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1 JlIH/ f 

No 62,634 « 

— fc 

Ttiatcher says 
no evidence 
on Rothschild 


k>«rtt>i i: 




SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


Judge tells heir to millions ‘you were weak and foolish’ 

Guinness laalec 


By Richard Evans, Political Correspondent 

The Prime Minister said moos on Thursday to give the Mrs" 
Iasi rugni no evidence existed public assurance demanded Roth: 


to suggest Lord Rothschild, 
former head of the Downing 
Street “think tank,’' had ever 
been a Soviet agent. 

Her brief statement came 
just 24 hours after she had 
stunned MPs by refusing to 
immediately clear the peer of 
allegations that he was the 
“fifth man” after his personal 
appeal in a letter to The Dailv 
Telegraph. 

Mrs Thatcher said: “I have 
now considered more fully 
Lord Rothschild's letter in 
The Daily Telegraph yes- 
terday, in which he referred to 
innuendoes that be had been a 
Soviet agent 

‘T consider it important to 
maintain the practice of 
successive governments of not 
commenting on security mat- 
ters. But 1 am willing to make 
an exception on the matter 
raised in Lord Rothschild’s 
letter. 

“I am advised that we have 
no evidence that he was ever a 
Soviet agent” 

Lord Rothschild, who was a 
wartime M25 officer, was in- 
formed by Downing Street of 
the Prime Minister’s 
announcement shortly before 
it was made at Spm. 

Although Mrs Thatcher de- 
clined five times in the Com- 

Monday 

Spycatcher 
speaks out 



On Monday Peter 
Wright, the man at 
the centre of the MI5 
spy case, goes into 
the witness box. A 
profile of the 
spycatcher whose 
unpublished book 
has sent 
reverberations 
around the world. 


• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
won yesterday by Mr 
John R. Talbot of 
Warrington, Cheshire. 
C Portfolio fists, 
pages 20, 25; rules and 
how to play, 
page 31. 

e Today £12,000 can 
be won — £B,00p m to® 
weekly competition 
and £4,000 in the daily. 


TIMES’BUSINESS 


T & N wins 

Turner & NewaiL the asbestos 
group, has won ibe battle for 
control of AE. the engineering 
company, after gaining more 
ihan 56 per cent of theequr^ 
Page 21 


••times'sport 


While Crusader, the un- 
provirn* British entry, moved 
closer to the ChaHengr semi- 
finals of the Am £ n “JLS 

2S®SSSB 

" n. * n^o* 


;■ TIMES MONEY 


Tax threat 

Stricter rules on mortgaBp ® 

this week’s Committee 
Public Accounts to 30 

Family M oney, pages 26 to -*> 

HomeNe** ^ J? 

M Let** 5 Jg 

12 Obituary *8 

SET >3 SStm 4 

21f IS 19 

Chess £ Srt 31-3A36 

O- 1 -«S SSU l*» 


by Lord Rothschild, she had 
already begun consulting min- 
isters and officials about his 
request. 

Those discussions contin- 
ued yesterday and white Mrs 
Thatcher would have pre- 
ferred to have made a state- 
ment to the Commons, she 
believed it was crucial her 
decision was made known as 
quickly as possible. 

As head of the security 
services, the Prime Minister 
will have spoken to Sir An- 


■Erl 

Lord Rothschild, who has 
now been cleared by No 10. 

thony Duff Director-General 
of MI5, as well as Cabinet 
colleagues before making her 
statement. 

Bui it was undear last night 
if she was shown the “un- 
equivocal repeat unequivo- 
cal evidence” which Lord 
Rothschild insisted MI5 pos- 
sessed to prove his' innocence. 

The form of words used by 


Mrs Thatcher in clearing Lord 
Rothschild is similar to those 
employed by herin 2981 when 
she said there was no proof 
that Sir Roger Hollis, former 
head of M15, had worked for 
the Russians. 

In spite of the negative tone 
of her statement, Mrs 
Thatcher appeared to have 
saiisifed Conservative MPs 
taken aback by her initial 
reluctance to immediately 
dear Lord Rothschild. 

Mr Tim Brinton, MP for 
Gravesend who invited the 
Prime Minister on Thursday 
to protect Lord Rothschild's 
reputation against false 
innuendoes and smears, said 
last nighfTt was quite clear 
from her answer then that she 
needed lime so that various 
people could consider the 
matter, rather than make a 
spot decision off the top of her 
head.” 

Mr Dale Campbell-Savours. 
Labour MP for Workington 
who signed a Commons mo- 
tion last month raising the 
possibility of Lord Rothschild 
being linked to previous spy 
scandals, said : “I am glad the 
Prime Minister has tellable to 
make a statement clearing 
away these allegations. She 
should have done so two 
weeks ago when she was asked 
to make a statement in a 
parliamentary motion.” 

• The Government yesterday 
dropped strong hints that if it 
foils to win the appeal to 
prevent highly classified docu- 
ments foam being handed over 

Conthmed on page 20, col 5 



Commons Paris gives 
row over concession 
gay slur to students 


BvOia’Pbliticai. 

Correspondent 

A front bench Labour MP 
sparked off a furious Com- 
mons row last night after 
saying some Conservative 
MPs prominent in the party’s 
hierarchy and bidding for 
leadership of the country are 
homosexual. 

Mr Jack Straw, MP for 
Blackburn and Labours local 
government spokesman, 
made bis remarks in response 
to the growing campagm 
waged by Tory MPs against 
Labour controlled councils 
which promote gay rights. 

"The road they tread is a 
very dangerous one because it 
is notorious that there are a 
number of members of the 
Conservative party, some in 


• From Diana Geddes ‘ 
Pfcris 

In an attempt to appease 


From Peter Davenport 

Defence Correspondent 
Brussels 

A Soviet Union proposal for 
the first-ever meeting between 
the Commander in Chief of 
the Warsaw Pact forces and 
the Supreme Allied Com- 
mander in Europe has been 
rejected by Nato. 

The proposal from Moscow 
was that Marshall Viktor 
Kulikov should hold face-to- 
face talks with General Ber- 
nard Rogers. 

It is seen as part of a series 
of similar initiatives over 
recent weeks in which die 
Soviets have tried to establish 
direct contact with bdiVKLsti 
Nato officials both pouticai 
aid military. Some observers 
believe the purpose of the 


French students, M Rent; Soviet strategy is to exert 
Monory, the Education Mia- pressure on the alhes as they 


is ter, announced on television 
last night that the Govern- 
ment had agreed to withdraw 
from its university reform Ml 
the clauses touching on the 
three most hotly contested 
issues. 

There will therefore be no 
change “for the time being” in 
the present system of entrance 
to university, fiat rale registra- 
tion fees, and 
nationallyawarded degrees. 
The Bill's other provisions 
providing for greater auton- 
omy in the universities will 
remain. 

Those changes were agreed 


define a common attitude to 
I possible negotiations on re- 
ductions of conventional for- 
i ces in Europe. 

i In Rome recently Russian 
envoys proposed a direct con- 
tact with the deputy General 
Secretary of Nato, Mr Mar- 
cello Guidi who is currently 
beading the organization’s 
High Level Task Force work- 


Mr Gorbachov announced last 
night that the Soviet Union 
wiU continue to observe the 
Salt 2 aims treaty even in foe 
wake iff the US abandonment 
of the agreement. The State 
Department declined to com- 
ment yesterday on the Tass 
statement amonocemest (Mi- 
chael Binyoo writes from 
Washington). 

But the Reagan A&nhristra- 
tion fegk that the announce- 
west w m ts w de d fiw pari— 
propaganda in Western 
Europe, where there is strong 
opposition to the US unilateral 
derision to break the Salt 2 
missile Drafts. 


i ng out policy on conventional 
disarmament 

General Wolfgang Alten- 
burg, chairman of Nato ’s mili- 
tary committee, was invited to 
appear on Russian television. 

Nato has taken no action on 
any of the proposals. Officials 
take the view that such talks 
are not feasible and that the 
alliance is fundamentally dif- 
ferent from the Warsaw Pact 
in that it is a group of 16 
independent nations and staff 
at Nato and Shape, its military 


Ministers condemn Labour stance 


high places in the Conser- at an emergency meeting of 
vative party hierarchy, who ‘the ministers most closely 


have homosexual 

tendencies ” he said in a 
Commons debate. 

“Those people deserve the 
same tolerance as Labour 
councillors trying to help gay 
and lesbian people in their 
communities.” 

Mr Straw, responding to 
one Tory backbencher who 
said homosexuals were unfit 
to be teachers, added: u If it’s 
wrong for homosexuals to 
teach in schools is it also 
wrong for homosexuals to 
seek the leadership of this 
country and prominent po- 
sitions within this House?” 

It is well known that a s m all 
Continued on page 20, col 4 


concerned. It was chaired by 
M Jacques Chirac, the Prime 
Minister, before bis departure 
for the EEC summit in 
London. 

It is by no means certain, 
however, that the Govern- 
ment’s latest concessions will 
satisfy the students who have 
been demanding nothing less 
than tire total withdrawal of 
the whole Bill. 

Thousands of students de- 
scended into the streets of 
Paris again yesterday to ex- 
press their anger over the 
previous night's violence, 
which left scores of injured, 

Continued on page 2d ad 2 


Brussels - Nato defence 
ministers endorsed their nuc- 
lear strategy yesterday and is- 
sued a condemnation of uni- 
lateral disarmament, which 
was seen as a thinly-veiled 
attack on Labour Party policy 
(Peter Davenport writes). 

They said the policy would 
result tn the abandonment by 
the alliance of its deterrent 
strategy and the basis for its 
continued security and stab- 
ility. 

Although Labour’s non-nu- 
clear defence policies were not 

Japanese 
economy 
slows down 

Prospects for a recovery in 


pan of the official discussion, 
they figured largely in events 
surrounding the meeting. 

General Bernard Rogers, 
foe Supreme Allied Com- 
mander in Europe, said that if 
such policies were enacted 
they would lead to the with- 
drawal of the 350,000 US 
troops in Europe. 

The US Defence Secretary, 
Mr Caspar Weinberger, re- 
ferred to such proposals as 
“defenceless defence” and Mr 
George Younger, the Secretary 
of State for Defence, said no 


country has supported Lab- 
our’s plans. 

The rejection of unilateral 
disarmament was not in- 
cluded in the final commu- 
nique at the instigation of the 
British, although they were; 
pleased that it was there. Mr , 
Younger said the rejection was 1 
already in the draft commu- 
nique when he arrived. 

He said ft was a totally 
sensible and truthful view and 
if it fitted Mr Kinnock’s 
situation this week then be 
should lake note of ft. 


Small buyers benefit 
most in gas sell-off 


Small investors have re- 


worid economic growth have ceived priority treatment in 
dimmed. If the slower pace is the British Gas flotation 


Hypnotherapist guilty 


Dr Joseph Jaffe, the 
hypnotherapist accused of 
“brainwashing” a business- 
man with drugs, injections 
and hypnotism, was found 
guilty yesterday of serious 
professional misconduct. 

The former Mayor of Sal- 
ford, aged 61, who has a 
private practice in Manchester 
where he administered the 
injections of “Jaflfe juice” was 


admonished by the General 
Medical Council. 

Dr Jaffe; who also has 2,000 
National Health Service pa- 
tients, was told that he could 
continue his private hypno- 
therapy work but only after he 
undertook to give no move 
■drug injections. 

Police have started an in- 
vestigation into the case. 

Fall story, page 4 


maintained, the 

Government’s hopes for a 
foster British rate of growth 
next year could be threatened 
(Rodney Lord writes). 

Japan yesterday announced 
that its economy had grown by 
only 0.6 per cent during the 
third quarter. Growth for the 
year will now be nowhere near 
the official 4 per cent forecast. 

This comes after a poor 
third quarter in West Ger- 
many and a poor year so for in 
the united States. 

Out of steam, page 21 


(Richard Lander writes). Ap- 
plicants who sought up to 400 
shares will receive their full 
allocations, Mr Peter Walker, 
the Secremry of State for 
Energy, said last night. 

“This will mean that more 
than 2 million small investors 
in Britain will obtain all the 
shares they applied for.” But 
he added that there would be 
scaling down for larger 
applications, with some peo- 
ple receiving less than 10 per 
cent of what they sought. 

