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By Sue \:,.J. 

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No 62,631 


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 




Thatcher warns Labour leader over MI5 secrets case 




left out of 




briefings 


The Prime Minister yes- 
terday accused Mr Neil 
Kin nock of abandoning the 
bipartisan approach to sec- 
urity because of his conduct 
during the Australian spy 
book bearing and threatened 
to exclude him from the con- 
fidential security briefings tra- 
ditionally granted to party 
leaders. 

Mrs Thatcher's warning was 
delivered in the Commons as 
the Government prepared to 
give notice in Sydney early 
today that it will appeal 
against the order of the judge 
in the New South Wales 
Supreme Court that it should 
hand over secret documents to 
the defence counsel. 

Although Mr Justice Powell 
ruled yesterday that the highly 
secret documents could be 
edited before being shown to 
Mr Peter Wright’s defence 
lawyers, ministers were 
preparing to challenge his 
ruling in the Australian Court 
of Appeal and made clear that 
they were determined to fight 
the case to the end, if nec- 
essary. to the Australian High 
Court the final court of 
appeal. 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


Although refusing again to 
comment in the Commons on 
the Australian case, Mrs 
Thatcher, roared on by her 
backbenchers, turned the at- 
tack on the opposition leader, 
who is in America on a lour to 
sell the Labour Party's non- 
nuclear defence policy. 

Mr Kin nock admitted last 
Friday before leaving that be 
had spoken to the defence 
lawyer in the Wright case, Mr 
Malcolm Turnbull, and that 
there had been seven other 
contacts between his office 
and Mr TumbulL 

Mrs Thatcher described Mr 
KLinnock’s action yesterday as 


Whitehall ponders 11 

Leading article 17 

Letters 17 



“astonishing**. She told a 
Conservative backbencher 
“The leader of the Opposition 
has abandoned the fun- 
damental defence policy pur- 
sued by his predecessors and 
he has now abandoned the 
fundamental security policy.** 

But it was her reply to Mr 
Cranley Onslow, chairman of 
the Conservative backbench 
1922 committee, that caused 
the greatest stir. 

Mr Onslow told her that Mr 
Kinnock had allowed himself 
to be set up to ask in the 
Commons the questions 
which were to be asked in the 
Australian court the following 
day. 

He went on: “Is she aware 
that she would have the fufl 
support of this side of the 
House if she refused to have 
any more truck on matters of 
national security with some- 
body who has reduced himself 
to the status of Mr Turnbull’s 


mouthpiece?” The Prime 
Minister replied: “Yes. I agree 
wholeheartedly.” 

•It was said later on Mrs 
Thatcher’s behalf that she had 
followed the bipartisan ap- 
proach to security in opposi- 
tion and in government, and 
that she intended and hoped 
to be able to follow it in future. 
But, Whitehall sources said, 
she regarded it as a matter for 
Mr Kinnock as to whether he 
wanted to follow it in future. 
The dear implication was that 
unless Mr Kinnock returned 
to the bipartisan approach, he 
would be left out of future 
briefings, given on privy coun- 
cillor terms to the party 
leaders. 

It is understood that Mr 
Kinnock has had no private 
briefings on the Wright case. 

Amid continuing Conser- 
vative calls for Mr Kinnock to 
return home to face tbe Com- 
mons, Mr Roy Hattersley, 
Labour's deputy leader, press- 
ed Mrs Thatcher on why she 
had attempted to suppress the 
Wright book while allowing 
and indeed encouraging , 
publication of tbe Chapman , 
Pincher spy book. Their Trade 
Is Treachery, in 1981. it was 
her decision not to act against 
Mr Pincher which, had pro- 
duced “die present humili- 
ation and resulted in the 
Attorney-General's authority 
being usurped by the Prime 
Minister to manipulate the 
law for party political rea- 
sons.” 

He accused die Prime Min- 
ister of treating the law as if it 
were her own property. 
“Hence her willingness ip 
allow Mr Wright to sell his 
secrets to Chapman Pmcber 

C^ndsned on page 2A, col 5 



^ ^ 

Pi$n names 
CIA man for 


security post 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 
President Reagan yesterday the facts over Iran and the 


named Mr Frank Carlucci, a 
former deputy director of the 
Central Intelligence Agency 
and Ambassador to Portugal, 
as his new National Security 
Adviser. He also agreed to the 
appointment of an indepen- 
dent investigator to look at the 
Iran arms scandaL 

In a brief address on na- 
tional television, Mr Reagan 
said tbe independent investi- 
gator, together with the Justice 
Department investigation, 
would give America a d u al 
system for assuring a thorough 
review of all aspects, of the 
affair. 

“If illegal acts had been 
undertaken, those who did so 


transfer of funds to the 
Contras would shortly be 
made public. Looking strain- 
ed, and with his voice almost 
breaking, he declared: “Then 
the American people, yon, will 
be tbe final arbiters of this 
controversy. You will have all 
the facts and will be able to 


The successor to Admiral 
John Poindexter is a man 
known for his toughness, 
experience and efficiency. As 
Ambassador to Portugal in 
1974, Mr Carlucci was cred- 
ited with helping prevent a 
communist takeover at a time 
when Dr Henry Kissinger, the 
then Secretary of State, had 


will be brought to justice. If admitted defeat and was 
actions in implementing my opposing further aid to the 

ft- .*-• > CnmnlvH liftO l P nt TnPnf 


Mr Peter Wright, the former MIS agent whose book the British Government is seeking to 
haw, arriving at the Supreme Court in Sydney for yesterday s hearing. 


uinness inquiry 
net widening 


By Lawrence Lever 

The echoes of the govern- The Guinness share price 


Summons 
served 
on Collier 


policy were taken without my 
authorization, knowledge or 
concurrence, this will be ex- 
posed and appropriate correc- 
tive steps will be imple- 
mented.” 

Mr Reagan said he fully 
recognized the interest of Con- 
gress in the affair, and that it 
would want to hold its own 
inquiry. His Administration, 
he said, would co-operate fully 
with that inquiry. 

The President said he had 
already taken the unprece- 
dented step of allowing two 
former national security ad- 
visers to testify, but he was 
ur ging Congress to consider 
consolidating its inqiries to a 
single special committee — as 


Socialist Government 
The 56-year-old Korean war 
veteran was stabbed in the 
Congo in 1960 when he res- 
cued a carload of Americans 
ftom a mob. He worked in 
President Nixon’s White 
House, and in 1978 President 
Carter made him deputy 
director of the CIA. 


proposed by Senator Robert 
Dote and backed by most 
Republicans as a way of 
slopping tbe proliferation of 
hearings. 

Ifthe new inquiry was given Mr Carlucci: 
a chance to work, he said, all tough ano 


Bookcase Bid fails to 


...that’s what he 
calls himself - and 
he’s just beaten 
Cram, Thompson 
and Lineker to 
become Britain’s 
Soortsman of the 
Year. A took at the 
Hfe of Lloyd 
Honeyghan, world 
I welterweight 
1 champion 


leaks upset 
Whitehall 



e The £4,000 dariypnze 
in yesterday’s Portfolio 
Gold competition was 
shared by two winners. 
Details, page 3... 

© There is a former 


how play, information 

service* pas® 2®' 


billion bid 


Uniiever. tbe Anglo-Ehitcfa 

household ^ods conglom- 

ersie, has made a $3.1 buhon 
{£2.1 billion) agreed bid for 
Chesebrougb-Pond's group to 
strengthen its i ^ msn SL>°‘!| 
erations _ £l 


By Philip Webster 

Concern is being voiced at 
the highest levels in the British 
Government about miparent 
leaks from the confidential 
bearings in the Wright case in 
Australia. 

At the same time there is 
anxiety that a person dosely 
involved in the production of 
Mr Wright’s book about his 
l work for MI5 has been allow- 
ed to sit in on the hearing as a 
member of the team of The 
defence lawyer Mr Malcolm 
Turnbull. 

It is not being suggested that 
the person is responsible for 
the alleged leaks, which in any 
case have not been regarded as 
serious. 

Lawyers representing the 
British Government protested 
about the man’s presence in 
the defence team in the pri- 
vate hearings, but they were 
turned down by the judge, Mr 
Justice PowelL 

Sir Robert Armstrong, me 
Cabinet Secretary, a leading 
witness in the Sydney case, is 
believed to have made his 
concern about the man known 
to toe Cabinet Office in 
London. 


ban story 
in Ireland 

By Robin Young 


The Government yesterday 
lost its court attempt to ban 
tbe publication in the Irish 
Republic of a book written by 
a former MI5 employee. The 
case turned on similar ques- 
tions to those raised in the 
efforts in Australia to ban the 
publication of a far more 
controversial book written by 
the former secret service 
agent, Mr Peter Wright 
Miss Justice Mella Carroll 
ruled in the Dublin High 
Court that Brandon Press of 
Dingle. Co Kerry, had a 
constitutional right to publish 
and distribute One Girl’s War, 


ment investigation into Guin- 
ness resounded further yester- 
day when it emetged that two 
top City institutions have 
been induded in toe inquiry. 

The investigation centres 
upon the movement in toe 
Guinness share price during 
its four-and-arhalf month 
takeover battle for Distillers. 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry inspectors are 
looking in particular at the 
way in which the Guinness 
share price rose shaiply to- 
wards the end of thte^battle. 
The focus of the inquiry 
provides further evidence that 
toe investigation was triggered 
by information passed to the 
DTI about the activities of Mr 
Ivan Boesky, toe disgraced 
American arbitrageur. 

In addition to Guinness and 
Morgan Grenfell, its merchant 
bank adviser, the stockbrokers 
to Guinness at the time of the 
bid, Caz&nove and Wood 
Mackenzie have also received 
visits. 

The nature of the DTI 
inquiry was revealed by Mr 
George Law, compliance offi- 
cer at Morgan Grenfell yes- 
terday. “The representatives 
are interested in any docu- 
ments or papers which relate 
to dealings in the price of 
Guinness's shares at the time 
of toe bid for Distillers,” he 
said. 


rose about 25 per cent in toe 
dosing stages of the bid which 


dosing stages of toe bid which 1 
therefore increased its value, j 
Guinness ultimately secured 
control of Distillers, with a 
£2.7 billion bid, defeating a 
rival bid from Argyll 
The contest between Guin- 
ness and Argyll for control of 
EMstiUers was one of the most 
bitter ever fought ft was 


characterized by allegations of 
“dirty tricks” and toe use of 


By Richard Thomson, 
Banking Correspondent 

A summ ons was served 
yesterday on Mr Geoffrey 
Collier, the Department of 
Trade and Industry 
accounced. Mr GolHer was 
forced to resign as a director of 
Morgan Grenfell last month, 
because of alleged offences 
connected with share dealings. 



tough and 


Leyland Trucks in 
talks with Dutch 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


bugging devices. 

A Guinness spokesman said 
last night: “We are still very 
much m the dark — the DTI 
won't tell us anything”. 


Mr Collier has for more 
than two weeks been toe 
subject of the first full-scale 
investigation ever launched 
by the DTI Into insider 
dealing. 




■rSS» 


The summons relates to Mr 
Collier's dealings in shares of 
AE the engineering company, 
and appears to stem from an 
interim report submitted by 
the two DTI inspectors. 






• Four employees of Phil- 
lips & Drew, the stockbroker, 
have been sacked for a breach 
of staff dealing rules. It is 
understood that they booked a 
traded options bargain to their 
own account when it should 
have been recorded as a trade 
byP&D. 


1°2K3l 


The company emphasized 
that there was no question of 
insider trading involved with 
toe sackings- The profit on toe 
j deal amounted to about 
£5,000. 


DAF Truck of The Nether- 
lands is in talks aimed at 
closer collaboration, possibly 
even a merger, with Leyland 
Trucks, the Rover Group’s 
loss-making commercial ve- 
hicles manufacturer. 

A bid for tbe trucks opera- 
tion is also being considered 
by Paccar, toe north American 
heavy trucks manufacturer 
which in 1980 bought up 
Foden, the British commercial 
vehicles maker based at 
Sandbach, Cheshire. 

The talks with DAF are the 
most advanced after an agree- 
ment in September with the 
Dutch manufacturer on sell- 
ing Leyland trucks and vans in 
Europe. 

The new moves on the 
Rover Group’s troubled 
subsidiary, on which earlier 
merger talks, with General 
Motors' Bedford subsidiary 
broke down, were disclosed 
yesterday in the House of 
Commons by Mr Paul 


Channon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry. 

Mr Channon added that he 
expeced toe Rover Group in 
its forthcoming corporate plan 
for 1987 to set out “a positive 
course” for Austin Rover as a 
significant car producer and 
exporter. 

There was immediate anger 
at tbe prospect of rationaliza- 


tion and job losses at Leyland 
trucks after Mr Channon said 
that restructuring at the di- 
vision could be expected 
whatever the outcome of the 
talks. 

He added, however, during 
exchanges in the Commons, 
that toe outcome “may well be 
merger or takeover." 

Mr Channon said: “Our 
objective is to achieve a secure 
future for the production of 
Leyland trucks, but it must be 
recognized that any option for 
the company — whether re- 


CoQthmed on page 20, col 1 


a memoir 1 written by Miss 
.Train Miller who died in in 


Joan Miller who died in in 
Malta in 1984. 

Sir Michael Havers, the 
Attorney General had been \ 
granted a temporary injunc- 
tion stopping publication of 
the book last week, and was 
seeking to have it confirmed. 
In a sworn affidavit, his legal 
secretary, Mr Michael Law- 
rence Sanders, said that 
publication would cause ir- 
reparable damage to the Brit- 
ish secret service. 

ContinHed on page 20, col 4 


lidley forced to think 
again on shire rates 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


‘Grants to 


students 


Mr Nicholas Ridley, Sec- 
retary of State for toe Environ- 
ment, is set to bow to toe 
demands of Conservative 


Their complaint is that Mr 
Ridley's plans would lead to 
disproportionately higher 
rises in the shires, where toe 


inadequate 9 


» tone. • • 

meadareff e/ity w gw/t/ 


UtmUilUO VI wvilifva • — — - 

MPs for a rethink of his Tories are strongest, in an 
proposals for allocating the election year. 


MI5 attack on Wright 


rale support grant which 
would force large increases in 
the shire counties. 

Mr Ridley, who feces the 
threat of a big backbench 
revolt, is to announce today a 
further round of consul ta- 


Several parliamentary pri- 
vate secretaries have warned 
Whips privately that they will 
resign if the proposals go 
through unchanged, and min- 
isters from toe counties worst 


BOC the industrial gases and 
healthcare group, reported 

P^xpraCBoffM.Irnjiboo 


cent jjjrTm-ii 




The head of MI5, Sir 
Antony Duff, delivered a 
stinging rebuke against Mr 
Peter Wright, toe former MI5 
officer, earlier this year (Our 

Whitehall Correspondent 

writes). ... . .. 

Sir Antony criticized Mr 
Wright's plan to publish a 
book about Soviet penetration 
of toe security service and 
allegations about past MD 


about 50 MI5 pensioners in- 
vited by Sir Antony to a 
reunion in London. j 

According to sources yes- 
terday, a number of those pre- 
sent were upset by the attack , 
on Mr Wright, who was well 
known to most of tbem ; A 
similar criticism of Mr Wright 
and a warning against any 
former M15 officers writing, 
memoirs will be made this 


former round ot consnna- ajfec^j have also made their 
lions, which mU mean that. protests . 
this year’s final rate support H 

■„ ^ further consulanve 


Waugh-pat^ 

Enaland i«d Australia - for 
whom Waugh wok nve wiefc- 
,. s f or yesterday — ty ->90 

“ S n ^4onedaylefMn>he 

second Test match at Perm 
Page 44 


Sops week at Mother— 


grant settlement will be de- 
layed until the new year. 

Mr Ridley and Mr Rhodes 
Boyson, Minister for Local 
Government, have been 
receiving numerous deputa- 
tions from MPs and local 
authority leaders in toe south- 
ern shires complaining that 
they would be hit unfairly by 
Mr Ridley’s plans. 


period ministers will go on 
seeing MPs and rework the 


seeing MPs and rework toe 
proposals in an attempt to 
meet their demands. It ap- 
pears unlikely, however, that 
there will be more money 
from the Treasury and min- 
isters accept that in attempt- 
ing to mollify some supporters 
they risk alienating others. 


The Government admitted 
for the first time yesterday 
that student grants were no 
longer adequate to meet basic 
expenditure needs. 

The admission was made in 
written evidence by the 
Department of Education to 
the education select commit- 
tee, which is inquiring into the 
level of student support. 

This is toe first time that 
there has been an official 
admission that the student 
grant is inadequate. 

However, the admission 
was not made with toe know- 
ledge or approval of ministers 
Thai toe grant is now 
inadequate is a charge that has 
been repeatedly made both by 
university vice-chancellors 
and the National Union of 
Students 


PiageT 






Student grants, page 5 


British Gas Thatcher’s warning on ‘jet set’ Aids 

«LnillA CAlO . A Uul.U IwaM nninn am mill kon/ 


New town sale] 

An imp**; *&££ 

publ.cil)jslhe ^ ^ a 


HoibcNpw* JK 
0wsfiaS 
Aspfs 1S, j2 

0irtL deaths 

mania 

Btisirti'SS -I'-' 


taw Report 38 
Uairn \L 

Let®* 1 a 

parliament JJ 

Property 3133 
Sale Room j J 


4 




sport 

TV&R*h° 43 
nwher - 


<r * 


•fir * * 


share sale 
closes today 

By Richard Under 

The £ 5.6 billion British Gas 
privatization clbses today 
with at least three million 
investors applying for a slice 
of the largest share sale on the 
London Slock Exchanw. 

The number of appheants 
could swell above the 5 1 m fl- 
lion mark as a finaltide of 
forms floods in by P°*. a ® d 
hand before the JO am dead- 
line. The organizers of toe 
ssuewill then start calculating 
£ number of shares applied 
for and weeding out illegal 
multiple applicants. 

Dealings in toe shares will 
Stan on Monday afternoon.: 
Sth an expected premium of 
a! Icasi lOp over the miaaj50p 
oiler price. 21 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporier 


Loose-Uving among inter- 
national bureaucrats and jet- 
setting businessmen threatens 
to accelerate tbe spread of toe 
disease Aids, the Prime Min- 
ister will warn at this 
weekend’s EEC summit in 
London. ■ 

She wifi urge her fellow 
heads of government to frpllow 
Britain’s lead in mounting a 
concerted Community-wide 
campaign to warn the popula- 
tion of Western Europe of toe 
threat posed by toe killer 
virus. 1 

And, given toe established 
link between sexual promiscu- 
ity and the transmission of the 

disease, she wants them to 
concentrate their efforts on 
getting the message across to 


high risk groups such as 
people working away from 
home in international agen- 


cies and company executives 
onexpenses-paid foreign trips. 

Mrs Thatcher and other 
ministers believe that Aids 
cannot be fought 1 in one 
country alone given the nature 
and frequency of international 
travel 

They point to toe fact that 
toe first cases of the disease in 
the UK can be traced to 
contacts between the toe local 


populace and homosexuals 
from toe USA. 


from toe USA. 

Circumstantial support for 
their anxieties about the 
health risks inherent in the 
racy lifestyle often enjoyed by 
expatriate and- frequent trav- 
ellers to Europe comes from 
data released last month by 


toe Department and Health 
and Social Security. 

Switzerland and Belgium, 
toe two EEC countries that 
play host to most of Europe’s 
international agencies - for 
instance toe World Health 
Organization and the Euro- 
pean Commission -.also have 
toe highest per capita in- 
cidence of toe disease on tbe 
Continent. 

The Swiss rate is 2.12 per 
100.000 people, 1 . compared 
with J.73 in Belgium and 0.69 
in toe UK. The figure for the 
US is .10.5 per 100,000. 

The first signs of tbe high 
moral tone mat the Prime 
Minister is prepared to take to 
combat toe disease emerged 
yesterday in toe Commons. 

.She told MPs: «"I think 
much behaviour which has 


been going on will become 


totally unacceptable for many 
and varied reasons.” 


The most important ele- 
ment in combating this 
“terrible” threat was to ensure 
that the public knew how it 
was spread among men and 
women. 


0 JOHANNESBURG: An 
unprecedented ‘campaign to 
enlist toe help of Souto 
Africa's estimated 50,000 
sangomas. or witch doctors, in 
controlling toe spread of Aids 
is to be launched on Friday, it 
was disclosed here yesterday 
(Michael Hornsby writes). 

About 200 leading san- 
gomas from all oyer the 
country are to be briefed qd 
aids and how it is transmitted, 
at toe Souto African Institute 
for Medical Research. 


Thewidesi possible collection always available from stock- 

Thc PiageT showroom. 

14 New Bond Si.. London. 

v Tel: Ol-W* 2^25. / 

\ Full colourcaialoguc on request. // 





J 


HOME NEWS 


NEWS SUMMARY 


The BMA backs 
drink-drive ban 


Threat to the QE2 


The liner QE2 will not be allowed to sail again aid wfll 
become a **11181 bucket” ontess site continues to carry a 
British crew, Mr Sam McQuskie, general secretary of the 
National Union of Seamen, told a meeting of 400 crew 
members in Southampton yesterday. 

Canard, the owner of die QE2, is currently balloting the 
ship's hotel and catering crew on whether they will accept 
severance payments so that new contracts can be 
introduced when the ship returns to Southampton in April 
from her refit in West Germany. Last night the company 
said that 60 per cent of those balloted had retained their 


voting papers. The union 
place the present crew with 


that Canard wants to re- 
p foreign labour. 


Print 

anger 


Moscow 
bank plea 


Dismissed printworkers 
yesterday criticized the 
manner in which they were 
made redundant from the 
Communist Morning Star 
newspaper. 

Thirty-nine printers 
have lost their jobs because 
tiie paper faces a severe 
cash crisis. The paper's 
prod action director, Mr 
Bill Bex, reportedly asked 
the doorman to distribute 
their notices. 

The men, members of 
Sogat and the NGA, are 
also unhappy at their 
redundancy terms. 


The Banking Insurance 
and Finance Union is due 
to riahw pnfalr dismissal 

against the Moscow - 
Narodny Bank, on behalf 
of a former employee of the 
bank, at the central indns- 
trial tribunal in London 
today. 

The union datnw that 
Mr Tony Palmer, a clerk, 
had worked satisfactorily 
at the bank for more than 
10 years hot mas dismissed 
for .his persistent union 
activities. 

The bank strongly de- 
nies the charge. 


Anger at milk ruling 


MPls opposed to Britain's membership of the EEC 
protested yesterday at a ruling by the European Court of 
Justice that the Milk Marketing Board had infringed 
Community rales on milk pricing. 

The Board's offence was to operate a two tier pricing 
scheme for milk sold for processing into hotter and 
skimmed milk powder, enabling manufacturers to obtain it 
more cheaply if the end prodnct were destined far the home 
market, thus undermining the community’s complex 
intervention price support system. 


RAC ban 
driver 


Judge 

‘sexist’ 


A blanket ban on dis- 
abled drivers by the Royal 
Automobile Club has cost 
one of Britain's best known 
stage rally drivers his com- 
petition licence. 

Mr Ken Ridley, aged 30, 
a Gateshead sub-post- 
master who is a thalido- 
mide victim, was this week 
named Ford Rally Man of 
the Month, bathe will have 
to prove his fitness to an 
RAC medical committee to 
win back his licence. 

Mr Neil Eason-Gibson, 
technical executive of the 


Mrs Wendy Birch, aged 
37, a teacher, called a judge 
“Sexist” yesterday after he 
advised her to switch on the 
charm to avoid police 
reporting her for driving 
offences. 


RAC, said Mr Ridley was 
**a borderline case.” 


Judge Anthony GoodaO, 
aged 70, a former Guards- 
man, made his remarks at 
Exeter Crown Coart, where 
Mrs Birch, of Starcxoff 
Devon, won an appeal 
against convictions for 
speeding, driving with no 
insurance and failing to 
produce her driving licence. 


Ex-prison chief jailed 
for charity cash thefts 


A former assistant prison 
governor was jailed for three 
moaths yesterday after he 
pleaded guilty to six charges of 
theft from charities he helped 
before he resigned from his 
job last year. 

Chichester Crown Court 
was told that Arnold Johnson, 
aged 39, former assistant gov- 
ernor of Ford Open Prison 
near Arundel West Sussex, 
was a gambling addict. 

He pocketed £50 belonging 
to Reach Out, a charity for 
mentally and physically 
handicapped children sup- 
ported by prisoners at Ford. 

He also kept £170 from the 
Litllehamplon Victims Sup- 
port Scheme which he had set 
up and been its first 
chairman. Mr David 
Tomlinson, for the prosecu- 
tion. said Johnson had stolen 


money from the sale of tickets 
for a charity show at Bognor 
Regis. 

He also took £40 which 
should have been used to 
insure a prize car on offer at a 
“fun day” charity event. 

Mr Anthony Higgins, for 
Johnson, said he was faced 
with debts and had let gam- 
bling become a problem. 

He was now an unemployed 
iaborour but had repaid kD the 
stolen money. Since resigning 
last year after 17 years in the 
prison service, be had joined 
Gamblers Annonymous. 

Mr Higgins said the prison 
terra would be more difficult 
because of his previous job. 

Johnson, of Elm Dale, 
Bamham, West Sussex, de- 
nied a further four similar 
charges and they were left on 
the file. 


Hurd to block free TV for pensioners 


BySbeOaGunn 
Political Staff 


The British Medical Association yesterday backed the 
Government's call to motorists not to drive if they drink 
doling the Christmas and New Year festivities. 

Speaking as he signed the United Kingdom Charter for 
European Road Safety Year, Sir Christopher Booth, 
president of the BMA, said that a zero level of alcohol in 
the blood-stream was the correct amount far driving. 

• The Royal Ulster Constabulary is to insta ll he ath 
alysers in ail police vehicles and not simply its traffic di- 
vision cars. 


The Government is ex- 
pected to txy to block an 
attempt to give pensioners 
free television licences. 

Mr David Winnicfc, Labour 
MP for Walsall North, an- 
nounced yesterday that he will 
bring in a Bfll to remove the 
licence fee for pensioners, and 
households where the main 
breadwinner is of pensionable 


He came top of the ballot 
for private members* Bills, so 
the proposals stand a good 


chance of making progress in 
the Commons. But deter- 
mined opposition from the 
Government will prevent the 
Bill reaching the statute book. 

The Home Office will not 
support the measure while a 
major review of the funding of 
television is underway follow- 
ing the Peacock Report. 

There axe also fears that it 
would create a new set of 
anomalies, althou gh .th e 
present system of concession- 
ary licences has not been 
considered a success. 

Mr W innick ’s measure 
would mean 4.8 million 


households would receive free 
licences from 1988, including 
2.9 million’ pensioners living 
on their own. 

The Labour Party’s pledge 
goes a step further, giving all 
households which include a 
pensioner a free licence. 

Mr Winnick calculates his 
Bill would cost £220 million a 
year. But the Home Office 
believes the figure win be 
more than £225 million, 
equivalent to adding between 
30 and 50 per cent on to the 
present £58 colour licence. 

He is backed by Mr Jack 
Jones, the pensioners' cam- 


paigner, who said: “This 
should not be viewed as some 
sort of handout. Television is 
a window on the world for 
many old people. For many ft 
is a companion and a friend”. 


But Mr John Wheeler, 
Conservative MP for West- 
minster North and secretary' 

of the Conservative 
backbench home affairs 
committee, described the B3i 

as “political humbug” and 
“dishonest”. “There is no 
such thing as a free television 
licence. Who is going to pay 
the difference?” 


Managing the scheme 
would be a bureaucratic night- 
mare, giving enormous scope 
for dishonesty. If the Bill went 
through, there would soon be 
campaigns for free licences for 
low-income and single parent 
families, he said. 


Mr Ivan Lawrence. Conser- 
vative MP for Burton and also 
a committee member, said 
that Labour believed pension- 
ers were best helped by giving 
blanket payments, whatever 
their resources, and the 
Conservatives gave it to those 
most in need. 


Fowler gives 
pledge to 
stop attacks 
on staff 


gfjmShamo 


A committee to tackle grow- 
ing violence against health, 
social services and social sec- 
urity staff was set up by the 
Government yesterday. 

The committee, to be 
chaired by Lady Trump- 
ingion. Parliamentary Under- 
secretary for Health, will 
report on measures in health 
ana local authorities for 'deal- 
ing with the attacks, which 
have claimed the lives of three 
social workers and one medi- 
cal secretary in the past 18 
months. 

Speaking at a Department 
of Health and Social Security 
conference on violence against 
staff; Mr Norman Fowler, 
Secretary of State for Social 
Services, said the committee, 
with representatives from pro- 
fessional or ganizati on* and 
trade unions, would co-or- 
dinate infor mati on across all 
three services, examine what 
had been done and what could 
be done. 

“The information will form 
the basis of a new policy drive 
to tackle violence against so- 
cial services staff” Mr Fowler 
indicated that the Govern- 
ment would be issuing new 
guidelines to cover all groups 
of caring staff 

He confirmed that the 
DHSS would consider the 
availability of physical mea- 
sures, including erecting 
screens, issuing of personal 
alarms and two-way radios 
but stressed that it was im- 
portant to weigh the balance 
between the use of security 
devices and the need to keep 
open human access to clients. 

“We don’t want to interfere 
with the work of the personal 
social services. We cannot 
provide a great range of 
services from behind locked 
doors. We cannot just retreat 
But nor can we have a 
situation where more social - 


workers get injured or killed. 

Members of the public 
should also assume some 
responsibility, he said. “Those 
who help the public are en- 
titled to help from the public. 
The community has a duty to 
protect those people who 
serve it” 

A survey from the Health 
and Safety Executive, due to 
be published next year, found 
that out of 5,000 health work- 
ers questioned, one in 200 had 
suffered a major injury need- 
ing medical treatment follow- 
ing a violent attack during the 
last 12 months. One in 10 bad 
needed first aid, and five out 
of every 100 health workers 
bad been threatened with 
weapons, including knives, 
broken bottles, chairs and 
coffee tables. 

But the questionnaire, sent 
to hospitals in five district 
health authorities, showed 
that one third of serious 
incidents were not officially 
recorded. 

Mr David Jones, general 
secretary of the British Associ- 
ation of Social W orker s, 
stressed the need for greater 
training and management-led 
initiatives to proved counsel- 
ling and support to those 
workers at nsk 

Speakers also called for 
more attention to be paid to 
social security offices and 
accident and emergency 
departments where attacks 
were often initiated by clients 
frustrated by waiting. 

Dr Ross MitcheD, consul- 
tant psychiatrist at the Young 
People’s Psychiatric Service. 
Cambridge, said: “We need 
more positive steps to make 
these more homely: better 
lighting, more pictures and 
plants, reduced waiting times, 
access to eating facilities and 
telephones and toilets that are 
clean and work”. 


Hurd urged to reopen 
pub bomb blast case 


Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, yesterday 
came under intense all-party 
pressure to reopen the case of 
the six men jailed for life for 
the 1974 bombing of a Bir- 
mingham public house in 
which 21 people were killed 
(Our Political Reporter 
writes). 

A group of MPs said that 
there is now the “most serious 
possible doubt” about the 
validity of the convictions 
obtained in 1975. 

Mr David Alton, the Liberal 
chief whip and MP for 
Mossley Hill, said the Home 
Secretary should make a state- 
ment about the case. 

Sir John Fair, Conservative 
MP for Harborough, said he 
would be urging Mr Hurd to 
reopen the case. 

Mr Peter Archer. Labour’s 


frontbench spokesman on 
Northern Ireland, said: 
“There now seems to be a 
serious danger that the people 
convicted were not the people 
who planted the bomb.” 

Guilty verdicts in the trial 
were handed down almost 
entirely on the basis of the 
men’s confessions and foren- 
sic evidence- 
At a press conference yes- 
terday , the MPS said there 
was persuasive new evidence 
to support the men’s conten- 
tion that their confessions 
were “beaten out of them” 
They also said that the latest 
information substantiated 
tests carried out by Granada 
Teievision’s World in Action 
programme discrediting 
prosecution evidence purport- 
ing to show traces of explo- 
sives on the men’s hands. 


Falklands deaths 


Ministry of Defence denies cover up 


By Pete* Davenport, Defence Correspondent 


Ministry of Defence of- 
ficials denied yesterday that 
there had been any attempt to 
cover-up an incident, during 
the Falklands campaign, in 
which four soldiers were killed 
when men from their own unit 
mistook them for the enemy 
and opened fire. 

The next of kin of the men 
were informed about the 
“tragic accident” as soon as 
possible after the conflict was 
over, and details had been 
printed in a history of the 
campaign. 

A Ministry of Defence of- 
ficial said yesterday: “Such 
incidents have always hap- 
pened in the chaos and confu- 
sion of war and probably 
always will. 

"However, the next of kin 
were informed as soon as 
possible after the conflict was 
over and the re-emergence of 
the incident now can only 
cause unnecessary hurt.” 

In military circles such 
events are known as "blue on 
blue” incidents. 

In the Falklands campaign, 
in which a total of 255 Task 
Force personnel lost their 
.lives, four such incidents, in 
which 10 servicemen 


were 


killed, were acknowledged 

The shoot-out between two 
units of 45 Commando, Royal 
Marines, which is being high- 
lighted, is a classic example of 
a "blue on blue", a term 
derived from military ter- 
minology in which all friendly 
forces arc blue and all enemy 
forces red. 

A Ministry of Defence 
spokesman said yesterday that 
the incident occurred on the 
night of June 9-10. 1982, in 
pitch darkness and driving 
rain on Mount Kent 

A fighting patrol of 45 
Commando, having just 
"yomped” across the Falk- 
lands. mistook a mortar sec- 
tion of their colleagues for a 
detachment of Argentine 
troops. 

In the brief but fierce ex- 
change of fire that followed, 
four men were killed They 
were the mortar platoon ser- 
geant. Robert Leeming, aged 
32, Corporals Andrew Uren, 
aged 23 and Peter Flitton, 
aged 25. and Marine Keith 
Philips, aged 19. Three others 
were wounded 

The next of kin of the men 
were informed of the details 
by the officer commanding the 


unit, Lt Col Andrew White- 
head. soon after the end of the 
conflict 

• In one of the other in- 
cidents. two members of the 
Army Air Corps and two men 
of the Royal Signals Regiment 
died when their Gazelle heli- 
copter was hit by a Sea Dart 
missile, now believed to have 
been fired by HMS Cardiff in 
the mistaken belief it was 
attacking an enemy heli- 
copter. 

Initially a metallurgical 
examination had ruled out a 
hit by a Sea Dart but after 
further investigations at the 
Royal Aircraft Establishment 
at Fam bo rough it was con- 
cluded that the Gazelle could 
have been brought down by a 
missile fired by the destroyer. 

Since the end of the cam- 
paign. the procedures govern- 
ing the difficult problem of the 
management of low-level air 
space in a battle, which may 
have led to the error, have 
been tightened up. 

After pressure from the 
mother of one of the Army Air 
Corps men killed in the in- 
cident, a Board of Inquiry was 
set up to examine the details. 
It ended in November and a 


report is now with the Min- 
of Defence. 


istry o 

Relatives of those killed 


were informed, this year, of 
the latest findings in advance 
of expected newspaper pub- 
licity about the helicopter 
having been bit by a British 
missile. 

• In another incident a sol- 
dier with the 2nd Battalion, 
the Parachute Regiment was 
killed by British artillery fire 
while attacking Argentine po- 
sitions on the night of June 13- 
14. His relatives were not told 
of the details until late in 1 983 
because of a wish by his 
battalion to spare them further 
distress. 

However when it became 
known that the incident was to 
be included in General John 
Frost's book 2 Pam : Falk- 
lands, a decision was taken to 
inform them. 

• The final “blue on blue” led 
to the death of a soldier 
serving with the SAS. 

It is understood he was 
engaged on covert activities as 
part of the tattle for the 
islands, but the Ministry of 
Defence will only say that he 
died as a result of an “unfortu- 
nate incident." 


K 


j 

-A' 


i ; 

m 




Woman Police Sergeant Carol Miller consoles WPCs Alison Thrash (centre) and Jndy 
Kerslake at the funeral yesterday of WPC Deborah Lent, aged 20, killed in a car crash last 
week while pursuing a driver who refused to stop, in the Speed weD area of Bristol. 


Industrial 
action 
hits the 
Maze jail 


Disturbances broke out at 
Ulsters Maze prison yes- 
terday as prison officers began 
what they describe as “mqjor” 
industrial action over the 
suspension of a colleague for 
allegedly sleeping on duty. 

During the afternoon the 
Northern Ireland Office de- 
nied a news agency report that 
there' had been a riot in the 
prison. 

A spokesman confirmed, 
however, that some inmates 
who were locked in their cells 
for most or all of the day, had 
broken a number of windows 
in two wings of one of the 
prison’s H blocks. 

The distuibances were in 
one wing occupied wholly by 
“loyalists” and in one mixed 
wing, he said. The situation at 
the Maze is likely to affect the 
expected return today from 
Amsterdam of two men who 
escaped in 1983, Brendan 
McFariane and Gerard Kelly. 

The authorities had been 
intending to re nun the two 
fugitives straight to the Ma ze 
once their extradition had 
been achieved but are unlikely 
to risk putting the two men 
back there while abnormal 
tension, and minimal security, 
prevail. McFariane and Kelly 
will be flown aboard an RAF 
aircraft from Maastricht direct 
to Belfast Aldeigrove airport 
and taken to the C nimfin 
Road prison in Belfast 
Many warders walked out 
or failed to report for doty 
following the suspension of 
one prison officer. 

The RUC was pot on 
standby and police will re- 
main at the prison 


Steel spikes put in path of news lorry 


By Michael McCarthy 

Two sets of solid steel 
spikes, each four feet long, 
were placed at the weekend in 
the path of a 32-ton articu- 
lated lorry coming from the 
News International plant at 
Wapping, east London. 

At the time, it was crossing a 
40 ft high viaduct with an- 
other road beneath it and a 
block of fiats to one side, 
Scotland Yard revealed 
yesterday. 

The driver managed to 
avoid the spikes but had his 
vehicle hit them, said Com- 
mander George Ness, the 
consequences of the incident, 
on the Silvertown flyover in 
north Woolwich on Friday 
night, could have been 
“catastrophic". 

Commander Ness displayed 
the spikes at the second police 
press conference in a fortnight 
specially called to draw atten- 
tion to the spiralling level of 
vidoosness in attacks on ve- 


hicles connected with the 
Wapping dispute. 

He said: “I am absolutely 
amazed that anyone should be 
so callous and reckless as to 
put these things in the path of 
such a vehicle in such a place. 
Soon someone is going to be 
killed". 

The Silvertown incident, 
during which the driver’s 
windscreen was smashed 
when be slowed down to avoid 
the spikes and ball bearings 
fired at his cab from a 
catapult, was only one of 10 
major attacks on News Inter- 
national vehicles over the 
weekend listed by Com- 
mander Ness, operation head 
of the Yard’s No 2 area, which 
covers east London. 

Eight articulated lorries 
belonging to the haulage firm 
TNT. used to transport News 
International newspapers, 
were attacked over Saturday 
night and Sunday morning in 
location ranging from Bethnal 
Green to Ramham in Essex. 


Then in the early hours of 
Monday a half brick was 
dropped on a News Inter- 
national van as it passed 
under Blackfriars Bridge in 
London, narrowly missing the 
driver. 

Those attacks were in addi- 
tion to the mass assault by 20 
to 25 men on News Inter- 
national delivery vehicles at 
Ilford, east London, early on 
Monday morning, reported 
yesterday. 

Commander Ness disclosed 
that there have now been 
more than 1,000 attacks on 
vehicles connected with News 
International since the start of 
the Wapping dispute, which 
began when 5,100 print work- 
ers were dismissed after going 
on strike. 


The spikes displayed yes- 
terday consisted of lengths of 
square steel tubing into which 
specially turned razor-sharp 
steel spikes, two inches long, 
had been fitted. 



Commander George Ness 
showing tire steel spike sets. 
(Photograph: James Gray). 


NEEDS 


THE TIMES 


CONCISE 


Atlas of the 


TOLD 




ty 


I) Where in the World . . ? 
a) Where is Tombouctou? 
b) Where are the Makfive Islands? 
c) Where is theTunguska? 
d) Where is Embu ? 


ANSWERS: I) <AjS)|(p tuaqsiwtiofc 


2) Names to Remember 

a) What Is the capital of Honduras? 

b) What is the longest river in Asia? 

c) What is the capital of Mauritius? 

d) What is the highest mountain In Africa? 

Score 5 points for every correct answer 

0-15 

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Aids virus carriers 
in Britain ‘could 


THE TIMS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


HOME NEWS 


total up to 100,000’ 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

J“ about 20 y ears > by which lime the rea 
7-J,™. may be rarrymg the many millions of people Clay ss 
Aids vinis and a substantial world-wide would be infected. AM _ 
proportion” will develop the At . Aids 

disease within the next few . A j ai ?? h £f “““S « the lea 
years, a sperialisr predicted ^e Royal Coflegeof intern 

yesierdav Nursing said that some Aids from i 

n,, - qqi ,, . - parents were refusing to enter workei 

By 1 991 ihc number of new some hospitals hre^nyt of the world 
?Sf s each month could reach way they or olte tol to o° c ii 
340 the equivalent of “a treated. 


years, a sperialisr predicted 
yesterday. 

By 1991 the number of new 
cases each month could reach 
340, the equivalent of “a 
Jurtibo jet load of passengers 
falling from the skies”. Dr 
John Gailwey, a consultant 
pnvsician ai the Radcliffc 
Infirmary, Oxford, said. 

Dr Gailwey, an adviser on 
Aids to the Oxford Regional 
Health Authority, also said 
that it was time researchers 
”came clean” about the 
percentage of carriers likely to 
develop the disease. 

He challenged the Govern- 
ment-held estimate of about 
30.000 carriers in Britain and 
its view that 30 per cent would 
develop illness. The estimates 
discussed privately by some 
United States specialists were 
that more than 90 per cent of 
carriers would develop Aids or 
related conditions. 

SpeaJang at a Medical 
Journalists Association meet- 
ing in London, Dr Gailwey 
said that he regretted making 
such grim forecasts. ”But we 
have to retain credibility in 
the eyes of our patients and if 
we tell them a low figure and 
they read a higher estimate 
elsewhere they will question 
our honesty”. 

The Department of Health 
said yesterday that 599 Aids 
cases have been recorded, 
including 296 deaths. There 
were 34 new cases and IS 
deaths in November. 

Dr Gailwey predicted that 
there would not be a vaccine 
against Aids available for 


Some individuals were 
M quite unnecessarily” put into 
isolation by hospitals which 
had over-reacted and had 
unfair attitudes towards the 
original population of patients 
at risk — male homosexuals 
and drug addicts. 

The college has asked the 
authorities to change their 
attitudes and gave a warning 
that it may name the hospitals 
if they do not. 

The college issued new 
nursing guidelines on Aids 
emphasizing that there can be 
no “opi-oui clause” for caring 
for Aids patients. 

Nurses must tend victims of 
the disease, face disciplinary 
action or resign, Mr Richard 
Wells, its nursing adviser on 
oncology, said. 

However, there had been an 
“overwhelming response” by 
nurses willing to care for Aids - 
patients, ana nurses could 
lead the way in changing 
people's attitudes towards the 
disease, Mr Trever Clay, gen- 
eral secretary, said. 

The guidelines say that 
“refusal to cam may well 
result in disciplinary proce- 
dures being taken against the 
nurse for unprofessional 
conduct” 


Some nurses had been vices committee, told coun- 
unwilling to handle Aids cases cillois that medical experts 


early on because they lacked said it was impossible to catch 
adequate information about the Aids virus through water. 


PC made hostage 
offer, jury told 


A young policeman offered 
himself as hostage in exchange 
for the release of a little girt 
held prisoner by a knifeman, a 


jury was told yesterday. 

But Errol walker, aged 29, 
who is accused of murdering 
the girl’s mother, refused. 
Instead he started to repeat- 


edly hack the child's hands 
with a JO-incb knife as PC 
Rafi Landi looked on help- 
lessly. 

“The veins of his forehead 
were clearly visible. His eyes 
were red and wide open. He 
was sweating and extremely 
agitated.” PC Landi told the 
Central Criminal Court 

He was describing a siege 
last Christmas in which Mr 
Walker allegedly first mur- 
dered the giri's mother, Jackie 
Charles, in front of her, and 
then subjected Carlene. aged 
four, to a 29-hour ondeaL 

He slashed her on several 
occasions, dangled her from a 
third-floor balcony by just her 
vest and constantly threatened 
to kill her, the prosecution 
said. 

Mr Walker, of Tachbrook 
Road, Southall, west London, 
denies murder, attempted 
murder, wounding, false 
imprisonment and threaten- 
ing to kill. 

The prosecution alleges - that 
Mr Walker took Carlene and 
her mother hostage at their 



PC Landi, hostage offer. 


council flat in Poynteis Court, 
Northolt, west London, while 
searching for his wife, Mar- 
lene. 

Walker was demanding that 
police should bring his wife to 
see him at the flat. PC Landi 
said he was outside the win- 
dow after Jackie was stabbed 
to death when he saw the 
toddler screaming and snug- 
gling in Mr Walker's arms. 

“He put her on thefloor and 
sat on her back with his legs 
either side. He held her right 
hand out flat on the carpet and 
looked at me and said be was 
going to cut her up. 

“I appealed to him not to 
hurt the child but then I saw 
him deliberately slice his knife 
across the back of her hand. I 
saw blood coming from her 
hand and Carlene screamed. 

“I told Walker to let the 
child go and offered myself as 
hostage. He refused and 
threatened to kill her. He then 
started to hack at her hand 
with the knife. 

“I offered him some ban- 
dages for the girl's injuries but 
he refused, saying he was 
going to bleed her to death.” 

PC Landi said that be saw 
Mr Walker tie Carlene to a 
chair with flex and hit her with 
a radio. 

“He then said he was going 
to cat Carlene’s hand off” PC 
Landi said. 

Next he said that Mr Walker 
put a plastic bag over 
Carlene’s bead and said: 
“Look, she’s suffocating.” 

The jury was shown a video 
of the end of the siege before 
PC Landi's evidence. It 
showed officers storming into 
the flat and the jury heard 
three shots ring out Mr 
Walker, the prosecution al- 
leges, was shot in the back of 
the head as be was on the 
point of stabbing Carlene in 
the neck. 

The case continues today. 


Probation 
for armed 
bank visit 


An engineer who walked 
into a teak armed with a 
pistol and two petrol bombs 
and demanded £68,000 was 
put on probation for two years 
at the Gsntral Criminal Court 
yesterday. 

Judge Capstick, QC, told 
Emil Molnar, aged 54, of- 
Scotts Hill Cottage, Ware, 
Hertfordshire: “I am prepared 
to take an exceptional and 
unique course in putting you 
on probation.” 

The court was told that 
Molnar, a “brilliant and 
innovative” engineer, had a 
personal grudge against 
Lloyds Bank, which gave him 
a loan of £40,000 10 years ago 
to set up a factory. 

Half way to its completion 
the bank converted the loan 
into a mortgage and recalled 
the money. Molnar was forced 
to sell everything to repay it 

He made an appointment to 
see the manager of foe bank's 
branch in Oxford Street, 
London, and, in his office, 
took out home-made petrol 
bombs, an imitation grenade, 
and a gun. 

The court was told he 
| expected to be shot down by 
armed police and when be was 
, arrested a note was found on 
him asking for his organs to go 
i to medical science. 


Molnar admitted demand- 
ing money with menaces. Mr 
Howard Shaw, for the defence, 
said: “It welled up inside him 
and he finally snapped”. 


Breeder loses 
appeal over 
goshawk sales 


‘Cult link’ 
ruled out 
on deaths 


17 facing 

corruption 

charges 


A coroner yesterday ruled 
out any “cult link" between 
the deaths of two young 
colleagues who travelled to 
Bristol to die. 

In October Arshad Shanf. 
aeed 26. a computer engineer, 

Sussirsfti'; 

convinced that Mr Shanf 
iniendediok.il himself. 

Two months earlier Vrma^ 

Jtonh from the Cliflon suspen- 

sion bridge in Bristol. 

A card from a Hindu cult 

u-as found in Mr 
pocket and an open verdict 

was recorded. 

MrihanT'from Waltham- 
adjourned t«o "““J? ^ 


, Seven Civil Servants and 10 
| private building contractors 
accused of corruption over 
i contracts worth more than £50 
million for work at royal 
palaces and other government 
buildings, were yesterdaysmt 
for trial at foe Genual Crim- 
inal Court. 

They include foe former 
Greater London Council arch- 
itectural department officer 
and six officials of foe 
Government's Property Ser- 
vices Agency. 

The 17 men face a total of 
96 charges, mainly of giving or 
accepting bribes of cash, free 
home improvements and afl- 
expenses-paid holidays to Mi- ; 
ami. Las Vegas and Austria. 

• Mr Anthony Deduca, aged 
46 of Romanburet Gardens, i 
Bromley, Kent, owner of a ! 
building group, won a 
■‘substantial” undisclosed 
sum and a public apology m 
foe High Court yesterday over 
allegations in foe of the 
World that his companies had 
been black-listed by the Prop- 
erty Services Agency after a 
bribery scandal. 


A bird breeder who bought 
and sold four wild goshawks, 
worth £2,000, lost his appeal 
yesterday against fines and 
tests totalling £1,125 imposed 
for breaches of foe Wildlife 
and Countryside Act 1981. 

Eric Kirkland, of Manor 
Road. Haughton Green, Den- 
ton. Greater Manchester, was 
fined by local magistrates, a 
decision which foe Divisional 
Court upheld. 


Lord Justice Brown ruled 
that it did not matter that the 
dealer did not know foe law. 

The four birds cannot be 
returned to the wild and will 
be given to licensed owners. 


$8m high-tech 
fraud charge 


Angelo Lambeiti, aged 24, a 
clerk, of Woodhouse Road, 
North Finchley, north 
London, and John Rlinski, 
aged 22, a roofer, of Gold- 
smith Road, New Southgate, 
north London, both accused 
of an attempted $8 million hi- 
technotogy fraud, were yes- 
terday committed to the 
Central Criminal Court for 
trial. 

The alleged fraud involved 
the transfer of securities val- 
ued at $8,522,750 from Bache 
Securities' account with Mor- 
gan Guaranty. BrusseIs,to the 
account of Cede! SA, 
Luxembourg. 





Mortgage 
demand 
drops but 
not prices 


By Christopher Warman 
Property Correspondent 


Mortgage approvals fell by 
suiv 20 ner cent last month 


—% old • 
Success 
discovered 
by chance 


the real risks of infection, Mr 
Clay said. 

Aids had shown itself to be 
the least infectious of illnesses 
in terms of being transmitted 
from patient to health care 
worker. Only three cases in the 
world were known, including 
one in Britain. None had 
developed foe disease. 


^ VV ?i ; i-r>' • ■ =• si: ' .1 


k: 






Aids patients could be 
nursed in open wards but they 
were more at risk from other 
patients because of their low- 
ered immunity than foe other 
patients were from them. Mr 
Wells said. 




The great majority of hos- 
pitals and nursing staffs were 
providing “exceedingly good 
care” to Aids patients, Mr 
Clay said. “As with all serious 
new diseases there has been 
fear and panic. What we are 
trying to do now is turn down 
the heat and turn up foe light.” 




nearly 20 per cent last montn 
because of higher interest rates 
and a seasonal drop in de- 
mand, the Halifax Budding 
Society said yesterday. 

The figure was 40 per cent 
down on the peak home- 


buying boom in July, but foe 
effect has not filtered through 




f3s»se* 


• Gay and lesbian swimming 
sessions at foe Victoria Lei- 
sure Centre, Nottingham, are 
to continue in spite of 10 
schools banning lessons there 
because of fears over contract- 
ing the Aids virus. 

The Labour-controlled dty 
council has pledged to con- 
tinue the gay sessions despite a 
deluge of complaints from 
parents and Conservative 
councillors. 

The sessions were at foe 
request of the gay community, 
which has complained of 
harassment during normal 
sessions, but pool attendants 
have voted not to supervise 
them. Mrs Frances Dennett, 
chairman of foe leisure ser- 






HMS Upholder, the first diesel submarine to be built in Britain for 25 years, was launched 
by the Duchess of Kent at Vickers 1 yard in Barrow yesterday. (Photograph: Harry Kerr). 


effect has not filtered through 
into prices. 

The Halifax house price 
index shows that prices in- 
creased by 1 3.6 per cent in foe 
year to the end of November, 
foe same as last month, and 
house price inflation has been 
virtually unchanged since 
June. Prices are rising by over 
tour times foe rate of inflation , 
and twice as fast as average 
earnings. 

Inflation fell in Greater 
London from 25 per cent in 
the year to October to 24 per 
cent last month, but in south- 
east England increased from 
20 per cent to 22 per centlo 
Yorkshire and Humberside, 
prices increased by 6.7 per 
cent, slightly less than in foe 
previous months. 

• The Association of British 
Insurers said that the cost of 
rebuilding a house increased 
by 4.2 per cent between 
September 1985 and Sepiem- 1 
ber 1986 and gave a warning i 
that the market value of a ! 
house was not an accurate . 
guide to rebuilding costs. i 


A retired Indian Army offi- 
cer, from Fife, in Scotland, was 
one of three winners of 
yesterday's £4,000 Portfolio 
Gold prize. 

Mr NeO Collier, aged 64, of 
Elie. was clearing his desk 
when he found his card and 
derided to check the n ambers. 

“It was quite by chance that 
1 realized I was a winner, 
because 1 am usually too busy 
to look at it,” he safe. 

Mr Thomas Ames, aged 60, 
and Miss Shan Abram, aged 
24, estate agents in CKd 
Brampton Road, south-west 
London, shared the remaining 
£ 2 , 000 . 

Miss Abram said: “We were 
really excited and jumping 
around the office when we 
realized we bad won.” 



Callas on Channel 4 for Christmas 


Channel 4 yesterday an- 
nounced its Christmas pro- 
grammes, which will include a 
broadcast on December 27 of 
foe second act of Puccini's 
Tosco, with Maria Callas in 
foe title role and Tito Gobbi as 
foe police chief. 

The programme was re- 
corded at the Royal Opera 
House in 1964 and was di- 
rected by Franco Zeffirelli. 


Other highlights of foe 
Channel 4 schedule include an 
interview with Dame Peggy 
Ashcroft on Christmas Eve 
and Vladimir Horowitz in 
conversation and perfor- 
mance on Christinas Day. 

Wayne Sleep leads the cast 
of Dash, in a programme 
recorded at the Palace Theatre 
in London, on Christmas Eve. 

Rock tons are offered the 


guitarist. Eric Clapton, in 
■ concert on Christmas Day and 
a 90-minute selection of the 
year's best pop videos on 
December 30. 

Comedy includes Max 
Headroom, joined by Bob 
Geldof and Tina Turner on 
Boxing Day, Just Wisdom, a 
documentary about Norman 
Wisdom on December 27. 

Sir David Willcocks con- 


ducts his own arrangements of 
23 carols from St Emundsbury 
Cathedral on Christmas Eve, 
with Aled Jones, foe Welsh 
boy treble, and foe Royal 
College of Music Chamber 
Choir. 

Cathedral Praise on Decem- 
ber 23 from Gloucester Cathe- 
dral will be a mixture of . . . , ... 

traditional carols and Afro- Ames and Miss Abram 


Caribbean music. 


will boy Christmas gifts 


We built 


Trafalgar House 


to withstand 


harsh conditions 


It works. 


. The year to 30th September 
1986 was a difficult one, yet three of 
the four divisions which constitute 
Trafalgar House’s business produced 
improvements in operating profit 

However the reduction in the 
price of oil and gas to a level which 
produced operating losses in the 
second half of the year resulted in the 
contribution from this division falling 
by £27 million compared with the 
previous year. 

Property and Investment, and 
Shipping, Aviation and Hotels pro- 
duced record profits. 

Construction and Engineering 
came through a difficult year with a 
substantial increase in turnover; due to 
the acquisition of John Brown, and a 
marginal increase in operating profit 


1966 RESULTS 

fin 

Property 

Chang? 

*1985 

arid Investment 

76.4 

+35% 

Construction 

and Engrieering 

442 

+7% 

Stepping, Aviation 

and Hotels 

385 

+21% 

OBandGas 

3.8 

-88% 

Operating Profit 

1629 

+2% 

Interest 

17J 

-2% 

Net Profit 

before Taxation 

1455 

+2% 

Profit after Taxation 

and Minority Interests 

1150 

+4% 

Ortihary Dividend 

132p 

+15% 


Group turnover increased from 
£1*9 billion in 1985 to £2T billion in 
1986. 

We are therefore able to an- 
nounce preliminary results for the 
year to 30th September 1986 which 
show an increase in profit before tax 
and a 15% increase in dividend. The 
figures are subject to final audit 

The 1986 Report and Accounts 
will be posted to shareholders on 8th 
December 1986. 

Copies may be obtained from 
the Secretary, 1 Berkeley St., London 
W1A 1BY 



TRAFALGAR 

HOUSE 


n Bi it ii«iih 







r 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY 


IER 3 1986 


I < l Cr'' 


December 2 1 986 


Leyland 

talks 

under 


way 


Hattersley 
fails to move 
Thatcher on 


Mr Pan] Chaimon, Secretary of 
State Tor Trade and Insutry, 
outlined in a statement to the 
Commons, the progress being 
made by Leyland Trucks in 
negotiations on options for the 
future of the division. He 
emphasized that he expected Mr 
Graham Day, chairman of the 
Rover Group, to come forward 
with plans for Austin Rover to 
ensure that it remained a major 
manufacturer and exporter of 
cars made in Britain. 

The Government was accused 
from the Opposition benches of 
contemplating “flogging off" 
what was left of the industrial 
base to foreigners. 

Mr Chanson said: On July 24 1 
informed the House that agree- 
ment in principle bad been 
reached on the sale of Leyland 
Bus and of a majority holding in 
Uniparr and I can report in both 
cases that detailed negotiations 
are proceedings satisfactorily. 

In reply to questions ou 
November 5 1 also announced 
the disposal of majority in- 
terests in Jaguar-Rover-Austra- 
lia and in IsieL The situation on 
Land-Rover remains as 1 stated 
last April, that Land-Rover will 
be retained in the Rover Group 
for a possible flotation or trade 
sale at a later date. 

The chairman of Rover 
Group has also been reviewing 
the options for Leyland trucks. 


spy case 


PRIME MINISTER 


This review has been taking 
Diace aeainst the backdrop of 


place against the backdrop of 
continuing depressed demand, 
particularly in overseas mar- 
kets, and severe over-capacity in 
Europe. 

Our objective is to achieve a 
secure future for the production 
of Leyland trucks. But it must be 
recognized that any option for 
the company — whether related 
to collaboration, merger, sale or 
indeed continuation under 
present ownership — will in- 
volve restructuring. 

Jalks are progressing with 
two companies. 

The first is DAP. In October a 
limited but important collabora- 
tion on the marketing of Road- 
runner trucks and Sherpa vans 
was announced. DAP and 
Rover Group are now in talks 
about the benefits that could, 
arise from much more fun-' 
da mental collaboration in the 
truck and van businesses. 

The second is Paccar, the 
parent company of Foden. who 
arc considering the basis on 
which they might wish to make 
a bid for Leyland trucks. 

Both sets of talks are at an 
early stage and. for the reasons I 
have already outlined, Mr Day 
has my foil support in pursuing 
them. I thought it right to 
inform the House at this early 
stage and 1 shall of course keep 
the House in touch with 
developments. 

1 am sure MPs will under- 
stand and accept that it would 
be prejudicial to the interests of 
those employed in these opera- 
tions and in their suppliers for 
me to make any further detailed 
comment on the discussion at 
this stage. 

Mr Day’s review of the plans 


Mr Roy Hattersley, Deputy 
Leader of the Opposition, had 
no better luck than Mr Neil 
Kinnock had had the previous 
week in persuading the Prime 
Minister to respond to his 
criticisms and questions about 
the Wright case and the 
Government’s failure to stop 
publication of Their Trade is 
Treachery by Mr Chapman 
P'mcherin 1981. 

Mr Hattersley asked, during 
Prime Minister’s question time: 
In her consideration of these 
matters, particularly of what is 
known as public interest, will 
she tell us how she disti ngui s h ed 
between a book written by Mr 
peter Wright and one based on 
information supplied by him? 

Why did she choose to pros- 
ecute - or attempt to suppress a 
publication — in the one case 
and allow, indeed encourage, 
publication in the other? 

Roars of Opposition laughter 
interrupted Mrs Thatcher as she 
began to reply: I cannot com- 
ment — on matters which may 
arise from proceedings about 
the Peter Wright case in Austra- 


lia while proceedings continue «re concerned? 


and f intend to follow die 
precedent of previous ministers 
in not commenting on security 
matters (renewed Labour laugh- 
ter and protests'). 

Mr Hattersley: I am asking her 
to answer for past errors. Is it 
not her decision not to act 
against Chapman Pincber in 
1981 which has produced the 
present humiliation and re- 
sulted in the Attorney General’s 
authority being usurped by the 
Prime Minister to manipulate 
the law for party political 
reasons 

Mrs Thatcher: He is attempting 
to be irresponsible. I shall not 



Mr GreviUe Jannen Ques- 
tion on secrets Act 
comment however much he 


Mrs Thatcher: The abandon- 
ment of the bipartisan approach 
to security matters is totally and 
utterly fundamental to the sec- 
urity of this country. The Leader 
of the Opposition has aban- 
doned the fundamental defence 
policy pursued by his prede- 
cessors and he has now aban- 
doned the fundamental security 
policy. 

Mr GreviDe Janner (Leicester 
West, Lab): In view of die 
anxiety which the Prime Min- 
ister must have suffered during 
the past few weeks over the 
contradictory application and 
non-application of Section 2 of I 
the Official Secrets Act, and in l 
view of her refusal to comment > 
on this to this House, is she 
considering amending the Act? 
Mrs Thatcben We tried to 
amend the Ad in 1980 and 
brought before the House a Bill 
for that purpose. It was. at that 
time, rejected. We have no 
present proposals to amend il 
M r Antony Marlow (Northamp- 
ton North, C): Is it possible to 
arrange a special flight for the 
Leader of the Opposition so he 
can come to the House tomor- 
row to answer the very real 
allegation that he has been 
conniving with defence lawyers 
in Australia in the case against 
the Crown? 

Mrs Thatchen It is not for me to 
answer for the Leader of the 
Opposition and I am jolly glad I 
do not have to. 


for all RG operating companies asks (Labour protests), 
including Austin Rover will Mr Hattersley. Nobody is taken 


form the basis of the 1987 
corporate plan now under 
preparation. After I have re- 
ceived it and given it careful 
consideration, I will announce 
the Government’s response. 

In respect of Austin Rover, 1 
should however like to take this 
opportunity to emphasize that I 
expea Mr Day's plan to set out a 
positive course for the continu- 


in, by her prevarication. The 
country knows that the Prime 
Minister has begun to treat the 
law as if it were her own 
property (Conservative pro- 
tests). Hence her willingness to 
allow Mr Wright to sell his 
secrets to Chapman Pincber, but 
not to allow him to pubbsh 
them under his own name. 

Mrs Thatcher It would be 


alion of the company as a major; inappropriate for me to corn- 
producer and leading exporter- ment on matters which may 


of cats made in Britain. I stress 
that the Government's aim is to 
secure the best possible future 
for Austin Rover, its suppliers 
and the motor industry gen- 


erally in this country. 
Mr John Smith, ( 


Mr John Smith, Opposition 
spokesman on Trade and in- 
dustry. said that Mr Channon 
bad announced two sets of talks. 


arise in proceedings concerning 
the Peter Wright case in Austra- 
lia, while proceedings continue. 
I also intend to follow - the 
precedent set by previous prime 
ministers not to comment on 
security matters, a precedent 


Mr Cranley Onslow (Woking, 
Q: Given the way the Leader of 
the Opposition let him self be set 
up to ask in this House the 
questions which were to be I 
asked in the Australian court the | 
following day. is she aware that j 
she would have the foil support i 
of this side of the House if she I 
refused to have any more truck 1 
on matters of national security 
with somebody who has re- 
duced himself to the status of 

Mr Turnbull's mouthpiece? 

Mrs Thatcher: Yes, I agree 
wholcheartedley. 

• Mr Dale Campbell-Savo nrs 
(Workington, Lab) said on a 
point of order later that at 
12.05pm today the news bul- 
la ins had announced that the 
Government bad “taken a 
sound thrashing" in the Irish 
courts over its application for an 
injunction to prevent publica- 


whicb Mr Hattersley himself lion of the book One Woman's 
adhered to when be was in War by Joan Miller. 


Were they alternatives? 
The first proposilic 


junior office. 


The first proposition with (Brigg and Cleethorpes, Q had 
DAF appeared on the basis of asked the Prime Minister: Will 
the statement to be an extension she consider setting up an 
of existing collaboration, which official inquiry to consider what 
appeared to be proceeding precedents there are. if any, fora 
satisfactorily. It was desirable if leader of her Majesty's Opposi- 


it was a true collaboration 
between equal and independent 
companies. 

The second proposition was a i 


leader of her Majesty's Opposi- 
tion to intervene in a court case 
involving her Majesty's Gov- 
ernment, by means of contact- 
ing _ privately counsel acting 


takeover attempt .by another against HM Government? (La- 
forcign-owned company for bour laughter and protests) 


Leyland Trucks. Given that 
General Motors appeared to be 
persisting in their decision to 
end truck making in the UK. the 
only truck maker left in Britain 
would cease to be British owned. 

Why was Mr Channon en- 
couraging these talks which 
would lead to extensive na- 
tionalization. to job loses and to 
loss of British ownership and 
control of a crucial pan of the 
engineering economy? 

Would he take the opportu- 
nity of having foil consultations 
with the relevant trade unions to 
whom this statement would be 
news. Would it not make sense 
for him to seek, at this stage, to 
give the fullest possible informa- 
tion and to allow the follesi 
possible consultation with the 
trade unions? 

On Austin Rover, while not- 
ing the Government’s apparent 
conversion to maintaining the 
company as a major car pro- 
ducer. would Mr Channon ap- 
peal to the Prime Minister to 
stop knocking the group as she 
did in her recent interview with 
The Financial Times? When 
would the Government see Aus- 
tin Rover as a great opportunity 
for Britain and not as a problem 


Mrs Thatctaen Mr Brown 
makes his point effectively, if 


n or by Joan Miner. 

Had the news come before 
noon he would have been able to 
give notice of his intention to 
seek an emergency debate in 
order to get a statement from the 
Government as to why, having 
failed in Ireland, il should carry 
on with the proceedings in 
Australia. 

Did the Speaker accept that he 
had the right to apply for an 
emergency debate tomorrow? 
The Speaker (Mr Bernard 
WeatherilD replied amid laugh- 
ter. He knows the rules better 
than I do. 


PARLIAMENT 


there are any such precedents 
for this astonishing action, per- 
haos the Deputy Leader of the 


haps the Deputy Leader of the 
Opposition will let us know. 

Mr Donald Stewart (Western 
Isles, SNP): In looking at the 
present difficulties of the British 
Government and of the Ameri- 
can Government, many people 
are contrasting her Govern- 
ment’s shoddy, bole-m-tho-cor- 
ner, sweep-it-under-the-carpet 
tactics as against the fact that in 
America, everything is going to 
come out in the wash (laughter 
and protests). When are the 
people of the United Kingdom 
going to be trusted with open 
government? 

Mrs Thatcher: As a housewife I 
think be became mixed up 
about his subject 
Mr Richard Hiehxoet (Glanford 
and Scunthorpe, Cf May I 
assure the Prime Minister that 
the questions from this side of 
the House have not been 
planted . . . (prolonged laughter) 
by Mr Turnbull. 

What damage does she think 
the abandonment of the biparti- 
san approach to security matters 
has done to British security 
interests and whai effect does 
she think this will have in the 
future, as far as security interests 



Mr Roy Hattersley tuns into a brick wafl. 


Teachers’ pay talks ‘a 
great opportunity’ 


The negotiations on teachers' 
pay provided a great opportu- 
nity to improve the quality of 
the teaching profession which 
should not be missed. Mr 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education and Science, 
said during Commons question 
time. 

Answering a question about 
the latest state of the negotia- 
tions. he said that the NUT had 
voted narrowly at its conference 
at the weekend to accept the 
proposals in the Acas document 
signed by the local authorities 
and some teacher unions. 

The NUT was balloting its 
members and local authorities 
were meeting to discuss the 
proposals. He remained willing 
to hold further discussions with 
the local authorities and any of 
the teacher unions. 

Mr Robert Hicks (South East 
Cornwall, Q said that his 
concern was the genuine 
predicament in the case of the 
good classroom teacher in 
schools in smaller villages and 
market towns who, having 
achieved the maximum after 
nine years, would find them- 
selves locked in and their 
chance of promotion very 
limited. 

Mr Baker said that that was 
exactly one of the main flaws of 
the Acas proposals and would 
affect adversely the smaller 
primary schools. 

Under the Acas proposals 
there would be no promotion 
posts at all in three-quarters of 
primary schools and therefore 
no incentive for teachers to do 
well unless they sought to 
become a head teacher or dep- 
uty head, and a deputy at a small 
school would earn only £5 a 
week more than than the main 
professional grade teacher under 
the Acas proposals. 

Mr Derek Fatchett (Leeds Cen- 
tral, Lab) said that Mr Baker 
made dear that be-was prepared 
to be flexible about his own 


EDUCATION 


disnipted the schools once 

a gain, 

Mr Baker said that the NUT 
had made dear it was not 
prepared to move at all; 

Mr John Townend (Bridlington, 
Q said that there had been 
considerable improvement in. 
the teacher-pupil ratio without 
an equivalent improvement in 
the quality of education. Would 
he resist .demands for more 


Mr Clement Freud (North East 
Cambridgeshire, L) asked if be 
would reassure teachers that not 
only was his door open but that 
bis mind remained open also? 
Mr Baker said that it was often 
difficult to distinguish between 


the views of Mr Freud and the “ resist .gemanes ror more 
Labour Party on education. A -teachers and more free periods, 
career stniemre that included *** «ncentrate rerources on 


incentive posts and proper re- 
wards was surely one of the 



Mr dement Freud: Is 
minister’s mind open? 

dements of liberal thinking? 
Mr Alan Haselhwst (Saffron 
Walden, Q said that the prize 
would be more glittering if a 
settlement could be achieved by 
agreement 

Mr Baker said that he agreed 
and that was why he had said his 
door remained open. It had been 
made more difficult by what Mr 
McAvoy, deputy general sec- 
retary of NUT, had said after 
the NUT conference, that there 
was no likelihood of the NUT 


jo) said that Mr Baker agreement's being changed. Mr 
tear that be-was prepared McAvoy had been quoted as 
flexible about his own saying; “There is an alternative: 


suggested imposed settlement 
Would he give some indication 
of the areas in which be would 
be flexible? 

Mr Baker said that he had net 
Mr John Pearman (the local 
authorities representative) and 
two unions so for and another 
bad asked to see him next week. 

The Government’s position 
on pay remained within the cost 
envelope of £600 million. 


a return to action and dis- 
ruption’'. 

Mr Baker said: I utterly deplore 
that statement coining from a 
major figure in the NUT. 

Mr Martin Flannery (Sheffield, 

Hillsborough, Lab) said that the 
real word in the question had 
been negotiation. If the Sec- 
retary of State tried to impose 
his will on the unions he would 
unify them and would have 


and concentrate resources on 
rewarding good teachers who 
were conscientious and accepted 
responsibility? 

Mr Baker said that the popS- 
teacher ratio bad improved 
from 18-9io 1 in 1979 to 17.6 to 
I now. The Government’s pro- 
posals would improve tire qual- 
ity of education by providing 
incentives and rewards for at 
least half of the profession 
compared with one-thud in the 
Acas document 
Mr Anthony Favell (Stockport, 
Q said that the time bad come 
to removelocal authorities from 
the pay equation. People wanted 
a national curriculum and na- 
tional standards. 

Mr Baker said that there was a 
move to try to support and 
encourage movement towards a 
national curriculum. 

On the future, determining 
pay and conditions for teachers, 
the Bill to come before the 
House for second reading next 
week would set out the 
Government* s proposals for in- 
terim advisory committees and 
he was sure that many people 
would welcome the fact that the 
Burnham n e g o ti ating machin- 
ery was coming to its end. 

Mr Giles Radice, chief Opposi- 
tion spokesman on education, 
asked Mr Baker whether he was 
prepared to accept any mod- 
ification of his proposals or 
whether he was merely delaying 
until be had got his legislation 
through Parliament so thai he 
could impose a settlement on 
teachers and employers. 

Mr Baker said that on October 
30 he had set out the 
Government's position and had 
provided a further £600 million. 

“Since then there has been no 
movement towards the Gov- 
ernment's position. Some 
unions are now coming to me 
and saying they would like to 
reconsider their position. I am 
willing to listen.” 


Norfolk and Suffolk Broads 


Bill wins a second reading 


Mr Channon said that he en- 
tirely repudiated that point 
about the Prime Minister. The 
Financial Times had issued a 
correction. As £2.2 billion had 
been pul into Austin Rover, it ill 
became Mr Smith to criticize 
the Government for not 
supporting the company. 

Their would be consulation 
in the normal way. through the 
normal machinery, with the 
trade unions. 

On Paccar, as opposed to 
DAF. it was far to soon at this 
stage to say how these talks 
would progress. 


The following is a summary of 
the Commons debate on ' the 
second reading of the Norfolk 
and Suffolk Broads BUI that 
appeared in late editions of this 
newspaper yesterday. 

There had been a decline in the 
past 25 years in the natural 
beupty and scientific interest of 
the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads, 
Mr Wflliatu Wahlegrave, Min- 
ister for Environment, Country- 
side and Planning, said when 
moving the second reading of tbe 
Bill, which sets up a statutory 
authority to develop, manage 
and conserve the area. 

He said the landscape was 
largely man-made and unique. It 
covered 111 square miles and 
the waterways attracted thou- 
sands of visitors, bringing great 
benefits to the local economy. 
But there were problems. 

The decline in the natural 
beauty and scientific interest 
bad been caused by tbe accu- 
mulated effects of complex and 
interrelated factors, including 
water pollution, loss of riverside 
reed beds and other fringe 
vegetation. . 

Conversion of marshland to 
l arable land had cansed the loss 
of some of the characteristic 
-features of the landscape of tbe 
Broads. 

Tbe Government's approach 
had been to establish a new 


Tbe heart and or ig in of the 
B3I was to conserve the Broads 
for ever for the enjoyment of 
everyone. The Bill weald fail 
unless it secured proper con- 
servation. There was therefore a 
need for a properly integrated 
authority to manage the water- 
ways and land together. 

The BQl provided for the eight 
relevant local authorities to meet 
the balance of expenditure not 
met by grant from the Govern- 
ment Tbe Government intended 
to set its grant at the same level 
as that for national parks. 

*?t David Clark, for the Opposi- 
tion, said that the Opposition 
***d*ly supported the concept of 
the Bill, bat with reservations. 

One of its strengths was that it 


The river banks had eroded, 
the water quality had changed 
and the bird and plant life had l 
been affected. All those and 
other matters could be given 
much greater attention under the 
provisions of this B3L 
Mr Clement Freud (North East 
Cambridgeshfre, L) said that j 
this was a splendid Bill and be i 
welcomed ft wholeheartedley. 
He would like it to place more 
emphasis on conservation rather 
than navigation. 

The Bin <fid not mention ; 
natnre conservation specifically! : 
it mentioned natural beauty 
instead. Were the Broads going 1 
to look pretty? That would not 
necessarily ensure good con- 


Owen speaks out 
for nuclear policy 


Minister p 


attacks 

insider 


if*:- 




deals 

The Government 
sider dealing on the financial 




ft 


rolritett as a thoroughly per- 
^S^nSnice which damaged 


S§« peoffreySmS 

SjvertSrenu hc added ',^ The MI5 book case is jnst 

doaUiniispowertorooitiou^ ^ kind of issue that the 
He claimed that theQpP^Jj Honse fl f Commons lores. It 

£>s * whiff of conspiracy, a 
Sf2SvStb^Cft> bashing". good deal of mystery, a lot of 

cSSfog the debate. Mr Robin personalities hot not modi 

Cdolu an Opposition spokes- technical detail. There is 
man, moved a motion express- therefore a risk that loo many 
ing concern at the evidence oj mbers w ili enjoy today's 

Stodging ia^finannal J”.,,., 


markets and the low dear-up 
rate, and rejecting the 
Government’s policy of Uty 
self- regulation. 

■— He yairi that when the Opposi- 
tion tabled the motion on Cit y 
fraud for today il had not been 


It would be a_ pity if it 
becomes an occasion for un- 
focused indignation because 
there are serions questions to 
be discussed. If ministers are 
to emerge unscathed they mast 


acting on Myinsider intmroa- - de adequate an- 

srariaf , .‘ h s!d si** 1 

ta« year the total' volume meat is lacking a justification 


staked in the City in takeover ^ bringing the case. There is 
bids was a record £6.000 mil- a 0 f principle to be 

lion. In the first 10 months ol ^ that, even if books 


Hon- In the first 10 montns ot defended: that, even if books 

TJ - SrUwM. from ftw e.h, 


times as great — 
£30,000 million. 

The City of London was one 
of the three main financial 
markets in the world and it was 
set in an economy in which 


time by ontside authors with 
the aid of leaks from within 
the security services, it is 
essentia] to prevent former 
members of these services 


“r **** 1,00,15 tf,ai - 

’Whit the Government has 


heroic proportions and invest- 
ment in manufacturing industry 
was dedining from ns earlier 
miserable level. 


Within that economy, the 


to show is that it has been 
consistent and politically sen- 
sible in defence of that prin- 


City nevertheless found it pos- ciple. The argument falls to 
stole to raise astronomic funds the ground if it is evident that 


with which to gamble on the fj, e Government was itself 
ownership of British industry in directly or indirectly a party to 
which it showed such little .. _ it/r* 


interest m investing. 

Al the moment, the Dry, in 
contrast to the industry around 
it, was going through a cham- 
pagne period, with champagne 
salaries for those currently deal- 
ing in shares. 

Last year's accounts for Mor- 
gan Grenfell showed that it had 
no fewer than 47 directors paid 
more than £1 00,000 a year. That 
was a generous reward, equiva- 
lent to the entire income of five 


the book produced by Mr 
Chapman Fincher from Mr 
Peter Wright's disclosures. 


Anxieties arising 
again on control 


head teachers or four surgeons. 
It was Morgan Grenfell that 


It was Morgan Grenfell that 
hired Geoffrey Collier and paid 
him £300,000. but that did not 
stop him seeking to have his bit 
on the side which, if successful 
would have netted him in an 
overnight transaction as much 
as tbe Secretary of State for 
Education was prepared to pay 
an unpromoted teacher for a full 
year’s work. 

fodder H paling was theft. The 
wealth in. which the City dealt 
every day did not belong to the 
City. The source of all its power 
and wealth comprised the 
contributions to pension funds 
made by millions of workers 
and the insurance premiums 
paid by millions of ordinary 
men and women. They were the 
victims if the basis on which 
deals were struck in the City was 
not honest and above board. 

Most of those trading in the 
City were honest dealers and he 
was prepared to accept that 
most of them were even more 


intonated than MPs by recent 
revelations. But he found it 


revelations. But he found it 
difficult in the face of the 
evidence, to accept that Mr 
Collier was tbe (exception, other 


Not for the first time in this 
Government's history a num- 
ber of broad anxieties arise. It 
is almost exactly a year since 
Westland exploded upon an 
unsuspecting country and it is 
remarkable how many of these 
anxieties were present then as 
well. 

The drcnmstances of tbe 
two controversies are quite 
different and there is no sign of 
the Wright affair tearing the 
Government apart as West- 
land did. But Mrs Thatcher 
has displayed some of the 
same weaknesses in handling 
both episodes. 

In both cases she has re- 
vealed an insensitivity towards 
the special role of the law 
officers. This is not an ab- 
struse technicality because 
when ministers have a Mind 
spot on such constitutional 
niceties they are more likely to 
stumble into political error. 

The danger of rash and 
blinkered derision-making is 
all the greater when correct 
procedures are not followed 
and the relevant voices are not 
heard. 

That f ailing has again been 


than in the sense that he was I evfi * SBt 0115 taEe * 


was born out of the concern of serration. 

local people. They had been Mr James Prior (Wareoey, C) 

■ - .S m »La« L. Hilt »ViA 


authority, the Broads Authority, 
with powers and duties in line 


with those of park 

authorities. 


anxious to protect foe area from 
tbe effects of tourism Q| *a 
navigation. The Bill represea ted 
their aspirations. 

However, navigation seemed 
to be placed ahead of environ- 
mental considerations in its 
order id priorities. 

Sir John Wells (Maidstone, C) 
said rtM»t the >■*»«««« commu- 
nity, which he understood would 
be proriding more than half the 
revenue of the authority, should 
be given greate r str ength on the 
navigation committee. 

Mr John Powtey (No rwich 
South, O said tfce Broads were 
changing and aa time passed ana 
snore people used them they had 
in manyrespects deteriorated. 


said that he was grateful to the 
minister for grasp? ® tins tricky 
nettle and, on the whole, satisfy- 
ing most of tbe interests. 

Mr Ronald Davies (Caerphilly, 
Lab) said flat tbe Government 
had given c ons e r v a tion too low a 
priority in the BilL There should 
be restrictions on boating in- 
terests, but the BiH was over- 
loaded with navigational 
mteiests. There was a clear 
““tfority of navigation interests 
on the authority. 

Mr Heniy Bellingham (North 
West Norfolk, C) ««hI that the 
G<rre ™ n KM bad risen to the 
Mmwi with the BBL 
The Bill vras read a second 
tune. 


Dr David Owen, Leader of the, 
SDP, used a question to Mrs 
Thatcher to demonstrate his 
support of nudear defence strat- 
egy, and his division from 
Labour defence policy. 

He asked the Prime Minister: 
While we may disagree how best 
to make a contribution to the 
Nato nuclear deterrent, that is as 
nothing compared with the ad- 
vocacy of a non-nuclear defence 
strategy for Nato. 

Does she agree that the 
Australian precedent, whereby. 
Australia agreed with the 
United States that New Zea- 
land. pursuing a non-nuclear 
defence strategy, could no 
longer remain a member of the 
Anzus treaty oiganization is 
exactly the attitude, that our 
European partners will take to 
the idea of one Nato country 
opting out of Nato's nuclear 
defence strategy? 

Mrs Thatcben The nuclear 
defence strategy is a fun- 


damental part of the Nato 
defence strategy. 

Earlier, Mr Kenneth Hargreaves 
(Hyndbum, Q bad said: The' 
more the people of this country 
learn about the defence policies 
of the Labour Party, the more 
they will support this Gov- 
ernment’s policy of full 
membership of Nato and 
maintaining the deterrent. . 
Mra Thatcher said that the 
Liberal-SDP defence policy 
would not deter. 

Mr Michael Heseftine (Henley, 
Cy. Will Mrs Thatcher ask the 
Chiefs of Staff if they could 
make an assessment — and if it 
could be published — of the 
Labour Party's latest alternative 
to a nuclear deterrent, a ditch 
from the Baltic to the Adriatic 
filled with explosive slurry to 


deter Soviet tanks? (laughter). 
Mrs Thatcher: We do not need 
an assessment from the Chiefs 
of Staff. Labour’s suggestion is 
crackers. 


Cash decision soon 


Universities would learn early 
next year how much money 
there was for academic pay, Mrs 
Angela Ram bold. Minister of 
State for Education, said during 
Commons questions. 

She was replying to Mr 
Andrew Bennett, an Opposition 
spokesman on education, who 
said there was consderabJe 
confusion in the universities 


because they did not know how 
much money each of them was 


g ung to get or how much the 
overnment had earmarked for 


Government had earmarked for 
academic staff and non-aca-. 
demic staff 


brought to book. 

Many shares prices increased 
before the announcement of 
takeover bids and a lot of it 
turned on very well placed 
information. 

It was no wonder The Finan- 
cial Times had called the . 
Department of Trade and In- 
dustry the Inspector Clouseau of \ 
insider dealing when tbe DTI 
had prosecuted only nine out of 
110 cases. 

Last year there had been only 
five prosecutions for all forms of 
fraud in the City. The JMB case, 
the biggest City scandal for a 
very long time, had so for 
resulted in not one single 
prosecution in the City. But this 
Government had prosecuted 
138,918 social security claim- 
ants for fraud, and all of those 
cases involved sums which 
would barely pay for lunch in 
the City. 

In the light of the current 
position would the Government 
not seek to persuade the Stock 
Exchange to stop trading in 
GuinnesS? 

Mr Michael Howard, Under- 
secretary of State for T rade and 
Industry, moved a government 
amendment congratulating the 
City and tbe Government's 
efforts against insider dealing. 

He said that insider dealing 
had become an offence through 
the Companies Act, 1 980, but it 
bad not been an easy offence to 
prove. There was no lack of 
willingness to prosecute where 
evidence was available, the 
problem was meeting the high 
standard of proof required to 
secure a conviction. 

In The Times that morning 
there had been an article by 
Senator William Proxmire. 
chairman of the Senate Banking 
Committee, in which he pointed 
out that the Securities and 
Exchange Commissioa had 
fined no one for violating 
insider information in 1982, 
1983, 1984 or 198S. It bad not 
been until 1986 that the Boesky 
case hit them between the eyes. 

“Is it on that basis that the 
Opposition urge us to move 
away from our system towards 
the SEC?” he said. 

The Financial Services Act 
contained powers to investigate 
insider dealer which could, 
without exaggeration, be de- 
scribed as draconian. 


Why has it seemed to often 
to be surprised by the ex- 
pected? Why did it fail to 
make sufficient allowance for 
the extent to which the arcam- 
stances of the Chapman 
Pincher book had weakened 
its case? Did it reflect that an 
ineffectual action would under- 
mine tbe very principle that It 
was seeking to defend? 

Above aU, why did it (ail to 
appreciate the political dimen- 
sioD of the course on which it 
was embarking? A large part' 
of the answer to all these 
questions is that the rirde of 
consultation was too narrow. 

This is a frequent criticism 
of tbe way in which Mrs 
Thatcher runs the Govern- 
ment. Bat It points in this 
instance to another, largely 
unsuspected, failing . For aU 
her strength of purpose and 
personality she sometimes 
does not exercise sufficient 
control. 


Westland showed 
lack of control 


In tiie Westland crisis she 
was unable to control the open 
warfare in her Cabinet Now 
sbe appears to have accorded 
too modi influence to MIS. 

This is an area on which the 
Government can reasonably be 
expected to provide satisfac- 
tion for tiie future. Whatever 
ministers may say today, they 
are not likely to convince the 
House or anyone else that they 
have been conducting an 
accomplished political ex- 
ercise. 

But they ought to offer 
reassurance that tbe security 
services will be brought under 
effective political controL I 
doubt if parliamentary over- 
sight would be the best way of 
doing this. It would probably 
either be inefTectnal or too 
inhibiting, and the danger of 
leaks is reaL So It wold be 
better to keep that- threat in 
reserve. 

But the Government should 
appreciate that the demand for 


The Opposition was appalled 
at die very low wages paid to 
some non-academic staff in the 
universities. 


Parliament today 


Ceauams (230k Debates on aev arrangements to ea- 
Aluance motions on the need sure that minwttpri«| control 
»r a committee to oversee the will be more effective m the 
security services and on defence, future than it has in d* past 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


knME NEWS 


Grants to students no 
longer adequate 
goYemment admits 


By Martin Fletcher, Political Reporter 


The Government admitted 
for the first time yesterday 
that student grants were no 
longer adequate to meet basic 
expenditure needs, thus seem- 
ing to pave the way for radical 
reforms in methods of student 
support. 

In written evidence to the 
education select committee, 
which is inquiring into the 
level of student support, the 
Department of Education 
(DES) stated: “We would not 
now maintain that the mainte- 
nance dement of the man- 
datory award is sufficient to 
meet all the essential expen- 
diture of the average student”. 

It explained that “the 
consideration of student needs 
has to be balanced by an 
assessment of what it is fair 
and reasonable to ask tax- 
payers to contribute in the 
current economic climate”. 

And in oral evidence to the 
committee, Mr Nicholas Sum- 
mers, an under-secretary at 
the DES, agreed that amend- 


ments would now be nec- 
essary to the wording of the 
department's guidance book- 
let issued to potential stu- 
dents. 

This states that the giant is 
“the sum, calculated annually, 
needed for the basic mainte- 
nance requirements of a stu- 
dent taking a first degree or 
similar qualification”, and 
that it “normally covers tu- 
ition fees and maintenance". 

The department's ad- 
mission was interpreted by 
MPs yesterday as paving the 
way for radical innovations in 
methods of student support 
which would be unveiled in 
the government's Student 
Support Review being chaired 
by Mr George Walden, Under 
Secretary of Stale at the 
department. Certainly DES 
officials made no attempt 
yesterday to justify the present 
system. 

Mr Summers emphasized 
that the amount of taxpayers' 


University’s £4m gift 
will fund art teaching 

In 1973, Sir Robert and 
Lady Sainsbury gave UEA 
their art collection of 399 
Hems, including paintings by 
Picasso and Degas and sculp- 
tures by Henry Moore. Five 
years later they commissioned 
a centre for the visual arts. ' 


A new unit to promote 
teaching and research in non- 
Western art is to be estab- 
lished at the University of 
East Anglia, Norwich, with a 
£4.5 million grant from the 
trustees of the Samsbnry Art 
Trust (Oar Education Re- 
porter writes). 

The award marks the golden 
wedding in March I9S7 of Sir 
Robert and Lady Sainsbury 
and is the latest in a history of 
artistic ties between the family 
and the university. 

The gift, believed to be the 
most substantial to an institu- 
tion of higher education in 
recent years, was described 
yesterday by Professor Mi- 
chael Thompson, the uni- 
versity's vice-chancellor, as 
“wonderfully generous”. 

The grant represents a huge 
amount of money when set 
alongside the latest figures 
from the Universities Informa- 
tion Unit in London. In 1984- 
85, the total amount received 
by the 45 British universities 
from endowments made by 
industries and charities was 
£ 22.1 million. 


It is expected that the £4.5 
million wfll be divided evenly 
between the visual arts centre 
and the new unit, which will 
feature indigenous art from 
Africa, America and the Far 
East. 

The university says that the 
non-Western art mrit will 
contribute to undergraduate 

teaching in the School of Art 
History and Music. It is to 
offer two or three postgraduate 
bursaries for doctoral re- 
search, and there will be 
exhibitions and a series of 
publications. 

The injection of cash is a 
welcome boost to the univer- 
sity, which is faring a pro- 
jected cat of about £1 million 
from the University Grants 
Committee. 


money available to students 
would remain “broadly com- 
mensurate” with its present 
level, and spoke freely of 
alternative sources of student 
finance, including student 
loans and sponsorship. There 
was, he said, a general agree- 
ment on the need for a 
fundamental reappraisal of 
the arrangements for student 
support. 

The department admitted 
also that the real value of 
student grants had fellen by 13 
per cent since 1979 — though 
other interested bodies have 
in their evidence cited figures 
of around 20 per cent. 

Mr Nicholas Baker, an 
assistant secretary at the DES, 
agreed that this fall, allied with 
the rapidly increasing cost of 
board and lodging, meant that 
notional allowances for books 
and equipment were being 
“squeezed out”. Students were 
increasingly dependent on 
what libraries could make 
available to them, he said 

In further admissions, the 
officials also conceded that the 
department's estimates of stu- 
dent needs were based not on 
independent research, but on 
evidence supplied by the Na- 
tional Union of Students and 
the Committee of Vice-Chan- 
cellors and Principals; and 
that the retail price index did 
not really apply to students, 
whose costs were entirely dif- 
ferent from other sections of 
society. 

Mr Summers further admit- 
ted that the new system of 
travel grants, limiting the sum 
available for any student to 
£170, represented “rough 
justice”, with many students 
losing out. 


Separate 
language 
units ‘defy 
race Act’ 

By John Clare 
Education Correspondent 

Teaching English to Asian 
children in separate language 
units contravenes the Race 
Relations Act according to a 
report published yesterday by 
the Commission for Racial 
Equality. 

Using its powers under the 
Act, the commission carried 
out a formal investigation into 
the teaching of English as a 
second language to pupils in 
Calderdale, West Yorkshire. It 
concluded that the auxhorit 
methods could not bejustif _ 
on educational grounds and 
amounted to indirect racial 
discrimination. 

The commission believes 
that the education of up to 
75,000 children In Britain, 
most of them Asian, could be 
affected by its findings. 

The report says Asian chil- 
dren in Calderdale have to 
pass a language screening test 
before being admitted to an 
ordinary school. Eight out of 
10 of them fail and are then 
segregated for up to two years. 

One consequence, it says, is 
that the segregated children 
are given a restricted cur- 
riculum. It adds that the 
language development of 
Asian children is actually 
hindered by the separation 
from native speakers of 
English. 

Calderdale, which co- 
operated with the commission 
during the investigation, now 
accepts the prevailing view 
that it is better to educate 
children whose first language 
is not English in mainstream 
schools and classes. 

The report calls on Mr 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for Education and Sci- 
ence, to take steps to ensure 
that unsatisfactory arrange- 
ments are changed. 




The Queen and the Duke of 
Edinburgh «*-cting an eye over 
muck spreaders, sprayers, 
tractors and ploughs at the 
175th Royal SrahMieM Show 
at Earls Court, west London, 
yesterday. 

A new blackcurrant har- 
vester caught the Queen's 
attention and sbe spent some 
tune studying it. She has 
several acres of blackcurrants 
on her estate at Sandringham. 

A total of 170 agricultural 
machines and tractors were on 
display for the first time at the 
show, which is being visited by 
more than 20 government and 
commercial trade missions. 

The Queen presented the 
trophy for the show's Supreme 
Champion to Mr Joseph Gil- 
berts, of Church Farm, Cov- 
entry, for his steer Brnno, a 
Limonsin-Charolafa cross. 


Shorter hours ‘no 
help to jobless’ 


Shorter working hours and 
earlier retirement would not 
cut the number of people out 
of work, a report from Charter 
for Jobs, a non-party cam- 
paign which promotes action 
over unemployment, says 
(Our Employment Affairs 
Correspondent writes). 

The report, produced by 
Professor Richard Layafd, 
head of the Centre for Labour 
Economics at the London 
School of Economics, points 
to the United Kingdom ap- 
proach that had reduced work- 
ing hours and at the same time 
increased unemployment. Re- 


search bad shown that such 
measures led to lower output 
and offered no protection 
against unemployment 

The case for shorter work- 
ing hours received no support 
from the research figures. 

When workers were given 
early retirement and the num- 
ber of jobs remained constant, 
then inflation would again 
increase. If that was accept- 
able it would be better for the 
extra inflation to be generated 
by providing more jobs than 
by shuffling existing jobs 
around, ii says. 


Court plea 
by mother 
of Ripper 
victim 

The mother of the York- 
shire Ripper's last victim yes- 
terday asked the Court of 
Appeal to overturn a High 
Court ruling that she could not 
sue tiie police for negligence. 

Mre Doreen Hill, from 
Middlesbrough. Cleveland, 
brought an action against 
West Yorkshire Police claim- 
ing her daughter would not 
have died were it not for 
mistakes made during police 
investigations. 

She is asking Lord Justice 
Fox, sitting with Lord Justice 
Glidewell and Sir Roualeyn 
Cumming-Bruce, to overturn 
the ri»ting that the police had 
no duty of care to her 

daughter. 

Mr Richard Clegg, QC 
counsel for Mrs Hill, said that 
in the five years before the 
murder of Miss Jacqueline 
Hill in 1980, Peter Sutcliffe 
had killed or attempted to kill 
20 other young women. 

A police inquiry later found 
there had been “major errore 
of judgement and in- 
efficenries” in the investi- 
gation. 

Mr Clegg said: “If they had 
not occurred, Sutcliffe would 
have been identified as a 
prime suspect sooner than he 
was and therefore he would 
have been arrested sooner”. 

He claimed it was “unjust 
and unfair” for the judge to 
deride they had no cause of 
action before the evidence was 
complete. 

Once they had determined 
10 catch him, the police were . 
under a specific duty to do so, 
Mr Clegg said “We submit 
they have carried out that task 
in a careless manner.” 

Mrs Hill, who was not in 
court, is claiming around 
£ 100 . 000 . which she would 
use for a charitable trust in 
memory of her daughter. 

The hearing continues to- 
day. 


A 3BE Y HAT! ORAL FIVE STAR ACC Q tfHT 


School dinners staff 
lose appeal on jobs 

• . ■ • 1 I •*_ .ftf 


An industrial tribunal has 
decided that a council was 
right to dismiss 105 school 
lunch assistants. 

The women claimed they 
were constructively dismissed 
when they refused to accept 
new contracts from Enfield 
council in north London, 
which would have cut holiday 
and retainer pay. Some said 
they would lose more than 
£700 in wages. 

Mr Alan Pardoe. represent- 
ing the council, told a week- 
long hearing last month that 
Enfield was threatened with 
rate-capping. 

in its re port the panel 

Prison for 
woman 
swindler 


expressed “a deal -of sym- 
pathy” with the women but 
said that Enfield’s charges for 
school meals were the highest 
in London and it was attempt- 
ing to save £250,000 on the 
service. 

“Even if there had been a 
greater take-up in the service 
this would not have resulted 
in the savings that were 
desired.” 

• Fanners in the Fens of East 
Anglia have given five tons of 
food and vegetables to 45 local 
schools to enable pupils to 
prepare dishes in cookery 
classes using fresh produce. 

Future of 
ToryMP 
in doubt 






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m 


While awaiting trial in 
North Wales for obtaining 
£5.000 by deception from a 
neighbour, Anne Mane Burke, 
aped 22. of Park Avenue 
Roger-stone, Gwenu earried 
on a business in Newport 
swindling investor of more 
than £130.000, CardiffCrown 
Court was told yesterday when 
she appeared for sentence. 

Describing l** 

Mr Justice McNeill I jailed ^ her 
for five years, which included 
a 12 -monih suspended sen- 
tence received at Caernarvon 
in November last year. 

Among Burke's victims 
were a woman, aged 77, wno 

lost £ 20.000 received from the 
sale of her house, anda 
mother of three who invested 
£*> 0.000 insurance money, 
a retired couple were left 

penniless after investing 
£58.000. 


The Winchester Conser- 
vative Association is to meet 
on December 16 to discuss 
whether to readopt Mr John 
Browne as its candidate at the 
next election. 

Mr Browne, whose former 
wife faces jail for non-pay- 
ment of a divorce settlement, 
said yesterday that he was 
amazed aL the move. 

The association's former 
president. Lady Riches, wife 
of General Sir lan Riches, said 
she was not interested in his 
divorce problems but felt he 
had not spent enough time in 
his constituency. 

She is supported by other 
members, including Mr Hardy 
Wakefield, who wants the 
association to ask Mr Browne 
to step down. . , . 

Mr Browne denied being 
out of touch with strone local 
issues. 






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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


HOME NEWS 


'V 






BBC bars value-for-money 
audit of external services 


BBC chiefs are refusing to 
allow the National Audit of- 
nce to carry out a value-for- 
money inquiry into the 
corporation’s external ser- 
vices, in spite of evidence of 
financial mismanagement, in- 
efficiency and a high level of 
cash incentives for staff 

The rebuff, which could 
lead to a confrontation be- 
tween the BBC and the power- 
mi Commons Public Ac- 
counts Committee, is dis- 
closed in a highly critical 
report published yesterday by 
Sir Gordon Downey, the 
Comptroller and Auditor 
General, who expresses deep 
reservations about the finan- 
cial running of the external 
services, and insists he should 
be allowed to carry out a full 
investigation. 

The findings of a recent 
Whitehall review and die 
BBC's resistance to im- 
plementing recommended 
changes “have underlined the 
need for independent ac cess to 
BBC External Sendees for the 
purpose of satisfying Par- 
liament about economy, ef- 
ficiency and effectiveness in 
the use of resources met 
directly from public funds”. 

But Sir Gordon, who as 
independent bead of the audit 
office (NAO) is empowered by 
Parliament to report on the 


By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 


financial efficiency of all 
government departments and 
a large number of public 
bodies, is being thwarted by 
the BBC because of a legal 
disagreement over whether 
the corporation is covered by 
the National Audit Acl 

He calls on the foreign and 
Commonwealth Office, which 
finances the services, to uy to 
resolve the disagreement on 
the interpretation of the Na- 
tional Audit Act and obtain 
BBC agreement to NAO ac- 
cess to external services. 

The Public Accounts Com- 
mittee, which acts as Parl- 
iament’s public spending 
watchdog, is expected to take 
evidence from the BBC on Sir 
Gordon's report early in the 
new year and is bound to 
support his demand for access 
to information. 

BBC Externa] Services 
broadcast to countries over- 
seas in English, through the 
World Service, and in 36 
foreign languages. Over the 
past six years running costs 
have risen in real terms by IS 
per cent, while output has 
increased by only 2.5 per cent 

Last year. Foreign Office 
grants, which pay for the 
world renowned services, 
totalled £88. 2 million. 

Sir Gordon's report, which 
covers the Foreign Office's 
funding and oversight of the 


In the EEC chair; 3 

Battle on air fares 
nearing its climax 


Britain has been crusading 
for cheaper air fares in Europe 
for seven years. When we took 
over ibe Common Market 
presidency last July the great 
hope of Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
the Foreign Secretary, was that 
a successful British initiative 
on air fores would at last 
convince doubters that there 
were practical advantages to 
membership of the Common 
Market 

Apart from Sir Geoffrey and 
his Minister of State, Mrs 
Lynda Chalker, probably no 
ministerial team has worked 
more intensively during the 
past five months in Europe 
than Mr John Moore, Sec- 
retary of State for Transport 
and Mr Michael Spicer, the 
Aviation Minister, to secure 
some practical results. 

In endless bilateral meet- 
ing with their Common Mar- 
ket counterparts they have 
cajoled, wheedled, bullied and 
threatened in an attempt to 
end the European carve-up on 
airfares. 

They regard their case as 
unanswerable. Air traffic has 
grown 15 per cent in lib- 
eralized Britain. We lifted 
barriers with the Dutch in 
1984 and London to Amster- 
dam in consequence is now 
the busiest route in the world. 

In mid-November, how- 
ever, after two days of furious 
wrangling in Brussels, their 
hopes foundered when the 
Transport Council refused to 
back even a compromise pro- 
gramme for which Mr Moore 
had been criticized by British 
consumer groups for giving 
too much away. 

At the European su mmit 
this week Mrs Thatcher will, if 
she judges the mood to be 
right, launch a final assault. 
But it seems now that the 
battle will be won, as it 
eventually must be, as much 
in the courts as around the 

negotiating table. 

Airline customers within 
Europe are cheated into pay- 
ing higher prices than they 
should in three ways. National 
flag carriers divide up many 
routes on a 50:50 basis, fixing 
prices, deciding how many 
seats to sell and splitting the 
profits. 

Would-be competitors are 
denied market access. Rules 
and regulations for t^ offer- 
ing of discounts are hedged 
around with so many restric- 
tions that few passengers can 

benefit . „ ^ ... 

Britain, with the full sup- 
port of British Airways, Bm- 


In the third of a series 
reviewing Britain s six 
months as chairman of 
the EEC, Robin Oakley , 
Political Editor, exam- 
ines the battle to get 
cheaper air fares in 
Europe. 

ish Caledonian and British 
Midland, is campaigning for 
foil liberalization of air trans- 
port 

The Common Market has 
agreed liberalization as a tar- 
get by 1992. But many mem- 
ber governments are fighting 
all the way to protect their 
inefficient subsidized airlines. 

At ibe November Transport 
Council meeting. Mr Moore 
tried to get a compromise 
pap-fray that would still have 
reserved 40 per cent of capac- 
ity for the national carrier, for 
increased — but not absolute — 
access for new airlines, and for 
the easing of restrictions on 
fere discounts but the talks 
broke down. 

On the 60:40 split on capac- 
ity only Greece and Denmark 
were opposed this time. On 
cheaper feres the opponents 
were down to six — France, 
Italy, Greece, Denmark, Spain 
and Portugal- Before too long 
under the new European Sin- 
gle Art, majority voting will 
come in. So we need only one 
more convert. 

Belgium takes over the 
presidency next and M Her- 
man de Croo, its Transport 
Secretary, is a liberalizer. 

On this issue we have the 
Common Market Commis- 
sion working with us. After 
court cases involving a French 
travel agent prosecuted for 
undercutting Air France the 
European Court of Justice has 
ruled that the cartel arrange- 
ment is illegal. The Commis- 
sion has written to all the 
airlin es concerned after com- 
piling a dossier on their prac- 
tices. Court actions will bring 
results in time if political 
action foils. . . 

Mr Spicer says that Britain 
will make no further com- 
promises and that we are 
prepared to take unilateral 
action to ensure that com- 
petition is increased and feres 
are cut 

Mr Spicer has also under- 
lined the other weapon avail- 
able to Britain: pressure from 
consumers for cheaper flights. 

Tomorrow; Playing tbe 
European 


Ex-curator 
of museum 

for trial 


■ curator of the 
stal Museum was 
to the Central 
, art for trial yes- 

charges of forgery 
stamps from the 

llellstead, aged 56. 
'barges of stealing 
worth more than 
veen 1983 and 

cad. former head 

»um in Holboro, 
don, is also 

lining a cheque by 
ie was authorized 
ps owned by the 

ead. of Ben John- 
Barbican. m me 
committed by 
lasstraies’ Court 
bail on condition 

endered his pa^ 
ovided a £10.000 


Policemen 
for trial 
on assault 

Six British Transport Police 
officers accused of assault 
during an incident Iasi year 
involving supporters of 
Everion Football Gub were 
yesterday committed for trial 
at Knight sbridge Crown 
Court. 

PCs Gary Jennings, Peter 
Hauling Terence Orchard. 
John Barry, Martin Britt, and 
Police Inspector Michael Fos- 
ter. whose addresses were 
given as the British Transport 
police headquarters. The 
Broadway, St James’s Park, 
Westminster, London, ap- 
peared ai Wells Street Magist- 
rates' Court, central London. 

A seventh man, PC Phillip 
James, of Ivanhoe Road, 
Hounslow, west London, was 
discharged owing to in- 
sufficient evidence. 

The alleged incident took 
place at Edgware Road Under- 
ground Station on October 12. 


BBC organization, comes on 
the heels of a Whitehall review 
which concluded it would be 
possible to make net savings 
of £1.6 million a year and 151 
staff 

The review team, which 
included officials from the 
Treasury and the Prime 
Minister's efficiency unit, 
found that the BBC lacked a 
system for reviewing annual 
expenditure programmes and 
foiled to examine critically the 
costs or proposed capital 
projects. 

It also discovered that in the 
External Broadcasting Direc- 
torate, which manages the 
services, there had been ”a 
significant underlying increase 
in new and up-graded posts _ 
without equivalent compen- 
sating surrenders or down- 
gradings of posts”. 

Within ihe directorate there 
was also “an unexpectedly 
high incidence of discretion- 
ary merit awards, enjoyed by 
25 per cent of monthly paid 
stan, and of personal salaries 
awarded to 16 per cent of 
senior staff”. 

In February 1985 the review 
team published its report and 
made 38 detailed recom- 
mendations aimed at improv- 
ing efficiency and effective- 
ness and to enhance financial 
control and accountability to 
the Foreign Office. 


In spire of a proposed 
timetable for carrying out the 
changes. Sir Gordon con- 
cludes: “Progress has been 
variable and slower than ex- 
pected in implementing the 
recommendations of the re- 
view”. And he points to 
"determined BBC resistance” 
to any significant changes in 
coverage and priorities. 

He adds: "There is as yet no 
acceptance on the pan of the 
BBC that it should observe the 
same standards of account- 
ability as are required for 
other grant-aided bodies”. 

Mr John Tusa, managing 
director of BBC External Ser- 
vices, yesterday called Sir 
Gordon's report "muddled 
and misleading”. 

He said: "The danger lurk- 
ing for us in the NAO report is 
that if ever the External 
Services were, or were per- 
ceived abroad, to be con- 
trolled by the Foreign Office 
rather than the BBC Board of 
Governors, then our credibil- 
ity with our audience would 
be fatally undermined”. 

With more than 120 million 
listeners, the External Services 
had the largest world-wide 
audience of any international 
broadcaster. The audience was 
obtained at much less cost and 
by using only a fraction of the 
transmission time of the 
BBCs main rivals. Mr Tusa 
said. 



rimmy Tarbuck, with Angie Layne, marking the Royal 
Marsden thermometer (Photograph: Tim Bishop)- 


Stars aid 
cancer 
hospital 
appeal 

Bv David Cross 

Comedian Jimmy Tarbuck 
and model Angie Layne yes- 
terday lent their support to a 
£5 million appeal for the 
Royal Marsden Hospital in 
Chelsea, south-west London. 

They put the first marks on 
a giant thermometer erected 
outside the hospital to chart 
the progress of the appeal, to 
raise money for a new four- 
storey clinical Mock. Miss 
Layne has recently undergone 
surgery for breast cancer at 
the hospital. 

Mr Tarbuck said: “We're 
heading for the first million. 
But there’s still a long nay to 
go before we reach our target,” 

Mr Mansadnke Hussey, 
chairman of the board of 
governors of the hospital and 
chairman of the BBC wants to 
reach the £1 million mark by 
Christinas at the latest 
"There is very little time left, 
but I know we can depend on 
the generosity of the public”, 
he said. 

Since the appeal was 
launched last September, 
more than £750,000 has been 
collected for the extension, 
which will be equipped with 
advanced cancer-fighting aids. 
These wfll include op to six 
operating theatres designed to 
accommodate hi-tech equip- 
ment required for die delicate 
reconstructive techniques now 
being performed on cancer 
patients. 


Scottish 
bank to 
cut j'obs 
by 1,150 

Clvdesdale Bank in Scot- 
land is planning at least 1.150 
redundancies under a "ration- 
alization” programme oui- 
lined to staff yesterday. 

The bank will dose eighi io 
1 0 branches in each of the next 
two or three years in 
Scotland's main cities and 
towns where it already has 
"adequate representation”. 

Banks in ouilying areas will 
be down-graded with groups 
of branches coming under the 
control of one senior manager. 

it is not known how many 
job losses are involved in this 
exercise, but the bank is also 
planning to lose 350 clerical 
jobs over a similar period. 

Clydesdale says there will be 
no compulsory redundancies 
and job cuts over the next two 
years will be achieved through 
natural wastage. 

The principal union in- 
volved. The Banking. Insur- 
ance and Finance Union, 
which represents 3.500 staff, 
believes the Clydesdale Bank 
is losing its autonomy and is 
becoming merely a regional 
network of Midland Bank. 

The union's first response 
will be to seek public support 
for a campaign against job 
losses and branch closures, 
industrial action is also an 
option. 

Clydesdale recorded a 
27 . 1 7 per cent rise in pre-tax 
profits to £29.5 million earlier 
this vear. 


LIFE 





Being 55 or over gives 
you an exciting new begin- 
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Around this time, the 
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The mortgage may well have 
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right financial advice. 

With help from Midland Bank 
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If you’re aged 55 or over and a 
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It’s a package of advice, savings 
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of your new beginning. 

For instance, there’s a special 
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Unit Trusts’ Monthly Income Plan 
(for an introductory period, ending on 


31 January 1987). 

There’s our High 
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money 

We can arrange an interest-only 
loan, secured by a mortgage over the 
property, for home improvements if 
you want that. 

We offer discounts on health 
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as a special travel pack through 


# MIDLAND FIFTY-FIVE PLUS 



Thomas Cook. We also 
have a brochure — ‘A New 
Beginning]. It’s free with ‘Fifty -Five 
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Just post off the coupon for 
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Post to: Customer Information Service. FREEPOST. 
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When you need us we’ll be listening 


C Midland Bank pic. 1986 


jiff jtvtfs WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 





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wnflHSS#’-.* ’. 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


PLO halts Amal 
tank thrust 

Beomt — Palestinian guerrillas yesterday claimed they had 
nailed a new attack by the Shta Muslim Amal militia after 
/ ? nrs ** erce fighting around two refugee camps in Beirut 
(Joan Carlos Gumncio writes). 

Artillery and rocket battles near the hilltop village of 
Magdooche. in the hills east of Sidon, went unabat ed for the 
ninth consecutive day with no clear gains for either side. 

. violence came as Lebanon's Chris tians an< i Mosliiiis, 
in an unosnal expression of unity, brought the country to a 
standstill in a general strike in protest against the high cost 

The guerrillas said they had crashed an Amal tank- 
supported thrust around Beirut's Bonrj el-Barajneh and 
Chatila camps with barrages of mortar and rocket tire. 

Unconfirmed reports said 43 people were killed and more 
than 70 wounded in the past 24 hours. Palestinians in 
southern Lebanon alleged that among the dead were 12 
children from the refugee camp of Rashidiyeh, which has 
been under Amal siege since October 1. 

UN blow for France 

New York — The UN General Assembly voted yesterday 
to place the French Pacific Territory of New Caledonia under 

I f M ArprcinKt !n mwIam tv. AA |f " 







OVERSEAS NEWS 

The arms debate 

Moscow threat to 
end moratorium 
on nuclear testing 







"^iPT: 






mm 




a uc imc. <yr iu « niui austeuuuus, was a Diplomatic 

blow for France, which conducted a vigorous lobbying effort 
against tbe measure. 

Seven countries from the South Pacific forum, including 
Australia and New Zealand, spearheaded the successful 
campaign aimed against what are seen as French attempts to 
consolidate its hold over New Caledonia. The outcome in the 
assembly was a rare defeat for France at the UN. 

The French Government is now bound to allow special UN 
missions entry on to the territory and to submit regular re- 
ports regarding its stewardship over New Caledonia to the 
UN Secretary-General. 


Guerrillas 
hit Kabul 

Islamabad (AP) — Mus- 
lim guerrillas launched an 
attack on the Afghan cap- 
ital, Kabul, firing at least 
20 rockets into the city and 
causing explosions around 
the Soviet Embassy and 
other key targets. 

Western diplomats said 

the guerrillas launched 
the co-ordinated attack on 
Saturday night and wit- 
nesses indicated it came 
from four separate direc- 
tions ontside the city. 
There were explosions in 
the Khair Khane com- 
mercial district and about 
20 rockets hh in the 
Darnlaman area. 


ID papers 
charge 

Paris (Renter) — M Jac- 
ques Delebois, bead of tbe 
International Service of 
Technical Police Co-opera- 
tion, was charged yester- 
day with issuing false iden- 
tity papers to M Yves Cha- 
lier, an aide to the former 
Socialist Minister of Co- ^ 
operation, who fled abroad ’ 
after being accused of I 
embezzling public funds. i 

He was charged over the 
disappearance of 20 million 
francs (£2.2 million). The 
money vanished after pass- 
ing through a state-funded 
sail association set up by 
the previous government to 
promote awareness of 
Third World issues. 


^ Chirac, the French Prime Minister, an aide and Mr Weinberger, the US Defence Secretary, after their Paris meeting. 

Poll shows popularity 

of Reagan reaching defence 

lowest ebb since 1982 

Paris 


Poll shows popularity 
of Reagan reaching 
lowest ebb since 1982 


Moscow (Reuter) — Senior 
Soviet officials yesterday ac- 
cused Washington of stalling 
in talks on nuclear weapons 
testing and indicated that 
Moscow might resume its own 
tests, suspended for almost IS 
months, in the New Year. 

Mr Yuly Vorontsov, Fust 
Deputy Foreign Minister, said 
a decision on whether to end 
the Soviet moratorium on 
underground tests depended 
on “the behaviour of the 
American Administration be- 
tween now and the end of the 
year". 

Professor Andranik Pet- 
rosyants said the US delega- 
tion at Geneva, where he 
heads the Moscow team in 
negotiations on testing, was 
using “ail sons of pretexts” to 
avoid concrete discussions on 
preparing a -total test ban 
treaty. 

Mr Vorontsov said Wash- 
ington had staged 23 tests, 
some of them unannounced, 
since August 1985 when Mos- 
cow first declared a mora- 
torium. which it has since 
extended four times. 

“It is well established that 
the latest series of tests is 
intended to produce a third 


generation of nuclear weap- 
onry, and has nothing ici do 
with maintaining present 
weapons in a stale of readiness 
as the US claims,” he said. 

~Il is quite obvious the 
American Administration is 
engaged in a clear effort to 
establish military superiority 
over the Soviet Union, 
.through the tests and the 
Strategic Defence Initiative 
programme." 

Mr Gorbachov, the Soviet 
leader, who has pul his per- 
sonal authority behind the 
drive for a total test ban. said 
in August that he was extend- 
ing the moratorium until 
January I. 

• GENEVA: The Moscow, 
intimation that the unilateral 
Soviet moratorium on nuclear 
testing may not be extended 
into 1987 follows three rounds 
of bilateral talks here between 
the Americans and Russians 
(Alan McGregor writes). 

According to Tass. Mr 
Vorontsov "said in Moscow 
yesterday that at the third 12- 
day round which was com- 
pleted here last week, die US 
side even rejected inclusion of 
the word “ending" in associ- 
ation with testing. 


Pretoria frees Christie 

Johannesburg — A former white research fellow at the 
University of Cape Town sentenced six years ago to a 10- 
year jail term for terrorism has been set free, apparently to 
avoid embroiling President Botha in an embarrassing court 
case (Michael Hornsby writes). 

Dr Renfrew Christie, who was convicted of passing 
documents concerning the Koeberg nuclear power plant near 
Cape Town to the outlawed African National Congress 
(ANQ, had brought a court action against Mr Botha 

In February 1985, Dr Christie wrote a letter to Mr Botha 
agreeing not to nse violence as a means of achieving political 
objectives and requesting to be set free. The previous month 
Mr Botha had made a statement to Parliament offering to re- 
lease Mr Nelson Mandela of the ANC, and other security 
prisoners, if they promised to renounce violence. 

Amaz 
dies 

Los Angeles (AP)-Desi 
Amaz (right), tbe Cuban- 
born entertainer who 
teamed with the comedi- 
enne Lodlle Bail to become i 
one of the giants of tele- 
vision, died early yesterday 
of cancer in Del Mar near 
San Diego. 

Reports that Arnaz was 
seriously ill had circulated 
since 1981. 

Obituary, page 1 8 

Assassins kill Akrotiri 
mortar attack detective 

From Our Own Correspondent, Limassol 



A Cypriot police officer 
involved in the investigation 
of the mortar attack on the 
British base at Akroun last 
summer has been the victim 
of a professional assassination 
in Limassol. 

The -killing of Mr Pandeus 
Phvdas. who was until recent- 
ly head of the CID in the 
southern Cypriot port, was 
curried out by gunmen in two 
Mercedes cars who sprayed 
him with automatic fire when 
he returned to his home from 
work in the north of the city 
on Monday. 

Up to 100 detectives were 
vesterday called to the old Bn- 
r:-h nalictf barracks in the cen- 
ifo^Limassol to investigate 
the murder, the first killing ° 
a senior Cypriot policeman 


since the island gained in- 
dependence from Britain in 
1960. 

Many of the officers evinced 
ignorance as to the motives for i 
the murder but one said sever- 
al Arabs were believed to have 
been involved. A group claim- 
ing to be pro-Libyan said it 
carried out the Akrotiri attack. 

Greek Cypriot newspapers 
suggested yesterday that Mr 
Phydas may have made ene- 
mies among the drug dealers 
and brothel keepers of Limas- 
sol because of an anti-narcot- 
ics campaign which he had en- 
thusiastically endorsed. 

It was also the Limassol 
police force which seized 
weapons from a container at 
tbe port last month. 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

President Reagan's popular- 
ity rating has suffered the 
sharpest decline in the past 
month of any President since 
such polls begin 50 years ago. 

