 
without a derision made with 
his pupil master. The pupil 
master should also give an 
explanation of any such de- 
cision to the pupil. 

Mr Scott says , that some 
banisters* clerks have ob- I 


tenancy vacancy, sets of 
chambers with no or few black 
members “can properly be 
*. encouraged to cbose the black 
* candidate". 

Mr Justice Scott, chairman 
‘«V of the Bar's race relations 
•. committee, says that the case 
for a code of conduct on race 
r rela lions, which covers both 
* applications for places and the 
distribution ofbriefe, has been 
made out. . . 

'‘This is not because racial 
discrimination is rampant in 
'■ all or in most chambers," be 
ays. 

: But evidence has indicated 

“ibat racial discrimination has 
been, and - continues to be v 
: suffered hy some black 
.: barristers". 


special^ chambers was other 
than white: But two years fa ter 
the number had risen to. 17. 

The new code calls for the 
widest possible advertisement 
of vacancies so that can- 
didates do not come from 
•within an exclusive' circle 
that will often exclude black - 
candidates". 

Second, chambers " should 
establish and follow selection 
procedures. Any rejection of a 
candidate without interview 
should be endorsed by mpre 
than one barrister in the 
chambers, as should the de- 
cision to appoint 'any can- 
didate. 

' Interviews should be con- 
ducted by as wide a cross- . 


their discretion - to allocate 
work. 

But he says the allocation of 
briefs is one of the main areas 
in which complaints of dis- I 
crimination have been made. 

That state of affairs is 
unlikely to be remedied with- 
out a change in . 'procedure 
even if h places “some slight 
drag on the unfettered dis- 
cretion of decks**. • 

Finally, the code says that 
no brief should ever be di- 
verted from a black barrister 
on the ground of believed 
prejudice against them from 
solicitors or lay diems. 

Such beliefs are unfounded 
and should never be a reason 
for diverting work, Mr Scon 
says. 



Demotion Ex-mayor 
of black was given 


not racial, 
bank says 


house 


priority 


By Nicholas Beeston 
The securities arm 


Three councillors were yes- 
terday asked to resign their 
senior posts because one of 


Barclays Bank claimed yes- them, a former mayor, 
terday that a black employee “jumped" the housing queue 


was demoted because he "did and was allocated a three* 
not make the grade", bul bedroom semi-detached 


refused to comment on house. 

accusations that the move was The resignations were de- 


racially motivated. 


manded after a special meet- 


Mr David Adeleke, aged 23, \ n S of the Port Talbot Council 
who is thought to be the only in west Glamorgan which 


black person to have worked discussed an investigation rer 
on the floor- of the Slock port on the affair. - 


Exchange, threatened to take The trouble arose last June 


his former employer, Barclays when Mrs Valerie Kingdom, a 
de Zoete Wedd. to an indus- divorcee, a former mayor and 


trial tribunal, claiming 1 chairman of the housing ser- 


A Blackbird, known more formally as a Lockheed SR-7I, flying over countryside near its 
US Air Force base at MjOdenhali, Suffolk. The MnndBg-lookiag plane is a reconnais- 
sance aircraft; which is capable of operating at altitudes of $5,000 feet and can reach more 
than three times the speed . of sound. It was taken by an air-to-air photography enth usiast, 
Flight Lieutenant Chris Allan, from a camera mounted on an RAF Hawk. 


Cervical cancer 
deaths ‘needless’ 


Cervical cancer kills 2,000 
women every year in Britain, 
but at least half the deaths 
could be prevented, according 
to a new report. 

The report, published yes- 
terday, calls on the Govern- 
ment to establish a 


Government's abandonment 
of responsibility for cervical 
cancer screening extends to a 
complete lade of -information 
as to the state of screening In 
Britain today. 


Man faces 
7th death 
charge 


Tobacco advertising attack 


constructive dismissal 

Mr Adeleke, of Pimlico, 
south-west London, resigned 
from his £15.000 a year po- 
sition as a jobber after he was 
told he was "not going to 
make it". 

"If everyone made the grade 
it would be wonderful but 
that is not how it works out," 
said the spokesman, who re- 
fused to discuss Mr Adeleke's 
allegations of prejudice. 

Mr Adeleke contends that 
racist motives were partly 
behind the decision, and that 
the company fought to under- 
mine him for personal rea- 
sons, including his outspoken 
opposition to investment by 
Barclays in South Africa. 

"1 would not say that the 
reason for my effective dis- 
missal was 1 00 per cent racial. 


vices committee, was given a 
house after being pul in a 
priority category. The repeat 
states normal council rules 
were by-passed. 


Railway alert 
over abduction 


Railway stations through- 
out Britain have been given 
the description of a man 
police wish to interview about 
the abduction of Jamie 
Thomas. aged eight, from hi? 
home in Newark Road, Lin- 
coln. on Wednesday. 

The boy was found 24 hours 
lateral Peterborough. 


TUCfilmon 

discrimination 

A £50,000. one minute long, 


By Jfll Sherman 

The tobacco industry's 
assertion that advertising fis 


An independent 


A man arrested in connec- 
JSJSJJJ tion 'with the Stockwell 
22^1 strangling? faced a seventh 
Nngm. murder charge yesterday. 

Before Kenneth Erskine ap- 
survey, peared at South Western Mag- 


' -v, Jf commissioned by Mr Frank fistrates Court, London, he was advertising 

Dobsoia Labour spokfsman | SSSor murSS 


screening system, for all 
women over 20, with recalls 
for repeat tests every three 
years. 


on health,, showed- that more I ence Tisdall, aged 80, who was 


than a third of district health 
authorities (77) /have no sys- 
tem at all, and 70 of those 


‘ * Technical and Managerial 

•: Staffs (ASTMS), which has 
12,000 members working in 
tat laboratories. 

I , L iLJJ The report. Behind the 

t iii)OUrDUtSM & ' rewr '^y srthatceirvicalcan “ 

r JiWU cer can be prevented. “It is a 
K scandal that women are dying 

IImN III If tfilZl fi needlessly because insufficient 
* resources ancf planning are put 


... ' t* I,,# l,, 4 |. ' >GIU «u Oil, ami /u UI uiwc 

£"»« ***& P«I»« *» 
■ Technical and Managerial . r _ ^ 


found straw 
Ranelagh C 
on July 23. ' 


in her bed at 
ms, Fulham, 


me union report, in- its 
conclusion, says mat the lives 
of about 1,000 women, a year 
-could be saved by a properly 
organized screening system. 
Mr Clive Jenkins, the I 


He is already charged with 
the murdecs of Eileen Emms, 
aged 77, of West Hill Road, 
Putney, on April 9; Janet 
Cockett aged 67, of Overton 
Road, Stockwell on June 
9&bigniew Strabawa, aged 94, 
and Valentine Gleinv, aged 84, 


union’s genefal secretary, said both of Stockwell Park Cres- 
yestenJay that the report was cent, on June 28;WiUiam 


into prevention, detection and 

. * treatment," ft raysl" - 

I.,*- "Through analysis tifeer- - -.■** ,t, u » -m i , 

..vical smears, potentially s,ldes - of 5^ Overton Road estate, ^/| C'AaIt'g 

cancerous cdls ^i .be d&- -Country the: backlog was. well Stotkwen, on July‘21. IVlT By vK.3 

;* ' 'tected before they- -filDy de- /.Mr Erskine is also accused ... . H«l| ‘ . . 

_■ velop< and treatment lo -He huends UKtistrilniietite of the attempted murder of. a ■ 111 il Oil 

. destroy this abnormal tissue report to all delegates attend- 111211 of 73 at an old people's . , . .... 

be .more than . 90.per cent , - i^g-neatt wedc^^GCongress^ 

^ Iftocessful if'tbfe atmdrraali^: 

' - ‘ ■ K ndu Miniish * l nltnur P nncptvofiua I itianl U* nnc mmaiwlMl in mu. 


produced because of the con- Carmen,, aged 84, of the 
cern of ASTMS members -Marquess estate^IsHngton. be- 
working in laboratories ewer tween July 7 and 8; and 
the zde%- jn^handling.. smear Wiffiam Downs, aged 74, of 
slides, fit some parts of .tie the 1 ’ Overtdn Road estate, 1 
country the backlog was well Stcfckwen, on July‘21. 
over three months. . : ' ■ . , • Air Ersidne is also accused 


not directed at children was 
challenged yesterday at a Brit- 
ish Medical Association con- 
ference in London. 

Recent research by the 
Norwegian government shows 
a dramatic drop in the number 
of children ranking since the 
country banned all tobacco 
advertising in 1975. 

In 1975, 61 per cent of all 
schoolgirls aged 15 smoked. In 
1985, the figure was 40 per 
cent. The drop in the umber 
of younger children was even 
more marked with only 13 per 
cent of girls aged 13 raniwg 
in 1985, compared with 36J 
per cent in 1975. 

"There, is no doubt at all 
that since the ban was in- 
troduced smoking amongst 
young people has decreased 
quite dramatically." Dr Judith 
Mackay, a World Health 
Organization expert on smok- 
ing, said. 

Dr Mackay emphasized 


that all the evidence showed 
that most people start smok- 
ing when they are in their 
teens. 

"Nobody starts smoking 
when they are over 20. The 
core of the industry's argu- 
ment is that tobacco advertise- 
ments never tty to recruit 
children or non-smokers. But 
advertisers have subtie in- 
fluences over both groups in 
their efforts to put across 
socially desirable images," Dr 
Mackay said. 

Last year the tobacco In- 
dustry in this country sprat 
£68,464,000 on advertising — 
more than double the amount 
it spent in 1976. 

"Children do not remain 
innocent of the tobacco 
industry's campaigns,” the 
BMA said. 

The conference was held to 
launch a study challenging the 
tobacco industry's claims that 
people are not affected by 
cigarette advertising. 

Great Expectorations : 
Advertising and ike Tobacco 


Industry by Mr Simon Chap- 
man, another WHO expert, 
claims that the tobacco in- 
dustry is marketing a product 
which is responsible for more i 
than one million premature 
deaths each year worldwide. 

Mr Stephen Woodward, 
Australian executive director 
of Ash, the anti-smoking pres- 
sure group, claimed that to- 
bacco advertising was also 
cancelling the effects of expen- 
sive and comprehensive educa- 
tion compaigns worldwide. 

In Australia, the Govern- 
ment spent $1.54 a head on 
health education but in Nor- 
way only 8-12 cents were 
devoted a head to this 
education. 

"Educational campaigns in 
Norway are very effective 
because they don't have to 
compete with advertising," he 
said. 

The BMA announced yes- 
terday that it will be writing to 
all authorities requesting them 
to ban tobacco promotion on 
billboards under their control 


There has been a good deal of ami-apartheid film, sponsored 
personal animosity against me by the Trade Union Congress, 
byanumberofpeople,butthe M ’ 


by a number of people, but the will have its first showing at 
racial element is certainly a the TUC Congress in Brighton 
major factor," he said. "It had next week. It will then be 
nothing lo do with my perfor- screened as a paid advertise- 
mance as a dealer." 


ment in cinemas. 


Paediatrician faces 
pornography charges 


Professor Oliver- Brooke, photographs of children under 
aged 45. former head of the age of 16. 


paediatric medicine at St 
George's Hospital, Tooting, 
south London, was remanded 
on unconditional bail hy 
South Western magistrates 
yesterday .on eight charges 
involving child pornography. 

Professor Brooke is accused 
of seven offences under the 
Protection of Children Act 
1978. and one under the 1979 
Obscene Publications Act. 

He is charged on seven 
counts of supplying child 
pornography and soliciting, 
counselling, aiding and- abet- 
ting others to take indecent 


He is also charged with one 
count of possessing obscene 
articles for gain. 


Christopher Hilton, aged 
32, a property developer, and 
his wife Julie, aged 24, of 
Poulton-Le-Fylde, Blackpool 
Lancashire, both face two 
charges of taking and supply- 
ing indecent photographs. 
Robert Freeman, aged 49, a 
photographic chemist, of Rye, 
East Sussex, is charged with 
intent to supply Professor 
Brooke with indecent photo* 
graphs. 


He huendT u^dikrilmte tite of the attempted murder of. a 
report to an .delegates attend- man of 73 at an old people's 


is detected early enough." 

The report says that the 


Labour' Conservative, libera] 
and SDP party conferences: 


He was remanded in cus- 
tody. 


By John Winder 


I . Multiple Sclerosis is merdless. 

. Itis a disease that can strike anybody, 
anytime. 

there’s no cure. ^ < - v 
/ ' . 

Every penny\you contribute to the 


Autumn entertainment 

TV stars’ No ‘cheap imports’ for 
£100,000 BBC’s Daytime lineup 
’ludicrous’ 


txJSflS&whS'te Multiple Sclerosis Society brings the cure 

much doser. 

and Bermondsey to prepare a It alSO brings SOlTie COmfort tO the 


many 'thousands who suffer the misery 
of impaired speech, loss of eyesight, in- 


\irtms 


■ The BBC yesterday de- 
fended its decisioa to attract 
. pro top UN broadcasters to 
: its current affairs team, but 
said reports that they would 
receive salaries near £200,000 
were “lndkroiis". 

A corporation spokesman 
\ * m a\ denied that ITN newsreaders, 
*?*’, Martyn Lewis and Pamela 
f J Armstrong, will more than 
L iv double their salaries when 


B BO-TV’S Daytime sched- 
ule. supposed to start in mid- 
autumn, will not feature 
"cheap imports",- a spokes- 
man insists. 

It win instead be dominated 
by- inexpensively made British 
programmes, particularly the 
"talking heads" type in which 
presenters and guests chat in 
front of a camera. 


me sched- tion to daytime sport, this is 
irt to mid- an audience that has been 
l feature largely abandoned to ITV, 
a spokes- particularly in the afternoons, 
which the BBC has been filling 
lominated with Ceefax. | 

ide British The Daytime schedule will 
ulariy the begin each morning at 9.20, 

: in which after Breakfast Time ; and 
£5 chat in continue to 4pm, when 
children's programming 


inhaling a thinner used in a 
typewriter eraser. 

Mr Hughes believes that the 


• contineacearid paralysis. 

The rouch-publidsed events of the 
past twelve months have demonstrated 
past ROw generOife people can be-wifish 
they believe in a cause. 

Our cause is very important. 

Please give as much as you can. 

Because the sooner we find the 
answer the sooner we can ensure that 
the lives of those nearest to you are not 
tom apart . 


present law, the Intoxicating 
Substances (Supply) Art 1985 


The BBC calls this "a * begins. -T 
service with a strong British There wffl be news bulletins 


,V;' they join the BBC. 


- ITN has accused the BBC of 
Poaching staff after reports 
that Mr Lewis will double his 
£40,000-a-year salary. There 
has been speculation that 
rafela Armstrong is to he 
Paid £100,000 for a 20-month 
contract 

The BBC spokesman said 
he did not know what their 
salaries wm be. 

• Olivia O'Leary, aged 36, 
«to has hosted BBC 2’s 
Nncsnigki, takes over in Octo- 
ber from Jonathan Dimbleby 
>? presenter of Yorkshire 
Television’s documentary 

rew Tuesday. 


accent . ; 

Mr Roger Laughton, the 
head of Daytime television, 
has been given a budget of £9 


million to fill almost seven • ITN. 


on tne hour ana at lptn each 
day. an expanded, 36-minute 
news programme presented by 
Martyn Lewis, who 1ms left 


hours each weekday for 18 
months. 

He intends to concentrate 
on "news and information" 
with drama repeats and some 
films. 

The BBC says that its push 
into the area is justified by 
“socio-economic factors".' 

Ten million • pensioners, 
three million unemployed and 
millions of housewives, moth- 
ers, with small children and 
shift workers produce an audi- 
ence of roughly 25 million. 

• Excepting die BBC’s devo- 


Two other BBC-1 pro- 
grammes continue the empha- 
sis on information: Open Air. 
which will originate from 
Manchester, will be a daily 
programme dealing mostly 
with television itself: 

And from Pebble Mifl. Mr 
Robert Kilroy-Silk, the former 
Labour MP, will host a daily 
chat show with the working 


title. Day by Day. 

. The BBC has m 


. The BBC has not set a date 
for the start of the Daytime 
service or announced its exact 
composition. ; 


| Substances (Supply) Art 1985 
has been shown to be ineffec- 
tive with police finding ft 
impossible to intervene when 
retailers knowingly sold sol- 
vents to young abusers. ] 

Mr Hughes proposes to 
prohibit retailers from selling 
products containing listed 
. chemicals to people under 16. 
The products would not be 
allowed on open shelves and 
retailers would have to display 
notices raying that such prod- 
ucts could not be. sold ..to 
under- 16s. Offenders would 
be liable to prosecution. 

But Mr Hughes believes 
that the Home Office will need 
persuading that his Bill is 
necessary. Ministers will wish 
to give the present legislation, 
which came into force only a 
year ago. more time before 
making a judgement. 

Statistics show that one m ' 
four London children have 
experimented and deaths have 
risen from 31 in 1 980 to 120 or 
more in 1985. 


imagine yours 


puns at home, 
eing tom apart. 



The Doctor on trial in 
new television series. 


v |M /u> 


Doctor Who. one of 
! television’s longest running 
science-fiction programmes, 
. returns to the BBC on Septem- 


B|y Angefla Johnson 

one of violence ana the script is 
running peppered with humour, 
grammes, Mr John Naihan-Turner. 
itSepteoi- the producer, said: "Some 


Unions fear 
Superchannel 
‘erosion* 


Huge crane 
collapses in 
town centre 





after an 18-month' people wrote in to the BBC 




an 


absence. 

Colin Baker plays the 900- 
year-old time traveller for the 
tecond time in the show's 23- 
y^r history. 

The riew series consistsofa 
lf-part epic, "The Trial of a 
Tune Lord", which sees the 
Doctor on trial before the 
Time Lords of Gaflifrey on his 
own super-advanced planet 

He is accused of constantly' 
meddling in the affairs of 
others. The penalty, if found 
guilty, is death. 

Throughout the trial- adven- 


coraplaining - that the pro- 
gramme was too dependent on 
violent clashes between char- 
acters. So .we toned down the 
action and substituted the 
violence with humorous inter- 
course between the actors.” 

A lineup of stars, including 
Honor Blackman. Joan Sims. 
Torn- Selby and Lynda 
Bellingham, will appear in the 
series. The Doctor's assistant 
Peri, is played by Nicola 
Bryant who is followed by, 
Molanie: played by Bonnie 
.Langford. 

Some 1J0 million viewers 


tuns from the pas*, present worldwide watch Doctor Who 
and’ future are used- as^ev- as he projects himself from 


jdence of the Doctor’s interfer- 
es by Valeyard. the 
< prosecutor, played by Michael 
iJayston. ' , 

t The series has- minimum 


one imeraalactic problem to 
another m his police . tele- 
phone bos* There are several 
hundred' -fan dubs in more 
than 60 countries. 


Mr Stan Hibben, assistant 
' general secretary of the 
Musidans' Union, said yes- 
terday that any agreement 
with the delayed 
Superchannel cable-television 
venture will require a "fresh . 
approach", that takes into 
account the unique pan-Euro- 
pean nature of the service. 

Mr Hibbert said that the 
Musicians' Union and Equity 
are woriang together to gain 
protection against the 
possibility that Superchannei 
will erode the 'market for 
conventional sales of British 
programmes in Europe. 

"We have to be careful that 
in apparently maximizing the 
income of our members, we 
don’t, in fact reduce it" he 
said. 

Superchannei owned by # a 
consortium of ITV companies 
and the Virgin group, intends 
to beam a 24-hour schedule of 
ITV. BBC and music-video 
programmes to cable- systems 
throughout Western Europe. . 


A huge crane, which was 
towering nearly 300 feet above 
a town centre street collapsed i 
yesterday, slicing through a | 
construction worker’s kg and 
narrowly missing a crowded 
bus station. 

Workers leapt for their fives 
as a six ton jib. from another 
crane if was dismantling, 
smashed through the roof of a 
bus wash hangar alongside a 
plaza office development at 
Basingstoke. Hampshire. 

The injured workman was 
taken to Basingstoke, district 
hospital where his condition 
was described as serious. Two 
other workmen were also 
taken , to hospital but were 
later allowed home. 


For receipt of donation 
tick box In coupon. 


The accident happened 
lien lifting gear on the 200- 


I We enclose a donation to 
The Multiple Sderosis.Sociery of £■. 


when lifting gear on' the 200- 
ton mobile crane crumpled 
under the weight of the jib it 
was lowering and slewed out 
of control 

Safety experts are in- 
vestigating collapse. 


ADDRESS. 


MUIXIPLE 
SCLEROSIS 

Ws can only find the cure 
ifwe find the funds. 




\u°. : The Multiple bderosis Society Fivepmt. 2? Effit: Road. LONDON SNS'6 1 YZ. Telephone 01-~36 ti’fT. Giro Bank No. 5149S55. I 

■ r f — — ■ — -■ — —Hr 


/ 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


* 



offensive 
on workers 



benefit claims 


By Nicholas Beeston 


. A drive against pan-time 
workers illegally claiming un- 
employment benefits is to be 
made by anti-fraud investi- 
gators from the Department of 

Employment. 

Hundreds of investigators 
across the country will be 
scouring the casual labour 
market in the coming months. 

The move comes after the- 
announcement on Thursday 
by Mr Ian Lang, Par- 
liamentary Under-Secretary 
of State for Employment, that 
.100 people face prosecution 
for working for sub-con- 
tractors on British Steel's 
complex in Cleveland, while 
jdaiming up to £60 a week in 
-unemployment and supple- 
mentary benefits. 

The fraudulent claims were 
uncovered after a “rip-off” to 
the department. A team of 
investigators questioned 
employers for four weeks. 

Mr Lang has emphasized 
that no one genuinely un- 
employed has anything to fear 
from fraud investigators, but 
it is believed that 8 per cent of 
unemployment claims are 
fraudulent. 

A spokesman for the depart- 
ment said that investigators 


often concentrated their in- 
quiries in the catering, trans- 
port and building industries. 

During the summer season 
special attention is focused on 
seaside resorts, which provide 
many part-time jobs. 

Mr Lang said: “In the next 
few months there will be 
major anti-fraud operations in 
different parts of the country, 
aimed particularly at those 
types of work where fraudu- 
lent claiming of benefit is 
known to be prevalent.” 

The department this year 
increased its investigation 
team to 700 and estimates that 
in the first quarter of the tax 
year, April to June, it has 
saved £10 million of 
taxpayers' money by uncover- 
ing 'illegal unemployment 
claimants. 

The department could al- 
most double last year’s es- 
timated savings of £22 
million, when there were 
nearly 3,000 prosecutions and 
40,000 slopped claiming bene- 
fits after investigations. 

This month a total of (20 
workers at resorts in South 
Wales, Brighton and Grimsby, 
could face prosecution for 
working and claiming. 


350 lose 
jobs after 
hurricane 
dispute 

An offshore engineering 
company has dismissed 350 
men after a dispute over 
working conditions during the 
hurricane Charley stonms. 

Howard Doris Structures at 
Wallsend, Tyne and Wear, 
said yesterday it planned to 
recruit a new workforce. 

Dismissal notices were sent 
after the men walked out 
claiming that crane drivers 
who could not be found other 
jobs during Tuesday’s storm 
were told they would be put on 
half pay — which could mean 
them losing £100. 

The one-year-old yard’s first 
contract, a £12 million order 
from Conoco for a gas rig 
jacket, has halted. 

A spokesman for the work- 
ers, mostly General, Munici- 
pal, Boilennakers, and Allied 
Trades Union members, said 
they wanted an agreement on 
bad weather working 
payments. 

0 Recent storms have driven 
a record number of unusual 
binds on to Britain’s east coast 
Wrynecks, small brown, 
buff and grey-coloured wood- 
peckers, have been forced 
down between Shetland and 
Norfolk while migrating from 
Scandinavia to Africa. 

The West Country's largest 
reservoir, Colliford Lake on 
Bodmin Moor, is overflowing 
for the first time since it came 
into use in 1984. 

Weather details, page 28 


£50,000 more for Ruskin’s garden 


A further £50,000 is to be 
spent on restoring the 15-acre 
garden at the home of John 
Raskin, the Victorian critic, at 
Conzston in Cambria. 

The Manpower Services 
Corn miss km has agreed to a 
continuation of the community 
programme, which employs 10 
to 12 people for a year. 


bringing to £150,000 their 
investment In the project in the 
past three years. 

It will be some years before 
the work is complete, but 
already many footpaths laid 
out at Brantwood by Raskin's 
12 gardeners in the 1870s have 
been uncovered and some 
replanting has started. 


An appeal has been 
launched for plants for the 
garden. 

“The aim is to restore the 
gardens to the glory they had 
in Raskin's day,” Mr Brace 
Hanson, manager of the 
Brantwood project, said 
yesterday. 





The tangled wreckage of the car after it was in collision with an Army t a nk . 


£100,000 
bail in 
gold case 

A businessman accused of 
handling proceeds of the £26 
million Brinks-Mal gold bul- 
lion raid at Heathrow Airport, 
was freed on £100,000 bail at 
Horse ferry Road Magistrates' 
Court, south-west London, 
yesterday. 

Mr Brian Perry, aged 48, of 
Main Road, Biggin Hill, Kent, 
was bailed for six weeks, ac- 
cused of assisting in the realiza- 
tion of £98.000 of stolen gold 
bullion on or before August 12. 

Mr John Palmer, aged 36. of 
The Coach House, Battlefield, 
Lansdown, near Bath, was fur- 
ther remanded in custody for a 
week, charged in connection 
with the same raid. 


Car driver dies in 
tank collision 


By a Staff Reporter 


The Army's latest Chal- 
lenger tank which is equipped 
with new technology, was in- 
volved in a head-on collision 
which killed the woman driver 
of a car early yesterday near 
the Royal Armoured Corps 
depot at Bovington camp, 
Dorset. 

The car was cot in half in 
the accident by the right hand 
track. 

The 50-ton tank had a crew 
of two, a driver and . com- 
mander, both NCOs. 

A spokesman for the corps 
said it was being tested on 
public roads which had been 


reinforced for the purpose. 

The turret and gnn bad been 
removed bat the tank was 
weighted to give an accurate 
test of the engine and gearbox. 
The Challenger is the newest 
tank in service. 

The car, a white Datsun, 
was badly damaged in the 
collision. The victim's dog, 
taken away by a veterinary 
surgeon, was believed to be 
nnhnrL 

The woman was found to be 
dead on arrival at Poole 
HospitaL .The West Dorset 
coroner has been informed. 


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** 26 . 9 % 


Rare film 
of Beatles 
is sold 

A private “home movie" 
featuring the Beaties relaxing 
by a Hollywood swimming 
pool during their 1 965 Ameri- 
can tour, was sold for an 
unexpected £26,400 at auction 
in London yesterday. 

The Smm colour film, 
which has not been screened, 
was shot by the group's former 
press officer, Mr Tony 
Barrow. 

The three-spool, 52-minute 
silent film, which was sold 
with copyright, also showed 
exclusive shots of the “Fab 
Four" playing poker. Its new 
refused ■ ■-*- 



owner 

identity. 


to disclose his 


Dutch are 
accused of 
poaching 
car firm 

Mr Henry Bellingham. 
Conservative MP for Norfolk, 
North-wesLjcstcrday accused 
the Dutch government of 
bribery by trying to lure Lotus, 
the car manufacturer, into 
switching its British operation 
to The Netherlands by offer- 
ing financial incentives. 

Lotus executives Hew to 
The Netherlands yesterday for 
talks which could lead to the 
closure of their 20-year-old 
factory at Hethel, Norfolk, 
with the loss of 600 jobs. 

Mr Bellingham sai± “It 
-would be a disaster for Nor- 
folk if they did leave. This 
bribery by a foreign govern- 
ment is totally unacceptable." 

He said that the departure 
of the car makers would also 
badly hit sub-contractors 
throughout Norfolk who did 
work for Lotus.. 

A Dutch government 
spokesman said there were 
“all kinds of subsidies" for 
firms wishing to set up or 
expand in The Netherlands, 
especially technologically ad- 
vanced companies. 

Mr Mike Kimberley, the 
firm's managing director, said: 
-Wc would be stupid not to 
follow this Up. Wc have been 
told by the Government there 
is no way we can gain assis- 
tance in Norfolk." Norfolk is 
not an area which qualifies for 
development aid. 

Eight months ago Lotus was 
taken over in a £23 million 
deal by the American firm. 
General Motors. .As a result, 
increased job prospects had 
been expected. 

Mr Bellingham said that he 
had given warning to Mr Peter 
Morrison, the minister for 
industry, of the devastating 
effect of the loss of Lotus. He 
said the firm was looking at a 
number of expansion sites in 
Britain and abroad 


VI 1 


Lake District in peril, 
National Trust told 


A warning that millions of 
pounds need to be spent on 
preserving the Lake District 
was given in a resolution 
yesterday, which will be put to 
the annual meeting of the 
National Trust at Exeter on 
November l. 

The resolution signed by 12 
members of the trust calls on 
the council to publish within 
four months, details of the 
financial needs of the trust's 
Lake District properties in a 
form suitable for presentation 
to charitable trusts, public 
authorities and the public 

It also calls for detailed 
proposals to raise an addi- 
tional £1.5 million a year for 
five years to overcome the 
backlog of conservation work 
needed on Lake District 
property. 

The resolution claims that 
the National Trust feces se- 
vere problems in the Lake 
District and that there is a 
backlog of necessary work to 
be done. 

The problem was rec- 
ognized two years ago but the 
trust's appeal . expects to 
realizeonly £400,000 by 
November. 


The statement added that 
the relatively modest response 
to the appeal was hardly 
surprising. “Until the public 
realizes how much money is 
required and how it will be 
spent they are unlikely to 
respond to the appeal on the 
necessary scale." 

The trust was still acquiring 
new properties in the Lake 
District but the great majority 
had been in its care for many 
years. 

The council said that during 
the past four years, expen- 
diture in the Lake District by 
the trust had increased to £1.7 
million a year, 22 full-time 
staff had been engaged and 
there were 130 people working 
on Manpower Service 
Commission schemes. 

“A great deal of progress has 
already been made with re- 
pairs and improvements to 
footpaths walls, woods and 
buildings," said the trust 

The council said it was 
confident, that between 1984 
and 1991, additional mainte- 
nance work to the value of at 
least (7.5 million would have 
been carried ouL 


Warning 
on toxic 
cargoes 

Ports along the east coast of 
England have been warned 
not to handle two barges 
loaded with 4.000 tons.of toxic 
waste, waiting to cross the 
North Sea to be dumped in 
Britain. 

The arsenic-contaminated 
waste was recovered from a 
Danish-owned ship that sank 
off the Dutch coast last 
month. 

The cargoes were to have 
been unloaded on the. 
Thames, but now the Dutch' 
want to land the powdered 
waste at an east coast port and 
transfer it by road to a plant at 
Thurrock. 

Bui their plan to unload the 
poisonous waste at the small 
port of Brightingsea in Essex 
met with fierce local 
opposition. 

Mr Terry Coleman, a senior 
chemist from the the Essex 
County Council consumer 
department, said yesterday; 
“We have not granted a 
licence to any Essex port to 
handle waste like this and we 
we have warned neighbouring 
authorities about the cargo." 


Cottage 
costs new 
owner £1 

A fully furnished country 
cottage overlooking a Na- 
tional T rust deer park went for 
£1 yesterday. 

The new owner held the 
winning ticket in a com- 
petition organized by Mr 
Tony Carpanini. an un- 
employed computer engineer, 
to raise £70,000 on the cottage 
at Llandeilo, west Wales. 

Mr Carpanini. aged 50, 
needed the money to set up his 
own business but had to be 
satisfied with £30.000. Only 
33.000 tickets were sold and 
1 0 per cent of the proceeds will 
go to charities, such as Friends 
of the Earth, which sold most 
of them. 

Mr Carpanini said: “I'm a 
bit disappointed but it has 
given me the £20,000 1 need to 
make a fresh start after five 
years on the dole." 

The winner was Mr E 
Ban ham. of Bridgewater 
Road. Wembley, north-west 
London, who was not present 
when the draw was made in 
Swansea. 


Police not to charge 
drug man’s mother 


By a Staff Reporter 


Police said yesterday that 
they would deal “sympathetic- 
ally" with the mother who 
risked prison and turned drag 
posher to save her sou aged 19 
from a £100-»-dxy cocaine 
habit. 

A spokesman announced 
that although Mrs Jean Bird, 
aged 47, had confessed to 
spending np to £300 of her own 
money on the drug, she will not 
be prosecuted. 

Mrs Bird and her husband, 
Roger, went to their son Paul’s 
dealer to try to wean him off 
the drug. They gradually low- 


ered his dose every day until 
after three weeks he was 
smoking just a small amount 
of cannabis. 

Yesterday a police officer 
visited Mrs Bird at the garage 
where she works, near her 
home in Whitmead - Close, 
Hartdifle, Bristol. 

’He discussed with her news- 
paper reports of her confer 
sions and a police spokesman 
said: “We are viewing her 
position sympathetically, 
bearing in mind the onforto- 
nate circumstances she found 
herself in." 


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IE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


S Mugabe to scrap trade 
5! pact with South Africa 


Across the Wall to safety in a hail of bullets 




and seek world’s help 


^* ,f v film 

* N 


\\ .iriunu 

on 

f.iriini'** 


COSls-' 

0 


Harare (Reuler) — Mr Rob- 
ert Mugabe, the Prime Min- 
ister of Zimbabwe, who is 
about to become chairman, of 
the 101-counuy Non-Aligned 
Movement, said yesterday 
that bis Government would 
scrap a long-standing trade 
agreement with South Africa 
so that sanctions could go 
ahead. 

Mr Mugabe appealed for 
world help that would allow 
the black states of southern 
Africa to survive any retali- 
ation by Pretoria against anti- 
apartheid efforts by its nei- 
ghbours. 

At a press conference before 
next week’s Non-Aligned 
Movement summit in Harare, 
Mr Mugabe, who starts a 
' ihTee-year term as the 
organization's chairman on 
Monday, said the group 
should be independent of both 
the US and the Soviet Union 
and work for superpower 
dialogue. 

But the summit is expected 
to concentrate on the issue of 
South Africa, whose bonder is 
450 miles from the conference 
siie. 

Mr Mugabe said Zimbabwe 


South Africa which had been don of installations destroyed 
inherited from the country's, by - what he called South 


f , . . , , , ■ 7 .. "J IK UUICU OUUUI 

[ormer white rulers. Instead. African sabotage 
his Government would join in . In an apparent criticism of 1 
miposm 8 limited sanction s the US and Britain, trading 
agreed by the Commonwealth, partners of South Africa which j 
i S. 01 ” iwbbshed the are resisting sanctions. Mr 
latest amendments made to Mugabe said; "What concerns 
the trade accord yesterday. us is the Jack of concern, grave 

Each country must give six concent, by those countries 
months notice before any which have the potential to. 
withdrawal fronr the agree-’ exert pressure effectively on 
mem. and a spokesman for the South Africa." 

•JOHANNESBUBG-.Soulh 

“We will hOTiourourconunit^ 
ment and 1 have no doubt the 

Gy^eny of Ztobaby SSMSM 

rl'JZZLl~ S a re?p0nS,blC Mugabe’s ranaAs (Michael 


• JOHANNESBURG: South 
African Foreign Ministry 
sources said in Cape Town 
yesterday that theywere still 



- r V- < v._. . 


Government." 

Mr Mugabe said the Non- 
Aligned conference would de- 
cide on its own sanctions, 
which should be.adhercd to by 
all nations. 

He said South Africa would 
retaliate against its ’Hack 
neighbours and that they 
should be given, world bac- 
king. 

The Zimbabwean leader 
said this should include alter- 
native markets for their ex- 
ports. new sources of supply, 
help in creating trade routes 


intended to tear up a preferen- that would bypass South Af- 


agreemeni 


rica, and aid in the reconstruc- 


■;ikc DistrictSi 
National Trnstt 



Mr Mugabe speaking at a Harare press conference during 
which be pledged himself to sanctions against Pretoria. 


Hornsby writes). 

It was not dear, they main- 
tained. that he was actually 
threatening abrogation of the 
iradeagreenient 

The Foreign Minister. Mr 
R.F. "Pik" Botha, announced 
on August 4 that agreement 
had begp reached on im- 
portant amendments to the 
agreement. Harare did not 
welcome this public reminder 
of the close commercial ties 
between the two countries, 
and maintained an embar- 
rassed silence. 

Mr Botha said last night in 
response to Mr Mugabe's 
remarks that it would "not be 
Mr Mugabe, but the people of 
Zimbabwe who would pay the 
price" if the trade agreement | 
was abrogated. 

South Africa did “not" be- 
lieve in sanctions, but if any 
country in southern Africa 
wants to take steps against it. 
it could not be expected of the 
Government of the Republic 
' of South Africa not to take 
notice thereof', Mr Botha said 
in what seemed to be a veiled 
threat of counter-action. 

South Africa buys 11 per 
cent of Zimbabwe’s exports 
. (40 per cent of its exports of 
manufactured goods), and 
supplies 18 per cent of its 
imports. 



k: : 


, - - , 

■ jl 


East German border guards, above and ta 
Berliner, a woman and an 8-month-old bal 
crashed a construction lorry (right, in a V 




- % • . ■ 




r ~ 

... V it -c * t 

■ {•■•■j* 1 

Sy-?': 'j . ‘ 


t, checking the damaged barriers at Checkpoint Charlie, through which an East 
y escaped unhurt to the West early yesterday. Braving a hail of bullets, the man 
est Berlin police car park) through the main crossing point of the Berlin Wall. 


Suzman demands judicial inquiry 


From Michael Hornsby ... .. f 

Johannesburg erence and be m a position to 

• _ ; B hear a wider range of ev- 

Tbe Opposition in the white idence. Mrs Suzman con- 
chamber of the South African tended. 

Parliament is continuing to The Government's derision 
press for a full judicial inquiry to hold an inquest was an- 
into the killing of at least 21 nounced on Thursday night 
■people m Soweto this week. by Mr Louis Nel, Deputy 
Mrs Helen Suzman, law and Minister of Information. , it 
order spokesman for the would be conducted in public, 
Progressive Federal Party, and lawyers would be able to 
said yesterday, . after visiting cross-examine witnesses, ra- 
the scene of the shootings: eluding police witnesses. 


the scene of the shootings: 
“The official. story contrasts 
quite markedly with what I 
beard from people in Soweto. 
Everybody I spoke to said 
there had been no provoca- 
tion, that there was random 
• shooting by the police. It 
reepis to- have, beep .|Qtall^, 
{uncontrolled and" uhdisep' 
plined 

An inquest was much more 
limited in scope than a ju- 
dicial inquiry, which would 
have broader terms of ref- 

Western 
plea over 
refugees 

From Alan McGregor 
Geneva 

A "concerted international 
approach” to the problem of 
Iranians and Tamils seeking 
political asylum was called for 
by officials from eight West- , 
em countries, including Brit- 
ain, Australia and Canada, 
after a three-day meeting here | 
at the UN High Commis- 
sioner for Refugees. 

"This does not mean an 
early solution to the prob- 
lem," a UNHCR spokesman 
said. "But they agreed these 
refugees must not be shuttled 
from one country to another." 

- The spokesman said there 
was no question of sending 
back to their own countries. 
"It’s a matter of deciding how 
to acecomraodate them and 
share the burden, not leaving 
it all to one or two countries,” 
he said. 

The influx of Iranians into 
West Germany this year has 
increased markedly. Last year 
23,000 came to Western Eu- 
rope and 13.000 in 1984. The 
total exodus from Iran of 
asylum seekers since the 
revolution is put at 100.000. 

About 50,000 Tamils are 
now in Europe and Canada. 


eluding police witnesses. 

' . Stone-throwing continued 


The association and the 
United Democratic Front, the 
umbrella organization to 
which it is affiliated, have 
warned the authorities that 
attempts to prevent a mass 
funeral for the victims could 
"lead to a bloodbath". 

No date has been set for a 
funeral Under the State 'of 
Emergency, mass ‘ burials, 
which tend to develop quickly 
into emotion-charged antj- 
gpyernmeni rallies, have been 


m pans of Soweto yesterday tanned, or allowed opljr on 
after a night of scattered ^‘condition ~lhai "attendance is 


rioting, and sporadic gunfire, severely Iim 
No casualties were reported, cal speeches 
and the official toll of dead - ’. Inits daft 
and injured m the violence on the Bureau 
. Tuesday 3 St^5tand$iar21,and 3ajd*bat\a; 
^8 r, rcspect3^ly:'lTh , e ; Stiweto man, Mfr 2 


severely fimitedand ho politi-. 
cal speeches are made: 

Inits daSy “unrest^Teport, 
the Bureau, for Information 


Civic Association, the main 
local vehicle for resistance to 
the Government, claims that 
as many as 30 were killed and 
200 injured. 


man, ‘Mfr Jacobs 'had' 
been “twcklaoed" — burnt to 
death with a blazing tyre 
round his neck — by a mob of 
100 people in Ttnus in the 
Eastern Cape. 


Strike-hit Bolivia sends 
100 into internal exile 

La Paz (Reuter) — Bolivia's Extremists would have used 
centre-right Government is the strike to provoke violence 
preparing to send into internal in a bid to overthrow the 


exile up to 1 00 opponents, 
mainly trade unionists, on the 


Government he said. 

The siege bans all dera- 


second day of a state of siege onstzations and movement 
called to quell unrest over suspends freedom of travel, 
austerity measures. and? imposes a midnight-to- 

The Interior Minister, Se- dawn curfew. 


ftor Fernando Barth elemy, 
said yesterday that Bolivia 
had returned . to normality 


The Government on Thurs- 
day arrested 162 opponents, 
mainly .union leaders, whom it 


underthe siege and thattroops said rt was checking for links 
were peacefully dissolving a to the alleged subversive plan. 


communist-led protest march 
by 5.000 miners which had 
been halted by tanks from 
reaching La Paz. 

He said on Thursday that 
the state of siege declaration 
was intended to slop miners 
going on hunger strike here as 


As many as 100 were to have 
been confined yesterday at an 
undisclosed site, be said. 

Among those detained were 
union leaders who joined the 

Bolivian Labour Confeder- 
ation and another stoppage i 


part of a "subversive plan" to which paralysed the mining- 
topple President Victor Paz rich states of Oruro and Poiosi 


Esienssoro. 


for n early two weeks. 


Prague jails dissident author 


Vienna (AP) - Jaroslav 
Svestka. a forestry worker who 
wrote Orwell's Year, a satire 
on life in Czechoslovakia, has 
been sentenced in Prague to a 
year in jail for "subversive 
activity." a well-infonned 
source said. 

The appeals court halved an 
earlier sentence when it found 


procedural shortcomings in 
the original trial in Budejovice 
in April. 

The court also quashed an 
order of three years of “protec- 
tive surveillance” which Mr 
Svestka. aged 42. had' been 
sentenced to. He will seek 
emigration to the West after 
serving his term. 


Russian 
gloom 
on summit 

From Mohsin AJfi 
Washington 

Mr Anatoly Adamishin, the 
Soviet Deputy Foreign Min- 
ister, said little progress had 
been made by the superpowers 
at this week's talks on the 
world's main regional dis- 
putes. 

He also repeated Moscow's 
reluctance to commit itself to a 
sup erp o wer summit later this 
year. "We have to decide yet 
whether die summit meeting 
wdl take place, because It has 
to be productive," he said, 
especially on aims control 
issues. 

President Reagan wants Mr I 
Mikhail G©rfeachov, the So- 
viet leader, to attend a summit 
here in November or Decent- 
, ber^He is awaiting^ reply to. 
his letter to Moscow, in which 
be oatiined US strategic and 
©theranens control proposals.. ' 

US officials hope that the 
two foreign nimstets, Mr 
George Shultz and Mr Edu ard 

' smu^datra'inffiel^epara- 
tory talks here on September 
19-20. 

Meanwhile; the US is ex- 
pected to stay within the limits 
of the 1979 Salt 2 accord 
.before the proposed summit 
since Washington has fallen 
behind in its schedule to 
deploy cruise missiles on 
bombers because of technical 
problems. 

But it is expected to exceed 
the treaty Units when the 
131st bomber is equipped with 
the missiles, unless other sys- 
tems are dismantled. 

Mr Reagan has denounced 
the 1979 treaty, but has said 
Soviet behaviour will inUnence 
his decisions on exceeding its 
limits. 

Mr Adanushin's talks with 
Mr Michael Armacost, the 
Undersecretary of State for 
Political Affairs, included dis- 
cussions on southern Africa 
and the Angola conflict. Cen- 
tral America, the Middle East 
and Afghanistan. 

US officials emphasized 
that the discussions were an 
exchange of views oo the 
world's trouble' spots and not 
negotiation; 

• MOSCOW: The Soviet 
Union's limited withdrawal of 
troops from Afghanistan will 
involve 8,000 troops and will 
begin in the autumn, Mr 
Valentin Falin, chairman of 
the news agency Novosti and a 
non-voting member of the 
Central Committee, said yes- 
terday (AP reports). 

The Kremlin planned to 
invite ■ foreign journalists to 
witness the pull-out. 

Further limited withdrawals 
were not excluded, be said, but 
declined to predict when they 
might happen. 


Tension in the Mediterranean 

Walters will try to convince 
Europe of Libyan ‘plots’ 


From Michael Binyon in Washington and Harry Debelins in Madrid 

Mr Vernon Walters, the US mu meeting to step up co- man said: "We co: 
Ambassador to the United operation to fight terrorism, rorism . . . but thi 
Nations, leaves today for Eu- particuarly that sponsored by fight against this uj 
rope to brief leaders on the Libya. should be in due 

present US assessment of But a chilly reception awafts and should confer 
Colonel Gadaffi's continuing Mr Walters when he arrives in national law." 
support of terrorism. He will Madrid on Monday morning In a related de 


be in London at the end of with a personal message for 
next week for talks with Sir the Spanish Government 


Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 
Secretary. 

He will attempt to rally 


The Prime Minister, Sefior 
Felipe Gonzalez, will not see 
him, a Foreign Ministry 


support for tougher economic spokesman said yesterday. In- 
sanctions against Libya, but stead, Senor Francisco Fer- 
officials here have emphasized nandez Ordonez, the Foreign 
that he is not seeking allied Minister, will meet Mr 
support for any imminent new Walters. 

US strike against Libya. Washington has not made 
"We’re not nearly as far up public Mr Walters's itinerary, 
that ladder yet," one source for security reasons, but he is 
said. 4 i also expected to visit Paris. 


Instead Mr Walters, will .Bonn and Rome. 


present evidence, some of it 
circumstantial, that Libya is 
still plotting acts of violence 
against the US. The Reagan 
Administration has insisted it ■ 


He will press particularly 
for a closure of loopholes 
allowing products refined 
from Libyan oil to evade 
sanctions, and - measures 


hasmeW intelligence informa- against some subsidiaries of 
tion. but has refused to give US companies in Libya. 


details. 


In Madrid, Senor Fernan- 


The US. initially angry and dez Ordonez is expected to 
shaken by the harsh condem- explain to Mr Walters Spain's 
nation in Europe of the raid on reservations about proposed troductory courtesy cair. 
Libya in April, has been new economic sanctions •ROME: The Italian Gov- 
heartened by gradually warm- against Libya, which is Spain's emmem rejects any necessity 
ing retrospective allied sup- third most important oil sup- for another military strike 
port of the action, and the plier. 'against Libya on present ev- 

agreement at the Tokyo sum- A Foreign Ministry spokes- idence (Peter Nichols writes). 

Gadaffl on tour despite US threats 


man said: "We condemn ter- 
rorism . . . but the means to 
fight against this ugly blemish 
should be in due proportion 
and should conform to inter- 
national law." 

In a related development, 
the Spanish naval head- 
quarters in Cadiz confirmed 
that six US naval vessels, 
including the modern aircraft 
carriers America and John F. 
Kennedy, arrived there on 
Thursday “to take on pro- 
visions”. 

• LONDON: The Foreign 
Office dismissed a report that 
Britain was seeking “hard 
evidence” from the US of 
planned Libyan terrorist ac- 
tivities as a prelude to 
determining its attitude to-* 
wards a second air &rike 
against the country (Nicholas 
Wood writes). 

A spokesman said that the i 
meeting between Sir Antony 
Acland. the new Ambassador 
in Washington, who arrived in 
the US on Thursday, and Mr 
John Whitehead. Deputy Sec- 
retary of State, was an "in- 
troductory courtesy call". 

• ROME: The Italian Gov- 
ernment rejects any necessity 


Al-Khums (Reuter) - Colo- In his biggest public appear- 
nel Gadaffi, the Libyan leader, a nee since the April raids on 
has been greeting large crowds Tripoli and Benghazi, the 
of young militants on a whirl- colonel rode through the 
wind tour of three Libyan streets of Musuraia. Libya's 
coastal cities, while the United fourth biggest city. 120 miles 
States has been increasing its east of Tripoli in a large open 


other slogans of support for 
his 1969 revolution. 

Colonel Gadaffi made no 
speech, but told foreign 


fS hi^ Pfl X reporters following his motdr- 
fourth biggest aty. 1_0 miles ih at i, e was n0 , worried 


pressure on him by stationing 
its aircraft carrier Forrestal on 
the Libyan coast and sending 
new F IT 1 fighters to Britain, 


Cadillac. 

He was greeted by more 
than 1.000 residents, some on 


cade that he was not worried 
by the new US threats. 

Washington says it believes 
Libya still backs international 


Mexico 
bus 
crash 
kills 13 

Naeozari de Garcia (AP) - 
A bus carrying building work- 
ers plunged off a mountain 
road in northern Mexico, 
killing 1 3. Police blamed 
mechanical malfunction. 

The bus belonged to the 
Constructors Industrial com- 
pany. Ambulances took the 
injured to Hermosillo. state 
capital of Sonora. 

Free pay for 
soldiers 

Berne (Reuter) - The Swiss 
Goverment admitted that it 
had been inadvertently paying 
Nicaraguan development wor- 
kers during periods when they 
were called up by the left-wing 
Sandinista Government .for 
military service. 

An official said that the 
Government ended the prac- 
tice early this year, with 
Managua agreeing to pay 
wages whenever they were 
under arms. 

Peking solves 
unemployment 

Peking (AP) — The Peking 
Labour Bureau has claimed 
that it has virtually eliminated 
unemployment in the capital. 

There are only 1,600 out of 
work in Peking out of 3.8 
million people of working age. 

Kidnap victim 

Sdo Paulo (Reuter) — A 
Brazilian businessman, Se- 
nhor Osorio Baqim. was killed 
by kidnappers who shot him 
even though his family paid 
the $95,000 (£63.500) de- 
manded for his freedom. 

Prudish China 

Hong Kong (Reuter) — Four 
teachers of English have been 
expelled from Canton for 
preaching free sex. The four, 
from Australia and the US. 
were members of the Chris- 
tian sect Children of God, 
which advocates sexual 
freedom. 

Bubbly boom 

Paris (Reuter) — French 
champagne exports were off to 
a sparkling start in the first 
half of the year with 30.4 
million bottles exported, and 
could reach a record high in 
1986. the Champagne Trade 
Association said. Britain is 
still the main market 

Solidarity tine 

Warsaw (AFP) — A police 
court in southern Poland fined 
Mrs Anna Walentynowicz, a 
Solidarity militant 20,000 
zlotys (£54) for disrupting 
public order. She was arrested 
in June on her way to celebrate 
the birthday of a pro-Solidar- 
ity priest 

Cuban flees 

Paris (Reuter) — The French 
Foreign Ministry said that 
Senor Ricardo Bofill, former 
deputy Dean of Havana 
University's Faculty of Sci- 
ences. has entered the French 
Embassy in Havana. It refused 
further details of what ap- 
peared to be an attempt to 
seek asylum. 

Border trade 

Moscow (AP) — Soviet and 
Chinese delegates meeting in 
the capital of Soviet Kazakh- 
stan signed new contracts for 
limited cross-border trade that 
was renewed in 1983. 


new F H 1 tightere to Britain, horseback, and busloads of terrorism, a charge Tripoli Airproft avqoK 
from where it launched its schoolchildren shouting denies, and will strike again if dll l Cl 

attack on his country in April, “down with Americans" * =- J n * 5 — ~ 


a new terrorist link is proved. 


Buenos Aires (AP) — An 

v • a. xt» Argentine Air Force helicopter 

W asilingtoil V lew has been found in the Andes 

° ' with the bodies of three Army 

Leak that became tidal wave soccer check 


Legal eagles soar into outer space 


]]{ \ I# 

Jniti > lUi11 ’ , 


From Paul Yallely 1 
New York 

America's lawyers, already 

legendary in their pursuit of 
fresh areas of litigation and 
profit, have a new mission: to 
boldly go where no man has 
been before in search of a split 
infinity. 

There will be. money to be 
made from lawsuits in outer 
space which, according to a 
new report, will require the 
evolution of a whole new body 
of national and international 
law. 

^In 30 or 40 vears we're 
going to have our first murder 
in outer space." says Professor - 
Ralph Steinhardt of the 
George Washington Univer- 
sity Law School, who was one 
of the consultants on the 
report. But there may be more 


immediate legal problems. 

Suppose you were the in- 
ventor of a new manufac- 
turing process in the zero 
gravity of an imemationaJ 
Space station: where could you 
patent it? What would your 
liability be if you were the 
employer of a space worker 
seriouslv injured in the outer 
Sphere?' With President Rea- 


ones already involved. 

"Its major conclusion is 
that, though there is oo press- 
ing urgency, we need to look at 
the whole area before anyone 
gets into trouble." Dr Ray 
Williamson, of the OTA, said 
yesterday. “Laws we take for 
granted here on Earth will not 
necessarily apply in space." 

Existing laws — the most 


gan's recent annoucement of comprehensive of which is the 
his intention to privatize the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, 


launching of commercial sat- 
ellites. such issues have- be- 
come more real to the 
American business world. 

Now a report by the 
Congress's Office of Technol- 
ogy .Assessment (OTA) has 
indicated that the lack of space 
law could prove a significant 
disincentive because it adds 
extra legal risks to the consid- 
erable practical and financial 


which was signed by more 
than 80 nations — deal -with 


from the -negligence of a 
foreign astronaut in an inter- 
national station. 

Jurisdiction is considered 
the most important issue to 
resolve. Dr Williamson said. 
“Many questions of patent, 
ton and liability are depen- 
dent on that. 

"To establish that will re- 
quire both legislation by na- 
tional governments and inter- 
national agreements. At the 
moment it is already a matter 
of some dispute: some eqtia- 


issues such as banning coun- tonal countries contend that 
tries from proclaiming sever- satellites in geostationary or- 


eighty over celestial bodies 
and how to assign blame if one 
country's satellite falls to 
Birth causing damage. 

But. the report says, they do 
not cover matters such as a 
dead US .astronaut's family 
alleging that death resulted 


bit above them should be in 
their jurisdiction. There are 
many issues to be resolved." 

But if the lawyers are raring 
to gp. the same cannot be said 
for the US space industry, 
which has had six launch 
failures since January. 


“It was not authorized but 
was highly authoritative.” 
That is how an embarrassed 
White House official finally 
characterized a newspaper 
article that almost single- 
handedly appears to have 
sparked off a new United 
States crisis with Libya. 

The article was in the sober 
and respected Wall Street 
Journal igdaring that the US 
was "on a collision course" 
with Libya, and that the 
Pentagon bad completed 
contingency plans for a new 
and bigger bombing raid. It 
was dear to observers here 
that this was information 
deliberately placed by the 
Administration. 

But was It information or 
disinformation? In the five 
days since its appearance 
there has been a flurry of 
contradictions coming from 
.official Washington and from 
the- Reagan ranch in Califor- 
nia: indirect confirmation, ea- 
ger discussion of new Libyan 
terrorism, hints of plots uncov- 
ered, stonewalling, and finally 
furious back-pedalling as peo- 
ple began to realize that things 
were getting out of hand and 
that the European allies were 
becoming increasingly 
alarmed. 

The US invariably main- 
tains that disinformation is the 
standard fare of KGB propa- 
ganda: the planting of 
misleading stories and the 
sowing of confusion in the 
Western press. Washington, 
by definition, does not indulge 
in such tactics. 

Yet this week has seen a 


very similar result, though 
perhaps not by intention. 

The main purpose was to 
scare Colonel Gadaffi, let him 
know that the US would keep 
up the pressure, and warn him 
again that any new terrorist 
plotting would draw retali- 
ation. This was the President's 
intention. 

But one or two zealous 
officials in the National Se- 
curity - Council saw a way of 
reinforcing diplomatic nudges 
and indirect messages to Trip- 
oli. When the Wall Street . 

By Michael Binyon 

Journo/ began making routine 
inquiries about relations with 
Libya, its journalists were 
handed much more than they 
expected. 

But the leak was com- 
pounded by geographical con- 
fusion. When Mr Reagan is on 
holiday, no one quite knows 
who is running the show. 

The press spokesman de- 
camps to Santa Barbara, with 
a bevy of top officials from the 
National Security Council. 
The State Department, some- 
times late to be let in on policy 
decisions, was leaderless, with 
Mr George Shultz on holiday. 

Those left behind in Wash- 
ington's traditionally torpid 
August, with a th ree-hour time 
difference from Santa Bar- 
bara. were not snre who had 
been authorized to say what 
and (to whom. 

When things are in full 
swing, no Administration has 
been as assiduous as Mr 


Reagan's in manipulating the 
press for its own purposes. 

Not only are seats allocated 
at press conferences to ensure 
that the right journalists axe in 
the- right places to ask ques- 
tions, feat also all important 
announcements, and even mili- 
tary 1 actions, are timed with an 
eye on the evening television 
news bulletins. 

In April Mr Larry Speakes, 
the White House spokesman, 
told the world (hat US bomb- 
ers had struck Libya just m 
time for the national news- 
casts. | 

The notoriously aggressive 1 
US press has been markedly 
tamed by such tactics — at 
least as far as the White 
House is concerned. But this 
last week has revived some of 
the combative spirit. The 
Washington Post has attacked 
what it saw* as an attempt to 
get the press to do the Admini- 
stration's sabre-rattling for it 

The New York Times has 


Singapore (AFP) — The 
anti-corruption squad here 
has been called in to investi- 
gate match-fixing claims in the 
Meriion Cup international 
football tournament. Officers 
have questioned 1 1 people.. 

Tax asylum 

Munich (Reuter) — An Aus- 
trian businessman trying to 
escape the taxman asked for 
political asylum in West Ger- 
many. Police said the dis- 
gruntled import-exporp 
salesman claimed he had had 
‘enough of a lax system that 
took 60 per cent of his income: 

Early marriage 

Valletta (Reuter) - Maltese 
couples under 16 years of age 
will not be allowed to many in 
church tinder new rules issued 
by the Maltese Episcopal 
Commission of the Catholic 
Church. Men could previously 
many- at 16 and girls at 14. 


sparred with Mr Speakes over _ 

his reported softening of the Italian fillftlfP 

Administration's warning to 4 uaJ ^ c 


Administrations warning to 
Libya. But he denied this: 
Gadaffi is not to be let off the 
hook. 

The problem now is to calm 
the August storm as the waves 
wash over Europe and new 
misunderstandings arise. The 
burly Mr Vernon Walters has 
been sent off again to sort it 
out. The officials have been 
told to keep quiet 


Venice (AP) — A strong 
I earthquake reading 5 on the 
Richter scale shook areas 
north of here and sent hun- 
dreds of people fleeing their 
homes. 

Drug deaths 

Moscow (Reuter) — An 
Azcrbaijaini girl from . a 
wealthy family m Baku sent a 


Meanwhile. Mr Reagan, jggng of armed robbers to her 
chopping _ wood and horse- parents' home because she 


riding high up above the 
flurries, has been happily left 
out of the whole affair. 


needed money for drugs; an 
official newspaper said- Both 
parents died in the robbery. 


f 



from Bleasdale 


On the face of it, Alan Bleasdale’s new drama “The 
Monocled Mutineer” is a catalogue of dark deeds. 

But any drama by the man who gave us “Boys from the 
Black Stuff’ is naturally not without its lighter moments. 

The impudent Percy Toplis was a racketeering rogue. 
But he also had wit, style, and, as the ladies will doubdess 
testify, considerable charm. 

His enthralling true-life story, from pit boy to the most 
wanted man in Britain, is told in four parts, beginning this 
Sunday evening on BBC 1 at 9.05 pm. 

It heralds a new autumn drama season on BBC1. 

- Hard on “The Monocled Mutineer’s” heels are works by 
the likes of Dennis Potter; Alan Plater and Richard Gordon. 


Their subject matter ranges from the ttibiilations of 
South African politics in the volatile early ’60’s, to the trials 
of competitive swimming today. 

From misplaced care for the aged, to teenage love set 
amongst the video arcades and money markets of London. 

Equally exciting is what radio has to offer 

This Sunday sees the first-ever drama link-up between 
Radio 4 and the World Service. 

Apdy named “Globe Theatre,” it will present a series 
of established works to a potential international audience of 
25 million listeners. : 

Without question then, if it’s drama you’re aftei; the 
forthcoming Sundays look very bright indeed 


a 



IN 


r : : • 

VV- • •• , N 










s 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


‘Devastating’ damage to US security 

Naval spy ring classed 
as most vital KGB 
operation ever mounted 


The United States has de- 
clared that the information 
gven to the Russians by the 
Walker naval spy ring would 
have been “devastating" to 
the US during a war, and was 
the most important Soviet 
espionage operation ever 
mounted. 

The statement by the Jus- 
tice Department was made 
after Jerry Whitworth, a mem- 
ber of the ring, was sentenced 
on Thursday in San Francisco 
to 365 years in prison, the 
harshest punishment imposed 
for espionage since the aboli- 
tion of the death penalty for 
spying. 

Whitworth wiD not be eli- 
gible for parole until he is 107 
years old. He was also fined 
$410,000. a suffer penalty 
than the prosecution had 
asked for. 

The Justice Department re- 
vealed that the assessment of 
the damage to US security was 
obtained from Mr Vitaly 
Yurchenko, the would-be 
KGB defector who returned to 
Moscow after being debriefed 
here last year. 

The department said that 
the information delivered to 
Moscow by John Walker, 
head of the spy ring, enabled 
the Russians to decipher more 
than 100 million secret US 
messages. 

Mr Yurchenko had told 
intelligence officials that the 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 


KGB officers who handled the 
spy operation received im- 
portant promotions and dec- 
orations. and that one had 
been secretly designated a 
“Hero of the Soviet Union". 

Judge John Vukasin, who 
presided over the trial, said 
that Whitworth, aged 47, a 
former naval communications 
expert, was "one of the most 
spectacular spies of the 
century". He was a man who 
represented “the evil of 
banality" 

Whitworth did not believe 
in what he did; he did not 
believe in anything, the judge 
said. “He was the type of 



Jerry Whitworth: said he 
was ‘very, very sorry’. 


modem man whose highest 
expression resided in his 
amorality." 

After he was sentenced 
Whitworth, wiping away tears, 
said softly: “1 just want to say 
I'm very, very sorry," He did 
not testify during his 3¥i- 
month trial. 

He may actually stay in 
prison longer than John 
Walker, who admitted funnel- 
ling vital secrets to the Soviet 
Union for more than 17 years, 
but who will be eligible for 
parole in 10 years after having 
agreed to co-operate in the 
prosecution. 

Other members of his ring 
were his brother, Arthur, a 
former naval lieutenant-com- 
mander, and his son Michael, 
a former seaman on a nuclear 
aircraft carrier. 

Mr Yurchenko had told the 
CIA that, after John Walker’s 
arrest and before his own 
defection, he was briefed by 
the KGB on the spy ring and 
asked how to deal with what 
his superiors suspected was a 
breach of security within the 
Soviet agency, the Justice 
Department statement said 

The KGB did not at first 
believe that the FBI had been 
tipped off about Walker’s 
activities by his former wife. It 
suspected that one of its 
officers involved in the opera- 
tion had become a spy for a 
Western intelligence agency. 


Pacific 
test talks 
offer by 
Chirac 

Noumea (Renter) — The 
French Government was ready 
to discuss “any question" with 
its critics in the South Pacific, 
including nuclear tests and the 
problems of New Caledonia, 
M Jacques Chirac, the Prime 
Minister, said yesterday. 

But be apparently rejected 
demands by New Caledonia’s 
Kanak separatists for an in- 
dependence referendum re- 
stricted to the Indigenous 
minority. 

The head -of France’s right- 
wing Government told I®,®! 
people in an open-air address 
that Paris “is ready to discuss 
any question, induding dis- 
armament, with all the South 
Pacific Forum nations". 

He did not elaborate on this 
first gesture of French wffling- 
uess to discuss its highly 
criticized nuclear test pro- 
gramme as part of general 
discussions on nuclear dis~ 

But he emphasized that 
France would stand by pre- 
vious commitments not to 
attack non-nuclear nations 
with nuclear weapons “except 
in the case of aggression 
waged in association, or hi 
alliance, with a nuclear power* 
against his country or its 
allies. 

Aides said the statement 
was an important signal of 
French hopes to improve ties 
with nations in the region. M 
Chirac arrived bore yesterday 
for a two-day visit his first 
since taking office five months 
ago, and is due to leave 
tomorrow for the French pos- 


The Speaker of the Iranian 
Parliament yesterday called 
upon the country's Revolu- 
tionary Guard corps to send 
1.000 ’battalions to the front 
lines of the Gulf war in 
preparation for the forthcom- 
ing offensive against Iraq. 

Hojaioleslam Ali Hash e mi 
Rafsanjani made his appeal at 
yesterday’s Fridas prayers in- 
Tehran, at the same time 
warning Arab Gulf states that 
Iran reserved the right to close 
the Straits of Hormuz, at the 
entrance to the Golf, if they 
continued to give financial 
support to Iraq. • 

Addressing hupdreds of 
Revolutionary Guards sitting 
before him in the'grounds of 
Tehran University, the Hoja- 
ioleslam demanded **a mas- 
sive dispatch to the fronts of 
trained, volunteer forces", 
telling them: "Putlyour fingers 
on the trigger arid await the 
issuance ofthe oijder to attack 


From Robert Fisk, Bahrain 

so that we may be able to save 
the people of Iran, fraq and 
the peoples of the region from 
the evil of the Zionist (sic) 
regime of Iraq." 

For the Arab states of the 
Gull however, it was his 
additional threat against the 
Straits of Hormuz that pro- 
vided the most disturbing 
element in his address. 

“When you place your oil 
funds at the disposal of the 
Iraqi regime and when you 
support and back that regime, 
you are partners in the war," 
he said. 

“So what do you expect 
from us? If we were to shoot at 
your shipping, we would have 
the right to do so. 

“And it is also our right to 
close the Straits of Hormuz in 
the Persian (sic) Gulf and 
thereby prevent your ships 
from obtaining access to the 
Persian Gulf." 


The US has already guar- 
anteed that it will keep the 
straits open and the Iranians 
are unlikely to block the 
shipping lanes in the immedi- 
ate future, despite Hojatol- 
eslam Rafsanjani's threats. 
But attacks on Arab Gulf oil 
tankers by the Iranian Air 
Force can be expected to 
increase. 

It was with this in mind that 
the six nations of the Gulf Co- 
operation Council had been 
discussing new methods of 
naval protection for the tank- 
ers during a conference in the 
Saudi town of Abha this week. 

For the present — as the 
Arab leaders are only too weQ 
aware — Iran's attention is 
concentrated on its forthcom- 
ing offensive, for which 
650.000 men have already 
been deployed on the southern 
sector of die front, opposite 
the Iraqi Army defending 
Basra. 


UN consults France over role of 
peacekeeping force in Lebanon 


Mr Marrack Gouiding, the 
Deputy Secreiary-General of 
the United Nations, yesterday 
met French dfficials here for 
talks on the* future of the 
beleaguered IJN interim force 
in Lebanon (Unifil), after 
Tuesday's call by M Jacques 
Chirac, the French Prime 
Minister, for an urgent 
“redefinition" of the force’s 
role and mission. 

France /has tbe largest 
contingenl/in Unifil. making 
up I,4tl0 if the 5,800-strong 
multinaticjhal force. 

The force was set up by the 
LIN Security Council in 1978 
to supervise the withdrawal of 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 

Israeli troops from southern 
Lebanon and help the Leba- 
nese Government re-establish 
its authority in the area. 

France, however, has be- 
come increasingly concerned 
by the force's apparent im- 
potence in the face of growing 
violence between various war- 
ring Lebanese factions in the 
area. In the words of M Denis 
Baudouin, the French 
Government's spokesman: 
“Our soldiers are not there to 
be shot at like rabbits from 
before and behind". 

On Tuesday, M Chirac ap- 
peared to be threatening a 
withdrawal of French troops 



A Finnish member of Unifil, the UN peacekeeping force, 
manning a checkpoint in southern Lebanon. 


from southern Lebanon when 
he called on tbe UN to 
redefine Unifil’s role and mis- 
sion, “foiling which", he said, 
“it would be absurd in the 
present conditions to keep 
these soldiers there, whatever 
their nationality, particularly 
the French” 

Two days later, however, M 
Baudouin hastened to explain 
that there was no question of a 
unilateral French withdrawal 
AU the contingents in the force 
were facing the same diffi- 
culties, he said 

Asked what changes France 
would like to see introduced, 
M Baudouin replied that Paris 
had merely posed the problem 
and now it was up to the UN 
to come up with a solution 
which would allow the force to 
cany out its mission safely 
and efficiently. 

Only the UN Security 
Council can make modifica- 
tions to the force. 

Speculation about an im- 
mediate French withdrawal 
from southern Lebanon was 
heightened on Wednesday 
when a French naval trans- 
port, the Ouragan. on its way 
to take part in Nato exeereises 
in the North Atlantic, was 
suddenly ordered to change 
tack for the Mediterranean. 

• BEIRUT: Ireland has no 
plans to withdraw its contin- 
gent from the UN peace- 
keeping force in Lebanon, an 
Irish Embassy diplomat said 
yesterday (Reuter reports). 

Mr John Rowan, after call- 
ing on Mr Fouad al-Turk, the 
Secretary-General ofthe Leba- 
nese Foreign Ministry, said 
Ireland had no intention of 
withdrawing from Unifil at 
this stage, but would review 
the question if the situation in 
southern Lebanon worsened. 






-V ^ V- ** •* 

• _ ■>►.. - -v. 


fefrv •• • „ 'TJ 

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te* ••• 

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- . * "V ' V 5 -!* *• r -r 

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Gurkha 

brawl 

officers 

cleared 

. Hong Kong (Reuter) ~ 

Allegations that British offi- 
cers insulted the Gurkhas 
during exercises in Hawaii Iasi 
May were "wholly without 
-foundation", Mr John Stan- 
ley, Minister of State for tbe 
Armed Forces, said here 
yesterday. 

He said a thorough in- 
vestigation had foiled to un- 
cover the reason behind a 
brawl between Gurkha sol- 
diers and their British officers, 
tending to the dismissal o f an 
entire company of Hong 
Kong-based troops. Two cm- 
cers suffered broken ribs in the 


M Chirac, the French Prime Minister, bear 
Caledonia for a two-day visit which ind 


“We regard this unhappy 
incident as an. isolated and 
wholly untypical one which m 
no way detracts from the high 
esteem in which the Brigade of 
Gurkhas is held," Mr Stanley 


talks on independence and nuclear tests. 


sessions of Wallis and Futuna. On the Foann’s move two 
“France wants, to nourish weeks ago to pot New Caledor 
and develop a political di- ufo on the UN dearionizatifla 
alogne with all South Pacific list, M Chirac said tbe action 
states ... contribute to peace “reflected a veiy bad under- 
aad development," M Chirac standing" of the situation. 

. , _ France's democratic tra- 

France has wse ante ditioas and civilization, which 
steady attack from tire 13- bad grreo the territory one of 
nation Forum which Bon^ bigiest levels of develop- 

mentis the region, ruled out 
Pacific, its status m the region the possibility of allowing a 


flared late in 1984 between 
separatist Kanahs, who make 
up 43 per cent of the 145,000- 
strong population, and Shso- 
peai* - settlers and other 


S&Mkl* 

•' He said that the Aziny could 
not find but exactly what 
happened because no Gurkha 
was willing to talk. 

“This made it impossible to 
identify all the offenders and 
so enable court-martial pro- 


reached its lowest point last 
year after French agents in 
New 7+aiand planted a bomb 
on the Greenpeace flagship. 
Rain bow Warrior. 


minority to impose its wffl on 
the majority. 

More than 20 people have 
been killed since violence 


M Chirac had his first! 
meeting with M Jean-Marie 
Tpbaou, leader of the Kanak l 
Socialist National liberation i 
Front, and left the doer open to 
the separatists, saying. he fa- ! 
vonred talks with all sides 
before the referendmn on in- ; 
dependence due for next July 1 
or August. 


Iran threatens Gulf states Officers of 
with closure of Hormuz sun \ 

From Robert Fisk, Bahrain PUDlSIlClI 


The Chernobyl Inquest 


Wellington (Renter) — A 
Soviet inquiry into the sinking 
of the cruise liner Mikhail 
Lermontov in New Zealand in 
February has found the local 
pilot, Captain Don Jamison, 
guilty of causing the ship- 
wreck, the Transport Min- 
ister, Mr Richard Prebble, 
add yesterday. 

But the inquiry also ruled 
that three of the ship's officers 
were culpable, Mr Prebble, 
who released the report with 
permission from the Soviet 
authorities, said. 

The chief navigator, Mr 
Sergei Stepanischchev, was 
sentenced to four years in 
prison, and Captain Vladislav 
Vorobyov was permanently 
transferred to shore duties. 

The second mate, Mr Sergei 
Gusev, had his marine licence 
removed for two years. 

“The Soviet authorities are 
not able in any way to penalize 
Captain Jamison," Mr Preb- 
ble said. 

A preliminary inquiry in 
New Zealand Mamed Captain 
Jamison for the sinking in 
making a “sudden decision" to 
navigate the 20J52- tonne , 
j liner through a rocky passage 
too shallow for it at the tip of 
the South Island. One crew 
member died, but the other 
737 passengers and crew were 
| rescued. 

Details of tbe inquiry have 
not been released, and Captain 
Jamison is taking legal action 
to prevent them from becom- 
ing public. New Zealand po- 
lice said earlier that they 
would not prosecute him, in 
view of the difficulty and cost 
of obtaining evidence. 

“The Soviet authorities ap- 
pear to have carried out a very 
thorough investigation," Mr 
Prebble said, “and the pen- 
alties received by tbe Soviet 
officers are very severe." 

Legionnaires’ 
disease kills 3 

Los Angeles (Reuter) — An 
outbreak of Legionnaires* dis- 
ease in a hospital here has 
killed three patients, infected 
three others, and forced the 
evacuation of two wards. 

Of the three survivors, a 
woman is listed as critical and 
two men are in stable 
condition. 

A Los Angeles health 
spokesman said five of the 
patients who contracted the 
disease - including the three 
survivors — were in the bone 
marrow transplant unit, near 
where construction crews were 
working. 


Experts urge research into 
nuclear fuel rod dangers 

Fran Pearce Wright, Science Editor, Vienna 


An urgent research pro- 
gramme into the conditions 
which could cause nuclear 
reactor fuel rods to explode 
was proposed at the end of this 
week's inquest into the 
Chernobyl disaster in April 

The recommendation came 
from one of four expert groups 
which have been deep in 
discussion with Soviet experts 
in private sessions at the 
headquarters in Vienna of the 
International Atomic Energy 
Agency (IAEA). 

The disaster, in which 31 
people died and more than 
200 remain suffering from 
acute radiation sickness, has 
also left a population of 
135,000 contaminated. Their 
health will be monitored for 
the rest of their lives in the 
most intensive medical pro- 
gramme since the bombing of 
Hiroshima and Nagasaki 

Since each person's annual 
medical check will include 
elaborate analyses of blood 
chemistry, involving 500 tests 
on each sample, British doc- 
tors have offered to share the 
work under a special research 
programme. 

Other proposals to come 
from the lessons of the catas- 
trophe include: 

• More frequent international 
safety inspection of nuclear 
plants; 

• Development of new tech- 
niques for fire-fighting with 
robots and of protective 
clothing; 

• Preparation of international 
standards for training nuclear 
power station operators; 

• Setting of “action levels" 
for radioactive contamination 
at which foodstuffs must be 
withdrawn immediately; 

• Early warning and pro- 
vision of details of nuclear 
accidents between nations. 

These and other measures 
will be brought together next 
week by a committee ap- 
pointed to prepare a report for 
a foil meeting of all 1 12 IAEA 
member countries between 


September 24 and 29. Min- 
isters from all countries axe 
expected. 

Each expert group cross- 
examined their Soviet count- 
erparts, who had submitted a 
388-page technical report on 
the accident 

Dr Bryan, Edmondson, 
chairman of ’ the specialist 
group which looked at the 
events leading op to the 
accident, said: “The operating 
staff seem to have lost all 
sense of danger." 

Dr Edmonson, a senior 
engineer • of the Central 
Electricity Generating Board, 
fold the conference, which 

Tbe West German Govern- 
ment has paid out about 
DM272 million (£90 mffifoa) 
to formers churning compensa- 
tion for crops damaged by 
fallout from the Soviet imdear 
disaster at Chernobyl, Herr 
Friedrich Zbmaennaim, the 
Interim- Minister, said (Renter 
repor ts from Bonn). 

brought together represent- 
atives of 45 countries, that 
there was a need to evolve a 
“nuclear safety culture”. 

“This is the principal lesson 
of the Chernobyl tragedy," he 
said. 

The second lesson was ad- 
dressed specifically to de- 
signers of nuclear power 
stations: the absolute necessity 
of an approach which he 
described as “design which 
must mitigate operator error." 

While the accident hap- 
pened because operators swit- 
ched off safety control sytems 
for an experiment by the 
Electro technical Commercial 
Organization, which exports 
Soviet electrical generating 
equipment, the catastrophe 
which followed involved an 
explosion which experts have 
said repeatedly could not hap- 
pen in a nuclear power station. 

A single fuel rod, one of 
1,600 in the Chernobyl re- 
actor, seems to have precip- 


itated -the disaster when ft 
exploded info minute par- 
tides. 

The energy in the particles 
contained enough heat to 
create a head of superheated 
steam, which blew the con- 
crete lid off the reactor — the 
event thought to have been 
impossible. 

M Pierre Tanguy, of EL 
ectricite de Fracas, and chair- 
man of the special group 
which unravelled this link in 
the accident chain, raid pos- 
itively: “It was not an atomic 
explosion."; .. • - 

The super-critical reaction 
in a nuclear bomb took less 
than l,00QkniQionth of a sec- 
ond to generate the un- 
controlled release of its 
energy, he said, but the build- 
up of heatenergy in the fuel 
rod in question happened over 
the comparatively long period 
of one second. After that the 
element could no longer stand 
tbe “thermal shock” and 
exploded. 

Although it did not vapor- 
ize, like a nuclear weapon, the 
intense energy ' n the particles 
became the source of heat for 
the sudden creation of the 
superheated steam. 

As the question of training 
nuclear station operators fig- 
ured so regularly in the 
explanation of the disaster. 
Lord Marshall chairman of 
the Central Electricity Gen- 
erating Board, offered in a 
private meeting with Profes- 
sor Valery Legasov, deputy 
director of the Kurchatov 
Institute of Atomic Energy, to 
establish co-operative pro- 
grammes in tiie area. 

The leader of the British 
delegation Mr David Morpb- 
et, the senior official respon- 
sible for nuclear power at the 
Department of Energy, said: 
“We attached comaderabJe 
importance to this review 
meeting of the Chernobyl 
accident Clearly the Soviet 
experts put a great deal of 
effort into the preparation." 


them,” he said. 

“Faced with a very serious 
disciplinary offence which 
could not be ignored ... the 
army authorities had no alter- 
native but to recommend the 
administrative discharge of all 
the 123 members of the sup- 
port company.” 

Mr Stanley raid the dis- 
missed Gurkhas, many of 
them veterans of the Faflc- 
lands war, were given the right 
to appeal against the army 
derision. 

But only 36 soldiers had 
done so and the discharge 
order had subsequently been 
rescinded in 12 cares, he said. 

He denied that morale 
among the Gurkha units, who 
have served tbe British Army 
for 171 yearst had been af- 
fected by the incident 

Some dismissed Gurkhas 
have alleged that British offi- 
cers made insulting remarks 
about Nepal's poverty during 
the exercises and said this led 
to the fighting. 

• Security rote: Mr Stanley 
said the Gurkhas could cany 
out their role of. defending 
Hong Kong against any threat 
to its- security despite the 
brawl in Hawaii (writes David 
Bonavia). 

Mr Stanley denied there was 
a drug problem in the First 
Battalion, 7th Duke, of 
Edinburgh's Own Gurkha Ri- . 
lies, most of whom have been 
sacked and sent bade to Nepal 
He also denied that a British 
television film abontthe Gur- 
khas had given offence: 

Meanwhile, Major Conn 
Pearce, who was injured in the 
Hawaii fracas, left Hong Kong 
two days ago to take up duties 
in Northern Ireland, after 
army public relations officers 
here told journalists that he 
bad left several weeks earlier. 

It appears that Major Pearce 
was temporarily absent in 
London for questioning about 
the incident. 

Major Pearce, who was 
assaulted after a party in 
Hawaii together with a Gur- 
kha officer, has apparently 
been unable to identify Jus 
assailants. . . 

Sea search for 
Challenger 
wreckage ends 


Museveni tames rebel invaders 


From Charles Harrison 
Nairobi 

President Museveni of Ug- 
anda yesterday claimed that 
his forces had contained the 
threat from rebel Ugandans 
who crossed recently from 
southern Sudan and tried to 
capture Gulu, the main town 
in the country's north. 


He said remnants of the 
rebels had been driven bade 
across the border after about 
300 had been captured and 
12S had surrendered. At least 
100 were reported to have 
been killed in fierce fighting. 

Estimates of the number of 
rebels involved in what ap- 
pears to have been an attempt 
to overthrow the-Government 


vary from between 1,200 and 
3,000. Some have escaped into 
Karamoja in the north-east, 
where they have linked up 
with armed cattle rustlers, but 
they are no longer regarded as 
a serious military threat. . 

The attackers were former 
members . of the Ugandan 
Army who fled when Mr 
Museveni took power. 


Cape Canaveral (Reuter) — 
The US space agency called off 
the search for wreckage of tbe 
space shuttle Challenger yes- 
terday, ending the largest 
ocean salvage operation in. 
history exactly seven months 
after Challenger and its crew 
of seven were consumed in a 
giant firebalL 

Rear-Admiral Richard Tru- 
ly, chief of tbe shuttle pro- 
gramme, made the anno- 
uncement after the three 
remaining ships taking part in 
the search steamed info Port 
Canaveral 

The salvage operation cov- 
ered 93,000 square miles of 
ocean and involved 6,000 
workers, 31 ships and 52 
aircraft. It recovered wreckage 
making up 45 per cent of the 
spaceship. 90 per cent of the 
crew compartment and 50 per 
cent of the external fuel tank. 


Making a mountain out of naming Everest 


Crewman describes H-bomb drop 


Orangevale, California (AP) 
I — A crewman on the bomber 
I that accidentally dropped a 
hvdrogen bomb 29 years ago 
says it happened when the 
i plane hit turbulence just as an 
officer was setting a safety pin 
! that secured the bomb for 

• ,a Mr^eorge Houston, aged 
61, radio operator of the B36 
that dropped the bomb near 
Albuquerque. New Mexico, 
said on Thursday that to keep 
from falling, the officer 
g & ifoed the mechanism- the 


bombardier uses to release the 
bomb. The bomb crashed to 
earth without setting off a 
nuclear blast. 

For a few moments mem- 
bers of the crew thought the 
man might also have gone 
down with the bomb. Mr 
Houston said. 

“It's one of those things 
that's terrifying at the time, 
but is funny afterwards," Mr 
Houston said. He compared 
the sequence of events thal 
caused the 1957 accident to 
the closing scene of the 1964 


film Dr Strangelove, in which 
a bomber pilot releases a stuck 
H-bomb by hand and rides it 
out of the plane to his death in 
a nuclear explosion. 

But Mr Houston said the 
navigator was trying to secure, 
not release, the bomb. He 
sated himself from falling and 
crawled back from the bomb 
hay "whiter than any sheet 
you ever saw’*. 

No details on the accident 
had been released until the 
Albuquerque Journal pub- 
lished a report on Wednesday. 


The British expedition to the 
north-east ridge of Everest has 
established its base camp at 
16.500 ft on the Rongbuk gla- 
cier . above the ruins of 
Rongbuk monastery. From 
there. Ronald Faux reflects on 
what's in a name among the 
most renowned mountains. 

Everest. The name has a 
ring of mysterious sanctuary 
about it. There Is an echo of 
the high snows and empty 
places. 

The local alternatives, Cho- 
molungma, Chomolungma or 
Sagamuuha, are fine in 
translation: “Goddess Mother 
of the World", “Goddess of 
the Mountain Snows" or, more 
flatulently. “Goddess of the 
Wind". But to a British ear the 
originals have the sound of 
boiling porridge, and ft is 
Everest that sounds right 

The choice was quite ac- 
cidental Had Sir George Ev- 


erest the Surveyor-General 
for India and chief architect of 
tbe Great Trigonometrical 
Survey of India, been born 
with a less resounding and 
appropriate name, would quite 
so many mountaineers have 
lifted their eyes so eagerly 
towards what is only margin- 
ally tbe highest s umm it on 
Earth? 

It was after him that plain 
Peak XV was named in 1865. 
If a Ontterbuck-Shufflebot- 
tom had got tbe job instead 
and his name was given to tbe 
mountain, the story ought 
have been very different 

General Brace, leader of two 
early expeditions, might have 
stuck simply to carrying two 
Sherpas on his bade for 
exercise. George Mallory 
might have remained a school- 
master on the fringes of the 
Bloomsbury set. Sir Edmund 
Hillary might never have 
“knocked the bastard off" — 


an expression that put Everest 
firmly in its place with 
bootmarks all over its summit. 

With no disrespect intended 
to the Clutterbock-Shnffle- 
bottoms — and there are many 
more names that it would be 
incongruous to attach to a 
mountain — Sr Geoipe cer- 
tainly stirred the sp its of 
several generations of mount- 
aineers with his. 

But would the Hon. Godfrey 
Strongfoot have taken his 
young wife gently in his arms 
and confessed: “Darting, I 
have something to tell yon. I'm 
off to climb . . , Shuffle- 
bottom." I doubt it. 

K2, tiie pant of the Kara- 
koram, is the second highest 
summit, only a 'whisker fewer 
than Everest hi Himalayan 
terms and arguably a harder 
climb. 

An attempt to call the peak 
Mount Godwin Austen largely 
failed, - and even such for- 


midable indiridnals as Char- 
les Houston and the Duke of 
Abrazzi were never seriously 
mentioned as contenders to 
lead their names to the moot . 
tain, even though they had 
spent so modi time on ft. 

K2 remains K2 and it was 
Everest that became the 
exception, even though Sir 
George and die British 
mountaineering establishment 
resisted the idea. He was duly 
gratified at the time, but 
pointed out to the Royal 
Geographical Society that In- 
dian natives would be unable 
to pronounce his name and 
that It could not be written in 
either Hindi or Persian. 

: It took eight years of official 
discussion • before “Everest^ 
was officially adopted, 13 
years after tiie survey had 
plotted its height (29,028 ft) 
and position. Eventheaene 
leading; figure in tfee RGS and . 
Alpine Club, masted on pfoCr 


ing inverted commas around 

the name whenever he wrote it. 
He felt it quite inappropriate 
that sneb a mowtain should 
have an alien name grafted on. 

Bat by 1920 Sir Fronds 
Ymughnsband, of Mission to 


it would be a great nk fa wiw f 
if the “beautiful and srftabfe" 
name of Mount Everest was 
ever changed, even though ft 

was not native. 


cMVU \iSB„ 


It is the Local names that hare 
endared and sound as beauti- 
ful ami suitable , as Yotmg- 
busband found Everest to be. 

Tn'tbe Everett region alone 
there are Cfaangtse, which has 
a better ring than its raw .• 
translation “North Peak", and 
Lhotse and Nuptse — •l yp 
grander names than South 
Peak and West Peak. The ! 

§^^ e P* Ionwa,aIW «ysi» L 

ffie British taneyrife epos- . f 
ymoos. summit. , I I ' 


I. 


8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


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SPORTS 

DIARY 

Simon Barnes 


Earring 

aid 


It's a man's life in modern 
football. With hamstrings and 
ligaments and canDeges con- 
stantly threatening you while the 
groin strains snap at your vitals, 
life is unquestionably tough. To 
make things worse, every week 
they invent a new problem. The 
latest tragic victim of a hitherto 
unknown footballing injury is 
Peter Whitehurst, who went down 
in agony when playing for 
Grantham of the Southern Lea gu e 
in a pre-season friendly against 
Norwich City. The physio, h _ 
Marshall, rushed on to the pitch, 
horrified at what he might find 
after Whitehurst had been in- 
volved in a clash of heads. He 
quickly discovered the truth: 
Whitehurst's earring had stapled 
his ear to the side of his head. 


Double billing 


Every year, American football 
reaches its climax with the 
Superbowl. But in Britain Ameri- 
can football has to have two 
climaxes. Tomorrow Streatham 
Olympians take on London Rav- 
ens in the Budweiser Bowl at 
Crystal Palace. September 13 sees 
the second grand British final, 
.staged by the rival league. They 
call their event Summerbowl II 
and this weekend bold the semi- 
finals: Manchester Spartans v 
Birmingham Bulls and Glasgow 
Lions v Leicester Panthers. 


Riding high 


Drug testing is nothing new in 
horse raring, but the Ohio State 
Racing Commission has derided 
to aim the might of its testing labs 
at people as well as horses. Ata re- 
cent meeting, jockeys, jockeys’ 
agents, owners, trainers and 
grooms were subjected to a ver- 
itable orgy of testing — and 23 
people were found positive. Mari- 
juana and cocaine were the prin- 
cipal drugs discovered. I hope the 
Jockey Cub doesn't start testing 
British racing folk for lager and 
Lanson. 


Own goals 


Like Private Eye, I firmly believe 
that jokes improve with age. The 
third Colemanballs book has just 
appeared, and the new collection 
is as good as ever. “A racing horse 
is not like a machine. It has to be 
tuned up just like you tune up a 
racing motor car”. . t “ Martina, 
she's got several layers of steel out 
there, like a cat with nine 
lives”. . . “He’s like a needle in a 
haystack, that man — he's 
everywhereT 1 tell you, it’s 
enough to confirm any writer's 
belief that he is much better off 
with nice, safe print. 


Frisbee friendly 


This is one of the great weeks in 
British sporting history, for the 
nation is in the middle of staging 
the World Ultimate Champion- 
ships. The sport is played with a 
frisbee, and 650 players from 15 
nations are taking part in the event 
at Colchester, The finals are 
tomorrow. Even at this exalted 
level of competition, there are no 
referees. Ultimate has a "players’ 
code” written into the rules. "It 
encourages players to be compet- 
itive but not at the expense of 
mutual esteem", says Rod Ven- 
ables. secretary of the British 
Ultimate Federation. 


Mariner’s tales 


The BOC single-handed round the 
world yacht race has been en- 
livened by the lone British 
competitor. Harry MitcheL aged 
62. Miichel loathes publicity and 
loves leasing. He evades press 
men by telling them be is not 
Hany Miichel, but Hany’s 
brother, and recently told one 
national newspaper that he was a 
garage mechanic who had just 
been made redundant In stria 
truth, he actually owned the 
garage, and recently sold up. But 
to his deep and lasting pleasure, 
the paper took it all for real 


Gagging the gags 


The Test and County Cricket 
Board is increasingly keento keep 
cricketers quiet. For some time it 
has vetted players* printed effu- 
sions and is also trying to stop 
ghosted columns. Now a whale 
new area of potential prohibition 
has been opened up by a book by 
Frances Edmonds, wife of the 
great and good Philippe, entitled 
Another Bloody Tour. Rumours 
abound that the cricket authori- 
ties. taking exception to some of 
her disclosures, want to vet any- 
thing written by any relative of 
any player. 


BARRY F ANTONI 



Mrs Thatcher and Norman 
TebbiL the Conservative Party 
chairman, were recently reported 
to differ over which advertising 
agency should represent the party: 
Saatchi and Saatchi or Young and 
Rubicam. Many loyal Conser- 
vatives may well wish a plague on 
both. For it could be argued that 
what the petty needs to win the 
next election is something that no 
advertising firm can offer, indeed, 
that the increasing influence of 
such firms and the devices that go 
with them are responsible for pan 
of the malaise in the party. 

Most of what advertisers do is 
unsuiied to the political task of 
winning votes. They are used to 
marketing products to which they 
have no personal commitment — 
they may advertise a fizzy drink, 
but that does not mean their own 
children drink it. Politics, on the 
contrary, demands total commit- 
ment because only those who are 
totally committed can take others 
along with them. 

Political polls are a poor guide 
to political choices either because 
of their complexity, their remote- 
ness from daily life, or because 
they cannot measure intensity of 
commitment. A recent poll on 
South Africa revealed that while a 
majority favoured “sanctions”, 
there was also a majority against 
each of the particular sanctions 
that had been suggested. Trusting 
polls led to the fiasco of the 
government's Shops Bill 
It is particularly dangerous to 
argue from the fact that advertis- 
ing firms play a useful role In 


Fire the ad men 


and put the 
money up front 


byMaxBeloff 


American politics. Nearly all at- 
tempts to graft American practices 
on to British institutions are 
misguided, and this is no excep- 
tion. With enormous electorates 
lacking in homogeneity, and with- 
out whaz Europeans would rec- 
ognize as organized political 
parties, American aspirants for 
political office have to use extra- 
political organizations. Such de- 
vices - computerized records,' 
direct mall, the “telethon” soon if 
we can afford it— are irrelevant to 
a serious political party which has 
an organic personality and 
embodies a set of accepted values. 

In the Conservative Party there 
has always been tension between 
headquarters and the party in the 
country. Central Office and what 
Is now the National Union of 
Conservative and Unionist Ass- 
ociations were founded within a 
few years of each other to embody 
the two. ways of handling party 
activities. 


This tension can be a healthy 
one if the various tasks are 
properly distributed between the 
two. The wight both of ascertain- 
ing the feelings of the party’s rank 
and file and of campaigning in the 
constituencies must rest with the 
National Union. Indeed, for from 
needing polling devices from, 
advertising men to find out what 
people think, ministers should pay 
more attention to backbench MPs, 
prospective candidates and even 
backbench peers. 

One should also remember that 
campaigning for a party implies 
winning people for good to a 
certain way or looking at the world 
and thinking about politics; it has 
tittle to do with shopping lists of 
proposals. In his admirable study 
of the Primrose League, The 
Tories and the People 1880-1935 , 
Martin Pugh observed that 'the 
League's significance was a “sys- 
tematic attempt to make political 
loyalty an integral part of the lives 


of a large number of people rather 
t ha n the private language of an 
elite". The methods of the Prim- 
rose at the end of the last 
century may seem quaint and 
outmoded, but they were certainly 
more effective for their purpose 
than trying to recruit party mem- 
bers through mail order dubs or 
discount concessions. You may get 
members that way. bat what use 
will they be? It is because in parts 
of the country loyalty to the 
Labour Party is an integral part of 
people's lives that Labour remains 
the real opposition. 

Central Office should help the 
constituency parties by its publicar 
tions and by providing other 
services. The money spent on 
advertising would be better spent 
on attracting and paying ade- 
quately a full corps of agates. 
Instead of pressing constituencies 
to raise money that would meet 
the cost of advertising. Central 
Office should subsidize the 
constituencies so that they can 
recruit and campaign more ef- 
ficiently. Battles are won by the, 
forward troops, not at HQ — and 
what goes for war goes for political 
warfare also. 

Above- all, there is the central 
point to make and repeat. The 
difference between Gonservat- 
ivism and Socialism is not the 
difference between one lager and 
another. Margaret Thatcher is not 
a bar of soap. 

Lord Betqff represents the Assoc- 
iation qf Conservative Peers on the 
National Union's executive 
committee. 


Michael Manser 



, per 


innovators 


Bayreuth 

In 1983. the new production of the 
Ring, here was entrusted to Sir 
Georg Solti as conductor. Sir Peter 
Hall as director, and William 
Dudley as designer. High hopes 
were entertained of the venture, 
but as the shaping of the produc- 
tion went forward, and rehearsals 


Bernard Levin 


got under way, disquieting news 
:k from the Holy 


then I realized it 
was an estimated gas MU' 


began to filter bad 
Place of Wagner. It was said that 
the British team were at logger- 
heads with Hen- Wolfgang Wag- 
ner, the composer’s only surviving 
grandson and director of the 
Festival; it was said that the new 
White Hope for a Siegfried, Rainer 
Goldberg, would not or could not 
go through with it; it was said that 
the curtain would go up with the 
production unfinished and un- 
ready. 


From where 
I sit — agony 
and ecstasy 


All these rumours proved abun- 
dantly true. Goldberg's services 
were dispensed with at the final 
dress rehearsal; Wolfgang and Hall 
were hardly on spoking terms 
(though I gather that peace has 
since been made); it had once 
again proved impossible to mount 
a complete Ring in a single season. 


The uproar in the auditorium 
came close to exceeding the worst 
ever in the Festspielhaus — Patrice 
Chereau’s centenary production in 
1976, when the booing and cat- 
calling began during the perfor- 
mance. At curtain-fall the booers 1 
and cheerere <1 was emphatically 
among the latter) kept it up for 40 
minutes every evening, and there 
were fist fights on the pavement 
The following year, Solti an- 
nounced that he was pulling out of 
the production, for reasons of 
health; the year after. Hall quit 
too. A virtually unknown conduc- 
tor. Peter Schneider, took over the 
invisible baton; Michael 
McCaffery was engaged to re-stage 
Hall's production; Manfred Jung, 
who had been booed almost 
unconscious after taking over 
Siegfried and not making a 
particularly good shot at the part, 
was retained because, as Wolfgang 
delightfully explained, there 
wasn't anybody else. Now read on. 



Tom passe, tout lasse, tout casse. 
1 returned to Bayreuth, for this, 
the last year of the British Ring. 
McCaffery had been loyal to Hall’s 
original, making few significant 
changes and even fewer significant 
mistakes; Dudley’s sets and cos- 
tumes now show themselves to be 
outstanding, as imaginative and 
convincing as the work has every 
enjoyed from a designer; Jung, 
though he barked his way through 
the Gdtterd&mmerung Siegfried as 
charmlessly as ever, was cheered 
until the rafters began to crack, 
and buried beneath an avalanche 
of bouquets; not a single dissen- 
tient note was heard from any- 
where in the audience, not even 
for the newest White Hope, Toni 
Kramer, who sang the Siegfried 
Siegfried and proved to be a prize 
dud. (I know Siegfried is half- 
witted. but somebody should tell 
Mr Kramer that the singer's task is 
to conceal this fact, not promul- 
gate it.) And the conductor drew 
some magical sounds from the 
orchestra, and proved to be no 
mere stopgap. 

Then what was all the fuss 
about? I cannot say. But the 
reason I cannot say is that, once 


again, this mighty and merciless 
work seized me, as it seized my 
2,000-odd companions in the . 
Festspielhaus, at 6 pm on Toes* . 
L day. and did not let go until l l pm 
on Sunday, by which time ques- 
tions of this or that performance, 
those or these touches in the 
production, had long since ceased * 
to matter. In a minute, 1 shall once 
again attempt to explain to those 
who have never fallen under the 
spell of the Ring what we who 
have done so get out of it; I s ham, 
of course, once again fail But first, 
one or two things have to be said 
in the light of the morning after. 

Hildegard Behrens, whose 
Brflnhilde was one of the few 
unqualified triumphs of the first 
year, showed that that perfor- 
mance was not a fluke. She lades 
the unwavering gleam of gold that 
Flagstad's tireless voice com- 
manded, and the similar stainless 
steel of Nilsson's, and her vibrato 
has now gone as wide as it can 
without danger. But the voice is 
wonderfully flexible, pure and 
delicate, crammed with meaning 
and encompassing a rich variety of 
colours, yet ample and thrilling 
when beauty needed lung power to 
express itself; the Siegfried love 
duet, despite the fact that her 
partner might have been a Christ- 
mas pudding for all the passion he 
got into his voice, brought down 
the curtain to a fully deserved 
thunder of cheers. 

The other main success was 


Sicgmtuxd Nimsgern as Wotan. In 
1983 his performance had been 
little more than a sketch for the 
part, but now it has fleshed out 
into a complete and commanding 
portrait, emphasizing the pa- 
tience, wisdom and cunning of the 
role rather than the grandeur; in a 
few more years, we shall be 
comparing him with Hotter. Other 
successes included Siegfried 
Jerusalem's ringing and beautiful 
Siegmund, Hannah Schwarz’s 
Fricka. a pert she can now count as 
her own as long as she wants to, 
and Hermann Becht and Peter 
Haags as the Brothers Nibeluug, 
Purveyors of Curses and Plots to 
the Nobility and Gentry. 

All Ring producers are allowed 
one unqualified idiocy, and 
McCafiery’s was the piling of the 
gold in Rheingold; it was turned 
into a stack that was half wattle- 
fenring and half chest of drawans, 
with Fraa on the wrong side of it, 
so that the giants had to keep 
peering round it, in imminen t 
danger of losing their footing and 
rolling down the reverse slope just 
beyond. But McCaffery cancelled 
out that blunder with a brilliant ‘ 
echo. Wotan, at foe end of Act 
Two of Waikare, doses his be- 
loved son's eyes m death; at the 
end of Act Three, he repeats foe 
gesture exactly, as he doses his 
beloved daughter’s eyes in sleep. 

Vaut le voyage, despite renewed 
signs that the tribe of Wagner is 
ultimately ineducable and incorri- 


But even foe Bayreuth seats 
cannot dim foe glory of the Ring 
for us devotees, mid that would be 
true even if the Festspielhaus did 
not have that uniquely marvellous 
acoustic, and that uniquely atten- 
tive audience (hardly a single 
cough from Tuesday to Sunday). 
The Ring tells of gods and heroes, 
dwarfs and giants, dragons and 
fire, mermaids and clairvoyance, 
magic apples and magic helmets. 
At a deeper level it tells ofbetrayal 
and oath-breaking, envy and re- 
venge. incest and murder. And 
yet, at the deepest level of all, it 
tells of things far removed from 
foe myth and its working out in 
these extravagant symbols, of 
things that touch us a fi, like 
inexorability and duty, love and 
nature, faith and works, above all 
chores Wagner’s story, and of 
course for more his music, stirs us 
as deeply as anything in all art 
because it goes into the deepest 
and darkest recesses of the human 
soul, there to make us acquainted 
with all we have .within us of 
cowardice and 1 courage, truth and 
deceit, glory and failure, vain 
regret and impossible hope. The 
Ring , for anyone who will take the 
trouble to know and understand it, 
will purge its listeners of all petty 
concerns, and leave them in foe 
knowledge that for those four 
evenings they have been feeing 
eternal things, which have nothing 
to do with foe quality of Mr 
KTSmerfs singing or Mr Wagner’s 
seats. God and Wolfgang willing, I 
shall come again; and- again; and 
again. 