The issue was four times 


subscribed. Details of the | 
allocation will be announced 
during the weekend. j 

According to Mr Walker, | 
about 4.5 million applications 
were received, more than 1 
Thursday's estimated 4 mil- , 
lion, but less than the 6 : 
million hoped for | 

“More than half a million of : 
these have been in joint! 
names, meaning that 5 million | 
people will become share- 
holders." Mr Walker added. | 
Trading in Gas shares starts 
on Monday, bur shareholders : 
will not receive allocation I 
letters until the next week. | 
*Hsit trading", page 21 j 


Catholics agree to contraception advertisements 


By Clifford Longley 
Religions Affairs 

Correspondent 

The Goventmenfs current 
£20 million advertising cam- 
paign against Aids, emphasiz- 
ing the use of condoms, has 
unexpectedly gained tacit 
acceptance by the Roman 
Grthofic Church in spile of its 
official opposition to contra- 
ception. Cathohc publications 


Government's plans, saying 
only that he “regrets that they 
are' necessary”. It is under- 
stood that the Bishops' Con- 
ference of England and Wales, 
at its meeting last month, 
deliberately decided not to 
make an issue out of the 
Government’s promotion of 
condoms as a safety measure 
against Aids. The conference 
also wanted to dissociate the 


s ore an 
if there 


are not being advised to refuse Oiibohc Church frmn the 
Government Aids advertising, view that Aids was a form of 
~r d r a iholic schools have divine punishment for sexual 
heen oven to understand that wickedness, 
th-v may co-operate with Nevertheless, some aspects 
Aids-related sex education. of the Government campaign 
A hcavilv nuanced policy are considered more aceept- 
,ine has emerged from dis- able than others. Those that 
Sons within the church, stress sexual responsibility, 
Cardinal Basil Hume, Arch- even if mentioning condoms, 
hishoo of Westminster, has are being regarded as more 
declined to attack the satisfactory than those which 


§“-» rtsl3 ’S A 
as. aitUr^ i! 

****** 


sex as if there were no moral 
considerations apart from 
avoiding. Aids. 

Official Catholic spokes- 
men have been advised to be 
very careful what they say 
publicly. No official publica- 
tion is being prepared, and it is 
dear that the “condom 
strategy” has posed difficult 
dilemmas in terms of Catholic 
moral teaching. 

One view heard is that 
condoms may even be morally 
permissible if the intention in 
using them is to avoid the 
spread of disease rather than 
to prevent conception, even if 
that is the result. 

In Catholic schools, head 
teachers are being asked to use 
their discretion, and not to 
refuse to use anti-Aids sex 


the ideal of chastity. 

Mis Victoria Gilfick. a 
Catholic who campaigned in 
the courts against the pro- 
vision of contraceptives to 
girls under 16, said she dis- 
approved of the Government 
Aids campaign largely because 


chastity and fidelity as the real 
remedy to the spread of Aids, 
and the £20 million the 
Government was spending on 
advertising should be used for 
research into medical treat- 
ment against Aids. 

leading article, page 17 


Rosie Johnston, above, Sebastian Gmaness, top right, and Paul Dtmstan who were all jailed 
yesterday after admitting drug offences that were brought after the death of Oliria Chaxmon. 

Nato commanders reject 
Warsaw Pact meeting 


wing, cannot speak on behalf 
of them alL __ 

Lord Carrington, the Nato ! 
Secretary General said yes- 
terday that such indications 
could not be accepted, adding: 

“It is not because we are 
anxious to avoid discussing 
these things but it is not the 
right way to bring ft about” , 

The future of General Rog- 
ers as the Supreme Allied 
Commander in Europe re- 
mains the subject of specula- 
tion. His extended tour of 
duty in Europe is due to expire 
in July next year and it has 
been reported that he may be 
replaced by General John 
•Galvin, at present the Com- 
mander of the US Southern 
Command in Panama. 

Relations between the out- 
spoken General Rogers and 
the administration in Wash- 
ington have frequently been 
difficult but he has indicated 
his desire to stay on in his 
post. 

Lord Carrington said yes- 
terday that General Rogers 
had been “magnificent” in his 
role and he would be pleased 
for him to stay until he was 
100 . 


over oianiMM 
heroin party 

By Craig Seton 

Sebastian Guinness, an heir none of the defendants was 
to the Guinness brewing and responsible “directly or 
banking fortune, was jailed indirectly” for the death of 
yesterday for his pan in the Miss Channon. who had 
death of Olivia Channon, the started taking hard drugs in 
daughter of Paul Channcn, the 19S5- 
Secretary of State for Trade After hearing guilty pleas to 
and Industry. the charges for which they 

Also sent to prison were were sentenced, the judge told 
Paul Dunstan, a heroin addict the defendants: “Cocaine and 
and drugs pusher and Rosie heroin arc agents of human 
Johnston, toe lifelong friend misery. The courts are deler- 
ofMiss Channon. who died ol mined to play their part in 
a drink and heroin overdose, stamping out this evil traffic." 

Sentencing them at Oxford Guinness, aged 23. of Ker- 
Crown Court, only a few yards eford Square, London, toe son 
from Christ Church where of Mr Jonathan Guinness. 
Miss Channon, aged 22, died millionaire member of the 
after a party last June. Mr brewing and banking family 
Justice Orton said: “There is and former chairman of the 
perhaps a notion in our soci- Conservative Monday Club, 
ety that ii is acceptable for the was sentenced to four months 
rich and privileged to dabble imprisonment for possessing 
in hard drugs, ti is not and heroin and cocaine, 
these sentences are intended His grim-faced father was in 

to show it is not, as well as court to sec his son described 
punishing you." by the judge as “weak and 

Both Guinness. Miss foolish” before being taken 
Channon’s second cousin, and away to the cells to start his 
Johnston took part in drug sentence, 
taking at ifae drunken cham- The judge iold Sebastian 
pagne and heroin party to Guinness: “Fortune smiled on 
celebrate toe end o? Miss you. You had every privilege 
Chanson's history finals at St which was going — the best of 
Hilda’s College. education, the best of oppor- 

At the celebration party, tunities in life but here you 
Johnston gave her some her- stand, on your own confession 
oin and said: “There you convicted of possessing Class 
are — celebrate.’’ A drugs.” 

Mr Anthony King, for the Guinness, he said, was not 
prosecution, told the court an undergraduate at Oxford 
that Miss Channon was found and had travelled specially to 
dead in the rooms of another the city to participate in the 
student at the Blue Boar party, 
building of Christ Church on The judge said: 'You knew 
June 1 1. because of your close family 

But, tiie judge said that Con tinned on page 3, col 3 


EEC speed urged 
on creating jobs 

By Andrew McEwen, Diplomatic Correspondent 
The Prime Minister yester- standards which would other- 


day urged the EEC to speed up 
measures to create .lobs nsd 
improve business conditions. 

She called on her 1 1 fellow 
beads of government to pro- 
vide a political impetus to 
push through a broad range of 
ideas brought forward during 
Britain's presidency of the 
Common Market- 

Speaking at the opening of 
the EEC summit in London, 
Mrs Thatcher said there were 
no easy answers to unemploy- 
ment. The problem could not 
be solved by encouraging in- 
dustries to become more and 
more reliant on increasingly 
expensive national subsidies. 
Thai route had failed. 

However, by reducing barri- 
ers to trade and creating 
conditions to encourage small 
businesses to start up, much 
could be achieved. 

She tnged Europe to sweep 
away conflicting national 


wise prevent it from securing a 
substantial share of the vast 
international market in mo- 
bile telephones. 

Also high on her list of 
priorities was a European 
agreement to increase compe- 
tition in air fores, which she 
said would benefit millions of 
Europeans. 

Last night, a broad con sen- ; 
sus appeared lobe emerging to 
deliver the political impetus 
she had suggested. 

M Jacques Delors. president 
of the European Commission, 
who was reappointed for a 
further two years yesterday, 
said that under the British 
presidency a new dynamism 
had emerged in the search for 
a genuine common market 
He forecast that by the end of 
toe year. 20 per cent of the 300 
trade barriers still to be dis-; 
mantled will have vanished. 


education material merely be- it would not work. She would 
cause ft is sexually explicit or prefer a campaign aimed at 
explains the use of condoms, strengthening the resolve of 
They are expected to put this young women to ay “no" to 
sex education material into casual sex. 
the context of Catholic leach- she said the promotion of 

"H 5 in. condoms was likely to 

the idea that pre- 
msri ' 21 sex was acceptable 
staled last month that ex- nmvided it was “safe" 
plicit public education about prDVIdfid ltW3S ^ ■ 
prophylactic measures such as Mr Graham Webster- 
the use of the contraceptive Gardiner, of the Conservative 
sheath is essential” even Family Campaign, said the 
though the first line of defence churches should be promoting 
ought to be the promotion of the traditional standards of 


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HOME NEWS 


THF TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986, 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Little hope for 
Siamese twins 


Sargeoas at Scrathraead hospital, Bristol, were last night 
unsure if Siamese twins, burn Joined at the chest and shar- 
ing the same heart and lungs, coaid be separated. 

They were studying X-rays and ultrasound scans to see if 
there was any chance of saving the babies, who weighed 8 JIp 
13ozs between them when they were delivered by 
Caesarean section on Wednesday. 

Experts have said success fu l separation is almost 
impossible if two or more organs are shared. It is likely to 


wiD know if the babies will survive. 


GLC payment legal 


Payment of £78 million by the Greater London Cornual 
to a property company three days before its abolition, for 
the upkeep and u nprovenentoffts housing stock, was rnled 
lawful by die High Court in London yesterday. 

The London Residuary Body, supported by HflUngdon 
council, sought to have the payment rnled unlawM, saying 
that it should have been passed on to the LRB and 
eventually the boroughs. But Mr Justice Macpberson said 
tha t he was satisfied, the payment was a “justifiable and 
proper” exercise of the GLC*s powers- 
He ordered the LRB and Hillingdon to pay the costs of 
the property company Salman Developments who defended 
the action. 


Surgery 
for actor 


The actor Bill Simpson, 
aged 54, who is seriously ill 
in hospital, had a minor 
operation yestyerday. His 
condition was said to be 
poor but stable. 

Mr Simpson, best known 
for his television role in Dr 
Finlay’s Casebook, was 
taken to hospital in Ayr 11 
days ago. 

He was transferred to 
Bailochmyle Hospital near 
Maochline, Strathclyde, 
for yesterday's operation, 
and will remain there over 
the weekend. 


Talks on 
pay plan 


Officials from Britain's 
biggest water authority, 
Thames, are to seek meet- 
ings with the unions 
representing their 9,000 
workforce next week to 
explain their decision to 
withdraw from national 
pgy bargaining machinery, 
in favour of local deals. 

The meetings wQl be 
designed to bead off threats 
of industrial action in the 
new year made by some 
mi in n officials over the 
move, announced on Thurs- 
day. 


2 on IRA 
charges 


Gerard Kelly (right) and 
Brendan McFarlane, two 
convicted IRA terrorists, 
appeared in court in Belfast 
yesterday after being extra- 
dited from the Nether- 
lands. Both face charges of 
holding prison officers hos- 
tage during mass breakout 
from the Mare prison in 
1983. Kelly is also accused 
of two attempted murders 
and assault. 

A representative of the 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions aid the Government 
would remit two life sen- 
tences Kelly was serving. 



Alert on typhoid 


A man aged 30 is in St Mary's Hospital, Portsmouth, 
suffering from typhoid. He was admitted four days ago, but 
his illness was not confirmed until this afternoon. 

The man's name is not being released, but he lives in the 
Portsmouth area and his condition is described as being 
comfortable. 

Everyone who has been in dose contact with him since 
his return from holiday in sooth east Asia three weeks ago 
is being closely monitored. 

They five in Portsmouth, London and Lincoln, and will 

i. _ ^ . • il. • i .r» 


Hindlev delay frustrates moors search 

w foco were still being 


By Oar Northern 


. The officer in charge of the 
search ofSaddleworth Moor is 
to again seek permission from 
the Home Office to take Myra 
Hindley, jailed along with Ian 
Brady for the moors murders, 
to the scene of the hunt 


Mr Tonring, who has made 
no secret of his eagerness to 
take Hindley to the moor 
under a heavy police guard, 
believes a visit could end the 
cag e , which is now in its 22nd 
year and has become part of 
international murder folklore. 


Chief Superintendent Peter 
Topping, head of Greater 
Manchester C1D, said after 
returning from the search 
scene yesterday that he was 
anxious she should be taken to 
the site as soon as possible. 


Stalker saves 
house as his 
legal fees 
are ‘halved’ 


By Ian Smith, Northern Correspondent 


be under close scrutiny during the incubation period of ty- 
phoid, which is from three to 21 


days. Symptoms of the ill- 
ness are head and bade ache, a rash ana fever. 


