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teg Thatcher opts 

iH to stay silent 

MSI on Rothschild 


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FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


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The Prime Minister yes- 
terday shocked the Commons 
by declining to clear Lord 
Rothschild of allegations that 
he was the “fifth man” in the 
Soviet spy scandals. 

She angered the opposition 
and dismayed some of her 
own backbenchers who had 
been looking to her to respond 
immediately to Lord 
Rothschild's appeal to Sir 
Anthony Duff. Director-Gen- 
eral of MIS. to clear his name. 

She staled merely that the 
letter published yesterday by 
the former head of the 
Downing Street “think lank” 
in which he called on the 
Director-General to state that 
MI5 had unequivocal ev- 
idence that he was not and 
never had been a Soviet agent 
was being considered by the 
Govern mem. and that she 
could add nothing further ai 
this stage. 

It was an answer which Mr 
Roy Hattersley. Labour’s dep- 
uty leader, described as “quite 
extraordinary” and caused 
concern on the Tory 
backbenches. 

Mr Robert Rhodes James, 
Conservative MP for Cam- 
bridge, who in the Commons 
asked for immediate attention 
to be given to Lord 
Rothschild's letter, said last 
night that he had been asion- 

Tomorrow 

Amo, amas, 
a mess? 


By Philip Webster, Chief Political Cor re spo ndent 


ished and upset by the Prime 
Minister’s “non-reply”. 

Although some Conser- 
vative MPs understood the 
Prime Minister's natural cau- 
tion and wish not be be rushed 
into a statement on such a 
sensitive issue. Conservative 
and Labour MPs were voicing 
surprise last night that she had 
not been able immediately to 
give Lord Rothschild, Some- 

Parliament 4 

Last chance 11 

one who had held such a key 
Do wing Street position and 
enjoyed the confidence of 
other prime ministers, the 
clearance be had demanded. 

There was no confirmation 
last night of any contacts 
between Lord Rothschild and 
Mrs Thatcher before he de- 
cided to make his public 
appeal through the columns of 
The Doily Telegraph. He said 
he had written the letter “Jest 
h be thought that silence 
would be an indication of 
anything other than complete 
innocence.” 

In his letter Lord Roth- 
schild. aged 76, who worked 
for MIS during the Second 
World War, had asked for a 
statement to be made either by 
the director general, or 
through his legal adviser or 
through “any other rec- 
ognizably authoratitive 
source.” 

A statement by the Direc- 
tor-General would be highly 
unusual if not unprecedented 


and given past precedents, 
including her statement in 
1981 when she announced 
that Sir Roger Hollis had been 
investigated and there was no 
proof that he had worked for 
the Russians, it is assumed by 
MPs that Mrs Thatcher, as 
head of the security services, 
will eventually make a 
statement. 

After she declined to give it 
yesterday, as many Conser- 
vative MPs had anticipated, it 
was being said on her behalf 
that an early statement was 
unlikely. 

It became dear last night, 
however, that the Australian 
spy-book case is not regarded 
as a constraint, and that if and 
when the Prime Minister is 
ready to make a statement she 
will do so. 

The issue had been by 
raised by a Conservative MP, 
Mr Tim Brinlon, who asked 
her what steps she would take 
to protect Lord Rothschild’s 
reputation against false innu- 
endo and smears. 

Her answer that the 
Government was considering 
the letter Jed Mr Hattersley to 
demand that she follow the 
precedent set in the Hollis case 
and to respond to Lord 
Rothschild's plea by making 
clear he was not and never had 
been an agent 

When she refused to go 
further Mr Hattersley, anud 
mounting uproar, said her 
answer would cause “personal 
anguish." 



. v “ / / 

re?; M ^ 


The meeting that 
nailed Kim Philby 

By Michael Evans, Whitehall Correspondent 
: Lorn Rothschild's state- MIS at the end .of the Second * 



Have standards of 
school grammar 
really declined? 
Philip Howard says 
the pedants have a 
lot to learn... 


9 > The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
won yesterday by Mr 
D.J. Budden of 
Northfield, Birmingham. 
Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio list, page 
31; how to play, 
information service, 
nnflp 94 

• Tomorrow £12,000 
can be won — £8,000 in 
the weekly 

competition and £4,000 
in the daHy. 


: Loro Rothschild's state- 
mentthat MI5 has “unequivo- 
cal evidence" that he was 
never a Soviet spy is a 
reference to a secret meeting at 
his fiat in London with tbe 
head of Mi 6, when he helped 
finally to nail Kim Philby as a 
longstanding KGB agent 

Lord Rothschild, who has 
appealed to the present direc- 
tor-general ofMI5. Sir Antony 
Duff, to make a public state- 
ment about his “complete 
innocence”, has not explained 
what he means by tbe "un- 
equivocal evidence”. 

However, his caudal part in 
exposing Philby only a few 
weeks before he vanished 
from Beirut and defected to 
the Soviet Union, is clearly 
what he has in mind. 

The incident was part of his 
defence against suspicions 
that he was the “Fifth Man” in 
the Soviet spy ring during the 
M15 mole-hunting period in 
ibe 19605. He said that he 
would never have helped to 
denounce Philby if he was also 
a Soviet agent 

Lord Rothschild bad left 


World War after a distin- 
guished record in foe anti- 
sabotage unit; and it was sheer 
coincidence that he was to 
play a part in foe final chapter 
of foe Philby affair 17 years 
later, towards foe end of 1962. 

At that time he was visiting 
Israel and, during a cocktail 
party in Tel Aviv, he had a 
conversation with an old 
friend of Philby, Mrs Flora 
Solomon, a leading Zionist 
and a senior executive at 
Marks & Spencer. She bad set 
up the now famous welfare 
section of foe shopping chain 
and had employed at one time 
Philby’s second wife, Aileen. 

In 1962, Philby was a 
journalist writing for The 
Observer and The Economist. 
bared in Beirut. He had left 
M16 in September 1952, hav- 
ing already been interrogated 
on several occasions as a 
suspected Soviet agent He 
had never confessed and the 
evidence against him was not 
sufficient to warrant an arrest 

Cbatinned on page 24 , col 2 


By Martin Fletcher 
Political Reporter 

The Government took the 
extraordinary step yesterday 
of announcing which com- 
pany it would like to see win 
the contract to run the Royal 
Dockyard at Rosyth. 

While still technically com- 
plying with foe Dockyard 
Services Act, the Ministry of 
Defence, which is under pres- 
sure to privatize Rosyth and 
Devonport, gave a dear signal 
to Babcock Thorn Ltd that h 
could proceed on the basis 
that it would ultimately be 
awarded foe contract. 

The Act slates unequivo- 
cally that the dockyard unions 
must be fully consulted before 
any final decisions are taken. 

These consultations are not 
yet complete. 

Lord Denning, former Mas- 
ter of the Rolls, who almost 
single-handedly saw union 
rights to exhaustive consulta- 
tion written into tbe Act 
earlier this year, said be was 
"surprised this announcement 
should be made in the midst 
of these negotiations, because 
it looks very like the Govern- 
ment is pre-empting the 
unions”. 

The announcement made it 
“virtually impossible for the 
negotiations to be considered 
fair", Lord Denning said. 

The unions said they would 
be seeking legal advice on 
whether tire Government had 
acted breached an agreement 
readied on November 17 
which laid out a timetable for 
consultation into next year. 

Labour MPs were angry that 
the announcement was made 
through a written par- 
liamentary answer rather than 
in a Commons statement. . 

Mr George Younger, Sec- 
retary of State for Defence, 
said he was “satisfied that ...... s . 

there now exists the basis for & 
an advantageous contract to 
be placed for the future opera- 
tion of Rosyth Dockyard with 
Babcock Thom Ltd”. Negotia- 
tions had indicated savings of 
£38 million. 

He said no . final decision 
would be made until he had 
satisfied himself “that the 
. continuing process of consul- 
tation with foe unions has 
fully met my obligations 
under the Dockyard Services 
Act". 

Mr Archibald Hamilton, 

Under Secretary of State for 
Defence Procurement agreed 
that an outright declaration 
that Babcock Thorn had won 
could have laid foe ministry 
open to legal action. 


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One of the several armed marshals on duty at the student 
march through Paris, (Photograph: John Rogers). 

Big march | Gas shares 
by Pans <%near 
students kisiip nrira 



Lord Demi 
early dock 


S' a ^ in Speakesto 

quit White 

Ferries halted House foie 


Scientists concerned 
at hole in ozone layer 


Passenger ferry sailings be- 
tween the Isle of Man and 
Heysham, Lancashire, were 
cancelled yesterday after strike 
action by members of the 
National Union of Seamen. 


TIMES SPORT J, 


Cricket deal 

Refuge Assurance, foe insur- 
ance company, will sponsor 
Sunday League cricket for the 
next five vears in a deal worth 

£2.Sm. ' Pag e42 


Busy Royals 

The Prince of Wales and 
Princess Anne opened two 
research centres in London 
yesterday. Prince Charles was 
at foe Brunei Science Park 
near Uxbridge, and Princess 
Anne at the Institute of 
Neurology science research 
centre. Bloomsbury. 

Special reports: pages 20- 
21, 32-33. 

MPs’ holiday 

The House of Commons 
will adjourn for the Christmas 
S on December 19 nnd 
return on January .12. Tne 
House of Lords will nse a day 

earlier. 

Lair report 15 

Leaders 1 

Letters 19 

Obituary 22 

^ i 


From Michael Btnyon 
Washington 

Mr Larry Speakes, Presi- 
dent Reagan’s long-serving 

spokesman, is leaving foe 
Whire House to- become chief 
press officer for foe New York 
investment group, Memli 
Lynch, he announced yes- 
terday. His departure is not 
connected with the Iranian 
arms scandal. 

Mr Speakes, aged 47, will 
leave on February 1. No 
successor has been named, 
though several deputies al- 
ready occasionally stand in. 

He has been the Presidents 
chief press spokesman since 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 

Plans for a spacecraft to merit for a project called the 
investigate a hole which has Upper Atmosphere Research 
appeared in the protective Satellite programme were pro- 
ozone layer in foe atmosphere posed by scientists from tbe 


were disclosed yesterday at a Clarendon Laboratory, of Ox- 
meeting of the Royal Society ford University, 
in London. Dr Rnssell drew attention to 

Dr J.M. Russell, of the concern that man-made activ- 
American National Aero- ity can alter foe ozone which 
nautics and Space Admin- acts as a shield for life on 
istration, had said that the Earth from too much ultra- 
hole had been discovered over violet radiation from foe Sun, 


From Diana Geddes 
Paris 

A carnival atmosphere : 
dominated yesterday's dem- 
onstration by hundreds of, 
thousands of students and | 
Lycee pupils who marched 
under multi-coloured banners 1 
in bright sunshine through the 
streets of Paris in protest 
against the Government’s pro- 
posed university reforms. 

No violence was reported. 
Between 200 and 300 extreme 
right-wing students, armed 
with iron bars, dustbin lids 
and helmets, and evidently 
out for trouble, were blocked 
by the police and prevented 
from joining the march. 

Hundreds of student mar- 
shals were on hand with strict 
instructions to keep order. 

Student organizers spoke of 
one milli on demonstrators; 
the police put the figure at 
around 130,000. Most agreed 
that it was one of the biggest 
student demonstrations since 
1968. 

After a meeting with M 
Rene Monory, the Education 
Minister, student delegates 
said they had received sat- 
isfaction on none of the 
contested points in the Bill for 
reforms, mid that their strike 
would continue. 

• MADRID (Reuter) — 
Police made repeated tenon- 
charges to dispose thousands 
of students demonstrating in 
Madrid yesterday against 
changes in foe university 
system. 


issue pnee 

By Richard Lander 

Applicants for the £5.6 bil- 
lion British Gas share flota- 
tion had a nervous day 
yesterday as the shares slipped 
to their issue price on foe grey 
market, foe forum for trading 
until official dealings open on 
foe Stock Exchange on 
Monday. 

The shares dipped in re- 
action to foe news that only 
3.97 million applications had 
been received compared with 
hopes expressed by the or- 
ganizers that 6 million or 
more Sids would be found. 
The shares recovered to close 
at around 55!6p. 

While it is obvious that 
there will be no “double your 
money” possibilities, as hap- 
pened with the flotation of 
British Telecom and TSB, 
analysis said that the shares 
should open above foe grey 
market price. 

Most expect the shares to 
open at around 58p then to 
improve slightly. 

The analysts pointed out 
that because private investors 
applied for abom S billion 
shares, their allocation had 
been increased at the expense 
of British institutions and 
foreign investors. Buyers from 
these are expected to enter the 
market next week for more 
shares, particularly if the pre- 
mium over the offer price is 
slim. 


Palme hunt shake-up 


Antarctica. Measurements 
from spacecraft bad con- 
firmed foal it showed signs of 
spreading. 


which can affect crops and 
cause skin cancers. 

He identified chlorofluour- 
carbons, used in aerosols, and 


The possible cause was from oxides of nitrogen from indus- 
foe accumulation of unexpect- trial and vehicle exhausts. 


edly high levels of nitric acid 
in the atmosphere, which 


March 1981. although his title could be formed from water 
remained that of deputy prin- vapour and oxides of nitrogen. 


cipal spokesman. 

Iran inquiry, page 10 


In response to his report. 


More accurate and detailed 
measurements from special 
instruments would be needed 
to get a more complete picture 
of the atmospheric chemistry 


designs of the special equip- behind foe changes. 


A row broke out yesterday 
over the unsuccessful police 
hunt for the assassin of Olof 
Palme, the Swedish Prime 

Minister. 

Opposition MPs, led by 
their new Conservative leader, 
Mr Carl Bildt called for a 
parliam entary commission of 
inquiry into the police in- 
vestigation. 

The demands came as 12 


Labour rebels are put to the sword 


By Sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 


Mr Dale Campbell-Savours, 
Labour MP for Workington, 
. „ . . ignored their advice. 

J r t‘ h w a ; ro“nfSl Bui staining on a Govern- 

nvpr the Alliance’s debate on mem motion stating! ha l This 
S 1 ^ESged House has foil confidence m 
Sr it vras ra foe presmt arrangements 

re S fonny SSa in foe Dennis® Skinner, MP for 
J2E lobbte offoe Com- Bplsover. Thcy__ duly djs- 


left-wing MPs. led by Mr 
Dennis Skinner, MP for 
Bolsover. They duly dis- 


in irritating all three parties - 
including their own - by 
foeir tacucs. 

It certainly annoyed Mr 
Archy Kirkwood, Liberal MP 
for Roxburgh and Berwick- 
shire, who trial to shift them. 
But it eventually took the 
quaintly-dressed deputy Ser- 
jeant-at-Arms, Major P. N. W. 
Jennings, to prove the worth 
of conventional weapons. One 
look at his sword and the 


Chesterfield, not being called 
to speak. 

Later Mr Dave Nellist, La- 
bour MP for Coventry South 
East, went one step further 
and found himself voting 
alongside the Conservatives 
against the Alliance on de- 
fence. 


senior detectives were re- 
moved from foe case. 

Mr Leif Hallbeig, the police 
press spokesman, said other 

officers took over from the 
men after the publication of 
foeir photographs in foe 
Stockholm newspaper 
Aftonbbzdei.This had made it 
impossible for them to con- 
tinue with undercover work. 

Murder hunt, page 18 

Man charged 
with murder 
of two girls 

A man was charged at Hove 
magistrates court yesterday 
with the muitiers of Brighton 
schoolgirls Nicola Fellows and 
Karen Hadaway. 


u. c uu Mr Russell Bishop, aged 20, 

ie .' • • „ , flanked by policemen and 

Mr David Steel, the Liberal handcuffed, said nothing dur- 
leader. said: “The Labour ing foe seven-minute hearing. 


voting lobbies of foe Com- »«vcr . u.*; iook al his ^ 

mons were sparited off by ihe ototH mjawP* g* rebels sunendered meekly. 


Party, which has made an 
enormous fuss about the con- 


Mr Bishop, of Stephens 
Road, Brighton, was re- 


TV £ Rad™ 41 


Labour whips ordering its 
MPs not to vote in any of the 
divisions. In foe first division, 
in which the Alliance called 
for a special commission to 
oversee foe security servios, 
only foe fodependent-nunaea 


“No” lobby alongside foe 

Alliance. 

They then refused to leave. 
Their aim was to delay foe 
start of foe Alliance’s defence 
debate and. showing ad- 
mirable fairness, thus succeed 


They did succeed in lopping 
10 minutes off foe Alliance's 
defence debate. Bui ironically 
this only resulted in one of foe 
ringleaders, inevitably Mr 
Tony Bean, Labour MP for 


duct of our security services manded in custody for a week, 
not only refused to vote for a The charges were that on or 
way improving foeir about October 9 this year he 
accountability to Parliament murdered Nicola Fellows. 10. 
but also refused to vote and Karen Hadaway. 9. 
against a Government sugges- Mr Bishop is not expected 
tion that the present system to appear in court again until 


i&sy 


Awacs dea 

By Kerrey Elliott Air Correspondent 


Two big orders for the 
British electronics industry 
were announced yesterday, 
puning even greater pressure 
on the Government to choose 
foe American-built Boeing 
Awacs system of airborne 
radar. 

With a final decision likely 
before Christmas on whether 
to buy the American system or 
Stick with foe British Nimrod, 
much will depend on the 
amount of work each will 
provide for British industry. 

Boeing, and foe Westing- 
house electric Corporation ot 
Pittsburg, yesterday piled on 
the pressure by announcing 
deals with both Plcssey and 
Racal. 

Westinghouse promised a 
deal with Plessey which could 
add £1 billion to the 
company's sales if foe contract 
went ro Awacs. 

And Racal sealed a £300 
million agreement with 
Boeing to supply Saudi Arabia 
with equipment to build an 
electronics and radio factory, 
to help them escape from the 
dominating economics of oil. 

The Westinghouse deal will 
only come into effect if foe 
Awacs contract goes through. 

The Racal contract is firm, 
but could also form the blue- 
print for further collaborative 
work, and will be pul forward 
as part of the off-set agree- 
ment, proposed by Boeing. 

In an attempt to get foe 
Awacs contract over foe rival 
GEC Nimrod, Boeing has 


guaranteed to place £i.30p 
worth ofbusmess with British 
companies for every £1 the 
Government spends on foe 
Awacs. 

The offer uas regarded with 
cynicism in some quarters 
because Awacs will cost al 
lean £850 million. Boeing 
would have to be looking for 
about £1.000 million worth of 
business from British com- 
panies if its promise was to be 
fulfilled. 

The Saudi deal revolves 
around a similar, but more 
complicated, arrangement 
with the Saudi Government in 
which Boeing promised to 
create 10 separate high- tech- 
nology industrial bases in the 
kingdom, to help it to move 
away from such a large depen- 
dence on income from oil, in 
return for a contract for 
Awacs. 

It won foe contract, known 
as the Peace Shield Air De- 
fence Project, and is now in 
the process of honouring its 
off-set arrangements. 

Eventually, it is hoped that 
Saudi Arabia will take over 
the facility and become self- 
sufficient, even exporting high 
technology goods to other 
parts of the Middle East. 

Although foe order is not 
directly linked to the British 
Awacs decision, it will be put 
forward as a major part of the 
off-set proposals should 
Boeing get the go-ahead. 

Business news, page 25 


UK firms to 
Star Wars 


From Peter Davenport, Defence Correspondent. Brussels 

Mr Caspar Weinberger, the million and $7 million. 
United States Secretary of dollars. 

Defence, yesterday an- The research programme is 
nounced seven new contracts an indication of the growing 
to American and European concern abom the threat 


consortiums under foe Strate- 
gic Defence Initiative pro- 
gramme. 

Each of the contracts is for 
$2 ir.tiiwu -and involve 5! 
companies, eight of them in 
Britain. 

Tbe initial contracts, which 
still have to be negotiated in 
detaiL are aimed at producing 
suggestions for weapons sys- 
tems which can intercept and 
destroy the theatre ballistic 
missiles, both nuclear and 
conventionally armed 

Mr Weinberger, who an- 
nounced the contracts al foe 
meeting in Brussels of Nato's 
Defence Planning Committee 
said foe work would be com- 
pleted by July. 

There was no intention to 
produce any hardware yet at 
this stage of foe programme. 
Contracts for the second 
phase, to produce detailed 
systems requirements and 
specifications, would each be 
worth between a further $5 


posed by Soviet tactical ballis- 
tic missiles within Nato. 

Mr Weinberger said that the 
Nato resesirih was separate 
from SDt but that there would 
be a . need for an alliance 
defence against tactical mis- 
siles whether cr not there was 
a Star Wars programme. 

The British companies in- 
volved in foe various con- 
sortiums are British 
Aerospace, Oxford Analytical 
Limited Ferranti Computer 
Systems, Hunting Engineer- 
ing. Marconi Space Systems. 
Easams, Sricon Limited and 
Marconi Radar Systems. 

Mr Richard Perle, the assis- 
tant US Secretary of Defence. 
said the contracts would not 
contravene foe ABM treaty. 

Mr George Younger, foe 
British Secretary of Stale for 
Defence, said Iasi night that 
the UK's share of foe latest 
round of SD1 contracts total- 
led almost $2 million, foe 
biggest slice of the package 
outside foe US. 


was entirely satisfactory. 


December 31. 













IMENEWS 


FRIDj 


■R5 1986 


Gun is fired near 
minister’s home 


Bill to allow all-day drinking 


By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 


Two police officers have been suspended after a revolver 
was accidently find as they stood guard at the country 
home of Mr Tom Xing, Secretary of State for Northern 
Ireland. 

Yesterday Wiltshire police said the incident took place 
last Sunday at Mr King's home at Dancombe Mill, Ford, 
near Chippenham, Wiltshire. No one was injured. 

A spokesman for Wiltshire police said the two officers 
had been suspended automatically because a firearm had 
been fired. An official inquiry is to be held. 


£300,000 offer 


The Government is supp- 
orting moves by backbench 
MF5 to allow “all day” open- 
ing for pubs - and to ban the 
sale of crossbows to children 
under 17. 

Mr Peter Bniinvels, Conser- 
vative MP for Leicester, East, 
who came third in the recent 
backbench ballot far private 
members' bills, has all-party 
support for his bin to crack 
down on crossbows and it 
looks certain to become law 
early next summer. 

Under his proposed legisla- 


tion, anyone who sold a 
crossbow to a youngster could 
be sentenced to up to six 
months in jail and be fined a 
maximum of £2,000. 

Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, has already 
indicated strong support for 
Mr Bruinvels* bill and yes- 
terday announced he was 
issuing gu idance notices to 
retailers urging them not to 
sell crossbows to under-17s. 

Mr Bruinvels said yester- 
day; “The aim is to outlaw the 
sale of these weapons of death 
to young people. It is a 
contribution by me in my fight 
against rising crime. 


' “We know of 1 1 5 instances 
of the misuse of crossbows in 
the past 12 months. These 
include criminal damage and 
injury and even death to 
persons and animals. There 
was also one reported suicide 
attempt with a crossbow.” 

Mr Bruinvels said the 
“kilter weapons” were ad- 
vertised openly in magazines 
and could be bought for as 
little as £48 and were accurate 
up to SO yards. He said: 
“Before this bill becomes law I 
would hope that all young 


look forward to the near 
certainty of guiding his mea- 
sure on to the statute book, 
doubts bang over the chances 
of a licensing bill being in- 
troduced by Mr Allan Stewart. 
Conservative MP for East- 
wood. becoming law. 


licensees with a choice, subject 
to the agreement of local 
magistrates, of selling alco- 
holic drinks for up to 1 2 hours 
a day between 10.30am and . 

1 130pm- 


Prince has 
to abandon 
scheme for 
homeless 


wild hand them in.” 

While Mr Bruinvels can 


Although he has Govern- 
ment support there is likely to 
be opposition from some 
Conservative and Labour 
MFs. who could block the 
measure. He is also eighth in 
the Private Members’ Bill 
queue. 

His bill would provide 


Mr Stewart, a former Scot- 
tish health minister, said; My 
bill will be beneficial for 
choice, tourism, jobs and for 
alcohol abuse.” 


Bv David Cross 


If Mr Stewart’s efforts Fail, 
Mr Hurd is expected to press 
for a general election mani- 
festo commitment to lib- 
eralize the licensing laws. 


Spain has offered £300,000 compensation for the death 
of Mr Joe Rnjiah, the Automobile Association executive 
accidentally shot dead by police near Seville five weeks 


But lawyers for the associafioo, who are representing Mr 
Rajuh's daughter, Shanta. aged 12, who was with him, 
want more than £1 million damages on her behalf. 

Mr Rajpah, aged 43, was stopped by police looking for 
drag dealers, aim an officer’s pistol accidentally went off, 
hittiqg him in the neck. 


Doctor 

charged 


Pile-up 
on M62 


Schools hit 
as teachers 
strike 


ariose^ 

£h school; 


Moor hunt 
delay 
torments 
mothers 


An anaesthetist was 
charged yesterday with the 
manslaughter of a patient 
at the Lister hospital, 
Stevenage, Hertfordshire. 

Eh Etiyathamby Kan- 
charalingam, agei 37, of 
Clarerdaie Road, Brixton, 
south-west London, who 
has already been charged 
with falsifying an an- 
aesthetic report, was 
granted bail by Stevenage 
magistrates on a charge of 
unlawfully killing Mr Mi- 
chael North, aged 33, of 
Lonsdale Road, Stevenage, 
last July. 


A stray sheep caased a 
37- vehicle p3e up yes- 
terday on the eastbound 
carriageway of the M62 
motorway, near Brighouse, 
West Yorkshire. 

The animal, which had 
wandered foam nearby 
moorland, was hit by a 
tanker, nip taring the ve- 
hicle's fuel tank and spill- 
ing 90 gallons of diesel on 
to the read. Police said the 
carriageway was turned 
into an ice rink. Four 
drivers were injured and 
police closed the 


over pay 




MOLY roc© 


a „ H w I • 


f.i x> 


Beatle’s 

victory 



A cinema built Haifa - 
century ago has been saved 
from demolition after a 
campaign by local res- 
idents, led by the former 
Beatle, George Harrison 
(right), at Healey-on- 
Thames, Oxfordshire. 

Now the Regal cinema 
will have most of its struc- 
ture preserved, as part of a 
£5 million scheme being 
prepared by the Save the 
Regal Trust and a local 
development company, if 
the new plan is approved by 
the local conned. 





MP’s call on Scargill 


Mr Beruffd Weatheril!, the Speaker of the House of 
Commons, is to be asked if Mr Arthur Scargill has 
committed a contempt of Partiament by calling publicly for 
the expulsion from the Labour Party of two moderate MPs 
who represent Nottinghamshire constituencies. 

Mr Scargill, president of the National Union of 
Mine workers, nude bis demand in respect of Mr Frank 
Haynes, MP for AshfieM. and Mr Den Concannon, MP 
for Mansfield, who have maintained link* with the 
breakaway Union of Democratic Mmeworkers. 

Mr Martin Brandon- Bram, Conservative MP for 
Not tingham South, is asking for a Speaker’s riding. 


More than 750,000 children 
in Scotland had their educa- 
tion disrupted yesterday when 
members of the Educational 
Institute of Scotland, the larg- 
est teaching union, went on a 
one-day strike. 

The union was protesting a! 
the Govermeni’s phased pay 
offer of 16.4 per cent. 
Roughly the same proportion 
of the membership — 84 per- 
cent — took part in the strike 
as had voted to reject the deal 

Legislation giving powers to 
Mr Kenneth Baker, the Sec- 
retary of State for Education, 
to impose his own settlement 
in foe teachers' pay dispute in 
England and Wales is to be 
rushed through the Commons 
next week. 

The Teachers Pay and Con- 
ditions Bill is to have its 
second reading on Monday, 
and most of Wednesday’s 
Commons business, after 
question time, is set aside for 
the Bill’s remaining stages. 

If the Bill is completed 
quickly in the Lords then it 
could become law by early 
next year. 

Yesterday’s strike is likely 
to be foe last in Scotland 
before Christmas because all 
the teaching unions involved, 
as well as their employers and 
the Government, have agreed 
to establish two working par- 
ties which wflj examine sepa- 
rately the issues of pay and 
conditions. 

At least 300 schools were 
shut and about 3,000 were 
seriously disrupted. Backing 
for the strike was solid in 
Strathclyde but less so in the 
Lothian region. 

Most of the 2,500 members 
of the National Association of 
Schoolmasters and Union of 


Women Teachers (Scotland) 
were also on strike. 

■ About 12,000 teachers took 
part in the institute's march 
and rally in Edinburgh 
yesterday. 

Mr Malcolm Rifldnd, the 
Secretary of State for Scot- 
land, said that foe strike was 
inconsistent with the unions’ 
declared intention of seeking a 
settlement through negotia- 
tion. He added that that the 
Government would have no 
hesitation in drawing up 
contingency plans if disrup- 
tion continued into the new 
year. 

Mr Baker has. made it dear 
that he would only use his new 
powers in England and Wales 
to end the two-year-old dis- 
pute if the teachers’ unions 
and the employers come up 
with a settlement that is at 
odds with foe Government’s 
objectives. 

His proposed Bill repeals 
the Remuneration of Tea- 
chers' Act, disbanding . the 
Burnham machinery 

The Burnham, committee 
will be replaced by an interim 
committee, which could be- 
come permanent The new 
committee would advise foe 
Education Secretary on teach- 
ers' pay and condi lions, mean- 
ing the end of negotiations 
between employers and 
teachers. 

The BQI also enables the 
Government “to introduce 
new arrangements to settle 
teachers' pay, duties and con- 
ditions of service within the 
resources available”. 

Mr Baker wants a salary j 
structure which rewards the 
best teachers and gives a better 
deal to those on the lower 
salary scales. 


£9 

m 




all 



m 


St riking teacher s march through Edinbur gh yesterday on 
their way to a rally (Photograph: Tom Kidd). 


By Ian Smith 

Northern Correspondent 

Myra Hindley and the se- 
nior policeman leading the 
renewed search for moorland 
murder victims are awaiting 
Home Office permission for 
her to visit the scene. 

The unexplained and in- 
creasingly criticized delay by 
the Home Office means the 
woman who possibly in min- 
utes could solve the case 
which has baffled police for 22 
years is being denied the 
opportunity. 

Far worse is the emotional 
trauma the delay is causing to 
the mothers of Keith Bennett 
aged 12, and Pauline Reade. 
aged 16. whose bodies are 
believed to be buried on 
Saddleworth Moor. 

While senior Home Office 
officials ponder their position, 
Mrs Joan Reade is in hospital 
suffering emotional strain. 

Keith's mother, Mrs Win- 
ifiied Johnson, sits in her 
council home in a Manchester 
suburb hoping her torment 
will end and trying to under- 
stand why the Home Office is 
reticent on foe police inquiry. 

Greater Manchester Chief 
Superintendent Peter Top- 
ping, CID head, paid his 
fourth visit to Hindley at 
Crookhara Wood Prison in 
Rochester, Kent, yesterday. 


Kinnock criticized Scheme to 

for defence speech cut h° mes 


By Andrew McEwen, Our Diplomatic Correspondent 


X 


Driver ‘not 
unfairly 
dismissed’ 


Les Architectes du Temp: 



A lorry driver who was 
forced to resign because be did 
not belong to a union had not 
been unfairly dismissed, 
Courtaulds, the textiles manu- 
facturer, told an industrial 
appeal tribunal yesterday. 

The driver, who left the 
Transport and General Work- 
ers Union after a dispute, had i 
refused to accept a transfer to | 
another depot because “he felt i 
he would lose face if he went”, 
the hearing was told. 

Workmates of Mr Denis 
Sibson, aged 57, refused to 
work with him and threatened 
to strike unless he was moved 
away from their depot in 
Greengate, near Manchester. 

Mr Michael Supperstone, 
for Courtaulds, said that the 
company bad asked Mr Sib- 
son to transfer to a depot near 
by but he refused and resigned 
in November last year. 

An industrial tribunal ruled 
in favour of a claim for 
constructive dismissal by Mr 
. Sibs^a, a former union branch 
secretary employed by 
Courtaulds Northern Spin- 
ning for 12 years. He was 
assisted in his case by the 
Freedom Association. Sir 
Ralph Kilner Brown OBE, 
chairman of the Employment 
Appeals Tribunal, reserved a 
decision until December 19. 


Mr Neil Kinnock, the leader 
of the Labour Party, was 
yesterday accused of “wanton 
irresponsibility” after his hint 
that a British government 
finding itself under pressure 
from Washington might cut 
United States intelligence 
facilities in this country. 

Although Mr Kinnock’s 
speech contained no direct 
threat, it was taken by British 
defence experts as showing a 
willingness to “play the intelli- 
gence card”. 

. Mr Jonathan 'Aitken. the 
Conservative MP for Thanet 
South, said that Mr Kinnock's 
remarks in foe US showed 
him “at his most immature 
and unwise”. 

Mr Kinnock's speech con- 
tained an implicit recognition 
that Labour’s defence policies 
would cause a serious crack in 
the Anglo-American affiance, 
resulting in withdrawals of 
some American forces and 
closures of bases, he said. 


“For him to say he would . 
play the intelligence card 
seems an act of wanton 
irresponsibility*', Mr Ahken 
said. 

He added that the sharing of 
intelligence information with 
the US was a vital link in the 
defence of the West The 
British listening post in Cy- 
prus was only one of a number 
of intelligence-gathering facil- 
ities malting an immense 
contribution to the affiance. 

While the loss of informa- 
tion from these posts would be 
an immense blow to the US, 
the inevitable US reciprocal 
move would hit Britain much 
harder. Mr Aitken said. 

Mr Kinnock drew a parallel 
with US reprisals against the' 
Labour government in New 
Zealand after its decision to 
refuse US nuclear vessels per- 
mission to enter its ports. 

Mr Kinnock is making a 
speaking tour of the US. 


red tape 


By Nicholas Wood 
Political Reporter 


A plan to cut red tape on 
council house building and 
renovation schemes was put 
forward by the Government 
yesterday. 


It suggests scrapping the 
project control system, under 
which local authorities qual- 
ifying for state subsidies have 
first to submit their proposals 
to the Department of the 
Environment. 


“Not every one was opposed 
to the idea, but quite a lot of 
people fell it would drag the 
area down,” said the Rev Neil 
Dawson, who was vicar of St 
Philip's Parish, Kennington. 
when the project was being 
discussed. 

The Prince first became 
interested in the plight of 
young people in inner-city 
areas in 1984 when he made a 
midnight expedition to see 
young dossers sleeping on 
cardboard boxes underneath 
Waterloo Bridge. 

After picking his way past 
inert figures wrapped in urine- 
soaked blankets, he asked 
members of his Trust to find 
suitable premises in the 
Kennington area to house 
young people and help them 
on their way in the world. 

Mr Harold Haywood, direc- 
tor of the Trust, yesterday 
said: “Although three houses 
in different locations were 
proposed, they all proved 
unsuitable, bearing in mind 
the need to be sensitive to 
existing householders and the 
critical need to seek 
neighbourhood support”. 

However, it is understood 
that not all Trust members 
were happy with the decision 
to drop the project. Some felt 
that foe plans could have been 
modified to accommodate 
some of the misgivings of 
residents. 


Instea d , the level of assis- 
tance would be determined by 
reference to a national table of 
unit cost limits. 


Fate of free 
skies policy 
in the balance 


• The ceiling on foe discount 
available to tenants buying 
their homes under the right- 
to-buy scheme is to be raised 
from £25,000 to £35,000, Mr 
John Patten, the housing min- 
ister. said yesterday (Our 
Property Correspondent 
writes). 


By Harvey Elliott 
Air Correspondent 


Student in 
protest is 
honoured 


Duke’s visit to 
Ulster kept secret 


Students at Bristol Univer- 
sity have awarded life 
membership of their union to 
a student who led protests 
against Professor John Vin- 
cent earlier this year for his 
columns in The Sun. one of 
the papers affected by the 
Wapping dispute. 


Miss Claire Godfrey was 1 
disciplined by the university 
for her actions and her Drama 
degree was withheld for six 
months. 


The degree of secrecy 
surrounding royal visits to 
Northern Ireland was high- 
lighted yesterday when Army 
headquarters at Lisburn con- 
firmed the Duke of Edinburgh 
was in foe province for a day 
two weeks ago. 

During the visit to a num- 
ber of units with which he has 
connections, the Duke flew by 


Lisburn and of the Duke of 
Edinburgh's Royal Regiment 
at RAF Aldeigrove. 

The Duke has not made a 
public visit to Northern Ire- 
land since foe Queen's Silver 
Jubilee tour more than nine 
years ago but has made several 
private visits to the Army. 

• A businessman escaped 
what police believe was a , 


helicopter lo fly borderpoa at miuder attempt as he left his 
MKldrelowti in South At- home at Ballymena. Co An- 

him, yesterday morning. 


But she appealed and was 
later acquitted by the authori- 
ties on a legal loophole. j 


After a long meeting its good 
to see you relaxing. 


foe target of a Provisional IRA 
mortar attack in which five 
soldiers were injured. 

The Duke visited foe first 
and second battalions of the 
Grenadier Guards who mao 
the Middletown post and ma- 
jor bases as Bally kinler, Co 
Down and Bally kelly, Co 
Londonderry. He is Colonel of 
the Grenadiers. 

He also met members of the 
intelligence corps at REME at 


He was confronted by an 
armed and masked man at 
about 8am and a single shot 
was discharged. He was struck 
with the gun but escaped with 
a superficial head wound. 

• In East Belfast, an Army 
bomb disposal squad dealt 
with an unexploded anti-air- 
craft shell dating from the 
Second World War, unearthed 
as workmen were digging 
foundations. 


Mr Michael Spicer, the 
minister for aviation, left for 
Greece last night in a final 
attempt at persuading the 
Greek government to relax its 
opposition to greater com- 
petition in European air feres. 

Bui whta 10 days to go 
before the final meeting of the 
European transport ministers 
under British EEC presidency 
there is little sign that the six 
countries that voted against 
real liberalisation last month 
have changed their views. 

At Heathrow Airport where 
he had arrived after a similar 
visit to Portugal, Mr Spicer 
said a free skies policy was 
now “in the balance”. 

But officials claimed that 
the Portuguese had only soft- 
ened their position slightly. 
They now appear ready to go 
along if everyone else votes in 
favour of liberalisation. 

ft is now looking more 
likely that Britain will have to 
resort to law if it wants to force 
European governments to ex- 
pose their state owned airlines 
to real competition. 


Off k 


3* 

L 


IV-- 


The Prince of Wales has 
been forced to abandon a 
scheme in south London to 
help homeless youngsters after 
strong protests from his own 
tenants, who felt it would 
"drag the area down”. 

After two years of effort, the 
Prince's Royal Jubilee Trust 
has dropped the scheme to 
convert three houses in 
Kennington Lane and Cott- 
ingron Street. Kennington, 
near the Oval cricket ground, 
into homes for up to 40 
teenagers at risk. 

In one area residents, many 
of them elderly, feared for 
their safety and in the other 
tenants argued that the influx 
of teenagers would lower the 
tone of an area which was 
gradually being "gen trifled”. 

Yesterday the Prince was 
reported to be disappointed 
that the scheme had fallen 
through. 

“.As this was a project with 
which be had been dosely 
associated he was naturally 
concerned . that the scheme 
had not gone ahead, because a 
lot of effort had gone into it,” 
said a spokeswoman for the 
Duchy of Cornwall, which 
owns the properties. 

Residents of Duchy of 
Cornwall properties in Ken- 
nington include politicians, 
former staff of the Royal 
Household and senior Civil 
Servants. 


exec:; 


dr: 


i n " 

1 feiffi: 


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Buying Ttus Times overseas 

»: Belgium B Frs 50. 
Canada S2.7S: Canaries P« 200. 

TOtenjs: Denmark Dkr lO OO: 

MWfi 9.00: France F 800: W 
Germany DM 5.50: Qbndlar *Op: 
gw™ Dr 180: HouandCH 5.50: SSi 
HSffiiPVS 22 D: .. ,to,y L 2.700: I Uiacem- 
gy ur O j-T * 5: Madeira Esc 170: Malta 
55c: .Morocco Dir lO OO. Nonwav Kr 


35c^Morocco Dir 10.00. Norway Kr 
JOipO; Pawsiaii Rps IS: Portugal Esc 
1 TO: Sin gapore S5SO: Spain Pcs 200: 
Sweden Su- 12,00 iSwitzertand S Frs 
USA “■ 7 * 



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J-THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


Drug-addicted mother 

ii vMWL 

Doctor is 

w n i 

mmm 


loses challenge over 
child taken into care 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 

££*«? M? have iht child made a wart of 

daughter, *ho was born drug- the magistrates “should not be 

entitled to have regard 


addicted. 


to 


In a far-reaching ruling events before the child was 
which could pave the way for bom" or to the “state of affairs 
legal proceedings by children at the child's birth. 


against their mothers for 
maltreatment in the womb 
through abuse of drink or 
drugs, the Law Lords ruled 
that pregnant women can be 

held liable for the care of their 
unborn babies. 

Some lawyers also believe 


“It is contrary to common 
sense that they should be 
inhibited from doing so.” 

They could also say that 
there was a likelihood that, 
because of the mother’s and 
father's drug addiction the 
child's health would continue 


that it opens the possibility of to be impaired. 


women being prosecuted for 
barm done to their unborn 
babies through illegal acts 
such as taking restricted drugs. 

The baby, known as Vic- 
toria, who was with foster 
parents since her birth 15 
months ago. was bom pre- 
maturely. weighing only 51b. 
She was suffering from' drug 
withdrawal symptoms and 
spent six weeks in an intensive 
care unit. 

Throughout the pregnancy 
the mother, aged 30, still an 
addict, took drugs in excess of 
those prescribed by her 

doctor. 

Yesterday dismissing the 
appeal by the mother against a 
care order by Berkshire 
County Council the five Law 
Lords unanimously ruled that 
the local authority was en- 
titled when making its care 
order to take into account the 
mother's treatment of the 
unborn child. 

Lord Brandon of Oakbrook 
said that because the mother 
"persisted in taking excessive 


That was particularly the 
case as the mother was “so 
addicted that she continued to 
take drugs throughout her 
pregnancy in the knowledge of 
the effect that this might have 
or her unborn child". 

Last night, lawyers pre- 
dicted that the ruling could 
have far-reaching effects. Mr 
Paul Reid, counsel for the 
mother, said that the ruling 
meant that for the first time 
women could be held account- 
able for their unbora children 
in (aw. 

H did not make abortion 
illegal, he added: but one 
possible development might 
be children taking legal action 
their mothers for damage 
done while in the womb. 

Professor Michael Freeman, 
of University College, Lon- 
don, said that in his view it 
opened the possibility of crim- 
inal proceedings against moth- 
ers. albeit in thedistant future. 

Another solicitor for the 
child, Mr Chris Darbyshire, 
added that it also opened the 


narcotic drugs throughout her ’ doors to local authorities mak- 
pregnancy” the magistrates ing care orders in such circum- 
were entitled to find that the stances rather than seeking to 


court. 

“There have been cases 
similar to this; but in the past, 
the local authorities have dealt 
with them through wardship, 
where the future of the child is 
determined by the court.” he 
said. 

“With care orders, there is 
no control at all over how the 
child is dealt with” 

The parents of the child, 
who are to contest adoption 
proceedings due to start later 
this month, said that if pos- 
sible. they would pursue the 
case to the European Court of 
Human Rights. 

The mother said: “1 am 
heartbroken. This is legalized 
kidnapping. We just want to 
be left alone to bring our 
daughter up ourselves.” 

For many years, she said, 
she had been told she could 
not have a child because of 
blocked fallopian tubes. 
""Then by some miracle I had 
my baby, only to have her 
snatched away.” 

The parents say they are 
under medical care and 
receiving only controlled 
doses of methadone. 

Mrs Ann Parker, Berk- 
shire’s director of social ser- 
vices, said that its first 
concent must be for the child. 
But in the past where ward- 
ship proceedings had been 
used, they had been found to 
be slow, cumbersome and not 
responsive to the needs of! 
young children. 

In future, where there was 
harm to the child and where 
the parents could not offer 
care, she said, the council 
would continue to initiate care 
proceedings. 


Law Report, page 15 


£320,000 
swindle by 
executives 


Kenneth Atkinson, a senior 
executive at a power station, 
lived in luxury by running 
swindles and taking bribes 
worth a total of £320,000. 
Teeside Crown Court was told 


The £I5,000-a-year senior 
engineer ended up with a 
£100,000 country house; a 
£42.000 holiday bungalow; an 
ocean-going cruiser and a 
£85.000 factory for his own 
electrical company. 

Atkinson's wife, Frances, 
aged 39. was the stores super- 
visor at the North Tees Power 
Station. Cleveland, and was 
also involved. 

Geoffrey Variey, aged 61, 
the station manager, of Leven 
Road, Yarm -on-Tees, who 
was in the plot too, had two 
yachts. 

Firms who provided these 


luxuries, including executive 
id £2 


cars, were paid £250,000 by 
the Central Electricity Gen- 
erating Board on false in- 
voices. Bribes completed the 
£320,000 swindle. 

The court was told that 
months before contractors be- 
gan work on a £4.2 million 
modernisation programme on 
the station in 1978 life began 
to improve for the Atkinsons. 

The couple, with two chil- 
dren. moved from a three- 
bedroom semi-detached 
house to The Hi ghl a nd s, a 
white-painted house in exten- 
sive grounds at Bromplon 
near Northallerton. 

The three former executives 
admitted fraud, conspiracy, 
corruption and theft. 

Eleven firms and con- 
tractors pleaded guilty to giv- 
ing bribes, deception and 
forgery. They will be sen- 
tenced later. 


Police return £2m 
sex books to store 


By Peter Evans and Peter De Ionno 


Police yesterday delivered 
four lorryloads of pornog- 
raphy, about 500,000 books 
and magazines worth an es- 
timated £2 million, to the east 
London warehouse from 
which it was seized in a raid 
involving 100 officers almost 
two years aga 

The return of the sex books 
was ordered by Newham West 
magistrates who had ruled 
they were not obscene, even 
though magazines of the same 
titles seen by The Times 
contained explicit sexual 
scenes including oral sex and 
lesbianism and group sex. 

Titles ranged from White- 
house. Rustler and Park Lane 
which are available in news- 
agents, to Colour Climax, 
Rodox and Intercourse 
Illustrated. 

While the police attitude 
was “very philosophical” 
according to Det Inspector 
Colin White of the Obscene 
Publications Branch, who 
oversaw the operation, Mr 
Brian Richards, managing 
director of Quietiynn Ltd, 
owners of the material was 
triumphant. 

""All this shows is that the 
whole thing was a waste of 
taxpayers' money,” he said in 
the forecourt of the warehouse 
in Faraday Road, Stratford, 
that is the headquarters of the 
company that has shot to 
prominence in the past four 
years. 

“This is pornography but 
none of it is illegal. I draw the 
line at anything involving 
children, animals or torture,” 
he said. 

Magistrates at Newham 
West Court had ordered ma- 
terial from a raid on St 


Valentine's Day last year, 
code-named Operation Sweet- 
heart, to be rcturned. 

Quietlynn has once more 
been the subject of police 
attention with the seizure on 
November 27 of four lorry- 
loads of magazines and video 
cassettes from its east London 
warehouse. 

Thirty-four forces through- 
out the rest of Britain had 
been alerted by Scotland Yard 
to retail outlets in their areas 
supplied with material from 
Quietlynn's ware- 

house. Viewing by magistrates 
of the latest material seized 
may be early next week, 
possibly Tuesday. 

The impact of Mr Richards 
on Quietiynn after be became 
a director on July 15, 1982 was 
immediateJn the first results 
for the period from October 
18, 1982, to June 30, 1983, the 
consolidated profit and loss 
account shown! a turnover of 
£6.7 million. 

But the cost of sales is given 
as £4.2 million. leaving a gross 
profit of £24 million. 

Out of that came £1.9 
million administrative ex- 
penses. Together with dis- 
tribution mid other costs that 
left a loss for the group of 
nearly £250,000. 

The directors’ report for the 
year ending June 30, 1984, 
described the main activities 
of the group and company as 
being publishers and retailers 
of magazines and ancillary 
products. _ 

The turnover was now £7.6 
million, the gross profit £29 
million, the administrative 
expenses £2.3 million. The 
profit for the group was given 
as £71,009. 



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Russians 
‘harassed’ 
bank clerk 


A Russian bank tried to 
impose “military” discipline 
on a clerk they later diqussed 
for being too left-wing, an 
industrial tribunal in London 
was told yesterday. 

Mr Tony Palmer, a deik, 
also claimed one of his bosses 
at the London branch of the 
Moscow Narodny Bank 
threatened to “fill him in”. Mir 
Palmer, aged 39, said he was 
harassed by his superiors be- 
cause of his trade union 
activities. 

A report on his work said he 
was “a disruptive influence”, 
worked at an “erratic speed”, 
and in one year was late 63 
times and off sick for eight 
days, the bearing was told. 

When Mr Palmer saw the 
report, he replied by letter 
saying: “These comments 
could only be relevant if 
discipline of a military nature 
was being imposed. If I wished 
to be subjected to military 
discipline l would have joined 
the Army." 

Mr Philip Naughton, for the 
bank, said: “He appeals to be 
wholly unable to accept any 
criticism of him as valid”. 

Mr Palmer, of Darwin 
Drive, Tonbridge, Kent, 
claims be was unfairly dis- 
missed because the bank did 
not like his union activities as 
health and safety officer for 
the Banking, Insurance and 
Finance Union. 

The hearing continues. 


laier. i 

Savoy safe ‘used as lending bank 

rti.nqn^r rfic. eaiH wav he had left security officers fighting' tice. everyone has doi 


A security manager tts- 
roissed by the Savoy Hotel for 
failing to report that guards 

° - ac a 


and said the way he had left 
lOUs and taken the money 
out in the presence of another 

- —J .L .J n H ie nnirtrr fA 


were 
lending 
terday 


10 repon Ulill B UOJ4M uui ui UIS piwuw V. — — 

using the safe as a guard showed he was going to 
_ ves- renav iL" 


bank, denied yes- 
that he ignored the 
problem. 

Mr Ian Yexley, aged 30, told 
an industrial tribunal tijatl be 
disciplined Mr Ken Rhodes 
after he was caught putting 
IOUs into the lost property 
safe to borrow money for a 
night ouL 

He said: “I told him in no 
uncertain terms it^ was not 
ever to happen again and he 
should consider that he was 

having a verbal wpft . 

**He realized that he should 
not have borrowed the money 


repay it 
Mr Yexley went on: “I did 
not put a report forward 
because I felt I had dealt with 
the matter correctly. There 
was no evidence of theft and 
the matter had been dealt with 
straight away." 

He felt the trouble “was just 
' of personality" be- 


a clash OI personamy uv- J^ve oeen given uuw ueauer mat management 

tween Mr Timothy Beer, a back a wallet minus X amount, were planning to trap other 
security officer who found the 0 f money.” window cleaners who were 

IOU, and Mr Rhodes. Mr Beer said he was told by stealing cash from mens. 

Mr Yexley said: to I did not Mr Rhodes, the guard later 
want to cause more problems dismissed for borrowing the 
the department with money: "It is common prao 


fighting' tice, everyone has done it” 
Mr Yexley added that he 
had no idea that such a 
practice was common, and 
claimed he told the personnel 
manager, Mr David Lowth, 
what he bad done. 

— — Mr Yexley, of Pevansey 

Yexley might not take action Road, Tooting, south-west 
because it would be a bad London, claims that his dis- 
refleciion on his deportment missal for not reporting the 
“On face value if the person “borrowing", was unfeir. 
whose contents were in the The Savoy also alleges that 
safe had returned for them Mr Yexley tipped off a win- 
they could have been given dow cleaner that management 


security officers 
among each other.” 

But Mr Beer, aged 29, who 
had found the IOUs taped to 
the safe door, gave a report to 
the management. 

He told the tribunal: "It was 
gross misconduct I felt Mr 

mr 1 4«klm nnhAd 


“The system was not in- 

By Alan Hamilton ^ the lost stalled because there was a 

Security was the sohget ot ^ safe as a source of particular seemity problem, 

some reticence at the Savoy borrowing. We were snnply takin| pre- 


claims at an industrial tribunal 

that the presOj^OTS res- 
idence's own security staff had 
Etatbe habit of borrowing 
money from the lost 
safe, and that three window 
had been caught 

SJf money from rooms. 

” Mr Peter Croroe, manager 
offfreSaroy. tall and M 

jSsrfhissecanty. 


short-term borrowing. 

But he was willing to snow 
electronic room-key 
installed 18 months 


■Mr 


pre- 

xome 


off his 

system, 
ago. 

A computer registers every 

time a room is entered witt the 

electronic key, whose com- 
bination is changed every time 
a new guest is given a room, 
A window cleaner or anyone 
else w ho has legitimate reason 
for entering a room has to sign 
for a key. and his presence in 
the room wifi also be fogged 


We were simply 
ventive measures, 
said. 

The Savoy’s security staff 
are all employed directly by 
the hotel rather than by an 
outside agency. All wear pbin 
dothes, and are generally 
indistinguishable from guests. 
The management dedmed to 
say whether dishonesty among 
staff brought automatic in- 
stant ftma L 

Thai it appears, would be a 
breach of security. 


were 

w guests. 

Mr Yexley said he was told 
by Mr Paul Brunei a window 
deaner, that his supervisor 
was taking money from rooms 
and wanted him to do some- 
thing about it because “he 
enjoyed working at the hotel 
and was friendly with a num- 
ber of the maids.” 

Mr Yexley said: “He told 
me that he and some of the 
maids were planning to set a 
trap but 1 said under no 
circumstances was he to at- 
tempt to and if any trap was to 
be set it would be by the 
management 

"I just gave him that general 
warning that a trap might be 
set Anyway he was not a 
suspect - he was a good in- 
former, and I knew be 
wouldn't pass on any 
information.” 

The hearing continues 
today. 


• • w * 

Discovery looking 
shipshape again 


Captain Scott’s ship Discov- 
ery, in the Victoria Dock, 
Dundee, looms over Jim 
Hayter, who has helped to 
recaulk her over the past seven 
weeks (Kee Gosling writes). 

Restoration work on Discov- 
ery, returned last Easter to her 
borne port from the Thames, 
will take a farther three years. 
The Dundee Heritage Trust 
needs to raise £501000 to pay 
for interior repairs. 


Afl the old external paint 
has been stripped and four new 
coats have been applied to her 
wooden hail. 

Discovery sailed in 1901 to 
the Antarctic trader Scott's 
leadership. She was frozen 
into the tee for two years and 
was rescued fry two other 
Dnodee-bmlt ships Ere days 
before Scott was to have 
abandoned her. 

Photograph: Arthur Foster 


‘poaching’ 
patients 


Dr Joseph Jaffe. a hypno- 
therapist accused of turning a 
patient into a “zombie” by 
using hypnotism and drags, 
"poached” patients from the 
National Health Service for 
his own private practice, it 
was claimed yesterday. 

It is alleged that bus "Jaffe 
juice” injections, mainly con- 
sisting of the barbiturate drug 
Brietal, drove Mr George 
Waterloo, aged 49. a business- 
man, to the point of suicide, 
wrecked his business and al- 
most ruined his marriage. 

Mr Nicholas Brandt, for Mr 
Waterson. of Arthog Road, 
Hale. Cheshire, told a hearing 
of the General Medical 
Council's professional con- 
duct committee that Dr Jaffe, 
aged 61, “diverted” patients 
from the Crumpsall Road 
Hospital, north Manchester, 
to his consulting room in $1 
John’s Street, Manchester. 

He said: “It was barely 35 
minutes before Mr Waterson 
ceased to be a patient on the 
national health and became 
one at St John's Street”. 

Mr Waterson was not the 
only patient Dr Jaffe “divert- 
ed”, Mr Brandt said. 

He described the 
hypnotherapist, who allegedly 
obtained up to £60.000 out of 
Mr Waterson, as a ‘"politically 
and socially ambitious man”. 

Dr Jaffe, of Sheepfooi Lane, 
Prestwicb, Manchester, a for- 
mer mayor of Salford, denies 
four charges of serious pro- 
fessional misconduct 
Mr Brandi said: “It is 
extraordinary that a man with 
no psychiatric qualifications 
could have created his own 
line of medical thinking and 
embarked on treatment on a 
patient without reference to 
anybody of any standing 
Mr Anthony Arlidge, QC, in 
his closing speech for Dr Jaffe, 
denied that he had poached 
Mr Waterson from the NHS. 

He said: “The suggestion 
that Dr Jaffe rubbed his hands 
with glee, peeped round cor- 
ners and saw Mr Waterson's 
Rolls Royce in the hospital car 
park before saying ‘Right this 
one's for St John's Street', is 
absolute rubbish. 

“Mr Waterson asked to be 
transferred to the consulting 
rooms. He did not tike the 
brisk manner at the hospital 
“Mr Waterson could not 
possibly have been as bad as 
people say he was. According 
to witnesses, this man was in a 
chronic state for something 
like four, maybe more, years 
and that state had. got mark- 
edly worse after he started 
treatment by Dr Jaffe ” 

But none of the witnesses 
bad done anything about Mr 
Waterson’s condition, Mr 
Arlidge said. 

The bearing was adjourned 
and is expected to finish 
today. 


Christmas 

windfall 


welcomed 


Mr Dennis Sudden, a re- 
tired mechanical engineer 
from Northfiefd, in Bir- 
mingham, was the sole winner 
iff yesterday's Portfolio Gold 
competition. 

Mr Budden, aged 61, says 
he will ese the £4,000 towards 
home improvements and a 
holiday. 

“Most of the pleasure will 
be deriding what to do with the 
money,” he added. "But with 
Christmas jest around the 
corner, it is most welcome.” 

A former reader of The 
Daily Telegraph , Mr Budden 
says be was converted to The 
Times just before the Portfolio 
competition was introduced 
and has remained a satisfied 

customer. 

Portfolio Gold cards can be 
obtained by sending a stamped 
addressed envelope to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40. 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Therapy class 
for school 
age smokers 


Young smokers at a school 
in Dorset are being given a 
chance to beat their addicton. 
with the introduction of lunch- 
time anti-smoking therapy 
(Angella Johnson writes). 

Queen Elizabeth's School, 
in Wimborae Minster, plans 
to begin the lessons next term 
after receiving a plea from a 
mother whose teenage son had 
become a chain smoker. 

The school called in an 
expert to run special classes on 
how to give up smoking, and 
about SO teenagers attended 
the introductory session. 

Mr Peter Moore, acting 
headmaster, said it was the 
teachers' way of responding 
positively to a major problem. 

Smoking is banned at the 
school but many youngsters 
are believed to smoke between 
20 and 25 cigarettes a day 
ouside school hoars. 


Sculptor in 
cage protest 


A London sculptor has be- 
gun a 24-day fast locked in a 
cage in St Sepulchre’s Church 
in Holborn. central London, in 
protest at the imprisonment iff 
a Russian Christian dissident. 

Mr Athanosins Hart, a New 
Zealander, is protesting on 
behalf of Alexander 
Ogorodnikov. 


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HOME NEWS- 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


m! 75I iilJiTi 


•7.1 ». 






demand 


A Conservative MP ashed dur- -4 

■,'ing business questions for an I I f \ , 

;■ early debate on an Opposition Vf I I 

. early day motion questioning I J. 8 I V va— < 

the conduct of Mrs Edwina Cr 

. Currie, the Under-Secretary of - — . 

••'State for Health and Social 

•r Security. PRIME MINISTER 

- The motion calls on Mis 

r.. Currie to make a statement _ ... . 

' -about the interests of her rel- The ■ Minister, stont 

-atives in Arthur Anderson and ^"' n S throughout, refused t 
. Co which, it says, gains firtan- 9* drawn on the issi» c 
fondly from contram entered 1 5 0t S 

•into by the Department of “bM- former head of the No 1 1 
Health and Social Purity and P^ k Tank < ™««ht *“ v ® ■ 

' by regional health authorities. So , v,et p?" thantojm 

/■Mr Michael FaDot. (Darlington, * tetler by pun publi shed l ira 
Cl said that the rise in the day was being considered u 
.-Government's popularity might Government. 

. be dated from the appointment She faced a senes of question; 

of Mrs Currie. on the subject by Mr Koi 

There should be an early Hatteraley. deputy iMder of th« 
debate in Older that her condutt if *»ur ,Parw dunng Primt 
through her husband’s employ- Minister s question lime in tm 
ment might be fully exposed and Commons. ^ 
the charges thoroughly repudi- Mr . Timothy Bratton (Gra- 
■ a ted (Conservative cheers). vesham, C) opened the ex- 

Mr John Biflen, Leader if the ®bang« when he asked what 
House; I share the distaste steps she would take, in the light 
expressed, i think it is down- of work done unto 

right sexist... (Opposition successive governments by Lord 
protests). Rothschild, to protect his 

' reputation against hlse innu- 

TT| ___ T endo and smears? 

K HW nVPT Mrs Thatcher: I have seen the 
AW v ▼ V/ t Vi letter Lord Rothschild pub- 
J 9 Jished this morning. That letter 

Tj | fl prl PCC is being considered in Govero- 
l. uuvliV JJ ment and I cannot add anything 

Mr ToBj Banks (Newham is a quite 

North West, Lab), on 3 point of extraoniinary answer for the 

Prime Minister to give. Can she 


Silence from 
Thatcher on 
Rothschild 
allegations 





The Prime -Minister, stone- 
walling throughout, refused to 
be drawn on the issue of 
allegations that Lord Roth- 
schild, former bead of the No 10 
Think Tank, might have been a 
Soviet spy. other than to say that 
a letter by him published that 
day was being considered in 
Government 

She faced a series of questions 
on the subject by Mr Roy 
Hattersley, deputy leader of the 
Labour Party, during Prime 
Minister's question time in the 
Commons. 

Mr Timothy Brinton (Gra- 
ves ham, O opened the ex- 
changes when he asked what 
steps she would take, in the light 
of the work done under 
successive governments by Lord 
Rothschild, to protect _ his 
reputation against false innu- 
endo and smears? 

Mrs Thatcher: 1 have seen the 
letter Lord Rothschild pub- 
lished this morning. That letter 
is being considered in Govern- 
ment and I cannot add anything 
further at this stage. 

Mr Hattersley: That is a quite 


Marlow (Northampton North. 
Q had recently made an un- 
pleasant comment about Mrs 
Helen Hayman, a former MP. . 
She had written to Mr Marlow 
and asked him to apologize. Mr 
Marlow had not only made a 
very wounding statement but 
had got the name of the person 
wrong as well. 

Mr Marlow said that it was 
correct that he had used the 
wrong name and he apologized 
to the lady concerned. It was 
based on incorrect information. 

TV request 
is denied 

It would be unrealistic, in the 


not follow her own precedent, 
which she set on March 26, 

Later, Mr Spencer Batiste 
(Elniet, C) suggested to Mr John 
Biflen, Leader of the House of 
Commons, that an all-party 
committee of senior and experi- 
enced privy Counsellors shook! 
formulate a code of conduct 
compatible with the national 
interest for the Leader of the 
Opposition, who, be said, did not 
seem to be able to work out one 
for himself. 

“It would be unfair to exclude 
him from security briefings untB 
be has had the opportunity to 
mend his ways.” 

Mr Biflen: If this is a brand new 


practice of this House that the 
Government does not comment 
on matters of this kind” (loud 

Conservative cheers). u| uSfcffiggg 

Mr James Hamilton (Mother- M K ffilffijSg Sg 

well North, Lab): Will she tell us Waj&h ggf , 

when she first became aware jgK sMfll w 

that Sir Robert Armstrong's 

evidence was incorrect and ilw* jRm\|( 

when she instructed him to 

Mrs Thatcher: As he is aware, 

and as the Attorney General tomwWIII 

repeated on Monday, the Wn 

Government is a plaintiff in this 

case and we are not able to WWy/fJy- 

Mr Terence Lewis (Worsley, w@S|i|M 

Lab): Since Sir Robert Arm- 

strong bas said in the court in mHgK 

Sydney that a committee of w® 

ministers, including the Prime 

Minister, decided not to ban ~ 

Chapman Pin Cher’s book, when 
did the book come into her 
posession? 

Mrs Thatcher reminded him of 
what the Attorney General had 
said on Monday about being a 

plaintiff in the Australian court ' « 

case and about not being able to f - rallCTOV I 

comment on some of the allega- I M|Nlw l 1 J- 

tions being-bandied about \ _ c A* 

Mr Robert Rhodes James I Or ^ 

(Cambridge, C* Lord Roth- | 

schild ts a constituent of mine 1 rjlSlN* 

and a very distinguished public lw WI 

servant and his letter requires I — 

immediate and urgent attention. 1 

Mrs Thatchen I cannot add 
further to what I have said and I 
hope the House will understand 

Mr Tam Dalyefl (Linlithgow, Mr W il l i a m Hamflt 

Lab) asked if the Prime Minister r““ 1 

would seperate the position of /""I - 

Cabinet Secretary from that of 1 .IfTl ill 
the head of the Civil Service. WlIVWU 

Mrs Thatcher No. 

SMEatt over forest 

strong acting in his capacity as a 

head of the Gvil Service or in OT^f Tj TV 

his capacity as Cabinet Sep- 

retary when he parti ci paled in There was concern in much of 
the decision to withhold from the country about the system of 
the Attorney General knowledge grants and fiscal incentives by 










mr 


Mr William Hamilton faking a view of the Prime Ministers statements. 


Concern 
over forest 
grants 


Imports of butter 
still declining 


.1 wuuiu ue luiiauiut, U. uic ccunittee with no experience, 
concluding stages of a Par- to&sttoskwouM beVmI£ 

I lament, to take a decision on 
the televising of the House of 

SS^ttal l981 ' “ the case of Sir Roger 
L?! * “ f C Hollis quite explicitly, and now 
respond to Lord Rothschild's 

WirsJ^S 

S^tetev^Sn HeSS to 1 S 2 ES 2 S& 


of how Chapman Pincber’s 
book was obtained or pur- 
loined? 

Mrs Thatcher ref erre d him to 


management companies to pro- 
vide blanket afforestation in 
many parts of the upland areas, 
Mr Michael Forsyth (Sorting. 


the answers given by the Attor- 1 q said during Commons qoes- 


1981, in the case of Sir Roger SSS 9 LJS!!f%.wh.rei 
Hollis quite explicitly, and now ™ VS^.^2^55 

respond to Lord Rothschild's 

plea by making dear he was not huSSt SSfvii? 

2„rr <■“*«->’>&•*« SSf °“‘^bS ,, S 

Mrs Thatcher: Lord Rothschild doc ? ne thzl 5™* 

published a letter this morning. Bnmh s ‘*-“ nt y P 61 * 0 **** 
l have seen iL The letter Lsbeing ^„°y^!S^ dutytokeq>their 

considered in Government as it ?l oul ^S. . . , . „ 


tions on 
He s 


nilture 

that Ihic rancwt 


and Melton, C): Has not Sir considerable damage to farming 
Robert Armstrong, acting in interests and to the environ- 
either of his official capacities, ment, in addition to damaging 
been trying to establish the tourism. 

Mr Michael Jopting, Minister 


been dying 
essential do 


mg to establish the 
doctrine that former 


British security personnel have 0 f Agriculture. Fisheries and 
an overriding duty to keep their Fbod. said h must be remem- 
?. ou “* “ ut? bered that the fact that there was 


an early debate on a motion for 
televising the House so that the 
whole country could eqjoy the 
Prime Minister's twice weekly 
discomfort and listen to the ' 
Opposition's excellent speeches, j 

• i 

Parliament 
next week 

The main business in the House 
of Commons next week will be: 
Monday: Teachers’ Pay and 
Conditions Bill, second reading. 
Tuesday: Abolition of Domestic 
Rates, Etc (Scotland) Bill, sec- 
ond reading. 

Wednesday: Teachers' Pay and 
Conditions Bill, remaining sta- 
ges. 

Thursday: Northern Ireland 
(Emergency Provisions) Bill, 
second reading. Northern Ire- 
land (Emergency Provisions) 
Act 1978 (Continuance) (No 3) 
Order. 

Friday; Debate on private 
member’s motion on employ- 
ment and training initiatives. 

The main business in the 
House of Lords will be: 

Monday: Consumer Protection 
Bill, second reading. 

Tuesday: Criminal Justice 
(Scotland) Bill, second reading. 
Wednesday: Debates on uie 
housing situation and on 
government measures to com- 
bat Aids. 

Thursday: Family Law Reform 
Bill, committee. 


Parliament today 

Commons (9.30): Private mem- 
ber's motion on local gov- 
ernment. 


mouths shut? 

should be and I cannot add 1 «a?not add 

anything at this stage. I would f MT therl ° 1 tov « 

have thought Mr Hattersley 
would have understood that ^ 

Mr HaUeraley: I understand the 

implication of the Prime ad e 8** 1 f ** wouJd 

Minister’s prevarication and I 

hope she does die same. ^ Lead®* - of the Oppost- 

Putting aside the personal non on matters of security; since 
an guish that her answer is’ ?* ^ believe a word she 
bound to cause. Lord Roth- dial or anything else 

schild was bead of the Central * au K bter ’ Conservative 

Policy Review Staff working at ... ■ . 

10 Downing Street for Mr f"*»TtaldMr:Asara»lbi8sidc 
Edward Heath when be was ‘ s ranceraed thc normal «nirte- 
Prime Minister; is the Prime f” ^ .f?" 1 ™ 10 hf 
Minister really not prepared to ?3n^WS^£2f es,s) - 

ay here and now that Lord SvJSciSmn 

Rothschild was not a spy? IWortan^on, Lab) fatter asked 

Mrs Thatchen He is causing ^ S 

anguish. Lord Rothschild’s tel- 

ter was pubhsbcd this morning. Pnme Min- 

I have seen it; the letter is being S? 10 S^ me J M f ore ^ 
considered in Government and l ^* ce a st ^ tcraen . 1 


I cannot add anything further at 
this stage (Opposition protests). 
Mr Hattersley: Would she not 
consider even now answering 
this question? WiU she consider 
not simply her obligation to 


allegations made against Lord 
Rothschild, and deal with 
innuendoes made over the past 
five years about his activities. 

“If the Prime Minister had 
made a statement, Loid Roth- i 


g^r^ impoJses she do« not *hild never have been 

possess, but the damage her ™harrassed. 


answers are doing to the British 
security services? (protests from 
the Government benches) 


“It is strange that only today 
after the intervention by Lord 
Rothschild in a letter to the 


It is preposterous to give the Doily Telegraph, the Prime 
impression we are infiltrated Minister has been dragged to the 


impression we are infiltrated Minisl< 
with moles, we are not. Would 
she not make that dear here and refuses 
now in the case of Lord J??.,. 
Rothschild? Will s 

Mrs Thatcher; I have nothing statemc 
further to add to what 1 have Mr Jol 
already said about Lord Roth- Com mi 
schild. With regard to what he by him 
said about security matters, ister an 
might I remind him what he us mor 
said when he was Minister of her. 

State at the Foreign Office. He Labour 
said: “It is a long established question. 


Minister has been dragged to the 
despatch box and even yet she : 
refuses to make the statement 
we demanded two weeks ago. 
Will she now make a full 
statement?" 

Mr John Biflen, Leader of the 
Commons: The remarks made 
by him about the Prime Min- 
ister and bis tone and terms tell 
us more about him than about 


Answer 


so much forestry in this country 
was due largely to the activities 
of specialist firms. But he agreed 
stongly that all future p lanting s 
of trees needed to be looked at to 
ensure that they were environ- 
mentally sympathetic. 

He said earlier that be had 
received representations from 
organizations and individuals 
on the benefits of expansion of 
form woodlands. These had 
emphasized the environmental 
benefits of including a 
broadleaved component 

Aids scheme 

Mr Antony Newton, Minister 
for Health, said in a written 
reply that careful consideration 
would be given to whether ft 
would be worthwhile for con- 
doms to be provided free as part 
of the fight against Aids, given 
that they were already widely 
available cheaply. 

Art on tour 

Mr Richard Lace, Minister for 
the Arts, is discussing with the 
Museums and Galleries Cbm- 
mission the scope for introduc- 
ing a scheme to support touring 
exhibitions, including those 
involving the loan of items from 
national collections, he said in a 
written reply. 

FalMands TV 

The new taped television service 
far the Falkland Islands garrison 
will begin on Thursday. Mr 
John Stanley, Minister for the 
Armed Faroes, said in a written 
reply. It will transmit four hours 
a day of taped current BBC and 
ITV programmes. 


Thatcher hlames 
rates formula 


By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 

TJe Prime Minister sym- in the South, how does that 
pathized last night with the help to build one nation?” 
plight of Birmingham and Mrs Thatcher said she was 
other cities which have suf- well aware the changes would 
fered after the Government’s be greeted with approval by 
controversial revision of rate- some MPs and disapproval by 
support grant to local cou- others, 
ncils. “Dmi 


Peers are 
to study 
efficiency 

By Sheila Gann 
Political Staff 


The United Kingdom has about 
260,000 tonnes (Abutter In store, 
Mr’ John Gammer, Minister of 
State for Agricnftnre, Fisheries 
and Food, said during Commons 
questions. Imports bare de- 
clined in each of the past five 
years and in 1985 stood at 
138,700 tonnes. 

“The marketing of British 
butter is primarily a matter for 
the industry itself, but the 
Government bas taken the ini- 
tiative of establishing (the cam- 
paign) Food from Britain, with 
substantial government funding, 
and is pressing for reform of the 
Community's milk regime in 
order to secure a viable long- 
term future for the UK dairy 
; in d ustr y .” 

Mr Sean Hughes (Knows ley 
South, Lab): Can be confirm 
that batter stocks in British 
intervention stores have in- 
creased by a staggering 33 per 
cent m the past six months? 
Could not the Government make 
a quantity of batter available 
free to old age pensioners this 
winter? 

Mr Gammer: If we amid find a 
way of ensuing that giving 
batter to deserving people dal 
not actually mean there was less 
butter sold and therefore more 
going into intervention we would 
be happy to do ft. I am looking 
carefully at proposals, but have 
not found a way to do that. I 
would like to. 

Mr Cofin Shepherd (Hereford, 
Q: New Zealanders and other 
importers have access to the UK 
market bat must sell an better 
performance and price. There- 
fore ft is oar batter industry 
which is foifing to sell British 
butter. 

Mr Gammer: It is important 
that the butter industry shook! 
seek to sell to British house- 
wives. It is difficult to talk about 
the fact that we are setf- 
sofficieot if we are potting all 
these tonnes of batter into 
intervention while other peo- 
ple — not just New Zealand- 
ers - are selling their butter on 
our markets, even though in 
many cases it is more expensive 
than oars. New Zealand batter 
was more expensive than British 
in Tesco last Monday and only 
Ip less expensive in Sains bnry’s 
today. 

Mr John Home (Foyle. SDLP) 
said that urgent reform of the 
common agriculture policy was 


AGRI CULTURE 

required. Was it not s ur pris i ng 
that this was not on the agenda 
of the next meeting of the beads 
of EEC governments? 

Mr Gammer said rhnf H»»c was 
on the agenda of the agricultural 
ministers next week, the proper 
place for ft. 

Mr Patrick McLonghfin (West 
Derbyshire, Ck Is be not dis- 
turbed by the remarks of the 
chairman of the Milk Market- 
ing Board rhfo morning predict- 
ing a cat of 1 1 percent in British 
dairy quotas and a loss of 
thousands of jobs In the UK 
creamery industry? 

Mr Gammer: We have to be very 
careful in the kind of statements 
sometimes made which frighten 
people entirety unnecessarily. 

• The Government was pre- 
pared to look at any new cases of 
compensation for sheep formers 
that might have slipped through 
the net of arrangements already 
in operation following the 
Chernobyl disaster, Mr Michael 
Jopting,- Minister for Agri- 
culture, Fisheries and Food, said 
during Commons questions. 

He was replying to Sir Hector 
Monro (Dumfries, C), who 
asked him to ensure that every 
former who bad lost income as a 
result of Chernobyl retieved 
compensation 

Mr Jopling said that almost all 
the cases where there bad been 
hardship would have already 
been thought through. 

Mr John Home Robertson, an 
Opposition spokesman on agri- 
culture, said that in view of the 
concern of sheep formas and 
others about Chernobyl, re- 
inforced by the foct that sheep 
were still under restrictions 
seven mouths afterwards, would 
he publish new contingency 
plans for oodear emergency as 
soon as they were prepared? 

Mr Jopling; Of the original four 
million sheep in the UK subject 
to controj, fewer than 300,000 
remain under control. Levels do. 
remain high because of a num- 
ber of factors arising from the 
nature of the terrain anrf the i 
dietary habits of sheep in upland . 


Petrol 
tax Bill 
queried 
by MPs 

The method to be used in the 

Advance Petroleum Revenue 
Tax Bill to help North Sea oil 
companies affected by the foil in 
oil prices was questioned in the 
Commons by Mr Bryan Gould, ' 
an Opposition spokesman on 
trade and industry, when the 
Bill was discussed in committee 
in the Commons. 

The Bill brings forward the 
repayment of APRT credits to 
oil companies with fields that 
have yet to generate any net cash 
flow which could be used to 
finance further development. 

Mr Gould said that the first of a 
group of amendments he was 
moving would remove the 
requirement that, to qualify for 
the repayment, a company must 
be in a field that had not reached 
the payback stage or. in other 
words, was not yet making a 
profit. 

The Government bad done 
what it could, in what was 
inevitably a Went and crude 
way. to identify companies 
needing help. But ft would be 
unfortunate if the outcome was 
that some fields and some 
companies, perhaps judged by 
inappropriate criteria, found 
themselves excluded from the 
repayment while other com- 
panies in a similar situation 
would benefit 

Presumably the Gov- 
ernment's thinking was that a 
field which had reached payback 
meant by definition that the 
companies with interests in ft 
should have overcome their 
cash flow problems because the 
field should be generating 
enough income to enable them 
to overcome particular short- 
term problems. 

That rough-and-ready cri- 
terion seemed to work in most 
cases. Companies such as Britoil 
and Enterprise Oil would bene- 
fit, but the Maureen Held would 
seem to foil outside the cri- 
terion. That field had still much 
unrelieved APRT, but no relief 
could be offered under the Bill 
became payback had been 
reached before July 1, 1986, the 
qualifying date. 

Mr Norman Lament. Financial 


COMMENTARY 



Mr Norman Lament, Financial 
Secretary to the Treasury, said 
that the amendments, if taken 
with another proposed change 
that would raise the ceiling on 
the early repayment to a com- 
pany in respect of a particular 
field from £15 million to 
£20 million, would involve a 
package costing £210 million. 

The total reduction in the 
1986-87 tax take would be 
increased from £310 million, 
the amount proposed by the 
Government, to £520 mtlliOD. 
The lion’s share of the benefit 
was to go to independent. 



Defence debates 


Nato ‘exists to prevent war’ 


But during Commons ques- 
tions she blamed the complex 
formula used for allocating 
central government cash to 
local councils and repeated a 
pledge to reform the rates 
system. 

Birmingham, set to lose 
£31 million in grant support 
orignally promised in Octo- 
ber. is the council worst 
affected by the changes an- 
nounced by Mr Nicholas Rid- 
ley. Secretary of State for the 
Environment, which switched 
about £22 million extra grant 
to die shire counties. 

Mr Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark, Conservative MP for 
Birmingham, Selly Oak, asked 
Mrs Thatcher how she squ- 
ared her intention to build 
‘‘one nation” with Birm- 
ingham's loss of cash. 

“Bearing in mind the deep 
privations there are in Bir- 
mingham about the prosperity 


mis i natener said sue was Lord Whitelaw, Leader of 
5 awfre the changes would ^ House, disclosed details 

n S 1 ^fp? a W H t w-2 )pr0Va ^i & yesterday of the informal 
me MPS and disapproval by 0 f peers who are to 

. investigate ways of speeding 

ihat is inevitable in view procedures in the Lords, 
of the way in which the The group has been formed 
formula works. in the wake of the backlog of 


While Mr Beaumont-Dark, business which has meant 
with a small number of follow long hours — and frayed tem- 


Tories whose constituencies pers — at the end of the last 
are adversely affected by the two sessions, 
changes, looks likely to rebel Lord Whitelaw announced 
against the Government when that the group would examine 
the new grant figures come the conduct of business, 
before the Commons. Mr including statements, the 
Rdiely appears to have bought length ofspeeches, the rules of 
on up to 70 Conservative debate, as well as the law- 


backbenchers who threatened 
to rebel over his original grant 
allocations. 


making procedures. 

Peers on all sides welcomed 
the move. But there are j 


Mr Beaumont-Dark said of doubts about how time could 
Mr Ridley: “He has created be saved without restricting 
the most dangerous confronta- the traditional freedoms to 
tion between the prosperous pursue their particular in- ] 
South and the impoverished terests. Lord Whitelaw made j 
North ever perpetrated in my clear that all peers were being i 


time in political life. 

“It cannot be right that the 
knights of (he shires with all 
their southern prosperity 


invited to put their views. 

It will consist of: Lord 
Aberdare, chairman of com- 
mittees: Lend Perth; Lord 


should gain at the expense of Belstead; Lady Uewelyn-Da- 
thoseofus from the Midlands vies: Lord Aylesione; and 


and the North.’ 


Lord Wigoder, 


The following are summaries of 
defence debates that appeared in 
later editions Qf this newspaper 
yesterday. 

Nato existed solely to prevent 
war and its whole strategy was 
defensive, Mr George Younger, 
Secretary of State for Defence, 
said in the Commons debate. 
For that strategy to work, be 
said, Nato must have and be 
seen to have sufficient forces to 
convince any potential aggres- 
sor that he had more to lose than 
to gain by aggression. 

Opening the debate, Mr 
David Steel, Leader of the 
Libera? Party, moved a motion 
reaffirming support for Britain's 
membership of Nato and stating 
that a policy combining the 
unilateral abandonment of Bri- 
tain’s nuclear deterrent, the 
expulsion from Britain of the 
US nudearcontributfon to Nato 
apd the rejection of Nato's 
policy of main mining con- 
ventional and nuclear deter- 
rence while pursuing negotiated 
disarmament was incompatible 
with membership of Nato and 
the security of Britain. 

He said that the Government 
had an obligation to provide 
effectively for the defence of the 
country, it also had an obliga- 
tion to use its best endeavours to 
turn down the ratchet of the 
arms race, and particularly the 
nuclear arms race. But this 
Government was committed to 
increasing the nuclear arms race 


through the Trident pro- 
gramme. 

Mr George Younger, Secretary 
or State for Defence, moved a 
government amendment rcjeci- 
ing the non-nuclear defence 
policies or the Labour Party. 

He said that the Liberal-SDP 
motion did not even mention 
Uie Libera] Party’s views on 
defence. Mr Steel had foiled 
lamentably in his one opportu- 
nity to put across some idea to 
Uie country of what Liberal 
defence policy was. 

Even if a Labour government 
spent every penny of Uie money 
being devoted to the Trident 
programme to increase con- 
ventional defence, it would do 
virtually nothing to alter the 
convenuonal imbalance. 


Mr Demi] Davies, chief Opposi- defence." • • 
tion spokesman on defence and Lord Sennet, (SDP) said that 
disarmament, said that the de- Labour's policy would strip the 
hate was being held because of Army on the Rhine of its 


Mr Steel's desperate desire to nuclear weapons and leave the 
paper over the cracks of his wny oP^n die Russians to 
party’s defence policy. mass on the border. 

Trident was the only option if Lord Trefg&rae, Minister of 
one wanted to go down the road State for Defence Procurement, 
of acquiring a third generation s^d lha * successful deterrence 
of British nuclear weaponry, meant being able, and being 
The Labour Party thought that s® 00 *° ** fble. to respond to 


Mr Jopling said that almost all M 7 Gosld, who withdrew his 
the cases where there had been amendments. 

* lMir SSiT — — com- 
0^1%^ ■ Tfe a mendme nt would resu., 

othST 1 m ChS pa™* ® k *y developments 
informed by the focTthatsbecp when LS? fl ? w **■ | j kely 10 P* 
were still under .SfriSfoS 

seven months afterwards, would e y^ 9 p “ en L am_ 

he publish new contingency ***** ^ 

■* T^Pbitting the distribution of 

STjSl^OfSe P S3'loor SS v B S , lS enefi ?' 

million sheep in the UK subject ^ , 0eilt 1 0 ^ repay- 

to control, fewer than 300 onn go to the majors, 

remain under control. Levels do APRT^msmndS? 
remain high because of a nuro- ^ 50 ^ 

her of factors arising from the smaller compmues 

nature of the terralH and the ^PP er l f ent °/' ^ 

dietary habits of sheep to upland SSSS^SS 

MSWfB'SSB 

— hke the coal industry. Instead of 

shutting down oil fields Uie 
Government was going to re- 
lieve the oil companies of 
certain taxation and give them 

r/x-n-f „ mt ,5 an advance of £3 10 million in 

J Gill Wfll pre-election year. 

1/ VY LVl That was so that the oil 

Lord Irring of Dartford. for the M®? a*guaiid pro- 

Dpposition, said Uie Govern- Governments 

mem, in buying Trident, was “ Jf® BlU was . ^ 

seeking to increase Britain’s a 

iticfear fire power by 800 per “MS 5“ developments which 
rent at a time when Uie super- aiKac V 

»wers were talking ofa 50>r die am- 

ent cut in nuclear weapons. 

“I believe in the special *“ ™£®d a **“■*«■ amend- 
elationship with the United “f, J" 0 *"* **“ 

States. Bui it must be based on a lo . 1 ,® ach oil 

ot more than the tame accep- 551? million to 
ance of Mr Reagan's policies. S^ n,, I^£ n ' iT.? e “!**.*“ *° 
rhe only way to avoid the risk ^ “ m ? ei L dable - 
if conflict is by comprehensive Sj; Jgf® or was 

rms control and relying on ^ l $F ance . 10 

onventional arms for our of ^K) million in- 

/wd < Keonet, (SDP) said that ^ object 

abour's policy would strip the foj^rep^yments to 

irmy on the Rhine of its K ^ fcr 

udear weapons and leave the PO*JfCOB|r rosh-flow difficulties 


pen I o us to change drastically 
Britain's defence policy at this 
lime. 

Lord Xrriag of Dartford, for the 
Opposition, said the Govern- 
ment. in buying Trident, was 
seeking to increase Britain’s 
nuclear fire power by 800 per 
cent at a time when the super- 
powers were talking of a 50 per 
cent cut in nuclear weapons. 

“I believe in the special 
relationship with the United 
States. Bui it must be based on a 
lot more than the tame accep- 
tance of Mr Reagan’s policies. 
The only way to avoid the risk 
of conflict is by comprehensive 
arms control and relying on 
conventional arms for our 


Geoffrey Smith 


he Boldness often pays in poli- 
10 tics, and Mr Bannock deserves 
“U the credit he is being given for 
^ taking his case for a non- 
nod ear defence policy directly 
fa to American politicians and 
as public opinion. But to rec- 
he oncQetbem to his strategy is, I 
hr believe, an impossible task. 

His difficulty is not that 
™ many Americans do not know 
a what he proposes. Even before 
his visit a surprising number 
de of them were aware of his 
as ideas and did not tike them, 
le Throughout my time in the 
« United States last mouth I 
“ found . even fairly liberal 
“ Democrats eager to impress 
)V upon me that it was not only 
the Reagan Administration 
ie that was opposed to Labour’s 
j- defence comnutments. 
n What Americans object to is 
not the renunciation of the 
British independent deterrent 
£ bat the poposal to get rid of 
e all United States unclear 
it bases from this country, 
ir Whether we keep our own 
e nod ear weapons is seen as a 
8 decision for the British. But 
3 the expulsion of American 
nuclear bases would be re- 
garded, and to my mind 
t rightly, as a threat to the 
j stability of Nato. 


! Kinnock loyal to 
j- Nato alliance 


1 That is not what Mr 
Kinnock intends, nor what the 
Labour Party proposes. There 
I are powerful voices in the 
| party calling for British with- 
t drawai from Nato. But a series 
of Labour conferences have 
voted consistently by large 
majorities against that option. 

■ Mr Kinnock has himself 
spoken with vehemence of his 
loyalty to the alliance, and I do 
not question his sincerity. But 
his words and his policy do not 
point in the same direction. 

It would be a psychological 
blow to Nato if that policy 
were put into effect, especially 
at this' time when articulate 
voices are heard in the United 
States questiomng America's 
continued role in the alliance. 
Europe is no longer the centre 
of American strategic concern, 
as it was when Nato was 
founded. 

Now one hears increasingly 
the argument that because of 
the alliance too large a propor- 
tion of American defence re- , 
sources are directed to Europe, - 
that ft would be better for 
budgetary as well as defence 
reasons at least to reduce the 
number of American troops 
there and that the Europeans 
ought to be doing more to 
defend themselves. 

Many Americans are there- 
fore looking for an excuse to 
bring some or ail of these 
troops back home. The com- 
pulsory removal of their 
nuclear bases from Britain 
would provide just that excuse. 
Britain is not and never has 
been a minor member of the 
alliance; so what it. does has 
more than a proportionate 
effect on American opinion. 

In this instance it would be 
seen as rebuffing the United 
States and according a low 
priority to Nato by changing < 
Britain's role regardless of the 
wishes of other members. 

There is a contradiction at < 
the^ heart of Mr Kinnock's 
policy. It is designed to shift 
Nato strategy towards the 
conventional defence of Eu- 
rope. But because ft would 
involve a partial rejection of 
the American defence role in 
Europe it would in all 
probability weaken the Ameri- 
can commitment to European 


r*i 


As their commitment weak- 
(med, however, ft is much more 
likely that their conventional 
c ontri bution would be run 
down before their unclear 
protection was withdrawn. 
American troops would be 
going back across the Atlantic 
while the nuclear guarantee 
was maintained, though with 
somewhat reduced credibility. 

This would make ft in- 
finitely harder to build np 
Nato’s conventional strength 
in Europe, which Mr Kinnock 
proclai ms to be his objective. 
He is potting forward a two- 
pronged policy with the poten- 




was not necessary. 


potential aggression 


The Alliance motion was Lord Homeof the Hirsef(C). the 
rejected by 217 votes to 22 — former Prime Minister, said that , 
Government majority, 195, and it was not only prudent, but; 
the Government amendment vital, that the forces and weap- 
camcd by 208 votes to 35 — onry of Britain and her allies 1 


Government majority, 173. 
Opening the Lords debate. Lord 


should be- directly and visibly 
related (o those deployed by a 


Thorneycroft, Secretary of Stale . potential enemy. 


and it had been judged that this 
degree of relief would reduce 
cash-flow shortages in appro- 
priate cases and make further 
research and development pos- 
sible at existing fields. 

Mr Gould said that the fear had 
been that the Bill represented 
uie first instalment of repay- 
ments to the oil industry by a 
Government flush with money 
from North Sea oiL with more 
to come. He withdrew the 
amendment. 

The committee stage was 
concluded and the Bffl com- 
pleted its remaining stages. 


prong, it is possible to believe 
that a Labour government 
wmJd remove American db- 
clear bases, but not that it 
wonW strengthen Nato's con- 
ventional forces as he would 
like. _ 

This Is a policy that would 
niake sense only on the 
assumption that Soviet miii- 
tary strength no longer poses a 


It is not only the American 
publicthat will be unwilling to 
***** its policy on such an 
assumption. 


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*ES 


Standard of maternity 
care ‘plummeting’ due 
to midwives shortage 


Standards of maternity ser- 
vices are approaching danger 
levels in parts of the country 
due lo a severe shortage of 
roidwives, the Royal College 
of Midwives said yesterday. 

The college said that mid- 
wives are leaving the service, 
because of poor pay and 
stressful workloads, and 
health authorities were unable 
to fill vacancies. 

According to a survey con- 
ducted by the college, some 
health authorities are unable 
to HU half their vacancies and 
nearly 25 per cent of the 
country’s 192 district health 
authorities have vacancy lev- 
els of more than 10 per cent. 
One health authority reported 
vacancies in 69 per cent of its 
midwife posts. 

Mrs Rosemary Jenkins, 
RCM professional officer for 
Wales, said that health 
authorities were having to fill 
the vacancies with staff who 
had no obstetric training, 
including nursing auxiliaries. 

“Labour wards are fast turn- 
ing into production lines. The 
persona] touch, an integral 
part of maternity care, has 
been sacrificed," Mrs Jenkins 
said. 

“Mothers in post-natal 
wards are being cared for by 
nurses with no training in this 
field. Midwives are fighting a 
losing battle to maintain 
levels." 

Yesterday the college defied 
an embargo imposed by the 
joint staff side of the nurses 
and midwives pay review 
body, by issuing hs own 


By Jm Sherman 


evidence to the review body. 
The college claimed that mid- 
wives should be made a 
special case as their role was 
fundamentally different to 
nurses. 

In its evidence the college 
said that although there were 
250,000 qualified midwives in 
the country, only 30,000 were 
willing to practise in the NHS. 
Last year nearly a quarter of 
the midwifery students who 
qualified did not practise. 

"The majority of midwives 
earn around £7,000 per 
annum. They are responsible 
for 76 per cent of the coun- 
try’s deliveries," Miss Ruth 
Ashton, RCM general sec- 
retary, said. 

The college has now asked 
the review body to regrade all 
midwives to a higher Whiiely 
Council grading. All midwives 
on staff nurse grades earning 
as little as £6,475 should be 
graded as midwifery sisters, 
on a minimum salary of 
£8,070, it said. 

Yesterday Mrs Edwina Cur- 
rie, the junior health minister, 
was told that all nursing 
services were now facing a 
serious crisis, due to a short- 
age of recruits and because 
health authorities, faced with 
financial cutbacks, were re- 
ducing staff by cutting intakes 
of new students. 

Dr Eve BendalL chief exec- 
utive of the English National 
Board, which overseas nurse 
training, said that until 1982, 
about 30,000 new students 
were reertmed every year. 
Since then the numbers had 


Ruling on 
Ripper 
hunt later 


£18m debt 
admitted 


by dealer 


Mrs Doreen Hill, mother of 
the Yorkshire Ripper's last 
victim, must wait to hear if 
she has won her appeal against 
a ruling which blocked her 
attempt to sue West Yorkshire 
police for damages. 

In the Court of Appeal in 
London yesterday, judgement 
was reserved by Lord Justice 
Fox, Lord Justice Glidewell 
and Sir Roualeyn Cumming- 
Bruce. 

Mrs Hill, a widow, aged 52, 
of Leahoira Crescent, Orm- 
esby, Middlesbrough, Cleve- 
land, claims that Jacqueline, 
who was murdered by Peter 
Sutcliffe in November 1980, 
would stilt be alive but for 
police negligence in tracking 
him down. 

She asked the Court of 
Appeal to overturn a ruling by 
Sir Neil Lawson last Decem- 
ber that she had no legal basis 
for her claim. 


He granted an application 
to Mr Colin Sampson. Chief 
Constable of West Yorkshire, 
to strike out her claim. He 
ruled that Mrs Hill could not 
establish that the police owed 
a duty of care to Jacqueline, 
aged 20. to catch Sutcliffe 
before she became his thir- 
teenth murder victim. 


A chartered accountant told 
a bankruptcy hearing yes- 
terday that be had kept no 
books while doing share deal- 
ing as a Lloyd's underwriter. 

Mr India Sethia, aged 39, of 
Arundel Road, Sutton, Surrey, 
admitted debts of more than 
£18 million and be agreed 
with Mr Jaffray Mogg, Assis- 
tant Official Receiver, that 
another £7 million was un- 
accounted for. 

At Croydon. Bankrptcy 
Court, Mr Sethia admitted 
understating _ various other 
liabilities which he had not 
mentioned in his statement of 
affairs. He was ordered by the 
registrar to submit new fig- 
ures. Mr Sethia, who once ran 
five finance companies, be- 
came a Lloyd's underwriter in 
1978 and from that work he 
had been making an annual 
profit of around £12,000. 

He said: "I have no records 
of my dealings at Lloyds. I did 
not keep books as such." 

The public examination was 
adjourned to March 28. 


Opera singer 
seeks divorce 


In court this week, Mrs 
Hill’s counsel, Mr Richard 
Clegg. QC, said the police 
were guilty of "administrative 
and operational blunders and 
lack of judgement from jhc 
top of the force downards". 

Mr Alan Rawley, QC, for 
West Yorkshire Police, chal- 
lenged Mrs Hill's daim. If the 
duty of care existed it would 
be of an "enormous and vast 
type," he said. 

If Mrs Hill obtains damages 
she plans to use them to set up 
a trust fund for underpnv- 
jleged children in memory of 
Jacqueline, who was killed as 
she walked the few yards from 
a bus stop to her hall of 
residence at Leeds University. 


Mr Richard Van Allan, aged 
41, the opera singer, is to 
divorce his wife after 10 years 
of marriage. 

Mr Van Allan, of south 
London, is seeking a decree 
nisi from his wife Elizabeth, 
aged 31, of north London. 
They have lived apart for 
more than two years. 


Funeral for 


PC in fall 


Ancient map was 


used as wrapping 


By Kenneth Costing 

i r. mmmnt trf from the Red Sea ro the 

A" Canaries, is ta Latin, tat the 

Dmn map, desewsed Dyw® northern place names are a 
hnlar as being take a sheet of JFm... •»! Cm t- 


vellum map, descri ed by one 
scholar as being like a sheet of 

dried lasagna, is m go on 

exhibition at the British Li- 
brary from next Thursday- 
Daring from the mid-four- 
teenth century, it idwti- 
fied by library «pejte after 
being taken there by Mre 
Joyce Oveodea. of New Bar- 
net, north Ixmdon. _ 

The piece, measuring 2R »y 
9ins, was wrapped rotmcl* 
family heirloom, 
rental book, 

Ovenden took to the library 

with other documents affera 

aj?S£T5?wI& 

Norfolk land- 

owner - to be discovered sro« 

1911 The only more or less 

the kind, dating from ffie 
thirteenth century, *? , 
found in Hereford 
. . .hOtir we realized 


found in Hereford Cathedra^ bind books, winch is how this 
“I don't think fragment survived, 

just how important it mtt ^g ritish Library saysthe 
we had it ««*der ultra-vm** would have been copied 

light", a library spokesjJ» from several sources, mneh of 
sSd. “-Not « it misspelt. ™y«xo-Dt 


dropped by 25 per cent to 

22,000. 

Ten per cent of all qualified 
nurses leave the NHS every 
year, most of whom are 
women who have been quali- 
fied for less than eight years. 

"The numbers now qualify- 
ing are barely covering the 
numbers who are leaving and 
the signs are that the down- 
ward trend is continuing,” Dr 
Bendall said. 

She called for urgent action 
to reduce the drain of quali- 
fied staff, including improving 
pay, management and person- 
nel policies. 

It was also important to try 
and gcL back nurses who were 
qualified, who wished to 
work, but who were in other 
jobs. 

This could be done by back- 
to-nursing courses, sensitive 
personnel policies and pos- 
itive attitudes from senior 



Siege man in plea 
switch must face 


charge of murder 


Errol Walker, a self-con- 
fessed killer, was still facing a 
murder charge at the Central 
Criminal Coun yesterday af- 
ter the prosecution refused to 
accept his plea of guilty to 


manslaughter. 

Mr Walker, aged 29, had a 
"change of heart" on the third 
day of his murder trial, and 
admitted he stabbed a mother 
to death during a 29-hour 
siege in west London last 
Christmas. 

He denied murder, but 
admitted the manslaughter of 
Mrs Jackie Charles, aged 22. 
He also admitted severely 
wounding her daughter 
Cariene, aged four, during the 
siege. At first be had denied all 
charges. 

Mr Julian Bevan, for the 
prosecution, said that after 
considering Mr Walker’s pleas 
“the Crown cannot accept 
them". , , . 

The jury was told the tnal 
would continue with Mr 
Walker facing two chaises: 
murder and one of attempting 
to murder the girL Mr Walker, 
of Tachbrook Road. Southall, 
west London, has denied both. 

Mr Justice Allioti has told 
the jurors they will be trying 
Mr Walker on the murder 
charge on a limited issue 
based on psychiatric evidence. 

The prosecution alleges that 
Mr Walker took Mrs Charles 
and her daughter hostage in 
their council flat on Christmas 
day. Minutes later he allegedly 
hurled Mrs Charles from a 
window after fatally stabbing 
her in the neck. 

He then turned on the girl, 
slashing her with a lOin knife 
mid threatening to kill her, Mr 
Bevan has said. 


Mr lyad Shiblak (hand raised) bids yesterday for the bottle (Photograph: Tim Bishop). 


£39,600 for historic wine, 


nursing managers. 

Mrs Currie said that the 


NHS management board was 
now examining recruitment 
problems but that senior man- 
agers should also take respon- 
sibility for ensuring that staff 
were not put under excessive 
strain. 

She suggested that more 
men should go into nursing 
and that educational qualifica- 
tions for people wanting to 
enter nursing could be made 
more flexible. Pay was only 
part of the problem, she said, 
and added that the Govern- 
ment had paid out the award 
recommended by the pay 
review body. 


A single bottle of Chateau 
d'Yqnem dating from 1784 and 
engraved with the nritiabi of 
Thomas Jefferson, then Amer- 
ican minister in Paris, was 
sold at Christie’s yesterday for 
£39,600 (estimate £10,000 
pins). 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 

Chateau seen at a Christie's sale before baden. It included three 
1784 and hot he settled himself in the Jefferson bottles of Yqnem, 
rivals of front row, directly underneath one of which was drunk in 


It was bought by Mr lyad 
Shiblak, a Jordanian, on be- 
half of a friend in the United 
States. The price sets an 
auction record for Yqnem but 
did not come as a surprise in 
the light of the £105,000 paid 
for a bottle of Jefferson’s 1787 
Lafite at Christie's last year. . 


Mr Shiblak had never been 


the auctioneer's rostrum, and 
bid flamboyantly, spending a 
total of £51,476.70. 

His cheapest purchase was 
a set of three bottles of 1863 
Malmsey at £101.20 (estimate 
£60 pies) and the most expen- 
sive — Yqnem apart - a sin- 
gle bottle of 1832 Lafite at 
£3,520 (estimate £2,000 pins). 

The Yqnem comes from a 
cache of bottles found in a 
Paris cellar three years ago 
which were acquired by Mr 
Hard; Rodensfock, of Wies- 


1985 and one of which he I 
retains. I 

Mr Michael Broad bent, of 
Christie's, tasted the 1985 ! 
bottle and reports: "The nose 
was perfect gentle, scented 
vanilla, no oxidation, not a 
trace of acetification, no 
faults". 

The sale also set a new 
auction price record for a 
bottle of twentieth-century 
wine, when a jeroboam of 
Chateau Petrus 1945 sold for 
£7,920 (estimate £5,000 plus) 
to an English connoisseur. 


The giri’s ordeal lasted 29 
hours until she was rescued by 
a policeman, who shot Mr 
Walker through the head. 

Mr Walker took the hos- 
tages when he went to the flats 
in Poynters Court. Nortboh. 
looking for his wife, Marlene, 
after a rift with her. He 
demanded police should bring 
her to the flat or else he would 
cut, maim and kill the girl, it is 
alleged. 

At one point he dangled her 
from a third floor balcony by 
her vest. He lied her up and 
smashed a police radio against 
her head, threatened to cut off 
her hand, sever her jugular 
vein, electrocute and suffocate 
her, Mr Bevan has told the 
court 

Police Constable Anthony 
Long said he was among 
several armed officers who 
stormed the flat to end the 
siege. After throwing a stun 
grenade through the kitchen 
window, he climbed in and 
saw Mr Walker holding the 
girl on top of him. 

"I could see his hand mov- 
ing up and down, it appeared 
he was cutting her across the 
throat 

"I shouted 'drop it, you 
bastard'. He did not ! fired a 
pair of shots ai his shoulder. 
When this appeared to have 
no effect I fired a single aimed 
shot at his temple from a 
distance of 3ft." . . , . 

PC Long said he had three 
years’ experience with fire- 
arms. He was told by the 
judge: “This was an agonizing 
decision you were faced with. 
Mercifully the defendant has 
made a full recovery. Well 
done."The hearing continues 
today. 


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A funeral sendee was held 
yesterday for Police Constable 
John Taylor, aged 26, who 
died while on duty last week 
from injuries received in a 
50ft fell from flats in Stoke on 
Trent 

His widow Angela is expect- 
ing their first child. A man has 
been charged with his murder. 


iwiuKiu yw — — . -- -- 

mixture ©f Italian and Cat- 
alan. It is based on maps 
similar to the 1275 Psalter 
world map whit* is to the 
library’s possession." 

The map was reamstracteo 
In a fortnight by a curator in 
the manuscripts department 
It has many bizarre inscrip- 
tions locating various strange 
tribes, such as: “The Agofaar 
who eat only panthers and 
lions and have one eye m their 
foreheads and large Iceland 
are of deadly aspect". Another 
locates “the people who eat 
salted locusts and who do not 
exceed 60 years". .... 

It was Walter Ashke who 

compfled the rent roll and who 
is thought to have salvaged the 

map from Creek Abbey, near 
Hunstanton, where it was 
seriously damaged m an arson 
attack in 1484. Some of the 
mburnt pieces were used to 
bind books, which is how this 


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Cut out the 


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of investing 





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More prisoners held in 
police cells because of 
overcrowding in jails 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 19 



By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 

crili h s e h 3 w^n ?? rc T di ? B 10 show what Miss Vivien the jj 
crisis nas taken a turn for the Stem, its director «iied ** a ihe^r 


worse with a population of 
more than 48.000 in England 
a ^d Wales forcing drastic use 
of police cells. 

There were 195 prisoners 
held in police cells on Friday, 
as numbers in custody soared 
to their highest since the freak 
total of more than 48,000 in 
August last year, the only 
other time it has been so high. 

And the situation in Scot- 
land is just as bad with a 
report yesterday revealing that 
the pressures of overcrowding 
had led to a increase in violent 
attacks by prisoners on fellow 
inmates, 

. Prison chiefs must be wor- 
ried by a trend that will be 
seized on by (heir critics 
claiming that the massive 
pnson building programme 
will only encourage courts to 
pass more and longer cus- 
todial sentences. 

The National Association 
for the Care and Resettlement 
of Offenders (Nacro) said in a 
briefing paper yesterday that 
Friday's total of 48,010 for 
England and Wales was more 
than 1.000 higher than the 
figure a year ago, when the 
prison population stood at 
46.972. including 42 in police 
celts. 

Nacro gives official figures 


to show what Miss Vivien 
Stem, its director, called “a 
continuing deterioration in 
prison life”. They arc: 

• The average population in 
1985-86 was 3,000 higher than 
in 1984-85. 

• 1985-86 had the highest 
ever number of prisoners shar- 
ing a cefi built for one — 

18.544. compared with a 
1984-85 peak ofl 7,236. 

• The average number of 
women in pnson in 1985-86 
was 1,570, compared with 
1,470 the previous year. 

Yet more prisoners were 
confined in overcrowded cells, 
with less to do. 

The total number of hours 
worked by prisoners fell again, 
and was less than half the 
figure for 1974-75 when more 
than 17 million hours were 
worked. 

In the academic year 1984- 
85 there was a drop of nearly 
half a million hours spent by 
prisoners in education from 
the 1983-84 total of 5.5 mil- 
lion. 

Prisoners in 22,000 of the 
system's 41,200 places have 
no access to sanitation at 
night 

The figure will still be 
15.600 in 1999 after the 
current building plans are 
carried out, Nacro says. 

Miss Stem said: “Most of 


the prisoners subjected to 
these conditions are no danger 
to the public and could per- 
fectly well be dealt with by 
non-custodial measures”. 

Overcrowding is imposing 
severe strains on the prison 
system in Scotland, according 
to the annua] prisons report 
published yesterday. 

The report revealed that 
there had been a substantial 
increase in the number of, 
attacks by prisoners on fellow 
inmates. 

The number of people in 
prison reached its highest total 1 
ever — nearly 5,800 — is 
March last year. 

Mr Alaslair Thompson, 
Scottish prison service direc- 
tor, said: “The pressures fell 
mainly on the larger local 
prisons such as Edinburgh and 
Barlinnie. The pressures are 
not only on accommodation, 
but also on other facilities 
such as recreation areas, work 
places and arrangements for 
visiting.” 

He said that a review of 
prison accommodation and 
the commissioning of phase 
two of Shorts Prison, Lanark- 
shire, which will add 468 
places, should mean an end to 
overcrowding. 

A Bleak Year for the Prison 
System (Nacro. 169 Clapham 
Road. London SW9 0PU; free). 



Stalker is dealt a 
double blow over 
his legal expenses 

Bv Ian Smith, Northers Correspondent 
The Association of Chief ienl’s protracted struggle to 
Police Officers yesterday re- dear his name. 


Chelsea pensioner Mr Bert Tilley, aged 93, takes a sword to help to celebrate the Ceremony 
of the Christmas Cheeses at The Royal Hospital, Chelsea, yesterday. The National Dairy 
Council presents 3001b of cheeses each year to die pensioners (Photograph; Tim Bishop). 


fused an appeal by Mr John 
Stalker, deputy chief constable 
of Greater Manchester, to 
contribute towards tbe 
£21,000 legal bill he incurred 
in clearing his professional 
and personal reputation. 

The association also refused 
a request by the Greater 
Manchester Police Authority 
to administer a fund set up to 
handle donations from sym- 
pathetic members of the pub- 
lic towards Mr Stalker’s 
solicitor's bill 

The decisions mean that the 
fund might now be aban- 
doned. So far, £2.500 has been 
received in donations and the 
police authority gave per- 
mission for Mr Stalker to 
accept the money on the 
condition that the fund was 
administered by the assoc- 
iation. 

Mr Steve Murphy, the 
authority chairman, said last 
night that members would 
now have to review the situa- 
tion and reconsider their de- 
cision to allow the reinstated 
senior police officer access to 
the money. 

Tbe double blow was 
administered on the eve of Mr 
Stalker's return to duty after 
two weeks' rest ordered by his 
doctor, who had diagnosed 
exhaustion following his pat- 


The saga began last summer 
when Mr Stalker, aged 47, was 
removed as head ofa top level 
investigation into an alleged 
Royal Ulster Constabulary 
“shoot-to-kirr policy and 
then suspended for seven 
weeks during an inquiry into 
allegations against him of 
serious disciplinary offences. 

Foliowing its meeting, the 
officers’ association issued a 
statement saying its executive 
committee had resolved that 
the request for financial assis- 
tance was not one that it could 
meet 

The statement also said that 
the association did not accept 
it was its job to administer the 
public fond and that this was 
solely the responsibility of the 
police authority. 

Mr Rodger Pennoni, Mr 
Stalker's solicitor, will now 
meet his client to discuss the 
latest setback. Mr Pennoni 
said: “I find it very regrettable 
that Mr Stalker is repeatedly 
being made to stand alone to 
pay my charges. 

“1 am very conscious it is a 
very large bill which has 
caused mv diem a great deal 
of anxiety. The one positive 
thing to have come out of all 
of this is the response from the 
public, who by their generos- 
ity have proved they wholly 
support Mr Stalker and be- 
lieve in his integrity.” 


Lamplugh trust 
seeks £450,000 


The family of Miss Snzy 
Lamplugh, the mining estate 
agent, yesterday launched a 
trust in her memory, to protect 
other women from die fate 
which police believe she met. 

Miss Lamplugh, aged 25, 
vanished after showing a bo- 
gus client, known as Mr 
Kipper, a boose in F ulham, 
south-west London, on July 
28. Police believe she was 
abducted. 

Her parents, Paul and Di- 
ana Lamplugh. hope to raise 
up to £450,000 for the Suzy 
Lamplugh Trust which wOI 
seek to improve the personal 
security of women at work, 
through research and advice. 

Mrs Lamplugh, a teacher, 
said the aim of the trust was to 
carry oat research “to enable 
women of all ages to fulfil their 
potential safely, particularly 
with regard to employees”. 

Speaking at a press con- 
ference in London she said she 
blamed her daughter’s lack of 
awareness of her own viva- 
cious nature for what hap- 
pened to her. “She didn’t ever 
take regard of the fact that she 
was so attractive and, when 
she was excited, she shone and 
this could pot her into a 
situation with a man where she 
was trapped,” she said. 

“It could easily be that she 
was vulnerable because of 
that” 

She said there were several 
simple rules her daughter 
could have adopted to ensure 
her safety, 

“First of alL she didn’t leave 
quite enough information. She 
should have asked Mr Kipper 
to come to tbe office rather 
than met him at the house. 

“Having gone to the house 


with him she should have let 
him inside first and left the 
front door open so that she had 
got a means of escape. And she 
should have known when to 
tiring down the shatters to 
beep a man at bay.” 

Police have scaled down 
their investigation into Miss 
Lamplngh’s disappearance, 
with tbe case still unsolved. 

Mrs Lamplugh said: “I have 

accepted the fact that I may 
never see Sazy again. It is a 
long time and there has been 
nothing since the first day.** 

Patrons of the trust inefnde 
Esther Rantzea, the television 
personality, and her hnsbai 
Desmond WOcux. 

Among the trustees is Bar- 
oness E wart-Biggs, widow of 
Sir Christopher E wart-Biggs, 
the British Ambassador to 
Dublin who was sundered by 
the IRA in 1976 iaMs car near 
the official residence oa tire 
edge of tbe Dubfin mountains. 

She said yesterday that the 
Suzy Lamplugh Trust re- 
minded her of toe time, neariy 
fen years ago, when she 
launched a memorial trust “to 
bring something positive oat of 
the mindless assassination of 
my husband”. 

She added: “I couldn’t ap- 
plaud more the wish to make 

something positive come out of 
something so negative and 
crael”. 

The trust is to produce 
videos and newsletters to help 
working women protect them- 
selves. It plans a series of 
courses “to encourage women 
to be self aware and to be 
aware of others — both to 
reduce their vulnerability and 
to increase their effectiveness 
at work”. 


Secrets of I Oil chiefs 


Bronze 
Age life 

By Howard Foster 

A remarkably-wdi pre- 
served stone bouse discovered 
in the Orkney Islands prom- 
ises to give archaeologists a 
unique insight into Bronze 
Age family life, it was revealed 

yesterday. M .. 

A team from Bradford 
University has been examin- 
ing the house and . artefacts 
found since it was discovered 
by chance durinf excavation 
work in preparation for local , 
farming improvements. 

The house, built around 
800BC, survived almost intact 
because it had been covered in 
a blanket of fern and rand 
blown from a nearby beach. 

Inside the metre-high dwelling 

is original stone furniture* 
including draughi-proof beds 
filled with straw and bracten. 
Mr Steve DocknlL the 

archaeologists team leader, 

said: “We are very excited as , 
very little is luio wn about j 
Bronze Age family l*«- 

“it is in remarkable con- 
dition and gives .us M cnor-i 

mous amount of mformaM^ | 

Bronze would not ow * ; 
reached this remote part when | 

^ in the 

US sSse of the cartoon 
characters." , I 

Marks from a 

hf*n discovered »n a nearoy , 
S aS cattle bones with | 
S-marks have been ent- 
ered, giving a va '^ ^3 
of dues to Bronze Age 




foundat Tofts Ness on Main- 

13 Mostof the items have been 

mtoloBmdfordforcwmm; 

and the site has been 

for i he winter. 


bail plea 
rejected 

A businessman described as 
a “Cabinet rank” adviser to 
the Nigerian government was 
ordered into custody at Marl- 
borough Street Court 
London yesterday accused of 

conspiracy to cheat British 
Airways. „ . 

A lawyer’s bail plea for 
Alhaji Bashir, aged 35, of 
Portman Square, Maryjebone, 
chairman of a Nigerian oil 
company who is on a business 
visit, was rejected. 

The court was told Mr 
Bashir had suffered a heart 
attack. 

Mr Fitzgibbons said the 
Nigerian High Commissioner 
bad been told of Mr Bashir’s 
arrest But the magistrate re- 
fused to delay his custody 
decision to allow the diplomat 
time to get to court. 

Paternity pay 
plea rejected 

The Government has re- 
jected a demand few time off 
with pay for fathers who work 
in the Civil Service. 

The Treasury nas told 
unions at Whitehall that while 
it supports tbe concept of 
paternity leave, it would cost 
£2.2 million a year and 
“would not represent value for 
money". 

Reward over 
girl murders 

A £20,000 reward from two 
anonymous donations is being 
offered by Leicestershire PoL 
ice for information leading to 
ihe arrest and conviction of 
the Idfler of two girts aged f 5. 

The body of Dawn 
Ashworth was found in a field 
in Enderby on August 2. near 
the spot where the body of 
Linda Mann was found three 
years before. 



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OVERSEAS NEWS 


TWF TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


• *1*3*. r» a -. - '• »V: w -- \> s'- "- - -- r 

.... . s**^.**^ 


Maputo sticks to 
peace accord 


Maputo — The new President off Mozambique, Mr 
Joaqnim Chissano. said here yesterday that his Government 
wanted to maintain the Nknmati non-aggression pact with 
Sooth Africa, even though he accused Pretoria of vMath^ 
the agreement (Michael Hornsby writes). 

“The Nkomati Accord is a correct agreement , and 
therefore we do not want to ad It What we nave to do is to 
gather the forces which can oblige Sooth Africa to come to ite 
senses and implement the agreement" Mr Chissaiup told his 
first international press conference since bong elected to 
succeed Mr Samara MacheL Mr Macbei was killed in a 
plane crash just inside Smith Africa on October 19. 

Mr Chissano performed with polish and assurance, 
showing die diplomatic he taunt as Mozambique's 
Foreign Minister during the 11 years since the comitiy 
gained independence from Portugal He said the Nkomati 
Accord was theonly means Mozambique had of putting pres- 
sure on Sooth Africa to end its continuing support for the 
Rensnm insurgents in Mozambique. Maputo was keeping its 
side of the bargain by not allowing the ANC to use 
Mozambique as a base for armed attacks on South Africa. 