PS. All is forgiven. I stayed on to 
hear the Mastersingers. foe night 
after G Otterdctm menwg. Directed 
by Wolfgang, it was as joyous a 
version of that joyous work as any 
I have ever- been at. Berad Weikl 
was Sachs — wonderfully human, 
noble and far-seeing — and Her- 
mann Prey Beckmessen they 
played a brilliant and touching 
two-hander which held the whole 


house enthralled, and W< 
direction was imaginative, 
and, above afl, loving. 
Bravo. 


QTtoftsrtrapapw^lSM, 


On foe very day that I read in The 
Times the astonishing report that 
Oxford Street loses £1 million 
worth of merchandise through 
shoplifting per week. I actually 
saw a bit of it go. But it wasn't as 
simple as that 

I originally went into Selfridges 
to get change because some loony 
taxi driver had none. 1 had tried 
the commissionaire, but he dealt 
in nothing less than £50 notes, it 
appeared, and one of those Dallas- 
style lady-foings at the perfume 
counters blinked at me with 
distaste, as if there had suddenly 
wafted through foe revolving 
doors an odour of a rather less 
rarefied nature than that to which 
she was used. It transpired that she 
had never hoards change. 

A rather less overtly glamorous 
(and therefore infinitely more 
helpful) sub-colleague rather 
thought that she haa heard of it. 
but regretted that her till was too 
sophisticated to cope with foe 
concept. 

And then it happened. A girl of 
no more than 12 slipped from her 
mother's side, reached down, an 
immense flagon of Christian 
Dior's “Poison” and dropped it 
into her carrier tag. The whole 
action was so rapid and smooth 
that I momentarily suspected my 


Family outing, 
with uplift 


eyes of- horsing around But I 
rallied like a stallion and ap- 
proached the mother. 

“Excuse me” I began, and then 
I paused. Tricky one, this. “I 
rather think foal your daughter 


might have inadvertently reached 
j = flagon of 


down an immense 
Christian Dior’s “Poison” and 
dropped it into her carrier bag. 
Sony.” I tacked on. inanely. 

The lady's face blanched 

“She didn’flr she hissed in 
disbelief holding her child by the ' 
shoulders. 1 nodded sadly. “How 
many times have I told you?!" she 
berated her daughter. “The bottle 
at the front isalways a dummy. It’s 
the boxed ones at the baric you go 
for. silly.” Whereupon the lady 


replaced foe flagon, and appro- 
theback. 


priated a boxed one from 

Now this was foe stuff of 
induced dreams, and I was 


®bbcring badl^ by tire time I 


realized that both mother and 
daughter had drifted out of sight 
What was a body to do? Fust 1 
priorities were to get some bloody 


change for foe taxi, and then to nip 
back into Sdfridges for a bottie of 
Glenfiddich. 

Il was in foe food hall that I 
caught sight of the pair again. The 
child was picking up slices of ham 
from the kiW counter and deposit- 
ing them alternately into her tag 
and into her mouth. Once more I 
attracted the mother’s attention, 
this time by tugging at her sleeve. 

“Look look look”. I babbled. 
“Just [ookT 

“Yes r , she nodded with dis- 
approval. “It’s not very hygienic, 
is it?” 

“Hygienic? Hygienic?. The little 
savage is robbing foe store blind! 
What are you going to do about it? 
I mean, good God. really, for 
heaven's sake!” 

By way of an answer, this female 
Fagui swept a couple of tins of foie 
gras into her raincoat pocket, and 
beckoned her daughter sway from 
the nasty shouting man. This was 
too much, • 

“Madam”. I said 'with hauteur 
and trembling (she was a big 


woman). “You wifi replace every 
single item that you have taken. At 
once. Or else”. I added with 
hesitation; she really was awfully 
big. By now I was rather commit- 
ted to seeing foe thing through, but 
ready to alert a member of foe staff 
if she showed any signs of turning 
ugly, or making a bolt for it 
But I think this must have 
happened to her before, for she 
nodded at once, before her eyes 
flicked up in supplication. 

“ffmythiog?” she queried. 
“Even the bed linen?” 

“Everything**. I verified, 
wondering what rise foe was 
concealing. A four-poster bed? 


As foe saga of St John’s Lodge 
rumbles on it becomes snore and 
more dear that foe process of 
conservation in Britain is in need 
of overhaul. I was one of the 
architects involved on Red 
Koch's behalf and I saw the event, 
to a certain extent, as through 

American eyes. 1 felt ashamed at 

the vituperation, ignorance and 
foe sheer intellectual inelegance of 
this aspect of Britain which was 
presented to my client 
A museum at St John's Lodge 
will never open, the Koch collec- 
tion will go elsewhere. On whose 
behalf was it refused? The vast 
body of the galteiy and museum 
visiting public certainly had no 
say. They lost their opportunity 
through the obsessively reaction- 
ary attitudes of comparatively few 


people. It is this inability to fece 
foe fiiti 


gible. Consider after I know not 
How many decades (my own 
memories of Bayreuth go back 
only three) of foe most uncomfort- 
able chairs in the entire theatrical 
and operatic world, somebody has 
had the bright idea of padding the 
■ seat It is a miserable tittle bit of 
nothing, but I was prepared to be 
properly grateful until I discov- 
ered that nothing had been done 
about the thing that has always 
made the chairs the world's worn 
and most painful which is not; 
and never has been, the hardness 
of the seat but foe angle of the 
back, which is a plain bit of rigid 
wood that, whatever you do, jabs 
for the 16 hours of foe Ring into 
your spine. The reason that Wolf- 
gang refuses to abate this scandal 
is not that he doesn’t sit in those 
seats and is therefore unaware of 
their condition, nor that he thinks 
it is good for our souls if our 
bodies suffer; ft is simply that his 
name is Wagner, and that there is 
therefore nothing whatever to be 
done about him short of murder, 
which I understand to be in breach 
of foe municipal by-laws of Bay- 
reuth. 


'Except the ham”, she haggled. 
“Olivia's eaten foe ham!” 




“We’ll waive the ham”. I said, 
concentrating on maintaining a 
grip on reality as the floor formed 
an askew rhombus before my eyes. 

“And foe drink", she went on 
chattily. Tve already drunk the 
drink." 

“Good God” I -murmured. But 
she replaced everything else, and I 
watched her do it And was this 
contrition I suddenly caught sight 
of? Yes? Was this remorse on ha- 
face. in the shape of the lame 
quivering and crystal tear? No. 
actually it was gin, 

Joseph Connolly 

— 


iture. the reluctance to accept 

change and a pervasive mawkish 

reverence for foe past which is 

part of the British Disease that has 
caused our national . decline. 
Those who think tins way have 

much to answer for. Do they truly 

represent a public view and are 

their activities sufficiently bal- 
anced within the planning system? 
Unlike many avowed conserva- 

tionists I am interested in every 
period of architecture — each is 
equally important — including an 
architecture of foe 2ofo century, 

which is produced by the needs, 

the techniques and foe new 
materials ot foe 20th century. 
Nothing will convince me that 
there is a case for replicating the 
past when feced wtih an empty 
building site. Bui I do not object u 
others want to replicate. 

' The richness of foe past is 
entirely due to building owners 
expressing their personality in 
their choice of designer, however 
idiosyncratic tire buildings that 
resulted. The curious idea that 

there is a notion of universal good 

taste which it is the duty of the 
planning authorities to impose 
upon their fellow citizens is as 

arrogant as it is incorrect In the 

last 40 yearn it has emasculated tire 
creativity of the best of our 
architects and has caused a 
remarkable diminution of archit- 
ectural quality and variety. It is 
possible that by tins procedure 
some offensive designs may have 

been prevented. So too has much 

that is innovative and interesting. 

There is manifest public im- 

patience with the minutiae and 
delay of planning procefoms and 

the excesses of conservation ze&L 
To redevelop the docklands and 
other prime, areas expeditiously 

the government created Enteiprise 

Zones and Planning Free Zones. 
But it is a dangerous route to take 
whole areas out of planning; It 
could lead In foe end to no 


planning at all 

. In the meantime; m the rest tf 
the country delay and frustration 
persist. If the desire for change is 
not met very soon, public pressure 
will cause the pesdidum swing 
which has began to go tea if 
down the Enterprise Zone road,- 

vital pfenning fecmevememsfsnch 

as the green Dem and conserva- 
tion could be tosL 

The swing tack has to he 
checked at midpohn. Pfenning 
control is involved in immeasur- 
able subjective decisions and dfe. 
regards economic femes which 
cause delays and make develop- 
ment more cos£h\ Its intrusion 
into censorship of design has been 
a monstrously expensive feflare. 
At its simplest everyone tas k 
democratic right to embellish h* 
property — his way. There fe ao 
evidence that 40 years of design 
control has produced better build- 
ings. 

Planning should be confined ife 

• Hus- me to which land or 
buildings are pm. 

• The density o f development 
and control of spaces be t ween 
building s. 

• National planning policies and 
strategy (including transport). 

Conservation and tire ground 
rules of whether or not to conserve 
a building were set out by Sir John 
Summcrson in his important 
book, Heavenly Mansions, in 
1947. These can be reduced to 
three categories: 

(a) those structures of such excep- 
tional historic or architectural 
interest that: they must be pre- 
served at the public cost. as 
museums. 

(b) those buflefings or structures 
which can be'adapted for a new 
use that will generate income for 
the costs of maintenance. In this 
case change is inevitable. 

(c) those of au infinite range of 
much less im- 

whkh individ- 
are wilting to 
own resource*, 
absolute authority of his- 
toric budding officers to tc& 
owners which nmktings most be 
preserved and ow and to what 

degree without i sard to cost has 

to stopL Power w thoot culpability 
is extremely da tgerous and can 
and does breed jurats. ft is also 
unfair to the owi er. Ifa budding is 
oftbathnportai * titer? has toft 
public funding, ’for its preserva- 
tion. Better than autocratic direc- 
tion would be ten incentives to 
encourage cm era to look after 
_ their historic few&sgs. . 

Above aU, t fere needs to be 
more dfecrimh Ktiaen. A gft alone 
. does not jugtty conservation. 

Jhe author mA president of the 
Royal Institute wf British Archi- 
tects 1983-85. 


much 
portent btril 
uab, or_ 

.from 


Philip Howard 



“Water Rules, OKT, scribbled the 
poet 25 centuries ago. though I 
dare say even he turned to 
something a bit stronger when he 
was . straining for a difficult 
choriambic dimeter, or Hieron of 
Syracuse was late with his royal- 
ties. And. of course, the lad was 
right By the desert island test, if 
you are allowed only one liquid, it 
has to be water. One would get 
bored even with champagne at 
breakfast; and you cannot wash 
your teeth or your socks in whisky. 
Milk would go off 

. Now is foe time of the year 
when we put water to a use other 
than shaving and drinking, by 
immersing the body gingerly in it 
and swimming, either with an 
athletic Australian crawl, or with a 
staid Cheltenham Ladies' breast 
stroke, puffing to heave the body 
out of the water as far as the paps, 
like the Nereids. This is a tip-toe 
process in darkest Ayrshire — 
washed, it is alleged, by the Gulf 
Stream — which must be getting 
diluted by the time it reaches the 
Maidens and Cray. The beach 
shelves agonizingly gently out 
over rocks and seaweed that pops 
and dings. The bather shuddere 
and dutches himself as the fey 
brine creeps slowly up bis th fe hn 

I had the first dip of the summer 
off Chest) Beach the other day, 

. ignoring notices proclaiming that 
Bathing was Extremely Dan- 
gerous. It looked safe enough, 
apart from ten miles of fishermen 
and severed mackerel heads. But 
when you try to ‘come out, you see 
the difficulty. The beach shelves 
steeply a few feet out, and the 
undertow on the pebbles 
landing tricky. Nothing tike so . 
hazardous, however, as the rocky . 
waterfront of Alexandria, where I 
came nearest yet to a watery death, 
while swimming illegally after 
midnight in underpants with the 
Oxford and Cambridge rowing 
crews. Those who know the secrets 
of foe sea treat it with great 
respecL 

- Considering , the coldness of the 
water and foe dimaw. and the 
discomfort of the beaches, it is 
remarkable that foe English were 
foe firs modern nation to institute 
swimming as a sport There were 
six indoor swimming pools with 
diving boards in London by 1837. 

. and Some evidence that there was 
competitive swimming. The 
whole thing has got out of hand 
now. with ugly and inefficient 
strokes .such as foe butterfly, and 
events such as ' synchronized 
swimming, which are not sports at 
aU but films with Esther Wil- 
liams. 

But the . English ■ have been 
swimming for longer than that 


Hall of Hrothgar. 
ier questions . 
a swimmer; “A 
Beowulf who 
Breca, and raced 
the open sea in 
contest, when, either} 
glory or 
risked your lives in\ 
Beowulf replies hotly 1 
he is that chap. 


ish court- 


reaHy foal 
with 
him in 


swimming 
of vain- 


you both 
deep?” 
indeed 
lat the 



CMsWormafl 

contest lasted five days and nights 
m foil armour, into a violent 
tempest, and included a great 
struggle with tame ftarfifl mon- 
sters of foe deep, Le. officials of the 
Amateur Swimming Association. 

Naturally \ Mediterranean na- 
tions have an even older tradition 
of swimming, not counting Lean- 
der who swam for love, dot sport 
The Grades had a phrase for the 
elementary basics of education: 
the Alphabet and swimming. The 
Emperor Augustus taught his 
grandsons, “Letters and- swim* 
imng and other rudiments.” 

River swimming is better than 
sea swimming, if^you can find a 
dean river. You .can see more 
under water, and foe flow of the 
current is more interesting than 
foe monotonous chop of the 
waves. At school I swam in 
Cuckoo Weir, until a plague of 
polio laid us low. I do not thick I 
shall ever swim in such agreeable 
water again, a bit like slowly 
. flowing pea soup with crodums. 
.But maybe foe pleasure was as 
much to do with, being -young as 
foe Thames. The Cherwetl is just 
about clean enough* if you have 
tad all the advisable injections, 
cxid can ignore. the narcissistic 
.posturings of foe obese ex- 
Jubmomsjs at parson’s Pleasure. 
Ifine unmerst comes to the worst, 
a good pod wfll do. and we have 
pients of gpod pools. For ihcnea 
week or so. Water Rules. OKTBttt 
Out for the monsters, Bcck- 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


l Pennington Street, London E l 9XN Telephone; 01-481 4100 


COMMERCE NOT WELFARE 


; :.l COMMI 

*». IN i * 

* ’ To '■?, ; 

* ! ^iThe reasoning of Mr Kinnock 

.! Vand Mr Hatterslev and their 
> . ^colleagues on the nationalized 
' '^industries is simple. British 
;• •VvRaiJi British Coal and the rest 
C ;-!servc national purposes. (Why 
^-jdsc should they be in public 

- ^.ownership?) In the Labour 

forty's scheme the alleviation 

- : of unemployment is a national 

* : s ^priority: there should therefore 

no objection to making the 
■ nationalized corporations, into 

- --.isjt agencies of make-work. The 
■-^objections, however, are 

' ■; strong. They are fourfold. 
f ^ One comes from consumers, 

. ’* inured through long years to 
iV’fcesi 1 the effects of. overmanning in 
public services. The absence of 
V ^ ^ manpower discipline is an 
"'ancient cause of public sus- 
picion of nationalization — 
rail travellers know precisely 

- ; what that means. Another 
\ objection comes from 

nationalized industry man- 
.C. 1 : aeers. Thev mifijit. with some 


Uncertain glories of the Revolution 


constrained t»y ^financial tar- 
gets that have more to do with 
.T public borrowing definitions 

than the future of transport or 
I." 1 coat but as a result they have 
.'C* ^ worked for the past few years 
within a sharper operational 
^. 7^- climate than at any time since 
1945. ; 

Objection must surely come ■ 

• from the staff of the national-; 
-• ized industries Their numbers - k 

" ) have been cut; they have made 

sacrifices — in the name of 
: ziz commercial integrity and long- 
term security of employment. 

^ British Rail,, with its propa- 


ganda to the public about 
better service, is also offering 
ji$ staff a proud corporate 
identity, which they would 
Tosc if their ranks were diluted 
in order to create jobs. 

The / most pertinent ob- 
jection^ must come from the 
public, in whose name British 
Rail and the utilities are '• 
.supposed to operate. To as- 
cribe to them certain social 
purposes is appropriate. It is 
fitting to ask. for example, that, 
the Elccircrty Council makes a 
non-commercial effort to liaise 
iWith ihc Department of Health 
and Social Security or local 
authority social services before 
it cuts off supplies of power to 
a non-payer who may be 
indigent or infirm. Likewise to 
give British Rail a subsidy, 
distinguished from its com- 
mercial revenues, is necessary 
to provide lines without which 
people would be immobilized. 
But to go beyond this could 
introduce a fatal confusion of 
purpose between, cost effec- 
tiveness and welfarism. 

The purposes of the na- 
tionalized industries have, it 
must be said, never been 
entirely clear. The Mor- 
risonian doctrine of public 
corporations at arms' length 
from the government left un- 
stated the balance of interest 
between efficiency and emp- 
loyment. In practice poli- 
ticians of all persuasions; were 
ready to sacrifice long-run 
goals of productivity and 
investment to avoid short run 
embarrassment caused, say. by 
job losses. 


Labour itself once argued 
that nationalization was nec- 
essary in order to secure 
productivity gains; the na- 
tionalization of steel by the 
Wilson government was con- 
ceived as an act of ra- 
tionalization (meaning the 
shedding of Labour). It cer- 
tainly never formed part of 
socialist doctrine' that high- 
cost steel plant should be kept 
running for the sake of provid- 
ing jobs. Labour's various 
Plans for Coal provided, 
admittedly at a' slower rate 
than the Government in- 
stituted. for the diminution of 
the workforce. 


From Dr J. C. D. Clark 
Sir. Many of your readers will 
have been dismayed by Noel 
Annan's eulogy, of the Glorious 
Revolution (August 22X It may be 
merely tiresome to be assured by 
the pundits of the Whig establish- 
ment that they are on the side of 
the angels and that nv need to be 
recalled to values which we are in 
danger of losing sight of. But it's 
more serious when they misrepre- 
sent those values, and as here, 
derive them from an antiquated 
and polemical account of the 
English Constitution nbi seriously 
believed .since the age of G. M, 
Trevelyan. 

More serious, too. because Lord 
Annan shows no sign of being 
aware that scholars for two de- . 
cades have been successfully 
demolishing tbe comfortable pic- 
ture of 1688 which he so blandly 
retails to us. It may have been true 
fifty years ago that “every school- 
boy knew" Macaulay's account of 


uic womorec. boy knew" Macaulay's account of 

Labour’s concern to reduce Glorious Revolution to be a 

... - • selMviaMt truth; nvfav c cf iwVntc 


joblessness is sincere. Tbe 
party has a contribution to 
make to the question of how 
far the borrowing needs of the 
nationalized industries need 
be a residual of Treasury 
aggregates. There is a good 
deal of running to be made on 
such themes as borrowing 
outside the PSBR, lending 
pegged more closely to the 
asseis and prospects of the 
energy utilities, and generally 
to the regulatory environment 
within which gas and electric- 
ity. publicly or privately 
owned, should operate. 

But giving the nationalized 
industries targets for employ- 
ment in the way Labour now 
proposes is to reject markets 
and tbe disciplines of price and 
cost. It cuts across their 
managers' competence. It 
turns them into agencies of 
social work. 


CHOOSING A CHAIRMAN 


I'tiilip Howard 

,’im ulfandt 
hutterflv 


Two different gear wheels are 
rraf grinding within the pro- 
gramme-making machine of 
' the ; British Broadcasting 
- 'Corporation. The first is vast, 

’ ; slow and inexorable. It is the 

wheel of technological change 
which— one day -will in- 
■ -4 “ : evitaWy crush the BBCs cosy 
structures into ^fragmented, 

. T *;;* freer pattern df electronic 
. ** ■' publishing. : 

1 The second is smaller and 
, faster. It is the wheel, that: 

YisZi 1U. '■ 


with a deputy director general 
and a new head of its commer- 
cial arm who will — it is to be 
hoped — continue Ms work for 
as long as the present un- 
satisfactory system of financ- 
ing the broadcasters remains 
in place. 

Mr Young’s difficulties were 
all political. Despite being the 
brother of a late-entiy. poli- 
. tician, he did not succeed in 
making the change himself. 


even if much of the program- 
ming is not 

The Real Lives affair com- 
promised the Corporation’s 
independence. The BBC chair- 
man was not the only one to 
meritblame but neither was he 
blameless. It is easy to say with 
hindsight that it should have 
been handled differently. The 
feet, however, is that it should 
have been handled better; it 
could have been , handled bet- 


The second is small er and making the change mm sen. coma nave Decu-naniucu uci- 
fasfer. “It is the wheel that - ^Mrs Thatcher succeeded with . ter,, tpt, not by someone who. 
actually drives; ahdicanbcfrJi^veh 

Following the (joveramenfs for hopmg tfuit she might do lifetime’strainmg for doingso. 
reluctance to push the first equally well with another. She To appoint a man now who 


reluctance to push the first 
wheel any faster, both before 
die establishment of the Pea- 
cock committee and, still more 
strikingly since, it is the second 
wheel that demands attention. 

The man ultimately in 


did not 

She recognized that the BBC 
had become intellectually as 
well as financially flabby. She 
did not realize that the only 
chairman who could do any- 


charge of it is the chairman of ' tiring about that was a chair- 
the BBC governors. Until his man whose natural habitat was 


'w. 

A 


death yesterday that position 
was held with distinction and 
no little difficulty by Mr Stuart 
Young, whose successor is 
now being sought. 

Mr Young’s distinction lay 
in the control of the 
Corporation's ramshackle fi- 
nances. He was an accountant 
by training and his instincts 
wwp id extract at least some 
degree! of value for money 
Jjpnnih industry that had long 
allowed to treat that 
llpurejftwxth contempt. He has 
»fts j>ehind an organization 


the political tight-rope, who 
understood the ways of 
journalists and politicians, 
who could mediate between 
them when necessary, and, 
better still,- make sure that it 
almost never was necessary. 

It is important that the 
successor to the chair of the 
BBC governors should be tbe 
man that Mr Young was not 
able to be. It is important 
because the public still has a 
longish term stake in the 
political independence of the 
BBC That is worth paying for 


To appoint a man now who 
has a businessman's reputa- 
tion for knocking recalcitrant 
heads off would be a recipe for 
repeat disasters. The BBC, in 
its current unreformed, over- 
extended, overweeening form, 
is a nest of a hundred hydras. 
And every hydra has a hun- 
dred friends in the rest of the 
media, each happy to cause 
trouble for a government- 
appointed hatchet man. 

If the BBC's size is to be 
retained, its independence 
needs to be retained too. It 
needs a man of weight who 
understands journalists and 
can influence them, who 
understands politicians and 
can influence them. It is, 
perhaps, early days to back 
horses in this race. But, exem- \ 
pli gratia, better Lord Barnett 
than Lord King. 


A- 

a 


FOURTH LEADER 


|JiktheU3nited States, a Miss 
IjyEJwhb is a follower of the 
polilidari Lyndon 
|®I§biiehe. has been fined 
;$5£© fbr "disorderly conduct”. 
What Vshe was convicted of 
wiping was "to present a slab of 
raw jiifer to an archbishop as a 
protest against what she said 
was his support for'the Inter- 
national Mohetary Fund”. 

We confess that we are as 
baffled by this story as we have 
ever been in our lives. There 
are no further details in the 
repbrt we have seen, other 
than the lady's age. which can 
hardly be a material consid- 
eration. and we have quoted 
the words of the charge ver- 
batim. But what can h mean? 

In the first place, why should 
it be termed "disorderly 
conduct” (and of a nature 
grave enough to warrant arrest 
and a fine]! to give an arch- 
bishop a piece of liver? Pos- 
sibly. he was known not to like 
liver, even lightly grilled with 
sage and accompanied by a 
watercress salad (which is how 
we like it): but in that case he 


would merely have declined 
the gift, and could hardly have 
taken offence at it. (Even if he 
was a vegetarian the same' 
would hold true.) 

Besides, if the archbishop is 
anything like the archbishops 
we know, he would have 
accepted it as a gift even if he 
did not like the taste, and 
distributed it to the poor and 
hungry of his archdiocese, thus 
turning what was intended as 
an insult into a deed of mercy. 
But how could it have been 
intended as an insult? For note 
that Miss Hart presented the 
liver to him: there is no 
suggestion that she threw it at 
him. lei alone hit him on the 
head with it 

And. that is only half of the 
mystery. The presentation of 
the liver, we are told, was by 
way of rebuke for his support 
of ihc International Monetary 
Fund. Now there is no reason 
why an archbishop should not 
admire the work of the IMF,, 
though it is unlikely that he 
would have time to involve 
himself closely in its activities. 


But why should that bring 
down on him ihe wrath of a 
lady, to the extent that she 
■ would pause on her way to her 
rendezvous with history to 
pop into a butcher's? 

Nor does theology help: if it 
was pig's liver. Jews and 
Mohammedans would be 
forbidden 10 touch it. but there 
are no Jewish or Muslim 
archbishops, and we know of 
nothing in the teaching of any 
of the sects of Christianity 
which takes any view at all of 
liver, much less a view so 
strong that it warrants 
prosecution. 

We end as baffled as we 
began, and throw ourselves on 
our readers. To the sender of , 
the most implausible solution 
to this mystery, provided its 
inner logic is without fault we 
shall present a full pound of 
the best calves liver that 
money can buy. Archbishops, 
and directors of the Inter- 
national . Monetary Fund, are 
eligible, and welcome to com- 
pete. 


Awfnl wamino think of the risks and benefits of . jaiicnnakes ihc risk and swallows 

AWIU1 warning noI doing anvihmg of the son. the medicine. Meanwhile ihe doo- 

Fmm Dr Gerard Bulger ' • * When talking to patients 1 refer lor feels much better. The need 10 

Sir. Dr Kicran Sweeney's ekleHy' 10 Iheir medicines as poisons. This massage our egos and be seen 10 
paiicni who realised her medicine, often precipitates a discussion that do somcihing can be _ quite 
Warfarin, was a poison (August ensures that both the pauent and I ^overwhelming. TJc filling m of a 
27) had remarkable insight which • understand ihe risks. and.lhai._I prescription pad has a remarkable 
should be tUKterstoodhy a^l. fevery acknowledge that I have, felt it therapeutic cflcci on me and; my 
onc of oiq- raS#dhcs'is^i pefison at ' worthwhile IQ take on the risk and colleague s. ^ 
any prescribe the poison. 

doaore?ijrescfibe swe^tsfaould-^be Doctors often prescribe to treat GERARD BULGER. 

wdghiCT|iftjficBisa$(Xb«5efit5 r .'!%rsd\ es for our problem, which 58 Newtek Road, 

^^^.^atictit pietnck-i^titat the LowcrClapion. E5., 


self-evident truth: today's students 
have access to a quite different 
understanding of the English past. 

If all that a senior historian has 
to offer us is a moralising endorse- 
ment of a national myth, a wider 
public might indeed be entitled to 
ask: who needs academic history? 
Yours faithfully. 

JONATHAN CLARK. 

All Souls College. 

Oxford. 

From Mr Toby Horton 
Sir. Lord Annan is right — 
Parliament was the winner from 
the Glorious Revolution: but the 
best. motive for celebrating the 
tercentenary is that the ground 
won and held since then is slipping 
away. 

However well intentioned our 
public sector, and however ef- 
ficient our internationalised econ- 
omy, both present a test to the 
parliamentary system. Both are 
answerable to a Parliament that 
speaks for the majority of individ- 
uals who neither dispense state 
benefits nor manage international 
corporations: that is the main 
justification for 1988's festivities. 
Yours faithfully. 

TOBY HORTON, 

Whoriton Cottage. 

Swainby, 

Northallerton. N. Yorkshire. 

From Dr Judith Pinnirtgton 
Sir. The leading revolutionaries of 
1688 w ere squalid, for one veiy 
simple reason which Lord Annan 

Water councils 

From Councillor Jack L. Jack ■ 

Sir. One thust admire Councillor 
Nadia Conway's -stout defence 
(August 26) of the independence 
of the Water Consumer Consul- 
TativeCorammee?^WCC(^. Jam. 
sure.'- she - speaks own- 

committee but. sadly, her words 
may not be equally true for all the 
49 CCCs throughout England and 
Wales. One could hardly expect 
otherwise when a consumer 
committee has to depend solely on 


fudges with his Cold War analo- 
gies. They violated every maxim 
of decency and honesty in their 
relations with the King, not 
merely in the heat of a crisis, not 
only during the period of wide- 
spread anxiety about James's pol- 
icy but in some instances from 
long before he became king. 

Lord Annan's attempt to shift 
the weight of moral turpitude to 
the margins of Scotland and 
Ireland will not do. Analogies with 
modern Liberal and Tory politics 
are false, which is precisely why 
Lord Grimond's recent comments 
in the House of Lords were both 
timely and consistent. 

The parlies then were little 
more than loose alliances of 
interest- There was as little in 
common between the Tory gran- 
dees who went over to William 
and the “Tory squirearchy" as 
there was in the 1960s between 
New England Democrats and 
those of the Deep South, while the 
Whigs of the City and those of the 
provinces had almost as little in 
common. 

It is true that modern constitu- 
tional liberties are legitimised by 
the Bill of Rights, but must we for 
that reason honour the politics of 
the Revolution? It took more than 
words on paper to effect those 
liberties. The sea-change of 19th- 
century electoral reform, as Karl 
Marx knew wdL was more im- 
portant than the Bill of Rights, for 
what we now enjoy. 

Yours faithfully. 

JUDITH PINNINGTON. 

64 Ravine Grove. 

Plumsiead Common. SE1& 

August 22. 

From Mr Charles Smith 
Sir. With all due respect to Lord 
Annan, the forthcoming ter- 
centenary of the so-called Glori- 
ous Revolution should be no 
occasion for rejoicing. 

In 1688. the legitimate Sov- 
ereign of this country was deposed 
by a powerful Whig establishment 
— forbears of our entrepreneurs, 
captains of industry and Fleet 
Street belletrists — and replaced by 
a compliant, foreign usurper, 
ready to endorse their factional 
interests. 

Yours faithfully. 

CHARLES SMITH, 

29 Market Place. 
Henley-on-Thames. Oxfordshire. 
August 22. 

co-Ordinating body at national 
leveL 

This would be drawn -from 
.members of local CCCs and 
provide a channel for presenting 
consumer interests, where appro- 
priate, directly to Government 
For mstance, during the passage of 
a privatisation Bill through Par- 
liament there would be a heed for 
intensive lobbying on many 
points and this would require 
careful co-ordination. 

Far from being superceded by a 
new water commission, the forma- 
tion of a national water consumer 


for ns entire funding and admin- ing existent of local CCCs and 
lstrative support. provide the water consumer 

The present system of local movement with a much needed 
CCCs should be left intact to cany voice at the national leveL 
on their good work. Certainly they Yours faithfully, 
should not be reduced to 10 in JACK L. JACK. Chairman, 
number (one per region) as was Steering Committee fora National 
proposed in the recent White Water Consumer CounriL 
Paper. But there is aneed also fora 18 Queen Anne's Gate. SW1. 


58 Ncwick Road. 
Lower Clapton. E5. , 


High and mighty 

From Lord Boyd-Carpenter 
Sir. Mr Kristol bases nis entertain- 
ing article. beaded "Abandon your 
lordships" iti your issue of yes- 
terday (August 26) on his theory 
that there is something peculiar to 
this country in the use of titles. It 
would seem that he has travelled 
very little. 

For instance. France is full of 
dukes and marquises, who create 
fearsome problems for the place- 
ment at any dinnerparty in. Paris 
at which Napoleonic and Bourbon 
noblemen are present! Moreover, 
anyone who has been an under 
secretary in a French Government 
for. three weeks has “M le 
Ministre" for life. 

Spain is full of noblemen, 
including people bom without a 
title who marry a noblewoman. 

So. is Italy, with princes galore 

PaUadian harmony 

. From Mr Edward Saunders 
Sir. Mr Briggs's comments (Au- 
gust 25) that the glazing bars in 
PaUadian buildings “are an inte- 
gral pan of the overall harmony of 
the original designs" raise an 
interesting point. Eighteenth-cen- 
tury architects seldom, if ever, 
showed glazing bars on their ' 
design drawings. They invariably 
left black voids for windows to 

Durham and beyond 

From the Dean of Durham 

Sir. Whether “the Church of 
England is not amused" (Gifford 
Longlcy. August 1 8) by the Bishop 
of Durham's recent speech to 
General Synod I would not know. 

I do believe, however, that in his 
own peculiarly vivid style the 
Bishop has highlighted a fiin- 
damcntaJ issue in the contem- 
porary theological debate, taking 
us. as your Religious Affairs 
Correspondent rightly observes, 
beyond the cbnscrvati ve/liberal 
dispute over the literary and 
historical status of the gospel 
records and pointing us to the 
related but deeper question of the 
nature of God and the manner of 
his working in the world. 

Traditional conceptions of God. • 
with their emphasis on his 
transcendence, often characterise 
his activity in the world as 
occasional. ! intervening and con- 


ing existence of local CCCs and 
provide the water consumer 
movement with a much needed 
voice at the national leveL 
Yours faithfully, 

JACK L. JACK. Chairman, 
Steering Committee fora National 
Water Consumer CounriL 
18 Queen Anne's Gate. SW1. 

and every successful professional 
man prefixing his name with such 
lilies as Ingeniere or Avrocato and 
in the USA. where Mr Kristol says 
he has been, it is pretty certain that 
in a gathering of middle-aged and 
prosperous men a substantial 
proportion of them will answer, 
and expect to answer, to the prefix 
Colonel. Judge or Senator. 

So we would be really more 
“peculiar" if we acted on Mr 
Kristol's advice and put our titles 
in the freezer. And in addition he 
may have noted that in France 
many people proudly sport the 
little badge which announces that 
they hold the Legion of Honour on 
their ordinary gento-work suits. 

I am your Obedient Servant and. 
for consistency, sign myself in the 
usual way. 

BOYD-CARPENTER. 

House of Lords. 

contrast with the solid masonry or 
brickwork. 

Presumably this is how they 
would have liked their buildings 
to appear. The glazing bare were 
there because of the limitations of 
eighteenth-century building tech- 
nology. 

Yours faithfully. 

EDWARD SAUNDERS. 

The Continent. 

TicknaJL Derby. 

tra-natural. In this pattern of ideas 
there is depriy no problem about 
the production of miracles. There 
is. however, a moral problem 
about their distribution, which 
appears to be so arbitrary as to 
jeopardise God's love and trust- 
worthiness. 

Is there here a danger perhaps 
that, ignoring the lesson of the 
narratives of Jesus’s temptations, 
which are of primary importance 
for a Christian understanding of 
miracle, we have allowed our- 
selves to be bemused by an 
idolatrous projection of an all-too- 
h iiman love of power in place of 
the reality of the power oflove? 

Ought we. then, without 
substituting' immanence for 
transcendence, the world for God. 
or chance for providence, so to re- 
shape our concept of God that we 
can recognise in his creation love's 
gracious self-limitation, a careful 
regard for the structures of the 
world he- is. making: and a- patient 



Lessons of the 
K2 disaster 

Fnwi Mr Peter Uoyd and others 
Sir. Your report (August 19) on 
the disaster on K2 rightly records 
the bravery of the victims of the 
storm on this difficult and savage 
mountain. Nor is there any reason 
to question the skill and experi- 
ence of the climbers: Alan Rouse, 
for instance, was a man with an 
outstanding record. 

Bui there is a darker side to the 
picture which must not be forgot- 
ten. When a group of seven loses 
no less than five ofiis members in 
achieving a sporting objective this 
is by any standards an excessive 
and unjustifiable price to pay. 
Alan Rouse's death is also a 
reminder of the deaths, during the 
last decade, of other leading 
British mountaineers who have 
died in ambitious ventures on the 
big mountains. 

Particularly worrying to many 
mountaineers is the present fash- 
ion for “Alpine style“ ascents of 
the Himalayan giants in which the 
whole party is committed to the 
attempt on the summit without 
any support from lower camps, 
and for which the use of oxygen, 
even in emergency, is regarded as 
unnecessary and artificial 
In consequence of these and 
other factors there have in recent 
years been several fatalities on the 
big mountains caused not by falls 
or avalanches but by acute moun- 
tain sickness and physical 
deterioration. In the August 
disaster on K2 it seems dear that 
the lives were lost through a 
combination of physical exhaus- 
tion. dehydration and hypother- 
mia. 

At these great altitudes most of 
the oxygen gained by increased 
breathing is used by the respi- 
ratory muscles at the expense of 
the rest of the body. At the same 
time the high heat loss from the 
lungs can exceed what the body 
can generate and however good 
the protective clothing this heat 
loss can become criticaL At this 
stage physical weakness is com- 
pounded by inertia and loss of 
motivation. 

The Mount Everest Foundation 
has done what it could to warn the 
mountaineering fraternity of the ' 
seriousness of these hazards but 
the K2 tragedy shows tint much 
more needs to be done to bring 
home the lesson. 

Yours etc. • 

PETER LLOYD. 

MICHAEL WARD. 

CHARLES WARREN. 

Alpine Club. 

74 South Audley Street, Wl. 

August 26. 

Totally improper 

From Countess Attlee. 

Sir. Mr Stewart Alexander's letter 
(August- 26) about the New Zea- 
land carpenters’ convention (in- 
genious. 1 admit) of working in 
eighths of an inch and using “lull'* 
and “bare" to indicate plus or 
minus one-sixteenth of an inch is 
yet another illustration of the 
inadequacy of the Imperial system 
of measurement and the folly of 
clinging to it when the accuracy 
and ease of the metric system is 
much superior. 

In the late 1940s we laughed at 
the fiiddy-duddy carl in The 
Chilian Hundreds who didn't 
understand using the telephone — 
lines that would not be written 
today when everyone takes using 
the telephone for granted. 1 won- 
der over what span the British 
public will come to laugh at the 
absurd mental gymnastics in- 
volved in using outdated methods 
of measuring? 

Yours faithfully. 

ANNE ATTLEE 
125 Hendon Lane, N3. 

August 27. 

Heat of the moment 

From Mr P. J. Jennings 
Sir. I was interested io read the 
letter from Mrs Hocking (August 
26). For some years now I nave 
been able to fry an egg with three 
pages of The Times crumpled up 
and rapidly popped into my 1903 
cast-iron “Belle portable” kitchen 
range from cold! 

Yours faithfully. 

P. J. JENNINGS. 

14 The Causeway, 

Oxney Green. 

Wriulc. 

Chelmsford. 

Essex. 

Royal mix-up 

Fmm Major D. S. Foster 
Sir. A new cocktail for the Princess ’ 
of Wales (August 28)? Surely we 
already have one — the D(a)iquirL 
Yours sincerely. 

D. S. FOSTER. 

Coombes. 

Western By-Pass. 

Totnes. Devon. 

waiting upon the free response of 
his creatures? 

Such a conception would, not 
rule out the miraculous, but would 
interpret it in terms of a working 
with and transformation or 
worldly energies, making possible 
what, left to themselves, they 
could not achieve. Thus the 
miraculous is inevitably ambigu- 
ous and hidden, discernible only 
with the eyes of faith. 

Such an approach, while cau- 
tious and reserved about the 
details of the history of Jesus, 
might give a new and fuller 
meaning to the central Christian 
doctrines of Incarnation and 
Resurrection, binding them to- 
gether in a pattern of transcen- 
dence through immanence, the 
Word made flesh. Jt might' also, 
with reason, claim to stand within 
the living tradition of Christian 
orthodoxy. 

Yours faithfully. 

PETER BAELZ. 

As from: The Deanery. Durham. 


AUGUST 30 1914 
The baefymund to thin dispatch by 
William A rthur Moore, from one of 
the 19 Sunday editions of 1914-18, 
is unusual possibly unique. After it 
was received at Printing House 
Square it u«tu submitted to the 
censor, with some passages 


diplomatically deleted by the Editor. 

Nat only were these restored by the 
censor, but in addition he had 
written in same sentences of his 
mm to strengthen Moore's 
conclusions, asking in a note to the 
Editor to 'jorgive my journalistic 
suggestions ... " The censor was F. K 
Smith, later Lord Birkenhead and 
his interpolations are printed below 
in bold. 

BROKEN BRITISH 
REGIMENTS. 

From Our Special 
Correspondent. 

AMIENS. Aug. 29. 

I read this afternoon in Amiens 
this morning's Paris papers. To 
me. knowing some portion of the 
truth, it seemed incredible that a 
great people should be so kept in 
ignorance of the situation which it 
has to face. Tbe papers reed like 
children's prattle, gleanings from 
the wartalk uf their parents a week 
ago- 

This is not well. I would plead 
with the English censor to let my 
message pass. I guarantee him that 
as regards the situation of troops I 
have nothing to say that is not 
known and noted already by the 
German General Staff — 

On tbe other hand, it is impor- 
tant that the nation should know 
and realize certain things. Bitted 
truths, but we can face them. We 
have to cut our losses, to take stock 
of the situation, to set our teeth. 

AN UNBROKEN SPIRIT 

First let it be said that our 
honour is bright. Amongst all the 
straggling units that I have seen, 
flotsam and jetsam of the fiercest 
fight in history. I saw fear in no 
man's face. It was a retreating and 
a broken army, but it was not an 
army of hunted men. Nor in all the 
plain tales of officers, non-commis- 
sioned officers, and men did a 
single story of the white feather 
reach me — 

Since Monday morning last the 
German advance has been one of 
almost incredible rapidity. As I 
have already written you, the 
British Force fought a terrible fight 
—which may be railed the action of 
Mons, though it covered a big front 
— on Sunday. The German attack 
was withstood to the utmost limit, 
and a whole division was flung into 
the fight at the end of a long march 
and had not even time to dig 
trenches -. 

Our losses are very great. I have 
seen. the broken bits of many 
regiments. Let me repeat that there 
is no failure in discipline, no panic, 
no throwing up the sponge. Every 
one's temper is sweet, and nerves 
do not show. A group of men, it. 
may be a dozen, or less or more, : 
arrives, under the command of 
whoever is entitled to command it. 
The men are battered with march- 
ing. and ought to be weak with 
hunger, for, of course, no commis- 
sariat could cope with such a case, 
but they are steady and cheerful, 
and wherever they arrive make 
straight for the proper authority, 
report t hem selves, and seek news 
of their regiment — 

ENORMOUS GERMAN LOSSES 

Certain things about the fighting 
seem dear. One is the colossal 
character of the German losses. I 
confess that when I read daily in 
o ffici al bulletins in Paris of how 
much greater the German losses 
were than those of the Allies I was 
nut much impressed. Much contem- 
plation of Eastern warfare, where 
each side claims to have annihilated 
the other, has made me over- 
sceptical in such matters. But three 
days among the combatants has 
convinced me of the truth of the 
story in this rase — 

To sum up, the first great German 
effort has succeeded We have to 
face the fact that the British 
Expeditionary Force, which bore tbe 
great weight of the blow, has 
suffered terrible losses and 
requires immediate and Im- 
mense reinforcement. The Brit- 
ish Expeditionary Force has won 
indeed imperishable glory, but 
it needs men, men and yet 
more men. The investment of 
Paris cannot be banished from 
the field of possibility. I saw the 
rolling stock being hurriedly moved 
to-day. Proximua ardet 
Ucalegon. We want reinforce- 
ments and we want them now. 


Pot luck 

From the Reverend David Barnes 
Sir. Mrs Enid Wells (August 22) 
should count herself fortunate: at 
least her cream tea in Kent 
included real cream. 

In ApriL at a tea room in 
Coniston. Cumbria — where cows 
arc not exactly unknown — I was 
dumbfounded to discover that the 
cream supplied for a cream tea 
there was squirted from a 
pressurised aerosol container on 
to the plate, where it resembled 
nothing so much as shaving foam. 
And only £1.60 per head. . . i 
Yours sincerely. 

DAVID BARNES. 

Aylmer House. 

Sutton Valence. 

Maidstone, Kem. 

Body-snatchers 

From Mr Walter Ritchie 
Sir. On the Foss out of Stow on the 
Wold. Gloucestershire, is a sign- 
post. The Slaughters. Directly 
opposite this is a Body Repair 
Centre. Further on the same road 
arc Spook Erections Lid. 

J 10 "Ms ‘"to 

Warwickshire! 

Yours. 

WALTER RITCHIE. 

2 Rosemary Hill, 

Kenilworth. Warwickshire. 


.•-***# 


THE ARTS 




Television 


Does a sick person recover 
because of medical treatment 
or by using the body's own 
“-power to heal itself - or 
, .perhaps by a combination of 
both techniques? The Healing 
: Arts (BBC2), a fascinating 
series devoted to alternative 
! medicine, concluded fast night 
by tracing some of the inner 
. paths to recovery from Alness. 
1 The most moving oontribo- 

■ tion was made by Peony 
; Brohn, of the Bristol Cancer 

Clinic, a tong-term cancer 
i survivor. She counsels people 
, stricken with the disease to 
' find their own fcpaHng tech- 
. toques among the remedies 
' and lifestyles available to 
them. Illness, she believed, 
was sometimes a matofesta- 
' tion of the anxiety of being 
; alive, to which the greater fear 

■ of death was aunptaeatary. 

Her own healing path led 
her, she said, to find her true 
self behind the roles she had to 
play for other people, which 
■she did by using medication 
.and visualization, and not 
- working so hard* Her defence 
1 ^garnet ranrer amounted to 
' finding the kingdom of heaven 

■ inside bexsetf, and it had 
; plainly been the most thrilling 

experience of her life. 

At London's Charing Cross 
1 Hospital they were less inspir- 
ing but more specific, teaching 
cardiac patients how to" medi- 
tate and express themselves 
creatively in order to reduce 

■ strain on their hearts. **We all 
have riches inside ourselves — 
the patient knows inside what 
he needs to get better, ft's a 
question of listening and tap- 
ping those resoHrces"’, the 
doctor advised. He also en- 
couraged patients to take 


Theatre: Saraleigh Carney at the first of the season’s new musicals 
on Broadway and Irving Wardle in Edinburgh 


Concerts 


The rough edge 
of true grit 


Vibrant life-saver 
for sleepy tones 


p QOG (Avram) and Marcia Lewis 

xva S a (Rachel) delight with their 

Mark Hellinger ' anthem to the scarcity of 
. , decent apartments in New 

X neatre, York. “Three Sunny Rooms”. 

New York 1x158 successful h the at- 

- tempt to integrate traditional 

Rags celebrates the frequently ""^T 

je - j£2A’S= t aj! Ssr ff wfars 



° 19l °- fiseph Stein’s book mines 
S of »»e same human 


Stmtas) mid her. young son £££ tadSTJEhta 

ZTESSJi 


experience 


assimilation, the life of a 
trora exploited continually 


M community continually 

^eenhora to radicalized and ihreatened by ethnic prej- 

*2!"2 n “ ed UD,0n S^peLSpaXml 


Americanized union 
supporter. 

Bucking the present wave of 


iition to the mate an 
tog chooses. But in Fid- 


,°V1. Ofa table. In tea there is not 


an equhralMt dmice evok- 

applauded and there is full : no t la Tn^npip Shinumfcf 


approval for resistance to 
oppression from neigh- 


ing the Triangle Shirtwaist 
Factory fire, and the result is 


bouriiood toughs, political • jar ^ ng " . , . _ 

machines and raparious is also visually at cross 




Toronto SO/ 
Davis 

Usher Hall ; 
Edinburgh 


There is no need to dwell on 
the lack of musical excitement 
at this Edinburgh Festival. 
Some hard lessons, one hopes, 
have now been learned. How- 
ever stimulating the “Scottish 
Enlightenment” theme may 
have been in other disciplines, 
it has proved a slim stimulant 
for 21 days of music-making. 

Consequently, visiting en- 
sembles have got away with 
some fairly tepid contribu- 
tions. But not the Toronto 
Symphony. Their Stravinsky 
double-bill of Oedipus Rex 
and The Soldier's Tale was all 
the more creditable for not 
being part of the tour 
“package”. 

It was also great fun. es- 


when supporting the anger* 
but rich toned and powerful 
where the. music touches on 
the raw emotions that Jean 
Cocteau so deliberately 
purged from his libretto. * . . . 

When wildness was re- 
quired - in the giddy, hysteri- 
cal dance of triplets, as Jocasui 
vainly strives to keep the lid 
on her “big lie”, far instance - 
the playing had a savage 
virtuosity. 

Davis could .perhaps have 
given more punch to the bast 
osiinatos in the first section, 
and his pacing of Oedipus's 
traumatic discovery seemed 
rather peremptonr. But his: 
handling of the final chorus; 
had a magnificantly bniud 
swing. 

Robert Tear projected the 
title role too suavely at times, 
though he was suitably pas- 
sionate when mulling over his - 
unfortunate deed at the cross- 
roads. Stafford Dean was in : 
excellent dark-hued voice as 


pecially The Soldier’s Tale Tiresias; the baritone An- 


where the orchestra's prin- 
cipals were joined by dancers 


employers. This is the land of purposes, with Beni 
the tenement the pushcart Montresor's settings at one 


Wearing sentiment on the sleeve; Josh Blake and Teresa Stratus 


thony Michaels-Moore re- 
vealed considerable potential 


and the sweatshop. That gritty 
edge is reflected in Charles 
Stro use’s music, with its occa- 
sional atonality and un- 
resolved chords, Stephen 
Schwartz's ethnicaliy-ca- 
denced lyrics and the 
predominant setting of clever 
fold-out tenements which 


responsibility for their illness . franie much ofthe act j on . 


and embark upon healing as 
an active process. 

This series as a whole has 
been structured so as to invite 
the viewer to consider its 
ideas, rather than advancing 
the programme-makers' own 
persuasive arguments. To this 
end, the camera often lingers 
and observes people at length 
as they go about their lives. 


The , evening’s principal 
pleasure is hearing the so- 
prano Teresa Strains sing 
virtually throughout, although 
the score seems to emphasize 
the break in her range rather 
than its upper-register beauty. 
In her musical numbers, she 
brings an attractive presence 
as well as her remarkable 
voice to the virtuous Rebecca, 


with no commentary to intrude, aid ter' deSSSSl 1SS 
• Peter Hill has asked me to frightened newcomer to in- 


make it clear that none of the dependent thinker is plati- 
remarks quoted in my report Slb *?' "somewhat predictable. 


on the Edinburgh Inter- 
nationa] Television Festival 


She is well supported by 
Larry Kert as her ambitious 


were made by him. He did not hustend and Terrence Mann 
attend the Television Festival 35 }^ e union organizer who 


and has not breached the undertakes her education. 
BBCs instruction to its staff W £uhn as Bella _ and 


not to discuss the Rough p-onny Price as Ben, her brash 


Justice case. suitor, succeed in winning our 

i- w u affection, and as older, more 
Celia Brayneld pragmatic lovers Dick Latessa 


moment selectively realistic 
and at another starkly Brecht- 
fan, placing one or two 
performers on a vast bare 
stage with its box-set walls 
incongruously bathed in Jules 
Fisher’s saturated coloured 
light. 

Beset by director troubles. 
Rags is now staged by Gene 
Saks, with musical staging by 
Ron Field. They keep things 
moving briskly, and get maxi- 
mum momentum through a 
combination of Stratas's en- 
ergy and a large, hard-working 
chorus. In a misguided or 
misperformed effort, how- 
ever, to have the work flow 
without applause at the end of 
musical numbers, the 
closing moments bf too many 
songs are undercut or blurred. 
This is also true of the finale, 
which celebrates community 
and new beginnings. Saks has 
inexplicably cleared the stage 
of the other immigrants, leav- 
ing Stratas and Josh Blake 
alone. Rags moves us because 
it, and the immigrant saga 
which inspired it, is about 
more than justihese two. 


Miss Julie 

King’s 


Although a masterpiece can be 
defined as a work that can 


defined as a work that can 
never reach a definitive 
performance, it is hard to 
imagine any version of Miss 
Julie more complete than this 
production by the Stockholm 
Royal Dramatic Theatre. 


The second Ingmar 
Bergman production in the 
Edinburgh programme, it ran- 
sacks every crevice of 
Strindberg's play, exploring 
silences no less than dialogue. 
It also restores a crucial line 
which Strindberg cut from the 
original manuscript. This re- 
veals that when Julie broke off 
with her fiance he struck her 
with a whip marking her face 
for life. Marie Goranzom, 
Bergman's Julie, duly carries 
that disfigurement as a sign of 
the greater humiliations to 
come. 


S.G 


With all respect to Sweden's 
greatest director working on a 
national classic, his very 
thoroughness has distorted 
one dement of the play. This 


is the character of Jean's 
feUow-servam Kristin, usually 
presented as a bovine menial. 
This description does not 
apply to Gerthi KuIIe’s Kris- 
tin. a vigilantly alert figure, 
hovering in the background 
like a hawk as soon as Julie 
starts laying claim to her prey. 

There is a strong sensual 
bond between her and Jean 
which has an electrifying effect 
in the early scenes. But its 
long-range effect is to change 
her into “the other woman.” 
That is not her role, and even 
if it were it is still highly 
improbable that a character 
racked with jealousy would 
conveniently retire for the 
night and leave Julie and Jean 
alone. 

Otherwise, the production 
offers a wonderfully or- 
chestrated account of the cen- 
tral sexual power games. No 
matter how well you know 
them, the fresh detail, inten- 
sity, and surprise timing re- 
stores their original shock. 

Waking the steeping Kris- 
tin, Julie seizes her by the 
nose — thus provoking Jean 
to his first non-servile 
exclamation of protest When 


Julie invites him to kiss her 
foot she presents him with an 
unclad leg. You can almost see 
blue sparks sizzling between 
them, leading to an embrace 
where Julie thrusts his face 
into her breasts while beating 
his hands away so that they 
hang limply by his side. 

They first come together in 
their exchange of dreams, 
when the voices take on the 
note of a confession between 
equals. And when Jean' comes 
down to earth to describe his 
childhood escape through the 
privy, he gives her a hyacinth 
to smell: a wonderful link 
between the artificial gal- 
lantries of the opening scenes 
and the true contact he estab- 
lishes with her. 

There are a number of 
factors at work during the final ' 
and most thrilling passages. 
Most notable is the continuing 
attraction between the charac- 
ters. At this stege in the play 
performance is apt to slide 
into mere recrimination. 
Bergman's actors are still 
raressmg and holding each 
Other; , sometimes in passion, j 
sometimes as consolation. , 


opals were joined by dancers veated considerable potential 
from the National Ballet of as Creon and the Messenger; 
Canada in a production of but Alfreda Hodgson (Jocasta) 


self-debunking charm, bread seemed unsettled sometimes - 
humour in the Canadian tra- in ibis hybrid idiom. 


dition. and considerable n . , , .. ■ 

choreographic exuberance. KlCuSUTI JVtOITISOIl 
Jeff Hyslop's Devil, chang- 
ing from butterfly-catching T DA /Uairinlr 
country gem to tap-dancing LiTU/naiuu*. - 

toreador type (it was that sort Albert Hall/RadlO 3 


of eclectic show), danced with 
whiplash athleticism, and 
pointed his ironic lines well. 
The latter skill eluded Peter 
Ottman (Soldier), but his 
transition from perky, loose- 
limbed violinist to a “corpse 
among living men” was ex- 
cellently conveyed and bis 
insouciant Charleston with 
Karen Kate's flapperish Prin- 


In the first of his two Prome- 
nade concerts with the Lon- 
don Philharmonic Orchestra, 
this week, Bernard Haitink: 
had an audience even more 
attentive than usual to the 
rewards of his perceptive 
thoughts about the symphony 
No 10 by Shostakovich. It was 
this orchestra who first in- 


cess (who seemed like a eiri m,s o««*esira wno nrsi m- 

s&ssv.si ms-hwsss--- 


fiddler) stole the show. 

Whether it /fitted 
Stravinsky's style of musical 


burlesque is questionable, but 
it matched the nud&e-m-the- 


30 years ago. and Mr Haitink 
made a record of it with them 
in the 1970s which is still to be 
treasured. 

' Since then, however, his 


rite h^uTof stse: ssKij-rffc ** 

tion, narrated with panache by 1*1.^ S ?£l l 


John Neville. 


composer’s* greatest 


Andrew Davis and his play- achievement the fi ve farteer ■ 
ers kept the music tautly 


aligned to the snq^busfoess; has ^become more penetrating, 
th£ had moretoSLdto* fere without losing command of ns 


they had more demanding fare w,uunu ,U5UJ * oi ia 

in Prr HiJthi. unconventional structure and : 


in Oedipus Rex. Here the 

orchestra was admirable?. -"I® music's 


LW.-I Sympathetic and restrained 



Radio 


Sound’s revealing qualities 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 


ALL THAT’S BEST IN BRITISH JOURNALISM 




HILL’S LONG GOODBYE 



THE LOST LEADER 


First extract 
from an 
exclusive 
three-part 
serialisation of 


a major new 
biography 


JEFFREY 

ARCHER 

ON 

THE 

NOVELIST 
AS TORY 
SALESMAN 





BRIAN WALDEN 
interviews 
Sir Ian 
MacGregor 


What stops us giving the 
attention to mental ill ness that 
we give to cancer? Of the two, 
the first fills far more hospital 
beds, yet it commands fir 
fewer resources. One reason is 
that madness doesn't often 
* kill, 'it merely incapacitates 
and does so in a way that 
provokes not sympathy but 
rejection. Another may be that 
while we all know about 
physical pain, the world of 
mental collapse is dosed to 
most of us. But last week. 
Capital Radio put out a truly 
remarkable programme which 
may actually have done some- 
thing to open it up. 

Breakdown (Wednesday) 
was made by Mark Haliiley 
and Peter Simmons, a senior 
engineer on Capital's staff In 
outline It was very simple: 
excerpts from interviews with 
a man (Mike Lawson) and. a 
girl (anonymous), both of 
whom had experienced col- 
lapse — and ia the girl’s case 
appeared still to be doing so — 
were superimposed on a back- 
ground of manipulated voices 
and electronic sound designed 
to echo their states of mind. 

Radio has a sort of standard 
effects vocabulary for mental 
upset and early on it seemed 
as if Haliiley and Simmons 
would do little but refer to 
that. Very soon, however, the 
sound score began to assert 
itself as Mr Lawson told of a 
nightmare trip . by Under- 
ground which had ushered his 
breakdown. Millions of us 
know the London Under- 
ground; many travelling on it 
must have felt at times tension 
and disquieL What this man 
described was that common 
experience writ large, and the 


accompanying sound took the 
noises associated with it rather 
subtley and gave them the 
quality of impending panic. 

This sort of relationship 
between painful auto- 
biography and sensitive 
radiophonics characterized, 
the entire programme so -that 
time after time the dreadful 
world of breakdown took on 
reality and ceased to be shut 
off 

If this was a marvellous 
example of- sound employed 
to open up another realm of 
consciousness, then Rony 
Robinson's play, The Beano 
(Radio. 4, Monday, repeating 
today), by using a resolutely 
realistic fabric of effect, 
successfully evoked another 
time now so remote it almost 
had the flavour of a different 
consciousness: . ■- ; 

This, not quite without a 
-backward glance at Dylan 
Thomas and Under Milk 
Wood, was an enormous por- 
trait of a brewery outing to 
Scarborough fa the last days of 
July, 19 14. Writer and direc- 
tor built up with near perfect 
clarity a sort of moving canvas 
on which the fortunes of a 
dozen different lives were 
chronicled- What helped bold 
it together 'was partly the 
unbroken background of efc- . 
feet created by David Flem- 
ing- Williams and his technical 
team and partly .the well- 
imegrated use of a narrator 
who could, from time to time, 
remind us ofthe awfol shadow 
just outside the canvas edge. 
And what ah interesting idea it 
was to give that narration to 


Ray Gosling His' voice has 
just the right poignancy. 

" Mr Robinson's lost- world 


was a bustling fiction, an 
artifice; a radio. equivalent of 
Frith’s Derby Day. Roy Apps's 
Hopping Down In Kent (Ra- 
dio 4, Saturday* repeated 
Wednesday) was more like an 
old blade and white photo- 
graph, its apparent plain truth 
conceding any amount of 
careful aud imaginative 
arrangement ; 

Apart from a little sound 
effect this programme de- 
pended on the reminiscences 
of those Eastenders who, as 
late as I960, used to take off 
for ‘Kent and the hopping 
season, and of the country 
people who received them 
with a degree of trepidation. 
Not that the residents; were 
alone in their nervousness. 
The countryside was often a 
strange, wild place to these 
Londoners, ai)d if they seemed 
a rough lot, 1 that was some- 
times only in response to the 
extremely primitive acconv 
modation provided for them 
by the farmers: bare huts, 
bundles of twigs to lie on, 
straw to stuff their pillow- 
cases. And a farmer in the 30s 
could be a man to reckon with: 
we heard how one concluded a 
dispute with some gypsies by 
threatening to shoot their dogs 
and if necessary them — 
though only in the legs. 

I ended last week with some 
unkind words about Steve 
Race's reading of his own You 
Can’t Be Serious. These were 
based on seemingly reliable 
information that the book was 
about to be published. I was 
misled, it came out last 
September, so this week I 
must end with an apology. 


* proportions. Hif shaping of: 
tire long, winding and mainly.- 
elegiac . first , mpveroenL in. 
particular, and its central dir a 
max of fierce emotional inten- 
sity, was splendidly sustained. 

There followed, a fiercely . 
sardonic second ’.movement, 
when the wind ’ instrument • 
players began to show their 
mettle in the constantly ex- 
posed solo writing that is so 
distinct a feature of this ana 
the following movements. . 

Remarkable in severe? 
places was the delicacy of '• 
dynamic shading to tbe quiet- 
est extreme, and the conduc- 
tor made a persuasive case for 
the moderate tempo he bah - 
always preferred in the third, 
movement and the start ofthe 
finale, reserving further vital-, 
ity to put a brave face on tire J 
work's somewhat contrived ' 
“happy ending**. - r r ‘ , £ ; 

The programme was shared.'-, 
with the “Enigma" Variations? 
as the opening work,' ’ 
which Mr Haiftek. has. _ 
equally individual viqwsi, . 
for him all the received fore 
the “friends pictured: wfthi 
so much as a cortberh for 
detail and balance of 
instrumental writing ^ } 

Several ofthe portraits 
carefully, even cation 
drawn, particularly the mi 
feminine “Ysobel? 
“Dorabella", and “Bl G 
and his cello were accc 
almost the graijly 
“Nimrod", who was fatet 
gently subdued. * 


Noil Good 


Dgvid Wade 




JOHN 



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THE 



TIMES 



August 30 - September 5, 1986 


v!\ 1 

l »l 


SATURDAY 


A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


w 


i ^ ' & T t 

mm 




; i J&rr « 





‘Give us back 
our bad 
old world’ 

Mayfair was once the hub of London social life. Knights on 
the town, not to mention princes and lords, gathered 
in elegant, sometimes scandalous, enclaves which even the 
Blitz hardly penetrated. Carol Kennedy charts the history 


^ * 7 - ■ 7 -— - - -- ■ - -■ — - ^ ^ , ■ ■■ ■ 


m 


Lit 


>1 dimmed 






m-f 


t - Night-dubs rul- 

fli ed social life in 

JjJ London’s May- 

'S# fair between the 

wars. They gave 
the West End 
its seductive 
glitter and filled 
— it with dance 
music of such style and verve 
that, more than half a century 
later, a few opening notes 
played by the bands df Am- 
brose, Harry Roy or Ray 
Noble have the power to 
summon up a whole era which 
had been given over, for a 
fortunate few hundred, to the 
pursuit of pleasure and fun. 

“Fun" is the word that 
recurs again and again in the 
conversation of those who 
were part of that gilded cote- 
rie. "It was the most marvel- 
lous lime," Lady Lindsay 
sighed. thinking back to the 
days when she reigned over 
Mayfair society with her for- 
mer husband Bendor. He was 
the second Duke of West- 
minster and the richest man in 
Europe, with an income re- 
puted 10 be twice that of King 
George V. “I wish I’d realized 
that it was ail going." 

Of all the respectable dabs, 
none had a more glamorous 
reputation than the Embassy 
in Old Bond Street where the 
Prince of Wales, the Mount- 
battens and their friends, and 
Bendor Westminster had cor- 
ner tables permanently re- 
served. and where the legend- 
ary Luigi presided over 
nightly gatherings that had the 
air of private parties trans- 
ported from a nearby house. 

Habitues, of the Embassy 
included Lady Dana Cooper, 
\ Thelma.' Lady, Furness, and 
^Freda Dudley Ward, both 
intimates df the Prince of 
• Wales; the bung Prince AJy 
i Khan; CecilfBeaton; Viscount 
lie gossip writer; 
tie son of Lord 
' Bea verb root and the Mount- 
batten ciref. among whom 
and Countess of 
Lady Alexandra 
alfe and her hus- 
Edward “Fruity" 
to the Prince 


fafhfona 


was the most 
night to be seen 
asiess would have 
btis so stlpid as to give a 
,t night." Barbara 


Cartland recalled in her 
memoirs. - 

The Prince of Wales always 
sat on the left as you went in 
and Ambrose's band, which 
later moved to the May Fair 
Hotel (he was offered the 
enormous salary off 10.000 to 
go there in 1 927) was regarded 
as the best in London. Am- 
brose knew the favourite tunes 
of all the Embassy regulars. 
“You just waved to him as 
you went in and soon he was 
playing one of your favour- 
ites." said Lady Alexandra 
Metcalfe. 

After a spell in New York, 
Bert Ambrose (a Londoner 
bom in 1897) had been lured 
back to the Embassy by a 
telegram from the Prince of 
Wales: “Come bade, we need 
you. Edward P". The Prince 
was an enthusiastic, but not 
particularly skilful, dancer, 
but it was understood that the 
band would continue to play 
as long as he stayed on the 
floor. 

Ambrose recounted in his 
later years how he would start 
off a waltz slowly when the 
Prince was dancing and 
“watch him like a hawk until 
he got into the swing of things. 
Then I would increase the, 
tempo until he went whirling 
away". No wonder Edward 
thought no band could play a 
waltz like Ambrose's. 

The Cafe de Paris in Cov- 
entry Street opened in 1924 
by Martin Poulsen - a former 
head waiter at the Embassy — 
also had a glittering reputation 
thanks to the Prince who kept 
a promise that, if Poulsen ever 
opened his own place, he 
would visit it He came three 
nights a week for a month and 
pul the Cafe on the social 
map. The Prince would sit 
with a party of friends at the 
first banquette table on the 
right of the dance floor, 

The cabaret acts were fam- 
ous: Marlene Dietrich, Mau- 
rice Chevalier. Josephine 
Baker. One evening, when the 
star attraction was Marion 
Harris, there were four kings — 
of Greece, Norway. Spain and 
Portugal — sitting at one table 
while at another sat No£l 
Coward. Gertrude Lawrence, 
Oifton Webb. Bea Lillie and 
Gloria Swanson. 

The dubs were expensive to 
drink in. A bottle of chain- 


Slli 


-4 • > o 







* •* *- «, j. -■ _ '■ *.. v * j 


-m 

-i 


& 



Ekh 



II ;.y 











~r 


Cafe society: in 1941. a German 
bomb exploded on the dance 
floor of the Cafe de Paris S* 
(left), lulling hand-leader ' ^ 
Ken Johnson (top) and more 
tfaan 30 others. In fts 
heyday, the dob's guests had 
included Gloria Swanson 
(above), who went to listen to 
artistes such as Marlene 
Dietricfa(beh>») 



TELEVISION 
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CENTRE 

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pagne cost 25 or 30 shillings 
(£1.25 or £1.50). which was 
about half the weekly wage of 
a working man in the mid- 
1920s. 

Yet night after night the 
taxis and chauffeur-driven 
cars discharged their cargoes 
of white- or black-tied men 
and evening-gowned women 
at the Embassy, the Cafe de 
Paris, the KitrCat in the 
Haymarket, the Ambassador 
in Conduit Street, the Silver 
Slipper in Regent Street, 
Qro’s in Orange Street and 
the Monseigneur in St 
James's, the Five Hundred in 
Albemarle Street, the Bruton 
in Bruton Mews, the Bag 
OlMails in Soho and a whole 
flock of racier establishments. 

In these places, like Uncle's 
and The Bat, the owners paid 
only lip service to the 2 am 
dosing lime — normal at most 
licensed clubs — and the 
customary night-dub attrac- 
tions of late drinking, sexual 
adventure and hot Jazz were 
liable to be sharpened by the 
risk of a police raid. 

1 ■ Police bribery 

fij was rife on the 
jUjj. JjJ night-dub cir- 

/(vfyyi# cuiL M 1 * ^ ale 

/ Meyrick. owner 

l of The 43 at 43 

UA Gerrard Street, 
\ \ was implicated 
« i ■■■‘in the fam ous 
Goddard police corruption 
case in 1928, in which she, 
along with Sergeant George 
Goddard of the vice squad, 
was jailed for bribery. 

In spite of this and several 
other prison sentences, 
Meyrick never lost the loyalty 
of her society ciienleie, which 
at different times included 
Augustus John, Jacob Epstein, 
Joseph Conrad, June the 
musical comedy star (Lady 
InvendydeX Tallulah Bank- 
bead, Jack Buchanan, the 







f n ! : 


■ ! Vv 

'.■W; ■ ■ 


InveidydeX Tallulah Bank- and thin, painted women with 
bead. Jack Bu chan a n , the fox capes and long silk legs 
writer Michael Arlen (“more - and small artificial curls 
bri Ilian tine than brilliant", it clustering around their bony. 



Apply tir- 

TELEVISiON TRAINING CENTRE 
FUlilAM STUDIOS 
101 Farm Lane 
London SW6 1QJ 
Telephon&01-381 4000-381 4411 


was saidX the flier Jim 
Mollison and boxers Georges 
Carpentier and Primo 
Camera. Three of her daugh- 
ters, who went to Roedean, 
married into die peerage. 

War brought the closure of 
many of Mayfair's great 
houses, but West End social 
life continued, transferred to 
hotels, restaurants and night- 
clubs. In the evenings, dinner 
dresses and black ties mingled 
with uniforms on the dance 
floors of the Embassy, 
Hatchett's. Ciro’s. Quagiino's 
and the Cafe de Paris. 

The pre-stressed concrete 
construction of the Dorchester 
was reputed to make it the 
safest hotel in London. In 
September 1940, the young 
Canadian diplomat Charles 
Ritchie wrote in his diary: “In 
the Dorchester the sweepings 
of the Riviera have bear 
washed up . . . pot-bellied, 
sallow, sleek-haired nervous 
gentlemen with loose mouths 
and wobbly chins, wearing 
suede shoes and checked suits, 


sheep-like heads." 

Dining there in October of 
the same year, he observed 
that the hotel resembled “a 
luxury liner on which the 
remnants of London society 
have embarked in the midst of 
a storm". 

Yet London's night-life was 
never seriously disrupted dur- 
ing the war. despite the shock 
on March 8, 1941 when more 
than 30 revellers died and 
another 60 were injured as a 
result of a direct hit on the 
Cafe de Paris. 

It had been advertised as 
London's safest night-spot, 20 
feet underground, in a base- 
ment beneath the Rialto cin- 
ema in Coventry Street The 
stairs descended to a foyer and 
bar. from which one stepped 
out on to the balcony of the 
restaurant which legend (per- 
haps subsequently) had it was 
modelled on either the Palm 
Court of the Lusitania or the 
ballroom of the Titanic. 

At .9.50 pm on March 8. the 


tne wine grey wiui ausi. 
The waiter who had been 
. pouring it a moment before 
lay dead across his feet 

A girl celebrating her 2 1st 
birthday had all her clothes 
stripped off by the blast 
Covered in a tablecloth, she 
died in a stranger's arms. A 
Dutch officer washed a 
woman's broken leg in cham- 
pagne. the only liquid avail- 
able since the kitchens were 

A radio actor named An- 
thony Jacobs, then serving as 
a private in the infantry, 
recalled bodies being laid out 
on the pavement “like bright 
dead dolls with dust on them". 
Inside, in the darkened chaos 
of the dance floor, two men in 
flat caps and working clothes 
were glimpsed rifling the 
handbags of the dead and 
injured women, and Martin 
Poulsen's cufflinks were 
ripped from his dress shin. 


I Pate was kind 
^SJ wr ft to some. Mar- 

J!) garet Duchess 
Ar ® y11 * had 
( been planning 
l -C to go to the Cafe 
with a party of 
\ \ .friends that Sat- 

1 — urday night: 

“But we changed our minds". 
Lady Betty Baldwin, daughter 
of the former prime minister, 
did go but the Cafe was so 
crowded that she coukl not 
have her usual banquette ta- 
ble. AJ1 who sat there died. 

She herself was badly cut 
about the face and head, and 
the cab driver she hailed to 
lake her to her doctor in 
Cuirass Street. Mayfair, told 
her not to bleed over his seats. 
Other survivors included 
Fulke Walwyn. the racehorse 
trainer, and Douglas Byng. 
who should have been the 
cabaret star that evening but 
had agreed to appear at a 
charity ball in Grosvenor 
House. 

After the war the Cafe was 
refurbished to something like 
the old glamour — but it 
consistently lost money and 
closed in 1957. 

It would have disappointed 
Charles Ritchie, who 
mourned in 1941: “Oh God. 
leave us our luxuries even if 
we must do without our 
necessities. Let Cartier’s and 
the Ritz be restored to their 
former glories. Let house par- 
ties burgeon once more in the 
stately homes of England. 
Restore the vintage port to the 
clubs and the old brown sherry 
to the colleges. Let us have 
pomp and luxury, painted 
jezebels and scarlet guards- 
men. rags and riches rubbing 
shoulders. 

“Give us back our bad old 
world". 







There is still an Embassy 
Club al 6 Old Bond Street, 
but it now has a much 
less glamorous clientele. 

A new Cafe de Paris was 
opened last year on the site 
of the old dub at 3 
Coventry Street and is 
popular with music 
business, ragtrnde and 
media glitterati. The Kit- 
Cat Club, bombed in the 
war. has now become the 
Odeon Cinema in the 
Haymarket. The site of 
the Ambassador at 26-27 
Conduit Street is non 
occupied by offices. 

The premises of the once 
luxurious restaurant 
Monseiftneiir.at 16-17 
Jermyn Street; Quagiino's 
in Bury Street, and the 
Five Hundred at 42 
Albemarle Street, are 
empty and awaiting the 
arrival of new tenants. 

The Bruton has 
disappeared but the 
premises in Bruton Lane 
enjoyed a brief revival in the 
1960s as The Revolution 
Club. Today it's a late night 
drinking venue called the 
Bristol Suite Club. 

1 Dover Street, once the 
sight of Hatchetts, a 
delightful old restaurant, 
is the home of Smolensky's 
Balloon — a cocktail bar 
and restaurant. The 
Dorchester is now owned 
by the Sultan of Brunei. 

The decadent rendezvous 
Uncle's in Albemarle Street 
4ias faded info a block of . 
offices. 

The 43 at 43 Gerrard 
Street has now become the 
Loon Fung Supermarket, 
and 45 Orange Street, once 
occupied by Giro's, is 
now the Department of the 
Environment lift 
maintenance depot. 

Rebecca Nicolson 


SATURDAY 


Ayckbourn’s voice: 
Julia McKenzie, 
no song in her 
part but a role in 
her head — p 16 


Arts Diari 

16 

Gardening 

15 

Bridge 

15 

Oul and About 13 

Chcv. 

15 

Opera 

16 

Conrans 

lo 

Radio 

15 

Crossword 

15 

Rerieo 

15 

Dance 

16 

Rock £ Jazz 

16 

Drink 

13 

Shopping 

12 

Ealing Oul 

13 

Television 

15 

Films 

16 

Times Cook 

1? 

Galleries 

16 

Trau'l 

12 


If this original cost only 
.£85 you’d buy it 








Caribbean swing band assem- 
bled by Ken “Snakehips" 
Johnson and regarded as 
London's best, was playing a 
popular quickstep. Oh- 
Johnny. There was a curious 
pinging sound — one dancer 
thought it the signal for a 
novelty number — and a blue 
flash, and then everything 
blew up. Two 1001b bombs 
had fallen down an airshaft 
through the Rialto and on to 
the dance floor. 

1 Only one ex- 

Ijm J /h ploded — di- 
rectly in front 
/(X'S/y# Lhe band- 
/ \X-Zr siand. The fa- 
l talities there 

VA included John- 
\ \ son and his 
^ — ‘tenor saxo- 
phone player, Dave Williams. 
Martin Poulsen, the 
restaurant's owner, and his 
Swiss head waiter. Charles, 
were killed outright as they 
stood side by side on the 
balcony. 

Survivors spoke of dark- 
ness. dusu bodies all around, 
groaning and whimpering. 
One man remembered seeing 


■fabnifAlr'i ■nff’iul wavn/wn hHuMfiirfuuVn 

It does. 

Few people realise what remarkable value 
original prints can be. True we sell Picasso's and 
Miro's for upwards of £ 10,000, butprices start as low 
as £50, and most cost under £100. 

CCA Galleries was formed as Christie's 
Contemporary Art in 1972. Our free catalogue 
features a wide selection of original etchings, screen 
prints and lithographs. Each print is part of a strictly 
limited edition, created, signed and numbered by 
the artist himself. 

If you are pleasantly surprised by the price of 
the original above, you'll be just as delighted by the 
rest of our collection. 

For a copy of our free colour catalogue, post the 
/ coupon or call us; or visit our Dover Street gallery. 



J To: CCA Galleries, FREEPOST 30, 8 Dover Street, London 
[ W1X 3P|. [01-491 2523- 24 hours] 

| Name 

I Address 


Postcode, 


.Tel. No., 


Adapted front Mayfair. A So- 
cial Hisiory hr Carol Kennedy, 
u • he published by Hutchinson 
on September 1 1. price £12.9$. 

\ 


CCA GALLERIES pmh 

J CHIUSTlEMONTEMI'OllAUYAltT 1 

I m/oa/BS ^ j 













i tir. i ilviLS SAi Urd>A i AUGUST 50 i 986 


Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 


T he stoning point of An- 
thony Minghella's witty 
and humane play. Made 
in Bangkok, was that 
tourists to the city divide 
into two groups. There are those 
who come to see the temples and 
there are those in search of 
tiuHation in the red light area of 
Ppt Pong. When the twain do meet 
there is likely to be trouble. But 
there are other reasons for a visit; 
bargains in silk, jewellery or 
clothes, for example, or just a 
chance to see for a few days a city 
that can look remarkably beautiful. 

It is probably best observed in 
the half-light from the river tenace 
of the Oriental Hotel. That can be 
at dusk, with a sundowner at hand 
as the sky turns pink, or at dawn 
before boarding one of the 
longtailed boats that most tourists 
(not engaged with temples or Pat 
Pong) will board around 7am for 
the floating market half an hour 
away. 

The longtails soon turn ofT the 
Chao Phya River into the side 
waterways, or klongs. which are 
now a good deal less pungent than 
once they were. The main odour at 
dawn comes from frying rice and 
the main noise is of slopping out. as 
pre-breakfast ablutions depend al- 
most entirely on the water flowing 
around the" legs of the wooden 
houses. In the market itself fish 
lakes over pans of frittura for 
which the tiniest tiddler qualifies. 

Ignore those who say that the 
floating market is a tourist trap. 
For the unwary of course it is and 
knick-knacks here may well be two 
or three times the price they are in 
the Central Department Store back 
in the city. But the unwary will 
always be" trapped. No. this is a 
working market and the prizes to 
be brought back are fruit, like 
papayas the size of rugby footballs 
for about 30p. and an impression 
plus an aroma of how Bangkok 
feeds itself. _ 

Finding true Thai food is not as 
easy as it might be for the tourist. 
Eating ofT the myriad stalls is not 
advised except for those with 
stomachs well conditioned to the 
Far EasL And the Thais themselves 
are forever telling Europeans, let 
alone Americans, that their food is 
impossibly hot for foreign palates. 

Heat on the plate is much 
exaggerated. Those who want to 
sample an old-established Thai 
restaurant should visit the Som 
Dacng on Rajdamnem Avenue, 
where there are no concessions to 
the West and no warnings either. 
Only really exotic dishes like 


From Bangkok to Jakarta, John Higgins manages to uncover the less obvious tourist delights 

Mixing the erotic and exotic 


*8 




soured serpent-head soup will cost 
more than £1. while a request fora 
whisky and soda will bring a 
quarter bottle of the local product 
at about £ 1 .20. it is advisable not to 
finish it all off 

There is no Thai restaurant in 
the Oriental, but the standards of 
cuisine remain high, as do the 
prices. The hotel has changed 
considerably since I was last there a 
decade ago. Much is still made of 
the literary luminaries, alive and 
dead, who have trod the carpets 
and sipped the sundowners. But 
the Oriental has lost its isolation. 
Going there for cocktails from the 
Intercontinental, say. or the 
Erewan could be a major ex- 
pedition on a rainy night when 
Bangkok's streets were impen- 
etrable with traffic. That traffic has 
improved a little: what was a safari 
is now just a slow ride. 

B ut the Oriental also 
seems to have gathered a 
little bit of Bangkok, old 
and new. unto itself. Pat 
Pong, for one group of 
Mr Minghella's tourists and any- 
one else who wants to see the replay 
of scenes the censor removed from 
Emanuel L\ is but 1 0 minutes away. 
A fl beer is enough to gain the 
voyeur admission. 

Behind the hotel a glistening 
shopping mall has sprouted. 
Texan-cool in style and with 
security guards to match. For 


bargains walk two minutes further 
to the main road where a Pierre 
Lacoste tennis shirt — or so it says 
— will cost the inevitable £1. 

Or. better still, go to the Village 
T rade Centre in Silom Road where, 
with a few discreet words, battered 
suitcases will be opened to reveal 
watches marked Gucci. Cartier and 
Rolcx: £13 is the going price and 
quantity discounts are available. 
The more respectable will make 
their way to the store of Jim 
Thompson, one-time doyen — 
some would say inventor — of the 
Thai silk trade. The gold Amex 
cards may flash, but the cloth itself 
is still excellent value at around £8 
a yard. 

And for Minghella's temple fan- 
ciers? The first stop has to be the 
Grand Palace, which is in fact a 
mass of temples and palaces, whose 
tiny bells tinkle and golden roofs 
glint in the sunlight It is a 
conglomeration beyond the 
dreams of Darryl F. Zanuck and 
possibly Oscar Hammerslein — the 
tactful will forbear from mention- 
ing The King and I. which in the 
film version is still banned in these 
parts. The holiest figure is the tiny 
Emerald Buddha and decorum 
should be observed when entering 
the chapel that houses him. 

Bangkok look over from 
Ayutthya as capital, when that city 
was destroyed by the Burmese in 
1767. What remains is still worth 


seeing, as indeed is the King's 
Palace nearby. 

Once again the starting point is 
the terrace of the Oriental Hotel, 
where the Oriental Queen leaves at 
breakfast to make the 45-mile 
journey upstream, docking at Bang 
Pa-ln where pavilions mark the 
summer home of the Thai kings. 

A ll is set in a landscape of 
gardens and lakes, which 
suggest that the French 
had their influence be- 
fore Governess Anna 
came on the scene to King Rama 
(alias Yul Brynner). The return to 
Bangkok is by coach down the 
tedious main highway. The cost, 
including lunch, is approximately 
£20: those who want to get the road 
journey over first can return by 
steamer. 

And so from Bangkok to one of 
the Oriental’s sister hotels, the 
Mandarin in Jakarta. Tourists to 
Indonesia tend to head straight for 
Bali, especially if they are en route 
for Australia. “Jakarta?" queried 
the steward on Garuda. the na- 
tional airline. “There's nothing 
there”. Well, there is an eight-lane 
highway which looks as though it 
has been imported direct from Los 
Angeles; a brand new airport whose 
single-storey buildings and open 
walkways give it the feel of a beach 
hotel; and. if you go at the wrong 
time of year, which is Christmas 
and just after, a great deal of rain. 


It’s all made in Bangkok: the ' 
city feeds itself from the nearby , 
floating market, left, and feasts 
its eyes on the many and 
magnificent temples, right 

Jakarta, though, is not just full of 
oilmen and Australians arguing 
with the government It is the town 
where the great American soprano 
Nordica died, although 1 could find 
no plaque. And down by the 
harbour, remnants of the old 
Batavia and the Dutch rale remain. 
The flea market abounds in bat- 
tered ships' compasses and brass 
pipes for tobacco — or something 
stronger. The latter may have been 
knocked up in Taiwan, but at least 
they have an authentic look about 
them. 

The bird market, where talking 
mynahs fetch $70 but monkeys can 
be found at half that {Mice, is alive 
and exotic. Where else do you find 
a full range of fighting cocks with 
brilliant purple combs? Yes. the 
spirit of Conrad is more present 
here than in Bangkok. 

Jakarta, too. is the stepping-off 
ground for excursions into the hills 
and possibly an overland journey 
to the for end of Java and 
Yogyakarta. Once up imo the tea 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Garuda Indonesian Airways, 35 
Duke Street. London W1 (01- 
436 301 1) sells fuH-price tickets 
only. A tourist class round trip ticket 
starting the journey in 
Amsterdam costs El, 430. Rom 
NAS Travel. 3rd Floor. Kent 
House, 87 Regent Street London 



plantations, a different world takes 
over and the wayside stalls are 
piled high with rambutans and 
durians, that spiky, yellowish fruit 
which lays claim to the world's 
most disgusting odour. Hotels will 
not let it within their doors, airlines 
will not carry iL so eat it by the 
road and discover the coffee- 
praline taste of the soft pulp around 
the nut But it certainly does linger. 

North of Jakarta and out into the 
ocean lie the Pulau Seribu (Thou- 
sand Islands), tiny outcrops in the 
water each with its skirt of coral 
visible on a fine day. They are at 
about the state of development the 
Maldives were eight years ago: 
primitive, with fruit-eating bats 
who loss half-munched kernels 
into your beer, should you be lucky 
enough to find one, and iguanas 
who somehow track down sus- 
tenance in the undergrowth. 

Yes, Java remains exotic and the 
Mandarin a haven of comfort 
before setting off into the tiitle- 
expfored. 

W1 (01-434 1594) the round trip 
ticket, including the London- 
Amsterdam leg costs £5 65. TTns 
fare has a seven-day minimum and 
a 21-day maximum stay 
restriction. 

For information on Mandarin 
Oriental Hotels, contact the group's 
' London office at 99-101 Regent 
Street London W1 (01-734 6671). 


£100 fare 
cut to 
Australia 


TRAVEL NEWS 


l Air fares to Australia are being 
reduced this autumn. Both 
British Airways and Qantas 
arc cutting excursion fares by 
£100 in October. November 
and December. Return fares - 
I Penh £765. Sydney £840. . 

Lunn Poly is also cutting 
Fares to Australia or New 
Zealand by up to £40 on 
bookings before September 30 
by customers who buy us 
insurance. Return fares, be- 
tween March and June next 
vean Penh (including a two- 
night stopover in Bali) £640, 
Sydney and Melbourne. £680. 

Time dipper 

British Airways is to operate 
the fastest scheduled flights so 
far between London and Syd- 
ney from October 29. One 
service a week in each direc- 
tion will make only one stop, 
at Bangkok, and the flight 
time to Sydney will be cut by 
35 minutes to 21 hours and 15 
minutes. 

• Wings is expanding 

its range of packaged wedding 
ceremonies in exotic 
destinations which have , 
attracted more than 500 
couples this year. In 1987 it 
wifl be arranging weddings 
in the Seychelles, the 
Bahamas, St Lada, 

Antigua. Barbados and 
Jamaica. A typical 
package includes 
documentation, best man. 

bridesmaid and photographer. 

Wings of romance 

KuonL the leading long-haul 
tour operator, is bringing down 
the cost of holidays in Egypt 
next winter. It is introducing a 
scries of weekly non-stop Dan- 
Air charter flights from 
Gat wick to Luxor or .4swo/t. 
with a week’s half-board start- 
ing at £298. There will also be 
Kile cruises priced from £398. 

Young and fast 

A special skiing week for 
teenagers is being run by John 
Morgan Travel at La Plagne 

• during the Easter holidays 
next year. The £269 price 
includes meals as well as ski 
pass and ski hire. 

Philip Ray 


l 5 

'■3 : 

iW 






Veienahop hcfe kBaben 


7eL0>041/56/225251 
Gi-5400 Sadcfl 
near Zurich 


S&. 

S02&B ?£ .1 



Thailand, Hoag Rang, Malaysirt-IQ other countries. 

Wo talar-make trad a -centre holidays that enable you lo experience the exotic 
delights of a variety of Far East destinations Sample 
piices from oof brochure, including remrn Nights, 
airport lrartslers and lust class actortwnodafiBn ate: 
^ 1,45 ‘ Swywv-PvoTtbeadi 

Awfel yfedal [ES9 - IS days Oiagkci-Cbjagra-Hvi Hi. keaefe 

(US - Snijjcore-&»«gfail-Nong Hc"0 
f 9M - ISdi»j Dr«»-nora-Bjn(|bik'ft8»iibiK* 
Olli ■ Horn) budr-Saigjpvf 

ASIA PACIFIC HOLIDAYS. 103 Waterloo Rd. London. SE1 8UL Telephone 01 -928 5511 

A teat fiv* 3 t - AS/A {.Vo ftf.'fj larjtt 


Thailand is truly a land of exotic Zsj * A 

contrasts - beaches and modern Ea S jj jj a 
city life set against its unique • •» h O- 

history and tradition. And our experience in 
arranging 
Faraway 





Ow twttoys on so good tfiar In HW2. 1 9SS. f SW and ««S tnrvof agios 
voted Knew -Britan's Boot SeceJafts Tow Opwator* And we arc so 
confident of our value tor money that on aB KUONI 3 hoOdaysMe^Mrantae 
to refund VwdUkrencc tf you (hid the »ame holiday tor tan. 

For your MJON 3 sidWORUTWTC brochures see vow travel agent or 
contact ua now. 

KUCMTWVO. nffMHOusc mmc sweev axnnoM 


A September 
to remember. 

Savour the season 
and the savings. 

Apart from the sun. sand and sea. the \ f \ 

savings on guest houses, hotels and car hire. J i. / 

make jersey even more worthwhile. v >1 
Wit h low duty shopping, no VAT. "V, ^ 


. v : THE MOSXEXOTICCOUSCTKY iN ASi, 


9 DAYS FROM £568 

ensures that you get only the highest 
rt quality - holidays. For details of the 
wide range of one- and two- centre 

Faraway and Escorted Journeys 
brochures. Phone 01-629 0999 
jr"” today tor copies, or visit anv 
Thomas Cook or Frames Travel 
ot> atcvi branch. 


mi 


With low duty shopping, no VAT. - 
fine restaurants. a varied night life 
and everv sport under the sun you 11 
really value your days in Jersey. 

Ask your travel agent, or send the 


coupon’to Dept SJ&'jersev Tourism, . 

St Helier, Jersey Cl. f / 

A Ft Or ring 01-200 0200 for 24 hr C O Vy 

brochure service.^ \i\ f* O 


'%A, r V 

/// v 


Far and away 
the best. 
Far East value. 


i ° r 

! — a 

1 that 
I hydn 
says 
plant 
i offict 

! that 

landi 

Mi 

61.fi 

that 

Altai- 

said t 

from 

grabt 


✓ Name. 
/ Address — 

I - 

\ 

\ 




■With PScO you can be 
assured of the best the Far 
East can offer: Excellent 
hotels. Scheduled flights. 
Without doubt, 
competitive prices. Single 
centre holidays, or the 
irresistible attractions and 
contrasts of multi- 
destination tours. 


Thailand from £599 

Hong Kong from £595 

Bali from £695 


The choice is yours. 

The brochure's ours. 

Send for a copy and let us 
tempt you some more. 


P&OAir 


Name 

Address. 




HOTLINE AVAILABILITY 0534 27372 


IS 


1.TOL 

77 New Oxford Street. London WC1A 1PP. 

Telephone (01.1 831 1221. . 


SHOPPING 


Back to school 
with style 


Design starts in the school- 
room these days, writes Beryl 
Downing. The latest kit for the 
back to school brigade is 
better looking and more 
coJonrfnl than eTer. 

There are jazzy red and 
yellow loose leaf binders deco- 
rated with studious spectacles. 
£3.25 from Scribblers in 
James Street, Covent Garden; 
smart black and red nylon 
writing cases, £8.50 from John 
Lewis; colour splashed 
tnuisparent set squares. £145, 
and rulers to match, £1.10, at 
Hymans. 


r. 




For a free copy of an 
attractive poster delight- 
fully iDuKnxcd by Andabe 
together wirii our 
brochure on mdrvxkial 
inclusive holidays to dus 
beautiful city, wnte m- 
Time OffLnL, 

2a Chea te r Cl ua r . 
London SWIX7BQ. 


SILVERBlRD 

Specialists in 
individual 
tailor-made 
itineraries to the 
FAR EAST 
( including China ) 
Speedy, reliable, 
competitive 
quotations. 

Silverbird Travel 
01-408 1450 

Duke Street House * 

4 1 V4 1 7 Oxford Street 
London W|R 1FH c 




Eren calculators are getting 
the designer treatment now 
that they can hardly improve 
on the mechanics. The base 
Texas 1103 with square roots 
and percentages for junior use 
comes in bright red or trine at 
£4.45 while the more sophis- 
ticated versions with O level 
and A level scientific functions 
all come in smart hard cases to 
withstand unscientific play. 

Here are three of the smart- 
est ideas from a selection of 
style-setting students of every 
age. from primary school tots 
to A level swots. 


;SmsK Karma 




'V.1 


. .. 


:f • t. 
. . J i i 

.£ 


y .’-i 

■ i ■••"T. 

■ . • . / i ... ■ 

■’ '<i ' 

\ t. lr • : 7. 

if: 

m L, : 












Student set-op (top) with the bear necessity backpack of die season in nylon 
for with a zip pocket, £15.95 at Harrods Way In. For high scofefe (aboveleft) 
football pencil case £2299 from Iitdewoods. Boxing the compass (right) with a 
neatly packaged hi-tech set by Maped £6Jft5 at Hymans 


£*■: y>. ! 

i 

or IS : 


DOUOMVTE5 * IBU2T 


R>r Morsntioa. twodnmtaad 
rt&eTvaooos. contac t: - 


OUknt Sooth lyioIRqiRKabiisa. 1 
* Reca Mew. laodoaSWr Jhe. 
Td: W-SM 2841 134 to) nr SR* 1831 


Continental 

Motoring 


FARES TO AUSTRALIA if 
SLASHED BY£££’s! ’ < 


• > i 


Choice oT an r 150 hotels tntbla 
easy driving disunce of Calais and 
Boulogne. 

With your [tafcefa.ynulbc |gHti a 
tree tape cnetde or mfopnaUon pack 
for ihr area 

Prices, from around £51 p.p_ 
Include hold accommodation and 
brak&M.and return hontnfun» 
tng with tar from Dover laaaimmg 4 
adults In pKiyl 

For a brochure see your travel 
ajjeni w pi wne (01)534 7061. 




* BA Qanfas and Air JVtewZealarKjfar^ reduced by £100 

New Zealand from £770 return. 

* Exotic low cost stopovers, fbr example: 

Smgaporefrom£17. J 

* Best rates on Hotels. Car Hire and TourL 

* Hotels in Australia & New Zealand from £6 per night 

* Free £5 Duty Free voucher or £12 first Class return 
BRfare. 

* Manchester departures reduced by £120. 

* New low fares for children. 

* Pay by cheque Bardaycard or Access. 

i 

For Latest Fares Can 
01-631 3424 or 01-631 0501 

p eiso^ | 3tersi«kxinieafJetsetHousft 74 New Oxford areeL 
London WC 1 A l£U 

For a brochure telephone 01-584 5160 
or write toDept V F Mount Farm, Milton Keynes MK1 1HQ. 

Im ABH& tATA • 


73m Biggntt and Bast Dewn-Uncter 








1 








THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


13 


DRINK 


I Tipples to 
! ' tingle 


tastebuds 






1 Outside Franconia, Syl- 
vaners are mostly light fruity 
wines. On the other side of the 
Rhine. Alsace generally pro- 
duces drier and more distinc- 
tive wines, bnt do not expect 
every Alsace Syivaner to be 
delidons for there are a lot of 
boriit«- French bottles bearing 
Uke name. Supermarket 
5 Syivaner is unlikely to impress 
anyone bnt a happy exception. 
m is Waitrose's *84 German 
m Silvuner from Dratted, in the 
w Rfaempfalz. Its lively yet foil 
I tfvonr has that characteristic 
i •_ nd refreshingly petUlaat 
l ' viva tier finish. Priced at just 
’.85 a litre, it most be the 
l.-eaptst and most agreeable 
’reduction to the grape. 

On the next notch np is the 
. ritzy TS5 Sylraner, Caves 
‘ 'adition. from the Turkheim 
• -operative. It is hard to beat 
i c refreshing verdant, almost 
gnu sy flavour, and it is the 
finest I have tasted from this 
virvage. It is available at the 
Bs qes Wine Shop, 51 High 
Sir ret, Barnes, Lon d on SW13, 
in' . d at £3.29. 

Tuc..-— ^lian fans will be keen to 
f" : a 1 , Syivaner from Sooth 

” roll Here, J. Tiefen- 
bn aner s wines have been 
grabbing all the attention but 
taring tasted through their 
ran,», I cannot see what all the 
ftiss h> about Still, the ’84 
South Tyrol Tiefenbnmner 
Syivaner (Tesco, £2.75), with 
its «ift, spicy nose and taste 
awl jigh acidity on the palate 
is, as Alexis Lichme would 
say. r. good summer lunchtime 
tipple. 

, Jane MacQnitty 


THE TIMES COOK 


EATING OUT 


Chopping and changing 


Being judged a “pleasant light 
luncheon wine” by Alexis 
Lichine is probably the closest 
the Sylyaner grape will get to a 
compliment. Generally 
acknowledged as the work- 
horse white nine grape, this 
most _ shy and retiring of 
varieties often produces a 
thoroughly dreary wine. But 
now, as a result of improved 
white wine-making and han- 
dling techniques, it is reward- 
ing to taste increasingly good 
and characterful Syivaner 
wines. 

While everyone agrees that 
the Syivaner grape is light in 
flavour, it does have that vital 
white wine ingredient of good 
acidity. This caste bnd -tingling 
attribute is usually 
by a pleasant accompanying 
prickle of petiUance. First- 
class Sytvaners also have an 
attractive verdant quality on 
the nose and palate, backed op 
by a slight steely fruit that is 
occasionally spicy. 

The original homeland of 
the grape (spelt SOvaner in 
Germany and Syivaner almost 
everywhere else), was some- 
where in central Europe, but 
the exact spot is not known. 
Today, Germany is its major 
home and it is the third most 
popular grape variety here 
after the Muller-Th organ and 
Riesling. However, few bottles 
of German wine actually bear 
its name: most of it disappears 
into blends like the ubiquitous 
Liebfranmikh. The most im- 
portant exception is the 
Sylvaners of Franconia whose 
steinweins are some of the 
finest this grape produces. But 
they are expensive and rarely 
seen outside Germany. 

L Enc Beaumont 


Pork undergoes a transformation in 
the hands of Shona Crawford Poole 


As maxims go. nothing suc- 
ceeds like success is one of the 
more reliable saws, and it is as 
true of souffles as it is of 
hitting top C. or of not 
breaking your neck when 
attempting one of those 
twiddly dives or gymnastic 
flips that happen so fast that 
only the competition judges 
can really see what is going on. 
Cooking is like every other 
activity which benefits from a 
dash of confidence or a pinch 
of panache. 

Pork chops, plainly grilled, 
were the unlikely subject of 
my earliest kitchen triumph. 
At school we had just done 
that bit of the O level biology 
syllabus that deals with the 
fascinating subject of tape- 
worms. and if there was one 
thing I was sure of. it was that 
Sainsbury's pork chops would 
be free of them. Where, then, 
was the need to overcook 
them? I could, of course, find 
none, and 1 basked in the 
praise for those succulent 
chops. 

With the demand for ever- 
leaner meat, pork chops are 
even more prone to dryness 
and 1 had pretty well given up 
cooking them until Fiona, 
who is a friend of mine, served 
me her grandmother's pork 
chop, black pudding and apple 
casserole recipe. It is not the 
prettiest dish in the world, but 
not many taste better. 

The pork chops can be 
traditionally cut or be one of 
the newer," boneless leg or 
shoulder cutlets. The black 
pudding should be English — 
the kind which has lumps of 
fat through it is less likely to 
disi ntegrate than the (to my 
mind) finer Scottish black 
pudding, which is ideal for the 
second recipe. 


Fiona's pork and black 
pudding casserole 

Serves four 

4 pork chops 

2 large onions, peeled and 

finely sliced 

2 crisp eating apples, 
peeled, cored and sliced 


1 black pudding, thickly 
sliced 


About 1.2 litres (2 pints) 
chicken stock 


Salt and freshly ground 
black pepper 


Pork chops with black 
pudding and apple 

Serves four 

4 pork chops 

2 tablespoons vegetable oil 
2 large onions, thinly sliced 

About 600 ml (1 pint) dry 
cider or stock, or a mixture 


All types of black pudding 
freeze successfully, so a good 
one is worth buying in bulk. 


Sait and freshly ground 

black pepper 

2 tablespoons clarified 
(concentrated) butter 

1 black pudding 

2 or 3 crisp eating apples, 
peeled and cored 


Venus magic 
within the 
Adam touch 


Sculpture is only one of the several 
dramatic experiences offered 
by Newby Hall. Nigel Andrew reports 


“I wouldn't have the dusting 
of this lot”, remarks a house- 
wife of the old school, casting 
an expert eye over the Sculp- 
ture Gallery of Newby Hall in 
Yorkshire. You can see her 
point, but it is perhaps not 
quite the reaction William 
Weddell, the 18th-century 
dilettante, was aiming for 
when he assembled bis collec- 
tion of prized Italian 
antiquities. 

One of his statues, the 
Barberini Venus, set him back 
so much that he was still 
paying the instalments on it 
when he died. Other items are 
more cryptic — a giant set of 
sculptured toes is particularly 
striking - and no one today 
would vouch for the antiquity 
of many of them. However, 
they pleased Weddell enough 
for him to have a quite 
splendid gallery designed for 
them by Robert Adam. And 
now that gallery, a perfect 


example of the 18th century’s 
lavish idea of a Roman in- 
terior, is the climax of the tour 
of Newby HalL 

Or rather one of a succes- ■ 
sion of dazzling climaxes 
which together form as dra- 
matic an experience of the 
Adam style as can be had 
anywhere. Apart from the 
Sculpture Gallery, the most 
famous element of it is the 
Tapestry Room, which is hung 
with a complete custom-made 
set of Gobelins tapestries 
depicting “The Loves of the 
Gods”. 