A New York Times poll found 
that it has fallen from 67 to 46 > 
per cent since the Iran arms 
affair began. 

The poll, conducted on 
Sunday and published yes- 
terday, gives Mr Reagan the 
lowest approval rating since 
the economic recession in 
1982. 

However, it is still far ahead 
of the low points reached by 
President Nixon and Presi- 
dent Carter. 

The poll found that a major- 
ity of Americans believe the 
Reagan Administration is 
“covering up” the facts of its 
arms deal with Iran and that 
the incident is at least as seri- 
ous as the Watergate afiair. 

It found people did not 
believe President Reagan’s de- 
nials about knowledge of Iran 
arms deals’ profits going to the 
i Nicaraguan Contras. They 
were also deeply sceptical of 
similar denials from Vice- 
President George Bush and 
Mr Donald Regan, the White 
House Oiief of! Staff 
Some 56 per cent of those 
questioned disapproved of the 
President's conduct of foreign 
policy, the most since he took 
office. More than half said 
I they were “uneasy” about his 
handling of an international 
crisis- . 

The poll was published as 
the Senate Intelligence Com- 
mittee began its hearings into 
the Iran scandal. Senators 
heard 12 hours of secret testi- 
mony on Monday from Mr 
Robert McFarlane, the former 
National Security Adviser, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver 
North, tbe dismissed military 

Israeli in 
1981 

‘arms deal’ 

By Nicholas Beeston 

An Iranian opposition 
group yesterday released 
documents which it claimed 
proved that an Israeli arms 
dealer negotiated a secret $ f 36 
million (£94.6 million) arms 
deal with Iran as early as 1981. 

Copies of the documents, 
which were given to The 
Times by The People’s 
Mujahidin Organization of 
Iran, show that Mr Jacob 
Nimordi, an Israeli arms 
dealer who is a key figure in 
the current White House cri- 
sis, also shipped missiles and 
ammunition to Iran in the 
summer ofl 98 1. 

The documents, which in- 
dude a letter from Mr 
Nimrodi to the Ministry of 
Defence in Iran, secret in- 
ternal Iranian memos and the 
arms contract, were appar- 
ently smuggled out of Iran by 
I the group's agents, 
i The documents are impos- 
' sible to verily independently. 


Crisis in the 
White House 

adviser and a third witness, 
said to have been Mr John 
McMahon, former deputy 
director of the CIA. 

Mr McFarlane looked flush- 
ed and grim after testifying for 
‘ more than six hours and refus- 
ed to comment. The senators, 
who are sworn not to reveal 
what they heard, said they 
were getting the candour and 
co-operation the Administra- 
tion had promised. 

Senator Thomas Eagleton, 
an outgoing Democrat from 
Missouri, said he was sure Mr 
McFarlane had authorized the 
arms sale and diversion of 
funds. 

“It wasn't Santa Claus,” be 
said. No one believed Colonel 
North operated alone, he said. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the For- 
eign Secretary, yesterday in- 
dicated that Washington’s 
European allies were anxious 
that Mr Reagan should speed- 
fly resolve tbe Iran arms 
shipment controversy (Renter 
rep orts from Brussels), 

In answer to tbe President's 
description of him as a “na- 
tional hero”, he said no one 
questioned Colonel North’s 
gut patriotism. But “even 
patriots can make horrendous, 
grossly illegal mistakes”. 

* Meanwhile, a flamboyant 
Texan billionaire was reported 
to have put up ransom money 
several times during the past 
five years in an unsuccessful 
attempt to obtain the release 
of various US hostages, in- 
cluding those in Lebanon. 


Mr Ross Perot was appar- 
ently ready to place $2 million 
(£1.4 million) in a Zurich bank 
on May 23 at the request of 
Colonel North as part of a 
secret transaction to secure the 
release of the remaining cap- 
tives in Lebanon. 

But Colonel North instead 
asked him to send the money 
by courier to Cyprus, accord- 
ing to The Washington Post. 
This was to be exchanged at 
sea for five hostages in a 
“ship-to-ship" transfer. The 
courier waited in Cyprus for 
five days, but the deal fell 
through. 

Mr Perot, the third wealthi- 
est man in America, was quot- 
ed as saying: “I wouldn't have 
done that unless it was the 
request of the US Govern- 
ment . . . Ollie didn’t operate 
in a vacuum.” 

But yesterday the White 
House said it knew nothing of 
any such arrangement, and if 
it took place it was without 
authorization. 

President Reagan's remarks j 
to Time magazine last week ! 
have caused considerable con- 
troversy in Israel and within 
the Jewish community here. 
He suggested in an interview 
that “another country” — 
apparently Israel — had over- 
charged Iran for weapons and 
then knowingly pul the profits 
into bank accounts for the 
Contras. . 

. The Israeli Government 
had hotly denied this, with the 
spokesman saying he did not 
know what “other country” 
President Reagan meant. He 
said the funds did not pass 
through Israel and Israel had 
no knowledge that any funds 
might be going to the Contras. 

Rabbi Alexander Schindler, 
President of the Union of 
American Hebrew Congrega- 
tions, said he was shocked and 
dismayed. 


Conspiracy case 
close to collapse 

From Christopher Thomas, New York 

The United Slates Attorney southern district of New York, 
in Manhattan was yesterday expressed concern about re- 
granted a 10-day court delay ports that key documents 
in order to “reassess” the trial relating to government arms 
of 17 men accused of conspir- * sales to Iran had been shred- 
ing to send 52 billion (£1.4 ded by Administration of- 


billion) in arms to Iran. 

In an implied reference to 
White House involvement in 
similar arms sales, Ms Loma 
Schofield, the assistant US 
Attorney said: “We are 
attempting to review the en- 
tire situation in the light of 
recent disclosures” Clearly 
the case is in imminent danger 
of collapse. 

Defence lawyers said the 
move could mean that govern- 
ment prosecutors would ask 


ficials. Dearly the judge was 
making a connection between 
the “pilot” plot to sell arms to 
Iran and the Administration's 
own secret operation. 

He issued an order stating: 
“No person employed by the 
US Government, regardless of 
agency or capacity, is to 
destroy, conceal or alter any 
document which relates to the 
shipment of arms to Iran, 
either directly from the 
United States or from any 


for dismissal of all or some of other country.” 


the charges. It is now clear that 
at the lime the US Customs 
Service mounted the prosecu- 
tions last April, it was un- 
aware that the Reagan Admin- 
istration was secretly shipping 
arms to Iran. 

Judge Leonard Sand of the 
Federal Court, who sits in the 


The judge noted that one 
defence lawyer had suggested 
that Israel might be involved 
in the case. Judge Sand said he 
wanted to know what docu- 
ments accompanied the arms 
shipments and whether they 
reflected destinations other 
than Iran. 


M Jacques Chirac, the 
French Prime Minister, called 
yesterday for a “Western 
European charter of security 
principles" to reinforce Euro- 
pean co-operation on defence, 
and to give a new boost to the 
still ailing Western European 
Union (WELT), the only Euro- 
pean organization with com- 
petence in defence matters. 

In a speech to the WEU 
assembly in Paris, attended by 
parliamentary representatives 
from the organization's seven 
member nations — Britain, 
France, West Germany, Italy, 
the Netherlands, Belgium and 
Luxembourg — M Chirac 
admitted that the attempt to 
relaunch the WEU in 1984 
had not been entirely success- 
ful and suggested that the time 
had come to breathe into it 
“the political breath of life it 
still lacks”. 

He said that all too often 
Western Europe appeared to 
be at the mercy of forces 
beyond its control France was 
determined to contribute to the 
emergence of a common Euro- 
pean conscience on defence 
nutters. 

Recent events had dem- 
onstrated a pressing need for 

greater European cooperation 

on defence: the disturbance 
preceding the deployment of 
US missiles in Europe, the 
debates surrounding the US 
Star Wars initiative, and. the 
hopes and anxieties aroused 
by tbe Reykjavik summit 
A strong, united Europe was 
**a guarantee of vitality for the 
allian ce and the basis for a 
healthy, balanced relationship 
between the two sides of the 
Atlantic” M Chirac argned. 

The affiance was not so 
much threatened by risks of 
division, “but rather by the 
feeling, whether justified or 
not that decisions vital to the 
security of Europe could be 
taken without Europe really 
having any say in the matter”. 

The “essential principles” 
outlined by M Chirac for 
inclusion in a future Western 
European security charter 
centred on the premise that 
“nuclear deterrence remains 
the only effective way of 
preventing war in Europe; 
there is no alternative to it in 
the foreseeable future”. 

“The threat which hangs 
over Western Europe mast be 
considered as a whole: unclear 
arms of all ranges, imbalance 
of conventional and chemical 
weapons. Dissuasive capabili- 
ties and disarmament efforts 
must be defined in relation to 
this overall threat. 

“Deterrence in Europe re- 
quires a strategic linkage be- 
tween the two sides of the 
Atlantic. This in torn requires 
the presence of American con- 
ventional and nuclear farces 
on onr continent. 

“ Maintaining the defence 

effort of the European states 
on a level in keeping with the 
threat is a necessity . . .the 
contribution of the indepei- 
dent French and British 
nuclear forces is an essential 
factor. The aim of disarma- 
ment must be to increase 
security.” 


Kinnock accuses 
US of ‘bad faith 9 

From Robin Oakley, New York 

Mr Neil Kinnock claimed be used to defend Britain.” ^ 
last night that President He said it was a “delusion 
Reagan’s promise to Mrs that Britain was a world power 
Thatcher that Britain could and that it should have the 
continue to purchase the Tri- “adornments of that status ’ in 
dent missile system as a re- the form of nuclear weapons. 


placement for Polaris would 
never be implemented. 


To argue that British 
nuclear weapons were needed 


His accusation of bad faith for first use to trigger Ameri- 
on the part of the President can useofnuclearlorceswasa 


came in. a speech in Boston, 
his first major attempt to win 
American acquiesence in La- 


peculiar attitude to the special 
relationship. 

Mr Kinnock claimed the 


hour's unilateralist strategy Conservative Government's 
involving the banning of all “nuclear fixation" with buy- 


US nuclear weapons. 

He described the Pres- 


ing Trident would result in 30 
per cent spending cuts hitting 


ident's pledge to Mrs Thatcher all three services. 

. . ri . _ Tl.. 


when she flew to Washington 
after the Reykjavik summit as 


The Navy would lose at 
least three frigates or destroy- 


“an undertaking of sorts, a ers. the average life of key • 
tribute to the communique ships would be stretched from ( 
drafter’s art”. 1 8 to 22 years and convention- 

He said Mrs Thatcher was al submarines were likely to be • ; 
“one of the few people in the reduced from 13 to eight- 
world who believes that an The RAF would be hit be- 
American president who was cause the development con- . 
securing 50 per cent cuts in tract for the European fighter • 
strategic ballistic missiles in aircraft had not been signed 
the next five years would and plans to purchase 2 d 0 ot ■ 
meanwhile placidly allow the them had not beer, confirmed. . 
UK to increase its strategic The Army would oe smaller 
ballistic system by 800 per and less well-trained, being 
cent” denied a terminally guided • 

In his speech at the Ken- anti-tank rocket a scanerabie 
nedy School of Government mine rocket and a battlefield 


Mr Kinnock: 

• Accused Mrs Thatcher of 


electronic warfare system. 

Mr Kinnock emphasized 


raia .... ,jVT 

trying to impede the reduction that Labour would boost us 
or elimination of nuclear conventional forces contnbu- 


weapons. — — - - — , . 

• Claimed that Nato's stral- do that job property than two 
egy rested upon “untenable jobs badly, 
assumptions” and called for a He said the full extent of La- 

commitment to no first use of hour's ban on US nuclear wea- 


pon to Nato. It was better to 


nuclear weapons. 

• Insisted that the British 
Government's determination 


pons would be the closing of 
cruise missile sites at Green- 
ham Common and Moles- 


^ ~ _ , _ , 

to buy Trident tp stay in the worth, the Poseidon submar- 
“nuclear club” would seri- ine facilities at Holy Loch and 
ously weaken our convention- a change to a non-nuclear role 
al forces. forthe FI 1 1 aircraft- “The rest 

• Emphasized Labour’s com- of the US facilities will re- 
mitment to Nato and willing- main" — including all com- 
ness to share its burden, munication and intelligence 
saying that 5 per cent of stations. . . 

Britain's gross domestic prod- He said cruise missiles had 
uct would continue to be spent been installed for political, not 
on defence, 95 percent of it for military reasons. The Holy 

Loch base would soon be ob- 


Nato purposes. „ — - - - --- - _ 

• Demanded a new role for solcteand would breach ban J. 

America's FI 1 1 aircraft based provisions by J 990 and the 
on Lakenheath and Upper danger of the dual role for the 
Heyford. Fills was that at present the 

• Promised to discuss “the Soviet Union could never be 
process of implementation” of certain that an Fill mission 
Labour's policies fully with was not a nuclear attack. 


Nato allies, and 


In response to implied 


• Criticized Mr Mikhail American threats that all U5> 
Gorbachov for being obstruc- troops would be withdrawn 
tionist in seeking to link from Britain if denied the 
progress on arms control with protection of the nuclear um- 
American abandonment of brella, Mr Kinnock claimed 
the Star Wars programme. that the changes "will not - 
Mr Kinnock said Nato’s diminish the protection at- 
flexible response strategy was forded to US service person- 
a strategy of limited nuclear nel in Europe”, arguing that 
war and labelled it a “lethaily nuclear weapons cannot give - „ 


dangerous” fantasy which cover to troops who would be 
could not be implemented destroyed by their use. 
without destroying our own • Iran interview: Mr 
side. Kinnock, in an NBC tele- 


He said: “Whatever may be vision interview, condemned 
claimed for them in terms of the US Administration's 
balance, deterrents and sec- apparent involvement in the 
urity, nuclear weapons cannot Iran arms deal. 


And more 




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v 






OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


Hindu gangs take to 
Delhi streets in 
vengeance for massacre 


From Oar Own Correspondent, Delhi 


Mob violence shook the In- 
dian capital yesterday as angry 
Hindu gangs trial to exact 
vengeance for the bus massa- 
cre of 24 Hindus by Sikh 
temrorists at the weekend. 

Police action saved the 
situation from getting out of 
hand and last night the Army 
was put on alerL Tear gas. 
baton charges and shots fired 
in the air were needed to quell 
the riots. 

Mr Ved Marwah. the Delhi 
police chief said that six 
policemen, including an as- 
sistant commissioner, were 
injured by stone-lh rowing 
mobs. Witnesses put the figure 
nearer to 30. More than 800 
people were reported to have 
been arrested. 

One of the worst incidents 
took place outside the 300- 
year-old Sikh temple, Sisganj. 
in the historic Cbandni 
Cbowk. which is usually 
thronged with tourists at this 
time of year. A 1,000-strong 
mob threw stones at the 
building until the Sikhs inside 
swarmed out waving swords, 
knives and spears. 

Police cleared the area but 
the Hindu gangs played hide- 
and-seek with police in the 
narrow streets of Old Delhi, 
throwing stones and then 
melting away. 

The Government arrested 
more than 80 people in the 
Punjab, including two prom- 
inent politicians, Mr Prakash 
Singh Badai, the leader of a 
breakaway 'faction of the rul- 
ing AkaK Dal Party, and Mr 
Gurcharan Singh Tohra, one 
of his supporters, who was 


elected head of the principal late for those responsible for 
temple management commit- Sunday’s killings, 
tee of the Golden Temple of The terrorists continued 
Amritsar on Sunday. their bloody activities during 

Defending the decision to P® 81 ” hours, killing 
arrest the two, who win imme- another 10 people m isolated 


diaiely become martyrs with 
the militant Sikhs, Mr Buta 
Singh, the Home Minister in 
the central Government, told 
Parliament that they and oth- 
ers bad been arrested and 


incidents in the stale, where 
the principal Hindu organiza- 
tion has threatened a cam- 
paign of non-cooperation un- 
less Mr Suijit Singh’s Govern- 
ment is sacked and control is 


detained under the National £* ven to fo® Army. 


Security Act because of their 
“cynical optimism" that they 
could gain power by blending 
terrorism with religious sen- 
timents. 

The Punjab Chief Minister, 
Mr Suijit Singh Bamala, has 
introduced a series of mea- 
sures aimed at strengthening 
his government's response to 
the terrorists. Four armed 
guards will be posted on ail 
buses at night and rewards of 
100.000 rupees (£5.000) will 
be given for information 
about terrorists and their 
plans. 

He has dismissed two Cabi- 
net ministers for supporting 
Mr Tohra in the temple elec- 
tions. He said the arrested pol- 
iticians had been openly sup- 
porting the terrorist element 
and that so for his own mod- 
eration and patience had been 


Feeling desperately in- 
secure, The Hindus are plan- 
ning to begin their eampaign 
on January 1 by blocking the 
offices where sales tax is paid. 

Yesterday's riots took place 
during a general strike called 
by the Bharatiya Janata Party, 
which is generally supported 
by the Hindu chauvinists. Or- 
ganizers said the strike was a 
total success. 

There were no buses on the 
roads after the Delhi Trans- 
port Commission decided not 
to risk further bus burnings. 

Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the 
Prime Minister, last night 
reviewed the Punjab situation 
with his Home Minister, Mr 
Buta Singh, and the Minister 
of State, Mr P. Chidambaram. 
The political affairs commitee r 
of the Cabinet has met twice I 
during the past three days to 



Gunmen 

kill 

leading 

blacks 


Juror 


court of 
bribe 


From Michael Hornsby 

Johannesburg 




A prominent black poUtiral murder has bee j *>> 
activist and medical doctor. Dr lhe revdauon 

Swbeiro. and his "if* jurors accepted 


Fabian Ribeiro, ana 
were killed by unknown gun- 
men in their home »n 

Mamelodi, a Mack 

near Pretoria, on Monday 

evening, it was learnt here 

yesterdav. . 

Johannesburg’s evening 

newspaper. The Stov » ported 
dmt neighbours of the Kin- 
eiros claimed to hare seen two 
imcfcwi white men at the scene 
of the shooting. 

The neighbours reportedly 
tried to follow the two assail- 
ants who, they said, fled in two 
a jeep and a white Dafcsnn 


r.V-'v*- _ : •' • 

Siy ;• . *7 * W."5 • 

H, ?„».■>. > 

... • ^ 


Woman’s body 

switched cars at a petrol „ , . _ rnn J 


Sword in hand, si Sikh militant chants nationalist slogans in Delhi during yesterday’s riots. 


taken by some as a sign of evolve new measures against 
weakness. the terrorists. 

He said a manv-Droneed The Prime Minister's Office 


weakness. 

He said a many-pronged 
attack on terrorism would 
unfold over the next few days 
and pointed out that the 
perpetrators of the last bus 
massacre, in July, bave been 
caught. He promised the same 


said last night that Mr Rajiv 
Gandhi has reaffirmed his 
commitment to implement 
the Punjab accord, and to help 
the state's crippled economy 
back on the rails. 


Russians 
prepare 
a shuttle 


Chorus of criticism 


Fraga plea after resignation 


From Mohsin Ali 
Washington 

The Soviet Union has com- 
pleted the first tests on its 


Pressure mounts 
on Haitian ruler 


From Alan Tomfinson, Port-an-Prince 


space shuttle on the launch I. Namphy, the armed forces 


Senor Manuel Fraga, the 
Spanish Opposition leader, 
pleaded with thousands of bis 
fervent supporters who gath- 
ered yestmday in a central 
Madrid street to understand 
his “supreme sacrifice" in 
deciding to resign from leading 
the right wing party because of 
election defeats. 

He addressed the crowd 
Cram a balcony at party head- 
quarters as the national exec- 
utive of his Popular Alliance 
began a crisis meeting. 

Setter Fraga read them a 
letter of resignation which he 
said was “irrevocable". 

“Do not go; if Fraga goes, 
we all go too," the crowds 
chorused, adding: “Without 
Fraga we will not vote." 

Senor Fraga, aged 64, a 
veteran ptditidan and a major 
figure on the Right throughout 
Spain's transition to democ- 
racy, had already informed 
King Juan Carlos of his 
decision. 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 

Two of his deputies as party 
chief, including Senor Gerardo 
Fenrindez, the Chief Minister 
of GaBda, who took put in the 
National Executive crisis mee- 
ting last night, said they would 
be seeking to persuade Setter 
Fraga to change his mind. 

The wnmpdifltp reason be- 
hind Senor Fraga’s decision. 



Senor Fraga: resignation 
is “irrevocable". 


coming after months of trouble 
within his party, was the 
Popular Alliance's disastrous 
performance in the Basque 
general election on Sunday. 

Setior Fraga had cam- 
paigned with his typical vigour 
but his party won only two 
seats in the Basque par- 
liament 

Behind his personal re- 
action lay months of rows and 
expulsions of other party tend- 
ers, debt problems with 
Spain's influential private 
banks after over-spending, 
and the complete faflmre of 
Setter Fraga's “master plan" 1 
to dislodge the Socialists from ! 
power at Spain’s general dec- ! 
tion in June. 

The anguish of party mem- 
bers at Senor Fraga's an- 
nouncement coaid also be i 
explained by the evident risk 
that the Spanish Right in its 
present low state, could dis- 
integrate entirely if such a 
“father figure” departs. 


pad at Ty ura tarn, the authori- 
tative US magazine Aviation 
Week and Space Technology 
reported yesterday. 

It said US reconnaissance 
satellite pictures showed the 
Soviet ortriter mounted piggy- 
back on its heavy expendable 
launch vehicle while under- 
going checks. 

The Soviet orbiter was re- 
moved from the launch pad 
after the tests, it said. 

American intelligence of- 
ficials think Moscow will at- 
tempt the first launch of the 
expendable booster next year 
— unmanned but with its 
piggy-back cargo pod. 

The first Soviet-manned 
launch is expected in 1988 at 
about the same time the US 
shuttle returns to flight 

• BORDEAUX: The Euro- 
pean Ariane rocket pro- 
gramme, suspended on May 
30 after a rocket crashed soon 
after lift-off, will resume sat- 
ellite launches in March 1987 
or thereabouts, M Frederic 
d'AUest, the Arianespace pres- 
ident, said yesterday. 




Now she’s about to 


The provisional govern- 
ment of General Henri 
■Namphy, the armed forces 
chief, is under increasing pres- 
sure to step down amid persis- 
tent popular unrest and 
irstability in an army poorly 
prepared to deal with iL 

Political parties, unions, 
civic groups and radical Cath- 
olic priests are leading a rising 
chorus of criticism of the 
caretaker regime which has 
pledged to stay on until gen- 
eral Sections in a year. 

They accuse the ruling 
Council of National Govern- 
ment (CNG) of incompetent 
leadership, failure to reform a 
corrupt and inefficient admin- 
istrative system and reluc- 
tance to purge former assoc- 
iates of ousted President 
“Baby Doc" Duvalier from 
army and public Ufa. 

The Government recently 
survived a general strike, a 
reported coup plot and a 
boycott of elections for a 
constituent assembly — dra- 
matically underlining a loss of 
public faith m its ability to 
guide the Caribbean island 
nation to democracy after 29 
years of dictatorship. 

But the strongest challenge 
to General Namphy’s author- 
ity may yet be in store. People 
in the rebellious northern sea 
port of Gonaives. which led 
the uprising that toppled 


nomic aid, plus S4 milli on in 
non-fcthal hardware for a 
7,000- man army and police 
force which US officials con- 
cede does not have the experi- 
ence, training or equipment to 
deal with disorder. The army 
was subjugated during three 
decades of Duvalier rule to the 
dynasty's brutal private sec- 
urity force, the aow-dis- 
banded Tonton Macoutes. 

President Reagan recently 
underlined his support for 
General Namphy by inviting 
him to the White House, but 
on the eve of the general's 
departure on November 19, 
troops and armoured cars 
surrounded the presidential 
palace following the discovery 
of an apparent coup attempt. 

Haitian newspapers have 
since carried reports of an 
apparent uprising by discon- 
tented junior officers. In an 
apparent attempt to pacify 
rebellion in his ranks. General 
Namphy is reported to have 
transferred the conspirators to 
provincial posts rather than 
court martial them. US of- , 
fidals would not confirm or 
deny a coup attempt, admit- | 
ting only that “there has been ; 
a lot of turmoil in the army”. 

The turmoil coincided with , 
continuing civil unrest. While 
General Namphy was in the 
US, Haiti was paralysed by a 
week-long general strike led by 


station and- made for P retoria . found in wood 

The government's Barwa ns _ Po]ice or 

island of Rhodes are "9 
however, that “two biackper sure'* thev have four 

sons fired abort seven shotsat s “ f ? 3 _ ve ^ r _oid Mrs 

SSrsavt 

bmeaM, with her family and ft 
MroRiiSS was the sister of ( A ' 

tte fate Mr Robert Sobnkw^ ^^"^'discover 

chance about half a mile i 

S pine forest near the vilU 
which broke away cram at r r pin lives said 

African National Congress Relatives saia 

(ANQ in 1959. Other {reports Cooper had suffered 
said she was Mr Sobukwe's amnesia. 

^SSo-s account ^ Ivory ban 

the impression that the killing Dar es Salaam (AFP) - 
was another example of inter- Tanzanian Government 
nedne warfare between dif- drew all ivory trading lio 
ferent Mack factions. But Dr yesterday and banned thi 
Ribeiro was a respected elder and export of big-game 
statesman of the black resis- phies in a new bid to sav 
tance movement with good country's dwindling gam 

New friends 


Athens - Police on the 
island of Rhodes are ”99 per 
ceni sure” thev have found the 
body of 73-year-old Mrs Mary 
Lee Cooper, from Leeds, who 
vanished during a holiday 
with her family and friends 
two months ago (A Corres- 
pondent writes). 

The body was discovered by- 
chance about half a mile into a 
pine forest near the village of 
Lardhos. Relatives said Mrs 
Cooper had suffered from 
amnesia. 

Ivory ban 

Dar es Salaam (AFP) — The 
Tanzanian Government with- 
drew all ivory trading licences 
yesterday and banned the sale 
and export of big-game tro- 
phies in a new bid to save the 
country's dwindling game. 


riro’s Mamelodi home was 
petrol-bombed, and he said 
that be believed government 
agents were responsible. 

“I found a police vehicle 
I parked outside my boose. I 
rushed to the van and told 
them that my house was on 
fire, and they would not re- 
spond or move an inch." 

Dr Ribeiro was detained for 
a time during tiie state of 
emergency. 

Meanwhile, officials of the 
Metal and Allied Workers' 
Union (MAWU) said that 
soldiers aid government of- 
ficials yesterday visited the 
black township outside Brits, 
west iff Pretoria, where 10,000 
people are threatened with 
forced resettlement. 

“They went from boose to 
bonse checking how many 
people were in them »d 
taking their names,” said Mr 
Jacob Magakwe, a MAWU 
organizer. 


Peking (Reuter) - President 
de la Madrid of Mexico 
arrives in China tomorrow for 
a one-week official visit aimed 
at consolidating political rela- 
tions and improving trade 
links. 


Birds hazard 


Angelholra (Reuter) - A 
collision with birds probably 
caused the crash of a Swedish- 
built fighter plane last month 
in which the Austrian pilot 
was killed. 


Coal plans 


President Duvalier in Feb- the country’s estimated 5,000 
ruary, are threatening to de- transport workers 







like thousands of children, 

14- year-old Louise ran away from 
home. 

Like many, she'd been the victim 
of sexual abuse. 

In London, she survived by pros- 
titution. And even after contracting 
syphillis she continued to work on 
the streets. 

Every year thousands of teen- 
agers run away from physical and 
emotional violence at home or in local 
authority care. 

They arrive in London with no 
money, no work and .often no hope 
of finding any. 

That’s why The Children^ Society 
has responded with a unique 
initiative. 

WeVe opened a 'Safe house' for 
homeless teenagers. 

We give them a roof over their 
heads, feed them, discuss their future 
with them, and if appropriate 
persuade them to return home of 
their own accord. 

So far weVe been able to help over 
300 teenagers at our 'safe house.' 
And many more at our other projects. 

Unfortunately it all costs money. 

But you could help us to help 
even more of these youngsters. 


dare an alternative govern- 
ment later this week and to 
block the main northern high- 
way, effectively cutting the 
country in two. 

The United States is back- 
ing the general with $109 
million (£76 million) in eco- 


In a speech in the US, 
General Namphy dismissed 
the unrest as evidence of “the 
vitality of our infant demo- 
cracy”. He added in an inter- 
view: “It is only normal that 
we should go through a stormy 
period at first" 


The Sfl^year-old township, 
known as Uukasie (an abbrev- 
iation of tiie Afrikaans for 
“OM Location") was “abol- 
ished" by government decree 
on October 17, and its remain- 
ing 10,000 inhabitants became 
illegal squatters. 

Pretoria intends to move 
them to a new she some IS 
mites away, where 5,000 far- 
mer residents of Oukasie, 
which abate a white suburb of 
Brits, agreed to settle at the 
aid of last year. The remain- 
der, however, wish to stay and 
signed affidavits to that effect 
at toe end of last month. 


Antaibao, China (Reuter) — 
Mr Arm and Hammer, chair- 
man of the Occidental Petro- 
leum Corporation, announced 
plans to triple the output of 
China's largest coal mine, 
partly owned by his company, 
from 15 to 45 million tonnes. 

20-year com a 

Johannesburg (AFP) — Mrs 
Everlie Blerk-Warren, a South 
African woman who went into 
a coma while giving birth to 
her first child in 1967. has died 
without ever regaining con- 
sciousness or being aware of 
her son, now aged 19. . 


Two held 


Manila — (Reuter) — A 
government panel investigat- 
ing the murder of the left-wing 
union leader Mr Rolando 
Olalia and his driver, has 
ordered the detention of a 
soldier and a civilian sus- 
pected of involvement. 


Elvis was 
drug spy 
for Nixon 


Simply send, a donation, however j 
small, to: Church of England Clddrenh ■ 
Society, Freepost, London WC1X OBR. ! 


Name. 

Addre: 


Amount' £ 

WOVe grateful for your donation but to save us I 
money we wfll not send a receipt unless you | 
tick this box. G i 

Access/Bardaycard E3 S , 


From Mohsin AH 
- Washington 

The White House sent Elvis 
Presley a Special badge after 
he.had told Presieot Nixon at 
a 1970 meeting that the 
Beaties had been a real force 
for anti-American spirit 

The rock singer had earlier 
written to Mr Nixon offering 
his services as an anti-drag 
agent and saying: “I can and 
will do more good if I were 
made a federal agent at large." 

Presley was later sent the 
badge with his name engraved 
on it designating him an 
honorary anti-drug agent Mr 
Nixon told him that drag asers 
were also in the vanguard of 
anti-American prot e sts. 

The presidential dealing 
with Presley was revealed in 
the latest batch of Nixon 
papers released to the public 
on Monday. 

They also include a memo- 
random by a current White 
House aide urging Mr Nixon 
not to visit Dr Martin Lather 
King's widow on the first 
anniversary of her husband's 
assass ination. 

President Nixon had mainly 
sought to keep secret the 
papers, which include abort 
13 million pages of Admin- 
istration documents. They dis- 
close that the White House 
was caught off-guard by the 
public outcry against an effort 
to deport the late Bertie, John 
Lennon. 

Senator Strom Thurmond, a 
South Carolina Republican, 
appears to _ have been in- 
strumental in pressing the 
case against Lennon, who 
opposed the US war effort in 
Vietnam. In a memorandum to 
the White House, he said a 
series of concerts by Lennon 
“will pour tremendous am- 
ounts of cash in the coffers' of 
the New Left". 


How long 


before the 


milkround 


turns sour? 


There’s one thing a spell at University 
always guarantees. Plenty oPmUkrouncT 
visits from company executives. 

Each and every one of them has 
well-paid jobs to offer: 

But before signing on the dotted line, 
think very carefully. 

Will the promises turn out to be 
empty? Will the job suit your particular 
abilities and skills? * 

These are not the sort of questions 
you can answer in 3 minutes. So why not 
take 3 years to decide your future - as 
an Army Officer? 

On completion of your training at 
Sandhurst you will be commissioned as 
a Lie utenant earning .£ 10,428. 

Naturally you will learn how to 
command and care for a group of bright 
young soldiers and to handle our 
sophisticated weapons and equipment 

And if you are posted abroad at short 


notice to lead soldiers in unfamiliar 
surroundings you’d have to cope. 

No wonder many leading industri- 
alists regard an Army Commission as 
the best management training a young 
man or woman can have. 

Whether you make the Army your 

long-term career or leave earlier is up to 
you. 

Either way it promises not to sour 
your future. Quite the opposite in fact 

And you’ll gain unrivalled executive 
training at our expense. 

So if you need a little more time to 
decide, see your Career Staff and pick 
up an Introduction Form. 

Through this we will arrange for a 


Liaison Officer to 


.. . see you at your 

University; Polytechnic, or College of 
Higher Education. 


ArmyOfficei 


f -if I 

U & L * ■ 


— The Montreal 


trial of four Hells Angels 

bikers chafed with a multiple 


t£P 500) bribe to bring about 
an acquittal or a hung jury 
(John Best wnies). 

Mr Justice Jean-Guy Boi- 
lanl of Quebec Superior Coun 
dismissed the umdenufiedju- 
ror after receiving a note from 
him reading: *“I have been 
bought - Hell’s Angels juror 

No S.” . 

The judge rejected ve- 
hement demands by two de- 
fence lawyers for a mistrial. 
The four arc charged with 
killing five other bikers in 
1985. 


* IT ' ■ V » 

- . v * i £ I 


- •- -i 

tHl ~ -—i- 






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U-f 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


11 


MI5 case: Judge orders papers disclosed 

Whitehall ponders secrets appeal 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Whitehall has until tomor- 
row to decide its response to 
an order that it make available 
secret papers to Mr Peter 
Sjnghi and his lawyers in the 
MI5 book hearing. 

The British ‘ Government's 
reluctance to give up the 
papers has been a consistent 
feature of the case, now in its 
third week, and it would come 
as no surprise if it decides to 
seek leave to appeal a gai nst 
yesterday’s disclosure ruling 
oy Mr Justice Powell. 

The judge, who last week 
won his own demand to see 
the papers, yesterday over- 
ruled Whitehall’s claim that 
they were so secret as to be 
exempt from usual consid- 
erations of public interest. 

He produced a schedule of 
the papers which he indicated 
had been edited in a way 
intended to protect British 
security interests and, at the 
same time, to provide infor- 
mation sought by Mr Wright’s 
lawyers on why the Govern- 
ment did not try to restrain 
other controversial books on 
security service operations. 

Even the schedule remains 
secret and was said by British 
officials here to have been 
transmitted in code to White- 
hall for consideration. 

Compliance with the order 
could see the hearing ended 
early next week. That would 
raise the prospect of a ruling 
on the application for an 
injunction to suppress pub- 
lication of Mr Wright's book 
by the end of the year. But an 
appeal could prolong the case 
significantly. 

In the first instance, White- 
hall would ask the Court of 



Mr W illiam SHiaap, the American publisher and CIA expert, arriving at the Supreme Court in Sydney yesterday. 


Appeal for leave to appeal 
against Mr Justice Powell’s 
order. Such leave is not 
granted automatically by the 
three appeal court judges, and 
the British side has already 
been turned down once before 
over the papers. 

Mr Justice Powell said in 
his ruling yesterday that al- 
though some of the papers 
were highly confidential, oth- 
ers could not be said to be 
covered by the immunity 
claim, and it was edited 
versions of these that he 
sought to make available to 
the defence. 


If the Appeal Court did 
grant leave, it would probably 
need some days to examine 
the papers and evaluate them 
before giving a ruling. 

If, again, leave was rejected, 
there is one last avenue of 
appeal open to the Govern- 
ment, and that is the High 
Court in Canberra. 

For the first time, Mr 
Justice Powell suggested yes- 
terday that a compromise in 
the 1 4-month-old wrangle was 
a possibility when he said that 
if he accepted Whitehall’s 
“fell-back position” he might 
“have to undertake a blue- 


pencil exercise”. 

He did not expand on this 
remark, and the hint at a 
possible sanitized version of 
the Wright manuscript was 
dismissed by Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary. 

Sir Robert said in cross- 
examination yesterday that 
the objection to the manu- 
script remained unchanged. 

The only other witness yes- 
terday was Mr William 
Scbaap, a lawyer and pub- 
lisher who was called on Mr 
Wright’s behalf, and who has 
published books by former 
members of the United States 


security services. 

He described the functions 
of the CIA manuscript review 
panel, and said Sir Robert's 
evidence that the CIA. as a 
friendly intelligence agency, 
would be concerned by the 
publication of Mr Wright’s 
book was “untenable”. . 

Mr Schaap said: “The CIA 
on its own has approved the 
publication of books at least as 
intriguing as the (Wright) 
book, and with considerable, 
indeed voluminous, details 
about personnel operations, 
technology and all aspects of 
intelligence work.” 


Poles seek 
damages 
after spill 

From Roger Bayes 

Warsaw 

Poland will ask Czecho- 
slovakia for compensation for 
the damage inflicted by an oil 
slick which leaked into the 
Oder River last month, a Gov- 
ernment spokesman said yes- 
terday. 

There is no concealing the 
friction between the two So- 
viet allies since the fuel oil 
seeped from a concrete factory 
in Ostrava, on the Czech side 
of the frontier. 

The Polish Govennent 
spokesman, Mr Jerzy Urban, 
was unable to- explain the 
discrepancy between the 
Czech version — that only 
about 40 tonnes of oO entered 
the Oder — and the Polish 
experience. Hundreds of em- 
ergency workers have dredged 
some 100 tonnes of the dick 
from the surface of the river 
and the Polish estimate of the 
pollution is close to 200 
tonnes. 

The Poles are concerned 
that the fuel oil could have 
entered the food cycle — 
though so far this seems to 
have been avoided — and have 
not blocked the publication of 
articles criticizing Prague. 

The main complaint is 
about late and inadequate 
information provided by the 
Czechs to the Polish Consul in 
Ostrava 


Kong fu and yellow dresses 
in run-up to Taiwan poll 


From Robert Grieves 
Taipei 

During the campaign run- 
up to Taiwan’s legislative 
elections on Saturday, Taipei 
has been treated to public 
rallies in support of the knng 
jfu candidate, the j ugging can- 
didate and half-a-dozen can- 
didates wearing yellow dresses 
whose sole qualification for 
office appears to be their dose 
resemblance to President 
Aquino of the Philippines- 

Forty-four opposition can- 
didates are campaigning for a 
total of 157 seats in the. 
Legislative Yuan, Taiwan’s 
parliament, and in the Na- 
tional Assembly, which elects 
a president every six years. 

This past October, the 
Kuomintang's central stand- 
ing committee adopted a 
resolution that would lift 
Taiwan's 37-year-old martial 
law and replace it with na- 
tional security and election 
laws. 

Under the election law, 
which is expected to be passed 
early next year, the creation of 
political parties would be le- 
gal. Until then, however, par- 
ties such as the Democratic 
Progressive Party (DPP) wh- 
ich was formed in September, 
are officially banned, although 
the Kuomintang has not yet 
moved to suppress it and the 
party is fielding candidates in 
this election. 


Mr Hsu Hsin-liang, the Tai- 
wanese political dissident who 
failed to return to Taiwan on 
Sunday from his self-imposed 
exile in the US, was forced to 
return to Manila after landing 
in Taipei yesterday (Robert 
Grieves writes from Taipei). 

Mr Hsu landed at Chang 
Kai-shek airport on a Phil- 
ippine Airlines flight- Tai- 
wanese authorities stopped the 
aircraft on the runway apron 
and then checked visas. After 
finding that Mr Hsu’s visa 
was not in order they returned 
him to Manila. 

• MANILA: Mr Hsu was last 
night at Manila International 
Airport enable to enter the 
Philippines since he was 
carrying only an expired Tai- 
wanese passport and an 
American travel document 
(David Watts writes). He 
planned to take a ffight back to 
Tokyo today. 

The campaigning, which be- 
gan on November 21, has 
been divided into phases. Im 
the first week, individual can- 
didates were allowed to cam-, 
paign wherever and as often as, 
they liked. In the second week, 
both Ruomintang and opposi- 
tion candidates have appeared 
together in a series of four- 
hour-long rallies at schools 
and other public areas. 

At an outdoor rally in a 
small Taipei park last week. 


Mr Hsieh Chang- ting, aged 40. 
one of the most dynamic 
candidates of the fledgling 
DPP, addressed a crowd of 
more than 1,000 people at 
noon. The appearance was 
one of four that Mr Hsieh, a 
lawyer and city councillor, 
was scheduled to make that 
day. 

“Ten years ago, Taiwanese 
believed that President Chi- 
ang Citing- kuo was our 
future,” said Mr Hsieh. “Now, 
I say, Taiwan’s fixture depends 
on Taiwanese.” 

Across the town at a rally of 
another DPP candidate whose 
husband is in jail on-political 
charges, two folk singers at- 
tracted a large crowd to an 
urban park, where platforms, 
speakers and microphones 
had been set up- 

There on sale among other 
pamphlets and leaflets were 
repnnts of Time magazine’s 
1985 Man of the Year issue 
which featured Mr Deng 
Xiaoping, the senior leader of 
the People’s Republic of 
China, as well as copies of the 
Soong Dynasty, a book that 
portrays the Kuomintang as 
corrupt and ruthless. 

This week, the long rallies at 
which Kuomintang and opp- 
osition candidates speak for 
only 15 minutes each have 
been fer more subdued than 
the so-called personal cam- 
paigns of last week. 


Indonesia 
buys more 
Rapiers 

Jakarta — Indonesia has 
signed a £40 million contract 
with British Aerospace for its 
third consecutive order of 
Rapier missiles (Our Own 
Correspondent writes). 

Military sources said the 
Rapier system, chosen by the 
Indonesian Army in 1984 
over the French Roland mis- 
sile, gives Indonesia its most 
modem ground-to-air missile, 
replacing 10-year-old Swedish 
weapons 

Rapier is now used in 13 
countries, and it is believed 
that Indonesia chose it be- 
cause of its ease of transport 
for use in the defence of 
outlying islands and oil rigs. 

The Indonesian Navy uses 
French Exocet missiles and 
earlier this year the armed 
forces signed a letter of intent 
to buy 12 American F 16 
fighter planes. 


Bhopal gas tragedy claims 
more victims two years on 


When Babn Khan, aged 61, 
a bookbinder, died yesterday 
in the new Jawaharla! Nehru 
Hospital, his family said he 
was merely the latest victim of 
the Bhopal gas tragedy. 

So far 2352 people are 
certified by the State Govern- 
ment to have dud from the 
effects of the gas. The number 
keeps increasing as more and 
more cases are investigated 
and as people like Baku Khan 
die. 

Today marks the second 
anniversary of the day the 
deadly methyl isocyanate 
(MIQ gas seeped from the 
pesticide manufacturing plant, 
owned by the Union Carbide 
Corporation, over the sleeping 
town. 

Hie police superintendent 
forecasts that the demonstra- 
tions, processions and public 


6 Now people think 
that something is 
going on 9 


disturbances mil be a good 
dead l w< <tmn last year, and a 
citizen hearing him explains: 
“People are getting better, and 
now the case is being heard 
people think that something is 

g iiog on, the Government is 
gfating for them.” 

Though the case has indeed 
Started, and tbongh some left- 
wingers are forecasting a 

shameful settlement will he 
made shortly, the organiza- 
tions looking after the gas 
victims are not in the best 
shape. Doctors and voluntary 
organizations are quarrelling 
among themselves and both of 
them are falling out with the 
Government. 

The doctors are at logger- 
beads over the results of post 
mortems on people who have 
died since the tragedy. Those 
responsible for treating the 
victims say the results are 
being kept secret by the 
forensic science department, 
headed by Dr Hiresh Chan- 
dra, because of its evidential 
possibilities in the case. 

“If we had more information 
it conk! increase our ability to 
heal” insisted Dr N R Bhan- 
dari, the superintendent of the 
Hamidia Hospital, the city's 
biggest medical institution, 
but he says that he can only 
give his finding s in the court. 
Among the volunteer gr- 


From Michael Haralyn, Bhopal 

onps, feelings are even more 
bitter. Those which received 
funds from Union Carbide are 
accused by the more revolu- 
tionary organizations of being 
stooges and of collecting data 
only to prove the effects of the 
MIC gas are minimal and 
that the real vflfain is 
maln utrition. 

Even the organization that 
provided lands for Mr David 
Bergman, the Briton later 
arrested and accused of of- 
fences under the Secrets Art, 
was accused of this kind of 
heresy when two of its mem- 
bers called fora programme of 
milk distribution. 

Mr Bergman, who has been 
given until the end of the 
month to leave India, is a 
symbol of the ill feelings 
between die state authorities 

and the volunteer organiza- 
tions. “Mr Bergman was not 
doing anything worthwhile 
among the people,” said Mr 
Satyanand Mishra, the state's 
publicity director. “He was 
only collecting some kids in a 
decrepit store house and 
teaching them to paint 

Said the police super- 
intendent: “He was found in 
possession of classified 
material.” 

A paper on the effect of 
MIC on plants, animals and 
fishes, which is obtainable by 
writing to the Indian Centre 
for Agricnltnral Research, 
scoffed at Mr Arvind 
Rajagopai, of the Bhopal Gas 
Information and Action 
Centre, which helped Mr 
Bergman, and which has itself, 
been accused of reformism by 
the most vehement of the 
groups. 

The latter organization, the 
Zahreeli Gas Kbaud Saqgaisb 
Morcha — Poison Gas Trag- 
edy Struggle Front — has 
assembled a list of demands 
which will be pressed during 
today’s demonstrations. 

The Morcha organizers 
urge that better treatment for 
the gas affected could be 
discovered if only more de- 
tailed and more regular in- 
vestigations of the victims was 
provided. 

They call for permanent 
employment for those whose 
ability to work has been 
diminished by their failing 
lungs, and for adequate 
compensation without delay 
for their suffering. They also 


seek punishment for Union 
Carbide and a ban on all 
Caibidersponsored clinics. 

Despite the quarrelling, the 
actual medical attention re- 
ceived by the people of Bhopal 
has unproved dramatically 
over the past two years. It will 
dearly not be long before — at 
least in terms of equipment - 
the city’s hospital will be the 
finest in the country. 

Dr Bhandari’s own hospital 
is installing, for example, a 
six-unit central station mon- 
itoring unit in the paediatric 
ward, incubators are being 
brought in for better care of 
new-born infants, spirometers 
each worth 600,000 rupees 
(£324)00) are being imported 
to test lungs. 

But all the medical equip- 
ment in the world will not help 
Balm Khan. Nor does it 
appear to be helping such as 
Israr Ahmed, a gas victim, 
aged 38, looking 10 years older 
whose lungs were seared by 
the gas, ami who has been in 
and out of hospital ever since. 

He was a cobbler but has 
been unable to work. His 
family lived on his 25 or 30 
rupees a day but now have to 
depend od the five or 10 rupees 
Farida, his wife, gets from 
sewing, and bn what his 
father-in-law can spare. 

There are other victims too. 
Not many people can feel 
sorry for Mr Jaganath Muk- 
und, the Union Carbide plant 

6 We live with 
the consequences 
every day 9 

manager, who is still subject to 
investigation by the Indian 
police, and over whose head 
cri minal charges still hang. 
He sits behind the barbed wire 
defences of the plant clearing 
his desk for his transfer to the 
Bombay office. 

He seems unlikely to find 
other work to do even there, 
except in connection with the 
legal proceedings, and be is 
probably unemployable else- 
where. 

White his employer, who 
was far away in America, tvas 
burned m effigy last year, Mr 
Mnkond’s effigy was buried. 

“No.” be says, “it doesn’t 
seem like a bad dream. We are 
living with the coasequences 
every day.” 


MPs meet Papandreou over Cyprus 


A six-member British par- 
liamentary investigating team 
yesterday met Greece’s Prime 
Minister, Mr Andreas Pap- 
andreou, as part of a fact- 
finding effort on the dead- 
locked Cyprus in te rcommunal 
talks. 

The delegation, led by Sir 
Anthony Kershaw, Conser- 
vative MP for Stroud, was also 


From A Correspondent, Athens 

briefed by Greece’s Conser- 
vative opposition leader. Mr 
Constantine Mitsotakis. and 
members of the Greek Par- 
liament before leaving for 
Nicosia. 

Sir Anthony said his report 
would focus on Cyprus but 
would also address relations 
between Greece and Turkey. 

Last May, the House of 


Commons commissioned the 
inquiry into the Cyprus 
question. 

The delegation also includes 
Conservative MPs Robert 
Harvey, Jim Lester and Peter 
Thomas, and Labour MPs 
Dennis Canavan and Mick 
Welsh. Another Conservative 
MP. Mr Ivan Lawrence QC, 
will join the group in Nicosia. 





. <\ C.LARUM FT VTOERABM NOMB-ll 



i or uic - / V-year tradition 
ice that the company have 
uid Nation, the staff have 
a motto that might best 
irtnum & Mason, 
jually enthusiastic to 
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Pickles, Chocolates and 
jffles. Wines and ‘warious’ 

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tma s is to be urgently 
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rise of decorum and good 
peered of a Fortnum & 

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RxtqiBn&SfeSB ft 

Pi/rjJilU 


Catholic priests grow 
old in Chinese prisons 


By Caroline Moorehead 


Father Vincent Zhu Hong- 
shesg has been 29 years in 
captivity, A Chinese Jesuit 
priest, be is bring held in 
Shanghai prison and is not due 
for release until 1996 when Im 
will be 82. 

His crime is that of ‘’carry- 
ing on intrigues with foreign 
countries”, but friends are 
certain that he owes his 
contusing detention to a re- 
fusal to join tire Go venunent- 
contro&ed Catholic Patriotic 
Association. 

Father Zhu is only (me of 
sevea Catholic priests, all 
aged between 65 and 79, in 
prison or labour camps in 
China for at least 20 years for 
continuing to carry out banned 



Their stories are remark- 
ably similar; first arrested in 
the 1950s, they were briefly 
released rathe late 1970s, only 
to be detained agam in the 
early 1980s. One, Father 
Francis Wang Chuhua, has 
tuberculosis and is almost 
blind. 



Father Zhu: 29 years in jail 
with 10 more to serve. 


OF CONSCIENCE 


Elsewhere in Ch ina, in 
Hebei province, 40 Catholics, 
induding five elderly priests 
am) nuns are believed to have 
been arrested in September. 

In various other parts of the 
world. Catholic priests and 
church workers are increas- 
ingly becoming victims of of- 
ficial persecution, whether as a 
resalt of haring defied restric- 
tions on their refijpoas work or 
for having supported human 
rights campaigns. 

• In Romania, Father Janos 
Csilik has been interrogated 
and tortured for refusing to 
collaborate with the secret 
police. Severe hand injuries 
have led to him being kept in 
hospital. 

• In Chile, the Church’s 
involvement in human rights 
has resulted to repeated 
persecutions of individual 
workers, who have been ac- 
cused by the authorities of 
harbouring “terrorists” and of 
being “more communist than 
the communists”. 

This year the attacks oo the 
Vicaria de la Solidaridad, a 
h uman rights group within the 
Church, have intensified. Mr 
Gustavo Villalobos, a lawyer, 
aid Mr Ramiro Olivares, a 
doctor, have been arrested and- 
charged with “assisting ter- 
rorists” after they had treated 
a man with bullet wounds. 

• In Brazil, a 33-year-old 
Catholic priest Father Josimo 
Monies Tavares, was shot in 
the back and died earlier this 
year, while pastoral workers, 
nuns and priests have received 
death threats. The Catholic 
workers had been investigat- 
ing land disputes m their 
region. 




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12 


THF. TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


THE ARTS 1 


Pithy comments 
for politicians 



In the final episode of -First 
Among Equals (TTV) last night 
file ex-wife of one of Mr 
Jeffrey Archer’s characters 
was toM that her ex-husband 
might become Prime Minister. 
“So what? Screw him,* 1 she 
replied. Splendid woman, we 
thought We most forgive her 
crudity, when she so pithily 
expresses what we think of 
this programme, as well as 
ganging the exact level of 
interest we fed in her ex- 
husband's political fortunes. 

She was then, however, 
offered £100,000 to sell her 
story Co the press. Interest 
became sharp, and she rushed 
to her ex-husband's drawing 
room to blackmail him. The 
ex-husband tried to beat her 
down to £50,000, but she held 
out for the foil amount, mean- 
while pouring herself a 
whisky. The ex-husband gave 
in. We, the viewers, would 
happily have settled for the 
smaller snm, or even the glass 
of whisky. 

Wooden scenes in the 
House of Commons followed. 
We conld tell from those bits 
one bears on the news that the 
background noise, for exam- 


ple, was nothing like the real 
thing . Bat some of ns kept 
watching, because after a hard 
day’s work, bad television 
programmes can he more 
relaxing than good ones. They 
need less digesting. And be- 
sides, how can one maintain a 
conversation the next day, if 
one Is not familiar with the 
latest from the first among 
self-publicists? 

“Can yos imagine just being 
left on a platform?” a lad y 
asked on First flusdqy (ITV). 
“Hard to imagine”, she added 
after a pause. She cannot know 
The Importance of Being Ear- 
nest. Jack Worthing was 
found in a cloak-room at 
Victoria Station in the mid- 
19th century, whereas she was 
found on the platform at St 
John's Wood underground 
station in 1942, but their 
situations are in other respects 
similar. Crnd, you may say, to 
make such suffering into a 
joke. Crueller still to film h. 
Lata-, in this programme 
about abandoned babies, she 
was shown in tears. The 
voyeuristic delight which tele- 
vision producers take in film- 
ing private grief seems each 
year to grow more unashamed. 

Andrew Gimson 




Equal to all Europe conld offer. Efiha Vedder’s Japanese Still Life (1879) 


galleries i Modem times 


Crafts manship across the 
board keeps Steinway at 
the peak of perfection. 

Like all great performers Steinway constantly strives for perfection. 
Take the superior soundboard. Only the timber from one particular 
Bavarian forest is acceptable fora Steinway Piano. Here the high altitude 
and even climate produce rare regular tree rings. A smooth, even grain 
dial allows vibration to travel freely; perfect lor delivering Steinway's 
unsurpassed sound. 

See one, touch one. play one, own one. 

* STEfNWAY 

Swinwat Hall. 44 Marylebone Lane, Wigmote Sueet. London Wl. Tel: 01-487 3391. 
Please send me full details of Steinway Pianos I would like a demonstration 


Name. 


.Address. 


TT 3/12/86 


•Steinway panes can also be seen in Belfast. Bolton. Cardiff. Chester. Edinburgh. 
Glasgow. Highclifft. Huddersfield. Liverpool. Manchester. Nottingham and Oxford. 


It may or may not have 
something to do with the 
centenary of the Statue of 
Liberty but there is no doubt 
that, m American museum 
circles at least, the 1880s are 
very “in” at the moment. 
They provide the keynote for a 
surprising number of major 
exhibitions in New York and 
elsewhere, and encourage a 
new look at the very founda- 
tions of the 20th century in 
American art. Or, one ought 
say, the pedestal upon which 
modernism was eventually 
erected. 

It emerges that the most 
important and influential ex- 
hibition of modem ait in 
America before the Armory 
Show was the 1883 Pedestal 
Fund Art Loan Exhibition — 
the pedestal in question being, 
of course, the literal pedestal 
upon which in 1886 the Statue 
of Liberty was to be erected. In 
Support of Liberty, at the 
National Academy of Design, 
New York, until Sunday, 
reconstitutes this show as far 
as may be — more than half of 
the original 194 paintings 
have been reassembled — and 
gives us a vivid insight into 
advanced artistic taste at the 
time, as well as exactly how it 
was filtered through to the 
great American public 

paintingTselected by William 
Merritt Chase and J. Carroll 
Beckwith are astonishing — 
especially when you consider 
that the show took place only 
nine years after the first 
Impressionist group ex- 
hibition in Paris. Two of the 
major Impressionists, Manet 
and Degas, are included, but 
in general the show is stronger 
on contemporaries who were 
more widely admired at the 
time, like the Dutch Mauve 
and the Maris brothers, the 


John Russell Taylor on a reassembled 
exhibition, which woke America to 
modem art, and other New York shows 


Belgian Alfred Stevens (repre- 
sented by his landscapes 
rather than his society scenes) 
and the Provencal proto* 
Expressionist MonticeUi. 

The impact these must have 
had can be realistically as- 
sessed when you consider that 
the New York Times critic 
queried: “Was it not a mistake 
to pass over such as 
Bouguereau and CabaneL who 
are tremendously 

popular . . . and take so many 
examples of Millet an artist 
for the select; of Courbet, a 
pointer whose rough brush 
sends a cold chill down the 
average American's 
back ...?". 

What was happening in 
America, as elsewhere, was 
that modem ideas were assail- 
ing in vain the battlements of 
contemporary academic taste 
while they successfully 
sneaked in by the Trojan 
Horse of design. The progress 
of American design in the 
1880s, in particular through 
hs relations with the Aesthetic 
Movement, is resplcndently 
charted in the Metropolitan 
Museum's show In Pursuit of 
Beauty (until January 11). 

It was in 1882 that Oscar 
Wilde made his sensational 
tour of America lecturing on 
Aesthetic ideals. But even 
before that the more advanced 
designers in the States were 
aware of what was happening 
in Britain: from Owen Jones’s 
Grammar of Ornament (1856) 
on, the main British manuals 
and books of advice to the 
aesthetically ambitious like 
Eastlake’s Hints on Household 


Taste ran through edition after 
edition, spreading the word 
about the possible styles of 
Gothic, Greek, Japanese or 
Queen Anne revival currently 
being explored and exploited 
in Europe. Walter Crane's toy- 
books and Kate Greenawa/s 
children's picture-books were 
as well known in America as 
in Europe. 

And American designers of 
furniture and interiors, 
American illustrators of books 
(or even humble advertising), 
and an army of those con- 
nected with foe decorative 
arts, hastened to follow suit 
Some of the furniture and 
domestic metalwork is, even 
to our accustomed eyes, un- 
gainly and Hnappwalmg But 
on foe other hand some of the 
ceramics are amazingly for- 
ward-1 oolong (well into foe 
20th century, indeed) and foe 
p ainting s of such as Elihu 
Vedder, whose Japanese Still- 
Life of 1879 tells it all, readily 
stand comparison with any- 
thing Europe at the time had 
to offer. 

When we come on to Louis 
Comfort Tiffany, there is no 
doubt that America tak« the 
lead . /Usd we need only re- 
mind ourselves that Bing, who 
created the original Art Nou- 
veau store in Paris (at present 
being grandly paid tribute in a 
show in Richmond, Virginia, 
due at the Cooper-Hewitt next 
year), was the great proponent 
of American arts and crafts 
and wrote (in French) foe first 
serious bode about them. 

So, needless to say, were 


. Whistler, already firmly en- 
sconced in England, and Sar- 
gent, who arrived in 1884 — 
took refuge, one might almost 
say, after the Madame X 
scandal in foe Paris Salon of 
that year. Sargent had an 
important showing in London 
some seven years ago, but has 
not, apparently, had a major 
retrospective in the Stales 
a long time. All the same, he 
continued to regard himself as 
an American throughout -his 
life, and Americans continue 
to claim him for their own. 

Hence, no doubt, the exten- 
sive show John Singer Sar- 
gent at foe Whitney Museum 
until January 4, since foe 
Whitney concerns itself only 
with American art And an 
impressive show it certainly 
mikes — revelatory, indeed, to 
most of the Americans who 
have been flocking to it. 
Though the heyday of 
Sargent's English portraits is 
reasonably represented, foe 
emphasis of the show seems to 
be on foe non-portrait work: 
the first landscapes, foe 
discovery of Impressionism in 
France, foe later, Amiing 


watercolours — made, it often 
seems, to divert himself from 
foe lucrative business of por- 
traiture — and foe war paint- 
ings and Boston murals of his 
final period. The 
draughtsmanship is brilliant 
throughout; the sheer Hash 
and vigour and flair are 
e xtrao r d inary- 


Treble in 
the camp 



The Communards 

Royal Albert Hall 

While the emergence of The 
Communards as a pop success 
of 1986 may have been diffi- 
cult to predict, the carefully 
nurtured idea that they are in 
some way a radical departure 
from foe broad traditions of 
mainstream pop is dearly at 
odds with foe evidence of their 
live show, which was a light, 
cheerful entertainment that 
imposed few demands on an 
audience comprised mostly of 
excited teenagers. 

Certainly foe crop-haired, 
pug-faced Jimmy Somerville 
formerly of Bronski Beat and 
his gawky partner Richard 
Coles with whom he founded 
The Communards in 1 985, are 
unlike ly candidates for the 
role of pop star. But their 
music collected together a 
variety of classic styles from 
doo-wop to disco that were 
smoothly expedited by 
Somerville's distinctive fal- 
setto voice — a cross between 
Frankie Valli and Aled Jones, 
and a sound that requires a 
taste I have yet to acquire. 

Watching Somerville shuf- 


fling nervously to the micro- 
phone. and shyly muddling 
bis introductions to foe songs, 
was a • far cry from the gay 
socialist rhetoric one might 
have expected from reading 
his interviews in the press; 
instead there was foe gentle 
humour of “Lover Man" 
where he and Sarah Jane 
Morris sang foe high and low 
parts respectively and foe 
camp, light-hearted clowning 
of “La Do la Rosa” where foe 
group’s string quartet played 
swirling chamber pop and 
everyone else shook 
Tambourines. 

It is in foe matter of 
instrumentation that they dif- 
fer most from conventional 
ensembles, and as Coles 
moved from the piano to join 
Jo Pretzel on soprano sax 
during “So Cold foe Night" 
combining with foe two vi- 
olins, viola, cello, a pre- 
recorded drum track, and 
Somerville's high-pitched 
voice there was a veritable 
cats' chorus of brittle treble 
sound. 

But most of their material, 
like foe number oce hit, 
“Don’t Leave Me This Way”, 
was a combination of a simple 
dance brat and a bouncy 
memorable tune with lots of 
rousing ad libs at foe end, and 
if they stay the course, The 
Communards, like the 
Housemartins and the Style 
Council, will become a bas- 
tion of civilized career pop as 
we all know and love ft. 

David Sinclair 


* 


TfieINFERNAL 

“MACHINE - 

The Cast: 

FfeuI Brightwell. Jim Carter, Nei! Cunningham, 
Robert Eddison. Veronica Smart. Maggie Smith. 
Trevor Thomas. Lambert Wilson 


Directed a Translated by: 
Simon Callow 
Designer: 

Bruno Santini 


Theatre box office A 

-^StHammesnrthWS 01-7412311 -Jp 


'dazzling ... rip-roaring entertainment" 

-Swan Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon • v Guardian 

THE FAIR MAID OF THE WEST 

bylhomcs'Heywood : • •/. ; : • 

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Dm-ctM By Minn El RODMAN 
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HAMPSTEAD 722 9301. Eves 0. 
S ot M ai 4 30. SELLMO THE 
S Cm. A Naw Carnad , by 
Pater BMa. -A script that ate- 
zt«s with wfL-vety tunny" D 
EW 


HA 

Boa Office ACC 01-930 9832. 1st 
CaH24hr/ 7 day CCDfeR, 240 720Q 
Even 7JO Wed Or Bat mats aJOpra, 


IfNomtaiated Actor of the Yea 
Laurence Oerter Awards! m 

BREAKING the CODE 

by HUSH 


Otr by CLIFFORD WILLIAMS 
M0VMW AND ENORMOUSLY 
ENJOYABLE- D-Estp 
No Parte Christmas Eve 


BWEN 
TAYLOR 

THE MAINTENANCE 
MAN 

^.9sr ?«ly by Richard Hams 

—WONBEHrULLY FUNNY** 

.._ N of the W 
ir-eappiause of raplurma 
.... fer-cunnion- D Mail 
„ '•K. funov indeed" SExp 
Mon Thu B Fn/Sat B.» 


■8" 928 9JEi CC 
■Nauanai Theatre's small audt- 
tonumi Tomer. Fn 7,30 

STUDIO MCHT 1, Laa« TtSm 
Dana by C ather ine Haves. Sal. 
Mon 730 STUDIO NWIfr 3. 
Tue 7.30 THE BAY AT (BCE 
and WRECKED EBBS 


YOR KS 83 6 6122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999/379 6433 
=4hr 240 7200. Eve* 8. ThU 3. 
Sat 6 A 8 30 

COMED Y OF THE YEAR 

■““"and Dr a w Award 1SS4 

„„ .STEPPING OUT 

Hit Comedy by Richard Harm 
O trected by Julia McK’etme 
"TRHHBPH OH TAP- Std 

third hilarious year 


B Of CC S 836 2238/9 

Aw 240 7200 <24hr* M19 feel 

Mon to Fn a Sal 8 30 Mai Thun 

LYNDA* 1 3 0a mM - 


in DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-I enjoyed every minute” ST 
“A classic of wnodunttry - la 
urteeatable" Times ES 

BE POtMLE PARE YOU TO 
DCTECT HOW IT* DONE 


HER MAJESTYS. HaynurtceL Ol- 
839 2244 TKHatmaster CC 379 
6131 First C an CC 240 7200 

ANDREW LLOYD W EBBER ' S 
NEW MUSICAL 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

WINNER BEST MUSICAL 19B8 
EVEN on STANDARD AWARD 

Starring 


Sarah Steve 

Bdgmnua Barton 

CUire Moore Man Chnarliie 
al rertam porformances 
Directed by HAROLD PRINCE 
Eve* 7 46 Mate Wed & Sal 3 
Postal bkg* only tor Apr 10 On 


LYRIC HAMMERSMITH 01-741 
2311- 78 Sat Ei«S 7.45. Mate 
T oday 2.30. Sal 4pm THE 
INFERNAL MACHME oy Coc- 
teau. With IHaajrft 9 mini From 
13 Dec ALICE M WONDER- 
LAND adapted by jmh mate 
with kook by Carl Pnk. 
STUDWi Pm* from TOmor 
Bnm 1 Opens Tue al 7pm) Suo 
Eve * 6p m TW 
SUXBtRD. 


LONDON PALLADIUM 457 7373. 
741 9999 (MtkgM). First Call 
2« H r 7 P ay CC 240 7200. (NO 
BKB FEE) Qrp Sale* 930 61Z3 
Tldtetmaster 379 6433 


THE HIT MUSICAL 
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Note fcoali hM te April 2S. I 
NOPERF YWNOHT 


LYRIC THEATRE Shaflesbunr 
Ave Wl 01-437 3656/7 01-430 
1560. 01-434 1060- 01-734 

5166/7 


“A brilliant A Wyomte; 

comic perfo r m a nce" F. Times 
In 

The NaOonal Theatre'* acrlatroed 
pnxlucltorr of 

ALAN AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
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LYTTELTON -•Sf 928 2263 CC 

■National Theatrel proscenium 

stagei Toda y IQ-SCwm & 2.00 . 

Fn 1 030am THE Pt EP P IPER a 

miedral show from Browning's 

poem (for 6-1 1 year of da. low 

pricesj. Tom. Mon 7.45. 
Tnrnor t 30 Oww price mart. 

Tue 2. is ilow prleemao A 7 ; 45 

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From Dec is to Jaa 3 
Twice dally 30 A a.O 
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SOOTY’S XMAS SHOW 


MAYFAIR S CC 629 3036. Mon 
Thu a Fn /Sat 540 & a io 

RICHARD TODDin 

-The Beet TfarMer lor yoarF* 8 M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
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CTH TMRlLLtNC YEAH 


. E OI BM 

5568 lal CAII 240 7200 379 6JM 
741 9999 Ov Sates 930 6123 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Opera December 15 for 4 weeks 
only Twice daily al 2.0 A 60 


NATIONAL THEATRE Stti Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

See SEPARATE ENTR IES under 

OLfV ICR /LYTTEJ-TON/ 

rreOOL Exeeuam < 
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ZSfSZSl 

BARBARA EWWC 
B JULIA FOSTER 


PATTI LOVE 

DIANA QUKK 

ZENA WALKER 

and 

SUSANNAH YORK In 

THE WOMEN 


by Clare Soothe Luce 

AB fc wi h rftey nkaraentu” 
FT. -DELICIOUSLY FUNNY" 
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world" S-C jtp. -STYUSN. STAR- 
STUDDED PRUOUCHUN" D 
Mirror 

ONLYC MORE WEEKS TO SEE 
TRW FABULOUS CAST 


OLIVIER ■S" 928 2252 CC tNa- 
Uonal Tluuret open stagei 
Previews KMC UT ~ 
TonTTomor. Fit Sal (no seals 
available Uiis Sat mvtet 
Standard Theatre Oubk TUr 
mat ANBH AL FARM as srkiled 
In leonni A Dec IQ afl al 700. 
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DIANA RIGG 

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■■It ripples with excttemem" 

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JOSEPH 

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DAVID 


R UZ ROBERTSON In 

FULLING JESSICA . 

A Myvtery Thriller for 

An the Family 
Directed fay RRYAHFOHBCS 
■%h ‘Mtedh* tor u 

D.MaU.-toth 

af m 

SU. 


COMEDY Ol 579 6399 CC 01 379 
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6123 

Mon-Frt a. Wed Mat 5. sat 6.15 
130 

FREVWWS FROM FRIDAY 

THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
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lavish new produetton 
TOM cwm bl 

AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 

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Previews until Dec IS. Oma Dec 
15 M. TOO 


VAUDEVILLE Box Office A CC. 

836 9987/5646 First can CC. 24 

hfS 240 7200 0*9 toe) 

Tldtetmaster 379 6433 (Meg teek 

Eigs 8.0, Mats Wed 230. Sat 6.a 

8-30. No pert* Dec 34. SB. Dec 26 

at 6 L 8. Dec 27 at 5 i 830. 

ne n as, irr ynr 
BEST ACTRESS OF THE YEAR 
Standa rd D rama Award 

MARTIN JARVIS 


WOMAN IN MIND 


PLAY M LONDON, IT IS ALSO 

[HE MOST DOTUNBNM- S.TNI 

ALAN AYCKBOURN IS WHIM 

MO AT MS BEST- S.Tunes 


VICTORIA PALACE 01 240 7200 

BOOKING NOW g4.nr 7 day 


H NATASHA mCMAIUMOM 


PKCADHJLY 437 4806 CC 379 
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& 8.16 


"A Master Clown- Times 

PATRICK CAROBJL 


OCMK ROY1X hi 


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HAPPENED 

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Dec 24 3ona only Ore 268pm. No 


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cc Booking 836 3464 Orp Sam 
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CHESS 

M amlaatod tor 


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ouvm a< 


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CABARET 


Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed AOwrawaplwd by 

Mon-Frt Mat 'wed 3 DO 

Sat 4 30 6 8 15 

DAP REDUCED M CES MATS. 
BOOKING NOW UP TO LAM W 


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charge} cn first CALL 2oo T200 

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CHARLIE GIRL 
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CHARLIE GIRL 

GROUP SALES OZ «M 8123 
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SHAKESPEARE COMPANY at 
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ten Ttieetie. Eneey Mm* To- 
day I 30. Fair MaM TaughL 
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-The very beet of Britain '* 
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SHAFTESBURY THEATRE 
OF COMEDY 


834 0283/4 
CC 834 0048. CC TKketmaMer 379 
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by ts. Lewte 


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839 4456 cc Ol 379 6G6S/3T9 
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KtUE OQuiMm 

WALTERS JaKS 


The Award Winning Comedy 

. * **“ * QU * L 
■ USED TO SCNKAM A SHOUT 

by snarmon Mecdsmala 

Directed by Simon Slakes 

Now previewing. Mot*- Frt fl. Sal 
6.30 A b 30 Wed mate 5. From 10 
Dec 


WYHDHAMV S 836 3028 cc 379 
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For a limited season 
-A pertinaeam mgmrafM 
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VANESSA REDGRAVE 

_■ -T OM W HJ0N90N m 

”ghosts 

By Henrik Risen 
Direct ed by David Thacker 
“^u^pgwouciTOK. 
DONT MBS- CMy UmiN 


VOUHR VIC 928 6363 CC 379 
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7.30 mat Wed 2pm 

ledgreve'e e 


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Pirated by David Thatewr. 


YOUNG VK STUDIO 928 6363 
Inner Ctnde Th Co in 
Wedek lmTs masterpiece 

SfHBW AWAKEMNC. Evrs 8 
manor 7Cnu 


ART GALLERIES 


J 


ANTHONY d’OFFAY 9 A 23 

^^Vkoownb. 4100 


J*rg? *q*p" swi t«. 

584 7566. Fine British and Enro- 
PMn pain lings and setttetwe. 


•to. Through Dec. Mon-Frt 106 
sat 10-4. 

CRANE OALLERY 

JZi? n ‘>orl Sloane Street 
Stei' ^ 2464 . Earty En- 

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Sr-«”BSffi,s5S.;sr 


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ART - 2001 Cen- 
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T .JSr> si -495 2107; 
HE- 1 ! 1 * Algt CEWt U WY 
r AiwT- 

J*ov ember” 

M9n-FM 10.5. 


LEFEVRE QALUarr Jo 

■ Frt 106. Sate 10-1230. 


LEBER. 13. Old Bond SI 
AMWAL WATERCOLOUR EX- 
fnmnOH. Mon-Frt. 9 30-5.30. 

MRKM GALLERY u Motcorab 
SI SWI. 01-235 8144. 
ADMAN ALLRWOH 1890 - 
196a musical A theatrical 
cvfcdira AjniiRdeun. 

1877 • 1943. 


RUT AL ACADEMY. Piccadilly Ol 
734 9050 Open daily 106 Inc. 
Sun. I reduced rate Sun. until 
145) H EW ARCHITECTURE: 
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£250. £170 Cone, rate 


Saul* Row. 


THACKERAY GALLERY. 18 

T]iack*r» 8L W8. 937 5883. 
CHARLES DURANTY 
Watercolours. Until 19 Dec. 


TRAD. -IAS. AND MOO Ail Eahi- 
b«Jo*i of European Archilec- 
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CINEMAS 


CAMDEN PLAZA opp Camden 
Town Tube 485 2443 MEM 1 161 

Film al 2.25 4 30 6.40 8 55 


CHELSM C3NEMA Kings Road 
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CUMON MAYFAIH Curran SI 
Qauge Laramann's 
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IB-4S Sate i i.30am A 
122 Mon - A Frt 

f/ 1 ® Sundays pan , M 
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1 y Jlwoi'binfl.. aee the him" Std. 


CUREON WEST END Shaflesbury 
Wl «9 4805. Maggie 
Smith, pnuiotm Qumi judi 
bl A ROOM WITH A 
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Sum. 3.45. 6.10 A 8 40. 

"A rum as near la pertodkn as 
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Alestander Wei her, std. 


LDOSTni SQUARE THEATRE 

WO 6Sf5B oawi/gao kis (24 
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faW MO TROUBLE fa LITTLE 
«*NtA I PCI n 70mm Domy 
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totekebic in advance. 


LUMtERE OKMA St Martin's 
Lane WC2 379 3014/ 836 
0691 ■ROUtsrnDHKMT iTS 
FRm M 1.00 5 30 6.00 8.35. 
Doray stereo. LATE SHOW Frt 
■' J 1 ISom- AD- 
V ANCE _ BOOKING Eve Perto. 
Acceas/vna 


"SJUUJ* KNWHTSBR3DCC 
'HANNAH AND HER 
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"“UWLE ARCH OSS 

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OA T?- _U B4Q noiden. Student 
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_ S’*- Ruaseb Bn. Tube 
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*151 Film *121304.366 489 00 
UntEBMURG CPQl 
FPra 41 1 00 3,30 UO 8JS 




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fsttiat 


Glorious 

flexibility 

CONCERTS*" 

Philharmonic/ 

Haitink 

Festival Hall 


There is at least one happy 
side-effect of Bernard Hai- 
tink’s new Royal Opera 
responsibility. Being an 
industrious Du tchman on his 
nights off from Covent 
„? Garden he seems to enjoy 
. ' nothing better than a little 
light conducting at the Festi- 
val Hall: this is excellent news 
for London orchestras, and 
South Bank audiences. 

The Phiiharmoxua, for in- 
stance, is a very different 
orchestral animal from 
Haitink's former charge, the 
Concertgebouw; more explicit 
in colouring, beefier in tex- 
ture, perhaps less silldly 
blended. 

It was not too fanciful to 
hear, in these gloriously virile 
performances of Brahms's 
Serenade No 1 and the Fourth 
Symphony, a master of musi- 
cal possibility gearing his 
interpretation to the strengths 
of the musicians in front of 

^ him. 

Strength — a tense mus- 
cularity that was never hard- 
driven yet which galvanized 
even passages usually thought 

Prometheus 

Ensemble 

Purcell Room 

We probably have the Nash 
Ensemble to thank for inspir- 
ing the formation of several 
young flexible chamber 
groups, of which genre the 
Prometheus Ensemble is a fine 
example. 

And it was the Nash 
Ensemble’s playing that the 
Prometheus most readily 
brought to mind, with their 
warm sound, their eupho- 
nious blend and their ability 
to play as a single unit The 
programme was Nash-like 
too; three classical pieces and 
a new one, by Judith Weir, to 
add spice. 

Weir’s Sketches From A 
Bagpiper’s Album, far 
trio, “was inspired fry file 
of James Reid, a bagpiper in 
Bonny Prince Charlie's Jaco- 
bite Army who was captured 
by the English in 1764, and 
executed after a judge had 
declared the bagpipes an in- 
strument of war”. 

Such an explanation invites 
speculation that it might be a 
work with a sombre outlook; 
not so. Instead, its three short, 
evocatively titled movements 
seem almost whimsical in 
flavour. 

The declamatory first, 
“Salute", is dominated by 
drones implied and real and 


of as “repose” - was indeed a 
foremost quality. 

Most conductors wade duti- 
fully through the puddingy 
textures of the Adagio as 
deftly as they on. feirinlt 
illuminated the very mul- 
tiplicity of detail, constantly 
shifting the emphasis to dii- 
ferent instrumental sections. 

The power harnessed in the 
Symphony was of quite a 
different order. AH seemed 
channelled towards the 
caglia's tragedy, so that even 
the implicit resignation of the 
opening string sequences in- 
evitably (but with subtly var- 
ied degrees of abruptness) 
gave way to aggression aiw ^ 
conflict. 

In this scheme the central 
movements offered different 
kinds of relief The Andante 
was shaped into an intense 
expression of arilour, with the 
Phiiharmonia struts (exposed 

to their occasional discomfort 
by one or two of the lesser 
known corners of the Sere- 
nade earlier} producing some 
fine tone. The third move- 
ment was a glorious burst of 
energy, brassy and ebullient. 

So when Haitink presented 
the passacaglia’s opening as a 
series of hammer-stroke sfor- 
zandos, with an almost 
Mahlerian em phasis on a 
chining muted-horn sound, it 
was like the brutal cutting of a 
lifeline. Some tenderly-shaped 
flute and clarinet solos, and a 
noble blend of bassoons and 
trombones in their mournful 
variation, only temporarily 
soothed this tempestuous 
drive to a savage conclusion. 

Richard Morrison 

by parallel open fifths which 
transport us back, I fear, 
rather too many centuries, 
while the “nocturne" played 
with mutes on, is fractured 
and syncopated. The final 
“lament, over the sea", is 
purely and simply a calm Lied 
dominated by the cello. 

. One has a feeling that these 
attractive miniatures ought to 
lead to something larger. Per- 
haps one day they will, but 
meanwhile we can enjoy 
Weir’s sensitive textures and 
admire her direct, strongly 
tonal manner, while also 
relishing, with a slightly non- 
plussed smile, the charming 
naivety., with which she uses 
the “Scotch snap” to evoke 
the sense of place. 

The trio that form the 
.kernel of this ensemble gave 
an admirably assured perfor- 
mance, as with Richard Blake 
they did of Mozart's Flute 
Quartet, K285, and the same 
composer’s Oboe Quartet, 
K370, where JuKa GirdwootTs 
oboe playing was full of 
spacious phrasing and do- 
lirious tonal nuances. Beetho- 
vens Septet,* OP20, on the 
other hand, although it was 
technically well up to the 
mark, suffered sometimes 
from a little heaviness in the 
rhythm. It is, in any case, a 
work that can so easily outstay 
its welcome. 

Stephen Pettitt 


Kokh Cummin* 


vv 


An auction 
where you can 
even afford 
the time. 

If the prices don’t put some auctions out of your 
reach, the tiewing and sale times certainly wilL 
Sotheby's Conduit Street Sales are devised to fit 
in with vour lifestyle. So there are evening and 
Sunday viewings, with the sale on the following 
Monday evening. 

You’ll find many complete room selling? ot 
furniture, rugs, ceramics, silver and works of arL 
As few pieces, if any need restoration, they are 
ready to take home and enjoy Delivery ts in- 
expensive and easily arranged on the spot- 

Visa or Access Cards are accepted. And as lots 
suit from as little as €200, time won't be the only 
thing you can afford. 





Thursday -HhDere q oo am-5.00 pm 

Friday 5* li.mi am-4.00 pm 

Sunday l * cc '™* r q 00 ;im -2-00 pm 

s».p-w 

FSTEti986 



In the Falklands: Reece Dinsdale and Leslee Udwin 

Southern comfort 


THEATRE 


Wonndings 

Royal Exchange, 
Manchester 


Jeff Noon tells us that the idea 
for this {flay came to him after 
reading that the ratio of men 
to eligible women in the 
Falklands was 200 to 1, and 
that a campaign was afoot to 
put the boys out of their 
misery by encouraging women 
to emigrate and “forge a new 
'life". 

It didn't happen; and the 
very idea of aircraft disgorging 
hordes of randy gills hoping to 
get lucky with the standing 
army belongs to the world of 
Cany On films. This is not Mr 
Noon’s world: and he pressed 
on with the play by turning the 
Falklands into an imaginary 
island foil of locations with 
names like Mount Shrapnel, 
the Bullet Held, and the 
Wonndings, 

it was the kind of fantasy 
territory for which the Royal 
Exchange — in past produc- 
tions ofGerald McLamon and 
Russel Hoban - has shown 
itself to have a soft spoL 

The play duly carried off 
third prize in die Theatre's 
Mobil Competition, and Gre- 
gory Hersov’s production co- 
incides with the publication 
which launches the new Bir- 
mingham based company of 


Oberon Books. 

Waundings is designed as 
an elemental tragedy involv- 
ing conflict between military 
discipline and various forms 
of freedom. It is easy to say 
that as these tragic abstrac- 
tions have been allowed to 


THE ROYAL OPERA 



IN ENGLISH 


Mlimc GEORGE'. ER1DHEIC II WDEL 

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ana modcr iheuiric i'. u>te ' 

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i '.CsTT;''. I O ~ 

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R.-A OlT-.i. LVr : 


Black satire bites back 


Martha Swaps 



flourish at the expense of 
particular human detail. 

There is a story, in which 
three of the girls pair off with 
three of the soldiers and meet 
variously unhappy fates. 
Doug, the most regimental, 
gets blown up by a mine after 
ditching a local girl; Jimmy 
(Reece Dinsdale), tom be- 
tween discipline and love, 
resolves matters by sbootmg 
his girlfriend (Leslee Udwin). 
Stan goes through a military 
mamage service giving 
straight-freed answers to ques- 
tions like, “Wilt thou. Private 
Stanley Jardine, have this 
woman to be thy wounded 
wife?” 

Meanwhile the islanders, 
armed with rakes and pitch- 
forks, are prowling around foe 
minefiel ds as a volunteer de- 
fence force liable at any mo- 
ment to turn into marauding 
guerrillas. It is Cold Comfort 
Farm in the South Atlantic. 

Dialogue consists mainly of 
bursts of long-winded tele- 
graphese, that m an ip ulate 
characters into a sequence of 
stereotype situations. If love 
takes place out of doors, the 
lovers talk of the stars: if a girl 
is lying side in bed, another 
leans solicitously over her 
saying, “Don’t fry to talk." 

Mr Hersov’s production 
goes afl out for violence. 
Instead of passionate writing 
we get exploding mines and 
gunfire, unmotivated brawls, 
deafening percussion, screa- 
med orders, and lots of mood 
music and wild sea waves. 
With no characters to play, the 
cast are no match for all this; 
though there are physically 
commanding performances 
from Brendan nice and Mag- 
gie Saunders. 

Irving Wardle 


Ever the entrepreneur to make the 
numbers add up bis way , Joseph Papp is 
producing fewer shows this season at the 
Pahhc Theater doe to renovations, bra 
has opened with a demonstration that 
Less is More. The Colored Museum is a 
satirical -revue whose bite is as keen as 
its baric. Perhaps author George 
C Wolfe, a 32-year-old black making 
his New York mainstream debut, ought 
to wear a sign, “Beware of Dog." 

“Git on Board,** the first of eleven 
sketches, features an effervescent 
stewardess in hot pink miniskirt uni- 
form aboard the Celebrity Slave Ship. 
With non-stop perkiness, Danitra 
Vance demonstrates how to use a 
“Fasten Shackles" sign, offers treats to 
passengers and reassures them that after 
a few hundred years of suffering; “Just 
think of what you're going to mean to 
W illiam Faulkner.” 

As written and played, the sketch is 
hilarious and painfiil, an authentic dash 
of emotions winch extends throughout 
the show’s ninety minutes, though most 
sketches need tightening and their 
quality varies. All are played with gusto 
by Miss Vance, Loretta Devine, 
Tommy Hollis, Reggie Montgomery 
and Vickflyn Reynolds. 

L. Kenneth Richardson’s production 
is stylish and imaginative, with stun- 
ning tableaux as players and set pieces 
revolve on and off a white curved 
setting which suggests a stark modern 
museum. Slide projections of black 
history contribute to the emotional 
impact, 

The centrepiece of The Colored 
Museum, literally and psychologically, 
is “The Last Mama-on-fre-Couch 
Play”, in which the author satirizes “A 
Raisin in the Sun”, Lorraine 
Hansberry’s 1939 Broadway drama 
whose recent Off Broadway revival 
confirmed its stature as a hallmark for 
Riprir theatre artists and a high point in 
American theatre history. As soon as the 



Squeezing the pips oat of “A Raisin in die Sun”: Danitra Vance, VickOyn Reynolds 

James Earl Jones, comes to Broadway. 
In Off Broadway theatres playing to 
racially mixed audiences but devoted to 
developing black talent, there are also 
engrossing shows. 

Blues for A Gospel Queen (Billie 
Holiday Theatre) is a biography of 
Mahalia Jackson, chronicling hex strug- 
gle to find acceptance singing the Lord’s 
music (gospel) rather than the devil’s 
(blues) and her personal disappoint- 
ments. Combining such familiar songs 
as “We Shall Over Come" with original 
music by John Lewis and lyrics and 
book by Don Evans, the show is three 
solid hours of melody and melodrama. 
Kathi Walker is a cor 
Mahalia, and in the supporting cast i 
Hidden's dancing gives new meaning to 
the phrase “movers and shakers." 


couch holding Mama holding an over- 
sized Holy Bible appears, you know that 
all sacred cows are up for milking, and 
sure enough the sketch manages to send 
up not only “Raisin in the Sun” but a 
whole range of black musicals. The 
Colored Museum examines our ideas 
and feelings about what it means to be 
black with aggressive, affectionate, com- 
passionate humour. 

The arrival of such an impressive new 
writer eariy in the season is com- 
plimented by other developments 
which suggest that Made theatre may be 
enjoying a renaissance of recognition by 
the white theatrical establishment The 
Colored Museum is Off Broadway’s 
newest hit, but Lonette McKee as Billie 
Holiday in a drama with music. Lady 
day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill is also in 
for a run, and this spring August 
Wilson’s new play Fences starring 


Holly Hill 




Just some of the hundreds of 
cassettes and LPs for only 
£3.79 each or less. 
Mozart/Symphonies 

Nos 40 & 41 - LSO/Abbado £3.79 

Bach/Toccata And Fugue In D / 

Prelude And Fugue In F/ 

Fantasia And Fugue In G - 

Helmut VfaJcha (Organ) £3.79 

Beethoven Symphony No 5 And 
No 8/Fidelio Overture - VA 

BPO /Karajan £3.79 |\< 

Wagner/ Overtures And 
Preludes - Vienna Philharmonic 

Orchestra/Bohm. £3.79 

Albinoni/Coreffi/ Adagio/ 

Christmas Concerto/Etc - 

BPO/Karajan £3.79 

Christmas Pops/ Boston Pops 

Orchestra/ Arthur Fiedler £3.79 

Mozart/Ene KJeine Nachtmusik - 

Festival Strings/Baumgartner £3.79 

Songs Of The Auvergne/ 

(arr Cantdoube) - Jffl Gomez/ 

Royal Liverpool 
Philharmonic Orchestra/ 

Vfemon Handley £3.25 

Handel/Water Music (Complete) - 
Bath Festival/Yehudi Menuhin ....£3.25 
Rodrigo/Conciearto De Aranjuez - 
Alfonso Moreno/ 

LSO/Batiz ... £3.25 




Egar Violin Concerto - Nigel 
Kennedy (Violin)/LPO/ 

Vernon Handley £3.25 

Tchaikovsky/ Piano Concerto No 1/ 
Rachmaninov Piano Concerto 

No 2 - Ashkenazy £3.79 

Tchaikovsky/1812 Overture and 
other popular Tchaikovsky pieces/ 
Detroit Symphony Orchestra/ 

Dorati i £3.79 


We are currently offering all 
single compact-discs, 
including this small selection, 
for only £10.99 each or less? 

Vivaldi/The Four Seasons - 
Academy Of Ancient Music/ 

Hogwcod £10.99 

WHS/Christmas Carols £7.99 

Nimbus Digital Sampler 1986 £7.99 

Tchaikovsky /IS 12 Overture - 
Montreal Symphony Orchestra/ 

Dutoit £10.99 

Holst/The Planets Suite - BPO/ 

Karajan £10.99 

Beethoven/Symphonies Nos 5 & 6 - 

BPO/Karajan £10.99 

Elgar /Violin Concerto - LPO/ 

Kennedy /H a n dl ey _ £10.99 

Carl Orfl/Carmtna Burana - LSO 

And Chorus/Previn „....£10.99 

Rachmaninov/Piano Concert! 

Nos 2 & 4 - Ashkenazy/ 
Concertgebouw Orchestra/ 

Haitink. £10.99 

Sgar/Cello Concerto And Enigma 
Variations - Julian Lloyd Webber/ 

RPO/Menuhin £10.99 

Tchaikovsky/Violm Concerto - 
Nigel Kennedy/London Philharmonic 

Orchestra/Karnu £10.99 

Mozart/Symphonies 40 & 41 - 
Academy of Ancient Music/ 

Hogwood £10.99 


Compact discs confc 

Tchaikovsky/ Piano Concerto No 1 - 
Barry Douglas/London Symphony 

Ore best ra/Slatkin £10.99 

English String Music/Sir John 

Barbarolli £10.99 

Placido Domingo/Vienna, 

City of My Dreams £10.99 

Chopin/ Waltzes - 

Vladimir Ashkenazy £10.99 

Faure/Requiem - AJed Jones/RPO/ 

LSO Chorus/Hickox £10.99 

Kiri Te Kanawa/Highlights from 

Handeft Messiah £10.99 

Horowitz/In Moscow £10.99 

Tchaikovsky/ Ballet Suites/Swan Lake/ 
Nutcracker Suite £10.99 

Walkman Classics on 
cassette, at £3.49 each 
(cassette only). 

Vivaldi/The Four Seasons - 
Lucerne Festival Strings/ 

Baumgartner £3.49 

Handel/Water Music/Music 
For Royal Fireworks - BPO/ 

Kubelik £3.49 

Mozart/Eine Kleine Nachtmusik - 
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.. £3.49 
Mozart/Symphonies No 31 ‘Paris,’ 

35 ‘Haffner,’ 40 and 41 ‘Jupiter’ - 
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra.. ..£3 .4 9 



Beethoven/Symphonies Nos 5 & 6/ 
Egmont Overture - Vienna 
Philharmonic Orchestra/Bohm.. .£3.49 
Beethoven/Piano Sonatas 
Appassionato,’ ‘Pastoral,’ ‘Moonlight,* 
‘Pathetique’ and ‘Les Adieux 5 - 

Kempff £3.49 

Schubert/Trout Quintet/Mozart/ 

Hunt Quartet/ Beethoven/Ghost 

Trio - \hrious Orchestras jE3.49 

Holst/The Planets/Elgar/Enigma 
Stations/ Pomp And Circumstance 
Marches - Various Orchestras £3-49 


All our single LPs are also available at the special price of £5.99 each or less until 31 December* 



0S SlltJpU 10 Jrt'UBiMT f'nc*£ G fl^vl X, li-'tcj g^rrgto 51-91 *£u.linji[ig ■"Du'li A,,;J1?W»WW V 0 U fW PW- 




THF TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


SPECTRUM 


Just the job, 


and how to find it F° + n S 




Has the tide turned? 
With the government 
spending billions 
on job creation, 
George Hill looks at 
what is on offer 


With the announcement last month 
of the sharpest three-month fell fat 
unempfoyaient for 13 years, and 
Employment Minister Lord Yeaog 
expecting another drop this month. 
Government hopes that the figures 
may fail behm three mfUion before 
the election look increasingly rosy. 
The contisned rise in the number of 
registered vacancies supports 

rlpinMf that a imjnO WWIWIt 

is muter way . 

Bat the true «ngmficanrg of the 
figures is hard to separate from the 
impact of foe repeated changes in 
the way they are compiled — 17 
rhpnore since 1979 — and the 
rapidly proliferating schemes to 
provide the jobless with temporary 
work nr trending. The importance 
the Government attaches to these 
efforts is shown by the feet that 
Employment Department spending 
is pleased to rise by almost a fifth 
between now and 1989 — much 
more than any other department. 



out of 
Africa 


• . 


^ i l A 


Karen Blixen died 
25 years ago, but 
a single film has 


P 


made her into a 


Danish cult figure 


.... — j ' v 

/r-.{ . . • . ; <_'**-» < ^ 




Critics fh™ that fh a a ges in the 
way claimants are counted have 
tended to reduce the recorded total, 
and point oat that the 600,00# 
people now in special schemes 
almost exactly matches the somber 
by which the fignres have fatten. 
Bat the Government is bopefol that 
the £2.5 billion investment will 
equip the unemployed with valu- 
able skills. 


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........ . . . 

1 '* ** ___ 

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The tough get going: since 


the leadership of Jackie Jones (in foe centre of the right-hand window), 26 m embe rs haw fh nnrf wpHr 


T he world-wide success 
of Sydney PdlaekVi 
Oscar-winning film 
Oat of Africa, based. on foe 
experiences in Kenya of Ka- 
ren Blixen, is reviving mas- 
sive interest in the works of 
the Danish writer. 

As a resalt, the 
Rongstedland Foundation, 
homed in the Btixen family 
home at Rnngsted, north of 
Copenhagen, has been saved 
from impending fmancwii 
ruin. Professor Alfa- Philip, 
the lawyer responsible for 
administering the foundation, 
revealed that around 
£140,000 for the film rights to 
Den Afnka m k e Farm (Ont of 
Africa) was netted in 1984. 
And a contract with Universal t 
Pictures wffl bring in a far- 
ther 1.5 per emit of the global 
box office takings next year. 

Sales of Buxen’s novels 
and short stories are booming 
and the film rights to another 
of her works, Tke Foundation, 
have earned a farther 
£140,000. Denmark is pos- 
sessed by Blixen fever. 
Bookshops abound with dis- 
plays of her works, dofoes 


U p the stain behind the 
Jobcentre in the Finch- 
ley Road, north 
London, a new office 
has recently opened — 
airy, well-equipped, witWa dozen 
workers getting on with the job at 
their phones or typewriters, with 
files of data ready to hand and a 


large sales chart on the waH 
The “product” they are m 


The “product” they are market- 
ing is themselves, and every “sale” 
— marked triumphantly with a 
green star on the chart — indicates 
the departure of one more of them 
to a permanent job after months or 
years without work. This is one of 
the first of Britain’s Jobdnbs, one 
of the more ingenious ideas among 
the Government’s battery of mea- 
sures intended to reduce un- 
employment. It is a dub of which 
even Groucho Marx might have 
approved, since its. members have 
joined with the intention of resign- 
ing as soon as the chance comes 
along. 

The dub, a forerunners of thou- 
sands planned under an expansion, 
announced in October, offers a 
crash course in foe techniques of 
job-hunting and gives members the 
moral backing to persist in die face 
of discouragement 

Jackie Jones has been leader of 
the Finchley Jobdub since it 
opened in June. She has the breezy, 
motherly air of a school sports 
mistress dolled in cajoling reluc- 
tant snd shivering pupils out on to 
the games pitch — and persuading 
them that they are enjoying 
themselves. 

“Since we opened, 26 of our 
people have got jobs”, she says. 
“With an intake of 12 every three 


weeks, that’s 76 per cent. 1 don’t 
think we’ve had anybody coining 
to the Jobdub for more than five 
weeks, and the few who have left 
without work have done so fin* 
perfectly respectable reasons — to 
join other dobs opening closer to 
their homes, or because of serious 
family problems. I expect they’ll 
come back when they can.” 

Pilot trials in Britain since 1984 
of Jobclubs, an American concept, 
have drawn similar ly high success 
rates. Participants are invited, or 


can adc to join if they have been out 
of work for six months or more. 
Since the high morale necessary to 
die scheme would be jeopardised 
by a low rate of success. Jobcentres 
prefer to divert candidates with 
obvious weaknesses into some 
kind of training, thus the members 
are already a select group. 

They get free use of facilities — 
typewriters and photocopiers to 
produce their curricula vitae and 
letters of application, envelopes 
and stamps, and whatever direc- 
tories and publications may offer 
hopeful lines of inquiry, from The 
Times and Computer if'aafcfytothe 
local newspaper. But to avoid 
accusations that the unemployed 
are allowed to roister on the 
taxpayer’s coffee, they pay for it at 
IOp a cup. 

The Jobdub leader starts off a 
fresh batch of a dozen every three 
weeks with closely-supervised tu- 
ition in job-hunting skills. The 
course lasts two weeks, and after 
that they cany on the hunt on their, 
own, reporting back at the end of 
each session. 

“It is a matter of confidence to a 
great extent”, says Mrs 


Jones. “Many of them are quite 
demoralized at first We’ve had 
some who have been out of work 
for tei years, and it is easy for them 
to get out of touch with the ways 
their skills might still be used.” 

Jobdnbs gather a wide range of 
members. In Finchley I met Paul, a 
teenager who ended up without a 
job tins year at the end of a Youth 
Training Scheme with a bank. He 
had 20 job leads on his desk and 
had already had two interviews in 
his first week. 

Dennis, aged 28, with an air of 
slightly feverish buoyancy, had 
worked in legal counselling until a 
year ago, and was typing a Idler to 
a university law department with 
minimal ex pect ati ons that they 
would have a job for him, but in 
hopes that they might have an idea 
to offer.“Indirect leads can be very 
important — people who say: *No, 
but I know someone who might—’ i 
find the Jobdub helpful in the way 
of stopping you becoming narrow- 
minded.” 

Hcmchand, a 57-year-old former 
photographer who used to run his 
own processing laboratory, was 
patiently listing companies which 
might be able to provide him with 
any kind of clerical work.“I send 
out six or eight applications a day, 
and I was called to one interview 
this week, but they told me my age 
was against me.” 

“Seventy per cent of jobs are 
never advertised,” says Mrs Jones. 
“We teach them how to find the 
vacancies that are hidden, by 
keeping their eyes open. We help 
them to reach a realistic apprecia- 
tion of their potential, and put 
across what they have to offer.” 


The extra resaarces from the 
Government wiQ wmtrane a mas- 
sive expansion hi jobs schemes. As 
well as a £600m expansion for the 
two major schemes, the Ommamity 
Programme and the Youth Train-, 
ing Scheme, new projects are bring 
launched, adding to a kaleido- 
scopic array of more than 25 
initiatives to find people Jobs or 
equip them to take up work. There 
are also inducements to employers 
to provide temporary or permanent 
o p p ortuni ties. 

The Restart programme, in 
which everyone lemployed for 
more than a year is invited for in- 
depth thorough cmHwgiHng , and , 
the Jobdnbs are among foe 
fastest-growing and most imagi- 
native. The major schemes 
summarised in order of cost are: 


bless adults, through MSC. 
>52,000 this yean cost 
minion. 


Job Release: Allowances for 
older workers retiring earfy or 
switching to part-time to give 
work to a jobless worker. Supplies 
33.000 full and part-time jobs, 
cost £124 mBGon. 


Community Programme: Ex- 
panded from 158,000 jobs last year 
to 230,000 this year. Annual cost 
now £1 bffllon (cost per reenut, 
£1,900). Temporary paid 
community work ana training for 
tong-term jobless, provided in 
oofiaborahon between employers 
and Manpower Services 
Commteston. CWef object of Labour 
derision as "unreal jobs". 


Youth Ttarinhig Scheme: Train- 
ing at college and on the job for 
young school leavers, now ex- 
tended from one year to two, with a 
place for aM who find nothing 
else. Two in five entrants go from 
YTS to the dole, but two in five 
who complete it gain a qualification. 
There were 395,000 entrants this 
year, cost £900 mfflioa 
Job Training Scheme: Training 


Enterprise Allowance: Tem- 
poral? subsides for jobless to start 
a small business, wife capital of 
thefr own to invest This year 64,000 
entrants at a cost of £111 mflfion 
(rising to 80,000 entrants next year). 

Restart Jobcentre interviews of- 
fered to anyone who has not 
worked for a year, with the joint 
purpose of offering new 
oportunffies mid weeding out of 
the register those who are not seri- 
ously looking for work. By next 
March, an those eligible wfH have 
been contacted: 1,300,000 on a 
budget of about £90 mflfton this 
year. 

Technical and Vocational 
Education Initiative: The MSC's 
arm In schools and cofleges. 
Rapidly-growing scheme to make 1 
curriculum more relevant to 
world of work. About 1 00,000 young 
people involved in running 
projects, cost this year £87 mfllton. 
Jobriubs: Moral support and 
coaching in job-hunting sMIs for 
tong-term unemployed. Recently 
geared up from pflot project, wife 
450 dubs this year, 2,000 next - 
with places for 400,000; cost about 
£36 million. 


NewWorioara: Newly-introduced 

under people 

finishing their YTS. Demand-re- 
lated scheme with estimated cost of 
£26 mSton if 1 00,000 places are 
sought — but take-up so far has 
been below expectations. 

Wider Opportuititiss: Menu of 
training courses, with special ones 
for women seeking to return to 
work, and for ethnic minorities with 
language problems. Involves 
44, 700/ cost £26 million. 



^ ^ s « K 


50,400 participants, cost £2 

million. 

Jobstart Allowances to top 
Initial pay of long-term unerr 



Karen Blixen: suddenly in 
vogue, courtesy of film 


earnings below £80. New demand- 
related programme, only 1 .600 
entrants so far at a cost of £20QJ)00 
but expected to rise to £15 rrtil- 
Bon when in full swing. 

Voluntary Projects Pro g r a mme: 


Com m un i ty Industry; Temporary 
work, with some training, tor youn 


improve self-confidence and 
work skills. Grants to sponsors. 
About 13,000 volunteers, cost 
£14 rralfion. 

Mobflhy Schemes: Help for job- 
less people to travel to fob inter- 
views outside their tocalrty, and 
help with removals if they get a jab. 
Pilot schemes being extended, 
expected to help 21,000 at a cost of 
£5.6 million. 

Job Spfltting: Grants to 

job by splitting an existing one 
Into two. Only 280 jobs provided last 


shops sell safari-style fash- 
ions, travel agencies advertise 
Bfixen-type safaris to Africa, 
and jeeps are foe new fashion- 
able means of yuppie 
transport. 

The Rnngsfedfaiid Founda- 
tion ensures the maintenance 
of the former seaside res- 
idence of Karen Btixen (1885- 
1962), Denmark’s leading 
female novelist of this 
century. 


advantages; 7 JU0 places, cost £26 
miiflon. 


6,000 next year. Present cost, £3 
million. 


BRITISH WOOL TRAVEL/KNEE RUGS 


Rallying’s banned supercars are looking for homes, reports Peter Barnard 


Wrong side of the tracks 



Ptanewnod 


T he* cuk>urful tartan Travd/Knce Rup 
are made from a special blend of 100% 


X are made from a special blend of 100% 
pure British wool chosen to produce warm, 
resilient and durable yams, [deal for long 
journeys when the weather is cold, or when 
travelling through the night, a Travel Rug will 
keep you comfortably warm while you rest. 
Their use. however, is not restricted to 
(ravelling; a mg is indispensible for picnics, 
spectator sports, fishing trips; and at home a 
knee rug can keep you comfortable while 
watching television, sewing, or during other 
sedentary pastimes. 


TTOvel Rug - Royal Stewart (red. black, blue, 
yellow) Dress Gordon (dark blue. grey, light 
blue) Dress Stewart (white. red. ’ blue, 
yellow) Buchanan (orange, blue, green, 
red. yellow). 


Prices; Knee Rug- £19.95 each 
Travel Rug- £29.95 each 


A vailable m two Maes, each with a fringe on 
two sides. Knee Rug (4ir x 56“), Travel 


Rug (72" x 56 ). and offered in the following 
range of tartans: 


AD prices ore inrhtshe of pwi and packing. FtoaeaBm tinipjf 
days for defray. If you are not utU^fkd ti T "iff refund nwr 
money without question. In addition to our fptamntee xuu hai e 
tjv benefit of yoorfufl jw/hkvy iwfar u-fack wr nor affected. 

Thu offer cm only be despatched to addresses m the 0. K. 

The Times Travel Rag Offer. Bourne Road. 

Beaky. Kent DAS ISL 

TeL Cnyfard (0322) 53316 tor enquiries oaiy. 


The scene is foe Ford special- 
ist division at Chelmsfonl A 
customer, a mere mortal, is 
being given the VIP treat- 
ment Not only is he seeing 
what goes on in the cloistered 
atmosphere of such an 
establishment, he is also bein g 
invited to drive a certain 
motor car around the hal- 
lowed test trade, in the com- 
pany of no less an immortal 
than Stig Blomqvist, the for- 
mer world rally champion. 
Whatever can have brought 
this about? 

The short answer is that 
after spending six years and 
£10 million putting the iwm 
together, Ford has arrived on 
the pitch to find the goalposts 
have been moved. The result 
is that mere mortals, provided 
they have £50,000 to spare, 
may now taka to the public 
highway in a car so potent that 
Blomqvist is not allowed to 
take it near a world champion- 
ship rally course. 

The -Ford RS200, iflea the 
rest of raUying's current 



Rafr Sport 


wheels and generates between for £8,000 more yon have a 
400 and 5Q0bhp — the same as choice of colours plus fancy 
Formula One cars of only five upholstery, 
years ago. 

Any resemblance between A ™ 0De >£ 

these supercars and the ones Certainly the ranty value wffl 
we drive to work is -or was- w ? rk , tor . “cm and anyone 
purely coincidental. Cotin ^ Parading the term 
Wilson, editor of Rally Sport ^^m xtatm g asset” m front 
magazine and a driver him- a sceptical bank nanag e r 


Is it worth the money? 
Certainly the rarity value wiQ 
work fin- them and anyone 
who fancies parading the term 


says the change are 



Any colour 
as long as 
it’s white 


Safety factor 
key to the 
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generation of “supercars” — 
which include the Peugeot 205 
Turbo 16 E2, the Lancia Delta 
S4, the Audi Quattro E2 and 
the MG Metro 6R4 El — has 
turned out to be too potent for 
its own good. 

So, from January 1, rally 
cars will be slower, heavier 
(relative to their power) and 
therefore safer. That last is the 
key word- a sport that lives off 
sponsorship has had its vari- 
ous brand-images rfgwted rtifc 


MrfMn/Miss I ous brand-imagfts rfgntgrf thic 

Address I notably by two ac- 

T I cadents: Henn Toivonen died 


Fast exit: foe RS200 leaves 
the world raftying scene 

unstuck in Portugal, killing 
spectators. 

Within 24 honrs of 
Torvonen’s death, FISA — 
motor sport's governing body 
— had announced that from 
next year, cars competing in 
major championships would 
have a limit of 300 brake horse 
power (bhp), they would carry 
more weight and their wheel 
widths would be reduced. 

A look bade to 1979, when 
Group 4 was the equivalent of 
what became, the following 
year. Group B, demonstrates 
why so many people, includ- 
ing a majority of the drivers, 
fed performance has out- 
stripped its enviroment 
A good Group 4 car would 
have a top speed of between 
120 and 130mph; it would be 
two-wheel-drive and its O- 


ia* RE*Na8MMti 


in Corsica when his Land a 
ran off the road and caught 
fire and an RS200 came 


five seconds. Now a Group B 
car will reach 140mph flat out, 
is four-wheel drive, has a 0-60 
time of 2.7 seconds, wide '. 


overdue from everyone’s 
point of view. “What this does 
is dose the gap between the 
factory teams and the guy who 
does it for firn. In effect people 
will have to use what is more 
or less a road car, something 
ordinary people can relate to.” 

Even at Chelmsford the 
view is philosophical. “We 
think rallying should have 
gone beck to more basic 
concepts a lot earlier,” says 
Hany Gallon of Fold’s public 
affairs division. “Group B faad 
become so sophisticated it was 
untrue; we could chany a 
gearbox in nine mmufew and 
at one time you had heli- 
copters ferrying parts around a 
rally coarse — you could 
virtually rebuild the car in the 
course of the event.” 

Not everyone is taking it 
lying down. Jean Todt, racing 
manager for Peugeot — the 205 
Turbo 16 E2 cleaned up in die 
recent Lom b ard RAC rally — 
plans to pursue FISA through 
the French courts, hpt few 
insiders give him a chance. 

As fix the RS200, the name 
itself is a due to its potential 
value. Ford only had to build 
200 to meet Group B regula- 
tions, they have 100 left and 
they are all street legal. For 
that £50,000 you can have any 
colour as long as it’s white and 


should quote the Ford GT40 
of foncf memory, a sports 
prototype designed specifi- 
cally to win the Le Mans 24- 
honr race. It achieved that in 
1966. Ford built 128 of them 
and they retailed at £14,000. It 
would cost you about 
£150,000 now. 


S he wrote many of her * 
works in EagtisA and 
her one time Rnngsted- 
hmd home is a small manor 
honse set in woods overlook- 
ing die narrow sound which 
separates Denmark from 
Sweden at the month of tire 
Baltic. 

Blixen is buried in a simple 
grave in foe woods surround- 
ing Rnngstedhind. In ac- 
cordance with her wishes the 
gardens have been declared a 

bisd sanctuary, maintained fa 
co-operation with foe Danish 
Oraifooliagical Society. 

Oat of Africa traces 
Blixea’s life in Africa, where 
foe lived as a coffee farmer 
from 1914 until 1931. It also 
explores the collapse of her 
marriage with Bror Von P 
Bfixea-Finecke - a Swedish 
baron — and her love affair 
there with Denys Finch- 
Hat ton, an English 
aristocrat. 

Ffach-Hatton perished fa 
an air crash shortly before 
Btixen left Kenya far foe last 
time and the Swede, from 
whom she contracted syphi- 
lis, died in a road 
a cc i dent . There are ns plans 
as yet to open Rnagstedhmd 
to foe public as a Btixen 


jar? 

M. e 


But don’t buy an RS200 
thinking yon can outstrip all 
comers — one organization in 
Essex had the car on test 
recently and the spo n sor’s , 
name is on foe side: POLICE. I 


ing park and gardens and her 
heantiftdly- s itBat e d grave can 
be visited. 


Christopher Foiled 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 122 


am 


9 Sodden wealth (7) 

10 Elizabeth I lawmrite 
(5) 

11 Go to press (5) 

12 Bodily cavity (5) 

13 Tooth fining (S) 

15 Thkve(5) 

lfi Radiolocation (5) 

18 Sullen (5) 

20 Throng (5) 

21 Highly orijpna!(?) 

23 Pour forth (4) 

24 Pasta dish cheese (8) 


QHU 


£!■■■■ ■ £!■£!■■ 


QBaam ■ anaa 




1 Striped bones (6) 

2 Give up (8) 

3 Large vase (3) 

4 Warwicks saline 
spring ( 1 0J) 

6 Russia (I.I.l.l) 

7 Slackness (6) 


8 Medieval animal 


book (8) 


11 Church singing (8) 


s= ‘jura 


1 5 


'He >. 


L tajrc&i i : 














TgJSgi^ 

ren BLi\- r . ;«' r fc *^«r 



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SansstedL-.-d e ? 11 - t 

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£ i 40.ru w] f,- T jL ^i. Jfiw 
Piet^re^ *o.n w Hn 

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S*ir, ..f 

S! las . frigh^2 

£U0 *'"'**! *.,*5 

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Sons and 
stinging 
invective 

Dennis Potter’s controversial serial 
Th e Singing Detective raises once agftin 
the vexed question of the mother’s role 
in literature, especially modem drama 
Libby Pmres examines this complex 
relationship and asks why the pen 
becomes a sword when the nest is flown 

W hat is it about play- in episodes four to six. So talc 
wnghts and moth- that and a few other Htw 
ere? I ask because incidents into consideration, < 
although Dennis might be forgiven for thinking t 


W hat is it about play- 
wrights and moth- 
ers? I ask because 
although Dennis 
Potter’s uneasy 
masterpiece. The Singing Detec- 
tive, iS about a lot of thing s, last 
Sunday’s controversial episode 
brought into sharp focus the issue 
of a son’s feelings about his 
mother. 

When Potter’s Philip Marlowe, 
in his hospital bed, remembers the 
childhood pain of perching in a 
tree and spotting his mother in 
woodland adultery, a powerful 
sense ofbetrayal screams from the 
text Autobiographical or not, the 
episode was strong and savage in 
its portrayal of the boy’s be- 
wildered blaming of his young 
wartime mother. Having read the 
script, 1 can tell yon that relations 
between them do not soften modi 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


fe^Virj * 

W'i, 

#m M* *1 



in episodes four to six. So taking 
that and a few other literary 
incidents into consideration, one 
might be forgiven for thinlring that 
any woman with an eye on her 
future reputation would be well- 
advised not to let any of her little 
sons have a toy theatre this 
Christmas. If we really don’t want 
to know what the lads think of us, 
we should dearly discourage all 
literary activities. 

Since writers are merely 
successful, hardworking people 
who happen to have a talent for 
expressing the forces of human 
nature, the question broadens out 
what is it about successful men 
and their mothers? Why do feel- 
ings run so high? Why is it that, as 
another playwright, Bernard 
Shaw, said: “Of all human strug- 
gles there is none so treacherous 
and remorseless as that between 


Sons and mothers: Dennis Potter (left), and Alison Steadman and 


* 

*«$«***& 


Lyndon Davies, who play Mrs Marlow and Philip in the series 


the artist nrm« and the mother 
woman”? 

A good guru on the subject 
seemed to be Fay Weldon: not 
only a powerful writer on the 
curious relations between men 
and women, but the most omniv- 
orous reader I know. And, as it 
happens, a mother. Despite her 
reputation for plumbing murky 
depths, she was not inclined to 
plunge straight into psycbosexual 
analysis. It was, she said, largely a 
matter of class. 

“If you think of writers, they are 
generally socially-mobile people. 
John Osborne came to write for, 
and mix with, a certain class of 
people, the intelligentsia if you 
like. Hu mother remains a proof 
of his origin, a very intimate 
proof A bright lad with aspira- 
tions generally wants to get away 
prim everything rhar his mother 


represents. Sometimes you even 
find writers who are socially 
mobile downwards — like Colin 
Melon es, who couldn’t stand his 
mother, because she was a lady 1 , 1 
suppose.” 

In the Twenties and Thirties, 
she added, “it was very fashion- 
able to hate your parents. Ac- 
tually, in Australia right now, 
people are still doing it and diking 
about it It’s to do with escaping 
from your background — for 
example, Catholic-Irish-hard- 
working-poor-r expectable — and 
being a new, modern, free man.” 


B ut why do these escapers 
resent their mothers 
most, though, and why 
do successful sons of 
perfectly reasonable 
mothers so often seem to hide 
them more asstduoosly than they 


hide their equally-embarrassing 
aunts and cousins? “Well, a man’s 
pip thi- r makes him feel undigni- 
fied. She wiped his bottom.” And 
whatever she is, he is tied to her by 
cords he can never quite break: as 
be grows older, the presence of 
ducking old Mum grows even less 
appropriate, in his view. 

Even worse, she may have 
photographs. In a patriarchal soci- 
ety, to be a Top Man’s mother is a 
dead liberty. Somerset Maugham 
reckoned that “few misfortunes 
can befell a boy which bring worse 
consequences than to have a really 
affectionate mother”. 

D H Lawrence melodramatically 
lamented that “Nobody can have 
the soul of me. My mother had it, 
and nobody can come into my 
veiy self again ...” A whole 
boarding-school culture grew up 
among foe British upper classes, to 


ensure the divorce of a boy from 
the unwholesome, retarding com- 
pany of Mum. 

Potter, though, was exploring a 
darker area of the relationshi p , 
little Philip sits in his tree, seeing 
his mother and her lover; as foe 
stage-direction says: “He is not 
totally sure about what is going on, 
but his face shows that he knows it 
is frightening and illicit . . . there 
is some receding laughter, of that 
distant, mysterious, half-heard or- 
der which is always the most 
difficult to deal with . . . out of 
Philip’s reach — and yet it is there, 
threateningly, the worse for being 
increasingly fer off” 

The child is not only horrified 
by the combative appearance of 
sexual intercourse but he is 
thwarted by being at a distance. “It 
is” said a psychotherapist who 
found the programme true to 


many of his male patients’ night- 
mares, “one of the most appalling 
thing for a boy child, to see his 
mother being dominated and 
transported fire this. Even by his 
fether." 

Fay Weldon, herself a a for- 
midable tele virion playwright, 
agrees.” All of us work hard to 
avoid that crossover between the 
maternal and foe erotic, with a 
boy. So we pose as non-sexnal 
beings, quite deliberately. There- 
fore it is very difficult for a boy to 
accept, later, that his mother is a 
sexual being.” 

A ny widow or divorcee 
attempting a second 
courtship with a glower- 
ing son in the back- 
ground would probably 
agree. “He sleeps round at his 
mate’s when my lover slays” says 
one mother of a lS-year-oki, 
resignedly. “Even six years after 
the divorce, which was not even 
my fault, I wouldn’t put it past 
him to be writing a play about 
me.” 

It was not ever thus. I have 
always been puzzled that David 
Copperfidd never blamed his 
feeble little mother for fending 
him with Mr and Miss Murdstone 
and a frightful life thereafter. She 
remained, as Victorian mothers in 
novels toad to remain, a beloved, 
angelic, innocent figure. “Well," 
says Fay Weldon tartly. “These 
women were just (hat They were 
seen by their sons as weak. Christ- 
like martyrs because they actually 
were victims totally dependent on 
men, and likely to the in childbirth 
when they were still young.” 

It was not until our century that 
mother became what Germaine 
Greer so sweetly called “the dead 
heart of the family, spending 
father’s Mrninp on consumer 
goods”. We are a lot easier to 
despise, now. 

But the very strength of the 
contempt, when it arises, is an 
unwilling proof oftove. We should 
perhaps be gentle when our sons 
despise us, and try not to remind 
them of foe awful truth: that they 
cannot get away, and that that is 
why they try so hard. 

Q Tire DU— fpWSilS 1386 


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The stereotyped image of foe 
female dimity worker, all 
sensible clothes and selfless 
good works, is shattered in- 
stantly by Penny Jenden. Slim 
and attractive, with Made lace 
tights, dangling silver earrings 1 
and chipped red nail polish, 
she can be juggling figures 
with foe best financial brains 
in foe business one minute, 
poring over the minutiae of 
bee-keeping in Sudan the next, 
and still find time to argue her 
corner with Bob Geldof in a 
vocabulary as earthy as his. 