Solicitors unexpectedly 
more than halved their legal 
charges yesterday so Mr John 
Stalker, Greater Manchester 
deputy chief constable, will no 
longer have to forfeit his home 
after clearing his name. 

Instead offering repayment 
of a £21,000 legal bill, Mr 
Stalker is being asked to pay 
only a sum already offered 
through public donations to a 
special fund set up in his 
name. 

Back at his police head- 
quarters desk for the first time 
yesterday after taking two 
weeks' rest because of exhaus- 
tion. Mr Stalker said he was 
deeply gratefuL 

“I hope this will be the final 
chapter if not the last page of 
the Stalker affair. What this 
has done is allow me and ray 
family to for the first time 
know exactly where we stand 
Financially, it is an enormous 
relief.” he said. 

“We have been living on 
our nerves for an awfully long 
time; two weeks’ rest helped, 
this news helps even more.” 

The unusally philanthropic 
gesture by the senior police 
officers’ legal advisers came 
just 24 hours after the Associ- 
ation of Chief Police Officers 
refused to contribute towards 
Mr Stalker’s legal bill and 
declined a Greater Manches- 
ter Police Authority request 
that they administer the fund 
set up to handle public 
donations. : ' 

Mr Rodger Pennone, who 
has championed Mr Stalker's 
prolonged struggle to protect 
his professional and private 
reputation, is enraged by the 
financial pressures piled on 
his client. 

He said: “We have dis- 
cussed the matter thoroughly 
and after further consid- 
eration have derided to ask 
Mr Stalker to pay only the 


sum which he has readily 
av aila ble and which wiB not 
cause his family further 
pressure”. 

Mr Pennone said he knew 
that at times the pressures on 
the Stalker family, which had 
been enormous because of the 
official police investigation, 
had been exacerbated by 
mounting legal costs. 

Mr Pennone has fought long 
and hard to try to persuade the 
Greater Manchester Police 
Authority to foot the bill but- 
without success. 

“What has infuriated me 
throughout is that John 
Stalker has been penalized for 
being innocent,” Mr Pennone 
added. 

0 At a joint meeting of the 
Police Authority's finance and 
policy and personnel commit- 
tee yesterday members de- 
cided to recommend thatno 
action be taken over a year- 
long investigation by Sir Stan- 
ley Bailey, Northumbria Chief 
Constable, into allegations of 
misconduct by Greater Man- 
chester Chief Constable James 

Anderton. 

The outspoken Mr An- 
derton infuriated members of 
the now defunct Greater Man- 
chester Police Authority by 
telling delegates at a County 
Police Federation meeting 
that the committee was ob- 
sessed with irrelevant issues 
and had mounted a deliberate 
and sustained assault upon the 
independence and status of 
chief constables. 

Mr Steve Muiphy.police 
authority chairman, said it 
would be inappropriate to 
take any action on Sir 
Stanley’s investigation which 
made no recommendations 
•and readied no conclusions 
but brought into question the 
legality of such an inquiry 
bang ordered in the first 
place. 


Nuclear power 


Unit studies Sizewell report 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


A special unit has been 
formed at the Department of 
Energy to analyse the public 
inquuy report on plans for an 
advanced £1.2 billion nuclear 
power station at Sizewell, 
Suffolk. 

Mr Peter Walker, Secretary 
of State for Energy, expected 
delivery of the contusions by 
this weekend, nearly four 
years after the inquiry began. 

The Govern men I will not 
publish the report before a 
detailed scrutiny, taking some 
weeks, is completed by the 
new unit and Mr Walker has 
reached a decision. 

The proposal by the Central 
Electricity Generating Board 
is for permission to build an 
American-type pressurized 
water reactor (PWR) next to 
its existing Magnox nuclear 
power station at Sizewell, on 
the Suffolk coast. 

For the past 20 months a 
team working with Sir Frank 
Layfield, QC the inspector to 
the inquiry, has distilled the 
information from 340 days of 
hearings into a more intelli- 
gible form. 

The material includes pub- 
lic cross-examinations and a 


mound of other supporting 
documents included engineer- 
ing blueprints and calcula- 
tions about design and safety, 
economic forecasts, compari- 
sons between different types 
of fuel and artist's impressions 
of the impact of the power 
station on the Suffolk coast 

U was the longest and most 
expensive public inquiry in 
Britain, costing about £20. 
million; most of it met by the 
electricity board. 

When the submissions by 
supporters and opponents fin- 
ished in March last year, no 
further evidence was admis- 
sible. In principle, the assess- 
ment is based only on the 
information and arguments to 
that date. 

The impact of the 
Chernobyl nuclear accident, 
changes in the comparative 
economics of various fuels 
now that oil prices have been 
halved, and shifts in prevail- 
ing public attitudes on the 
subject of nuclear energy are 
not meant to influence recom- 
mendations made to Mr 
Walker. 

In effect. Sir Frank and his 
expert advisers - Professor 


Christopher Hall an econo- 
mist; Professor William Hall, 
a nuclear engineer. Dr John 
Vennart, a radiobiologist and 
Professor John Alexander, a 
mechanical engineer — were 
expected to insulate them- 
selves from events which 
might have overtaken some of 
the evidence they heard. 

Since taking the last ev- 
idence 20 months ago, the 
inquiry team has had two 
homes. 

Five pantechnicons were 
needed to transport 55 tons of 
documents in March last year 
first from Snape Mailings, in 
Suffolk, where the hearings 
took place, to an office in 
Oxford; then last Easier, to 
premises on a new industrial 
park on the A34 near 
Abingdon. 

The administrative staff in- 
cluded secretaries with six 
word processors, who have 
worked on average a 50-hour 
week to compile the report. 

In the last four months they 
have been joined by a team of 
librarians, cross-checking that 
references referred to in the 
main report support the ev- 
idence that was submitted. 


Freed pair 
deny spy 
charges 


By Angella Johnson 

Two Britons imprisoned for 
more than five years in Zim- 
babwe on spying charges re- 
turned home yesterday main- 
taining their innocence and 
said: “It is great to be free at 
last”. 

Mr Colin Evans, aged 31, 
and Mr Philip Hartlebuiy, 
aged 36, were detained u 
Harare under emergency pow- 
ers on December 31. 1981 and 
brought to trial for allegedly 
spying for South Africa and 
illegally possessing arms. 

The men. both former 
members of the country's 
Central Intelligence Organiza- 
tion, yesterday admitted being 
involved in “normal intelli- 
gence work” but denied hav- 
ing spied for Pretoria. 

> Asked why he thought they 
had been arrested, Mr Hartle- 
bury said: “Basically, after 
independence there were loo 
many whites around”. 

The Foreign Office in' 
London said last night their 
release would remove a long- 
standing consular problem 
between Britain and Zim- 
babwe. 


Each time he has travelled 
on to Cookham Wood Prison, 
Kent, to seek further informa- 
tion from Hindley to stren- 
gthen bis case for her 
temporary release from a life 
sentence. 


Twice in the past two weeks 
Mr Topping has met senior 
Home Office officials for talks 
on the search. He has told 
them he is convinced that a 
brief visit to Saddleworth 
Moor by Hindley will bt 
the inquiry to a 
contusion. 


Speculation is mounting as 
to why Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, is jrovaricai- 
ing over, the official police 
request for a visit 


days without success. An av- 
erage of 1 5 Greater Manches- 
ter police tactical support 
group officers and eight body 
detection dogs and their han- 
dlers are combing the gale- 
lashed moor from dawn to 
dusk. 


case, were 

considered. 


Mr Hurd has also refused to 
reveal his intentions. Senior 
police officers believe that 
Whitehall inertia could stran- 
gle the investigation before it 
can properly succeed. 


The expensive police search 
for the graves of two children 
who d i s app eared over 20 yeai 
ago has btxn continuing for I 


The Prison Department 
press office has refused to 
the reasons for the 
delay in a decision by Mr 
Hurd, and trill not speculate 
as to how long Mr Topping 
wiB have to waft. A spokes- 
man would only say yesterday 
that “various^aspects” of the 


They are claiming that as 
snifter dogs roam relentlessly 
over bleak peat bogs, and two 
mothers sit hoping that the 
bodies of their lost children 
ran be found, the mantle of 
secrecy has grown tighter 
around Whitehall 



Sir Robert Armstrong facing reporters at Heathrow Airport (Photograph: Peter Trievnor) 


Armstrong has police guard 


By David Sapsted 


Sir Robert Armstrong, the 
Cabinet Secretary and die 
Government's much-quizzed 
protagonist hi the Peter 
Wright spy-book case, re- 
turned to London yesterday 
conscientiously retaining his 
out-of-court reluctance to 
speak about the affair. 

It was wee to be back in 
London, he declared, but he 


would miss some of the aspects 
of fife hi Sydney. 

Exactly what aspects, he 
would not say. 

Looking remarkably spry 
after his 25-honr fli gh t Sir 
Robot stepped off Q&mas 
flight QFOfll to be met by a 
squad of pofice. He speat 20 
minutes at a Heathrow VIP 
lounge before being driven 
away in a limousine. 

He stonewalled questions oo 


his “economical” use of the 
truth in evidence to the court 
(“The case is still going on so I 
can’t make any comment”) 
and was no more forthcoming 
about the political storm 
su rr ounding the affair in 
Britain (“I haven't really seen 
what’s been going on here”). 

He also declined to com- 
ment on the scuffle with 
photographers that marked 
his departure from Australia. 


Secondary heads 
back oat of deal 


By John Care, Education Correspondent 
Secondary Heads agreed because schools cannot 
be run property without it” 


The 

Association yesterday refused 
to ratify the agreement on the 
pay and conditions of teachers 
in England and Wales. 

The deal was put together 
three weeks ago at the concili- 
ation service. Acas, and signed 
by four of the six unions. 

In a severe blow to the 
deal’s already fragile credibil- 
ity, the association, which 
represents about half of 
secondary head teachers, and 
was one of the original sig- 
natories, decided unanim- 
ously that it would not ratify 
the agreement unless it pro- 
vided an improved man age- 
men; structure. 

The unexpected develop- 
ment means that the associ- 
ation has effectively aligned 
itself with the National 
Association of Head Teachers, 
which represents most other 
heads and refused to sign the 
original deal, as did the second 
biggest teaching union, the 
National Association of 
School masters/Union of Wo- 
men Teachers. 

The Secondary Heads 
Association changed its mind 
after taking soundings among 
its 5,400 members. 

Its general-secretary, Mr Pe- 
ter Snape, said: “Our mem- 
bers welcomed the deal’s 
significant achievements, in 
particular the new contract 
and conditions of service, the 
introduction of appraisal and 
the new negotiating 
machinery. 

“But they want an addi- 
tional management tier on top 
of the two that have been 


Mr Snape warns these pro- 
moted posts to cany addi- 
tional payments of £1,000, 
£2,000 and £3,000 a year 
instead of the £779 and £2,077 
that has been agreed. 

He acknowledged that this 
would add significantly to the 
overall cost unless the full 
implementation of the pay 
agreement was postponed. 

If the association’s pro- 
posals were accepted by the 
three other signatories, they 
would bring the Acas deal 
closer to that proposed by Mr 
Kenneth Baker. Secretary of 
State for Education. 

Meanwhile, another teach- 
ing union yesterday registered 
its opposition to government 
plans to change the way 
teachers’ pay and conditions 
are determined. 

In a letter to Mr Baker, the 
president of the Assistant 
Masters and Mistresses 
Association protested that the 
Bill to be debated in the 
Commons on Monday “eff- 
ectively abolishes collective 
bargaining procedures”. 

Mr Frank Groarke went on: 
"Not merely do we regard the 
right of employees to negotiate 
direct with their employers as 
being a fundamental charact- 
eristic of a democratic society, 
we are convinced that orderly 
industrial relations can in the 
long term flow only from such 
a process.” 

Mr Groarkesaid that teach- 
ers were likely to be deeply 
resentful of the terms and 
conditions. 


Militant 
‘stooge’ in 
marginal 


By Shelia Gunn 
Political Staff 


The Labour candidate to be 
selected today to fight the 
marginal Blyth Valley seat in 
the general election will be “a 
stooge” of the Militant Ten- 
dency, Mr John Ryroan. foe 
moderate sitting MP, said 
yesterday. 

Mr Ryman, aged 56, has 
represented foe area for 12 
years. He is to stand down at 
the next election after a year of 
fights with his local party 
which, he said, had been 
infiltrated by supporters of 
Militant. 

On foe surface his position 
is similar to that of Mr Robert 
Kilroy-Silk, who claimed that 
Militant supporters bounded 
him out of his Knowsley 
North constituency. 