These are very rare indeed, 
extraordinarily well preserved 
— and. if you ask me, utterly 
frightful: a riot of insipidly 
vulgar design, very French in 
the worst possible way. One 
can only be thankful that their 
background colour is a restful 
dove-grey — the other four 
known sets were done in rose 
pink. 





mu 



sierras 


.'Nescafe** now brings you the pure taste of Latin 


Of 
- A 
that 
hydr- 
says 
; plane 
loffict 
j that 
' landi 
i Mi 
1 61, n 
that 
Alb** 
saidc 
from 
grabfc 


Mer--ate’ ‘Alta Rica™ distinctly latin. A rich, high 
->-\tec coffee with a ftill-bodJed flavour. A bold 
d'lenh ve in taste. 

‘Wes* aft’ ‘Cap Colorable™ pure Colombian 
offee. ibtle. delicate and aromatic, with a medium 
,as’t li.- mess. A rare experience in taste. 


tiew coffees, exclusively made from 100°o 
beans. Now at fine food stores. 


cover them. 


,v worlds of pure taste from ‘Nescafe! 


'Alla Rr a' ani 'Cap Ci+imi.i,.' ar<- Inide marfu In rteagnaw NmiM i nuiaui cnllivs. 


DlmLaadMlBr 


Cool opening for 
couscous houses 


A dumpy earthenware casse- 
role suits this dish. Pul the 
onions in the bottom of the 
casserole, then the chops fol- 
lowed by a layer of black 
pudding and finally the ap- 
ples. Season the stock and 
pour in enough to cover the 
apples. Cover the casserole 
and cook it in a moderately 
hoi oven (I90°C/375"F, gas 
mark 5) for about Vh hours or 
until the chops are tender. 

Serve straight from the 
casserole with plenty of fluffy 
mashed potato. 

Cooking the black pudding 
and apple separately is an- 
other variation on the theme. 
It is a little dressier, not belter, 
but different 



Trim the chops, removing the 
rind and any excess fat Heat 
the oil in a fireproof casserole 
and brown the chops lightly 
on both sides. Take them out 
and add the onions. Cook the 
onions slowly until they have 
softened and taken on a little 
colour. 

Return the pork to the pan 
with the onions and add the 
cider, stock, or a mixture of 
the two. If the liquid does not 
cover the meat, top it with 
some of the onions to keep the 
surface moist as it cooks. 

Season the casserole and 
bring it _to the boil on top of 
the stove. Cover and continue 
cooking much more slowly in 
a preheated cool oven 
(140°C/275 , F. gas mark 1) for 
about one hour or until the 
pork is very tender. Once the 
meat is cooked, the liquid can 
be reduced by fast boiling. 

Start cooking the black pud- 
ding and apples about 15 
minutes before serving. Cut 
the black pudding into thick 


slices. Quarter the apples and 
slice them into segemenis. 


Heat the clarified butter in 
one or two frying pans and 
add the black pudding and 
apples, keeping them separate. 
The quantities of fat specified 
here assume a non-stick pan. ■ 
More may be needed using 
any pan which is not well- 
seasoned. Fry them slowly 
until the apples are cooked 
and golden brown. 

Serve the pork with the fried 
apples and black pudding, and 
well-creamed potatoes to mop 
up the good gravy. 


2 cloves garlic, crushed 
4 tablespoons finely 


1 teaspoon finely chopped 


2 eggs, beaten 

Juice of 1 large lemon 
Salt and freshly-ground 


black pepper 

Vi teaspoon freshly grated 
nutmeg 


Plain flour to coat 
1 tablespoon vegetable oil 


Pork meatballs 

Serves six to eight 


570g(lK lb) finely minced 
lean pork 

1 1 0g (4 oz) Parma ham, 
very finely chopped 


85g (3 oz)freshly grated 
Parmesan cheese 


Mix all the ingredients except 
the flour and oil thoroughly. 
Form teaspoonfuis of the mix- 
ture into small balls. Roll in 
flour to coat all sides. Heat the 
oil and fry the meatballs, a few 
at a time, until they are 
cooked. Keep the first batches 
warm in a very cool oven 
(1I0*C/225*F, gas mark K) 
while the rest are fried. Save 
them at once with buttered 
lagliatelle and more freshly- 
grated Parmesan. 


The French have couscous the 
way we have curry: the 
adapted staples of former . 
colonies which have become 
the adoptive staples -of their 
former colonizers. . - 
However, the. French .find, 
curry exotic, in a way in which 
we do not find couscous. Any. 
decent London Indian res- 
taurant will haVe a tableful of 
French adventurers, at the 
height of the tourist season. 
Try finding any English in the 
coucous houses of Barbes 
Rochechouan or Rue de la 

Hucfoette Try finding any 

English in the couscous houses 
of Soho and Paddington 
Green. Within the past two 
months new couscous {daces 
haveopened there to apparent 
indifference. : .* 

The man from The Marra- 
kesh dressed in a panto ver- 
sion of Moroccan “national 
costume” Handing out leaflets 
to the shoppers, gives a due to 
what is the matter with the 
place: the timing is out — it 
belongs to the pre-package 
Maroc. to Luck gf the Legion 
and Dietrich walking into the , 
desert in three-inch heels. 

.The couscous is all right — 
the semolina is property dry, 
the veg broth is savoury and 
the stewed lamb is sweet; tort 
the additional grilled meats 
and sausages which should 
provide a contrast and an 
addition aren't offered. - 
Far better are such pe- 
culiarly Moroccan things as: 
the chilli-dominated soup 
called harira; the crisp meat 
pies called briwates; tajine — a 
lamb stew (which might as 
well belong to Persian cook- 
ing): a cold dish of mackerel or 
something kindred smothered 
in a jam-like paste of tomato 
and chilli Two will pay bet- 
ween £30 and £40. 

The management of the 
Marrakesh is Egyptian, that of 
La Reash is Lebanese and this 
is reflected in a menu which 
offers, besides couscous, the 
usual meze as well as steak 


and chips, smoked salmon 
and so on. 

By prudish design or 
prophet-managed accident. La 
Reash has grabbed the only 
site in Old Compton Street 
that affords no view of a 
mania J aids consultancy. This 
may be good for your soul but 
it's bad for the mise-en-scene. 

There is only a tenuous link 
between the kitchen of the 
Lebanon and that of Morocco, 
that accomplished meze do 
not promise couscous of the 
same quality. So it is here: 
there are delirious little pies 


filled with spinach; crisp and 
spicey felareJ: a stew of 
chickpeas, courgettes and to- 
mato billed as moussaka. The 
only Lebanese dish not tip to 
scratch was the aubergine 
purge, moutabal. which was 
insufficiently smokey. 


It lacks the fire of 
curry that is 
capturing the French 


. Almost inevitably the 
couscous, and the other 
Moroccan dish tried (steamed 
fish with a hot, watery sauce) 
belonged to-a lower league. As 
at the Marrakesh, the cous- 
cous was OK so far as it went 
— little or no grilled meat the 
harissa sauce not properly 
spficey. insufficient tooth for 
quantity of grain. 

There's little point in drink- 
ing anything other than the 
rough, loutish Sidi Brahim. 
The French wines on offer are 
dearer and much better. Two 
will pay about £40. 


Marrakesh, 295 Edgware 
Road. London W2 (01- 
723 9693). Open: daily 

noon-2. 3uam. 

La Reash Couscous 
House, 23-24 Greek Street, 
London W1 (01-439 1063). 
Open: daHy noon-midnight 


Jonathan Meades 


OUT AND ABOUT 





IN THE TOWN 


...'■S' - . • vtTfl 





.•- r — w*»v. \; ' 




high culture to 


walks and an 


The Library, on the other 
hand, is a perfectly satisfying 
interior, rich in Adam plaster- 
work set off against terracotta, 
blues and pale grey. Ornate 
Corinthian columns bestride 
the room and the books 
themselves are a mouth- 
watering array. 

It is the present owners, Mr 
and Mrs Robin Compton, 
who have made the house 
what it is today — fully 
restored, considerably re- 
arranged and redecorated and 
above all, open to the public. 
The house presents a warm, 
almost homely aspect, all 
mellow brick with well-worn 
stone trimmings and old win- 
dow-glass giving those 
marvellous rippling reflec- 
tions of which modern glass is 
incapable. 

The Comptons are mem- 
bers of the family which has 
owned Newby since 1748, and 
a wonderful succession of 


which included, as wen as the 
connoisseur Weddell, a very 
different kind of cofleclor and 
builder in Robert de Grey 
Vyner, a considerable land- 
owner with a passion for 
horse-racing. 

The Victorian Vyner built 


on to Newby in a style wholly 
at odds with the rest of the 
house. His billiards room is a 
tour de Jorce of gloomy, 
money-no-object elaboration. 
But on the way up to it you 
can see something much 
stranger — his unique collec- 
tion of chamber pots, dili- 
gently collected from all over 
Europe and the Far East. 
Many of these are, under- 
standably, extremely rare, and 
they range from high elegance 
to quite remarkable homely 
indecency. 

The gardens — 25 acres — 


secluded paths, grottoes and 
waterfalls, rose gardens that 
nearly knock youflat with the 
scent; gardens for all four 
seasons, a woodland walk, a 
river, a fine adventure garden 
for children, a miniature 
railway . . . it's all there. 

You could happily spend 


hours just wandering in the 
Newby grounds. It is a case, 
you might say, of all this and 
Adam too. 


Newby Hall is some four miles 

outride Rqraa, a delightful 
' v<wll city cmientiy celebrat- 
ing ift 1,100th anniversary. 
Tbe cathedral is a magnificent 
mixture of styles, fronted by 
the ranest; earty-EogUsh west 
front 

Every night at 9pm a bora 
Mowing ceremony takes piaoe 
in the Market Square. On a 
corner s the old Wakeraan’s 
House, and nearby are two 
grand old coaching bus, the 
Cjnicun and the Black BolL 
The river Shell offers pleasant 
. walks and the splendid race- 
course — a mfie np the 
Boroughbridge Road — has 
fine views of the city. 


Skelton, the village at the 
gates of Newby Hell, Is 
unspoilt and quiet, with' a 
friendly local, the Black Lion 
(which serves meals). The old 
parish church is in rains and 
was replaced by the Victorian 
horror (by Barges) in the 
grounds of Newby HalL 


Newby HaH, Ripon, North 
Yorkshire is open dafiy except 


Mon, 1-5pmr grounds and 
restaurant, lfam-5.30pm.Unta 


Sept 30. 



TOUCH Z>> AND POWERS 


. camxjnuvmaeocouafl 


have been lovingly restored by 
the Comptons: from formal 
areas with statues and tuns to 


KMK WAXED COTTON OUTH 


OUTINGS 


CHATS WORTH COUNTRY 
FAIR: One of the best country 
fairs in the calendar with 
virtually ail country pursuits 
represented including 
lurcher-racing, gun-dog 
scurries, fly-casting, 
falconry, horse-driving, rifle- 
shooting. 

Chatsworth. BakeweQ, 
Derbyshire (024688 2204). 
Today, tomorrow, 9.15am- 
6.30pm. Adult £3, child £1 . 


Between 70-60 different beers, 
ciders and perry plus soft 
drinks. 

Dunelm House, New Bvet 
Durham City. Today, 1 1 am- 
3pm and 5.30-1 0.30pm. 
Admission 50p. 



■nwWHBOOVUNBl ! 


| R IBBE D STOW U GUFFS 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA FIREWORKS 
SPECTACULAR: Carl Davis 
conducts and the programme 
indudes Handel's “Water 
Music" and Elgar's "Pomp and 
Circumstance Mat* No 1". 
Broad lands. Ramsey, 


POUCH POCKETS 


r WATERPROOF 
GAMQtSEPERS POCKET 


D ue to the success of our previous offers 
for waxed jackets we are again offering 


INVASION ’86: Period 
enactment of what might have 
happened had Napoleon 
invaded Kent in 1 805. British 
units from the Napoleonic 
Association plus 250 troops 
from France, Italy, Belgium 
and Germany. 

Fort Amherst, Barrier Road, 
Chatham, Kent (0634 47747). 
Today from 9.30a m-7pm, 
tomorrow I0.30am-earty 
evening. Adult £1 .50, child 
75p. 


MOZART FESTIVAL: First 


of its kind to be put on by the 
Aide bunch Foundation. The 


THE GREAT DORSET 
STEAM FAIR: Considered to 
be the leading event of its 
kind in Britain with 2,500 steam 
exhibits already entered, 
including 78 fair organs and 40 
showman's engines. 

Numerous rural crafts on 
display. 

Stourpaine Bushes, 

Blandf ord. Dorset Today, 
tomorrow. Ham-midnight. 
Adult £2.50. child £1.50. Car 
park free. 


Aide burgh Foundation. The 
eight-day event includes opera 
— Cost fan tutta, Bergmans 
film version of The Magic Flute 
and Joseph Losey's Don 
Giovanni— chamber music in 
Blylheburgh Church and 
Orford Church, songs, 
exhibitions and an opera 
forum. 

Snape Mai tings, Akfeburgh, 
Suffolk. Further details of 
events and tickets on 
(072885 2935). Today-Sept 6. 


this new sty le waxed coat The Times Wocd 
Coat is designed to keep you warm and com- 
fortable whatever the weather and is ideal 
for both town and country being fashionable 
and practical. It is made in the UK from 
100% ohve green waxed cotton and lined 
with a tartan lining - - 

T he coat has a traditional, brown 
corduroy collar and fastens with a double 
actum zipand poppas. It has interior ribbed 
storm ctffis ana there axe two roomy pockets 
with double folding flaps to keep them 
watertight. Inride there is a large jeame- 


and shooting to horseriding and point-to- 
point- StylisE and comfortable, the coat is 
suitable for both sexes. Marvellous value at 
£49.95. • 

fees: Small (36-38% Medium (38-4T), 
Larg e (42-46"), Ex page (46-5T). (AH 
riza have an extra four indies added to 


All prices ore indasvecfpotztmd packing. PkmeoUawaptp 
2J dayS* delivery Jhm> receipt of order. Ifyoa arr^mt^^d 
The Tannvill rtfradyoarmoitej with out qtum/oi,. In addition 

toour&tannuee you have Arbotffiicfyaiirfijil natatory rights 
un/Cn are not affirct&L 


Orden and fTVfdrfa (kouid btrstm so; 

The Times Rtamf Cim Offer. AuwM Bedes. 
Bern OA 5 IBL. Cmxfr* 4 S 3 Mfor enquiries ant 


BURGHLEY REMY MARTIN 
HORSE TRIALS: Thors and Fri, 
dressage; Sept 6, cross- 


the lining . This garmen t tsgenoousiyazEd 
to allow & to be wran over tinck sweaters and 
measures 36J' from neck to hem. 

T his coat is invaluable for a whole 
range of country pursuits from fishing 


Please send me Waxed Cotton Coals CKE49.93 

each a s mdkafed bekwc 

SIZES: 

O SMALL (36-383 O MEDIUM (38-42") 
O LARGE .(42-46 i EX LARGE >46-50-1 


country, speed and endurance; 
Sept 7, show jumping. 


THE TIMES 


O SMALL <36-38} D MEDIUM (38- 

0 LARGE .(42-46*) EX LARGE (46- 

1 enclose cfaeqne/PO for £ made par 

to: The Times Wared Cotton Coat OflerT 
Or debitto^Aixxss/^saNo.™ 


Sept 7, show jumjL.. 
Burghley Park, Burghley 
House, Stamford, uncofnsh 


ELEVENTH DURHAM 
BEER FESTIVAL: One Of 
Britain's big beer festivals, 
held in the student’s Union of 
Durham university. 


(0780 52131). Thurs-Sept 7. 
Gates open 8.30am. Thurs and 
Fri events from 9.30am; 

Sept 6. 1 lam; Sept 7, noon. £6 
per car; £15 on Sept 6. 


Judy Frosbaug 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

KAPtD ORDERING SERVICE 
fc BY TELEPHONE ON 

k _ ACCESSOR VISA ■■■ 
t fro atm to cnrpfew coupani 

(Crayton!) 0322-58811 
24 hours a day ^7 days a week . 


Signature..:...... . 

Expiry date 

Mr/Mri/MSss-. 







:=5§ 


§ •• 

$1 4 


IB 


i 


Jii 


i 

? tfii* 


if 

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IS 




:■ \ • 


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f-5 ii; 

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:. a -T J 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


t:nT>' CC?MTI?A*353'? H^3O>’l0S7CALL?-W* 7 D-AY CC 2 JO 7*300 IPbgf- 


Bti.'vtD£»?B9. LOMDoWrjc: rix BOXONiCI 1 Co.-n-ti.-r.' oo.-^:t 

. k(')V\l;:l IvSTIUI. HM.I. • • 


Open aB day with free arhibtoom and lunchtime music. Coffee Shop, Buffet Bat? ond Rmenide Cafe- 
Jon group' ever. Fn&lfSur evemngs. Enjoy Ihe magnrficert viwn of Big fan aid Rntfanetit from our nvefiidewufa. 


VIVALDI CONCERTANTE 

Conductor JOSEPH PILBERY 


THURSDAY 4th SEPTEMBER at 7.*5p® 

BARBICAN CENTRE 



THE MAGIC OF CHINA Drect Wi p t* ' ft g «■* •'eomtuuutt CMw 
tamiii - giuniKiicxtiiiuK gymnasts, mogien. oancen 

awtf C7WES tn 50 mat Moent-JugK-Thg Seut" flat* Beam 


TtvwvSrf HOOKED OH CLASSICS Hot* «■»■"■*»•= tVehwta Uu» QM 
«Snl -conauCU'i icrvurw huluiinq nili Irom Homed an 

7 jg pm Claws J"u"wvTnioi» 3 'iTwCias>:s ana CantSfOo mt-Ctassica' 

taw PM i*Xi tn 50 dJjO Rjymena Guttaay ua 

FHIDAV NIGHT l% MU9C WIGHT BBC Conan OrcHerfra 
Ban Woctaucrth itomai AH Comet iwpj Ranee rtimfloi tun) 
Tnomst Trotter .organ- John McCarthy Sngcn. ScecJ qau 
p?ecmijpWOi''VBflC 9*ao 2 oOOUUt lux onMramne 
ic ti t6 SO » £S 50 Huso t"» 


SUSANNA RIGACCI 
GIUSEPPE FA1X1SI 
JONATHAN VEISA 
MARYPUBEKY 



W ®EMSEE^«E:m HALL 


■. PL/RCKI.U ROOM 



RAYMOND GUBBAT presents 

THURSDAY NEXT 4 SEPTEMBER at 130 pjn. 

HOOKED ON CLASSICS 

Litcm Stage - the return of Hooked oo Chvaw 
j m jK Music, Lights and Specrxfe featuring hits from 

Hooked on CfavMrt. Journey through the 
V, fJtSb Classics and Can't Stop the Classics. 

hViaa ROYAL PHttHARMOMr. ORCHESTRA 

J&jJjSf Coafaaor LOUIS CLARK 

QESr £5.50. £I9>. £9.50. Lit V>.£U.S0 

Hal! 01428)111 CC. 01 0288800 




Soprano 

Tenor 

Bus-Baritone 

Oboe 


SUUtKRSCCFE 

BRUTE CREATION The Wateraom. IMU CRAy. Uartyn BmO. 
Vie GMimm «n entertain mem mat (umms me ituMRM Between 
man t Deasi and W na» n atnen it* enj^sn haw itaaTOM enenafc 

owr mea «t<00was mmbB The South Bank Board 

THE BVRESS CM 1W SOUTH 8AM 
Ftbb u w niu et tne Foya a a fternoon hem 200 pm. watt JO m Bte 
Cirwtr Bird aw Bear. Smpng. Danone. Uoc and Sums 
Boo Dawn port, n^a ot me tanous Empress of Rusutraotorfa music 
dub. muottioss a taneectdw corears m me Puren Room Scab 
tar each cancan Cl SO 3 00 om HOLME V4ti£Y TttnOfTTOtt * 30 pm 

MAIRE Nl CHATHASAKH: 5 <S pm THE CORRBI FAULT: 7 is pm 

BOS OAVWORT AND ROGER DKtBY: 830 pm RUSH DANCM& 

DAMONCW THE FOVEU TO THE RAKES Fftta 

Tnn Scum Bern Beard 


I.T, SI MMFR^COPi; 

I ; 'i ' ~A Celebration ol e 


TOOL Overture: The Force at Doitot 

# MOZART: Ana '-iJikw* of thr Mpht ' Ftuicl 

VIVALDI: titana KMcrpi?) 

PASCUU4: Coneeno ti»r Oboe ufcer Drauons "U Fainnu"i 

MOZART: Lthuluc Jubilate 

VIVALDI: Concerto for 2 Trumpets 

VJVALDU "Spn/tp from the Four Seasons ifor niprano. icnor. 
COKKLTTE.- taritooe v’fcucvs. tmhoin) FIRST I K PERFORMANCE 
PUCCINI! Ana ' Nessun Donna" and Fmale Irom TurancliH 

Tickets £4.00 £5.50 £6.50 £6.00 £9-00 
Sponsored by Telephone bookings: 01*638 8891 /0 1-628 8.95 
PB1NTROMCS Including Sundays 


aunrt oi w i it»r/ 

02M/GI2P 2 A|»r «* 3*0 7203 
Crp Sato °SO 0123 

“THE BEST MUSICAL IN 

LONDON" am 


-A WONOCRFl 1 ST W; MSB 

UCOHANO ■UNSTUII'I 

WONDERFUL TOWN! 

-IT RIPPLES VTTM 
LNCTTtMCKr 1 S TUIOT 
■■just woNDcnnv d.lw 
M om Sal 8 Man Wed JMS4 6 


FAYE DUN W AY 
■ t lemiim" in Mjhi u, 



ART GALLERIES 


IARRKAM AWT OaURT, fc,. 

Mran Dvlrp. I mam. 1C? m 
n» 4141 Until B Dn 

RtUtHdramUk TACMKR. IW 

ap job Diewtim h- b. 
ImlMa port. Tmanr Utafl » 

occ W. CtMCHC tMUtv . I? 

mmintma d M qyu B 

BAanqraBnrrN net mnagL. r 


phatofyagiH. OaHrrv MMiMan 
C? J1«1 U oom TWt . Sw 
Itkio . e> ASctm. Hun 4 Bam 
H* 12 S48pnt CSmW aw 
n«Hl BAaS Man ’ 


28 JULY- 
31 AUGUST 

A Celebration ert our Century 



- -3S. WlGUCtRS STREET ' 


WIH i 

MAHAZEP WILLItM LfliE 


7: £«CWC5-0/S.15 ?M£- VfiiUMS SSI 

WIGMORE HALL 



RAYMOND GUBBAT presents 

FRIDAY NEXT 5 SEPTEMBER at 130 p.m. 

FRIDAY NIGHT 
£gm IS MUSIC NIGHT 

vL ^o S/ A special gala performance aj BBC Radio Z’s 
popular musk programme, being broadcast live 
far the first rime front the Royal Rstival Hall 

BBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA Conductor BARRY WORDSWORTH 
JILL GOMEZ taprazo RAMON REMEDfOSueer 
THOMAS TROTTER organ JOHN MCCARTHY SINGERS 

BAND OF THE ROYAL MARINES SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Introduced by ROBIN BOYLE 

£4. a. £6.50. £8. £9.50,30.50, flLM IMOWB 3191 CC 01428880(1 




WIGMORE HALL 

Manager: \HUmn Lyur 

SONG RECITAL SERIES 

BOOKING NOW OPEN 
PHONE 01*935 2141 FOR FREE BROCHURE, OR 
WRITE TO WIGMORE HALL 
20ft DISCOUNT IF YOU BOOR FOR6 CONCERTS 
OR MORE 


11 Sept GWYNETH JONES 

Geaflre; Parsons piano 


17 & 20 ELLY AMELING 

Sept. Rudolf Jaasen piano 


10, 11, 13 HERMANN PREY 

Oct Leonard Hofcansoa piano 

Dm Schubert Rmcamta 


28 Oct 


RAYMOND GUBBAT praMBU SUNDAY 14 SEPTEMBER at 13* pja. 

ROSSINI-HANDEL 

RACHMANINOV-BEETHOVEN 

^-*5^ Beawai WILLIAM TELL OVERTURE 

ASflV W— Art MUSIC FOR THE ROYAL FIREWORKS 

ft RaehmanfawT PIANO CONCERTO No. 2 

9 kHaB Pit Ik SYMPHONY NO. 5 

IftVg/ ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

WMogy Coodnaor HRAMWELLTOVEY 

WILLIAM STEPHENSON putto 
1.50 Ball 01-928 3191 CC01 




VICTOR HOCHHAUSER with (he South Bank 
preaeut at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

THE INCOMPARABLE 

CHINESE ACROBA’ 

Dazzling — Incredible — Pure Magic 

LAST 4 PERFORMANCES 


TODAY & TOMORROW at 3 and 7. 


£150. C&00.f7. .50. IROO. £IL50 CHILDREN HAIf FRKZ 
6mn BaU 928 3I9U928 8800 


THE SONGMAKERS* ALMANAC 

The Ufe amdnmgt of Dt ord 


SARAH WALKER 

Roger Vtgn«lea piano 


IRINA ARKHIPOVA 
Diyalvari piano 


SIEGFRIED JERUSALEM 

Siegfried Manser piano 
Sdmberv WiUnd m 


THE SONGMAKERS’ ALMANAC 

Welcome to January 


ARLEEN AUGER 

Dalton Baldwin piano 


ROBERT HOLL 

Andrus SchilT piano 



The BBC presents (hr 4.W sesain uf Henry W.v/ FrurtmuJc GmurO 

FROMSS3d) 

1 8 July — 13 September 
Royal Albert Hall 




VICTOR HOCHHAUSER presents at the RFH 
TUESDAY 16 SEPTEMBER at 7.30 

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 

and the 

ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

BERNSTEIN. .JUBILEE GAMES (European premiere) 

LUKAS FOSS.... .SONG OF SONGS 

Mezzo Soprano; Sheri Greenawald 

DVORAK .SYMPHONY NO 9 (New World) 

Tickets from Royal Festival Hall Bos Office 928 3191/9288800 


MONDAY 1 SEPTEMBER 1J9 TORONTO SYMPHONY 

RETURN SEATS ONLY Worts by Moan B Mahler 


TUESDAY 2 SEPTEMBER 7 JO LONDON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

RETURN SEATS ONLY Wafa by Bohns, Defauuv A Bare* 


WEDNESDAY 3 SEPTEMBER 7 JO SCOTTISH NATIONAL 

ORCHESTRA 

RETURN SEATS ONLY Wafa by John Oaten, BrabOB A Mauag*) 
l* n- T wn talk hyMn Cidn i 6J5am 


THURSDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 7J0 THOMAS TROTTER lagan 

Prometheus LISZT tar. GUILLOU 

U) Seats £A 00 Syarohcmy Nahw G minor W1DOR 


LONDON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA b 


Sunday 7 September 7 JOptn 

P ro gramme ind ales 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No ] 

DVORAK ....... Symphony No 9 

"From the New World" 

CRISTINA ORTIZ piano BARRY' TL'CKWELL conductor 
See Barbican pends abort Jbr full prugranwe details 


Samday 13 September 7.45pm 

DVORAK Carnival Overture 

TC HAI KOVSKY Violin Concerto in D 

R. STRAUSS Don Juan 

BARBER Adagio for Strings 

RAVEL LaVaise 

STEPHANIE CHASE violin GEOFFREY SIMON conductor 


Seat Prices £ U JO, £930. £730, £6, £4.50. £3 JO. 

Box Office TeL 10-8 every day htcL Sun 01-638 8891/628 8795 


Two concern conducted by 

RAFAEL FRUHBECK DE BURGOS 


Thursday 18 September 7^Spm 

JON KIMURA PARKER piano 

( Winner Leeds International Competition 1984) 

BEETHOVEN Overture *0000130* 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 2 

BERLIOZ Symphonic fantasriq ue 

Sponsored by ihe Peter Saiyvesau Foundation 


Saturday 20 September 7^15poi 

CLAUDIO ARRAU piano 

BEETHOVEN.... Piano Concerto No 4 

DEBUSSY - Trots Nocturnes 

STRAVINSKY The Firebird Suite (1919 version) 

LONDON SYMPHONY CHORUS (LADIES) 


Scat Plica SlZJD.£!U5n.DLS0.£f>JO.£S.£3JI). 

Bon Office Tct 10-8 every diyiad. San fJl -638 889 1/628 8795 . 


YICTOB HOCHHAUSER wkh the BAUmCAH pi mu 
SATURDAY NEXT 6th SEPT at 7.45 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

MENDELSSOHN Ov. Fingal’sCnve 

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS—^. JFtniita on Gitemltewt 

RACHMANINOV — ...Pinim Concerto No 2 

SUPPE — — — Overture Tight Cnvsdrj-' 

MASCAGNI. Jmcrmczzo from *Csrallcraa Kuticana’ 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 




Qassical records 


REVIEW 


A rich and flying Dutchman 


r.'ftblrander Bayreuth 
; \ production / Nelsson 
VPhilips 416 300-1 (three black 
'discs, also on cassette and 
: S. CD) 

Messiaen; TurangaHa- 

! 'Vsymphonie Crossley / 

Murail / Philharrrfonia / 
i ‘ Salonen. CBS I2M 421 26 (two 
1 .black discs) 
i - Amy. Various works 
1 . Erato / Conifer NUM 75264 
1 Masson: Various works 
^ -i jErato / Conifer MUM 75267 

’‘‘■■One hears rather a lot of Harry 
..-.Kupfcr's production in the 
recording of Der fliegende 
Hollander [The Flying Dutch- 
> man ) from last year's Bay- 
reuth Festival, but never 
mind: this is a performance 
. that hauls one into its strik- 
s ingly vivid and richly imagi- 

- .J native world. Woldcmar 
l^Nclsson's conducting is 

stormy, but also tightly drawn, 
illuminating the score like 
> lightning- 

There are times when his 
ifast tempos cause problems 
for the generally excellent 
chorus. notably in the Spin- 
?t - ning Room scene, but at such 
; moments the instability seems 
'to answer an instability in the 
^ score. It is as if one heard the 
'mature Wagnerian style of 
~ ^ most of the opera heightening 
^ - with distaste — the passages 
■ t ofdosed-n umber grand opera. 

This set's other great asset is 
the performance of Simon 
Estes as the Dutchman, a 
^performance offering every- 
thing that was suppressed or 
^doubtful in his singing of the 
■ ^ role at Covcnt Garden. His 
^ distinctive combination of 
' ripe strength and a certain 
.v. bareness of tone is exactly 
fright for charting the undead: 

it allows him to achieve the 
•^•paradox of being passionately 
u't hopeless. The long periods of 
the role arc beautifully sus- 
tained and in shoner interjec- 
tions Estes hits the point with 
telling certainty. 

The picture on the cover of the 
-*» libretto of Decca's Tosca. out 
this week,' tells most of the 
story. It is a close-up of Sir 
,ri Georg Solti, blue eyes more 
___ than usually mesmeric and 
.-Jaw pugnacious, ready for 
. action. It is indeed Solti in 
command and a very fair 
*’* reflection of the two CDs it 
" accompanies. 

Solti nowadays would 
—scarcely lay claim to being a 

— Puccini specialist, although he 
did record a Boheme for RCA 
'some years back. But this 

Tosca finds him in tremen- 

.jedous form. Predictably, the 
Opening chords are full of 
aggression and the old razzle- 
-dazzle is turned on by both 
“ 'Solti and the engineers for the 



High drama: lisbeth Balslev as the hysterical Senta and Robert Schunk as Erik in Act UTof Der fliegende Hollander 


Lisbcih Balslev is an un- 
usual Scuta. She sounds older 
than one normally imagines 
but she makes an excellent 
case for regarding Senta as a 
spinster with a torrid fantasy 
life: her upper register has the 
excited clarity of hysteria as 
much as her lower range 
speaks of maturity. But the 
character is slightly held back 
by the singer's tendency to 
make slow rhythms delib- 
erate. as in the bardic phrases 
of the ballad. 

The rest of the cast present 
their characters in more con- 
ventional — but also more sure 
— terms. Robert Schunk pro- 
vides an utterly direct, youth- 
ful Erik: Matti Salminen is a 
canny bargainer as Daland: 
Anny Schlemm is a stem 
Maty’ and .Graham Clark an 
ardent Steersman. The whole 
thing is powered by the 


conviction that Kupfer's stag- 
ing obviously generated and it 
seems entirely appropriate 
that the ending, reluming to 
the original version, should 
include crashing echoes from 
the decor. 

. My other choices are all of 
contemporary French music. 


Estes’s ripe strength 
and bareness of 
tone are exactly right 


inevitably dominated by 
Messiaen, whose Turangalila- 
symphonie is currently enjoy- 
ing a vogue both in concert 
halls and in recording studio. 

I cannot imagine that any- 
one will want to have more 
than one recording — it is not a 
work that has room for dif- 


ferent' slams of interpretation 
— but Esa-Pekka Salonen's 
version will do very well 
indeed. It is uncompromis- 
ingly positive, bold and 
colourful: even the big adagio 
seems to just put the music's 
drive into slow motion. There 
is also the advantage of 
sparklingly precise, almost 
mani.cally incisive piano play- 
ing from Paul Crossley, while 
Tristan Murail's sighing 
Ondcs Manenot is given due 
prominence in the glowing 
sound picture. 

The selection of Works by 
Gilt* »1 Amy is rather dis- 
appointing. The earliest work, 
the brass quintet Rdais. tes- 
tifies to how exciting it was to 
be a young composer follow- 
ing in Boulez's footsteps in the 
1 960s but the later pieces, all 
vocal, gradually lose the fire. 


Solti’s pugnacious Puccini 


Act I Te Deum. But the pace 
throughout is most artfully 
constructed: hectic in Act I — 
which, after all is partly about 
a man on the run — and 
sensuously languid in Act III 
as Tosca and Cavardossi look 
forward to a new dawn. Dawn 
itself, in the Prelude, is Solti 
and the New Philharmonic at 
their most magical. 

Such enthusiasm has to be 
tempered a little when it 
comes to the soloists. 
Giacomo Aragail. who has 
been in excellent voice these 
past couple of years after a 


Pucctnfc Tosca Te 
Kanawa / Aragail / Nucci / 
NPO/ Solti. Decca 414 
597-2 DH2 (2 CDs, also black 
disc and cassette) 


poorish patch, is an heroic 
Cavardossi. His fellow Span- 
iard. Jos6 Carreras, who has 
twice recorded the role, may 
have more silkiness of tone 
but Aragail proves that he too 
has a head voice when it. 
comes to “O dolci manT. Leo 
Nucri's Scarpia is firmly vil- 
lainous without having much 
subtlety: Gobbi in the first 


Calias set forever remains the 
model 

The main question mark is 
suspended over Kiri Te 
Kanawa in the title role. She 
sounds uncomfortably 
breathy during the encounter 
with Cavardossi in Act I and 
its attendant cooings and jeal- 
ousies. “Vissi d'arte" has 
some majestically soaring 
phrases before ending on a 
surprisingly abrupt “cos". 

The final act finds her in 
more convincing form. But it 
is not an interpretation to 
topple Leontyne Price itf the 
Karajan set, let alone Calias. 


Amy's contemporary. Ge- 
rard Masson, seems to have 
more going for him. though 
his career has been more 
subterranean. In 1970 he came 
to notice when a piece by him 
was choreographed by Ashton 
in Lament of the H'arrs: now 
he suddenly reappears as a 
composer of substantial in- 
strumental pieces: works for 
one and two pianos, and a duo 
for violin and viola. 

They are fluent and fluid 
pieces, still having to do with 
the play of the waves, perhaps 
— though it is another EXe- 
bussy piece that is washed up 
during the course of the 20- 
minuic piece abstractly en- 
titled Pianosolo. This is not 
music for dancing, but music 
for thinking. 

Paul Griffiths 


Yes. this is Solti's Tosca and 
he enters quite a crowded 
market with at least three 
rivals on CD: Davis (Philips). 
De Sabata (EMI) and Karajan 
with Ricciarelli (DG). who last 
month also brought out a 
range of Abbado opera sets on 
CD, and have made August 
Carlos Kleiber month. There 
is the early FreischQtz. the best 
recording (415 432-2. two 
CDs), a somewhat eccentric 
Fledermaus (415 646-2, two 
CDs) and. pick of the bunch, 
Tristan (413 315-2, four CDs). 
Surprisingly, there is no sign 
of the Traviaia with Cotmbas 
and Domingo but perhaps 
that is to come. 


John Higgins 


ON THE AIR 


Lowlife 
and soft 
hearts 


TELEVISION 


lan Kennedy Marlin, creator 
of The Sweeney, has come up 
with another appealing slice of 
London low life in King and 
Castle (1TV. Wed. 9- 1 0pm), a 
comedy of villains, bent cops 
and shady businessmen. 

Derek Martin co-stars as 
former Detective Sergeant 
Ronald King, who is turning 
his grubby hands to running 
an East End debt collecting 
agency with an unlikely 
underling. David Castle, a 
mild, scruffy moped-bome ex- 
pert in martial arts and geneal- 
ogy ^ a role well suited to the 
straight acting talents of the 
former Ytnmg One Nigel 
Planer. 

Clifford Odets's soft- 
centred play Rocket to the 
Moon about a soft-hearted 
Manhattan dentist was first 
performed in 1938. Bui its 
themes of middle-aged 
frustration, caution and pas- 
sion stand the test of time in 
the Limchousc studio produc- 
tion directed by John Jacobs 
(Channel 4. Thurs. 9.30- 
ll.3Spm). 

John Matkovich stars as the 
dentist B£n Stark, dominated 
by his overioving wife Belle 
(Connie Booth), who slips into 
an affair with his neurotic 
femme fatale of a receptionist 
(Judy Davis). 

The Citroen 2CV. which 
never seems to traxel without 
nuclear power or disarma- 
ment stickers, has been in 
continuous, and virtually 
unredesigned, production 
since 1948. as is illustrated in 
Equinox: The Tin Snail 
(Channel 4. Thurs. 8-9pm). 
Designed as a "people's car", 
it has retained its principles of 
honesL cheap simplicity and 
soft curves. 

Bob Williams 



Lnve and money: McQueen and McGraw in The Getaway 

Cool corruption 


FILMS ON TV 


The late Sam Peckinpah was 
best known for his violent but 
elegiac westerns. But besides 
modem classics like The Wild 
Fiimlt and Pat Garrett and 
Hilly the Kid. he also made 
contemporary thrillers, an' 
impressive example of which 
i* The Getaway ( BBC I . Thurs. 
lOpm-midnighi). 

Made in 1972. (he film 
stans with the release of Doc 
(Sieve McQueen) from prison. 
Soon, he is organizing a daring 
bank robbery with his wile 
(All McGraw) and a couple of 
none-too-briglu heavies. The 
job is botched: Doc finds 
himself double-crossed by 
wife and accomplices and 
pursued by both the mob and 
the police. 

Peckinpah creates a cool, 
cruel world of ubiquitous 
corruption and deception. Al- 
though the film is first and 
foremost a taut thriller, it is 
also a tentative romance, 
portraying with an admirable 
lack of sentimentality the 
awkward steps taken by Doc 


RECOMMENDED 


Across the Pacific (1942): 
John Huston's brisk, breezy 
tale of wartime espionage, 
with Bogart. Greenstreet and 
Astor (BBC2. today, 4,45- 
6 20pm). 

Jezebel (1938): Archetypal 
Bene Davis melodrama, ably 


and his wife to regain their 
faith in each other after his 
long, lonely years in prison. 

Central to the film's success 
is McQueen's laconic perfor- 
mance. suggesting both an 
existentialist man of action (a 
common Peckinpah hero) and 
a world-weary professional, 
warily blinking in the sunlight 
of i he outside world as he 
struggles to oxereome his fear 
of betrayal. 

But Peckinpah is also 
blessed with a fi&hi-ucitunt 
script by "alter Hill, who 
later went on io direct his own 
estimable acuon-mos ics. As 
the film progresses. Doc's 
odyssey leads him through the 
seedy underbelly of modern 
Amcnca. literally immersing 
him in garbage and exorcizing 
his single-minded obsession 
with money. 

Though cynical and colder 
than most Peckinpah films. 
The (ii'Miur. in emphasizing 
I Xu's quiet, determined dig- 
nity. finally emerges as a 
strangely touching film of 
unusual gravity and integrity. 

Geoff Andrew 

directed by William Wyler 
(Channel 9. today. 1 1 pm- 
12 55am). 

A Bill of Divorcement 
(1932): Katharine Hepburn's 
notable screen debut as the 
canng daughter of John 
Sarrimore. unstable and 
unwanted by his wife (Channel 
4. tomorrow. 2.30-3.50pml. 


Noble educational endeavours 


tomorrow afternoon. Radio 4 
is joining forces with the 
World Service to broadcast a 
season of six classic plays, 
beginning with Shaw's Pyg- 
malion (2^MMpm). The size of 
the potential audience is 
staggering: it is equivalent to 
filling an auditorium of the 
National Theatre six nights a 
week for 40 years. Globe 
Theatre is the series title. 
Pygmalion stars Simon Cadeil 
as Professor Higgins, with 
Imeida Staunton as Eliza 
Dolittfe. 

“Nobel Prize for British 
Housewife" was the news- 
paper headline that greeted 


RADIO • 


Professor Dorothy Hodgkin's 
prize for Chemistry in 1964. 
Happily, successful women 
scientists do not seem so 
unusual now. but how much 
hate things really changed? In 
Mothers of Intention (Radio 
4. Wed. 8.15-9pm) Georgina 
Ferry examines the obstacles 
that still hinder women wish- 
ing to pursue a career in 
science, and asks what can be 
done lo remote (hem. 

As (he return to school 
looms, educational issues are 
again to the fore. A new series 
called Education Roadshow is 


previewed tomorrow afternoon 
(Radio 4 VHF, 4-4 .30pm). Six 
couples with children of vari- 
ous ages will be firing ques- 
tions at Professor Ted VVragg. 
After that, he and Eric Robson 
will take to the Toad for six live 
question-and-answer sessions 
from around the country, and 
in Brainwaves. Radio 4's 
education magazine. (T ues. 8- 
830pm). Kenneth Baker. Sec- 
retary of State for Education, 
will be questioned by teachers, 
parents and pupils at 
kingsthurpe Upper School in 
Nuri Hampton. 


Nigel Andrew 



CHESS 


t’- Tonight the closing ceremony 
.of the London leg of the 
Centenary World Champion- 
ship takes place at the Park 
Lane Hotel. Kasparov and 
Karpov hax'e fought an evenly 
. - matched duel, involving some 
»\ l classic chess. Games 4, 5. 6. 7. 
8 and 1 1 stand out as major 
contributions to the creative 
heritage of chess.' 

... As 1 write it is still unclear 
^ which game has won the 
£10.000 prize offered by Save 
and Prosper for the most 
'■ brilliant game. But game 11, 

. with honours even, must be 
the leading candidate. 

White: Karpov; Black: 
Kasparov. Griinfeld Defence. 


A draw for the record 


9 NO 

Qxc5 

10 Bb3 

Mc8 

11 0-0 

0*5 

12 Id 

86 

13 0*2 

Hn* 

14 MIS 

•5 


2 * - 


25 nr 


15 R*c6 

A brilliant sacrifice. If 
15. ..bxc6, 16 Ne7+ Kh8. 
17 Nxc6 followed by Nxe5. 
Kasparov wisely declines. 

IS - 18 Rc7 BeS 

17 Q»T 

Karpov later said that this 
was the only move. 

17 _ _ ObS 


25 Rxg7 Qxg7, 26 Qh5+ 
Qh7. 27 Ng6+ also leads to a 
draw. 

25- ftxTT 28 QxTT NgS 
27 NgSck Kb7 28 NxaS HxtT 
29 HxIT 
11 Me* 


KgS 30 Nd8 txsl 


19 Bre6 
21 MM 


18 N*7+ Kh8 
fc*6 20 Obi NgS 
Nxh3+ 22 KN2 


‘.J 1 <M 

' 3 Hc3 

NTS 

(Q 

2 

4 

C4 

BM 

Sfl7 

s «3 

c5 

6 


QnS 

7 

dxo4 

8 

BXC4 

-0-0 


If 22 gxh3 Qg+. 23 Njg f3 

23 Ne*fl8* tagS 24 5 kb6 

24 Nxg6+ Kg8. 25 Ne7+ 
would lead to a draw. Karpov 
boldly plays for a win. 


After the complications, a 
drawn ending has resulted, 
though Kasparov has a slight 
initiative. 

31 - axfi 32 RaS 85 

33 Na3 *5 M Kg3 m* 

35 Be2 R>8 36 Kg* BcM 

37 Re2 b*3 38 R»3 M2 

39 83 Rxg2cfl 40 M3 Rn2 

41 8m4 

Draw agreed. 

Raymond Keene 



Challenger: Anatoly Karpov 


< CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1041- 

.'Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
• correct solutions opened on Thursday. September 4. 1986. Entries 
r should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition. I Pennington Street. London. El 9XN. The winners and 
^^/solution will be announced on Saturday. September 6, 1986. 

ACROSS 

I Ncwl\-wcd (4.7) 

„ ' 9 Shake (7) 

10 Thin pancake (S) 

J\\ Moose 13) 

<■. 13 Calla (4) 

16 Southern negro 
j bnaihcr(4) 
yP Family intercourse 
y (M 
: , ' 18 Invalid (4) 

Mop (4) 

j • 71 Incite 14.2) 

12 Breeze (4) 
i . O Assert (4) 

* 3 Tight spot (3) 

- .** Missouri Indian 15) 

Fix (7) 

j^30 Christ's suffering 
drama (7.4) 




Il8 


\22 


& 



DOWN 
- Swahili ‘“freedom’ - 
: (5) 

3 N!cai(4| 

4 Standard tend mca- 
sure (4) 

5 Sutci stick (4) 

. 6 Forehead ndge (7) 


7 Cirav ity scientist 
(5.6) 

8 Soup grain (5.6) 

12 Sheen (6) 

14 Thousandth of inch 

(Jl 

15 Concave moulding 
( 6 ) 


19 iSihceni Cretan 
script (6.1) 

20 Watering spoil 3 1 

24 London fin dc sicclc 
museum (1.3.D 

25 Hawk strap (4) 

26 Irish Castlebar 
county (4) 

27 Let go (4) 


.■/NAME. 

ADDRESS 

TUITION TO NO 1040 

CROSS: 1 Crater 5 Cobble g|w 9 Finals 10 Casual I j Beta 12 
Opencast 14 Evolve 17 Police I9 Takcauav 22 Bock 24 Button 25 
• 26003 27 Starve 28 Daybcd . 

2 Rhine 3 Travail 4 Rissole 5C\clc 6 Basic 7U»»c 13 
.0 IS Viaduct 16 Via (7Pa\load 18 Libenv ZOEcior 21 
/ 'Op 1 23Casie 


BRIDGE 


If in doubt, bid high 


A careful examination of the 
records of world champion- 
ships over the years reveals an 
interesting feet. Of course the 
victory roster contains spar- 
kling card players and well- 
disciplined, constructive 
bidders, but competitive bid- 
ding is the field where all the 
great champions invariably 
excel. This is not surprising, as 
it is a demanding art, requir- 
ing the minute judgement of 
an apothecary one minute and 
the inscrutable courage of a 
poker player the next 
This hand occurred in the 
Round Robin stages of the 
1971 World Championships 
in Taipei. 

Oosed room. Australia v 
US Aces. North-South Game. 
Dealer South 

♦ 1095 
A 

A 04 

* J95432 


Ei sen berg, faced with an 
awkward lead, selected a 
club, raising Australian 
hopes. Cummings tried to 
discard his spades, but 
Eiscnberg ruffed the third 
round, and Hamman's red 
a ccs defeated the contract by 
one trick. 

Until the final bid. the 
auction in the other room 
was substantially identical 

Open room. Australia v 
Aces. 

W N E S 


IN THE GARDEN 


Tolerantly tempered trumpets 


1 grow the royal lily. Lilium regale. 
where their splendid white trumpets 
flushed deep rose on the outside can be 
seen from a downstairs window and 
their heady fragrance drifts up to our 
bedroom. Strange that these lilies, 
which in the wild grow only in a single 
valley region of China, should be so 
comfortable in garden cultivation — to 
the extent of producing fertile seed from 
which new plants can be raised quite 
easily. Seed usually ripens in September 
to October, when it may be sown in 
boxes six to nine inches deep, filled with 
John Innes seed compost, and left in a 
cool greenhouse or cold frame. 

Lilies look good in almostanyganden. 
They are especially handsome when 
growing up through other plants and 
this practice helps keep the roots cool. 
There are several lilies with those 
delightful thrown-back. turk's-cap pet- 
als which arc fairly easy to grow. The 
best known. Lilium managon. slow 
growing but lime tolerant, is a delightful 
pink-purple colour. The strange greeny 
petals of the powerfully scented Pyre- 
nean lily curl back from a hanging 
cluster of brilliant orange stamens. 

All these will thrive in most soils 
provided that a few rules are observed. 
Most important, the ground should be 
well drained: put broken crockery or a 
layer of gravel beneath where the bulb is 
to go if there is any danger of 
waterlogging, or plant in a raised bed. 
The soil should have plenty of humus 
and a planting area free from cold 


Clare Roberts 



Furled flowers: blooms of die exotic 
Liliam managon album, with its 
distinctive turk's-cap petals; It is 
slow-growing bat will tolerate lime 

draughts. I should perhaps add that 
before I learnt that lilies prefer leaf- 
mould with a bone-meal fertilizer to 
anything highly nitrogenous. I heaped 
manure on my regale lilies, which 
thrived determinedly nonetheless. 

. Lilies break horticultural rules. If 


certain conditions suit them, it seems 
they will put up with less than the 
pa*scribed ideals in other respects. 
There are many domestic gardeners 
»ho grow splendid lilies, perhaps not 
quite knowing how. and professional 
gardeni rx who fail with common 
spec ies. 

T iger hi) t usually sold as L. iignmmi) 
has dramatic orange-red flowers spotted 
black w hich bloom well into September. 
It dislikes lime but. like most lilies, 
looks well in a pot. This species is one 
which generously produces glossy 
brown bulbils at the base of its leaves. 
These can easily be detached and grown. 
One is always warned that this plant is 
susceptible to viruses, and I should like 
to know whether bulbils from affected 
plants would be virus-free or not My 
own. I am glad to say. have so far 
remained healthy, so 1 have not been 
able to make the experiment. 

Now is the time 10 choose lilies for 
planting in November, which is more 
desirable than at a later date because 
late-purchased bulbs are often damaged 
from having been out of the soil too 
long. Some species arc x>ery demanding 
and tricky, but the half-dozen which arc 
relatively easy give a good range of 
colourand flowering limes 3nd arc long- 
lived perennial species. There arc also 
hundreds of hybrids, some of them 
rcNOlungly gaudy and overdressed, but 
these tend 10 die for one reason or 
another after a few seasons. 

Francesca Greenoak 


• z 

K O 3 2 
6 75 2 
4 A K O 10 


N 

W E 
S 


♦ K8 

' J 108654 
•: KJ109 

* 6 


♦ A O J 7 5 *3 
97 

. 93 

* 87 

Some accurate exchanges 
in the dosed room led to the 
par result. 


W 

N 

E 

s 

Seres 

Harman 

Cnwgt 

E 2!?0 

• 

- 

• 


» Ml 

4* 

5’ 

NO (T) 

NO 

«*3> 

No 

NO 

NO 




(1) A lake-cut request m tne Australian 

system. 

«l Only ir»«ten«wed players would be 


tempted is 6*a. Soon nos dewiMO iu* 
nand. Correctly n« leaves tne next move 
to Ns partner. 

(31 A close daosion. 


worn J Borin Jscoby N Bonn 

2 * 

DouMe a* 5' Mo 

No 5* Double No 

No No 

Wolff unwisely cashed two 
top clubs before switching to a 
diamond. Norma Borin poun- 
ced on this tiny error. 

She rose with dummy's 
? A. ruffed a club and crossed 
to dummy with- the ‘Ta. After 
another dub ruff and a heart 
ruff. Norma wras in dummy. 
When she led the ♦IO. 
Norma presented Jacoby 
with an invidious option. If 
he covered. Norma would 
win and re-enter dummy 
with the 49 to cash the clubs. 
If he ducked (as he did), 
dummy's dubs would be as 
irresistible as the incoming 
tide. 

The American judgement 
was theoretically correct, and 
xct they lost a 1*3 IMP swing, 
which reinforces the old 
maxim. **if in doubt, bid one 
more*'. 

Jeremy Flint 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• On your return from holi- 
day, don't be panicked into 
inactivity by a jungle garden: 
take the jobs steadily and 
order will soon be restored. 

• Tie up and cut back herba- 
ceous plants which have be- 
come overgrown or fallen over 
in your absence. 

• Weed in half-hour doses as 
often as you can, rather than 
attempt h all at once. 


• As you weed, prune back 
rock and low-growing border 
plants such as alyssnm and 
anbrietia — and take cuttings. 

-• M atch out for new self-sown 
seedlings (geraniums and mal- 
lows, for example) which may 
be nestling among the weeds, 
and mark their position or 
move them gently to a safe 
place. 

• Don't put couch grass or 
bindweed on the compost heap 
— burn or throw them a»av. 



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•twft. 








3r- 


f — 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


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THE WEEK AHEAD 





CONCERTS 

MAGIC WAND: Gunter Wand, the 
veteran German conductor, makes 
his contribution to the BBC 
Symphony Orchestra's quintet of 
Bruckner symphonies at the 1 986 
Proms with a performance of the 
formidable Fifth. Royal Albert Hall 
(01-589 8212), Tuesday, 8.30pm. 



wittl&tt-VIK 


FILMS 

UNEASY RIDER; Bob Hoskins 

shared the top actor prize at Cannes 
for his role as the bemused 
chauffeur in the comedy-drama, 
•Mona Lisa (18). It is Neil Jordan's 
first film since The Company of 
Wolves. Odeon Haymarket(01- 
920 2738), from Friday. . 



OPERA 

HIGH NOTE: Cathryn Pope, the 
English National Opera’s rising 
young soprano, repeats her much • 
praised Susanna in a revival of 
Jonathan Miller's production of. 

The Marriage of Figaro. John 
Tomlinson sings the title role. 
Coliseum (01 -836 31 61 ). Wednesday. 



TIMES CHOICE 


OPERA 


ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: The new season has 
started with a revival of 
John Copley's production of II 
trovatore. Jane Eaglen has 
ascended to the rote of 
Leonora, with Kenneth 
Collins as the Manrico. Ann 
Howard the Azucena, and 
Neil Howlett the Count de 
Luna. James Lockhart 
conducts performances 
tonight Tues and Fri at 
7.3dpm. 

Coliseum, St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 

WELSH NATIONAL 
OPERA: The company ■ 
presents its Goran Jarvefett 
Ring cycle at Cardiff, starting 
on Fri at 7.15pm with The 
Rhinegokl. Richard Armstrong 
conducts a cast including 
Anne Williams-King. Penelope 
Walker, Phillip Joil and 
Nicholas Folwell. 

New Theatre, Park Place, 
Cardiff (02 22 32446/394844). 

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL: 

This afternoon a performance 
at 230pm of Aida, sung in 
Swedish by the Folkopera of 
Stockholm. Productions 
there, says the programme, 
"tend to be rough and 
immediate”. 

Leith Theatre, Edinburgh 
(031 225 5756). 

NEW SADLER’S WELLS: 

After a final performance 
tonight at Sunderland's 
Empire Theatre (0783 4251 7), 
the company's highly 
successful Mikado visits 
Aberdeen, with 
performances on Tues-Sep 6. 
Barry Wordsworth 
conducts a lively young cast 
led by Ian Comboy, 
Christopher Gillett and 
Deborah Rees. AH . - 

performances start at 7.30pm. 
His Majesty's Theatre, 
Aberdeen (0224 638080). 


FILMS 



Tom Conti (above) as a 
newfy-divorced couple thrown 
together by terrorists, from 
the magpie mind of writer- 
director Jim Kouf. 

Cannon Panton Street (01- 
930 0631), Cannon Oxford 
Street (01-636 0310). From 
;FH. 

JAKE SPEED (15): 

Derivative but spirited fun, with 
' Wayne Crawford as the 
pulp thriller hero helping to find 
a girl whisked off to Africa 
by white slave traffickers. 
Directed by Andrew Lane; 

- with Karen Kopins, John Hurt 
Cannon Oxford Street (01- 
636 0310), Cannon Panton 
Sheet (01-930 0631). From 

SELECTED 

. ROSA LUXEMBURG (PG): 

-The life and murder of the 
Communist revolutionary, 
solemnly filmed by Margarathe 
*von Trotta with a solid 
-performance by Barbara 
Sukowa. 

.Xumiere (01-836 0691). 
OSSESSIONE (PG): Lust 
and murder in provincial Italy, 
based on James M. Cain's 

■ Twice. Visconti s powerful 
first film (1942), released in a 
.sparkling print with extra 
-footage. 

'Renoir (01-837 8402). 

-DESERT HEARTS (18): 

Donna Deitch's beautifully 
controlled drama about 


OPENINGS 

ELIMINATORS 
(15) I TERROR VISION (18): 
The ICA’s silUestfDm 
. season in years - a tribute to 
- the producer Charles Band, 
king of the gory low-budget rip- 
off - concludes with two 
British premieres. Eliminators 
features Patrick Reynolds 
as a robotized human out to 
revenge his maker; in 
Terrorvision an alien monster 
takes up residence in TV 
sets. 

1C A Cinematheque (01-930 
3647). From Mon. > 

MIRACLES (PG): Farcical 
comedy, with Ten Gan- and 


reaching out and taking 
chances, set in Roto during 
the late 1950s. 

Screen on the Hill (01-435 
3366). 

ROCK AND JAZZ 

PJ.PROBY: The real wild 
man of pop, last seen in his 
magnificent impersonation 
of toe ageing Presley in Jack 
Good's underrated musical. 
Tonight, Half Moon, 93 
Lower Richmond Road, 

London SW15(01-788 
2387). 

JEAN CARNE: Talented US 
jazz-funk singer. 

Tonight and tomorrow. 

Town and Country Ctub, 
Highgate Road, London 
NW5 (01-267 3334). 

MAN JUMPING: Outdoor 
recital by a perennially 
intriguing systems -to- salsa 
band, surely on the brink of 
wider recognition. 

Tomorrow (2pm), Covent 
Garden Piazza, London WC2. 

JAZZ EXPLOSION: More 
US jazz-funk, from Angela 
Bonll Dave Valentin and 
Stanley Clarke. 

Tomorrow, Hammersmith 
Odeon, London WB (01-748 
4081). 

LOOSE TUBES: A 21 -piece 
band embodying all the 
excitement and freshness 
of the current British jazz 
scene. Unmissable. 

Mon to Sat, Ronnie Scott's 
Club, 47 Frith Street, London 
W1 (01-439 0747). 

GEORGE COLEMAN: 

Balancing the technical one- 
upmanship of bebop with 
the emotional firepower of the 
Cottrane generation, this 
former Miles Davis sldeman 
deserves to be recognized 
as the reigning world champion 
of the tenor saxophone. 

Mon to Thu rs, Bass Cfef, 35 
Coronet Sheet, London N1 
(01-7292476). 

CONCERTS 

RARE USZT: Ceqifon 
entend sur la montagne, 

Liszt's first symphonic 
poem, gets a rare performance 
from toe BBC SO under 
Peter Eotvos. 

Royal Albert Hall, 

Kensington Gore, London SW7 
(01-589 821 2). Today, 

7.30pm. 

RAVEL, ROSSINI: The BBC 
Concert Orchestra interprets 
Ravel's Vaises nobles et 
sentimentales, the Rossini- 
Respighi Boutique 
fantasque and Jacques Iberfs 
picturesque Escates. 

Jacques Delacore conducts. 
Royal Albert Hall. 

Tomorrow, 7.30pm. 

MOZART, MAHLER: The 
Toronto Symphony Orchestra 
makes Its appearance at 
the Proms in Mahler's 
Symphony No 9. Andrew 
Davis conducts, and Louis 
Lortie solos in Mozart's 
great Piano Concerto K 503. 
Royal Albert HalL Mon, 

730pm. 

BARTOK, BRAHMS: 

Besides Debussy's Nocturnes, 
Claudio Abbado conducts 
the London Symphony 
Orchestra in Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suita, 
and in Brahms's Piano 
Concerto No 1 the soloist is 
Alfred Bnendel. 

Royal Albert Hall. Tues, 

7.30pm. 

OCKIM AND MA: Young 
Uck Kim and Yo Yo Ma are the 
soloists in Brahms's * 
Concerto for Violin and Cello. 
John Casken's Orion over 
Fame is also heard from toe 
Scottish National Orchestra 
under Matthias Bamert, as is 
the Mussorgsky-Ravel 
Pictures at an Exhibition. 

Royal Albert Han. Wed, 

730pm. 

ENGLISH CONCERT: 

Trevor Pin nock conducts toe 
English Concert in Haydn's 
Symphony No 6 "Le Matin” 
and "Nelson" Mass. 

Barbican Centre, Silk 
Street London EC2(01-628 
8795, credit cards 01 -638 
8891). Fri, 7.45pm. 

BBC SO: Jerzy Maksymluk 
conducts toe BBC Scottish 
Symphony in Haydn's 
■Symphony No 79, 
Shostakovich's Symphony 
No 1, and Kun Woo Palk solos 
in Ravel’s G major Piano 
Concerto. 

Royal Albert Han. Fri, 

7.3upm. 


THEATRE 


IN PREVIEW 

■ THE HOUSE OF BERNARDA 
ALBA: Nuria Espert directs a 
new translation of Federico 
Garcia Lorca's final work, 
which he described as "a 
drama of women in the villages 
of Spain" with Glenda 
Jackson, Joan Plowright 
Patricia Hayes and June . 

Leg rand. 

Lyric, Hammersmith (01-741 
231 1). Previews from Mon. 
Opens Sep 8. 

SINK THE BELGRANOI: 

Steven Berkoff effects his own 
“scathing expose" of the 
Thatcher government during 
the Falklands conflict with 
Maggie Steed, Barry Stanton 
ana Edward Tudor Pole. 

Half Moon, 213 Mile End Road, 
London El (01-790 4000). 

From Tues. Press night Sep 9. 

OPENINGS 

THE MAINTENANCE MAN: 

Latest play by Richard Harris, 
a sour comedy about a man, 
ex-wife and mistress. John 
AJderton, Gwen Taylor and 



23 Dering Street New Bond 
Street London W1 (01- 
499 4100) from Thurs. 

ART BY LASER: Spectacular 
holograms by Susan Gam We 
and Michael wenyoa 
Salisbury f ” 

(for information i 
from Wed. 

JACKOWSKI: Paintings by toe 
young North Wales-born artist 
Andrzej JackowskL 
Marlborough Fine Art Ltd, 6 
Albermarfe Street London W1 
(01-629 51 61) from Fri. 

ANN WINN: Oils and 
watercolours of Greece, 
Scotland and Wales. 
Christopher Hull Gallery, 17 
Moteomb Street London SW1 
(for information 01-584 1744) 
from Wed. 

SELECTED 

SCANDINAVIAN 
PAINTING: Major show of 
Norwegian, Danish and 
Swedish paintings from the 
turn of toe century. 

Hayward Gallery, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01- 
928 3144). 

ARCHAEOLOGY: Massive 
review of archaeological 
discoveries made in Britain 
since toe war. 

British Museum, Great 
Russell Street London WC1 
(01-636 1555). 

FROM TWO WORLDS: 
Contemporary work by artists 
of non -European 
background working In Britain. 
Whitechapel Art Gallery, 
Whitechapel High Street 
London El (01-377 0107). 


DANCE 


Susan Penhaligon (above), 
directed by Roger r 
Comedy (01-930 2578/1972). 
Previews today. Opens Mon. 

CRAMP: John Goober's study 
of a young provincial body- 
builder, attempting to break-out 
of toe dead-end file projected ■ 
for him; music and lyrics by 
Tom Robinson and He reward 
K, directed by Godber. 
Bloomsbury (01-387 9629). 
Previews Mon. Opens Tues. 

SELECTED 


A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL: Alan 
Ayckbourn's own production of 
his celebration of amateur 
dramatics. 

Lyric (01-437 3686). 

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO 
NIGHT: Jonathan Miller's 
quirky production of O' NeDI's 
doomy masterpiece. 

Haymarket (01-930 9832). 

OUT OF TOWN 

BROMLEY: Charley’s Aunt 
Christopher Timothy heads the 
cast of a new production of the 
Brandon Thomas farce, 
directed by Peter Coe. 

Churchill (01-460 6677). Opens 
Tues. 

LEICESTER: Loot: Ian Forrest 
directs a new productiotn of 
the black comedy by Joe 
Orton. Ben Roberts plays 
Inspector Truscott 
HaymarkBt (0533 539797). 
Preview Wed. Opens Thurs. 

WORCESTER: Once in a 
Lifetime: The George S. 
Kaufman/Moss Hart comedy 
of Hollywood arid the arrival of 
toe talkies. David MonJco and 
Ken Bones head the cast. - 
directed by John Gmman. 

Swan (0905 27322). Opens 
Thurs. 

GALLERIES 

OPENINGS 

DUTCH LANDSCAPE: Major 
loan exhibition from Europe 
and America of Dotch 
landscape painting 1590-1650. 
The National Gallery, Trafalgar 
Square, London WC2 (01- 
839 3321} from Wed. 

JAPANESE PRINTS: 
Contemporary print show, as a 
result of enlightened collecting 
by the museum. 

British Museum, Great Russell 
Street London WC1 (01- 
636 1555) from Thurs. 

CLEMENTE: Seven new 
works by toe young Italian 
Francesco Clemente, all 
painted in India hast autumn. 
Anthony D'Offay Gallery, 9 & 


TOKYO BALLET: The 
programme Thurs. Fri is Las 
Sylphkfes, Kylian's comic 
Symphony inD and the British 
premiere of Tam Tam et 
Percussion by Fefix Biaska. 
Covent Garden (01-240 
1066). 

BOLSHOI BALLET: Ends its 
British tour in the special 
marquee in Battersea Park 
with Les Syiphides, the middle 
act of Spartacus and a 
group of display pieces. 
Battersea Park, London 
SW11 (booking through agents 
only). 

SADLER’S WELLS ROYAL 
BALLET: At Cambridge today 
they give Balanchine's - 
Prodigal Son and Tchaikovsky 
Pas de Deux, Bintfey 's 
Flowers of the Forestand 
MacMillan's Quartet. Swan 
Lake follows (Mon-Thurs) and 
the season ends (Fri and 
Sep 6) with de VaJcris's 
Checkmate, Cranko's 
Pineapple Poll and two works 
by dancers in the company, 
Track and Fiekiand Caught 
Time. 

Big Top. Jesus Green 
(advance booking 
0223 68848). 


BOOKINGS 


in 


For ticket availability, performance and opening times, 
telephone the numbers listed. Opera: Hilary Finch: Films: 
Geoff Brown; Dance: John Perdral; Concerts: Max 
Harrison; Theatre: Tony Patrick and Martin Cropper; 
Galleries: Sarah Jane Checkland; Rock. & Jazz: Richard 
Williams; Bookings: Anne Whhefaonse 


FIRST CHANCE 

CARDIFF FESTIVAL OF 
MUSIC: Booking opens Mon 
tor concerts with various 
orchestras playing choral and 
other works by young 
composers. Nov 22-Dec 6. 

St David's Hall. Cardiff. 
Secretary, Fox Hollows, 
Maendy, Cowbridge, South 
Glamorgan (04463 3474). 

BRITTEN-TIPPETT 
FESTIVAL: Britten s War 
rat the Albert Hair; 
frigate at St John's Smith 
Square, and concerts at 
South Bank. Sep-Oec. 

London Sirrfdniette, 

Kingston Polytechnic, Gipsy 
HiU Centre, Kingston HBJ, 
Kingston, Surrey (01-549 


LAST CHANCE 

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL: 

Ends toddy with Strindberg’s 
Miss JuSe by Royal 
Dramatic Theatre of - 
Stockholm, Aida by 
Folkopera of Stockholm, 
Hamlet by Oxford 
Playhouse Company, and 
concert by City of 
• Birmingham Symphony 
Orchestra. 

Festival Office, 21 Market 
Street, Edinburgh (031 225 
5756). 

CHINA DANCES: 
Photographs, rubbings and 
replicas illustrating more 
than 2,000 years of Chinese 
dance. Ends tomorrow. 

Royal Festival Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3002). 



DANCE 

TOKYO STORY: Eric Vu An, the 

French dancer, guests with the 

Tokyo Ballet paying its first visit 
to London for 11 years, in The 
Kabuki: 47 Samurais. The ballet is 
by Bejart, with whom Vu An has been 
a frequent collaborator. Covent 
Garden (01-240 1066), from Monday. 



BOOKS 

HIGH LIFE: Aristotle Onassis, 



playboy of the Western world, is toe 
subject of Art, a racy, anecdotal 
warts-and-ail biography by Peter 
Evans which is published on 
Thursday (Jonathan Cape, £12.95). 



THEATRE 

HARE PIECES: Irene Worth is a 
Russian artist called in to 
authenticate a paintingin David 
Hare's The Bay At Nice. It shares the 
bill with another new Kara play, 
Wrecked Eggs, which charts toe lives 
of three Americans. Cottesloe (01- 

928 2252), previews from Thursday. 


On stage with no 
score to settle 


J ulia McKenzie has a 
voice which many an 
actress would give her 
capped teeth for. But 
she's cock-a-hoop about hav- 
ing landed a leading role in 
which she doesn't sing a note. 

Even the foci that she is 
required to play her key scene 
flat on her back with only her 
curly auburn mop visible to 
the stalls does not dim her 
enthusiasm. 

Her role of an unhappy 
woman in Alan Ayckbourn's 
32nd play. Woman in Mind. 
requires her to suggest that 
half of the play is taking place 
in her head. Such difficulties 
only made Julia McKenzie 
purr with pride that 
Ayckbourn's script was sent to 
her. 

“It's the nearest I've yet got 
to a serious part Thai's the 
trouble with being a singer — 
you are just not considered as 
a serious actress. Singing and 
appearing in television sit- 
com are death to serious parts 
-and I’ve done both." 

She is famous for her 
blistering attack in Side by 
Side by Sondheim and for toe 
gullible innocence which she 
gave the lovelorn Miss Ad- 
elaide in Guys and Dolls ai the 
National Theatre. With half of 
toe West End theatres devoted - 
to. musicals, old and mostly 
fragrant, you might have 
thought she would be perma- 
nently busy leading one of the 
casts. 

But it was always acting 
rather than singing which 
appealed to her. despite the 
fact that it was her rendition of 
“One Fine Day" in a school 
concert led to a" scholarship at 
too Guildhall School. In her 
four years of opera training, 
she wished all the time that 
she was on the drama course. 

Her cancer began in Rose 
Marie (no. not the original 
production). “I had no tech- 
nique in those days, so 1 cried 
real tears in the Indian Love 
Call every night on lour." She 
understudied in musicals, of- 
ten look over from the star, 
and was cast in a long string of 


Purring with pride, 
Julia McKenzie 
has landed the 
part of an 
unhappy woman 

British flops — “You name 
one. I was in it." 

A hurt look showed through 
her eccentric- shaped spec- 
tacles as she said: “Acting was 
something other people did. I 
didn't know any actors. I 
didn't think I would ever 
make toe jump." 

It led to a bad patch of self- 
doubt and depression at gel- 
ting nowhere. “I was not 
married and past ‘marriagable 
age*. I thought I wasn't going 
to do anything much in life. It 
may have been simple frustra- 
tion with the son of work I 
was getting. I had forgotten 
what it was like to be happy." 


t was a surprising ad- 
mission from such a 


. I bubbly “good trouper" 
“ with -a warm personality 
which clears -the footlights 
without effort. She faced up to 
her disappointment: when 
many would have given up, 
she stuck in. "What saved me 
was positive thinking. I de- 
cided it didn't matter. . 

"I’d . never- particularly 
wanted to be a star. It's staying 
power that counts in -our 
business. If you stick at it and 
if you're any. good at all. you 
become somebody whom peo- 
ple trust to deliver. 1 don’t 
think there are that many 
comedy actresses in that 
category." 

Within two- years of this 
crisis, toe picture had altered. 
She was acting and- she was 
married to Jerry Harte, an 
American actor who chose to 
work in England . 

The change in career came 
about through television, in a 
sit-com which gave her -flic 
chance to act with the -great 
Irene Hand!. In due course 


Michael Codron spotted her 
and offered her a first acting 
chance in The Norman Con- 
quests. Ayckbourn's trilogy. 

Ten Times Table followed 
and later the all-star television 
production of Absent Friends 
with Tom Courtenay. By now 
she is an Ayckbourn specialist 
“I think it was -because he 
Jikcd me in Absent Friends 
that he thought of me for his 
new play." 

She speaks of Alan 
Ayckbourn as playwright and 
director with awe. "He is so 
much cleverer than the rest of 
us. He has this great domed 
head the same shape as 
Shakespeare's. I believe this is 
a major play, ft's a much 
darker comedy than, usual, toe 
sort that wipes the laugh off 
the audience's lips as the lights 
fade. I’m never off the stage 
but doing thaL even eight 
times a week, is wonderfuL" 

Docs this mean she is 
through with musicals? One 
hopes noL because she is one 
of the very few English ac- 
tresses who can sock a song 
across and act it at the same 
time. "My big ambition is to 
get Ayckbourn and Sondheim 
together to write a musical." 

But until, that happens, she 
will be singing on television in 
her first "special" Julia and 
Comjkmy. next month. She 
will also be reluming in a 
fourth series as the scatter- 
brained wife in Fresh Fields. 

' She was hun by critics who 
asked why she appeared in 
situation comedy. “We do it 
. to make a living. We've got 
mortgages like other people''. - 
she said with a touch of 
exasperation. 

“Every New Year's Eve 1 
lean out of the window and 
whisper a wish on the wind", 
she. confided. "This year I 
wished for a lovelv dramatic 
part in a new play.” Her hope 
is that her wish has come true. 

Peter Lewis 

Woman in Mind opens at 
the -Vaudeville Theatre (01-836 
. 9987) on Wednesday. 


ARTS DIARY 


JolwW winm 




Few will ever forget the cata- 
strophic production of Mac- 
beth starring Peter O’Toole 
and directed by Brian Forbes, 
six years go. The critical 
slating it received might be. 
considered enough to deter 
anyone ever staging the play in 
the West End again, curse or 
no curse. ■ 

But now- Forbes is about 
ready to put his reputation an 
the tine again. He is planning 
to bring a murder-mystery, 
Killing Jessica, to the West 
End after a trial run in 
Richmond. . 

Despite toe howls of an- 
guish created by O'Toole's 
unforgettable performance. 
Forbes looks back on that 
milestone of theatre history 
with amusement “One would 
think we'd restarted Vietnam 
from the way they reacted" he 
says. One can only wish the 
optimistic follow luck. 

Lady of Spain 

Fineaifs hot potato, the Goya 
portrait of too, Marquesa de 
jSauta Cruz, 2&4ft surface for 
"" first tone' since the un- 
ity tussle over its owner- 
ship four months ago, which 
culminated in its owner. Lord 
Wuhborne, having to sell it 
back to the Spanish govern- 
ment Soon it will be seen in 
its proper context, amid the 
other magnificent Goyas at 
the Villa Favorite at Lake 
Lugaroo. Then on to the 
Prado Museum in Madrid 
which, the Spaniards claim, 
was always its spiritual home. 

• The ay went up from an 
increasingly beleaguered 
corner of London's dance 
community — and now it may 
have been answered. 

Strippers who want to be 
represented by Equity in 
an attempt to improve their 
lot, should heed the words 
of Equity general secretary 
Peter Pkrariez: “Of course 
this union frill represent 
strippers. All we ask is 
that they show us right recent 
contracts from different 
employers. We like to 
represent all speciality 
acts”. 

Words’ worth 

As .Sir Freddie Ayer put it 
when chairing the Booker 
Prize, his cleaning lady was 
paid more per hour than he 
was. For reading 120 novels 
this year's judges — who 
include Anthony Thwaite, 
Edna Healey. Bernice Rubens 
and Gillian Reynolds - will 
each be paid £1,250 for what 
cannot be less than 600 hours’ 
work if diligently done. So 
how popular, one wonders. 




1 


i 


■ii . :• 


Quigley and Thwaite 
will the other judge, label 
Quigley, be when they all meet 
next week and discover that 
she has called in a further five 
books to be read? Answer 
probably more popular than 
chairman Thwaite, who is said 
to have annoyed fellow judges 
by deliveringa lecture on ho* 
a book should be read. 

No live Aid? 

Though it will be beamed 
around the world by saieltift 
there is no guarantee tha 1 
British viewers will see Classic 
Aid. the Geneva-based charin' 
extravaganza on September 
30. The cast list is mouth - 
watering: Maazcl. Sah>< 
Ashkenazy. Bream. T c 
Kanawa. Pavarotti. Menuhin 
Isaac Stern, Yo Yo Ma. Barry. 
Tuckwell and many other* 
But the BBC tells me. "We£ 
still in discussion with 
organizers. It won't be a Ii? 
transmission. Mavbe later 13 , 
the year." r 

Christopher Wlfeo* 


v.t* . . 


















THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


17 






COURT 

CIRCULAR 

ORK HOUSE 
f JAMES’S PALACE 
ugusr 28: The Duke of Kent, 
ofonel Soots Guards, today 
sited the 1st Battalion in 
an ford, Norfolk. 

Captain Michael Campbefi- 
amerton was in attendance. 


be Prince of Wales will attend 
, i informal meeting of agri- 
"i.fltiire ministers of the Euro- 
*an Community al the Old 
' igland Hotel, Bowness-oo- 
' ^ndermere, on September 30. 


* - v. 


English Speaking 
Jnion 

fr Ahmed E. H. Jailer, Chair- 
ian of the English Speaking 
nion of Pakistan, has arrived 
Edinburgh to attend ESU 
, .. , .. iternational Council and 
L! 1 ' i j f/orid Members’ Conference 
is 


staying at the Sheraton 



foiel. 


COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Birthdays 

TODAY: Sir Harold Aicberiey, 
68; Lord Brain. 60; Sir Patrick 
Branigan. QC 80; Sir Charles 
Burman, 78; Mr Allan Davis, 
73; Mr Kenneth Gilk 59; Dr A- 
B. Gilmour, 58; Mr M. R. 
Harris, 64; Mr Denis Healey. 
CH. MP, 69; Rear-Admiral 
John Howson. 78: Lord Keith of 
Castleacre, 70; Sir Desmond 
Lee, 78; the Countess of Long- 
ford, 80; Mr Brewster Mason. 
64; Sir Peter Parker, 62; Sir 
Henry Phillips, 72; Sir Ri char d 
Stone, 73; Professor J. M. 
Thoday, 70; the Very Rev 
Professor T. F. Torrance, 73; Sir 
Philip Wood field, 63. 
TOMORROW; Judge Argyle, 
QC 71; Mr Roy Castle. 54; Sir 
James Cleminson, 65; Lieuten- 
ant-General. Sir Napier 
Crookenden. 71; Judge de Piro. 
QC 67; Air Marsha Sir Edward 
Gordon Jones, 72; Mr Larry 
Grayson, 56; Miss N. M. 
Hickey, 62; Mr Clive Lloyd, 42; 
Professor Sir Bernard Lovell, 
73; Mr Bryan Organ. 51; Mr 
Itzhak Perlman, 41; Mr Justice 
Sheen. 68. 


Kevin Kelly 


Sexual ethics and the Vatican 


- 




".m 

, - J-i 


k. j' 


^ appointments 

Tr»,J aiesi appointments include: 
i; l-’fliWessor Gordon Reynolds to 
•2^1 e Emeritus Professor of the 
loyal Military School of Music, 
■ n "his retirement from Knell er 

■' tall 

>r Harry Law and Professor 
- ■ ohn Thomas to be members of 


the Science and Engineering 
Research Council. Professor 
Richard Norman is reappointed 
to the council. 

Mr Colin Edwards to be chair- 
man, and Mr Ralph Harris, to 
be vice-chairman, of the Associ- 
ation of Chief Officers of 
Probation. 


forthcoming 


Damages 

. -lr DJ. Cross 
■ud Miss C.O. Mitchell 
lie engagement is announced 
■ ■ ei ween David James, elder son 
f Mr and Mrs F. W. Cross, 38 
. ;■ Street. Blackpool, and Caih- 

.nnc Olivia, younger daughter 
•f Mr and Mrs Angus Mitchell. 

0 Regent Terrace. Edinburgh, 
fr JJ- Denton 

- ad Miss S. Challiss 

. Tie engagement is announced 
. . etween Jonathan, only son of 
fr and Mrs P. Denton, of 
laidstone. and Sara, only 
a lighter of Mr and Mrs M. 
‘owling. also of Maidstone. 

1r R J- Dunbar 
‘ nd Miss A.H. Martin 
Tie engagement is announced 

- el ween Richard, son of Mrand 

1 rs W. J. Dunbar, of 
anderstead. Surrey, and 
iinanda. daughter of Mr and 
4rs C. H. Martin, of Potters 

. • tar. Hertfordshire, 
fr TJ. Fish 

nd Miss SJLC. Limbers 
Tie engagement is announced 
•etween James, second son of 
' 4r and Mrs G. M. Fish, of 
•fanor House. Bulcote. Notting- 

- am. and Susannah, younger 
aughter of Mr and Mrs R. H. 
Imbers. of Whitehall, Bigby. 
incolnshire. 

fr N J.C. Guidon 
nd Miss CJ. Wilson 
Tie engagement is announced 
etween Nicholas, younger son 
if the Rev P. J. and Mrs 
jandon. of Hindolveston. Nor- 
olV. and Carole, only daughter 

• if Mr and Mrs B. K. Wilson, of 
rheUenham. Gloucestershire. 

Mr H.C. Grissell 

ind Mrs H.E. Menzies 
fhe engagement is announced 
aeiween Henry CubitL younger 
>on of the late Major Michael 
. Grissell and of Mrs Michael 
GrisselL of Brightiing Park. 

• Robensbridge. East Sussex, and 
Helena Eileen, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Robert Mair. of 
Wick Farm. Udimore. Rye, East 
Sussex. 


Mr HJ. Mackenzie 
.and Miss J.R. Pnttman 
The engagement is announced 
between Hamish John Macken- 
zie. of Cobham. Surrey, son of 
the late Dr and Mrs D.C. 
Mackenzie, of Alverstoke. 
Hampshire, and Jacqueline Ro- 
berta. younger daughter of the 
late Mr J. H. Pattman and of 
Mrs Pauman. of Peaslake, 
Surrey. 

Mr T.M. Purring 
and Miss M.F. Horst 
The engagement is announced 
between Todd Matthew, youn- 
ger son of Commander G. A. 
Purring. US Navy, retd, and the 
late Mrs Kilty Purring, of 
Anapolis. Maryland. United 
States, and Muffin, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Mike Hurst, of 
Crapstone House, Devon. 

Mr J.T J. Stageman 
and Miss A.G- Turnbull 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian, son of Mr and 
Mrs F. D. Stageman. of 
Red bourn. Hertfordshire, and 
Alexandra, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs S. D. T. Turnbull, of St 
Albans. Hertfordshire. 

Mr DJ. Stevenson 
and Miss J.M. Bloomer 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Mr and 
Mrs J. Stevenson, of Solihull. 
Birmingham, and Julia, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J. H. 
Bloomer. of Padfieid, 
Derbyshire. 

Mr H.H. Tapper 
and Miss S.M. Williamson 
The engagement is announced 
between Henry, eldest son of Dr 
and Mrs G-W. Tapper, of | 
Shaftesbury. Dorset, and Sarah, 
younger daughter of Mrand Mrs 
L. M. Williamson, of Long 
Ashton. Bristol. 

Mr S-R. Wells 
and Miss GJ. Armifage 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, son of the late 
Mr Martin Wells and of Mrs 
Pamela Wells, of St John’s, 
Woking, and Gillian, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs James Amutage. 
of Wh infield. Manchester. 


The Vatican has recently said that the 
American moral theologian. Father 
Charles Curran, is ‘not suitable or 
eligible to teach Catholic theology”. The 
objection made against Curran is that be 
dissents from some of the “official" 
positions held in the Roman Catholic 
church on contraception, masturbation, 
homosexuality, pre-marital sex, divorce 
and abortion. They are issues which 
have to be faced honestly by anyone 
who. like Curran or myseffi is involved 
in teaching moral theology. 

Curran is well versed in the teaching 
of the Second Vatican CoundL In 
particular, he has taken to heart Vatican 
IFs insistence that you cannot realty 
judge whether an action is good or bad if 
you isolate it from the person doing the 
action. 

What Curran has done in his 
and writing is to apply that crucial 
insight of Vatican J2 to some areas of 
personal morality where the current 
“official" position does not seem help- 
fill from a pastoral point of view. 
Conan’s approach is typical of most 
moral theologians today, myself in- 
cluded, even though we would all 
express things in our own particular 
way. 

With regard to contraception, this 
approach admits that interfering with 
the natural functioning of the sexual act 
by using some form of artificial contra- 
ception stops the marriage act from 
being life-giving in one sense (that is. 
physical) though in that sense it cannot 
actually be life-giving for most of a 
woman's cycle anyway. However, it also 
maintains that such an act can still be 
life-giving in another very rich sense. 

In loving each other a married couple 
help each other to become more alive 
and to grow as persons. And if this love 
is to be sustained and to grow, it needs 
to be expressed and communicated in 
all sons of ways, including the sexual 
language of making love. It is precisely 
this love that they have for each other 
which is so crucial for the personal good 
of their children. It provides a secure, 
loving home which enables the children 
themselves to come to life as loving 
persons. So even when a couple's 
making love actually excludes more 
children for the fbrseeable future, it can 
still be life-giving love for their children. 
Seen in the context of the persons 
involved, therefore, making love in a 
way which is physically contraceptive 
can actually be a genuine expression of 


life-giving love between two persons 
and, as such, pleasing to God. 

This approach also applies Vatican 
ITs emphasis on the human person to 
the other issues mentioned. For in- 
stance, it say’s that seen in a personal 
context, for many individuals 
masturbation is a symptom of some 
stress or anxiety they art going through. 
Consequently, a person so affected 
needs help, not condemnation. In the 
personal context of a couple who are 
undergoing fertility therapy to help 
them have a baby, masturbation by the 
husband to obtain a specimen of his 
sperm can bean act which draws its real 
meaning from his unselfish, life-giving 
love. 

The approach I am describing would 
say that if some men and women are 
homosexual in a deep, almost constitu- 
tional way, that does not make them any 
less persons loved by God and called to 
live lives of interpersonal love. Being a 
homosexual does not automatically 
bring with it a vocation to celibacy. The 
Gospel is hardly “good news" to such a 
person ifbe or she is told by the Church: 
“As a person you are loved by God but 
the capacity you have for loving at this 
very deep level of your personal being is 
displeasing to God." This approach is 
simply saying that in some way or other 
the Church must help homosexuals to 
five fives of faithful love. To refuse 
them such help can leave some homo- 
sexuals so isolated and coofiised that 
they might be led to look for comfort in 
promiscuous relationships. And since 
Aids (acquired immune deficiency syn- 
drome) is spread by promiscuity, not by 
homosexuality, our so-called Christian 
teaching could actually be helping to 
spread Aids. 

This approach is not in favour of sex 
before marriage. However, it says that, 
from a personal angle, there isa world of 
difference between a one night stand or 
a very immature pair of youngsters 
trying to find comfort in their loneliness 
and the expression of love between a 
couple who are firmly committed to 
each other, even though this has not yet 
been solemnized by a Church wedding. 

This approach also recognizes that 
marriage breakdown is a terrible human 
tragedy. The Church must have special 
care for those whose lives have been 
shattered by a marriage breakdown. It 
must help them to find healing and to 
come back to life again. God wants us to 
five our lives forwards, not backwards. 


Some who have suffered marriage 
breakdown have found that the way- 
forward which has brought them heal- 
ing and given them new life has been the 
love and security of a second marriage. 
When this is the case, such people 
should be able to find support from ihe 
church, not condemnation or exclusion 
from the sacraments. 

The question that some moral theolo- 
gians are raising about abortion is one 
that has been a matter of dispute in the 
Church over many centuries, even 
though the practice of abortion has 
always been condemned. This question 
is not raised in order to provide some 
justification for the appalling number of 
abortions taking place in Britain under 
the current Abortion ACL On the 
contrary, this approach to moral theol- 
ogy recognizes that abortion involves 
destroying life and that, in itself is evil. 
However, it is concerned about certain 
very specific personal situations in 
which it makes an enormous difference 
whether one believes that the early 
embryo is io be given exactly the same 
respect as a human person or not. This 
affects a couple whose only chance of a 
baby is through in-vitro fertilization, 
when part of that technique can involve 
discarding some surplus embryos. 

It is clear that the approach I have 
outlined arrives at pastoral conclusions 
on these various issues that are out of 
step with the current “official" position 
of the Roman Catholic church as 
represented by the Pope and the 
Vatican. However, this approach claims 
that it is very much in step with the gen- 
eral approach to moral issues found in 
the very authoritative “offical" teaching 
of Vatican U. Vatican II clearly taught 
that an awareness of the dignity of the 
human person is one of the “signs of the 
times" in our day. 

Father Curran sees himself 


OBITUARY 

MR STUART YOUNG 

BBC chairman through 
a difficult time 


as 


responding to this particular “sign of the 
times" high-lighted by Vatican IL 
Vatican II has helped the church to 
become more person-centred and thus 
to bring comfort and healing to many 
people who are facing difficult personal 
situations. Like Paul at Antioch, his 
dissent from the church’s “official" 
position is because he believes it is “not 
respecting the true meaning of the Good 
News" (Galatians 2:14) 

Father Kelly is a Raman Catholic 
moral theologian 


Marriages 

The Hon W JLF. Vane 
and Miss CJL Pembertoo- 
Pigott 

The marriage took place yes- 
terday at St Keatigern’s. 
Crosihwaiie. of the Hon Rich- 
ard Vane, elder son of Lord 
Inglewood and the late Lady 
Inglewood, of Huuon-in-the- 
Forest, Penrith, and Miss Cres- 
sida Pemberton-Pigott. 
youngest daughter of the late Mr 
Desmond Pemberton-Pigott 
and of Mrs Pemberton-Pigott, of 
Fawe Park. Keswick. The Rev 
R. T. Hughes and the Rev R. p. 
Frank officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her brother. Mr 
Jason Pemberton-Pigott, was 
attended by Hugh Tallents, 
Edward Brims. Max Helmore, 
Freddy and Melissa Pemberton- 
Pigott. the Hon Saracha Brand. 
Genevieve Butler. Alexandra 
and Alice Proby, Anna-Rose 
Hughes. Laura Graham, 
Georgina Dessain. Catherine 
Blackett-Ord and Frances New- 
man. The Hon Christopher 
Vane was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon will be spent in 
Turkey. 

Mr WJL Causin 
and Miss SJ. TdweD 
The marriage took place on 
August I. in Seattle. Wash- 
ington. of Mr William Causin 
and Miss Susan ToweU. 


Science report 


Principles of microwave cooking 
applied to treatment of cancer 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

Cancer specialists in the Heat and radiation appear 
United States are finding that to potentiate each other, said 

Dr Dierdre Cohen, one of the 
doctors. “Heat allows ns to use 


they can make radiation ther- 
apy mere effective in cancer 
treatment by applying some of 
the same principles nsed in 
microwave cookery. 

Patients who have failed 
completely with standard 
forms of treatment have re- 
sponded to a combination of 
heat and radiation, according 
to doctors at the University of implanted in the tumour. Up to 
Son them California's 14 such elements - microwave 


much less radiation thaw 
usual, so there is less danger of 
da m ag ing normal tissue and of 
producing other side-effects." 

The most successful form of 
the treatment is interstitial 
hyperthermia, in which micro- 
wave heating elements are 


Kenneth Norris Jnr Cancer 
Hospital and Research 
Institute. 

After the innovative treat- 
ment, tumours have improved 
or disappeared in the majority 
of cases among patients who 
have already had chemo- 
therapy, radiation or surgery. 
But the doctors caution that 
the treatment is still in its 
infancy, and is being tried only 
on very 31 patients for whom 
nothing else has worked. 


antennae - are placed one 
centimetre apart, along with 
two temperature probes to 
monitor the temperatnre of the 
tumour. The goal is to main- 
tain a temperature of 43°C 
(I09F), in the tumour tissue. 

In a typical treatment, the 
antennae are inserted through 
flexible plastic tubes and heat 
is administered for one hoar. 
The antennae are removed and 
replaced by radioactive iso- 
topes to supply interstitial. 


“into the tissue", radiation for 
four or five days. Finally, 
another hour's heat treatment 
is given. 

Of 20 patients treated at the 
Norris hospital by this method 
since February 1985, half have 
shown some improvement, and 
half have seen thefr tumours 
disappear completely. Dr Co- 
ben sauL 

The treatment has only a 
limited capability and is best 
suited to tumours dose to the 
skin surface, breast cancer, 
rectal cancer and tumours in 
the bead and neck area. Some 
treatment equipment has been 
approved by the US Food and 
Drag Administration and is 
clinically available at some 
university medical centres. 

It is not available in Britain. 

Source: University of Southern 
California Nates Service, PVW 
205, Los Angeles, California 
90089-1227) 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memariam 


BIRTHS, MARRUGES, 
BERTHS and H HQKKUUM 
£4 a In + 15ft VAT 

(minimum 3 Kites) 

^nnoonccmcnu. authenticated by die 
wbk and permanent address at the 
sower, may be rent io: 

THE TIMES 
. P0 BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS 

“ telephoned (by telephone subs- 
ohere only] la 0U81&Z4 

Anvewciocnu can be received by 
between 9.00am and 
Monday lo Friday, on Samr- 
taMw Q.OQam and 12 noon- 
■ Only) For pnbiicalion the 
day by 130pm. 

WHWNB HWWlAflES. TOOMBS 
“t® Court and Social Rage EE a On 
* o' Ml. 

Chart and Social Page annoucements 
w not be accepted by telephone. 
Eoqwria la tl-822 9853 
™jr IQJOBml. or send to: 

1 fcwdwta Street, l mOm Ft 9XN. 

riege nfltw* at least 48 boon before 
POtMcaiioo. 


sa&L 

following da 


Mr? wtUi an mm. and holiness. 
""Hmu whim no man shall see the 
Lord. 

12- 14 


tr 


BIRTHS 


SATTY . on August 29th. lo Michael 
ajd Frances l nee Twtsleton- 
wweham-ncnnesi. a daughter. 
Caroline, a sister for Geraldine 
troaniia and Katherine. 

- On August 2 1st 1986. lo 
“JMn irate Frankish] and 
Jj^nwopher. a daughter. Sophia 
'‘f’tfitfa May. 

SAN® . On August 23rd. at Si 
Hospital, lo Felicity and 
Edward, a son. Nicholas. 

*®y®-t-On 28lh August 1966.10 Oriel 
Whitehead) and Hugo, a 
« ,a O«ner. Leonora. 

■ On August 28U». 10 
and Fra none inee 

™‘Wpyi. in Toronto. Ontario. » 
»n. Wuuam Maclean, brother to 
«waid and Christopher. 

■ On August 2eth. In Oxford. 
K jfonv-Frances and Francis, a 
““Shier. Elisabeth -Mary. 

SEP**** ’ 1 °n August 2oth. in 
ip™™, to Janet (nee Steckwell) and 
ony. a daughter. Emily dm 

numeimki - On August 16th. at 
ju^TV 11 ®' in*e Duuuoy] 

a -fotwny. a daughter. Emily Jane. 

- On August 2TUi. to 
and Craham. a dautfiter. 

Sarah Elinor Jane 

uknex - On 29th August, lo 
JJMsw and Howard, a son. Jack 
wutam Le Valllanl. a brother for 
Henry George Le VallunL 

■ On August 22nd. to Sarah 
Oraves/oni and James a son. 
■uexander, 

- On August 22nd. to* 

Fm) and Howard, a 
•auwier. Rosanna ChariMte. 


On Saturday 23rd 
August, at St Thomas' Hospital. Lon- 
don. to Fiona i nee AUom) and Robin, 
twin sons; one doing weU. Ihe other 
very sadly born dead. 


• On August 28th. to Kate unto 
KaUienne Clarke) and MgeL 
daughter. Melissa, a sister for OUvta 
and Emily. 

JOSEPH • On August 18th. at St 
Luke's. Guildford to Judy inee Berry) 
and Michael, a son. Maxwell Philip 
George. 

LANE - To Julta <n«e Murray) and 
Oliver, on 26th August at 
RonKswood Hospital. Worcester, 
son. Henry Benedict. 

LANGOON On August 7th to Claudia 
inee LuKheri and MkchaeL a daugtv 
ler. Alexandra. A sister for Catherine 
and Francesca. 

LEAKE On August 24th. at Princess 
Margaret's Hospital. Swindon, to 
Gillian mee Meadwem and David, 
two sons. Thomas George and James 
Leonard. 

MYATT • On August 23rd. lo Suzanne 
inee Nash wanknni and John, a son. 
William John Redvers. a brother for 
Jennifer. 

OSMAN • On August nth. 1986. to 
Rosemary inee Jones) and Stephen, a 
daughter. Sarah Clare Michelle. 

PEMBERTON - On August 28th. to 
Ceri and Giles, a daughter, sister for 
Camilla. 

cm - On August 26th. at Westmin- 
ster. Io Andrew and CtareJitee 
McDowatn a son. Henry Lends 
Hamilton. 

SELBY - On August 26th. lo Marianne 
and Brian, a daughter. Anna 
Christina, a sister tor Carl. 

STAFFEL - On 25UI August 1986. at 
Lewis HospitaL Western bln. to 
Mary-Bess inte Hatford-Marijeod) 
and Peter, a son. 

THOMAS • To Fiona and Ian. of 
-AorangT. LUUewfek Common. 
Surrey, a son. Datld Laird Roald, on 
2Ath August. 1986. at St Peter’S. 
CherUcy. Fiona and David both well: 
Carl la and Rosane deUghied. 


MARRIAGES 


MR FJ>. FITZGERALD i MSS R.T. 
DUFT1H - The marriage took place 
between David Fitzgerald and 
Rosemary Duilbi on Thursday. 28th 
August, al The Church o ( Uie 
Resurrect ion. Belfast. 


DEATHS 


ACHARWA - On August 27th. 
suddenly al home In Calcutta. 
Snchangshu Kanla. Advocate 
General of West Bengal. India. 

MBtEMElfiH • Mrs Maraeam 
Austin -Leigh of bet HalL Isd. 
Gockermouin. Cumbria, suddenly on 
26th August. 1966. at The Cottage 
Hospital. Cockermoulh. 


.On August 2Jlh. her 86O1 
tNrihdaf. peacefully at SobeU House. 
Oxford. Phoebe Mildred, formerly 
Eastwood (nee Heaton) of Manor 
Cottage. SutnesfiehL Oxon. Funeral 
Service. Tuesday. 9Ui September at 
2pm at SI Jame'e. Sionesflrtd. fol- 
lowed by cremation al Heodlngion 
Oematonum. 


(CRACRWtL inie WlltraotU - On 
August 27th, peacefully at Villa Ron 
Nursing Horae. Torquay. Winifred 
May. in her B7th year, wife of the 
late Ernest Leslie Gradate)) and 
mother of John and Robin (bom In 
USA). Funeral Service at St Luke's 
Oiurctv Torquay, on Thursday. Sep- 
tember 4th. at 11.30am. No Dowers 
by request, but donations for The Na- 
tional Kidney Research Fund may be 
sent to Torbay & District Funeral 
Service. WeUswood. Torquay. 


On August 27th peacefully In 
Hastemere Hospital. Herbert Prenzel 
aged 86 years. Beloved Husband of 
Louise & Father of Bryan A Pru- 
dence. Funeral Service on Monday 
1st September at Grayswood Church 
at 1.46 tun. Family Dowers only. 

JAKEMAM . on August 26th. peaceful 
ty in Abeam*. Richard W. l 
Malayan CrirtT Service, aged 78. 

KATE On August 27th. Anthony PauL 
peacefully In Ms steep, at home in 
Clare. Suffolk, aged 61. Dearly loved 
husband of JUI and father of Nicho- 
las. Tessa and Rupert. Funeral and. 
Service and Thanks Giving for his 
life at 12 noon on Tuesday. 2nd Sep- 
tember al Clare Parish Church, 
followed by burial at SL Augmtine's. 
Ashen. Donations tr desired to The 
Imperial Cancer Research Fuad. P.O 
Box 123. Lincoln's bin Field. Lo ndon 
WC2. 

LOCH - SMrtey beloved wtfe of Colonel 

I I.C. Loch of Monksford Cottage. 

SL 8osweib and mother of Anne and 
John, peacefully on 27th August. 
1986 Funeral private, family 
Dowers only. Any donations lo 
Cancer Rebel. 


On 2S(ft August at 
Eastbury House. Sherborne. Dorset. 
Marion MarMasier. widow of J S 
Maonaster. aged 87. Funeral service 
at Casdeton church. Sherborne on 
Tuesday ^id September at 2.15 p.m. 
Followed by cremation at YeoviL 
Flowers to Eason Funeral Services. 
Newell. Sherborne. 

NEWMAN - On August 18th. 1986. In a 
car crash In Spain. Sandra Noeile. 
aged 48 years, much loved mother of 
Julian, Christopher, Jeremy and 
Aaron and dear friend lo many. Fu- 
neral Service at YaUmfon Parish 
Church. Berks, on Monday. 1st Sep- 
tember al 12 noon followed by burial 
In the Church yard. Flowers to Cyril 
H Lovegroue. 114 Oxford B0. Read- 
ing. Tel Reading 620 16, 

PARMMME - Peacefully in hospital tn 
Belgium on August 25th. 1986. 
Alexander Paul Paramore. dear 
husband of Simone, father of Patrick 
and John. 

PILCHER - On August 28th 1936. 
peacefully. Eileen Beatrice Margaret 
of Monorgan Longforgan. Perth- 
shire. Wife of lire tale W. Hope 
Pilcher and tavtafl mother, mother- 
in-law. grandmother and great 
grandmother. Funeral service at 
Lon gf org a n Church, at 2-30 on Mon- 
day September isL Family flowers 
only. No tellers please. 

PULLING - on August 7?th. 1986. at 
Bosstngton House. Adisham. .Nr 
Canterbury. k’enL Joan King Pulling, 
aged 91 years, a dearly loved sister 
and aunt Cremation Servlet? 
Tuesday. 2nd S ep te mber- Barham 
Crematorium, at 4pm. Flowers to C 
W Lyons. Funeral Directors. 
Canterbury. 