“My kids get rick to death of 
Africa and me harping on 
about bow that would be 
enough to feed a family. They 
tell me to stop nagging and 
give up smoking. ‘Think of all 
foe money you waste on 
cigarettes’” she says with a 
laugh. 

A 36-year old anthropolo- 
gist who mixes street credibil- 
ity with a mind like a steel 
trap. Penny Jenden is the 
executive director of the Band 
Aid Trust and the brain which 
oversees the spending of the 
£70m raised so fer. 

She feels she has had to be 
extremely tough with Band 
Aid’s cash. “This is very 
special money, very precious 
money because a lot of it came 
from a group of people who 
had never given before. 

“Kids are not walking 
around tormented by African 
famine - they went to foe 
concert or Ran The World 



As Bob Geldof prepares 
to lower his Band Aid 
profile, Liz Gill meets 
the woman who will carry 
on the good work 


because these things were fun. 
They must not be allowed to 
sit back and think, ‘Well, we 
gave it to. Band Aid and they 
screwed it up’, so we’re extra, 
extra cautious.” 

For nearly two years, ever 
since she put her near-com- 
pleted PhD thesis on ice and 
volunteered her services. 
Penny Jenden has been Bob 
Geldof s key back-room figure 
— bossing and bullying, 
chivvying and charming, fru- 
gally she joined via her archi- 
tect husband Kevin who, 
racked by what he had seen on 
television and memories of 
his own Red Cross work in 
Africa, stepped forward with 
his skills. 

As the money poured in and 
the ideals took concrete form. 
Penny became the vital link 
between foe evaluation com- 
mittee, which recommends 
which projects should get the 
cash, and the trustees, who 
have the final word. 

From the beginning one of 
Band Aid’s guidmg principles 
has been that it was no good 


simply pouring money into 
short-term care, however 
heart-rending the need. Iflives 
were to be saved in the future 
and Africa to get back on its 
feet, the greater proportion 
must go on long-term aid. 

“Long-term aid might not 
be as dramatic as emergency 
assistance, but there can be 
profound ramifications fin* 
people’s lives”, says Jenden. 
At her office in London’s West 
End she has fist after list of 
what it means in reality: from 
the largest grant, $500,000 for 
a major start-from-smteh 
programme, to the smallest, 
$4,000 for a water pamp 

Tackling foe problem in 
such a real way brings incal- 
culable satisfaction. “I went 
into Sudan on one of the first 
flights taking in these special 
biscuits which are like short- 
bread but which, contain 
enough calories to keep a child 
alive for one day. 

“We went to a camp where 
foe children were really in a 
terrible state and finding ft 
difficult even to eat foe gruel 





that was being given as the 
supplementary food. We gave 
them the biscuits and as I 
watched them hold them in 
their bands and sude on them, 
I feft a great sense of gratifica- 
tion because I knew those 
biscuits were there because of 
my efforts." 

Much of Jenden’s life has 
been spent straddling two 
worlds. As the daughter of a 
master mari ner she spent part 
of her childhood and adoles- 
cence in Africa and India. 

“I always suffer greater 
culture shock coming back 
here. For example in India 
nothing ever gets thrown away 
and on one level you think 
isn’t that nice’. But of course 
it’s because people are so 
bloody poor that there’s no 
waste. 

“I always start off intending 
to take bottles to the bottle 
bank and papers to be re- 
cycled, but m the end I never 
da It does go against foe grain 
to throw food in foe bin but 
when you're a working mother 
(she has two sons aged 15 and 
12 and a four-year-old daugh- 
ter) that’s the way it goes. Yon 
buy food and then you have to 
chuck it because something’s 
cropped up.” 

Penny Jenden is paid 
£1 0.000 a year — “Bob wanted 
us all to work for nothing for 
ever but you can’t go on like 
that” - and will stay as long as 
she’s needed. 


A round-up of news, 
views and information 


Toddling 
to fame 

Keeping an 18-meofo-old tod- 
dler entertained fe enough 40 
test any mother’s imagination 
— hot after a trip to the zoo 
with sod Joseph, 28-year-old 
Barbara Dewar’s imagination 
quite rah away with her. She 
and her hits hand Ted had the 
brainwave of creating an flJus- 
trated account of the outing, 
with the pages laced together 
with bootlaces. The rapturous 
response of their friends (not 
to mention Joseph) prompted 
them to publish a series of 
stories written especially for 


the boy, such as “Joseph and 
foe Jumble” ami “Joseph 
Chooses Paint”. 

It is eight months since the 
prototype was created but 
already The Bootlace Books, 
price £1.75, are being stocked 
by Boots and W H Smith, 
among others. For safety, the 
pages have round edges, are 
laminated, and the bootlaces 
brightly coloured with non- 
toxic dyes. And now, with 
excited foreign enquiries, it 
even looks as if Joseph fe 
destined for international feme 
— and all because of a simple 
trip to the zoo phis a. little 
imagination. 

Tanstoppers 

Winter sports become ever 
more popular — yet having a 
tan (at any time of the year) is 
increasingly unfashionable, 
in response. Boots System 1 



Jenden: doing good isn’t all Laura Ashley and brown rice 


BRIEFLY 


Her job has taught her, she 
says, a healthy cynicism about 
professionals but also a great 
optimism. “I know now dial 
people can change history. 

“It took Bob to start it off 
but at' the end of the day 
people thought they could do 
something, too. They realized 
that you didn’t have to wear 
Laura Ashley and eat brown 
rice to do a bit of good. You 
could be your own person, do 
your own thing and give a bit 


range now offers three very 
inexpensive moisturfng prod- 
ucts designed to stop faces 
frying in foe snow-reflected 
glare and protecting, too, 
against chill winds. Fra- 
grance-free and ideal for 
sensitive skiers' skirts, Ultra- 
Protective Ski Cream (Cl 25). 
Protective Action Ski Cream 
Sun Filter 4 (£1.95) and Ultra 
Protective Ski Salve (£1.15) 
can be found in Boots 
branches nationwide. Should 
stop the blisters in 
Ktosters. . . 

Quote me... 



“Feminism has gone too fer, 
too fast It is not as happy for 
women as they imagined ft to 
be and ft is partkntoriy sad 
because if the race is to go on, 
women will hare to many and 
have children. It’s that sanple. 
Or they will have children but 
taw them over to the state — 
which reduces them to a far 
worse state than they were in 
when the feminist revolution 
began” — Clare Booth Lace, 
author of The Women. 

Aids aid ! 

The growing number of Aids 
antibody positive women now 
have a shoulder to lean on: 
foe National Support Group 
for Women with HIV Infection. 
Hs helpline number is 01 -833- 
2971 and ft operates Mon- 
days to Fridays 7-1 0 pm, 3-1 0 
pm at weekends. Send a I 


of money and ft was valid.” 

The job has had its more 
frivolous compensations. 
“When Bob was knighted he 
had a party at the Hard Rock 
Cafe and I met Mick Jagger. I 
remember my dad thumping 
me as a kid for saying I fended 
him. It was a childhood dream 
come true. I said to Bob, T can 
resign my job tomorrow now 
because Tve fulfilled my life- 
long ambition’.” 

© Tims Nawapapan Lid 1886 


10x8 inch, 38p SAE for an 
Aids booklet targeted at 
women. Write to foe Support 
Group c/o BM AIDS, London 
WC1N3XX. 

Just pup in 

Keeping a dog is fcacompatible 
with many people’s lifestyle — 
so what abort sponsoring one 
instead? A donation to foe 
National Canine Defence 
League will go towards foe 
feeding and upkeep of a 
particular animal — they’ll 
send you a picture of the 
bowser and if you live near the 
kennels you can even visit, to 
take him for walks. For details 
about this new way of express- 
ing your puppy love, write to 
Steve Goody, Code 203, 
NDCL, 1 Pratt Mews, London 
NWI OAD. 

Play cookery 

The Cooking Game is prob- 
ably this Christmas's most 
defiaous board game: a race 
to concoct dinner-party 
menus from beautifully 
photographed ingredient 
cards for recipes compiled by 
gourmet Jane Grigson (and 
featured in full In an 
accompanying guide, in case 
you actually want to cook the 
dishes). It costs £14.95 from 
stockists including 
W.H. Smith, John Lewis and 
good toy shops; but alas, you 
won’t find any leftovers in the 
fridge next day. 

Josephine Fairley 



Desk for computer, mini-office or 
study. Plus storage from cubes to 
wardrobes, shelving, trestles, etc 
Mail-order catalogue or visit us-. 
Cu beSt ore 58 Pembroke Rd W8 
01-994 6016 (also Sflk & Notts) 


From Mrs Annette 
Maclmrae, Billhead, 
Glasgow 

David Latch’s article on 
Tracing The Path To Lug 
Lost Parents (Wednesday 
Page,. November 26), has a 
quote from do-gooder Ariel 
Brace abort her work in 
helping adopted children find 
those parents: “—there can be 
cruel and hurtful refections, 
and they are extraordinarily 
sad. But even when ft doesn’t 
work out, I’ve never heard 
anyone say they wish they 
hadn't dime it.” 


TALKBACK 


How many adoptive par- 
ents has she spoken to? If 
Arid Brace had any idea of 
foe hart and disappointment 
caused when a fickle teenager 
decides that he whimsically 
fancies failing his “real” 
parents, she would fed mock 
less sdfaatisfied. 

There are two sides to every 
story; die would do well to 
consider that before weighing 
in to the often delicate bal- 
ance of famil y life. 



GR.IMA 

Closing down sale i 

at Jermyn Street's 1 

Internationally M J 

renowned _____ 

jewellers' shop. "1 

Ail stuck including Lj 

many original » 

designs at .1 J 

HaHPrice 


GltlMA 

80 JERMYN STREET 
LONDON SW1 


Autumn Promotion 
N ow On. 

Ends December 15th. 



On Supra' Repiaccment Cwexs Ar AnyT/me 

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Boesky’s Guinness records 


Roger Scruton 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

All the old 
intelligence 

• Peter Wright is not the only 
former British intelligence officer 

• the authorities would like to 
silence. Alter publication of Free- 

: man and Penrose's Conspiracy of 
■ Silence. The Secret Life of A ninony 
'Blunt, the security services have 

been hot on the heels of the elderly 

'intelligence officers quoted 
therein. “They have been writing 
to the old boys in a threatening 
way — for talking about things that 
happened in the 1930s and '40's, 
.things that in no way jeopardize 
national security," says Freeman. 
.Among those to receive letters was 
Malcolm Muggeridge - who has 
penned his own words on the 
intelligence services. William 
-Skardon. the crack MJ5 interro- 
gator who helped unmask Philby 
and KJaus Fuchs — who sold atom 
bomb secrets to the Russians - 
was particularly surprised to re- 
ceive a warning. All his quotations 
were lifted from a Sunday Times 
article Penrose wrote six years 
ago. 

• A singularly inappropriate inclu- 
sion on Marks and Spencer's new 
range of so-called exotic fruit: 
French prunes. 

Loyalist 

Sir Alan Goodison, who has just 
stepped down as ambassador to 
Dublin, will not be sitting down at 
a typewriter to give his side of the 
Hillsborough agreement, in which 
he played a key role. “I thi n k 
ambassadorial memoirs are far 
too often either superficial or 
disloyal," he tells me. But one of 
his aims in retirement is to master 
a subject every bit as complex as 
Irish politics — New Testament 
Greek. His writing, meanwhile, 
will be confined to articles on 
theology; during his three years in 
Dublin he contributed frequently 
to The Furrow , a magazine read 
almost exclusively by the Roman 
Catholic clergy. 

• Tory Nicholas Wiafcrton is 
leading a group of MPs who have 
asked W H Smith not to stock 
Comic Relirf - the Christmas 
Book, sold to betp Oxfam and Save 
the Children. They object to a 
comic strip of the Nativity Uttered 
with four-letter words. “Insulting 
and offensive," they say. 

Washed away 

Tory wets are ruing the appear- 
ance of newspaper reports last 
week revealing their plan to take 
over the backbench Education 
Committee. Hie dries immedi- 
ately sent out photocopies and 
marshalled all their supporters to 
vote for the leading committee 
posts. The wets were duly foiled: 
right-wing John Pawsey stays as 
chairman, with equally dry Peter 
Bruinvels voted in as vice-chair- 
man. Both will have the ear of the 
Education Secretary as the elec- 
tion approaches. 

BARRY FANTONI 



Seriously, Sid 

That tedious character being em- 
, ployed by British Gas to promote 
its interests is even more ubiq- 
uitous than I had feared. Pick op a 
copy, as 1 did the other day, of 
Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel An Artist 
of the Floating World, and you 
will find the front cover photo- 
graph attributed, simply to “Sid." 
The plot thickens somewhat when 
you telephone the publishers, 
Faber and Faber, to try to estab- 
lish the true identity of the 
photographer, for not even the 
publicity department knows. The 
next chapter is to call, as I did, the 
cover designers. Pentagram, em- 
ployer of one Sid Compton James 
— a woman. “It’s just a name I've 
picked up over the years," she 
explained, slightly wearily. “The 
trouble is that since the British 
Gas campaign, no-one takes me 
seriously. If I leave a message for 
someone to ring me, they think it’s 
a joke.” 

The limit 

- Radio Moscow, peddling the du- 
bious line of Aids having been 
concocted by mad scientists in a 
military lab in the United States, 
came up with a new punch line the 
other night. Propagandist Boris 
Belitskiy concluded: “Aids could 
have more tragic consequences 
than earlier US exports such as TV 
violence and drug addiction." 

Danse macabre 

The current Photo Man contains 
an unusual advertisment from a 
video firm. Among the 99 tides on 
sale — most are “strictly adult 
only” — a small section is dedi- 
cated to Music and General 
Entertainment. The first movie 
appearing under this heading is 
Adolf Hitler. Are they, one won- 
ders, confusing the goose step with 
the foxtrot? 


Ivan Boesky’s deal with the US 
regulatory authorities to provide 
information on his insider share 
dealing activites to ensure a light 
prison sentence threatens sleepless 
nights on both sides of the 
Atlantic-For months, unknown to 
those with whom he traded, 
Boesky has been taping his 
conversations and handing over 
details of his transactions. This 
financial equivalent of the Water- 
gate tapes appears to be proving 
fertile ground for the sleuths of the 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion, which monitors the US 
investment industry. 

Now Boesky's shadow has fallen 
on Guinness, which became one 
of Britain’s biggest companies 
after the acrimonious takeover of 
Distillers, which dominates the 
Scotch whisky industry. The 
Guinness chairman, Ernest 
Saunders, was stunned by the 
arrival of Department of Trade 
inspectors at bis Portman Square 
head office on Monday. “I know 
of no reason why the Department 
has derided to investigate Guinn- 
ess," he said. 

In the City, there is little doubt. 
For Boesky was a major stock 
market player during the battle 
with James Gulliver’s Argyll 
group for control of Distillers. 

On Wall Street Boesky is “King 
of the Arbs", the term deriving 


PUTTING GOODNESS INTO GUINNESS 



from arbitrageur — one who buys 
shares in takeover stocks in a 
calculated gamble on a higher 
offer. The DTI will neither con- 
firm nor deny that its inspectors 
are looking at purchases and sales 
of both Guinness and Argyll 
shares on the basis of information 
provided via the Boesky tapes. 

A DTI investigation into a 
company is a very serious — and 
comparatively rare — event In the 
case of Guinness, the inspectors 
were sent in under a section of the 
Act giving them wide powers of 
investigation. In theory the result 
could be anything from a clean bill 


of health to a winding up order. 

The inspectors can examine all 
the company's books and docu- 
ments as well as those held by 
other people — such as its pro- 
fessional advisers. That is why on 
Monday the inspectors moved 
simultaneously on both Guinness 
and Morgan Grenfell, its mer- 
chant bank adviser. 

Perhaps the inspectors' most 
important power will be to ques- 
tion, on oath, anyone they think 
could help them with their in- 
vestigation. This would catch 
anyone relevant to the inquiry - 
Guinness, not just the directors of 


Anyone who refuses to 
co-operate, for instance by 
remaining silent, risks being in 
contempt of court 
The evidence of a link between 
Wall Street and Guinness is at the 
moment only circums t a ntial. The 
information came from the 
American SEC Last Thursdavthe 
government bought into effect 
new powers in the Financial 
Services Act which would allow it 
to return the favour. The powers 
give the government the legal 
right, for the first time, to 
information gathered as a result ol 
a company investigation to other 
regulators, including the SEC. 

There are two crucial aspects to 
the Boesky case. He will name 
names. The bigger the name, the 
more likely he will be treated 
leniently by the US authorities. 
But what Iras really shaken Wall 
Street is that pan of his coopera- 
tion with the SEC included tape 
recording conversations and film- 
ing his interviews with o*’ 
market operators. 

In fact before Boesky moved 
into his offices about 20 months 
ago he got workmen to install tape 
recording and video equipment 
When the SEC caught up with him 
ail he bad to do was to keep the 
cameras and tapes running. 

John Bell and 
Lawrence Lever 


This autumn has bad a particular 
fascination for students of British 
electoral behaviour. Labour's 
opinion poll lead has dissapeared. 
Largely because of a sudden 
erosion of Alliance support the 
Tories have first pulled level and 
now ahead, thus providing a clear 
glimpse of a third successive 
election victory. 

The pound and the stock mar- 
ket responded quickly to the shift 
So did Mrs Thatcher, who visibly 
slipped into one of her euphoric 
“I-as-a-goverment” moods, talk- 
ing happily about how “I have to 
put up interest rates”, as if neither 
the Chancellor nor the Bank of 
England nor the allegedly free 
financial market existed. 

Almost immediately, however, 
we sealed down to a more normal 
diet of City and spy scandals. The 
Tory lead vanished and Labour 
were back in first place. What did 
that glimpse mean? 

Since 1951, the Liberal vote has 
risen under Tory governments as 
disaffected Tory voters drifted 
towards the middle; under a 
Labour government the Liberal 
vote has declined as anti-Labour 
voters rallied to the Tories. 

By the 1960s and '70s, with the 
Liberals attracting greater support, 
this meant that Labour could even 
win elections despite a declining 
share of the vote: it was enough 
that the Liberals did more damage 
to the Tories than to Labour, and 
any period of Tory government 
seemed to guarantee that. 

At first the birth of the Alliance 
seemed only to magnify this trend. 
But the Alliance, fortified by its 
Tory gains, could now appear as a 
credible alternative to Labour too. 
This enabled the Alliance to ped a 
second skin of the onion, as it were 
— with such astonishing success 
that by December 1981 it stood at 
50 per cent in the polls with 
Labour and Tories tying at a 
miserable 23 per cent each. In this 
second stage of the process the 
Labour vote proved far more 
vulnerable to Alliance temptation 
than the Tory. Labour has, more- 
over, never fully recovered the 
ground it lost to the Alliance in 
this period. The Falklan d^ war 
transformed the political land- 
scape at a stroke, by pulling 
Alliance voters back to the Tories 
in droves. 

Note the asymmetrical billiard 
ball effect the Alliance first struck 
the Tories a terrible blow; then 
dealt Labour a s imilar blow; but 
then itself took a heavy blow from 
the Tories. The difference was that 
while the Tories recovered, the 
other two never really did. More- 
over, what progress either made 
was at each other’s expense, not 
that of the Tories. 

Once the 1 983 election was over 
Labour rapidly regained — in the 
polls at least — most of the votes it 
had lost to the Alliance in 1983, 
but the Alliance, reverting to its 
1981 pattern, compensated by 
stealing votes from the Tories. 

At this point the 1986 con- 
ference season intervened, and 
with it the defence issue. It is 
worth noting that the Labour 
conference's reiteration of its own 
unilateralist policy did the party 
no harm at first It had, after all, 
been entirely expected. Labour 
rose over the 40 per cent barrier in 

the polls. 

A lime bomb was ticking away, 


R. W. Johnson outlines the high-risk 
gambles as the election approaches 

Defence: when 
will Kinnock 
a retreat? 




uowever, in the shape of David 
Owen’s rejection of the agreed 
Alliance statement on defence: 
had Owen accepted this statement 
there is little doubt that the 
anodyne policy it enunciated 
would have sailed unproblemat- 
ically through both SDP and 
Liberal conferences and there 
would have been correspondingly 
little discussion of defence. The 
reality was that Owen had now 
nailed to the SDP mast a policy 
which a majority of the Liberal 
assembly were always likely to 
refuse, producing a split in the 
Alliance and a public denouement 
over defence policy. The whole 
area of defence policy now natu- 
rally received intense media 
coverage — which in turn (the 
billiard baD effect again) hurt 
Labour by focusing attention on 
its weakest policy. 

The result was a re-enactment, 
on a minor scale, of the Falklands 
effect. Labour was quickly pulled 
back under 40 per cent while 
erstwhile Tory defectors to the 
Alliance homed back to the To- 
ries. The Alliance vote collapsed. 
Labour faltered, and the Tories 
surged ahead. Hence the 
“glimpse” of a Tory victory. 


Owen's imperious style of 
leadership had a thunderous rico- 
chet. Having started by shooting 
himself in the foot, his bullet then 
hit the Liberals and Labour too. 

How deliberate was the Owen 
bullet? It is apparent enough that 
the true disaster for Owen would 
be a Labour victory and that he 
has, for some time, been Hying to 
create a rationale for an AUiance- 
Tory coalition. No doubt he 
would have preferred to haul the 
Liberals towards a pro-nuclear 
stance, but he must have cal- 
culated the consequences of that 
failing too. There seems little 
doubt that Owen's top priority is 
to hurt Labour; if that means 
helping the Tories — or even 
damaging the Alliance - the price 
is still worth paying. 

The larger question is whether 
the Alliance will hurt the Tories or 
Labour most at the next election. 
On past form, the former should 
be the more likely, but events of 
the past few months suggest that 
the “freak” effect of 1983 could be 
repeated if defence can be made a 
passable substitute for the Falk- 
lands. Labour seems certain to do 
better next time than it did in 
1983, so the Alliance would need 


to attract a good number of Tory 
defectors even to bold hs 26 per 
cent level of 1983. 

Defence policy is important in 
itself but for many voters is highly 
symbolic — reawakening imperial 
echoes, standing for “strong 
government” and for macho poli- 
tics' in general. Seen in this 
context, Kinnock has gone well 
out on a limb by promising to 
close US nuclear bases and scrap 
British nuclear weapons. 

Promising the first was a tol- 
erable political risk; promising 
both at once looks like an in- 
superable electoral handicap, rais- 
ing die spectre of a simultaneous 
hail of criticism from the US, a 
possible resignation threat from 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff and a 
withering cross-fire from both 
Owen and Thatcher. There is no 
doubt that Kinnock sincerely be- 
lieves in this policy but there is 
also no doubt that be wants to win. 
So a partial dimbdown on defence 
cannot be ruled oul 
To date, Kinnock has used 
unilateralism cleverly to guarantee 
bis credentials to the left, thus 
giving him the freedom to move to 
the centre on almost every other 
issue. Since Labour cannot win 
unless it is united, this strategy is 
sound enough and has paid hand- 
some dividends in the polls. Bat 
one senses that this autumn has 
shown that that implicit bargain 
has paid all the dividends it can: 
from now there will be only costs. 

If Kinnock backed off from 
unilateralism now, he might face 
chaos in his own ranks — even ii 
the policy on US bases was 
maintained. But if he waited until 
his troops were under general 
election discipline, dying only to 
see the Tories defeated, he might 
get away with this partial switch. It 
would be high risk politics either 
way. If he feels that Labour is 
unlikely to win anyway, it would 
be folly to change course, for the 
post-election reckoning within the 
party would be horrible indeed. 
Against that Kinnock has to 
calculate the potentially even 
more horrible consequences for 
Labour of a third Tory win. There 
is no safe choice. 

Indeed, the rise of three-party 
politics means that every party 
leader is now playing at higher risk 
for bigger stakes. In the main, our 
politicians are not suited to iL 
Owen is the only natural gambler, 
first in leaving Labour and then 
running against Roy Jenkins for 
the SDP leadership. Now he is 
gambling with defence to lever an 
unhappy David Steel into a co- 
alition stance with the Tories. 

The real mystery is Kinnock. 
His youthful accession to the 
Labour leadership was the result 
of a series of successful gambles, 
and he has occasionally shown the 
same penchant since (his shouting 
match with George Shultz, for 
example). He has seemed some- 
what alarmed, however, by his 
own risk-taking and has often 
backed down under pressure. 
Much of the time — as during the 
miners' strike, and over mortgage 
tax relief — be has seemed a 
cautious, even pedestrian example 
of a Labour leader. With him, one 
senses, things could always go 
either way; and of all the leaders 
be has the biggest gambles to take. 
The author is a fellow of Magdalen 
College. Oxford. 


Communism and 
all that jazz 


Japan in search of a jobless cure 


Totalitarian governments are 
increasingly reluctant to subject 
their critics to political trials, 
which attract too much attention 
in the West and thwart the policy 
of image-building. Instead, the 
habit has developed of charging 
political offenders with “eco- 
nomic crimes”. By and large, the 
lactic has been successful, and the 
astonishing increase in recent 
years In the number of Soviet 
dozens executed for economic 
“corruption” has either aroused 
no comment in the western press 
or has been offered as further 
proof of Gorbachov’s tough, 
reforming liberalism. 

The policy has also been 
adopted in the Soviet satellites, 
and is well illustrated by the case 
of the Jazz Section of the Czech 
Musicians’ Union; a case which is 
decisive for our understanding of 
post-Helsinki Europe. Jazz has 
played an important part in the 
development of modem Czech 
culture, both directly, through the 
jazz dubs of prewar Prague, and 
indirectly, through poetry, the 
theatre of Burian, the music of 
Martinu and the novels of 
Skvorecky and Kundera. 

Founded in 1971, at a time 
when the “counter-revolutionary 
forces" of the brief Dubcek era 
were being “liquidated”, the Jazz 
Section rapidly became the focus 
of renewal aspirations towards 
light, air, freedom and a cosmo- 
politan culture. Its official 
membership increased to the 
permitted maximum of 7,000; 
through its journal. Jazz Bulletin, 
it was to reach a further 100,000 
enthusiasts. 

These enthusiasts are not sim- 
ply jazz lovers. Jazz, for them, is a 
Symbol of all That mmmimimi 
denies, and a coveted fink with the 
popular culture of America and 
the high culture of Europe. Mak- 
ing use of its legal privilege as a 
trade union, the Jazz Section 
began to publish memoranda for 
internal distribution: studies of 
modem an and literature, mem- 
oirs of Nazi concentration camps, 
and even an edition of Nietzsche's 
writings on Wagner. Under its 
auspices all kinds of events were 
held: exhibitions, lectures, dis- 
cussions, concerts and festivals. 
For a while it seemed as though 
the tradition of the beseda — the 
local discussion group which had 
played such an important pan in 
the 19th century nationalist move- 
ment — was about to be revived. 

In 1981 the authorities began to 
move against the section, burning 
its festival The section 

thereupon joined the Inter- 
national Jazz Federation, hoping 
to buy security through the 
federation's membership of 
Unesco (an organization which is, 
from the communist point of 
view, distinctly “comradely*’). 
The Musicians’ Union was then 
ordered to abolish the Jazz Sec- 
tion. Its council appealed, on the 
grounds that the Ministry of the 
Interior, which issued the order, 
had no power to abolish a cultural 
organization without evidenoe of 
subversive activity. (It is typical of 
the Kafkaesque atmosphere of 
modern Czechoslovakia that such 


appeals must be addressed to a 
“constitutional court” which has 
never, in feet, been constituted). 
Repeated letters to the ministry 
a sking for an explanation of what 
the section bad done wrong were 
left unanswered. 

The authorities then raided the 
premises of the Jazz Section, 
seized its account books and 
destroyed them, simultaneously 
presenting the section with a tax 
bill (incredible by Czech stan- 
dards) fix* three million crowns. 
The members of the council were 
arrested on grounds of “tax 
evasion”, being now deprived of 
the evidence necessary For their 
defence. 

Perhaps because the trick was 
too obvious, and too open to 
ridicule, the prosecuting lawyers 
have recently changed the charges. 
Six of the council members are 
now accused of running an illegal 
commercial enterprise, contrary 
to article 118 of the Criminal 
Code, while iheir chairman, Karel 
Srp. feces an additional charge of 
illegal financial dealings. Both 
charges carry a maximum eight- 
year sentence. The council mem- 
bers have a defence, for they have 
always acted within the law, and 
believed themselves to be legally 
constituted throughout the period 
when they waited in vain for a 
legal definition of their status. 

Fortunately, the western press 
has seen through the official 
tactics, and recognized the trial of 
the Jazz Section as a fabrication. 
Disturbed by the western re- 
sponse, Rude Pram recently ear- 
ned an article criticizing “ins- 
truments of the bourgeois media” 
(a label attached, amusingly, to 
The Guardian ) for their “mean- 
ingless, lying assertions.” And the 
Czech embassy in London has 
issued a press release affirming die 
guilt of the Jazz Section Council 
and stating that the section owes 
some five million crowns in tax 
arrears, and that its council has 
been arrested “on the basis of this 
financial defraudation”. 

The interest of this document is 
twofold: first it gives, not the new 
charge against the Jazz Section, 
but the old one. Secondly, it 
assumes that the council members 
are guilty, come what may. The 
document is therefore a staggering 
admission that the members of the 
Jazz Section council are really 
political prisoners, as well as 
providing a wonderful testimony 
to the Czech government's legal 
incompetence. Not only does the 
state not bother to inform itself of 
the actual details of its own 
accusations; not only does it 
proclaim the guilt of the accused 
before they have been tried; it 
even incorporates this guilt, as an 
undisputed fact, into its foreign 
policy. 

There is no better proof of the 
innocence of Karel Srp and his 
colleagues than this that their 
guilt has been made axiomatic by 
a state which has so little respect 
for its own law that it is prepared 
to broadcast the outcome of a trial 
which has not even begun. 

The author is editor of the Salis- 
bury Review. 


Paul Pickering 

Home is where 
the angst is 


In a country where more than a 
third of the workforce is accus- 
tomed to the security of life-time 
employment, the Japanese must 
be disturbed by the recent rise in 
unemployment. 

In an interim report released 
rarlier this week, the Meakawa 
Commission, which published its 
blueprint for restructuring the 
Japanese economy in April, a pn~w 
called on the government to 
expand the growth potential in the 
domestic economy. This, it said, 
was essential to help Japan reduce 


Nippon Steel, and the inevitability 
of major lay-offs in coal mining 
over the next five years, the 
Japanese have suddenly realized 
that their ability to escape the 
unemployment problems asso- 
ciated with most other advanced 
industrial economies could be 
coming to an end. 

On the surface, Japanese un- 
employment figures do not look 
thai disturbing. According to 
government statistics, only 2.8 per 
cent of the workforce is un- 
employed — slightly less than the 
2.9 per cent record for the entire 


its dependence on exports as the 

major source of economic growth. post-war period. But the official 

It also said that economic figures considerably under-es- 


restructunng was required to help 
offset the increased redundancies 
by manufa c turers of exported 
goods, who are suffering becam e 
of the 40 per cent appreciation of 
the yen over the past year. This is 
the first time in Japan’s post-war 
history that an official govern- 
ment body has made such a policy 
statement on unemployment. 

After a series of redundancy 
announcements in October by 
such household names as 
Mitsubishi, Hitachi, Jami gnd 


timate the full extent of un- 
employment. 

According to some economists, 
if the Japanese conducted then- 
labour force surveys in the same 
way as the United States or 
Western Europe, the unemploy- 
ment figure would be somewhere 
between 4 and 6 per cent — 
roughly two million people. 

Ironically, Yasuhiro NaJcasone’s 
government may be able to use the 
growing anxiety over unemploy- 
ment to its advantage. Over the 


past few years it has been under 
intense pressure from Japan’s 
major trading partners to bring the 
country’s burgeoning trade sur- 
pluses under controL But many 
foreign critics have expressed 
profound scrap asm that the mea- 
sures so far introduced by 
Nakasone win lead to any appre- 
ciable reduction in Japan’s ex- 
ternal imbalances. 

Nonetheless, the Japanese have 
made significant efforts in this 
direction, despite concerted opp- 
osition to change from estab- 
lished, mostly bureaucratic, in- 
terests. Nakasone's commitment 
to accept a coordinated apprecia- 
tion of the yen is only one 
example. 

Other industrialized countries, 
already accustomed to the decline 
of their manufacturing industries, 
have expanded the service sector 
to provide new jobs. But the 
downturn in Japanese manufac- 
turing has occurred so quickly that 
the country has been caught off 
guard, and seems unlikely to be 
able to generate sufficient jobs in 
time to take up the slack. 
Unemnlovment is not some- 


thing that the government can 
dismiss lightly. During their 40 
years of postwar expansion, the 
Japanese have never had to deal 
with the political and social 
problems generated by unemploy- 
ment that most Western countries 
have been struggling with for 
years. Moreover, because of 
Japan’s aging population, all the 
young need to work to provide 
pensions for those reaching retire- 
ment age. 

In drawing attention to the 
growth in unemployment, the 
Meakawa Commission has fo- 
cused on the. need to formulate 
new policies that can quickly be 
put into effect before unemploy- 
ment gets out of hand. The 
powerful bureaucracies, which 
hitherto have impeded Nakas- 
one's attempts to switch the 
.source of economic growth from 
exports to domestic demand, are 
likely to prove more responsive to 
the need to generate new sources 
of employment than they have 
been to foreign pressure to in- 
crease imports.. 

Michael Dynes 


When a stockbroker friend came 
around with a bowlful of goldfish 
and feeding instructions en route 
to a holiday in Barbados, he 
remarked how lucky I was to work 
at home. “Reflection in tran- 
quillity, eh?", he said. “Nothing to 
beat it” 

Immediately he left, my grand- 
mother was tlie first to ring and to 
prove him wrong. She was most 
upset “Please promise me they 
won’t have me put down like poor 
George V._I know you think I'm a 
silly, but if you have to go into 
hospital these days, these young 
doctors try all sorts of thing s on 
helpless old people's bodies.” 

An hour later 1 had just about 
assured her that neither she, nor 
indeed any of her favourite royals, 
was next in line for compulsory 
eut han as i a, when the door ’phone 
buzzed. 

Plumber,” was the yell. For the 
next few hours an irrepressibly 
cheerful thug smashed my bath- 
room to atoms while playing 
Meatloaf on a ghetto-blaster. He 
then dash e d my hopes as to 
whether he could build another 
with taste and artistry by admit- 
ting that he was once part of The 
Inter City Firm; a band of West 
Ham supporters who stab people 
on trains. 

Throughout the afternoon, Mr 
Plumber, for reasons best known 
to himself; began to sing the 
children’s song, Muffin The Mule, 
as he mangled piping. There was 
another ring at the door “You 
have not paid your television 
licence," announced an angry 
voice. 

Downstairs were two men in 
turbans; one very small, while the 
other was the size of a pantomime 
genie. I said my set was broken, 
“what do you all day if you don't 
have a television?” I tried to 
explain I was a writer. “You are 
not a writer, and will be 
prosecuted," sneered the genie 
relaxing his grip on my shoulder 
just long enough to allow me to 
flee mside. 

Back upstairs, the plumber had 
now fractured a waste pipe and 
gone ui search of a bacon sand- 
wich, leaving behind him a scene 
of destruction that would have 
made Action Directs envious. 


After a bride domestic discussion 
with my wife, ranging from bath- 
room design to divorce, a friend 
calle d to ask if I thought his looks 
, could be improved with a toupee. 

He was followed by my mother 
enquiring if I minded having 
underpants again for Christmas. 
The radio announced tha t on a 
London street a man just 
produced a large snake from 
beneath his anorak and was taking 
it for a walk on a piece of string. 

Sanity, not just tranquillity, 
appeared to be on the nm, and as 
madness prefers a sitting target, I 
went for a walk in the park. Ready 
and waiting to console me in the 
park cafe over a capuccino was an 
unemployed lecturer. What I 
needed, it appeared, was a stiff 
dose of new, LOO per cent British 
Zea, or the Headless Way, as 
invented by Major Douglas Har- 
ding (Indian Army, rtd). Some- 
what desperate, I telephoned the 
major. 

“Point to your face,” he com- 
manded. “Now if you cut out 
memory and imagination, you 
must admit you are pointing at 
nothing at alL We have all been 
walking about headless and not 
realized. We are only a space for 
the world to happen in. I made 
this discovery in 1943 in India. I 
looked down and there were my 
legs, my khaki, my torso . . . my 
head was the Himalayas," he said 
triumphantly. My head was still 
choc-a-bloc with vandalized bath- 
rooms and turbaned ruffians from 
the BBC, or wherever. 

By now the waste pipe water 
had leaked into the flat down- 
stairs, with no sign of Mr Plumber 
returning from his bacon sand- 
wich. The lady upstairs h«H caught 
a gerbil under a kitchen sieve and 
was accusing me of ow ning it. The 
major’s theories began to mat* 
sense. 

Why nm around in a self- 
employed panic when, somewhere 
out there, is an organization happy 
to take you in, satisfy your every 
i mm e di ate need, has its own 
capable plumber — and electrician 
and decorators, too — and, if 
Hungs still get on top of you, will 
refer you to the corporate psydbo- 
analyst Yes, if you really want 
peace of mind, get a job. - 


-A 






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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 I 




Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


JUDGING SECRETS 


i.SS! has Leader of the Opposition to 

ney is ™fidgntial mteUigeoce briefr 


ne .y tbat the central issue of 
Principle has been obscured by 
the incidental revelations that 
have tumbled forth both inside 
and outside the courtroom. 
Not that these have always 
teen trivial. On the contrary 
they have raised a number of 
questions requiring answers 
from those involved: namely 
Lord Rothschild, Mr Neii 
Krnnock. Sir Michael Havers 
and Mrs Thatcher. 

Exactly what were Lord 
Rothschild’s motives, for in- 
stance, in bringing over Mr 
Wnght in 1981 at his own 
expense, introducing him to 
Mr Chapman Pincher and 
thus facilitating the publica- 
tion of a book which broke the 
Official Secrets Act? We could 
hazard a number of g uesse s , 
among them that the noble 
Lord is an incurable busybody. 
Mr Pincher’s version is that in 
the aftermath of the Blunt 
Affair, Lord Rothschild 
brought Mr Wright to Britain 
in order to prepare a 
memorandum describing his 
(Lord Rothschild’s) sterling 
work for MI5 as a defence 
against the possibility that 
conspiracy theorists would one 
day name him as a KGB agent 

According to this account, it 
was Mr Wright who suggested 
that they cooperate on what 
became Their Trade is Treach- 
ery in which the central thesis 
is that Sir Roger Hollis was a 
KGB agent Lord Rothschild 
wrote to Mr Pincher discour- 
aging him from this line of 
inquiry. Yet Mr Pincher also 
states that Lord Rothschild 
“realising that Wright was 
determined to publish a 
book.. ..suggested me as a 
collaborator.” which raises all 
the earlier doubts in a milder 
form, llie episode remains 
curious. Lord Rothschild 
surely has a responsibility to 
give his own version when the 
case is concluded in Sydney. 

Mr Kinnock must face the 
question of whether he has 
behaved improperly in 
discussing the case with Mr 
Wright’s Australian lawyer, 
Mr Malcom Turnbull. His 
reply is that he was merely 
attempting to inform himself 
accurately about the court 
proceedings. But there are 
innumerable ways in which he 
might achieve the same object 
without raising the slightest 
controversy. Instead, the 
Leader of the Opposition has 
chosen to do so by talking to 
the lawyer opposing the British 
Government in a court case in 
which national security is an 


issue. 

That must surely be an 
impropriety. It allows the 
charge to be made that be is 
collaborating with Mr 
Turnbull in order to hamper 
the Government’s conduct of 
the case and thus to derive 
political benefit from its loss. 
And though we may acquit Mr 
Kinnock of any such intent, a 
secondary charge remains on 
the sheet namely, that he 
might seem to be serving the 
defence cause inadvertently. 

Mrs Thatcher was thus not 
without grounds for implying 
yesterday that Mr Kinnock 
was risking his access as 


ings. That penalty is, however, 
too severe for an impropriety 
arising largely from inexperi- 
ence. 

Of the various charges 
against Mrs Thatcher and the 
Attorney-General, Sir Michael 
Havers, the allegation that 
they learnt of Mr Kinnock’s 
calls by bugging his telephone 
can be summarily dismissed 
as, indeed, Mr Kinnock has 
dismissed it. It is almost 
inconceivable that Ministers 
would tap an Opposition 
Leader’s telephone and utterly 
inconceivable that if they did, 
they would risk revealing such 
a damaging fact by leaking it 
to, of all people, a band ofTory 
backbenchers. 

But the principal charge is 
that in the case of the Pincher- 
Wright book, the Prime Min- 
ister overrode Sir Michael’s 
constitutional duty to deter- 
mine prosecutions, and Sir 
Michael failed by not asserting 
his responsibility in the mat- 
ter. The supporting evidence 
for this is that Sir Robert 
Armstrong, having originally 
testified in Australia that Sir 
Michael was party to the 
decision not to prevent 
publication, later withdrew 
this claim upon instructions 
from London. 

The legal thickets here are 
thick indeed. Sir Michael drew 
the distinction in the Com- 
mons on Monday between his 
independent role as a pros- 
ecutor in criminal matters, in 
which he brooks no influence 
from other Ministers, and his 
role as the nominal plaintiff in 
civil cases in which he acts for 
the Government as a whole. 
Since the decision in 1981 not 
to seek to prevent publication 
of the Chapman-Wright book 
was a civil one, there was 
nothing improper in his exclu- 
sion from it. 

But was there not a duty 
upon the four Ministers who 
did take the decision, as 
Labour argues, to draw the 
Attorney-General’s attention 
to the fact that a criminal 
breach of the Official Secrets 
Act was about to occur? It 
appears not for a reason that is 
superficially embarrassing to 
the Government- By failing to 
move against the book. Min- 
isters had in effect authorised 
its publication in law. No 
criminal offence had therefore 
been committed about which 
the prosecuting authorities 
could be informed. What these 
legal niceties conceal, of 
course, is a commonsense 
calculation by Ministers that 
more harm than good would 
be done by the pnblicity that 
such a legal case would attract 

The opposite decision was 
made in the case of Mr 
Wright’s own book because 
there is a real distinction 
between a book by an outside 
journalist and one by a former 
MI5 official whose revelations 
are more plausible, more 


authoritative and thus more 
damag in g . The Government is 
defending in Australia the vital 
principle that former intelli- 
gence agents have a lifelong 
duty of confidentiality. If they 
are able to publish the secrets 
they have obtained in their. 


ACCOUNTS AND ACCOUNTABILITY 

J l.J .1 • .1 


The refusal of the BBC to 
allow the National Audit Of- 
fice to examine the financial 
management of its External 
Services is understandable, but 
probably misguided. At a time 
when the BBC needs to dem- 
onstrate its value to a doubting 
public, this is precisely the sort 
of decision that gives it a bad 


name. . .... , 

The BBC, quite rightly, 
prizes its editorial indepen- 
dence - by which it means its 
editorial independence of 
government - above all else. 
For the External Services, 

which may be the only rel.awe 

and impartial sourc ? ir £[ 
information in ; countries 


The BBC has defended its 
action on three grounds. First, 
it argues that the BBC is not 
covered by the remit of the 
National Audit Office, indeed, 
that it was specifically ex- 
cluded from the office’s value- 
for-money reviews. This may 
be technically correct. Further, 
the BBC’s Charter guarantees 
the External Services man- 
agerial and editorial indepen- 
dence, with the result that 
financial management — like 
staff appointments — has tra- 
ditionally been left to the 
managers of the External Ser- 
vices. If, as seems to be the 
case, however, Parliament is 
not satisfied with the way the 


information in mu ^ money ^ng used, there is 
where information is g , ern r&l50ri w j,y this situation 

should continue. 


mem uiwh-k-v.. . 

dence is especially important 
To submit to a re^ew by ibe 

National Audit Office, there- 




=«• -IF 

independent watchdog. 

To equate editonal tndepen- 

deice with financial mdepe^ 
dence, however, as the 
appears to do, is ~ P not 

to a delusion. The BBC *s im 

financially ’L-j V e 


The BBCs second defence is 
that the External Services are 
already undergoing economy 
and efficiency reviews led by 
outside management consul- 
tants in response to recom- 
mendations made in an earlier 
report (conducted jointly by 
the BBC, the Treasury and the 
Foreign Office). Until these 
reviews are complete, it ar- 
gues. it is premature to start on 


financially uiuc^-- „ jve a further scrutiny. Tins would 
External .Services alone : rece , ^ a valid objection if the BBC 


million of .ays* 


money “hiT'for those tax- 

unreasonabu » | jamen t 

payers, . a " d , J r jiterests, 
represeming lh n!ee that 
not to have a g to 

their money is being ^ 

good effect 


r Is it so very 


was intending to make the 
results of these reviews avail- 
able either to Parliament or to 
the Foreign Office or both, but 
it apparently has no such 
plans. 

The BBCs third defence is 


that the efficiency of the 
External Services and their 
credibility as a broadcasting 
organization are unrivalled. 
This is a mitigating factor, and 
it will be popular among BBC 
staff. But it is more an example 
of BBC-style defensiveness 
than a reason for refusing an 
NAO audit If the External 
Services are so efficient and 
effective, they should be able 
to prove it 

- This does not mean that 
they should have to assess 
their efficiency in narrow 
statistical terms alone. The 
worldwide reputation of the 
BBC for veracity and im- 
partiality is not statistically 
quantifiable. Nor is it possible 
even to estimate the number of 
listeners in countries where 
surveys are not permitted and 
listening to foreign radio sta- 
tions is expressly discouraged. 
It is possible, however, to 
compare the productivity of 
different departments and to 
find out how money, tax- 
payers’ money, is spent. 

So long as the National 
Audit Office realizes in ad- 
vance how difficult a task it is 
to assess the effectiveness of 
the External Services, and how 
many “invisible” factors have 
to be taken into account, their 
officers should be welcome in 
Bush House. The BBC Ex- 
ternal Services have much to 
be proud of and their man- 
agers could be pleasantly sur- 
prised by the outcome. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Matters of conscience in spy case 

From Mr M. B. Spencer future breaches by Gvil Servants 


service, it will become impos- 
sible to run an intelligence 
service at all. 

Vital though this principle 
is, it was always going to be 
difficult to sustain it in an 
Australian Court. Democratic 
governments always look 
shifty and uncomfortable 
when they try to defend their 
secrets In public. Such activity 
prompts the question: Is na- 
tional security the reason — or 
political embarrassment? 
Suave Whitehall civil servants 
like Sir Robert could similarly 
expect a rough ride from 
Australian lawyers who like to 
flaunt their defiance of colo- 
nial values (they have appar- 
ently forgotten that they were 
colonisers rather than 
colonised.) 

The Government was sus- 
tained in its decision to pro- 
ceed against these risks by the 
assumption that Mr Wright’s 
book was a betrayal of 
Australia's national security 
interest as well as of our own. 
That is certainly the view of 
Mr Hawke’s Labour govern- 
ment and it conveyed it to the 
court. Is it, however, the view 
of the Australian courts? 

That question is raised by 
Mr Justice Powell's decision to 
release confidential British 
documents, somewhat cen- 
sored, to the defence. The case 
against disclosure was based 
upon the British claim of 
“public interest immunity” 
and would certainly be sus- 
tained in a British court But 
the judge, distinguishing be- 
tween foe public interests of 
the two countries, determined 
for disclosure, pending appeal 

The Government seems cer- 
tain to appeal and it is right to 
do so. if Australians are to 
determine whether publica- 
tion of Mr Wright’s book 
would be in the interests of 
their own national security, as 
seems eminently reasonable, 
the judgement of the federal 
government should surely 
carry greater weight than that 
of a state court judge. 

If the appeal is lost, how- 
ever, the Government will be 
faced with a hard decision. On 
the side of proceeding further 
will be the importance of the 
principle at stake; on the other 
side will lie the practical 
difficulty of sustaining it — a 
difficulty now intensified by 
the decision of an Irish court to 
allow publication of a similar 
book. One Girl’s War, by the 
late Joan Miller. Mr Wright, 
having lost in Sydney, could 
then make his way to Ireland 
and seek out a sympathetic 
Dublin publisher. 

-It may well be that Ministers 
are committed to a principle 
that is both vital and impos- 
sible to defend effectively. 
Should that be so, the intelli- 
gence services would be seri- 
ously vulnerable to disturbed 
or greedy former officials. 
They do not have the Israeli 
option of simply kidnapping 
people like Mr Wright and 
returning them to British juris- 
diction — nor, despite Mr 
Gough Whitlam’s dark 
insinuations, of attempting 
still harsher penalties. But 
some method of protecting the 
legitimate secrets of the intelli- 
gence services has to be found. 


From Mr M. B. Spencer 
Sir, Mr Malcolm Turnbull has 
defended his actions in speaking 
to Mr Kinnock on the telephone 
about what had taken place in 
court is the case of Attorney 
General vWright, saying that what 
he did was ethical andjustifiabie. 


Whatever may actually have 
hero said, the appearance given by 
such a conversation taking place is 
highly unfortunate. As Mr 
Turnbull knows (or ought to 
know) the purpose of Mr Kinnock 
in ringing him was to gain 
information for possible use 
against the British Government in 
Parliament: such parliamentary 
proceedings could influence the 
Government’s conduct in that 
case, to the possible advantage of 
Mr Turnbull's client i£ for exam- 
ple, the decision were taken to 
discontinue the proceedings. 

The appearance given is there- 
fore of Mr Turnbull aiding and 
abetting the bringing of extra- 
curial pressure upon a party to an 
action in which be is invotod. No 
lawyer in this country would place 
himself in such a potentially 
embarrassing position and 1 can- 
not believe the situation is any 
different in Australia. 

The feet is that Mr Turnbull is 
not running a news agency, and is 
under no obligation to provide 
information about any case in 
which he is a protagonist For him 
to do so to a person in Mr 
Kinnock’s position during the 
continuance of the proceedings 
compromises Mr Turnbull’s pos- 
ition as an advocate in those 
proceedings. 

Yours faithfully, 

MARTIN SPENCER, 

4 Paper Buildings, 

Temple, EC4. 

December 1. 

From Mr Michael Rubinstein 
Sir, Who would have understood 
from your main front page head- 
line (November 29) - “Havers 
forces MX5 about-turn” - that, as . 
the following report made dear. 
Sir Michael had only insisted 
upon the correction of wmleadiwg 


of the oaths of secrecy by which 
they are supposedly bound for fife. 
It seems to be directed rather by 
the fear ihat Civil Servants may be 
tempted to draw attention to 
misguided or corrupt actions of 
the ministers they are there to 
serve, or to any attempt at a cover- 
up. 


In the absence of a confidential 
outlet for a Gvil Servant’s sincere 
concern in the nation’s interest - as 
he sees it, inevitably, subjectively - 
then on occasion he will break his 
oath and protest publicly. 

• A Gvil Servant's right to resign, 
with the continuing obligation to 
remain silent, will not assuage the 
dictates of conscience: nor should 
a minister have the right to hide 
incompetence or to protect or 
further his party’s interests agnmst 
the national interest behind a 
Gvil Servant’s traditional loyalty. 

It is self-evident that Sir Robert 
has been set an impossible task. 
Those who sent him on this 
thankless mission, whoever they 
may be, are on trial in New South 
Wales. Lord Rothschild, Peter 
Wright, Chapman Pincher and 
Neil Kinnock are red herrings, of 
various hues, in a murky sea. 
Yours faithfully, 

MICHAEL RUBINSTEIN, 

2 Raymond Buildings, 

Gray’s Inn, WCI. 


evidence given on oath by Sir 
Robert Armstrong, for which Sir 


Robert Armstrong, for which Sir 
Robert promptly apologised to the 
New South Wales court? The 
headline implied that MIS has 
acceded to pressure from Sir 
Michael to do a U-turn - some- 
thing be would of course never 
have demanded of MIS. 

The humiliation suffered by 
both Sir Michael and Sir Robert in 
this extraordinary affair could 
surely not result from a decision, 
however misguided, to discourage 


Better use of research in farming 


From Dr Brian J. Legg 
Sir, I was alarmed that your 
article. “Research that goes 
against the grain” (November 27), 
promoted the naive view dial 
agricultural research should stop 
because we have food surpluses. 

. British farmers are feeing stiff 
competition from European and 
other countries, and if they do not 
improve efficiency and produce 
food at prices that are steadily 
decreasing in real terms they wiQ 
simply go out of business. 

One good example is tomato 
production, where the price paid 
to growers remained steady for ten 
years while the cost of fuel to heat 
the greenhouses increased four- 
fold. We could not prevent 
progress abroad, and unless our 
growers had taken advantage of 
scientific research and doubled 
their yield per hectare they would 
no longer be selling tomatoes. 

Just for the record, the wide- 
span gantry that illustrated the 
article has nothing to do with grain 


The former experiment was of 
course tried with success in the 
early part of the century in 
Herefordshire when our old cider 
orchards were growing, with 
Ryland sheep grating underneath 
the trees. In feet this dog-and-stick 
fanning, as it was called, kept us 
just alive when our colleagues in 
the eastern counties were going 
bankrupt, in the thirties, selling 
com at five shillings a sack. 

Geese also make excellent graz- 
ers, excellent pate, and simply 
excellent fertilizer for forest trees. 
There is a very strong case for 
following up the professor’s ideas 
as a part of the agricultural 
solution. 

Yours feithfiifly, 

THEO SANGER, 

Brookside, Whitebrook, 
Monmouth, Gwent. 


From Mr Roger Stiles 


Sir, Your Spectrum series 
(November 24-28) forgets that the 
four horsemen of the Apocalypse 
are always poised to strike. 


are always poised to : 


for cauliflower harvesting. By 
following widely spaced trades xt 
will not destroy perfectly good 
cauliflowers as tractors and trail- 
ers do; it will not compact the soil 
and waste fuel on unnecessary 
cultivations; and nor will it sink 
into the soft winter soils, causing 
damage and erosion. 

Or should we scrap it and boy 
Dutch? 

Yours fehhfiilly, 

BRIAN LEGG. Head, 
Horticultural Engineering Divisiaii, 
Institute of Engineering Research, 
Wrest PUric, Siboe, Bedford. 


You state (November 24) that 
by 1991 there win be Scwt of grain 
stored for every man, woman and 
child. Why is this such a disaster? 

When Chernobyl poisoned 
thousands of acres it was just a 
•pinprick compared with the re- 
sults of potential terrorist activity, 
let alone a bit of atomic nudging 
and jostling, between super- 
powers. Sad to survive atomic 
warfare and then die of starvation. 

If I were a politician I would 
premise the electorate Scwt of 
grain per bead in an underground 
rocket-proof metropolis. It would 
be my first building priority, to he 
funded out of the cancellation of 
the Channel tunnel and I would be 
right Evolution is survival. 

Yours, 

ROGER STILES, 

Held Place, Dunsfold, 

Godaiming, Surrey. 


From Mr Theodore Sanger 
Sir, Professor Cohn Speddmg of 
Reading University is quoted as 
saying in the Spectrum article on 
November 28: “We might try 
mixing sheep with trees . . . trees 
with free range poultry”. 


Lessons of history 

From Dr Jeremy Blade 
Sir, In suggesting that British 
school and university depart- 
ments and syllabuses are exten- 
sively concerned with British 
history to the detriment of the 
study of the affairs of continental 
Europe, Dr Alexander (November 25) 
unwittingly serves to compound die 
pnitem be dtsetans correctly. 

hs the habit of poring the two as 
alternatives that has led to inadequate 
attention to the history of Europe: 
British history is in no way separable 
from the tatary of other European 


countries and the habit of treating it as 
such stems Iaxgdy from the paro- 
chialism of historians unwilling to 
move outside their own speciality, 
and from a misgtided notion of the 
wiiq ntU ffCT of B ft tish htaray 
It is to be hoped lhat rather than 
challenging this situation by teaching 
more European and less British 
history, the two can be bridged and 
exciting perspectives offered to the 
student as a resuk. 

Yours faithfully, 

JEREMY BIACX, 

University of Durham, 

Department of History. 

43/46 North Briley, Durham. 


Fight against Aids 


From Dr A. M. Nvssey 
Sir, It is sad to reflect that the 
impassioned plea by Dr Peter 
Jones (November 20) for 

ha pmnphiliare and theif fiunitiflS 

who have become inadvertently 
affected by the HI virus might not 
have been needed had we striven 
to rely on our own production of 
the anti-haemophiliac (VIII) fee- 
tor. 

We can justly be proud of the 
free donations of blood by the 
people of this country, which have 
always met the needs for transfu- 
sion ever since the inception of 
that procedure. There has also 


been enough to spare here for the 

rodh*^^tor^ro*birteven now 
we buy from the USA about SO per 
cent bf our requirements for it 


In connection with this, it is 
known that Mood, which is habit- 
ually obtained by purchase in the 
States, quite frequently comes 
from tainted individuals and this 
is particularly dangerous when it is 
pooled for processing. By contrast, 
it is exceedingly rare even now for 
any of our near two million 
donors to be sero-positive 


It is true that current donor 
screening and other protective 
measures should greatly reduce 


Measures of the 
evil that men do 


Where the truth lies 

From Lady Home of die Hirsel 
Sir, Following on the corres- 
pondence about Sir Robert 
Armstrong’s “economy with the 
truth” (November 27), my mother 
— the politest of people; who 
would never call anyone a liar — 
once referred to “your friend who 
has rather an open mind as to 
feet”. 

Yours sincerely, 

ELIZABETH HOME, 

The Hirsel, 

Coldstream, Berwickshire. 

From Mr T. W. Preston, QC 
Sir, A more accurate attribution of 
Sir Robert Armstrong’s phrase 
than that suggested by Mr E. P. 
Wilson (November 271 is surely to ■ 
be found in The Irish R. M., by 
Somerville and Ross. 

In the story “Tricket's Colt”, 
Hurry Knox has stolen the colt 
from his grandmother, and when 
she arrives to tax him with the 
theft he is recorded as “not 
shrinking from that economy of 
truth that the situation required”. 
Yours faithfully, 

T. W. PRESTON, 

2 Temple Gardens, 

Temple, EC4. 


From Rabbi Julia Neuberger 
Sir, Bernard Levin (November 24) 
is not quite right in bis analysis of 
human eviL It is not as simple as 
he suggests. The tradition Ire 
comes from and 1 try to teach is 
nearer the mark- 

Judaism argues that we are all 
born innocent, but with as in- 
clination towards good and an 
inclination towards eviL These 
are, roughly speaking, evenly bal- 
anced. If we follow the good 
teaching and the moral precepts 
we are given, then the good 
inclination will weigh down the 
scales. If we ignore the good 
teachings and moral precepts, 
then the ev3 inclination will win. 

All of us sometimes let the evil 
inclination win by virtue of ignor- 
ing the moral precepts we know to 
be right. In that sense, Bernard 
Levin is correct in saying we are all 
sinners and responsible for our 
own sin. But some of us have our 
moral sensitivities so blunted by 
environment, by nature or by 
history - or by a mixture of the 
three - that foe evil inclination 
always wins, and we are capable of 
terrible things, as our standard 
practice. 

That blunting of moral sensibil- 
ities is a gradual process, and the 
more it continues foe easier it is to 
commit great evil. One 
dehumanises fellow human be- 
ings, rejoices in physical violence, 
sees nothing wrong in dealing 
dishonestly from the inside or 
whatever - but one begins by 
blocking off one’s moral sense. Be 
it Nazi Germany, Cambodia, 
Broadwater Farm Estate or the 
London Stock Exchange, foe pro- 
cess is a gradual one and we can all 
be caught up in it if we are not 
carefuL 

Evil deeds are on a spectrum, 
some more horrific than others. 
Comrade Tek probably did not 
Think, when a child, that he would 
have been able to be so wantonly 
cnieL Through a process of brain- 
washing with political doctrine, a 
refusal to think, and a gradual 
training in cruelty, he changed. 

I believe we could all do the 
same and that it is ordinary 
h uman responsibility for great 
human evfl that we should worry 
about For it is not true that people 
“are evil”; it is that they are 
capable of behaving in an utterly 
evd way. Bernard Levin, Salman 
Rushdie, you and 1 are all equally 
susceptible, once our moral sen- 
sitivities are sufficiently blunted. 

I remain. Sir, yours faithfully, 
JULIA NEUBERGER, 

South London Liberal Synagogue, 
Prentis Road, 

Streatham, SW16. 

November 24. 


Instability in Africa 


From Captain T. C. Keigwin 
Sir, I read with sadness that my 
good friend and neighbour. Gen- 
eral Sir John Adand (November 
24). still seeks to persuade us that 
’’Comrade” Mugabe is a 
“moderate”. This is not a view 
shared by the Matabek, slaugh- 
tered in their thousands, or by the 
prisoners in “Comrade” Mugabe’s 
jails; or by the gnat majority of a 
quarter of a million of our own 
friends and relations in Rhodesia 


whose futures were destroyed in 
1980 by a treacherous, liberal 


1980 by a treacherous, liberal 
English establishment. 

Mugabe makes no secret of his 
intention to establish a one-party 
Marxist state. Meanwhile he co- 
ordinates the attack on South 
Africa. 

For 20 years the Soviet strategy 
has been to build up huge naval 
power, to outflank Nato, over- 
throw the South African Govern- 
ment, and install a Marxist puppet 
regime in the Cape. They could 
then force the West to surrender, 
by denying us the vital strategic 
minerals needed to keep our 
factories open. 

The overriding British interest 
must be to ensure that foe Cape 
remains in friendly hands. To 
provide funds and ammunition to 
troops helping the Soviet plan is 
suicidal lunacy. 

1 hope British taxpayers will 
turn a deaf ear to John A eland's 
weD-intentioaed but misguided plea. 
Yours faithfully, 

HM KEIGWIN, 

The Old Vicarage, West Anstey, 
Soufh Mohon, Devon. 


Oxford’s plight 

From the Chairman of B. H. 
Blackwell Ltd 

Sir, The Press reports of the 
financial plight of Oxford Univer- 
sity and the stale of its library 
collections did not go unnoticed 
abroad: the China Daily I picked 
up in Beijing on November 
19 made much of them. 

One might ask how this, country 
is to carry conviction in foe face of 
commercial, technological and 
cultural competition if it is seen to 
value so little what is internation- 
ally esteemed as a national trea- 
sure as wefi as a natfonri resource. 
I am. Sir, etc, 

MILES BLACKWELL* Chairman, 
& R Blackwell Ltd, 

50 Broad Street, Oxford. 


the danger of infecting innocent 
people, but we cannot be sure that 
the reported mutations of the 
virus might not make detection 
more difficult 


Thus it is more than ever 
advisable to increase our reliance 
on home-produced factor Vm, 
even ifi in the interim, the 
achievement of self-sufficiency 
would make foe product a little 
more expensive than foe import 


Yours faithfully, 

A M. NUSSEY, 
Heron Gose, 

46 Meadow Hill Road, 

Bi rmingham 

November 24. 


ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 3 1805 


Last year, on November 7 , we 
reprinted Admiral CoUingwoods 
dispatch on the battle of Trafalgar 
(October 21, 1805).. After hie official 

version a number of less formci 
accounts were published, of which 
tiic one below is typical 


[BATTLE OF 
TRAFALGAR] 

From the GIBRALTAR 
CHRONICLE, NovJ. 

We abaD nowpiwant our readers 
with such further interesting par- 
ticulars, respecting the late impor- 
tant victory, as have come to our 
knowledge since those inserted in 
our last number. . . . 

The bravery of our seamen has 
never been doubted; but the un- 
common success and marked supe- 
riority which they displayed over 

the enemy on this gkxrilous day, are 
chiefly to be attributed to the cool 

intrepidity and discipline which 
prevailed throughout the fleet in a 
hi gh degree; a very remarkable 
proof of which is, that we have not 
beard of a single accident having 
happened on board any of our 
ships, from hurry or carelessness, 
during- the whole of the 


We do not recollect any general 
action, where bo many of our ships 
ran on board those of the enemy; 
no less than five of the French 
captured ships were engaged so 
closely, that the muzzles of our 
lower-deck guns touched those of 
the enemy; and it is worthy of 
remark, that in every instance 
where this occurred, the French- 
man immediately lowered their 
ports and deserted their guns on 
that deck; whilst our seamen, on 
the contrary, were deliberately 

Inn ding n qri fi ring tJwir gUQS With 

two- and often with three-round 
shot, which soon reduced the 
enemy's ships to a perfect wreck. 

The dreadful skuighter on board, . 
and the shattered condition of all , 
the captured ships, whilst it ahewB 
with what obstinacy the enemy in 
general fought, is a convincing 
proof of the decided superiority our 
seamen possess over foe enemy in 
dose action. 

It seems to be generally allowed 
that the French fired with more 
vivacity at the commencement of 
the action than the Spaniards; but 
that the Spaniards shewed more 
firmness and courage to thw end 
then foe French, . As enemies, 
though vanquished, their gallantly 
commands foe highest reject, end 
the humanity with which every 
RngliBh sailor that fell into their 
handg was treated, exceeds all 
praise. They refused to consider 88 
prisoners of war. snch of our 
officers and man as were driven on i 

their coast in the captured ships by 

the violence of the storm; every 
exertion was msitp from the shore 
to save their lives, and the Spanish 
soldiers were turned out of their 
beds to accommodate our 
shipwrecked seamen, who experi- 
enced every of kindness and 
attention that a generous enemy 
could bestow. 

The behaviour of the French, on 
the contrary, in several instances, 
both during, and after, the engage- 
ment, forms so melanch o ly a 
contrast to the bravery and hu- 
manity of the Spaniards, that as we 
have felt it our duty to render the 1 
latter that applause, which their 
conduct eo truly entitles them to, 
we think it equally an act of justice 
to record, with impartiality, foe 
baseness of foe French, both to 
their allies and foes. ... 

On the surrender of the 
Bucentaure, an Officer and a 
hundred men were sent to take 
possession of her, who conducted 
themselves with that moderation 
and forbearance to a vanquished 
enemy which is characteristic of 
Britons. The violent storm, which 
bo soon followed foe engagement, 
prevented the removal of the 
prisoners, and drove the 
Bucentaure towards Cadiz, when 
the Frenchmen, from their superi- 
or numbers, were easily enabled to 
take possession of the ship and 
carry her into the harbour, where, 
however, she was stranded, and 
completely wrecked The crew, and 
party of Englishmen, were ta k e n 
off the wreck by the boats of one of 
the French frigates in foe harbour, 
and carried on board of the vessel, 
where, will it be believed?, the 
infamous and cowardly crew of the 
frigate, when they saw some of the 
gallant conqnerats of their Admiral 
and his flek completely in their 
power, unarmed, and exhausted 
with fatigue and shipwreck, and 
incapable of resistance, in this 
situation, did these dastardly 
Frenchmen, in revenge for foe 
defeat they had susta i ned, assault 
and treat with foe utmost cruelty; 
and with every species of insult and 
inhumani ty, marry of the unfortu- 
nate and defenceless English pris- 
oners, whom foe firry of the 
elements, and not the fete of foe 
battle, had thus subjec t ed to then- 
power. . , . 


Bitter-sweet memory 

From Miss Pat Entract 
Sir, Mis Weston-Davies’s bottle of 
Angostura bitters (November 21) 
is comparatively youthful. 1 still 
use a bottle which has been in my 
family since about 1937 — cer- 
tainly several years before the war. 

If I remember rightly, it was 
contributed to our modest drinks 
cupboard by a rather sophisticated 
aunt It still has intact its useful 
glass dropper-pipe in the cork and 
its yellowing wrapper extols its 
many virtues, not least as “an 
excellent remedy for hysterical 


and hypochondriac attacks”. 
Yours faithfully, 


Yours faithfully, 
PAT ENTRACT, 

2 Elm Court, 
Cholmetey Park, N6. 
November 22. 


From Mr Paul Waghom 
Sir, Angostura bitters do not last 
as long if also used in sauce 
vinaigrette. 

Yours faithfully, 
PAULWAGHORN, 

9 Alfred Road, W3. 

November 21. 



18 


THF. TTMFS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 



COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December 2: The Queen, Pa- 
iron, and The Duke of Edin- 
burgh visited The Royal South- 
field Show at Earls Court this 
morning. 

Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness were received by the 
Mayor of the Royal Borough of 
Kensington and Chelsea (Coun- 
cillor John Co*) and the Presi- 
dent. Royal Smilhfield Show 
(the Lord Vestey). 

The Countess of Airiie, Mr 
Kenneth Scott and Lieutenant- 
Commander Timothy Laur- 
ence, RN, were in attendance. 

The Right Hon Margaret 
Thatcher, MP (Prime Minister 
and First Lord of the Treasury) 
had an audience of The Queen 
this evening. 

The Duke of Edinburgh this 
afternoon attended the second 
meeting of the Council of Brit- 
ish Food and Farming Year at 
Buckingham Palace. 

His Royal Highness. Patron 
of the Outward Bound Trust, 
this evening gave a Reception at 
Buckingham Palace for the 40th 
Anniversary Appeal of the 
Trust. 

The Duke of Edinburgh at- 
tended a dinner given by the 
Royal Yachting Association 
(President, Sir Maurice Laing) 
at Claridge’s. 

Brigadier Clive Robertson 
was in attendance. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips, President of the British 
Knitting and Clothing Export 
Council, this afternoon visited 
Mulberry Company (Design) 
Ltd (Managing Director, Mr 
Roger Saul) at Chilcompion and 
Midsomer Norton. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty’s Lord- 
Lieutenant for Somerset (Lieu- 
tenam-Colonri Walter Luttreli). 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Marie 
Phillips, later opened the new 
HTV West Studio and Office 
Facilities at the Television 
Centre. Bath Road. BristoL 
Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty’s Lord- 
Lieu tenant for Avon (Sir John 
Wills, BO and the Chairman of 
HTV Ltd (Mr George 
McWatters). 

Mrs Malcolm Wallace was in 
attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
December 2: Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother this evening 
honoured the Treasurer and 
Masters of the Bench at 
Lincoln's Inn with her presence 
at Dinner in Hall. 

The Dowager Viscountess 
Ham bled en and Sir Martin 
Gilliat were in attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 2: The Prince of 
Wales, Royal Patron, The 
Abbeyfield Society, gave a lun- 
cheon at Kensington Palace for 
members of the Society and 
other guests. 


His Royal Highness this after- 
noon presented the 1986 Willis 
Faber Manufacturing Effective- 
ness Awards at the Hilton Hotel 
Park Lane, Wl. 

The Hon Rupert Fairfax was 
in attendance. 

The Prince of Wales. Chair- 
man, Cambridge Common- 
wealth Trust, this evening gave 
a reception for the Trust at 
Kensington Palace; 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 2: Princess Alice, 
Duchess of Gloucester, Presi 
dent. The National Gardens 
Scheme, this morning received 
Mis Alan Hardy on relinquish- 
ing her appointment as 
Chairman. 

The Duke of Gloucester this 
morning visited Locks Heath 
Shopping Centre, Fareham, and 
later opened the Fareham Lei- 
sure Centre. His Royal Highness 
was entertained to Luncheon by 
the Mayor of Fareham (Coun- 
cillor Mrs J. Vause) at the Civic 
Offices, Fareham. and in the 
afternoon opened Gloucester 
House. Oak Street, Gosport, and 
visited St Agatha’s Church 
Portsmouth. 

The Duke of Gloucester, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen’s Flight, was attended by 
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
this afternoon opened the 
Children's Dialysis Unit at East 
Birmingham Hospital and later 
presented the prizes at the 
Bendix and Persil Togs for 
Toddlers Design Award 1986 at 
Pebble Mill Studios, Birm- 
ingham. 

Her Royal Highness travelled 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight. 

In theeveniog The Duchess of 
Gloucester, Patron of Notting 
Hill Housing Trust visited the 
Christmas Fair at Kensingtfor 
Town Halt London W8. 

Mrs Euan McConjuodale was 
in attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
December 2: The Duke of Kent 
Vice-Chairman of the British 
Overseas Trade Board, today 
opened Thorn EMI Electronics 
Umited’s new Electro Optics 
Division factory at FeJtham, 
Middlesex. 

Captain Michael CampbeU- 
Lamertcm was in attendance. 

The Duchess of Kent today 
launched HMS Upholder at 
Vickers Shipbuilding and En- 
gineering Limited, Barrow-in- 
Furness. Cumbria. 

Her Royal Highness was at- 
tended by Mrs Peter Wilmot- 
Sitwell. 

THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
December 2: Princess Alexan- 
dra was present this evening at a 
Chopin Recital given by Alan 
Kogosowski. in aid of the Help 
Poland' Fund, at St John’s. 
Smith Square, SWI. 

Lady Mary Mumfond was in 
attendance. 


Latest wills 

Mr Patrick Gee, of Giffords 
Mesne, Gloucestershire. left es- 
tate valued at £2.407,361 net. 
Miss Eveline Millicent 
Rickards, of Airaondsbuiy, 
Avon, left estate valued at 
£219,642 net. She left £800 and 
some effects to personal legatees 
and the residue to the Imperial 
Cancer Research Fund. 

Mr Jack Walter Lambert, of 
London NW3, a former literary 
editor of The Sunday Times, left 
estate valued at £237,672 net. 
Mr Cyril Henry Carrington 
Hanner, of Putney Heath, 
London, chairman and manag- 
ing director of Hanners of 
London, the stamp auctioneers, 
left estate valued at £215,085 
net 


Mexican thanks 

Mr John Stanley, Minister of 
State for the Armed Forces, has 
been presented with a plaque by 
(he Mexican Ambassador in 
recogn ition of the role played by 
the British Armed Forces in the 
disaster relief operation after 
last year's earthquake in 
Mexico. 


Correction 

The artist who designed and laid 
the mosaic at St Peter’s Church. 
Pentre, Mid Glamorgan, was Mr 
Anthony Goble, not Noble, as 
stated on November 22. 


Church news 

Appointments 

The Rev P Morley. Aastetam Corale. 
SI John. Part, and Oambilm of 
Stervwabunr HaapUaL Sheffield. tM- 
of Sheffield, to be Vicar. St 
.. worsbroufth Common, same 

diocese. 

The Rey P W Notces. Curate. 
Ludlow, diocese of Hereford, (o be 
Priesi-in-charge. Wrtttie with 
High wood, diocese of Chelmsford. 

Canon D C Pain. Priest -In-cnarge. 
Brtghton St Mary the Virgin, and SI 
James, diocese or Chichester, to be 
Vicar, same parish, same diocese. 

Canon B R Pearson. Rector. Thorpe 

St Andrew EMacopl. diocese of 
Norwich, Jobe also Rural Dean of 
Norwich fEasU. 

„ Tfie Rev J G Pescod. Rector. 
PosOetaury (Ntmney and WlUiam 
Friary. Msston Bigot. Wanstrow and 
Ooford). (Uocese Bath and Wells, to be 
Rector. MOvertmt with Hat* and 
FUzhead. same diocese. 

The Rev K J Pillar. Array Chanlatn. 
to be Rector. unMed benefice. Curry 
Rive! with nvehead and Swell, 
diocese of Bath and weDo. 

. TT** "S' C RandaD. Curate. St 
James. Carlisle, to be Rural curate 
Rural Deanery of Braiaston. same 
diocese. 

The Rev K Richard s. Chaplain to the 
Derbyshire College OfHtgber educa- 
tion. to be Vicar. RotDngdean St 
Mannret. and Resources Officer to 
Ihe bjooesan Education Team, diocese 
of Chichester. 

The Rev R M RUmuer. Rector. 
Roujfham. and Prlest-ln-cbarge. 


of st 

Edmund&bury and Ipswich, to be 
Ail Saints, same 


brooke. diocese 

_ r id 

Vicar. Newmarket, 
diocese. 

,_Th«- «ev M j R Riggs, curate. 
Eastbourne St Andrew, diocese of 
Chichester, to be Curate. Hove St 
Patrick wtlh Christ Church and Si 
Andrew (Waterloo Stray, same <tt- 

The Rev P Stonier. Assistant 
Curate. Atherstey a Heim, diocese of 
wahtfeki. (o be Vicar, nine parts*. 

The Rev A Viney. Curate Cnorv 
glnend laryl... Clayton st John the 
Baptist wiui Keymer St Cosmos and St 
Damian, diocese of Chichester, to be 

same diocese. 

_ The Rev W Wade. Rector. Moresby, 
st Bridget, diocese of CarttafetoW 
Vicar. Langdale. Holy Trtntty. same 
diocese. 

The Rev M G wooders on . vicar. 
Chaaetown. diocese of UchfiekL to be 
also Rural Dean of UcMMd. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Leslie Ames, 81; Mr Welter 
Anderson, 76, Mr Trevor Bai- 
ley. 63; Mr Charles Craig. 66; Mr 
Mike Gibson. 44; SirWilliam 
Harpham, 80; Professor G. S. 
Kirk, 65; Miss Tanya 
Motseiwiisch, 72; Air Marshal 
Sir Douglas Morris, 78: the Rev 
Professor C F. D. Mottle, 78; 
Mr Victor Pasmore, CH, 78; 
Pro fe ssor Sir Thomas Smith, 

QG 71. 

Luncheons 

HM Government 

Mr Malcolm Rifltiud, QC, Sec- 
retary of State for Scotland, and 
Mrs Rifirind were hosts at a 
luncheon held yesterday at Do- 
ver House, Whitehall, in honour 
of the visit to London of the 
Right Rev Professor Robed 
Craig, Moderator of the General 
Assembly of the Church of 
Scotland. 

Royal Yachting Association 
The Duke of Edinburgh at- 
tended a dinner given by the 
Royal Yachting Association last 
night at Claridge’s hotel in 
honour of Mr John Durie. Sir 
Maurice Laing. president, was 
in the chair. 

Ista^ParlhiBientary Union 
Mr David Crouch, MP, Chair- 
man of the British Group of the 
Inter-Parliamentary Union, was 
host at a luncheon held at the 
House of Commons yesterday 
in honour of an Egyptian Par- 
liamentary delegation led by Dr 
Mohamed Hassan El Zayat 

West tmtiu Committee 
The West India Committee, the 
West Indies Trade Advisory 
Group and the British Carib- 
bean Parliamentary Group held 
_ luncheon at the Dorchester 
hotel yesterday in honour of the 
Prime Minister of Barbados. Sir 
George Bishop, President of the 
West India Committee, pre- 
sided. The High Commissioners 
for Barbados and Guyana were 
among those presenL 

Royal College of Physicians 
Sir Raymond Hofienbera, Presi- 
dent of the Royal College of 
Physicians, gave a luncheon 
yesterday at the col lege for the 
Friends of the College. Among 
those present w ere : 

The Co un Mm at Limerick. Ldftl Carr 
of Hadley. Sir Kenneth 
Mark Barlh 

Prof easor Sir 

Perm. Sir WUUaxn 
Lloyd. MT 

Mr J MCA 

Sedgman and 

Reception 

National Association of Local 
Cornells 
Mr Dill wyn Miles, Chairman of 
the National Association of 
Local Councils, was host at a 
reception held yesterday at the 
London Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr G Brranage 

and the Hon Jaquufne 
Thellasson 

The engagement is announced 
betweenChartes, son of Colonel 
and Mrs Nigel Bromagft, of 
Bartend House, . Presteigne, 
Powys, and Jaqumine, youngest 
Hiuighii-r of Lord and Lady 
Rendiesham, of Glebe Place, 
London. 

Mr GF. Cater 
and Mrs WJ. Russell 

The engagement is announced 
between Charles, son of Mr and 
the Hon Mis Francis Gator, of 
Ran worth, Norfolk, and Jane 
Russell, widow of William Rus- 
sell, and daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Robert CuIverweU, Luck- 
ington, Wiltshire. 

Mr T.C Edhwd 

and Miss S.C. Johnstone 

The engagement is announced 
between Timothy, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs Allan Edlund, of 
Eastbourne, and Sally, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Charles 
Johnstone, of Colchester. 

Mr AJD.Car! 

and Miss LM Marks 

The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr and 
Mrs Ted Carl of Santa Cruz, 
California, and Lucy, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Give Marks, of 
London, NW2. 


Captain M.P. CampbeJI- 
Lamertorf 

and MissGGMaxse 
The engagem ent is announced 
between Michael CampbelT 
Lamenon, Scots Guards, son. of 
Colonel and Mrs Michael 
Campbetl-Lamenon, of $hip- 
ston-on-Stour, Warwickshire, 
and Clare Caroline, daughter of 
Colonel and Mrs Martin Maxse, 
of Great Fishenon, Bishops 
Tawton, Barnstaple, north 
Devon. 

Mr J J. EDard 
and Miss NJVL Pngh 

The engagement is announced 
between John Francis, only son 
of Mr and Mis J-E. EDard, of 
Eysins. Vaud, Switzerland, and 
Nicola Marigo, eldest daughter 
of the late Mr J.D. Pugh and Mrs 
KLM. Pugh, of Hythe, Kent. 

Mr KJi. Faber 
and Miss ILA. Picldn 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, yo unger son of 
Mr and Mrs Jack Faber, of 
Funtington. West Sussex and 
Hong Kong, and Kim, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs David Pickm, of 
Windsor, Berkshire. 

Mr JJL Gage 

and Miss AJVLR. McKenzie 
The engagement is announced 
between John, younger son of 
Mr and Mis Wl. Gage, of 
Pinner, Middlesex, and Alexan- 
dra, younger daughter of Dr and 
Mrs K.T.C. McKenzie, of Soli- 
hull West Midlands. 


Mr RA, Jennings 
and Miss SJ. Whitfield 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, son of the Rev 
John and Mis Jennings, of 
lognsoll, Ontario, Canada, and 
Sarah , yo unger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Ray Whitfield, of 
Kensington. 

Mr TJtW. Lapage-Norris 

and Miss RN. Verney 
The engagement is announced 
between Thomas, eldest son of 
Captain T F. Lapage-Nonis, of 
Wortnn. Wiltshire, and Mrs 
S.R. Lapege-N orris, of Lussac, 


Dordogne. France, and Henri- 
etta. younger daughter of Major 
P.V.L. Verney. ofChalfond Hill, 
Gloucestershire, and Mis C 
Verney. of Ewen, Glouc- 
estershire. 

MrMJ. MRhelson 
and Miss D-M- Vickers 
The engagement is announced 
between Muir, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs J-EL Michelson, of 
Douglas, Isle of Man. and Debt, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mis 
P. Vickers, of Greeba Bridge, 
Isle of Man. 

Mr J. Wyn-Evans 
and Miss PXJ. King 
The engagement is announced 
between John, only son of the 
late Dr RJ. Evans and Mrs 
Gwenfor George and stepson of 
Mr David Lloyd George, of 
Swansea, and Philippa Gab- 
rielie, only daughter of Mr and 
Mis Philip King, of Barnes, 
London. 


Sale room echoes to falling 
records and rising hisses 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 




Dinners 


Speaker 
The Speaker gave a dinn er in 
Speaker’s House yesterday eve- 
ning in honour of a Par- 
liamentary delegation from 
Egypt. The Ambassador of 
Egypt was present and among 
the other guests were: 

Mr Ernest Armstrong. MP. Mr 9tan- 

K Orrae. MP. Mr Robert AUdos. MP. 

David Crouch. MP. Mr Kenneth 

Eastham. MP. Mr Andrew FauldS. 

MP. Mr Cecfl Franks. MP. to warren 

Hawkstey. MP. Mr Atari Howarth, 

MP. Mr Gregory Knight. MP. Mr 
Lewis. MP. Mr Hngh 

IT, M P. to Seamus Malkm. 

MP. Mr Trevor SkeeL MP. Mr James 

Spicer. MP. Mr Robert Warsing. MP. 

to John WhUMd. MP. Mrs 0rwg*o 
— Lteutenanl-Cokmel ‘ “ — 


med Aly Kegazy. Captain Peter Shaw 

the Rev Dr John Tudor and to Peter 
mean. 

Farmers' Gob 

Mr A. J. M. Holmes, President 
of the Farmers' Gub, presided 
at the annual dinner held last 
night at Grosvenor House. Sir 
John Harvey-Jones and Mr B. 
T. G. Nicholson also spoke. The 
guests included: 

Lord and 

and Lady . 

Courisy. Mr and Mis j h m Norris 
and to and Mrs T w KeraHey 


J Lady vestey. Sir Michael 
Lady Franklin. Mr and Mrs S A 


Conservative Group for Europe 
Mr Ian Taylor, Chairman of the 
Conservative Group for Europe, 
presided at a dinner held last 
night at Church House, West- 
minster. Mr Kenneth Clarke, 
QC MP, was the guest of 
honour and Mr Tom Spencer 
also spoke. 

Lecture 

Charterhouse 

Lord Dane of Glanton, Master 
of Peterhouse, Cambridge, de- 
livered the Sir Robert Biiiey 
memorial lecture at 
Charterhouse yesterday. 


Christie's have launched 
London's week of Impressionist 
and modern picture sales with an 
explosion of new high prices. 

Nevertheless, New York's 
glittered had not followed the 
market to London and were not 
available to soak up the indif- 
ferent pictures at the crazy price 
levels of two weeks ago. A big 
contingent of buyers from Ja- 
pan, some oa the telephone and 
some in person, went a little way 
to make up for the American 
absense on the prettier, more 
colourful works. 

Besides Che £7.7m31ion Ma- 
net, the £l.tmiBioa for Leger's 
“Lea Trob Peraonoages" of 
1920 gave die biggest hoist to 
the doubting pre-sale 

estimates and setting a new 
auction price record for the 
artist. 

It was bought over the tele- 
phone from Japan. By 
cempariou, the rich tow-life 
sceae by Toulouse-Lautrec at 
£i.76miUioa (estimate £1.5m- 
fywif wwijMl- PiewunmMy 
the Emopean dealer who bought 
it takes the same view and is 
hoping to resell it for more. 

The maim sale was not without 
mishap. The hammer fell for 
Mondrian's “Cbmpositioa with 
red, yellow and blue" at 
£600,000 to a buyer on die 
telephone. Jan Krngier, the 


Geneva dealer, then protested 
that his follow-on bid had been 
ignored. The telephone by that 
twn* bad been disconnected: the 
bidder had to be tracked down 
and the picture reoffered. 

Krngier then offered an extra 
£5,000 and an argument broke 
out as to whether the auctioneer 
would accept so small an in- 
crement. In Ignorance of die 
argument the anxious collector 
on the telephone came in with a 
£700,000 bid. The hammer fell 
again and the assembled dealers 
expressed their feelings, by 
hissing, that the telephone Ud- 
der had been cheated out of 
£100,000 by the confustoo. 

Yesterday morning the collec- 
tion of Mr and Mrs Philip 
Goldberg, a charming private 
collection of lesser pain tings and 
sculptures, removed from their 
home in Eaton Square, was 
greeted with extraordinary 
enthusiasm and made almntf 
double the auctioneer’s estimate 
at £4 iJmflBoa with every let 
finding a buyer. 

A small Matisse, “Jeime fiDe 
en robe Manche", soared to 
£429,000 (estimate £120,000- 
£150,000) while a Matisse 
bronze, “Head of Jeanette IT 
made £231,000 (estimate 
£70^)00-£90,000). The Van 
Gogh Foundation In Amsterdam 
complemented the Goldbergs’ 


taste by spending £82£00 (es- 
timate £50,000^60.000) to se- 
cure a Van Gogh drawing made 
in Drenthe in 1883, *Le lever dn 
solefl” . 

Sotheby's yesterday sold the 
manuscript of a thirteenth cen- 
tury Bible, Qhmiinated ha Nor- 
mandy, for fiie ninth time. The 
price history is revealing; 2745 
£3-6s, 1776 £l .6s, 1844 £15.10$, 
1891 £104, 1898 £302. 1906 
£630, 2909 £190, 1975 £15,000 
and 1986 £176,000. 

It was bought on this occasion 
by Maggs, the London dealers. 
The best mannscripts in 
Sotheby's sale fetched prices 
that were slightly lower than 
expected while middle range and 
cheaper items were body com- 
peted for. The top price in the 
sale was £198.000 (estimate 
£200,000-£300,000) for a Paris 
Book of Boors of about 1412, 
while a Hungarian prayer book 
of around 1425 secured £88,000 
(estimate £30,000-£50J)00). The 
sale totalled £1408,418 with 
less than one per cent left 
unsold. 

The four sessions of sales 
devoted to the collection of the 
Comtesse Mona Bismarck by 
Sotheby's in Monaco finished 
yesterday with a total of £23mJl- 
lion and only one per cent 
unsold. 


OBITUARY 

DR JOHN GIBBONS 

Adventurous scientist 


Dr John Gibbons. zoologisL 
who discovered the cresied 
i guana died in a boating 
accident off the South Pacific 
island of Lakeba on Novem- 
ber 15. He was 40. 

John Richard Hutchinson 
Gibbons was born at 
Dunmow. Essex, on June 3, 

1 946. a member of a brewing 
family. It is recalled how, as a 
child, he knocked on a 
neighbour’s door at dawn, 
asking to be let in to catch a 
rare butterfly he had spied 
through their bedroom 
window. 

He was educated at 
Bioxham and at Sheffield 
University. He then went to 
Ontario, where he worked for 
a time on the conservation of 
inland fish-stocks. With the 
zoologist Jane Goodall he 
then went to a jungle outpost 
in Tanzani a, spending the 
next year studying 
chimpanzees. 

But he found this a lonely 
job and departed for Adelaide, 
where he took his doctorate, 
before moving to a lecturing 
post at the University of the 
South Pacific in Fiji. His 
colleagues there found him an 
inspired teacher. 

He first achieved note 
among fellow zoologists for an 
elegant paper on the fly insect, 
megarhyssa. But bis major 
achievement came in 1982 
with the discovery of the 


crested iguana (brachylophus 
vitiensis). a hitherto unrecord- 
ed species, on the remote 
Pacific island of Yadatuaba. 
Gibbons gave it a Fijian name: 
vokai votovoio. 

As a result of his efforts to 
safeguard these rare lizards the 
island became Fiji's first wild- 
life sanctuary. 

Though his interest in the 
region's herpetofouna never 
waned, he turned his attention 
to studying the arrival of man 
in the islands. With a col- 
league, Fergus Clunie, he pub- 
lished a paper in the journal 
Pacific History challenging the 
accepted view that the islands 
were first colonised no more 
than 4.000 years ago. 

Gibbons maintained that 
man had in fact arrived much 
earlier, and that evidence of 
this had been swept away by 
changes in sea levels brought 
about by ice-age glacial move- 
ments. At the time of his death 
he had secured financial assis- 
tance from the National Geo- 
graphical Society to research 
this theory. 

Gibbons was an abrasive 
and determined man with a 
zest for debate. He was a good 
fisherman, and amassed a 
fascinating collection of shells. 

He married his Chinese 
wife. Lily Wong, in 1981. She. 
with their son and daughter, : 
perished with him. 


DR HERBERT RGSENFELD 


psychoanalysis alone. At that 
time Rosenfeld faced not only 
the scepticism and hostility of 
the psychiatric establishment, 
but also the opposition of 
Nurnbeig on July 2, 1910. He. colleagues belonging to a dis- 
qualified as a doctor in Mu- ferent school of thought. 


Dr Herbert Rosenfeld, psy- 
choanalyst died on Novem- 
ber 29. He was 76. 

Herbert Alexander 
Rosenfeld was born at 


Memorial service 


Prince Georg of Denrairk 
The Queen was represented by 
the Earl of Airiie and the Duke 
of Edinburgh fry General Sir 
Pbter Whitdey at a memorial 
service for Prince Georg of 
Denmark held in Westminster 
Abbey on Monday. Queen 
Hizabeth the Queen Mother 



5Otki a 09t*rsenrt$&6 

lij ARTHRITIS RESEARCH 


Major Tax Concessions on Charity Contributions 

NOW A DONATION WILL 
WORK EVEN HARDERTOWARDS 
AN EARLY CERE 


Arthritis has no respect for age. Although it is true 
that two out of three people over 65 in our Countiy 
today suffer from it, so do millions of the not so old, 
including many of your employees and their families. 
And also including, sadly some 152)00 chSdren. In 
fact, rheumatic disease results in 80 million lost 
working days to Industry each yeat 

The Arthritis and Rheumatism Council is the only 
Charity in the UK financing medical research into all 
aspects of this painful, disabling and all too common 
but as yet incurable disease. 

Contributions bom your workforce will play a key 
role in our earlier discovery of the cure. 

Up to £100 Tax-free with Contributions at Source 

As you will know, the new Payroll Deduction 

Scheme to be introduced on 6th April 1987, enables 
people in work to donate up to £100 per year to 
Chanty from their pay, before tax. Tne advantages are 

THE ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM 
COUNCIL FOR RESEARCH 


Working to 
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£71 in real terms. This will not wily give a crucial 
extra £29 for our research at no extra expense io the 

donation can be used to evei?h^CT^^a^ 

Today, we’re spending ova £6 million annually 
on our search for an early cure to arthritis. W 2 receive 
no State Aid whatsoever and rely entirely on 
voluntary contributions. The ftyroD Deduction Scheme 
could make an important differeice to Rheumatofogjcal 
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Please take the first step towards helping us End an 
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was present 

The Queen of Denmark and 
the Prince of Denmark at- 
tended. The King of Norway 
was represented by the Norwe- 
gian Ambassador. The Prince of 
Wales was represented by Sir 
John Riddell and Princess Mar- 
garet by the Hon Mrs Wills. 
Princess Alice Duchess of 
Gloucester and the Duke and 
Duchess of Gloucester were 
present The Duke and Duchess 
of Kent were represented by 
Lieutenant-Commander Sir 
Richard Buckley. Prince Mi- 
chael of Kent attended and 
Princess Alexandra was repre- 
sented by the Hon Angus 
Ogilvy. 

King Michael and Queen 
Anne of Rumania and King 
Constantine and Queen Anne- 
Marie of the Hellenes attended. 
The Crown Prince of Norway 
was represented Captain Senior 
Grade Tor Nikdaisen. Princess 
Maigaretha of Sweden and Mr 
John Ambler, Princess Mar- 
garita of Baden and the Crown 
Prince and Crown Princess 
Alexander of Yugoslavia were 
present 

The Dean ofWestminster, the 
Very Rev Michael Mayne, 
officiated, assisted by the Rev 
Alan Lufl precentor. Lady 
Elizabeth Shakerley, step- 
daughter, read from John 
Bimyan’s Pilgrim's Progress and 
the Earl of Lichfield (stepson) 
from the works of Canon Henry 
Scon Holland. The Bishop of 
Brechin, Primus of Scotland, 
and the Rev PouJ Erik 


- Fabridus, Chaplain of the Dan- 
ish Church, said prayers. 

The Regimental Colours of 
the Royal Danish Life Guards 
were carried in procession by 
First Lieutenant E. Roug and 
WOl P.S. Larsen and placed on 
the High Altar by the Dean. 
Prince Georg’s Orders and 
Decorations were borne through 
the quire to the sacrarium by Mr 
Albert Nice and Petty Officer C. 
Anker. The Right Rev Edward 
Knapp-Fish er, the Rev B. 
Larsen, Danish Seamen's 
Church, Canon Sebastian 
Charles, Canon Trevor Beeson 
and Canon Anthony Harvey 
were robed and in the sacrar- 
inm. 

The Lord Mayor of West- 
minster attended and among 
others present were: 

Sir Geoffrey StiakerVy (Stepson-tn- 
l*wl, Min Plana Shake rlev 
WemnHWigtaiCoail and Count- 
ess Flemming of Rosenborg (brother 
and stoler-ln-law). Mr Peter Somervell 
ibrother-m-tew), .Count Chrtttlan of 
Rosenborg. Mias Katherine Somervell. 
Mr and Mri Kogevlnw. Mr S Wand 
Lady Mary Clayton. Major Sir John 
Wtagtn. Mr B H e Wigtfn. 

Members of the OpkxnaEc Corps. 
U»e Duke of FHe. RafaeUe Duchess of 
Leinster, ihe Countess of UctUJekl. me 
Countess of ^Scarbrough. Countess 
Beauchamp, the Earl and Countess of 
tnchcape. Countem St AWwvn. Vis- 
count Crtdgavon (House of Lords 
representative ofme Anglo-Dantsb 
Parliamentary .Group). Viscount and 
Viscountess SUm. Lord and Lady 
daroiv Lora and Lady Kllkam. Lora 
and Lady Otmlhorpe. Lord and Lady 
McFadzean- Lady LyeU. Lady Angela 
Oswald. Ihe Hon Hugh and Mrs 
o-NeUL the Hen Diana MafcgtiL Sir 
Anthony^ Meyer. MP. and Lady 

Meyer. Sir Andrew " ‘ 

Danish Society]. Sir . . 

Hon Lady de ZUueta. 

Dodds-Parfcer (Special 
with sir BrootaFhchards and Croup 
Captain H B Verity. Lieutcnant- 
CokxieJ sir Brie Penn. Sir CoMn Cole. 
Sir Seymour Egerton. Dame Anne 
Warburto o. M r., George and Lady 
CUbao Kenesc. Mr Marmsduke and 
Lady Susan Huasey. Mr Michael and 
the Hon Mrs Cunningham. 

„Dr Atap oEti. MP (House of 
Commons representative Anqto-Dan- 
tsh Parliamentary Group}. aSonet C 
D Burgess lAraodaUon of Military 
Attache) md Mrs Buroeas. Lietden- 
ani-Cotone! G J W Malrt [Foreign 
Liaison Section. Mliustiy of Defence). 
Lieuienanr-Ootonel J T Sutherland 
(Edzefl cotf Club) and Mrs smher- 
land. Rear-Admiral M D KVrle Pope 
iHertrorasWre Society) and Mrs Kyrte 
Pom, Miss Lise Schouboe (Danttfi 
YWCA in London). 


Philip antTlK! 


Oundle School 

The Oundle Appeal for £1 
million launched on October 2, 
reached £500.000 on November 
26. Work on the sports hall 
began on December I and 
conversion of the gymnasium 
into a library will start next July. 
The Director of the Appeal is 
Mr Roger Frcebaim and the 
Appeal Office is in Church 
Street, Oundle, (0832-73434). 


Rosemead School 
Uttlehampton 

Dr Margaret Rule, Research 
Director of the Mary Rose 
Trust, will open the new sixth 
form house at Rosemead 
School Uttlehampton, on Sat- 
urday, December 6, at 10.30 am. 
The chairman of governors 
welcomes all old girls, parents 
and friends to attend the 
ceremony. 


Lancaster Ball 

The Lancaster Ball will be held 
at the Savoy Hotel on New 
Year’s Eve. Music will be by 
Johnny Howard's Moonlight 
Serena ders and Ricky Valente 
and the cabaret is by The 
Pegasus Band of The Parachute 
Regiment. Tickets, at £100 per 
person , including a champagne 
reception and five course gala 
dinner, are available from Hie 
Savoy Hotel's New Year’s Eve 
office. Telephone: 01-836 4343. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr Bradford Morse, formerly 
administrator of the United 
Nations development pro- 
gramme, to be a member of the 
Hunger Project Trust’s global 
board of directors. 

Miss Jessica Pnlay, of Christ 
Church, to be President of the 
Oxford Union Society for Trin- 
ity Term, 1987. 


Science report 


Wider vision of road safety 


The complex sequence of visual 
and mental events that lead to a 
child becoming involved in a 
road accident - or escaping - is 
being unravelled by research 
workers at Leeds University. 
Their results question present 
assumptions about the com- 
petence of young children to 
notice approaching vehicles and 
make decisions about crossing 
the road. 

Casualty figures show the 
vulnerability of children be- 
tween die ages of 5 and 14; 
nearly 30,000 child pede s t r ians 
are involved in road accidents 
each year and last year 5,656 
were killed or seriously injured. 

It has been assumed that die 
peripheral vision in six-year- 
olds has a much narrower range 
than that of 1 1 -year-olds, which 
Is similar to that of adults; and 
that because boys are almost 
twice as likely to be involved In 
traffic accidents than girls, fe- 
males have better peripheral 
vision than males. 

Dr Siriol David, Professor 
Tony Chapman. Dr Hugh Foot 
and Dr Noel Sheehy investi- 


/ 


By Peter Brock 

gated the role of peripheral 
vision in children. Sixty-fomr 
volunteers aged from seven to 23 
(the adults were controls in die 
experiment) were shown a sets 
of lights positioned around a 
semi-circle, functioning ran- 
domly at extreme and mid- 
peripheral vision. Their 
attention was foensed at the 
centre of the semi-circle and 
they had to report the incidence 
of light changes at either 
periphery. 

The seven-year-olds were less 
reliable than the others In 
detecting when the lights 
c han ge d, being poor with move- 
ments in the extreme periphery. 
But when they did detect Change, 
they were bo slower than the 
others. Their best scores occ- 
urred in the left visual field. 
There were no differences m 
performance between the sexes. 

The second experiment, using 
film, involved real traffic. Again 
attention was foensed on a point 
ahead of the subjects at the 
centre of the screen, the traffic 
action being confined to either 
periphery. 


The results did not provide 
evidence that younger children, 
particularly boys, are relatively 
poor .at responding to visual 
peripheral activity. 

Dr David and her colleagues 
say that the experiments suggest 
there are few substantial dif- 
ferences hi the peripheral vision 
of children and adults, although 
the missing of some movements 
by the seven-year-olds has seri- 
ous implications for their safety 
on the road. 

As for making decisions to 
cross the road, the evidence 
suggests that they are more 
cautions than adults, which flies 
against the interpretation of 
casualty figures. 

Dr David points out that the 
ad a Its made their decisions to 
cross more rapidly than the 
children, giving themselves 
more time, so that greater 
caution cannot be assumed 
among children. They simply 
leave themselves narrower 
safety m a r gins . 

Source: The British Journal of 
Psychology. 1986.77.4. 


nich in 1934. but being a Jew 
was not allowed 10 practice. 

He emigrated to England in 
1 935, and was soon working at 
the Edinburgh Royal Infirma- 
ry. Later, he worked at the 
Maudsley Hospital and the 
Tavistock Clinic, London. 

At the end of the Second 
World War he trained to 
become a psychoanalyst with 
M. Klein. After qualifying, he 
soon became a training ana- 
lyst, working mainly in pri- 
vate practice. He also taught at 
the Institute of Psychoanalysis 
for more than 30 years. 

His main interest was in the 
treatment of psych otics. In 
this field his work has to be 
acknowledged as that of a 
pioneer. Together with W. R. 
Bion, H. Segal and others he 
belonged to the group of 
psychoanalysts who had the 
chance to work with Klein 
during the most creative peri- 
od of her career. 

In 1 946 Klein published her 
famous paper, “Notes on 
Some Schizoid Mechanisms”. 
Using her insight and clinical 
ocperience, but also his own 
intuition and outstanding 
clinical talent, Rosenfeld pub- 
lished in 1947 a case history 
called “Analysis of a Schizo- 
phrenic State with De- 
personalisation". 

This made history because 
it was the first detailed de- 
scription of a psychotic pa- 
tient successfully treated by 


Yet, comforted by his first 
success and by the creative 
atmosphere of the Klein 
group, he continued his work, 
soon achieving an internation- 
al reputation. He was several 
times invited to North and 
South America, and gave lec- 
tures and seminars all over 
Europe, until the last mouth of 
Ms life. 

In 1965 be published ■ his 
first coDection of papers in a 
book called Psychotic States, 
which was immediately ac- 
knowledged as a classic and 
translated into several lan- 
guages. His further contribu- 
tions focused mainly on 
problems of technique, on 
psychosomatic conditions and 
borderline cases in general. 

Particularly important are 
his researches into the destruc- 
tive aspects of narcissism. A 
book called Impasse and In- 
terpretations into the Psycho- 
analytic Process, is due to 
appear next year. 

Tall and thin, but also 
strong, Rosenfeld had a warm 
character and a subtle sense of 
humour, though at times he 
might appear a little distant 
He belonged to the generation 
of Middle European artists, 
intellectuals and scientists 
with which Hiller’s madness 
enriched their countries of 
refuge. 

He leaves a wife, Lottie, two 
daughters and a son. 


DESI ARNAZ 


Desi Amaz, who was Lucille 
Ball's partner in one of 
television's most enduring 
sitcoms, and also at the time 
her husband, died yesterday. 
He was 69. 


television, and were also lead- 
ing Hollywood socialites. 

Amaz was the driving force 
behind the success of Desilu, 
but in 1960 the popularity of 
its shows waned, as did the 
In the / Love Lucy series he Amaz-Ball relationship. Both 
played Ricky Ricardo, the the business and their mar- 
dashing Cuban bandleader be- riage ended that year. In 1963 
devilled by a zany wife (Ball), he married Edith Mack 
He was bom in Cuba on Hirsch. 

March 2, 1917, and his foil n.,nne hi« miimmmi h» 

ETdS°lK ™ n !he“rfo™?„™rf' C ht 

SoToflsm 'iS't 

the United States where his ^76 published m 

first job was cleaning bird- 

^1938 £ formed his ow, I ADY HERMON 
small band and appeared at R. J. a. writes : 

toce that became a natmrS ^ ^ 


craze. He then moved to New 
York, where he was soon cast 
in the Broadway musical Too 
Many Girls. 


the 

Hermon, the 
wife of the Chief Constable of 
the Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary, referred briefly to her 


An RKO executive signed Xtra SStoSilS wCl** 
him to appear in the movie 

version ofthe show, which SlSSS «^ 2 jf ,,n * ,ll S 011 i n 
starred Miss Ball. They were selfless andqulti; 

mamed soon after the film lstan ng ‘ 
was completed. As president of the RUC 

Amaz then toured the coun- Widows’ Association she 
fry with his own band while made it her persona] task not 
Jus wife remained in films, only to visit the widoW or 
During the Second World War parents of every police officer 
he was in the Army for three killed on duty (more than 100 
. during the past six years) but 

Atter the war, he formed also, most importantly, 10 
anot her touring band and keep in touch with ihem 
became musical director of subsequently. 

Bob Hope's network radio 


show. Both he and Lucille Ball 
were intrigued by television 
and, when CBS offered to 
present the husband-wife 


In addition, she spent a 
great deal of time visiting in 
hospital the much larger num- 
ber of officers who have been 
seriously injured, and often 


team as the stars of / Love V'J aao oneu 

Lucy, they readily agreed. By P® l ™® ne njJy disabled, in ter- 
1955, they had bought RKO ro Z! s L : inc,t ^ nl *-^i , s wasajob 
and become the mosasuccess- ^.Z!3£ i ' h £ hysi !* lly 
fill comedy producers in tele- ®™°V ona ^ exhausting, call- 
m «ie ing for 00 ^,^ as well — 

understanding and tacL 


vision. 

As well as being a natural 
comedian, Amaz was an as- 
tute businessman and a pio- 
neer in television comedy, 
introducing the three-camera 
technique employed in most 
sitcoms to this day. 

He and Lucille" Ball estab- comfort and console" 
lished a television company 
called « - • - 


as 


Jean brought to it a combi- 
nation of warmth and hu- 
mour, and an unfailing 
sensitivity which earned the 
gratitude and affection of all 
those whom she set out to 


The work was done entirely 


thiM H^n^od « C h- ° V T d ^ om ostentation or pubUc- 
S ° l SJS? 1 ,S? dl °* Fo I !, y- but was- widely recognized 

rcigned r and aw**** m deforce 
the king and queen of and the community. 


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*S-i 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES 
DEATHS 


LMra to im. OMant notions. you vmntr 

j£5 # ^^ ad,M 1 was “«tiu£ 
Lord am me and asroinled m u k_ 
nts servant. skwik 

■MWl 49. a 


BEMi - On November 77 th, 10 Eto»- 
n0T SS* y. (chersl «« Christopher. a 
soo jonn Hcnrv. a brother for Sarah. 
James and Emma 

PUC 8 AN ■ On November 20lh to 
Amanda and Toby, a son. John 
Alasdair Gawein. 

CAWBEU. - On 30th November, to 
Sabrina (rife Walbeoffe-Witocai) and 
Doodas. a son. Billy. a brother lor 
Tbnya and Jack. 

FAT ALIOS - On 29th November, at 
Mount AJvpmia Hospital, cufldfbrd 
to victona (nee Parnell) and Mark, a 
eon. Georoe Mark 

CASroti - On November 23rd. to Jane 
(Me Tyndalii and David, a son. 
Beniamin David. 


- On November 27th. at 
Kings College Hospital, to Monica 
and Anthony, a son, Guy, a brother 
to AMgafl and Lauren. 

CWMSHAVt - On December la. In Do- 
ver. Lo Rachel (nee Kinnainl) and 
Eying, a daughter. Kali? Elizabeth. 

MARTIN SOUTH - On November 29th 
1986. to Jenny and Andrew, twin 
daughters. 

HOFFATT ■ On November 30tli ( St 
Andrews Day), to Sarah Jane (Me 
Calling) and Alexander Robert, a 
son. Alexander George. 

PAVER - On November 29th. at 
Mai ion Hospital, to Tina (Me Burke) 
and Stua rt a son dawn) 

ROBERTS - On November 28th. a! 
Foresiertitll Hospital. Aberdeen, to 
Jaoqoi (Me Anthony Jackman) and 
David, a daughter Bryony Charlotte, 
a sister (or Philippa. Stewart. 
S amant ha and Rachael. 

SCMPPER - On November 27th. Lon- 
don. a Thanksgiving baby boy. 
Christobber George Tray Jr. brother 
to Other, son to Dudley and Chrts. 
grandson la Christopher and LesUe 
Brands. Cornells and Sabine 
Schi taper. 

TIMONEY - On November 29th 1986. 
m NeuiUy. lo Ines (Me Vergara) and 
Charles, a son. Sebastian Craig 
Sylvaln. 

TUCKER - On December 2nd. to Cath- 
erine (Me Scott-Maiden) and Paul, or 
Malvern, a daughter Laura Mary. 

WtLDSnrm - On November 29th. at 
Basingstoke District HopllaL lo 
Sldla (Me Dyson) and Max. a daugh- 
ter. Katie Louise. 

WINTER • On November 22nd at 
Wythenshawe Hospital, to Patricia 
iMe Seller*.) and Marcus a daughter 
Victoria Claire, a aster for Rebecca. 


AHERY - On 27th Nove m btr. In Ids 
83rd year, peacefully at SMnwuth. 
Devon. Richard Gregory. 3rd son of 
Frederick and Charlotte of Bath. Be- 
loved husband of Linda, dearly loved 
father of Philip. Christopher and 
Heather. Loving father In law of Car- 
oline and Kale and modi loved 
grandfather of Caroline. Fiona. 
Timothy. Nicola. Benjamin. Dante]. 
Edward and Nicholas. Funeral Ser- 
vice Salcombe Regis on S(h 
December at 2.30 pm. Flowers for 
me Church. No Wreaths please. A 
Memorial Service wfll be held at SL 
Nicholas' Church. Winstey nr Brad- 
ford on Avon on 16th December at 
noon at which aU wffl be welcome. 

BAMMLEY - On November 29th. stsl- 
denly. Ronald BackUtey. dearly loved 
. husband of Noreen. much loved fa- 
ther of Francesca and Nkole and ‘Pa’ 
to Emma and Ramon. Sendee and 
cremation on Thusday 4th December 
Bt l .as pm. Breakspear Cremalort- 
um. Rinslip. All aujuirtes to W S 
Bead Ltd 01 567 0422. 

BIRO - On November 28th. peacefttBy 
after an illness bravely borne bi hos- 
pital. Major Leonard Stewart (Dickie) 
Bird aged 68. of Octavta Road. Me- 
worth. Middlesex. Former Malor of 
the 23rd Kina's African Rifles and 
ex-CoirtmanOo. Funeral Service at 
. South West M kWleswc CremaXori irm 
on Thursday December Slh ax 11am. 

BOIVC- On November 3QHi 1986. at 
Bournemouth. Helen Margaret, afted 
80 years. Wire of the late Cart Gus- 
tav Boivle and formerly of is 
Holland Park. WI1. Funeral service 
Thursday December 4th at 1 1 .45am 
al Bournemouth Q-eraaiortura. Fam- 
ily flowers only. 

CURRAN - On 2nd December 1986. 
Paul, at Wimbledon. Requiem Man 
at 10 am on Tuesday 9th December 
at Sacred Heart Church. Edge WO. 
Wimbledon swi 9. Putney Vale Cre- 
matorium at 11 am. Family flowers, 
donations to Heart Foundation. 

Cismss - On November 28th. Richard 
Ralsioun Constable, win be sadly 
missed by hit family and Mends. 
Service at St Frantss Church. High 
Wycombe on Friday 5th December 
at 11.18 am. followed by cremation 
at the ChiUems Crematorium. 
Amersftam. Bucks. No flowers 
please, but donations may be sent to 
the Leukaemia Research Fund, 43 
Great Ormond SL WCi. If desired. 

EUUNG70N - On November 30th, at 
Malvern. Grace Mary, aged 93. Wife 
of the (ate Col. GG. Efkmgton. 

D.S.O.. D.i Much loved mother of 

Nome. Joan and Ttlaa. grandmother 
amt great grandmother. Funeral Ser- 
vice at Worcester Cremator) urn on 
Thursday December 4th at 11.30 
am. No flowers please, but donations 
to the Red Goss. Green Htif. Worces- 
ter. If desired. 

FKtCKEB- On November 29. Pt gCTflU - 
ty at home amongst Ills family. 
Edward George Flicker, aged 76 
years, the world famous healer, alter 
a life time devoted 10 healing fhe sick. 
Funeral Service at St Paul's. OdlUel 
Way. Hadley Wood. Herts, at 1L30 
am on Monday December 8 1986. 
followed by mierment at New soum- 
gaie Cemetery. Brunswick Park 
Road Nil. Flowers may be sett to 
Neffiercoti & San. 150 Eterke* Lane. 
Potters Bar. Herts, by 10.00 am on 
December 8. 

GOVETT - On December 2nd 1986. at 
Royal Surrey County ^spfM. 
Guildford. Muriel Hope iPeta). wld- 
aw . of Francis GovelL Funeral 
Service on Friday 5 th Pww W* M 
Woking St John's Gemaimtum. at 
3.30pm. Enquiries to G ®oul^* 
Son. Funeral Directors- Tel. Byfleet 
46037. 

RAM -On ^venttwraWLaa&tgdMf 
Hospital after a AoH 
frev AlestaadO" Haifl O.B-t. “9* J* • s \ 
Ste A much tajg 

hmihfr and unde. Funeral service 
^sTySo-’s Church. Tandriiwe- 

OxtCd- 713767 

HERVEY-BATHtRST ■ On November 

^arwafassM 

PiwSSSS 

Eastnor. Ledtidiy. 

'rtie StieM* Cm. Sir 

Christina. __ . jetomourne- DefW 

siure. 

lermeni » Mgu T i sui if de- 

Famlly flcrwerso^ H j. 

SswsssBffr s 

search HWytt**- 

Funeral Directors. 25 

Bartwvon-Humber. 

K0Mt J > fr*» , 25 

Leonard. .tSTof awe and 

01 uliLv AWrstoiw. War 

Bridget, of HurteiL^** g, Albans. 

asJgiS-s.'Ba 

Service at Th f„ sth Decem- 

Crcmawrium ong^ ma> , & sent 
^Funeral Service. 

to' SiouemaM 
Doran Court- Rednai- 


MORTELMAK - Or November 30th 
1986. Derek John. Requiem MassSL 
Elheldreila's. Ely Place. Holborn on 
■nuirsdtor 4lh December at 1 1 .30 am 
for family and (Mends only. To be 
foltowefl by a private cremation at a 
later dale. No (towers. Donations, if 
desired, lost. Ethddreda's. The date 
of a Memorial Service win tie an- 
nounced in due course. 

PARSONS • On November 30th. 
Yvonne, at Little Gaddesden. widow 
of Charles and mother of Patricks 
and Yvonne (Btnnle). Funeral at 
12J30 Friday 5tii December at 
Amersham Crematorium. No flow- 
ers. Donations to R.NJJB TatUng 
Book Service. 

PWCHM - On Saturday 29th Novem- 
ber. Barbara MabeL only daughter of 
the tele Duncan and Mabel Ptncbtn 
of Brockenburst and late of Martins. 
Kook, suddenly at Paul's Place. 
Sway. Hants, Funeral arrangements 
Diamond & Son. Lymtatgton Tel: 
0590 72060. Family flowers only, 
but donations, tf desired, to Phyllis 
Tuckw«j Hospim FamhaoL Surrey 

REES - On Saturday November 29th 
1986. Martel LDten. widow of Dr H 
G SI Michael Rees FAC.. GP. Bar- 
rister at Law. Mother of Humphrey 
Rees and Judith MMdteton-Suwan. 
The FUnerai Service takes place at 

AB Saints. Wortingion. Suffolk, on 
Friday 12th December ai 3pm. No 
flowers. 

RODGER - On 28th November 1986. 
suddenly in hospital. Alistair of 71 
Fcdmer Drive. Gen-ants Cross. Dear- 
ly loved husband of Doreen, much 
loved father of Martuw and Row and 
son of Catherine. Funeral on Thurs- 
day 4ui December at 2-30 pm. 
Chiltems Crematorium. Amereham. 
Family flowers date 


On November 29th. 

1986, peacefully In hosptiaL Drl 
Herbert Alexander, aged 76 years. 
Funeral at Goldere Green Crematori- 
um at 12 noon on Thursday 4th 
December. Flowers to Leverton & 
Sons Ltd. 212 EvershoR Street. 
London NWl. by 10am. 

ROSSER - On November 30th. m a car 
accident. Dr Michael Rosser, aped 24 
years of Dotgarreg. Solva. Dyfed. 
dearly loved son of Tom Hywel and 
Barbara and loving brother of Sally 
Funeral Service at Parc Gwyn Ore- 
mat ortum. N a rtert i i on Friday 
December 6th at SJO pm. 

ROWLANDS • On November 28th 
1986. peacefully Jane aged 79 years, 
beloved wife of RKtde. dearly loved 
mother of Susan ana grandmother of 
Rupert. PhyHda. Edward. Susannah 
and Camilla. Funeral service at The 
Putney Vale Cemetery, Kingston 
Road Sw 16. Monday 8th December, 
at l.4Spm. Floral tributes tf desired, 
to e. Lanier & Sons Lid. 117 Falcon 
Road. London SWll 2PE Til : Ol 
223 6432 or donations to League of 
Friends at Westmlroter Hospital. 

■YELAJ0- On November 29th 190&1 
Edna May. widow of Jim. formerly 
of Marine Court. Dover, adored and 
loved by all her family- Service all 
Barham Crematorium at 11.30. 
Thursday December 4Ut. No flowere. 
but donations may be sent to (he Pit 
grfras Hospice. 66 London Road. 
Canterbury CT2 BJY. 

TERRY - an November 27th, peaceful-! 
ly In hospMal. Evelyn Maryl 
Bradshaw, beloved wife of DoutJasf 
and much loved mother and grand-l 
mother of Moorlands. Mullton. 
Hetaton. Oornwafl. Cremation hast 
taken place. 

THOMAS - On November 28th 1986. 
Martyn Beaumont Thomas of Green 
Farm, East TUddentiam. Norfolk, 
deariy loved eon and Stepson of Mar 
gares and Edmund Timlin of 
Humbcreton. South Hmnberakle and 
much laved brother of Jantter and 
Peter Metiows of Nottingham. Funv- 
al SMTrtce and Interment at AO Saints 
Church. East Tuddenham an Mon- 
day December 8th at 2 pm. Flowers 
may be sou lo Messrs R j Bartram & 
Son. Funeral Directors, 
wymondham. Norfolk please. 

THOMPSON - On 30th Noverabcri 
1986. suddenly at RBuursiey Cbstle. 
Margaret Angela, fonoerty of 1 
Weedon Lois. Ttowcester. aged 84 
years. Widow of Sarabei George 
Thompeon and k>v«d mother of Rob- 
ert and Edward. Private cremation. 
Memorial Service at KUmerion Par- 
ish Church, tomorrow. Thursday 
4th December at 5L30 pm. Flowers 
Please to Dow* Bros- Westfaiing 
Street. H ereford. 