But foe future of Mr 
Ryman 's Northumberland 
seal is more uncertain because 
Labour’s majority is only 
3,243. 

Mr Ryman, who has threat- 
ened to force a by-election 
unless there is an inquiry into 
the conduct of business, has 
distanced himself from the 
selection. 

"It is entirely a mailer for 
the local constituency Labour 
Party to select a new Labour 
candidate,” he said. 

But he added: “The actual 
power in the local party is 
controlled by foe Militant 
Tendency. Whoever is se- 
lected will be controlled by 
Militant Tendency and its 
supporters.” 


Disquiet 
as firm 


loses out 
on £220m 


inquiry 


Ian Gilmour MP, him- 
self a former Conservative 
defence secretary, last night 
described foe affair as "a 
scandal which will not be 
allowed to rest”. 

The Ministry of Defence 
awarded foe contract to 
Scammel, part of LeyLand 
Vehicles, and to Fodens. a 
British subsidiary of foe 
American company, Paccar, 
which is currently bidding for 
Leyland Trucks. 

The company at the centre 
of the controversy, however, is 
Boughtons of Amersham. 
Buckinghamshire, in Sir Ian's 


constituency, which pioneered 
if such 


Area finals for 
crossword 
championship 

By Our Crossword Editor 


Next year’s Collins Dic- 
tionaries Times Crossword 
Championship will again have 
six regional finals before foe 
national final, but this lime 
the West of England centre 
will be Bath instead of Bristol, 
and the Leeds final will pre- 
cede foe Glasgow final. 

Hie qualifying puzzle for 
foe 1987 Championship will 
be published on Thursday, 
January 15, and foe elimi- 
nator puzzle, assuming it is 
necessary, on Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 19. 

The regional finals will be: 
Leeds, Queens Hotel (capacity 
300 competitors). Sunday. 
March 1; Glasgow, Stakis 
Grosvenor Hotel (150). Sun- 
day, March 15; Birmingham, 
Grand Hotel (250), Sunday, 
April 26; Bath, Ladbroke 
Beaufort Hotel (240), Sunday, 
May 17; London A, Saturday, 
June 6. and London B. Sun- 
day, June 7, Park Lane Hotel 
(300). 

The national final will be at 
the Park Lane Hotel, London, 
on Sunday, September 6. 


Engineer dies 


An investigation was under- 
way yesterday into foe death 
of Mr John Tusley, aged 56, mi 
engineering contractor of Ald- 
ington Road, Northampton, 
who was found at foe bottom 
of a heat treatment tank at foe 
Rolls Royce factory in Derby. 


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Bar puts computers in dock 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


The Bar takes a step into 
the high-technology age today 
when more than 300 barristers 
and clerks meet in London to 
discuss how to bring their 
chambers up to date. 

The first of its kind, foe 


of 


v . modernization blowing 
through foe ancient passages 
of foe Inns of Court. 

The old-style barristers' 
chambers, with draughty 
rooms and creaking staircases, 
are slowly dying out as coal 
fires hare already done. 

Now is the time for comput- 
ers, wall-to-wall carpeting and 
soft lighting. 

Mr Robert Alexander, QC 
chairman of foe Bar, said that 
administration bad in foe past 
taken second place to a 
barrister's main work of 
preparing court cases, which 
“involve teas boors’* . 


But sets of chambers had 
grown in size and were 
substantial- businesses which 
had to be cost-effective and 
competitive. “No-one owes us 
a tiring. No set can afford to be 
less than efficiently ran.” 

The conference, organized 
jointly by foe Bar and the 
Barristers 1 Clerks’ Associ- 
ation, takes place against a 
doubling In size of the Bar in 
recent years. Chambers now 
average 20 members, and one 
or two sets hare as many as 50. 

At the same time the impact 
of computers is being felt in 
the shape of word processors, 
ami computer systems for 
accounting and keeping track 
of fees and work in progress. 

Mr Alexander said there 
was great interest in good 
administrathw and in improv- 
ing the service for the client, 
and this meant using telex 


systems and electronic mail. 

“The public sees the wigs 
and gowns in which a barrister 
dresses for court and foe 
beautiful buildings of foe 
Temple,” he said. But that 
fended to conceal the speed 
with which the profession was 
adapting its practices. 


Topics to be discussed at the 
conference wffl include the 
financing of chambers, includ- 
ing the controversial issue of 
“purse-sharing”, by which 
barristers pool their fees and 
draw a salary. 


Bat there is one traditional 
feature of chambers life which 
wfll dot be open to debate: the 
derk’s fee. Clerics are paid a 
percentage of foe earnings of 
the barristers whose affairs 
they handle, and a senior derk 
often earns £40,900 a 
with a few 


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By Martut Fletcher 
Political Reporter 
The Government yesterday 
awarded two companies a 
joint £220 million contract for 
battlefield ammunition trans- 
porters known as DROPS, but 
conspicuously foiled to still a 
mounting political furore over 
its alleged intimidation, exclu- 
sion and mistreatment of a 
third interested company. 

The Comptroller and Audi- 
tor General is to investigate, 
and this may lead to a full 
inquiry by the Commons Pub- 
lic Accounts Committee. 

Mr Paddy Ashdown, the 
Liberal trade spokesman, and 
Mr Jim Wallace, Liberal de- 
fence spokesman, yesterday 
tabled a Commons motion 
calling for a full independent 


* 


the idea of such transporters 
and which is understood to be 
considering legal action 
against the ministry. 

It has been alleged that 
Boughtons was unfairly ex- 
cluded from the trials process, 
that its patents have been 
stolen, and that it has sub- 
sequently been subjected to 
heavy pressure from the min- 
istry not to make a fuss. 

Answering these charges at 
a press conference yesterday. 
Lord Trefgame, Minister of 
State for Defence Procure- 
ment, ruled out an indepen- 
dent inquiry but said that the 
ministry had agreed to an 
examination of alleged patent 
infringments. 

General Sir Richard Vin- 
cent, who heads the ministry's 
procurement operations, de- 
nied that Boughtons had been 
pressurised into disassociating 
itself from a BBC Panorama 
programme last July which 
was critical of the ministry. 


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THE TIMES SAT! TODAY 




ft 6,1986 


HOME NEWS 




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Oxford set 
involved in 
one party 
too many 


By Craig Seton 

Rosie Johnston, aged 22, 
one of three sentenced yes- 
terday in the Chan non drugs 
case, is petite, thin faced and 
looking younger than her 
years with Jet black hair. 

Her family have been on the 
fringes of high society for 
many years and are related to 
the Chancellor literary aryf 
publishing family. 

Her mother, Suzanne, » a 
travel writer, her father an 
architect They live in a 
spectacular £400,000 seven- 
teenth century mansion in 
Shell ingford, near Faringdon, 
Oxfordshire. They also have a 
cottage in Italy. 

Her uncle is the wealthy 
publisher, Robin Duff Chan- 
cellor of the Spectator. 

At Oxford, Johnston, Jailed 
for nine months, was in the 
second year of a three-year 
English course. She was a 
childhood ebum and best 
friend of Miss Olivia Chan- 
con. 

The) 1 lived in a riverside 
terrace cottage in Doyiey 
Road, Osney, a bohemian area 
of Oxford by the Thames. The 
house was owned by Miss 
Channon. 

After her death a torn-up 
letter from her to Johnston 
was found at the bouse. When 
the 15 fragments were pieced 
together it told of Miss 
Channon’s heartbreak split 
from high society DJ, Mr 
Jeremy Barnes, whom she 
called “Jeremy Hippy". 

Miss Channon said in her 
letter be was her first love and 
she was “madly in love with 
him”. 

She wrote: “I quite honestly 
can't face going through this 
feeling of rejection again. It’s 
too painful.” 

Miss Channon began her 
letter: “By the time you read 
this I won’t be around any- 
more. But I feel I owe you this 
more than anyone else in the 
world. 

“But why should the poor 
thing cope with my emotions? 
lam sorry to be so stupid but I 
feel completely and utterly 
miserable.” 

Written in blue ballpoint 
pea and the paper stained with 
tears. Miss Channon umed 
Johnston to spend £2,000 
from her will on a lavish wake 
for all their high society 
friends. 

Johnston never received the 
letter. 

Sebastian Guinness, aged 
22. is short, musdy and 
chubby faced with blond hair. 

He is Miss Channon’s sec- 
ond cousin, a member of die 
huge banking and brewing 
dynasty, a family that has had 
more than its fair share of 
tragedy in recent years. 

His father, Jonathan, is a 
merchant banker, director of 
the brewers and a former 
chairman of the Conservative 
Monday Club. 

He divorced his first wife, 

Ingrid, in 1962 after 1 1 years’ 
marriage and she wed Mr Paul 
Channon. Secretary for Trade 
and Industry, a year later. 

Olivia was their daughter. 


Sebastian is a product of his 
father’s second marriage. 

Guinness has a penchant for 
flamboyant dress, wearing 
dark glasses in all weathers 
and painting his finge rnails 
black. 

Rosie Johnston was his girl 
friend and in the summer of 
1983 they attended a ball 
hosted by the Queen at Wind- 
sor Casile. 

Guinness arrived from 
London especially to celebrate 
the end of Miss Channon’s 
examinations and to see his 
sweetheart Rosie: 

Guinness seemed to be the 
least affected by the tragedy 
and has lost none of his 
arrogance. After one court 
appearance in which mag- 
istrates refused to give him his 
passport back so he could go 
abroad on holiday, Guinness' 
left the court room and 
screamed “bastards”. 

Paul Dunstan, aged 31, with 
a haggard face ana spiky hair, 
used the latest technology to 
go about his business and was 
contacted by his customers on 
a radio pager. 

Dunstan knew Miss 
Channon only as Liz and she 
met him in sleazy public 
houses in Londonilhe would 
hand him an envelope 
containing £100. He would 
hand over a gram of heroin. 

He is the second of four 
children and a former altar 
boy. 

He was a woridng^ass man 
who had tried and railed to be 
a successful pop song writer 
and guitarist His experience 
in the music business brought 
him into contact with drugs. 

He soon found that supply- 
ing top grade cocaine ami 
heroine to tire spoilt rich kids 
of high Society was more 
lucrative. 

He lived with his fetter, 
Ron, a buOder, and mother 
Edie, a dinner lady, in Elles- 
mere Road, WUtesden, north 
London, but spent a lot of 
time with a girl, aged 16, in a 
seedy Gofders Green flat 

Olivia Channon, a privi- 
leged member of one of the 
richest and most powerful 
families in the land, (bed from 
a lethal mixture of heroin, 
champagne and a constant 
cravingfor adventure. 

Her ultimately deadly 
addiction to the monied 
extra vaganre and thrills of the 
high society “smart set” to 
which she belonged led her to 
one wild party too many. 

Miss Channon had more 
t ha n £500,000 in trusts and 
enjoyed an annual allowance 
of £25,000 during her three 
years at St Hilda’s. She ap- 
peared to have everything to 
live for. 

Princess Margaret attended 
her twenty first birthday ball 
at the Channons’ luxurious 
house in Cheyne Walk. 
Friends were taken to the 
family’s holiday home on the 
Caribbean island of Mustique 
or its magnificent country 
house in Essex. 



Heir to Guinness 
fortune is jailed 


Continued from page 1 

tics with Miss Channon that 
she used drugs and you must 
have known that drugs would 
be available at that party. You 
have many good attributes. So 
many speak well of you, but 
on this occasion you were 
weak and foolish and commit- 
ted a criminal offence.” 

Mr Richard Du Cann, QC, 
for Guinness said in mitiga- 
tion that his client was a young 
man of good character who 
was now free of any level of 
addiction he might have had. 

He had used drugs only 
sporadically in social settings 
and there was no question of 
him returning to drugs, even 
on the most casual basis. 

Because of the con- 
sequences of what happened 
and the feet that Olivia 
Channon was very dose to 
him, it was unlikely that he 
would reoffend. 

“He is a follower, not an 
initiator ” said Mr Du Cann. 

He said: “Since June he has 
lived in a void. He feels 
himself to be a marked man 
because of the substantial 
public belief quite erroneous, 
that he is responsible for or 
contributed in some way to 
Olivia Channon’s death. He 
feds it is quite impossible to 
pass unnoticed and 
un vilified.” 

Johnston, aged 23, of 
SheHingford HaU, Faringdon, 
Oxfordshire was jailed for 
nine months for supplying 
heroin to Miss Channon and 
possessing cocaine, cannabis 
and amphetamines. 

She travelled to London to 
collect heroin from Dunstan 
as a “favour” to Miss 
Channon who was too busy. 