On August 2«n. me eve or 
his 87th birthday, after l'e days of 
HI -health. LleuLCeoeral Sir Harold 
I Dixie) Redman. K.C.B..OB.E.. date 
H A. and K.O.Y.LJ.) of Stair House 
Lutworth. Dorset. Beloved husband 
of Barbara (BofabteL tether of Sally 
FrllcUy and Jeremy, and grand 
father of Leo. Isobei and tone. 
Funeral service at 2.30 on Tuesday. 
2nd September, at the Church of SI 
Mary, wareham. The 11.32 train 
Rom Waterloo will be met at 1.41 
Wareham. Family flowers only. No 
mourning and no memorial wsvtce 
ai his request. 

OUTHEBM • On August 25m. 1986 
Henry Neville, peacefully after 
short illness ui The John Raddkffe 
Hospital, dearly loved and deeply 
mtwd by his wife Kitty, tanuty and 
friends. Funeral Service al Oxford 
Crematorium, on Tuesday. Septem 
ber 2nd. at 12 noon. No flowers by 
request, donations U desired, to 
Speech Therapy DepL Tavermead 
Rehabilitation Centre. Abingdon Rd. 
Oxford. 

TAT - On August 27th. peacefully at 
his home. Dr Andrew, aged 68 yews. 
Service at Randalls Park Crematori- 
um. Leaiherhead. on Wednesday. 
September 3rd. at 4pm. Family 
Dowers only please, donations may 
be sent to The National Trust 
MGLEY - On August 2Bth. peacefully 
after a king illness. Peg beloved wife 
of Cordon and mother at GUUan and 
John . Enq uiries to J H Kenyon tel Of 
957 0757. 

WmrON ■ on August 18th. 1986. Eric 
Davan. husband of Utr late Valeric 
(nee Edwards) and of Mary (nee 
Cray), father of Philip and Hilary 
and grandfather of Charlotte. 
Veaetia and Fenefia. The funeral 
look place on August 21sL in Nairn. 
WILSON, mia May (nee Donahue- 
Neasmilhi - Peacefully In her sleep 
an 25lh August 1986. in her 80th 
year at her home in Maries one, 
Northamw. Widow of John Charles 
and mother of Allan. She will be In 
our thoughts forever. Sue: Allan. 
Emma and PhUlfppa wish lo thank 
aB of the family for their support and 

kindness during her Illness and in the 

preceecUng years when her fading 
memory deprived her of the k>y of 
thing. Funeral al Northampton 
Crematorium on Monday. 1st Sep- 
tember. Her ashes lo loin her Jack at 
rest in Br&iton. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


6WSH01M. Evelyn Mary of Croft 
Mouse. Bootle. Cumbria. Correction: 
Memorial Service at Bootle Parish 
Church on Saturday. 6th September 
at 12.3Q pm. not al 12 noon as 
prev iously stated. 

KnTORD-SLADE - A Memorial Ser- 
vice lor Cecil Townkv MiifontStade 
KSU. DL. JP tale Cokmei krrc. 
who died at home on August i3Ui. 
will be held on Friday. October 3rd. 
at 12 noon. In St Mary's. Taunton. 

Writ LISON . a Memorial Service will 
be held »l SI Paul's Church. Covent 
Garden. London. WC2. on Wednes- 
day. lOUi September at 12 noon for 
ainord Monison, M.B£. Actor, who 
died an 4th June. 1966. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


CLARKE Gordon remembering always 
with abiding love Marde. 

RtTMOi I ril, Wilhelm, ingeborg and 
Ulrihe - in loving Memory. ‘But the I 
greatest of them all t$ Kne ' J.C.G. 


Latest wills 

Lady Mai] one Frances Burdett 
Fisher, of Priory Farm, Axford, 
Marlborough. Wiltshire, left un- 
settled valued at £1,034, 143 net. 
Mr Richard Solomon Marshall, 
of Welton Manor, Welton le 
Wold, Lincolnshire, left estate 
valued at £1,671,779 net. 

Mr John Frank Carter, of The 
Cottage, Walcot Lane, Drakes 
Broughton. Worcester, left 
£223,809 net. After bequests of 
£69,000 he left the residue to his 
Trustees for such charities for 
the disabled as they think fit. 
Mr Stanley Robson, of 


Wrayside, Wetheral Shields. 
Carlisle, left £885. 170 net 

Major-General Eric Keir 
Gilbome Sixsmith. of Langpon. 
Somerset, soldier and author, 
left estate valued at £67.437 net 
Rose MOleasted, of Westgate- 
on-Sea, Kent. left estate valued 
at £708.53 1 net. 

Mr Bernard Wheatley, of 
Seaford, East Sussex, left estate 
valued at £649.909 net- 
Mis Olga Mary Anthony, of 
GosTorth, Tyne and Wear, left 
£778.833 net 

Mr John David Kerr, of Chig- 
welL Essex, left £334,559 net. 


Mr Stuart Young. FCA. 
chairman of the Board of 
Governors of the BBC since 
1 983, died yesterday at the age 
of 52. 

Stuart Young was bora in 
Hackney, on April 23, 1934, 
the son of a comfonably-off 
Jewish flour merchant. When 
he was eight, the family 
moved to Finchley. With his 
brother, David (now Lord 
Young of Grafiham), he at- 
tended Woodhouse Grammar 
School, where he was a dili- 
gent if not Specially distin- 
guished pupil. He became a 
prefect - “always a good thing 
to be", he later recalled - and 
was good at cricket: a spin 
bowler. 

Going on to university 
would have made him a 
financial burden on bis par- 
ents for a further three years, 
so he left school at the age of 
16 and. on the advice of his 
father, became an articled 
clerk earning 10 shillings a 
week. 

He was a hard worker, and 
by the time be was 21 had 
sufficiently established him- 
self to be able to set up his own 
practice. Young prospered as a 
chartered accountant. He was 
a formidable negotiator and 
built a reputation as an expert 
in corporate finance. 

He might have continued 
happily as senior partner of 
his firm, Hacker Young, had it 
not been for his involvement, 
in 1980. with a consortium 
bidding for the breakfast tele- 
vision franchise. The bid was 
unsuccessful, but it showed 
that Young had an interest in 
broadcasting. The following 
year, he was invited to become 
a governor of the BBC. 

His brother was director of 
the Centre for Policy Studies 
and. as such, moving into the 
political orbit as a mend and 
protege of the Prime Minister. 
Stuart Young was beginning 
to move in a similar direction, 
though not into politics in the 
strict sense. When, two years 
later, he was asked to become 
chairman of the BBC gover- 
nors. he accepted with uncon- 
cealed enthusiasm: “It is 
certainly the most important 
job I have ever had in my life, 
and probably the most impor- 
tant I ever will have". 

Young was only 49 when he 
took up the appointment, the 
youngest chairman in the 
Corporation's history and to 
most an unknown quantity. 
Whatever doubts there may 
have been in the Press and 
among the public at large 
about what appeared to be 
such a nakedly partisan ap- 
pointment. it was on the 
whole popular with the BBC 
management, many of whom 
had got to know Young well 
during his chairmanship of the 
finance and resources com- 
mittee. 

He had never had a boss 
since his days as an articled 
clerk. Besides, as an accoun- 
tant. he was more in the habit 
of giving advice than receiving 
iL Yet he was determined that 
as chairman he should be 
simply primus inter pares and 
that the board’s views should 
always be a true consensus. He 
was not afraid to explain his 
own views or to give a lead 
where necessary, but he never 
tried to bulldoze his 
colleagues. 

At the end of July, 1985, he 
ran into the big crisis of his 
chairmanship, over the deci- 



sion of the board o( governors 
that a documentary pro- 
gramme on Northern Ireland 
called “Ai the Edge of the 
Union” should not be trans- 
mitted in its existing form. 
The programme was. in fact, 
unbalanced but, in the ab- 
sence of proper editorial con- 
trol. was on the point of being 
transmitted. 

All would have been well if 
the matter had been drawn to 
the governors' attention by the 
BBC management, or if the 
Home Secretary - then Mr 
Leon Brittan - on hearing 
about it. had expressed his 
doubts and fears privately to 
the board. Such procedure is 
common form, and the gover- 
nors are always free cither to 
act or not to act on representa- 
tions from the Home Secre- 
tary or any other minister. 

Unfortunately, in this case, 
Mr Brittan published the letter 
that he wrote to Young on July 
29. When, therefore, the gov- 
ernors decided to view the 
programme, and as a result 
decided that it should not go 
out in its existing form, they 
seemed to be acting as censors 
under direct government 
dictation. 

The ensuing row did consid- 
erable damage to the BBC's 
reputation, particularly in 
view of a protest strike by the 
World Service, which must 
have suggested to foreigners 
that the Corporation’s famed 
independence had become a 
myth. Bui Young went out of 
his way to demonstrate that he 
was not a government puppet 
Having survived this most 
unpleasant episode, which 
was essentially not of his 
making, he was proving in 
many ways a competent and 
effective chairman. Earlier 
this year he made a good 
impression when presenting 
the BBCs evidence to the 
Peacock Committee. 

He was very active in the 
Jewish community, notably as 
chairman of the Central Coun- 
cil of Jewish Social Services. 
He was also deeply interested 
in the arts. He was a trustee of 
both the Architectural Heri- 
tage Fund and the National 
Gallery, and he served on the 
Historic Buildings Council. 

He was a good chess player 
and a passionate golfer, pas- 
times which reflected the de- 
liberation which was his most 
obvious temperamental trail. 
He often said that if he not 
become an accountant he 
could very happily have made 
his living as a golf 
professional. 

He married, in 1956, Shirley 
Aarons, who survives him 
with their two daughters. 


LIEUTENANT-GENERAL 
SIR HAROLD REDMAN 


Services tomorrow 

Fourteenth Sunday 
after Trinity 


CANTERBURY 
9 30 M. II Sta 
J«su ETHi very l _ 

C Brett: 3.16 E .... 

Responses (Smith). Cxpectans 
ewjectavl iWojxl) Rev D W Ctevertey 
Fort]; 6-JO ES. Rev M W Funlames. 
YORK MpCSJER: 8. B.&3 HC1D.I5 


*JRY CATHEDRAL: 8 HCt 
S ung Euch (Sumsttxi tn FX 
erjr gioo^iUTyt). Rev P G 


ST GEORGCS. Hanover Square. Wl: 
BJO KC ii sung Euch (MetKcke). 
the Rector. 

ST JAMES'S. Piccadilly. WI: 8.30 
HC 1 1 Bung Eoch: 6 Evantoo Prayer 
gT_ LUKE’S. CTCtsra. SWi B. 12.15 


10.30 Sung EUCt: (Darter in F). 

*r>. Rev D R Watson: 

song atoaotyi. Rev N 


Ave Verum (EXWj. Rev D R Wateon: 
6.30 E. Evening 


Sung Eurti 'Darke in EX God be in ray 
head iRuueri. Canon Michael 
Bowerlng; 11.30 M tsmnlonl in CX a 
ElSlairier m B). I saw the Lord 
(Stainer), the Treasurer. Canon Ralph 
Mayiaiw. 

ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL: a 1 1.30 
HC. Mhsa Aetema enmu munera 

Te ^ A)- t <£noo 


mine 


RouUrtfoe: : 

~ ■■ B-J. R _ 

ABBEY: 8 HcflSjO 

M. Jubflaw and Tc Demn (Britten in 
a > a voice from heaven 

rnpprn Si Johns College Service* 
The King of Love fflaWowi Dee- 
SSJ*S? June Oshome: 6-SO Eg. Rev 
David Campbell. 

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 HCS 
M Euch. voluntary ta G fOreene). 
Allenunde. Fugue j la Ooue (Bach). 
R ev An dr ew W lMop; 3 EJ 
WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL: 7. B. 
9. 12. 5-50 7 LM: lOJO SM: X50 V. 
ST GEORGES'S CATHEDRAL. South. 


Weir. 

ST MARGARET'S. Westminster. 
SWt: b is. 12.15 HC II M and 
Sermon, ihe Canon Trevo r Beeson 
ST MARTIN- IN -THE -FIELDS, Wd 
8. 9.45 HC Ihe Vicar: 1 1 .30 Morning 
Prayer. Rev John wuhendoe: 2-*6 
Chinese Sendee: 6 30 Evening 
Prayer. Rev Stephen Roberts. 
STMARY ABBOTS, Kensington. WB: 
& 12.30 HC 9.30 Sung Euch: 11.15 
M: 6JO E. ihe Vkar. _ _ 

ST MARY’S. Bourne Street. SW1: 9. 
9-aS. T LM: 11 . HM. M tefci jarey ts 
(Mozart In Bl. Sacerdotea _ Domini 
Ave verum carpus (Mazarti. 
Booby: 6-1S “ 


E and 


Fr 

ItTi AR YL FRONT. Mar ytebone 
Road. Wl: 8. 1 1 HC IMecbecke): 630. 
Rev C K Hamel Cooke. 

ST PAUL’S. Wilton Place. SWt: 8. 9 
HC 11 Solemn Euch. Rev ACC 
Courtauld. 

ST PETER’S. Eaton Square. Swi: 
8 16 HC IO Family Maas; 11 
Macs. Mtesa Brevis < Anertok Retotce 

In ihe Lord Alway ntedtotU- 

ST SIMON 2ELOTES, _ Mil ner S freeL 
SWI 8 HC 11 M: 6 JO E. Preh John 


12.1 6. 6 LM; 11 HM. 
Rev Peter Stodan. 

GUARDS CHAPEL. Wellington Bar- 
rtKfcs. SWl: 11 m. the Chaptatn: 12 

ST CLEMENT DANES (RAF Church) 
WC& 8-30.12 16 HC 11 iShtag 
Prayer. Te Deum and JuWtate (Stan- 
ford). The surrender or the soul 
(Cornel tat). Rev R N Ken ward 
ALL HALLOWS BY THE TOWER: 11 

5 16 LM: 11 HM. Mina Brevis and 
Laudato Donuman (Mozart). Rev G A 
Redoing! on; 6 Euch and B (NoOte ta 
AL O Lord, the maker or all thing 
iMimdyj. Rev J S W Young. 

ALL SOULS, Lansham Place. Wl: 
9 30 HC ii. Rev iSm SwiiMabaniQ 
6.30. Rev Richard Bewtn. 

CHELSEA OLD CHURCH. Old 
Church Street. SW3: B. 12 HC 1 1 M. 
Preo Leighton Thomson: 6 e, Preb 
Thomson. _ 

. CHURCH. CHELSEA. 8W& 
8 HC 1 1 Parish C. Rev N weir. 
GROSVENOR CHAPEL. South 
Audley Street 8.15 HC 11 sung 
Euch. Ret A w Marks. 

HOLY TRINITY. Brampton Road. 
SWT: 8 30 HC 11 M. Rev P J S 
Perkin: 6 30 ES. Rev J A K Mfltar. 
HOLY TRINITY. Prince Consort 
RoatL SW7: 8.30. 12.05 HC 11 
Morning Prayer. Rev Oswald Clarke. 
HOLY TRINITY. Soane Strata, swi: 
S.So. 12.10 hc IOJO Euch. Canon 
Roberts. 

ST ALBAN’S. Brooke St. EC1: 9-30 
SM. tt HM (Nobiet. O how antatata 
(Vaughan Wiuams). Fr Baker: 5-30 

ST BRIDE'S. Fleet street. EG#; 11 M 
and Eueh. JitaUare and GtorU (Said). 
Canon James Robertson: 6.30 E. Raw 
Wallace Boulton. 

ST CUTH8ERTS. PhUtmeti Gardens 
SWS: ID HC 11 sung Euch lAnertoL 
Herr. O my Lord iWhUlockj. Rev 
John vine: 6 E and B. 


ST VEDAST. Foster Lamb EC2: 11 
Sung Euch. MlssaBrevts (Wins). My 

Bgraraton 

Street Wl: 1 1 SM. Mtsra Singe « 
regnum coetanint (Guerrero), caude 
Virgo Maria rVk=torUk6 LM ana B. 
ST COLU MBA’S CHURCH OF SCOT- 
LAND. Pont Street SWl: 11. 630. 
the very Rev J Fraser Mrt-udtQ^ 

6.30. Rev Kermeth G Hughes. 

tor three voices (ByrdX Conflieminl 
Domino tConstantlnlX O saenun 

tvnvM um iwai czynsid). „ 

FARM STREET. Wl: 7T30L 0.30. 10. 
12.15. 4.15. 6.15 LM: 11 HM, Mteffl 
Landis (Peelers), Paste nos (Dttoois). 
the ORATORY- Brommon Road. 
SWT: 7. 8. 9. 10. 12.30. d.SO. 71W; 
u hm. Spagenme sse.. 

ST U £TKELD^SA , ’s! 8 Sy Pla ce : 11 
SM. Ntese tn B tKromolKW. Oomine 

AMERICAN CwSfCH 1 ^ LONDON. 
Wl: 11. Res.' Ron F Allison. 

CITY TEMPLE. Hotoom. ECU 11. 
6.30. Rev Erie Waugh. irinir . 
HINDE STREET METHODIST 
CHURCH. Wi ll. Rev Stuart Jordan: 
63a Rev Ken Howcrofl. „ 

Altai __ Street. 


WB:' IT. 6 JO. pr Kenneth SU ck- 
REGENT SOL ARE PRESBYTQ1L 


IAN 


urc. Tavistock Place, wci: 11. Mr J 
M robs: 6 JO. Dr John Kennedy. 


Rev John Miller. _ _ __ 

WESLEY'S CHAF’D- City Hoad. EC2: 
11. Rev R onald C QtDMre . ,, t , 
WESTMINSTER CENTRAL HALL 
(Method bn. Swi: 11. 6.30. Rev R 
John Tudor 

WESTMINSTER CHAPEL. SocWitBr 
ham CtaeJSWl: 11. 6.30. Rev CBlDert 
Kirby- 


Lieutenant-General Sir 
Harold Redman, KCB. CBE, 
who died on August 24 at the 
age of 86, had a distinguished 
record of service on the staff 
during and after the Second 
World War, and was Gover- 
nor and Coratnander-in- 
Chief, Gibraltar, from 1955 to 
1958. 

Harold (Dixie) Redman was 
bom on August 25, 1899, at 
Shawfond, Winchester, and 
was educated at Famham 
Grammar School and at the 
Royal Military Academy, 
Woolwich, from which he was 
commissioned in the Royal 
Artillery in 1917. 

He saw active service with 
his regiment in France and 
Germany before the end of the 
First World War, and then 
served in Wazixistan for two 
years. Redman was one of a 
number of gunner officers 
who applied for transfer to 
other branches of the service 
between the wars, and he 
joined the King's Own York- 
shire Light Infantry in 1929. 

Having passed the Staff 
College, be held a number of 
staff apointments before the 
outbreak of the Second World 
War. In 1939, he left his post 
as instructor at the Senior 
Officers’ School to become 
representative of the War 
Cabinet Secretariat in France, 
where he remained until he 
was given command of the 7th 
Battalion of his regiment in 
1940. 

His first brigade command 
came in 1941 with his ap- 
pointment to the 151st (DLI) 
Infantry Brigade, which be 
took to the Middle East. He 
next served for a time as BGS 
Sth Army, and in 1 942 became 
commander of the I Oth Inde- 
pendent Motor Brigade. This 
was Redman's Iasi command, 
and thereafter, until the end of 
his Army service twelve years 
later, he held an unbroken 
succession of staff 
appointments. 


In 1943, he went to Wash- 
ington as British Secretary to 
the Combined Chiefs of Staff 
with Field Marshal Sir John 
Dili. Promoted major-general 
in 1944, he was appointed 
deputy head of the S.HA.EF. 
Mission to France, and in the 
next year became head of the 
British Military Mission to 
France. 

His subsequent appoint- 
ments included those of Chief 
of the Genera] Staff to the 
Allied Land Forces in South- 
East Asia, director of Military 
Operations at the War Office, 
and principal staff officer to 
Field-Marshal Montgomery at 
Supreme Allied HQ. 

In 1952, he became 
V.C.I.G.S. with the rank of 
lieutenant-general. Three 
years later, he was appointed 
governor and C-in-C. Gibral- 
tar, and, on the conclusion of 
his tenure of office in 1958, he 
retired from the Army. He was 
director and secretary’ of The 
Wolfson Foundation from 
1958 to 1967. 

He was colonel of the 
KOYLI from 1950 to I960. As 
well as his British decorations, 
he was a Commander of the 
French Legion of Honour and 
of the American Legion of 
Merit 

Redman was a man of 
sterling character, modest and 
unassuming, with a great ca- 
pacity for making friends 
wherever he went He had a 
gift forgetting on with foreign- 
ers which served him well in 
the high appointments he 
filled is the later stages of his 
career. 

He was twice married; first, 
in 1947, to Patricia Weston, 
who died in 1951, and, sec- 
ond. in 1 953, to Barbara 
Wharton, who survives him 
together with a daughter of the 
first marriage and a son and 
daughter of the second. 


i 



'a A JUC, lirni^ OAI UKl>r\X rtUUUOl J7U 1*60 


Bjeoppijpiprepra 


Stalker’s Survivors confront the legacy of Nyos 
chief 

“to face 1 
inquiry 

By a Staff Reporter 

Mr James Anderton, chief 
constable of Greater Manches- 
ter police, is to be asked to 
account for his actions both in 
and out of the office, just a 
month after Mr John Stalker, 
his deputy, was cleared follow- 
ing an identical grilling. 

Mr Anderton. is also to face 
questions over his handling of 
the inquiry of Mr Stalker, 
which he ordered. 

This second inquiry, set for 
September 19, will be con- 
ducted by the Greater Man- 
chester Police Authority, who 
a week ago, ordered Mr 
Stalker's immediate reinstate- 
ment after studying a report 
compiled by Mr Colin Samp- 
son. chief constable of West 
Yorkshire. 

Mr Anderton will be asked 
why he did not instigate the 
Stalker inquiry two years ago 
when knowledge of theallega- 


when knowledge of the allega- 
tions against him were first 
made known. 

Mr Anderton was aware of 
them just six weeks after Mr 
Stalker was selected to lead a 
sensitive investigation into an 
alleged shoot-to-kill policy, 
allegedly being operated by 
the Royal Ulster Constab- 
ulary. 

After Mr Stalker’s suspen- 
sion. Mr Sampson was in- 
structed to take over that 
inquiry as welL He is still 
leading the inquiry. 

Mr .Anderton will be asked 
. to detail use of police vehicles 
at social events, to explain his 
relationship with some prom- 
inent businessmen and to give 
details of some social events, 
including visits to race meet- 
ings at Haydock and York. 

Mr Terry Lewis, Labour 
MP for Worsley. has called on 
the Prime Minister to hold an 
inquiry into the whole affair. 

Although Mr Stalker re- 
sumed work a week ago today, 
it was Tuesday before he and 
his chief met for the first time 
in three months. 

A request, from the media 
for both men to shake hands 
was rejected by Mr Anderton. 
He later issued a- statement 
saying that he and Mr Stalker 
had “always worked well 
together". 



Continued from page I 

The situation in Europe in 
such periods would be 
critical” 

He criticized some state- 
ments made by the united 
States at the conference. Il 
seemed that Washington 
wanted to make Europe 
“transparent” up to the Urals, 
he said, but to dose its own 
military activities in the US to 
inspection. . 

The moves made m Stock- 


tion for 15 'ears, such is the 
definition of constituents in} 
the elimination ofpreductkm 
facilities and stockpiles, had 
been brought taa point where 
onlv tcrhnkal nuwrs rc* 
matned to bt itsgv&l 
Achievement of ^ ctekal 
weapons convention was sow 
within reach, 

Discussing the ; Soviet 
Union's attitude to verifica- 
tion proceduresTo ensure fat 
no cheating takes Mr 
Komatina said that Moscow 


terday give a clear feeling ot an 
accelerating process of con- 
cession on Doth sides. 

The evidence of senous 
attempts to reach agreement 
emerged on August 19. the 
first day of the session, when 
the Soviet Union first ac- 
cepted the principle of on-stte 
inspections of military act- 
ivities. 

Three days ago the US 
made a move to meet the 
Soviet Union’s needs by 
agreeing to give notice of 
troop movements from North 
America to Europe. 

In Geneva, where efforts are 
being made to negotiate a 
treaty banning chemical weap- 
ons. Mr Komatina said issues 
that had been under negoiia- 


was beginning s understand 

that these procedures .wen 
crucial to avoid basing im- 
portant decisions on specula- 
tion and conjecture^ 

Britain has taken a stroog 
lead in pressing fora ootnpfcie 
ban on all chemical weapons/ 
and British, diplomats Kg. 
corned the fact that, although 
yesterday was the last day of 
ihc plenary sessoaia Geneva, 
the chemical weapons work- 
ing group wffl meet again in 
the second half of ncxi momh 
and in November and Dec- 
ember. ; ./ 

In addition,’ direct dis- 
cussions are to continue be- 
tween the US ami the Soviet 
Union. 


* ’ * **’/ ' 


: . 


Regina Fang sits on her son's hospital bed in Wum comforting the sleeping boy, aged 216. who suffered bums to his abdomen in the Cameroon disaster. 


Continued from page 1 
hope of devising a warning 
system for villagers living near 
about a dozen similar lakes in 
the region. 

Relief supplies are being 
brought in by military heli- 
copters and by trucks grinding 
up a tortuous dirt road from 
the provincial capital 75 miles 
away. 

Some 30 tonnes of food 
have arrived from Britain and 
the United States, and Zaire 
has sent 50 army tents to 
accommodate 250 people. 

The stricken area has been 
evacuated, but nobody seems 
to know for sure how many 
people have been 
dispiaced-An official of the 
Save The Children Fund put 
the number at several hun- 
dred. but a doctor treating 
survivors in a rural hospital 
said thousands had been 
forced to seek shelter with 
relatives or in local commu- 
nity centres. 


The verdant hills and val- 
levs around Nyos are still 
littered with the festering car- 
casses of cattle, which pose a 
serious risk of disease. 

Indeed, you have to drive 
away from the ghost village for 
at least 30 minutes before 
squirrels scampering in the 
forests present the first sign of 
life. 

• BAMENDA; An Italian sci- 
entist yesterday joined a 
French expert in warning that 
further explosions of toxic gas 
were possible and the danger 
in north-west Cameroon had 
not passed (Reuter reports). 

Signor Giorgio Marinelli 
echoed the warning given 
earlier by M Tazieff, the 
French volcanologist, by say- 
ing: “The risk of a gas emis- 
sion still exists. Hie lake is hot 
and its current temperature is 
30 degrees while it is normally 
20 degrees”. 



BBC chairman dies 
after long illness 







Bong Enos, left, mourns his five wives killed by the toxic fumes from Lake Nyos, and a 27- 
year-old woman, right, points to her cheek where the silent killer has left his ma it 


Continued from page 1 
commitment to the corpora- 
tion, his enthusiasm and 
involvement in all its activ- 
ities were the solid proof of 
that feeling.” 

On behalf of the board of 
governors, Mr Alwyn Roberts, 
the national governor for 
Wales, said: “In Stuart Young 
we expected a critic and found 
a champion. His advocacy of 
public-service broadcasting 
sprang from a deep con viction 
of the BBCs role not only asa 
boadcasting body but as a 
force for unity and tolerance 
in British life.” 

In other tributes Mr Doug- 
las Hurd, the Home Secretary, 
said he had come to value Mr 
Young's “dedication and dear 
good judgment”; and Lord 
Thomson of Monifieth, chair- 
man of the Independent 
Broadcasting Authority, said 
that Mr Young had tadded the 
challenges feeing, the BBC 
“with the same quiet courage 


with which he fought his long 
period of ill-health". Mr 
Young's death has renewed 
speculation . about his 
successor. 

The name of Lord King, at 
present chairman of British 
Airways, had already been 
suggested as having Mrs 
Thatcher’s favour when it was 
thought that Mr Young's ill- 
ness might cause him to 
resign. Soundings yesterday, 
however, suggr***** that there 
is noshonage of alternatives. 

The present vice-chairman, 
Lord Barnett (formerly, as Mr 
Jod Barnett, chief secretary to 
the treasury ip the last Labour 
government), only took office 
at the beginning of this month. 

There arc precedents for the 
appointment of the head of 
the IBA (the position Lord 
Hill of Luton held before 
taking the BBC chair), but 
Lord Thomson of Monifieth is 
also a former Labour minister. 



THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


jSoIntion ta Puzzle No 17,132 Solution to Puzzle No 17,137 I Today’s events 


In the garden 


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The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,138 

A prize o/The Times Atlas ofWorld History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition PO Box 4S6. 1 Virginia Street. London, El 9XN. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday's competition are: A E Brookes. 
267 Bold mere Road. Sutton Coldfield; R H Bishop, c/o Forest 
School, College Place, London El 7; J A Crane. 159 St Leonards 
Road. Thorpe Hamlet. Norwich. 


Address 



ACROSS 

1 Magic transport may cover 
flight (6). 

5 How butchers compete with 
each other, selling this? (8J. 

9 Disposition shown by a 

’ striker? (8). 

10 East-Ender among the Ar- 
chers? (6). 

11 Scattered picadors in confu- 
sion (S). 

12 Follow pacifist policy of re- 
jected artists back in ob- 
scure circumstances (6). 

13 Angels semi-distressed 
about broken harp (8). 

15 Fashion without money that 
troubles the viewer (4). 

17 Army entertainer (4). 

19 Tricky device needs skill if 
taking diamonds (8). 

20 Sea-nymph as Neptune’s 
heavenly attendant (6). 

21 Unnecessary to' reduce one's ' 
output of dough, say? (8). 

22 One “dismantled" in 
translation (6). 

23 Directions designed to mini- 
mize friction (8). 

24 Scene of Mr Darling's self- 
imposed disgrace (3-5). 

25 Religion is embraced by 
them (6). 


DOWN 

2 But such a bet cannot be 
after ihe event as weU (4-4). 

3 The Vicar of Wakefield's 
bloomer (S). 

4 Times past in the river be- 
low (9). 

5 Ourwardlv incompetent but 
one on ihe inside beyond 
reproach (15). 

6 Times go awry from self- 
conceit (7). 

7 Order round the shod; 
troops (8). 

8 The two-way principle 
about men's accommoda- 
tion (8). 

14 Journeying with it in time to 
the Northern Territory (9). 

15 Scalp the young gangster? 

(S). 

16 Horse unusually early in 

■ beginning to gallop (8). 

17 Medmenham Abbey dub — 
to which Don Giovanni was 
finally admitted (4-4). 

J8 Topping advertisements for 
the Bull and the Lion etc (3- 
5). 

19 Disturbance thereby caused 
in bars, thanks to a soldier 
at first (7). 


Cryptics against the dock page 8 
Concise Crossword page 1 5 


New exhibition 

The an of Lepenski Vin 
neolithic sculpture; City An 
Gallery. Civic Centre, South- 
ampton: Tues to Fri 10 to 5, Sat 
10 to 4. Sun 2 to 5 (ends Oct 5). 
Last chance to see 

With Walls and Towers Gir- 
dled: photographs of Yoik from 
the 1850's io the present day. 
Impressions Gallery of Photog- 
raphy, 17 Colliergaie, York, 

10.30 to 530. 

Open Fell, Hidden Drit 
photographic study of landscape 
and lifestyles in the Yorkshire 
Dales: Public Library, Dearden 
. Gate. HasUngden, Rossendale, 

9.30 to 4. 

Scottish landscapes by Alan 
Turner Commonwealth In- 
stitute Gallery, Rutland Sq, 
Edinburgh, 10 to 12. 

Music 

Concert by the Nottingham- 
shire Schools Symphony Or- 
chestra: Southwell Minster. 
SoHthweU, Nous. 7.30. 

Organ recital by Joseph 
Cullen; St Andrew's Cathedral, 
Glasgow, 1.45. 

Recital by Richard Ingham 
(saxaphone) and Alan Cuckston 
(piano): The Bam. Beech 
House. Cnrthwaite, Cumbria. 8. 

Recital by Stephen Roberts 
(baritone) accompanied by John 
Constable: Romsey Abbey, 7. 

Mozart Festival Recital by 
George Malcolm (piano), Doug- 
las Boyd (oboe). Richard 
Hosford and Nicholas Rodweil 
(clarinets), Robin O'Neill (bas- 
soon) and Jonathan Williams 
and Stephen Stirling (horn s)f 
Blythborgh Church. Suffolk, 8. 
General 

Basketmaking demonstration 
with Richard Cale; Coiswold 
Countryside Collection, North- 
leach. GIos. today 10 to 530, 
tomorrow 2 to 5.30. 

Peebles Arts Festival: Book 
Fain Eastgate HalL Peebles, 10 
to 4: Craft displays. Old Bake- 
house. St Andrew's. Ledde, 10 
IO 4. 

Craft Fain ShirehalL Her- 
eford, 10 to 5. 


Tomorrow 

New exhibition 
Furniture and screens; Old 
Town HalL Bampton. Oxon; 
T ues and Thurs to Sal 10.30 to 1 
and 2.30 to 5. Sun 2.30 to 430 
(ends Sept 21). 

Music 

Concert by the London Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra: Harrogate 
Conference Centre. King's Rd. 
7.30. 

Concert by the Glynde and 
Beddingham Brass Band; De La 
Warr Pavilion Terrace. SexhflL 
3. 

Talk 

Far over the Fell, by Gerald 
Craskc: Lake District National 
Visitor Centre, Brockhole, Win- 
dermere. 3.30. 

General 

Arundel Festival: Grand 
Torchlight Procession and Bon- 
fire: Mill Road car park. 
ArnndeL 7.30- 

La n cash ire Constabulary 
open day: 40 special events, arts 
and crafts and displays: Police 
Force headquarters, Sutton, 1 1 
io 5. 

The Shutilewonh Collection: 
living display: Old Warden 
Aerodrome. Biggleswade. Beds. 
2 to 4.30. 

East Sussex country fair. Es- 
sex showground. Great Leiahs. 

12 to 5. 



P = Plants for sale 
TODAY 

ao ucmwhK Ktftscata Court. 3m 
NE. im E of A46 and B4081. adjacent to 
Hxtcots National Trust Garden; many 
unusual plants, and shrubs, old roses, 
largest rose in England: also open Sin 
Wed. Thor to end ol September. 2 to 6. 

Tteaeddate Traquair House, taner- 
todhen: oldest inhabited house in Scot- 
land. 70 acres, herbaceous, old roses, 
mare, peacocks, woodland waft: dafy 
until OocSerr £ 1 30 to 530. 
TOMOflflOW 

Shropshire Graystones. Utile Ness, 
Baschureh, 8m NE of Shrewsbwy off AS 
el Monttord Bridge, Shan Garage: 1* 
acres, herbaceous, shrubs, paved and 
gravel gardens, raised beds; P; 2 to 6. 

. WBtsfta: Ktftfay nr East Knoyte, olf 
A350 at sun to West Tistxay; 1 acre 
plainsman's garden, stream, pond, at 
year interest, great variety of plants, 
shrubs, roses, apkies, voter plants; 2 ID 

r sw woe Waltons. Ashdon 4m of 
Saffron waidan. 4m S of A604 Mi Bartow; 
beautiful waled garden, in peridend, fine 
trees, lake, shrubs and herbaceous: p; 2 
to 6. 

BuckMamsWre: Dunnings. Oxford 
Road. Ma row. 7m E of Hants* 3m S of 
High Wycombe off MISS: 2V> acres, fine 
trees, herbaceous plants, bedding: 2 to 7. 


Anniversaries 


today 

• Births: Jacaues-Louis David, 
painter. Paris. 1784; Mary 
Wollstoueeraft Sbellev. nov- 
elist, author of Frankenstein. 
London. 1797: Ernest, lsi 
Baron Rutherford of Nelson 
physicist, Nobel laureate 1908 
Spring Grove. New Zealand i 
1871. 

Deaths: Feargos O’Connor , 
Chartist leader. London. 1855 
Sr John Ross, explorer, Lon 
don. 1856: Georges Sorel 
socialist, Boulogne. 1922; Henr 
Barbusse. novelist Moscow 
1935: Joseph John Thomson, 
physicist. Nobel laureate. 1906, 
Cambridge. 1940. 

TOMORROW 

Births: Caligula. Roman em- 
peror AD37-41. Antinoi (An- 
zio). Italy AD12; Charles Lever, 
novelist (Confessions of Harry 
Lorrequcr). Dublin, 1906: Ma- 
ria Moutessori. educator. Chia- 
ravalle. Italy. 1870. 

Deaths: Henry V (reigned 
1413-221. Bois de Vincennes. 
France. 1422: John Bunyan. 
London, 1688: Arthur Phillip, 
founder of penal colony at 
Sydney. 1st Governor of New 
South Wales. Bath. (814: 
Georges Braque, Paris. 1963. 

Tower Bridge 

Tower Bridge will be raised 
tomorrow at 1 1. 15 am and 1 1.4S 
am. 


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Portfolio roles and bow to play, 
page 29 


TODAY 

London &22 pm to 5.4 f am 
Bristol &32pm to &51 am 
Ednbwgh 8.43 prato 5.44 am 
Manchester &S4 pm to 546 am 
Panama 8.41 pm to 0.OS Kn - 

TOMORROW 

London 820 pm to 543 am 
Bristol &30 pm o 5i52 am 
Edinburgh 841 pm to 546 am 
Manchester 832 pm in 647 am 
PniBnoe 639 pm to 6J» am 


Roads 

MMos end west M4; Lana closures on 
both carriauways beMoen junction 37 
and 40 ( Porihcavrt/Pbft iwootj, A4: Traffic 
rostnCMns on London Road. Bam. A342: 
Roadwtte and tanoomry Hgms Between 
Dorses and to junction with A4 at 
Branham. 

The North; UKL Contraflow between 
junction 7 niWtews) and Burtonwood 
services. IK3; venous traffic resmetans 
at BatWn Bodge. Greater Manchester 
avod if possmie. AT; Contrafkw at 
Bakteraby. near Rjpon. 

Scodand: 1174: TWo^vsy traffle operat- 
ing on northbound carriageway N of 
Lesmak sgrw. MM; Cortomont oeiwewt 
(unctions 4 and 8 (KaRy^9li A94: Smgfa 
Vne traffic throe mto N of Rortor. Angus, 
with temporary bgma. 

Uriormsbao ai^rpMail by AA 


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Weymouth 6.1 

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Torquay 66 

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6.1 - 17 63 Sunny 

5J .07 15 69 bright 

M - 17 83 bright 

66 - 17 63 bright 


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BMW I 19 66 Funchal 
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r-r- ” 8 33 91 Gibraltar 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


is> 

SPORT 29 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 33 


SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet : 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
131 1.9 (+25.5) 

FT-SE 100 
1660-9 (+24.1) 


iraai 

416 


2141 

USM (Data stream) 
126.11 (+0.18) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4870 (+0.0060) 

W German mark 
3.0321 (+0.0020) 

Trade-weighted 
71.1 (+0.1) 






/ ^ 

•• 

A 






N Sea oil 
job fears 

■ The North Sea oil boom has 
gpne for ever, according to the 
Royal Bank of Scotland’s 
latest monthly index, which 
suggests that about 10.000 ofl- 
relaied jobs could he added to 
the 7.000 lost so far. 

The Bank says that allhough 
oil output returned to near 
peak levels in June, employ' 
mem in the industry is un- 
likely to return to its 1 9S2 high 
of 60,000 jobs. 

At present, 31 rigs are 
drilling in the North Sea, but a 
further 20 are laid up. 

The slump is also hitting the 
local housing market Prices in 
Aberdeen have fallen 1.4 per 
cent in the 12 months to June 
and an estimated 5.000 houses 
are for sale in the North East 
of Scotland. 

CPI change 

CPT Holdings is changing its 
reporting date from Septem- 
ber 30 to December 31 to 
coincide with that of Marley. 
its parent company. Accounts 
to December 31 will incor- 
porate 15 months trading, 
second interim statement will 
be issued to shareholders in 
December with the results for 
the six months to September 
30. 

jyiatheson buy 

} Mtf&ies&d'and Co, the Brit- 
ish ’ subsidiary of Jardine 
Matheson Group, is to buy 
which special- 
/ private* client agency 

f r^ckbroking, , fund manage- 
1 f '' l *ient and smaller company 
itutional business. . 

orwich deal 



soars 


to record 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 

The US trade deficit soared The new data cast strong 
to a record SI 8.04 billion last doubts on the .Reagan Admin- 
month. continuing a series of istration’s forecast that the 



poor monthly performances 
which point to the worst year 
ever for American manufac- 
turing and. fanning com- 
panies. 

■ The news was much worse 
than expected and sent the 
dollar, which had opened firm 
in London, falling against 
most leading currencies dur- 
ing the afternoon. 

It retreated one cent against 
the pound to $1.4875, one 
pfennig against the mark at 
2.0355 and fell from 155.55 to 
154.6 against the yen. 

Commerce Department of- 
ficials said yesterday that the 
trade picture deteriorated on 
all fronts last month, indicat- 
ing that the lower dollar had 
had little or no effect m 
reducing the deficit which, is 


economy . would rebound 
significantly in the second half 
.of the year. 

The figures also put in- 
creased pressure on West Ger- 
many and. Japan to stimulate 
their domestic economies to 
ensure continued global 
growth as the US economy 
. slides downward. 

There were reports yes- 
terday that Japan, which 
experienced another record 
trade surplus last month, was 
considering a new, more 
stimulative domestic budget 
largely in response to the 
American downturn and 
threats of sweeping protec- 
tionist legislation in the US 
Congress. 

But West Germany earlier 
: this week declined to bow to 
heading, at the present rate of -'US pressure to reflate its 
growth, for another record this “ economy by lowering interest 
year, projected at SI 75 billion, . rates. The Bundesbank issued 





t 

.ft-'-r W - 


n 



»,T L * 

' S > 




... if 


0 


rwich Union has paid a 
f of £27.51 milhonfbrtbe’ 
ntterests of the Stewart 
.Wrightson Group and of 
Sunley Holdings in Fountain 
House in Fencburch Street, 
London. The Stewart 
Wrightson group receives 
£19.28 million, which will be 
used to reduce debt 

Jonas closure 

i Jonas Woodhead is to close 
its steel rolling division based 
hi Sheffield, trading under the 
Same Apollo Steels. The com- 
pany has conditionally agreed 
to sell the land and buildings. 

T&N stake up 

Turner & NewaJl and its 
associates have increased their 
total stake in AE, their take- 
over target, to 25.32 percent. 

Correction 

A dropped '‘no” changed 
the meaning of a sentence in 
yesterday's report headlined 
“Prudential may cut S Africa 
tie.” The report should have 
said (hat a spokesman for 
Colonial Mutual in London 
“knew of no plans to sell the 
group’s South African arm.” 




Comment 21 
Jh*P« 2© 

CnjwyNews 20 
Slock Market 21 
Foreign Each 21 
Tilted Opts 21 


Shore Pres 23 
Wall Street 20 
Money Mrkfc? 2P 
Unit Tresis 22 
Commodities 22 
USM Prices 22 



-110 


-\s 


■M-B PHI EttM E-'I-ftB FT-I-Hi KliM KFT^l 


the trade gap 

$ billion 



SoueeOBtBSVMn) 


-10 


h15 


-20 


a terse statement on Thursday 
saying there would be no 
change in the discount rate 

The White House reacted 
with a statement expressing its 
disappointment that other 
countries are not taking steps 
in concert with the United 
States to ensure global growth. 

Mr Stephen Roach, an 
economist with Morgan Stan- 
ley and Company, said that 
the surprisingjump in the July 
trade deficit, raised questions 
about the sustainability of the 
US expansion. He said the 
situation could deteriorate 
dramatically if West Germany 
and Japan “ remain on the 
sidelines”. 

US officials, who had ex- 
pected a July deficit of $16 
billion or less, said that im- 
ports continued to be strong 
last month while exports 
continued to decline rapidly. 

The growth in imports, 
despite the lower dollar, 
showed up dramatically in the 
form sector which experienced 
its third consecutive monthly 
deficit of $248 million. 

Commerce Department of- 
ficials said that the farm trade 
balance, normally a bright 
spot, had never been in deficit 
for three consecutive months 
in the 30 years records have 
been kept. 

The July deficit compared 
to a deficit in June of S 14.17 
billion on an unrevised basis. 
The US trade deficit totalled 
$101.96 billion for the year so 
far, up sharply from the deficit 
of $80.9 billion in the first 
seven months of last year. 



Staff at the National Westminster Bank, the receiving bank, check app licatio ns 

Investors scramble for YTV 


The offer for sale of 25 per 
cent of Yorkshire Television 
was enormonsly over- 
subscribed when applications 
closed yesterday. 

Baring Brothers, the mer- 
chant rank acting for YTV, 
offered 82 million shares at 
125p. 

The basis of allocation 
will be public by Monday and 
tetters of acceptance will be 
posted on Thursday Septem- 


ber 4, with dealing starting the 
next day. 

Considerable numbers of 
multiple applications are 
tbougbt to be among the piles 
of paper waiting to be sorted 
out this weekend. The cost of 
multiple applications is 
considerable since receiving 
banks charge about 50p for 
each piece of paper handled. 

It is not common practice for 
all cheques to be presented. 


However, the terms and con- 
ditions of application state 
dearly that Biiuings can reject 
multiple or suspected multiple 
applications and can present 
cheques received. Applicants 
agree on the completion of a 
form that their cheques will be 
honoured on first presentation. 

It is not dear whether 
Barings win carry out its 
threat and cash cheques for 
more outrageous multiples. 


Some hopefuls may have ap- 
plied well over 50 times. 

YTV is the last independent 
television company to seek a 
stock market listing and the 
third to come to the market 
this year. Thames and TV- 
AM were also oversubscribed. 

Yorkshire has forecast pre- 
tax profits for the year to the 
end of September of at least 
£825 million. 


Evered 
sells TI 
stake 

By Our City Staff 


Japan surplus at new high 


Tokyo (Reuter) - Japan 
ed a -record trade surplus 
isl month when unemploy- 
ment also set a record, accord- 
ing to government figures 
released yesterday. 


The surplus jumped to 
;$8.«r-biIir<m l .fioin- $7.65 ba- 
llon in Juite and $4,92 billion ■ 
a year earlier. . .. . 

Unemployment , reached a 
record 2.9 per cent, op from 
17 per cent in June and 2.4 
per cent a year earlier. A total 


Economists blamed the 
strong yen for both records. 
The 40 per cent rise in the 
currency's value against the 
'dollar ra the last 18 months 
burr exporters, making their 
products less competitive and 
forcing them to lay off 
workers. 

But the currency’s rise in- 
creased the surplus because 
-exports fetch -many more dol- 
lars than previously, even 
though prices -have not 


out of work last month. ' * ■ ' The figures are expected to 


increase domestic and over- 
seas pressure on Japan to cut 
interest rates and most cur- 
rency dealers believe the Bank 
of Japan will succumb next 
month, after its own survey of 
Japanese companies confirms 
the poor state of theeconomy. 

The strong yen does have 
benefits because it pushes 
down the price of imports. 
The government said yes- 
terday that consumer prices 
last monthwere ^lighjiy-lower 
•than tf'yieaf eatfierr the first 
year-on-year drop since 4958. 


Hillsdown in £62m bid 
for Meadow Farm 

By Our City Staff 

Holdings, the Meats, a fanners' co-operative 


Hillsdown 

food and furniture group, 
continued on its acquisitive 
path yesterday with an agreed 
£62 million purchase of 
Meadow Farm Produce, a 
USM-Iisted wholesale butcher 
supplying the retail and cater- 
ing trade. 

The aquisition came just 
one day after a £14.2 million 
agreed bid for May & HasselL 
the timber importers, which 
Hillsdown tied up yesterday 
through purchases in the 
market. 

Meadow Farm is 
Hillsdown's eighth purchase 
of over £1 million since 
dropping its bid for S&W 
Berisford. which was referred 
to the Monopolies and Merg- 
ers Commission in May. 

The Meadow Farm pur- 
chase will help Hillsdown 
achieve its aim of becoming a 
fully integrated player in the 
meat industry. It already owns 
FMC Meat which supplies 
about one-eighth of the 
country's meat, and last 
month snatched North Devon 


abattoir, from under the nose 
of Meadow Farm itself 

Other recent purchases in- 
clude John Silver Holdings, a 
meal supplier and processor, 
and Culrose Foods, which 
specializes in canned and 
processed meats. 

Meadow Farm, based in 
Milton Keynes, made pretax 
profits of £2.6 million in the 
year to March 28 on turnover 
of £34.1. million and had 
earnings per share of 12p. 
Hillsdown is offering Meadow 
Farm shareholders a straight 
one- for-one share swap which 
would increase its own issued 
share capital by about nine per 
cent. The terms already have 
the backing of Meadow Farm 
shareholders speaking for 
about a quarter of its shares. 

Hillsdown shares were 
steady at 305p yesterday while 
Meadow Farm, suspended at 
270p earlier in the week, 
ended the day at 302p. The 
group was floated through a 
placing in April 1984 at I30pa 
share. 


Orion bank 
names chief 
executive 



John Sanders 
Orion Royal Bank, the mer- 
chant banking arm of Royal 
Bank of Canada, yesterday 
announced that it had ap- 
pointed a new chairman and 
chief executive after a gap of 
nearly a year. 

He is Mr John Sanders, 
aged 43, head of the inter- 
national .capital markets di- 
vision of SG Warburg 
Mr Sanders will be respon- 
sible for all of RBCs world- 
wide investment, banking 
activites outside North Amer- 
ica. He takes op his new post 
on October 1. 


Evered Holdings, the fast- 
growing engineering group run 
by the Abdullah brothers. 
Cteman and Raschid, yes- 
terday quashed speculation 
that it may bid for TT Group 
by selling its 14.6 per cent 
stake in the company, at a 
profit of about £8 million. 

Evered was joined by other 
investors in its concert party, 
which together controlled 20. 1 
|- per cent of Tl, the former 
Tube Investments group, best 
known for its Raleigh bicycles 
and Creda, Hoover and Rus- 
sell Hobbs domestic 
appliances. 

AboutJ7.4 per cent of TTs 
shares were sold through the 
market at 460.5p a share. The 
shares rose to 493p. before 
they closed unchanged at 
477p, while Evered shares 
gained 20p to 236p. 

City hopes of a full bid for 
TI have waxed and waned 
since the Abdullah brothers 
first moved into the company 
about 13 months ago. 

They have been trying to 
put together a consortium bid 
with the help of Citicorp, the 
New York bank, having been 
thwarted by leaks in its efforts 
to place the shares this year. 

The £8 million profit from 
the Tl share sale will more 
than offset the £4 million loss 
suffered by Evered after the 
failure last month of its £160 
million hid for McKechnie 
Brothers. 

The bid cost Evered about 
£1 million, while it lost about 
£3 million placing its 15.1 per 
cent stake in McKechnie in 
the market 

The £40 million proceeds 
from the TI shares will wipe 
out EverwTs debts and give it 
about £20 million to £22 
million in cash holdings, 
according to Mr Richard 
Templeton of Robert Flem- 
ing. the company’s advisers. 

Evered said acquisitions 
would continue to play an 
important part in its expan- 
sion, but these would probably 
be on an agreed basis. It 
promised to announce soon 
two small cash acquisitions. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


. . 




JtewYorfc' 
Dow Jones . 

KKdo*. 


.... 1906.38 (+6.19)* 

. 16533.68 (+165.70) 

1913.00 (-21.20) 

294 7 <-4.6] 

11923 (+83) 


Sydney: AO. _ 
jJWkfurfc 

Commerzbank 2095-8 (+103) 

3 


general 

Paris: CAC 
Zurich: 

SKA General .. 


London closing prices 


3835.42 (-1.4] 
- 41Z0<+3. 


n/a 

Page 23 


INTEREST RATES 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

BTR 


Blue Circle — 


Nat West Bank — 

Samuel Heath 

Derecfc Crouch 
Bestobell 


315p f+19p) 
55lp (+15pj 
574p +32p) 

550p (+30p 

—— 178p (+17p 
547p (+23p 


Evered 236p (+20p) 

Op) 


Johnson Matthey 
Intnl- Signal 


Palp 


« 22Dp (+1 
_ 283p (+15p) 
_540p<+40pj 

Body Shop 625p (+30pj 

A. B. Ports — 283p (+12pj 

GRE 879p (+17p 

Stewart Wrightson — 434p (+I0pj 
Suri Alliance 719p(+15p) 


BT still months behind on 
System X installation 


tendon: 

Bank Base: 10 % 

3-month Interbank 9 ,6 io-9VX> 
3-month eligible 
irate 






Prime Rate 7W, 

Federal Funds 5"u%* 

3-fnonth Treasury Bins 5.18-5.16%* 
30-year bonds 100 ,s «-100 ,, az* 

CURRENCIES 


Umdotr 
£51.4870 
£' DM3.0321.. 
£SWFr2.4431 
£ FFr93183 
&Yen229.95 
£ lndex:7l.l 


New York: 
fc $1.4885* 

S: DM2.0345* 

$: Index: 110.4 

ECU £0.692217 
SDR £0.815502 


FALLS: 

B.P. 


Brit Aerospace 

'Lee Refrigeration 22Dp l- 

Penfland Indus -- 440p (-25pj 

Euro Femes 132J4P l-7p) 

Extel 375p (-28p) 



GOLD 


London Fixing: 
AMS386.00pm-S384.70 
ctasa S385.0D-385.50 (£259-00- 
259.50 1 - 

Maut YaHc 

Comex S385-55-386.05* 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (On.) pm514.90bW £14.85) 
* Denotes latest trading price 


British Telecom yesterday 
admitted that its telephone 
system modernization pro- 
gramme was until recently 15 
months behind schedule due to 
late deliveries from suppliers 
of the new System X digital 
exchange equipment 

Only 165.000 tines have so 
far been connected to System 
X exchanges, compared with 
the original target of one 
million. He conversion pro- 
le has been speeded np 
even at the planned rate of 
one new digital exchange 
entering service every working 
day, it will take until March to 
complete a million 
connections. 

This month there has berm a 
five-fold increase in the num- 
ber of System X exchanges 
entering service. 

Mr Iain Val lance, chief of 
operations and.chief executive 
designate, said: “We will do 
oar damnedest to catch np.” 
He added that.be would have 
liked more digital lines in 


By Teresa Poole 

place in the City of London in 
time for big bang; by March 
only a third of City customers 
will have been converted. 

Mr Vallance was speaking 
at the opening of the City of 
London's first major digital 
exchange, in Wood Street, 
EC2. when 3£0Q customers, 
including the Bank of En- 
gland. were transferred from 
the mechanical Stronger ex- 
change, installed in 1947, to 
System X. 

Customers of digital ex- 
changes benefit from quicker 
connections, clearer speech, 
and a better service. Addi- 
tional customer services, such 
as call-forwarding facilities 
and alarm calls, are planned. 

Eight other local System X 
exchanges in other parts of the 
country were also inaugurated . 
yesterday, bringing the total to 
71. 

BT has fallen behind sched- 
ule owing to previous delays in 
the development of System X 
by General Electric Company 


and Plessey, the two suppliers. 
Production is now naming 
smoothly however, and a large 
volume of equipment has al- 
ready been delivered and is 
awaiting installation. 

From now on all orders for 
digital eqpipmeat win be put 
out to tender and GEC and 
Plessey free competition from 
Thorn-Ericsson, which mano- 
factnres the rival AXE10 ex- 
change, the first of which will 
be installed In Sevenoaks this 
autumn. 

BT expects to invest np to £4 
billion in digital equipment by 
1990. 

At the planned installation 
rate of 216 million digital lines 
a year, half of BT*s customers 
will be connected to modern 
exchanges by the end of the 
decade. 

The modernization of the 
trunk network, which connects 
major cities, will be completed 
by the end of next year, some 
two years earlier than orig- 
inally scheduled. 


Maxwell thwarted as Extel 
wins backing for US buy 


It was a close shave, but the 
Extel Group yesterday gar- 
nered the support of enough 
institutions and private 
shareholders to beat off the 
Mirror Group publisher Mr 
Robert Maxwell, who sought 
to block its $40 million (£27 
million) purchase of Dealers 
Digest, an American financial 
publishing firm. 

Shareholders controlling 
1824 million shares in the 
information and priming 
group voted to approve the 
purchase and a £26 million 
issue of new shares, while 
17.34 million voted against 
The majority in favour, which 
included Globe Asset 
Management and Legal & 
General, was just 5126 per 
cent of the votes cast on an 
impressive turnout of about 
83 per cent 

Mr MaxwelL who speaks for 
29.99 per cent of Extel, has 


By Richard Lander 

vehemently opposed the Deal- 
ers* Digest purchase, which he 
says is too costly for a com- 
pany which made taxed prof- 
its of $362,000 in its last 
financial year. 

Moa of his support yes- 
terday came from Mr David 
Stevens' MIM investment 
group, which owns about 7 per 
cent of ExteL The nock mar- 
ket also cast its vote in favour 
of Mr MaxwelL cutting Extel 
shares by 40p to 363p. 

The" result was announced 
by ExteTs chairman, Mr Alan 
Brooker, after a meeting nota- 
ble more for its touches of 
high farce and drama than for 
incisive questioning from. the 
floor. Mr Maxwell was absent, 
in the Mediterranean, but was 
represented in force by his 
bankers.N.M Rothschild, who 
said he maintained his stance 
despite the defeat. 

The meeting started in a 


tiny room at Extefs London 
headquarters but was quickly - 
moved to the more spacious 
Pepys Room at the nearby 
International Press Centre, 
where it went ahead despite 
the absence of voting cards 
and after a minor procedural 
wrangle. 

Finally, after an hour-long 
vote count, it was left to Mr 
Brooker to announce the re- 
sult with the aplomb and 
voice modulation of a . by- 
election reluming officer. 

Confident of victory after a 
vigorous telephone canvass- 
ing campaign of shareholders, 
Mr Brooker said he was. _ 
delighted- with the result/ .**1 
have no doubts that it will 
prove a very good dm! 

He was adamant that he 
would not meet Mr Maxwell, 
who has called for talks in 
order to launch an agreed offer 
forExteL 


Wight pays $20m for US agency 

rinllmr • \T. V.J. t . . . . V 


Wight Collins Rutherford 
Scott, the advertising agency 
which helped launch the To- 
day newspaper, is reinforcing 
its drive into the United States 
by puchasing Della Femina 
Travisana, an agency with 


offices in New York, Los 
Angeles, California and At- 
lanta. Georgia. 

WCRS is paying an initial 
$20 million (£13 million) for 
DFT, comprising $5 million 
in shares and $15 million in 


cash, raised with a placing of 
ordinary and convertible pref- 
erence shares. 

Further payments will be 
made according to DFTs 
future profit performance. ' 



31st Issue 
Savings 

Certificates 


INCREASE IN 

MAXIMUM HOLDING LIMIT 

Beginning onl September 1986, 
the maximum holding limit for 

31st Issue 

National Savings Certificates 
will be doubled to 
£10,000, which is 
the purchase price of 
400 units. 

Issued by the Department for National Savings on behalf of the Treasury. 


J- _ 



V 


w 
















MM 


■mt’Z 




wmmm 


mmm 


*3fe^'^r;4 VJf'^ 






•**#& 








BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


7 WALL STREET 


Shares edge higher 
at start of trading 


THE TIMES SA 


Oxford Instruments in 
£9m Plasma purchase 


TEMPUS 


New York (Renter) - Wall 
Street shares rose slightly in 
early trading yesterday, with 
the Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage np six points to 
1 £0&68. 

Traders said investors were 
still optimistic that the US 
economy can improve, despite 
a record trade deficit lost 
month. 

Mr Monte Gordon of the 
broker, Dreyfus, said: “The 
general feeling is that the 
Federal Reserve Board is 
committed to cutting discounts 
rates to boost the economy.” 

The volume was moderately 
active, with 15 mill t on shares 
traded, as advancing issues led 
itoHining issues by a margin of 
three to two. 


Owen Corning led the active 
shares, rising } x to 80 3 s. IBM 
was up With to 39 7 &, Lockheed 
was up 7 8 to 48%, Mobil was 
up With to 36%th, Merrill 
Lynch added h to 38^1, AT&T 
was up %th to 24*8 aid Exxon 
added % to reach 69%. 

British Petroleum was up 
%th to 39*8 and Grolier added 
% to 12 %. 

The transportation average 
was np 0.63 points at T7&38, 
utilities, at 218.05, were ahead 
0.55 points and stocks added 
1.25 points to reach 738.49. 

The Standard and Poors 
100 index was np 0.62 points 
to 238.24 and the $ and P 
composite average reached 
353.60, np 0.76 points. 


Oxford In si rumen is is to 
Lake 99 per cent of Plasma 
Technology for £9. 1 million in 
what it sees as a strategic 
acquisition. 

Plasma was formed in 1981 
to develop and manufacture 
plasma etching and deposition 
equipment used in the 
processing of semiconductors. 

With turnover of £3.1 mil- 
lion and pretax profits of 
£6 J 6.000 for the year to 
October 31. Plasma’s net as- 
sets stood at £825.000 for the 
first quarter of this year. 
Turnover is expected to reach 
£5.5 million with pretax prof- 


• LEG REFRIGERATION: 
For the six months ending June 
30, with figures in £000. the 
interim dividend is 4p (same) 
turnover was 23,788 (25,958) 


265 (558) profit after tax 467 
(763) and earnings per share 
were 7.72p (12.62). 

• TFAJH BRAINE HOLD- 
INGS: The interim dividend is 
Up (same) for the six months 
to June 30. Turnover was 
1.798.847 (1,756.929) trading 
profit was 14,570 (949) invest- 
ment income 47,278 (53,422) 
and interest payable 4,970 
(7,961). Profit before tax was 
56,878 (46.410). 

(•ARNCLIFFE HOLDINGS: 
There wilt be no interim divi- 
dend (same) for the half year to 
June 30. The turnover was 
£2.464.802 (£2,739,933) and the 
trading pretax profit was 
£88.085 (£1 18,784). 

• SCOTTISH INVESTMENT 
TRUST: For the nine months to 
July 31. with figures in £000, 
gross investment income was 
9.234 (8,247) revenue before lax 
5,992 (5.826) net asset value per 
per ordinary stock unitafiter 
deducting prior charges at par, 
was 459. ip (349p at October 31 
lastyear). 

• A J GELFER: Turnover was 
£7,457,994 (£6, 1 94.684) for year 
to March 31 1986 and pretax 
profit was £1,168,877 
(£1.148,450). Earnings per share 
were Up (I0.48p)_ A final 
dividend of 4p (3.3p) was paid 
on J une 11, making 5.4p (5.2p). 

• UNITED STATES DEBEN- 
TURE CORPORATION: The 
interim dividend is 2^5p. 
(same). With figures in £000. the 
results for the six months to 
June 30 were: interest receivable 
30 (26) profits less losses on 
dealings in investments by 
subsidiaries 788 (43) other 320 
(138) interest payable 1,471.5 
(1.576) pretax profit 4,718 
(1,176) a nd tax 1,113(756). 

• MILLETTS: Sean has re- 
ceived acceptances in respect of 
5,075,449 ordinary shares, 
representing . 97.6 per cent of 
Mdietts. ft intends to acquire 
compulsorily the outstanding 
Milieus shares. 


By Amanda Gee Smyth 

its in excess of £1 million for 
1986. 

Mr David Carr and Mr 
John Ball, the Plasma 
shareholders, are selling 
485.000 of the SQO.0Q0 issued 
ordinary shares. In return they 
will receive 1.76 million new 
Oxford shares, of which they 
will keep 83.684 for at least 12 
months. 

Robert Fleming and Co. the 
merchant bank, has agreeed to 
purchase or find purchasers 
for 1.68 million of the new 
Oxford shares. 

Mr Carr and Mr Ball have 
entered into three-year sevice 


COMPANY NEWS 


• HALL ENGINEERING 
(HOLDINGS): Regentcrest and 
its associates, after a recent 
purchase, now own a total of 
1.035,000 ordinary shares or 7.3 


• NEW LONDON . OIL: The 
company is to acquire oil and 
gas properties from Guinness 
Peat group. The deal will be 
effected by the issue to Guinness 
Mahon Energy of 8,045,000 new 
ordinary shares and warrants to 
subscribe for 2.100,000 new 
ordinary shares for an aggregate 
cash price of £2,09 1,700. 

• COMPUTERS & FINAN- 
CIAL CONSULTANTS: An 
agreement in principle has been 
reached for the purchase of the 
business and certain assets of 
Business House Systems and 
Business House Systems Austra- 
lia, together ref e rre d to as BHS. 
for a consideration of 
AusS500,000 (£207,468). 

• STEWART ENTER- 
PRISES: Acceptances have 
been received in respect of 
5,571,654 new 6U per cent 
convertible, redeemable pref- 
erence sahres at lOOp, being 
84.42 per amt of the total 
number of convertible pref- 
erence shares provisionally 
allotted to shareholders in terms 
of the rights issue. The 
1,061,582 convertible pref- 
erence shares not taken up by 
existing shareholders have been 
sold in the market 

• BRUNTONS 
(MUSSELBURGH): Cardo 
Engineering says that it now 
owns or nas acceptances in 
respect of 4,190,056 Bruntons 
ordinary shares, representing 
52.38 per cent of Bruntons 
equity and has declared its 
improved ofTer unconditional in 
all respects. 

• PARAMBE INTER- 
NATIONAL: Results for the six 
months to June 30. Interim 
dividend 0.45p (same), figures 
in £000: gross investment in- 
come 32 (43). Works of art 
dealing income S (56). Securi- 
ties. dealing income 32 (27). 
Underwriting 5 (4). Profit after 
charging bank interest of 
£19,689 (£24.227) 20 (70). Tax 6 


contracts with Plasma and w ill 
remain joint managing 
directors. 

Oxford secs its acquisition 
as an important step towards 
the establishment of a special- 
ist semiconductor products 
division. Plasma aims its 
specialized products at re- 
search and development lab- 
oratories and institutions 
worldwide. 

Oxford, with about 75 per 
cent of the market in magnets 
used in body scanning, saw 
turnover rise from £59.13 
million to £75.91 million in 
the year to March 31. 


(21). Purchase of own shares 12 
(nil). Retained loss 17 (30 
profit). Earnings per share 0-33p 
(1.1 4p). Net asset value 50.7p 
(54.1 par December 31 1985). In 


30,000 of its own shares far 
cancellation at 40 l-2p. Earnings 
are based on a weighted average 
of number of shares outstand- 
ing. 

• ANGLO-AFRICAN 
FINANCE: With figures in 
£000 an d no interim dividend 
(nil) turnover was 56,090 
(78,671) for sax months to June 
30. Income before tax 2^44 
(2319). Tax 636 (934). Earnings 
per share S.2p (2p). 

• ROHAN GROUP: For the 
six months to Jane 30, the 
interim dividend is 2.4p (2.4p). 
payable on September 26. With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
9,038 (9,965), trading profit 902 
(1,616) share of losses of asso- 
ciates 31 (276) profit before tax 
871(1.340) tax 196 (328) 

• THE FROST GROUP: Re- 
sults for the six months to June 
30 in £000. Interim dividend 
2.5p (2. Op). Turnover 33,627 
(44J209). Pretax profit 912 
(708). Tax 190(174). Minorities 
nil (82). Farning s per share 
5.1 Ip (4.90P). Net cost of site 
closures in the period under 
review amounted to £59,000, 
which will be written off as an 
extraordinary item at the year 
end. Negotiations have been 
concluded to open an additional 
branch of Raphaels for banking 
services in Banbury, Oxford- 
shire, early next year. 

• SONESSON: Results for the 
six months u> June 30 show 
(figures in SKr million or 
£96,246) sales at 3.090 (3,183), 
profit before depreciation at 422 
( 4 1 5) and profit before appropri- 
ations and tax ax 544 (328). 

• STEEL BROTHERS 
HOLDINGS: The company has 
sold Sondes Place, pan of its 
headquarters premises in 
Dorking. Surrey. Sondes Place 
will become the headquarters of 
Komori Currency Technology 
UK. which paid more than £2 
million for the building. 


Hong Kong property 
looking stronger 


Do not let poor half year 
results from Swire Pacific 
dampen your enthusiasm for 
the Hong Kong property 
market. 

‘ According to De Zoete & 
Bevan, the brokers, 
yesterday's figures reflect the 
fact that virtually no forward 
marketing of properties was 
undertaken by Swire between 
June 1985 and March 1986. 
Since then, the level of activ- 
ity has improved, which will 
boost second half profits. 

Swire Pacific is ’’sticking to 
its knitting" according to one 
Hong Kong analyst. Recent 
actions underline its con- 
fidence in the Hong Kong . 
property market. It bought 
out the minority in Swire 
Properties in 1984 and this 

vear re-invested the 

HKSi.382 billion (£120 mil- 
lion) net profit realized from 
the flotation of Cathay Pa- 
cific in a 600,000 sq ft site, 
Victoria Barracks, 

Queensway, on the fringe of 
the fashionable Central 
District. 

Investors still nursing their 
wounds after the 1982 crash 
of the Hong Kong property 
market may not share Swire's 
enthusiasm. The upsurge in 
the market in 1984 after the 
signing of the Sino-British 
agreement was seen by some 
as a full recovery. 

Mr Roy Crabbe. Hong 
Kong analyst at Smith New 
Court Far East, does not 
subscribe to this view. He is 
optimistic about the Hong 
Kong property market 
particularly on a two to three 
year view. 

Demand for office space is 
outstripping supply. The out- 
look is particularly encourag- 
ing for companies such as 
Swire Pacific, because of 
Victoria Barracks, and others 
like Hong Kong and Kow- 
loon Wharf and New World 
Development, both well 
placed in the promising mar- 
ket of TsiinshatsuL 

According to Mr Crabbe, 
whose firm has recently pub- 
lished a substantia] review of 
the Hong Kong property 
market there is increasing 
interest in the colony as an 
attractive regional centre. 

IBM and American Ex- 
press have recently chosen 
Hong Kong and rumours 
abound that the Japanese are 
daily increasing their interest 
in Hong Kong as tenants and 
as investors. Perhaps inves- 
tors should be less circum- 
spect and join them. 


Hong Kong 
office space 1382 

Q SUPPLY : 
fU DEMAND 

Source Jam Long Womon :j '~ 
Praavty Rm> 


Avana Group 

“The rale is, jam tomorrow 
and jam yesterday — but 
never jam today." This is 
what Avana’s shareholders 
feared they would hear at 
yesterday's annual meeting. 

Once one of the glamour 
stocks of the food manufac- 
turing sector, Avana has 
found the going tough. The 
loss of Co-op’s own-brand 
cereal order, together with 
increased competition at 
Robertson’s jams, led to dis- 
appointing 1985-86 profits. 

However, the message yes- 
terday was that the worst is 
over. A progress report 
pointed out that investment 
in new own-brand oriented 
manufacturing outlets is 
beginning to pay its way 
while the considerable poten- 
tial of the chocolate market is 
being tapped. Future growth 
is likely to be organic rather 
than by acquisition. 

Avana is still not making 
its targeted return on capital 
but is now enjoying a better 
trading performance. The 
mood at the meeting was one 
of confidence. 

Analysts looking for £21 
million this year may be 
upgrading forecasts. 

Broad Street 

What better way to judge a. 
financial . public relations 
agency than by the success of 
its own stock market flota- 
tion? As poacher turned 
gamekeeper, (or should it be 


the other way around?) it 
presumably knows the pit- 
falls well enough to avoid 
them. A flop would be a 
professional disaster. 

Broad Street Associates, 
well-admired for its prowess ; 
in the recent takeover battles, 
is the latest such company to 
go public. Dealings in the 
shares start on Tuesday after 
the reverse takeover of the 
USM-quoted heating equip- 
ment company. Standco — 
now named the Broad Street 
Group. 

At the price at which the 
mandatory 10 per cent of 
shares were placed earlier this 
week. Broad Street has taken 
its own advice in viewing a 
flotation as a beginning 
rather than an end. 

The company is capitalized 
at £9.8 million at the 43p 
placing price, and stands on a 
prospective p/e of about 1 7 V:. 
assuming profits for the cup-. 
rent year fall somewhere: 
between the forecast 
£850.000 and the £950,000 at 
which all the deferred shares 
will convert. Not exactly 
cheap, but cheaper than some 
of the others in this burgeon- 
ing sector. 

Founded in 1977 by Brian 
Basham and Michael Pres- 
ton. Broad Street now boasts 
83 clients and an unusually 
loval (for the PR world) staff 
of 70. 

Further . expansion, es- 
pecially on the advertising 
side is planned, but the 
company does not intend to 
be rushed into acquisitions. 


A RANGE 
FOR THE 
UPWARDLY 
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i-jiv T-gt.-r, 





. - - s . ,~» 4 i5Vr .a. -r b-y» - •» •■ j ■ -• ' ■ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


.BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


21 


StfDCK MARKET REPORT 







kr-f 


Tbe stock market bad oneof 
hs best trading sessions for 
many weeks as institutional 
investors from home and 
abroad decided that British 
equities were cheap and 
poured money into leading 
industrials, banks and 
insurances. 

The FT 30'Share index 
defied at 1,311.9. up 25.5, 
talcing the. total gain for the 
three-week August holiday ac- 
count to almost 100. points. 
The FT-SE 100 index finished 
np 24.4 at 1,66 I^- 
Siock. shortage was a factor 
behind many of the sh arper 
rises. Among- -leaders BTR 
Shea up 19p to 315p ahead of 
interim figures next month. 

‘ IC3 continued to find fervour 
with the Americans 20p hi ghe r 
at lQ7fjp. 

Bine Circle rebounded 15p 
to 551p after the recent de- 
pression caused by the cement 
mic e war and lower profits. 
GEC shrugged aside a gloomy 
annual statement to finish 4p 
better at 186p. Grand Met 
continued to respond to heavy 
option activity up 7p to 403p. 

The forthcoming TSB 
launch and vague rumours of 
a bid for Lloyds from Hong 
Kong Bank fuelled fresh de- 
mand for the cleaners. Lloyds 
jumped 35p at one stage 
before ending 2Sp higher at 
467 p. NatWest climbed 1 5p to 
557p after touching 579p. . 

Insurances were also buoy- 
ant in spite of the recent 


concern caused by die impact 
of Hurricane Charley. Best 
levels were not always held 
but Guardian Royal 
Exh change at 869p and. Sim 
Alliance 709p both rose lOp 
ahead pf next Wednesday's 
interim results. 

Engineers were excited by 

the : announcement that 
Evened had sold hs entire 17.4 
per. cent holding in TT Group 
for around £40 million. A 
Kuwait Investment Office is 
rumoured to have' taken the 
bulk ofihe shares. Evered 


Maaiey gained another 6¥rp to 
~I28p on further response to 
the figures and Derek Crouch 
reporting next Friday ad- 
. vanced 17p to !78p. Bestobd 
shares were lifted 23p to 547p 
as Meggitt won control. 

Ransomes -Sims with in- 
terim figures soon put on 8p to 
176p. Amstrsd continual to 
anticipate the launch of its 
new IBM-compatible com- 
puter next month and- was up 
4pto 140p. . 

There were a few exceptions , 
to the general euphoria. Oils 


To avoid speculation. Regen forest, the property 
company, says It and Its associates hold only a 
nominal a mount of Manders (Holdings) shares and 
have no Intention of increasing their stake at thi« 
stage. The share price of Manders, which mann&ic- 
tare s pa ints and printing ink but also h as property 
investments, has risen 17p in the past week to 31 5p. 


of Dealers Digest. Samuel 
Heath shares were marked up 
30p to 550p after a 56 per cent 
expansion. Asset injection 
hopes continued to stimulate 
Continuous Stationery at 82p 
up 5p while bid hopes sup- 
ported Marlborough Prop- 
erties at 82p up 5p. 

Meadow Faros returned 
from suspension at 302p up 
32p after bid terms from 
Hillsdown. Suggestions that 
the company was planning a 
rights issue knocked !5p from 
Tip book at 290p. 

Pentiand gave up 25p to 
440p in spite of Thursday's 


shaares were hoisted 20p to 1 
236p but TT -Group remained 
unmoved at 4T7p. 

Stores made good selective 
progress on cheaper money 
hopes and .the prospect of an 
autumn spending boom. 
Among the best were Dixons 
at 382p up 1 Op and Body Shop 
30p higher at 625p. Boots at 
2l7p improved 6p more on 
the approval of the Flint 
acquisition. 

In breweries AIKed-Lyons 
added 8p to 343p hoping for a - 
monopolies goihead for the 
Elders bid. Builders were 
helped by press comment 


RECENT ISSUES 


succumbed- to fight' profit- 
taking on further consid- 
eration .of Thursday's figures 
from BP 5p lower at 66 lp. 

. Gifts continued to sulk at 
the West German and Japa- 
nese authorities’ resistance to 
interest rates but fells were 
confined to a quarter. 

European Ferries fell 7p to 
132’/!p as Fielding and Hoare 
reduced its profit forecast 
ahead ofihe interim statement 
due on September 11. Extel 
retreated 28p to 375p as 

MrRobert Maxwell narrowly 
failed to block the acquisition 


thm dropped another 26p to 
220p on further reaction to the 
45 per cent setback announced 
on Thursday. In thin markets 
De La Rue gained 35p to 
MZ5p and Eucalyptus Pulp 
40p to 540p. 

Recent comment lifted Brit- 
ish Benzol 6p to 94p and AB 
Ports climbed 12p to 283p in 
anticipation of good profits 
expected on September 10. 
Stewart Wrightson rose 1 2p to 
436p following the sale, of a 
leasehold property in 
Fenchurch Street Bid hopes 
continued to stimulate Ham- 
bros at 220p up 7p. 

Mining shares benefited 
from the underlying strength 
of metal prices. Platinum 
shares rose 50 ‘cents and 
Johnson Mattbey gained lOp 
to 220p. 


. EQUITIES 
AngUa Secs fll5p) 

KlSiSSt, 

Beaverco n45p) 

Borland fi25p) 

Chelsea Man (l25p> 
Coated Bectrodes (B4p) 
Cofane (ii Op) 

Evans Hattsnaw (I20p) 
Fletcher Dennys (70p) 
GT Management (210p) 
Guthne Corp (150p) 
Harnson (150p) 


183 
200+1 
68-2 
148-2 
145-1 
130-2 
107+7 
121 -1 
117 
70 
r208 
172 
162 


Hdle Ergonom (92p) 
Hughes Food (20p) 

Lon utd Inv (330p) 

M6 Cash & C ooort 
Manna Dev (IlOp) 
Morgan Grenfell (500p) 

Stanley Leaure chop) 
TV-AM (130p) 

Tendy inds |1i2p) 
Thames TV (I90p) 
Tibbet & Britten (I20p) 
Trees 2H%i/t 2016 =97 
Umlock (63p) 
Windsmoor (106p) 


90-1 

22'? -'i 

431 +3 
82+1 
95 
• 450 
170 
120+1 
160 
145-2 
240 
148 
£41 3 j 
. 89-1 
107 +1 


Yeiverton (38p) '• 

BIGHTS ISSUES 
BBA Gp N/P 7 +1 

Brawn & Tawse N/P 5 +1 

Crtywsion F/P 27 

CoferoH F/P 201 -1 

Fbrward Tech N/P 5 

Rock F/P 23*? 

Sutctm. speak N/P 17 +2 

Television Slh F/P . 223 

Top Value F/P 76 

(issue price in brackets). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Time Month Storing 

Sep 86 

Doc 88 

Mar 87 

•ton 87 

Sep 87. 

Dec 87. 


9<E27 

9072 

9083 

9074 

9045 


Previous day's total open 
Three Month Euradoter 

Sep86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun87 


s 


5134 


wgh 

9032 

|JW 

Odh 

EatVol 

9025 

9032 

445 

90.80 

90.69 

90.79 

1267 

90.84 

90 .83 

9084 

45 

90.74 

90.74 

9074 

1 

9045 

9041 

9047 

5 



9024 

0 


USTreutayBonti 

Sep 86 

Dec 66 _ 

Mar 87 


Sep 86. 
Doc 88. 
Mir 87. 


9420 

94.23 

94.16 

9098 

101-18 

101-01 

N/T 


101-26 

101-31 

N/T 


Previous day's tool open interest 22200 
94.30 94.19 94.30 625 

94.39 9422 9437 3783 

9409 94.16 94.28 402 

94.10 93.98 94.10 180 

Previous day's total open interest 4831 
102-12 101-16 102-04 1313 

101-29 


101-34 

101-36 


101-01 101-18 3052 

100-21 0 

Previous days total open Interest 1220 
101-26 101-31 56 


101-31 


101-34 

101-34 


Long Qat 

SepB6 

Dec 88 

Mr 87 

Jwi87 

gjifeioo 

DbcSbIH 


121-10- 121-16 121 

121-16 121-21 . 121-06 


Previous day's total open interest 17124 
21-03 121-16 403 




18530- 

170.70 


109flO 

172.40 


121-20 3469 

121-20 ' 0 
. .121-20 0 -. 

ilotr openintBresraS 
- . _ - - 578% . 

170.70 17TJ5 13 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Aq>4 
Aug 18 
Sep 8 


Aug 15 
Sap5 
Sap 19 


Nov 8 
Nov 20 
Dec 4. 


Nov 17 
Deci 
Dec 15 


Cal opbona ware taken put ok 29/8/86 TricsrtroL Abaco Investments. BSR bitorna- 
mer EJecnonics. Barker & Dobson. Trust House Forte. 


tonal. Flamers. Amstrad Consumer I 


-Utramar. AIM Lyons. PoKy Peck. Rocfcwire Group. fC Gas. Westwood Dawes. 
Bownaao. Yougtwl Carpets. ConsoUated Gold r 


Puc Hofenes Pros. 


l Fields. 


Eleco bid fails 

Whitecroft's £26 million bid 
for Eleco Holdings has felled, 
with the Cheshire property, 
building and lighting supplies 
group able to speak for only 
31.7 per cent of Eleco's shares 
when its final offer closed 
yesterday. Whitecroft. which 
was opposed by Eleco 
throughout despite raising its 
initial bid. said it would 
consider what to do with its 
1 1.9 per cent stake. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market r?ts» 

sks* 

N York 1.4740-1.4885 
Montreal ZOB 034 JJ 72 T 
Amsdam3.4 145-3. 4266 
Brussels 62-57-62. BO 
Cptmen 11.4558-11.4842 
DubRn 1.1015-1.1060 
F7arVdun3.0205-3JB65 
Lisbon 215X5-217^2 
Makid 198X6-199X1 
Milan 2087.05-2087.15 
Oslo 10X263-10X958 
Pans 9X098-9X507 
Sfk/ilm 102283-102625 
Tokyo- 229.74-231.03 
Vienna 2127-21X9 
Zjricfi 24402-24507 


in 

1.4866-1.4875 

206402X669 

3.4145-34213 

6257-6276 

114558-11.4725 

1.1015-1.1025 

3X2352X386 

215.6221725 

198-66-198X5 

2087.052091.43 

10X402-10X62* 

9X098-9X313 

102373-102516 

229.74-230X4 

2127-21X1 

24403-24448 


OX2-OXOprem 

035-025 

IK-lftprem 

15-12prem 

Itprem-Vldis • 

5prem-1cfis 

ift-lftpram 

100-165cfas 

55-75dis 

2-5ds 

3ft-4tfe 

2!4-2V4prBm 

Xprwn-ftds 

1-ftprwn 

S-8prem 

1 54-154 prem 


Swing index compered with 1175 fane up it 71.1 (day's range 71.0-71.1). 


Smooth* 
1X0-1. 45prem 
0X8-0.74 
454-3Hprem 

par-lE 
4X-4pram 
260480*5 
125-1 80di& 
7-11dts 
11V4-12 ftdb 
6K-5%pram 
.154-Kerem 
3-2Kprvn ' 

24 JWTXrpra 
3>i-3!4 pram 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Aigartfna austiar 
Aosaaia do4ar_ 
>Bahta»i dinar i_ 
Brfglcmtado" 
Cyprus pound — 

FWand m»ka 

Greece rkactma. 
Hong Kong dotter 
Indra rupee 
(raqtSrwr. 


__-2Q4^20X0 
. 0.7280-6.7380 
72850-7X050 
, 198.15200.15 
11X037-11.8131 

1840-18,60 

'0430wf4340 
_ 3X8 12-3X683 
1030X0-1080X0 
— 3X404-3X551 
5X236-5X635 


Irelands. 

S2S2* 

Mwpa. 


1X470-1X520 
, . ..2,15202,1 HO 
^^,.2X97048000 
0X091-0.6096 


Sweden 


West Germany 

wwiugranu «■■ 

Netherlands — 


New Zealand doltar 
Saudi Arabia riyte 

Singapore dollar.— 2199521963 

South Afnca rend 3.78323X052 

UAEdfahem 54075-54475 

Ur^dsBank 


Japan. 


BenlumfConvn). 
Hong Kong 
Portugal 
Spam _ 

Austria , 


Rates stppRacfby Barclays Break KOFEX and Extel 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


&- 

,-ir 




■ 





Crtte 



Put* 



Seriw 

-Oct 

Jan 

Apr 

Oct 

Jn 

_*2L 

AMea Lyons 

300 

52 

60 

72 

3 

6 

9 

f-343) 

330 

32 

40 

52 

10 

13 

1/ 

360 

13 

22 

33 

25 

28 

30 

BP 

sso 

110 

122 

135 

1 

8 

12 

reei) 

600 

SO 

87 

102 

8 

18 

23 

650 

27 

47 

85 

30 

40 

48 

Cons Gold 

420 

90 

100 

110 

3 

11 

18 

fS02l 

460 

K> 

7S 

64 

10 

22 

35 


500 

27 

52 

60 

30 

42 

54 

Courtauids 

260 

20 

32 

40 

7 

12 

16 

C2B9I 

280 

11 

21 

30 

20 

23 

26 


i i] 

4 

13 

— 

34 

37 

— 


330 

1 

7 

— 

64 

85 

— 

Comumon 

280 

99 

38 

42 

4 

6 

9 

r*? 


13 

25 

31 

12 

15 

20 

330 

2 

13 

19 

3S 

36 

38 

CaUeAWre 


50 

sr 

72 

4 

El 

14 

(-3*2) 

325 

95 

42. 

5/ 

10 

13 

25 


350 

9)4 

25 

40 

25 

30 

zr 


375 

4 

14 

— 

42 

50 

— 

QMters 

rreo) 

600 

180 




» 

— 



650 

130 

— 

— 

4 

— 

— 


700 

85 

— 

— 

8 

— 

— 

GEC * 

180 

' 16 

24 

32 

5 

7 

10 


200 

6 

11 

18 

18 

20 

22 

220 

2 

5 

— 

38 

38 

— 

Grand Met 


85 

_ 


1 

_ 



r«3> 

355 

60 


— 

3 

— 

— 


380 

— 

67 

72 

— 

7 

11 

-r ■ 

382 

42 

— 

— 1 

10 

— 

— 

K3V. 

900 

192 

217 

_ 

4 

5 



0077) 

950 

142 

172 

187 

4 

10 

15 

1000 

100 

12/ 

140 

8 

16 

24 

. •• • 

1050 

60 

85 

100 

20 

21 

40 

Land Sac 

300. 

13 

40 

48 

2 

6 

8 

r3Z5> 

330 

13 

20 

29 

12 

14 

16 


360 

3 

11 

18 

38 

39 

40 


100 

40 

48 

54 

1* 

2 

4 


V '■ 

21 

29 

35 

4 

8 


220 

8 

15 

20 

11 

1b 

Em 


750 


190 

200 

1 

4 

-10 

rssi 

800 

130 

140 

155 

2% 

9 

18 

850 

82 

93 

no 

11 

20 

M 

Tf^aar House 

260. 

44 

51 

57 

3 

6 

9 

r aw . 



36 

44 

8 

12- 

16 


300 

12 

21 

29 

15 

19V. 

23 


Serin 

®SE_ 

Dec 

Mar 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Bwttam 

360 

58 

El 

78 

4 

6 

10 

(■416) 

390 

35 

45 

55 

5 

12 

mm 

. X*. • ■ ■ 


14 

32 

38 

18 

■u 

!_! 



5 

15 

25 

LJI 

mm 

LJ 

BoOte- 

.. 200 

22 

32 

38 

3 

5 

8 

P218) 


11 

20 

78 

11 

14 


_ —1 

240 

2)4 

11 

16 

24 

25 

El 

BTR 

280 

38 

47 

58 

4 

6 

10 

rasj 

300 


— 

45 


— 

i/ 

• 

333 

5 

16 


22 

28 

— 

ISS. 


53 

75 

85 

* 

l5 

23 

C7W 


1? 

45 

55 

25 

33 

gin 

- 600 

5 

25 

40 

60 

60 

n 

3 »cmb- 

550 

IB 

EH 

80 

ri 

FM 

r« 

rs5i) 


6 

20 

33 

58 

58 

f.~.n 


- 650 

- 1 

7 

22 

108 

108 

lUJ 


550 

its 


155 

4 

12 

25 


600 

70 

[El 

13U 

11 

3U 

47 

650 

45 

65 

95 

2b 

53 

t.l 


7W 

17 

40 

65 

65 

75 100 

Obons 


K 

*96 

104 

1 

El 



330 

55 

66 

74 

2 

mm 

■ I 



28 

48 

50 

6 

n 

LI 

GKN 

260 

23 

38 

45 

6 

9 

12 


280 

11 

73 

3? 

14 

18 

21 

- 

300 

4 

15 

22 

26 

29 



330 

1 

5 

11 

56 

56 

El 

0&tt> 

900 

HO 

148 

__ 

7 

30 


rwoj 

950 

75 

05 

140 

20 

40 


1000 

40 

75 

110 

35 

60 

LI 

— 

1050 

25 

55 

85 

75 

LJL-Jte 


Hfanaon 

H3SI 


135 

150 

160 

180 

200 


61 - - 
45 - - 

38 42 45 

18% 25% 28 

Sft 14% 18 


1 - 

1 

154 254 
2 5 


12 


5 
10 
18 18 


August 30, 18W. Total contract* 29483. Ceft* 22798, Pid*«85 






Cad* 



Fate 


- 


Series Sept 

Dec 

Mar 

Sep Doc 

Har 

rST 


500 

23 

42 - 55 

15 

25 

30 


SM 

7 

22 

37 

45 

50 

55 


600 

2 

9 

15 

95 

95 

98 

Thorn EM 


42 D 

82 

95 

106 

2 

4 

8 

(* 4 S 7 ) 


460 

42 

57 

•70 

3 

12 

15 


500 

12 

28 

40 

15 

25 

30 



550 

2 

12 

- — 

57 

60 

— 

Tosco 


300 

115 




2 

_ 


f 40 B) 


330 

85 

95 

_ 

2 

2 

— 


360 

55 

67 

80 

2 

6 

9 



390 

28 

42 

55 

5 

10 

15 



Serin 

Nov 

Feb May 

MW 

F 0 b 

"V 

Brit Aero 


460 

89 

80 


7 

15 

_ 

C 503 ) 


500 

40 

58 

66 

23 

30 

35 


550 

18 

30 

40 

52 

55 

60 

BATInds 


360 

67 

80 


5 

8 


(* 415 ) 


390 

45 

50 

60 

12 

17 

10 


490 

25 

34 

43 

21 

25 

20 



460 

7 

17 

25 

52 

55 

58 

Barclays 


460 

75 

90 

100 

6 

8 

13 



500 

42 

62 

75 

15 

.22 

27 


550 

.15 

30 

— 

35 

42 

— 



180 

34 

40 

46 

2 

4 ft 

9 

| C 206 ) 


2 00 

18 

25 

32 

7 

12 

16 


220 

9 

13 

22 

20 

20 

24 

( Cadbury Scftwpps 

160 

26 

31 

38 

4 

7 

8 

(* 178 ) 


180 

■ 12 

20 

25 

11 

14 

17 


200 

4 

B 

— 

25 

26 

— 



.300 

58 

68 

75 

4 

7 

11 

(• 346 ) 


330 

35 

45 

53 

72 

15 

20 


360 

15 

25 

30 

CJ 

25 

28 

lmpenal&' 

<• 370 ) 


300 

97 

— 



1 ft 



— 


330 

67 

— 

— 

2 

— ■ 

— 


360 

38 

— 

— 

S 

— 

— 

LadfaroKe 


300 

60 

72 


3 

5 



1 - 355 ) 


330 

33 

43 

S 3 

8 

12 

17 


380 

15 

25 

33 

22 

22 

30 

LASMO 


WEB 

K 3 

45 


4 

7 


(• 128 ) 


110 

39 

37 

— 

6 

10 



120 

23 

25 . 

30 

8 

14 

16 

Midland Bank 


500 

82 

100 

107 

5 

8 

13 

CS 74 ) 


550 

47 

66 

C 

17 

22 

27 


600 

18 

30 

— ■ 

42 

47 

— 

P&O 


KZZfl 

E 3 

75 



5 

10 


C 513 ) 

1 

500 

3 ? 

47 

57 

15 

9 ? 

V 


Eza 

12 . 

23 

32 

45 

47 

52 



600 

. 4 

— 

— 

92 

— 

— 

Racal 


160 

28 

36 

44 

4 

7 

9 

H 82 ) 


100 

17 

22 

30 

12 

14 

18 


200 

8 

13 

— 

22 

24 


RTZ 


500 

122 

-M 0 



4 

9 


C 612 ) 


850 

77 

95 

— 

11 

90 

— 


Eul 

45 

67 

77 

28 

4 ? 

47 



650 

25 

38 

50 

60 

75 

82 

Vaai Reals 


50 

1755 

n 


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3 ft 


(- 65 ) 


60 

11 

13 14)4 

5 

/ 

7 


70 


7 % : 


10 lift 

J 2 . 


Serin 

Nov 

Mar 

Jun 

Nov 

Her 

Joe 

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Ev 1 

23 


35 

8 

13 

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218 

IB 

— 

— 

18 

— 

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238 

9 

— 

— 

33 

— 

91 



240 

— 

11 

— 

— 

38 

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256 

4 

— 

— 

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— 

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Serin 

Aug 

Nov Fob Aog Nov Feb 1 

Tr 11 *% 1991 


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108 

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114 

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354 

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5)4 

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118 

1 

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120 


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122 

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Oct 

NOV n 

FT-SE 1525 

124 

157 

170 

187 

ft 

2 

5 

12 - 

Index 1550 

ffi 

132 

145 

165 

ft 

4 

8 

IB 

1 - 1661 ) 1575 

74 

110 

125 

142 

ft 

7 

12 

2 S 


47 

90 

105 

129 

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IQ 

20 

33 - 

1825 

24 

72 

88 

107 

ft 

17 

26 

42 F 

1650 

1 

55 

70 

94 

3 

28 

35 

53 S 

1075 

1 

40 

55 


29 

40 

50 

— if 

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■Undertying sacuhty prit*. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


There was little change in 
the periods as trading proved 
slow for mach of the day. 
.Attentions were mainly con- 
centrated upon weekend 
money and the short dates. 
Local authorities still showed 
no serious interest 

Base Rates % 

Clearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 
Dtecaunt iwrtrntl oena % 

1054 Low 8 


Treasury B8ta (Dbctxsrt te) 


2 mmn 9’»» 
3mnth 9*4 


2 mnth 914 
3mreh 9K 


Prime Bre* SB* (Discount %) 

1 mnth 9 2mnth9V9 , n 

3mnth9 7 *-9% Bmntn 954-9 ^b 

TredeBRs (Discount %1 
immhiO’K 2 mnth 1 0X 

3 mnth 10’i» 6 mnth 9K 


{%) 

Ovarntrerc open 10)4 dose 9 
1 weetTlO V10 6 mnth 9 l1 i»9 > i a 

1 ninth IO’ir-10 9 mnth 

3 mnth 9'»i»X14 12rmh 9".e-0% 

Local Authority Dapoaita pt) 

2 days 10 7 days 10 

1 mnth 9% 3 ninth 9* 

6 rerun 9*ii 12mth 9)4 


Authority 

n iox-10 


1 mnth 
3 mnth 1054-9% 
9 mnth 9*4% 

Starting CDs (%) 

1 mnth iD'ivS'* 


f%) 

2 mnth 1054-9% 
6 mnth 954-9% 

12 nwi 954-9% 
w 3mmtr 


6imdi I2mth 9 i *d- 9 ’’jj 

DotiarCO*(%) 

1 mnth 5X5-5.80 3 mnth 5.70-5X5 

6 mnth 570XX5 12mth S.7JK5.65 


EURO MCMEY DEPOSITS % 


cat 8X-5X 
1 mrth 

6 mnth 5"ia-5*m 
call 54 
1 mnth 4^i#4»» 
6 mnth 4 r i#-4*« 
ert 7%-6% 
1 mnth 7X-754 
6 mnth 7 , ia-7'n 
aa 255-1% 
'1 mnth 4*,*43i» 
6 nin th 4X4% 
call 554-4% 

1 mnth Pi+S'te 
6 mnth 4X-4% 


GOLD 


'Excludes VA' 


l|£62S-63.00) 


TREASURY BILLS 


«&£430.TM 
: £97.565% 


aUotfidrElOOM 
recanred:16% 
received: £88% 
last wk £9X347% 
replica ElOWA 


ECGD 


Stake sale 
salvages 
Swire’s 
results 

Front Stephen Leather 
Hong Kong 

Swire Pacific. Ihe Hong 
Kong airline, property, ship- 
ping and industrial group, 
needed a huge extraordinary 
item to rescue disappointing 
interim profit figures. 

Profits after tax and before 
the extraordinary item ac- 
tually dropped 4 per cent to 
HKS6I3 million (£53 mil- 
lion), and the market reacted 
by slashing 40 cents off the 
share price, marking them 
down to HKS13.70. 

Bui Swire — one of only two 
British-run trading hongs still 
centred on Hong Kong — was 
able to report interim profits 
up 10 per cent to HKJ 1.017 
billion before tax after reaping 
the benefit of the Cathay 
Pacific flotation during the 
half year. 

It reduced its holding from 
70 per cent to 54.25 percent in 
April and the net profit of 
HKS 1.382 billion is included 
as an extraordinary item. 

As a result, the profit 
attributable to shareholders 
soared from HKS640 million 
to HKS1.995 billion, though 
earnings per share dropped 6.S 
per cent to 47.9 cents for the 
“A" shares and 9.6 cents for 
the “B". 

Dividends have been boost- 
ed by 22 per cent to 18 cents 
for the “A" shares and 3.6 
cents for the “B" shares. 

The chairman Mr Michael 
Miles blamed the fall in post- 
tax profits on a number of 
property developments which 
will not be completed until the 
second half, reversing last 
year’s trend. 

Earnings from aviation, in- 
dustries and trading were all 
ahead, he said. Turnover was 
7 per cent up during the six 
months to the end of June. 

Mr Miles said second half 
profits should show a signifi- 
cant increase on last year and 
on the first six months. 

“The property division in 
particular should record prof- 
its at substantially higher 
levels.’’ he said. 

“Strong performances are 
also expected from aviation, 
industries and trading di- 
visions, with shipping and 
ofishore services remaining 
depressed.” 

Prospects for the full year 
were excellent, he said 

Hutchison Whampoa, the 
Hong Kong trading, property 
and investment groupalso re- 
vealed its interim profits 
The company, which- re^ 
cently announced it was going 
into partnership with British 
Telecom to compete for a 
cable TV licence in the crown 
colony, reported pretax profits 
up 2 per cent to HKS691 
million and that it was boost- 
ing as interim dividend by 23 
per cent to 43 cents a share. 

Tempos, page 20 


COMMENT 


Hillsdown’s big guns 
fire another salvo 


David Thompson, and his partner 
Hairy Solomon are building an 
intriguing conglomerate in Hillsdown 
Holding. They have made a series of 
acquisitions to rill gaps in businesses 
and integrate them vertically, while 
sometimes taking great steps forward 
that worry, but usually endear them to 
City investors. 

Two quite different takeover bids 
have been mounted this week. The 
lossmaking May & Hassell limber 
group, in the daring Hillsdown tra- 
dition of buying what few others 
would touch, was sewn up yesterday. 
At the same time came a £62 million 
offer, again agreed, for meat proces- 
sors Meadow Farm Produce. 

Meadow Farm has grown fast on 
the Unlisted Securities Market. The 
two made rival offers for North 
Devon Meat, an abattoir owner that 
Meadow Farm wanted in order to tie 
up meat supplies- Hillsdown had the 
bigger guns and Meadow Farm will 
now achieve its vertical integration by 
joining Hillsdown’s tough manage- 
ment stable. 

Acquisitions totalling £76 million 
and adding 1 1 per cent to equity in 
one week looks hectic going. But these 
two both come in the category of 
augmenting existing Hillsdown di- 
visions, in much the same way as the 
stream of takeovers from £1 million 
upwards made in the past 12 months, 
cutting further swathes through tra- 


ditional fresh food processing and 
distribution industries. They are al- 
most routine. 

This year's planned great leap 
forward, roughly doubling the size of 
the group by buying British Sugar via 
S&W Berisford, fell when it was 
referred to the Monopolies Commis- 
sion. Market doubts about the wis- 
dom of that move eased Hillsdown’s 
decision to make a swift withdrawal 
by selling to its Italian friend Ferruzzi. 

Certainly, Hillsdown 's share price, 
inevitably its single most important 
asset and weapon, has benefited from 
the lack of Berisford. From about 
243p in March, the shares have risen 
strongly against the tide to 305p, 
outperforming the market particularly 
well in the recovery. 

Next week, all eyes will be on the in- 
terim results. The broker, de Zoete & 
Bevan, is hoping for half-year profits 
of £19 million, against £13.5 million 
on the way to fuU-year profits of £44 
million (£33 million) and an un- 
spectacular 12 per cent rise in earnings 
per share, due partly to a higher tax 
charge. 

The benefit of small and medium- 
sized acquisitions, with demonstrated 
internal growth, should come through 
in the next two years. It would still be 
surprising if Messrs Thompson and 
Solomon do not show their other face 
and accelerate the momentum again 
by taking another big bite. 


Early autumn for shares 


Summer has been early on the stock 
market, whatever the weather outside. 
It paid handsomely to sell in May, 
preferably as early as possible since 
share prices had peaked. But it has 
paid to come back early too, to enjoy a 
6 per cent average rise this month. 

The most hopeful, if puzzling, 
development has been the strength of 
share prices in the last two days of this 
week as the three-week bank holiday 
account wound up and buying started 
for the next The latest news, after all, 
has been almost entirely gloomy, with 
succeeding haiTshitt economic fore- 
casts, sterling under pressure and 
hopes of a base rate cut disappointed. 

Perhaps the opinion poll showing a 
recovery of Government fortunes 
helped; it certainly buoyed up politi- 
cally sensitive stocks such as British 
Telecom. And Wall Street, testing the 
all-time high on the Dow-Jones index, 
has proved a positive influence, even 
though share prices there were 
responding to the cut in prime rates 
denied for the moment here. 

A market that shrugs off bad news 
surely has some underlying strength. 
It would be asking a lot for such rapid 
rises to be sustained next week but 
some basic- positive influences re- 
main. Dividend growth, in particular. 


remains comfortably in double fig- 
ures. The sharp rise in real incomes is 
likely to keep business brisk in the 
high street. And it is widely thought 
that the advent of the TSB flotation 
next month will help other bank 
shares. 