TOWSETT - On December 1st In hos- 
pital at Dorchester. Rex Tompsett 
MAtOxonV youngest child of Percy 
and Ida Tompsett of Marden. KenL 
aged 76. Much loved mute, grand- 
uncle and great-grand-uncle of lUs 7 
nephews and their taraHteB. Lieut. 
Cdr. RNVR 1940-45. Housemaster. 
Courtenay House. Kelly College and 
Wollaston House. Hardye's Sctwoti 
Choir Master. St Peter’s Church. 
Dorchester and President Western 
Counties Schools Hock9 Associa- 
tion- No funeral at Ms request Any 
donations to Help the Aged. Freepost. 
London. EC1B 1BD. 

TRU5COTT - On November 28th 
1986. peacefully at her home after 
an fitness courageously borne. Jean 
Mela, devoted mother of Dr. Peter H 
Waierfleld. Funeral Service at lp» 
wfch Crematorium. North Chapel. 
Friday December 6th at IX» pm. No 
flowers by request ted donations tf 
desired to the MacMillan Nursing 
Fund or the Samaritans, c/o Michael 
Stny, Funeral Director. 146 
Felixstowe Road. Ipswich. 

WARREN - On Monday Dec e mber lit. 
after a shod illness, Dick (aka 
Chanes ami ‘PooT. much loved fa- 
ther or John and Michael. Funeral 
Service at ll am an Monday 8th De- 
cember at Si John's Wood Church. 
NWS and afterwards, at MUesptt Hfll 
Cemetery. NW7. Flowers to EA 
Langley Lid. 36 CSdppenham Rd. 
London W9. Donations to Motor 
Nruone Disease Assoc. 
Hazelwood Rd. Northampton. 

IHULUHS- On November 30tii 1986. 
T. Gwynne M.D.. FJLC. Psyriu at 
home. Hafan. Brookhouse Road. 
Denbigh. Much loved husband of 
Peg. (Other of Ann. Pel* and RoUa 
and dearly loved TakL Funeral ser- 
vice at St Marcella's Church 
Denbigh, on Thursday December 4ift 
at 2pm. followed by private crema- 
tion. Family flowere only, donations 
In feu. may be sent lo the Gwynne 
Williams Memorial Fund, c/o Na- 
tional Westminster Bank, vale SL 
Denbigh. Enquiries Denbigh 2061. 

gnXUUWS-On November 28th 1986. 
peacefully to hospital. Olive Marion 
aged 85 years. Beloved staler of Ma- 
ddetne in Australia. Funeral Service 
St.. Mary the Virgin Church. High 
Street. Oxford on Friday December 
5Ui at 2 pm. Family flowers only. 
Enquiries to Edward Carter (Funeral 
Director). 2 Herons Wane. Abingdon. 
Tet 0235 20968. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 




19 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


GRAND BOOK SIGNING 

by CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS 
Mm Academy or Am Shop 
On Thuraday. 4 December. 
12.16 - 1.16 pm. 

Peter Blake. Rabat Botnar. Sir Hugh 
Caswu Robert dc Grey. Ettafeth 
Fra*. Anthony Oven. Paul Hoowth. 
Allen Jones. Ruakin spear, caret 
Weight, r.b total. Jeffery Camp. 
Bernard Dunstan wM bo smupo books 
may mw teustraied. written or bad 
written, (boot them. 

Royal Academy 

Burhntpon House. PfccodfBy. 
London Wl. 01-794 9062 


CLARE THOMAS HENRY CLARE IMeo( 
dare vma. Mam Road, snscy. flostpn. 
lira, utmt lire. dM Thera on 13th 
FttnHT 1986. ^ 

(Estate about £12.000). 
DAVIS STEWART ROVES DAVIS We 
Of 117 Duck Lane. SL Neon. Hunttneaon. 
CsmbnagaMK. Pled There en ton JUy 
1986. 

(Erato about cii.iooi 
JOHN OttMrwbe MBISJOHN HELENA 

GWENDQLME LOUISA JOHN OUtcndU 

HELENA GWENDOLINE LOIASA MILL&- 

JOHH. Scatter law of 24 Cardtey 

OntmL Earls Court. London SWUM 

in Wen Bronwten. London SW loon 28m 

December 1984. 

(Estat* moui £14.000) 
JONES MARY ELLEN JONES. WIT 
tam of IS Trinity Rond, uumU, Dyfed. 
dkd « Sksuy. Swanson on 3oa> Jutv 
1984. 

(Estate about CilMM 
PERKS an MOBLEY JOAN MARY 
PERKS dm MOBLEY. Widow MS Of (Z 

CebOHm Court. OoMan Street. Patfrey. 

WMtaU. Waal MMsnfls. (fed Thera on 

141h March 1000. 

{Mate about £9.000) 
THOMAS ore BURN. HELEN MIRIAM 

THOMAS nre BURNS. Widow late Of 106 

SL Alban's Avenue. Bedford nek, 

CUewKk, London W4. died Thereon 24m 

May 1906. 
(Estate about £9&2QO> 
Tno un or me above-named are reoueeted 

to asete W the TYeraev Sobcttor (B.V.X 

Queen AtuWs Chamfere. 23 Broadway. 

London. SW1H SIS. IHUop wMrti Bw 

Treasury Soflcnor may take stare n 


Galuty nre brereton 
MARY GALLEY nee BRERODN. Wid- 
ow, late of “The CrofT 32 Crewe Rood. 
snavtnobMi near Crewe, cnesture/Hcd in 

wmictuHch. siworetdre. an mo Bib May 

1986 lundtatKiead of raw abom 
£16.0001. Tfe next of Un of me above 

named are reouesUna lb apply to Meson 

sreakman 6 Co- Sanction, of 18t 


luoniwich Rood. Crewe. cnesMre. CWS 


wood - Moody Frederick, son of Thonun 

Wood. Mbaur af York Place, 
Walworth, who dkd tn me lB40*s. 

Weald any descendant klraUy contact 

me? Ian Aiwmther. aartaMtneton 
Farm. Pecworth. Smoc. 


THE EARL SPOKOL MVCLM- w« be al 

MOWBRAYS BOOKSHOP. 28 Mares- 

rri Street (nr Oxford Clmis I iondon Wi 

on THURSDAY 4TH DECEMBER, t- 

2pm lo Pm cepieo of Ms rrctnoy 

pu w nht d book of ntuworapta;" JA- 

PAN AND THE EAST “ (£14.96). Tef : 
01-600 2012 (OeW Tl. ff you cannot U- 
IB4. to reserve signed copies. 

IMS cnwnul oleaae lwfe> our Chra- 
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core. Condon and companfotuftki tor 
many lonete oM people- DouaUore 
please to Hie National Ben evolent Fund 
for me abM New Broad St House. 36 
New teoad StrceUmMMn EC2M inh. 


in South Ease 

pocstbte ghrtng brief fetalis and a teto- 
Dtme manner to BOX J32. No arms. 
BUM «C4 M4T - plrere conlict Forbes 6 

urerecy'oLeas 17»>9 or^oi !+££*£££ 
CMBSTM4S UMCWS AID UDDteJUI. 
for im lo 1 BOM Bfgglea of St-famas'. For 
avaUabUtty tei e phone 01-900 4889. 
PMNCESSES wmited la test new amnram 
type. Most ae peendoo rayaf ifne 0372 
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BIRTHDAYS 


] 


HACCY - John CBE 80 years aid on Bw 
3rd DccoBber. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS | 


MRS m MCLEAN Wtahas to Omok «B 
the numerous, friends tar their BeautlftU 
IstUn aha has received on the o ora n uu 
of the death of her beloved husband and 
wldcft she wffl unrar to time. 


SERVICES 


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6066. Essex re. Ot 604 4142. Ibgh 
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success ram. seen 4666*- fit deamnd. 


ttons tor me unattached- 68 Maddox 
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CALMW On Ltd |MWM[ 
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MARRIAaE & ADVICE Bureau Katharine 
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CAPITAL CVs prec ur e MB hO UaM V Ctortf 
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announcements 


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AKMELM - A Memorial Service for L 
E (MJcky) Armelln win take Mace at 
12 noon on Monday 16th December 
at Si Benedict's Abbey. Ctiaribury 
Grove. EataB. London W5 
an i . a Memorial Service for Antho- 
ny E Ledger HID DAE. Di, wffl be 
Udd atRMitsey Abbey on Monday 
8th December 1986 al 11.30 am. 


IN MEMOMAM - private]} 


Minn - ooa Cower. DteywrtghL 
love on tbte 20th 

sad anniversay 

MuncTOi - To ttertlng Oorts on her 
birthday- Always. & 

KAPflAlJK - Mrs 

197a Onlorgembte and 
W Charles at* 


aifnHS, HARRlASS 

rtata + lSWAT 

(miniifliuti 3 lines), 

AnnounccmcnB. t mhctmcaie d 

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seat to: _ 

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or telephone (by f c ' e S*? one 

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London Bcnigo-f 




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boms, 13m. December, at aem.RtMpOi- 


1922 orand i 
lie. 01-230 6080 

STEMWAY Grand. S’ lor. Rote wood. 
Cxccaettt romt tao h . £6000. TM: Ol 
B86 4981. 


MMAMSS COftTL 1966. t < 
■ai TO) 01-230 6609 




WANTED 


9RE "40 SbavrtS. CteOUng. Uneo wtttited. 
TWXnXM 731962 


Jar cerate tor ren t 

a. MUwllz. February. Write : Roomer. 9 
rue Calvto. CM 1204 Geneva. 

££. WAM7ED Large Vic wardrobes, 
enters. ratemauu Mbs. 

<wwi ■■ riraliiin i toBaa tontlnn* 
etc, 01 9467683 dw OI 709 0471 eves. 

WANTED Bernard Loach pm by pri- 
vate conector. Too prices paid. No 
deem 01992 7985 


flatshare 


FEMALE Id shore, own room, rent free, 
modern flat tn LtiOs Venice- In return 
for UOM hent ak eeatoo. Mr busy profes- 
glonai awn. 01-734 6969 teveto 

MB CAMBER SQUARE NWl Room to 
family house, own phone, kll. share 
hath, some baby atiting. £35 DW lacL 
Tel. 01 607 106« after 6 pm. 

W14 Short trim tintfe roam. Luxury 
turn, modern kitche n, twrdet v- ,Eaw 
poridag. Perfect esecuttre Mod a ten*, 
raorvw. Reft. T4U 01 30S 2674. 

•AKER ST, Wl. Prof m/f lo shire Mr 
fiat. 0/7. oil mod cum. £250 pern. Tel 
day 575 9999. eras 723 6«90, 

VOW E3 Prof M/F mr o/n in lux flaL 
Tube 4 rains. £3S pw plus dep (return- 
able)- Teixn 980 1736 (message). 

CUmtAMCdaHSOMSttwle room m mod 
house, share K aad B £flflgw heme 
OI 874 2897 m an Un CB/eveiMnaa 

DOCKLANDS 05 nr OOr PTCf 

FULHAM ROND. SW6. Prof F to Shore 
scry nter flaL O/R. £66 per week, am S. 
Tot 01-731 2451 ferasL 

LANCASTER SATE o/r. ire not. to share 
with 2 young prof mates. £76 aw. 01- 
724 0334 


FLATSHARE 


CHELSEA Prof M/F return so share tux 
2 bedroom Oaf- Aetna to rouar* Par- 
dons. own doubt* nom. CH. T.v /video. 
wattwr/dQwr etc. £100 pw me. M/6 
praterrodT™. Ol 361 6233. 


BATTERSEA Lane room wgh own Uth 
In fntiy i matorand house, wn i den- 
or £66 p/w exCLCafl SARAH, Tel Ot 
236 1622. (dxylOt 228 1601 MWJ). 


DULHncH i/9 br eRy. prof. m/i. » snare 
Hse wm 1 oebar. £29 p/w aad. Tel 01 
693 09»3 after 7 JD 


cmswkk, H4. 2 mam ira u frod to 
share largo 3 IteOroow m ab rai o ite wwi 
on* otttw. Tube to mum. Non saioken 
prri. Doted* room each. £60 pw ane. 

work 603 I I33«r 996 8726 altar apes. 

CCMTMAL, or North. ProSanoaal tody 
)M 40 nguirea bodstt/nnhare from 
January i. Phonr Doreen Fttrtesouc: 
OL9K941 1 . MteBSSen 209 (doyi or et- 
229 9977. extension 238 

FLATMATE* Setectteo Shsnno. Wen 
niak Uuroductery servsre. Pise M tar 
309L- 01-689 6491. 3l3 Bro mp t ou 
noad. sw3 

RNJ1AM SW6. Owg gw Mdroom near 
tube. CCH. N/a 
1361 after AJOpm. 

N EWIB WIO R. wti. Studio flat «w_a 


muni HIH tum. Q/R m brand new 
flat, very dose aB MWfes. M/F. N/S. 
£40 pw Hus MOB- Ol 941 E299- 

wasito. south Loadon. 3 prof peeuie 
■Mt 3 bed Itet/bae. Max rent £120 pw. 
On tet uuteXOC. Tab 01-643 0963 lewesl- 

] male / female b. 

I MU*, to minutes from 

city. £40pw. TaL 01 701 0190. 

SOUTH DULWICH - 3rd person to Am 
new. HghL spacious Oat. O/R. genian. 
£40 PW ddCL TaL 6Sg 1687 tetri 7pm. 

STREATRAM Prof F. 21 *. 19* O/R la toe. 
Of houso/darden. BR 3 ndna. CXy 20 
mins. £140 pm excL TaL oi 769 SS66. 

IW.1S sared Prison (prof). £162 pan. 
mutt be mom tratnwL ptoooe: Ol 640 
91ML 

vreprof f.24 N/s. lb share MX irtnoor 
rial. o/r. CH. Nr tube. £200 pan ckl 
O t 741 3626 eves. 

1 FLATSHARE 6/B weeks. CM 22 * 
. £40 DW me. 01.370 

HR 0LOUCSRTER RD tube. Prof 30 tsh. 
O/r. £60 PW (WL 680 7030 (day). 373 
9MB (eves). 

HIR Ctrl own room fa fraurr OaL TV. 
CH. Video. Conumuxal garden*. £46 pw 
Teh ot 461 6041. 


BCCteHL Tenerife 23/12 x 8 

C2SBgp A 19/12 x 16 days Br £36Bpn. 
G/Canaria 22/12 x 8 days fr £ 27 bpp . 

Lamrote 18/12 x 16 days fr £STBop. 

Fit telly nr fitaopp- Bonanza Hols. Aid 

OSLATOL 231. 0802 298844 


AIR TOUTS Spedatttts N York. £249. 
LA/San Fran £329. Sydney /Melbourne 

£769. AU aired daily (UghaDartter 130 

Jcnayn SreeLOl 839 7144 


COSTCurmS OH regnu/htes to En- 
rage. USA A moat desmtakons- 
Sptor. Travel: 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL- 


BELMHIiUL VUto to own wounds won 
pool w MJStwtta. 3 doUbte bedroouito 2 
boms, available Xmas. £276 pw, Tel: 
036206 767. 


AFRICAN SEATS 1P1M11ALIITI, World 
Travel Centre. Ol 070 8146. ABTA. 
IATA. 


1ST 8 CLUB CLASS FUOHTS: H uge Pto 
counts. S u nwcrtd TraveL 403727) 
26097 /27109/27S3ft 


FUBHIROOKCRS Discount Fwns word- 
wide. iBt/econom>. 01-387.9100 


MALASA. CANAMES. Ol 441 ml. 

Ttavrtwise. Alda. AtoL 


MOHOCCO ROURL Regent SL Wl. Ol 
734 6307. ABTA/ASOL 


S. AFRICA From £466. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


CHEAP FUaHTS WortdwUte. Hayraarket 
01-930 1366. 


wfOcu Tat U.T.C. 40785) BS7O30. 


DISCOUNT YARD WMtdwMK 01-434 
0734 Jupiter Tram. 


Cyprus. Cot 


iraageofs/cvD- 


down lo earth prices- Orand iHwnri 

Screen rr«TL » 6io«c Newju om n 

Churet* SL Londba NI6 Teh 01-249 

0721. 


IS. 1987 


b ro c h u re oat ucfe cows wlntri Crorie 
and TWbey wl Aetfimagh.^ 

Rd. Cambridge. 0223 63266. oor 30tb 
yMT Absl 36B. 

owe CALL tor tum of iter betti derate 
meMs. apartment*, ho tels and car tore 
Tel London oi 636 sooa Ma ntnanri 
061 032 2000. APT Travel Advisory 


TRAVEL CENTRE roecMWng m Fhsi and 

Club C hws tram vwrtwMe. Budget 

Fares Aussie. NZ S. Afifcte USA rad 

Ponngal with aooom. Tel Ol 666 HOI. 
ABTA 73196. 


price of 2. £339. LUnUod avaPfeOKy tar 
2 whs £339. 109ZS1 T78344. Tlmsway 
Holidays. ABTA. ATTN. 1107. 

ALBARVE ALTERNATIVE^ 

The finest houses lor w«L 73 St 
James SL SWI. Ol 491 0002. 

FLORENCE Slum house. Stas 2/3. tn 
isrue beadtUU ganiaL oentraL tranautt. 
wta tarnfOhed and raWffwjh own 
rttone and cnL heaUng. Ol 703 3671. 

SHI TRACESt BONAN2AP Thnu. La 
Plaooe. Deux Atom A CnanxmOc S/C 

ants. 13 Dac 1 wk £89 tinci ench ouL St 
back). Chrtatmaa fr £891 Mao 01244 
7361. ATOL 1820. 


enure of vtitage. siccas 6 l Avail for 
Xmas and New year. For itelena phono 
sue 0703 fissses. 

MEYE R KHtWHHSLY UNDCMOJl We 
bete any tare h> anywhe re hi the world. 
Eating Travel. Ol 679 7775. ABTA. 

CIMUTMAI OTTERS. W cstorad Cha- 
late with aB Xrena extras. Only £J97. 
Can Le Sto 0484 048996. 


WANTED 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK. 

AMMoe and Modern Jewellery, watches. Stiver and Plate. FiadliuN. Bronaes. 
Erumrls. tvories. jade. Prwwr. Qocta- PatoUajS. Porcelain, n as t . OM Doth. Toys 
and Teddy Scam etc- A«k|u* * »d tPMY Oomss. FaMey and other. Shawls. 
Patchwork Qufite, samptris. onom Jeweflaiy. Lace. Uncn. afl mmomc Items. 
OwTs^ki bora * tostnimenis and ol othfr Intensting trttitos. immediate can 
by JeweHety and other ArtWM tM Kivo o. 

Our expert ran can on you. or call personalty wtstotn omganon. 
our expen era ^ g* 9 g0 ^ ^ 

Oree» Anuaue CaOnries. 117 Xendngton Gfinrta ante 
“*** London W8 7LN. TO Ol 229 9618 
(Alia In Now Yard 


Alpm to vernier, vpars. Maura A 
Megevm-Ttl 01 602 9766. 

JOHN MOR Q AM TRAVEL OnM Parties 
(ram £169 per person. TO Ol 499 I9ii 
or 0730 66561 

LE SW Courchevel. Chalets tor an sea* 
sansl By AlT. coach or ear. For a 
brochure call 0404 648996. 

MO mans. Daffy to Geneva. Zurich. 
Munch eae. From £89. SW WEST. TO 
Ol 70S 9999. 

TONtoM. For your hoBdw wtrae ill still 
summer. Call tor our brochure now. Tu- 
ntstoa Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 

ALICANTE, Faro. MaMM. Ptema. 
Tenerife. DtaftoM Travel ATOL 1783. 
01-381 4641. Horsham 60641 

EUROPE /WORLD MflDC lowest (area on 
tfhvter/tctMOrtM flu. POM FhgJU Ot 
631 0167. Agt Aka 1893. 

MOROCCAN MACK • Hotidfflfc flights, 
occom. car tore. Can Seagufl Houdwa. 
01 629 9712 ABTA ATOL 1178 

ALL U0 oiks. Lowest toe* major 
scheouted carriov. 01-684 7371 jvbta 

vmn. Mealy sued Itraury ItaL Hasps 
6. Tel 01 660 3446. 


Worldwide fawooa ffigbn 
The best - and «e can prove k 
I95JH0 diene tinee 1 970 
CURRENT BEST BUYS 
Around (be World from £766 
SYDNEY COLOMBO 

PERTH NAIROBI 

AUCKLAND XTBURG 

BANGKOK LIMA 

SINGAPORE GENEVA 

HONG KONG ISTANBUL 

DELHI/ NEW YORK 

BOMBAY LOS ANGELES 

Washington Baltimore 

TRAILF3NDERS 

4^-08 Earls Coiat Road 
London W8 6EJ 
OPEN 9^ MON-SAT 
Lono-Haul 01-937 9631 
and 01-603 >515 

Europe/USA 01-957 6400 

Isl/Bu$iness 01-958 5444 

Government Uctmed/BondM 

ABTA IATA ATOL/14S8 


DISCOUNT FLIGHTS 

0/W Rtn 

Sydney £«0 £78 S 

SdUand £464 £775 

Lot An#la £178 £340 

Jotral*^ 046 £485 

Bangkok C2D £360 

Bin^ £282 £504 

LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


DISCOUNTED FARES 


JCTBURGfHAR C«6S DOUALA C420 
NAIROBI £390 SYDNEY £760 
CAIRO £230 AUCKLAND.. CTOS 

LAGOS £360 HONG MONO £550 

DEUBOMSAY £350 MIAMI £330 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

162(198 Roam SL Wl 
7EL B1-43/B2S5W7/B 
Lets & Group Booths* Wsfcome 
auex/v&a 


SKI WHIZZ 
ITS ARRIVEEW 

_SNOW IN THE ALPS 
Ttaie fa oef roar sidfr raf 
i Mnwtfinur. OWSTMAS OFFERS 
ONLY £109 

l wk 20 Dec ca i cfe tete taei fra 
COUROHEVEL. MDaBEL- VERBffiR 
MOXVE. CHAMONIX 
20 DM. S/c Courdievd £136 
Rina Now 

01-370 0999/0^ 

AOB far ATOL 1820 


SX1 • FLY * SKI * FLY 
MANCHESTER & 
CATWIOC TO ANDORRA 
| WK BY AM FROM £114 
2 WK 8Y AIR FROM £l«„ „ 
PLUS FREE riWnsfe tobtera FREC IM 

Passa or FREE laiuaaR aa mmy bk. 

XbswnY. 

FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 
tkr Aadona Etpctt* **a 1912 
01-741 4466/4*71 «M bn) 
Mastfmttr ON 236 OOW 
ATOL 41! IATA WTO 


SKI SUPERTRAVEL 
SPECIAL XMAS OFFER 
20 DEC FROM £149! 

Catered dakto iti fee top resorts 
-other dates £50 offi 
- S/C apanmetus fo £1 38 
RJNG NOW 

01-584 5060 


VAL DtSEK * Merttra. Far the 


service An es c e t ta if Mtecito* of s/c 

apti available throuenoul me season 

Traval nMUfe ftiaM or tenet coach. 

Sto Vai. Ol 200 60aoc24tsrs) or OI 903 

4444. AST A/ ATOL. 


LOWEST FARES 

£69 N YORK 

£60 LA/6F £366 

£320 MUM £320 

£306 Singapore £420 

Jo-burg £460 Bangkok £336 

era £206 Katmandu £440 

Dct/Bote £336 BaMOon £360 

Hoag Kong £610 CsictXta £426 

Hog* OhmuBB AvaD en ui 6 CM) Obs 

SUN & SAND 

21 SwaOow SL London Wl 
01-439 2100/437 0637 


NEW LOW FARES - 

AMMAN £235 KUWAIT £336 
BOM/OEL £365 NEW YORK £266 
CAIRO £206 BALTIMORE £270 

DAMASCUS £24E ROME £106 

DUBAI £346 SEOUL £606 

FRATTJRT £ 66 SIN/KUL £420 
HOMO KONG £490 SYD/MEL £69 O 
ISTANBUL £170 TAMA] £670 

KARACHI £285 TOKYO £590 
SKYLORD TRAVEL LTD. 

2 DENMAN STREET. LONDON Wl. 
TEL: 01-439 3621 /BOOT 
AIRLINE BONDED 


TRAVEL 

WORLDWIDE 

Boasd advice m OMtoxa oa 
ittbmil ban hot me! core 

LON COST ECONOMY WOHLSiSc 

(03727)42730 

Maoter o) tie InsttsaB al TimiI & TatMste 
TmaHMaanteSpedAsL 


CSO off Oaurchem C hrhimaa cfiateta. 
Fur ruh detans call Le Skf 0484 648996. 


& AFRICA FTOm £466. 01-684 7371 
ABTA. 


IPARL Port u g a l. Ouapest oro. Bhatei*. 
Ol 736 0*91- ABTA ATOL. 


USA. Canada. Caribbean. SM) America. 
HTT 01-930 2466. 


TAW IRK OFF lu Paris. Amsterdam. 
Snoods. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lau- 
sanne. Zurich. The Hague. Duran. 
Rouen. Boulog n e 0 Di eppe- Time Off. 
Sa. Owtar Ctoae; LdndOB. fiWIX 7 BQl 
01-236 8070. 

XMAS WOT Dre & Steamer 07. Duma. 
Ctetertaa. Oraece tRs A hota. 6 wn hols 
3/1 if £399. Luaarsc ap s- oi-44t 0122 
04M. 


ofJtrin* ri ie ap cst Ares 

■vaiteote woruwfde. Only a phooc can 
away. QTW 01-960 0033 lio Unas) 
ABTA/ACCESS. 

CRRRTSAS avteMteWy. CdWKk/FBro 
IS Dec £146 Malaga 22 December. 
£189. VBkxander. Ol 723 6966. Abto 
AM tecot/Vto 


sandy beach ITOm H/row. 1 wk £299.2 
wks £366 Ring Put World Hotidevs OI 
734 2662. 

LATHI A MERIC A Law coal BteMs ete. 
Rio £486. Luna £496 tin. Also Small 
Group Holiday JoarneysJeg Peru IRn 
£350) JLA 01-747-3100 

LOW FARES WORUMMMt ■ USA. N/S 
America. Far East. ABlca- Alma* Aprd 

Ate Trayvale. 40 Margaret Streal. WI. 

Ol 680 2928 (Vtta Accepted) 

NEW YORK, L-A- WSA- WortdwMr OMO- 
nanons. For the cheapest Item try us 
ini. Rtctunond TraveL 1 Duke Street. 
Ricnmand surrey. ABTA 01-940 4073. 

MIT OMARI Seat sale to iSACarUoa- 
Far Ean-AuKrate. CaB the 
prafeaslMwb ABTA IATA cc imuBii, 
Tet Ol 264 6788 


Mann. Morocco. Greece. MOWN * T«- 
nertfie. Nov 6 Dec. pan World Holidays 
Ol 734 2662. 

am winter. Suitaner. Akp rre. Ta wr- 
tfa. Greece. Turtaiy. Spain. Saw Sri 
Lanka and many mote bou/nigtite- 
Vauturai 0742 531 LOO. ATOL 2034. 

nteT/CUB ga te OOhcorde. PMmtittf? 
faxes. Dumas TraveL 01-488 9011 
ABTA 

raiiim Daily iaghta. £36 O/W. £66 
Rtn. FranKtort titan £69. MUaoe J*L 
Ol 379 3322 

6614 ABTA. 

LOWEST Ate Para*. Europ e, and world 
Wide. Ol 636 8622. Bncktoteraa 
Travel. 

LOWEST Air Fares. Scheduled Europe*) 
Worldwide. Med Star TrawL oi 928 
3200 

LOWEST 1TORUWWE FARES. CSial- 

curn Travel TO 01 730 6216. ABTA. 


WINTER SPORTS 


JUST FRANCE - Soper vahie self oMrtng 
ski Ixffldays to (he beet Frew* resorts. 
Ring for new brwJiure now. 

Tel 01-789 2692. 

ABTA 69266 Atol 1383. 


LATE AVABJtBEJTY. Staffed ctiafri In 
SwttzerUDd for w/C 10 Jan at £199 
bidudie of IBoM (KmSwow) H/B 
accom. Guide*. Tft Ol 22S 0601 


MU WEST - WOW Offcriasr sup erb OuR *- 
aiM apedAb to Fnacs and Swtoeriand. 
save op u £200 for den On 20/27 
Dec. Ol 785 9999. 

TWAttl aaa fort a b l e catered aroma 
-MaUon. Near sktota. French rook 
super food. Lunds of aaow tor OwMinas 
and New year- TO: 01-688 3414. 

IWBtt. 5 room tunny apartment. 
Steeps 8. Factag stapes. SW Iron) door, 
stop. Tet Ol 573 1961. 


WINTER SPORTS 


VERtHEJ? 

MERISEL 

COURMAYEUR 


BLADON LINES 

The Biggest Choice on Skis 
CHRISTMAS CRACKERS 

Dan. 20/21 December 7 rights 
CUM Parties & Quiet Hotels 
from £149 SAN VIQLIO 
(iroa £169 VAL DISERE 
(tan £149 CHANS MONTANA 
SELF CATERING Dram £99 


from £149 

from £2B9 

from £149 


01-785 7771 

Self Catering & Hoteto 


March Dens. 
0422 78121 


GENERAL ENSURES 
01-785 2200 


01-785 3131 

Chalet Parties 

ABTA16733 

ATOL 1232 


ITCHY PERT- Deucy Skis? Take advan- 

tage of our pre-Xatro akting bargains. 

Val dTsere A ngnea catered chaiet/ciub 

HottQuI. 6 A 13 Dec fr only £1S6 od. 
Xmas avaftobinty. no surcharges. -The 

Snow Has Arrhedi'SM VAI. TO ot 200 

coat) <24hn) or Oi 903 4444. 
AST Ay ATOL. 


UJL HOLIDAYS 


B R B T I TO Family HoBd ay? Lwdv 
warm thatched tannhouw 4 beds. S/C. 
Exmoor a coast. Tet 0643 84361. 

WARM core tartatar lux cottage, psaee ft ii 
and ercMdsd. open nre. short let. 0458 
262067 

■ HAraSw Owners detached coastal bun- 
galow in «uM tana. Sea views Tab 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Churtei CanmMumm have 
orepMud draft nastarai tchetnm provMina 

tor maktog a dedirotion of redimdancy In 

remect of the pritah church of Sotot John 

the (Xvtae. Dunton Crete) betoa «» of the 

two parish churches of the parish of 

Rtutahead with Dunton Green (Rochester 

dtoceeek tor uniting the beneflee aad 

parish tt tmmaimel with Saint Ameka. 

sueattiten aad me beneflu and parish of 

Sum Andrew. Lower Stroatbacn and tor 

making a declaration of redradsney in 

reaped of the saridh church of tho parish 

of Saint Andrew. Lower Sbeottuun 

(Southwark teocesrt tor making a Oecto- 

mtfon of redundancy to respect of Sotni 


caadtormMaoa 


FUndiCOvenlryd 

tedatoon Of redundancy in respoct of 

the parish church of the parish of 

Wooktaton with Aivtnetan and for the 

dtunch of Saint Andrew. Aiolngton to be 

substituted as the parish dunctl of the said 

parish (Otouoetesr dtacose). Capias af tht 

draft scheme may be obtained from me 

Church GaramisakxNm. 1 Mtitoaox. 
i™y. SW1P 3JZ lo whom any repre- 

sentsttomsboted be seni within 28 days 

of me pubticatian af Ms police. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE MATTER OF UNIQU E DESI GN 
AND CONSTRUCTION LIMITED 
AND 

tel THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
NOTICE to HEREBY COVEN that the 
C re te m i s or me Bsmasad Oonpany. 
widen Is bems votamarHy wound up. are 
raoubwL an or before OM 22nd day of 
December 1986. to sand tn their Ml 
Christian and surnames, niter addresses 
and a e aot ptt ob s . ton psroctean or nrar 
debts or teattaa. and M namns and 
a ddre — ofttrarSMtaSoroaf araXtoihe 
imdsratoned David Swadea fca or 46 
Itodhay Street. UVnpoaL U 9AA. me 
Uquldaiar of the said Company, and. tt so 
required by notice to writing from itise said 
UguUator. arc. peraonaUy or for their 



DATED tWa 21st day of November 1 986. 

D5WADEN 

LiqUBlATOR 


HEDONCREST CADE LteCTED. 
NOTICE IS HEREBY CTVEN pursuant to 

Section BBS of tho Oonuwnies ACL 1986. 

lira a MEETING of the oedtiDts of me 

above named Company win ae heH at ma 

offlcsa Of LEONARD CUR TIS 6 CO, 

tetuaced at 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 

LONDON. W2 6UF ot> Wednesday me 

tout dw Of Decoraur 1986 at 12 00 

o'clock midday, tor me pu r pesM provided 

tor In SecHans 689 and 890. 

DATED tt» 2SUi day of Nuvembei 1906 
H. CHAYTOW 
DIRECTOR 


6AROAN LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN ptetetanl to 
Seaton 668 of the coesppnies ACL 198S. 
mat a meeting of me ena m ors of the 
above named Company wt H be ra ted af the 
offices of LEONARD CURIE* CO. 
■tOtetad tf 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON. W2 6LF an Tltin-sday the 1 lib 
day of OkhuUt 3966 al IOJO o'clock 
fore noon, tor the purposas provkfed for to 
Sochona 689 and WO. 

DATED the 2Slh day of November I98& 
BA, PCSWN 



tel PARUMEhTT 

SESSION 198687 
ASSOCIATED BfOTtoH PORTS 
NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN Dial ante- 

canon Is betan made to fterifenent H> me 

■infill bv Anoddsd orUMi 

Ports rAJ. PortST for leave to introduce 

a Bn radar Die above name or short tine 

for purposes of which the (btiowmg to a 

ranch* saamsaiy*- 

». C uu e buc ua n tatheCByof PlyuioiXh. 
la Devon, of Work No. I: oonteattag of Dw 
redamanon and rating in of Die eastern 
ot tile war Baein al Plymouth 


I provMeaa m counsction with 
of me I nten ded works. 
; tor ma renewal, a*- 


3. Aeouaanen of 
rights ever toads tar me purposes of the 
toieodni works: special provMoo as le en- 
try and c mi p s i w aiion and Incorporation 
of certain pro v takma. todudtog Wrttortto n 
or supenttra oC private ritfds of way over 
lane* is be purchased or used. 

а. To router powers on AA Porta for 
me malting of tare u wg tn retation la me 
river Humber andudlDa part of me rivers 
owe and Trent) tn reaped of matters con- 
cerning con s ervan cy. protection, 
regulation, mainte na nce and bnprwe- 
mwi af the Humber and me prevention nf 
coBUtam therein. 

б. P re v iM on for duly a u mort te d person* 
etnteoved en bebuf of AB. Para ai in 
iwtra*. doeka and tern to ba duty 
autbarised officers of AJEL Ports tor Die 
purpose of utenip 

6. Provtalooi of a general nature, tnriud- 
mg the bmnxvatton and ab di cat i o n of 
certain nrevtatowa. aupbeteili to or in con- 
pwiurece of the totondod Act. 

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN But 
a cow of me 818 and of the man and 
sections of ma propoted works, with ma 
tadkation of ma land which may beao- 
oulred or used cotatMtorfly. together wtth 


p book of reference to each Man. lave 
been deposited tor public bneactian wDh 
me Chief Executive. Devon County Coun- 
cil C o un ty HeH. Yapsbam Road. Exeter. 
EX2 4QQ. rad wnh the Chief Executive 
rad Town desk, FtynMtttb CUy OounciL 
dvic Centre. Royal Parade. Plynmuh. 
PU SEW- 

Cm and after me am day of Dacambar 
i486, atopy of the BUI may be inspected 
and copie s obtained M a price of bop rate) 
at toe undermen ti oned effloes nod at Ore 
office af the Port Manager, Pan Office, 
MiUbay Docks. Ptymouth. Devon PU 


OWectiaa to me BU may bo mode by 
dromiuag a Petition agatist 8. tf bw BO 
originates to me House of Commons, me 
Mete dale ta r d o p w dB n g ouch a Petitio n la 
the Private Bid Office of that House wU be 
Ute sam January 1987. tf it ortgkutai la 
the Houae of Lorda. the latest date for de- 
POtettoB eueh a Ptettton to the omes af the 
Cfofk of me PBriaineniB to mat House wffl 
be the 6th February 1987. Further Ufor- 
mauau may be obtained from tbe omc* of 
mo Clerk of m* PartUMSM* in the Horae 
or Comaunc or tiw uadteBMtttioaffmr, 
Ua tn r pl a r y Aarnts. 

DATED mis 3rd day of Dseambar 19B6 

RiV. PEARCE. 

Amu d teed Britith Ports. 

160 Holbum. 
umton, ECiN 2LR- 
SoticUor. 

fiffCRWOGDA CD.. 

QuMti Anne's Cf— uber s. 
a Dean fente SaeeL 


London. SW»H 9LG- 

ftoritameouey Agents. 


parliamentary 

NOTICES 


■f PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 198647 
LONDON REGIONAL TRANSPORT 

Notice a h ereby 9*vra Bra appacatira is 
M^miS^toPsrttonieai » ttoament 
ay LoatioTi Regional TVJtewl 

t-ttra CwnoraUotfTtor rajw to ktoaouCT 

a Bfii under me apove name or short tiuo 
SjFjESte tf widen tiie fotiowtag is a 


To oes p ower the Corporation and Lon- 
don urammsd Ltiititod l*»* 
Cmpw*) to construct works aad ac- 
quire lands and for other purpearo. as 


re»*» 


1. Construction of me tone 
to cream- London - 

works to fecunstnxtett btfttteOmrany- 

work NO. i - A p tfiw ay and un ihan at 
the Company *■ Angel ntm to tor Loo- 
doa borough of HtoteoK 

works Noa. 2 and 8 -TYw railway s 04* 
ntafret and 297 metre* to lenteh). being 
muuiw mi tidlncs south and north reapoc- 
ttvety w me company* nnehicy Central 
Sutton In Uk London Borough of Barnet: 

Work no. a - A railway (210 metres in 
iengtoi. Mng adtetttxra sidings to tt«e 
Osiananys SunetirldM Pvk Deodi In me 
London Barmen af RrauL 
worn to do constructed by IM OtepM*- 
Ura - 

wart No. 6 - A raiwny (dlO metres tn 
taugmiai Pudtfag MW Lane to the London 
borough of Newham to form pan of Work 
No. 1 bring constructed under mo London 
POCfdaads Railway Act 1986. 

2. Special p rov tri o wi to confectio n with 
the construction, of the pro paid works, 
birtudino me b ridg m a BV work No. B Of 


N& ^rad^lfe Ora 
No. 6 of lands, or i 
only, rad power to i 



4. Further power tar to* Company to 

■muter lands tn the London boroughs of 
Southwark and Tower HamMs tor tier 
purpose of l ec ufetrum ag and rnbanlna 
me octet ham si Etepnani and Cattle and 
Wapteno stations respectively. 

5. Power for the Company to open op 
tor surface of Torrens Street in the Lon- 
don boro u gh of Httoqwn. lo stag up 
temporarily pen of that street and lo nar- 
row and stop up a further part or mat 
street; power for me Oorporallra lo 
Interfere with ine surface of. rad to sup 
up temporarily, para of Pudding MiP 
Lane and Manitgtfr un* tn the London 
boro u gh of Newham. 

a. Power tar the Co rp oration lo mane 
provision for the payment of addUtorra 
fares on me prooomd railway cransag 
Work No. 6. 

7. AncdtcaDoa of section 168 or me Road 
TraiDc Art 1972 lo the British Transport 
Police Force In reran of ra alleged of- 
fence ai a mn croasiuu or en a road 
tarndogan access or ap pr onch to p raid ato 


8 ProoMon tar me anraonnwkm into a 
sfngte Scheme of the London T Hum Hir l 
Pension Fund and the London Transport 
1970 Superannuation Fund. 

And Notice ta furmer On lira plans 
and sections of Hie la landed worka, Inrtad- 
Ing Hans of me lands prop oor d lo be 
acoufred or raed cora p u teortty. togctiier 
wito a book of r rie tonce to aoch ptona, 
have been deposifetf tar public inspection 
with the Chief Executive and Town CWk 
of uw London Borough of Barnet at Town 
hob. The Burroutfta. Hendon. London 
NW4 obo. with thoouef ExrcuUvo of ma 
London Boro u gh of taint M Brent Town 
Hall. Forty Lam. Wembley HA9 9HD. 
wtth toe Chief Executive of the London 
Borough of UtogMi at Ttown Had. t/pper 
StreeL London Nl 2UD. wito toe Chief 
Executive of the London Borough or New- 
ham pi Town Han. Barking Rond. London 
E6 tap. wfm the Chief Executive of the 
London Borough at Southwark m Town 
Hatt. Pockbam Rood. London 8E6 BUB 
and wnh the Chief Executive of Ihe Lon- 
don Borough of Tow e r HanM af the 
Town HsfL Patriot souaro. London E21 
9LN. 

On an after am Decamba IMfscov 
of llie BUI tar me intended Art may be 
impacted and corrit u obfafned M the prtoa 
of Sop each at the under-raeotioned 
offloes. 


Otaemon to the sot may ba made W 
depaeUtap a Pattttoa agataai n. If me BM 
oriobiaus In me Haina of commons, the 
ibMm date far itepotiuna such a Petition In 
the Private Btf oinre of mtf Houm wm bo 
300) January 1987. ir il originates in toe 

House of Loras, me latest date tar deposu- 

mg such a PefBkm In toe Offke of me 
Oerk of toe Partwiiara to Otot Home win 
be dm February 1987. Further tafonra- 
tun may be u bt ata a d tram the Office of 
toe Oerk or the Parttomms m me House 
of Lords, me Private BH Office of me 
Howe of Commons or me under-men- 
tinned PartfamenUfy Agents. 

DATED 3rd December 1906 
LE. KINO 
l on d rnr RetfpnM Tramport 
OB Broadway 


SWXH OBO 
Sobcttor 
SHotwooo • co. 
Queen Annek Ctanbo* 
3 Dean Farrar sueet 


London SW1H 9LO 


IN PARUAbtfNT 
SESSION 190687 
LONDON DOCKLANDS RAILWAY 
CBECKT0N1 

NbUcv is Iterator tfvan mat apoticaUon la 
being made to ParOamenf tn me mm e uf 
Session by London Rotfontf Tramport 
«“ihe corporation”) tar leave to Introduce 

a Bia under the above name or short title 
tar p u rpoaea of which the toOowlpg is a 


1. Construction of worm in the fnmkin 
Boroughs of Newham and Tower Ham lete 
lo provide ra extenstou at (he Docklands 
Rattway to Bectoon comprteto a concise - 
Horn iwarfes Nos. 1 and 2 respectively 366 
metres and 871 metres in fenotti) with the 
DortUands RaUway. as aufhorWSd by me 
London Docklands Railway Arts 19B4 
and 1986. a new railway (Work No. 3. 
T.W mrines I n leotffU to BMUra and ra 
extension (Works No* 4 and 6 reapecthw- 
ly 607 rortre* rad 08 metres to tanottO 
teto the sue of toe former BecMra Holder 
Station oas works: including special provi- 
sion bi connection with me construction. 


works and as to the use of tk x t rt C M power 
an the proposed railways and to* bridtfnp 
ora pan of me river Lea known as Bow 
Creek; 

SL teonMlMn or lands, or new rights 
only, and power to ice lands, to toe arras 
■ fo rested. Extinction of rights of way over 
toe lands to be acgidred or wed aad spe- 
cial aiuvfa fc ma a* to cnliv aad 


S. Power for the Corporation lo slop up. 


or road* to too London boroughs of New- 
ham and Tower Hamlets; to open up toe 
surtaoe of pans of specified streets to toe 
■aM London boroughs and to divert the 
footpath to toe London borough of New- 
ham between Tidal Basin Road and 
Vicuna Dock Road and which croons toe 
North Woolwich une of me British Rail- 
ways Board DV means of a bridge. 

4. P o wer tar toe Co r poration to make 
pro vtelun tar me payment of apmunnal 


And Notice Is feather tfvm Dial puns 
rad sections of toe baended nodes, taciud- 
Ing plans of toe lands u c o ppss d id be 
admired or used raenptfsortay. together 
wito a book of re fe rence to such plans, 
have been deposited for pubDc inspection 
woh the Chief exec u t iv e at toe London 
Borough of Newham af Ms OlfICw al me 
Town Hatf. Barking Road. Loudon E6 
2Rf» aad wtth toe Chief Executive of me 
London Borough of Tower Hamleta at his 
office at the Town Han. Patriot Square. 
London E2 9LN. 

On and Oder 40i Dmtnber 1986 t oni 
of Die B» tar ih* intended Art may bo 
toprdri and oop te s obtained te the price 
of SOP each M toe under menlionM at- 
ftoco. (Mectton to the BH may be made by 
depaeUtap a Petition aotente tt. K me BU 
originates tn the Moose' of Commons, toe 
Ifdrai date for demsUtae aueb a Petftfen la 
toe Private Bill Offlee of tool House win fe 
3«l» January 1967. u n nr igt na >cs tn toe 
Horn* of Lords, toe Itfcci date for detMttU- 
tog such a Petition in toe Office of toe 
Cterti of toe Parttomentt to titai House w« 
be 6to February 1987. Further mfonru- 
Una may be omined (ram the office of me 
Cleric of fbe ParSancnb In the House Of 
Lords, the Private BM OOce Of the How 
af Commons or too undrr-aentUmed Par- 
lammtary Aoenis. 

BATED 3rd December I9B6 
l£ KING 
Hanlon Rsgioiial Transport 
66 Broadway 
WeatmlMUr 
Lendon SWIH OBD 
Sotidtor 

SHERWOOD & CO- 
Qotsh Anne's C ham bers 
Westminster 
London 6W1H 9LC 
ttarttaatefttarv Agents 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


Ml MB raammf to 
Two children Brad 11, VaU*. 22. Oaai 
Ou MaU. 4&I30 Meung sur Loire. 
France. TO: 38 44 42 72- 


ASmrTAffT gUMMU/ Ma m a na n er- 
arnUy rroulred for large well couittMiad 
Japanese aty rauurant. EngBsh/Jaoa- 
base uMiur eapsrtenrefl In slinllar 
japaarae ota b M i h nienl essetnial. 
Knowtedge of titebana usefuL Mamasan 
would be reoubed to wear Kimono. Ex- 
c eBnte salary- Pfer contact MBs J- 
IfttiA RoBterook Lid. 348-306 Regent 
pyk Road. Landon. NS 2LJ. TO: Ol 
346 9273. • 


< 



\ TMP TTMBS WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


Police marksmen end airport hostage drama 



Perpignan (Renter) - Three 
gunmen, foiled hi an attempt 
to rob a bank here, gave 
themselves ap to the police at 
the airport of this southern 
French town and released 
their three hostages un- 
harmed, witnesses said. 

They surrendered after a 
raikufi attempt to break out of 
the airport in a van whose 
tyres were pnncteed by police 
marksmen. They had spent sis 
hoars on the tarmac. 

The ganmea had d e ma nd e d 
a getaway plane and a ransom. 

Meanwhile, France's anti- 
temrrist chief, M Robert 
Broussard had flown to Per- 
pignan with 10 elite marksmen 
wlo were posted on rooftops 
overlooking the van, parked 
near the control tower. 

Police said they sealed off 
the airport after the foiled 
hank robbers seized two ba nk 
staff and a client, a mother of 
three children,, and drove with 
them to an airport runway in a 
van. 

They set an original dead- 
line for 1300 GMT but several 
hours after its expiry the 

situation was unchanged. 

According to French radio, 
in the tense hours of waiting 
the woman hostage said in a 
loodhailer appeal that the men 
were desperate and would stop 
at nothing if their demands for 
a plane, pilot and co-pilot and 
one million francs (£107,000) 
woe not met 

A court official was trying to 
negotiate with the gang after 
the woman hostage's dramatic 
appeal from the van. 

It was M Broussard who 
negotiated the surrender of 
twoguamen who seized hos- 
tages at a Nantes court trial in 
western France a year ago. 


y/' ; r>aV- 

vVd-i-'Cv ; 






u 


. 'iZ, 


* ■ 








Cardiff spy in the 
Wright Affair 




% 


fji 


Conservative back- confession, might have been 
benchers yesterday increased granted immunity by the 
their efforts to turn the British m return for revealing 
Wright Affair into the information aboui 

Kinnock Affair. Australia s vast 

At the end of last week, disinformation network in 
they somehow discovered Britain - the legendary Pilger 
that Mr Kinnock and his staff Ring, reaching deep mio the 
had had lots of telephone Daily Mirror. The New 
conversations with Mr Statesman and television. 
TurnbuIL Australian torturer But what if it was not like 
of our Secretary to the Cabi- that? What if he is still 
net and lawyer opposing the working for Canberra Centre? 
British Government’s efforts Those Tories who believe 
to stop the Wright memoirs that he still is are inclined to 
being published in Australia, point out that his press 
JRrcftn this, they have spun secretary. Ms Patricia Hewitt, 


an elaborate theory that Mr 
Kinnock has been an Austra- 
lian agent all along. 
Presumably, the theory 


is an Australian. She is said to 
be the so-called “ First 
Woman” who tipped off Mr 
Kinnock that the lawyer 








U 


fir 


*3* 


/ 




v ”'K; ■ 


fa 


% 








(fi- 


i leaving a Perpignan bank with their hostages bat no 


after their hold-up went wrong yesterday, 


Leyland in Dutch link talks 


Continued from page 1 

la ted to collaboration, merger, 
sale or indeed continuation 
under present ownership — 
will involve restructuring”. 

The Rover Group had been 
reviewing the options for the 
trucks subsidiary against the 
backdrop of continuing de- 
pressed demand, particularly 
in overseas markets, and se- 
vere over-capacity in Europe, 
MrCharmon said. 

His announcement brought 
an immediate warning from 
Mr John Smith, Opposition 
spokesman on industry, that a 
takeover by Paccar would 
mean “extensive rationaliza- 
tion and job losses.” 

Mr Smith dismissed the 
Paccar talks as a takeover 
attempt by another foreign- 
own ed company and added: 
“Given that General Motors 
appears to be persisting in its 
derision to end track making 
in the UK if this goes ahead 
the only volume truck maker 


Today’s events 

Royal engagements 
The Queen holds an Investi- 
ture at Buckingham Palace at 1L 
The Duke of Edinburgh, as 
Patron and Trustee, attends the 
Duke of Edinburgh’s Award 
Scheme General Council, in 
Bournemouth, I0.4S; and as 
Permanent Master of the 
Shipwrights' Company presides 


in Britain would cease to be 
British-owned”. 

The tracks subsidiary had a 
half-year operating loss, be- 
fore tax and interest, of £21.1 
million in the first part of this 
year. It was the first time the 
Rover Group had broken out 
figures for the trucks 
subsidiary. 

There are three main manu- 
facturing locations at Leyland 
trucks. The key assembly 
plant at Leyland, Lancashire, 
employs 4,600; the axle-mak- 
ing Albion plant in Glasgow 
employs 1,250; and the 
Scammeli factory at Watford, 
Hertfordshire, has a workforce 
of 695. The Bathgate, Edin- 
burgh, factory which em- 
ployed 1,100, has been dosed. 

The talks with DAF are, 
according to Rover Group, 
“exploring the benefits that 
could arise from a much more 
fundamental collaboration” 


at a livery dinner at 
Ironmongers' Hall. 7.45. The 
Prince ofWaks also attends and 
will be appointed an Assistant to 
the court. 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother visits the Royal 
Smilhfield Show at Earls Court, 
11.15. 

The Princess of Wales opens 
the new headquarters of The 
Bod!y Srop pic at Hawthorn 
Road Wick, Littiehampton, 


A merger or takeover by DAF 
is regarded as among the 
possible options. 

There would be attractions 
for both Leyland and DAF in 
drawing closer together. 
DAFs product line is stron- 
gest among heavy trucks and 
Leyland's new lighter range 
would be complementary. 
Leyland, now leader in Britain 
with 17 per cent of the market, 
has had problems in breaking 
into overseas markets where 
DAF has more muscle. 

• * 

A recent contract with DAF 
is expected to lead to about 
2,000 of Leyland's light vans 
and trucks being sold next 
year through DAFs 500 deal- 
ers in continental Europe. 

Mr Channon has given his 
full support for miles with 
DAF and Paccar to Mr Gra- 
ham Day, Rover Group's 
chairman. The group's cor- 
porate plan for next year is 
still under preparation. 


10.50; and visits Downland 
Housing Society Project, run by 
the Sussex Association for Spina 
Bifida and Hydrocephalus, 5 
Grand Avenue, Worthing, 
12.30. 

Princess Anne. President of 
the Royal Agricultural Society 
of England, attends the society's 


Bid fails to 
ban story 
in Ireland 

Continued from page 1 

The British case referred 
to the book's .jacket which 
carries the subtitle Personal 
Exploits in MIS’s Most Secret 
Station. It was claimed this 
showed the book to be a 
flagrant breach of the con- 
fidentiality under which Miss 
Miller had been employed. 

For the defendants, it was 
claimed the book contained 
no great secrets and was a 
personal reminiscence about 
events which had already 
entered the public record. 

Miss Justice Carroll said the 
case was based solely upon the 
issue of confidentiality be- 
tween an individual and a 
government. “The plaintiff is 
a foreign government and 
there is no question of this 
state bring afiectefl.” 


Kinnock could be left 
out of spy briefings 


Continued from page 1 

but not to allow him to 
publish them under his own 
name.” 

Ministers are confident of 
winning the case in the 
Australian Court of Appeal. 
But there was less certainty 
last night over whether the 
government would appeal 
against the decision by the 
Dublin High Court yesterday 
□ot to prevent the publication 
of another book by a former 
MI5 employee, One Girts 
War , , by Joan Miller. 

The attempt by Sir Michael 
Havers, the Attoraey-GeneraL 
to ban the book was thrown 
out yesterday on the grounds 
that the publishers had a 
constitutional right to publish 
it. Some ministers believe it 
will be difficult to win an 
appeal on the constitutional 
issue. 

• The Conservatives have re- 


gained a lead over Labour 
with the Allian ce trailing 
badly in third place, according 
to the latest opinion poll 
published last night (Richard 
Evans writes). 

The MORI survey, con- 
ducted for the London Stan- 
dard \ puls the Tories on 41 per 
cent. Labour on 39 per cent, 
the Liberal/SDP Alliance on 
18 per cent with Others on 2 
percent. 


Private radio 

Athens (Reuter) — The 
Greek Prime Minister, Mr 
Andreas ’Papandreou, has 
called for the setting up of a 
multi-party parliamentary 
committee to study the in- 
troduction of private local 
radio stations in Greece. All 
radio and television in Greece 
is state-run. 


runs that Mr Kinnock. who is Turnbull would talk to him 
now aged 44. was one of the about the Wright case, 
so-called “Cardiff spies” - Yesterday one of these 
gifted and socially well-con- suspicious Tories asked the 
nected students at University prime Minister whether there 
College, Cardiff, who were W ere any precedents for a 
lured into woridng for the Leader of the Opposition 
Australians during the turbu- contacting private counsel 
lent 1960s when Harold Wil- acting ag ains t Her Majesty's 
son was ruling Britain and, to Government 
many of Mr Kinnock’s __ . 

generation, there seemed to Mrs Thatcher replied that 
be no hope.( According to Mr if there were any precedents 
Kinnock’s Who’s Who entry, “for this astonishing action”, 
he was president of that perhaps the House should be 
university’s union in 1965- told. But by the tune she 
66) spoke Mr Kinnock had al- 

Such young men were at- mystfirious 

traded to a society where flight to Amenca. 

they believed the workers The chairman of the Tory 
spent all their time slumped backbench 1922 Committee, 

in front of the television, Mr Cranley Onslow, showed 

swilling beer out of tins and that he too believed in the 

watching rugby, exerting Kinnock conspiracy theory, 

themselves only to scratch He urged Mrs Thatcher to 

their huge, exposed bellies, or have no truck with Mr 

to look out of the window and Kinnock on security issues 

Dggle golden-Iimbed girls now that be had been “set up 

frolicking in the surf. lo ask in this House questions 

That was the ideal of the wh »cb were to be asked in the 

New Australian Man sold to Australian court the follow- 

them in the propagandists JJS pay. and was Mr 

literature of the time, and by TurnbulTs mouthpiece, 
the Antipodean recruiters Mr Anthony Marlow, 


who moved among Cardiff Conservative MP for North- 
students looking for potential ampion North, accused Mr 


agents. There is no denying 
that it appealed to a strain of 
idealism deep in the Welsh 
character. 

But of course we now know 


Kinnock of “conniving with 
the defence lawyers in 
Australia in the case against 
the crown”. He urged Mrs 
Thatcher to send an aero- 


uul ui wu x we now luiuw _i___ »«. l-' , . 

that such an Australia never f lane 10 ^i Mr 1 t k,n ? ,ck back 
really exisSi TCeSty of t0 answer ****"• 


life there at the time was 
much harsher. It was a land 
of would-be poets, sensitive 
essayists, and ballet dancers 
trying to escape to the West - 
mainly Earls Court, west 
London. But Mr Kinnock 
was not to know that. 

At some point in the 1960s, 
so the Tory theory presum- 
ably continues, he became an 


She said that it was not for 
her to answer for the Leader 
of the Opposition and she 
was “jolly glad” she did not 
have to do so. 

Jf these Tories are right, 
and Mr Kinnock is still 
working for Australia, the 
consequences appear stark. 
The Australian selectors 
would be withjn a general 


Australian agent. But the election of getting their man 
‘assumption is that he was into Number Ten. England 


later disillusioned with 
Australian society and, after a 


would never be allowed to 
win a Test again. 


Books — hardback 


The literary Enters selection of interesting books published this week: 
Democracy 4 RaGrion, Gladstone and the Liberal Party 1867-1875, by 


J.P. Pwry (Cambridge, £3750) 

Ibsen's Poems, in versions by John Northam (Oxford, £18.50) 

Graft tweets, by Malcolm Davies A Jeyaraney K a tf i t rilhainby (Duckworth. 

of fee Dance, A Moncreiffe MsceSany, eefited by Hugh Montgomery- 


Tbe limes Crossword Puzzle No 17,219 



ACROSS 

1 Directions to a faithful 
friend to provide salt (3-3). 

5 Refuse to give description of 
a person of influence (8). 

9 Controversial poet receives 
£1 for subsistence (10). 

10 Many a typical expression 
from dwellers near this lake 
(4). 

11 Refinement of food (8). 

12 Dull river for grown-up (6X 

13 Repulsive-sounding fruit 
(4) 

15 Needlewoman in barbaric 
rite? (8). 

18 Dine dnmkenly, perhaps 
flounder about — mon- 
strous! (8) 

19 Throws in a cotter, say (4) 

21 Regulate publicity so much 

and no more (6) 

23 Ersatz sort of fuel base (8). 

25 Ballads by university dole 
(4). 

26 Collect again and look like 
accepting a shilling (10). 

27 Assume rote of ship's offi- 
cer. a childhood friend (8). 

28 Shelter a Pole in part of the 
building (6). 

DOWN 

2 Raised hat when introduc- 
ing Oriental type (5). 

3 Cease to five with artist — 
he’s a dictator, of course (9). 


4 Diminutive music-maker 
accompanying Lear’s saga- 
cious bird (6) 

5 Why this good Dane vandal- 
ized the plant (5,10). 

6 It shows the limit of our 
liquidity (4-4). 

7 Though only a villein, he 
has a parcel of land (5) 

8 Hauled over the coals after 
material is tom (9). 

14 Meeting-place where 13 had 
converted two students? (9). 

16 His interest in traffic wor- 
ried Dean Smart (9\ 

17 Man . overturned first-class 
carriage (8). 

2D Plant a halfwit in US , 
Intelligence (6) 

22 Interest of union leader in 
American transport (5). ! 

24 Cavalryman retreating in an 
exceptional hurry! (5). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,218 


{gSMMiasiflHifl saiasu 
tg E u ii b 
gGWonEra iasrannEfflE 
® ■ n s s b 

E_^.. H- ffl ■ IS E • G 
iysiiaSBPSu. 

i ■s s isi • ra • [3 
sEIaO • 13@E3EE[5Q[3 

ra ts it e e ■ n 

aiBEEnBEEii ansasia 

& E E EJ • 0 C5 m 

faBEanBra iannsnEE 

BE E O BE G g 

lansoEE kisrcHEnnnrs 


Concise Crossword page 14 


presides at die Degree Cere- 
mony of the Utuvenaty at the 
Albert Hall, 2; later, as chan- 
cellor, attends a thanksgiving 
service in celebration of the 
university’s 150th anniversary 
at St Paul’s Cathedral , 6.25; and 
as Commandant in Chief of St 
John Ambulance and Nursing 
Cadets, attends the Order Gala 
Ball at the Intercontinental Ho- 
tel, 8.20. 

The Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester attend the British- 
American Ball at Grosv&uor 
House, Park Lane, 8. 

The Duchess of Gloucester 
presents commemorative 
certificates to Smith and 
Nephew Fellows and Nursing 
Scholars at a reception at the 
Royal College of Surgeons of 
England, 35 Lincoln's Inn 
Fields, 6.15 

The Duke of Kent opens the 
tenth National Energy Manage- 
ment Conference and Ex- 
hibition at the National 
Exhibition Centre, Bir- 
mingham, 10.10. 

The Duchess of Kent, Patron 
of Age Concern, atten ds a carol 
concert in Salisbury fjnthMr^ 

Princess Alexandra attends 
the . .opening of the 
exhibiUon"The New Thracian 
Treasure from Rogozen, 
Bulgaria" by the Deputy Chair- 
man of ibe Council of Ministers 
of Bulgaria, at the British Mu- 
seum, 5.50. 

Music 

The Nash Ensemble of 
London; Petersfield Festival 
Hall, Petersfield. 730. 

Recital by Thomas Trotter. 
Birmingham Town Hall, 1. 

Bournemouth Sinfonietta 
with Christian ‘ Blackshaw; 
Guildhall, Plymouth, 730. 

Strathclyde University Cham- 
ber Choir; Glasgow (TaihpdraL 
John Knox Street, Glasgow, 8. 

Bournemouth Symphony Or- 
chestra, Wessex Hall. Poole Arts 
Centre, 7.3ft 

Student Recital; Bel voir 
Room, Charles Wilson Build- 
ing, Leicester University. 1. 10. 

Talks, lectures 

Bristol and the Atlantic Trade 
in the Eighteenth Century by Dr 
Kenneth Morgan; Willis Me- 
morial Building, University of 
Bristol. S.I5. 

Physics Open Lecture by Profes- 
sor Sir Brian Pippard FRS, 
University of Birmingham. 1 1. 

General 

Poetry; British Airways 
Commonwealth Poetry Prize- 
winners, Third Eve Centre, 350 
Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, 
7Jft 


C WEATHER ) Pressure win remain low to the N of Britain and high 

over the continent and fronts will affect northern areas. 
England and Wales will be mainly cloudy, central and eastern districts will 
brighten Hp later. In northern border comities of England there may be some rain. 
Northern Ireland and much of Scotland will be windy and dull with periods of rain, 
sometimes heavy although the extreme N of Scotland will have a mixture of sun- 
shine and showers. Much of Britain will have another mild day. Outlook for tomor- 
row and Friday: England and Wales will be mainly dry and rather doudy but 
Scotland and Northern Ireland will have more rain. Brighter colder weather with 
showers over Scotland and Northern Ireland wfll reach most places by the end of 
Friday. 


HIGH TIDES 




The pound 


Roads 






ifeaa 


■igii 

■■Bil 

wmMTZvbS 


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TODAY 

AM 

NT 

PM 

NT 

londoo Bridge 

222 

7.1 

242 

73 

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1.48 

45 

208 

Aj4 

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13 A 

826 

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11.39 

2J 

Caidff 

7A 7 

123 

8.11 

122 

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628 

5.7 

7XS 

55 

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11X0 

6.7 



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60B 

55 

659 

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1.11 

12.15 

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3-05 

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328 

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11.57 

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1221 

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656 

75 

721 

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5.48 

73 

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6.24 

42 

6.44 

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526 

55 

639 

53 

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7.49 

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43 

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11.53 

6.4 


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11-32 

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provide a course for anyone 
closely involved with people 
who nave a mental handicap. 

Further information about 
the course. Mental Handicap: 
Patterns far Living, is available 

from: Jan Walmsley, Depart- 
ment of Health and Social 
Wei fere. Open University, Mil- 
ton Keynes, MK7 6AA. 


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confession, migh* 

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working for Canberra r *8 
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were an\ Drircr^--. ri k*» 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 


Bpi 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 

1278.4 (+5.9) 

FT-SE 100 

1625.5 (+7.7) 

Bargains 
27395 (29647) 

s°sr m) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 
1.4330 (-0.0045) 

W German mark 

2.8244 (+0.0011) 

Trade-weighted 

67.8 (-0.1) 


loD to urge 
cut In taxes 


US indicators 
jump by 0.6% 


rose by 1.6 per cent to $386.5 
billion {£270.2 billion) as 


billion (£270.2 billion) as 
builders rushed projects to 
beat tougher tax laws. 


Beecfaam sells 


Beechara Group has sold its I 
Morion Brands tinned veg- j 
etables and fruit fillings busi- 
ness to Hillsdown Holdings 
for £8.5 million. Based at 
Lowestoft. Morton employs 
1 60 people and has assets with 
a book value of £6 million. 
Beecham said that the sale was 
in line with its plans to 
concentrate on “core brands , 
which offer profitable growth 

opportunities." 

Bid rebuff 

FoihergiU & Harvey says i 
that the offer document from 
Courtaulds contains nothing 
to cause the board to modify j 
its judgement that the offer for 
the company is both 
“opportunistic and com- 
pletely unacceptable.” 


Kollis stake 


Mr Robert Maxwell's Hollis 
group bolds a stake of 28.3 per 
cent in AE, the engineering 
group, after buying more 
shares in the market. The rival 
bidder. Turner & NewalL 
whose bid closes on Friday, 
has a 42 per cent holding. 


Rio Tinto-Zinc Corpora- 
tion is to increase its stake in 
Anglesey Aluminium from 
33.3 to 5 1 per cent. It is paying 
£20 million for part of the 
stake held by its partner in the 
project, Kaiser Aluminium & 
Chemical Corporation. 


Wall Street 22 
Comoent 23 
Stock Market 23 
Tea pus 24 
Co News 24,25 
Money Mitts 24 


Foreign EM 24 
Traded Opts 24 

Unit Trnsts 26 
Commodities 26 
USM Prices 26 
Store Prices 27 


TIMES 


21 

SPORT 39 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 43 


WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


Share price movement sharp 


HbCkRogen 


Guinness: bid 1 




... . 


Unilever spends 

£2.1 billion 


w 


under scrutiny 




on US toiletries 




By Lawrence Lever 


The Institute of Directors is 
to urge the Government to cut 
the top rale of income tax by 
lOp and says the Chancellor 
can afford to trim 3p off the 
basic tax rate of 29p. 

The institute's council met 
yesterday to consider its pro- 
posals for next spring's Bud- 
get. to be submitted to the 
Treasury in the new year. 

Mr Lawson has said the 
£4,700 million increase in 
government spending he an- 
nounced in the autumn state- 
ment ruled out a cut in the 
basic rate from 29p to 25p. 

Bui the institute says the 
steadying of the oil price, 
savings from the reduction in 
the dole queues, and extra tax 
revenue from the increase in 
government spending will 
give him about £4 billion. 


The Government investiga- 
tion into Guirmess centres on 
the movement of Guinness's 
share price throughout the 
course of its hotly-contested 
battle for control of Disiliera 
with Mr Jimmy Gulliver's 
Argyll Group. 

Confirmation of the 
investigation's locus came 
yesterday from Mr George 
Law. the compliance officer of 
Morgan Grenfell, merchant 
bank advisers to Guinness, 
who were visited by repre- 
sentatives of the DTI inspec- 
tors on Monday morning. 

It emerged also that the two 
broking firms that acted for 
Guinness at the time of the 
bid, Cazenove and Wood 
Mackenzie, were both visited 
by representatives of the DTI 
inspectors on Monday morn- 
ing. 

Guinness's share price fell 
back further yesterday from 
an opening level of 298p to 
285p. This represents a rail of 


4Sp in the shares since the 
announcement of the enquiry 
— and the shares are rapidly 
approaching the year’s low of 
277p 

The Argyll Group yesterday 
lent support to the DTI in- 
vestigation and added its be- 
lief that there had been share 


price manipulations by Wall 
Street speculators. 

The focus of attention is still 
Mr Ivan Boesky the disgraced 
American arbitrageur, who is 
known to have been involved 
in the bid. although to date 
only as a purchaser of Distill- 
ers shares. 

The timing of the DTI 
investigation after receiving 
information from the SEC 
suggests Mr Boesky’s evidence 
has triggered the investiga- 
tion. Furhler support comes 
from the Government bring- 
ing in special powers last 
Thursday which would enable 
it to return the compliment to 
the SEC. 


GUINNESS 
SHANE PRICE 


QATASTREAM 35Q 


Referring to the visit at 
Morgan Grenfell, Mr Law said 
yesterday, “ What they wanted 
was to look at all files or other 

records that in any way related 
to dealings in Guinness shares 
from the start of the bid for 
Distillers. ” 

The DTI investigation will 
extend to any dealings in ! 
Guinness shares done by Mor- I 
gan Grenfell Asset Manage- 
ment, the discretionery fund 
management arm of Morgan 
Grenfell as well as dealings by 
Morgan Grenfell Securities, 
the market-making arm which 
was formerly run by Mr 
Geoffrey Collier. 

The insepetors have asked 
also for details of deals carried 
out by Morgan Grenfell & Co, 
which was financial adviser to 
Guinness and bought shares 
in Guinness as a principal at 
the time of the bid. And they 
will examine records of 
Pinchin Denny and Pember 
and Boyle which became 1 00 
per cent subsidiaries of Mor- 
gan Grenfell towards the end 
of Ihe bid 


AMR**,* f»*i 










Unilever, the Angio-Dutch 
food and household products 
empire, is making an agreed 
S3.1 billion (£2.1 billion) bid 
for the Chesebrough-Pond’s 
group in a move that will 
significantly strengthen its 
American presence. 

The merger will bring to- 
gether two of the strongest- 
branded conglomerates in the 
personal and household goods 
sector. 

A combined group would 
include Lux soap, O. mo wash- 
ing powder and Brooke Bond 
tea from the Unilever stable 
and Cbesebrough’s Vaseline 


By Richanl Lander 

lo-Dutch short-term borrowings raised 
products at attractive rates in the US. 
a agreed The agreed terms top the 
lion) bid hostile $66 offer announced 
h-Pond’s last week by American 
that will Brands, the diversified to- 
ihen its bacco group, which owns the 
Gallaher cigarette company in 
bring to- Britain. 

itropgest- a spokesman at American 
ies in the Brands' headquarters in 
>ld goods Greenwich. Cbnnetieut, said 




petroleum jelly. Pond's cold 
cream ana O-tips cotton 




- 



iiila 


The US index of leading 
indicators, a broad gauge of 
economic activity, jumped by 
0.6 per cent in October after a 
0.2 per cent rise in September, 
the Commerce Department 
said. 

Meanwhile, building in- 
dustry contracts were at their 
highest level for 10 months 
and construction spending 


MARCH 


APRIL 


Mr Law was not able to say 
whether the inspectors' in- 
terest was in the ownership of 
Guinness shares or on the 
pattern of trading in them. 

Guinness shares moved up 
substantially during the latter 
part of its 4 and a half month 
battle. The shares which stood 
at 281 pence on the 13th of 
March rose to 353 pence on 
April 11th shortly before it 
secured control of Distillers. 





; -fefe : 7. 




■ .*.« 


DTI inquiry ‘urgent’ 


Mr Michael Howard, Min- 
ister for Consumer and Cor- 


porate Affairs, yesterday 
forcefully defended govern- 
ment polity for combatting 
insider dealing and City fraud, 
making dear that special 
inspectors appointed in the 
past three weeks by the Trade 
and Industry Department to 
look into alleged abuse were 
under orders to act with the 
greatest urgency. 

In a Commons debate on 
insider dealing, he declined to 
be drawn over the investiga^ 
tion announced on Monday 
into Guinness pic, saying that 
it would be improper ofhim to 
comment or give details of 
cases under investigation. 

“No-one can be in any 
doubt that we regard insider 
dealing as a thoroughly per- 
nicious practice which is 
damaging to markets and 
unfair to individuals and 


By Colin Narbroogh 

which we are determined to do 
all in our power to root out” 
Mr Howard said, the timing of 
the inspectors' report was a 
matter for them, but he ex- 
pected them “to address tbeir 
task with the greatest possible 
urgency." 

To • underline that the 
government was not holding 
back where wrongdoers were 
concerned, he disclosed that 
Mr Geoffrey Collier, the for- 
mer head of Morgan Gren- 
felTs market-making 
operation, who was the rant 
of DTI inspectors last mono, 
had been charged for alleged 
offences involving deals in AE 
shares. Preliminary investiga- 
tion had also been completed 
concerning an employee of 
British and Commonwealth. 

Mr Robin Cook, opening 
for Labour, described the DTI 
move against Guinness, as a 
“fraud investigation” that fol- 



cream and vj-txps cotton 
swabs. 

The Cbesebrougb group in- 
cludes also Ragu, the pack- 
aged food business which is 
thought to control about half 
of the $750 million market in 
America for spaghetti sauces. 

Overall, Chesebrough 
showed net income of SS2 
million last year on sales of 
$2.7 billion — equivalent to 
more than 10 per cent of 
Unilever's turnover. Net in- 
come nose to $138 million in 
the first nine months this year. 

Unilever is making a cash 
tender offer of $72.50 for each 
Chesebrough share, which wifi 
remain open until December 
3ft 

It has an option to purchase 
7.9 million new shares, 
equivalent to 18.5 per cent of 
die present issued capital at 
the same price, and another 
option over the Ragu 
subsidiary. 

Unilever is ungeared at 
present and funds for the deal 
are expected to come from 



the group was evaluating the 
situation closely. 

Shares in Chesebrough. 
which stood at $45 last week 
before the American Brands 
bid emerged, rose $3 to 71-7/8 
on the New York Slock Ex- 
change yesterday. 

The deal also excited City 
followers of Unilever, whose 
shares rose 83p to an all-time 
high of £21. 18- 

Analysts had been awaiting 


a decisive play by the group in 
America, where profits have 


America, where profits have 
recovered this year after a 
sharp downturn last year be- 
cause of stiff competition, 
especially from Procter & 
Gamble in the detergents 
sector. 

Mr Les Pugh, of Wood 
Mackenzie, the brokers, said: 
“The Unilever story has been 
a very successful one this year 
and this latest one should give 
it a new twist for 1987.” 




Chancellor rules 




out devaluation 


lowed the company's ‘'ex- 
tremely seedy transactions” in 
conjunction with its £2.7 bil- 
lion takeover of Distillers this 
year. The financial world's 
passion for takeover^ was a 
paradox seen against Britain's 
declining manufacturing 
sector. 

Mr Howard accused Labour 
of “City-bashing” and of hav- 
ing no genuine concern for 
regulatory arrangements.. No 
further powers had been 
identified as being needed to 
combat insider dealing be- 
yond those already provided. 
And remarks in yesterday’s 
Times by Senator William 
Proxmire showed that the US' 
statutory Securities and Ex- 
change Commission had 
foiled to identify major insider 
dealing for some years, hardly 
recommending that system as 
an alternative to Britain's 
system of self-regulation. 


Out for die coast: 17-year-old David Raymout at the 
Nat West bank’s British Gas share coast 


By Rodney Lord, Economics Editor 


Tell Sid - it’s too late 


For Sids who live in Aber- 
deen, Liverpool, Southampton 
and 23 other towns up and 
down tile United Kingdom, 
you have one last chance to get 
your British Gas applications 
in th Iq morning. For Sids in 
Aacbternmchty, Lowestoft, 
Skegness and everywhere else, 
forget it — it’s too late. 

Even those Sids living near 
one of the 32 receiving centres 
will have to leg it down there 
chop-drap, to nse the parlance 
of the £5j6 bfilton issue's 
advertising campaign, to get 
their forms m on time — 
applications close at 10 am 
around the country. 

Application forms, with 
cheques attached, continued to 


pour in yesterday with the 
organizers of the issue hoping 
that the number of potential 
investors will top the five 
million who sought shares in 
the TSB Bank flotation in 
October. 

The shares appear likely to 
open at a 10p-15p premium 
over the initial SOp payment 
when tradf ng starts next Mon- 
day. However letters of alloca- 
tion will not be posted raitfl a 
week foter.. 

For now, it just remains for 


The Chancellor, Mr Nigel 
Lawson, yesterday again 
spoke out against devaluation 
as a policy to improve 
Britain’s competitiveness. 

He did so as - for the 
second successive day — the 


pound slipped a little in 
foreign exchange markets on 


the forms, weed out the mul- 
tiple appficants and decide the 
basis of allocation. And, of 
course, to tear down all those 
“TelJ Sid” adverts. 


foreign exchange markets on 
continuing concern about the 
outlook for the balance of 
payments. 

Speaking at a dinner given 
by the Better Made In Britain 
organization. Mr. Lawson said: 
“Devaluation means surren- 
der to inflation. It simply 
perpetuates the inflationary 
spiral 

“I have always made it dear 
that I favour an exchange rate 
which will exert a degree of 
financial discipline and put 
British industry on its mettle ” 

The Chancellor said that the 
performance of British ex- 


ports in recent years had been 
very encouraging but that 
there was still concern about 
the rapid growth of imports. 
Any retreat into protectionism 
would be a disastrous step 
backwards. 

Official reserves of gold and 
foreign currencies rose Iasi 
month by $14 million to 
$22,006 million. The under- 
lying rise, after netting out 
official borrowing and capital 
repayments, was $35 million. 

The figures were better than 
expected because markets had 
been anticipating some further 
effect from the official inter- 
vention in support of the 
pound during September and 
October. 

Mr Peter Warburton, of L 
Messel, the broker, com- 
mented: “We imagine the bad 
news has been postponed.” 


Profits up 
at Anglia 


Pretax profits from Anglia 
Secure Homes, the specialist 
manager and developer of 
sheltered housing for the el- 
derly, soared by 85 percent in 
the year to September 30 to 
£840,000. Turnover rose 94 
per cent to £4.2 million. 
Earnings per share were 8.4p. 

The group sold 107 homes 
last year compared with 61 die 
year before. Thisyear, the City 
expects the group to sefl moire 
than 210. They forecast pretax 
profits of £2.3 million and 
earnings per ihare of 1 6.2p. 

Anglia came to the unlisted 
securities market in July when 
2.6 million shares were placed, 
raising £2.6 million. The 
shares performed strongly, rte- 
ing from the 115p placing 
price to 242p yesterday. 


GEC expects tiny 
growth next year 


By Alexandra Jackson 


Trafalgar 
write-offs 
cost £100m 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Dowses ...... 1956.60 (+14.06)- 

iSS Dow 18190.97 (-117.011 

Hong Kong : „ AC n /j* 051 


Sydney: AO 

SSSaflK ...... 2053.9 (-19.4) 

403853 (+9.62) 

^^...560.901^.10) 

London: FT- A n i a 

FT Gifts ’ 

Closing prices 


RISES: 

Derek Crouch 

Portals Hokhngs 
Hall Engineering — 

j. Biltam .: 

Lucas — 

Morfand ... ; — 

RedteamNat — 

Bentalls 

Cantors 'A' 

Woolworth — 

Fogarty — 

Glaxo - 

BOC Group 

ICI 

P40 

ChesterfieW 


Lord Weinstock, the 
managing director of The 
General Bectric Company, 
Britain's biggest electronics 
group, is not expecting its 
trading profits to grow by 
more than a few per cent next 
year. However, in ' the two 
years following that,, trading 
profits are exposed to grow by 
between 12 and 16 percent, be 
said. 

Lord Weinstock was speak- 
ing yesterday at a meeting 
with City analysts following 
the announcement of the 
group's interim results for the 
six months to the end of 
September 1986. The pretax 
profits were at the bottom end 
of expectations at £289 mil- 
lion compared to £275 million 
in the first half of last year. 
Turnover increased by 1 per 
cent to £2.5 billion. A divi- 
dend of 1.5p was declared. 

The chairman of GEC, The 


Right Honorable James Prior, 
reminded shareholders of a 
market softness which he had 
mentioned at the time of the 
annual meeting in August He 
felt that the 1 percent increase 
in attributable earnings was a 
reflection of the company’s 
ability to cope with difficult 
conditions. “Our core busi- 
nesses are intact” he said. But 
the shares fell by Up to 169p. 

Some City analysts were 
comforted, however, by state- 
ments made during 
yesterday's meeting about the 
group's attitude to ac- 
quisitions. GEC does not, they 
said, believe that it is in its 
shareholders' interest to earn 
such a high proportion of its 
profits from cash balances. 
Bulls of the stock were also 
encourage about the prospect 
of GEC winning the RAF 
Nimrod airborne early warn- 
ing contract Tempos page 24 , 


By Carol Ferguson 


Trafalgar House lost more 
than £100 million in write-offs 
last year due to its raposure to 
oil and gas production and the 
offshore construction indus- 
try. The shares, which have 
been falling since the begin- 
ning of the year were marked 
down another lOp to 272p 

Extraordinary write-offs 
taken below the tine were £79 
million of which £56.8 million 
related to oil and gas invest- 
ments. In addition, £50 mil- 
lion was charged direct to 
reserves in respect of the Scott 
Lithgow acquisition. 

Pretax profit for the year to 
September 30 rose 2 per cent 
to £145.8 million. Earnings 
per share fell from 34.7p to 
32.7p before extraordinary 
items. The dividend was lifted 
15 per cent to 13-2p. 

Tempos, page 24 


iMsukTOwne MiaaMDrNUiMiscaa & sons Lmadca Mm" H rum & pic 

lKbMBr.olltMrictlNe»*Fv: aeBrimoB 

* m ikm owwq tan jfl «mi gw b mm il« w* a n au i »*• «iraniu«n am « n n»i ;x*«ib«bi 0 < s n wi nr cc* 

n*DM)Dr.(i(lpair<<lNcw«P1£KctsiK6ao*wMitt uronwiBh 


TIN 


Turner & 
Newall plc 


FINAL OFFER FOR 


AE 


PLC 


VALUE OF T&N FINAL OFFER: 

(pan share, part cash! 


218p(+8p)i — 

iWSSB Giordano steers BOC back to what it does best 


zHSHm 

— 380p(+t2p) 


— 673p(+13p) 
100p (+1 Opj 


Ready for 20% lift-off 


VALUE OF ADDITIONAL SHARE ELECTION 
UNDER T&N FINAL OFFER: 


fluff n mui i u M satisfaction of such an efecnonj 


349p(+9p) 

ztisub 

..... 475p (+20p) 


8brrERE5TRATES_ 

London: Bank' Base: J V* 

ISffl5SSS£.sSS» 

Federal Funds _ 4 , 5 39 %- 


FALLS: 

Oxford ftist t£P) 

iSSall- - i®- 5 ® 

United Leasing - Wp -9p) 

Anglia Sec. Homes — 237p |-0p) 
Prices are as at 4pm 


GOLD 


CUR3ENC6ES 


London: 

£■ Si .4330 > 

£ : DM2 8244 
£: SwFr2 353i 

£. FFr9.2429 
£■ 60 

£: Indexes 

ECU £0.734568 


NewVork: 

S: El .4345* 

S: DM1.9725- n . 
S: S«Fr1 .*>440 
$: FFr6 4620 
S: Yenl 6li® 

S: indax-lOS-S 
SDR £Q.S4646o 


London Firing: 

{£270.50- 

271.00) 

Sx < ^9.0(W89.50- 


north sea oil 


Brent (Jan.). 

* Denotes latest tradaig price 


By Alexandra Jackson 

Mr Rickard Giordano, the 
chairman and chief executive 
of BOC, is expecting profits 
and earnings to grow by 20 per 
cent in the current year. 

Speaking yesterday afleithe 
announcement of the group's 
results for the year to the end 
of September, Mr Giordano 
said that a good underlying 
performance would be en- 
1 hanced by lower interest pay- 
ments and a lower than 
; expected tax charge. 

The gronp is now 
concentrating 90 per cent id its 
efforts on its core bssinesses of 
industrial gases and 
healthcare. 

BOC reported pretax profits 
of £64.1 million, on a modified 
historic cost basis, compared 


gjg? * " ' 



Richard Giordano: building 
on less debt and tax 


to £1713 million in 1984-85. 
However, this was after an 
exceptional charge of £128 
million covering the write 
down of certain assets. 


The figures were also struck 
after charging £27,1 million of 
additional depreciation on 
revaluations. Turnover, 
excluding related companies, 
rose during the period from 
£1.9 billion to £1.94 billion. 

A final dividend of 6Ap was 
declared. Combined with the 
interim payment, this repre- j 
sects a 15 per cent increase for : 
the year to 10.8p. Mr 
Giordano thought there was no j 
reason why a similar increase 
could not be expected in the 
current year. 

City analysts are forecast- 
ing pretax profits for 1986-87 1 
on an historic cost basis of I 
£255 million and 35-5p of | 
earnings. The shares rose 8p ! 
yesterday to 348p. 

Tempos page 24 i 


287p 


THE RENEWED OFFER IS FINAL AND WILL CLOSE AT 1.00 pm ON 
5 th DECEMBER, 1986 UNLESS IT IS THEN UNCONDITIONAL AS TO 
ACCEPTANCES 


ADDITIONAL SHARE ELECTIONS AND ADDITIONAL CASH 
ELECTIONS WZLL NOT BE AVAILABLE ASTER 1.00 p.m. ON 
5th DECEMBER, 1886 IN ANY CIRCUMSTANCES 


The values ot ate oHerare based on ihe price of f&lp per Turner & Newall ordinary snare ai 3 30 p m on 2nd December. 1936 




I 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


Shares pull back 
after early buying 


New York (Agencies} — 
Wall Street shares polled back 
in earl; Hading yesterday 
after a futures-related buying 
spree, bat remained sofidly 
higher on the day. 

Shares were buoyed by the 
momentum of die previous 
- day’s recovery and a rise of 0.6 
per cent in the October leading 
economic indicators. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
' average was np 1&45 at 
1,928.99, after being np by 
more than 20 points for a few 
minutes. The average was Stitt 
above its record dosing high of 
1319.71 set on September 4. 


Advancing issues led shares 
by a margin of five to one and 
trading was moderately active. 
Hie volume 59 minion shares. 

Share prices rose strongly at 
the opening bell as arbitra- 
geurs took advantage of the 
huge premiums being com- 
manded by stock hubs futures 
contracts. 

The December Standard & 
Poor’s 500 contract, for exam- 
ple, was priced at about two 
points over the index itself. 

The transportation average 
was up &58 at 851.41, utilities, 
at 212^3, were up 0.75 and 
stocks were np 5.73 at 758.92. 


Takeovers: more 
winners than losers 


Argyll rings up 
£ 36 m despite 


A * 

t: / %* ? ? 5 


Sir Gordon White, 
chairman of 
Hanson Industries, 
the American arm 
of Hanson Trust, 
puts the case for 
more, not less, 
competition 




MieftwiWan* 


Distillers scars 


A year ago yesterday, Mr 
James Gulliver, the chairman 


of the Argyll group, embarked 
on the most ambitious ven- 



Dec 

Nov 


1 

28 

Firestone 

FstChkaoo 

Z7« 

32* 

27ft 

32ft 

FstmtBncp 

54 

9ft 

53ft 

9ft 



Change is the overriding 
feature of the modem indus- 
trial world. The rise and &U of 
competitive advantage be- 
tween industries and between 
individual companies is con- 
stant, kept moving by fero- 
cious competition between 
businesses and indeed coun- 
tries. 

It is perfectly natural that in 
this process there are losers as 
well as winners. No amount of 
wishful thinking on the part of 
politicians or businessmen 
nostalgic for earlier, easier 
times can change that What 
must be done — especially in 
this country — is to ease the 
path for the businesses and 
industries which are in the 
ascendency so that they can 
flourish and for those in 
decline to be redeployed with 
all speed and efficiency. 
Entrenched management 
I and trade union attitudes, 
resistant to inevitable change, 
have been a major cause of 
Britain's post-war industrial 
decline. Indeed the com- 
placent and generally poor 
management of these sunset 
industries on the one hand 
and the lack of political will by 
successive governments on 
the other, have come in for 
much deserved criticism on 
this score. 

A major role played by 
takeovers is that of displacing 
unsuccessful managements 
and restoring the competitive 
position. Inis is already 
occurring in large sections of 
British industry. It is really 
surprising that this positive 
aspect has not been more 
widely arriaimM, when the 
constant Mealing of sectional 



ture of his distinguished busi- 
ness career — the £17 billion 
battle for control of the whisky 
giant. Distillers. It was also to 
prove his most disappointing 
Mure, ending in defeat by 
Guinness after the roughest 
takeover the City has seen. 

Yesterday, Mr Gulliver 
proved that he is nothing if 
not durable, turning in ex- 
cellent half-time profits from 



Sir Gordon: vital role of mergers and takeovers in modernization 
and would rather go down ualiy taking the place of the opportunity to cast their votes 
with their ship than embrace traditional, one-product com- in favour of the incumbent 


cellent half-time profits from 
Argyll which show that even 
during the distractions of the 
bid, he and his colleague 
Alistair Grant, newly ap- 
pointed group chief executive, 
kept the superm arkets -1 o- 
whisky group well on track for 
substantially higher profits 
next year. 

The figures were at the top 
end of City expectations, 
showing a 22 per cent rise at 
the pretax level to £36.3 
million. 

The profit and loss account 
bears the legacy of the failed 
Guinness takeover, which led 
to interest charges of £2.5 
million on the borrowings 


By John Belt City Editor 

sterdav, Mr same league as its bigger high 
ie chairman street rivals, 
p, embarked Only five years ago, Argyll's 
bilious ven- food retailing margins were a 
Lushed busi- wafer thin 1.6 per cent on 
£17 billion sales. After the takeover of the 
if the whisky Allied Suppliers chain, Gulli- 
: was also to ver and his team owned more 
^appointing than 1200 stores, many of 
1 defeat by them small and inefficient and 
tte roughest suppliers were delivering to 
has seen. more than 600 locations, 
r Gulliver The profitablity has been 
: nothing if improved substantially by a 
ting in ex- tripartite strategy, 
rrofits from Gulliver's first task was to 
y that even rationalize the distribution 
tions of the system with a network of new 
> colleague depots. By 1985, just over a 
newly ap- third of the food division 
f executive, merchandise went through 
markets-! o- Argyll’s own warehouse sys- 
on track for iem but by 1 988 almost 90 per 
ier profits cent will be distributed in- 
house. 

: at the top The second step was to 
jpecta tions, make substantial changes to 
cent rise at the store portfolio. Although 
to £36.3 the number of Argyll's outlets 
has dropped from 1200 in 
»s account 19 82 to 972, its selling space 
has grown by more than 10 per 
, which ited cent to 5 million square feet 
is of £2.5 Stage three was to rational- 
borrowings fee the identities of the outlets. 




with their ship than embrace 
inevitable change. Seen in the 
light of industrial reorganiza- 


tion, it becomes clear why 
merger activity has been much 


merger activity has been much 
more a feature of post-war 
Britain and the US. 

It is often suggested that the 
low level of takeover activity 
in Germany and Japan is 
direct proof that mergers are 
harmful. This fails to 
recognise the vital role that 
mergers and takeovers play in 
the essential process of mod- 
ernization in the UK and the 
US. The post-war restructur- 
ing of Germany and Japan, as 
is well known, was extensive. 
It was done out of necessity by 
other means. The victorious 
nations had to phase out the 
pre-war assets (and attitudes) 
more gradually. 

Given the head start that 
post-war regeneration gave 
Japan, it is interesting to note 
that the most powerful 


interests unw illing and ill- commercial forces in Japan 
equipped to face up to the new today are the conglomerate 


realities, is still able to retain 
some misplaced credibility. 

Captains of yesterday’s in- 
dustries fight fiercely to pre- 
serve their areas of privilege 


'Zaibatsu' rather than one- 
product producers. In the UK 
and US. multiproduct com- 
panies (like Hanson Trust and 
BTR) are emerging and grad- 



panies. This trend will 
continue. 

I am not for a moment 
suggesting that all takeovers 
are beneficial. Some -are ill- 
conceived and do not live up 
to their promises - either of 
greater productive efficiency 
or financial saving. Successful 
acquisition requires special 
skills and these are, frankl y 
not very well distributed 
among British industrial 
managements. Yet this does 
not deter many from embark- 
ing on ambitious diversifica- 
tion programmes. 

It is the responsibility of 
management to ensure that it 
musters the necessary relevant 
skills. If not, the chickens will 
soon come home to roost. 
What Z do assert is that 
restructuring is necessary and 
that takeovers — particularly 
contested takeovers — are a 
major catalyst in this process. 

Whatever role the authori- 
ties choose to [day in this, it 
should not be pan of govern- 
ment policy to protect inept 
and inefficient managements 
from being replaced. The 
benefits to the economy as a 
whole are dear. Neither is the 
process unfair or unfortunate 
from the standpoint of the 
shareholder, as superior ef- 
fidency comes into play as a 
result 

If there are suspicions about 
the quality of management the 
shareholders have ample 


in favour of the incumbent 
management if this is how 
they see their interests served. 

Then there is the nebulous 
concept of the public interest 
Preservation of the compet- 
itive position is in the interests 
of the public whether as 
consumer, employer or share- 
holder. It is often suggested 
that somehow it is more 
acceptable to allow the free- 
wheel downhill slide of 
incumbent management in 
key areas of industry to con- 
tinue undisturbed than to 
revitalize a business. It is hard 
to see just how the public's 
interests can be congruent 
with those of management in 
these circumstances. 

And yet thwi* managements 
complain that a takeover ap- 
proach is a diversion of 
management resources. An 
earlier investment by manage- 
ment in serving shareholder’s 
interests would have made 
this all unnecessary and a 
takeover approach 

improbable. 

Those who clamour for the 
protection of incumbent 
management privileges 
should realize, like King Ca- 
nute, that change will come 
willy-nilly. It is they, the 
opponents of change, who are 
responsible for the bulge in 
unemployment that has re- 
sulted from the long delayed 
but vital restructuring of 
much of the core of British 
industry that should have 
taken place long ago. 


necessary to finance the £34 After the half-time figures 
million of net expenses in- -yesterday, analysts wereTook- 


curred during the battle. 

The star performer was the 
food division which produced 
a 30 per cent increase in 
operating profit, while the 
most si gnifican t achievement 
was the increase in net mar- 
gins from 3.09 per cent to 3.75 
per cent, taking Argyll into the 


ing for 20 per cent 
improvement to £78 million 
over the full year with a 
further strong advance to 
perhaps £95 million next year. 

Shareholders are to receive 
an interim dividend of 3.1 p, 
an increase of 17 per cent on 
last year. 


ARGYLL FOOD DIVISION 





OPERATING MARGIN 


Percent 


CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 


£ mUfion 



84 85 86 




PATERSON 


ZOCHONIS 


Record profits for 1986 


Year ended 31st May 1986 

Turnover £241.7m 

Profit before tax £42.4m 

Earnings per share 4257p 

Total dividend per share 6«50p 


1985 

£276.6m 

£38.6m 

38.61p 

5.90p 


Whitehead Mann is now 
truly international 


Through our association with Ward Howell 
we are now represented in 24 major cities, worldwide. 


nfwyork Europe RestofWorld 

S™ London Tokyo 

r ac Amsterdam Johannesburg 

u ^ Brussels Melbourne 

wr^K=T^ H ' CT Copenhagen Mexico city 

rcAurm pc DUSSELDORF SINGAPORE 

LOS ANGELES MILAN SYDNEY 

San Francisco Munich Toronto 

Oslo 

Paris 

Zurich 

rw a For more information about Whitehead Mann please contact: 

Dr. Anna R. Mann, 44 Welbeck Street, London W1M 7HF. Telephone: 01-935 8978 


Highlights 1985/86: In a year when, as a result of exchange rate movements, 
the contribution to group profits from the Nigerian operations has declined, 
it is very encouraging to be able to report improvements elsewhere in the 
group which more than offset this falL 

Considering the difficulties under which they were operating the Nigerian 
companies did remarkably well. The new economic measures introduced in 
September should help to achieve a satisfactory' rescheduling of the country's 
foreign exchange obligations which in turn should allow time for the local ' 
economy to benefit from the relaxation of controls. 

Profits of the Cussons group showed significant improvement The UK. 
companies made further gains in market share and continued to benefit from 
favourable raw material prices. Record profits were made in Australia while the 
Kenya company maintained its position and both these subsidiaries have plans 
to increase their production capacities. y 


RestofWorld 

TOKYO 

Johannesburg 

Melbourne 

Mexico city 

Singapore 

Sydney 

Toronto 


Current year. The movement in Nigerian exchange rates means that group 
profits of the first half-year are expected to be lower than the corresponding 
penod of last ym Resuks of the second half-year should be comparable w§h 

the second half of 1980/86. 


WHITEHEAD MANN 

executive Search consultants. .. worldwide 







IMPERIAL 

LEATHER 


BATH SIZE 







imperial 

leather 

LU C , 



PATERSON ZOCHONIS PLC. BRIDGEWATER HOHSF 
60 WHITWORTH STREET MANCHESTTCRM1 

Africa - United Kingdom Europe ■ Australia S° Far East 


■ A 



























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>86 















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


STOCK MARKET 


Pilkington concern at possible 
insider trading before bid 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


[COMMENT Kenneth FleetH 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 


Pilkington Brothers, the 
biggest glass manufacturer in 
Bnuun and currently on the 
receiving end of an un- 
welcome £1.2 billion bid from 
dt-d '^dustrial conglomerate 
B nc is worried that its shares 
may have been used for 
insider trading. 

The chairman. Mr Antony 
Pilkington. the fifth genera* 
lion of the Pilkington family 
Jo run the company, says: 
“Our shares rose sharply the 
day before BTR started buying 
~ somebody must have 
known something.’' 

BTR. which, through its 
subsidiary Treadsiep, now 
owns more than 8 million 
Pilkington shares — equiva- 
lent to 3.8 per cent of the 
company — made its first 
purchase of 200,000 shares at 
439p each on Thursday, 
September 4. 

The day before that 
Pilfcingion’s shares jumped 
12p to 433p and they rose a 
further 6p on the Thursday, 
before BTR actually made its 
first purchase. 

Yesterday Pilkington's 
shares firmed a penny to 61 7p 
while BTR recovered some of 
the ground it had lost earlier in 
the week, climbing 9p to 274p. 
The BTR offer is now worth 
53 Ip a share. 

Pilkington hopes that its 
interim results, out on Decem- 
ber 8. together with its official 
defence document, due to be 
published on December 10, 
will lift it even further out of 
BTR’s reach. 

But most City experts see 
the current offer from BTR, 
whose advisers are Morgan 
GrenfeiL as a “sighting shot" 
and confidently expect it to go 
higher before the battle is 
over. BTR has until January 
10 to post details of any 
improved offer. 


t \ *> 

: v; 


In a recently published 
“buy" circular from Savory 
Milln, the broker, Mr Mark 
Stockdale. an anlayst, says: 
“BTR will have to pay much 
more, possibly 750p, to win." 

Elsewhere the market recov- 
ered in most sectors as job- 
bers, long on stock, mailced 
equities higher in .an attmept 
to entice buyers. But the mood 
remained cautious and vol- 
umes thin, despite the bounce 
of Wall Street, where indexes 
flit a new high in early trading. 

By the close of business the 
FT-SE 100 share index was up 
7.7 points, off its highest level 
of the day, at 1625.5. The FT 
30-share index closed 5.9 

• The rise of Conroy 
Petrolttnn, after a recent 
report in Ireland indicating 
substantial mineral deposns, 
is running out of steam. 

The shares which more than 
doubled to 690p during 
November advanced 5p to 
560p yesterday. Dublin 
brokers are urging clients to 
switch into Glenaw. 

higher at 1, 278.4. Gilts man- 



Pilkington- 
was there a leak? 


..r£. *»:" 



Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Ott Nov Dee 


7.7 points, off its highest level been 25 times over- 
of the day, at 1625.5. The FT subscribed. 

30-share index closed 5.9 Bowater, the paper group, 

jumped 7p to 338p, on talk 
• that Hanson Trust may have 

iSSZ. h&TJcen, ?r a privale d «u 10 sdl is 

II per cent stake in the 
c ? ra ' M ?y 10 6““*- B“nzl 

Sh fSn™ P r r0 i V U m^.“^, 3P io 

The shares which more than •viosn H t 
doubled to 690p during -09 5 pas market men gave the 

November advanced^ to S 5 n 5J? .ftJWS? 

S60p yesterday. Dublin a f rml mcr ^ r ° lts ,y s °(T 

brokers are urging clients to Cheesbrough- 

mSEklS Gto K 0 *’ ,n adeal whjch vaJues 

^ Chcesb rough at $3. 1 billion. 

Tate & Lyle, the Mr Cube 
higher at 1, 278.4. Gilts man- sugar producer, advanced 8p 
aged to reverse early losses of to 583p ahead of preliminary 


£ 3 s. 

Among blue chips GEC lost 
lip to 169p following dis- 
appointing interim results, 
with 17 million shares chang- 
ing hands in the market IC3 
gained 2 Op to U04p, Glaxo 
lip to 921p, Lucas lip to 
47 lp. Vickers 6p to 386p, 
Hawker Siddeiey 4p to 441p, 
and British Telecom 3p to 
!97p. 

Fletcher King, the fully- 
quoted chartered surveyor, 
which started dealings yes- 
terday, went to a 20p premium 
over its 175p offer price. The 
offer-for-saie, handled by 
Lazards and Cazenove, had 


results expected later today. 
These should make pleasant 
reading. Last night there was 
talk in the market that a 
provision of£10 million made 
by the group a few years back 
against losses incurred in the 
Far East may be written back 
into these figures. Analysts are 
already looking for pretax 
profits of about £82 million 
compared with £76.7 million 
last time. 

Among the high street 
retailers. Next improved 3p to 
235p following a seminar for 
the company in Edinburgh on 
Monday night with various 
City institutions. They were 


looking for some indication 
from Mr George Davies, 
chairman/ as to how well this 

• Metal Box, op 4p at 
I85p, has been a firm market 
on talk of someone trying 
to build up a near 5 per cent 
stake — a large buyer has 
been doing the rounds. He 
snapped up 1 million 
shares last week from James 
CapeL the broker, during 
its switching operation for the 
Post Office Pension Fund. 

year’s merger with Grattan, 
the mail order group, was 
progressing. 

Wool worth celebrated its. 
debui on the traded option 
market with a lOp rise to 
670p, while speculative buy- 
ing lifted Beu tails, the depart- 
ment store group, 23pto I48p. 
Earlier this year the group 
received a bid approach from 
Capitai and Counties, the 
property developer, thought to 
be worth 170p a share. The 
approach split the Bentall 
family, but was eventually 
rejected. 


talking point in the market as 
the shares slid 4p to 294p. 

About £330 million has 
been wiped off the company’s 
stock market value in the past 
couple of days. On Monday, , 
the shares were trading at the 
33lp level The market be- 
lieves that more bad news has 
still to come out of the affair 
and the. revelations from the 
American arbitrageur, Mr 
Ivan Boesky, are still thought 
to be the reason why the DTI 
decided to appoint its investi- 
gators. 

Over six million Guinness 
shares changed hands yes- 
terday bringing the total in the 
past couple of days ro a hefty 
26 million. Marketmen claim 
that a cloud will continue to 
hang over the shares until the 
full facts of the affair are 
brought out into the open. 

The reverberations 
surrounding Guinness contin- 
ued to be felt by its own 
financial adviser, Morgan 
GrenfeiL Shares of the mer- 
chant bank which helped to 
steer Guinness to victory in 
the battles for control of both 
Arthur Bell and Distillers 
slipped another lp to a new 
low of 367p - for a two-day 
loss of 26p. 

Almost £40 million has 
been wiped off Morgan’s 
capitalization this week, add- 
ing to the gloom of those 
investors who bought the 
shares when they were floated 
off this summer at 500p. 

The news from Guinness 
also succeeded in cutting short 
a promising rally in shares of 
Motgan GrenfeiL Last week 
the price briefly touched 420p, 
but will now probably have to 
wait until publication of the 
investigators' findings before 
enjoying another sustained 


Three men finding it 
tougher at the top 

M anaging, successfully, a major sudden decision of the Depanmen 
company is never easy, not Trade to send in inspectors, aln 
least because success itself icresnective of their findings, is de 


M anaging, successfully, a major 
company is never easy, not 
least because success itself 
brings its own problems. You are only as 
good as the next set of profit figures; 
growth is not a continuous process; and 
the temptations of maturity can be as 
damaging to corporate health as the 
temptations of youth. 

Thus, after the latest results, critics of 
GEC will feel surer of their ground and 
admirers of Trafalgar House will feel 
uneasy. At GEC the direction has 
become less sure, or if not the direction, 

the will Trafalgar House has lacked 

none of iis" former boldness; its judge- 
ment of the right opportunities is less 
good. 

Sir Nigel Broackes is hoping that the 
award of the Dartford Bridge contract 
marked the turning of the tide in 
Trafalgar's sea of recent misfortunes — 
Scott Lithgow, an ill-timed commit- 
ment to oil and gas, the tourist fell-out 
from Chernobyl and the Libyan raid — 
and indeed the second half of the 
current financial year should bring 
better results. But some of the bounce 
has gone and the dividend reflects 
promise rather than performance. 

For Lord Weinstock the problems are 
of a greater magnitude. Moreover, some 
of the possible solutions are in the hands 
of others — the award of the critical 
airborne early warning system contract 
for example — or are made difficult by 
distortions in the current image of GEC, 
which contrasts for instance with the 
flattering public perception of Plessey. 
GEC can no longer afford simply to 
stand its ground; it needs to move 
forward. 

But neither Traflagar nor GEC is 
faced with the horrendous problems 
which suddenly confront Guinness. The 


sudden decision of the Department of 
Trade to send in inspectors, almost 
irrespective of their findings, is clearly 
damaging to the business itself In 
particular the three managing directors 
in charge of Guinness’s three main 
divisions, if it is humanly possibly, have 
to shut out other considerations and 
continue running the business. With an 
important set of results due next week 
Guinness is under the microscope — 

For its part ihe Department of Trade 
ought, without further delay, to detail 
the reasons why it has acted in the way it 
has. Both Guinness management and 
Guinness shareholders should not be 
left to speculate in the dark about what 
exactly the DTI suspects may have 
happened during the bid for Distillers 
(DCL) to break the law. It appeared 
yesterday that the inspectors were 
concentrating on dealings in Guinness 
shares, acting on information received 
from the United States based on the 
testimony, in various forms, of fallen 
arbitrageur, Ivan Boesky. Having been 
more specific about its concerns, the 
DTI should ensure that its inspectors do 
their work as rapidly as possible. A 
prolonged period of uncertainty about 
the outcome of their investigations 
would compound the damage already 
done by the fact of the inquiry. 

If the investigation cannot be carried 
out properly except over months, it 
would raise a very difficult question for 
the Guinness board and in particular for 
Mr Ernest Saunders. Would it make 
sense, during a lengthy investigation for 
him to attempt three jobs: responding to 
the inquisitors, presiding as chairman 
and overseeing and directing the group 
as chief executive. In the list analysis 
the board’s first responsibility is the 
health and prosperity of Guinness. 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


1988 

High Low Company 

363 283 Allied-Lyons 
174 126 ASOA-MR 
483 264 BTR 
491 361 BAT 
572 449 Barclays 
840 680 Bass 
450 356 Baechun 
726 526 Blue Crete 
383 2S3 BOC 
289 170 Boots 
60S 423 Br Aerospace 
709 530 Br Petroleum 
280 177 'a Br Telecom 
193 98 Broun 

354 256 Burton 
369 277 Cable & wireless 


Price 

BM Offer Qfg» 
300 305 

148 152 +2 

272 277 +10 

452 457 +4 

470 477 +5 

720 730 -2 

415 420 • +1 

643 648 

345 348 +7 

229 232 • 

500 SOS +5 

675 680 +3 

194 196 >2 

1S1 163 +8 

262 286 +2 

320 327 +2 


196 158 Cadhuiy Schweppes 180 183 

336 257 Com Union 257 280 

704 409 Cons GotdfleKfc 84S 6S2 

330 252 CourtaUUs 315 318 

438 318 Dhtons Grp 332 336 

650 408 Raws 545 550 

954 701 Gan Accident 818 82S 

226 158 GEC 166 170 

11 758 'a Glaxo 817 927 

481 328 Grand Met 463 468 

11'*721 GUS'A 10 10’« 

954 720 GRE 770 777 

385 235 G(KN 275 278 

355 275 Guinness 283 288 

215’* 1*1 Hanson 192 194 


AS 1X8 636 

3J» 1&4 521 

35 192 5300 

45 11.9 912 

55 BJ 821 

30 15.4 388 

4.1 174 938 

45 9 2 101 

4.1 132 4,000 

45 15.1 3.900 

4.7 ia5 1J00 

7.2 74 3.700 

55 114 -4.000 
6.1 4.1 1500 

31 145 1500 

22 17.7 2500 
45 215 2500 

6.7 .. 1500 

64 165 280 

32 10.7 2.100 

15 235 1.700 
13 2AA 712 
32 20.7 432 

36 105 17500 

22 195 1.700 
25 155 5400 
35 14.1 151 

55 224 348 

85 • 95 992 

35 105 6500 
35 172 A700 


55 224 
65 95 


623 403 Hawker Skfcfiey 
1l’«734 bop Cham ted 
563 335 Jaguar 
391 312 Latteroke 
349 276 Laid Securities 
288 133 Legal & Gan 
484 2S3 Lloyds 
283 183 Lontro 
231 183 Marks 6 Spencer 
599 417 Mtfland 
583 426 Nat West . 

578 428 PSO Dhd . 

246 162 Plessey 
942 718 Prudential 
234 148 RacaJ Beet 
' 900 60S Recfcft Cotman 
569 345 Raders 
791 511 RTZ 
967 782 Royal Ins 
426 344 Sateshury (J) 
148'r 39 Sean 
415 321 Sedgwick Gp 
970 653 She! 

174 96 STC 

772 620 Sun ABanca 
ai’4 75J.TSB P/P 
420 265 Tesco 
529 374 Thom EMI 
349 133 Trafalgar House 
209 130 Trusthouse Forte 


Price 

BM Otter Ch'ge 

438 444 • +4 

11 11 +’. 
520 525 +7 

356 380 +2 

343 346 • +2 

237 242 +2 

425 430 +6 

229 231 *e 
163 186 • 

545 550 +1 

488 493 +4 

530 525 e +7 
168 172 

815 822 +2 

176 180 +4 

798 805 • 

565 570 +1! 

663 670 a +3 
813 B20 e +3 
415 419 +3 

123 12t<7 0 +«! 

325 330 +8 

943 948 +11 

188 172 +2 

620 627 e +6 
76 77 ■j +<a 
375 380 +2 

4«8 475 +3 

270 273 -II 

177 180 


.SJW.ISW. enjoying another sustained 

The appointment of the effort. 

Department of Trade and There was further heavy 
Industry investigators at trade in Grand Metropolitan, 
Guinness was still a major ^ drinks, hotels and food 

group, where more than three 
milli on shares changed hands. 
Dealers are still convinced 
that someone may have built 
up a near S per cent stake in 
Grc *J" the company and hopes re- 

dfaa MOM % p/E main high that some sort of 

consortium bid wifi follow. 

• £ SJ S 2 S Grand Met is thought to be 

+7 12.7 24 laa 873 the ideal break-up case. How- 

42 16.8 4.7 17.1 512 ever, the asking price of more 

• +2 1*5 42 23.1 709 than £4 bilhon may prove to 

+2 125 5.1 308 87i _ be a stumbling block to all but 

+6 2 &o &b *8 ro the most serious of predators. 

• 46 w 01 22 ? ijbS The shares finished the day 8p 

♦i S 7 .i 65 203 798 cheaper at 467p. 

44 275 55 5.1 1,400 The rest of the drinks sector 

• + 7 - 255 • <« 185 2500 enjoyed selective support, but 

3^ « S? 2 ^ p , nces Y£L°?’ ^ ^ ^ 

48 45 2A 185 5.700 dose. Allied Lynns finned Ip 

• 209 35 175 889 to 304p, after 307p, while 

+1 - ^ ™ Vanx Group, a recent takeover 

: 3 » u nw favourite. rose 3pto502 p. aid 

+3 84 20 245 *78 Vonng & Co Brewery 3p to 

i« +’> 55 45 165 3.100 295p. 


Unilever patience rewarded 

U nilever’s American megabid Upton tea and grocery business anc 
looks like a case of patience National Starch. But, margarine apart 
rewarded. Last vear it foiled, as 1 wer Brothers has for some timr 


U nilever's American megabid 
looks like a case of patience 
rewarded. Last year it foiled, as 
the perceived hostile aggressor, in a bid 
for Richardson-Vicks. This time the 
positions were reversed. The Anglo- 
Dutch group, which has long gone 
native in the US, emerged as the white 
knight for Chesebrough-Pond’s to 
counter a hostile bid from - American 
Brands. 

Both the commercial fit and the 
timing, in terms of sterling-dollar 
currency swings, look better as a result 
of the year’s delay to Unilever’s 
ambitions. Admittedly, by overbidding 
about $300 million (£208.3 million) at 
$3.1 billion, Unilever has set itself much 
to . do to establish, a bargain buy. 
Chesebrough’s net income was only $82 
million in 1985, though the $138 
million for the first nine months of this 
year shows the improving trend well 
enough. 

The logic,however, is powerful 
Unilever in the US is strong through the 


Upton tea and grocery business and 
National Starch. But, margarine apart. 
Lever Brothers has for some time 
looked liked the also-ran in its long- 
running battles with Procter & Gamble 
and Colgate-Palmolive, particularly in 
toiletries, where it has not quite the size 
and distribution expected from a multi- 
national of this stature. Lever Brothers 
in the US made an estimated $80 
million loss last year compared with 
group North American trading profits of 
$108 miUlion. 

Chesebrough will make good this 
weakness at one go through its domi- 
nant if mature brands. It will also 
strengthen the grocery operations 

The bid arithmetic will, however, 
depend intitiafiy on-how much of the 
purchase price can be recouped by 
selling some of Chesebrough's less 
inspired diversifications into chemicals. 
If Unilever can sell divisions with the 
skill of a Hanson, as well as achieving 
long-term commercial logic for itself, it 
will have made a good buy. 


BRYANT 


BRYANT 


BRYANT 


BRYANT 


Perot cannot resist a final jab 
at flank of General Motors 


Bryant Holdings 


n 


From Bailey Morris 
Washington 

Mr Ross Perot has a knack 
of placing himself in the eye of 
the storm. The Texas billion- 
aire's allegations that he was 
paid $700 million (£488 mil- 
lion) in a “hushmair buyout 
agreement to still his criticism 
of General Motors, the world's 
largest corporation, was in 
character. 

Equally in character was his 
claim that he bad been en- 
listed secretly by the National 
Security Council to provide $2 
million in ransom money to 
free .American hostages in 
Lebanon. . . 

Mr Perot said yesterday he 
had been contacted by Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Oliver North 
to provide ransom money. He 
made no apology. It was Mr 
PeroL after all, who staged a 
successful and daring com- 
mando raid in 1979 to free two 
of his company’s employees 
held captive in Iran. 

Mr PeroL an outspoken 
entrepreneur, has been at the 
centre of national events smee 

ssassrMc 

“srp'ffite. 

with GM to buy his shares for 
$700 million - a pnce wefi 
above the going market rate 






* ' -t, 




Ross Perot condemned $700m “hushmair' buyout 

Mr Perot assented not to challenge. “We want to be part 
criticize GM or face a penalty of the revitalization of the 


of $7.5 million. GM con- 
firmed in its press statement 
yesterday that this was a 
clause in the agreement 
“Is this greenmail?" Mr 
Perot was asked. “No, it is 
more like bushmail, so do not 
ask questions that will lose me 


world's biggest corporation. 
We could not think of any- 
thing that would be more fun 
or more challenging,” Mr 
Perot said. 

But his dream soured when 
it became apparent that Mr 
Perot's free-wheeling manage- 


loo much money " he replied. . ment style was incompatible 
Two years ago, when he sold with the structured, bureau- 
his company to GM for $2.5 cralic approach of GM’s lead- 
billion, Mr Perot said he was ers. The relationship between 
taking on an exciting new Mr Perot and Mr Roger 


Smith, CM'S chairman, grew 
stormy. 

Describing GM’s cars as 
“over-priced under-achiev- 
ers", Mr Perot became one of 
the lead voices in the growing 
chorus of criticism against the 
US “corporcracy", a tenn 
coined by Mr Richard Dar- 
man, the US deputy Treasury 
secretary, to describe bloated, 
unproductive managements. 

Mr Perot ridiculed GM for 
its inability to change whb the 
times and produce cats con- 
sumers wanted. “Trying to 
change GM’s corporate cul- 
ture was like trying to teach an 
elephant to tap-dance,” he 
said. 

He advocated full-scale re- 
forms from his position on the 
GM board, urging Mr Smith 
and other executives “on the 
14th floor to get down to the 
real places where people are 
doing the real work ofbuilding 
cars." 

At a news conference, after 
the buyout announcement, 
Mr Perot could no! resist one 
last criticism. He described 
the expensive buyout “mor- 
ally wrong" at a time when 
GM was paying off workers, 
closing plants and scaling back 
investments in- new 
technology. 





Turnover 

Pre-tax profit 

Earnings per share 

Total dividend 
per share 


£157 million - up 30% 
£13.5 million -up 16% 
10.3p - up 25% 

3.7p - up 12% 


Buyout likely after missed forecast 


By Cliff Fettham 


rratwi-i 

Jt Sftr’: : 


A management buyomjs on 

SiSSfia 

XantXnk at the 85p pbci«8 

S&iS&g: 

£ 776.000 last year. Trading m 


the shares was suspended last 
month. , . . . 

The company admitted that 
its forecast would be missed 
because of "serious losses on 
recently-completed contracts" 
at one of its subsidiaries in the 

Souih-easL 

It said: “The trading perfor- 
mance of this pabular 
subsidiary does not affect the 
performance of any other 
subsidiary in the group. The 
group's position remains 
strong, and the group has 
more than adequate resources 
to meet Jts trading 

commitments.” 

The problems apparently 
relate to contracts entered into 


by the Miskins offshoot, a 
Welwyn builder acquired in 
■ 1982. Miskins had run into 
difficulties in the past but it 
was expected to return to 
profit this year; - 

However, conditions wors- 
ened, and losses are expected 
to dent an otherwise profitable 
performance by the group. 

Mr Edward Stanger, chair- 
man and chief executive said : 
“It is very unfortunate but we 
are advised that in view of the 
circumstances, it is best to 
consider giving shareholders 
the chance to sell their shares 
at the same price they paid, so 
that they do not suffer any 
Joss. It is a pity because the 


rest of the group is doing so 
well." 

A number of private build- 
ing companies has also ex- j 
pressed an interest in bidding 
for Ford & Weston. 

The company was formed 
in 1874. but the real growth j 
began in the mid 1970s with | 
the arrival of Mr Stanger, a 
Scottish chartered accountant : 
specializing in breathing life 
into family construction busi- 
nesses in need of a change of 
style and management 
■ He embarked on an ac- 
quisition programme, bring- 
ing Ford & Weston to the 
USM to raise money. to cut 
borrowings’ 



LU 

L 


A copy of the 1986 Bryant Report and Accounts can be 
obtained from Qtris Bryant, 

Bryant Holdings pic 

Cranmore House, Cranmore Boulevard, Shirley, 

Solihull, West Midlands B90 4SD. 