Mexico limits agents 


Mexico City — Mexico is to revise its regulations 
governing US narcotics agents operating within its borders 1 
(Alan Robinson writes). 

Observers say the agents* anti-drug efforts could be hin- 
dered if more limitations are placed on their activities. Hie 
Mexican Attorney-General, Sefior Sergio Garcia Ramirez, 
confirmed this week that regulations controlling the US 
agents are to be changed. 

Mexico has been hinting at such action since the alleged 
arrest and torture last summer of a US Drug Enforcement 
Agency offkiaL Mr Victor Cortez, by the Jalisco state police. 
He was meeting an informer in Guadalajara when he was ar- 
rested and churned police beat him. 

The Mexican Government promised to investigate the 
incident, bat accused the DEA of “engaging in unauthorized 
activities". The Mexican Foreign Relations Ministry 
claimed the US agent had no identification. 




jLondois summit 


Thatcher’s vision 
for EEC cats out 
masses of detail 


Bv Richard Owen and Andrew McEnen 

Wre Thatcher met British projtosaJs to mcrease 


Israeli troops ^Wiring the papers of Palestinians yesterday at a roadblock outside Bir Zeit University, near Ram al l a h , 
after the killing id 1 two Arab students by soldiers daring violent demonstrations at the campus. 


Kohl in 
sub row 


Boon — The West Ger- 
man Government had not 
approved any deal to pro- 
vide Sooth Africa with 
submarine construction 
plans. Here Gerhard Stolt- 
enberg, the Finance Min- 
ister, told the Bonn Par- 
liament yesterday after an 
attack over an alleged scan- 
dal that is said to involve 
Chancellor Kohl (John 
England writes). 

The Social Democratic 
(SPD) and Greens opposi- 
tion parties accuse Herr 
Kohl of having approved 
the blueprints deal in 
contravention of arms 
export laws. 


Disaster 

warnings 


Nairobi — A meeting 
hoe of 500 of die world’s 
top sdeotists; including 
some foremost experts on 
remote sensing, amid lead 
to a more effective early- 
warning system utilizing 
which would use satellite 
photographs to alert Af- 
rican countries of imminent 
natural disasters (A Cor- 
respondent writes). 

The scientists will pre- 
sent papers on the role of 
remote sensing in Third 
World development, its use 
in the African food crisis 
and for early-warning sys- 
tems to indicate impending 
droughts. 


Tamil captain cleared 



Bremerhaven (Renter) — The West German freighter 
captain who set down 155 Tamil refugees off Newfoundland 
will not be prosecuted, lawyers said yesterday. 

Captain Wolfgang Bindel was investigated on suspicion of 
abandoning the Tamils at sea and profiteering after the July 
incident, in which the refugees were shipped aboard the 425- 
ton freighter Aurigae from West Germany. 

A spokesman for die state prosecutor’s office in 
Oldenburg said investigations had found no evidence to 
warrant charges. He said the Tamils, who paid $2^00 
(£1*250) for their passages, appeared to have left the vessel 
at their own request in order to continue the jonmey to Can- 
ada in two lifeboats. 


Phosgene 
use cut 


EEC deal 
on fish 


Basle (Renter) — Sandoz, 
the Swiss chemical com- 
pany, said yesterday it 
would cut the use of phos- 
gene, a poison gas used in 
the First World War, as 
part of new safety measures 
following last month's poll- 
ution of the Rhine. 

The company stopped all 
nse of the gas at its paint 
plant in Scfaweuerhalle. It 
would continue using phos- 
gene to produce pharma- 
ceuticals in Basle. 


Brussels — European 
Community fisheries min- 
isters have reached a diffi- 
cult agreement on fending a 
new structural programme 
to rejuvenate the European 
fishing industry (Our 
Correspondent writes). 

The agreement win inject 
a total of £580 million into 
the European fishing in- 
dustry in die hope of 
carrying it through the 
ament difficult economic 
phase. 


Kinnock in America 


Interest in non-nuclear 
message picking up 


From Robin Oakley, Washington 

The mission by the Labour He said a defence posture as 
leader, Mr Neil Kinnock, to passive as the one suggested 

call j. k., t i j i ,i 


sell Nato’s unilateralist de- by Labour would have the 
fence policies to the Ameri- Russians laughing. 


cans took a turn for the better 
yesterday. 


General Rogers's interven- 
tion will be particularly un- 


While claims that senators welcome to Mr Kinnock, who 
and congressmen were queu- has previously quoted the 


mg up to meet Mr Kinnock general in support of his 
were a pardonable exaggera- argument that Nato could 


tion by his entourage after the manage without nuclear weap- 
traumas of the US trip, ons. 


Washington's interest in hts Senator Daniel Mo 


message was clearly quicken- of New York, who 


cancel an earlier meeting with 


But while Mr Kinnock was Mr Kinnock, plans to see him 
winning access to more US today. 


politicians, be was getting a One sign that Mr Kinnock 


coo), and sometimes sharply was beginning to register on 
critical response to his the American political scene 


message. 


was that Mr Paul Volcker, the 


He had a cordial meeting chairman of the Federal Re- 
with Mr Les Aspin. chairman serve Board, cancelled bis 


of the House armed services commitment to chair another 
committee, at which he ex- lunch in order to join Mr 

nlo ■ nori T nkmicV « — x: . . ■ . ■ 


plained Labour's plans to Kinnock at a meeting with 
close down all US nuclear leading American economists. 


bases. But a much frostier inclu 
meeting followed with Senator of th 
John Warner from Virginia, Schul 
who said America's reaction Du 
to Mr Kinnock's message Kinn 


including the former Secretary 
of the Treasury, Mr Charies 
Schultz. 


During the meeting, Mr 
Kinnock was said to have 


would be “extremely tinfav- expressed strong disagreement 


ourable”. 

Senator Warner said: “The 
whole basis of our relationship 


is one of sharing the responsi- 
bilities of nuclear weapons 


bilities of nuclear weapons 
and the peace they have 
brought for 40 years.” 

If Mr Kinnock was to get 
into power and implement La- 
bour's policies, he said, the 
Nato alliance would unravel. 

Mr Kinnock's task in Amer- 
ica was complicated further 
yesterday when General Ber- 
nard Rogers, Nato’s Supreme 

Allied Commander, said in a 
magazine interview in Ger- 
many that, if Labour's plans 
were to be enacted, the United 
States could decide: “Good. 
That does it We will go." 


with American suggestions 
that Britain should devalue, 
on the ground that it would 
increase inflation. 

Mr Kinnock's aides claimed 
that the Americans expressed 
great interest in Labour’s 
plans to force institutional 
investors to repatriate capital 
exported from Britain sinry 
the Conservative Govern- 
ment freed exchange controls. 

The US economists are said 
to have warned that Labour 
could be “embarrassed" by 
the flow of returning money 
and to have suggested the set- 
ting up of an exchange equal- 
ization fund to reschedule the 
money into long-term public 
sector loan funding. 




Top Zapu man freed as Israel ^ y . es 

Mugabe seeks backing support 

to Amal 


for a single-party state 


From Juan Carlos Gnmuoo 


When Mrs Thatcher met 
feBow EEC beads of govern- 
ment a year ago at the Lux- 
embourg summit she express- 
ed impatience with the detail 
EEC leaders had to wade 

*kwh!le the grand vision she 
prefers will be adopted at the 
London summit today and to- 
morrow, its effectiveness re- 
mains to lie proved. 

The leaders are expected to 
give a “political impetus” to 
lower-level decision makers, 
bat sot to go into details. The 
far m minis ters, who have so 
far fanprf to reduce food pro- 
duction, will probably be told 
to fry harder at their meeting 
next week. The approach will 
be rnnHar on other issues. 

The fear is that this will 
have no practical effect. Many 
diplomats feel that the summit 
should focus on breaking down 
na tional objections at present 
blocking progress. 

“The common agricultural 
policy (CAP) should be top of 
the agenda, not left to a 
dinner-table chat at 10 
Downing Street,” said one 
observer. 

Whitehall's answer is that 


The Zimbabwean Govern- 
ment has taken a calculated 
step to resolve the bitter 
enmity with its own effective 
opposition, Zapu, and re- 
leased from detention Mr 
Dumiso Dabengwa, the man 
considered to be its severest 
threat 

Freed yesterday morning 
with Mr Dabengwa, who is 
dubbed “the black Russian” 
for his afleged close links with 


From Jan Raath, Harare 

The move was applauded in 
Bulawayo by Mr Joshua 
Nkomo, Zapu's leader who 
said: “This in itself is a sign of 
understanding which should 
help in the move towards 
unity” 

Mr Dabengwa, aged 47, is a 
shadowy figure who served as 
the chief strategist for Zapu in 
the guerrilla war against 
white-ruled Rhodesia. He was 
arrested in February, 198Z on 


National Congress of South 
Africa. 


r ■dm.-SStotaA-- 

forces fighting Palestinian wSt G«Sis cannot risk 


Like Mr Dabengwa and 
many others, Mr Hartlebury 
and Mr Evans were acquitted 
at their trial on what MrNkala | 
described as a “technicality" 
and re-detained. 


antagonizing their powerful 


expectedsupport^m^e 

sea Mien three In* w Thfc hafnot satisfied the 


ships launched a rocket attack 
onjtenjla bases near Sidom 
The 30-minute naval attack 


Americans arc often unjustly 
critical of Europe in areas 
where the US record is no 
better. Mr Ruud Lubbers, the 
Dutch Prime Minister, said in 
London last night (Michael 
Evans writes). Europe and the 
United States should have 
mutual respect for each other 
and not indulge in “exag- 
gerated criticism”, be said. 

Mr Lubbers was in favour of 
constructive dialogue between 
East and West, but it was 
“unjust" for the US to suggest 
that Europeans were by defi- 
nition the “wets” 


the KGB, were two whites, Mr allegations that he orchesrated 
Phillip Hartlebury. aged 36, a plot to cache large quantities 


and Mr Colin Evans, 


of arms to overthrow the 


former Rhodesian intelligence Government. His trial ended 
officers and Zimbabwe's two with his acquittal, and he was 


longest-serving political 
prisoners. 

Another senior Zapo of- 
ficial Mr Norman Zikhali, 
Zapu's Secretary for Youth, 
and a previously unknown 
Zapu functionary, were also 
released. 

The release of the three 
Zapu men removes one of the 


immediately re-detained. 

Mr Dabengwa has long been 
regarded as one of the few 
personalities capable of pull- 
ing the party out of its 
ineffective opposition after 
years of grinding attrition 
inflicted on it by Zanu (PF)- 
With political unity closer 
than ever before, his profile as 


Subsequent attempts to se- 
cure tneir release were 
wrecked by disclosures by the 
Government here that South 
Africa was sufficiently anx- 
ious to obtain their release as 
to offer an exchange of 131 
Angolan prisoners of war and 
an alleged Soviet spy for the 
two officers. 


was the second Israeli strike in 


summit risks be: 

MKUlWBg ^Bp Of 


a bland 

g main 


the course of the battles bet- SZTPLmS n^T- 
ween Amal and the Palestra- 


HESS I whfch 1135 20 


ofSidon. 




^har^kdSemSiS fight against terrorism and 


. p ~ drugs, the completion of the 

Mieh Palestinian refugee ca- market job creation 

mp, witnesses said. _ STo*. 


remaining stumbling btocks to a threat may disappear if he 
the merging ofZnzra with the falls in with the unity plans, 
ruling Zanu (PF) of Mr Robert .... 


ruling Zanu (PF) of Mr Robert 
Mugabe, the Prime Minister, 
and takes the country a long 
way towards the achievement 
of at least a de facto one-party 
state. 

At a press conference yes- 
terday morning, Mr Enos 
Nkaia, the Minister of Home 
Affairs, said the releases were 
“aimed at facilitating the 
attainment of national unity 


Mr Nkaia said Mr 
Dabengwa and the other two 
Zapu officials had promised to 
try to help end the activities of 
“dissident guerrillas in Mat- 
abel eland wherever possible”. 

The two whites stayed in 
their sensitive security jobs 
with the Government after 
independence in 1980, but on 
new year's eve in 1981 were 


Mr Nkaia said they had 
asked to be allowed to travel 
to Britain, and a spokesman 
for the British High Commis- 
sion in Harare confirmed that 
they were due to leave late 1st 
night for London. 

The spokesman welcomed 
their release and said it “re- 
moves a long standing con- 
sular problem between foe two 
countries." 


mg,wiuNa»Miiu. and small businesses, aad as a 

The targets were apparently rr,“ 

Palestinian artillery bSlerieb “ Wlt,<m - 

new) (n nmuirta mvar fi r p in fipiQCIDlC, 


used to provide cover fire in p V?~7V 1JL , n ^ 

Apart from anodyne state- 




tions in the village of Magh- ^SeTS^ 

on more 

tadfcS the same a ?“ n r 

:m. __ ■„ Tvni .ri common market will be 

“Jfc agreed. Thirty-two so-called 


Amal militia and Muslim 
prevent foe alleged plan of the ** ra0ndlS fte 

nr n _v_: - i/. v “CUB. 


Mr Hartlebury was bom in 
Britain, while Mr Evans was 
bom in Bulawayo, but had 
duel British-Zimbabwe na- 
tionality. He has since ceded 
his Zimbabwean citizenship. 
Frequent appeals for their 
release have been made by foe 
Foreign Office. 


PLO chairman , Mr Yassir 
Arafat, to re-establish ins 


However, only a slender 


political and military power j hope remains that foe summit 


and lasting peace in the arrested and linked with the 
country". There were now assassination four months ear- 


only 31 prisoners being held 
without trial he said. 


tier of the Zimbabwe repre- 
sentative of the African 


Mr Evans' son, Dayey, aged 
12, is a long-term victim of the 
wasting muscular disease, 
Duchenne’s dystrophy. 





Haiti calls off hunt 
for mob leaders 


structure in Lebanon after his 
forces were expelled by the 
invading Israeli army in 1982 
and in 1983 by a Syrian- 
promoted rebellion within the 
guerrilla ranks. 

Id Beirut, the Amal-Pales- 
tinian conflict around foe 
camps of Chatilla and Bomj 
el-Barajneh briefly spread to 
the streets of the Muslim 
sector after a series of night; 
attacks against Amal offices. 

Two militiamen were killed 
when gunmen stormed an 
Amal post in the Hamra com- 
mercial district A previously 


iff dear the deadlock on 


Terrorism is iikeiy to be foe 
subject of another “political 
impetus”. 

The summit is likely to call 
for “concerted action" against 
Aids, without offering any new 
weapons to fight it 

Whitehall sees it as foe 
summit that will show ordina- 
ry people that foe EEC is rele- 
vant to their lives. Few ob- 
servers share that perspective. 

As a result, EEC officials 
fear that foe London summit 
will fail to enhance Britain's 
role in Europe or underline 
Britain's comntitmeut to the 
EEC after 13 yean of 
membership. 

M Jacques Ddors, Presi- 
dent of the European Commis- 
sion, said on the eve of foe 
summit that he found foe 
avoidance of central issues on 
foe summit agenda “difficult 
to explain”. 

Leading article, page 19 


Shooting 
sparks 
mine strike 


From Ray Kennedy 
Johannesburg 

Five thousand angry black 
gold miners went on strike 
yesterday after one of their 
number was shot dead and 


Chalker 
advice for 
Uganda 


unknown group calling itself I eight were injured by police 


From Alan Tomlinson, Port-au-Prince 

Haitian authorities in the three other men. 
riot-torn northern city of He was reporte 


Professor Odra: mroring on 
top-secret trials. 


Sub expert 
disappears 
in Baltic 


Gonaives have withdrawn 
warrants for foe arrest of 
leaders of a mob which looted 
shops and burnt houses after 
violent clashes with rice farm- 
ers on Saturday. 

Police and troops were pre- 
vented from making the ar- 
rests Mien protesters barred 
their way into a slum district 
by erecting barricades. Local 
authorities backed down from 
their effort to round up foe 
leaders after a 24-hour lull in 
the violence between troops 
and rioters. 


He was reported to have 
said he had received threats 
and that local police were 
unable to guarantee his 
protection. 

The climbdown by the sec- 
urity forces in the face of 
increasing lawlessness in Gon- 
aives appears to place foe mob 
leaders above foe law. 

They had been charged with 
serious crimes, including loot- 
ing, arson and rape. The 
charges arose out of bloody 
dashes at foe nearby town of 
L'Estere on Saturday, when a 
mob attacked rice fanners 


Lebanese Punishment Organ- 
ization claimed responsibility. 
• JERUSALEM: Israeli gun- 
boats steered dose to the shore 
south of Sidon yesterday 
morning to use their firepower 
against Palestinian positions 
near foe Bn el Hilweh and 
Mieh Mieh refugee camps, 
which have already been 
under sustained attack by 
Amal Shia militia for more 
than a week (Ian Murray 
writes). 

According to military sour- 


Mr Bruce Evans, chief exec- 
utive of Gencofs gold and 
uranium division, said be- 
tween 100 and 200 miners 
started a disturbance. He said: 
“Residents of foe area appar- 
ently called foe police." 

The National Union of 
Mineworkers said foe men 
were only singing and that the 
shooting was unprovoked. 

A Bureau for Information | 
spokesman said: “A lot of 
people converged at foe num- 
ber three shaft. ’Hiey were 


r 

V V- 


com petition in air travel 

Recent EEC summits have 
dominated by a single 
issue. The Lu x emb o u rg 
summit a sear ago was domi- 
nated bv EEC institutional 
reforms codified in foe Single 
European Act. 

The reforms aroused pas- 
sion over the partial loss of 
national sovereignty involved, 
but the Single Act was ac- 
cepted and comes info force 
next year. . . „ 

The Hague summit m June 
was dominated by the South 
African issue and resulted in a 
modest conditional fist of 
sanctions and agreement to 
send Sir Geoffrey Howe to 
southern .Africa on a peace 
mission, which proved unsu- 
cessfol. 

No new declarations on 
foreign policy are expected. 


ces here the naval attack was aggressive. The police arrived 
against a number of Pales- and one miner threw a bottle. 


tinian organizations. Wit- A policeman ‘was slightly ill- 
nesses said more than 70 roc- jured by the flying bottle and 


kets slammed into foe hills in another o 


The government prosecutor who had barricaded the north- 
for foe area went on local em highway to prevent ship- 


an area which land has been miner and injuring another. 


Stockholm (Reuter) — A 
Swedish professor reported to 
be working on a top-secret 
invention to track alien sub- 
marines has disappeared, pol- 


radio to announce that the merits of contraband rice from 
warrants had been withdrawn Gonaives being transported 


against Jean Tatoune and 


attacking increasingly in re- 
cent weeks as Palestinian 
fighters have been building up 
their strength. 


ipened fire killing one 
d injuring another " 


south. Three people died. 1 “©ff strength. 


Messages in mirror world of Romania 


The Gencor official said foe 
number injured was eight and 
said mine security staff were 
not involved. 


ice said yesterday. 
Last July Profe 


Last July Professor Svante 
Oden, aged 62, went out alone 
into the island-dotted waters 
of the Baltic north of Stock- 
holm in a 30 ft adapted fishing 
boat equipped for his scien- 
tific research, a spokesman 
said. Two days later the boat 
was found drifting in appar- 
ently good conditions, but 
without the professor and his 
technical equipment 

Hie Swedish newspaper. 

Svenska Dagbladet, said Pro- 
fessor Oden was working on 
an invention which would 
measure minute wave move- 
ments to help foe hunt for 
submarines intruding in 
Swedish waters. It quoted 
defence and security police 
sources as saying foe sub- 
marine-tracking invention 
had raised interest in foe 
United States and Russia. 


Ceausescu likened to 


Khan 


By Roger Boyes 
East European 


A spokesman for Sweden's 
independent Defence Procure- 
ment Agency said Professor 
Oden was contracted to cany 
out research tests upon which 
he was due to report soon 
afterwards, but he declined to 
give details of foe project. 

A spokesman for the 
government defence staff said 
that the professor's work was 
not directly to do with litem. 

Sweden has accused Soviet 
submarines of intruding into 
domestic waters on several 
occasions. In 1981 a Soviet 
submarine ran aground near a 
top-secret base at Karlskrona. 


East European 
Correspondent 

Is Genghis Khan really 

Nkohe Ceausescu? Roma- 
nian readers are more accus- 
tomed to see their leader 
compared, in rhyming cou- 
plets, to Alexander tire Great 
and Joins Caesar, but a long 
series of historical articles jnst 
published in Bucharest hints 
at strong parallels between the 
lives of tire cruel autocratic 
Mongol leader and President 
CeaiKescu. 

Criticism of Mr Ceausescu, 
known as the Omdacator, is 
usually swaddled in allusion, 
but the latest articles, entitled 
Alone as Mongotht, are only 
thinly camouflaged. 

The writer, Mircea Mien, 
describing Genghis Khu in 
the weekly LaceafnruL, builds 
up the comparisons gradually. 

Genghis Khan had three 
children; so does Mr Ceansesr 
cu. His wife “interfered” in 
government affairs; Elena 
Ceausescu is one of the stron- 
gest members of the party 
leadership — partly because 
she is worried about her son, 
Nice, who aspires to the 
throne and is being groomed 
as a successor to his father. 

Mr Mien's Genghis Khan 
does not much care for this son 
who “fa very fond of drinking 
and women”; Nicn Ceausescu 





city and m move all of them 
(his disobedient noblemen) 
onto the steppes”; Mr Ceau- 
sescu — who is frequently ac- 
cased of demolishing foe older 
parts of Bucharest — wants to 
move the capita] to Tirgoviste, 
on the edge of the plains. He is 
suspidoas of party bosses in 

B«cbarest and is trying to 

rotate them into the provinces. 

Perhaps then Mr Mien is 
only poking harmless fun? 

Perhaps-Bet feeze are some 

senons messages tucked away 
rathe mirror world of Genghis 


Parallel lives: President Ceausescu, the 
and a sixteenth-century likeness of C 
has a reputation for fast firing, bear era- 
Genghis Khan is worried history of 1 
aheat his health and consults a The skin v 
Chinese doctor; Chinese doc- foe pages 
tors have been consulted by Party ds"* 
Romanian go-betweens on be- - Mere 
half of Mr Ceansesca, who aDeb conti 
suffers from an Alness of version of 
prostate gland. Khan he i 

The Mongol leader was 31 country’s 
partly because of an accident 
during a bear bunt; President 
Ceausescu b regarded as a struck by 
passionate bear-hunter and August, 
was even awarded a wwhl in Cecghi-s 
1978 for “shooting the biggest say: *TU di 

t 


The Mongol warlord, for 
is anxious about his 
and fears that “foe 
tmie “a* come -when they are 
no longer obedient”. Mr 
who has just an- 
"oaaesd significant cuts in 
* spenduig, weapons 
aad troop levels, prob- 
shares similar fears. The 
fer from being happy 
fleeca l whenever the 
. to make a 
Restore towards East- 
vtcsi dttente. 


struck by 


say: “TU 


So far, it seems, nothing has 

to Mr Micu, prob- 

*se be has been care- 

^ l f? st so®* Of 
MMsbmgraphyon 

his text is only oqp 
“"“ her feat is tryfcj in an 
.’toy to criticize the 
Mr Ceansesca. 


By Andrew McEwen 
Diplomatic Correspondent .j 

Mrs Lynda Chalker, Min- 
ister of State at the Foreign 
Office, flew to Uganda yes- 
terday amid growing con- 
fidence that the long night- 
mare of the former protec- 
torate is at last over. 

Mrs Chalker will meet' 
President Museveni today at 
his hunting lodge to discuss' 
British aid and Uganda's-' 
economy. : 

The Government believes, 
that Mr Museveni who seized - 
power in January, has m a d e a ' 
clean break with Uganda's 
brutal past under President: 
Obote and President Amin. 

Mrs Chalker said: “There is- 
much better hope for the' 
future than at any time since * . 

independence in 1962. I P 
“President Museveni has* 
made a first-class start in - 
restoring peace and h uman ' 
rights. He is absolutely deter- 
mined to improve the quality., 
of life of his people.” 

She added that she had “a 
good deal of faith that, pro- 
vided Museveni is given good 
advice, they will go on 
strengthening the situation". 

The delicate part of her 
mission is to offer economic 
advice without appearing 
paternalistic. The Ta nzanian - _ 
educated President has shown * 
a distrust of IMF economic I 
models. 

Persuading him to move ■ A 
towards a realistic exchange . * 
rate and low inflation is seen 
as the key to Uganda's eco- ,* 
nomic health. * 

Mrs Chalker said she did * 
not believe the Ugandans were ■ 
unwilling to listen. “I think ; 
they want to understand better ■ 
what it means. They want ‘ 
someone they regard as a 
friend to sit down with them . 
and discuss it.” 

With debt repayments al- ■ 
ready costing Uganda £200 . 
million a year. Mr Museveni ; 
is strongly opposed to loans. • 
Recent British aid has taken ; 
the form of grants. 

Mrs Chalker established , 

herself as a friend of the 
fledging regime by arriving in \ _. 
Febiuary. only two weeks after • f) 

the President was sworn in. At . 
the time she offered an initial ; 
w million grant and Mrs ■ 
Thatcher added a further £10 ! 
million in November when he 
visited London. ' 


A farge pan is to be spent on • 

Improving transport infra- : 
stroeture. Mrs Chalker will 
discuss a scheme to repair 

chicles. s he will also 

hand over »6 new Land- 

of °I a “alignment 

o 40 being donated totfae 
Ugandan police. 


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----- V 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986_ 


Angry congressmen to see 
Reagan on Iran inquiry 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

President Reagan agreed 
yesterday to meet a bipartisan 
group of congressional lead- 
ers, as a growing number of 
congressmen expressed ex- 
asperation with the refusal of 
key former members, of the 
White House staff to testify. 

Both Republican and Dem- 
ocratic leaders are making 
clear to Mr Reagan that this 
made a mockery of his prom- 
ise to provide Congress with 
all the details of the Iran arms 
shipments. 

Both Vice-Admiral John 
Poindexter, the former Na- 
tional Security Adviser, and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Oliver 
North, the former NSC mili- 




Crisis in the 
White House 

tary adviser, have invoked 
their Filth Amendment rights 
against self-incrimination, 
and refused to give evidence 
to the investigating Senate 
intelligence committee. 

“Here we are dealing with 
the worst foreign policy fiasco 

in years and yean and part 

of the public relations is to 
announce co-operation,” Sen- 
ator Patrick Leahy, the 
committee's Democratic vice- 
chairman said angrily. “If we 
don’t have testimony, we 
don't have co-operation.” 

Mr Reagan, however, has 
insisted be has done ail he 
should to get the facts made 
known. “The machinery is in 
place to seek answers to the 
questions being asked, to fix 
what needs fixing and to 
restore complete confidence 



President Reagan talking to businesswomen while bolding 
With a Little Lack by Helen Boehm, their chairman. 


to our foreign policy,” he toid 
a group of businesswomen on 
Wednesday evening. 

Mr Reagan yesterday bad a 
meeting with Mr Frank 
Carlucci, his new National 


Security Adviser, to discuss 
his plans for the NSC when he 
takes up his post on January 1. 
As a condition for accepting 
the job, Mr Carlucci is re- 
ported to have insisted that he 


have guaranteed direct access 
to President Reagan, without 
being under the control of Mr 
Donald Regan, the White 
House chief of staff- . 

Mr Regan's resignation 
over the Iran affair is be mg 
demanded by a growing num- 
ber of Republicans and Demo- 
crats. But the White House 
insisted that be was staying at 
his post and bad no intention 
of leaving. 

Meanwhile, in one of the 
most outspoken criticisms of 
the arms rales to Iran from a 
Cabinet member, Mr Caspar 
Weinbeiger, the Defence Sec- 
retary, said in a television 
interview from Brussels yes- 
terday that the advice given to 
the President was “very bad”. 

Mr Weinberger said there 
were no moderate elements in 
Tehran with whom the US 
could deal But he strongly 
defended Mr Reagan's de- 
rision to seek an opening to 
Iran. 

He hoped there would be 
moderates in Iran one day, 
and said it was important to 
have a better relationship with 
that strategic country. 

Mr Weinberger, who op- 
posed the arms sales from the 
start, said the Pentagon had 
carried out Mr Reagan's order 
to transfer the arms to the 
Central Intelligence Agency. 
But he knew nothing about 
how the CIA got the arms to 
Iran. 

Mr Weinberger warmly wel- 
come the appointment of Mr 
Carlucci, his former deputy at 
the Pentagon, and said he 
would restore confidence to 
the National Security Council. 

Another poll published yes- 
terday again -showed a sharp 
drop in Mr Reagan's popular- 
ity over the bin affair. An 
ABC television poll showed 
his approval rating at only 49 
per cent, a drop of 1 8 per cent 
since September. I 


Officers 
charged 
over Cairo 
coup plot 

From A Correspondent 
Cairo 

Four army officers were 
charged yesterday with form- 
ing a dan destine religious 
organization aimed ax over- 
throwing the Government and 
establishing an Islamic regime 
in Cairo. 

It was the first official 
disclosure in five years that 
! the military was involved in 
! the extremist Muslim move- 
! mem in Egypt. An indictment 
issued by the prosecutor-gen- 
eral, Mr Mohammed el- 
Guindi, raid the officers, with 
29 civilians, bad “founded, 
participated and directed a 
group advocating opposition 
to the fundamental principles 
underlying the system of 
government. 

“It also urged hatred and 
contempt of this regime and 
incited resistance to public 
authority." 

A military source in Cairo 
dismissed fears of a military 
coup, claim ing that the four 
military defendants were of 
junior rank and were in charge 
of adminis trative and tech- 
nical departments. 

All 33 defendants will be 
put on trial in the Supreme 
State Security Court and face 
prison sentences ranging from 
hard labour to life. This group 
brings the number of Muslim 
extremists awaiting trial for 
the same charge to 100. 

The indictment said the 
organization had a civilian 
section and another military 
wing that was in charge of 
recruiting members and train- 
ing them on the use of 
firearms and explosives. 

Police received dues on the 
group from 75 fundamental- 
ists who were charged on 
September 1 with attempting 
to oust the Government and 
with fire-bombing clubs, cine- 
mas and a liquor store. 


Free enterprise in Estonia 

Swift service with a smile in 
pursuit of a shared pront 

* _ — •_ i u'diL-nr Tallinn. Estonia 


Under the stern but approv- 
ing g az e of Mr Alexander 
Pyezner, one of die Kremlin's 
main pcowimic planners, I 
have jnst been given a stylish 
cut and blow-dry among the 

tastefully hung pot plants in 

the first independently-run 
hakdressing salon permitted 
to open in the Soviet Union. 

With it came a raze insight 
into a Kttie-pubGcized eco- 
nomic experiment under which 
— together with the 
recentiyannoanced legislation 
to sanction limited forms of 
private enterprise — Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov hopes to 
transform die monolithic toce 
of Soviet communism. 

Unlike the drab and nnifbnn 
state-run establishments, with 
their hopelessly outdated style 
portraits, the shop, opened 
last month in this remote 
Baltic republic by die enter- 
prising Mr and Airs Yuri 
Troshina, is a self-financing 
co-operative with members 
able to dictate thefr own 
working patterns and maintain 
a share of die profits after a 
monthly t ump sum hag been 
paid off to the state. 

Already customers are 
h oginning to flock for appoint- 
ments, attracted by the mod- 
ern cms, the coffee available to 
iwiiliu g riwmh amf Other amo - 

nides which, although fairly 
standard in the West, have 
previously been unheard of in 
toe Soviet Union. Few 1 spoke 
to appeared deterred by the 
slightly higher prices. 

“We hope that by providing 
a better service and by making 
people happy, they w31 want to 
come back to us,” explained 
Mrs Troshina, a Russian by 
birth and an active member of 
the Communist Party who is 
also a deputy to toe local 
Supreme Soviet. 

It was toe land of remark 


From Christopher > a 0 f seven local designers led bv 

pprov- that WesternereU«n g ^ Temsso , a n-year- 

aoder Soviet Umonjiad almftgr. ^ ^ fonner ^ ^ 

nlin's op hope of bearing JJ a | 0 ng with his colleagues, 

rs, I the country s . “IS created the shop m wkat was 
tvlish badly-run semce ^^J. previously a derelict cellar. 

£ the meats, where studied r v ~Our salary depends di- 
rts in ference ****5*5, rec tly on how rnuchwe are 

wm customer is usually nrenared to work, die new 


MW 

mM = 

wf 


m 


*%p 




ft. . 

. ■ 


-I 


. mi 






ri 


^■nm' Estonian experiment 
was one of a nnmber in- 
troduced in different areas of 
the Soviet Union m 1985 _m j in 
effort by the Kremlin to find a 
means of boosting iu dividual 
Initiative and prodocdyit} 
without adm itting ideological 

6 By making the 
customers happy, 
they may want to 
come back 9 

defeat and reverting directly to 
a free-market system. _ 

Although blurring toe divid- 
ing ime between co mmun ism 
and capitalism (co-operative 
members are responsible for 
renting their own premises and 
purchasing their own equip- 
ment), it has proved so 
successful fhaf it is now going 
to be spread to toe 14 other 
Soviet republics from toe 
beg inning of uext year. 

According to stastics sup- 
plied to The Times by toe 
Fonnian Foreign Ministry, 
8.9 per cent of the total 
workforce in the republic's 
service sector has now opted to 
work under the new setf- 
financing system, and the 
numbers are growing monthly. 
A senior Estonian official said 
that since 1985 toe controver- 
sial experiment had increased 
productivity by “between 30 to 
40 per cent” 

Among the other enterprises 
already involved in Tallinn, 
toe pktnresqne Estonian cap- 
ital, are Graphic Design, the 
only independentiy-nni greet- 
ing card shop in toe Soviet 
Union — where the risque 
design of the main 1987 New 
Year’s card centres on a 
cartoon of a scantOy-dad 
dancing girl and a fast-food 
cafe, whose meat pies are 
tastier and more swiftly served 
than any elsewhere in the 
republic. 

The card shop, complete 
with mirrored celling and 
prices some JO times higher 
than those in nearby state 
kiosks, was opened by a team 


previously a derelict cellar. 

-•Our salary depends di- 
rect!*' on bow much we are 
prepared to work," the new 
breed of Soviet entrepreneur 

explained. . . 

probably by coincidence, 
but possibly also reflecting the 
deep resistance in sections of 
the local Comunuist Party to J 
the new. self-financing system, 
a slogan scrawled on a wall in 
a narrow archway opposite the 
blue-and-pink painted prem- 
ises declared: “Our anarchy 
rules”. 

The Kremlins decision to 
adopt toe Estonian self- 
financing system on a nation- 
wide basis was confirmed app- 
ropriately, if rather 
unconventionally, at an im- 
promptu press conference 
staged in the Troshina salon 
by Mr Pyezner, the man 
responsible for the future 
shape of the Soviet service 
sector in a think-tank ran by 
Gosplan. the state planning 
organization. 

Speaking to a small group oi> 
reporters who, like him, ha# 
travelled more than 600 miles 
from Moscow to investigate 
the working of toe experiment, 

Mr Pyezner sakfc “The way 
that they are working in this 
shop will be spread to all parts 
of toe Soviet Union. We are 
p lanning to start op a mnuber 
of self-financing co-operatives 
in Moscow, where we hope the 
first will open in January." 

He said that two centrally 
located premises had aleady 
been earmarked for the 
capital's first co-operative-run 
restaurants. Other types of 
enterprise involved would 
stretch through toe spectrum 
of toe service sector and 
include a new organization for 
repairing fiats and another 
which would build green- ; 
houses. * 

The enthusiasm with which 
he praised the Estonian sys- 
tem, and the confidence with 
which he was able to predict 
publicly that it would rapidly 
be expanded, left the Western 
newsmen and the beaming 
staff of the Troshina salon 
with little doubt that we were 
both looking at the future 
structure of growing areas of 
the troubled Soviet economy. 




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Sudan is dusting off its 
steam engines to get its 
clogged communications go- 
ing. Its fleet of costly diesel 
locomotives are being retired. 

The steam locomotives are 
better suited to the arduous 
operating conditions in Sudan 
than the diesel engines which 
had replaced them. If desert 
sand gets into the works, it 
does not put a steam loco- 
motive out of action. 

Another factor is that the 
steam locomotives can op- 
erate over lines where light 
rails are laid, without ballast, 
on toe desert floor, whereas 
diesel engines are too heavy 
for use on such poor track 

The European Community 
is financing the import of 
sand-ploughs — adapted from 
European snow-ploughs — to 
clear railway lines which at 
times can be buried under 2ft 
of desert sand. The sand- 
ploughs have proved remark- 
ably efficient, and much fester 
and cheaper than using gangs 
of workmen to shovel away 
the sand by hand. 

Sudan, the largest country 
in Africa, covers almost a 
million square miles — most 
of them desert, with vast 
distances separating popula- 
tion centres. 

Communications are diffi- 
cult at the best of times, but 
the Sudanese infrastructure is 
so badly run down after years 
of economic setbacks and 
mounting inflation that they 
are now inadequate. 

Sudan Railways, developed 
to a high standard during 
Anglo-Egyptian rule, has 
2,972 miles of track. But only 
53 of the 159 locomotives are 
serviceable, and no more thaw 
100 of the 500 passenger 
coaches are in reasonable 


dons for the last three years. A 
string of barges recently , 
reached Malakal 500 miles ' 
south of here, for the first time 
in months. 

River traffic to points far- 
ther south is still halted, 
despite confident predictions 
by Mr Sadik el-Mahdi the 
Prime Minister, that govern- 
ment forces have now re- 
opened all surface routes after 
routing the guerrillas of the 
Sudan People's Liberation 
Army. 

Road transport is expensive 
in a country of such vast 
distances, but at least it is 
available these days with am- 
ple supplies of petrol, thanks 
to low world oil prices and 
helpful Arab neighbours. 

From Nyala, toe railhe ad in 
western Sudan, a new road is 


Jj SUDAN 
* Khartoum i 
Nyala 


ZAIRE 
100 miles 


being driven with inter- 
national aid to the Chad- 
border, last year’s drought and^r. 
famine having demonstrated 
toe inadequacy of existing 
roads. But there are serious 
problems in bridging rivers, 
now completely dry, which 
become raging torrents in the 
July rains. 

Life in Sudan is also ham- 


332 ? oni y ha3f pered by inadequate tele- 
2E* 000 fre,ght "asm* are communication services. Lo- 

Wi/iroc h.„. t . a \ and international tel- 

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Haifa on the Egyptian border, 
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have run to Wau in the south- 
west for years. 

Inadequate roads carry 
much of the freight which 
ideally should be moving by 

Britain and other European 
Community countries are co- 
operating to resolve this situa- 
tion. A South Wales firm 


notorious for their inef- 
ficiency. 

External assistance is al- 
ready helping to repair some 
of the unserviceable equip- 
ment, but people here are 
resisted to living with limited 
feciiities. 

Sudan lacks the finance for 
such things. Apart from many># 
other problems, the country 
has 1.2 million refugees, an 
enormous economic burden. 


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were abandoned inlwfc Sooooo^SPrf T ^ crc T 
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The MI5 case: trial within the trial 

J udges grant Britain 
last chance to avoid 
releasing spy papers 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


OVERSEAS 





The MI5 case will embark 
on a trial within the trial next 
week after an appeal court 
ruling yesterday which may 
yet save Whitehall from show- 
ing secret papers to Mr Peter 
" right and his lawyers. 

The Court of Appeal, in a 
two-hour hearing, granted 
leave to the British side to 
appeal, and set aside next 
Thursday to reconsider the 
order by Mr Justice Powell 
that it show an edited version 
of the papers to Mr Wright, 
the author of a book on MIS. 

During this first setback to 
ihe Wright case, Mr Malcolm 
Turnbull, the author's coun- 
sel, indicated that the ailing 
spy-catcher would probably 
start his testimony on Mon- 
day. 

In the process, Mr Turnbull 
told the appeal court that Mr 
Wright's health was now so 
bad that “he might very well 
die in the witness box”. 

Mr Turnbull said he was 
concerned about the stressiul 
effect the case was having on 
Mr Wright and had hoped that 
he could get his evidence and 
cross-examination over with- 
out interruption. 

As a result of yesterday's 
ruling, Mr Wright may have to 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

return to the witness box after 
the appeal. In the past week he 
has been attending the hear- 
ing, cutting a distinctive figure 
in a rather worn double- 
breasted suit and Australian 
drover's hal and walking with 
a slick which conceals a small 
liquor flask in the handle. 

In another development 
yesterday. Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary, 
who had a torrid nine days 
under cross-examination, flew 
back to Britain after giving an 
undertaking to the court that 
he would return to Australia if 
he was needed for further 
evidence. 

The British Government 
had failed once before to gain, 
the appeal court's leave to 
appeal against a disclosure 
order for the papers. 

But it was evident from the 
outset of yesterday's hearing 
that the three appellate judges 
held the view that the gravity 
of Whitehall's new plea - that 
national security could be 
damaged by showing the pa- 
pers to Mr Wright and Mr 
Turnbull even in the edited 
version proposed by Mr Jus- 
tice Powell — shifted the onus' 
on Mr Turnbull to show why 
leave should not be granted. 


Defence complains 
of smear campaign 

From Our Correspondent, Sydney 


Whitehall allegations that a 
member of the Wright defence 
team bad leaked details of 
evidence, given in camera, to 
Mr Neil Kinnock, the Opposi- 
tion leader, were vigorously 
denied yesterday. 

Mr Malcolm Tnrnbnll Mr 
Peter Wright's counsel said 
the claims made about Mr 
Paul Greengrass, a Granada 
television producer who has 
been assisting him, were “a 
disgraceful effort by certain 
interested parties to discredit 
those assisting Mr Wright* 1 . 

He called on the British 
Government to either dis- 
sociate itself from the allega- 
tions, or to instruct its lawyers 
to make them in open court, 
backed np by evidence. 

Mr Greengrass himself said 
ontside the Supreme Court 
that he understood the allega- 
tions had been made by Mr 
Bernard Ingham, Mrs That- 
cher's press secretary. 

He added: “It's a lie. I 
resent the fact that he does it 
on an unattribntable basis. 1 
have not released one jot of 
information from private 
sessions. ” 

Mr Tarn bull said the past 


week had seen “a despicable 
smear campaign a gahuBi Mr 
Wright, myself, now Mr 


He said Mr Greengrass, 
who was involved in Mr 
Wright’s interview with Gra- 
nada in 1984 in which he 
revealed his suspicions about 
Sir Roger Hollis, toe former 
security service head!, was 
helping the defence while on 
holiday from Granada. 

“He has considerable know- 
ledge of intelligence matters 
and has provided an enormous 
amount of research m a ter ial” 
Mr Tnrnbnfl continued. 

“Mr Greengrass has under- 
taken to toe court and to toe- 
British Government that he 
will not reveal any information 
learnt by him in confidential 
session. He has not provided 
any such information to any 
person, other than those en- 
titled to receive it 

“Those responsible for this 
campaign are plainly endeav- 
ouring to pervert the coarse of 
justice. They are cowardly and 
despicable people whose con- 
duct disentitles them to any 
respect from those who believe 
in toe impartial administra- 
tion of justice.” 



. Zthrs ■ 



g^Treport Rowsim 
for youth ministei 

of America A Bonn Cabinet mi 

. . ua, Thomas yesterday cancelled a vi 
From Christoghw Thomas > Moscow ’ Rau Wta Sissi 
jM ew York who Famihe 


Row simmers as Bonn 
minister cancels visit 

From John England, Bonn 


children wn^a ^ 

level a ^ nf i critical thinking 
ni ^‘° n needed society, 
sk!lis rn/ to a report on 

on a 

Tlw r -‘P°"T froS 55,000 
n* 1 ' 0 "? 1 “d P public schools 
P" 0 h;llren aged eighu I- 

and , ® nA ade ‘ 
“Jau- prelaw^; ms joniy 

w wruc /i q ihe simp'osf of 

ropo;* ' a ,porL issued bv 
tasks., Assessment ot 

the ^ Il0 r, 3 ftiitss. states. 

Educati 00 ^ rjjgs, American 
express 

children ^ en0 ugh 
thenisi’ 1 '* 5 , ji^ir writing ^ 

ensure lhai .ft intended P«r- 
rrtu'is 

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ouaner of 
'■'Fewer ihan a Vtlbrmed 


A Bonn Cabinet minister 
yesterday cancelled a visit to 
Moscow. Frau Rita Sussmuth, 
who bolds the Families and 
Health portfolio, called off her 
trip next week because her 
Soviet hosts had not provided 
a programme. 

But Chancellor Kohl said be 
was confident that soured 
relations with the Soviet 
Union over his comparison of 
Mr Gorbachov, the Soviet 
leader, with the Nazis’ war- 
time propaganda chief. Dr 
Goebbels, would soon be back 
to normal. 

Frau Sussmuth’s cancella- 
tion is one of several at high 
levels on both sides of the 
East-West divide. 

Herr Anton Pfeiffer, state 
secretary in the West German 
Education Ministry, was to 
visit East Berlin, but the East 
Germans on Wednesday with- 
drew their invitation until 
further notice. 

Tass. the Soviet News 
agency, yesterday also at- 
tacked Herr Kohl and. his 
Government for “increasingly 
distinct nationalistic tones" as 
the West German federal elec- 
tion on January 25 nears. 

Herr Kohl, however, m an 
interview with Neue Ruhr 
Zeiiungy yesterday said he 
expected an improvement in 


juS*> 








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r ••*... :\?r- ' 
. • ■ .. \ 


Mr Justice Street, the Chief 
Justice, said: M Thc balance of 
prejudice is overwhelmingly 
against you. Mr Turnbull If 
what Mr Simos (counsel for 
the British side) says is cor- 
reci access might be granted 
to sensitive documents to a 
party whose responsibility in 
handling sensitive material is 
under challenge.** 

Mr Turnbull responded 
that, if the court took that 
view, he would undertake, if 
the papers were handed over, 
not to show them or divulge 
their contents to Mr Wright or 
any other member of his legal 
team. 

As Mr Justice Street added, 
it still remains for Whitehall 
to show that the papers are so 
secret that the effect of their 
disclosure would outweigh 
any benefit to the public 
interest, and that they cannot 
be edited in a form to render 
them effectively harmless. 

In the end, all yesterday's 
ruling does is offer Whitehall a 
window of opportunity to 
disprove Mr Justice Powell's 
contention that at least some 
of the papers cannot be sard to 
be secret, but are still relevant 
to Mr Wright's case. 

Focus on 
secret B1 
document 

From Our Correspondent 
Sydney 

Fresh light was cast yes- 
terday on the contents of the 
Whitehall secret papers, incl- 
uding one document in part- 
icular that the Wright defence 
team sets enormous store by. 

The paper, known only as 
Bl, the name it is given on the 
Government's affidavit of 
documents (which is itself 
secret), is one of what Mr 
Malcolm Turnbull Mr Peter 
Wright's defence counsel has 
described as “three whales in 
toe bay”. 

These papers, and in 
particular Bl, he claims, will 
cast “enormous doubt” on the 
evidence of Sir Robert Arm- 
strong, the Cabinet Secretary, 
that the British Government 
knew nothing bout Chapman 
Pincher's book. Their Trade Is 
Treachery , until shortly before 
it was published. 

In submissions made to Mr 
Justice Powell on November 
27, Mr Turnbull drew the 
judge's attention to the date of 
Bl. 

Without describing the con- 
tents, he said: “That docu- 
ment was created at least two 
months before Sir Robert said 
the Government knew of the 
book. The sending organiza- 
tion is the one Sir Robert has 
difficulty identifying (MI 61 
Look at what was enclosed 
with that letter. What can that 
be but ... 1 won’t say." 

Before the Appeal Court 
yesterday, Mr Turnbull re- 
peated his version of the 
events leading up to the 
book’s publication: that the 
Government, wanting to get 
“a number of skeletons out of 
the cupboard”, had through 
Lord Rothschild got Mr 
Pincfaer to make the disclo- 
sure in Their Trade Is Treach- 
ery that Sir Roger Hollis, the 
former security service head, 
had been suspected of being a 
Soviet double-agenL 

In the course of Mr 
Turnbull's submission, Mr 
Justice Glass, one of the 
appeal court judges, referred 
to the enclosure in Bl which 
he said was “a synopsis”. 

Mr Turnbull: “Yes. The: 
synopsis can’t mean anything 
other than the book.** . 







‘ * ■. a 4 L U ■ _• JMJ- 




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Scientists and volunteers attempting to 
save one of dozens of pilot whales beached 
along Cape Cod by pushing it back into 
deep water. 

Of about 50 whales involved in a mass 
beaching off East ham, Massachusetts, 
five suffocated or died ot other causes (AP 
reports). 


Biologists used lethal injections to kill 
six others. “It would be inhuman to let 
them suffer any more at that point,” said 
Mr Greg Early, a New England Aquarium 
biologist. 

Rescuers got to the remainder in time to 
help them back out to sea on a high tide. 

Mr Robert Prescott, director of the 


Massachusetts Audubon WelUleet Bay 
Wildlife Sanctuary, said the black and 
white whales averaged about 15 to 20 feet 
in length and weighed between one and 
two tons each. They were females, along 
with a few juveniles among them. “These 
are some of the biggest female pilots I've 
ever seen in my life,” be said. 


Punjab anti-terror powers sharpened 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Delhi 

Despite a terrifying array of 
laws already at its disposal, the 
Indian Government is taking 
even more draconian powers 
lo deal with terrorists in the 
turbulent north Indian state of 
Punjab. 

Evidently feeling that a 
show of additional strength is 
necessary to assuage feelings 
outraged by the recent out- 
break of random killings, the 
Government has given the 
Army special authority in 
certain areas and stepped up 
ihe powers of the police: 

The Opposition in the In- 
dian Parliament, however. i§_ 


beginning to feel distinctly 
uncomfortable about the weal- 
th of new laws that the 
Government is invoking to 
deal with the terrorists. 

The Army has been given its 
new powers in Amritsar dis- 
trict and in parts of seven 
other districts of the state 
which have been declared 
“disturbed areas". The sol- 
diers now have the right to 
detain, interrogate, conduct 
searches and raids and issue 
shoot-on-sight orders. 

' The Act under which the 
powers have been inken was 
imposed on the stale soon 
after the Army's seizure of the 
Golden Temple in 1984 and 
remained in operation until 


X. • 'VC •- 

.t.-* V.j. 


July 19S5. It caused much ill- 
feeling among the Sikh 
population, who felt them- 
selves very much at the mercy 
of the armed forces then. 

Similar powers were yes- 
terday given to the police “or 
to any other authorized 
person” by the tabling in 
Parliament of orders under a 
Terrorist Act passed last year, 
but not so far enforced. 

They confer power to search 
people and vehicles, to close 
roads and canals, taporcutolf 
telephones, or commandeer 
any private telephone ex- 
change. 

Police conducted a city- 
wide exercise in the country's 
capital yesterday called “Op- 


eration Blackout”, looking for 
a known terrorist. Haijindcr 
Singh, known as “Jinda". He 
was reported to have come to 
town with one of his asso- 
ciates. He is believed to be the 
killer of the former Chief of 
Army Staff. General A.S. 
Vaidya. 

While hundreds of police 
manned checkpoints all over 
Delhi tension between the 
Sikh and Hindu communities 
relaxed still further, and the 
daytime curfew was lifted in 
the Old City. 

At the same time, though, 
two Sikh oiganizations called 
for an inquiry into the attack 
on the Sikh temple of Sisganj 
in Old Delhi on Tuesday. 


Iran offers 
to repair 
bombed 
oilrig 

Tehran (Reuter) — Iran has 
offered to help the United 
Arab Emirates repair an oil rig 
in Abu Dhabi's offshore Abu 
al-Bukhoosh field hit in an air 
raid on November 25, in 
which eight woricers were 
lulled. 

Iran has flatly denied 
charges by Iraq that it was 
responsible for the raid and 
has accused Iraqi aircraft of 
carrying out the strike. 

Chess man 

Dubai (Reuter) - The 
Australian Chess Federation 
president, NaLhan Sterling, 
has been elected president of 
the 36-country Common- 
wealth Chess Federation, 
replacing Raymond Keene of 
Britain. 

Turkish Bravo 

Ankara (Reuter) - Turkey 
has its first woman head of a 
district police station. 
Superintendent Nazli Senlik. 
who has taken over Sumer 
precinct in Malatya. 

Justice done 

Tehran (Reuter) - Three 
men were stoned to death for 
adultery in the west Iranian 
city of Hamadan. but a fourth 
escaped the punishment by 
freeing himself from the hole 
in which he had been buried 
up to his waist. 

Aids demand 

Nairobi (Reuter) — Ameri- 
can sailors visiting Kenya's 
Indian Ocean port of Mom 
basa should be screened for 
Aids, a Mombasa MP. Mr 
Abdallah Mwaura, said in 
Parliament. 

Save the Taj 

Delhi (AP) — The Govern- 
ment is to close two thermal 
power plants as part of a long- 
term programme to curb air 
pollution that is damaging the 
Taj Mahal in Agra- 








' - .• .n • — * 



German-Soviet relations after 
the polling. 

Moscow would probably 
increase economic coopera- 
tion with Bonn next year 
because this was dearly in its 
interests, he added. 

Herr Kohl said be apolo- 
gized in the Bonn Parliament 
for his Gorbachov-Goebbels 
remark and had nothing to 
add. 

“Terrible things happened 
between Germans and Rus- 
sians in this century. We 
should learn from that.” 

He was sure there were real 
opportunities for improving 
relations between the two 
countries and West Germany 
was prepared for broader and 
better ties in all areas, not 
merely trade. 

Herr Kohl pointed out that 
Mr Gorbachov had an- 
nounced significant plans for 
modernizing the Soviet econ- 
omy, so it was likely that 
Moscow would seek to expand 
economic links with West 
Germany. 

A staunch admirer and 
supporter of President Rea- 
gan, Herr Kohl reaffirmed his 
belief that the American Presi- 
dent and Mr Gorbachov will 
stage another summit meeting 
in 1987 and achieve agree- 
ments on disarmament 




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^en-ita#es to -beibg a Balice Inspector, 

"M- : ^ ; - ^K»k)gists senid phiiosopiiers perform equally well 


There have been chemists, too, who have 
measured up ro this responsibility rather 
well And economists, historians, English 
graduates and mathematicians whoVe 
excelled themselves as well 

For, as you may have gathered, it isn’t a 
particular academic background that were 
looking for when we recruit graduates for a 
career in the Police Force. 

Were looking for the same combination 
of management qualities that any large 
industrial or commercial concern would 
look for: clarity of thought, self discipline 
and the ability to get on with people. 

But were looking for other qualities too; 
impartiality, dedication and, of course, a 
sense of humour. 

For a graduate who has these qualities, 
the Police Force has a great deal to offer 
in return. 

That’s why Inspector Liz Burbeck MA and 
Inspector Richard Brunsrrom BSc joined us. 

As a graduate, two routes through the 
Police Force are open to you. You could 
join by conventional entry and sit the Ser- 
geants' examinations after two years as a 
Probationary Constable. 

If you performed especially well you 
could then be selected for the prestigious 
Special Course at the Police Staff College, 
Bramshill, w’hich is designed to accelerate 
your career within the Force. 

But even if you did not secure a place 
on the course, the opportunities for pro- 
motion to the higher ranks of the Force 
would still be open to you. 

Alternatively, you could apply to enter via 
our Graduate Entry Scheme. Competition 
is fierce, but if you were accepted your 
place on the Special Course would be 
virtually guaranteed, and you could be an 
Inspector six years after you’d first joined. 

If you are interested in joining the Police 
write to us, and we’ll send you a copy of 
the booklet A Career for Graduates} as 
well as more details of our Graduate Enny 
Scheme. Closing date for applications is 
16th January 1987. 

Starting salary for recruits aged over 22 
is currendy £9,756 and the present salary 
for an Inspector is £14493 (rates of pay 
are higher in London). 

This is one career for which every degree 
subject is suitable. 


To: SupL Andrew Jones BSc, Room 553, Home Office, Queen AnneV Gale, London SWJH 9AT. Please send me your booklet and application form for the Police Graduate Entry Scheme- 


Address 


Unri'ersity/Polytechnic/Qallcj: 


Alv Decree course ends. 


O F F I C E R 




In the last six years, profits haverisen twentyfcj^ share 

570% and dividends by 560% to 15.7p net. 

\nother record year anticipated, with profits well tip to expectations. 


*«.*• # * 

• y* •* * 










"'s 






I9S6 was rhe sixteenth consecutive record year 
for the Company. In 1986 we achieved what few British 
companies achieve - world marker leadership in our 
business sector. In doing so we have firmly positioned the 
Company for maximum growth and security 

PRETAX PROFIT (£M) *.» 



The advertising business has been going through 
structural change like many of its clients, seeing the 
emergence of global concerns and the concentration 
of the business into fewer hands. 


Over the last 5 years the share of total world adver- 
tising spending by the largest 100 US advertisers has risen 
from 12% to 17%. Over the last 10 years the small group of 
multinational agencies have grown by 311% compared to 
130% for domestic agencies, increasing their share of 
world advertising from 12% to 20%. And their number 
has shrunk from 12 multinationals five years ago to just 
S today. 

Professor Sheth of the University of California sees 
most industries becoming organised into no more than 
three global concerns and a number of niche players. 
Three seems to be the magic number in almost every 
market. This follows the ‘Law of Dominance’ expounded 
by research studies which define market rank in these 
simple terms: No. 1 is wonderful; No. 2 is . terrific; 
No. 3 is threatened; No. 4 is fatal. 

During the course of 1986 the Company took 
significant steps Towards achieving improved market rank. 
In February we added creative strength in the US through 
the acquisition of Backer & Spielvogel Inc, America’s 
fastest growing agency of recent years and highly regarded 
for its outstanding work for major US clients 

More recently the Company acquired Ted Bates 
Worldwide Inc., the world’s third largest advertising 
network. Through Bares we have been able to add a truly 
olobal structure to the Company’s operations. 

We are now the leading company in nine key 
markets including the US and UK, and rank in the top 
five in a further twelve countries. 

The Company’s 150 wholly owned offices world- 
wide now work with over 60 of the world’s largest 100 
advertisers and over 40 clients in five or more countries. 


A GLOBAL RESOURCE 


To put the scale of the Company’s advertising 
operations into perspective, the billings of our agency in 
Minneapolis exceed those of any agency in the UK. The 



, ; n 1985/86 by our agencies in Scandinavia 

profits tdii^ u 

alone exceeded those of the next largest UK quoted 


1 087 the Company is expecting over fifty 
agency, in 1 • L 

individual profit centres ro generate pre-tax profits of 


more than $1 million each. 

In aider to achieve a prize of this magnitude it was 
Li ,u*r some clients would be given up due to con- 

inevitable mat 

. _u Over rhe last six months this expected 
flier with oiiur * 

• , >f clients has duly taken place. Though the 

restructuring «■ . 

, * u, mi ness transferred, almost $400 million, 

ai value or ou. 


rot 



has produced a number of gory headlines, ir represents 
only around 5% of total group killings, and has been more 
than compensated for by over $400 million of new 
business gained within the group in the same period, 
including major assignments from Procter & Gamble, 
RJR/Nabisco, Xerox, Mars and Renault. 

The Company’s global scale and resource provide 
us with the strength from which to build our world adver- 
tising market share from its current level of around 5%, 
and our market position within the important sectors 
which together make up the business services industry 

The Communications Division has already made 
good progress in the year by the establishment of a sig- 
nificant presence in direct marketing in Europe, ro build 
on our strength in this fast growing field in the US and in 
the UK our public relations operations now rank amongst 
the top three. 

The partnership with Dancer Fitzgerald Sample 
(DFS), the 13th largest US advertising agency, has 
provided a major international alliance for Dorland 
in the building of a substantial independent and auto- 
nomous group. 

The Consulting Division had an encouraging year. 
Following top level promotions within the Hay Group 
which has seen the next generation of management 
succeed to key positions in the company, we are look- 
ing forward to significant growth from this sector of our 
business. 



The business services market is large, fast growing 
and highly fragmented. An ideal opportunity for the 
Company to exploit existing net cash resources of over 
£100 million organically and by further acquisitions. 


A CO-ORDINATED BUSINESS SYSTEM 

In recent years the best run companies have been 
seeking to bring together every part of their organisation 
in a co-ordinated drive for maximum efficiency. In this 
‘holistic’ view every part of the business pulls together 
in the same direction - a clear strategy, a simple organi- 
sational structure, highly motivated people working 
with the best information, sound marketing and good 
communications with customers and staff. 

To achieve the optimum business system for its 
industry, every aspect of a company’s activity has to be 
seen holistically - or the organisation is only as strong 
as the weakest link in the chain. 

A brilliant new strategy is of little use if the people 
in the company don’t understand it, or are not motivated 
by ir. And highly motivated people are not much use 
either if they are acting on the wrong information, or are 
not communicating clearly with their customers. 

In essence, the workings of a company are not dis- 
similar to the workings of one’s body There is no point in 
trying to get fit just by dieting, because regular exercise is 
needed as well, coupled with the right diet, and the right 
psychological condition. 

Our objective is to help clients achieve their 
optimum business system by offering a co-ordinated 
expertise in the key business services areas: advertising, 
direct marketing, public relations, sales promotion. 


research, design, management consultancy and recruit- 
ment. Already, over 30 major clients work with our 
Company across 3 or more of these sectors. 

Theodore Levitt, Professor of Business Administra- 
tion at Harvard Business School, one of the most influen- 
tial thinkers about global marketing and business trends, 
has joined the Boards of both our Communications and 
Consulting Divisions. His experience has already proved 
beneficial to the Company and a number of our clients. 


A CREATIVE FOCUS 


Our consistent strategic aim is to achieve the 
highest standards of professional excellence in every 
sector and in every country. 

We believe that we should never be satisfied with 
the status quo, but should always look for a better way - 
borh for ourselves and for our clients. That real change 
can be achieved. 

Observers often ask how it is possible to remain 
‘creative’ as you get bigger. Certainly, it is possible to create 
a small organisation with a handful of people and clients 
which is intimare, bright and creative. 

Such companies declare that they would rather 
have high creative standards than succumb to the arthritis 
of international management disciplines. 

Other managers feel that they would prefer to 
operate a solid, structured international network rather 
than try to outdo creative ‘boutiques’. 

Both viewpoints overlook the possibility of com- 
bining discipline and creativity in one organisation. This is 
because it is hard to da 

We have always tried to be consistent and single- 
minded about the type of company we wanted to build. 
We have never been believers in small operations which 
are dependent on the style of one or two top people, 
however outstanding those individuals may be. 

On the other hand we have had no desire to create 
a giant - if that meant operating along the lines of some 
grey bureaucracy. 

We have always aimed to create the one type of 
service organisation which so often eludes the grasp of 
those few men and women who have tried to achieve it — 
a large organisation, certainly, with all the stability that 
gives to employees, and all the back-up that provides for 
clients - but one which at the same time also succeeds 
in being progressive, youthful and innovative in approach. 


inth^UKmferdie idstfive years 




G&rwe^ e&r- 

ag&icy won imre edimfe itei 


In short, we believe that it is good to be big, it is 
better to be good, but it is best to be both. If we succeed 
in achieving this goal we will be sure of continued growth 
in all of our activities, and continued financial success. 

Every year since becoming a public company in 
1976, we have been able to state that the year to come will 
show a record performance by the Company. We are 
delighted to report chat we anticipate that 1987 will 


be another record year, well up to expectations. 

For any further information about Sacuchi & Saaichi 
Company PLC please contact the Company Secretary at 
15 Lower Regent Street,, London SWIY 4LR or at 


625 Madison Avenue, Neiv York N\ T I0022. 


SAATCHI & SAATCHI COMPANY 



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14 


THE ARTS 1 


A certain crazy dignity 


| CINEMA 

: Eat the Peach 
“-(PG) 

Plaza 

- Labyrinth (U) 
-Odeon Leicester 
:• Square 

; The Passion of 
Remembrance 
■(15) 

7 Metro 

Malcolm (15) 

J Cannon Tottenham 
" Court Road 

Kangaroo (PG) 

Cannon Haymarket 

Real Genius (15) 

: Cannon Panton 
Street 


“Shall I part my hair behind? 
Do I dare to eat a peach?" saag 
the desperately anxious, mid- 
dle-aged J. Alfred Prufrock in 
T. S. Eliot's famous poem. 
The lead character in Eat the 
Peach, a delicious comedy 
from Ireland directed by Peter 
Ormrod, shares none of 
Prufrock's crippling in- 
hibitions. While idly watching 
Roustabout, an Elvis Presley 
movie featuring a wall of 
death stunt, a crazy whim 
creeps into Vinnie's mind: 
why not build and ride your 
own wall of death? So he lays 
waste his form land, works as a 
driver in “commodity 
relocation 7 * (that is, smug- 
gling) to pay for wood, tena- 
ciously constructs the circular 
edifice, and rides up the side 
before family, friends, and 
local dignitaries. In meta- 
phorical terms, he eats the 
peach. 

This story of a mental 
obsession obstinately pushed 
out into concrete reality could 
easily have crumbled into 
cloying whimsy. But Ormrod 
and his producer/co-writer 
John Kelleber (both experi- 
enced in television) success- 
fully root the film's 
eccentricities in the hard facts 
of modem life in Ireland's 
neglected comers: poverty, 
unemployment, the drudgery 
of peat farming, local political 


corruption, the background 
presence of the IRA. 

No matter bow fancy the 
comic embroidery, the force 
always keeps faith with the 
characters, delightfully por- 
trayed by tiie Irish cast. Ste- 
phen Brennan imbues the 
single-minded Vinnie with 
strength and a certain crazy 
dignity. Others include 
Eamon Morrissey as his be- 
mused but willing brother-in- 
law; Catherine Byrne as the 
wife who briefly ijoes back to 
mother; and NiauToibin as a 
stetson-toting, American-ac- 
cented hustler who has never 
set foot out of Ireland. 

Ormrod and Kelleher view 
their characters’ antics with 
gentle, though never indul- 
gent, affection. That in itself 
singles out Eat the Peach from 
the pack. But the film deserves 
equal applause for visual qual- 
ities achieved on a modest 
budget 

Three years ago Muppet- 
master Jim Henson mounted 
an elaborate fantasy. The 
Dark Crystal, in which a 
sententious plot and too many 
grey, wrinkled creatures 
forced considerable technical 
wizardry to go up the spout 
Labyrinth, which received its 
Royal premiere on Monday, 
shows a slight improvement 
The story's pretentions are 
fewer, and we have at least two 


THE ROYAL BALLET 


WORLD PREMIERE 



John & Read 


. 1 

• V 

s 

■■r 

«vn 

Young Apollo 

AW 

Le Baiser de la fie 

Dec 11, 17 at 7.30pm 

*un 

Young Apollo 

Gloria 

Jan IS, 16. 21, 

Feb4ai 7 -30pm 

V 

- • 

Reservations 


W.. 

01-240 10Sfi/19Il 



Tickets £1.0©-£22-5Q 

A 


Royal 






humans — teenaged Jennifer 
Connelly, questing after her 
baby brother, and David 
Bowie as a lightweight Goblin 
King — to vary the visual diet 
The stylistic mixture is rich 
enough to cause indigestion: 
into this stew goes Maurice 
Sendak, the Wonderland 
books, M.C. Eschers perspec- 
tive-bending designs, rock 
video frenzy, some Indiana 
Jonesery (George Lucas 
served as executive producer), 
and a coil or two of Monty 
Python (Terry Jones wrote the 
final script). 

As before, Henson delights 
in overkill: hybrid creatures 
made from a pot-pourri of 
myths, species, humans and 
electronics are further suffo- 
cated by whiskers, eye- 
patches, plumes and armour— 
considerably limiting facial 
expressions (and audience in- 
terest). The bland, rather bral- 
tisfa young heroine is a further 
encumbrance; she invites 
indiffe re nce, not sympathy. 
This is, then, a laborious 
labyrinth, and one not recom- 
mended for the very young. 

The Passion of Remem- 
brance, made by the Sankofa 
collective, presents an eclectic 
kaleidoscope of the British 
black experience, its corporate 
image and unresolved issues 
from the struggles of the 1960s 
and 70s (particularly sexual 
matters and the role of 
women). The title is not the 
kind that looks good in lights, 
yet the film-makers go some 
way towards creating an enter- 
taining package from their 
ardour. Pulsating music drives 
the film through diverse 
clumps of abstract debate, 
video montages of protest 
marches, and quasi-realistic 
family conversations. Images 
offer their own attractions: 
London architecture is sur- 
veyed, from the City temples 
of finance to the peeling 
caverns of Tower Hamlets; a 
debate about power and sex- 
ual politics is portentously 
staged in a smoke-swept sandy 
hollow. Despite the stylistic 
jolts and some weak 
“naturalistic” acting, the argu- 
ments and evidence are strong 
enough to hook the attention 
of a non-partisan viewer. In a 















genre prone to hermetic 
squawks and rigmarole, this is 
a considerable achievement 

Australia fields two new 
entries in this crowded week — 
Makohn and Kangaroo — 
both with the same lead actor, 
Cohn Friels. In Kangaroo, 
adapted from D.H. Law- 
rence's novel, he cuts a mo- 
rose figure as the author’s 
surrogate —an exiled, bearded 
novelist with a German wife; 
(Judy Davis, excellent), at 
large among Fascists in 
Australian suburbia. In Nadia 
Tass and David Parker’s Mal- 
colm, he plays the title charac- 
ter, -whose dim-witted exterior 
hides a brain responsible for 
ingenious gadgets, put to crim- 
inal use when a hank is robbed 
by motorized, radio-con- 
trolled ashcans. 

This is comedy of the Ealing 
sort, gently bouncing its jokes 
off oddball characters ana the 
audience's fondness for mild 
anarchy. There are some 
endearing conceits, but 
Parker’s script has nothing of 
the fierce narrative logic that 
held together T.EB. Clarke’s 
Fating escapades; and experi- 1 
ence teaches us to beware any 
film where thieves disguise 


Above: Aimi Domingo w atching 
the smoke in The Passion of 
Remembrance, a kaleidoscopic 
view of the blade experience 
IPig hti the whimsical Vinnie 
(Stephen Brennan) in Eat the 
Peach, realizing his obsession 
with building a Wall of Death 

their getaway vehicle as an ire- 
cream van. Some of its 
whims y could have been use- 
fully diverted to -the doleful 
Kangaroo , stodgily directed by 
Tim Burstall, a key figure in 
Australian cinema's renais- 
sance. 

Martha Cootidge's raucous 
college comedy Real Genius 
Opened last summer in Amer- 
ica, and one can see why, in a 
crowded market, no-one felt 
its British release a priority. 
Things start promisingly with 
some barbed dialogue and the 
strange spectacle of whizzkids 
helping their professor build a 
laser-beam weapon. But 
stupidities multiply, reaching 
their climax when the 
professor’s house collapses in 
a sea of popcorn — not modi 
of a finale perhaps, but a 
perfect cue for rousing inter- 
mission sales. 

Geoff Brown 





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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 

THE ARTS 2 


Twit 







Sorting the goats 


A few months ago w had a bee 
swarm of health films. Now it 
“ recruitment's tarn. For 
Jose who tailed to get into 
Queens’ or Newcastle or, more 
recently, become fighter pilots. 

“Bhj’s 40 Minutes 
(?®C2) offered the dvil ser- 
vice. 

The system of graduate 
recruitment Is ‘‘the most rig- 
orous and sophisticated in the 
world” (explaining why yoor 
CTife fedl before the first 
hurdle with one of the lowest 
marks recorded at Cam- 
bridge). Of the 5,305 who 
applied rats year, only 100 are 
chosen after gruelling days in 
Whitehall. ^ 

It most be said that in 
following two candidates 
through the selection proce- 

TELEVISION 

dare, Chris Carling’s film did 
not sensationalize his subject 
matter. Cross-cutting between 
what they thought of their 
performance and then what 
the examiners thought, the 
res nit made the best of a most 
boring Job. 

Evelyn bad come to the 
brown formica table via Chip- 
ping Sod bury and the Midland 
Bank. “An interesting 
background.” said one exam- 
iner of a past which seemed 
singularly lacking in fascina- 
tion. Tim, a balding Oxford 
graduate who wrote fiction in 
his spare time, admitted to 
shedding a chip while working 
for the GLC. “That does wmi«> 
him sound interesting.” Al- 
ready one could feel with a 
tingle the dimensions of the 
problem. 


The first question, about 
whether we could afford the 
luxury of a monarchy, really 
separated the goals from die 
goats, (“I didn’t even mention 
Marx,” someone breathed in 
the pub afterwards.) It also 
raised questions about the 
nature of the examiners — a 
tribe with metal-rimmed 
glasses and Dralen skirts 
called "observers”. Their 
deathless evaluation was quite 
somethin# “Her basic style is 
not a very compelling style” — 
of a giri who had not opened 
her mouth. It remains to be 
seen in next week’s instalment 
whether the researcher Mo 
Bowyer has chosen 
destined for the top. On the 
basis of last night, I sincerely 
hope not 

Timewetck (BBC2) had a 
hu man interest story about 
s<Mne Bul g a rian peasants who 
dug up a board of Thracian 
silver. This was nicely re- 
enacted by the people in- 
volved. Harping on sonorously 
about rare insights, Peter 
France finally admitted we did 
not understand a dkkle bird 
about the men who forged the 
treasure. He also proved most 
effectively there is a limit to 
the mileage to be got from a 
standup Bulgarian archaeolo- 
gist. More interesting was 
Neil Cameron’s item on the 
forger Afceo Dossena. Well 
presented by David Sox, it 
unearthed some intriguing 
footage of Dossena at work 
and the information that he 
achieved his special patina by 
placing his forged sculptures 

in a militar y n rinal 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Relish of death 
and a love 
of spectacle 


DANCE 


Ceremony 

Sadler’s Wells 


The last week of London Contem- 
porary Theatre’s season at Sadler's 
Wells contains another London pre- 
miere, bringing the total to five: a 
reasonably impressive tally, even if 
they have looked workmanlike rather 
than inspired. This one is now called 
Ceremony but it began life on tour 
last February as Slow Dance on a 
Burial Ground, a more descriptive 
title although not one to delight the 
marketing department. 

Surprisingly, many in the audience 
last night tittered at the opening solo 
for Christopher Bannennan as, his 
back to the spectators, he moved with 
a recurring step of sliding sideways on 
flat feet Perhaps it was because in the 
gloomy lighting (evidence that this 
was not meant to be funny) bis 
leotard blended with fleshtones and 
made them think him nude. 

The work continues its choreog- 
rapher Robert Chian’s love of spec- 
tacle. There is the fancy lighting plot 
that nowadays seems almost obliga- 
tory in this company’s productions 
(are they afraid the works would not 
bear close scrutiny?). There is the use 
of clever costumes, in this case an 
amalgamation of the garment that 


extrudes itself from the scenery, as in 
his Forest, and of a large swirling 
cloak (as in Chamber Dances) for a 
woman to ensnare her victims. 

The woman, this time represents 
Death and Charlotte Kirkpatrick gets 
a lot of evil relish out of trapping 
Bannerman, and the four colleagues 
who have joined him, one by one, 
during the opening number. 

Before Death’s arrival they have 
been joined for a while by five 
women, who also of course have their 
own separate number. Afterwards it 
is grief for the women and oblivion 
for the men, Kirkpatrick preriding 
finally over models representing their 
mummified corpses. 

All this is shown in dances which 
are pleasant enough but rarely strik- 
ing (an exception is a startling duet 

for Bannerman and <>li» Hultpn in 

which he supports her by the neck). 
They are borne along by Stephen 
Montague’s soundtrack, starting with 
jungle twitterings and proceeding 
through what could be Scots piping to 
what sounds like South American 
flutes. A reversible, transferable 
backcloth by Norberto Chiesa, and 
brightly painted leotards complete 
the effect 

The programme also indudes Je- 
rome Robbins’s Moves, performed in 
silence, and Robert North’s jokey 
Troy Game for male dancers only. 



T _i u ill 

JODIl rercival Startling dnet: Celia Holton and Christopher Bannerman In Cohan’s hallet 


ROCK 


Status Quo 

Hammersmith 

Odeon 

Surprisingly, in the theoreti- 
cally youthfhl world of rock. 
Status Quo have made a 
virtue ofbeing old In 1982, 14 
years after the release of then- 
debut single “Pictures of 
Maichstick Men”, they cele- 
brated a spurious “20th 
anniversary” and ticket sales 
for their 1984 tour were 
boosted by news of the group's 
imminent “retirement” Even 


their name is entirely 
priate to a musical manifesto 
that had already become anti- 
quated by the early 1970s. 

At Hammersmith, the only 
hostage to progress was the 
huge mobile lighting rig, but 
Ride Parti tt and Francis 
Rossi, the original members, 
still favoured the same old 
jeans and hair-styles, still 
wielded their old gin tars, and 
went through familiar run- 
ning, circling, and limbo-like 
crouching manoeuvres. 

Predictably too, the bulk of 
the performance was given 
over to the group's peculiar 
variant of boogie, a stiff 
piston-like interpretation that 
rides roughshod over the fluid 


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shuffling rhythms that distin- 
guished such 12-bar music in 
its original form. Neat, 
chunky arrangements of “Pa- 
per Plane”, “Rockin’ All Over 
the World”, "Caroline”, and 
“Down Down” were inter- 
changeable toe-tappers, and 
the only fleeting relaxation of 
the “boogie” grip was afforded 
by “In the Army Now” and 
“Don’t Drive My Car." 

However the recruitment of 
the talented John Edwards on 
bass, whose short hair and 
youthful demeanour attracted 
heated criticisms in the letters 
pages of a specialist magazine, 
has proved an astute move, 
and his energetic playing in- 
jected a much-needed spring 
into the plodding, steps of the 
old-timers. 

The finale was a medley of J 
tire most cobwebbed Chuck 
Berry pub-rock themes imag- 
inable — “Carol”, “Route 66”, 
“Rock & Roll Music", and 
“Bye Bye Johnny” — but 
perhaps the appearance of a 
head-banging muppet and 


teddy-bear on top of the amps 
indicated that the time for 
serious consideration of the 
show's merits had passed. 1 
look forward to the “golden 
jubilee/grand retirement” tom- 
before too long. 

David Sinclair 


CONCERTS 


BBC SO/ 
Pritchard 

Festival Hall/ 
Radio 3 


Dmitri Alexeev, the soloist 
here in Prokofiev’s Second 
Piano Concerto, gave us 
nearly all the notes (and that 
feat should not be belittled) 
but only a partially-sighted 
performance. 

He was equal to famously 
ferocious, challenges like the 
enormous first-movement ca- 
denza or the Scherzo's moto 
perpetuum semiquavers. Th- 
ese are passages where tech- 
nique, tenacity -and muscles 
can go a long way towards 
rendering the listener (in the 
celebrated description of the 
audience at the premiere) 
“frozen with flight, hair stand- 
ing on end”. 

However, when it came to 
acknowledging that the score 
also has contrasting potential 
for lyricism (the rhapsodic 
opening), tonal shading and 
even impish humour (the 
Intermezzo's throwaway end- 
ing) Alexeev was more 
economical with the truth. He 


remained singie-mindedly ste- 
ely-fingered throughout. - 

In the hefl-for-leather tuttis, 
it is not really fair to ask the pi- 
anist to cut bade. The or- 
chestra should know when to 
thrust forward. That was ex- 
actly what it did in 
Shostakovich’s Symphony No 
li, “The Year 1905”. Pritch- 
ard made a persuasive and 
thrilling case for some not 
wholly persuasive progra- 
mme-music: a symphony in 
which banal popular t»np* ; 
however evocative to Soviet 
ears, sometimes seem to sh 
uneasily in Shostakovich’s 
complex musical idiom. 

The “Palace Square” adagio 
was paced with great patience: 
the picture of a hungry crowd 
silent, pregnant with danger, 
was _ effectively drawn. 
Pritchard’s handling of the 
succeeding allegro —“Bloody 
Sunday” itself — at first 
sounded too contained. But 
when one beard the savagery 
with which the orchestra tore 
into the “Tocsin” finale, one 
understood the earlier tactical 
restraint 

In between came the “In 
Memoriam” adagio, beauti- 
fully played, with the violas 
striking an especially rich vein 
of elegy. 

Richard Morrison 


Vienna Schubert 
Trio 

Wigmore Hall 

During the past fortnight or 
so, the Vienna Schubert Trio 
-have been surveying, in three 
concerts, the late romantic 
Austro-German piano trio. 
They have included not only 
examples of the unquestion- 
able status and quality of 
Brahms, but also unknown 
pieces. On Wednesday it was 
the turn of Hans Pfitzner, 
known chiefly for his opera 
Palestrina, and Max Reger, 
known for a few more things 
but perhaps above all for his 
densely scored organ pieces. 

It cannot be said that 
Pfitzner and Reger are exactly 
economical with their notes or 
in the time-space that the trios 
played here occupy. Both 
works show their composers 
straining at the leash of tonal- 
ity without ever quite manag- 
ing to shake themselves flee of 
iL And both are dominated by 
a spirit of lyricism that points 
in the direction of Richard 
Strauss, though without ever 
achieving his well-oiled man- 
ner. But neither work succeeds 
in leaving the aesthetic orbit 
of Brahms, though the 
Pfitzner, his Piano Trio No 2, 


Opus 8, tries hard, with its 
quirky stop-starts, its torrid- 
ness, its curious combination 
of the rhetorical and the 
expressionistic, and its often 
telling use of silence. And 
Pfitzner is well capable of 
building to impressive di- 
maxes or of alarming the 
listener with sudden outbursts 

Reger’s £ minor Piano Trio, 
Opus 102, is more structurally 
homogeneous, and perhaps 
because of that is marginally 
less intriguing a work, though 
its Scherzo exploits a bizarre 
harmonic relationship, be- 
tween C and F sharp minors. 

The Vienna Schubert Trio 
gave both works with an 
anient spirit, playing with 
abundant breadth and stam- 
ina. Individually they are all 
obviously distinguished play- 
ers, and even if the pianist's 
tone is at times rather forced, 
their blended sound is a 
distinctly Germanic, luxuriant 
one. Yet at the same time they 
phrase with a care that allows 
shafts of light to penetrate 
even the densest textures, 
even if occasionally they make 
too much of particular points. 
But they make a formidable 
team, the more admirable for 
such an enterprising attitude 
to programme planning. 

Stephen Pettitt 


Cinders 
under 
fire 


THEATRE 


Sandra Mellor 

Old Red Lion 


Anyone who has ever gone 
rummaging in the shoddier 
niches of Fringe Theatre will 
recognize some of the eccen- 
trics gathered in this pastiche: 
the tense feminist without 
humour or make-up who is 
described in her phoney biog- 
raphy as a founder member of 
the "Punching Judies”Mhe 

Hugo^Etaly) who will ^nd a 
sub-text in an aspirin advert 
and never says “yes” if he can 
intone “right” instead. Even 
the reference in the true 
biographies to a production of 
Pear Gynt is not impossible 
among the wilder orchards of 
experimental drama. 

But only a modest equip- 
ment of wit and perception is 
required to set out a pattern of 
Aunt Sallies — a feminist, a 
matronly trouper, a club co- 
median, a commercials 1 star- 
let. What the (real) actor and 
director, Simon Cherry and 
Richard Hanson, do not come 
up with is that succession of 
fast, hard chops of the axe to 
smash the soft targets to dust 

As a parody of a numbskull 
attempt to radicalize panto- 
mime -for Sandra Mettor 
read Cinderella — the on- 
slaught is both too brief in its 
attacks and trivial in the 
damage it inflicts. 

We are watching what pur- 
ports to be a run-through of 
the show where Sandra 
(Madeleine Church), by her 
humble kitchen fire, wishes 
she were not oppressed by the 
Thatcherite fascist junta, and 
her Fairy Godmother (Phi- 
lippa Morgan), brought in at 
short notice, retreats from the 
alarming leftist tone of her 
script to the securer comforts 
of gin. 

Some comic mileage is to be 
found in the anti-sexist analy- 
sis of the fish-net tights enclos- 
ing the shapely rear of the 

S irince (an amusing per- 
ormance by Janet Rawson) as 
well as the predicament of a 
comedian unable to tell his 
joke about the queer black 
Irish Jew, a combination un- 
likely to gladden the cockles of 
many liberal hearts. But the 
proper location for soft satire 
is in the indulgent country of 
the university show, where 
anything goes provided it does 
not gp on for very long. Like 
so many such shows, perfor- 
mances are pleasing within the 
confines of their stereotypes, 
but what is performed is 
almost instantly forgotten. 

Jeremy Kingston 


D.H. LAWRENCE’S PASSIONATE 
STORY OF VIOLENCE, POWER 
AND PREJUDICE! 



Law Report December 5 1986 House of Lords 

Mother’s pre-birth behaviour relevant 


ROSSOlUSn OUESCMTSaTIMBURSTALLFILM COLIN F PI EL£ *HDJU0Y DAVIS IN KANGAROO 
- JOHN ■/’.'ALTON JUL>E NJHILL PETEBHtHIft PETER CUMMINS Ann HUGH hEAYB-BYRNE AS KANGAROO 
/A.N JONES *D»PTEDWI3M TmL ROhEl BY D H LAWRENCE PAO&UCTIOK DESIGN TRACY WATT 
v:< ‘’ ' -flrJilMf 5 TERRY RYAN MUSiC NATHAN WARS OIOCnOB.:-t n.OIOWI»Pr' DAN SURSTALL 

PRODUCER ROSS DIMSEY &IBEC10RTIMBURSTALL /j. 

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KENSINGTON 
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In re D (a Minor) 

Before Lord Keith of Kinkei, 
Lord Brandon of Oakbrook. 
Lord Griffiths, Lord Mackay of 
Cash fern and Lord Gon of 
Chieveley 

[Speeches December 4] 

The expression “is being” in 
section l(2Ka) of the Children 
and Young Persons Act 1969 
related to an existing situation, 
and in considering whether to 
make a care order in respect ofa 
child born prematurely and 
suffering from drug depen- 
dency, on the ground that her 
proper development was being 
avoidably prevented or her 
health was being avoidably im- 
paired, the justices had been 
entitled to nave regard to the 
feet that the mother, a drug 
addict, had taken drugs during 
her pregnancy. 

The House of Lords dis- 
missed an appeal by the child by 
her guardian ad litem from the 
Court of Appal (Lord Justice 
DiUon. Lord Justice Stephen 
Brown and Lord Justice Woolf) 
(The Times March 24. 1986; 
[1986] 3 WLR 85) who had 
allowed an appeal by case stated 
by the local authority, Berkshire 
County Council from the Di- 
visional Court of the Family 
Division (Mr Justice Hollings 
and Mr Justice Waite) who, on 
February 4, 1986, had dis- 
charged a care order made by 
Reading Juvenile Court on Au- 
gust !. 1985, under section I of 
the 1969 Act- 

Section I provides: “(2) If the 
Court before which a child ... is 
brought is of opinion that 
any of the following conditions 
is satisfied ... (a) his proper 
development is bring avoidably 
prevented or neglected or his 
health is being avoidably im- 
paired or neglected or he is being 
ill-treated; . . .and also that he is 
in need of care or control . . . 
then ... the court may if it 
thinks fit make 'Such an 
order . . 

Mr James Town end. QC and 
Mr Christopher CritchJow for 
the child; Mr Nicholas Meda- 
war, QC and Miss Barbara 
Slomnicka for the council Mr 
T. Scott Baker, QC and Mr Paul 
W. Reid for the parents. 

LORD BRANDON said that 
the justices had found, inter 
alia . that at the time of the 
child’s birth, on March 12. 1985, 
at the Royal Berkshire Hospital 
she had been suffering from 
symptoms caused by with- 
drawal from narcotics; that the 


mother bad been a registered 
drug addict since 1982 and had 
continued to take drugs, in 
excess of those prescribed, dur- 
ing her pregnancy to the birth, 
and had known that by taking 
drugs while pregnant she could 
be causing damage to her child. 

The child had been kept in 
intensive care in hospital for 
several weeks immediately 
following the birth. A place of 
safety order had been obtained 
by Berkshire social services on 
April 23, 1985. and successive 
interim care orders had been in 
force since May 13, 1985. 

The child had never been in 
the care or control of the mother 
or the father, who continued to 
be addicted to drugs. Her medi- 
cal condition had been a direct 
result of deliberate and exces- 
sive taking of drugs by the 
mother during pregnancy. 

It had never been in dispute 
that the secondary condition in 
section 1(2) of the 1969 Act. 
namely that the child was in 
need of care and control was 
satisfied. 

The dispute was as to whether 
the primary condition, in para- 
graph (a), was satisfied. 

As to the meaning and effect 
of “is being” as used in section 
I (2|(a), the questions arose: 

(1) Did it refer, to an instant, or 
to a continuing, situation? 

(2) If it referred to a continuing 
situation, as at what point of 
time should the court consider 
whether that continuing situa- 
tion existed? 

(3) How for back and how far 
forward, if at all. from that point 
of time should the court look? 

(4) Could the court look bock to 
the time before the child had 
been born? 

On (IX there were two 
compelling reasons for conclud- 
ing that what was being referred 
to was a continuing, rather than 
an instant, situation. 

The first was that the use of 
the present continuous in- 
dicated a reference to a continu- 
ing situation or state of affairs. 
The second was that the con- 
cepts of development, health 
and treatment were continuing 
concepts. 

On (2). it was necessary to 

have in mind the purpose 
sought to be achieved not only 
by section 1 but also by section 
28. The effect of section 28, 
when combined with section I, 
was to create a process for the 
protection of children that 
might include three separate but 
connected stages. 

Against the background of 


those three possible stages it was 
clear that the court, in consid- 
ering whether a continuing 
situation of one of the three 
kinds in section i(2Xa) existed, 
had to do so as at the point of 
time immediately before the 
process of protecting the child 
was first put into motion. 

To consider that matter when 
l he child had been placed under 
protection for several weeks, 
first by a place of safety order 
and then by one or more interim 
care orders, would defeat the 
purpose of Parliament. 

On (3k it seemed to his 
Lordship that the court, in 
considering, as at the point of 
time immediately before the 
process of protecting the child 
concerned was first put into 
motion, whether a continuing 
situation of any of the three 
kinds described in section 
l(2Xa) existed, had to look both 
at the situation as it was then 
and also at the situation as it had 
been; how for back in the past 
had to depend on the facts of 
any particular case. 

Should it look at the future as 
well? In his Lordship's view it 
Should, but only in a hypotheti- 
cal Way by looking to see 
whether the situation that had 
begun earlier and had still been 
continuing when the process of 
protecting the child bad been 
put into motion would, if that 
process had not been put info 
motion, have been likely to 
continue. 

His Lordship would not think 
it right for toe court to look at 
the future alone: only at the 
hypothetical future in conjunc- 
tion with the actual present and 
the actual past 

With regard to question (4), in 
his Lordship's opinion the pro- 
visions of section !(2Xa) had to 
be given a broad and liberal 
construction that gave full effect 
to their legislative purpose. 

That purpose was to protect 
among other ways through the 
medium of a care order, any 
child of whom it could be said, 
in the ordinary and natural 
meaning of the words used, 
either (i) that its proper develop- 
ment was being avoidably pre- 
vented or neglected, or <ii) that 
its health was being avoidably 
impaired or neglected, or (in) 
that it was being ill-treated. 

In the present case, the juven- 
ile court had had ample material 
on which to find that on April 
23. 1985. when the child was 
still in hospital her proper 
development had been being 
avoidably prevented and her 


health had been avoidably im- 
paired. Each situation could 
have been avoided if the mother 
had not persisted in taking 
excessive narcotic drugs 
throughout her pregnancy. 

His Lordship saw no reason 
why the juvenile court, in 
considering whether those situa- 
tions existed, should not have 
looked back at the time before 
the child had been bom. 

At the relevant point of time 
for such consideration the child 
had been six weeks old and 
accordingly a person under the 
age of 14 years within the 
meaning of the expression 
“child” in section 70(1). 

The circumstance that the 
cause of the two situations in 
which the child had been then, 
and the possibility of their 
having been avoided, dated 
back to before she had been 
born was immaterial. 

His Lordship could find noth- 
ing in section H2ya) that would 
exclude taking into account 
those matters. Further, it 
seemed that the legislative pur- 

a of section H2*a) was best 
ered by allowing such mai- 
lers, in such a case, to be taken 
into accounL 

Accordingly, his Lordship 
would dismiss the appeal. 

Lord Keith agreed with Lord 
Brandon, and Lord Griffiths 
and Lord Mackay agreed with 
Lord Brandon and Lord Goff. 

LORD GOFF, concurring, 
said that the House had to avoid 
a construction of the Act that 
produced the result that any 
child bom suffering from the 
symptoms or effects of some 
avoidable ante-natal affliction 
could be described, after its 
birth, as being a child *ho« 
proper development “is being 
avoidably prevented or whose 
health ^is being" avoidably 
impaired 

The mere fact of a past 
avoidable prevention of proper 
development or impairment of 
health was not sufficient to fulfil 
the condition, even if there wen? 
symptoms or effects that per- 
sisted or manifested themselves 
later. There had to be a contin- 
uum in existence at the relevant 
tiroc- 

Solicitors: Kingsford Dorman 
for Rowbeny, Morris &Co. 




16 


TWF. TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


SPECTRUM 



Graham wood 



The Temple 
goes hi- 



Behind every top barrister is a good clerk. 
Tomorrow’s brief the latest legal technology 



'-/.ti 7 ***&? i * /**• > 

l*> -/ l &*»*•, •«*■•■•:.'•■• • 1*V*«V* ,v - *••'.•* V*' ■' 


Welcome aboard: Rear Admiral John Kerr, Hie mao in charge of Global 8ffs deployment; on tbe flight deck of HM5 Illustrious — “what we are talking about is jobs bade home” 


Setting sail to sell 


9 





□ the quarter-deck of the 
aircraft carrier HMS 
Illustrious, berthed in the 
steamy midday heat of 
Bombay, Leading Stew- 
ard Paul Smith opened the 96th. 
bottle of white wine and polished the 
last of tbe 400 glasses before serving 
up another tray of shrimps rolled in. 
best smoked salmon. 

The hum of small talk from the 
conversations taking place among 
the rubber plants was typical of any 
diplomatic cocktail party. In their 
tropical uniforms Rear Admiral 
John Kerr and his officers mingled 
with senior Indian navy personnel in 
their gleaming whites. 

Ft was, however, the presence of 
dozens of British businessmen, 
many fresh out from London and 
perspiring in their shirts as they 
flitted from group to group, that 
marked out foe real point of this 
exercise in hospitality. 

A few hours before, a group of 
Indian naval officers, gingerly hang- 
ing onto their turbans, had been 
below decks, peering at the inside of 
the latest Airborne Early Wanting 
Sea King helicopter. Many British 
jobs may depend on their opinion. 

The Government is intent on 
increasing the defence industry's £3 
billion of export sales. The 2,400 
men serving on HMS Illustrious, 
and foe six other ships steaming 
around the world as part of foe 
Global 86 naval deployment, are at 
foe sharp end of the exercise. 

ITHEj 


A unique naval 
venture in global 
salesmanship draws to 
a close this month, 
Peter Davenport 
joined the fleet 

Illustrious and foe other ships are 
acting as floating salesrooms for the 
best of British innovations. They 
have been dramming up sales in IS 
countries on a 43,000-mile voyage 
that began in April and will see them 
home on December 18. 

It is the first lime foal foe 
marketing of UK Ltd has been given 
such a high proule in a naval 
deployment, and industry has been 
closely involved in foe planning 
required to make it work. Its success 
will be judged by foe number of 
orders that come from the 
demonstrations of equipment, rang- 
ing from smoke hoods to Sea 
Harriers to the ships themselves. 

The sales days around foe world 
have also generated interest in 
unexpected items. In Malaysia one 
local officer Listened patiently but 
without obvious reaction to a long 
litany extolling foe virtues of the 
latest mis&les and computers. 

When it came to the cocktail party. 



however, his interests were revived 
by the plastic dip attached to the side 
of his plate, holding his glass of fruit 
punch. How, he asked, could he 
import a consignment? 

But the main ann of Global 86 is 
to sell aims and ships. It was planned 
against a background of government 
determination to increase defence 
export sales, on which around 
125,000 jobs directly depend. De- 
mand from tbe UK armed forces 
alone cannot sustain foe size of foe 
industry. To survive, it has to selL 
The world arms market is domi- 
nated by the United States and the 
USSR, who between them account 
for 60 per cent of foe sales. The 
French, with their aggressive build- 
to-export policy, come next with 10 
per cent and the UK is fourth in the 
league with about 6 per cent. But 
there is developing competition 
from countries such as Brazil, Singa- 
pore, Korea, Australia and Chinn- 
Alex Marsh, managing director of 


Swan Hunter on Tyneside, which 
recently made more than 800 work- 
ers redundant because of lack of 
orders, was in no doubt about the 
value of foe discussions be held on 
the aircraft carrier in Bombay. 


Breaker, of Westland helicopters, 
anxious to secure further orders for 
the company's Sea Kings: “The navy 
are better salesmen than we are. If we 
tell a customer that our product is 
the best he is bound to be suspicious. 
This way he gets to talk lo the people 
using foe equipment and he gets an 
honest opinion. 

“The feedback we are getting 
already from Global has been very 
good. There will be orders in foe next 
twelve months because of iL" 

Through foe Defence Export Ser- 
vices Organization within the Min- 
istry of Defence, foe Government 
works closely with industry to 
develop contacts and sales opportu- 
nities. Six months before Global 86 
sailed from foe Channel, tbe depart- 


T 


— mem contacted 130 British com- 
here was no way that any panies, asking what products they 

wanted poshing and whether they 
intended to have representatives on 
band. About 100 replied and then- 
products were included in a glossy 
brochure on display at all the ports. 

The enthusiasm of the sailors for 
their part in foe exercise, however, 
sometimes goes too far. One sailor, 
so the story goes, became increas- 
ingly agitated by foe a ggre ss i ve 
questioning of a sheikh casting 
doubts on the quality of the British 
gun he was demonstrating. Unable 
to take any more, foe sailor tucked 
foe weapon under his aim, grabbed 
foe surprised sheikh by his robes and 
said: “If I hear one more word 
against this gun- FI! ...” 


single company could put 
on such an event he said. 
The marvellous thing 
about Global 86 is that we 
have a floating display of everything 
that is best in British industry. It 
means that officers in foreign navies 
can talk to our sailors, who are 
actually handling equipment they 
may be interested in purchasing. 
And then we are on hand to follow 
up that interest 

“The simple truth is that contacts 
made over tbe fruit punch at a 
shipboard cocktail party in Bombay 
may eventually save a man’s jab on 
Tyneside. It is a very direct link.” 

His words were echoed by Len 


.aid Shrubsall has one 
of the most influential 
jobs in foe legal pro- 
fession. He is am sludge, nor 
a top <«llq he is a barristers’ 
clerk, one of a small, exclu- 
sive g roup of powerful figures 
who are not legally quali fied 
themselves, but determine to 
a great extent the careers of 
the lawyers whose affairs 
they handl e. 

ShrabsaZE, aged 39, became 
a clerk more than 20 years 
ago. He was unusual in 
having some O levels, al- 
though mere derks now come 
in with cpiafifkatioas. A 
ample have degrees; and the 
Barristers'’ Ckxks’ Associ- 
ation now runs an examina- 
tion course. 

: the biggest change has 
been growth. Shrubsall 
started as a junior clerk, 
making tea, naming errands, 
\ bundles to court, in a 
seven barristers, man- 
aged by tbe senior clerk and a 
typist Now be is senior clerk 
m a set in the Temple, wifo 16 
barristers, four of them QCs, 
and a staff of three junior 
derks, a book-keeper and five 
secretaries. 

What does the dork do? As 
one judge pot it, he is a 
“complicated cross between a 
theatrical agent, a business 
manager, an accountant, and 
a or, in another 

description, he blends tire 
functions of “office admin- 
istrator and accountant, tast- 
ier, agofo adviser 

j nd friend”.. 

ittie is known about 
banisters’ clerks out- 
' side legal circles- Tra- 
ditionally the jobs have not 
been advertised and derks 
have came in through per- 
cautnet and word of 

mnntfi- 

Once they reach senior 
clerk status, they command 
considerable power, and sal- 
aries to match; £30,000 to 
£40,000 a year is not un- 
common and a few are paid as 
much as £75^000, with sal- 
aries operated on a commis- 
sion basis — 5 or 10 per cent 
of what the barristers earn. 

Shrubsall says: “We still 
have the traditional 
bar ri st ers ’ derks’ role that we 
bad 200 years ago, described 
by Land) as a servant, 
dresser, friend. We have to be 


responsible to each barrister 
as an individual, manage and 
develop his practice, bring oa 
young barristers; sot let them 
loose on work that is too 
difficult for them and boiM 

them up, over the years, until, 
we hope, they are successful.” 

In other respects, however, 
foe derks’ role Iras undergone 
huge Decimalization 

in 1973 ended the separate 
clerk's fee, in guineas, charged 
to the client on top of tire 
barrister’s. The modernization 
of accounts meant the end of 



the ledger, and now there is 
the computer. Word proces- 
sors are moving in. The Bar 
has become a service industry, 
Shrubsall says. Clerks have to 
be executive managers, run-. 
ning a business equipped with 
tbe latest technology and sup- 
port systems - *that is needed 
for a succes sf ul business in a 
competitive industry to satisfy 
the client”, says ShrabsalL 

The problems this poses for 
chambers will be examined for 
the first time at a conference 
involving 300 barristers and 
their derks in Lincoln’s Inn 
tomorrow. The time is ripe for 
a look at how chambers are 
nm and how they can be 
brought up-to-date in the hi- 
tech age. Martin Bowky QC, 
one of the conference or- 
ganizers, says: “We are me- 
dium-sized businesses in a 
very compe titive industry and 
we mist think in these terms 
rather than in the old-fash- 
toned Dickensian terms of 
creaking staircases and coal 
fires. Those days are gone.** 

Frances Gibb 


v TIM ESI 


SATURDAY 



£12,000 to be won 



Tteadwy afoot Raddo Domingo wflti Justtno Diaz (logo) In ZammTs CMb 

Classic performances 

As Placfdo Domingo poms out his heart in OteBo. Akd 
Jones delivers a beautiful account of Handel's boy Kn g 

Joas. Meanwhile Horowitz retnras to Mioscow and 

GleanGouM, hacked by a Russian student band, rives 
an p 1 * ^-*"* "* — — . f ■ — - — 


Piano Concerto. Meet the whole cast tomorrow in The 
Times c lassical records pick of the 

Making 
a date 
Pick of next 
year’s diaries 


Rawalpindi 
or bust... 
Tough travelling 
in Pakistan 


Still growing amid the greens 


Can you always get your copy of The Times? 



One group has been 
on the conservation 
battlefield for 
sixty years, and the 
war is still going on 

Rural England begins, at least 
for Londoners, within a 
juggernaut's roar of the out- 
side rim of the M25. But to tire 
Council for foe Protection of 
Rural England the London 
orbital motorway is more than 
just a handy map re fer ence 
m a rk i n g off their territory. It 
defines the busiest edge of a 
battlefield. 

The threat of masrive 
development in sensitive 
countryside is not confined to 
foe south-east, and the CPRE, 
60 years old on Sunday, 
deploys its concern and its 
forces widely. It is opposing 
plans for a nuclear power 
station on the empty 
N orthumberland cnasrim^ a 
British Coal “superpit” in foe 
Green Beit which separates 
Bir m in gham from Coventry, 
afforestation on lakeland frits 
and onshore ofl production in 
conspicuous or delicate 
places. 

The CPRFs priorities have 
changed little since an early 
promotional leaflet trumpeted 
“action is urgently needed if 
foe incessant attacks upon the 
amenities of the countryside 
are to be overcome”, those 
were the days of unrestricted 
ribbon development and the 
wholesale destruction of his- 
toric buildings (or their 
conversion into petrol 
stations). 

Its campaigning and back- 
stairs lobbying in Whitehall 
contributed to foe creation of 
Green Belts, control of ribbon 
development, creation of na- 
tional paries and foe develop- 
ment of foe town and country 
pfenning system. More re- 
cently, its campaign to balance 
subsidies to fa rme r s with grant 
aid to conservation was re- 
flected in the designation of 



6 We need to 
show people 
that we can 
reflect their 
concerns 5 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 124 

ACROSS rmTT 

I Factions of split (6) » » I “ 

4 Ribbed dress fabric 
<61 

7 Calf meal (4) 

8 Supporter iS) 

9 Hairiess horse tail (7) 

11 Perch ( 5 ) 

12 UK official journal 
(6-71 

15 Overcharge (5) 

16 Extend (7) 

20 Atrocity (8) 

21 Stout stick (4) 

22 Score (6) 

23 Shoulder cape (6) 

DOWN 

1 Small number (7) 

2 Courage (5) 

3 Gen Gordon enemy 
(5) 

4 Armoured combat 
vehicle (4) 

5 Grief relief (7) - 

6 Opinion (5) 

SOLUTION TO NO H23 

ACROSS; 1 Semite 4 Rotter 9 Majorca 10 Dumps 11 Brad 

SES57 br^^vS”" , » R " ck 22H * d “ 

DOWTI: 1 Sump 2 Major 3 Tiredness 5 Old 6 Tempera 7 Re- 

lis, 'oST"” 1SQuOKta ' > 6Y “ t 



10 In midst of (5) 
31 Shaving tool (5) 

13 Offensive (7) 

14 Display (7) 


IS Sugary (5) 

17 Secret meeting (5) 

18 Dutch flower (5) 

19 Somme ridge (4) 


Far enoQgk Robin Grove- White between green belt and M25 


environmentally sensitive ar- 
eas last summer. 

It can criticize as robustly as 
any amenity group. “Cavalier, 
superficial and blatantly 
uniair”, said Robin Grove- 
White, executive director of 
foe CPRE, in a statement last 
week on tbe select committee 
report on the Channel Tunnel 
Bill He accused it of “high 
.handedness, under brutal 
.backstairs government 
pressure”. 

Last year foe executive sur- 
prised some of its county types 
by appointing a film producer 
as its president to replace the 
eminent planner. Sir Colin 
Buchanan. David Puttnam 
came in breathlessly asserting 
his credentials — he lives in a 
converted mill in Wiltshire. 

. Puttnam's appointment was 
the most conspicuous sign of a 
shift in projection for the 
organisation, with its battal- 
ions of solid professionals, 
planners and retired admin- 
istrators. But there are not 
many genuine rustics in its 43 
county branches. 

“We did have a problem”, 
says Grove-White. “Despite 
the things we were doing and 
the influence we were exerting 
CPRE has been perceived in 
terms of privitased and sed- 


entary rural dwellers. Puttnam 
helps communicate that we 
are energetic. He has a lot of 
pull in spheres we did not 

inhabi t" 

• The CPRE has only 32,000 
members, compared with tbe 
National Trust’s 1.3 miiHm, 
“We should have more 
members” said Grove- White. 
“As we become better known 
we generate expectations 
which cannnot be fulfilled. 
We need to show local people 
we reflect their interests. We 
are also important to town 
dwellers as a cultural force. 
The English countryside has 
resonances for people who 
don’t live in it.” 

The council is preparing for 
its biggest challenge, respond- 
ing to changes in land use in 
the countryside to counter 
EEC surpluses, the problems 
of withdrawing land from 
production or diversifying its 
use, and possible changes to 
the planning system, “which 
could lake us back to where we 
came In.” Grove-White sees 
little prospect of foe CPRE 
c am p ai g n ing itself out of 
existence. 

Gareth Hnw Davies 

© Haw H awi pqa ira LM 1W 


The Present with a Future* 

Move into part}’ power -fc 
A icola Shu (man roasts die hosts 

Eat out and be hi ★ 

• Meredith EtheringtouSmith says where 

Be merry merry well-dressed in ★ 
all-over Christinas country-house clothes 

Earn £1 million a year at 35 k 
Nicholas Coleridge tots it up 

Find filth amusing ★ 

A lexand ra A rtley meets the grandest fluff 
Look and feel divine 'it 




ueen 


^ i 1 1 1. i iin - . :;J :i |; |||. , k . n; , 0 ,j. 

J • -:i' e 1 1.:: I .1 - \ U,, lX .| 

I Ik- -i | '( ■ m ;n [., 

(lilt subscription £2].(H) 


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Post to: The Subscription Manager. Quadrant Subscription Services. FREEPOST 
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TSlfig 







THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


--- 





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17 


FRIDAY PAGE 




her art 


ftespmjkwattr 


on her sleeve 


I ts been 10 years since Dory 
Previn Iasi sang in London. 
Even through the fog of time 
and changing women’s issues I 
remember her touching cour- 
age and wit in those days. An 
agonizing divorce from Andre 
Previn had seemed ail the more 
humiliating as the conductor pub- 
licly played happy families with 
actress Mia Farrow. Together they 
adopted a litter of beautiful, needy 
children and added their own. 

Dory Previn had none. She didn't 
seem to have anything much at ail. 
but what she had she capitalized on. 
Her angst spun off every record 
player from Coldwater Canyon to 
ihe King's Road. In and out of 
mental institutions and hooked on 
pills, she wrote a book. Midnight 
Baby, recalling a home life so 
troubled by her Irish labourer 
father’s instability that Anais Nin 
called it the most tragic childhood 
that could happen to a sensitive 
child. According to Previn it was a 
piece of Dickens in New Jersey. 

If pain is the stuff of creation 
Previn had a seemingly endless well. 
But it all seemed to evaporate in her 
songs, leaving only the humour and 
the guts to inspire all those women 
trying to find where they began and 
the men ended in tbeir lives. 

Humour is the keynote. And a 
good dose of the femininity with 
which too many women at the time 
dispensed. Now, at 60, Previn can 
still flash a smile at a stranger which 
draws the fine, pale skin tight over 
her beautiful bones. Add a mass of 
red (angled hair, tinted glasses and a 
wardrobe of layered sweaters and a 
wide-brimmed hat and you might 
think she had something to hide. 

Yet Previn says her secret is the 
opposite. She cured herself by facing 
it all out. As she wrote in a later 
book, Bogtrotter, “when I realized I 


Dory Previn is back 
in Britain, having 
overcome despair 


with wit and guts. 


Clenys Roberts found 


her happy to have 


nothing left to hide 


had nothing left to lose I realized I 
had nothing left to hide". 

It was the point at which she 
married for a second time — to 
painter Jobey Baker — gave up her 
fear of flying and moved from the 
madness of California to the quiet 
ofMassachussetts. 

There the Bakers lead an ex- 


tremely disciplined life, working in 

ofthe 


separate studios on either side of 
road so as not to disturb each other 
- “we actually don’t get on that 
well” Previn says. 

She gets up very early in the 
morning and the first thing she does 
is write down her dreams of the 
night before. She's been doing that 
ever since we in England last heard 
from her and by now must have one 
of the most impressive journals of 
the sub-conscious on record. Her 
inspiration and method come from 
it. 

All this has freed her to turn her 
humorous warning eye on the world 
as wellas her personal problems and 
this is what she will sing about in the 
Don mar Warehouse Theatre, 
Covent Garden for the next five 
weeks. 

“I've always believed I was a few 
hairs of the eyelash ahead of other 
people, especially women,” she 
says. “1 was judged a schizophrenic 


and now we live in a schizophrenic 
universe. Schizophrenia is the mal- 
ady of the late 20th century. I see 
people walking down the street in 
exactly the same condition as I used 
to see them in the mental hospitaL 
In the Fifties everyone on the street 
was neat and together. Now we are 
having a massive collective nervous 
breakdown.” 

Previn peppers her talk with a 
great deal of fashionable Califor- 
nian astrology, right side of tire 
brain theory, and Jungian 
synchro nid ty. It is enough to scare 
most down-to-earth people half to 
death, but the proof that her 
obsessions work lies in a formidable 
lyric talent. “If Marilyn Monroe had 
been a writer she would have been 
Dory Previn,” one critic said. 

These days she lectures American 
university students, telling them 
how it's done. The first question 
most ask is how to find a publisher. 
“If that’s all you want you are 
wasting valuable time with me 
when you could be out looking for 
one right now,” she replies. 

T o those who want to learn 
how to write songs she 
offers the following ad- 
vice: “Take the simplest 
verse you know, some- 
thing like Irving Berlin’s Always.** 
she says. In its short form it 
contains all the essential ingredients 
of a love affair - the hope, the 
doubt, the commitment 
“Analyse it line by line,” Previn 
says. “OK, got it? Now write a 
second verse.” Very few can. 

Previn's methods continue to be 
equally painstaking. She practises 
writing in her journal with both her 
left hand and her right and both 
forwards and backwards. 



Dory Previn: “a few hairs of the eyelash ahead of other people* 


The effort has completely cured 
any writer’s block ami given the 
balance to her personality which 


previously had to be chemically 
induced by the medical profession. 
“I have committed myself to the 
outside world.” she says. 

Of course she's also of an age 
when women simply have to find 
themselves — or else. “It is amazing 
how many women of my generation 
had to be inspired by men,” she 
says. Her first mentor was a 
professor of literature who took a 
girl who had only read the comics 
and introduced her to Joyce and 
Yeats. 


Her second was Andre Previn, 
whom she saw on television in 


Chicago when she was babysitting 
and made, she says, a powerful sub- 
conscious mental effort to meet. 
Four months later a completely 
novice lyric writer, she was working 
with him at MGM. 

It was when she recognized the 
part she had played in the break-up 
of that marriage that she knew she 
had a future. “I looked at my feet as 
! was walking down the street and I 
thought, ‘You’ve really blown your 
life’. ! can remember the exact 
moment I can even remember the 
shoes I was wearing.” 

© TtoMM NmHpapara Ltd 198G 


Divorce of the incompatible statistics 


It all started with an article in 
an American magazine. Nine 
months ago. People got bold of 
a survey conducted by two 
Yale sociologists and a Har- 
vard economist, containing 
some surprising statistics 
about marriage among pro- 
fessional women. According 
to the survey — based on 
census information from 1982 
— an unmarried white female 
college graduate aged 25 had 
only a 50 per cent chance of 
ever maijying. By the time she 
was 30, it was 10 per cent, by 
35, it was down to five per 
cent, and at 40, it was, they 
generously conceded, 
“perhaps*' one per cent. Black 
women fared even worse. 

The magazine is not exactly 
known for its quietly under- 
stated style; so it was some- 
thing less than a surprise when 
the cover of their March 31 
issue bore glamour shots of 
four Hollywood actresses in 
their thirties with the headline 
“Are These Old Maids?" . 
What is remarkable is that the 
ripples of shock are still 
spreading. 


Does a 40-year-old single American woman have as much chance of finding 


a husband as of being killed by terrorists? It depends which figures you look at 


The survey was taken up 
and quoted in newspapers 
from coast to coast Newsweek 
offered the cheery consid- 
eration that, according to 
those statistics, unmarried 40- 
year-olds are “more likely to 
be killed by a terrorist” than to 
marry. And campus surveys 
suggested that single female 
college graduates spent a sum- 
mer surreptitiously eyeing 
their contemporaries and 
wondering which of tbeir 
number were, and which were 
not. to be among the lucky 50 
(or 10 or five or one) per cent. 

Ail of which, according to 
Catherine Johnson, a Los 
Angeles-based journalist, 
feminist spokesperson (and, 
incidentally, a 34-year-old 
college graduate who married 
at the age of 32) is not only 
unfortunate but unnecessary. 
She has joined a growing 
number of sociologists, 
psychologists and com- 



mentators in not only 
condemning media treatment 
of the survey but in question- 
ing its motives. 

“There’s an element of re- 
venge there”, Johnson be- 
lieves. “It’s as if someone is 


saying, ’You women thought 
you were so smart, you 
thought you could have it all, 
have a career and delay your 
marriage and still marry. Well, 
you can V 

“The way in which the 
survey has been presented 
taps the very worst fears of 
women, particularly those in 
their thirties, who can feel 
their biological time clocks 
ticking away. These women 
believe the only way they can 
get a husband is by a miracle. 

“One told me she was going 
to start preparing her daughter 
now for the idea that she may 
not get married. Her daughter 
is 12 years old; and since the 
survey is based on the sex 
ratio among baby boomers 
and the rather sweeping 
supposition that women 
marry men three years older 
then themselves, there is no 
way this girl is even going to 
be affected by it But her 


mother is preparing her any- 
way. That’s how hysterical it 
has become/’ 

Even more depressing, she 
says, is the effect it is having 
on men. “They are becoming 
empowered in a rather 
destructive way. To put it 
more plainly, they’re turning 
into creeps before our very 
eyes. Just the other day, I was 
talking to a 26-year-old Holly- 
wood baby mogul type, and he 
was saying ’Oh yeah, I date 
women in their thirties. 
They’re so grateful if anyone 
looks at them, I always feel I 
am doing them a big fevour.' 

“I pointed out to him that 
because the sex ratio has 
changed over the years men of 
his age are actually at a 
numerical disadvantage 
against women, and he looked 
blank. He couldn't imagine 
that he would ever be in the 
position of not being able to 
find someone. 


“But if be carries on acting 
- that way, he might find 
himself past 32 and alone. The 
. saying ’All the good ones are 
taken' could easily start apply- 
ing to women instead of to 
men.” 

The good news for single 
professionals is that rescue is 
at hand. Census worker 
Jeanne Moorman is preparing 
a paper for the Population 
Association of America that 
will strongly contest the find- 
ings of the earlier survey. It 
will, for example, give an 85 
per cent chance of marriage at 
25, a 65 per cent chance at 30, 
40 per cent at 35 and 22 per 
cent at 40. 

Since both sets of statistics 
are based on projections of 
future behaviour, rather than 
records of past, the question of 
which is the more accurate is 
an open and — for the 
beleagured American pro- 
fessional women — a burning 
one. 