The judge told Johnston: “ft 
is a grievous sight to see you in 
the dock. You were Olivia 
Channon’s best friend. You 
could have and should have 
said no. You were foolish and 
reckless.” 

Johnston, a former student 
of Manchester College, Lon- 
don University, came from a 
good home and had a loving 
family, the judge said. 

He told her. ‘You may not 
be the most privileged in your 
set, but you had many advan- 
tages in your life. I have 
enormous sympathy for you. 1 


well understand your guilt, 
shock and distress.” 

He accepted she was not an 
addict and that Miss Channon 
had “already entered upon the 
drugs scene and had already 
set up this particular deal” 

He went on: “Bui, you are 
intelligent, you knew that your 
best friend was already ad- 
dicted You knew she would 
use the drug.” 

As she was led away to the 
cells, Johnston’s mother and 
three sisters burst into tears in 
court and at the end of the 
hearing comforted each otter 
with embraces. 

Mr Robin Simpson. QC for 
Johnston, had appealed to the 
judge not to give her a 
custodial sentence. 

Describing the effect of 
Miss Channon’s death on 
Johnston, he said: “Ct was one 
of the most profound shock 

and distress and guilt. She still 

has the most terrible night- 
mares and she misses Olivia 
quite dreadfully. 

Dunstan, aged 31, an un- 
employed musician from 
north London, was jailed fora 
total of four years on five 
charges of supplying heroin to 
Miss Channon, jointly with 
Miss Johnston of supplying 
heroin to Miss Channo n and 
possession of heroin and 
cocaine. 

The court heard that his 
heroin addiction coSt him 
between £300 and £400 a 
fortnight 

Mr Justice Otton told him: 
’You were a commercial 
dealer — an out and out 
pusher. Pushers must expect 
confined punishment.” 

Mr Peter Clark, for Dun- 
stan, said: “He is where the 
buck stops as fer as this matter 
is concerned. He supplied 
drugs because he was fearfully 
addicted to the drug." 

The court heard that two 
other men were feeing charges 
following the arrest of Dun- 
stan. 

Det Supt Andrew Vallis, 
who led the investigation in 
Oxford into Miss Channon’s 
death said last night: “It is to 
be hoped that at least some 
people will have teamed a 
lesson from the tragic events 
and realize just what the final 
result of heroin use can be.” 


‘Bed was 
called the 
playpen’ 

Mrs Veronica Snowball, 
called her bed “the playpen , 
an industrial tribunal in 
London was told yesterday. 

Mrs Snowball,, aged 46, who 
claims unfair dismissal as a 
canteen manageress by .her 
former employers, Gardner 
Merchant, often used to talk 
about her men friends mid sex 
to a work colleague, it was 

claimed. . 

Mrs Snowball, of Harmons 
Mead, East Gnnstead, West 
Sussex, allege she wwsefr 
ually harassed by her former 
district manager, Mr nruce 

third day of the 

hearing Mr A J2jj57 
popplewell, for Mr 
yesterday asked Miss 
Farley, who used to work for 
Mis Snowball, about their sex 

hear her «fer 

bToften Jjked about to 

zsjmx m 

conversations on sex. 


Work swindle paid 
for life of luxury 


The wife of a power station 
engineer lived in luxury with- 
out knowing it was with the 
help of her corrupt husband’s 
secret mistress, a court was 
told yesterday. 

Mrs Joan Atkinson, aged 
50, was horrified when Crime 
Squad detectives raided their 
country mansion and told her 
of Kenneth Atkinson’s 
£320,000 swindle. 

It was revealed that he was 
aided by his lover of many 
years, Frances McNally, aged 
39, the stores supervisor at the 
North Tees power station in 

Haverton Hill, Cleveland. 

Mrs Atkinson had never 
questioned how her husband 
could afford their six-bed- 
room house in Brompton, 
Nonh Yorkshire, a holiday 
bungalow in Devon, an ocean- 
going yacht and his own 
electrical firm on the tests of 
his £15,000 salary. 

She divorced him and took 
the £43,000 bungalow at 
Foxhills, Exmouth, in part 
settlement. 

Atkinson would never have 
managed his Central Electric- 
ity Generating Board fraud 

but for Mcbfefly, wbp became 

ihe new Mrs Atkinstm in 
1984, Teesade Crown Court 


was told yesterday . 

He ordered everything from 
lampshades to lawnmowers 
on the power station’s ac- 
counts, and the items went 
straight to his mansion or his 
factory at Leaning Bar, North 
Yorkshire. 

Mr Geoffrey Rivfin, QC for 
the prosecution, sakfc“It was 
her (McNally’s) duty to check 
that die ordered goods were 
received at the power station. 
She knew what was going on. 

He said that Atkinson 
played a power game with 
outside contractors on the 
principle of “no favours — no 
work”. 

George Cinnamood, aged 
69, beadof Teesside Roof and 
Roadworks Ltd, who has 
admitted corruption, told pol- 
ice: “I gave him £200 every 
few weeks for about six years 
to keep the job right” 

The Atkinsoas, together 
with power station manager 


Geoffrey Variey, aged 61, of; 
Leven Road, Yarm-on-Tees, 
Cleveland, and 12 contractors 
admit bribery, fraud, theft and 
forgery. They will be sen- 
tenced next week. 

Six others who have denied 
related charges will be tried 
later. 



A soliawr who arranged ^ 

arsonists to d^troy to 
nline country mansion so mat 

he 

^i,Ss e pra °Si*fo o " 

SrsswS 


plotted home arson 


am ateurish attempt at crime 
had led to disgrace and the 

ruin of his career. 

The court was told that he 
removed paintings, anlfoue 
furniture and other valuables 
from Wheaton Aston New 
Hall in Staffordshire before 
calling in unknown arsonists 
to set fire to the Victorian 
building, which he could not 

^Mr Anthony Barker, QC 
for Wordley, fflidthaiwhen he 
received £163,000 from the 


insurance company for ihe 
partly gutted house, he spent 
the money on rebuilding it 

Mr Anthony Smith, for the 
prosecution, said a fireman 
was trapped by a felling beam 
during the Maze and lay in the 
bunting building until col- 
leagues beard his cry for help. 

Wordley’s wife Julia, aged 
42, admitted making a false 
insurance claim for a mink 
coat and was ordered to do 
120 hours community service. 


Sex case 
head gets 
1$ months 

A primary school head- 
master who indecently as- 
saulted pupils over a four-year 
period has been allowed to 
retire on full pension, a court 
was told yesterday. 

David Holman, aged 50, of 
Charlestown Primary School, 
Cariyon Bay. Cornwall, was 
jailed for IS months for three 
specimen charges of in- 
decently assaulting boys aged 
10 and 1 1. He asked for seven 
otter offences to be con- 
sidered. 

Mr Justice Smart-Smith at 
Plymouth Gown Court said: 
“Souk people might take the 
view he is lucky not to have 
been summarily dismissed”. 

Indecent acts 
ag ainst pupils 

A primary school head- 
master who indecently as- 
saulted pupils during bogus 
research into their physical 
growth was jailed for six 
months yesteraay at Preston 
Crown CourL 

Peter Morris, aged 42. of 
Beetham House, Beetham, 
Cumbria, who measured 
pupils' bodies in his study, 
admitted five specimen 
charges. 

Police head on 

drink charge 

A Regional Crime Squad 
chief was suspended from 
duty yesterday after an alleged 
drink-drive accident. 

Chief Inspector Tony Fur- 
ze land, aged 48, stationed at 
Plymouth, is to be charged 
with driving with excess al- 
cohol in his blood, after his 
private car was in collision 
with another car in Plymouth 
last Thursday. 


Drug film model 
gets jail term 


A model who once appeared 
in an anti-drugs documentary 
on television was yesterday 
jailed for nine months for 
possessing and supplying 
heroin. 

Oxford Crown Court was 
told that Sian Griffiths, aged 
21, had paid for the drugs 
which killed Simon March, 
her boy friend. 

Lynn Guilford, aged 21, of 
Cuxnam, Oxfordshire, was 
jailed for 21 months after he 
admitted supplying the heroin 
and unlawfully killing Mr 
March by injecting the drug. 

The court was told that 
shortly before last Christmas, 
Griffiths gave a party at the 
country cottage she shared 
with Mr March, a guitarist, in 
Spriggs Holly Lane, near 


Chinnor, Oxfordshire. The 
next day. she gave £50 to 
Guildford, a friend of her boy 
friend, who obtained the 
drugs. 

An hour after being in- 
jected, Mr March was found 
dead 

Mr Nigel Rumfitt, for Grif- 
fiths. said finding her boy 
friend dead had been a “dev- 
astating experience”. He 
blamed Griffiths' father for 
her involvement in drugs, 
claiming he had encouraged 
her to live with a man of 44, 
now in prison, who used 
drugs. 

Griffiths featured in the 
1TV documentary Kick the 
Habit , in which her with- 
drawal from heroin addiction 
was portrayed 


Tommy in 
tune for 
bird show 

Tommy, an Australian sul- 
phur crested cockatoo, taking 
a spin in his car for Jamie 
Yates, aged five, and his sister, 
EZspefo, aged two, of Burton 
on Trent, Staffordshire, at the 
national cage and aviary bird 
exhibition yesterday. 

Tommy, aged 30, who can 
also pedal a tricycle and ride a 
chariot, is the star of a troupe 
of performing parrots at the 
show at the National Ex- 
hibition Centre, Birmingham. 

The show, which opens 
from 1 0am today and tomor- 
row. features more than 8,600 
budgerigars and canaries com- 
peting in 848 dasses-Total 
prize money has been doubted 
this year to a record £4,645. 

(Photograph: Tim Bishop). 



Oiance of 
a family 
Qiristmas 

A retired businessman was 
yesterday’s only winner of the 
£4,0M Portfolio Gold prize. 

Mr John Talbot, aged 63, of 
Longbam, Padgate, Warring- 
ton, Cheshire, was forced into 
retirement 13 years ago be- 
cause of illness . He will use 
seme of the money to enable 
him and his wife Hilda to 
spend Christmas with their 
son in Guernsey. 

“I always check my Port- 
folio Gold card in the morning 
after haring breakfast. But 
this time I checked it at least 
sax times before I would 
believe toe numbers were 
correct,” he said. 

“Then I was absolutely 
delighted because it is such an 
unexpected windfall.” 

Mr Talbot, who has been a 
reader of The Times all his 
adult life, says his ambition is 
to visit Singapore and Austra- 
lia, where he served in the 
Royal Tank Regiment during 
the Second World War. 

Portfolio Gold cards can be 
obtained by sending a stamped 
addressed envelope to: 
Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

P0 Box 40, 

Blackburn. 

BB1 6AJ. 


Kasparov in 
court move 

Gary Kasparov, the world 
chess champion, went to the 
High Court yesterday to stop 
the sate of computer chess 
games using his name. 

Eureka Electronics Ltd gave 
undertakings to Mr Justice 
Millett not to import, sell or 
deal in any way with the 
computer games until a full 
hearing of the dispute. 



ETHNIC 


RAMBO 


SICK NOTE 


JOSIE 


HALLAM 


WATCH BLUE WATCH GET INTO ATANGLE AND PUTOUTTHE FIRES 

LONDON’S BURNING 

A NEW FILM BY JACK ROSENTHAL 

SUNDAY AT 9 00 PM 











r^v 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DEC EMBER 6 1 986 


‘ Jaffe juice’ doctor is 
guilty of misconduct 
but keeps his practice 


The doctor accused of turn- 
ing a wealthy patient into a 
“zombie” with an addictive 
drug concoction called “Jaffe 
juice" was found guilty yes- 
terday of serious professional 
misconduct. 

But Dr Joseph Jaffe, who 
specializes in private hypno- 
therapy, escaped with an 
admonishment from the Gen- 
eral Medical Council- 

After Dr Jaffe, aged 61, 
promised that he would no 
longer use drugs when he 
hypnotized patients at his 
consulting rooms in Manches- 
ter, the council allowed him to 
continue in practice. 

He is said to have 2,000 
National Health Service pa- 
tients but only three private 
patients whom he hypnotizes. 

Mr George Waterson, aged 
49, a businessman from Al- 
trincham, Cheshire, who al- 


By Michael Hrasndl 
leged that five years of drug 
treatment ruined his business 
and nearly wrecked his mar- 
riage, said afterwards that he 
was saddened by the outcome. 

Police, who were awaiting 
the result of the hearing, have 
begun an inquiry into the case. 

It is understood that a 
report has been sent to the 
Director of Public 
Prosecutions. 

During the record 16-day 
, in London it was 
that Mr Waterson fell 
under Dr Jaffe’s spell and was 
turned into a zombie by “Jaffe 
juice" during a course of 
treatment for which he paid 
between £35,000 and £60,000. 