BRYANT 


BRYANT 


BRYANT 


BRYANT 


J 


i 




BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


• PLATON INTER- 
NATIONAL; Interim dividend 
J-02p. Figures in £000 for half 
year to October 3. Turnover 
5,020.9 (2,852), pretax profit 
413.4 (25&3X lax 84.9 (75.4), 
earnings per share 7.58p (4.16). 
With the major contribution 
historically occurring in the 
second hai£ the boanf views the 
future with optimism. Contracts 
have been exchanged for the 
acquisition by Platon K and N 
of 51 percent of New Technol- 
ogy Systems, of Maidenhead, 
for £104,000 cash. 

• (THOMAS) BORTHWICK 

& SONS: Dividend 0.75p (0.5). 
Figures in £000 for year to 
September 28. Group turnover 
353,907 (552,690), pretax profit 
1.171 (4,699), tax 410 (I.502L 
extraordinary credit 3.153 (nil), 
earnings per share before 
extraordinary items 1.5p (5.3). 
The directors say that they 
intend to consider the declara- 
tion of an interim dividend in 
the current year if trading 
maintains the encouraging note 
on which it has begun. 

More company news 


the soap finishing plant is 
p articula rly busy. 

• STIRLING GROUP: Interim 
dividend 0.85p (0.6). payable 
February 20- Figures in £000 for 
half year to Sejrtember 30. Sales 
18,717 (11393), pretax profit 
1,622 (1,076), earnings per share 
5.75p (4.42). Part of the increase 
in sales and profits is 
attributable to figures for the 
Forster Group, acquired in 
January. 

• LYNTON HOLDINGS: 
Interim dividend 3Jp (3X pay- 
able January 5. Figures in £000 
for six months to September 3d 
Pretax pft 1,237 (929). tax 316 
(221), earnings per stare 6L87p 
K4.94). The board says that the 
company has considerably in- 
creased its activity and Ins 
broadened its range of develop- 
ments. The investment port- 
folio and there has been a 
further net increase in income 


COMPANY NEWS 


derived from investment prop* 
erties. A site for a 90,000-sq ft 
retail development has just been 

S uired mid a 4I,w0-sq ft 
ce building has been pur- 
chased in London's West End. 

• CHELSEA MAN: Interim 
dividend O.Sp, payable January 
20 l Figures in £000 for 26 weeks 
to September 27. Turnover 
2420 (1,364), pretax profit 524 
(300), tax 181 (126), earnings 
per share 336p (1.82). The 
board says that the company is 
actively continuing its policy of 
yrfring additional retail outlets 
in the Midlands and the Home 
Counties. 

• DRUMMOND 
GROUPdnterim dividend l-2p 
(1). Figures m £000 for half-year 
to September 30. Turnover 
12,859 (iai03X pretax profit 
748 (574). earnings per share, 
fully diluted 8.14p (6.33). The 


TEMPUS 


(1,640), pretax pront an (// 
ta), tax debit 40 (33 credit), 
earning per share 3J3p (G.9p 
loss). The b oard says m at the 

manyi it^ iTf | if 

ter withdrawal from the safc of 
IBM personal computers and 
related products has resulted in 
improved performance through- 


chairman say$ that t he p oor 
spring and summer weather 
affected high street clothing 
■ gait-c, particularly retailer con- 
fidence in placing forward 
commitments. But the 
company's order book is ahead 

oftta corresponding pen od,aiMl 
he is confident of a n ot her 
“useful increase'' in profits for 
the foil financial year. 

• ZYGAX^DWAMlC&^Fig- 


g t saassa g E 

MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


remains at a high level, with 
significant orders received re* 

fwillo vn AUill isf 111. AiUHIIM 


BmIMh% 

Clearing Banks 11 
finance House 1154 
ttacauat Market Lsm % 
Owriott HWt tOU Low 4 
Wtaek fixed: 10H 
Treasury BHs (Discount %) 

ZmnE 10«W imnS 10* 

Smrati 10U Smntfi 10"ia 




Donor 

7 days CPibtG 
3 mnth 6*ii 6 *m 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


MueBenk BUS (Discount*) 
t mn*h 10 ls n-10N 2mnBi r0«Si#-1|HS 

3 ninth mirth 10 m io-1 tT»»* 

Hade SMs (Qfacounf %J 
1 rnnth ll’t* 2 mnth 11 r i« 

3mnth tV*37 6mnth 11*w 




First Dealings 
Nov 17 
Oecl 
One 15 


LastOcaBno* 

Novas 

Dec 12 
Jan 22 


For SMOamanl 
Mar 2 
MarlS 
Mar 30 


pagers 

• ARUEN: Interim dividend 
0.5p (nil), payable March 28. 
Fibres in £000 for six months 
to September 30. Turnover 
4,979.9 (3.358.0), pretax profit 
501.6 (2J), tax 121.4 (nil), 
earnings per share S.I7p (0.036), 
fully diluted S-44p (niS). The 
chairman says that tbe 
company's performance contin- 
ues to show all-round improve- 
ment. The company has agreed 
to acquire the entire share 
capital of Scandinavian Decor 
for a total of 585,000 shares. 
Much attention is being given to 
extending the product range of 
the Columbia companies. 

• CREIGHTON LAB- 
ORATORIES: Interim divi- 
dend 1.2p, payable January 19. 
Figures in £000 for six mouths 
to September 30. Turn over 
1,972 (1,522), profit on ordinary 
activities before tax 257 (213), 
tax 85 (91), profit on ordinary 
activities after lax 172 (122), 
profit attributable 159 (122), 
earnings per share 5.1p (3.7). 
The chair man says that the 
company traditionally experi- 
ences a busy period in the three 
months leading to Christmas. 
Demand is again buoyant and 


LONDON FINANCIAL: FUTURES 


Overnight open 10* dose 5 
1 WMKl0 , *i»-10 n iaS mnth 1114-11% 
1 mnth 111 M 1 Omrth 11)4-11* 
3 mnth ll’is-11* 12 mth 11)4-11* 

Local AoBmrtyP«po t* a(%) 

'days 10% 7doys 10% 

, mnth 10N 3 mnth 11K 

6 mntft 11 K 12 irsh 11 * 


7 days 4 , *i«-4 ,, ia 
Smith 4»w-4<iii 
French Franc - 
7 days 7N-7% 
Smith 6*-8K 
Safes Franc 
7 days 2J4-1* 

3 mnth 454-4 
Yen 

7 days 4N-4X 
3 mnth 4 *w4’m 


Gokt$387.50-38&00 


0N-SX 
I 6%-fiX 
i 614-6 
5-4 

I 4»w-u» 
I 4»ie-"w 
754-6* 

I 8X-8 
I 8N-SK 
2X-1X 

I 4*»4' to 

I 4 , w3 n n 
4)4-354 

i 4N-4X 
i V nJ’a 


. ' •( .'\I 1 


1 PRICE RELATIVE 
1 TOFTA 
I ALL SHARE INDEX 


Local AaAoiRyBi 
1 mnth 1194-1154 
3 mnth 11*-11* 
9 mnth I1X-11X 


TIsueiliJiaiitiMiinB Open 

Dee 86 «L5B 

87 8558 

JunB7 8689 

Sep 87 BBJ» 

DbcB7 69.04 

Mar 88 H/T 

FYevtous days total open Interest 1G7S8 

Thu— Month Cum Jo— r 

Dec 88 9300 

Mar 87 94-01 

Jun87 9306 

Sep 87 — 93.79 


1 mnth UK-11 
Smntfi 11 K- 11 X 


1 mnth 6-30-625 
6 mnth 5L95-6JX) 


3 mnth 11X 
12 mh 11* 

“zmSi 11X-11X 
6mnft 11*-11* 

12 mth 11*-11* 

3 mnth 11H-11X 
12mth 11*ie-11*« 

Smnlh 6.05-6.00 
12 mW ac&ejn 


$91^04350 (£63J 
Platinum 

$ 48^50 (£33840) 
•ExdodraVAT 




FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


mo Marat 25305 
83.92 10B4 

mm 2115 

9*00 403 

9333 688 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


USTraernyBood 
Dec 88 

Mar B7 

Jun87 


Short OBI 
Dec6S — 
Mar 87 — 
Jun87 __ 


Previous day's total open Merest 3292 
99-04 100-08 99-rfl iSwO 107B 

98-08 99-10 98-06 99-02 5222 

HfT — 96-06 O 

*** JS-— - 

95-40 96-48 95-40 9683 37 

HfT — — ■ 0 


Previous deVa MM open Meres* 20829 

106- 26 107-18 10620 107-20 200 

107- 00 108-02 106-20 107-25 2S277 

N ft 107-25 0 



Sleeping GEC waits 
for th e Nimrod kiss 

GEC inanag ^ w roi^nn foe ^ 

both^ro 140 ll f|||| ” '* 

Some were hoping for a 120 ~ £ 

marked recovery m the sec- I 

ond half but it appears that 100 pwcerhative mmMtfi; | 

the keeping giant wiD^con- | 

Marconi, GECs star 80 1984 1985 1988 j 

performer, which has enjoyed — , . 

a 24 per cent increase in its suits have only deepenw tne 
order book is not going to gloom. Shareholdep fop 05 -■ 

grow by more than 10 per have sunk to £440 million BOC is lesumng how to 
cent This does not prcssage because of extraordinary manipulate the City. In An- 
well for the rest of the group, charges of £79 million, gust it announced that 1986 
GEC must be fed up being mainl y the write-down of ou results would contain an £1 28 
compared to Plessey. Admit- and gas investments, and million wnte-down of assets 
tsdly, Plessey a different another £50 milli on write- in the carbon division. An- 
mix in its *ytff?ymmmiira- down charged direct to re- alysts had been worried about 
li nns b usin ess but it is hard serves for the £12 million the poor pe rform ance of the 
not to draw conclusions from Scott Lithgow acquisition graphite electrodes business 
GECs flat performance and marts in 1984. This is on top and were relieved that BOC 
Flessey's increase in profits of of £60 million charged the was at last biting the buDeL 
more than 50 per cent year before. Consequently, the shares 

A fall-offin Middle Eastern Included in the provisions reacted favourably both at 

nigi "gorin g activity hart an are penalty payments, un- the time of this announce- 
ad verse afreet on engineering q uantifiab le till delivery next meat and when the full 
operations while power gene- February. These are payable figures were revealed yes- 
ration needs a resurgence in to Brhoil for late completion terday. Another sigh -of relief 
activity to boost proms . of its dri llin g platform. was breathed since lhe group 

The only flicker of excite- Trafalgar House intends to has decided also to stop 
ment for GEC is the posabQ- submit a misrepresentation presenting figures on a modi- 
ity of being awarded the claim to British Shipbuilders, fied historic cost accounting 
Nimrod contract- The poHti- previous owners of Scott basis. 


activity to boost profits . of its drilling platform- 
The only flicker of excite- Trafalgar House intends to 
ment for GEC is the posribO- submit a misrepresentation 
ity of being awarded the daim to British Shipbuilders, 

NT* J - TL_ - - - .r 


Nimrod contract- The politi- 
cal risk fin* the Government 


; for these amounts Definitions of a mature 


FT-8E100 

Doe 86 

Mar 87 — 


— — w 2u,tch 2347623610 23562-23810 IX-IKpram 4X-4Kprwn 

i te>an iti JMowggn Storing kvtax compmd wWi 1975 was down it 673 (day's ranga S73-673). 

IkS 166.10 168.10 io _ OTHER STERUNG RATES DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Auto Etrops (280p) 

Baker Hants Sndr (170p) 
Btontiehn Exhb »5p) 
Btteton&Battsrsea (ffep) 


OanM S (13t 
Retcher K rig 
Geest (125p) 
GtentreeJ16p 
Gordon Fuse 
Guthrie Corp 
HaQs Homes 
Harrison (150 


231 >2 
194 
140 
143 
150-1 
156-1-1 
190 
' 158+1 
50-1 
207 
168 

) 108 
180-1 
205-1 


Lloyds ChemM (1050) 
Lon& Me tr opo lia n (145jp) 
M & G Group 
Mecca Leisure (I35pl 
Mss San Hkte (1Q6p) 
Plum Kktaspp) 

Quarto (115p) 

Spandex 
Sumit (136p) 

TSB Own Mea (7Qp) 


WooHons Better ( 
Ward Group (97p; 


133-1 
170 
273 +2 
ISO 1 ! -•* 
104 
99 
130 
221 
140 
91 +1 
78** +’• 
ISSHr-Hi 
167+1 
86-1 
103 


RIGHTS' ISSUES 

modes Leisure N/P 
Cook WM N/P 

Gtanfidd N/P 
Lon Assc HIV F/P 
Norik* Cop F/P 


. OTHER STERUNG RATES 

ArganUneaustrar 138461.6918 

AustraNadoSar 21B5621992 

Bahrein dinar 03385-05425 

BrazS cruzado* 203485-203645 

Cyprus pound 0.72B60J360 

FhSandmarim 6353663930 

3 * Graace drachma 194.75-196.75 

8 Hong Kong dolar 11.121611.1244 

„ Inda rupee 1850-1850 

fi Iraqdmar ni 

22 +] KumitiSnarKO a4185-0422 

24 Malaysia defer 3.71063.720 


of choosing the Boeing Awacs which the last annual report business vary, but BOC in- 
E3 system would be colossal, and accounts described as sists that the industrial gases 
so force of circumstance “substantiaL” But the usual is uot ex-growth. In Britain, 
should bring the contract stately pace of the legal for example, the group sells 
GECs way. process means that it could three times as much nitrogen 

Although the immediate be a long time before as oxygen, 
effect on the shares win be Trafalger House sees its Even in the US where 
more in the form of a money back. industrial activty remains 

removal of a negative, the Scott Lithgow remains stagnant, the group 'is con- 
effect on trading in the years short of work beyond a six- fident of improving 


removal of a negative, the Scott Lithgow remains stagnant, the group 'is con- 
effect on trading in the years short of work beyond a six- fident of improving 
ahead should be sig n i fi cant month horizon. Trafalgar's profitability. However cur- 
i It is well acknowledged that other yards have trimmed rendes will continue to have 
Nimrod has for better export back, and are operating at 60 ^ adverse effect in Japan for 
potential than Awacs (Air- per cent capacity. the remainder of the year, 

borne Warning And Com- The first six months of the Healthcare accounts for 
mand System). A room- new finanraal year are likely half of its turnover in the 

mendation is being made by to be down on the com- United States.- It is a frag- 

the Defence Procure ment pamMe period of last year, mented market, so there con- 
Conmutlee tomorrow and There wfll be no contribution tinue to be opportunities to 
the Cabinet should be in a from the QE2 which is being maka acquisi tions. 
position to announce its de- re-engined and refitted at a The effect of lower 
asion m the next two weeks, cost of £100 million. reimbursement levels on 

In the meantime, analysts j t ^ earfy days at John Glasrock’s profits should be 

^reducing thorforerasts grown, only three months less marked this year and 

for this year. On £690 million included in the 1986 there will be cost saving 

pretax profit and a reducing when it made only a following the installation of 

tax charge, the shares are before interest, new computer systems, 

selling on a 10 per cent fog acquisition signifi- Helped by a lower depreci- 

«»dy increases the goup’s ation . charge and assets 
“ s 5 ye SSf^ s ^? repn ^ e exposure to oil-related off- halved to £130 million, it will 
reaction, t here a re those who construction, a sector be less difficult for the Car- 
are not prepared to support it ^ mfokeiy to revive bon business to perform 

at these levels. until tbe oil price rises at least acceptably. 

Trafalgar House to $25 a barrel, and con- Sentiment is swinging 


Patro ca n F/P 
RegMfen N/P 
ting See N/P 


■ Z\ Kuwait (SnarKD 

24 Malaysia dotar 

65 Mexieopeeo 

A NewZaatand dotar. 
_ Sauffl Amhln rival 


55 mwwopno 

a Nm Zantand do>ar 

0 Suuca Arabia rfyal - 

*• Singapore dotar _ 

in South AMca rand - 

U AEcfrham 

'Lloyds Bank 


(issue price in bracket s) . 


0.4185-0.4225 

3.7100-3.7200 

1240.612900 

2534625478 

53560-53950 

3.13263.1365 

01491-01654 

53455-53855 


iterate 

Canada 

Swedsn 

Norway 

Denmark 

West Germany 
SwSzertand — 
Netherlands — 
France 




Austria 

IMn supplM by Barclays Baric HOFEX and I 


. 1381613845 
. 2.18862.1898 
. 25940-05960 
. 0557605578 
. 1381613820 
. 63725-63775 
. 7.4900-7.4950 
.73400-73450 
. 15722-15732 
. 15432-15442 

. 1615616255 
13685-13595 
_ 4037-4152 
. 7.7700-7.7800 
146.70-14750 
1333613040 
— 13561067 


Keep up with the London markets 

Real-time refreshed 


information 

on Reuter Monitor 


The effect of lower 
reimbursement levels on 


at these levels. 

Trafalgar House 


to $25 a barrel, and con- Sentiment is swinging 
fidence that it will stay there. BOCs way. On a current 
> The second half of 1987 year, figures as good as those 


How the mighty have fallen! . The second half of 1987 year, figures as good as those 
A plunging oil pike hard on looks brighter, and Septem- forecast by the company — 
the heels of major invest- ber 1987 pretax profits £255 million pretax and 
ments in oil-related com- shouldbe about £146 million, 35.5p of earnings — the shares 
panics have left: Tr afalgar the same as 1986. But inves- are selling on under 10 times 
House's balance sheet ex- tors will want to know the full earnings. This is unduly mod- 
posed and its share price extent of the bad news still to est given the quality of the 
reeling. come before buying the business and the better Out- 

Yesterday’s preliminary re- shares. look on the earnings front 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


11 COroGoU 

550 

112 

135 

_ 

3 

10 


II™ 

600 

77 

100 

115 

12 

23 

32 

850 

43 

67 

84 

30 

45 

55 


280 13 21 28 9 18 21 I 

280 5 12 20 24 33 38 I (*504) 

300 IX 6 14 42 47 48 


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i BCD '-103/0 H03/0 H03/0 


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i_rof bl=im fZBH] EQ 7 /0 
I RBI 165/0 1 83/0 185/0 
310/0 330/0 


/ u i to n 7 o /n 
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331/0 


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Dl LUI\I 

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n j //_/ on / n 

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unr /n unn /n 

luD/u luu/u 

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DOO n d n i n 
L UU. U L I I.U 


331/0 333/0 330/0 


J r u / n ice/ n i r p / n 
io 1/ u i o o / u i 03/ u 

QDn/n OQD/n 

3 Du/ J u u l / u 

3 DP /n 3 3 n /n 

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OQ j /n 
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131353 H 


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7 7 n c C n n 

I I UUUUQ 

7 333 7 n r 
I UL L / DO 

DOOUOr 
I /_/ IU 3 

3 r j 3 3 O 
u Dl u uu 


UK EQUITIES 

Type 

ALPHA 

BETA 

GAMMA 

OVERSEAS 
NEWS 

UK GILTS 

REFER ENCE PRICES 
CONTRIBUTOR INDEX 
INDEX OF PRICES 

NEWS “ 


LIFFE 

INDEX OF FUTURES PAGES 


Page codes 

IDIAD 

IDLI 

IDU 

IDLH 

AAKK 


GILY-Z 

IDLK 

RMEArF 


AND MUCH MUCH MORE... 

INTERNATIONAL MONEY MARKETS 
INTERNATIONAL GOLD MARKETS 
INTERNATIONAL OIL MARKETS 
INTERNATIONAL BOND MARKETS 
DOMESTIC MONEY MARKETS 
international futures markets 
international equities markets 



MUandBa* 

rS43) 


J2 67 97 5 14 

550 37 47 57 20 32 

600 12 18 30 60 65 


LIEA-B 



REUTER MONITOR - THE INFORMATION SERVICE FOR YOUR MARKETS 


82 75 — 1 2 _ 

32 50 S3 2 8 13 

8 32 43 8 20 29 

1 13 24 45 48 S3 


200 35 43 48 1 3 4 

220 18 28 33 1J4 8 11 

240 min 22 11 14 23 


BUS 

650 

as 

100 

115 

2 

s 

12 

C731) 

700 

45 

05 

30 

S 

13 

30 


nn 

12 

35 

55 

35 

45 

55 

BfeaCkcto 

(*846) 

600 

660 

700 

57 

17 

4 

82 

50 

» 

67 

4 

20 

57 

11 

33 

18 

38 

On Bon 

650 

135 

155 


2 

13 


r77B) 

700 

90 

12b 

140 

3 

25 

35 

ThO 

4 1 

95 

116 

10 

45 

80 


BOO 

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63 

96 

40 

88 

86 

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800 

36 

62 

64 

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6 

9 

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330 

10 

32 

40 

7 

US 

20 

380 

IX 

18 

30 

28 

32 

35 

GKN 

240 

41 

49 

54 




rz 73) 

260 

280 

300 

20 

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2 

33 

21 

13 

39 

27 

2 

11 

25 

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15 

29 

14 

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900 

40 

85 

110 

7 

26 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


25 


Lubrichem: Mr Colin Rob- 
son becomes director and 
chief executive. 

Telford Development 
Corporation: Mr Frank J 
Jones becomes deputy chair- 
man. 

Chubb Lock Company: Mr 
Oraham Davis becomes direc- 
tor. Mr Tony Pearson be* 
comes financial director and 
Mr Steve Wood works 
director. 

East London Tele- 
communications: Mr Peter 
Maddock becomes finance 
director. 

Plessey Company: Mr 
David Simon has been made a 
non-cxccutive director. Mr 
Derek Mayes and Mr David 
?ey have become executive 
directors. 

Couus & Co: Mr Roger 
Flemittgisn has joined the 
board. 

Confederation of British 
Industry's Employment Pol- 
icy Committee: Mr Geoffrey 
Armstrong becomes chair- 
man, succeeding Sir Alex 

Jarratt 

United Transport Distribu- 
tion: Mr Michael Reid has 
been named managing 
director. 

Chancery Securities: Mr 
Stephen Mood and Mr Craig 
Reader have become cor- 
porate finance executives. 

KCL Research Enterprises: 
Mr KW Groves has been 
appointed director. 

Thorn EMI Protech: Mr 
Peter Stansfield has been 
made personnel director. 

British National Life: Mr 
Paul Gibbs becomes market- 
ing director. 

TWIL Group: Mr Dihvya 
Strive ns has been made 
managing director, Tinsley 
Wire (Sheffield), with Dr Ed- 


die Vcys as managing director, 
Rylands-Whitecross, and Mr 
Alex Lawtber as managing 
director. Spring Division. 

York Trust Mr Robert 
Wilson becomes executive 
director, corporate finance. 

Firstland Oil & Gas: Mr TC 
Gibson has joined the board. 

ERA: Mr Lindsay Bury 
becomes a non-executive 
director, with Dr John Wear- 
ing as engineering director, 
Mr John Taylor as director 
and general manager, Mr 
Peter Yarrow as financial 
director and Mr David Saakey 
as chairman. 

Courage: Mr John Elliott 
joins the board as chairman, 
with Mr Peter Bartels and Mr 
Andrew Cummins as deputy 
chairmen, Mr Ken Biggins as 
director and Mr Peter Jooson 
as finance director-designate. 
Dale Electric International: 

Mr Howard Hunter is ap- 
pointed mana ging director, 
Erekine Systems, succeeding 
Mr Roy Morris. Mr John 
Armistead becomes a director. 
Dale Electric of Great Brit ai n . 

Euro-La tinameri can Bank: 
Mr Federico Slinger has be- 
come chairman with Mr Lou- 
ise de Bievre as vice- 
chairman. 

BET: Mr John Griffiths has 
been made deputy finance 
director. 

The Rivers Group: Mrs 
Maralyn Fichte has been ap- 
pointed managing director, ‘ 
British Continental Office, 
Brussels. 

ML Holdings Group: Mr 
MR Mobbs has been namerf 
director, business develop- 
ment, from January 1. Mr 
Peter Pollock becomes chair- 
man, ML Aviation, with Mr 
James Lock as managing 
director. 


GT Management wins top 
rating in Laing review 


Alexanders Laing and 
Cruickshank, the stock- 
broking arm of Mercantile 
House, expresses a mixture of 
caution and optimism for the 
financial services sector in its 
latest quarterly review. 

It is written by Mr Philip 
Gibbs — recently voted the 
leading financial services an- 
alyst m the Extel analysts' 
survey - and slates that it is 
“cautious of the finance 
houses and bullish of the fund 
manager and the leasing 
companies.” 


company recently announced 
a 170 per cent increase in half- 
year pretax profits and Mr 
Gibbs says that “funds under 
management have now in- 
creased so significantly and 
margins moved so much in 
the group's favour that we fee! 
the shares are materially 
undervalued.” 


The review highlights GT 
Management as the “main 
buy” recommendation in the 

fund management sector. The 


Other “buy” recommenda- 
tions in the fund management 
sector are Templeton Gal- 
braith. Edinburgh Fund Man- 
agers. Framlingion Group and 
Henderson Administration. 

The review is not. however, 
encouraging about M & G, 
the investment management 
group. On the recent public 


By Lawrence Lever 

offer of most of KJemwort 
Benson's stake in M & G, it 
says: “we are not convinced 
that the current high rating 
can be held once the 
marketability of the shares 
expands.” 

Aiikeu Hume is the only 
constituent of the fund 
management sector to merit a 
firm “sell” recommendation, 
as a bid now seems unlikely. 

In the teasing sector the 
review highlights the feet that 
the independent leasing com- 
panies should benefit from the 
withdrawal of the large finan- 
cial institutions from the mar- 
ket after the loss of 100 per 
cent first year capital allow- 
ances. 


Comcap and Nevi Baltic get 
“buy” recommendations - 
Comcap for its good geo- 
graphical spread of business, 
conservative accounting poli- 
cies and strong management, 
and Nevi Baltic as it trades at 
almost no premium to its net 
assets. 


The review is cautious 
about the money broking sec- 
tor. Big Bang has created 
intense competition among 
the inter-dealer broking arms 
established by the money 
brokers in the gUts market, 
while there are concerns about 

lower mar gins for inter-dealer 
brokers in the US government 
securities market 


Bank of America aims 
for growth in China 


From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 


The troubled Bank of Amer- 
ica plans to expand Into China 
despite a large rationalization 
of its worldwide operations in 
the wake of mounting losses. 

These amounted to US$577 
million (£403 million) in the 
first half of this year and the 
Bank has announced that it is 
selling off its headquarters 
building in San Francisco. 

The bank plans to shed a 
total of 5.000 jobs from its 
75,000 workforce. 

In Hong Kong almost one in 


five of 1,180 jobs have gone, 
along with 100 in Singapore, 
61 in Bangkok and 36 in Kuala 
Lumpur. 

But the Bank is determined 
to grow in China. Mr Stephen 
Hunt, vice-president and 
Hong Kong area general man- 
ager, has been to China to 
reassure its leading bankers. 

“In order to better serve the 
China market, we plan to 
increase the staff force of our 
China office in Hong Kong,” 
Mr Hunt said. 


Indonesia opens up 
gold exploration 


From Oar Correspondent, Jakarta 


Twelve foreign companies, 
most of them Australian, 
signed 34 gold mining and 
exploration contracts with the 
Indonesian government. 

Dr Subroto, the oilminister, 
said he hoped the deal would 
turn Indonesia into a major 
world gold exporter within 10 
years. 

This is ihelargest number of 
gold mining contracts signed 
w the country and cover 30 
years. The companies have to 
sign over 50 percent owner- 


COMPANY NEWS 


ship to Indonesian nationals 
Dr Subroto said he es- 
timated that the could 
produce up to 140 tons of gold 
a year by 1996. Several com- 
panies were equally 
optimistic. 

Most said that the richest 
untapped area was the island 
of Kalimantan in Borneo. 

At present Indonesia pro- 
duces only three tons of gold 

annuall y with ZDUCfa of the 

production coming as a by- 
product from copper mining. 

hi 


• CH INDUSTRIALS: Interim 
dividend 0.575p (0.5p). Figures 
in £000. Turnover 25.141 
(14,026) for six months to 
September 27. Operating profit 
1.91 8 (1,234). pretax profit 
1.350 (653). profit attributable 
890 (204), eps net 2.90p (238p), 
felly diluted 2.9p (2_35p). 

• ATKINS BROTHERS (HO- 
SIERY): Six months to Septem- 
ber 30 (figures in £000). Interim 


GREAT WESTERN RE- 
SOURCES: A final dividend of 
1 ,43p (1 .43p)has been declared, 
making 2 . 86 p ( 2 . 86 p) for the 
year to September 30. With 
figures in $ 000 , results include 
turnover at 16,071 (6211), pre- 
tax profit 2,032 ( 1,596) and a tax 


credit of 18 (562 debit). Earnings 
per common share were $0.06 


dividend 2.2p ( 1 . 7 p). Group 
243 (8.2 


turnover 10,243 (8.324), pretax 
profit 458 (215), profit 
attribuiabien287 (1 14), eps 7.Slp 
(2.89p). 

• JOHN MICHAEL DE- 
SIGN.* Six months ended 
September 30 (figures in £000). 
Interim dividend 0.5p (0.4p). 
Turnover 1,245 (547), gross 
profit 660 (349k profit before 
tax 253(190), eps l.99p(!.75pk 

• DBE TECHNOLOGY 
GROUP: Figures in £000. 28 
weeks to October 12 (28 weeks 
to October 4). Pretax profit 209 
(28 loss) on work done worth 
3.016 (1.571), profit attributable 
136 (17 loss), eps l.5p (0 l2 p 
loss). 


($0.05). Pretax profit includes 
an extraordinary gain of 
$250,000, arising upon early 
repayment of certain debts. The 
company was affected by 
volatility of oil and gas prices 
and substantial curtailments 
and shut-ins of gas imposed by 
purchasers. Nevertheless, sec- 
ond-half results were better than 
expected and the company re- 
mains in a strong financial 
position, with no debt and 
substantial .cash balances of $13 
million. 

TUNSTALL GROUP: Final 


• TR NATURAL RESOUR- 
CES INVESTMENT TRUST: 
For the six months ended 
September 30 an interim divi- 
dend of 1.7Sp (1.75p adj) has 
been declared, payable January 
2. With figures in £000, franked 
investment income was 856 
(913). unfranked investment in- 
come 1.509 (1,605) and interest 
from short-term deposits 393 
( 1 60). Revenue before tax 2,442 
(2JZ26), corporation tax: 558 


(525) and imputed lax on 
franked it 


dividend I. 68 p making 2.48p 
30. Fig- 
ures in £000. turnover 25.100 


for year to September 


(21.064). pretax profit 4,587 
(4,069k profit attributable 2,602 
(2244), eps 16.3p (14.4pk 


income 248 (274). Earn- 
ings per share were 2.72p (237p 
adjusted for one for one 
capitalization). Net asset value 
in ^ence per share: I5J.5 (139.2 

adjusted). 

• CHAMBERLIN A mr.i^ 
For the six months ended 
September 30 an interim divi- 
dend of 1.4p (same) has been 
declared. Warrants will be 
posted on December 16. With 
figures in £ 000 , turnover was 
5,375 (5,161), group trading 
profit 247 (245), interest payable 
55 (43X group profits before tax 
192 (202). Earnings per share 
(3.42pT 


were 3^3p 


The coin- 


been made m restructuring 
the group to meet market needs, 
but there was no ~sign yet of an 
improvement in business which 
would quickly lead to an in- 
crease in earnings. Higher trad- 
ing profits were offset by higher 
interest charges, due to the costs 
of the Bloxwich foundry de- 
velopment, and the acquisition 
of Filter and Poulton u the end 
of August The shares were 
down 2 pat 106p. 

• JARVIS PORTER GROUP: 
An interim dividend of 1 .3p will 
be payable (single dividend of 
2p the previous year). With 
figures in £ 000 , results for the 
six months to August 31 in- 
clude: turnover 1 1,177 (10,463), 
profit on ordinary activities 
1,012 ( 1 , 200 ), an exceptional 
item (Mono-Web development 
expenditure of 57), pretax proft 
955 (1,280), tax 283 (495), 
extraordinary credit 481 (nil). 
Earnings per share were 4 . Ip 
(4.3p). The extraordinary item 
consists of interest earned on 
application monies in the 
company's offer for sale, 


amounting to £348,966 net of 
attributable tax, and £132.079 
profit arising from the sale of the 
group's teasing subsidiary. 

• MONKS & CRANE: Results 
for the six months to September 
30: interim dividend of l.lp 
(nil), payable February 5. With 
figures in £ 000 . turnover 
amounted to 13.738 (£1 1.480). 
gross profit 2,814 (2,356) dis- 
tribution costs 472 (382). 

Administrative expenses were 
1,477 (1222), interest payable 
less receivable 26 (46), share of 
loss of associated companies 27 
(nil). Pretax profit was 812(706) 
and tax 260 (265). Earnings per 
dare were 4.2p (3.5pX The 


(16^97), pretax profit 2,410 
(2,007) and tax 910 (793). 
Earnin gs per share were 1.65p 
(1.35pX 


company said prospects were 
ible 


favourable for the second half 
which traditionally brings 
higher sales. Branch growth and 
new acquisitions, would give a 
wider distribution, based on 
new product and business areas. 
• LONDON INVESTMENT 
TRUST: Results for the six 
months ended Septemebr 30 
include an interim dividend of 
0.54p (0.469p). With figures in 
£000, turnover was 20.732 


• COUNTRY & NEW TOWN 
PROPERTIES: Tbe half-year 
results include an interim divi- 
dend of 0.7p (0.6p), payable on 
January 30. With figures in 
£ 000 , gross rental income was 
5.921 (5,668), surplus on dis- 
posal of properties 453 (4.670). 
profit before tax 1,264 (4,934), 
tax 416 (1.923) and minorities 
272 (2.169). Earnings per share 
were J.27p (l. 86 p). Results for 
tbe full year should show earn- 
ings comparable with those 
reported for the year to January 
31, 1986, foe company said. 


• EVANS OT LEEDS: Six 
months to September 30. In- 
terim dividend 1.625p (l.SpX 
total revenue £4,638,312 
(£3,862,963). net revenue after 
interest and other charges 
£2,510,181 (£2264,441% tax 
878.463 (£905.776). profit at- 
tributable £1,631.618 
(£1.358,665). eps 4.97p (4.14p). 


Harmony Leisure 
in £3m USM float 


By Cliff Feltham 

Stanley Lever used £20,000 
of savings to launch his own 
company when be stopped 
running the Cafe Royal and 
Hennekey Inns for the Trust- 
house Forte group. 

Yesterday, he launched his 
Harmony Leisure Group, a 
chain of 20 upmarket public 
houses in central London and 
the Home Counties, on the 
unlisted securities market 
with a pricetag of £3 million. 

■ Since 1982, turnover has 
gone up from £13 million to 
£3.8 million with pretax prof- 
its rising from £38,000 in 1984 
to £65,000 last year. Profits for 
this year are expected to be not 
less than £250,000. 

About 16 per cent of the 
company's shares are being 
placed through the broker Le 
Mare, Martin at 23p each. 


Mr Lever said he plans to 
use the £500,000 raised by the 
issue to buy more outlets, at 
the rate of two or three a vear. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


. 11 JIK 


Adam & Company lim 

BCG 11.00% 

Citibank Savings! 12.45% 

Consolidated Crts lim 

Co-operative Bank 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 


Hong Kong & Stangte.™ 11.00% 

Lloyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 


Royal Bank of Scotland..™ lim 

TSB 11D0% 

Cttbank NA 11.00% 


t Mortgage Base Bate. 


Buy or sell shams in 

BRITISH GAS pic 


Free of commission through 

PRIOR HARWIN 

SECURITIES LIMITED 

(Licensed Dealer in Securities and member of F1MBRA) 

01-920 0652 

Note this number for future reference 
65 LONDON WALL, LONDON, EC2M 5TU 



Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 


The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 


r 1 

I For fun her infoimatinn and (he current prospectuses. 

please complete and return this coupon to: Robin Fuller. 

I N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.l.) Limited. 

I P.O. Box 242. St. Julian's Court. St. PelCF Part. Guernsey, 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Guernsey (0481) 26741. 


Name 


| Address 


AttZ 


N M ROTHSCHILD ASSET MANAGEMENT J 



cei 11 





.y v 

' ' PANORAMA-CBroutsxJe 




mob now tarn . _ , 

string *oreuch and oot favu$ to umtinwa] 
scribe the atmosphere doing re me eitwnp ( 

Our Hotei-on-Rails , _ r . , 

F«o *0 100 guess, tw+iKh otherwise 2 coache would lure »accornodatel our confer 


t of course) 


rr»es.ftesafcrtinpassfetade- 
smoothty dong rate lakes aod farts. 


- 9 sleeptng-cars from the wwW timous 

Orient Express which are nw newly lifted with 
chemical toilets and partly «bh showers. (Ho more 
problems when the tram is standing Shi!) Every 
corrpaftnwn) has a large washbasin (graruraro- 
fan - even more than twol. 


- 1 tikfajndgBKt&catikoMredbyllieJmel 
Agency Mtetthugau) 


As in a hotri, a room (steeping<ar-conipanniert) and a 
reserved seat in the restaurant (ftwrama compartment! 
is reserved for every gret 


. 4 fenorana-ObwaabwvCart (owned by the Trawl 
Agency Mineithurgaul. apart from the exclusive 
VisU-Pofne-Seclton. each having a cosy har and 
2 first class compartnwnh Meals are served mall 
toe compartments (extra charge for sen** in the 
V'sU-Dome-Seclion). 


Meals can be sewed in one „ 
are ^ yow dtsposai forsetvice. hotel farilife, 
tcfmtalcweandccTtfrol.ToetBureihehigheSswid- 
aitl of romfon poefoie. our ftnorama-Eiqvess fraveh 
at a gentle speed, and at n^il sometimes stasis on 

Seeping Car Inside 



joumesuhith is p<rfifeibanfatort0M5VBl*- 
J lurtforu5a»dourg«sld 


I able to 


Eq«s pnreJtfm rSSte K w hnednsen fce&rrt sales method. How- 


ttpress i tot 7 ■ 7^2^ ^ reasonable Sn* 

Our further Hotel-Trains: 

_ ^ ibc PMm 1*5 k.- 


I6.-30L April 1987 from £ .... 
13.5ept.19a7 frees £ 1190,- 


<60, 


5-Scpf . \W from E 79JU 


The virgin land of the North with its famous Midnight Sun, experienced 
from our unique Hotel-on-Rails. 


Travelling dates: 

24 June — 04 July and 15 July — 25 July 1987 


Our Route 
Vfe have made every effort wMe 
such as the area around the «Hi 


,. 5 .. ecash t* Krarnfo, or the inland ptmiey to the «wnines in GaeJIrvare. The 

opjcmal oulinp in Copenhagen. Oslo, Stockholm, Kramfors. Vmdeln [a trip on the raads or a visit to foe WBdHe 
ftrkl, Gaefcvare, NaMk, and to the Lofoten Islands, male this pray an experience dial is offered nowhereebel 



BALA1R 

Our programme 


1/ London- Zurich Aiport 
FEgh ton London to Zmkh/KlQten in the morafag. 
Tower to your hotel m Zurich. Sightseeing tow in die 
afternoon. ahefuAkhie use ^nyaaromdspouL 
Overnight say in the hotel 


Day2/Zrtfc-Haatog-hfiginfci> 
fa me rouse of the morning, occupation of your sleep- 
B^carawpartwi*. After oar NofetaHbfe has left 
the main ration, lunch wd! be served during de journey 
acimCemuny.Ourtanwillieachihefenynha- 
Mrtteoat night. Hhb. ihewWe train will be loaded into 
fee ferry-on ofe. Our jowney continues northwards 
whenwereadv Denmark After foe dimes the night will 
he spent on baud in die sleeping-as. 


Dayl/InCapnbga . 

Ate bslifat, tvftsrfi wffl he seoed fo the bncam* 
iw ftain wdl draw irto Gtoih^ten antrri ste 
dm. During an optima! sshtsewig tax, you wffl have 
tecfrtefofietfalowlnemetn^ofDennaiilrQsi 
raojjiiy E 15.-1. The fee lone following fois tour wifi 
give you Ihe opportun ky lo explore the tily andtfiefe- 
mous Trvofi. In the meantime, our Hdef-on-Ra& wii 
hare tavehed by boat ant® to Hetsinjiws, Ttwartk 
dve evening, we will also cress wiffithefenyaSwden 
in roadies, where our HoteUr-feiis will bewaitb^ ft* 
us. bening meal will he saved white our ptney cm- 
ihe. 


Day4/lB0* 

Travdlmg via Goebog, we wifl teach die frontier sa- 
tion Chafottenberg in foe course of foe mcmeig. Our 
Hofrtot-Bafc Wdisfop here forte day, andpj will 
hawe the possSrifiiy lo go on «i aptioul ccuch-lrip to 
Osin lam ratify £ 19.- fed. SshBwng touri. As w 
jenrney onwards in the wning, a meal will be served 
on board W tram. 


Dayh/Sodhota- 
Wter enjoying your breams in the hetri. the morning is 
free lor you to do as you please, h the afternoon, the 
second part of the sightseeing awakes plate with boat 
tou^the .Venice of the Nordn. Fotoringthsome' 
tieoce, we board our train once again, and fowl to 
Uppsala. Evening meal will he sewed befcwren Stock- 
holm «d Uppsala lid parti After an optional sight- 
seeing tour in Uppsab (cost roughly E 13.-) we wB 
enjoyco^eeandde^Btwhiletra^fffegfmthernortb. 


Day7/Knmfas-lfohCaasl 
Our Hotekn-Raft wS arrive in tomfors riter break- 
tasLAnopHxiaJwfnt^ti^wfflshowyouthebQH- 
fies of the woretefol scenoydf the eastcoa of middle 
Sweddt During a bod trip, we will also be able fa ad- 
one foe viewston the sea kssl rot^dy E 32.- ind. 
fond)] . h the evening, once again an board ou train, we 
continue our journey towards the S$il nights of foe 
forth. Evening meal will be served on board. 



Strife ate breakfast on board, arrival m Vmdeln, m 
South Lt 


Day5/lnSfortiwhl 

AmaJ m Sarihoh atti hrealiag rai board Here, we 
Lnfv ask ynu in twbfcrlo nadres wsh handb^agp, 
as w wifi spend ihcfl^ht in a hotel in Stockholm as an 
ewrptoi. ter an opniul sigfftjwtng true, whicli 
conyst. nllvro parts trod mughlyE J9 -I you will once 
again hawfeasine time fospendasynu wish. Rv wj^-ol 
etrrpnn. mring meal hod included m the airanp> 
merit, » >nu havefree rhow of SKixxxt and mmu. 


laptarri Here, two poss^rtoarerfeedtoyfflt: 

- a nip on foe raoids frottghhr E 62.- inri Jmcht.or 

- a tr^) to LycfeeJe to the Wildlife Pal Mlowd by a 
wMtothcbigBesbydro-elec&icpcmrersWionQffoe 
North: Sfomonfav near Uneu togftty U2-- nd. 
lunch). 

In the evening once again on hoanf. a roeaf will be 
setwd, andM travel onwards towaids the ArtticOrde. 

■* 


Day 97 Arctic Cbdr-CaeKsare 
During the course of this n#U, v« wB readi the Arctic 
Code Here we will hah. and a Lapp wil perform foe 
« Arcfir GrrieChrislenBig*. from bee on, the fauna and 
fioca begets to afoer rmnienrty. Arrive at the flatten in 
CaefthM’ after breJdssL Dams foe optional irp we 
ofier on dus day. you will be aoe to gel to bow foe 
peoole ol Laptaod. We wffl visit a ribs with original 
taphouse, an cremine in which we will be able to see 
ttrerradwie myti tin-ui shg-^nwg^mtgest- 

besawd. . Train w&iLaptemfy 



ll/Nsvft^LafotabMs 

_ break&st, we wffl be passmg the most 
beaoufii str^ofil»«eal«^fceOfotei8Awy 
with late Tonetraesk k> start with. The btttatang 
views of the fiords foal appar ate foe shod tumefc 
jushwfoteseenfobebeieved,bfoeatenoon,)ic 
teach Narvik, where you will have the dance to late 
fortftcoacfiandbaatfodefefotBifsteik 
mE»ies.(udefBiforepofot. font where 
we mil ifo bad to Swteriina [roughly £ 39.-ewwng 
meal or bovri sbip is nduded in fee price). Ymv tug- 
gage wB be teetered dvedly fo the aipait. 




PANOfVWACar inside 


fochded in foe anaogemot are: 

- f5* fatm London - ZundtAdokn and hack 
-rail journey according to propamine 87 m the 

category booked 
-Infill a hotel in Zurich 
• Iri^inahctomSttKktobmadoLfofenmm* 
wifotoorshoiwW.indudedbieAfast 

- return from Nan* - ZuridtASoten with a 

special plane ton Bate 

-20 kg luggage conveyed free 

-alltnnsten 

-all taxes and dues 

- half-beard on ihe whole journey (ewpt on foe 
lartoinZimhanfoeSthdaymStDcliiob) 

- English speaking guide will accompany you on 
the whole of foe journey 

- detailed documents 
Notbcfadedare; 

-ail insurances 

- meals not mentioned in the prcgranune 

- your personal expenditure sirii as fordrinfa, 
sotnews, foe usual small tips ete 

-tteoptroulexansBia 


Z-Wr, 

Bookm^orm: please cut out and send to 


j mittelthurgau 
: travel agency 


Day 11 / Evas -Zaricfcflotffl - loofom 
Ate rakforeht we depart with the new aufaus ton 
WUS andftysttar^ into the rnrfn^htsm We wffl 
fmf at ZiridvKfotenm foe early morning, fefiinftga 
to London. Endofour journey, feian* 





PDA 131 
GMS70 Werifeidm (Smtartod) 
TttephoncDI04172- 22 4677 
Telex 45-882 377 
Tekhxmm-223407 


I/We ntmh'that UwewiUdtfinildy parttqBteoofoe journey vrifotte«Mat-Panorarna4xpfess 1987i aaonjing 
»the programme. (Please ttbtL w«i a crass which atrangBnent you wish to bool.) 


[J|(MMYmyjufelW- 4|ulyl987 

□ (oumeytm 15tuly 19B7 - 25 |ufr 1987 

0 fo^eepiigconipadfnenh wah 2 -berths, 1 tow and I upperbedh with ttash^n 
0 In sleeping ccnpalments with .aaniknnltBt*. J fowo beifosand2w*h bwfts 

□ Sfeete 5feepute corrqunmera vntn 

□ Adfotunal cusl for a guaranteed seat in one oi the VNtaflone-Sfftion nf Ihe Pjnorama-Cars 

□ Anradation and specul rtom costs insurance (compulsory i not existing veil 


C 1390- 

C 15tfl- 
f 1341?- 
£ 130.- 
E 22- 


'• Reaeregfito- all names (focsepnces are of rouw pw peoonl. 


1. Surname 


1st Name 

ISumane 


hi Name 

Street 

POHate 

Tri.Nr.dumglhcdjy; 

t. 



i U pr>*ihfa nJin the Panryamarar □ wwirr D nm-vmArr 

* □ Pluse send aie foe brodmdooi your oterHokho»4tiis|WgfanBK. 







iisEaSgaSsistaessiayBacsaSSnSaBBSSSaBsaaa aSftS^caSlSgfflSaftiiiiSj-SaSifiaySsua^SafiBa Mua^aaiBBSsaaSyftSSSSSaSSSSMisaisHac 
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ETTSTNESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 






IIuHl 

rata ragnfWgs s*Mpri 


* is u ms -oi sun 

■ Co'S ACC ZOJ 2500 -ai . . 

icm . mu leu - 0 . 1 0J9 

cm 6B4 719 ..on 

MJ #24* -05 4J0 
MfeblK 63.1 67.1 .. 300 

es 1004 1132 .. .. 

taimtmi IS7 6M -09 147 

■6.1 U.K +12 026 


Tlw Slock 6* 
OMnean 

FaftMsNphK 
Omni tac (< 
Do Mew I 
tocarae Raw 
Do Accum | 
Mftag P) 

Do Accoroj 
ttM talBli 
Do Accum | 


01 -eel M0 
CS Jxpwt ftwd 


go London BV BJf 
512 6*8 +U 300 

sioj saosm .. an 

3632 3807 . . 358 

1 VBA 1072* .. 626 

1632 101.7 .. 62S 

1362 1422 .. 128 

1822 1852 ■■ 1-S8 

mn t 222 .. tsa 

0399 ran 223 

jSmdtai WC1V 5PV 

M2 087 +12 028 


Grow* 8902 3072 +12 224 

tenon* 3372 367.1 +12 378 

FarEM 2332 8487 +32 026 

Ktamrtewi langfl -03 qm 
GUO 6Z2 552 +0.4 021 

tarnn 682 612 402 122 

SJw 582 682 402020 

CWBLUAUBaiMMIIWMMPW 
PO Bat 581 Bmta Mata London ECS 7 JO 
01281 0011 

CaoU 3604 3832 +12 120 

KXmm && 

CMdAULEM _ 


1. Ktaw WOMB St EG4N 7AU 
012S303M 


012330814 
cm Trust 


667 882* -221228 


ORffUM BOARD 0FFMMK8 OF 


T T+ 7 V 






aM 


i 




1102 1182 ... 304 


EOUTAOLE UNITS AOHMSlfiATICM 
35. fdunta St MOKfmwr 
061-336 8686 

Eta*** PtaBcan 782 802 

Wi tacono TM 784 UM 

0 « 8 Rud lot 484 612 

TSt Of Inv Trusts 705 754 

Spec s SBs Tra« 752 604 

mAm That cm 8*3 

Far Ewkwh Triwt 880 1022 
MOmti 588 885 


EQUITY & LAW 

St Qeagt Hsa Corpora#™ St Covertly COT 
ISO „ . 

0303 563231 

UK Grow* Mob 1482 156.7* -07 320 
DO taoonw 1272 KUO* -02 820 


-04 847 
-0.1 823 
-02 822 
+05 128 
-01 233 
402 12S 
+02 045 
+07 128 



74/78 RnstM* P wa m an t London EC2A I JO 
01-68S 7777 dmng01438 0*78/9 
UK Soadtatat Tnwu 

Grozin 582 604 .. 226 

StaWtar Ctfx 1412 1505 .. 128 

UK Mart cat Mm 682 812 +12 172 

Do Accum 804 962 +13 172 

Grand FUrds 

UK OTOwtn 372 385* -AI 222 

Mragwl hi* 582 83.1 +04 228 

Hgh taoonw Rinds 

Extra he 874 602 -AI 725 

CM 242 ZSB -03 054 

me 5 Growth 20*5 217.1* +03 ajLS 

Has IM tag 1862 2092 -04 926 

Pral ShtaBS 172 1&2G +A11A26 

Sactcr spedUst Funds 

C uini K f y 1431 1512* +22 174 

FfewncH fines 47.7 506c -04 1.12 

Gold 59.0 033 +17 AS 

Do Accum 61-2 65 fl +(.B a® 

Int Latum 154 l&3c +0.1 090 

Prop Slarsa 6A1 701 4A3 D21 

Untv fe#w 404 422 +A2 093 

World Tech 432 452 +A1 020 


EMnpt Finds 
Exnmot 

Ovtnwa Growth I 
Anwr Growth 
Auat Growth 
European nrf 
Do Accum 
EMoSraBer 


BUS Otter eh 


Biro Oh « JgJ mh: zii\M 
DO A C O W . _ Igjf "il j ^nj 32S 

*BE£* iiii so 

MURAAY JOWCSTCHE UWTTWMT 

iSuSt wgjrt rt P»ip« G2 SU» 

JlSn 1212 1313 

y* *E Z3VB 29*9 +3S 115 

frjffErfrw m3 Z3&0* +13 063 

■UTKJMU. PBOVUdr (HWESIWW 
IUNUBS 

5amrtrataaP3« 

01-0Z3 4200 Bd 289 

muc a“5SS2 ■■ an 

Do Accum 3»S - fS 

HPI Owan 6 22 3 682.1 . . t.10 

Do Acam 7522 8107 • - 

Far MM Acc 925 B5 • ■ OiO 

American Ace «.i «.!■ »-g 

Cgsoosm Acc jU 622 -• 9w 

WrtSwM 642 562 -• 1-10 

NORWICH UT MANAGER*. 

R OBmc A Honmeh NR1 3NG 

GrouD Trust £1221 1226 -AOS 327 

SnSust 1*13 U04* +12 1-18 

O PPD flI DWCT TRUST MAHA gwq tT 

58. CXnon Strom. London EC4N 6AE 

dnl^ OMM 3886I8PWW0 

M w r wnpnsl Growth 1612 1913 +13 OS 

sssAsr m gc +otis 

Amsrtcsn Growth 311 353 +02 . . 

i—». Mi 552 587* +04 0. 00 

ffisti*** £J Sf. 

ssTtaSsr S3 sr 7 * 


UnO Trust he 
Do Ac cum 


SUB 374 +A1 240 

1372 1*82 +07 ZM 

1210 1302 -04 sn 

1412 1800 +A7 126 

1422 1512 +07 126 

1292 137-5* -02 187 
3262 2*02* -AS 227 


M Growth 
tad Ftaeomry 
Japan Part 
Japan GmMtar CM 
iS SdBW CO 
Do Accum 


1042 1112 
784 81.1 
942 092 
944 1002 
173 182* 
893 632 
342 364 
3A8 412* 
1BSJ5 1162* 
78.1 828 
160 172 
B82 7224. 
BBS 732*. 


+04 130 
+06 12* 
+09 024 
+12 024 
+OI 073 
+07 029 
+02 124 
+04 1.16 
+61 047 
+12 OOO 
+02 020 
+02 02D 
+03 020 


perpetual uornnisr _ 

48. H art Sca nt. Harmy On Thsnws 
049T 57GBBB 

ha gro wth ZgO OT2 +27 0.74 

1913 2012 .. 438 

WortMda Bsc 1572 1673 .. 

Mar Oowtn 68 .1 ^-8 -07 020 

H Emara Co S 83.1 877 -13 056 

FMeSWi 632 873* -01 0B7 

mrrpun Gtn BBS 663* -1.0 127 

pnOUFKrUHTTmSTMAIUGEItSUS 
222. B sn apgh. London EC2 


toy nmnS 1246 1323 +A5 OS* 

ZS 815 659* -Al 428 

oSr* a GBt 072 1035* . . 627 

1023 1050 +37 002 

North Amsdean 1»2 1«2 +0* 027 

g na t+M SB 702 76.1* +A1 1.73 

TianObM 1165 1243* -07 020 

EdraSn «M »i +AI 430 

Bra Gtn * Inc 475 503 ..821 

PRUDBtTUU. UNIT TRUST HAMAQBB 

51-OS. Btnrtl «. Mood brat. K31 SDL 
01479 3377 

HrMnro EmMv *012 4M5* -13 A12 

Buna 1121 1185* +1.1 052 




Owaaas i n come Funds 
M Hah Inc 563 

US tacotna 593 

Do Aeon 652 

MEL Trusts 

NataUr Gat 673 

lOAUtfr TRUST MANAGE* 
g%MMlM.Mita 
0022 674751 

baa Aawrtcan M3 

MLAGerwM 332 

MA I— l U B n* 58.1 

IAAGAUI* 214 

MLA Lxortw 417 

BAA Badpaan 82.1 


603* +04 438 

610 +04 4.11 

682 +04 4.11 


683 -031A12 


ob. Kant 104 OK 

283 +AI 088 
35l 1* -02 2-73 
IC-fl +02 034 
223* -021150 
442* +05 520 
342 .. 073 


a Qaaram war. Sannnoa Harts 
0438 858101 

EtasaSi Unas 7S3 805 

□* A mm) M 1013 1062 
He* taoonw IMta 1155 122.7 


«Oh YWtd G* UM 

fe7atw«l UMH 

N American UWs 
Far EM Uto 
Snadtar Cot FUnd 


387 587 
1423 1513 
745 782 
BOO 1012 
73.1 777 


Ratfttan Dm. Goring^Gaa. womtao- w 

Suaaax 
0444 4S0144 

Batancad 1614 WM -07 821 

Do Accum 3275 3484* -12 821 

Goni Emo SJi few 600 .. .. 

Do Room 600 .. .. 

Enra tat 543 577 +03 321 

Do Accum 60S 847 +07 301 


■FNCAFUMT TRUST 

Uniotan Hsa, 252. Romford RtL E7 

01-23* 5544 

Mancap T3U 1482* -04 458 

mtCURY FUND MAHAOBIX LID 
33. lOng WBam SL BS4H BAS 
01^80 2060 


13. Charwtta Sq, EtMwgh 
031-225 1551 

Auttralvi Sold 275 202 

PacKc Basel 215 225* 

Canadian Bat Gth 574 812* 

EtaaSa Maa Fnd 01044 1082* 




Da Accum 
Goman Gth loo 
Do Acorn 
henna 
Do Mam 

tall Toai 
Do Atom 
Japai Grown 
Do Aeaxn 
N Amor 8 San 
Da Atom 
PseMe Bash 
Do Mam 
thwnrCoa 8 Hoc 
Oo Accun 
WortdNtda Growth 
Do Accum 
UK Growth Fund 


1614 net* 

3275 3*84* 
600 
602 

543 577 
60S 847 
1585 1883* 
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Open interest n/a 

Spot marital eommaniary: 

Tartar hdroc 

9433 down 24J on 1/12/86 


fiXS on 102/96 


























• '->*■4 (£^ 
F«r Etv 4 
i ifc 
*«■ V* S 


TOUOC F£*rfeitr- 




THE TIME S WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Equities rally 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 




your cart available when claiming. 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on November 24. Dealings end Friday. §Contango day next Monday. Settlement day December 15. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

Whore stocks have only one price quoted, these are middle price* tafcan dafty at 5pm. YMd, change and pfc ratio am catenated on ttomhftte price 


— ^{dd — 

@ Tiaw N t wi pi nw United 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Haim s required for 
+43 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 



Storehouse 


Dixons Grp 



ii 1 

dl 

cj3 

mi 



Hardys A Hansons 


Nichols (JN) (Vimio 


Coats Vryella 



a 


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+1 


17 

09 

mi 

609 

• 

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13 

*9 


310 

.. 

150 


iv if Bucmii lei 

sisrip 1 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Weeldy Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8,000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 



i +4 

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47 

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717 

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156 

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119 

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110 

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119 

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BRITISH FUNDS 



HI U 1U 
2J 19 179 

mi si ms 

20.1 3J ISO 

21 11 212 

7.1 u ua 
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107 za las 
wj zb iso 

57 7.0 57 

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5.4 4.4 217 

73 4.1 158 

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41 17 ns 

12 21 IU 

14 19 .. 

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207 59 109 

157 19 152 
98 4-2 194 
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209 12 144 

17.1 49 129 

129 45 150 
94 54 m 

15 27 202 
59 79 129 
119b 17 179 
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100 11 358 
159 49 117 
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177 in *t 

115 120 *-5 
330 333 1 +2 

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85 85 44 

470 474 +3 

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31B 320 fl 

195 195 *1 

177 IK -9 

145 145 t4 

422 427 -2 

23Zb 237*1 43 

73 7B 

HS N -I 

267 277 
167 172 


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111 

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19 

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107 

26 

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10 

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36 

44 

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17 

27 

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21 

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BJ 

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54 

100 

14 

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736 

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41 

143 

14 

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19 

187 

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120 

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740 

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156 

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7.8 

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82 

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365 

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56 

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133 

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107 75 fiSrtto rail 37 90 «4l 19 69 .. 

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505 an taac*n 491 496 * 42 259 12 39.1 

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203 193 M 4_. 229 231 46 17.1 74 1U 

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286 iso Ramon Znch 292 2S7 *+2 93 33 73 

3B ISO Do 26? 2B7 a+2 S3 33 73 

213 12S PUy PWi 180 184 941 U U 15 



FINANCE AND LAND 


242 205 tttagMMk 
177 IS AMO HOT 
157 125 ftnAtua 
m «5 Ste/Tert 
22 18 Cnu 
263 210 GnfeKr 
43 23 Cerawny 
34 17 tei Gm 

185 132 hoy 8 Sm 
207 ISS HOT* 

UO SB Nrf Hot Loans 


10 SVPanb (JT) 

723 185 Temptei GMb 


232 238 

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135 145 
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217 222 41 

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207 212 -t 


199 19 742 
17 ZB 348 

L3 40 SL7 
7.1 49 214 

89 4S 2B5 
29 « 305 
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HnncW TlttMa appear on Pag» 2fi 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


51'. 40 AK20 IVV Bnr 
242'i 10 Mai Ortttfc 
455 355 Annrtu* 

247 1« MsrQaKS 
158 132 BTP _ 

io BtABanr onso 

132 m2 aapa* 

no IS Burt CMm 
100 66 * Banal 
174 NO Camtag (tt) 

306 243 CaHl 
IBB T3S corns Bm 

177 125 Do 'K 

i^^ga 

S iS Mm 

133 113 EOT 

298 206 FncnrMss 

173 m HSteftem 
4SS 330 iictsa 7 
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ass? 

15b ri'.NBDk hot 

174 M RI|W 

1 » BBHMnakHdti 

178 VS tanW 

3» 21B 9» BH) 

13 36 SUUBnSpUOT 

240 178 W UmKnAn Brt 
1Kb 87 IMMi Eton 


CINEMAS AND TV 


328 20 AOT TV V 
417 3B OOTTy 

2 « ire HlfS 

341 m TMOK TV 
229 156'jTV^M 
151 1W IMS TV 
m M4 VbdBttn TV 


320 333 -1 

398 403 
48 50 • .. 

207 210 41 

4K 457 • .. 
348 352 -2 

2S7 201 -1 

48b m «4'« 
305 318 • . 
210 212 • . 
148 151 • 

178 178 -1 


119 43 118 

29 99 7.1 

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259 17 SOB 

159 45 Til 
143 59 129 
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420 

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11 

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406 

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fl 

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308 

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164 


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321 

317 

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164 

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161 

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209 

236 

348 


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ISO 

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2/ 

19 

219 

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173 

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223 

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19 

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288 

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250 

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500 

585 *-2 

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152 

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48 

329 

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202 

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206 

215 

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241 

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34 

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204 

208 

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33 

139 

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<13 •-! 

189 

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114 

415 

410 

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158 


49 

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229 

231 

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174 

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144 

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80 

1/9 


318 

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43b Mb 

153 

102b 

Mb 24b 

M4 

81 

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381 

295 

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114 

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1C 

347 

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214 

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245 

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116 

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208 

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111 

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344 

194 

506 

240 

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153 

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182 

120 

255 

175 

290 

230 

S7b 23b 

57 

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MS 

689 b 98 
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280 

133 

275 

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205 

81 


M0 

201 

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122 

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70 

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2W> 

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473 

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133 

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345 

335 

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29 

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323 

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219 177 KMIIb 
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6GB B20 ttulhS 

aw. 23yw 6», 

415 273 banck 
904 131 ton 
336 257 Cm UMD 
309 228 EOT9 LM 
*05 184 FM 
sm m Gmtedn 
954 720 GK 
708 427 HOT CE 
3594767 Horn MasM 
263 133 Lot 8 Bn 
224 in Late 6 Mm 
455 257 ion Ud hr 
68b SMH1 McLrn 
305 220 W 
348 223 FWS 
15b 12 tan 
M2 718 MUM 
453 361 Ate 
967 762 ftSa 
415 321 Se*r*tit & 
4B9 346 Drain# 
445 380 Swgi HMot 
772 520 SaiOTtt 
927 772 SailA 
i2'.ia TOT team* 

4B4 384 Wfc Fitsr 


205 206 4b HU 10 

IWr - #4b 100 59 

833 ■ .... 

26b • 4*. HO 13 

385 390 -2 8S 22 

mm 44 447 51 

2S7 259 17.4 17 

306 310 43 BJ 11 

355 385 1 . .. 

620 822 • 44 3(3 43 

773 777 a *6 42S 15 

458 *62 • -2 3S0b 79 
335 338 . 117 41 

218 242 42 123 SI 

202 205 -2 00 44 

450 455 41 249 14 

42 - 220 52 

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295 302 -3 02 44 

Mb Mb . 811 49 

B2D E2 44 380 47 

423 425 .. 3tt4 4B 

818 B20 • 45 399 47 

327 330 44 17.1 52 

458 *60 a -3 15J 34 

41 B 413-3 1110 24 

BS 627 •*€ 2 79 44 

905b 1109b 045b 3S4 39 

Z30 240 . S3 23 

450 455 -4 1U 29 


in Do -A- 787 Z87 a 42 U U 73 

126 POiy Ptdi 180 184 a 41 99 13 39 

S4S is aS? 636 655 •*? 229 39 140 

SI Tuer Ksashr <63 164 -3b .. 566 

153 Vi4t Can 253 25B -2 HI7 42 119 


PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERT G 


taOTtaw* Trusts oppaar on Page 2fi 


LEISURE 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


a .. is 

•44 29 

-1 18 
•412 13 


+10 30 

•2 ^ 
a ft 

41 11 

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• 44 179 

43 m« 

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Kara (te 
HOTS Of 1 

SSlL 


260 IW 

at, 

11b 6 

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212 Ifi 
291 2g 
102 « 

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■£'’*** 
198 t3Sb 
570 J£ 
48* 293 ' 

153 «* 

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90 b 18 

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155 133 Worth HOT 130 M2 *41 19 07 CU 
*81 3SB GnrtW 473 474 -1b 139 29 159 

305 208 MOOT tartan 272 275 *-7 24 09 M2 

3W 312 LaMA 358 360 40 109 47 17.1 

565 447 LonPabHoWt 460 485 -2 M3 II TO 

100 WbMouS Ccurtom 83', 04b ~b l U IU 

115 67 taw Dl W MSS 110 - -3 21 19 W9 

70 46b0m»m MM 64b B5b 4b 23 IS 17 1 

405 348 SMU HOT "A" 363 367 -1 50 1.4 K4 

fll 58 SOT ffl fl -T 19 2£ I7J 

209 138 TanaaiM Wia UO 182 42 79 44 179 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


39 S 
159b1U 
323 189 
75 42 

78b 30 
173 68 
B8 64 
73 53 

35b 23 
240 ITS 
145 95 
113 5Bb 
260 159 
X3 m'j 
467 306 
119 84 
48 31 
393 255 
WO 121 
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138 78 

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194 128 
91 55 

78b 45 
129 68 

201 163 
325 212 
206 2S>b 
42 20b 
218 135 
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50 
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ELECTRICALS 


MJ 

43 


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4.1 

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29 

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19 11 219 
M 42 89 
29 44 17 

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3$ 33 SL5 

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14 14 7.4 

19 7JB 99 

149 77 103 

74 99 mi 

aa 29 202 
790 12 154 
1140 16 IM 
29 13 53 
190 42 ns 

a/ 27 ms 

2J 5.1 82 

M3 83 112 

15 59 92 

89 13 22S 

4£ 11 79 

29 32 99 

57 52 <9 
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16 12 279 

33 43 112 

11 19 21.1 

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113 5J 104 

126 40 17.7 

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11 03 111 

mo 85 14 

14 IB 56.1 

mi ks ni 

19 1.1 2&I 

1.7 85 134 

HJ u U.1 
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12.1 99 72 

17.1 41 VJJ 

114 29 »4 

BBS 

90 57 21J 

286 47 UO 

26 0.4 256 

B£ 03 250 
IBJ 31 163 
41 11 U0 
109 41 114 
29 IS 376 
2ZI 74 21B 

12 1.1 183 

64 3.7 129 

39 29 219 
229 43 117 
74 42 143 

17 19 39 

219 JO 173 
8£ 28 89 

64 19 189 

89 36 

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11 09 199 

.. • .. 89 

64 59 129 

14 119 439 

19 39 126 

4.6 1* 109 

10 EJ 83 
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n 40 m 

Mb 12 «o 


M4 96 Bar 8 HH A' 

220 128 Baotev 8 ttaOT 

221 130 tart WOT 
132 42 Cmmim i 
225 158 Chyata 
ma 325 fra Leant 
02b Q ERA 

90 50 ftattMgar tal*5 

MTb S3 ttezon TOT 
HI 84 H Lesm 
103 32 irtai HUp 

2K 137 LMHI 
m ssa Madaraar 
391 14 POTm 

403 326 HnrtrUMU 
64 36bltay Lam 
228 129 SotHoWm 
3SJ MB SlOTtrtn & 

17? 119 Sumn Urtwe 
74 51 lOTnlttgu 
185 12BbZrtin 


53 31 

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425 238 
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367 226 

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205 65 
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TOO 74 HLB 
. . « . . 278 

79 39 188 
14 12 313 

80 43 153 
93 29 189 

479 

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280 

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MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


335 IK AC 
286 136 «E 

116 iibAieartH 
193 118 AMOTM 
Ml 104 ArtOrng 
56 MbBSG 


325 335 *2 

284b 267 KJb 17 159 

14b 15b -b .. .. 294 

153b 158b -8 89b 59 73 

127 08 -lb 19 11 124 

52b 53b • 1J 32 U3 


St rirt Umm 


772 44 

01 •+! 
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430 • 

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COMMISSION FOR THE NEW TOWNS 


The property 
sale of 
the century 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBE R 3 1986 

l FOCUS j 


A SPECIAL REPORT 

By Michael HatfieM 


D uring the past 
seven years, the 
past five particu- 
larly, the Govern- 
ment has been 
undertaking one of the most 
important aspects of its 
privatization policy without 
the publicity hype of the 
British Telecom or British Gas 
flotations — the sale of new 
town assets. 

In the seven years the 
Co mmiss ion for the New 
Towns has sold about £500 
mini on of assets. In the next 
eight years plans are in hand 
to realize commercial and 
industrial assets worth an- 
other £1 billion. 

The commission initially 
had responsibility for the four 
original new towns — Crawley, 
Heme! Hempstead, Hatfield 
and Welwyn Garden City. It 
now has 13 of the 19 new 
towns under its wing and has 
responsibility for selling its 


■hmhwmmi eight London ring towns have 
— hbmhb been disposed of — though, of 
hmhm course, there are still prob- 
I n I lems, particularly with tire two 
t a M * 1 1 1 a 9 new towns in the north-west. 

lIVv I 1 1 Mr Heseltine's new chair- 

I 1 1 man was Sir Neil Shields, a 

I I ^^11 leading Conservative Party 

worthy, who served on Hamp- 
stead borough council for 20 
assets and working itself out of years. The chief executive was 
a job. a no-nonsense northerner. 

After a mighty shake-up of David Woodall, a planner 
its organization in 1982 be- with local government expen- 


cause of the slow progress it 
was making — Michael 
Heseltme, then Environment 
Secretary, named a new chair- 
man with a stronger remit — 
the commission claims, jus- 
tifiably, that it has become a 
success. The commission can 
show it has exceeded its 
an miai targets, tha t there is 
less criticism from politicians 
armed with constituents* com- 
plaints about delays, and that 
well over half the assets of the 


ence, being deputy chief exec- 
utive of Northamptonshire 
county council before joining 
the commission. 

They inherited a heavily 
bureaucratic organization, 
where initial inquiries for 
acquiring property could lie in 
folders for months, and where 
even tenants of property were 
not even fully informal that 
they had the first option to 
buy if they wanted. 

This has now been changed. 



Millio ns of pounds* worth to sell: Sir Neil Shields, chairman of the commission that is disposing of new town assets 

rventy per cent of assets sold that all the assets are available ness in the south-east, where ensu re tha t ownership was as 

ive been bought by tenants, for sale immediately, an wholesale disposal of assets widespread as possible so tnai 

adlines have been imposed impossibility in a town such as would create havoc in the there was no dominant 

i settlements once contracts Skelmersdale, which has acres property market. landlord. 


Welwvn Gdn Citv 


Seventy per cent of assets sold 
have been bought by tenants, 
deadlines have been imposed 
on settlements once contracts 
have been agreed, and there is 
less of the property dealers’ 
weakness of the fun of the 
chase — holding back on an 
asset in the belief that its value 
will increase. This is not to say 


rhat all the assets are available 
for sale immediately, an 
impossibility in a town such as 
Skelmersdale, which has acres 
of out-moded factory space to 
attract clients and is applying 
next year for a £15 million 
grant from the EEC Economic 
and Social Fund for structural 
changes, or an economic mad- 


One of the instructions to 
the commission was to take 
care of the market to absorb 
the sales so that best value 
could be realized and also to 





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relocation 


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in one, , 


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and relocation advisor - CNT are all 
these things and many more. 

No-one else can provide such a 
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So why make relocation complicated 
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I • " . S office on 01-935 6100 . 





PROPERTY: 
CENTRE 1 


Don’t make a move without us. 

Commission for the New Towns. 58 Sl Jamesb Street. 
London SW1A 1LD. Telex; 262334. Facsimile: 01-491 0412. 
PresteL *28884# 

Basildon Bracknell Central Lancashire Corby Crawley 
Harlow Hatfield Hemel Hempstead Northampton Redduch 
Skelmersdale Stevenage Welwyn Garden Cnv 





on their properties, but Sir 
Neil replies: “Every sale has to 
_ , be defeasible. Nobody should 

“gEj-.fc. Uppan make a killing in six or nine 

When the new broom began months an< j jf <j 0 there is 
to sweep, the commission had . .. ; i n .v, e 

the original four towns, plus f clause^ Inthe 

StevenageT Harlow, Bracknell 

and Corby - the latter almost stances and " ; pnt 

dying on its feet through the Himselt a ™ ®ge 
closure of its steel production consi^tanL^d^ereforean 
works before being given outsider to the property world, 
emergency status to turn Sir Neil has found it a tough 
round the local economy. industry. “I quicUy reahzed 
Sir Neil told Mr Heseltine that it is essential u be as 
he calculated that most of the tough as Lhe rest I ha\e tried 


assets of the eight towns could 
be realized over five to six 
years, but since then the 
commission has taken over 


to instil a hard-nosed 
commercial attitude into the 
commission." he said. 

While critics of privatiza- 


the responsibility for the re- tion argue that more money 
alization of die assets of could have been earned if the 


Northampton, Redditch, 
Skelmersdale, Central Lan- 
cashire and Basildon. 


itch. Government had retained 
Lan- sites and developed them 
itself, Sir Neil says: “The New 


There are others in the Towns and Urban Develop- 
pipeline — Milton Keynes, ment Corporations Act pre- 


Peterborough, Telford and 
W r arrington/Runcom. No 
firm dates have been given, as 
they are all still growing and 
continuing to be the 
responsibility of their 
development corporations. In 
addition, the Environment 
Department has granted 
extensions to the three north- 
east new towns — Aydiffe, 
Peterlee and Washington — 
and a decision has yet to be 


and supposes that there is no need 
No for a public role. Our sole 


Sales to June 
topped £100m 

remit is to sell properties as 
soon as possible, but at a 
proper price.” 

This year the commission 
announced that agreed sales of 
commercial and industrial 


made on the hand-over of property and land in the year 
their re maining assets to the up to June had topped £100 


rommission. 

When the commission takes 
over the responsibility, hous- 
ing assets are transferred back 
to either the local council, 
housing associations, or in- 
dividual tenants, depending 
on local conditions. 

The overall policy is to give 
existing tenants first option. 
One of the changes which 
have been brought in is that, 
whereas tenants almost had a 
gun pointed at their heads by 
being given about two weeks 
to make np their minds, the 
attitude now is that they 


million, almost double the 
previous year's figure, and £33 
million above target. 

Top of the league table in 
sales was Bracknell. Berkshire, 
with sales worth £26.5 million, 
second was Hemel Hemstead 
with just over £19,250.000. 
But such league tables invite 
unfair comparisons when 
towns such as Skelmersdale. 
which realized assets of only 
£491,418. live in a cold eco- 
nomic climate — unemploy- 
ment is 25 per cent 

Sir Neil says the new towns 
were created to found a new 


should have a ma x i m u m of environment. He says: “They 
three months. If they turn have achieved this in the sense 
down the option, the eommis- that every one of the south- 
sion will seek other buyers east towns has less than the 
such as property investors or regional average unem ploy- 
financial institutions. meat leveL Of course, some. 


financial institutions. 


ment leveL 


There have been allegations like Skelmersdale, have not 
that some tenants have made managed this. That has been a 
unacceptable profit by selling hard nut to crack.” 


<fc 

/KEL^ 


THE flEIU 


S Situated on its own motorway (M50) linking it to the national motorway 
network system. 

U Under Regcnal Development Status, the only area offering 15% Devel- 
opment Grams ant selective end EEC assistance, in Lancashire. 

C Centrally located within easy access of the Liverpool Container Port and 
Manchester and Liverpool airports. 

C Clubs - The West Lancashire business dub. Business advice centre and 
an Enterprise Trust offer the first time businessman valuable asststsica. 

E Environment and quality of ftte in West Lancashire is excellent You will 
find it a great area to tore and work!. 

S Skilled labour force of 43,000 with an excellent labour relations 
record. 

S Success -why not join us -just like people such as the National Farmers 
Union dd. They chose Skelmersdale for their new regional headquarters; 
a site was found, and the deal completed, within 3 weeks. 


LISfS TO BE 


mSS ££ t teppeT ^ afl - Assistant Economic 

DisWrt Council. 52 Derby 
Onnskkk, L 39 2 DF. Tel Onnskirk 77177 Ext 3 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 



Tale of two towns 
with a lot to offer 




■lit 


O ne day fast week 
more than 100 
businessmen from 
the north-west met 
in Bolton to hear 
the tale of two new towns; 
Skelmersdale and Central 
Lancashire. 

Beth places, having known 
better times, were embarking 
on a venture to encourage 
investment in their commu- 
nities by buying or lasing 
commercial and industrial as- 
sets owned by the Commis- 
sion for the New Towns, 

It is a tough operation in a 
region suffering the sharp end 

of the economic depression. 

Skelmersdale, with unemploy- 
ment running at 25 per cent, is 
the hardest nut to crack. The 
rate in Central Lancashire is 
11.7 per cent. 

The fading dreams of 
Skelmersdale, between Liver- 
pool and Manchester, are best 
illustrated on a map in the 
boardroom of the com- 
mission's local office. 

Designated in 1961 with the 
intention that it would pro- 
vide both housing and em- 
ployment for people from the 
congested areas of north 
Merseyside, its original plan- 
ned population was 80,000. 
This was then reduced to 
60.000 and later still to 40,000. 

Today the commission is 
charged with disposing of 
some 150 acres of undevel- 
oped residential land and 130 
acres of industrial sites, but its 
first task has been to try and 
bring confidence back to the 
town by creating a better 
environment and regenerating 
the local economy. 

Its main shopping centre is 
being given a £1 million fee©- 
lifi and a further £500,000 is 
being spent on two neigh- 
bouring centres. 

John Leigh, the com- 
mission's executive officer for 
the town, said: “We have to 
make the people feel better 
and that Skelmersdale is a 
good place to live. The 
commission feels it has a 
social responsibility to the 
town as well as the job of 
disposing of our property.” 

Mr Leigh detects improve- 
ments. He is gratified that the 
regional National Farmers’ 
Union is to locate its head- 
quarters in the town, a feet 
which will not greatly enhance 






&& -* *av. 


employment prospects, but 
which could be seen as a 
symbol that there is con- 
fidence in the future. 

Skelmersdale’s problem was 
that it was geared to be a 
manufacturing town but this 
never happened because of the 
recession. “Let’s face it,” says 
Mr Leigh, “the development 
corporation put all its epgs in 
the manufacturing basket and 
the handle fell off” 

The commission’s role has 
been to switch the emphasis 
away from manufacturing to- 
wards high tech and the 




(All the eggs were 
put into the 
manufacturing 
basket — and the 
handle fell off 9 


service industries, not easy 
when the speculative advance 
factories built by the corpora- 
tion were geared to manu- 
facturing. 

The units that were built are 
far too big to attract service- 
oriented companies and dev- 
elopers, which is why Skel- 
mersdale is seeking a 
£1 5 million grant from the 
EEC Economic and Social 
Fund so that the units can be 
cut down to more manageable 
and saleable sizes. 

Though there is only about 
30 miles betwen Skelmersdale 
and Central Lancashire — its 
boundaries cover 50 square 
miles and encompass Preston, 
Chorley and Leyiand — there 
is no dash between them in 
seeking clients for commercial 
and industrial property and 
land. 

“We are not fishing in die 
same pool,” says Brian 
Birtwistle, the commission's 
executive officer for Central 
Lancashire. “We have dif- 
ferent opportunities to offer.” 
Though, like its near neigh- 
bour, u is not easy. 

Both suffer from the na- 
tional syndrome that 75 per 


cent of companies which wish 
to expand or relocate them- 
selves look within a radius of 
only 42 miles and that 50 per 
cent are reluctant to go beyond 
a 12-mile limit. 

In a depressed area like the 
north-west, getting companies 
or developers to move up 
from the south has to be 
considered as a bonus. 

Central Lancashire MTT,P - 
within the commission’s am- 
bit only this year. Its first task 
was to dispose of 5, 500 houses 
which went to housing associ- 
ations, with the agreement of 
the local council, for about 
£90 million. 

With industrial and com- 
mercial assets to be disposed 
of worth about £50 million the 
commission, taking over from 
where the development corp- 
oration left off, is spending 
£17 million on an infrastruc- 
ture programme, such as 
building new roads to open up 
its 250 acres of land set aside, 
for industrial development' 
and 400 acres for residential 
development 

The commission has also 
inherited industrial estates on 
which there is advance build- 
ing waiting to be let or sold, 
the largest a 50-acre site 
formerly owned by Court- 
auids which closed its factory 
and was redeveloped by the 
development corporation. Its 
occupants range from multi- 
national companies to one- 
man bands. 

It is a town which has had to 
live with redundancies, not 
only those from Courtaukls, 
but also British Leyiand 
where, last week, a further 
1,000 woe made jobless. 




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But at the are time the 
commission is developing ar- 
eas. Last month it announced 
plans to redevelop the former 
British Leyiand North Works 
at a cost of around £5 million, 
the plan involving almost 90 
houses and bungalows for sale, 
together with a commercial 
office block. 

Brian Birtwistle says: “We 
see our function as not only 
creating jobs by attracting 
further investment to the 
town, but also preserving 
those that we have already 
There is no shortage of skilled 
labour and we are attracting 
interest from both manufac- 
turing and service industries. 


■ 'itffrr .'| •‘i ” ' "■ 

Finding jobs at Skelmersdale presented problems, bat 
ferllier south, “selling” Harlow (top) was easier 

from' light engineering and couraged by the development 
chemicals to distribution corporation — so that com- 


companies. 

Back at Skelmersdale, wh- 
ich was transferred to the 
commission in 1985, there are 
already some 170 companies 
established in its main indus- 
trial areas occupying more 
than 200 factory units. 

In its attempts to boost 
morale, the commission, to- 
gether with die local council, 
has brought together 200 local 
businessmen to form a Cham- 
ber of Commerce — remark- 
ably this was never en- 


couraged by the development 
corporation — so that com- 
mon problems can be dis- 
cussed and there can be a 
united thrust to regenerate the 
town. 

It is going to be a longer haul 
than that of Central Lanca- 
shire for the commission, but 
backed with 1 5 per cent grants 
for capital expenditure on new 
buildings or works, and to- 
wards the capital cost of new 
machinery, Mr Leigh, like his 
seniors in London, believes 
the economy can be turned 
round and assets realized. 


When the Commission for the 

New Towns inherited its sec- 
ond tranche of new towns from 
the development corporations 
in 1980 it found itself with a 
potentially disastrous employ- 
ment crisis on its hands — 
Corby, the steel town that no 
longer was. 

The closure of the British 
Steel metal production works 
— the town was bnOt round 
steel - threatened local un- 
employment of 30 per cent. 

The commission had an 
emergency on its hands. Its 
role for the town was changed. 
No longer was it a remit to 
realize its assets, but to co- 
operate with the local council 
to rescue the close-knit steel- 
making community from 
disaster. The task was to bring 
in n£w jobs, new indastries, 
even a new life into the town. 

Six years after the crisis. 
Corby boasts the creation of 
more than 5,000 new jobs 
(though some were to dis- 
appear) with some 250 new 
firms faming into the area. 
About 400 acres of land was 
set aside for industrial and 
commercial development, 175 
acres of winch have already 
been sold, an indication of the 
remarkable tnrn-aroond. 

While no one pretends that 
Corby is ont of the woods — 
unemployment is still running 
at 17 per cent — there is a 
greater confidence in the town 
than there was even three 
years ago. 

To overcome the initial cri- 
sis, an allianre was created 
between the local and county 
councils, the departments «>f 
Trade, Industry and the 
Environment and the commis- 
sion, who formed themselves 
into an Industrial Develop- 
ment Committee. 


The town was immediately 
designated a development 
area, with all that this implied 
in the way of government 


been short of more recent 
problems. It had the idea of 
selling off its shopping centre, 
not as a job lot but in four or 


grants, Euro-loans, and other fi*e parcels, which it valued at 


financial incentives to attract 
new industries and indus- 
trialists. Later it was made the 
first Enterprise Zone, again 
allowing it to offer more 
financial inducements. 

Sir Neil Shields, the 
commission's chairman, ex- 
presses particular pleasure at 
what has been achieved in 
Corb}\ bet it has cot been 
easy: “3c five years K have seen 
the tragedy of the people in the 


Bottom fell out 
of the market 


commission working flat out to 
attract 5,090 jobs only to lose 
2300,” he says. 

The case of Commodore, the 
home computer manufac- 
turers, is a classic example. 
They took a 200,000 sq ft 
factory in the enterprise zone 
only to see the bottom drop out 
of the home computer market. 
“How could we tell?” asks Sir 
Neil. “You have to welcome 
employers.” 

Bnt while steel tnhe-making 
continues at Corby, the town 
has diversified its interests. 
The potato and other crops 
from the surrounding agri- 
cultural land help to sustain, 
and attract, the food manufac- 
turing and processing 
industries. 


some £25 million, bnt the local 
council upset the plans by 
selling off a large development 
area it owned — ironically the 
site of the old steel works — to 
ASDA to bcild a superstore. 

As a shopping attraction it 
was an inevitable rival for 
custom. Now the commission 
is piannisg to refurbish parts 
of the town centre before 
selling its assets. 

The commission will give 
first choice to sitting tenants, 
encouraging them to form 
consortia to buy blocks. 

Graham Lloyd, the 
coxnrnissicn’s executive offi- 
cer. in explaining the advan- 
tages of Corby in attracting 
new indastries. apart from the 
financial services, points ont 
that it is a central location in 
the heart of England, making 
h a natural “warehouse” for 
distribution companies. Ox- 
ford University Press, as an 
instance; has established its 
national distribution centre in 
the town. 

Mr Lloyd says that the 
commission, having realized 
about 2 mfliios sq ft of indus- 
trial commercial space; has a 
further 2 million still to dis- 
pose of, but is confident that 
the assets will be realized. 

“There has been a continu- 
ing demand for industrial sites 
for owner-occupation”, he 


There are companies in- 1 says. “It is an i n dication that 
volved in engineering, Corby has overcome Its crisis 


electronics, packaging, cloth- 
ing cosmetics and' printing. In 
total there has been welt-over 
£500 rnffikm of investment in 
the town. 

Bnt the commission has not 


and that there is confidence in 
the town, not only in industrial 
and commercial development 
hot also in the growth In 
demand for private housing 
and land.” 




lopment 





H mm 





owhere else comes 



within miles of - Corny ^ 


If you're planning to develop your business you 
need look no further than Corby. 




Devetapmem Areas 
□ 


Corby »s o Development Area so your business 
□els the help of Development Area benefits. For 
most companies this means the better deal for ^ 
them of either 15% grants on plant, machinery « 
and equipment or £3000 per job created. There ^ 
is aiso selective assistance for some |ob creating 
protects. 


as defined by 
The Department of 
IhaJoandtnduflTY 
lo lake effect from 29 1184 


r. ji - \-v3r 

Mi 






Corby is also a Steel Opportunity Area, and 

this means even more incentives. 


Corbv is England's firs* Enterprise Zone. There are 
factories o7the peg, from 500 sq.ft, to 50,000 sq.ft., some 
of which are rates, free until 1991 You can also choose ^ 
from offices, warehouses, and hgh tech buildings. 

Corby has EEC aid for small businesses. jf_ 

Clm is now available to aid efficiency. 


is?,., -m:. - <: 






Mondiwef 

# 


■ > ' •. 




Nottingham 


Above all. Corby is nght in t ^ h ^9L E ( J 9lanc, ■ 
Within 80 miles of London. 50 miles from 
Birmingham- Strategically placed for any business 

that needs fast, inexpensive, easy acces io the bq 
South East and Midland populat.on centres. 


Brnmnchom a L, y 

• V COBBY 




W'S , **:•'-* 


JUUI" ~ 

However lor you loot, you will find that, 
SSwid package lor the worn* 
your business, nowhere else comes 
within miles of Corby . 


tendon 

* • 


Recent Property 
Sales in excess of £>16 5 m 






Nome - 

p| Company, 
n Position. ... 
1 Address: 


Fot monjirtonnow 'tend lo Ray Jactaon, 
taw oi kidiiKiv Cotbv hduwiol Dtvebpnwfvr Ccntnc 
Dei-'glaj. Hoiw Qurteu Square Corbv NonhOTcronsfcjie. England 
fetepluiiH''C>XtJy(0f.3r.tj:S?l Ww 341542 
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COMMISSION FOR THE NEW TOWNS/2 



30 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


COMMISSION FOR THE NEW TOWNS/3 


FOCUS 


A new ring of confidence around 
London’s eight new towns 


Hob DMnstsr 





W hile the M25 or- 
bital motorway 
has brought a 
ring of con- 
fidence for the 
future development of 
London's eight new towns, it 
has proved a bonus for the 
Commission for the New 
Towns in realizing its indus- 
trial and commercial assets. 

With so many potential 
clients knocking on die 
commission's door in the 
prosperous south-east it might 
appear to be an easy task to 
cany out its remit, bid it is not 
as simple as it seems. 

“Imagine what would have 
happened to property values if 
all the assets were available at 
the same time”, says David 
Woodall, the chief executive. 
“The market would slump 
and the taxpayer would not be 
getting value.” 

Which is not to say that the 
commission has not been 
aggressive in its marketing; 
only phasing in property when 
the time is thought ripe. To 
have done otherwise would 



Guiding light: James Grafton, director of promotions for the Commission for New Towns 


The drive to push north 


When the new towns of foe 
Midlands and the north of 
England became the res- 
ponslbilty of die Commission 
for die New Towns, die 
commission changed its strat- 


ify have over-he»ted the «■ As an oigniza^ ft 
local economies, creating in byame nmqn e, mth a hre add, 


the functions of realizing as- an ^ pnvate 


sets is to band back to the local 
council and the community a 
stable environment. 

Each of the eight towns has 
had its own problems which 
have had to be fitted into a 
strategy. 

Harlow, for instance, has not 
been a runaway success in the 


No inquiries are 
turned away 


disposal of assets, as has some B 

of its orbital counterparts, but Skehnersdaleas mu 
that is not because its ame- Steamy Reddrtch as 
niti« are tess favourable than 

Wh0e the commission has *JL| 

not turned away inquiries— in tutus, says. “North o f W 
the last accounting year 1985- ^ 

86 agreed sales were worth 
£7,197,250 - Mr Woodall f"**® ™ 
agreed that they were not JCSITJELS. * 
exactly aggressively marketing “e queues oflwyers. 
the town in the knowledge that 

it would become an even more developed as bringing "east- 
attractive a proposition with era promise” — it is felt that it 
the M25 completion and the has already made considerable 
development of Stanstead advances from a low base. 
Airport. Howard Thomas, the com- 

Basiidon, which came under mission's head of estates, says: 
the commission's umbrella in “So far there has not been a lot 
April, has been a late devel- of sales in Basildon. It has 

been a late developer com- 
pared with the other towns in 


property company. 

Kit bow to weld that info a 
whole? How best to promote 
foe benefits and attractions of 
the towns north of Watford as 
wed as those in the wanner 
economic climate of the south? 

One of the first decisions 
was to create a national prop- 
erty centre at Metro House, in 
London’s West End, which 
has become the heart of the 
commission's promotional 
strategy. It also gave the 
centre a budget — nearly 
£1 million — to project 
Skelmersdale as much as 
Stevenage, Redditch as wefl as 
Crawley. 

The job is not easy. James 
Grafton, director of promo- 
tions, says: "North of Watford 
we hare to organize how best 
to attract clients to what we 
have to offer, whereas around 
Loudon we have to organize 
the queues of buyers.” 


Potential investors, as well 
as those considering relocation 
or expansion or about to start 
a business, are aMe to gain 
rapid access to the 
commission's assets through 
information stored on com- 
puter and, under the advice 
and guidance of the staf^ to 
select suitable land or 
premises to visit. 

The major obstacle in 
promoting the more hard- 
pressed northern and Mid- 
lands towns b that 75 per cent 
of companies more within a 
radios of only 42 miles when 
they want to expand, or re- 
locate, and that 59 per cent 
want to move only 12 miles. 

Bat the commission prop- 
erty centre can count successes 
because it is a rational focus of 
tile «Mnnx*nvfl l and ind ■atrial 
assets it has available for 
disposal up and down the 
country. 

These assets range from 
office space from 300 sq ft to 
more than 50,000 sq ft and 
land from one-quarter of an 
acre to more than 200 acres. 
Sales range from £20,000 to 
what the market will' take. 

The commissioa's opera- 
tional activities can be roughly 
divided thus: when it is m- 


oper, but with the completion 
of the ring road — seen by 



The 

WorSd Leader 
IraTksrhocharger 


the London ring and has 
always been the weakest loca- 
tion, partly because it is in the 
east and partly because of its 
earlier reputation.'’ 

The first task when the town 
was designated was to tidy up 
the wasteland. With a shop- 
ping centre totalling some 60 
acres and including 500 ten- 
ancies and sub-tenancies, and 
the recent opening of the 
second phase of the Eastgate 
shopping centre, financed by 
Norwich Union, the town is 
now established as the region’s 
principle shopping centre. 

In attracting interest, the 
commission recognizes that 
international companies may 
want to be nearer airports 
! such as Heathrow and Gat- 
! wick and may go to new towns 
! like Hemd Hempstead or 
Crawley, but it is also seeing 
that interest is being shown in 
high-tech for Harlow and 
Basildon. 

Hemd Hempstead, in turn, is 
reaping the benefits of pension 






David Woodhall, the new 
towns' chief executive 


constructed with high alumina 
cement and are now deter- 


iorating. 

The commission, is win 


funds which are as willing as down its operation in Hemel 
ever to invest in high-tech. Hempstead and m a kin g more 


Garrett Automotive Limited 
Skelmersdale, Lancashire 
England WN8 9PH 
Phone: (0695) 22391 


The town enjoys the enviable 
location of being a mile from 


land available as well as selling 
off assets with first refusal, as 


the Ml, three miles from the elsewhere, going to existing 
M2S, 26 miles from HSathrow tenants. 


GARRETT 


Allied 

' “ Signal 


and nine miles from Luton 
airport 

Realizing its assets has 
rarely been a problem, though 
there may have been diffi- 
culties with some of its prop- 
erties which, like others 
throughout the country, were 


Hatfield, to the north, still has 
an estimated one-fifth of its 
industrial and comm ercial as- 
sets and land to be realized. It 
has resolved problems that 
bedevilled the last remaining 
development site, bnt it has 
encountered one difficulty 


V v ;• • -y- . V. : /.; / 


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1 ^ >■ v‘ .* GO M E A N D SEE 

■- ‘ — - w 




STAR ATTRACTIONS 


-FACTORY AND WAREHOUSE SPACE ALL TYPES AND SIZES 
. /; **. ★ RENTS AND RATES FAR LOWER THAN LONDON/HOME COUNTIES 

Y ' .‘T;,, ' :C Y, / VMODERNTOWN CENTRE OFFICESITES 

V'j .&zi. WIDE .CHOICE OF HOUSING-AT SENSIBLE PRICES- 
•• ' K-/r-'V'*: : ^EW:^E;ISURE AND ' SKOPPIN G 'AREAS, -BLENDINC'.VVITH ; . 


ATTRACTIVE-TRADITIONAL TOWN 


| ^ ^:^feS^ERR LOCATION MIDWAY LONDON & BIRMINGHAM. CLOSE 

'■ ■' ; - 


'? ■ V- 


T G.Ml JUN^TIpNS i 15 & 16, 




^NORTHAMPTON .^’77 '.M - 4 > 


. vvri 


V A A, . ■ ' ‘ 




A- 


volved in leasehold It operates 
as its own agent through the 
national and town offices; 
when it is involved in selling 
assets it brings to private 
sector agents to conduct the 
transactions. 


Each town has its own office 
wo rkin g to conjunction with 
the load council through a 
liaison committee. David 
WoodhaO, the commission’s 
chief executive, explained: 
“Our role is to disengage 
ourselves from the towns by 
Handing assets back to the 
community through their 
democratically-elected 
bodies.” 

Tin* CB— Mm has a 

unique portfolio of properties 
and, through its London bu- 
reau, plans to attract national 
and international companies 
seeking to locate or relocate. 

Sir NeO Shields, the 
commission's chairman, says: 
“The bureau also plays an 
important role in establishing 
and sustaining institutional 
interests to the commissioa’s 
towns. Institutions in the past 
have been a little blinkered in 
fltfif aftirod* to in vestme nt in 
the new towns and this we . 
intend to change.”. 


Rent reviews 
helped assets 


pre-war parts of the town's 
industrial area. While pro- 
posals are under consid- 
eration, it is expected that it 
will be sometime before a start 
can be made. But the commis- 
sion says that existing pre-war 
factories continue to be let on 
a short-term basis. 

Stevenage, further up the AI, 
has had to suffer closures by 
companies such as Kodak, 
Bo waters and British Vis- 
queen in recent years, produc- 
ing a higher unemployment 
ratio than most of its orbital 
new town counterparts. Some 
of the vacated sites have been 
converted by new owners into 
smaller units, other still re- 
main to be realized and 
developed. 

But a major round of rent 
reviews has meant that the 
capital value of several town 
centre Mocks have been maxi- 
mized and should be capable 
of realization during the next 
year. 

While the commission re- 
ports satisfactory prog ress in 
realizing assets in Stevenage 
there is buried within its 1985 
review an example of how it 
sometimes has to deal with 
local authorities in attracting 
clients. 

Salisbury's put up a scheme 
to develop an area for a 
superstore and filling station, 
and the commission, de- 
lighted with the proposition, 
sought the local council's 
planning permission. 

No objections were raised, 
provided that the developers 
also included a community 
centre, a play centre, a 
doctor's surgery, a public 
house and sheltered accom- 
modation. 

The scheme is to jo ahead, 
with everyone benefiting, the 
commission realizing a valu- 
able asset, Sainsbory’s acquir- 
ing a prime she, and the 
community getting additional 


which illustrates how strategy 
can sometimes be upset by 
local factors. 

Welwyn Hatfield district 
council announced plans to 
develop a scheme at Hatfield 
which inducted a hotel, ice 
rink, offices, garden centre, 
residential units and a shop- 
ping centre based on leisure 
goods. Ostensibly, an admir- 
able project, but the commis- 
sion objected because of the 
potential impact on its own 
interests on another of its 
towns, Welwyn Garden City. 

The recent outcome of an 
inquiry found in favour of the 
district council, hi ghli ghtin g a 
general problem faced by the 
commission: when it rates 
over the role of a development 
corporation, the planning 
rights fell within the res- 
ponsibility of the local auth- 
ority, not with the com- 
mission. 

It is a policy which has 
given rise to a tew difficulties 
in the past, but has since been 
rectified with other new towns 
felling wi thin its remit When 
it took over responsibility for 
disposing of the rrawmi-rrial 
and industrial assets of 
Bracknell and Central Lan- 
cashire this year, the commis- 
sion retained some of the 






Welwyn Garden City, seen by 
many as the home of the new 
town movement, has a project 
for redeveloping the local 
railway station, including a 
shopping centre, which is now 
in jeopardy. The commission 
needs to consider the pros- 
pects of finding any other 
si gnifi<*Bnf retail scheme in 
Welwyn Garden City. Cer- 
tainly it is going to be more 
difficult 

There is also a long-term 
need for redevelopment of the 




West Midlands: attractive office space (fop) is available at Ipsley Court, Redditch. Below: 
Sir Gordon Roberts, CNT board representative for Redditch (and Basildon) discusses 
computers with Boon Yeng, one of the early tenants at the Rubicon Centre, Redditch 


When space gets tight, 
the Midlands has room 


What do yon do when your company is 
successful, needs to expand, bnt yon have run 
oat of space? The answer: head fora new town. 
Which is why, last week, a Birmingham shop- 
fitting company took its employees on a 
familiariza tion tour of nearby Redditch. 

Tony Ham, rice chairman of AMS Group 
Ltd, which includes many household retailing 
companies among its customers, said: “We 
hope to take our entire work force with os from 
the King's Heath area when we move and with, 
a continued growth of the group we expect to 
recruit more people in time.” 

The group's decision is the latest example of 
growing interest in Redditch as the Commis- 
sion for the New Towns sets about realizing its 
industrial and commercial assets. 

Redditch, like Northampton, ■ and 
Skelmersdale in the north-west, was trans- 
ferred to the commission about 18 months ago 
along with an unusually high nmnber of 
residential ground-leased properties. 

Its first priority was to launch a major 
programme to provide information and en- 
couragement to leaseholders to boy. The 
market demand for new housing development 
sites remains strong and the commission has 
been able to sen several serviced sites. 

There was also a lot of vacant factory space, 
of which die commission was able to dispose of 
one-third within six months. 

The commission believes that the town's 
attraction as in industrial and commercial 
location will be enhanced with the opening of 
the M42 extension. Bnt getting people to move 
to the new town takes time. 

Tony Ham sakl: “We looked round the 


region for nearly 18 months before we found a 
suitable new (oration. We deckled on Redditch 
because of the availability of ideal premises 
and its dose proximity to the national 
motorway network.” 

Northampton, by tradition, has been a 
. prosperous commercial and indnstrial centre 
and the commission's portfolio includes both 
industrial development (and and vacant indns- 
trial premises. It also inherited a large amount 
or agricultural land which was considered 
surplus to requirements for expansion. 

Sited on the Ml, almost halfway between 
London and Birmingham, Northampton was 
designated a new town with the directive of 
providing homes and jobs for Londoners. 

Between the time of designation in 1968 and 
1981 some 15,600 homes had been built. The 
town’s indnstrial sites rater for a wide range of 
companies and a big programme of office 
development has also enabled some .major 
companies to relocate or expand activities. 

One of the latest moves by die commission 
has been to apply to the Northampton borough 
council for planning permission for major new 
leisure and entertainment facilities. The 
proposals envisage a lake and marina with 
possibly a link for boats on to the river Nene, 
tennis courts an indoor cricket stadium, ice 
rink, multi-cinema and motel. 

David Woodhall, the commission's chief 
executive, believes the proposals, which could 
create op to 1,000 extra jobs, would “enhance 
Northampton's retail status by complimenting 
existing traders, and provide a wide range of 
leisure facilities which could extend into a 
major tourist attraction.” 




Greater demand 
for warehouses 


'-mis 


A 


facilities at little or no cost to 
itself. 

Crawley, whose industrial 
base is the work generated by 
nearby Gatwick Airport, also 
has the added bonus of access 
to the M25. A major 
redevelopment of the town 
centre is taking place and 
more development land is to 
be released on to the market 
The commission says it is 
anticipating even greater de- 
mand for its own warehouse 
development the Gatwick 
Distribution Centre, as the 
airport continues to expand. 
Bracknell, to the west, sits in 
the “Golden Triangle”, dose 
to Heathrow, the M4 and now 
the London orbital motxwway. 
With a population — now 
more than 50,000 — 10 times 
what it was when first des- 
ignated a new town, it sup- 1 
ports new industries involved , 
in electronics, chemicals, en 
gmeering, computers and food 








Mi 


iv ;ik a 


II 


>y* 




DO 


With a highly-skilled labour 
force, the commission finds 
little difficulty in realizing 
assets when it sees fit to 
release them on to the market. 
Apart from speculative pri- 
vate enterprise development, 
much of the considerable 
building taking place in the 
town involves the redevelop- 
ment of premises sold by the 
commission. 


rail and air links, and the full range of social, sporting cultiSsSISI'^i eXCeIi . ent road ' 
A combination that 



(o\{ 0 




Dane6hUi HoYiSl 1 HN 
Call the Development Group on 

Stevenage (0438) 317021 


• * ^ 
























THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 







Project managers 



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(Corner of Mill Street) 


Contract oral completion 1988 

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LONDON PROPERTIES 














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£14. SPECTACULAR WATERFRONT Apartment 
overlooking Greenwich Palace. 2 Bedrooms. 2D 1 
Lounge, fitted Kitchen. Luxury Bathroom, Shower 
Room, Central Heating. Garage. £159£00- 

£14. INSTANTLY APPEALING Ground Floor 
Masonette situated on New Development Bedrooms, 
Lounge. Open Plan fitted Kitchen. Bathroom. Parking 
Space. £51,000. 

E.14. CHARMING WATERSIDE APARTMENT with , 
Private Mooring. 2 Bedrooms. ‘L‘ shaped Longa. 
Fitted Kitchen. Luxury Bathroom, Central Heating. 
Pabo. Parking. £110400. 

LI. RELAXING RIVERSIDE APARTMENT in 
prestigious dewtopmerL Bedroom, Lounge, Wd) 
Equipped Khehea Bathroom, Central Heating. Video , 
Erkiy Phone, Understand parking. £85,000. 

£14. RIVERSIDE HED-ArTERRE Ground Root Newly i 
Constructed Apartment fitted Bedroom. Lounge with 
access to Patio. Excellent Kitchen, Bathroom, 
Heating. £85*000. 

£14. BUOY THE VIEW from ttts exceflsnt 2nd Row 
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Kitchen, 6attin»m, Central Heating, Balcony. Garage. 
£130,000. 

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OPEN DAILY. 

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naans pnk. 2 nma. 3 teams. I*, tattro + «*n w-t Mth-itte 
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2 mem (1 tn-sota) mb wt DM temsw- Mum lot company he * ran 
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ton lase A bar adWMiss. Bed/Setxq Bm, K 1 Bab. T2S yi& ES2J00. 
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32 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


tOPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 




cid'i :la:i i ft, WAV* i B\ 





Winkworth 
Financial Services 

2Sa Motco mb St reet 
London SW1 


WDrking9to5? 


Then you'll want to make the man of your leisure rime 
and not waste it travelling to and from borne. 
Rialto can certainly hdp herewith super pew homes 
in ideal locatkaK- 


The Friaries, Colney Hatch Lane, 
Friera Barnet. 

Luxury I and 2 bedroom flats from 
only £48,300 and £56,850 respectively. 
Impressive studios to be released soon. 
Contact Aim at Copping Joyce, 01-361 3768. 


RiahoBrnkim Unuicd. Telephone: Hertford (0992^ 584980. 



How to beat the burglar ’sodds 


By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 


A burglary takes place every 90 seconds, 
night and day, according to the Legal & 
General insurance group, and there is a 
one-in-three chance that yon wfl be 
burgled at some time. A Home Office 
working paper published last week stain 
that there is a burglary every minute, ana 
you are likely to be burgled every 35 
years. . , _ - 

The slight variations m the possibil- 
ities suggested by these two sources do 
not bring any comfort, and the only 
consolation is an increasing emphasis 
among builders and developers on 


security. At the top of the ma rket, 
individual houses are protected by 
electronically-controlled gates, and the 
camp applies to a number of small 
developments. 

Barrett's Dulwich Gate development 
is one of several in London where the 
entrance to all the houses is controlled by 
security gate and guard, and is 
Blackhealh, Wimpey’s new Mayfield 
development is protected by access 
through maimed lodge gates. 

Such schemes follow a pattern com- 
mon in the United States, and there is lit- 
tle doubt that these enclosed and secure 
developments will thrive as burglaries 
increase and people become ever more 
security-conscious. But it is not only the 
most expensive property that is being 

g rotecteo. Builders are beginning now to 
t anti-burglar devices as standard in 
new developments. 

The statistics of house burglaries are 
chilling. When Legal & General 
launched an assault last month a gain st 
Britain's “burglary epidemic**, it re- 
ported that in 1984 losses from house- 
holds amounted to £209.7 million, and 
in 1985 £219.4 million, showing a rise of 
4.6 per cent 

There were 480,000 recorded bur- 
glaries in 1985, of which nine out of Z0 


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1 & 2 BEDROOM FLATS £110,000 TO £140000 
LEASES OF 125 YEARS FOR SALE 
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Fashionable Area 


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One Bedroom Apartment: Offers above £200,000 
Two Bedroom Apartment: Offers above £300.000 


For more information please telephone 
Brahma International Properties C@753) 841791 



were spontaneous and took less than 10 
minutes. The same proportion of break- 
ins were through insecure doors and 
windows, with nearly one-third occur- 
ring at the front of the house, two thirds 
at the rear — and 3 per cent through the 
roof 

ij- gai & General’s new insurance 
scheme is based on self-help, offering 
home-owners up to 20 per cent savings 
through its Homesafe policy if they take 
anti-burglar steps. 

Brian Palmer, the company's general 
director, said: “Burglars joke that God 
helps those who hdp themselves. The 
same is true for their potential victims. 
Householders could avoid financial loss 
and often heartbreak if they took simple 
precautions. Adequate lodes and bolts 
are a major deterrent to break-ins. They 
are simple to fit and much cheaper than 
most ueooie think. " 


The new scheme applies to house- 
owners who have had three daim-free 
years and whose property has adequate 
physical protection and is occupied nrost 
of the day. For identical houses, with 
£15.000 contents cover, for example, the 
“self-help” measures will reduce the 
Legal & General premium from £165 to 
£136.50 in Birmingham, from £82.50 to 
£69 in Bristol and from £210 to £168 in 
London and Liverpool 

It is no good installing good locks if the 
home-owner then leaves windows open 
or keys “hidden" in an obvious place, 
puts good locks on weak doors, allows 
papers or milk to be left when, absent, 
leaves equipment such as a ladder 
outside, or of course, leaves a key in the 
lock. 

The cost of securing an average house 
is about £60, ranging from £34 for a 
ground-floor fiat to £55 for a two- 
bedroom terrace house, £64 for a three- 
bedroom semi-detached and £90 for a 
four-bedroom detached house. These 
estimates do not include the cost of 
fitting. 

Prudential Assurance, Britain's largest 
household insurer, has also taken mea- 
sures to alert people to the dangers with a 
£100,000 publicity campaign “Stop 
Thief', featuring booklets ana a video 
available from any of the company's 400 
district offices. Last year the Pro paid out 
£33 million in compensation for goods 
stolen and damage caused to property by 
burglars. 

Housebuilders, too, are responding to 
the “epidemic'*. Heron Homes has 
announced that in all future develop- 
ments it will incorporate anti-theft 
feainres devised in co-operation with the 
Surrey county police. They include 


alarms, mortice locks, security chains, 
spy holes and special hinges on windows 
and doors. 

One of the earliest into the field was 
BeDway Homes, which recently an- 
nounced a plan to incorporate a fully 
integrated anti-burglar package into 
every' house on its new developments at 
no extra cost to buyers. “We have even 
been inundated with requests for 
information from home-owners who 
want to incorporate our measures into 
their present homes,” says Howard 
Dawe, Beltway’s group technical 
director. 

The scheme was originally introduced 


Builders offered 
gesture of support 


- « * £ tS-TfS* 


in response to an appeal by 
Northumbria’s Chief Constable, Stanley 
Bailey, for builders to support the police 
in their fight against crime by designing 
in security. Beltway’s move, introduced 
not as a sales aid but as a gesture of sup- 
port, was welcomed by Home Office 
ministers, and the Sun Alliance insur- 
ance group offered 15 per cent discounts 
off its standard rates for its “secure” 
homes. 

The security package, installed on all 
houses on new developments costing 
more than £35,000 (£50,000 in the 
London area), includes mortice locks, 
door bolts and chains, door viewers, 
window locks, patio door locks and up- 
and-over garage door locks. In addition, 
Bellway commissioned a subsidiary 
company to produce an integrated 
electronic alarm system, which is also 
being installed. 


o:; 

:i vc.-sjtSi* 




ISLINGTON TM1. Rat 
conversion in period 
house. I bed. £60000. 
CANONBUSY NL Geor- 
gian style townhouK in 
square. 3 beds. pidoL 
£155.000 F/H. 

VICTORIA PARK £9. 4 
storey period bouse, direct 
access to park. Separate 
Hat £165.000. F/H. 
ISLINGTON NL 2 bed 
maisonette with garden. 
£83.000. 

LONDON FIELDS E8. 
Ftiriod bouse, excellent 
condition. 3 beds, ga r den. 
£110000 F/H. 


EVANS 

BAKER 


COVERT GARDEN: 


onto pan i tna at house 
ncatnratng ptaas a nt gankn with 
shrubs. At rev ot house a pared area 
sujUM a . tar bubaratsanl 
a As taring. Bugfar aiam system. 
Ml gas antral heating eflh anraon 
heatar, naw mot. dad* (paring at 
tram oJ the hue. 


compactor eta. mctpal Bed 21. m 
bp 901 bid i U real of fitted 
wardrobes. Dm 40 patio. Bed 2 
(Mil Wad cupboards. Fufty tied 
baft reft s hower . GDI Video entry 
phone. 24 hour srarty and 
porterage. Mreg taL Landscaped 
conumnri gardens reft pmata 
sports corapra tad SHtmmtag pool 
satires, gymresrem eta Ths flat 
was dwstm fcr tbe developers 
prorrotaa! Sm and the 997 yea - 
lease Is auatable * 

KWWMd. Tel: SI 935 22A 
(office Inn ortrt 


fifiTwi jg 

caretbDy iratomJ Georgian 

frnilr f fn g r~iTT>. 

+ large kitchen/ eating 
room + 2 butinuuns + 
utility room* + brautifvi 
atirireOTew t own street 
entranreetc- etc. 


H0XTQN ST, N.1 
Wait to tbe City Iran ttss 
spurious flat set in bustling 
market street 2 beds, Inga, 
kit/btst rm, bath/ wo. 
utifty gss cJl E6&000 l/h. 


TO UET 

(Famished or OatamisM] 
e£4O0 parade or 
FOR SALE £340400. 
018318641 




CADOGAR SQUARE 
SW1 


MagniScent mateone® with due 
Reception, Terrace 3 Bedims, 3 
Bathm# 8 Sttrel Garden. Reconst- 
ructed & finished to the highest 
standard. £350.000. 


Teh 81 445 2535. 


CLEVELAND ST. W.1 

Attracti ve IflXTs taJtftat in 
central location. Shot waft 
Regents Park & Oxford St 
etc. 2 bedims, Inge, kit. 
batten rex. balcony, gas 
ch. £91,500 l/h 


STAR STREET V2 

Aflraawe marione t te In 6tade 
R feted house. One to West 
End. Reception, modern 
jatifen . 2 doptita bedrooms, 
trethrootn. secluded pen, 
GOi Excellent decorative 
order, 118 yew lease. 
ElfiJKQ 

Tel: 01-262-4821 


CHELSEA* 

KENSINGTON 


KragWstjrttge. BeauttfuRy 
modernised comer house 
ready for Immediate 
occupation. Drawing Rm, 
3 Sods. 2 Baths, Fifty 
Fitted Kit. Garage. L/H. 


QUALITY 


Chesterfield & Co 
01-581 5234/01-584 2391 


1st floor Dai, new conversion. 2 bedrooms (I with en suite 
shower room + sepeme wilei and wash basin). fined 
wardrobes m both. Small study, fitted kitchen with Gageetuu 
cooker and hob. Bathroom with white suite. I wmiy with 
fitted cupboards and bookshelves, marble and pinefirndacc. 
Laura Ashley decor. GCH throughout. ujgJXXX 
99 year lease. 

TeL 01 898 9226/898 7473. 


Building better homes 
for Londoners 


Contact us on 04862-70818 


HOLLAND PARK. 

W.11. 

M ews ho use it rood 
decorative order and niiy 
carpeted ttroughnit. Root 
terrace, integral oarage aid 
easy parking. Stadia style 
reception room, spaoous 
ttctai/breattast room, rtnng 
M. 3 bedrooms and 2 
h a htoo ms (t en sutei 
Freehold Exceflent value at 
£179500 

JOHN WILCOX & COL 
BW»Z 2362 

Office opao Mm ilav-Tpm. 
































































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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/2 


The towered 
survivor of 
the Tudor age 




u J2£.9^? n^ 58 8* Botebrook. 
HarffieW, East Sussex, built in 1540, was 
Jb gate house to Botebrook Castle, 
destroyed by fire in the 17th centwy. The 
castle was rebuilt but although it has 
Tudor features, the Gate HoUse is the 
only original Tudor building left it 
retains the 16th-century bnckwork turrets 
and a solid oak staircase. The present 
owners have fully restored the brickwork 
with the co-operation of the 
Environment Department A modem wing 
was added some years ago. 

This country house, dose to Ashdown 
rorest, now has five bedrooms and three 
reception rooms, with the master and 
9 U0 st bedroom suites in its Elizabethan 
tower. The house, in half an acre, is 
for sale through Taylor and Tester's East 
Gnnstead office at £250,000. 


VT*. : El 

- • •;• fv. •. 

; - - v • . -tffi a 


■ Number ll f Bridge Street Bures; 
Suffolk, withai seven mfles of 
Colchester, is a modest name fora 
modest three-bedroom cottage, boat in 
hie late 17th century of lath and 
piaster wfth a timber frame. There are 
exposed timbers m the sitting room 
and dining room, and the cottage has a 
courtyard garden. Simon Berry and 
Partners, of Sudbury, is asking £54,000. 



‘*'7 **)«?' 

-Sa.-.. .'a, .waataat » 


Starter shortage 



j-time buyers 

homes, leading to the dispr 
price increase for this type 
property. Ratt & Mead, which has offices 
in 13 towns and villages in 
Hertfordshire, Buckingham shir a and 
Oxfordshire, says in its 1986 review 
that builders prefer to use the little 
available land for larger, more 
profitable houses, and that council 
planning policies, demanding space 
for cars, encourage sheltered housing 
and homes for the elderly, not small 
houses and flats lor car-owning first-time 
buyers. 


Mkfaehnersh Court, on the edge of the village of Mkhelmersh, near Ramsey, 
Hampshire, overlooking the Test Valley, is an outstanding example of the Eng- 
lish country house, unspoilt mid beautifully maintained, it was constructed in 
about 1790 by the Rev Philip Baker, rector Of Michebnersh, in the days when 
rectors could do such things, and became the rectory for the next 130 years. It is a 
Grade II listed Georgian house with period features, including cornicing and pax^ 
a pets, with an imposing hall and staircase, a panelled gating room and a dining 
room for large-scale entertaining. There are two finder reception rooms, four 
main bedrooms and four secondary bedrooms, and in the 17 acres of grounds 
there are a swimming pool, a tennis court, a staff flat and a three-bedroom lodge 
cottage- Hampton and Sons is seeking offers of more than £900,000 


lisproportionata re— i -g-| 1 • .re »rere 

Folks who live m the mill 


■ Some of the Roman coins dating 
from 350-360AD, found in the grounds of 
the newly built Kutu Lodge at 
Shipftam kt Avon, will be included in the 
sale of the house. The coins, known 
as the Shipham Hoard, were discovered 
by the owner of the land while 
gardening, and it is believed there may 
be further caches. The house has 
four bedrooms and four reception 
rooms, fts fta/f-acre grounds rnclurfe 


a leisure complex and a s wim min g pooL 
The agents, C.J. Hole, of Wrington, 
Avon, are seeking more than £150,000. 