Rising inflation and reduced 
expectations over interest rates are 
also clouding the rivals for institu- 
tional cash; gilt-edged and property. 

Wood Mackenzie in Edinburgh is 
looking for the FT-SE 100 share index 
to rise by about 100 points from its 
present 1660 over the next year and 
optimism can be self-fulfilling. 

There will surely, however, be a 
bumpy ride. Up to big bang in 
October, new marketmakers will tend 
to building up stock. Once the -great 
day comes, however, there will be 
plenty of nerves to exaggerate fluctua- 
tions either way. The British Gas 
flotation, to be followed by British 
Airways and Rolls-Royce, will also 
test the market’s, appetite for stock, 
while putting pressure on the Treasury 
and the Bank of England to bring 
interest rates gently down if they can. 
But higher New Year interest rates to 
support sterling, a favourite among 
more gloomy economic forecasters, 
would be disastrous. 



NEW MORTGAGES 
FROM OLD FRIENDS 


Household Mortgage Corporation 
starts granting mortgages on 
September 1st. 

A brand new company, backed by 
leading financial institutions and, as you 
can see, associated with some extremely 
well respected friends. 

HMC's aim is to provide one of the 
fastest and most cost-efficient mortgage 
services available. Faster because we 
make decisions centrally. Efficient, 
because we raise our funds on the 
wholesale money market. So we wall 
always be able to grant mortgages, and at 
rates that are both highly competitive and 
very consistent. Just compare our current 
rate 10.65%, (APR 1U%*). 

With our friends we offer some of the 
best endowment and pension mortgage 
plans on the market We also offer a new- 
form of bridging loan to short cut the 
housebuying “chain!’ And all our 
products are available only through 


independent financial advisors and 
brokers who can get you full details. 

This is because we believe buying a 
house is the most important financial 
decision most people have to make. 

To get it right, well informed, impartial 
advice is essential. Ask one of our friends 
for full details. 

*FnB written details can be obtained tf?roitgb the 
life assurance companies mentioned above. 



HOUSEHOLD 


MORTGAGE 


CORPORATION PLC . 

H> Miatfiijse t i •rporMfoi PI. ( ", 

Z!H. fru-N’fj. “ft, H\K- Hnu sr, Mlf/M RruJ. 

H;ij' W vnuif/jj-, Burks HPI i i HA. 



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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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Tw*M BV USH 3602 3944 +509 2*0 


HAMBROS BANK W0T TRUST MANAQSIS 
Praoaar UT Atman. 5. Winui Rfl. D rtrawaod 

(CT7J1791B 


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CAML(JARC8I MANAGEMENT _ 

PO Box 551 Berne Uaria London ECS 7JO 
01-621 0011 

Capital 3715 3974 +Z* 150 

Mom 2823 302.0 +1* &9S 

North American 2935 314.1 +04 085 


CATER ALLEN 

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102-1 IQS 3* -Ol 1093 


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PEARL TRUST 
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01-4051*11 


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Eat* fee 


) w 4 55 U 1 , 1 ■*» ■ '; ■ » 


PERPETUAL OWT TWIST 

*6. Hut SeeeL Hanley Oa Thamee 

0*91 976880 


mo Grown 


UtetMOe hoc 
M eet Growth 
am Cmw a Go's 
Hi East Gram 
Euopeen GO) 


2760 2962 
1920 2058 
152* 164* 
70S 757 
811 871 
709 62.6 
625 672 


-04 074 
+1* 4*1 
-03 13* 
-01 071 
+0* 057 
.1.1 0*5 
1.41 


8 CrMrTARAS8ETAUN*a*MOr- 

33-96 GracacMirch Si late AC9V SAX 
01-823 57700711 


fig* »4 

8a> Wtt X2 MO 

Do Acc 292 300 

BM Oth fee 

DO ACC M7 318 

Managed Enampi 1232 OM 


942 a» 5-tS 

2(4 269 5W 

282 MO LOO 

292 300 100 

29.8 31 S . 1*0 

29J 316 *0.4 I DO 


-ovoas 

+02 190 
+0* fi)0 
+04 428 




+0.1 236 
*01 828 


PROLIFIC I94IT TRUSTS 
222. frmom. London ECZ 
01-247 7S**j7 


Non mcotne 

Com 6 GR 
Far EesMm 


Sons fro 
Teebnefegy 


118* 127.4 
81.4 68.1 » 
97 5 MRS# 
1924 1955 
1325 1*25 

89* 7&2a 

1119 1204 
884 35.1 


+05 075 
+06 411 
+05 4*8 
-65 050 
+21 090 
+06 157 
+05 0.00 
+09 4*0 


KOTTISH 60WA8L* 

36. » A nauw a Sa fiaMCugh 
031-556 smn 

am mcome n» 3SS l&S 

00 ACCOM 2255 2ML0 


scarnsN uk Mima 

18. AMme Sc. Erandorgh 
031 225 2211 , 

UK £oat* 184.7 107.8 

SCbSm 1516 1£-1 

Paabc 1899 2032 

Eutnan 2307 2682 


♦ 1 * 1 .W 
+53 127 
-15 055 
+22 0*4 


MLL SAWIEL UNfT TRUST ailNAGSIS 
NLA Tonmr. A e—BBTO e Rqbq. Croydon 
01-686 *356 01-628 8011 
Son Trite IMe 9*6* 9815 +3. 


PRUDENTIAL UNtTTRUBT MANAGERS 
51-69. ttrord ML BtOTO Ebh. Cl JOL 
01-478 3377 

Hornom Equey 402 1 428.4 +25 321 

Eunmn 104*1114 +08 054 

Hoteen Coma 53.* 56*# +0.1 0*5 

Honan Hon me 665 705c +03 &2S 

H BtePn M 1019 1064* -0.1 0*0 

J anaaa 1021 10850 -2* 006 

N American 78* 814 . . 05* 

Homoni spec fra 855 61.1 +0.1 2-OS 

Horoom UK Growm 8i9 87 10 +65 2.14 

HoMom OR Trite 1912 2002 -12 246 


SCOTTISH MUTUAL INVESTMENT 


109- vacant 61 . Ota g o *’ 02 5HN 
0*1-348 8100 


^I’SLn 

UK Snar Cto-a Eg 
Euocean 
N Amancan 


17U3 1812 
1195 126.4 
1*86 1964 
2135 2272 
1139 1232 
1806 1822 


+1.1 289 
-04 607 
+08 225 
+02 098 
-01 129 
- 1 * 059 


+19 320 
+4*3*0 
+06 SM 
+30 3*4 

-02 426 

•05 613 


OUILTIM MANAGCMBfT COMPANY 
31-4& Gramm St London EC2V Tut 
01-800 4177 


ctpol Trite Unt* 1015 10820 +22 251 
□Sw That Unis 1927 2055 +35 2_B9 

Europeen Trite M2 2 1515 +12 OM 

Fir eS Trua 1282 1355 -TO 1 12 

Arancel-thm 397 0 3905 +49 22* 

OMRsdlntlnc 209 3010 -06 8*6 

Do Growti 442 46* -OJ 726 

Hon Yted Tate B3JB B7.B0 +02* 520 

tocan* That 925 87 9 +05 *54 

aSroanai 1272 i3S4# -02 -lbs 

japan tmi tr 37.1 365 + 0.1 032 

NctumJ HoeuoH 319 34.0 +09 246 

Sacunty Trite 1867 194.7c +12 253 
SmeMrCCa 59.3 95.1 +01 1.49 

Spaoa! aS 935 9950 +22 248 

BIFUMMANAOSiS 

32. OuMn Annas Gate, lottn SMrlH SA* 
01-222 1000 

IBientS O t mm 1379 |487 +07 170 
BJ me Mia 56.8 605 +05 950 

8 Caom Growth 552 585 +05 250 

mMseiwN Tat Bid 7*1 74* +4LS 340 


Eurapwn Tnte 

Fir East Tate 


Mranctethte 

an rwj mt me 

□0 Grown 
Mai Y-eid That 
toconm That 





fjt-rj* 


CLBBCAL MEDICAL UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narroe/ Plan. BnsU BS2 OIH 
0600 373393 

Ama Growth 235 252 MLI 190 

Baay Mi Income 42.7 4S5c +Q* 450 

EoroDaan Growth 30.1 32.1 +05 250 

Genera Equty 385 412# +02 250 

Gtl S Fused kit GM 30.1 31.70 -0.1 320 

GR 6 Fined me 253 257 c 950 

am seamaes 5 wi ) 250 

JRW 1 Growth S* 361 -05 0*0 


Prnhem End. Doming. Surrey 

0306 668095 


FP Eatey D« 
Da Accun 
FP Feted ku DM 
Do Accun 
Stentedpup DM 
Oo Accum 


nu 211 * 

3325 3635 
1145 122.1 

130.7 1395 

172.7 1835 
1763 189* 


♦15 Z77 
+2.1 277 
-03 559 
-05 9*8 
+05 1J1 
+05 1*1 


COUNTY ITT MANAGERS LTD 
181 . CTwnpinOO, London EC2V 6EU 
01-726 IMS 

Envoy Tnte 47 1 50 10 

Emraw 164.6 17S50 

1671 177 70 
565 562 


FUNDS M COURT 

PucAc Trustee Kfe Q» ii «> WC2 

01-405 4300 

CapOl 3*95 3615 

Gross Me 1*6* 149* 

H«n VWd 2161 22020 


QT UMT MANAGERS 

0pi Floor. 6 Devonshve 
01-283 2575 Dsaing OL 


KLONWOftTBENSOH 

20. Fanchurai SL London EC3 

01-623 8000 

A mar Growth lnc B55 89 

Do Acxan 573 71 

Fund me Ta me 2Q.7 22 

□c Accun 2 62 2£ 

hoi Y#id me 1262 u* 


UK Cap Fnd fee 671 

OO Accun 1389 


Growtn m ro atmem 2833 3013 




income A Growtn «3 425# 

jetwwse Growth 197 6 2102c 

Nth Amer Growm 10*4 1115 

me Raccwery ' 1120 11910 

SmaevCos 212 2 226*0 

Guo# Inc Tu 595 832 c 

Spend So Acc 2805 296* 
CROWN UMT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown Howe. Wbxmn GU21 UCW 
0*862 5033 

Htei income Trust 2*36 2605 
(feDwm Trust 221.2 236*0 

Amencan Thai 131.9 1 * 1 1 


00 Accun 

Incane Fund 81 .* 

Pwwun Exempt 1803 

rmuneoona 1767 

US 8 Genera 59* 

Teen 8 Growth 63.7 

japan 8 Genarol 2832 

Fa Ban 8 Gan 1223 

Euopean Fum 270.1 

Germany Fun) 74* 


+04 350 

+ 0 * aoo 

+0* 590 
180 
-1.1 090 
0.90 

+01 120 
-63 OtO 
-35 0*0 
+25 030 
+05 0*0 


11 Recovery me 

DO ACCun 

■pen Grow* me 


jroen Grater lnc 
Do Accra) 
Sewer Co's me 
Oo *ccrai 
<M Ed Grate) me 
Do Accun 


655 69.70 
673 71* 
20.7 222 c 
26 2 265c 
1262 1344 
* 10 * 2340 
105.0 111* 
1105 117.7 
103* 111.1 
104* 1115 
1822 171* 
2118 2245 
269 305# 
♦7 5 504 


WonowrorTedi he 403 4250 


2. St Mary Axe. London EC3A 8 BP 

01-623 1212 Pe ein g 01-6335768 B aai ng Qi-623 


DO Aocun 4070 43370 

L AC UNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
Pwr» HMML C op ete AM. EC2R 
01-5M 2800 


♦fit 1*1 
+02 .. 
♦02 19* 
+04 .. 
+04 5*8 
+0* .. 
*04 246 
+04 .. 
>1.6 050 
> 1.6 .. 
-02 2.10 
+<X3 

+OI 070 
+52 . 

-0.1 090 

_n m 


mcome Fund 4331 *4250 
mnmaaona 6 Oan 25 12 2564 


CRUSADER W«T TRUST KANAMRS LID 


Recam. Surey RH2 EBL 
07372 42424 


50.0 S3* +0* 447 


UK QfDWdl Accum 49* 53.0 +04 2.43 

Oa Oat 499 530 +04 243 


Euopeen Growth 
Pacnc GrowV) 


499 S3.0 +04 243 

562 599 +03 193 

59* 564 -09 




EFMtMT TRUST MANAGERS 
4 . MenRa Craxcam, EOnouUi 
031-226 3*82 

Amencan Puna 765 60* 

CBO«a Fund 965 102.7 

Grawm 8 me Flme 1282 137 10 
hign Dot Fund 1095 1166 

I liM ineeonai Rmd 2003 2|42 

Remioas Fund 225 241 

Sear Jap Co s Fnc 362 367 

Tokyo Frac 17B.4 196BC 

(ExJAmarca 1504 1553 

(Ex) Japan (3) 117 0 120. B 



(Ex) Amar ® 1504 1553 

(Ex) japan (3) 117 0 120.8 

(Ex) Paste (4) 288.6 296.0c 

fix! Smteer Jap (*| 2093 2161 
Eurohmo 285 304 

EAGLE STAR UWT TRUST MAAMOB 
Bath PoiQ. CneTOrmam. aouca a nr 
02*2 521311 

UK Baancao lx 664 745 
DO ACCUm 705 75* 

UK' Growth Accun 817 833 
U< rtgn me me 663 703 
N Amencan Aocun 679 7240 
Fa Easam Accun 1023 1095 
Eutmean Aocun 8456 9060# 
UK GR A R tne 545 562 
DO Accra) S83 HJ5 


•04 2*3 
+04 2. 79 

-a* i.n 
♦05 552 
.. 1.06 
-12 aoo 

+698 075 
-02 8*5 
-02 851 


LEGAL 8 GENERAL UMT TRUST 


5. RavfeNjh Hoed. BfeHPC Bd Esse* 


Quaoreni Genera 43*3 4821 

Ckraoim Income 2387 2519 

Quxorara me Fd 4005 «h 9 

Oueorari Recowvy 2809 2775 


NM ROTMSCKBD ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Si SwmwM Lane, Lonooa EC4P4QU 
01-290 8*86 

NC Acsanca Me 2883 3067# +09 1*2 

Do Accra) 3134 33X40 +09 122 

NC Energy Res 1312 1395 +04 253 

NC Income 868 942 +05 379 

NC Japan 191.0 2031 -05 051 

NC Sm tea Cos Ml* 1502c +05 157 

NCSrterEuopCcrs 1918 2»5 +15 032 

NC Exempt S £1295 1345 8*2 

NC A*nar Prop S1157 12.18 

NC Property 1683 1662 


scamtHtROT TRUST 
29. cnanae So. Eonough 
031-226*372 

Paolc 6B1 745 

vrono Growdi 379 *06 

4 Amencan 345 36* 

Income Fin) *5* *64# 

Eurooeai *55 «.0 

N Mar lnc 265 265 

UK Groten 31 3 335 

Extra me 321 3440 


-I* aoo 

. 156 

+01 ate 
+03 489 
+55 080 
-01 29* 
+02 1.56 
+0.1 525 


SCOTTISH WOOWS 

PO Box 902. Earourgn BUS SBU 

031-655 6000 

Pm E« ma 2356 2507 

OP Accum 2713 288* 


8ENTWIL MIIBS MANAGEMENT 

30. Crty no. London EC1Y 2AY 
01-636 6011 


Amor TScn A Oan 103* 11 05 c 


ROWAN UNIT TRUST 

33 King WMaro SDWL London EC*fl SAB 
01-638 5678 

Amencan M 2385 2*25 +35 1*0 

SecenaraH 6875 7025# 258 

Hljn Yhta g) 1735 1785 846 

MatmO) 4215 42850 .. 174 

Fixed Interest 1720 1700 - 1.0 239 

High maarest 123 s 12*5 -051232 

Fv East (X 2425 2*55 ail 


Paahe 

S+c Incane Fnd 
Spaote SMiaacna 
mo Growth 


196 4 2101 
1706 18250 
206* 2200 
SAB J72 
726 77.7 
39 9 42Je 


High awes 
»O«0 


Ante Co s 39 9 *2Je 

Japan Tech A Gwi 11*8 122* 
un a r T u no na mcorna 56* 60*0 

Exempt 536* 6737 

UK Genera 355 375 

Eut) Qrowttr 361 35* 

Euro mooaw 44* 4740 


♦0* 0*4 
+1* 0.00 
+10 4.18 
+0* 149 

+ 0 * ore 

+03 031 
♦04 157 
+03 000 


. 2*3 

♦05 181 
. 032 
403 450 


ROYAL UFE RMD MANAGERair 
NBW Had nsch Liverpool 150 3NS 
051-227 4x22 

Ewer That <23 68* *03 257 

Wdl Trust 7*3 7950 -0.1 132 

GM Trust 269 28* . . 61S 

US That 335 355 c +01 156 

Paoec 8m TM 43* 48* -05 030 


STANDARD UR 


X Oeoro* SL EtHOuRpi B« 7XZ 
031 225 2552 


03) 225 2SS2 
Income Unqs 
Do ACM Una 


257 275 
264 304 


+61 3*6 
+OI 3*6 


STEWART. IVORY DMT TRUST 


20 Caiton 8L London EC2 
01-320 03il 


JS; 

091-226 3271 




1167 12t* 
164.1 174* 


HO) Incomn Thai 903 98.7 
DO ACM 107 0 1135 


DO ACM 
US Growth 
Do Accun 


Do Accum 
OolMMrawal 
Aa nw a an Frad 
Do Accun 
•wshFraa 
Do Accam 
European Rmd 
DO ACM 
Japan Fund 


229* 2*4* 
2573 2744 
1608 1715 
1006 1072 
1023 109.1 
6092 64S5C 
6205 674 1C 
3165 3372 
3332 3561 
344.7 3676 
3*64 3895 
1665 1763 


-ID 2*0 
>1.2 2J0 
MLB 2J0 
-08 1*5 
-OB 125 
+08 **3 
+0.7 #33 
♦2* 0.77 
♦2.4 077 
- 2 * 0*0 
-25 0*0 


Prices in thir table refer 
to Thursday's trading 


lawTa-4l-.lv E 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 



15 6'.- A « M Go 11 

60 45 ATh Swo o n 56 

130 93 Acoeycresi 118 

69 33 AOardeen S0> Ha# 35 

108 3? Acorn Ccmp 48 

275 183 M Cal 211 

123 102 Antpnng 103 

297 204 ABOB 270 

163 152 Angka Secunas 163 

121 99 AnSw 99 

158 131 Awa«M 153 

290 215 Am KoKrama 256 

250 185 Do Wmfs 2?0 

355 163 As Den COmme 325 

180 131 Aaonee i38 

620 443 Asorey 968 

40 IB tosae Energy 35 

233 ISO ASO 190 

123 122 Adas GquOmem TZ3 

95 61 AUomegic 95 

70 68 BBQOesjgr) 60 

228 185 BPP^^ 200 

85 68 BT$ Op 83 

123 68 Bedford fWtSxmt 85 

27 . 12 Baaien 8 Koraam M 

S3 31 Benaone Cnsps 38 

15'. h- D am Ma y 8 Hay is 

01 30 Bemawy Exo 30 

335 139 Berxeim Go 230 

30 14 Bio rsafems 1* 

34 IB Bxxneuiuxcs 21 

■S'. 41 Boel 41 

135 88 BUneharth 126 

220 165 Bhxmmi Toy* 216 

161 138 Bound 146 

27 19 Bmwnaher 20 

210 87 fr*ut 87 

200 125 B"th IBS 

130 75 E Y Oeuhj Sec 115 

250 1S5 Br BWOOMCX 190 

69 SO fr I trend 54 

350 176 O roa u t n ua 296 

1B3 115 Brown (CTOrWl) 150 

3*5 230 fryam IDerwu 275 

9 S'- BUa n il out ra n 2 

92 73 CCA O eaenee 81 

180 125 C44LMOO 155 

36 CPS Comp S’. 

42 . 25 CPU Comp 25 

195 130 CVO 160 

320 85 Cweoonan Oh 100 

W 62 Camowch &> 

1*0 88 Camiai Seeat «w 138 

350 213 Central TV 325 

120 6* Chancery Sacs i» 

133 83 ORCkCOte Europe 130 

13? 12S Otesaa Man 130 

18 7 Cham Madiods 8 

253 130 OwsmraW 238 

17 0. Crier 11- 

40 27 QrywRon 27 

603 900 Ckyroon 7% 500 


06 55 1&7 
2 1 IB 16J1 
35 3.1 166 
Of 85 96 
3* 

26 12 672 
77 78 . 
93 a* IS* 
23 14226 


44 1 4 33.9 

8.8 6* 74 

M3 25 16* 

8* 

11.4 00 62 

70 5.7 112 

86 91141 
14 2 1 16* 

71 3.616* 
5l7 6* 96 
64 75 79 
06 25 256 

. 107 

25* 
42 

36 13203 


1 9 44 102 

640 51 17 6 
56 22 166 


1 1 55 105 

-3 66 6.9 OI 


+2 21b 16 167 

I 125 65 9.0 
40 74 98 
»-)0 SO 17 162 
08 24 226 
-5 116 42 9.7 


+3 34 42 126 

+5 26 17 156 

1.4 216 34 
a 39 


29 4$ 133' 
36 36 205 
179 55 127 

3.1 00 12* 


31 24213 

10 375 
S3 22 25* 
e 16 


1iS 70 Cneoprn 
188 152 CUrae Hooper 
23. 11 OogauGcM 
40 26 OufiO* Hug* 

107 87 corned eactodtt 

85 53 Com Bneram 

124 IM Colna 

10S 45 Cwigen Inc 
175 lia Camp FmanoR 

S3 30 conoson 

122 74 Constetets 
<0 38 Cons Tern m* 
343 205 am itaoiM 

108 85 Cowta 


15 21 03 
13 10232 

*1 

+7 18 82 124 


-1 39 32 132 


1*3 HO CPU 
415 30S Cramonan 


78 50 Crantras 
11* 98 Oww-wd. 


138 75 Coion Laege 
103 SB Crawi me 
97 75 Cruett 
73 *3 OBC Tech 
178 MS DOT 
140 7B OJ Sec Atoms 
91 63 Datran 

216 195 Dawn IDY) 

84 U Dean & Bones 
29 30 Da Bran (Aim) 


1*5 13* DKft* 
57 40 Oeanar 


31 30 281 
69 

+8 1 8 13 23.7 

+2 71*165 »9 

5.7 22 146 

>1 37 35 13 * 

35 S 3 162 

74 22234 

are 1 4 ( 3 * 
76 72 92 
26 35 169 

■ 66 103 115 

10 12 135 
286 

*5 17 I Q 146 

r-6 21 20 36 

♦3 1 * 1 9 105 

-1 43 25 207 

36 4.4 200 
04 1 7 146 


138 105 Dteeora 
T15 75 On mans I 


106 68 Dewey Warren 

328 130 damns 
460 3*5 Drue* 

3 * iB'. asm 


29 as 105 
29 21 189 
5* 68 61 

10.70143 51 
70 34 172 
56 13 28* 
03 16 146 


52 3S EH* *g 

148 102 Eakng Bad ODBCS 127 

3i 9 Ec opnc 27 

3Z5 2*5 EM Fund 250 

43 22 Eon Sacs 26 

379 244 Bonoge Pom A 377 

1*8 111 Baoron Horae 111 

100 61 Becsiyac Oaa P 96 

U. 23 Ennex 2S 

15 7 En ten a mment nod 9'. 

215 122 Emu 132 

255 130 F» 235 

248 151 FKB Go 22B 

160 157 F 6 H Group ISO 

90 53 Feee&acx S3 

*2 'B F+ftyo-OOA 28 

133 123 Fwos (Mnl 130 

73 TP FfeRmr Oermya 70 


+1 ZS 5.1 15* 

31 24 220 

•1 04 15 201 

68 34 1*9 

+1 e 850 

95 25 174 

-5 49 4 4 12* 

+3 22 24 14 1 


14 14 7 4 9 
71 54 111 


19 7 4 191 
17 BO 24 


65 

31 

SM 

100 

SO 

30 

-55 

06 

220 

145 

103 

65 

G7D 

420 

100 

04 

150 

93 

47 

38 

63 

72 

165 

100 

17 

11 

GO 

33 

188 

as 

124 

68 

128 

96 

91 

.56 

ITS 

118 

38 

19 

1)5 

8V. 

100 

ISO 

92 

58 

49 

39 

210 

133 

a» 

196 

*6 

26 

450 

383'. 

390 

293'. 

145 

143'. 

51 s 

100 

205 

50 

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90 

30 

7 

113 

105 

133 

105 

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Hb 

2 * 

22'. 

14 

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168 

115 

255 

188 

230 

165 

31 

15 

115 

44 

103 

68 

353 

190 

32 

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350 

233 

190 

116 

26 

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US 

105 

120 

73 

25 

48 

330 

253 

90 

67 

300 m 

83 

55 

Its 

65 

113 

87 

83 

37 

IBS 

70 

43 

32 

1IB 

100 

91 

73 

.140 

95 

190. 

133 ' 

62 

17 

J 4 

77 

255 

160 

160 

101 

126 

48 

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96 

90 

176 

92 

3S 

9 

116 

101 

135 

S3 

306 

195 

220 

133 

96 

75 

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9 

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21 

148 

140 

390 

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95 

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35 

59 

760 

360 

220 

116 

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163 

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385 ; 

231 

193 

155 

220 

130 

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367 237 i 
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35 16 52* 
21 29 11.6 
16 39 142 
810 35 255 
57 24 *14 

1.1 28 107 

122 27 177 

123 3*152 


61 34 114 
29 3 J 2 14.4 


36 2* 186 

46 37 156 


07 21 18* 
0.4 33 75 

35 23 20* 

21 as 28 * 

3* 16 156 

30 200 19 
108 


79 *0 97 
0.7 29 im 

32 16311 
7.9 46 100 
■ 0 . 03 

56 46 140 

810 54128 
25 4.7 8* 
47 16 172 

22 27 130 
149 52 12* 

17 2* 106 
1.4b 22 11* 

36 <0 70 
46 66 78 

56 10135 

. . 204 

18 3*111 
29 IS 171 
8 * 8 * 10 * 
a8 16 17* 


6* 28214 

mo 33 66 
45 8* 11 
1A 1*254 


4* 19212 
06 06 171 

51 IS 26 * 

52 3*114 

42 4*209 

232 _ 22 


54 204 1.7 
18 2* 146 
66 24 196 
6* 52 185 

15 1*135 

17 2*177 
29 (LB 678 
57 4* 96 

16 47 107 


57 23 79.4 

is aa as* 


36 2.1377 

7.9 f «* i05 

26 15 255 

29 21 115 


21 *2 249 
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35 *7 90 
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68 36 15.8 
24 « 8 29 


42 10 163 

10 17 05 

3* 30 126 

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29 83 5* 


85 68 '. 

54 28V 

230 188 
.170 1*5 
101 50 

173 128 
220 136 

208 131 

160 157 
131 06 

27 33 
182 113 
31 11 

99 92 
1H 90 

S3 *8 
38 30 
X 87 
71 56 

220 S3 
105 7l 
38' 17' 
93 58 

129 108 
230 175 
235 150 
200 110 
134 112 
160 156 
115 108 

164 52 

146 96 
385 19* 

209 1<S 
188 113 

138 70 

S72 180 

se ss 

58 42 

1*4 113 
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160 138 
470 27Q 
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139 99 
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108 79 

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188 190 
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490 98 
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77 

771 

317 

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21 

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29 

252 

132 

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36 

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88 


39 

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44 

0+2 

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93 

141 


*7 

332 

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452 

154 


SS 

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78 

152 

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188 

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721 

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2004 


148 

0 

23 

162 

73 

+1 

18 

2*; 

59 

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ESS 




a 

+5 






380 3*4 Greanfnar 
320 215 aranmH 
194 158 Hemtjro# 
326 263 W (P) . 


70 58 

71 60V 
06 102 
216 161 
166 128 
187 137 
332 215 
365 318 



360 

+6 

24 

07 

BN 

*15 

# 

69 

22 389 


188 

+2 

84 

84 41 1 


328 

. +1 

,5 4 

47 299 

rr— 

820 

■ 0 .. 

82 

19 . 


262 

0+2 

65 

25 74.4 

1 

138 

■ +2 

a* 

59 18* 

e 

61 


0.1 

02 . 

wnir 

100 

+1 

a * 

35 43.1 

'Beat 

134 

+3 




205 

-6 



ua 

230 

0 

99 

89 279 

m Sac 

63 


32 

5.1 182 


68 40 
197 158 
64 30V 

271 1*5 
354 279 
81 20 
*04 279 
201 M6 
79 68 

38 31 
42 38 

413 338 
171 1*7 
258 216 
276 207 
2S1 181 


Mora* 

Mmay Moome 
Mraey me 
NAxsy frnae 
Moray venture 
ram* oout 
New Danan 06 


1Q2 

81 

TRAurn** 

88 


35 

3*31.0 

122 

95 

TR C*ty O* Loo Did 115 

0+1 

92b 

8*289 

212 

IK 

TR tad 8 Gan 

212 

+8 

57 

2.7 458 

113 

100' 

TR Natural Raa 

112 

1+1 

55 

03 2*9 

101 

88 

TR Nonh Amerce 

97 

+1 

25 

27 492 

186 

T1S 

tr Paoec Beni 

168 

+1 

1A 

OS , 

IK 

140 

TR Properly 

185 

+1 

5.7 

2.1 419 

118 

M'r 

TR Teen 

-MS 

+1 

25 

24 814 

174 

138 

TR Tnitteaa 

178 

0+1 

69 

3*375 

52 271 

IM 

136 

Txracta Bar 

ISO 

0 

8.1D 

M 

237 

Thoramonoa 

203 

+3 

1L9B 4.1 359 1 

370 

300 

moo Stand cap 3*0 




207 

157 V 

Tram Ocaanc 

206 

+1 

55 

27 51* 

’J 3 

1T2 

Teerae 

1*2 


40 

2*407 

9* 

79 

Tnptanett me 

80 


155 

17.8 OI 

296 

2X7 

US Deoentura 

29B 


95 

34 58* 

Ft 

33 

S3 

Vfcxig ReaaurtM 
vroewooi 

30 

63 


290 74 192 

22 85 45* i 

w 

B0'» Wkan 

106 

1-1 

48 

U355 ' 

360 

2K 

Yeoman 

3*8 

0 . ’ 

15.1 h 


05 14 97A 

17.1 4.1 41* 

66b 53 29* 
124 -6.1 283 


■eaem 126 

■arc 'A *00 

5* 540 +3 

at 300 —3 

1 ARa n ca 695. ♦* 

' 81 + '* 

1 &*erp 41 r 


COMMODITIES 


EXCHANGE 


C W Jofiwon and Co report 
SUGAR (From C. Czandkow) 
RDfl 

0 « 116,4-162 

Dec 13WW4* 

Mbt 138MM 

May. 1400-424 


— _ 136 . 00 - 33.00 

139.75-32.00 

14^00-32.00 


Three Months . 764*0-7«J)0 

vol MI 

Tone (dig 



LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
flgConeact 
D-parMa 


LONDON . 
POTATO FUTURES 


£p 6 Tt 0 ftf» 


Aug 149.4-48.8 

Oa . .. 153 ^ 52 ^ 

V<* . . 3717 


UnoffieWjmou 
Official Tumorer figure* 
Price in E per metric *«■>• 
Sfrwr la pa ne* par t rey otni G 


Cash 77 & 00 - 77&00 

Threa Months . 764.00-765. 00 

Vta >3250 

Tom Bartey Study 


RurioM WON & Co. LhL report 


cash 

Ttwa Months. 

voi 

Tone — 


Open Close 
106*0 109*0 
11450 114*0 
11MQ 11R50 

102.00 103JXJ 

103.00 103XD 
IOSjOO 103.00 

' 10*^0 104 JO 


Opw O08d 
11400 11330 
124^0 . 122.80 
17tU)0 165.80 
18 Sl00 102.50 
8L50 6500 

Vot 1275 


—-—60 
-r Steady 


Dec . . 
vot 

COFFEE 
Sao .. 
«o» 

Jan 

Mgr 

May 

£L 

a 


.222^215 
22S0-265 
2250-2*5 
2200.195 
2r 85-1 75 
2205-195 
2220-710 
11370 


SOYABEAN 

oa 

Dec. .. 
Feu ' 

Aor . 

•Ida 

Vw. 

GASOU. 

Oct 

Nov .. . 
■Dec 
Jan 
FW 


137-W5.0 
1333-325 
T3AM15 
136^360 
1333-32.0 
13SL5-30l5 
134^30.5 
4* 


137^0-31^5 

T 36 . 0 W 5.75 

130 * 0 - 39*5 

1430042.75 

1*550-45.00 

1d425«J5 


Cash : 8710M76.00 

Three Montfo S91JX1-891J0 

Vol 3200 

Tone Steady 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash 850.00-851 00 

ThrM Monos 67000*72.00 

voi 950 

Tons - - CJutt 

LEAD 

Cash — 270JXM71.00 

Three Monde 272AK73JX) 

Voi — 7750 

Tone — Steady 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 54O0O-SSQB0 

VOL Ntt 

Tone fcrte 

ZMCMGH GRADE 

Cash 573 jOO-574.QQ 

Three Mond». 577^4-578^0 

va ..: --43W 

Tone — Steady 

SfLVBl LARGE -' 

Cash 343-50^45.00 

TTrea Months . 35f^M52J0 

VOI 48 

Tone OUJat 

SLVER SMALL 

Cash 343EDG45A0 . 


PtgMeesvok 10 


AT AND LIVESTOCK 
COMMSSUN 


mm. . . 

OXL Freight PODreaUd: 
report $10 per index point 

+ fiwfte-, 

llBIJflNNVIMA 


Anrege iMMoGh prices at 
repre sena dve wartteo op 
Ai mm2i 


LONDON l®AT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
UveCeta* Contract 
p.PtfWX> : 


G& GBRte, 06.34P per kfllw 


^grapi61.94ppGfhsr 

U^TTESppahghe 

* ast dead carcase weighr 

bgteadandWBfes; • 


Open Close . 

8850 96*0 

..9840 99.00 

99 JO - 99.00 
9940 99.00 
- 9940 9940 
9940 9940 


High/Low Ctese 

0dS6 785.0-760.0 •' 7564 
Jan 67 785.0-7794 7824 

87 8264-8254 8264 

Ju<87 7800-7604 756£ 

Oca 87 810.0 

Jan 88 8234 

Aor 88 — — 917.0 

Jul88 W74- 


VqI: 137KMS 
Open interest 2048 


Cbwg nos. up 7 J it, ave. 

pnce.96.12To.l6) 

Sheep nn. up 55.7 ib, aw* 
price. 152.15 (+034) 


to. up 55.7 ib, ave. 


Sheep nos. up 5 
poce. 152.15 M 
Ptenos.iajiiBRh.j 
prfc.77.fe (+249) 


*1 n ■ 

NWOOTS 


SSfgfeW* 


pnee. 9545 (+014) 

Sheeg nos. down 344 %. a«a. 
-pnee. 14943 (+1095) 

P*0TO Vavo . 


VofcO 

LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 

Eper tonne 

• Whe« Barley 
Mtnth Close Ctoae 
Sap 107*0 104.00 

No* 108.40 10745 

Jan 110*5 109.80 

Mar 113.00 111.85 


TANKER REPORT 

High/Low OoM 

Aug 88 

Sep 86 1070-1070 10784 
Oa8S r 33304 


Oc* 83 

Dec 88 ; 

Mar 87 — - 

Jun87 — 
vote ict* 
0pennwast42 


Volume: 

whom ....Ul 

Barley 


: 2«6 

- 1W 


Spot m a ri tw usinue oi R T- 

TVjkenndeK, 

I2804d0wn*640h 2^6/86 











































AuuUi'f 30 1VS6 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


. f‘S 
• f 


^ 

»• /r- 


' V. 

■* -1 


‘>4,. * 






•«»i^ 


mitt* 






WM 



w’ 

[J 



— €WM# 

Fnun vour portfolio card- dreefe Vour 
ciphi share price movcmcius. Add incm 

up id gjic iou jour overall total. Check 

this aeainsf . I he daif>- dn-idend figuiv 
published on this pajst ir il dutches vou 
have won outright or a Share of -the total 
ilaiK print mono, stated (f- vou an? a 
>k inner follow the claim procedure m the 
hack of your card. -.You Jitusi always have 
your card available when claiming. .. 


No. ConyaB Y 

Caw or 
Croop Iocs 


1 Robinson (Thonaay 

indtmriate L-R 



3 Smiihs (ltd 

lodusinab S-Z 



1 EE3BMI 

Industrtab 5-Z 







1 EE2l3MBk9 

Industrials SZ 



1 b Glynwed 

Industrials E-K 

“ 


I 7 Me one* (John) 




1 Ki 

Industrials E-K 



I 9| Sirs & Ev«ard 

Chemical S-Ptas 

"T" 


1 ! ■ i i'BMW' liLh 1 

Ekdricals 



1 111 Aitwwdi 






nr 


I IEE^oS3HIHH 




1 IB EEflUI 1 .T-! Eg . H'l »: J . '.".'’r, 1 ■ 







fngftnm?TM 

Industrials A-D 




BaiUinsJloads 

- 


(QCv^sm 





Breweries 



EHESH 

Industrials L-R 


. 

E1E2KSS3BBB 


jr~ 


PI R>l- r <i— — ^ 




FJ’rnrT"— ^ 




E3 




F^ll r 7 , T— — b 




KF7T7?!T*^^— 




E1B3555SM 

Industrials L-R 




Foods 



1 2*7 Whitbread -A' 

Breweries 



1 30 Broken Hill 

Industrials A-D 



1 31 Hickson 




I esesjIbbhibi 




1 iSEESSEUMBl 

rp.fTTT^'i^m 



1 1 HM E3 iiMMl 




1 .1$ Rainers (Jewellers) 

DraDavJSUKts 1 



1 3ft Wood (SW) 

In dug nab S-Z 1 



I KVjBCT?T7Tff—— ■! 

ISETTHI 



1 38 Aiexon 

Dmwry5«KCs 1 



1 .w Mctalras 

fS35SZXSM\ 



1 40 Elccirocomponcou 








1 -12 Ferranli 

Electricals 



I ->3 MrKcdintc 

Industrials L-R 



■ 44 L'Ul Bacons ] 

Foods 




■ " T~M 

■i | 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Account ends on high note 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings August 11. Dealings ended yesterday. §Coniango day next Monday. Setilement day September 8. 

S'Orwara bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 





DAILY 

DIVIDEND 

£8.000 

Claims required 
for 

+34 points 


WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required 
for 

+ 174 points ' 


Clannanteshou^^ 


«86 

HtfUow Conwy 


Oroea 
tfv YM 
Price Qi Qfl pence % Pfl- 


' rt8S 

Hgnaw Con w 


am 

— — *» YB 

Puce Cnpe ptoce b«e 


1996 

Iby Uw Company 


GrtM 
On YU 
Pro* woe pence % 


fl(6 


1986 

retfi LWi Comply 


Mil 
a* yu 
P nce Cn flc penen % 


P/E 


1988 

regh Low Cranpany 


Mm 
a* yu 

Pupa Oi’pe penoe % fit- 


M 


MB 280 PKMdm 
m 08 Am Bra* _ 

;» 1“ tao 

B8B“- 

ST 


3 


»3 


150 4412ft 

05 UM4 
7.1 U1U 

M5 U 9S 
1A2 23 127 
6S 87 
525 75 875 


1*5 


7 17 25 125 


151 136 

580 379 Swthorpe 
2B0 177V Br IMm __ 

119 75 Brown Bowi Ken ice 

ill * 

318 % touiuseare 1 
243 i7B CAP Gp 
ST 37 CfitanCa 
22S 149 Do 7'.* CPF 


208 •+8 


*+10 


BREWERIES 


35 fg S*4on* 3a 

8*5 630 B*M . 740 

67 38 B id ha iaii d 

144 85 BMOngmw 137 

530 375 Brawn (Matthew} 485 

IBS 144 BoUwr (M P] 148 

MO 405 Bwtopwooa Brew SB0 

bis *ro Owfc pmw i ) sos 

237 12B DMonuA) 104 

204 18S GmMIMMir 171 

2*3 tm Greene lOng 228 

353 Z» Gumnw* 34$ . 

*24 405 Hartys « Hansone 52* 

81 68 tflghtoto (Ml 79 

178 155 knwnudonOM 155 

268 170 snt/tiDMl 170 

114 77 kuratoa Thompson 111 

254 217 Mental 254 

VB 131 SA Brawn* * 178 

234 IBS Scot & M Mr ISO 

540 353 Urn sh 

318 223 VW m efl -A- 

318 228 Oo V 
251 188 WMMM few 

530 410 wwmnnp u i 0 D 

330 188 Young 


+8 

• 41 


05 <014.7 
217 25 15.7 

15 £0 243 
45 34 175 
2000 45 152 
75 5.1 155 
ISA 2J 19ft 
115 2J 173 
185 05 .. 
75 45 722 
15 85135 
103 3518LT. 
2S5 45185 
25 35 153 
85 45 09 

00 35 .. 
32 25185 

01 35145 


B7 
344 
183 
196 
53 
913 

323 *3 

323 • 

200 S 

■SI +1 

1S5 -3 

35 • .. 

315 -5 

37 -2 

172 -4 

•4SHJ *+2 


105 15 185 
107 5.1 12 1 

44 42 SO 

01 05 286 

06 02 73 

65 25188 

106 95116 

“■ 1 1 248 

.. 124 


2.1 


sz 


T7D 

108 

38 

IBS 

118 


• +3 
*2 

• *2 


273 

270 

213 

343 

305 


105 55 106 

.164 42 ISO 
11.1 4.1 126 

11.1 4.1 125 

106 £6 275 

127 43 185 
104 34 215 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


960 218 Aberdeen Co (Mr 
297 213 Amec 
74 52 Amckfle 

IBS 12S Aitwcodt 
550 331 BP0MUHM 
377 264 Baagendg* Brick 
184 114 BwtmdSv* 

M 2 BaaayfBan) Conor 
192 12B 8o0wny 
S3 63 BM Bras 
975 675 BtocMnys 
726 S2B BUCnfe 


275 «S 
91 81 

29 16 

73 37 

132 




27 ^7% ££..«*» 
Can 


230 


1V4 

Aft 210 

294 

+7 

164 

6815ft 

68 


61* 

0.1 100 

195 

+5 

61 

XI 170 

505 

♦8 

120 


340 

144 

+2 

102 

100 


28 



.. 62 

174 

-2 

KLO 

67 190 

SB 



67 180 

910 


37.1 

4 1 127 

S58 

+20 

300 

64 7 ft 

255 


14ft 

50 242 

77 


4ft 


23 



.. S90 

83 

S -2 

80 

60 320 



Aft 

8015ft 


-IV 


.. 08 


343 250 Cray 

258 140 CMttMfe 
79 SO DWoBkt 
190 147 Dmun 

* »'■ oy*ra A 

305 202 Donno 

50 37 Downing 6 MB 

212 IK O uotMr 

' B5 46 Bromine Mach 
R 42 tfeenne Hauls 
S £E E mw UQh Bng 
380 056 EuruMm 
253 147“ Fame! Efea 
156 102 Praia 

51 24 Fawfl Tfeth 

226 15B GEC 
160 90 Grotvenor 
114 80 HUXaiU Boa 

1B3 50 ST 58 

3SS 2» fen Sgnel 8 Centre* VBQ 

250 175 Janes Stroud 250 

290 US Koae 260 

323.220 Lee Refrigerate] 225 -2 

210 124 Loam 204 *3 

423 270 MKBecl 3TO 

188 196 Macro 4 US 

433 205 Meroro 230 

82 51V Mem BS 58 

250 QB ucra Focua 115 

58 33 MWnnBKt 48 

65 43 Murray Saa 43 -g 

313 241V Newmarii (Laud) 280 

irwv « NO B4 

49 13 Oceontas 20 

580 383 Oxford (nsoununa 541 •+! 

185 150 P-E fe UP n a apaM 188 

32 13 Placom 24 

164*4114 Preape An 5%% £117 

17V 13 Plaapi Lamp* NJV Eih 

260 180 ftteo 2S5 

190 120 Do -A' ua VoanQ 1G5 
248 192 Pleesey 194 

24V 15V Do APR a Cl 9% 

158 116 Plmsac (38- -3 

45 22 Ckast Automate! 33 

234 i£o Race! Bad 184 +10 

488 158 RoMflo, *83 

SIS 445 Screws* icmj BOO 

« Omown 43'i 


£1 

U 


07 161 
— 1 7 217 

66 33 12.1 

43 a.4 186 
13 06 .. 
16 46 78 
£8 08 212 
Z1 5.7 116 
41 £4 126 
S3 22 T9 4 
10 13 904 

46 86 146 

&SB 3.1 166 

56 22164 
31 16 186 
24 23182 
16b 26156 
8.1 33 116 
96 
1.0 


250 132 Q*U (Qeownn 
143 98 Dayton Sot 

KO 380 Cohan f« 

216 i4i CmvoV Gp 
20' a-. Comaneci Teen 

112 71 Concentre 

62 25 Cow Stammy 
260 74 Cook (Vftnl 

570 356 Cooiaoo 
80 32 Ceasan ff] 
in 83 v comb 


42S 331 Courtnav Pen 
7a Grow 


81 40 Cowan Da I 

1?4 i?i Crest tensaon 
224 156 Crown Hon. 
218. 112'. Cuonta 3".M 


48 32 OSC 

315 207-. WCE 


3 05 208 Otigaty 
23'. 17V * 


BO 48 
203 17H 

132 82 
H-I0M 
299 167 
275 188 


Dala Rim 

a*. 


239 


60 

23 560 

138 


100 

72 92 

490 


154 

81 .. 

Ml 

10 

10* 

•+i 

7.1 

35 156 


88 

64 142 

235 

473 


1ft 

10 200 

+2 

11.1 

Z3 125 

bb 


Z1 

82365 

103 

• +2 





123 

32 130 


• . . 







203- 


lift 


Cl 38' 


973 

Z7 .. 




»0 


2ft 

09 37.8 

.100 

+2 

17ft 


C1BV 




63 




m 


Uft 

SA 64 


• .. 

6ft 

53 72 



471 



+1 

Bft 

SO 9.1 


241 7$ Turner & Np* 

125 75 


315 188 Etamow 


86a 56 96 
38 42110 
1.7 29 61 


• +15 16 04 


13-1 46 9.7 

1710 86 i" _ 


!B'. 17 PrtoaHM 
371 180 DwUtna 
102'. 83 Dobsai Park 
HO 93 Dam 
123 95 Common (rt 

150 25 Dura, 


242 

19 

223 


-- l 543 

176 80 87 
14a 0.7 22.1 


5 Sl'Vr* 


113 

138 


♦1 

+3 


ire 43 136 
104 43 10! 
06 36 213 

76 34 136 
74 &1 130 
7 8 103 


71 


7.9 70126 


75 


84 7.7 126 
84 86 11.8 


125 75 Umup 
19V 13', UriSrer 
90'- 56 . UnOamr (N VJ 
286 212 Vaor 
MO 293 UCkaiS 
i30 102 ww Preoum 
195 120 Wien 
3M'-I34 Wj* aw ig» i 
180 154 VSEL 
205 118 WSL 
i£6 \28 vnoa Pornna* 
238 156 wagon ino 
86 29 Wahar IC&WI 

144 69 I W ferfe r a Gttm 

198 151 WAKm 
STS 239 Waogmoa 
154 S wer 
231 174 Waaeome 
50'. 14'/ Waaman 
no u wanting 
118 TX Wait* 

295 21D Wnatman Ram 
134 83 wnatsoe 

283 177 Wruwcroh 
188 125 warn UarneM 
740 3S5 WMaama hum 
160 120 WB Go 
598 436 W o n ley 
M 56 Wood (Anhui 
44 20 WQOO (SW1 

93 43v Woodnouu 8 Rn 
89 58 Wyiut ia m In 

178 135 Young (H) 


187 

105 

£19 

no 

254 

affl 

i» 
135 
Cl 89. 

i80 

17* 

125 

228 


*+: 


1068 57 76 
1.6 IS 20* 
556 1917.4 


73 29 146 
18 8 48 116 
71 56 99 

26 17214 




111 


173 

861 

111 

181 


~2 

+1 

•3 


80 

in 

275 

TOO 

229 

125 


135 

556 

66 


71 

73 

1U 


+S'< .. .. 

81 8.1 76 
-2 .. ..923 

4* 34130 
> .. 12.1 33 119 

+*» 21 36 234 

+S 19 1 7 ISO 

31 29 218 

1*3 *9 11.9 
45 4 1 8.? 

3.0 17 24.1 

.196 
+4 43 54 273 

.. 79 76 150 

35 13 193 

-8 73 79 89 

+7 1438 86 120 

86 77 81 

+20 2000 30 290 
+2 8 8 84 . 

•10 ISO 27176 
38 551*7 
+2 140 18 139 

.. 430 0.r 116 

660 18 US 
.. 47 11 15.1 


31? soo cum H Ra* 
58 28 Goal AH 

a wanarii Ra* 
>C Os* 

ICC CM 
woCb 

KCA Mo 
LASHO 
Do UK5 
NSW London 04 
Pnrocon 
PnmuK 
Royal Duran 


456 

7V 4' 

$4 28 

29 11 

2*3 85 
300 (30 
48 15 

143 «l 
3i 21 
6lv 43 


275 

30 

71 

458 


+3 

+3 


i* «7 nV 


29 41 
239 U 1*»“ 


940 853 Slta4 
185 193 SAOWW 
97 IB Sow«v> 


23'.* H*. TR Erafgy 
Incenooi 


153 41 

no 80 Tmen Europa 
218 125 Ulnmar 


28 

-IS 

130 

180 

24 

88 

30 

EBOV 

928 

152 

30 

H 

59 

145 

143 


•l 43 28.7 5T 
+2 174 114 44» 

•10 142. 783- 1 s-» 


19 100 «■ 
. nn 
226 3 7 
500 S*5» l 
16 5733** 

. . . . -!»• 
. . «I- 
71*126 IS 


7S 57 u; 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


I 


58 3i Bonnwich 

158 177 emmofem 

107 75 Fmav pMmtil — 

395 32S Hanwn QMOtlfl 381 


154 f31|| 


1 « 07 L. 

43 19 176 

07 1J 06 


E-K 


INSURANCE 


0.1 06 323 

am 06 9i£ 
200 7.1 go 
76 10 115 
. .. 40 

26 OS 234 


-1 


IS 8711.9 
575 49 


313 248 Etnem Prod 
221 158 EODto 
277 214 EIS 
43V 29V Elb+t 
153 10?’. EMCO 
29 » 17a EMvcfca (A£l 
104 52 Eton ffij 

Enruw 


2T- 18 '< 


-5 

*2 


76 29 119 

75 45 90 

76 17 141 


28 1 ■ 18V 


3.1 


34 7B System Oeeianers 88 -2 07 09 21.7 

18V 13 TDK CU’e 


126 85 

128 80 
574 449 


CtaUr Grp 


Please be sure to take account 
of any minus signs 


475 296 CaumrusU* 

181 124 Crouch (Derek) 

■ gjsrsB 

F40 

Do-A - 

Federated Hsg 

FVttsn Op ^ 

GaMprri 


1M 84 

137 72 
104 63 

S3 75 
71 54 

172 SI 
70 54 

94 80 


ISO 

101 

128 

370 

478 

178 

100 

130 

102 

88 

58 

148 

70 

88 


+3 


131 108 QbtM 8 Dandy Ord 121 


'-■at 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
Tor the weekly dividend of £8.000 in 
today's newspaper. 


385 254 
143 86 

246 58 
79 42 


HAT 


(MJ) 


El 

THE 

WED 

THU 

m 

S*T 

L 







BRITISH FUNDS 


378 
1*1 
233 

. HewMv-Sfejan 87 
244 1*4 Haywood WAun* 2TB 
828 *28 HugsSJM . G2B 
190 V 128 Ibsssck Jotwwen 180 
«3S2B5 Jaws (i) * Sans *33 
*88 296 LwhQ (J) 408 

Do 'A 407 

Ltwrmai (Wmr) 113 
UUy (FJQ 72 

429 290 Lova (Yj) *86 

186 128 Magnet 8 SouOt 188 
— Mandara 315 

Uartey I2flv 

Marshals (HaMtx) 203 
May 8 Hauak T*o 
UcAipine 


•+1 


484 296 
122 78 

91 71 


3i5 178 
135 101 
203 181 
143 86 

.444 304 
272 171 
38 23 


• +« 


1888 

High Low Slock 


Ira. Gross 
(My Rad. 
Prca Cti'gv y*A y«% 


(AOrad) 

Mayer H 

_ Iflur (Stanlay) 
130 109 Monk (A) 

444 306 MowUm (John) 
920 798 NawarthH 
613 163 NoOngtem Brack 
244 Ilf pKBmman 

Ptnam Tanbar 


98V 84 V Bren 2'*% 1886 
102V 1D0'*£sch 


•Ift 


SHORTS (Under Five Years] 
«'• 
100 '* 
101 '• 
100V 
97*» 
10OT. 
98% 

100V 

96't 


110 87 

395 285 Roctkns 
688 4*0 HMC 


430 

258 

31 

111 

418 

860 

181 

244 


M«w 1888 

103 95- East 13'*% 1987 
100', 93-Trfw) CT0'<% 1987 
97*. 92-. E«h 2'.-% 1987 
101'. 97VExch 1D'r% 1087 
18’. oan. Fund 8'|% 198987 
101'* 9S*»Trea* 101*1987 
97', 90'aTraas 3% 1967 


15 8038 
139 9690 


482 340 


111 

106 

.26 


9956 

9691 

7305 


105 9 772 
86 8953 


108 9640 

11 7287 


=jo*> 97%-Troai 




9032 


92% Tran 

7\% 1985-88 


9248 

104% 

9SV Each 

10>y% 1980 
C9%% 1988 


ia: 

9473 

102*. 

94*. Traas 

*■ 


9*66 

»*% 

85 V Trans 

3% 197008 

. 32 

7231 



9'r% 1988 

ay* 


90*4 

93VTreaa 

11 V% 1988 

104% 

9416 

10?v 

BSVTkan 

10 '»% 19B9 

102V 

Vo 

9*16 

I04V 

SjVExcn 

10% 1989 

101% ■ 

9447 

111% 

94%Exdi 

10'.% 1989 

1(0% 

94 

8 342 

107' 

94 Excn 

11% 1BB9 

104'* • . 

104 

9403 

* 

84'; Tress 

5M*Ht 

#1 

50 

. 63T5 

92% Ttosa C9V% 1989 

«0% 

.-M 

- 9400 

!'.92 

82% Trees 

8% 1909 

89% • 

. aft 

. /2S0 

-• 114*103% Trees 

13% 1990 

110% 

11:8 

9289 


. Badland 
323 189 RuearcM 
191 13SV Rugby I. . 

140 87 Shwpa 6 Rsar 
84 70 Smart *n 

516 342 Tarmac 
348 Qt 1 ) Tauten Woodrow 
180 140 -TlDuy Stood 
433 328 Tratn-J Arnold 
101 75 Tmra 

-IBS 138 TLanfl 
381 195 MbroDUnl 
290 248 Wwtf - 
84 58 Wamnaron ftl 
204 172 wauBUka- 
67 WMam Brad 
IS* 41 Ytegnt 
281 157 Winn (Capnoay) 
225 120 Mmpay iGaotgi] 


355 

688 

459 

28S 

153 

139- 


458 

313 

188 

423 


263 

83 

144 

255 

218 


« *Q .. 
36 26 186 
+6 249b 41 106 

8L5 I J 129 
+1? 86 46 119 

86 86 14.1 
.. 250 1 B 231 

.. *J 4.6 <96 

.. 26 26 120 

.. 25 41 78 

.. Sis 34 156 

.. 5.4 76 176 

.. 5L3 79 U.0 

. . 26 2.1 335 

. . .76 2.1 111 

56 16114 

.. ..886 
24 IS 116 
111 46 14.7 

184 11 172 
71 36 115 
149 39 BBS 
109 25116 
100 25116 

52 46 86 
55 76 99 
102 25 141 

74 36 224 
116 17 19.1 

54 42 246 

75 32 176 
0.1 0.1 . 

176 42119 
12 12 136 
14 45 
75156 
55 (26 
16 172 

5.1 115 

3.1 139 
_ 46 56 

184 52 76 
208 29 1512 
165 18 146 
123 43111 

£ 1 59 179 

I 24 212 
KID 92 17.8 
134 29 204 
137 43 139 
76 '45 124 
.. Q2 29 166 
.. 1.8 16 885 

-* .106 .89 286 
. . 156 42 102 

.. 104 46 146 

.. 14 12 85 

.. 89 35135 

.. 16 16 255 

.. 07 05 186 

+2 29 l.i 20.1 

.. 54 25 219 


54 

30 

IM 


218 


134 

7H 

in 


253 


T2S 

44 

529 

37* 

250 

170 

380 

225 

322 

son 

273 

1711 

785 

1*0 

190 

118 

SR> 

320 

xn 

725 

108 

54 

103 

75 

285 

230 


IBS 


+15 314 
+1'i 07 
21 
69 


Tatomotra 


-a 

82 -4 

497 
250 
270 
322 


I LaiffBig 

I SoennSc 


Wamam S a Uct an 


195 

149 

149 

471 

258 

73 

88 

278 


• +5 


8.1 


FINANCE AND LAND 


•-3 


245 211 AtMtgwortt 
114 126 Mkan Him 
itb>. 71V Mmag a«a 

210 110 ttateyfach 
28 il CameAi 
263 194 Candour 
43 16 Cemraww 

29V 17 Equdv 1 Gan 
IBS 132 hory 8 Sm 
DM 153 Muache 
78 62 Nat Kona Loan* 

98 80 Do 8% 

148 114 NawnwMi 
220 205 TampMot 


213 

142 

150 


na 

238 

28 

2 a 

138 

188 

85 

£84 

135 

220 


17.1 

57 


• +4 


Financial Trusts appear on Pag# 22 


+4 


£ 

1£7 




FOODS 


+4 

•*7 


*6 

+3 


160 128 ASOA-UF! 

37 21 AUkta Dnrika 

an aoi Ami 

368 236 AB FOOD 
128 95 Auoe Hthana* 
007 522 Avans 
360 240 Bum [Sidney Cl 
14V 12 BMW 1 Dobnn 


•:£ 

-t 


•+s 


360 230 BarrtAtn 

sen Food* 


201 145 Bassett 
108 90 BaDava 
188 -145 Brt0m 
150 73 SUeim} C<rt 
. 130 54 Br Vendno (BVq 
192 142 Cadburyc&wafipi 
183 145 Carrs img 
270 >60 CkXorda Da<toa 
241 . 142 Do -A - 
280 175 CuMn 
290 220 CUe 
201 15T Farter (AMR) 

316 238 Fact) Lows 


-1 


‘ft 


7B’-Exch 

«4. fetch 

.100 fetch 
TPvTrau 
1004 89 r “ 


2V% 1990 
11% 1980 


113 V 100 Each 12 VW 1990 
86 v TPvTiaas 3% 1890 


8’*% 1987-90 

10% 1890 

Tms 11*6* (Bid 
94 V 64*; Fund 5**% 1987-91 
98V Each 11% 1891 
S3 Treat 3% if»i 




110 ' 


83V 

104% 

!(»%• 

97 V 
102 

w. 

106V -% 
83 


10 7090 
106 9300 
116 9625 
15 7335 
84 8911 
86 9654 
106 9349 
66 8131 
106 9639 




CHEMICALS, PLASTICS - 


38'; MOD N/V Bearer 

CBBokH 213 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 


liBV 103 Trees 121.% 1892 
107 1 . 91 > Tien 10% 1992 
IDS'i 95V Tlea* C10V% 1992 
117,100-.E«n 12V%1992 
123'.'HfirE«li 13V% 1992 
108 94-feTran 10% 1993 
12l V 103^- Troa* 12' A 1993 
91V 79'. Fund 8% 199B 
128 TlIVTrau l3‘.%1983 
133'. 105 ’.Traai Ub% 1984 
122'. 97V fegqh 12V% 1984 
127V 110'; Bren 13'*% 1994 
103'. 83'. Trees 9% 1994 
120 TOP. Tim 12% 1995 
78*. MV Gat S%t: 

110V 91', Exctt 10V% 1' 

128 108V Traas 12*.% 1985 
mMiaVTrow 14% 1998 
103'. 57 Traai 9% 1992-96 
14T, 122V- Treat 15'.% 1998 
130'rlllVExch 13'*% 1998 
B4V 74V Rcknpt 3% >996 
TO'.loi’.Ccn, 10% 1998 
131 110 Traas l3v% 1997 
112V 83': fetch l0'j% 1997 
lDlV 79V Haas 8».% 1997 
142V 122 VEron 19% 1987 
»V Ty.Tma* fr>«% 195&68 
107V SS'.Exch 9Mb 1998 
IMS 126V Traai I5'i% 1938 
124V 105'. Each 12% 1998 
107'. B8'iTr*M 9V% 1998 
126V IDS'. Each >2'.% 1939 
114 96'. Traas 10V% 1939 

112V MV Corn 10V% 1899 
133 VI US Traas 13% 2000 
98 B5'.Con» 

11V, 91% Tram 
HW. 88V Cora 
137 V 117V Tree* 


9% 2000 
10% 2001 
9%% 2001 


113% 
102 % 
104V 
112V 
T’B • 
103 
115* 

121V . 

128'* • . 
115S -V 
120 % 

96 

113V -V 
7BV 

104’. -V 
118% -V 
126 

37 V a-v 
We 
122% -V 
83*.* .. 
iar. -■» 
123% -% 
108 -% 
95%*-V 
134% -■* 
83% -*a 
101V -% 
140% #-% 
118% -% 
IOC. -'a 
119 W-V 
107% 

105 V -% 
1»% -% 
97%e-% 
104% -% 
102% -V 


14% 1998-01 129V -V 


TT6 

97 9307 

106 9681 

106 9438 
11.4 9.551 
ft7 9 361 
10L9 9*50 

86 7.779 
116 9545 
114 |410 

106 Jj-903 

'Jl SS 
« IS 

96 9647 

107 

11.1 g.«7 
gj 9690 

”- 4 822 
10.9 9672 

36 

97 95*2 
ia7 9 629 

BS 9654 
03 9 378 
.116 9815 

8.1 9139 

*6 9407 

116 

96 9388 
103 9 645 
BS 9501 
BJ 9517 

r 

n ss 

106 9 767 


» 

213 180 Affled 
425 291 Anunhaiii 
2*7 »o Anchor ChamcM 
158 106 BTP 
111 78V Bayer DM30 

132 102 Btagden 
10 112 Brant CMlM 
100 57V Br Benzol 
136 B2 Canrmg (W1 
306 2*5 COakla 
188 135 Corots Broc 
ISO 112 Do -A- 

gs&r”* 

Do DM 
Efc 8 Evarard 

Evodn 


£45% 



1*0 >20 Haztaood Poodi 
250 168 HOarOB 
323 181 K tedoan HMga 
92 75 Home Fann 
5S7 494 lealand FWwan 
292 220 Kw* Sava 
- 05 Loai (John J) 

Love* IGF) 


150 
23 

330 
316 
BS 
5*4 
980 
13>«- 
328 
188 
80 
162 . 

» •. 

105 
1177 
173 
2ZS 
2(0 
105 . 

283 

151 

m . .. 

613 a-5 

142 & .. 

iM-em 
303 


+5 

1+2 

-3 


50 


505 Lew (Wiry 


92 

532 

292 

111 

95 

605 


*3 

+2 


124 Maztnewt fflamam 2S0 


93 Mara Trada Supo 


103 

218 


-5 

+a 

-2 

+2 


106 86186 
12 16 246 
156 . 56 113 
56 17 186 
. ' 26 16 204 
•4.7 26 186 
86 2.0 HI 
46 50 96 
M 16 238 
74 26 20 B 

26 26 136 
56 56 8.7 
17.9 12 178 
36 16212 
7.6 74 146 
16 05 224 


21V 15 
163 127 
131 100 
2*5 172 
133 111 
298 215 
168 113 


+1 


Halstead (Jamas) 

453 330 HkJtson 385 »+2 

101% 72% Hoachai DM50 £92 *'f 

10% 73* too Cham kid £10% •+'* 

Laporia 370 

i3syt 88 • 

Pttau 165 +1 

Rwbrook HkJga 8* 

178 128 RtraoM 138 

330 216 SNIABPO 281 +4 

73 36 SotdrtM soeakDian 58 a +4 

233 178 WaHtatOkue nt* 225 

153 87 Yoritanira Cham 136 • .. 


11 43 196 
1017 17106 
16 18 106 
86 44 96 

M 42 72 
106 76146 
.. ..124 

93 46 15.1 
47 46 127 

126 54 BJ 
84 46124 
216 5.7 86 


J10 333 
118 99 

165 119 
91 82 


48L6 46 126 
116 32 154 
54 56 144 
26 16 216 
18 43 96 
17 27 174 


Nicnou (ftri (Vmto) 22S 


80 

3ft 14 B 

NOOnros 

5* 

• .. 

2.7 

50 222 
30 lift 


252 

+2 

1>* 

Murom & Paacock 

102 


50 

32 150 


150 

• .. 

0ft 

ift 12ft 

RT** 

288 

+6 

80 

3ft 18ft 

Rownoue M»c 

4«J 

r +10 

ir.« 

4.4 11.1 

1 S£?^U 

4i2 

15* 

+2 

70 

40 

10 230 
3ft 190 

Someone* 

218 

-2 



DTO 4 LyW 

SBb 

+4 

32.1 

50 119 

Tosco 

408 

+3 

Bft 

2ft 233 


288 

• +s 

13ft 

*6130 

UU Bis o,aa 

240 

+2 

i3.ee 

67 13.0 

5ft 18ft 

wstson 6 pnap 

149 


67 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


.. .. 874 

11.1 46 256 
46 32 126 


433 328 Grand Mat 
2B6 208 Kanneor Bradkas 
391 312 Ladbrato 
.545 447 Lon Park HoMt 
100 7BV Mount OwtOtW 


CINEMAS AND TV 


270 178 Angle TV A' 
52 27 Gmnuen 
2<»fl 170 FfTW *w 
380 263 LWT HUgS 
van ,aa t u “*■ 


280 

44 

215 


350 180 Scot TV T A 
273 1*9 TVS N/V 
*6 31 TSW 
240 228 Thames TV 


318 

228 

45 

2*0 


+7 

+1 

-6 

+5 


ms 56118 
23 BS S3 
114 56 96 
216 56 152 
15.0 47 106 
146b 86 11.1 
26 56124 


79 68'. Queans Morn 
403 368 Savoy 'A' ■ 
81 56 Stales 

209 141 Trunhouse FOR* 


40S 

• +7 

130 

63 130 

220 


2A 

VI U.B 

355 


161 

40 169 

540 

+5 

14ft 

20 164 

91 

• .. 

£1 

2ft 15ft 

84 

• .. 

2.1 

20 15.1 

T7 


23 

30160 

370 


SO 

14 140 

64 

• ir 

1ft 

20 168 

149 

• .. 

7ft 

63140 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


260 178 AAH 
239 160 AG8 Research 
127 BS aim 
6n 583 NPO 
110 80 Aanmon 
258 172 AdMm 


235 

182 

125 

583 

» 

224 


343 207 Atoomfea Wwaar 325 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 


111N 9* V Cora 10% 2002 104% -V 

«*% 103% Eacn 12% I9B862 118% -'a 
na-v 00 Traai 9>*% 2002 ■ 103% -% 
112 , 03 V Haas 10* 2003 105'**-% 

13BVl18’*lnto 13»A 200040 130% -V 
> 23V 10* Tree* 11 V% 200164 llS%a-V 
112 1 * MV Tirce ill* 200* iosv -v 
»V 48% Fund 3V% 19B964 56V -'* 

108V W.COnv 9V% 200* 101% .. 

'W- 30V Cora 9’j%»2005 101'» -% 
tOB%90VCo.lv 9'r% 2005 101 V 

117*. M'.Excn 10V% 2005 110%*-% 


96 9381 
103 9613 
96 9363 
96 9303 


(§1 


96 9489 
AS 0360 
6J 8190 
94 9337 
34 9326 

! * 9318 
6 9314 


103 90 Akuon 175 

. 00 El Aquaicutum -A' 71 

90 79 Baataa (James) 'A' 92 

208 125 Bentrak 1«1 

16 4 Sacks Lam 4V 

850 307 Body Shop 636 

B2 _*« eramnar « 

: |N) Hf 


46 26 114 

18-11246 
30 4.1 126 
16 26 29.1 



130 


41 


85% TV. Traas 
W.-TO2 Cora 


20024B 
9>^% 2008 _ 


MV 92V Traas 8'r% 2007 


S'. 00 V Traas 0% 2009 
Jr. ST'; Trees 5V% 2000-12 
93% 78V Traas 7>.% 2012-15 
136 113 . Been 17% 2013-17 


UNDATED 


*f- 38 V Consols a% 
« 34 V war Lit 3V% 

52% *4 , Conv 3V% 
3*', 29V Traas 3% 
»% 24 V qoraots 2 V% 
29% 24'. Traas 2'i% 


INDEX-LINKED 


>22% 114 vr raw n. 2% T9GB 
107V 90'. -Traas t 2% 1990 
tn 100% Treat il 2% iBBB 
107% 95% Treat IL2V* 2001 
107 V 93'.- Trass IU'1% 2003 
1«V 98V Treat tL 7% 2008 
108’.- 97V Treat iL2'j% 2D0B 
111\ 87 Traas IL2V% 2011 
Mv 79 1 . Traas IL2'i% 2013 
y- 87vneaa IL2'.% 2010 


S '- 97** Trees 86'j*% 2010 A 
V 88V 


i Traas IL2 V% 2020 


125V 

160 

9 45* 

89 -% 

9.0 

9209 

180% -% 

6* 

935* 


90 

9447 

93V -% 

9.1 

9207 

134% *-V 

10ft 

9.453 

88% • .. 

9ft 

9168 

RSV *-’» 

63 

8902 

06*. 

as 

9 078 

127 -V 

BA 

9342 

43% -V 

B ft 


30% -V 

9.1 





32% -% 

62 


27% -% 

61 


zr.Bk.% 

S3 


125% ■ . 

XI 

1066 

107% . 

23 


119%* . 

2A 



23 

3005 

103% . 

3ft 

3*61 


20 


101V 

3ft 

X343 

107% 

3ft 

3283 


3ft 

32*1 

98 

XI 



20 

3157 

86% 

60 

3180 


388 

J VlyaBB 490 

26B US ComofefeM BtgScrii 235 

152 118 Ctara (Fuinj 'A' T» 

365 210 OAKS Skrvun A' 300 

98 80 DewtsmiU) 8* 

438 2l6 »««* Grp 382 

533 3« Donmi 5OT 

100 73 EM B GokWakt 00 

7i5 boo Bys OMroeiaam) BOO 

256 134 Envee Sum 206 

274 1M Eton 


*2 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


11 
I2v BV 
260 173 
M 6 


*83 384 
588 429 
45 32 
7« 410 
438 288 
60V 38 

ft* 

380 .215V 

itc n 
281 19$ 
430 333 

484 233 
<2*' 319 
>58 120 ' 
m in 
321 191 
693 428 
>22 80 


. _ (Hwsy) 
Aus New Z 

Bra* Lmsw knd 
Bank Leina UK 
Bam at Stated 


’i 


10b 46 5.7 
.. 0 ^ *26 


Shktoy 
CMarABan 
Cattas 

Chase M a nhraai 


SKU- 


Firs Net Fktanca 
Garrard Nat 
Gttonees Para 


Ml Samuai 

hk ; 


K»i 


SKSSP 


UOWt 

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203 

+A 

15JU 

1A 





IM 

Ell 

740 

+5 

l?ft 

96 


160 

67 112 

422 


260 

47 9ft 


+12 

261 

64 7.6 

A75 


130 

29 222 

rm 

" *5 

280 

67 41 7 


-t 

20 

139 

5015.4 

4ft 

£37% 

+% 

208 

54.;_ 

W 


14 

40 lift 

D15 

+2 

60 

01 

E27B 1 


200 

Aft . 

3i 

*3 

60 

£4 IT 6 

+2 

22.1 

7ft 8ft 

s? 

+1 

20 

8ft 118 

IS 

+7 

IQftn 4.7 80 




59 

-1 

3ft 

480 

■ 

17.7 

37 202 

14* 


120 

87 T£J 

771 

+5 

28(1 

37 113 

467 

•+ift 

25.0 

5* 70 

343 

s+3 



1^1 




967 

• +8 

W.1 

60 210 

A# 

+1 
• +15 

27ft 

60 5ft 

£1M 


BOO 

JJ 810 


. 105 Fine An Dee 

133' fil Fora [MartaD 

200 103 Fenrnmw 
470 310 Freemans 

178 87 GAr IAJ) 

8* 54 oam SR 

153 89 

232 172 

14 -830 GUS *l«-> 

11 771 Do A eil'r 

307 190 Hams Oue Hto aOy 297 

33 25 Helene CM London 77V 

43 a Hdte 42 

182 102 House Ol Lzram is* 

:: 78 Jonas lEmarai 84 

36 M Ladas Pnda 34 

132 110’.- ICP 126 

226 135 Lee Goober 2DJ 

830 675 Ubany 595 

250 165 Uncrott Klgour 229 

231 >03 Marks 8 Spencer 210 

350 283 Marian Mann) 316 

G3S 530 Moss Bros 530 

297 100 N*4I 2SJ 

153 305 0%W (G) 225 

fti a Pantos , 74 

130 100 PTOBdy (Akr*(fl 114 

209 105 (Umars Uewatora) M9 

370 220 Rood (Austrl) 

179 135 DO A 

44 31 Si U Stores 

148 IDS Sens 
354 234 EiMMWH) A 

72 47 Oo "B __ 

W 85 SttoUr (AG1 84 

98 74 SUMS Sanpgm A 88 

385 385 StonauuM 348 

24 15' SMrmBard 17 

42 22 Sumna Cuoas 28 

523 413 Sivenlrvg Stem 480 

75 33 Ten+CartsuiaM 33 

60 £7'. Tm Proowos 88 

193 170 T* Tap Drug T90 

198 158 Uodamoods 170 

3G 235 Wart) Mvm 356 

178 98 WraWs 163 

sis 430 woetweem MB 


36 06026 
0.7 1.1 4- . 

18.1 21 276 
86 27 216 

37 25334 

21 78 76 

121 36 146 

17.1 36 146 

96 4,1 21.1 
6.7 56 96 
86 26 116 
16 16 176 

46 1.1 876 
76 16 186 

36 4,1 106 

136 23 236 

5.4 26 20.1 

0.1 26 186 
29 22 96 
67 36 196 


180 M4 Aksnasc 
27 ■> HO Amear VO 
*03 155 ABMdora 
47 32 Aranaon 

32 21 Armour 

440 5B5 Ash 6 Lacey 
»i as Atoiay 
510 212 am Or Eng 8% 
S3 37V Niora 
373 283 Avon Ruboer 

ggr #u “ l 

455 303 err dm 
85 62 BETEC 

386 277V BOC 
332 237 BTR 
202 1*0 Bacooek 
2fP. 10 BMeyfCH) 

423 200 BaralWml 
310 216 - - - 

.210 128 

174 112 

495 100 Barlow Rand 
57 ’■ “ 


158 

233 

100 

39 

27V 

415 

SI 

7TS 

82V 

3*3 

45 

190 

415 


11 1 4.7 136 

96 56 296 
87 66 127 

ms 3.8 10 4 
ao 67 ion 
116 56 146 

86 28 196 


♦1 

+8 


333 

316 

!Bt 

10V 

340 


• +2 
+19 
+2 


+3 


121 S3 106 
M U U 
08 16 76 

0.3 1.1 146 
286 76 12.1 
. . a . 40 

11.4 56 

16 26 0.7 

86 25 123 
1.4 3 1 47 
24b 1 J 776 
226 56 15.1 

28 36 96 

14.1 46 127 

0-3 26220 

106 5.7 146 
.. .. 194 

186 54 116 

11L7 4.1 96 

86 44 14 A 

29 1.7 19-7 


•-5 


152 

37 

122 

778 

55 


96 4J 106 
106 21 20.1 
73 46 146 
14 23 376 

3.7 27120 

10.7 6.8 «sji 
300 21 193 
306. 27146 

. 86 28 186 
23 84 96 
21 T412B 
126 76 116 

60 06 136 
1.1 36 256 ’ 

84 81 187 
06 36 86 
11.1 1.6225 

107 46 156 
56 28 356 
56 16 156 
62 16Z5.1 

56n 26216 
128 4.0 19.9 

16 14 196 

35 46 727 
46 21 2D.T 
76 24 292 
78 56 123 
.. .. 248 

42 40 127 
88 3.1 188 

17 41 M 
42 21 136 
5 I 56 186 

112 33 185 
.. 224 



M h| Benrapre (SAW) 
148 BS 

St St 

820 310 
335 235 
205 140 
123 76 Mm Ul 

153 84'. Brand OuMcast 


+7 

+11 ... 
.. 36 7611* 

.. 25.7a 95 86 

.. 1 9b 86 .. 

107 87.128 
36 28 96 
-2 60 27 ISO 

*13 17.1 4.1 176 

. . I . . .. 

-1 16 4.1 336 



200 105 Bkmndum Mad 
174 142 Buck Am* 


.256 170 
‘ 81 34 

403 199 BUS Arrow 
335 107 ‘ 


9-0 


§sa sr 


.. 7 S 76 87 

.. 76n 7.0 87 

81 60 276 

+23 21 4q 3* 148 

86 16 41.4 

96 41 146 

. . 24 16 356 

. . 5* 46 12.7 

-1 81 46 127 

89 49 108 

7.1 20 98 

26 1.1 19 0 

14b 34 88 

20 06268 
06 36116 
17.1 46 188 
101 48146 


ELECTRICALS 




cjrofPC fcng 

Brooke Toot 
Brown 0 Ttwse 
Mown (John) 
Burnm iMus) 


• +3 


398 180 AB Etel 
181 )20 
1U 38 
99 43 


325 

NttmMK 175 

Amend U4 

Apnea Compatara 53 


• +2 
+B 


96 63 Arlan 
300 205 Atlantic Comp 
58 •*« Auto? Fidaky 
220 i40 Juo Bee 
370 2*0 B*CC 


138 64 

147 IZB BtO 


90 

260 

56 

179 

283 

73 

129 


+3 

+5 

-2 

4 


114 38243 
21 18 176 

03 08 5*5 
05b 09 OO 

41 ijfl M 
.. . 178 
28 1512.1 
>57 U 160 
25 34 40 


_ __ Bun»wikKrvn 

108 50 Qumord Eng 
50 26 . Capsro mo 
90 56 CAP* IrU 
440 2S3 Caroueng 


4, Cancel & Shew 



25 

13 

Cerarawey M 

22 



.. 10ft 

99 

45 

CM Ino 

03 



37 100 

89 

55' 


85 



Sft 124 

KB 

59 

Cnamaten 6 Ha 

99 


5.0 

52 105 

2ta 

m 

Cnattm Cons 

783 

*2 

18* 

83 US 

6*0 

510 

owu«mi 

550 


jn.r 

XB 120 

jbd 

£S3 

Cremes wt 

270 


70 

20 182 


05 

Chnsiy Hirat 

49 

+5 

0 

12.1 


/ 


26 20.1 
. . . . 150 

*3 26 195 
71* 16 25* 
56 135 
16109 
15 134 
4 1 314 


_. . . _ — i (LM) B 

is* 134 Eisbne Houm 
177-. 130V Eiaopasn Pumas 
142 112 Do 5% M 
3*2 158 Earned 
2i4 124 Expamet mt 
EfW 
Falcon 

Feedrn Agrd ind 
Fanner (JR) 

FJ* Indmar 


423 312 
55 22 
42 26 

143 108 
75 58 


638 *08 F dons 
07 35 Fizwthon 


50 157 
40 35 


’SI 

• +10 25 .D 50384 

8.1 24 124 

25 00 156 

70 25 222 


1» 

09 31V 
123 96 


96 46 14.1 
57 36 50 
5515 


... - J 123 

30 08 286 
120 50 80 

46 50 17.1 

22 25 135 
120 43 120 


67 48 French (Thomas) 
131 M GB mt 
385 256 GAN 
310 260 GR 

Ganon Ena 
Gesutner 
Gre<raa 


393 


14ft 

40 74 

228 177 
3TV 22 

AOOey IM 

193 

+2 
• +% 

99 

>00 

5.1 .. 
3.7 .. 



23 




800 




107 

5 8 121 

405 

223 


365 

•-5 

65 

2ft 25 7 





917 

807 



+2 

447 

5J .. 

• .. 



336 

228 


303 

+2 

174 

67 .. 




301 

228 



+1 

90 

M .. 

Cfl*V 





213 






A* 


*3 

*9212 

95* 

701 

Gan Accmant 

877 

*20 

3*3 

30 220 

+ ' 4 


& 7 

95* 



877 


41.1 



•+i 



70S 

46* 

Haalh CE 

482 


349 

77 7ft 

ttZt 


90 


3*9 

267 


325 


1X7 




Oft 



231 

Leg* & Gan 



11 7 


137'. 

-7 

88 

51 98 

224 

173 


IBS 

+3 

80 

Aft 70 

133 

+20 



+38 

257 

Lon thd few 

431 

+3 

3*8 

67 128 

no 



M% 20V 


I49V 

-% 

220 

44 . a 


r +2 

96t 

Sft 148 

285 

229 


255 

♦2 

11 A 

4ft 12ft 

383 

-40 

14ft 

90 165 

348 

223 

PWS 



12.9 

40 200 




1.7 93ft 


Pan 

£15% 

*% 

MH 


34 


21 

62 68 

6* 200 

9*2 

718 

Pruoantal 

KIT 

+23 

371 

41 59ft 

132 

• .. 




» 


+7 

204 


61 


50 

82 177 


7M 


+10 

388 

40 896 


+3 

79 

1ft 270 

420 

.128 


343 

15 7 

4ft 182 

(4 

+1 

10 


47* 

1*6 


*27 

+3 

167 

87 17ft 

|v 



01 89 


.190 


415 

• . 

10 On 

£4 21.4 

+ l'i 

03 

Oft A3 

772 

520 

SunVUonce 

719 

+15 

260 

10 8A7 

98 



02 128 

927 

772 


898 

+4 

330 

30 

33V 


20 

60 70 


120 


320 


48 

£1 8 0 

59 


120 

70 13ft 

47* 

394 

Wtts Faoar 

412 


120 

30190 

m .. 

41 

82 980 





4tt 303 merest* 

37 20 ; jacks (Will 
283 183 Owe 
<0 34 Ocean tNUsan 

258 190 PamrKVI Zocn 
260 190 Oo A' 

213 120 Posy Peck 
50 30 GrasDaroy 

sea 555 SM Brae 
22* 01 Tovar Mmslay 

218 153 Tut* cans 


+3 


Ul 
33V 

207 «*2 

so a-i 
218 +1 
210 *1 
151 +3 


07 13146- 

100 70 128 

50 72 ... . 
288 79 1*5 
as 8&3X0. 


10 49 121 
1 102 


47 +1 


171 86(02 

36 76 80 
80 40 71 
80 40 T t 
75 50 59 


U0 

17? 

215 


220 


4 1 121 
810 

47 00., 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERTG 


1 


110 60 
157 100 
ISO 111 


8+1 


HV7S0 1 : GkUO 
3** 19* Oynwee 


505 250 Goraig Kerr 
IS? 107 Grampian Htigs 
3>2 206 Granada 
10% 6v GnmuieD 
». HaM Precodh 


15 08 .. 
32 23 80 


232 134 H»fl Era 
182 128 Hal (U) 


10 722 
24 378 


16 4.8 2fe4 
85 SO 185 
80b 45 28.6 


285 100 

290 230 Hewa 
41 25% Hamason Ind 

as 20 Hlihmaa 
195 141 Hanson 
190 145 DO 0*. Ol» 
119 98 DO 5 J *% Pf 
125% 115% Do 10% 


582 
295 
100 
114 
120 
990 
310 
280 
1*3 
292 
6'. 

78 

170 +4 

132 

193 ■ . 

280 

38 • . 

25 

195 +5 

[189 +5 

119 +2' 

El 25V +2' 


100 

50 

2T 




84 B0 118 
170 S3 95 
34 8.1 
4.7 SO 
_. 18 10? 
47 69 117 
157 1 8 285 

120 42 1U 
155 5511.1 
5 7 40 144 

109 17 136 

05 7.7 110 

26 3.3 18 4 

120 71 80 
84 4fl 90 
140 7 A 121 
09 316 
4.7 95 


Invwsfczteot Ttustm appear on Page 22 


LEISURE 


2*5 ?10 Abano Maad 
126 129 Aoseon Cons 
08 43 Adeem k« 

250 225 Assoc Pmer 
47 31 aim i woora 
158 140 Barhar (Chanas) 
190 135 Bemrose 
357 717 Beast MttwN 
310 901 BPCC 
180 143 Brunrmg 
105 143 Do ON 
3*3 155 BlinU 
930 720 Carton Comm 
225 173 Chapman 

^ s gzr" Mnm) 

196 130 OamMcm Pearce 
540 360 Eucurtnua Plan 
201 172 Fotpuson bid 
465 375 Ftefioeswi 
60 53 Goara Gross 

233 196 Gold Graaota 
t#o «5 Good B a Mfe ane 
na lag HMtMrorait 
123 110 Lopi* 

420 3il Lowe H« C-E 
235 140 McCorquodal* 
135 93 Mora O Fwral 

155 in Nonon opts 


218 

m 

53 

245 


140 
173 
791 

2n 

IBS 

185 

230 

910 

203 

365 

292 

141 
540 
275 
400 

70 

198 

IBS 


24 

18 


57b 20170 

800 40 


8 2 
0 




280 

133 

Haigiearos 

276 


70 

£9 19ft 

275 

175 

Mams (Pn*0) 

250 

• . 

13? 

5312.6 

623 


Hawner Sknatay 

an 

+16 

20.7 

4 1 lift 

ISO 

90 

Hawk* 

no 


£7 

2ft 80 

205 

B1 

Hay (Norman) 

SW) 


54 

27 382 



Hepworth Carwrae 

205 

-a 

10ft 

50 17.1 

201 

98 

Hetta* 

176 

*7 

Bin 3 4 20ft 

% 



88 


30 

44 7ft 

1*2 

122 

Highgue 6 Job 

125 



.. 298 

81 

82 

Homs Bros 



4ft 1 


106 

68 

Hoh UovO 

V 


57 

Eft 133 

TBS 



XK 


107 

4ft 9ft 

120 

91 

Hotfte) 

10* 


5 5 


310 

23* 

HunPog Assoc 

300 


114 

30 93 

115 

88 

Hunsng Group 

103 


66 

Bft 74 


144 

96 

Bair 6 WA -A 

135 


100 

74 10 8 

£20 

IT1 

128 

K 

Boosay 6 Hawke* 
Bran wite 

155 

187 

+3 

79 

.. 23ft 
AT 129 

58 

3* 

Canute) 

48 


14 

10 12ft 

m 

158 


181 

-i 

60 

44 110 

*10 

.VS 

Fast LttSWS 

383 


9ft 

20 IBB 

82' 

*9 

GRA 

57 

+3 


.. 4X7 

i?8 

65 

93 

tterooger Brook* 
Horizon Tram 

85 

120 


83 

.. TO 
8ft 57 

ISi 

94 


113 

• .. 

71 

6ft 100 

103 

.3 

Juliana's HWgi 

50 


Aft 

60 190 

IM) 

lea iml 

IM 

+6 



ICS 

ISO 

tenmu 

*35 


TSr 

59 91 

391 

278 

Pwasuena 

378 

• .. 

IM 

XA 150 

393 

.125 

RaaOy UseU 

369 


18.1 


(4 

« 

ruey lesura 

48 



.. 265 

228 

360 

134 

V* 

Saga Heaaays 
Samuawon Gp 

138 

182 

• ■ . 

• -8 

68 

14 

49 115 
10109 

72 

51 

Toaerraani Hotspur 

72 


5.7a 

7ft 1X1 
3ft 168 

185 

126'. 

Zettars 

185 

• .. 

7.1 


a sr-'SEswr* 


885 513 St hras Gp 
BOS 630 Staten tSiaUhi 


150 (It 


US 
303 
223 
130 
110 
C19' 

50 

750 *5 

TOO • .. 


-2 

AO 

18 2*2 


Ifl 

30 184. 


60 

38 147* 

•3 

■ 

. 168‘ 

+3 

Tl 

4i n» 

r 

Ul 20 170- 

+2 

30 00 

7 3 378 


70 

38 484 

*1 

70 

30 400 


40 

20 2*4 


95 

18BI 

•5 

170 

30 100 

+5 

39 

II 40 

•2 

111 

40120" 


38 

29 1*4 

+40 

7 1 

13 11' 

+2 

113 

4 1 17?' 


07 

3ft 210 


Aft 

57207 . 

• !’ 

14 

07 193. 

• «2 

70 

00 17* 

89 

3ft 94 

+.-• 

89 

22 2X2 


88 

3 9 22ft 

+£ 

57 

44 10* 

• . 

60 

30 1X1 


.. • 547 

1200 17X8 
22.9 31 140 


756 124 Simakt (J*») 
270 200 Ushar Wasmr 
215 125 Vton Po*sn 
75 to waca 
191 113 WaopngmU] 
SSi 220 Urumckign 
565 320 WahtOm 


119 


90 

78 .. 

225 

+1 

*7 

£1 

205 


104 

51 95 

130 

•ft 



89 

>4 



100 

+5 

7* 

34 170 

260 

+2 

93 


SOS 

*+10 

81 

1ft 29ft 


MINING 


40 10 IE4 

26 110*6 0 
111 3A 156 

8.7 28123 
50 50223 

.171 . 3.1 170 
16-4 46 8 1 

.. .. 222 

13.1 40 93 

9.7 0218.1 

3.1 14 101 

53 .06 10 A 
74 76 276 
20 10 184 

BA 42SB.7 
88 40 90 

103 40120 
103 5.1 11.6 


297 207'. Hutchsn Whampoa 284 


187 

210 

3*5 

136 


191 119 (Ml 
375 SID Isotron 
295 245 JMMons Bourne 

141 96'; JarewM Math 

6i5 473 jonnscra Cwanara 555 
220 133 JDtmaon tamey 320 
44 * 22'.- Johnson & FB 
3*5 235 Johnston 
1*0 58 Jones 6 Smpman 
132 67 Jcwdan (Thomasj 
29 2l Katamaroo ■ 

38 25 KaUri 
325 i8B Kelsey Ind 
130 105 Kennedy Soakr 
290 230 Kershaw IAI 
2(5 123 Kiean-E-Ze 


-13 

+1 


78 46 119 
18 09 390 
80 38192 


35 V 
313 
118 
123 


+10 

+1 


-a 

•-a 


30.4 58 151 

3 8 1.6149 

.. . 170 

1Q7 34 122 
55 4.7 78 
58 45184 


40 _ 

41 22 
198 120 
425 238 
160 00 

21% 0% 


31 

200 

120 

270 

200 


17 


'Hr 


>214 


11.4 3614 8 


57 


48 12.7 


21^ 


170 


L-R 


39 

22 

LDM 

38 

♦: 2 

00 

1ft 229 

158' 

120 


120 


34 

33 2X6 

323 

216 

Uartl 

235 

+5 

66 

37 Bft 

75 

*2 

Lewies 

62 


3JBb SB 60 


41 

lea (Amur) 

71V 


33 



69 

Laesnai 

110 


Sft 

£9 212 

88 

M 

Unread 

73 


38 

44 50 

73 

M 

LlovC IFH] 

65V 


b* 

8ft 74 

3b 

23 

Looror (T) 

27 


19 

74 90 

aa 

179 

Lon Mteand 

23* 

• +T 

142 


139 

«. 

Do Dtd 

139 

♦2 



77 

50V 

Lon t Win 

75'; 


Ta 

00 132 

228 

li* 

Lon Ml 

228 


Sis 


283 

13* 

Longten tad 

258 

+3 

67 

22 310 

*00 

319 

Low 8 Sonar 

413 


160 

36 1X4 

*10 

Mb 

ml Hogs 

408 

•i5 

1I.4D £0 154 


49 31 MY Kpktoto 

anfiys Pharm 


393 255 Macarihys 
100 121 Modaruna 


40V +2 'j 


79 43 MacMDan (P6WI 

288 IBS McKachma 

130 76 Magnate 

7i0 435 Menchfltwr Snfei __ 

79 52 Manganese Bronre 67 

88 01 Hums 
143 65 Marshal) (Unlay) 

183 IDS Metal Bo» 

19* 128 Mm Ctosuer 

9i 55 Matakw 
7BV S3'.- Marjiau Cons 
12S 70 M*chaF Somers 

198 IBS moms 
318 2l2 Morgan CruckW 

*2 20'; Ntepwnd 

216 158 Ned (J) 

41 28 Newman Ukta 

153 92 Newman Tonka 

133 66 NoW* 6 Lund 
6S *3 Notion 

289 1 80 Nor cron 

258 203 Office 0*0 Uadi 218 

4*H 2*7 Parker Kno0 A' 

9 J -525 Ramsn JT 
603 3B3 Paaraon 
27 il Peek 
1*3 88 Peeriet* 

|7* 332 PugJar+latterstoy 


520 1*0 FtaJand Ind 
14 775 PTUU-M* 


483 311 
96 51 


PISSOc Constr 
365 195 Portals 
323 215 Ptaiar Cnadbum 
314 238 Powek Duhryn 
71 Presiwlcn HUgi 
180 119 RHP 
150 123 Haoant Meat 
589 421 Rank Or? 

229 115 Ransom* Sms 


900 605 Rackm 8 CotoM 
245 ns Raoream Base 
390 2<n Road Oecukra 
?.162% Raaa ini 
173 132 Raken 
RanokJ 
Resmor 


9i 

105 


520 345 Routers 


39 21 FtaoMm 


ISO 110 ftcardo Eng 


BO 53 Rehard 


SB 

152 


Rchard (Lees) 
FUmarason West 


Roborteon Res 


55 30 

ISO 127 
1*0 118 


Rock ware 

"■STa- 


130 88 Rushs (A) 


330 

• .. 

its 

140 


05 

55 

.) 

£7 

214 

+a 

14J 

125 


48 

680 


0.6 

) 67 


42 

65 

• -2 

20 

128 

. , 

S2 

183 

+3 

66 

155 

+7 

96 

80 

+1 

32 

55 


61 

109 

•-i" 

50 

183 


lift 

258 


121 

29 

*i 

01 

158 


100 

3* 


11 

149 


103 

131 

+2 

14 

44 


1A 

263 

♦V 

13ft 

£18 

•5 

1£1 

378 


150 

CSV 


14ft 

521 


2019 


90 

1*3 

.. 

621 


206 

*40 

-3 

1.9 

C12% 


70 

*18 


19ft 

71 

*-i 

4.1 

305 

298 

+5 

’Si 

280 


217 

in 

-a 1 

14 

ITS 


04 

145 

• !' 

66 

50* 

-3 

220 

170 

+8 

71 

103 

-5 

1 7 

BO* 

+5 

22.9 

203 


24 

365 


04 

2*8 

+8 


108 

• .. 

09 

87 


24 

106 

+2 

6.4 

510 

• -3 

54 

35 

• .. 

14 

148 


4.1 

83 


ift 

42 



95 

• Il 

X6 

300 

+2 


40 



131 


93 

121 


9ft 

2V 



134 


8.1 

90 


2J 


10b 4.4 (3.0 
58 50181 
85 26 1B0 

2-7 49 102 

.40 87 103 

48 36 116 

13 230 
64 79 
26 30 79 
52 4.1 «.7 
17 

82 232 
40 13 0 

0.1 111 56 
56 50 125 

s: M 

47 144 

00 150 

83 57 
32 SI 5 
69 12.4 
0 0 423 

1 A 32494 
" 51128 
SB 09 


13 3V Ang Airier Coal 
10 -030 Ang Am 
57 3i Am Gold 
SB 33 AMT 

Aigtovad 

Avar Hearn 
Btyvoor* 
Brecwsn 
. BuKatS 
358 22S CRA 
as 33 Can Boyd 
53* 403 Cons GouflMds 
531 314 De Deem 
200 HU Deerkrasi 
9% 4V DoOnrionMoi 
I3*» 7 Otalorten 
7V 2% Duroan 
255 150 E Dagau 
594 2M ETanovand 
205 129 BOro 
ist& 85 Eisburg 
390 200 E Rand Gold 
4% 2V E Rang plop 

9 4% FS Cons 
213 93 PS Da* 

75 17 Qatar* 

8% 4V Gandai 

10 6 Gen kanrag 

1D% S'* GFSA 

470 313 GM Kdgeorii 
83 35 Gooeng 

M 85 G.eem»di Res 
375 165 GrooMd 
158 91 Hampton Areas 
9> 4V Harmony 
350 175 Hamas 
81 47V Jontnam 

12'.- S’- Kauosa 
S'* 2V Wool 
150 65 Luka 

13% 6V Lmanon 
*10 170 Lorane 
157 64 M1M 
28 15 Maiavwn Mnaig 

123 60 Manama 
42 14V Matas E*0 

26 S'; Mvangua 

9 S'. MdOk was 

855 450 Mraorco 
S'. 2V Now Wo 
1*2 73 Ntn Broken ho 


+25 5*0 83 
+1 448 10.4 

*3 271 5.7 

+5 142 4.7 

+5 1*2 *9 

4TJ 31.7 
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108 144 Br Lana 
170 138 Bnaon 
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290 200 Cerdril Prop 
198 188 CanDoMidal 
485 4io CMsMrtieU 
900 CALA 

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485 417V Do "A 
2*8 1)0 Hanover Druce 
325 233 Hardanger 
62V 48V twig Kong uno 
380 270 any 
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320 273 Lang Prop 
348 278 Land SacuriMS 
695 368 LotilEdmTtH 
288 1*7 Do 8'.-% 

268 218 Lon 6 Pro* finop 258 
177 151 Ion Shop Prop 177 
353 208 Lyirion 
390 275 kfcPC 
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118 IDS McKay Sacs 
58 44 Markham. 

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538 187 Matte Est 
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108 82 Muektow<AA0 
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282 235 Peachey 
260 72V Pnest Manans 
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155 107 Prep HUgi 
131 106 Prop Security 
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330 160 RageUn 
645 313 Rosanai 
297 238 RuuS 
103 78 Sen Mat 
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58 *5 Town Centra 

280 198 Triton! Park 
148 95 UK Lana 

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885 675 Warner 
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175 161 
1.1 30 


312V 107 Assoc Br Pons 285 
398 238 Br Commrameaffll 2SS 


37 7.7 


4 0 143 
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60 80 
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141 70'. Anitationg 

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273 180 caffyna 


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300 136 Altana Bros 
169 97 Baal* (John) 
100 00 Beaman (A) 

144 123 Br Motter 
127 69 Biftnta & Limb 
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187 127 n w miaw B' 


415 

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Ex nonts * E* scrip i 
No srgnJJicant data. 







































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


Edited by Martin Baker 



Words that can ruin retirement 


PENSIONS 


— ~ \ year 

IMMEDIATE INCOME PAID FREE OFTAXt 


Do you know what benefits 
you are entitled to under your 
company pension scheme? Be- 
fore you reply you should take 
heed of the cautionary tales of 
some employees, who have 
discovered to their cost that 
the details of their pensions 



THE FUND — primarily Invests in "exempt" 
British Government Securities (Gilts). These are 
Gilts which are not liable to any U.K. taxation. 

QUARTERLY DIVIDENDS - paid 
free of any witholding taxes. 

A REAL RETURN — inflation is now 
under 3%, the Fund therefore provides a real 
return of more than 9% . 

NO FIXED TERM — the investment can 

be held for as long as you wish, you can sell at 

any time; on any business day 

MINIMUM INVESTMENT £1,000 

The Fund has been certified as a "Distributing 
Fund" under die provisions of the U.K. Finance 
Act 1984 in respect of itslatesracctJunt period. 

ABOUT BRITANNIA GROUP. 

Britannia is one of the leadins Investment 


S ' ven in their company boos- 
ts were incorrect. 



lets were incorrect. 

One of the country's biggest 
trade unions has taken up the 
case of one of its members, a 
fireman who worked for a 
large company. The fireman 
developed a serious illness 
which affected his balance and 
he could not carry out his job. 

He has now discovered that 
there is a discrepancy between 
the actual rules of the pension 
scheme, relating to retirement 
through ill health, and the 
explanation of them in his 
company booklet. As far as he 
was concerned the terms of his 
booklet were pan of the terms 
of his contract of 
employment. 

But he will be £2.000 to 
£3,000 a year worse off if the 
company insists on relying on 
the rules rather than the terms 
of his booklet. The union is 
now considering issuing writs 
against both the company and 
the pension fund. 

In another recent example, 
a company booklet referred to 
one method of calculating a 
pension for early retirement, 
but the pension rules set out 
another. According to the 
rules, the former employee 
would be entitled to a pension 
of £5,900 a year. The booklet 
would have given him only 
£3,400. His solicitor, John 
Quarrel!, of Nabarro 


Nathanson. commented: “It 
took a considerable amount of 
time and effort to get the 
company to agree to pay the 
higher amount. But he got it in 
the end." 

But it is not just solicitors 
who discover drafting errors. 
Theactuary Jon Spain, of Clay 
and Partners, explained: "The 
definition of the word salary, 
on which the retirement fig- 
ures were based, was different 


in the company booklet from 
the rules of the pension fund. 

The pension rules were writ- 
ten using archaic construc- 
tions. The booklet was written 
m relatively modem English. 


‘More generous than 
the booklet 9 


The two just did not 
correspond. 

“When this came to light, 
the trustees were invited to 
check past retirement sums 
paid. It is understood that they 
were, in feci, correctly cal- 
culated. The rules were kept 
to. but they were more gen- 
erous than the booklet." 

So what is the reason for 
these alarming drafting errors? 
Henry James, of the National 
Association of Pension Funds, 
said: "The language in the 
pension documents is so ar- 
chaic that, when simplifying it 
for a booklet, it is fer too easy 
to make mistakes in trying to 
translate it.” 

Mr Quarrell has already 
come across an expensive 
drafting mistake in another 
scheme: “A pension booklet 
provided fora pension accrual 
of one-sixtieth for every year 
worked The rules said one- 
eightieth. 


* In May the advertisement for our European Trust said . . . 
Trust Fidelity to find the fastest growing investments in Europe.’ 
Now the record proves we have. 

Planned Savings statistics (to 1st August 1986) show that Fidelity 
has the best performing European fund this year. 

£1,000 invested at the launch last November is now worth over 
£1,750. A considerable return for your money. 

Showing the underlying strength of a fund created for long term 
capital growth. 