Mr Waterson, married with 
four children, was referred to 
Dr Jaffe by his GP in 1978. 
because he was suffering from 
stress. 

By the end ofhis association 
he was allegedly living on the 
breadline and reeling suicidal, 
while his once-prosperous bi- 
cycle business went into liq- 
uidation. 

He took on Dr Jaffa's own 
accountant and allegedly lost 
all control of the company 
finances. 

The cause of the trouble was 
said to be the drug concoction 
with which he was injected up 
to five limes a week, consist- 
ing primarily of BriatoL a 
barbiturate manufactured for 
use as an anaesthetic, which 
Dr Jaffe administered before 
hypnotizing him. 

Mr Waterson, who used to 
drive a Rolls Royce, is defend- 
ing a High Court case brought 
by Barclays Bank for the 
repossession ofhis house. 

The General Medical Coun- 
cil's professional conduct 
committee found Dr Jaffe 


guilty after a 90-minute del- 
iberation. 

Principally it found that he 
had improperly persisted in 
treating Mr Waterson in such 
a way as to adversely affect his 
capacity to fulfil his domestic 
and business responsibilities. 

Mr David Bolt, fixe commit- 
tee ctefirui a", said that the 
committee had reached its 
conclusion on the basis of 
expert evidence on the effect 
of the drug on patients and on 
Dr Jaffa's failure to warn Mr 
Waterson of those effects. 

He told Dr Jaffe; “The 
committee have judged you 
guilty of serious professH 
misconduct 
“However, they have felt 
able to take account of 
counsel’s representations 
made on your behalf and your 
undertaking that yon will not 
in future use any drug in 
connection with hypnother- 
apy in the treatment of 
patients." 

Mr Waterson, who left the 
hearing grim-feced on the arm 
ofhis wife Ann. a nurse, said: 
“It has bran a terrible ordeaL 
“It has been terribly upset- 
ting for me and my family. 1 
really want to put it behind 
me. I just fed terribly sad. 1 ' 

Dr Jaffe said: “I will make 
my comments in my own 
time. I have no idea when I 
will start work again." 

He refused to say whether 
he felt disgraced or relieved. 

Mrs Eleanor Jaffe said: “Of 
course l am relieved". 

Mr Anthony Ariidge, QC, 
counsel for Dr Jaffe, had told 
the hearing that the doctor had 
reasonable grounds for his 
faith in the injections which 
be gave Mr Waterson but that 
he would never use drugs 
again. 


Science report 


Black snow ‘worse 
than acid rain’ 


New research suggests that 
when add rain settles as snow 
and later melts, the con- 
centrated flood causes far 
more devastating effects than 
the steady trickle when it tails 
as rain. 

This conclusion comes from 
studies in the Cairngorms in 
Scotland. 

The finding has been exam- 
ined in more detail in connec- 
tion with another discovery, 
made a few years ago, dem- 
onstrating that the high add 
content and discoloration often 
fotmd in such snow frequently 
originated from eastern 
Europe. It was given the 
nickname “Mack snow". 

Now it is dear from work at 
the Climate Research Unit at 
East Anglia University that 
when Mack snow melts the 
effects of adds from it can be 
multiplied many times. 

Tiny particles of wet add 
soot from Russian and eastern 
European chimneys rise up to 
a height of more than two 
kilometres and form a stable 
layer which is carried by winds 
all the way to Scotland or 
Wales. There, air cur ren ts 
rising over the mountains, 
especially the Cairngorms, 
bring down the polluting parti- 
cles in snowflakes. They 
gather modi more pollution 
than raindrops, because of 
their elaborate shapes. 


By John Newell 

Dr Trevor Davies, deputy 
director of the research unit, 
has been analysing what hap- 
pens when drifts of black snow 
start to melt His findio 
show that 80 per cent of the 
acids and other pollutants in 
the snow trickle out in the first 
20 per cent of the snow which 
melts. 

That effect is not entirely 
surprising since when water 
freezes, imparities of any kind 
tend to move to the outsides of 
file ice crystals formed. So 
they might be expected to 
emerge first when the ice 
melts. But the strength of the 
effect was unexpected. 

Dr Davies has found that 
the concentrations of adds In 
the water formed in the first 
hour or so after Mack snow 
begins to melt are up to 15 
times higher than they are in 
the umndted snow as a whole. 

There is now an urgent need 
to look at the biological effects 
of brief exposure to very high 
concentrations of adds in 
netting snow. Although these 
effects may only last for an 
hoor, for that period, life forms 
ranging from trees through 
grass and crops tn insects and 
soil bacteria will be exposed to 
much higher concentrations of 
adds than had been suspected. 

Research to date has only 
investigated tire effects of such 
high concentrations on fish. 


Sale room 

Hard cash 
for rare 
soft toys 

By Geraldine Norman 

Sale Room Correspondent 

High prices were achieved 
yesterday for 1950s teddy 
bears and for 16 Kate Greena- 
way illustrations for The April 
Baby's Book of Tunes at 
£55,000 (estimate £40,000- 
£60,000). 

A SteifF “Teddy-Baby” in 
golden mohair, dating from 
around 1954 and with a 
squeaker operated by squeez- 
ing the tummy, sold for £330 
(estimate £60 h£ 80) at Chris- 
tie’s. South Kensington. 

A seasonal note was struck 
by a clockwork nodding rein- 
deer pulling Father Christmas 
in a green sleigh which made 
£770 (estimate £200-£300). 

Sotheby's sale of children’s 
books and related drawings 
had a curious pattern of up 
and down prices with a .few 
lots going exceptionally high. 
A first edition of Alice’s 
Adventures in Wonderland 
sold Tor £49,500 (estimate 
£8,00O-£i 2,000) to Justin 
Schiller, the New York dealer 
in children's books. 

The consistently high prices 
paid fin* miniature bools was 
the other notable feature of the 
sale. Tom Thumb’s Play Book 
of 1755, the only recorded 
copy of the earliest known 
edition of this alphabet book, 
made £8,800 (estimate £3,000- 
£4,000). 


Tiny parts of England are 
up lor sale for Christinas. Six 
thousand plots of land, each 
measuring no more *t»n one 
square metre, can be snapped 
up for a “bargain” £12. 

But there is a catch — new 
owners will not be able to build 
on their plot 

it is a fund-raising scheme 
by fixe conservation group 
Friends of the Earth, which 
had the idea of selling off an 
acre of land adjoining a natere 
reserve at Baihford, Avon. 

The land, beside the 
Brown’s Folly nature reserve, 
will be kept as a wilderness to 
protect rare butterflies. 

Well-established flora on 
tire site include Twayblade 
and the Co rning" Spotted 
Orchid. 

The land was donated to 
Friends of the Earth by a local 
family who want to remain 
anonymous 

Now Friends of the Earth is 
hoping to bay more land in 
Avon with the £50,600 it 


expects to raise from sale of 
the plots. 

One of the first takers, Mr 
Trevor Houghton, was de- 
lighted with the plot he bought 
for his so n Daniel Hammond, 
aged five. 

Mr Houghton, aged 32, of 
Bedminster, Bristol: “It’s a 
marvellous Christmas present. 
1 wQJ teach my son to care 
more about nature by involving 
him in the countryside in a 
personal way. He’D have his 
own fittie piece of It” 

Miss Julie Glynn, a solic- 
itor, who spent 18 months 
setting up the legal aspects of 
the scheme said: “We have 
managed to produce a very 
simple conveyance which a 
layman wiQ be able to use 
without having to seek legal 
advice. 

“The idea is that each plot 
purchaser will be able to fifi in 
the conveyance for him or 
herself, In fret this is one of 
those rare occasions when the 
purchaser wffl he able to act 
for himself.” 


Daniel Hammond, aged five, wraps op his Christmas present — a small piece of En glan d (Photograph: Paul Walters). 

Buy a slice of England 
for £12 this Christmas 


Crisis for physics 
lessons in schools 

By John Clare, Education Correspondent 

New evidence of the crisis kind to be carried out by the 

institute, refers to the 1985-86 


in physics teaching in schools 
is revealed in a survey pub- 
lished yesterday by the 
subject’s main professional 
body, the Institute of Physics. 

It reports that nearly one 
physics lesson in five in 
Britain is taught by someone 
not qualified in the subject 
And it finds that a lack of time 
and a chronic shortage of 
resources are together making 
physics teaching in secondary 
schools “difficult if not 
unbearable” 

Responding to a ques- 
tionnaire, the heads of physics 
in a sample of schools re- 
ported that their teaching 
groups were too big; they did 
not have enough laboratory 
equipment books or tech- 
nician s up po r t; and that their 
working conditions were often 
dirty, cramped and inad- 
equately ventilated. 

The survey, the first of its 


■ school year and therefore pre- 
dates the introduction of the 
new 16-phis exam, the Gen- 
eral Certificate of Secondary 
Education, with its greater 
emphasis on practical work 
and the continuous assess- 
ment of pupils’ progress. 

Many teachers said they did 
not see bow they could cope 
with the extra demands. 

Most reported that time was 
the greatest pressure: time 
away from teaching to prepare 
practicals. try out experi- 
ments, mark books, work on 
new syllabuses and develop 
the use of microcomputers. 

The main reason is the 
shortage of teachers. The in- 
stitute says that they are 
leaving the profession fester 
than they can be recruited. 
Consequently fewer students 
would opt to study physics at 
university. 


Bill aims 
for safer 
sports 
grounds 

By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

New powers to ensure safety- 
in sports grounds after the 
Bradford fire disaster last yea; 
are proposed in a government 
Bill published yesterday. 

Local authorities will be 
able, subject to tight of appeal 
to courts, to issue notices 
restricting or prohibiting ad- 
mission to grounds where 
there are serious risks to 
spectators. The new power 
will replace the present need 
for a local authority to apply 
to a magistrates' court first. 

Under the Fire Safely and 
Safety of Places of Sport Bill, 
local authorities will be re- 
quired to carry out inspections 
of certificated sports grounds 
and stands in accordance with 
Home Office guidance. 

There will be a new system 
of safety certificates for stands 
which hold 500 or more 
spectators under cover at 
sports grounds, mostly the 
smaller ones which are not 
designated under Section 1 of 
the Safety of Sports Grounds 
Act 1975. 

The Bill also provides for 
local authorities to licence 
certain indoor premises to 
which the public are invited as 
spectators. 

This will bring them into 
line with present arrange- 
ments to licence music, danc- 
ing and other entertainments, 
thus removing an anonoly 
highlighted by Mr Justice 
Popplewefl's inquiry into the 
Bradford fire. 

Judges ponder 
CS gas plea 

Judgement was reserved in 
the High Court yesterday over 
new powers which enable 
chief constables to provide 
plastic bullets and CS gas 
against the wishes of their 
police authorities. 

Lord Justice Watkins, sit- 
ting with Mr Justice Mann, is 
considering a claim by 
Northumbria Police Auth- 
ority that new Home Office 
guidelines are unlawful. 

Rous’s ashes 

The ashes of Sir Stanley 
Rous, the international foot- 
ball administrator, have been 
scattered on a football pitchat 
Mutford, near Lowestoft Suf- 
folk, the village where he was 
bom. 


December 5 1986 


PARLIAMENT 


MPs trade accusations over councils 


The activities of left-wing La- 
bour councillors came under 
spirited attack during a debate 
opened by a Conservative MP 
on local government. Labour 
MPs counter-attacked with 
strong criticism of Conservative 
councils, of the Government for 
undermining local authorities, 
and of newspaper reporting of 
council affairs. 

Mr Kenneth Hind (West Lan- 
cashire C), who opened the 
debate, said that many coun- 
cillors now saw their role as 
challenging that of central 
government. In many areas, 
civic pride and community 
spirit had given way to groups of 
left-wing Labour councillors. 
Trotskyists. Militants and their 
sympathisers, who saw [oca] 
authorities as mini-Soviets or 
power bases from which to 
attack other political parties and 
particularly central government 
The public had not realized 
that this change had taken place. 
They still voted in local govern- 
ment elections for the label they 
had supported throughout their 
lives. 

Sir George Young (Haling, Ac- 
ton. Q, a former Under-Sec- 
retary of State for the 
Environment said that the fail- 
ures and bloody-muidedness of 
local authorities had forced the 
Government to remove more 
and more powers from them. 
There was no sinister conspir- 
acy. These were sensible de- 
cisions designed to protea local 
citizens, but they had contrib- 
uted to the continuing decline of 
focal government 

Six months of Labour control 
of Ealing Council had achieved 
as many new members for the 
Conservative Party as had years 
of knocking on doors. Ealing 
Council's activities encapsu- 
lated all that was wrong with 
local government today. 