Prince’s favourite 


■ Clifton Cottage, buflt in 1833, 
perhaps the most original Georgian 
house in a conservation area in 
Camberwell, south London, is for sale 
through Farrar Stead and Glyn's 


Clapham office. It was reputedly owned 
if the Prince of Wales, 


by a mistress of the I 
later King Edward VII. The house retains 
many original features, including 
plaster cornices and fireplaces with 
marble surrounds. The house, recently 
refurbished, offers a large reception 
room, a dining room and four 
bedrooms. The agents are seeking 
£198,000 for the freehold. 


Convened mills and mill houses are 
always in demand. They are invariably 
attractive to lode at. usually, offer 
spacious living, and have delightful 
country outlooks. And any property with 
water near by seems to have that extra 
something — not damp, it is hoped. 

Bidwells, of Cambrige, is selling an 
unusual collection of Georgian build- 
ings, including a mill, in the village of 
Exiling, two miles from Newmarket The 
mill house has recently been renovated 
to provide a five-bedroom house with 
more than two acres of grounds. 

It is believed to date from the 18th 
century and is built ofbrick under a day- 
tiled roof The kitchen and bathroom are 
to be left for the intending purchaser to 
modernize to his or her own taste, and 
the guide price is £120,000. 

Also for sale is the original min, which 
is to be converted into a two-bedroom 
bouse and contains the bow wheel and 
crown wheel of the old machinery. In 
addition there is a brick-built period 
bam for sale, for conversion into a three- 
bedroom house, and Bidwells is inviting 
offers for them without giving a guide 
price. 

The agents say two or more of the 
properties would be ideal for a family 
looking for granny accommodation or 
staff quarters. 

Saxolls is offering not only a water mill, 
but also The Mill Inn at Withington, 
near Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. The 
inn has bear in the private ownership of 
the same family for 60 years and is one of 
rite best known inns m the Cotswolds. 


Turnover for the year ended March 31, 
1986, was £202,000. 

The inn stands by the River Coin, a 
good trout stream. It is built of Cotswold 
stone and has timbered rooms and open 
fireplaces. It has five bedrooms, includ- 
ing two letting rooms, and a self- 
contained manager’s fiat. SaviUs’ 
Banbury office and the Cirencester office 


The stone-ground 
flour is in demand 


of Robert Barry and Company are asking 
for offers of more than £330,000. 

Savills' York office is selling the Mill 
House and Corn Water Mill at 
Crakehafi, near Bedale. The mill was 
recorded in the Domesday Book and it 
still has timbers which have been dated 
to this period. It fell into disrepair after 
1924 but was restored by the present 
owner, who bought it in 1977 and had it 
grinding com again in 1980. There is 
now a local demand for the stone-ground 
wholemeal flour produced at the mill 
from untreated quality wheat It remains 
a working mill and, understandably, a 
tourist attraction. 

The Mill House, overlooking flic mill, 
has three reception rooms and three 
bedrooms, and close by is a two- 
bedroom cottage and tea room. The 
grounds of six acres indude a number of 
outbuildings and paddocks, and Savills 
is asking tor offers around £165,000. 

cw 


HAMPSTEAD* 

HIGHGATE 





6 CARLYLE CLOSE 

HAMPSTEAD 6ABDHI SUBURB 
Unify double tmrtad 5 bertuom. 
2 battumxn. 3 reception room 
house, s&m&w m h acre grants 
(approx) m dus desirable aide- 
sac. 

Price on Application 

458-8814 
SOLE AGENTS 


r *ve mm Reduced for 

oulck sale Lfje studio flat. Al 
condition Fitted wt * carpefa. 
CCM. Esc valor. £55.960 ono. 
Mum ■tell. Td-Oi *86 5877 x 
saa idayj Ol 79« 6372 meal. 


HAM5TU9 QAROEN Sober* 
r-WU Terraced Iwibc. 
recruv lux klltticn. 2 bed. 2 
tulle, it en Miilei. &ouUl facing 
pardro. £139.950. Tct: Ol 209 
0165 or Ol 468 1739 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


CHRISTMAS 
SALE 


Buy j stxKSal pdWBflf Bxs 
C Wisi mas - A 2 petaiw macf. . 

reeflpoon. kitctwi. MU"CC«ri 

outage, neni to"? Muwe m 
Belgravia, tot EWO.000. 

Tel: 01 824 8638 ewntogs 
or m 01 734 3034 
during office hauts. 


UPPER NORWOOD SE19 

Detached Wdonan house. 
f3 rooms, -f kitchens. 3 
baths in l/3rd acre. Large 
heated tiled swimrangpool. 
sauna. 4 garages. Baers 


hTnoediate possesam. 

Nofratak 

Tel: 01 305 5365. 


VAMIEDOT V1UAK 2 

bed C0TTAGI, m 


fiSwStm BWIJ WW3 bed 
OcM '*”2 S2S 


ccucnra nous®. 

scat. Su«f J»J 

dswg room adionmg raafi mw 

EttMW 


RICHARD BARCLAY 

OlWfol 


SWlt. Print* f * ^"SJS nait. 

and nr 2 

uum*. flll«l taW* pjjKlnq 
bMB # C F,whSE £71.500. 

833 iwTtMr Marks) 


CLAPHAMSW4 lounawgW <££ 

omd floor IW- rrc 
ba,n - 


nuna consrrvallon 

flour fl* •" ,^c 

HrAS.’SS- S«A» 


0956 — 


sc, g 




» 

tn 1 t 


Charmed Surveyor - 

WANDSWORTH 





a s 


DULWICH 


A BRAND NEW 


detached house btft by Roger 
Maksim Homes. Sduated on an 
end estate wttm easy reach 
toisiji Paiate and Duhuch Paik. 
4 Detb. 2 baths. 2 means, ka 


Wdiner. GCH. Sed gdn. dMe 
F/h; Large 


gge. E 154,950 
reducti on tor qua* adange ol 
CQDQlCtG 

John Qund 761 6424. 


.228 7474 \ 


Canltind anytMna tor itw price 
bi OiMdir Try in. C99.9BO 
for dukk -sup- Good decomiv* 
order. 3/4 bedroomeo town 
Immjm. open plan lounge/ dtnma 


I40NQRTHCOTE ROAD SW 1 1 


LAVENDER 
GARDENS, SW11 

A choice oM hncury 1 
bedroom Ibis. 
£49.000 - £54,000 
A good satedion of 
properties always 
dvatabj p 

WRBf PflOPSTHES 
675 6950 


STREATHAM. 


An irnpessne 1930‘s bult 
dot fandy homo offering 
elegant 7 bedrtnd accom 
with 2 tiathrms. Ige 


landscaped grins. & dble 


integral ggo. El 95.000 f/h. 

WMKW08TH 

Streatham 677 7211. 


west rvneev. Dctmtnrw. ana- 
drt»»€hcaOld M«y to 
tttnsm-auon arra 6 beds. 3 
brtif*. rtii»i rro-s 
baths, doak. tHlar. OOt So- 
dudm w-faetng l®**- Gg£ 
otf si parktno- I/iLEESjSS 0 
for quiclc ak Ol- 788 407H 


BALHAM 5W12 Quick sale (1 m. 
2/3 Beds. 2 reccps. C3L wi" 
roof. 9 dn. ellnrted adwaa 
cornrrMvi and tube. I &>od dert>. 

m||V# orripf. C3TPrt& I PCt W S/T 

RIM 01-673 MW 

nW w «■!. «Kb 


BMMLCY KEMT £ 155050a 
c-ec net Tudor style char acter 
w^a«c oh.. 4 bed. 4 reep. 
Sx S^kti. New decor Jg? 

rarDet*. etc. Gdn » * Jl“. 
Swoi 4B4 7524 E ir* w-entte 
nao 9637 


M tauiU. SUM AMevflle 
fee 1 "“^ =! 
M mfe. odn ren9 ?S?jSf«‘ 

w/ends/ei'ee) or P 

JJlSSfMSi ituytmie' 


KEWWSTO" 

^386 e\ W weekend:. 


SCS DH^ritd Kenture^ 

gfe&sro-Sft**® 1 

With 

gSf/'&El wi 

1479 >Ti 


a-.. 

arfa _?iuK Co*J»U'ard dewt . 

^^aisarioo- 

sag Sf^ sgASii 

r i*tg do tl» Wattirg. 

‘SffisSw*- - 


/fuby WMWthgi 2 


room. OOi 
swl mmm a pool. pm. Td: Ol 
778 6822 eves * w/ettds. 


SWOtHAM HU- Attractive 
2 nd floor rial in modem P/B 
Block. 2 beds. HvtnB room, titled 
carpets and Utchen. balcony, 
entryphone. £56.000. Tel Ol 
699 0849. 


VICTORIAN charming 4 dble bod 
semi. Elegant thru living rm. Ige 
pine kn/ timer Qum rd. 
£118.000. scon James 771 
6211. Sunday viewing 


WJKJt-WKR Spaaous 3 bed 
house. 2 reorpo. new 
idtcnen/balti. CM. Gardm. 
£77^00 Tel 01 670 3030 


DOCKLANDS 


THINKING OF 
MOVING IN 
DOCKLANDS? 


Think.. 


rntliwa 



Residential 


A huge selection of 


properties available 
front E37.0C 


000 - £350.000 
throughout Docklands 


Open 7 days a week 
01*538 1821 


28 Skylines. 
Lime Hart 


rbour 
London E14 9TB. 


ENJOYING 

PANORAMIC 

VIEWS 


bolii wot to the City and 
across the Thames, this 
stunning 3 bed nn pent- 
house offers good size 
accommodation and private 
garage. Price £131,500. 

Also built along side the 
Thames is ibis attractive 3 
bedim maisonette with 
views directly onto the 
River, the properly has 
good suk accommodation & 
private garage. Price 
2.-MI.50& 

For information 
telephone Parris & 
Qfjffk 01*987 4473 


■AfeMt. Largu luxury DM U 
converted rtwnkte waraitoum. 
Cxtcratvc vtvws. Doubto bed- 
room. Fined uichen. carpels. 
Porurax. Pnvale safe. 
XioO.OOO. ono. fdr Quick safe. 
Tel. 01 985 1068. 


WAWMC - SupsrMy Ittfed one 
BM. s/c tut. wwi Tower 
Brufee/Mier views. FHc mUn 
walk iron St KsUwrinn Dock 
£72000 • Pauttne TeW?i 958 
9902 


DOCftUUUtt * Oty ■ Sow. 

3* Mell on M period & New 
HOtMM a FMS Close CBS" AM 
River. £40 ■ £550.000. Phone 
MeOewaas rmmhimbi; oi 790 
9652 Of 0860 711564 


DOCKLANDS 

PROPERTY CENTRE 

FLATS & HOUSES 

THROUGHOUT THE 
DOCKLANDS 

TEL: 790 9560 

| WIMBLEDON . 

SW20 

1 Two BED Hal, 

1st Rr, 6rge, 

Entrance Phons, 

Long Lease. 

£84,500. 

Td 01 879 1196. 

DOCKLANDS WATMMB Near 
Cm / transport. Modem. 3/4 
bed. houae. kitchen /(Uner. liv- 
ing room, study, garden. C/H 
etc. £230 POO. Tel: Ol 729 
3078. 


CENTRAL 

WIMBLEDON 

Super 2 double bedroom 
COTTAGE wait gu d> and m 
fXCTttent onto. Lounge 19 x 12, 
tatdiai/ (finer 12 x 12 . modem 
bfflhroom . £74X0 

RICHARD BARCLAY 
(Wimbledon Office) 

01 947 9141 

RICHMOND £ V 
KINGSTON 1 


RICHMOND/ 

TWICKENHAM 

Freehold detached house with 
landscaped Bteden M mfe. 
Owner mmtw abroad, 
tenures qusk sa or tented. 3 
double bedrooms, luxury ttod 
lutchgn, 2 bathrooms. 2 
taxps. Bdeprice Et78j000 or 
rental £1200 pm. 

| TeJ 01 602 0535. 


VMBUIHM HILL 

SW19 

We ere pleased m offer tins 
cwiptetBfe mod 7 bed. sons 
deaAed tfisunan property 
oftemg vety spadous accom: 3 
rocepts. shower hr bath, fee 
cellar, pas cb. maty onghoJ 
feetens. 130 ft gdn £Z29.00o Ri 
Wateon T«re« ft Deans 

01 877 7811 


I RtCBWHB PARK 

N SUFIS. 

fl Qua Batfeteteptaa Gate. 

B SiftMtei Tutor awtoMiw an 
ffl wm kxtan Sfec mm om ? 

II te uuh »i aar odn bekng onto/ 

U «o paft. </5,fate. 2 MB. W3 

II Hun, mrnmr. cap efts. 

D SDK W h* (Ale we Ottos pom- 

| 01-384 1257 CT) 

VHJUMK. Character Edwardian 
house. 5 bed. 2 bath. 3 recep. 
double garage, partly wafied 
landscaped garden. Ota contra! 
hearing, recently renovated, 
dose io common and moo*. 
£279.000. Txl 01 946 1324. 

mne EXCELLENT decorative 
order. 4 bed.. 3 reccps. ruby 
modernised, end terrace, so 
CH. convenient for an services. 
£ 110.000 ono for quick talc. 
Teh OI 642 1833 


NMER PARK MAIL 2 doable 
bed purpose baflt art. Garaoe. 
Nor PMrMt Line. £66.960. 
Tel. Ol 789 4735 alter 6 ora. 

TOWN AND COUNTBV CjM Of 
terrace lawn bouw tn Ham 
avertooUng wafer meadows. 5 
bedrooms, gdn. «e £90000 
Tel 01-940 at 13. 01-363 9276. 

tWifinHi swig Top floor 
studio apartment auertngstm- 
ny easy to maintain 
accammodatfero close to tho 
common, an semes, studio 
room. flUea KUrtven. bathroom. 

Gascoune-Pees Ol 947 7722. 

STJMAItCAJtCTS Twickenham. 
Cdwardbm 2 bed terraced 
house, upstairs hathroom. Ai- 
trartive snail garaen. large 
rooms Wen arranged accom- 
odation. GCH. 6 mins rtver 
£84.950 ror oufek safe. Teh Ol 
677 0644 day 892 0914 eves. 

CIOS WICK tM intenor dsslunM 
nnc 3 bedroomed house tn 
metduatve private dneiop- 
meni F/hoia. £225.000. T«3 
01 747 0920 tl/ 724 6142 w. 

PROPERTY TX) LET 1 
LONDON 1 

■KMMOHD. Three Bedroom roc 
appL Two recaps Fully fur- 
nuned- V dor to Htchnaond 
Part. Co let. £226 pw. tod HW 
and CH. TM! 01-948 8964 (w/t 
or eves 5 pm - 12 pro). 

COUNTRY PROPERTY | 



BERKSHIRE | 

| BUCKS | 



MAIDENHEAD 

Large det Farrtty 
Home. Select aiWe- 
sac. 2 mins M4 & 

Town Centre. 2 Recep, 
KH/ B’fast rm, 4/5 
Beds. Bath. Gas CH. 

Gge. V» acre 
landscaped gdns. 
Offers around 
£160,000. 

Tel (0828) 21336 

HEW: 

THREE OMLY 

preosrtM todt to lexwnjG 

epeofestm. « oeefroan*. 

*ss®z afflsr 

I UWdanMRL 

Pbonosote agents 

VBWONWfSE 

(8296)431458 

CML1EBB Delightful UfTteetd 
carings to fine podnon with 
m«(y nnf views. BrJnces 
Rtoboroush 2 mfles. Central 
London 40 mins. SrilliN rotten. 
UKtoen/dfeer. 2 bedrooms, 
bathroom. 12011 URKfl. CH. 
freehold £49300. Phene 
08444 7381 Sun inemaiur Ol- 
722 2855 ewes. 

HURST, bi vtllaoe, end of bar. 3 
beds, uuuty rm. Utchen. 
feimge, dining rm. sao ft gdn 

oieriooUng UcWt. Twyford 3 

mfles. Paddlnoton 36 mtm. 
£64.950. Evos 0734 341412. 

OLD A8KBSHAM 17th com COO 
in conservation area. Oak 
nemo, ige inglenook- 3 beds. 2 
reccps. o« Mne ml tom. sep 
wc. Igo utifji.-’ Sttl [KUig pafao 
gdn. GCH. £<10.000. 02403 
4290 eves/nraetentfe 

wnemsoR. Ghrowcisr virtortan 3 
tori todat- ngnpedhftically 

modernised. Gas CW. Doubto 
garage Garden. £135.900. 
Walk Thames. (0733M62309 





33 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 
COUNTRY PROPERTIES 





TADWOFSThr SURREY 



An impressive develdptneni al only £i« 4 bed'oemeri 
rie la cried houses. Tradiuonailv buih toahighstanddritititwo 
aniactiuo styles in a mature wooded setting 
2 '3 reception looms, kitchen Er utiltry room with Regency 
sivfc units, iusinv bath and ^houieroam. double garage with 
electrically opetated doors, numerous Qualify re'merients 

Shewhoosa open each day except Tues. lOam-Jpm. 

PiTCOS from Cl 80.000 

th .i-.'imW’'. • nil r. A..-'. :. - I. ■ ... 


Gfeeson Homes Ltd.. Haredon House. London Road 
North Cheam. Surrey SM3 9BS 
Telephone 01-6444321 


glEESDn 


A great deal for 1986^b 


Octiigon art; prepared to niter substantia! 
discounts ion prices I Mod holnu t to pnicniial 
bu>cr\ who can e\chjn*<o coniracis or mo\ e imo 
one of our superb 5 bciinmni detached houcs 
i\n the follow ing 2 seleeiud deselopmenis. 
hv /be- end of jyw». 

GlrnltciulfH Ri\r. RfiWU’ Ri\nt. LfJtluriifoJ. 
Surrey. Sluwlnuiw fjvn litim-.rpmeu'ryjuy. 
Ttltphivw LtwherliftiJ 38625 7 
£2ti5jUWlnvhuLl. 

Ltftiyf Clast' off r Howell I fill (June. Chtunt Rmi J. 
Cheam. Shtwhn nv open Ham-5pw 
Friday ■MmitkiK iiietn\ne. 

Telephone 01-394 1197 (other times 01 -fetl 1531 1 . 

£245.000 uiid £255.000. 

This offer is on a stncilv tirsi come hrsi sened 
basis and applies io L *nh tuo houses 
on each sue* 

For full details contain the show. houses or 
Octagon Development's Office at 01-941 4131. 


■HI33M 


ALBION NURSERIES, 

NR. WIVELSFIELD GREEN, 

NR. HAYWARDS HEATH, WEST SUSSEX 
2.53 ACRES BUILDING LAND WITH OUTLINE 
CONSENT FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FOR SALE BY TENDER 
ClosiBg Due 14th January. 1987 
Brodmres/Tender Form from; 


Stiles Horton Ledger 


5 Master Green, Haywards Heath, 

W. Sussex RH16 4 AS Tefc(0444) 416011 


THE PERIOD PROPERTY REGISTER 

The Christmas gift that lasts all year. Hundreds of 
beautiful old arai historic homes for sals throughout the 
country month after month in one book. Favour a 
friend with a subscription this Ch ri stmas 
Telephone our Christ mas Gift Line for early despatch. 
The Historic inSiags Co 
P O Box 150, Chobham GU24 8JD 
09905 7983/6128 


ARKLEY, HERTS 




Road, offering 4 doubto fiedroems. 3 recaptions. 
- f. 3 bathrooms (2 an suite) shower room, spadout; 
_ capirai haatmg. doubto glazing throughout Urge 
doubto garage, gardens. 

£379,000 
01-888 7066 


i F/H. 
(7 di 


days) 


POUND1SFORD, TAUNTON 

HISTORIC LODGE HOUSE 

t refurbished, many features. Large lom^c. hniny 
; room, ntiliiy. 4 bedrooms, bathroom, CH- 


Bcanti 

btcbca 


Garden orchard. Situs led in mod sough! after area 


ooiy^fmUes from Taumon- MS junction. Near racecourse. 


.golf come. 

r iloeai 

Teh (0823) 42263 


LITTLE 

MARLOW 


ready Chten vAne 2 nates 

Iran Martov & 6qw*4 

baains. hgterato Btantoa. 4 
Betfe 3 naps. 2 bate, tat 
utility, age Secluded gdns. 

EISROQuatos TbI 

SOHOItS ft UHH8EKE 
0SZ84 43S3 


CENTRAL UMWi 
45 HNS. 

Brick ft nn contnr house atm ty 
harit oU stylo. MagriBca« accom. 
rtgh spec Nemenns charedar 
teanses. Total secksm. 10 area m 


Lae bnck A m ham tomno «« 6 
stufta Mtresovw f Wi. 

RAFFETY BVCKLAMD 
Onaky Hmns B4948 7843S. 


DEVON & CORNWALL 


Favoured 

vfBaree. Modernised 4/a bra 
how. 2 recess. 2 baths, fitted 
kitchen. CH. waited BE*®- 
JCS9JO0 YOU 107471 2680 


ROCK 


Com Iwuye. Three bed 

. StctuMd nUnibon. 

Ctose to OOU comae and beach . 
« £40000. Teh (0926) 

401703. 


eastancua 


ESSEX/SUFFOLK. 

Snuatsd in quiet mini 
handat, yat only one nuto 
Itom busy market town with 

tail Bnfcs to London (L'pod 
SL 75 inns}. Architect 
4 bed detached 


taffli. taun&y. doubto 
Anex suteabto tor 

to granny flat/ wait shop. 
Large garden to rear with 
open aspect £35.000. 

Tet Sodborv 

(0787) 78S3V rieur. 


SUFftoLK Luxury rerircineM 
flats and bunoatown for the ei. 
dotty Independent- Situated In 
Uw market town of 8ory St Ed- 
munas. a few imnum walk 
from local shops. A new feoh 
Ciaa dn-elopment with luxiry 
Dully fitKd mwraic kltdina in. 
dudlDg many etectriCal extras. 
One and two Bedrooms avsH- 
Mfe. Total indepenrtance wKn 
secuniy entrance phones. War- 
den on eat for emergenc i es- 
Prices from EASjOOO. Appty for 
detaiiM brochm 10 Jod 
Homos. 18a Hatter Street. Bury 
S Cdmunds. Suffolk. IP33 
IhC Td: (0864) 63364 


WE HAVE A LARGE 
SELECTION OF PERIOD 
AND MODERN 
PROPERTIES IN WEST 
SUFFOLK 
CONTACTS SWORDERS 
37 HOUIU STREET. 
SUDBURY 
StfffQLK 
6767 V b teb 


ESSEX 



■MttaMiHina'toSWItinfy 
^pefifqamii 
Prices Iron t2ZOjDB0 
FURNISHED SHOWHOME 
OPEN DAILY tl am to 5pra. 

TEL' 0277210226 


Alfred MWpine 

!kt wni 


ESSEX/SSFFILK 

Bunin 5up«fi County Rtotato. 
but mud penod afflaos. hghe9 

sttritatai fowfrtst. 2 acre «r- 
dwts am couch y mews. Wl ^ 3 
[wspnon. hltMl known /teeatos. 
reuy. 4 bettgaras. 2 oakoons, 
ftflad tem. smffliHig pool, 
^nfen. OHera nnec 

(Rpt 18176) 

H J Turner* Son 
0787 72833 


30 mams from the City. Lux- 
ury second Door apartment. 
Bedroom 14 a 14. lounge 14 x 
17. 2nd bednn. k and b. GCH. 
Carden. Superb views over 
countryside. Parktaa £&5.5oO 
Brentwood Td Ol 212 Oil* 
office hours. 


Two bed- send 


detached bunsatow. bi^soutfa 


artef area, comer plot, 
tactwd garage with own drive. 
Large wen stocked garden, 
needs Mymtt- EBlflOO 
Teln099Dj 822634 


EAST OF ENGLAND 


. Lincoln 7 mues. 
Sleaford II mtia (Fad trains to 
Kings Crossi A superb dot lam- 
Uv hse utuaied on a maimlficent 
Mol of ^ acre in trie heart or a 
conservation v-ptage. Oto CH. 
dMe guano, immec decor. 4 
bnfe. 2 rotes**, fitted kn. 
tathrm £M.eoa Carl & Lew. 
retire Praoenwe. m#, 
Street Uncoin 0622 2221 S. 


MORTGAGES 
NEEDING HOMES: 
APPLY NOW 


At Midland, we've plenty of funds 
and they're available now We won’t 
keep you hanging around for a mort- 
gage. Our rate is currently 12.5% 
(APR 13.1%)*. whatever the size of 
your mortgage. Call in to your local 
branch, and you’ll get a decision 
within a couple of days. 

We also lend up to 90% of 
valuation, and up to three times your 
income lor double joint applicants' 
combined income ». And you don't 
even have to be a Midland customer: 

We offer the same rate for endow- 
ment and repayment mortgages, and 


Any questions? 

Get u$ on our new mortgage 
‘Hotline’ — on 0742 761231 
during office hours. Well be 
talking as well as listening. 

Written details available from 
Customer Information Service, 
Freepost, Sheffield Si 1AZ. 
•Interest rates are variable but are 
correct at time of going to press. 


'We !l make you fee! 
more at home.' . 


well give you a mortgage certificate B 


to prove you've got the funds on tap. 
It all adds up to a better mortgage. 


m MIDLAND 
MORTGAGES 

■ M id L 11 id Bonk pic tHlSti 




f 



House hunting? 

Lets talk Swedish. 



Tie Kronor in Svcnj^aby. the Swedisn wiiagein Peterborough, is an 
ciClifineflevdOfnrent of fedl awwisn houses 
They have everything the most tastuftous Swede could went - 
tacupt me cow. cd« Swedish vtimers. But ihe houses have got an 
the insulation and inpJe glazing to 
keep vou waim wrthout onppimg 
beauigbiUs. 

Orty 50 minutes by tram to 
London. From 1115,900 


Cad Hunters now 


NHunters 1 


Tel: 0733*45131 ... 

New Homes Office. Cowgate. Relertwrough. 



WEYBRIDGE 


CLOSE TO ST GEORGE'S HILL - A MAGNIFICENT 
RESIDENCE SET IN TWO THIRDS OF AN ACRE OF 
SECLUDED GARDENS, WITH NEWLY CONSTRUCTED 
INDOOR HEATED POOL COMPLEX. 


The superbly appomad accom roefudes: 5 bedrms. master with 
ensutte dressing rm and shower/bathmi. further luxury bathnn 
and ensutte shower rm, sumptuous oak paneled lounge, dng rm. 
btolard rm. b'last rm. excelent oak fitted Wt uUMy, pool kune, 
with staff/guest gum indudes bedim, ensuite bathnn. fitted krt. 
ch, dtee ggB. mth tong dive approach and 2 parking bays. 


£585,000 FREEHOLD SOLE AGENTS 
1 Copp & Co, New Maiden. Tel: 942 9211 


THE DOWER HOUSE 

BOURTON -ON-WATER 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE 

BdBKMiy tHiowad and modernised, the Dower House b a fine Sratte 2 
total propety set in the grnnis of a recently rasftnd Manor House « the 
Cotswolds. Tl*s defegtidid house otters exaflert accommodam 
Ernrann Porch. Entrance Haft, aoataoom. Drawing Room, tUmng 
Room. Kitchen. 2 bedrooms en Srter. 1 further BedrotHD and Snaly 
- wth fufiier Guest Sate or In-Law Acctxniudahon, 1 Bedroom. 
Lounge, Bdhroom. Ongmd Rropteces rave been retained, with all 
Stone Hutton Windows with leaded rtfas. 

(Wen nwted for the freehold n the region of TlBStiOO. 
Vtewng anaageneett: Tstophns Day 01-438 0689 

EsMtag 8451-22818 


John 
German 

WILTSHIRE - RAMSBURY 



Between Mariborough end Hungerfenl A dwmbig bstod cottage 


near wdego centra. 3 
bathroom. Excefiant 


Ite glai 


utfitty and ctoeka, 3 bed. 
and pretty garden. 


Join Bonn. Rwstary, Wlb. SHB 2PD. T«t (8672) 20691 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 


Knight Frank 


M —cc stewMwt 

An tapoaing CotewoM 
stone riouee wHh exceflant 
getdene and vtowa 

3 good reception rooms. 6 
bedrooms. 3 Bathrooms, mne 
cedar. Sefi-conomed Rd w(h 2 
bedrooms, bathroom and 
Udwn. Healed switnrrong pool, 
doubto and angle ranges. 
Stem gardens and pounds 
Abate 3K acme 
Otters mWted araond CB5J00 
Apply CireK ester 
(0285) 69771 

(SMG8/I3GB3) 


LISTED COTSWOLD 
BCTBEAT 

VW «W MM MOW. ora 
KSD grant B rated, pwtof orgni 
mwo nousa Hear Su*«a4M. 

Won ene Bwtne. trtv in ton 

Iran London Lndy ean ii fs te i 

««n cBcy pUc. tew tenrfitwss 

at been n ra 4 
ncMri i 
EI15J0W I . 

T * 


STH COTSWOLDS Sradoor del 
houw EH. imiiiac 3 d/MU 
Lounge 6 d/rm- Lux tciiti £ klL 
Cakrrn/utll D/#anw. 9h an 
undinMl gdiH Pan views. 
£97.000. Td; 046984 9601 - 


HANTSJDORSET, £ 

IX).W. 


WINCHESTER. 


Detached (anWy house, c 1850. 
Urge rooms. Dr aw i n g room, sun 
roooi. tfieAg noanutti bnaktetn 
room, study, ktttai (gu cooker), 
ufltev room . wc. tergo cefers. 4 
tasebfltto.Jbetos.MGCH, 
Mdedsaroan. range and 
stmsng 3/3 cars. 

Offers C190JB8. 

Tel Islay edy 6962 63919. 


ABBAS COMBE 

- 6 mdos ham Sherttome. 20 
ndrrtiial prqefbes S ton 
coweraon m a detgiUy urape 
setting, larru posts, archways, 
eottStes etc. 3 4 4 beftird houses 
from £52^00 Ift £60.950. Ctontt 
nay choose Mtehen & bathrm 
fittings All anwArties to nearby 
Tempfemmfae. Contac t 
VALARETTE LTD 
02S8 820414 


IlftllRLMUl Wltb taKOfne. Perf- 
Od Secluded lawn Bungalow 
with garden and adjacent of- 
fleen N.C Hants. £I93K. 
Tri:0420 83366 


ME or WNUnr Property. Com- 
plete reveraoe contact 
CH CASEY & JEFFERY ol New- 
port o| count! i09B3> 535241. 


VEUTfeoanw-New con v er si on 6 
MOicTb large hut Oats overlook- 
ing ihotra. 2 beds., g/e/ri. Orem 
£41.760 0983 852359 


VEMTMOtt - Upfew opportunity. 
Superti 6 twd riouw Hib 6 Holi- 
day A pw» overtook Inn sea. Can 
sm- £245.000 0983 862259 1 


HEREFORDSHIRE, 
WORCS, & SHROP 


HF1HJPBP. 81one faiiulHJiBO. 3 

bods, bathroom, fitted Mfehor. 

dmttio room and lounoo with 

French windows onto iruonUl 

coni views, deer and pheasant. 

£89.950. Tot 0«3 79303 


W U Bg STO MWE Stonroort 
L 'txav Severn, a maonUKenl 
country reddenco. pari of 
widen H over ZOO years old. 
Lovely country wrano 2 
reccps. Uichen. 3 beds. both, 
shower rm. garaoe- approx, 'a 
acre garden. Offers baaed an 
£115000. Andrew GranL 
Worcester <09051 24477. 
M8IP U I1 IL 


CHARMKQ Queen Anne country 
cottage 5 mb souin of Ashford. 

Superb dbl ggo with fer OMtCe 
above 4 beds. 3 recepv. 3 web. 
beauinul uichen and bautrm. 
ingtrnook. exposed beams. 
Healed vunmniine pool. 1 : acre 
gdn £145.000 April enmpfe- 
lion. Tet:i033373) 2391. 


MIDDLESEX 


STAMWOM: WLL immacnlaie. 
newly decorated, hath. Morn- 
ing. 4 beds. 3 recen. semi. New 
built tn uicnen. new carpets, 
oarage- Prime position 
£l3asoo. Evenings and week- 
ends 01 964 9829. 


T gUU WI Q TQH Oegant Vtrt del 
dble from house tn one third 
acre. 6 beds. 4 large recces. Lux 
Mt/break. Cellar. Gas CH. DMe 
garage Period charm 
£230.000 mid. Tel: Mlkstone 
& Corns Ol 077 1 166 


unite 3 Storey S bed tsuntty 
house of character, currently 
wed as 3 S/C flats, prime 
postton. easy access oeu ptcc. 


cent, main line. SMO and M2S 
lOOn garden. View anytime. 
£160X100. Teh 0896 6S7469 
after 6pm. 


MIDLANDS 


Detached 4 bedrooms/ex 
house, secluded garden. 5 mbm 
driving to centre, school taclfe 
dee. £82.800. Tel: 021 744 73 
33 after 10.00 am. 



Hampton & Sons 


OXFORDSHIRE, 

BAMPTON 

• ds ia pft id( law an i altrocfiiw 
period state tm sBag* tom 
MMta lw totetoi Age d 


Ehlnnoi htotqr. enttanz hteL 3 
louiAuii rooms, htchen. More 
room, doskioom. consnatoty. 4 
bedrooms. Iw PiOom. we. 2 stbc 
rooms lam wa fed gadms. 
finge. Gas tad central hsfeng. 

Eacttent taoify taao*. 

00m torftot Is tea roatoe M 
I13MW FmtaU Sail 
(man, 


MU Stead 
(UMdshta 


m uu. 


FHMshan. Fine tastefully con- 
verted slih i fn . IV act I id village 
location. 2 receps. sun lounge. 
Id) clwo. bfaot rm. 3 beds. bath. 
V: acre of gardens. 2 riiitiirn 
lack room. Offers bawd on 
£99.950. Andrew Gran I . 
Worcester <.0906) 24477. 


HERTFORDSHIRE 


■MEATHAMPSTEAD. 

Modem 4 bed. Rural Die 


Becepaons. etvswe ehoenr. 
OouOU garage- GCH. doUde 
ramB.Camyws mbMi.Law 
oufeawgs. Gmm landscaped 
gantai (MM Soronj. 3 nb 
npeodm fCdy Ss inkiak 7 eds 


HMpMdenfCdytoeWAI 
M25/ Ml. Cl 48 HOD. 

Tel; 8438 832761. 


i s.w. or Huchm 

17m Century property. 4 beds. 

2 baiM. 3 Keeps, fee (arm 
house Bl wflti boa. hard tennis 
courts, magnlflcenl vfews. I'fc 
acres £346.000. CXJNNllLS 
OF LETCHWORTH 68527) 


MOSr cast! C Cottage in Her! 
For (fabric. 3 tMdrmg. 3 bMrirm. 
Large recep. Pretty sheltered 
garden. Garage, t nuie M26 
and station. 16 miles London. 
£129,996. Rodlen--092 76 441 1 


MJSMCV MEATH 12 mfles central 
London. Green beJL standing in 
apprattmalely 1 acre. toauUftd- 
ly refurritetiM Ettwardlan 
house. 4 beds. 2 bade. 3 imcpb. 
UKtien/ breakfast room, de- 
tached double oaraoe 4- office/ 
names room. E315JOOO reduced 
ror nutefc sale 01 9S0 XI 19 

MR to ABE Delightfully secluded 
accessible hamlet refurbished 

period property. 4 bed. 3 mm. 
1/3 acre. CM. garaocs 
£176.000 T«: 0920 870436. 

UNIQUE proparty secluded 
among outet uraorooi rountry- 
afafe. with atamcit ana paddock: 
yet only 6 mins from M25 ft 
Ml. Klnra Langley 65478. 


KENT 


KENT COAST 


Superb 4 Bedroomed 
detached fiouse. 2 minutes 
front quiet sandy beach, 3 
recapbona. bMtey kitcrien. 
with afl appliances Future 
stone fireplaces, full gas 
G.H. afl carpets and curtains. 

£95,000 

TeL [0843} 295738 


CORK TO SROADSTAKS. See 
trie unimaiB h, forory ■ our 
small exclusive- devetopmem of 
brand new apartm en ts close to 
the sea. Ring Today On (08431 
303631 or (03271 720661 ID 
4 Tit nkt Tudor me. London 60 
mins. Ooic M2. M25. Eac 
shop* ft vpowi* (Sid. dale ft aaU) 
4 betfa. 2 nun. u too m ktL o ch. 
w. gdn £89 JOO. Medway 
376736 


iJackson-Stops 
bjrr.. & Staff 


oaroRp sHiRR/ 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE 
Burford 2 miles. 

Sopcrbfy caownod Listed 
CorawuUbuB. 

? reception mnois, 5 bedrooms. 
2 botiuttoens. Courtyard, tome 
boxes, ankn. 

Offers isV^toa oC£33Sjm. 


‘XSS, 


Bouse, 

r.t« 


NR BURFORD 


Interior designers elegant 
conversron ot a turreted stone 
chapel in a lowly CotswoM 
viage. 3 magrof. toe recaps, 
b'tess/Wt 4 beds. 2 tux baths. 
Smell coach rise and gdns. 
Over El 20000- 
Sote agents. MaBams, 
St Michael Street Oxford 
(0865) 241466 


NR tMPCtotT. In oulrt downland 
vllfeae. (40 mins paddtnoton. 8 
mfa M4. dnU M40/M2SJ. I6th 
CMilury lhalchM cottage. Four 
beds. Lounge- Kitchen. Dining 
room. Beams. Large open log 
Itreolaee. Garaoe- '•> acre Oil 
fired CH. Freehold. Cl 42.000. 
Td: Itxasai B60766 


DctigMIuI 

cottage In rlvmlile village, pri- 
vate tranquil setting, lounge, 
k 11 / dinner, a beds, bathtm. wp 
«c. gdns. ggc. Maaay refurh. 40 
mins London. £63.600. 0236 
31616 after 6.30 pm ft w/ends 


3 BOLES SOUTH OF BANBURV 
Modem, (ocecuuue focrobed. de- 
tached property set in 1/5 acre. 
Many tnirnstma teanirK. 
£86.000 TO 0296 81 1658. 
09*6 32S2S ext 4209. Tayfor. 


t MLES South of Bantiara>. Mod- 
em. executive lom-ocd. 
detached property set In 1/5 

acre Many tnfefesiuvg feolures. 

£86,000 Tel 0296 81165a 
0926 32S25 eH 4209. Taylor. 


KMOO STOME COTTAGE 3 
rauw Banbury. 3 due beds, 
largo fitted Ut/dinfng room, tit 
Ung room. baih. CH. gdn. 
£60X100 029575 8393. 


STRATFORD UPON AVON 5 mb 

south. 16th Gen UUKtird cot- 
tage in roil picturesque hamlet 3 
nun A34. is min mainline HR. 
London I or 36 mm Spacious 
luxurious act. 4 tfijfe Beds all 
wilh filled furniture, vanity 
units. 2 superb eauipped bains. 
I tm suite. 300 Inge- ipe Siting 
rm. f/f Oak kttth. 3 Inglenook 
nrepfecea. wealth of oak] Mams 
ft flagstone firs. Cw 2/3 cars, 
smi cottage ndn. Offers m est- 
eem £100.000 f/h. Full details 
060 882 473 anytime 


SCOTLAND 


8US8ESS, WYKE 
■ ORKHETH 


Fully hww bI . — 
unL 60 aero tool ton®. 

3 bod taroHwiiMr (da e . 

OutouMngs lite. new fern) on 
Bcreettota unto taawL wtojuswl 
semces (ana bom nritfuiMing 

rJlDUMU. 

Kkt&SSsul 


Cootiawd ea qttl 




34 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


OVERSEAS PROPERTIES 


RENTALS 


Caamaepimstbc<k)oisto}^aMlJ*pnttiffOasOddatBeadt 
derdt^ataO.Sa&iagbasbeea^jimdloatbiezT^ebi^cstlMssSde 
standards with air amdiinming fatfr aptpped k&bens. spuncux 
mri&JkmdniOm&^b&iermttowrtoiUiigllKpoalsmd 
spe&aat&tr sab- tnptccti gardes. This onbstanding . Medhtrr-jncvH 

wt^gfflrnsl&Tiifa&^-^a m rq^barte&mmos 
a*ta golden rat of oar \ uftt* Onto Jet Sob 
best beeches at tour / \Oootsap. 



PROPERTIES LTD, 


36 North Street, URton. 

W Salisbury. Witts. SP2 OKU. 

IMAGINE A VILLA 

«Ab marine Boom, Gothic arete*, deader htcheo, 
b rea tht ak ing views, secluded swimming pool « 


Wehave tor Sea" most beautiful luxury yfla wffl eeparata 
nunra ii ra X set in la own private mounds. El 25.000 
Seldom does a propartyj rf& BS quaWy cotne cm to 

Member For further detatis of tMs and o ur Ml 

Q range of propertie s Contact: (0722} 

743584 

Spanish Office: 010-34 

ABOPA buv with confidence 


- ABOPA 80 


Spanish Otfkn 0103451 320 201 
IV WITH CONFIDENCE. 


f \ TURN YOUR 
HOLIDAY INTO 
/ftci YOUR BEST 

, f ; INVESTMENT 

Luxury apartments to rent or to 
CTp^rtO M PUERTO BANOS. 

, ruci w Swimming pools, gardens. Jacuzzi, 
i 1 sauna, gymnasium, squash, paddle 
tennis. T.V„ phone, fax, 24 hour reception, maid 
service, parking. I min from beach. Nearby tennis and 
pdt. 

01-630 5065/6/7: London Office. 
78-38-00/05/06: Marbdla Office (Spain). 



EXHIBITION 

of properties on Spain's glorious Costa Blanca 
FR! 5TH, SAT 6TH, SUN 7TH DECEMBER 
AT THE SPANISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
5 CAVENDISH SQUARE, LONDON W1 



* 1 BED FROM £12^75 
TO: 

★ 4 BED at £64250 


FOR INFORMATION WRITE TO: 

MARISAL, 130 KING STREET, LONDON W6 
OR TEL: 01-741 4860/9. 

"COME LIVE WITH US M CIUDAD QUEZADA" 



COSTA DEL SOL SPECIALISTS 


Use our years of experience to guide you. 
Complete choice of villas, townhouses. 
apartments. Weekly four-day inspection 
trips £75 per person in January. 


Cc'ciir brochure: 

IStRiA.fi PROPERTY ASSOCIATES 
*3 Rochester St. Chatham. -Cert Tei: 0634 -01672 


COTE D’AZUR, ANTIBES 


EteffDtfapalmen((6Bsqinetres.727sa.ft) l ^Rien(25si}fnl. t»race]l5 
so m), subsondal reception and bedroom, tearoom. fateften, garage, ceto. 
qua dose to beaches. 

Ft 680-000 

Thomas Watts ft Co, SoOcAors, 19 Kensington Cftureb 
St, Kenstogton, London W8 4LT, 01-837 0996 
Staffing Eat Agents. 18 Rue Notre Damn. 06 Came*. 
TdS3 39 39 00, Tei« 461 023. Fax S3 68 48 99 


ANDORRA 

A ampfett tup of No uuriu» homes tt r o M ONW this tmxfcr tea ww tax 
town. flflwtewB (ram ElBjfc Octets tram £SQJB& to tSfUDfi. 

Wrtw stag ad sums an. Unixofate! 

ESTEPONA 

■ Com del Sol A sort tawjr dewtoenvat of jpartmBfe. Mv reread ad wfl> 
dna twrii ns Press horn as Utte as tSSBS. tattaxses to EIX4BL 
Comer Gesador IK lid. 25 ttacrti Sl London SWI OBJ. 

Teh 01-222 3183 (24 bis) 

Spoc>* Motor Intention rats mliM non! 

Sole Agents tor Gestandor (Antnra) 


GENERAL 



LfiJfZAJWIE from £29.500 
finance from UK or Spansh Ba*s 
at bigMy axnpatmue rates. Figtts 
an ngea. 

— ISI,, l^i, L,, J 

IxUk W8sanoret5na 
int e rn ati o na l. 

30-33 Sou* Strea, 
Cfnchester. 

Sussex. 

0243 773112 


Property parIMfe. vfts. tpts. 
fatnhouses tor ranowtion. ML tie. 
Pnces Iran £25D00 - £250 JOa 
Campreheisw sevica free 
of charge. 

For broctoe tot 

(0925) 411082/30302 
(24 to) 


BALEARICS 



Contact: Unmac. 091-268 4177 


CANARY ISLANDS 


“l CAN PERSONALLY 
RECOMMEND EL BOTANKCr 
BECAU5E1 HAT MADE TT 
MY PERMANENT HOME 
Ta Tto y Wwad. Oarrnn af the 

RrafitebndBr-ttMLtotera 

051-3369906 

IbwMHwbEUWO 

RectoUijwnf-MDOO 


(WUItT BLANDS Enptlfrfi buUd- 
«r offers land and construction 
on Uv boaubful bU dr La Pal- 
ma: Information: AjHutado ai. 
Tkanxlr, Towrllv Canarlas. 


CANARY UNK 
TENERIFE SOUTH 

Property portfolio - Los 
Clmsuanos. Las AmencasA 
Casa Del Sttoao. Pntxs fmm 
CtSJWL Or the excVim San 
Miguel goff development. Luxury 
vte/ apartments. 
Comonhensiw sovee free of 
Charge Telephone for timduex 
KQ5 30312 (24 boras}. 


FRANCE 


BEAUTIFUL ALPS 


I Milll II M 


Hill lop village: Upper 
masonatfe. 25 ndes Antibes. 
3 beds, lo unge. fcnehen - ting. 
luUuuuir, shower room an 
suite, balcony, patio with 
ma g nffice re raws Gorge - Du - 
Into. Offers £50,000 neg. Tet 
01 455 5564 evmngs. 




Crown Marine 
Apartments 


MALLORCA 

The most desxable seaside 
property in Ktecas. Crown Ma- 
rine enjoys a sheltered 
southern aspect located be- 
tween the two nmor tradition 
hotels at tfes lowy resort. 
Minutes 1mm Palma itself. 

Crown Marine is also dose to 
naff courses, tonne courts and 
Oraches. Al Crown Mama ytti 
(bus a choice of two and three 
bedrooms, large Wing rooms 
with utforgeftobto views, two 
bathrooms, iftted lolchen and 
private parking. In addition 
there are two pods, set n 

E iftcent landscaped 

Marine the ideal invest- 
ment m resort tong. 


lAfatine 

<y* 

Alex Ned & Co 
116 Kensington Church St 
London W8 4BH. Tel (01) 221 


MHBMKIS Cool muded comi- 
tr» ootuge A beds 6 pool. 
£100.000 Sandy Lane Beocti S 
minutes. Tel Bartudo* 809 42S 
0611. UK* 0323 613871 


CYPRUS 


emu Property Feel cheated 7 
Contact us now. tPJ>. Assoc. 
as Petri or House. London wio 


IB-BHWWSKE Town cen- 
tre. 19th cmnxy mansion. 20 
rooms on two levels. adtataUnp 
o<l ices and a courtyard also 
available. Contact Madam 
MatMeo. In Oantauds. SL 
CanadeL 13610 Le Puy Sle. 
Reoarade. France. 


WVl tjiA. L ux ury mted one 
bedroomed apartment. Exclu- 
sive complex- Two pools. 
Ten nta. Bowls Garage. Laepo 
ctrilar. Resident Concierge Low 
"“tophi*!. F/H. Tet 10639) 


FRANCE * A0 repots - cotia9es - 
chateaux (ram £10.000. Fi- 
nance available. Brochure. 
V motel Ltd Ot-485 2733. 


PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 

Kototly fees it betteii 

CarngnAoBvi ranu a t iMiyp to- 
ernes from £35X00 - £300000. 

Fa IndtR. phone or who. 
(12), StBgbBB Baacrofl 



m ALBUFEHIA. Algarve. 1. 2 A 
3 bed apartments and villas 
from £29.730. 30 mins Faro 
airport, fun management ser- 
vice. various arocnUlea Inc 

tennis courts, swimming pool 
restaurants etc. Inspection 
nights arranged. Fun details 
from. Leonard D Morgan Over- 
seas. 8 Victoria Terrace. 
Newbridge. Gwent. Contact Pe- 
ndope Lewis. 10*95) 243200- 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 


SOMERSET & AVON 


BATH Lansdown Crescent. Free 
hold. Flist floor. Modernised 
period apartmeni - ruled inch 
en ■ magnificent views . entry 
phone ■ Gas CM. C63.500. Tet 
Ol 736 3120 levenlngsi. 

INI BRISTOL: Character f amity 
home. 2 recepx. 4 dUe beds. 2 
baths, friayrm. GCH. swimndug 
pool. acre <udn. views 
£106.000 Tel: 10*04) 613361 



SURREY 


WOLDINGHAM. 

New 5.500 sq It detached 
property in private road. 6 
bedrooms. 3 bathrooms. 4 
reception rooms, luxury rifled 
kitchen. Indoor swnrnmg pool & 
tesra axnotet sal in 1 acre with 
exrertwnal vms. Close to M25, 
6R Vet 35 mns. £465.000 

0883 712160 (T) 


w IHVElt THANKS In II acres, 
fulty rurnlancd house, easy 
reach Heidey. Oxford and 
Reading. 3 Bedrooms, AG A. 
CH. exceOenl dd mevW c help 3 
mornings, garden help. 
Telephone (Oil 688-1587. 


raiMLETrS mins walk 10 station. 

22 mins to Victoria/ London 
Bridge. 10 mins M25/M23. a 
bed*. 2 baths, detached cottage 
style house baching woodland 
in acre PM. GOL oarage 
£20&XMC). Tel: 0I-M6 ZTTSS 


wm 


_L H 


1 ; 


firtf 13* C Soup a ret gopaty 
xnnrediKly nmd ham 2 cot- 
ops m vn Ktome nnl dtoge. 3 
b«s SL Sep [tag ttfeik 
Opedaes. Saafed n prase read 
isang v> Sussex Doom, kfyto 
wcetand ma a staacus mre- 
mrt hone. £89 SOB no ofea. 
(0273) 26833. 


TTTmnrr 


Rra advert. Country house wth 
Grate mutor gate houses bat 2 
batic 3 ncopt Mceflem Idtch: 2 
cioakK woe. Chanting garden etc. 
OHera &50.000 frcehtM. 

Sole agrate Taylor 8 Tester, 
3 Nogs SL 
East Gmstead 
(0342) 24478 


CKOWMJR5T Sussex New ar- 
r hi led ItradWonan desta 
ctulel bungalow. Three double 
bedrooms, lounge/dtner. two 
ha Ih rooms. Double garage. 
Manawtale mnlecta £1 20.000 
TeL 042483 272 lEvenings.i 


CHOKS CHTU-Edge of 
Ashdown forest. ExonMonai 
half Victorian country house. 2 
acres iPaddorkai 3 recent. « 
beds, lust TO gxdal. Fid] Octal la 
082571 2S97/2678 £148.000 
Must Sefl ducounl on rmd sale. 




PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


GREECE 




POHTO HYDflA VILLAGE 
Gateway to toe Unis 
limey B*4m vdbs wah mama 
md irawra aradabto. lull 
freetnid tide frtxn £23JXXL 
Wtamer WWte Ltd, 

177 London Rd, 

01-546 9465 


EPIDAVROS 

Eastern Petaponnese 
New 1 & 2 O edrooreefl 
Quality Apartments 
Smoi Coastal Resort 
Magnifice rt&wlronm ent 

Frorn^^OT^MO*^ 

ROBERT COMINS 
TEL: (0799) 22641 


COSTA BLANCA 




BuW a unique home d ytu 
own desiffi. in fastiianabie 
Ofiva. Panoramic views of GuU 
of Valanca ra d mo trtalns. 30 
mns from airport dose to 
beach and Old Town. ExcLsrve 
to Sablo WHi adiua l PWs 
from £438 and detached 
wffas from £20/100. Legd 
Protection Fret 
Details front 

SaUo NfenaSBBal lid. 



ffiVSEr. WH.TS. rtnom Kara 
Cang e 3 beds. 2 reaps, good gdn. 
courtyards. dUe gge £500 pent nd. 
B tertZES 1RL1L Ige Famhouse. 
A beds. 2 mops, axetfm! gdres. 3 
gges. auttxikknqs rid qjtviQ pgdd- 
dcS avai. £500 pan ind. 
lUnLBOnpUBH. WILTS. M Coent- 
iy House. 5 beds. 2 mgs. ige adm. 
ordwd. dbto gge. £650 pan nd. 

DENNIS POCOCK A 


' i R, Til 


TEL: 

DEVIZES (0380) 3451 
00 3959 


PROPERTY WANTED 


■OUSE WANTED In goad etas 
area near Central London. !4o 
ablection la ousting parttsl ten- 
ancy. proving ground mid lint 
floors ore available Up to 
£200.000 offered. Tei Mrs Tay- 
lor 1021) 706 6899. 




SLYM CEonoe VALLEY 

Llangoum. Excellent country 
house Occupying srfflBfnj pca)- 
bon wtlh 7 acres. Fun CH. Bit 1 
y y'- rth rm. mod hlL 2 recepo. LOW START Manages/ 
J I Ota* lor.anyjforpo 


2 bedroom cm- 
Ita- Convenient access m 
nwtaways. Excellem halUar 
ar weekend retreat- £34 OOO 
Tet 09016 as s. 


gages lor any purpose win 
visit Ml chart Evans 01-244 
8570 or 0272 296408 anytime 


PWTTTfrpf I 


Very fine villa on coast, 
uitntHtuptBd vww. 
mapuficant situation. 3 bed, 2 
bath. Easy pasBiiity to 
wend, large plot Price fufly 
tuiKhed.E300.000. 
Ring: 01-581 5043 
Separate float House 
Arafebte 


TORRIEVEJA AREA 

Costa Blanca. Spela Villas, 
apartments, chalets for sale 

from £10.000 to £60, 00a 

We reprasent only butiders 
of good repidB. 

Free advice. 
CostawDa Ltd, College 
Farm, PufeBdiR, Bedford. 
Tet (0525) 718123. 




PROPERTIES 

VSaa a apartmonta « Casta Dei 
Sol. Casta Bianca a Portugal. 
PRICES FROM £12,000 

to raxMxn 

SotMiiSsed inspection flights 
and francos arranged. 

TEL 01-504 2176 


CENTRAL BRIGHTON - Fjtlwxi- 
oble area. Pretty Victorian 
cottage. CH. Two double beds. 
New kitchen. Sun roof. WaUrd 
aarden- Price: 164 . 9 Sa Tel: 
Narthwood. Mkklx 26966 . 


SEA VICWS-18 min from Lon- 
don. 2 ram [ram sea. grade 2 
UWM house. Hastings old town. 
6 bedroom s plus seg flat. 
£80-000 Tel: 0424 426203 

HOVE doe Iron! VKfonan X 
•tar • ariJage. £70.000. T HOS- 
KINS: 01 730 9937 


A UNIQUE 

CpovmM Dunn Anne Bern sdnh 
of xn acre Entrance lobb*. 
Etaswe vwm room wnti Mmi 

RtaJS^°rf m * r S 1 " U “ urv Mdl - 3 

o 1 ™* AL " l ® DUe 

Gaia pr. P antxng aenrarilon for 
swimiihiiy poo) 4 tennis court 
Superb rural posinon. Now 
umargonp renmanon Offers in 
exeess ol E 140.000. Cnunlu 
ftopBlrw 0722 742828. y 


SOUTH OF ENGLAND 


THE ENGLISH 
COURTYARD 
ASSOCIATION 

Mats ytw raoremen icnto mtti are 
xid raretoa to oaM. You mt a 150 
tor Jose oi am Eogksti CcuJratl 
coitagB and Hats. traAonal n tut 
jxl layauL AndyUncaapfu aid 
®W* o fry maxxnsn pnvan. 
corre maiia aaO w tepwxl a ic a . ted 
your anal o ivottaed 
rttexxi From £79AU. Dexon. 
Bate. Nortiarts. Sonwj*. 

Ft*l Oeafo from 



A 

SWISS COTTAGE 
LONDON 

TODAY . 7th DSC 

11am -5pm 


Tri 1 1 1 3 • ‘c r W\ W«TV , 


0379 506555 


COSTA DEL SOL 

Malaga id Eaepoia. We can 
offer wide isue of new 
properties near beach or in 
land. £23.000 - £250000- 

Regular in t|Wtinn ftigfrfc 

Par bnttmt Mfiytow 
IJ-551 6825, 

Casa Epw LH 
• Carewdo Haa, 43a Hifk SL 
Baddnidc. Set*. Emx. 


LONDON'S LEADING RESIDEN ) IAL LETTING AGENTS 
offering that personal & professional service. . . 

Quraishi Constantine 


CHELSEA CLOISTERS SW3 

Busneasman's pafadao in S. 

Kenarwwn. Ewepiional 1 bed apart- 
mam n tins exclusive complex, 
immaculately fur nishe d, ensuto bath, 
fuly a pphanced kitchen. 24 tvs porter- 
age. maid service, cable and sat TV, 
worldwide con sra Scation- Co. let 
£300 pw 

HANOVER TERRACE HOT1 

Charming 2 bed mews cottage nh 
heart otltegems ParK surrounded by 
private gardens. Reception with 
origi n al freptaea. If kitchen, bath, 

P ”*’ 9 ' l ° n9 OSO'pw 

TORN HOUSE SW3 

Superior 2 bethopmed am floor 
apa rtment in luxury block new S oane 
Square. Beaudtutiy fcgreshed. Short 
walk to river and gardens, reeep/ 
tSrrino, fufly mpfianced kitchen, bath 
wtti shower. Co tet 

£275 pw 


ROSEMQQR STREET S«3 

ExceSera 1 bedroom Aperer- e m n 
prime residential area, ctase S. 
Kensington. Large reception 
overtoSag patio, ft kitchen with 
madams, oath until shower. Long co 
tot. 

£150 pw 

COLEHEttti COURT SVS 

Oerani 2nd floor flat <n this wea iui 
U oac overioofong cammunat gardens, 
south taeng- 2 dbie bedrooms. 2 
bathrooms, drawing room, tfiwig 
room, large kitchen with as machmes. 
Co tot 

£425 pw 

ELM VILLAGE KW1 

Defightfri 2 bedroom new Own bouse 
tn a quiet secluded mews cverioo tang 
Regents Canal with easy access to 
west End and CSy. Large recepeon. fl 
krtchen. bam with shower, car pert, 
cno/gdn. Ata3 for J-3 years; 

£175 pw 


FULHAM SW6 

Smart 2 bed fiat « s igwoncw 
devebpmeflL landsra^d gardens, i 
shoa«r room. 1 bathrt ynt. 
open plan recepWfftmg. Anwncan «yte 
kitchen, garage. Co tet good value. 

£130 pw 

KORBURY SW16 

Srumung ttaUanstyte house. Decwated 
and ftgtwfted to the fnghesr stai^a TO. 
.4 bedrooms, double raoepron. r ymg 
room, breakfast room. M|y Wed 
lutchen. beautrtuDy maintamefl garden 
with nttmiamd rind, double garage. 
Must be seen . 1 ye ar +. 

£325 pw 

OAKLEY STREET SW3 

Sen sa t ion al rn te n or _desgned 
inasoratte in the heart of C h ssea. 3 
bedrooms. 3 bathrooms (i ensuda) 
douUe reception with original features, 
dmmg room, super kitchen with afl 
ma ctme s. roof terrace. Co tet 6 
months only. 

£500 pw 


270 Earls Court Rd. SW5. 01-244 7353 AREAS ALSO AVAILABLE : 


CHESTERTONS 

^ P R V D ENT I A L 


HAHKTEU WAGE 
£456 P * 

Stveria newty converted 
duplex flat + sporious views oj 
London. Large Ale rec. 3 
bads. 2 baths, kfl. tarr. 

UBto Vorta (BScs BM86 «32 

naiaaLsns 
£156 p-w. 

Smsrt 2 b e d room flat in 
secure pbb block. Reoepf 
drmg rm. « baffvm. bal- 
cony. private parking. Co leL 
Dtetdsdoi OfeK 61-9*8 906 


E BCHES IEB S1BEET, S*1 
£148 p.V. 

Newly furnished & tinconoscl 
one bedroom ground floor OaL 
Excellent value for company 
toL Avafiebto immecSattey. 
Ptaks ORE 6M34 9991 
STAMM S TffiET , SW1B 
£130 p-w. 

Very good vsfere in popular 
sdUBbon ust off the Kings 
Road. New dec tftrotfghout. 
a«e bed, fiv rm. open plan kfi, 
bath. 


BAY HAL, VI 

£325 M- 

Exceflent fu»y furetshed 4th 
tow Bat seconds from Berke- 
ley Square. 1 double bed. 
bath, recap, ff Ul 
H ntxh Mck B1-C23 4513 


MtaB Office: #1-731 3111 
BEBB88B STRST, SVS 
£475 g*. 

CMghtttd- uroer masarstte m 

OUiet residential Street dose 
Kings Road. Large recap. 2 
beds. 2 baths, shxjy. ff 
kitchen. 

OWas Office 01-5® 8211 


CLOSE HTK MO, WZ 
£220 pJt. 

tmescutote tvro bedroom first 
floor flat, situated wflhm a 
handsome whits st u cco 

t r on te fl fvriMnri 

Bytfe Ptok Offlac 0V262 SBfiO 

BffiBSATE VOLAfiE, K 
£275 px. 

Supra vteua detached hsa 
| avaa fum/semi furn. Recap + 
sep (fining rm. 4 beds bath- 
room. good kaeftan, targe 
garden. 

BtfrfpH OBcc 01-341 9091 

DfiCKLAMBS, E14 
£150 ILK. 

tosnaculan 2 bedroom house 
in exceSent new waterside 
development, close to shops & 

transport. 

Office B1-53B 021 


Lend, 

£110 pjo. 

Spacitxis conversion flat in 
Central London locaHoa 
Double bedroom, brae double 
recap , tat & bath. CH/CHW- 6 
nflhs. 

HO Office 01-221 35TO 

(VEBM COBRT, «8 
ESSO pjfl. 

3 bedroom flat in tjset Mrden 

sq. reception rm, 2 beds & 8 
kH/btast rm. Srtuatsd dose to 
Ken ffigh Street Co let. 
a jg^ .i j tBn Offictc D1-837 7214 


OPENING 
SOON IN 
BATTERSEA 


A c* P-.^ertol Prs a&ry Serr ate Ltd. 




Homer 

KAKINGALLTHE RIGHT MOVES 


TO LET 

ESHER, SURREY 

Furnished detached home situated in private rotof. 
within wsfidng dstance to vOagB. easy access to 
London. M23 and M3 

3 recap rooms. 4 bethoome. 2 bat hro oms. hi8y fitted 
Idtctwn. 

£1.400 ROM. Tel (03272) 66614 

COBHAM, SURREY 

A very attractive con v en ed Victorian Cottage 

f- . . r- . .. . eeSjacent to gott course. beaufltuBy decorated. 2 

recep noms. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms togs 
and Woken krtchen. 

£1.500 P DM. Tel (0S3Z) 64351 


KATHINI 

GRAHAM 

LIMITED 

5843285 

the vale 

5.W.3. 

Wen deeoraforf house with 
huge looms with 5 
bedrooms. 3 recgptons.3 
bathrroms. Md* 1 3°^ 5W* 
RaL 

£1650.00 par week 
SLOANE GARDENS 
S.W.1. 

Newty decorated spactous 

untarsshed 1st floor flat 
with 4/5 bodroems. 2 large 
^cepoons. 3 bathrooms, 
kitchen (would fumsh}- 
CiOOOJto per w eek. 

WALTON STREET 
S.W.3. 

Lovely Kmghisbndge house 
wrth 4 double bedrooms. 2/3 
recaptions, kitchen and 
bathroom. Garden. £ 850 .0 0 
par week. 

CAMP DEN HILL 
COURT 
W-8. 

Spacious unfunvshea flat 
being redecorated rath 4 
bedrooms, Z receptions, 2 
bathrooms, large tatchea 
CH induded. (wfl tumsh) 
£700.00 per we ek. 
MILNER STREET 
S-W.3. 

Newfy decorated fanVy 
house with 4 bedrooms. 2 
good recaptions. 

2 bathrooms, krtchen. 
£750.00 pra week. 
WEST EATON 
PLACE MEWS 
S.W.1. 

Enchanting mews house 
with 3 bed rooms. 2 
receptions. 2 bathrooms. 

kitchen. Pretty garden and 

passtodity of garage. 
£700.00 per week. 

WILLIAMS MEWS 

S.W.1. 

Modem unfurmshed mews 
house m exceBent location 
wtth light good sizad rooms 
with 4 bedrooms, reception. 

2 bathrooms, tatchen. 2 
terraces. Garage. £600.00 
pra week. 

EATON MEWS 
SOUTH 
S.W.1. 

Pretty end of mews house 
with 3 be drooms , double 
reception, 

2 b a throom s , kitchen. Patio 
(mil consider short tots). 
£550.00 pra week. 

CULFORD 

MANSIONS 

S.W.3. 

very modem 1st floor flat 
wtth2be*ooms,2 
recaptions. 2 bathrooms, 
Htchen. £400.00 pra week. 

COURTF1ELD 



■wun/ fttU Re- 

solo. ca u M m Ut lavtiw Soto 
Agents for tann vita develop- 
ment A SHttsn resale agency. 
Fuengtroiz Co ouronWs 
utoae. Tel: 01-446 2481 m 




m ® 


Famous ntomttunai ski aod ooti 
resort For Sate- 
. until new sexto (hxrtshed) 
Sir. 45J000 

- fage new stixto Sff. 133,000 

- prrtty ne* chtieti A vakw 
pneas 

60V ere* on afl. 

For a fkst contact 


Hampton & Sons 


FURNISHED RENTALS 

HJBTOfl COURT, fBANKURS ROW, SW3 PARAIHSE WALK. SW3 

An nrettexu iy spaoaus aid Boor fia wflb resatenl Exofient fandy house rah sm terrace, gsden and 
porter, xtoa l_ for e ntertan ma. Ac axi modmon ra t Mai bedroom rate, 2n d bedroom grata. 2 
xxtixlBE 3 Bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 n ts i lta further Imkuraus and baStroom, 5th bedroom/ 
mare {owrtooiui xj gad ag). WC. fufiy fitted hraaa. study, table reception room, tuBy fitted fatefren 
ona pa nafe £790 pm rank 

A SELECTION FROM OUR REGISTER 

St. James’s Office 01-493 8222 


Anscombe 
& Ring (and 

Residential Lettings 

\% Plaza Estates 


hie sikel sn 

NBacbtaanyaiogSlwIaH 
srarChteaM location. 2 bwfcran 
braroooL laoxsofl room. fclaJ rai 


“61X00 pat 

PRMCES GATE. SN7 
Sum ffomd i»«x am o ppotite 
Hyde Ml a dbto Mda. 3 txW» mm 


eouvpert uaam ■ art 
porterage. hMQfl pw 


01-724 3103 01-Sai 76^5 


kikdwn and bathroom. Some 
maid service. Short lets by 
arrangement E SOOjOO pra 
week. 

ADDISON ROAD 
W.14. 

Spanous gratmd floor flat In 
good order with 2 
bedrooms, large reception. 2 
bathrooms, kitchen. 
Balcony, (short tots 


£30000 pra week. 
EATON MANSIONS 
S.W.1. 

Pa rity fira t fl oor flat with one 
bedroom, reception, krtchen 
and bathroom. Patio. 
Avaflabie for 5 months. 
£250.00 par week. 




isiiJISSN 


BRUCE 


f Ntrls 



EXECUTIVE HOMES TO LET 
IN PRIME LONDON LOCATIONS 

Personal help in selecting from over 500 prestigious 
• properties. 

Ranging from Studios from £150 per week to five bedroom 
Ambassadorial residences up to £3000 per week. 
Booklet - 'Guidance Notes for Tenants' available on request 
— — i 4/6 St Anns Terrace PAX TAOO 
■MM St Johns Wood NWS 300 jUuO 


OLD BHOIVTON road^sws 

Large flat which has just bean repainted. 2 Bedrooms. 
Lge Sludy/3rd Bad. 2 Bathrms. Dining Rm. Ktt. Use of 
Communal Gttos. £375pw. 

nwninnr caanH w s w n 

Fabtdous tower gromf floor flat lge Sitting Rm/Dnjvw 
flm. FittacJ Kitchen. UtBty Rm. 2 DWe Bedrms. Ftoodlrt 
Patio Gdn. Bathrm. Sep Loo. £450pw. 

CAOOGAN STREET, SW3 

Spacious famfly house consisting of Ktehen/Brerfdast 
Rm. Dining Fbn. Drawing Rm. 4 Bedrms. 2 Bathrms. 
Stody/ah Bed. derm & Gdn. £750pw. 


ST JAiVES ^Cwl 
.LONDON '.V.?- 


" G < 3 •' N G T O ‘SO I J A P r. . 

■ 01-337 534 •.•••337.5S 


FLORIDA 
1 ACRE PLOTS 
$84100 

9h% mortgage, easy terms 
First International 
Real Estate Ltd 

01-303 3596 





^fGirJeron Smith I CHESTERTONS [I 

4*»ai & Co: 01-488 901 ■ I Qi 533 4321 |j 


DOCKLANDS PRIME POSITION 
Blyths Wart Umehouse 

Magnificent river views from immac town 
house with show house interior cfirectfy South 
facing onto River. Large through dining room 
and kitchen/breakfast room, recept, study with 
ensuita shower, utifity, 2dtfe beds with ensuite 
baths. 3rd bed guest bath, cloakroom, garage, 
patio £375 pw, 

OLIVERS WARF WAPPING 

Spacious flat to fisted warehouse In exceBent 
location dose to City and toed arnmenities, 
large recept with orig features and pretty 
views, ideal tor entertaming, quality krtchen, 3 
dbto beds, 2 baths, parking fift, £325 pw 


RESENTS PARK NW1 elegant wan furnished mews house in 
excellent dee order, at advantages of the Perk tx/t dose lo Baker 
Si Superb Ale recept with large tenaoe study fu8y toed 
American kitchen with al ma chfiwB 2 beds 2 baths £400 pw 
PMLBEACH GDNS SW5 3 bed newly dec mafson e tte 3 recajtt. 2 
bath, kit use of commxtal gdns £330 pw neg 
COLLDKSHAJB PLACE SWS Superb ratiranisbsd metaonette dbto 
recept study with balcony, teroa ff Wtichen/ bretertast roam 3 ttttie 
beds, 2 bam (t ensuite) £350 pw nag 

MARVEEM SMITH ASSOC 
01 727 7957/937 9001 


JOHN D HOOD N.CO. 


SUFFOLK, NR YOXFORD 

Iprurkh 24 toiler. Norwich 38 miles 
TO LET 

A Magtriffceal Country Hoon Set in about 90 Acres of 
Parkland. 

s pS& Wi * * 

w 4 ^ 

Attractive ptdess end nrabae nurkUral Pvtia] 
no dtrgraajtkm hes bee n recently curled out. with scope for 
*®twf nuuTD Mrmrn L 

ftrejttfateoe a tag M. tote potafiil to a vartaty el mes xsAjed 


23 Btekater Sm.1 
Ttit B1-CS9B56 


«*n W1X SAL 
(Set CFTD) 


1*1 

M 




HOUSES AHD FLATS THROUG 
OUT THE DOCKLAHDS AREA 

RESffiBITML LETTIN8 DB»AHTMENT 

TBj 01-790 9560 


B this e ntai you are hwking 
for - wg nl find ft for yni 
We have a avert) range of 
properties from 
6150 - £1.500 pw. 
81-2251622 61-9469447 

(CHOSEA) (WMBIEDON) 


Property Management Services Ltd 


VARIETY OF ONE BEDROOM 
FLATS AVAILABLE 

ELYSTON PLACE 5W3 2170 p.w. 

COTC PLACE W8 £200 p.w. 

ROSARY GARDENS SW7 £22So W 
CORNWAO. GARDENS SW7 £225n_w 
CHELSEA MANOR QAROENS SWS SBS O w 

ORR EWING ASSOCIATES 
TELEPHONE KM 581 8025 


barnard 

marcus 




,01-629 6604,^ 


SEDAN STREET 

W14 

Attractive 2 bed fixrtstied cottage 
In racetoit toetiton. OotXHe reero- 
tiort kiBy aqupped Hdten. bath, 
CH. Saden. Co let £200 pw. 

Maitowa, Hunting 
and Worsley 
01-603 0281 


FROM £65,000. 

Ctaxce at 3 Mt tw 




ororanded. E37S pw. CD's only 
WEST LONDON OFFICE 
01 602 2428 

gMEMO BO, SW77. Vary ba 
5/6 bed far loa dose to 
waxtoxxtt Can OMe reeep. dm 

lUHWSVRS 

SOUTH LONDON O TFICE 
01 627 0393 


01-603 9291 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREM 



^ SALES 
ADMINISTRATION 

COVENT 6AKJEH 
211.000 

* company 

**“**“>9 « high quality 
wper rdated gift ware sefl- 
■hg worWwKte needs an 
{“P®®*** Sales arinwas- 
*®«e person You must & 
■He to cotnmuraca& won 
*”? « departments and 
««®hws. be numerate and 
°W wcrionn in a team af- 
’WSphOT. Skate 80/60 WP 
Swrencad essential. Age 
28-45- (me core) 

01-498 0092 

Senior 

secretaries 



ISLIHfiTOfl 

2i2jnoNeg 

The Managing Director of a 
bwiy video pmduaton com- 
pany nouns a wed 
presented. bright aid ctaor- 

MPA/seeraarywithagood 

sense of humow. Must be 
Soot* a admmstratHfi and 
JW using own initntrve. 
Your day Mh be varied with 
BHiouse lunches, basing 
*® 1 the P«ss. attmg 
speeches, taking minutes at 
meetings ate. Must have fast 
accurate skifts 100+/60, 
Age 24-35. (roe eons) 
01-4% Q092 

Sen iinr 
Secretaries 



Team Spirit 

£7,750 

Excellent opening lor an outgoing capable 
young person to join this dynamic PR 
Company. Working with 2 young executives, 
you will enjoy total involvement with projects, 
presentations, press (unctions and releases 
etc. A relaxed, but very busy environment 
you must be flexible, willing and happy to 
become part of the team. Skills 70/50. 
Age 20+. Please telephone 01-409 1232. 
Rvcndiamil Cmrireh 


Sheer Panache 

£10,000 + excellent package 

Due to vast expansion this Multinational 
Holding Company is looking for a poised, 
professional person to join their Director of 
Resources. A newly developed role offering 
scope and involvement, you will also assist 
with recruiting senior staff. The ability lo 
handle pressure, and senior level experience 
are essential. Skills 90/60. Please telephone 
01-493 4460. 

MERmvEATHER ADVERTISING* SELECTION 



BE A TEMPORARY 
SECRETARY, 
NOT JUST A TEMP! 

Tired of being taken for granted? 

As an experienced secretary with extensive 
knowledge of word processing, wc can offer 
you:- 

• Up to £7.00 per hour 

• Overtime pay 

• A friendly, professional service 

• A selection of London's top assignments 
To join our team of valued, high calibre 

secretaries, please call Camilla Arnold on 
01-631 0479. 

Seer Selection ci;j>i> 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS -=AJi < ii > ji¥=- 


BULLORBEAR? 

£13,000 + MORTGAGE SUBSIDY 

The Chief Executive of a respected 
stockbroking firm in EC2 seeks a stylish PA 
with initiative and confidence to co-ordinate 
his hectic schedule. 

You will help to nurture his prestigious city 
dienes whilst remaining cod, calm and 
collected, even under pressure. 

Your high standard of education and 
senior lewd experience will be invaluable m 
addition to skills of 100/60. Excellent package 
includes mortgage subsidy and bonus. Age 
preferred 24-35. Please call on 01-631 0479. 

Seer Selection ciM/t? 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


A STEP UP 

£1 1 ,000+ 

Are you bright efficient Immaculately presented 
and ready and waiting to take or the role of Office 
Manager as wefl as Senior Secretary? 

If so, this small brokerage company in EC2 would 
tike to meet you. The Senior Trader (American, 
mkl-30'a) Is seeking a right hand to act as the pivot 
between himself and brokers as wen as develop- 
ing existing systems and providing sec. support 
90/60, some WP exp. + abiSty to stay calm under 
pressure. Find out more by ringing: 

437 6032 


SLADE TRAVEL 
LEISURE GROUP LTD 

PA required for Chief Executive 

Full secretarial duties. To include audio/ihortliaod. 
Salary negotiable. Company perks. 

Please write with fuliCV and detarfs of current salary to: 

Personae! Dept 
Slade Travel Leisure Group 
Slade House Vivian Avenue 
London, NW43UT 

(N# agencies) 




RECRUITMENT 
CONSULTANTS 

J oin our very successful Covent Garden 
office. We specialise in secretarial remrit- 
ntem and wim m recruit an additional 
consultant to join us as soon as possible. You 
will be results orientated with a good memory 
in cxder to help our many applicants and diems 
and maintain our r-frtMrt* reputation in the 
industry. Please telephone Karen for more 
information on 01-240 351 L 

Elizabeth Hunt * 

Reciudment Consultanls 
2-3 Bedford Sheet London WC2 




-frrad-iffeart^rt. 


TOP ADVERTISING AGENCY 
SEEKS FIVE 

This agency not only produces some of the best 
award winning advertising around, but it prides itseK 
on its staff relations. They have benefits tike profit 
share schemes and tong holidays but perhaps more 
im p o rta nt, are the cabs home if you work late, the 
parties, lunches and group outings. The old cliche - 
’‘work hand, play hard” certainty applies here. They 
have five openings for pa/secretaries at the moment 
at salaries from £8,000 - £10,000. Highly 
recommended. Please phone 434 0030. 


OLDER APPLICANTS 
WELCOME 
£ 9 , 500 pa pins bonus 

Senior secretary for weB known Westminster 
Planning Consultants Chartered Surveyors. Heavy 
responsibility to run small office with intense job 
involvement- Shorthand vital. 

Howard Sharp & Partners 
79 Great Peter St, SW1 
or phone evenings only 0732 454042 


SECRETARY /QTY 

Managing Director of group of companies, busy 
entrepreneur, requires personal secretary. Varied, 

interesting and demanding secretarial job requiring 

excellent shorthand and typing skills. A good 
rewarding package is available to a loyal, accurate 
and conscientious person able to work under 
pressure aged between 25 and 35 years. 

Please contact Mrs. Penny Smith 
4th Floor, 8 Safisbnry Square, London EC4Y SAP. 


BILINGUAL 

SECRETARY 

required for Advertisement Department of limes 
Newspapers Ltd. Applicant must be fluent in 
French and German. Good shorthand/typing. 
Excellent salary. 4 weeks holiday + Company 
benefits. Please write to: 

Mr Ian Wilkie. 

Advertisement Sales Administration Manager, 
Times Newspapers LttL, 

Gray's Inn Road, 

London, WC1X 8EZ. 


RENTALS 




luxury 

( APARTMENTS 

TO LET 

CHELSEA SWA 




HARRINGEY. 

3 bedroom basement 8aL 
£160 pw. 

H1GHGATE. 

2 bed flat £160 pw- 
N10. 

I bed flat £95 pw. 
NIGEL HOLDER 
01 883 3255 


HYDE PH Mtt Mews WJ- 2 !«» + 

study /Srttwd 1ft * ***** 

Sm klciin Ail M'lJCaorti. Avail 

lor nod 3/f 


sagRgg yfS 

qmxcti or Lorraine canwueu on 
OI 957 9684. 

BMRAVW Mewv no«c uwrnor 

wnile klldven *> 

or, mm Lei. JEW® » w Ooddanl 

?sSS5i OI 950 732U 


01-798 0823- 


^J^U OCC 0f4» 
7850 m. 


„ unMT gafloo 600 VBrOS 

Ultra 

«*»•”*** tea, r Inter- 

Ev» BJO 

4703 in. stUt Very 

Of MaJ iwr- , K f~r% rt - po /tHn« r 

2 sp»#» 0l K L B S*mmr. 

weekly ncrvIdBB- 
soflcte"* prooeriy 

n SZ \xJZ. 

Lewis. SauBi o» a . 1 1 or 

^ ortkre. 0l -»2 

Norm * ^.SSteme 

part and 

2/3 a 4 KW*T wmMln IOC 
Oil* ffvrCTiuW* .951 

NW fr„ 01961 

S79O/6790/S61 6 - ^T^nwfl l* 

L> d i Mort eV »^ HA 8 6LP 

MZSOt s / c period 

waullhdiy «cj/r beUx y 

Mhsca'Wle Id 

LOVHR rcilHcd. nur- 

9IUU nai do«s- P“ cl ' 

h|( hfllhtn- ran FW 

Wtetwn Rent r« 

inti service * cHlcr« 


ROBERT. IRVING - BURNS 


Offers tense selection of 
flats & houses im 
CITY. . 

KN1CHTSBR1DGE. 

KENSINGTON. 

. WIMBLEDON. 

and other areas. 

For prompt & efficient 
service Please CiB 


01-637 0821 

MARGARET STREET Vil 


ALBERT HALL 

Buisnss. 

Ua^iM mansion apt 3 
Oedrms. 3 tamrnis. fps 0* e 
ncep. fUBy eqwped rnoton W 
with all *k*bw 3- £800 pw htfy 
md. 

Kaffett Lines & Cm 
748 3224. 


,,, . i 2 minutes tram 

the City- superior newly bunt 
iwnhouw.SOrtLZMhi.W 
rape and *«mH sarden. kdwioc 
designed and newly f imKM. 
wim aU aoWtance*. luuinrjf 
unos. Company remdred. 
£2SO pw. Tel. OI 431 0806. 


KCNsawroH m 

rasueiown Rd. Fully Itambtird 

2 bedroomed flat Loe reeepUon 

* entrance loMy. 

■vaiteUe lor immediate C/O Mt 

only £980 cem. M 256 

1826 (day L 0836 22661 2 1 eves) 


KLOUVU- Luxury PenlhotfK 
Appartmenl. l Bed. Loun pe.KIL 
BaitT Balcony. FUto e golpped 
and Funuaned TWouono<n- 
iM, or Sliort ML AvafllaWe 
Now. £350 pw. OI 299 7125 


1 im Tfl 81 turning 2nd floor 
irwoBn flat over communal 
gardens. 2 Deds. reem/dlne^ 
rauwOte fireplacr. br a nd new kK 
. an m actnnes. Dam and sep 

shower. » 

Goddard Strum OI 950 7521. 


CT-UMWO* Arlinwan HW- 09 
Green Pork, dose MB. PrraOqe 
2 / 3 bed fly. UP w ®»r I lease. 

No IWWim-WW BucWtural 

3 Co. OI BBO 7011- 


HAMPSTEAB »m MBA 

tu-aiin/ui conralon. 5 Beds. 

OP«i Plan KtL Dlalng 
noatn/Study, saihrnv 2 BWi 
£22Spw. Tel: Marie 

SSSdS®.^ _ 

materBH NS 5 iWna AngH 
^TreJ: 0084 640770. 

■ nn. Tit 01-074 6739 

■aSSSLBE 

tSS&SB* 

tSSS Tel.229 9966 

HAI ULt ABO« Srwrt, 1 ^ “f 

^fS'of^.casopw. oi 
Jn» 4 4 7 MdrMnL “"Sfo^ 

A W«B sHUJleO 4 bed. 2 
?Jh -L ge Wl/dln. Uf 
^CTipanv W- Qw* vaI ^ 

* «W**“ 

JS^tCO ■ Allraeine nrt> 

m. receb. KM. 
tel. CTSO PW- Te* O1-S50 


only 
S74B- 
PUHLICO 

nalh r~- 
rrrtF 
uc " 

951 

Ud. rnme 


n cWlV 


paw 
1026 
SW&3 
superb 
Otoe 


Wpn 

8701 


'■ cottage 2 iwns inoe. 


B-KCt 

saon 

md- 


nal SvMrtrSJwS 

rJOO pem- T " ““ 


KBBNETM M. V. pretty Hat 

MB off Kan Vfcfc SL 2 bads, 
brae recap, wg lafl. kx aid 
tarn £220 ire. 

KMGHTSfifiBGE SVfL Buuttt 
flat in pnvtiB mews. 2 dilutee 
beds. 1 *m» bed , fry*. reap 
2 tens, m mo 


SB 

KENNCI I 

TURNER 

59 CADOGAN ST 
LONDON SW32QJ 
01 584 2531 


LONG/SHORT 

LETS 

(or a selection of luxury 
* properties. 1-5 BeOS, From 

BERKLEY 
ESTATES 
01-935 8959 


• Charming 2 Drd dal 

near King's Road. Puny fur 


imp. Own uUUiy room. OCH. 
tmmediaie Com. £186 pw. 
Tel: OI HMW.T. 


Large lurary family nraae. - 
dbi bed. 5 foe new. FOCH- 
ideal for commuting to city 
C22S pw. 6 noolhs let only. Tel 
0734 864283 eves. 


penOunse OaL onfWnBhed. 
Brand new conversion, luxury 
finishes, new carpets and cur- 
tains. 2 bedrooms, roof terrace, 
etc. £296 Per week. Write J 
Fourie. 15H Swan T 
Mania Vale. W9. Company let 

pi pf err e d 


C HW HCS orawitfra nvusonetle 
m newly -converted period 

house nr. laoe. M4. 3C recere 5 

bads. 80* garden, fudv Ann. 

CT 90pw GO. let- ABO Mil-fevd 

1/2 bed dardse rial. Hears 

turn. £120bw. Duckwoctn OI 

BBS 4566/999 0218 


spectacular views, newly deco- 
rated. beauWuOy ftoviahad. 2 
recepd. kitcnen/dfnlnp. games 
room. 8 bedrooms. 3 batb- 
rooms. 2 gartens. easy partfog. 
7 mbs eHy £530 pw.opc. Tel 
01 BIB 9912 OI 605 7269. 


Him DHe room in elegant two 
bed naL £500 » moniti Ofd. ID 
mins WUleaoen own nree. 

Non smoker. Tefc 01460 8641 


KUIS PARK N«3 - Uflt new 

llmdlW. targe lounge wim b£ 

cany. £150 pw met CH- Tel: 01 
TOT4827 / OI 487 6348. 


BEST part Pumey. Sunny newly 
decorated dbte Mdm Adly torn 

naL Living rm.kib.CH. £100 

pw. 940 2266 or 788 1820 IT) 

r mwnmnr cwr 3/4 bed noe. 
GardsL Station 6 imna. 
£UOpw iOS25> 313661 
Mr. Edward 

EAST rUTOET Near Tube. Single 
ftaUrt. own Mtdiea Quiet fam- 
ily heme. £48 pw Ind. (except 
Elec.) Tel: 01-870 5900. 

HOCMTH ESTATES 575 9537. 
AoMentlal letangs n Central 
London- Company and nobday 
apartments. 

KDHMSnW A SurrwPKttng ar- 
eas. Wide constantly ebanoina 
caocctlea of AndM Oats A 
lewis on our reiW HL 
Bonham A Reeves 958 3622. 

HUM VALE «f» Lovely l bad 
nt in P/B b». Uft. porter, afl 
new. racrince at £140 b-w. hie 
(W GoBe APIS OI 838 9618. 

M0R6ANS WALK 2 bed ganVrc 
flat with garapo- company let 3 
mantra £780pm Td OI 223 
SS47 or 0483 809267 

M2. Spae furn 1 bid OM wtm 
reeep. lib. gat CM. Queer Rd. 
Cta shops. £83 pw. Co Let only. 
43 1,1020 l»> 346 0272 |R>. 

RZqUMED, Only luxury QlB 
and homes in W1/W2/NW8/ 
SWI/SW5/SW7 lor long cn 
fere. Kenwood 01-402 2271. 

ST J0MH8 WOW 2 bed raachras 
flat taab. Mode near Regents 
Part/Prlmrose IfllL Co Id 
£225 p-w. TflC 586 0665 


I j teEl UOM TMD, BAYF4W 
umHBnEumanHTt a 
I m MW red adoai 
Mr Hare* M a SM0GE. S 
Imam. 2 BTnirev Iff 

feS*1)«taraB'onr 1 ' 

4 qmttr mmt aMi a fores 

ssrJt&zjSt 



DOLWCU ALLEGE. Superb mod- 
emiMacM taaa o prime toc- 
aflon. 5/B b ^s. kuogn . dbtog 
room, study. 2 ba faQom s. QnQB. 
Beauteul gwkn. £275 pw. 

HBVC OU. LcMfy Edwrton 
home. 3 be*. ldWiewbrea«asi 
mom, 2 reeepllpns. 060 pw. 

' KEYHOUh 
01-733 4518 


BROOK GREEN 
W 14 . 

Lux 5-bed family hse. 
2 baths. Long let AU 
i. £400 


mod cons. 


pw. 


H.P.M Ltd 
01-7493406 


A executives urgently seek 
quality properties to aU central/ 
Vest ^rmoon atom. Foe 
lion please ring 01-938 3426 


LUXURY FLATS * Kernses in 
Hampstead, st Jo*m» Wood 
Area. Urgently remitted for 
Oveneaa Crsmrt Ewtuuvci 


Tel* 


*38 7191. 


PMUCO: Superb, newly dec. 1 
bed. ftara (tat CUM aM tenets. 
£J 30 pw. OI .2883044- Ref GC 


LATH ■ Furnished 4 bed Georgian 
tawnbome. Convenient Bath 
Sea railway gm. and M. ay. 
now 6/12 rams. £580 pxjn. 
toe. Martin and Stratford 
(0225)66805 


■ W MN1 walk SMT11. Brand 
new s a«d ire mar free Avan 


pen. Tel 01-660 6161 x 2101. 


Sin Brtsni 6 spade's family flat 
dose to *8 amenffles. 3 Beds. 2 
Recess. Klt/Bfaa- 2 BaBsL 
£300pw. Goof os 828 8851. 
5W1 BrtgBL clean, furnished *ta- 
dio Rat Res porter. CHW avail 
imraedieiriy Co lets only. £1CX) 
p.w. Tet 569 2110/6 m 
SWt-1 8He nod nan from 
£150/080 p.w + lux 2 dbte 
bed Hal from £170/ £260 p.w. 
Co Let naunmra 854 sooo. 
SWISS COTTA EC- CJDce tube, 
gprum lux furn naL 3 beds. 1 
r*a>. k A b. CH. Wadi ta/c-. 
freezer SlTOPW.Ol 794 8701 

Hie 4/ 5 bed. torn. Its CH 
imuw. Gge. Oda Short/ Wag 

ML £300PW. 444 5407. 

HW3. UnTBrn audio flaL 
bcd/rscea kn « balfi. CTO p.w 
at. Co Let. aura 482 2277. 
mwcD APAttnmm in 
KendnaiSB, Cal T.V. 24 hr Sw. 
Telex. C o Mtotera m Apartmeoto. 
01-373 6505. 

Stoeur 4 bemxaned drtsrbr d. 
CQi. lOO ga rden, garage. 
£700 PIP TotOl 300 0602 
HMK 4MKnm> PRIM 
ioepOan e ft Staane Sown?. 
Folly serviced A cantoned. Tet 
01-373 6306 m. 

ST JAMES’S FLAGI SWS Luxu- 
ry serviced 2 Bed eoanramt. 
Prime locaUon next to Par*. OI - 
3736306 m, 

SnMWBdVY MU. SHdons 4 
bed family M* wtm igi loan. 
£200 pw, 01-940 4565 (Tj 
stlti LKT Ur Chrttansa. 2/5 whs. 
spnMa i bed flat Cram 
£120 pw. Tct 01 736-0241 
Him HU B IT MS - Srtf contained 
lurnadwd (Ul 5 ranras. kudten. 
bam. OCH. DttoneOi «SQom. 


SLASHED PRICES 

«(IGHTSBfllBGE 

fBBgsaaaggg 

MM - 


Sak wad S ton i oi.MS 
MMy sbhol ora u_ 2 * hrpra- 
Wto. Oi OWL Cw a n w craT rarexa. 
PiPHttMiiredi Uag - ran ML . 
t2SB ml (wtoaBy MSS 
AflESFVBD AND GO 
01-351 23S3 


LOXDRT 

THAHESSIDE 

APARTMERT 

On area if —a HjUuciren d t 


1 4 Cuoy Srelt Top 

. 2 beds. Fid, turnfshad/ 

jartn. 

iWreLRumf 
Phase 01 2471 


WILTSHIRE: 

Fumtohad period property 
between Salisbury and 
Andovar. 6 bedrooms, sail 
c o ntai ne d annexe, tans 
Corel, spac i o us grounds, in 
courtry setting. £750pem. 
Corediy CMBte Properlies 
0264 51771. 


H2. Modern mews tow. Three 
beds. Two bams Bee ep. Din 
area. KK. Oamps. Co let pref. 
From Jan 1*. £250 pw. TO: 
01-221- 7665 (everdneL 


F W OM 

deal Ltd require properties fei 
- OeotraL Sotnn and wrai Lon- 
don Aren tor waiting 
appueanre MOi»l 8858. 


bouse. 3 beds, studio ton. 2 
recent- need idL Can daw 
BR/tS rains Titoe. £156 pw 
accL TO: Ol 542 8664. 


MW II M D 6 mra tin top 
Mlcben. aO macMnea. balcony. 
IPrnHMd. 4th ttoor period 
bunding, nn aft. sunny and 
£180 pw (ram Jan 6. 




AVAMJWLC NOW Luxury ftato A 
hordes £ 200 - £1.000 per WKk. 
Teh Burgess 381 5135- 


ALLEM BATES « CP nave a large 
MHcflon of fists * h ousts avail 
tor long / short lei fm £ 100.00 
D.w. 01 499 1665 


BUM urgently re- 


qusm MUy Asto/hoiara- 

^-| i,. . Ii'iildl Q^wek 

QfWftti RnunfwiQBte. fw* - 

vu arena. £200 - £ 2 X 00 pw. 
BurgmFsialr Agnit, 581 6136 
THE HEW aietoea Chasten, tole- 
nar dedgnad. newly rum rated 
1 bed ararL AS amen. Co. let 
only £24 S pw. Tal 689 9849 
337 9681 The number to resnem- 
ber when seeking best rentoi 
brawtles to central radprtme 
London areas £JB0/£2XXXtow. 
WMU90N. Comped studio 
flat doaa att. AvaH new. 8uK 
angle person only. £75 pw. 
SlurglB h Son 788 4651. 
DOCKLANDS Flats and houses to 
let ttooeraoof the OoOUandi 
area. TetrO 1-790 9560 
BREEN PARK Fully lined 
studlaa/flato. Laag/ahon let 
From £135 pw. 957 4999 m. 
UA — hlhA I I NWS Lux flaL add 
rec. dbte bed. CH, tv. tge sun- 
ny bate. W/aartL ca tot oref. 
£125 me 01 -624 4617. 

NEW CREEK. Luxiay renaa 
Georgian tree. Unfum/Fura. 
£275 pw. 01-940 4£65 m 
KMGHTSBmCE - Dtri« bed. 
«WP. toi/dtoer. CH. 1 year. 
£140pw. TH< 01-856 2382. 
MATFAM . Hyde Kr* Uie mom 
tamurtoiB toog/shon lets 1/8 
beds, best enm# atoae Apart, 
nrento 01 955 5812. 

WlB Large fat. l too dtor & i 
single bedroom. CH. Co mi 
only. £180 pw. 01 968 991&. 
Wl second ftoor flat 3 be ds, tree. 
1 twth-OasOL only £225 p.w. 
Lawson A Herman 955 5«S 
W2 Lore tfl pontnous p naL C/H 
Sun ttrnce. Tv. £230 pw. 
TPM Ol 446 2025 


MAYFAIR 

Secretary 

. Commercial 
Estate Agents 
require secretary 
with word 
processing 
experience. 
Audio essential. 
Salary £8,250 pa 
with review. 

Tel: 01 408 1635. 

NO AGENCIES. 




TRAVEL £13,000 

Efapatby is the key woad 
in this role as an Executive! 
Secretary to an 
I n t erna t io nal 
BuaanesBmaa who is Ao a 
Member of the House of 
Lords. The variety of work] 
pecrantota a sound 
education which bra 
resulted in a natural atyte 
pnri mviondanrrinf nf the 

ways of the wcekL Good 

P — w rli nti-eU .nl utilb anrf| 

the wiD to constantly pot 
tbe job first, oriBlead to a 
foM-ma ring and uniiyiR 


SHEILA CHILDS 

aECEurnHBvr 

01-408 1295 


SECRETARY/ 

RECEPTIONIST 

for busy, friendly Estate 
Agents .between commons 
at Clapham. Audio aid 
WP experience preferred, 
shorthand a plus. Ability 
to work under pressure 
important Salary £8.000 
neg. Contact - 

Michael Conratfae, 
Richari Barclay & Co, 

01-228 6588 


LKAL EAGLES 
far tte HEV TEAK 
£19,000 

Expreraved l»gR a a a ran aa 
are reqttgd by Ore cemreanra 
conrayanong and raaptoqi 
uju nBe M tea itoiiRfert Bof 
Me pnadolDua End tow 


For oora OataS* cal Jo at 

“W5S, J 



SENIOR SECRETARY 

£11,000 

Woriung fora partner using your sriortrianri and Word 
Processing sKSJs. a variety at adnunsbation with at 
least 60?a secretaria}. Your boss is an American with a 
strong personality, so you need to be aUa to handle 
people. Luxury offices, lots of telephone work 
arranging travel, appo in tm en ts eta. 

Please contact Ranks Jonas 

— OFFICE — 

— SYSTEMS — 
RECRUITMENT 
— SERVICES — 


ir.-Amm Vwwcl*«iV«WICjMLAD 

I regret 01-43-3 <001 


NO SHORTHAND!! 


It you have experience in the sates and marketing 
fi8W and haw used an electronic maSng and micro 
computer system this large city company needs an 
administrator for their US and overseas business 
accounts. Considerable contact with their New York 
office is expected. £10.000 + Free Travel 

This ymrtg, expanding video company need a 
secretary who is a wiz on the WP and enjoys 
organising. There is never a duti day looking after 
these three super directors as you wfti be totally 
responsible for naming the office. 60 wpm audio 
£11,000 + perks 



PA/SECRETARY 

A vacancy has arisen for a competent PA/secretary to 
the Assistant Secretary (ICC) of The Marytebone Cricket 
Club at Lord’s Cnckei Ground. Applicants should have 
good shorthand speeds and should be able to work on 
their own initiative. Interest in cricket is desirable, 
although not essential Position involves dealing with a 
variety of matters connected with the MCC ana Intem- 
atxxial Cricket, including pr e par a tion of committee agen- 
da's and minute writing- Salary dependant on age and 
experience. 

Apply in writing to: 

The Secretary, 

MCC, Lord’s Ground, 

London NW8 8QN. 




please telephone: 01 -499 8070 
87 New Bond Street London W.1 . 

CAROLINE KING SECRETARIAL APPOINTMENTS 


J 


PAUL MILLER 
POST PRODUCTIONS 

We are a leading Vufe© Facilities Company woridns mainly in 
the business tefeviskn and advertising markets. We require a 
hvelv and inteilijeru person to act both as recepooniS end 
personal assistant to the Maaap ng Director. The successful 
apphean: rn>o have pood tvrong and fekpbone manner. 
gfcaUv with shorthand and wore processing ceperience. as well 
as the ability tea wort, efficiently rad cbccrtuDy under pressure. 
Salary negotiable according to experience. A tell C.V. with 
re fer races must be provided. 

Please phone 439-9319 for farther information. 


SLADE TRAVEL 
LEISURE GROUP LTD 

PA required for Chief Executive 

Full secretarial chuies. To mdode audjo/sborthand- 
Satory negotiable. Company peris. 

Please write with foil CV and details of aurcni salary in: 

Personnel Dept 
Slade Travel Leisure Group 
Slade House Vivian Avenue 
London, NW4 3UT 

(Naagtodts) 


BOOK-XEEPER/ADHINISTRATIOH 

A small film end video production company is 
looking tor someone to handle accounts to trial 
balance, and who wifl. when needed, also perform a 
number of other tasks - not all of them routine. 
Please write to: 

THE VISION GROUP. Shirley House, 

25-27 Camden Road, London. NW1 9LL. 


DIRECTORS* SECRETARY 


C. London 


to £9k + benefits 


Wt're a Computer Software House looking for an 
experienced secretary to work with two directors. If yon 
are responsible, bright and articulate with good typing 
skills, we will train you in WP and in the use of a PC 

CaU Nikki on 631 1313. 




IIMDRAKE 

• PEKSONNEL 

CHAIRMAN’S SEC 

£13400 

Based n tfayttr in tMrious 
ottos, me management 
company s lootoq >°r t «gy 
ponate tope ol perron. Yore 
(toy •« be UL Use yore 
oqpasaiond state to wfi the 
rtfireTyore mltabra to acaW 
tha chaonaB and yore tad and 
ttodomacy to dett rath cbents. 

As tfc is Even a ramr 
pwrtien toa ampam rant to 
reout some we who has 
woritad at ths level beta*. 

Cal 8ANDRA FBnWG on 
■a Bt-734 011 


DRAKE 

PE2SONMEL 

CAREER IN 
MARKETING 
qu a 

Has fast moving dynanac 
company are tooUng lor a PA 
totharmWingdnctw.Yoo 
*6 be mvotovd m a8 aspects 
of me martedno depamnaaL 
ncutoa oromramg ^ 


the td PA ttee. You need a ; 
aS ere oy^ lafap btsy. i te 

aJ"? 

Bratae era £■ 81-2715*71 


BEAUCHAMP 

PLACE 

£10,000 

Super Secretary PA 
for Partner in small 
friendly general legal 
practice witti 
conveyanang bias. 

Legal experience 
necessary, Wordstar 
an advantage. Ability 
to deal with clients 
essential. 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS 
PLEASE CALL* 

ROD ON 01 581 4918. 


£14,000 

Placing Eascutwes at the 
»wy lop of the tree is this 
leading Cons u ltancy's 
business and a brilliant 
cater swats the Managing 
Director's near Executive 
Seosiay. Excellent shflbi 
impeccable presentation and 
the abffity to convnumcata 
with the tact id a true 
dipte na hsi writ open the 
door to (ha fast paced 
professional world of 
Executive Search. 



■DRAKE 

... PERSONNEL 

HOTEL CAREER 

£9,680 

' Mac rath the neb and famous 

an n e m aSaBd o i gai i sa t i on . 

As personal Asestail to the 
i General Manager you wM hare 
! hit rwohanart n tte day to 
I day iwnng el tie bate. 

issts/ssss 

i SWS ■ te Ml. attending 
pUtoc retrains events and 
coctiai pate eto. Good 
: shorteKlendlypeiBessertel. 

cm poeua race ora ■ 

SI -33d B388. 

-4- ** |A 

THTO» wmmtmONMMMJ* 


SECRET ARY/P. A. 

SecreCaiy-Gff»taf of a Rat- 
ional Charity remmes exper- 
ieiced secretary/pa. to start 
early in 1987. 

Salary accord ing to age and 
experience. 

Send for application form to: 

Peisooul Officer, 

10 Queen Ante Street, 
London WIN QBD 


ESTATE 

AGENTS 

residential investments 
department require 
outstanding PA with 

varied duties. Age 22-35. 

Exc8Hant Engrah and 
secretarial shift. Orivtag 
Scenes and inWattve. 
Salary £104X0 pa. 
Tel 221 3534 


COMPUTER 
SOFTWARE CO. 
SW1 

Corapotef SttfhWB Co. SW1 hM a 
challenging vacancy tor an 
BBeneaced secretary, wem ttwi 
enwnWTWB WDdiq rath a wain « 
dynamic aaitsmao. Vanet A 
IrtHKang vork onering good career 
pttentaL Fast ante stated/ 
typng. WP expenan, atosowt 
petsmaBy. good Mpbm tnenw. 
hntanw & «a»isah«al stalls. 
Languages aft advanage. Anrecra 
sate & benefits- Conte: 


Sags ec. 256. 


: Jtts on 


COMPUTER 
SOFTWARE CO. 
SW1 

Corapuler Software Co. SW1 
require a Secretary (2nd Jobber). 
Demafdng pasun hnkmg tater 
a tsam d tusy sass enanow. 
Excellent typmg ability. WP 
ppaw te. attracts perareAty 
t speaking voice, friendly 
working eiwtronmont. Good 
satay & boiefits. Contact Sbefia 
nn 01-222 5685 ml. 243. 


A Hampstead coflega 
requires a capable 

GRADUATE 

SECRETARY 

for an a di rtni s tr ati ve 
post as Secretary to the 
Bursar. 

Applications in writing, 
to; 

Tbs Bursar, 

2 Arfmrnght Road, 
Lou{ob,NW3 6AD. 


SEC/PA <£12,008 

Qoup seeks a naSf^nw^/P? 
n art tv tore Deputy Cue to- 
ettvt fetkrs secreara) >100/60/- 
Wskfc + good or^ieBboral rai- 
dy to anara buaness tunettw art 
nasgs. Aged 35-50. 

Ms Darr 734 8466 
Stekbn Assoc. Rec Coos, 
29 fitessfcosse St, Wl 


OLDER APPLICANTS 
WELCOME 
£9,500pa plus bonus 

Senior secretary for well known Westminster 
Planning Consultants Clianered Surveyors. Heavy 
responsibility lo run small office with intense job 
involvement. Shorthand vital. 

Howard Sharp & Partners 
79 Great Peter St, SW1 
or phone evenings only 0732 454042 


MAYFAIR 

Additional Secretary needed tor fivtty. erttusasdc team n busy, ex 
psiteg office. Nn only «d te successful appficant have good 
secretarial skills fmciutfutg Audio/WP experience and some 
slratnaedl. but they «fl be wal oresened. orgswed. have a sense of 
humour and be a non-sreoks. ResponsdaUes will include providing 
secretanal srewort to one land ter two) Executive Dnertore and bee 
man involved n te day to day turning ol te otto. A fina nc i a l 
bacfcgrortid rail be useful. Satay negotiable. 


Write enciosng CV hr 

Kara Pratt 

Demlooaeal Capital CorporaSt 
103 Mount Street 
Lonfrn W1Y 5HE 


United 


l 


A FRENCH CHALLENGE 

Do you speak and writs French to a high standard? Are 
you a good organisar. and able to delegate? Interested in 
people? Decisive? Tactful? And nave exceflent secretarial 
skWs? 

A tewfing kitamationai Youth Travel Organisation seeks 
sudi a person to liaise with French dients and EngHsh co- 
ordinators; monitor travel arrangements; tackle unfore- 
seen problems with initiative. It can be hard work, but 
rewanfing. Aga 25+ £9000. 

Write with CV to Eurolanguage Lid. Greyhound House. 
23/24 George Street Richmond. Surrey TtN9 1HY. 


De VERE APPOINTMENTS 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT 

As a fast expanding Banking Agency based in 
the City, we are now lookmg for an experi- 
enced Consultant (preferably Banking but not 
essential) to join our friendly team. Must be 
willing to work bard for high rewards. Sense of 
humour essential.' Excellent salary £10,000 + 
negotiable plus 10% commision. 

Can Susan Parry 01-248 0918 (Rec Cans) 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT 
£17,000 

Doe to a New Year espansooD w require Interviewers with 
minimum 2 yao experience for oar estohRuhwl West 1 
Secretarial Agency. Siicessfol cmxfidfitw. with initiative and 
motivation, can expect nn excellent high basic phis 
coaunisHon. For bitter information please telephone 

486 0855 


■DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

LEBAL SUPERVISOR 

mm 

tew you mteor state? 
Assisting yourdyromc boss in 
ths m ahead bw company you 
be taught te exetong nn 
American computer system. 

VRh your aoMrtsi state, 
superaea and van ciants and 
stall on ths emnanve system 
rad compde Ira du uanana tar 
coat caw. H eate d ! datefc 
of ases daalng «dh cboits n 
peraoo ax) on te phone 
taeitert prospects as the rate , 
dmalgps aidi ym. AutoL WP 
rad some -kandedgeM taw 


c*FW*ra Min iwm 
not am 


MAYFAIR 

Secretary 

Commercial 
Estate Agents 
require secretary 
with word 
processing 
experience. 
Audio essential 
Salary £8,250 pa 
with review. 

Tel 01 408 3035. 

NO AGENCIES. 


SKY’S THE 
LIMIT! 
c£ 20 ,Q 0 D 

To pPAtoyura gdygnro 
ewapreneu in svn. 
fesentetodansaresBue | 
or burouml good 
KUnODoo- Unguues a 
asset as travel bmxvhI 
Httimun stals 
130/75 *^un. 


£ 13,000 + 
Mortgage Sab. 

This abswtmg post wrtaog tor 
te Eirutec HD of a major 
Stoddraking company requres a 
seuetary rath excellent City 
m porianco. a hgh degree at 
conDdertntty and someone wflt 
exceHenl organisational aid 
aAnms&abve state {sb/typmg 
100/70). Overall package k 
excellent incl. bonuses 

itraudiout te year. 

430 1551/2653 


Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd 


QBEEH MARY COLLEGE 
(BHmtity sf L os i oa l 

PERSONAL 

SECRETARY 

Centre for Casserefo 
Us SMIb 

The Centre I or CommerciaJ 
Law Studies needs a comps* 


ent. intefligent and mdustrtous 
Personal seaettuy to work 
lor its Director. 

Applicants should have good 
secretarial and organisational 
skills and be able to ad on 
their own initiative. 

Good shorthand is necessary 
and tuition in word-processing 
will be provided. The apporrt- 
ee will nave some secretarial 
back-up as the post is 
demanding and the duties 
wide-ranging. 

Salary on scale £8,132 • 
£9,764 including London 
Allowance. 

Please apply by letter to:- 

Tbe Assfctaat Pfirssanel Off- 
icer, Queen Han College, 
M3e End Road, undos El 
4 NS, gnaflsg rsi ns. 86/125- 


EXCEPTIONAL 

SECRETARY 

required for the Vice 
. Principal of a 
Hampstead college. 
Applications in writing 

to: 

'Hie Vice Principal, 
2 Arkwright Road, 
Loffifoa, NWS 6AD 


SECRETARY 

Directors of fine art 
publishing company 
need experienced 
personal assistant with 
good shorthand and 
typing. Opportunity to 
develop existing interests 
in Art and Narnia! 
History. Please apply 
with GV.to the 

Personnel Director, 
The Medici Society Lid., 
3442 Featonville Road, 
London N1 9HC. 


E1L00D + BEKEFITS 
BHM6BAL FBEHCH 

PA/Set 25-B. 100/60 rath mod 
eojeatond btdipounf and Oly 
apmnx. tor Diecw d 
pmnneflt Btentent Bank. City. 

Phone 437-8478 or 
734*3768 Rec Cons. 
133 Oxford Street. 

MILLER McNISH 


LEGAL EAGLES 
foe fee KW YEAH 
£ 18,808 


ore requtari by M wwwrata 
cMvayanong ana compaig 
ettui M t ia l Ira aetraxranto 
Ns prettgkius MM End to* 

FW more datofis ea* Jo at 





LA CREME DE LA CREME 


Marketing Manager's 
Secretary 


cMOOO 


Our client is a major international manufacturer and distributor of 
a wide range of pharmaceutical products based to the west of 
London, whose Marketing Manager now has an immediate need 
for an experienced secretary. 

Applicants should have excellent secretarial skills, including 
word processing and shorthand, and have the ability to work on 
their own initiative ensuring that the office operates effectively at 
all times. You will have had at least 5 years’ previous relevant 
experience and be looking for a job which will involve you fully in . 
the Marketing Division. In addition to a competitive salary we offer 
a range of benefits such as L.V.s and non-contributory Pension and 
Life Assurance Scheme. 

If you are looking for a job with challenge and variety, and are 
able to assume responsibility, then please send your C. V. to: 

Confidential Reply Service. Reference AWM 9557. Austin Knight 
Advertising Limited. 17 St. Helen's Place, London EC3A 6 AS. 

Applications will be forwarded directly to the client concerned. 
Therefore companies in which you are not interested should be 
listed in a covering letter to * A • 

su e P e“ nlialReplJ ' Austin 


flight mum 

Advertising 


SECRETARY/EA. 

TO MANAGING DIRECTOR 


Ourclimi. j picuiciou* hiph-iech induvnal •.umpjnv with j Sv.indun-bjn.-d Eutopr.ni 
H Q_. has rctenilv ■.-moved considerable expansion. Their success, combined with inicmal 
promotion, has created two exceptional opportunities lor Dnecim level seiKiacirs: with the 
skills, ihe am bn ions and ihe personal qualities ihji mold flourish in a ihrmny environment. 


PERSONAL ASSISTANT/SECRETARY TO MANAGING 
DIRECTOR 

UP TO 1 10.000 GRADUATE • FRENCH SPEAKING 
DEVELOPMENT PROSPECTS 


Apart from the msviem basic secretarial requirements ni WT operation and audio 
npinp. applicants si iciuld be ol graduate calibre, aged JS-JS.and have guod oral French. 
Personal presentation, serial skills and an oui^itint; personality are soughr ro workar ibis 
senior level, alont: «nih the inrellectual abiluv ro organise and co-oidinaie a demanding work 
schedule 

In return. weoHera compeiiiivc salary with development prospects in a rapidly 
expanding oijyni'jnun Fringe benetitsare aura ellwand include 5 weeks holiday, subsidised 
restaurant, pension and litc assurance schemes. iRetcicnce number 512 ) 


SECRETARY TO SALES AND MARKETING DIRECTOR 

U P TO £1.000 • DEVELOPM E NT PROSPECTS ' 

Applicant should be Oi A Icrel standard with a secrriarulqualihcalion. European 
language skills would be an advantage but n>si essential Orgamsanonal and presentation skills 
arc ol pnme importance- bur ihe successful applicant must also haw the pcrumjlirv and 
personal presc-nranon skills which this post demands. I Reference number 313 i 

Relocation expe nses will be paid if necessary. 

Send sour detailed C V i quoting appropnaic reference number), plus a recent 
photograph loSuc Bailee. AID Recruitment. Bourn m Grange. Bourton. Swndon. Wilidmr 
SNbSHZ. 


AJD-Recruitment 


-CONFIDENTIAL REPLY - 
A division of Alexander lame* and Dexter Limited 


Directors' 

Secretary 


Victoria 


up to £12,000 


Required by B.A.T Industries p.I.c.. one of the U.K.'s largest 
groups, at their Head Office in Victoria Street 

You will work for the Finance Directors, providing 
professional secretarial support. There will be a considerable 
workload of meetings and international travel toco-ordinate. 
You will not only have first class secretarial skills but also the 
maturity and experience necessary for dealing with company 
matters and people at Board level in the U.K. and worldwide. 

Attractive major company benefits include free lunches, 
flexible hours, interest-free season ticket loan and a non- 
contributory pension scheme. 

Please telephone or write to Kim Howard for an application 
form. Personnel Department. B.A.T Industries p.l.c., Windsor 
House, 50 Victoria Street, SW1H 0NL. Tel: 01-222 7659. 




B AT INDUSTRIES 


INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES 
P.A./SEC TO MD 
£12,000 + Banking Benefits 


A leading investment bank in EC2 is looking for a P.A./ 
Secretary to work closely with the M.D. and his small 
Securities team. We require someone who has both the 
diplomacy and authority to deal with people at all levels, and 
the ability to provide essential administrative and secretarial 
back up to the team. Age range mid-late 20s. Skills 100/60/ 
Wp. City background preferable. Please telephone 588 3535. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSUI .TA NTS 


COLLEGE LEAVER TO £10,000 

Do you want to understand what your boss is doing? Do you like the 
fdea of a people oriented job? Then join this small, friendly Executive 


Search Consultancy as flexible member of their successful team. They 
ask for 'A 1 levels, accurate typing and the ability to project a 
professional but welcoming manner to clients and candidates. For more 
details call 437 6032. 


Alternatively make 1967 the time to temp by joining our busy team. 



Personnel Secretary 

Salary to £9,500 pa 


Robson Rhodes is a major in m ol chartered accountants with 
17 Uh offices employing some 750 staff, of whom about hall 
are based in our London office. 


We are cuirently seeking a smart, self -motivated and well 
organised secretary to work for the London Personnel 
Manager and Personnel Officer. 

You should be educated to 0 Level standard, including Maths 
and English. You need la have had secretarial training 
followed by at least two years' experience. A minimum typing 
speed of GOwpm is' essential and some word processing 
experience - but framing will be provided for the AES+ and 
for use of our computerised personnel database system. 


You should enjoy working in a busy environment and be able 
to liaise with all levels of staff. 


Please apply in writing with concise CV fa: 


ROBSON RHODES 


Chartered Accountants 


Miss J Wilkinson, Personnel Officer 
Robson Rhodes. 186 City Rood. London EC1V 2NU 


Saviils is a dynamic and fast moving firm of surveyors covering all 
areas of the property market. We can offer stimulating jobs at 
competitive salaries in friendly, busy teams. 

We are looking for enthusiastic parmer/director level secretaries who 
enjoy involvement, client contact and thrive on hard work. Excellent 
skills and a willingness to turn your hand to anything are essential. 


CORNHILL, EC3 - particularly busy commercial office - City 
experience useful. Skills used include Wang, audio and «ome shorthand. 
SLOANE STREET, SWl - House department - team nt rhree need a 
good secretary u-hi » has all the qualities lisred above and also enjoys 
administration. 

KENSINGTON, W8 - this residential » <11 ice opened in Julv and is 
already expanding. Bright secretary required to help two negotiators in 
the Hats section. 

GROSVENOR HILL, W1 

Commercial - nwi openings. The fir* demands initiative, proven Board 
level' experience and organising ability (mainly shorthand). The second 
would suit a less experienced secretary who prefers a 9 to 5 routine. 

Both use Wang. 

Country House Residential - rare »ipportunity to join thisexrremeh' 
popular department. Skills needcJ include Olivetti, shorthand and audio. 


Please apply in writing with full curriculum vitae to the Staff 
Secretary, Christine Townsend. 


20 Gmsvenur Hill. Berkeley Square. London \V1X 0HQ 

01-499 8644 




French Pharmaceutical Company 
based in Paris seeks 



English mother tongue, fluent 
French, with excellent secretarial 
skills and preferably one year's 
experience. 

Her function will involve : 

•follow up of scientific or admi- 
nistrative files. 

•word processing. 

•organising meetings, telephone, 
telex... 

The successful applicant will be 
adaptable, will have a very good edu- 
cation and a cheerful nature 
Scientific studies or medical interest 
would be an asset. 


Good working conditions. 
Salary X 13 months. 
Social benefits. 

Bonuses. 

pleasant environment. 


The interested candidates are millet/ 
to send their handwritten application 
with full details together with a 
recent photograph to Media-Sjstem. 
2 rue Je la Tour-des-Domes 
73009 fans. FRANCE quoting refe- 
rence 1754 on the envelope. 



SENIOR 

SECRETARY 


An experienced and weli-qualified Secretary is required by leading 
Employer's Association. The work is varied and demanding and involves 
the provision of secretarial support JO three industrial relations executives, 
arrangement of conferences and appointments and other administrative 
duties. You must be used to working on your own initiative and first-class 
organisational ability is essential, together with word processor experience 
(preferably IBM Displaywriler). Preferred age 25-35. although applications 
from those outside this age range will be considered. 


The job offers a good salary, five weeks holiday and subsidised staff 
restaurant. 


Please write for further details, enclosing your Cl' to: 


Mr C G Pope 

Deputy Director & Secretary 

ENGINEERING EMPLOYERS LONDON ASSOCIATION 
23 Essex Street STRAND London WC2R 3AR 


STOP SEARCHING 

Up To £13,000 + Bonus 


Do you have the enthusiasm and flair to be a member of a young 
dynamic team in a highly successful executive search 
consultancy? If so. join this leading international firm in Wl. 
Working for two consultants you will be completely involved at 
the highest level with prestigious clients and candidates where 
discretion and charm are essential. There is potential to undertake 
independent research while providing fast efficient secretarial 
support (audio, 65 typing, 80sh, WP). Graduate preferred, 
immaculate appearance and a cheerful and positive approach 
essential. Age 23-33. Please ring 434 4512. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


INTERNATIONAL ^ 

office for a young secretary- who is an ability ro o ? j j ca | ajIC early H «’ 


lookine to move straight to the top. 
Working at their prestigious Mayfair 
head office w hich is the heart of the 
growing company, you w ill need to be 
able to handle extremely confidential 


r far the 18-2>yearoldd 


The Head Office of Branded Restaurants, 
part of the Berra & Host Group, have 
recently moved into new offices in 
Uxbridge. As you might expect from one 
of the leading companies in the leisure 
sector, working conditions and benefits 
are really first class. 