Why Fidelity^ Europe is even more promising. 

The value of the Fund is now £65m. 

What has contributed to our greater success? 

We believe it is because Fidelity knows where and how'toshop^in 
Europe to your best advantage; 

We have already been ten years in this market, managing over - 

£500m of investments. 

Last year alone we visited over 300 companies. 

The Fidelity approach demands a far more thorough under- 
standing of the market opportunities. - ■ • 

For.exampje we are currently taking strong positions in France 

and Italy. 


Fidelity The best 


performing European 


fund this year. 


We have tactically exploited the superior strengths of leading 
European currencies. 

We have avoided locking ourselves into particular countries or 
market sectors. 

Instead we have concentrated on highly focused stock picking 
based on each individual company’s enterprise, growth and profit 
potential. 

The price of units and income from them can go down as well 
as up. 

But in our view Europe continues to offer a very fruitful invest- 
ment opportunity. 

This investment momentum is being further fuelled by 
cheaper oil and energy, low inflation and thrusting consumer 
demand. While American and Japanese institutional interest 
remains high. 


Immediate advice A quicker 


You can talk directly to our investment advisers on our 
special Callfree number 0800 414161. The lines areopen 
from 10a.m. to 1 p.m. today and from 9a.m. to 6p.m. > 

Monday to Friday. . . -JIM 

Our new high speed registration system 
means that cheques can now be issued to 
you in 24 hours and certificates . 
within six days. . 


You can also 
check your investment 
price daily in the Financial 
Times, Oracle P574 and on Prestel *481506. 


I 


For i nvestment advice Callfree Fidelity 3 

0800414161 I 


The wodds biggest independent fund 
management groip 

The Fidelity Group manages over £40bn of institutional and 
private investment money. With locally staffed offices in all the major 
economic zones we can monitor all the world markets. Hour by hour. 


I To: Fidelity Investment Services Limited, 

P.O. Box 80, Riv er Walk, Tonbridge, Kent TN 9 tDW. 

I I wish to invest £ l I mFMelfevEuropeanTrust at the offer 

J ' price ruling on receipt of my application and enclose my cheque made payable 10 
I Fidelity Investment Services Limited. Minimum Investment is £500. 


Surname MRp^S/MISSfBJddileflm pk^M) 


Make more money out of Rddity’5 Europe now 

You can enter Europe for a minimum of £500. 

Fill out the coupon and post it with your cheque directly, to 
Fidelity or your professional adviser today. “ 


First names 
Address 


Postcode 


Signature 


f Qflrnn M fram lundi to272i Au* iii 14M. 


"flfmorc ib*n mcapplicanl all RiiutsgnV. 
□ Please tick box if an easting 
• - Fidelity investor 



making money make money 


GENERAL INFORMATION 

Afomraci note far vour application ic^trerwirhabrorhinr'^llbr jqii irrmwt&info- Thteurroti cmmaicd gro«vkld h nil aii>it; offer ir»cc of 40.Tp for Fiddirv European Truw ai 2?[h Auemg lira .mifr^^llbtiw^ 

The fini dmribunon dates 17th November l^Ikd.tthOciobcrl. Aniiiiriddiarscof31^f«|uivalaiiM5 , Vi^ihe«^pTicelisiiieJiidedin the pnee of units oui of whidi the MatufnswiQ pay eommisaionioqualBMwnisi rates ouailablt 
on request Itic Tom paw >n annual charge to ih* Manager* oua olincwnetoreapial il there fa insuffioent intowld between 1Mb and 1?V plui VAT. ol the wlue d the Fund. The annual charge g eunwidv IfVpIus VAT. hut the 
Managers haw the tight to change thu within the above range, aubjcct lo pvmg imkttitum 3 months' notirc to unit holder*. L'nin may be aoWon any day ai the bid price ruling on receipt <dywraHHinecdccni&ate.RinHKralG(iiimen> 
No. J0I(iS5& Trustees Clydesdale Bank PLC Managers F«Mit> Intotmeni Semen limited Regu&errd Office River Walk. Tonbrtdgft Kent TX0 1 DY. The Trim s a wrier-rantc mater security authorised by the D.T.L Member of the 
Unit Trust Association. Otfcr not open to toidenis of the Republic oflrriand. 



Most retirements are happy but pensioners should always read their booklets carefully 


‘The people who wrote the 
booklet had to put their hands 
in their pockets to pay out 
about £30,000 to the pension 
fund for the difference for all 
the employees." 

There may well be even 
more problems ahead. All new 
members of a pension scheme 
from November 1, 1987, will, 
within 13 weeks of their 
joining the scheme, have to be 
provided in their booklet with 
specific information about 


their pension benefits and 
how they are calculated. Exist- 
ing pension scheme members 
can request this information 
from November I this year, 
and it must be supplied as 
soon as practicable. 

But what can an employee 
member of pension scheme 
do, when he is relying on the 
terms of his booklet which 
may not correctly reflect what 
is contained in the pension 
fund documentation? From 


November I he will be en- 
titled to seea copy of the trust 
fond deed and rules, but these 
are hardly easy bedtime 
reading. 


Mr Quarrell has a useful 
piece of advice: “Ask for a 
better from the employer 
confirming that the booklet 
and its provisions accurately 
reflect what is available under 
the pension scheme." 


Susan Fieldmaxt 


Even the TSB could totter 


When is a share not a 
share? When it generates 
a special kind of public 
hunger. The TSB claims 
that more than 12 
million people are 
interested in buying its 
shares. MARTIN 
BAKER looks at a 
special investment 


The imminent arrival of TSB, 
anachronistic bowler hats and 
all. is beginning to generate 
Telecom fever. More 2.25 

million people applied for BT 
shares. The TSB flotation, 
with inquiries tunning at the 
rate of 100,000 a day, is 
expected to attract at least a 
million investors. 

Bnt Telecom fever is hardly 
Boy Scout enthusiasm for the 
stock market or for the con- 
cept of a share-owning democ- 
racy. People fondly believe a 
share is something that dou- 
bles overnight, so foe unchari- 
table might call the 
enthusiasm a mixture of ig- 
norance and greed. 

Although it seems almost 
certain that the TSB will be a 


splendidly profitable invest- 
ment, one can also say that the 
issue will not be any more 
typical of shares in general 
than foe BT flotation. 

The TSB issue is not tech- 
nically a governmental 
privatization — all the cash 
raised is going to the hank 
itself, not the government — 
hot it certainly bears all the 
hallmarks. There is a huge 
BT-style publicity campaign, 
whidi foe TSB claims has 
brought it to the attention of 
27 million of us. Public in- 
terest is intense, and foe 1% 
investors, such as pension 


The issue will float 
die right way 


tor. who should have no diffi- 
culty in disposing at a 
premium to an institution. 

The problem, however, is 
that financial open goals do 
not stay open for ever. BT no 
longer has the divine right to 
soar upwards. It is now trading 
around 200p, -after a Ugh of 
278p. The conclusion for many 
investors must be that the TSB 
is an issue that will almost 
certainly yield profit in the 
short term but thereafter is 
suhfect to foesame perils as its 
bumble peers. 

De spite foe quality of the 
TOT as a business and foe talk 
of Its beluga “people's share" 
the temptation most be for a 
qideksafei The jargon nSed is 
to "stag" the Issue. 


funds and insurance com- 
panies, are going to be given 
few, if any, shares. 

Unless foe bankers put a 
huge price tag on the shares 


S will start oat offering big 
ts for those who obtain 
them. It is difficult to find a 
banker who does not concede 
that foe issue wifi float the 
right way for the small inves- 


But there must be provisos 
— the price of the issue will be 
crucial, there have been flops 
in the past the stock market 
may even start crumbling to 
spoil investors' appetites. 

In the meantime, if you have 
an account bnt have not reg- 
istered for priority status, do 
so now. You have until the 
dose of business on Friday. 


This advertisement is issued in compliance with the Regulations of The Stock Exchange. 


Nationwide 

Butlding Society 

(Ir^rporatedinEnglaxid under foe Buil ding Societies Act IBM) , 


Placing of £20,000,000 9% per cent Bonds 
due 7th September 1987 


Listing for the bonds has been granted by the Council of The Stock Exchange. Listing 
Particulars in relation to Tbe Nationwide B uilding Society are available in the Extdl 
Statistical Services. Copies may be collected from Companies Announcements Office, 
P.O. Box No. 119, The Stock Exchange, London EC2P2BT until 2nd September 1986 
and until 15th September 1986 from:- . . 


Fulton Prebon 
Sterling Ltd., 
34-40 Ludgate Hill, 
London EC4M 7 JT 


Chase Manhattan . 

Securities, 

Portland House, 

72/73 Basinghall Street, 
London EC2V5DP 


Rowe & Pitman Ltd., 
1 Finsbury Avenue, 
London EC2M 2PA 


30th August 1986 



Regal Shares 


- FOR A KING-SIZE 
INTEREST RATE 


O ne year term with instant access if over £8,000 is left in the account. 



Withdrawals, without penalty, may be 
made at any time so long as at lean £8.069' 
remains after the withdrawal. 

Withdrawals taking the balance bdow 
£8.000 are subject to just 60 days’ notice 
with full interest, provided the withdrawal 
occurs after the first year. 

Immediate withdrawals after the first year 
which take the balance below £8,000 are 
available with a loss of 60 days’ interest on 
the amount withdrawn. 

GUARANTEED at least 3JO* 
Ordinary Shares until 31st Pa c cmber 1 W7. 
interest paid or credited annually. 

Rate subject to varaoon. 


HBIQO. W«£mkiK®r Srtdge Road. LortttonSEl 7XE 
HO Tel: 01-928 1331 MOtiLEYOMMtiM STacATHAM'eunrwU 

2S5SSSS5PSK 1 . ZSESSJHUS!* ™BESS£-wm 

aoumnnurrH jonqi omwcton mu. um»sm taw 


•Bwwvm jdnhi lanNuiuN Mtt uraws r a mo 
lAMMTxeMnans . rugate emt woSncijsu^ 


I *D«afcr Lambeth Buying Society. FREEPOST. London SEf 2«. 
MWe enclose C to open a new R*ga] Share Account. 

| or Please send Investment deuJs to O Tick boa 


Member of the Building Societies Associatio 
Asset? ejeeed £230,000,000 





1 


'Ox 

; 

O 













T 

; 



tb 


' #> 


*3 «■ 


r 


Ot 
i - a 


i that 
] hydr. o 


1,1 '-\Ta.. 


mtliMtt a/ViUKUAX AUUUiUUlM. 


bU&ilNfcbh AiNU FllNAINCE 




FAMILY MONEY/2 


Mortgage 
men get 
the jitters 


I it ready is a petrol-pump-style price 
war m the mortgage market Despite the 
record number of re-possessions and 
borrowers failing into arrears, most banks 
ana building societies are still eager to 
tend. But is that confidence ebbing? 
“ankAmerica has announced that its 
IPO percent mortgages are to be 
withdrawn. At the same time it is 


an to £50.000. 

Meanwhile, mortgages arranged by 
Fairchilds are on offer at a rate of 10.25 
per cent fixed for three years. 
Presumably the company expects a 
Labour administration writ come into 
office with a policy of expansion and 
inflation. Fairchilds says its new loan 


t tight until iaea and continue to gr»„ 
priority to controlling inflation, this loan 
may not be quite such good value. 

But what wffl happen to Interest rates? 

you believe they will rise during the next 
three years, this mortgage is worth 
even with an a 



‘I suggest we all join hands and contact any rich relatives we may have had" 


fee of £15* 1 arrangement 

Details: BankAmerica Finance, Bdon 
Lodge, 196-200 Kings Road, Reading 
RG14NJ (0734 55891j); Fairchilds, 54 


PaU Mali, London SW1 5JH (01-839 3182). 


Twin advantages 

■ Twins Marjorie and May Chavasse 
are 100 years and one day old today. 
Their birth was aretoimced in The 
Tunes on September 1, 1886 . 
Congratulations are due not merely 
because of their longevity; their financial 
prudence is to be admired too. The 
twins entered one of the very first home 
income plans in 1973 with Affied 
Dunbar. 

These plans are a means of turning 
the capital tied up in a house into 
income. A loan is made against the 
security of a mortgage on the house, 
and the money is used to purchase 
an annuity - a special type of contract 
which pays the beneficiary income 
for fife. The annuity income is normally 
used to pay off the interest on the 
loan with the rest going to the home 
owner. 

The Chavasse twins have done rather 
wefl out of their plan. A mortgage of 
£10,000 has yielded more than 
£13,000 in income. The story would be 
different, of course, had they not 
lived so long. 


deducted from your wage packet you are 
probably paying the Inland Revenue 
too much. Tne relief is applicable to the 
first £30,000 of loan interest, but it is 
only applied at source for mortgages of 
£30,000 or less by many lenders. 

Banks and building societies are not at 

f resent obliged to make toe Mortage 
iterest Relief at Source (MIRAS) 
system work for the larger borrower. 
Some, such as toe Cheltenham & 
Gloucester and, for new borrowers from 
this week, toe Yorkshire, do make the 
effort 

If MIRAS is not applied, the employee 
paying tax under toe PAYE system has to 
wait until toe end of the year to claim a 
rebate. The Revenue will not pay interest 
on toe overpaid tax unless the 
overpayment is outstanding far more than 
a year. 

From toe next tax year all lenders will 
apply MIRAS on qualifying home loans, 
whatever toe size. Roil on April. 


the business. The company will lend 
endowment and pension loans as first 


mortgages, and also make repayment 


s. No commission will 
received or charged by HMC, 
according to Mr Young. HMC win make its 
money by obtaining its funds cheaply 
on toe wholesale international money 
markets. 

A loan wffl be made at 1 1 2. per cent 
APR, with a minimum £20,000. The 
maximum mortage is £150,000 but 
"more can be negotiated", while a typical 
term win be 25 years. 

Details: HMC, P.O. Box 76, BeflffeJd 
Road, High Wycombe, Bucks HP13 5HA. 


Two more funds 


Caution to borrowers 


■ “If you can't afford it, don't do ft," 
says Duncan Young, of toe Household 
Mortgage Corporation (HMC). The 
latest lender in the home loans market 
expects to turn over £500 mflfion In its 
first year, but says it wishes to discourage 
borrowers who might have difficulty 


Losers on tax 


making toe payments. An application 
form with particular < 


! If you have a mortgage of more 
ire in empk 


than £30,000 and are in employment 
where income tax is automatically 


'emphasis on 
outgoings rather than income has been 
designed to help assess 
creditworthiness. 

HMC is relying on its connections in 
the life and pensions industry to bring In 


■ The Unit Trust Association is 
happfiy beating its chest at the way win 
trusts have been attracting more 
money from the smaff investor than the 
builcfing societies in recent months. A 
fat proportion of the high figures comes 
from the incureion of Die assurance 
and pension companies into the unit 
trust market Some of them have 
converted existing funds into unit trusts, 
others choose to send man to their 
investors promoting new funds. 

The latest entnurt is Sun Life of 
Canada, which today imwraps two UK- 
invested funds, one aimed at capital 
growth, the other primarily at producing 
income. 

Charges are 5.25 per cent, up to a 
maximum of just under El 25 per cent, 
initially, with an annual levy of 1 per 
cent 

Details: Sun Life of Canada, 2, 3 and 
4 Cockspur Street, London SW1Y5BH. 


10 


14.14% GROSS EQ1IV. 


Financial journal ids often recommend Friendly Societies os ideal for savers 
because BUILDING SOCIETY SWINGS EARN 30*» MORE WHEN INVESTED 
THROUGH A FRIENDLY SOCIETY Homeowners, the largest, invests C30 million 
on behaU ot 19(1000 savere- 

Ians 


There are tax tree momhlv and annual savings pla 

00' to 




and attractive lumpsum schemes (iSWoril.nOO’ 
choose town. Funds are saiely invested in Bradford St 
Btngley Building Society, sr* there's absolutely no risk 

involved. Your savings could be earning 10 1 >J"npa. tax nn a nTYMirsi 
free 1 1414% gross equivalent)? with no tax liability uKALaVKl/l 

whatsoever. Send for details TODAY l Without obligation, JR. kV 1 

-We promise no salesman will call). ** UlisvjliLi A ■ 


FREEPOST NO STAMP NEEDED 


Send today 10 ; Homeowners Friendly Society FREEPOST. Springfield | 
Avenue. Harrogate, North Yorkshire HG1 5BR. TS3008K . 

MR/MRS ■'MISS | 


ADDRESS 


1 BLOCK CAPITALS I 


pi m 
core: 


PHONE NOW 
FOR BROCHURE 


‘Alnmvniroimniimemi Crass equivalent 
tar baste rale lax payees 



Double your money 


National Savings have been 
given a new lease of life. The 
31st issue of certificates has 
had the maximum bolding 
doubled to £10,000 “to give a 
further opportunity** to would- 
be buyers. National Savings 
issues are free of tax. and so 
represent a special bargain for 
the higher yafce taxpayer. 

The 31st issue is something 
of an old-timer by recent 
standards. It went on sale last 
autumn, and will be one year 
old on September 26. 

In 1984 the 28th issue lasted 
jHst one mouth. In that time it 
garnered more than £1 billion 
of the public's money. “We 
just had to turn the tap of!,** 
said a spokesman for National 
Savings. 

The 31st issue “did not 
break any records** on launch, 
which is a euphemism for a 
spectacularly poor perfor- 
mance. But as interest rates 
have edged down its popularity 
has improved. 


The yield is a guaranteed 
7.85 per cent over the next five 
years. The National Savings 
people obviously feel they 
have got this one right for 
today's savings market An 
extension of the current issue 
has been preferred to a new 
one “as that would have 
offered different rates**. 

There are few dues as to 
whether we can expect die 
limit on fixed interest certifi- 
cates to be raised permanently 
to £10,000. This may be a 
particular one-off move, but 
the National Savings spokes- 
men are refusing to comment 
on the long term. 

One thing, however, is cer- 
tain — if interest rates do fall 
sharply once more, as some 
analysts are predicting, we can 
expect that the “tap** of the 
31st issue will be turned off 
rather smartly. 


MB 


,*v.i . 


says 
;plan« 

; offict 1 
1 that _ i 

l landi .- 

• Mr 
61 , n 
that 
Alb* 
said 
fro* , 


■v 


i '.'V^ .T.V- ••"-O'-* 

' . ' -i T 

- Barlow Clowes: 
&pi(tnCTS^:ifC5’ 




The Product 


4 £, ' - 
. — / , < > ' " • V - - Sir, V 

- Portfelio 




The Objective 




jg$& 

• , If, •' < ■■■": ■ * iV-’J TS?. 1 *) >0| 

v '‘9 % 


- A Guaranteed 

T r * *• _ ^1 

Monthly Return 


The Guarantee - Security of Capit 


i 



*Io: Barlow Clowes & Partners Limited 

Wamford Court, Throgmonon SireeL London EC2N 2AT. 

Telephone 01-256 6433 

Please send me information about Portfolio 30 


I 


Name. 


Address. 


l 

h 


r C%e Qilt Specialists 

Lticni. d Dralen M Stain V: 


Telephone. 


a 


Amount available for investment £ . 


DCS ESSO SZ9 KuSI L-'XI SBB **38 EBEZ3 BESS EEE3 Silfil ajL'.^J g.’Sr; 



EUROPE 


The top European fund over the past year, 
managed by Baillie Gifford. 


T he BG Europe unit trust was launched on 7 th July 
1985. The aim of the fund is to obtain capital growth by 
investing in companies in continental Europe. £1,000 
invested then would now be worth £2260 * and foe the year 
to 1st August 1986, based on figures calculated by Piahned 
Savings, BG Europe was the best in its sector. 

We cannot promise that future growth will be as 
good, but we do expect a second upward move in the major 
European stock markets. 


EUROPE’S BULL MARKET - 
THE SECOND PHASE 

News of disappointing economic growth during 
die first quarter led investors to take profits while share pikes 
were still at record levels. Naturally enough this resulted in a 
general downturn. The news has improved; retail sa lre and 
capital investment are rising and economic gr o wt h looks sus- 
tainable. In general, inflation rates axe kmc currencies and 
trade accounts arc strong and the European economies are 
among the leading beneficiaries of the fell in oil prices. 


Against this strong economic base share prices 
now look comparatively cheap, which is why astute investors 
are already taking advantage of the situation; more will 
undoubtedly follow 


THE BG EUROPE UNIT TRUST - 
UP 126%* SINCE LAUNCH 
The BG Europe unit trust is the leader in its sector 
oyer the past year and bas risen 126.0% since launch. Three 
out of five of our other unit trusts are also among the top 
performers in their respective sector, It is this kind of success 
which brought Baillie Gifford four top honours in 1985, our 
.first. full year in die unit trust market; honours which 
included Money Magazine's ‘Best small crust group* and the 
Observer's “Best newcomer*. 

Vk appreciate such, accolades but after more than 
75 years of managing peoples’ money we tend to feel we’ve 
earned them. 


THE BG EUROPE UNIT TRUST - 
A BUY 

Vfe recommend investors to place pan of their 
portfolio into BG Europe to take advantage of the current 
sinjation. 

At the same time, we would like to remind inves- 
tors that the price of units and the income from them may go 
down as well as up. 

To invest, simply complete the application and 
return it, with a cheque, to Baillie Gifford & Co. Limited, 
3 Gknfinlas Street; Edinburgh EH26YY. . 

tVHli|HtcMp.M|iiwIIMr<3«K 


IMPORTANT INFORMATION 


The mux is a UK authorised 
unit mux and a Vride range’ invest- 
ment under the Trustee Investments 
Act 1961- 

Tbe rmnrmwTW iimwlinml is 

£500 and units may be bongfat or 
sold normally on any wo r kin g day at 
nifii^ paces. Prk» and yield atepdb- 
lisfaed daily in the financial Times. 

There is an initial charge of 5% 
and an annua! charge of 1% (plus 
VAT), calculated monthly of the 
value of the trust Both charges are 
taken into account when calcu- 
lating unit prices. The trust deed 
allows the latter to be raised to a 
maximum of L5% (plus VAT) pro- 
viding die Managers give 3 months’ 
written notice to unitholders. 

The Royal Bank of Scotland pie 
is trustee and holds all investments 
and cash on behalf of unitholders. 
The trust deed may be inspected in 


normal business hours ar the office of 
the Managers, BaiDieGtfibid& Co. 
limited It allows the Managers and 
Trustee to write or purchase Haded 
Fall Options of purchase Traded 
Put Options on behalfof the trust. 

Contract notes will be sent on . 
receipt of any application. Certifi- 
cates are normally issued within 
6 weeks and when sdting, a cheque 
wifl normally be sent within 7 
working days of receipt of your 
nenounred ce rt ifi c a tes). 

Income, net ofbasic rate tax, is 
distributed annually to unitholders 
on 31st December. 

As at28thAugustl986 the esti- 
mated gross yield was 080% pa based 
on an offer price of 12(L3p per unit. 

Commission is paid id interme- 
diaries— rates avaflabk cm request. 

This offer is not available to 
residents ofEirc. 


EUROPE 


UNIT TRUST 

To: Baillie Gifford 6c Co. Lfmiw-d, 3 Gknfinlas Street, Edinburgh 
EH2 6YY. 031-226 6066 is die telephone number for the dealers. 


I/Wfc wish to invest £_ 


in units ofBG Europe unit trust. 

(minimum £500and in multiples of" £100 thereafter) “ I 


I am/We are over the age of 18. 

Wfe enclose a cheque payable to Badlie Gifford Sc Co. Limited 
| for unitsac the offer price applicable on the date of your receipt 

I - of this application. 

TjdcbQxforremvestmentofmcome.1 1 

Surname (Mr/Mrs/Miss) — 


forenames in full. 
Address 


1 


Postcode. 


.Date. 


Signatures) 


| (j oint applicants should all sign and grirg detail separately) r J 


GET IN AT THE START 


OF TWO IMPORTANT 


NEW FUNDS 


I nvestment in unit trusts is breaking all records this year. In May, 
fbr the first time ever; more net money was invested in unit 
trusts than in building societies. 

Now Sun Life of Canada Unit Managers limited is launching 
two new unit trusts — the UK Growth Fund and die UK Income 
Fund. If you have £500 or more to invest, and act before 19th 
September, 1986, you can buy units for 25p each. 

EXCELLENT PROSPECTS 
Vf’e believ e that the UK. is now a very attractive place 
to invest, with inflation felling and ev ery 
sign of continued economic growth. 

Our two new unit trusts will be managed | 
by the same people who have done so 
well with our 16 internal 


insurance unit-linked hinds. 

They r will concentrate on 
carefully selected stocks in 
British companies which 

have shown themselves in 

the past ro be sound and 

successful. 

Remember, the price of 
units and the income from 

them can go down as well 

as up. 

In view of this, our unit 
trusts should be regarded 
as a medium to long term investment 

OUR RECORD 




OUR LAUNCH OFFER 
To invest, complete and post 
the application below, with 
your cheque. Provided we 
receive this by close of 
business on 19th September, 
1986. units will be allocated 
at the initial offer price of 
25p each. After that datel 
units will be allocated at the 
prevailing offer price. 

The minimum investment 
in each oust is £500 — but 
if you invest £1,500 or 
more, we will give you a 
year's FREE subscription to 
WHAT INVESTMENT?* a 
leading magazine for the 
private investor. 

If you have any fun her 
questions, please phone by 
asking the operator for 
FREEFONE 2367 or ring 
direct on 01-930 2602 
■ between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., 
Monday' to Friday: 


The Sun Life of Canada Group has been investing 
‘ ‘ ‘ »ii 


money in Britain on behalfof its British clients since 
1893- It currently has £L3 billion of funds under 
management in the U.K. — and a record of sustained 
growth. 

INCOME OR GROWTH? 

You should choose the UK Income Fund if you want to 

draw a half-y early income from your investment and 

the UK Growth Fund if you are saving for the future. 


LAUNCH OFFER 
PRICE- --FIXED UNTIL 
19th SEPTH M BE R 1 986 


Information that you should know 

tCTMtniwrtOtfrcHwi 1. UK GWMftFunit To pnMdaloiM (arm capital growth 

lncoit»®olMCTnoaryinwort- 

2- UKlroanw Fim* th pronto^ an sbom average intoai income and 
inciaasi^MccinwiremiiMHtniommBpoiTfataatpnMoirMianil/ UK.aqun«s. 

SatoguHda Both Fundi am authortsad by ttw Seoneniy ol swe eorTVKie and 

mduKry. The Trustee * tfw&urtol Scotland 

pNltegl In UnteihJ life may nomalty to nought and soft] on any wo* mg day. 
Certfeatai wU normally oe tofnonJal witMn 28 days. When umtearasoM 
WMta IIm Msmoarg. payraont m nontaby mads Mrittin 5 worWng oays of our 

y omng ranpu mw oOTlicawBft. Prices and ttwywidi ana quoiad daily in 
nnancoi press, 

Cargos l! MBal Chains (IncfUCXti in theoffer price* SSSfeEAis a routing 

adpo&Tieni not axceedtng tho lower of i%or l2Sp pvunti OotoJ ms, 
MBnuoatebon (at :rana MtebW on mouest) <Mi be paid w authonsod prolev 
advisers 2. Annual Chsrge rtvot the the Fund ohc vat 

( . d *? 1Ka ” fwwOwFuntfs iiKomei raaea itenagW wprmsee TrumWand 

** w a owimuin ot r.S»b(ji die «due oi it»- ■■ ■ 
Eutx IpioaVAT.aute ea to3 months’ not**- 

Mrt lneemepteM&uHon UK Girmtti Fund ISth January each year (first 151BBL 
UK Inonrte Fund: 15<h January and 15lh July each ywr tflrat (S.7B7I. 

Ctti nahid iiMH CnaaVWd UK GrtWti FM 3S. UK income Fund s% 

” - TheteuriOBadenabtaathel' 


to mwest m iecondatv 
‘ lothe temtSiona 


•nDinwLwwvNunastnenH 
markets and to pu rebate aid wns traded oobone. s 
laid down by the Oeoamnaru oTTVaoe and Industry 
■—l i t" Sun Lite of Canada Unft War. 

Na 2004516 A member o> Itw Un* TVua , 

Tilts otter « notanHaeteureaiitentsol the flapubkeol UrtawL 
Tfr Brenda Murrey. DeplUT. a. 3 fl JCocHspurBlrert. London SW1V5BH 


m England 


l^iyieofCcnadalhiirMmageisIJrnited 

a TdBrmAito^DteMtrez.aaeODdbiMirSbwt Pleasfi complete in BLOCK CAPITALS: 


UT1 


London SMny 5 BH. 

I/We wish to invest 


*in the 

UK GROWTH FUND 


Please complete in block capitals: 
Surname {Mr/Mrs/MissL 

Full first name (s) 

Address 


Signature^). 


1 

I 

■ 


Date. 


*in the 

UK INCOME FUND 


'minimum £500 for each TrusL 
I enclose my cheque, payable to 
'Sun Life of Canada Unn Managers 
Limited 1 . 1 confirm I am aged over 18 years. 


.Postcode 


(Joint ojpUdiuiu should an aign and attach 
details to this application lorm .i 
UK CSROWTH.FUNO. Tick the box only If. 
you do NOT wish to hare net demtnitions 
automatically reinvested to puich^e 
atMirtonal unite 

UK I NCOME Fund. Tick the to* onty if 
■ you do NOT wish to ha« the income pa*! 
to you. Out automahcaRv nMnvastod to 

purcnaM sdtfiiMrtat uivia. 


ttwir 


I 

I 


Sun Lite otcawwa unn Managers Limited 1^200*^ 2- ^8 <| C oc k«0»gSh^ai. London S*hV5BH 


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THE TTMgS SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 



50/50 GUARANTEED INVESTMENT PLAN 
10.5% NETT GUARANTEED FOR 1 YEAR 

CAPITAL GROWTH: 60% APPRECIATION ALREADY 
ACHIEVED OVER LAST 3 YEARS 

invest wtth full confidence to produce a vay Wgh guaranteed 
Building Society rate of 10 .5% net of basic rate lax and with 
excellent prospects of real capital growth. 

50% of your investment wiB be put in a fixed 1 yaar amount 
with the Regency Building Society and the remaining 50% wffl 
be invested in the investment Portfolio Bond Managed Fund 
with Royal life; a first dass combination giving you a BuMng 
Society guarantee and a top performing managed insurance 


capital in the bond and a high initial unit alocatJOn of 102%. 
There is the normal 5% bW/ofter spread and a deduction of 
£ 50.00 for administration costs. The value of your units can 
vary as they can rise or fall. 

This offer must be strictly fimitBd in view of the Wgh guaran- 
teed rate and the continued faH-in Building Society rates of 
interest 

Post the coupon and your cheques for ImnuxSate Investment 
with Regency Budding Society (Members of the Buflcfing Soct- 


Royal Lite, to: 

Westminster Assurance & FtoanciaJ Services Ltd, 

Murray House, 3 Vandon Street, Wesbnuwtor, 

London SW1H OAN. Tab 01-222 1655 


I/We wish to invest £ (rnwmum £2400) m the 

50/50 Investment Plan and attach cheques pnyuWe in Re- 
gency Bidding Society (50%) and Royal Life (50%) to pur- 
chase units to the Investment Portfolio Bond Managed Fund. 

Nameafs) (in full) — - - 

Address ■ - 


Signatures) — 
Date(s) of Birth 
TeL No. Office . 


FAMILY MONEY /3 


Record value by the ton 


More than six tons of 78rpra 
records — 30,000 to 40,000 of 
them — came under the ham- 
mer at Bonhams' saleroom in 
Chelsea, west London, re- 
cently, selling at just over 
£I,000aton. My abacus works 
this out at an average of 20p a 
record. They covered the 
whole spectrum of sound from 
pop to classical instrumental 
music and from jazz to opera. 

Most lots were estimated 
between £15 to £60 — for 
example. Grade Fields (about 
130), £!5-£25; British dance 
bands. Cotton, Savoy 
Orpbeans etc, on Regal, 
Zonophone and HMV (about 
100), £30-£40; I2in music hall 
and comedy artists, Florrie 
Forde, Billy Williams etc,, and 
speech and historical records 
(about 80), £30-£50. 


“They are generally col- 
lected for playing. With 
proper equipment, there is 
very little danger of damaging 
them. 

“After this staple diet, most 
collections contain a few 
'prized items'. Almost without 
exception, these records are 
rare, either because they are 
old and few examples exist - 
many collections disappeared 
during die war - or else 
because, being unappreciated 
at the time, they sola in very 
low numbers. 

“For example, although 
many Caruso records sold m 
colossal numbers and are 
common even today, those of 
some of his contemporaries 
sold very thinly. 

“This important difference 
can result in a price differtrn- 


A record of ’Marilyn Mon- tial of, sot, from £2-£3 for a 
roe seductively singing “Di- Popular Caneo^r^rdmg of 
amonds are a Girl's Best 1910, to £300^500 for the 


HIGHER 
INTEREST RATES 




b 8-68 *= 12 - 23 * 


3 YEAR SHARE K»mwn.ln«™.£SOO 

8702 = 8 * 892 = 12 * 52 ^ 




End Office 178 Ionian Bood. Berth Ead-Part«aio^ra29H. 
TtkpfeM (0705) 693311. 

ortsnKrath Buildin g Society 


I > .. ■ • t- "M, • ' I.- jr?.:'. 


——I 1 '-t'.v. 


Friend" made £50 on the sale, 
and a particularly rare theatri- 
cal recording of Sarah Bern- 
hardt reciting a piece from 

‘Best records were 
picked out first 5 

“Phedre”/“La Samaritaine” 
realized only £20, somewhat 
disappointingly. 

So why these low prices in a 
world of music lovers and 
collectors? 

Peter Machin, of Chelsea 
Antique Market, gives this 
explanation: 

“Many of the lots were large 
and contained a high percent- 
age of common -items of no 
real value. The lots were 
purchased, mainly by dealers, 
for perhaps five to ten records 
of interest originally present in 
the collection which formed 
the base for the auction, must 
have been picked out. 

“As with books, many old 
records have no real value. 
Equally, there are many 
which, although fairly com- 
mon. represent the best exam- 
ples of musical, theatrical and 
other entertainment of the 
first part of the 20th century 
and are highly collectable, 
selling at between £2 and £5. 


very rare recordings by lesser 
known artists of the same 
period (see the Freestone story 
later for the rare Caruso!). 

“Similar criteria apply in 
the highly collectable jazz 
field, where rare original 
American recordings by King 
Oliver, Louis Armstrong et ol 
have been known to change 
hands for thousands of dol- 
lars, whereas excellent later re- 
pressings of the same 
recordings in British 
Pariophone Rhythm Style se- 
ries are generally sold for less 
than £5, 

“Record collecting is defi- 
nitely a growth area and by no 


means restricted to 78s. There 
is a very large interest in post- 
war LPs, EPs and singles and 
die demand for some of these 
is higher because of genuine 
nostalgia for the sounds on 
them. 

“In addition there is a 
volatile market in modern 
recordings, where demonstra- 
tion records, promotional 
samples and foreign issues of 
well known artists frequently 
attract three-figure sums. 

“However, it is difficult to 
recommend it as an invest- 
ment area unless the investor 
is prepared to spend a great 
deal of time becoming ac- 
quainted with the intricacies 
of condition, rarity and 
collectability which distin- 
guish the junk shop piles from 
the magnificent collections 
owned by several well known 
actors, millionaires and 
musicians. 

“Far better to enjoy the 
simple pleasure of collecting 
and listening to outstanding 
musical performances, com- 
edy turns etc which are 
unavailable in any other form 
and build up in a time a 
collection which will increase 
in value well ahead of 
inflation.’’ 

For a second opinion I 
turned to Brian Andrews, of 
The Vintage Gramophone 
Company. He bought an Aeo- 
lian Vocation table gramo- 
phone at the sale for 
renovation. 

This company, operating 
from Windmill Cottage, 


HuKonPfcturaLfemy 



Old tunes are the best — and sometimes the most valuable 




MONTHLY 
INCOME FUND 

The Only Income Unit Trust Y)u Will Ever Need 


W ith Framtington Monthly Income 
Fund you invest in a single high 
yielding unit trust which pays out 
its income evenly every month. 
Achieving this with a conventional portfolio of 
unit trusts or shares is almost impossible, but 
with Monthly Income Fund you can couple the 
convenience of monthly distributions with a wide 
spread of shares (there are currently 100} and 
excellent performance. 

This could be the only equity investment you 
will ever need. It can replace a complete portfolio 
of shares and unit trusts in a highly convenient 
and well-managed form. Its objective is growth 
of both income and capitaL It is achieving both. 

GROWING INCOME 
The current net monthly payment is 0_24p per unit 
The first p a y me n ts after the fund started in October 
1984 were 0.20p. They were raised to 0.21 in 
May 1985, to 0.22 in July 1985, to 0.23 in May 
1986 and will be 0.24 next month, up 20 per cent 
since the start Over the same period income from a 
typical fixed interest investment soch as a building 
society account actually fell by nearly a third, 
from 75* percent® 5 W per cent. 

CAPITAL GROWTH 

The fund's capital growth has been good; too* From 
the launch in October 1984 to the time of going 
to press (6th August) the price of units had risen 
71.2 per cent on an ofkr-m-ofkr basis and 612 
per cent on an offer-to-bid basis. Over the same 
period the FT All-Share Index rose 44JJ per cent. 

In practical terms this means that an original 
investment of £2,000 is now worth £3,224 

HOW TO INVEST 

To invest in Framtington Monthly Income Fund, 
complete the application form and send it to us with 
your cheque. The details of your bank account 
most be included. Units will be allocated to you at 
the price ruling when we receive your application, 
rounded up myour femur to the neanst whole unit 
The offer price of units on 6th August was 85.6p. 

The minimum initial investment is £2,000. 
The minimum far subsequent additions is £1,000. 
All investments of £10,000 or more qualify for 
a bonus of 1 per cent additional units. - 

EXCHANGING SHARES OR UNITS 
It is possible to exchange an existing portfolio 
of unit trusts or shares for units in Framtington 
Monthly Income Fund. 


In the case of unit trusts, you can use the 
application form below, leaving the amount to be 
invested blank. Send it with the relevant unit trust 
certificates, duly renounced and endorsed 'Pay 
Framtington Unit Management Limited’. The 
proceeds at tire bid price ruling when we receive 
your order will be used to buy units in Monthly 
Income Fund at the offer price ruling, less 1 per 
cent discount in tire form of extra units. The units 
must have a value of at least £2,000. If the value 
is £10,000 or over the discount is 2 per cent; if 
the units are Framtington units, it is 2.5 percent 
In the case of shares you should complete the 
application form in the Fnmiington Unit Trust 
Guide, available on request. 

INCOME PAYMENTS 

E ach income distribution is on the 5th of 
the month. Your payment is made directly 

into your bank by computer transfer accord- 
ing to the instructions given on your 
application form. 

The first income payment will be made on the 
next distribution day after your units have been 
held for one month. The net.payment cm the next 
distribution day (5th September) will be 0.24p per 
unit. The estimated gross annual yield on 6th 
August was 4.92 per cent 

Income payments are kept as even as possible 
with the aim of increasing tnpm gradually Regular 
increases axe expected, but not guaranteed. 


Investors are reminded that tire price of units 
and the income from them can go down as -well as 
up. All unit trust investment should be regarded 

as lung n»nn. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
Framtington Monthly Income Fond is an authorised 
unit crust constituted by Trust Deed. The Trustee is 
Lloyds Bank Pic 

Applications will be acknowledged by contract note. 
Certi&ates will be sent by die Registrars, Lloyds Bank 
Pic, normally within six weeks. 

Prices are published daily in The Times, Daily 

TpLyr nph atvi P twnnfHit TiinAg. 

The annual charge is & per cent |+\M*) of the 
value of the hind. The Trust Deed includes powers to 
increase this to a maximum of 1 per cent if necessary. The 
initial charge (indoded in the a&r price) is 5 per cent. 

Units can be sold back to tire managers at any ting 
at the mice ruling when the renounced o»ftifirnh» is 
received. Payment is normally made within 7 days. 
Commission erf IW per cent (+VAT) is paid to 


Distributions are paid net of basic rate tax on the 
5th of- each month into h»«lr accounts within the 
BAGS system, to winch all UK rWrmg banks belong, 
lax credit vouchers are sent periodically to unit- 
holders’ banks. 

The Managers are framtington Unit Management 
limited, 3 London BnMngs, London EC2M 5NQ. 
Telephone 01-6.28 5181. Registered in England 
No, 895241. Member of the Unit Trust Association. 

This offer is not open to residents of the Rqjublic 
of Ireland. 


TO: FRAMTINGTON UNIT MANAGEMENT LIMITED, 3 LONDON WALL BUILDINGS, 

LONDON EC2M5NQ 

I wish to invest £ mFramlingtpnMtmtfaly Income Food (minimum £2^X30). 

I enclose my cheque payable to Framtington Unit Management Limited. I am over 18. 

Surname (Mr/Mrs/Miss/Tifie) 

Full first namefs) 


Monthly distributions should be credited to the following bank account: 

“ — 1 | (shown m top right-hand 

Bank sorting code: comer of your theque) 


Ai.i 'iHiui name 

Signatures ) 

(Jotnlopplioutts should all sign 
and give details separately! 


Account i 


Lower Street Bitiingford, Dear 
Diss. Norfolk LP21 4HL 
(0379 740436). provides a real 
service in several ways. It not 
only repairs oh) gramophones, 
but produces beautiful hand- 
made reproduction Horn 
gramophones. No two ma- 
chines are exactly the same.- ; 

Each of the company’s two i 
models is powered by an 
original spring motor .and 
reproduction is through an 
anginal sound box. What is 
even more important to many 
collectors of old machines is , 
that it supplies needles for 78s, 1 
often difficult to find, in steel, 
thorn and sapphire. i 

Mr Andrews was equally 
cautious on the investment 
front: “The ‘hobby’ of collect- 
ing records is spreading quite 
quickly and the investment 
potential of collecting 78 rpm 
records is rearing its ugly 
head. 

“I say this because most 
collections are of modest 

means, and I wouldn't like to 

Condition most 
be considered 

see the hobby become thought 
of as just an investment Most 
collectors know roughly what 
their collection is worth. Yet 
there are no comprehensive 
catalogues of value, as in 
stamp collecting. Several of us 
have tried to initiate such a 
step, but the lack of response 
from most dealers is terrible.” 

The Vintage Gramophone 
Company, however, does 
have a subscription and up- 
date service to its record 
catalogue (UK £5, Europe £8). 
A sample list showed prices 
ranging from 30p fora Winnie 
Melville HMV record “Whis- 
per in your Dreams'7* 4 Tfae 
Meaning of a Rose”, to £5 for 
a JOin McKinneys Cotton 
Pickers “Gee, Ain't I Good to 
You” (slow foxtrot)/“rd love 
It" (fox trot). 

A useful indicator was a 
grading of every record to 
show its condition, something 
to be carefully considered 
when buying. 

A director of the company, 
John Freestone, of Hove, East 
Sussex, well known in the 
trade, speaks with authority 
and caution on investment - 
although he has sold a record 
recently for £500 to a 
collector. 

He also spoke of a set of 
seven Caruso Zonophone | 
records that made £3.000, and ■ 
were sold to a» well known 
collector: “They were re- 
corded in Italy in 1903 and put 
on sale in Europe for a very 
short time. And probably only 
three complete sets still exist.” 

Howver, if the other two 
sets were to turn . up, the 
scarcity value of the first 
would almost certainly dimin- 
ish, said Mr Freestone. 

Collectors tend towards 
thcmarics — classical records, 
music haR, dance etc They 
may also collect particular 
singers, composers, orchestras 
— so it would appear safest to 
go to a dealer specializing in a 
particular field. 

Many second-hand record 


Invaluable list 
with many dealers 


shops m and around London 
are advertised in newspapers, 
magazines and free papers. In 
addition, especially for post- 
war records, the monthly 
magazine, Record Collector, is 
available at most newsagents, 
listing many dealers. It is an 
invaluable guide. Not many 
shops and dealers specialize in 
78 rpm records, but here is a 
short recommended list 

“Discovery”, Chelsea An- 
tique Market, 245 King’s 
Road, London SW3 (01-352 
9695, Mon-Sat, IQam-6pm, 
more than 20,000 in stock, ati 
styles, also by mail). 

John Crawley, 246 Church 
Street, Edmonton, London N9 
9HQ (all styles, accent on 
vocal and classical, mail only). 

John Gunn, “Hollybank” 
Bramble Hall Lane, Daws 
Heath, Hadleigh, Essex (all 
popular styles, mail only). 

Norman Stevens, 48 
Eversley Avenue, Bamhurst, 
Kent (mainly jazz and dance , 
muse, mail only). 

The Gramophone Ex.- 
change, Drury Lane, London i 
WC2 (claims to have the 
largest collection of rare 78s 
anywhere, in mint condition). 

For browsers National 
Sound Archives, Exhibition 
Road, London SW7. * 

Arda Lacey 


FRAMLINGTON — ---* 



Adam & Company 101)6% 

BCCL iQfm 

^aJSwngst 10.75% 

Consofctated fids 10 . 00 % 

Coctriente! Trust 10.00% 

Cooperative Bank™ 10.00% 

C. Hoars S Co __10JX)% 

Hoofl Kong 6 Shanghai __10.00% 

UfrtS Back— — — 10.00% 

tat Westmk^ ______ IQ.00% 

fowl 8ank of Scotland 10.00% 


Cfcfiwft NA_ 

t Base Rate. 








Tve fought in five campaigns and studied countless war 
strategies, but I'm damned if I can understand unit trusts’* 

At last Australia’s 
looking sunnier 


( UNIT TRUSTS j 

Perhaps the moment has come 
for Australian unit trusts to 
dainyr n» from tbe Outback. 
While shares on the Sydney 
stock market have been soar- 
ing, at least for the first sewn 

months of this year, British 
unit trust investors have seen 
their holdings fall in value. 

According to Opal Statis- 
tics, the average AastraKan- 
invested wit trust is down 
more than 10 per cent over the 
year, with a 19.2 per cent Call 
for three years. Bei how can 
investors be losing money 
when shares have hew rising? 

The explanation Iks in what 
die experts like to call “cur- 
rency factors”. Hu Australian 
dollar has been so weak 
against major currencies, 
including sterling, that more 
Australian dollars for a share 
still translates into fewer Brit- 
ish pounds. 

Australia's recent Budget 
prompted a brief flurry of 
activity in the country's dollar. 
It rose, then went down again. 
The government dearly in- 
tends not to let. its currency 
slide hefow 60 cents to the US 
dollar, and has been intervene 
ing in support of the Austra- 
lian dollar and its bonds. ' 

Some commentators are 
daring to suggest that the 
corner may have been turned. 
“Distress selling may be be- 
hind ns,” says Charlie 
Snaking, of Henderson, “hut 
another currency crisis is en- 
tirely possible if the markets 
don't like the look of things' 
like the next trade figures.” 


For most investors trade 
figures represent a great 
imponderable and an almost 
irresistible inducement to 
sleep. Whether economic data 
is intrinsically dall or not, 
Britons are finally beginning 
to see a return on their money. 
During the past month Opal’s 
figures show the average of the 

fends actually rose 13 per 
cent. 

Some of course did better 
fhan others. M&G's Austra- 
lian & General fund added 
112 per cent in the month, 
although it is down by 1(U 
and leper cent aver one and 
three years- The improvement 
“makes a nice cbange”$ays 
M&G’s rather modest invest- 
ment manager, David 
Hutchins. 

The recent surge in the gold 
price has helped to posh 
Australian gold mining shares 
along, and relaxation of roles 
on foreign investment will 
mstetedly push some shares 
higher. Foreign parent 
comapnies can mm acquire the 
share capital of Australian 
subsidiaries. ReckJtt & Cole- 
man have already acquired 
their antipodean sibling. 
“Buyers are getting their as- 
sets cheaply because the 
Australian doUarhas faUen so 
for,” says Mr Hutchins. 

But is Australia worth buy- 
ing? “We had a board meeting 
last week,” said one analyst, 
“and someone said, ‘What 
about Australia?*. ItVthe first 
time that's happened in a very, 
longtime.” 

. Martin Baker 


INCREASED INTEREST 


4. v.. -• 

f ' 

.*.>**•**' 


»• >' > . -v '• >- 

V-'.. ■' •' v ..'’ r ‘l 


eiOJOOO and over 

8 . 25 = 11.86 


£S00(m«n)-£&999 

8 . 00 = 11.49 


£lty)0Q and over 

8 . 30 = 11.93 


£500 (min)-£9999 

8 . 15 = 11.70 


£10000 andovw 

8 . 50 = 12.23 


£500 (mm)-E 9 J 999 

8 . 25 = 11.86 


’BactaBBxpKt t&OSS*(W»alKiJ«)tMS«:r*la)(Oflei5*ifeiesiccmpoiindMhdK^a^iC A R ) 

ftnes arc 

BOLTON BUILDING SOCIETY 

295/237 BAKER STREET, LONDON NWl. TEL: 01-9350138 
24 Hour AraNSnng Sftvice 
Members of the Bulking Societies Assocarttan 
& Investors Protection Scheme. Ttustee Status 
emoMwcrs864 



Your Own 
Personal Investment Manager 
From Only £ 5, ooo! 

Now you can enjoy all the benefits of professional 
investment management with from as little as £5,000. 

Lancashire & Yorkshire Portfolio Management will 
assign one of their experts to create and manage a 
portfolio of stocks ana shares expressly for you. 

To find out more about this, and other uniaue 
services from Lancashire and Yorkshire, simplyfill in 
thereupon or phone 01-377 2727 between 10.00 am 
and 2.00 pm at weekends or between 8.30 am and 
6.00 pm Monday to Friday. 

IB otest information technology 

j |« ou receive full records of all transactions 

* in rompt withdrawal, without penalty, on 

I Mi any Stock Exchange Settlement Day 


inimum Only £5,000 



YORKSHIRE 


Lancashire ^Yorkshire Portfolio Management Limited: 

52-54 Artillery Lane, London El 715. 

Please send me, without obligation, full deteilsof your 

FERSONALSlOCKMM?KET^MCES , r 




L:* • 


. POSTCODE. 


TREPHONENO. 


If 

























'-»C 






: •' -r 


JHE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


27 


FAMILY MONEY/4 



earners 


EMPLOYMENT) 


V 


\ 




sun 


Weariy one child In 
fear is given £20 per week 
locket money, 

iccdrding to a recent 
,nrvey for Pontius 
Holidays. Should parents 
ay ap or encourage 
■frildren to earn the 
noitey for themselves? 
u ^HRIS WATTS looks at 
'the lot of the young 
Verker of today 
.■Will your child decide this 
^ i | jj i winner to join , what is be- 
lieved to be one of Britain's 
astest-growing groups of 
^vage- earners — working 
‘i-schoolcbildren? 
s It is not possible to give 
' jrecise figures on the number 
schoolchildren who have 
jobs because the 
i Government does not keep 
i ' Vecords. But a survey of more 
• •. '/vhaii 1,700 children in the 
Condon and- Bedford areas, 
.■ •• .‘-oanied out earlier this sum- 
' .nerby the Low Pay Unit and 
Jie Open University, found 
/‘ hai 40 per cent of children 
' nad some form of 
spntoyment. 

^ x IF this figure were to be 
‘ \p" ippjjed nationally, then sorae- 
1 . rf o£ing like 2.5 mimon children 
> .) may be working.' The. same 
■> survey came to the conclusion 
s^'thafiftic majority of them are 
' ~ working illegally. You may 
:< .* i ! taeU*fiave bought goods from a 
;• I'Wrikl- working m a street 


market, or flowers from a 
child selling by the roadside — 
chances are that they are 
working illegally.. . 

The' law regulating the 
employment or children is 
more than 50 years old. It was 
passed when- the school leav- 
ing age was 14. 

In general, it states that 


providing useful tips' for chil- 
dren who want to eam some 
extra cash. 


children under thp 
compuslory school-leaving 
age should not be employed: 

• if they are under 1 3 

• during school hours 

i before 7am or after 7pm on 


any day 
• fa 


for more than two hours on 
a school day or on a Sunday. ; . 

The situation is made more 
complicated because the law 
gives local authorities wide 
powers to' make by-laws which 
can affect the hours children 


Laws at present 
create confusion 


can do. It is, therefore, quite 
possible that a child can live in 
one area, go to school in 
another, work in a third, and 
be confronted by three dif- 
ferent sets of regulations. 

As it stands the law allows 
every local authority to make 
its own by-laws, which creates 
confusion and makes it easy 
for some employers to evade 
and ignore the law. 

A recent issue of Which? 
magazine carried an article on 
Britain's working children. 


But it also takes a serious 
look at how the muddled state 
of child employment law- 
makes it easy for some 
employers to exploit children 
.and break the law. 

Not surprisingly. Which? 
came to the conclusion that 
the Government should act to 
set up a national, rather than 
IpcaL framework of regula- 
tions. Its call for the Govern- 
ment to take action is echoed 
by the National Association of 
Social Workers in Education, 
one of the groups responsible 
for enforcing the law. David 
-Beer, the association's general 
.secretary, has clear views, 
.about the muddle surrounding 
child employment law. 

He says: “My association is 
certainly not against the id** 
of children having part-time 
"Jobs. What concerns us is the 
) growing number of children - 
who are taking jobs which 
jeopardize their safety and 
interefere with their school 
work. 



OFflER CLOSES AT 
£2 MILLION OR SEPT. 10TH 


14-65 


GUARANTEED ) YEAR 
BUILDING SOCIETY RETURN 


BuMmg societies and houses 
represent to most people the sriesi 
and most marring investments 
Uwy can make. Mow the Maximum 
Interest Bond bmgs the two 
together. 

investors wiH have the* money 
divided to secure a 146594 net* 
guaranteed 1 year return on their 
account with a leadng Society and 
the balance placed ei a fund 
fives ted solely ni residential 
property. 


. Thh fat a strictly limited 

77-776 


offer. Call 0272-276954' for 
o Reservation Number 

'HWSC Tta wuew I? POO 

Ui/nmity Medical Gmend Lid. 

I mtPosr MsiauBSUM TT30/8 

NAME 

| ADM 


I 


-TEL 


l TAXRATE % AMOUNT [f ^ I 

i jz. ) | 


NATIONAL COUNTIES 


BUILDING SOCIETY 



For sums of 

£5000 to £24,999' 


EMERALD SHARES 

On 90 days Notice • Limited Issue 




NET 


=11.97% 


For sums at 

£25,000 plus 


% 

PA 

=12.32% 


ts given 
.000 remans invested 


Min. £5.000 Max.C200.000 Variable Rates No 

Interest Paid Annually Immeckete withdrawal facility If 

NATIONAL COUNTIES can offer top rates as it has the 
BEST GENERAL RESERVE RATIO in the Movement 
now over 10% at more than £25 million. 

Trustee Secutty Members B5A In* Prowuon Scneme 


Please send demits ol wxr Emerald Shams 
NATOHALCQUHT1ES BS. 1 47/153 Hgh Street, Epson, Surrey KTOSBtTefc (03727) 42211 


NAME 

ADDRESS 


Paper boys find the money useful, but they must be at least 
13 years old and most not start work before 7am 


premier 


“The law on child employ- 
ment is' an absolute mess. 
There are more and more 
examples of employers break- 
ing the law so that they can 
employ children rather than 
adults — obviously at a much 
cheaper rate. 

“The problem has got worse 
as adult unemployment has 


increased. We’ve come across 
countless examples of families 
where the children are the 
only bread-winners. 

“We'd like to see the Gov- 
ernment introduce one law 
which applied to all parts of 
the UK. The easier il is to 
understand the law, then the 
more parents and employers 
will understand exactly what 


type of work children can and 
cannot do." 

There have been attempts 
to rationalize the law. Thir- 
teen years ago. Parliament 
passed the Employment of 
Children Act This aimed to 
set up a nationwide frame- 
work of regulations. Although 
law, it hasn’t been 
implemented. 


SHARES 


with 


paid 





torbank 


, &ery 
3 months 




^ OR 

!n,e ^Snt re,Ur! < 


INTEREST 


RATES 




ROUND-UP 




.. %>»*» 

-Tiatr. 'Current account — no Interest | 

. , . " *3eposft accounts - seven 

uotfee required for withdrawals: 


iys, 




njfeardays 4-375 per cent. Lloyds 4.30 

m cent; Midland 4.35 per cent, 

~. tetwgsi 4.375 per cent National 
'* ’ "Sirotwink 455 per cent Fixed term 
- .jlepOBitS £10,000 to £24.999 : 1 
•• , nonth 6.75 per cent 3 months 
1.625 per cent. 8 months 6J75 per 
* "art (National Westminster): i 
— ■ north 6-26 per cent 3 months 
i .. L jS.a*t per cent 6 months 5.9B per 
'ant {Midland)- Other banks may 
* differ. 



frk.' 


Nationel Savings Bank 
Ordinary accounts — If a minimum 
balance of £100 ■ maintained for 
whole of 1986, 6 per cent interest 
p-a. for each complete month where 
- balance Is over £500, otherwise 3 
per cent Investment Account - 
10.75 per cent Interest paid without 
deduction of tax. one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
Investment £100,000 . 

National Savings Income Bend 
Minimum investment £2,000, maxi- 
mum £1.00,000. interest 1125 per 
' variable at ' 


six weeks' notice 


paid ^-monthly without deduction erf 


■ Repayment at 3 months' notice. 
Penalties m first year. 


National Savings Indexed Incoma 


MONEY FUNDS 

, ' "OKI Net CNAR Telephone 

■ -VtanHune 

lonMy me. 631 7.13 

~ ref Second 6367.18 

; Higher Rale 
I Account 

6.63 6J9 
7.00 7.19 
7.10 734 


017261000 

017261000 


01 638 6070 
016286060 


01 236 6362 
01236 6362 


MOMUH 
10,000 1 over 
Mr Mm cal 

«-w ■- 

^SSSc 


016261567 
016261567 
01586 2777 


0315570201 

070866666 


.730 773 
7757 JD 


015811422 
01 2368381 



665.7.18 


ii 80ftgh7tLDep.7Z5 7J« 
s WCA 7 


720 740 


016385757 

013883211 

016261500 


■W -WflUfli «¥«B8 


L0OOH&990 6-75 632 074220686 

WjMWwJowr 730 7.13 074220069 


Ntt west High 

bit Spec Reserve 

£ZOSO£9.699 . 6168 735 
£103006 (nor 730 7.19 
Oppemeenw Money 
Mamuement Account 
undar £10,000 731 7.19 

over £10300 7.19 739 

Royri B ol Scotland 
Piwmen Account 7.10 729 
SCPCefl 630 733 
Schroder Warn 
£2300 to £9^9 6.73 634 
wer £10.000 631 7.13 

TuAet&FUeycal 730 746 
T8 R7day 730 746 
Tyndall cal 7.15 734 
Tyndall 7 day 730 7.19 
UOTIdey 7.10 729 
Western TidCt 
l month 731 724 0752261161 

CNAR — ConqxxniodNer Annual Bate 
Figures aie the latest evsdaOie it tM time of 
gong io pm. Reseerch D. Bern 


Start rate monthly income for first 
year, B per cent , increased at end of 
each year to match increase in 
prices as measured by Retail Prices 
index. Cash value remains the 
same, income taxable, payed gross. 
Three months' notice of withdrawal 
Minimum investment of £5,000 in 
multiples of £1,000. Maximum 
£100,000, 


0705 62773 3 
0705 827733 
01 236 0952 
012360952 
0272 732241 
0272732241 
01 026 4881 


ft 


asm***- ■ - * r . 


v*f 


b.2:- 





RTGAGES MORTGAGES 


C.i 


RE-MORTGAGES 


a4 rft 


S.v 


PHONE: (0202) 887171 
PHONE: (0202) 841948 


q : WHICH SERVICE DO YOU NEED? 


?;■ 


1. House purchase with deposit 

2. 100% home loan. 


3. Re-mortgage facilities. 

4. Business fina 


inane© with house purchase. 

5. Second Homes. 

6. Debt rescheduling. 

7. Mortgages in retirement 

Ring or return our coupon NOW. Anybody can 
benefit, you don’t need to be a teacher to apply. 

TAKE THE DIRECT ROUTE. 

RING OR WRITE TODAY. 



TEACHERS’ BUILDING SOCIETY, 
BRANHAM RD-, WIMBORNE, DORSET BH21 1AQ. 


CtdetOtfica: AHenview House, Han ham Road, Wimbome, 
BH21 1AG Tel: (0202) 887171 

Age 


BBbm 



.Post code 


sand details of mortgage facilities. 
• «n Interested in number above. 


Daytime 

T/phone. 


TT3 


National Savings 4th Index-Unkad 
Certificates 

Maximum Investment — £5,000 
excluding holdings of other issues. 
Return tax-free and linked to 
changes in the retail prior index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cert in the 
first year. 3 .25 per cent in the 
second, 3-50 per cent in the third, 
4.50 per cent in the fourth, and 6.00 
per cent in the fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased in August 1981. £148.42 , 
including bonus and supplement 
July RPT384.7 .(The new RPi figure" 
is hot announced until the third 
week of the following month). 

MrsteMA* 

income and capital gains tax. equiv- 
alent to an annual interest rate over 
the five-year term of 7.85 per cent, 
maximum investment £ 10,000 (as 
trom September 1st 1966). 

General extension rate for holders 
of earfier issues which have 
reached maturity is 841 

National Savings Yearly Pfan 
A one year regular savings plan 
converting Into 4-year savings cer- 
tificates. Minimum £20 a month, 
maximum £200 . Return over five 
years 8.19 per cent, tax free. 

National Savings Deposit Btond 
Minimum investment £100 . maxi- 
mum £100.000 . interest 1125 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
credited annually without deduction 
of tax. Repayment at three months' 
notice. Half interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 


Local Authority Yearling Bonds 
~ rate mv 


12 months fixed rate investments 
Interest 9' '4 b par cent basic rets tax 
deducted at source (can be re- 
claimed by non- taxpayer), minimum 
Investment £1 ,000, purchased 
through stockbroker or bank. 

Guaranteed Income Bonds 
Return paid net of basic rate tax; 
higher rate taxpayers may have a 
further liability on maturity, lyr 
Credit & Commerce, 7.75 per cent 
2yrs Credit & Commerce, 725 per 
cent 3yrs Premium Life, 7.70 per 
cent 4yrs Prov Capital 825 per 
cent 5yrs Pinnacle Ins, 7.75 per 
cent . 


Local authorRy town haR bonds 
Fixed term, fixed rate Investments, 
interest quoted net (basic rata tax 
deducted at source non reclaim- 
able) lyr Northampton 7.1 per cent: 
2yrs Manchester 725 per cent Syrs 
KJrWees 725 per cent min inv £500: 


The •dvcruwracM b awed in compliance »uh tbc requirements of (be Council of The Slock Exchange. 


Memcom International Holdings PLC 


Rights issues of 1,027,660 New Ordinary Shares of lOp each at 30p per Share and 
£2,158,086 10 per cent Convertible Secured Loan Stock 1989 at par 


payable in full on acceptance not later than 19th September. 1986 


d 

0 


The Council of The Stock Exchange has granted permission for the New Ordinary 
Shares and Convertible Stock to be dealt in on the Unlisted Securities Market 


Particulars or the Convertible Secured Loan Slock are available in the Exiel Siatistical 
- Services and copies may be obtained daring normal business hours on any weekday (Saturdays 
and public holidays excluded) up to and including 19th September, 1986 from: — 



Memcom International Holdings PL‘C 
Stafford Park 2. 

Telford, 

Shropshire. 

TF3 3BD 


Green well Montagu St Co„ 
Bow Bells House. 

Bread Street. 

London EC4M 9EL . 


30th August. 1986 


W. H. S de milord & Co. 
1 Lov<rLane. 
London EC2V 7JJ 


— 1 • 



\ 


4yrs Bristol 7 par cant, min Inv 
£1000; 5yrs Northampton 6.91 per 
cent min inv £500; 6yrs Grimsby 


6.50 par com, min inv £1000;~?yr 
mm 


Waltham Forest 6.50 per cent 
inv 6.50 per cant min inv £1000; 


531 per cent 9&10yrs 
lin my 


par cam. mm my 


mv 6.50 per c 
8yrsTafTEjy 5. 

Taft Ely, 631 
£1000 

Further details available from Char- 
tered .natitute of Public Finance & 
Accountancy. Loans Bureau (638 
6361 between 10 am and 230pm) 
see also preitel no 24808. 

Building Societies 
Ordinary share accounts - 5.25 per 
cent Extra interest accounts usual- 
J^a^^^e^en^v^^rdjnary 


share rate. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered. Indi- 
vidual bulkfing societies may quote 
different rates. Interest on ati ac- 
counts paid net of basic rata tax. 
Not redsimabte by non-taxpayers. 
Foreign currency deposits 
Rates quoted by RothschM's Old 
Court International Reserves 0481 
26741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made for switching currencies. 
Sterling 905 per cent 

US doHar 538 per cent 

Yen 330 per cent 

0 Mark 355 per cent 

French Franc' 630 per cent 

Swiss Franc 235 par cent 


PREMIER PACKAGE 

For full details of our prompt 
postal service — 
fust send this advertisement 
with your name and address 
or 

telephone at any time. 


a AR t 


Quartef* 






GUARDIAN 

BUILDING SOCIETY M 






Dept TP, 120 High Holborn, London WC1V 6RH 
Tel: 01-242 0811 (out-of-hours answerphone) 

RATES VARIABLE - TRUSTEE STATUS - ME MBER O FB3LA. 

1 1 — i iii uni mi ropumoN— 


We offer you the strength of 

rfc the highest reserve ratio amongst the top 

twenty societies 

and 

* we operate without branch offices to 
maintain the lowest cost ratio 


UNfT TRUST 


RECORD BREAKER 


Between January 28th and August 14th 1986, 
^ r iffi# ^#t biP tH^ Coii my Jdpia n Growth : 

Trust doubled in value in what we believe to 
be a record breaking 198 days. 

It is also the top-performing authorised 
Unit Trust in the U.K. over the last twelve months 
- £1000 invested 12 months ago is now worth 
£2549. 

Nevertheless past performance can be 
regarded only as a guide to the qualify of the 
fund management and should not be relied on 
to predict future returns. 

The Fund Manager is confident, however, 
that a fundamental historical change in the 
Japanese domestic economy has given the fund 
considerable long term growth potential. 

The price of units and the income from them 
can go down as well as up. 

THE PATH TO SUCCESS 

The County Japan Growth Trust aims to pro- 
vide good long term capital growfh. 

We believe that traditional investment tech- 
niques are insufficient. They now need to be 
supplemented by an in-depth understanding 
of technical analysis and the demographic 
factors influencing the Japanese economy. 

The Trust's performance has been enhanced 
by up to the minute local information and views 
from County's Tokyo office. 

This gives an invaluable 
edge to our experienced 
Fund Manager in London. 



All prices calculated on on offer to bid price basis to 278.86 with income reinvested 
Source: IDC Opal 


HOWTO INVEST 

To take advantage of this offer either phone 
the direct dealing line on any business day to 
purchase units at the prevailing price 

01-726 T999 

or complete the coupon and send it to us with 
your cheque. 


The purchase price on 27.8.86 was 216.5p per unit, and. the 
estimated annual gross yield was 0.6%. 


County Unit Trusts 


GENERAL INFORMATION 
- Contract notes wiD be issued within 7 days: 
certificates within 42 days. The prices and yield 
are published daily in leading national 
newspapers. Ybu can sell units bock to the 
Managers cm any business day at the Bid Price 
ruling on receipt of your irtstrubions. An initial 
charge of 5% is inducted in the Offer Price of 
units. Remuneration is paid to qualified 
intennediories-rntes available on request. The 
annual charge is 1% per annum (+W) of the 

Trust value whkh is deducted from the Trust's ; 
income: The income distribution will be me 
annually on 1st November to unitholders 
registered by the 1st Septembec 
trustee: Royal Exchange Assurance. 

Managers: County Unit Trust Managers Ltd 
Registaed Office: Ganoid House, 

31 Gresham Street, London EC2V 7DX. 
Registered Number 907310. ■ 

Member of the Unit trust Association. 


I 


Post to: County Unit Trust Managers Ltd, 161 Cheapsldo, London EC2V 6EU. 

i/Wfe wish to invest £ (minimum investment £500} in the Japan Growth 


I 


I 


Urust at the 'offer price ruling on the day of receipt of my cheque, made payable to County Unit Trust 
Managers Limited ... 

Or debit my ACCESS account Card No. I — l — i — l — I — l — l I — I i — l — l I » i • » -1 

5umame(s): Mr/Mtx/Miv: _ - — 

First names: (in full) — — — 

Address: (in full) : • _• 


Data. 


_Sig nature (s)u 


I 


Please tick-bere foe automatic reinvestment of income O 
Please tick here for details erf the.Courrty Share Exchange Schemed UNTTS/^eD ‘ 


-I om/We are over 18. 


I 


I 


& The NatWest Investment Bank Group I 

TNjoffeB»KHq»oteiA»lDnM«fen8ofEi« 


ST 






; i 


L . 

/ 


» »■ i U xVX/‘Ti A 


t ->U i>uO 


HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 


PERSONAL! RENTALS 


Overseas Travel 


— r. : , -M 


CMaway from it all 
through a hole in this page 


lust cut out this coupon, send it away and we'll send you our free 
brochure on Far Away Holidays. You could escape far away from 
Winter to exotic places like Africa, the Seychelles, the Caribbean, 
the Far East, and even the Amazon 
Cut this coupon now or simply cut along to your travel agent 
YES . Please send me a full-colour brochure. 

Mr/Mrs-'Miss ~X~ 

Address 

Postcode 




Mora low-cost flights 
via more routes 
to more destinations 
than any other agency 
PUIS 

■ Fast, expert, high-tech 
service ■ Free worldwide 
hotel & car hire pass 
• up to 80% discounts 
Open 9-6 Mon-Sat 
On-tee-Spot 

immunisation, Insurance, 


CLEAR OFFS I 

Age 31/8 £189 1 


4/9 £109 
4/BCW9 
5/9 zm 
8/9 £129 
6/9 £159 
6/9 £159 
7/9 £123 


AH classified adw nanao itt 
can be accepted by icfcpbonc 
(caccix Anno u ncements). The 
deadline is SlOOpoi 2 days prior 
lo puhlKStion fir S.OGpra Mon- 
day for Wednesday! Should 
you wish to send an aducnise- 
meftt in writing p l ease include 
yoor ds ytime phone number. 


SHORT LETS 


HAMPSTEAD HW3 


CRUtt KmqOISOmJqr. BMgn 
via. Dunum- WrammsMT 
Luxury houses and ito» ***** , 
aSr Iqr m or »"ort W» 
Please raw ler cunfrt hit 
Coal PS. 0*5 BurhftiWMin FaUte 
M bWl Ol 83 8251 . 


«»V * M*» Conurt us now 
on 01 23S H8oV lor IN’ « 
irroon ot turawy d IMa and 

noum (O rml id . 

Chrtraa Kcnsu^wn ,ri 


niRTNair. IT you have any 
queries or problems mating to 
your advertisement once h hat 
appeared, picrae contact our 
Customer Services Department 
by tdephone an 01-481 4100. 


Elegant flat with pan- 
oramic views. 1 reception, 
1 large bedroom, fully 
equiped kitchen & ham- 
room. self contamsd CH. 
Ample street parking. 


CHELSEA MASONCTTC (deafly 
KKMM (Or Kot^Wnldqr & 

Sootn him. Z «snr ncoioom. 
vumt room. KiB Colour TV. 
■tai r/h. ciiw & elect me h« 
day or Co let. 3 mmilMnu* 
case pw Ter. oi asi data 


HOLLAND PARK Modorn JuJW 

fumhft«J not m Norw ws 

sciwrc Wl 1 

rorariv- Cj 50 p w Tel <31 W 7 

l7o& «« 


for short let. £130 p 
Telephone 
01-794 4960 
alto 6 p.HL 


CUHUMS/c fUm haornwM ItL 
n/vming m - (ol. damns rro. 

shower shr (ml pm. C/h. 
w/iMHwmffliTV.winwiW. 

Liao nuu lor TeL Ol &S-2 5306 
or ooao &3Q247 <Mon & Tun) 


l UP O u nc fiats ■ 
as ad A read lot **»«“*£; 

nrcutikrv Long A ^ a7 L K ^ H K1 

*Q Areas, uotnend & C? rrr 

AUramark-Stwi Ol 499 633*- 


SWIS/PuIney ndm Ey twgmo 
iuui Edw n»c Shed*. 
a/13 mounts, C22S P wCl>lrl 
0345 TO 302 


announcements 


Foreign Exchange, 
Map & Book Shop 


HMV Ttv Sanrd Heart o> Jesus 
br pranrd. adoml and otonlwd 


QIQQ 

osaat 


To: Silk Cut Far Away Holidays. P.O. Box 46. Hounslow, 
Middlesex TW4 6NF. Tel-. 0730 65211. 


farAweV 

9 HOUDWS 


■fc&utffaySmtt defte 

42-43 Earta Court Road 
London WB6EJ 
Lona-Ma** 01-303 1513 
Eurap«/tJSA 01-937 5400 
1 st/Boatoeoo 01-938 3444 



br prawpd. adaevd and gtortHea 
ihioupwul urn wane lor nu 

and mn Amm 
OAP TEAR Join in m Italy for 4 
ft wwts boo An HtsHtry 
Abroad in Oinvat Travel. 


CHELSEA DUUMMTTt 2 4Mo I 
nnfi. umi.K4B.n tain 
Co in. LSSOnw Ol 351 4815 
LUXURY SOtVKCD FLATS, 
contra! London front ta g pw 
Ring Town H» Ant* 575 3453 


ANBtMS/ OWNERS. IT yon 
haio a quality property to let 
trU us about H Wr o Her a pro- 
frvdonai A retianN? imw 
Ouraahl Committing Ter. Ol 
244 7555. 


COMM Superb nowK* mg 
mter road, dw l» V*gj 
Cl. 500 pent Tel Q1 9*7 1560 


fjfWZt ALANP 
BOCjNDt h-.'VtO^D 


Cancer 


FLATSHARE 


HEV LOW FARES 
I WORLDWIDE 

ESSO 

era 

£345 
£330 
£(30 
5765 
£560 

LTB 

|Z 0QMU STREET. L0HD0H Wl 
| lit 01-439 3S21/M07 
I AIRLINE BOWED 


LOWEST FARES 
Parts £69 N YORK £275 

Frai*lurt £60 UWSF £395 
Lagrc rSM Mum £330 
"tarot* C335 Satgapote £420 
JO burn £460 Barqtu* £335 
Can £205 Katmandu E-MO 
Dew Bom r»5 Rangoon £350 
Hong Kong £310 Gafcuita £425 
Please cad 
SUN & SAND 
21 SMn SL London Wl 
Bf'4» 2100(497 0537 
MAJOR C/CAROS ACCEPTED 


UP UP & AWAY 


Nairutn. Jo" Burg. Cairo. Dubai. 
Istanbul. Singapore. K.L. Drthi. 


OZ-NZ 


Bangkok. Hum Kong. Sjdnc 
Europe. S. Thr Americas. 


Europe. £ Thr Americas. 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Avenue 
London WIV 7DG. , 


PERTH - r-n!r Zb29 

SYDAHELBRIS « f. £6$> 
AUCKLAND ." r-:,trl75T 


INDIA 

THAILAJiD 


01-439 0102/01-439 77SI 
tlpco Nonmiat I0JKMJJJ0 


. 01-^425555 

RE HO TRAVEL. :AnTA.:"f\; 


THE TRAVEL 
SHOP 

Sydmy/MeBxmme £700 rtn 
Hongkong £450 rtn 
Los Angolas £350 rm 
Same price as seasons. 
No ' from" about our faros. 
No extra to pay. 

Tel: 01-631 1714 
01-636 9451 


The winter's most original 2-3 
week holidays. In Mia — 
Ra|Mtan Daaart Cities <ncL 
5-day Camel Sa ta n: exploring 
tamos Mkm 8 Painted 
Villages: by boat and tram 
ffvough Ihebeep South. Also 
Thailand's Gotten Triangta 
rncl 5-ttay Hi Uribe Walk. From 
£795. Contact: 



Together we can beat it. 

We fluid over one third of 
oil reseJrth into iht- prersen- 
lum and cur* ol cJiicer in 
■hr UK 

Help us b> sendings dona- 
tion or make a legacy icu 


ISRAEL 


Cancer \%> 
Researm V; 
Ownp^nat 


old amwir row M7Pnr f < 25- 

501. Lux flat tiurr. own room. 
aU xntmrtm. staro. waslnng 
nwrtuno. we C2EO Pent awl. 
Aim lBunrd. Tel . 370 5188 
HOLLAND PARK 3rd Person to 
tlurr house, own double mn, 
washing macMne. CH we. £300 
pent TW Ol 221 6435 
■ELCMAVIA luxury apanmrm. 
suit a protoaMonat Mmate. n/s. 
C1IO pw Tel 01235 4648 
HHKCATE Anracme juuit nn 
Spar unis acrotit for i seoroers 
nr lube £46 Eject 883 5290 
WEST RENSMGTOII. <emal». oul 
Standing house share. £96 pw 
UK Tel Ol 602 0994 


WIMBLEDON, furnished hse. V 
4 oMrjns. 2 rrrepL mod Ml A 
bath. C« tSXI gdn. Op. W 
only C200PW Tel Ol 946 
7286 or 879 1729 >dayL 879 
1556 invest. 


tahutwiop mciihfetuaMda 
BefNdnm aid Ttens soarg Jau 


1 11 artiini H* «n«4- Terr* r. 

iriritt ITWlI .4tt.4lSW.IVf.AR 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


IRELAND. FROM £267. 

Visit Ring ot Kerry. 
Connemara and Dublin 
on a 9 day coach tour 


FINISHED SCHOOL? 


with National Holidays. 
Call {0924} 387387 for 


Call (0924) 387387 for 
details. 

Yoa'n Onty Know By 
Being Thera 


Taking a gap? 

Join us in Italy! 

For 4-8 weeks of fun & 
culture. An unforgettable 
experience. 

ABT HISTORY ABROAD 
01-244 8164 

S Wethaftoy Place 

London SW 7 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
mat idxn 
Jo bufll/K* £300 £490 

«■<» E75 £390 

Cara £150 £230 

UOB £?0 £360 

Dri/Bom £250 £3S0 

BantAok 1220 £350 

Douda £420 

Afro Amen Trowel Ltd 
1621168 ftenent SL Wl 


Explore Worldwide (DTI 
ffigh 9L AMershot, Hants 


B A B aid way mad 

£235 ALL INCLUSIVE. 
AVAIL 9 OCTOBSL 


WANTED 


7 HU St. Aldershot, 
M 0252 319448 (24 


Tel (6682) 860596 


1621168 tenant SL W' 
T£L 01-437 8255/6/7/9 


Late & Gioud Bottop W ricc me 
AMELMSAOUCRS 


COSTCUTTERS ON Highlv/bob 
lo Europe. I SA A raovl dpvtina 
lam nphmui Travel Ol 730 
2301 -VBTA I \T.\ ATOL 


OISCOUNT FARES WortdwKtt-. 
01 454 0754 JupUet Travel 


AFRICA SFECfAUSTSt Kro 
Travel SO. Red Lran ST. SCI 
Ol 406 1406 ABTA/lATL 


OtSCOUNTED A SBOUF FAIRS. 

IIC Oik'll 5.P 0763 867036 


HOT TURKEY. Spend a week re 
laMiHi at our private beam 
hnlrl then a week rrumina on 
nn v.Mhi lor £420 me III. 
It/B. dee n /«mh other e onv 
t»n.il>ons pow Ol 32b 1006 


MOROCCO BOUND. Regent St. 
Wl Ol 734 5307 ABT A 


MMTZEHLARO Scheduled menus 
Ol 724 2588 ABT A ATOL 


LOW COST FARES lo L' S A M» 
■or Travel Ol 486 9237 IAT A. 


1ST 8 CLUB CLASS FU6MTS; 

Huge Dive ounls Sunworld 
Tiuvel IOS727I 26097 
/27109/27S38 


KNOW A UMQUE FARAMSC of 

while -oil wihI washed by a 
Mur lagoon with exotir fah 6 
cocaK. Details from. 01-841 
8724 <24hrsi 


CHEAPEST FLIGHTS W W1DC - 
Beau Travel TH Ol 3B6 0414 


HOLT CHARD TOUR UM. Ex 

* reptroial value Ute^eason 
Oiler Deoar I urns still avaUUMr 
on Turs 30 Sr pi. 7.14 A 21 On. 
fuHvmrl Calwirh day nighlL 7 
nuthts H/B in 3/4 star hotel*, 
airport tax A rniranre fen. 
Abo TAOftMtNA from CITI. 
same dales ISLAND SUN Ol- 
222 7452 ABTA/ATOL 1907. 

IMF ARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
n/w £420 Tin L7eO Auckland 
o/w £420 rtn CTTO Jolwrg 
O/W £500 rtn £499. LOV Anpe 
leso/w £210 nn C4QS London 
»7iohf Cmtir Ol 370 03 32 


MM CALL lor some of the ben 
deals in rbobtv aunmenb. Ho- 
tels and rar lure Tel London Ol 
030 5000. Manrfmier Oftl 832 . 
2000 Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau 


05 per oz up to paid for diver 
articles C2S0 per or for Odd 
(.roenuv wanted any diamond 
Jewellery Mr Hart 01-960 
8030 or Write 361 Harrow 
Road. London. W9 AO England 
eovered. 


KARBELLA exprvtenred couple 
remitted io work ascook/boffer 
lo Imiirv v lUa Own arrommo- 
dalton A rufM terms Non 

smokers. Highest rets required. 
Reply lo BOX 054 The Tunes. 


LOW COST FLIGHTS Mou Euro- 
pean destinations VaF-vander 
Ol 402 4Jo2/00&2 AST A 
01004 ATOL 1900 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


■xi «e» e iMiiHfr Ol ax, 
lilt Tr.vv elwise Ahta AM 


Itorwi lerlure lOth Sept for 
winter i98o/7 KMirs Phone 
TwirkersworM Ol 892 7600 


LOW FARES WORLDWRM! 

IkA. 5 Amrrira Mid and Far . 
La-4, s Aiikx. Trays ale. as 
Margaret Niren. Wl Ol 680 
2928 iVtsa ArrepInD 


MAM. 1AM AI T A. N.YORK. 

Worldwide rheopevl fares 
RM-hinond Travel, t Duke SI 
Richmond ABT A Ot 940 4071 


STD /MEL CO 18 Perth C5U AR 
nwuor earners to Aus A NZ. Ol 
SB4 7371 ABT A. 


HONG KONG C488 Bangkok 
CJoR Sum £457 Other FE nl 
les Ol 5tM 0614 


TENERIFE. Crock Htands. AMtar 
ve. Menoira VUlao. iota. 
; pensions, lavrrnas Hofkfays/ 

Hi unis. brochures/ mslanl 
nooVinos Ventura Holidays 
i Tel dot BM 6033 


Joe mlormatiofi 6 mv nation. 
LATM AMERICA. Low rm 


JtTW AMERICA. Low cost 
flights eg Rm G4S5 Lima 
0*95 rln. Also Small croup 

Hobday Journeys irg Peru 
Hum £3601 JLA Ol 747 3108 


DISCO UMTS 1 si /’economy tick- 
rev Try in Last FLIGHT - 
BOOKERS 01 387 9100. 

Act- evx/v na arrepied 


TUMBUk Perfect tx - a rhrv for 
vour summer holiday Call for 
our tnormne now Tunoian 
Travel Bureau 01373 4411 


ALICANTE, f aro. Malaga etc. 
Ounond Travel ATOL 1783. 
Ol 681 4041. Horsham 68641 


in us C7T1E5. Lowest farm an 
nutior scheduled rigiki k Ol 
181 7371 ABTA 


Genuine rrdurtiofts on over 
lOO new L restored HMTU- 
mmb Lnm ailed after sain 
i him Free ntakgur 30* 
Hrahgale Rd. NWS 01-267 
7671 Five caiaMoue 

BECKSTUM Cl 907 60 8M1 Raw- 
wood Superb lone. BeatOHui 
raw wk £3.100 Ol 891 3471. 

CLAVtCMORD Mortey Bach 4 On 
Mahogany Fine tone, v.good 
rondn. £890 ono. 0743 75438. 


L AFRICA From C46S. Ol 584 
7371 ABTA. 


FOR SALE 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


GENERAL 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


MEUDON 


Wei! put a 
spell on you. 

If you answer this 
advertisement, well send 
you the Magic of Italy 
brochure, and you will fall 
under its spell: 

•■3£\ Here you will find 
Italy, off the tourist 
track. Hotels, villas 
and swimming pools in 
Tuscany, Sar dinia and 
lardy, unspoiled Ravello 
on the coast of Amalfi. 
People who expea magic 
on holiday use us. Call 
01-749 7449 now (24 hre). 
Magic of Italy Ltd_ 

47 Shepherds Bush Green. 

London W128PS. 


WANTED 6 MONTHS LET for Ihh ' 

win lor LudJ-ti nHipk- mm inf) 
lo Mxi-Millr would hkr lo rent 
oralxv ->uiiimi' lo ulb lor 6 
monlhs nrfmi* huvlno own 
hnuir. Trl >048931 4090 «r 01 
845 1930 


CANTERBURY 


Fran Braaos ta Rsyais 
16th- 19th OclBher 1986 


HOTEL 
ramaaiii south amnwu. 
TELC3262S0S4L TTLEX.-4S478 


■ROVENCE Murm SI Rrmy & 
Ln Biiuv Snull hv. 1 arrr 
vin-m 4 wondrrful vrrorry 
Avail 4 OH. Irom C 1 60 pw 
Also Vc idler lob. .IIMI at low 
md Tot Ol 940 oOS8. 


TAe a 4 day break *4b ful board n 
Ok beatfikd rout, hom «fM» you 
vaduau 9*(» «4l lAa wu M niaces 
miti a neaipi of num ton stars 
and ends a Vioona Coach SiaiMi. 
London Dnads/tnotaig form turn. 


IMPflLSE BREAKS 


SOUTH OF FRANCE- bubdonlM 
VIII.B wilh nwn pooh from 16 
brpl .lrnrii nl £5017 wkly Pjlm- 
tr A Parker 1049 489, 6411 


COflMTRY T0B8S 
38 BKH STHffT, 
WHGHAM, CMTERB08Y 
KERTCT3 1AB 
0227 720587 


Scoi yoursed 4, CotwaH. 
T—fTr^T — *--* 
shoo 9®rs Kodng lo pn»a» 
core Entoya(Xft>cus«*and 
anenmc 5WHC8 Hecommarded 
bylbftDestaudes. 


TORQUAY 
HOTEL COHCOBDE 

U censed family hotel, cokv TV 
and central Iwaung n al bed- 
rooms. some en suite. Large 
neated smnurang pooL car pariL 
BB and EM from £7533 mtiksve. 
any tour days tram £4150 m du- 
ra One cbdd free when stnnrg 
Vacancies September and Odotw. 
Fror days Christmas Pnuramrae. 
£12B tattasrie. redadtaH 
tar children. 

TELffKOfff UQ3 22330 
26 NEWTON RD. 


EAST ANGLIA 


NORTH NORFOLK Bah and <61- ! 
tow. bom drop 6 + roll. TV. 
DM w. inhnq. brounful Mr»- 
uon nw I hr nvrr Wraam. 
From C14S pw TH: 0328 
79289. 


RESIST* . 
CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 


ROYAL MAHME. 9 years service. 

Anything n-gal conMd t rwL any- 
- wtwrc uw lo BOX A44 


N. NORFOLK - Fully niulpprd 
rvtlMtr. 3 douolo bnfrooms. 
rndw. W Martiinr. Coloir 
T V . TH. 037975 609 rvrntngs 


Wool mo Botes trom £135 per 
sq yd + VAT. 80% wool Heavy 
Domabc VKKon £1385 per sq yd 
+ VAT. Cortspiast ties E8.75 per 
sq yd + VAT 8 raiy other jnat 
reductions. 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


CAMDEM TOWN Studio rUL hall, 
frpvalf kitrhm. daragr. 88 
HTs £46.000 01-3878416 


SCOTLAND 


287 Haventack WO, 
Hampstead SW6 ! 

Tel: 01-794 01391 

Free e kURri t s- fapert BBag. 1 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


NR CANNES Ijiun m Pmu. Mod 
Uonl .ipl M9<- 50 yds undv 
Caiu-H BnuMm, <0273 i3628o 


I ,wi 0 ^ 


FORT CRMMAUO GULF St Tro- 
prr Suprri, ript. 9ps4/6antlw 
mm. Ot 4o2 1259 


UJL HOLIDAYS 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


I 5. DEVON. Sra. Spwlous lamuy 
(IjI Srpt on for 2/0. C84-U54 
pw OI 794 0237/01-074 6060. 


iSSirMagic of 
Siyam Italy 

The best company when 
you're on holiday 


TUSCANY 


SUFFOLK Brrrtrv. v/r nal In Tu 
■lot Manor, vlrrov 5 C80 D w 
THQ5CI2 712115 


TAKE TIME OFF lo Pam. Am I 
vlmfanv Biwrtv Broun ] 
Urnrv.1. Bctim-. Lausumr. Thr 
KukH- Oubfin. Hoorn . Bm i 
kvmr A Dwppf. Tmt Of! 2a. 
Chrwtrt Clow. London. SW1X 
7BQ Ol 235 BO 70 


Enoy Tuscany oul of season 
Cottage oi aj»«tihem fc* rroi « 
lesroced ntt ■> oeaKriui ennny- 
skr Periact base tci «k lo 
ftawt*. S««>a. Aiezioem. Wno 
and farm produce a»a*ioie 
Cottage £200 pw. 
Apartment £150 pw. 
reduction lor longer periods. 

TEL (070131) 369 I 


WELSH BORDER Banks of R|v - 
1 rr kye with tMrVdiop of Black 
Mouniaitu. 4 min famous 
Book Town Of Hay-Oil Wyc 
Sell -ralmnq C50 per wrrfc Uv 
rlUMvr of power and bghltng. 
-deeps 2/4. Abo bed and break 
rm £.10.00 per pnsoo Tel : 
i 04974 510 iTl 


The Malvern 
HiHs-die 
backdrop to a 
perfect break 


EX QUOTE COTTAGES OF 

auuucra & 

MS TBCnON 

Set n heart o> On aumysde n» 
sea. Genefoos neahno. ed Wl 
lnm. garages M awe. 

True bray comteied otti oU nods 
ctann Also cosy one bednmmed 
collage tangly leswed and cared 
lor by Jofin and Nancy JoUifl. 
Tioroni Gfeen. Lone. C on w r afl. 
0503 20333 


•ORAr rurnnhoj v/nqie Horry 
ro Haw. 'IPS 2/4. OuMH soof on 
thr Moray rod nr sea A golf 
c-oursr Mrs R Jew man. The 
Farm. Lower Aurhenrealh. Mr 
Sorabrrv Moray 0346820383 


HURRY NURjrr TO TOPS. 50 rtf . 

TV'S from £60 ID £100.-91 
Lower SknM SL SW1 730 ! 
0933. 


baiuamv Perfen lo, aoH or Ed- 
miiunah lourmq. 4 days O.B&B 
in Ihtv ete^anl ruMH from Only 
C7o THE BELLEVUE HOTEL 
<03081 02322. 


LOCH RAMNOCN Holland 
Lodoe Sps 6 For nrn4in-llth 
Ort Tel: 0406 23196. 


SFLEMHD solM matiogany. band 
man dura*) table. Lmncd. Suit 
palabal home or cfegaol board 
room Extends lo nearly 12*. 
rtosrs lo 8' Can scat 16. TradJ- 
uonai Regency r eprod u ction 
Finings, solid brass. Accept 
Cl 500 Number at matemng 
Prince of Wales ctvatrs. band 
carved and polished. All un 
used £125 each. Also 2 Simdar 
hand bum sobd manoQany ta 
btes. unused, seabng upMlOor 
12 Tet 01-203 6027 


SOUTH KEMS1HGT0M 

Luxury senriced, 2 daAie 
bedrooms. 2 receptions, 
bathroom with w.c. seperets 
doAnnm. Near lube and 
buses. £325.00 par wedt, 


Co Id only. 

Hum Rsaday-Satardair 


Hum HndarSatardai 
ItLOfl are - MO pa 
01 581 5109. 


ACTIVm HOUDAYS 


Nesrtng beneath The • 
•estein slopes ol theMaJeein 
ftads. the CotwaB Fa* a a 
country hotel wth all the 
comforts, cusme and wrres lo 
make any length of stay oertecl 
The Cattail ftar* Htxei 
CoMall. SWiem 
Wb'cssiersltre WR3 6QG 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEAR1CS 


TUSCANY Manna Dl 

Pkiravinla Lovely villnv sleep- 
ing 4/e>/8 Hit 1/2 wls Sell 
drive o< ntv lion CM or Man 
i irom uVj op Ri-voti villas 
Oftl Ui 9094 ABTA/ATOL 


RALXMG FOR WEEMES £1 

moor oiHrteri walking. Aw ard 
winmnu betel 0598 52291 


las. Aprs A Taverna Id III ad 
prwe ranges A all iw nroups 
1 2.3 A 4 bed! lie. avail Tel 
Monarch Villas A Apartments 
<0682i 456773/419898 ABTA 
ATOL 1821 

M E WOUCA 2 new exclusive spa 
nous vlllnv sleeps ft* 1 minute 
lo mnwIiIuI sandy hurii. 
i Water sports, ftept/Ort Irom 
C35 PPtrw TH. 0b42 712393. 


, TUSCANY. 3 Hals in farmhotne I 
near Arerm lor ho! May let 01 ! 
c22 7202 ■ Weekday Eves, 


AUTUMN BREAKS 




BOSEHUHDY W* 
St Agnes, Cormnfl 

Sts n lowty gmunos near sea. 
Family mn coimuv house hold 
otters good food. bat. heated 
MRmng pool, games room. 
HjU board tram i80 per week. 

B&Btrom £52 per *re*L 
Enaaie rooms wun cotaw TV. 

TEL 087 255 2101 


SOMERSET & AVON 


ALFOXTQH PARK 


Geon^n Mansoi n 50 ap es gar- 
dens, once poof Wordsworths 
home Good tood (orgmerfy 


«dmi vegetables, fm range eggs, 
home-made braad. pate, so^ «c.) 
Also sett-cRonq accommodRion 
avatabie. 

Retaxed, tnsrefv atmosphere. 
Bndtn 

Td (027874) 211 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


tstx OF SKYE: DeflnMrly dWter 
enl. I inuinn Loloe self ralering 
hotel. Dunvrrun mhmg A 
shooting. Trf 047C02 445 


Td:0684 


DORSET, HANTS* ft 
L0.W. 


HTEK-END BREAKS 


MOUNTS BAY 
HOUSE HOTEL 
THE LIZARD 
CORNWALL 


YORKSHIRE 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


ALGARVE From 3rd of 5epfem 
her. 4 heds-’H i»«pfe I usury 
villa W,m pool near Vlhtrieira 
M.iirf vn ,rr. Ilmhl adv Ire 
av.Hkibie CeOO per week 
Trlt>o£86 36373 


Houses ort loth 19th. vislbnq 
houses rhurrhev and villaqm. 
Amrtv Dileti.wli Ol 749 7Q96 


ISLANDS IN THE SON 

SB>TBHBER/QCTOBER 


ALGARVE. Lin villas wdh pools. 
A -iPtv Avail hrpt/Ocl irom 
C3?Spw Ol 409 2838 

VillaWortd 


FITNESS ft HEALTH 


FLY DIRECT TO CORFU, 
CEPHALONIA, 
ZAKYNTHOS. CRETE 
& SKIATHOS. 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. The 

lin<-4 house-, lor i filial 73 SI 
James Ml. SW| Ol 491 0802. 


RELAX M UHASNAMH) 
LUXURY AT 

HUSTYNS 


Unpretentious little hotel in 
unique secluded position 
overtootew beautiful Kynance 
Cove. Wonderful views, 
beeches, walks. Close village, 
shops, licensed, cosy bar. 
good home cooking Children, 
pets welcome. 

(0326)290305 


SHANKUN 
CLARENCE COURT 


BRtSMTS OF NETTLEBCD Thr 
unnnaf» rrpUca furntfurr spe- 
nahats Onr of EMtaadi 
largnt collerUons of I7lh G 
18th Cemury prrtod ityWfurm- 
lurr C2 imuon stocls for 
immediate delivery. NHUebetL 
near Henley aa Thtanm i Q49» 
641 1 IS. Boumwrtoulh ,02021 
293580. Toptaam. Devon 
.0192871 7443. Berketcy. do* ; 
<OC63f 810952 

F N 1EST ouallly wool carveM- A1 
trade pnm and under, abo 
available lOCTi extra- Large 
room aor remnants under half 
normal prlre. Chaoccey Carpets 
01 405 0453. 

aeUTON STYLE Olntng Ta- 
mes. chairs, sideboards and 
desks- CaUlcsjuM from WM» 
nuram. Crourn Lane. BoravN 
Green. Ketri. 0732 883278. 

THE IKS 1735-1*86. Other 
titles avad Hand bound ready 
lor prewnraaon a*» 

-Sundays". £1-2-60 ncmember 
When. O! 688 6323. 

TICKETS FDR ANY EVENT. CHS. 
Starlight Exp. Chess. Les MB. 
Alt theatre and snorts. 


MIDDLESEX 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


RADLETT HERTS, 20 nrimdes 
renoraf London FDrnWied 4/5 
bedroom house ui 3 acres wim 
lake Including twice a week 
houeeAeeper and gardener 
C2Z3PCT week Teh092767313 


SERVICES 


Fan,, nn Heal ScMenbo end Ot 
tan £85 acting V»T Fare 
taom to toracs md mftes 
Ham #6 Otoe wmooi n R 
ram 

lne menannee tora a re*. 
Date ign 4 «M d>ag& 

none uke a* Luu 

0306 2530 


LUXURY GARDEN STUMO for 2 
In o beaulriul loraiion In 
Applet rrrvvK-li twn arfp dal rl . 

From C96pw Tel: 0766 72302. 


Trl SSI Ot*6/a3BO*9G. 

A. Ex / Visa / Diners. I 

an LIARD TABLE Burroughs A ' 
Walls. VKlorlan. oak. Excel- i 
lent condition 0362 3206 I 
before lOam a after 8pm. 
BUTTNDAY DUE Y Ove someone 
an ori gin al Times Newspaper 

dared the very day they were 
born £1260 0*92-31303. 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES, cob- 
ble setts elc Nationwide 
doth cries. TH: >0380, 860059 
■Wilts, 

YORK FLAGSTONES (or patios A 
dmewayv Liquid a tion sale Tel 
061 225 0881/061 231 6786. 


tRDDCRDAUE. ftmmaled nrifl 

rouaae. vlpv 4 Balh/vhower. 

CH Colour T V Linen. 
COOP w Tel 0423 780274 


nUUMOURA Lux 3 hro viBj 
O wn pool tike of Oort Course 
Avari now £150 lo £600 pw 
Trl 0222 TOJS30 or TO 1588 


B g m f ifu l vitks & opartmants. 
Oas* to glorious beodies. 


FKS w u N bu r fin g in Crate. 

Lata AvaBdbiKty 
Optra Saturday 930-230 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


KARBELLA Nrw he.irhMdr « 
■■edroomed vilLi. «Jero* ID. 
Available 30m August on 
wards From £200 la £550 pw 
Plume. Ol 486 248ft day or 
06285 26743 evenings 


Corfu 

7. 14. 2Ir 28 Sept 
BeMtful VB3S bv th> Sez. Hotels 

rso ffartabta tttuglKHfl 

togjsi & SeptOTte 

tang Pan World 
Holidays 

Open Sat 01-734 2562 
(Sm 01-736 2464) 


NER1A. OU del Ml Lux 
aparts. s/pool. rfove heart, A 
fowl, rmlie -Irar! now from 
C60 dw Ldiu Iris from 
Cl lOpm Tel >0423, 872463 


An ndvra Heafm aod Courtry 
Oub n tw Man at CornwR Un- 
ify settv 9t a 120 acres otero 
comolete peace and sados^n Ev- 
ery laokty to KtaM somUi MO 
tenns courts, manor sworering 
pad ans gymnasun. beady 
dne «vi restaisa. Regret no che- 
oren or pets 

Fol Mails and brochures trosE 
Hratyos Hearth rad 
CoMriry dab 
SL Breocfc Downs 
Widebridge 
CarmeaS 
PL27 7UL 

Tetagtaae (0ZBB) 813188. 




ML > MOUTII lanry a late hotl 

rt-iv. Superior new G/F 

sealronl 5/C Hal Streps 3/4. 
L nnvalled posalioii. romlort la 
nbhes Tel 0306 78272ft. 


WALES 


BREAKAWAY. London’s dub for 
proresaiooal wuicatehed people 
23-43.0, er 200 erven rs mon in- 
ly 24 hr mfo tape. 997 7994. 


nek IN LONDON pew a TV or 
video by day - wk or month. 
TOPS TV 01-720 4469 


COMPANY GOLF Days organised 
for surf or tram mers- A ny 
lota b on- Te l 0754. 872722 
fKMHBP, Love or Marriage 
Alt ages, areas. Datetme. Dept 
iQlftl 23 Abtngdon Road. Lon- 
don WB. TeL 01-938 lOll 




FnSEi*6sh!»«ldw. 


^OmsspapronmiaL -Fretsu: 

1 efHeadfadriesioc. Craqsd bren* 


LYMOtCTON. Super Cottage, use 
ol heated pool. 3 brdv sleeps 6. 
4 im Wth onward* C90 ISO 
pw Tet- 0590 72068 


BOD WALES 

DOVEY VALLEY 


HOME ft GARDEN 


Sesd farosnoecn] QaapetK 
Verieadi brednre wday. 

©(07695)2666 

MrafaHd Cranny feme, 
Santa Mailan. N-Perra BOtWQ 


LAKE DISTRICT 


KESWICK AREA DrtKjnUuiiv sU 
is.il ed rotlage. *lrep* 4. TV Tel. 
0423 74894/059 083 360 


IVyrefsi -4d lwh Omim Farm, 
ku- m braoiihil rmmlrvwlr: taeh 
me and nln. nmkelabie end 
hwk- al m ii p bi n: •pnoa. Manner 
and Miiaao oamarvL 
StYC'IAl. MINI KKKAKS 
Htt Imoktaw and nwaae rncaL Lift 
prr infra per uda. Pet- mlnaer. 

RHIWLAS FARM 
Telephone (06S4) 2796 


FREE! atoms new bulb Cata- 
logue 64 coiourfni pages. 
Hundreds ol tolour pteturo of 
Dutbv and riowm plus useful 
growing hints With 3B coraec- 
utftp goto medals m Chelsea, 
you're assured at the best 
kmc Ron Bwn. Dept T12. 
Leavesdea. Watford. WIM 
7BH Or phone 0923 672071 
,24 hrsi. 