Mr Samoa Hughes (Southwark 
and Bermondsey, L) said that 
there wens dangers in local 
government if Labour did not 
recognize the cancer in the party 
and dangers which, tra ns ferred 
to Westminster, would make 
Parliament far more a totali- 
tarian regime than had ever 
been seen. 

Labour councillors must heed 
the warning from their own 
front bench that local govern- 
ment could not be run on the 
basis that some day some god- 
parent government would bail 
out their mistakes. 

Many Labour authorities did 
a good job. There were others in 
which people perniciously, mis- 
leadingly and anti-democrai- 
icalfy were corrupting local 
government every single day. 

It was necessary to return to a 
system in which there was fair 
treatment of the representatives 
of the different political group- 
ings on local authorities or the 
disenchantment would con- 
tinue. 

“If we do not deal with this 

problem, and particularly if the 
Labour Party do not put their 
house in order, then the House 
of Commons will see the same 
sort of distortion.” 

Sir Hugh Rossi (Hornsey and 
Wood Green,. C) said that 
members of the “loony le£" 


were actually highly intelligent 
and articulate. They derived 
more from anarchism than 
socialism. They were deter- 
mined to destabilize society. 

They wished to undermine 
family values, destroy respect 
for the forces of law and order 
and create financial instability 
in the areas under their control 

The Labour Party had to be 
careful of those people in its 
midst. Sooner or later, they 
would lead to its destruction. 
Mr Alfred Dubs ( B a tt ersea. Lab) 
said that there had been an 
attempt by the Conservatives to 


Simon Hagbes: 

Labour cancer 

smear certain local authorities 
purely for political advantage. 

The actions of Conservative- 
controlled Wandsworth Council 
were a thousand times worse 
than anything attributed to La- 
bour local authorities. 

Mr Frederick Silvester (Man- 
chester, Withington, Q said that 
five chief officers had resigned 
since Labour took control of 
Manchester City CoundL at 
least two of them under duress. 

The council bad refused to 
bold a VE Day parade for (rid 
soldiers, it had abolished the 
police band, it had put Nelson 
Mandela on its Christmas cards 
and removed portraits of the 
Queen from its offices. Die 
cumulative effect of these 
changes, which in themselves 
might be considered trivial, was 
that the traditions of the city had 
been undermined and changed. 
Mr Tony Banks (Newham 
North West, Lab) said that this 
Government had consistently 
done its utmost to undermine 
local govern mem. Why, when a 
local council tried to do some- 
thing about discrimination 
against gays and lesbians, was 
there an enormous reaction 
from Conservative MPs? Did 
they believe that there should be 
no attempt to end such 
discrimination? 

Perhaps some of these local 
authorities had been a little 
ham-fisted, but at least they 
were trying. They deserved a 
great deal more sympathy from 
MPs, whether straight or gay. 
than they were getting at 
present. 

He was worried about the 
intoleranceof democracy within 
the Conservative Party. “I am 
convinced that the Tones would 
not stop from inspiring a mili- 
tary coup in this country to 
thwart the socialist policies of a 
Labour government- When they 


saw the capitalist system under 
threat they would stop at noth- 
ing to remove a Labour 
government." 

Sr Geoffrey Fmsberg (Hamp- 
stead and Hxghgate. Q said that 
those who acted as political 
advisers were politicians who 
ponced on the ratepayer. They 
were giving advice to the local 
councils at the ratepayers ex- 
pense. In many cases they were 
coundUors in other authorities. 
That was an evil which should 
not be tolerated by the 
Government. 

Mr Jeremy Corbyn (Islington 
North, Lab), a former Haringey 
councillor, said that since 1979 
there had been a continued 
process of curtailing the powers 
of local government, of central- 
izing power around the Secre- 
tary of State and of attacking 
authorities that attempted to do 
anything to meet the needs of 
their community or to redress 
the imbalance inherent in 
society. 

Over the past four years, there 
had been a systematic process of 
media attacks on individual 
local authorities. Haringey had 
been crawled over by journalists 
from the Murdoch empire, day 
after day scratching for dirt and 
salacious gossip, camping 
around the gardens of houses 
where Labour councillors lived 
and following them. There had 
been a series of untrue news- 
paper stories concerning actions 
that councils had supposedly 
taken. 

The Government bad sup- 
ported tbe smear campaign. 


“This marauding band of gutter 
journalists wander round tbe 
country just looking for lies to 
print about Labour councils." 

The campaign was trying to 
hide what the Tory and Liberal 
councils were up to. 

In Berkshire, the Christmas 
lunch for school children would 
be normal for those who paid 
and bangers and mash at a 
separate table for those on free 
school meals. That was the kind 
of policy pursued by Conser- 
vative-controlled councils. 

Lambeth had a better record 
than Wandsworth, with lower 
rate and rent rises and more new 
homes being built Yet it was the 
Lambeth councillors who had 
been surcharged and thrown out 
of office. 

Mr Jade Straw, an Opposition 
spokesman on the environment 
said that many of the speeches 
made by Conservative MPs 


in schools, is it also wrong for 
homosexuals to seek the leader- 
ship of this country and prom- 
inent places within this House?" 

Across the country the 
Conservative Party had lost the 
support of the electorate in 
council ' election after council 
election.. It had never been 
weaker in Britain's town and 
county halls. The modem 
Conservative Party was unable 
to cope with defeat and so it 
sought scapegoats on which to 
vent its wrath. 

Dr Rhodes Boyson, Minister 
for Local Government, said that 
there were a number of people 
within the Labour Party who 
were doing things which would 
damage first that party and then 
the rest of the country. 

Where such people had taken 
over they spent as if there was 
no tomorrow, politicized coun- 




^c &LrvaatTMPs had forc ®> policy in mini-Soviels. 


objected to Labour councils 
trying to ensure that people with 
gay or lesbian tendencies were 
treated fairly. The rood they 
trod was a very dangerous one 
because it was notorious that 
there were a number of Conser- 
vative MPs, some in high places 
in the Party hierarchy, who had 
homosexual tendencies and 
they deserved tbe same tol- 
erance as Labour councillors 
trying to help gay and lesbian 
people in their communities, 
“They had better pm up or 
shut up on this issue. If it is 
wrong for bomesexuals to teach 


On homosexuality, he wanted 
no persecution of anyone, but 
most people in this country had 
a normality, the family. To have 
anything else was anti-life and 
the end of life. 

New Society had referred to 
the Salem witch trial of Miss 
Maureen McGoldrick. It had 
been done against the wishes of 
Mr Kinnock and other people 
and was like an eastern Euro- 
pean or Russian show trial. 
What that lady had gone 
through was something he 
would not wish on his worst 
enemy. 


are The Times accused of lies * 


THE PRESS 


The Times and The Sun were 
accused by Mr Denis S kinne r 
(Botsover, Lab) of lying about 
what had occurred in the Com- 
mons division lobbies on 
Wednesday evening. 

On a point of order, Mr Skinner 
said that that morning in The 
Sun and The Times — signifi- 
cantly only those two Murdoch 
newspapers — there was a 
reference to a delayed division 
on Wednesday at half-past 
seven. He was referred to in The 
Sun as having been in the lobby 
when the Deputy Scrjeant-at- 
Arms, Major Peter Jennings, 
turned MPs out with his sword. 
He did not see the Deputy 
Serjeam-at-Amts at all. 

The Sun also referred this 
morning to people “ignoring 
Deputy Speaker Harold Wal- 
ker”. He had bad a word with 


Mr Walker who had confirmed 
that he was not in the Chair on 
Wednesday night when that 
supposed incident took place. 

“In The Times, the other half 
of the Wapping press, it was 
stated that the MPs who were in 
the lobby succeeded in lopping 
10 minutes off the Alliance 
defence debate. That suggests 
that that division must have 
taken something like 22. 23 or 
24 minutes instead of the usual 
12 to 15 minutes. 

He (Mr Skinner) had asked 
the Deputy Serjeant-at-Arms to 
confirm in writing that he had 
never seen him (Mr Skinner) in 
the voting lobby and that 
according to the Official Report , 
the vote was taken at 7.32pm. 

Tbe next debate began at 
7.47pm, despite a point of order 
having been raised in the cham- 
ber before the debate. 

. “ I have now received a reply 
in which. he says: ‘I can confirm 
each of the points in your letter 


Since you did not see me either, 
you may care to know that I did 
not draw my sword*." 

Mr Simon Hughes (Ber- 
mondsey. L) said he had no 
knowledge of where the infor- 
mation had come from. He had 
asked Mr James Wallace. They 
were the two tellers. 

To his recollection, there was 
discussion between the clerk at 
the table and the Deputy 
i *2^ cer aboul delay in the 
lobbies. An order was made by 
the Deputy Speaker that the 
Serjeani-ai-Arms cause in- 
quiries to be made as to what 
was causing that delay. After 
that, a group of MPs came out 
quickly. 

“I guess that there was a delay 
of some minutes. It certainly 
was not as long as 10 minutes. 
There was the unusual occur- 
rence of the Deputy Speaker’s 
request The story was partially 
accurate and partially in- 
accurate." 


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Hotel Jatea, S2B ZermaB 
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I 






THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


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ix die in Delhi 
temple battles 

BnSb%Sh « rKV d f perse SiUts HiSwauSe 

hnM i • lerap,e ' where «>e Sikhs were attempting to 
The Sh£ff procession Correspondent write? 

™ ,enw ****“* Hiadns *hU not want the 
50 wnmemotate the memory of Teg Bahadur, 
dns from * £* FV*? sacri5ced his life to save the Hin- 

1 * MW* *““8 “ to go ahead. 

Broun Afr^, o'" a *«* <**«» >»y • Sikh rammed into a 
TWS R Pobw Forcc (CRPF) troops outside 

e ’ kJ1 ? K three. Witnesses said the dead officers’ 
comrades gave the driver a severe beating. 

inplnrt^L^JT 1 ^- were “« ,ired ’ five A"* Poficemen, 
including some hurt in a stone-throwing melfe. 

. ?“P. ,e were re Port«* injured in another dash 

• ini? r ?d?. e i ,L 3 0nc “top*® “ Old Delhi 
O Jonrnatetkmed: Terrorists in Punjab killed a Sikh jouru- 

Guerrillas shoot 1 3 

. ^clhi (Renter) — Tribal guerrillas stormed out of the 
jungle with nfles and sub-machine guns blazing, killed 13 
Bengali settlers and set their village isa Tripura state on lire 
on Thursday night, the Press Trust of India (PT1) reported. 

1 he massacre in Akrabari, in the west of the strategic 
state, was the worst since August 29, when Tripura National 
Volunteer guerrillas killed 14 people in northern Tripura 
and fled across the border into Bangladesh. 

. Three ministers of the Marxist state government, 
including the deputy chief minister, rushed to Akrabari 
yesterday, and police reinforcements scoured the jungle for 
the attackers. PTI said the attack brought to 81 the death 
toll in a TNV offensive. 


Propaganda coup for Kremlin | Vietnam veteran kills 27 in Bogota 

Concession on 
Salt enhances 
Gorbachov’s 
peace image 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 






Death 
W- '*% threats 

Stockholm — Death 
threats have been made 
, against Mr Sten Anders- 

X son. Foreign Minister of 

> Sweden, left, a dose liriend 

of Mr Olof Palme, the 
assassinated Prime Min- 
ister, it was revealed yes- 
terday (Christopher Mosey 
J^a,L _ , writes). Security around 

. W Mr Andersson had been 

* -S| stepped np after the threats 

ffUll mSf HI made in a letter to Ny Dug, 

fia&Kgq |H the Commonist newspaper. 

Extradition refusal 

Jerusalem — Israel has turned down a request by France 
for the extradition of Mr William Nafcash, aged 25, who was 
convicted by a French court for the murder of an And) in 
Besancon in 1983 (Ian Murray writes). 

The decision has outraged senior lawyers and politicians 
here and last night two court writs were filed against him in 
an attempt to keep him in prison and to force the Justice 
Minister, Mr Avraham Sharir, to change his mind. 

Mr Nakash arrived in Israel with a forged French 
passport in 1983, when he was being hunted for the murder.. 
Granted Israeli citizenship as a Jew, he was tracked down by 
French police and was jailed for Me tx absentia* 


The Soviet Union an- 
nounced last night that it will 
continue to observe its strate- 
gic arms limitation treaties 
with the US, despite the 
Reagan Administration's re- 
cent decision to exceed the 
ceiling set by the unralified 
1979 Salt 2 agreement. 