SECRETARY/PA 

to Personnel Director 


To provide a confidential secretarial service 
and also to become involved in some aspects 
of personnel administration. This position 
wilt suit someone with a least five years high 
level secretarial experience, good inter- 
personal skills Mid a strong sense of 
commitment. 


SECRETARY 

to Commercial Director 


in addition to first class secretarial skil ls, yo u 
should be numerate, a good administrator 
and be able to work under pressure. The 
person appointed win also be required to 
work for other senior managers within the 
Division. Good people skills and the ability to 
work on own initiative are essential. 


Familiarity with word processing would be an 
advantage. Excellent salaries are offered and 
extensive fringe benefits include 22 days 
holiday and Lv.’S. 


Please send your detailed c.v., including 
current salarv. to Tina Willouahy. Branded 


current salary, to Tina WiTtoughy. Br 
Restaurants, Oxford House, Oxford 


Uxbridge UB8 1 HX. 


•irectors Secre 

Search for Excellence 
£12,000 neg 


* I 'his iniemadoml firm of execucrc search 
X consultants base their 3C van success on 


X consultants base their 3C years su cces s on a 
reputation of professionalism cowards both diems 
and candidates. Thev specialise in senior level 
assignments in a wide range ot disciplines. 

Two senior level consultants in the London office 
require a senior PA who understands the need tor 
excellent communicative skills, discretion and first 
class presentation- The job entails being totally 
conversant with all assignments and a willingness 
to deal with any situation as it arises. In return the 
successful applicant will enjoy total involvement 
in an energetic and friendly environment. 


Applicants will have fast, accurate typing 
fTOwpm). excellent Enzlsh and be educated i 


(TQwpm). excellent English and be 
least ‘A’ level standard. 


Age indicator: 25-35. 

Please telephone 01-437 1564 


NASH 

Sc Associates Ltd 
21-437 15M 

Recruitment Consultants 130 Regent Street, 
London DTI R5FE 


584 

TM IHTBMUirOUL 
SCCRETJRIM. 
fifCRUtlUFM 



[private 


SECRETAR Yc£1 5,000 + Bonus 

A Company Director of a wefi known organisation 
is looking for a top das P A/secretary to help Mm 
organise his business and private engagements. 
You wifi be arranging his meetings and many 
social functions in England and abroad which 
would mainly be related to his new business 
ventures. You wffl need to be flexible as 20% of 
your tree win be spent out of the office. Up to 26. 
120/601 

COSMETICS WCt £10,000+ 

A young MD of a cosmetic company is urgently 
looking tor a young dy namic PAJsecretary to help 
run his busy office. You wifi be dealing with chants 
- department stores and retail outlets as wed as 
Die manufacturers both in person and on the 
telephone. You win also be helping him with the 
P.R. and marketing of the products. A test brain 
and good secretarial skats are a must c.22. 100/60 


| Please call us lor an interview until 6. 30pm. j 


COLLEGE LEAVERS 
START HERE 


Launch your career on a high note by coming 
to see us to bear about all the super jobs we 
have to offer. Our clients range from property, • 
personnel and P JL to hanking and investment. 
With good skills, smart presentation, good 
educational background and lots of enthusiasm, 
the world is your oyster. Ring us now oil- 


434 4512 
West End 


588 3535 

City 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


PR & AOMIN PA £15,000 

This Uaytzr based pubSc company sa* a PA n their Mnw rf ftanc 
Arars. Take on a duri rate is you assist WJi armWn 


Aran. Tale on a due ids is you assist MSI anaWn 

for ofreo aomnstreon. Aqc o Z7 - 40, good snortfnfiri & audio state 
reotanxL 

CHAIRMANS PA £13,000 neg 

With ssnor toad wpensra. Jan Be Qiaiinan at this pubbe eompaiy 
ORWWfO sperttoa w its- D arby. Royal Ascot and Lonls. lire oosMon 
has lass man 25% seasonal content Aged 25 - 40, 100/to skdls are 
fWEWed 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

£12.000 - £14,000 

Your tea tart on ywp B e iwwty gpointedDirBctoris whelp find new 
offices* Assist tram the outset mth projects, dealing mth aR aspects of 
than nuneraus sees and properties Good secratau skBIs as sought. 

Can 629 8863 


■HODGE 

[RECRUITMENT 


an ability to commurauw. - ■ 
essential. Skill ^ l > J v 

Excellent bcnelits include ej .4909175 
discount on hotels in me hanovep sc m 

UK. and abroad. f 


appointments UD 


OUT IN FRONT! So £11,000 


A calm approach, lots of stamina and * Secratend 
track record w® set the pace in if*®™*"*; 
demanding sound cM to a flying 

start by applying to Ref (B1) 55l/0400o. 


ON THE BALL! to £11,000 

Get involved as one at a smafl. friendly »am. A 
Secretari al afi-rounejer is needed, toncjht and confident, 
aUe on occasions to substitute for others and run the 
office. Ref- (A) 552/02002. 


SMASH HIT! £10,000 

Promotion is difficult to adwra, so a newly 
estabfished. progressive Sales Consultants require a 
keen Senior Secretary whose initiative. Administrative 
strength aid energy vwO help market many prestigious 
products. Ref (B) 551/04012. 


SKILLFUL* £9,000 

Provide the Admrustration skdls tar Departmental 
Managers and you’fl be more than a match tar this 
Covent Garden based high tech company. Your 
organisational abflrty wifi earn a benefits package 
inchxfing sp orts dub membership. Ref (FJ 551/04015. 


TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS! j 

There is a demand for experienced Secret ari es and j 


WP Operators sk£ed in Hermes Toptronic. Lexitron. 
: Digital Pen mates, Wordptex and Norsk Data Mmi 
| Computer Systems with Nods WP Program. 


PLEASE PHONE OR CALL IN TO: 

131/133 Cannes SL EC4 Tel: 625 8315 
22 Wormwood St EC2 Tel: 638 3845 


185 Victoria St. SWl 
19/23 Oxford SL Wl 


Tel: 638 3845 
Tet 828 3845 
Tet 437 9330 


l\»-i riiiiineiu l ■ni-i»ll.»m« 



LEGAL 
SECRETARY 


Otis Elevator pic. the international 
leader in the lift and escalator industry, 
requires an experienced Legal 
Secretary to assist our Company 
Secretary. 

Yon will have a minimum of n years 
experience in legal environs, have above 
average secretarial skills, be an adept 
organiser and be educated to * A ‘ level 
standard. You will also have good 
Audio Typing and Word ProcessorskiUs. 
We are offering an excellent salary as 
well as all the benefits usually associated 
with a large, progressive company. 


To apply, please send your c.v. or write 
for an application form giving salary 


for an application form giving salary 
expec rations to: 

Fad Greta, Ferawsel Officer, 

Wt Eteiater pic. 43-59 Cbphaai Raad. 
Lradoo.SGSSJZ. 


AX EQUAL OPPORTIWITTES EMPLOiEK 


OTIS 




I 


01-5849033 

Ml IHIBWAUOTAi. 
StCTfMWM. 
RtOAHTHENr 


TM 


01-5848931 

»HANofflE:cr«r 

WH'jHTStJfilDGE 

ICWOONSWl 




TEMPS 


We are willing to tram or cross-train you 
on to the ond processing systems our 
clients use (mainly WANG and 
MULTIMATE). Top rate depending on 
experience - overtime paid - well known 
companies in central locations - both 
short and long term work available. 
Shorthand and typing essential (90/60), 
languages useful. Age 20-35. 

We visit all our clients and interview all 
our candidates to ascertain individual 
requirements. Please call us for interview ] 
on 581 3977 or 589 0909. I 


•irr'-U'rT-rVr- >• rs- 


S- vart-^vt 5cqr;:ee s.roaticciJs.io^filV: 

style ‘ 

*1- 4^-*.. JJ, -. 1 - y+ JS . ' • 


}--r Vr :r:<-3pr.r.c-s-.ii ;-ara= \vt-tc r.rcctsar.ji-,'^ ' ;> 
!^^nc£jrij;'i.rT^:r£cVo.-c«c5aJH^l5ii.j£'- 

ir.v-:v':d ;b- ’ R 2); 

••.. V'-v ; - 

- ir; sKpiTcc-j-.-.-esau-.i r.ssfciar/ «iar/jsc3-b«3^t* 


■:o t be njh: person. " 

■'Xz-teir.dsiZ.g i full. C vi?. Pi-vi-. 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS 


^ chosen 


1387 as their year tar further expansion. 

Consultants 
mss a compeimg recnittmem 
top of a high basic salary we aoerate a 

comweni mat we offer one of the best deals in town. 


3 * rtc * confidence 

Amanda Newell or Mark Madsen on 


Call 629 8863 

: HODGE 


recruitaaeimt 



re* 


AN 









: GROUP 


ts’ — 


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-~n L'- -_ - ' 


=RCNTS 


BALL! 


HIT! 




RARY aSS ^ 


*HOH£ CK 
rtcsr St E-.4 
soS R K2 
s St Sw: 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


V 1. 


LA CREME DE LA CREMES 


television 


SECRETARY IN MARKETING 


scwiaJist t mi^ ices ^ xa ?!!j. ve has a demanding and highly 
nSr rS""*#? for the ad min Oration of a 

”nde pendent Wlh,n «* marketing field of 


ih e i fJ tT r SeCT ^ ** 8 challenging rale, and lo provide 
tS O SUppon nee ¥? y° u &>Sld be Xatedto ™ 
and ^ g00d - shorthand/ 

90 ( 50 wpm - You should also be capable of 
at leLT^e Sl Ve ;*£ e “ excellent telephone mannw. and 
year s experience in a broadcasting environment 

Salary will be in accordance with age and experience. 


ir you would like to apply, 
curriculum vitae, lo:- 


please write, enclosing your 


The Personnel Officer, 
Independent Television 
Companies Association Ltd_ 
Knighton House, 

56 Mortimer Street, 

London, 

WIN 8AN. 


WE ARE AN EQUAL 

OPPORTUNITY^ 

EMPLOYER. 


Independent Television 
Companies Association 


WANTED 


A new band of angels in Oxford Street 


Very soon after the twelfth night, the twelfth branch office or Office 
Angels will open its heavenly doors in Oxford Street. Which is excellent 
news for employers in Central London and even more exciting to the 
Capital’s temporaries and full-tmiejoti seekers who seem to have taken 
to ‘the Angels' warm, sympathetic and winning manner in a big way! 

And 7/e now need three more 'Professionals’ to complete this 
angelic team. Educated (minimum 'O' levels, 'A' levels even better), 
articulate (your verbal skills and presentation are key) and with a 
fondness for people (despite human idiosyncrasies), you should be in 
the 23-35 age group. Your experience could be in a caring profession, 
sales, personnel or a secretarial background. Your future could be 
stimulating, frustrating, depressing and gloriously uplifting — all in the 
same week, month and year. 

Dependent upon the skills and experience you bring us. your 
remuneration will be no less than S.KX50Q (f 
could reach £13,000 by next Christmas. 

Please write to me. in strict confidence, with brief career details; fi 

Laurence Rosen, Chief Executive, _ _ (L 

Office Angels Limited 
37 Golden Square, London W1R4AL 
Or telephone Maureen Donnelly, 

Director, on 01-734 1200 


BANKING BONANZA 


Package to £12,500 Plus Mortgage 
SW1 Early 20s 


In the fast moving world of international investment 
banking this is a super job for a bright enthusiastic young 
secretary. As part of a dynamic team you will need sound 
secretarial experience, good educational background and 
smart presentation. Some French or German useful, skills 
of 100/60/WP. Please ring 434 4512. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


MUSIC CO. 

M0 ot important Music Co. 

needs a level headed 
hardworking PA/Sec to keep 
things running smoothly. 

c. £10,000 deg. 


THEATRICAL AGENCY 

leading Theatrical Agency 
responsible for many hit 
stage productions need a 

totaliy reliable secretaryable 
to work without 

c. 



SOTHEBYS 


FOUNDED 1744 


Excellent opportunities exist at Sotheby's for 
secretaries with reliable skills { min 90f50wpm) to 
work in expert departments such as Chinese H irks 
nf Art and European Ceramics as well as our Art 
Courses. 

Hr have vacancies for college leavers (with or 
without shorthand) and for secretaries looking for a 
second appointment in an interesting and absorbing 
environment. 

Salary range £7,QQQ-£8,50Q pa. 

Please send your ctirriadum vitae to: 

Sotheby's Personnel Department, 
34/35 New Bond Street, 

London W1A 2AA. 


TELEVISION 

PRODUCTION 


MD of leading T.V. Prod- 

uction Company needs a 
PA/Sec to become totally 
involved in his many pro- 
jects. Good typing essential 

ror confidents . correspon- 
dence but more rmpo riant is 
a mature outlook and the 
flexibility to 

wide variety of tasks from 
meeting VIP's to organisms 
the Christmas party. Salary 
£8,000+. 


leaflake 

RECRUITMENT 
499-3663 or 499-3649 


WP WHIZZES 


WANTED 



PR & Travel 


£9,000 

If you are looking for variety and a fast-moving 
environment, then look no further. In the Press 
Office of this dynamic top-name agency you will 
assist 2 young Executives, co-ordinatmg projects, 
liaising at top-level and attending their annual 
overseas convention. You should be well 
organised and unflappable with a good work 

record and sound skills (80/60). Age24+. Please 
telephone 01-409 1232. 

Recnjifflitutl Consul (wits 


V>-l 

: ‘H 


5 expenew»dWP°P® 

lor Aecotmttntom 

eST Will cross PWL 

Iff 

etasoa. 

DebfiielWwi 

43943*4 
377-266® 


ARCHITECT'S PA 

HAMMERSMITH C.E8.500 


.s 


yjoRoFte* 

IThcWPConsult^i £3 



« a . 

;U3 


• -a 


re/sas io ea.«o ^ 

H»miR/JOUiaAUSteMJ» + 
Wntc dmL «M* » ^SeMUSlM 

uasuflE AW wasti®* 13 - 5 ™ 

Rn ®ew*l in* P* =“ ... pm 

magazines I 

Mom PA. mwiwmBii * 
ADVERTISING ET "- B " 

Be ice s« sw* 8 

Use 5« W" 

.HJBUSHWG 

C**t 504*. * 

MAHXETIN6 JWWW 

LreM-tac** 


lively, intelligent, adaptable! pa/administrator 
to bring order into the fives of the two 
Partners in this young expanding company, 
and assist in the daily, running of the 
business. Age 23+, minimum 3 years 
pvnarience. preferably in a creative 
Sy go/60 and WP skitts, willingness 
roTearn V about marketing, bookkeeping and 
computer essential. 

Telephone 01-602 8522. 




■f:rZ ** - 




Vfcjfw • 


.a. 

.-'V 



y 


MULTnJNGUAT 

* yL QERVICEQ ** 

WJ Recruitment fYw KMimn T*^- * 


THINK AHEAD 


There are kits of Bilingual Secretarial jobs for next 
■year - junior, middling and senior. For instance, you 
could use 


GERMAN and FRENCH with an International 
Bank in the City working fora Director. You would 
need to be 23 to 30 and able to cope with a lively 
crowd who live on their nerves, do lots of organising, 
have English shorthand (but you wouldn I use it 


much and there is a junior secretary) and be very 
flexible about how*. The job would lead far and 


maenwhite pays £1 1,OQO-£12,OGO plus banking 
package and overtime pay. 


FRENCH as top dog in a medium-sized, super- 
busy firm (which means overtime). Lots of scope 10 


and who would be generously rewarded. English 
shorthand of course. 


JAPANESE as secretary in corporate finance or as 
a researcher in the same investment bouse. 


01 836 3794 

f22 Charing Cross Road, London WC2H 0HR 


PA! Administrator 



£11,000 

Successful \%st-End based Company 
require a aUw professional person to join 
their team. Working with' their Director, 
you will be involved in marketing 
procedures, staff recruitment and 
personnel projects for large organisations 
as wtrll as liaising with consultants and 
providing full PA support. Senior level 
experience and good skills (80/50) 
essential Age 2S+. Please telephone 
01-4955787. 


GORDONYATES 


Rccinmnm Gmuham 


City Stunners ! 

£9,000 


A real go-getter with highly developed 
social skills is required by this fast-moving 
Company Vforktng with their young, 
dynamic Director you will meet, greet and 
entertain the City's most prominent 
personalities. Charm, confidence and 
initiative are essential as are an excellent 
education, good skills (80/50) and. above 
all a sense of humour. Age 21. Please 
telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDONYATES 


fctTUttmrnrCcciufcnxz 


r— is? 



S 


High-Flyer! 


c£9,000 

This dynamic major Advertising Agency 
deals with clients and companies all over 
the world. The Director of their Interna- 
tional Division is looking for a person to 
join him, arrange bis travel and hold the 
fort during his frequent absences. \bu 
should be bright, efficient, able to work on 
your own initiative and have good skills 
< 80/50 ) 4 Please telephone 01-409 1232. 

Recruitment Consultant* 


I— Tjro 



Personnel 


£10,000 padsage 

This Multinational Organisation are seeking 
an ambitious, professional person to join their 
Personnel Division. A developing role, you 
will be working together with the Administra- 
tion Manager, assisting with recruitment and 
liaisin g with staff at all levels. Lots of common 
sense and a cheerful, outgoing personality are 
a rousL Skills 90/55. Age 24+. Please 


telephone 01-409 1232. 

Recruitment Consultant!. 


SENIOR PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

£12,000 

Our diem is a brae American Brokers Finn, situated in the 
heart ol tire City. No two days are the same working for this 
company. You will have a keen interest in the computer 
industry working in an all male environment, so you need to be 
Strang and able to deal with people firmly. Also a sense of 
humour 1$ requiei Good levdofsicifls on the IBM PC with 
Mutomate, using your shorthand and adminstratlon expertise. 
Own office, excellent company perks. Your boss is a dynamic 
American Director. 

Ptaaae contact Ranks Jones 


— OFFICE — 
— SYSTEMS — 
RECRUITMENT 
— SERVICES — 


comawnramwauNKonH 


IW U*nbuy *we laitti WC2H SAD 
WflJhSirQl^ejOMOl 


OLDER APPLICANTS 
WELCOME 
£9,500pa pins bonus 

Senior secretary for wdi known Westminster 
Planning Consultants Chartered Surveyors. Heavy 
responsibility to run small office with intense job 
involvement. Shorthand vital 
Howard Sharp & Partners 
79 Great Peter St, SW1 
or phone evenings only 0732 454042 




BOOK-KEEPER/ADMINISTRATION 


A small film and video production company is 
looking tor someone to handle accounts to trial 
balance, and who ww, whan needed, also perform a 
number of other tasks - not all of them routine. 

Please write to: 


WE VISION GNOUP, Shirley Moose, 
2S-27 Camdoo Need, London, NW1 SLL. 



PA/SECRETARY 


The Company Secretary and 


npany 

Controller of Legal Services is seeking 
an experienced PA/Secretary with 
excellent secretarial skills. 

This is a management appointment 
requiring someone with discretion and 
diplomacy, who is literate, can com- 
municate clearly and with confidence, 
and can handle a busy administrative 
workload on his or her own initiative. 
Experience of working at board-level 
is expected. 

Please send your full cv, to arrive 
by 17 December, to Helen Auty, 
Personnel and Training Manager 
LWT, South Bank Television Centre. 
London SE1 9LT. 

An equal opportunities employer 



ILW/Tf 



The best wav to miss 


rayi 
the big chill 


• Immediate work 

• Competitive rales and a holiday pay 
scheme tfirougfwut the winter 

m The pidz of tfo best assignments in 
Landon 

• Professional and personal service 
Telephone Sally Dowson 
on 01-4390601. 



nobiM&HAiMlHniaiil. 

nMrmtr * 


ADVERTISING 

£11408+ 

IUL et ad. aomey a WCZ ■ 

Kvfcag tor 1 6rtfa. afjfcti PX 

«tea«UnQlagenouly 

nmnd«nflMg«ir 


iMVeoupBi. 

pnnaistf.EW ndwwM. 

ADVERTISING 

EU5Q0 

Piaagaaid igacymlooiBB 
fa aPJTtoi ftw am Swww 

(MUM. LM5 a mdWBIW 

ncaAn amMUk mat be a 
set^unv nti cm mrtw w. 
am. SflMds 100/60 wpm. 

MARKETING 


P JL/Sk iwonri B wak tar 
Umong Dnstt m> ata 
DnMdwnlwtatbi 


uvaagMX awfav « •*«« 


15* 


jtBirr. Ag& 2435. 5p«b 
IDO 


IDO/55. 
PB0PHTTY/ 

ADMmsnuTKm 

£7,500 

Sweaty m ured in wm* 
fa Lonoon AwsBaun 
a 1*84. picsatreB 
ptapetrai. DeM n W1. 




Mew York! Mew York! 


£8,000 


A superb opening for □ young, lively person to 
join the Advertising Depr of this American News 
Publishing Company. In a buzzy. informal 
atmosphere you will be working with 2 young 
Sales Executives, both excellent delegators, 
dealing wirh clients and Telephone queries and 
providing full secretarial support. Great people 
and prospects. Some work experience and good 
skills (80/50) requested Please telephone 
01-4934466. 


MERRYWEAIHER ADVERTISING & SELECTION 





NO SHORTHAND 
to £10,500 



f. 

OremastgconflKL 

Fubxmmu MC Btor 
jdiMBUMw or prapany 

sdeoltMCTm.S9wU 

UmesUd 


ttnkorCte^f.%31 


J oin ibis very prestigious firm of Mayfair estate agents as 
secretary u their senior partner. He would like the load 
« PA who is been to get to know his clients projects in 
fc«nL Somebody with a Bair for organising and getting 
things done. Modern offices and informal atmosphere. 60 
wpm audio ability nee d ed. 


YOUNG BANKING 
SECRETARY 
£9*500 + BENEFITS 


J oin this iniemaiional invesment bank as 

secretary on the fast moving trading floors. You’ll 
oced a lively out-going personality as you provide 
secretarial and administrative support in the team. Superb 
benefits indude fret fares to wort, generous bonus and 
mortgage subsidy. WP and 90/60 dolls needed. Please 
telephone 01-240 353L 


Elizabeth Hunt 



Reautmerit Consuftonb 


B&osvencx Sheet London Wl 



DAVIS CO 

SECRETARIAL 

01-734 6652 


c.£9,000 

KENT 


Kmgsdown is a Stockist and 
Trading house situated near 
Maidstone, dealing in the 
export of motor spares. Wa 
raqulre a mature and 
efficient admtnisirator who 
wsi also supervise staff and 
be willing to use their 
shorthand and typing sKOs 
where necessary in a last 
moving and pressurised 
enviro nm e nt 

Bor an application for and 
further details piaase contact 
Mrs Victoria BaWnger on 
844572. 


07321 


OIL COMPANY 

PA/SECRETARY 
TO M.D. 


For small exploration company 
based in Wl. As well as providing 
secretarial back-up, and some book- 
keeping. Knowledge of French 
useful Salary negotiable a.a.e. 

Tel 01-499 2262. 


FLIGHT OPERATIONS 
ASSISTANT 


This demanding job in a helicopter company near Heathrow, 
manag in g our own and customers aircraft, requires a high 
degree of responsibility and flexibility and a good standard oT 
nommeracy. 

Age 25-W, ctndkfaacs should be personable, used to customer 
liaMon at executive lewd, telephone work and be capable of 
taking dedsions. PA/gcneml operational experience desirable. 
Training win be given. Some shift work necessary. Own 
bapspon essential. Salary cO.OOO pa. 

Apply in writing with CV to: 

Capfeia M. Barrett, 

McAlpme Helicopters, 
Swalkmfieid Way, 

Hayes, Middlesex. 


THE ROYAL OPEBA MISt 


has an immediate vacancy tor a 
Junior Secratty in the Assistant 
Director's office. Fast accurate 
audio typing and some short- 
hand mvMi'l College leaver 
with good skills and some work 
experience considered. 


Applications with hri CV and 
telephone number to: 


PursooneJ Manager, 


Royal Opera House, 
Govent Gai 


Garden, 
LDBdon WC2E 9DD 


Mi 


EXECUTIVE CREME 


NABARRO NATHANSON 


SENIOR SECRETARY 
TO PARTNER 


(Company Law) 


A senior ftartner In the Company Law Department of this 
expanding Firm ofWest End solicitors is looking lor an 
experienced audio secretary 

The successful candidate wiB have a solid legal background at 
senlorlevel preferably in Company Law. The main requirements 
are fast accurate typing, a good command of English, an 
organised and flexible approach to work, and the ability to work 
underpressure. 

Age: 30+ 

TTie Firm offers a competitive salary; twice yearly reviews.- season 
ticket loan: four weeks' holiday: contributory pension scheme. 
Please send full c-v. to Miss R Brown, Nabarro Nathanson. 

76 Jermvn Street London 5W1Y 6NR 


9 


C 


PERFECTIONIST 




£13,500 


The Chairman of this public company 
appreciates the value of an rmmpccabte PA 
The rote is to co-ordinate a small team 
including junior secretary in order to provide 
total support for this prominent bu sinessman. 
The successful candidate will be 
involved in all aspects of the 
business including the 
organisation of social and 
business functions. Attention 
lo detail and a warm 
outgoing personality are 
essential qualities. 

Age: 25-40 Skills: 100/60. 



= RECRUITMENT 


cl. 


M P A N V 


5 GARRICK STREET 
! C0VENT GARDEN 
TEL 01-831 1220 


PA TO DIRECTOR 


Search and Selection Consultancy 

£ Negotiable 


We are an expanding and well-respected consultancy 
operating in the UK and international search and 
selection market. As jran of our expansion programme 
we are opening an Executive Division in January 1987. 
A PA is required to fill a key role in this new division. 
You are likely to be aged 23-30 and in addifion to 
having excellent secretarial skills, will have had . 
exposure to WP/computer systems. The ability' to deal 
with senior clients with tact and initiative is essential. 
There will also be some involvement in media/ 
recruitment advertising cami>aigns and other 
marketing-related exercises. 

If you feel callable of working in a demanding and 
invigorating environmeni, please call David Ryves on 
01-930 7850 or write enclosing brief details to tlie 
address below: 


ROBERT ♦ WALTERS • ASSOCIATES 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 
66-68 Haymurfcei London swiy«rf Telephone: oi -930 7850 


PERSONNEL MANAGER 


Imernauonal Fteigbl Forwarder invites applications 
from qualified personnel generalists with several 
years' experience for the above post, dealing with all 
aspects of personnel administration, recruitment, 
training and industrial rotations. Previous 
experience of pay-roll control essential. 

Salary dependent on age and experience, 20 days' 
leave, non-contributory pension scheme, life 
assurance plan and STL, are offered. 

Applicants, aged 24+, should send detailed CV. to 
Personnel Department, Scbenkers Li m ited, 51/53, 
Hatton Garden, London EON 8QJ, by 9th 
December, 1986. 


TRAVEL CONSULTANT 

£1(M>00+ pa after 12 months 


moat 


If you era wad Unvoted with an aptitude tor Mlflng, or have 
previous travel agency experience and ara locking for a fast 
moving, cltalenging fob In a very busy and progressive 
ratal agency, tien apply to us. Situated In Kensington with 
sfl licences. Travicom, United Apollo and tna i 
advanced technology, we are market leaders. 

Written applications and CVS to: 

Diane Brandon, 

TMflndm Travel Centre, 

42-48 Earis Court Road, 

London W8 6EJ- 



Secretary to 
Managing Director 


This demanding and Interesting position is an opportunity for a highly 
competent senior secretary to become involved in all aspects of business. 


UtSsmg your fufi range of abilities, you'll arrange meetings and travel, 
disseminate incoming Information, prepare regular reports and 
consolidate data on market shares and statistics for our companies 
worldwide. 


An excellent communicator with a high degree of tact, you must have 
faultless shorthand/typing and word processing skills and a knowledge of 
Spanish would be an advantage. 

Can you provide the total support our busy Managing Director needs? If 
so, please write with fun details of your background 
and experience:- Barbara Rottenova, Snr. Personnel 
Officer, EMI Music Limited, 20 Manchester Square, 

London W1A 1ES. Tel: 01486 4488. 




ATHORNCMeomcum 


c£1 3,000+ 

Mtg + Beeeffts 


He is a banking Chief 
Executive, he to one of the 

best-known lewfera in hi« 

field, and he needs a top 
caUbraPA. 

Totafly confident in your 
secretarial, org an is a tional 

and communication sktib, 

you wa need to manage 

hodwarae buSsiess 
aftalrs wttii great aptomb. 
gaining his appreciation as 
you do so. 

Poise professionalism and 
senior level financM 
experience are required to 



and! 

Age 25-36 

on OFFICE 
726 8491 




PART TIME 
VACANCIES 


WXl SECRETARY REQUIRES Z 

or 3 mornings a week far smaU 
property company Hoar* & «»- 

uy by amnwnwnL 72T 0024 
fltuum J E5S pk Fax SPMOf 
(do SHI Wd ny nan sootier 
N*w 281 8444 


PA 

SECRETARY 

£11400 

Sales/Marketing 

Director, 

design/ exhibition centra, 
Islington Green. Good 
shorthand eeeentuL 

PERSONNEL 

SEC/PA 

£10,500+ 

Partnershki Secretary of 


'Lane. 
Telephone 

Hampstead 
Secretarial Bureau 
01 435 8194/8879 


STEPPING STONES I 


ARE YOU AN IS* OEM? and 
wuuna io pot belli frcl in. lo 
targe uwad in i*** Marianne 
Deeartmenl. A* UW c«H>nl*n»- 
lonasaM Yourinvotvrmcnlili 
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crai nsmrti. 46 wrn- TyTHne 
win ifcvetap mu role is ns lull 
oatoHUi Saury cCfi.WO. flam 
lacr Sue Kvr*h*w 408-IA1A 

kMuHirn Sec Corns. 








































LAW 


Chancery Division . Law Report I 

UK tax relief for Jersey partnership 


Court of Appeal 


Padmore t inlan d Revenue SON said that the dispute 
Commissioners concerned the true construction 

Before Mr Justice Peter Gibson ?! S? ASHPSSL 


1 Whether the term “Jersey 
enterprise" conld include the 
business of a partnership as 
such. He conducted that it could 
beeavs* a partnership was a 
person or body of persons with 


THF. TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 TT 

Law Report December 3 1986 Court of Appe: 

rtnership Costs in divorce case can be claimed 

* ^Jcha^JaHwCobdeaLtd of brain uynnes he Appeal would inevitably hs 


tended to be excluded from the 
Arrangement. .Moreover as a 
matter of the ordinary use of 
language a partnership was a 
body of persons. 

More difficult was the ques- 


oeiore Mr justice trerer uiDson ~ jjj rtaubte Taxation Relief such. He conducted that it could language a partuersnip ™s a 

[Judgment December 1J rr_„__ __ i nrnmf >^ Uerav) Or- because a partnership was a body of persons. 

United Kingdom resident JL (S1 jof? t216) in person or body of persons with More difficult was the qoes- 
partnere 0 r a partnership that re , al £ n l0 innate that was the residence in Jersey by reason of tion of wheih g ^ The purpo^ 
was managed and controlled in taxuaver’s share of the profits of the management and control of of paragraph 3 of me Anange- 
Jersey were not liable to United rSartnerebip. the business of the partnership in Jersey, merit a jjarmership lmd a 
Kingdom income tax on their * controlled and man- Accordingly he held that the “residence" and if so what was 


shares of the partnership's prof- 
i is. . The double taxation arrange- 
ment made in 1952 between 
Jersey and the United Kingdom 
applied to afford such partners 
relief 

Mr Justice Peter Gibson so 
held in the Chancery Division in 
a reserved judgment allowing an 
appeal by Mr Maurice Padmore 
from a determination of a single 
special commissisoner. 

The taxpayer was a United 
Kingdom resident and a mem- 
ber of a partnership, the busi- 
ness of which was controlled 
and managed in Jersey. The 
partnership, carrying on a busi- 
ness of furnishing a world-wide 
renewals service for patents and 
trade marks, had over 140 
partners, the majority of whom 
resided in the United Kingdom. 

The partnership had always 
been carried on from Sl Helier 
and its day-to-day managment 
carried on by two partners who 
were resident in Jersey. 

In December 1979 a tax 
inspector refused to allow a 
claim by the taxpayer under 
section 497 of the Income and 
Corporation Taxes Act 1970 for 
relief from United Kingdom 
income tax in respect of his 
share of the partnership's profits 
for the years from 1975 to 1982 
inclusive. An appeal by the 
taxpayer against that refusal was 
dismissed by a special commis- 
sioner. The taxpayer appealed. 

Mr Peier Whiteman. QC and 
Mr Patrick Soares for the tax- 
payer, Mr Andrew Park QC and 
Mr Alan Moses for the Crown. 

MR JUSTICE PETER GIB- 


which was controlled and man- 
aged in Jersey. 

Under English law a partner- 
ship was not itself a legal entity 
— it was the partners carrying on 
the business as principals aud as 
agents for each other { Sadler v 
Whiteman {[1910] 1 KB 868)). 

The legal position of a Jersey 
partnership was not entirely 
clear. However, Jersey tax law 
was modelled on the United 
Kingdom Income Tax Act 1918 
and was not materially different 
from UK legislation relating to 
the taxation of partnerships. _ 

Obviously many possibilities 
could arise of two countries 
seeking to tax the same income. 
Hence the growth of double 
taxation arrangements between 
countries to provide relief from 
double taxation. The 1952 Jer- 
sey Arrangement was one of a 
large number entered into by the 
Untied Kingdom at tbat time in 
like form with overseas terri- 
tories. 

Paragraph 3(2) of the 


Arrangement provided that the 
“profits of a Jersey enterprise 
shall not be subject to United 
Kingdom tax unless the enter- 
prise is engaged in trade or 
business in the United 
Kingdom — 

By paragraph 2(1) a person 
was defined as including “any 
body of persons"; a Jersey 
resident meant “any person who 
is resident in Jersey" and “Jer- 
sey enterprise" meant an enter- 


prise carried on by “a resident of less correct. 


partnership was a Jersey enter- 
prise. 

2 Whether the exemption 
from United Kingdom tax of the 
profits of the partnership ex- 
tended also to each of the 
individual United Kingdom res- 
ident partner’s share of such 
profits. He concluded that it did 
not because a partner bad an 
enterprise but by reason of the 
residence of that United King- 
dom partner, it was not a Jersey 
enterprise and so the taxpayer’s 
share was liable to tax. 

Mr Whiteman supported the 
commissioner's conclusion on 
the first question but submitted 
that he had erred on the second 
because no partner had a busi- 
ness separate from that of every 
other partner of the partnership 
and that as the profits of the 
partnership were not subject to 
United Kingdom tax each 
partner’s share of the same 
profits was also not subject to 
tax. 

Mr Park attacked the 
commissioner’s conclusion on 
the first question, submitting 
tbat a partnership for the pur- 
poses of the Arrangement was 
not a “person” or “body of 
persons" and that the partner- 
ship did not have a residence in 
Jersey. He did not seek to 
support the commissioner’s 
reasoning on the second ques- 
tion but said that the conclusion 
reached thereon was neverthe- 


Jersey". 

The commissioner stated that 
he had two questions to deter- 
mine: 


His Lordship said that a 
partnership was a “body of 
persons”. It was highly improb- 
able that partnerships were in- 


ment a partnership nao a 
“residence" and if so what was 
the test to determine such 
residence. 

The commissioner on that 
point had been correct in decid- 
ing that an assessable entity had 

to be treated as having a 

residence somewhere and that 
such residence was to be deter- 
mined, as it was for companies, 
by the control and management 
factor. 

Turning to the second ques- 
tion that the commissioner had 
to determine, the point was 
essentially a short one. The 
starting point was the language 
of paragraph 3(2). That was 
unequivocal in its me anin g. 

All the profits of a Jersey 
enterprise were not to be subject 
to United Kingdom tax — that 
meant that those profits whether 
earned in Jersey or in the United 
Kingdom or anywhere else were 
not to be subject to tax save only 
to the extent that they were 
attributable to a per m a n e nt 
establishment in the United 
Kingdom. _ . _ 

It was implicit in paragraph 
3(2) that a share of the profits 
was exempted if the profits 
themselves were exempted. 
How could a share of the profits 
not be exempt when all the 
profits were exempt? 

The conclusion was that para- 
graph 3(2) exempted from 
United Kingdom income tax the 
share of a United Kingdom 
resident partner of the profits of 
a Jersey partnership. It followed 
that the taxpayer’s appeal was 
allowed. 

Solicitors; Needham & Grant; 
Solicitor of Inlan d Revenue. 


Pritchard v J. H. Cobden Ltd 
and Another 

Before Lord Justice O’Connor, 

Lord Justice Croom-Johnson 
and Sir Roger Orm rod 
[Judgment November 26] 

Although when the injuries 
sustained by a plaintiff resulted 
in tbe breakdown of his mar- 
riage, the plaintiff was not 
entitled to daim tbe financial 
loss arising from the provisions 
made in matrimonial proceed- 
ings as a head of damages in a 
personal injuries action, the 
court nevertheless had a dis- 
cretionary power to order the 
defendants xn the personal inju- 
ries action to pay the taxed costs 
of the plaintiffs divorce. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
refusing an application fry tbe 
defendants, J. IH. Cobden Ltd 
and Malcolm Cyril Parra ri for 
an alteration of an order of “no 
order for costs" in an appeal 
where their Lordships on July 
30 reduced the damages 
awarded to the plaintiff; Vivien 
John Pritchard (The Times Au- 
gust 27). 

Mr Pi eis Ashworth, QC and 
Mr Benjamin Browne for the 
defendants; Mr William 
Growther, QC and Miss Rosa- 
lind Foster for the plaintiff 


had suffered. 

The parties had thought that 
the position was covered by 
Jones v Jones ([1985] QB 794) 
and that any financial provision 
arising out of the divorce which 
could be said to be a burden on 
(be plaintiff could be passed on 
to the defendants. 

There was so guidance in the 
Jones case as to bow thai should 


solicitor and own client basis if 
not agreed". 

When the matter last came to 
the Coun of Appeal the defen- 
dants appealed against a num- 
ber of assessments of damans 
in tbe personal injuries claim 
and also appealed against the 
quantification of the £53,000 
arising from the matrimonial 
proceedings. , , 

It was accepted tbat the Jones 
was binding on the _ court 


be dealt with. Since the size of and it was thought that it 
the plaintiffs claim « to be not Possible 


LORD JUSTICE 

O'CONNOR said that tbe plain- 
tiff was grievously injured in an 
accident The defendants admit- 
ted liability and the only ques- 
tion at the trial was one of 
damages. 

Some years after the accident, 
while the personal injuries ac- 
tion was still awaiting trial, the 


governed fry the provision for 
his wife, it was thought best that 
the two proceedings should be 
heard fry the same judge at tbe 
same time. _ * m 

Mr Justice Swmton Thomas 
heard the matrimonial proceed- 
ings and the personal injuries 
action. Casts were incurred by 
three parties. 

Tbe judge decided that 
£53,000 of the provisions made 
in the matrimonial proceedings 
for the wife should be passed on 
to tbe defendants. 

As far as costs were con- 
cerned, the parties handed in an 
agreed order. In those circum- 
stances tbe order of tbe coun 
was drawn up and provided that 
rfoTTTggfg totalling £434,126 to- 
gether with interest of £16,806 
be awarded to tbe plaintiff. 

Tbe order further provided 
that the defendants do pay the 
plaintiffe* costs “such costs to be 
taxed on a party and party basis 
if not agreed together with all 
costs incurred by [the plaintiff] 
or payable by him to [his wife] 
in respect of the divorce and 

ancillary relief proceedings 

such costs to be taxed mi a 


claim lay. Bui when that case 
was considered, it became 
apparent to the court that the 
point that damages were avail- 
able in respect of a divorce 
caused by the personal injuries 
was conceded and was not 
argued there. 

The Coun of Appeal then 
held that because tbe point was 
not argued it could be reviewed. 
The Court of Appeal did review 
it and came to the conclusion 
that the Jones case was wrong. 

Therefore aD the damages 
stemming from the matrimonial . 
proceedings were disallowed as 
it was said to be against public 
policy. It was said that the 
alteration in the financial pos- 
ition as a result of a divorce 
should be disregarded because it 
was an adjustment of the family 
assets and not a loss which could 
be claimed. 

The plaintiffs d am ages were 
therefore reduced and the order 
was drawn np on August 26, 
1986. There was no order as to 
the costs of the appeal and 
therefore no provision was 
made for dealing with the order 
for costs below. 


The defendants now submit- 
ted that, if asked, the Court of 
Appeal would inevitably have 
altered that pan of the judgment 
below ordering the defendants 
to pav the costs of the divorce. U 
would have been set aside. 

it was said to be an accident 
or omission by counsel not to 
have asked. The defendants said 
that this case was similar to In re 
inchcape ([1942] Ch 394) where 
it was self-evident that, if asked, 
the order would have been 
made, and therefore the slip rule 
applied. 

For the plaintiff it was 
submitted that the present case 
was different because it was 
never argued whether the costs 
of a divorce could be recovered. 
The judgment covered the point 
but it was never argued and 
therefore tbe slip rule did not 
apply. 

The order had been effected 
and unless tbe slip rule applied 
nothing could be done. The 
plaintiffs argument was correct. 

Aidcn Skipping Co Ltd v 
Imerbulk Ltd < The Times June 
2. 1986: [1986] 2 WLR 1051) 
was authority for tbe propo- 
sition that the court's discretion 
as to awarding costs extended to 
ordering a party who was not a 
party to tbe proceedings to pay 
the costs. 

In all (he circumstances of the 
case it was not unfair that the 
defendants should be held to the 
order. The application was dis- 
missed with costs on an indem- 
nity basis. 

Lord Justice Croom-Johnson 
and Sir Roger Ormrod agreed. 

Solicitors: Trethowans. Salis- 
bury; C. A Norris. Ringwood. 


Waiver of privilege Spent convictions 


Pozzi v Eli Lilly & Co and 
Others 


Domestic violence is 
no mitigation 


Improper observation 
to the jury 


Regina r Cutts 

Die fact that a serious assault 
occurred in a domestic scene 
was no mitigation whatsoever, 
and no reason for proceedings 
not being taken and condign 
punishment following in a 
proper case. 

Die Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Lawton, Mr Justice Mi- 
chael Davies and Mr Justice 
Roch) so stated on November 
20 when dismissing the appeal 
of Harry Cults against the 
sentence of 18 months' 
imprisonment imposed on him 


time that the message was 
understood in clear terms by 
courts, by police forces, by 
probation officers and, above 
all. by husbands and boyfriends 
of women, that it was no 
mitigation of a serious assault 
that it had occurred in a 
domestic scene. 

That did not mean, of course, 
that for every tiff in which a slap 
was exchanged or given by one 
to another the involvement of 
the police and prosecution 
ought to follow. That would be 
taking what their Lordships had 


on June 18. 1986 following bis just said out of its context and 
plea of guilty on May 21 at out of proportion. 

Acton Crown Court (Judge 


Acton Crown Court (Judge 
Palmer) to an offence of causing 
grievous bodily harm to his 


But the idea that in some way 
serious assaults were rendered 
trivial because of a relationship 


' ... r . c UIV Lll ULU 1 UOL. VI O 1 V'UJUVtUIMp 

W u lh 7^° nlrary of marriage or friendship was 

l h 5.^ Cesa8aJnSllhePerSOn completely outdated. In a 


Act 1861. 

MR JUSTICE MICHAEL 
DAVIES said that it was high 


proper case proceedings should 
be taken, and condign punish- 
ment should follow. 


Regina ▼ Smith (William) 
Regina ▼ Doe 

It was improper fora judge in 
summing up to a jury to make 
the observation that when a 
submission had been made at 
the close of the prosecution case 
that there was no case to answer, 
if he had not thought there was 
sufficient evidence of identifica- 
tion available to the jury, be 
would have withdrawn the case 
from them. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Watkins, Mr Justice 
Drake and Mr Justice Ognall) so 
stated on November 25 when 
allowing the appeals of William 
Smith and Henry Doe against 
their convictions on July 24, 
1986 in Reading Crown Court 
(Judge EUison and a jury) of 
burglary. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 


the absence of tbe jury, and the 
question as to whether or not 
there was a sufficiency of ev- 
idence was one which was 
exclusively for the judge. 

His consideration of that 

S ' m and his decision 
not be revealed to the 
jury lest it wrongly influenced 
them to the conclusion that, 
because the judge had been 
satisfied that there was enough 
evidence for them to consider, 
there was enough there on which 
they could convict. 

In tbe circumstances of this 
particular case, however, that 


Tbe disclosure of part of a 
letter pursuant to a general older 
of discovery in the course of 
litigation between the parties 
constituted a waiver of privilege 
in respect of the whole contents 
of that tetter. 

Mr Justice Hirst so held in the 
Queen's Bench Division on 
November 26 in a judgment in 
open court following a bearing 
in chambers when he allowed 
tbe defendants' summons for an 
order that the plaintiff produce 
to the defendants a complete 
copy ofa tetter from his general 
medical practitioner to his solic- 
itors; see also The Times May I, 
1986; August 2, 1986. 


distinct documents each of 
which is complete". 

In >hat rewp there bad nisn 
been disclosure on discovery 
and the court had not drawn any 
contrast between the two: see 
also General Accident Fire and 


D v Yates and Others 


A judge had no discretion in 
the trial of a civil actios to 
preyem cross-examination as to 
a witness's previous convictions 
if it was relevent to the witness's 


Life .•Assurance Corporation Ltd credibility, unless the convio- 


r Tamer ([1984] 1 WLR 100, 
1 14). Die evidence before the 
court went nowhere towards 
establishing different subject 
matter or different modems. 


uon was spent under the 
Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 
1974. 


Where a party in such an 
action wished to cross-examine 


Deportation appeals 


a witness as to convictions 
which were spent under the 
1974 Act, he would have fiisi to 
satisfy the judge that it would 
not be possible for justice to be 
done unless such cross- 
examination were permitted. 

Tbe Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Purchas and Lord Jus- 
tice Nourse) so held on Novem- 
ber 27, dismissing an appeal by 
the defendants from an order o’f 
Judge Brown. QC. who. silting 


as a judge of the High Court on 
March 3. had refused to permit 
them to cross-examine the 
plaintiff as to three previous 
convictions. One of them had 
then already become spent for 
tbe purposes of the 1974 Act and 
the others had become spent on 
the day of the hearing in the 
Court of Appeal. 


observation standing by itself Atlantic Insurance Co v Home 
would not be a reason for Insurance Co ([1981] 1 WLR 


declaring that the verdicts were 529) held resulted in a waiver of 
unsafe or unsatisfactory. Un-. privilege of tbe entire contents 


to the defendants a complete Regina t Immig ration Appeals 
copy of a tetter from his general Tribunal, Ex parte Chtunon 
medical practitioner to his solic- and Another 

iS? PEZE"* 1 May l ' Regina v Immigration Appeals 
1986, August 2, 1986. Tribunal, Ex parte Bano- 

MR JUSTICE HIRST said Orais and Another 
that there was no relevant When appealing against a 
distinction between tbe situa- deportation order under section 
tion in the present case and 1 5 of the Immigration Act 1971, 
disclosure of part of a document or against a notice of intention 
by counsel in open court which to deport by an adjudicator,' 
the Coun of Appeal in Great time had begun to run when 
Atlantic Insurance Co v Home service was effected. 

Insurance Co ([1981] 1 WLR Mr Justice Hodgson so held in 
529) held resulted in a waiver of the Queen's Bench Division on 


ticeS of intention to deport made 
against Halima Husah Bano- 
Ovais and Huma Lazi. 

In both cases notices of 
intention to deport were sent by 
recorded delivery to their last 
known address and were re- 
turned marked “gone away". 


fortunately, much had gone 
wrong in this trial, which had 
been a difficult matter for the 


said that submissions of “no judge and counsel in some 
case to answer” were made in respects. 


of the document “unless the 
document deals with separate 
subject matters so that the 
document can in effect be 
divided into two separate and 


November 25, allowing orders 
of certiorari to quash deporta- 
tion orders made by the sec- 
retary of state against Mariam 
Bibi Chumun and Begam 
Chummun, and to quash no- 


MR JUSTICE HODGSON 
said that he was bound to find 
on the authorities referred to. in 
particular. R r County of 
London Quarter Sessions. Ex 
parte Rossi ([1956] I QB 682) 
and Hewitt v Leicester Corpora- 
tion ([1969] 1 WLR 855), that 
the two notices never took effect 
to start the two periods of 14 
days running, and that therefore 
the two deportation orders had 
to be quashed. 


LORD JUSTICE NOURSE 
said that the 1974 Act had had 
far-reaching and dramatic con- 
sequences. and section 7(3). 
which provided that the coun 
could admit evidence of pre- 
vious convictions if justice 
could not be done except by so 
doing, imposed an requirement, 
additional to relevance and 
materiality, which bad to be 
fulfilled before the judge's dis- 
cretion to admiL such evidence 
arose. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


TEMPTING TIMES 


NON-SECRET ARIAL 


SFDAT SPA (TEKSID) 
PA&T-TIME SECRETARY 


INTERNATIONAL LEISURE 
GROUP PLC 


SPORTY SECRETARY 
COLLEGE LEAVER 
c£8,000 


with knowledge of Italian required for 
Genera! Commercial Manager. Duties 
include customer and works contact 
on sales matters, general secretarial 
duties and office administration. 
Hours flexible. Salary £6,000 per 
annum plus bonus. 5 weeks holiday. 

Please ring 
Mrs Mirella Wells 
on 01-225 1644 


The Chairman and Managing Director's office of Has major 
pubic company is currently looking for a shorthand 
typtst/Jumor secretary. The work Is varied and Interesting, as 
you wot*) expect tram the Head Office of this bating leisure 
group. The position would entafl same (nvotvememt wtth two 
mem charities. The variety Chib of Greet Britari and The 
Prince's Trust 

Apart from accurate shorthand typing skats, you wfl need to 
be enthusiastic, writ presented, and conscientious. You 
cannot be a dock watcher. 


Swb and (ta) tqmdh in ihc teaman. ScCKBrid coOac kancr fA" 
Inch! Hi join fhrodhea of ModBM Bankx h.lbc Cln. Use yourSH. 


typinc. Icon loose ni IBM WPatdamvimii^iMddaria BrSom 
non ib iodide IbJOOl £1 per dvr LVv boon, pnjfii dare: — — mr 
mtaidy. bdp wdl fao. A*c I8+. SUb KtyJO "Ora. M u a &ME . 


Love+Tale 

Appointments 


01-283 0UL 


write with your current CV to: Miss Louise Stade-Getts, 
International Leisure Group pfc, StocMey House. 130 Wilton 


RECEPTIONIST/ 

SECRETARY 


UNIVERSITY 
OF LONDON 


Road, London SW1B B.Q. 


Iwtb WP sk9s rewired for small! 


but Rratytatifeets office in South 
Mahon amt un. 


No Agencies 


COLLOQUIAL HKMCX A Or- 
man. Wed known CUy 
company seeks PA (EngUaa 
monw long nr) for a busy and 
very Charming director. nm ts 
a true PA rale wm> a lot or ad- 
mumtraUon hivoiwa 

Shorthand required. 00,000+. 

: Phone 683 006S Meredith Scon 
RecraUmciu. 


Motion arest Wl. 

Writs with CVs to: 

ADP, 

45 South Molton St, 
London W1Y 1HD. 


INSTITUTE OF 
NEUROLOGY 


AN EXCELLENT opportunity to 
part of the IU< of a 
turning prrvafe school in Ken- 
sington. SI Thomas's London 
Day Schools require a school 
Secretary for on interesting and 
responsible post Ln a busy 
o hoel nine*. Applicants should 
De uuellnetii. calm. energetic 
and dipkonauc with Uie ability 
lo run an cffiaeni office They 
musf enloy and or eapabfe of 
dealing with children, parents 
and leather*. Monday le Frt- 
day. Sam-epni Holidays efghi 
weeks oor year, lunches provid- 
ed Salary negotiable. For 
further dclam please contact 
IkUss Jin hellium on Ol 938 
1931 


RECJfUIIKNT CONSULTANT 

Over the five yean of lb 
exMancv. Synergy has bum up 
a reputation for the excellence 
ot lu service 10 both cUnb and 
applicants which is second lo 
none. We are now seeking a 
COraidtant who has Bie ability 
lo appreciate Die benefits wMdi 
naturally result front providing 
such a service. The Meal penon 
for this challenging position wtU 
be Iasi moving, have a retentive 
mind, a down lo earth lirtcHI- 
gence and a professional 
attitude to working. Salary; 
c£ 12.000 pa. U you would like 
lo know more about Ihb vacan- 
cy. please telephone; June Cox 
or David Russell. Synergy, me 
recruitment consultancy. Ol- 
63V 9633. 


FRENCH: COLLERC LEAVER 

Secretary wtth good French In 
Min smaH West End offico ot 
major French Ann. An Meal 
first Mb wtth a friendly uwr. 
Shorthand not vuaL but good 
typing a. £8.000 + extras. Mul- 
tilingual ’Services meoruUmeni 
Consultants! 01-836 5790/5. 



PERSONAL 

SECRETARY 


Ent husi as ti c and ratable per l 
son required for interesting | 




post as Pwsooal Secretary to 
the Secretary of the Institute. 
Good secretarial bmcs requir- 
ed. including word processor 


, r wBrngness to 
learn). AMUty to wore quickly 
and accuately under press- 
ure. Ptoasam office anriook- 
mg garden square neer Russ- 
« Square tube station. Gen- 
erous holidays. Salary on 
scab £7,278 - £8,632 ind- 
usiva 


HI 2nd lobber wan good 
I exper i ence tekgH 90/50) enUwi- 

stasdc and well prasoiM has lx 
made far 1987 with 2 Impor- 
tant executives of maior Ora 
1 supplying staff etc. loHospbais. 

cCAAOO. 6 wrta hoi*. Joyce 
GUinexs 01-689 8807/00X0 
Otec Cota). 

TRHJNGUM. (French + Ger- 
man) Sec to Director. 
Languages must be esceflcnL 
Responsible p c^ fl t lw i ffaa il ng 
wnb diems on the telephone 
and to wyn. Exd pr es e natt on 
+ outgoing personality essen- 
tial. £9-Eio.aoo ue. Merraw 
Emu Agy one Language Spe- 
daustt) 01-636 1087. 

PROOF REARER Start a non-sec 
career whb this leading man- 
agement co n sulta n cy. 

Performing an Important and 
r es po n s i ble function, you win 
need esc English and lola of 
tacL Satiny: to C&500 pa. 

Synergy, the recruitment consul- 
laucy. 01-637 9653. 

RESEARCH SECRETARY /PA. 
nddaOTM- far Director of Finan- 
cial Group in CUy. Wanted • an 
easy going peraonamy. short- 
hand and wp shuts. Languages 
useful. Call oi-377 8600 iCtty) 
or 01-45 9 7001 (West End) 
SECRETARIES PLUS - Tbe 
Secretarial GonBuUams. 

FANTASTIC JOB. Trainee PA to 
weo-knnwn writer. Tote! lo- 
voivefneal. world- wide travoL 
answer letters, drive cars. etc. 
Suggested age 18-BZ. DetaOe 
and phone number to dulsto- 
nher Lanoe. 1 8a CrevO* Place. 
NW6 BJH. 


WORK IN THE 
WEST END ON CITY 
WITH WORDPLUS 

Wu need Operiencad 
temporary WP secretaries/ 
operators to fain our tram of 
(JOfesstangfa. 
W&ng/IBM Daptaywriur/ 
Phap^W Onfate r/MUtenaie 
and many more. 

JUHMOanM MI43M344 j 
CUBSTK(C8 v)3Z7-2H8l 




LETTING MANAGER' 
BATTERSEA OFFICE 


| Telephone 377 8600 1 


LUord Flush- 


We have a key vacancy for our new office 
soon to be opened in Lavender Hill. We 
require someone with considerable 
experience in .residential lettings to 
establish our Rentals department m the 
area. 


I The WP Consultants ] 


BUST TRUES! Joto» our tempo- 
ray team for a happy 
December! Top rates au Atus. 
Covent Garden Bureau. 110 
Fleet SL EC4- 363 7696 
ROSY WEST OR Consultancy 
seeks temp sec early Jan 87 far 
6 mots, kag hours. £7.00 pn. 
TefcOl-248 0446 


SITUATIONS WANTED! 


We are looking for a dynamic and self 
motivated person to join our team. High i 
rewards will be paid for profit related 
success. Co Car, PPP. 

Please apply in writing to:- 

Christine Davis, 

Area Director 

116 Kensington Huh Street 
London W8 



Zl* £10.3 60. Ejiiov a full and 
'acted wvnarUUMmin poal- 
Uon wild these vnall friendly 
Cllv Finance Hroecrv 90+ 
shorthand and wp CMlOl 377 
8600 iCIlyi or 01439 7001 
End) SECRETARIES 
PLUS ■ TJX- Secretarial 
Consultants. 


DYMAMC DOWN. Tip-lop PA 
See. do SH. c£l 1.000 Interest- 
ing A varied duties for senior 
Assoc. 499-0768 LSL Rec Cons. 


COLLEGE LEAVER SEC'S, inter. 

views now far lively ton tabs 
‘ via Govent Carden Bureau. 1X0 
Fleet SL ECU. 3S3 7696 


n-AUAH: LEGAL Secretary of d- 
ther EnflbUi or Italian mother 
tongue itbe other language has 
10 be of a very Mgh standard) to 
UJue on an Involving rote as sec- 
retary to a partner in a law 
Orm. Three plus year's experi- 
ence. Shorthand unnecessary, 
area £9.000. MurtlUngual Scr- 
1 Ices iRecruitroeiu Consultants) 
01-836 5794/8. 


RECEPTIONIST. This well 
known company at manage- 
mem conviliano- require a well- 
-xoonH-d person wild poise and 
personam v -swhcniit not only 
to he a rccopbotusi bin also hi 
de.u with Partners private busi- 
ness. I pan from drilling with 
applicants, duties are varied 
and Mill invohe elf KienUs eon- 
irollinu iniersieu- rooms, 
running rrcepllc-n area, arrang- 
ing me-wnger sere ice. pius 
some ovcrfloM typing. This b 
an e\miieni opponurulv for 
anv one inlereslcd in a vers peo- 
pie orientated business Typing 
Sy*" Excellent satan- Age 
S-fl-Jrt Ol~i9oet 75 Finesse Ap 1 
pninuneni* Ud >Riv Const. 


CHARITY to £9.000: Do you love 
luggllng 6 bolls In the air and 
gnlng your all lo a days worle? 
Then you will find providing 
sec and admin support 10 2 se- 
nior executives of lilts small, 
busy. 3rd world charity near 
victoria rewarding and stimu- 
lating. In I urn your excellent 
memory, organised approach, 
common sense and sense ot hu- 
mour will be highly appreciated 
by them. F*H aec. typing* WP 
exp. Age 20's. Please telephone 
437 6032 Hotel ones Rec. Cons. 


PROPERTY £8.750 - brtgM. seen- 
presented person required by 
prominent nrm of Estate Agents 
based in the heart of the weal 
End. WHMng wllfi a great 
bunch of people & dealing with 

leisure properti es, you win 

organise meetings and I undies, 
produce reports and variations 
and generally become loully In- 
volved. Good audio typing 

essential. Age: 21+. Please tele- 
phone 01-493 8787 Gordon 
Yalta Consultancy. 


AovnmswG - to £ 9.750 - e*- 
reUeni prospects far a bright 
orUcutale A on-tne-ball young 
person 10 tom this large Adver- 
tising Company. Working as 
pari or a team you wfli 'hold ihe 
fair when the Manager H 
away, deal with au the admin & 
provide run sec back-up. Some 
work experience & good audio 
typing skills emtuaL Age; 21 +. 
Please telephone 01 409 1232 
The Week Shop. 


CMLDROTS Onrw E9JDOO. 
Have you considered a move 
from me commercial world to 
the world of children's chari- 
ties? The Director of lids Baker 
SL based organisation needs an 
experienced PA whose duties 
wiu range from co r n w ood- 
once and diary work to bandog 
won volunteers and co- 
oed nuking the Executive 
CommWee. Honesty, tad and 
sound secretarial skills 1100 / 
6Q/WP4 essential Aat 36-50 
Please can 434 48X2 Crone 
CorkWa fteCndbueM 

Consultants. 


lUflUMfl ■ *» lo- 

ifiuuNT appocanons id. 

The Secretary, 
bntiute of Neurology, 
The National Hospital, 
Queen Square, 
London WCiN 3BG. 



EXPERIENCED 
AND AMBITIOUS 
PA/SEC 



Seeks permanent employ- 
ment West End in varied 
and interesting position. 
PubBstaig/media prefered 
but not essential. 100 / 60 . 
CV and references supp- 
lied. 


FINANCIAL NOTICES 


< TRAJKRM COURSE ADMINIS- 
TRATOR £9.000- A major 
Inleraafkmal arm with superb 
CHy offices seeks person aged 
Ideally early to ndd twenties lo 
Kan their busy National Train 
Ing Dept. Applicants should 
have a good standard of educa- 
tion. some typing, ibe ability lo 
work on own Imitative and en- 
kxy dealing with people at all 
levels. Good admin exp. ess.,- 
and driving licence prsf. CaOl 
Lorraine Hindmarsh 01-405 " 
6148 Klngsiand Pen Cora. 






TOMS 


FULMARS £9,000 Fast speeds 
nrednf for new friendly office 1 
m Oiwri Rd Non smoker Aoc 
» 35 381 6444. 

SECRET ARIES lor AnhIIMv A ' 
DoMqnrt> Permanent J, 
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■ THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 

Scots show how to ease the burden 


SPORT 


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Grass-roots sport is 
under attack from 

the town halls of 


Britain. Heavy 
increases in the rates 


imposed by local 


5* 7= - 

Sli:. • 


* 

t- _ 


authorities has 


forced many sport s 
clubs to consider 


cutting back on their 
facilities at a time 


when there is public 
demand for more of 



them. In his second ** eter ^ awson: “Sport belongs to the masses. There are a lot of rotes for the party which provides what they want."" (Photograph; Paul Lovelace) 


and final article on 


the threat to sport , 
John Good body 


studies the present 
figures and the future 
effect 


The fear is creeping through 
the committee meetings of 
thousands of amateur sports 
cfubs in England and Wales. 

■ Many are already struggling to 
■ . survive because of the acute 
increase in their rates. But 
worse may yet' come. In 
- Scotland dubs often pay six or 
seven times more than similar 
. organizations south of the 
border. The Government has 
. promised there will be har- 
monization of sports clubs' 
rates throughout Britain in 
1990. 

“In my experience when the 
word harmonization is used 
by local and national govern- 
ments, it always means a 


the Central Council of Phys- 
ical Recreation, says. 

So worried has the CCPR 
become that in October it led a 
delegation of officials to talk 
to members of all political 
parties at the House of Com- 
mons. Mr Lawson reports that 
Neil Kinnock was “sympa- 
thetic and understanding." 
Jeffrey Archer, in one of his 
last duties as vice-chairman of 
the Conservative Party, was 
“helpful” and Dr David 
Owen, for the SDP, was 
“interested." Only the lib- 
erals were “indifferent." 

The CCPR is now girding 
itself for a campaign that is 
being waged with striking 
success in Scotland. At the 
heart of the problem is the fact 
that local authorities have the 
discretion to give rate relief. 
This is not mandatory and the 
rates vary from one region to 
another according to the 
council's policy. 

The anomalies between 
Scotland and the rest of 


Cub. This represented an 
increase of more than £1,200 
in only a year. The high 
amount was because of the 
1984 property revaluation in 
Scotland in which the rateable 
value of sports clubs was 
based on the estimated capital 
value of the property. Mr 
Kilgour found that a rugby 
club of a similar size, uke 
Keighley in Yorkshire, was 
only paying £350 while some 
of the leading English clubs 


were paying less than Kirk- 
Scottis 


Britain only came to light 
land for 


levelling up not a levelling 
down. Wc 


/e are very worried," 
Peter Lawson, the secretary of 


when . a rates demand for 
£5.500 arrived on the desk of 
Alex Kilgour, the treasurer of 
Kirkcaldy Rugby . Football 


caldy, a Scottish National 
League third division club 
which has not bad an inter- 
national player since 1925. 

Northampton and Leicester 
were paying £2,65 1 and £3,500 
in rates respectively while 
Bristol bad to find £4,000. 
Whereas Bristol had a bar 
turnover of £1 29,000, 
Kirkcaldy's turnover was 
£24,000. It was not confined 
to rugby. As Mr Kilgour 
investigated he found other 
ludicrous disparities. 
Abercom Tennis Club in 
Edinburgh, with five tennis 
courts, three squash courts 
and a pavilion, paid £6,500 
while Winchester Tennis and 


Squash Gub, with 19 tennis 
courts, eight squash courts 
and a pavilion was paying 
£3,000. 

The Glasgow Academical 
Club, with three rugby pitches, 
a cricket square and four 
squash courts, was paying 
£16,500 while the MCC, 
whose ground is the most 
famous in cricket, was paying 
£25,700 for Lord’s. 

Mr Kilgour found allies 
everywhere. The treasurers of 
other sports clubs were 
equally disgruntled and 
backed the campaign led by 
Alan Grosset, the chairman of 
the Scottish Sports Associ- 
ation. Bill Mann, a former 
president of the Scottish 
Cricket Union, and Mr 
Kilgour. 

Meetings were held. Letters 
were written to MPs and local 
authorities. A debate was even 
held in the House of Com- 
mons on May 19. Mr Mann, a 
financier, was delighted when 
he heard that a rates assessor 
in Strathclyde had said that he 
was fed up bearing about the 
problems of sports dubs. 
“That shows we are making an 
impression." 


Results followed. In Fife, 
Kirkcaldy's own region, the 
local authority finally suc- 
cumbed to the sustained pres- 
sure from nearly 100 clubs. It 
gave full relief to unlicensed 
clubs and half to those with 
bars. Kirkcaldy itself was 
completely removed from the 
valuation roll after an appeal 
based on a Scottish local 
government act which said 
that buildings and public 
parks were free from rates if 
their use was ancillary to the 
park. If this may have wide- 
spread effect in Scotland, the 
(aw does not apply to England 
and Wales. 

Although the struggle is 
being fought and sometimes 
won north of the border — the 
campaigners have a meeting 
on Friday with Mr Malcolm 
Rifkind. the Secretary of State 
for Scotland — it has hardly 
begun in England. The CCPR 
wants 100 per cent mandatory 
rate relief for all sports dubs 
without a bar,. 50 per cent for 
those with a bar or full rate 
charged on the bar area only 
and 100 per cent relief plus 
grant aid support for all youth 
sections of voluntary sports 


clubs. Lawson stresses the 
importance of the value of 
dubs to the local community 
and, with a smile, points out: 
“It is cheaper to mug an old 
lady on a street corner than to 
take part in sport." 

The Department of the 
Environment agrees that there 
are a lot of anomalies in the 
system and states that the 
reason local authorities have 
discretionary powers is be- 
cause they are in the best 
position to tailor the relief to 
the benefit of the community 
derived from a sports dub. It 
points out that although some 
do provide a valuable service 
to the community. There are 
others where membership 
rules are unduly restrictive 

The CCPR will not let the 
matter rest there. Sport is 
gradually realizing that it must 
become involved in politics at 
both national and local level. 
As Mr Lawson says: “Sport 
belongs to the masses — the 
masses who vote. There are 
millions of members of or- 
dinary sports clubs in Britain. 
There are a lot of votes for the 
party which provides what 
they want" 


GOLF 


Olazabal favoured 
to pip Gark for 
Masters invitation 


By Mitchell Platts 


Jose-Maria Olazabal, the 
young Spaniard who enjoyed an 
outstanding first season as a 
professional, is the European 
player most likely to be given a 
special invitation to lbe 51st US 
Masters at Augusta National, 
Georgia, on Apru 9 to 12. 

Hord Hardin, chairman of the 
Augusta National golf dub, said; 
“It would be hard to pass him by 
unless in checking his record we 
discover something that might 
deter us.” 

Bernhard Langer, the cham- 
pion in 1985, and Severiano 
Ballesteros, the winner in 1980 
and 1983 have automatically 
qualified, along with Sandy 
Lyle. David Ctury. the 1986 
Amateur champion, is also set 
to join Garth McGimpsey, the 
1985 Amateur champion, in the 
Geld. 

The British champion is 
historically awarded a place for 
two successive years and 
Olazabal, the Amateur cham- 
pion in 1984, played at Augusta 
the following year, although he 
was ineiigble this year as he had 
turned professional. 

Hardin stressed that no de- 
cisions had been taken regarding 
the additional invitations which 
are to be awarded. Olazabal. 
however, made an astonishing 
ion on the golfing world 


with a place at Augusta for 


finishing third in the European 


Order of Merit would appear to 
be slender. Eighty-eight players 
contested the fiftieth US Mas- 
ters this year, won by Jack 
Nicklaus, and it was one of the 
largest fields in the recent 
history of the tournament 

Hardin explained: “We do 
not like to have as many as 90 
contestants. Our preferred num- 
ber is 80. A number of European 
players now automatically qual- 
ify- under the American rules 
and whereas we once used only 
to look at Great Britain and 
Ireland it is now essential that 
we take a broader view with the 
progress made by individuals 
through Europe." 

The Masters, however, is 
strictly an invitation tour- 
nament sponsored by a private 
organization, and the Gub's 
qualification regulations are the 
principal means of dererminieg 
the player invitation list, but 
such eligibility under these 
regulations does not oblige the 
Tournament Committee to is- 
sue an invitation. 


with bis victories in the Ebel 
European Masters and Sanyo 
Open on the way to finishing 
runner-up to Ballesteros in the 
Epson Order of Merit with 
record winnings for a “rookie" 
of £136,775. 

Even so the likelihood of 
Howard Gark being rewarded 


In the past the usual proce- 
dure has been for all the 
invitations to be extended be- 
fore Christmas, so creating some 
suspense among British players 
during the festive season, but 
Hardin added that there could 
be some later invitations, 
depending on the size of the 
field. “If we find that in Feb- 
ruary there are only 7S or 78 
players qualified then we might 
open the door to others even at 
that stage,” he said. 


Britain lags behind 


Women's professional golf in 
Europe is growing at a remark- 
ably fast pace, but still foils to 
attract huge galleries in Britain. 

“We attract huge crowds in 
Europe, but the British are 
rather blase.” Beverly Lewis, 
chairman of the Women’s PGA, 
said when she announced yes- 
terday that the 1987 tour's prize 
money would top £1 million for 
the first time. 

“The Belgium Open had 
9,000 on one day last year, but 
we need to publicize ourselves 
much more on this side of the 
Channel," Mrs Lewis said. The 
WPGA have appointed their 
own press officer but are still 
bolding bade on the possibility 


of pre-qualifving for their tour- 
naments. except when daylight 
hours cause the field to be 
restricted. “We may lace that 
possibility one day. or start an 
all-exempt tour," Mrs Lewis 
said 

The 1987 calendar lists 20 
events between April and Octo- 
ber with four more possibilities 
which could take the prize 
money up to £1,250,000. The 
European Masters at Boras in 
Sweden lops die list with 
£1 10,000. followed by the Brit- 
ish Women's Open on £100,000. 


“The hope of playing for £1 
earn only a few 


million was a dream 
years ago; now it is a reality,” 
Mrs Lewis said 


BOXING: AMERICAN HAS LEARNED TRADE IN TOUGH SCHOOL 


Lively Boston may upset tea 
party for confident Ouistie 


By Srikmnar Set, Boxing Correspondent 


Errol Christie, having found a. 
. roftoe 


toehold in the door of the World 
rankings at No 10 in the 
International Boxing Federation 
ratings, has a chance to impress 
the other two world bodies, the 
World Boxing Association and 
World Boxing Council, against 
Charlie Boston, of New Jersey, 
the WBC No 12, at Alexandra 
Pavilion, nonh London- 

After his brilliant win against 
k Sean Mannion, the worid-rated 
light-middleweight _ Christie has 
regained much of bis confidence 
shattered by the eighth round 
defeat by Mark Kaylor last year- 
11 nder Jimmy Tibbs, his new 
trainer. Christie is expected to 
have sharpened up his punch- 
ing. According to Tibbs, Chris- 
tie "will do a good job on Boston 
tonight-’’ 

Christie showed against 
Mannion that he is most eff- 
ective when attacking in short- 
sharp bursts or when his oppo- 
nent comes on to bis quick 
combinations. It will be interest- 
ing to see whether he can draw 
• Boston on to h is shots. Christie 
has so much natural talent that 
he should be able to do so. 

Although Boston has had only 
I S bouts, losing three, he should 
be a good test for Christie. Last 
■A April, Boston knocked oui m 
* eight rounds Dwight Davidson, 
the former world No I whom 
Tonv Sibson beat on points w 
1 9S2. Boston lost a split points 
decision to Doug De Witt who 
recenilv tested Thomas Hearns. 
Christie has been watching 
Boston’s two contests and was 
suitably impressed. 

If Boston is not quite as 
durable as Manmon he eaura 
prove livelier. He is thought to 
have something of the style of 
Marvin Hagler. “I can bo* or 
fight depending on the sit- 
uation." Boston said. He has 



Christie: sharper punching 


distance. “You don’t have 
judges in. your country and 1 
hope the referee will give us the 
derision if we win." Tavema 
said. 

Christie is expected to have 
one more bout before meeting 
Sibson in March for the 
Commonwealth middleweight 
title. Sibson, who pulled out a 
month ago with a shoulder 
injury from tonight's card, 
should be fit, according to Ken 
Squires, his trainer. 

On the undercard. H . 
Currie, the former Bri 
heavyweight champion, has 
been called in after Kirkland 
Latng. a flu victim, missed 
fighting for the British welter- 
weight title, vacated by Lloyd 
Honcyghan. Sylvester Mittee 
now meets ldelmar Montero, 
the Colombian champion, who 
has a career record of 14 wins 
and three losses. 

Currie meets Melvin Epps, a 
New York bank guard. Epps is 
only 1901b against Currie’s 200 
plus. Now Currie must answer a 
stamina problem against the 
lanky New Yorker, who has 
been the distance with Jeff Sims 
and Marvis Frazier. If he does 


been a sparring partner for 
Hagler’s opponents such as John 
Mugabi and Roberto Duran. 

Recently he has been training 
with Sugar Ray Leonard, who 
meets Hagler in April Boston 
will continue training with 
Leonard on his return to the 
United Stales. Clearly be can be 
expected to show a few moves 
tonighL 

From the way Angelo Tav- 
ema. Boston's manager, spoke 
yesterday it seems that they are 
not looking for a quick win and 
expect the bout to go the 


not dispose of Epps quickly he 


could be in troubl 


• Tsuyoshi Hamada. of Japan, 
obtained a 2-1 split decison over 
Ronnie Shields, his American 
challenger, yesterday to retain 
bis WBC junior welterweight 
title. James Jenkim, the United 
Slates judge, scored 1 1 1-108 and 
Larry Nadaya. of the Phil- 
ippines. 116-111, for Hamada, 
but Malcolm Bulner, the Austra- 
lian, had Shields ahead 115-113 
in a fierce contest in Tokyo that 
halted the Japanese champion's 
record of 17 straight knockout 
victories. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


49ers lose thrust as sleepy Giants 
wake up and secure play-off place 


By Robert Kiriey 


Joe Montana, the quarterback 

of the San Francisco 4yers. 
offeSd a terse evaluation on 
Monday niHu; ££ 

Two different games. Thm 

just one result- °Lafthe 49ers 
New York Giants teat 
■>1-17 in the National Footoau 
‘ Th/> Giants sur- 


division title will determine the 
home-field advantage- 


“ m 

-Everything is gom^tcMMnie 


**• 


r# 


■>1-17 n tne- 

League match. T^Gianw sur- 
vived an abysmal . 
scared touchdowns i on thetrfim 

^ berth 

secure at leart a wmi-v.** 

in the play-ons. . 

The 49eis to*}***? ^, h 7 ^ 
advantage a 1 half-im* 

30-yarTfieId 

Wersching. f'J. Parana to 
w down pass from modui 

' JenTR&daone-yorin.nW 

Rice. After half-time. 

Yorkers rook - 

threw two WW*ftSriJl5d 34 
17 yards to Joe _ --j 

yards to Stacy ^S^aone-. 
Onis Anderson dived tor a 

yard touchdown. 

When the Gian^ P ^ Su n . 

Washington Redski * cs#i0B 

day. the undisputed po E3Sl 


down to the »me at - - - 
Giants' linebacker, Lawrence 
Taylor, said, referring to the 
Robert F Kennedy stadium m 
Washington. “I . guess that s 
going to be^ihe biggest game of 
the season.” 

The importance of lhe match 
has not been lost on lhe Rod- 
skins. Dexter Manley, the 

Washington defender, said the 
ga me would be “like the Super 
Bowl.- The Redskins have woo 
five consecutive games since 
insine against the Giants on 
October 27. “I want to be.no 
ShSr place in the world than at 
pFK. stadium next Sunday, 
Manlefsaid. "Iff won the &4 
SnjackpoUdon'tthii.trd 
show up to. pick it up. 

A Teams eliminated from con- 
ation for the piay-ofls are 
Buffalo. Green Bay. Houston. 
Indianapolis. Philadelphia, 
pinsburgb. St Louis. San Diego 
and Tampa Bay. 

The Miami University 
Quarterback. Vinny Testarerde, 
q TrIk expected to win the 
iSkntJr* Trnnhv as the finest 


college player, sustained severe 
cuts and abrasions in a motor- 
bike acridenL However, he 
should be fit to play against 
Penn Slate for rhe collegiate title 
in the Fiesta Bowl on January 2. 
Tcstaverde will probably be the 
first player selected in the spring 
in the NFL draft of college 
players. 

• Irving Ffyar, of the New 
England Patriots, was talking to 
his wife on a car telephone two 
weeks ago when he lost control 
of the vehicle and crashed into a 
ilice in Foxboro, 


tree, ponce in Foxooro, 
Massachusetts, said yesterday. 
Fryar was in hospital with 


concussion for three days after 
the accident, which 
while New England were 
against the Buffalo Bills. Fryar, 
an All-Pro punt returner, had 
left the game with a shoulder 
injury in the first half Police 
gave him a S20 citation for 
failing to stay within marked 
lines. 

A week before the accident, 
Fryar had caught a touchdown 
miss as time expired to lift the 
Patriots to a win against die 
Rams. Team officials did not 
say when Fryar would return to 
action. 


BASKETBALL 


Stayaway 
McNish 
spoils his 
chances 


By Nicholas Harling 


Colin McNish's faflare to 
attend two training weekends 
has cost the 6ft 9ia Polycefl 
Kingston forward, the chance of 
extending his England career in 
the four-nation Pohlajo tow- 
nsmen! in Finland later this 

McNish, aged 26, who failed 
to score in Us only 


land at Leicester in February, 
wanted another opportunity af- 
ter missing the European 
championships in Denmark div- 
ing the summer became his 
mother was ill in Trinidad. 

David Trtmoss, the new Eng- 
land coach who watched 
McNish help Kingston reach 
their third successive cop final 
on Sunday, was so keen to give 
him ilnff rk«nf* that tie made 
special arrangements for the 
player to attend the northern 
training camp for England 
possibles at Oldham after be 
had missed the weekend for 
soothern players ia 
Hertfordshire. 

Tb very disappointed that 
he didn't bother to attend," 
Titnmss said. “He's my type of 
player and withoat prejudging it 
I think that be could help 
England, f couldn't pick him 
after that I wanted to pick 
players that I had worked with. I 
arranged the camps carefaUy so 
that they woald not dash with 
league games but of the three 
Kingston players 2 invited, only 
Kexmy Scott turned np. The door 
is not closed to them bat they 
will obvionsly have to attend in 
fotnre." 

McNish has a chance to get 
hack into the good books of 
Thranss, though not immedi- 
ately ffie squad itself, by attend- 
ing a third training casap ea 
December 21. “It's most likely 
HI be there,** be said yesterday. 
McNish explained (hat be had 
missed toe first camp becanse he 
was 01 and the second becanse 
there was no one to transport 
him from Kingston's game at 
Leicester to Oldham as had been 
promised. “I was all packed up 
and ready," he said, “bat when I 
saw there was no one there I 
went bade with the team." 

Five of toe players among toe 
sqnad of 17, which wOl be 
reduced to 10, have never played 
for the senior England team 
before. They are Peter 
Scantlebnry (Happy Eater 
Bracknell), Jason Fogarty 
(Sharp Manchester United), 
Kenny Scott (Polycefl Kings- 
ton), Roy Jordan (HoroeSpare 
Bolton) and Russell Taylor (Reg 
Vardy Smderland). 

SQUAD; S Sfflw, P Scartdfebuy (toth 
Bndodl). M Spaid. K T&Bwn (opt). C 
Irish. J Moors tin IMruwinttQ. A 
R Pun, BQtidnor, J Fogwty 

Msacheszcr Vmted X K Scott (&&• 
tan). R Jordan {Bohn), C Vnaohaft. P 
JmeapetfaLdostarkR Taylor 
had), P SthapKin, M Bfltt (bwfa BCP 


• Danny Palmer, the former 
coach of Crystal Palace and 
Portsmouth, now a television 
commentator, has taken over as 
coach of Bamberg, toe West 
German dub, until the end of the 
season. Tonight's game as 
Leverkusen, the unbeaten league 
leaders, brings Palmer into 
opposition with his American 
compatriot, Jim Kelly, who was 
also formerly in charge of an 
English dob, Solent Stars. 


TENNIS: KRAMER’S BRAINCHILD HAS COME A LONG WAY SINCE 1970 


Masters puts its teething troubles 
behind and comes of mature age 


From Richard Evans 
New York 


It was a bizarre and somewhat 
inauspicious birth — an ancient, 
dimly-lit auditorium m a Tokyo 
suburb where wc sat huddled 
under blankets watching Jack 
Kramer’s brainchild struggle for 
life- 

That was in 1970 and since 
then the Masters has proved to 
be a difficult and often unruly 
offspring; hampered, perhaps, 
by a constant switch of homes 
and parental sponsorship as it 
lurched through a controversial 
adolescence. 

It is a little surprising, there- 
fore, that the event which opens 
at Madison Square garden today 
is at last showing signs of 
growing up. Not only has the 
date been changed from January 
to December to link it to the 
same year as the Grand Prix 
tournaments which provide its 
qualifiers, but the format has 


reverted to eight-man round 
robin after mucfrfli 


flirtation with 

2 or 16-man knockout compe- 
titions. 

Quite rightly, Eu g e n e L Scott, 
who took over as tournament 
director last January, felt that an 
eight-man field gave the tour- 
nament a more elitest feel and 
that the round robin concept 
would enable the star-conscious 
New York crowd to watch the 
likes of Boris Becker and the 
reigning Master, Ivan Lendl at 
least three times, win or lose. 

What Scott did not forsee was 
that, John McEnroe apart. 
American players would fade so 
quickly from the game's elite. 
With Jimmy Connors missing 
out by one place. Scott has been 
left with ibe first Masters in 
history not to include an Ameri- 
can player. 

Scou, a former US amateur 
real tennis champion and Forest 
Hills semi-finalist, is, however, 
too urbane and sophisticated to 
let that be a cause of more than 
passing regret He merely ac- 
cepts the irony of McEnroe’s 
observation a few weeks ago 
when the three-times Masters 
winner said: “1 helped advocate 
the changes that have been 
made but as a result of not 
playing for the first half of the 
year toe only person who has 
been hurt by them is me." 

Had suspension not inter- 
vened McEnroe would normally 
have' still managed to qualify if 
the Masters had remained a 16- 
man event. 

Such problems were for from 
the thoughts of the small group 
of men who burnt much mid- 
night oil in the Paris apartment 
of Philippe Cha frier, the future 
1TF president, in' 1969. Cha- 
trier’s guests were his great 
friend Kramer, 1947 Wimble- 
don champion and pro-pro- 
moter extraordinaire, and Don- 
ald Dell, who was in the process 



Ady\- • f 

Nastasein bad old days of downing and temper that nearly brought the Masters to its knees 




of forming the game's first high- 
powered management com- 
pany. 

Although Lamar Hunt was 
already ready to launch ' his 
World Championship Tennis 
circuit with its Dallas final, 
Kramer was determined that toe 
Masters should provide Uie 
showcase finale to a world-wide 
series of tournaments linked by 
a points system. “The bonus 
pool system is the only way to 
ensure that the top players have 
an incentive to support the 
legitimate Grand Prix circuit 
rather than go off and play 
exhibitions," Kramer told his 
colleagues. 

The Grand Prix tour became 
legitimate, but the Masters and 
its participants struggled to get 
out of the kindergarten. After 
Stan Smith won that first title in 
Tokyo the event became the toy 
of Hie Nastase, one of the game's 
most talented and iJLdisciplined 
stars. 

The round robin format was 
ideal for Nastase because it 
enabled him to rid of all his 
excesses, even to the point of 
losing a match or being disquali- 


fied without being eliminated. 
Courting disaster at every turn, 
the Romanian drove officials 
and opponents to distraction, 
but still managed to become toe 
Master four times out of five. 

In Paris in 1972, Cliff Ritchie 
held two points for a 5-0 lead in 
the deciding set against Nastase 
before losing 8-6. In Boston two 
years later Nastase refused to 
shake hands with Tom Gorman 
after losing his opening match 6- 
4, 6-1 and still went on to win. 
Then most memorably his an- 
tics inspired Arthur Ashe’s fam- 
ous walk-off in Stockholm in 
1975. Nastase was disqualified 
from that match, but still man- 
aged to win the title with a 
dazzling display of artistry 
against a bewildered Bjorn Borg 
in ihe final. 


By this time Masters sponsor- 
ship had moved from a soda 
pop company through insurance 
to makers of toothpaste, but still 
had not learned how to clean its 
teeth. More controversy centred 
around huge video screens — on 
which Kira Douglas predicted 
Wojtek Fibak's ultimate down- 
fall against Manuel Oranies in 


the middle of their match — in 
Houston in 1976. Bur the 
following year lhe event finally 
settled into a permanent home 
ai Madison Square Garden. 

Suddenly tennis was big time 
and a record crowd of over 
IS, 000 caused traffic jams on 
Eighth Avenue as they flocked 
to see Connors beat Guillermo 
Vilas on a Thursday night in 
1978. But controversies over 
players dumping matches they 
no longer nekfed to win in the 
round robin and law suits over 
yet another change of sponsor 
continued to give Kramer's 
child a naughty boy image. 

Now with Nabisco sponsoring 
the entire Grand Prix circuit 
under lhe auspicies of the Men's 
Intemationl Professional Ten- 
nis Council and Scott, street 
smart in an elegant son of way, 
taking charge of the Masters 
itself, toe event seems on toe 
verge of a more mature future. 
Nonetheless, next Monday the 
1986 Master could still be a 
teenager. Becker, should he seize 
Lendl's title, would become the 
youngest winner since Mc- 
Enroe, aged 19, won in 1979. 


Becker and Graf aim to share room at the top 


Bonn (Reuter) - Steffi Graf 


said yesterday she was con- 
1 both site and her West 


vinced 

German compatriot, the 
Wimbledon champion Boris 
Becker, would be No 1 in the 
world at toe same time. But 
Miss Graf, aged 17. added toe 
was sure Becker would get there 
first. 

Becker, who was 19 last 
month, has won Wimbledon for 
the last two years and is ranked 
second behind Ivan LendL of 
Czechoslovakia. Miss Graf is 


third in toe women's rankings 
behind Martina Navratilova 
and Chris Lloyd, of the United 
Slates. 

In an open letter to Becker in 
yesterday's Bild newspaper Miss 
Graf wrote: “Many tennis fens 
in Germany dream that we will 
both become No 1 in the world 
at the same time. That would be 
fabulous. “I don't just dream 
about iL I am firmly convinced 
of it- You will certainly do it 
before 1 do. Then you will 
dominate toe tennis world as 


McEnroe at his best and as 
Bjorn Borg and Rod Laver did 
before." 

Meanwhile, Becker, speaking 
after his 3-6, 6-3, 7-5, victory 
over John McEnroe in the 
Atlanta Challenge, bis fourth 
tournament win in succession, 
said he should already be ranked 
No 1. Becker said: “1 know what 
I think. I would say ii is my 
secret" 

But McEnroe, himself a for- 
mer No ], said he believed 
Lendl belongs there. Becker, 


who is seeded second to Lend) in 
the Masters tournament starting 
today has beaten Lendl in three 
of toeir last four matches. 


Becker has won seven tour- 
naments this year, six on toe 
Grand Prix lour. Lendl has won 
eight times, including the 
French Open and US Open. 

“Now I have toe chance (to 
get No 1), 1 think it would be 
stupid to say I am No 2,” Becker 
said. “You don’t always have 
the chance, you knowTJ 




SPORT 


THF times WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


RACING 


Well-schooled i 
Plaid should 


make fine start 


to new career 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Doubles for trainers Tim 
Forster and Peter Walwyn and 
jockeys. Luke Harvey and 
Dermol Browne look the or- 
der of the day at Worcester 
this afternoon. 

Harvey. Richard Dun- 
woody's capable young 
replacement as Forster’s sec- 
ond jockey this season, has 
already ridden Celtic Slave to 
victory twice this autumn. 
The first was achieved at 
Chepstow, the second at 
Worcester. Now I envisage 
them making a triumphant 
return to the same Midlands 
track and winning the Long 
Haul Handicap Chase. 

While conceding that both 
the ground and the distance 
will suit that out-and-out 
slayer. Knock Hill, who 
showed signs of returning to 
form at Haydock last time out 
when he finished fourth be- 
hind Blackhawk Star, 1 still 
prefer Celtic Slave now that 
she is so clearly on a crest, 
having recently beaten 
yesterday's Hereford winner, 
Mayanncor. 

On travelling companion 
Suez, Harvey will face an 
infinitely harder task in the 
Stretton Leisure Handicap 
Hurdle. However, 1 still think 
that it will be worth following 
them because Suez excelled at 
Windsor first time out consid- 
ering how long he had been off 
course. 

The Processor, who beat 
him three lengths at Windsor, 
had looked desperately un- 
lucky not to win his previous 
race at Ascot where his rider 
was unseated at the last be- 
cause of a broken iron. Open 
The Box. who finished third, 
had won his previous race and 
has run well to be placed at 
Wincanton since. 

While Auntie Dot, Bold 
Illusion, Cm den Bay, How 
Now and Whither Goest Thou 
should also go well, they may 
all find Suez too much of a 
handful with so little to carry. 

Walwyn and Browne are 
pinning their hopes of a 
double on Framlinglon Court 
and Plaid winning the two 
divisions of the Rushock 
Novices* Hurdle. In each in- 


stance, Martin Pi pe, _ the 
successful Somerset trainer, 
will be fielding a f ormi dable 
opponent but I still prefer the 
Seven Barrows runners. 

A half-brother to the useful 
Fort Rupert, Framlinglon 
Court 02.30) ran well enough 
in his first race over hurdles at 
Newbury recently when he 
was runner-up to Do marc, 
beaten only lengths, to 
suggest that the first division 
could be his for the takii£ in 
spite of the presence of Pipe’s 
runner Splendid Magnolia, 
not to mention Tim's Crusade 
and the one-time Derby hope. 
Sir Percy, who changed hands 
for as much as 40,000 guineas 
at .Newmarket in the autumn. 

Basically Splendid Mag- 
nolia is not much better than a 
plater. So I shall be dis- 
appointed if he can manage to 
give 71b to Framlington Court 
even though he has run up a 
seemingly impressive se- 
quence of wins. 

Plaid (1.30) may lack that 
little bit of experience that his 
travelling companion gained 
at Newbury but be is nonethe- 
less napped to make a success- 
ful start to his jumping career 
by winning the second 
division. 

Besides being placed in both 
the Gerry Feilden Stakes at 
Newmarket and the Dee 
Stakes at Chester in the spring. 
Plaid also won the Somerset 
Stakes over 1 ‘A miles at Bath. 
From that it can be deduced 
that he was a horse of some 
ability on the Flat 
Harness to that record a 
reported relish for jumping 
hurdles and he looks a decent 
bet to appreciate this change 
of life and beat Pipe's runner. 
Mareth Line, who ran much 
too freely for his own good at 
Haydock two weeks ago when 
he was beaten five lengths by 
Arrow Express. 

At Hexham, I rather like the 
look of Secret Walk in the 
Priestlands Handicap Hurdle, 
even though he will be carry- 
ing considerably more weight 
than when he won it last year. 
His recent seventh behind 
Comeragh King augured welL 



WORCESTER 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.30 Framlington Court- 
1.00 Attiabo. 

1 JO PLAID (nap). 


100 Doubfeuagain. 
130 Suez. 

3.00 Celtic Slave, 

3.30 Saint Acion. 


By Michael Seely 

1.30 Plaid. 3.00 KNOCK HILL (nap). 

The Times Private Han dicapper’s top rating: 12.30 FRAMLINGTON COURT. 


Guide to our in-line racecard 


& West (4) 


103 (12) 0-0432 W ^ 

Racecard number. Draw in brackets. Six-figure and <***™'^ 

Ktwuei Handicappw's rawig. Apprcaumata startmg 
course winner. P-dteiance winnqr. CtXouree price. ___ 


Going^jood to soft 

1230 RUSHOCK NOVICE HURDLE (Div 1: 3-Y-O: £759: 2m) (20 runners) 

1 01111 SPLBBUMAGN0UA(P)(MPiee)MPipel1-3-. J ** W 

3 BUBNMG BRIGHT (Mrs E Engteh) D Ringer IMP — — — DMwpfy — — 

5 022230 CUCKOOBiTW NEST (B) (Mia B WStUns) D Ehwwtn 10-10 76 10-1 


DIG TAflQUM (SOS S Pearson) GH Jones 

FWQE5T (0) (R AShford) Miss A Kkig 10-10 -- — ITT ohJISZ 17 

O FORCELLO <BF) (Brtsh Thoroughtrad Ltd) G 8 Balding 10-10 O Bredtoy 89 6-1 

2 FRAMLINGTON COURT ft. Smdh) P Welwyn 10-10 ^ ’ 

3 KING'S CRUSADE (H Mould] D NMhOteon 1 0-1 0 R«mwoo«7 91 9-2 

Q00/CF RECTORY BOY (W Price) W Price 10-10 A Price (7) ~ “ 

RUBUSfD Thom) O Them M B rennan -14-1 

U RUE ST JACQUES (O Matters) B Smart 10-10 

5AHRAAM (Mis K Davenport) F Jordan — — 

SELL IT KtLROT (Dawtresh Mushrooms) G Huffer 10-10 — 12-1 

Sffi PERCY (1 Fenra] C Hctaes 10-10 .CC°y (4) — S-i 

SPffiNG PALM (D HmcMn&ori) R Peacock 10-10 K Ryan (7) 

JANE CRAIG (S Griffiths) S GrtfWhS 10-S CUew e»yn(7) 

MABEL ALICE (Mrs B Mason) P FSfgate 10-5 S Jotoaoa 

0 WSS HAYMOT£(R Berber) R Barber 10-5 5 W orahoad — — 

0 SUNTAN (M H»Bh) P FWgata 103 

TUDOR IZOR(K Dancer) M Casual OS JDDoyfeW 

1085: KQffl 10-10 P Scudamore (11-0 fav) D Nicholson 21 ran 

5PLENDTO MAGNOUA pi-3) continued Ms run of success wtth a 41 wtoowr Ktosurbrau (10- 
UV1 ia ar Bangor (2m *1, £685. good. Nov 7. 10 ram). CUCKOO M THE NEST tl (MO) seen to best 
ae when 71 &rd to Praams Ma&a (11 -2) at Pbntwefl (2m 2t, EBBS, goad to ffmL ' Oct 2. 6 raft KINGS 


Derrick Goddard and Lady Moon bid each other a fond farewell before the mare came under the hammer at 
yesterday's Newmarket December sales (Photograph: Hugh Routledge) 


Joel’s classic jewel leads the way | 
as a breeding empire winds down form 


Fairy Footsteps, the 1,000 Guineas 
winner of 1981, described by the 
auctioneer, former Tattersalls' 
chai r man, Kenneth Watt, as the 
“the jewel in Jim Joel's crown of 
broodmares," was sold for 720,000 
guineas at yesterday's December 
Sales. 

It was a sign of the times that an 
eigbt-year-old classic winner should 
have failed to break the British 
record of 820,000 guineas estab- 
lished by Dunette three years ago 
and the 1,025,641 guineas European 
reedrd for Turkish Treasure in 
Ireland the following season. 

Nevertheless there was still an 
expectant hush when Fairy Foot- 
steps, a rich, dark bay with a blaze 
and three white socks, was led into 
the ring. It was indeed the end of an 
era, the disposal of the majority of 
the breeding empire of the 92-year- 
old Mr JoeL who had looked so 
healthy and spry when welcoming 
home Midnight Count after that 
spectacular victory at Sandowu last 
Saturday. 

The bidding opened at 500.000 
guineas and there were some spir- 
ited exchanges before the hammer 
fell to a final nod from Hugo 
Lascelles, of the British Bloodstock 
Agency. James Wigan was the 
underbidder. 

Fairy Footsteps will now be sent 
to the Heron wood Farm in Virginia. 


By Michael Seely 

Lascelles refused to disclose the was also purchased by the Maktoura 


BPmrefl 

C Smith 

M Dwyer 

C Cox (4) 

K Ryan (7) 

C Llewe8yn(7) 

S Johnson 

SMorstoad 

RJBogsan 

JODoyfeW 


11 12)bi Bangor (2m 41. £885. good, Nov 7. 10 ran). I 
when 7! Sid to Prasma Ma&a (1i-2)at Fomwefl(2m; 


name of the owner of the Stnd, but family. She was knocked down to a 
said that it was ran on a commercial bid from Anthony Stroud, Sheikh 


El 878. soft. Nov 21. 16 ranjwftfi FORCELLO fll-O) 1 SI back In 
ireeating nderatthe last FRAiaiKWON COUflT(1 1-0)made 
71 at Newbury (2m 100yd. El 78 3, soft. Nov 21. 13 ran). SUNTj 
M arket Resen Sefcc (an. £722. good, Nov 14, 12 ran). 
Selection: FHAffflJNGTON COURT 


(10-1) finished 141 5tfi CO Dereocs (9-7) in a 


basis and that there were a couple of Mohammed's Earing 


training 


The 20 lots offered by Air Joel 


1 J0 KEMPSEY CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP CHASE (£1 ,5732m) (4 runners) 


Harwood. “The Teesoso foal that were sold for an aggregate of 
the mare is carrying will be offered 3^37,200 guineas. This represents 


for auction at the Highflyer Sales in an average of 196,860 g uin eas. 


he said. “Fairy Footsteps Xbe other h ig hli g ht of the after- 


1 244013- ATATAHO (B Sneff) J D Roberta ID-12-0 

3 TOPOF/2- CHELSEA ISLAND (D) (W Taytor) W Taylor 11-108 

5 400F0/F BEECH COPSE (D MUbum) A Tumefl 7-10-0 

8 FB2304 SPARTAN NATIVE (D Breretori) A W Jones 6-10-0 

1985: POMPOSITY 8-10-8 C Evans (9-4) R J Smith 4 ran 


HFeem • 99F4-5 

, G Landau 90 5-4 

B GaMn — 14-1 

— D Morris 85 12-1 


herself will be mated with either noon was the sale of 18 mares 
Nnrcyev or Lyphard.” offered by the agency of the 

Kenneth Watt emerged from Swettenharo Stnd. These are owned 
retirement as a sign of respect to Mr in partnership by Stavros Niarchos, 




not only 


Robert Sangster, Vincent O'Brien, 


FORM ATATAHO (11-11) cbsappoinOr 

rWnlVI p o-8) at Down (2m If. good to 
Loffipopman(i0-0) 151 at Newton Abbot (2m 5f. £2979. soft 
out since a 4| and to Parish Rigged (12-0) here (3m. £1 01 8. good to firm. Sflf 
behind when a 9ft fence feHerln race won by Awning flO-O) at VUhdsor (2m. 
SPARTAN NATIVE p 0-9) had no chance Inside the fired mfle when a wefl 
' Tm 4f Nov Ql £2290, good to soft, Nov 19, S rant 
ATATAHO 


of last season when 331 3rd to Lanacre Bridga 
(1 GO) was dear bom the 2nd last when basting 


'20. 9 isn). CHELSEA ISLAND (11-5) not seen 
iofirm. Sept '85. 4 ran). BEECH COPSE (10-0) 
hdsor (2m. £1315. good to eoft Nov 1 7. B ran), 
men a wee beaten 4th to Hand Over (11-4) at 


Footsteps, but also her mother, John Magnier and Danny Schwarz 
Glass Slipper, the next lot offered, and were sold because Niarchos 


1.30 RUSHOCK NOVICE HURDLE (Div Ik 3-Y-O: £721: 2m) (20 runners) 


Aged 17 and not in foal, die mother wished to dispose of his interest in 
of another classic winner besides the stock. “Stavro owned 25 per 


Fairy Footsteps in light Cavalry, cent across 


board,*' 


ARABIAN BLUES (T Marshal) M Usher 10-10. 
0 ATROCflTOS (A Qiung) W Tomer 1O-10_— 
ELPASTp Webber) JVVsb&vr 10-1 0 


R Strongs — — 

Tracey Tumor (7) — — 

O Motnsgft 


was sold to the BBA (Ireland) for Sangster. “The rest of us have 


250,000 guineas. Her destination is varying interests in different 
thought to be the Coobnore Stud. mares." 


The second highest price from the 
Cfaildwick Bury Stud was the 
700,000 guineas paid by Hubie de 
Burgh for Magic Slipper, a three- 
year-old filly out of training from 
Henry Cedi's stable. The daughter 


Eighteen lots were sold for an 
aggregate of 2,439,000 guineas, 
which was an average of 335£0O 
guineas. The highest price was the 
380,000 guineas paid for Gala 
Parade, an unraced two-year-old 


of Habitat and Glass Slipper was fifty by Alydar out of Galletto. She 
bought for the Derrinstown Stnd, was purchased by Peter Wragg for 


which is the property of Hamdan A1 an unknown client. 


Maktoum. 


8 

9 

10 

FORT UNO (C Lewis) C Holme* 10-10 

FRANGNTTD (B) (Brtsft Thoroughbred Ltd) G 8 BaKSng 10-10- 

FRANK DALE (Mr* R n H . Irwin* in.ir> 

_ CCo> (4) 
_ G Bradfey 

— 

12-1 

7-1 


70 HAfStlJtV DOWN (Nutamod ftihfldty) R Hnrmcn tD-10 


98 







14 

2 MAHETH LUBE (Craydale Lt^ M Pipe 10-10- 

Pl«v* 

• 99F3-1 

16 

p OCPAN LAD P Pnrrntl) .1 PxmVI iftin 




17 

PLAID (A Oldrey) P WUwyn 10-10 

DBmne 

— 

4-1 

20 

22 

0000 RIVERS NEPHEW (MaJ N Hambro) L Kermard 10-10 

o «vA-*F1JIVT; PARK fl Unl) P Fkrfjjnt* 

B Powell 

89 

— 

23 

SCARBOROUGH ID Rrakwkkl □ Rodntak 10-10 

C Seward 



25 

I 

l 

La 

|8 

1 lH 

8 

GDertea 



28 

043 STORMGUARO (H Joel) A Tumefl 10-10 

Stem Knight 

92 

5-1 

28 

29 

ON IMPULSE p finher) i bw in-i 

_ CUeweByn (7) 

77 


30 

RAJ KUMARI (T Stafferd) D Wlrnle 10-5 

ACenoO 



14-1 


Earlier in the afternoon the BBA 


The third highest priced mare and the National Stud had staged a 
from the contingent. Lady Moon, by parade of stallions. These indnled 


MSI Reef out of Moonlight Night, is 
believed to be in foal to Kris and she 


Damister, Petoski, Final Straw and 
Rousflkm. 


1885: SOLAR CLOUD 10-10 P Scudamore (13-8 fav)D Mchaison 22 ran 

CO DM STORWGUiU® (1l-Q)*«s seen » best advantage at Newtwiy Wm 100yds. £141 7. good. Nav 5. 
runm isranlwtun 131514th to Problem Child (10-12)mffl RIVERS NEPHEW (1 1-0} Zhl back in 5tn and 
a sightly betow par HAWLEY DOWN (11-0) a further 21 away ki 0th. Previously HANKLEY DOWN (11-0) fin- 
ishw <jaid to Branr RnrafS«to(10-1Q)atAscot tan. £2299, ttm. Oct 29, lOran). MARETH Ul® (11-0) ran well 


HEXHAM 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.45 Quay Man. 

1.15 Bounty's Clown. 
1.45 Tartan TorchlighL 


2.1 5 Of Thai Ilk. 
2.45 Mr Spot 
' 3-15 Secret Walk. 


Windsor criticized in Dark Raven 
racecourse review to extend 

Royal Windsor is anything One point Knight might have fuic TAP/ITfl 
but regal according to a survey made is that while Windsor is JULIO JL vVvl Vk 
just published in the 1987 not the best course i 


_ _ 11-0) ran well 

when SI 2nd lb Arrow Express (1 l-3)’at Haydock (2m. 21 148, good to soft Now 19. 19 ran) and wH Improve. 
PLAID was ptacad m a coupla « Bstad raoas on die Bbl KELLTANN (10-2) lookad a lima one pacsd whan 321 
am of 15 to Cuttle CWef (11-fl> at Nawton Abbot (2m 150y. £821. Bolt Nov25) when RKKSTOWN LAD (10-10; 
fell at the Mi 
Selection: MARETH LINE 


One point Knight might have 
matte is that while Windsor is 
not the best course in the 


Directory of the Turf. Eighteen country, which he readOy con- 
raring - journalists were asked cedes, he may feel that a small 
their opinions on Britain's race- number of people who rarely 
courses and Windsor was con- pay to go racing are not neo- 


Michael Seely’s selection: 3.15 Night Guest 


By Our Irish Raring 
Correspondent 


Going: good (back straight good to soft) 

12.45 PRIESTPOPPLE HANDICAP CHASE (£1,190: 2m) (7 runners) 


deraned as the worst in the essarily the ideal arbiters of 


2 4D122-3 QUAY MAN (BJ3) (Mrs M Graanshuids) J 5 Wfton 11-11-10 MBowfeyW 98 3-1 

3 021110- RAM THE THOR (CO) (MSP Walton) F Walton 11-11-9 Mr J Walton 95 8-1 

4 1/32-144 THE HOWLET (CO, BP) (W WRson) J Otvar 7-10-13 J K IGnanc 93 F5-2 

5 13PP-30 COEUR VALL1ANT (CD) (R Adamson) V Thompson 8-10-12 . Mr M Thompson (4) 99 10-1 

7 0 -42441 MENDEUTA (BJ)) (Capt P Courage) P Courage 1(L10-8 (Sax) AStringar 90 7-2 

10 40/0P2P- GROUND MASTER (D)(C Ball) C Bel 9-HW) C Grant • 99 8-1 

11 2441-00 VICTORY MORN (Mrs E Dixon) J Dixon 10-104) KDooian 9814-1 

1985: SAUCEPOT 7-108 J Hanson (3-1 Jt-fav) G Rchanls 6 ran 

1.15 EASTGATE NOVICE HURDLE (Amateurs: £548: 2m 4f) (13 runners) 

1 030/001 BOUNTY’S CLOWN (R St**9) R Sheis 6-1 1-12 R Steals (7) •» 7-2 

2 220-233 CHRISTMAS HOLLY (R Wood) MreGRewalay 5-11-12 J Osbourne (7) 98F3-1 

3 024-201 PLEDGDON GREBI (R Adamson) V Thompson 8-11-12 M Thompson (7) 82 4-1 

7 OOP- CAPTAM MONTY (Ms A Page) W Page 5-11-8 P Graggs 

10 P08 KARLS CHERRY (C RoraSson) W Storey 7-118 Mba F Storey (7) — — 

12 MB-ROSIAN (J BJacMock) J Haldane 0-11-8 L Hudson (7) 

15 0/0 PARK PRINCE (W Stephenson) W A Stephenson 5-11-8 P Johnson (7) — — 

17 PERMANENT WAV (A Oesn) Mss M Bel 4-11-8 T Read — 8-1 


country. whai 

The course came bottom in wants, 
six of the It categories with 
facilities in the Members’ and „ ” hl 


While the crowds continue to 


Tattersalls enclosures heavily flock to the riverside course he 
criticized, as were the viewing ^ claim, with some justinca- 


positions, car parking areas, tion- to be doing something 

. . . . i - nnhl OAll-Hfnru> flinu„wl 


bars and general cleanliness. righL Folkestone disputed the 


However, Windsor’s manag- second worst position _ with 
ing director. Jack Knight, was Goodwood, a disappointing re- 


not downhearted by the verdict, f° r such a major venue. 

in^hu^cn.wdstohs 

immensely popular summer new 

Ascot came out best with 


evening fixtures. 

Constraints of space tend to 


18 F3F-000 PRINCE SOL (V Thompson) V Thompson 7-11-5 


pack the crowds together, rea- Sand own, voted the Racecourse 
sons Knight, which accentuate of the Year in the Racegoers 


000 QUEENS PATTERN (Mrs M Dawson) P Beaumont 9-11-8 .. Mbs A Beaumont (7) 

OOOF-O RUFF RIDER (Greer & Bel Television) Mrs S Austin 4-11-5 H Brown (7) 

0020-0 WORTHY KMGHT (1 Mamie) B McLaan 5-11-5 A Orkney (7) 

0 LIGHTER SHADE (B Hestop) W Reed 4-11-0 M Soworaby (7) 

1985: SAN CARLOS BAY 4-10-12 P Ntean (9-4) A Staphanson 17 ran 


the problems. Smaller crowds Club poll, and York just behind. 


would mean fewer difficliies, Leopardstown, Phoenix Park 


— — I but it is one solution he will not and the Curragb were the most 


be pursuing. 


popular Irish tracks. 


1.45 RACING POST TOP OF IRE NORTH NOVICE CHASE (Qualifier: £1.211: 2m) (16 
runners) 


1 F03F0-1 IMPAGE (D) (D Nicholson) S Leacftetter 8-11-7 — 

2 124300- ALKEPAfJ Burgess) G Moore 6-1 1-2 M Hammond 

3 040-020 AUCKLAND EXPRESS (M Thompson) V Thompson 6-11-2 .. Mr M Thompson (4) 

4 40-0000 BORDEAUX ROUGE (P Doherty) E Carter 5-11-2. MPoppv 

7 030-3 ECHO BEACH (Denys Smite) Denys Smith 5-11-2 — 

8 00000-3 FRED ASTAIRE (Mtq I Strakar)N Crump 5-1 1-2. C Hawkins 

9 040-OU4 GENNARO (B) (P Wame) M Naugtiton 6-11-2 C Grant 

10 34433 -3 IDA'S DELIGHT (H Proud) J Charlton 7-11-2 R Eamshaw 

11 3PP3P-U LUCKY FEN (Mrs H Ballard) C Tinkler 6-11-2 ASMnger 

12 U LUKE TREWARKE (B| (R Price) W Storey 6-11-2 NMcConnadc 

13 22/P20-4 MIGHTY MARK (Mrs F Walton) F Walton 7-11-2 Mr J Walton 

14 2FFP-43 PAHAQLO (C Sample) W Sample B-11-2 Mr C Sample 

t5 900-222 TARTAN TORCHLIGHT (Edinburgh WooBsn MU Lid) G Richards 6-11-2... P Tuck 

W^S«MT(W Sfflphenson) w a Stephenson 7-11^ Mr P Johnson (7) 

18 0000/P0 OCflAS ID Hodgson) D Hodgson 7-T0-11 K Doolan 

20 00/00-UF SWOP SHOP (J Lane) H Wharton 7-10-11 D WSunson 

1985: No cerreaponAig race 


Stewards anger Gifford 

Josh Gifford saddled Musical would have won very easily. 


Dark Raven, second iavourite 
at 6-1 for the Champion Hurdle, 
reappears over jumps in the 
Newbridge Hurdle at Naas this 
afternoon. Last season he 
proved himself an outstanding 
juvenile, putting together an 
unbeaten record of four wins, 
topped by a four-length victory 
over Rarctylo in the Gtenlivet 
Hurdle at Liverpool 

His trainer, Dennot Weld, 
believes that he was overrated 
by the English han dicapper and 
that his Irish counterpart had a , 
more accurate opinion of his 
true ability. That view will be 
tested this afternoon as Dark 
Raven's principal rival, 
Bonalma, actually meets him on 
31b better terms than be would 
in an Irish handicap. 

Booalma wain the final run- 
ning of the Sweeps Handicap 
Hurdle at Leopardstown in 
January but it would be a shock 
if Dark Raven lost his unbeaten 
record today as be has been 


2.0 BROSTIN GROUP GREAT BRITAIN V AUSTRALIA HANDICAP CHASE (Rnd 4: 
£1,332: 2m 4f) (8 runners) . . 

1 OOFtyO-O CROWECOPPER (CD) (Mrs M Price) B Preec« 7-11-10 H Orem (Ana) — 12-1 

2 2D-QPF3 MEI»UDGE(PDiifosea)PDuf«M 11-1 1-8 P Barton (GB) — 7-2 

3 030-03U DOUBLEUAGA1H (D) (B Park) CHoftngs 12-11-6 R DOMOOdy (GB) 97 F3-1 

4 P/DI PPF TAKE A BOW (B)(J BartWf) R Btiftw 10-1 1-4 P Detatmy (Aun) 9*4-1 

5 3200/00 ROYALMANX(8<ynP3Bng LM) B Poflkig 9-.11-3 P Scndamora (G8) — 10-1 

8 000001 s - POLAR EXPRESS (CO) (WKhg)W King 11-10-13 D Cannon (Aum) 96 10-1 

7 13443-0 WGH RBXE (BJ3) (E Lodge) J PonWt 7-10-10 HDntaa(QB) *99 5-1 

8 Oq/D-O LEGAL SUGAR (H Manrwa) H Marewni 8-10-0 N Haraott (Ana) — 14-1 

1985: JOIWS PRESaiT 7-11-7 N Oofeman (9-1) R Hokfor 18 ran 
PDRM MBWBRlDGE(1(L10}hadnittod)9iic«f)nom3oitfiNti8nadhitant3rdtoCociquering(11-12)at 

rwniYI Nawtxiry (3m. good to ^t). Best sftonlast season (lOdlyvas when 51 3rd to Castlewardeniil- 
0) at Kdmplon (3m Opp Hem CD. £2427, good. Jan 17, 8 ran). OOUBLEUAGAM (1(M) hwt affart th» season 
on penuttnafe start whan HIM 3rd to Rogairio (10-10) at Windsor (3m, £1657. good to soft. Now 17. 11 ran). 
TAKE A BOW (UL1) was last sucoassfulwtian bsaitog The HoortayBr (10-7) Gtat Wincanton (an 5f. £21 1 7. 
Brm. Sept 16, 11 ran). ROYAL MANX ftO-3) was nevor In with a chance wtian wefl baatan ®h to Annaae's 
DefigW (11 -4) at Wul v urham pton (2m. £2(07, good to soft. Now 24. 10 ran). POLAR EXPRESS has poor form at 


at Windsor pm. good to Krtfl. Successful last season T1 04) whan beating Fluid (1 0-4) a at Ludlow (2m 4f Nov 
Heap Ch. £1 04ft good, Dec 17. 13 ran). LEGAL SUQAR(1 1-6) always tielmd in event won by tod w Sp«t(1 1- 
5) at Leicester (2m Nov Ch. £1348, good, New 28, 13 ran). 


2^0 STRETTON LEISURE HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,591: 2m) (24 runners) 

7 000/038- OALBURV (D) (R Smaie) A Moore 8-12-1 ; G Moore 


Mystery to win the first division The third horse was another 12 
of the Greenwich Novices' Hur- lengths further behind. HI give 


nicely tuned up with two recent 
races on the Flat. 

In the latest issue of the Irish 
Racing Annual, published in 
Dublin yesterday, Edward 
O’Grady nominated Go For It 
as bis National Hunt horse to 
follow. In his words: “She has 
the potential to make a high- 
class staying hurdler.'’ If that is 
her future, then Go For It 
should be well suited by the two 
miles and three furlongs of the 
Kilcullen Mares Maiden 
Hurdle. 

Another jumper with a big 
reputation is KnocfceUy Castle, 
trained by Paddy PrendeigasL A 
winner on the Flat and over 
hurdles, he makes his debut 
over fences in the Kildare 
Novices' Chase. 


7 000/038- OALBURV (D) (R Smaie) A Moore 8-72-1 ; 

6 021230- PEARL RUN (D) (fi Squires) G Prtcn 5-11-2 

7 10F-020 AUNTE DOT (OJBF)(J Webber) JWebbar 5-11-3 

8 20202-0 BOLD ILLUSION (D) (H ThursfiaW) M Eddoy Ml-1 

9 2000-21 CRUDEN BAY (0) (P QrwSey) P Feigate 8-10-13 (7ex) 

17 47217-P HOW NOW |D) (BfehaHeUtog) Mis JPItnun 5-10-11 

12 3212-01 WHITHER GOEST THOU (D) (Ms E EngBrfi) D Rteger 4-10-10 

13 000400- CONS PAL (D) (F FauDOMI) D WMfe 8-100 

14 001-000 MORMNG UNE (CO) (T Pi/me*) L Kennsrd 9-108 

16 0011 P- SPEND EASY (A AytotQ A AytaS 8-108 

17 023241- DESTROY (CD) (Adopt (80)U<J) □ Buwortfl 7-108 

18 01/001-00 WR.T5WRE YEOMAN (D) (J Sawysr) P Haywwd 8-108 

20 PQ/00 GBeiALBREYFAX(JGIIo)MMcCourt 0-10-1 

21 OF200/2 SUEZ (CD) (Lord Owbaa/TForetar 7-10-1 

22 112302 RKUNG SOVEREIGM (D) (J Partsti) J Parish 8-10-0 : 

23 4/40301- END OF THE ROAD p|(K Parranj J Ptinott 6-100 

24 00-4030 EN8XMS KfT(D}(A Bilsbourm) A Brisboums 11-1DO 


R Crank 92 — 

GIAsmsgti 92 8-1 

BDonfeig (7) #99 12-1 

SJotason 92 5-1 

BdsHsan 99 7-1 

0 D Murphy 94 8-1 

ACwroO 98 — 

B Panel 97 — 

G Jones 86 — 

C Brew 89 14-1 

CMmm 84 — 

P Scudamore 99 — 

L Harvey (4) 86F5-1 

M Ahern (4) 95 14-1 

— G Charter Joww 94 12-1 

oj ___ 

uniiMnnv 9* “■ 


of the Greenwich Novices' Hur- lengths further behind. TU give 
die at Fontwell Park yesterday mine another couple of races 


out was m an angry mood alter and think about better things 

the stewards had held an inquiry after Christmas." 

into the horse's performance The explanations of Gifford 


compared with his previous mo. and his jockey, Richard Rowe, 
Musical Mystery had been a were accepted but the trainer 


disappointing favourite when was still arguing with officials 
reappearing at Wincanton in after (he inquiry was over. 


mid-November 


Gifford. However, the feeling among 


highly indignant at being sent racegoers was that the stewards 
for, said: “Surely they can were right to ask questions as 


^BATTLE hill CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£588: 
3m) (to runners) 


expect improvement on -a 
horse’s first run of the season." 