Gabriefle Donnelly 

© Times Nenpipm Ltd 1986 


MEDICAL BRIEFING 


A rash 
approach 


Parents can try too hard with 
their children and at no time is 
this more apparent than when 
they devise their own diets to 
treat eczema. Some prac- 
titioners claim that a wide 
range of diseases can be cored 
by drastic dietary regimes. 
Recent research has shown 
that these can kad to children 
being deprived of essential 
nourishment — without help- 
ing to cure their eczema. 

The National Eczema Soci- 
ety branches a campaign and a 
diet guide next week to help 
educate parents about aller- 
gies. At the same time, it will 
warn them about bogus prac- 
titioners who set op bizarre 
dinks which prey on the 


anxieties of parents of chil- 
dren with severe eczema — 
parents who are prepared to 
try practical])' anything to get 
rid of the trouble. 

Although allergy to some 
foods plays a part in atopic 
eczema in between a third to a 
half of ell children, the causes 
are legion and other physical 
and emotional factors are 
equally important. Food is not 
the only allergen which will 
provoke a reaction; 
frousemites, pollen and pets 
can be equally responsible. 

Parents are also warned 
about the often well-meant 
advice against the ose of 
emollients — which are essen- 
tial to keep the skin supple — 
for fear that they may contain 
steroids. They do not; and in 
any case not all steroids are 
dangerous; some, indeed, are 
essential for treatment 


The gift of success 

m * 



Existing methods of in vitro (test-tube) fertiliza- 
tion result in approximately 15 per cent of 
would-be mothers becoming pregnant, but only 
half eventually give birth. Although the women 
are prepared to accept these odds and the 
inconvenience of the present procedure, re- 
search workers have been exploring other 
methods in an attempt to obtain better results. Professor R. 
H. Asch. working in San Antonio, Texas, Dr D. Malloy in 
Melbourne and Professor lan Craft in London have devised 
similar modifications - known as GIFT in America and 
Australia and T-set in Britain - which simplify the procedure 
and result in more successful deliveries - Craft’s cases show 
an overall success rate of between 20 and 30 per cent 
Instead of arranging artificial fertilization in the laboratory 
they use the woman's own Fallopian tube as the place for 
ovum and sperm to conjugate. The collection of foe egg has 
not changed, and hormone therapy ensures that more than 
one ovum ripens. While ripening their development is 
monitored by means of ultrasound. The ova are then collected 
at the optimum time, mixed with sperm and introduced into the 
Fallopian tube; usually two ova and sperm are introduced into 
each of the tubes. 


Aid to age 



For most of the 
l over-fifties 
! sane loss of re- 
cent memory is 
one of the acc- 
eptable effects 
1 of ageing; tat in 
others these same symptoms 
may be the insidious start of 
Alzbeimer's disease. 

Senlk dementia was, mtil 
recently, attributed to a failure 
of the blood supply to the 
brain, either as a result of a 
series of small strokes or the 
gradual blocking of the cere- 
bral arteries with atheroma. 

Now, although those vas- 
cular causes are sometimes to 
blame, dementia is thought to 
be more often the result of the 
primary failure of the acetyl- 
choline receptor neurones in 
the central nervous tissue — 
Alzheimer's disease. As 
acetylcholine is a neuro- 
transmitter, failure of the 
receptor mechanism or inad- 
equate acetylcholine results In 
loss of inteDectnal power. 

The New England Journal of 
Medicine reported recently 
that Dr William Koopman 
Summers of the University of 
California had treated 17 pa- 
tients suffering from 
Alzheimer’s with THA, an 
inhibitor of the enzyme 
cholinesterase which reduces 
the level of acetylcholine. Six- 
teen of his patients showed an 
improvement in memory and 
their speech improved. One 
even returned to the golf 


course. Unfortunately, they 
relapsed later. 

Doctors are seeking a means 
of early diagnosis of 
Alzheimer's so that it can be 
distinguished from other 
causes of ageing. Dr Peter 
Davis told the annual meeting 
of the Society of Neuroscience 
in New York that he had 
isolated a protein, A68, which 
was uniquely present in foe 
brain and cerebrospinal Unids 
of Alzheimer sufferers. An- 
other brain peptide, 
somatostatin had been eval- 
uated as a marker, but height- 
ened levels also occur in 
depressed patients. 


Right scent 



Research has 
shown that 
male sweat can 
help to make a 
woman's peri- 
ods more regu- 
lar and less 
painful. Philadelphia doctors 
George Pretti, a biochemist 
and Winifred Cutler, a biolo- 
gist, have shown that the 
smell of foe pheromones in 
male sweat has a stabilizing 
effect on a woman's 
reproductive life. 

The scientists asked men 
to wear pads in their armpits 
from which sweat could be 
extracted and painted on foe 
upper lips of some women, 
whose menstrual cycles be- 
came regular. Other women, 
treated with a placebo, 
experienced no change. 


Dr Thomas Stuttaford 



FIRST PERSON 


" Margery Roberts 

Breast-feuding 


of How 1 admire the Kb- 
M erated, but criticized, 
memu mother in . Barbara 
AmieTs article (New 
Taboos For Old Val- 
ues, November 12) who 
openly breast-fed ber baby at a 
dinner party. When I had my 
first child I started out with 
similarly enlightened views. 
Now, breast-feeding my third 
child, 1 am sadly hardened to 
the feet that, for most people,' 
breast-feeding is something to 
be hidden away from the 
public. 

But I am usually so swathed 
in modest garments and 
neckwear that very little ofthe 
baby is visible, let alone any 
uncovered areas of me. Even 
so, I fed horribly self con- 
scious and imagine that every- 
body must be staring at me 
disapprovingly. Perhaps they 
are. 

In the maternity ward, 
mothers breast-feed their ba- 
bies: 
nureir 

them for giving .... 

the best nourishment avail- 
able. They look pityingly at 
the few mothers who keep 
dashing off to the cupboard in 
the night nursery to fetch 
unappetizing little while 
bottles. 

Outside in the big wide 
world it is a different story. 
Breast may still be best but 
only if the whole tasteless 
business is performed in pri- 
vate. It is no wonder that so 
many mothers give up breast- 
feeding after the first few 
weeks: they discover for them- 
selves that breast-feeding is a 
lonely and dispiriting activity. 

People who have never fed a 
baby do not realize how long it 
takes or how insistent the baby 
becomes if the supplies are 
delayed or cut short. Shopping 
in crowded stores, visiting 
stately homes, going almost 
anywhere can be nerve- 



racking experiences with a 
young baby when there is no 
obvious haven. Many times I 
have changed a nappy on a 
duty or wet floor and perched 
myself miserably on a loo lid 
to feed a desperate intent. 

Men, particularly un- 
married ones, may perhaps be 
forgiven for finding the sight 
of a partly uncovered mother 
feeding her baby a little un- 
comfortable. But why do so 
many women also dis- 
approve? 

When I was breast-feeding 
my second child, I was the 
secretary of a church commit- 
tee. We usually met in the 
gloomy and cramped vestry, 
sitting on decrepit -chairs. 
Because my little son liked to 
feed for much of the evening, I 
decided to invite the members 
of the committee io meet 
instead at my bouse, where i 
could most conveniently com- 
bine my duties. 

On the first occasion we had 
a record attendance and, as I 
doled out the coffee and 
biscuits, I congratulated my- 
self on dreaming up such a 
successful plan. The next time, 
the numbers fell and, even- 
tually, someone told me 
“tactfully” that several mem- 
bers of the almost entirely 
female committee disap- 
proved of my breast-feeding in 
front of them. I resigned. 

At dinner parties and eve- 
ning functions, the hostess 
usually directs me firmly to a 
“warm bedroom” where l can 
give my baby a feed in private. 
So I end up spending half the 
evening there, listening to the 
sound of happy conversation 
and chinking cups or glasses 
floating up from downstairs 
and reflecting on the sure 
knowledge that, had I chucked 
in the breast business 
in favour of the de- 
spised bottle, 1 could 
be down there too. 


TO TEAR OUT OUR SHOP-FRONT, 
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UP OUR PRICE LIS' 


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i 



Chi Monday Dec. 15th 
our Piccadilly Fur Superstore ,‘s 
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UP TO 









THE TIMS FRIDAY DECEMBERS 1986 



David Hale on the causes, and consequences, of the great dollar deficit 


David Watt 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Jack’s frosty 
Christmas 

Jack Slipper, the former Flying 
Squad chief who 12 years ago 
tailed to bring Ronnie Biggs back 
from Rio, will be watching his 
television particularly closely this 
Christmas. The BBC is showing a 
dramatization of Slip- Up, journal- 
ist Anthony Delano's book about 
the fiasco. Despite repeated re- ! 
quests from Slipper and his solic- 
itors to see it before transmission, 
the BBC has refused on the 
grounds that other people por- 
trayed could also demand a pre- 
view. Having watched a 
clandestine copy this week, I am 
not surprised at the BBC’s cau- 
tion. I was amazed at actor Jeremy 
Kemp's comic portrayal of Slipper 
as a bumbling copper out of his 
depth amid the niceties of extra- 
dition. who resorts to frequent 
libation. “I am disgusted with the 
BBC for not getting in touch with 
me.” he says, promising he will 
wait until transmission before 
deciding whether to sue. 

Unfair sex 

Sisterly solidarity in the House of 
Commons has collapsed over the 
latest Ed win a Currie affair. La- 
bour MP Ann Qywd’s query over 
the health contract given to the 
accountancy firm employing 
Edwina’s husband and brother-in- 
law has led Tory members Anna 
McCurley and Elizabeth Peacock 
to table a protest motion. They 
wonder if the link would have 
been remarked at all had the 
honourable member concerned 
not been female, and conclude; 
“This kind of implication with its 
sexist undertones does nothing to 
advance the interests of politi- 
cally-minded women associated 
with successful men of comm- 
erce". They will be signing their 
letters “yours so ro rally” next 




S» s 




• Cyprus Always dearly wants to 
keep all sides happy in the Middle 
East While omitting foe name of 
Israel from the eastern Mediterra- 
nean, a caption declares its free 
map (above) to have “no political 
significance”. I do hope Arab 
terrorists are pacified. 

Gift wrapped 

CND vice-chairman Joan Rud- 
dock, who has long been hoping 
for a Labour seat to fight at foe 
next election, could be getting an 
early Christmas present on Sat- 
urday week — adoption by foe 
Deptford party. Although she is 
one of 36 hopefuls, she is well 
ahead in foe race for nominations. 
Only two things stand in her way. 
Oddly, at a time when Labour’s 
unilateralism is denting its poll 
rating, she is considered by some 
to be too right-wing. The other is 
that during these last crucial arm- 
twisting days, she is on a CND 
mission — to Moscow. 


BARRY FANTONI 




0 O 








Wv 


‘Remind me, is it the sort of thing 
Mrs White house is for or against?' 

Off the record 

The Reform Club’s days as haven 
from the House for our political 
betters are are over, judging by a 
memo just posted in the library 
announcing the proposed 
cancellation of the club's £1,100 
annual subscription to Hansard. 
Fiona Sailer, the librarian, tells me 
that despite some members’ pro- 
tests — and to the surprise of foe 
general committee — it appears 
that only one member now con- 
sults foe official parliamentary 
record with any regularity. 



re <2 

G 0 

0 & 
€> 

As 


He NOT VAUP ir WHOIffl OR R£VOMP 


Priority 


The Inner London Education 
Authority is facing its most serious 
financial crisis; to make its next 
budget legal, it has to make cuts of 
£100 million. An odd moment, 
one might think, for it to refit 
deputy leader Bernard Wilcher’s 
County Hall office with a sprung 
three-piece suite in light apricot, 
an oak standard lamp with apricot 
shade, a new 75 per cent wool 
carpet, matching grey velour cur- 
tains. grey swivel chair, Georgian 
desk and refrigerator. Tory leader 
David Avery is to ask foe cost to 
the ratepayer of this lavish 
redecoration of the office once 
happily occupied by Ken Living- 
stone. 

PHS 


. At current rates of borrowing, the 
i US will have an external debt 
i approaching one trillion dollars or 
20 per cent of GNP by foe early 
r 1990s. Should the world's wealtbi- 
r est nation be a major capital 
■, importer? Will it some day have to 
run a large trade surplus to 
: generate export income for debt 
servicing? With a large external 
i debt and a potentially weak cur- 
I rency, will it be willing to sustain 
heavy external defence spending 
on behalf of Asian and European 
countries with much healthier 
balance of payments? 

To answer these questions, one 
must begin by asking why the US 
has emerged as a major capital 
importer during the 1980s. Most 
analysts regard the development 
as a freakish abnormality. Since 
1981, the Reagan administration 
has been pursuing a highly expan- 
sionary fiscal policy, including 
large tax cuts and big increases in 
defence spending, while Europe 
and Japan have been reducing 
their budget deficits. 

As a result, the US, during foe 
early 1980s, inadvertently evolved 
into the world economy’s bor- 
rower and spender of last resort, 
rescuing other countries from the 
deflationary consequences of their . 
own policy mixes. Students of 
long-term business cycles may 
argue one day that there would 
have been another world de- 
pression during the early 1980s if 
the US bad not miraculously 
elected a president who had the 
capacity to talk like Herbert 
Hoover while borrowing like 
Franklin Roosevelt 
But foal does not tell foe whole 
story. The changes now occurring 
in foe world balance of payments 
are also foe result of structural 
economic developments which 
could the US to remain a 
moderate capital importer during 
foe 1990s even if its budget deficit 
shrinks. 

First, private investors now 
enjoy more freedom of movement 
in deploying their capital than at 
any time since foe Second World 
War. In foe past decade, there has 
been a steady international pro- 
gression towards liberalization of 
all financial regulations, while new 
developments in computer and 
communications technology have 
greatly reduced the transaction 
cost of international investing. As 
the US has foe world's largest 
financial markets, foe deregula- 
tion of European and Japanese 
savings flows unleashed a pent-up 
demand for North American 
securities. 

Savings flows to the US were 
also encouraged by the higher 
investment returns resulting from 
foe Reagan administration's tax 
policies, which reduced the top 
marginal tax rate on US personal 
income to its lowest level since the 
19205 while also significantly 
expanding corporate depredation 
allowances. The higher after-tax 
return on US assets encouraged an 
upsurge of capital spending which 
quickly outstripped foe country's 
relatively inelastic supply of 
domestic savings. 

(In an age of capital mobility, it 
is logical that a country which 
subsidizes savings but not invest- 
ment (Japan) should export cap- 
ital to a country which subsidizes 
investment but not savings (the 
US).) 

The savings imbalance, result- 
ing from higher American invest- 
ment returns, was corrected by the 
rise in foe US trade deficit after 
1981. This process occurred 
through appreciation of foe ex- 
change rate and foe increased 
penetration of US markets by 
foreign exp orters. Ironically, what 

Stockholm 

Ten months after the assassina- 
tion of Olof Palme, their prime 
minister. Swedes are starting to 
demand results from a police 
investigation which has so for cost 
more than £3 million and been 
riddled with incompetence. 

increasingly it resembles those 
inconclusive searches for Soviet 
submarines off foe Swedish coast. 
The killer is still free, foe police 
have no murder weapon and they 
Ifove only a sketchy description of 
foe assassin. Yet Stockholm’s 
police chief Hans Hoimer, still 
masts that he will get his man 
rewSwcdes share his convic- 
tion. There is a growing sense of 

murdered foe country’s only ma- 
jor international political figure 
There is also 
extreme discomfort that a national 
reputation for efficiency is being 
tarnished by a police investigation 
that sometimes borders on force 
Some examples: foe police fed- 
ure to seal off foe inner city area 
where Palme was killed and check 
trains leaving the central station; 
foe discovery of two bullets — so 
far the only real dues — by 
members of the public outside the 
area cordoned off; five weeks after 
foe assassination the use of a ; 
Swedish air force jet which 
screamed back and forth taking 
aerial photographs of the area < 
around the murder scene — appar- 
ently in an attempt to locate the j 
weapon, a Smith and Wesson \ 
revolver. 1 

Now, iu an 80-page report, the ' 


How the world 
will pay for 
America’s 
built-in debt 


foe Treasury gave US industry 
through bigger tax allowances, tire 
currency markets took back 
through a commercially un- 
competitive dollar exchange rate. 

The third structural change has 
been demography. The popula- 
tions of Japan and continental 
northern Europe are aging rapidly 
compared with that of North 
America. These demographic 
trends have made the US a natural 
capital importer. 

In most societies, middle-aged 
people accumulate financial assets 
to prepare for retirement while 
young people borrow to establish 
households Hence, in an open 
and integrated world economy, it 
is logical for rich but aging 
societies to export capital to 
countries with younger popula- 
tions in order to build op a stock 
of investments for generating 
future retirement income. 

Many commentators object to 
the fret that a country as wealthy 
as foe US is absorbing such a large 
share of the world's surplus sav- 
ings. But in the 19th century it was 
common for British overseas 
investment to go to countries with 
per capita incomes higher than 
Britain's, including Australia, 
fWnada, and the US. Because 
many developing countries with 
populations younger than the US 
have lost foe mechanisms for 
attracting foreign savings which 
existed during foe colonial era, 
there is a crisis of senility and 
adolescence in today's global bal- 
ance of payments. Mexico, for 
example, is exporting people to 
foe US because its economic 
policies are not conducive to 
importing capita] for employing 
them at home. This will be hard to 
reverse without radical reforms. 

Other Industrialised 
countries mast 
grow more rapidly 

All foe same, the US will have to 
reduce its trade deficit gradually. 
At present, it has a trade deficit 
equal to 4 per cent of GNP and a 
small surplus on investment and 
service income which produces a 
total current account deficit equal 
to nearly 3 J per cent of GNP. As 
the surplus on investment income 
shifts into a large deficit during the 
early 1990s, the US will have to 
halve its trade deficit as a share of 
national income merely to sta- 
bilize the current account deficit at 
2.5 to 3.5 per cent of GNP. 

To do this, the government will 
have to reduce its borrowing and 
accept slower growth of domestic 
spending, and the private sector 
mil have to allocate more re- 
sources to manufacturing in- 
dustry. While the Reagan admin- 
istration's tax policy gave a 
significant boost to capital spend- 
ing after 1982, foe over-valuation 
of the dollar encouraged an over- 
concentration of investment in 
non-tradeable sectors, such as 
commercial real estate. 


If the US is to reduce its trade 

deficit without pushing the world 
economy into a recession, other 
countries also will have to grow 
more rapidly. At foe “Group 
Five” meeting of western finance 
ministers in September, 1985, it 
was agreed to pursue more expan- 
sionary economic policies in order 
to help the US reduce its trade 
imbalance, but in 1 986 most of the 
stimulus to domestic spending in 
Europe and Japan came from the 
benign e Sects of collapsing oil 
prices. In 1987, there will have to 
be substantive changes in Euro- 
pean and Japanese economic pol- 
icy, induding interest rate cuts 
and tax reduction, if faltering 
exports are not to reverse this 
momentum by depressing manu- 
facturing output. 

The deterioration now occur- 
ring in America's international 
financial status will ultimately 
require Europe and Japan to 
spend more on defence as welL 
With an external debt exceeding 
20 per cent of GNP, continuing 
pressure for cuts in public spend- 
ing, and a potentially weak cur- 
rency. it is doubtfid that the 
American people will be prepared 
to spend as heavily on defence 
during the 1990s as they have in 
foe past 

There win be increasing pres- 
sure from both major political 
parties to scale back military 
expenditure, especially in coun- 
tries seen as having strong econo- 
mies. Japan still spends only about 
1 per cent of GNP on deforce, or 
the same as the US before 1939, 
white Germany spends about 3 per 
cent. It will not be easy for the 
major industrial nations to accept 
these changes. The US is a debtor 
nation with the habits of a creditor 
nation; Germany and Japan are 
creditor nations with foe habits of 
debtor nations. 

In fret, there are many striking 
historical similarities between the 
changing international roles of foe 
US and Britain during the late 
1920s and the US and Japan 
today. In foe halfcentury before 
1914, foe British balance of pay- 
ments had been the finchpin of the 
international economic system. 
Britain had accumulated a large 
stock of external assets that gen- 
erated a stream of investment 
equal to nearly 8 percent of GNP. 
It used this income to run a trade 
deficit that allowed developing 
countries, such as the US and 
Argentina, to earn export income 
for servicing their overseas loans. 

After 1914, wartime borrowing 
and asset sates crippled Britain's 
ability to export capital and the 
US became the world’s major 
creditor power. Under the leader- 
ship of Benjamin Strong, foe 
Federal Reserve pursued an 
expansionary monetary policy 
during the mid- 1920s to en- 
courage capital outflows and 
stimulate world growth. But while 
the US was eager to assume 
Britain’s rote as a supplier of 
capital, it continued to adhere to 


Christopher Mosey on the Palme mnrder hunt 

Will Clintan ever 
get his man? 


government’s chief law officer, 
Justice Chancellor Bengt 
HandaU, has accused foe police of 
malting serious mistakes. In 
particular be criticizes the police 
team for showing a photograph of 
the prime suspect, Victor 
Gunnarsson, a 33-year-old 
rughtwarchman linked with the 
right-wing European Workers’ 
Party, to foe main police witness 
immediately before the identifica- 
tion parade: 

One factor in foe apparent 
bungling could be that Sweden’s 
basically conformist, well ordered 
society tends to blunt individual- 
ity and personal initiative. Its 
bureaucratic excess is legmdary. 
When a police officer arrived to 
find Mrs Lisbet Palme sobbing 
over the body of her husband as it 
lay in foe snow on February 28, his 
first thought was to demand 
production of her Id entity card. 

To show how hard he has been 
trying, Hoimer — known as 
Clintan, foe Swedish diminutive 
for Clint, as in Eastwood — 
announces that 14,577 people 
have been interviewed. 2,484 guns 
have been checked and 24,340 
documents are stored in the police 



its 19 th-century tradition of 
protectionist trade policy. As with 
Japan in foe 1980s, the US did not 
understand the need for a nation 
to liberalize its trade policies once 
it assumed a world creditor statas. 

Not only has Japan traditionally 
pursued mercantilist trade , poli- 
cies. Its central bank has also 
refused to acknowledge the im- 
plications of foe worldwide col- 
lapse in commodity prices since 
1981. Instead of allowing Japanese 
living standards and property 
values to adjust upward m re- 
sponse to foe huge improvement 
in foe country's trade account, 
policy makers in Tokyo have tried 
to force foe world economy to 
cope with tire developing coun- 
tries' balance of payments crisis 
solely through a massive increase 
in the US trade deficit financed by 
borrowing from Japan. 

As a result. Japan's trade sur- 
plus with foe developing countries 
has actually increased since 1980 
while foe US has swung from a 
trade surplus of $26 billion to a 
deficit of nearly $20 billion. If 
Japan had allowed its home 
economy to grow more rapidly 
during the first half of the decade, 
the world recovery would have 
been more broadly based and 
developing countries would not 
have been so dependent upon foe 1 
US economy to g e ne ra t e export 
income for debt servicing. 

Devaluation threat 
to encourage 
foreign expansion 

Fortunately, the flexibility of 
today’s exchange rate system com- 
pared to foe 1920s is permitting 
both foe debtor countries and the 
US to cope with their trade and 
debt servicing problems through 
competitive devaluation rather 
than just competitive deflation. 
The US Treasury Secretary, James 
Baker, has been using the threat of 
dollar devaluation to export 
American monetary reflation to 
Europe and Japan. 

This policy has been a useful 
battering ram for pushing E urop e 
and Japan in a more expansionary 
direction, but there are limits to 
how rapidly a debtor nation can 
depress its exchange rate without 
provoking a financial crisis. The 
industrial nations need a new 
policy framework to deal with 
America’s re-emergence as a large 
external debtor. 

The US has to devalue tire 
dollar and reduce its trade deficit 
at a pace which does not destabi- 
lize its bond market or simply 
export recession to other conn- 
tries. Germany and Japan have to 
assume more of the traditional 
responsibilities of creditor na- 
tions. 

As the increasing pressure for 
trade restrictions in the US Con- 
gress today will testify, without 
effective multilateral co-opera- 
tion, there is a danger that foe 
resurgent American confidence of 
foe Reagan era could deteriorate 
into a frustrated post-Reagan 
nationalism, spawning a dan- 
gerous new mix of isolationism, 
protectionism, and olilateral dis- 
armament in American politics. 
Under such circumstances, the 
Reagan economic boom of the 
early 1980s would not have pre- 
vented a world depression; it 
would merely have postponed it 
OTtoMNnapapm, t9B6. 

The author is an economist with 
Kemper Financial Services. Chi- 
cago l This week he addressed the 
annual meeting of the Association 
of Business Economists in 
London. 


When secrecy 
is essential 


Amid foe stupefying tedium of foe 
Australian spy book case and all 
its ramifications there is only one 
glim mer of broad interest to be 
found (apart, that is, from foe mild 
pleasure we all take in seeing 
Authority making a public ass of 
itself). That point concerns the 
role of foe Attorney General, and 
his exclusion from foe small 
Tn wring of ministers which de- 
cided not to try to prevent 
Chapman Pinchers confidential 
disclosures being published in 
1981. 

Of course foe government tries 
to resolve this crux by lega l 
sophistry: the conclave under the 
Prime Minister in effect decided 
to authorize publication; ergo the 
question of criminality never 
arose and the Attorney General's 
presence was not needed . The 
critics reply that the ministerial 
decision was, in fret, a decision 
not to prosecute and the 
government's chief legal adviser 
should not have been excluded 
from it. And foe political verdict? 
Probably that there is not enough 
in it to be worth arguing about for 
more than a week or two. 

Nevertheless the incident illus- 
trates a more general question and 
echoes the fair more serious row 
going os across the Atlantic. The 
important issue in London, as in 
Washington, is not so much 
whether the government has fol- 
lowed foolish or mistaken policies 
as whether the national interest 
ever demands that it should be 
allowed to make its mistakes, 
unhampered by in t er f erence from 
other actors such as the legislature 
and the media. In other words, 
what are the proper limits of 
executive discretion? 

The case for Mrs Thatcher m 
the matter of Sir Michael Havers 
rests on practical considerations. 
“It’s pretty obvious”, she will 
have said to herself in 1981, “that 
supp ressing this Pincher book will 
cause much more trouble for MI5 
than it will cure; the sensible thing 
is to let it go. I won't bother 
Michael with this one because if I 
do he will stand on his constitu- 
tional dignity and get afl hot under 
his wig and probably tell me I can’t 
do foe sensible thing after alL I'll 
just have to settle it with Willie.” I 
cannot for foe life of me see that 
this is very reprehensible: a 
conspiracy, perhaps, but not a 
sinister one. 

A similar case can be mafe 
with only a bit more difficulty, for 
Admiral Poindexter and Colonel 
North in the White House. They 
probably said: “The President 
wants to get foe Middle East 
hostages out fast and the only way 
we can do it is by dealing with foe 
Ayatollah. Congress and the me- 
dia would go bananas if we tried 
that idea on them, but we'd never 
get anything done at all if we stuck 
to what those ignorant dudes up 
on the Hill think is okay. Like 
everyone in the White House from 
Thomas Jefferson (and probably 
foe virtuous George Washington) 
onwards we're occasionally ready 
do what’s necessary on the quiet”. 

There is something in this 
defence, too. Whether foe policies 
of particularpresidentsare right or 
wrong, the US constitution with 
its elaborate checks and balances 


and its emphasis mi evolutionary 
consensus is hopelessly ill-de- 
signed for foe purposes of a 
superpower with a global network 
of interests and alliances — more 
especially, one confronted with a 
totalitarian adversary whose 
capacity to devise and carry out a 
coherent strategy is very high. 
Given these difficulties, there is an 
overwhelming temptation to cut 
comers. Every administration 
from Kennedy's to the present has 
been involved in undercover 
skulduggery of a fairly massive 
kin d usually to circumvent, for the 
best of patriotic motives, the 
probable wishes of the American 
people and Congress. 

British constitutional practice 
gives more latitude to foe exec- 
utive, especially in foreign affairs, 
but the limitations are still there, 
to an extent that outsiders often 
find incredible. For instance, on a 
trip to India last month I was 
constantly assailed on the subject 
of foe Sikh extremist leaders now 
living in London. Everyone, 
induding Mrs Thatcher, agrees 
they are extremely unpleasant 
people whose presence is poison- 
ing Indo-British relations, so why 
don't we kick them out? One 
explains that they are legal res- 
idents. Don't be absurd, is the 
reply. A little harassment from the 
police, a few interruptions in the 
electricity supply, a couple of 
visits from the tax inspector: they 
would soon get the message. 

It is because foe reins on this 
kind of behaviour are, thank 
heaven, real that Britain and 
America are not police states; and 
it is because recent governments, 
with their strong r adical im- 
patience. have visibly chafed at 
the bit (and occasionally thrown it 
out) that Congress and Parliament 
and the libertarian lobbies in both 
countries are fighting for more and 
more oi>eoness and public 
accountability. The security ser- 
vices and foe National Secmrity 
Council have become foe centres 
of this struggle because they are 
foe most egregious and acknowl- 
edged examples of untrammelled 
executive discretion; they are the 
test case for the unwelcome propo- 
sition that there are subjects on 
which the gentlemen in Whitehall 
and White House must be as- 
sumed to know best and allowed 
to act on that assumption. 

Both governments are felling 
back in disarray at prerent because 
it is band to defend discretion in 
principle when practice has been 
so controversial and inept. But foe 
principle is still worth arguing 
about and perhaps, in some areas, 
worth defendii^. 

A journalist is apt to have his 
buttons stripped off fin- saying so, 
but speed and secrecy sometimes 
do matter more than openness, 
and future efficiency may some- 
times be impaired rather than 
improved by public exposure of 
mistakes. I am totally against 
unnecessary secrecy and believe 
that all power tends to corrupt. But 
if we assume, as an axiom, that 
none of our politicians is to be 
trusted under any circumstances 
unless some regulatory hand is 
ceaselessly monitoring their every 1 
action in detail, we shall get not 
better government but worse. 


Henry Stanhope 


Have oboe, will 
blow low 


Palme: fresh roses every day 

computer. And, of course, there 
was that arrest. 

The original charge against 
Gunnarson was dropped after the 
abortive identification parade that 
Handahl now complains about. 
He was given round-tho<lock 
police protection, questioned 
p g»in and his jacket sent to 
Wiesbaden for incondusive analy- 
sis after foe discovery of what were 
claimed to be microscopic gun- 
powder burns. He was released 
only after a blazing public row 
between Hoimer and the public 


prosecutor, who resigned as a 
result. 

Hoimer still daims to have 
“real grounds for optimism” and 
declares that he is “99.9 per cent 
sure” of foe motive for the 

murder. The Swedish press says he 
knows the name of the killer, and 
meanwhile speculates on who it 
migftt be. Some of othe wildly 
different theories: Pahne was 
killed by a hit-man commissioned 
by the Chilean dictator. General 
Pinochet, because of a long- 
standing grudge; by a right-wing 
Swedish religious sect; by foe Abu 
Nidal terrorist group; by the West 
German Red Army Faction; 


The most plausible theory in 
recent weeks is that Palme was 
killed by Kurdish extremists in 
revenge for foe jailing of two 
Kurds for political murders in 
Sweden. But this theory is based 
largely on one tapped telephone 
conversation. " 

Some police officers are now 
calling for the investigation to be 
scaled down, claiming that Stock- 
holm is now awash with drugs 
because so many detectives have 
been taken from the drug squad to 
help in foe murder hunt. 

Still on the spot where Mr 
Palme was shot the red roses are 
renewed each day. Still candles are 
lighted in foe gathering winter 
murk; still the faithful file past his 
grave, a dignity and stoicism in 
foeir mounting that is deeply 
moving and in marked contrast to 
the bumbling efforts of foe police: 


Beside the ruins of Britain’s 
manufacturing industry, two areas 
remain in which foe national 
genius for invention finds ex- 
pression. One is the market for 
flavoured crisps, in which our skill 
in making a razor-thin slice of 
potate taste like a prawn cocktail is 
quite unmatched throughout foe 
European Community. The other 
is busking. 

Busking should not be confused 
with street entertainment, which 
sounds like a court case, or 
“altermative arts”, which sounds 
like a Channel 4 programme. 
Street entertainment is what goes 
on in foe piazza at Covent 
Garden, where a cross-section of 
the British public, which means 
the professional middle classes 
who can afford the local Rioja, 
stand and applaud acts which, 
transferred to foe television 
screen, would have them com- 
plaining about foe licence fee. 

No, true busking is, or should 
be, what goes on in the corner of 
one's eye or, more accurately, ear 
as one purposefully strides 
through foe capital. The slowest 
motion permissible is that shuf- 
fling gait of a cinema queue — a 
rustle of plastic macs accompany- 
ing foe percussion of the spoons or 
foe industry of the one-person 
band. The essence of the busker’s 
specialized art is that it should be 
ambient. It is music which is taken 
on the tun. 

This is presumably why few of 
its practitioners, until recently, 
have invested too much talent in 
their performance. No time and 
motion study could justify squan- 
dering an abundance of skill on a 
second or two of a secretary's time 
as she dick-clacks her way to foe 
Bakerioo line en route to the late 
night shopping at John Lewis's. A 
couple of bars of “The Rose of 
Tralee” in return for 5p in an 
upturned cap has sounded like a 
reasonable deal. 

Unemployment and foe rise of 
youth culture, however, have 
brought a new generation of 
buskers on to foe streets and below 
them. “Stranger on the Shore” qq 
a cracked trumpet and “Cockles 
and Mussels” on foe mouth or®in 
have been, succeeded by Mozart- 


ian flautists, flamenco guitarists 
and at least one classical harpist 
(how she got that down the 
escalator to her Orphean under- 
world, is a matter for speculation). 

At Monument station recently, 
passengers racing allegro vivace 
through foe tunnel to the North- 
ern Line were aided by two young 
violinists fiddling their way 
through Bach's Double Concerto 
in D Minor. Can many other cities 
match that? 

London Transport employees 
turn a half-blind eye to th es e 
wandering minstrels, refusing to 
invoke the by-laws, carrying 
substantial _ fines, that can be 
wielded against those buskers who 
make a nuisance of themselves. 
Some passengers do complain, 
generally, I would imagine, about 
those who moan unintelligible 
dirges a la Dylan to the 
accompaniment of an amplified 
guitar that can be heard at the next 
station down the fine in one 
recent 12-month period about 300 
buskers were “done” in court 

Itinerant pop groups who occa- 
sionally perform on foe trains, 
pushing from coach to coach past 
*• protesting audience of Stan- 
dards, would seem to cause the 
greatest irritation. But on the 
whole _ London officials and 
unofficials take a tolerant view — 
and the laws are happily open to a 
certain amount of interpretation. 

The argument should now be 
over whether we might go one 
better and encourage them in a 
country which is seeking to build 
up its service industries and 
develop its entrepreneurialisnu 
the busker is no bad example of 
what can be achieved. The British 
may no more be a nation of 
shopkeepers - a title they have 
surrendered to the e thnic minor- 
ities — but they retain some stoical 
street-comer qualities. He who 
ran play Elgar’s cello concerto in a 
draught, to the accompaniment of 
a tape -recorder and marching feet, 
deserves one's admiration. 

If one could persuade him to eat 
a packet of cheese and onion crisps 
atfoe same time lie might truly 
represent the spirit of Britain in 
foe last quarter of foe 2 Qih 
century. 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


U'Pjftui \l 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 



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MODEST PROGRESS 

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No future in buying British? 


the rhetoric might have led 
one to hope. The EEC summit 
starting in London today will 
have to perform miracles if it 
is to reform the Common 
Agricultural Policy, deregu- 
late air fares and free capital 
movements, to name but three 
of Britain’s objectives. C EC 
summits are not fruitful 
ground for miracle workers. 

Viewed against a realistic 
assessment of the politically 
possible, however, Britain’s 
presidency has not been with- 
out its rewards. It was never 
likely that substantive progress 
could be made in reforming 
the CAP just ahead of the 
German elections. The Bavar- 
ian farming vote is too im- 
portant But there has been 
some modest progress on 
removing constraints on mar- 
kets inside the Community; 
the Community’s external 
policies have generally been to 
Britain's satisfaction; and co- 
operation on security has 
substantially improved. 

Perhaps the greatest ad- 
vance has been made in the 
attack on terrorism and 
drugs.Following the Hindawi 
trial, Britain secured the agree- 
ment of its partners on ban- 
ning arms sales to Syria and 
taking a much closer look at 
the activities of Syria's so- 
called diplomatic missions. It 
is regrettable, to put it mildly, 
that at the point when Europe, 
urged by Mis Thatcher, seems 
finally to have accepted the US 
view that terrorism must be 
fought with all the weapons 
available, Washington has 
been exposed as engaged in 
secret arms deals with ban. 

Britain has got her way on a 
number of other important 
issues in the Community’s 
relations with the rest of the 


will include agriculture on its 
agenda. Trade conflicts with 
the US on steel and citrus fruit 
have been successfully de- 
fused, diminishing the threat 
of protectionism which would 
hurt this country more than 
most (though the effect of EEC 
enlargement on America’s 
com growers remains a subject 
of contention.) A satisfactory 
agreement on New Zealand 
butter has also been reached. 

On internal affairs Britain 
has succeeded in removing a 
total of 30 obstacles to trade 
which, for the record, is higher 
than during any other presi- 
dency. The Prime Minister’s 
personal letter to other heads 
of government last month may 
have helped this process along. 
Particularly important to this 
country is the further liberal- 
ization of capital movements 
agreed at the finance council 
last month which will help the 
City to consolidate its suprem- 
acy as a financial centre with 
the Community. 

Progress on de-regulating air 
fares has been disappointing, if 
predictably so. The Transport 
Secretary, Mr John Moore, did 
secure a modest change in the 
pernicious practice of capacity 
sharing on European routes. 
Airlines will now be able to 
enjoy up to 60 per cent of the 
profits on any particular route 
according to their relative 
commercial success rather 
than splitting them 50-30 with 
their foreign counterparts. But 
no agreement has been 
reached on cheaper feres. The 
balance of view among the 
twelve is six for and six 
against — with France the key 
to further progress. 

More important, perhaps, 
than the tally of specific mea- 
sures agreed is the gradual shift 


of opinion in the Community 
on key issues. On the internal 
market for instance, there is 
now general agreement that 
progress must be made — even 
if France will continue to 
protect her banks and Ger- 
many her insurance industry 
as best they can. 

Similarly, the enterprise cul- 
ture has begun to be accepted 
in Europe as something more 
than a slogan. At last month’s 
finance council it was agreed 
to make 1,500 million ecus 
available to small businesses 
to help them get access to new 
technologies. The Commis- 
sion is also proposing to raise 
the threshold at which small 
businesses have to register for 
VAT. 

On the core issue of agri- 
cultural reform, progress will 
not be made as a result of 
anything so ephemeral as a 
change in the presidency. But 
as the cost of the CAP and the 
weight of its absurdities grow, 
attitudes inside the EEC 
change substantially. France, 
originally the main architect of 
the system, is now the key to 
changing it. Whatever the 
benefits to certain sections of 
the French population, the 
burgeoning cost of the CAP is 
increasingly seen to be not in 
the interests of France as a 
whole. 

Negotiations begin on Mon- 
day on quota reductions for 
mi Ik and beef production. The 
mice fixing process which 
starts on January 1 will apply 
the leverage to this process 
that has been lacking during 
the British presidency. If the 
tergiversations of Community 
politics cannot easily be made 
to fit the formal pattern of the 
six-month presidency, Britain 
need not feel too disappointed 
with the underlying develop- 
ment of events during her 
period at the helm. 


SECURING LEYLAND’S FUTURE 


Leyland Trucks was, twenty 
years ago, a powerful and 
profitable company that 
served the nation well. Long 
years of neglect, as^part of a 
larger group with more press- 
ing problems in the car in- 
dustry, have progressively 
reduced it to weakness. For 
crucial years, management was 
p re-occupied with labour rela- 
tions. The temporary surge of 
sterling after 1979 inflicted 
lasting damage and the more 
recent collapse of traditional 
ex-imperial markets has ex- 
posed latent weakness else- 
where. 

But history cannot be rewrit- 
ten and the future of Leyland 
must start from these unhappy 
realities. The lorry industry is 
undergoing a beady restructur- 
ing in Europe and beyond, 
with even the largest multi- 
nationals obliged to seek alli- 
ances or mergers of parts of 
their business to survive an 
enduring period of overcapac- 
ity. Leyland, far from being 
immune, could find itself be- 
ing restructured rather than 
leading an alliance. 

The latest losses - some 
£21 million in six months — 
emphasize the need to tackle 
this situation, rather than 
shelve it Leyland has good, 
competitive products, . but 
might become increasingly 
marginal if left in isolation. 

The acknowledgement by 

Mr Paul Channon, the In- 


dustry Secretary, that 
Leyland’s parent. Rover, is 
having talks with both the 
Dutch DAF and the American 
heavy vehicle maker, Paccar, 
is therefore welcome. These 
are at an early stage- But it is 
sensible, given the political 
context, that they should be 
■out in die open. 

Of these, a closer alignment 
with DAF has the more ob- 
vious commercial attractions, 
building on the deal to distrib- 
ute fighter Leyland vehicles on 
the Continent The two have 
similar shares of the European 
market, and a combined 8 per 
cent or more, which though 
still puny by comparison with 
Daimler-Benz, would provide 
both a stronger springboard for 
marketing and a better base for 
product development 

A merger of the two should 
not however, be seen as an 
easy financial option. Neither 
DAF nor Paccar is a General 
Motors. Indeed, the Dutch 
group’s financial structure re- 
flects the sort of public/privaie 
partnership that might have 
suited the Rover group and its 
antecedants better than the 
state takeover that a previous 
Labour government exacted in 
exchange for aid. The some- 
what complex ownership 
binds a private family holding 
company with a Dutch state 
company and, indirectly, the 
Dutch national investment 
bank — which stepped in 


when a previous link with 
International Harvester was 
dissolved. And DAF made 
only a small profit — little or 
none in its main truck and bus 
business — from £700 million 
sales last year. 

Paccar already owns Fodens 
where it still has spare capac- 
ity. It could provide more 
competition in Europe — 
hardly an obvious require- 
ment at the moment — but 
offers no great immediate 
commercial benefits. It might 
therefore have to shrink Ley- 
land drastically. 

Mr Channon has already 
made it clear that Leyland will 
face further redundancies in 
any case. But if it is a mistake 
to put die truck problem to one 
side, it would be equally short- 
sighted to go for a sale at any 
industrial price merely to shift 
a problem from Whitehall’s in- 
tray. 

Leyland must have a future 
and that may well fie in 
partnership with DAF. The 
record of Anglo-Dutcb com- 
panies is a happy one. The 
creation ofa new one; in which 
the British shareholding was 
eventually passed on to the 
shareholders of Rover and 
ultimately to the public would 
combine industrial logic with a 
return to the private sector. 
But that would take time and 
involve no little financial risk. 


RIGHTS IN THE WOMB 


**«*<£«* 


In yesterday’s case dealing 
with the rights of an unborn 
child, the House of Lords has 
opened a door which can never 
- be shut. Previously, prac- 
‘ titioners worked as best they 

could with what they knew to 

be inadequate statutory pro- 
visions concerning foepos- 
sible Ul-treatment of achdd m 

the womb. Now they face the 

issue starkly in the face. 

The House of Lords has 
decided that for the purposes 
of an order taking aciuJdfrp™ 
its parents and placing 11 
the care of the local authonty 
a child’s development is a 

continuing "*“5 % 

compasses thepartj™. 
deed, it is perfectly 
court to look i o the tune Wore 
the child was bora in toodw 
whether that , chdds proper 
» development is being . 
ably prevented or its heal 

stressed that the 
m eK 0 ofa^voida“e 

prevention of. proper deveb£ 

Lnt or impairment of health 

is insufficient for s 
order. When the courtdecid^ 
to make ihc order, th future 
be a likelihood of bfturc 

avoidable prevennon of th^ 

child's development 
impairment of its heal 


In the present case, the 
mother had taken narcotic 
drugs both during the preg- 
nancy and afterwards. There 
would consequently appear to 
be an element of punishing the 
mother for what she is - 
however little that was the 
intention — since it was said 
that if she had irrevocably 
given up drugs before the child 
was born, the court’s decision 
might well have been different 

The case thus raises vital, if 
not imposable, questions; 
Where should the line be 
drawn as to a mother’s con- 
duct before or after the birth? 
Who is going to draw it? Will 
smoking or drinking or dieting 
or excessive exercise in preg- 
nancy amount to legally un- 
acceptable behaviour or will it 
be a question of degree? Who 
is going to police this? 

In practical terms it can only 
be the medical profession or 
social agencies which under- 
take this last role. This might 
possibly result in an increasing 
number of pregnant women 
(in particular those women at 
greatest risk) deciding to avoid 
ante-natal care and perhaps 
even giving birth without 
proper medical supervision. 

■ There is the further problem 
of abortion. At present a 


woman may lawfully have an 
abortion if there is a substan- 
tial risk that the child will be 
born with a physical or mental 
abnormality that would make 
it seriously handicapped. The 
present decision may well 
have the effect of forcing upon 
pregnant women the unenvi- 
able choice of having an 
abortion or continuing with 
the pregnancy in the know- 
ledge that her newborn child is 
likely to be taken into care. 

Lord Brandon drew atten- 
tion to the parents’ fears that 
the local authority, if left to 
itself; might decide to pro- 
gramme the child for early 
adoption without their having 
an adequate opportunity to 
resist such action. They 
wanted the protection of High 
Court wardship proceedings 
because that would ensure 
greater control over the man- 
ner in which the authority 
implemented the care order. 

That was a not unreasonable 
aim. Given the complexity of 
the issues involved and assum- 
ing that such cases should be 
resolved by the law rather than 
social mores, it is, at best, 
unfortunate that they are not 
to be reserved to the tribunal 
best fitted to do the job. 


From the President of the Conser- 
votive Parliamentary Group for 
European Reform and others 
Sir, One worrying aspect of the 
Consumer Protection Bill now 
under consideration in the House 
of Lords deserves to be more 
widely known. 

Earlier this year the European 
Commission served formal notice 
underarticle 169 of the EEC Treaty 
of its intention to open infraction 
proceedings against the United 
Kingdom in connection with the 
Trade Descriptions Act 1972. The 
Commission regard the Act as 
incompatible with article 30 of the 
Treaty. 

The Government reluctantly 
concluded that the UK could not 
reasonably expect successfully to 
defend a case against the 1972 Act 
in the European Court of Justice. 
Accordingly it informed the 
Commission of its intention to 
repeal the Act. Provision to do So 
is made in the Consumer Protec- 
tion BilL 

What th« means in simple 
English is that no longer will goods 
sola in Britain need to be «w«Hceri 
with their country of origin. Thus 
it will be virtually impossible for 
shoppers to know whether the 
goods they are purchasing in our 
shops are made in Madrid, Frank- 
furt, Manchester, Moscow, Tai- 
wan, Leipzig or anywhere else. 

Many people besides ourselves 

A case of misconduct 

From the President of die Royal 
College of Surgeons of England 
Sir, Your third leader of Novem- 
ber 27 (“The silent surgeons”) 
expresses the opinion that the 
Royal College ofSurgeons, and the 
other medial royal colleges and 
faculties whose main functions are 
to maintain standards of educa- 
tion and practice, should start “to 
exert some greater setfregulatory 
influence” over the professional 
conduct of their members. 

| At present, a doctor or dentist in 
I the hospital service is answerable 
first to his or her employing 
authority. In tbe instance to which 
your editorial refers [a case of 
serious professional misconduct] 
the authority held an enquiry, as it 
was proper that it should Mien a 
serious complaint had been made. 

I£ as in this case, a further 
complaint is then made to tbe 
profession's disciplinary body (the 
General Medical Council or Gen- 
eral Dental Council) the prac- 
titioner may be required to appear 
before the properly-constituted 
Professional Conduct r/wnmitio 

Where the truth lies 

From Mr Melvin J. Lasky 
Sir, The art of one-upmanship, 
especially in ’’quotation- • 
manship", is a tricky business. 
Your leader today (December 1) 
traces how Sir Robert Armstrong’s 
being “economical with the truth" 

I has given way to C P. Scon ( via 
Malcolm Muggpridge) and thence 
to none other than Edmund Burke 
in his Regicide letters of 1796-7. 

I I would want to throw the name 
i of Immanuel Kant into the ring. 
Although it is altogether unlikely 
that Messrs Armstrong, Scott, and 
Burke read the worthy Germany 
' philosopher, the idea that they 
were expressing — the 
“temperance” of speaking the 
truth with measure, incases where 
| silence is “manly and wise" — was 
! adumbrated by Kant 

In a letter to Moses Mendelsohn 
(in April, 1766), Kant tried to 

I Motor cycle crashes 

From the President of the Motor 
, Cycle Association of Great Britain 
! Sir, Stephen Plowden (feature, 

1 November 19) makes a sweeping 
assumption about the value of 
training for motor cyclists which 
1 cannot go unchallenged. He sug- 
! gests that training is therefore 
pointless — a view based by his 
own admission, on a single study 
: at Salford University in tbe early 
seventies. 

1 This association is convinced 
that a compulsory introductory 
training course is essential, and 
the majority of organisations 
within the trade, industry and user 
groups are agreed that it is an 
important part of tbe safety mix. 

It is fatuous to suggest, in effect, 
that access to motor cycles should 
be made so difficult that young 
people would have no alternative 
but to turn to cars or bicycles. The 
problem lies not with the machine 
but with tbe rider and his experi- 
ence-bravado ratio. 

Freedom of speech 

From Dr L A. Moritz 
Sir, Hell-fire sermons, like Ber- 
nard Levin’s today (December !) 
in which he says that 

The Cardiff authorities have made a 
formal agreement with the students’ 
union which. enshrines the right to 
deny a hearing to any speaker 
deemed “controversial" 

should not be directed at the 
converted. Had Bernard Levin, 
before inveighing against this 
college, troubled to ascertain the 
. facts be would have found 

(a) That a Press release was sent to 
all national newspapers, including 
The Times, on November 26, 
which included the following: 

As far as the College is concerned the 
freedom to express opposition to a 
speaker’s views does not allow 
students to prevent a speaker — by 
whatever means — from continuing 
provided that what he said was 
within the law. Tbe College is 
determined to do everything pos- 
sible to ensure both that speakers arc 
allowed to be heard and that 
! students are free to communicate 
| opposing views. . . 

(b) That the college's determina- 
tion to safeguard freedom of 
speech was re-emphasized by its 
president (Lord Ehwyn-Jones) in 
the House of Lords on Thursday 


mil think this outrageous. Those 
of us who try to bay British as a 
general rule and make our own 
small contribution to keeping our 
fellow citizens in work will be 
frustrated. 

It is a sad but significant 
indication of the extent to which 
our sovereignty is being eroded 
that an Act of Parliament designed 
to inform and protect consumers 
in our own country is bring 
scrapped, against the wishes of our 
own Government, for the sole 
reason that the non-elected Euro- 
pean Commission consider that it 
may contravene a section of the 
Treaty of Rome. 

Following the further surren- 
ders of sovereignty made in the 
Single European Act, we believe 
that there is a case for our 
Parliament and people to be more 
vigilant when further proposals on 
sovereignty come forward. 

Quite apart from the sov- 
ereignty issue, however, we would 
appreciate advice on how the 

abolition of origin marking 
furthers tbe cause of tbe EC, the 
consumer, or indeed anyone rise 
— except our non-EC competitors. 
Yours faithfully, 

EDWARD du CANN, President. 
Conservative Parliamentary 
Group for European Reform, 
JONATHAN A1TKEN, Chairman, 
TEDDY TAYLOR, Secretary. 
House of Commons. 

which has both the authority and 
the legal advice available to it to 
carry oat a judicial enquiry (nor- 
mally in public) and to deliver a 
judgment. 

It seems unreasonable to add 
yet a third tribunal, set up by a 
royal college or faculty, to winch 
the doctor or dentist should be 
answerable whenever the public or 
the media fed that the existing 
mechanisms have been either too 
severe or too lenient. 

Yours faithfully, 

IAN P. TODD. President, 

The Royal College of Surgeons of 
England, 

35-43 Uncob's Inn Fields, WC2. 
November 28. 

From Mr Michael Davies, FRCS 
Sir, With reference to ’The silent 
surgeons", would the writer kindly 
tell me what “privileged place in 
society the public affords” me 
today? 

Yours faithfully, 

M. DAVIES, 

The Forest, 

Benenden, 

Cran brook, Kent 
November 27. 

work out, in the face of so many 
political difficulties of truth-telling 
in the Prussian kingdom, a per- 
sonal principle of compromise. He 
admitted that there were many 
things that he would “never have 
the courage to say" — “But I would 
never say anything which I do not 
think.” 

This became his general prin- 
ciple in the political economy of 
truth: **. . . while everything a 
person says must be true, it is not 
his duty to proclaim publicly aD 
that is true." 

A convenient theory for accom- 
modating, for lack of courage? A 
temporizer's self-justification? 
Kant uttering cant? A debate has 
raged among critics for two centu- 
ries. 

Yours etc, 

MELVIN J. LASKY, 

Encounter. 

44 Great Windmill Street, Wl. 
December 1. 

An old, ill-maintained car is a 
mud) more lethal weapon than a 
motor cycle, in the hands of an 
irresponsible driver — and a car is 
capable of carrying more pas- 
sengers. The cyclist is even more 
vulnerable than a motor cyclist, 
without the advantage of powered 
manoeuvrability and protection in 
the form of helmet and suitable 
clothing. 

Fortunately Mr Plowden’s neg- 
ative views are not shared by those 
individuals and organisations who 
know most about the subject of 
motor cycle safety. Instead of 
statistics we need action, and 
compulsory training is the ob- 
vious course for tbe Government 
to take. 

Yours faithfully, 

DENBIGH, President, 

Motor Cycle Association of Great 
Britain, 

Stanley House, 

Eaton Road, 

Coventry, West Midlands. 
November 20. 

of last week and that the minister 
concerned (Baroness Hooper) ex- 
pressed satisfaction at the progress 
that was being made here in the 
implementation of the new Educa- 
tion Act 

(c) That the unfortunate events of 
Mr Enoch Powell's visit to the 
UWIST Conservative Students' 
Society on this college’s premises 
were unique in this college's 
history, and that the steps taken 
immediately afterwards led to the 
result that Mr Leon Brittan. who 
visited tbe college shortly after Mr 
Enoch Poweti, could contrast the 
civilised reception he had met 
here with what he had en- 
countered elsewhere. 

Had Mr Levin tried to get in 
touch with this college before 
attacking it, he would have discov- 
ered also that as long ago as 
January, 1986, I wrote to the 
Chairman of the Committee of 
Vice-ChanceHois and Principals 
expressing my disquiet at the 
committee’s guidelines on free- 
dom of speech and lawful assem- 
bly on the grounds that they 
seemed to encourage small and 
unrepresentative groups to deny 
speakers a platform by appearing 
to concede that, provided the threat 
of disorder is made loud and 
convincing enough, universities 
should surrender to it and them- 


Secret garden 
endangered 

Front the President of the Green - 
i rich Society and others 
Sir. Hidden between the inner and 
outer walls on the northern peri- 
meter of Greenwich Park there is a 
secret garden, formerly an orchard 
attached to Inigo Jones’s Queen's 
House and now in use as a schools’ 
wildlife ami tree nursery. The 
land, adjacent to Park Vista, now 
belongs to the Greenwich Bor- 
ough, who, for the third time, are 
applying for planning permission 
to build on it — this time terraced 
old peoples’ housing. 

Designated as “public open 
space" in the 1947 Initial 
Development Plan, and located 
within one of London's "out- 
standing conservation areas”, this 
land was originally inside the park 
boundaries. In 1872 Gladstone 
successfully led the people of 
Greenwich in a campaign which 
put a stop to the Admiralty's 
attempts to erect housing on it. 
The subsequent 1884 Admiralty 
plan marks this land as “not to be 
built upon." 

This is almost certainly the last 
chance to restore this land to the 
park and to make it available as a 
garden for the ever-increasing 
number of local national and 
international visitors to Green- 
wich who enjoy the park. We urge 
all ministers involved, all con- 
cerned people and the public to 
help in any way they can to bring 
this about. 

Yours faithfully, 

ROY FULLER (President). 

A.VALEXANDER. JOHN BRATBY. 
BULLOCK, JILL DAY-LEWIS, 
JOHN GRIGG. PATRICK HERON. 
GLENDA JACKSON. LEWTN. 
PETER SCOTT. MARINA VA1ZEY, 
TERRY WAITE. 

The Greenwich Society', 

37 Langton Way, SE3. 

November 28. 

Threats to boatyard 

From Squadron Leader B. 
Crittenden. RAF (retd) 

Sir, I am grateful for your report 
(December 1) highlighting the 
difficulties feeing this ancient 
boatyard in its battle over many 
years to maintain its existence and 
keep 10 jobs. 

I would point out, however, that 
tbe current scheme which has 
aroused so much ire is approved 
by tbe Nature Conservancy Coun- 
cil. Only last week the NCC 
reaffirmed that they support the 
alterations, which they consider 
compatible with the operation ofa 
site of special interest. 

This is hardly surprising since 
the alterations are all for environ- 
mental protection. They consist of 
a protective bund for existing fed 

3 lies, cages for existing gas 
es, properly laid-out gravel to 
ensure vehicles can get to boats 
without taking random tracks 
across the sward and delineation 
of the boatyard area, thus prevent- 
ing vehicles straying on to the 
grass. 

The gravelled area and other 
facilities are all well within the 
area of planning permissions and 
the usage of the previous owner. 

The verdict of two public 
enquiries in the boatyard’s favour 
should surely be sufficient indica- 
tion for the Oxford City Council to 
seek an honourable settlement, 
and put an end to strife and 
.violence. 

Yours truly, 

BRIAN CRITTENDEN. 

Director, 

Medley Boat Station, 

Port Meadow, 

Via Walton Well Road, 

Oxford. 

December 1. 

Badgering badgers 

From Sir Christopher Lever 
Sir, An apparent anomaly in the 
Badgers Act 1973 has come to my 
notice. 

Whereas under the Act it is 
illegal to cause harm to badgers 
themselves, tbe nature Conser- 
vancy Council confirm that there 
is no such prohibition against 
disturbing or destroying their 
setts, provided that in so doing the 
animals suffer no direct physical 
injury. 

This inconsistency seems quite 
illogical, and the Act as it now 
stands surely requires suitable 
amendment 
Yours faithfully, 

CHRISTOPHER LEVER. 

Newell House, Winkfield, 

Windsor, Berkshire. 

December!. 

selves “deny a platform” to the 
speaker concerned. It may be partly 
due 

I continued 

to my personal background that this 
paragraph forcibly reminds me of a 
similar surrender by German 
universities some 50 years ago. when 
storm troopers of another kind were 
allowed to disrupt or prevent meet- 
ings and when, in Julius 
Ebbinghaus’s words, "the German 
universities failed, while there was 
still time, to oppose publicly with all 
their power the destruction of 
freedom and of the democratic state 

Mr John Carlisle, who should 
know all about hostile receptions 
at universities, in a letter pub- 
lished in The Daily Telegraph on 
November 22, gave this college 
credit for its efforts to deal with 
the problem. 

Like Mr Carlisle, we recognise 
that much still remains to be done, 
but we have made a start, and we 
are confident that we can move 
forward in cooperation, rather 
than conflict with the vast major- 
ity of our students. 

Yours etc. 

L A. MORITZ, Vice-Principal 
(Administration) and Registrar, 
University College, Cardiff. 

PO Box 78, 

Cardiff, South Glamorgan. 
December 1. 


DECEMBER 5 1950 

At the end of a day's ploy in which 
20 utickets fdl for 130 runs 
Australia were 228 and 32 for 7 
dec; England 68 for 7 dec and 30 
for 6. Next day England were all 
out for 122. losing the match by 70 
runs. Hutton's unbeaten 62 in the 
final innings was acclaimed as one 
of his great performances 


THE FIRST TEST 
MATCH 

A DRAMATIC DAY AT 
BRISBANE 

From Our Special Correspondent 
BRISBANE, DEC, 4 

Edward Lear and Hogarth 
should have returned to life to 

describe the second day’s cricket in 
the first Test match at Brisbane, 
and bad these two grown weary 
with laughter or tears, their places 
could conveniently have been tak- 
en by Rabelais and Phil May. If the 
Marx Brothers had seen it, they 
would surely by now be considering 
a film called “A Day at the Test”. 

Friday was drama. Today was 
low comedy and the clowns, as it 
has ever been, were tbe victims as 
well as the playgivers. Compton or 
Chaplin. Grimaldi or Moroney, 
what’s in a name? 

Here, rightly speaking, is the 
time table. At 1 p.m. England went 
in to bat for the first time. At 3J20 
pan. Brown declared at 68 for 
seven wickets and tea was taken. 
After it, Australia went in to bat for 
the second time with a lead of 160. 
At 4.40 Hassett declared with the 
total 32 for seven wickets. At 5.55 
bad light ended tbe play with 
England’s second innings score 
standing at 30 for six wickets. So 
England, with Evans. Hutton, 
Compton, Brown and Wright, so to 
speak, in hand, need another 163 to 
win and they have a possible three 
days in which to do it. If the night 
and morrow be fine the pitch could 
recover a medium of sanity and the 
task would verge on the reasonable. 

If not. only unearthly skill can 
avaiL 

Let none begrudge Australia her 
position of command. Luck and 
games are good companions. But it 
should be recorded that so far in 
this match England has bowled 
and fielded rather better than 
Australia and has batted at best no 
worse. Indeed, the pitch is the 
victorious villain . . . 

A MOCKERY OF ART 

Lindwall yorked Simpson at the 
very start of that second innings, 
but the pitch was. as a whole, not 
so amenable to his speed for all its 
control. Iverson’s mysterious off- 
spin brought him two wickets late 
in the day, but his victims fell 
because of a sudden, carelessness 
rather than any venom in the baS. 
Through all the farce and tragedy 
the feeling persisted that art was 
being mocked except for half an ' 
hour or so when Hutton was 
batting in the first innings. 

Processions, except for that 
which tbe Lord Mayor annually 
provides, rarely profit by detailed 
description. But the spectators, 
rightly hilarious after Saturday's 
disappointment, applauded the 
comings and goings with impartial 
excitement. Washbrook and Simp- 
son, with only a flickering smile 
from fortune, scored 28 between 1 
o'clock and lunch by tbe moat 
skilful and courageous batting yet 
seen in th e Twntirh. 

Directly alter lunch Washbrook 
was caught at silly mid-off. All the 
day the sillier positions in the field 
were densely populated — Comp- 
ton ran out to drive and soored 
three over the slips, then was 
caught at wide slip with his left 
forearm in front of bis head . . . 
Within the short and appointed 
time the same sort of thing wbb 
being done even less successfully by 
batsmen in green caps. The first 
three went for nought Moroney 
was l.-b.-w. without perceptible 
motion of hat or foot . . . Harvey 
gave Simpson an easier catch and 
Lindwall was now free to open the 
bowling for the second time in tie 
day. 

Tbe heavy roller had been used 
and for a short time the pitch 
looked less vicious. The first ball 
was a fast yorfcer and hit Simpson’s 
stumps. Dewes and Washbrook 
gave a fair imitation of comfort till 
Washbrook mistimed a hook and 
was easily caught at short leg. 
Dewes went at 22 and Bedser, the 
next research student, appealed 
against the light which to the view 
of some was becoming as dim as 
England's hopes. The appeal was 

not upheld McIntyre hit his 

first ball from Iverson to the leg 
boundary and his second nearly as 
hard. But he tried a fourth run. 
Tallon seized Johnston's return 
and threw down the wicket 
Hutton was half-way to the pitch 
before he found the fielders walk- 
ing in. 

And that, as the ancient Greek 
messengers delighted to say, is all 
the trouble for the moment. 

Cover-up down under 

From Mr Steven Lynch 
Sir, With regard to Mr Dennett’s 
letter (November 29), it is not so 
long ago that the cricket captains 
of England and Australia both 
sported beards in the same series: 
at the Centenary Tesl at Lord’s in 
1980. skippers Ian Botham and 
Greg Chappell were so adorned, 
while the previous winter the 
captains for a three-Test series in 
Australia were Chappell and Mike 
Brearly, whose beard earned him 
the temporary nickname of "The 
Ayatollah". 

Captains’ beards arc not a new 
phenomenon: in the first Tests of 
ail, in Australia in 1876-77, rival 
skippers James Liliywhite of Eng- 
land and David Gregory of 
Australia were both luxuriantly 
bewhiskered. 

Yours faithfully, 

STEVEN LYNCH, 

Assistant Editor 
li isden Cricket Monthly. 

25 Market Street. 

Guildford, Surrey- 




THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 198< 


INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGY 


FOCUS 


A SPECIAL REPORT 

By Judith Parsons 


The science that 
flowed from two 


FjgwMstficfc floats 








Inside the huge magnet 
that scans the brain 


sisters of mercy 

W hen Princess were not without means and a institute's secretary, said that 
Anne opened social conscience, nursed their although overall research 
the Institute of grandmother and thereby hinds have risen from £2.76 
Neurology's grasped the full implications million in 1980to£4.1 million 

f? ^ miffinn rtf' ra rin a #vr cnmmnr nnth a Kv SCSMd rhftarfmil IVJTPI 


W hen Princess 
Anne opened 
the Institute of 
Neurology's 
£2.5 million 
Neuroscience Research 
Centre in London yesterday in 
her capacity as Chancellor of 
London University, she 
marked an important step 
forward in 126 years of caring, 
' teaching and research into the 
diagnosis and treatment of 
diseases of the nervous 
system. 

These are diseases which 
can affect the brain, spinal 
cord, nerves and muscles such 
as multiple sclerosis, muscular 
dystrophy, strokes, epilepsy, 
Parkinson's disease, brain tu- 
mours, Alzheimer's disease — 
all of which are devastating. 

The new Neuroscience Re- 
search Centre win focus 
- primarily on research into 
ageing and senile dementia — 
a progressive failure of higher, 
cerebral functions affecting 
the ability to think, reason and 
make judgments — and is a 
joint undertaking between the 
Institute of Neurology and the 
Swedish drug company Astra. 

Professor John Marshall, 
dean of the institute, points 
out “Recent estimates predict 
that senile dementia will afreet 
1.75 million people by 1995 if 
the disease remains 
unchecked." 

In any given year in Britain, 
neurological disorders affect 
more than 1.5 million people; 
250,000 suffer strokes, and 
although this ran affect all agr 
groups, more than 20 per cent 
of people over 45 today wfl] 
die from one; 2,250 people 
will die from brain tumours; 
60,000 will contract multiple 
sclerosis (MS) for reasons still 
unknown. At the same time 
65,000 are suffering from 
Parkinson's disease. Tlie mag- 
nitude of research to be done 

is da unting . 


were not without means and a 
social conscience, nursed their 
grandmother and thereby 
grasped the full implications 
of caring for someone with a 
neurological disorder. 

Shortly after this, one of 
their servants also suffered a 
stroke. The sisters, who ven- 
tured into the Ehst End of 
London to visit the paralysed 
servant, were horrified to 
discover that hospitals would 
not accept anyone with epi- 
lepsy or paralysis. 

The Chandlers promptly 
founded a hospital for the 
paralysed and epileptics in 
1860 in two rented houses in 
Queen Square. This act even- 
tually paved the way for the 
foundation and close Unity 
between the National Hos- 


of government money via the 
University Grants Committee 
(UGC) has fallen 30 per cent 
“In my five years as dean,” 
says Professor Marshall, 
“UGC grants have fallen from 
48 per cent to 24 per cent of to- 
tal funding. The result is that 
it is increasingly difficul t to 
keep basic things going; it is 
not our job to fond bases like 
heating and lig hting . Tins is 
tfae nuB of the problem, for we 
most have a given number of 
professors and senior st aff if 





Concentration of 
effort and research 


S3 




The graphic warning that you 
are about to enter a powerful 
magnetic field and must re- 
move all non-digital watches, 
rin^. credit cards and proceed 
with caution if you carry a 
pace-maker, barely prepares 
you for the astonishing 
diagnostic breakthrough in the 
basement of the National 
Hospitals for Nervous Dis- 
eases in Queen Square — the 
magnetic resonance imager 
(MRI). 

In what appears to be a 
rather uneventful but dis- 
tinctly claustrophobic proce- 
dure, lasting anything from 10 
to 50 minutes, a patient 
simply lies on a narrow bed 
mid slides slowly into the core 
of what is a huge magnet - 
bolding a buzzer in case of 
wanting attention. A small 
price to pay for a painless 
diagnosis. 

The patient has. in feet. 


MRI now helps to assess the 
degree of damage in estab- 
lished of multiple sclero- 
sis and in monitoring the 
effectiveness of therapeutic 
regimens. 

Another notable advance is 
that while MRI can aid early 
diagnosis, it can also differen- 
tiate between multiple sclero- 
sis and other pathogens that 
mimic the disease and have 
made diagnosis so difficult in 
the past 

The National Hospitals for 
Nervous Diseases is one of the 
first in Britain to install MRI. 
The cost £1-5 million, means 


Although different tissue and 
substances are distinguished 
by CT and MRI, their useful- 
ness overlaps. 

When the patient enters the 


MRI core, he is being sub- 
jected to short pulses of radio- 


Many clear images 
never seen before 


it will remain one of the few. 
MRI is the most expensive 
medical system ever invented. 
Its installation here was pos- 


entered the most informative sible only through funds from 
and non-mvasive scanner for the Multiple Sclerosis Society. 


pitais for Nervous Diseases, 
its sister hospital in Maida 
Vale, and one of London 
University's largest postgrad- 
uate medical institutes — the 
Institute of Neurology, 
founded in 1948. 


Past and 
present; The 
Chandler sis- 
ters, founders 
of the first 


Today Queen Square con- 
lins the highest concentra- 


tains the highest concentra- 
tion of neurochemists in the 
world, with 300 beds solely for 
neurological disorders. Profes- 
sor Marshall says he is not 
boasting unduly when he de- 
scribes the institute as unique. 

“Nowhere else can you find 
such a concentration of effort 
and research entirely devoted 
to neurology and neuro- 
sciences," he said. “It is a 
centre of excellence for both 
teaching and research.” The 
evidence he notes is that the 
highest proportion of overseas 
postgraduates still come from 
the United States, with 69 in 
attendance last year. 

Like many other academic 


Earliest attempts to under- institutions in Britain, the 
stand these frightening dis- institute is under growing 


eases began quietly in Queen pressure to maintain certain 
Square, Bloomsbury, when in acknowledged standards while 


1859 the grandmother of feeing heavy cuts in goveru- 
Johanna and Louisa Chandler meat funding which started in 


suddenly suffered a paralysing 
stroke. The two sisters, who. 


Julian 


we are to maintain our levels' 
of activity." 

The result, says Dr Axe, is 
that there is a marked increase 
in soft money, that is, money 
from charities and companies 
such as the Brain Research 
Trust, foe Multiple Sclerosis 
Society or Du Pont It could 
evaporate if the institute does 
not maintain aanriawfa of 
excellence. “This type of 
funding," he says, "now con- 
stitutes 52 per cent of our 
research money.” 

Of the five academic depart- 
ments which make up this 
postgraduate institute three 
are clinical: the departments 
of neurological surgery, clini- 
cal neurology ami neuro- 
pathology. The two non- 
clinical departments are the 
department of neurochem- 
istry and neurophysiology. 


r hospital, left. 

Above, Pro- 
fessor John 

dean of the 
Institute of 
Neurology 

According to Professor 
Marshall, among the most 
si gnifican t areas of research 
are those projects headed, by 


Research, he argues, is nec- 
essary from both a scientific, 
and a financial point of view; 
“It is important that we focus 
major effort not only on the 
areas where a breakthrough 
seems wi thin reach, but m 
areas where the size of the 
problem is so great for society 
that research has to be done — 


the central nervous system. 
The MRI is being used here 
specifically for neurological 
diagnosis and assay (or trial). 


“It is unlikely," says David 
MacMamus, a radiographer at 
the unit, “that there will ever 
be more than a couple of 




even though there is no hope 
yet of a solution." 


A good example, he says, is 
dementia: “Even though we 
cannot see the answer, we 
must get down to it as Europe 
is being confronted by an ever- 


fviSEUrK ageing population." Aids nro- 

DrRichand Green, director of another topical 

Astra 5 Neuroscience Re- ^ 


search Unit, and Dr David 
Bowen on senile dementia. 


work on multiple sclerosis led 
by Dr Louise Cuzner, research 
into the relationship of behav- 
iour and brain chemistry by 
Professor Gerald Cuizon, and 
investigations into Down's 
syndrome and brain develop- 
ment headed fry Professor 
Louis Lim. 

But as Professor Marshall 
points out, “it is very frustrat- 
ing to know that, although the 
causes for many of these 
diseases are not known, they 
may not be far distant and 
resources are simply not avail- 
able to get at it”. 


example. 

Professor Marshall says thai 
during the next 10 years the 
important areas of the 
institute’s thrust would be 
multiple sclerosis, neuro- 
oncology (brain tumours) and 
of course dementia. Much of 
the necessary funds will come 
from commissioned research, . 
which, says Professor Mar- 
shall, is a change of direction 
for the institute. 

He said: “With science and 
technology changing so rap- 
idly, we have had to be flexible 
and adapt We have nm dt » a 
point of this and our venture 
with Astra is proof" 


unit can reveal multiple 
sclerosis lesions in the brain 
previously undetectable: 

Apart from being a painless 
procedure, it is also a harmless 
one, and does not bombard 
the patient with harmful X- 
rays. The advantage is that the 
patient can have as many 
scans as treatment requires. 

MRL first developed in foe 
early 1970s. can today provide 
sharp, dear images of the soft 
. tissue of foe bram, spinal cord 
and pelvic system, differen- 
tiating between malignant and 
benign tissue. 

The MRI screens now bring 
into focus features never seen 
by doctors before. It can, for 
example, show the breakdown 
of the myelin sheaths of 
nerves in cases of multiple 
sclerosis before the patient is 
aware he is iO, and can show 
the flow of cerebral spinal 
fluid. 

“Magnetic resonance imag- 
ing of the brain is of special 
value." said Professor Alan 
Davison, who heads the 
institute’s Department of 
Neurochemistry, “because un- 
suspected abnormalities can 
be detected, particularly in the 
periventricular region and 


average deal with nine pa- 
tients each a day. 

It is foe absence of known 
biological hazards, namely X- 
rays, and the ability to obtain 
dear images in any plane foal 
gives MRI certain advantages 
over the other major imaging 
technique — computer tomo- 
graphic (CT) X-ray scanning. 


jected to short pulses of radio- 
frequency energy which cause 
foe protons, mostly in hydro- 
gen molecules, to wobble or 
give off resonances, thereby 
emitting radio waves which 
are picked up by an aerial 
signal to form a spectra image. 
The image is then analysed. 

This dual potential that 
exists with magnetic res- 
onance imaging and analysis 
is an important departure in 
foe battle against multiple 
sclerosis - one of the 
commonest neurological dis- 
eases, but with causes com- 
pletely unknown. 

It is a disease that affects 
more than 50,000 people in 
Britain and generally kills 
2,000 a year. 

According to Professor 
Davison, one possibility is 
that prospective patients may 
have a slight defect in their 
immune defence mechanisms, 
so are more than usually 
susceptible to an infection of 
foe nervous system. 

Whatever foe cause, foe 
disease is known to be exacer- 
bated by stress and inter- 
current infections. Cues may 
still lie, suggests Dr Davison, 
in the unusual geographical 
distribution of foe disease, 
which has a far greater in- 
cidence in north and central 
Europe. 




V»/C , .>r>Y* • 



brain stem.” 


A patient about to enter the magnetic resonance imager to 
receive the most informative, non-mvasive and totally 


painless scan available for the central nervous* system. 


How to make the pieces fit 


First, commitment 


Today, one in every five of Astra* 
Group’s 6500 employees worldwide 
is engaged in research. 

And that’s research where it’s 
needed. 

Into gastric illness, asthma, viral infections, 
cardiovascular disease, pain and its control 
by anaesthesia, and into the complexities / 
of brain disease. / 

High priority research ... on which / 
Astra Group invests 20 per cent of its / 
turnover. / 


Next, 

co-operation 


Astra Group is no 
stranger to acad- 
emic research ; 
centres. / 

Ten years ago the Astra / 
Clinical Research Unit was f 

established in Edinburgh, ( 

forging links with local univ- \ 
ersities and hospitals. 

And now to London, to Astra’s 
latest co-operative research 
project. 

The Astra Neuroscience Re- 
search Unit is situated within the 
Institute of Neurology, with which 
it will co-operate in the investig- 
ation of senile dementia. 



Research where 
it’s needed 






Senile dementia is a 
disease triggered by a 
breakdown in the brain's 
transmitter system. It is 
said to affect between 10 
and 15 per cent of people over 65. 

Co-ordination, memory and 
control may all be lost. 

And as the average age of the 
world’s population increases, senile 
dementia presents a growing . 
challenge. 

For one form of senile dementia, 
Alzheimer’s Disease, no effective 
treatment exists. Scientists are not 
even sure why it occurs. 

This will be the focus of research 
in Astra's new co-operative 
programme. To map the pathways of 
the brain and unravel its biochemical 
processes. 

Astra is committed to this research, 
and is proud to be associated 
with the Institute of Neurology. 

With commitment and co-operation, 
the pieces are beginning to fit together. 



/ / “ ,v ut.£iuuuig iu nt together 

/ /S) f 

We wish eveiy success to the research efforts 
of the Institute /of Neurology and to its 
co-operation' with the Astra Neuroscience 

Research Unit/ 


Astra Pharmaceuticals Ltd., 

Home Park Estate, King’s Langley, Herts WD4 8DH 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 



21 


((FOCUS)) 


INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGY/2 


The long haul to find a cure as 
dementia strikes ever harder 


“Dementia," says Dr David 
Bowen, head of the Dementia 
Research Group in the Mir- 
iam Monks Department of 
Neurochemistry at the In- 
stitute of Neurology, “is a 
condition in which there is an 
acquired global disturbance of 
higher mental function in an 
alert individual.” In other 
words, a progressive degenera- 
tion of an individual's 
personality. 

It is characterized by several 
major signs and symptoms 
such as loss of the ability to 
learn and remember facts and 
faces, wandering, difficulty in 
sleeping, and changes in intel- 
lect and mood marked by 
depression and anxiety com- 
bined with aggression. 

This dementia syndrome, 
says Dr Bowen, is frequently 
concealed by caring relatives 
who think it is an inevitable 
consequence of ageing, or is 
masked by frightened patients 
who fear institutional care. 

With an ageing population 
in Europe, that is, an increas- 
ing proportion of the total 
number now reaching the age 
of 65 and over, it is frightening 
to project the impact of the 
incidence of dementia. 

The disease already affects 
10 per cent of those over 6$ 
and 22 per cent of those over 
80. Today this means that 
there are three-quarters of a 
million people in the UK 
variously affected and the 
numbers are steadily growing. 

Neuro-degenerative dis- 
orders in the elderly, which 
include Alzheimer's disease, 
and are present in Parkinson’s 
disease and cerebral vascular 
disease, are not only becoming 
the scourges of a long life — 
they are as yet without any 
effective form of treatment. 

Dr Richard Green, director 
of the Neuroscience Research 
Unit of the Swedish 
pharmaceutical company As- 
tra, points out "The increas- 
ing costs to society in the 
coming 20 years will be enor- 
mous. Dementia is a very 
distressing condition to both 
the patient and family. 

“Imagine when you do not 


SUNSET CLEANING 
SYSTEMS 

658 2222 

the newly appointed cleaning 
contractor wish the Institute 
every success. 


even remember whom you are 
married to. Such a patient 
needs constant care, will not 
remember it and allows no 
rest to those nursing them.” 

The latest initiative in the 
fight to understand ageing and 
dementia is the joint research 
agreement between the in- 
stitute and Astra in the shape 
of the Neuroscience Research 
Centre in nearby Wakefield 
Sum. 

The first step has been the 
purchase and redevelopment 
of the former Royal Free 
Hospital School of Medicine, 
at a cost of £2.5 million, to 
house the new centre. 

Astra, whose total drug sales 
last year topped $583 million, 
has contributed 55 per cent of 
the costs. The company, 
which is talcing a long-term 
view with a 35-year lease on 
two floors of the centre. 

Increasing costs 
will be enormous 

expects to receive about £1 
million a year for research 
from the head office in 
Sweden. 

Astra is not new to the 
research business and has 
already established a strong 
reputation in several areas, 
including the development of 
lignocaine, one of the world's 
most widely used dental and 
local anaesthetics. 

Dr Richard Green, director 
of the project, who was pre- 
viously deputy director of the 
Medical Research Council's 
clinical pharmacology unit at 
Oxford, said; “We have two 
main objectives — in the short 
term to develop a drug which 
will make life more tolerable 
for both the patient and family 
or nursing care, and in the 
long term to find a way to 
prevent the whole degenera- 
tive process. 

“This will take at least five 
years to find a drug that can go 
forward for further dev- 
elopment, and probably 15 
years for a preventative drug.* 

Dr Julian Axe, the 
institute's secretary, points 
out: “The race is now on to 
face the challenge of an ageing 
population.** He said that 
Astra, which has interests in 
this field, and has been seeking 
an academic association, was 
impressed by the outstanding 
work on dementia by Dr 
David Bowen and Professor 
Alan Davison in the institute’s 




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London Office: 


York House 
Empire Way 
Wembley, London 
Middfesex HA9 OPA 


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1-903 


01-903 7831/32 


The Brain 
Research 
Trust 

supports additional research at the 
Institute of Neurology by means of 
endowments and project grants for 
work on dementia, multiple sclerosis, 
motor neurone disease, epilepsy and 
brain tumours. We are a registered 
charity, entirely supported 
by the public 

If vou would like to know more about 

us please contact the Secretary at 

1, Wakefield Street, 

London, WC1N IPJ. 
Telephone 01-278-5051. 


Looking after the affairs of 

institutes and charities 
demands a wide range of legal 
skills and professional 
expertise, from the setting up 
of charitable companies and 

drafting of tmst deeds to 
property and employment 

matters. 

Farrer& Co have been 

practising such skills for a very 
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LINCOLN’S INN FIELDS 
66 LONDON WC2A3LH 



and wool-like deposits within 
nerve cells called tangles. 

According to Dr Bowen, 
these changes are particularly 
found in the cerebral cortex 
and memory co-ordinating 

regions of the limbic system of 
the brain. 

It has recently been shown. 
Dr Bowen says, that in pa- 
tienls with Alzheimer's dis- 
ease, there is a marked loss of 
nerve cells from the under- 
neath part of the cortex, 
making much of the grey 
matter of the brain vulnerable. 

It has been suggested that 
the behavioural changes such 
as those found in the disease 
may be connected with the 
brain's nerve cells and as a 
result, communication 
through a network of nerve 
cell contact points called 
synapses, is impaired 

As nerve cells exchange 


The race is on to 
face the challenge 


On the frontiers of research: Dr Richard Green, director of 
the Astra Neuroscience Unit; above. Below, an indication of 

tire growing army of the aged and the size of the predicted de- 
mentia problem lacing Europe 


POPULATION OVER 65 IN WESTERN EUROPE 



Department of Neuro- 
chemistry. 

“There is a growing drift 
among drug companies away 
from greenfield research sites 
to university environments,” 
Dr Axe said. “Companies are 
beginning to understand the 
benefits of academic interplay 
and discussion, particularly in 
the field of basic scientific 
effort.” Astra's Dr Green 


agrees that the venture is 
“symbiotic". 

It now seems that studies on 
the post-mortem brains of 
patients with dementia, ini- 
tially undertaken by the Ger- 
man physician Alzheimer in 
1907. show visible shrinkag e 
There is also alteration in 
nerve cell structure, including 
island-like areas of diseased 
tissue called senile plaques 


information through neuro- 
transmitter substances and 
receptors, measurement of 
these chemical constituents 
and an assay (or trial) of 
neurolrans miner synthesizing 
proteins (enzymes) can show 
how synapses are affected in 
Alzheimer's disease. 

Dr Green is confident that 
one major area of research will 
be into these neurotransmitter 
chemicals, such as acetyl- 
choline and serotonin, whose 
levels in the brain affect 
memory, learning and mood 
changes. 

Research, he says, will be 
done to see if changes in the 
levels of those transmitters 
will help to increase the 
function of remaining un- 
damaged neurotransmilters in 
a patient suffering from 
dementia. 

But this is where the prob- 
lem begins, says Dr Green. 
“At present, given precursors 
of acetylcholine do not work 
and there are not as yet 
adequate tools to test whether 
the approach will work. 

“But we are optimistic,” he 
said, “otherwise we would not 
have taken it on. We have a 
definite goal and want to 
produce a compound at the 
end of the day. At this stage, 
we must get our hands dirty 
and rolL” 



^ 

Research at its best: Laboratory investigation at the institute into brain 
development and Down's syndrome 

Fresh hope for the few 


Malignan t cerebral gliomas, more commonly 
known as tumours, which develop in the 
brain's glial cells, most frequently occur in men 
as they approach early middle age, between the 
years of 40 and 60, with devastating results. 

Every year in Britain 1250 people die from 
brain tumours, and despite 50 years of 
intensive etiniral and experimental research, 
long-term survival for these patients remains 
consistently poor — half the patients die within 
nine months of diagnosis. 

Cerebral gliomas occur rather less com- 
monly than runfw of the bladder, but more 
commonly than renal cancer or Hodgkin's 
disease. To date, the caose of brain tumours re- 
mains unknown, although 95 per cent of all 
cancer is thought to be environmentally linked. 

Gliomas, which are the most malignant form 
of brain tumour, will often produce symptoms 
for 18 months to two years before diagnosis. 
Most common of these are headaches, 
vomiting, fading eyesight, epilepsy and mental 
deterioration. 

Surgical removal is complicated by the fact 
that tumours tend to be locally invasive, 
spreading through the brain tissue. 

Present forms of treatment apart from 
surgery, are restricted to radiotherapy and 
chemotherapy, using cytotoxic drags capable 
of kilting cells. 

One potentially vital and significant piece of 
cancer research is now being pursued at the 
institute's neuro-oncology section of the 
Gough-Cooper Department of Neurological 
Surgery, beaded by Mr David G.T. Thomas, 
with Dr John Darling and his team from the 
nenro-oncology section. 

From the biopsy samples of brain tumours 
from 117 patients, Dr Darling has set up an 
experimental model system nsing a 
chemosenshive assay (or trial) based on the 
uptake of the cytotoxic chemical 
uS-methionine. 

In so doing. Dr Darting was able to test, 
retrospectively (that is, bade in the laboratory), 
the relationship between a patient's response 
to a particular drag and the length of that 
person's relapse-free interval (RFT). 

Dr Darting explains: “We observed the 
response in the laboratory of tumour cells to 
the drags procarbazine (PCB), CCNU and 
vincristine (VCR). If the laboratory response 


of a patient's cells to these drags was good, it 
shows us that there is a chance that a 
particular patient will respond well dinkafiy to 
such treatments and will probably experience a 
longer RFI than the patient who does not 
respond.” 

The drags PCB, CCNU and VCR have been 
reported as modestly successful single agents 
for the treatment of glioma. They are capable 
of passing the blood-brain barrier and are 
therefore expected to pass not only into the 
body of the tumour but the tumour periphery, 
with its infiltrating edge. 

“We hare identified that a small number — 
20 to 30 per cent of patients - respond well to 
these chemotherapeutic protocol drugs.” 

At this stage research is still taking place in 
the laboratory with no attempts yet to pHt this 
chemotherapy into practice. The hope is, of 
course, to nse Dr Darling's statistical analysis, 
now confined to in vitro 


Ultimately the aim is to stop 
the brain tumour growing 


testing, as an important factor in establishing 
longer relapse-free intervals in prospective 
riinieal trials. 

If Dr Darling’s assay can help identify those 
20 to 30 percent of patients with brain tnmonrs 
who may respond positively to a specific 
treatment and thereby enjoy a longer relapse- 
free interval, this is progress. 

This work is made possible by the snrgkal 
skill of Mr Thomas, who with the nse of a CT 
scanner is now able to remove malignant cells 
for biopsy. This method ultimately allows for 
the removal of all tumour cells visible on the 
scanner. 

Ultimately, says Dr Darting, the aim is to 
stop the gliomas from growing, given that their 
removal is virtually impossible. 

“We are looking, in conjunction with the 
Medical Research Council’s Developmental 
Nenrobiology Unit, at agents which cause 
malignant glial cells to look more normal,” he 
said. 

“Provided we can make the tumour jost sit in 
the brain, it will not do the patient any harm.” 
But be added: “There will be at least 10 to 20 
years before any therapeutic nse.” 



GEORGE VARGAS 

Whinshields, Brimpton Common, 
Nr Reading, Berks, RG7 4RU. 
Tel: 07356 4983 

Is pleased to be associated 
with the 

INSTITUTE OF 
NEUROLOGY 


As property advisors 
to the Institute of Neurology, 


CHESTERTON 


LALONDE: = 


• r H A R T fR E n SURVEYORS 

wish to express their congratulations 
on the opening of the new laboratories 
at Wakefield Street, London WC1. 



Sheppard Robson 

Architects to the Institute of Neurology 


77 Parkway, Camden Town, London NW1 7PU 

Telephone 01 -48 S 4161 Telex 22157 



INSTITUTE 
NEUROLOGY 

(UNIVERSITY OF LONDON) 

THE INSTITUTE OFFERS A WIDE VARIETY 
OF TRAINING IN NEUROLOGY AND 
RELATED NEUROSCIENCES 

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BASIC TRAINING FOR POTENTIAL NEUROLOGISTS 
SIX MONTHS FROM 1ST OCTOBER 

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FOR THOSE WITH SOME NEUROLOGICAL EXPERIENCE 
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FOR DETAILS OF THESE AND OTHER COURSES APPLY TO 

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Tel: 01-837 3611 ext. 342 




THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 



Forthcoming marriages 


COURT AND SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December 4: The Queen and 
The Duke of Edinburgh this 
evening attended a Reception to 


50th Anniversary of a Receptioa. 


1 he Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips. President of the Save 
the Children Fund, this 
afemoon visited Charles of the 
Ritz Ltd (Managing Director, 
Mr K. Green) at Charles Ave- 
nue, Burgess Hill where Her 
Royal Highness opened the new 
factory and afterwards attended 


The Wellcome Trust, at the 
Wellcome Building, Euston 
Road, NWl. 

Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness were received by the 
Mayor of Camden (Councillor 
Mary Cane), the Chairman of 
The WeUcome Trust (Sir David 
Steel) and the Director (Dr P. O. 
Williams). 

The Queen unveiled a 
commemorative plaque and. 
with The Duke of Edinburgh, 
viewed various exhibitions and 


The Pri ncess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips travelled in an aircraft 
of The Queen's Flight and was 
received upon arrival by Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
West Sussex (Lavinia, Duchess 
of Norfolk). 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips, Patron of the College of 
Occupational Therapists, this 
evening attended a Reception at 
the Royal Air Force Club. 128 
Piccadilly, WI. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 


met Trustees and members of ceived by the Secretary to the 
the staff College and Immediate Past 

The Countess of Airue, Mr chairman of the Club (Air 
Robert Fettowes and Lieu ten- Commodore G. Oaridge), the 
anl-Commander Timothy president of the College (the 
Laurence, RN were in i /n d FfinnU ) and the C hair man 
attendance. of the College Council (Mrs 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Beryl Warren). 

Trustee, this morning attended The Hon Mrs Legge-Bourke 
a Trustees' Meeting followed by was in attendance. 


the staff 

The Countess of Airb'e, Mr 
Robert Fettowes and Lieuten- 
ant-Commander Timothy 
Laurence, RN were in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. 
Trustee, this morning attended 
a Trustees' Meeting followed by 
a luncheon to mark the launch 
of the Museum's Development 
Fund, at the National Maritime 
Museum, Greenwich, SE10. 

His Royal Highness this after- 
noon presented the 1986 Binney 
Memorial Awards and unveiled 
a plaque in memory of Captain 
Ralph Binney, RN at Gold- 
smith's Hall, Foster Lane, EC2. 

Cptain lan Gardiner, RM was 
in attendance. 

The Princess Anne, Mis Mark 
Phillips. Chancellor of the 
University of London, this 
morning opened the new re- 
search facilities at the Institute 
of Neurology, The National 
Hospital Queen's Square, WC1. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Vice-Chancellor of 
the University (the Lord Flow- 
ers). the Chairman of the 


Committee of 


CLARENCE HOUSE 
December 4: Queen Elizabeth 
The Queen Mother this after- 
noon visited the Royal College 
of Music, of which Her Majesty 
is President, and presented 
Certificates to Fellows and 
Awards to Senior Students. 

Mrs Patrick CampbeD-Pres- 
ton and Sir Alastair Aird were in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 4: The Prince of 
Wales, President. The Royal 
Jubilee Trusts, this morning 
attended a meeting of the 
Administrative Council at 8 
Bedford Row, WC1. 

Mr Humphrey Mews was in 
attendance. 

His Royal Highness attended 


the Institute (Sir John Read) 
and the Dean (Professor John 
Marshall). 

Memorial services 

Lieutenant-General Sir Richard 
Goodwin 

Princess Margaret, Deputy 
ColoneLin-Chief. The Royal 
Anglian Regiment, was repre- 
sented by Sir Joshua Rowley. 
'Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk, at a 
service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Lieutenant-General Sir 
Richard Goodwin held yes- 
terday at St Mary's. Bury St 
Edmunds. The Mayor of St 
Edmundsbury was present 
Canon Michael J. Walker offici- 
ated and Captain Nigel Good- 
win, RN. son. read the lesson. 
Major-General J. B. Dye gave an 
address. 

His Honour AS. Trapnell 
A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of His Honour Alan 
Trapnell was held at All Souls. 
Langfaam Place, on Wednesday. 
The Rev Richard Bewes offici- 
ated, assisted by the Rev Ste- 
phen Trapnell. Dr David 
Trapnell read the lesson and Mr 
Patrick Back, QC, and the Rev- 
Dr John Stott gave addresses. 
Among those present were: 


ment of a luncheon given by the Editor 


of The Spectator magazine (Mr 
Charles Moore) at 56 Doughty 
Street WCl. 


Mrs Rum Trapnell. Mr and Mrs Leigh 
Trapnell. Mr Philip Trapnell. Mrs 
David Trapnell. Mrs H TTapoeU. Mr 
Ronald Fan-ant. Mr David Stewart. 
Mr D A Hackman. 


Sir John RiddeH Bt was in 
attendance. 

The Prince of Wales this 
afternoon opened Phase One of 
Brunei University's Science 
Park at Uxbridge. Middlesex. 

The Hon Rupert Fairfax was 
in attendance. 

His Royal Highness, Patron, 
the Maraca Rainforest Project 
Brazil this evening attended a 
Reception to Launch the Project 
at the Royal Geographical Soci- 
ety, Kensington Gore, SW7. 

Lieuntenant-Colooel Brian 
Anderson was in attendance: 
December 4: The Princess Mar- 
garet Countess of Snowdon was 
represented by Sir Joshua Row- 
ley, Bt, at the Service of Thanks- 
giving for Lieutenant-General 
Sir Richard Goodwin which was 
held in St Mary's Church, Bury 
St Edmunds, today. 

December 4: Princess Alice, 
Duchess of Gloucester this after- 
noon visited HMS Walrus, al 
the Pool of London, before the 
Ship pays off at the end of its 
final Commission. 

Mis Michael Harvey was in 
attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
December 4: The Duke of Kent 
Vice Chairman of the British 
Overseas Trade Board, today 
visited Integrated Power Semi- 
conductors Limited, Living- 
ston, West Lothian, Vickers 
Marine Engineering Division, 
Edinburgh and The Ballantytte 
Sportswear Company limited, 
Bonnyrigg, Midlothian. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an airaaft of The 
Queen's Flight was attended by 
Sir Richard Buckley. 
THATCHED HOUSE LODGE 
December 4: Princess Alexan- 
dra, Chancellor, this afternoon 
presided at a congregation for 
the 'conferment of Higher and 
Honorary Degrees at the 
University of Lancaster. 

Her Royal Highness travelled 
in an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight. 

Lady Mary Mumfbrd was in 
attendance: 


Lord John Townshead 
and Miss ILL- Chappie 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of the Mar- 
quess and Marchioness 
Townshend. and Rachel daugh- 
ter of Lieutenant-General Sir 
John and Lady Chappie. 

Mr HJW. Butler 
and Miss DX. Montgomray 
The engagement is announced 
between Humphrey, son of Mr 
and Mrs Geoffrey Butler, of 
Cheveley Cottage, Stetchworth, 
and Davina, daughter of Sir 
David and Lady Montgomery, 
of Kinross House, Kinross. 

Mr DJEL Ashby 
and Miss SX.H. Clifton 
The engagement is announced 
between Duncan Robert, son of 
Mr and Mis Brian A. Ashby, of 
Lumb Grange, Hazelwood, 
Derby, and Sarah Louise Har- 
riet, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Michael D. Clifton, of 
North wood. Middlesex. 

Mr M. Bound 
and Miss JX. YeBowlees 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael Mensun, elder 
son of the late Mr H. L Bound 
and Mrs J. Bound. Port Stanley, 
Falkland Islands, and Joanna 
Lilian, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs J. M. Yeflowlees, 
Knutsford, Cheshire. 

Mr R. Brown 
and Miss J-NJL Corbett 
The engagement is announced 
between Roy. youngest son of 
Mrs J. M. Brown, of Hove; 
Sussex, and Judith Nicole Ka- 
ren. daughter of Mr and Mrs P. 
D. Corbett, of Woldin gham, 
Surrey. 

Mr WX Byers 
and Dr P.TJL Saunders 
The engagement is announced 
between William, son of Mr and 


Mr R.P. CsunpbeB-Gray 
and Miss J.M. Macdonald 
The engagement is announced 
between Robert, son of Mr and 
Mrs Ian Campbell-Gray, of 
Morden House. Guilden 
Morden, Hertfordshire, and 
Jayne, elder daughter of Mr and 
Mrs James Macdonald, of Old 
House Farm, Beaumont-cum- 
Maze, Essex. 

Mr E.V. Cohen 
and Miss S J. Korer 
The engagement is announced 
between EDiou only son of the 
late Mr Leslie Cohen and Mrs 
Renee Cohen, of Cbeadle. 
Cheshire, and Susan, second 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Peter F. 
Kurer, of Cheadle, Ches h i r e. 

Mr SJL Duncan 
and Miss MX Cantwell 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, eldest son of 
Professor and Mrs G. J. Duncan, 
of West Kirby, WIrraL and 
Marie, eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mis J. P. Cantwell, of 
Redcar, Cleveland. 

Mr P JLSL Eogeka 
and Miss &AJL Robertson 
The engagement is announced 
from Trane, Albania, between 
Philip Anzhoney Robert 
Engelen, of Gobhatn, Surrey, 
and Sandra Anne Ross Robert- 
son. of St Boswells, Scotland. 

Mr E.CX. Leith 
and Miss F J. Goodbody 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, son of Mr and 
Mrs W. B. G. Leith, of 
Blandfbrd St Mary, Dorset, and 
Fiona, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs G. U. Goodbody, of 
Inverness. 

Mr CD. Parr 
and Miss OCX. Wolff 
The engagement is announced 
from South Africa, between 
Christopher David, son of Mr 
and Mrs Brian Parr, of Fbraiby, 
Lancashire, and Claudia Caro- 


Mrs James Byers, of Carlisle, _ line Langley, younger daughter 
Cumbria, and Philippa, daueh- of the late Michael Wolff. JP. 


Cumbria, and Philippa, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Christopher 
Saunders, of Dyrhara, Wiltshire. 


of the late Michael Wolff, JP. 
and Mra Rosemary Wolff of 
Holland Park. London, Wl 1. 




Mr L Campbell QC 
A memorial service lor Mr lan 
Campbell QC, was held in 
Lincoln's Inn Chapel yesterday. 
The Rev Felix Boyse officiated. 
Mr James Campbell son. read 
the lesson and the Earl of 
Malmesbury gave an address. 



Mr P R (nazebrook (Jesus College. 
Cambridge). Mr Richard Bensiead 



Birthdays today 

Lord Chalfont, 67; Miss Lucie 
Clayton. 58; Sir William Down- 
ward, 74; Miss Enid M. Essame, 
80, Major-General H. R. B. 
Foote, VG 82; the Earl of 
Longford, 81; Lord Matthews, 
67; Mr Sheridan Mortey, 45; 
Lord Napier and Ettrick, 56; 
Lord Nathan, 64; Lord 
Rotherwick. 74; Mr Jeremy 
Sandford, 52; Dame Mary 
Smieton, 84. 

Binney Memorial 
Awards 

The Duke of Edinburgh pre- 
sented the Binney Memorial 
Awards for Bravery and support 
of Law and Order in the City of 
London and the Metropolis at 
Goldsmiths’ Hall yesterday. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Lord Crawshaw of 
Ain tree will be held at St 
Margaret’s Church, West- 
minster. at noon on Wednesday. 
December 10. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
lives of Mr T. E. Scaife and Mr 
X C. Sands will take place in 
Pocklington Parish Church on 
Saturday, December 13 (Old 
Pocklinglonian Day), at 1 1-30 
am. The address will be given by 
Sir James Cobban. 

Colonel Thomas and Lady Betty 
Wiimington regret they were 
unable to attend the memorial 
service for Prince Georg of 
Denmark on Tuesday. .. 


Luncheons 


Baroness Phillips 
The Lord Mayor of West- 
minster was present at the 
National Dairy Council Home 
Safety luncheon held al die 
House of Lords yesterday. Bar- 
oness Phillips was the host and 


Mr AXX, Pude 
and Miss E. Tonrisb 
The engagement is announced 
between Adam Julian Laurie, 
elder son of the late Mr J. S. F. 
Pode and of Mrs Pode. of 
Richmond. Surrey, and Kath- 
leen. eldest daughter of Mr and 
Mrs G J. Tourish. of Pimlico: 
London. 

Mr AP. Robson 
and MissS-SidgwIck 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr and 
Mrs R. W. Robson, of Constitu- 
tion Hill. Ipswich, and Susan, 
only daughter of Mrs D. A. , 
SkJgwjck, of Cambridge. 

Mr M. Samuelson 
and Miss D. Blackburn 
The en gag ement is announced 
between Marc, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs Sydney Samuelson. 
and Deborah, daughter of Mr 
David Blackburn and Mrs Lou- 
ise Winton. 

Mr H.GJL Sanderson 
Miss N.G. Bolt 

The engagement is announced 
between Glen, younger son of 
Mr and Mis T. P. H. Sanderson, 
of Eshott Hall Northumber- 
land, and Nicola, eldest daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs J. A. Bolt, of 
Pontefand. Northumberland. 

Mr R.G. VUe 
and Miss S. Long-Fox 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, younger son 
of Professor Maurice Vile and 
Mrs Margaret Vile, both of 
Canterbury, and Sadie, second 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Rich- 
ard Long-Fox, of Teffont, 
Wiltshire. 

Mr TA Wright 
and Miss FG. Prescott 
The engagement is announced 
between Thomas, ekler son of 
Dr and Mrs Antony Wright, ol 
The Moor, Westfield, Sussex, 
and Fiona, daughter of Brigadier 
and Mrs Peter Prescott, of The 
Bourne, Holybourae, Alton. 
Hampshire. 


on Wednesday, December 3, to 
celebrate the opening of new 


OBITUARY 

PROF MICHAEL BRIGGS 

Controversial scientist 




Professor Michael Briggs, 
biochemist, whose distin- 
guished career ended in con- 
troversy. died in Spain on 
November 28- He was 51. 

Michael Harvey Briggs was 
born in Manchester on August 
20. 1 935.He was educated at 
Manchester Grammar School, 
and at Liverpool and Cornell 
universities, where he gained a 
doctorate. Later be became a 
DSc at the University of New 
Zealand. 

Between 1963 and 1970 he 
held posts in industry, most 
significantly as a research 
director for Schering AG, the 
West German pharmaceutical 
company. He always felt that 
this experience was invaluable 
in his later work setting up 
major scientific studies. 

He travelled extensively, 
holding academic posts in 
Britain. New Zealand. Zambia 
and Australia, where in 1976 
he was appointed Professor of 
Human Biology at Deakin 
University, Geelong. Under 
his guidance, the university 
took its first post-graduate 
students, who praised him for 
his enthusiasm and commit- 
ment to teaching. 

At international scientific 
meetings be was a familiar and 
popular speaker who im- 
pressed colleagues with his 
warmth, charm and sharpness 
of mind. His writings were ofa 
high standard of interest and 
clarity, winning him an addi- 
tional-reputation as a medical 
journalist 

He was author or editor of a 
number of books, including A 
Handbook of Philosophy, Cur- 
rent Aspects of Exobiology, a 
seven-volume reference work 
entitled Advances in Steroid 


Biochemistry, and a two-vol- 
ume work. Oral 
Contraceptives. 

In 1984 he left Deakin and 
moved to Marbella. Recently, 
his activities cm the past ten 
year s have become a matter of 
controversy. An investigation 
carried out by The Sunday 
Times in September of tins 
year led to serious allegations 
about the research done by 
Briggs while he was at Deakin. 
This work, which was fi- 
nanced by Schering AG and 
the associated American firm 
of Wveih, showed results 
favourable to the oral contra- 
ceptives produced by them. 

Among the papers referred 
to were "Recent biological 
studies in relation to low dose 
hormonal contraceptives" 
(1979) and "Progestogens and 
mammary tumours in the 
beagle bitch" (1980). Briggs 
was quoted as admitting that 
be had collected from other 
people unpublishable, small- 
scale findings and generalized 
them into apparently big and 
convincing trials. 

It is understood that he 
disputed certain aspects of the 
Sunday Times story; but he 
did not sue. and bad produced 
no rejoinder for publication 
bv the lime of his death. The 
allegations are now the subject 
of inquiry by Deakin and the 
UK Committee on the Safety 
of Medicines. 

This controversy clouded 
the end of his career, but the - 
validity of his earlier achieve- 
ments has never been called in 
question. 

His wife. Dr Maxine . 
Stamford - whom he met 
while working for Schering - 
survives him. with a son and 
daughter. 


SALLY MILES 


Britisb-Israel Chamber of 
Commerce 

The British- Israel Chamber of 
Commerce held its annual busi- 
ness luncheon at the King David 
Suite, Marble Arch yesterday. 
Lord Sieff ofBrimpton was host. 
Mr Martin Mendoza presided 
and Sir Ralph Halpem. Chair- 
man and Chief Executive, the 
Burton Group, was the guest of 
honour. 

Botchers' Company 
Mr Norman C. Poultney. Mas- 
ter of the Butchers* Company, 
presided al a luncheon held at 
Butchers' Hall yesterday. Mr 
Keith Roberts and Mr John 
SeJwyn Gummer, Minister of 
State for Agriculture, Fisheries 
and Food, also spoke. 

Mayfair, Piccadilly and 
St James's Association 
The Lord Mayor of West- 
minster locum lenens attended 
the annual luncheon of the 
Mayfair, Piccadilly and St 
James's Assocation held at the 
Royal Over-Seas League yes- 
terday. Lord Deedes was the 
guest of honour. 

Law Society 

Mr John Wickerson, President 
of the Law Society, was host at a 
luncheon at 60 Carey Street 
yesterday. 

Dinners 

Better Made in Britain 
Mr Nigel Lawson, Chancellor of 
the Exchequer, was the guest of 
honour at a reunion dinner 
given on Tuesday, December 2, 
ax Leighton House by Better 
Made In Britain. Mr Robin 
Leigh- Pemberton, Mr David 
Nickson, Sir Brian Hayes, Mr 
David Lea, Mr John Ca sseds, Mr 
Bryan Nicholson, and the Hon 
Sir John Baring were among the 
guests. Sir Basil Feldman, chair- . 
man, presided and also spoke. 

Institute of Neurology 


Society of County Treasurers 
The annual dinner of the Society 
of County Treasurers was held 
on December 4 at Painters' Hall. 
The president, Mr Alan 
Twelvetree. County Treasurer 
of Essex County Council was m 
the chair and the principal 
guests and speakers were Mr 
Tudor David and Dr Alex 
Sherlock. MEP. Representatives 
of comity councils and local 
authority assocations and the 
beads of a number of Civil 
Service departments were also 
present. 

London Society of Rugby 
Football Union Referees 
The anniversary dinner of the 
London Society of Rugby Foot- 
ball Union Referees was held at 
the Cafe Royal yesterday. Mr R. 
A. B. Crowe, president, was in 
the chair and the other speakers 
were Mr A. A. GnmsdeD, 
president of the onion. Judge 
Rice, Mr B. A. Riley and Mr R. 
J. Howard. 

Company of Makers of 
Playing Cards 

The Lord Mayor and the Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by the 
Sheriffs and their ladies, at- 
tended the annual dinner of the 
Company of Makers of Playing , 
Cards held at the Mansion 
House yesterday. The Master, 
Mr D. B. Maurice, presided and 
the other speakers were the Lord 
Mayor, the Chairman of Lloyds 
of London and the Senior 
Warden. The Masters of the 
Grocers'. Feltmakers', 
Plaisterers*. Painter-Stainers’, 
Homers* and Stationers' and 
"Newspaper Makers' companies 
were among others presenL 

America-Enropeaa Community 
Association 

The Prime Minister of The 
Netherlands was the guest of 
honour at a dinner given by the 
America-Europeaq. Co mmuni ty 
Association held at the Savoy 
Hotel yesterday. Mr Derek 
Hornby, Chairman of AECA 
United Kingdom, welcomed the 
Prime Minister and Sir David 
Nioolson, international chair- 
man, also spoke. The Ambas- 
sador of The Netherlands, Lord 


Sir John Read. Chairman of the and Lady Fans ha we of Rich- 
Committee of Management of mond, Mr Roy Jenkins. MP, Sir 


Sally Miles, singer, comedi- 
enne, theatre and club manag- 
er, director, artist and author, 
died on December 1 She was 
53. 

The Hon Sarah Jane Miles 
was bom on September 11, 
1 933. Her first passion was for 
the circus, and when she was 
11 she arranged her appren- 
ticeship as a contortionist and 
snake charmer, an adventure 
ended only by her father's 
refusal to pay the fee. 

She b egan her theatre career 
working with her parents, 
Bernard and Josephine (now 
Lord and Lady) Miles, at the 
first Mermaid Theatre in 
North London in 19S0, and 
nine years later helped them in 
the foundation of its perma- 
nent home at Puddle Dock. 

Then, with her first hus- 
band, she founded and ran the 
Margate Stage Company, 
whose policy was to seek 
greater theatrical liveliness in 
a departure from realism. In 
this it achieved considerable 
success. 

Her next creation was the 
Horseshoe Wharf Gub, which 
many people in the City and 
Fleet Street as well as theatri- 
cal people, remember as a 
place where they could eat 
talk, play chess or read. In two 
years it built up a membership 
of over 1 ,000, and it was there 
that Gerald Scarfe had his first 
exhibition. 

Sally Miles did not fit easily 
into any ready-made theatri- 
cal niche. She broke new 
ground with a series of one- 
woman shows in which she 
performed much material of 
her own as well as work 
written for her. 

A typical comment on her 
was this: ** She. never lifts one 
out of one's seat but then, 
unlike one or two soloists, she 
never makes one want to 
crawl under it either. And 
after 90 minutes she has the 
sense to know that she has 
delighted us sufficiently." 


Her most notable shows -- 
were Love to Kill and The 
Ruined Maid. For a time she 
directed the Wakefield Mys- 
tery Plays for the Abbey 
Theatre in Dublin, spending 
almost all of her wages flying 
home each weekend. With 
Colin Tam she wrote the foil- „ 
length musical Bed and Some- 
times Breakfast, which played 
to audiences all over the 
world. 

In 1980 she discovered that 
she had motor neurone dis- „ 
ease, but despite increasing 
difficulty she undertook the ' 
tour of her show to the 
Philippines. She also pro- 
duced for the Motor Neurone 
Disease Association a televi- 
sion film about it. The Best 
Kept Secret, which was shown 
on television earlier this year. 

When it finally became 
impossible for her to work on 
stage, she concentrated on 
writing, and produced a 
children’s book. Crisis at 
Crabtree, which was published 
recently. Her first book. Natu- 
ral Collage, contains illustra- • 
lions of her pictures - of which 
she had several exhibitions - 
made from seeds and grasses. 

Her second children's book, 

A /fie and the Dark, is to be 
published next year, and she 
was currently working on a . 
book of Buddhist tales. 

She was a Buddhist, a 
member of Nichiren Shoshu 
of the United Kingdom. Last 
June she directed the NSUK 
Alice!, a musical with a cast of 
some 350 which was presented 
at the Hammersmith Odeon. 

She was rehearsing a new 
production of the show until 
the night before she died. 

She was twice married; first, 
in 1961, to Gerald Frow, with 
whom she had a son and a 
daughter; second, in 1969, to 
Anthony Loynes. with whom 
she had a daughter. All sur- 
vive her. , 


the Institute of Neurology, was 
the guest of honour at a dinner 


Douglas and Lady Morpeth and 
Sir Anthony and Lady Tuke 


given by Astra Pharmaceuticals were among the guests. 


Science report 


Treating the problems 
of drop-out students 


By Pieter Brock 




m 






Christinas just wouldn’t be Christinas without a real fire blazing 
" y°ur hearth. So a visit to your local Approved Coal Merchant is an 
essential part of Christmas shopping. 

Make sure you order enough solid file! to last well beyond Boxing 
Day ( or the feast of Stephen, as Good King Wenceslas would have called it). 

Real fires start with British Coal. 

A Real Fire can cost as little as £24.95. For further information just dial 100 and ask for d 
Freefone Real Fites or write to the Solid Fuel Advisory Service, Freepost, Sunderland SR9 9 AD. - 


The lonely, withdrawn stu- 
dent and the drop-our have 
become cliches of academic life, 
a certain percentage of them 
being “par for the oouree" in the 
eyes of some academics. 

But a deeper understanding of 
such young people, and with it a 
way lo head off their problems, 
is being achieved by Dr 
Krystyna Szulecka and her team 
of researchers who carried out a 
study of more than 1.200 stu- 
dents entering Nottingham 
University. 

And in their efforts to lease 
out the areas of psychiatric and 
- psychological vulnerability 
among undergraduates, they 
tested a combination of the 
work of two great psychologists, 
Erik Erikson and Liam Hudson. . 

Dr Szulecka, a psychiatrist at 
Bassetlaw District General Hos- 
pital. Worksop. Dr Karel de 
Pauw. of Towers Hospital 
Leicester, and Mr Nigel 
Springetl of the university's 
counselling service, proposed 
that adolescents with identity 
confusion would lean towards 
the humanities. 

And that since arts students 
arrive at university with lower 
career commitments than sci- 
ence students, they see campus 
life more as a route to maturity 
than as a career training. 

When the students registered 
ai the university health centre, 
they were given a general health 
questionnaire ana another to 
measure physical and psycho- 
logical states as wdl as the 
quality of relationships with 
others. 

One study through the data 


identified thosp potentially 
vulnerable to psychological 
disturbance. Two groups were 
formed. One received psycho- 
therapeutic intervention, the 
other did not 

The effects were measured by 
the number of visits lo the 
centre’s doctors, type of treat- 
ment and rate or withdrawal 
from the university. There was a 
trend for the treated group to 
show fewer problems and less 
dropping out. 

Another analysis of the data 
revealed that arts students 
showed more - evidence’ of 
psycbologiclal disturbance and 
poorer relationships with par- 
ents than those in other facul- 
ties. Women arts students 
tended to have higher levels of 
anxiety and suffered insomnia 
while the men experienced 
greater depression. 

Most students seemed to per- 
ceive their relationship with 
their mothers as being better 
than those with their fotbets, 
something that was significantly 
stronger in the arts g ro u p. 

The drop-out rate was highest 
in the first year, most ofthe 
withdrawals stemming from 
emotional difficulties rather 
than failing to stay the course. 

As with others of all ages who 
ate psychologically vulnerable, 
the students were reluctant lo 
seek help because they feared 
the lable of “psychiatric 
disturbance”. 

Source: British Journal of 
Psychiatry. 1986. 149, 75-80. 
British Journal of Medical 
Psychology , 1986, 59, 69-73. 


MR JON 
BRADSHAW 

Mr Jon Bradshaw, writer, 
died in Los Angeles on No- 
vember 25. He was 48. 

Jon Wayne Bradshaw was 
bom in Vtiginia on December 
13, 1937, the son of a football 
player and a Vogue magazine 
editor, wbo brought him to 
Ireland for much of his child- 
hood. He was later educated in 
Philadelphia; Albright Coll- 
ege. Reading, Pennsylvania; 
and at Columbia University. 

He then joined the New 
York Herald Tribune as a 
reporter. In the early 1960s he 
came to London where he 
quickly established himself as 
a magazine writer working for 
Queen, Vogue and The Sun- 
day Times. 

In 1968 he published 
Bradshaw’s Guide ; a collec- 
tion of magazine pieces; in 
1974 The Cruellest Game, a 
book about backgammon; and 
in 1975 Fast Company , pro- 
files of six professional gam- 
blers. 

He lived in London for 15 
years before moving back to 
New York and thence to Los 
Angeles, where he worked on a 
biography of the blues singer, 
Libby Holman. Dreams that 
Money can Buy was published 
in 1985. 

It was above all in 
Bradshaw's long essays for the 
American magazines Esquire 
and New York that he proved 
a succinct stylist He had just 
completed a novel, Rafferty. 
whose central character has 
much of the author's own love 
of adventure and lack of guile. 

He leaves a widow, film 
producer Carolyn Pfeiffer, and 
a daughter. 


DR EDITH 
STERBA 

Dr Edith Sterba, child psy- 
choanalyst, musician and au- 
thor, who studied under 
Sigmund Freud, died on De- 
cember !. She was 92. 