Contact 

ths team with tea best 
BJtperiwica Worid-wida 

ACHIEVEMENTS 


DEPT TT. NORTHOATE 
CANTERBURY CT11BA 


SHORT LETS 


TEL: 0227 462618 


COUHTISBBRY LODGE 
HOTEL AA RAC 

Lymnoaft, Dstroo. 


LAKELAND Sett Catering Cot 
Lee-, ctiatetv rlr Crry Abbey 
Brorn i090ft> J7T3 


NR. CORKTON. Beautiful home 
nv .iitanoe 31 Aug 1 9 Sect Sips 
8 C200 pw Trf 09323 45109. 


ANGLESEY. HOI May Collage* A 
apartments overtop kino sea 
Own healed Munanns pool, 
fnim roiith. bowls, mooker. 
tat4e Irtinrv ysl tievh water & 
mm Ifthing. Sanrtv bearh Sepl 
v.mnciev Trt- 0407 800789 
Frtasdarian Troaiddur Bay 


HOLLAND PARK Owners Oe«u- 
utul 1*1 floor nal over looking 


ROMS pnv lirv rnai me apt Sbv 
a/o pm. tennis, sandv Bearn 
r-s Tet Oftl 432 4375 


CANTERBURY Sept only Ter 
t.m nl collage wilhin rit> wall*. 
Sleeps s parsing 0271593157 


inn an VILLAS We *ull brae 

C ?y,ft?lrr77i4 ji?e aepi »«■ 

? Beaulriul vUlm nr the 

oearf. ex §■'““* Jg£ 
HolitUYl. OX TJ8 


CORNWALL ft DEVON 


Former Victorian warage 
dose Lynmou* HatDour & 
Ernnoor. Traddonai home 
COOkmQ. chtkca Ot menu. 

Ensurte avadabla. 
From EliSO BB & EM. 


LONDON 


SNOWDONIA Late Break 8 berth 
raravan in sperlarular loraiion. 
rroni bth Sept 0437 721 357 


retc ub ow. 1 double 1 single bed- 
room. kHrhen/«knrr. Iuxbo> 
halhroom. all mbetune*. CMSc 
bu*/IUDP. 8 10 wks. £200 p.w. 
Tetepbone Ol 229 8918. 


JAVEA. Be.-uii.lirt Mat sleep* 4 
Bearn 2 muts -\v.iil atler IRIh 
w*rt Cl 25 P«» Tel 0084 
295512 All** 7 inn 


gYCLADGS .Mykono*- 

ear w». 


EAST DEVON. TradUronal larm 
IrniM- sips 8 rotmlrv walk*, 
niuslii none., witmite. tog (He. 

rt, lo Mins coast Cl 80 pw 
■niiKH Ho n do* .04041 23401 


Tel: (0598) 52388. 


KEMWNCTON WU l.u« Sen wed 
apK >'ot T\ t nh-om Lid. 15 

Elgu. Caes. Wu Ol 451 3094 


PORTHMADOG. Drhgntfut bar 
ho., rtweffing *fpv 4/5 Avail 
Supl/MT <0978831 2390. 


luOr lunuHiad And equipped 
studio rial Short or hobday let 
<1/2 month*! CTO per month. 
Ko other charge* except #efe- 
phone TH Ol 727 7973 


KPT G OM Cray roltagr nr sea/ 
Ouairtorks/ExmooT 4/0 * col 
Baby wiling < linen /Her / rot TV 
inrruded 0378 732206 


wales 


OXOM Allrartrvp «/« bedroom 
luronhed house. spacious 
ground* 4 mile* Didrcrt (M 
dlngton 40 imns) C4SO Dm. 
Tel 0235 880010 


MFCS. I ropoilt 
fhwiH. villa renlat* rtr /no 
h£k bl 434 1647 llol AUO. 


MARRELLA Luv villa al Aloha 

h.1 PulBdlxn T/lOUTI s/pool. 
f 1 £180 pw <04831273472 


MEVAGISSY. rewriwm col 
l.ior 1 SOviK harbour SIP* 5 7 . 
CISO pw inrliKling linen and 
eu-.ii.riiv Telephone 040 926 
270 


wwwrs | its aparl hokv from 

'cfS?S3ftlO»3Sep.S«rama 

OTte 8628 14- 


WINTER SPORTS 


CRUISE ft SAIL ABROAD 


TUHUT lo* 4 IT yacht mr 
wtadl- w/ak, Singlev wel 
JiS^Mert Sail 0243 674333 


SKI WEST hump-1 Ur or rune out 
now narked ssiin .dl me lop rr 
sons Sund-iv fuglils -heal Ihe 
■railM-i «um! ansv/inirt, low 
■xn-essi.nhim.il £5*1 Ring.Oli 

THS aora In v mu rob*- 
.VBT Aft92Sft VIOL13H3 


CORNISH COUNTRY MANOR 

IMiiise Ptrniv In do. see and 
ral hpe.wl C«r» per ereek. am 
nn IU.B TH CB22 8324J2 


WATERSRX COTT ACE Sterpv 4 
■sal isiun . GKI nnoiw. TV . (i* 
r.uur-. rti.xtv Pi ■* ale giuy C80 
u» 0841 540793 


THE OLD BLACK LION 

HAY-ON-WYE 
HEREFORD HRS 5AD 

?iy>; a nefl sesned break « bis chain raj o*0 Wrisn Caxton) Inn cdtamg 
rein, urmortatW acapigiuttahon 10 reams. 6 mtn pnvta snoraer and »c 
HAY IS the SSCOffTKAMO- BOOKSHOP TOWN S« rt peturesaue uuaiysde 
vh* Valiev Slack Unmans ano Brecon Beacons Salmon hstong oi ire Wye 
"ws* ■'■wo an! cai BJrirtO IIMIVS Dm? o> tre best « vretyi and Euroooan 
Iona ir oct a* Beanes amej num. ot ml foawires fo sands min a 
onaera: w au henaly Ba Oren trttt Chisirnas hen Year 
For dftMlB thin phono 
(04971 820841 


TRUSTEE ACTS 


ANTIQUES ft 
lOLLECTABLES 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY ft MADEIRA 


II milll 1 Lui- aparl ftlp* ft 
pSlemus. gvm OpO heart, 

ShM I9ib hewt Ol 328 125ft 


mora l Las Vnmr* rrlu <n 
AuiMfs llixurv sea Iron* villa , 
ur.Uv 021 4462SOS 


SKI BLAOON UNES 

86/87 BROCHURES NOW OUT! 

47 Resorts m SmUerimk 
Austria. France & Italy 
The Biggest Chmce On Skis' 
E( Gatmcfc. lirion Mancrester. 
Glasgow & ECrtBurgh 

Ol 785 2200 

Mancfe Oeps. 0422 7SJ27 
ABTA 16723 ATOL 1232 


L.K. HOLIDAYS 


LEARN TO SWIM 


(in glorious Devon) 


in only 7 days 


UUBAROTE BY CONCORDE 


Winter holidays to 

Unorate, Tenerife and Fuerieveniura. 
Villas with pools, Beadi apartmente^, 
3 4 & 5 staf hotels etc 
lamzaroteviuas 

Horehaw «J4Q3J SOM 24 his 
ABTA ATOL 003 


T^ar- «* » O Unable to svsrim? O Lack confidence? 

\ Do you fear □ Water, □ Jumping in. 

, □ Bumping into people? 

V * Could you improve youn □ Co-ordination. 

Jy y □ Stamina. □ Breathing techniques? 

Wf ' \ . 4 Do you know about: 

□ Survival techniques. G Breast & Back stroke. □ Crawl? 

□ Do your children haw similar problems 

• Highest success rare e 92 degrees F (33 Cl • No spectators • 7 day swim ming hoHday 
e Lessons ond acocmmodaiion wnn to*?ak(a*i and 3-co rase meat, al under ono rool 
• No age taki 30.000 successes by ito method. mdwJmg a 94 year ott 
G & C Holidays lid.. 98 Contaton Rd. Basingstoke. Hants. RG22 5HZ 
Telephone: 10256) 882760 (Office hours) 467205 l Evenings/Weekends) 
Please send me tree o* charge and wnhour oOUgaocxi mtofmaten ol the nems I hawe ticked above 


NO T1C£ r* nrrrkv raven pursuant 
10*27 ol Ihe TRUSTEE -Ml. 1925 
■hat any prr*on hj. ,ng a CLAIM 
again*! or an tkTEBEST in thr 
ESTATE of anv « the deceased 
person’* h nave name*. aHnren 
and dr-vrnption* are *rt out below 
ft hrrrftj reuurrod ta send panic 
uior* in w ruing of nrv flam or 
inlrcral lo llv person nr pers on s 
rrv-nlioivd in irtalKin lo the de- 
rcM-^ft raven ronrerned before 
ihe dote vpmlred atler w-ruch 
dale trrr relale of me deceased 
will to- distributed In Ihe Personal 
reprevrnub* r* among Ore per 
son- rnldied memo hav ,ng 
regard call . lo the claims and in- 
lec.-Mv oi wrurh they have had 
ncairr 

CHIMES KTt RIKGR05E. 
DOROTHY MAY CHIMES NEE 
R1NCROSL- WIDOW Late Of 
Heathrote HOvbrtal. tajnnrk. 
Warwickshire died- al Warwick 
on 7 MARCH 1985 iLndKposec 
ol residue about CIS.OOOi The 
km of (hr above named are re- 
mimed lo aCPtv lo BLYTHE 
OtvlNdCOMX 6 CO. Srimlon 
ol Dalkeith Hoove. 7 Clarendon 
Place. Lramngton S» 
War., rrkvhire 

ELEFTHERKX F£mavk>lt* ol 40 
i>.lllrton Avenue. WembM 
MldUk—v. died on 26U, (tar Ol 
Srptemlirt 1984 Particular-, to 
%i s Mai ks ft Co Sobnlar* M 
^.rit.nia Hooo-. 52 Lincoln'* Inn 
FirtOv London WC2A SvL be- 
lore 3W OrKrtwr 1986 


ROYAL DOULTDR Toby JOB*, 
rtguime*. animats, etc . wamt- 
rd Ol 883 0024 


GEORGIAN 
FULL SIZE 
BILLIARD 
TABLE 


By Gfliows in 
Cuban Mahogany. 


2 Mscreng Cue Samis 
SptayaJ leg scoreboard 1 


All grnnal accsssones. 
nil tataory. 


nil HaSOfy. 

TEL: 82805-665 
(BUCKS) 



Srad kc The Eqorabfc Lite, 
FREEPOST 4 Coirmra Sc. Loobon 
EC2Bgrfetej*ooeG1^06 661 L 

rdrud mntelu u L e i dec u kotiyonr 
sdnol kc plus, faanonc dxn 
teDAcspmljnm-DSpfejdijf 
tbeontortrj perod. 


The Eauitabfe Life 

I YbnpahcrarraRtUnat. — 


BENTLEY &C9 


The VM ikHrte Sidney Arthur 

Rohm Ceoroe Drngo 11TM OLKE 
OF M-YNCHESTLR Of P O Bin 
24ftft~ Karen Kenva died on 3rd 
June 1985 Particular* lo 
Bcwtnrrofl* Mlyilarviit IDO Fet 
ter Lane London LC4A IRK >Rcf 
JSh > More 3t*f Oriabet i486 


now nrgcntly require to pur chHB e 

DIAMOtffiS AND DIAMOND ^WRlBiY 

immed iate — trf**”* TJwtiAM W|,| ^ |> ; 

85 Naw Bond Street, W. 1. Telephone 0 1-629 06f5 T 




RCQUMED MMEMATCLY 
South of France 

Cannes/Mougiin exberienced 
prnerabty ouatlfied nanny for 
brtgM. lively. Eoglnh speaking 
3 year old boy Must be of a 
Und and afferuonaie nature m 
her 2C7*. rar driver Jton small 
rr own l b e d roo m ed apartment 
and car Ekcefleoi salary of- 
fered muS have reference* tor 1 
further information TeLOLO 33 < 
93 752338 .reverse chargesi. 

CAMHEGr FRANCS Chaffeur 

handvman/carelaker required 
lor large, modern vrifa-Mraf ; 
have corrtuieotai ttru log expert 
rare, acromodahen provided, 
ewrelleni terms ottered, must 
have relerences For further ui 
formation THttlO 33 93 

752338 I reverse charges! 

GERMAN STUDENT, 22. looking 
tor au-patr lor half a year begin 

• turn Ort. or Nov 1986. Pnaor 
OIO 49 S222 7510. 


BABGARC Kriburn bedail for sin- 
gle. only C3Q pw Express 
Rental* Ol 883 S457- 
■A RNW Large 1 bed garden OM. 
handy 7Ub> £70 rt* Br i d al 
Guide 01-606 7S76 
CR OYDON 3 bed house- khU/pHs 
welcome Cl IO pw md. Rental 
Guide 01-686 7976 
EDGEWAKE 3 .bed. C/h -boose 

Ktds/pets neliwe »«0 pw 

Express Rental* Ol -S83 54S7 
HAMPSTEAD C/H flaL SUI cou- 
ple. handy Tube £ 90 v* 
Esm Rentals 01-083 6407 

HOUSES, FLATS BedSHk and 
share* In North London. Ex- 
press Rentals 01-883 5407 
OFF FUTHEV WLL attractive 
drily euuipped 2 bed Oal bt wed 
mannamed block. 789 8317 
OVER 200 Flats & House* araG 
in Central 6 SW Lonrim. Op A 
Hot Ms only 930 7508 tTL 
RENTAL CWD* CARRY Flats, 
houses, shar e* SU i London ar 
ea*. 01-686 7S76 
twit, atbarlh-e wmw f»*L «*>*e 
toedriYi. 1 1» loo rm. dhung m. 
lAb. Cl 30 pw Ol 351 0016 


A M E Rt flA H KAECUTIVe^fcS 

lux flat/house- UP lo CSOupw 
Lsual lee* rev f'hlH.P* 

Lewd. 50010 of me Park p»W 
*ra office. OI SOS sill or 

North of the Park tawetrito 
Park Office. Ol S8o 9882 
cwawnl large dwaefied 4 Bed 
house. I ur imbed, ini map jiara 
condition, dose to cenwa' 
srtiooH. amenine*. ooH .^' OQ 
per week Tel 01 349 1288 - 


. HAMPSTEAD Family b*r Sheds: 


garden, rer Heath fi O iris Gre 
year C300 p.w Tel: 267 4881 
H P—I CT M L very Metaenl 
conv i t u e nl 2 bedroom, pb flaL 
cmm> lubes £500 Pent- Tel Ol - 
735 2194 i 


MMHJSOH Btsrr own 
frtdge/cooker. pvuro . 
pw Rental Oidde 01-686 7376 


NWlls/r fum ground flal 
2 reran, krt A bath SWrehraf 
mg Phone UOrwl No tor 
3uM prof couple 486 6146 
HUM . Sunny radec 2 M« wy 
rube. CH. garden- parki ng- T V. 
CI25PW TCt Ol 202 4944 oa 
226 9B8a - 

UJLCOtDAHY seeks fum PW 
ernes in best kmdon arcsM- 
CAB&AM A CMPg.L'gf 1 
Fee* reoutredL Ol 589 5481 
Wl FW z bera. 1 reP P; 
Secluded OveeluoWng Co 

tom let £190 P W Tel- Ol 724 
9312 

Wl MARBLE AKK. Un ,$£ 
studio not. v iw * *■'£'*!£ 
will, 4 wKly maid service £146 
pw Ol 724 4172 • 

ACADEMICS VEHTtNC. Flats nr 

Heim Walton A Co 680 627B 


PORTUGAL 


PORSCHE 


BEUA ASSOCIATES 

7b8 mmm tor proporty to 

Algarve. 

Expensive etna of tanC. tents 
hn amersew, luxury ribs, m- 
wswwnts and adwe. Oor tatty 
BtaUed. Eogbsft/ ttatagese 
warn aval you C ontact J em any 
eve ning 0 fl Q706B 7932 or Beryt 
on 07OB 3SSOOU 


ROUS ROYCE ft 
BENTLEY WANTED - 


Coptnwed oa ptge 14 



IARY 

OF 


THE TIMES 

CLASSIFIED 


1*6 CARDEN FLAT, 2 room*. Ml. 
bain. CH. palm. 2 mans tube 
CUO pw TM Ol 741 3264 


AM BtVESrMDfT Female crop 
Nr Station nram l n g pernrawon 
lor 2 MaeaneUe- Easy comer 
urn For ouKfc sale. Often from 
£66.000. TefcOl 841 8724 


The Times Oassi&ed cotanms are read fay 
13 nuffion of^ the most affluent people in the 
countiy. The foSowng categories appear 
regriariy each week an d are generally . 
accomMnied by refevaid editorial articles. 
Use die coupon (bekw), and fin d oaf how 
easy, fast ana economical ft is to advertise in 
The Times Classified. 


MONDAY 


Ednradon: Uhiveraty ^Appointments, PTCp& 


PuHic School Appointments, Educational 
Genuses, Scholarships and Fellowships. 

La Creme de ia Qenie and other secretarial 


appointments. 


TUESDAY 


Computer Horizons: Computer Appoint- 
ments with editoriaL 
Legri Appointments: SoEritois, Com- 
mercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, Private & 
Public Practice. 

Lead La Creme for top legal secretaries. 
Public Sector Appointments. 


WEDNESDAY 


La Creme de la Creme and other secretarial 
appointments. 

Property: Residential, Town & Country, 
Overseas, Rentals, with editoriaL 
Antiques and Collectables. 


THURSDAY 


General Appointments: Management and 
Executive appointments with editorial. 

La Creme de ta Creme and other secretarial 
appointments. ■ 


FRIDAY 


Motors: A complete car buyer’s guide with 
editoriaL 

Business to Business: Business opportunities, 
franchises etc. with editoriaL 
Restaurant Guide. - 


SATURDAY 


Overseas and UK Holidays: VQIas/Gottages, 
Holds, Flights etc. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS 
PERSONAL COLUMN, INCLUDING 
RENTALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY. 


THE 


TIMES 


FiU m the coupon and atadb i n to your advertisement. I 

wniten on a separate piece of paper, allowing 28 tniem 1 
and spaces per tine. . 


; ‘r ; Mt...;. 


t-. .. ; 

fp' iV. 
M 


'V ■ 


I- ft 

Wr ' --/>• 


§ : Vri'. 


VORSCHK 911 SC SPORT. 1980. 
M mark, biark lrnn. taH- *89 
marts. mmFnvmL eM’rtirvowun 
roof ana wmoows. y een. MOT 
and Tax. 57.000 nu^-s. ITO 
nurkad aa new LllcOSO ONO 
Tet 0402 458977 


ALL MODELS REQUIRED. TOO 

pntr* for loo contblion rar* 
0245 87571 ITJ. • 


and spaces per ime. . S 

Rales are Linage £4.00 per tine (mm. 3 Kites); [ ) e ;■ 

Boxed Display £23 per angfe. column centimetre; T * 

Court & Social £6 per line. if ' 


All rales subject to 15% VAT. 

Send tic SbMey Msgrib, Group Ctestbed Advertise- 
meat Manages, Times Newspapers LfaL, PO Box 484. 
Vitgteta Street. Londoa El 9DD.. ^ 


Wepfooe (Daytime). 


i 1 "j 

i;H 


Dateofiosertkn. 


IT Access, ^ Visa, Amro or Dines carts. | 


iPi 

Vt a - 


BS 



TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 3D 1986 


i ruu a 


mmm 




■■MBiNIM 





SPQRT /UNIVERSTrY REST TLTS 


RESULTS FROM STUTTGART 


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*f ,'ti -I'.&C 

^ * AVr.’ r 

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^ • *— -1 




TO PLACE 
YOUR 

TRAVEL 

advertisement 

IN 

THE 

TIMES 

_ TRADE 
Advertisers 
1 tel 

# 1-481 1989 

ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 
01-481 9313 
TELEX 
925088 

PRIVATE 

ADVERTISERS 

TEL 

01-481 4000 

USB YOUR 
ACCESS 
OR 

BARCLAY 

CARD 


Times Portfolio Gold rules are 
as follows; 

1 Times Portfolio is free. 
Purchase of The Times is not a 
condition of caking pan. 

2 Times Portfolio list com- 
prises a group of public com- 
panies whose shares are listed 
on the Stock Exchange and 
quoted in The Times Stock 
Exchange prices page. The com- 
panies comprising that list wall 
change from day to day. The list 
(which is numbered 1 — 44) is 
divided into four randomly 
distributed groups of 1 1 shares. 
Every Portfolio card contains 
two numbers from each group 
and each card contains a unique 
set of numbers. 

3 Times portfolio ‘dividend* 
will be the figure in pence which 
represents the optimum move- 
ment in prices (Le. the lamest 
increase or lowest loss) or a 
combination of eight (two from 
each randomly distributedgroup 
within the 44 shares) of the 44 
shares which on any one day 
comprise The Times Portfolio 
list, 

4 The daily dividend will be 
announced each day and the 
weekly dividend will be an- 
nounced each Saturday in The 
Times. 

5 Times Portfolio list and 
details of the daily or weekly 
dividend will also be available 
for inspection at the offices of 
The Times. 

6 If the overall price move- 
mem of more than one 
combination of shares equals 
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claimants holding those 
combinations of shares. 

. 7 AH ctaflns are subject to 

scrutiny before payment- Any 




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defoced. tampered with or in- 
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& Employees of News Inter- 
national pic and its subsidiaries 
and of Europrint Group Limited 
(producers and distributors of 
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lowed to play Times Portfolio- 

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10 In any dispute. The 
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11 If for any reason The 
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Howtop4ay—Da3y Dividend 
On each day your unique set of 
eight numbers win _ represent 
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page. 

In the columns provided next 
to your shares note the price 
change (+ or ■), in pence, as 
published in that day's Times. 


The following students satisfied 
the academic requirements for 
the award of the degree of BA 
(Hons) or BA in a scheme of 
collaboration between the Open 
University and the University 
of Warwick. 

|A JHff")* ? A AMhetofl 1; S L Frost 
3 nr- B A Jamas 2 an. 

IA.-LC nstay- 

After listing the price changes 
of your eight shares for that day, 
add up all eight share changes to 
give you your overall total plus 
or minus (+ or -). 

Check your overall total 
against The Times Portfolio 
dividend published on the Stock 
Exchange Prices page. 

If your overall total matches 
The Times Portfolio, dividend 
you have won outright or a 
share of the total prize money 
staled for that day and must 
claim your prize as instructed 
below. 

How to play — Weekly 
Dividend 

Monday-Sat urday record your 
daily Portfolio total 
Add these together to deter- 
mine your weekly Portfolio 
total. 

if your total matches the 
published weekly dividend fig- 
ure you have won outright or a 
share of the prize money stated 
for that week, and must chum 
your prize as instructed below. 
How to dbtisn 

Telephone The Times Portfolio 
claims Ene 0254-53272 between 
10.00am and 330pm, on the day 
your overall total matches The 
Times Portfolio Dividend. No 
claims can be accepted outside 
these hours. 

You must have your card 
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folio claims line between the 
stipulated times. 

No responsibility can be ac- 
cepted for failure to contact the 
claims office for any reason 
within the stated boms. 

The above waaion m ap- 
<teay 




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In the sw ing: Johann Lindner, of Austria, abont to launch rite hammer TIM metres in yesterday’s qualifying throws 
dwing the European athletics championships in Stuttgart It was a throw good enough to get him into today’s final. 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL AND OTHER FIXTURES 


Kick-off an unless stated 

First division 

Coventry v Everton 

Liverpool v Arsenal — 

Luton v Newcastle 

Manchester Utd v Chariton _ 

Norwich v Sout ha mpton 

Nottingham Fv Watford 

Oxford v West Ham 

OPR v A VSte 

Sheffield Wed v Chelsea 

Tottenham v Manchester C — 
Wimbledon v Leicester 


Second division 

Birmingham v Derby 

C Palace v Stoke 

Grimsby v Bradford 

Leeds v Sheffield Utd - 

MIHwaN v Barnsley 

Oldham v Hu* — „ — 

Plymouth v Reading 

Portsmouth v Ipswich 

Shrewsbury v Blackburn 

Sunderland v Brighton — — 

WBA v Huddersfield 

Scottish premier division 

Aberdeen v Dundee 

Clydebank v Falkirk 


CM-vauxhall conference: A»rin- Aberdeen v Dundee 

dam V Boston; Sanwt v Sutton Utd; Clydebank v Falkirk 

v St ^en . 

stone; Scarooraugh vNiMMoton; Stafford Hamilton V MoffterwiN 

Hbernta.Hms 

VAUXKAU-OFO. LEAGUE: PMwiar H- 
vteten: Bondna v Windsor & Bon; Car- _ _. „ 
shMon v WaRiwneiow; CMwfch . v SoytfiaU; 

Hendon; Famborougn V Bromtey; Harrow * 


Htoemten v Hearts 

Edgware v Corlmtiian Casuals; Ctastam 
Utd v Met FoUor CracfconMl v FUtham; 

v Eritti and Alma Swartey v 
SouthalL Ctapmn v Yeadteg: Dwtoorou®! 

v Flackwal Heath; Merstham v Lflyton- 


TTirrd division 

Bournemouth w Newport 

Bristol R v Bolton 

Bury v Chester (3.15) 

Carlisle v York 

Chesterfield v Walsall 

Darlington v Mansfield 

Doncaster v Brentford 

Fulham v Blackpool 

Glffingham v Bristol C 

P Vale v Rotherham 

Wigan v Middlesbrough 

Scottish first division 

Brechin v Forfar 

Dunfermline v £ Fife 

Montrose v Airdrie 

Morton v Dumbarton 

PartickvCtyde 

Queen of Sth v Kfimamock 


Croydon; Ktefidi v Wokirwham; Slough jttgn afflgrd; Tring v Cherteay; Btfgws 
KkiQStonfan.- Tooting t Mteham v |«vSteines: Chtfiwm v vaudtM Mc&re; 
■yes; Worthing y St Anarw; Wycombe v Y. Porklng ^^gO" 1 and 


Hayes; Worthing v St Abans; Wycombe v 
Bognor Ynovii v Bishop's StorttonL 
MULTIPART LEAGUE: Bangor City v 
Honirtch; Barrow v MacctasIWd; Bwton v 
South Liverpool; Choriey v Rlnf; Goole v 
Caomarfon; Mattock v Mam; More- 
cambo v Buxton; Moseley v Southport; 
Oswestry v Hyde: WKton v Qainsborough; 
WOrfcsop v Woridngton. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Piwnter K- 
v U oas Bosingstoko v Folkestone; 
Bedworth v Wrawy: Bromsarove v Qos- 
KVt Chelmsford v Worcester Corhy v 
lytMbuy; Crawley v Kintfs Lynn; 
tartford v Alvecnuran; Reddtan v 
; araham; Safabuyv Dudley; Shepshod v 
temtvktea mtenhoS v Fisher. 
FOOTBALL COABMATXJN: Arsenal 
las v Bristol Rovers Res; Cheisaa Res v 
ddenham Res; Readng Res v Ports- 
mouth Res (at Kensington Rd, flam); 
Southampton Res v MOwaN Res; Watford 
R» v Norwich Bos; West Ham Roe; v 
Crystal Palace Res. 

SCOTTISH RESERVE LEAGUE: Prwater 
DMMR Celtic Rea v Rangers Res; 
Dundee Res v Aberdeen Res: Fwdrk Res 


Three Bridges; Horsham YMGA v Harin- 
gey Boro; RsdhD v Maidenhead Utd: 
Dover Attdetic v Tunbridge Wells; Motesay 
v Wick; Leatherhead v Eestbourne; 
Arundel v Rmamen CambeHoy w 
Shoreham; Tontxidge v Haywards Hseth; 
Homdean v Woking; Lanoog v Peace- 
haven; Thane! Utd v Lewes; Ashford v 
Steaming; Eastbourne Utd v Partflekl; 
Utd v Ctehestsr City; Andover v 
ports: Devizes v Famham Town; 
d Utd v VtaAshann Hawaii v 
Radstock; Broksnhum v Westhtiry; 
Ctandown v Abingdon Town; Shortwood 
Utd v MeUsham; Trowbridge v 
^oid: Cievedon v PauKxi Rovers; 
Manor Farm v Evesham Utd: 
Park v LlaneB; Ottery St Mary v 
Sattash Utd v Gloucester 


BUUMO SCENE EASTBW LEAGUE: 
Bramtrae v Watton ut* Bury v New- 
markte; Chattens v Colchester Utct C3ao 
»n v Theriont Havarhttl Rovers v 
Brantham Athletic Wisbech v Lowestoft 
COMBINED COUNTIES LEAGUE: Con- 
« Trophy: First Round: Frimtey Green 
CWpsteaa (Z-OOk Hartley twmney v 
rtey Town (2.00). Preoter DIvWok 
— £ Weytndge v Godaiming: Cotoham v 
Ash Utd; Cove v Malden Town; Crenlaigh 
v Chottum; Maiden Vale v Westfield; 
Virginia Wider v Farieign Rover*. 

NEME UWTED COUITOES LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier DiviaioiK Aresey v bdiUnoDoro; 


Kempston v 


Buckby. League KO Cup: BracMey v St 
hres; St Neots v Hfoham: Corby v 
Cogentxw; Stotfofd v samlord; Ihra- 


supef-Mare v Tomngton. 

SOUTHERN Mdtend DMetec 

Buckingham v Gr ant ha m ; Forest Green 
Rovers v Stourbridge; VS 
Hednestord. Southern DMsion: 
bury City v Watanoovffle; Dorehaswr v 
CorirttWan; Dunstable v Gravesend; Has- 


pston v CUney. Woottan h Raunds. 

Dhrtekai One: Fwd Sports v Blackstone; 
Newport Pegnail- v Coffloghem; Timken 
Atttrac v Baker Perkins; Timken Duston v 


Res; Momerwea Res v Hamaton Res St SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: 
Mkran Res V Dundee Utd Res. vision One; CambrktaevFUhanuChel 


SMRNOFF BUSH LEAGt*: CMunvfile v 
DisttUery: CDtentine v Gtontoran; Linfleld v 
Bsaymene. 

FA Cup pieBainaty rowed : Alnwick v 
Guisboraugh; Con sett v Armfieid PWn; 
FerryhB AadetkS v Dwftigton Cleveland 
Bridge; Ashtnmon v Seran Red Star 
Bridengton v TAntnc North SNaktt v 
Denaby Utd; Norton and Stockton An- 
cients v Newcastle Blue Star; Ryhopa v 
Farstey Celtic; Durham Cdy v Shhlon; 
Fleet Wood v CStheroe; NortheBerton V 
GuisJffy; Darwen v West Auckland; Lwig- 


Vteten One; Cambridge v FUham; Chelsea 
v Ipswich: G M ngh a mvNonwcInMHiwallv 
Portsmouth: Orient v Southend: OPR v 
WatKtd; Tottenham v Arsenal; West Ham 
v Charlton. Division Two: Bournemouth v 
Wimttedoo; Colchoster v Tooanham; 
Luton v Briditon; Oxford Utd v Crystal 
Palace; Southampton v Bristol Rovers; 
Southend v Nort hamp ton; Swindon v 

NORTHERN LEAGUE: 
Fbsi Dhtiafonc Oylh Spartans v Easmgfon 
“15): Crook Town v Chester ie Street; 
etna vBedtmgton Tamers: Hartlepool v 


roSEX LEAGUE: Brighttngseav Bowers; 
Burnham v Purfleec Convey Island v 
Stansted: Coggesnal v Woodlord; East 
Ham v MaMonTtron Manor v.Ctwkiwtdrd: 
Ford v Sawtxidgewonh: Halstead v 
Brentwood; wtthara v East Thurrock. 
NORTHERN COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 
North Fentnr v Lorn Eaton Utd: Bosun v 
Bridwigton Trinity: Bentley v Eastwood; 


HELLBRC LEAGLte: Pramtor DMsfort: 
Abingdon Utd v Moreton: Pegasus Ju- 


Fourth division 

MJersbot v Woiverbampton 

Burnley v Scunthorpe 

Cambridge v Halifax 

Cardiff v Rochdale — 

Crewe v Hereford ... 

Orient v Peterborough 

Preston v Swansea 

Wrexham v Lincoln 

Scottish second division 

Albion v Alloa 

Ayr V Arbroath 

E Stirling v Cowdenbeath 

Raith v Queen's Park 

Stenhsmulr v Meadowbank — - 

Stiffing v St Johnstone 

Stranraer v Berwick 


nkxs v Bicester Supermarine v Moms 
Motors: Thame Utd v Fafrlord; VHdng 
Sports v Sharpness; Wnttngftxri v 
Wantage; Yatev Hounslow. DivaJon One: 
Bishops Cleave v A wood Bradford; 
Carterton vHlghwonh; Cheltenham Town 
v Kintbury Rangers; Chipping Norton v 
Cheltenham Saracens Ckencestar v 
H«e»: Clanfiei v AJmorxfctoury (keenway; 
Eaeington Sports v Did cot ProssedStett 
V Badminton Pfckson; Punon v Wdfington. 

CRICKET 

B ritannic Assurance county 
chnmpfonehlp 

rtlJKWJffl, mWrrxjm HO overs) 

Derby: Dertrystore v Hampshire 
FttkeetariK Kent v Essex 
Lafoestar: Leicestorshire v Somerset 
Hovac Sussex v Noftinghamshins 
EdgbsstoK wanrickshke v MkkSesex 
Yormg i Cricketers Teat match 
Trent Bridge: England v S<1 Lanka 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
SMoro Lager Natkmal Laemie: Dudley 
Hffl V Wigan St Patrick's: Element v 
Hawonh;Lttgh Mkiers v Wtonh. MBom v 
Wodston; pfidngton’s v West Hufl. (aH 
230). 

OTHER SPORT 

CROQUET: Hunstanton tournament 
Parkstone tournament 
TENNIS: Yupo Cera Jersey Open 
tCaesaraan LTC. St SavioiX). 

SOtlASH: Warrington invitation ttarr- 
namam (War rin g t on SC). 


TOMORROW 
Third division Hew 

Swindon Town v Notts County Warwii 


Warwickshire 


Yorkshire 


Guteey; Darwen v West Auckland; Lang- Gretna v Beattngton Terriers: Karttapoolv 
ley Park Wettare vEvonwotxtThattdey v Bkmgp Auckland Petariee v Spemymoor 
NetheriWtf: Ashton Utd v Ossett Atoforr. Utd: South Bank v Brandon Utd; Whitby v 
Penrith v Gtossop: Accrington Stanley v Tow Law. Second Division: Bilinghani 
Lancaster CHy: Chaddemn v Mam; Synthoma v Esb Whnttng: Horden CW v 
Hkestsn v Errfey; Boot** v Baber: Bdmgham Town; Stockton v Shonon 
Btrscough v IGrttiy; Fdrrnby v ~ 

Cwzen Ashton v Armthorpe 




Fourth division 

Northampton v Torquay UW 

Scottish premier division 

Rangers v Celtic 


Cohvyn Bay v Rossendala Utd; 
v Bridgnorth: RadctBfo Boro v Eastwood 
Hentey: Sutton Town v SMybriolge Caltks 
WMsaH Wood vSketnwsdtoe lift Bteton 
. . _ AmOM: Leicester Utd v Friar 

Lane OftTfottiwefi TMdais: Otoswinford 
v Bokhnsre St Miehaei; WtiBngboro v 
Sutton Cokffiekf; Coventry Sporting v 
Rating Club Warwick; M^igata 

Banbury Utd; Me Oak Rowers v' 
ion; Bourne Town v “ 

Roms v Wohmrton; Rushs* Olympic v 
Moor Green; Sptitino Utd v Fkoshden: 

Boro v uwon Keynes Bora; 
Bsnnn Rovars v Saffron w**Jon; Hemet 
Hempetead v Bakiock: March Town uu v 
Hbto n: Berkhamatsd v nptree Utd: 
Febc&loew v By Chy; Roysun v FlncMey; 
Avetey v Homchurtit; BasHdon Utd v 




Potion Utd; Hoddaadon v Great Yar- Cadord Wanare; 


LMnaard Ath; Minariead v Exmouth: 
Frome v Dewksh. Fbet DMskxc Caine v 
Glastonbury; Heawree Utd v Bath CHy: 
LarkhaB Ath v Bmore; Odd Down v 
Keynsham Tiverton v Weymouth; War- 
minster v Portway Bristol; Writ - " 
YeovK Backwel t m v Ilfracombe. 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE; I 

Bret rowd: Bromtey Alh v Waltham 
: Southgate Ath v ramant Premier 
k BeaoonafMf Utd v Crown and 
Manor: Brimsdown Rovers V Amersham: 
Damon v Uyssns: HactwaH v Beckun 
Utd; Norttnvood v BarMngsidB. DMakn 
One: Brob Barnet v Ryt Arsenti; 
Chtngtord v PenhU Standard; North 
Greenford v Phoenix Sports; Old Roan v 


mouth; Choshuni v Rabham Sudbury v 
Gorieaton; DW erie ay v Stowmarket; 
Harwick and PV Colfiar ROW. Soham 


Sppr« V 


Chigwea RoBca; Walthamstow Trojans v 
Swswy: Wandsworth vrtiameGmead. 
SAKS NORTH WEST COUNTIES 


Town Rangers vHBftlord; Bonham Wood LEAGUE: Brat D Mtfcm: Leek v Layiand 
v EgMm; Burnham and Rayners Lane; Motors; VWnsfofd Utd v St Helens. 


CRICKET 

Britannic Assurance County 

Championship ( 11.0 to 6.30, 
110 overs minimum): Hove: 
Sussex v Nottinghamshire. 
John Player Special. League 
(2.0, 40 overs): 

Heanor: Derbyshire ' v 
Hampshire 

Moroton-in-Marsh: 

Gloucestershire v 

Northamptonshire 
Folkestone: Kent v Essex 
Okf Traffoftf: Lancashire v 
Surrey 

L ei c est er Leicestershire v 
Somerset 

Lord’s: Middlesex v 
Worcestershire 


Tour match (12.0 to 7.0): Scar- 
borough: D B Close's XI v New 
Zealanders 

Young Cricketers Test Trent 
Bridge: England v Sri Lanka 
Warwick under-25 competi- 
tion final: Edgbaston: Surrey v 
Yorkshire 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
stamn DM* atanptorartpe Barrow v 


r bi' 1 ‘ 


Waketittd: Oktwn v Leeds: St Helens v 
Lttgti; Warrington v CasdetoRfc Wigan v 
salbid. Dtaafofl Two: BnBnl^T v 
WtHQhaven (3a0); Oewshurv v Biaeknmi 
031* HuddersM 
Runcorn v Hunslat; 

SwxuonvBat 

(K30); York v 

OTHER SPORT 

AMEJ8CAN FOOTBALL.- BudwoserBowt; 
wroatfim Olympians v London Ravens 
(Crystal PaJiceL 

TENNIS: Middlesex closed mentor 
ehampkanattps Final stages (North 

JMWINQ: Pqpiar and BlaekwaB regatta. 
SQUASH: Warri n gton jnvttaOon tnur- 
nament (Warrington SC). 


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RACING 


Pennine Walk 
to maintain 
British record 
in Million 


By Robert Carter 


Pennine Walk can become 
the the third British-trained 
winner of the Budweiser- 
Arlington Million in the last 
four years at Arlington Park, 
Chicago, tomorrow. The race 
is due off at 10.35pm BST and 
will be shown live on British 
television for the first time. 
Channel 4’s programme be- 
gins at JO. 10 . 

Pennine Walk has never 
raced beyond the 8 ft furlongs 
over which be won the 
Diomed Stakes in June but 
this is not necessarily a draw- 
back. The key to success in the 
Million is the gaining and 
holding of a good early po- 
sition as Teleprompter did last 
year. 

Tolomeo, the other British 
winner in 1 983, was in the first 
three most of the lime and 
quickened through on the 
inside as they straightened for 
home. Pat Eddery, who rode 
that colt to victory, will be on 
Pennine Walk, who has won 
the Jubilee Handicap and the 
Queen Anne Stakes, as well as 
the Diomed, this year. He is 
by Persian Bold, whose prog- 
eny, led by Bold Arrangement, 
Persian Tiara and King's Is- 
land. already have a good 
record in top company in the 
■United States at distances 
beyond a mile. 

Pennine Walk is preferred 


to the other two British hopes, 
Maysoon, a tame second to 
Park Express in the Nassau 
Stakes, and Teleprompter, 
who has not won in six outings 
since last year’s Million. 

Theatrical, who represents 
Ireland, is without a win since 
May of last year and appears a 
little out of his depth on his 
recent form. If there is to be a 
European threat to the selec- 
tion, it may come from Over 
The Ocean, who made a 
timely return to winning form 
in the Prix Gontaut-Biron-at 
Deauville two weeks ago. 

There is little to choose 
between several of the Ameri- 
can runners, the pick of whom 
hail from California. That 
stale supplied both John 
Henry and the 1982 winner, 
Renault, and is strongly repre- 
sented this time by Palace 
Music, Zoffany, A1 Mamoon, 
Esirapade and Alpbabatim. 

Palace Music, who won the 
Dubai Champion Stakes in 
] 984 and was third to Pebbles 
in that race last year, has 
always been a horse for the big 
occasion. He is held by A 1 
Mamoon and Zoffany on their 
running in the Eddie Read 
Handicap over nine furlongs 
at Del Mar three weeks ago. 
However, this trip should suit 
him better than that pair. 



Pennine Walk ami Pat Eddery, seen here wramng the Diomed Stakes, team up again tomorrow in the Arlington MMion 


Well-bred Reference Point 


Dunlop filly 
can lift 


can make winning debut Drize 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


BIG RACE FIELD 


Televised: 10.35pm 

Going: good to fast 
Draw: low numban best 

BUDWHSER-ARLMGTON MILLION (Grade I: £419,580: 1m 2f turf) 
(14 runners) 


3- 11311 AL MAMOON (B RibsKXW) R Franfcal 5-9-0 
2-31204 PALACE MUStCrB Hunt) 

0200-02 THEATRICAL (B Hrestonete 

4- 23210 ESTRAPADE (A Paulson) (■ 

32-1210 IKVULGEIADansIGMosdKmi 
1201012 UPTOWN SWELL MraV Kraft M 


I- 23301 

231013 ■ 

20-2333 TELEPROMPTEH 
00-1113 PENMNEWALKI 

II- 4112 ZOFFAN Y (AM 
1143322 ALPHABAM 



i Derby) J Watts (GB) 6-81 
I me MNfarchoslJTrae (GB) 4-8-0 _ 
I J Gosden 6-9-0. 


i FAima) J Gostfen 5*0. 


MEddeqrlfl 

EDcMwMSsyt 11 
LPmcayJrtt 


301232 MAYSOON (Maktoum AHttHoun) M SUM (GB) 3-B-2 CHcCmn13 

3-1 Zoffany. 4-1 Tetaproireitar. 11-2 Maysoon. 6-1 Over The Ocean, 7-1 Pennine 
Walk. 8-1 At Mamoon. 10-1 Theatrical, 12-1 Palace Music. 

• 7l«afrCN. Pataca Mfasfc. Etmpade andAI Mamoon wH be coupled in pert-nMuol bailing 


Henry Coal looks poised to 
delight the many who annually 
support Variety Club day at 
Sandown by .landing a double 
there this afternoon with Loch 
Seafbrth (335) and Reference 
Point (4.10V- 

Now that Power Bender has 
been withdrawn. Franca 
Vittadiai has a orach better 
chance of winning the Ladies 
Memorial Stakes on LOCH 
SEAFORTH. Nevertheless, she 
will stm need to be on her guard, 
even oh this ranch-improved 
three-year-old, lest Amanda 
Harwood coaxes Effigy bade to 
form. For, make no mistake. 
Effigy wonld be a real threat if 
he could reproduce his sparkling 
form of last season. 

The champion jockey, Steve 
Cautbeii, is charged with land- 
ing today's nap on the weD-bred 
REFERENCE POINT, who 
makes his debut in the EBF 
Heart of Variety Stakes. Recent 
gallops with the likes of 
Hendeka and Russian Steppe, 
both winners in the past week, 
have pointed to this son of MID 
Reef and Home On The Range 
bring able to make a winning 
debut at the expense of Brother 
Patrick. Old Maestro and Port 
Helene. The latter looked woe- 
fully short of pace when she was 
trounced by Iosifa at Goodwood. 

Half an hour later TOP 
RANGE, who is the first foal oat 
of Home On The Range, the 
1981 Sun Chariot Stakes win- 


ner, can put the finishing 
touches to breeder Lonis 
Freedman's day by winning the 
Variety Club Maiden Stokes, 
albeit carrying the colours of 
Victor Raimn. 

Last time out Top Range was 
beaten a length at Newmarket, 
when trying to give 101b to 
HARD ASERON, who now has 
an undeniable chance of winning 
the International Leisure Group 
Stakes carrying only 8st 41b. 

Willie Carson will also be 
fancying his chances in the same 
race on Princess Nawaal follow- 
ing that victory in the EMrisham 
Stokes at Epsom in June. Sub- 
sequently, oat of her depth in 
group company in France, Prin- 
cess Nawaal should appreciate 
this drop in class. 

f firmly befieve, though, that 
Carson's best hope of winning a 
race during Hhfev a«in—i spon- 
sored gala lies with 
ALACAZAM in the Sportsman 
Qab Handicap. Following wins 
at Wolverhampton and Salis- 
bury, John Spraring*s improved 
foer-year-old looks to be le- 
niently treated with only 8st lib. 
Nonetheless, 1 still venture the 
suggestion that even Alacaam 
could find that habitual front- 
runner, Floyd, iliflimlt to peg 
back IT David Elsworth has him 
on song. The fact that he has 
booked Steve Caothen in di cates 
be has. 

Spearing is also hopeful that 
Carson wOl win the Ladbroke 


Holidays Handicap for him on 
Cree Bay but in this case I prefer 
DERRY RIVER, another fine 
example of Gerald Cottrell's 
skilful training when he beat the 
subsequent Epsom winner. Per- 
fect Timing, at Newbury a 
fortnight ago. 

At Ripon the choice for the 
Bayford Fuels Hornblower 
Stakes would appear to Be 
between either the unbeaten hot 
under-exposed Whipper In or 
the modi more experienced 
Whippet, who was beaten less 
«faau a length by Carol's Trea- 
sure and Bag O' Rhythm at 
York 10 days ago. Rock solid 
form gives WHIPPET the edge 
and the same applies to IM- 
PERIAL PALACE (430) and 
LYPHLAW (5-0) in later races 
on the Yorkshire track. 

Across the Pennines at Ches- 
ter, I give Abigail Richards a 
good chance of winning the 
Berry Magi coal Matchless 
Nursery on PEN BAL LADY, 
who ran so weD to finish a dose 
third in a race at York 

recently. 

The same budding jockette 
partners Gulfland in the Berry 
Magkoal Surefire Handicap but 
here she may well have to play 
second fiddle to Siev e Dawson 
on TRAPEZE ARTIST. 

Finally, the softer ground is 
sore to suit STAR OF A 
GUNNER, my selection for die 
Berry Magicoal Snnseeker 
Handicap. 


From Onr Irish Racrag 
Correspondent, Dublin 

I Want To Be, without a win 
this season, can put matters 
right in the group three Meld 
Stakes at the Omagh this 
afternoon. 

Last season I Want To Be 
carried off the Park Hill Stakes 
at Doncaster, taking the lead a 
quarter of a mile from home and 
going on to beat Kashi Lagoon 
bat three lengths. 

The Park HOI of 198S clearly 
did not measure up to the 
standard normally associated 
with the race but John Dunlop's 
filly, having shown her ability to 
act on any surface, will be very 
hard to beat here. 

Early in the year Ramich John 
won twice in the style ofa mare 
that had made substantial 
improvement from three to four 
years but when she went up in 
class her limitations were ex- 
posed. 

A bigger danger to my selec- 
tion could be Popularity, who 
disappointed when only fifth to 
Colorspin in the Gill town Stud 
Irish Oaks but who had pre- 
viously won two races 

Yet another English runner 
with obvious prospects is Matt 
McCormack’s Quel Esprit in the 
Anglesey Stakes. He foiled by 
2 ft lengths to give 61b to 
Dominion Royale in the 
Nisbapour Omagh Stokes Iasi 
month but is more kindly 
treated by today's conditions 


CHESTER 


Televised: 1.45, 235, 245 
Going: good to soft 
Draw: low numbers best 

145 BERRY MAGICOAL SUREHRE HANDICAP 

(£3,1 1 6: 1m 4f 65yd) § runners) 

2 0112 GULFUIND (C-D) G tetectord-Gortlofi 5-9-8 

Mtasa«cbM 9 ( 7)5 

3 11 ROUBAYD R Johnson Houghton 387(6aic) Reid 3 

4 0022 TRAPEZE ARTIST (C-D) NVtoora 5-8-13 -Summon 2 

5 2120 TWICE BOLD N Qflagtan 348 MHMsI 

8 2140 REGALSTEH.R Hofinsti8ad8-7-7_ A(fofino*(7)4 

5-4 Gutftend, 52 Roubayd. 4-1 Trapeze Arttat, 8-1 Twice 
BoW. 12-1 Regal Steal 

FOHto GULFLAND (83)2 1 2nd to Witchcraft (8-4) at York. Earfier 
(57) beat REGAL STEEL (8-1) 1KI over cotra and distance 
(£3746. good to firm. Jtey 11. 6 ran}. ROUBAYD (8-12) HI 
Leicester winner f rom Am bassador (8-7) (im M, £2616. good. 
Aug 18. 4 ran). TRAPEZE ARTIST (58) 2fcl 2nd of 9 to PacSus 
g-T) at Lmgnetd flm Bt £2763. good to firm. Aug 16). TWICE 
BOLD 6 th afYorklast time(im Previously ( 88 ) 21 2nd to Rva 
Fartftmjjs (9-6) at Newmarket ( 1 m 4f, £11530, good to fam, Aug 

SetectiofE TRAPEZEARTIST * 

Chester selections 

By Mandarin 

1.45 Trapeze Artist —15 Star Of A Gunner. 2.45 
Pen Bal Lady. 3.15 Maj’d. 3.45 Eye Sight 4.15 
Collyweston. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
1.45 Gulfland. 2.15 Safcera. 2.45 Pen Bal Lady. 

3.15 Misk. 3.45 Queen Of Battle. 4.15 
Collyweston. 

Michael Seely’s selection: 1.4S Twice Bold. 

2.15 BERRY MAGICOAL SUN SEEKER HANDICAP 
(£3.688: 7f 122yd) (18) 

2 0043 STAH OF A SU MMER H Hotter 6-8-7 jRtfdS 

3 0000 CORN SraEETJ Bosley 554 W Ryan 9 

4 OOI HARAABAH (USA) K Thomson Janas 3-9-2 

ARkflnB(7}8 

7 3410 SAFEENA (0-0) M Jarvis 3-9-0 W Woodafcj 2 

8 2102 DARWTJC-O) E Wewnes 4-6-13 M Tefabatt (7) 18 

9 0200 ROMANTIC UNCLE H Wharton 3-9-12— J Carrofi (7) 7 

10 030* TOP WWG J Hkxley 3-8-12 HHMs 12 

11 1430 CHEEAG£RJC-D)W Wharton 4*11 NCatritete 17 

12 0320 MOORES METAL R HdVnsftead 6 -B -8 A CdaM (7) 11 

13 0340 KNIGHTS SECRET (BF) M H Eastertiy 886 


good Aug 15). 
3nL KNIGHT'S 


_ SECRET behind fast time; Eartfar (7-11) had 

CREEAGER (8-4) 4KI back in 3rd when Thirsk wfanar (7f. 


firm, May; 
MOORES P 


METAL (9-2) 71 beck In 5th and O 
atune 8 th latest start I 


£4182. 

HI away 5th and 
I XI course and 
with MOORES 
(7-13) 7th. 
21 3rd Of 12 to 
tofirntAugl)- 


r 31 . 14 ran), with IDLE TMES 
l METAL ( 8 - 8 ) 7th. CREEAGER 
distance victory ow KNIGHTS 
0-2) 71 

FORMA' 

Retgnbeau (8-7) at Goodwood 
APRIL FOOL (7-7) was 7th. 

Steacto ROMANTIC UNCLE 

245 BERRY MAGICOAL NURSERY HANDICAP (2- 

Y-O: £5,119: 7f) (10) 

2 2113 PEN BAL LADY (DJGPrfchartGorton 9-7 

Atakrtl Hdwds (71 2 

4 13 WELSH ARROW J Winter 9-5 GDnflMd 6 

5 0111 MYBUOOYmRJWMamsM HHhS 

6 10 DUTCH AUCTION LPIggott9-4 B Crowley 7 

7 130 THENOAN R HoBnshead 8-9 W Ryan 9 

10 1 SHADE OF PALE (D)PHaatara 62 GFranchB 

13 0012 PHARAOH BLUE pfc Brittain 7-13 H Retorts 10 

14 2041 MAZURKAH0VA C Thornton 7-7 NCatSMel 

15 044 MY 5EHBMDE (USA) J W Watts 7-10_ L Ctatnock 4 

18 003 BREWtiTUtt M H Eas»rt»y7-10 AMackayS 

7-2 My Buddy. 4-1 Pen Bal Lady. 5-2 Shade Of Pals, 8-1 
Welsh Anew, 8-1 Mazurksnova. 161 Ptnruah Blue. 12-1 
Brewin Time, 14-1 others. 

FORM: PEN 8 AL LADY (9-1) \U 3rd of 14 to Guff 
York (71. £4253. good. Aug 19. 14 ran). MY BUDDY 
(TQ.masr ~ 


at 
a wh> 
DUTCH 


narkiOsund (71). most recently 
AUCTION finished last in nursery Mowing Jin 
win (9-0) from Green's OfcJ Master (9-0) (pt. £964. good to firm. 
July 16. 8 ran). SHADE OF PALE (811) beat Trynova(&5) Kiln 
Newmarket seller (71, £1786. good to firm. Aug 8 . 12 rant 
PHARAOH BLUE (80) 41 2nd of fitoBen Led (S-fifat Newcastle 
(7L £2851. good. Aug 25). MAZURKANORA (85) tod BREWM 
TIME ( 8 nf 3 Jack m 3rd when Haydock winner (61. £1516, 
. 10 ran) 

; PEN BAL LADY 

3.15 L1NENHALL STAKES (2-Y-O: £2,788: 6f) (4) 


1 2201 MffiK (USAHQ) H Cad) 9-6_ 

7 33 MAJD P Wahvyn 811 

10 0 RUMBOOGEC Brittain 611. 


3 

4 

H Robots 1 


12 0000 SUPREME OPnMBTtBlREIfaacOCk 811 S Dawson 2 
4-7 Me*. 2-1 Mafd. 181 Rumbooge. 281 Supreme 

Optim i st 

3.45 ROUGE ROSE MAIDEN FBJJES STAKES (3- 
Y-O: £1 ,927: 1m 2f 85yd) ( 8 ) 

5 3 EYE SKHTR Johnson Houghton 811 JRtid8 

8 0044 UNASH G Wragg 81 1 PSUlElktayA 

10 03 HAKE tt SHARP A Stewart 811 M Roberts 6 

13 4400 l«TS MAINWARMG (FRJ S Norton B-11 _ B Crocstoy 5 

16 2234 QUEEN OF BATTLE M Ryan 611 NDsyl 

17 m SATW AND Sax A Baiey 811 M««er7 

18 -COO SHUJUN (USA1(B)H Thomson Janes 811 — M Ifite 3 
CM) TRANSFORM W Jams 


21 


1811 . 


D Arbuttmot 484 
884. 


14 2030 FORMA1UNE 

15 0140 BURHAAMP 

18 0030 DLE TIMES W 

19 3)303 APRIL FOOL (8) LCottren 4-7-12 
21 W» YOUNG BRUSSJEJheringiDn 4-7-10., 


AM»ckay14 7-4 Eye Sight 81 Make It Sharp. 82 Queen Of Battle. 81 
G DnffieM 6 Linash. 81 Shujun. 181 others. 


4-7-13. 


. Paid Eddery 1 
— J Lowe 10 
. T Lang (7) 15 
S Dawson 4 


?? ^ ARE YOU G UM.TY M Ryan 3-7-8 . — G Bartwea (^13 


J Berry 187-7 


J Quinn ( . . 
G French 16 


25 0222 OIOYSTON ^ 

27 0000 RBiOiBRAHCE R Peacock 67-7- 
81 Star Of A Gunner. 11-2 Dsmtt. 81 Sateara. 81 
Haraobah, 181 Moores MetaL Knghts Secret 12-1 OJ.Oyston. 
Creeager. 14-1 Butuaki. FOrmatune, Gam Street 281 others. 


FORM: HARAABAH ( 88 ) 
with MOORES METAL ( 8 : 
SAFSRA 6 th fasti 


«at O I Oyst on (87) li at Cattenck 
_ ,7th (71, EM3. good to firm. July 24. 9 

ran). SA^£RA 6 th fast time; prwiousty (8-9) beat Hymn Of 
HarteTO (812 ) iiovar course am distance (£3247. good. July 12 . 

7 ran). ROMANTIC UNCLE tolo« torn since ( 6 -et 2nd to 
Doomanc here f7f.£3960. soft May 8 , 9 ran), with HARAABAH 


4.15 PARADISE MAIDEN CLAIMING STAKES (3- 
Y-O: 71 122yd) (11) 

1 0430 NORTHERN GUNNER W Janis B-0 A Mackey 1 

2 0000 SCWTllXATOR ffl) C Booth 80 JfitattHasfl 

3 0000 CHARDONNAY D Labig 811 — JRbMII 

6 0-0 LE MANS J Wfeori 8-8. PMdEddwyS 

7 2002 SnZCARRALDO R HMKH 1 88 M Robert* 4 

8 0000 STATE JESTER WEfasy 88 JLOM2 

9 00 COLLYWESTON M Prescott 87 G DofMd S 

10 0000 EVER SO SHARP JP Smith 88 W Woods® 1C 

11 0444 GRWESGHLJ Hindley 8-5 MHMsS 

13 20 BOLD FURY (B) (W) P Hastam 8-0 G French 7 

14 0 LADY STC1IAHC (B) P Hastam 7-9 JCnkr(7)9 

2-1 SrCccarratta 7-2 Nonhem Gunner. 4-T Grlmssgdl, 13-2 

Bold Fury. 181 Cturdonruy. 12-1 Sdntifator, 281 others. 


HEREFORD 


Going: good to firm 

2.15 DTNMORE NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m 4f) 
(12 runners) 

i oo/i anwAMPTONKnFYansay 8n-5 RCrare 

3 008 CAIBLA’S CHOICE 5 Mem- 61612 MrTMdadifT) 

5 SHAMROCK MASTER MOfirer 81 61 2 J Duggan 

6 SULPHUR BFWOws 81812 to T Stephenson (7) 

7 03-P UTOPIAN G Roe 81812 MrCLusnden 

8 OFF BAY POND GGrawy 4-1810 GMcCosrt 

10 008 CHALET WAlitGG D GandoilO 6167_.„ — 

11 0/P- GMGEROOED taker 18187 N Coleman 

12 KAGAME ROONEY Mss 5 Brown 810-7 . 


7 POT TDUOLBOYJ Edwards 7-11-3 Whn(0 

8 -242 TURKANA (BF) W Casey 811-3 GManatfi 

9 44B GRAY TORBAY EH Owen lun 81812 R Strong* 

10 02-0 MISS PRAGUE O L Wttams 12-1612 R r ' 


1 1-30 WSDC TIMES 
4 012- Ti 
6 P-02 NATIVE 


RDonnfa( . 
PDever 


13 PFP* PME GYPSY P Bowden 8187 — 

14 0 Bas ANGEL RHoArtiead 4-185 

15 NDIAN VANT1TR FMiows 4-165 ~ MbnJawFeftMis 
4-9 Gomhanpun. 81 Gamdte's Choice. 81 Chalet 

Watde^. 12-1 Bata Angst 14-1 Shamrodk Master. 181 others. 

Hereford selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Combampton. 2.45 Repetitive. 3.15 Official 
Dress. 3.45 W Six Times. 4. 1 5 Carol's Music. 4.45 
. Dick's Fblly. 

2.45 EARD1SLAND SELLING HURDLE (£529: 2m) 
(6) 

GMcCemt 
— CSnRb 


7-4 Lord Latrence. 11-4 Jtmmlny Quicfctt. 4-1 Turicana, 
11-2 Othcal Dress. 81 Grey Rose Bay. 181 others. 

3.45 RUSS WATKINS HANDICAP CHASE (£2,082: 
2m 41) (7) 

) W Kemp 811-10 R J Begum 

)MHmnqu(a8160 B0o*ltag(7) 
t (USA) (C-O) Mra W Sykes 8 160 

7 PF-4 HARANZ1 J Coteton 8160 JSfaheni 

12 P28 ROUGH ESTMATE V Bishop 16160 CMmn 

13 3P/Q CHESTNUT PSUNCEP Pritchard 11-160. DCWaj 

14 008 AYRESOMEkBSSBrotm 11-160 CTeRwright(7) 

2-1 W Six Times, 11-4 Native Break, 7-2 Takeafence. 

11-2 Mannd. 281 Rough Esttmate. 25-1 Chestnut Prince. 
381 Aiyasome. 

4.15 YARSOP CONDmONAL JOCKEYS NOVICE 
HURDLE (£548: 2m) (12) 

2 060 BYRNES GROVE (BJDtimCaBo 7-1 1-0— TWofcyP) 

3 008 CAROL'S MUSIC A James 5-1 1-0 — 

5 2-03 HAODAX (USA) BPaBng 811-0 C Evans 

7 064 ARMORADRJuctas 4-1612 Judy Bfakeney (5) 

8 604 VENTURE TO REFORM (BF) A JWiiSGn 4-1612 

9 8 CUONDA JT^ 6169. Jacqid Other 


11 


MAGIC FANTASY R Brown 6169- 


P 6 P 6 ADATTS STROKE GGraeey 4-11-8- 
31 HA0D0NLAD( 


03 STEP OH H 
4 BAG J 
0 MET/ 


8167 

6162 


C Cox 
JSuthem 


13 


RULE CVMnonMBBr 8162 

K Mooney 

0 HBCITTIVE (USA) M Pipe 8162™, — P Scudamore 


4-5 Heddon Lad, 82 Stop On, 7-1 Bao. 181 MetaKwoods 
Peadars Shake. 


12 084 OUTWOOD LASS (B)B Weis 6189. 

13 32/ RICH RETURN R Hodges 6169 

15 /OB- StVER BIPfffiSS PrSyward 6168- 

18 FP- DONNALDen(BlRlM 4-167 SI 

18 06 LADY KK1ANE NGasatae 4-167- 

11-4 Venture To Reform. 100-30 Haddok. 81 Rich Return, 
13-2 Lady KRlane. 81 CaroTs Music. 161 Annonid, SBvn 
Ernprcea. 14-l Byrnes Grove. 181 others. 

4.45 TARRINGTON HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,226: 
2m) (7) 


Rufa. Repetitive. 161 


• - .. 


^15 HOLE IN THE WALL NOVICE CHASE (£1 ,508: 
2m 4f) (9) 

1 P61 JtMMMYOUCWrTForafar 811-10 HDaAes 

3 00=2 COUNTRY SPARK PPrtuheid 81 1-3 DCMun 

4 26F LOftQLAURS«E(BF)DGandotto7-11-3 

ssmrihEedee 

5 3P-4 OFFICIAL DRESS M Diver &-1 1-3 — - — ._ JDoMto 

6 80P SENOT MAGWHCQ MT 5 MBtCbaga 811-3 NBahoega 


J. 


1 M3 DICK’S FOLLY 
3 11-2 REDGRAVE 

5 0-P0 BALLYWESTR 

6 048 LITTLE SL0to>(D) 


1 7-11-10™™™-- B Powell 
JM Pipe 5-1 1-3 MPftmM 
Lll-1 HDntee 


Ncholson 4-1610 

w 

M Eekfey 610-3 

Mrs VTeal 6160 JOuggaa 


B -113 WALHAN 

a 060 : . . . . 

10 008 OUR CMCKL^TTE (D) R DIcMn 4-160— P 
62 fiedmeve Artist 11-4 Wathan. 10830 Oidt'S Folly. 
182 LtttteSoop. 12-1 BaUymst. 14-1 Ottf CMeklettt. 
161 Tnsgeirfog. 


RIPON 


Going: soft, with heavy patches 
Draw: 5f~6f low numbers 


5-63- 


28 800 THATCHERED JBertyS 

27 -400 JUSTABiTin(DlNrWEuMbvi 
OUCKEN THEBID J WMer 58T1 


best 


230 SUNSHINE COACHES HANDICAP (£1,725: 
1m 41) (10 runners) 

1 0240 l£DN ID) N Tender 4-810 NmHakfarS ' 

4 -031 SQHAtt. (USA) (C1H Thomson Jones 382. A Murray 4 

9 0010 NORTHBtNi£st(01H WTufaig 4-89 M Birch 6 

10 2030 THE YOMPERfFRJJ Parkas 4-&3 S Webster 2 

11 030 BAYTWOH &>hngtdge 3-6-8 MRkaiMrlO 

14 0010 DKK KNIGHT (B) ID) Klwxy58S AShouBsQIS 

16 0230 CARVERYAIfoe884 WRSwMmml 

21 0000 GL£NDERRY(B)(QH Jones 4-80 S Morris 7 

5 0000 BREGUET E tncKa 3-7-8 — ■ 


25 0000 RAPtOAN M HEasteitJf 5-7-7 


GCeiter(3J9 


81 Carvwy, 7-2 Soto*. 81 Leon. 61 Baytkio. 182 Dick 
Knight 81 Northern Rider. 181 The Tamper. 161 others. 


Ripon selections - 

By Mandarin 

2.30 So bail. 3.0 Rhabdomanoer. 3.30 Golden 
Guilder. 4.0 Whippet. 4 JO Imperial Palace. 5.0 
Lyphlaw. 5.30 Highest Peak. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.30 SohaiL 3.0 Crown Justice: 3.30 Quicken The 
Bid. 4.0 Whippet. 4 JO Bath. 5.0 SpringwelL 5.30 
Hamper. 

Michael Seely's selection: 4.0 Whippet. 


3.0 FRIENDS OF THE VARIETY CLUB SELLING 
STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,380: 6f) (24) 

2 0120 CHANTILLY DAWN (80) RWNMw 81 

KBfwkdMw(5)15 

3 1002 SHARPHAV EN (O) M Britton 8 T KOwfayM 

JUSTICE NT ' * 


H Fry 14 

4-82. JHeaedMe I 

30 800 OUCXEN TllE'BtQJ Winin' 88 fl->— ASboulfa(S) 5 

33 0004 WARTHLL LADY MBntttin 4-7-11 KDMM4 

36 000/ COSTOCK BUNNY JGkwW 87-7- SB Win m 15 

38 0M0 PORT MKT A Jams 4-7-7. T CroWe (QM 

39 2300 WESBREE BAY(B)N ByCTOft 4-7-7 G0MM17 

42 0000 ACKA* BOY OMottalt *7-7 P Butte (1)2 

43 0000 NAME THE GAME A Potts 4-7-7— — MLTliaain7 
82 Henry's Venture, 7-2 Gotten Grtder, H-2 Rasta 

□idans. Top ftot 61 Just A Bk, 181 Maranfita, 11-1 Jonn' 
Pat: 281 others. 

4.0 BAYFORD FUELS HORN BLOWER STAKES 

(2-Y-O: £4^480:5t)(6) 

3 1201 FULLOFPWDEiptMH 

5 4000 PANBOY ( 8 ) (DJ T Faetwst 811 

6 1 B MPPER W (C-D) J Ettwrington 811 

7 0003 WHPPErmCBnttam&TI. 

10 33 SWING SWGBBBRHWhitng 85- 

11 004 THE GREAT DUTCH RWIMakw 88 
84 Whfoprt, 11-4 WWpper In. 7-2 FUl Ol Prlcta. 182 The 

Greet Match, 81 Swing Stager, 381 Psnboy. 

4.30 PLAYTIME POLLYNUT HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£1,725: 1m) (15) 

3 0024 GOLDEN ANCONA (B) E Ekfin 87 E Geests 5 

8 0034 CHARLTON KMGS (I^A) (ffl (q R HoMieSd 94 

S Poke 13 

9 0211 MPBBAL PALACE (D)CTHder 81 0M MWoat TI2 

12 0440 HAITI MU. W Wharton 811 AShw*«P)7 

15 -000 PROIBUDER (ffl P WMwyn 89 - N Howe 14 

19 -001 PRINCESS ANCRuMBW DCtopmen 8-9 DWcheSa 11 

24 0042 BATH J Toler 8-4 VRSrttoal 

28 800 COVBIBMM Camacho 83 N Coanorion 15 

31 0003 MC0U0 Jimm Rtmendd 84) MLTtaawlO 

32 2000 AFFAITAT1 (GER) E fwse 8-0 N BeecroRZ 

33 0040 GARDA'S GOLD M Brittain 7-13 : KDarigS 

M ,pwrt4 

36 0000 BEAR'S REVENGE WHOiden 7-1 2 RMocreffiB 

NRvS 

7-9 j. .Q Carter (3) 3 


_ MBin*4 
MKnmarB 

.A Money 2 

WR5wMnrn5 

DMchoOal 

- DMcKenraS 


34 0000 PAULS SECRET Oenys Smith 7-12.. 

36 0000 BEAR'S REVENGE WHOiden 7-12. 

37 1031 GRANBANGUS (B) K Inn 7-T1 0od. 

38 040 SEAIERE M TompUns 74. 


611. 


. ADtamyig 
S Webster 17 
_T Lucas 21 
8 


0 CROWN. _ 

15 0400 JUST A DECOY NBycrtjft^-11. 

16 00 MASTER PFnNMWEastert 

17 O IEDALUON MAN W Mackie I 

21 0400 PEHTAIN(B)W Wharton 811 

22 M PtPERS EHTBtfWSE W HoUan 611 — I 

27 000 1RAFF0RD WAY M H Eastarby 811 

28 2300 U-BX COPY JSWfiSOO 811 

29 000 VBO«MPCfaher611 

30 0000 COROfflN LASS C Tnkfar 68 

31 3001 DQHTY BABY (C) M W EasteTCy 81 

3S ®a GOLDCHAN HVmanon84 

35 0 MGNLAND KATE T Karaev 88 

37 HOLYROOOH Wharton 8-8 ML Themes 23 

44 0000 MADDYBBWY K Slona 88 — 20 

47 00 WSS BOLERO D Chapman 8-8 

48 0002 MSS BMLYD Ottoman 68 

SO oead MUSIC DELIGHT ( 6 ) K tan 88 . A 

52 COO PATHS GOLD H Jones 88 

55 333 RHA800MANCS1JW Watts 88 MComorton5 

58 00 SALLY FOXTROT C Thornton 88 J Me—dtae 7 



9-4. Bath, 4-1 Grandangus, 941 Gotten Ancona, hgwrt 
Pafacs. 7-1 Princess Andromeda. 61 Hato MM, 12-1 others. 

5.0 THRUST PETROLEUM MAIDEN STAKES 
G3-Y-0:£1,398:1m2f)(13) 

5 0033 LYPHLAW 

7 003 RIVARTJP 

8 08 SANTO BOY W Wharton 80 
10 -000 SOMETHMGSaffLAR Jimmy Fitzgerald 94 


SA) J Dunlop 9-0 □ Sextan 12 

P KMmny98~ QayKtomy 0 1 


11 004 TOGDALEM W 
16 333 LOUVEC 8 MES 
IS 4 MHtSE YS PEED J 


80L 


A Money 10 
KDertvy 9 


)Douieb811 WRSwMnmll 

_ j611 SWatottrlS 

22 -on PLEASING PROSPECT MHEastetoy 611 - MBkch 4 

23 (UDE5MEM W Eatterby 811 T Lucas 3 

24 80 S1NMJR D Ringer 61 1 NWipMaS 

25 003 SfWNGWELL G Hutfar 81 1 G Carter (3) 7 

26 080 STfiLLMARCHMGW Jarvis 811 EGaMtjni 

27 04 TRANSFORM W Jarvis 811 NON-RUNNERS 

2-1 Lyphtaw. 82 Louvectartnes. 11-2 Ffivart 182 

SpringwelL ib -1 SomeMng Smlto. Mere ey s po ed. 261 others. 


59 0304 8 KERNE ROCKET H Jones 88 . 


S Monis C 

4-1 Rhabdomanoer. 82 Dohty Baby. 81 U-BIx Copy, 
81 Sharptoven, 7-1 Ctiantaty oawn. 81 Miss Emy. 
12-1 Music DMighL 181 Skems Rocket, 281 others. 

3J0 BUXTED TURKEY HANDICAP (£1,380: 61) (29) 

3 140 JAMES' PAL (DtWPearee 4-811 OMcftoas 10 

6 0020 TOP THAT (CD) T Baron 583. -S Webster 12 

9 0000 ROYAL FAN (DIM H Easterby 3-813 HBkcbS 

11 000 SING OUT LOUO M W Eastorcy 4-811 G Carter 3 

12 1333 GOLDEN GULDB1 (B) (D) M W Eastotby M-11 

TlacaalB 

13 1400 ROSIE DICXMS (D) R HoSnsheed 4-811 RU^nP)S 

’j Wad (7) 13 


APPRENTICE STAKES 


18 2420 HARAVLLA 


4-84. 


29 080 BOLD SCUFFLE JPSmUfi 866 - 
21 0000 JERSEY M 

24 1303 HBBUrs VENTURE (USA)(D)D Chapman - 

A Proud 1 

25 00n SMGLE HAND (D)D Chapman 883 JCMtaspM (7) IS 


KHodpon19 


5J0 LEVY BOARD 
(£1,142: 1m 11) (14) 

1 004 MOON MOODY MSN Macaulay 544 l JSctoyl 

3 0004 MCYMARMBt JPShtah894-. J Ward ( i lO 

6 0403 FOREVER TOGO HWttanfl 880 A Camay (5) 4 

B /430 KCORO HAULIER W Htsjjfi 4-94— W ' “ 

9 040 SURPRISE ATTACK E Bvi 894— A 

12 m- GOLDEN SECRET DMoflatl 44-11 

13 CO02 MANABELS Bowring 44-11 H Canon (5)1 

14 040 RUSTLMGDArbuthnot 44-11 J Lauch 3 

I . 7 zS MMSTAaBjESlif fiBK 

21 om i^ANGAROO (B)H Thomson Jones 883 A Rkflngra 13 

22 040 LADY LAMB P Wahnm 884 — SWMmm(5)8 

26 448 THE FLNK95TERS A Baflty344 JCter12 

28 640 ZSLANDIA T FaWtorst 3-83 JCalaftu5 

81 Hamptar. 7-2 Highest Peak. 81 ManabeL 11-2 Forever 
TJtoO-81 The Fink Sisters. 12-1 Lady Lamb. 14-1 Kangaroo. 
16-1 OclflfS. 


PERTH 


Going: fiim 

2J0 GLENISLA JUVENILE NOVICE HURDLE 

(3-Y-O: £685: 2m) (8 runners) 


i 

7 

8 
9 

13 

14 

15 


21 UPTOWN RANDffSGM Moon 11-1.. 
DONNKD Yeoman 114. 


MASTS) LAMB Mbs S Hafi 114. 


0 MOVING PSIFORMANCE Mbs Z Green 114. 
VAMDEH PUP UtasZ Green 114 


H Ha mmond 
- CHmkns 
Rl 


GB5AN GREY J RKsttteweH 169 SKcUeweH 

KAMPHALL Mss Z Green 1M — 

16 042 LADY ST CLAR Denys Snah 169 — CGomt 

11-10 Uptown Randfs. 188 Lady St CSar. 4-1 Master 
Lamb. 161 Dom*. ifrl others. 


Perth selections 

By Mandarin 

2.30 Lady St Clair. 3JJ- Prince Moon. 3.30 
Tharaleos. 4.0 Atkinsons. 4 JO Melerek. 5.0 
Minalure Miss. 


13 344- LAUGH-A-MMITE Mrs D Cttham 7-160- II 
MTharalew, li-4 Secret Finale. 81 Specfai Setttament. 
11-2 Strathoonon, 7-1 Pourmnts*. 81 Lai#v-A-Mnuta. 

40) CRA 1 GVINEAN NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) 

( 6 ) 

1 Ml ATMNSOHSGWRfctwdsWI-1 PTtxk 

4 406 PRMCEOBOtOtt R aimi 6169 N Doughty 

5 U63 SUMMER STOP ff) P Montaith 81M D Notes 

G 060 BMASCREEXnnjS Wilson 4-167 TG Dm 

7 CANE HLL C W Taunttai 4-167 DWMtbwm 

8 6 GO CRAZY Mrs DCgfosm 4-10-7 REamihaw 

11-4 AOdnsons. 11630 Cmm MB. 4-1 Summer Stop, 

11-2 Biras Creek. 7-1 Prince Oberon, 161 Go Crazy. 

4J0 BLAIRADAM HANDICAP CHASE (£1,615: 3m) 

3 2U11 MFSttAL BLACK (B)(D)D McCain 16185 (Sent 

KDoolKl 

4 004 tGKBrsnn£CnON(D)W A Siapharaon 811-13 R 

Larafa 

9 234 HAZY GL£N(&D)TABsnias 6114 N Doughty 

8 4TP RONAN-PAUL (OfS J LsadbatMT 181611____— - 

10 26B PURPLE BEAM T A Barm* 7-1 65 B Storey 


JOATRW 


GM Moore 11-104 M 

16164, 


3J) LADYWELL NOVICE CHASE (£1,059: 2m) (5) 

1 611 THI BOY (0)WTKenro 7-12-7 SShfiston 

3 MU PRMQG BUBBLY (D) M Avison 811-12 RIMayffl 


4 094 mQH DROP FS Storey 61 1-7 

5 -144 PRMCE MOON GBBakfog 811-7 


Storey 
R Guest (7) 
_ fl Manta 


G 208 RIGHT CLOUDY P LkUa 811-2. 

11-6. Tin Boy, 11-4 Prince Moon, 61 Prince Bubbly, 


7-1 High Onto, 61 FUght Cloudy. 


HANDICAP 


3J0 SCOTTISH RACING CLUB 
HURDLE (£1,215: 2m 4f) ( 6 ) 

1 F04. SECRET ratALE kmr J H Johnson 7-124 P Deflate (4) 
4 FP8 POUNBnES(q(C}WWMcGhta8114 

Mr K Andersen (7) 
B Kay 0) 
C Grant 


9 038 STRATHCONONT 


11 04F totSCiAU 


7 1-32 THAflAlEOSWSA)^^ 1 Watson 81 1-0- __ 

. SETTCEMifr (USA) (Q R Afan 8163 


811*1 . 


N Doughty 


2-1 Moterek, 9-4 imperial Black, 81 Hmy Glen, 182 Joat 

5-0 ERROCHTY HANDICAP HURDLE (Amateurs: 
£790: 3m) ( 6 ) 

3 908 LARRY HUJL (C-D) Mrs JGoodhBow 11-11*7 

4 & sasusRcn assfuJS® 8 

- G 8fl) RABABtliJONJ VGaon 4-166 D |*« G . 

7 041 MMA7URE MBS W A Stephenson 4-160 (4ex) 

9 PP4 PANDA MAN M Arison 7-160 N 

11-4 Oonsharagh,'81 Gotten HoOy, 10630 NUnatore Miss. 
11-2 RstaabBkjn.81 Larry Hta. 181 Panda Man. 

Blinkered first time 

SANDOWN: 4.10 Keecagee. 

CHESTEH: 3.A5 Shotun. 4.16 Bold FUry, Lady Stamatle. 
flB*ON:4JTffantiqy.4J0G0foan Ancona, ffnome na dar. - 



101 

TO? 

104 

tOS 

107 

109 

110 
111 
112 

114 

115 

117 

118 


SANDOWN PARK 


Tetavtortt 1 WLMILiQ 
,nwndcouraG,goadto»bft,9fralgmcoiir*8-- 
Drnw: 51-61, high numbers boat 

1J0 LADBROKE HOLIDAYS HANDICAP (£3,158: 51) 0&IWW&) 

201200 lapqg «n»EEr LWY — i»c558 

S g® a|B5 S|£S 

0UZ30 GBONGEWlLjAMCTfBPIlCNadanlJIIWfalRfrW--— -■JJagatoi 
3M0B Ud) M McComadt 47- ML— NSheat ? 

... aoSS SphuSwBISi H **** 9 s^- TSrt)--^ l .wbm; mt 

others. 





was risored tor the first Ome vrftanWBj 

3rd and GLJCNXEUA MANX (9-Q II beck 

-■iiiifnia iiiTtnrrritrti 


Sandown selections 

By Mandarin 

Top Range. 

By Our Newmarket Conespondeut 
1 JO Woodfold. 10 Reform Princess. 130 Hard Aston. 10 
Morning Flower. 3J5 Loch ScafortbL 4.10 Reference PomL 4.40 
Top Range. 

Michael Seely's selection: 130 KICK THE H ASn^nap)^^^ 

Zfl SPORTSMAN CLUB HANDICAP (£3,776: 1m 6 Q (17) 

201 
202 
203 
207 
209 
211 
213 

215 

218 

217 

218 
221 

223 

224 
226 
227 
230 


wSS fttr* M WMcm) R Ahjtorat 4812(5 bx)- ™* ta>4 

031/0 ITALIAN SWtRJ^ (D) (^Qlpon) D OoSTlMjl &-9-5 

sssysstis Si 

049023 rTTKAAD (Hmxlan Al Mddcun) C BertStStd 34-1 1 -Wjl 

2^«-B USMOH ' - r Stnjttora) J Duntaa *4-1 1---- 

04103 REFORM PMHCE8S TOP) S Gertteuseri M Ryan887^ 

030240 Asnoor—MBiB— 

2ll4t»™^ 

oSSU* 

022083 TAHAS CHAMOT fl TOttt) P MttCtofl S-7-7_M 



C Rutter (3)4 




Princess, 261 


Ustrure, 181 DsikSkona. 
others. 

FORM: VINTAGE PORT (812)2! Nawmarint winner from Bans Bird* (7-8) (1m tt. 

E3257. good Aug 22. 9 ranf nmHAAD (87)2l3rd of 10 to Akfino (81) at Windsor (Imffl 

150y. £2&S.good to firm, atne 16L OaIrk S8KMA (SG) won Ripon tolnar ty2W from 
Cocked HatSjprame (813) (Ira «£ £2844. good, Aug 16. 17 rani REFORM PRINCESS 
(87) 2KI 3rdt? 8 m Juriaffloderea (8Ri at NewSstta (2m. &198. good. Aug 11 ). 
ALACAZAM (7-1 1 ) had PEARLY KMG ffl-13) SHI back in Btfiwhen~ 

GL £2194. good, Aug 14, 16 raid, with AL9BA (8tt^ behind. MUSIC' 

4VH 4th te T3toStox»urne (8$ at Nottingham (2m, E1382. good, Aug 12). 


130 INTERNATIONAL LEISURE GROUP HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £5,929: 

1m 21) (11) 

303 001014 LMMJD1U Rstw) M Rmn 87 PRoWmmI 

3tS 44-1100 PROCESS NAWAAL (USA) (Shaikh Ahmed AIMaktom)JDunio^84 ^ 


308 


312 

314 

315 
317 
31B 
319 


BHIY& (09 (Lady D’Awgdor - Goidwntt) N Vigors 8 
MARSHALL MACOOKaLd (Mht JHbfcvAwitoicien 


81G 


Mumn BtotYS 

309 0-00440 

310 04102 HATTIE ALONG (O WMari'PWMwyn 84 

■ 122140 STTMJGKrTHROiXWroiUPrsr^JHfotwOOB 

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3jQ BERNARD SUNLEY SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,682: 7f) (18) 


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506 040000 WINTER PALACE (pD) tR E A Bcrt ljifl C Neteon4-183_ Joirew Wtto2 

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510 441T11 LOCH SEAFORTH (D)®r D WMs) H CacO 4-160 FrencaVtoaMI 

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515 CORN WOL (Mrs M Campbafi) C Horgan 884 DMtee Atrion 

4-5 Loch Sesforth. 81 March Harrier. 13-2 Effigy. 81 The Footman. 12-1 Irish 

Haro. 20-1 others. 

4.10 EBF HEART OF VARIETY STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,615: 1m) (14) 


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515 
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618 
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627 000 WOO AND WAVE (J Jeyes) D Lalng 64 W Nanas tt 

_ 2-1 Port Hatena. 7* Brother Patrick. 81 Reference PoM. 7-1 Laera. 61 Dancer 
To Follow, Old Maestro. 181 others. 

4.40 VARIETY CLUB MAIDEN STAKES {3-Y-O: £1 ,959: 1m 2f) (13) 

1 000 ALMUTANABH 

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Top Range. 181 other*. 


Santiki is outstanding 


Santiki (Walter Swinburn) 
has an excellent chance of 
landing the group three Prix de 
la Noaette over 10 furlongs at 
Deauville on Sunday! She has 
been running well all season and 
looks better than (he other 
British challenger Queen Helen 
(Willie Carson). 

Sirk (Carson) rims in the 
group two Grand Prix de Deau- 
ville (I3ftf) but is' unlikely to 
trouble either Galla Pladdia or 
Baby Turk, who was second to 
Sharaari at Newmarket in July. 

Harlesione Lake -(Brent 
Thomson) will be hard 16 beat in 


tomorrow's Giadiateaf 
d'Ostende in which Tugboat 
also runs Tor Philip MitcheU. 

Zahdam . (Grtvilie Starkey) 
ran make up fbr bis unexpectefl 
defeat in the Grand Ptix oe 
Vichy by- winning the group 
three Furste nbcrg-Reancn (119 
at * Baden-Baden tomorm tf ; 
North Verdict (Ray Cochrt^) 
and Gorgeous ..Strike . (Jow 
Reid) are also in the line-up.: 

Eve's Error (Tony KimbriW 
and Ghanayim (Richard Hflh) 
both won their races at Bade®* 
Baden yesterday to give w 
British raiders an excellent titf* 


Today’s course specialists 


SANDOWN 

TRAINERS: H Cart, 18 wtanars from 63 
nnw*. 28:5*: w Ham, 19 trom 78, 
2Sp*:G Harwood. 33 (Rim 160.22.0%. 
JOCKEYS; T Quinn, Ifr wtonos from 58 
rktas. 2as%;.W Canon, 52 from 247, 
21.1%: R Cochrane, 9 (ran 56, 185%. 
CHESTER. 

TPAWERS: h CocA 6 wrawra from IB 

IWW. SSAK: G Wragg. 7 from 29. 

2*-i%: G Pritt^twrd-aonwn. 7 from 31. 

22.5% 

JOCKEYS; J Raid, 12 wkiitare from 60 
rWK. 204%; W Ryafl. 7 from 55, 1Z7%. 
(only quaWwS) 

RIPON 

TRAnasg p Ktoiw^.a trtrmtotfromas 
junnartt. 324%; w Hawna-Ban, 5 trom 
&.25JBH; Jromy Hqgaqld, 10 from 47, 

< 14 %. 


wn 9wfctoum.7wfr«nars»3f 
32 rfcfes. 21.9%; ONfcbni. 15 from 8 * 
1^2%; M Hrch. 25 from 233. IB.7%. 

HEREFORD 

TRAteCRS; Mrs W Sytts. i0.**g 

from 50 ranMfi.2atl%; V Mhr- *** 

54, iflj%;DMchotaon,Gfrpm1 












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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 


Colts prove 
no match 
for Shining 
Water 






CRICKET: ESSEX OPEN UP A SEVEN-POINT GAP AT THE TOP OF THE TABLE 


SPORT 


1L 


GOLF 


- 



-fl: 


^Stcve Cauthen and Shining 
\W8ter sprang a 20-1 surprise 
'when beating ibe colts to land 
■flrf £25.000 added Glen Jnter- 
national Solano Stakes at 
1 \Sandown vesterday. 

Cauthen soon had the 


. ' filly in front and going 

S .wirBut appeared likely to be 
&iight two furlongs out as the 
runners bunched up to 
__ jflge. But Cauthen kept 
Shining Water going well to 
score by' two lengths from 
vSaoam. 

. The unlutky horse was 
Lockton, who ran on well to 
take third -after being deprived 
. of a gap 1 Vh furlongs out. New 
' Attitude, the odds-on favourite, 
'ran disappointingly and could 
finish only sixth. 

Shining Water will now tackle 
her own sex in the Hoover 
Fillies' Mile at Ascot on Septem- 
bcr 25. 

Another filly to make all the 
k running over this stiff track was 
Purcftascpa perch ase, who stuck 
to her task in game fashion to 
win the Atalanta Stakes. 

Her trainer, Robert' Arm- 
strong. reported that his smart 
two-year-old filly. Invited 
Guest, is a possible fin- the May 
jjiil ’Stakes at Doncaster. 

^.Bonhomie, who injured a 
Juice on the gallops on Wednes- 


- ByRichard Streeton 
v Somerset's current turmoil will 
provide posterity with a classic ' 
reminder that brilliant individuals 
, in sportdo not nenssarOy guarantee 
success in a team game, nor do they 
bring contentment within a dub. 
Sensible, long-term thinking en- 
tirely justified the sacking. — for 
cricketing reasons — of the West 
Indians. Viv Richards and Joel 
Garner; though the man in the 
street, inevitably, remains puzzled - 
and angry. 

Ian Botham's immediate reaction, 
tod, was predictable. For Botham to 
want to leave Somerset Hi sympathy 
with his two dose friends was a 
basic, instinctive reaction. It was 
typical and worthy of a man, whose 
loyalty to a mate, to nse a. modern 
colloquialism, . is one of his most 
admirable traits. All the upheaval, 
though; will bring wry and sympa- 
thetic smiles . around die comity 
circuit. - 

In Yorkshire, of comae, there will 
be smugness from some, sympathy 
from others. They continue to have 
nothing to do with anyone born 
outside their own borders. The civil 
war which split their ranks, leaving 


versus charisma in Somerset 


the dab scarred and the member- 
ship split,' was over Geoffrey Boy- 
cott, one of their own. 

- Among the other 15 county 
championship dobs, there will be 
much consulting of balance sheets 
and mental anguish over the ques- 
tion of whether to Join in should an 
auction ensue for Richards and 
■ Garner. It coaid be that there will 
not be as much interest in securing 
the services of tiie two brilliant West 
Indians as might be thought. 

Both men are in their 30s; 
will probably be unavailable in 1. __ 
because of the West Indies tour to 
F . ng h m d that year; in addition. 
Garner has increasing problems 
with knee and shoulder injuries. 
Similarly, too, in Botham's case, 
more level-headed committee mem- 
bers will remind their oofieagues 
that these days his Test ma tch 
absences mean Chat he misses half 


be weighed against their unsettling 
s far as dressing room 


the championship programme. 

- Botham and his West Indian 


make a 

contribution to Somerset In the 
lucrative one-day events. They are- 
charismatic, swell the membership 
and bring people in through the 
turnstiles. All this, however, Isas to 


influence as 

harmony is concerned. 

Disruptive is too strong a word, 
but Test players' frequent absences, 
excessive attention from the media 
and the_ players' own outside 
commercial interests, certainly 
bring distractions for younger, in- 
experienced team members. 

At Somerset, for dl the wonderful 
deeds that the big three, on occa- 
sions, have performed, the county's 
lack of success recently has under- 
lined the factors undisclosed in the 
reference hooks. There has been a 
dreadful falling away since the brief, 
fe®fey®n period of one-day triumphs 
for four years from 1079 onwards. In 
the past two summers, Somerset 
have done Bette in limit ed overs 
cricket; they were bottom of the 
championship in 1985 and are now 
third from bottom. 

This is a ludicrous record for a 
team containing three of the worid'a 
most talented cricketers. Staleness, 
sheer weariness with the treadmill 
of cricket's round the year travel 
and a consequent lack of motivation, 
have all played their part in some 
uneven performances by the Somer- 


set stars and the county. In this 
context, have never looked as pro- 
fessional a team as Middlesex or 
Essex since Brian Close relin- 
quished their captaincy in 1977. It 
might be brutal, but Richards and 
Garner have served their purpose 
with the past glories and as cricket 
mercenaries they can now be add to 
have had to pay the price. 

- Many - of those on Somerset's 
unwieldy, 39-strong general 
committee, win confirm these 
contentious matters in private 


conversation, though they refuse to 
licly. Taunton remains 


Championship 
turning point 


be quoted publicly, 
an unsophisticated town. 

It has fallen to Brian Langford, 
the former off spinner and county 
champion, who between 1953 and 
1974, played a record number of 504 
matches for Somerset, to emerge as 
the strong man required. He took on 
the cricket committee chair mans hip 
last year and faces a tremendous 
challenge in the next few weeks. 

First Mr Langford will be the 
prime target for the militant, vocal 
members who have called a special 
general meeting of the dob with a 
view to having the present general 
committee dismissed and Richards 


and Garner reinstated. If he survives 
this, Mr Langford will doubtless be 
taking a hard look at Somerset's 
youth development scheme, which 
since the 70s has not consistently 
provided the gifted newcomers' that 
it did in the past- 
Taking a far-sighted view, how- 
ever, Somerset’s future is far from 
bleak, presuming that the maximum 
use Is made of the cricket talent 
within its own borders. Botham 
could have a crucial role to play in 
this transitional period. In terms of 
commitment Somerset, too, could 
wish for no better replacement for 
Richards and Garner than the New 
Zealander, Martin Crowe. 


Baker one 
stroke 
ahead of 
his hero 


From Mitchell Platts, 
Dusseldorf 


Tony Cham ley put togethc 
fine second round of 67 on i 
Hubbelraih 


terday to share the halfway lead 


ISandown results 

OofRo: 


By Richard Streeton 

TAUNTON: Essex (20pts) beat his legs and seemed in the mood 


round course 
l course good to soft 


good, 


, • 20 Om It) 1, DARK HERITAGE (S 
- Honda*. 14-1 fc & NeedtawMMn (V Srotth. 


11-1*3. Mnus Km (R Morse. S-1 fav), 4, 

? net Rank (L Johnsey, 14-1). ALSO BAN: 


. ' ;'l3a Sovereign Love. 7 Exytophone. 10 
•. . SpSrpae Way. 11 Simon's Fantasy (5th), 


’-V&'SpiinnRkW Lady. FBm Consultant 14 




„ j Starmast Sumrfrost, 18 

- .QHkxars Dream. Sweet Andy, 20 farm 
1 uim. 25 Morgana (6th), 50 Main Star. 
Okaadu 19 ran. NR: Cantraisptres Best. 

1*1, nk, H. a. 1L C Nelson at Upper 

Lanfcoum. Tote: E15L20; £2-40. £4.40. 

Cl -70, £7.20. DF: £173.00. CSF: £161.49. 

TOaet £821 .78. 1 min 54.738ec. 

1. SILENT MAJORITY (7 Ires. 

Careon. fc-1): 3, 


'JOT' 

Handsome Safer 


Thomson. 


ALSO RAN: 9-2 Respect (4th), 7 Precious 

M«al 14 Rayhaan, 16 Fountain i 


A." 


1 Boils. 20 

CoppermU Lad, Hetawe Jem). Pas Dos 
. J Regrets. 25 Northern Trust (5th). 66 
Cresta Leap. 12 ran. 1 KL1 Kl, 2M, hd, nk. 
: W Ottoman at Newmarket. Tots: £3.10: 

£i;«. £1.40, £1-90- DF: £7-80. CSF: 

£25-39. Tricast £100-59. imirt 01 .31 sec. 
•- *5 pm) 1. PERFECT STRANGER (T 
WBtanu. 6-1L- 2. Paleface (T Ives. S-IJr 3. 
. . Combined Excmdme (S Cauthen. 20-1). 
r- ALSO RAN: 100-30 t*v Counter Attack, 7- 

. 2 YMzter (pu). 6 Plague O'Rats (4th», 8 
. " -Ltearftws. 14 Otore Mate C5*L 20 
■Murfeh (6th), 25 veigly Blazed. 10 ran. 

' ■ SH.1T2L II. 1L P Ha3am at Newmarket 
£6.80: £1.60. £1.60, £260. DF: 
■* EHAO. CSF. £34.79. Tncast £521.10. 
'• 1mh<3-70sec. 

.140 (7Q 1. SHMMG WATER (S 
'Cauthen, 20-1): 2. Sanam Ml Carson. 12- 
■ it 3. Lockton (M HUs. 6-1). ALSO RAN: 
10-11 tav New Attitude (6th). 15-2 Lack A 




_ nkMM.S 

KL.lid. «L R Johnson Houghton at 
Btowtwy. TOW £14.40; £260. £450. 
El 5ft OF; £9340. CSF: £213.80. Irrtn 


After a stewards' rnquky me 


1. PURCHASEPAPERCHA5E 
Orison, 16-ii 2 Va dy Sophie (S 
" " vt S. ReaWy £1 Reid. 14-1). 

■4 DoNw. 94 land Ol ivory 
! Vianora (Bth). 16 Chalk Stream. 



50 Black Sophie (4to), Rare 
t 2L R W 


0 ran. 2L 11 hd. nfc 
at Newmarket Tote: £1650: 
.40, £350. DF: £1750. CSF: 
mtn 42.1 6sec. 


m 3f 100yd) 1. LYDIA EVA 
vISM): 2 8 S Santo v 
flfifc 3, Cototoan HniUn 
ALSO RAN: 2-1 lav Merht. 
Eloquence, 16 numeric 


Somerset (6) by nine runs. 

An incredible victory for Es- 
sex ai the eleventh hour won 
them this remarkable match and 
enabled Gooch's team to move 
into a seven-point lead ahead of 
Gloucestershire at the top of the 
championship table. Somerset 
lost their last five wickets for 10 
runs in the final 40 minutes as 
Essex completed a win which 
until then had seemed beyond 
reach. 

It added further drama to the 
closing stages that first Viv 
Richards, with a brilliant 94. 
and then Ian Botham, rising 
from his sickbed to make 41 in 
29 balls, led the way as Somerset 
made their own challenge. 
Marks, too. with a fluent 56, was 
an important contributor. 

Somerset had been left a 
target of 273 in 250 minutes, or 
a minimum of 68 overs, which 
seemed generous. Gooch, 
though, was aware of an un- 
certain weather forecast and 
with Essex. having two games in' 
hand over Gloucestershire, the 
ramble was worth taking. 
Somerset seemed home and dry 
at 253 for five, but then Botham 
was caught at long on and the 
closing slump was under way. 

Essex previously led the table 
until deposed by .Gloucester- 
shire on July 8. They meet Kent 
at Folkestone today knowing 
that Gloucestershire's bid for 
the title has realistically finished 
and that they are now dear 
favourites themselves, even -if 
one or ty?o . other counties 
mathematically still have, a 
chance to catch them. 

Gloucestershire's last match 
against Surrey at the Oval next 
Wednesday becomes irrelevant. 
After the Folkestone game. Es- 
sex meet Nottinghamshire at 


to win the game on his own. 
Shortly towards tea Hardy was 
held at first slip, trying to cut, 
and then Harden was caught at 
third slip against a ball which 
lifted more than most 

Marks drove and palled freely 
as 88 runs came, in 17 overs 
before Richards was out, caught 
byHardie as he attempted apuD 
off Lever to mid-wicket. Somer- 
set needed 20 runs, with IS 
overs left when Botham was 
out, having earlier driven Lever 
for three successive fours. 
Pringlc dismissed Gard in the 
following over and then bowled 
Marks, who had played sensibly 
for two hours. 

Harman, the ninth wicket to 
fafi, was run-out trying to sngteh 
a single, after Dredge drove a 
ball near, Fletcher at backward 
point. Ten tense minutes fol- 
lowed before Childs had- Taylor 
leg before and Essex had won 
with 8.5 overs in hand. 

Essex had added a further 1 30 
runs before they declared. 10 
minutes before the lunch inter- 
val. after East was caught at 
mid- wicket. Hardie had contin- 
ued his imperturbable pro gre s s 
and duly ■ reached his second 
century this summer. He batted 
for six hours in aU and hit 1 1 
unnoticed boundaries. 


ESSEX: Frol tarings 129(0 E East 58 not 
cwt N S Taytor 4 tor 40) 


Second tarings . 
-G A Gooch tow b Taylor . 


J P Stephenson o Gard b Taylor . 

P J Pnchart c Hardy b Mario 

8 R Hardie not out . 


KWR Fletcher c Mardeo b Marts __ 28 

DR Pringle runout ; : 21 

J K Lever b Dredge - 38 

tO E East c Roebuck b Hannan — 41 

H A Foster not ma — ..0 


Extras (b 6. to 9) 

TotaI(7 wtasdec) 343 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-32 2-64, 3-115, 4- 


163. 5-207. 6-259, 7-343. 



(5th), 25 Hang Loose. 
, 6HVM.7L10I.R 


,10 ran. DM, l 

Hemp at Marlborough. Tots: £17.70; 
ffiwyem £2.1 d!dF: £ 7950. CSF: 
ifTigkarin 2&33sec. 

Jadqok nn won; Ptocspot £7155 

* Chester 

OaisjpgoodibeoK 


215 nm 21 B5yd)1. MISTER POfNTfW 
Goodwh. 7-2 to* 2, Rhefai CourtjJ Lake, 


IMt 3. Treyamon IJ Ward, 1 i-SJj. ALSO 
RA)fc4, Bucks Boil 6 


EaurTs Court (4ft), 7 
Trophy, 12 


etri) 


StoNto Pal. 10 Mondare 
PotonbW (5th). 33 Dawn v 
Sco&h Breen. 10 ran. 71. 31, 2Vtl. II . 
C-regtor v Mutton. Tote: £3.30: £1.60, 

E2-5q.Tl.9a DF: E220ft CSF: £39^8. 

Tncaw £200.90. 2min I9.l9sec. 


1. SHUSH OmtY (A Stoufts. 

% 2. Keen Note (M Roberts, 7-1); 3, 


(S WWtvwxth. 11-1). ALSO 
RAN: 6 Atrayu. 13-2 Styfoh Oil, 7 Use 
P«2BM«cch» leth). 6 Lttfle Upstart 14th), 

20 Game Feathers (5th). Pretty Soon. 33 

ThaOpss. 10 ran. NR: Church Star. DM. 


their programme against 
Glamorgan at Chelmsford. 

Somerset began their second 
rnttings after lunch and were 
clearly in the box seat by tea, 
with only another 121 needed 
and six wickets in hand. The 
pitch was dry and playing more 
easily than at any other time. 
Lever and Foster bowled most 
of the afternoon. Fdton was an 
early casualty: Roebuck, too, 
was beaten playing forward, 
after an uncharacteristic flurry 
of strokes. 

Richards took some time to 
settle in before he went on the 
rampage. He drove Lever for 
two sixes and flicked another off 



DELHI: The Australians open their 
torn- of India today with a testing 
three-day fixture In the southern 
city of Bangalore against an Indian 
Cricket Board President's XI 
containing a number of players with 
reputations either to be made or 
restored (Renter reports). Two 
notables in the latter category are 
leg-spinner Laxman 

Si varamakrishnan. seeking a recall 
to Test cricket, and batsman 
Mohammad Azharuddin. 