Musical Mystery 
beaten nearly 50 


Gifford gave Musical Mystery Wincanton. 


had been 
lengths at 


only a couple of runs last year Gifford and Rowe completed 


3 OOP -000 AM BEBW ELL (C.D) [Mrs P Sevan) P Bgvan IQ-n-7 

6 0FIW»2P MASTER CROFT (O McCain) 0 McCain 9-10-13 " A Item** 

7 Q3P/P03* BARLEY BRAKE fR Barr) R Ban 10-10-13 ' 

? *J* G,CAL MOMENT (A Carruttwra) N Bycrott 6-10-13 ' ‘ R Gvifty 

9 310M/ YOUNG ADVENTURER (Mrs M Lamb) D Lamb 7-10-12 AMwrtara 

JY" 016 W-C) (Tagoan & w-tjon LxflJS WUson 10-10-10 M Bowtey 

It 2404-4F OF THAT fLK (Mm J Weir) Mrs J Weir 6-10-7 .. . „ r ton* 

12 OPP/PUP WATCHKNOWE LAD (W Young) WYoorm 8-10-7 ‘ 

,3 OO^NUS (V TAompson) V Thompson &.1P-7 . JOtoorman 

14 00000-0 PETE AMD DUD (M»6 P Remuson) W Storey 7-10-7 o Totter 

1985: HIGH BARN 5-108 S Turner (15-2) B Chamley 10 ran 

2.45 HENCOTES HANDICAP CHASE (£2.085: 3m) (9 runners) 

1 2024PO- RtCHDEE (D| (Mss D Oabeti) N Crump 10-12-S runUn ■« «, 

3 31121-4 MR SPOT (D)tR Steefc, R Steels fttli. I. St 

a 2P-2F42 REJUVENATOR (Mr* T Mstcelfe) G Rtoiurds 10 - 11 - 0 .. * PTuS 

«. D40P13- ROYAL BOWLER |M<se J Paimert J cnantoo 7-10-13 . » 71 

} 1204-24 MR BAKER (A Banett) J Jrtteraon 8-1 0-8 " ^£21 £ 

9 0U0IP00- STRAWHBX (CO) iMrs L Ford) E Alston 1 1-108 """ K ~ itl 

10 12444R MELEREK (D) (Mrs JJo«ten)G Moore 11108 “MHemSS » tl 


. . A Murphy 

— 

5-1 

... ........ — 

90 

3-1 

... - R Ganfty 

91 

— 

. AMarrigan 

— 

— 

MBowfey 

• 99FB-4 

.. . C Dentes 

....... D Jones 

89 

9-2 

J O ’German 

84 

8-1 

... . D Tetter 

— 

10-1 


and added: “I wanted to keep a double when Royal Gambit, 
him a maiden. He jumped like a ihe odds-on favourite, followed 


buck today and if Fourth Tudor up his recent Huntingdon suo- 
had not been in the race he cess in the novice chase. 


25 00030-2 BOLD RODERICK (D)(G Richards) Groiwilo Nchards 7-10-0 Mbs T Darts (7) 

27 0-R3O11 STEAMY (BJ)) (Mtes J Raed) D Ougftton 5-10-0 L Jentdiw (7) 

29 0RH/P0 LAST TRAIL (D) (M WtesmBti) M WlaEirtth 7-108 J Bryan 

30 02233(0 KEEP SAUNTERING (CO) (W Turner) W Tumar 7-10-0 TteonTartWr(7) 

31 3313- ATTAW (C WMams) C WBams 4-10-0 — U Dwyer 

32 41/000-F BARRERA LAD (R Townsend) RTounsond 6-100 Mr D Townsend (71 

33 000/1 2P- SNOWBALL JIM (D) (Mrs P HamUton) A Moore 6-104) Candy Moore (4) 

188S: (2m 4f 110JKI) RAGGB2 ROBIN 5-11-8 H Davtes (11-2 JMav) T Ftorster IS ran 



Ran best race last season 
S439. good to soft, Apr 5. 19 ran). HOW 
Bavaitf (10-12)31 at uttoxatsr (2m. £685. 
tan beating Mandaul (11-3) II at 
ran). MORNMG LINE has shown 


on a 71 defeat of Radgraw GM f108) at Taunton 
BOLD RODERICK (10-S|ahoi4drever 
£1 1 0B.goqd Jp son. Ncv 18, 12 ran). 


) at Taunton (2m if. 12254. 
down the weights and (10- 
' to firm. Oct 23. 15 ran), 
hen 71 at SouthwaM (2m. 


Fontwell results ' 


11 2-PB3PF CLOHROCHE STREAM (M Thompson) V Thompson V-VtW 7 lfc 
13 0O8T10 ROYAL GAM UT (Mm S Wart) M>, S W®d 9-IM.. 


Going: good to soft 
1.0 (2m 2f 110yd ch 
DOWNPAYMENT * 

14-T); 2. Bravan (S 

lenamana^i (B DowSng. 8-1). 
RAN: 8 Sioiang (f). 9 Fina Raise (fj. 
Who's Drttftog H), 14 Annagh Glow fft 18 
Faely Marryj pth|, 20 Nera WoH (fl. Stretch 
Out |4to). Ernie a Keep (0. HUOMy (ft 
Uncle Dai (pu), Rachel Street (fed). 14 ran. 
nk. 20L 12L not recorded. M Bolton at East 
Grmstead. Tote: E1Z30: £2.80. £1.70. 
£230. DF: £1830. CSF: £2922. Noted tor 
winner. 


(f). 18 Jury Action (f). vabmat II), 50 High 
Blend (0. Gtenbane Lady (f) fell. 9 raa 3. 
distance. J Grfford at Findon. Tote: £1.40; 
El.ia n.40, £1.30. DF: £320. CSF: 
E&33. 




330 (2m 2f hdfe) 1, TTV1AN (M Perrmt 
10-11 favfc 2. Dream Meniiant (M Klnane. 
8-1): a Tarrakan (Peter Hohte. 20-1). 
ALSO RAN: 7-2 Crairaon Bold (6th), 8 
Mexican MS, 33 Another “ ~ 

K^xrt). 66 Barnes Star 


, . House (puL 11 ran. 9L 51. 20. 
15L F Winter at Lamboun. Toea £320: 
£2.90. £2.10, £220. DR £5.00. CSF: 
£1 0.78. Alter a stewards' inquiry fee reauft 
Blood. 

1. TASHONYA 


135 (2m hdfe) 1. TASHONYA 
Harnett 25-1); Z Rta Woodcock 




Scyaa'a Ctap (I). 

12 ran. *L 151, 51. 21. 1XL I Matthews at 


12 ran. *1. 15f. 51. 21. 1X1 
NewmerXeL Tote: £1.90; 
£2.00, £3 60. DF: £430. C 
Ptacepot£423S. 


Delaney. 13-2). A 

Ramboiro CO. 12 Tegto (4ft). 2S Carol 
Harbour (Hi), 33 Green Spider (5th). 7 
ran. NR: Uttta Sloop, nk, 4L dwTaottol B 
WaRs at KXtoenrtnster. Tote: £1590; 
£6.70, £2.40. DF: £2840. CSF: £10097. 

2.15 Om If ch) 1. MAYANNCOR (R 
Crank. 3-lk 2. Coney Gtan (G Mernagh, 
12-1); 3. Canquoring (P SteJdamoreTXe 
lav). ALSO RAN: 7 Mtevas (ft 33 Trusty 
Catcher (pu) 50 Vulnxy's Pie (4ft). 6 ran. 
7). m tSst D WHams at Stourbridge. 
Tot* £330: £1.70. £1.40. OF: 

CSF: £2897. NR: Uoie* OBver. 

245 (2m hde) 1, CWDIE GSL (M 
Harrttaton. 3-1); Z Model Lady (5 J 
ONeCJ-1 It 3. ught Venture (HHyea.20- 
1) ALSO RAN: 11-4 few Annie Ra (ft 8 


£1.10: 
E7.97. 




10 LONG HAUL HANDICAP CHASE (£3,038: 3m 5f) (6 runners) 

2 41 IP-04 KNOCK HILL (BF) (P Thompson) J Webber 10-11-7 G Mnmanti *99 4-1 

3 12TO-11 CB.T1C SLAVE (Q (B hMlyer) T Forster 9-11-7. LHwwyW 94F4-5 

4 10-1310 FtTZHBUSERT (A Ford) L Kemard 8-11-6 BPnwtel S3 8-1 

5 F2PB-40 GALESBURG (R Jenks) N Gasaiee 9-109 ~D Browne 85 14-1 

7 OBI 23-0 PLAY THE KNAVE (C) (C da Berry) P Batey 9-1 DO SMorstoad 98 7-1 

8 OOFP-29 SOWTULLA BOY (C) fT HoAbrooke) T HouBvoaka 1 1-10-4 JB *«n 88 20-1 

198& BROOMY BANK 10-11-7 P Barton (12-1) J Edwards 9 ran 

FORM WU. (10-9} .o g InsMe Om Anal Y> m8e to be 4W 4th to BtacMtawk Star (100) atfl', 
rvjnm Havdc«k 4m, pood to soft). Best effort test season (10-5) was when amino up dose home to * 
beaLPort Aafcaig (106) ki at Warwick (4m if. £8271. good, Jan 18,15 ran). CELTIC &_Avi on a hat- 

trick attar beating Mayanncor (HW) 31 here (3m. ElftaTablt. Nov 19. 10 ran). FTTZlIEHBEirr (ifMJiwtxi on 
B <1^ anStoerlobSncIWWffl Devon 

Oct 31 ,10 ran). PLAY THE KNAVE (11-1) was a wall beaten 5th to Geats An licsce (10-3) ai 

soft No* 8. 11 ran). SOWTUIAA BOV (11-8) best effort thteseas»nvres wt»n12!£c(to 

Fl rialClear ^O^^Wrfrertwmpton (3m If. E2065. firm. Nov 10. 5 ran). wa-aww 


1988: SUCCEEDED 8-1 1-2 K Jonee (8-1) W A Stephenson 1 1 ran 

3.1S PRIESTLANDS HANDICAP HURDLE (£911: 2m) (16 runners) 

1 411-000 SECRET WALK (CO) (Hathaway Roofing Ltd) W A Stephenson S-12-0 ocmki 

2 24/B3PP- MOUNT RULE (CD) (D GooM) C BeO Mr jnnh^^ 

1 iim tuiauiT .. - nr j WDOme If) 


190 (2m 2f hdlfl) 1. MUSICAL MYS- 
TERY (R Rowe. 3-1 fert: 2. Fourth Tudor 
(G McCourt, 11-2), 3. Treble Chance (C 
Brown. 9-2). ALSO RAN; 5 Mount Tunble- 
down (6th). 6 Camden Beta l<Wi>, 10 




3 1031-00 RAMPANT (CO) (Mrs R Barrt R Barr 7-1 VIO.'”!”!!!' 

r. niLMi — - — • — ■ ■ - . . .. . B»nurownirj 


5 210-P00 AOARE (D)(D Hodgson) D Hodgson r-tt-a ~..l 90 ~ 

7 3-14044 OUKE OF DOLUS (D) IB RtetWjW Storey 7-11-7. .. ...I DT«SSm « t^J 

6 0311/23- COOL JAME (D) fT Beaty) R ASan 5-1 1-0_ ZT^T DTeKBr(7) » 11-2 

10 0021-00 MATELOT (CD) IB SommervBe) M Nautaton 4-1 1-2 ' “ 12 

11 2126/00- COOL ANDY (CO) (H Rebanks) H Retaonks B-11-1 “ “ 

12 44I110P ATKINSONS (D9F) (Mrs T MetcaHe) G Rtaards 5-1 1-1 .H* p?S 77 

13 wwoa TEUCER CCD) IRAdarrwmiV Thompson 6- UM1 MrHIwJ,^ «« Z.] 

14 210-334 ABSONANT (D) (Mrs A Shaw) Mrs G Reveley 4-10-tl - S tl 

15 OI-OOPI NIGHT GUEST (CO) (J RcWet) P Mometth 4-10-1 1 (Sex) — OBtabte « Fit 

16 201-FOO GOLDEN SECRET (R Day) D Moitett 4-10-6 LZ. K Teebm S 

1 7 223003 SPECIAL SETTLEMENT (D> (T Beaty) R Allan S-10-3... .'.T" _ « 77 

18 »WO/0 LITTLE TEMPEST (O)lMraG Young) Mrs A Bel 7-10-1. ASMnar — ~ 

19 03000-0 UTTL£ NE WINGTO N (Gapes Man Ser Ltd) N Bycrott 5-lQO MFWw 

1985: SECRET WALK 4-ID- 3 K Jones (9-1) W A S te phenson 11 ran 


UU). Rpyai Nap (pu), Elizabeth 


TOLiai. no. j Glhoid at rtndon. Tote: 
£3 70: £130. £2.40. £130. OF: £11 JO. 
CSF: £19.73. NR: SumcieL 


Hereford 

ftHn y good to soft 
12.15 (2m hdfe) 1. RUBY FLIGHT 
14-1); 2. Rl The Jug (C Gray. 5- 
(Candy Moons, 4-1 
-1 jt-tavs Gamni Stone, Tudor 


Tufip (ft 9 C B M Girl (pul 12 Chance 
Parmer (4th), 14 Rigtrt You - 


29 (2m 2t 110yd ch) 1. FEARLESS IW* 
(3 Powefl, 10-f): Z Autumn Zulu (R 
Rowes (7-4 jtJavi: 3. Claude Monet (P 
Barton. 7-1). ALSO RAN: 7-4 it-fav Maiuba 
Road (5th), 5 Bright Morning [4#ij 5 rt)n. 
9. Hi. 2L 1SL H Shepherd at Devizes. 
Tote- C&60: £2.90. £11 0 DF; £7.60 CSF: 
£2618 


Pbrmer (4th), 14 Right You 
General's Gat (pu). Poets ttey 
Miss Monroe (pu), Not Enough ( 

“ 501 BmtaaceJEn Pato, 

n Christmas (pu). 17 ran. 

hd. 10L 4L 15L R Edetov mlOngton. Toa: 
£1490: £840. £1.70, £190. OTArtmer or 
second *4th any other horse): £190. CSF: 
£81-01- 


3^0 CHERRY ORCHARD NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£993£m 4f) (16 runners) 

2 222233- SAINT ACTON (Mrs E Wetostefn) G Batdftg 5-11-0 GBradtav 90 5-1 

4 3P-41 STAGHOUND (Mrs c Meadows) DOughton 4-11-2 (7ex) HCtartu 93F6-4 


4*3 nomi 1 
Harrtngton. 3-1): 2, 
ONeC4-1L8Ught 
1). ALSO RAN: T1-< 


7 403291 ANAGMOVS DAUGHTER (A Raison) K Bishop 5-11-0 (7ex) HIM 

8 QP20/3-2 DYLAN'S PMDE (C Lewis) D Barons 7-10-12 p m m s!i 

9 F31F-BF ANNA'S BUTE (J Btakanay) R Btataney 7-10-10 -- - r _ 

10 003000 PHAROAirS TREASURE (A J Blngley Lid) M McCotet 5-10-1^^13" G McCourt 88 — 

13 222-4P0 SANOYLA (B) (Mrs E Beganio) 0 Thom 5-10-8 "SawSrei B2 — 

15 0POO4 SKYLARK WONDER (A Huit) LKanrenJ4-10-4 bS- 3 OT B-l 

18 8040-0 MARY KATE Q*BRPI (Mrs B Curley) B Gurley 5-ift-a ~~ wnii mirmna fa _ 

18 00/P- AUCTION ROYALE (Mrs S James) A James 7-102 GJww* _ _ 


19 030004 SPEAK NO EVIL (Mrs B Cwfey) B Curtoy 6-102. 


Amethee (4th). 20 Ada 
Bride, Ruths Love, Sint 
WlnnBtka^25 ^we ^Sl orm , 

Mem- at Lamboum. Tote; £870; £190, 
£1.40, £690. DF: £7.70. CSF: £1498 
815 (2m 41 tele) 1. ISBIY TOM (A 
Price. 12-1); Z Horsy Lancaster 




290 (2m 2f hdfe] 1. CAWARRA LAD (C 
Cox. 8-1): Z BeUalas Lad (M PerretL TO- 
iy. 3. Hawser (A Madgwick. 33-1). ALSO 


RAN- 5-2 tav Private Views (pu). 11-4 
Predominate (6th). 7 Owen s Pitas (pu), 8 
Goodman Poire 14th). Marshall Key (5ft). 
16 Jade And Diamond. 33 Capistrano 
Prince. 50 Courageous Charger (f). 11 ran. 


TRAINERS 


Course specialists 


1245 (2m hcHe) 1, TRACK MARSHALL 
Gardner. 4-1); 2. Hefuctam cm ~ 
---Ofey. 3, WVsamth (D Bure 
1ST). ALSO RAN; 7-4 tav SymteobC I 
6 OurChcklette (4ft). 7 Donnal Deux ( 

10 La Chanmr(ft 16 Hotxximes GM (1 


21 0*0-02 ELLFERANOEM (Mrs E Marridew) S MeBor 8-10-1 

23 P00200/ POLAR ICE (Mrs M Bostock) J Harrle 10-100. 

25 840PP/P HOLLOW LAUGH (M Banks) M Banks 0-100 

26 0FP-008 TRUE POETRY (D Underwood) O Underwood 5-100 

27 OOO PADOrS GLOSS (MrsE Jones) Earl Jones 5-1O0..I 

196& No oorreopomSng race 


Morphy 

G Ch arl es Jonaa 

J A Harris 

DSkymw(7) 

Harvey (4) 

SJOTteM 


. -« - t- 4 

? i ‘ ‘ ' 


? 

£ A * 




\ \ ** 


(Saninrtha Dunster. 11-4 tayt 3. 
Start (S Marahead, 16-1); 4, Hn 


JSWteson 

Winners 

Runners 


9 

29 


G Richards 

21 

9i 


J Oliver 

9 



PMomoith 

6 

31 

19.4 


JOCKEYS 

Winners 

23 

14 


50 Sussax Overseas (5th I. Mr Panache 
(pul. 10 ran. 2WI. 3L 1L3GL dlsL D WWams 
al !«« E3J»: Cl-10. £4.50. 

£3.70. DF: £43.50. CSF; E8&8& Winner 
bought in lor 1 .BOOgno 


201. 71, 31, 41. 5.-L C James at Newbury. 
Tote: £3.90: £2.80. £390. £2 50. DF: 
£31.00. CSF- £79.68. Tricast £297858. 


Rkfes Par Cent 


topher (A Dicks. 33-1). ALSO RAN: 7-2 
Flanker Jpu). 5 hrnnter. 9 Untcol (6ttg. 14 
KoMy Bay, 18 Hoboumes (pu). PerrtioS 
(pu), 20 FttUand Conqueror (Gog, 
Karamoun (pu). Little Rosie. Shaktra 
Grove. 25 F&Jfleway GM. 33 Lift High. 
Clear Magic feu). Corn Merchant (pu). 
S hal xtero ba . K oa S o -Oae.aO ran. 71. 5L il 


I STAGHOUND I 


a 101 2nd to Ten 
4) was ridden out 
good to soft. Nov 
at Wncwnun (2m 6ft £1265. 
tenlngJ DYLAN'S PfficiE (11- 
.Nov27. 21 ran) wtth SPEAK 
raee when 151 2nd to Marna Sprtng 


3JJ (3m 21 1 1 0yd ch) 1 . ROYAL GAMBIT 
1 Rowe. 8-13 <avu 2. Texas T u rk e y |M 


Only quafifiers 


S Rowe. 8-13 
rrett. 8-1). 2 


irren. 8-1). 3. The TMnrty Farmer (P 
Murphv. 12-1). ALSO RAN: 7 Rodger DeB 


1.15 {2m 41 ch) 1. LARHY-O (P 
Scudamore, fi-4 few 2. Cathyfe Pal (A 


Sharpe. 5-iL 3. Uanpadrtg (M Bowtoy, 5- 

1). ALSO RAN: 5 Stand firm (ft 7 SanWt 


25L 41 WNtom Price at Bbw Vale. Tote: 
81590: £190, £190. £390. £4.00. OF; 
£7690. CSF: S*7£Z Tricast £52042. 
PteenwtEISCfiO 


LKemard 
D Nicholson 
T Forster 


Course specialists 

rs^Runnera ParCnm JOCKHYS 


TRAINERS 

Wmtwra Runnera Percent 
24 104 23.1 

2* 123 199 

IS 128 15J 


Only qualifiers 


P Scudamore 
H Davies 
G McCourt 

SSmtih Ecdes 
S Marahead 


Winners 

Rides 

PerCant 

36 

216 

18.7 

28 

190 

14.7 

14 

108 

130 

9 

84 

10.7 

15 

152 

B£ 


rd'i 


Girar- 


u ^!iV 


, \ i 

iii r - 


n'* . - 

ilciiliii.' 


Be 


* • ^ 

s • - . 

. r »- -, 

::k. • • - 

K*- 

*4^ 5 , ,l ‘ * • 

& • . 


^.; v 


:f Tl. 

Jr -LT; 


>*■ 

i I 


i 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 


SPORT 


41 


YACHTING 


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Crusader chalks up 
a win thanks to the 
drawing-board boys 

► 


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4NCICAP CHASE 

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While 

> _ sader showed 

^ that she had 

benefited 
A substantially 
from her lay- 
off modifications. Her win 
over Eagle was never in doubt 
and the final margin of over 
five minutes could have been 
greater but for some very 
conservative sailing from 
skipper Harold Cudmore and 
helmsman Chris Law. 

“We chose small genoas and 
dropped the spinnakers very 
early at each leeward mark. 

We were just pleased that 
there were no gremlins on 
board,” said Law. “The boat 
felt beautiful. Just terrific” 
White Crusader did break a 
rudder flap but it had no effect 
on performance. “While Cru- 
sader had better balance and 
stability. The hull is much 
sweeter after the modifica- 
tions to bow and stem. The 
shore party deserve 
everyone's congratulations.” 

In the first five minutes of 
the pre-start manoeuvres 
White Crusader avoided all 
contact with Eagle. “We en- 
gaged them at the five minute 
gun and opted for the leeward 
berth,” Law said. “It was 
never aggressive with us. We 
were counting on a starboard 
shift early on.” 

That happened half-way up 
the first leg when the wind 
went from 223 to 210 degrees. 
“We felt very comfortable the 
whole way around,” added 
Law. White Crusader showed 


From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 
Cru- that the modifications to her 
keel and the newly flared bow 
— a la French Kiss — have 
made her a much fester boat 
Against Eagle, herself the 


P*VULBM» RESULTS: Hurt <4 Amw> 
S£ A S^i'- WXteCrtisadar* 
5mm j 4 sac Sore and stupes n 
CanadaH. 3:46. New Zealand WOW- 
Hg" tew ?. 728: French Kiss u 
Azzurra. 3:42; itaia M USA. 1239. 

W L 

New Zealand 

Stars and Sthpes 

French Kiss 


America it _ 

White Cmss 

USA 

tafia 


Canada U 

Heart at Amenca 

Ea$e 

Azzuna. 


Chatengs France. 


23 1 

19 5 
14 10 

20 4 

is a 

is o 
12 12 
11 13 

. a is 
. e is 

. 3 21 
2 22 


PtS 
78 
58 
57 

56 

55 

43 

38 
31 
25 
24 
11 

TODAY'S RACES: New Zeetand v Heart 

of America: America II v Stars and Stripes 
Amirra v ttaHe: Chaflenge France v USA: 

Whae Crusader v French Mas; Canada il v 
Eagle. 

DEFENDER RESULTS: Kookaburra m M 
Kookaburra 8. 32sec Steak n' Kidney bt 
South Auarmta Srrtn 54sec 
DEFENDER POINTS: Kookaburra HI 32. 
Australia IV 23. Kookaburra I1 19. South 
Austraka. & Steak n‘ Kidney. 3. 
TODAY'S RACES: South Austrafia v 
Kookaburra lh. Austraka tv v Steak *n* 
Kidney: Kookaburra in. bye. 

recipient of a new keel, Harry 
Cudmore demonstrated his 
boat to be much improved 
from her last configuration. 

Each windward leg gave the 
British about another minute 
over Eagle. The mar gins were 
1 min 1 9sec at the first windward 
mark. 2min 23sec at the second 
and 4min 19sec at the third. 
Cudmore has said that he’s not 
worried about downwind speed 
— “you beat them uphill*" he 
says. 

Elsewhere on the three 
courses, layoff modifications 


seemed to be paying off. Steak 
*n* Kidney, boasting a new keel 
but without a win — except in 
the protest room ~ in the 
defender series, completely out- 
classed South Australia. The 
Sydney yacht lost the start, 
definitely an area of weakness 
with helmsman Fred Neill, but 
thereafter increased her lead 
over South Australia by nearly 
40 seconds on each leg. The final 
result must have fxo a worry in 
Stockholm, where a Swedish 

syndicate have just concluded 
the purchase of the Adelaide 
boat. 

Il was a day of in -house racing 
for the two Kookaburras. As 
always ft was a dose contest. 

Kookaburra Q leading by IS 
seconds at the first mark but 
never increasing her margin 
thereafter. At the third wind- 
ward it was down to two 
seconds. Downwind Iain Mur- 
ray overhauled Finer Gilmour 
on Kooka It At the final 
leeward mark be had reversed 
the lead and put Kooka 1IL 23 
seconds in fronL At the finish 
line it was Murray by 32 
secsonds. Australia !v had a bye 
as a consequence of Australia 
Ill's withdrawal. 

It was a disappointing day fbr 
Tom Blackaller aboard the rad- 
ical USA. The first tow legs of 
the race against Italia were dose, 
with USA 10 seconds in front at 
the top mark and nine seconds 
at the first leeward. At this point 
the spinnaker fooled and went 
under the boat, costing 
Blackaller a vital race against 
one of his opponents for a semi- 
final race. At the next mark the 
Italians were two minutes in 
front and never looked back. In 
the final leg USA had major 
problems and a rout 
tea faroe. 


‘Wizard’ works his magic 


w -.1 - 
»*■ J 


Baddy Melges, the grand- 
father skipper from America's 
mid-west, provided the 
America's Cap trials biggest 
npset to date when he beat 
America II by almost a minafe in 
the first day of the third and 
final Roand Robin (Keith 
Wheatley writes from Fre- 
mantle). 

There wiD be near pank in the 
New York Yacht Club com- 
pound tonight. The big question 
is whether Melges has Improved 
his boat out of all recognition or, 
just as likely; America n has 
been inadvertantly de-Omed dur^ 
ing the lay-off period. 

The skipper, John Koftas, 
spoke on Monday of the lead 
roulette* being played with the 
keel of Amenca □ and oa the 
same day a new mast was 
stepped. As Warren Jones, the 
sHpremo in the Bond camp, is 
fond of saying, it is as easy to 
make a 12 -metre gp down as 
make it faster. 

The race started wi d e r bine 
skies and with a classic lgkaot 
sea-breeze from the South West. 
America II, sailed by Kofins, 
took an agressive start by the 
narrowest of m argi n s, one sec- 
ond, from Heart of America. Up 
the first beat Kolias was able to 
stay in front only by virtue of 
having been slightly better po- 


sitioned across the start line. At 
the top mark Melges and his 
team were right on flu tafl of 
America 0, just 10 seconds 
behind. 

Hie Chicago 12-mefre under- 
went major surgery to her keel 
daring the lay-off period. 
Melges described ft as: “new 
frplets wider the wipglets of the 
keeL She's not skidding down 
out of a tack anymore bat still 
feds trader.** Asked after the 
race what a Tiplet* was the 
euphoric Melges replied: “If 
goes on the end of a winglet. I 
hope it’s not a Hash in the pan. 
It's a little late in die day fbr 
that- I hope it's Heart of 
America that’s speeding up and 
not America II that's slowing 
down.” Whatever the specifics 
of the wotfc on Heart of America 
they delivered the goods in speed 
terms. On the first ran, the 
hardest leg on which to overtake 
an opponent. Heart of America 
swept past Kotins and the 
wortied-lobkmg crew on Amer- 
ica n. 

Melges is an 
medal winner in Star 
and. although aged 57. is one of 
the hardest competitors in inter- 
national y achting . If his Fre- 
mantle rivals had almost written 
Melges off ft was becaase of the 
boat's slowness, not a lack of. 


respect for his sailing abilities. 
.In yachting circles be is univer- 
sally kn own as The Wizard of 
Zends', a reference to the small 
takeridw town where be runs a 
hmLh niMiiw bosmess. “Zeada 
is not the end of the world hot 
yon can see it from there,*’ nms a 
fevonrite Melges gag. 

At the bottom mark ft was 
Heart of America by a nine 
second margin. Up the second 
work the two white yachts broke 
oat of phase to opposite sides of 
the course. It was hard to pick 
the leader from the weather 
mark bat at each cross Melges 
poshed the yacht farther in 
front. 

As the wind freshened. Heart 
of America seemed to gain a 
lftde pace. Melges said a week 
ago that their big gamble for a 
place in the getni-fimds was a big 
breeze every day and a new keeL 
As the Americans say. he looked 
like a man who had rolled a 
natural sevea. At the second 
weather mark. Heart of America 
was 34 seconds in front. On the 
two readies she seemed in a 
little bit of trouble, her lead 
dropping by eig ht seconds oa 
each of the two legs. But at the 
second leeward, with the breeze 
now hitting 22 knots. she was 
still a combative 19 seconds m 
front. 


- 


1 




r 


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hr s 




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is L#r* • 


SKIING 

Girardelli 

defies 

handicap 

Val d’lsere (AFP) -Marc 
Girardelli. the Worid . Cup 
holder, who dislocated his ten. 
shoulder in -a fall on Saturday s 
special slalom, the first 
pean event in the 1986-8/ 
season, was fastest’ in practice 
here yesterday for Friday s 
downhilL 

The Austrian, who now com- 
petes for Luxembourg. Had al- 
ready defied doctors' advice to 
lake a fortnight’s rest by 
competing in Sunday’s giant 
slalom at Seaineres. Holy, al- 
though he was dearly handi- 
capped by his iqjury and unable 

to qualify for the second ron. 

“I still cannot lift my leftaira 
completely, but that d «s not gel 
in the way for a downhill, ne 
said after raring down « 
famous O K. pisre m 2nun 
3.26sec. “I'll be fine in two 
days.” he added. 

Michael Miir , , ef Italy, 
just three hundredths of a 
second slower and Pjrmin 

didn’t take any nsk V JgLgJSv 
“although the snow, parocriwly 
over the bottom half, made rt 
very easy.” Zurbnggen, ham- 
pered by injury in his battle with 

the two downhills raced lu 

Who W 90 ^JJ^K^Tworld 
Argentina and »s twee 

pace. 


wee*?* 

Vi'. - 
***•>• ' >- 
Sjrrw ‘ • 

fs&t rm- 

N 

rt ■ 

: .m-.* fi- ' ‘ 

jjw’ ' 

■ •• 
«-z. 
ifcAr 

k 



m !*■« - ■* 

f* ■ 1 


cinii 


f s 


2^)457: 15. DMagrerfS^'^ ^ 
• Belgrade sfc | s from 

- four pairs °f SP^'" aiming- 

champion »n l he atft 

special slalom, and a 
in . a case ° ^ 

for their ^ - rn^aison. 

tkmaJ League wm of 

will be without thar toPP'gJ 
Rod Htties for ^j^Sham 
division mah* 

starts a seven-u^ fnendb 

alter being sent “ tjooal in 
against Murray Inl«<“ IWU ~ 
Edinburgh last moc™* 


ATHLETICS 


A £75,250 helping 
hand for leagues 

By Pat Botcher, Athletics Correspondent 


There are signs ofa new mood 
at the Amateur Athletic Associ- 
ation — something approa c hi ng 
voluntary revelation of fa ct s and 
figures, probably not un- 
connected with Saturday's an- 
nual meeting showdown, with 
member-clubs demanding more 
details, of commercial 
transactions. 

It may seem only a minor 
point, but referring to prize- 
money. rather than to 
euphemistic “grants” or 
“subventions^ 1 , at yesterday’s 
Press conference to announce a 
£75.250 sponsorship by RFC 

Trust for the area track and field 
leagues in Britain is a symptom 
of the new mood. 

The AAA, rather like the City 
of London, are gradually com- 
ing to terms with the need for 
public accountability after their 
own “Big Bang”. . 

It is a pity that those in charge 
of Women's AAA policy do not 
feel the same weight of 
responsibility. For yesterday’s 
infusion of further cash for 
men's athletics in Britain was 
also a salutary reminder of how 
utterly inadequate and in- 
capable is a women’s admin- 
istration prepared to sacrifice 
track and field progress for their 
own political longevity. 

The commercialisation of the 
sport, which began openly at the 
top four years ago. when the 
International Amateur Athletic 
Federation agreed to payment to 
athletes, has now, with 
yesterday's deal, permested the 
whole structure of men's athlet- 
ics in Britain. 


The six area track and field 
leagues, which form the ladder 
of promotion to the British 
Athletics league, are comprised 
of almost 400 clubs m 40 
divisions throughout Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland. 

They will now compete for 
£22.100 in club prize-money 
next summer alone, with a 
further £7,500 in bonuses for 
field events — an area in which 
Britain is traditionally weak. 

There will also be £3,650 
included in individual prizes, 
plus an extra £37,000 overall to 
the six leagues to disperse as 
they wash in back-up support 
and promotion in the first year 
of a three-year deaL 

Swindon Athletic Club's pro-’ 
posaL at Saturday's agm in 
Leeds, that details of television, 
and sponsorship deals by the 
AAA be made available to all 
dub members has been con- 
demned by an independent 
group of athletics consultants, 
headed by Chris Chataway, the 
former MP and worid record- 
holder. 

Chataway’s group were 
formed, after last year's agm, to 
advise on financial and bittiness 
affairs. They consider that 
Swindon's motion would “very 
seriously jeopardize” the sport's 
ability 10 raise fends by destroy- 
ing confidentiality. 

Swindon’s claim is that the 
situation cannot be healthy if 
the representatives • of area 
associations are not being kept 
informed of what the general 
committee are deriding. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

Beware of the ‘Joeys’! 

By Keith Macklin 

Cumbria’s slaughter by the cashire, Cumbria, Cheshire and 
Young Kangaroos, the Austra- 
lian high schools’ touring squad, 
has sent shudders through 
Britain's schoolboy and youth 
Sms as the Bnlisb Amateur 

R uebv L caff'g Association an- ana nona^nsi vwuuucs ««. 
ni-umce their 1 8-strong squad for Warrington on Friday, and both 
two internationals — at Wigan associations will do well to keep. 
J, December 12 and EUand the margins reasonably dose. 
Road on December 20- 
There is a prevailing pcssi- 
jtm that the Australian young- 
sicR 1 —nicknamed “Joeys”. 

kangaroos - will run not, 
jSt as thefrseniors did during 

lh B^BARLA’ have selecteJ a 
British squad, with play- 
^■choien from Yorkshire. Lin- 


Humberside. 

The Australians, strapping 
young men who look far more 
mature than under- 1 9s. take on 
West Riding at Halifax tonight 
and North-west Counties at 


SQUAD: P Aldred (Leigh . 
^ ■ £ HaM. I Srales 

P & 


Randeraon (NDLB, Hiit). C Broome. A 
Raw (Yew Tree. Leeds). C Comaty 
fCrasfieftl W hnfajat G Fortier (Thstto 
Heath. St HetenejTG Hewer (KeSsl R 
UveeeyfHidcBr, Barrow), PMoran (Wigan 
St P&TKkS), C O BrtBT (HuOBCL A Parte 
(Wttus St Maries). G PTt*ps (Dewsbury 
Moor}. NSnaw (Barrow island^ BTetionj 
(Hanstagham). 



Toeing the tine. White Crusader and Eagle jostle for position before the start of yesterday's 

race. 


RUGBY UNION 


Compensation: three crucial 
meetings to clear the fog 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


Three meetings, tomorrow 
and on Friday, may clarify the 
muddy waters that have been 
swirling around the home 
unions in their discussions of 
the International Rugby Foot- 
ball Board's proposals on 
compensation for players on 
tour. 

It is important that they 
should — or the board them- 
selves will suffer a setback in 
ibeir assumption of direct pow- 
ers of leadership of the world 
game. 

The Welsh Rugby Union 
discuss the IRFB proposals 
tomorrow and seem Likely to 
vote in favour. On Friday, the 
Rugby Football Union's exec- 
utive committee meet, and will 
discuss the implications of last 
Friday’s full committee vote 
against the proposals, while, in 
Wellington, the New Zealand 
council hope to come to a 
decision on acceptance or other- 
wise of the IRFB package, which 
was unveiled in October. 

The IRFB require all mem- 
ber-unions to reach a decision 
on the proposals by the end of 
the year, so that all relevant 
details can he circulated and 
considered before the board 
meet in March. 

' A day here or there will not 
matter. Thus the Irish Rugby 
Football Union — who have ac- 
cepted the package in principle, 
but not all the details — can 
have a further discussion at 
their next meeting on January 2 

Fitzgerald 
rattles 
his sword 

By George Ace 

The team that tore the record 
books apart with a 60-0 win over 
Romania last month have, not 
surprisingly, been nominated 
for the senior role in the trial at 
Lansdowne Road on December 
20. But the choice of Ciaran 
Fitzgerald to lead the Possibles 
will send a tremor through the 
team captained by Dona! 
Lenihan. 

Fitzgerald wiD relish the 
opportunity to cross swords 
with Harry Haibison. who re- 
placed him in the Ireland team, 
and to put Lenihau's captaincy 
OP the line. 

Fitzgerald is already one up 
on Lenihan, having recently led 
a hitherto hapless Connacht to a 
first-ever win over Munster at 
Thomond Part Lenihan was 
captaining Munster to an rater- 
provincial whitewash on that 
occasion and was unavailable 
when Munster defeated the 
Fijian Barbarians on Saturday. 

Bill Harbinsdtt, in his first 
season as an Ulster player, 
teams up with David Irwin in 
the Possibles centre. Harbinson 
turned in a first-class perfor- 
mance against Connacht and 
followed it up with another eye- 
catching run against Leinster in 
the championship decider. 

John O' Driscoll, the former 
British Lion, who has been out 
of international reckoning for a 
few seasons, is bade in conten- 
tion in a back row which has 
Brian Spillane at No S and 
Ulster’s Willie Duncan on the 
flank. 

PROBABLES: H HscfM (London Irish); 
T Rbgbnd (BaBymena), B Muffin (Oxford 
Neman WML * 


and reach agreement in time to 
catch the IRFB deadline. 

England’s next full committee 
meeting is not until January 
16 — too late for the deadline. 
But there must be a certain 
unhappiness at the outcome of 
last Friday's meeting, during 
which the proposals were de- 
bated for some three hours and 
then rejected by 34 votes to 14. 

The RFLFs own amateur 
status sub-committee had 
recommended, with some 
reservations, acceptance of the 
proposals, but the appropriate 
minutes were not available to 
full committee members until 
the morning of their meeting. 

International Board repre- 
sentatives are, however, free to 
make up their own minds on the 
issues that confront them, while 
bearing in mind the views 
expressed by their domestic 
eoUeagnes, and it would be 
wrong to think that the RFU 
had closed the door on the IB 
proposals. 

Dudley Wood, the RFU sec- 
retary, tacitly admitted as much 
when suggesting that no firm 
conclnsion had yet been 
reached, even though a vote had 
been taken, but one wonders if it 
would not be easier to come to a 
decision with a smaller 
committee. 

The Irish, who have a 21- 
strong commitee, compared 
with the RFU's 56, have been 
very dear-headed in deciding, 
for instance, their referees for 


the Worid Cup. and that players 
would be capped fbr all matches 
played, at this early juncture. 

The difficulty for the Inter- 
national Board, at this particu- 
lar time, is that they have three 
issues pending-' all of them 
crucial to the well-being of the 
game. , 

There is a major internal 
reorganisation, which indudes 
the introduction of associate 
members; the amateur regula- 
tions have to be brought up to 
date; and, on top of that, there is 
the organization of the inaugu- 
ral World Cup to oversee. 

Nor can one of the three be 
divorced from the others be- 
cause they are all intertinked. 

This is why it will be particu- 
larly interesting to see which 
way the New Zealand council 
move on Friday. The southern 
hemisphere have been prime 
movers in bringing rugby into 
line with their concept of 

“modernisation’’. 

But Russ Thomas, the New 
Zealand council chairman, is 
adamant in his belief in 
amateurism. “When you start to 
change things, where do you 
stop?” he asked yesterday. 

It is a view shared by England, 
who have fought for a more 
privileged existence for players, 
but are not entirely sure whether 
they remain in control of events. 

New Zealand will also receive 
an up-to-date report on the 
investigation into the Cavaliers’ 
tour of South Africa 


England and Wales 
push drug test case 


By Paul Martin 


England and Wafas are to 
press this weekend for the 
introduction of drag testing dur- 
ing the Five Nations ragby 
competition starting next month. 
Scotland and Ireland will sup- 
port the move, and a decision in 
favoar frill almost certainly 
emerge at the Five Nations 
committee meeting in London 
this Saturday. 

Drag testing is to be in- 
troduced at the World Cup next 
year in Australia and New 
Zealand, the World Cap 
Committee agreed last weekend. 
The Rngby Football Union de- 
cided last Friday to institute its 
own random drag-testing pro- 
gramme, 00 the lines recom- 
mended by the Sports ConnriL 

Dudley Wood, the RFU Sec- 
retary, has written to the Five 
Nations committee proposing 
that a uniform drag-testing pro- 
gramme be brought in this 
season. The Welsh have made a 

similar suggestion. 

“We have decided Oat the 
Five Nations should approach it 
as a joint operation,” said 
Desmond Barnett, the Welsh 
president It was prefers We to 
have a uniform -standard, be 
added. His onion had declined to 
follow England’s example and 
Institute drag-testing of its own: 
that might Seem to imply that 
oar players are taking drags, 
which we do not believe 
happens,” Barnett added. 


Scotiand will “go along with 
England's proposal** B0! Hogg, 
the Scottish Rngby Union Sec- 
retary, said yesterday. The Scot- 
tish contacted a random drag 
test last season on their A & B 
International trials te a m s . 

The Irish, though they have 
no drag-testing plans of their 
own, also agree with the idea at 
Five Nations leveL “I can see no 
reason why we should not 
support the move on Saturday,” 
said Sir Ewart Bell, toe presi- 
dent- “As rqgby football gets 
more competitive — especially at 
high level — we mast make 
checks to see that drags don't 
enter the game. In certain sports 
where drugs ate a problem, 
administrators at first claimed ft 
did not exist.” 

The English and Welsh na- 
tional squads have already re- 
ceived medical advice on how to 
resist temptation. The Webb 
medical advisor. Dr John Davies 
a leading sports medicine ex- 
pert; recently wrote a letter to all 
players warning that their 
increasing use of gymnasiums to 
btdld op strength — especially 
for the Worid Cap — coakf bring 
them Into contact with weight 
lifters and other sportsmen 
prone to using steroids and 
drags. He cautioned them about 
the physical risks involved. 
“What he wrote about hormone 
changes certainly scared foe life 
om of them,” Barnett gripped. 


Newport take no action 


UnwwsftyL M Hi 
Cmssaa (insttxws! 


Rtzgenrid (Lansdowne), P Ma tthews 
(Wanderers), D Lerihm (Cork Conefrflj- 
tm, captain). W Anderson (Dungannon), 
N KarrfArds), M Gtaon (London hsh). 
POSSIBLES: 9 Rates* (BaUymene): P 
Haycock (terenua). W i f rt mv o u (Ma- 
lone). D mrin Unstoniara). J Grotty 
" ' A Want (Graystwres). A Doyle 
‘ J Langbrak (Btertroc*), C 

ConsMtffnX W Oencan (MakneX B 
Spffiane (Bohemians). 



Newport have decided not to 
make an official complaint to 
the Rugby Football Union over 
reported remarks made by 
Roger Quittenton, the RFU 
international panel referee, who 
handled their game against 
London Welsh last month 
(David Hands writes). The dub 
committee met on Monday 
evening to discuss a national 
newspaper report in which the 
referee was quoted as saying he 
had to “whip Welsh clubs like 
animals” but concluded by 
criticising “provocative reports 
and irresponsible comments”. 

Quittenton bad previously 


contacted the dub, the Welsh 
Rugby Union, and Denzil 
Lloyd, the chairman of the 
Welsh referees committee, to 
assure them that he had been 
misquoted. . 

London Welsh have been 
involved in talks with Moseley 
over the injury to their flanker, 
Stuart Russell, who suffered a 


between the dubSt After study- 
ing a video of the game, officials 
claimed the injury was the result 
ofa punch, an accusation denied 
by lan Metcalfe, the Moseley 
captain and full back, who had a 
clear view of the inddenL 


TENNIS 


Trumped by the 
court card of a 
king-size talent 


Sports writers of The Times 
present their selection from the 
sporting books of the year. 
Today: Rex Bellamy on the 
best of the tennis books. 

But for his charm and infec- 
tious enthusiasm, John Barrett 
would be insufferable. He be- 
longs to that rare breed of 
omnivorous, practical visionar- 
ies whose minds make disturbed 
anthills seem like studies in still 
life. 

You know the kind. They 
juggle dextrously with a wide 
range of activities, light fires in 
everyone they meet and make 
things happen. They are so 
outrageously multi-talented that 
the rest of us are reduced to the 
status of honest plodders. 

Nor do we mind, because the 
Barrens of this world are im- 
bued with the spirit of laughter 
and a childish sense of wonder. 
They cannot believe that life is 
being so good to them. They 
have a divine spark, a streak of 
joyous lunacy. They make us 
feel better. They opw windows 
in the mind. And their powers of 
persuasion are such that they 
could sell defoliants to bedouin. 

This year I wrote a tennis 
book. Game, Set and Deadline 
(Kingswood Press, £12.95). that 
achieved a modest ranking in 
the best-seller list Barrett 
trumped that card with WO 
Wimbledon Championships 
(Willow Books, £18.95), which 
on several counts may be the 
best tennis book written in this 
or any other year. 

But his counter-punch was so 
sweetly delivered, right on the 
button, that it caused no pain. 
We were fighting at different 
weights, anyway. Barrett was the 
heavyweighL 

This extraordinary man 
earned an honours degree in 
history and remains, as tus book 
vividly confirms, an ardent 
historian. He joined Slazenger. 
became a Davis Cup player and 
captain, founded the trend- 
setting training squad known as 
the “Barrett Boys” and the BP 
International Tennis Fellowship 
(a junior development pro- 
gramme), and established him- 
self as a writer and broadcaster 
tipped to succeed Dan Maskell 
— if anyone ever does. 

Barren is also something ofa 
musician and versifier with an 
ambition to compose a light 
opera in the Gilbert and Sum- 
van vein. 


The man of the 
elastic minute 


One would put nothing past 
him. When Kipling wrote that 
stuff about filling the unforgiv- 
ing minute with 60 seconds’ 
worth of distance ran, he did not 
know about Barrett, to whom a 
minute is an elastic quantity 
with no known braking point. 

From all this it follows that 
Barrett is good company, 
whether in the flesh or in prim. 
He may have the most active, 
imaginative, best-stocked mind 
in tennis, plus an inexhaustible 
zest for the game and for life as a 
whole. 

He has poured all that into an 
absorbing book that, in addition 


r'«i 


to being the most readably 
comprehensive of ‘Wimbledon 
histories, puts the game's great- 
est tournament into its social, 
political, economic and artistic 
context. To suggest that Barrett 
has taken a fresh approach is to 
suggest that Everest is big. His 
book is a joyous education and, 
in its own field, a peerless work 
of reference. 

Where else, for example, 
could one find the singles results 
for every year of the tour- 
nament, plus the finals of the 
other events? Where else such a 
wealth of evocative prints and 
photographs and anecdotes 
dispersing the gathering dust of 
history? where else the rele- 
vance to tennis as a whole and in 
Wimbledon in particular of the 
railway system, the suffragette 

movement and the develop- 
ment of rubber and the jet 

engine? 

A year in the life 
of an insomniac 

Joy of joys, there has been 
another such book — equally 
lavish in its production and. in a 
different way, equally wide in its 
range. Like Barrett, Roy 
McKelvie was a distinguished 
amateur sportsman who then 
became a hard-nosed pro- 
fessional communicator. 

McKelvie has given us The 
Queen’s Club Story (Stanley 
Paul, £19.50), a centenary his- 
tory of Britain's most renowned 
and influential multi-sports club 
— though Queen's is no longer as 
“multi” as it used to be . 
McKelvie's book has already 
been reviewed here but can be 
recommended again to all 
enthusiasts of racket games. 

There is so much traffic across 
the Atlantic these days that, one 
way or another, you may be able 
to get a copy of Pam Shriver's 
Passing Shots (McGraw-Hill. 
S16.95L which is basically a 
diary of one year’s thoughts by a 
player who reached the United 
States final at the age of 16. 

Miss Shriver is a smart and 
witty insomniac who hunts wild 
geese and has intruded into 
Republican politics. She writes 
as weU as she talks, which is 
going (some, and discusses the 
players and the game with 
disarming candour. She reckons 
that drugs are no problem in 
tennis because the players are 
too mean to buy them. Her 
asides also cover man-hunting, 
homosexuality and menstrual 
cramps. WelL nobody ever ac- 
cused Miss Shriver of being 
mealy-mouthed. 

This, though, was Barren’s 
year. One day I would like to get 
my own back by giving him a 
rough day on the mountains — 
the Glyders, perhaps, or the 
Five Sisters of Kintail. But be 
would probably romp over the 
ridges with childish glee and 
then, eyes shining, ask inno- 
cently; “What are we doing 
tonight?” 

There is nothing to be done 
about people like that. They 
were born fell of beans and their 
Maker forgot to put a lid on the 
can. 



Barrett counter-punch Shriver disarming candour 


BADMINTON 


White No 1 for Scots 


Billy GilHIand and Dan Tra- 
vers, the Commonwealth 
Games doubles champions, are 
in Scotland's team to play 
England at Hereford tomorrow, 
while Alex White, who reached 
the Commonwealth men’s sin- 
gles semi-finals, will play at 
No. 1 for the Scots, teaming up 
with lain Pringle in the second 
day's doubles. 

Anthony Gallagher, who has 
won two local tournaments in 
the past two weeks, will play in 
the second singles spoL 


Jennifer Allen will play in the 
women’s singles and her sister, 
Elinor, will line up in the 
women's doubles with 
Scotland's most capped woman 
player, Pamela Hamilton. Jen- 
nifer Allen and Gilliland are in 
the mixed doubles. 

Allan Campbell, the Scottish 
coach, said: “Andy Goode and 
Fiona Elliott have just won Lhe 
Scottish Open mixed doubles, 
but I think we have an outside 
chance of beating England, 
though it will be tough.” 


CRICKET 

Ejaz prompts 
Pakistan to 
their first win 

Sharjah (Renter) — Pakistan 
recovered from middle-order 
nerves to claim their first win in 
the four-nations Champions 
Trophy tournament yesterday, 
beating Sri Lanka by four wick- 
ets with one over to spare. 

Chasing a moderate target of 
165 in the 45-overs match, 
Pakistan were steered to victory 
by the newcomer, Ejaz Ahmed, 
who hit 12 runs in lhe penul- 
timate over from the medium- 
pace bowler, Graeme Labrooy. 

Sri Lanka looked to be in with 
a chance when the Parisian 
captain, Imran Khan, was 
caught by his counterpart, 
Duleep Mendis, at mid-wicket 
for 22 off the fast bowler, 
Rumesh Ratnayake, to leave 
Pakistan on 142 for six. 

But Ejaz, partnered by the 
experienced Mudassar Nazar, 
saw Pakistan home. Rameez 
Raja was top scorer for Pakistan 
with 39. 

For Sri Lanka, only Asantha 
Gurusinghe coped with the 
Pakistani attack on an easy- 
paced pitch. His 60, which 
included only three fours, an- 
chored the innings and earned 
him the man-of-ihe-match 
award. 


HOCKEY 

Indoor season 
comes first 
for England 

By Sydney Frisian 

Neither England nor Great 
Britain will take part in the 
inaugural Indira Gandhi invita- 
tion tournament in Delhi from 
January 11 to 20. The Hockey 
Association's internaiional 
tournaments committee recom- 
mended at a recent meeting in 
London that England should 
decline the invitation. 

The reason is that the tour- 
nament fells in the middle of the 
indoor season and uppermost in 
England's minds, apart from 

other indoor commitments, is 
the preparation for fee Euro- 
pean indoor qualifying tour- 
nament from February 20 to 22 
at Torun, in Poland, where they 
will face opposition from fee 
host nation. West Germany. 
Sweden. Austria, Italy and 
Wales. 

However, West Germany. Po- 
land, The Netherlands. Spain 
and fee Soviet Union have 
accepted the invitation to the 
outdoor Delhi tournament, us- 
ing it as a training ground for the 

Champions Trophy com- 
petition in Amsterdam from 
June 18 to 28 next y^ar. 


i 


v 


A province unites in tribute to a fine goalkeeper and one of football’s most dignified representatives 

A true ambassador for Irish sport 


By George Ace 

For a brief period, tonight, the twin 

pBlars of hatred and bitterness that hare 

dominated life in Ulster for nearly two 

decades will be pnsbed aside. A crowd in 
excess of 20,000, and of an religions 
persuasions, will assemble at Windsor 
Park, Belfast, to pay tribute to one of the 
Province's most distfcsgtfishefi sporting 
sons — Pat J enning s, bolder of a British 

record 119 international caps and the 

world's most-capped goalkeeper. 

Jennings has bestrode the world 
football stage with a dignity and modesty 
that placed him on a pedestal few morta ls 
ever achieve. If there is a grain of truth in 

that hackneyed phrase “a true ambas- 

sador for bis sport and country", then it 
applies to Pat Jenni ng s. 

That doyen of wing halves from 
another era, Danny B lan ch flower, whose 
simplistic style aim elegance made him 
quite unique as a player, said of Jennings 

in one of many tributes: “Not only did fee 

survive in the big time, bat he mastered 
iL He became one of tbe greatest with his 
cool, smooth, style." 

The exploits of die "big man from 
Newry” since be first won an Irish youth 
international cap in 1963 until be bade 

his farewell at the World Cup in Mexico 

earlier this year are legendary. On 43 
occasions in his appearances for his 
country, be did not coodede a goal; in 975 
League and Cup games for Watford, 
Tottenham Hotspur and Arsenal he 
picked up one booking — against Leeds 



Hallmark of a fine goalkeeper: Jennings dives to make a save earijr in his career 


United at EUand Road in tbe late 1960s. 

Further elaboration is unnecessary, suf- 
fice to say that Jennings, from every 
aspect, has written a page in football 
history which is embossed in pare gold. 

It £s never too difficult in most cases, if 
one probes beneath the surface, to 
discover something of an ansavomy 
nature in many of those who ma ke 
newspaper headlines. In truth, in many 

instances there is no need to probe. Not 

so with Jennings. His conduct on ami off 

the field has been exemplary and the 
youth of today have in him a perfect 
example of all that portrays tree 
sportsmanship. 


J ennings was transferred from Newry 
Town to Watford for a fee of ££,500 on 
the advice of a former Irish international, 

BOly McCTacken, who was 79 years old 

when he saw Jennings playing for an 
Irish youth side at Bromley. After a 
season and 52 games at Vicarage Rwsi, 
Jennings Joined Tottenham in June, 
1964, for £27,500 and, three years fatter, 
won his first FA Cup . medal wSmb 
T ottenham defeated Chelsea 2-1. He 
gained his second when Arsenal achieved 

a 3-2 win over Manchester United in 

1979. 

"Football has enriched my life, 
Jennings says, "but nothing could have 
been achieved without the helping hand 


of so many people — in Newry where I 
started off; at Watford where 1 served ray 
apprenticeship; at To ttenham where I 
enjoyed 13 happy and successful years; 
and at Arsenal where I ended my career 

as a 40 year okL On the inte r national 
front I have had some wonderfid experi- 
ences, enjoyed the comradeship of so 
many great players. The past 23 years 
leave me wife a host of ^ lasting 
memories.” 

• Brian dough, tbe Nottingham Forest 
manager, is sending two of his exciting 
young players, Franz Carr and Neil 
Webb, to help replace Ikn Rush, Norman 
Whiteside and John Aldridge, who have 
been forced to withdraw from the 
Windsor Park tribute because of injuries 
and dub c a ll s - Also missing will be 
Jennings' international colleagues, 
Jimmy Nicho! and Gerry Armstrong, 
while there are doubts about the presence 
of the likes of Kenny Dalglish, Glenn 
Hoddle and Ossie Ardfies. 

PAT JHWWOS SELECT P J «a *y_ (g 

Wednesday], P Reid (Everton) “ M - /! — * ™«*— 

G l SSi?«*^S^SwlS^Ln^(Aserf(j. fOai 

fL frerpooQ. R 

OenieMr (Tottenlmni Hotspv), J Smbtek (Manchester 

BSVSS 

ster United). T Cabin {Tottenham Hflfspm). 

A Saoddy (Northern Irefamd). 


F Stnlcmn 

UritedLC 



Hallmark of a fine goalkeeper: Tbe large hands which were Jennings' trademark 


GOLF 


Tinning strikes a 
golden streak 
to stay seven clear 

From John Hennessy, La Manga, Spain 


The British presence at the 
PGA qualifying school was 
strengthened at the La Manga 
club yesterday by arrivals from 
Wentworth and Wapping, but, 
with a few exceptions, the 
golfers from home did not stand 
out as prominently as the 
secretariat and the scribblers. 

Steen Tinning, the tall elegant 
Dane, continued to dominate 
the field of 232 (after five 
withdrawals) still engaged in a 
tense struggle for the coveted 
European Tour players' card. 
While the top SO will be elated, 
1 82 players wiU leave La Manga 
disappointed either after the 
fourth round tonight or the 
sixth round on Friday. 

Tinning had a second round 
of 69 over the South course for a 
total of 199. which places him 
16 under par. seven strokes 
ahead of Wayne Smith (68). a 
rangy Australian, and nine 
ahead of David Gilford, of 
Trentham Park (69), and Jeus 
and Lopez of Spain (75). 

It was. however, hard work 
for Tinning yesterday, still 
haunted, he says, by his 61, 10 
under par, over the North 
course on Sunday. He has 
apparently burnt the midnight 
oil since that stunning achieve- 
ment He seems drained and has 
lost all feel with his irons. "I 
think I played it smart today." 
he said afterwards, "just bitting 
into the centre of the green and. 
not trying to knock the flag 
down." If he can play a round of 
69 in those circumstances, one 
wonders what triumphs may lie 
ahead in his professional career. 

Gilford, a former England 
amateur champion, advanced 
from four under par to seven 
under with another characteris- 
tically steady round. After tinn- 
ing in 34, he momentarily lost 
his momentum and was pun- 
ished by a third putt on the 1 0th 
and an errant second to the next, 
but he came home strongly with 
three birdies in the last four 
holes. A superb four-iron to six 
feet at the 435-yard 15th was 
followed by a sand wedge 
millimetres from the I6lh hole 


(405 yards), and a three-iron 
safely carried the ravine of the 
18th. 

Lee Fielding, of Finchley, 
came unexpectedly into the 
picture with a 66. which puts 
him only one stroke behind 
Gilford. Here is a young man 
who has lived an adventurous 
golfing life after turning pro- 
fessional in 1977 at the age or 1 6 
(“otherwise I would have had to 
go to work"). 

He was beaten in a play-off for 
the fiftieth place in last season's 
school at La Manga and has 
been walking a tightrope this 
year between the conflicting 
demands of the PGA's Southern 
Region and the European tour. 
One way and another he has 
lotted up £300 in fines for 
withdrawals. He is the pro- 
fessional at Finchley driving 
range when neither of the 
administrative bodies can offer 
him a tournament. 

His round fitted into the 
pattern yesterday, with a variety 
of seven birdies, one eagle, and 
three shots dropped to par. The 
eagle three at the third was a 
beauty, for the hole measures 
520 yards. He went boldly for a 
drive over the comer of the dog- 
leg and. undaunted by a lie in 
the rough, be struck a three-iron 
to 12 feet and holed the putt. 

His chequered record suggests 
he may not survive in the top 
drawer but his cheerful, un- 
inhibited approach to life in- 
duces one to hope otherwise. 

LEAPING SCORES: 199: S Tinning (Den). 
61 . 68. 69. 20& W Smith (AusL 66. 72. 88. 
m- D Gflfort (GBL 68. 71. 69; J LApez 
(Sp). 67. 66. 75. 209: L FfckllnglGBL 71. 
72:66. 210: P A Brostedt (SwsK ra. 68. 70; 
M Sunesson (Swot 73, 66, 71; D Mac- 
Millan fUS). 69. 67. 74. 211: J Hobday 
(SA). 70. 71. 70; D Klenk (US). 70.71.70; 
MfSw(GB), 71. 71, 69. 212: n Mine (GSL 
69. 72, 71; W WlnsnesJSAL 72. 72. 68. 
218: A Cannes (HI. 72. 71, TO: M Moreno 
(SpJ.72.B9. 72; A Evans (G8), 74,70.69; J 
Bennett (GB). 70. 71. 72; A Stubbs (GBJ. 
75, 84. 74; A PlfierD (Sp), 6a 70. 75: C 


i. 217: S Stephen (GB); P Hoad. 218: 
C Brooks. C Laurence. 


REAL TENNIS 


Pace proves decisive 


By William Stephens 


Wayne Davies, a professional 
at the New York Racquet and 
Tennis Cub, and Lachlan 
Deuchar, the Hampton Court 
deputy professional Cub. elimi- 
nated Jerome Fletcher (un- 
attached) and Neil Smith 
(Queen's Club) from the George 
Wimpcy open doubles 
championship at Queen's Club 
yesterday, defeating them 6-1,6- 
4. 6-3 in the second round. 

Davies and Deuchar are the 
holders; both are Australian and 
Deuchar will be reluming to the 
Royal Melbourne Tennis Club 
next April as head professional. 
He is a former British and 
Lfoiied States professionals sin- 


gles champion and is the present 
holder, with Fletcher, of the 
British professionals doubles 
title. 

Davies and Deuchar set too 
severe a pace for Fletcher and 
Smith in a match full of bard 
hitting. 

Chris Ronaidson. the world 
champion and head pro- 
fessional at the Hampton Court 
Club, together with Mick Dean, 
a master at Radley, beat 
Ronaldson's younger brother, 
Stephen, and Michael Gooding, 
both professionals at the 
Canford Club, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. 
Ronaidson and Dean have twice 
won this championship. 



THE RIGHT PLACE 
TO PARK YOUR CAR 

Ti wltvmscwmr car in the Times Classified. fill in your adwniscmeiii 
m me space Jvfnut fl^nj^mtss^jescan heal moiled svraraielyt. 

n,in ' m " m ,hra ' 

Cheques to he made payable in Times Newspapers Ltd. Should you wish 
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Send to Shirley Marjmlis. Group Classified Advertisement Manner 
limes Newspapers Ud, AdwrtBemeBt Department. P.O. Bmd&j' 
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Advertisement:. 


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Address: . 


Toothpaste salesman 
to put shine back 
into teeth of the game 

By Stnart Jones, Football Correspondent 


Greece are Caernarfon’s King 

rules but he would 
like a new throne 


The Football League have 
chosen a toothpaste salesman 
to dean up the image of the 
game. Philip Carter, the presi- 
dent, announced yesterday 
that Trevor Phillips, who 
resigned from his post as the 
genera] sales manager of the 
Beecham Group on Monday, 
has been appointed as the new 
commercial director. 

When he starts his new job 
officially in March Phillips 
will attempt to cany the 
antiquated system into a mar- 
ket-place in which he can see 
“enormous opportunities." 
Even though he preferred not 
to reveal his plans in detail, he 
is clearly attracted by the ever- 
widening world of television. 

"The development of cable 
and satellite television will 
rewrite the rulebook," he said. 
"I hope to try and create a 
better environment for poten- 
tial investors. There are prob- 
lems at the moment but it 
seems as though football is 
more or less at the bottom of 
the curve. 

“If that is tree, there can be 
no better time for a salesman 
to come into the game. Every- 
body involved must hdp to 
give ita push back on the way 
up. It is a big challenge. 
Yesterday I was selling tooth- 


paste; now I must learn about 
a fresh product” 

Carter admitted: “We have 
had our difficulties, particu- 
larly over the last few weeks, 
and one of the areas that has 
most concerned us is the 
commercial aspect. We 
needed an expert to improve 
the ambience and to promote 
the positive side, such as the 
increase in family enclosures. 

“dubs are already individ- 
ually helping to bring families 
and children back to football 
and the gates are up, which is 
encouraging. Now we want the 
92 dubs to work together. If 
we could put ground advertis- 
ing on a national basis, for 
example, that would put us in 
a much stronger bargaining 
position." 

Carter warned that the 
representatives of the BBC 
and ITV should not expect to 
teach a similar agreement with 
the League when the current 
contract finishes at the end of 
next season. "There may be a 
situation then where recorded 
highlights might be suitable 
for outlets other than the 
national networks," he said. 

j Ken Bates, Chelsea's chair- 
man, suggested that the finan- 
cial structure may be about to 
undergo a significant shift in 



Carter: new image seeker 


balance. "The game is still 
subsidized by lotteries, direc- 
tors and supporters. We were 
amateurs when we entered the 
television negotiations two 
years ago, for example, but we 
are now learning how to sell 
the game." 

Bates selected an unfortu- 
nate metaphor when he added 
that "this is one of the areas 
where Trevor can pick up the 
ball and run with it" Then 
again, in one sense, it was 
appropriate. Phillips, a 44- 
year-old who joined 
Beechara’s in 1 968, was once a 
goalkeeper with Bradfbrd-on- 
Avon. 


Stevens leaves a mark Stapleton puts 
on historic fixture 


By George Chesterton 


Westminster .................. 1 

Charterhouse - 5 


Four goals from Stevens gave 
Charterhouse a comfortable vic- 
tory against Westminster at 
Vincent Square in a fixture 
which has been played annually 
since 1863 — the year in which 
the Football Association was 
founded. 

In the early stages West- 
minster combined well in attack 
and seven minutes into the 
game Charterhouse were fortu- 
nate to escape from an 
inswinging comer which Islef 
was forced to tip over the 
crossbar and another well-taken 
comer was only cleared at the 
third attempt Moments later 
Griffiths hit the crossbar with 
the goalkeeper beaten. 

Charterhouse opened the 
scoring against the run of play 
when Stevens made the most of 
a Westminster defensive lapse 
to run a loose ball into the net 
Westminster came back im- 


mediately and from yet another 
comer Baylin headed in the 
equalizer. Charterhouse re- 
stored their lead when Leale 
turned well in the Westminster 
area to shoot inside the near 
post 

Despite much spirited effort 
the next goal did not come until 
20 minutes into the second half. 
Stevens finished his season in 
the grand manner and put the 
result beyond doubt by scoring a 
further three goals, all somewhat 
similar in nature. He broke 
through the centre for Leale to 
find him unmarked with only 
the goalkeeper to beat 

Cogan and Griffiths were 
Westminster’s two most experi- 
enced players and in a week's 
time they will be representing 
their school on the cricket Geld 
in Bombay. 

WESTMINSTER: R Stopford; T 
Pemberton, 0 Johnson, M Aspa, S Baffin, 
A Jaque , N Hudson. J Griffiths, H 
Gregory. S Rice, D Cogan. 
CHARTERHOUSE: L Bet R GoodHffe, M 
Streaker. A Zenos, N Payne. H Bedford, 
S MeUstrom. A tvenree, M Gray, N 
Stevens. A Leale. 

Referee: M wasams (Kent). 


his name to 
new contract 

Frank Stapleton has finally 
agreed a new three-year contract 
with Manchester United, which 
wifi keep him at Old Trafford 
until he is 33. 

Martin Edwards, the dub 
chairman, said: “We have 
shaken hands on a new deal and 
Frank will sign a new comma 
within the next two or three 
weeks.” 

Norman Whiteside, out of the 
United team for three weeks 
through suspension, could be in 
line for a recall in the televised 
match against Tottenham 
Hotspur on Sunday if he im- 
presses United's new manage- 
ment team. Colin Gibson, who 
through injury has only bad 
three senior games this season, 
will play in a friendly match at 
Burnley on Saturday. 

• A statement made by tbe 
Chesterfield chairman, Mike 
Watierson, that the third di- 
vision club was for sale was 
publicly denied yesterday in a 
statement issued by the rest of 
the directors. 


taking 
nothing for 
granted 

Greece will go top of group 
five — a section which indodes 
Poland. Tbe Netherlands and 
Hungary — if they beat Cyprus 
in tonight's European 
Championship match in Nico- 
sia. However, Miltos 
Papapostolou, the Greek man- 
ager, is remaining cautious 
about his side's chances. In 
February, Cyprus held Greece to 
a goalless draw and last night 
Papapostolon said: “We have to 
be very careful. Their standard 
has improved a lot in recent 
years." 

Playing their first qualifying 
game of the championship, Cy- 
prus have high hopes of upset- 
ting their visitors. Greece, 
however, will be full of con- 
fidence after last month's 2-1 
victory over Hungary, and will 
pin their hopes on Anastopoulos 
and Mitropoolos, their goal 
scorers in that match. 

Cyprus wifi be looking for 
goals from their new cap. 
loannou, who was the top scorer 
last year in his domestic league, 
with 22 gods for APOEL. In 14 
matches between the two since 
1963, Greece have won seven, 
Cyprus two 

In Tirana. Albania are ex- 
pected to make lour changes 
from the side which lost 3-0 to 
Austria in October, for tonight's 
match against Spain. Cipi and 
Ocelli, both defenders, are likely 
to lose their places to Omari and 
Hodga, with Zijaji and Kola will 
stand down for Tiera and Musa. 

Spain, 1-0 winners over 
Romania last month, are ex- 
pected to make two changes. 
Joaquin, the Sporting Gyon 
defender who has made only 
intermittent appearances since 
the 1982 World Cup in Spain, 
will replace Gal lego, who is 
unwell, while Roberto — pro- 
moted from the side which beat 
Italy in the under-2I final in 
October, is expected to replace 
his Barcelona dub-mate Julio 
AJberio in midfield. 

In Group Two, Italy’s cap- 
tain, Cabrini, has been omitted 
from the 18-man squad to play 
Malta, in Rome, on Saturday. 
Veteran of three World Cup 
tournaments, Cabrini is re- 
placed as captain by AltobelJi. 

Although hit by injury this 
season, Aliobelli played for 
Juvenlus on Sunday, but 
Azeglio, the national manager, 
said: “Cabrini is playing with a 
bandaged knee at the moment. 

Whelton reported 

Joe Whelton. the basketball 
coach of Sharp Manchester 
United, has upset the indepen- 
dent Referees Association with 
his remarks about the choice of 
referee, Mick Howell for last 
Sunday's Prudential National 
Cup semi-final with Palycell 
Kingston, who had previously 
invited the official to a league 
game between the dubs. The 
association have reported the 
matter to the English Basket Ball 
Association, who will discuss 
the matter next Tuesday. 


By Paul Newman 

John King has been waiting 
for six years for one telephone 
<-aiL When he left his job as 
manager of Tramnere Rovers in 
1980, after fire seasons; he did 
not think it would be long before 
a Football League chairman 
worfd be seeking his services. 
Bat the call has never come 

"I think my record speaks for 
itself," be says. "I took 
Tramnere into the third division 
and genially did well on limited 
resources. Since then, Fve had a 
fair degree of success in non- 
Leagne football. 

"I still believe I would do a 
good job in tbe League, bat I've 
never had an offer. I used to 
apply for every job that mu 
going, bat I don't any more. I 
reckon that, if a dob warn me, 
they'll know where I am." 

Anyone looking for King will 
have to go to one of football's 
farthest-filing comers. For the 
last 15 months, the former 
Everton, Bournemouth, 
Tramnere and Port Vale mid- 
field player has managed 
. Caernarfon Town, who play in 
the second round of the FA Cop 
for the first time on Saturday 
when they entertain York City. 

Perched on tbe north-west tip 
of Wales, there cannot be many 
more remote football outposts. 
“Chelsea came op to play os in a 
pre-season friendly this 
summer." Bang says. "John 
Hollins said it war good to see 
me again, but be kept on talking 
about me “doing my work out 
here*, ft was as though I was a 
missionary or on another 
planet." 

After leaving Tramnere, King 
became assistant manager at 
Rochdale and then manager of 
Northwich Victoria, of the GM 
Vanxhall Conference. He took 
them to two successive FA 
Trophy finals at W'embley — 
one ended in victory after a 
replay — and enjoyed consistent 
league success before the dob's 
financial problems ended in his 
departure. 

Having had no lock applying 
for posts elsewhere, he then 
accepted the offer to manage 
Caernarfon on a part-time basis. 
In his 1 5 months at The Oval, he 
has done a remarkable job. 

When be arrived, Cae rn a rfon, 



FA CUP 


hopelessly oat of their depth 
after winning promotion to the 
Multipart League from the 
North West Counties League, 
were stranded it the bottom of 
the table. On a minimal budget 
King has taken them into 
contention for promotion to the 
Conference and, after beating 
Stockport Coanty in the first 
round of the Cup, they are only 
90 minutes away front the 
potential riches of the third 
round. 

King, aged 48, admits he was 
wary about taking the job. "I 
didn't much fancy putting my 
reputation on the line because 
they had had a terrible time and. 
if it carried on. people were 
bound to ask who tbe manager 
was. I did it only as a favour 
initially, though I've not regret- 
ted rL I'm still doing it in the 
hope that something better 
comes along, bat there are only a 
few jobs in the game." 

Such is his determination to 
remain in football — "It bas 
always been my living and I 
want to keep it teat way" — that 
he has not taken the financially 
easy way out of too king for work 
outside the game. The only other 
job he has is on a Government 
scheme, arranging football 
matches and coaching for the 
unemployed in his home city of 
LiverpooL 

“Although f hope the job at 
Caernarfon is only a stepping-, 
stone. I'm delighted I've been 
able to bring some success to the 
dub,” he says. “The board of 
directors say they want enjoy- 
ment out of their football more 
than anything, but I know 
success is really the only way to 
bring that. 

"It is a bit more relaxed here, 
but, though there's less pressure 
than I was under at Northwich. 
for example, they're still veiy' 
ambitious. Their eventual aim is 
to get into the Football League. 
They've spent £40,000 on the 
ground and are ready to 
progress." 


SKIING 


Daytime Telephone: 
1 ACCCSSI 


. I Burdaycitnl l .. 


A Calgary screen test 
suggested by jumpers 


Coaches from around the 
world have suggested the in- 
stallation of wind screens at the 
new 70- and 90-melre Olympic 
ski jumps tested in Calgary tor 
the first time over the weekend. 

During a test competition in 
preparation for the 1988 Olym- 
pic Games, skiers gave high 
marks to the S6.5m (about 
£4.6m) complex on a hill 
overlooking Canada's oil capital 
when wind conditions were 
calm. 

But when swirling winds up to 
37 mph disrupted training, 
competitors suggested the 
construction of wind screens 
such as those used on some 
European jumps. 

"The wind was so strong 
sometimes that it was hard just 
to stand up." said Matt! Pulli. 
coach of Finland's team. "All 
our jumps at home have some 
wind, but this is the worst that I 
have seen." 

American Zane Palmer said. 
"I’ve experienced wind before, 
but nothing like what I faced 
here. This is a beautiful facility, 
but something has to be done 
about putting in wind screens 
before 1988 or the competition 
won't be far." The screens 
would cost up to $216,000 

(about £1 52.000). 

The Canadian government's 


Olympic co-ordinator, Gerald 
Berger, said that studies in- 
dicated that winds should posq 
no problems during the month 
of February, and jumps could be 
scheduled lo avoid the windiest 
pans of tbe day. 

Jiri Parma of Czechoslovakia 
had the best jump of the 
weekend, measuring 113.5 me- 
ters. but last-minute prepara- 
tions were needed to make the 
landing area safe. 

In an initial lest a week ago, 
Canadian jumper Horst Bulau 
was unable to stop in the landing 
area and spilled over the top 
into a gravel heap, collecting 
cuts and bruises, and snow was 
dumped on the finishing area to 
prevent a recurrence. 

Olympic organizers were dis- 
appointed that only about 3.000 
paying customers turned up for 
the inaugural jumping com- 
petition, when 20,000 had been 
' expected. 

The ski jump is one of two 
major question marks about 
Olympic sites in Calgary. The 
other is Mount Allan where the 
Alpine events are scheduled and 
which will not be tested by 
world-class skiers until Dec. 21. 
Critics say the mountain often 
lacks snow and the middle of tbe 
downhill course is too flaL 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


REAL TENNIS 


BASINGSTOKE: Cflx Drinks slv-mUe 

i pa dra cs: T, 8 Reynolds (TonbnegoJ, 29mln 

39sec: 2. M Phrtpdt ( 

Jackson (Hr 
don. 30p*s; I 

V atoms: M Dufl ( AJdorshoC. 3i:17. Woman: 
a wyotti (Southampton). assn. 


. . .... .Tcnbrwop). 2S 

sac 2, M Phrtpot (HllnadanL 2SM5: 3. A 
ckson (Hjanodoo), 2855. TOM 1. HUtag- 
n. 30pts; 2, Aldershot, 4& 8, Overton. 66. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


UNTTH) STATES: Nmtoori League (NFLfc 
Nw York Gians 21 . San Francisco «9era iT 


CRICKET 


SHEFFIELD SHCLD: tabanc Queensland 

162 tor man v western Australia. Rato. 

Match drawn. AdalaMac VfcMrtr 368 and 223 
lor lira dec. South Aunrsda .233 and 339 (D 

Hookas 5*: M Hughes 4 tor 68}. Victoria won 

tv 117 runs. 


QUEE N'S OJJ ft Geo rge ^ LJ|||] 

SadfwFSSSSsSwtw*) and L Oouchar 

Hampton Cowl] bt J Ratchar (un a tt a ched) 

arsd MPA Smith (Queen's), 6-1. 6-4. 6-3: C J 
RonaUsm (Haanmn CouD and M F Dean M 

S Ronaktson TCantonJ) and M Goodng 

(Cantord). 6-4. 6-3, 6-3; C J Lumtoy (unai- 

tacned) and JP Snow bt J HoweNfflcattoauxi 

and K Shatoon (UwntogtonJ. 6-5. 6-4. 6-3. 

Stogies: Third round: Deuchar M Ftotthw. 6- 

2. M. 6-0: Howi* « A J W Pago. 6-5. 5-2. 6-1; 

Oavfcn bt S Ronaktson 6-2. B-1. W. 
HOLYPOHT: ctogt VHopof wcnanTs sto- 
ries dwtttoH Atorira* J Vaughan M 
vDaaies. 5-fl. 6-1; M Wgnon bt C 

Armstrong- Smdti. 6-1. 3-6. 6-5; FMactotosh 

bt C George. B-2. 6-1; JPagacxP VVtson. 6-1, 


RUGBY UNION 


CLUB MATCH: Cambridge LX Qub 3, Oxford 
Greyhounds 8. 


FOOTBALL 


SQUASH RACKETS 


FA TUOPHYr TOW guaWytag nMi& I 
Crawley 1. W rn b fa y 0. Second 
DiMch Hansel 1. Grays O. 

FA YOUTH CUP: Seeend rewefe QWtogham 0. 
Cteriton 3: West Broma. Coventry 0. 
VAUXHALL^OPEL LEAGUE: Second dMstwi 
north: VautfMl Motors *, Hornchurch 3. 
Combined Services 2. WbnbliMen 3. AC 
Delee Cap: Second rand: Southwk* O. 
Maidenhead UtdOUeo. 

Oil-VAUXHAU. COtFEHEMCE: Ktodsrmto- 
aterl, Northmen 2. 

OMAC CUP: First round: FMtnm 0. Bath 1. 
NORTHERN P 1104101 LEAGUE CUP: Hot 
round. Or* leffi Caernarfon 1. Bangor 1. 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: BN Dritow Cwk Ffcsl 
round: Avtosbury 2. Bsangstoka 1; Chetme- 
tom 1. Ca m brtdon City P: PutSey a. Btston J 
(at WHenftaiL Worcester t. Leamington 3: 

End 4. 
at- 


i open: First roond: Q Zamsn 
flBjWKJ- 6-9. 8-4. 9-8. 9-4: S 
UCOmmar (AusL 8-6. 8-3. 8- 


MU8CAT: Al Frit 

SaranfOTt (NZJ bi CtWimar (Aus 
2: C Robertson (Aus) bt H Jafan (En®. 8-2. 8- 
3, 8-10. 08. 94.- R Norman (NS bt T 
Nancarrow (AusL 9-1. 9-2. 9-2; P Kenyon 
(Eng) H M Ahmad (Pak}. 9-1. 9-5. 9-3; R 
ThSne lAu« M K Smtot (Aus). 8-3. 9-4. 8-1 ; G 
Boars (EncflW O Briariy (Aus). 9-6. M. 6-B. 
6-9. M: JKtan (Pak) M G^ WUams (EngL B-t. 



Rolen John Kins* who reigns over a remote football outpost 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


*to= L Opto bt M 

Levans. 2-9. «4. 104. 94. 104: SPahuj bt G 
Martin. 9-10. 94. 64. 94. 54 {rwft A Banned 
bt S Ford. 104. ML 7-9. 94! J Watar bt H 
Gefiek. 9-3. 8-10. 9-2. 9-3. 


. . . Ruahden v King's Lyon, 
OTHER MATCHES: Preston North 
Parock nwoe a Tot 


TENNIS 


wt Lfeoastar Present 1, ufcestar Past 0. 
EUROPEAN UNDER -21 CHAimQNSKR: 
Group one (Beralfc Atoanla ft Spain 0. Group 
tore (McorirtCyonisO. Greece «. _ 

FOOTBALL COMBtHATIOft SwhMn 0. WK- 
fero 3: IMwel a Rearing 4; Bngraon 4, 
CharftOT fr. Queen's Park Rangers 0. Chris**- 
Z 


MUNICH: Women's asMritton match: 8 Oral 
(WGItX H ManOkova (CzL 6-7. 8-3. 6-2. 

ARUNOTOM: Association of Tennis Protari- 
atoeato rankings: 1. 1 Lendl (Czir 2. B Becker 
n«3fc 3. M Wtomder (SweL 4, s Edtnra (Swnfc 
5. Y Noah (Frt 6. H Leconte (Fry 7. J HiSrain 
(Swak 8. J Camera ItlSh 9. M Mear (Cz). 10. 
A Gomes (£4 


FOOTBALL 

Kick -off 7 JO unless stated. 

FA Cup 
First round 

Bristol Rovers v Brentford (7.45) 
Second round 

Southend v Northampton (7.45) 

FuH Members Cup 
Third round 

Everton v Newcastle 

Freight Rover Trophy 
Preliminary round 

Brantford v Swindon (7.45) 

Peterborough v Aldershot 

Scottish premier division 

Aberdeen v Falkirk 

Clydebank v Hibernian ™ 

Dundee v Hamilton 

Hearts v Celtic ^ 

Motherwell v Dundee Utd 

Rangers v St Mirren 

REPRESENTATIVE MATCH; Football 

GMACWftSeeond mend: Sofoorough 

PfTOtf™ CUP- S mnd Ifoun* Erm, & 
Mwdare v Abingdon Town; Luton w 

WfflwW. 

KWGHT FLOODLIT CUP: Bartong y 
Ramarn . 

NORTHERN PREMIER iF&mg rnp. 
Hwt Round, first Log: Oswestry vRnyL 


LEAGUE; Worksop v Burton 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: BIB OeJtow Cuff 
First round: AJvechurch v Halesowen: 
Faiaham v Andover. King's Lynn y Corby: 
J^cesaer United v Grantham: Pods « 
Dorchester Sutton CoWfeU u Wo Oak: 

Ttanhrirfnf* u k^rtinw- wc ^ a. 


iriJ- rn3i ovisnir AStOT 

ViBflv Derby 17.07. Blackburn v Hull f? 01 
Manchester City v Sunderland (6451 
Leicester v Manchester United (7.0) 
Jtowcasile v Everton (7.01: Snetfielo Uid v 
Nntrn second tJhnskm: Barnsley v Srofce 
U O). Blackpool V Scunthorpe (7 01 . BotttHi 
Darlington (7 0); Wigan v Doncaster 

FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Crystal Pat- 
ace v Portsmouth: West Bromwich « 
Norwch v Fulnam. 

VAUXHAU.-OPEL LEAGUE: Second <U- 
vtawn nor lie Chestum v Royston. 

RUGBY UNION 

JJjORN EMI COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Ox.oroshira v Buckinghamshire ia i Ox- 
lord. 7.15) 

CUIS MATCHES: Atwtfflery u Pontyoool 
{7 Oi: Bridgend v South Glamcrqan tost 
(* .151: Cross Keys v Maesieg (7.W 

OTHER SPORT 

«OCKEY: Pi 12 a Express London 
League: Cambridge University v 
G mid lord. Qtfard University v London 
University. 

SNOOKER: Hofmerotar World Doubles. 

Kar$ST : ,0arn 3 a,B Co "‘ r * 

SOUASH RACKETS: Haflamsrtre trvna- 
non tournament (Hatensiwe T 8 SC 
SheffwUj. 















3 


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V-'-‘ 




W.1 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 3 1986 



43 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


Britten, with and without distortion 


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S^S-V’SiTURS 


• When Tony Palmer's film 
about Benjamin Britten, A Time 
There Was.... (Channel 4, 
9.00pm), was first shown six years 
ago, it was a tribute only to Britten 
who had died four years earlier. 
Now, it is also a tribute to Peter 
Pears, very much alive when 
Palmer made his film, and an 
important contributor to it Since 
thei^Pears, too, has gone, and the 
film's concluding sequences do- 
voted to Death in Venice — the 
opera that spoke so eloquently of 
so many elements in the lives of 
the composer and the singer — 
which were sad enough when 
Britten alone had departed, are 
now made ineffably moving with 
the death of his closest friend and 
collaborator. This is an affec- 
tionate film, sensitively con- 
trolled, and immensely detailed. 
The most accurate comparison 
that can be drawn between /t Time 


6-00 Ceefax AM. 

230 News headlines Mowed by 
The FGntatones. (r) 255 
Weather. 

7M Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough, Salty Magnus son and 
Jeremy Pax man. National and 
international news at 7.00, 
7.30, &0O and 850; regional 
news and travel at 7.15, 7.45 
and 8.1 5; and weather at 7.25, 
7.55 and 855. 

8.40 Watchdog. Hot Seat - a 

whose dedsionsaf^I^^jr 
file 8.55 Regional news and 
weather 94)0 News update. 

94)5 Day to Day. 'Robert Kflroy-Sak, 
his Quests and a studio 
audfence, discuss tranouflfeer 
safety. 945 Advice Stop. 
Margo MacDonald with 
supplementary benefit advice 
10.00 Neighbours, (r) 

1020 The Wombfes. (r) 1225 Phf&p 
SchoAeM with children's 
television programme news, 
and birthday greetings 1030 
Play School 104)0 Henry's 
Cat(r) 

10l 55 Five to Seven. Ftitton Mackay 
with a thought for the day 

114X)Day Out with Angela 

Rippon on the Nadder, the 
Ebble, and Cranbome Chase, 
(r) 11J0 Open Air. Viewers say 
what they think about 
television programmes. 

1255 Domesday Detectiv es . Quiz 
game for teams about Britain 
1255 Regional news and 
weather. 

1.00 One O'clock news with Martvn 
Lewis, weather 1-25 
Neighbours. 150 Little 
Misses. Little Miss HeipfuL 

2.00 F3m: Not Just Another Affair 
(1982) starring Victoria 
Principal and OH Gerard. A 
made-tor-toievtsion tale of a 
wealthy lady-killer lawyer who 
believes he can conquer his 
courtroom adversary with his 
irresistible charm. But the lady, 
a marine biologist is not 
Interested in tne opposite sex 
and lives only tor her work. 
Directed by Steven Stem 350 
HBstofjawSupershaik- 

.iwT-V"- 


C CHOICE ) 

There fVos and «ftm» of 

Palmer’s other films about musi- 
cal personalities (Puccini and 
Wagner among them) is similar to 
the one that can be waA between 
Ken Russell's poetic film about 
Etear and the maniacal gyrations 
of his movie about Tchaikovsky, 
By coincidence. Radio 4 today 
repeats the edition of With Great 
Pleasure (1 1.00am) in which Peter 
Peats, not long before his death, 
made a selection of some of his 
favourite poetry and prose. 

• I applaud Channel 4 for provid- 
ing a coda to Palmer's film about 
Benjamin Britten — a performance 
by the Lindsay Quartet of Britten's 
String Quartet No 3 (10.30pm), 
composed shortly before Britten 
died. This is a noble interpretation 
of the work. The airade is that the 


Cartoon 350 Sava a Lite. 
Bnergency first aid sarles. (r) 

350 UnnyAs House, read by Matilda 
Thorpe 44)0 Animal Fair with 
Don Spencer 44)5 The 
Adventures of BuBwI nM a and 
Rocky, (rt 4.10 U aa thcHtf o and 
Co. 455 Haitbeat with Derek 
Hait. 

54X1 John Craven's Newsround 
54)5 The Children of Oman 

Knowe. Part two. 

555 Macterteam. 

64M Nows with Nicholas Witched 
and PhBp Hayton. Weather. 

655 London Plus. 

7.00 Wogan. Tonight's guests 
include Lord Longford, Jean 
Rook, and the fastest talker in 
the world, John Moschftta. 
Music Is provided by A-Ha. 

755 The domes S h ow p re se nted 
by SeHna Scott and Jeff Banks. 
Ian McCaskBI models the latest 
in tonswear; Jane Lomas tries 
supermarket fashion; Graham 
Srnfth of KOngof displays a 
collection of hats; and 
Anouska Hampel shows off 
her wardrobe, (r) 

84)0 Dattas. Bobby and Pam 
prepare to ptoht their troths 
once again. (Caefax) 

850 Points of View with Barry 
Took. 

94» A Party PoSUcaJ Broadcast on 
bahatfof the Labour Party. 

94)5 News with JuKaSomervife and 
John Humphrys. Regional 
news and weather. 

955 The Visit, presented by 

Desmond WRcox. A widow, 62- 
year old LHan Wales, la re- 
united vntti Betty, her twin she 
never knew she had. (Ceefax) 
(see Choice) 

1025 Sportsnipht, introduced by 
Steve Rider. An appreciation 
at Arsenal, the London fbotbafi 
team that celebrates the 
centenary of its foundation on 

Christmas Day; plus action 

from Belfast in tne Pat 
Jennings testimonial match; 
and cricket htah8ghts of the 
last day's play n tne second 
test in Perth. — 

1155 Weather. 





nobility manages to survive de- 
spite some reflecting panels be- 
hind the players that so distort 
them that they sometimes look 
like something out of Francis 
Bacon. The neon squiggles don’t 
help much, either. 

• Some judicious trimming of 
superfluous detail would not rave 
come amiss in this week’s film in 
Desmond Wilcox’s series The 
Visit (BBC1, 935pm). The tale it 
tells is a good one, though: the 
reunion of twins in their sixties, 
neither of whom suspected that 
she had a sister and neither of 
whom knew that the mother who 
abandoned them to the not-too- 
tender care of foster families, was 
still alive. The film is essentially a 
detective story, using the word in 
the non-Dennis Potter sense. For 
some reason, not sufficiently ex- 
plained, it then goes off on a 
tangent, linking the “detective” (a 


BBC 2 


555 Cricket Second TetLUve 
coverage of trie lest 
afternoon's session. Ends at 
750 

9.00 Ceefax 

9-15 Daytime on Two: how the 
Scots cope with their dtmste 
958 Ceefax 104X) For the very 
young 10.15 Science: hearing 
1058 Solving sctentmc 
problems by measurement 
114)0 Words and pictures 
11.17 Living on a Croft 

1150 Do boys or dris get the best 
roles In Me7124B Maths: 
statistics 1255 Working in a 
family business 1248 Spanish 
language course 1.10 The 
state ot English law 158 
Preparing for a pant o mime 
24nTMnkabout2.15 Finland’s 
winter festivals. 

255 Sports Afternoon Includes a 
profile of downhill skier Martin 
BeU. 355 Regional news 

44)0 Pamela Armstrong. This 
afternoon's guests indude 
Lord Forte. 

455 Global Report: Valley of Hope. 
A report on the revolutionary 
health plan of a village in the 
La Esperanza valley, (rt 

54)0 Doroea d ay Detectiv es . A 
repeat of the programme 
shown on BBC 1 at 1255. 

550 Cover to Cover presented by 
JID Nevflto. Auberon Waugh 
discusses a new biography of 
Ws father Jeremy Cherfas 
reviews Richard Mabey*s 
biography of GHbert White; and 
Nigerian novefist Buchl 
Emecheta talks about her 
autobiography. 

64)0 FUm: A Man Atone (1955) 
starring Ray MHand and Mary 
Murphy. A gunman at the 
scene of a stage hold-up Is 
forced to kill a lawman In self- 
defence. Whfe he is on the run 
he investigates who was 
respondbfe tor the hold-up 
ana the killings that 
accompanied the robbery. The 

film marked the directorial 
debut of Ray MiKand. 

755 Cricket Second Test 
Highlights of the final day's 
play In Perth. 

84» Paul Stmon. A Whistle Teat 
Extrain which the celebrated 
Ameri can sin ger talks about 

ofb^UGrecSSS 9 

850 Outof Court Indudes an 

investigation into the ruing on 
whether or not a woman Is 
legally responses tor the 
foetus In her womb; and pofioe 
policy towards battered wives. 

94)0 StAtPH. Hawkeye is in 
daso&iras burosucf&cv 
thwarts Ms attempts to acquire 
a new pair of boots to replace 
the ones that let in water, (r) 

9.25 Breaking Up. Part three and 
with the Masers' divorce 
looking inevitable, soda! 
worker Clare has to decide 
which of the parents can offer 
their son the best home. 

10.15 The TtototoWBh Sex. This 
final programme of the series 
examines sex education. 

1045 A Party PoBfcal Broadcast on 
behalf of the Labour Parly. 

1050 N e w an tght 1155 Weather. 


social service official) with re- 
search being carried out in the 
United States into the similarities 
and di ffe rence s between identical 
twins. 

• Radio choice: The BBC’s ra- 
ces tty-appointed Chairman, Duke 
Hussey, is guest of the week on 
Woman’s Hoar (Radio 4, 
200pm). „ There is a second 
chance ( Radio 4, 9.00pm) to hear 
Jessie Kesson's play Three Sane 
and Ten, Sir, a most perceptive 
study of the sad devastation that 
death and environmental • ’ 
can cause in the lives of 
elderly. The drama is part of 
Scottish Drama Week which, in 
the main, continues to ma ke good 
listening Miiara! hi g hli g hts in- 

clude Dmitri Alexeev playing 

Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No 2, 
with the BBC SO (Radio 3, 
7.30pm). „ _ „ 

Peter Davalle 



. I f 





‘ # W;.- ' •* 



The nnsn^>ectzng twins: Tilten (left) and Betty* Hie Visit (BBC 1 ,935pm) 


1TV/LONDON 


8.15 TV-ane Good Morning Bri tain , 
presented by Anne Diamond 
and Geoff ftteade. News with 
David Foster at 650,7.00, 
750. 8410. 850 and 94Xk 
financial news at 655; sport at 
650 and 7A(k exercises at 
655 and 9.17; cartoon at 755; 
pop musk: at 755; and the 
results ot the Funny people 
competition at 8-35. The After 
Nine guests include Farah 
Fawcett Major. 

955 Thames news heatffl rtes. 

950 Schools: maths- the number 
’5' 952 Children's experiences 
of being ignored 959 How 


j t 2 rty of the 
human votes 1159 Shopping ir 
Paris. 

124)0 The Giddy Game Show, (r) 
12.10 Our Backyard, (r) 1250 


5.15 Blockbusters. General 
knowledge game tor 
teenagers, presented by Bob 
Hotness. 

5.45 News with Atastalr Stewart 
64)0 Thames news. 

655 Help! Vhr Taylor Gee with the 
second of three programmes 
discusses lip-reading, 
(subtitled) 

655 Crossroads. Nficole is not m a 
sociable mood. 

74X1 TWs Is Your Life. Eamorm 
Andrews springs an emotional 
surprise on another 
unsuspecting worthy. 

750 Coronation Street Alec GSroy 
show Bat another side of Ms 
character. (Oracle) 

84)0 Strike If Lucky. Game show 
using the latest technology. 

— - - 1 by Michael 


Spin-Offs. Tim Brooke-Taylor 
continues his tour of 
Interesting places made more 
accessible by the opening of 
the M25. . 

14W News at One with Leonard 
Parkin includes the third part of 
the sertes on Aids, today 
examintog the best ways of 
putting over the facts about the 
disease to the public. 150 
Thames news. 

150 A Country Practice. Metfcsi 
drama serial set in an 
Austraflan rural community 
250 Farmhouse Kitchen. 
Grace MuSgan and Joan Tyers 
prepare microwave meals. 

34)0 Taka the Ugh Road A 

postman's hat is found floating 


1 the toch 355 Thanes news 
headlines 350 Sons and 
Daughters. 

450 Thomas the Tank Entena and 
Friends. Narrated by I 
Starr 4.10 The I 
S.WJLLL.O.W. David! 
unravels dues set by pupils 
from Marden Bridge Middle 
Achool 455 Hold Ti^itl with 
The ftousemartins and tfe Red ' 
Devils. 


Enteneand 
by Ringo 
tou gs 45 0 


850 The Barmy HB1 Show. 

HigMights from the master of 
innuendos past series’ 

94M) The Equafiza. Edward 
Woodward stars as Robert 
McCall, a sort of one-man Ar 
Team based in Manhattan 
where, tonight, he to asked to 
help a lady who has moved 
into a district controlled by a 
violent gang. (Orate) 

104)0 A Party Poetical Broadcast on 
behalf of the Labour Party. 

104)5 News with Sandy GaS and 
Carol Barnes. Weather 
followed by Thames news 
headlines. 

1055 Midweek Sport SpeciaL 
International boxing from 
Frank Warren’s bfll at the 
Alexandra Pavilion inducting a 

nrvdcfiewsight contest between 
Errol Christie and Chartie 
Boston from New Jersey. The 
commentators are Reg 
Gutteridge, Jim Rosenthal and 
Jim Watt. In the studo, Nick 
Owen and Tony Francis have a 
round-up of the rest of the 
sporting news. 

12.15 That’s Hotywood. Clips from 
science fiction and fantasy 
fikns. 

1250 Night Thoughts. 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Their Lortfshtos* House, (r) 
250 Rim: I Love Mahrin (1953) 
starring Donald O'Connor and 
Debbie Reynolds. Musical 
comedy about a 
photoyapher's assistant who 
persuades a chorus girt that he 
can get her picture on the 
cover of Look magazine. 
Directed by Don Weis. 

44)0 Marts on 4. In this week’s 

edition of Predicaments. Marts 
talks to a group of people 

whose lives have been 
severely affected by the 


450 


problems of retirement 

Countdown.' 


Yesterday's 
winner Is challenged tqi 
Michael Stephenson from near 
Harrogate. 

54)0 SHente, Please: The Black 
note* A condensed version of 
the swashbudding tale of a 
nobleman who becomes a 
feared pirate whits avenging 
his father’s death. Made in 
1926, starring Douglas 
Fakbank Sr^ and directed by 
Atoert Parker. 

550 Hogan’s Heroes. Vintage 
American comedy series about 
a resourceful group of Allied 
prisoners-of-war who make Bfe 
heH for their captors. 

64)0 The Abbott and CoataBo 
Show* Lou and Bud come to 
the assistance of an ok) lady 
who has been thrown out of 
her home but their good 
intentions only make matters 

worse for the woman. 

650 In Time of War: Shadow of the 
Bomber. Clips from Soldiers 
with Wings, a 1939 film about 


7.00 



DebbfeRejnMMsaRdDoMMOXJottnorra^ioraaBffccoMedyl 
Love MeWn (Channel 4, 230pm) 




The very soul of France 

in the very heart of London. 

the oak room 

LE MERIDIEN PICCADILLY 

The perfect setting for a memorable : festive feast 
‘l ,Jl r own 3 star executive chef, Michel Lorain 
“fSrid Chambers, Meridians head ehehjogether 
they present exciting and highly 
inventive dishes to satisfy the 

to make your reservation. 

_ nl L,. Meridien Pkx-adiUy. Piccadilly. London W1V 0BH. 

Res-iauran ; FwTTierl y'n w New Piccadilly Hotel) 


MERIDIEN 


Tlie Oak,R uon1 


= 4 ; ^ 


MF frnedun wave). Stereo 
VHF(saabek>w) 

News on the half-hour from 
■6185000 
mkMght 
kiantehn 


_ from 
than at 104)0 


until 

and 12-00 

550am Adlan John 750 MDte 
Smith's Breakfast Show 850 
Simon Bates 1250pm 
Newsbeat (Frank Partridge) 1Z*S 
- t Davies SJtOStBvewnght' 
i Newsbeat (Frank Partridge) 
545 Bruno Brookes (lnd Top 
30 afiMjmchwt) 750 Janice Long 
iojx)-12jOO John PeeL VHF 
Stereo Radtoe 1 & 2: 44toam As 
Ratflo 2. lOJMpm As Radio 1. 
1250-44)0aiB As Radto 2. 


News on the hour. Sports 
Desks 156pm, 252. 352. 4L02. 
555. 645&4S frnf only). 955. 
Cricket Second Test reaxts at 
452am, 552. 652. 74)7. &07, 

952, 1052. 1152. 

450am Coin Berry 550 Ray 
Moore 750 Derek Jameson 950 
Ken Bruce 1150 Jimmy Young 
IJfipm David Jacobs 24)0 Gloria 
Hunrffard 350 Itevfd HamUon 
555 John Dunn 750 FOIc On 2 850 
T heSphmgs And Friends 

Aspects of Max W^4 10.15 Roger 
Whittaker 1050 The Golden 
Years (muchJoved sfngers of the 
pest) 1150 Brian Matthew 
I4»an Charles Nova 34XM50 A 
Little Mght Music. 


WORLD SERVICE 


(until «Wl) 7.06 ■ 

74» ■nwenteFour Hm»T 55 D ewlop - 

rwnt-ea loo Nm .am Ratedtans. 

8.15 Ctasdcti Reotw Mw. 130 jura a 

tAnuta. 950 NfW.851 Review ef British 

press. MS World Today. U0 nrancte 

News. 140 Look Ahold- SLte Lyrin and 
Lyricists. 1050 News. 1001 OmnUua. 

•50 JaZ2 SCOW. 1150 News. 1158 

New About Britan. 1L1S Straw ub. 

1155 A Later from Woles fund 1150). 

1250 Radto NewareaL 1216 MutapiMe 
in Wnlalire. 1226 Fainting WbrkL 1245 
Sports RoumMx 150 News. 158 Twan- 
ty-Fcxr Hows. 150 Development 'B6. 

200 Outlook. 248 Rapon on Relgton. 

350 Rado Ne wsree l. 515 UMtns rt 
Home 320 King Street Junior. 450 News. 
MtamTOllS Rock Salad. L45 
•■News, f iff A Lrttv 
FftmVWm lata 5.15X3 00 News. 8581 
Twenty-Pour Hours. UO^H 
850 News. 951 NrtworitH 
Recording of week. 1000 News. 1009 
Worid Today. IMS A tatter Rom Wales. 
1050 FinancU News. 1040 Reflections. 
10.45 Sports Rewtrtp. 1100 Newt 1159 
Commontwy. 11.15 Seed Books. 1150 
Mrttbrok Z-Too Twenty. 1200 News. 
1259 News Abort Britan. 12.15 Ratal 
NewsraeL 1258 Kbn Street Junior. 158 
Nows. 151 Outlook 150 Waveguide, uo 
Book Chore. Body Talk. £» News. 

209 Review at British Press. 215 
Netw o rk UK. 250 Assl^iment 350 
Neva. 359 News About Britan. 215 
World Today. 358 Not Shakupesre's 
-tear-. SSmentom of Marsrttos. 450 
N ewad o sk. 450 OBaskal Record Review 
bmta 445). 555 Wcrtd Today JUrtB—bi 


459 Commentary. 1 
Mtorid Today. 550 


Asatanmen. 
k UK. 215 


bombing; and the 1944-mac 
The Unknown Battle which 
examined the wartime practice 
of bombing. (Oracle) 

Channel ANewa with Peter 
Sissons Includes an 
assessment of the successes 
and failures of industry Year. 

7.50 C om ment This week's poMcal 
slot is fit tod by Derail Davies, 
the Shadow Secretary of State 
for Defence. Weather. 

8.00 LodangMbPaMnga. Robert 
Cumming, director of Christie’s 
Fine Arts Course examines 
Constable's The Hay Wain, (r) 
(Oracle) 

&30 The New EnBghtenmenL Part 
four of Professor Kenneth 
Minogue’s series explores the 
thesis that it is only individuals 
whocan create real wealth. 

94)0 A Tbne There Was— On the 
eve of the tenth anniversary of 
his death, a profile of Benjamin 
Britten, (see Choice) 

1030 The Lindsay Quartet perform 
Britten's String Quartet No 3 
Opus 49. which was defeated 
to the late writer and 
broadcaster, Hans KaHer. 

11.25 Aerial View. A successful 
Canadian architect begins to 
question the ethics of his work 
and in consequence drives his 
wife from their retreat back to 
MontreaL Starring Kenneth 
Umtond. 

1230 Their LordaMps 1 House. The 
day's debates in the House of 
Lords. Presented by Glyn 
Mathias. Ends at 1245. 


VARIATIONS 


BBC1 


headlines; matter. SCOTLAND KLSO- 

Sport SAMAOInstoBlAsW. &S5-74W 

►AaSortsam. 1155-1250 New3 and 

weamer. ENGLAND 655-750 Regional nows 
magazines. 

iBC2K£^So lnBral 

HORTHBtN RIBAND 1140wm-1252pm 
Ceefax. 

NWUI.W laJOpm-IJX) Ganfens at Afl 
150-150 News 650455 Abo ut AnQti »_ 
1215am Art Btokey rt Ronnie Scon s 12«5 
Joy in my Soul. Closedown. 

RDPnFR As London except 
PmPHEP I230pm-I.ro Gardening Tima 
150-150 News 350 Lady Hugh Russetfat 
Home 230-4.00 YoungDocurs 650-&3S 
Lookaround 1215am OoBedowa 


Crossroads 85S-750 Nows 12l5aot New 
Avengers 1.15 Comedy Tonight 150 
JoMnder 240 Closedown. 

CHANNEL ^^^s££vansi5D 

News 1J» Short Story 2502W Probtem 

Page 230-450 Young Doctors 650455 
Ownel Report IZlsamCtoeedown. 

GRAMPIAN SsSSJS®. h* 


Nwood 150-150 News 6 lOO- 65S North 
Toreght I2l5mn News. Cknodown. 

GRANADA 

150 Grenada Reports 150230 RandaB 
and Hqptork (Deceased) 350450 Young Doc- 
tors 200 Granada Reports 655 This « 

Your Right 650-740 &assn»ds 1215am 
Stmt Story 1240 Closedown. 


Hopidrk (Deceased) 650455 News 1215am 
Closedown. 

HTV WALES vtotRr. 

at Six. 

SCOTTlSH ^^gygSm^ 

Practice 356-440 Sortey Mtaten rt te 
640-655 Scotland Today 12l5aa LatoCta. 
Ctosedown. 

TCUl Aa London SNoept: 1250pm-150 
-2=5* Gardens tor A1 150-150 News 215 
Qus Haneytiun 620-&45 Crossroads 850 
Today South Weet 650-7410 Emmerdale Farm 
121 moi Postscnpt, Ctosedown. 

TVS As London except 129 0p m 150 
-Li= SuOvans 150 News 150 Short Story 
200-230 Problem Page 350-440 Young 
Doctors 640-655 Coast to Coast 1215am 
Company, Ctosedown. 

TYNE TEES 


1230pa>-150 Orphans of 
55-150 Where the 


the W3(J1 50 News 155-1- 

Jobs Are 650455 Northern Ufa 12 tSem Pre- 
paring for Chrieftnas. Closedown. 

ULSTER As London eoccept 
Ut-JI cn 1230pm-140 Something to 
Treasure 150-150 l40Chtinie3L30-4JW 
WHd World of Animals 6504L3S Good Evening 
Ulster 1215am Festival Fdk 1240 Nmvs. 
CkMdovm. 

YORKSHIRE SSBSS.W. 

Live 150 News 150-230 Falcon Crest 
640-655 Calender 1215am Moviemakers 
1245450 Mutic Box. Closedown. 

OAfi Stans 1150am Schootsr Rro- 

grenmes 1146 mtsrval 1215 Ftec 
fled DusT 145 Thee Lordships' House 
200 Countdown 230 Strangers Abroad 230 
Pnnt-ti-Yovsetf 210 FWatiatam 450 Guto 
Goch a Maiwen 456 Y Smyrfls 640 BOdowcar 
540 Ftve Women Photoyapher s 640 
BraoksMa 640 Maws on 4750 Newydcflon 
Saith 750 Btas ar FVw 650 Roc *Rol Te 
630 HrtStrason21B Flkn: Potato Indemnity 
11.18 New BmghBnmert 1140 A 
VarOAOemCto 


People's War 1 


» Ctosedown. 


&35am Medhim wavs. Test 
Match In Perth. 
Goveraga continues untB 
10415am 

2S5 amVHF.Woattar.74X) 

74)5 Concert Tchaflcov^cy 


:Sutssa 

Bomande. with FUcd, 
vioBn), Alberez (Majorca, Op 


No 5:1 

.. Poutonc (Sonata 

flute and orchestra: 
Gatway with RPC^. 84)0 
News 

84)5 Concerttoocrtnuad): 

Bartok (Two Portraits, 

>5: Vienna PO), Debussy 
beroamasquo: 
cenberg, plrtto), 
Stravinsky (Dhrertiiner 
La balser de la f6e: London 
Srntontotla). 200 News 
94)5 This Weeks Composers: 
At the Court of Dresden. 
Recordings of works by 
Heinichen (Concerto in E 
flat, with New B8ch 
Cofieigium Mustount), 
and Zeienka (Requiem in C 
minor Berne Chamber 
Choir and Orchestra and 


(Variations on a national 
hymmSaar RSO under 
Leonard station). Barber 
(Adagio for strings), Copland 
(BflfyitaiOd suite), last 
two works are also 
performed by the Saar 
RSO under Station 
250 Record Review: includes 
Nicholas Kenyon’s guide 
to reconfings of masses by 
Wfflam Byro, and Joan 
Chtesefi on new piano 
records. Also new 
recorcSngs of Haydn 
symphonies by L Estno 
Armortco. revtowed by 
Stephen PattitL (r) 

AM Choral Evensong; from 
Bristol 

CathedreLOrganist and 
master of choristers to 
Malcolm Archer. 4JS5 Naan 
550 Midweek Choice: 

Rfaager (Trumpet 
Concerto, with GSrert 
Johnsonphfladelphka, 
Mozart (Divertimento m E 
ftotKSfe 
Heifetz/Pranrose/ 


1005 L'EventaBde Jeanne; 

PtiBharmonia under 
Geoffrey Stmon ptay the 
balrt with music by 
Auric, Schmitt. Poulenc, 
Ravel, Ferroud, Ibert, 
Rdand-Msnuel. Detarmoy, 
Rctttssel and Miiaud 

1040 Czechs at Home and 
Abroad: Scht*ert 
Ensembte of London. Dvorak 
(Piano Quartet No U 

Martfmi (Piano Trio No 2) 

11 JO Matinee tnusicale: BBC 
Scottish SO (under 
BramweB Rcwert, wfth 
Geoffrey Trabidwfl 
(vkifin). Dorward (Comedy 
Overture; The Cooper O' 
Fife), Coates (E&zabeth of 
Glamto), Mozart (Adagio 
In E, K261.andBont»lnC, 
K 373), Borodin (in the 

steppes of central Asia), 
Musarava (Scottish 
Dance Suite movements), 
Massenet (Mediation. 
Thais), DeSbes (Waltz and 
') 


(Rhapsody tor sax i 
orchesraRasctarand 
New York PO), Dohnmyi 
(Piano Concerto No 1: 

BaEnt Vazonyi, with New 
PhHha r monta) 

750 Debut Paul Goodwin 
fttaroque oboe), Mchotas 
Parte (harpsichord)- Thomas 

Vmcent Son (Sonata No 
6). Bach (Sonata oinG 
minor) 

750 BBC SO (under Sir John 
Pritchard), with Dnrtri 
Alexeev (piano). Part on& 
Prokofiev (Piano 

Concerto No 2). A direct 
transmission from the 
Royal Festival Had in 
London. 

84)0 Six Continents: foreign 
radiobroadcasts 
&20 Concert pad two. 

Shostakovich (Symphony 
Noil) 

9L3S Guitar music: Frederic 
Ziganta plays Bach's 
Suite in A minor, BWV997. 
and Vite-Lobos's 
Preludes Nos 1 and 4 
104)5 Mozart Sonata in Eftat, 

K 380. Nona Liddell 
), Daphne Ibbott 


1130 Transattantic Blues: fast 
progrenvneinanaw 
series. Dave Geliy presents 

recordings made by 
Louie Armstrong, during the 

two visits he peS to 

Europe during the 19302 
14)0 News 

14)5 Fairfield Quartet 
Schubert (Quartet 
movement in C minor, D 
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250 American LoHpoptohras 


1030 Music tor strife and 
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1157 News. 124M Close 


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SPORT 


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ad psychology to let 

Australia off the hook 


From John Woodcock. Cricket Correspondent Perth 


Play in the second Test 
match here yesterday re- 
volved first around the follow- 
on, which Australia saved, 
and then a second innings 
declaration by England, which 
they must have hoped to make 
before the close but felt unable 
to. With one day left, or a 
minimum of 90 overs. Eng- 
land lead by 390 runs, more 
than enough to get Australia in 
first thing today. 

On a pitch which occa- 
sionally did extravagant 
things - one ball to Border 
and another to Gatting, both 
of which hit a crack, must 
have moved a fool or more 
from leg to off — only Gower, 
with his marvellous gift of 
timing, scored at all freely. 

Despite their strength, and 
although they were looking for 
scoring chances. Gutting took 
121 rails to make 70 and 
Botham was half an hour over 
six. In Waugh and Reid, 
bowling to protected fields. 
Australia found an effective 
pair of blockers. Waugh’s five 
for 69 bei ng as good a return as 
he is likeiy to have in Test 
crickeL 

For all that, England should 
have made it their business to 
get Australia in again last 
night Gatling will say that he 
wanted the runs he has got so 
that his bowlers are able to 
crowd the bat today, and there 
is something in that. 

On the other hand, you may 
be sure Australia were relieved 
not to have to go in again for 
five or six hours before 
yesterday's close, and the 
chances of their getting even 
330 to win. let alone 391 . were 


remote enough. It was bad 
psychology, I thought not to 
keep up the pressure on 
Australia. The enemy may feel 
now that perhaps England are 
not quite as confident after all. 

Without knowing for cer- 
tain whether England would 
have enforced the follow-on. 
Australia were mighty re- 
lieved when, just before lunch, 
they saved it. Haying played 
the stroke which did the trick. 
Border did a Highland fling 
while his side cheered with 
delight Australia may have 
felt there and then, that they 
would save the game. 

Border was already passed 
his 100, his twentieth for 
Australia and sixth against 
England, two of them at Perth. 
He becomes only the tenth 
batsman to score 20 Test 
hundreds. 

it is a roll of famous names; 
Gavaskar (who has scored 32), 
Bradman (29). Sobers (26), 
Greg Chappell (24). Ham- 
mond. Cowdrey and Boycott 
(all 22), Harvey (21). Barring- 
ton and Richards (20). 

England gave the im- 
pression of a side keen to put 
Australia back in if they could. 
There was obviously some- 
thing to be said, though, for 
their trying for quick runs 
themselves and having all 
today in which to bowl 
Australia out a second time on 
a deteriorating pitch, which is 
how things worked out. 

Needing 84 runs when the 
day started to reach 393 and so 
avoid, come what may. having 
to bat again. Australia got 
them in the penultimate over 
before lunch, by when Reid, 


their last man, was Border's 
partner. 

They lost Zoehrer after 25 
minutes, a leg-before to Dilley, 
who had started the bowling 
with Botham. As he usually 
does. Botham often bowled 
too short, partly because he 
placed two long legs for 
Zoehrer, a fairly bizarre tactic 
in the circumstances. Right 
from the start Gatting laid the 
field back for Border, as 
though he thought there was 
little chance of getting him 
out. 

For Australia's eighth 
wicket Border and Lawson 


Scoreboard 



FALL OF WICKETS: 1-8, 2-47, 3-50, 4- 
133, 5-140, 6-172, 7-190, B-f 


-199. 


BOWLING: Rota 21-3-58-3; Lawson 9-1- 
4441; Waugh 21 .3-4-S9-S C Matthews 2- 
0-15-0. 

AUSTRALIA: Find innings 
GR Marche Broad b Botham 15 

DCBoonbDBkqr 2 

S R Waugh c Botham b Eoboney — 71 


D M Jones c Athey b Etteunds 27 

*A R Banter c Richards I 


. bOffler — 12 S 

G M flitcMa c Botham b Edmonds _ 33 
G RJMatfbevsc Baton bUtey- 45 

fT M Zoehrer tow b May 29 

G F Lawson b DeFtoftas — — — — - 13 


CD Matthews e Broad b Emburay _ 10 
B A Held no! out - 2 


Extras (b 9, lb 9, (lb 11) 
Total 


401 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4, 254, 3-114. 4- 
128, 5-198, 5-279, 7-334, 8-360, 9-38S, 
10-401. 

BOWLING: Botham 22-4-72-1-, Dfisry 
110 - 2 ; 


24.4-4-79-4; Emt 


43-9-110- 


mot to rescue 


nburay 43-! 
OflFrOftaa 24-4-67-1; Etfemds 21-4-55- 
2 . 

Umpires: P McConaefl and R Ftench. 


East London (Reuter) — 
Lome Wilmot. the ageing 
Springbok brought out of retire- 
ment to lead Border, launched 
his side's revival against Kim 
Hughes's Australian “rebels'" 
after the first day of a ihree-dav 
game at the Jan Smuts ground 
here yesterday. 

Wilmofs hard-hit 


founh-wickci partnership of 69 
with Hayes (74) turned the tide 
for Border before Osborne (97 
no! out) took his side to a 
comfortable 317 for seven at the 
close. 


-hit 44 in a 


Border 317 For 7 (B M Osborne 97 not out 
G L Hayes 74. L WHmot 44: C G 
Rackemam 3-72): w K J Hughes's 
Australian XI. 


SNOOKER 


Seeds given tough time 


Neal Foulds and John Par- 
rott found it difficult to live up 
to their No. 7 seeding when 
the began their third round 
match in the £200.000 
Hofrr.eisier World Doubles 
championship in Northamp- 
ton yesterday. 

Foulds, runner-up to Steve 
Davis in the Tennents UK 
Open at the weekend, and 
Parrott, semi-finalist in the 
same evcnL might have been 
expected to brash aside the 
unseeded partnership of Steve 
Newbury and Roger Bales 
without getting into too much 
of a lather. 


The reality, however, was a 
little different It took Parrott 
and Foulds 42 minutes to win 
a scrappy first frame on the 
black and a further 30 minutes 
to stretch their lead to 2-0 with 
an unconvincing 58-31 suc- 
cess in the second frame. The 
seeded pair then however 


caught alight to go through 5- 

Therc was no easy passage, 
either, for Silvino Francisco 
and his nephew, Peter, the No. 
8 seeds. Their opponents, Vic 
Harris and Dave Gilbert came 
successfully through a second 
round match against Dean 
R