She earned doctorates in 
psychology and musicology 
from Vienna University, and 
then, in the 1930s, attended 
the Vienna Psychoanalytical 
Institute, over which Freud 
presided. 

As the Second World War 
approached, she and her hus- 
band. Richard Sterba - also a • 
pupil of Freud - fled to the 
United States, making their 
home in Michigan. Edith 
Sterba founded the McGregor . 
Health Center in Dei roil and 
taught at Wayne State and 
Michigan universities. 

She was a pianist, and her 
husband a violinist. Together, 
in 1954, they wrote Beethoven 
and His Nephew, a psychologi- 
cal study ofthe composer. She 
also collaborated with Alexan- 
der Grinstein on the book 
l ndersianding Your Family, 
and she wrote numerous 
pscyhological articles, includ- 
■og (with her husband) a study 
of Michelangelo. 

She is survived by her 
husband and their two daugh- 
ters. - 

Mr Michael Braade, writer 
and publisher, died on No- 
vember 29. He was 77. 

In 1959 he founded Quad- 
rangle Books, which later be- 
came Times Books, and has 
now been taken over by 
Random House. 

He wrote light verse, and a 
collection of more serious 
poems soon to be published; 
a|so an autobiography. The 
First SO Odd Years. 


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BIRTHS, MARRIAGES 
DEATHS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 




may ■» cnonnumraaon or thy (ajtn Or- 
ion* rttoflukl tty the MmowMBMo at 
r*OT #»> «l» Which h Ip ySuby 
anu jwa w 

PhHwnon vcv 6 


BIRTHS 


DCaa OiiMvtmOn 271 ii. at Queen 
Mary's Unlverrily Hospital. 
RMbampton. to Alison and Ronald, a 
son. Bryan Paul. 

BUD ■ On December 5m. ai 
Penabyry. to Susie utee Kec.i and Si- 
mon. a daughter Lucy Susanna, a 
sister for Joshua. 

BtUDGaX - On November 2am. to 
Man- and Mike, a daughter Antonia 
Loutu. a sister tor David and 
Andrew. 

BMKRSCN ■ On November 20tti. in 
Munich. u> cnrtstlane and KaL a 
dauAddT. Alma canriua. 

BfTfAH - On December 3rd. at Dul- 
wich Hospital. to Rex and Mary (nee 
O Toole) a daughter. Victoria Louise, 
a stsler for Adam and Roland. 

FAUUtttX - On December 3rd 1986 . 
to Fitly and Robin, a son. Edward 
George Augustus Sajer A brother 
for Hornet and Alice. 

C O tPUHH - On December 3rd. in 
Athens to Emma mec Rodgersi and 
Cosmo, a son. 

HARRISON - On November 27th. at 
Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, lo 
jane uiec Simms’ and David a 
daughter Sarah Jane 
DBA VO On November 27ih. to Ann 
mec Alexander) and Bryan, a son. 
Robert Alexander Lewis. 

OSBORNE fiOUCH - On Notwnfier 
2 ist. at Westminster Hospital, to 
Joanna and Orlando, a son. Daniel. 
FELLY - On December 2nd. to Clare 
rn^e Dove) and Richard, a son. James 
Rlcnard A brother tor Anibony. 
FOKSONRY ■ on December 3rd. lo O 
inee Van Hulzen) and John. (wins, a 
son. Luke and a daughter. Francesca. 
RITCHIE ■ On December 3rd. at me 
! . Royal Ftve Hospital. Hampstead. lo 
.- Camilla mec Trollopet and Andrew. 

a daughter. Annabel Elizabeth. 
SHAW - On 2Sth November 1986. to 
Delta Cnee Lmgord) and David, a 
daughter. Lucinda Jemma Frances, 
a aster (or Rebecca and Elizabeth, at 
Wellington Hospital. London, with 
grateful thanks to all concerned. 
SHORROGKS - On November 29th. in 
Rosalind mfc Stripe) and Peter, a son 
Thomas Davtd. a brother for 
Jennifer. 

STOCK - On October 3rd 1986. lo 
Susan (nee Bastuu and Jeffrey, a son 
Richard James. 

5T0NE - On December 4th. at Jersey 
Maternity Hospital, to Caryn inee 
Shorthousci and Graham, a son. 
Martin Philip. 

1ESFAIOHANNES - On Wednesday 
3rd December, to Raina and Isaac, a 
daugh t er. H annah. 

WffiTnMGTON . on December 1st lo 
Joanna (nee Nash! and Charles, a 
daughter. Flora Mary Alice, a sister 
for Edward and Harry. 
WOODHAMS - On December 3rd 
1986. at SI Luke's Hospital. 
Guildford, to Lesley into Howard] 
and Jeffrey, a daughter. Victoria 
Jane, a sister for Timothy. 

ZEAL - On December isl to Christine 
i nee Holbrook) and Stephen, a 
daughter Grace. 


BATEMAN - Chi December 2nd 1986. 
in Kings College Hospital. London. 
Ne$ia aged 64 years, of 5, The Drive. 
St Ives. Cam to. Dearly loved wife of 
John and mother of Swan and 
Charles. Funeral service at All Saints 
Church. Si (ves on Wednesday De- 
cember 10th at 2»m followed by 
private internment at SI Ives. Ram- 
sey Rd Cemetery. Flowers or 
donations to Arthritis and Rneuma- 
lism Council, c/o Dennis Eason 
Funeral Sendee. The Lodge. Broad 
Leas. Si Ives. Huntingdon. Cambs. 

BAYNHAM - On December 2nd. at 
Cheltenham- Uw Rev. Verner. Chap- 
lain of Bearwood College, tormerty 
captain the Royal FusRien. after a 
shon times. Funeral Service at 
Christ Church. Cheltenham on Mon- 
day 8Ui December at 11.30 am. 
Enouirtcs to W.S. Trenhaile. Funeral 
Directors. Tel. 0242 514187. 

BLACK - On 2nd December. Frances 
Clementine inte Bosiock) at St 
Stephen s Hospital. Fulham. Adored 
widow of the late Edward, much 
loved mother ot Pamela and the late 
Sheila, grandmother of Francesca. 
Timothy and Guy. treat grandmoth- 
er of Luke and Alexander. Funeral 
* on tOth December al Putney Vale 
Crematorium al 3 pm. 

BBHSfiS - On November 28th 1986. in 
Spain, following a brief Illness. Mi- 
chael Harvey Briggs. D-Sc.. PhJO. 
aged 51. Former Planning Dean and 
Dean of Science. Professor of Human 
Blotoqy. DeaJdn University. Geelong. 
Australia. 

CSOWTHER- On December 2nd 1986. 
in hospital. Minnie, aged 85 years, 
peacefully and with dignity. Ute lov- 
ing and supportive wife of the late 
Harold Quwlher OB-E-. of Baker 
Perkins Holdings Ud. beloved moth- 
er of Pal and Micky, loving mother- 
In-law of Daw id and Zev and a dear 
grandmother. Funeral Service at 
Longthome Parish Church, at 12 
noon, on Tuesday December 9th. fol- 
lowed by oneroaUon. Family flowers 
only. Donations if desired may be 
sent lor Age Concern. 40 Broadway. 
Peterborough. 

OH MG - On December 3rd. suddenly 
at SolIhuH. George, beloved husband 
of Mildred, father and grandfather. 
Funeral al 3pm. Thursday December 
nth al Robin Hood Crematorium. 
* Strcetsbrook Road. SoUhuil Family 
flowers only 

FIRTH - On Derembrr 2nd. suddenly 
at his home. Bnan. beloved husband 
of Hazel and father 
line and Nicholas. rynera^Service 
on Wednesday December lOthaMhe 
Croydon Crematorium at 12.50 pm. 
Rowers to house, but <*ha((oiTS may 
be sent to the National Heari 
Uon. Any enquiries to Rowland Bros 
Tel: Ol 684 1667. 

FOSTER - On DerxrnDer 3rd 1986. 
peacefully In Col orad oSpnnSS- USA. 
Laurcncti.al the age of 80. heJov«i 
husband of Armoriia awl 
thcr of Bruce and Ihe talc Rena. 
Funeral pnvate. 

GUWWLLE - OT Oe«|^ 
denly al East Surrey 
deeply loved husband of Chrwmt 

dearest father ol Fiona . Char^ 

fDerd.i and Carina andm uctifov^ 
b>- an his family and 
service al SI- Peter and S* • ^ 
’Church. Nutfleldon T «^ y 

Neurone Disease AswctalKm. 
Oerngate. Northampton. 

Receptions 

The^raker. as immediaw^ 1 
President of the Common- 
wealth Parliamentary AJJJJJ 
aiion-and Mrs Weajhen«gv« 
reception in Speakers 
vcsierday evening to tnanK 
Sok who heiped towards the 
Access of the thirty-second 
Commonwealth 

Conference which look P 5are ,n 
London last September. 

College, of Occupational 

ISn«?^Anae was welcomed^ 

Patron ofthe Collie Of 

- tional Therapists at a tvagio 
held last oight al the R-AfClubL 

PiccaeiJi>- Those p 
included: . ,<j v Byers 

Lord EnnaK ^^.Stnlvico ntesl- 
and Dr l *S 

don.’>. . M,s ASnih«S repnsrtil' fl 9 0,1 

Service reception 

2fSf»Kra5®8JE 

honour. 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


600WWY - On December 3rd 1986. 
peacefully oj a Seasons Nura»e 
Home. Alfred Wnley (Alan) aged 88. 
beloved lather of Dorothy, sadly 
fflrised by all his family and many 
Inends. Donations If desired, lo The 
Guide Dogs For The Blind. C/O Mrs l 
Dymott 5 Esher Close. Seaford. r»i 
Sussex. Service al 5l Leonards 
Cnutth. SeofonL on Tuesday De- 
cember 9th al 12 noon, followed by 
cremation al Eastbourne. Enuiuries 
ana Flower* C/O Seaford and 

JnSS^waSr™ 1 Scrvl "' ™ : 

HAWKSLEY ■ On December isl 1986. 
suddenly. Joan Emabem Hawksley. 
sister o* the lot* Violet Ballanunr and 
dearly loved mother of BourdUer 
and Henry, mothtr inlaw and 
grandmother. A private cremation 
service will take place on Thursday 
December nth followed by a 
Thanksgiving Service at St Saviours 
Church. Walton St. &W3 at 2 pm. 
Family flowers only please- Her per- 
sonal request was for donations In 
aid of Ibe NSPCC Young League. Do- 
nations and enquiries, please to J H 
Kenyon Lid. 83 Weslbourae Grove. 
London W2. Tel. Ol 229 9861. 

HUZJKE - On November 26Uv peace- 
fully at the King Edward the Seventh 
Hospital In Guernsey. Jotui. A me- 
morial service wfli be held at Pinner. 
Middlesex. Detain to be announced 
la ter. 

L1PFRK1B - On Wednesday 3rd De- 
cember 1986. Adeie. wtfe of Hla ; 
Honour Judge Unfriend and mother ' 
of Robert, peacefully In hospital. Fu 
ncrsl Service at the Western 
Synagogue Oemeferv. CM: 723 , 
9333> Cheshimt. at 1 1 am on Friday ; 
5m December 1966. Prayers at 10 | 
Wooaside Avenue. London. N6 an 
Sunday and Monday 7U> and 8m De- 
cember 1986 al 8pm. 

KALLE50H - On December 1st. David ! 
Charles, fine son of Janice and MUn I 
and much loved brother ot Beatrice 
and Ruth, in an accident Service al 
Si Margaret!, church. Putney Pork I 
Lane. SW15 at 11.15 on Tuesday I 
December 9th. 

MORTfMOftE • On December 3rd. I 
peacefully in hospital. Katharine 
Elizabeth Mackenzie, dearly loved 
wile ol Robert, mother of Simon and 
Angela, mother <n-iaw of Fiona and 
qrand mother of Laura. Also dear sis- 
ter of Maila. Funeral service al St. 
CHars. Po tight u on Monday Oerem 
ber 8th at 2pm. Family flowers only, 
but donations. If wished. 10 Imperial 
Cancer Research Fund. 

OS WELL On December 3rd. peaceful- 
ly al home. Freda, widow of Henry, 
beloved mother of Rosamund. Hugh, 
Anihoj and OubiUn Cremation ol 
Mortiakr crematorium at 2pm on 
Tuesday 9ih December 1986 Flow- 
ers lo 94 Chciverton Road. Putney. 
SW15 by noon. 

PARSONS - On November 50th. Eric 
Allan, aged 64. reference bbrarinn 
Battersea Library. Funeral servue 
Thursday 1 1th December. 11.45am. 
South London Crematorium. Rowan 
Rd. SW16. No (towers by request, 
donations in lieu lo Che Mafcmm Sar- 
gent Cancer Fund for Children or 
jacauetlne Du Pres Fund. Multiple 
Sclerosis Society. Enquiries u> E 
Lamer and Son Ltd. 1ST Falcon Rd. 
SWll. Tel Ol 223 5432. 

PERKINS - On December 2nd. bi his 
sleep al 5 months. Alexander Jack, 
so befoved son of Geoffrey and Usa. 
Funeral Service at Si Peter and Sr 
Paul. Stuptake on Friday 5th Decem- 
ber at 2pm. Enquiries to Arthur 
Butler. Funeral Directors. fVppard 
Common. Henley-on-Thames. Ox- 
fordshire. Tel: 0734 722232. 

PETERSON - On December 4th. peace- 
fully. George Rainy tPeferi. aged 77. 
beloved husband of Beryl, much 
loved father of Marlin and Sally and 
grandpa to Sara. Funeral Service al 
Si Mary’S Church. Wargrave. on 
Monday December 8th at 2^0 pm. 
No flowers please, but donations. M 
desired, to Parkinsons Disease Soci- 
ety. 36 Portland Place. London. 
WIN 3DG. 

Pint LEY - On December 2nd 1986. 
peacefully in a nursing home, Marga- 
ret. widow of Patrick LavaDio 
Puxiey. Funeral al SI. Micheal’s 
Church. Warfield, nr Bracknell. 
Wednesday 10th December at 2-30 
pm, 

RfSHWORTH - On December 3rd 
1986. peacefully in her steep, al 
Notthlrach Hospital. Ottve Mary 
aged 78. Devoted wife of Charles 
Pasiew and loving mother Of John. 
Anne and Robert and grand modier 
of Hugh. Clare and Juliet- Funeral 
service at Si Peter and Si Pauls 
church. NotthLeach on Tuesday 9th 
December at 2.15pm. followed by 
private cremation at Cheltenham. 
Family flowers only, but donation* IT 
desired lo Asthma Research Council. 
300 Upper SL London NI 2XX. 

SMALL - On November 28th 1986. 
Florence Mabel SroaU. aged 78 
years, of Hendon. Daughter of the 
late Henry and Mabel and dear sister 
of George and June. Funeral service 
to be arranged. AO enquires to Donne 
and CD. 39 Brenl Street NW4. TeL 
01 202 8008. 

' SWANSON - On November 8th. at 
Torquay, the Reverend Raymond. St 
Clair Swanson- 

WRAITH - On October 300» 1986. 
peacefully at 36 Pukalea Street East- 
bourne. Wellington. New Zealand. 

L C O. (Billy), aged 79. formerly of 
Bcrkhamsted. Herts, survived by in* 
wnc. Dorothea. 


| MEMORIAL SERVICES^] 

AmnTACE - A Thanksgiving Service 
for Rlcnard Nod Marshall Arndtage 
wui lake place al 12 noon on Tues- 
day 16th December, at St GHes In the 
Fields Church. St Giles High Street 
London WC2. 

STEWART - A thanksgiving sendee for 
Alan Graham Stewart. TV Producer, 
will take place al 12 noon on Friday 
12 th December, af Si Oolombab 
(The Church of Scotland) Pont 
Street SWl. 

TOBIAS - A memorial service for the 
late Professor S. A. Tomas. Head of 
Department of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. university of Birmingham from 
1 959 to 1986. will be held m St Fran- 
cte Hall. Edghaslon Park read. 
Birmingham al 2ptu on Saturday 
13th December 

\ inmemoiu am-private| 

GUBU 1 K - Dennis Charles. December 
6 ih 1986. Reme m bere d with love 
and respect by hts family and Ws 
friends. 

MCE - Nicholas Alton. Slh December 
1084. Loving father to Hannan. 
Catherine. Angela. Missed so very, 
very much. 

TAYLOR - Brigadier pontod Verner. 
c B.E.. F.DJS. H.DJ3.. Barrister al 
law. a most dearly loved husband. 
WHYTE - Robert McFadzean. to lowing 
memory. 5lh December 1983. 1W. 

I GOLDEN ~~1 

1 anniversaries j 

HESTER - On December 5th 1936 at 
Ihe Friend's Meeting House. Croydon 
- Kenneth lo Muriel Harrison. 

Service dinners 

ftova! Army Ordnance Corps 
Officers of to Royal Army 

Ordnance Corps held a ladies 
dinner night ’ n ..^ 1 - e 0® cefB 
Mess, Decpcuu Major-General 
G. B. Benagan presided. Gen- 
eral Sir Richard and Lady Trent, 
Major-General and Mrs M. 
GaJJaiL Major-General and Mrs 
w. L. whalley and Major- 
General and Mrs P- J OB. 
Minoguc were among tfiose 
present. 

17lh/2Ist Lancers 
The annual dinner ol uie 
17lh/2Isi Lancers was held ai 
jji,* Cavalry and Guards Club 
yesterday. 

McKenna Dinner 
A Graduation dinner of uie 
Empire Test Pilots’ School was 
held at the Officers Mess, 
Aeroplane and Armament 

Experi menial Establishment, 
Boscombc Down yesterday. Mr 
NkSnanTcbbiLMP.presemed 
the McKenna Trophy to Major 
Mike Keane. USAr. 

AnnyLcfiaJ Corps 

Officers of rhe Anny Legal 
Toros held iheir annual dinner 
irFoumai Mess. AWershou 
vesterdov- Ucutenam-Gcnera 
S^Daiid Moslyn. Colonel 

Commandant, presided. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


DIALYSIS AND 
TRANSPLANT THEIR 
ONLY HOPE 

Lift saving tnauncm » fcoo»n, hit 
unavntabk through feci of funds to 
2000 people who die aaiuoBy tom 
kidney failure. Please hdp irant a 
reprieve for some of ihem mis year 
Donumns ur. 

THE BRrTfSH KIDNEY 
PATIENT ASSOCIATION 
Borttm, Hanu, 

TeL Bwdon 2021/3 


Ml» BHIDCCT MAfiV MriJOK 
Dmoud 

woum any SoJkiior hatdinu or having 
knowMnr of a Will by Mhs BM«N Mary 
Mrttor. larmwly of Cnmcarnoch. Unmm. 
KiniKTankir. manure awl unw of 

craomd. 3 Cnnn w. 11 Rom. Morin Bn-, 
wirii who On lal Nownher. Itt86. 
plraie cmiuu Moon w * j BMmess. 
ws h, Hour Strori. OUnburqh. no 
400 tm CAB/RJMi. 


MR a MRS SYDNEY COWAN wtw to 

■hank all Utrir rrtabvs*. fnotosaiM W- 
Iragon far Uirir qood wabn anq toria 
a Lin no Sydney 1 * uinns. am Pry to be 

riWUM iram rvpfymp Personalty lo ov. 
ervonh due lo Uie unpountollly of 
Bwlum out hb many totuvidiul Kim 


SERVICES 

SOMETHING FISHY 
AQUASCAPE 

mien tnr umour ooponuirity of 
IsMuiermng vrxiratstn or name wtih 
a styitm oauariuni complete win 
tropical imi. 

we provide muitoiian * 

imUnlroance. 

for dcfaift oh an e. 

(0708) - 23118 


WANTED 


WOOD • HocMy Fiedenck. m •* Tbenu* 

WTC4. LOOCttOT ol York Plan. 

Waiwonn. wno died In me iSkri 
wouto any dricendsnt Undiy cenuct 
me? La Aromuher. BarttvmsuB 
ram. Ret worth. Sussex 


PAMreNW by fUmata! 
Chane* Sonoson 


nuorMn orton. 
u ret er. O7B0 


contort Mr Mlcwari Jahhwa Id W wrt 
Waliworh. Nrttun and Jttbntom -dll. 
Theatrr SUecl. Pmton PHI flaCr. 

1MB W UUWM ttriwern Mr O SaliH 
CabraSmyllt and Counters Barbara 
Row Lada CroUtha (oUowed by a Mrts 
m»a nvOiumol9 Mary uw Virmn. 
WarMMMi. L« txmnt on MHMW 
lien CN-rvottarr Mill not take place 

IMS CMKSTMA& please hrtn our Cnmr 
man. Lurd Tonvoandy. provide more 
core. camJart and ceanpuiuonsMp for 
many lonely old DeoMr. Donations 
Mcuv io ihe National Benexoleiii Fund 
lor I hr AgeO. New Blood SI House. 38 
New Broad btreeLLandOn FC2M INK. 

FVMO RUKR reamred for pUDUc school 
in South Du England Reply as soon ad 
possible wring brief driaS* and « tele- 
phone number la BOX JS2. No firm 


lor up (o i GOM B»9>pes ol SuaPMS*. For 
acauamniy uHrphone 01030 saao. 


CROSSWORD CLUE. IWMMrrwirsrr 
formed wcR on Ute race c ourse ha 


SERVICES 


FMSMSD eXAMsr Taking a -gap year*? 
Jam our b week winter course in luly 
Tel Art Hbiory Abroad. Ol 244 8164. 


SELECT rnmipr. Enluwr miroduc- 
UaiD for Ihe utudached 08 Maddox 
Street. London Wi. Telephone 01-493 
9937. 

CAL— CVS Lid profeodonaf currtou- 
lum vtuc dociancnri. Driattk QI6U 
AIBE 

fMDBHtf, Love dr MnW. AO ago*, 
areas. Dateline. Drpl 10161 23 AMngdoo 
Road. London w& Tel: 01-936 1011. 


UBCE London School ol Sr 
dub. 38 Ktnsi Road. SW3 
7201. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 




HARRY SECOMBE SAYS: 

'What have I got 
that I can’t give? 

Diabetes is not infectious but 
ic can strike anyone, it is still 
incurable but we can fight 
the damage and suffering ii 
can cause -every year more 
than 1.500 children develop 
diabetes, ihe hidden disease. 

Join us in the 
fight Wfeneed 
yourhetp-Nuw 

BRITISH ^255^ 
DIABETIC ASSOCIATION 

1U Queen Anne Street, London 
.VVIMOBD. m. i ii win n.. .new. 


We can't 
care for the 
victims of 
cancer unless 
you do. 

You can help us ro replace 
fear and despair with calm and 
dignity for so many, by making 
a legacy, covenant or donation. 

Please contact us for details 
of payment right away ar 
The National Society for Cancer 
Relief, Room 74B, Anchor House. 
15-19 Britten SL. London SW3 STY 
"telephone. 01 -351 7811 


[Caricer Relief 


Macmillan fund 


JLthe myal star 

GARTER NOaiE 

Opened in 1916, the Royal 
Star & Garter provides a true 
home for disabled ex-Servfee 
men and women. Please help 
ik to continue caring forthese 
men and women to whom we 
owe so much, by sending a 
donation or leaving a legacy. 
The need is urgent! 

THE ROYAL STAR & 
GARTER HOME 

OegLTT. Richmond, Surrey TW10 6flR 
TeK 01-840 3314 


How near ^ 
• j weareto. ; 

. v- the cure... . . 
dependson;you. 


LEUKAEMIA 


i - ^ h T§ a iTT*] 


43 Craat Ormond Street, 
London IVCIlt 3J] OI-40S«St 

iblfyBMckss Iknmptoql Frlfiln 



own WAHID I urgroth remare a pair 
of bnt Coottab gum to any ronomcti 
bmp I ant prepared io luv« any iwco 
■ary roumuon urM aM rayuil. 
RriUy to BOX D44 

t£ WAHID Largr vie » i red raw . 
rtairt. suradlng uues. 
■wtotoOnsR. burrausi on pamitngi 
rte .Ol 946 7AS3day.OI 7U9 0471 rtn 
HELM 2 FrxV 1 9 year oWptfla eeek rttoreo 
Rat to Uie Futoaro area. £3&£40 pw. 
TeL Lou«a 631 4373 n IO day* 
WMOHK ITEMS and ad reiaMd orilctre 
wanted. Greens Anttaun.117 Keramg- 
ic» ommi sum m oi 229 96iB. 
ROYAL ASCOT UST prisafe Box 
mum Any (toy ronstoered or Ml 4 
da ys. R eply to BOX Mb 
WANTED Bernard Learn pouery by sri 
tub- couectat Too price* and No 
drulm 01-992 7984 
WANTED Cdwardtea. Vktorun and aa 
painted fununire Mr AVUon OI 947 
6946 667-669 CdtTaO Lane. CansOrUL 
SWl 7 


I FOR SALE 

YOU'LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

wuanderi beautiful namral cork OKs. 
CtoMMD hart wrortog Die besl fio»- 
ry ran buy £8 94 pit r v4 ♦ vaL 
Merakaion vovn Mfe carpet M Ptom 
eotoun Buili In underlay 12* wide 
from Koo. 7 year wear guarantee tor 
hofnedrolnre C4.76 per iq yd * vac 
Plus toe large*! wteetton M plam car- 
pcona to London. 

148 Wandsworth Bridge Rd 
Panola Creep SWb 

Td:0 1-73 1-3368/9 

Free EaOmate*- Expert Fntuw 


The Second Annual 

WESTMINSTER CHRISTMAS 
ANTIQUES FAIR 

RwN HorncaOurai 
Old h ML Vincent So. SWl 
4to - 7Ui DECEMBER 
ThureSal l iwu-7 JOpea 

Sunday llaiwfipm 
62 TOP QUALITY STANDS 
AdiMsatan £1.60 

Pentium MHquM rare 
Ol B28 2674/04447 2S14 


MARKSONS 
CHOPIN LISZT 

10(7* at new A 2nd hand UPritod* & 
Grand Plano* for *ale. A u nique Me 
with opportunity to pwawse Man 
from only £it*m. 

MARKSON PIANOS 

AfeMO SL NW1 
01 935 8682 

Art* try More. SE18 

Ol 854 4617 


UHTD EDmOM MMTS ‘Horn Abeam' 
stanad by Mooiague Dmvsen andl ram- 
etc Ctuebocer. Often dose as £3.000. 
Tel. 0003 812578 


SOUD S&VEli enres art. Roman* and 
,. Egyptians, bond BnWliril ■■on c ou ty. a- 
untque Clinstmas PfeseaL £7^00 ono. 
TEL: 01 460 6041. or 0669 711138. 


PIANO B ii i too* Grand. Rteriani upp 
1912. Rosewood. Good condition. 
£1.700. Phone: 0223 68317 drier 7pm. 


WOODSTOCK Driptay Uklien to cherry. 
One only. 23 P a bwiinm S nart. WCI. 
01837 1818 Qianca ot a lUedmel 


lhrrti-4 sUM avauabto on numerous 
dining odtes to toe CMpprodpIr. Heppto 
•mile and Sher a ton MM and C npPah 
oak. Hundreds of Uemi of occasional 
lUntoure.Some of tor Ohm rcoHco fur- 
nllure in Engla nd . Nettle bed. near 
Hetdey on Thames (0491) 641116. 
Bournrmeidb (0202) 293680. TonHiam 
*039287) 7443. Berkeley. Ota* (0453) 
8)0952. 


van yard ol tajvaprd hardwood*, an- 
tique mou ldi ng mm* panrtUnq. brM 
softwood*, everythin* mini be cleartd 
and rheaoed price*. Firewood tom 
Bring your own saw. Sal 22nd and 29th 
November and bal 6to December. 10am 
3pm Laatro- Gdkatan tnd EsL Carpan- 
lei* Rd.. Bow. E16 Ol 739 0448. 

IK IKK 4 1 1814- 1906) Thta Xmas gnro 
someone an an original issue dated toe 
very date they were been. £11.96 umm 
lire 187(7* newspaper!) YaBrttlayT 
News. 43 DtmdOttoM Rood. Cotwyn 
Bay Tel 0492 S3 1 195/631303. 

fsmt ooaUty wool cype w. Al tra de 
price* and under, atoo avadaoto iocts 
etora. Larpe room rile remn tod* indn 
half ocrmai price. Cnancafy Carperi Ol 
405 0493. 

RANCH Female MU* Fin- Jackef. DM 
Irngto (29 UteMS). Size 12-14. £1«X7 
Trt: Ol 980 4583 ktaytunci or 01 668 
4319 (evening). 

IK twr> imam. <xn*r unw 

oval). Hand bound ready tor Poremto- 

non • ate • ■Sunday* £12.80. 

Hiioera b er When 01-688 6323. 

■nouns for ant event. 

cats. Stardom E* 11 - Lc* AJ* 
them re andsoortv-Tet 821*616/828- 
0496. A.Es / vua / Duer*. 

AMERICAN ANTIQUE Pool Mte. Intel 
M O P all a t ceai o r t ea. Often over 
C3.000 Trt*01 940 1162 

AKDOUAMAM BOOK FAIR. 8 Pay IO • 7 
at The Mariborougli Crest Hotel. Qreat 
RuhiU Si Admissloo Free 

CATS. CHESS, Les MttAnd Phamom AH 
tneSre and anen . Tel 439 1 763. AH ma- 
lar rrnui eds. 

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Ticket* avail. 
Ate Wimntedon ■ Qriten toke w^ RO P. 
Iheaire. Ol 240 8609/01 831 7968. 

fulfill UFRJttHT ptonq. Afimgton - P c 
COM. VtveK me. ^4-0. Trt O) 289 
6891 coiner bom: Mr HewrtD. 

STEMWAV Oraod P«i« Model M. 6T6". 
Lace nro l ranuuen. £9.7TB. Trt: 0962 
71266a 

CBUTS aRNnrtNK VW Bertie. Sro sure 
day Ttroe*. Coded ore Care. 

KMBS ALEc Baa 4 Ch. One book- from 
February 1902. Ten 108868) 209 

TNE PMNO WIMKSffOP FTer credit over 
1 year icr» APRi Low inlemiover 2 vra 
& 3 yre. Wrttten quotobons. Free Cata- 
logs 30* Hignoair M. NW6 ot-267 
7671. 


FLATSHARE 


FULHAM prof mate/iemale share tourty 
rial with balcony. Single romp. Near, 
lube. Ail mod com. C/H. W/M. Video. 
HnniedUN occupancy £200 pen- exc- 
Tei: oi sfOOSSOarOl 3SS lags eves. 

FLATMATES Select he Sharing. Wen 

i-siab introductory service. Phe trt for 
apse 01-689 8491. 3)3 Bra mpton 

mao. sws 

WS - Prof may u> share lux Ml Of R. 
rime i ravel and aAenlUaL 33+ yrs. 
£180 pan cxcL Tel: 01969 0674 oiler 
6om. 

ACTON. Pleasant nedsH in CrinxOy laniity 
heutt Sufi dilMren leteroung profe*- 
Itooal letnale. C4Spw InO. 01 740 8382. 
clapham C OMM O N single room in mod 
bou». share K and 8 £50pw todusrie 
01 874 2897 mornings/eventogi 
CROUCH DR» N8. Near 2 tubes / 3 Him- 
Share home. Own room. £40 pw exri. 
Trt. 01 348 3260 drier 6 JOPtn. 

DOCKLANDS CS nr CUy Prof M/F 25+ 
lo share mod lux house wan firflen. 
£45 DW. Tel. 01 476 4563 1 alter 7 pmL 

EAST LONDON: prafesannal female. 16 
snore luxury house. Every Imaginable 
amenity. £50 pw Ine Tel: 8064923 
JHAIDA VALR Female to share Jafpe rial. 

Own ream £76 p w. Inrlusnv. TeL Ol 
289 5948 


CHILD WITH 
KIDNEY ILLHESS? 

Read this important seif help booklet 
prepared fay the country's leading 
kidney specialists. Suggested minimum 
donation just £1. All contributions to the 
NKRF life saving worit 

■HMNl OTHEY RESEARCH FUND 
TT(a), Freepost, London SE1 7BP 


FLATSHARE 


CDELSCA Prof M/F reotnred torture tox 

9 ttedroem llaL Acre* n square gar- 
dnw. mu dauaia room CM. r.v /video, 
wauier/tayrr «e. flOO P*« »*. N rS. 
te riem m. Trt 01 351 6232 


SOUTH KENHWTQN - «»tan 2 ite. 
own large rum. tatep bonr. ewer (lai In 
Dcrtad nmoe. anthwe fiWMBW AUuUI- 
fOM. Carom. £70 pw. mare out*. Ot- 
681 8566 alter 6pm. or SaL 


FUUUJL m// to mm lovely cardan Oat 
wrm one other Own rc«. en. near 
tube. £60 pw uk Trt 929 0394. 


MNMHT VMtmr prof. F N/S tea 
o/n + an toe. W.SW Tat 0283 7S4S92 

MV2 On. own room in taney RM. TV, 
CH. video CqmmuASlwwdene £46 bw 
Tel 01 481 5841. 


to tin to too per week OI 444 8201 or 
Ol 630 0720 rat 214 days 

SC 23 F lo mare. Lovely gqrom urn. An 
mod raoL £40 pw. 12 mm Central 

London. Trt Ol 68* 0923 aller 4.3CWn. 
MUTS DULWICH - 3rd person to share 
now. bore, martens fiat O/R. garden. 
£40 pw hd Trt. tt69 168? after 7pm. 

8TMCATHAM PrtM F. 21 -. tgr O/R to te. 
CH bouM/grtden. BR 3 pone, cev 20 
nuM £140 pm SKI. TeL 01 769 6666. 

M 12 O/R to newly uamrhl OK. 18- 
21 M/F s/S Near rune aoa cumaea. 
£40 pw rxcumre. Trt Ol 622 1268. 

SO Room to let rttonog to large house. 
£60pw. Tel' 01 602 2137 (day) Ol 727 
1007 me* a weeken ds). 


RENTALS 


For the besl 
rental sesrcstao ot 

QUALITY 
FLATS & HOUSES 

in prime Lonooo areas 

QURA1SK1 

COPSTANTINE 

270 Earls Court Road. SWB 

01-244 7353 


MfLWflCH-seSt 4 bed CH Oriarhed ror- 
nbbed bouse. 2 bam it en subel. 
rtoakrooni. 2 recepti on s, tvffly equipped 
kitchen, garage. 3 wtnmee walk to 
Sydenham HOI BR rtobon Company or 
diptomaUr remng only. £170 pw. Trt: 
Ol 994 7810 da V/ Ol 886 7B50 eve. 


VEST K08MC70N W1J, Castletown 
Rd. Fldly furnished 2 bedroomed rial. 
Loe rscspMcn 6 entrance tabby. All mod 
con*. Available tor imm ed i ate Co us 
only. £660 pan. M Breed? 236 1826 
utu-x 0836 226012 (eves) 


ALL WWIUM to London, a large setec- 
bon of quality [undshed nats and 
houses as Centra London. Brtprovto. 
Kensington. MoBvad Dark esc. Hunters: 
837 7368. 


MUSWEU. ULL/HHUMATE Large hum- 
ry ranriy home. 4dM bed. 3 ige recess. 
FCCM. ideal (Or coramoung to cky. 
£225 pw 6 months let only. Trt 0734 


mB WIC K Super two bed furnished gar- 
den Oat. Ctaae n*e. Long let. £136 b/w. 
exd. Tel: Ol 878 9336 

fWOMF (Management Services) Ud re- 
quire p ro pertie s In Cami. South and 
West London Arabs tor waiting aoob- 
cauls IM 01 221 8838. 


B JS B T O H note- Cay. 2 BM. tau n pe . CM 
rite Cm TV. W/ntarti- entry nbonq. To 
IM Cl 38 pw. Trt 284 9802 OT Ol * 09 
7810 alter &3a 


MAYFAM,W1 Lite S/trtoL2Bd™*. Lor 
Rerep. Fully ewra. £200pw. FT It Dec 
01-093 7830 ITT 


*. Modem mews house. Three beds, two 
baths. Recep. On area. KR. Gareet. Oo 
M peer. From Jan 1ST. tZ90 pw. Tot 
01-221- 7663 (evening). 


AVAILABLE NOW Horary (te(s * houses 
£200 - £1.000 per week- Trt: Bnrgess 
SSI 51.36. 


C N R i rm U T CRACK ER8 E Holiday Bats/ 
hses m London avdUabto now. Bargain 
prices. More Properties 01-486 8926 


IM/taiK UP to CBOOPW. Usual tees 
req. Ptauua Kpy A Lewis. South or me 
Peck. Chrises office. 01362 Bill or 
North Of (hr Park. Regent's Ank alllee. 


FtRBOY SQUARE WI: fiuperb beratfi* 
ly dec. f/furn. s/c period apt. an 3 firs. 
Drawing rm. halrnay. sen dining rm. 
ML 3 beds. 2 baths easute. coroerva- 
lory, root pan. Nr. Rewrote Park. Short 
/ tong les £300 pw. Apply 387-4781. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


ITS ALL AT 
TRA1LFINDERS 

worldwide low cos Banns 
The besl - and are can prove a 
155.000 cheats sttc 1970 
AROUND THE WORLD FROM £766 
O/W RTN 
SYDNEY £374 £660 

PERTH £003 £600 

AUCKLAND £390 £748 

BANGKOK £S09 £385 

StNGAPORC £209 £418 

HONGKONG £248 £496 

OCLHI/BOM8AY 4=31 £385 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


LOWEST FARES 

£69 N YORK 


SYDNEY 

PE»TW 

AUCKLAND 

BANG KOK 

SINGAPORE 

HONG KONG 

OtXHI/BOMBAY 

COLOMBO 

NABtOBI 

JO-BLRG 

LIMA 

LOS AM3ELES 

NEW YORK 

WASHINCmSN 

BOSTON 

HONOLULU 

GENEVA 



CbO 

LA/SF 

£366 


£320 

Miaou 

£320 

Kkito 

£3?» 

luiwuurc 

£420 

JoBteru 

C400 

Banskok 

C33S 

Cairo 

£206 

KMm»do 

£440 

Or] /Bom 

CASS 

Rjtooooa 

£350 

mng Kona 

£510 

Calcutta 

£425 


Hoge (mrami* Asad on us* Chib Cla» 

SUN & SAND 

21 Swritow 9. Umdon Wi 
OI4M 2100/437 0537 


£248 £396 
£270 £467 
£275 £506 
£193 £308 
£ 99 £198 
£137 £274 
£137 £274 
ES81 £457 
£ 75 £ 89 


42-48 EARLS COURT ROAD 
LONDON WS 6EJ 

Curopc/USA Fbrttts 01-937 5400 
UM Ham nson 01-603 ISIS 
im/Buxtoest dare Oi 938 3*44 
GttvrtnmrtU LUYotod/BODard 
ABTA LATA ATOL 1458 





CSSS WICK Scquuna soadoas 2 bed nuu- 
sonrtte with awn garden. Newly 
furnished throughouL aB modern appli- 
anres. Gas Ol. 7 mins time. £160 pw. 
Tel: Oi 743 3910 (eves/wkendaL 

OT mttef tel 3 ndro Angel Tube. Loacte 
ry rndna 2 MBW 1st Door ou. 
unr recep. bathroom. GCH. Fully lu- 
ted kitchen. P rivate entrance. £196 pw. 
Trt: 0484 64077a 

BRtfMSWtCK CONS W8 Newly decorated 
2nd door (UL doable bedroom, targe Hv. 
mg room & Utehca. Fuay rwed. £180 
pw tor CH. Trt 0753 882262. 

CKUE4. SMf3 Rec ently re decora ted 1. 
Bed Ral to cxceunu Chrtaea tocauon off 
the Kings Road. Db toBed. Rwe b/nmer. 
Ktt. Bath. O70pw. Caaotes 828 8261. 

EARLS COURT, stndio nai. fully run open 
pun kn. bathrre. ch A ehw. Crrt phone, 
porterage- CD or holiday teL£140 pw 
Sagarose Properties 629 9653. 

CARLS COURT. 2 bed flat In secure black, 
rec. fidly ma kiL bathrm. newly dec. ch 
6 chw. IMI. porterage. £226 pw- Co tet 
or holiday lei Separate Props 6B9 9653 

HAMPSTEAD CARDEN Suburb Pretty 3 
bedroomed cottage, touase/durtop. lVr 
bam. washing machine, central heating. 
£196 pw. Trt: 01-456 5769. 


M TICKETS Spemusa N Yort. £249. 
LA/san Fran £329. Sydney / Me dtouroe 
£769 ABUtrectdaity fbabtsDartaer 130 
Jermyh Street Ol 839 7144 


cosiuinm on msms/hotv io Eu- 
rope. LSA * moo derttnaiwns. 
Dlptomat Travel 01-730 2201. ABTA 
IATA ATOL 


APR1CAM SCATS SKCUUSn. World 
Travel Ceaue Ol 878 8146. ABTA. 
IATA. 


1ST A CLUB CLASS FUCHTS. HugeDte- 
count*. Sunworta Travel. 103727) 
26097 /27 109/27538. 


£635 Perth £565 A8 mate 
to AU9/NE 01-584 7371 


XMAS M Austrian rip a. Depart London 
by roach 22 Dec 8 day* special Xmas 
tjtnner /Tyrolean evening 3 nranlon 
C1S9 tort. Phone CdwaTOv HaMaay* OI- 
3bO 9241 ABTA 

TAKE TWK OFF to Parts. Amsterdam. 
Brussels. Bruges. Geneva. Berne. Lau- 
sanne. Anlro. Tne Hague. Dublin. 
Rove-tv Boulogne & Dieppe Time Oft. 
2a. Chester Clove- London. SW1X 7BQ. 

01 236 8070. 

AMFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney o/w 
£490rtn £785. Auckland o/w £464 tin i 
£776. Johurg o/w £246 rtn £485 Los 
Angrin of w £178 rm £34a London . 
FVgtU Cenlre 01-370 6332. 

C— MM to Lanrarate. *wU lor me 
price of 2. £339. timllfd avattoMUty far 

2 wks £39). 10923) 778344. THnsway 
Holiday* ABTA. ATOL 1107. 

CtTV BREAK SPECIALISTS Parts. Am- 
derdam. Rome. Venice. Florence. Tel 1 
Caprtre Holidays lor a arorhure and 
avritanluy toaSBt 316622 (24 mil 

Mm Meal tor winter holidays 1987 i 
brochure oi4 now coven wtnier Oeece 
and Turkey too. Aegloa OUb. 25a HUt* 
Rd. Cambridge. 0223 63236 Our 300i 
year. AW 26 2. 

OIK CALL for same al the best dealt m 
rephls Boai unr uls. hotels and car hire. 
Trt London Ol 636 6000. Manchester 
061 832 2000. Air Travel Advisory 


HOLT FROM £138 Taortnma hotels. 
Sicily a la Carte. Grand Tour. Flight 
only tram £89 rtn. BLAND SUN Ol- 
222 7462. ABTVATOL 1907. 

TRAVEL CENTRE SpeclriUtng to Finland 
Hib Class travel wortwide. Budget 
Fares Aussie. NZ. s. Africa, usa and 
Portugal with acoora. Tet OI 655 HOI. 
ABTA 73196. 

XMAS 90/27 Dec * Sumner 87. Dteiba. 
Canaries. Greece Rtv » MM. 6 w* MM 
VI ft- £399. Lunararase. 01-441 0122 
<24brsL 

XMAS. Winter. Sommer. Algarve. Tener- 
ife- Greece, Turkey. Sp a in . Egypt Sri 
Lanka and may more hots/rognts. 
Ventura: Ol 251 5456. ATOL 2034. 
B AH 6 A8I Ate Fares. Ca ribb ean . 
Aurtral l a rt o. USA. Africa- Far EML In- 
dia. Oobccrest. 01737 0659/2162- 
ABTA 

CHRISTMAS avafiahClty. GatwMk/Fbra 
IB Dec £145 Malaga 22 December. 
£169. Vaiexandar. Ol 72S 6964. Abu 
AW Aeress/vua. 

0MMTMAS C YP RUS . Jrt Ctas betel on . 
sandy beach froth H/rqw. i wfc £299. 2 
wks £365 Ring Pan Worid Holidays Ol 
734 2562. 

LATW AMERICA. Low cost fllgbls r.g. 
Rto £485. Lima £495 rtn. AHC Small 
Grotto Hotiday Journeysoeg pern Cram 
£360) JLA 01-747-3108 


mmo ce o bound. Rrgmi sl wi. oi 

734 6307. ABTA/AloL 


*- AFRICA From £465 01-884 7371 
ABTA. 


SPAM. Portugal. Cheapest fares. Bloom. 
Ol 736 8191. ABTA ATOL. 


IMA. Canada. Caribbean. Slh America. 
KTT 01-930 24SS. 


CHEAP FUOMTS Woridwup Haymarkrt 
Ol 930 1366. 


peSCOUNTCD A CROUP FARES Wortd- 
wtdr. Tel U.T.C. <0763) B576S5. 


MS COUWT FARES Worldwide: 01-434 
0734 JuoUcr Travel. 


F UOH TSOOKERS Dtorount Faros worid- 
wipe ivl/econofry 01-387 9100 


KAIAIIA. CANARIES. Ol 441 fill 
Travrtwar. Ah la. ajm. 

LOW FARES TO America. Australia A 
New Zealand. Tel. 01-9302556. Heratfe 
Travel 35 Whitehall London SWl. 
ABTA 3485X. 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE ■ USA. N/S 
America. Far East. Africa. Airline AMU 
Apt Trayvaic. 48 Mteparrt Street. w». 
Ol 580 2928 (VIM Accepled) 

NEVER KNOWMCLY UNDERSOLD. We 
bral any fate m anywhrre ui the world 
Caltim Travri. Ol 579 7TTS. ABTA 

IKW YORK. L A . USA. WMtdwtdr decU- 
nations. For Uie cheapest taros. UY ua 
trt Richmond Travel, i Duka Street 
Richmond Surrey. ABTA 01-940 4073. 

WPPDMUR Seat sale In USA -Caribbean 
Far Casl-AtMraHa. Can Ore 
profrsuonus ABTA IATA cc excepted. 
Trt 01 264 S788 

IKE 1*87 America Book, using BrNMh 
Airway* lor an USA orsd nations has ar 
nved cm us on at 584 6182. 

WINTER SUN Spectafc prim io Cyprus. 
Malta. Morocco. Greece. Malaga A Te- 
nerife. Nov A Dec. Pan World Holidays 
01 734 2662. 

AUCAWTE. Faro. Malaga. Palma. 
Tenerife. Dftnond Travel ATOL 1783. 
Ol 581 4641. Horsham 68541 

EUROPE /WORLD WBE towett fare* or 
charier /scheduled Ills. Pilot FUghl Ol 
631 0167. Agt AIM IB93. 

FRtST/CLUB Ctass Concorde. OtecouMed 
fares. Dumas Travel. 01-488 9011 
ABTA 

HOLLAND. Daily (bahts. £36 O/W. £55 
Rtn Frankfurt from £69. Miracle Jet- 
01 379 3322 

HOUR KONC £488. BANGKOK £369. 

Singapore £457. Other FEcHles. 01-584 
6514 ABTA. 

LOWEST Ate Fare*. Scheduled Europe & 
Worldwide. Mad Star Travel. Ol 928 
3200 1 

LOWEST WORLDWIDE FARES. Cato*- 1 
con Travel Tel Ol 730 6216. ABTA. 

■BtmOCCAN MAGIC . Hobdays. IBgbto. 
arc wn. car tore. Gail Seagup Hobdays. 
Ol 629 9712 ABTA ATOL 1178 

TRAVEL WORLDWIDE- Bril lares world 
wide, ak classes. Travel World- 
IOS727M35B9. 

ALL OS dm. Lowest tores on ntator 
achfdoKa carriers. 01-684 7371. ABTA 

GMM51RM8/New Year to Kyrenta North 
Cyprus. C o mprehensive range of s/c vll 
las. bungalow* A braenside hoteta at 
down to earth prim. Grand Universal 
Service* rr*T). 20 Stoke Newington 
Oiureti Sl. London N16 Tel: 01-249 
0721. 

AMERICAN EXPRESS VUIa book 1987 
has arrived. Booh now io avoid dtean- 
notolmem. Call us on Ol 584 6182. 

F L ORE NC E STUMO house. Stos 2/S. to 
large braidtful garden, central, tranquil, 
web (Urnbhed and equipped with own 
phone aM cent heating. Ol 703 3671. 

ALSARVE ALTERNATIVE. 

The IVnesi house* lor rental. 73 St 
Jama SL SWl. Ol 491 0802. 


VERBID? 

MERBEL 

COURMAYEUR 


Iwmnaonsl 

BLADON LINES 
The Biggest Choice on Skis 
CHRISTMAS CRACKERS 

Dens. 20/21 December 7 nights 

Chalet Parties & Chalet Hotels 
from £149 SAN viGlLIO 
from £149 VAL DTSERE 
from £149 CRAMS MONTANA 
SELF CATERING from £99 


(ram £149 
from £189 
from £149 


01-785 7771 

Seif Catering & Hotels 


March Dm. 
0422 78121 


GOCRAL ENQUIRES 
01-785 2200 


01-785 3131 

ChalM Parlies 

ABTA 16723 
ATOL 1232 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Rrtoro Return 

JO-BURQ/HAft £465 DOUALA £420 
NAIRCB £390 SYDNEY ^ £760 

CAIRO £230 AUCKLAND £785 

LAGOS £360 MONO KONG £550 

DEL /BOMBAY £350 MUM £33 0 

BANGKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

163/168 Recent Sl. WI 
TEL 01-»3re55/6/7« 


UP UP & away 

Nairobi. Jo-Burg. Cairo. Dubai, 
bt antral. Singapore. k.L. DetW. 
Bangkok. Hong Kong. Sidney. 
Mcmro. Bogota. Caraca*. 
Europe, tc The Americas. 

Flamingo Travel. 

76ShaiiMoury Avenue 
London wiv 7DG 

01-439 0102/01-439 7751 

Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI BEACH 

VILLAS 

CHRISTMAS SPECIALS 

VTRBJER £169 
MERISEL £209 
ANDORRA £149 

STAFFED CHALET PRICES FULLY 
INCLUSIVE 

Ol lilgni. Mi insurant* and deudous 

load 

NO EXTRAS BUT ALL THE FRULLS1 
LIMITED OTTERS - BOOK NOW ON 
•Q223i SUMS 

ABTA 1415X ATOL 3818 

Arce*s/Ba relay card/ Araev 


SKI * FLY • SKI * FLY 

MANCHESTER A 
G A TWICE TO ANDORRA 

1 WK BY AIR TROM £119 

2 WK BY AIR FROM 063 
PLUS FREE rtiUdrrn'v nojidav*. 
FREE Lin hmn Of FREE Insurance 
on man* dale* I nr Xmak/NY 

FREEDOM HOLIDAYS 

The Andorra £ Writs since 1072 
Ol 741 4686/4471 124 hi*) 
Manchester 061 236 001a 
ATOL 432 IATA ATTO 


VAL D9SENC 4 Merlbet. For the 
inaepnaLuii skier an inrtam leseivanon 
service An rxteUrm selecttan of s/c 
apb avattawe mrouahooi the soasttR. 
Travel avtolwto- ntahl or dlren coach. 
Ski val. 01 200 6O80(24hrs> or Ol 903 
4444 AST A/ ATOL. 


1UST FBANCC - Super value sett catering 
ski hobday* in me be*l French resort*. 
Ring lor new brochure now. 

Tel 01-789 2692. 

ABTA 69256 Aid 1383. 


SKI WEST - NOW Offering sitoerb Christ- 
mas medals to France and Switzerland. 
SAVE up to £200 for deps. Ob 20/27 
Dec. 01 785 9999. 

noNO romfortanie ratrred 

arommodauon. Near slope*. French 
cook - super I nod. Load* at anew lor 
Christ mas and New Year TN: 01-686 
3414. 

VOtSKER Swibrrtand. Private chalet to 
renire at vuiaar. Siren* 6. Avail (or 
Xmas ana New yrar. Far detail* phone 
Kdlr 0751 653586. 

LA CL U SAZ- French Ski Chalet. Resident 
MafT. Superb, trad, accotn. S/cal apis. 
Tel <02421 605695 (day)/ 602776 
■even. 

JANUARY SKI SPECIALS from SM Les 
Alpes to Vertoer. Vdlars. Meribal 4 
Menevc*. Trt Oi 602 9766- 

ME AMO. MEJRSKL Xmas chawts £ 199. 
New Year £299. On pM>. Tel 0890 
78219(24 MSL 

ONLY £179pp 20 Dec. Lovely catered 
rhalrt Porte* duSolelJ. Ski Total (0932) 
231113 

BIU FUOOTS. Dany w Geneva. Zurich. 
MtaUrii rtr From £39. SKI WEST. Trt 
Ol 78S *»999 

SKI OKEBCUHOL. Xmas A New Yb#r 
tergal re. Coach or S/D. B/B IT £136. 
S/C fr £I6« Madbon 0902 46297. 

NUWOKD Xmas Hob from £09 Andor- 
■ a? Tipne* Brochure Ol 602 4826 24hr. 
A8T4 

VEStBHN. toeaty uted luiuiry flat. Bteepl 
6. Tel Ol S80 34457 


DOMESTIC A 
CATERING SITUATIONS 


CLARKE'S. KenrthBton Church Street to 
Ute New Year, we shad have rub and 
ban dmr vacancies both In Ute kueben 
and Uw dtnmo room for young peoNe 
wtlh al Hast two years experience m 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


Students ITwo Royal kids settle down under arms 
killed on 

West 
Bank 


Letter from Buenos Aires 

Plaza vigil against 
Alfonsin deadline 


From lan Murray 
Jerusalem 

Two Palestinian students 
were killed when Israeli troops 
opened fire on stone-throwing 
demonstrators on the campus 
of Bir Zeit University in the 
occupied West Bank yes- 
terday . Another IS were 
wounded, two critically. 

The shooting came after 
three angry hours during 
which students and faculty 
members clashed with the 
Army, which had ringed the 
university with roadblocks. 

According to members of 
the faculty the Army later used 
tear gas and opened fire cm 
students at Ramallah Hos- 
pital, where some of the : 
wounded had been taken. 

Last night the town of 
Ramallah, in whose area the 
university comes, was de- 
clared a closed military area 
and sealed off by roadblocks. 
Troop reinforcements were 
brought in to carry out extra 
patrols. 

By nightfall the campus was 
ringed by troops who were 
refusing the allow the besieged 
students in or out. 

The two who died were- 
Jawad Abu Selmi and Saeb 
Abu Dahhab, who were shot 
in the head and the heart 
A military spokesman said 
civilian ambulances trying to 
reach the university were 
stoned by students who re- 
fused to let them in. According 
to the students the am- 
bulances were deliberately de- 
layed by troops. 

At least one of the dead men 
is said to have bled to death in 
the ambulance because of the 
length of time it took for 
medical help to arrive. 

Students converged on the 
hospital to find out what had. 
happened, 

Mr Roger Heacock, an 
American professor of history, 
watched the ambulances 
bringing in the dead. “Two 
minutes later the military 
appeared, surged through the 
courtyard yelling, screaming, 
charging and shooting," he 
said. 



Every Thursday afternoon 
Nora Cortinas boards a raj - 
tling subway car and heads 
for the downtown Plaza de 
Mayo to protest a brutal wave 
of repression long since 


y afternoon leader. Senora Hebe Bona- 
Sarts a rai- fini. has described the 
^and heads Alfonsin Government as a 
,n pjaza de diciaiorship and some of us 
brutal wave leaders as “fascists . Her 
long since angry outbursts have ahen- 
ated some other human nghts 


SSrite three vears of organizations and even led to 
deX shefjoins dozens a split - 


of other women in a mea- 
sured. clockwise march 
around the centre ot the 


Earlier this year. 10 of the 
original mothers, including 
Senora Cortinas. formed a 


oESThey wear their trader dissident faction known m 
piaza. iney . . »r nun( i, ne line . which 


marie, white kerchiefs bearing 
the names of sons and daugh- 
ters who disappeared almost 
a decade ago. 

A government commission 
documented the disappear- 
ance of nearly 9.000 people 

during an anti-subversion 
ramp ai g n by rightist military 
leaders who seized power in 
March 1976 and ruled until 
President Raul Alfonsin took 
office in December 1 983. The 
mothers, however, put the 
total as high as 30.000. 

The military Government 
contended that the campaign 
was to stop leftist guerrillas 
killing, kidnapping, robbing 
and attacking security forces. 


the “founding line" which 
takes a more moderate view 
of the Government 

The mothers contend that 
Sciior Alfonsin has done too 
little to earn the res pea 
evident in several inter- 
national human rights prizes 
he has been awarded. 

“We are not naive ... we 
mav never find our children. 
But wc won't stop until we 
find out everyone who was 
responsible, and see them 
punished." said Senora Cor- 
unas. 

In some cases, including 
that of her son Carlos, such a 
resolution appears unlikely. 

Carlos was 24 when he was 


Over the years the weekly abc j ucte ^ bv security forces at 
demonstrations of me Moth- Q g uenos Aires railwav sla- 
ereofthe Plaza de Mayo have aon Qn ApriI 15 , 977 and 

^ come ,._ a ® uei ^9 s carried off to an unknown 


Meeting that nailed Philby as a spy 


“1 shall never forget those 
screaming individuals armed 
to the teeth, using their weap- 
ons and throwing panic 
among the sick. It was un- 
believable, bestial behaviour 
by these men in uniform who 
attempted to take the hospital 
by storm." 

Hours after the incident the 
Army said it was still trying to 
prepare an official statement 
Photograph, page 8 


Continued from page 1 
In October 1 955 his name was 
mentioned as the Third Man 
by Colonel Marcus IJpton, the 
MP, but the then Foreign 
Secretary, Mr Harold Mac- 
millan, was forced to say that 
there was no reason to con- 
clude that Philby had at any 
time betrayed the interests of 
his country. 

- At the 1962 Tel Aviv cock- 
tail party, Mrs Solomon spoke 
out in very strong terms 
against Philby. whom she had 
known since he was a boy. She 
complained that he was writ- 
ing anti-Zionist and pro-Nas- 
ser articles and then told Lord 
Rothschild that Philby was a 
Soviet spy. 

When Lord Rothschild 
asked what she meant, she 
told him that Philby had tried 
to recruit her m 1937 for 
“important work for peace" 
and be revealed that he was 
engaged in dangerous, secret 
work. He asked Mrs Solomon, 


who rejected his appeal, to tell 
no one what he had said She 
never told the authorities 
about Philby when be fell 
under suspicion because all 
the public statements maria 
about him said he was 
innocent 

Mrs Solomon, who is now 
dead, referred to the Philby 
approach in her auto- 
biography , Baku to Baker 
Sired. The headquarters of 
Marks & Spencer was in Baker 
Street References to the role 
of Mrs Solomon in the afiair 
also appear in Too Secret, Too 
Long by Chapman Pinchcr 
and A Matter ojTrust by Nigel 
West 

When Lord Rothschild re- 
turned home from Israel, he 
relayed what Mrs Solomon 
had told him to Sir Dick 
White, then director-general 
of MI6, and a meeting was 
arranged at his flat in 
StJames’s Street Mrs Sol- 
omon told Sir Dick everything 


she knew about Philby. She 
was later interviewed by a 
senior MI5 officer, Mr Arthur 
Martin, who was then head of 
D1 branch responsible for 
countering Soviet espionage. 

According to Mr West yes- 
terday, unbeknown to Lord 
Rothschild, a decision was 
then taken by four key people 
in MIS; Mr Martin, Mr Gra- 
ham Mitchell, the deputy 
director-general. Sir Roger 
Hollis, the director-general 
and Mr Malcolm Cumming. 
directin' of D branch , to make 
Philby a formal offer of immu- 
nity from prosecution in ex- 
change for a confession that he 
was a Soviet spy. Their de- 
cision was approved by the 
then Attorney General Sir 
John Hobson, now also dead. 

The mummif y offer was 
taken out to Beirut just before 
Christmas 1962 by an MI6 
officer, Mr Nicholas Elliott 
who was a friend of Philby. 
Presented with the evidence of 


Mrs Solomon, Philby agreed 
to confess, although to this 
day it is believed that he had 
anticipated the visit and had a 
statement prepared with the 
hdp of his Soviet controller. 

Philby vanished from his 
Beirut fat in January 23 1963 
and it was formally confirmed 
in the Commons on March 29 
the same year 

Whatever the reasons for 
-Philby's agreement to sign a 
confession and then disappear 
to Moscow, it was un- 
doubtedly the intervention of 
Mrs Solomon and Lord Roth- 
schild in 1962 which brought 
the Philby affair to a head. 

Yesterday Sir Dick White, 
who was head ofboth MI5 and 
MI6 during his career in 
intelligence, said he knew 
nothing about the unequivo- 
cal evidence referred to by 
Lend RothschikLHowever he 
added :“I haven’t the slightest 
doubt that Lord Rothschild 
was not a Soviet spy." 


Reluctant recruits. 
Sospan and Dewi IV were 
signed up for the military 
life yesterday as mascots, 
of the 3rd and 4th battal- 
ions of the Royal Regi- 
ment of Wales. 

The pedigree of the kid 
goats made them the ideal 
choice for their ceremo- 
nial roles when they were 
picked from the royal! 
herd and enlisted at 
Whipsnade Zoo. The. 
Queen’s permission had 
to be sought before they 
could be signed np. 

At first they shied away 
from their new command- 
ing officers. Cdlonr Ser- 
geant Barry John, rights 
is holding Sospan and 
Corporal Colin Pryce, 
who is a local sergeant, 
met Dewi IV before tak- 
ing them to be measured 1 
for their scarlet uniforms. 

(Photograph: Peter 
Trievnor) 


Aires life, like the mid- 
aftemoon ritual of coffee and 
croissants in sidewalk cafes. 

They have become casual, 
exchanging small talk and 
kissing. They smile for tour- 
ists who take their pictures. 
Their purpose, however, .re- 
mains as solemn as the faded 
photographs of the missing 
hanging around their necks. 

“We made a promise that 
until we recover our children, 
or find out what happened lo 
them, we would continue to 
go to the plaza." the 56-year- 
old Senora Cortinas said 

Their continued presence 
irks Seiior Alfonsin. whose 
Government has been ac- 
claimed worldwide for restor- 
ing- respect for civil liberties 
and for its human rights 
iro seditions of the country's 
onner military rulers. 

In speeches, Seiior Alf- 


fate. Unlike many of “ihe dis- 
appeared". who have since 
been seen in clandestine tor- 
ture and detention centres by 
survivors. Carlos has never 
been seen again. 

Sixteen days after his 
abduction, a group of moth- 
ers whose children had suf- 
fered similar fates gathered 
for the first time at the plaza. 
Senora Cortinas was not 
there, but she heard about it 
and she was there the next 
week. 

“Although I didn't realize 
it at the time, it was partly 
therapy, a way of dealing with 
so much pain." she said. 

The mothers want a de- 
tailed case-by-case examina- 
tion that names every 
repressor. 

Five ruling Junta members 
already have been given long 



onsin has linked the mothers jail terms and several other 
with the extreme left and officers are being prosecuted 
alluded to them as “seekers of But the mothers complain 
vengeance". about the lack of progress in 

This is true of some of the prosecuting scores of tower- 


vengeance". about me tack ot progress in 

This is true of some of the prosecuting scores of tower- 
mothers. who have aligned ranking officials accused of 
themselves with leftist parties direct participation in the 
by lobbying for causes un- abductions, tortures and 
related to their original mis- fis- 
sion and who routinely take The group is most con- 
part in marches protesting ceraed with local newspaper 
aigovemment austerity mea- reports that the Government 
sores and appealing for a is planning to set a time limit 
moratorium on payments of on prosecution, 
the $50 billion (about £33.3 rr 

billion) foreign debt MVl 

That faction’s outspoken A 


Kevin Noblet 

.Associated Press 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


D . . statuary m the Old Market 

Royal engagements Square, Nottingham, 12.50; as 

The Queen gives a luncheon President of the Save the Chil- 
at Buckingham Palace for the dren Fund, visits the Save the 
Heads of State/Governmem Children Fund Shop in Derby 


Airport, 1 1.50; and has lunch at 1 Awards Exhibition; Spacex Gal- 
the Council House and unveils I lery, 45 Preston St, Devon; 10 to 


TopFflms 


and Foreign Ministers of the 
European Communities who 
are attending the European 
Council Meeting, 1. 

Princess Anne opens the new 
extension at East Midlands 


Road. 2.45; attends a buffet 
reception at the County HaO, 
5.30; and a Gala Evening at the 
Royal Concert Hall, 7.15. j 

New exhibitions ! 

Benson and Hedges Gold I 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,221 


u m u 

I SiHBI 

m m m m 


5 (ends Dec 23). 

Engraved Glass and Illu- 
minated Manuscripts; Derby 
Museums and Art Gallery, The 
Strand, Derby, Tues to Sat, 10 to 
5 (ends Dec 24). 

Last chance to see 

The Social History of the 
Microscope; .University of Cam- 
bridge, Whipple Museum of the 
History of Science, Free School 
Lane, Cambridge, 2 to 4. 
Music 

Concert by Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra. Richard 
McNicol (conductor) at ZOO; 
and six songs for soprano and 
orchestra at 7.30; Great Hall, 
Exeter University. 

Concert by Peter Donoboe 
(piano); Haddersfiekl Town 
Hall; 7.30. 

Concert by the Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra: Neeme Jarvi 
(conductor) and Henryk 
Szeryng (violin); Usher Hall, 
Lothian Rd, Edinburgh; 7.30. 

Organ recital by Edwin Gray 
at 1.1ft and, Ulster Orchestra 
concert of Gallaher's Maestros 
of Europe; Sir Charles Groves 
(conductor) and Robert Cohen 
(soloist) at 7.45; Ulster Halt 
Belfast 

Bath International Festival: 
Hagen String Quartet; 
Guildhall, Bath ; 730. 

Talks 

Composers Talking, by John 


The top box-office films in 
London: 
f (2) Top Gun 

2 (1 1 The Mission 

3 M Round MRWgbt 
4(3) Ruthless People 
5 5) Mona Usa 

6(4) Big Trouble in Little China 

7 6) Running Scared 
8(7} True Stories 

9 fr) Critters 

10(8) A Room With a View 
The top flms hi the provinces: 

1 Top Gun 

2 Ruthless People 

3 Running Scared 

4 Mona lisa 

5 Big Trouble kt Little China 

Support by Sown Mrnottmf 

Top video rentals 

1(1) Indtane Jones and the Tem- 
ple of Doom 

2 4) Fright Night 

3 2 Teen Worf 

4 5) Spies Like US 

5 3) The Delta Force 
6(6) Death Wish 
7(1tn The Howing 2 

8 ( j Santa Claus The Movie 
9(7) Year ot the Dragon 

10 ( 8) The Sword In the Stone 
SuppKed by WNoSbUngrt 


Food prices 


C WEATHER depression will move NE from northern Scotland to 

„ . . __ , _ Norway, and its associated cold front will move slowly 

are by4^ S E « Jros the U X, .ProbaM y clearing SE England early tomorrow. Friday will . 

pound OT legs and 2p to 3p a *£"***{ ™ ** districts, and the ram will move slowly SE across ». J 

pound on other cuts. New Dntala during the day, SE Eng l a n d should stay dry unto late in the day. Clearer 
Zetland lamb on the other hand weather with some showers will reach Northern Ireland and western Scotland in 

^ foUow IJ the «dn slowly SE. The SE will be very tnild again, 
elsewbereit will tore colder. Most places windy. Outlook for tomorrow andSuu- 
day: Unsettled with ram at times everywhere, especially in W and N. Becoming 
mild again. 


Roads 

North: Ml: Repairs between 
junctions 31 and 33 (A57 
Worksop and A630 Roth- 
erham). Slip road closures at 


ACROSS 

1 Fed up. Sir Thomas, with 
shed (7,3). 

6 Bill is a shepherd (4). 

9 Took place - as Xeraes did 
at Thermopylae (4,2,4). 

10 An unpleasant character 
drawn to the audience (4). 

12 Wine — it’s twice rejected 
(4X 

13 Being prepared to study one 
such as 29 (9). 

15 Argue about entering the 
lack's age (8). 

16 The dullness of Proust's 
characters (6). 

18 The letter S heard and seen 
in 'Gosh' (6). 

20 Stretch the food (8). 

23 Light switch is not free 
(3,2,4). 

24 Covering the action (4). 

26 The girl to make a come- 
back (4). 

27 Toy retailed in much small- 
er case (3,7). 

28 Where to keep the money — 
it's about two pounds <4j. 

29 Dispatch contains painful 
point (6,4). 

down 

1 Money does attract this (4). 

2 Gradual assimilation of bin 
Dxnc girl (7). 


3 Love acting? Certainly noil 
(7,5). 

4 Indeed, a tot late (8). 

5 Califs free of taxes (6). 

7 Draw together a huge pic- 
ture (5-2). 


McCabe. London Collie of junctions 31 and 32 (M18 
flrr *??? » QP 1 *? interchange). M6: Roadworks at 
junctiorT 23 till end 

JS?«f° n i , S Gil1 ; Decemberaxmtraflow between 
S? “i National junctions 29 and 32 (A6 Preston 


8 Byway that's edged by strag- 
gling trees (4-6). 

11 The man's conservative, 
without one term in the past 
( 12 ). 

14 A state payment's very little 
money for a youth (10). 

17 Variety of conifers used in 
courts (8). 

19 Bag carried by pensioners at 
Chelsea (7). 

21 Intend to tie ends loosely 
(7). 

22 In punishment it is limited 
(6). 

25 Urge forward without fight- 
mg(4X 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,220 


gse a n h la iti-13 
jyiajsiiEEE wonnona 
ffl 15 SB IT ' PE 0 JJ1 [g 
f^nrsEnncasra iisssH 
rc s & pi rs . is 
i2Eehet asnnnnsns 

0- E E ' R . R S 

MHEHrsnasy'' 
e - . v "-«= : -.cb- o n a - 

? i=?v3*«r3E®E5S!£l 
m n c* b ,e c G R 
anracraRE- iiararsiiniJii 

a r= m m e- e 


Schools Project, by Garry 
Miller: Usher Gallery, Lind urn 
Rd, Lincoln, 7.30. 

General 

Annual Christmas County 
Antique Dealers' Fain Nosicll 
Priory, Doncaster Rd, NosteU, 
Nr Wakefield. W Yorkshire; 
ends Dec 7. 

Book fair; Library Theatre, 
SofihnEL 12 to 8, 10 to 5 (ends 
Dec 6). 

The Planetarium Roadshow; 
Cushendall Lifeboat Station, 
CushendalL, County Antrim; 
8 . 00 . 

The pound 


Australia $ 
Austria Sea 
BeJgajm Fr 
Canada S 
SsmnaritKir 
FMandNKk 
Franca Fr 
Sannanypni 

aieeeeOr 

SMS?” 

Italy Lira 
Japan Yen 
NattmtandsOd 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
Sootri Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Soritrsrland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 


and M5S interchange). M18: 
Contraflow between junctions 1 
and 2 (Rotherham and A! M). 
Contraflows between junctions 
6 and 7 (Thome and M62). 
Southbound exit and north- 
bound entry roads closed at 
junction 6. M61: Lane closures 
at M6 interchange- M63: Road- 
works on northbound carriage- 
way; restrictions between 
junctions 1 and 7, long term, 
avoid if possible. Lane restric- 
tions junction 10toM63. 
Scotland: M& Construction 
work junctions 15 and 17 (Glas- 
gow city centre and Dumbarton) 
till March. M74: Contraflow 
junction 5 (A725). M90: 
Contraflow junctions 3 and 4 
(Dunfermline and Kelly). Re- 
pairs junctions 5 and 8 
(Glenrothes and A91 Glen&ig). 

Information supplied by AA 

Anniversaries 


is stable with whole legs between 
£1.09 and £1.59 a pound and 
loin chops £1.35 to £1.69 a 
pound. 

Meat and poultry on promo- 
tion in shops and supermarkets 
this week include; Bejanc grade 
A basted and non-basted turkey 
at 49p a pound and golden 
Norfolk basted turkey 57p a 
pound; Fine Fare: frozen leg of 
pork 99p a pound; Safeway: 
home-produced fresh pork chop 
£1 219 a pound; Sahasburys; self- 
basting turkey 57p a pound and 
pork loin chops bone in £127 a 
pound; Presto: grade A British 
turkey 54pa pound and roasting 
beef (forequarter) £1.48 a 
pound. 

Sharon fruit (18 lo 45p each) 
is the sweet non-astringent ver- 
sion of the persimmon and was 
developed in the Sharon Valley 
of Israel. Unlike persimmon, 
which can only be eaten when 
ripe otherwise it is very bitter, 
the Sharon fruit is sweet even 
when auite firm. It is widely 
available now and the season 
lasts until the end of January. 

The best value in fruit in- 
cludes English coxes 25 to 45p a 
pound, French Golden De- 
licious 22 to 35p a pound, and 
Granny Smiths 25 to 40p a 
pound. Spanish and Italian 
Italia grapes SO lo 90p a pound. 
New Zealand kiwi fruit 15 to 
30p each. Lemons 6 to 18peach, 
oranges 12 to 29p each. 
Satsumas 34 to 45pa pound and 
clementines 35 to 60p a pound. 

Watch the quality of French 
chestnuts at 40 to 50p a pound, 
the Italian and Spanish at 50 to 
80p a pound are more reliable. 
Fresh French Grenoble walnuts 
are finishing but Chinese wal- 
nuts at 65 to 79p a pound are 
also available. Mixed nuts are a 
good buy at 70 to 80p a pound. 

Parliament today 


HIGH TIDES 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

• PM 

HT 

London Bricto 

3^6 

7.0 

424 

72 

Aberdeen 

3J9 

42 

243 

42 

Avonrooutb 

9.38 

127 

10.4 

122 

Betfast 

1.03 

35 

1.23 

35 

Cardiff 

9Z3 

11.7 

9.49 

112 

Pewnport 

ai7 

55 

852 

51 

Dover 

1-03 

65 

127 

8L4 

i nuMidPi 

7.47 

52 

8 72 

48 


2J>1 

45 

203 

52 

Harwich 

1.45 

35 

223 

40 


12.19 

55 

1238 

5.6 

HuB 

639 

72 

849 

72 

Bfraoorabe 

ais 

9.1 

842 

8.6 


4^1 

56 

5.12 

54 

UHnpool 

1.14 

92 

125 

92 

Lowestoft 

11J6 

25 

154 

25 

Margate 
MHonl Haven 

2.02 

834 

4.7 

7.0 

238 

9.03 

4.9 

6.6 

“ewquay 

726 

7.0 

756 

56 

Oban 

755 

4.0 

8.19 

35 

Ptnrcanur 

721 

55 

758 

5? 

Portland 

9.T4 

24 

951 

20 

Portsmouth 

1.34 

4.6 

1.45 

45 

Shorafanm 

1.18 

62 

124 

62 

Southampton 

12.57 

45 

1.09 

44 

Swansea 

8.37 

94 

9.03 

8.9 

Tees 

6.01 

5.3 

6.10 

54 

WTton-onJtee 

1.40 

4.1 

212 

42 


i 






Births: Martin van Boren, 
eighth President of the USA 
1837-41. Kinderhook. New 
York, 1782; Christina Rossetti, 
poet. London. 1830: Jtaef 
Pflsadski. Chief of State, Poland ' 
1918-22, Prime Minister 1926- 
28. 1930. Zulow. Lithuania. 
1867. 

Deaths: Wolfgang Amadeus 
- Mozart. Vienna. 1791; 

Alexandre Dumas, pm. Puys, 


Commons (9.30): Private mem- 
ber’s motion on local gover- 
nment. 


Monday -Saturday record your daUy 

Add U ^J5?jtogej!wr to McnnliM 
ytmr weekly Portfolio l<m 
If your total matches me pubUalMd 
weekly fttvMend figure you have won 
mihlaht or a share of the nrtw money 
staled for that week, and must claim 


Teteahnaa The Than Femes* 






Concise Crossword page 16 


only as suppled by Bardoys Sank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers’ 
cheques and other foreign currency 
business. 

ReM Price Warn S8&4 

London: The /T index dosed 12 down at 
12653. 


swelters’ France, 1870; Claude Monet, 
currency Giverny. France, 1926: Vacbet 
Lindsay, poet, Springfield, Illi- 
nois. 1931. 

’jfawnm Prohibition was repealed in 
tile USA, 1933. 


You must hove your card wltn you . 
when you telephone. 

K you are unable to leMptienc 
ymoonc ctae can ctelm on ytmr behalf 
but they must have your card and can 
Tiroes Portfolio claims une 

Sowed 

for failure to contact the ctetato office 
for any reason within Ihe stated 
noun. 

.The above instructions ere • at*, 
piicabie to both daily and weekly 
dividend ciatma. 


Tide measured in natres: 1m=3£80M. 

C AROUND BRITAIN "I 

Sun Rain Max 
ftrs in C F 

- .05 14 57 did 

- .09 13 55 rain 

• 

- - 14 57 Cloudy 

- - 12 54 cfoudy 

14) - 13 55 Cloudy 

* - 14 57 duB 

Fotowtone 05 - 13 55 cloudy 

Hastes* 1.1 - 13 55 cloudy 

Ea stbo urne 1.0 - 13 55 doudy 

02 - 12 54 doudy 

0.6 - 13 55 doudy 

0-9 - 13 55 cloudy 

18 - 13 55 doudy 

0.1 - 14 57 doudy 

1.2 - 14 57 Bright 

- - 13 55 doudy 

- - 13 65 cloudy 

0.1 - 15 58 doudy 

- - 13 55 doudy 

- - 13 55 duB 

- - 14 57 doudy 

- - 14 57 doudy 

; - 14 57 duf 

- - 13 55 doudy 

0J3 - 13 55 doudy 

5.6 - 13 55 sunny 

3D - 14 57 sunny 

- - 14 57 cloudy 

* - 15 59 dUl 

- 184 12 54 ram 

- D4 12 54 rain 
_ - M 10 50 rain 

Abp! 02 .04 14 57 doudy 
BrtmKCM) 0-6 - 15 59 cloudy 

- DO 10 50 rain 

- - 15 59 doudy 

Manchester 0.1 JS3 14 57 rain 
HfoB-n-Tyne - .10 10 50 rain 

- - 13 55 doudy 

- 44 12 54 doudy 

• - - 13 55 doudy 

- 2* 13 55 doudy 
0D - 10 50 doudy 

Edinburgh 0.1 - 10 50 doudy 

- .09 8 46 rain 

- .06 8 48 rain 
0A .03 B 45 shower 

- .13 8 46 rain 

- .09 8 48 ram 

- .17 B 46 Shower 

- D1 9 48 doudy 
03 .02 8 48 doudy 

- .15. a 46 ram 


I & -'iSBl. 

(LIGHTING-UPTIME 

London 423 pm to 720 am 
Bristol 4-3 3 pm to 7.30 am 
Ertntaigfa 4.11pm to 7.57 am 
Mmctartk* A22 pm to 7.38 am 
Panzanca 451 pm to 7JS am 


Sunrises: 

I 749 am 

Sunsets: 
353 pm 

M Moon dees 

_ 1158 am 

Moon sets 
8.01 pm 


wise 1 _ ' 
11 i 04 

i <3Sl 

' 44 4 U \ 

1 ” (Sj/ 

13 W/ 

c2j iL 

444 ^jt 


C YESTERDAY ) 

Temporatwes at midday yesterday: c. 
doud: f. tor. r, rain: s, sun. 

C F C F 

Belfast c B46 Guernsey c 1254 
B’rmgham fl4S7 trnem tias c 745 
OOckpool d 948 Jersey a 1254 
1 1559 London c 1457 
CanJBf c 1355 MYKhster 11254 
Edinburgh f 946 Newcastle r 1050 
Glasgow c 848 Rfoldsway T 846 


NOON TODAY 



Cohqn 

S u 


ABROAD 

*ra®AY:c. cloud: d. dnssde; f. tam Mg; r. mfo; 

- -9 _F C F 

f 10 50 Majorca 
c 9 48 Malaga 
s 18 64 Malta - 
r 8 48 Mem -roe 


AtortMa c 19 66 
Algiers a 19 66 
Amsrdm f 13 55 
Atttens 
Bahrain 



©roara ncwspapcrs UMnrca 
rwtto. Pruned ay London Post (Prait- 
ore) Umtted of i vjrafeia strveL 
London El 9XN ana tw News 
Scotland Ud-. 124 Porteian street. 
Kinnum Park. Gtasoow .041 JEJ. 
rrfcJay. December E I486. Aeg- 
-(red as a newspaper at me Post 


Algiers s 19 66 
Amsrdm f 13 55 _ 

s 16 61 Fan 
e 19 66 

_ — _ f SB 84 

Baredna" s 15 59 
B ere t 

s 7 45 
f 11 52 
Berawla- c 23 73 
3 15 SB 
s 10 50 
fioerne c 12 54 
Brussels f 11 52 JoW 
Budapst ta SSSS 
g_Airo»- T 27 81 LHh 
Cairo t 18 64 Lisbon 
Cape To s 23 73 Locarno 
C-blanca 3 16 64 B- 
Pwcf io c 1 34 LuxreE 
CVdarch a 14 57 Marais 


a. sun: an. snow: t, thunder. 

C F C F 

f 16 81 Rone 5 13 55 
S 18 64 Satzherg s 10 50 
s 17 63 S Prises’ c 12 54 


. r J« **■*£»* 1 20 68 Senflego’ s 29 84 

? 3§ S* g^cpC* 1 15 59 SPauto’ c 26 79 

ri ’a « EES' ® 25 77 Seoul s 4 39 

« I !SSL_r s 9 48 Sng'por I 31 88 

l Jl 11 r 2 36SrU>ota & 8 46 


tg 3 37 Milan 
S 5 41 Montreal 
c 20 68 Moscow 
*9 -1 30 Muaicfi 
J 17 63 Nairobi 
* -3 27 Naples 
1 21 70 NDeM 
S 7 45 N Yorf 
8 10 50 Nice 
f 26 7B Oslo 
s 26 79 Paris 
Peking 

S 21 70 Perai 
s 12 54 Prague 
S 8 46 ReykMk 
s IS 66 Mwdns 
c 4 39 Mode J 
f 11 52 RtyacB) 


r 

e 5 41 Strasb'rg 
s 13 55 Sydney 
t 25 77 TmgSr 
s 15 59 Tolavrv 
9 22 72 Tenerife 
c 12 54 Tokyo 

s 13 55 Toronto- 

s 8 46 Tunis 
s 9 48 Valencia 


I 31 88 
& 8 46 
6 7 45 
s 25 77 
S 19 66 
S 17 63 
s 23 73 
C 11 S2 
C 3 37 
1 18 64 
f 17 63 


VVednasday’s figures are tatsst svaaabie 


c 6 43 Vanc'ver s 2 36 
a 24 75 Venice s 8 46 
s 9 46 Vienna fg -1 30 
sn -1 30 Warsaw ? 11 52 
a 17 63 WashW e 14 g 
c Zr 81 werraon s 14 g 
e 9 46 aiffoh to -i 30 








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wmO'FI NANCE 


THE 




25 


TIMES 


SPORT 37 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 41 


FRIDAY DECEMBER S 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1269.1 (-9.3) 

FT-SE100 

1615.1 (-10.4) 

Bargains 
25431 (27395) 

USM (Data stream) 

128.SS (-0.53) 
THE poum 


US Dollar 
1.4310 (-0.0020) 

W German mark 

2.8241 (+0.0230) 

Trade-weighted 

67.9 (+0.1) 


Agreement with Westinghouse depends on Awacs decision 


Bass cuts 
Pontin’s 
book value 

Bass, ihe brewing giant, said 
yesterday it had slashed £50 
million off the value of its 
Pontin’s Holidays centres. 
The revaluation, which al- 
most halves Lhe book value, is 
based on the open-market 
value, taking into account the 
future earnings stream and 
land value. 

The £50 million reduction 
in the book value of Pomin’s 
was charged below the tine in 
the 1986 results, released yes- 
terday. The group achieved 
record results. Pretax profit 
for the year to September 30 
jumped by 22 per cent to £3 10 
million, on turnover up 1 2 per 
cent to £2.7 billion. 

Tempos, page 28 

AE cliffhanger 

Turner & New ail. the asbes- 
tos group, last night claimed 
acceptances of just over 47 per 
cent in its bid for AE, the 
engineering group. The offer 
closes today. Mr Robert 
Maxwell's Hollis Group is 
sitting on a 29 per cent stake. 

Director goes 

Mr Patrick Dawnay, a direc- 
tor of Morgan Grenfell & Co, 
is to become executive direc- 
tor of Mr Robert Maxwells 
Pergamon Holdings. He . was 
in charge of Morgan Grenfell 
Laurie, the bank’s property 
services arm. 



bn US link 
or Plessey 





By Kenneth Fleet, Executive Editor 



Family Money explains to- 
morrow where Adam Faitn, 
(above) and other show busi- 
ness stars go for their finan- 
cial advice, and analyses the 
latest unit trust performance 

figures. . , 

In addition, controversial 
insurance schemes designed 
to ease the financial burden 
on drivers who lose their 
licence are examined. 



Christian Salvesen, the 
Edinburgh food distribution 
and industrial services group, 
reported pretax profits for the 
six months to September 30 
up from £19.3 msUiOD lo %‘-0 
million. Turnover, excluding 
seafoods and parts of the 
housebuilding division al- 
ready sold, rose to £ 38.3 

million from £1 j 3.7 
The interim dividend :s 1.3&P- 
Terapas, page 28 


Wall Street 26 
Coaraeal £7 

Stock Market 27 
Tempos 

Co News 2§ 

Traded Opts 28 


Money Mrkts 29 
Foreign Exea 29 
Unit Trusts 30 
Commodities 39 

USM Prices 30 
Share Prices 31 


Plcssev and Westinghouse 
Electric Corporation of Pitts- 
burgh have signed a com- 
prehensive agreement, mark- 
ing a new stage in Anglo- 
American collaboration in 
critical areas of advanced 
technology. 

The agreement will become 
operative if the Government 
awards • the airborne early 
warning contract to Boeing, 
whose Airborne Warning and 
Command System (Awacs) 
employs militarized Boeing 
707 aircraft and Westinghouse 
APY-2 radar. 

A decision on the AEW 
contract, for which GECs 
Nimrod is the domestic and 
sole competing contender, 
may be announced on Decem- 
ber' II, although December 18 
is more likely, after the Cabi- 
net has studied the final paper, 
which is about to be prepared 
by Mr George Younger, Sec- 
retary of State for Defence, 
and Lord Trefgarne, Defence 
Procurement Minister. 

[f Boeing is favoured, the 
new Westinghouse-Plessey ag- 
reement is expected to add 
more than £1 billion to 
Plessey’s sales by the end of 
the next decade. Last year 
Plessey’s total turnover was 
£1.4 billion. 

The agreement is not, how- 
ever, confined to offset busi- 
ness flowing from the award of 

the AEW contract to Boeing. 

Westinghouse acknowled- 
ges Plessey’s skills, the prob- 
lems of co-operating with 
other leading US co 
tions, especially other d 

Invisibles 
revised 
downwards 

By Rodney Lord 

Economics Editor 

Britain’s current account is 
now estimated to have been 
broadly in balance during toe 
firet three quarters of toe year. 

This compares with a pre- 
vious estimate of a £364 
million surplus 
Figures for the balance of 
payments in the third quarter 
issued yesterday by the Cen- 
tral Statistical Office, show a 
downward revision in the4 
estimated monthly surplus on 
invisible trade from £800 
milli on to £751 million. 

At the time of the October 
trade figures the Government 
revised these figures up from 
£600 million. 

The earlier upwards re- 
visions helped the markets to 
receive the October trade fig- 
ures with relative equanimity. 

But government spokesmen 
said there was no reason at 
present to suppose lhe upward 
revision of the invisibles es- 
timate for toe fourth quarter 
to £900 million a month was 
over-optimistic. 

Despite toe more restrained 
view of Britain’s invisible 
trade performance, the third 
quarter still snows significant 

advance. . . 

Total earnings on invisibles 
rose from £1.85 billion in the 
second quarter to £2.25 billion 
in toe third. 

Earnings on services, in- 
cluding financial services, rose 
from £1.34 billion to. £1.64 
billion and the net inward 
flow of interest, profits and 
dividends rose from £1.11 
billion to £1.47 billion. 

This was offset partly! bjr 
higher payments to the EEL. 


contractors, and the complex- 
ity and size of toe world 
market The two companies 
are looking to co-operate in air 

defence, air traffic control 
systems, advanced-technology 
research and electronic war- 
fare. 

The agreement provides co- 
operation in various fields of 
advanced technology and 
product development and 
collaboration in marketing 
technology and products 
throughout the world. 

. The two companies are 
especially keen on collaborat- 
ing in toe production and 
application of gallium arse- 
nide, which they sec as replac- 
ing silicon at the leading edgp 
of microchip technology. In 
production technique Plessey 
is first in Europe, while 
Westinghouse leads in digital 
applications. 

The agreement, which has 
been signed by Mr Jack 
Tymann, general manager of 
Westinghouse Systems Divi- 
sion, and Mr Michael White- 
man, managing director of 
Plessey Avionics, provides for 
a joint Westinghouse-Plessey 
business board. 

Particular projects would be 
structured in toe most appro- 
priate way. Although each 
company might have agreed 
amounts of equity in joint 
ventures, there is no provision 
for either to take up shares in 
the other’s parent company. 

Under “Offset Require- 
ments” the agreement says: 
“Following the award of the 
UK AEW contract, Westing- 


house will place orders accept- 
able to the UK Ministry of 
Defence on UK companies for 
high-technology design, en- 
gineering and manufacturing 
work in toe defence field.” 

All orders for AEW radars 
“shall be placed on Plessey 
Avionics Ltd,” which may 
fulfil toe orders itself or sub- 
contract with other British 
companies. Future “enhance- 
ments" of AEW radar for US 
Air Force E-3 aircraft “will be 
jointly developed and pro- 
duced with Plessey Avionics”. 

Both Westinghouse and 
Plessey believe the chances of 
Boeing receiving toe AEW 
contract are good. They claim 
the cost of Awacs to the 
British Government has been 
“grossly exaggerated” in pub- 
lic debate about the merits of 
Nimrod versus Awacs. 

Boeing's 130 per cent offset 
commitment — for every 
pound spent in the US. £1.30 
would be spent in Britain - is 
“a contractual requirement to 
place high-technology work 
throughout a broad spectrum 
of British industry”. 

Boeing is setting up an offset 
office near Whitehall and 
already has a list of 252 British 
companies 

In preparing its piece of the 
E-3 offset programme, West- 
inghouse, whose defence di- 
vision alone has a turnover of 
$2.4 billion (£1 .67 billion) and 
employs 20,000 people, has 
mikftd with Racal, Thorn 
EML Ferranti, Airship In- 
dustries and Foster Wheeler, 
as well as with Plessey. 



PLESSEY’S SHARE OF THE PARTNERSHIP 


YEAR 

AWACS 1 E-3 radar programme 

&3/AEW radar enhancement 
An traffic control systems 
Air defence systems 

IKSAR/Adaptatrie radar appecotkms 
Advanced technology co-operation 
Spin-offs from technology co-operation 
Electronic warfare 
TOTAL 




Another peak: Maurice Saatchi (left) and Charles 

Saatchis chalk up 
another record 


Saatchi & Saatchi, the larg- 
est advertising group in the 
world, yesterday reported its 
16to year of consecutive 
record profits, but its shares 
sliced 2p to 668p. They have 
fallen from a peak of990p. 

Profits before tax were up 
73 per cent to £70J million 
and toe dividend payout is 
boosted by 20 per cent to 
1 5.7p a share. Another record 
year is also in prospect 
But the group says that 
-ory headlines” lave chron- 
icled the loss of almost $400 
million of business even 
though this has been replaced 
by the same amount of new 


work from blue chip clients 
such as Procter and Gamble. 
Xerox and Mars. 

It says it was inevitable that 
some of its business would be 
lost because of conflict of 
interest 
Saatchi & Saatchi, whose 
clients now indude 60 of the 
world's top 100 advertisers, 
bas set its sights on building 
up its management consulting 
Mr Victor Millar, formerly 
one of toe managing partners 
at Arthur Andersen, the 
world’s largest consultancy, is 
coming in to spearhead the 
drive, and acquisitions are 
likely. 


Morgan 
Grenfell 
in new 
deal inquiry 

By Lawrence Lever 

Moigan Grenfell, toe mer- 
chant bank, was at the centre 
or a fresh City scandal yes- 
terday when LCP Holdings 
ackftrt the Stock Exchange to 
investigate a block purchase of 
25,000 of its shares the day 
before it received a bid from 
Ward White. 

Morgan Grenfell advising 
Wan) White on toe bid, hit 
back at LCP Holdings, accus^ 
mg it of waging a “dirty tricks” 
campaign. “They are trying to 
male* the most of our involve- 
ment in the Guinness invest- 
igation,” a Morgan Grenfell 
spokesman said. 

LCP Holdings said yes- 
terday its request for an 
Exchange inquiry was trig- 
gered by reports In Wednes- 
day’s Wall Street Journal. The 
reports referred to an un- 
identified block purchase of 
25,000 LCP shares, which 
took place on October 21 — 
the day before Ward White 
announced its bid for LCP. 
According' to the Wall Street 
Journal, the purchase took 
place after the London stock 
market had closed, and at 8 
per cent above toe market 

Mr Gavin Simmonds, a 
partner in Phillips & Drew, 
brokers to LCP, arrived at toe 
Stock Exchange at 9 am 
yesterday and requested an 
inquiry. “We are looking into 
ii," a spokesman for toe Stock 
Exchange said. 

Ward White issued a state- 
ment in response, saying toe 
LCP announcement, “should 
not distract attention” from 
its bid. It added that it “will 
fully support any Stock Ex- 
change inquiry”. 

LCP*s shares moved up 
sharply in the three weeks 
before the Ward White bid, 
rising from 126p on October 1 
to lSlp just before the bid. 

Mr Philip Evans, of Morgan 
Grenfell, said Schroder, toe 
merchant bank adviser to 
LCP, had written to Morgan 
on November 18, asking Mor- 
gan to confirm that Mr Geof- 
frey Collier, toe former head 
of Morgan Grenfell Securities, 
had not purchased LCP 
shares. Morgan’s compliance 
officer, Mr George Law, wrote 
back confirming this. 


Johnson Matthey 
doubles profits 


By Richard Lander 


Johnson Matthey, the pre- 
cious metals, materials tech- 
nology and printing group 
which has been recovering 
from the collapse of Johnson 
Matthey Bankers in 1984, 
more than doubled pretax 
profits from £10.5 million to 
£21.6 million in toe six 
months to September 30. 

JM, significantly, is now 
starting to show higher operat- 
ing profits rather than just 
achieving better results thr- 
ough lower interest charges. 

Operating income rose £6.9 
million to £27.4 million. More 
than half the gain was ac- 
counted for by the precious 

SvSion^Si^has benefited 
from higher prices, particu- 
larly for platinum, and in- 
creased efficiency. 

Mr Eugene Anderson, toe 
American chief executive who 
has overseen the group’s turn- 
around, said there would be a 
few small rationalizations to 
add to toe £19 million of 
write-offs caused by closures 
and disposals. 



Borrowings of money and 
precious metals had been 
reduced from £225 million to 
£165 million. 

Mr Anderson said JM had 
no intention of cutting its 
links With South Africa, from 
where it receives platinum for 
refining and marketing. 

The interim dividend, 
which gained 2p to 2I7p, was 
raised from 0.5p to 2p. 


Eurobond dealers’ pact 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


Eurobond dealers held an 
emergency meeting yesterday 
for the second successive day 
to find a way of st emm i n g the 
sharp drop in prices which is 
undermining confidence in 
the perpetual floating rate 
note market 

Senior representatives of 
nearly 40 firms dealing in the 
bonds thrashed, out a method 
of operating the market which 
dealers hope will tide them 
over at least until Christmas. 

Six of the main market- 
makers decided to continue 


making firm two-way prices in 
perpetuate, while the majority 
agreed to give “basis” prices, 
which would serve only as 
indicators of the level at which 
they were willing to deal 

Mr Jerry Goldstein, manag- 
ing director of Sanwa Inter- 
national, who was host for the 
meeting, said: “Wednesday’s 
meeting was clearly not eff- 
ective m stabilizing the mar- 
ket.” 

Yesterday, prices in 
perpetuate continued to tum- 
ble by one or two points. 


P&Oin 
£287m 
bid for 
ferries 

By Cliff Feitham 

Sir Jeffrey Sterling’s P & O 
shipping group yesterday 
launched an agreed bid worth 
£286.8 million for European 
Ferries in what amounted to a 
rescue operaiion.The terms 
were thrashed out within 24 
hours of clearance by the 
Monopolies Commission. 

Sir Jeffiey said: “There is a 
compelling logic to this deal 
which should be to everyone’s 
advantage.” „ _ _ 

The takeover gives P & O 
control of the leading cross- 
Channel ferry group, Towns- 
end Thoresen, and of toe ports 
of Felixstowe and Larne. 

P & O has extensive roll-on, 
roll-off freight operations and 
toe combined group will 
present a powerful challenge 
to the Eurotunnel. 

But in backing the deal toe 
board of European Ferries 
concedes that on its own it 
would have faced severe diffi- 
culties and expects a very 
substantial drop in profits for 
toe current vear.Tbe company 
has been hit by a 10-week 
stoppage on services from 
Felixstowe and by toe slump 
in toe US property market 
The directors say toe strikes 
will be responsible for £10 
million of lost profits in 1 986 
while in toe US property 
profits, normally generated 
towards the end of toe year, 
will be eliminated. 

Last year, its property activ- 
ities in Houston and Denver 
contributed £17 million prof- 
its but they are expected to be 
wiped out” after write-offs for 
carrying costs in Houston. 

European Ferries made £48 
million last year but. accord- 
ing to market sources, is 
expected to make only half 
that this time. 

The company said that 
because of a lack of any 
prospect of recovery it would 
have had to sell its property 
business if it remained in- 
dependent It also expected to 
cut toe final dividend. 

The board is confident its 
core shipping and harbour 
interests have good growth 
potential over toe medium 
term but overall the short- 
term outlook is uncertain. 

It says, however, it cannot 
be confident “that profits and 
dividends of an independent 
European Ferries would re- 
cover quickly.” 

p & O, which already holds 
a 20.8 per cent stake in 
European Ferries, is making a 
share swap valuing each Euro- 
pean Ferries share at 123.5p. 
This compares with a 122p 
price when the shares were 
suspended on Wednesday. 

Mr Kenneth Long, trans- 
port analyst at KJeinwort 
Grieveson, said: “It looks as if 
P & O is paying a fair price for 
a company going through a bit 
of a bad time.” 


Agency defends that advertising campaign 

Is Britain sick of Sid? 



STOCK BTi&BKETS 

)947.41 (+0.«)- 

Nftkei Dow 16623.95 (+168.89) 

B 3Ss5T , “®MH<3 

££&•*- 2 « 8 - 9( - 10 - 1) 

gwgKf- 407332 H2- 12 ! 

Ga ! er ?i;-f;- 404.5 (sama) 

London: M ■ A g^21 (-0.34) 

Paae3t 

Closing prices ^ 

nNTE RgST^gZ 

SBCm.™* 

Federal Funds 40 ^. 38 %' 




maim price changes 


Nottingham Snck — gepj+43p| 

AssooatedNews . — 35fo 

Fine Art Dev. 1|»P 

QSGKynpdi 

CteTwhoietoods — 260p +18p 
United Trust — — 44 °P l +25 P) 


+14p 

+14pj 

+15pj 

+1tp) 


By Jonathan Miller 
Media Correspondent 

Rntncam, the 
advertising agency that 
launched Sid into the consc- 
ioosness of- 97 per cent of the 
British people, is gwepariag to 
defend itself against accusa- 
tions that it engaged in a 
campaign of issdla overkill 
that backft-efi 

agency hopes to win govern- nhuprity annoying, did 
nwi permission to reveal allow it to dissuade toeia from 
details of toe £20 million acting in their economic self- 




Londorr. 
£$1.4300 
£ DM2.8471 
£: SwFr2J709 
L- FFr951 65 
L- Yen2S2.73 
£: [ndex:68.0 

ECU En/a 


Me* Yorjc 
$: Cl -4290* 

£• DM1.9535 
S:SvvFr1.6MD- 
$; FFr5.5305* 

$; Yen 162.80 
S: lndex:i 10.1 
SDfiBtfa 


IF’ t?» 


BreedoVctowi”. ISS Hjjfi 

Baker Perkins - 



Standard Chart 7Hip 

Willis Faber - 

Holden Hydroman — 185p(-13p) 
prices are as at 4p® 


M4P> 


-1 


strategy behind Ski and of toe 
data, which - it is claimed - 
proves that he succeeded in 
ac hie ving a sefl-ont for the 
British Gas share flotation 
beyond the Government's ini- 
tial hopes. 

Detailed research conducted 
by the agency k believed to 
show that there was almost rat 
public backlash to Sid and 
that, even those who found his 


interest. 

Mr Peter Walker, Secretory 
of State for Energy, was an 
early and enfhnsaistic sup- 
porter of SkL, and the cam- 
paign was put into full gear. 

At every stage Young & 
Robicam monitored public re- 
action. The agency was ready 
to moderate the message or 
pull out Sid if the message 
began to go wrong. 


Young & Robicam officiate 
were said to be angiy yes- 
terday at suggestions being 
made that Sid had fluted to do 
his job. Suggestions that np to 

8 nuDhtt applications might 
have been possible without Sid 
were described as absurd. 

There hare been sugges- 
tions that the Government was 
determined to obtain a foil 
price for the offering, and 
believed that the only way to 
achieve this was by subtly 
pttariring the power of City 
in sti tuti on s to set the price. 

By seating an impression of 
mwe depssd for British Gas, 
the power of the City to talk 
down the price was effectively 
controlled. 

As it turned oat the Govern- 
ment appeared to have set the 
price at the correct level The 
grey market value of British 
Gas shares yesterday was the 
offering price. 


Four million apply for gas shares 


GOLD 


London FnifR£F 

S£S^SSSSt§noxo. 

270. 50). 

^^36.70-397.20* 

north seaoil 

f Jan > ..." 814,75 bW ($14.85) 
fpS&tete* trada* pneo 


Nearly four million people plus applicants talked of at 
applied for about 5 billion one stage, it should mean that 


shares in the British Gas 
flotation, N M Rothschild, the 
merchant bank adviser to toe 
issue, estimated after toe final 
application forms had been 
sorted, checked and counted 
Ian night 

Whether this is judgM a 
success or relative failure 
compared to toe six milhon- 


invesiors, particularly smaller 
ones, will get a healthy alloca- 
tion of shares. 

With the “clawback” of 
shares from institutional and 
overseas allocations, there are 
2.58 billion shares to be 
divided, meaning the issue has 
been almost twice subscribed. 


Allocation details will be 
known by Monday. 

British Gas ’customers who 
registered their priority before 
November 14 have been guar- 
anteed at least 200 shares -The 
average si 2 e of applications 
was £1,700 in fully-paid form 
— greater than earlier es- 
timates and well above the 
comparable figures for the 
British Telecom and TSB 


64 Compared with 1985, profits, sales and 
earnings per share all increased 
significantly. 

The interim dividend has been raised by 
5.0% to 2Jp per share. 

Scapa companies continue to do well in 
their industrial markets supported by 
the underlying strength of business 
in Europe and North America. ^5 

RW GOODALL, Chairman 

• Growth continues worldwide 

• Operating profits up by 15.0% 

• Sales up by 15.5% 

• Earnings per share up by 10.8% 

• Interim dividend up by 5.0% 

INTERM STATEMENT 


Results for six months to 
September 30th, 1986 1986 

(unaudited) £’000 

Turnover 101,695 

1985 

£■000 

88,036 

Ml Year 
1986 
£'000 
186,929 

Operating Profit 
Interest 

16.719 

(2,074) 

14,539 

(1,453) 

32,340 

(3,184) 

Profit before tax 

14,645 

13,086 

29,156 

Dividend 

1,713 

1,627 

4,921 

Earnings per share* 

10.3p 

9.3p 

20.4p 

Dividend per share* 

aip 

2.0p 

6.05p 


■Comparatives adjusted for the one for one capitalisation issue made m August l?St 



SCAPA GROUP PLC 

Oakfield House, 52 Preston New Road Blaclibura 3B2 6AH- 










_ 26 


WALL' STREET 


Fall in factory orders 
boosts bond optimism 


■New York 

Stock prices, 


(Agencies) — 

hart at the 


the mild profit-taking that 
began on Wednesday, tamed 
better. 

•A 3j6 per cent M In new 
factory orders injected op- 
timism about a possible easing 
of monetary - policy into the 
bend market, and this spilled 
oyer into stocks. 

■The Dow Jones industrial 
average improved by 1.55 
prints to J.948J82 and the 
transportation index 239 to 
866.14, bat the utilities index 
was 0.46 off at 21338. 

‘Declines led advances by > 
small margin on a volume of 
33 minion shares. 

! Tandy rose 1 cent to 44 
emits and Gencorp was up 1% 
cgnts to 20W cents. 

' Baxter Laboratories led the 
active stocks with a half point 
gain to 2014 cents. 

! Schlmnberger stock ad- 
vanced sharply on a recom- 
mendation from Shearson. 


In later trading bine chip 
issues were showing signs of 
an increased revival. 

The Itel Corporation an- 
nounced that the temporary 
suspension of its Great Lakes 
International Dredging 
subsidiary from being awarded 
government contracts had 
been lifted. 

Precious metal foteres were 
lower in New York trading. 
Dealers said that metals were 
tracking currency and energy 
futures trading. 

Meanwhile, the United 
States Treasury Secretary, Mr 
James Baker, said that the US 
was still pursuing the ex- 
change rate in an effort to help 
correct world trade 
imbalances. 

He told the Congressional 
summit on debt and trade that, 
in concert with some other 
natrons, they had moved to- 
wards exchange rates that 
should help provide a 
correction. 


Dec 

3 


Dec 


AMR 
ASA 
Ailed 
Ailed 
AffisCftfmra 
Alcoa 
Afnaxlnc 
Art’YjJaHs 
A/n Brands 
Am Can 
Afn Cynm'd 
AmePwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
Am St 'rod 
A roTat apO 
Amoco 
Arrow Steel 
Asarco 
Ashland OH 
At Richfield 
Avon Prods 
BkrsTstNY 
Bankanwr 
Bk of Baton 
Bank at NY 
Bett Steel 


Bse 
Biden 
Ba Warner 
Bret Myers 
BP 

Burr ton ind 
Button Nin 


Car Pacific 
CoterpMer 
CWanesa . 
Ce ntral SW 
Champion 
Chase Man 
Chm Bk ny 
Chevron 
Chrysler 
CKicorp 
Clark Equip 
COca Oola 


CbnUaGas 
CfnbtnEng 
Comwtth Ed 
Cons Eds 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
Cntrf Data 
iQ 


In 
Crane 
Curtiss Wri 
Den & Kraft 
Deere 
Delta Ah- 
DetroBEd 
Digital Eq 


58% 
37% 
41 K 
66 
Z% 
34% 
13 
22ft 
46% 
87* 
82* 
29% 
60% 
80% 
3 

43% 

27% 

69 

5K 

15 

57% 

59% 

29% 

45% 

14V 

41 

42 
4% 

52% 

63% 

50% 

40% 

81% 

39% 

41% 

62% 

t* 
12 % 
40% 
241 K 
35% 
33% 
38% 
47 
47 
40% 
54% 
20 % 
37% 

44% 

136% 

44% 

33% 

33% 

49 

33% 

15% 

26% 

57% 

80% 

35% 

53% 


Dow 
Dresser bid 
Duke Power 
Du Pom 
Eastern Air 
Earn Kodak 
Eaton Cora 
Emerson 0 
Exxon Corp 


50 

18% 

107% 

45 

61% 

19% 

49% 

91 

9% 

68 % 

79% 

90% 

69% 


53% 

37 

41 

66 % 

2 % 

35% 

13% 

23% 

47% 

88 % 

81% 

29% 

S9% 

81% 

3 

44% 

27% 

89V 

5% 

15% 

57% 

60% 

30 

45% 

14V 

40% 

40% 

4% 

50% 

63% 

50V 

39 

81% 

39V 

40% 

63 

12V 

39% 

241% 

35% 

33V 

38% 

47 

48 
41 
55 
19V 
37% 
45V 

136V 

44V 

33% 

33% 

49% 

33% 

16% 

26 

57 

80% 

36% 

53 

51% 

23% 

49V 

18% 

107% 

45% 

59% 

19% 

49 
90V 

9* 

69 

79 

90% 

70% 

90V 


Dec 

3 


Dec 

2 


firestone 
FM Chicago 
FstbitBncp 
FstPennC 
Ford 

FTWSctwa 
GAP Corp 
GTE Corp 
GenCorp 
Gen Dymcs 
Gen Efectric 

Gen Inst 
Gen Mas 
Gen Motors 
GnPblttny 
Genera 
Georgia Pac 
GBeta 

Goodrich 

Goodyear 
GoUdlnc 
Grace 
GtAtt&Tac 
Grind 
GrumanCor 
Gutffi West 
Heinz Hd. 
Hercules 
H'lett-Pkrd 
Honeywafl 
iClnos 
rngetsoH 
brad Steel 
IBM 
INCO 
tot Paper 
IntTolTel 
hiring Bank 
JhnsnA Jhn 
Kaiser Alum 
Kerr McGee 
KrnblyCtrk 
K 


mblyf 

Man 

Kroger 

L.T.v7c 


Corp 

Litton 

Lockheed 

Lucky Stra 

ManH'nvar 

MamOeCp 

Mapco 

Marine Md 

Mrt Marietta 

Masco 

McDonalds 

McOarmefl 

Mead 

Merck 

MinstaMng 

Mobil OH 

Monsanto 

Morgan JJ>. 

Motorola 

NCR Carp 

NLIndstrs 

NatDtetlrs 

NatMedEnt 

NatSmcnft 

NortofcSth 
NWBanap 
OcadntPet 
Ogden 
OinCorp 
Owens- Hi 
Pac Gas El 
Pan Am 
Penney J.C. 
PennzoH 


Fed Dpt Sts 90 90V I Papraco 27% 28% 

eE»iw >*3aocbiin«itie«i tee raw part ■erosST 


28% 

32% 

54% 

9 

59% 

38% 

40% 

61 

8Z% 

75% 

88 % 

19% 

44% 

72 

24K 

3% 

40% 

48 

45 

43 

18V 

54V 

24V 

33% 

2SV 

70 

43% 

59% 

44% 

68X 

25% 

59% 

18% 

128% 

12 % 

79 

SSV 

50% 

70V 

13% 

29V 

88 

50V 

31V 

IV 

82 

53% 

31% 

47V 

2V 

59% 

45X 

43 

28% 

64 

78% 

58% 

114 

114% 

39% 

80% 

87% 

39% 

48V 

5% 

46% 

24V 

11 % 

86V 

39V 

28% 

46% 

44V 

46 

26% 

5V 

84% 

71% 

27% 


28V 

32% 

54% 

9 

GOV 

37% 

41 

62 

83% 

75% 

85% 

18V 

44% 

70% 

23% 

3% 

40% 

49% 

45% 

43K 

18* 

54% 

24V 

33V 

28% 

68 % 

43% 

59% 

45% 

70% 

25% 

59V 

19% 

129% 

12 % 

78% 

55V 

50 

70 

13% 

29% 

86V 

50V 

31V 

IV 

82% 

56% 

31% 

47% 

2 % 

57% 

45V 

44% 

28% 

64V 

79% 

58V 

115V 

115% 

39V 

80% 

88V 

39% 

49% 

4% 

48% 

2SV 

11V 

86V 

39% 

28V 

46V 

44% 

46% 

26 

5% 

84 

72V 

28% 


Dec 

3 


Dee 

2 


Pfizer 
Phelps Dge 
PhBpMrs 
PhSpsPet 
Polaroid 
PPG tod 
PrctrGmW 
PbSE&G 
Raytheon 
RynidsMet 
Rockwall hit 
Dutch 


Sara Lee 
SFESopee 
ScWberger 
Scott Paper 
Seagram 
Sears Rbck 
SheO Trans 


Bk 


IX, 


SttiCal Ed 

S-WstoBel 

SWOT 
Staring Dm 
Stevens JF 
Sun Comp 
Teledyne 
Teroira 
Texaco 
Texas ECor 
Texas Inst 
Texas lIUs 
Textron 
TravtraCor 
TRW toe 
UAL Inc 


63% 

21 % 

74V 

11% 

73 

76% 

79V 

42V, 

70% 

42% 

43% 

93% 

61% 

70S 

33% 

33% 

65% 

64% 

44% 

54% 

39V 

90% 

21 % 

35S 


62% 

21V 

rev 

11V 

74% 

75V 

80% 

42 

69V 

43% 

44% 

94% 

61% 

70% 

33% 

33% 

65% 

64% 

45% 

55% 

40% 

91% 

21V 

36 


UnflewNV 231% 
tin Carbide 23 
Un Pac Cor 66% 
U« Brands 34 % 
USGCorp 43 
UtdTectmol 45 V 
USX Corp 21% 
Unocal 26% 
Jim Walter 49V 
WmerLmbt 59% 
Wtts Fargo 106% 
WstgnseB 61% 
Weyerh'sar 40V 
Wtftoool 72 
Woohvorti 45% 
Xerox Corp 61 
Zenith 20% 


114% 118* 

50V 50% 

46V 46% 

39% 37% 
58% 58% 

321% 323V 
36% 38% 

35 35% 

30% 30% 
123V 124% 
32V 32V 

67V 67% 

45% 45% 
93% 93% 

60% 60 


233% 

23% 

66 % 

34* 

44% 

45V 

21% 

28V 

49% 

59% 

106% 

62 

39% 

72 

45% 

50% 

20 


Li Ka-shing buys £290m 
majority stake at Husky 


From Stephen Leather 
Hong Kong 

The Hong Kong magnate Li 
a-shiug yesterday took the 
ff his HK$3.2 billion 
million) bid fora major- 
ity interest in Husky Oil. (he 
CannHinn oil company. 

Mr Li’s Hutchison Wham- 
poa trading group and his 
utility company, Hong Kong 
Electric, are buying 43 per cent 
of the share capital of 
Canada's largest independent 
oil and gas firm. Mr Li's 
family is buying another 9 per 
cent. 

Mr Li and Nova AN Alberta 
Corporation, which also owns 
43 per cent ofHusky, said they 
planned to invest up to CanS I 
billion (£500 million) in the 
oil company “in the event that 
suitable investment opportu- 
nities arise which meet the 
shareholders’ investment cri- 
teria.” 

Although Mr Li will have 



U 

wifi be left 

the majority stake in Husky, 
he will not have management 
control He admitted that 
Husky's management struc- 
ture will be left “almost 
intact” and Mr Arthur Price 
will stay as president and chief 
executive. 


Mr Simon Murray, manag- 
ing director of Hutchison and 
chairman of Hong Kong Elec- 
tric, will be co-chairman of 
Husky with Mr Robert Blair, 
the Nova chief executive. At 
least two-thirds of Husky's 
directors will be Canadians. 

“We were specifically look- 
ing for an oil company which 
was well managed and that is 
one ofHusky’s plus points. It's 
a very well managed company 
doing welL” Mr Murray said. 

Mr U said he regarded the 
acquisition as a long-term 
investment. 

“1 wouldn't expect oil prices 

10 go up in the next year or 
two, but should the prices rise 
in five years' time, the pur- 
chase should prove a very 
good investment,” he said 

“Even if oil prices remained 
stagnant we would be getting 
stable income from Husky's 

011 refinery operations.” 


The Husky deal follows Mr 
Li's purchase of a personal 4.9 
per cent stake in Guff 03 
earlier this week. He bad no 
plans to take stakes in other oil 
companies, be said 

Mr Li said that the holding 
in Husky would boost the 
overseas content of bis group 
from 2 to 10 per cent, at a time 
when local analysts think he is 
gradually moving his business 
away from Hong Kong 

Mr Li denied any plans to 
leave Hong Kong. “My roots 
are here,” he said. 

In addition to giving Mr Li 
control of a company with 
assets of US$1.4 billion (£979 
million) and net earnings of 
USS70 million for the first 
nine months of this year, the 
deal qualifies him for Ca- 
nadian dtizenship. 

But he said he had no plans 
“at this hour” to apply for a 
Canadian passport 



Chinese 
reserves 
top £7bn 

From Our Correspondent 
Hong Kong 

China's foreign exchange 
reserves total more than 
SUSI0 billion (£7 billion), 
enough to cover three months' 
imports, according to a top 
Chinese banker. 

Mr Chen Quangeng, chief of 
the policy research division of 
the State Administration of 
Exchange Control, told 


CANADIAN PRICES 

AgncoEag 
/uaiAlum 


AtgomaSU 
Can Pacific 
Coimoco 

ConBatorst 

Hkr/SWCan 
HdsnSMm 
Imasco 
Imperial OB 


CO 

•nmsnN’A' 

» C “ P 


26% 

41 

11 % 

17V 

13V 

28V 

26% 

24% 

32% 

47% 

39% 

29% 

89V 

19% 

29% 

2.76 

13 

31V 


T ratal y UaguotM. 


26% 

41% 

11 % 

17% 

13% 

28% 

26% 

24% 

32V 

47% 

39% 

29 

88 % 

19% 

29X 

289 

12V 

21 - 


seminar in Peking that 
China's reserves would rise as 
the country increases its ex- 
port earnings. 

Latest figures show foreign 
exchange reserves of $10.47 
billion at the end of the second 
uarter of this year, up from 
10.35 billion in the first 
quarter but down from $10.85 
billion in June last year. 