Gloucester 
see their 
lead vanish 


By John Woodcock 
Cridiet Correspondent 

BRJSTOL: Gloucestershire (3 
pis) drew with H ’orcestershire (8) 
For Gloucestershire, the 
month of August, which came in 
with burgeoning hopes of 
championship success, goes out 
in ami-climax. They were over- 
taken by Essex yesterday eve- 
ning after the weather had made 
3 certain draw of their own 
match with Worcestershire, 
delaying the start by an hour and 
causing various other stoppages. 

After the first match of the 
Cheltenham Week, on August 5, 
Gloucestershire had a lead of 54 
points over Essex at the top of 
the table. In six matches since 


then they have managed only 22 
e against Essex's 85. Whe 


more against Essex's 85. When 
the rain has not been holding 
Gloucestershire up, their own 
limitations have. 

Their, disappointment is 
heightened by the fact that much 
the same thing happened last 
year. Even so. whatever the 
remaining fortnight brings. 


CHAMPIONSHIP TABLE 


p 

21 

23 

22 

20 

21 

22 

22 

23 


EbMx<4! 

Guxjcs 
Swray 
Notts (1 
Hams 
Worts 
Latcs(l6) 

Yorits(ll) 

Northants 00)21 
Kant (9) 21 

Dsrt>ye(12) 21 
Warwicks (15) 21 
Middx (1) 22 

Sussex (7) 21 

Somerset <17)20 
Lancs (14) 22 

Glam (12) 21 

1965 positians in brackets 
Yorkshire total includes 
drawn mated when scores 


L D Bt EM PH 

5 7 46 66 259 

3 11 47 61 252 

6 9 48 62 222 

2 12 48 64 208 

4 11 49 63 208 

5 12 50 67 197 

6 11 52 62 194 

5 14 59 55 186 

3 13 46 SI 177 

6 11 37 68 169 

4 13 38 66 168 

3 14 51 43 158 
9 10 43 83 154 

7 10 37 49 150 

4 13 48 42 138 

5 14 40 47 135 
5 15 33 41 90 


for 

level. 


era 
the 

course here yes- 
ay lead 

with the Australian, Ian Baker- 
Finch (68) in the German Open. 

Chamley. runner-up in the 
German Open six years ago, and 
Baker-Finch, edged out in a 
play-off for the Bell's Scottish 
Open last Sunday, have eight 
under par 36-hole totals of 136. 

. Peter Baker, aged 18. contin- 
ued to make excellent progress 
in only his fourth tournament as 
a professional by compiling a 70 
for a score of 137 which put him 
one ahead of Severiano 
Ballesteros (69). 

The immediate outcome of 
Baker's sterling effort is that he 
will now partner Ballesteros in 
the third round. There is a 
tendency to glamorize such 
achievements so burdening the 
player with the task of fulfilling 
his potential overnight rather 
than in his own time. To some 
players such adulation can 
prove permanently damaging to 
their personality if not their 
game. 

Baker most certainly has a 
promising future. More im- 
portantly he would appear to 
possess the strength of character 
10 resist the urge to believe that 
one spirited effort here will 
provide an instantaneous 
launching pad to stardom. He 
was naturally excited though he 
contained nis emotions well 
even when he was ushered 
alongside Ballesteros in the 
traditional post-round inter- 
view. The Spaniard immedi- 
ately put him at ease by 
congratulating him on his 
achievement. In fact they had 
met once before, four years 
earlier at the La Manga dub in 
Spain, and a photograph of that 
occasion has pride of place in 
the Baker sitting room in their 
home at Codsali, near 
Wolverhampton. 

“Sevyy won't remember it, 
which is more than under- 
standable, but for me it was a 
moment to treasure." Baker 
recalled. 

Baker played well within him- 
self as he gathered three birdies 
in an almost faultless 70. He 
dropped his only shot when he 
missed the green with a six iron 
at the !6ih. 

Meanwhile Chamley, who 
has profited little from making 
10 halfway cuts this season. 

g utted well for his 67. He holed 
ve times from between eight 
and 1 5 feet and he made a tricky ‘ 
four foot putt at the last to keep 
his score intact. 

Baker-Finch was annexed at 
allowing his concentration 10 
wain at Glasgow last Sunday 
when he let slip a healthy 
advantage. But be retains his 
form well as-he emphasized fry 
collecting four birdies in his last 
six holes to move alongside 
Chamley. 

Bernhard Langer, reunited 
with the dubs he currently 


^rv^5i«SSS^SSi4 torS? ^ ne ***** ®°* away: (right) foils to prevent Hick from adding to his total at Bristol 


Remaming fixtures 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE v Suiray (Oral Sep 


favours, sprang out of the pack 
of 65 but 


Socond tarings 
N A Fdton tow b Lew , 


*P M Roebuck tow b Foster 

J J E Hardy c Prinrie b Roster ___ 
I VARichsrdsc write blew — 
R J Harden c c FWcher b Fostsr 

V J Marks b Pringle - 

I T Botfwm c Stephenson b CttMe. 


grGeidtbwb 


I Dredge not 


M D Herman run out . 


NS Taylor tow bCNMs. 


Extras (04, to E. Rb 1) . 
Total 


.24 
19 
.94 
—4 
.56 
41 
-0 
~ 4 
-0 
2 


Late flurry Afford shuts door 


(Folkestone, starting 



secures 

victory 


on Kent’s hopes 


URREY: v Gloucestershire (Oval. Sep 3); 
Leroestershn (Oval, Sep 13). 


HAMPSMREtV 



.13 


.283 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-30. 238. 3-100, 4- 
110. 5-198, 6-253. 7-254, 6-259. 9-261. ID- 
283. 

BOWLING: Invar 192-104-2: Rwer 20- 
4-79-3; Prnflle 12-1-45-2; Childs 9.1-2-23- 

UmpirestKJ Lyons and R A White. 


By Ivo Tennant 

7RJ/S: Middlesex 


YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


2L shhd. tvt, hd. J Huxley st Newmarket 

0- D .feo. $2.70. OF: 


TotoiZBO; £1.40, 

£7.50. CSF; Fl&ftl. 1mm 0&28sec. 


Warwicks v Yorks Leics v Derbyshire 


3.15(lffl7fl86yd)1, TEMPLE WALK (W 
JJJJJJOto. 6-1): 2. Lgprccheun. Ledy (B 
1 7-r " m, ~‘ *" 


7-2* 3. Maiestlciwi (G 
-11-8 tav). ALSO RAN: S RewM 
11-2 BaSey Chump (Stn). 17-2 
*»<8th>- 2S Lhasa. 7 ran. 61. 4\. H, 6). 

W.4£Hem it West Bstey. Tote: £6.80; 

£90, 0.30. DF: £34.00. CSF: £4646. 

3n«n:4t.96soc. 


AT EDGBASTON 

Warwtdatifra(l9pa) Mat Yor*shini(0}by 
SAnm- 

WARWICKSHIRE: First tarings 

A J Moles b Fletcher — 91 

P a Srwh e Moxon b Shew — . 55 


A 1 KaPtoharrBU not out 
0 L Amiss rw out 


103 


ATLBCESTER 
LekxstBfShkB (7pts) drew with DerOy- 
shew (8) 

LEICESTERSHIRE: First tarings 292 (P 
Willey 168 not out; O H Mommsen 4 tor 
61). 


n a$fit)l.R!OPIEDRAS(MM0er. 
2- sonnet (M Robens. 3-1 
f-Mowh (8 Crowley. 5-1). ALSO 


__ ay. 5-1). 1 

8£r !fek B Khashsb, 6 One To Now 


Extras (D 2. lb 10. w 4. nb 9) J25 

Total (2 wkts dec 68 ovens) - — 282 
K3 w Humpage. As* Dta. A M Ferreira. K 
J Kerr. G CSnaM. T A Muwon and *H 
Gifford <W not bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-109. 2-272. 


Second tarings 

«rma b Mataotm 12 


J C Mdamone c Sfwrma 
R A Cobb c Sharma b Miter 
T J Boon c Sharma b MlBer 
J J Whitaker not out 


.45 

.42 


P Boeder c.MBIar b Sharma . 


ffitaLfcAnzon* Sun (5th). 10 Ottaen. 20 

Atolon place (4thi 50 Major Oafcey. 
TbgsayEyentafl.lBren.2L4E4.31.r- - 


BOWLING: DertaS 19449-0; P J Harter 


IP Whitdcaso C Mortensen b MBer , 
P A j De Freitas c Roberts b MBer. 
*P UMey not out 


.106 

.6 


KLA 


g«^«NiwmerkeL Tomb E7-3 0;E1.30. 


4-0-16-0: Fletcher 17-3-61-1; Shew 
45-1. S N Hardey 3^- 1-1 2-0: Moran 
2-35-0: Sharp 4-0-32-0; Love 3-2-6-Q. 


Extras (to 2. w 4) 
Total (6 wWa) 


.45 

- 0 

-0 

.P 


.m 


. i J2O0- OF: £19.70. CSF: £19.17. 

Jmta 3202aec. After an otyecdon and a 

the Objection was 


Second bwangs toraKed 


.L« 


ptedngs rentamed 


YORKSHIRE: First tantaga forfeited 1 
Second Inntags 
M O Mown b Snath. 


1. HENDON MELODY (4 

2, Arrirex Lad (W Newnes. 


A A Metcalfe b Smak — 




S N Hartley tow b Smith 
J D Love b Munton 


JWtetjBh), 10 Crete Cargo. 12 Fawleys 
tete. Ftaiiway, Pine 
EWe- TOsh (5th). 14 Sudden Imped 66 


PermawchWeta.122 


K Sharp cGittoiri b Munton. 
ID L Bavatow to* b Small . 


nMK Vjto shBth). 14 Sudden Impact 66 
SffcwrOouM*. iSran. iHLshhd.lw.3), 


PJ Hartley bFortetaa 
P Came* tow d Smrt 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14, 2-75, 3-150. 4- 
187. 5-252. 6-262. 

BOWLING: MHcotm 8-0-48-1; Mortensen 
2-1 -2-0: MWer39-9-n4-4: Ftawy 2-0ri5-0; 
Barnett 6-2-29-0; Sharma 25-7-62-1. 
DERBYSHRE: Prat tarings 

*K J Barnett b De Freitas — — 98 

10 tB JM Maher c Goto D Taylor 14 

24 -A HSc Whmfcase b Benjanun ... 12 

8 JE Moms c Whitaker bWHey 118 

B Rodens tow b De Freitas — 23 

G MBer b De Freitas 0 


.13 

.10 


LORD'S: Middlesex beat 
Lancashire by an innings and 
157 runs. 

They may have left it a little 
late in the season, until their last 
championship match at Lord's 
to be exact, but this was the 
biggest victory Middlesex have 
achieved since they won the 
championship last year. They 
dismissed Lancashire cheaply 
for a second lime, their bowlers 
again sharing the wickets. 

At- lunch, Lancashire were 
going well on 1 34 for one. There 
was not a great deal in the pitch 
and the forecast spelled rain. 
After Mendis had gone early in 
the morning. Fowler and Abra- 
hams batted with considerable 
ease against pace and spin alike. 
Then after lunch, Middlesex lost 
their captain. Gatting. He look a 
siesta, but this owed nothing to 
his enjoyment of a good meaL 
He has flu. However, Middle- 
sex. under the direction of 
Down ton rather than Emburey. 
their vice-captain, managed to 
break through immediately. 
Cowans Jiad Fowler, who hit 
eight fours and a six in 70 runs. 


132 


S'n « NawmariML Tola: 

£330. £1 SO. OF: £100.30. 

Tncast: £477.55. Irota 

A* J 


S J Darrms tow b Gittorri 
C Shaw tow b Smith — 
S D Ftatdwr not out 


Extras (to 7. w 5. nb 6) 
Total 


ic^-before on the from foot 


IB 


R Sharma c Beniamin 0 Da Freitas _ 38 
R J Finney c Wtntncase b Da Freitas . 13 
M Jean-Jacques c Vftritticasa b Taylor . 8 

OH Mortansati tow b Wteay 3 

D E Malcolm not out 0 


.228 


Newnes, 



_ j Lad. 25 

^ -"JHanay, fry Hfii Supptas. 9 ren. 

«. 4L SSI. MBwHtaairi at 
jKgwm. Tota; E3J0; £1.60. £2.10. 
g-2-JJP: £1900. CSF- £10.16. Imtn 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-81, 2-25. 3-42 .4. 
65. 5-115. 6-150. 7-164. 8-175. 9-216. ID- 
223 

SOWUNG: Sma* 17-M&G; SnW 9.1-2- 
46-3. tojnton 10-2-34-2; Gifford 5-2-15-1. 
Ferreira J4-2-70-1 
Umpires. J Hams and M J Kitchen. 


Extras (lb ft nb 9). 
Total (94.5 own;) 


- 11 
338 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-86. 2-122. 3-137, 4- 
191. 5-191. 6-244. 7-288. 830a 9031. ID- 
336. 

BOWLING: Twfor 1ft4-78-2; 


i Tlyior .. 

24-1-104-1: Wffley 143^1-25-2: De 


1 1, WSS M0.VEAOH ej Carr. 5- 
I And Abet JPata Edfery. H-* 
1 Free (C Rutter. 5-1). ALSO 
^’TS! w ^ c rt>HBfJ4mL5UrinO'Dto 

^ SjOwwig Bene (W. 12 Fafowun. 7 
HI. 3L BL A Bariey at 
JSSP®. Tore: aso: E2.10. £i na of- 

^iSljIl 56, ' ma as7Qsmc - 


Glamorgan v Surrey 

AT SWANSEA 

GiammanomwmftSMmytOHhmings 
much -no Bonus ports twardad). 
SURREY 

A R Butcher bOntong 
G S CHmon c Dava b I 


27-4-92-5: Agnew &-2-33-0; Bowtor 2-0-4- 
0. 

Umpires: J Blrkenahaw and B Dudeston. 

Northants v Hants 

AT NORTHAMPTON 
Hampshire aopts) beet Nontmmpton- 
srm(0>by 169 runs 


HAMPSHIRE: First tarings 338 for 2 dec 
' ' ' 222. v 


55. 


Perth 

eSPSFSA (14-11. Ban Creek 3-1 tav. 

Satan* Park. 7L nk. 7t, «t P. 

^ft-as&^.A-SiSa 

igasiaa: 

55. Bm 4i to 

2, Caperson (7-4 
5 ran. 1L nk_ TCra . 
£1.10. DF S2JXZ CSF- 


SfciwereSnTSitaS 

w.Tota: 


.<2— 

.’E6.48. 

E3,50, “ DF ' eta - 40 - 

atv® 1. Mowat (P Tuck. -4-6 

Aft 5 . g . Tma a Brig (6*1): 3. 

6 tan. 7L 31. G 

SUS’tiS F »~™- 


A J Stewart tow bBanmck 23 

T E Jesty b Barwick 13 

M A Lyncn b Barwck ** 

: JRicm 


tc J Richards notou*.---.— 

D J Thomas st Damn bOntong — 


STOartianotout 
Extras (b 6. lb 5) ■ 

Total (6 wkts dec) 

M A Fewrem. K T Medycon and *P 


5 

. 16 
_1i 


(C G Qreenidge 222. v P 
BOWLING: MaSendar 13-1-33-1; . . 

18-0-87-1: N G B Cook 25-6-81-0; Harper 
25-5-66-0: Boyd-Moss 8-1-21-0; Copal 
12-4-3M) 

Second tarangs toreteltad 
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE: Frist Inntags 
forfeitad 

Second fontasp 

"G Cook cTer^b Mare 34 


210 w Larkins tow b Marshall , 


pocock aw not bat. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-122, 2-133. 3-152. 
4-181. 5-T82. 6-189. 

SOWUNG: Tliomaa 84-21-ft Bara«k- 
23-5-90-3. Omong 22-7-563: Dsrrtck 6-0- 
32-0 


R J BoyO-Moss sf Parks p Mara , 
A J Larrto c Greenfoge b Mwu — 
R J Bailey e Parks b Trsnriea ™ 
D J Capel c Greenldge b Mara __ 
R A Harper tow b Marshall — - 
tD Ripley tow bTremlett . 


GLAMORGAN 

jAHoptamcCknfonbFeWiaiti 3 

V Moms C Thomas O FHthvrr — = 

A L Jones c Storert b FfoOCk 50 
c C Holmes c Chqtot b Mer%cott — S 
M P Maynard nothut 29 

R C OnioM not qu* 1 

Extras (B 2. B(1.w1) 


N G B Cook c R A Smith b Manslwfl . 

N A MaSencterb Marshall 

A Walker not out. 


Extras (b 2. to 6) 
Total 


30 

.0 

-0 

~s 


.169 


Total (4wktaj 


117 


j Demck J G Thomas, n Dswes. P O 

North. S R Berwick Gd not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS, 1-6.2-9.3-54.4*115. 

BOWUNG Otaka’ 12-4-29* TeWtam 4- 

44W. Poeock* 17-B-41-L MeGycon 9-1- 

40*1 Buener3-2-4-0 

Uropres a XSJHtyv and R Patner 


FALL OF WICKETS; 1-5. 2-59. 3-62. 4-93, 
5-102. 6-1 ia 7-120. 8-166. 9-16a 10-169. 
BOWUNG: Marshall 17^41-4; Jamas 
11-5-21-0. Manj 24^47-4; TremtM 162- 
39-2; Cowley 9-5-64): CLSmrtfn -0-7-0. 
Umpees: J A Jameson and A A Jones. 

• Leicestershire have . re-en- 
gaged all iheir snuff for next 
season, which means ihm the 
leieran batsman Chris 
flolderstone will stay ai Grace 
Road. 


_ ometmng a 

in. Cowans had O'Shaughnessy 
caught at short-) eg as he hovered 
between getting out of the line 
and going through with his 
stroke. Hay hurst did try to pnQ 
his hat out of the wav but failed 
and was caught at third slip. In 
21 bails. Cowans took three for 
six. Next. Abrahams, who bad 
held up 'Middlesex for almost 
two and a half hours, was drawn 
by Emburey into playing bails 
increasingly wide of the off- 
stump. until be edged one to 
first slip. It was a clever piece of 
bowling. 

After* that, only Simmons 
stayed for long. Maynard hit 
around a straight ball. Emburey 
removed Waiidnson and Allot! 
m the same over. Folley was leg 
'before to one that kept low ana 
Patterson was caught behind off 
a glove. Thank goodness Lan- 
cashire have Clive Lloyd to baL 
for them in the Nat West-finaL 
MKIOLESEX: First towns 432 ln-8 (foc(P 
R Dowrtton84. WN Stack 83. CTRaatey- 
71. RO Breeder 53). 

LANCASHIRE Prat Inntags 71. 

Second tarang s 

GDMtMHsc Emburey « Hughes 28 

G FcwvUr tow b Cowans — 70 

JAbranam&eBreetterbEmtkray 45 

S J O'SosugtwaBsy c Slack a Cowans 4 

A NHevtwrttc Carta Gowns -3 

tC Maynard b Hugftos 6 

V Stantons not out 13 

M Watkirwon c RatSey b Emburey — -3 
P J w Afloa b Emburey J- 2 


By Peter Ball 

TRENT BRIDGE: Notti, 
shire (22pts) beat Kent (4) 
runs. 

With Hadlee available for a- 
' final push and Essex still to play 
Nottinghamshire, Give Rice, 
the Notts captain, believes that 
bis team can still- win the 
championship. His spinners 
gave sustenance to that belief 
yesterday, dismissing Kent for 
209 to gain a convincing victory 
with over two hours us spare. 

With Hemmiogs playing an 
invaluable supporting role, for 
the second time in the match the 
the main damage was done by 
Afford, who claimed a career 
best six for Si to finish with 
overall figures of 10 for 103. 

Afford, aged 22, has had mixed 
fortunes this season, only 
returning to the side earlier this 
month after being dropped in 
early June. 

Yesterday he looked a very 
.good prospect as be bowled 
throughout the day, none of the 
Kern batsmen facing him with 
any comfort as he exploited the 
increasing turn with his high 
action and pleasing loop, and 
revealing a dangerous quicker 
loll. Only a perverse decision to 
bow] over the- wicket at the 
rough outside leg slump late in 
the innings, revealed his 
inexperience. 

Having survived an awkward 
final half hour iniaci on Thurs- 
day. Kent's target of 324 when 
they began the day looked 
possible, if unlikely, given a 
good start. Afford denied it 10 
them, removing both openers in 
his first four overs. Benson 


today); v 
Essex (Trent 
ampfonsttra f 


Sussex (Hove. 
- am, Sep 3); V 
_ . ifl): * Nonh- 

1 Bridge, Sep 13). 


beaten off the pitch and Taylor 
through the air. 

Tavarf. however, was giving 
ominous signs of taking root 
and together with Aslert, always 
a good player of spin, they 
revived Kent's hopes with -a 
stand of 60 in 16 overs until 
Hemmings interrupted Afford's 
tenancy of the Pavilion end to 
york Tavare. 

Afford returned immediately 
to end Asletfs resistance with a 
ball which turned sharply to 
lake the edge. From then on it 
was only a matter of time as 
Hemmings immediately 
switched to the Radcliffe Road 
end. Only Ellison and Marsh 
gave any sense of permanence 
as. in tandem. Afford and 
Hemmings worked their way 
through the long Kent taiL 


NOTTINGHAMSHIRE: First tanirng 240 (R 
»®TM 


J Hades 68, R T Robinson 
Alderman 5 for 54). 

Second Inrangs 241 for 1 dec (R T 
Robinson 159 not out). 


KENT: first Innings 140(S A Marsh 61; J A 
AHord 4 tor 22). 

Second Inntags 

M R Benson b Alford 20 

NR Taytor tow b Afford 6 

*CJTavaiAb Hammings - ■ ,_21 

D G Astett c Hadlee b Afford 40 


SG Hoiks c Johnson b AfftXfl 

H M Ellison st French b Hammings 

+S A Marsh b Hemmnra 

GRDflteycNeweUbAflord. 


C S Dale b Hemmings 

D L Underwood tow b Afford 
T M Aldennan not OUL. 


— TO 
..26 
..32 
.7 


Extras (b 7. ft> 6. w 1) 
Total . 


.16 
.15 
- 2 
.14 


.209 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-27. 2-30. 3m 4- 
95. 5-122. 6-1 65. 7-174, B-174. 9-207, 1 D- 
209. 

BOWUNG: Hadlee 1 1-3-20*0; Pick 7-2-26- 
O: Hemrrangs 28-8-59-4; Rice 2-1-60; 
Afford 332-11-81-8. 

Umpires; R Julian and N T Ptews, 


-Gloucestershire are going to be 
able to look back on another 
season when they have given 
their supporters a very good run 
for their money. 

Watching them over the last 
three days it was hard not to 
wonder at their achievement in 
ever gaining the lead they did. It 
represented a tour de force by 
'Walsh, and says much for their 
spirit. 1 am sure. 

The one remote possibility of 
a result to yesterday's match lay 
in Worcestershire, who had 
been 18 runs behind overnight, 
galloping into a first-innings 
lead and then bowling 
Gloucestershire out cheaply. 
Worcestershire themselves are 
still in contention for champion- 
ship prize money. In the event, 
although they never threatened 
to run through the Gloucester- 
shire batting, they had no 
difficulty in making the 109 
more runs they needed for a full 
set of bonus points. 

Hick drove and hooked 
Walsh much as he pleased until, 
hooking again, he skied a catch 
to square leg. In the fairly recent 
past Martin Crowe; Greg Chap- 
pell and Vivian Richards all 
made a great impact in their first 
season of championship cricket, 
but no one. I think, has ever 
done so to quite ihe same extent 
as Hick. For Worcestershire's 
third wicket he and Damian 
D'Oliveira had added 157. 


Hampshire double act 


By Peter Marson 


I FOItey tow b Cowan* 


.17 


BPFtaoBmncDowraonb Fraser — 9 

Extras {& 1. toZ 1* 1) 4 

TOW 204 


FALL OF MCKETS: 1-80.2-137,3-145.4- 
14a 5-153. 6-161. 7-164. 6-166. 9-1». ID- 
204 

BOwunG: Hugnes 2J -480-2: Fraser 12- 
2-33-t: Cowans 15-4364: Embney 23- 
1 1-263. Gtotng 6-T-28-0. 

Umpires: D J Constant avl B UMMaur. 


Malcolm Marshall and 
Rajesfa Mam moved in behind 
Gordon Greenidge's double 
hundred yesterday to bring 
about Hampshire's sixth success 
in the county championship 
when they beat Northampton- 
shire by 169 runs with 90 
minutes to spare at 
Northampton. 

After Hampshire's overnight 
declaration at 338 for two. 
Northamptonshire forfeited 
their first innings and Hamp-‘ 
shire their second, a device by 
which Northamptonshire were 
given a target of 339 at which to 
aim. Yet their cause suffered ? 
damaging blow in the third over 
when Larkins fell leg-before to 
Marshall and by lunch North- 
amptonshire were 80 for three. 

At Swansea. Surrey's bowlers 
were thwarted by Glamorgan's 
middle-order batsmen as they 
went in search of 12 points from 
a one-jnnings match. 

After rain on Wednesday and 


Ihursaay. tne pitch was still 
damp when Butcher and Clin- 
ton wa!ked*out to take guard . At 
lunch. Surrey bad made 122 for 
the loss of Butcher. Looking for 
runs. Surrey then lost five 
1 wickets to Barwick and Omong 
before Pocock made his declara- 
tion at 210 for sax from 59 overs. 

James Whitaker made 106 
not out in Leicestershire's total 
of 262 for six before bad light 
brought a halt at Grace Road. 
Whitaker hit his fifth century 
this summer offl64 bolls, in 148 
minutes. Morris, too, was an- 
other to crown a splendid 
innings by making a hundred. 
He had been 86 when Derby- 
shire resumed at 300 for seven. 

Alvin Kallicharran moved to 
■his 83rd hundred, his fifth in 17 
innings this summer, at 
EdgbasioiL where Warwickshire 
beat Yorkshire after two for- 
feited innings, by 54 runs.. Set to 
make 283 m 52 overs to win. 
Yorkshire's baiting was rounded 
up for 228. 


0*011 veira's 146 not out was 
his best first-class score and his 
fourth first-class hundred. It wjJl 
have done him the world of 
good after a slightly disappoint- 
ing season, and the last 80 or so 
of his runs were splendidly 
made. He is not very talL but, 
like his father, he is not short of 
strength. No one could hit the 
ball harder with a shorter 
backlifl than BasiL 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE: first tarings 209 
for fl dec (C W J Athay 73). 

Second Inrrings 

P w Romataes c D'Obvoto b Radford to 

K P Tonritns not oui 46 

CWJAtfteybD'Olivalra 42 


P Bataondga c Radford b D'Oivwra 1 

fR C Russet not out It 

Total (3 writs) IIO 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-18. 2-89, 3-95. 
BOWLING: Radford 6-1-21-1; PrUgeon 4- 
1-10-0: Petal 7-1-184: Hfinflwotth17-6- 
41-0: Newport 2-0G-0: D'Oliveira 10-5-17- 


WORCESTERSHIRE: Fmt Inntags 
T S Cures c sub b Uoyda ..42 


D B D'Otwaira not out 148 
D M Snstri c and 0 Gravaney 5 
G A Hick c Attiey D WMsh 


‘P A Naato c Athay b Btmbnoga 
D N Patsl not out 


Extras (b 3. to 3. nb 1) . 


Total (4 wkts dec. 71.3 overs) — 300 


JSJ Rhodoa. P J Newport N V Radford. R 


I Jlbngworlh and A P Pndgeon did not bat. 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-69. 2-78. 3*233, 4- 
281 

BOWUNG' WaMi 21-3-100-1; Lawrence 
12-0-55-0: Lloyds 17-2-76-1 : Gravenay 
10-1-42-1; Bainbfldoe 3.3*1*21*1. 
Umpires: J H Hampshire and PB Wight 


with a course record 
Nick Faldo (74 equals 149) and 
Paul Way, who disqualified 
himself* by failing to sign bis 
card, were victims of the half- 
way guillotine. 

SECOND ROUND LEADERS: JOB uriass 
atattd): 136: A Chamley 69. 67; I Bafcar- 
Fdnctt (An) 68. 68. 137? P Baker 67, 70. 
138 S BafestartU <Sp) 68. 69. 139: N 
Crosdy (US) 70, 69; I Mosey 72. 87; M 
McNulty (Zan) 67, 72; D Farierty 68, 71. 
140: R Chapman 74. 66; A Johnstone 

(Zm) 70. 70: D Smyth (Ire) 73, 67: B 

T«1: S Ly* " 


i Lyle 70. 71: D 


Langer (WG) 75. 65. 

Lfewafiyn 72. 69: M MoUard 68. 73: B 
McCoM Sa. 73; R Davis (Aus) 68. 73; O 


Moore (Aus) 72. 69: R Stewart (Can) 68. 
— , M Wiltshire 


73. 142: Putaf Hamson 73. 69. 1 

ISA) 70. 72: D Dumian 67. 75: D WBtems 


(SA) 

73. 6B-.C Mason 66. 74; j Gonzalez (Bt) 


73, 69: G Brand Jnr71. 71; I Woosnam < . 
68. 143: PMo Harrison 74, 69; C 

O'Connor Jtn ((re) 73, 70: V Farrandaz 

(Af^74, 6S; S Torrence 70, 73; P Curry 


Ptulo H 

Jtn tav) 

8; S Tore 

: L Jones, 68. 75. 

Davies makes 
up ground 


All three leaders in the WPGA 
tournament at Borlange. Swe- 
den. scored a one under par, 71 
yesterday, so that the position is 
unchanged at the top. Karen 
Lunn, of Australia, leads 
Liselotxe Neumann (Sweden) 
and Peggy Conley (United 
States) by two strokes on 212, 
four under par. 

A second Swede, Marie 
Wen n erst en, achieved the low- 
est round of the tournament so 
far. 69. to move into fourth 
place on 216. The best placed 
British player is Laura Davies, 
winner Iasi year of the WPGA 
Ring & Brymer Order of Merit. 
WUh a third round of 70 she lies 
five strokes behind the leader. 

The weather was better yes- 
terday but torrential rain ts 
forecast today and. with the 
course already saturated, there 
are fears that the three-round 
totals, will already have decided 
the winner 


LEADING SCORES (British unlaw s 

212: K Lunn (AusL 70.7171. 214: 

Neumann (Sms). 7to7l .71; P Corf 
72.71.71. 216: M Mtanrwrsten 

74,7359. 217: L Davies. 74,73,70. 218: 1 

Gncfr-Whinaker. 73,72.73. 221: M Thom- 
son. 75.75,71: J Comtachan. 757373; C 
PBntort. 73,7573. 222: J Forrest 
75.75.72: D Rflfo, 74.75,73. 


YACHTING 


BURNHAM WEEK RESULTS 
Ctass ir 1, SKtowmdar (J Om 


.The 


Red Dragon (P lm; 

Herring). Ctass 2: 1. Fitata of Burnham 0 

L Geaves): 2. Erotic Bbw (L G Baker); 3, 

Carronade V (P CtamantaL Ctass S 1. 
Harmony (P Dyer): 2. HuBabaBoo (D 
Evans); a Local Hera n fR j Beales). 
Class 4s 1, Krystal of Mersey (J A 
GozzetO: 2. Cheater of Bumham (A H 
CrakeiT 3, Fbcochta (P j CHton). Ctasa 5: 
1. Fsst Knirfd (R Sutton): 2. Mirage (R 
Towafl); 3-jET ffi T AltenL ctass 6: 1. 
Freelance ® Lariunan): 2, Conference (D 

J ChUds): i s— *— 3f - 

Ctass 7; 1. fi 

JR B Wrotn). Ctass to 1. Squalus fC 
Thiwh); Z Nelly Dean (B H Coot* 3, 
ficelle (JPinneyL Ctass 9:1. MtssMuffett 
ft. R Whttej: 2 Wvtisnce (P C Wood); 3, 
Bara Neoeewtes (C Kwa). Conteua 32* 
L »ria P W Brittain): z Accelerando (R 
£wlney)i ft Serntfis 11 (J MeWn. 

L Come), OragooK i. Water Rat (I C 

MMrfka. RojoWYiidw): a" 


GaiipettetJ 


1. CsrindeBe (A J Marsh): 2. Coreas 


Munrot; 3,' Corafla > (V Mailer) 
1. Gwanmeson 


SB® 

3 .JUi 


J 




r 


\ 




1 


FOOTBALL 


Sweepers queue 

up to make 
life difficult for 
West Ham 

JBy Clive White 

West Ham United, making stifle their progress. Anyone 


a start to the season that Allan 
Wells would be proud of, seem 
to have discovered in the past 
year the knack: of winning that 
has for more seasons than 
London can care to remember 


we sign has got to be better 
than what we have got already 
in the first team," Lyafl said. 

Today their embryonic state 
of perfection is threatened by 
Oxford United at the Manor 


been privy only to residents of Ground. Oxford, as LyaU 
Merseyside. For probably the concedes, are a creative side 


if 


first time since Arsenal in the 
early seventies, the capital has 
a genuine contender for the 
championship. 

West Ham proved last sea- 
son that they have the stamina 
to. carry them successfully 
through the marathon season 
and that they have the ability 
to put together clusters of 
good performances which is 
the key to overall success. Last 
season they strung together 
two such periods of ex- 
cellence. From mid-October 
to mid-December they won 
nine consecutive league games 
to move from 11th to third 
position. But, more impres- 
sively, later in the season, 
while under the immense 
handicap of having to play 
their last 10 games in 27 days, 
they registered eight victories. 

The fact that that particular 
burst still left them trailing the 
Merseysiders is an indication 
of the magnitude of their task. 
For the moment, at least, they 
are superior to Liverpool and 
Everton by virtue of being the 
only first division dub with a 
perfect record after the open- 
ing two games. But since the 
Merseyside clubs each man- 
aged to win only one of their 
first three games last season, 
not too much should be read 
into this small chapter. 

Any fears that McAvennie 
and Cottee, who bagged 52 
goals between them last sea- 
son, had lost their magic touch 
when failing to convert a 
single goal between them 
against Coventry last Saturday 
were firmly allayed at Old 
Trafford on Bank Holiday 
Monday when McAvennie 
deposited a brace of goals in 
their joint account The fact 
that West Ham went to Man- 
chester in such a positive 
frame of mind and that so 
many onlookers expected 
them to win is proof of the 
new attitude which surrounds 
Upton Park these days. 

They have not so much 
toughened up as become in- 
dividually more sympathetic 
and understanding of each 
other's functions. Confirma- 
tion of the unity to be found in 
the side has been reflected by 
the decision of John LyaU, the 
manager, not to introduce any 
notable new faces to the dub 
this summer. “We’ve got two 
or three youngsters with great 
poiential and we don’t want to 


unlikely to defend as stub- 
bornly as did Coventry who 
by introducing a sweeper, 
restricted West Ham to one 
86th minute goal. LyaU ex- 
pects to see increasing use of a 
sweeper system against his 
elusive double act and it is 
worth noting that Perryman, 
now with Oxford, performed 
this rote against West Ham 
late last season. “If sides do 
succeed in squeezing the space 
for McAvennie and Cottee it's 
up to them to find new areas. 
It's a credit to the game when 
new systems are introduced. It 
presents a different view , a 
new challenge.** Gale, their 
match-winner against Cov- 
entry. must test his ankle. 
Hilton stands by to deputise as 
he did at Old Trafford. 

Fellow Londoners Arsenal 
meet the Merseyside challenge 
head-on at Anfield where 
Williams will play if Robson 
or Rix are unfit Nicholas, 
who has made an excellent 
start to the season, will 
endeavour to show Liverpool 
what they are - missing; the 
Scot was reported to be on the 
verge of joining Kenny 
Dalglish's team during the 
close season. 

If Liverpool are less than 
satisfied with their early 
points haul they should spare 
a thought for Manchester 
United, currently joint bottom 
of an unofficial league table 
without a point to their illus- 
trious name. Last season they 
opened their account with a 
stunning collection of 10 
successive victories. Ron 
Atkinson, their manager, as- 
sumes that what went wrong 
against Arsenal and West 
Ham cannot possibly do so 
against less distinguished 
Londoners as Chariton Ath- 
letic and retains the same ride. 

If the early confidence of 
Lennie Lawrence, the 
Charlton manager, and his 
• players had not been punc- 
tured enough by the four goals 
that Nottingham Forest 
drilled through them. Brian 
Gough, the Forest manager, 
speared it still further by 
criticizing his team for failing 
to win more easilv. I shall 
further demoralize Charlton, 1 
am afraid, by saying that if 
United cannot win this one 
with something in hand then 
they should forget about the 
championship forthwith. 


Celtic are the acid 
test for Rangers 


By Hugh Taylor 


While Celtic are favourites to 
beat Rangers at Ibrox tomorrow 
in the first Scottish league match 
to be televised live, David Hay, 
their manager, points out: 
“Form before an Old Firm 
match goes for nothing." 

Despite that Celtic have been 
playing much more efficiently 
than Rangers, whose credibility 
suffered with an embarrassing 
struggle to overcome East Fife 
in a scoreless cup tie on 
Wednesday. 

Rangers are also beset with 
selection problems. Graeme 
Souness, the player-manager, is 
under suspension and there are 
doubts about the fitness of West, 
Bums and Dawson, who were 
injured in midweek. 

Never, however, have Rang- 
ers been in such need of victory 
over their oldest rivals. Al- 
though there have been signs 
that expensive imports are 

beginning to settle and a pleas- . 
ing pattern is emeigmg. the temn 

has hardly brought delight to the 

supporters, who are concerned 
about poor finishing, and the 
giving away of foolish goals, 
befoai would leave Rangers 
trailing Cchic by five points and 
bring a torrent of criticism with 

,L Ai present Celtic are the 
better-balanced side of thetwo, 
Jujd in Johnston and McClair 
they have the sharpest, anackers 
hi the premier division. This 
£aS. them co uld be the acid 


test for a Rangers team which 
cost a fortune. 

There will be excitement, too, 
for Edinburgh enthusiasts. Al- 
though Hibernian and Heart of 
Midlothian, who meet at Easter 
Road this afternoon, have not 
reached the heights so far. there 
is hope that both now have the 
resources to put themselves in a 
challenging position for honours 
before long. There should be 
more entertainment than has 
been provided in recent Edin- 
burgh derby matches. 

Aberdeen will have Leighton, 
their international goalkeeper, 
back in action after injury for 
their match with Dundee at 
Piltodrie. But they will have to 
be at their best if they are to take 
the points from opponents who 
are playing such confident and 
relaxed football that they may 
find themselves among the 
contenders for the 
championship. 

However. Dundee United are 
still the side playing the best 
football in the premier division 
and could become league lead- 
ers tonight by beating the dis- 
consolate St Mirren at 
Tannadice. 

Hamilton and Falkirk have 
failed to make an impact since 
dieir arrival in the top flight and 
they are hardly likely to improve 
their lowly positions today at 
the expense, respectively, of 
Motherwell and Clydebank. 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


Coventry v Everton 
Coventry. 

Liverpool v Arsenal 
Hoooer continues to deputise tor 
tJEfKured Grobtwtear In ihaLwaj 
pooTtoSn. W»mi« shop» of 
Saying for Arsena* depw»d on the 
fan ess of Rbt and Robson. 

. Luton v Newcastle 

Hatted is not K enough to tacehjs 

former dub so News#. wt» missed 
a penalty to midweek, contmues for 
' Luton. Wflson, who scored on ho 
debut, continues in place of Presce. 
Mnakened by flu. Newcastle's Gas- 
: SwiwSns h* midfield place. 

: Manchester Utd v 
Charlton * 

oWsSSSSrKSSS 

SiSrKn remains substitute. 
raSton. who were well beaten m 
SSw*. are also ****”&- 
Norwich v Southampton 
Norwich, performing for the first 
gSiTftSrtdf their new SUm 

their former England winger who 

almost left the dub In the summer 


Putney, Mendham and Hodgson are 
all injured and unavailable. Moran 
and Armstrong are back in conten- 
tion for Southampton. 

Oxford v West Ham 
Langan. who missed the Repubflc of 
Ireland's get-together at UUeshafl 
because of a swollen toe, expects 
to be Ht tor Oxford. Gale must test 
an ankle; HBton Is on stand-by. 

QPR v Aston Villa 

Lee, Rangers' signing from Liver- 
pool. Is set to make Ins debut For 
Villa Keown makes his debut in 
place ot waitams. sent oft in 
midweek and about whom they 
have received an offer from the 
other Rangers. Kerr takes over from 
the injured Thompson. rs 

Sheff Wed v Chelsea 
Chelsea stick with the side that has 
opened with two draws. Nevfci tests 
a thigh. Wednesday, who have also 
opened with two draws, look to 
Hirst their new agning, for a 
positive result this time. 

Tottenham v Man C 

fan BrightweH. the 18-year-old sen 
of Robbie Brightwe* and Anne 
Packer, the former Olympic ath- 
letes, is given another run-out by 
City. Baker is stfll injured. Totten- 
ham wilt be without FaJco, who is 
suspended 







■hT**-V * 


„ t : : 

t: ' \ . + * * „ - i**’ ' 


II till! Ilf 






YACHTING 


Spice of danger as 
25 brave men 
challenge the seas 


Winning form: Steffi Graf, of West Germany, on her way to victory in the US Open tennis championship- Report, page 34 


CYCLING 


Ekimov dictates the pace by 
destroying pursuit time 


From John Wflcockson, Colorado Springs 


The astounding time of 4 
minutes 30.532 seconds re- 
corded by Vyalcheslav Ekimov. 
of the Soviet Union, in 
Thursday's qualifying 4.000 me- 
tre pursuit rides promises much 
in the world cycling champion- 
ships which have started here. 

This time by Ekimov. the 
defending champion, was five 
seconds faster than the best 
previous performance on an 
outdoor track set by Steve Hegg 
of America at the 1984 Olympic 
Games. But it cannot be consid- 
ered as a world record because it 
was done in man-to-nian com- 
petition. not in a time trial. 

Ekimov. from Leningrad, 
represents a new generation or 
Soviet cyclists. He has the speed 
of a sprinter — he completed the 
first kilometre in 68 seconds 
from a standing start — and the 
endurance of a road racer. 

As preparation for these 
championships, he took part in 
a stage race in the Rocky 
Mountains, winning a five-mile 
hill climb ahead of the Olympic 


GYMNASTICS 


China host 
new look 
world cup 

By Peter Aykroyd 

The World Cap, which begins 
in Beijing today, will be the first 
major event to be staged by 
C hina on behalf of the Federa- 
tion Internationale de 
Gynmastiqne (FIG) since they 
were re-admitted to that body in 
1978. 

The tournament wfl] also be 
the first World Cap to be held 
for four years afte the FIG 
decided to change it from an 
amnal occasion to a quadrennial 
one. The World Cup was inaago- 
rated in London in 1975 in order 
to provide more individual world 
class competition for leading 
nations, sadi as Japan and the 
United States, who are not 
eligible for the European 
CfeunpiOfisbips. 

Foot years ago, the Chinese, 
curiously enough, held centre 
stage at Zagreb. Then, Li Niag 
humiliated the world champion, 
Yuri ‘Korolyov, of the Soviet 
Union, by winning the men’s 
title with onstandiBg technical 
virtuosity. Four years on, 
Korolyov, who regained the 
world crown at Montreal last 
year, after die reigning cham- 
pion. Dmitri Bilozercfaev, was 
injured in a car crash, will seek 
revenge on Li. now ranked five in 
the world. Li is still a formidable 
competitor, but bis recent in- 
consistency coaid see bis col- 
league Xn Zbiqiang as 
Korolyov's main threat. 
Korolyov wfll be supported by 
aU-roander, Valentin Mogflny. 

The women's competition is 
likely to remain Soviet domi- 
nated raider the two world 
champions Yelena Shnstannova 
and Oksana Omelyanchik. 
However, both were upstaged 
this summer at the Moscow 
Goodwill Games by their tal- 
ented compatriot Vera 
Kolesnikova. They will also be 
under pressure from Ekaterina 
Szabo of Romania, the Olympic 
runner-up, making her last bid 
for an overall world title. Roma- 
nia are also entering Daniels 
Silivas and Came Ira Voinea, 
while tiie East Germans will 
field Martina Jenscfa and 
CabrieUa Faharicb. 


US OPEN 


TENNIS RESULTS 


MEN'S SINGLES Second raw id (US 
Unless stated): H Leontis (Pi) bt H de Is 
Pena. (Are). 6-1. 6<2. 6-0; J B Svsnsscn 
<Sws> M J Baras (GBj. 6-4, 6-2. 8-0: A 
Knckstssi M P Amacone. 4-6. 4^. 6-3, 6- 
4. 7-6 :JKnektX John Sadn. 6-3. 6-3. 6-4; 
B &B»rt bi N OOzor (Mgena). 5-7. 6S. 6- 
4. 6-2: T WBuson bt P McNames (Aus). 6- 
1. 6-2. 6-1. A Mansdort (isr) « F Maori 
liiexi. 7-53-0. 6-0: M Purteb M B Green. 

6-3. 64. 6-2. B Mo* (SA)WC Hooper. 5-7. 

02. 64. 7-5, M Freeman bt C Swjn (SAL 


road race champion. Alexi 
GrewaJ and helping his team to 
win the 50-mile team lime triaL 

Neither of Britain's two en- 
trants made the last 16. though. 
Chris Board man. from Liver- 
pool. showed promise in his first 
senior world championship 
appearance in recording 
4:48.409. a personal best. Better 
things were expected from the 
two British professionals here. 
Tony Doyle and Shaun Wallace. 
Doyl was being regarded as the 
more serious challenger to the 
reigning world champion. Hans- 
Hcnrik Oersted of Denmark, in 
the 5.000 metres pursuiL 

Wallace, who should also 
qualify 1 for the quarter-finals, 
has made a dramatic entry into 
the professional ranks. In the 
past two weeks he has survived 
two crashes, one with a car 
during training, and he has set a 
new world record, even if it is an 
obscure one. in the flying start 
one kilometre. 

Doyle has also had problems. 
When leaving the velodrome 


after a training session on 
Wednesday, his calf muscle was 
bitten by a police dog and he 
needed/ first aid treatment. “We 
regret the incident," a police 
spokesman said. “But we fell it 
did not affect his 
competitiveness.’’ 

RESULTS: Amateur 4.000 mtras porsuft 
qualifying roan* 1. V Sumov (USSR). 
4:30532; 2, GUmw&S (USSR). 434.271: 

). 436635: 4. 0 Woods 
5. B Doert (EG). 43753a, 
6. C Fischer (Cz). 439.043. British 
ptadngs: 24. C Bostonian, 448.409; 28, R 
Musa 451390. 

• France has been selected over 
Colombia to host the 1989 
world championships, the Inter- 
national Cycling Union an- 
nounced in Colorado Springs 
before the championships 
began. 

The track races will be held in 
Besancon and the road events in 
Chambery. which are located 
about 200 miles east of Paris. 

The 1987 world champion- 
ships were awarded to Vienna 
two years ago and the 1988 
championships were allotted to 
Brussels. ' 


RUGBY UNION 


Huntsman answers 
the all-star call 


By David Hands 

Paul Huntsman, capped twice together 
by England in New Zealand last Frenchn 
year, has been brought into the Jean-Pal 
Internationa] XV which will them. BI 
play a charity game against with 1 
Ulster at Ravenhill today — a countryi 
tasty aperitif before the new havoc ii 
rugby season begins officially on they pla 
Monday. Huntsman, the iansoni 
Headingley loose-head prop, re- Waitti 
places the much-capped Orr, p^ia^rr 
who has influenza. former 


The match is to raise funds for 
Ken McCormick, a 21 -year-old 
former CTYMS prop, who was 
paralysed from the neck down 
when the scrum collapsed in a 
club match earlier this year. His 
misfortune has drawn players 
from all the countries in the 
Five Nations championship, as 
well as Wilson, the former All 
Blacks captain, who is in Lon- 
don on business for the or- 
ganizers of next year’s World 
Cup. 

Ulster, whose expanding fix- 
ture-list includes early-season 
games with South of Scotland, a 
Canadian touring side and the 
Fijian Barbarians, are not at full 
strength — their bade row has 
been rejigged in the absence, 
through illness, of Carr and 
Duncan — but will doubtless 
play with their customary fer- 
vour. Brady, their scrum -half, 
will take every opportunity to 
impress his country's selectors 
this season, in die hope of 
working his way into Ireland’s 
side against Romania on 
November 1. 

The guest side, captained by 
Cieran Fitzgerald, brings Jona- 
than Davies and Nigel Melville 


together at half-back, with two 
Frenchmen — Eric Blanc and 
Jean-Pa trick Lafond — outside 
them. Blanc, not to be confused 
with his more illustrious 
countryman, Blanco, created 
havoc in Ulster’s ranks when 
they played the Italian Barbar- 
ians on touflast May. 

Waiting in the wings as a 
replacement will be Irwin, the 
former Ulster captain and a 
1983 British Lion in New 
Zealand, who believed bis ca- 
reer was over after severely 
damaging medial ligaments in 
his knee in a match against 
Connacht last December. But he 
has acted upon advice from J P 
R Williams, the former Wales 
foll-back, and has built up the 
muscles around the knee and 
now hopes tc resume playing at 
representative level It will be 
curious if he does not find 
himself called upon this 
afternoon. 

The season in England will 
also take on a greenish tinge 
next weekend when tbe Irish 
Wolfhounds stage their annual 
September tour to London. 
Among their games, the Wolf- 
hounds. now in their 30th year, 
will help London Irish celebrate 
the official opening of their new 
clubhouse extensions (costing 
almost £200.000) next Saturday. 

Several of those players in- 
volved in Belfast today appear 
for the Wolfhounds, notably the 
national back-row p£r of Mat- 
thews and Anderson. London 
Irish, of course, wilt be able to 
call upon MacNeill Ireland’s 
full-back, who plays for the 
Internationa! XV today. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Double biU 
opens 
new season 

By Keith Macklin 

The new season kicks off with 
a double bill this weekend. 
Today, tbe new 10-team na- 
tional amateur league is 
launched, and tomorrow, the 
professionals resume the stage. 

The national administrator of 
the British Amateur Rugby 
League Association, Maurice 
Oldroyd, is brimming with op- 
timism over the future of the 
first ever amateur league to be 
created from among the sprawl- 
ing local leagues in Cumbria, 
Lancashire and Yorkshire. He 
expects that today's five opening 
fixtures will draw attendances to 
rival many professional second 
division dubs, and says that the 
choice of Saturday fin- fixtures, 
with a 2.30pm uniform kick-offi 
was a deliberate move to give 
fans tbe opportunity to watch 
two games in a weekend. 

Meanwhile, the professionals 
start their season with several 
attractive clashes in prosptxn, 
and the biggest interest in- 
evitably focussing on. yet an- 
other attempt by the injury; 
prone Teny Holmes to launch a. 
new career . with Bradford 
Northern. 

The champions, Halifax, who 
have mkkri Graham Eaidie, the 
former Australian international 
fbllback, to their ranks, are 
anxious to prove that they are 
worthy champions, but wiB find 
a revived Featherstone Rovers 
tough opponents in their first 
game. Also looking to make a 
good start are the Challenge Cup 
winners. Castleford, who travel 
to the ground of the premiership 
holders. Warrington , who fin- 
ished last season powerfully and 
are likely to make a lag impact 
with Les Boyd, the Australian 
forward, back in harness. 

There will be an almighty 
scramble to avoid the -bottom 
four (dares this season, with four 
dubs going down and only two 
coming up. Candidates fin* the 
drop are invariably the pro- 
moted dubs, and two of them, 
Barrow and Salford, have hard 
opening games. Barrow enter- 
tain Hull .Kingston Rovere, and 
Salford travel to Wigan, who 
will want to give their Graham 
Lowe, expensive New Zealand 
coach, a rousing send-off at 
Central Park. In Jhe second 
division, winch like the first, 
will have a play-off sponsored 
by Stones Bitter, it will be 
interesting to see if Doncaster 
can maintain last season's 
revival 


“The greatest danger in -this 
rare is failing overboard. Many 
things can go wrong, but that is 
the only one 1 can do nothing 
about, concedes Philippe 
Jeantot. tbe French solo sailor, 
on the eve of the second BOC 
Challenge — a single-handed 
race around the world which 
starts from Newport at 3pm 
today. 

This is tbe sailor’s Everest. 
27,000 miles of solitary torture 
against the dements and fellow 
man - In the heavy weather to 
follow, each of the 25 contes- 
tants win nurse his boat through 
heavy yvwt, and have night- 
mares of capsizing, collision and 
dismasting. The pressures, are 
just as great in tbe calm periods 
too, when, each frets that others 
are faring better and tbe con- 
stant flogging of sails becomes 
no less a torture than lying 
beneath a dripping tap. 

Their only respite will be the 
compulsory stops at Cape 
Town. Sydney and once round 
Cape Horn, Rio de Janeiro, 
where they are given the chance 
to repair their damaged yachts 
and recharge personal bartenes. 

Jean tot won the last of these 
marathons four years ago and is 
favourite to win again inis time. 
Sailing Credit Agricole m, the 
60ft Ribadeau Dumas designed 
yacht, he has already claimed a 
solo distance record of 290 mites 
in 24 hours against the 247 set in 
the last BOC race, and hopes to 
dip at least 15 days on his 
earlier 159-day record fix’ the 
dreum navigation. 


By Barry RcfcthaQ 

sr in this • Ranged against him, 
nL Many are JO others, all equally d«»- 
Kittbaits mined to be the fimt back to 
s nothing Newport next May, together 
Philippe with another 14 -iriiosedcto 

>k> saflor. dominate m class 2 fbr 3®™?? 
and BOC tanging ip length between ^ 
le-banded and 50 feet, including Harry 
Id which MiicheL the British entrant . m 
at 3pm 62, the oldest competitor tn the 
race. 

; Everest. Some like Jeantot are P* 1 ®- 
ry torture fesskmals. but abolBted among 
ind fellow the entries are builders, waca- 
reather to ers, authors, a cowboy, demo- 
5 conies- lition contractor and a dentist 
it through and each has an equal cfianceot 
ve night- winning. 

listonaud Robin Knox- Johnston, the 
Bures are fi^t man to sail around the 
m periods worfd alone non-stop, is chair- 

hat others manofthe BOC race committee 

tbe con- knows more, than most 

; becomes about the pressures involved, 
tan lying Yesterday he presented his view 
i. of the Challenge ahead. “ We 

rill be the expect casualties. We hope there 
at Cape win be no fatalities. T believe as 
ice round many as 10 wiU drop out- But 
i Janeiro, there can be no chance of 
he chance triumph without tbe possibility 
ed yachts of tragedy, and no ultimate 
batteri es, challenge without ultimate de- 
mands. Many will be frightened 
“ 0 0 ’S near to death at some point 
lifetime. 

iTm live with that fear and master it 

.dStoSS alone- They wfl pustaihou- 


sefves to personal limits they 
never knew they possessed. And 
in the achievement will find a 
onc/> of ffaris fi u? ri on that I can 
only describe as sheer ecstacy.” 

That is exactly what this BOC 
ChaDenge is all about. 


ROUND WORLD CONTENDERS 




mmmmm 





fcw;. irTJ.ii! hi - , l ;ii,rLi'Tj 












Mtorfd raoofd for frwfastest dreum- 
navigation tor boats under 12 
metres ovwafl lengfa. He returns 
this year wife a purpose-buK 
boar (fiat gained second ptace 
among the monotiuls hi the re- 
cent carteberg Transatlantic race. 

Jeait Yves Terfain < - 

Natfonaffly: French 

Age: 42 

Boat SO ft UAP4four Medecins 
Sans Fronfcdms. 

Teriataoone of France's most 
vfoerienced solo satora who bets 
competed in every slngle- 
hamted transatlantic race since 


designed forlhe rice. Is mo most 
futuristic in-the fleet Starts race, 
with a one and a half hour time pen- 
alty for late arrival far Newport 

John BiddleQonte 

Ha tto na flty: Austraflan 
Age? 42 ■ 

Boat 60ft ACt Crusader 
This AustraXan has extensive 
offshore racing experience but this 

ishtefirst major single-handed , 

event Biddecoms's original boat 
was wrecked at tha end of his 

qualifying cnise across the Padflc 

earner this war and hehas 
taken over Claire Marty's entry af- 
ter tha Frenchwoman ran out of 

finds. 

Ian Kfernan 

Nationality: AustraBa 

Ag« 45 

Boat 60ft TripteM Spirit of 
Sydney. 


tT ^s2*sSii 

<r w-it 1 1 ■ ffiiTi iiX uta > j 


safe. Fit and highly 

'SS SSffiS 

Dick McBride 
tUBonaOjr New Zealand 
Age: 42 

Boat 6Dft Neptune’s Express. 
Another veteran from the pre- 
vious BOC race. McBride only .. 

gained the sponsorship money 
needed to compete ki this race six 
daysago. Hebidt the boat him- 
self ana is expected to feature 
more strongly as the race 
progre ss es. 

Ja cques de Roux . 
Nationality: French 
Age:49 

Boat 50ft SWoem IV 
De Roux starts the race as 
favourite for dass 2 honours after 
buMtog up an eight-rfay toed 
over h£ nearest rivals in the (ast 
Challenge before hia boat sank 
midway behraan NewZeatond and 
Cape Horn. 


Harry Mitchell 
NetionaHpGB 
Age 62 

Boat 41ft Double Cross 
Mftchal, a former garage owner 
from Portsmouth Is the veteran 
among the fleet and one of nine 
unsponsored entrants. He also has 
the second smallest boat and is 
competing for the challenge this 
race offers and not the fane 
money. 


Barry Pickthall 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


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urdass StauefK U Navrattova W B 
Nsgeteen. 6 - 2 . 7 - 5 : K Maleava (Bul) beat J 
Byrne (Aus). 6 - 1 . 6 - 2 : £ Winter lAus! bt G 
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5 , 64 : E Bunn bt M Van Nostrand. 6 - 2 . 2 - 
6 . 7 -ft P Sraver bt C BaitoS-Cserepy 
(Hung). 7 - 6 . 60 ; R Regoi (IQ » T Phe^s, 
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Croft (GB) K P Harper. 64 ). 7 - 6 : H Ketes 
(Can) tX B BWW(VTO}. 6 - 1 . 7 - 5 : B Bowes 
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*“!?*•*< 
d, «ii 







THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1 986 


33 


Weekend television and radio programmes 

Edited by Peter Davalle and Elizabeth Larard 


BBC 1 


‘V-AM 


. aa ° Z&3Z& 


Uitivwtily. Ends at ( 6.15 Oood 


> Britain 


4407110 

_ £45 The 

Saturday Picture Stow 
presantad by Mark Curry 
and Chary) Baker. 
i£H Fftrc M^Wforc* (1982 

Perste Knambatra and 
Edward MuJhare. A 
science fiction adventure 
about a force of freedom 
fighters which patrols the 
sues. Directed by Hal 
*--_v Needham. 

12.30 Grandstand introduced by 
. Desmond Lynam. The 
; timetable Is as follows: 

. 1235 Football: 1.00 News 
and weather; 1.10 
Carriage Driving; 1.40. 


Morning E 
presented by Mike Morris. 
Jfews at 740: regional 
report at 7-08: sport at 


7.30 The Wide Awake Chib. 


IT V LONDON 


**• 


2.10 and 2.40 Radng; 

50 Water 


1.50. 2£0 and Z50 _ 

■ Ski-tog; 3.1Q Athletics 
-• £00 Final Score. 

News with Jan Learning. 
. Weather. 545 Sport arS 


£25 Get Fresh! in Cartiste 

Castle. 

[ 11J9 Punky Brewster. A new 
series about the 
- adventures of a snail gfri 
■ who fives with her puppy 
in a vacant Chicago 

apartment block. 

1 124)0 News 

1 12.05 Baint A Greavsie. (an St 
John and Jimmy Greaves 

review the sporting week 

12.30 Wrestling. 1i0 
AIrwotf. Adventure series. 
2.15 The Cuckoo Walts. 

1970s comedy starring 



BBC 1 


TV-AM 


MS Ope n University- Ends at 


1s$ 


BBS Play School. 9.15 Morning 
Worship. A national 
ecumenical celebration 
from Buiith Wells. Powys. 
10J10 Asian Magazine. Eastern 
music. 1020 Aristocrats. 
Prince Johannes von 
Thum und Taxis, of West 
Germany (r) 11.20 Cameo. 
The wildlife of the 


(L55 Good Morning Britain 
begins with Sunday 
Comment 7.00 Are You 
Awake Yet? 7.25 WAC 
Extra Includes a second 
showing of a report on the 
Duka of Edinburgh's 
Award Scheme. 


11.30 


Camaigue. In Provence, (r) 


820 Kefly on Sunday. News, 

weather, a review of the 
Sunday newspapers, and 
guests. 


- i 


Henry Foods sod Bette Davis (who won in Oscar for her role) in 
William Wyler's Jezebel ( Channel 4, II .OOpm) 


BBC 2 


£50 


Plane Keen, 


University. Ends at 


£30 


Regional news. 
XIVEur 



European Athletics 

Championships. 

Desmond Lynam 
• introduces the Men's 
Marathon; Men's 1 10- 
metres Hurdles Final; and 
Women's 10.000-metres 
Final. 

720 The Two Ronnie*. Messrs 
Corbett and Barker’s 
guests are Susannah York 
and Koo Stark; and 
tonight's film. The 
• Admxable Brighton. 

f.15 FBm: Tap* (1981) Starring 
. George C. Scott. Timothy 
, Hutton, Sean Penn and 
- Tom Cruise. A 

. • demonstration turns into a 

dangerous siege when 
. cadetsatatong- 

■- estabfished mlmary 

academy use their 
cfedpHned training to 
’ execute a protest against 
. .. its threatened closure. 
Directed by Harold 
Becker. 

10.15 Newt and Sport With Jan 
Leerntog. Weather. 

Mott on the Landscape. 

__ The first of a six-part 
- dramatization of Tom 
Sharpe's comic novel 
- ’ -* about (he conflict between 
;L‘ ; a couple who Hve in a 

* s stately home. Starring 
George Cole, Geraldine 
James. David Suchet and 
Julia McKenzie. (Ceefax) 
1120 FHm: The Prisoner of 
. Second Avenue. (1975) 

bg Starring Jack Lemmon 

and Anne Bancroft Tragi- 
; . comedy about a couple 
living in a New York City 
. „ apartment block having to 
endure ail the worst 
■aspects of urban fife in 
summer. Directed by 
Melvin Frank. 

- 1255 Weather 


245 European At 

Championships plus 
World Cup Gymnastics 
from Peking, worn 
Stuttgart coverage of the 
men's marathon; From 
Peking, exclusive 
coverage of the 
competition forthe men’s 

overall title. £45 Sports 

Results. 

5.00 News 

54)5 Blockbuster*. General 
knowledge show for 

teenagers. 

£35 The A-Team. The first of a 
new series about Hannibal 
Smith and his sofdiers.of 

fortune. Today, the Soviet 

government hires 
Hannibal and Iris men to 
capture an insane Russian 


general who has come to 


•21 




‘I 


V -TC 


■ r wr 








T - v - 



.1 

f '' ' • 



ie United States to start 
World War III. (Oracle) 

6-30 Blind Date. CHia Black 
hosts a new series of 

shows in which people 

choose blind dates and 

are then filmed on their 

days out 
7.15 Copy Cats. The first of a 
new series of satirical 

shows which today 
presents its own soap 
opera: DeadEnders. 
Starring Bobby Davro, 

7.45 3-2-1. A new series of 
game shows with 
entertainers Ted Rogers, 
Nana Mouskouri, Peter 
Skeltem and Norman 
Collier. (Oracle) 

8.45 News and sport 
9.00 Dempsey and 

Makepeace. A new 
adventure series about the 
partnership between a 

New York cop and a 

sophisticated British 
detective. Starring Michael 
Brandon and Giynis 
Barber. 

10.00 European Athletic* 
Championships. Jim 
Rosenthal with highlights 
of the day's events. 

10J0 LWT News Film: Twifi 
Zone the Movie. (1< 
four-m-onefull 1 1 
adaptation of the' 
television series about the 
supernatural. Stars 
include trie Morrow, Abbe 
Lane and Kathleen 
Quinlan. Directors are 
John Landis, Steven 


220 FHm: That Rhriera Touch 
(1966) Starring Eric 
Morecambe and Ernie 
Wise. The famous comedy 
duo play traffic wardens 
on a Riviera holiday who 
become Involved In a plan 
by a gang of Jewel thieves 
to smuggle gems into 
England. (Directed by Cliff 
Owen) 

3lS 5 Laramfo. A reformed 
criminal whom Jess has 
saved from Indians is 
being pressed by outlaws 
to return to his former 
criminal ways. (0 

4.45 FQm; Across the Pacific. 
(1942) Starring Humphrey 
Bogart MaryAstar and 
Sydney Greenstreet A 
World war Two spy 
thriller, set mostly at sea, 
about a US army officer 
who has been given a fake 
dishonourable discharge 
and told to trail an enemy 
agent aboard a ship bound 
for the Orient (Directed by 
John Huston). 

6,20 World Chess Report A 
review of the week's play 
in the contest between 
Kasparov and Karpov. 

£50 News View with Jan 
Leaning and Sue 
Carpenter . Weather. 

7-30 The Bolshoi Uve. The 
Bolshoi Ballet perform Las 
Sylph'tdes; followed by 
Spartacus Act II (8.10); 
and Divertissements 
<920): excerpts from The 
Nutracker, Swan Lake, Le 
Corsaire. and their highly 
praised Golden Age, which 
had its British premidre a 


indude $rtma Ballerina 


Spielberg. Joe Danteand 
George Mfi 


Pier. 

1225 Bliss. The first of a new 
series of rock muse show, 


featuring tonight the rock 
King. 1250' 


BBCI, 1055am 


group i 

Baron. 

1.40 Night Thoughts 


I The 


and the leading male 
dancer Irek Mukhamedov. 
The Orchestra of London 
is conducted by Alexander 
Kopytor. 

10-30 XIV European Athletic* 
Cham p ion ship* . 

Desmond Lynam 
introduces highlight's from 
the day’s events. 

1120 Fftn: The Mask of Satan* 
It 961) Starring Barbara 
Steele and John 
. Richardson. Airend- 
setting Italian horror 
movie, adapted from a 
Gogol story . about a 
doctor travelling to a 
medical congress who 
accidentally brings to fife a 
witch burnt at the stake 
200 years earlier- Directed 
by Mario Bava. Ends at 
1250. • - 


CHANNEL 4 


1.15 Charnel 4 Racing from 
Sandown Park. John 
Oaksay introduces the 
Ladbroke Holidays 


itheWHd. Part 
One of a three-part series 
about a buzzard, (r) 124)0 
Cartoon 12.10 See Heart 

the^Mringfo^l^d 0 
1225 Farming Indudes a report 
from Fulback, a fanning 
area in Lincolnshire which 
the government has 
pinpointed for the possible 
dumping of nuclear waste, 
l from last 


1 TV/LONDON 


Lake 


925 Wake Up London. 
Windsurfing at Bra 
in Berkshire. 925 1 
Ramjet. Cartoons (r) 9.45 
Sylvester. Cartoons (r) 



David Jason, Nicholas Lyndhnrst (BBCl, 8-3Spm). And (right) 
Paul McCann: The Monoded Mutineer (BBCl, 9.05pm) 


104)0 Morning Worship. A 
service from Ran* 


Sunday). 1258 Weather 
ineadiii 


Sportsman Club ! 

): International 
ire Grotto Stakes 
hand Bernard Sunley 
illing Stakes (3.00). ■ 

325 RkmArattierMan's 
Poison* (1951) Starring 
Bette Davis and Anthony 
Steel. Melodrama, about a 
best-selling thriller writer, 
in love with a young 
engineer, whose cnminal 
husband turns up at their 
lonely house on the 
Yorkshire Moors after 
committing a murder. 
Directed by Irving Rapper. 

54)5 Braokelde. Omnibus 


edition. (r) (Oracle). 

i Athletics 


64)0 European > 

Championship*. Jim 
Rosenthal introduces the 
men s 1 10-metres hurdles 
final; the triple jump; and 
the men’s marathon. 

620 Right to Repfy. Simone 
Mondesir, producer of 
Channel 4's Comment 
programme, defends her 
choice of speakers. 

74)0 News summary followed 


The Sons of Abraham. 


ie Sunnites of Arabia. 
720 A Comer of a Foreign 
Field. Men and women 
from Pakistan talk about 
their way of life In Britain. 
820 Newhart American 

domestic comedy starring 
Bob Newhart 
9.00 The Organization. A 
1970s drama series set in 
the public relations ' 
department of a large 
company. Starring Donald 
Sinden. 

10- 00 HBI Street Blues. Drama 
series about an Inner dty 
police unit in America. 
(Grade) 

11- 00 FBm: Jezebel* (1938) 
Starring Bette Davis, 
Henry Fonda. George 
Brent and Fay Bainter.. 
Bette Davis and Fay 
Bainter both won Oscars, 
in this melodrama about a 
spoflt southern belle who 
sets out to cause trouble 
among the men of her 

• town. Dir 
Wyier. 

1255 Hie twilight Zone. Series 
of dramas about the 
supernatural Tonight a - 
small community his 
survived an atomic war by 
taking the advice of an old 
man who lives hidden in a - - 
cave. Starring James 
Coburn. Ends at12S 


1-00 Neva headlines. 1.05 
Bonanza, (r) 155 Cartoon 
24X) EaetEndersjCeefax) 

34)0 FBm: The Sand Pebbles 
(1966) Starring Steve 
McQueen and Richard 
Attenborough. Drama sat 
in China during the civil 
war of 1926. about an 
American gunboat on the 
Yangtze river which 
becomes involved with 
Chinese warlords. 
Directed by Robert Wise. 
550 Tom and Jerry. 
Cartoon 

6.00 Pet Watch. The first in a 
new series about pets, 
presented by Bruce Fogle 
and Jan Batchelor. 
Featured today are the 
animals who take part in 
EastEnders; behind the 
scenes at a circus; plus 
phone-in advice and 
competitions. 

620 News with Jan Leeming. 

Weather. ■ 

5.40 Songs of Praise. 

Churches from Brighton 
and Hove loin with 
holidaymakers to sing 
hymns on th8 seafront 
(Ceefax) 

7.15 Ever Decreasing drefos. 
The return of the series 
about suburban 


Ran worth 
Stalthe in the Norfbfc 
Broads. (Oracle). 11.00 
Link. Education for the 
disabled. 


BBC 2 


650 Open University. Bids at 
1.30. 


.1120 Working for a Better Life, 
hifiip Whitehead talks to 


neighbours. Starring 
Richer “ ‘ ~ 


Phillip t 

families in the Durham 
village of Kettoe. where 3 
colliery was recently 
dosed, (r) 

12.00 Fortune. The influence of 

private wealth on society. 
150 Police 5 with Shaw 
Taylor. 1.15 European 
Folk Tale*. The Nut 
Maiden. 1.30 The Smurfs. 
Cartoons, (r) 

2.00 LWT News followed by 
European Athletics 
Championships plus 
World Cup Gymnastics 
from Peking, coverage of 
the finals or the men s 
1 500-metre relay and 
5000-metre relay from 
Stuttgart; and the 
women's championship 
from Peking. 

54)0 BuDseye. New series of 
darts competitions. 

520 Sunday Sunday. Gloria 
Hunniford hosts a new 
series of chat shows. 
Taking part wifi be actors 
John Alderton and Nigel 
Hawthorne; actress Thora 
Hird; and comedian Kenny 
Everett 
620 News. 


120 Sunday Grandstand: XfV 
European Athletics 
Championships. 

Desmond Lynam 
introduces coverage of the 
Men’s 50-kilometre Walk; 
Men’s High Jump Final; 
Men's Discus Final; 
Womens 4 x 100-metre 
Final; Men's 4 x 100-metre 
Final; Women's 1 ,500- 
metre Final; Men's 1 500- 
metre Final; Men's 5,000- 
metre Final; Women’s 4 x 
400- metre Final; and 
Men's 4 x 400-metre Final. 
550 Foley Square. American 
comedy series about a 
lawyer m a District 
Attorney’s office. Molly is 
nervous when she I earns 
that Judge Faraday, the 
tough man of -the bench, 
wifi be presiding over her 
first big case. 

7.15 Donatello. A documentary 
filmed In Florence, where 
the 600th anniversary of 
the birth of the sculptor 
Donatello Is being 
celebrated. His work is 
discussed by three leading 
modem sculptors, Henry 
Moore, Elisabeth Frink 
and Peter Rockwell, and 


the programmes includes 

is of his 


lard Briers, Penelope 
Wilton, Peter Egan and 
Geraldine Newman. 
(Ceefax) 

7.45 Howards’ Way. The first of 
a new drama serial about 
a family running s sailing 
business. Starring Maurice 
Col bourne, Jan I 
and Dufcae Gray. (C 


6.49 Mgtiway. Sr Harry 
Secombe begins a new 
series of his religious 

i W00X 


shows, this week from 
Newcastle. His guests 
indude Geordie star Tim 
Healy and folk group The 
Spinners; and Missions to 
Seamen chaplain the 
Reverend Enc Newman. 


directed by William 


- v, 



( Radio 4 ) 


rw* 


■On long wave. Stereo on VHF 
545mi Shipping. 6.00 News. 6.10 
Prelude (s). 620 
News; Fanning. 650 
Bayer. 655 weather; 
Travel 

750 News. 7.10 Today's 
Papers. 7.15 On Your 
Farm, 7.45 In V 


920 Thriller? Coffin on the 
Water, t^ Gwendoline 
Butler, read by Conrad 
Phillips. 958 Weather 

10.00 News 

10.15 Evening Servioe (s) 
1020 The Good Book. Brian 
Redhead continues his 
exploration of the Bible 

11.00 Science Now -In 


(Religious affairs. 750 
Down to Earth. 7.55 


Passing. Colin Trudge 

i The Bristol 


Weather; Travel 
820 News 8.10 Today's 


Papers. 8.15 Sport on 4. 
157 Weather; Travel 


passes through The 
Exploratory. 

11.30 The Million Pound Radio 
Show. Comedy show 
12.00 News; Weather. 1223 


-/Weather' 

80S CHnt Eastwood is The 
Man With No Part in I'm 
Sorry l Haven’t a Cfue. Panel 


Shipping Forecast 
VHF (available i 


Look At- by 



950 News Stand. John 
Sweeney reviews the 

ernttSES**, 

Goodman examines 
democracy in the political 
parties. Wrth 

contributions from eminent 


in England and 
S Wales arty) as above 
except 5.5554)0am 
Weather: Travel 155- 
2.00pm Programme News. 
4.00-64)0 Options: 44)0 - 

Never The same Again. 420 
Not Another Diet 
Programme £00 Modem 
European Authors. 

Ognazio Silone). 520 Every 
Scrap I Can Get. 


( Radio 3 ) 


10J0 Loose Ends with Ned 
Sherrin and studio 

1 120 Somour Own 

Correspondent Life and 
W*tfcs abroad. 

12.00 News; A Small Country 
thing. Jearune McMufien 
on the detights of living in 

mral Britain. 

1227 After Henry. Comedy 
teries starring Prunella 
Scales as the widow. 1255 
„ _ Weather 

'■1° Devon Journeys. The last 
«Tom Salmon's 

Down to Plymouth 
158 Shipping 


On VNF/FM in stereo, end medium 
wave 

625 Open University. Education 
bulletin 7. Until 655am 
655 Weather. 7.00 News 
7.05 Aubade: Bach ( Cantata 
No 67; Suisse 
Romande/PTo Arte Choir of 
Lausanne and soloists). 

Debussy (Six epigraphes 

antiques). Schumann 


^9° News: The Afremoon 
nay. The Beano, by 
Pony Robinson. A story of a 
brewery firm's day's 
butlng to the seaside in 1914 

350 News: Travel: 
kHamatione! 

Alignment. BBC 

. „ correspondents report 

The Saturday Feature: I 

Hardly Know What l May 
•at Become, wrth Otiver 
^•n* as Constantine 
Samuel Rafinesque. one of 
most remarkable 


rt (Three I 

sonnets: Price, soprano), 
Respighi (Fountains of 

Rome). 9.00 News 
9.05 Stereo Release: 

Chausson (Vivians. Op 
5). Offenbach (Cello 
Concerto: Harney and 
Cincinnati SO). Elgar 


{Symphony No 1) 
10.45 Chopin: ' 


: Louis Lome 
(piano). 12 Etudes. Op 10 
11.15 Philadelphia (under 
Muti). with Brendei 


(piano). Verdi (Curse MIBer 
"aptand 


overture). Cot 
(Symphony No 3). 
Beethoven (Piano 
Concerto No 5). 14)0 News 
1.05 Orlando String Quartec 
Morart (Quartet in D 


minor, K 421). Schubert 
(Quartet In B fiat. D 112) 

24)5 BWy Budd: Britten’s two- 
ad opera. With Peter 
Gtossop (title role). Peter 
Pears and Michael 
langdon. LSO/Ambrosian 
Opera Chorus. Act two at 
325 

5430 Jazz Record Requests: 

with Peter Clayton 
5.45 Critics' Forum: topics 
indude the Peter Barnes 
plays on Radio 3, and Arthur 
Miller's The American 
Clock at the National Theatre 
625 Canadian Voices: 
recordings of Healey 
WI Kan's Missa brevis I 
Harry Somers’s Five 
songs for dark voice, and 
WHian's An apostrophe 
to heavenly hosts 
7.10 Lady's View: Aiden 
Grennell reads the story 
byitaDaly 


the I n t e rn a t io nal Piano 
Event at the i985Pendiey 
Manor Jazz Festival. 
1157 News. 124)0 
Closedown 


825 Only Fools and Horses. ‘ 
Return of a comedy series 
about two brothers Dving 
in London. Starring David 
Jason and Nicholas 
Lyndhurst (Ceefax) 

94)5 Sunday Premiere*. 

The MonocJed Mutineer. 
The first of a four-part 
drama by Alan Bleasdale, 
based on the true story of 
Percy Toplrs. con-man and 
master of disguise, who 
became a wanted man ' 
after leading a mutiny, in an 
army training camp in 
France duririgWoridWar J 
One. Starring Paul 
McGann. (Ceefax) 

1020 News with Jan Leeming. 
Weather. 

1025 Heart of the Matter, (ri the 
- - first of a new investigative 
series David Lomax 
reports on voodoo, the 
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SATURDAY AUGUST 30 1986 




First published in 1785 


SPORT 


Confident British 
trio throw 
down the gauntlet 


From Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent, Stuttgart 


The British middle-distance 
trio of Sebastian Coe, Steve 
Cram and, this time. John 
Gladwin laid down a chal- 
lenge to their opponents to 
stop them making another 
clean sweep of medals in 
tomorrow's 1,500 metres fi- 
nal SO easy was their 
qualification for today's semi- 
finals. 

Coe. only slightly less eu- 
phoric at having placed “a few 
bob" on himself to win the 
800- 1 500 metres double at the 
outrageous odds of 10-1 
against (“stupid really") than 
he was at finally winning the 
international 800-metres title 
which had eluded him for so 
long, strode through the first 
lap of the first heat in the lead 
and out of trouble. 

Looking as relaxed as he 
had been in the athletes' 
village earlier in the day. when 
he had enjoyed congratula- 
tions all round, Coe drifted 
back during the middle laps as 
the pack went through 800 
metres in 2min 02. Msec. 

And. with only three men 
certain to qualify from each of 
the three heats. Coe was still 
confident enough in sixth 
place to be giving eight metres 
to his opponents with only 
200 metres to run. It only 
needed a spurt round the last 
bend for Coe to get on terms, 
and although Marcus 
O'Sullivan, of Ireland, won 
the heal in 3:39.02. Coe was 
only 0.01 sec behind in second 
place, with Han Kulker. of 
The Netherlands, third, an- 
other 0.05sec behind. But 
there was danger for Jose 
Abascal, of Spain, the Olym- 
pic bronze medal winner and 
one of the two Spaniards with 
a legitimate medal chance, 
who had to wait to see if his 
time of 3:39.20 would be good 
enough to qualify as a fastest 
loser. 


The lower finishers in the 
second heat behind Cram’s 
five-metre victory were not 
fast enough to trouble 
Abased. Cram had taken it 
easv around the first couple of 
laps in the latest cloudburst to 
hit these 14th European 
Championships. The field was 
almost jogging through 1200 
me ires in 3:00.03. when Cram 
eased ahead and put in such a 
sprint around the top bend 
that he was able to look round 
and finish with comfort in 
3:40.66. 

John Gladwin and his oppo- 
nents in the third heat knew 
exactly what they had to do to 
get rid of Abascal. And they 
went out and did it witfir 
Gladwin leading the field. The 
crowd were conceivably get- 
ting a little offended, but could 
not help admiring every time 
they heard, 

“Gross britannien" in the lead. 
But Gladwin took them 
through 800 metres 

Results, page 29 

in 1:56.95. 1200 metres in 
2:55.60. and the writing was 
on the scoreboard for Abascal 
Gladwin won in 3:36.87 and 
five men followed within a 
second, meaning the three 
fastest losers for the final were 
in this heat — and one of the 
threats to British domination 
was oul 

Judy Simpson carried on in 
the multiple discipline events 
where Daley Thompson had 
left off the previous night 
Thompson had three personal 
bests in his 10 events, but 
Simpson had three in her first 
three of die seven events of the 
heptathlon, giving her a score 
of 3.092 points. 94 points 
ahead of her nearest rival. 
Malgorzata Novak, of Poland. 

Simpson had not had the 
finest of seasons so far, with a 


top score of only 6.282 points, 
over 60 points down on her 
best, and defeat for the first 
time by Kim Hagger, her 
British colleague. Yet she be- 
gan her personal record break- 
ing with a fine hurdles race in 
the morning, 13.05 seconds — 
not only taking 0.02 seconds 
off her personal best, but 
returning the second fastest 
time ever by a British athlete. 
Only Shirley Strong, the Unit- 
ed Kingdom record holder 
with I187sec has ever run 
better. In comparison. 
Simpson's was a better start 
than Thompson in his 100 
metres, for she collected 1.1 17 
points, 80 points better than 
her male counterpart. 

The success continued in 
the second event, the high 
jump, where the British girl 
equalled her personal best of 
1.92 metres, and only had the 
narrowest of failures at 1.95 
metres. As it was, that was 
even better on the scoring 
tables, with 1.131 

As if Simpson were not 
already impressive enough in 
stature, she is also a former 
practitioner of Tae Kwan Do. 
And sbe brought some of that 
channelled aggression to the 
third event, the shot put, 
improving her personal best 
from 14.59 to 14.73 metres, 
giving her 843 points and 
taking her to that intermediate 
total of 3,091 

Allan Wells never really 
looked in the hunt for a medal 
in the 200 metres final Run- 
ning in ordinary shorts, be- 
cause his “Jongs" were too 
uncomfortable, the Scot could 
do no better than fifth, in 
20.89sec. The winner was 
Valery Krylov, of the Soviet 
Union, whose lime of 
20.52sec was, none the less, 
slow for an international 
championship even in the 
cold and wet conditions. 


Thompson survives crowd 
to point the way to Seoul 


After what he described as, 
“the most fantastic experience 
of my life”, Daley Thompson 
took a day off from his war 
with the world’s Press yes- 
terday and explained the way 
forward to Seoul and his third 
Olympic tide. 

Thompson’s enthusiasm for 
this, rather than any other of 
the eight consecutive titles 
that be has won in inter- 
national championships in dm 
last eight years, was due to the 
fact that he had finally found 
the impetus of dose com- 
petition, from Jftrgen Hingsen 
and Siggi Wentz of West 
Germany, competing in front 
of their home crowd. 

Only Thompson's three per- 
sonal bests — 100 metres, shot 
and hurdles — kept him ahead 


From Pat Botcher 
this time in a competition 
where, uncharacteristically, he 
fell behind twice, after the 
fourth and seventh events. “To 
win when things are going well 
is the easiest thing in die 
world, but to win when there is 
real competition is the best 
thing of all for an athlete,” 
Thompson said yesterday 
morning at a press conference. 
He explained that the excite- 
ment of the dose competition 
had, in fact contributed to his 
poor performances in the two 
jumping events. 

“I was so worked up by the 
adrenalin pumping that 1 was 
running too East into the high 
jump. And the other problem 
with the long jump was that 
the wind was gusting with such 
variable speeds. Bnt I was just 


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trying to take advantage of the 
competition and got carried 
away by the excitement” 

Thompson had expected to 
draw his competitive impetus 
from the antagonism of the 
home crowd. Bnt tilings got a 
little out of control, prompted 
initially by the large numbers 
of school children. Bat there 
were moments of real nasti- 
ness, which the stadium com- 
mentator finally quelled with 
an admonition on the second 
day. Thompson said: “It's the 
closest I’ve ever seen to a 
football crowd at an athletics 
meeting. Some of them were 
yelling at me to go home. The 
Germans (his competitors) 
apologised for it, and the 
French coach came across and 
said "If the whole of Germany 
is against yon, remember that 
the rest of the world is with 
yon’.” 

Bnt Thompson felt that be 
had seen the best that his 
opponents conld do. “Provid- 
ing I do the right things, I 
should always be able to beat 
both of them. Bnt they were 
competing out of their socks, 
while I wasn't going very welL 
And I’m not sure that they 
conld ever do that again.” 
Thompson is now preparing ! 
for a complete reorientation 
for training towards next 
year's world championships in 
Rome and the 1988 Olympic 
Games in Seoul. He will still 
have his occasional forays to I 
California, but whereas his 
training for the last five years 
has usually been with groups 
of friends, he is now going to 
(ravel to different parts of the 
country to work with the 
national coaches for the 
seperate events, like Malcolm 
Arnold, national hurdles coa- 
ch, who is based in Wales, and 
Max Jones, the throws coach, 
in the Midlands, who also 
coaches Olympic silver medal 
winner, Dave Ottley, who will 
help Thompson with the new 
javelin. 

“Enthusiasm and energy is 
not a bottomless pit. There's 
no one thing that needs dras- 
tically changing. Bnt I need to 
refresh my approach. Training 
with the boys is perhaps too 
easygoing. 

For the record, the arguably 
greatest current athlete la the 
world, celebrated bis latest 
success in a hamburger joint 
on Thursday night, eating the 
sort of junk food that British 
distance runners — some of 
whom went to “see Thompson 
get into oxygen debt, running 
the 1,500 metres” — use to get 
their carbohydrates. 

There could be similar 
celebrations tonight, for Steve 
Jones in particular, and Hugh 
Jones and Ailister Hutton are 
the best trio of marathon 
rnnners that Britain has had in 
these championships for over 
a decade. The odds are looking 
good for a sixth British victory 
in these fourteenth 
championships. 



In the clear. Judy Simpson, of Britain, gliding over the bar in yesterday's high jump section of the women's heptathlon 

Two Europeans illuminate a drab day 


From Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent, New York 


The third day of the United 
States championships was 
overcast, chilly and, for a 
while, so beset by rain that 
play began almost three hours 
late. Two exciting Europeans 
then went to work with an 
urgency that suggested they 
had pressing appointments 
elsewhere and were in no 
mood to bang about at Flush- 
ing Meadow. One was Steffi 
Graf, the other Henri Leconte. 

Miss Graf heat Andrea 
Temesvari, 6-1, 6-0. which 
meant that in two matches she 
had lost only two games. Aged 
17, the dog-loving German 
has a forehand that is almost 
awesome in its power and 
precision. This year she has 
beaten all the other leading 
players. Miss Graf who plays 
a more ambitious game than 
she talks, is probably the only 
person on the premises who 
dismisses her chances of win- 
ning the title. 

Leconte, a firework with 
legs, lost only three games to 
Horacio de la Pena, a better 
player than this crashing re- 
sult may suggest Other early 
winners in the men’s event 
included Jonas Svensson, 

YACHTING j 

Defeated 
Conner 
to return 

Perth (Reuter) — Dennis 
Conner of America yesterday 
admitted that his 1983 
America's Cup defeat may 
have been the best thing to 
happen to yachting. “I don't 
like losing because I am a 
competitor,” the man whose 
emotions spilled over when he 
became the first US skipper to 
suffer an America’s Cup de- 
feat said. “But looking back, it 
may have been the best thing 
that could have happened for 
the America's Cup and sailing 
as a whole.” 

Conner was speaking at his 
first news conference since 
arriving in Fremantle earlier 
this week to spearhead the 
United Stales' campaign to 
lake the cup back to a new 
home in the San Diego Yacht 
Club. Nervous but affable, the 
drapery store owner, aged 43, 
scoffed at suggestions that he 
was obsessed with avenging 
the humiliation of losing for 
the New York Yacht Club. 
“Even if it is consuming, it's 
still only my hobby," he said, 
rejecting the notion that he 
would be personally dev- 
astated if he failed a second 
time. “I guess if 1 can survive 
the first time I can survive the 
second. 

CRICKET 

Doubts plague 
Gould over 
NatWest final 

Ian Gould, the Sussex cap- 
tain and wicketkeeper, fears 
he could miss the NatWest 
Trophy final against Lan- 
cashire at Lord's next Sat- 
urday. He is under intensive 
treatment for hip and groin 
injuries at Brighton’s football 
ground. 

Gould, who Joined Sussex 
in 1 98 1 after five years with 
Middlesex, is out of the 
county championship match 
against Nottinghamshire at 
Hove today. He sustained the 
injuries at Eastbourne eariy 
this month and aggravated 
them in the semi-final at 
Worcester. 

He said: “It's a dilemma. 
Sussex have done really weH 
and obviously 1 want to be 
part of the Lord's showpiece, 
but I am the kind of player 
who needs to ran into form, so 
7 would like to play some 
cricket before the frnaL” 

If Gould fails to make the 
final it will give the chance of 
a lifetime to Martin Speight, 
aged 18. who made his first- 
team debut only two weeks 
ago. 


aged 19. a dentist's son from 
Sweden. Svensson is a big lad 
and a relentlessly sound 
player. Jeremy Bates from 
Britain gave him an interest- 
ing first set but woo only two 
more games. 

Aaron Krickstein, of Michi- 
gan, aged 19. who is coached 
by the once familiar Brian 
Gottfried, came from behind 
to beat Paul Annacone in a 
match that lasted three hours 

Results, page 32 

and nine inmates. In the first 
round Annacone had beaten 
John McEnroe. 

Off-court, tactical dis- 
cussions are in progress in 
readiness for Monday's meet- 
ing between a committee of 
the men's Association of Ten- 
nis Professionals (ATP) and 
representatives of the four 
grand slam championships. 
The ATP are organizing a 
retirement fund, with benefits 
payable at the age of 49 'h. The 
controversial aspect of this 
otherwise admirable scheme is 
that the ATP want the grand 
slam championships to pay 


for it by allocating to the fund 
a percentage of their revenue 
from television. 

As the grand slam events 
have not even accepted the 
principle of such largesse and 
are unwilling to do so, any 
discussions of the precise 
percentage would at present be 
academic. The ATP request is 
not as cheeky and innovatory 
as non-Americans may think. 
A similar system already ap- 
plies in several professional 
sports in the United States. 
But it does not follow that 
such a principle should be 
accepted world-wide in tennis. 

The grand slam events, in 
common with other tour- 
naments on the grand prix 
circuit, already pay prize 
money, contribute to the 
players' end-of-year bonuses, 
and allocate an additional 
slice of their income to help 
the ATP meet administrative 
costs. Consequently it may 
reasonably be suggested that 
the grand slam tournaments 
cannot be expected to dig even 
more deeply into their pockets 
on behalf of the players. 

It seems logical to suggest 

HORSE TRIALS 


that the players should pay for 
their own retiremem fund, h 
should be borne in mind that 
earnings vary widely and that 
during their playing careers 
most ATP members are sub- 
ject to a higher rate of tax than 
that imposed after retirement, 
when their incomes are re- 
duced. That is true of most 
professions. But a tennis 
plaver's peak earnings are 
restricted to between 10 and 
IS years. 

Mike Davies, the ATP exec- 
utive director, helped to put 
men's professional tennis on 
its feet 18 years ago by 
pioneering die idea of "getting 
somebody else to pay tor it.” 
Ironically, he is now in trouble 
with the ATP for allegedly 
failing to press the same 
principle as forcefully as the 
board of directors would wish. 

One hopes the argument 
can be settled without exces- 
sive fuss. When it surfaced in 
January, as a “request” from 
the ATP. J suggested that the 
difference between a request 
and a demand tended to be 
only a matter of time. It would 
be gratifying to be wrong. 


Cockatoo is cock-a-hoop 


Some smart thinking by 
Lucinda Murray, aged 20, 
helped her and The Cockatoo, 
owned by Miss Gina Coles, to 
take the lead after the dressage 
phase of the European young 
riders lhree-day event cham- 
pionships at Rotherfield Park 
in Hampshire, sponsored by 
Bee-Hive Car Paries. In the 
team event the West Germans 
have kept their overnight lead, 
but the Poles have moved 
ahead of the British into 
second place. 

Miss Murray, who is 
competing as an individual 
watched many of the eariy 
competitors in the dressage 
and thought the three judges 
favoured the more energetic, 
forward going horses, as typi- 
fied by the West Germans. 
“So, 1 decided to ride like a 
West German,” Miss Murray, 
the adaptable daughter of an 
army officer basal at Pir- 


bright said. 
Her fluenl 


Her fluent, active test was 
rewarded with the highest 
mark of the day — 65.55 — 
which put her just ahead of 


Willey no 
to tour 

Peter Willey, the Leicester- 
shire all-rounder, has ruled 
himself out of consideraton 
for England's cricket tour to 
Australia this winter. He said: 
“It was a hard decision to 
make but I felt my trouble- 
some knees would probably 
not stand up to an arduous 
four-ancHa-half months tour, 
especially if 1 had a lot of 
bowling to da 
" I feel 1 would rather get 
myself fully fit during the 
winter in the hope that I can 
force my way beck into the 
Test side next summer." 


By Jenny MacArthur 

Albinos Autmaring, the West 
German rider on Aline, who 
led on Thursday night. 

Judith Copland, who is 
competing in the British team 
for the first time with her 
chestnut gelding Sweeney, 
produced an average test — 
but the second best of the 
British team — and is lying 
17th. Rachel Hunt, a key 
member of the team for the 
last three years, had a dis- 
appointing test on an alert but 
tense Friday Fox. She is more 
than 20 marks behind the 
leaders, but if sbe rides today's 
speed and endurance phase in 
her usual attacking manner, 
she should move upi 

Much will depend on the 
horses' fitness in the speed and 
endurance phase. Both phase 
C. the second roads and tracks 
and phase D, the cross coun- 
try, make effective use of 
Roiherfiefd’s hilly terrain — 
most dramatically with fence 
19, the MacConnal-Mason 
Masterpiece, one of the most 
technically demanding fences 
on the course. 


Miss Murray will have 
plenty to worry about with 
The Cockatoo. He only started 
eventing - seriously at the 
beginning of the year. "You 
have to nde him every inch of 
the way — you can never trust 
him," Miss Murray said of the 
gelding, aged 10. 

RESULTS: Young Oder European 
three-day event cha mp ion sh ip (re- 
sults after dressage): Team; 1 . Wast 
Germany, 209S9pts: 2. Poland, 
228 . 16 ; 3. Britain. 23621: 4. Soviet 
Union, 237.59; S. Sweden. 247-25: 
6. Ireland, 261 SI: 7, Italy 268.41. 
Individual: 1, The Cockatoo (L 
Murray, GB), 65.55pts: 2, Afina (A 
Autmaring, WG), 66.01; 3, Emburg 
(S Chifdiudze, USSR), 66.70. Brit- 
ish ptaangs: all. Hector James (V 


George (J-A Shield). 81.88: =25. 
Norton Boy (C Hoeg), Spy Story (A 
Ramus), 84.18; 27, Spanish Bullion 
(N Denham), 85.56: 31, Osberton 
Holly (S Keftard). 87.40; 34, Friday 
FoxJR Hunt), 89.01 : =35. Tasbec (D 


edes three-day event 1. Star Bum 
1S-A Egg inton), 5G.2pts; -2, The 
Irishman (R Powefi), Scorpion (D 
Rissik), 558.8. 


Scorpion (D 



Double tops 

Steve Davis and Tony Meo. 
the defending champions, will 
be among 58 pairs - the 


W illey t unavailable 


Driving test Going for gold 


Barry McGuigan. Ireland's 
former world featherweight 
boxing champion, makes his 
debut as a rally driver today 
when he takes the wheel in the 
sixth-stage of the Lakeland 
rally through the Fermanagh 
forests. Driving a 14 litre 
Meek Orion, powered by a 
260bhp engine. McGuigan 
will have Cahal Curley as his 
co-driver r- one of Ireland's 
most experienced drivers and 
a former Circuit of Ireland 
winner. 

On the move 

Eton Duffy, the Australian 
forward who joined Fulham 
two years ago from the Sydney 
dub! Parramatta, has joined 
Carlisle following the London 
club's withdrawal from the 
Rugby League. 


Gary Brabham. 25-year-oJd 
son of three-time world motor 
racing champion Sir Jack 
Brabham, is favourite to claim 
the f 1.000 bag of gold on offer 
to the first driver to break the 
1 OOmph barrier in the Lucas 
British formula three 
championship at Brands 
Hatch tomorrow. " 

Dire straits 

Notts County, the Football 
League's oldest dub. made a 
loss of £643,422 last season, 
bringing their total debts to ■ 
just under £1.800,000. Jack 
DunnetL the dub chairman, 
said: "The situation is very 
serious indeed, but the bank 
and directors are supporting 
the club to ensure it survives 
until the end of the season.” • 


a total of £200.000 in prize 
money at this year's 1 
Hofineister world doubles : 
snooker championship. The 1 
preliminary rounds will take 
place in Stockport from Octo- 
ber 12 to 16, with the final 
stages played at Derogate. 
Northampton, from Decem- 
ber 2 to 14. Seeded to meet 
Davis and Meo in ihe final are 
Cliff Thorburo and Willie 
Thome. 

In the basket 

Two basketball players to 
have faced each other with 
different clubs in the Atlantic 
10 Conference in the United 
Slates will be on opposite sides 
again next season, this time in 
England. Portsmouth have 
signed Danny Williams! a 6ft 
8tn forward from George 
Washington Universe, and 
Ed Coe. a 6ft Sin guard from 
Temple University h adjoined 
Derby, who have just been 
promoted to the Cbrisbcig 
first division. 

On defence 

Robert Dickie. o£Swansea. 
will defend his British feather- 
weight tide for x* second 
time, at the Ebbw v^s Leisure 
Centre on October 22. The 22- 
year-old championpriH meet 
John Feeney, of imrtlepool, 
whom he beat for me vacant 
title. * . 


man of 
next few 
years 


DAViD 

MILLER 


Tom McKean, whose Scots 
accent pro>ed too much for the 
translator at the official inter- 
view after Thursday's 896 
metres, spent the early part of 
this summer cartful!}' avoid- 
ing his two English rivals far 
the championships of Edin- 
burgh and Stuttgart He and 
his coach. Tommy Boyle, in- 
tended not to give (he oppo- 
sition any psychological 
advantage. From now on. him* 
ever, as European silver medal 
winner be will inevitably be 
more exposed. And, indeed, 
must look for more exposure. 

-He is the nan of the next 
fen years over two laps," 
Sebastian Cor said, having 
bad to use all tire experience of 
his celebrated finishing kick to 
get past McKean during n 
unforgettable last hundred 
metres. McKean, who for a 
while afterwards was in a 
confusion of laughter and 
tears, said self-deprecatingly: 
“To think that I lost to the eld 
man!” 

What distinguished him 
was not so much his silver 
medal but the manner in which 
he boldly attacked with the 
intention to win. “After Edin- 
burgh, when Cram made me 
look foolish, I knew that was 
nfrat f bad to do,” he said 
yesterday, having been awake , 
since before dawn with post-, 
race elation, lying in bed 
staring at the ceiling, thinking 
about next year's world 
championships. 


Room for further 
improvement 


How good really is : 
McKean? With his two silver 
medals in a month, and three 
improvements this season is 
his personal best, inclndmg* 
Thursday's new Scottish 
record of lmin 44.61 sec, this 
has been a spectacular sum- 
mer. Yet at the same age. dose 
on 23, Coe ran a world record 
lmin 4233$ec in 1979. If. 
McKean is to make his mark . 
in company with the Ameri- 
cans, Kenyans and Crnz a 
Rome next year he will have to 
improve farther stiff. 

An upbringing on a conned 
estate in Uddingstone, where 
he still lives with his parents, 
gave him few early privileges, 
but he now enjoys spoosorshto 
worth around £15,000 a yew 
from Glen Henderson, an ap* 
market motor dealer for who* 
he works, and from 
Honeywell, the computer com- 
pany who employ Tommy 
Boyle, for many years the dab 
coach with BeUsMI YMCA. ’ 

Although all McKean’s 
training is speed-orientated, 
apart from winter endurance 
work, there is an imbalance ta 
his shorter race tunes: 21 . 6 $ec 
for 200, yet only 47.6sec over 
400. This needs a substantial 
sharpening if be is to live with 
Cruz and the others who make 
tire 800 a single sustained 
sprint 

McKean has been having 
valuable scientific back-np 
from Dr Myra Ninuno, a 
physiologist and former ath- 
lete who has been monitoring 
bis blood, while Boyle intelli- 
gently confines his races to 
those which usefully lead to- 
wards the main objectives rf 
the season: he does not go 
money-chasing in meaningless 
races. 


Cram mismanaged 
his schedule 


Has this. In fact been the 
trouble with Steve Cram? All 
the evidence, as I previously 
suggested, is that be ta* 
mismanaged his schedule 
since Edinburgh. With a back- 
ground of muscle problems, ft 
was unwise immediately to 
compete in Gateshead after* 
wards, and even more mis- 
calculating to run last weeks 
1,000 in Buntingham for the 
sake of a fat cpsh subvention- 
What was his priority? 

With the irritation of Wj 
muscle last week, he show 
have settled for defending p 
title here, ami refifr' 
qnished his ambition to fa* 
Coe at SOOi, an objective whim 
may now have jeopard!#* 
both events. With such ► j 
responsibility towards himsm 
and the winning of matt® 
Cram is ill-placed to b** 
made his recent gratnHB* 
criticisms of the attitudes « 
Ovett and Coe, in wW? 
absence he won interna wj* 
championship medals in I# 7 * 
83. v 

The psychologically ertf* 
ing moment of the 800 
when, on the third bend, 
made room for Cram to 
wide in order to be able J 
follow him; a moment® 
supreme tactical confide** 
Dave Martin, a spjjg 
physiologist at Georgia SJJ 
University who has 
advising Coe for several ygg 
thinks that Cram’s n 
problems are probably 
to bis splayed 
“He has so roach sfrengfagg 
he's a hio-phy sfr aa 
nightmare”, Martin .-< 95a 
“with so much rotation 
leg joints.”