Mr Chen said that China 
was now examining methods 
of liberalizing its foreign ex- 
change market and allowing 
more financial institutions to 
handle foreign exchange trans- 
actions. 

China had allowed limited 
trading of foreign currencies at 
a number of centres set np by 
the People's Bank in special 
economic zones and coastal 
cities, he said. 

Chinese officials were now 
working on ways of relaxing 
foreign exchange control next 
year so that provinces could 
import more raw materials on 
a regional basis. 

At the moment the central 
authorities were importing 
commodities such as steel ana 
then allocating them to the 
provinces, Mr Chen added. 


Society in loans 
link with bank 


By Peter Gartiand 

The National and Provin- with 
dal Bonding Society is to offer 
its 1.5 raillioH customers a new 
range of personal financial 
services from January I, in a 
joint venture with the Bank of 
Scotland. 

The society, Britain’s sev- 
enth biggest, will offer un- 
secured loans for cars, 
furniture ami other consumer 
durables. 

The finance win be provided 
by Bank of Scotland’s wholly- 
owned finance house, North 
West Securities. 


pro- 


Tbe level of interest rates 
has yet to be weed, bnt it wifi 
be “competitive in the un- 
secured lending field.” 

The society win be offering 
its customers cheque books, 


facilities 

tided by the bank. 

Among other features win 
be Bank of Scotland 
cants and the facility to have 
salaries credited to an interest- 
earning National and Provin- 
cial account. 

The move enables National 
to extend further its tra- 
ditional services, under the 
Bonding Societies Act, 3986. 

The National and Provin- 
cial has recently announced an 
expansion into the marketing 
of stockbroking services. 

The deal also provides a 
wider potential customer base 
for the Bank of Scotland 
which, in the words of Its joint 
general manager, Mr Archie 
Gibson, is “unlikely to pick op 
many accounts on the South 
coast of England.” 


Hong Kong cutback 
by Bank of America 


Hong Kong (AP-Dow 
Jones) — Bank of America 
said that it is to dose right of 
its 11 Hong Kong retail offices 
and lay ®f 160 employees on 
December 27. 

The troubled San Fran- 
cisco-based bank said that the 
moves were designed to 
streamline its operations in 
die crown colony, where it 
employs 1,180 people in retail, 
wholesale and merchant bonk- 
ing. Bank iff America estab- 
lished its first Hong Kong 
office in 1959. 


Mr Stephen Hunt, a senior 
vice-president and area gen- 
eral manager, said that the 
bank was acutely aware of the 
impact of die reorganization 
on the staff, but this was 
unavoidable. The bank would 
offer employees involved gen- 
erous severance packages. 

The hank, in a statement, 
said that, while the retail 
banking network was contract- 
ing, the group's merchant 
banking subsidiary was enjoy- 
ing a record year. 


Good half 
for county 
jobs group 

By Onr City Staff 

Lancashire Enterprises 
limited, the job-creation arm 
of the county counciL has 
announced half-year profits of 
£416,000. 

The result maintained the 
“steady spectacular growth 
the agency enjoyed since hs 
birth four years ago, Mr Jim 
Mason, CEL's chairman, 
claimed. 

Group operating profits 
rose by 85 per cent compared 
with the same period for the 
last financial year and the 
number of jobs and trading 
places directly sustained by 
LEL’s work has increased by 
more than 700 to 5,255 since 
April. 

Mr Mason says the result is 
an indication of the agency's 
successful and innovative ap- 
proach to job creation. 

“A lot of projects which we 
undertake are long term and 
we are now reaping the re- 
wards of onr past work. 

“In the first half of the year 
we invested £1.2 million in 
companies and a further £1.3 
million in commercial and 
industrial properties,” he said. 

Funding from several banks 
this year provided LEL with 
£10 million to invest in Lan- 
cashire industry. 

Projects introduced so far 
during this financial year in- 
clude a redevelopment 
scheme for the Leeds-Liver- 
pool canal system. 

Talks with the management 
of the Ley land bus divison 
are also under way. 


Mergers board 
reviews £8 18 m 

bid 

necessarily bad and com- 
petition doesn i always bring 
excellence." he said. 

"If vou've got big players in 
the media you are foiug to 
provide more quality and 
competitive services to the 
readers and viewers. 

The H&WT and News 
Corporation have combined 
dailv newspaper sales of 4.54 
million against the Fairfax 
group’s 1.53 million, accord- 
ing to the latest Audit Bureau 
of Circulation figures. 

But Mr Murdoch yesterday 
foreshadowed a significant 
shake-up in the media in- 
dustry when he said he would- 
have "to break up the H&WT 
group by selling its televison 
stations under new cross me- 
dia-ownership laws. 

Mr Murdoch pledged that 
the iwo Adelaide daily news- 
papers. News Corporation's 
The A 'em. and H&WTs The 
Advertiser, would retain their 
autonomy after the takeover. - 
Both his own newspaper 
and The Advertiser had estab- 
lished themselves as essential 
and highly respected news- 
papers in their own fields, he 
said. 

The commission, which 
monitors all corporate take- 
overs. was making “rapid 
market-place inquiries” with 
the large media companies to 
assess the effect of the take- 
over on all aspects of the 
media, a TPC spokesman 
said. 

“Anything of this size has to 
be carefully looked at — it's 
huge.” he said. ; 

But he added that Mr , 
Murdoch had said he was ; 
prepared to comply with any - 
rules and regulations by sell- 
ing off parts of the H&WT 
group if necessary. 


Svdney (Reuter) - The 
Trade Practices Commission, 
Australia's monopoly' watch- 
dog, said yesterday it was 
reviewing Sir Rupert Mur- 
doch’s AusSI.S billion (£818 
million) bid for the Herald 
and Weekly Times Ltd. the 
country’s largest newspaper 
group. . , 

The commission could 
move to block the takeover of 
ihe Herald and Weekly Times 
in the courts if market domi- 
nance was established in 
contravention of trading laws, 
a spokesman for the commis- 
sion said. _ 

Mr Murdoch’s News Cor- 
poration looked set to become 
the country’s largest media 
group with an Aus$12 bid per 
share for H&WT, which its 
directors have recommended 
to shareholders. 

The bid, if successful, -would 
give News Corporation own- 
ership of all the large Austra- 
lian metropolitan newspapers 
apart from those owned by the 
John Fairfax group in Sydney 
and Melbourne. 

The offer was attacked by 
the - Australian _ Journalists 
Association, which said it 
would mean unprecedented 
economic and political power. 

In Melbourne more than 
400 H&WT and News Cor- 
poration journalists said they 
would stop work today fpr a 
meeting on the ramifications 
of the takeover bid. 

Local journalists called on 
the government to set up a 
Royal Commission into the 
ownership of press, radio and 
television outlets. 

But Mr John d'Arcy. chief 
executive of H&WT, de- 
fended his group's acceptance 
of the offer. 

“I believe that big is not 


COMPANY NEWS 




The Royal Bank 
of Scotland 
Group pic 


1986 RESULTS 


Years ended 
30 September 


1986 


1985 



£m 

£m 

Profit before taxation 



The company and its subsidiaries 

173.8 

158.7 

Share of profits of associated companies 

10.7 

7.6 


184.5 

166.3 

Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders 

118.2 

94.8 


Earnings per 25p ordinary share 

41 .6p 

35.7p 

Dividend per 25p ordinary share 

10.8p 

9.6p 

■ Earnings per share increased 1 6.5% 


■ Ordinary dividend increased 1 2.5% 


■ Total assets increased by 1 0.4% 



The Report and Accounts 1986 will be posted to shareholders on Thursday. 18 December 1986 


APPOINTMENTS 


British Steel Corporation: 
Dr Frank Fitzgerald joins the 
board as a full-time member 
and Mr Hugh Rumanian be- 
comes a part-time member. 

Mercantile Credit Com- 
pany: Mrs Rosalind Gilmore 
wfll be made a non-executive 
director from January l. 

London Metal Exchange: 
Mr John Wolff is elected 
chairman and Mr Clement 
Danin is made vice-chairman 
of the committee. 

Alexander Stenhouse: Mr 
AM Elson and Mr D J 
Woods are appointed manag- 
ing directors of Aviation and 
Aerospace division. 

Tandem Computers: Mr 
Jack Chapman becomes vice- 
president of international 
sales operations. Mr Rob 
Hoogstratea becomes vice- 
president and managing direc- 
tor. 

Association of Photo- 
graphic Laboratories: Mr 
Richard Cross is elected 
president. 

Tarmac: Mr Jack Mawds- 
ley will join the main -board 
from January I. 

Wright Air Conditioning 
(Products): Mr Michael 
Brown becomes export sales 
director. Mr Allan Hayward 
becomes mana g in g director. 

Hyman: Mr J H Webb 
becomes chairman and Mr 
E M Webster a director. 

Top Hat Foods: Mr Brian 
McGregor becomes sales and 
marketing director, Mr Ray 
Parkinson operations director 
and Mr Colin Thomson finan- 
cial director. 

Thompson and Morgan: 
Mr David Tostevin is made 
director of purchasing and 
production. 

The Associated Austral- 
asian Banks in London: Mr P 
Brind will become chairman 
from January 1. 



Dr Frank Fitzgerald 

Steelcase Strafor: Mr 
Charles Posneft is made Brit- 
ish sales and marketing 
director. 

Phoenician Holdings: Mr 
Anthony Mason will become 
chairman and chief executive 
from January 1. 


• 600 GROUP: The interim 
dividend is 234p (same) for 28 
weeks to October 11. With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
95,000 (108.000) trading profit 
before tax was 531 (3,061) 
interest debits, surplus on sale of 
properties was ! i 8 (33) share of 
related companies' loss 81 
(profit 167} pretax profit was 
568 (3,261) and tax was 717 
(1.633). Minorities credit was 5 
(debt 7) loss attributable was 
144 (prfit 1621) loss per share — 
net basis Q.4p (earnings 3.5p) — 
nil distribution basis earnings 
0.5p (earnings 3.6p). 

> DSC HOLDINGS: For the 
half year to September 30. the 
dividend is 0.5p (nil). With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
1,569.349 (861,548) trading 
profit before interest 44,375 
(loss 92.904) interest paid 
35,575 ( 1 6J7 1 ) share of profit of 
associated companies nil 
(44,847) net profir before tax 
8.800 (loss 6028) tax nil 
( 1 3.000) net profit after tax was 
8.800 (loss 77JJ2S) extraor- 
dinary debt 298.771 (I4J43) 
earnings per share 0.3p (loss 
2.5p). 

t TlfflOOK: The interim 
dividend is 1.43p(lJ5p) for the 
six months to October 3!. With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
15,827 (10.098) pretax profit 
was 1,508 (1,022) tax was 173 
(153) profit after tax was 1,335 
(869) earnings per share 7.9p 
(6p).The group, which includes 
trailer, container and rail wagon 
rental, with site security accom- 
modation and offshore mini- 
oomainer manufacture, had a 
successful rights issue in Octo- 
ber. which was taken up by 99.2 
per cent of the holders of the 
share capital. 

• FAIRLINE BOATS: The 
final dividend is 4p. making 6p 
(4.2p) for year to September 3<0 l 
W ith figures in sterling, turn- 
over was: overseas 7,082,594 
(5,423,279) Britain 5,579,681 
(4,474,531) making 12,662^75 
(9.897,810). Pretax profit 
\ 003,567 (806,354) tax 272,000 
(259,282) and earnings per share 
2L9p (I4.4p). The chairman 
said that the year had started 
well and company had an 
excellent order book, particu- 
larly for larger baits. New 
product development continues 
with the Sportfory 26 to be 
introduced at the London, Paris 


and Munich boat shows early 
next year and two other projects 
also in development and the 
company has a substantial 
investment programme to fond. 

• UNITED LEASING: An in- 
terim dividend of l.Sp f!.5p) is 
payable on January 23. The 
directors will be considering an 
increase in the final dividend in 
the light of the foil year's results. 
With figures in £000 for the six 
months to June 30, turnover 
was 113.407 (63,837), profit 
before tax 2,028 (1.01 1). tax 98 
(100), minority interests 232 
(75) and extraordinary loss 
1,500 (nil). Earnings per share 
were il.8p(5.8p). 


More company news 
is on page 28 


FS3 ELECTRICALS: Results 
for the half year to October 3 
include an interim dividend of 
0.4p (0_275p) and, with figures 
in £000, group turnover was 
36,863 (12,05 1 ), group profit on 
ordinary activities before tax 
4,507 (2^64), tax 261 (778), 
extraordinary items (net of tax 
provisions) credit 451 (debit 
418). Earnings per share were 
3.55p <1.75p). Despite very 
heavy rationalization costs, the 
group's balance sheet remains 
strong with positive cash bal- 
ances and the board continues 
to look for acquisition opportu- 
nities. Net assets per ordinary 
share (after writing off all good- 
will) totalled 27.6p. an increase 
of 1 12 per cent over the equiva- 
lent figure last year. 

• ILLINGWORTH MORRIS: 
Interim dividend IJLSp (same), 
six months to September 30, 
figures in £000. Turnover 
45.363 (49,684), operating profit 
3,094 (3,036). other income 352 
(442), pretax profit 3,451 
(3,055), eps 5 Jp (5.3p). 

• JAMES LATHAM: Figures 
in £000 for the six months to 
September 30. Interim was 6p 
(Sp), turnover was 20.482 
(17.889). trading profit was 
1 ,42 1 (886) and profit before tax 
was 1.031 (406). Tax was 127 
(83) and earnings per share were 
34. 3p(tl. 30). 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN L.11.00% 

Adam & Company 11.00% 

6CCI 11.00% 

Citibank Savings t 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Stiangtunll.00% 

Lloyds Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotlaidll.00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA 11.00% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. ‘ 


Jiphoa 


INTERNATIONAL 
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES’ 



Continued Strong Growth 


"Since the beginning of this fiscal year, in which we have had a most 
successful rights issue, taken up by the holders of 99.2% of the share capital 
the group has performed extremely well, it has achieved a high utilization ' 
on both its container and trailer rental subsidiaries, plus a strong increase 
in both fleets. The group's successes are continuing in the second half of 
the year, with ail areas operating wellf ’ Robert J. Monta gue. (Executive Chairman). 

The Directors announce the unaudited consolidated results for die half year ended 31st October. 1986. 


Turnover 

Profit on ordinary activities before taxation 
Taxation (advance corporation tax written off) 

Profit after taxation attrfoutable to shareholders 
Dividends - Preference 

-Ordinary (Note 3) 

Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders 
Dividends per ordinary share (Note 3) 

Earnings per ordinary share (Note 4) 

Notes 

1 The results for the year ended 30th April. 1986. are abridged from the company's ton jamm,, 

with the Registrar of Companies and which received an unqualified auditor Vopimon 00 LDUnis - '* hKh h * w be * ?n filed 

2 The unaudfted figures for the half j«ar to 31st October. 1986 include top r., 

which was acquired in October. 1985. and contribored a prom before lac of E1Z0 quo 10^2?^ ' 

April. 1986. The figures also include toe results of Central Tr.„|er Hemal 20to 


Hatf Year to 

Year to 

31 St Oct '86 

31st Ott S5 

30th AprH '86 

£000 

£000 

£000 

15,827 

10,098 . 

25.308 

1,508 

1.022 

2,770 

(173) 

1153) 

(360) 

1,335 

869 

2,410 

(141) 

(175) 

(315) 

(282) 

0S2) 

(549) 

912 

512 

1.546 

1.43p 

1.25p 

3.73p 

7.9p 

6 Op 

16. 2p 


minimal conutoutuSn to group profits in 1986. 

3 The interim oi binary dnrictond of 1 43 pence per share win be paid or, 30th Januaiu 
registered at toe close &l business on 8th January, 1937. y ’ ■ 


to ordinary shareholder! 


4.ThecalculatjQnoftheeamingsper10pOftiiJVHvshateforeach year isbasodontht.^r*,,«w u- * 

shares in issue, which includes toe rights issue in October, 1986. £ 

Rental (DenrtarVi A/S (formerly PNO Trailer leasmg A/S) m februa* Tree S 

reorganisation assorted .with toe flotawn in July. 1965, had been to place tor^'tw^ ‘Sm 3$i SSi' ffi 








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THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


(STOCK MARK! 


Speculative buying lifts Sears 
as 8m shares change hands 

D.. n «:_ i . , 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


[COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


GEC and Plessey in 
the political balance 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 

^ amid speculation that 


the Australian financier, was 
reckoned to be a big buyer of 
shares in Sears, the Selfridges 
to Mappin & Webb retailing 
empire, yesterday. 

His activity pushed the 
volume in the stock to more 
than 8 million and the share 
price edged up 3p to 12Sp. 

Dealers were undecided as 
to whether Mr Holmes i. 
Court was trying to build a 
stake or merely trading 

Mr Geoffrey Maitland- 
Smith, chairman of Sears, 
said: “We are keeping a close 
eye on our share register, it’s 
something that all companies 
must do now, but so far we 
haven’t discovered anything." 


the company is on the brink of 
launching a major takeover 
bid. 

Saatchi & Saatchi also 
recovered to its overnight 
level of 670p despite better- 
lhan*expected results and 
Bass, where the figures were 
atounpressive, slipped lOpto 

The FT 30-share index 
closed 3.2 lower at (,265.9 and 
the FT-SE 100 was down 5.0 
at 1610.1. 

Shares in Central Indepen- 
dent Television, down lOp to 
38 Ip yesterday, have virtually 
doubled in the past year a nd 
could be in for a further boost 



Central Independent Television: 
Being courted by two sutton? 


|SHAR£ PRICE) 


FTA 

ALL SHARE 
INDEX 




Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jut Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


Sears has been the subject of so °9: . Mr - R ,? b ^ 1 Maxwell, 
bid speculation for many Posher of th e Daily Mirror, 


months and although nothing 
has yet materialized the ru- 
mours refuse to go away. 
Other retailers such as Wool- 
worth and Mr Gerald Ronson, 
of Heron Corporation, are 
known to have cast a preda- 
tory eye over it 
Elsewhere the market had 
another quiet day despite a 


is already sitting on a 20 per 
cent stake; the maximum 
allowed under IBA rules. 

There is now talk that Carbon 
Communications, the Him 
production and television ser- 
vices group which last year 
tried to buy Thames Tele- 
vision, has also been buying 
shares. Markeunen say that 


string of results from leading Carlton could have built up a 
companies. Most of the holding of at least 3 per cent 


reporting stocks moved lower 
as shareholders took profits. 

Hanson Trust slipped a 
couple of pence after its 
“middle of the range" figures, 
before recovering to end the 
day unchanged at 191 p. The 
activity in its shares resulted 
in a volume of 19 million 


Last October Carlton had its 
agreed deal to buy Thames 
blocked by the IBA and since 
then it has been widely pre- 
dicted that Carbon would try 
to get its hands on another 
television franchise. 

Word of Carlton's share 
purchases comes less than a 


month after Mr Robert Phillis, 
managing director of Central, 
announced his resignation so 
that he could become manag- 
ing director of Carlton. He is 
expected to make the move 
next month, 

• It has been quite a year 
for Mr Gerald Ratner, chair- 
man of the family-con- 
trolled jeweller, who bought 
rival H. Samuel and has 
seen the share price leap from 
I03p to 243p. Last week, 
he sacked Kletnwort 
Grievesou as company bro- 
ker and has appointed 
Cazenove and Wood 
Mackenzie as joint brokers. 

City analysts say that if the 
rumour is true, they find it 
puzzling. Mr Luke Johnson, 
television analyst at 
Kleinwort Grieveson, the bro- 
ker, ays: “Neither Carlton 

- nor Mr Maxwell will be able to visions are firing on al 

'EM* A TT> buy Central because the IBA inders and he is confide 

JL X %J AJ XV would block it. They won't further strong growth ft 

•m ar r allow any television franchises full year. Last month tna 

1% /■ B m r ■ ^ B m ■ I V ' to change hands mid-term and the big container rental gi 

VI ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ they don’t run out until 1 99Z" were hit by the news 

■ % B ■ k X Carlton shares were up 5p at United Sates Lines had 

'*“■ ’ * 980p. lied under Chapter Elev 

Other television companies the US Federal Bankr 

A T^\7X7TW r r , TC , Tr , A were also down on the day Code to the US District C 

J \ i J V JlrJK. X l&tLlVLIliiN X with Yorkshire felling lOp to But Tipbook has em 

164p, TV Sooth lOp to 250p, unscathed and is con 

I1VF LWT 9p to 449p, Thames 4p making the most of th 

X1H to302pandAngiia4^to3(9p. export boom in Korea s 

■ m ■ M M m m Bad debt provisions at the company already ope 

' ■ i ■ ■1.1 Royal Bank of Scotland which from. Mr Montague expe 

« LJ reported results of £89.4 mil- see the number of conta 

■ ■ ■ I 1 . lion, almost double last year’s, in operation to doubi 

M*. JB, B m J took the market by surprise. 76,000 by April next yea 

Its shares responded by turn- grow to 100,000 by the t 

1 ,- j, M m m bling I4p to 284p. Bunk of ningof 1988. 

r ■ i ■ lm im ■ ,i m. l Scotland also dipped 6p to A number of analysts 

■ ■ I m 408p and Standard Chartered recently taken a shine l 

ajj |u I W ■ Hi continued its slide with a fell shares now that the grou 

JL. X ▼ -H H W , of 1 4p to 760p; making a two- been able to shrug of 

^ ■_ - - day loss of 58p. Standard effects of last year’s disas 

TDAHC An\/PPTIQPPQ Chartered issued a statement floatation at the ilOp ■ 

I iinUu AUVCn I IQunv saying that reports that Mr Yesterday the price clost 

XCI • A4 ilOtafl A 4AA Michad McWifliam, its chief lower at 330p. 

| CL* U I “HrO I executive, was about to resign. Shares of AE. the n 

were false. The DTI also components group, slippi 
_ reconfirmed that it had no to 272p with the battli 

A rj\/f-RTI^INC5 plans to launch an enquiry control of the company r 

riL/ w ^ 1 1 1 'Whim into share trading there. ing a dimax later toda> 

-peri In the beleagured merchant Robert MaxweD's priv; 

| uLuA 94vUOO banking sector, MoganGren- owned Pergammon HoI< 

Saudi Arabia’s new man 
to oil the wheels 


fell recovered lip to 564p. It 
confirmed that Mr Patrick 
Dawnay, vice-chairman of 
Morgan Grenfell Laurie Hold- 
ings, had resigned, but 
stressed that he was leaving to 
take up a post as an executive 
director of Pergamon Hold- 
ings. Mr Dawnay said: “I was 
not involved in the Guinness 
bid for Distillers a pan from 
S00 Distillers shares I inher- 
ited from my mother wbcih 
were turned into Guinness 
shares after the bid." 

Mr Robert Montague, 
chairman of Tiphook, the 
container and trailer rental 
group, breezed into town yes- 
terday with a set of interim 
figures at the cop end of 
market expectations. They 
showed pretax profits up 
nearty 50 per cent at £1.50 
million and earnings more 
than 30 per cent higher. 

Mr Montague says the 
company's five main di- 
visions are firing on all cyl- 
inders and he is confident of 
further strong growth for the 
full year. Last month many of 
the big container rental groups 
were hit by the news that 
United States Lines had app- 
lied under Chapter Eleven of 
the US Federal Bankruptcy 
Code to the US District Court 
But Tipbook has emerged 
unscathed and is currently 
making the most of the big 
export boom in Korea where 
the company already operates 
from. Mr Montague expects to 
see the number of containers 
in operation to double to 
76,000 by April next year and 
grow to 100,000 by the begin- 
ning of 1988. 

A number of analysts have 
recently taken a shine to the 
shares now that the group has 
been able to shrug off the 
effects of last year’s disastrous 
floatation at the il Op level. 
Yesterday the price closed 5p 
lower at 330p. 

Shares of AE. the motor 
components group, slipped 9p 
to 272p with the battle for 
control of the company reach- 
ing a dim ax later today. Mr 
Robert MaxweD’s privately- 
owned Pergaramon Holdings 


Next week’s Opec meeting will be the 

first for 20 years without 

Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yaroani 


O pec will meet in full 
ministerial session 
next week in Geneva 
with a new name in the 
register of the ImeroonrinentaJ 
Hotel as resident of the 
$5,000-a-day presidential 
suite on the 18th floor. 

For the first time in more 
than 20 years, Opec will meet 
without Sheikh Ahmed Zaia 
Yamani. the former Saudi 
Arabian oil minister. Instead, 
his successor. Sheikh Hisbam 
Nazer, will lead the Saudi 
delegation. 

However, the issues which 
the meeting will have to 
address and the solutions the 
ministers must find are an 
necessary because ofStaU- 

. Yamani, the man who laun- 
ched Opec as a world politick 
force and made the west 
rethink its economic strategies 
from the mid-1970s. 

* The meeting, appears to oe 
committed to reaching a de- 
cision which will return Opec 

(0 a fixed-price system, under 

which it sells. >ts oil onjerm 
contracts at prices fixed <»te> 
lively by the ministers, tesed 

on the grades of oil pumped by 

ea 7 j 1 ^ Un commiun e nt was 

reached after the inteivention 

of the Saudi monarch, King 
Fahd, after his dismissal of 
Sheikh Yamani. 

Since then it 

have been accepted by all 
/w member nations and tne 

gawwvsK 

s-fiirtjsg 

coK: will the 

forthcoming 

However, will what emm* 

ESSSS 

SVS fee lower than 
'"S’SSte.fimHrtfjg; 


suggestions from the Inter- 
national Energy Agency that 
the market in the indus- 
trialized world could take 1 83 
million barrels of Opec oil a 
day — it has been straggling to 
find a market for under 17 
million barrels a day — but 
winter buying and slocking 
programmes are nearing their 
end and demand next spring 
may not be high enough to 
give Opec the size of market it 
needs. 

Once an overall ceiling is 
set, it will then have to start 
allocating each of the 13 
member countries their share. 
It is when the meeting moves 
to this stage that the real 
negotiations — the came! trad- 
ing — will start 

country wants more of 
the available cake. The poor- 
est because they have mouths 
to feed back home and interest 
payments to meet in the banks 
of London and New York. 

The richest nations, such as 
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, also 
want to maximize their 
production. They have mas- 
sive capital programmes m 
hand, national airlines to re- 
equip. sophisticted armies, na- 
vies and air forces to arm and 
domestic infrastructures to 
maintain which largely run on 
ihe natural gas which is pro- 
duced alongside the on they 
pump for export. 

There are levels of produc- 
tion below which Saudi Ara- 
bia and Kuwait simply cannot 
drop unless power for air 
conditioning and water de- 
salination has to be restricted. 

I n addition, Kuwait and to 
a greater extent Saudi 
Arabia, feel they have 
borne the brunt of Opecs 
policy of defending its market 
share at the cost of cutting 
prices 

U was this policy which 
Sheikh Yamani launched a 
year ago in Geneva and which 
sent the world oil price and 
with it North Sea revenues 

plummeting 

Although companies such 



Sbelkfa Nazer: first time 
at head of delegation 

as BP, Shell and Esso have 
been able to keep their profit 
levels at near-record levels, 
the world oil price has feflra in 
the past year from about $30 a 
barrel to its present level of 
just under $15. 

At some stages during the 
past year, cargoes of good- 
quality Middle East oil were 
changing hands for as low as 
STabarrd 

At that level the oil com- 
panies can make profits from 
buying cheap ofl and selling 
expensive petrol at the pumps, 
but the producing nations 
were not able to play that 
game to any great extent - 
Kuwait is hoping to rectify 
that with its move into petrol 
refining and retailing in 
Europe — and the time came 
for the Yamani policy to be 
scrapped. 

Therefore, Opec will be 
under pressure fham Thursday 
to decide on the overall level 
of production. 

The present level of 17 
million bands a day ends this 
month, and is seen by many 
industry observers as a mil- 
lion barrels too high if the 
object of an $ 18 barrel of oil is 
to be achieved. 

An agreement to extend the 
present output quoin would in 
itself be interpreted by the 
optimists in the industry — it 
is practically evenly divided — 


as a sign that the organization 
is again serious about acting as j 
a proper cartel to set a price I 
limit. ] 

The opposing camps within ! 
the industry consider that 
unless firm new quotas are 
agreed on by each member 
nation then the free market, 
which has enjoyed controlling 
the price for the past year, will 
continue to keep it at about 
present levels. 

Opec has tried several times 
in recent meetings to set a new 
output system and each time 
has fudged and compromised. 

Within Opec there is a 
realization that this time it 
needs to emerge from its 
meeting with a firm agree- 
ment. 

However, one delegate from 
a Gulf country said yesterday: 
“The only way we can get into 
a position of fixing a price of 
$18 a barrel is by cutting back 
on output But no one is really 
prepared to be the first to 
announce that they will accept 
a cut in their output" 

T herefore without Sheikh 
Yamani and with 
Sheikh Nazer- it is still 
unclear whether the honorary 
'tide of Sheikh has been 
stripped from one and passed 
on (o the other. 

This is because neither are 
members of the ruling royal 
family - and Sheikh Nazer 
has su0 to assert his authority 
within Opec and the expecta- 
tion is that it will be a meeting 
where the telephoned pro- 
nouncements from heads of 
state to negotiating oil min- 
isters will hold the key to the 
length of the meeting. 

There are signs that some of 
the Latin American delegates 
are prepared to leave Geneva 
for Christmas and return to 
continue discussions into the 
new year. 

If that is the case, the 
economies of the oil-produc- 
ing nations, including that of 
Britain will be affected by low 
prices for a few more weeks. 

The Swiss will not mind. 
They do not have any oil 
wells, but they do have hotel 
suites at $5,000 a day. 

David Young 

Energy Correspondent 


has been buying more shares 
in AE on behalf of its associate 
Hollis Bros. This time it has 
paid 285.3p for 908,290 shares 
taking its total holding to 
28.48 million. This combined 
with the 476.500 shares al- 
ready owned by Hollis and 
other shares already commit- 
ted takes Hollis’s total holding 
in AE to 29.86 million, or 29.9 
per cent Mr Maxwell has 
already stated that he has no 
intention of accepting the 
Turner & Newall offer should 
his bid for AE fail. 

Tuner & Newall which last 
night announced that it had 
acceptances totalling just over 
47 per cent for its offer, 
slipped 23p to 18l.5p. 

l/nigate, the dairy and food 
produce group, firmed lp to 
309p ahead of a lunch later 
today with the company at the 

• Charter Consolidated, 
the mining equipment group, 
has completed consolida- 
tion and should move sharply 
higher, says Mr Richard 
Lake, chartist with Savory 
MiOn. He sees Its share 
price rising to 35ftp, from 
292p. The quadrupled divi- 
dend at Johnson Matthey, 
where it has a 27 per cent 
stake, will also help. 

offices of County Securities 
with a number of institutions. . 
Apparently County is a big fen 
of ihe shares and reckons they I 
look cheap. 

Nottingham Brick jumped 
55p to 290p following the 
news that the group was in 
talks with rival Steettey about 
the possibility of an agreed 
merger. The group is urging 
shareholders to take no action 
and confirms that preliminary 
figures, due next week, will be 
released on schedule. Steetiey 
ended the day 7p lower at 
458p. 

Steetiey has been tipped in 
the past as a likely bidder for 
Ihstock Johnson, another 
brick manufacturer. Ibstock 
responded with a 4p rise to 
194p. 

Accusations of insider trad- 
ing have now been extended 
to the bid tussle between LCP 
Hpldings and Ward White. 
LCP claims there was insider 
trading in the shares before 
Ward White announced its 
terms and has asked the Stock 
Exchange to investigate. Mr 
Philip Birch, chairman of 
Ward White, said be would 
fully suport any investigation. 

“The claim by LCP should 
not distract from the very real 
merits of Ward White’s offer. 
The announcement is entirely 
irrelevant to the offer’s 
commercial logic and finan- 
cial benefit,” he added. 


T he working agreemeni signed by 
Westinghouse Electric, a world 
leader in electronic and electrical 
systems and services, and Plessey, 
promises to have an electric impact on 
Plessey’s significance and status. If it 
can be implemented in the way they 
hope, the agreement would not only add 
5 per cent real growth to Plessey’s- 
annual turnover in the 1 990s, but would 
also arm Plessey against the com- 
petition of its leading foreign rivals and 
smooth its path though the bureaucratic 
jungle which overseas companies have 
to cut through to reach US Government 
contracts. 

With every British company operat- 
ing in the defence field feeling the 
pressure on their profits from the cost- 
cutting Levine regime (and cutting back 
on research and development as a 
result), the name of the game now is get- 
ting better value for every pound. Il is 
hard to imagine a better way of 
overcoming all these obstacles than 
collaborating with one of the leading 
international companies in the field 
which is also American, funds an 
impressive R & D programme across 
the board and is a prime US Govern- 
ment defence contractor. 

The contingency in all this is the 
.Airborne Early Warning contract which 
the Ministry of Defence will award in a 
week or two either to GEC (Nimrod) or 
Boeing (Awacs). Westinghouse, the 
major subcontractor, supplies Boeing 
with the radar systems. 

In its bid to secure the contract, 
Boeing has offered an unprecedented 
offset commitment of 130 per cent of 
the cost of Awacs to the British 
Government. Plessey stands to gain a 
great deal from the commitment 
through Westinghouse’ s share of the 
contract 

Should the contract go to GEC, 
Plessey does not lose anything in the 
sense that its existing business forecasts 
would not be affected. For GEC to lose 
the contract would be a hammer blow, 
not because of costs already incurred, 
which are relatively light, but to its 
engineering prestige. 

Morale within GEC would suffer and 
the difficult processes of change in 
which GEC, reluctantly and laboriously, 
is engaged would have to be accelerated 
in a highly charged atmosphere. Having 
escaped the clutches of GEC, with the 
invaluable assistance of the Monopolies 
and Mergeis Commission, Plessey 
would have . cause for a double 
celebration. 

The AEW decision is fiendishly 
difficult for the Government, not least 
because the costly delays in the Nimrod 
project are mainly the fault not of GEC 
but of the woolly thinking and out- 
moded practices of the brigade of 
Ministry of Defence officials. The 
advantages of Awacs as a system are 
obvious: it exists, is proven, gives earlier 
warning, meets the MoD’s specification 
with a margin to spare, is capable of 


“enhancement”, probably costs less 
than Nimrod viewed over its life, and 
the offset commitment offered by 
Boeing promises at least as many jobs in 
this country as would be lost if GEC 
were not given the contract. 

The argument really boils down to 
two issues: exports and politics. GEC 
has bedazzled MPs with estimates of a 
$5 billion (£3.5 billion) export market 
though not with the existing Nimrod 
“platform”. No more Nirarods will be 
built On the most favourable assump- 
tions. which Boeing and Westinghouse 
naturally dispute, the British share of 
the $5 billion AEW export market for 
the GEC system would be $2 billion. 
Boeing and Westinghouse maintain that 
active British participation, through the 
offset programme, in AEW improve- 
ment technology 1 and production, along 
with other military co-operation pro- 
grammes, would offer more export 
opportunities than Nimrod. 

The final judgment— not surprisingly 
— will be a political one. Can Mrs 
Thatcher afford to be seen, at this siage, 
to be turning her back on the home 
grown product? Would she be selling 
Britain's birthright if she did? Is her 
commitment to the Nato alliance to be 
visibly reinforced by opting for an inter- 
operable system? At the same time 
would she be giving a powerful stimulus 
to tiiis country's technological base? 

It looks 70-30, or maybe 80-20 in 
favour of Awacs. 

Floating rate rout 

T he coincidence of a number 'of 
bear factors has turned a price fall 
in the floating rate note market 
into a rout Perpetuais, which normally 
move about 5 cents on a really active 
day, were dropping by a full percentage 
point or more. The extra measures 
taken yesterday to calm the market were 
probably necessary to prevent the 
danger of worse developing, though if 
you believe Credit Suisse First Boston 
the movement can quite reasonably be 
seen as an overdue market correction. 

Yields on bank perpetual notes had 
sunk to levels comparable with many 
high quality, dated money market 
instruments. Now two things are 
happening. One is a recognition that not 
all perpetuais are alike. A more realistic 
differentiation is emerging between the 
yields of different banks' paper, in 
recognition that some are better risks 
than others. 

More important the equity value of a 
perpetual is now recognized. Like a 
company share, there is no promise of 
repayment To value it the same way as 
an ordinary bond is absurd. Yields on 
perpetuais are at last rising. Even so, 
over-use of this market may have killed 
it as a source of new capital for the 
banks. Can the Midland Bank rights 
issue be far away? 


PAYEN 

An International Force 
in Automotive Gaskets 

, I TAKE A LOOK AT TIE FACTS , 


A FWEN supplies the world's most 
comprehensive international range of 
automotivegaskets. 


A, RtofEN manufactures gaskets world-wide - 
European factories are in the UK, France, 
Italy. Spain and Holland. 

A R\YEN has a co-ordinated international 
research programme backed by the most 
extensive engine-test facilities devoted to 
gasket development 

A RWEN products are specified by leading 
vehicle manufacturers in 5 continents. 


A FHYEN has technical assistance or trade 
mark agreements with companies in Japan, 
Australia, India and Eastern Europe. 

A FftYEN has unrivalled aftermarket 
distribution through 14 subsidiary and 
associate companies world-wide. 

A Every winner of the Form ula 3 Constructors 
Championship has relied on fififEN 

products. 


A Pa yen 


THE PROFESSIONALS' CHOICE , 




/ 


/ / 






jk 


Payen International is a unit of \ 


BA Turner & . 

b&mII Newall plc \ 


'EfflEN* is a trademark of P&yen International Limited. 14 Liverpool Rood. Slough. Berkshire SLl 4QP 






_28 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1 986 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


•n. * 

Sanaa 

JM 

Calls 

Apr 

Jut 

•ton 

Puts 

Apr 

Jui 

AfedLrom 

300 

12 

21 

30 

14 

17 

23 

(■308) 

330 

4 

13 

18 

37 

40 

42 


360 

1 

7 

— 

68 

70 


BP 

600 

83 

100 


1 

11 


C673I 

650 

4fl 

58 

77 

7 

30 

40 


700 

10 

30 

47 

32 

58 

85 

Cans Gold 

550 

10? 

IPS 

•W 

3 

10 


C640) 

600 

70 

90 

104 

1? 

7S 

.13 


650 

3b 

60 

75 

32 

47 

57 

’Con route 

860 

53 

64 


ft 

P 


r*«8 

280 

38 

44 

54 

? 

5 

8 


200 

17 

37 

44 

6 

10 

IS 

-■ . 

330 

5 

1/ 

27 

2b 

28 

33 

Com Union 

260 

11 

20 

27 

10 

18 

20 

(*257) 

280 

4 

12 

19 

26 

32 

35 

r 

300 

1ft 

6 

13 

45 

46 

47 

Cable £ Wire 

300 

28 

40 

50 

8 

17 

23 

-T319) 

32S 

14 

25 


17 

25 



360 

5 

17 


35 

42 



375 

1ft 

— 


bU 

— 

— 

GEC 

1G0 

16 

71 

28 

3ft 

6 

8 

(167) 

180 

5 

1? 

77 

17 

70 

77 


200 

1 

5 

9 

34 

38 

40 

Grand Mai 

360 

103 

108 


1 

IK 



390 

73 

78 

— 

1 

3 

— 


420 

47 

un 

78 

3 

14 

16 


460 

23 

38 

52 

22 

33 

35 

ICI 

950 

170 

185 


7 

5 


(M102) 

1000 

120 

138 

16? 

3 

12 

18 


1050 

77 

100 

13? 

9 

26 

33 


1100 

35 

67 

100 

25 

45 

55 

Land Sec 

300 

44 

54 

60 

1ft 

3 

8 

T338) 

330 

18 

31 

38 

7 

13 

16 


380 

5 

13 

20 

27 

29 

32 

Marks S Spun 

160 

10 

19 

7* 

4 

6 

9 

C184] 

200 

3 

10 

16 

17 

20 

73 


220 

1 

5 

9 

37 

39 

40 

Shea Trans 

900 

68 

85 

105 

5 

77 

35 

C946) 

960 

70 

53 

73 

22 

45 

53 


1000 

9 

33 

46 

57 

72 

82 

Trafalgar House 

260 

14 

23 

30 

a 

17 

21 

(■266) 

200 

6 

14 

20 

27 

31 

36 


300 

3 

7 

12 

45 

48 

52 

TSS 

70 

9ft 

12 

4ft 

1 

7 

3ft 


SO 

3 

6ft 

8ft 

5 

6 

7 


90 

1ft 

2ft 

5K 

13 

14 

14 


Series 

Me 

Mar 

Jam Doc 

Mar 

Jun 

Beecfwn 

380 

55 

88 


1 

2 



C41 2) 

390 

25 

43 

55 

1ft 

9 

13 


420 

3 

2/ 

37 

12 

77 

30 


460 

1 

9K 

21 

53 

53 

60 


200 

30 

39 

4fl 

1 

3 

4 

(•228) 

220 

12 

25 

32 

2 

10 

11 


240 

2ft 

14 

21 

15 

16 

25 

BTH 

280 

3ft 

1? 

?n 

16 

19 

25 

(■267) 

300 

— 

7 

12 

— 

37 

40 


307 

1 

— 

— 

42 

— 

— 


B50 

70 

85 

100 

? 

7 

15 

(*714) 

700 

25 

50 

BH 

7 

18 

35 


750 

7 

25 

45 

43 

60 

75 

Blue Circle 

600 

47 

75 

95 

4 

11 

18 

(•640) 

650 

12 

45 

65 

22 

33 

42 


700 

1ft 

— 

— 

60 

— 

— 


650 

145 

185 


2 

13 



(TBS) 

700 

95 

30 

50 

3 

23 

33 


750 

55 

100 

20 

8 

40 

55 


BOO 

17 

67 

95 

35 

63 

80 

Dixons 

300 

32 

46 

58 

2 

e 

10 

C329) 

330 

6 

78 

40 

6 

18 

20 


360 

1ft 

16 

28 

32 

34 

38 

GKN 

240 

34 

4? 

47 

1 

3 

6 

(-271) 

260 

1b 

26 

33 

2 

9 

15 


280 

4 

17 

24 

14 

17 

23 


300 

2 

9 

— 

30 

31 

— 


900 

73 

74 104 

10 

30 

47 

(-908) 

950 

5 

46 

77 

43 

62 

67 


1000 

2 

78 

55 

85 10 0 105 

- 

1050 

1 

16 

- 145 147 

— 


Hanson 

Ciflil 


160 3214 36 - 

180 13 20 26ft 

200 2 9 16 

220 ft 3ft 8 


ft 2 — 

1 6 6K 

10 15ft 16 
29 31 32 




Series 

Dee 

Cals 

Mar 

Jun 

Dee 

Puts 

Mer 

Jun 

Jaguar 

rsuT 


500 

550 

600 

16 

1 

1 

48 

22 

11 

70 

37 

4 

38 

90 

25 

47 

90 

35 

53 

Thom EMI 


420 

60 

72 

88 

1 

5 

7 

f473) 


460 

22 

43 

52 

« 

19 

25 



500 

6 

21 

40 

31 

39 

45 



550 

1 

11 

— 

79 

84 

— 



330 

SB 



ft 



(*384) 


360 

26 

43 

55 

1ft 

9 

13 



390 

4 

7b 

:« 

10 

18 

25 



420 

1ft 

10 

18 

38 

43 

48 



Series 

Feb Mer Aug Feb Hey Aug I 

Brit Aaro 


420 

no 

980 


5 

7 

__ 

r«4j 


4fi(l 

50 

62 

75 

8 

15 

20 



500 

26 

38 

GO 

25 

30 

37 

BATInds 


360 

103 


_ 

1 

__ 

— 

r«o> 


390 

73 

m 

— 

2 

4 




420 

45 

55 

68 

5 

1? 

15 



460 

19 

30 

45 

22 

28 

30 



460 

37 

52 

62 

12 

22 

30 

f471 ) 


500 

18 

27 

3b 

35 

42 

50 



550 

5 

11 

— 

82 

37 

— 



180 

10 

26 

32 

3 

7 

12 

(■194) 


2 oa 

7ft 

15 

20 

15 

17 

21 



220 

3 

8 

— 

29 

81 

— 

J Cadbury Setavpas 

160 

30 

33 

37 

3 

5 

9 

C181) 


180 

12 

20 

24 

8 

12 

16 



200 

5H 

11 

14 

21 

26 

28 



300 

15 

27 

33 

26 

30 

35 

(283) 


330 

6 

15 

SB 

S3 

S3 

67 



380 

2 

6 

11 

80 

35 

87 




330 

38 

48 

80 

3 

9 

12 

C3S7) 


380 

20 

30 

42 

15 

20 

25 



390 

8 

17 

27 

35 

38 

42 

LAS MO 


130 

75 

29 


4 

8 



(146) 


140 

17 

23 

31 

» 

13 

15 



160 

10 

13 

18 

20 

23 

Z 7 



500 

57 

77 

85 

5 

15 

23 

C539) 


550 

32 

40 

47 

25 

35 

40 



600 

10 

15 

22 

65 

67 

72 

P40 


460 

65 

77 

90 

4 

10 

14 

("510) 


500 

35 

46 

65 

18 

25 

27 



550 

10 

22 

33 

45 

50 

55 



180 

24 

34 

38 

7 

8 

ID 

(177) 


180 

13 

18 

24 

12 

18 

22 



200 

4 

10 

— 

24 

30 

— 

RTZ 


600 

90 

107 


9 

70 


(•656) 


650 

52 

67 

87 

25 

40 

SO 



700 

24 

40 

60 

57 

65 

74 

Vad Reels 


70 

16ft 

21ft 24ft 

ftft 

4K 

5ft 

(-84) 


80 

9ft 

4ft 

17 

6 

8 

9ft 



90 

4 

9 lift 

11 

12ft 14ft 


Series 

Mer 

Jui 

i*e_ 

MsT 

Jan 

Ban 

Lonrho 


200 

35 

47 


7 

7 



(•228) 


220 

71 

27 

33 

9ft 

16 

19 



240 

9 

18 

20 

23 

28 

31 



260 

4 

8 

— 

40 

42 



Series 

Feb May Aug Feb Haw Auo l 

Tr11K%1991 


100 


"B 

2ft 

I*m 

*<■ 

IK 

(•£101) 


102 


2'm 

1ft 7* 

2ft 



104 

“a 

"w 

— 

3ft 

n w 


TV 1114% 03/07 


104 

3*ii 

4ft 

5 


• 7 m 


(T105) 


106 

2*» 3**1 

4 

2ft 

3ft 

4ft 



108 

1ft 


5ft 



110 

»IS 

1ft 

— 5*io 

5ft 




112 

ft !■■■ 

— 7»* 

8 





114 

K 

"m 

— 

9 

9H 

— 


Dec 

Jan 

Fall 

Her Dee 

Jan 

Fefe 

Her 

FT-SE 1550 

7? 

85 



3 

9 



Index 1575 

S7 

67 



— 

7 

17 




(160® 1600 

37 

50 

65 

— 

14 

27 

33 

— 

1625 

23 

38 

50 

62 

28 

40 

45 

50 

1650 

12 

28 

38 

52 

49 

55 

58 

60 

1675 

8 

18 

30 

— 

70 

73 

75 


1700 

3 

— 



95 



- 


Daombw 4, 1S8G . Total contacts 25169 . Cotta 1B4S7 . Puts 8732 . 

FT-SE Into. CrtK 511. Puts: 935 


t ln d f t y laa mco% price. 


Tootal to buy 
rival for $5im 


Tootal Group, the textile 
manufacturing company, yes- 
terday disclosed plans to be- 
come the leader in the 
American industrial thread 


COMPANY NEWS 


tax was 872 (882) profit after tax 
was 1.549 (1.569) extraordinary 

"■* 50 1 (279) and earn 
market with the purchase of inos ^ chn „, u/m , tf ^j n v 

the finishing and distribution 


ing 

business of one of its rivals 
there, Standard-Coosa-That- 

c ^ er> figures in £ 000 , turnover < 

Tootal intends to pay $5 1 33,020 (25.826) profit before 

milliou (£35.6 million), mdu- was i.9! 1_ (1.397) tax was : 
ding $29 million for borrow- 


ings per share were 5-Bp (&2 d). 

• ERSKEVE HOUSE; fdr 
the six months to September 30 
the dividend is t Jip(0.9p). With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
lax 

... 557 

(615) profit after tax was 1,354 


;«£ for the whole of SCT ( 7S2 ) minority interest was 3 

(nil)extrapidinaryprofiiv*snil 
(448) and earnings per shares 
were 6p (4p). 

• BENJAMIN PRIEST: For 
the six months to October 10 the 
dividend is 0.1 25p (nil). With 


which was acquired by its 
managers in 1984. The ac- 
quisition is conditional on 
Tootal simultaneously recou- 
ping $18 million by disposing 
of SCTs yarn business to 
another management buyout 
team. 

The purchase; which is be- 
ing made through Tootal’s 
American Thread subsidiary, 
will ultimately be funded fy a 
£23 million placing in London 
of Tootal shares at 90p each. 
The shares closed IVtp down. 
at97y4p. 


Mr 
m 
said 


Geoffrey MaddreD, 
_ director of Tootal, 
ideal would give his 


industrial thread market with 


Because of production over- 


Mr Maddrell said this 


integration 


Success from 
natural growth 

COMMENTS BY THE CHAIRMAN -SIR DEREK PALMAR 

The results for the 52 weeks to 30th September 1986 are again at a record 
level with an increase in profit before taxation of 21.7%. After an initial 
setback in the first quarter arising from a shortage of canned beer following 
the Runcorn dispute last year, gains in market share were made in the rest of 
the year. Volume growth of lager continued at a substantial rate despite a 
rather poor summer. Growth in profitability from the pub estate was very 
good. Profits from soft drinks and take-home sales of beer improved 
substantially. Wines and spirits activities have been rationalised and profits 
suffered from the costs of reorganisation. 

Leisure profits before the contribution of asset sales, were up by 26.4%. 
Crest Hotels continued its profit advance despite a difficult summer. Profits 
were again depressed in the British holiday market and this, together with a 
revaluation of that estate, has led to the decision to provide for a permanent 
diminution in the value of the estate. We shall continue to operate Pontinls 
United Kingdom holiday centres, taking whatever measures are necessary 
to improve the present level of profits. The performance of Bass Horizon 
Hotels was most encouraging. Bass Leisure, Coral Racing and Coral Social 
Clubs showed marked profit improvement. 

The Company invested £303m in capital assets and a further £340m has been 
allocated for capital expenditure in the current year. 

Trading in the current year to 30th September 1987 has started well . We shall 
continue to work hard for increased productivity,- improved margins and 
further expansion. Prospects for the Company are good. 

PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30th SEPTEMBER 1986 


lember 30. Gross 


ting profit was 4,685 
, j) share of related com- 

pany losses 9 (80) net interest 
payable 1 ,506 (943) profit before 
tax was 3,170 (7.343) tax was 
1.236 (1,690) and earnings per 
share were 4.6p (I5.4p). 

• SCAPA GROUP; The in- 
terim dividend is 2.1 p (2p) for 
the half year to September 30- 
With figures in (£000) sales were 
101.695 (88,036) and operating 
profit was 16,719(14,539). 

• GODFREY DAVIS 
HOLDINGS: The interim divi- 
dend is I.5p (same) for the six 
months to September 30. With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
65.325 (55,824) profit was 3.388 
(3,322) interest was 967 (871) 
pretax profit was 2,421 (2,451) 


figures in £000, sales were 
16.947 (16,651) trading profit 
was 723 (688) exceptional credit 
savings in pensions contribu- 
tions were 197 (nil) interest was 
186 (259) profit before tax was 
734 (429) tax was 86 (61) and 
profit after lax was 648 (368). 

• FINE ART DEV- 
ELOPMENTS: Figures m £000 
for the six months to September 
30. The dividend is !.5p (1.2p) 
payable on January 16. Turn- 
over was 66,62 5 (57,60 1 ) operat- 
ing profit was 4.326 (3.396) 
interest payable was 1,273 
(2,341) profit before tax was 
3.053 (1.055) lax was 878 (352) 
profit after tax was 2.175 (703) 
and earnings per share were 
2.933p (l.OOlp). 

• CENTRAL AND SHEER- 
WOOD: With figures in £000 
for the half-year to June 30. 
turnover was 19.696(33.047) 
cost of sales was 1 6,207 (28.221) 
pretax profit was 3,489 (4.826) 
distribution costs were 1,426 
(1.910) administration expenses 
were 2,548 (2.801) and other 
income was 290 (302). 

ADAM LEISURE: The 
USM-quoied company is being 
reversed into die privately- 
owned Hawthorn Leslie elec- 
trical group valuing the 
combined group at about £12 
million. 

• INDUSTRY YEAR: The 
campaign aimed at turning 
round anti-industry attitudes 
closes at the end of this month 
but will then be reborn as 
Industry Matters to carry on the 
drive. Sir Geoffrey Chandler, 
the campaign director, said. 

• FINANCE HOUSES 
ASSOCIATION: New con- 
sumer lending in the third 
quarter of 1986 was 23 per cent 
higher than in the corresponding 
period last year while new 
business overall rose to £3.287 
million, up 15 per cent on. last 
year. 

• DTI: The department says 
that the proposed £173 million 
management buy-in of Simon 
Engineering through Valuedale 
does not qualify for further 
investigation as Valuedale does 
not constitute an enterprise 
under the Fair Trading Act 
1973. 


( TEMPUS ) 

Leap in bad debts takes 

shine off Royal Bank 


Once a bank had to go all the 
way to South America to find 
spectacular bad debts. Thai 
was also a time when the 
Scottish cleaners became the 
darlings of the sector because 
their international exposure 
was relatively tiny compared 
with that of die English 
banks. Buz the latest results 
from Royal Bank of Scotland 
demonstrate that times have 
changed. 

The shares tumbled 14p to 
284p after the news that 
pretax profits for. the year to 
September 30 were £184-5 
million, up from £16 6.6 mil- 
lion. That represents an in- 
crease of 1 1 percent less than 
half the profit improvement 
reported by several of the 
English clearers in the 
summer. 

The fault lay with a jump in 
bad-debt provisions from £47 
million to £89.4 million. The 
souring of several big loans in 
the construction, oil and 
shipping sectors were largely 
to blame, while sovereign bad 
debts accounted for less than 
10 per cent of the total. The 
bank Is cautious about fore- 
casting the level of bad debts 
for next year, but it concedes 
that none of the problem 
sectors are likely to show 
much improvement in the 
near future. 

Royal has tried to limit the 
damage by transferring the 
whole of its sovereign debt 
into the tax-exempt 
•'specific" bad-debt category- 
reducing the overall tax rate 
from 43 to 35 per cent But no 
further cushioning from an 
even lower tax rate can be 
expected next year. 

Royal's expenses have shot 
up 1 8 per cent to £4G6 million - 
as development costs contin- 
ued to come through on 
Charterhouse, the new insur- 
ance operation and on credit 
cards. Bad debts aside. 
Royal's performance is credi- 
table. It still holds a relatively 
high p/e of just under 7. A 
dividend increase of Up to 
l0.8p leaves it with a slight 
increase in dividend cover. 



200 


J F M AM J J A SO NDJF MAMJJASONO 


standing at a 13 per cent 
discount instead of its more 
usual 10 percent premium. 

Yet Bass is one of the 
highest quality earners in the 
drinks sector. Rather than 
rely on cost reductions for 
profits growth it is. quite 
amply, selling more beer. 

Last year, one of the worst 
summers on record. Bass 
recorded a 12 per cent in- 


Christjan 

Salvesen 

Christian Salvesen cannot 
seem to do right as for as the 
City is concerned. Yester- 
day's interims were a case in 
point. Profits were in line with 
expectations, but recent dis- 
posals have changed the bal- 


t ... ancc of the business, making 

crease in turnover, in spite of it necessary for analysts to 
having most of its outlets in trim their 1986-87 estimates. 


Bass 


The shadow of the Monopo- 
lies and Mergers Commission 
investigation into the tfod- 
house system has fallen over 
Bass's share rating. It is 


the depressed North of Eng- 
land rather than in the more 
prosperous South where pub- 
licans can charge virtually 
what they like for a pint 

Brewing margins have wid- 
ened — partly because of 
increased trading in public 
houses and partly because' of 
the shift from ale to lager 
beers. 

Capital spending, in- 
ternally funded, is high at 
£303 million. Almost two- 
thirds of this was spent on 
retail outlets. 

Gearing, however, is low at 
about 20 per rent, and will 
foil further next year after the 
property revaluation is incor- 
porated into the accounts. 

In the year to September 
1987, beer margins are ex- 
pected to rise further and 
group profits should reach 
£355 million. 

In the worst case, the MMC 
could cause competition to 
increase. This would place 
the brewing industry in a 
similar position to the one 
stockbrokers find themselves 
in now. But this would not 
happen until 1990. if at alL 

Which ail makes Bass 
shares look good value for 
money. 


It will take time for profits to 
settle down after the re- 
deployment of assets. 

Admittedly, the group has 
always maintained it does not 
want to be a glamour stock, 
preferring steady organic 
growth to frenetic corporate 
activity.But this approach 
combined with a conser- 
vative accounting policy, has 
made it difficult for the 
market to appreciate 
Salvesen's undoubted 
strengths. 

Storage and distribution 
are the growth areas. Quality 
of service rather than price is 
the secret of Salvesen's suc- 
cess. 

One suspects that alle- 
giance to brick manufacture 
will not last, despite the £12 
million capital expenditure 
programme and the high 
return on capital. It may 
prove difficult to build up a 
strong market position with- 
out affecting margins. 

The 1986-87 price-earnings 
ratio, on £42 million pretax 
and 9.8p of earnings, ts 14.4 
times. Shareholders are not 
having a cut-price bargain but 
are paying for quality. How- 
ever, they should rest assured 
that Salvesen is unlikely to 
foil by the wayside. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Turnover 

Brewing, drinks and pub retailing 
Leisure 


Trading Profit 

Analysed: 

Brewing, drinks and pub retailing 
-operations 

- surplus on disposal of 
fixed assets 

Leisure 
-ope radons 

- surplus on disposal ol 
fixcJ assets 


52 weeks 
lo 30.9.86 

£m 

1.966.9 

742.8 

2,709.7 


52 weeks 
lo 30.9.85 

£m 

I.709.H 

641.2 

2.410.8 


252.8 

13.0 

57.4 

4.4 


265.8 


61J3 


214.2 

W.9 

45.4 

(2.1) 


235.1 


43.3 


Profit before taxation 

Taxation 

Profit after taxation 

Attributable to outside shareholders 
Extraordinary item (Note) 

Preference dividend 

Earnings available for ordinary shareholders 
Ordinary dividends — per share 
Earnings per ordinary share 

NOTE: 

The Company instructed experts to carry out a valuation of the Croup's properties as at Is 
It is expected that a surplus m excess of £700 million (excluding the United Kingdom holiday centres) will arise 
from this yuluai ion. w-hu3i will be included in the Croup's reserves in 19K7. There has been a decline in the 
mrontabiliry of United kingdom holiday centres in recent years. The Director, commissioned a valuation of 
the centres us part of the overall valuation and. as a result, have decided m provide for the diminution in value 
of the properties a nd for related expc uses ( less tax £ 1 jm ). which will he incurred in reorganising them. 


327.6 

310.4 

1113 

198.9 

3.8 

53.5 

0.3 

141. 3 

17.0p 

59.5p 


2KS.4 

255.J 

90.3 

164.8 

0.2 

0.3 

164.3 

I4.7p| 

50.4p 


1st October 1986. 



Public Limited Company 

30 Portland Place, London WIN 3DF 


Streets Financial St 
Mr Jonathan Clare and 
Ian Hunter join the board. 

Midsummer Inns: Mr A . 
Marten becomes operstiot 
director. 

Granville Trust Mr 
duel Allsopp becomes chair- 
man, Mr Ted 
m a n aging director and 
John Martin director 
company secretary. 

Mansion Palmer Mr JF 
Price becomes director 
general manager, specialised 
engineering division, and Mr 
B J Pearce becomes director 
and general manager, aero- 
space division. 

Tozer Kemsley & 
Millboum (Holdings): Mr R A 
Brierley becomes chairman 
from January 1. Mr Garnet 
Harrison joins as non-exec- 
utive director. 

Aquascutum: Mr Andrew I 
Sampson joins the board. 

TIP Europe: Sir Ronald 
Ellis has been made non- 
executive chairman. 

Citibank: Mr Paul Cohen 
has become managing direc- 
tor, Citibank Savings. Mr 
Tony FitzSimons becomes 
managing director. Personal 
Bank. 

Golden Wonder: Mr Hngh 
Cripps joins the board as 
operations director. 

Order of St John: Mrs 
Kathleen Duncan has been 
appointed marketing director. 

Nationwide Building Soci- 
ety: Mr David A Beety be- 
comes a director. 

Waterford Glass Group: Sir 
Arthur Bryan, Mr Alan 
Wedgwood and Mr James 
Moffat have joined the board 
of Waterford. Sir Arthur also 
becomes president of Water- 
ford Wedgwood Holdings, 
with Mr James Moffat Mr 
Frederick de Costobadie, Mr 
Christopher Johnson, Mr 
Robert Johnson, Mr Raymond 
Smyth, Mr Redmond 
O'Douoghoe, Mr Anthony 
Brophy, Mr Gerald Dempsey 
and Mr Quentin Morris as j 
directors. 

Whiiecroft Lighting Di- 
vision: Mr John Hardman 
becomes director and general 
manager, Mooriite Electrical. 
Mr Ivor Cole is made director 1 
and general manager. 

Si 1 vert own Lighting. 

Mediplan InternatioanL' Mr 
Graham Pmriey has been a pi- 
pointed group finance 
director. 

The Association of Invest- 
ment Trust Companies: Mr 
Donald Marr has become 
deputy chairman, succeeding 
Mr James Ferguson. 

STC Distributors: Mr J R 
! Bamforth has been made 
1 managing director, succeeding 
! Mr AJS. Bevins. 


LAST OVERSEAS 
POSTING OATES 
VIA TNT MAILFAST 




\\RS7> 


V 


% 


W# 


DECEMBER 7tb 

Indonesia 

raw a 

Philippines, Malaysia, Sarawak 

DECEMBER 9tii 

Pakistan, RSA 

DECEMBER lOlii 

Canada {excluding Omariol 

DECEMBER Utii 

South Africa, Korea, Sabah, 

Brunei 

■ DECEMBER 13tli 

China, Japan, Thailand 

DECEMBERS 

Europe {excluding Belgium, Holland, 
France, W. Germany, Luxembourg) 

DECEMBER 15th 

Ontario 

DECEMBER 16th 

Singapore 

DECEMBER 18th 

Belgium, Holland, France, 

W. Germany, Luxembourg 


IF YOU'VE MISSED THE BOAT 
AT THE POST OfFKE. 

YOU CAN STiL CATCH THE 
PLANE AT TNT MAAKST. 


command to post early for Chrisms 
ttlJust have your bulk overseas mail 
ready by the dates shown above: and we ll 
get it there before December 25th 
What's more when you send your 
airmad by free enterprise TNT Maiffast 
you don't have to frank, stamp or even 
post it 

We collect from your premises. then 
fly n straight out to one of our overseas 


re-mailing stations for first-class processing. 
Wb charge by the kdo (minimum 


Then when you need us, 
vim 'll come firing 


in fad TNT Madfast beats 


to post 

For more information, call TNT 
Madfest now on 01-848 Ml Or contact your \ 
local TNT office, as fisted in Yellow Pages. 


'ORlV 




T|l\l t] MaiHast 

International 


FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL W MAILFAST ON 01-848 1111 Mailing 


£ 


i> 




r 







US group buys rest 
of Panmure 

stockbroker money is a 

Sv-Sti^eH r ^mbination of an immediate 

fsirNfs Cn l ^~rt?i^ ,d 2 iy r uT sum- a deferred payment 
. Corporation, the US and a further amount depen- 

SSaSa™ 6 " ft on the performance 6 ©? 
1525J 1 ? 11 lhc . melted operation. 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


million, a spokesman for the 
firm said yesterday. 


At the moment Panmure is 
an agency broker, carrying out 


"Z ‘ y ' an agency broker, canying out 

JJC NB originally aquired a footed amount of broker 
29.9 per cent of Panmure in dealing. Mr Pal O’Reilly, a 
May. 1935. The decision to senw,r partner at Panmure, 
purchase the outstanding 71.1 said that the deal with NCNB 
per cent will lead to Panmure ^ay , **W lead to Panmure 
being merged with NCNB‘s providing a full market-mak- 
British banking operations, it * n 6 service for its corporate 
will also provide an invesi- diems. 

mnm ... ■■Tl.a I ...:n U .u_ 


ment banking service to its 
corporate clients. 


“The deal will enable us to 
fund our corporate client 


The Panmure Gordon < ? R 5 lly 

:n vwimub said This shnulrf akn fcan in 


name will be retained 0 ” £“ d - ms ! 5 ho . uW ^ *** 10 
„ .... Panmure playing a tafgar role 

ranmure is primarily a in underwriting share issues as 

mmnnilP hml'Ar rPnrorantL. ...Jl R T A ! 


. , . "J , “ in miuci wi mire mwc ttbUQ db 

flwporate broker re P rcsentl ng well as financing Aroerican- 
aoout 135 companies. It was style “bought deals” - taking 
tounded in 1876 and has 26 an entire issue of shares on to 
partners all of whom have an its own book before distribut- 
cquny stake in the business. ing it 

Steetley in merger talks 

Nottingham Brick is in ed nearly 120 years ago. has 
merger talks with Steetley, the the capacity to produce about 
building products group. 120 million bricks a year. 

Siect ley confirmed that Steetley, a much bigger 
talks were taking place after building group, has been keen 
what it described as the “re- to build up its existing brick 
cent upward movement in the business, which accounts for 
share price" of Nottingham about 15 percent of turnover. 
Bnck, which makes 4 per cent Bricks remain a buoyant sec- 
of tnc lacing bncks used in tor of the building materials j 
Britain. The company, found- industry. 


RECENT. ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Aws Europe (250p) 

Baker Harris Sndr (17Qp) 
Blenheim Exhita (95p) 
BiistonSSattarsea (103p) 
Brake Bros (125p) 

Darnel S (I30p) 

Fletcher King (175p) 
Gaynor (94 p) 

Geesi (T25p) 

G (entree |lSp> 


Gordon Russell (190p) 
Guthrie Corp (I50p) 

Halls Homes & Gdns (95p) 


Interlink Express (18Spl 
Lloyds Chemist {t05pf 
Lon& Metropolitan (145| 
M & G Group 
Mecca Leisure (135o) 
Miss Sam Hidgs (1(Kp) 
Plum Hidgs (90p) 
Quarto fl15p) 


229 

Dp) 192 -2 
146+3 
P) 143 

150 
158 +2 
178 
107 
153'» -»» 
51 +5 
206-1 
170+2 
(95p) 108 

I) 204 

132-1 

SO) «8 

271 

151 ’j +2*i 

l) 101 -1 
102+2 
130 


Soandex 

Sum5j135p) 

TSB Chan isles (70p) 
TSB Grot* (lOOp) 

Virgin 114&) 
wtwmey Mo okay ( 160 pl 
WooWons Better (I04p) 
Ward Group (97p) 


RIGHTS ISSUES 
Cook WM NIP 
Gian field N/P 
Lon Assc hw F/P 
Norfolk Cap F/P 
Petrocan F/P 
RegaHan N/P 
Three Sec N/P 


220 

140 

91 

765. 

131 -2 
IBS 


BIM picks a man of many 
faces to lead industrialists 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


raw 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 

Mr Peter Benton, chosen yes- 
terday as the new director- 
general of the British Institute 
of Management (BIM), is a 
man with a mission. 

He will be talcing a cut in 
salary to join the BIM as he 
scales down his present activ- 
ities. He is chairman of the 
European practice of Nolan, 
Norton and Company, the US 
information techology and 
management consultants, 
with directorships at Singer 
and Friedlander, the merchant 
bankers, and Turing Institute, 
which specializes in robotics 
and artificial intelligence. 

He is probably best known 
for his period at Post Office 
Telecommunications. He star- 
ted there in 1978 and between 
1981 and 1983, as managing 
director and deputy chairman, 
he played a crucial role in the 
launching of British Telecom. 

Mr Benton is an experi- 
enced manager. He has 
worked with Unilever, SheU 
Chemicals and Berger, the 
paints company, as well as 
spending seven years with 
McKinsey, the management 
consultants. After McKinsey, 
he spent six years at Galiaher, 
the tobacco company, where 
he helped with the group's 
diversification. 

He shruggs off the prospect 
ofa slimmer pay cheque. “The 
job at BiM is of crucial 
significance. At this point in 
time there is this economic 
revolution sweeping through 
the advanced economies. 
Britain cannot remain isolated 
from it There are notable 
success stories within Britain. 
But as a whole the economy 
and industry, I believe, has to 
go through and quickly. A 




\ % V: 

* M .* 


m-dt 


■. * jar 









Peter Benton: man with a mission to help managers cope 
with the economic revolution 


process of radical change must 
be ted by managers." 

He added: “The BiM is 
uniquely capable of promot- 
ing and supporting that 
change and it will be a great 
privilege for me to make a 
contribution to that role." 

The BIM role has several 
aspects, Mr Benton believes. 
One is to help the two million 
managers already working to 
come to terms with the radical 
changes in- their role. “We 
have to help those in the field 
to cope with the dramatic 
changes in the economy. 
These managers need to de- 
velop new skills, attitudes and 
approaches if they are to 
prosper personally and if their 
companies are to prosper." 

What had emerged in the 
US and was now growing in 
Britain was the importance of 


the small company, not least 
as the key generator of new 
jobs, Mr Benton pointed out. 
It was not just the emergence 
of smaller businesses but the 
trend among bigger com- 
panies to break down their 
activities into smaller, en- 
trepreneurial subsidiaries. 

He continued: “More and 
more it will be true of man- 
agers, that whatever discipline 
they started with, they will 
find themselves in small en- 
trepreneurial teams facing 
market-place decisions to beat 
the competition, deliver value 
to the customer and to cope 
with technological change." 

A manager aged 55 feces at 
least one change in the nature 
of his job before retirement, 
and anybody younger will 
have lo cope with several 
changes. Mr Benton believes. 


soam 


He sees the BIM playing a 
key role for Government. The 
BIM is uniquely placed, he 
believes, to indicate how 
political measures can affect 
industrial and commercial 
life. He said: “A government 
needs to assess how people are 
going to react Even those 
ministers with business 
experience will want to draw 
on the BIM's advice on what 
is happening now." 

Mr Benton believes British 
managers, with the right guid- 
ance and positive strategies as 
a framework from lop 
management, have the abil- 
ities to cope with the flood of 
change. The British Telecom 
experience, where be was lead- 
ing a staff of 240,000 and 
responsible for an investment 
programme of more than £2 
billion a year, taught him 
about the quality of British 
managers. He said: “I really 
was impressed by the calibre 
of managers I found in that 
business when they were given 
the opportunities to achieve 
results." 

He warned: “What is of 
great importance is that top 
management spells out the 
logic of us corporate strategy 
so that individual managers 
can act, creating their own 
rni natives, within a coherent 
whole." This approach can 
unlock managerial energies to 
the greatest effect, he believes. 

Mr Brian Wolfeon, the BIM 
chairman, said of Mr Benton: 
“BIM has managed to attract a 
man who has been a hands-on 
manager and a successful one 
in a substantial way in public 
and private sectors, and who 
has given a great deal of his life 
to the theoretical and intellec- 
tual side of management — 
and that is an unusual and 
interesting mix." 


Soper Plus Overseas Account 

Expatriate Investors 

12 . 00 % GROSS 1236 % CAR 
Investments of £500 to £105,000 maximum 

Details from Branch & Development Manager 
Surrey Bui Wing Society, 216Hlgh Street Dorking, Surrey RH4 1QR 
Telephone Dorking (0306) 882640 


Buy or sell shares 

NOW! 

* BRITISH 
GAS pic 

Free of commission through 

PRIOR 

HARWIN 

SECURITIES LIMITED 

(Licensed Dealer in Securities 
and member of FIMBRA) 

01-920 0652 

Note this number for future 
reference 

65 LONDON WALL, 
LONDON, EC2M 5TU 


Walker (AJHrad 
(issue price in brackets). 


Bate Ratio % 

Clearing Banks 11 
Finance House lift 

Discount Market Loan % 

Overnight Hugh; 11 Lows 
Wae* 7ota± Ton 

Treasury Bats (Discount ft) 

Buying Selfing 

2 ninth 10 ,s ib 2mnjfi 10"w 

3 mnth 10* 3nrth 10ft 

Prime Bank B«*(Dtecou>t ft) 

1 mnth I 0 n i*-I 0 **i 2 mnth i0»m-iws 
3 mnth 10X-10»» eiranti 10 , *i*-10 >i m 

Trade KBs (Discount %) 
fmrth 1l ? n 2imh 1f%z 

3 mnth lift 6 moth 11 ».« 

Interbank (%) 

Overnight open 11 ck»e7 
1 week 1 TV-1 1»u BimWi IIH-11'w 

1 mnth 1 1»ie-1lft Onrnm llft-ll’w 
3 mnth ll’wllft 12 mm lift-lib* 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 10ft 7 days 10ft 
i mntft I0 ,s w 3 mum lift 

6mmn lift I 2 mth lift 

3 mnth lift-lift 6mntti lift-lift 
9 mnth lift-lift 12 mm 11 ft- 11 ft 

Staffing CDs (ft) 

limth 11’n-ll’tt 3 mnth lift-lift 
6mmh lift-lift 12 mm 11 *«a- 11 *ia 




EURO MONET DEPOSITS % 


7 days 63^6 
3 tenth Bft-6 
Drataohmaifc 
7 days 4 u i+4 ,, ia 
3 tenth 4ft-4ft 
Ranch Franc 
7 days 7*-7ft 
3 mnth 8ft-8K 
Safes Franc 
7 days Ift-IK 
3 tenth 4X-4X 
Yen 

7dayB 4*ta-4*« 

3 mnth 4ft-4% 


cad Oft -5ft 

ImnhOft-Oft 

6 until 6 , »-6’*w 
cafi 5-4 

1 ninth 54ft 
6imh 4ft-4ft 
cal 7ft-6ft 

forth ffhe-e'm 
6 mnth 

caa 2 K- 1 X 

1 mnth 4 r n>-4*m 
6 mnth 4>»4'» 

cafi 4K-3ft 

1 nWh 4ft-4ft 
Bmnft 4 7 m-4 5 * 


QBarCDafft) 
tenth B 30-6 25 
tenth 5.95-5.90 


3 mnth 6.00-535 
12 mm VOO-SJB5 


GoktS387^S-387.75 
Kiugerrand* (par oobi): 

S ^X»-m6o(£20l5IM71 JXH 
Sovaralgns’lnew): 

$ aZdoSSJM (E640O65JM ) 
Ptaamun 

S 47B.85 (E334j 65) 
•BtthkJesVAT 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate tor 
Interest period Nowmber 1. 1 908 ID 
November 28. 1006 toCtoshm: 11248 per 

cent. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


Sierflna Index compared arltlt 1975 was at 6&i»(day , 0 range B7J-CML 
OTHER STERLING RAfES” DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina austral* — 

Australia cfoHar 

Bahrain daw 

Brazil cruzado ' 

Cyprus pound 

Finland madia 

Greece 1 OracUna 

Hong Kong dollar — 
India rupee ... 

Iraq dinar 

Kuwait dinar KD 

Malaysia dollar 

Mexico peso 

New Zealand doflar _ 
Saudi Arabia nyal — 

Singapore doflar 

South Africa rand — - 

U A E dirham 

■Lloyds Bank 


1 . 6841 - 1.6908 W and 1 - 3720 - 1-3750 | 

31350-21892 Singapore i 

0 - 538 W)i 42 Q M alaysia 

203MOM Austrafia 0 .^ 40^45 | 

0 . 73004)7400 Canada 1 ^ 17-15822 

6 . 9600 - 74 WJ 0 Sweden 6 .B 800 ^.M 50 ! 

1 96 : 3-19830 Norway 7 ^ 200 - 7^250 

rTl.imWl .1430 DermSk 7 . 4 ^- 7.4600 I 

18 . 60 - 18 J 0 West Germany 1 - 9765 - 1-9775 I 

n/a Switzerland - — 1 . 6475 - 1 . 64 ^ 

_ o 4180-0 4220 Netherlands 2 - 2335-27345 

7 ™” 3 . 7000 - 3.7200 France 6 A 72 &flA 77 S 

1245.0-12950 Japan 1ffi.4&-1gJ6 

2 . 8052 - 2-8184 Italy 137 00 - 1371. 0 i 

n 5S5-3910 &m(Cormn) 

3 . 1368 - 3.1405 Hong Kang T'JPS 2 l 25 ?S 2 

31547 - 3. 1710 Portugal — 

-- S2 ‘"«- 28 ’ 0 

IS anppaed by Barclays Bank HOFEX and EMeL 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


ikd rates 
i-s range 
xmber4 

295-1.4330 

? 53 - 1 .9781 

J26-32148 

55-58.97 

£ 355 - 10.6899 

J79-1 4)504 

175 - 2-8514 

.79-21 179 

.39-19251 

253-197197 

3856-10.7758 


1 
ii^Bi "fi 1 'ilM 


t month 

0 S 8 - 0 . 55 pram 

0-49-0.40prart 

Ift-lftprem 

20-15preni 

Ift-ftprem 

24-31 dls 

Ift-lftprem 

86 - 127 dte 

16 - 34 rSs 

lprem- 2 (fis 

5 ft-S%c*3 

2 ft- 2 ftpraei 

1 Vi ft pram 

Ift-lftprem 

gx- 7 ftpram 

Ift-lftprem 


153-1.7aprem 

150-lXJSorem 


4K-4ftprem 

218 - 340 dte 
21-71 dls 


21ft-23c*a 

5ft-Spram 

4ft-4ftpmn 

4ft-3«prem 


FtratDcflOngs Fab 19 

No*l7 Mar 5 

Doc 1 Mar 19 ^ 

pJrt^CoH; Tav Homes. 


lagt Deetoradan fbrSetBemeM 


Mar 2 
MarlS 
Mar 30 

in&entoU.DaeCorp.. 
Nat West. Barclays, 


; .LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Month Storfnfl ^58 

D«86 — 88.60 

Mar 8f — 89.03 

jun87 „ B913 

Sep 89.00 

Dec 87 — __ 88.77 

-nnee Month Einoddtor 

Dec *" I 94.08 

Mar 87 54.04 

junS7— - 9187 

Sap 87 

US Treasury Bond 10 tK30 

Dec 86 99-25 

Mar fj/T 

Jun87 


CtoM EstVd 
0 MB 384 

88£S 1203 

89X5 291 

80.16 51 

89X2 50 

8BjB2 6 


M14 94J» 94.13 1517 

9407 94X4 04X0 258 

^ MX? 93X2 156 . 

JfflWB «W4 10MB 3158 


Shortest 

pec* “ 

Mar "" 

Jin 37 


two®* 

Decsf — 

Mar 87 ” 

Junrt' — 

Sap 

FT-SE100 


Previous day's lowopen Warast 679 
95-48 95® 15 

111 sa k ss 765 


Previous day’s tofai W Mami 3543 
1827D 161-50 162X0 410 

{«.« 164.70 11 


H 


litan n 





Tinst 

ts 


for 1986 . 





Profit and dividend up for twenty-third 
consecutive year. 

Profit up 83%. 

Earnings per share up 35%. 

28% Annual growth in eps over last 
10 years. 

Dividend up 33%. 

One for three scrip issue. 

Balance sheet shows £3.5 billion in cash. 


For further information contact; Hanson Trust plc, 180 Brompton Road, 
London s\v5 ihf. Telephone: 01-589 7070 






HANS ON. T RUST 

A company from over here tliaft also doing rather well over there. 


!• t t T ■ 1 • < « » ., t I r ,« .7 • » «_ • I »•>.»_» t ■■ 1 • » I ■ t-*>* *+ » »■» ' >-* t I • I # V IJt'U t • I' V I * t It 1 ^ I'VI-'m ■,/.V l ■■.***. ft ’.l-l 4.-1. \ 1 * *: t «■.*. t. ‘.h » '..I. •■•-V \ ’i N v 'i I.-'- ’i ’ • ■ K 'l ' •' ■< . .;*• 







I 


business and finance 


THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


HUW he /team 

D0MCM 

oasJRua tens 
Do JncoflM 
Nth Amer Ter Aeeua 
Far EM TH teian 
Eirt Til Accvn 
Gan erf ttuk 
FlCUCTMAMAGS 
1. Lanm Pony 

ftt-823 4aao 

USRntferCcft 
CaWU 
UKlneome M 
Far tu w Find 


a**a ssua .13 *57 
me 33.1m -13 is 
«3 982 +«3B35 

773 813 40.7 825 

UU 147.7 +M 003 

1733 1M3a +23 0» 

177.1 1183 -13 088 

2373 2523 -10 040 


Neva! Rea Fax) 


M8. Lonom ECffi OBA 

710 713 ..023 

1123 1180 .. 026 

707 100 .. 400 

78.1 810 .. 000 

150 800 * .. 831 

580 57 . 1 # .. 800 

480 SU .. 8l25 

673 SOS ..271 

410 S 1.7 .. 290 




SEC 


2E 


CLBflCALMEDCALl 
MAMAGBtS 
Harrow Ran. Brant 
0900 373383 
Amer Growth 
Eqacy High Incoma 
Euopaan Growth 

«l t RS*W 60 l 
GBIflodhe 
Max Secunaes 
MKTS 
japan Growth 


352 207 
43.1 4070 
813 3390 
303 406 
Z7.1 881 
22-5 2070 
2*5 230 
233 253 

353 36.8 
2UI 255 


COUNTY UT HMHBB LTD 
ifil. Gneepeue. London EC2V OBJ 
01-721 1® 

ErarnlhH 412 Ol 

Extra Income 1870 1773 

Fhm-af 1916 1783 

Cat Strasogj 562 950* 

Grown mwatmar* 2810 287.8 
Incoma I Qoati 416 mm 

Japanese Growth 1935 20*3 

Nm Amer Growth 1060 iiSJM 

Wr RflCOMty 1156 122.3 

Sorter Co's 2223 2359 

Octal Inc Tot 61.0 652 * 

Spatial 9a Ace 2859 3023 

CROWN UNIT TRUST SBTWCeS 
Croon HooM. Woking GU21 1XW 
049625033 

H(p Mona This 2483 2853 

Growth Trust 2229 237.1 

American Truer 1318 1402 • 


+03 138 
-0.1 430 
-02 200 
-00 270 

+03 oeo 

+ai iso 

401 240 
.. 500 
41.0 asa 
-02 230 


-22 258 
-02 402 
438 001 
+ 1.7 101 
401 216 
-02 1.61 
.. 549 
-27 130 




l ' w i ,l 


IT 




Bid Otis-’ ch 


WBewy 

Offer en ng vy 


m 


Pa Accum i«10 

JMT* 1C25 »0W> 

SIT" fft if?:? 

*£> 1329 14; fi 


132.6 141 J* -1 7 3£s 

£6 0 91 . 4 * -02 *37 

IC25 1083 +1 a 0.10 

2+9 28.8 .. 002 


PMl£hjr»FJ - - — 

in ^pa ■’•i <5-3 -0 j 1 33 

8S5 w« -C 2 303 

T+cnnomcr 4' 1 S 3 7 +t t o iq 

«5«wS"* 640 68-0* 402 4 17 

rtcrtfwti# C*M4' 1*8 J 158 1 *03 I f 3 

Cguh Cl !3i fit S 34 0* lit 

X'tocnl 3) 166 7 177.&* 137 

THORNTON UWTT MANAGCT5 170 
p»* w«sp IS F+Wfj'y (Van London EC2M 
7DJ 

til -374 fc/K 

c.. ew £ G*n 67 0 71.6 +03 059 

HJ 562 +02 090 

NnMr 9 Gen 502 536 +02 034 


1080 +1 a 0.10 

28.8 . . o 33 

28 * +10 039 

476 + 1.1 qb« 

182 * -01 S 3 ? 

rs .3 -oiija 

908 -C2 039 

S 07 +i i 810 


Eflaly £• *31 
Do Arcu" i '-I 


e*. can a G*n 67 0 71.8 +03 059 

Sr- st st its 

8 ?* si' si 

UK* Qen 403 437 -04 230 

Oriental Acc -4 4 259 +05 290 

3mwn"Tnu8r« WMca B__ 

S Si U2TV AU>. London ECU EBP 
01 9283356 

Smaller Co s 657 698 +01 000 

TOUCHE REMNANT 

Mamma Hsuse. Z Pudfle Qxn. London EC4V 
3AT 

01 248 1290 


S3 4 57.1 
729 77 9 
409 437 
24 4 359 


AxO London ECU BBP 


American Growin 41 6 U3 +02 050 

General Growth 510 54.5 -0£ 2H 

GUOS’ Teen 459 500* +0.5 0.10 

Income Growth 81.0 649 -05 ACS 

Income Moctrey 463 502* -02 649 

Japan Growth 493 527* +0.7 013 

Mm Eoucy M M f 258 -04 236 

Da Azcjn 24 1 356 -0 4 236 

Oases Growth MO 558* +02 079 

Setter Cos 635 6?6 -03 220 

Spec* Opp= 759 BIX -04 1 71 

TYNDALL MANAGERS LTD 
401. SL Jam Street London ECTV +QE 
01-937 6494 

Ausnaan 654 699* +0.1 090 

Capua) 3116 3375* -2.1 3X1 

Europe Growth ACC 1201 1279 -09 093 


Ntfi Anar Ofli tec 
P rf o r onu i me 
Small Co's OH ms 
Seal CD's ate 
spec* sib me 


frrrf 


LAC LAAT TRUST MAJULGEHBIT 
fta^ Horota. Coptfud Ad EC2R 7BE 

Inoaaa ftnd <<79 457.1 
mmmM ha M 1 Gan 2923 297.7 


Earn DfcOMon 2640 2815 -22 288 

Do Accura 4180 * 45.1 -35 2-58 

Oo mesrae 820 689 -or *93 

Ewopaai 713 833 -H 2 158 

far turn 1116 1 J 7.1 +19 070 

GDI Trial 660 719 * 400 707 

Craaas Entity 870 BX 9 * +03 134 

EMM Rea 710 712 -Oli 234 

N American Thai 84.1 895 400 1.48 

UK Spec* 0 ks 630 579 -04 1.13 

latianuiml Bond *75 S 05 -02 693 

hpMaM TM 503 640 +00 092 

Managed TM <60 51-1 +11 203 


UjOVSSEMMCUNmiHJSr MANAGERS 
Raganra DM, OwbigOyCaa. WWNog. W 


Do Accwn 
Cong Euro Gtfi Inc 
Da Aeon 


Do Aeon 
Extra henna 
Do Acorn 


Do tatai 
me Tatii 
Do Accua 
Apoi Qu at i 
Do Acecm 

N Aner & Qen 
Do Aeon 
Paoec Baefct 
Do Aaaxn 
State CdeftAac 
Do Aeon 
WortdMdB Grtmft 
Do Aneun 
UKGrowttftM 

LONDON 6 MAMCME 
WAnsraa nat. Eaa 
uk am 

Ganetxl Thai 
tea Thai 
■nMmMonal That 


Thai of her 
MaasEctmmra 
TTiee Qrao. Towa 
01-6B6 4M6 
Aner a Gen K 
Do Accan 


190.1 I8f5* 

326.1 S4S-M 
600 

500 

543 582 
610 660 
1510 1903* 
2906 309.1* 
710 80S 
183 81.1 
2702 2870 
M20 5775 
I960 207-4* 
2040 2170* 
821 970 

320 875 

mi mo 

1117 724.1 
MO 1535 
1507 1603 

183.1 2960# 
2111 2320* 
2153 2290* 
SOU 323.1* 

470 S03* 


400 288 
405 206 
-OX 526 
-05 525 
-1.1 118 
- 1.1 116 
-18 4JI 
-IX 4 X 1 
+ 1.1 025 

41.1 125 
+03 102 
409 OQC 
+28 1 .M 
+17 1.14 
+13 103 
+19 002 
-09 2 JB 
-19 205 

42.1 006 
+10 005 
-03 205 


swift 


r Y*1 


Europe Growth ACC 1201 1279 -09 033 

Eaxnpr 2930 3110* -1.0 fish 

Far Eastern 1910 2343 +1.7 037 

Fin a Prop 563 BOX -03 3.0a 

G4 Captal 1123 1155 +QS 7 13 

GA income 963 907* +021091 

Hgn r aw sso 583# .. sse 

Income 2367 2523* -17 493 

W Eankigi 1604 1699 -LI 2T7 

M GnowSi be 852 30.7 407 077 

Japan Dorm ACC 752.7 7974* -20 403 
Nat Resources me 1990 2129 -i.i lb 

Mh Anar Glh tec 1180 1260 +2.1 033 

Proteronca me 112.4 1191* -021090 
Small Co's Dw ms 607 643 +01 577 

Smafl Co s me 202.1 2101 -02 1.76 

spec* Sib me 1061 1120# -15 191 
UK PROVnENTUT MANAGERS 
UK House. Castle St. Setatuy SP1 3SH 
0722 336242 

UK Eowy 121.7 1290 -43 

PaoSc Baser 1672 1772 +23 

N Anar 1290 1372 +2X . 

VANGUARD TRUST 
65 HoiDom Viaduct SNA 2EU 
I ^waJEntjuxies 01-236 3053 Dealing Lev 01- 

I 236 246B 

Growth Inc 188.0 2080 .. 200 

Do Actun 2760 2942 . . ? W 

I4«» TWO 2007 222.1 . . 500 

Do Accum 2130 227.1 .. 501 

ScaoaSits 41.1 417 .. 171 

DO Accua 41.4 4JJJ* . 271 

*WN 139.1 1480 .. 400 

Do Accum 2111 2260 . . 420 

Amer 8 Geo 635 677 . . 1 64 

DO Acorn 633 67.9 ..184 

Memr PonUb Eglos 64.66* . . 245 

Do Accum E8159 65X2 .. 205 

.Alang Rdta AMs (5) 12+ 0 132.0 . . 119 

Do Accum >2*9 132.9 . . XJ9 

Pari Eaa 8 Gen me 560 60.1 ..000 

Dotaun 560 611 ..ODD 

Euro Fima tec 506 539 . 073 

Dote 506 539 .. 073 

WAROLEYIMT TRUST MAMAOE)t5 
WaTOtey House. 7. Devorotae Sq. London BC2 
01-929 1532 

American That 884 712 +00 1.60 

Far East & Gen 1187 1257 +03 OSD 

ted Growlh 760 B29 +1 5 050 

mcome Trust 840 90.5* -03 500 

Japan Growth 1329 1422* +1.1 0.10 

Small Companes 110.9 1117 -80 200 

Technology 381 40.7* +14 O.IO 

Aiooaba 470 six 1 oa 

UK Trust 1353 1432* +02 250 

European Growlfi 61.6 CSX +00 020 

Hung Kong 313 311 +0.1 1.40 


Growth tec 
Do Actun 
ftp YMd 
Do Accum 
Spaoa S« 

Do Accua 
Trustee 
Do Accum 
Amer 6 Gflo 
Do Accun 
Moat Porfloao 
Do Accua 


4X7 «&» -00 &70 
36+ 387 mi 630 
362 403 ..180 

345 311* +17 100 
473 309 +09 100 

310 813 +02 220 


231.7 M 40 
2710 2 B 49 


+ 3 J L 3 S 

+<0 taa 


American That 664 712 +00 1.60 

Far East & Gen 1187 1257 +13 000 

ted Growth 783 B 23 +1 5 050 

Income Trust 840 900* -13 520 

Japan Growth 1329 1422 # +1.1 O.io 

SmeB Companes 1119 1187 -06 200 

Technology 38.1 40 . 7 * +14 0.10 

AnstrMi 470 SIX 1 40 

UK Trust 1353 1432 * +02 250 

Etrapsan Growlfi 61.6 652 +00 020 

Hong Kong 313 311 + 0.1 1.40 

WAVERLEY ASSET MANAGEMENT 
11 Oartane Si. Etintwgh 
031-225 1551 

Auxtrofcan Gold 280 297 .. 015 

Pmdfc Basin 210 2 X 0 * . . C 20 

Canadbn Bel Gdl 580 820 * +03 000 
Smi Mee Fno 61036 1079 * +03 600 
WWnMODALE Uiwr TRUST HAHAGERa 
2 Honey La EC 2 ffiT 
01-606 9085/6 

Sit DM Git Furxl 800 6 S 7 .. 000 

US Go*l Bond Fd 4516 520 + 0.1 

ChMhnger 4 B 0 501 + 0.1 200 

WWDS 0 RT 1 U 8 T MAHMBtSLTD 
Windsor House. 03 . Kingsaay. London WC 2 B 

MB 8331 

Conv 6 Equity 490 S 2 X* -12 70 ? 

mom 5 eo 990 .. 4.52 

Growm 543 97.6 - 0.1 2-13 


580 6X1 
893 730 




+19 10S 
+19 156 



iH 


+10 173 
+00 103 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 



11 * n*iW 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Mb lib -b 
SO 54 *-4 
13D 134 • .. 
47 52 -1 

M 41 -V 
17 » -I 
MM 

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248 251 +7 

IDS 112 

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36 17 188 
IX* 14 MO 

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23 09 345 


95 100 
390 410 • 
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63b 88b a +3 

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29 31 r .. 
425 432 

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112 117 

BS QS +3 

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135 1« -3 

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a<e xd 149 
93 35 180 
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96 22 198 

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COMMODITIES 



122 » [TR (Sty Of Lon Be 
Si 77 b IS hd S On 
M9 WQ'iTR KKlzP to 
T® 89 IS Moth Amtoci 
191 118 TP Paobc Bate 
204 «b TP Pnweny 
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117b 113 


50 20 56.1 

40 26 447 

17.1 20.1 77 

9-3 11 597 

'So 45 
29 12 200 

23 30 300 

20b 23 641 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 





OJ FMAMJ JASON 


m 


rrr*l 


£ 2 

38 21 Bnud 
154 i Jo Bmaxn Asow 
» I5b0as» MM 
20 '- 154 Do A' 

158': 137 Bean 
17? 95 Eng Trust 
27B 1B7 to 
113 ® EOara 
773 375 Franinoaxi 
118 81 FnM ft 
223 163 GThboanma 
74 n fiiiiirsi mi 

ra '.490 HBitane Aten 
218 153 CH 
448 320 UN 

jb iso use 

382 252 MatMtHnn 
138 88 (beta m T* 

41 ll Do w-rrnma 
206 ise SOD New Caul 


AUJMWnjM 

SSL 3 73000-781.00 

Three Months. 79400-79500 

vet — 4200 

Tone Steady 

MCXEL 

Cash 2525-2530 

Three Montfn 2575-2S80 

~~300 

Tone Steady 

MEATANDUVESTOOC 


►-lb 60b 
.. 700 


LONDON GRAM HTTURCS 
E par toms 

Wheel Barley 
Orth CJrae Cfapa 


TTi 


EXCHANGE 

GWJoynaon and Co report 
SUGAR (Freni C. CanAni) 

155.4-56.2 

1534-58.0 

1880-6X0 

IS. 6-614 

167^-650 

175.0-770 


127,7*27.0 

1267-26.0 

128627.0 

1290-28 51 

■jP 


LONDON BEAT FUTURES 

EXCHANGE 

LN* Pin Contract p. per Mte 
tarth Open CHxa 
Mi 85.80 9500 

* 9600 96.00 

" 8500 95-50 

*49 9500 95.00 


JtofcMOIotS 
Open Marsst 1028 


15 on 3/12/86 
































I 'm 




m 

• ’ - • • • 5 • 

t 



r THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

31 


~ ( £tcld— 

your P^oho card check, vaur 
3? ^ W** movemenS m thfc gS 

gaSRHfig* 

daiit 'SSL ouirighi or a shanTtfiE 1 loS 

SSjnasftnS?* 



Shares retreat 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began mi November 24. Dealings end today. §Contango day next Monday. Settlement day December 15. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 

Whore stocks hav* only one pries quoted, them sre middle prices taken daily « 5pm- YWW, change and P/E ratio am eafeadatad on the ntfddto price 


— ( pM>l/d — 

Q Ton Nnmpapei* United 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Gaims required for 
+32 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


No. Cnmmnv 


•■MS 


E IT!, ,-ff BBM * | 


IE PT 


3331 




IS EE 




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Industrials S-Z 


lESSEI 


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Indus rials E-K 


aaMgausi 


Please take account of any 
minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily lotah 
for lhe weekly dividend of ££.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


U 

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BRITISH FUNDS 


m 



53 




raM*i p * rA 


31 133 



wr lou Sww 


HKV Cna 

a; Ota !?i= 7 £.vd pi 


5iv 40 nett ny Bn 

M* to MaaCdM) 

455 355 A mtat 
247 M9 AniWf OwM 
158 13? BIP 
113 BfVBmra DH90 

132 102 RkpdOD 

193 135 M Owoa 
HO U Br Bated 

174 to# ChmoW) 

SB 248 CUM 
too 135 cam Bm 
177 125 DoH 

23 IE Cay [Hum 
103 142 Cute 
137 119 Do DM 
2(5 175 OkBEmMI 

133 113 End! 

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453 330 Mete* 

101 TZVItedM DU50 
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11'|734 tap On tad 
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175 IIS Pima 

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ITS 129 mu 
330 21B 5MABPD 
73 35 

240 178 nwmn ti ftG BW 
ITS 67 WUlhn 


ia 4.1 207 
7.1 *0 214 

as 285 
uum 
825 70 .. 


Financial Tru»t» appear on Page 30 


HP. - .% 

235 239 -B 
447 490 ®-1 
237 242 +2 

148 149 +3 

112 . 

123 128 *2 

148 HB 
73 7B -1 
121 IB 
259 261 +1 

197 200 • -! 
175 178 ■ .. 
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135 138 »+3 
209 211 
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114 49 252 
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328 1 Aagta TV ■»■ 

417 385 CBU1V 
52 27 Gann 

240 T76 HIV N/V 
477 14 LWT IMp5 

363 U8 So* TV 
276 1 TVS K/V 

GO 31 THU _ 
341 1 THn TV 

2S8 1 HMM 

192 W4 IU> TV 
Hi i VtattinTV 


317 322 -3 

388 403 

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300 303 «-4 
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130 40 KJ 

19 59 Til 
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29 59 9.7 

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84 39 .. 

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MS 

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152 

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170 

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155 133 HtflArHokO 138 141 • .. IS 07 683 

Mi 3ZB Gram PM 432 4» -1 115 39 112 

305 208 Kwnaey Bntea 270 272 »*6 24 09 M0 

391 312 U ftrata 355 358 -1 HB 47 179 

MS 447 LusMiHOtak 4G0 481 «3 143 11 141 

I B0 TBVMoo* Oarfent 94 95 2.1 22 lifi 

115 87 Pram 01 W Hem 1H 115 2.1 1.9 20.4 

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405 30 Soar Ha**' 372 375 +8 50 10 MJ 

81 56 Sate 73 74 40V 19 24 111 

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INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


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2«i 170 BnB»am 

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50 24 Bata 

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ELECTRICALS 


398 £65 «0*a 

2« 133 APMB* 

150 38'iAnsO* . 
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no ia we, _ 
ann 23 Mnc Coag 
« » Ma M+n 
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179 W • 23 13 124 


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143 72 

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587 590 ♦! 

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3E0 300 -1 

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425 429 -l 
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286 268 -8 
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297 307 -1 

41 43 

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70 75 
US 190 H-2 
414 4T7 H-2 
44 46 
£93 35 -3 
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475 485 -5 
170 180 *20 

270 280 
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162 m HU! (4 

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on Page 30 




PAPER, PRINTING. ADVERTG 


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32 


TTTF. TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986. 


BRUNEL SCIENCE PARK/1 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


Industry moves in beside the 



The Brunei Science Park, designed to 
promote collaboration between Brunei 
University and the worlds of industry 
and commerce, was formally opened 
by the Prince of Wales yesterday. It 
was the culmination of pl anning that 
went back more than 20 years. 

T he Brunei science 
park is only one 
among many such 
projects which have 
sprung up alongside 
British universities in the last 
20 years or so. But its or- 
ganizers are confident that h 
has a great deal to make it 
distinctive and hence to at- 
tract the industrial and 
commercial companies that it 
needs. 

Peter Russell, the former 
lecturer in mathematics who 
is director of the park, talks of 
its situation next to a univer- 
sity with a strong scientific 
and technological bent, the 
nearness of Heathrow Airport, 
the ease of access to the M4, 

M40 and M25 motorways and 
even of its position at one end 
of a “Silicon Gulch” of mod- 
em, high-technology indust- 
ries stretching from Swindon 
to West London. 

A mile away is Uxbridge, a 
rapidly expanding town which 
is a shopping centre for much 
of the surrounding area. 

It is still early days, how- 
ever. and the science park 
which the Prince of Wales 
formally opened yesterday 
consists for the time being of 
only two extended buildings, 
with a total of 54,000 sq ft of 
space — though companies 
based in other parts of the 
campus are associated with it 
One of the buildings is fully 
occupied by the International 
Tin Research Institute, the 
other partly by a varied group 
of companies - Air Products, 

One-Stop Professional Ser- 
vices, the West Greater 
London Productivity Associ- 
ation, and Micro Applied 
Computing. 

Set next to the Brunei 
campus, the science park 
forms part of a complex of 
modem buildings occupying a 
large site in the midst of a 
landscape of fields — now 
mainly playing fields — high 
hedges and suburban towns 
and villages. 

The object of this and other 


science parks is to achieve 
something very different from 
the traditional aims of a 
university - dose links with 
the worlds of industry and 
commerce. Hie intention is 
that every company which sets 
itself up in the park should 
make a contribution to the 
university’s own life, in terms 
both of finance and expertise; 
while the company gains from 
the proximity of the university 
staff; with their scientific 
knowledge and their ideas for 
new lines of research and 
development 

Jt is this which sets a science 
park apart from an ordinary 
industrial estate, where almost 
any business interested in 
taking space will be admitted. 

At Brunei, Mr Russell and 


Maintaining 
close contact 
with commercial 
companies has 
great advantages 
for Brunei 



Taking a place 
in the park 


The search for quality: researchers at Brunei Science Park working with a machine that analyses tin-coated surfaces 


the committee he chairs are 
only prepared to accept pro- 
posals from companies which 
offer the possibility of real 
collaboration between them- 
selves and the university; and 
he talks of “grilling” them on 
their intentions. 

Those he is interested in fall 
into two main groups, be says, 
companies which are already 
established and others which 
are only starting out For the 
second group he hopes to be 
able to arrange “seed com” 
funds of up to £100,000. 

He bas begun discussions 
with people with venture cap- 
ital within the framework of 
the United Kingdom Science 
Park Association, and has also 
had talks on his own with a 
potential investor with funds 
from Japan. 

For the university, and 


particularly for a predomi- 
nantly scientific and tech- 
nological one like Brunei, 
close contact of this sort with 
commercial companies has 
great advantages. It helps to 
dispose of the notion that it is 
some sort of ivory tower cut 
off from the real world around 
it. It serves to bring in fimds 
through research contracts. It 
is also, if things became 
difficult financially in the 
future, a valuable investment 
in real estate. 

Mr Russell emphasizes that 
Brunei was interested in hav- 
ing a science park long before 
Mrs Thatcher’s government, 
with its policy of cutting state 
aid to the universities, took 
office. 

But he agrees that govern- 
ment policy gave a new im- 
petus to the idea and that it 
shows Brunei to be responding 
to the new financial climate by 
developing its own sources of 
income. 

For the companies which 


have decided to move into the 
science park there is a clear 
advantage in being near a 
university. 

Air Products, for instance, 
is-a large, basically American 
company which produces 
industrial gases and the tech- 
nologies for applying them. Dr 
Miles Drake, manager of its 
IGD Europe Technology 
Group, talks of being able to 
use the university's technical 
facilities to help with research 
and of “w alking across the 
campus to discuss results”. 

Air Products moved in only 
at the end of July and has still 
to complete assembling its 
laboratory. But it intends to 
use its Brunei operation as a 
European arm of its research 
activities, largely carried out 
in Allentown, Pennsylvania, 
and as a means of servicing its 
activities in Europe. 

It is the first time the 
company has had research 
based in Europe. Dr Drake’s 
department will be conducting 



To Brunei University 
Midland Bank wishes 
you every success 
with the Science Park. 


□I) Midland Bank pic 

Head Office: Poultry, London, EC2P 2BX 


applications research to do 
with using nitrogen for freez- 
ing, and also looking for new 
applications for industrial 
gases and new gaseous pro- 
ducts. 

Another department, head- 
ed by Roger Tharby, will be 
dealing with technical diversi- 

The university 
is also helping 
industry with 
research into 
new and current 
uses for tin 

fication in Europe, which 
means investigating new areas 
of business such as, for in- 
stance, performance ceramics, 
that the company might want 
to move into in the 1990s. 

Ike International Tin Re- 
search Institute is another 
organization with worldwide 
links. Though based in this 
country since its foundation in 
1932, it is financed by only 
five major tin-producing 
countries — Indonesia, Ni- 
geria, Malaysia, Thailand and 
Zaire. Its function is to de- 
velop new uses for tin and 
help maintain the existing 
uses. 


It moved to the Brunei 
science park last August be- 
cause it needed larger and 
more up-to-date laboratories 
than it had at its previous 
headquarters at Perivale, 
Middlesex, and because it saw 
the advantages of being linked 
with a technological univ- 
ersity. 

Dr Colin Thwaites, the 
deputy director, says that the 
institute has had links with 
Brunei for a long time. It 
would now be dose to, but not 
part of foe university, and its 
own scientific staff of 45 
would have access to the 
Brand’s technical equipment 

Tin, he says, is primarily 
used these days in two main 
areas — in the tin plate from 
which cans are made and as 
part of the soft solders used in 
the electronics industry. 

Work was now going ahead 
both on these ami on new 
uses. One such new use was to 
have tin oxide as an additive 
to textile materials for its 
ability to prevent fire and 
suppress smoke; another to 
have tin as pan of an organic 
compound which would help 
prevent wood rot Research 
on all of this would be carried 
out in collaboration with the 
university. 

Peter Strafford 


Four companies have taken 
space so far in the Brunei 
Science Park. The first major 
company, which is also the 
largest is Air Products Ltd, 
and even though it is early 
days yet, collaboration is al- 
ready going on with it 
One example ts Jerry 
MlBer, an engineer in its 
research and development 
group, who has been liaising 
informally in the development 
of equipment for cryogenic 
freezing. 

Another is Ian Brass, a 
programme manager, who is 
working in the Material Sci- 
ence laboratories. 

The company which has 
taken the smallest space is 
Micro Applied Computing, 
which is a start-up company 
using and developing software 
to control a laser cutter for 
crating patterns for the cloth- 
ing industry to minimize 
waste. 

This company moved to 
Brunei to be dose to a former 
student of Brunei, Dr Stuart 
Robinson, who is now a 
lecturer in the Computer Sci- 
ence department. 

Two companies have moved 
to the science park which will 
help the research and develop- 
ment companies. They are: 

• One-Stop Professional 
Services, which offers a multi- 
disciplinary approach to cli- 
ents, having within one 
oiganization the services of an 
accountant, a patent agent and 
a trademark agent; arid It is 
looking for a marketing 
specialist 

• The West Greater 
London Productivity Associ- 
ation, an association for in- 
dustry and commerce. 

In addition to these Brunei 
has over the years encou rag e d 
various other companies and 
they are indnded under the 
overall mantle of the science 
park. The first to be founded in 
the university was Campus 
Computers lid, which devel- 
oped computer-based aids for 
the visually handicapped. 

They now have a work 
station which allows blind 
people to be employed in a 
variety of clerical and man- 
agerial jobs, and this has as 
one of its directors Professor 
Heinz Wolff of the Institute of 
Bioengineering. 

- Another such company is 
Frontend Ltd. This is a start- 
up company with directors 
from the academic staff and 
employees who are ex-gradu- 


ates of Brunei. It is led by 
Professor Gerry Musgrave, 
head of Electrical 
Engineering. . 

They are using their know- 
ledge and experience in a 
computer-aided design field of 
micro-electronics to produce a 
software product which will 
enable designers to work with 
computers more easily. 

A company that bas been 
formed through former stu- 
dents of the university and is 
about to set itself up in the 
science park is Plastic En- 
gineering Consultants, 
founded in 1984 as a partner- 
ship between three research 
fellows in the Department of 
Material Science. Its philos- 
ophy is to address the needs of 
the plastic industry, where an 
efficient and flexible approach 
is required to problems arising 
from the use of modern en- 
gineering thermoplastics and 
the techniques employed In 
their processing. 

Interests in 
health care 

Another company that 
forms part of the science park 
is Advanced Bearing Technol- 
ogy Ltd, established by Dr 
Richard Gozdawa, a former 
research fellow, which 
specialises in the design and 
manufacture of fluid film bear- 
ings and seals for 
turbomachinery. 

Biocompatibles Ltd, a com- 
pany formed in 1984 by 
Professor Dennis Chapman, , 

Is in the process of moving to 
the science park. 

The company was formed 
with the support of an indus- 
trial company with interests in 
the health care field, to 
commercialize inventions aris- 
ing from basic research pro- 
grammes carried ont by 
Professor Chapman and his 1 
colleagues at the Royal Free 
Hospital Medical School, 
London. 

The formation of 
Biocompatibles Ltd is a direct ' 
result of the collaboration 
between industry and the ; 
university. This mutually 
beneficial relationship brings 
together commercial expertise 
and scientific excellence, while 
providing in addition numer- 
ous opportunities for British 1 
industry to achieve or main- “ 
tsun technological leadership 
in these areas of the world ; 
health market. 


THE LAIRD GROUP 


is pleased to be associated 


K 


with the 


BRUNEL SCI ENCE PARK 



* 








THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


lomiil 


BRUNEL SCIENCE PARK/2 



\ T. 


ates of p ri ,. t 

Profesv.7 

head 

Fn^ini^— j~ n 
iecae 

msj.'ff-i-',---. . 

'Miwarv 

erai-L* i.. ■ m . : . 
C?ITipM».-7N n. : 
* tcrr.j:...- 

fcriuw-d i .■[ .■ 
dents of ■?- 
about »:j s.- "■ 
science p-.-. 
Kineerir.^ 
founded ir? - 
ship bcDvctr 
fellows in ■? 
Materia! 5-" 
o?h> :<£ v - 

the p!a;-;- , 

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»s r-jqu:.-.-2 • - 
from the 
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■ l*i! 


Gardiner’s way 
of making 

things pay 

s3£F“ se.ss«ir*£ 

chai^I g^Pbsofa Hong Kong train, a 




The bank loan that let 


*■: ... 


Brunei go it alone 


; 


ST* ^ ^ Bn,nel Canadian ore ronvejor belt 

mhf« n^ire n?geD! n nI com ’ *“• a Scottish long-distance 
rtf Kf; Si 1 cn l oys ** noUon bus. all built by thegroup. 

borne But it was soondiar that he 
ST acad ermcs. has his own strongly held 

councilor fiSfnrf 1 ?? of the views 00 education and 
fro« o ff % vers fi y wmwMy on the need for 
J2p 2M? I9 84 and he talks universities to be aware of 

rEnJF ,? of . how u he »w financial constraints. 

Brunei through the crisis A university was a service 

Jjjj r _ suited from the industry, be said, and needed 
Governments decision to cut to be subject to financial 
univer sity funding.. planning like any other. T?>e 

the academic academic staff were its assets, 
staff by 30 per cent . he says, and had to perform. “There 
un yes, I said that there was are two issues: can you afford 
no such thing as tenure fby the costs, and are you getting 
which academics had been value for money?** 












guaranteed, UfeteM employ- A former journalist, who 
ment in their posts]. I said that wrote f or the Financial Times 
all it meant was that 1 have to and later joined the Industrial 
pay you more money than I Reorganization Corporation, 
ir-^wir- jfcp r * Mr Gardiner has been on the 

boards of British Airways, 
British Ley land and other 
vmmr — ^KB companies, as well as being a 
member of the National 
Enterprise Board and the 
_ 3§ South Bank Theatre Board. 

IT He has been chief executive of 
^ what was previously Cammell 

u rn At t b at time, he says, the 

■ . group was in serious financial 
Msp / trouble and he was receiving 
writs almost daily. But he 
&3vP|| managed to turn the group 
around by drastically reducing 
Bf£} the workforce. He clearly be- 
'Zgg* lieves that this experience was 
iMm ***: », s V8& & of value to him, and to Brunei, 
« When the university faced its 
liversity IS & own financial ends. 

jpp industrv He had agreed only reluc- 
j / l J tantly to become council 
needs to oe chairman, he says, after a 
„u: Q/ ^ unanimous vote in his favour. 

UDjeCl 10 . Once be assumed bis new 
;ial p lannin g position he warned the 
university staff that a crisis 
any Otner* was coming and, in his wolds, 
JOHN GARDINER “they switched off because 
they didn’t believe if*. 

fierwise when I ter- But then the Government 
iut contract. decided to alter the rules 

> in anv case Iudi- which had governed univer- 




Jfis 







' 

' 4 


^ A university is a 
service industry 
and needs to be 
subject to 
financial p lanning 
like any other} 


*,**:* 
• 1 


...i 

C : .• , i, - - . a \ -‘ 


would otherwise when I ter- 
minate your contract. 

“It was in any case ludi- 




crous 10 have promised life- sity finance and the new 
long employment. Tenure was situation had to be meed. It 
originally intended to protect was differentfrom whm had 
academic freedom. It was a happened at The Laud Group 
relic of a bygone era." because there “I can issue 

One of the decisions taken instructions , whereas at a 
during his time as council university there had to be a 
chairman was to create the process of discussions and 
science park and he has agreed persuasion which took more 
to continue with responsibil- tiiana year, 
ity for this as chairman of the Bat at the end ofthat time 
park’s management commit- Brunei s financial amirs were 
tee. He is also treasurer of the under control and he betevK 
university. 1 that it was 18 months ahead of 


Brunei people top, Peter RnsseD, director of the Science Park which was officially opened 
yesterday; above, left and right, analysts at the International Tin Research institute 

basic choice to be made, research results. It also meant technological university - are 
Shorn of high-flown ideas, he malting certain financial air- such that the future is good. 


I met him in the distinctly othCT uniyeraties in that. 


un-academic setting of The 
Laird Group’s offices in St 


When it came to setting up 
the science park, there was a 


basic choice to be made. 
Shorn of high-flown ideas, he 
declares bluntly, a science 
park is after all no more than a 
collection of buildings, and 
the university had to decide 
whether it would simply ac- 
cept any company which was 
interested in taking space 
al o n g the lines of an industrial 
estate, or be more “picky”, 

It decided to be “picky”, 
which meant looking for ten- 
ants who would be of value to 
the university by providing 
access to industry for its 


angements, such as deferred 
loan repayments, so that the 
university could choose the 
companies it wanted. 

Because of all this it was 
now taking time to fill the 
space available. But that had 
been allowed for in the finan- 
cial pbrniing and Mr Gardiner 
believes that the advantages 
offered by the science park — 
being in the middle of an 
expanding industrial area and 
linked to a predominantly 


such that the future is good. 

He also emphasizes the 
finan cial value of the site and 
its buildings. The second of 
the two buildings had been 
built with the funds acquired 
by bringing in the Inter- 
national Tin Research In- 
stitute to occupy the first; and 
it-zs now worth twice as much 
as when it was built So, if 
Brunei was ever in financial 
difficulties, it could raise 
funds by liquidating the park. 

PS 


As far bade as 1962, when it 
was still only a college, Brunei 
looked into the possibilities iff 
a science park, and an 
arehireefs development plan 
was accepted by the college 
governors. 

“The pattern of education at 
Brunei frfh for a dose and 
continuous ossw ^tinn in lab* 
oratory and workshop with 
institutions and com p a ni es.” 
the plan said. “It would be 
desirable if, at the outset, 
consideration could be pven to 
the means by which develop- 
ments and associations of this 
sort could be encouraged. Not 
least would be the ability to 
offer sites or even laboratory 

facilities to such institutions.” 

It has *»k«i a long time for 
this challenge to be met. The 
plan —asked for by Dr James 
Topping, the former principal 
of Brand College and the 
university's first vice-chan- 
cellor — came many years 
before the Cambridge aid 
Heriot- Walt science parks. 

At the time Brunei was 
based at Acton, West London, 
but it has since moved a fear 
miles farther west to Ux- 
bridge, dose to Heathrow 
Airport and the London re- 
gional motorway network. 
Now Brand has the advantage 
of being a technological 
university as well having the 
first university science park 
within limiliw- 

Brnnel considered various 
plans over the years. One was 
an investment by a major 
insura nce company, another 
an investment from the former 
Greater London CounriL 

But it decided the only way 
it could have complete control 
over its science park and the 
choice of tenants would be to 
go it alone. And tills has hem 

achieved principally through a 
inan from the Midland 

Although this wfll be diffi- 
cult to repay in the early years, 
tiie university authorities re- 
gard the essential principle in 
having a science park as being 
academic/industrial collab- 
oration rather its use as a 
financial base to raise money 
for the adversity. 

The planning for tbe park 
has bemi headed by a former 
chairman of the university 
cooncfl, John Gardiner, chief 
executive of The Laird Group. 
Without his advice and assis- 
tance the project might not 
have started. 

Earlier hopes have now been 
realized and the first science 
nark building is already 
tenan te d. There are also oth- 
ers, the most im port a nt being 
the one occupied by the Inter- 
national Tin Research 
Institute. 


Our new 
developments 
will take root 
in the Park. 


Air Products Limited has strengthened its 
research capability by moving into Brunei Science 
Park - a further investment in technology by the 
company. 

We are one of the country's biggest manufac- 
turers and distributors of gases to industries such 
as micro-electronics, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, 
food and plastics. 

Our aim is to help our customers increase 
productivity, improve energy conservation and 
create new products: through new ideas in gas 
technology. 

In Uxbridge, we trust these ideas will take root 

MRJ- 

@@ODUCTS %m®m, 



i , 1 Nershaw Place. MOlesev Road. Walton-on-Thames. Surrey KTI2 4RZ. 
All Pioduds Lid He - letephone: (0932) 249200. 


BRUNEL SCIENCE 
PARK 


On the edge of London, 

1 Z 2 miles from M25 

Liaison with University research units 
encouraged 

Some space still to let: small 
or large units 

All enquiries: 

Mr. P.R. Russell, 

Director, 

Brunei Science Park, 

Brunei University, 

Middlesex, 

UB8 3PH 

Tel: (0895) 74000/72192 


Brunei S> 

THE UNIVERSITY OF WEST LONDON 


The institute purchased a 
long lease on land and erected 
its own buflding. The univer- 
sity raised capital by the 
release of this land for science 
park purposes, though when 
they received the premium 
from tbe institute the Treasury 
(through the University 
Grants Committee) intervened 
and clawed back 59 per cent of 
the money raised; money that 
con/d have been invested in tbe 
science park project 

The advantage in 
beinga 
technological 
university and 
having the first 
science park 
within London 

The institute moved into its 
building a few months ago and 
hopes the dose proximity to 
the university will be bene- 
ficial since the university has 
facilities they do not possess. 

Another advantage for the 
institute is that it wiU continue 
to develop its relationship with 
the Department of Material 
Science and through this at- 
tract high-calibre staff in an. 
area in which recruitment is 
known to be difficult 
in turn, the institute ml) 
help the university with its 
international contacts. 


With the money rased from 
the land transaction with the 
International Tin Research 
Institute and that borrowed 
from the Midland Bank, 
Brunei was in a position to 
Start its science park building, 
and for this purpose they 
contracted RM. Douglas, the 
builder responsible for the 
Birmingham International 
Conference Centre. Extensive 
landscaping has been carried 
onL 

Tbe building was finished in 
July and already several com- 
panies have taken occupation- 
The tenants have the advan- 
tage of being on the main 
university campus. Provision 
has also been made in the 
main science park bunding to 
share facilities. All tenants 
have access to a board /semi- 
nar room as well as a separate 
exhibition area to use on a 
bookable bams which is in- 
cluded in the overall leas e . 

Access is available (0 the 
university computer system 
and entry to the university 
telephone network, library, 
sports facilities and refectory, 
so that all tenants have the 
opportunity to become mem- 
bers of the university com- 
munity. 

Now that it has several 
companies installe d and a 
great deal of interest from 
others, Brunei is already plan- 
ning an extension to the 
existing science park bonding; 
and it is looking in particular 

infos cheaper type of building 
that will be of more interest to 
start-up companies. 


V( 


T1!U1 

Architects Co-Partnership 


sr 


Architects and main contractors 
for the International 
Un Research Institute Building 
at Brunei Science Park. 


CYGNUS 


WISE MEN FOLLOW THE STARS 
FOR VENTURE CAPITAL 
CALL 

CYGNUS VENTURE PARTNERS LTD 

(0895) 72601 

Advisers to Vista Ventures Ltd 


Municipal 

Mutual 

Insurance Limited 

Insurers of 
Brunei 
University 
wish them 
continued 
success 


% 


Head Office: 


22 Old Queen Street 
London SWlH 9HN 
i Telephone 01-222-7933 



I - 




BUILDING 





Main contractors for the Brunei Science Park 


R M DOUGLAS CONSTRUCTION LTD Ernest Gardens. Thames Road. Chiswick, London W4 3RA 

Telephone: 01-994 6737 










CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


P F FOLEY 


Land-Rovers 


The Business, 

In the palm of your hand 


r 


^*1 — f — NEW 

|UjlSg[AKg LAND-ROVERS 

AND 

w RANGE ROVERS 

Lhd/rtxJ. aU models, export sales 
Used selected Land-flows, twb/swb, hard and soft lop 
Ex-WD. rftd/lhd. home martcet or export 
Sold as is or refurbish 

Full stepping. pacJong. delivery all UK ports, colfectran service 
Vehicle transport and storage 
TRAILERS. ex-WD and NATO Mon, Mon. 1-ton 
SPARES AND ACCESSORIES 

New Land-Rover and Range Rover spares and equipment also many used parts for ah 
models: lyres, exhausts, roof racks, oil seals to engmes and gearboxes 
Overland preparation and modification work 
Service and MOT wort 

For spans fed. 01-443 3231. For sates and se n de e leL 01-443 3233 


P F FOLEY (LAND-ROVER) 

M1LIMARSH LANE, BRIMSDOWN. ENFIELD, MIDDLESEX EN3 7QN 

2 ni'i-i hsm 25 :•! M25 


Portable 
Telephones at 
Uia right cost 
from the 
company 




SPECIAL OF! 


Motoring by Clifford Webb 


A life-saver that is overlooked 




are one of the 
biggest micro- 
computer and 
commiinirattons 
produd distributors 
in the UK and are 
pleased to 
announce that they 
are now one of the 
biggest official 
Novatel dealers. 


f 9? £ O. 



Nortel 


TEL: (08281X0202 

AVJKl GARDE SYSTEMS Ltd. 


Safari Services 

SUPPLYING NEW AND USED jr Jon 
RANGE ROVER/LAND-ROVERS fl 

Supply * Servicing * Spans * Safari 
Preparation 

X Land/RangeRovera ahnys in stock * 

Utril 5, Leyhffl Road, BovfBgdon, Hamel Hemrtesi 
(0442)833413 


LAND ROVER & RANGE ROVER 

Now at Virginia Water 


-J opn L 

►^SD 


el. Hemet Hempstead 


CAFFYNS PLC 


Anti-lock brakes which enable a 
driver to brake in an emergency and stfll 
steer around an obstacle have to be the 
biggest breakthrough in car safety for 20 
years. But sadly the, British motorist 
does not put them high on his list of 
priority fittings when ordering a new 
car. 

Ford is setting the pace with anti-lock 
brakes on mass produced cars. It fits 
them as standard to the Granada and as 
optional extras on the Escort and Orion. 
To date, however, only one in five' 


The MM Sussex Land Rover Centre 
Brooks Road, Lewes 
Tel: 0273 473186 


P LAND - 


r LAMD - 
-ROVER! 


May we cordis By invite you to visit our premises from 
December 8th- 11th. 1986, 8am*8pm. We have been 
officially appointed Land Rover/Range Rover main 
dealer for your area. 


Ian Allan Motors Ltd 


Wnhraift Garage. SanfliSs Lane. HmUa Water. 
Soney GU2S 4BT. Tel: WestMori£(nge4) 2831. 


Southern 

Counties 

Lane Selection 
of New A Used 
Stock 

-aK? Always 
Available 




Afield Read, 
Crawley, Sussex 
Tet (8293) 20191 

C2S791I 




from £70 - £105 

SixtaUe tor Range Rover. 
Laid Rovei. Toyota. Subau. 
Nissan. Suzuki. Dshalsu, 
DMsutnlv. For] PlOO and 
Mercedes G Wagon. 

Write or telephone for 
brochure 

GaAsvraM Motor Spans 
(4WDJ United, 

28a Dyer Street. 

Cfesneeeter, 
(BaucestanNm- 
Tet (0285) 68015 
Pnos Kkjsw al aB charges 


HEREFORD 

LAND AND RANGE 
ROVER CENTRE 


1986 Romo Rarer Vogue m 
manual in Ca^xan Rue 
1986 Ruga Rover Vogai 
manual, n Red 
1985 Range Hmw Vnpo 
maunl. Sdw 

1M6 lantaror US Cmrnty W. 
m Green 

W86 taodrarar 111 StaOoa i 
Wapoa vs. Cowdy doth trim, hoty 
White 

1986 Landmnf 91 Canty need, 
sr omdibtmg. m Ivarv WtMe 


Rotts - Royce 
distributors & 
Scotlands largest 
Range Rover Centre 
offer 5 used Vogue 
EFTs from 

£16,950 

87 model - manual & 
Auto available from 
stock 


041-882 3381 
OPEN 7 DAYS 



THEHA LX TURBO 

165 BHP 0-62 moh 7? sees, 
Mi OTHER MODELS NUMABIE 
FINANCE UASE CffltfnWCTWW 

TELEPHONE 
MICHAEL WES 
2 



Centre 


Early (Mvay on 
Diesel Tubas Batter 
models 

Very spaa* dotes an 
1986 medals 
Phono Mice Cotaman 
For details 

HARRIS MAYES 


1984 Gel GT1 Comrade. in 
oapMt. 1 owner. tull serwee 

nlstay £7,486. 

1983 Escort XR3 Injection. In 

wirta usual abas 15,195. 

1983 Capri 28 tnpCbon. to 
stw, 1 owner, hd senses 

hffiary, rjwi 

Rnance and extended vranantes 
araiatilB. Over 100 load css for 
SM Td (04868)4311 
Hutinorc Road. GodaMng. 
Surrey 


pay the extra £300 for this invisible life- 
saver. 

Along with an increasing number of 
my colleagues and road safety experts I 

Road test 

The Land 
Rover 
diesel 
turbo 

Land Rover has been fitting 
turbo charged diesel engmes 
for only seven months but 
already its strategy is being 
questioned. In May a 2.4 litre 
Italian rnarip VM unit ap- 
peared in the Range Rover. It 
was followed a few weeks ago 
by an almost identically sized 
Solihull made turbo diesel for- 
the Land Rover. So why ineLJ 
import a foreign engine when gsfchp ft 
a perfectly good home grown moderab 
alternative was available? Rover er 
The answer is that the two .speed of 
engines fulfil two very dif- 0-60mph 
ferent roles. The Range Rover Howe\ 
spends much of its working toraue fj, 

l,500ron 

Vital statistics vm’s 2,4 

Model: Land Rover 1 10 County r 

P^£13^7 newiurij 

Engine: 2495 ex, 4 cylinder 
turbo diesel I 10 Coc 

Performance: 0-60mph 24 see- the mo 
onds, maximum speed 80mph. Rover a 

Official consumption: urban Range Ri 

23.1 mpa, 56mpb 25.7mpg, a f the ti 
75mph (Not applicable. Must be apparent 
within 10 per cent of maximum Tj, e s1an 

S^ISfL 

It also 

life travelling at high speed last we ] 
But the Land Rover is bought diesel w 
as an off-road workhorse able 70m ph w 
to lug heavy loads through athrcshii 
glutinous mud or along spring The lot 

shattering tracks. Station 1 

The 2.4 Italian engine pro- people. T 
duces 112bbp using a rel- versions] 
atively high turbo boost to The wim 
give the Range Rover a top front doc 
speed of around 95raph. It will gale at spi 
also accelerate from O-60mph lever is s 
in a very respectable 14.5 the avert 
seconds. This compares with without o 


would like to see anti-lock brakes made 
compuisorv on all new cars. 
problem is' that other car makers have 
been slow to follow Ford’s lead ana 
until there is widespread availability no 
government is likely to act. 

There is a good reason why no-one 
has yet followed Ford’s lead and fitted 
them as standard on a whole range of 
family cars. In addition to the obvious 
mgr advantage of not fitting. antHock 
technology is advancing so quickly that 
existing systems may become obsolete 
overnight. 

The relatively simple hydro-mechani- 
cal Lucas Girling system fitted to Escort 
and Orion is hundreds of poun ds 
cheaper than the complex electronic 


systems developed by their Wesi Ger- 
man competitors Tens and Boscn. 5ut 
the Girling svstem has its shortcomings. 
It can oniv be fitted to froniwhccl dmc 
cars and on dry road surfaces is reponca 
to increase lh£ straight line stopping 

distance slightly. . „ . 

The answer, and one which all three 
companies are working on. is a com- 
promise sharing the best aspects of both 
hydro-mechanical and electronics. TJc 
prize for the first into me market with a 
successful cost effective compromise 
will be enormous. Lets hope it is a 
British company. We need a break- 
through of this magnitude to counter 
the increasing import of foreign 
components. 



The Land Rover One Ten and the Land Rover Ninety County Station Wagon. 

Farewell to the Capri 


S5bhp from the much more 
moderately boosted 2.5 Land El 
Rover engine which has a fop 
■speed of around SOmph and a Th 
0-60mph time of 24 seconds. dubbt 

However it develops its ** ors * 
torque (lugging power) at only 1 
l,500rpm compared with the iyoy ’ 
VWs 2.400rpm. 

I have just been trying the ^ 
new turbo diesel version of the fimer . 
long-wheel base Land Rover 5 ^' 
110 County Station Wagon, K 
the most expensive Land B . 
Rover and the nearest to a 
Ran^ Rover. The extra power 
of the turbo is immediately *~v 
apparent both on and off road. 

The standard diesel is a dog- 
ger requiring patient handling. 

The turbo makes it much e 1 ' 
more responsive. 

It also means that at long 
last we have a Land Rover 
diesel which will cruise at 
70m ph without sounding like 
a threshing machine. 

The long wheel base County 
Station Wagon will seat 12 
people. The finish of the latest 
version still has shortcomings. 

The wind noise around the 
from doors was tike a winter 
gale at speed and the long gear 
lever is still too fer away for 
the average driver to reach 
without over-stretching. 


The Ford Capri, once 
dubbed “the poor man’s 
Porsche” has had a very long 
ran. It was first introduced ia 
1969. In recent years the 
company has been kept busy 
denying premature reports of 
its demise. But now the 
funeral arrangements have 
beat confirmed. Production 
wifi stop in March. 

But this much loved car will 
be going out with a final fling. 
The factory is producing a 
special limited edition of 
1,000 called the Capri 280 
and Aston Martin Tickford, 
the MBtou Keynes specialist 


car builder is offering a new 
look version of its 140mph 
Turbo Capri. 

Ford has not yet announced 
a price for the Capri 280 but it 
will probably cost around 
£10,000 compared with 
£18,581 for the very exclu- 
sively styled Tickford which 
will be available In eye- 
catching white or flaxen mist 
“pearlescent” paint. 

Tickford 's turbo-charged 
version of the 2B litre fuel- 
injected engine rocketed to 
6Gmph in only 6 seconds yet 
has a claimed touring 
consumption of 25mpg. Jp 



Tickford Turbo Capri: A final fling. 



STAND OUT FROM THE 
CROWD IN A LANCIA! 

343 

RajWghRd 
HundinsJey 
Bofleet 
Essex 
Tet 

B2B8 741184 

panel 





VOLVO - 760 rax auto. Manag- 
ing Directors car Stiver gey, 
Mack leather micnor in nrtoUne 
condlUon. Only 14.000 
miks.'B'rcg Aug 84. Fun wee. 
£8.760 for quick anvate sale as 
moving. Tel: wk 01 839 1461- 
tionte 01 398 0088. 


R. ROVER Vogue 8 Ur. auto. 84 
model. A reg. Dunvtnl Mue. 
very fun wee Inc. air. aUoys etc. 
only £11.960. FuH warranty 
Marlow 1063841 3763 R. Rover 
P\ welcome T 


ROMM Pnetude Ex 1600. A Reg. 
Silver. E/tun roof. E/ windows. 
E/aerlai. Panasonic Stereo. 6 
speed, heal sensor atom, pow- 
er steering. £6.000. Tel: 677 
2010 eves. 780 S677 day. 


BARGE ROVER vogue Auto 
1986. Caspian Mue. EF1. 4.000 
miles Immaculate condluan. 
£17.950. Tel: 0626 827900. 


MOMZA CSE 4 meed Auto. B6 
(D). 2X100 miles only, tremen- 
dous value. Houghton RegH 
AMD Centre Uta. 0682 866366 


DISCOUNTS -NCT IMPORTS 
MOST MAKES AVAILABLE 


• SUPPLIED BY IK MAIN DEALER 

• MANUFACTURERS FULL 
WARRANTY 

• FREE FIRST SERVES 

• SERVICING AT YOUR LOCAL 
DEALER 

eJl Sac £900 on Goa GT, 3 dr 


MOTORVATION 
'0450; 56233 - 4 Lines 


SEKATMI SjO CD, auto. B reg. 
52-000 miles. IBM gnu. air con- 
dull. ESP, PhlHos R/C. dgUd 
daati. FSH. maoufgnee. tmroac- 
ulate. £7.200. Tel: OJ 884 2728 


4q* r 2-si amo. 86 c/as a 

choice of 4. Pri ced from 

I £8^95. Lrasmg/Finance avail- 
able. Call Brian Felton on 0296 
82S21 Office. 

VAUWIUJL Carlto, 87. IM 


LAND & RANGE 
ROVER 

1882 T Rage Rarer 
4 Dr Ana Stand, ffiver. i 
trims. 37,000 ids. Good 

roxp 

198* A Ram Rom VBgra 

Ad®, o amo. ate c saamot. 1 
nmer in VbgnB Bue. 36TO0 mis. 
r\2JSL 

AO new and used Land & 




SBTTDR [XT] 
PARK 
GARAGE 

88 (C) PieMe 1 j An® As new. 

wtete SBJ99SL 

B 81 GMtll Siwr. 

excellent &MB. 

13 (4) Acnd 3 dr. Ex, auto, 

Mb EM95. 

81 (X) terf 4 dr. Ex. 
danvagna — E2JK. 

Tel 8622 50442 



1986 PORSCHE 944 

(New Model 8 ruths old, condition as new) 
* Metallic silver • Wide Wheels 

* Stereo/cassette * Black pinstripe seats 

* Rear seat belts + usual Porsche extras 

Also fitted Porsche towbar 

* In car telephone (RacaJ Voda phone) 

£18300 

Phone anally 

MR BROOKES - (0203) 468910 
Wkend (0905) 620985 


EB 


Sflvw/ black. Pristina car. 
2 owners from new. 
Alpine stereo/CD. FSH, 
£16,750. 

TELEPHONE : 
0825 790974 


128 S. Manual. V reg. Platinum 
metallic, rtectrlc sun root, low 

milage, smice history, med- 
ian Ihrougtil CI&OOO o.v.n.o. 
Tet. 021 464 6960. 


928 T reg 67.000 mfln. Fun«er- 
Ucehtalory ivtetaHir oak green. 
HUU leather. Excel tern buy at 
£8-000. No often or tow wan, 
m Evcntngx Ol 847 S317. 


9«4-Aulo Black. 1984. Wide al- 
loys. S/R. 1 lady owner, only 
17.000 miles. FSH. Mint 
£14-500 1W 02 S 706 SMC 


•44 LUX. Ann] 1964. Ruby red 
metallic. 1 owner. Manual, 
FSH. sunroof. 31.000 mis. 
£13.950. Tel: 10272 1 657096 


*44 LUX Auto 1964 ■ At. White. H 
owner*. 69X100 miles. Fun S/H 
AFN. good condluan £11.996 
Tel: 01-440^794 


•44 S3 Dark grey metallic, leath- 
er sports seats, s/roof, wide 
lyres. FSH, Superb. Above av 
erogc mlleagn ri0.7so 
Wokingham 107341 709884 T 
911 SC Tanga. T9. Guard* red 
Excellent condition. Recent ser 
SUM, History. £10-260. 
TdJStane 816048 ibomoi Wol 
vertiampton 341227 iwotli. 
944 AUTO One owner. 1984 
red. 24xoo miles. Immac. air 
tond . extras. £15.500 nvno 
Td: 01-436 7066 


•28 5 Sene, 2 auto. 1984 A reg. 
fun leather, htfi pack, elec seats 
A sunroof, air cm. ASS. 
3^000 miles. Mue meL. In, mac. 
Mndlpmi. £26.950 secures. 
TH:0304 ^63909 eve & w’oxb 


Urt- M. February 85. 
Guardi red. Alloy wheels. LSD. 
SH One owner. Excdbni con- 

£10.000. 


PORSCHE 944 B Reg. Oct 84. 
23.000 mues. Buck. Director's 
car. serviced at AFN. suwrb 
«ar £14 600 Tdr PMn-mooi. 
2966666. (HI 01-867-6107 


•28 S2 1964 Chtflon White, col. 
our coded wheots and soollm. 
-Mint- green leaUaer tnlenor 
Max. spec. £22.000. CxcedeM 
condlUon .1062861 29545 or 
25429. Private Sate 


•OMCHE 824 While, sunroof. 
Directors car. 16.000 tidies. 
£1 1.500 ono. Tet. Ol 863 3211 
Bits ness hours 


944 2 hank owned cars » new. 
Both 1986 CAD. Silver and 
red- Hide uMwKtry. phone. 
From £19.480. 0702 TBOIB. 
944 IM IMS B Reg. Guards 
5? 1 - BAS. ESR. POM. F099L 
Jte 26.000 miles. £15.980 Tgl; 
0926-2IS27 or 0926-26S96 
924 Lux -81 rw>. M red. 24.000 
mues- tnereo, sunroof, VGC. 
£6 300 Tel. 0522 58645 or 
OMT 63340 after 6 pm. 


944 TURBO 

August B&A$toe«Ma. stack 
isadiarytSuai tom soats. Aioy 
ntMOk-Soncatann. 
25000*4. 

C3L2S0. 

Tet8785 584365 (Hope) 

0705 529415 (Bobaess). 


944 TURBO 

August 86. Alpine white. 
Black toatter/ttotti sport 
seats. AAoy wtwets. Sonic 
alarm. 

2.600 miles. 

Tt±07D5 584385 (Home) 
0705 529415 (Bsisness). 


911 

TURBO 

PORSCHE 

Stack. April 86. 

C reg. As new. £39,500. 

Tel: 0274 662331 


contract. 10.000 mites pa. 56 
months. Only £76.00 p.w. Gan 
Deeslease on Ol 686 8888 T. 


911 CABBHLET 

Taitn Body 

ins Blue, Btue Hood, Colour 
Coted Wwete. Hot 55^6 
SMC. 5JX30 irate. As Kw. 


Td: Day B3Z-77977S 
Ews/Wkends 8937-72S9B 


delivery. The VauxtiaB Opel 
Paoote. Houghton Regis Auto 
Centre Lid. 0682 866586. 


3201 CABRIOLET 

Would make a race Cmstmas 
praam lor your ante? May 
19M. star with black not. 5 
speed box, poser steering, 
ttec windows, aRoy wheels. 
30000 mites, immaculate 
contemn. 1 owner, £9375. 

Tet 01 840 4481. 


944 LUX. July 1986. Cnaad Prlx 
While. Co. car forces sale. 
13.000 nates. Electric sunroof. 
216 tyres. Radio and ultra so nic 
alarm. £20.600. Tel : 05917 
6667 any Ume 


924 LUX -84 A- 17.000 mBea. 
Guards red. Black tun stripe In- 
terior. pioneer stereo. FSH. 
Immaculate. £9.980. Tel: Ol 
202 2272 Day / 01 207 5228 
Eve <N. Lnmlo nl . 


•ax SC Toga -80. Black. Sports 
seats. Turbo roar rood er. Pri- 
vate Ptote. FSH. Just serviced. 
Years MOT. immaculate condi- 
tion. £15.260 ono. Tel: 0670 
860738. 


•II Turbo 1986 Red/Black 
leather, sports scats. ESA. LSO. 
Air ran etc. Unused. £44.600 
Tel: 0388 88205 




C reg. 13,000 mies. teonza. 
tantiar mtanor. fui spac. or 
eon, FSK mocSfied rato 
Sfiteigs. dteriihod nunber. 


cassette. E28JXJ0. 

Tet 0844 7202. 


RANGE ROVER 

EFI Vogua. 5 speed. 
1986 Model Silver with 
Grey wetour. Air 
conditioning. 14,000 
mis. 2 years warranty 
£16.500. 

Tab 058081 280 
David Everest 


VOLVO. 240 GLE Estat e . Sliver 
menue- B tea. Genuine 20000 
nines. Excellent common. New 
Volvo rorces sale. £6000 . tw 
day; 01^71 0104. 


TMlMnm TB7 1980. automaikr. 
46.000 mUes. sunroof, good 
cendtUan HtroughouL £2^98 
part exchange welcome. Petiue 
Mm VeMcies. 021 468 3667. 
VOLVO 780 GLE EsL 1986. only 
6000 miles. FSH. total spec. 
£14.760 (08851 845779. 


320 AUTO 

1983 A Reg Sapphire 
Blue. PAS . Sunroof, 
Alloys. FSH. I ownsr. 
19,000 mb. £7,895. 

0705 587746 
Green Road 
Showroom 


1985 C rig, desri turbo: 8709 
mites, redwood metallic, (am 
totter ntorior, 1 year 7 months 
wsnanty. at amdOmsog, 
te rtal stm, dBctric wfcu taws 
and smoo(, ramoto conttd radio 
cassans. Moving bouse heme 
E12JSQ. 

Tel: 0272 516244, 


TOTOTA MH2. White. 1936. 
New spec. 30 months warranty. 
Often. Tet 01 876 6789 CH). 
998 1522 ext 414 (Ol. 


mUTOR SUM CO. 8G C. All ex- 
tras. anthracite. £9.996. 
Leastas/Ftnance available. Call 
Brian Fdloo on 0096 82321 


ROVER 213 CS) 1984 IB> 12^00 
mites, exd. rana £4.400. Ol 
874 7790 level Ol 438 1683 


ROLLS-ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 


OPAL SERATOR. 


19B4. 84ach - tmtad glass - airtn - 
PAS - v conditioning - electa sui 

mot - v elour uffimor - adl usual 
lehnements - taxed. 

Price: £6,759 
eh (9223) 861271 or 


VOLVO 760 Turbo 1984. 29.000 
miles, metallic Mue. velour 
Vim. electric sunroof, windows 
and mtrrora, air rantUUonlna. 
£7.996. T*. Datlington lOSsai 
jutoO.ihnwi 

HOISOA Accord EX. B reg. Betas, 
power sleeting, air rand, cruise 
control. 1 Owner. FSH. imnuc 
rand. £5,260 ona Tel: iaao6i 
783928 Evenings 

LANCIA HFC 2000 EE Racing 
red. Y reg. cxcvftont condlUon. 
£3250. Tel: Ol 996 2674. 




Diesel Conversion 
Specialist 


4.182, 4^36, VM 3.6 

Range Rovers twit to - 
customers own specification. 
Spares, servicing & repajrs. 

PERSHORE 9396 556561 


BEST BUYS 

A«f Car/Vaa sepplM 




(sitoiect to status) 

STB LOIDOR LTD. 

01 950 0052 



■44 (1983 series) Y Beg. Metallic 
Ruby with sunroof. otectrK 
windows, mirrors, etc. Service 
history, mechanical warranty 
available. screamy ptkm 
£ 9.760. Tel. Worthington 07M 
256912 mantel or 63171 
tworki ....... 


match setters with buyers. To 
sett or buy. TH 01-356 0566. 


■11 SPORT TAHGA. 1983. V 
Reg . Guards Red. 49.000 
miles. FSH. £16.600 PNO. TH. 
0990 20846. 

81 X S24 Lux. 6 and. bright red- 
brown check trim, average 
mileage, a One example. 
£6.773. 0642 479791. T 


BMW 3231 b reg. FSH. above av- 
erage miles but very nice. 18 
mounts warranty. PX or a dis- 
count. £7.496 Ring Castefonl 
0977 65077. T 


3231 1988 C. 27JSOQ mllo. 
while. aUay wheels, sun root. 
Blaupunki stereo. £9.700 ono 
Oundlocd (04851 811686 work. 
51800 weekends. 


MRS 32SLNew unregistered. 
Save over ££000. Ounce of 3. 
Chris Netn. RFO Ltd Ol 642 
6688 OtOcc Hours. 


BMW. eafl. Y reg. Superb condl- 
Hon. Lady owner, di .OOO mue*. 
Benutlfid car. £128 00. P hone 
evenings: (081) 428 7088. 


3231 AUM. (B) “86. CraMm 
black. 2 boot. C/S roof, alloys. 
EW. PAS. G/L. stereo. IS^OO 
murs. FSH. Inunaruiate. 
£10.980. TH 01-788 8612 
BMW 318 4 door. September 84. 
19000 miles. Bronze metallic, 
full service Mstory. value at 
£L4GO Tel 021 778 6533. 
3X8 1 1986 B. 4 door. Auto. Ocrt- 
nw* Blue. M.OOO Miles 
Excellent rand- Sunroof-Ste- 
rro. £7.980. Tet. Ol 884 8888. 
3201 1985 MB' beige. ADOyS- 
ESR. G/toddna- Orn ette. Care- 
rony used nil tugn mueooe. 
£3.950. THSJ799 30226- 
BMW IK 84 A. HMb Vr head 
rest*, r/e. 1 owner. saooOmB. 
£5.280. 0246 412871 T. 

MEW BMW'S > All models to or- 
der. 32B»'»cariy delivery. Law 
dbraums. th wjt-twmo m 


•mw 83s CS1A ■ 1985 Henna 
red/biack teainer inL Recaro 
seals. Fdl SDCC. ASS. SR. LSD. 
a speed FSH. pioneer stereo. 
£15.496. TEX : Ol 866 1668 or 
09278 4495 



NMV ■ 3301. 2 Door auto, l own- 
er. C Reg. August 1988, dolphin 
grey metamc. sports wheels, 
sunroof. £/W. C/I- PAS. 4 
speaker Pioneer stereo with 
graphic. 17.000 mites. Immacu- 
late. private sate. £8.950. Td: 
016809226 (Office) OI6S76867 
levesL 


32M -A' Beg 1984. New stupe. 6 
speed. Henna Bed. 1 owner. 
FMU Service History, 50,000 
pvin £6.996. Terms and PX. 
MktncM Motors inkhcrrow. 
Worse. Tel. (03661 7951 16. 


BMW MS Company damrarenra- 
tor. alpine white. M leouuc 
body ML 6.000 IRite*. POA. Tel 
0371 2506 or 0576 613874 

USE Auto. Nov 64 B Reg, 4 Dr 
Saloon. Gold aiding Roof, 
pas. Radio Stereo etc. FSH. 
BfouHIu! car. £6.696. PX Con- 
wined Tel: 0529 U& ata T 


X20fe4 floor. 1988. 14.000 macs, 
metallic Butpundy. manual. 
FSH. sun roof, allays, central 
locking. BMW colour coded 
body styling etc- 12 months 
warranty. m eomktercd. 
£7.996. TH: (082 5601 310 


32* B reBbtered. low mileage, 
henna red. exert lent condition. 
FSH. cobra Marm/infra red 
door locking system. Pioneer 
•stereo, electric windows /TOOT. 
£9-200. Tel: Epptng 74723, 
weekdays - Ol 808 6162. 


amp regbtrauon. white, sun- 
roof. 6.000 mOea. as new 
condition £12.800 ono Tel 
01567 5346 


BMW 3231 y Rea Iona mot. 
Metallic Peon, sunroof, elect r ic 
minora. 4 headrests, immacu- 
late condition inside and out. 
£4.980 Tet 0624-428993 


CABRIOLET 3SB November 85. 
Bter. 8000 mis- 8ureo/olarm. 
FSH. £9.996. Tel Ol 8860910. 


IM-W. WANTED 


BMW* Wonted 3181 ■ 78B-S. 
low/htgh nUkmpo. Private/ fleet 
vemcies. also reaturM Jaguar. 
Porsche 8 Volvo Estates. 0286 
57657 or 0860 711868 T 
BMW'S Instant valuations Na- 
ttonwide. cau John Davies 
now. on <04021 29486 



ROLLS ROYCE 
CORNICHE 
SALOON 

Cold metallic. Appro* 3SJU0 
miles. Excel bail ooodSwon. 

JCTtiec records 

smaMdc. and MOT uaiil 
Febnarr 87. 

WfiOO mo. 

Tel 0323 91911. 

(9 U> SJO). 


ROLLS ROYCE. 

Shadow H. 1980. W reg. 
ta a pristine canfikm, 
silver wth white hide. Full 
Service History, Must be 
seen 

RI 8,950. 

Tel 01 209 0977. 



Camargue. 

Cobalt bfue with champagne 
trim. True registered mteue 
12JX10. 1881, one owner, 
superb condition. 

Mr Westlake: 


SYTrTipKt 


186 (week days). 


1980 SHADOW II 

Cacibbean Blue. Realty 
««paB«nt oonettion. 
FSH. 39.000 miles. 
Second owner. 
Private sale. 
HUM. 

PIB3S8 cafe Mr Stag* 
.day) 01 - 3 77 1015 
(8VBS) 01-455 2842. 


COWBCItt SALOON. June 1976. 
Willow gold / Maonoua. abso- 
Utety tnmmibti. km ureter 
dust cover. Only -11 jsoo genu- 
ure miles. Private sate jcibjsoo. 
■pnonr. nay Ol 622 B812 / 
even- w/and 0990 24984. 


ROVER Vogue EFT Aula. 
First reg Fee 86 Caspian (due. 
11,500 miles. £16.495 ono. Tel 
029921 467. 


TOYOTA TERCEL 4WD XT Reg. 
Sliver. 7.000 mites only. Sun 
nxrt. stereo, as new condition, 
offered at £6.296 Pchbte MU* 
VeMCtes. 021 468 5667. Part 
exchange welcome ( 

CONVERTIBLE CavaJUcr. Various 
specs A colour. Houghlon Ftegts 
Aula Centre Lid. 0882 866355. 


BENTLEY T2 

1978. immaculate dark 
groan wHh F.S.H. Unmaifced 
magnolia piped leather and 
carpets. New M.O.T. Perfect 
running order, special No. 

AUK 77. £15.000 

Tel: 01 242 9671 
(Wetfc), 01 941 0782 
(Hue) 


ROLLS-ROYCE & 
BENTLEY WANTED 


PJ. nSOKR Ran highest prices, 
for tow mtteage HR d Bentleys. 
195D80. Ol 786 6653. 

CASH for your 1980/81 Rol# 
Havre. USA 619 7671137. 


MERCEDES 

AUTHORISED 

DEALERS 


tauiwDES Wanted All models, 
low/hiqh mileage, pmnw/flcei. 
aha reg'd Jaguar Si Porsche. 
0256 57557 or 0860 71 166ST 


MERCEDES 


CAR HIRE 


MKWCEBB 300 EE 8Bd 280 SL. 
seir drive hire. £75 per day. 
£480 per week. TcL Ol 449 
1 157 (Office) or 01 449 8065 
CE-vCcring* and WhUhWI . 


m BLVn WHAHH n. W Res. 
oarM/nod leather. 38.000 mis. 
Pah. 1 owner. Immac awl. 

CI9.9SO. Tol 061 401 3985 

nLVOt SHUT 1981 Georgian 
saver, onto hide. £24.960 rx 
welcome. 01 563 6697. (Sun) 
Ol 567 4366 (Weekdays). T. 
FOR MK SUw ftrtrlL Self-drive 
or chauffeur. Other vetatefm 
avsUabte. 01-540 9280/7902 T 
SFUrtT 1981. ocean Wue. 32.500 
mites. £30.000 ono- 0982 
. 70274. ^ 



H«wy/Magnoua in- 
prior Pieritc tobies. Gold piaied 
Lady. other tnaras. 

Sjmero car. £451300 ono. «. ■ 
fhODBC ramfdered. EaUwoods 
I^Sjnwjnsham 021 3270629: 

toUilCIE FHfc - 76. 71 qqq 
£ 15.600. TH: 0704 floSSo^ 


A' cog. Novemtw 83. Bed urtti 
bags veknr nmnof. Simnwl Ar 
conWtawfl Cnase cofxioi. ABS. 
Beora: seats from and ieu. Lady 
dnvcf. imnootae car. £17,750 
Tet 0623 55B135 (Office) 

B60Z 2S2E08 (Eves) 


SL- A reg. htov 83. white, 
rear wnL extras, perfect cocmii- 
uon. one owner. FSH. Elf .900 
Ol 289 5213 

280 SL A Rrg. Nov 83 Wnile. 
rear seals, extras, oerfect conth- 
Iton. 1. owner. FSH. £16.900. 
Ol 289 5213 

*■• TC 80 W Auto, thistle green 
nuftaUK. 69.000 miles 1 owner. 
rSH. tm mandate. £6.995. 021 
956 2621 T. 

360 D Auto Orl 1964 22.0 06 
.mis Many evlntv £15.000. 
Tel- Ol 2S3 7646 Off Hn. 

230 E A Reo s/roo(. sports 
22X2% ™?"- »7Nue. £6.760: 
0246 412871 T. 

2®0 TJL aa. AU extras ThKito 
£9J»50 for pufck sale. 01-486- 
0166 % 263 or .01(328 6011. 

*38 TE auio. 10.000 aim. 
19B 4.1rtre*V). £l I^QOono. Trt 
0895 852984. 



| sjjSj..: 






























































































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3ui 

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■el drive 

'STORCd 

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1986 



35 



VQCB AMD PICKETT 
OF LOflDON 
Tel: 01 629 8818 

MMKKS3MTSL wu™, 

Wwjh rutfi 


MBtcaicsan L to tamp 
un fim 


fc&wSr======3 

j”*** 1 i>ta mo um-j: aw 


I _ _ — — " »nui UtITiC 3RT. 

*=*'*» to *n uwbpk£: 

FOU CMMttUTE OEUVERy" 





ehuswe T-ntss iwnr n* 
■UDMiasMlW 
kmumiKStJSt 

®* w lea l*i mtf in 


5H aa. touted Brojtaj tow. 390 


W* Hrtho joia onu «... 

WMMatotoi GiamBop 

“S 5?£2™L hM Uejn **** *■. 

® a* MhtcjI hue Dry mu P5R 

«S tSwatc AC 

♦a st as* wm». a* ia» «s 

138 erase 1 cev 

cw 

*M n rmM B*a t» ( ma. 
edu it* xM H t<w Ami t«p 

4#ur. 

a l ttio me ■er- E» -Sop. 

SpnaM la Tn Fra Uk 

ICHJ mini 

I*** 238 Tl 5 '.w*a CW ; <xl 
Van ' « fSH «0» m 

nsn 

1W IW AUTO tto ISRdtais. t‘ 
•• «.■„ an nm ijoOQ m 


JM* S**b 5prt tenet green &g* 


Wm. 37JOOO SMS 

rrayj 

WW KS Me Bwi. SiD Am 

f («*«»*«. toe. 5 a nutes 

Ii w 

- nun n 

MW 


200 T 


Estate Manua]. 1984 . 5 
speed. Sunroof. PAS. 
Centra] locking. White 
with Black trim. 2 
owners. Exceptional 
example £8.695. 
0705 58 r <46 Green Road 

Showroom. 


AMG MB 190C Aulo. IW. All 
wlulr. Full body canvcrswm. 
AMG wtweb. New P7 tyros 
Walnut inltflor mouldum. 30 
BHP Inoraw. Toronto radio / 
rawn» 30.000 mllcv FSH 
£13.750 ono Tot: (Mommas 
and CVHWWS' 041 357 3167 or 
OJ1 037 202 S. 


2S0 SL A Ido. 'S3 iA). Hard and 
<«i lop. Ii-oo-. RMrteau ABS. 
Cruiv Alloys Eloctnc 
unndows/ccnlral toojnp. 
Hradltqtiis. wash wipe man 
Ntrxm Becker stereo. 29.500 
mites. One lady owner. 
EAcetUml rondllioo. £18.950. 
Trl 0070 519298/56432. 


300 SL ■ Renta ered Sept B6. UK 
supplied, red with black interi- 
or. cruise control. Toronto 
stereo radio /cassette, hard and 
black soft top. central locking, 
allays, ctcclrtc aenal. 6000 
miles. £28.000 ono. Tel.rOa77i 
S596 days.iOZ60j 280394 
e\mings 


MERCCDES 380 BE Silver bkie. 
4 door. W- re«. 1/1/81. 64.000 
miles. Immactuale condition, 
electric sunroof A wtndowB. 
BUuounkl radfe/cassenc uiew). 
full service rust ora. Offers 
aroilnd £11.000. TeL 05S5 
60939. 


900 SEL 1984 Petrol b»ur. grey 
leather. ESR. E/ windows. 

E/seats. E/hrodresta. ABS. 

A/C. cruise, alloys, stovo. etc. 
absolutely Immaculate, out- 
standing value. £39.600 ono 
Tel; 07 206 4026 office Jisnrs 


450 SL. Auto. 1980. Private 
plate 034)00 miles. FSH. Stiver 
blue Alloy wheels. PAS. Hard 
/ son lop. Exceflmt condition. 
£13.760 Inc Plate. Price nego- 
tiable without plate. Tel 0792 
49038. 


230 E 1984 IA) Lad ra rtn r Blue, 
aulo. PAS. olecinc windows / 
sunroof. 4 speaker stereo. 
33.000 miles. 1 owner. FSH. 
Immacidate condition. £9.460 
ono. Tel. 0428-61822 


230 TE 


Mowmbar iB«a CT,nnp 

mites. tvory/BIjo tflxauio. 

Raota/casMtiB towtnr. 

Roofracfc. crutsa eonfroL 

Mow tyres. Ono owner. Fidte 

£sater malniaineo. Perfect 

joowai. E7^», ona 


01-93074Q7 


w 


UNREGISTERED! 

300 TL 


Nano) B!ua noakc pne, atey 

Marc. iDNtur - 

rOTOsaste, efcttne rntdews 1 
nm u mm ns. doors, 
sitenng wheel etc. Air 
ccnneianaa U»C. oats, heal 
Hu MO ooa TA Dftce 
tens (0233) 25001 or Home 
(0233) 7200 Mr Pstansaa. 


DAVID J 
SPARSHATT LTD 


1984 A MERCEDES BENZ 
500 SEC COUPE 
fmisha] ii datmnl Hub MU 
blue vetaua anna, tmnd MU afl 

me usual 5 class refinements. 1 
ownei. POL 

Tef 0703 619044 


SOOSEL 1982 Mur metallic itogle 
owner, elect lie roof. ABS. A/C. 


service history, many tgnro 
superb condition 63 jOOO miles 
£1 3.950 ono Tel Mr. Key an oi 
68o 6323 


MERCEDES WANTED ] 


WANTED 
WANTED 
All Mercedes 

High or tow mHeags 
Top premiums pan 
We can anywhere 

(0742) 461020 
Anytime Time 



DUNNS OF BfETHI 

URtfNTIY mow* ION MU 

AGf MKtttS BUU VEHCLES 

IncfaauRd 

■MbBartMU 


Tat 


77311 oOtai 
MdoflBS 


COLLECTORS CARS | 


15500 mi**. FSH. 

H85 a* Jaguar 3ow t0nVI2.5o9Bl 
dPediM enJaaDaBOWMioeiB. one owner, 

FBN.ajOOQMea Cruoe 

IBM W Jegou Somndge L2.MO. togmi 

fm*tkMMn.FSH mrao 


1BB3(V) Jaguar 4AAidO.RhOdUil9l*«> *94. 


DEIGATE 

■X JAGUAR 


eteciool.3BJ500m4» . 


WWBeBafc naiKaagmrUadewUirety 

buck Martha mot, btack iwb at. ouew 
eonani. JSjOQD mBaaonly. nnaaMwi_£t3MB 
IWB K}M emu (Mi OMNI 

wwwgqy ngna. mm owner LttO nan* orty 

QJBB5 


(07372)41100 


PiMmedJBguBn/OaMers 
Nwcn • Stnlct • tali 

.1083* 232810 

rMayst or David Burton 


I NMarfSirrii 

esasssssi 



JAGUAR A DAIMLER 


E TYPE 
ROADSTER 


VIS. Manual. 1974. M ng. 

57,000 jnllBS. Factory re- 

cowMionad <ngM (about 1.500 

nulra). Bfaio. FuOy ntrumw] 

«hwt Mb grey leitar. Win 

•heals. Futyr motattonad Mb 

no aaKBM spared. Superb 

coretdm. Eiuoo lor QDKk sale. 


Phono: 01-488 0O&6 (OflKe 

houra) or (0B92) 41 


.. JB201 

(memos/ weekends). No fine 

wasters pleasg. 


COMPANY 

CHAIRMAN* 

Jaguar XJSV12 coupe. 
Nowmbor 1985. Crta 
BrttHh Raeiflo Graon. doe 
sUn hk)D. 6500 mUos. 

oxcolent condition 

Dtroughout. 1 owner sites 
new. air condtttonitg, 
£19750. 

Tet day otey 820 781541. 


XJS CABROILET 
HE AUTO 


1986 C Keg. 

Managing Director's car. 
speaaTu(£oisHiM rear stab, 
lined alarm, telephone. 
maUlc grey, low mVaga. 
C2SJOOO 
01-27B-296t 
0923-37094 


TWR M4 W AW XJS 1983. Wine 

red metallic, doe nun hide. 2 

owner*, air cu m m in du g. 
4&000 macs. FSH. eareUenr 

condition swwughouL £13.760 


Twyford 303292. 


maw* Mwmw i « aum 

Saloon. Clarendon Blue. Fufly 

air coMHoBed. bimanBaar 1 

owner. 19.000 mm ram Reg- 

bUTM July 1986. £14.780. 
Phone Ol BSB 0638. 


SOVEHEWL B reg/84. Rhodnan 

stiver with gray doeskin Interi- 

or. sunroof. AIT cond. Electric 


tree. 19 000 mOf*. £12.960. 

TeL oi 5393927 (OOTcr hours) 


IBM XB 3j6. Cobalt Hue with 
MB Hue leather Interior. 
liLAOO maos. tamnacuHM con- 
dleoa. FSH. £18.960. Ttt 
(07341 417011 Office or (0734) 
410293. 


XB HE. 1961 with cherished 

male. Red. pepperpot wheels. 

factory Rtted Hack velour Inte- 

rior. 22.000 mis documniML 
fsh very good cond. £8260 

ono. Tiro Webb 01-892 0632 


XJ40’s 


JANUARY 

DELIVERY. 

List price. Most modeb 
avaiBDfe. l/K suppfled. not 
impart. 

Executive Motors 
(Car Brokers). 

01 570 5651. 


JAOJAJt X883 CtoMH. Jm 
1986. steel grey metmuc. OTta- 
one condition. Mr con. erutsc 
control, dlr ecinr* personal car. 
6000 imJr* only DWatxUiy 
lams into. £23.993. TrL 0778 
426689 eves . 0664 60260 


A USED SAAB. 



SECOND ONLY 
TO A NEW SAAB. 


Saab dealers know that a 
used Saab with 'Safeguard' is 
A BETTER INVESTMENT THAN MANY 
OTHER NEW CARS. 

'Safeguard' is our mech- 
anical insurance only awarded 
to used cars that have been 
THOROUGHLY CHECKED AND TE S T ED . 

ITS JUST THE S1ANDARD OF 
QUALITY YOU'D EXPECT FROM THE 
ONLY CAR COMPANY IN THE JET 
AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY 


vmm local 


Saap malm 

TW POUCH 
Viitow mu 
OP PINC U5 0M 
<02721 317177. 


son 


APPROVED 
USED CARS 



JUMUML C Tvne. 2 * SL Via. 
1972. Green. Professionally re- 
stored to dnamai condition. 
Odm invited around £9000. 
Tel: <02031 413074. 


JAGUAR U Cabriolet Sport*. 
Full spec. Red. New January 
1986. Quick sole. £20.000. Tel: 
•0643) 263170 


»«EW XJ6 90VHE30N 34 Htgh 
spedlkalioo. deuvera mfleape. 
sotenl Mur. doeskin teather 
£27.960 0860 364747 


HSW JAGUAR available now or 
January 1st. Teh (02791 


US 1978 6.3 automatic. Red. So- 
ptrb. £3.000. Tel: Esher 
(Surrey) 0373 65746 


23DE May 84 A regHtraUoo. Me 
lolbc grey /black velour, only 
16000 miles. FW, electric 
windows, air candUtonbig. tm- 
maciilate condition £12.900 
ono Tel: OI 723 8196 


230 E <W 124). Metallic Steer. 
Mue interior, auto, etcctrtc sun- 
roof. ABS. radio stereo, door 
light*. 7.000 mite*, as new. pev 
vale rate £16.996 TeL 020 
881 2323 


300 SEL *86 model. C reg. Dark 
met blue. Leather Interior. Ah- 
con. Back window curtain. /U 
ley wheels Floor mat Elec 
operated driver'* seal- Atesro*. 
TJMoInltes. £32.600. Tel: OI 
362*121 anytime. 


206 T 1081 Automatic. Sunroof. 
Excel lent condition mrauotwuj. 
Service htstory- 
blue/beige Inieoor 

Stcreo/cosaene £6.996 ono. 
Tet:0233 30392. 


2ME AWlomallr B tp«FaUCTJ. 
Astral silver, blue doth. FSH. 

FCAR. HLWW. IVM. 
□hr stereo He ( owner. 
WM150. Tel 10602 ) B46409. 


MERCEDES 309 SLC auto coupe. 
1981. eueenent ™ES!, won ' 
ijtnir blue. 27000 mJies. 
£19,600. Td; Ot 328 6232 
'home/ Ol 724 2744 work. 


2<x>. X reg. <981. 
Auto. B»ur 40.000 nttles. Elec 

^Tr^. Suoertc R«Uo/ 

goo. Td: 0572 378166 


580 9TV Od 83 Silver Wue 
WCLSP. eleclronl^l- ABJ. 
crabe. FSH- MOFP^-Mcrr 
warranty, eart rand, ss™ 1 
mb £ 17.SOO. THOt 9S9 4628. 


BBQCCS Ren blue. Auto. swroM. 
alloy, radio casac,l *, , _ 5L59S* 
full tetsiora. unmarked. 
£SJ50.Tei.-0892 28386 


IMP tB) req- SSK* 

ABS. air cond /SJ; 

immac.. 

ono. TeL-OI 858 6222 


miles. 

v^s.- 


J ^ 1 E r 

CastJeford OPT 7 


Td: 01-736 6T78. 


SCO SE 83 TWS 

bio 

S 3 £?» 

uphobirry. ___# cruise 

atc , WJinonmo- 

control. -me car 

5!? ub, ?mLi k a«SaW** lf 

230 £ 196* A Auto 
32-000 ml*. 

t owner. carpet'- 

b>tw windows, 

dec son row- llv ctgrra. 

jr, s 

KSSssws 

olm. itr , t owner 

001 

iv-4 


liicr ddaib 


>.495 ™ : ., 500 

-__J1984AMed(S«n 11^ 

mttes. AOK» nP,ccp«or».it 
Ramo/Oua; 

u ^°'2«JS;* 0 e^<e Z» 7 


-HD MFHffTPM ftWf S£i S. 

19B0 Alloys. AJM-Ui 

PAS. Supert-C^^fpjSs. 
dcr Motors. 0902 u/aum. 
Mimfu 68 <Ci B- 

prebabiy in *l- t !f? ls tory Mrt 


GILBERN 

INVADER 


KH2 . 1972 UaniH, 0/D. 
YbHow. Black trim. Wsmsbo 
Sumiol, tetoys. 1 of otdy 63 butt 
Utetjftip hanilboolcs & read 
reports etc awaistte. Avery 
useaOto dassc. EmAflra 
crniimoa SZ895. 0705 587748 
p* 4 Rots* aw#. Grew fM 
Showroom. 


1967 E TYPE 


2 -4-2 4 2 Restored 

professtonaJty with 
receipts. White. In 
superb condttton. Offers 
required 

01 779 7064 
Porter Bros Ltd. 


PA— nt SOVEItEIGt* 1969. 
59.000 mb only. 6 months tax. 
12 months MOT. leather uphd- 
siery. a utom atic. PAS. Good 
condition. OfTers. Te«OS09l 
602361 i daytime) <0609) 
605337 i eve* / w/emW 


E TYPE 1974 aulo cotwedabJe. 

commemorative an Mack edt- 

Uon one of last 60 todlt. 

hnmaculate. 26.000 mties. 
black hard top. chauffeur rnatn- 
tamed. £20.000 Td: John 
Payne Ol 930 2161 weekdays 


i.- I ST IE -Ong urine 

last 600 Pewter. 35.000 miles. 
Alloy whe«t*. Stereo rad int- 
csssene. FuH service history. 
One enUublast ownerJnpnac. 


rondtnon UirougtMjuL £49«H 
ono. Td: 09904-3633 1 


i (Surrey). 


ASTON MARTIN D86.1968 
Seperteggera- wgF 
made. PAS. BUG. FSH. CP 
SJr? buecb. Excellent Condi 
uon. £ta 600 . dm* Nejn oi 
642 6865 Office Hms T 


HOTD 1963. Proteotonaity ra- 
stored, immaculate. No oilers. 
£9.050. TH: 01-433 6022 or 
(0494) 773468. tpnotoa/- 

reaioranon spec avaUableL 


BKHHHS — ! 1967. Almond 

Greece IK)ht Green Interior. 

lully restored to nine condition. 

lull service mstory + original 
EUU <?«*■■ 1 FT MOT. 1 ower. 
£5.730 mw. TA 01-274 1638 


ROLLS ROVCE Rare t qjTgt gte 
^Joor by Hooper. Supcthc*- 
^ f«- leather Owner daring 
■Tue model, oners new 
LICvOOO Lowestoll TH: 0602- 
2779 cves/ lV l f mjs 


196T SUM— tl—* MA«f2 


anMIW. onr OWfW. T7A66 
JSSThani top. Mrt loo. 

Offers- 0224 861188- 


7TI I960 


-KS 3 KS* 


X#**« 

•g&j-'iSftBH 708616. 


.eietliWC 1 * 




alloy - 

TSSe 

298“* ‘ 


+0 ,986. 4. SCO rruH9- 
p BOIWi roeuw®^"- 

IwiorW^'”'- 


JCNSEN CV8 

iamargue 

' tllfl 


,|0 Tmubb*K 


Tfl - 

offers- 

19S2 M* 


jjlW-w- 
0682 

ISK ra ' C . TD 
.Min'd 11 - 


■sfiraa 

.■S&ass 0 M 

•isSEJS 


lAttBAW XJS 3.6 Coape. 1986 B. 

Cum wtth doe 8km Mdr. 

I od inline of NwlUlIV w/w. 

Trip computer, mar mm bells. 

1 1.400 man ream new. War- 

ranted 12moda.FSHJU6.996. 
0466 6 14 848 T. 

OFFERS Are owned far Jaguar 

4.2 XJ6 Aulo 4 door saloon- Ex- 

cellent condHton. 1st reg 9/84. 
MUoage pans 17.000. FUB 

pwv tce ta aotyr. vtesvtn g by ml 

po h i tm e m . Edward syuunons 

* nram. Td osi 236 8464. 
XII2 HE Satoop. A rag, Mr con. 
computer ect. Idgb mllepge. but 
super condition, view London 
or Merseyside. Private saUar re- 
wires only £ 7.900 ono. 

Tab 051 336 3601. 


198* A XJS ME. Signal red. Mack 
ml dearie sunroof. 40.000 
itiaes. Matora. Must be seen. 
£12.995. Office: Northwood 
26471. Home: Marlow 60I3.T 
JAOUAR XJS V12 Coupe. 1986 
D. Hnamedl ID cobalt blue/doe 
skin Mde. CL 200 moe*. our own 
dmnonaraiion vddde. Price on 
appiteaston. 0466 614 84s T. 
lACUAte/DA— 1985/86. 
Choke of 45 whole raogo. 
£6.996X1 9JXXL EM. 19 years. 
PX. Td 01-684 9833 EHCK m. 


XJS nil B Reg. 17JWO rats. 1 
owner, com n/divor. 


me rand. 

£17.960. 0245 412871 T. 


JAGUARS DAIMLER. 

WANTED 


PERFORMANCE CARS; 


BS TURBO 
HEW SHAPE 


D registered, 2£0Q nftn, 
rosso red. recuro seats, 
rapid de-ica tram screen, 
etoctrle mgraa and 
windows, fuel computer, 
gun roof. antUock brakes, 
rear seatbelts, taxed 
August 87. 2 years extra 
cower warranty, £500 
system ttred. Cost 


security system I 

mr nim Am 

Tel 061 6267027 


ASTON MARTIN 

ZAGATOS. 


2 oaw supararetarMli by 
private anangaaMM. 
ItaH hand drtm .1 right 
lend dree 
OFFERS Wfim, 


MRS J COOMER 
TEL (0481)711148 


OUT SALMON Require your J^- 

tur Dahtricr (undo- 20:000 
ndlesL btonedtate teaswv 
Bankers draft, iiafteiwitlite coi- 

teCtiOO.TeL Mark UwteOt 388 



i B Bn OBRITMi 18880 PHrt wtate. B*«6 teereo. 
hdtar. sun nrt 1000 mtes CM51 


tBND HUM OMim TURBO FUfted In Mxmdo red. Mte. 


OH D MW 9S OMTim Rnchcd in Hunt gw EUMpad MBi 

170 BHP MT nodUd su sp aw toL 5.300 

m»«: 


W> 0 JEITA OT Wteoi wMb. tinted gtas. cnM toctena na 

nai. ttwM. 2300 am tM» «Uf. 

t 8 Httf BB BOW f W l £ FbpWt grey 
SL 31JOOO - 


214 PAVILION ROAD, LONDON. SW1. Tel: 01-730 2131 


GOLF STi 
CONVERTIBLE 


19B4. special edffibn. a§ wIAb 


IGjOOO mies. tteoad May Ifi 

ragutetly sendcod, yiitualiy as 

new, a stunolgj^car tor cwy 


TeL BM3 8641 SI. 


GOLF GTL 


ET Reg, Man Red. 
immacidste condition, 
aloys wldi new P8. Tinted 
windows, sun tool. Sotar 
Alarm, (rant tog lamps. 1 
owner. 22X100 miles. 
£BX>00 

Td 01 679 3627. 


NEWRUN LTD 

Quateu soecUist Wail 


t -- ^- sBsaf 


ter Me epateoc . 

" i BS ffi TomadD red, 
sunrod. ss-itenionsHtew. 
ortptai, hd s/tot 


AUDI 

QUATTRO 

‘C reg. Wtiite. Sunroof, 
ABS/Ete. 13,000 mil*. 
FSH. 

Tel: 0532 438201 

(T) 


VW GOLF sn CC co n v o r ub to- 
1986. WhRb well Mtte Udertor. 
lull VW eopincarliie comer- 
sum. Btattpunkl atereo. V.000 
~iw Offer* over £0.260. Tet 
0529 233472. 


GOLF on. 1986 "C CemrerMM* 
apedPl CC medd. wmm. exoo 
odes, (un Banner htamra. Oar 
lady owner. \MMRy to new. 
£8.750. Td 0522 810643. T. 


ftOLF cn September i«a. 
17.000 mat*. Full body ktL 
EWSWr aiantt. Radio css- 
9tu. Sun roof- £6800 or near 
offer. Tel; 0003 51 1365. 


AUDI COUPt . 1984. A Reg. 2 - 
Hire atuo. 25.000 mOes. One 
owner. Allay wtweta. sun roof, 
cSarm, Pkmeet 1 atovg- £5,950. 
Tel- 0734 695887 (day) or 073 
622 3199 lew/wkenflsj 


AKIM 90 1986 >Q. white. PAS. 
Her windows. fl/R. Btenpuniit 
4 speaker radio cassette, tm- 
macuteir. 7.000 mis. warramy. 
£8.950. Tel 031 -667-4980 eve* 
VW GOLF GTL Aug 86 (DL Ah 
ptne whHe. 5 dr. stereo, dim 
burglar atom. 7 months war- 
rrairv. 9J»0 Ids £&500 ono. 
06255 M79. 

16 VALVE GOLF Cm. Note, 
unread, extras, (mined del 
0682 872183. ivw dealer). 
CTI Gate* in stork (ndudlno LHD 
ja valve* ABoatAuroQiftrto- 
k-l. gn 9ihUe 01-93S 1395 T 
VW/ AUMlnRCMfCTi At Hugs 
□Mount, mud Dedvera- Phoe- 
ntt (025 1261 4676. 

VW (Ml Fbnnel 1982 Red. 12 
montne MOT- Good condition. 
CZASOtmo. TOT. 0580 240277 


WADNAM KENNING 



8582 417585 


me GoIGTi. 5 dr.Jhdt. 


than 1JJ00 nksOJHS 
. , Aud Coupa (team. Tornado 
Rat efec ainA 15 inch BBS 
■heds + PMI W tyres, te nan 
5X300 macs, as tm dSJMS 


PASSAT BUB WecM on estate. 
1985. B re*. 32000 mu*, tm- 
maculate condition. PAtS, dec 
windows 6 host Of accessories. 
Lady owner, very attractive 
car. saver/ Wue tntetiw. 
£6.995. TM: 0705 470639. 


REGISTRATION 

NUMBERS 


2 

T«fc 


MY £4So° <fcr 


KMflcoi 

Itaii 


TDDfl Talbot Horbon 65 
/dKU, automatic. 1980 
iwx mouuc Noe. -XLoaO miles. 

I condition. £ 2 J 0 a . 

•1-388 B7S9 (dayUnto) or 




Offers 

e 

TWjaSSO) 61*21 


CRC 1 over JS5J3O0 


U/s -ara-f Onvwcotfcn 

HL 121* 16V. Od 86. 

1.000 mde*. Mom Hue. 

“ — I— • 


hcu n 


Offers over 

LOOO 


(8X53)22717 


JCW 12 

ms 


LRU 2. 0nWn ^ 9w - 


. crfSgo. *986. one 

owner, red with tan trpn. 

•Cl 0.000 

Tet (04211 770 M B 


V YTi « Available tor 

Li 117 1. transfer. Often 


around £10.000. 

(0272) 741424. 


9999 MFSU 9 ^ 


tund Aprfl 1983. £4^00 Me tan- 
maculate car. 

TdMWUdtt 


PD1. 


£20.000. 


462 872 


LOTUS 

EXCEL 


' f S85. Cofypso 
. HaU leather. 
12,000 mflBS. 
Unmarked.C15.45a 
Tel; 0^5 706289 
(office hours) 


JOHN nm MOTOBS 


UD 


UMLHTNK FOLUMman 

UEMOHBnUTOn PON SAUE. 


T9BB T THBffi LX TURBO 
1966 ty PRISMA LX IE 
tflPB -d; VT0 HH8 
me nauwo. 

IOUS. HEMPSTEAD 
NO 8X011 


RERADLT 5 TURBO I 

1884 (A). hHhaaJan in 
meudBc Mack. IBS bRp. 
25,000 mans. Ft* sorvteo 
Mstory. £8,496. David 
Thompson. 

Tel: B86R 339353 


or 0483 574 
(evenfogs) 


registered, am 


73ei8ar. 


445629 office ban 


0900 823971 


£5£EO Tel: 01-4460326 


owner. 50X100 
personaUaed plate. 


21 12/061 860 4TT8 office. Aft 
hours 061 998 2260. 

HUH aUCWUWK Mark VI 
Coupe. i.900»i> from new. The 
mart individual car ut Braun. 
New price today £112X300. 
Creffit value. E3G.D00. Td 061 
881 21 12. Eves 061 998 2260. 
PERRAJH BBS GTSI X rep. Seal 
81 . rm/magnoUa. a/c. d/s. 
FSH. 40-000 nut. £21.000. Ol 
201 1200 Wk 600 1965 E/WE. 

88 (G) 280 SL. H/8 lop. pronaMv 
me best there b. 84X300 mis. 
FuH hJstory- MefaWc Geld. 
£14.996. 0642 479791. T 
SftAHAOA 4X4 Manani save 
CCCil On the road from 
£15£00. a saving of £3.720. 
Decs of Croydon Ol 686 8898. 
SEttA 4X4 1986 Red. Ex demo. 
Many extras. £11.500. Td: 
Dees of Croydon 01 686 8888- 
MB BRA RS COGWortb 1986 
White- £15.996. Sees of Grav- 
iton 01 686 8888. 


J | TVR 350i j 

fpiii 




I 1 FERRARI 1 

I 308GTS 

1 7JU0 rates nriy 

1 B40FS.rearspciBr. Sports 

-* whauat btadt -magnetethide. 
ro FSH. air oond. sbwU^iBa 

1 oflRtomgtauL 

| BZre73469 


I LOTUS ESPRIT TURBO 

1 1986 C. Rod, tape M leather 

. interior. riconDMiK)g.tectDiy taiga 

1 sot mot. stem nob eastern. 

1 2 DJM 0 nits, raamt new tyres. 

I mass | 

1 MiMil NWo Dcabn. 

I p£te M, 

| nx 


COSWORTH 

Sierrra 

For Immediate Defivanr 

From Etxope's Ha 1 R5. 
Deatar. Cal MBto Slaw tor 
personal sarvioo. 

Trtawco Dunrtabte 

Luton (0582) 67811 

MNYHOHUOLMTA 1.6(A) rrg. 
1984. wom woeer bda sad 
door caogHngs. 2.900 genutao 
mBca an Hoot. Superb condi- 
tion- £8.000 ono TdhOl 878 
88441 tonytinm) 

■5 C88W8BH D rrg. 
Wart/grey RUerior. Remote ut- 
p. trasoote suns system- 6.000 

1 mile*. Sato due to drtvug bon. 

* A*Wng Price £14.990. Tel 021 
^ 7486030(H) 0Q1 7073640(01 

L 

*■ LOTUS IXCCL 83 reg. ffiadk fuB 
silver teolhri. A/C- Atptnr me- 
_ reo. Low urteoge. Srrviw 

tmtniv. Atnolaurty tape TO. 

H £11-280 Phone 076 2K4 8876 

t- 

* ACTON MfumHOSe MU 1969. 

S Auto. PAS. sunroof. 11 maatta 

4 MOT. Black wtto Una leather 

UDhoCatro. BeamttfM car InaUte 
_ sad ouL Only £96oa 
Chorleywood (09278) «849. 

h 

5 MUSTANG Couwiablo V8 1972, • 

“ 1 nrwlou* owner, go Mdap 

*■ 50000 mites, wfdte/bfue (Um. 

_ exoeflem rondftion. power 

hood, power steering, auto 

6 £4.750. Tet 0860 5S4747 

a 

x LAMBONGW— Counffirti BOOOS 
1984 Black/beiga 4-SOOtan. 1 
owner. RHD. £48.000. TO: Ol 
- 794 1285 

l- MAZDA NX7 1986 D rag. white. 

roof. M-fl aysteia. 6.000 miles. 
£12.996. Tel: 0235 28828 T 

eomuHTH ton Wintr. one 
owner, ixivate sale. £15375. 

Teh 05*57 434210. 


OTA TURBO VS RENAULT. Pi» 
hs bOua. Hack valour. Ftrt) spec. 
9-000 Rifle*. FSH. starWng car. 
£2» -OCXX (08839 843979. T 
154 W> 2 Litre Ooff 08. 060 6.9 
sec. 150 MPU Jtfly 83. 21X300 
rnfles. Lhasa, an extras. £6.9Ba 
TH : (0703) 786143 tevefl 
CITKXUfa AD HOMO Al Huge 
DtscmniL RagU DeUvera- Phoe- 
M9L toss 126) 4676. 

LOTUS CARS. For the beat na- 

ttanwtde eau> buyers. w» 
Lotus Norfolk 0605 407766. 
MAZDA KX7. VGC. FSH. C rag. 
low mHeoge. £8800 ono. Td 
061 861 99SS A 061 486 1609. 
NISSAN WO XX Tan)* Auto. 
1988. red. One owner. Mini. 
£9.250. Tell 09274 20076. 
PEUGEOT Inc 205 GTi A CTI at 
Huge dtacouflt. tusM dedwtra, 
Phoenix (026 126} 4676. 
■OUOLT Inc 8 Gt Turbo. Huge 
Dtecouiu. Rapid DaHvera. Rioe- 
ntx I OSS 126) 4676. 


TO PLACE YOUR 
TRAVEL ADVERTISEMENT IN 


THE TIMES 


TRADE 

ADVERTISERS 


TEL: 

01-481 1989 


ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 

TELEX 


01-481 9313 
925088 


PRIVATE 

ADVERTISERS 


TEU 

01-481 4000 


USE YOUR ACCESS OR BARCLAY CARD 


PARLIAMENTARY 

NOTICES 


MPaMJAMCNT 


BRITISH WATBtWAYS 


NOTICE B HEREBY OVEN M M Hinmnn If being nude M 
r*m iimni tn me p ure town py me nan Waterway* Board 
Cine Boaitf~l car am to tocrouuce ■ to ooder the mow 

Mwimnw n ura ari * of wm» w« I o bp « hhi i» a r o nn» a«»Mnnii»ry - 
1. CUEptrucMn of the Baarag wort* u nreccDM wMh the 
renorptkwi of the Shreytalr* Upton Ctetdl - M Wrtg wn aeythhe toancli 
i-mecHua-) - 

Warts in Die dn tim or itiaraiiiwii nrtoi county at Powys - 
In (he rnmnunWly of New www and UanBwchatani • 

Work no (. A new rut 2387 metre* to tenant between 


< tochniodk Lack) al 

i Donor Loot and 


F i at non e Lock. 

Wort No. I A. A PCW brtdge M UanBwCMUm to cany me raid 

Pt wm Liannwenaiani Road and Bock ram over Wort No.l: 

Won NP.1B. A ratsteg of the pnvaie accca* road al Detfor teodtag to 


Newtown Water Reclamation Worts iMMdtog a bridge over Wort 

Mo 1 a 

Wort NolX. A reconr u c u tm of thr esteUna bddgp canying the 

•enm raad to Abcrtgchan (ram Ok B4599 over the caul: 

to Um t i smmiin ty of B ut new - 

Work M2 a dtvemoo of the r»nn 512 min i to tenant at Raa 


Wbrt NOM- A new read « rad How including a Midge owe Wet* 

ihj; 

Wom no a a m«w etd 290 para in te wi Ui at Fran: 

Wort Nol4a_ a new BUM at Fran to carry to A.485 are Work 
Nn4e 

Worn MaJL A now cut 727 atm tn langm M Oanhmyt 
Work NCL6A- A new road ot O M Pu ny l in a u d bi p a anuga over wort 

No. 4. togdtMr with o re Bn mum of the tenner A 485 and a bridge 

owr wont No.at 

Week n* 6 A new n* 37o mane* to tnpni M Mat: 

Wort Na 6A A new bridge at Rcfad to Die carry the 8.4588 ever 
week No A. 

ha 


Wert Np.7. A flow CM 296 nufraa to tangUi ai WMMwuses 
Wort NolTa a raumg of me A48B al wiuunouaa Including a bridge 
over won no. 7 wgemar wan a • are n o of Rod kawr. 

wort Mo 8. A new cut 3D5 metre* w length u GaBowUrec 

Wort NoBA ABtwuWottocany me A.48S and the private aeeeaa 

IP w c iu bpoqi Hppi School over work NoJh 

|p caa uw nrtty ef Qiihnoid (WBhouO and umteMo - 

Wort Net*. A w i n rnto a. inwwntnp and raailMuarm of to caoaL 

3.158 n«m to teaoov bdwacn — d d i Locks and Maerdy 

wetooma a new lock Maeroy locum MasiUy. rcconamacuan of me 

• ■ a dwn acres* lbs GuartMd Arm of Bw 


work No.«A. A new bridge 10 cwry too t 
BAWS wad Lower Hoorn (Potto) aw Work No.P: 

Work No-Va. 

over Wort No 9: 


Wort. No-io. A 

length al Yew Tree: 
wertNCLlOA. Anewraaaaci 
No.l<k 

Wort No.1l. A MW cut 294 
won no.ua A 
Work Na.li: 


readooment or (hr cum 112 metres In 


> to tengto ol Walla BMk: 


worts m the Meapi ot Bniiiaii and m toe dMtncl of North 
snrap ewtee . couney at fTTini>aTiin • 

la toe oe atihas of Uaaaymymch sod POM and Oamnue Rural . 

wen. No-12, a wMto a too. de o poci to o and nsliarmain at toe canal 

5.009 partu s to length, between Uaoynwneca 


Wert NO-12A A new rood ol OH School Home tactudtog o bridge 

over Work Ne.i2t 

Wort No-lSB. A new raad al RaOkrtto tnetndtoo o brioge over Wert 

No. 12 : 

In toe perttoaa at Oswestry RoraL Weae FaUaa. WHntogkn. Hortney 


Work No. 15. A ntw cut 201 metres to tenatti ot Masrtura: 

won nolIAA a MW rood at MasMura Inrtadtoo a bridge over weak 

No. 13- 

Wort No. i«. a wtfnu* deep ti l ing and taaflanmeM ot toe csaid 

0.947 metres In tenon* set* 


Wort N0.14A A new Bridge al OueenK Head to carry the ab over 
wort No.lA 

wort No.l A A wioenmg. do —nto g and rso M pi a a fau at toe w salon 
Aim of toe canal 342 m a tia a to loan al FranMoo. 

2. Stopsuig up or dtocntao of toe foHowma m oepai h * 
lal to the c ommun ity of Ngwinwn and Ltearewentosm. i 

between toe OU Pnaap lte u ss al newiown ana toe Newi o iwn water 


to) to toe community of Dci Ttew. the Motoadh MuMi brtween toe 

A483 and ■ potol item (he arogerty known a* “Hetmouae^. 

trt In the com mun ity at C h rrcghof h - 

(U toe footpstb tNo.1) brtw aan too BA3M ol NawbriOge and toe 


lH)lhe«ootoolh Aram toe north teds of toe CareeghoCa to usu yniyiiech 
Rood aa wan* BrIOo* (era dwee of eotM 20 retmc 
M) to toe (amnwBi or Q u naw a M (WtnwoU. Da lootoam 041*239) 
near to me weir al toe aradham and at can m Lock. 

A The itewidmi up. pmiwao. nprtkn. raangnmem. or rabtog of 

roak. artvMr oceess mk and means of acre** hi the dhtnete of 

MoaXoMnerasbire and North Sbrogehire. and In toe Boraugb of 

Qii ea n y. and toe OUtap in and d te a w don of part of toe rew Brook 

In the co i ureun Uy at R n rtew m toe OMCrtel of MnugoanyitiiK. 

4. Special provreonm m eoanactioo with toe conatmcnaa and 

mrtdrn a n ee of toe prapoa ul worts ana proW te n tor toe e alnnl o u . 

tidupuuui. amra u en. r ep lac emen t nr relaying thereof: tartndtog 

toe coeoinicUofl of nibsktlary worts: too tempanra suppose of rand* 

and other wav* and waterways: the appropriation of site* of roads 

and ways so dogged npimporauumy ter mo rspobr of bridges, rood* 

and wsyi nmda. diverted or anrad: too andarptantop of buudBga 

now the works: toe B wr s uu of water to toe canal ono toe fBUng to 

langm* or waterway raodaiad mmenny by toe 

■raot toe Board tram am ooHostion to nuMnin 


5. Pioriune of tend or rights to. wder or over tend tor toe purpeaao of 

toe gtogaatd works and ter toe p ro f lop of natora tua en te*. 

inehs Pn gpowsTtopu nJi n te usupulsslly and uaefor thapunKnesof 

toe wurta opart (40 squ are ui e ir eo or toa rea bo uti ) of toe publle open 

snsce aa C dto w rti te In tha communtly of WatanpooL dtetrict of 

ne. odteuiag me A483 to (he rtenwy of wetdwoof 

of. and ' ‘ 


to toe areas of toe proposed worm: sxa n enen of auapaciaton of private 

rtgMa of any and agarial proildoin as 10 any an toad and 


6. provtiton Bor the CteodUteauan of Idghwsys foemlno part of or In 

too vKtouy of toe p ro p ose a worts and ter toe dhoopfleotom. la 

relation to the canal, of Drovtifcma of toe London. MkUknd and 

SeMwe RaUwacy (Oman Act 19*4: autooridng the Board 10 peemM 

me oae or toe canal ter navtaohon and to mnculr works, carry out 

Ma ra dona and do ofl other thtogi as may bo lagpBnu for ecsteetog. 

m o tot o toin g. repairing and uatng too rente and to a afaht i ih and 

malntola further imspedned ntenre ramvee an land teeming part of 

or in too vtcbUty of toe anah and provision for toe canal to be 

re f erred to so toe Monagarevy Conte. 

7. Piortstaea of ■ general nature appucstoe to er tojsanoetoaaare of 


toe Mi lan dad Art Inrtud l n a mnwrief attain readlled rasctrwmi*- 

AND NOTICX: IS FURTHER GIVEN toot MOM M Motions oi toe 


propos ed wans and olara of too land wMcb may be purchased or 

need under toe I ntended AcL. wUh n book of ftebeanob to recti plan*. 

haw beat depoaHad ter panne fnepection a 1 teUaw*:. 

wito the Chief Execute « A Ootmty Treaower of the Powys County 

Gavaate. Powys Coooty HteL Usndrtodod Wteta. UM 6LG: 

with me Cnenly anerteaey of me Shraputitrr Oooniy Pou n d ! . The 


SbirehteL Abbey Foregato. Shrewnbory. SY2 OND: 

wan me ante Executive o 


of llie *4en»pp «a ara rti tra Duma comdL 

akdrtrt Council Office* Severn Road. WrtshpooL svai 7A& 

wtto toe Chief CxacnKw of toe Oswestry Boronoh Ctinncfl- Carrie 

View. Oswestry. SYii ur 

with toe Ctert and CMef Exscudve of the North Shropshire DMrict 


wtto toe Ctert 10 m# P a n l ew Oa mawmB y C oimrU . g Macs Bevno. 


with DeOrt ID me CSTTCUbaCa C0uw mu sty Co un cil. Green Crete. 
Uanymynech. war* 

wim the Ciert to me EDeanure Rural Fartm Oouncti. 10 Lime Cioae. 


wttfa toe Ctert to toe CuO a flrt d (Without) Oommunuy Council 

Sherwood. Ravtow Avonue. daunted. Powys: 

wbdi tor Ctert to toe Hordlay Panah Chnncn. Siandar. Baaiw Monti. 


with tor Ctert to BMUanOHnteOBr nnaadryO ota irt L Orchard Houen. 
il an dn n lo. Ua ny my oach. ppwys: 

wtto me Ctert to the Uamy n amach and ram Partite cou ne U. Canal 


wan me Oert at tor Wot Feiton Pw ite i On u nrtt . The OH flmaora. 


wtto the Oert of too W im n n gte w Partite Council. B aachfla M Lodge. 
Mordo Road. Owa ter y. SYll 2AW 



al tor prtea of a JO each at tor offieca of each of 

Parlismentary A g ains ana at the 






1987: if it nrinltuara in me House at Loras, me latest 

Datong a Petition tn too Office of tbs Ctert of tor 

In tote House wut ba 6m February 1987. Further 


ILJ. DUFFY 


London NW1 6JX 
SoUCttor to toe Board 


SHERWOOD tt CO 
Queen Anne's ch a mb ers 
3 Da — - 


London SWIM 9UO 


NPIlf 


IN PARLIAMENT 

SESSION 1986/87, 


1 applicsUon ia being mads to 

rllomanl by the National 



1. TO 

Mem In sM tut tow Art igio 
and me Nsllonal Provident 


2. To rhPrt provjskma 
lortdeatai to or cnasrauenUal 
upon me BhovemanDoned 



un de rat gped Secretary or nr 
S olicitor* and Parliamentary 
Agra Is apd M too following 


4 Wemyaa Ac* fftiiin auU 
CHS eajtfc 


Btotoeh homo. 2 LHianMk 
SMeL Britan BT2 8AA: 


Wntvfltr House. Fltzalar 
Court. Newport Rood. Cardlfl 
CF2 lELl 


Natio n al Provident Homo. 
Cte ver tey Road. Tunbridge Write. 
Kent TNI SUE. 


Copies of toe BIB may also 
be tnsxxted id any branch office 
of NW. 


Obtertion >0 toe toll now be 
made by depeallino a peution 
ogatare n m rttter or bom Homes 
of PsnisiMM. The lots* date ter 
toe depoau of such a petition to 
tor Flral House will be 30tb 
January 1987 If the Bill 
eonunencH Id ibe House of 
C om mon* or 6 U 1 February 1067 
H it co mm e n ce* tn too House of 
Lord*. Further ktfbnnaliau may 
be ooitenad from tor Office of tor 
cierk of me Paramenia. House 
of Lord*, tor Private Bfll Office of 
toe House of Commons or too 
undersigned Parliamentary 
Agents. 

Dated tote 38ih day of November 
1986 
APOa. Davis 
National Pnortdrti koUtnUon 
48 O racert m rrti street 
London GCSf> 3HH 
Srtrauey 


Druere A Attlee 
Stetebura More* 
London Wafl 
London EC=M EPS 
SoUrtion 


MASONIC TRUST FOB 
GIRLS AND BOVS 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
Dial appbrniMm has been made to 
ParHanmd tn Uie present ISemston 
by the Royal Masonic Inoutuftoh 
for Boy* and the Royal Maoontr 
Imuiuuon far cam (hrretaialtcr 
rHnred to M Itir “llie 
ttmHnUonm"i for Irate to inlro- 
dore a Bm rtiemnaflrr rrl erred k> 
"the BUT*) under the above 
name or dial title far purpascaof 
wtnm me (oUowing is a cnortse 


11 To IranUre- brapeny at the 
Institution* to Truttmiaf the M»- 
sonfc- Trust (of Girts and Bays 
Ibrrrtaaripr referred Is 01 "Be 


TnatT 
i*i To provide lor the transfer 
or HabfUMn of toe InatUrttons. tor 
rasing Mr ogmoinus. owaras. 
contrarbk deed*, actions ele.. 10 
ihf Trual and me rondruclton to 
favour at the Trust of beoumts 
made ia favour of mner of me 
lmllliilton&: 

(A To provide for me ranurur- 
00 in favour of toe 
Rkrkma u wu rt ti Masonic School 
Umurd of oeque at * made in (a- 
‘ ore of the Royal Masonic School 
for Girfr 

14) To proude for me nttludan 
of rrrum property from the pro- 
1 Won* of tor BiH. 

On and offer the 4Ui December 
1996 s ropy of the BID may be 


latoril ol toe prtre of DOp prr ropy 
at toe office* of Meaan. Cleaver. 
Fulton & Rankin. 29 Weiltngton 
Place. BrifosL 8 T 1 6CR. tor of- 
fice* of Merer*. Btggart BsUtie A 
afford. WS..3 GU-NIhLh StreeL 
EjdUdmrgft. EH5 6YY and al toe 
ouim of tne 
PerlHanenlara Agents. 

Oueruon to Ibe 


ogainal ll m the Off Ire of the Clerk 
ol toe parHamente. House of 
Lords. Or toe Private BU Of lire of 
toe House of Gammons. The lai- 
rd date tor tor deposit of uirti a 
petition in the raw House will be 
6th Frtnmra 1987. If the S*U 
orMnatn m me House of Lord*, 
er 30Ui January 1987 H II ortgl - 1 
■um in the House of Gomroon*. 

Further InforinMlon regarding 
the drttiht of surh a PeUbon may 
be obiained from wilier toe Offlre 
ol toe Ctert of toe Partiamnus. 
Horerof Lord* or tor Private BIB 
Offlre 01 llie Howe of Common* 
or toe undrnnniUaDed Psrtto- 
mentHy Agent*. 


DATED Has 28fti day of 
Nov ember i96b 

hTONEHAM LANGTON A 
PASSMORE 
38 High Street 
CibMint 
Kent BflT 5A8 
sotirnera 


Rees A Front 
1 Tho saneuiara 
Mrcauninater 
Loudon SW1P 5JT 
CterttameniBry Agents 


SPEECH LY BOtCHAM 
Bouverte Horae 
164 Fieri Sim* 
London E.C4A 2HX 
swman 


SHARPE. PRITCHARD A CO. 
Oureci Anne's Chamber* 
3 Dean Farrar Street 
West minder 
London swih 9JX 
Parnarnrntara A renlfl 


IN PARLIAMENT 

SESSION 1486-87 


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
LONDON 


Nome n, nreitiy gnen tool ap- 

nkrabon n being made to 

Potunmi ny me imunibi of 

London. L diversity CMtegr Lon- 

don ihmiNfler ntMlM to a* 
■The Connie" 1 . The Middlesex 
Havana) Medics* School therein 

jw referred to M -the School" 1 . 

the tesUute of Larynortogv and 

Otologv. tor htitMute of OrthortN 
on and toe imuuae of urstoay 

mnnoafter refor m ) 10 ov "the 

tmtalut**"i for leave to nurodure 

a 8dl ihpretnafter rNrrred to aa 


“the B»H- p under ihrate* 

or toorl bile (or toe purposes of 

winch me looowtng n a coortse 


1. To dtrealve (he School and 
me ln*Ui uin 

S. To trsrafiT from toe School 

and the Imllluun to tor Ctittege all 

taopmy. rtghfa and pnv liege* be- 

longing to. vetted to «• 
rorrasaMr by me School and the 

■nsinifln Kmrtoer witn afl drtfa 

and naHIHIn of the School and 

the bsMUM. 

3 To coni mar ana carry into 

rllrrt m tavore of re ffOM me 

collroe OU extitiaa or Pending 

a g ree tnrptv. appotnimenh. 

awards, rente arts, deeds and olh- 
rr mdntmenH. action*, and 
proreed mg* which urnnrdtalciy 

octree 1 m August 1987 evisl or 

ree pending in lovour of or 

agaansl the School and toe had 

line* rnoecuvefy. 

4. To provide but bequeuv or 

outer tienrills applyiiKi to favour 

al um- School and the hadllulct 

rnpertiveiy Shan on and -tiler m 

Auouti 1987 apply in lav our of 

me Caaroe 

a To provide uvti ■»->< pan or 

the Course romtliulinq ih medi 

ra) VMM siuU be known as The 

Lnnmttv C0UC9 


School of Medtnne id L'ntvmity 

CMlepe Loodoo and Stull be nun 

.igrd and controlled in 
accordance wtfh toe Royal Char- 

ier re an t e d tome Cortege on Out 
December 1977 
k To rnari provIMOn* incldrn- 

lai to or rowtowum upon toe 

above ntenuoned ponioan 
On and after toe am day of De- 

remorr 1986 a raw ol toe BUI 

may be inreectnl and copies 

I hereof may be obtained at the 

pnre ol Son each at me Swale 

House. University of London. 

Mate! street. London WCI C THU. 

University College London. Gow- 

er Steen. London WC1E 6BT. 
The Middlesex Hospital Medical 

bf hoot. Mortimer Street. London 

WIN 7PN. imUuir of Lorangoto- 

ov and Otology. Roval National 

Tliroai. Nose and Car Honpltal. 

Gray'* bin Rood. London WC1X 

SEE. imninlr of Orthopaedic*. 

Royal National Orthopaedic Ho* 

plUL Brorktey Ml. sumnore. 

Middlesex. HAT 4LP. tnsllUHe oi 

Lrotogy. 178 Snaltesbrev Ave- 

nue. London WITH 8JL and at 
the offices of toe underagnod 

Partismeraarv Agents 
omeritoo to the Bill may be 

made by deposHing a Petition 

agaimJ it in earner or both Homes 

oi Parliament. The last date for 

me degosii o< warn a Petition m 

Ihe lint Home win be bin Febru- 

ary 1987 it the Bin onqwoie* m 
the House of Lord* or SOttl Janu 

ary 1987 il H ongmales In the 

Mouse of Common*. Further In- 

formation may be obtained from 
me Private BUI Olrr of tor 

House ot Commons, the Offlre of 

Um- Clerk of me Parliament*. 

House ol Loros or Ihe under 

signed Pwiiammlary Agents 
Doled tots 28tb day of November 
1986 
Ren. A Freer* 
1 Thr Sanctuary 
Wrslmlnslrr 
London SWiP 3JT 
Parliamentary Agents 


COMPANY NOTICES 


TMC COMPANY OT 
PROPHorroics 01 
MflTGHlDCH BftIDCt 
NOTICE R, HEREBY GIVEN 
■haoatiExIraardiiiaik Mrriimol 
The Com pans ol Pmoriemrs oi 
Whur tMdrh Brume u'Ui tm heU at 

Ihe off Ires CU W Cumber A Sou 
•Theale, Unuled. TheoJe. BeiLs. 

re* Saturday me *ev enteenih day 
re January J9B7 al 12 noon tut 
Ihe- purpose of ronudenng uu- 
nioviMon* of Ihe Bill now bet Dir 
Panmmrnl tntlluled "A R|fl to 

moditv me Transport Charge'. 
Ac iMisrrtlaneoic. FroviunR.i 
Art 1964 in u-- appIk-Mion ip ih- 
bndoe undenaLliv) of Ute Compa- 
ny of Proortcloc* of Whlirhurm 
Btidre*. In renter other pohnnm 
Be Proonrtor* and to jiwiui nr 
rrprat certain at the local skau 
lots provision*, appnrahk- la 

toem: and lor OTTvr purpose." 

Al such Meetmq Ihe utd Ddi 
wifl be ■ utuwllrd Me tne rtttvudr: 
alion and apmovat of the 
proonrtor*. 

Dated Hus twrnlypighlh day ot 
November i*,bc 
T RE.Y1 
Clerk lo ihe Company 
The Toll Mouse 
WhitrnurTti brlil or 
P^ngbourne 
Rradum. Berl-v. 


LIVERPOOL EXCHANGE 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that apourauon b bring made to 
Parliament hy ON Properties 
Limited tor leave lo inirodurr in 
toe prevent Seaton of ParUammi 

a Sill under toe above name or 
short lute lor purposes of which 
me following h 4 concise 


To repeal ihe Liverpool Ex- 
(lunge Art* 1B69 lo 1965. 

On and after toe 4Ui day of Dp- 
ember 1986. a ropy ot the BUI 
may be In spected and forer* 
Ihrreaf Obtained al the price of 50 
pence rath si the offices of tor 
undretioned Soilctlor and Parlia- 
mentary Agnus. 

Obterlion 10 Ihe Bill may be 
nude by depositing a priuton 
again*) (1 m either or both House* 
of rarttamrni. The utrsl dale lor 
me deposn Of such a petition In 
the fin Hour wtu be 30Ui Janu- 
ary I9BTH Ihe BIH comme n ce* In 
Ihe Houle of Common* or 6lh 
February 1987 If ll cwmnm c c* In 
tne House of Lord*. Further Infor- 
mation may be renamed from the 
Olllra of Ihe Ctert of the Parlia- 
ments. Hour of Lord*, the 
Private Bit) Office of toe House of 
Commons re the Lmderugned 
Parliamentary Agents. 

dated not BBUt day at 

November 1986 
R.V. Co wire 
Hobart House 
Groivrnor Place 
. London Sw lx 7AE 
Solicitor 


Rn* & From 
1 The Sanctuary 
Westmlnner 
London SwtP 3JT 
ramameniary Agents 


COMPANY NOTICES 



KIWW roHMT MRUHUTNE 

■SIM OF EHMBMUBB 
Id bt hdo a the ottos al AWKNTO 
8V. Hew Botetam 133, ftawram. on 
Todfa), 2Sd Daontet. 1986. a 09 00 
Hut 

JtGBHM 

1 . Opteteig 
z To teuss me muosii u kfer ne 
Company s Anew at teaajwm 
It d proposed to dfc» Die Somaal vwr 
oi Be Camooiy wd to aflyst Arede 36 
si the Mules 9 AssoMBon s loflon 
Ted 


Hk ComnDv'5 rratoal yey sfqi un 
bail rip frit day ot Mo co w m list 
day Ol Fefinaty nkiK ol eack yea 


38 


I Tke ComtHDy'v Ironaai veat sttal 
tun fann tne tot day ot J»w to 
fee Otety-tol at) ft DeomDte. 
retot. al eah ved. 

7. Tke flair td cknue d me iraicul 
p. khdi conmnefl 00 tar fra 
ft Hack, nnaeeg honored and 
. 5M giaB be bit mny-fiisi day 
Dacwta. imciEBi touted and 


gnM OHMHMT GESERU. 
MEETING OF SHMBOUEBS 
B be hem at Uxsfeal Suuop 
F roWJnrt 16. PMystoo. Si Maanen. 
Kesbaanb Antes, on Wedncilay. 
Z4U Decernter. 1988. ■ 11 00 ton 


1. Openog 

2. Piwoa) to aha the Company s 
Arndts d Assooobon. 

tt 6 pmoosed u alter the tnamai yr> 
ol Ihe Qmvaqr end to adjuS Article 36 
ot the AiMb ol Assocodui as IdUtos 


Arfde 36 
The Canpany s buntai year shall rm 
(tom the fits) day ol Moth Id ne Iasi 
day ol Fetniani udusne at each pat- 

hffiod Hd 


t. The Cungmy's teanoal war mat 
nnhmthe tot day oi January » 
*e BWTy-toS day ol Decaitiff. 
rxhme ft tat)) year. 

Z The date ol ctosne ol pw hranoai 
year, ntsh eo ma aicM on the lira 
mdBa. mieiBBO totted ana 
dad bo ibe they- tor day 
to. nruteco todred ana 
St 

1 Qbsm. 

Haiders of Sho e Otfra es to Bcara 
ol aneodra ot bong 
mn se nt e fl 5 one ae acm 0 me aiwe 
rWim M uiMhiiL amid lodge Iter 
Share muicaus, Dr hand, (postal 
dements mi ngi be accepted), wen ihe 
Neural Wcamesw Ba* PIC. Stock 
Office Senses. 3d How. 20 (W Broad 
SML IdfldMi EC3N IE) (babwn the 
housoMOim Md2|un.lasiaifihK 
EXTRAOROMAfW HFORMATWE 
UEETMfi - NOT LATJB THAN TUESOAV 
I 6 U 1 DECEMBER IBBfL 


pmWffiUBIAIff GS0IAL METING 
ROT UTBt THAN WEDNESDAY 
17lh DECEMBER im 
■1 ftchanQe for a rat«L 

KM oonas nffiase sham 
DteUonE oe masMUy detnoled wsh 
a hank nut obwa a CmficaiB m 
Depart sgned by the bank at mince 
ttrt sub ink a baring the stare 
centaus. The Cetifcatt mast be 


The rtcett fwtte sbare catibcaes a 
Cenfiode ol Danss mi consmuB 
mfaa of a Staefinto s anwaiwa 
ID anaid and Me a Ae Merino and 
staid be pnseflted 2 the dm oMte 
MMM Hal. H a toder daytss a 
appoat a proxy «ao need not be a 
toll* 01 me Corapity. n aland and 
Me in IB stem a bum ol Bmv nav be 
blamed from ibe Nwual VMmnsttf 
Bit PIC as sum and tta torn of 
in»y mast ba presented 8 the don of 
the Meeting Hal ugens vUi is* 
' d Mr the shot certAcalri o» 
CW(S PriX* 

ShanhoMmi mho nanwt a Share 
bottn Adomt mdh ne Cdtaany 
wEfang id trind erttp ot bofti Meetings 
or appemi a gnur ia thee stead. n« 


thee (teuton m mntnfl W ne 
C/oAwwm 


j. Roma MW C/o — . . 

BY. Heat Boeekteg ii3. 3037 At 
FMtotam. NrtBxtands. b amw to 
mer than tha dabs intend rtwe. 


MUopri pranas may abend, wbs mil 
n« be m a n* nafmaM um 
Cope al me (uf agoM» «d onto 
Mnrt Reocrt k« 19DS/SS can h e 
utrtbned bwi nun* tesmoElp 
Bank FLC b Die address man abOM! 
Dated 5tt day « QeamMr 1886 
By (Met of d* Maapnwd 
ST WARTS) 


IN THE MICH COURT OT 
JlVTICt 

NO 00859? 01 |Qfti> 
CHVJLCEJJV DIVISION 

INTHF. MATTER OF 
MANL r A CTI. RCRS. HANOI CR 

L-K 

HOLDINGS UMITEO 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ,ILT 19UL 
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIV EN 
that a Petition wav an tfu- n->r 

Nmifirorr 1986 PmmM lo Her 
Mjmli'V Hre Court of Jiruire 
for llvr rnnllrmatiiHi of tho imk ■ 
Uon of thr rapiLil of thr above- 
luited Con* p.vn v tram 
USvOMUXXl lo rut by ranrritin'] 
dU 1 hr- 11.798 648 tworti Ordt 
lury “A" Snares, all the 
ll.701.3S2 umwixcd Ontuury 
-A" SOarr-L all Ihr 1.529JtbO t* 
vurO Ordinary " 11 " Sturre And all 
thr 170.740 unHSunl Ordtiiary 
“ 8 " Siren all of Cl each of thr 
viri Company On Ihr vad irrlur- 
Iron of rarelal Ifkinri rffrci Ute 
aialal of Ihr Company * to ru- 
■nrnvnrrl to ICO 000.000 dollars 
■n Ihr ruirmrv of Ihr Lnllrd 
sum of Ammra ‘hrrrinaiirr 
rafted "dollar-.") by Ihr rrratioii 
Of 94 000 000 Ordinary "V 
Sturm and t> 000 OOO Ordinary 
-B~ Siren of 1 dollar rarn The 
amoum ti*- wiurn I nr isvurtt rapl 
lal of Ihr Company n lucminra la 
hr trdurrd is Ip hr ronvrrtrd inlo 

aollary and 0091119 ] in paying dp 
■ n full nrw Ordinary "A" stvarr-. 
and nrw Ordinary "B" Slum of 
Ihr Commoiy ol 1 dollar rath 
AND NOTICE K, rt RTHFR G1V ■ 
LN I hal thr soxl Prill ion n 
dl r rriiti lo hr hr art! More ihr 
Houourablr Mr Ju.im Mrrvvn 
CM ur* al tor Ru al Court* of Juv 
■rr. Strand. London WCA 2LL 
on Monday l&fh day cH Dci r rTn 
tier 1986 

ANY Ci rdi ua or snarrnoldrr of 
I Or Company drain) lo eigirr 
Uk* making of on Order fee iho 
ronllrmalmn of Ihr said reduction 
of raetial should appear ai ihr 
limr of hraring in prison nr by 
Counsel lor liut purpose 
A cop* of Ihr vairt petition will be 
furnnhrd lo an* wh prison re . 
outrun) (hr same by ihr under- 
mrnfiann) sotiruors. nn pavrurni 
of ihr rrgulAird riui*r for Ihr 
vamr 

Dated thr* 2nd day of Drrcmtm 
1986 
Alien & Ovrry 
9 Chrapvidr 
London CCSV uAD 
RWC/ECR/V2B 


D4 THE HICH COURT OF 
JLISTICE. 

No 008596 oi 1986 
CHANCERY CHVfeKJN 
IN THE MATTER OF 
MANUFACTURERS HANOVER 
EXPORT FINANCE LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 198S 
NOTICE S HEREBY GIVEN 
IhM a Petition was on Ih* 21vl 
Noirmbrr 1 986 pmeulref lo Her 
MremlyS High Corel of Jusilco 
lor Ihr ronlirmallon of the reduc- 
tion of thr rap) lal of tor above- 
named Company from 
ci . 000.000 io mi by rontwilim 
all tor 500.000 Kauri! Ordinary 
Shares and alt tor soo.aoo 
unhnurd Ordinary Share* all of 
Cl iwH of Ihr void Company. On 
tor said reduction of raptiai tak 
uig rffm tor capital of tor 
Oouipanv is to br increased to 
2.00ODOO dollars m ihr currency 
of Ihr United Slain of America 
inerefnaffrr rafted -Italian" t by 
the creation of 2.000 000 Orfli 
nary Shares of 1 dollar each. Ttir 
amouni by wiurn Ihe issued cap)- 
lal of tor Company b proposed to 
be reduced is id br converted Inlo 
dollars and applied in paying up 
in full nrw Ordinary Stv.res of 
Um> Company of t dollar each 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER CIV 
CN that tor said Petition is 
ax Pried lo br heard before tor 
Honourable Mr JusUre Mrrvyn 
Da* te* al tor Royal Courts of Jib. 
lire, strand. London WC2A 2LL 
on Monday 15th day of Dec cm 
tier 1986. 

ANY Creditor or StvarrtioUter of 

Ihr Company desiring lo oppose 
the making of an Order lor Ihe 
ronf umallon of tor sold reduction 
of rapilal should appear at Ihe 
bmr of hearing In person or by 
Counsel for that purpose 
A ropy of Ihr said PrllUon will or 

lurnlshed lo any well orison rr 
uiurUK) the same by Ihr Lmdri- 
mrnttonnl sourllors on payment 
of tor regulated rhargr for tor 
Same. 

Doted tow 2nd day ot December 
1986 

Allen A Ovrry 
9 Chrapsirte 
LoniUMi EC2Y 6AD 
RWC/EGB/VZB 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF 
JUSTICE 

NO 007221 of 1966 
CHANC CRY D IVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF WEST 
RIDING 

WORSTED AND WOOLLEN 
MILLS 
LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
■hat a PrllUon wo* on Ihr 26th 
November 1986 presenlrd lo Hrr 
Mamly'v High Court ff Justice 
■or tor rtHtflmialton of Ihr redur- 
1.011 ol Ihr rapilal ol thr above- 
iianird Company irom 
C5.25O.00CI lo £3.750.000 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIV- 
EN rnal tor said Priilton is 
dirrried lo be hnard be) ore thr 
Honourable Mr Juslire Mervvn 
Dav trs ai Uir Royal Courts of Juv 
Ure. Strand. London WC2A 2U- 
on Monday t6to day o) Deem 
her 1986 

ANY Credit or or SharrhotOrr of 
Ihr Company desfrino lo oppose 
Ihr making of an Order lor thr 
onUrmalnn ol Ihr said reduction 
Of rapilal should appear at the 
bmr of hearing in person or by 

Counsel lor lhal purpose 

A ropy ol tor said WUlimr will t*r- 
lurmstard lo any such prison rr- 
cnnrtno tor same bv tor under 
mrnltonra solimors on pavmrni 
of me regulated charor for Ihr 
same. 

DATED ton 3rd daj- ol December 
1986 

Nahario Nalbanson 
76 Jertnvn Slrrrl 
London SWiV 6NR 
i Rrl b/PJS/Cl 610/1 5> 
Sollritors lor Ihr 
above named Coiripanv 


IN THE HIGH COURT LH 
JL-STICC 

No 008092 of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF ELS WICK 
PLC 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OT 
THE COMPANIES ACT >986 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
tortl a Prinmii was on Ihr tOlh 
November I486 presenlrd to Her 
Ma Irsly's High Court of JirJlre 
leu- Ihr ronnrnullon ol the rjurrt 
lal mn ol thr Shore Premium 
Account stand Unq Ip Ihr books of 
arraunl Oi thr above named com 
panv a* al the 30th November 
I "86 

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER 
OVEN lhal ton Prtlllon is dirert 
rd lo hr heard hrtorr tne 
Hcmourabk- Mr. Justice Mertvn 
Dav «rs at Ihr Roy al CourtvoC Juv 
Urn. 9rand. London WC2A 2LL 
oii Monday ton 15in day ol Dr 
ember 1986 

Any Creditor or Shareholder of 
ton said Company drsinno lo op- 
post Ihr matting of an Order for 
Use rgntirmaltOH Ol ton said ran 
reflation oi Share Premium 
Arc mint should appear al ihr 
limn of nrortna tn person or by 
Caunrrl for lhal purpose 
A row r* Wte NMd PHIIhbi will 
nr furnfthrd lo am' -urn arreon 
rgumnq tor same OV Ihr 
luwtrrmrnliofied SolKllorv on 

paymroi ol tor iroui.iird rharge 
lor um same 

OA TED tot* ard cfaKM Drenmtire 

|9B6 

Sturpn Pnrnard £ Co 
40 Long Acre 
London WC2E UT 
.Vgrnhv lor Rvlnnd MerllncJu A 


Co 

Of 4) Church Mrrrl 
Bumintfom B3 ?D V 
Soilcllor* lor llw 
dhovrtiartiril CoitpJnV 


NORTHIM4N USSECS 
LIMITED 

Notice h hereby given pui-juui 
w Section 588 ol Dm Cnmanil'"- 
,\d 1985. that a Medina ol tnr 

it editors of tor above named 
Company will be brill at 53 /M 
Ch-uirrrv L-inr. London WCRA 
1LW on Wednesday Ihe I71h d.i» 
| Derriiihec 1986 Bl 1C 00 
u'rlorh in tor tore noon, far toe- 
purinvi mentioned to Swnmr. 

589 and 690. ^ 

DATED Itm W day of 

P W T H ' b r t«ft* 

Bv Order of toe Board 

K GARDNER 
SECUFTABY 


CootiiuMd <w pasr % 





















































36 


BUSINESS TO BUSINESS 


FERGUSON & PARTNERS LTD 

Someone you can talk to in the City 

Ferguson & Partners are able to offer a confidential and 
personal service in the area of acquisitions and mergers. 
We can also assist with clients' equity or commercial 
funding requirements. 

Call Robert Graham. Managing Director. 


FERGUSON & PARTNERS LTD. 

Wamford Court, Throgmorton Street, London EC2N 2AT. 
Tel: 01-588 1187. Fax: 01-628 4189 

Ferguson & Partners Ltd is a subsidiary of James Ferguson Holdings pic. 




CHESHIRE 

ELLESMERE PORT 

TO LET 

INITIAL NOMINAL 
RENTAL (NO PREMIUM) 

' Superb modem office Hock built approx 
1970 

1 31,000 sq ft on 2 floors plus 3 storey 

amenities building and 4 storey tower block 
Excellent motorway access (M56 and MS3) 
30 minutes Manchester International 
Airport 

* Up to 280 acres of adjacent development 
land also available at favourable rate 

All enquiries to 
Industrial Development 
Officer, Ellesmere Port & 
Neston Borough Council, 

4 Civic Way, Ellesmere Port; 
Sooth Wfrral L65 OBE. 

Telephone 051 355 3665 X233. 


180% 

AVERAGE PER YEAR 
FOR THE PAST 5 YEARS 
PETER BRANDT S OWN 
TRADING RETURNS 


Commodity Tradere Consumer Report addi- 
tionally ranks Peter Brandt's newsletter The 
Factor #1 in the U.S. on return in margin 
equity 180%, lowest risk pertrade $252 and 
among the smallest drawdown in equity 
$3,758. Mr. Brandt wilt be accepting a 
limited number of managed accounts where 
his only compensation will be a per- 
centage of profits. For full disclo- 
sure documents, track record and 
Free Copy of Factor Report call: 

Conan The InturuUnal Division of VANGUARD BROKERAGE COW. 
Bv Telex V 1187 TAMM UR. h USA 1-800-225-5561. 1-800-221- 
2917. Or CaB David Thomas CUM in NY 1 -(21 2^227-5208. 

Past results are not indicative of tutue redans. 


RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 
LAND/COMPANY 

Our client is a very successful residential 
developer with funds available to strengthen 
its existing land bank via acquisitions in the 
North-West, Midlands and the South-East 

Personal or corporate land holdings will be | 
considered. 

Write, in strict confidence, quoting reference} 
09/1H/AMT. to: 

Deioitte Haskins & Sells 
Bank House, Charlotte Street. Manchester Ml 4BX 


WIMBLEDON 

NEW HIGH TECH INDUSTRIAL UNIT 
12^83 sqJL (Plus 28 parking spaces) 
50% Offices, Partitioned to high std. 
PRICE REDUCED FROM £490,000 
TO £420,000 FOR QUICK SALE 
OR LET AT £4.50 PER SQ. FT. 

Tel: 01-542 6111 



BE YOUR OWN BOSS 

he cmnuMy to med " * foM* (tag 
itemv ml wrt M .Pjrt-mB. 
GUZMG PHOTOGRAPHS OH TO 
PLATES 

HrepsKirareos EMWMBlLWiMla 
nraJnns Ink. fa (alter Mutt Tat WI7 

IUD-U 


ftp Hmtofc Tte Moutfato. Hofytasad. 

AaglBiqr 


U.S. 

EARTHMOVING 
EQUIPMENT 
& PARTS 

bred hum US iranutedurerc. 
Send your requrements. 

McKav World wide 
mfez&Trrau 


HCREASE SALES! 

Good sales reps are rare 

Bad sales reps abound 
We aN train year sales Bam to 

be stalled sales professionals. 

Vour sales aid prints wfl sard 

Contact us now 

Whitt Crass 


14 W ood la nds Tones 
Glasgow 03 6DF 


PfKNHOnOH Envkxm. Full col- 
our phoMs ■ any colour layout - 
on reedy made envelopes. 
Adilnv dramatic new no 
provem em end attenti o n to 
your readum. From only MOO 
envrs. S weeks delivery. Low 
price. Sample*. Immediate 
Quotation. Studio/ Promotion 
Envelopes 01-490 6977. 

ARE YOU having difficulty nnd- 
tog a product Him al a price. We 
beUeve we can Ms. contacts 
world wide, anything from elec- 
trical lo snlrtta to prenHnms 
Tel: P.CS Finders Departmem 
Ol -202 W28 tar further details. 

H O H1 HBBI miT Shop Lid. 
have a number of print shops 
available in N.W. England. For 
details contact MLS Prtm 
Consul Time. UMI 6. Common 
Bank Ind. EzL. Otoriey. Lancs. 
PR7 1NH. Tel: >025721 67056. 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 


WELL ESTABLISHED Company 
on exceptional profits has 

Branched oul A foi l Tie d an addi- 
tional company wim 
Inicrnaiioiul raiding giving 
pood returns & fantastic pros- 

per*. AH set up St I rad In Q. now 
requires capital Infection either 

by total sale, partial sale or bk 

urnnaorshlp. CX20CEK Reply to 

BOX B52. 

—M i Brtvate property and in- 

vestment company: built In tax 
advantage of c jci.boo Brlnlev 

Bowen. Milts 4 Co . Chartered 

Accountants, se Mansel Street. 

Swansea. W.Qianioroan. 

SRAW Marbcila. town centre. En- 
9llsn video dub Very high 
B^fgJfenutoereaMur for sale. 
336.000. 036 SB 26217. 


ESTATE 

AGENCY 

S.E Essex. Wei equipped 
business established over 
8 years. Gross 
commission income 
currently averages £8.500 
per month with projected 
ne/tproW tar 1*6/87 tfi 
£42^00. Substantial 2 
storey premises near main 
fine station. Offers bwtted 
for both freeflow or 
leasehold interest 
Telephone 
0702 558118/351738 
(after 6.00pm). 


MID-DEVOR 

A IGth Century, grade two. 
tasted, newly that c hed farm 
house - licenced quaBty 
guest house. Extensive 
accommodation Including 
sed contested 
gardens with 
pool, from bufldkigs and 1 
acres pasture land. Thriving 
business with further 
potential £275,000. 

Apply Rfckeards, Stats 


Devon, EX20 TJX. 

Tel: 0837 2543. 


THRIVING 

RETAIL 

FLORISTS 

(N. ol England! for sale as gong 
concern ( joint ventures 
consxtered) Sub F/H property. 
T/o £375.000, audited acnxrts 
avadatw. Pmapab and sornus 
wounesody. Reply to BOX J46 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


ATTENTION!!! 

LIQUIDATION 

SALE 

Bathroom suites, cloakroom 
suites, bathroom furniture, 
sharer trays, taps and Whrps ki 
chrome and goti. 100 ‘s of sums 
large or small quantities of 
particular interest hoteliers, 
butters, pfunteis. OtV shops. 
Bxtemon tedders. 

Chance of a litetirne. These 
pncesCAMNOT be beaten. Bring 
oansport and cash. 

WHILE STOCKS LAST 
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 
S TO 5 

CASTLE BATHROOMS, 
Unis 24 to 28. Bnon Close. 
Ott Brick Yard Road. 
Aldridge. West IteTaufe 
Tet QS22 59543/4 


MANAGING DIRECTOR I 

WITH EQUITY PARTICIPATION 

Young progressive concern engaged in the 
design development and manufacture of 
systems Passed structures is looking for an 
experienced self motivated managing direc- 
tor (age not more than 45) to manage the 
company's total operation. This is a unique 
opportunity to participate in a growing org- 
anisation. If you have the relevant exper- 
ience in this industry and are prepared to 
work with a young management team plea- 
se apply in writing giving full details of your 
achievements to-date to: 

Reply to BOX F43. 


RUN YOUR OWN 
SHOW 

Hava you tha confidence 
to run your own safes 
team and control some 
mobile units? National 
company needs 
someone in your area 
now. 

TefcMr lacy 0272 292579 


JOIN THE 
BOOMING 
HOLIDAY 
INDUSTRY 

We have inspection 
ffights to various resorts 
and are looking for 
people to organise small 
groups. Write to 
Overseas Property 
Services, 37 High Street 
Bexley. Kant DA5 1AB. 


1 Ejtperteacecllnsoleabtitfruxtnned 
' by ament product opponaniUB? 

tbu eon join Others canting over 
I £4000 per week Ina new market. 

with a hifrfi quality latUintiammzk 
| door range already enjoying huge 
: consumer occepiancc. 

No stock or cash co m m i t m ent, 
substantial deal flcxiMlcy. leads, 
' and support material available. 
Don’t hpftctc. ExtsOng agents on: 

ng volume sales ink 
Write wWi firff details to limhay 
I Jordan. JLG, WiU Oak Place. Troll, 
human. Somerset, 7H3 7JK 


BUSINESSES 


BUSINESSMAN 

(30yrs) with comprehensive 
experience hi sTOes, admin 
and computers seeks 
partnership or outright 
purchase of business Ores 
North London area. 

Reply to BOX B91 


BUSINESS SERVICES | 


PROFITS OR 
LOSS? 

Professional sales trartnc ts me 
drffoence. Prepare for 19B7 now. 
Let us train your sales ton*. 

White Crass Sales 
Consultants, 

031 33G 6323. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Informed & succeed. -The Prop. 

mv Dnetopnmu Review*. 
Cambridge (02231 312457 


' Collection . Problems in 
Brazil Do not herniate to con- 
tact an expert with many years 
enre Mr Oil Ohm 
Rua Julio. nnli 146. 
A apartment 166 04548 Sao 
Paulo Brazil. Phone: Oil 2SS 
6777 EM. L942 

vatOO* Tiurmie. etc. Lei yew 
name be seen, immediate aften- 
thsn. Star Straw 9am to Stan Ol- 
476 6061. 

WK SOLVE Corporate proMem 
rMrMnbilion. funding. as# 
management. aqcuMNanS. and 
disposals. Tef«S42 217810 

FINANCE avatUUe for smaO and 
taro# businesses. 01-229 4832 
Or 0803 64899. 

; mfiSTKE MATFAR ADDRESS 

BurU avion phooc. telex and for- 
warning serriees, Ol 434 2660 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wanttdJ 


MTHE 

SUPERIOR 

PACKAGE 

A4 FULL COLOUR 

PKOnOTIONAL LEAFLETS 
ROM 

£160 

INT1RESTED7 

FarsSUKNMDEM. 

COMKtJAMtB amddaa 

and our price |uMt an 

•225704311 


FRANCHISES 



MMffc by yBoncIf 


IMonoot? 

wewifl! 

Buskins Communication 
Centres Li in had 

IUNG 01*938 2233 


SURVEILLANCE 

MONITORING 

I and counter snoBmo equpment 
for b oth B» arntt Hir & 
professM. 

Ring or mrita tor price tet 
RUBY ELECTRONICS LTD 
716, Lea Bridge Rd 
London E10 SAW 
01<SS8 4236 


ACCOUNTANTS 

First class service. 
Don't pay extortionate 
fees, tax and VAT 
problems solved. 

(Hag 91-244 8578. 

C. Vesafalss & Co, 
Chartered Accountants. 


An 

attractive 


franchise 


opp ortunit y. 


S.G.O.. a revolutionary 
new system that creates 
a superb stained glass 
effect offers exciting 
prospects in franchising. 

□ product unique 
rnU.K. 

□ Outstanding martiet 
potential in private 
homes, industry and 
commerce. 

□ Invaluable boUt-iqi as 
part of Europe's largest 
home improvement 
company B.E.T. and 
Anglian Windows. 
Britain's leading window 
manufacturer. 

□One of most attractive 
franchising 

opportunities in Britain. 

□ Requires an invest — 
merit of £35*40.000. 

Contact us for further 
information today. 
Stained Glass Overlay 
UK Limited. 

23 Hurricane Way, 
lYorwtch HR66CJ. 

Tet (0603) 485454. 



Stained Glass Overlay 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 



PALL MALL 
+ W2 

Lowpremiom 24hr 
access + parting. Font 
carpeted offices ind 
phone/ telex/ fax. FT 
£75pw. 

01-839 4808 


COMPUTERS* 

COMPUTING 

SERVICES 


■XmmVE SEARCH Opportu- 
nity lo move up and run your 
own buslnas. Succssfid sole 
prtndial ooe-r atm p in the con- 
struction industry requires 
protcMonU search 
consultant preferably tram an- 
other progressive market 
sector. Results o rttuU H ett . 
SdceaslUI record and «x»Ung 
live contacts essential- West 
country base. Brief detads 
». Reply to BOX B42 . 

I SQUASH club OP- 
orators require worfctog partner 
tar London squash/ health dub. 
Investment £170000 required 
for freehold, experience unnec- 
essary but must be prepared to 
work nwMbty hard for good 
Income. Reply to BOX El 9. 
STARE TIME busmen wim a lull 
time income. lO tors a month - 
no setting - no comped Uon - cap-' I 
Ital required £6-500 tbumce 
available. Ring Mr. Green Ol 
502 B311 or write ProsoecMien 
Ltd.. Owl ST 136 Regent 
Street - London wi. 

SUPER Salesman with own office 
sec/retes/faK/car/carphone 
looking for something new? 
Projects/ consul tano . start ups 
and rescues a soefiahiy. Give 
me a caU on Ol SS2 1810 
DO YOU have a business klea trial 
you can't get off tne ground? 
Then phone BBS tar a chat. 021 
3275422. 



TO LET 

INDUSTRI 
WAREH01 
WITH OFFICES 

4700 sq ft 

* 2 mflas City 

* Close A2 
SE London 

EDWARD HUSHTON 
SON A KENYON 
01-493 6787 


CAPITALISE IN 
BUOYANT 
TENERIFE 
PROPERTY 
MARKET 

Exclusive buyer sought 
For 15 luxuiy 
1 bed ^jpartnwnts 
Situated on the 
highly desirable South 
side coast of Tenerife. 
Serious iovesbirs oofy. 
Contact Mr P Broadtey 
Tet 061 236 §838 


SECONDHAND 

128KWANGWIHTEBS 
Aron £395 j 


WK.5TS 


from £950 


WING PC’s SftaUka 
OfS HO-a.-atMPore £6580 
30 CPS. WANG Letter Quality 
RjHerOtS. PC fern £39 5 
OlSVfcrtsMiansSX-effi 

famtaQo ) 
23S5V-1 75MB Daw £4,500 1 
2265V-1 75MB Drive 

rofmbtsb £4S S8 ! 

VS100 GtG with 2B8 Drive 
rafmttsfa £59^5 0 1 

manyoiberwrmg 

BAHCAIMS AVAILABLE 

Selected IBM ACOroeili 


PREMISES 

WANTED 

Storage and distribution 
promises wanted. Approx 
4J3O0 sq ft Sotfl/roxdh east 
London. Preferably main 
road, anything constdarad. 

Tefc021 350 8690 


■ATK centre City iocK up shop tn 
new coimBUou. Rent CTJOOia. 
7 yn uneaptred tease. Premium 
52000a TeUJ226 69668 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 

TO RENT 


to dear ai a»fi 


t«fay 01 -408 15161 


LOGIC 


COMPUTER 

LISTING 

PAPER 

Good quality at to* cos. 
National distritniore. 
Ring for a quote 

0258 89 400 


computer sy stem? DUnculliea in 

integraunq Uw system Into your 

Dudnass operation? Nor qnung 

the uuormauon you need? 

From PCs to nniitt-termfiui 

systems, prq fcwta na b with tong 


ties Managemml 020*396524. 

tEW AnoCOT F10% taw only. 

S 12 K ram. to mo nard dHk 

12 Inch monltar, keyboard, 

mouse. DOS sir. £680 + VAT. 

Tet 01-660 BOBO- 


STORAGE 

PREMISES 

Urgently required. Approx 
1^00 sq ft North West 
London. With good 


TehC21 350 8690 


TELEX SERVICES 


MBFax - 4100 nanny u 
£1.196. Brand new Sharp FO- 
271 6 Fax. taH features £I .998. 
TdL-0925 4138e.UK 9413470 
AUTO Mari Hog System, folder and 
envelope trawler. £3.000 as 
new £1-260. Tet0924 4707 5 7 
CMkiUI 87 Telex. Current 
moM with VBU. £3.000 ac- 
C«0t EAJBO. Tetfi924 470TS7 


DISTRIBUTORS 
& AGENTS 


LATEST 

SONAR ALARM 

Deuets uitnttera before eoiry. 
ray easy me ro V39. Shoes 
200% pro hi gives fantastic 
demonstraHn. Weal second Hne. 
No wntg, no mess 

LKR ELECTRONICS. 

TeL-0604 880029 


WANTED 

Distributor seUing 
publietty 

Hems/advrotTOiiig gifts in 
Nortbem Home 
Counties seeks on? lines. 

RqKy to BOX 863. 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


Making 

milli ons 

at the 
markets 

By Soger Pearson 
Right; to operate markets were once 
prized privileges handed dow n by mon- 
arefas in the form of charters. For 
centuries, most open-air markets were 
under the exclusive control of local 
authorities which had in the past 
received such royal perks. 

But the last 25 years has seen a steady 
build-up of privately-operated markets 
as some councils have sold, or licensed, 
their operating rights. 

Typical of those who have cashed in 

on the private markets boom— operating - If l 1 

rights can change hands for hundreds of taking on a 30-staH Saturday market at 
t fr^icanrig of pounds — is Mr Bill Joynes, 
of Midland Markets based at 
Shipston-cm-Stour, Warwickshire. His 
business, set up six years ago, is now one 
of a dozen or so companies specializing 
in outdoor markets and has a yearly 
turnover of more than £1 million- 
The canvas-covered empire he has 
established since 1980 has taken Mr 
Joynes, a former plumber and odd-job 
builder, from a council house to a 1 12- 
acre farm in the Cotswolds. He says he is 
now a millionaire “twice over”. 

His path to success started in 1969 
when a friend, already in the business, 


I 



Canvas cavalier: Bill Joynes, millionaire market stalls owner, and his wife, Pam 

licence deals from local authorities. 
Earlier this year the company took on 


asked him to help erect stalls at Warwick 
market Laser Mr Joynes became man- 
a ge r for that operator and helped to 
establish new markets. 

In 1980, be branched out on his own. 


Kidlington near Oxford. Today that 
market, which formed the cornerstone of 
his operation, has grown to 140 stalls and 
operates two days a week. 

Now the co m p an y has markets in a 
dozen different towns, from Yorkshire to 
the West Country and Kent The 
markets, some of which have up to 300 
stalls and operate up to three days a 
week, offer a total of 21 "market days” a 
week. They provide a combined total of 
around 2,500 stalls and selling outlets for 
an estimated 1,000 market traders. 

Most of the sites are either leased from 
private owners or run on operating- 


three prime markets from local authori- 
ties in Kent — Canterbury, Heme Bay 
and Whitstable. 

Within two years of setting out on his 
own, Mr Joynes also raised a 15-year 
bank loan of £200,000 to buy outright an 
open market site at Dinnington, South 
Yorkshire, and a part open, part covered 
site at Maltby six miles away. These two 
sites alone are now reckoned to be worth 
around £1.5 million. 

The business has always been a family- 
run effort Mr Joynes's wife, Pam, who is 
now company secretary, has been closely 
involved from the start, when she helped 
to erect and dismantle market stalls. 
Other members of the family are among 
the 1 8-strong work force. 


briefing 


A six-month, part-tans programme to 


inner-city small businesses has been 
launched by me London Business School 
with funding from WeBcorne, the 
pharmaceuticals group, writes Derek 
Harris. 

The first five budefing entrepreneurs to 
benefit are - a fish restaurateur, 
financial analyst, roofing speciafist 
interior designer and an ex-magician's 
apprentice who is running a domestic 
cleaning service. AU are from Camden 
where Wellcome has its headquarters. 
There will be more courses 
subsequently, covering accounting, 
marketing, taxation, law and finance 
raising. A week's induction Is followed by 
five three-day study periods. 

• Contact John Lambden, London 


small rural businesses last year, an 
increase of 8.5 per cent over the year 
before. It was a record year for the 
c ommi ss i on's wholly-financed factory and 
workshop programme, with nearly 
£125 mifflon invested in workshops. Just 
over 330 workshops were completed 
with another 186 under construction, 
while 447 units were let or soid, a 56 
per cent increase over the previous year. 
A redundant tankfings scheme, aimed 
at creating jobs tar providing renovation 
grants of up to 25 per cent, saw a 
record £1.8 mfifion approved for 315 
grants during the year. Altogether. 

£4.5 mBSon has been paid out since the 
scheme started, creating 1.8 mifflon sq 


and offers an advisory service to smaller 
businesses. 

■ Small business owners wffl be able to 
buy the freehold of purpose-built 

E ises to be erected at Harlow, Essex, 
ledbed Centres, which already runs 
rtted industrial units on the same 
land. The 18 new premises, which should 
be ready earfy next year, range from 
1,750 to 2^00 sq ftand have telex and 
office services. 

• Contact Seedbed Centres, Twyforti 
House, Pig Lane, Bisitop's Stanford; 
(02731. 


MR FRIDAY 


Park, London NW1 4SA;(01)262i 
Demand for small rural workshops 
and an aid scheme for renovating 
redundant farm buJkfrms is so great 
that the Development Commfesfon is 
pressing the government for more 
cash to expand its schemes. Lord Vinson, 
chairman of the commission and its 
subsidiary, the Council for Small 
Industries in Rural Areas (CoSIRA), 
said In tha commission’s annual report for 
last yean "We could do even more if 
mai funds were made available.” 
CoSIRA, which provides advice, 
training and finance, assisted 20,500 


opportunities for about 3£50 people. 

■ Aberdeen Enter p rise Trust now two 
years old, has helped 300 new 
businesses to get started, creating 650 
jobs. More than 90 per cent of the 
businesses have survived beyond their 
firstyear. The cost has been modest 
£300 a job and £700 a business. Now the 
trust plans foflow-up support for young 
businesses. 

• Contact Aberdeen Enterprise Trust, 
Aberdeen Business Centre, WBowbank 
House. WiBowbank Road, Aberdeen AB1 
2YG; (0224) 582599. 

■ Warwick University's small-business 
centre is to be sponsored over the next 
three years by the Micfland Bank which 
win put up £25,000 a year. The centre 
charmete a range of training programmes 



•* Good grief! Is It reallythat dose to 
Christmas?** 


AGRESSIVE 

SALES 

AGENTS 

SlwuHdW Mr Norman on 
□628 73722 right away. 
Market leader m new tech 
bus. comm, field otters 
sole ten. + ha support 


their National exp ansi on 
programme. 

Doflt delay! 


FAX UPDATE 

Portable fax machines. 
Cheapest prices in 
Europe. Limited 
quantities available 
now. Please phone 
Fax International 

Tel: (0243) 860862 


MONTAGUE 
LLOYD LTD 


A marcher erf the 
of conjnnios no* 


€2! 

saw 

- no 

. „ required, for d parts 
of the OK. In " " ' — 

cwiKsavely priced 
toitet rig, VJJ> . end 
sates/martaorg praraionaJ 
products to Hotels, 
comrrtsion s aro ngs sand 
in wiling h» 

Brian Dalbcy, 

Chief wncntNe 
Mont a g u e Lloyd Ltd, 

3 Gun Wharf, 
Business Centro, 

0M Ford Road, Bow, 
London E3 506. 


AGENCIES REQUIRED 

Existing professional sales 
management tean seek agencies 
in Dewn/Conwafl. Commercial 
and/or direct to MmseMder 
silos capability. Unique 
ocportwrty for ngU companies 
to Bsubfeb tar products aid 
senna tar customers n ties 
lucrative areas. Please send 
company profile Reriy BOX B7B. 


IMPORT/EXPORTS 


WHISKY 
AVAILABLE 
FOR EXPORT 

at very competitive 
prices. 

CYLAND EXPORTS 
Tnfc 01-558 6028 
or 01 558 5233 


WHISKY 
AVAILABLE 
FOR EXPORT 

at vary competitive 
prices. 

CYLAND EXPORTS 
Tet 01-558 6028 
or 01 558 5233 


muuiD mnns cume 

of exporting Brlistnl teadb* 

brand iuims. Mtoctt a 
overmakra in ladles, eruuttm 

& rncnnanr Pmm boom for 

tanner details 061 480 4700. 


COMMERCIAL 

PRINTERS 


*■ SETS - Prmttdngs qtve a fasl 
service at the b«1 price. For an 
UBlanl quota tet 01-961 IdOX. 


& FURN 


EQUIPMENT I 

MOSHERS j 


CONFERENCE 

ROOM SUITE 

(Circa 1950 a). 24 matching 
high back mahogsty chairs 
won 7 metar* long 
mahogany table (when htey 
extended) El5.000. ono. 

Te(K)225 334595 (W). 
or 0272 775832 (H) 


PACKAGING 

MATERIALS 


CARTONS Larne qianUba 

one* used gh 

voB. IHnS x UWn x nidus, 
letebax 13Irax9VUra. I9tnsx 
X3in» x 6tas. Requ lr nuiaies. 
700 other sizes in stock. Ate 
redundant stocks 
sold. PIMM 0480 


PROMOTION, 
PUBLICITY & 
MARKETING 


? - An you a On. Curran; HD 
orMnating/ Promotions 
Executive? 

7 -Arejoukdemsiedoigalf? 

7 - Do you tesh to have a Tifrup 
wtti a top * 


SOLUTION - : 

Cd. write or telex; 
Mr MS Campbell 
Stroke Spoits 
Marketing Lid, 
Abbotsanch Road, 

i iUNfi 

PA3 MX 
Tet041 8898377 
Wrac 7795663 


WHOLESALERS 


DESIGNERS 
CLOTHING 
FOR SALE 

Various sons, pure silk or 
lOOfc couoo. Exclusively 
deSKncd. Kangn^ from 
Gowns, Evening, and 
Cockuul, us Daywear. 

Teh 01 736 6299 


FROZEN 

FOODS 

We are cash buyers of 
surpfes frozen foods. 
Straight or mixed pallets. 
Damaged or end of lines. 
We can move anything. 
Ring John Harris:- 

021 643 0997 

(Tubs, thurs, fri, sat) 


HOTELS ft UCENSED 
PREMISES 


WHITBY 

MOUTH 

YORKSHIRE 

tavttetem to godase hoSday 
com ptex at ri gh t and ha tf acres 
with planning pH Mission tor 85 
bohfimy cottages stb nverade 
torotage and mooriogs and iSrect 
accass to Bw Port of Wtatby. 
Semins mstafled aid penrossm 
granted In dewd^asasnt to 
ea m igiai c e e ran aijeiy. Qftaa 
in the region E45CLOOO 
Tet 0287 23te1 
For farther hriot ma doB 


BOURNEMOUTH 

Freehold licensed restaurant. 
Main road, position near sea 
& shops. Scaling 60/70 
covers, first class private 
accommodation. All fully 
central healed. Price: 
£117,000. For further 
information: 

Tel: (0292) 309062 


FINANCIAL 

OYSTER 

SOporti Rtstsnnt bar in Mand, 
beams. Open fireplaces. Joyous 
Udren. taamrodation. Lovely 
coastal situation near (Ovate. 


Ceric (BIB 35321) 772741 


LEGAL NOTICES 


PURE 

SHEEPSKIN 

COATS 

tliBsadi MMmum order ML 
AD Borg Dried £38.76 ucti 
minimum order 20. AD perfect 
and continuous Unas. CJD.D. 
+ (Mhwy. 

Fbng: 0283 761539 


order A auptfli 
■lock at honOMUea puSsim 

and eanUaara in 100% pom 

wool also acryUc/woots ana 

cotton* European mad*, '-bote 

sata only. T*t: 01-989 3611 ex 

313 01-90® 4190 9am lo Own. 

mUtACKATT LTD WrtK M> 

buyers of soar commodities 

foods Included TrtXXM 720 

8986 Aivtmw. 

uurr scbcem tvs and video' 

nrakcun. AU Haro mains. 

oei 3642393 <24hT3K 


IN THE HIGH COURT OT 
JUSTICE 

No. 008393 Of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
MANUFACTU RERS HANOVER 
LIMITED 
ANO 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1 988 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
IhM a Prtlllon was on I hr am 
Noirmorr 1986 nrrsmtm lo hot 
M atno't High Court or Justin* 
tor Uir mflrmaiion or um* imuc- 
uon of I he ranuai at Ibr above- 
named Company from 
C2E.aoo.aOQ lo nil by cancelling 
an Um* 22J27.28S Kurd Ordi- 
nary Sham and all ihr 
9A7Z.71S unman) Ordinary 
Sham an of Cl rarh or I ho said 
Oommny On UM* said mtucuon 
at rmlai law no dl«i the capllal 
at Utt* Company is lo bo UKTrasM 
•o 100.000.000 dollars m ihoorr 
U>o UnlMd sum or 
UMrrlnBftar canrd 
By the rr rollon or 
loo.ooaooo Ordinary Sham or 
l dollar rarh TIM* amount try 
which Ihr tewd ramul at ihr 
Company is proposed lo hr re- 
duced' is to hr convened Into 
dollars and mpUpd in paying up 
In lull new Ordinary Sham ol 
ihr Company ot i dollar each. 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER CIV. 
CN Uial ihr saM Petition m 
dirrrted lo hr heard before the 
Honourable Mr Justice Mrrvyn 
Oat lea at me Royal Courts of Jtn- 
im*. strand. London WCSA 2U. 
on Monday 16Ui day of Decem- 
ber 1986. 

ANY Ovdrtor or Sn ar rhotder ot 
Hie Company desiring lo opoase 
the maftm* of an Order foe me 
roanrmouon of Ihr said redurlloa 
e» raoual should appear al Ihr 
Umr oi hearing In person or by 
Counsel for Uial purnw, 

A ropy or the said Petition wUI be 
lurntshed id any o u ch person re. 
out rmo the same by me under - 
menboned soHrlloni on payment 
Of Ihr regulated charge lor ihr 
same. 

Doled ttws 2nd day of Dece mb er 
1996 
Allen A Oiery 
9 Chcapstdr 
London EC2V 6AD 

• Bwc/ecr/vzb 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF 
JUSTICE 

NO. 008396 at 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 

IN THE MATTER OF 
MANUFACTURERS HANOVER 
EXECUTOR AND TRUSTEE 
COMPANY 
LIMITED 
AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 

UMI a Pell Uon was on Um* lift 
November 1 986 presenleO L> Her 
Mainly'* High Court al Justice 
lor Uieroaflrniauan of the reduc- 
tion ot Ihe capital ot ihe above- 

named Company from ESOCLOOO 
lo mi by cancelling aU Ihe 
600.000 Issued Ordinary Sham 
ol Cl each ot Ihe said Company 
which are patd up lo ihe extent of 
SOp per share On the said reduc- 
uon of captui taking effect ihe 
capMal of Ihe Company h lo be 
Increased lo 1.000.000 doUars In 
the c u rre n cy of Ihe United Stales 
of America ihemnatier called 
"doaara~l by Um* creottan of 
600.000 Ordinary Sham of 
dollars each. The amount by 
which Ihe taurd capllal of ihe 
Company Is proposed lo be re- 
duced is lo be convened into 
dollars and aopUM ki paying up 
new Ordinary Sham of ihe Com 
nany of a dollars «arh lo me 
exusu of one haH of the nominal 
value thereor. 

AND NOTICE IS FURTHER CIV 
EN Uwt Uir said Petition ks 
directed lo be heard before Ure 
Honourable Mr Justice Mervyn 
tte h*s al Ihe Royal Courts of Jus- 
tice. Strand. London WC3A 2LL 
on Monday iGUi day of Oerem 
Her 1906. 


ANY credflor or Shareholder of 
the Company desiring lo oppose 
ihe maxing ot an Order tar Uw 
ron/Vrmallon oi the saM redurUon 
ol capital should appear al ihe 
lime ol hearing In person or by 
Counsel for mat purpose. 

A ropy ot ihe said Petition will be 
fumisned lo any such person re 
oiuruiq Ihe same by Ihe under 
rarsiikmed •oUcRors on payment 
Rlr requlaled charge for Ihe 


Doled Ihts ?nd day of December 
1986 


Allen A Overs 
9 Otramide 
London EC3V 6AD 
RWC/r.QH/VZB 


DAS RAW MATERIALS 
LIMITED 

NOTICE fS HEREBY GIVEN 
pursuant lo Seruorv 688 « Ihe 
C ornua mev Art. I98S. Uial a 
MEETING ot uie retailors « Ihe 
above named Company wUI be 
held ai the offices of LEONARD 
CL' RTIS A CO . situated al 30 
EASTBOURNE TERRACE. LON 
DON w: 6LF on Monday ihr Bth 
day of Onremher 1986 al 3 00 
o dork In the afternoon, lor Uu- 
ourpoaes provided for In Semens 
S89 and S90. 

Dated the 24lh day 
of Nov ember 1986] 
LR BRICHTMANI 
DIRECTOR 


IN THE HU3H COURT OF 
JUSTICE 

No. 008394 Of 1986 

CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
MA NUFA CTURERS HANOVER 
INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 
LIMITED 

AND IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE H HEREBY GIVEN 

llial a Prlttton was on ihe 31st 
Nov miner 1 986 presented lo Her 
Mainly'* High Court of Justice 
lor Uie ronfirraalion or Ihr rtaur 
lion of Ihe capUal of Ihe above 
named Company from CIOO.OOO 
lo ml by ranretllng all Ihe 35XXJO 
H&ued Ordinary Shares and an 
Ihe 7B.000 unissued Ordinary 
Shorn all of Cl earfa of Uie said 
Company. On Uie said reduction 
of capllal lading effect Ihe capful 
ol the Company Is lo be increased 
ha 150.000 dollars m ihe rutrcti- 
rypf Ihe United Stales at America 
i hereinafter ca Bed “dollars") by 
Ihe creation ot 160,000 Ordinary 

Sham of 1 dollar each. I he 
amount by wtuen the issued capl 
Lai of Ihe Company Is proposed lo 
be reduced Is lo be converted Into 
dollars and applied Pi paying up 
in mu new Ordinary Shares of 
Ihe Company of I dollar each. 

ANO NOTICE IS FURTHER GIV- 
EN Uial UK* said Petition Is 
anwled 10 be heard before the 
Honourable Mr Justice Mrrvyn 
Davies al ihe Royal courts of Jus- 
Wee. Sir and. London WCZA 2LL 
on Monday 1 5IH day of Oerem- 
nrr 1986 

ANY Creditor or SharvhoUMr ol 
Ihe Company desiring lo oppose 
Ihe making of an Order lor the 
ronflmuiuon at Ihe said reduction 
of capllal should appear at Ihr 
lime of hearing In person or bv 
Counsel lor Ihaf purpose. 

A ropy oi the said PelUion will be * 
lumished lo any sum person re- 
•lulnnu Ihe same by Ihe under- 
nientHMied solicitors on payment 
of ihe reguiaied ctiarnr for uie 


Dated Ihts and day of December 


Allen & Os pry 
9 CheapoMe 
London EC2V 6AD 
RWC/ECR/VZH 


PUBUC NOTICES 


The BRITISH RAILWAYS 
BOARD hereby ghe advance no- 
nce. In pursuanrr of Srrtkm M of 
Ihe Transport Art. 196Z. Ibal 
lliey plan to withdraw Irettfil ■ 
lartlllies (rum Ihe foUowmg W- 
iion In ihe month ot January 
1987 

FROME FREIGHT DEPOT 
Particulars ot me dale on wfurti*-' 
Ihe lartlllies will be withdrawn ' 
and ot Ihe aUernatlve lacllHie* 
will be announced locally. 


WESTERN MUSICAL LJMTTEJD 
Mot Ke h hereby taven. purui 
ant to Section 688 ol Ihe 
Companies Aft. 1986. Uial a 
Meeting of the ci tailors of Ihe 
above named Company wUI be 
held al 33/34 Chancery Lane, 
London WCZA 1EW mi wednec. 
ttav Uie 17th day ti December 
1086 al tl OQ o'clock In Uie tore 
noon, lor the purpos e s menUoned 
in SrclKUM '889 and 690 of Uie 

■WUd -Art. 

DATED HIM 18 day of 

December 1988 
By Order of ihr Board 
K GARDNER 
. . SECRETARY 


NOTICE 

TO 

READERS 

Readers are advised lo seek professional 
advice before entering into any form of 
agreement, or parting with any money, 
wtien replying to box numbers please do 
not enclose original documentation and 
mark the box number clearly on the lop left 
hand comer of the envelope and return it 
to: 

THE BOX NUMBER 
DEPARTMENT 
P.O. BOX 484 
VIRGINIA STREET 
WAPPING 
LONDON El 9DD 


ft ? i> !• 








i 9 7 V \ 
i i > ’ » 

i i * - 


t*'. 


vr--.'.."" •' 


Vy-. 


«- \ : r. 


Cl - . - . 


V;. -J, . 

^/■v- 1 


S£v..'v: 

fe: 



































THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 



SPORT 


37 


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Surijoriiies. 
r *v loo r: on 
■^35 auLhori- 
Herae Bay 

5 om on his 
i ^ J5-iear 
ouingh'i an 
tfoiv South 
ur. covered 
• These two 
be worth 


io a famih- 
*ani. who 'is 
*sr. closefy 
she helped 
rite: sutils. 
arc among 


$ 


* to smaller 

be a ole tc 
uiit 

tow. Essex 
ready runs 

* same 

sho^*d 
0 frc“i 
et n arc 


t, ;k 


!?)n. 

: ‘ills 

' i -r 

s-.* 

: r -le 
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Tourists are bro ught back down to earth after the euphoria of Brisbane 

Botham fitness doubt gives 
England cause for concern 



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Feeling a Ihtle less confident 
than when they left Brisbane 
after the first Test match, the 
England cricketers flew here 
from Perth yesterday for a 
four-day match against Vic- 
toria starting tomorrow. 
Among other things casting a 
doubt is the fitness of Botham, 
who has pulled a muscle in his 
left side, an injury that many 
bowlers suffer and can be a 
slow healer. 

Should Botham be unable 
to bowl in the next Test 
match, starling in Adelaide a 
week today, the balance, 
therefore the choice, of the 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Melhoime 


«de will present a problem. 
Botham would have to play as 
a batsman — who else is more 
likely to score a match-win- 
ning hundred? — and that 
could mean, and probably 
would, a side with only four 
regular bowlers (Dilley, 
DeFreiias, Edmonds and 
Emburey} supported by three 
others who turn an arm over— 
Gatting, A they and Broad. 
Being heavy — heaven knows 
how much his hair alone must 
weigh — Botham has done well 
to get as far as he has without 
an injury of this kind. 

In the context of the Test 


series, the dosing few minutes 
of last Sunday’s play, when 
Australia were hatting, may, 
ina few weeks time, be seen to 
have been crucial. In three or 
four overs of tired, untidy 
English cricket, there was a 
major psychological drift It 
showed to the Australians a 
crack in the English armour. 
The sight of Zoehrcr pulling 
two long hops off Emburey for 
four, followed by two lots of 
boundary byes scuttling down 
the side, also off Emburey. 
sent the Australians into the 
rest day in better heart, need- 
ing not 120 from their last four 


Australians claim a moral 

victory for gutsy escape 


Mel bourne (Agencies) —Aust- 
ralians are still celebrating their 
“great escape* 1 and rlaiming the 
title has turned after England let 
them off the book. 

After a crashing seven-wicket 
defeat is last month's Ashes 
opening Test the gutsy Perth 
draw was heralded across the 
v land. Goodness knows what joy 
a win would bring. “Australian 
fight is top drawer. 1 * claimed the 
Australian newspapers, adding; 
“We were the moral victors. 1 * 

Post-match debate centred on 
England's decision am to de- 
clare on Tuesday evening — 
leaving themselves only a day to 
bowl out the opposition. In the 
event, Australia finished at 197 
for four. They were never in with 
a chance of achieving the 391 
victory target but, as England 
captain Mike Catting pointed 
out. looked capable of surviving 
for a good deal longer on a pitch 
which lasted remarkably well. 

Australia's selectors are how- 
ever far from complacent. They 
are stepping up the search for 
two pace bowlers to partner 
Reid, the impressive left-handed 
fast bowler, at Adelaide. Lawson 
is sure to be omitted. His figures 
V of none for 170 in Perth will 
prove even more damaging to his 
cause than the back injury 
collected late in England's sec- 
ond innings. Chris Matthews, 
Reid's Western Australia col- 
leagne (three for 127) coaid also 
be axed. 

That gives Hughes, the Vic-» 
tore* fast howler— d rop ped after 
the Brisbane defeat — a great 
incentive to perform well against 
England this weekend, while 
McDermott, of Queensland, 


Aorfl 

I^RRST CLASS MATCH 
Fanner's: Cambridge Univeretty v 
Essex 

22 -FIRST CLASS MATCH 
Hie Parks: Oxford University v 
Kent 

Fenner's: Cambridge University v 
Lancashire 
OTHER MATCH 
Lord's: MCCv Essex 
25-COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
‘Chesterfield: Derbyshire v Sussex 
'Bristol. Gloucestershire v Essex 
'Southampton: Hampshire v 
Northampionshva 
"Lord's: Middlesex v Yorkshire 
■Trent Bridge: Nottinghamshire v 
Surrey 

Taunton- Somerset v Larxasfsra 
'Edgbaston: Warwickshire v 
Glamorgan 

•Worcester Worcesterstwe v Kent 
OTHER MATCH 

Fenner s: Cambridge University v 
Leicestershire 

29- COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Chelmsford: Essex v Warwickshire 
Canterbury: Kent v Glamorgan 
Old Traffortt Lancashire v 
Middlesex 

The Oval: Surrey v Derbyshire 
Hove: Sussex vGtoucestersh re 
OTHER MATCHES 
The Parks: Oxford University v 
Hampshire 

Fenner's: Cambridge University v 
Northamptonshire 

30- TOUR MATCH 

Arundefc Lavinia. Duchess of 
Norfolk's XI v Pakistan 

May 

2- BENSON AND HEDGES CUP 
Derby: DerOy siwe v 
Northamptonshire 
Swansea: Glamorgan v Sussex 

' Bristol: Gloucestershire v 

v Mtow Counties 
Taunton: Somerset v Essex 
Edgbaston: Warwtckshvev 

TTwParks: Combined Umvereities 

v Hampshire 

TOUR MATCH 

The Oval: Surrey v Pakistan 

3- SUNDAY LEAGUE 
DerOy: Derbyshire v 

NorlfiEmpiPnshifB 

Cardiff: Glamorgan v Sussex 
Leicester. Leicestershire v 

Nottinghamshire v 

K&i 1 

Taunton: Somerset.* Essex 

Ei * “ 

Yi 


in ton: aonw»' 

icwBaston warwichsnee < 

Worcester Worcestershire v 
Lancashire 
S-COUMTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Swansea: Glamorgan v Lancaswe 
Leicester: Leicestershire v Essex 
Lord's: Middlesex* 
Nortnampfonsnire 
ft Taunton: Somerset* Surrey 
Worcester Worcestershire v 
$L*SS£a 

Meartingiey: Yorkshire v 
Hampsrwe 

SueimjrvM<eni v Pakistan 

Bristol - GfcwcesMfshire v 

TnsTfB™ig£ ; Nortmgflamshire v 

Kfflon^vComlxned 

Universities 

The Oval: Surrey v Kent 
How: Sussex </ MLy" 

Headingley: Yoriiswe* 

•PertMNWiti inch): Scotland v 
Warwickshire 

3K52S l L**«™ i5tan 

10* SUNDAY LEAGUE 
Soutnampiwi: HamP 5 ™* v 

Old Trafford: Lancashire v 




H®J?£usse* * Derbyshire 
HeaSMgier- Yorkshire V 
Northamptonsiwe 

12-BENSOH MID 
CttoirnslorAE^M^f 811 
Southampton: Hampshire 

&asga- 

Lacssier Lewastersiwe * 

SSB5SS— «-*" 

^i e gK, s s»r ,pn 

Headingiev: YOh^hne v 

WorcMieretnre 

225S8S-.** 1 — 

imSmSm "SSUSS** 

Chefcnstord: Essex * 


who was so impressive in Eng- 
land two summers ago, is also 
tipped for a Test return. 

Tf Australia are worried over 
their bowlers, it is little com- 
pared to England's headache 
over Botham. England's all- 
roander visits a specialist today 
in an attempt to discover the 
seriousness of his side injury. 
Laurie Brown, the team physio- 
therapist, said: u rm aliaid this 
type of injury sometimes takes 
quite a while to dear up. I'm 
hoping Ian mil be fit for the next 
Test, bat well know more in a 
day or so when some of the 



Brows: working flat out 


OW Traflont Lancashire v 

Warwickshire 


Ts: MWdasax v Combined 
Urtwrefoes 

Tram Bridge: Nottinghamshire v 


Hove: Sussex v Surrey 
Worcester: Worcestershire v 
Scotland 

Oxford (Christ Church): Minor 
Counties v Glamorgan 

TOUR MATCH 

Taunton: Scmarsetv Pakistan 

(one day) 

16-BENSON AND HEDGES CUP 
Derby. Derbyshire v 
Gloucestershire 
Cardift Glamorgan v Kant 
tanfs: MBdtesex vSomarsaf^ 
Northampton: NqrtiiampioiahfcB v 


Edgbaston: Warwicfcstoe v 

Worcestarshbe 

Oxford (Christ Church): Minor 

Counties v Surrey 

Fenner’s: Combined UteveraWas v 

Essex 

-Glasgow {Hamaton Crescent): 
Scottand v Yorkshire 
TOUR MATCH 
•Hove: Sussex v Pakistan 

17-SUNDAY LEAGUE 
Chetmstord: Essex v 
LeteesterrhYB 

Swansea: Glamorgan v Kem 
Brtstok Gtoucestershire v 
Warwickshire 

Lord's: Middtesex v Somerset 
No rtha m p to n: Nor t hampton sh ire v 


Hampshire 
The Oval: Surrey 


v Lancashire 


20-COUNTY CHAMPtONSHF 
Chehnstont Essex v Gtemorgan 
Bournemouth: Hampshire v 
Nottinghamshire 
□artfonL- Kent v Sussex 
Leicester: Leicesters h i re v 
Lancashire 

Edgoaston: Warwickshire v Surrey 
Worcester Worcestershire v 


imgtey. Yorkshire v Somerset 

OTHER MATCHES 
The Parks: Oxford University v 
Gloucestershire „ 

Fenner's: Cambridge UmverMty v 
Mkktiesex 

21 -TEXACO TROPHY 

The OvM: England v Pakistan 
(first one-day international) 

^Tr^^gKE^nd v Pefetan 

& [ g^ v v , ¥s^r 

Old Traftoitt LancasMre v 
Worcestershire _ 

NorthampWT.Northtei(itDn5hBev 

LacaaerehfrB 
Taunton: Somerset v 

©oucesteretere 

The OvaL Surrey v Essex 

Hove" Sussex vVidrSasex 

OTHER MATCH 

The Parks: Oxtotd University v 

Nottinghamshire 

24- SUNDAY LEAGUE 
Derby- Derbyshire v 
Worcestershire 

Cantertxxy: Kent v Wwmsx 
OW Traffora: Laneashee^ v 

Hampshire 

Taunton Somorsst v 
Gioocesterehlre 

The Oval: Suney * Essex 

25- TEXACO TROPHY _ . . 
Edqbaston: England v Pakistan 

27^ENSON AND HEDGES CUP 
Quart er-finate 

^^^ey^Y orksha evPak^n 
or Ireland V Pakistan (at DU*iJ 
g^XjUlOYCHAIffWl®^ 
ChesrarfteW: DeibysWiflv 

|SSaSon:Hfflnpshire v 

STSS.terehirev 

Northamptonshffs v 

SSraaaMR wofcestershrt v 
S^wtwgtvVoriaHrev 


tSSk MiStesex v Pakistan 

^Slf^dlinivwsttyv 

Warwickshire 

^tortS^Hampsttre* 

'gfiSSSG**"’ 

^JJ^^iorcNorttomplonstoev 

fSlrU^Nottlnghflitiehlrev 
^^^^rev 
Worcestershire v 
SdSUmh: Yorkshire v Kent 


The world's leading Test 
fricket-tokcr was still w&dteg In 
pain in Melbourne yesterday, 
where England start a fbor~day 
game against Victoria tomorrow. 
-It is very sore," admitted 
Botham. “I couldn't bat never 
mind howl, at the moment I'm 
amazed how painful it is.- 

England have not jet given op 
hope of him making a fall 
recovery before the third Test, 
starting in Adelaide on Thurs- 
day . Brown is currently working 
at every available moment with 
nltrasoand treatment in an at- 
tempt to get Botham fit. 

Against Victoria to mo rrow, 
Gatting, A they and even Slack 
will probably have to bowl as, 
apart from Botham, DiUey 
(knee) and DeFmtas (ankle) an 
being rested as a precaution. 
Broad is gives his first break of 
the tour as reward for his 
century in Perth that gave 
1 ? upland the upper hand from 
the fast day, while the side 
includes both wicket-keepers. 
Richards, now established as the 
Test No 1 after his equally 
valuable century, win play as a 
batsman with French inking the 
gloves. 

En gland 1 * only batting worry 
is Lamb, who after his failures in 
the first two Tests, may find 
himself competing for a place 
tomorrow with Whitaker, al- 
though Lamb, like Gower, has a 
reputation for returning to form 
when the situation becomes 
crucial. 

ENGLAW TEAM: W N Sack, CWJ 
Atony, j j Whitaker, A J Lamb. *M W 
Gatting. D I Gower. C J Richards, fB N 
French, P H Edmonds, N A Foster, G C 
Sirs*. 


wickets to make England bat 
again but 94. 

When the match was re- 
sumed on Tuesday, Australia 
saved the follow-on with eight 
runs lo spare and, that done, 
they look a second nick ihe 
same evening when England, 
who had been aiming for a 
declaration before the dose, 
rather feebly failed to make 
one. Had Australia lost and 
gone two down in ihe series, it 
would have been hard to see 
them pulling back. And now. 
instead, we have a fight on our 
hands. 

Then there is the umpiring. 
When England were trying to 
bowl Australia out on 
Wednesday they were aghast 
at some of the leg before 
decisions that went against 
them. The trend began early 
and finished late, Greg Mat- 
thews twice looking decidedly 
fortunate to be given not out 
when he and Ritchie were 
clinching the draw for Austra- 
lia. But these things usually 
level themselves out over the 
course of a Test series, and 
England will be well advised 
not lo get worked up about it. 

As soon as Clive Lloyd, on 
his first tour here as captain, in 
1 975-6, began to rant and rave 
about the umpiring, his side 
were finished. They played 
from then on as though they 
thought they were in for a raw 
deal. 

In the recent Brisbane Test, 
the umpire Mel Johnson shot 
his finger up when Australia 
appealed for a catch at slip 
even before Border, the 
fielder, had had time to in- 
dicate that the ball had not 
carried. The same umpire 
gave one of the two wont run- 
out decisions i have seen in 
the first over of the deciding 
Test match on England's last 
Australian tour. The other, in 
Adelaide in 1958-59, was 
given by Mel McGuinnes, 
who England had reckoned, 
four years earlier, when they 
were winning, to be one of the 
best umpires in the world. 

The chances are that if 
England deserve to win the 
present series they win. what- 
ever the umpiring, so long as 
they realize the importance of 
taking the rough with the 
smooth. 



Looking ahead: Two young drivers (from left), Andy Wallace and David Hunt, with Peter Collins, Benetton's team manager 

Benetton looking forward to scoring 
a Ford-powered victory next year 


By John Blunsden, Motor Racing Correspondent 


This has been loo king-ahead 
week for Benetton, the team who 
broke through to the front ranks 
of grand priz racing this year 
with a victory in Mexico, two 
pole positions and three fastest 
race laps. 

Yesterday came confirmation 
that, in 1987, the team an to 
have the exclusive nse of the 1-5- 
lkre V6 Ford turbo power unit, 
developed by Ford's Formula 1 
engine partners; Coswortb En- 
gineering. Since last May, this 
engine has been seen inaction in 
an interim stage in its develop- 
ment with Team Haas, who 
recently announced their with- 
drawal from grand prix racing. 

Turbo-charged power units 


have only two more seasons of 
racing a head of them in Formula 
1, bat the engine development 
programme is being con tinned 
and, if Benetton can produce 
another of their highly-nimblc 
chassis designs, 1987 could well 
witness the first Ford-powered 
Formula 1 victory since Michele 
Alboreto won the 1983 Detroit 
Grand Prix for Tyrrell. 

Though bought by the Italian 
einthiag company at the cod of 
1985, the Benetton team are still 
batted at tire former Tolman 
headquarters in Witney, 
Oxfordshire, where* brand-new 
car is cnrrently at an advanced 


Teo FabL the Italian driver. 


Belgian decision soon 


Brussels (Reuter) — Motor 
taring's governing body. F7SA, 
is to make a final ruling on 
December IS on the disputed 
venue for next year's Belgian 
Grand Prix. a spokesman for the 
Belgian automobile federation 
said yesterday. 

FISA will have to decide 
between the Francorehamps 
track near the southern town of 
Spa, and the Zolder circuit. 

Zokler organizers say work to 
make the circuit safer has now 
been completed and they are 
ready to host the 1987 Grand 
Prix as scheduled. 

Francorehamps, which laid a 


LEADING CRICKET FIXTURES FOR 1987 


Pakistan and MCC Test head season of plenty 



Pakistan provide the main 
overseas opposition next cricket 
seasoa — bat the highlight of the 


is Ekefy to cnhronafe 
when MCC celebrate their bi- 
centenary with a Test-status 
five-day match against the Rest 
of the World at LonFs- 

The qnafity an view is Bkdy to 
represent the best of all that is 
good m cricket Allan Border, 
the Australian, is expected to 
lead the Rest and MCC will call 
on overseas players cnrrently 
performing in the comity 
championship. 

Pakistan coaid provide a num- 
ber of representatives tor the 
Rest of the World, a fitting 
reward at the end of a 26-match 
tom. Their party is expected to 
arrive on April 26 and kick-off in 
the castemary fashion, against 


Lavinia, Duchess of Norfolk's 
XI at Anmdel foar days later. As 
well as five Tests and three one- 
day in t er n ati onals, the tourists 
will play 14 matches against 
county oppos iti on and will play 
more than the Australians, who 
toured two sammers ago. 

On the domestic front, the 
county championship pro- 
gramme could not have a more 
scintillating start with last 
season's top foor in opposition 
against each other. Essex, the 
champions, travel to Bristol on 
April 25 to play Qoncestec s hfre. 
the runners-up, and Storey, who 
pipped Nottinghamshire by one 
point for third place, travel to 
Trent Bridge. 


Middlesex; the Benson and 
Hedges winners, are grouped in 
a tough zonal section this time, 
having to play Somerset, Essex, 
Combined Universities and 
Hampshire in order to qualify 
for the q Darter-final knock-out 
stages. The other gronps are 
made np of Derbyshfre, North- 
amptonshire, Nottinghamshire, 
Gloucestershire. Leicestershire; 
Glamorgan, Sussex, Minor 
Comities, Kent, Surrey; and 
Worcestershire, Imncashire, 
Yorkshire, Warwickshire. 

Sussex, the NatWest Trophy 
holders, start at home against 
Onnberiand and then could 
meet Lancashire, the county 
they beat in the final. 


SCOUNTY CHNMOMHP 
Swansea: Gte mo rga n v Hanp eto e 
Brtefot Gloucestershire* 


LORfs;! 

Taunton: Somerset v 
Notonghamshim 
Edgbaston: Wareteksterev 
LeeasJursbire 
Sheffield: YoriaWrev 

Worcestershire 

4- BftST CORMOLLTECT 
OLDTRAFFOftDlStGLANOv 
PAKISTAN 

5- COUNTY CHAMPtONSHP 
‘Swansea: Gtamoman v Somerset 
Tunbridge Weis: Kem v Essex 
Leicester Leicestershire v 
Worcestershire 

Lord's: Mtofle38x v 
Gloucestershire 

Northampton: Northamptonshire v 


Tram Bridge: Ncwingtiamshlre * 
Lancasnxe 

• Horsham: Sussex v Hampshire 
Harrogate: YortcsWe v Derbyshire 

7-SUNDAY LEAGUE 

Leicester: Leicestershire v 
Worcestershire 
Lord's: Middlesex v 
Gloucestershire 

Northampton; Noriftamtaonshlre v 
Notonghinsrire 
The Oval: Surrey v Warwickshire 
Horsham: Sussex v Hampshire 
Sheffield: Yorkshire vDerbysf** 
104ENS0N AW HEDGES CUP 
SemMinate 
OTHER HATCH 
Harrogate; Ticen Tiupfiy 

11-TOUR MATCH 
Gtesgow rntwgod): Scotland v 
Pakistan (One day) 

13- COUNTY CHAMPTONSHP 
Wont Essex vKont 

CanHJ: Gtemorgan v WarMeksWw 
*OU Trattord: Lancashire v 
Yorkstere 

Bath: Somerset v NSddtesex 
The Orel: Swray * Hampshire 
Worcester Worcestershire v 
Lfllcestereftke 
TOUR MATCH 

Bletchtey: N uilh anita ons h lrB v 

Pakistan 

14- SUNDAY LEAGUE 
nortt Essex v Kent 
Bibur VafK Glamorgan v 


Gloucestershire v 

Sussex 

Southampton; Hampshire v 
Derbyshire . 

Leicester Lecesterehrav Surrey 
Baft?: Somerset v War w icks hi re 
Worcester Worcestershire v 

Mddesex 

15-OTHER MATCH 
Downpatrick: Iretoid v 
Glo uce stershire (Crta day) 
17-COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Derby: Derbyshire v Lancashire 
Word: Essex v Northamptonshire 


Bath: Somerset* Kart 
Hove: Stnsex v Gtemorgan 
Woraster Worcestershire v 
GtoumateiaUw 
OTTER MATCH 

Fanner's: Cambridge Unvertoy v 
Surrey 

18-SECOND COtotOX TEST 
LORD'S: ENGLAND v PAKISTAN 
2D-C0UNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Southamphn Hampshire v 
kftddesex 

Uverpoot Lancashire v Kent 
Leicester Leicestershire * Sussex 
Luton: Northamptonshire v 
Warwickshire 

Trent Bodge: Nottinghamshire v 

WorcesJersnire 

Haadtegter . Yorkshire* Essex 

otherBatch 

The Parka Oxford Urivereny v 
Glamorgan 


»-6UNQAY LEAGUE 
■oeterc Derbyshire v 
S toucestare hira 
Basingstoke: Hampshire v 
Middlesex _ 

Old Trafton* Lancashire v Kem 
Luton: Northampton sh ire v 


Trent BndgaNotBnghamshJrev 
Worcestershire 
Baltt Somerset* Sussex 
Edgbaston: Warwickshire v Essex 
Headkigley: Yorkshire v Surrey . 

M-HATWEST TROPHY, first mad 
High Wycombe: Buckinghamshire 
vSomersBt 

Wisbech: Cambridgeshire v 
Derbyshire 

DarilrMTore Durham vMMd to ee x 
Citfift: Gtemorgan v Cheshire 
Southampton: Hampshire v Dorset 
Old Trafford: Lancashire v 
Gloucestershire 


Oxfordshire 
N ort h ampton: Nor toa mpt o nshirev 
man) 

Jesmond: Northumberland v 
Essex 

Trent Bridge: Notting ha mshire v 
Suffolk 

Edrtburrfi (Myreaide): Scotland v 
Kent 

Burtwvon-Trent (ind Coope* 
Staffordshire v Warwickshire 

The Ovafc Surrey v Hertfordshire 
Hove: Sussex v CunOertend 
Trowbridge: WteNre v Yorkshire 
Worcester Worcestershire v 
Devon 

TOUR MATCH 

Cambridge: Combined Universities 
vPBWstan 

27 -COUNTY CHAS9IOMSW> 

Chaimsfort- Essex v Somerset 
Gloucester Gloucestershire v 
Worcestershire 

Canterbury: Kantv 

NoffintfiamsWra 

Old Tratfort: Lancashire v 

Derbyshire 

Lord's: MicKXesex v Glamorgan 
Northampton.- Northamptenswre v 
Yorkshire 

Guadtont Sunny V Sussex 
Edgbaston: Warwickshire v 
Hampshire 

TOUR MATCH 
•Leicester L a toe s tenWre* 
Pakistan 

a-SUMDAY LEAGU E 
Gtoucasier Gteuoeswrehra v 
Worcestershire 
Canterbury: Kart v SonertM 
Otd Trattort: Lancashire* 
Derbyshire 

Lord's: Middesex v Gtemorgan 

GuScttord: Storey v 

Northamptonshire 

Hava Sussex* Nottinghamshire 

Edgteton: Warwickshire v 

Hamp shire 

July 

MMUNTY CHAMPIONSMP 
Swansea: Glamorgan v 
Normamptonshiie 
Gteucaatar.GkiiKestBrehlrev 
Hampshire 

Canterbury: Kent v Yorkshire 
OW Trattont Lancashire v Essex 
Leicester Leicestershire v 
DertwsNra 

TTte Oval: Surrey v Middlesex 
Edgbaston: Warwickshire v 

Somerset 

Kidderminster Worcestershire v 
Nottinghamshire 

OTHER MATCH 
Lord's: Oxford v Cambridge 
2-THRDC0fMflLLTE5r 
H£ADMGL£Y: ENGLAND v 

PAKISTAN 

4-COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
-Meaner: Derbys hire v Hampshire 
Swansea: Glamorgan v 
Gloucestershire 


Nort ha m pt on: ) 

Lancashre 
Trent Bridge: NotfinphenreMrev 
Yorkshire 

The Ovak Surrey v Leicestershire 
Hove: Sussex y Kent 
Worcester Worce stersh ire v 
Warwickshire 

E-SUNDAY LEAGUE 
Chelmsford: Essex v Sussex 
Lord's: Middtesex v Leicestershire 
Trmg: Northamptonshire v 


Trent Bridge NotttnghamsNrev 
YofkStWB 

Worcester Worcestershire v 
Warwickshire 

8-NATWEST TROPHY 


Leicester orTBA: Leice s tershire or 
OxonvH ampstere or 

Derbyshire *** 

Hove or TBA: Sussex or 
Cunbariand v Lancashire or 
Gtoucasterstare 
Trowbridge or Headtogley: 
watshire or Yorkshire v Glamorgan or 
Cheshire 

TBA or Uxbridge: Durham or 
Middesto v Nottinghamshire c* Suffolk 
N orthamp ton or TBA: 

Northamptonshire or Ireland v Surrey 
or Hertfordshire 

Slone or Edgbaston: Staffordshire 
or Warwickshire v Bucks or Somerset 
Jesmond or Chetmsfon* 
Nortiavnpylyi dOfEs^tv 

9-TOUR MATCH 
Buftort-orv-Trem(fodCcwp^ 

Minor Counties v Pakistan (Ttso days) 

1 1- LORD'S: BENSON AND HEDGES 
CUPFWAL 

TOUR MATCH 

Trent Bridge: Notfingnemsfire v 
Pafcsten or Lancashire v PaWsan at 
Od Traffon* or Warwickshire v 

Pakistan at Edgbaston 

OTHER MATCH 
DubtolMteaMde): Ireland v 
wort ha m p t o raiiirefTwodays) 

12- 5UNDAY LEAGUE 

Cftestte Oerbyghrt v Gtemorgan 

Chelmsford: Essex v 

Gloucestershire 

Southampton: Hampshire v 

Worcestershire 

Otd Traffont Lancashire v 

Leicestershire 

The Ovafc Surrey* Somerset 
Warwickshire v 


Scarborough: Yorkshire v 
Middlesex 

15-COUNTY CHAMPIONSMP 
Derby; Derbyshire v Keffi 
Southend. Essex v HampeMre 
Bristol: Gtoucestarshirev 
Mrtfiesax 
Trent I 


Tauntort Somerset* 

Worcestershire 

The OvaL Stfiwy v Yotkshro 

Nuneaton: Warwickshire v Sussex 

TOUR HATCH 

Carfiff: Glamorgan v Pakistan 
1B-WCA SILVER JUHLEEOtC DAY 
INTERNATIONAL 
Lad's: England v Austnsla 
15C0UNTY CHAMMONSW. 
Southend: Essex v Derbystwe 
Cardiff: Glamorgan v Surrey 
BristoL-Gtoucestershke* 
Northamptonshire 
■Bournemouth: Hampshnv 
Warmcfcshve 
Lord's: Middtesex v 
NoMn g namste re 
Taunton Somerset* 
Lefcesterafire 

Hastings: Sussex v Yorkshire 
TOUR MATCH 

•Worcester: Worcestershire v 

Pakistan 

OTHER MATCH 

•Coleraine: Ireland v Scotland 


. ajinim v « moi p 
S outhend: Essex V Derbyshire 
CanfifL. Glamorgan v Surrey 
Bristok Gloucestershire v 
Yorkshire 
Canterbury: Kent v 
Northamptonshire 
Trent frdge: Nottinghamshire » 
Mkkfiesex 

Taunton: Somerset v 
lercesfifshire 

Hastings: Sussex v Lancashire 

22-COUMTY CHAMPtONSHP 
Derby: Oerbyshkev 
NoffingtmrtHhire 

Portsmouth: Hampshire v Sussex 
Kentv 


Southport Lancashire v 
Warwickshire 


Northampton: Northamptonshire v 
Somerset 

The Ovat Surrey v Worcestershire 
HBBdfngky: Yorkshire v 
Gtamorgan 

23-FOURTH COTNHILL TEST 

EDGBASTON: ENGLAND v 
PAKISTAN 

25-COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Bnswfc Gloucestershire v 
Durtjysriire 

Portsmouth: Hampshire v Essex 
OW Traffont Lancashire v 


Leicestershire v 

Yorkshire 

Lord’s Midrfiesax v Kent 
Northampton- Northamptonshire v 
Sussex 

Worcester worcesterstwe v 
Somerset 

2&-SUNOAY LEAGUE 
Swansea: (Samoraan v 
Warwickstwe 

Portsmouth: Hampshire v Essex 
0« TraTtord: Latca&Wre v 
Hottmghamshirg 

Lfvcester LocestteshkB v 
Yorkshire 

Lonfto Middtesex v Derbyshire 

Flnedoa- Northamptcmahke v 
G totc esarehi re 
Worcester Worcestershire v 
Somerset 

83-NATWE5T TROPHY 
QBarterfoMA 
3D-QTHER MATCH 
Jesmond: Ensyand XI v Rest rf the 
World W 

31-Jesmond: EngJand XI v Rest « 
the World XI 


1- COUNTT CHAMYONSHIP 
Chekenftam: Gkwcesterehlre v 
Lekxsterehae 

Canterbury: Kent v Derbyshire 
lord's: Middlesex v Surrey 
Weston-super-Mare: Somerset* 
Glamorgan 
Eastbourne: Sussex v 
Nottinghamshire 
EflgbaslorL" WarwtcksMre v 
Northamptonshire 

f, Yorkshire v 

TOUR MATCH 
Southampton; Hampshire v 
Pakistan 

WOMEN'S TEST MATCH 
Worcester Engbnd v Austrafo 

2- SUNDAY LEAGUE 
Cheltenham Gloucestershire v 
Leicestershire 

Canterbury: Kent v Derbyshire 
Lore's: MtodteMix v Surrey 
Wesi on-super-Mare. Somerset v 
Gtemorgan 
Eastboumr Sussex v 
Worcestershire 
Ed^asttn: Warwickshire v 
Nonharotonshire 
Scarborough: YorkafXrev 

Lancashire 

5-COUNTY CHAMPfONSMP 
Chesterfieid: Derbyshire v 
Yfttehire 


new surfece after the 1985 event 
bad to be postponed when the 
track began to break up, recently 
announced a five-year contract 
with FISA. 

The spokesman said the Bel- 
gian federation had decided in 
favour of the Zolder circuit in 
the northeast of Belgium, thus 
honouring a deal made in 1984 
between the Belgian federation, 
FISA and the two tracks. 

The agreement stipulated that 
alternation between the two 
Belgian tracks would be adopted 
from 1987 onwards and that 
next year’s race would be re- 
served for Zolder. 


will again be part of the team, 
and be will be joined next season 
by the Belgian, Thierry Boutsen, 
who arrives from Arrows as the 
replacement for Gerhard 
Berger, the Austrian driver who 
recently signed for Ferrari. 

For the past week, however, 
Benetton have been conducting a 
series of tests at Donnuagton 
with their 1986 BMW-powered 
cars, which could have longer- 
term ramifications for grand 
prix raring because Peter Col- 
lins, their team manager, has 
been giving several np-aad- 
coming drivers the opportunity 
to sample Formula 1 tor bo 
power and demonstrate their 
skill and adaptability to it. 

They indnde Andy Wallace, 
the winner of the 1986 Lucas 
British Formula 3 championship 
with a VW-powered Madgwick 
Reynard, who; like Martin 
Brandle, the Tyrrell driver, a 
few seasons ago, has been 
backed by the Racing For 
Britain sponsorship organiza- 
tion as be strives for an eventual 
place in grand prix raring, 
perhaps in 1988. 

Wallace was joined at 
Donnington this week by David 
Hunt, yoanger brother of James 
Hunt, the former world cham- 
jrion, whose Toyota-powered 
Ralt has been part of Che 1986 
Intersport Formula 3 team, sup- 
ported by Cellnet. 

The communications com- 


Abergavenny: Gtemorgan v 
Leicestershire 

Cfteftenhain: Ooucesterafm w 
Surrey 

Canterbury: Kara v Mkkffesex 
Old Treftorct Lancashire* 
North a mpton shire 
Worksop: Nottinghamshire v 
Warwickshire 

Wesfoo-luper-Maro: Somerset v 
Hampshire 

Eastbourne: Sussex v Essex 
OTTER MATCH 

Lours: MCC v Ireland (Two days) 
8-FIFTH C0HNMLL TEST 
THE OVAL" ENGLAND* 

PAKISTAN 

8-COUNTY CHAMPUNSHP 
Che ste rfieid: Derbyshire v Surrey 
Cnafienham; Gloucestershire v 
Kent 

Southampton: Hampshke v 
Lancashire 

Hinckley: Letcsstereffire v 
Warwickshire 
Lord's: Middlesex v 
Wbrosstereftire 

Northampton: North a mptonshire v 
Essex 

T rent Bridga Nottinghamshire v 
Somerset 

Sheffield: Yorkshire v Sussex 
MOUR MATCH 
Arundel: Lavinia. Duchess of 
Nortons XI v Rest olthe world Xt (One 


SUNDAY 


kY LEAGUE 
Chesterfield: Derbyshire* 

Surrey 

Cheltenham: Gloucestershire v 

Kant 

Bournemouth: Hampshire v 
Glamorgan 

Letamter Leicestershire v 
Warwickshire 

Lord's: Midcflesex* Lancashire 
N ortam pton: Northamptonsh ire v 


Trent Bridge: Nottinghamshire v 
Somerea 

Hut Yorkshire v Sussex 
OTHER MATCH 

TBA: Wales v intend (Three days) 
12-NATWEST TROPHY 
Sand-finals 
TOUR MATCH 

Nottinghamshire v Rest of the 
WortdXI (at Trent BrWgelor 
Larautare * Best of ihe MM XJ 
(at Old Trafford) or Warwickshire v 
Rest of the World XI (at 
Edgbaston) 

OTfER MATCH 

Aberdeen (MamofteM): Scotland v 
MCC (Three days) 

15-COUNTY CHAMPfONSMP 
Demy: Derbyshire v Leicestershire 
Chelmsford: Essex v Middlesex 
Trent I 


Taunton: Somers e t v Yorkshire 
The Oval: Scxray v Kant 
Hove: Sussex v wanwekshira 
Worcester WDrcesteralwa w 


TOUR HATCH 

■BnsioL Gloucestershire » Rest of 
the WortdXI 
IS- SUNDAY LEAGUE 


Chelmsford: Essex v Middesex 
Swansea: Glamorgan v 
Worcestershire 

Trent Bridge: Nottinghamshire v 
Hampstwe 

Tauntorr Somerset v Yorkshire 
The Oval Surrey v Kent 
Hove: Sussex v Wanhckshlre 

19-COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Chehnstanfc Essex v 
N otti ngha msh ire 
Canter Gtemorgan v Middtesex 
Bournemouth: Hampshire v Kant 
Lytnam: Lancashire v Sussex 
Northanpton: Northampt o nshire v 
Worcestershire 
The OvaL Surrey v Somerset 
Edgbaston: Warwickshire v 
Gloucestershire 

Yorkshire v 


20-MCC BICENTENARY MATCH 
Lord s: MCC V Rest of ttte World » 
(five days J 

22- COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Derby: Derb ysh ire* Essex 
Neattc Glamorgan* 
Worcestershire 
Bournemouth: Hampshire v 
Somerset 

Wefingborough School: 
Northamptonshire v Middtesex 
Trent Bridge: Notti n g ha mshire v 
Gtoucestershra 
Hove: Sussex v Surrey 
Edgbaston: Warwickshire * 
Lancashire 

23- SUNDAY LEAGUE 
Neath: Glamorgan v Essex 
MoretorHn-MBTsit 
Gloucestershire v Nottinghamshire 
Bournemouth: Hampshire v 
Someoet 

Leicester: Leicestershire v KOT 
weangborough School: 
Northamp t on shire v MnSfiesex 
Hove: Sussex v Surrey 
Edgbaston. Warwickshire v 
Lancashire 

Worcester Worcestershire v 
Yorkshire 


pany recently signed an agree- 
ment with Benetton as part of a 
comprehensive help package 
they are potting together for 
young British drivers who show 
real potential. 

The consistent support of- 
fered to young and promising 
drivers in France has been 
largely responsible for their 
considerable impact on the 
grand prix scene in recent years, 
and confirmation came yes- 
terday that one of them, Phi- 
lippe Streiff. had signed a new 
contract with Ken Tyrrell, whose 
team will also be Ford-powered 

The new Tyrrell 016, cur- 
rently under construction, will 
be the team's first car to have 
been designed with the help of 
computer-aided technology sup- 
plied by Data General, the 
team's sponsors. 

It will ne powered by Ihe 
normally-aspirated 35 litre 
DFZ Ford Cosworth V8 engine, 
which has been developed from 
the highly-snccessfnl family of 
three-fibre engines that has 
dominated grand prix raring. 

Non- turbo charged power 
units have been accepted hack 
into Formula 1 by the changed 
regulations that operate from 
January 1. Whether or not 
Bnmdle also rejoins the Tyrrell 
team will almost certainly de- 
pend upon negotiations cur- 
rently taking place for 
additional sponsorship. 


28-COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Maidstone: Kerf v Lancashire 
Leicester Leicestershire v 
nslura 
Uxbridge: Middlesex v 


Nortnampun: Northamplonshke v 
Derbyshire 

The Oval: Surrey v Glamorgan 
Hove: Sussex v Somerset 
Worcester Worcestershire v 
Hampshire 

Heading tey: Yorkshire v 
Gloucestershire 

29- COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
Colchester Essex v Surrey 
Maidstone: Kent v Hampshire 
Old Trafford; Lancashire v 
Gloucestershire 
Leicester Leicestershire v 
Northamptonshire 
Uxbndce" Middlesex v Sussex 
Trent Bndga: Nottinghamshire v 
Derbyshire 

Ed^iaston: Warwickshxe v 
Worcestershire 
OTHER MATCHES 
Edgbaston: Warwick Under-25 
Final 

UaneUr Glamorgan* Somerset 
(Buckleys Brewery Trophy, one day) 

30- SUNUAY LEAGUE 
Derby: Derbyshire v 
Nottinghamshire 
Cotcbester Essex v Yorkshire 
Maidstone: Kent v Hampshire 
Otd Trafford: Lancashire* 

Gloucestershire 

Lafcesrar: Leicestershire * 
Northamptonshire 

Lord's: Whdctiesex v Sussex 
Hereford: WqrceBtafShee v Surrey 


September 

2-COUNTY CHAMrtONSHIP 
Colchesmr: Essex v 
Worcestershire 

Cardiff: Glamorgan v Derbyshire 
BnsioL Gloucestershire v 
Somerset 

Southampton: Hampshire v 
UncBStershim 

Trent Bodge; Nottinghamshire v 
Sussex 

The Oval 1 Surrey * 
Northamptonshire 
Edgbaston. Warwickshire v Kem 
OTHER MATCH 
Scaiborough: Yorksfxre v MCC 
(Three days) 

5-NATWEST TROPHY FINAL: 
LORD’S 

B-SUNDAY LEAGUE 
Canterbury ; Kent v Sussex 
Leicester: Leicestershire * 
Glamorgan 

Trent Bridge: Nottingham v Essex 
Taunton: Somerset * 
Northamptonshire 
The Ovat" Surrey v Gloucestershire 
" n: WarwKksIwe v 


Headingfey: Yoikshre v 
Hampshire 
OTHER MATCH 
Scarborough- Asda Cnckal 
Challenge: Lancashire v Derby&hr* 
7-OTHER MATCHES 
Bain Dawes Trophy Rnal 
Scarborough: Asda Cricket 
Challenge: Yorkshire v Hampshire 
•-OTHER MATCH 
Scarborough: Asda Cricket 
Challenge final 

9-COUNTY CHAMPtONSHP 
OM Traftoitt Lancashire* Surrey 
Leicester: Leicestershire v 
Gloucestershire 
Lord's: Middlesex * Hampshire 
Trent Bridge: Nottingtmmshve v 
Glamorgan 

Taunton: Somerset v DertjySfwe 

Hove: Sussex * Nonhampkmsfwe 

Scarborough: Yorkshire v 
WarwiCkshre 

12- COWTY CHAMPtOHSHfi* 

Derby. Derbyshire v Middlesex 
Chelmsford: Essex * Lancashire 
Bnstot GBoucestershire v 
Glamorgan 

Canterbury. Kem v Leicestershve 
Worcester: worcesteivwis * 
Northamptonshire 

13- SUNDAY LEAGUE 

Derby: Dertjysto e v Somerea! 
Chelmsford: Essex v Lancashire 
BnStOfcGkxJCBStashirev 
Gtemorgan 

Canterbury: Kent* Warwickshire 
The Ovat! 


Hova.3 ^ 

Worcester: Worcestershire v 
Northamptonshire 
■denotes Sunday play 

OTHER MATCHES AT LORD'S 
Mar M: MCC v MCC Young Cnctears 
Juty: * Eton v Harrow; 22:7*CC v MCC 
Schools; 2& MCC Sand v National 
Assouan erf Young Crtckstore); 24: 
MCA Young Cricketers V CombmaO 

Aug^S: MCC * Iwtend (two OWSt,* 
Nmonal Cfob Cricket Cnarrfotof&hfaTTnaJ 
ichk dev); 31: Norsk Hydro VBage Cncket 
Championship Final (one day) 







SPORT 


THE TTMF.S FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


RACING 


I Haventalight to steal 
thunder from West Tip 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


West Tip, the equine hero of being about 3tfi lengths. West 
this year’s Grand National, Tip was giving his rival 121b 


will have his first race since 
that memorable occasion at 
Aintree last April when he 
contests the Food Brokets 
Ferrero R ocher Handicap 
Chase at Cheltenham today. 

As at Liverpool, he will be 
ridden again by Richard 
Dun woody whose cool, calm 
and collected approach to the 
big occasion was another un- 
forgettable aspect of that 
afternoon. 

Much as I am loathe to 
desert old allies. I do so now 
for two reasons. 

First, West Tip has always 
needed a race to get him into 
shape after a long summer’s 
rest- Second, and perhaps 
even more important in this 
instance, X HaventaKght has 
the beating of him on Park 
course form. 

The race that I have in mind 
was the Rite Gub National 
Hunt Handicap Chase, which 
was run over today’s course 
and distance on the last day of 
the National Hunt Festival in 
March. 

f Haventalight finished 
third that day. West Tip, 
seventh, with the distance 
between them at the finish 


then. Now the concession is 
131b. 

Whereas West Tip has bees 
deservedly resting on his lau- 
rels since last spring, I 
Haventalight has been rel- 
atively busy this autumn. He 
began the season by dead- 
heating with Arctic Beau at 
Newbury in October. Then he 
finished second in the Silver 
Buck Handicap Chase at 
Wincanton. 

In the meantime, the form 
of that particular race has 
worked out exceptionally well 
with the winner, Broadheath, 
going on to achieve even 
greater fame in the Hennessy 
Cognac Gold Cup at Newbury 
and the third, Simon Legree, 
scoring in style at Sandown a 
week ago. 

As Queensway Boy will be 
carrying 261b more than he 
was allotted in the long handi- 
cap, I Haventalight looks an 
entirely justifiable nap. 

Today’s programme brans 
as it did last year with the first 
division of the Bristol 
Novices' Hurdle. It was won 
that day by that immensely 
exciting prospect Midnight 
Count. Now I am looking to 


another promising performer, 
The Demon Barber, to put his 
own stamp of authority od the 
occasion. 

The winner of two bumpers 
before he was sent hurdling, 
Gordon Richards' four-year- 
old duly lived up to his early 
promise at Wetherby where he 
accounted for the versatile 
Dual Venture and now I 
expect him to prove too good 
for Yeoman Broker. 

The other division, which 
was won by Ten Plus 12 
months ago, looks much eas- 
ier prey now for Compton 
Park who ran Erostin Ruler to 
a length at Towcester last 
Satuiday. 

On the corresponding occa- 
sion last year Tim Foister 
saddled Midnight Song and 
Latin American for the 
Kioeton Conditional Jockeys’ 
Handicap Chase- Now he is 
relying upon the same two. 

Last year third place was the 
best that Midnight Song could 
manage but even that was 
better than his stable compan- 
ion who made such a mess of 
the last fence that he got rid of 
his young rider. 

This time the pair could be 
thwarted again by Whisky 
Eyes 



Saffan dope tested 
after dismal 
display for Pipe 


n sVkS< 


ijt % 


National heroes: Richard Dtumoody reunited again with West Tip, who makes his seasonal 
reappearance In today's Food Brokers Ferrero JRocher Chase at Chelte nh a m 


The Wellington trainer Mar- 
tin Pipe, chasing His 30th winner 
of foe season at his homerourse. 
Taonton. was out of luck yes- 
terday with three runners. Kili- 
manjaro Bob was second in the 
opener. Lucky Four third in the 
next race, and hot favourite 
Saflan last but one in the 
Juvenile Novices’ Hurdle. 

Twice a winner on the Flat 
and purchased at Newmarket 
Autumn Sales for 31,000 guin- 
eas on behalf of the television 
comedian Freddie Starr, Saffan 
was fourth on his hurdling debut 
la<a month. 

Yesterday. Saflan started at 
! 5 -g on to beat 1 1 rivals, but 
jumped poorly for champion 
Peter Scudamore and gradually 
tailed off towards the rear from 
halfway. Neither Pipe nor 
Scudamore could find any ex- 
cuses. “Very' disappointing.” 
they said. 

The stewards inquired into 
the running of Saflan and, after 
interviewing bis trainer and 
jockey, ordered a routine dope 
test- Scudamore said that Saflan 
was never going easily at any 
wa p- and gave no response 
when asked to quicken along the 
back straight. 

Pipe mentioned that the geld- 
ing had gurgled on bis previous 
run, mid yesterdav wore a 
tongue strap for the first time — 
a possible contributory factor. 

The race went to newcomer 
Olympic Eagle, whose five 
lengths defeat of Cleavage ended 


a 16-year losing spell for retired 
Bristol builder James NutL 

In-form West Country train- 
ers who have big-race raids in 
the offering are David Elsworth. 
Ron Hodges and Les KennarcL 
Elsworth’s Spring Philtre defied 
a penalty for her winning 
Wincanton debut and survived 
a stewards’ inquiry after landing 
the Donyatt Conditional Jock- 
eys Novices' Hurdle by two 
lengths for 20-year-old Paul 
Holley. 

The Whitsbury trainer has his 
sights on the King Geoige VI 
Chase, in which he may be 
double handed with Desert Or- 
chid and Combs Ditch. Combs 
Ditch, who suffered a cut-hed 
setback, is "going on very well" 
according to Elswonh.. "I’d 
hoped to run him at Chelten- 
ham. but Boxing Day looks the 
likely comeback day,” he said. 

Hodges was on the mark for 
his eighth winner with Airwair 
in the Isello Iodine Challenge 
Cup Novices’ Chase. Making his 
debut over fences. Airwair was a 
lucky winner after Mr Seagull 
fell in the lead at the last fence, 
bringing down Jimmy Edwards. 
Hodges runs his smart novice 
chaser Charcoal Wally in the 
Frogmore Chase at Ascot on 
Saturday week. 

Keanard. who sent out Tudor 
Road to win the Lansdowne 
Chemical Handicap Chase, defi- 
nitely runs Mr Moonrafcer in 
Saturday's Glen Internationa] 
Gold Cup at Cheltenham. , 


mas** 


CHELTENHAM 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.35 The Demon Barber. 
1.10 Whiskey Eyes. 

1.45 Compton Park. 


230 I HAVENTALIGHT (nap) 
1L55 Summons. 

3.30 Spiders Well. 


Z20 FOOD BROKERS FERRERO ROC HER HANDICAP CHASE 
(£7,700: 3m 11) (6 runners) 

401 200011- WEST TV (CO (P Lu«) M Ofivar 9-11-10 RDMwoody 92 5-2 

403 0214-F0 BEAU RANGER (C5)(Wt*a Bros Ltd) Mu J Thome 8-1 1-3 — SSotthEcctes 9016-1 

405 3314-12 I HA VENT AUGHT (&BF) fToraftoc Ltd) F Whiter 7-10-1 1 PSctfdmm •99F6-4 

408 112222} PARC HANSEL (Mrs G McrnS-AdtertS) N Gaselee 8-10-2 SShwwod — 10-1 

■ 409 4PPF-30 TRACYS SPECIAL (CD) (LAmas) A TiffneS 9-1 0-0 Steve Knftjtt 9111-2 

412 12U311 OUEENSWAV BOY (Queensway SecunUes Ltd) Mss A King 7-10-0 (Sn) A Wabb 7G 13-2 
1385: RUN AND SUP 7-10-4 P Scudamore (6-4 On) J Spearing 6 ran 


Spartan Orient is Aintree type 


By Michael Seely 

2.20 l Haventalight. 3.30 SPIDER’S WELL (nap). 

Gnide to our In-line racecard 

103 (12) 0-0432 7TMESFORM (CDJ2F) [Mrs J Rytey) B HaO 9-105 B West (4) 88 7-2 

Racecard number. Draw tn brackets. Stx-flgure and dte ten o e wtrewr. BF-toeaton favourite In latest 
form (F-fefl- P-pufled up. U-unseated rider. B- race). Owner in brackets. Trainer. Age and 
brought down. S-sipped up. R-rafused). Horae's moi Rldar plus any duwnca . The Tines 
rame(B-ttnker&. V-ysot. H-Pood. E-EyesbieOd. C- Private Hantflcapper's ratmg. Approximate staring 
cours e tenner, D-agance winner- CP-coursa price. 

Going: good 

1235 BRISTOL NOVICE HURDLE (Div I: £2,131: 2m 4t) (10 runners) 

too 012 HIGH VISCOSITY (B Harvey) A Jarvis 4-11-4 T4en 83 7-2 

106 1 THE DEMON BARBER (R Cuppa) G Richards 4-1 1-4 PTtock 099F6-4 

107 202-10 YEOMAN BROKER (□) (Mrs H Atean) J Gilford 4-1 1-0 R Rowe « 94 

106 O/OOP- DOMRRY (WH Taylor) WHThyior 6-1 1-0 Mr M Price 

115 3 IMMORA BAY (Mrs EHitChtes) Mrs J Pitman 4-1 1-0 MPamtt 01 7-1 

117 0 ONLY A PONT (HBwnbarg)J OU 6-11-0 QBrateay 

118 90)0300- PINK PANTHER (T Panting] R Holtashaad 6-114) P Scudamore 8312-1 

03 SUNBEAM TALBOT (Mrs R Legotfe) R Armytoge 5-11-0 Mr M Anaytega (7) 8110-1 

«OP-0 (KHfBTA. AIR (C Mtchfll) C W Mitchell 5-10-9 MrTUkM{7) 

«V SATIN FINISH {D MackSok) G Roe 8-100 P McDermott (7) 

1985: MIDNIGHT COUNT 5-1 1-0 R Rowe 00-1) J QWord 21 nn 
|R| MGH VISCOSITY (10-11) could rmfce no impresstan on Jol’e 611(188) when 101 2nd at Foto- 
stone (2m 81. E685. soft. Nov 24, 12 nut). THE DEMON BARB81 (10-1 2) won two NH Rat races 


FORM »OGH VISCOSITY (10-11) could nofce no impresstan on JoTeGIrt 
rwnm stone (2m 81. £685. Soft. Nov 24, 12 ran). THE DEMON BARB81 f 
before a length victory of Dual Venture (10-12) in a wetherby novice hurdto (2m. 
YEOMAN BROKER weakened Into 5fti behind Tetatrader at Ascot Previously (1 
YourUp(I0-10)alK«npton(2ni4l.El615.goofl.N0v6.13ran).MAM0RABAY| 
looking in need of the race 111 3rd to Troy Fat (11-0) at Worcester (2m 41. 1 
SUNBEAM TALBOT (10-3) fonsMd |ust over 71 3rd to Keynes (10-10) atl^ceste 
ran) last tone. 

SetacttaR TIC DEMON BARBER 


(an. £879. good. Nov 25. 2S ran), 
ay i 1 0-1 0) 151 winner bom Button 
IAY (1 1 -0) rai a good race despite 
41. £103*. soft Nov 19. 19 rrai). 
ester (2m, £815, good. Nov 17, 13 


1-10 KINETON CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP CHASE (£2,918: an) (6 runners) 

202 1331F-1 WHISKEY EVES (D){HPMc)S Meter 5-11-13<6«) GLanteo *99 F5-4 

204 3UPIM0 WALNUT WONDER (D) (R htickman) R Hickman 11-11-1 P McDermott Si 16-1 

205 323243 MDMGHT SONG <DJM=) (Mrs DPrtce)T Forster 11-10-12 BOowtag 87 3-1 

206 0<24«2 LATMAMBVCAN (BASF) (JRAcM^T Foster 9-188 WHuawMes 92 8-1 

207 22122 1un£JM(D)(T Cumfo^am)T Cunningham 7-105 H Oatrfty 91 5-1 

206 313110 FUGHT SHEET (D)(MreB Read) PJ Jones 18-1MI T Bathe 95 7-1 

1985: peaces 9-188 K Ryan (5-2) R Fisher 5 ran 

FORM WHISKEY EYES (11-1 0 ) picks up a Sb pen 
runiYI Kamplon (2m 4f , £2002. good to soft. Nov 2 
best advantage on reappearance wften 11 Hi 4th to Rousp 
10 ran). MDNGKT SONG (188) was favourite when be 
150yds, £2997. good. Nov 12. 4 ran). LATIN AMSUCJ 
Maitredee(l0-6)atPlumpton[2rn3t, E2184, good to soft, 
to Just Mid (1 1-5) at Market Rasen (2m, £1785. good, Nw 
season, most recently on peradipnate start at Taunton C2n 

Lester (9-13) 4L 
Setadian: WIHSKEY EYES 

1.45 BRISTOL NOVICE HURDLE (Drv Ifc £2,155: 2m 41) (18 runners) 

303 030-301 ANOYm NORFOLK (N Sateh) B McMahon 5-1 1-4 GSradtey 00F8-4 

305 FF-00 AB8CYBRANEY (Mrs EBfaJPCuncW 7-118 P Dover 

307 0 BRK3HTNB) (D HorsweB) K Baley 5-11-0 PSeadaaore — 7-2 

309 040882 CQOTON PARK (Lord VwtetfJWng 5-11-0 — 96 5-1 

M Peered — — 

CSrttftb 

SSmUiEcdee — 8-1 
NON-RUNNER 



310 FAIR DANE. (PSeammeQ Mrs JPtenan 51 1-0 MPerrad 

311 RAMO- GUN MAN (J Solea) M "fate 511-0 CSarttb 

312 JUDGElEtn' DAY (R Tooth) N Henderson 4-11-0 SSedOiEcdas — 8-1 

313 0 HNGS ADVOCATE (R Norton) A Jarvis 4-1 18 NON-RUNNER 

315 0008 PITHY (P Harris) G Yardtey 4-1 1-0 R Rowe a — 

317 B0F- PRIVATE AUDITION (PH Betts Ltd) MTompkfns 4-1 1-0 S Sherwood 97 — 

316 0/0008 PROVERBIAL SESSION (B) (W M-Cotes) W McKorde-Colos 5-118 to B Towers 

319 088 RATH WONDBI (Anro Duchess of Wtastmknttr) R Francis 5-118 _ SjOWefl 75 — 

321 04 SHAMROCK MASTS! (Mrs M Otver) M Oteer 8-1 18 R Dunwoody 91 8-1 

322 SUFFOLK DOWNS (P Barber) Miss J Thome 4-118 S Horabead 

323 3- TRUE SPARTAN {TEcJdeyJG Price 6-1 18 C Price 88 — 

324 000232- VALLEY SO DEEP (J Brown] DGandoto 8-118 P Barton *99 — 

327 0 SCAlJWOJKWaissflflMr^KVVeisseftwg 7-188 C Jones 

328 4F080 SUNWOOD(MPve)M Pipe 4-188 PLeacb S3 — 

1986: TQI PUB 5-11-6 K Mooney (118 tas) F Wehryn 18 ran — 

FORM 0°:?) ndden om to bee t Mac Cha rley q8-11) 2W M Market Rasen 

^ W3ft.Ptow22, 15 ran) last time. COMPTON IWK(1fr10) drifted in the mar- 
iLffi S JS*hSe ( 18-13) 91 Towcester (2m 5f 26yds. £710, good. Nov 29. 12 rant with 
Ae^YWA^nD-l^wrtbonter.PWVATCAUDrnONrt 1-0) made some tele fisadwev when 11X1581 to a 

US ! 1 !?' * Umenck^ "twn 61 ^ ** to Susan McCann !-S)i to t handfoapi hurfipm.^ £1380, heavy. Apr 14 
i Bob. is ran). 

Seteetiort: PRIVATE AUDITION 


.heavy. Apr 14 


SOUTHWELL 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.30 Bit Of Order. 
1.00 Solent Express. 
1.30 Debt Follower. 


2.00 Tierenee. 

2.30 Special Vintage. 

3.00 Black River. 


The Times Private Handi capper’s top rating: 3.00 BLACK RIVER 

Going: good to soft 

1230 PARTRIDGE NOVICE HANDICAP CHASE (£1,007: 3m 110yd) (13 runners) 

1 200557F KMG HUSTL ER (VL ockley)W Clay 9-1 1-10 — — 14-1 

2 221230 MIGHTY DtSASTBfl (D Hanmorag W Kemp 8-11-7 SSWston 96 4-1 

3 401-003 BIT OF OHOte(S Marsh) RFteher 5-11-1 M Meegher — 10-1 

5 0F4U22 PRMCE METTERNICH (R England) C J BeB 5-10-13 H Dwyer 94F84 

7 04F2/P0 COMCULATEICF Lee) CFUt 10-184 J A Hants — — 

8 P40F-U3 JUBILEE UGHIB (B Gordon) P Prttchard 9*188 OChtan 90 7-1 

9 0Q34-4F HTUl (Ms J Maredtth) B Preace 510-I R Strange — 6-1 

10 003380 JAUMTER (Whitting CommodMes LM) W Holden 5108 C Grant 

11 0 U040P/ RIVAL (T Mrigety) K Morgan 8-1QO MBmmwn 

14 P/PP2FP uttletigbi (B) (M rs B Ransdan) K Stone 9-188 A Stringer — 12-1 

15 P4PO-3F JON PIPER (H Howard) B Morgan 8 - 108 . C Prince (7) *99 8-1 

18 4F/0 SCARLET COON (tesCPnwy)CPfoney 10-188 toMSowersby 

17 0880 GOOMBAY SMASH (J Young) J Young 7-108 — 

1985: BURMJTTCH BOY 51813 Mr P Niven (7-2)MreG Revetey 14 nn 
10) SPARROW SELLING HURDLE (3-Y-O: £622: 2m 4t) (9 runners) 

2 U0RJ MONTBEIKHS (M Mddess) B Preece 10-12 PHOar (7) 

3 434 ^UTEtyxMHudtey) JFKtch-Heyes 1812 Penny Flttsb Heyes (7) 87 5-1 

4 TDM HARDY (tos S Hafl) J Scaitan 10-12 M Fariong — . — 

5 F OALBY GIRL (J Benbcsw) P Mgm 10-7. SJotaMOn 

S 0208 MAHABAO (V) (C Chen) Mis N Macautsy 10-7 — 98 92 

7 «WRAM0 LVB tniHE(OG«s»B)Pasig10-T. - - MButtrd — 10-1 

| Sg gn ^XPRESS Jdra M Saunders) a Steran, 10-7 R Strange • 99 F4-S 

9 04 TANAGON(HONe)l)HO-NeaiO-7 ROwnaiffl — 12-1 

F TYRANNISE ID Raffl B Mditehnn m.7 HBmMB — 

1885: HOBOURNES GML 108 J Thompson (3-1) R WOodhouee 8 ran 

1.30 PHEASANT HANDICAP CHASE (£1.679: 3m 100yd) (11 runners) 

2 21Z3-P3 RANDOMLY (M Thompson) C J BeB 7-11-7 M Dwyer 87 7-1 

3 42P04P- CHANLQME (Mis P Fanrang) R Champion 8-11-5. l Wyer • 99 6-1 

4 213-P04 SUPR EME BO (Lotd Cadogan) N Crump 9-11-1., C HasAtae 84 10-1 

5 010/112 DOT FOLLOWER (BF) (F Star) Mrs J Pitman 8-10-13 BdeKaan S3F2-1 

6 P0-1P40 tot MOUSE (M BodAngton) N Gaselse 7-10-10 D Browne 0 51 

7 24BP 4Q MLL OF SL ANE (Mrs M Janrfa) A Jarrta 10-1510 — 8612-1 

9 12300F NQ1A (F Lure) R Hsher 7-108 - |g i » .. n h— 87 151 

i? W00P6URQH (CO) (M StBvens) J Bosifly 8151 M Bosley (4) 97 92 

P O'Comor 5100 C Grant 80 — 

13 01F-4CF PUNSTALL (J Drewrv) B Morgan fl-If U 13 

198a KASHU-L 7-11-0 G CftqrtesJoms (151) 5 Metor 6 ran 


FORM 


beat BEAU RMtOSt (1510) ZVy at 



ZSS STEEL PLATE A SECTIONS YOUNG CHASERS (Qualifier: £3.1 1 1: 
2m) (8 runners) 


501 3-121PP ST COLME (Dr K FrasafJG Richards 51 18 

502 12905-1 SUMMONS (Mrs S Embkloos) J Qmord 7-118 — 

503 4 BRBGETUWN Uto (V Rafcinl Mrs MRkneB 511-4 

506 %W118 FLAG OF TRUCE (P Lae) S Christian 511-4 

508 140211- MASTER BOB (E WBs) N Hendereon 51 1-4 

509 40P-P SALEHURST (Satohint Paper Co Ltd) G Baking 511-4 . 

511 411/052 BRIMSTONE LADY (BF) (P Graen) F WMar 5-1513 

512 UU3P-OT CANTABU (D) (Lady S Brooke) Lady S Brooke 7-1513- 

1985: No ca ne sp oadag race 


PToefc 8314-1 

RRowe • 99 9-4 

SMorabaad — 251 

R Boggen — 51 

.SSmMbEcxtea — F7-4 

G Brateey — 33-1 

_ PScodamore Ml 7-1 
_ JecquiOOver 83 14-1 


FORM ST COLNE W83 back hanpered when rated up at Cartatetast8maEarterni-6) beat Caro 
rurtm Wood <1512) laatUtoujter (2m 4l,£1^good to arm. Oct11,9ran).SUMMONS(11-g beat 
Cavwe6 Clown (11-2) 21 ki a compe«ivB Woicanton novico chase (2m. £16®. good to soft. Nov 13. 12 ran). 
FLAG OF TRUCE wen a couple otnowcehurdlBB MM eeaeon but til-2) was beate n a, a nd a aatance by 
■sing debut hare (2m. £4439, good to (ton. Nov 8, 5 ran). MAST81 BOB mekes 


: BRIMSTONE LADY 


&30 CORAL GOLDEN HANDICAP HURDLE (Qualifier: £3,115: 3m) (27 
runners) 


Jennie Pat who feQ on her 
first appearance over fences at 
L ttoxeter last month, before 
w inning at Ayr, again came to 
grief when a hot favourite for the 
Norbcry Novices’ Chase at 
Unoxeter yesterday, won by foe 
5-1 chance Spartan Orient. 

Simon McNcaB made most of 
foe running on Spartan Orient, 
w bo was only beaded for about 
six strides, mid way through foe 
race, by Carden Spirit, even- 
tually pulled up. 

Jennie Pat was lying second to 
Spartan Orient when she de- 
parted from foe raWli, wnd it 
was left to Liqoer Candy and 
General Sandy to chase home 
Spartan Or iaO, who won by 25 
lengths. Only eight of foe 14 
runners completed foe course. 

The former jump jockey Jeff 
King , who trains ten-year-eld 
Spartan Orient and a 
share in foe gelding with Ray 
Geddes, was delighted with this 
ex-iwinMo-pohiter’s second win 
in a row for him. 

“He is only a novice, but 
jumps like a handi capper and 
can act on any going. Its not 
beyond foe realms of possibiEty 
that be conM torn out to be a 
Grand National horse. I don’t 
say be would win, bat he fa foe 
type for Aintree,” King said. 

Roospeter. on whom Richard. 


Danwoody led all the way to win 
foe December Handicap Chase 
by 15 lengths, has proved a 
wonderful first venture into 
ownershi for Edward Young and 
his wife, Judith, from Wiltshire. 

They lease foe gelding, and he 
has now won three times from 
four outings for then. “This is 
oar first season in racing and we 
also have an interest with 
friends In another of David 
Nicholson’s horses. Members 
Revenge,** Mr Young said. 

Celtic Brew, the 2-1 favourite, 
moved np to dispute the lead 
with Roospeter three fences 
from home, bat Sun Morsbead 
reported the geld Lag had broken 
down by that point, and polled 
np his mount before foe last 
obstacle, l e a v ing Legate and 
Prehen For to fin foe minor 
positions. 

Bill Clay returned to 
Uttoxeter, where he trained for 
24 years before moving to Stoke- 
on-Trent. and saddled Aldro a 
comfortable winning favourite of 
the Sndbnry Conditional 
Jockeys’ Handicap Chase. 

Rockman, who led ever the 
first two fences, parted company 
with David Hood at the next 
obstacle, leaving Sieve Bracken 
at the head of affairs. 

He continued to cut oat the 
running until going into foe torn 


for home, then the lop weight 
Aldro periled himself to the frost 
to draw dear over foe remaining 
four fences and score by eight 
lengths front Shannie. 

Clay believed Aldro would 
.have won at Southwell ten days 
ago bet for missing a lot of work 
with a poisoned leg. “He was off 
five days, and I really had to ran 
him at Southwell, where be went 
under by a neck to Just Alidk, as 
his owner, Peter Riley, spon- 
sored the race,” he said. 

“Althongh Aldro is now jnst 
ten years old, he has been a 
backward borse, and 1 think be 
has just come to his best I shall 
keep him on the bo3 by probaHy 
running him at Bangor-on-Dee 
next Monday," Clay added. 

• Irish Flat apprentice Mar- 
tin Browne, 21-year-oMyoiniger 
brother of foe former amateur 
National Hunt champion 
Dermot, has arrived at 
Lamhoarn for a two-month spell 
with trainer Nick Henderson. 
Browne, who bas had 60 Flat 
winners and five jumping sac- 
cesses, rode Mr John into 
second place in this year’s Irish 
2JMM) Guineas. 

OFFICIAL SCHATCHMGS: AM engage- 
ments (dead): Kjnngger. Dunmore Lass. 
Wallow Bay. PUatftftrCNef Stoker. Jet 
Station. Lamkxn, Ratten Row. Lord Mar- 
lin. Adfea Easter NWtts, Camp Concert. 
Indian Mato. Lime House Blues. U piano 
Goose. 


& AM engage- tYi 1 '’*" 7 T - * L 

Dunmore Lass. I* 111’ » * 

Mat CM.~ IM - ■ " • ■ _ 


601 054110 

602 3U5403 

603 82111-P 

604 251300 

607 144445 

608 012511 

609 212U8 

810 OPOP-48 

811 200028 

612 FUPP-12 

613 00000/P 
615 00015 

617 P01118 

618 100/C1P- 

620 304211- 

621 044144 

623 0/98122- 

624 000500 

626 000521 

627 1130F5 

630 3-43002 

631 030053 

632 21-0Q2F 

633 400/533 

634 000405 

635 080040 

836 moo 


NLDWO (CJJ) (tody Hanto)G Baking 51 1-10 GBndq 

T0PHAMS TAVERNS (R Topham) G Mooro 5118 M Ha mmon d 

SPORTING MARKER (Craydato Lid) MPtoe 4-1513 p Loach 

WYE LEA(H JoPraon) J Edwards 7-1512 P Barton 

VOYANTfT wragg) D LWHana 7-1511 G Charts* Jones 

WHITE ROSE (R Jordan) N Henderson 4-1510 (4aoi)— — S Smith Ecctes 

BATTLE KING (Mil D Becktogton) F Writer 51 08 — P Sctidamont 

CELTIC CRACKS* (CD) (P Evas) RHartcp51M R Crank 

SOLO OAK (G Richards) GranvSs Richards 5108 RBaggan 

SPKSTS WEU. (A Taylor) D Barons 15158 (4mc) Has T Daria (7) 

ANEX(THaywvti)MraN Sirth 5157 C Brown 

MSTER HAHTIGAN (Mrs E Sts) J Edwards 5158 P Barton 

SUP UP fC) (F Gray) F Gray 515-2 EMnpfay 

SHOQBOER (P Rodtord) P Rodford 5152 CGray 

BLUFF COVE (Dkddns Lid) RHoOnshaad 4-151 PDmr 

DEW (C£F) (Kestrel Casae Ltt)R Holder 5150 N Q uIn i an 

WOODWAY (K Bet) D Wrti 5158 I Shoemaric (7) 

T1MSUN (K Mtetln Cteto) M McCowt 5158 to S Cowley (7) 

JBIPANZEfR Brarington) R Brazington 7-158 R Baggan 

ZIRCONS SUN (C) (Dorothea Viscountaaa Kefewn) D LAteg 7-108 — CCoa(4) 

KOFR (SaHoro VOn Has Ltd) D Mchoieon 4-150 ROumroody 

TIE SMNER(MMea«eh)M Tate 5150 G Landaa (4) 

CHEB1YB BUG (A Mactaggmi) A Mactaggart5158 PTue* 

GBIflY DOYLE (R Barber) R Barber 5158 A Sharp* 

CORRB LAD (MreEMBchaQNMItctiel 11-108 MrT MfcfaaB (7) 

MBS MALKOWSKigWoot9ey)JCosgrav» 5108 JStehem 

FAIR EXAMMER (W McKenzte-Cotae) W McKanzteGote* 5150 - kVBTParara 
1985: EMO FOREVER 5151 J J CTNaB (7-2 lav) M H Eastertiy 21 ran 


94 51 

95 — 
94 151 

94 — 
98 — 

97 52 
84 7-1 
86 — 

95 — 
• 99F7-2 

92151 

m — 

98 — 
.93 7-1 

88 151 
88 12-1 


sea 


DEVON & EXETER 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.45 Super Spark. 1.15 Le Gran Bnm. 

1.45 Repetitive. Z15 Doubleton. Z45 Mandavi 
3.15 Scahscro. 

Michael Seely's selection: 2.45 Mondavi. 
Going: soft 

12.45 SNIPE NOVICE HANDICAP HURDLE (£63& 
2m IQ (18 runners) 

4 405 
11 3F3D 
13 281 
15 280 
016 -P00 
17 800 

20 1330 

21 00 ft 
24 380 
26 058 

29 P04- 

30 4-42 

33 O/OP 

34 280 
36 OMD 


2.15 DECEMBER HANDICAP CHASE (£1,291: 
2m If) (11) 

1 042- FBIEDRUi. (CD) KBWnp 11-11-10 PKcfaartb 

2 3SU3 OYSTER POND MMcCout 51 18 J Duggan 

5 4322 D0UBLET0N (B^RLKeraianj 510-7 BP«mI 

6 -OIF TAF FY JON E8M KteConpicfc 7-104 LGrittWa 

8 MF HWESKO S Christian 5151 K Mooney 


I, w ; , 

1'C‘V' . • •. u 



IT-4 Maygon. 7-2 FteatB 
Force, 51 Kutatfs Brtta, 151 


r Spark, 51 Tour de 
151 others. 


1.15 TWYSDEN CHALLENGE CUP HANDICAP 
CHASE {£1,33% 3m IQ (14) 


Course specialists 


2 115 MY BONNE PRMCE (Cl» G Ham 11-1 

3 121- DARGAI (D) R Armytage 1511-7 

5 383 raOWNVBL(D)RiSny«ge11-1V6 


G Ham 11-11-7 C Warren m 
511-7 BPMhu 


iGAnavtageW 


TRAINERS 

Winners Rureurs Percent 


G Richards 
, D Boons 
R Holder 
MreMRkneO 


12 

60 

205 

P Tuck 

39 

202 

195 


6 

56 

145 

S Sherwood 

5 

40 

125 

R Dunwoody 

5 

42 

115 

P Leach 

19 

173 

115 

S SmrtTi Eodes 


JOCKEYS 

Winners totes Percent 

7 33 21J 

8 35 17.1 

10 63 15:9 

10 84 119 

5 42 115 

IS 143 105 



6 -OIF TAffV JONES M McCormack 7-104 LGrittWa 

8 MF nWCSKO S Christen 5151 K Mooney 

9 F41- LANACRE BRIDGE (B,CO) P Hotjbs 5151 Peter HoMn 

11 334 BOWDEN (CO) I Dudgeon 5158 MRfctnsde 

12 4184 THE RjOORUYHTealier 5150 5 Earle (8 

13 -P11 ROCXF9ELD BOY (CD) D Mlfntle 5108 A Cant* 

18 32/4 BUTTON BOY ^CDINAyltta 15108 — 

19 440 HOPE GAP (B) L Wamg 15158 GeageKagU 

51 Doubfcrtoa 7-2 Ftonesko. 51 Ftra DrW. 152 Taffy 
Jones. 51 Lanacre Bridge. 12-1 Bowden. 151 251 others. '. 

245 RACING POST CONDmONAL JOCKEYS 
HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,243: 2m If) (15) 

2 4-22 MANDAVI (D) N Hendaison 5118 MBWriby 

3 P08 ILPCM1ElfecCM0DMuT8y8nato5118SSrtteianb 

8 280 Came SAGA L Kneid 51513 DMnstow 

9 458 GENBIAUSE G Thomor 4-1512 CEwwa 

10 022- SNOWY BOMXAnRBWeBnay 7-1512 N Adana 

11 1401 AGAIN KATHLS1 (B.CD) P NUdn 51511 DHood 

12 1P5 1MirapJBMer5108 JHunt 

13 0040 FLYWG QffiCER (VXD) M Pipe 5108 J Lower 

14 334P GETTMG PLENTY (C) F Gorman 7-10-6 - Tracy Tuner 

16 583 BLUE SPARME J Old 5154 Cltewetpi 

17 -400 SAINT PUBA SSOFF (CD ) J Bradley 7-152 DTegg 

18 fW NORTHERN WTEREST P Hcbbs 7-108 IWrlgM 

19 OOT PACIFIST J FtaHOO NHiBUr 

22 4M> BALLYSEEDY HERO MnP O'Connor 5150 — 

23 OOP- BROOKS LAW (CQ) 0 Bloomfield 11-150 

SamanBaDmtw 

52 Mandavi, 51 Again Kathleen, 11-2 Blue Sparto 
51 Flylnfl Officer. 151 Generalise. 12-1 othere- 

3.15 SPARROW HAWK NOVICE HURDLE (£720: 
2m If) (18) 

? M 2 ^K^^? 3 „t‘?l9AW4son511-10XCapl#n(7) 

4 0 BEE GAJSEN P Buev 5118 -L- 

8 COURT RAPIER K Benop 4-1 1-0 SEatteW 

10 DOYITS EXPRESS MFfce 4-118 JLonrM 

11 GAUOPMGCLAUDERCharenn4-114) 

12 HASTY DIVER J Old 5118 I!?pS5!S / 

13 B MGH HAM BLUES J Fox 5118 SMooTO 

14 HIGHW AY EXP RESS R Hodges 5118 B Ponte) 

16 KUO'S KESTREL M Pto44l8__irR *SS 

£ «RP«JJU»GBait0^5118JZZZZKMw 

23 SAUXMWEDBarcnaJ-lUl - , PM c ry y H 

24 SCAUSCRON Henderson 51 18 MBowAy M 

V TAMBLM W WUraiRS 4-118 Vkiam 


Z0 MALLARD HANDICAP CHASE (£1 ,234: 2m 74yd) (10 runners) 

1 451100 TTB®<SE(CO£Fl(R Causer) TB8 a-1 1-10 N F*am (7) 

2 421-300 CCtE POBTHt (CO) (M Banks) M Banks 11-1 18 GMcCourt 

3 2021 MANSTON MARAUDER (CO)(M Surtti) P Hedger 15118 — Penny F-Hayes (7) 

4 01225P DOVER y Woortand) H Ftemng 511-4 M Pepper 

5 404048 UXAV(DP9cher)0 Pftcher 51 18 toOPNehar 

8 1181P/P AJSTMARTW(FPineti)R Champion 51512 LWy«r 

7 140220 TIN BOY (T Fry) W Korop 7-157 SStortm 

9 PP8F20 ABBEY AVENUE (BF) (Mrs J Groves) S Dow 5108 M Permit 

10 PP2P0Qf MBS WOOD (RRoOkrson)RRabmson 11-153— — 

11 243IM8 SMRJNG CAVAUST (A Madwar) A Uadwm 15108 MrsJSsnden 

1985: RRKSTYLE 1598 A Quinn (51) C Pkmey 9 ran 


88 51 

90 7-1 
67 7-2 
9712-1 
94 12-1 
-—151 
98151 
• 99F3-1 
— 251 
971 2-1 


„ 15-BBold Aortafea. 10530 Oargal. 4-1 Brown VW.1 18 My 
Bonnie Prince, 51 North Lane, 14-fLa Gran Brun. 251 others. 

1.45 BUZZARD NOVICE SELLING HURDLE 
(3-Y-O: £389: 2m 1ft (Q 

1 01 St&BiTIADB Stevens 118 S Moore 

2 P CONJOBTHateftT52 fniroOle Dwater(7) 

3 OPO RBTf SUNSET tot A KrtgW 152 GeoroeKnUit 

4 P WNGSWO QD NEFF R float 152. iJFtast 

7 0342 REPETTTIYEM Pipe 152 J Lower (4) 

54 Repetitive, 118 Solent Lad. 51 Fiery Sunset, 
151 Conjob, Ktagswooti NefL 


39 MSS BOOTSIENAyiffe 5159 

<1 „ W^PURPtE PROSE JOM 5159 — 

S P S ER VAN7ETTTPJ Roberts 5159 .- 
43 SERDON HUTCH T Forster 5108. 

45 0 TELLING TALES R Holder 4-t59__ 

„ 51 Scanscro. 4-1 Keyhoard Kina ' 
51 King's KestreL 51 Hasty Diver. 151 otoai 


Id 5159 CLtewdyom 

iris 5159 W Knox (4) 

star 5108 — H Davies 

Jr5t59 PMBphjr 

rd King. 51 Mr Pokanl, 
. 151 «!»«. 


Cheers 


Course specialists 

169 runners, 20.1%; M 

I 9 from 48. 158%; G 

133 rWto 21.1%; P 
19 from 124. 15 J%: C 
Browi^lB^rorn 133. 143%; J Frost 11 from 113. 9.7%. (Only 


&30 MOORHEN NOVICE HURDLE (£947: 2m 4f) (15 runners) 

2 ETERNAL CREDIT (Mrs B McKinney) fl Fisher 5157 

5 0 HASSLE MONEY (Mrs B McKinney) R Fisher 4-157 

12 OATLANDER (S F^efead) Mas G Pickard 15157 

15 PRJNCE OF PROWSE (R Schotey) R Scholey 5157 

18 40 SILENT MANUAL (Ms C ButonetBnice) M H Eastertiy 5157. 

19 SMUTS LAD (A Smith) Ms JPtonan 4-157 

21 SOUWP MPPIBamr (H ThtmpMmJ B Ttmuy n n d.tn.7 

22 SPECIAL VINTAGE (J Murdoch) J RtzGerald 5157 

24 TOUC1CZ LE BOIS (M Jenfcks) M Tonpldns 5157 

28 8 YDIIR CHOICE (HWS Srepkes Ltd) M C Chapman 5157 

29 D CHAMMLBH3ZE(WKavsnagh)E Wheeler 51 52 

30 P0 CWCXUNG LADY (SG Smith) SG Smith 5152 

31 0 DEEANDEMMTIP (Mr» S Brartehaw) F Gfcscn 5152 

33 <V GOLDEN SISlflY (S Bfcd) J Scafian 7-152 

37 VULQAITS FUGKT (Mrs A Hatoaa) Mrs M Thomas 15152 


A Stringer 

— M MMgbar 
SHolsws 

— P Deraria (*) 

LWJsr 

BdaHean 


Results from two meetings 

Taunton 


&* BjF^ ood (chase course); good to soft 

1245 (2m If txSeJ I. SPRING PMLTRE 
(P Hotoy. 54 levk2. KOmar^aro Bob (J 
Lower, 3-1): 3. Tafly* Pride (K Townend, 
51). ALSO RAN: 11-4 Moon Jester (4th). 
14 TWworth Tattoo pto). 33 BBy 
Whlteshoas. 50 Abbeydore (am. Mister 
Prelude. Stockbroker, ran Bobbin, Bank- 
ers Zipper, Orawters Miss. Valrech. 13 
ran. NK Court Derry. 7L 1KL6L20L3LD 
Elsworth at WMtsbunLTato: £285. £1 20. 
£150. £200. Dft E2A0. CSF: £659. After 
a stewards tnqitey result stood- 


— M B renna n — 

B O aHoor — 

to T Moor* (7) — 

C Grant — 


1985c JAMES MY BOY 5157 PTUcfc (4-1) M Dlcfdnson 11 ran 

3-0 CURLEW CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,142: 2m) (15 runners) 

2 21Q-P00 AOAHE <D) (p Hodgeon) D Hodgeon 7-11-7 AChamenfS) 

3 041335 ORBITAL MANOEUVBtS (D) (G Chlpman) B McMahon 511-7 CKwter(7) « 51 

5 1-00200 FnE CHEFTAlNn) (8 Pearce) J Long 51 1-2 Laesa Lone (5) 8712-1 

6 220340 ZACCn<RCtotka)S Dow 51 1-1 DM* HcKeown (3) 93 — 

7 12P008 WGH BARN (B CJarrVey) B Chamiey 7-1513 S Turner (S) 92 151 

9 051103 TROJAN COO (D? (S Oddord-Brooke) J F-Heyea 4-10-9 . Penny Fte ct Mte y* TO « 52 

10 00005 FDRTVCOATS or WhtoOO'NMi 4-155 PQraaaick(7) « — 


Christian at Lamboum. Tote: £450; £1.7a 

2150. S2J3D. OF: E2480. CSF: £7288. 

_2A5 pm If eh) 1. TUDOR ROAD (8 
Powet. 158); 2, Notre Orevel (Peter 
Hobbe. l51);3.Fe8CSBd>(K Mooney. 5-4 


tote: CLSJ £1.40, £3.1 a DF: £1380. 

CSF: £22.76. 

^3.15 (2m 11 hdte) 1. ARBITRAGE (N 
*»v).;2. Awmua(K Mooney. 
7-1 fc3. Cradte ot Jazz (S Sherwood. l£l) 
5-2^0pen toe Bw (fL 10 

TtolKindftfwrjSh). SwsNne Gal pthL 
50 B uc k m inster Boy (pirt SO 

a^^CpreliOtor. 

£255 £1 . 

£2028. Tricast £18482 
Ptecapot£2S08S 

Uttoxeter 

Gtoirirc soft (chase course); good to soft 




.ARBiA AUCTION 
2. Domars Boy 


5 1-00200 FNIE CHIEFTAIN to) (8 Pearce) J Long 511-2 

6 220340 ZACOO{ROari*)S Dow 51 1-1 Da 

7 12F008 HKSH BARN (B CtoriMBfi B Chamiey 7-1513 

9 051103 TROJAN GOD (D)(SOdrf0i5BraalCB)JF4leyn 4-1 06 .penny I 

10 00005 FDRTVCOATS (H Who) O O'Nrt 4-155 

11 lOOtePP BAWA’S RETREAT (BJR (F Bartow) Mrs S Austfci 5155 

12 52000D CM MAI (BJtol (A Guy) J Norton 5153 

13 01-0000 GALTRM (J OHenkmJT BB 7-150 

1* fl3340Py KING OF STRESS {CD) (W Hardy) JL Hams 5150 

15 320042 BLACK MVB) (Mrs D Brewster) U H Easterly 51 50 

16 003/0 HAZa. NUT (M Bonks) M Banks &-10-0 

20 0030-80 DALLAS SMmi (8} <S Bnwr) M Ottoman 5104) 

21 000050 SADINGHAM BOV (0 Claric*)W Holden 4-100 

1985: CM MAI 58-12 S James (151) J Norton 9 ran 


- N Maiden (5) — — 

- S Woods (5) 94 14-1 

, JO*Hamcn(7) 91151 

VUdHante(5) 

R llsriey (S) • 99 F7-4 

- DSteym*(5) — — 

.. S Mtotwfl 35 — 
K Tnmiaml (S) — — 


Gray f '4-1 2. Oomrt Boy ffl 

^Bai-aaasaissa 

J3eqeS^JoSl%1h). KtejA M 
Wkral (pu). 9 ran. 12L M. 8L 2L S 
Pattamore to Somerton. Tote: £45£. 
£1.60. £2ia £1.ia DF: £1515 CSFi 
£53.66. Winner bought bi lor 3800 fptt. 

1-45 (2m If ch) 1. AIRWAIR (B Powe*. 
11-1); iLocfcy 6oU (R Rowrtf. 15a 3, 
Hopeful CMrees (C Janes. 11-1L ALSO 


raa NR: Lord Laurence. Our Grade. 251. 
3J 1 J King at Swmdon. Tote: 

S^e5& £r '°^ i3J5D ~ * E9m 

2J> (2m 4t Oh) I. ROOSPETER (R 

Dunwoaoy. 51); 2 * 



I RAN: 158 lav Mr 


Jimmy 
(4di), 12 ftoche 
Friend. 33 Satewuse gad. 




Course specialists 


MH Easterly 
JFftzgerafd 
AJBVfe 
TBB 


TRAINERS JOCKEYS 

Winnera fftmars Percent Wrt *P HwCeot 

8 15 4QJ) M Brennan 18 144 125 

8 40 200 J A Harris 9 126 7.1 

6 33 122 

6 35 17.1 OrtyquaOBora 


Cuddy Bear (ur). 

13 ran. NR: Burns Lad- 2L 12L5L . 

»■. n HodMs « Somerton. Tom: E12^. 
£350. £l5a £150. DR £4050. CSF: 
£74.17. 

215 (2m 1 1 hdto) 1 . OLYtoNC EAGLE (R 

ALSO RAN: 515 ftv Saltan, 25 MiaMl 
<ur). Royal Berta. 33 Gokten AzeBa 004. 
60 Prita Oukken toe BUM*). WKowasq 


Argosy IN Paten. 5 £alSO RAN.B The 
^^£1727*' * 3 ^°’ e, 4a D * 


_ — — iwnrat wun unit, *-r 

Bnnrason (pul, 33 Alice's Bay (400. 
thngtat ( 8 th). 4 ran. 151. HL »L a. 10L D 
Jkrftoon at Stowun-the-Wold. Tow 
£850, £1.30. DF: £12850. 

1 l^av?^ (“Brorman. 

12-1 - ' 


16 Dr 

(ro). Secret Sioux, 

12 ran. NR: Lysithea. 
f.™- ‘"ii l3 *- M. %L O Brennan at 
Tofe E3.30; £1^0, £250. £2.70. 

DF; £27.00. CSF: £3559. Tncast £2750. 

aj) (2m 41 hdto) 1 . RAFFl£S ROGUE (M 

DntelG McCowt 11-8 . 
**'•)■ 3. Bahl )n CwnW (R Dunwoody, 5 j . 1 
ft ALSO RAN: 9 Cornish Prmce, 10 > 
Ktomrorau (Kh). 20 Couture Color M81L 
33 Garthman (Sth). Gunner Mac. 

Song. Swinendew (up. Strew tax (10 10 
f* M WteHmgsL City And Suhuten (10 5 


to m Weamgsl, City And Suburban (10 5 
Loma Vincent) (pu). Knockatene. MBs 
Aron M« Anrtaoetsky, Stendon MOL 16 
rarv. ML J. 20L nk. sh hd. M Camacho at 
“akon.Tow £4 .-vq-. jnao, £t^o. £1.70. 
DF: £750. CSF: £9 S9 


r a place ■: 
Mgiand v 

^ - 

tlZ- ■ . 

1 - 

5*:.=;.. ■■■ - 

L ^ * . 

b .. 

■ 

5s^*T:- ■ • 
fe-V: ‘ . 

- - 

SS4,**' ... V: • • 

r. 


a. SSm sS* cm 

Bmtey. S-1L ALSO RAN: 11-10 lav 

gtep Auburn (0. 33 Le SarSols.^ &immy 
Ckake (pu). Sewn Acres, Cootek (I). 1$ 


RAN: 4 Peace Term* |6th). 10 Ttssoc. 14 
Bay (5th). Synnx. Warwick Sutte, 16 

Pfrrew ajawtenhani.ToliK £7^0: £1.80. 
EI.40. &20. DF: £620. CSF: £1659. 
Tricasc £84/41. 

Ptacepot £25^45 




3‘ir t - 









THE TIMES FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


SPORT 


39 



YACHTING 


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Dickson puts Conner in 
a spin to open an 

unassailable advantage 

> 


> w IV completely 
r outshone Stars 
Jm and Stripes in 
** the third en- 
counter between the two ma- 
jor rivals to challenge for the 
America's Cup. The Kiwis 
were better than the Ameri- 
cans in tactics, boat handling 
and pure speed during a 
gripping 3hr IQmin race. 
White Crusader notched 
useful win against Italia. 

The conditions were much 
lighter, however, than in the 
first two days of racing in the 
resumed Louis Vuitton eli- 
mination trials. With a breeze 
seldom exceeding 18 knots, 
the weather was a little light 
for the robust tastes oi 
Conner’s crew. 

New Zealand's position at 
the head of the points table 
now looks unassailable, with 
102 points out of a possible 
103. Conner drops back to 
third after yesterday's defeat, 
while French Kiss moves to 
second place following her 
solid defeat of Canada II. 

What chance Conner had to 
answer the Kiwi magic was 
squandered in poor sail-han- 
dling. A small lead and po- 
sitional advantage after two 
legs was thrown away when a 
spinnaker was allowed to run 
amok. 

From the 10-minute gun 
Dickson showed a surprising 
ability to dominate the much 
more experienced Californian. 
After sailing deep into the 
starting zone. New Ze aland 
stayed on Conner's windward 
hip and forced a tong tack into 
the spectator fleet 
Among the ferries and 
launches Dickson seemed cool 
and in control; Conner a little 
flurried. When they emerged 
on starboard tack, it was still 
New Zealand to windward 
and in control. With just SO 
metres to go. Stars and Stripes 
fell into awful confusion. Hi- 
ther Dickson convinced them 
that both yachts were going to 
be early or a minor problem 
with a running backstay 
forced Conner to run towards 


From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 

New Zealand the pin before crossing the line 
ISsec behind the Kiwis, 

Up the .first beat the two 
yachts seemed wdl matched 
for boatspeed and pointing 
ability. But with his comfort- 
able three lengths lead, the 
Auckland prodigy was able to 
cross ahead of Stars and 
Stripes just a minute out from 
the lop mark. 


a CHALLENGER RESULTS: WWW CTU- 
sader n ttoua. 2:27; Amend (! tS EsqIs, 
B38: heart of America Dt CfWterEo 
Franca. MO; USA ts Azzum &3ft Mew 
Zealand ntSiare end Stripes, 032; French 
Kb 9 bt Canaoa it, 421. 


TABLE 


New Zealand IV 
French Kas 


Won Lost Pzs 


Stars and Stripes 

America ft 

Whttfl Crusader , 


USA 

tana 

Canada fl , 


Hear! of America 

SS&ss 


a 

is 

20 

2J 

17 

17 

13 

12 

7 

8 
3 
2 


102 

81 

70 

68 

87 

67 

SI 

43 

37 

24 

11 

2 


Cnaienge France — 

TOOArS RACES: Cfettraar Fraice 
Stars and Stnpes White Crusader v 
AKurrar Canada H* (taU; USA v Heart of 
America: New Zealand IV v Eagle: 
America II v French Kiss. 

DEFENDER RESULTS: Australia IV bt 
Kookaburra HI. 1750; Kookaburra U. m 
S teak H' KkSiey. 039. Byes Soum 
Australia. 

TABLE 

Won Lost Pts 

Kookaburra M 20 2 35 

Australia IV 16 6 29 

Kookaburra I1 15 8 25 

South Austraha S 17 11 

Steak -n’ Kidney 1 22 3 

roOArs RACES: Austrase rv » Kooka- 
burra II; Kookaburra IN v South AustraBa. 
By* Steak n 1 Kidney. 


With both the 12-metres 
approaching the bouy on star- 
board and New Zealand to 
windward, Dickson was able 
to roll Conner down below the 
layline and force an extra tack. 
With her slightly quicker 
recovery through the wind, 
this manoeuvre enabled New 
Zealand to stretch the advan- 
tage to 17sec. 

Stars and Stripes then 
recovered to gybe inside New 
Zealand and round the lee- 
ward marie first, but a cata-. 
strophic spinnaker foul-up 
rendered the lOsec Conner 
advantage meaningless as it 
jammed halfway down the 
halyard. The portion of the 
kite that was down then fell 


into the sea and acted like a 
giant sea anchor. 

Up the second beat Stars 
and Stripes threw over 30 
lacks at the New Zealanders. 
It had little effect on Dickson 
and Conner compounded his 
problems by failing to erect 
the spinnaker property. 

Down the two readies noth- 
ing improved for the San 
Diego team. However, at the 
second leeward. Stars and 
Stripes again indulged in 
spinnaker dunking, ridiculous 
behaviour for a crew who have 
been sailing together for 
nearly two years. Aboard New 
Zealand the sail-handling was 
flawless. 

Conner’s final crack came 
on the last square run where 
he was able to gybe and 
manoeuvre the margin down 
to 12sec. Clearly Dickson is 
vulverable downwind, if any- 
where. But it came to naught. 
Dickson dominated to beat off 
every California raid to finish 
32sec ahead. An awesome 
performance. 

White Crusader beat Italia 
without raising much sweat. 
Cud more described the 2’27 
victory as “comfonaWe”. The 
only fly in the ointment was 
the loss of nearly 40 seconds 
on the two reaches by a 
halyard sticking at the lop of 
the new mast and also avoid- 
ing Canada H sailing upwind. 
M !t doesn’t explain the whole 
deficit and I’m not happy 
about that.” said Cudmore. 

After three races the British 
team has decided to stick with 
the new mast although it has a 
few problems that will need 
adjustments on tomorrow's 
layday. ‘’The advantages in 
terms of weight and centre of 
gravity are too obvious to 
ignore," added Cudmore. 


Griffiths moves 

- Jim Griffiths, aged 37. the 
pace bowler not re-engaged by- 
Northamptonshire at the end of 
last season, will play for 
Lincolnshire in the minor coun- 
ties championship in 1987. Grif- 
fiths lakes a testimonial with 
Northamptonshire next year 


HOCKEY 

Four way 
match to 
be revived 

By Sydney Friskin 

The Home Countries tour- 
nament. which was last played 
in Cardiff in 1983. when Eng- 
land won the championship, 
will be revived in Dublin next 
July if the proposal by the Irish 
Hockey Union is accepted. Scot- 
ty land have already decided to 
■'V mke part. 

The management committee 
or the Hockey Association, the 
controllers of the game in 
England, will meet in London 
on December 12 to consider the 
Irish invitation and to decide 
whether to accept it in the light 
of England’s other commit- 
ments. 

Most of England’s players will 
probably be representing Great 
Britain in the Champions Tro- 
phy tournament in Amsterdam 
from June IS to 28, after which 
the full England squad will go to 
Moscow for the European 
championship which starts 
there on August 2a Ail four 
Home Countries have qualified 
for this evenL 

The Hpme Countries 
championship.'One of the oldest 
. tournaments in the country. 
v s; ceased to be an annual event 
after 1972 when England pulled 
out because of their desire to 
concentrate on Continental 
opposition. 

Cheetham wins 
a place in 
England squad 

By Joyce Whitehead 

Mary Cheetham. of Leicester- 
shire. a member of the Great 
Britain squad who were nor 
allowed to take part ?n 
women's territorial inter-county 
tournaments, has been 
in the England indoor squad for 
£ the Home Counin« indooj 
competition at Cardiff between 
February 9-10. Nine of the 12 
ESS? selected played fast y«r 

and there are three repre- 
sentatives from Lancashire, the 
North outdoor champions. 

Wales have picked 25 pteywj 

SrisstSS 

selection in February- 

^S/.^tsss? vissf 

(Laneas^ek MChewniP" i ustt» 

stitreL M EtWan*» (iw^k^e], J 




Crawley. R &W. E Evans, g *£££ s 
Groan. A Jonas. G F /jcCaitm. 

wove. 

» Ealing women .cegjrtiw ^00 

years of hockey Fndand 
season, the fire* club m Ens* 
to do so. special match* and 

social events l«« du b 
ganized and yesterday at 

held a chtxx ondwt “ Rgg* ^ 
Ealing cricket clubsc'uon 

to launch their edjhnjg^ 
gain as much sponsorship ■* 
possible. 


SHOW JUMPING 


Shockemohle in 
for another win 

From Jenny MacArthur. Bordeaux 


Paul Shockeradhle, West 
Germany’s triple European 
champion, intends to increase 
his already substantial lead in 
the European League standings 
for the Volvo Wond Cup when 
be competes at the Bordeaux 
International Show which be- 
gins here today. Bordeaux is the 
fifth of 1 1 qualifying rounds in 
Europe for the World Cup 
which has its final in Paris in 
April. 

It is the third World Cup 
show in succession for 
Shockemohle who came second 
in Berlin two weeks ago and 
then won in Brussels last week 
after a heroic performance 
against the clock ou his great 
partner. Deister. That win lifted 
him to the top of the European 
League standings — eight points 
ahead of Britain’s Peter Charles, 
who is currently lying second. 

Deister's formidable record 
includes the last three European 
championships as well as two 
Hickstead jumping derbys. “1 
like to save him for the big 
competitions.” Shockemohle, a 
millionaire businessman, says. 
However, he may decide to ride 
his second horse. Orcbidee, in 
Sunday's World Cup qualifying 
round because he intends to 
compete at the Olympia show in 
London next week and riders 
are only allowed to compete 
with the same horse at three 
successive shows. 

Peter Charles, who was with 
the British team on the North 
American tour in October, 
misses Bordeaux but, with all 
four members of the team which 
won the silver medal at the 
World Championships in July 
competing here as well as Har- 
vey and Robert Smith, the 
British are well represented. All 


four team members — Michael 
and John Whitaker, Nick Skel- 
ton and Malcolm Pyrah — sue 
hungry for points after a dis- 
appointing outing in Brussels 
where the highest placed Briton 
was Skelton on J Nick who were 
13th. 

Skelton will choose between J 
Nick and Raffles Airborne for 
Sunday. Michael and John 
Whitaker have Next Amanda 
and Next Milton respectively, 
both of whom had four faults in 
the first round in Brussels, but 
as that was the horses' first 
outing since Wembley in Octo- 
ber they are optimistic of 
improving their performances 
here. It was when winning the 
qualifier here last year that 
Milton fim gave notice of his 
limitless ability. 

Pyrah is resting his top horse, 
Towertands Anglezarke, on 
whom be came second in tbe 
Toronto World Cup qualifier 
last month, and on Sunday he 
hopes to ride Towertands Di- 
amond Seeker, providing he has 
recovered from the lameness 
which stopped him bom 
competing in Brussels. Pyrah, 
currently lying 15th equal in the 
League, is the second highest 
placed British rider. At the end 
of the series, the top 16 riders 
from the European League qual- 
ify for the final. 

Riders from 14 nations are 
competing at this fifth ihrce-day 
show including Lisa Tarnapol 
from the United States with 
Adam, on whom she was third 
at Amsterdam in October, 
Australia's Jeff McVeau and 
Ireland’s Eddie Mackeo — the 
last two are lying third and 
fourth in the League separated 
by a point 



TENNIS 


Power play: Becker on his way to a convincing victory against iVystrom in New York 


SWIMMING 

Bowden to 
train 
in Miami 

By Roy Moor 

Rebecca Bowden, from 
Southampton, who has made an 
impressive breakthrough in na- 
tional competition in the post 
two months is among 24 British 
swimmers chosen for 10 days of 
special training at Mission Bay. 
Miami from January 2-12. Miss 
Bowden, aged 17, won de- 
cisively both the 100 metres 
butterfly and 200 metres medley 
finals at the recent Yorkshire 
Bank Trials at Leicester and also 
reached the finals of the SO 
metres freestyle and 100 metres 
backstroke. 

Strong of stroke, she is sure to 
thrive on the work-outs at the 
two newly-bttih open-air SO 
metre pooh which are equipped 
with all the latest facilities for 
developing fitness. 

The youngest members of the 
British squad will be Joanne 
Wood, Nova Centurion all- 
rounder and Southend's record- 
breaking freestyle sprinter. 
Mark Foster. Both are aged 1 6. 

British swimmers based at 
colleges in the United States are 
noticeably missing from among 
the 24 selected. Derek Stubbs. 
Britain’s new director of swim- 
ming, explains: “Most of the 
British internationals studying 
in the Stales will be attending 
training camps with their college 
teams. Our main aim has been 
to give the best of our home- 
based swimmers the chance of 
some first class training in 
sunshine. 

“This is all pan of our new 
development plan which as can 
be seen from last week’s results 
in Toronto is already beginning 
to pay dividends.” 

Tony Day, the Welshman 
who broke the British short 
course records for 400 metres 
medley and 1,500 metres free- 
style, is among those selected as 
is David Stacey, of Beckenham, 
from whom Day took the 1.500 
metres record. Scots chosen are 
Linda Donnelly, Ruth Gilfillan. 
Jean Hill and Shonna Smart. 

Following the training in Mi- 
ami. eight swimmers will be 
nominated for the Golden Cup 
tournament m Strasbourg from 
January 23-25; 16 will compete 
in Paris from January 30-Feb I, 
and 16 also at the Arena Festival 
in Bonn from February 6-8. 
SELECTION: P Oaks (Torquay Leantfer), 

K Boyd (South Tyneside), J Browfaton 

(City ot Leeds). Abw {C*y d 
Foster (Southend?, M Fttbene (Becfc- 
etman). M Gitoahaci (Brrrangnami. T 
Jans* (Walsafl), A MooHmuso [Coy ot 
Leeds). S Pouter (Wigan), G 

(P c rtsrTKMtt and Nonhsea). 

(Uwvsretty ot Swansea). D SO 

enham). H Benley (MMeW). R 
* iy of SouffiampKxi). L DoreKPy 
iWiaft R GIHSten (Dundw). C Foot 
. RfleM). J Ml (Cumbernauld). K lleOar 

(Nofwtaft Penguin). X Road (Stockport 

Metro). S Smut (Chester I. G Stanley 
(Stoc&arr Metro), J Wood (Nova 


D Rotey 


BOXING 


Christie must still 
challenge Sibson 

By Sriknmar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


Errol Christie woke up to the 
most depressing day of his life 
yesterday. Just as he was trying 
to show ihaL after his brilliant 
win over Sean Mannion. be had 
found his feet at last, they were 
removed from under him by 
Charlie Boston, of New Jersey, 
at the Alexandra Pavilion, 
London, on Wednesday. 

For nearly eight rounds, 
Christie had been able to make 
little sense of Boston’s boxing 
and, even though he dropped 
the American in the sixth with a 
beautiful short right, the Cov- 
entry boxer himself was on the 
floor four times. 

Christie had not been able to 
land solidly enough to stop 
Boston showing off the moves 
he had learned sparring with 
John Mugabi, Roberto Duran 
and Sugar Ray Leonard — that 
confident little two-step before 
unleashing the old one-two. 
Worst of all, the fears about the 
vulnerability of Christie's chin 
had surfaced again. 

For none of the shots that 
floored him - the long right in 
the first that caught him going 
backwards, the long left in the 
third and, finally, after having 
been floored a third time, 
another long left through the 
middle in the eighth — carried 
the power of a full 
middleweight. 

Boston was a tight-middle 
only last March. No wonder the 
world Christie set out to con- 
quer was pressing down oo his 
chest yesterday. 

It will take all of Oiristie's 
courage to come fighting back. 
His new trainer, Jimmy Tibbs, 


will have to sharpen up his 
defence, while Christie's man- 
ager. Burt McCarthy, will have 
to consider how to proceed from 
here. McCarthy can step lightly 
through the middleweight di- 
vision. moving up by way of the 
British and European titles, or 
he can risk challenging Tony 
Sibson for the Commonwewalth 
title. 

Frank Warren, the promoter, 
has cancelled Christie’s March 
date with Sibson and asked 
Boston to come back and face 
Sibson next month. Warren said 
yesterday: “I'm not sure the 
public would stand for a fight 
between Christie and Sibson 
until he has proved that the Gght 
against Boston was not a normal 
performance. It seems that Errol 
will have to go back to basics.” 

Since there win always be a 
danger of Christie's chin letting 
him down — regardless of how 
well his defence is tightened 
up — taking on an ageing Sibson 
to win the vital top- 10 world 
ranking the Leicester boxer 
holds seems a better way for 
Christie than going back to 
basics where his chin would be 
at the mercy of young 
middleweights. 

RESULTS: Pa rt amwei gltt (she round# S 
Murphy (St Albans) M OGergano ( 


.Rowlands (West Ham) t* M Maioada 
*“ -—.pH. UrstenuMBte ( 10 founds): 

'iney) bt I Montano (Cotom- 


. Mateel ... 
bta). rec bwtJ- 
C Boston (New 


(10 rounds): 
bt E Christie 


(Coventry), rec eighth. HeavywwoW (eight 
maids): M Epps (New York) M H Cume 
(Cartoon, pis. Light-h— vyw itfit (b-*- 
rounds): Tony Wilson fWohrerhanwoi 
Simon Harris (HanweB), reared sudh. 


Mugabi clear favourite 


Las Vegas (Reuter) - John 
Mugabi is expected to don the 
World Boxing Council’s light- 
middleweight crown at Caesar's 
Palace here tonight - as a con- 
sequence of his defeat by the 
undisputed middleweight cham- 
pion, Marvin Hagler, last 
March. 

Mugabi, a 27-year-old Ugan- 
dan, (aces Duane Thomas, aged 
25. of the United States, for the 
WBC title, which was recently 
vacated by another American, 
Thomas Hearns, who has now 
moved up to light-heavyweight. 

It will be Mugabi’s first bout 
at the weight for 16 months, but 
that has not slopped local 
bookmakers from installing the 
No. 1 contender as the clear 
favourite. 

“He’s in the best shape of his 
life.” Britain’s Mickey Duff, 
Mugabi's manager, said. 
"Mugabi was only 70 per cent 
for the Hagler fight. He thought 
he had a licence to knock 
everybody out. 


“The more he won, the more 
difficult it became for him to 
keep discipline and to get him to 
work out. Now, after losing to 
Hagler. he’s a changed man.” 

Mugabi's impressive punch- 
ing power and record — all his 
26 wins have come inside the 
distance — are expected to 
prove too much for Thomas 

Jimmy Paid, of the United 
States, the International Boxing 
Federation champion, makes 
the fourth defence of his title 
against his compatriot. Greg 
Haugen, on the same bill. 

• Kin Buchanan, Scotland's 
former world lightweight cham- 
pion. yesterday launched his 
autobiography. High Life and 
Hard Times. 

Buchanan, now aged 41. 
chronicles his rise to the British, 
European and world titles in the 
late 1960s and early ’70s. and 
the fall that cost him his family 
and the lion's share of the 
£200.000 he earned from 
boxing. 


Becker’s broadside 
likely to cause a 
breach of the peace 

From Richard Evans, New York 


It would hare been a quiet 
opening to the Nabisco Masters 
had it not been for Boris Becker. 
Quiet is not a word one could 
use to describe the sound of 
Becker hitting a tennis boll and 
by the time the Wimbledon 
champion had demolished 
Joa&m Nystrom, of Sweden, 
spectators in courtside boxes at 
Madison Square Garden came 
away looking as if (hey had just 
spent time in the trenches. 

Previews on television do not 
prepare people for the real thing 
and when they get a closc-up 
look at this 1 9-year-old in 
action, the assault on the senses 
comes as something of a shock. 
The effect is magnified here this 

year because the Supreme court 

has been laid without the dou- 
bles alleys which are superfluous 
now that the Masters doubles 
have been merged with the 
WCT world doubles which take 
place at the Royal Albert Hall in 
London next week. So the court 
area is tighten the spectators are 
closer and those paying $20 
(about £14) for a ringside seal 
get more than they bargained 
for. 

So did Nystrom. although the 
bombardment would have 
come as less of a surprise to this 
phlegmatic Swede who had 
actually beaten Becker on the 
last two occasions the pair met 
— at La Quinta this year and the 
US Open in 1985 - but who. 
this time, found himself blown 
away o- 1. 6-3. Nystrom has been 
ofT the circuit with a knee injury 
for most of the last two months 
but even up in Skelleftea near 
the Arctic Circle, they gel the 
newspapers and he knows what 
Becker has been up to. 

Three consecutive Grand Prix 
titles in Sydney. Tokyo and 
Paris plus a hard-fought victory 
over John McEnroe in the final 
of ihe Atlanta exhibition tour- 

Australia 
call eight 
for final 

Melbourne (AFP) — Australia 
have named a large squad of 
eight players for the Davis Cup 
final against Sweden. 

The squad for the final, which 
starts at Kooyong here on 
December 26. was announced 
yesterday and consists of Pat 
Cash, Peter Doohao, Broderick 
Dyke, John Fitzgerald, Mark 
Kratztnann, Wally Masur and 
the doubles pair, Peter Mc- 
Namara and Paul McNamee. 

Neale Fraser, the non-playing 
captain, who will lead Australia 
into a Davis Cup final for the 
fourth time, said there were 
several reasons for an eight-man 
squad instead of the usual five 
or six. 

“We will practice for a longer 
than normal and wanted as 
much variety as possible.” Fra- 
ser said. Selection in the squad is 
also a reward for some of the 
players who have performed 
well on the world circuit 

The squad assemble in Mel- 
bourne next week and the 
Swedish team is expected to 
arrive the following week, mi- 
nus Mats Wilander who has 
caused a storm by deciding to 
stay in South Africa for his 
marriage early next month. 


nament last week has left the 
West German unbeaten since 
his largely irrelevant collapse 
against Mel Purcell in Hamburg 
last September. 

There was nowhere for 
Nystrom to hide in the face of 
the bombardment Becker threw 
at him here — a more measured 
and mature assault now as the 
teenager begins to realize that 
points can be won with a 
modicum of patience as well as 
sheer power. 

“I played great today.” Becker 
told us afterwards with that 
disarming honesty that removes 
any suggestion of arrogance. “I 
was especially happy with the 
way 1 played from the back 
court. It was almost as good as 
the two sets I played against 
Lendl in Sydney.” 

Becker found the court rel- 
atively slow with an unusually 
high bounce for a Supreme 
carpet but would not be drawn 
into offering an opinion of the 
round robin format which has 
been resurrected this year after 
discarded experiments with a 16 
man knock-out competition.'*! 
don't know- whether 1 like it yci“ 
he said. “I will tell you on 
Monday." On the evidence 
presented here so far there is not 
the slightest doubt that Becker 
will still be around on Monday 
to give the verdict. 

The other two Swedes were 
more successful. Mats 
Wilander. looking more like his 
old self again after a distracted 
son of year, never allowed 
Henri Leconte to recover from a 
poor stan and beat the French 
left-hander 6-1. 7-5 while Stefan 
Ed berg defeated Andres Gomez, 
of Ecuador. 6-2, 6-3. 

RESULTS: First day; Donald Budge 
group: M Wilander (Swe) W H Leconte 
«=r>rS-l. 7-5; B Becker (WG) Ot J Mysttom 
(SweL 6-1. 6-3. Fred Perry group: 5 
EdDerg (Swe) w A Gomez (Ecu), 6-2. 6-3 

Three in 
line for 
Hanover 

Jeremy Bates and Andrew 
Castle, the singles players in 
Britain's Iasi Davis Cup lie. and 
Stuart Bale, the national cham- 
pion, have provisionally been 
nominated to represent Britain 
in the European Cup team 
championship in Hanover from 
January 27 to February ! (Rex 
Bellamy writes). A fourth can- 
didate will be named later. 

The players listed are merely 
the most obvious candidates at 
the moment. The rules of the 
competition demand that na- 
tional associations should sub- 
mit the names of possible 
players a long way in advance, 
but this is no more than a 
formality. Britain's actual chit 
team will be chosen a month 
hence and. even then, can be 
changed up 10 48 hours before 
the event begins. 

* Gabriela Sabatini crushed 
Vicky Nelson- Dunbar, of the 
United States. 6-1, 6-0 to move 
into the quarter-finals of the 
Argentine women’s Open in 
Buenos Aires. The top seed, 
ranked tenth in the world, was 
never challenged by the Ameri- 
can 


BOBSLEIGHING 

Phipps’s lucky escape 

From Chris Moore, Win ter berg 

Nick Phipps, added to the 
British tale of woe in Winterbeig 
yesterday by crashing on his first 
practice run for tomorrow’s 
opening World Cup race of the 
season. 

The British champion, aged 
34, and his brcaknian, Alan 
C earns, escaped unhurt after 
overturning out of the 1 Itix 
bend. 

Not so lucky were the French 
crew in the next sled down who 
tipped over out of nine. The 
breakman, Philippe Stott, was 
taken to hospital with a shoulder 
injury. 

Phipps, who missed 
Wednesday’s opening practice 
programme, was driving a spare 
sledge which he hadn't used 
before, because the three new 
Allied steel bobs, built in 
Switzerland during the summer, 
were still en route to 


Winterberg. 

They finally arrived back 
from Canada late yesterday 
afternoon and will be used for 


the first time by Phipps. Tom 
De La Hunty and Peter 
Brugnani in today's last training 
session. 

An excess of mail on ibe flight 
from Toronto was the reason 
given for them not being loaded 
as scheduled on Monday. 

Yesterday’s crash was Phipp’s 
first at Winterberg for five years. 
But his only concern last night 
was to reassure his mother 
before she reads about it today. 

-[ made a basic mistake in 
being late out of the bend.” he 
said, “all things considered we 
couldn’t have had a much worse 
buildup. But at least we will 
have our own sleds from now 
on.” 

The split times for the top half 
of the course showed Phipps bad 
been heading for one of the 
quicker times yesterday until he 
made his £ua! error. He clocked 
a respectable 60.37secs on his 
second run but opted out of a 
third when he realized his own 
sled would not arrive in time. 


SKIING 


Downhill favourite sets pace 


Val d’lsere (Reuter) - Pinnin 
Zurbriggen, leader by 10 points 
in the World Cup alpine skiing 
standings, starts favourite for 
the first downhill of the Euro- 
pean season today . . ■ 

Zurbriggen. who missed last 
year’s race because of a bad 
{raining spill, posted the fasi«t 
time in practise yesterday. J 
didn’t want to go so fet and 
have the pressure of being 
favourite, but HI have to deal 
with it and not think too much 
about it If Tm loose and relaxed 
enough I should win il If not l 
may make mistakes. Zmbnggen 

53 The Swiss skier, aged 23, 
World Cup overall champion in 
1984 had to settle for second 
olace behind the Austnan-boru, 
Mare Giradelli, of Luxembourg 
for the top honour in die last 

iwo seasons. But. this season, 
buoyed by his victory m the 
second of the two opening 
World Cup downhills in La 
iimas, Argentina, last August 
zi?bng^wdi placed to gam 
his firstviciory in ihcAJps since 
he became downhill world 
Champion in Bormio. Italy. last 

>f Zurbriffi«* df* 

■H be Giradelli. last years Val 
JteJS winner. Michael Main of 

t J u nd 0 r 3 ii=n d Fra s 

promising eariy season 


form. Girardelli, second to Mair 
last year, recovered quickly after 
dislocating his shoulder in last 
Saturday's slalom in Sestriere. 
Italy, mid clocked the fastest 
time in Tuesday’s first practise 
here. 

Heinzerand Zurbriggen were 
swiftest in yesterday’s two train- 
ing runs, while Mair was second 
fastest. The powerful Swiss team 
have set the pace here, 
maintaining their hold with four 
in the first five. Peter Mueller, 
who won the first of the August 
Las i etnas doownhills, claimed 
three downhill victories last 
season and finished second in 
the final World Cup standings 
for that discipline, five points 
behind Austrian Peter 
Wimsberget 

“The track's in good Con- 
dition considering there’s not 
much snow around. It makes it 
much more technical, with more 
jumps and JinJe turns,” Mueller 
said after his ran. 

LEAD WO 1ME& (COUTH length 1354 
maws. vBfocaJ drop 865 meters): 1, P 
Zurbrtggen (Swttzj. 2 min 2.11 sec; 2. M 
Mar mZQZ2t: 3. 


D Mainer 


2H)?36: 4. K Mpne* tSnitzL 2*270: S. P 
Mueffer (SwfelT 202.75: 6. B Stemmls 
iCaro. 2:0355; 7. E Reecti (Austria) 
203.34; 6. C Cathomen (&«A 2 ). 203 48. 9. 
F Neouer {Swtai 20355; 10, R Rupp 
(Austria), 203 70 

• Tamara McKinney hopes to 

provide fimher proof of an 
American resurgence in Alpine 
skiing tomorrow when she com- 


petes in the second round oi 
women's Worid Cup races in 
Watervilfe Vatleu, New Hamp- 
shire (Reuter reports). 

McKinney moved to the top 
Of the overall World Cup stand- 
ings last weekend when she 
finished seventh and then sec- 
ond in the giant slalom and 
Slalom races in Park City, Utah. 
Now the American, overall 
champion in 1983. wants 10 
consolidate her early lead in 
tomorrow's slalom and 
Saturday's giant slalom and 
provide ihe platform for a 
powerful American push for 
honours when the World Cup 
circuit begins; its trek around 
Europe. 

McKinney's second place be- 
hind Corinne Schmidhauser or 
Switzerland in Iasi Sunday's 
slalom was her best perfor- 
mance for two years. It was 
enoufdi to take ho- top overall 
with 29 points, one point dear 
of Matcja Svel of Yugoslavia's. 

Schmidhauser. who pro- 
claimed herself one of a new 
generation of slalom skiers after 
her triumph iasr week, and 
opening giant slalom winner. 
Michada Gerg of West Ger- 
many, are both likely to be 
among the honours this week- 
end. So. loo. is Roswith Steiner. 
Austria's World Cup slalom 
champion and Vreni Schneider. 


SCHOOLS RUGBY UNION 


Three times a week and classes 


When Lancashire 18 Group 
narrowly defeated Warwick- 
shire (13-10) at Blundellsands 
last Sunday, it was their first 
match of the winter. Warwick- 
shire were playing their fourth 
game and, during the previous 
weeks, many of the team had 
represented their schools on 
Wednesday and Saturday and, 
apart from 'A' level commit- 
ments. have represented 
Warwickshire on the Sunday. It 
is not only first class players 
who are in danger of being 
overloaded. 

Two of the strongest sides in 
the North and probably m the 
country. Bradford GS and 
AmpJeforth. do not play each 
other. Bradford underlined the 
varying standard of the circuits, 
when they beat Newctstie- 
mder-Lyme, who had pre- 
viously lost only to Denstooe by 
a single point. 

In this one-off fixture. Brad- 
ford won 44-0. scoring, eight 
tries. Bradford have four i'or- 
wczrds in the Yorkshire 1 8 
Group side and ha ve only been 

extended by Sedbragfe (12-12) 
and Pockliugton. whom they 
beat N-IO. alter trailing 10-flat 
ihe intcrval. 

Gencrally lopsy-uirvy form, 
however, has continued. 
Scdbcrgh. back to their best after 


By Michael Stevenson 

defeats by Amplefortb (3-26), 
Stonyhurat (3-10), a drawn 
match with Durham (6-6) and 
defeat by Uppingham (0-15). 
comfortably defeated the power- 
fid Rossal! side (18-6) but 
narrowly lost their final match 
against Loretto on Saturday (7- 
8 ). 

They have been inordinately 
unlucky over injury this winter 
and their mesler-in-cbaigc, 
Kerry Wedd. writes: “I’ve 
banned my first XV from riding 
bicycles? We’ve not fielded the 
same team for two consecutive 
matches this season." 

Sevenoaks continue to pros- 
per. They beat Stamford (26-12), 
St DoflSEan's (S-4). through a 
solid performance by -their front 
five, and Maidstone GS (16-0), 

Harrow have badly missed 
their talented fly half Damian 
Hoplcy. They lost to St Paul's, 
Tonbridge, Wellington and Mill 
Hill but Hopley's return in- 
spired a good win { iO-7) against 
Hailey bury, Hoplcy scoring one 
try and making another. Prob- 
lems returned, however, in the 
next match against Radley, who 
scored two tries in their 10-3 
win. a combined match in 
which Radley and Wellington 
meet Christ’s Brecon and 
Llandovery will be held next 
Wednesday. 


Plymouth College have 
played 12, won seven and lost 
five. They have a young side 
with two 16 Group inter- 
nationals and 10 Devon county 
players. Three of their defeats 
were desperately dose: v 
Mittfield (6-13), v Monmouth 
(16-10) and v St Brendan's (8- 
3). 

King Edward's School. Bath, 
are enjoying a fine season, 
winning seven out of eight 
maiches. One of the two sides to 
beat them last winter. King’s 
Bruton, were defeated 16-0. 

Raul Kitovitz. master in 
charge of Si Edward's (Oxford) 
reports*. ”We lost five successive 
matches before half-term. 
Hailey bury 's Afro-Caribbcan 
wingers were far loo strong for 
us. and Wellington’s enterpris- 
ing centres took maximum 
advantage of minimal pos- 
session to score five tries. 

“Eton were well organized, 
and with two imports from (he 
T ransveal. were good value for 
their 7-6 win. We were fortunate 
to lose by only 0-3 to Oundie, 
but a 4-4 draw againsi Radley 
was the prelude to four good 
wins: versus Rugby il-MO), 
versus Pangbouroe ( 1 0-61. ver- 
sus Bedford M6-8). and Stowe 
(13-12)." 


ATHLETICS 

Durable Lopes 
looking for 
Geneva rebirth 

Lisbon (Reuter) - Carlos 
Lopes. Portugal's Olympic 
marathon champion and world 
record holder, returns to inter- 
national athletics in a road race 
at Geneva tomorrow with the 
firm intention of showing there 
is still life after 40. 

Lopes, who reaches that 
watershed age in February, is a 
senior citizen in athletics terms 
but still plans to compete at the 
top level. “I’m not ready to 
retire yet. you know how siub- 
bom 1 am," Lopes said during a 
break from training. 

He freely acknowledges that 
sponsorship and prize money 
are at leasi partly behind his 
decision to continue running. 

Whatever happens. Lopes will 
be remembered as one of the 
mosi durable of runners. Achil- 
ies tendon problems made him 
■retire' 10 years ago after win- 
ning the first of his three world 
cross country titles and the 
1 0.000 metres silver medal in 
the Montreal Olympics. 

He changed his mind but his 
form was patchy until he turned 
to the marathon. At Rotterdam 
in (983 he was second to Robdc 
Casiclla: in 1 984 he look the 
Oiympie title and ihe next year 
set the world best of 2hr 7min 
l2scc in Roller dam. 


SPORT 


THF TTMFS FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 



Wallaby coach returns to lick Oxford into shape 

Jones is back in town 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


it is like 1984 again: tbe short 
balding man in the green and 
yellow track suit on an English dob 
land, cajoling, praising, analys- 
a group of rugby players, 
keeping the basks in their minds, 
making a pitch seem a vast acreage 
and not the cramped arena it 
appears on so many Saturdays. 
Alan Jones is back in town. 

“He’s like a breath of fresh air," 
Ian George, one of Oxford Univer- 
sities three coaches, says. “The 
boys have listened to me for 10 or ' 
12 weeks and they need something 
new. This is the right time for Alan 
to crane in, foil of enthusiasm, 
babbling, alert.” 

Jones, Australia's coach in 
Britain in 1984 and still going, 
appeared in the dosing stages of 
the 1985 university term and 
helped turn the stndents from rank 
otesiders to 7-6 victors over Cam- 
bridge. This time Oxford's expo- 
sure to his abrasive, far from dnket 
times is tango; he worked with 
them for three boors on Wednes- 
day, another three yesterday and 
will do so again today. 

n . . . _ As the gloom descends on Iffley 

Pouting the way: Alan Jones, coach to the mighty Australian Wallabies, is lending his expertise to Oxford Road, Jones’s tongue is never s f*n? 
in their quest to repeat last year’s victory over Cambridge at Twickenham (Photograph.- Ian Stewart) “We’ve got to have depth, if we 


keep on onr feet we have all (he 
tune we want*, the baD's too wide, 
where are the blockers, rip, rip, 
rip-” 

Every bade summon receives 
attention, with BiH CaJcrafi, a 
Wallaby with Jones in 1984 and In 
New Zealand this year, an able 
ally. “That lmeonf’s too tong, 
tighten it op, tighten it Bp. John, 

yon took that ball too fiu:, yon know 
the supporting forwards are there, 
use them. Good play by the little 
hooka*, good boy, punch it, punch 
ft.” 

Perhaps the most overused word 
in the Jones lexicon is “hands.” 
Without good hands there is no 
expressing the skiBs of the game, 
no control of the baft Oxford are 
fortunate to have, in Brendan 
Mhliiu, one of the best midfield 
distributors of tbe ball in Britain. 

“You’re r un n ing too laterally, 
straighten ft, straighten xt_ yon 
missed the try, man, th*r was 
Twickenham on Tuesday and you 
missed the try. NdU, yon were too 
soft, the forwards were in the best 
ali gn mpnf they've had aD day and 
you held oft. Go straight through-” 

No time is wasted. A player 
leaves the field for 


“What are yon doing, standing 
around picking your nose. Think 
about your game.” An unhappy 
forward is discovered oat of place: 
“That's boBshh stuff. No forward 
should be standing between the 
halves and you didn't speak. 

Oxford trained yesterday with- 
out Ian McDonald their wing who 
has a damaged ankle and has onto 
Sunday to recover full fitness. 
General opinion is that he will 
receive his Bine; but Andrew 
Kennedy, the replacement foil 
back, limped off with a damaged 
ifwpp and may not make it to the 
substitute's bench at Twickenham. 

Cambridge, meanwhile, received 
the benefit of a session from Alan 
Davies, formerly the coach to 
Nottingham and now to tbe Mid- 
lands and England B team. They 
have received considerable assis- 
tance from Mike Davis, the former 
England marh ) and from leading 
players such as Gary Rees, the 
No ttingham flanker who has ad- 
vised their back row. They are in 
the same position Oxford occupied 
last year; then Jones gave Oxford a 
pawn * plan and turned them into a 
Sisa plmed ream. Have Cambridge 
their answer ready? 


FOOTBALL 


Cup a bigger shop Caernarfon 

window than ever at fault 

Evans says 


By Paul Newman — 


The FA Cup has always been 
a stage on which non-Leagoe 
players can demonstrate their 
skills to a wider audience. For 
some it has even provided the 
tumefa-pad for professional 
careers. 

With recent evidence suggest- 
ing that League dubs are 
increasingly turning to the part- 
tune game in their search for 
talent, this season the Cop could 
attract more interest than ever. 
Eddie McClnskey, the manager 
of Enfield, one of tbe most 
talented teams in non-Leagne 
football, travels to Swindon 
Town for bis side's second- 
round tie tomorrow well aware 
of foe interest that League dubs 
are showing In his GM Vauxhall 
Conference players. 

"They are looking more and 
more to our level for new talent,” 
be said. “Tve noticed a 
deterioration in standards 
throughout foe game and 
particularly at Football 
Combination level, which used 
to be where future League 
players were groomed- I've 
searched and searched for good 
players and they Ye very hard to 
find.” 

The financial situation has 
■forced League dobs to release 
players at 17 or 18 whom they 
might in the past have kept. A 
lot of them have ended np at 
dabs like Enfield and we have 
continued their football educa- 
tion. We have brought these 
players along and made them 
ready for presfessjossal careers.” 

McCluskey’s point was per- 
fectly illustrated by two exam- 
ples last week. Vince Jones, 
signed by Wimbledon from 
Wealdstone for more Hmb 
£ 10,000, scored the wirmtog goal 
in a first division match against 
Manchester United and Black- 
burn Rovers agreed to sign Paul 
McKinnon, the Sutton United 
forward, in a deal which could be 
worth £20,000 to tbe Conference 
dnb. 

Northampton Town, the ran- 



FA CUP 


division, have rebuilt their team 
with several signings from Con- 
ference dubs and Carl Richards, 
a forward signed from Enfield in 
the summer, is spearheading 
Bournemouth's challenge for 
promotion to the second 
division. 

“We weren't surprised to lose 
Carl because everyone is looking 
to pick ap good front players in 
particular,” McClnskey said. 
“What is perhaps surprising is 
the age at which people are 
starting professional careers. 
Richards was 26 when be left us 
and McKinnon is 28. It’s bizzare 
that nobody picked np 
McKinnon before. He has 
played abroad regularly in tbe 
summer for dubs like Malmo so 
he's got to be a good player.” 

McClnskey Is well aware that 
Paul Harding, the forward be 
signed from Dulwich Hamlet to 
replace Richards, is already 
bring watched by League dubs 
and foal a good performance 
against Swindon could alert 
them further. “Pud is playing 
really well for as and if he hadnY 
had a six-week suspension at the 
start of the season there's no 
telling what he might be doing. 
He's improved with every 
game." 

The EnfieM manager believes, 
however, that League dabs 
would have to malty particularly 
good offers to attract his players. . 

“McKinnon has always ford a 
horning desire to play League 
football, bat there are plenty of 
players who feel they are better 
on playing at onr level than 
going into the thin) or fourth 
division”, be said. “They’ve got 
the security of jobs outside tbe 
game aud at the same time they 
can pick np good money playing 

itart-fim* fnr rink. Kb. i 


away leaders of the fourth part-time for dubs likens- 

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


FA OR RM itJWKt Bristol Rovers 0. 
Brentford O ( Replay t o morrow. Winners 

FUlZ MEMBERS* CUP: TNnl round: 
Evarton 5. Newcastle Z 
FREIGHT ROVER TROPHY: Prafimtaary 
round: Pet erborough 3. Aldershot 3. 
SCOTTISH PREMER DIVISION: Aber- 
demi 1. FaMrk 0; Clydebank 0, Hibernian 
0; Dundee 3, HamMon 3; Keans 1. Cette 
0; MocherweU 0. Dundee United 2; 
are 2. St Mrni 0. 

, 1 CIK Scarborough 1, Gateshead 0. 
NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE CUP: 
First round, first lea Oswestry 2. Rhyl & 
MULTIPART LEAGUE Worksop 3, Burton 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE Btt Delaw Cup: 
First round: Ahechuroh 1, Hetesowen ft 
King's Lynn 2, Corby 1; Leicester United 

0, Grantham 1: Sutton Coldfield a Mte 
Oak 1 : Tonbndge 6. Hasbngs 1; VS Rugby 

1. Shepsfted 1 weungborou^i T. 
Rushden 0: Woodford 3. Dunstable 1. 


CENiHAL LEAGUE FM Aristae Aston 
yua 2. Derby 4; Btackbum 0, Hul 1; 
Jjkaetsr i. Manchester untied & Shef- 
field United 2, Nottingham Forest 1. 
Second dhrtaion: Barnsley 3. Stoke 0: 
Blackpool 1. Scunthorpe Z Bolton 2, 
Dartnrtm Z Wigan 3. Doncaster 1; West 
Bromwich AJbkxi Z Bradford t. 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Crystal PaJ- 
ace 5. Portsmouth 0: Norwich 1. Fuffwn 1. 
WELSH C UP: Thhd round: Hereford 0, 
Wrexham 1. 

EtySKKiSSSSaSS 

attendance: 25.000. 

MIDDLESEX SEtOOR CUE Ftast ROM: 
Hounslow 3. Southall. 

VAUXH ALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Second <*- 
4. Royston a 

REPRESENTATIVE MATCH: Footbal 
Association 4. VauxhaS-Opei League 1. 


Non-League football 
By Paul Newman 

Alun Evans, secretary of 
Football Association of Wales, 
yesterday defended the decision 
by an inquiry into crowd distur- 
bances at Caernarfon Town 
FA Cup tie at home to Stockport 
County last month to order the 
Multipart League dub to pay 70 
per cent of the hearing costs. 

“It has been said that 
Caernarfon were completely 
cleared by the inquiry, but that 
is not the case.” Mr Evans said. 
“Generally they took all reason- 
able precautions, but Urey did 
not properly steward foe ground 
and there was a pitch invasion 
which held up play. In addition 
some Stockport followers en- 
tered the dressing-room area 
and there were cases of gate-men 
admitting Stockport supporters 
without the right tickets. 

“It would be wrong to suggest 
that these were minor incidents 
and that an inquiry was not 
necessary. When spectators run 
on the pitch and get into the 
dressing-rooms that is a very 
serious problem indeed.” 

Mr Evans said that in cases in 
which clubs were found to be at 
fault it was quite normal for 
them to pay at least part of the 
costs. Caernarfon fear a bill of 
more than £1,000. but Mr Evans 
said it would be much less. 

Before the inquiry Caernarfon 
launched a public appeal for the 
£3,000 they are having to spend 
on crowd barriers for tomor- 
row’s second-round Cup tie at 
home to York City. The appeal 
has been boosted by a £500 
donation from David Evans, tbe 
Luton Town chairman. 

Arfon Roberts, foe Caernar- 
fon chairman, resigned after the 
inquiry in order to speak out 
without running the risk of 
being charged with bringing foe 
game into disrepute. “What 
distresses me most is that we've 
had children and old a| 
pensioners giving money to our 
appeal which wifi now be swal- 
lowed up by costs for an inquiry 
which was never needed in the 
first place,” he said. 

' Caernarfon’s directors de- 
cided at a board meeting to 
refuse to accept Mr Roberts’ 
resignation and to ask him to 
reconsider. They also agreed to 
take legal advice and to seek the 
support of their MP. 

• Wayne Harrison has resigned 
as manager of Workington but 
will stay at the Multipart League 
club as a player. Ian Hodgson, 
foe trainer, has taken charge of 
the team. 

• Dulwich Hamlet, of foe 
Vauxhali-Opel League, have 
parted company with Alien 
Batsford, their full- time general 
manager, in an attempt to 
reduce costs. 


RUGBY UNION 


Difficult to see who could 
topple devastating Neath 


Is there much life on the rugby 
field apart from that which 
draws those with a keen interest 
in probationary matters? It 
would seem noL, as with each 
. weekend a new. though 
m different, juicy story 
breaks in Wales. The season is 
now nearing the halfway mark 
and it would be as well, for foe 
moment, to look away from the 
darker side and cast an eye, 
instead, at foe current state of 
play among the clubs. 

It needs hardly to be repealed 
that Neath are in devastating 
and awe-inspiring form, and it is 
difficult to see which side, from 
within Wales, is likely to topple 
them. They are at foe top ofboth 
the Western Mail Champion- 
ship and Whitbread Merit Ta- 
ble. They have only lost two 
games so far but, as ever with a 
team making aD tbe early season 
running, the testing time is yet 
to come. The international sea- 
son lies ahead and they are sure 
lo have a solid representation. 
Seven of their players wifi play 
in tomorrow’s Welsh trial and 
two others are on the replace- 
ment bench. In addition, while 
keeping an eye on the 
championship tables which de- 
mands consistency, they will 
also expect to confirm their 
superiority in the more prestige 
Cup Competition in which the 
demands are so different — with 


By Gerald Davies 

the club's fine often being sealed 
in a day. Although they were in 
the final against Cardiff in 1984 
they have not won foe com- 
petition since its inaugural year 
in 1972. 

Maesteg were hot on Neath's 
laiL Brian Nicholas, their coach, 
still resisting the temptation to 
settle his team, continues to give 
all the players in the Maesteg 
squad a first team opportunity. 
A week ago, though, they stum- 
bled twice. They were beaten, 
surprisingly, by foe South 
Glamorgan Institute and. more 
expectedly, by Neath. This let 
Bridgend into second place and 
who. although they have lost 
five games, like Maesteg, are 
there by virtue of a better 
average. The restoration of 
Adrian Owen, Bridgend’s cap- 
tain, after bis 22 week suspen- 
sion was quashed on appeal will 
ensure, respected as he is as foe 
captain, that foe dub could do 
well this season. Apart from 
their scrummaging they look 
strong in both phases. They are 
an evenly balanced side with 
Aled Williams having a particn- 

S successful time at stand off 
He has scored 92 points, 
including 10 tries, and plays in 
tomorrow’s trial now Malcolm 
Dacey has withdrawn because of 
injury. 

Swansea had a successful start 
to foe season and were, in 


Injury sidelines captain 


Jonathan Davies's withdra- 
wal from tomorrow's Welsh trial 
at Cardiff nil] leave the Welsh 
selectors watching two replace- 
ment stand-off halves (David 
Hands writes). Tbe Neath cap- 
tain suffered an dhow injury 
agnnst Bath last weekend and 
joins Malcolm Dacey on the 
sidelines, leaving Aled WHfiams 
(Brafeend) and Geraint John 
(Cardiff) to contest matters. 
Dacey withdrew with torn stom- 
ach muscles on Monday. John 
Devereox, the Soath Glamorgan 
Institute centre, has also cried 


off became of a hamstring % 
tatary. 

How Duggan, the Bristol wing 
will, play for the South West in 
their divisional championship 
game against the North at 
Bnmdeflsands tomorrow. He re- 
places Richard Mogg (Glouces- 
ter) who wrD be oat uqtil 
Christmas with danmgad rib 
cartilages. Otherwise the South 
West came through Wednes- 
day’s evening strenuous workout 
at Bath mrscathed, as did the 
Midlands (who play London at 
Sudbury) at Nottingham. 


October, the last of the Welsh 
clubs to lose their unbeaten tag 
but have lost five since then. 
Tbe absence of Richard 
Moriarty, who was proving, 
himself to be a popular and 
effective captain has been, a 
blow to their ambitions. Like 
last year, they are capable of 
brilliant rugby one moment 
then foil by foe wayside foe nexL 
Last week they went down to 
Ebbw Vale who, in recent years, 
have shown a decline sadly 
equivalent to that of their local 
industry. But there are signs of 
better times to come for tbe 
Gwent clubi With a young side 
who, as well as having beaien 
Swansea for the first time in 
seven years, won against 
Bridfpid, Gloucester, Bedford 
and Northampton. 

While Llanelli's fortunes are 
on the torn, neither Cardiff or 
Newport have made a deep 
impression so for. Pontypool, 
champions for the last three 
years, are currently lan guishing 
in foe middle of the table and, in 
losing to Abertilleiy on Wednes- 
day evening, have now lost 10 
matches which is as many as 
they lost in aggregate over the 
last three years. Yet they are foe 
leading try^sco ring clubs with 93 
followed by South Wales Police 
(82), Cardiff (79) and Bridgend 
(78). Paul Turner of Newport is 
the leading points scorer with 
179 and leuan Evans (Uanelli) 
and Adrian Parry (Pontypool) 
foe leading try scorers with 17 

Macclesfield, current leaders 
of foe Girobank North-West 
League's east area division one, 
were among teams omitted from 
the proposed league champion- 
ship for the north which ap- 
peared in these columns 
yesterday. Tbe divisions are: 
OtTOtON WEST ONE Asm*. BfcChfieM. 


Onrakirtc, OU Parkonians, St Edwanf s 
OB. [toughs GOML 

WVtSWTEASr ONE Macclesfield, 
Bwnage, Cakter Vale. Coins and Nelson. 
Eccles. Fleetwood. Furness, 
rijttebanraglt. Moresby, OM AUwmtens. 
OidnaiiL 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Jahangir finds Norman’s off day 


Jahangir Khan, foe former 
world squash champion who 
last month lost bis crown to 
New Zealand's Ross Norman, 
was in vengeful mood in 
yesterday's final of the AJ Falaj 
Open in Muscat, crushing Nor- 
man 9-3, 9-2, 9-1 in 55 minutes 
(Cotin McQuillan writes). 

The 22-year-old Pakistani bad 
gone five and a half years 
without defeat until Norman 
dethroned him in the world final 
Toulouse three weeks ago. 
Norman always claimed he 


FOR THE RECORD 


would catch J ahang ir on an off 
day and be was supremely 
Fortunate that occasion came in 
a world championship. Plainly 
the former champion is in no 
mood to grant him another 
victory. 

In from of a capacity 400 
audience at the Ai Falaj Hotel, 
which included the new director 
of the Qaboos University in 
Oman, Hamad Bin Hamad al- 
Ghafiy, Jahangir played almost 
faultless retrieval squash to win 
the first prize of $7,000. 


Tbe _ court is a permanent \ 
three-sided glass structure with a 
solid front wall and is much 
respected by top players for its 
true bounce. On the plastic 
court at Toulouse Jahangir had 
been strangely error prone. In 
Muscat yesterday it was Nor- 
man who played the loose shots 
and presented foe killing 
opportunities. 

Qamar Taman of Pakistan 
de fe a t ed Philip Kenyon. Eng- 
land, 9-3. 9-7, 4-9, 2-9, 9-0 in the 
third place play-off. 


RACKETS 

Old rivals 
clash 
for world 
title 

By W illiam Stephens 

William Boone, aged 36, be- 
gins foe defence of the world 
championship at the New York 
Racquet and Tennis Gub to- 
morrow with the deciding leg to 
be played at Queen’s Club, 
London, on Saturday, Decem- 
ber 13. 

Boone is challenged by his 
predecessor, John Prenn, aged 
33. who won the title from 
William Surtees in 1981 after an 
epic encounter. There was an 
electric atmosphere in the 
packed gallery for the first leg of 
foe challenge in New York as 
the sustained brilliance of the 
long rallies continued through- 
out. Tbe ball, travelling at pace, 
rarely deviated from hues par- 
allel two inches from the side 
walls or diametrically from one 
corner to the other and at a 
height of little more than two 
indies above the board. Surtees 
won 4-2 but those present 
estimated — bearing in mud the 
adaptation necessary to the 
colder Queen's court foe follow- 
ing Saturday — that the score 
was effectively level- In foci 
Surtees had given his all in New 
York and Prenn took the decid- 
ing leg 4-0. 

Prerm was rfrallfngnri fry 
Boone in 1984 at tbe Montreal 
Racket Gub and Queen's. After 
a tense and closely contested 
first 1% Boone arrived in 
London 4-2 ahead; at Queen’s 
he was outstanding and 
achieved total dominance, im- 
mediately winning the three 
games necessary to lake the title. 

Boone went on to take the 
amateur championship in Janu- 
ary 1985 but appeared to lose 
motivation and Prenn gained 
limited revenge with a convinc- 
ing win in the open singles that 
April Prenn and Boone were 
both beaten by James Male in 
the amateur championship the 
following season, however, 
Prenn eliminated Male but suc- 
cumbed to Boone in tbe final of 
foe open singles in April. 

Boone is looking supremely 
fit and sharp; be is a hungry 
fighter and ambitious. Prenn is 
quietly determined and is 
aching foe dimax of a 
ibroughly prepared training 
programme. 

Tbe New York leg, where the 
rule wfl] be one serve, is over the 
best of seven games leaving up 
to seven games to be played at 
Queen’s. If foe games score is 
equal points will be the deader. 
The New York court is true but 
service should not be too 
predominant there; tbe ball 
tends to sit up and is difficult to 
kill — thus permitting tong 
rallies where a key premium is 
on fitness. 


GOLF 

Pressure is 
almost 
too much 
for Tinning 

From John Hennessy 
La Manga 


The strain began to td! on foe 
leader on the fifth and penul- 
timate day of the PGA Euro- 
pean Tour School qualifying 
competition at foe La Manga 
Gub. 

The 61 of Steen Tinning, of 
Denmark, on the first day must 
have seemed a distant mirage, to 
which a smiling sun from a 
smoky blue sky might have 
made some contribution. 

Tinning took 38, two over 
par. to reach the turn and thus 
saw his six-shot lead reduced to 
two against one of his playing 
partners. Wayne Smith (Austra- 
lia) and to four against the other, 
Justin Hobday (Smith Africa). 

The second nine drew 38 
more strokes and Tinning finds 
his lead now reduced to only 
one. He is on 346. 12 under par, 
one stroke ahead of Smith (71 
yesterday) and three ahead of 
Hobday (73) and another 
Australian of more mature vin- 
tage. John Gifford (68). 

Andrew Sherborne (Long 
Ashton), one of the forgotten 
men of British golf forced 
himself into the reckoning with 
a round of 68. which pat him on 
351. seven under par. fora share 
of fifth place. 

He is a former England and 
Great Britain international, but ■ 
little has been heard of him 
since be turned professional two 
years ago. He won his players' 
card in 1984 but his rewards 
were so meagre that he bad to go 
back to scbooL 
At foe second attempt he 
failed to make the four-round 
cut and here he is back atfoe La 
Manga Gub, at 25, making a 
better fist of iL 
Did he think he had it in him 
to succeed as a pro. I in- 
judiciously asked. He spluttered 
all over his Coke. “I certainly 
do”, he replied with all the 
vehemence he could muster 
from a west country burr 
reminescent more of tethered 
and buttercups than the 
rd world of professional golf. 

He does not putt as well as be 
used to in his amateur days, he 
says, but be did well enough on 
tbe South course greens yes- 
terday. Only one obvious putt 
got away, at the third (520 
yards), where his four iron to 
five feet deserved an eagle rather 
than a mere birdie. 

Lee Fideling (Finchley Driv- 
ing Range) is also on 351. after 
dropping shots at his 15th, 16 th 
and !7fo holes. He had started 
at foe 10th. 

LEADMG SCORES: 3W S Ttontog (pen). 
61,69359,71.76; Smith <Aus£ 
66.72X8,70.71. 34& J OMord (Ausj. 
73,69.72.67.68: J Hobday <SA). 
70.71,70.65.73. 351: A Sherborne tt23j, 
68,75.70.6958: P A BTOSladt (SweL 
72,68,70,72,69: L Pickling (GB). 
71.72^6,70.7% M Sunesson <S wet 
73^8.71.70.71. 3S2: A Stubbs (GB). 
75.64.74.68,70; P Van Off Rtot (Sa£ 
73.68.73.72.66. 353c D Gltorcf (GB), 
88.71.69,71,74: J Pinero (Sp). 
78.67,70,68,70; W Milne (GB). 
69,72,71,69.72; M Moreno (Spi, 
72j9.72Ea.72. ttier scores todudact 355: 

M Few (75 yesterday). 380: M Darts 
361: P Hoad (72). 3d& C LaiaBnce (79). 

REAL TENNIS 


BADMINTON 


TORQUAY: Railcard team I 

Man's doubles: S Baddefcv and A 
Goods losl to M Trodgon and D Hdl. 18-14. 
1 2-15.3-1 5 Match rnrib Baddete/s warn 2. 
Tradjjwi 5 team 3. 


GOLF 


BASKETBALL 


UWreD STATES: 


(MBAk Boston cams 119. owner Nuggets 
113; Indiana Pacora lie. Washington Bukin 

!£h Qe1r 2?., p ? tore 107 - N** 3 oraay Rea 

£06 (at PNtodafptea 76ws US. MtwaAM 
Bucks 110: Utah Jazz 99. C»«cago BiM » 

BRITISH MASTERS TROniY: 


WSWNOMITA: jm »,**: Sacond mate 

f \2l: Kjyai. 67. 70. 131: ! AofcL 

™ 66.72 HOST Nakamura. 

!?■ i!# 0 - ^ N Dzald, 71. 

71. 145: TSugiiara. 71. 74: S Maada. 73. 72 
Mf72 147: T 

Naka|™. 75. 72 14ft K Tafcahaahl 72, 77. 

182 N Vuftara! 77. 75.' WfcV rSSo^S 74 

S?KS^5SS£3SiSniSK 


71: M 


IWjiiobwte ^"fanOoih 


f?** JAus). 67: V Sonars Musk j Senior 
g. Ctevfe (Au°t at B aSSrer (Aus* T 

« H CDomtws. TTfc A VHson 

Jftttdax «£? oau,* Pahwr •SS* 0 
Bembndgs. 


s 66 (John 2ifc Lffcsster Rtten 110 
Sal .Z'£I l Wab 2 B 102 IShacMetord 
Steraf«^ roiS ^ 28 >- S0,WI 
EUROP jW.CUP: SotnHhtai fim sarin 
^reap: Ban Beonats Ortfwz re. Tracer Mian 

KQRA C- CUP: Quarter-final, first-seriM 

aefiSVr) TdTsSSS Star* (C) 7S 
Anwons Cantu (H) 107 Langes M 

(Sp) W WyrTpkta tTArittas 

(rn. W7-73. 

EUROPEJW CXJKCkMMrtor-nm 

*- 

RONCHETT1 CUP: QaarteM tea t, first anna 
grow Fararmte Mten 95. Tunsgram Buda- 
pest 60t JedhttvoAida Tuzia (Yug) 81. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


TOUR MATCH: Prwwnco S a to ctexi 5. Austra- 
lians 42 


RUGBY UNION 


W EDNESDAY'S LATE RESULTS 
ESSEX FLOODur CUPS SateMtaab Barking 
13. Harlow 9- 

CLU8 HATCHES: Atafteary 7. Porrtwo. 
Bridgend 29. South Glamorg an hist k Cross 
Keys 0. Maesteg 9. 

TOUR^hMTClt North Wafen 11. F* Batar- 

THOBW SR COUNTY CHAMNONSM* Ox- 

tardatere 8. Budonghamtara 4 (at OdunQ. 


ICE HOCKEY 


BOWLS 


, *yggg* National League 
Hartf ord Waters Z Quebec Nsrtequas 1: 


EGHAhh Unfa'S Navy R nn dusks Sante 

htate: A Thomson (Cyphers, Beehenhaiti) bi 

W Richards (Camtesta Park. TMcftastaml 

7-0. 6-7. 7-5: G Snath (Cyphors. Becfcartunj 
fat R Roytands (Mansfield. Hl gh ga te) 7-2 7-4. 


Capitate 3 

islanders 1 




TENNIS 


FOOTBALL 


TWnt .. 
Dunbar (i 


BELGIAN LEAGUE: Bevstewt 

t O; Mechelen a. Konrrk O. 


3. Oufa 

OF REUMk Uagn Qb Seori- 
jinte n mtey Sha mrock Rowers a^Wararford 
United Otwaaiafa play Dunoafc in final on New 

Year s Day). 


Raporri 

Getter 


±0 SanSnUAig) bt v Nettmrv 

Fares R o ldan (Aid) bt 

(Nath). 8-1. 8-1: L McNMO^M E 


B-l-e-IrtMcNag 
Mf PTarabw 

6-2 6-2 s Hade 

«Mmn(AnjL *3. %-«. &■ V. k—i « 



E 
bt J 
« A 
(SPltat 


MC ^NoooS 00. 4 - 6 . M. 6-2: B FufcoMra) S 


MOTO-CROSS 


MMSdnopp 

MMGwtner 


P ARtt: In door wearing 1. 4 Wart (USV 
2. R Johnson (USl Manila, at 


SQUASH RACKETS 



Sanity placed on a knife-edge when earning a pac ket with a annnirw 

show their Life behind the iron mask 

winning grit 

By a Correspondent 


The unseeded pairing of Steve 
Duggan and Bairy West, both 
from Rotherham, achieved a 
minor upset when they defeated 
Cliff Wilson and Warren King 
5-4 in tbe third round of the 
£200,000 Hofrneisier world 
doubles snooker championship 
in Northampton yesterday. 

Wils on, a Welshman, and his 
Australian partner seemed to 
have few problems as they 
opened a 4-2 lead, but Duggan 
and West showed some true 
Yorkshire grit to daw back. 

Duggan and West, who have „ „„ 

both qualified for the last 16 of is - well, Alex Higgins. “1 
next month s Mercantile Credit liant bloke,” another of 
and the last 32 of snooker’s hifatec said is tbe 


“Snooker is the 
game there is,” said Robboover 
breakfast Robbo - Robert Bra- 
zier, minder, mate and mascot to 
SteTe Davis and the rest of the 
mighty Matehroom team of 
seven elite players — expanded 
his thesis. “It sends 'em all batty 
in the end, yn knew.” 

There is do game like it for 
sustained ment al pressure, hour 
after horn in which a single slip, 
a single moment of mental 
frailty will finish yon. No won- 
der Davis, who in real life is 
rather a jofly character, pretends 
to be the man in tbe iron 
when he plays. Such a defence 
keeps him from going batty. 
And, imder the same pressure, it 
is no wonder that Alex 


j wwr* 

f-' 7- 


Simon 

Barnes 


Gassic 

February’s Dulux British Open, 
won a dogged 24-minute sev- 
enth frame by a 63-35 margin 
and then pulled level at 4-4 
when West scored breaks of 48 
and 35. 

Wilson’s long experience 
should have come to his aid in 
the deciding ninth frame, but it 
was not to be. Duggan made the 
early breakthrough with a ran of 
31 and tbe unseeded pair bung 
on determinedly to take it 69-51 
and earn a fourth-round tie 
against the defending cham- 
pions, Steve Davis and Tony 
Meo, on Sunday. 

David Taylor and Eddie 
Charlton had few problems on 
their way to a 5-1 win over foe 
all-Canadian pairing of Marcel 
Gauvreau and Bob ChaperoO- 

HESULT5 TMiri round: S Duggan and 
B West (England) W C WRsor (Wales) snd 
W King (AustraM. 5-4. DTayttr 
and EChartton (Austral*) bt M 
and R Chaperon (Canada), 5-1. 


bar. “Shame he’ll end op is the 
tony with nothing to show for it 

But Higgtes is stiD loved. He 
stepped oat on Wednesday night 
in tiie Hofinefcster world doubles 
championship to partner Jimmy 
White: “A Ug hand for the 
Hurricane and the Whirlwind!” 
There were two shnalteneoos 
matches either side of the screen 
that divided the andftorimn. 
Four members of the audience 
watched table B, and the other 
679 watched White and Higgins. 

Snooker is soap opera aad 
Higgins is Dirty Den. Higgins 
and White is an irresistible 
combination, like B otham rwh 
R ichards in happier times. It is 
almost too ranch of a good thing. 
“When Alex and I are alight, 
we’re slight,” White said. 
“When we’re not, we’re not. 
There’s nothing either of ns can 


do aboot it, really. Only practice 
and hope.” 

White had joined BoUbo at the 
breakfast table. He still looks a 
tittle like a ne'er-do-well, hot be, 
too, is part of the Matehroom 
team these days. He was red- 
eyed and tousled — who wouldn’t 
be a fter a night playing snooker 
with Hhodns? — bat be attacked 
a breakfast of fried ejgjs and iced 
water with commendable 
cowage. 

. “Yes, Alex was foil of himself 
last night, wasn’t he?” White 
skid, full of aflection for his 
Hend. “Didn't let it w orr y him, 
did be?” Higgins faces a police 
prosecution fir his latest non- 
sense, as the world knows. 
Naturally there was a full boose 
for the compulsory post-match 
pres conference, bat Ffi gg™ 
carried It off with great good 
cheer. 

A few tasty breaks to front of 
ate hydra-bended Higgins pub- 
lic was more than cna n g h to pat 
a sprine into tbe Uggtis step. 

ns a slightly confastog . 
“bent a horse be had 
that tost on an objection, 
and explained how this showed 
that when so r rows come they 
come not single spfes bat to 
battalions. “Bat you mustn't 
weaken,” be said. “Sometimes 
adversity can be a friend.” 

Ov er breakfast, Higgins'S 
extraordinary technique was 
discussed. Robbo (“I want 
tajwd grapefruit, not the fresh 
staff") said that no one dse did 


things Glee Higgins. “Like when 
he swerves the cue at the last 
minute to get side. It’s all body 
action. No one else could do it 
that way and still keep control, 
hot be does it aD the time.” 
White said: “Tbe way he uses 
his cue can he unbetterable. 
Sometimes be wifi grab the cue 
by the bstt, and by the (tore he 
has finished the slrot his band is 
halfway np the cue.” 

Bat that is enough aboat 
butts. The point is that 
Higgins's tednifspe, rather like 
Gower’s flkk-pdl across the 
line, is balanced on a technical 
The difference be- 
am! idiot is to be 


pact 


Yon cannot ex- 
_ Yon get in- 
sporadic outbreaks of the 


White plays rnoch like Hig- 
gins, so tor as cue-power, speed 
and attack are c o nc e rned. 
White, too, has bad his wild 



nights. Bat a profligate fife and 
membership of the Matehroom 
are incompatible. “I've 
been with them for five months 
and it's great,” be said. “IVe 
acver been so relaxed about 
saaaker.” The Matehroom trays 
are m a rke t ed in a way that is 
powerful meticulous, nltia- 
respectable - and they earn a 
packet. Once one might have 
wondered whether White would 
end op to the aforementioned 
karzy: Not any more. 

Hfegias once asked to join the 
Mdrauwiso, and was turned 
down. “PH get all the ro man tic 
when I retire. Davis 
will have the money,” Hums 
sad m hfe ghosted book. Alex 
Through The Looking Glass. 

Higgins Mug to comp ar e 
hmasetf with poor George Best, 
bat that b not right- He is more 
tike S id Virions: A man to a total 

subjection to ins own personal 
niyth. To the point of self- 
destruction: “I took the overdose 

to shoot my wife into action,” be 

says in this bizarre book. “I 
wanted her to know I was a real 


Deuchar and 
Davies 

reach final ■■ 

Wayne Davies and Lachlan 
Deuchar, the holders, advanced 
to tomorrow's final of foe 
George Wimpey Open doubles 
championship at Queen's Gub 
when they defeated Colin 
Lumley and Julian Snow 6-1, 6- 
0, 6-3 yesterday (William Ste- 
phens writes)- 

Davies and Deuchar, both 
Australian professionals, were 
too powerful for Urmley, an 
unattached professional, also 
Australian, and Snow who is the 
second ranked British amateur. 

The women’s open singles 
championship, also sponsored 
by George Wimpey at Queen's, 
was at the second round stage 
yesterday where Gin Dean de- 
feated Elisabeth Woodthorpe, a 
former US open singles cham- 
pion, 6-3, 6-2. 

RESULTS: Owen's ClutK George 
Wtapey Men's Open doubles chwnptoa- ' 
stto: Ftat raanf G Hytand (New Vbrib 
and A C Lovel bt D Cut! (Lord's) and M 
Ryan (unaoadtedl 6-1, 6-1 62; OaraWr- 
flnffs: Hyland and LoveB bt D C Johnson 
(Queen's) and G J Parsons funattaeftad) 
6-2.6-26-0. Sena-flnatWF Davies (New 
York) and L Deuchar (Hampton CowQbiC 
J Lumley (unattached) and J P Snow 6-1. 

6-0. 6-3. 

Men's singles: qmrtar-finals: C J 
Ronaktsori (Hampton Court) bt Snow 6-5, 

6-1. fr4; G Hyland bt Lundey BA frS, B-k 
Deuchar bt J Howes (Bonteaux) W). &4. ■ 

4-a 6* Davtes bt D C Johnson 6-4, 64, 

Woman's Open ikijjtaa: FM remdfc E 
Woocfflwme M MP&n 4-6. B-5. 6-0; P 
Dmjbybt F Madrtowi 6-3. 6-5; J PageW 
M 66. 84; P Fetowsbt J 

Vaughan B-3, 6-2. Second roaod: G Dean 
WWfeodttorpe 66, 6-2; A Wanenflperbt 
Omby 6£, frD. H MurseS bt FWtowsS*. 


l*rao«iality. A wife who cared 
wonid'have done something to 

Wbitr, Kike Higgins, has a 
wild talent for the put. But he 


White: afightwitb Higgins 


of by the Matehroom 
nation, and seems to nave 
moved miles avray from the 
***»“ to seif-destrnc- 
tam. Breakfr rtdone, Robbo was 
sto^fcaihHg WbHe to his nett j m v»~ 

apprfntment: “He’s a good boy. ISmaSSf ( 
Audi think be ifikeg being driven I ^^^PSEcketb: 
ahowt m a Bmo.“ Tbe next * 

■tautMt was to promote 
s’s new “Cydone” cne by 
■ *»®E3«nuiea of 2te 
virtues at Harrods. 


CRICKET 

Rebels match 
peters out 

East London. (Reuter) - Tbe 
foree-day match between the 
rebel Australians and the South 
African provincial side Border 
petered out into a draw when 
rain forced an early end. The 
Australians used tbe rigid pitch 
for batting practice before a 
senes of Tour one-day inter- 
nationals aga i ns t South Africa 
begins tomorrow. 

SCORES Border 358 (B M Osborns 127). 
Australian W 519 for eight dec (M 6 
i jayana n 180. K Weraett 137. E N 
Truman 4 lor 88). 

TODAY’S FIXTURES 

_ football 

Wcfc-oH 7.30 unteas stated 

FA Cup 
Second round 
Southend v Northa mpto n (7.45) 
’lRovar‘~ 


*■ 


* 


Halifax v Rotherham 

OTHER SPORT 
nwrra: Wtorau World Mastaa taue- 
mmmw (at Rsnhow Sate. Kenattoton]- 
SWOOKQfc U otuwla lar World DoufatM, 
etoBBK (at Demgala Centra. 


(ffHataratta T 38C. 
numv JJACaSuaff-19 tour: HQfl 








e 
st 
ich 
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oessy 

tell on ihe 
ad penuJ- 
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Q unifying 
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inning, of 
day must 

mirage, to 
a from a 
tghi have 

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educed 10 
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TELEVISION AND RADIO 


A key to the lock of bitter memories 


• Cambodian Witness (BBC2 
9.30). Nigel Williams's compe lling 
Arena documentary, brings the 
unrelenting precision of a legal 
cross-examination to the emo- 
tional agony of a man and the 
cultural death of a nation. Because 
Someth May, a Cambodian, was 
not himself able to chronicle his 
horrible experiences when the 
Khymer Rouge invaded his coun- 
try, the task of giving them 
permanent shape fell to the poet 
and journalist James Fenton. But 
Fenton’s role was not merely that 
of an amanuensis. For nigh on two 
years, during which May let go his 
painful memories, the writer 
coaxed out of him “the clinching 
details ** (Fenton's words) the 
Cambodian would have preferred 
to omit The book acquired its 
emotional and literary texture. 


6.00 CbefexAM. 

6X0 Nows headlines followed by 
The FOntstones. Cartoon 
senes, (r) 6.55 Weather. 

7X0 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough, Sally Magnusson, and 
Jeremy Paxman. National and 
international news at 7X0, 
7X0, 8.00 and 8.30; regional 
news and travel at 7.15, 7.45 
and 8.15; weather at 7X5. 7.55 
and 8X5. 

8.40 Watchdog. Lynn FauWs Wood 
and John Stapleton with 
consumer affairs advice 8X5 
Regional news and weather 
9X8 News. 

9.05 Day to Day. A studio 

discussion on a topical matter. 


( CHOICE ) 

from microscopic detail such as 
the names of the religious books 
placed in May's brother's coffin. 
Use exact lime it took for May to 
dig what he thought was to be his 
own grave, what sort of weather it 
was on the day that might have 
been his last, and the nature of the 
question that his fellow Cam- 
bodian asked before being exe- 
cuted by the Khymer Rouge. He 
had asked what liberty meant. 

• 1 am not sure whether, ethically, 
I ought to approve of this week’s 
Just Another Day (BBC2, 
9.00pm). It is about the Auto- 
mobile Association. Nothing 
wrongwith that, of course, even u 
the effect might be to boost the 
motoring organization's meraber- 


Phfloroena. Johnny Ball wtth 
another tale of the kitten 4.10 
SuperTed. (r) 4.15 Odysseus 
the Greatest Hero of them AO. 
Tony Richardson continues his 
stones from Greek mythology 
4X5ADaykttheUteL.The 
Toad's Tale, with the voices of 
Wfflie Rushton and Hugh Lloyd. 

4X5 John Craven's Newsround 
5X5 Grange HHL Episode 18. 


ship figures. Wbai slightly worries 
me about Linda Cleeve’s film is 
what one AA man suggests can be 
done to jump the queue when help 
is needed: just say you are a 
doctor, or a nurse, or a plumber, 
and thee patrolman is on the spot 
scarcely before you have put the 
phone down. Apparently, the rose 
never fails. In the end, of course, it 
is self-defeating. As G and S once 
said, when Everybody is Some- 
body, then Nobody is Anybody. 
Added to which, there is always 
the conscience factor io be consid- 
ered. In tonight's documentary, 
the doctor who calls out the AA 
man ruefully owns up to being just 
a doctor of science. The lot of the 
AA patrolman is shown not 
always to be a happy one. For 
every story of patrolmen being 
given royal souvenirs in the shape 


of photo-copies of Princess 
Margaret's membership card, 
there are woeful accounts such as 
that of the patrolman who was run 
over by the car that a district nurse 
had left in gear. Little wonder that, 
on this particular day on which we 
eavesdrop on the AA, he is 
apprehensive when sent out in 
answer to a distress call: it was 
made by a district nurse. 

• Highly recommended for those 
able to read The Times broadcast- 
ing guide over breakfast is the 
repeat broadcast of Desert Island 
Discs (Radio 4, 9.05pm). The 
castaway is Yes Minister actor 
Nigel Hawthorne who enrages, 
surely to nobody's suprise, as a 
very alert, highly articulate man . 



Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalie 


VARIATIONS 



1 1“ I ! *< i lA ii ,| ■ "7," 


Peter DfiVgllc PatroWng for tire AA: Just Another Day (BBC2^).OOpin) 


ITV/LONDON 


CHANNEL 4 


chaired by Robert Kdroy-Sflk 
9.45 Advice Line. Social 
security problems solved by 
Paul Clark and Eileen Evason. 
10X0 Neighbours, (r) 

10X0 The Wombtes. (r) 10X5 Phffip 
Schofield with news of 
children's television 
programmes, and birthday 


5X5 UaiMUBL 
6.00 News with Sue Lawley and 
Nicholas Witohefi. weather. 
b as London Plus. 

7X0 Wogan. Tonight's guests 
include Johnny Mathis and 
Henry Mandril, and Elaine 


7X0 'AUo 'AM A new series of the 
comedy starring Gordon Kaye 
as the French cate proprietor 
who strikes an uneasy balance 
living with the occupying 
German forces, his capricious 
write, his ffirte waitresses, and 
the French Resistance. 


10X0 Henry's Cat frt 
10X5 Five to Ten. Fulton Mackay 
with a thought for the day 
11.00 PubBc SCHOOL The sixth 
of ten films about life at 
Radley, a boy's public school, 
(r) 11.30 Open Air. Viewers 
comment on television 


12X5 Domesday D ete ctiv e s. Quiz 
about Britain for teams, 
presented by Paul Coia 12X5 
Regional news and weather. 

1.00 One O'clock News with 
Marten Lewis. Weather 1X5 
Neighbours. Max's suspicions 
about Danny are contained 
1X0 King Roflo. (r) 1X5 Gran. 

2X0 fte Liver Bbds. Comedy 
series starring PoUy James 
and Nerys Hughes. (t)2X5 
Knots Landing. When Richard 
Avery tricks his estranged wife 
site returning to Knots 
Landing, the nouse becomes 
the scene of a sane. 3X5 Box 
Clever. Famly qufe game 
presented by EmlynHughes. 

3X0 Jntboandthe JafSeL(r)4X0 


8.10 the Coibys. A new series 
begins vnth Fallon agonizing 
over who Is the father of the 
baby she is carrying - her ex- 
husoand or the newly acquired 
Jeff. 

9X0 News with John Humphrys and 
Andrew Harvey. Regional 
news and weather. 

9X0 FOne The Good, the Bad. and 
the Ugty (I960) starring CSnt 
Eastwood, Lee Van CJesf, and ■ 
EH WaHach. TWs third in the 
series of spaghetti Westerns 
concerns the search for a 
cashbox containing 3200,000 
hidden to a cemetery at the 
height of the American Civ8 
War. Directed by Sergio Leone. 
(Ceefax) 

12X0 rare CvuttSne (1974) starring 
□iaham Carrofl and James 
Eari Jones. A comedy about a 
mother of six who moonSgtits 
as a maid in a swanky part of 
New York who is swept off her 
feet by the man who empties 
her (tostbtos- Directed by John 

1X0 SS&er. 

i. "t 


9X5 Daytime on Two: sk9s in basic 
German 9X2 Part ten of the 
tale of a ori who befriends a 
badger 10.15 Preparing for a 
C h ristmas pant o m i me 10X8 
Mathematical Investigations: 
Patterns and Time Graph 11X0 
Wondermaths. Programme 10 
11.17 The redevetopmentof 
London's Docklands. 

11X7 Ceefax 12.00 The power of 
language 12X2 A group of 
teenage girts recount 
experiences of sexual 
harassment 1 is Learning 
English by watching popular 
television programmes 1X3 
Society's attitude to alcohoL 

2X0 You and Me. It) 

2.15 Racing from Cheltenham. The 
2X0. £55 and 3X0 races. 

345 100 Groat Sporting Momenta. 
Aride's battle with MW House Hr 
the 1964 Cheltenham Gold 
Cup. W 3X5 Regional news 
and weather. 

4X0 Pamela Armstrong. Today's 
guests indude John Netties, 
Cynthia Harvey, and, with a 
song, Bkie Brooks. 

4XS BSzzmTs Wonderful Wooden 

Toym. Richard Blizzard builds a 


6.15 TV-ttnc Good Morning Britain, 
presented by Anne Diamond 
and Geoff Meade. News with 
David Foster at 6X0, 7X0; 

7X0, 8X0, 8X0 and 9X0; 
financial news at 6X5; sport at 
6.40 and 7 AO; exercises at 
6X5 and 9.17; cartoon at 7X5; 
pop music at 7X5; and Jimmy 
Greaves's television toghflgbts 
at 8X5. The After Nine gu&ts 
indude Russefi Grant 

9X5 Thames news headlines 
followed by Watte Wottoo. 
9A0 El Pueblo. A documentary 
about an Andalucian village. 

10X0 FUra: The tron Mistress {? 952) 
starring Alan Ladd and Virginia 
Mayo. A fanciful tale of Jim 
Bowie, a bayou 
backwoodsman, who gave his 
name to the famous Bowie 
knlte. Directed by Gordcm 


shown at 12X5 on BSC 1. 

5X5 FteroWeB of Love (1970) 
starring Lassie. A made-for- 
teievifton tale of how Lassie's 
kindness to a young bey 
whose own dog (fles is repaid 
when Lassie is trapped down a 
mine-shaft Directed by Jack 

rttvwy* 

6X0 Chofr of the Year 1986. Choirs 
from Northern Ireland, 



vlBj 

i ' •" u j-~? ■ - . * 


X "i 

•4 \ \ -.'A—. ^ v - ^ 


• ~k] 

& 3 ^ 


compete for a place In the 
semifmafs. 

7X0 tflero Live. Fted Harris and 
Lesley Judd investigate the 
increasing use of micro- 
technology in the motor 
industry; and from the United 
States, Freff reports on ETAK. 
a car navigation system which 
shows a driver exactly where 
he is on a street plan. 

8X0 The Q u ea n’ * Prize. Brian 
Glover is at Bislay for the 
National Rifle Association's 
most valued compe ti tion. The 
Queen's Prize, (r) 

8X0 Goingto PoL Advice on indoor 
gardening. (Ceefax) 

0X0 Just Another Day. AA. John 
Pitman spends some time with 
the men and women who come 
to the aid of mot o rists with 
broken-down cars, (see 
Choice) 

9X0 Arena: Canbodtan Witness. 

The story of Someth May, a 
doctor's son who escaped 
from the Pol Pot regime In 
Cambodta to Thailand. There 
hemet James Fenton who 
brought him to England where 
they collaborated on May's 
autobiography, Cambodian 

Witness, (see Choice) 

1025 NewsaMM 11.10 Weather. 

11.15 The Rodcford Fites. Jim helps 
a local prostitute who is to fear 
of her lue.(r) Ends at 12.10. 


12X0 TheRaggy Dolls. (r) 12.10 
Rainbow. Learning, with 
puppets, about caring for 
others. 

12X0 New Way ol living. Chris Kefiy 
and Jenrri Mffls examine the 
problems faced by women 
when rettantog to work after 
an absence. 

1X0 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin. T?te final Item in the 
week's series on Aids 
examines how lifestyles wil be 
affected by the disease 120 
Thames news presented by 
John Andrew. 

1X0 Fane The Angel Who Pawned 
Her Haro* (1954) starring 
Diane Cuento. A comedy about 
mi angel who comes to earth 
to help save souls. She pawns 
her harp and makes for the 
Angel, m London's IsSngton. 
Directed by Alan Bromiy. 

3X0 Take the ragh Road. Brian 
receives disturbing news front 
Sheas 325 Thames news 
headlines 3X0 Sons and 


Rainbow. A repeat of the 
p r og ram me shown at 12.10 
4.15 The Tatebuga 4.W 
Insp ector Gadget 4X5 
Wortd w tee- Geography qufe 


5.15 Biacfcausteni. General 
knowledge game tor 
teenagers, presented by Bcb 
Hotness. 

5.45 News with Alastair Stewart. 

5X0 The 6 O'clock Show with 
Michael Asp?:. 

7.00 Bruce Forsyth’s Ptey Your 
Cards Right Game shew for 
couples. 

7X0 New Faces of 8S. Talent 
contest presented by Marti 
Caine. The non-voting judges 
are David Jensen, Nina 
Myskow. and Bernard 
Manning. 

8X0 The Two of Us. Domestic 
comedy series starring 
Nicholas Lyndhurst and Janet 
Dibtey. (Oracle) 

9.00 Lost Empires. Episode seven. 
Summer 1914 and the murder 
of Nonie Colmar remains 
unsolved, but Crabb's 
persistence eventually leads to 
a surprise arrest (Oracle) 

10X0 News at Ten with Alastair 
Burnet and Sandy Gall. 

10X0 The London Prog r a mme . What 
farmers in the south-east are 
proposing to do if ordered to 
cutback production in an effort 
to help reduce the Common 
Market's food mountain. 
Followed by LWT news 
headlines. 

11X0 South of Watford. Hugh Laurie 
probes the persona of London 
fashion guru, Michael Roberts. 
With contributions from, 
among others, Suzy Menkes, 
fashion edtorofThe Times. 

11X0 I nte rnational Darts. The 

Wfrvnau World Masters, from 
the Rainbow Suite, 

Kensington. 

12.15 Night Heat The death of an 
mormar sends Kirkwood back 
to the bottle. 

1.10 FRaKKung Full (1986) starring 
David Carratine. A made-for- 
teievison martial arts 
adventure about agents 
battling with an international 
gang of opium smugglers. 


2J5Q flight Thoughts. 



** : <« !l -*t 


- V:-fv 


s 


2.15 Their Lontehfo* J House, (r) 

2X0 GaMoy. Art quiz chaired by 

George Mefly. Frank WWtford 
and Maggi Hantofing are Joined 
by Richard Ingrams and 
Michael Gough. The student 
panelists are Lyn MaJcokn and 
Franco Melacra. (r) (Orade). 

3X0 The Wght is Dark. The final 
play in the series of Welsh 
language dramas. Bet is a 
nonconformist minister's wife 
whose sanity is threatened by 
the cam and hypocrisy which 
surrounds her in chapel-going 
life, (subtitled) 

4.15 World of Animation indudes 
Mike Walker's Running Joke. 

4X0 Countdown. Yesterday's 
winner is challenged by 
Jeremy Stephenson from 
Kendal. 

5X0 Car 54, Where Are You? 
Vintage American comedy 
series about two hapless New 
York policemen. 

5X0 The Tube. The first half 
includes pop music from It 
Bitas. later reggae takes the 
stage with Freddie McGregor, 
ana The Taxi Collection with 
the Sly and Robbie Band. Pius, 
the premiere of Madonna's 
new video. Open Your Heart 

7.00 Channel 4 News with Peter 
Sissons includes an 
assessment of the impact of 
Neil Kinnock’s trip to the 
United States. Weather. 

7X0 Book Choice. Peter HaH. 
director of the National 
Theatre, discusses the new 
Oxford edition of William 
Shakespeare: The Complete 
Works, edted by Stanley Wells 
and Gary Taylor. 

8X0 What the Papers Say. With 
Am it Roy of The Sunday 
Times. 

8.15 A Week in Potties presented 
by Nick Ross. Who should 
control ML5? With Jonathan 
Aitken, Roy Jenkins, CUva 
Solay, and Ray Whitney. Plus, 
a feature on West Germany's 
SPD party. 

9X0 Newhait American domestic 
comedy series. 

9X0 Garde ne r s' Calendar includes 
advice on a Christmas tree that 
can be replanted^) 

10.00 The Golden Girts. Award- 
winning comedy series about 
four middfe-aged women who 
share a Mtarm house. Tonight, 
Dorothy injures herself when 
she takes tap-dancing lessons. 
(Orade) 

10X0 A Change of Blind. Part four of 
the ^-programme series 
J * " to J 



i&m 


hirer 10L1S Why Me? 1025 LMas Man 
11.1S Crown in the Deep 11-55-12JX) Aubrey 
itepm News 1 .so-aao Film: Last Page’ 
&00-7.00 News 1CL3S Centre] Weekend 1200 
Fine Five Oesperase Women i^Sem 
JoSfmaar SL2S Closedown. 

CHANNEL As London except 
unaWNCL, 9 _ 2£am Cartoon 1B30-12J0 
Hnr There Goes me Bride IJOpm Maws 
IJOSoiTBlIano Son 2S0-100 Three Little 
Woids SJ0-406 Country G7 SOO Channel 
Rapon S2S Jana's Diarv S30-7.00 Country 
Wavs 10J0 In Camera 1lJ» Darts 12.1Sn 
Ftfnt Neatn me Anaona Stoas 1.15 Oosecowa 

GRAMPIAN ^ London except __ 

9L2S«n First TbtngMa 
Wine that Sings 1Q2S Snon Sayy 10X5 


Documentary 11^0-1200 Cartoon 
News 1.30-340 Ffcn: Spcia Dark Wed’ 
aaO-7-OO North Tonight 1030 CroEsfire 1l J» 
Darts 12.15am News. Qosedown. 

GRANADA 

030 European Folk Takes 940 Max end 
Montz 1025 The Waiters 11.00 Runaway Is- 
fanC 11 .2S-1Z00 Connections Itepm 
Granada Reports 1 JO Week In View 2JXKL00 
Hotel 030-440 Vouna Doctors 6J» Gre- 
nada Reports &25-7JU Please. Sir! 1030 CeF 
ebraran 11 XB Darts 12.15am Fane The 
Gorgon 1.40 Closedown. 

mywE^sysxsireet 

1025 Beyond 2000 11.1 0-12.00 Fal Guy 
IJOpm Newt IXIFSJOOnincTeza, 8ono( Co- 
chise &00 News 030-740 Good NeW>- 
txxir Show UL3Q Vour Say KL48-11J0 IBM 
South West Export Awards 12.15 m C losedown. 

HTVWA j JES a^^osons 

and Daughters Wales at Six 

10J0 Story and the Song 1 U»-12.1fiam Darla. 




TOUT Ac London except S28am Car- 
±32L toon 0L35 Sesame Street 10J0- 12J00 
Fftrc There Goes the Bride Itepm News 
1.30-3JH Film: Somebody's Stolen our Rus- 
sian Spy &2MJ00 Young Doctors AOO- 
7 j 00 Friday Show 1032-11 JO Sweeney 
12.15am Pomta^)t12te The Who — nrml 
Concan L38 Closedown. 

*rWQ Aa London except &28am Car- 
i-SH toon 9J5 Sasame Street HL30-12JDB 
Fflm: There Goes the Bnde 1.20pm News 
IJOSoneB and Son 2JO^OO Three Little 
Worrte 3 J0-4J0 Country GP SMO Coast to 
Coast 6JO-7JW Country Ways 1020 Facing 
South 1UM Darts 12.1BOM Rknc Neath 
the Aroona SMee 1.1B Compeny. Closadown. 
fyuC TPCC As London 








m 





Knef. A drama 
about a successful actress in 
her late tterties who returns to 
her parents' Normandy home 
where they took after their 

* ter, and bemoan 
r*s Kjertine fife- 
style. Directed by Helps 
Sanders-Brahms. (subtitled) 
Ends at 1X0. 





I 


THE EXCLUSVE PINE FURtaTUffi 


v Antique nnfsa puzc • 

ftBTuture marie entirely from 

seasoned wood for the StodjOIvliigRooin 

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OFF 




<TURES 


6X5 Weather. 7X0 News 

7X6 Concert Gabrieli, err 





LF (long wave), (s) Stereo on VHF 
5X5 Slipping. 6X0 News Brieftog. 
6l10 Fanning. 625 
Prayer For The Day (s) 

6X0 Today tod 6X0, 7X0, 

8X0 News summary. 

6j 45 Business News. 6X5, 
7X5 Weather. 7X0, 8X0 
News. 72S, 8X5 Sport. 7.45 
Thought for the Day. 8X5 
Yestwday in Parfiarnent 
8X0 Letters 8X7 
Weather; ^ Travel 
9X0 News 

9X5 Desert Island Discs. 


Beast at the Royal Opera 
House Covent Garden; 
Rayner HeppenstaJI's 
Vie Piper, and Tbe Master 
Eccentric: The Journals 
Of R H(r) 

5X0 PM News magazine. 5X0 
Shipping. 5X5 Weather 
6X0 News; Frnanoial Report 
6X0 Going Places. CSve 


actor, in conversation with 
Michael Parkinson (r) (s) 

9A5 Feetfoack. Christopher 
DunWey wtth comments, 
complains, and queries 
about the BBC 
10X0 International 

Assignment BBC 
correspondents report 
10X0 Morning Story. The 
Buttonholes by Doreen 
Dade. The reader is Heather 
Bed 

10X5 Daily Service (s) 

11X0 News: Travel; A Palace 
For The People. The 
story of the Crystal Palace, 
famed landmark and 
entertainment venue in 

London untfi it was 
destroyed by fire. The 
contributors induda 
son® of the people who 

flocked to t*>3 Palace for 

an unparaWed day out (r) 
11X8 The Enchanted Canopy- 

the remote work^toe^ 6 
rainforest canopy (4) 

12X0 News; The Food 

Programme with Derek 

Cooper 

1227 Carrott's Crash Court on 
the Cable-Car Comics. 
Jasper Carrott goes on a 
guided tour of the stand- 
up oomedy boom to San 
Francisco. 12^5 

1.00 The World At One. News 
1X0 The Archers. 1X5 Shipping 
2X0 News; Wbman's Hour 
from Bristol wtth Janrd 
Murray, toeftttes Hams on 
som a Mack s in the city 

rigtitswltm^OTie to^U^ 


magazine about travel and 
transport 
7X0 News 
7X5 The Archers 
720 Pick Of The Week. 

Margaret Howard with 

highfightsol the past week's 
programmes on bBC 


Radio and TV (s) 

8X0 Step Press. Glyn 

WOrsntp looks over this 
week's newspapers 
8X5 Any Questions? Norman 
Teobitt MR, Roy 
Hatterstey MP, Paddy Pta 


^^m|)Dun!StLTie 
programme comes from 
Anythin. Beds. With John 

Timpson. 

9X0 Letter from America by 
Alastair Cooke 

9X5 Kaleidoscope. Tonight's 
etifflonoftheaits 
programme includes items 
on Lana Pegrem's book 
Long Way Home; on the 
sage version of High 
Society at the Leicester 

Haymarkafc and tho f8m 
Eat the Peach 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime. The 

Fall of KeMn Walter, by 
Alasdakr Gray (3 of 8). 1029 
Weather 

10X0 The world Tonight 
11.00 Today to Parfiarnent 

11.15 The Financial wok! 

Tonight 

11X0 Week Encfing (s). 

Satirical review of the 

Ufoafe'e nPWS 

12X0 News; Weather. 12X3 

VHF (eHatte to England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except S X5 -6. 0 0 awi 
Weather; TraveL 11X0- 
12X0 For Schools; 11X0 
Earth Search 1120 

Playtime (s)11X5 Music 

sasrRfti&ni 


4X0 News 

4X5 The News Hudd&nss. 


4X0 kaleidoscope. A second 
chance to hear last 
night's edition. Includes 
comment on the film 
Labyrinth; Beauty and the 


Let's join in 22STakwBVBS 

140 Listen! (s). 5X04X5 
PM (continued). 12X0- 
I.IOsm Schools Nirttt- 
Time Broadcasting Throtie 
history -A background 
to 20 tfi century theatre. 
12 X 0 Theatre Upheaval 

(s) 




m VHFl HT ;j^h1M?W194mTvHF95.8; BBC B*fio London: 











FRIDAY DECEMBER 5 1986 


THE 3^^ TIMES 


First pnbfotedmira 


Arsenal keep the 
door shut on 
Nicholas too 


Charlie Nicholas is fit, 
ready and waiting to return for 
Arsenal, but there is no place 
for him in tomorrow's team 
against Queen's Park Rangers. 
The only place that could be 
reserved for the Scottish inter- 
national is on the bench. 

Since the shin that Nicholas 
gashed severely at Notting- 
ham Forest has now healed, he 
would be able to walk unaided 
back into the side and, under 
normal circumstances, he no 
doubt would. 

But circumstances at 
Highbury have been anything 
but normal since he left a 
dozen games ago. His col- 
leagues have not only re- 
mained unbeaten and climbed 
to the top of the first division, 
but they have also started to 
resemble the team that won 
the League title and the FA 
Cup in 1971. 

Two prominent members of 
the squad that claimed the 
double 15 years ago admitted 
yesterday that there are 
similarities between tbe past 
and the present One of them 
happens to be the current 
manager, George Graham. 
The other. Bob Wilson, 
coaches the club’s 
goalkeepers. 

“It is fair to make compari- 
sons only at the end of the 
season," Graham said, “but 
the defensive record cannot be 
ignored. We have conceded 
only eight goals so far and we 
are a third of the way through 
the season. We are beading for 
a total of 24. In tbe double 
season, it was 29." 

England's full-backs have 
securely locked Arsenal’s side 
doors, but Adams has also 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 

fit, been a significant figure, peril 
\ for standing in their main en- over 
lace trance. Such has been his he 
earn progress since he was in- Ars< 
*ers. traduced at the beginning of hop< 
i be the season that Graham can Sc 
iter- already foresee a startling affoi 
future for his central defender, pass 
olas “He will captain Arsenal xj 
mg- one day and be will probably timr- 
l, he go on to lead EngUmd,"he 
tied predicted. “He has only just ficiaj 
tder turned 20, but he plays like a 
: no man. He is a natural leader 

and he is very good to work p^y 
at with. He makes mistakes, but, next 
ling like the rest of the team, he c | ass 
ft a learns quickly ” reco* 


perfect during their 4-0 win 
over Aston Villa last Saturday, 


FA Cop on page 40 

Graham has few complaints 
about his mobile fortress — a 
rearguard that has been un- 
broken for nine hours and 
maintained a perfect record in 


he remains reticent about 
Arsenal's championship 
hopes. 

So does Wilson, who can 
afford to take a more dis- 
passionate view. 

The narrator on foe video, 
timed to celebrate ArsenaTs 
centenary, and released of- 
ficially yesterday, added his 
own commentary on foe cur- 
rent line-up: “Adams, must 
play for England within the 
next 18 months. Rocastle is a 
class player and he must be 
recognised soon as weft 
Anderson is playing out of his 
skin for club and country and 
Sansom is as consistent as 
ever. Lukic is winning foe fens 
over — particularly after his 
display against West Ham. 

“Davis is like Charlie 
George. He has his own pace 



m. 


2 ZrSZ' m L' m £3*S “< “L"? “f Boat Racesials »S 


Crabby crews: Tempers frayed when Oxford news dashed in their first trial on the Thames and a pu nch was thrown. (Photograph: Hugh Rontfedge). 

Oxford’s cricket Sir says 

gin and £2.5m Refuge sponsorship never 

“ for the Sunday League -j£ 

By Jim RaOton Refuge Assurance, a Man- under John Player's Championship cricket would By Paul Martin 

Tbe Oxford University Chester insurance company, sponsorship. be introduced. 


f 2.5m Refuge sponsorship 
for the Sunday League 


that there is room for 
improvement in front of it “1 
want the players in midfield 
and in attack to express 
themselves,” be said. 

“That is, perhaps, the main 
difference between 1971 and 
now. We may not have been 
technically gifted or blessed 
with individual skills in those 
days, but we were very hard to 
beau Anyone who did had to 
play extremely welL We are 
still disciplined and organised, 
but 1 want us to be more 
adventurous. 

“We have been 
adventurous in spasms and 
controlled the game, but I 
want us to take charge for 60 
or 70 minutes. It is unreason- 
able to aim for 90.” Though he 
conceded that “foe script” was 


has a mean streak and is a 
wonderful passer of the balL 
The blend up front is not quite 
right, but it works. If Quinn 
could add a few pounds to that 
frame of his, he would terrify 
people” 

There was, significantly, no 
mention of Nicholas. “How 
can I change a w inning side?” 
Graham asked. “When we do 
lose, it will be interesting to 
see how we read. That will be 
a test of how good we are.” 

Arsenal are still prepared to 
strengthen foe squad, as they 
were when foe season began. 
So far, there has been no need. 
But they are not ready to 
sell — especially Nicholas to 
Liverpool, as has been 
rumoured. 


Refuge Assurance, a Man- 
chester insurance company, 
are to sponsor Sunday League 


way yesterday was full of cricket for ai least the next five 
tension — and mishaps. Ox- years — spending £2.5 mil- 


Sports MP United’s midfield 


criticized 
by Clough 

By Dennis Shaw 


back to strength 


Brian Gough, the Netting- tnanage 
ham Forest manager, has ] 

turned his abrasive tongue on 111 
Dick Tracey, foe Minister for Gord ^ 
Sport, over the moves to 
introduce a total membership fo vis ? 0n 
card scheme for football clubs. 

The outspoken Clough de- Ho 
scribes foe concept of all £. or 1 
supporters having to be hold- < 
ers of Luton Town-style cards f^S 1150 ' 
as “so barmy it could have mU - r ? al } 
dropped out of a Christinas JP atc " 1 
cracker*’. In a scathing attack ESJU? 
he said: “Has anyone heard of ‘ ool ‘ 5a ^- 
Dick Tracey? He's our Min- 
ister for Sport and he's so Am 9J 
wrong it’s not true.” <tec ? . 10 

explaine 

“If be goes ahead with this (Mont 
scheme it will ring foe death who w 
knell for football in this United 
country” Gough claims that classic ft 
many major dubs are grad- first real 
rally winning the battle dreamed 
against hooliganism while in isall abc 
contrast, a membership three qu 
scheme would drive 'decent the side 
people' away from foe game, differenc 


By Steve Bates 

The Manchester United The 
manager, Alex Ferguson will midfiel 
restore his international mid- througl 
field trio of Bryan Robson, Leicest 
Gordon Strachan and Nor- when, 
man Whiteside back to first managi 
division action in Sunday's gency t 
televized game with Totten- the wt 
ham Hotspur at Old TraffordL quite 
For tbe first time since Stracha 
taking charge a month ago, an aun 
Ferguson wifi have all his top the you 
internationals available for a and tl 
match he describes as “his against 
first real taste of English Robs 

" 1 ,L 1 


The nudeus of United's 
midfield successfully came 
through a reserve test at 
Leicester on Wednesday night 
when, according to the 
manager “There was an ur- 
gency and commitment from 
the whole team which was 
quite refreshing. Robson. 
Strachan and Whiteside have 
an aura and presence which 


A month after leaving Aber- 
deen for United, Ferguson 
explained: “With all respect to 
Oxford, QPR and Wimbledon 
who we've met recently, 
United against Spurs is foe 
classic fixture and it will be my 
first realistic taste of what I’ve 
dreamed foe game down here 
is all about And having those 
three quality players feck in 
the side will make a big 
difference.” 


Cheshire Homes 
are all about 
caring 

-in so many ways. 



and they’ll definitely play 
against Spurs.” 

Robson and Strachan have 
both been out with hamstring 
injuries since November 1 
while Whiteside's aggravating 
knee problem has kept him 
out of Ferguson's four games 
in command. They seem cer- 
tain to join Remi Moses in a 
formidable four-man unit 

Although United marie a 
loss of £984,354 last year and 
have a wage bill of over £2.5m 
only a handful of disgruntled 
shareholders voiced their feel- 
ings at yesterday's annual 
general meeting. 

| Player to 
sue for 
broken jaw 

Martin Hicks, captain of 
Second Dfoisiop Reading, is to 
sae Km Futcher, tbe Oldham 
forward, after suffering a tri- 
ple fracture of tbe jaw doing a 
match between the chibs on 
October 25. 

The 29-year-old centre-back 
has only jnst had a wire damp 
removed from his damaged 
jaw and has not played since 
foe incident at Elm Park. 

Roger Smee, Reading chafr- 


fbid named their trial crews 
Gin and Tonic as Beefeater 
Gin sponsor the race on 
March 28. But unfortunately 
the drinks did not mix. Before 
foe mile post foe crews were 
intermeshed, foe contest post- 
poned, a rudder broken and 
even a punch thrown. 

But when the crews even- 
tually disentangled to race 
from Putney to Monlake, the 
impression was that this was a 
contest between coxswains 
with Andy Lobbenburg, of 
Isis, and Jonathan Fish, foe 
American fre shman, anxious 
to win favour. At times in the 
re-row they were even receiv- 
ing pilot instructions from the 
coaching launch, who were 
anxious not to repeat the i 
earlier tangle. 

Fish, who was out of water 
on this tricky Tideway course, 
eventually round his way. At 
Hammersmith. Tonic were 
three-quarters of a length 
ahead and when Gin were 
almost stopped in their tracks 
in foe rough. Fish steered 
Tonic to victory by three and 
one-third lengths. 

Although tension in yes- 
terday* trials was under- 
standable, in reality there are 
only marginal seats in the 
bows available as Oxford ob- 
viously have an embarrass- 
ment of talent in world and 
Olympic medal winners: mak- 
ing foe choice of coxswain 
crucial. 

OXFORD TRIAL CREWSt Tone PBaM 
(Ktag James’s Henry and OrieQ. bow; C 
I Own (Sir VflBm Baton's and Exaiari; 

| R Leach (Adelaide Urfv and fkaen’al: P 
Gish {Dartmouth IB and (Mel); R HuS 
(Hetooon Cambridge and OrialfcGStBw- 
art (Bournemouth school and waSranft O 
Lyots (Naval Academy and OrieQ: C 
Huntington (Unrv of CaWbmB and Mana- 
fiafej), Stroke: J fish (Foa^rtvnla Uni* 
and Mansfield), can. __ 

Gta H Petram (SI Ednenrs and Christ 
Church), bow; M Machin (King's Chester 
and Ora); T Cadoux-Hudson (London 
Untv and New Cottage); P Gteeson (St 
Martin's, Brentwood and Hertford); *C 
Ctark (Univ of CaHomta and University); 

■O Mac d on ald (Morrison s Academy and 
MansfMtft A wsrd (King's. Chester and 
Oriri); C Penny (Praam snd 81 John's), 
(Shreiwhvy and 


lion, the largest sponsorship 
deal to date in domestic 
cricket. 

The new sponsors began 
negotiating with the Test and 
County Cricket Board in July, 
and yesterday’s announce- 
ment ended speculation that 
Sunday cricket would be re- 
duced or contested in two 
divisions. 

Total prize-money for 1987 
will be around £75,000 — 
slightly more than this year. 
The format mil remain un- 
changed next year but, from 
1988, the comities finishing in 
the top four places in the table 
will contest a two-day knock- 
out competition, to be played 
at foe end of tbe season. 

Each county will continue 
to play 16 matches — almost 
certainly of 40 overs an in- 
nings, as ha* been foe case 


By Ivo Tennant 
under John Player’s 
sponsorship. 

The Refage Assurance 
League — as it will be 
known — will be covered by 
television, as will foe knock- 
out competition — to be 
called tbe Refuge Assurance 
Cup — which is to consist of 
two semi-finals and a final 

The county winning foe 
ii»agnfr are likely to play, on 
their home ground, tbe county 
finishing fourth, leaving foe 
runners-up to play foe county 
in third place. The final wfll be 
on a Test ground, but the 
number of overs a side has yet 
to be derided. 

Alan Smith, the TCCB's 
chief executive designate, said 
that, other than the possibility 
of some small changes to the 
rules, it was highly unlikely 
that the competition would 
change over the next five 
years. He added that this 
would not have a bearing on 
whether or not four-day 


Championship cricket would 
be introduced. 

Refuge Assurance were one 
of half-a-dozen potential 
sponsors to whom foe TCCB 
talked during foe last few 
months. The company have 
been involved in tennis 
sponsorship over foe last few 
years — the Refuge Assurance 
national competitions, which 
have ended because of lack of 
televirion coverage. 

Tom Booth, foe Refuge ! 
chairman, said his company ' 
did not intend to be “passive 
sponsors” of the Sunday 
League, and that television 
coverage was one of foe mam 
reasons why they had taken it 
on. 

Raman Subfe Row, foe 
TCCB chairman, said: “After 
John Player decided to end 
their 18-year sponsorship. 
Refuge Assurance made foe 
most attractive offer of the 
companies we talked with. 


GOLF 


McEvoy rejected 
in favour of.youth 


By Mitchell Platts 

Peter McEvoy, twice the to Sandy Lyle being left of foe 
British amateur champion Ryder Cup team while 
and the biggest name in McGimpsey, as the 1985 
amateur golf since Michael Amateur Champion, is eli- 


Bonaliack, has been left out of gible to compete alongside 
the Great Britain and Ireland Severiano Ballesteros and 
team for foe 1987 Walker Cup Jack Nicklaos in the US 


match against foe United 
States at Sunningdale on May 
27-28. 

McEvoy and Garth 


Masters at Augusta, next 
April, only six weeks before 
foe Walker Cap. 

Bm Rodney Foster, the 


McGimpsey, who is also omit- chairman of the selection 
ted, are victims of the sdec- committee of foe Royal and 
tors decision to rriy on a Ancient, explained: “We feel 
stronger youth policy even Peter McEvoy has produced 
though George Macgrcgor, his best form for England but 
aged 42, is included. Jeremy not always for Great Britain 
Robinson, aged 20, and Paul and Ireland and, as selectors, 
Girvan, 21, mid John Mo we believe foe general stan- 


BefioQ.cox. 

'AHue. 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

How to lick 
the captain 

Avignon (Reuter) — Wally 
Lewis, the Australian captain, 
was punched twice by a t earn 
member in a brawl between 
foe Kangaroos and their 
French opponents. 

Tempers exploded when 
Alexander, the Australian 
wing, fought with Molitor, foe 
Le Pontet full feck. Players 
exchanged punches and 
Lems, attempting to stop tbe 
fighting, was poleaxed by two 
punches on the chin from 


Henry, 22, the Irish cham- 
pion, are among tbe seven 
newcomers in foe team of 10. 


dard of tbe amateur game has 
improved to such an extent we 
now have more freedom of 


Geoff Marks, foe non-play- choice. There is no value to 
iog captain, said: “fm entirely being experienced if yon are 


happy with tbe team selected, no longer 
I have 10 players who I believe goods.” 

I can weld into a side that can Marks sa 
bring off a famous victory.” preparation 
Great Britain and Ireland team will g 
have enjoyed only two out- Spain in I 
right triumphs - at St An- February fi 
drews in 1938 and again on John Jacob 


producing 


Marks said: “As part of the 
preparation for the match foe 
team will go to La Manga in 
Spain in tbe last week in 
February for a week when 
John Jacobs will be there to 


the side links in 1971 — since assist with coaching. We will 
foe inaugu ral biennial match also have a m inimum of two 


man, saitfcy “On the advice of | Bella, tbe prop forward. 

fliO olnk^e mImiIav HllmJSn ici I 



Foumdrr. Cm* Captain 

UoMantChnlure. VC OM.DSO.DFC. 

The residents in Leonard Cheshire Homes are very severely 
handicapped men, women and children suffering from a wide range 
of conditions. Sometimes unable to speak, or to move much more 
than a fend or foot 

A Cheshire Home offers them much more than just physical 
care. It gives them the dignity and freedom that is their right as 
individuals, the opportunity of friendship, a sense of purpose and a 

chance to partidpBle. 

There are 75 Cheshire Homes in the United Kingdom and a 
further 147 in 45 countries throughout the world. All of them have 
been made possible by the efforts of dedicated volunteers and by 
generous charitable donations. 

Vfe also reach out to elderly and disabled people living in their 
own homes, and to families with a handicapped member who may 
be struggling alone in isolation and despair; 19 Family Sup port Services 
in England provide vital part-time help at crucial times of the day- 
a lifeline indeed. But many, many more services are needed to plug 
theya wiling gaps in state provision. Only 2J7%ofour income is spent 
on administering this large charity 

This means that almost all (he money we receive goes in 
DIRECT help to those in need. 

PLEASE HELP US TO GO ON CARING AND EXPANDING 

| lb: Hon. Thnsuret; Room B, The Leonard Cheshire Foundation, ! 


26-29 Miunsei Street, London SW1P2QN. 

□ I enclose a donation. 

O Phase send me some information on covenanls/legadesf 
CU Please send me more information. *fplease delete) 


j Name 

f Address. 




the club’s solicitor, Martin is 
to seek damages. The board 
fully endorse this action and 
neither be nor any of the dub’s 
officers will be prepared to 
comment further on the in- 
cident itself at this stage.” 

Smee, himself a former 
Reading player, added: “We 
have been in the fordront of 
trying to promote good con- 
duct on the terraces, but we 
can hardly dictate crowd 
behaviour if things like this 
happen on the field.” 

It is understood Hicks will 
call on film evidence from a 
video recording and several 
spectators have come forward 
to say they witnessed die off- 
the-fefl incident early in the 
second half of the match which 
Oldham won 3-1 

Oldham seem certain to 
contest any action because, at 
foe time, their manager, Joe 
Royle, hinted that it was a case 
of six of one and half-a-dozen 
of the other. 

Immediately after the game 
he said: “I didn’t see foe 
incident- All I know is that 
Ron has got a lamp on the side 
of his free and a split inside 
his month. He couldn't say 
very much to me.” 

Most of the crowd were 
mystified when they saw 
Hicks lying fiat out after an 
Oldham attack. Hicks himself 
has been instructed by the dob 
not to discuss the incident. 


“I charged in and a bloke 
was tangled up with Wally, so 
I hit Wally a couple of times to 
stir him up,” Bella explained 
shame-feced. 


England 
pick Cotton 

Bemie Cotton has been 
appointed as the new manager 
of the England men's hockey 
team in place of Colin 
Whalley. who has retired from 
the post after six years. Cotton 
will be in charge of foe team at 
the fifth European Champion- 
ship in Moscow next August. 

Cotton, foe assistant man- 
ager of the Great Britain team, 
guided tbe fortunes of this side 
in winning foe bronze medal 
at the Champions Trophy 
tournament at Karachi in 
1984 and foe silver medal at 
Perth, Australia, in November 
of the following year. 

Codes switch 

F ulham rugby league dub 
have signed the 24-year-old 
Richmond rugby union scrum 
half. Keiron Murphy, a former 
England coft. and student 
international- Last week Hugh 
Rees, the Wales B three- 
quarter , also signed for 
Fulham. 


in 1922 although foe United 
I States were hard-pressed to 
win 13-11 in 1985 when 
McEvoy and McGimpsey 
! were both in the team. 

McEvoy, who finished in 
the lop four in six events this 
season including reaching tbe 
quarter-finals of foe Amateur 
Championship, said: “I'm 
desperately disappointed but I 
have no intention of quitting. 
I will try and force my way 
bade for the 1989 Walker Cup 
team.” 

McEvoy's exclusion is akin 


practice sessions at 
Sunningdale and I believe we 
have the right venue to give 
ourselves every chance of 
following in the footsteps of 
the Ryder and Curtis teams by 
winning the Walker Cup.” 

GREAT BRITAM AND MBJIND TEAM: D 
G Cwrfck. aged 29, (Dourias Pali). D 
Crny. 23, TFnjdhoa). h Eggo. 25, 
(L'Ancresse). P Giron, 2t, (Prestrtc* St 
Nctotos). J J McHenry, 22 (Douglas). G 

(Newport]. C S Montgomene, 23, 
(Royal Troon), J G S Rob i nson, 2a 
(Wcmdhai SnaJ, G Shaw, 2a (Hagai 
Caste). 1st Reserve: J W MEgan/ZZ 
(KBmBnxxfc Sarassta). did Reserve: N 
Anderson, 25. (Shandon Park). Non- 
Staying captain: GC Marts (Trerahani). 


Clark in 
the mood 
to shine 

Sun City. South Africa 
(Reuter) — Howard Clark, of 
Great Britain, and the Ameri- 
can Lanny Wadkins shot 
three-under-par 69s to share a 
first round lead in a SI million 
(about £700,000) tournament 
here yesterday. However, the 
day was overshadowed by a 
furious row involving David ; 
Graham, of Australia, who . 
stormed from the course 
threatening to quit after being 
penalized two strokes. 

Graham, who started su- 
perbly with an eagle on foe 
573-yard par five second hole, 
fell tool of the officials on the 
sixth. His ball was plugged in 
semi-rough and he lifted it for 
what he believed was a free 
drop. Under United Stales 
professional golf rules that was 
permitted, he said. 

“They have got a different 
set of rules down here. I am 
going home,” he said angrily 
and walked out of a scheduled 
press conference. The penalty 
left Graham in fifth place, one 
over par on 73, and four adrift 
of Clark and Wadkins. How- 
ever, officials said later that 
the Australian had agreed to 
stay in the tournament, which 
carries a first prize of 
$300,000. 

Qark and Wadkins each 
struck four birdies and 
dropped one stroke in steady 
rounds on this tough 7,033- 
yard course. A stroke behind 
them on 70, and looking 
threatening; was last year’s 
winner Bernhard Langer, of 
West Germany. After a steady 
par 36 opening nine holes, he 


Sir says 
never 
mind the 
politics 

By Paul Martin ^ 

The handful of anti-apart- 
heid demonstrators (“not 
locals”, spectators hastened to 
inform) stood in a corner with 
their hastily written banners, a 
lonely bedraggled lot, who 
departed before yesterday’s 
real drama unfolded. 

It was all good Boys Otn 
staff on the Held. 
Micfeelbonse, the South Af- 
rican school, snatched victory 
in tbe dying moments with a 
powerful s ur ge to the line, and 
emerged 12-8 winners over one 
of England's strongest rugby 
schools, Sherborne. 

In the best West Country 
and public school traditions, 
foe losers clapped four oppo- 
nents off foe pitch by forming 
a passage through which foe ■: 
South Africans ran jubilantly 
and then returned the 
compliment. 

The bonhomie aided, how- 
ever, when that vDc name 
“press” was mentioned. The 
prevailing sentiment was that 
this was not a matter for foe 
media. “Why shouldn't we 
play against them?” snapped 
one parent, Roland Moore, 
whose son Jonathan had 
undergone a grilling at loose- 
| head prop. “After afl, children 
are children are children.” 

More tight-lipped 
than the MI5 

His son and his fellow- 
players had all been asked 
beforehand, he said, if they 
had any objections to playing < 
the South Africans, but added: 
“When you're given a first , 
team Mazer yon do what % 
says.” All of them did their 
duty, as Sir expected. 

Under Sr's orders, the local 
lads were considerably more 
tight-lipped than M15 agents. 
They have been well drilled by 
a school that dominates foe 
beautiful Dorset village of 
6,000 people, with its superb 
abbey. Its only ‘cotonred’ 
Inhabitants comprise a Viet- 
namese family, a Chinese 
restaurant owner, and a hand- 
ful of school boarders, girls 
and boys. 

The Michaelhouse boys in- 
cluded Laurens van der Post's 
grandson, Peter. One of bis 
team colleagues, Ryder Lee, 
managed some furtive words to 
this mmekome press man. He 
said that “because of all these -J 
demos and things”, foe team 
was planning to cut short its 
visit; they would be going to 
Austria today, he said, to learn 
to ski— an activity unknown to 
those from snnnier dimes, 
even in the great Drakensberg 
mountains that tower above 
their school in NataL 
“Those demonstrators don't 
really put you off, bat the 
people who help organize the 
tour don't want adverse pub- 
licity. They're jnst afraid—” 
Before he conk! finish his 



withdrawals because of South 
tt l j • A _ j Africa's apartheid race laws. 

Holder Stripped was in fourth place on 71. 

Steffen TangstatL of Nor- Marie 

way, has been stripped of his McN «Jty, who also eagted foe 
European heavyweight title *“ nd * superb sand 
forfeiting to defendrt within £S.S^ C !? i r , ! h 

the prescribed time limit, foe * ^ 10 

European Boxing Union said st 

vesterfay. The EBU secretary- . a ^ d 51, who 

geneiXpiero Pini saifftbe count, struggled 

vacant title would be disputed J 0111 

by Alfredo Evangelista, of bo ^ wh . ere . scored sixes, 

Sain, and Andre VanDen ^ ^ ^ 

Oetdaar, of Tbe Netherlands, ®“. f 7* GreaI 

in Madrid on December 28. a 


coDecttd tfeee Wrdies in foe. coach arrived and instructed 
second half ^though drop- tersely: “Shut op. No more.” 
ping a shot at the 14th. - — , — 

In footsteps of . 
S bSe ofsouS the Hedgehogs 


Cotton: Moscow challenge 

Hallain award 

Qiris Hallain, who is para- 
lysed from the waist down, 
was awarded the Bill 
McGowran trophy at the 
Sportswriters’ Association 
dinner last night. The Trophy 
ts given to foe outstanding 
disabled sports person of foe 
year- Hallam is a world record 
holder and Olympic champi- 
on of paraplegic swimming. 
He also holds foe course 
wheelchair record in tbe 
London marathon- 


Skiing off . JloLS^X fTatwan,; G • 

.TtemenWqridQip giant 


on 75 along with Great 
Britain's lan Woosnam. 

SCORES: Sft H Ctarit (GBV L Wadkins 

mEsS® 


slalom, scheduled for Val 
D’lsere on Sunday, has been 
cancelled because of poor 
snow conditions. Today’s 
downhill ami tomorrow's su- 
per giant slalom will stiD go 
ahead 

Molby staying 

Jan Molby, Liverpool's 
Danish international, signed a 
new four-year contract with 
foe Football League cham- 
pions at Anfield yesterday. 


chael Barftrop, an amateur, 
showed foe professionals foe 
way m foe New Zealand open 
yesterday, finishing tbe first 
round one shot ahead of tbe 
Spaniard Jose-Maria 
OlazafeL and Ian Baker- 
Finch, of Australia.The New 
Zealander’s five-under-par 65 
included eight birdies. Three 
Australians, Vaughan Somers, 
JeffSenior and Rodger Davis, 
shot 67 while Bob Shearer, of 
Australia, and Tony Price, of 
Great Britain, are one shot 
further feck. 


The team manager, however 
did make a quick comment. “1 
am sorry these mdmduals 
should potentially become vic- 
tims — especially as we are a 
multi-racial school.” It ap- 
peared that none of the re- 
cently niimiHpd black papils 
had yet reached first-team 
standing. The manager de- 
clined farther comment. 

Is the tour to suffer the same 
fate, abandonment, as that by 
the ill-fated Cape Town stu- 
dents, foe Hedgehogs? It de- 
pends if you believe the boy or 
the manager, who maintain ed 
there were still some matches 
to come in Wales. .j 

Certainly, Morris Davies, f 
secretary of the Welsh Youth 
Rugby Union, knew of no 
cancellations. He said the 
Webfa Schools Union had 
declined to play the Sooth 
Africans, but hk own emioa 
had had no objections, and 
would happily consider tonr- 
“gSoaft Africa if invited. 

• The Welsh Ragby Union's 
general committee yesterday 
considered whether to give the 
school's tour the go-ahead and 
will announce its derision 
today. 


v. — 


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