The Kremlin's conciliatory 
move was seen in Western 
circles as a skilful attempt to 
secure the maximum inter- 
national propaganda advan- 
tage from Washington's action 
Iasi month at a time when the 
White House is in deep in- 
ternal political difficulty. 

There was immediate dip- 
lomatic speculation that the 
latest gesture towards boosting 
the Soviet Union's image as 
the tnosi peace-conscious of 
the superpowers by Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov, the Sov- 
iet leader, might be followed 
by a forther extension of its 
soon-fo-expire moratorium 
on nuclear testing, despite 
repeated warnings here to the 
contrary. 

“There is no doubt that 
once again the Soviet side 
have played their cards more 
effectively," one senior West- 
ern diplomat said. “What the 
Reagan Administration did 
has played right into their 
bands and given them another 
propaganda triumph." 

A lengthy statement issued 
by Tass, the official Soviet 
news agency, claimed that, as 
a result of the US putting into 
service its 13lst heavy bomb- 
er armed with cruise missiles 
without dismantling an equiv- 
alent nuclear weapon delivery 
vehicle, Moscow had grounds 
to regard itself free of the 
limits imposed by Salt 2 and 
the earlier Salt 1 treaties. 

“At the same time, the 
Soviet side believes that there 
is still an opportunity for 
stopping the dangerous course 
of events that is being pro- 
voked by the irresponsible 
actions of the present Ameri- 


can Administration.” the 
communique added. 

“Taking into account the 
immense, universal impor- 
tance of the issue and the need 
to conserve the key constraint 
on the strategic arms race, the 
Soviet Union refrains, for the 
time being, from abandoning 
the limitations under Salt I 
and Salt 2.” 

The statement contradicted 
an earlier claim by a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman - deliv- 
ered during Mr Gorbachov's 
absence in India - that there 

The Americans reported “lim- 
ited but useful progress in 
reaffirming significant points 
of agreement and clarifying 
points of disagreement" in 
four extra days of meetings in 
Geneva with Soviet nego- 
tiators on controlling strategic 
intermediate-range space wea- 
pons (Our Geneva Corres- 
pondent writes). 

would be a direct Soviet 
response to the US move, 
which followed White House 
claims that Moscow has been 
breaching the treaties. 

The Soviet statement ac- 
cused the US of being in the 
grip of “militarist fever” and 
attacked the Reagan Admin- 
istration over a range of 
issues, including Star Wars 
and Washington's continuing 
refusal to join the moratorium 
on nuclear tests which is due 
to expire at the end of the 
month. 

In a pointed reference to the 
timing of the US Salt 2 
breach, so soon after the 
collapse of the Reykjavik 
summit, the Soviet Govern- 
ment stated: “It is significant 
that the United States decided 
to deal a Mow to the structure 
of fundamental accords in the 
field of strategic arms limita- 
tion precisely at a time when a 
prospect for an improvement 
in the international situation 
had appeared at last" 


Britons in 
air crash 

Cairo — Two Britons 
have survived a plane crash 
in southern Egypt and been 
rescued by helicopter, ac- 
cording to the British Em- 
bassy (Renter reports). 

Officials at Luxor air- 
port, 480 miles south of 
Cairo, said that the private 
Cessna 340 of Mr Nick 
Morris, aged 32, and Miss 
Jane Cunningham, 31, 
crash-landed after running 
out of fuel 10 miles south- 
east of the airport. A 
search helicopter found 
them 11 hours later. 

The Britons were flying 
from Addis Ababa to 
Luxor. Both are only 
slightly injured. 


Tourists 
in danger 

Bangkok — Proposed 
visits by foreign tourists to 
the former royal temples at 
Angkor in north-west Cam- 
bodia have been cancelled 
after warnings by the 
Khmer Rouge that the 
visitors would not be safe 
(Neil Kelly writes). 

Except for one small 
group two years ago, for- 
eign tourists have not been 
able to visit Angkor Wat 
for more than a decade. 

Travel agents in Bang- 
kok said warnings from 
anti- Vietnamese guerrillas 
had frightened clients 
who were to pay £795 each 
for the trip. 


UN censures Chile and 
Iran over human rights 

From Zoriana Pysariwsky, New York 


The United Nations Gen- 
eral Assembly has censured 
Iran and Chile over human 
rights violations. It also ac- 
cused Soviet forces and the 
Afghanistan Government of 
atrocities against civilians. 

The resolution on Afghani- 
stan was adopted 89-24 with 
36 abstentions. It expressed 
concern over “the great sever- 
ity” with which the occupying 
forces acted against their real 
or suspected opponents and 
the methods of warfare em- 
ployed, which include indis- 
criminate bombing and mili- 
tary action against villages. 

Ninety-four countries voted 
in favour of the draft censur- 
ing Chile. It cited violations 


epuMicans press President 
to speed up arms inquiry 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 

dent Reagan yesterday indirectly admitted for the He told the committee that 


President Reagan yesterday indirectly admitted for the He told the committee that 
met the congressional Repub- first time yesterday that mis- on Mr Reagan’s instructions, 
lican leadership to discuss takes were made in the way he informed the Israelis in 
what fiirther steps Congress arms were sold to Tehran and August 1985 that he would 
would take in investigating the in the diversion of funds to “condone” the Israeli ship- 
Iran affair Nicaragua. ment, and would sell Israel 

Senator Robert Dole, the Mr Larry Speakes, the replacement parts for the anti- 
^, nalP Republican leader. White House spokesman, said tank missiles sent to Iran. 


would take in investigating the ------ . - . 

Iran affair Nicaragua. ment, and would sell Israel 

Senator Robert Dole, the Mr Larry Speakes, the replacement parts for the anti- 
Senate Republican leader. White House spokesman, said tank missiles sent to Iran, 
wants him to call a special on television that the Presi- Mr McFariane also ron- 
«S'ion of Congress to enable dent agreed that “there were firmed that he had been told of 
STo authorize the investiga- some mistakes in the di- the secret diversion of funds 
linns and appropriate money version of funds, in some of for the Contras by Lieutenant- 
for them now° P The Demo- the implementing processes Colonel Oliver North, the 
*?£££ oppose this involved in the Iranian issue”, former NSC military adviser, 
and want to wait until next Vice-President George Bush while they were on a mission 
l n f n ih an i/heo Coneitss re- has already said that “clearly to Tehran for Mr Reagan. 


wants him to call a special on television that the Presi- 
session of Congress to enable dent agreed that “there were 


month when Congress re- has aireaay saia tnai cieany 
convenes with a Democratic mistakes were made, and Mr 
vrilv Caspar Wembereer, the De- 

m The Republicans say a spe- fence Secretary has gone fur- 
C ;J> session will speed up the ther and said that Mr Reagan 

5USE, "r* “ 


SSK us coven, advjce-onu^u. 


. n-.t Cpnltnr U2V1U UUI i*ia iwuvi fc I»*vi «hiuuv, Uiwiit m tfv|/ivxuvv« MWV. 

J«!cr the Republican the former National Security Meanwhile, a poll released 
Si^Tnofihc Senate intelli- .Adviser who was clearly the yesterday showed that Ameri- 
chairman investiga- target of Mr Weinberger’s cans think former President 

gence com. R c0 “Jj criticism, laid the blame Carter did a better job than 
thins up “If he squarely on the President He President Reagan in dealing 
b ^ !^^ll of the to and told the Senate intelligence with Iran, 
chose to get al * w0|iW committee, according to The An NBC television poll said 

make | hem p • flew York Times, that Mr 30 per cent of those asked now 

hasten me pro^esj l0 Reagan gave advance a p- say Mr Carter did a “good” or 

ln a criticism of provaJ lo Israel’s sate of arms “excellent” job in deahng with 

assuage within the to Iran, despite Administra- Tehran. Only 17 per cent rated 

Repubni^PW Mr Re 3 ® 20 tion assertions 10 ^ contrar >- President Reagan that highly. 

Iranian Jews seek Americas refuge 


Bui Mr Robert McFariane, 


former NSC military adviser, 
white they were on a mission 
to Tehran for Mr Reagan. 

His testimony contradicts 
the statement by Mr Edwin 
Meese, the Attorney-General, 
who said that Mr Reagan had 
only been told in genera! 
terms of the first Israeli ship- 
ment in September last year. 

Meanwhile, a poll released 
yesterday showed that Ameri- 
cans think former President 
Carter did a better job than 
President Reagan in dealing 
with Iran. 

An NBC television poll said 
30 per cent of those asked now 
say Mr Carter did a “good” or 
“excellent” job in dealing with 
Tehran. Only 17 per cent rated 
President Reagan that highly. 


which indude the ineffective- 
ness of the Government in 
preventing ill-treatment of in- 
dividuals by the military, 
police and security forces. 

The assembly voted 61 to 
32, with 42 abstentions, 
against Iran and expressed 
concern over the summary 
and arbitrary executions tak- 
ing place in Iran. 

• Moratorium call: In a direct 
challenge to the signatories of 
the Antarctic Treaty, the Gen- 
eral Assembly has called for a 
- moratorium on negotiations , 
to establish a minerals regime 
governing the continent's re- 
sources until all countries are 
allowed to participate equally 
in the deliberations. 

Contras to 
‘educate’ 
Europeans 

By Philip Jacobson 

The Nicaraguan rebels be- 
gin two-day conference in 
London this morning aimed at 
“educating” western Europe 
about their straggle against 
the Saudiaista regime. 

Dr Arturo Cruz, the main 
speaker at the conference, was 
once a member of the Sandin- 
ista Government and later 
Nicaragua's Ambassador in 
the US. After defecting be- 
cause iff “the betrayal of oar 
revolution”, he joined the 
United Nica rag uan Opposi- 
tion (UNO), an umbrella 
organization for the Contra 
movement 

He concedes that the tar- 
moil over the Reagan Admin- 
istration's dealings with Iran 
has inflicted serins political 
damag e cm the Contras, rais- 
ing serious questions about the 
readiness of the new Democrat 
majorities in the US to con- 
tinue US military support 

“This Iran bnsmks could 
not have been more badly 
tuned for ns,” Dr Crnz said 
yesterday. “We were just 


From Richard Bassett 
Vienna 

The number of Iranian Jews 
applying for asylum m lhe 
United Stales has nsen 
shSify in me last eight 
months, a spokeman for the 
American consulate in V icnna 

said yesterday. . myy 

There arc now about l.tHJO 
Iranians waiting m Vienna to 

turned US : KSf* 
compared with only 300 io 
4i)0 eight months 
these oopercent aa Jews. 

™ Many oflhem reach Vienna 
from Turkey- According to the 

Ausirian Min,s Sre claiming 
terior, the numbers claiming 


asylum in Austria has also 
risen from just over 100 in 
1982 to 338 in the first 10 
months of this year. 

The Austrian authorities 
were, however, unable to com- 
ment on the religious per- 
suasion of these refugees. 
“The only refugees whose 
religion we register are Jews 
from ihe Soviet Union," a 
ministry spokesman said. 

The Iranian Jews are fre- 
quently supported by the He- 
brew Immigration Aid Service 
in Vienna. Members of the 
organization are reluctant to 
comment on the refugees, for 


fear that reprisals will be taken 
against others trying to leave 
Iran. 

“The routes out of Iran 
have opened up considerably 
in the last few months, but 
they could easily be dosed 
again,” one official dealing 
with the refugees observed. 

Of the 1,000 Iranians wait- 
ing to reach the US, most are 
expected to have their applica- 
tions treated favourably. ‘Our 
experience has been that these 
people meet the requirements 
of US refugee status,” an 
American diplomat said here. 
“They have legitimate fear of 
persecution.” 


improvements inourorgawz*- 
tum which would certainly 
have improved our standing in 
die US and elsewhere.'’ 

One persistent criticism iff 
the UNO has been that mod- 
erate dvSian leaders were 
kept in the dark by the 
military wing about what was 
happening to the millions of 
dollars mtended for furthering 
the war effort 

“It’s possible some of the 
Iran arms money found its way 
from that famous Swiss bank 
account into our military 
operations,” says Dr Crnz. 

“ObvioHsIy something like 
this pots as on the defensive 
but, provided there is fall 
public disclosure of what 
really happened in the Iran 
scandal, we are optimistic 
about coming oat in good 
shape when the dust settles.” 









Medics removing a body, left, from the scene of slaughter at the Pozzeno restaurant in Bogota where Delgado ran amok. 


Bogota — Hospitals yesterday appealed 
for Mood donations to save survivors of a 
massacre quried oat by a deranged 
Vietnam war veteran who killed 27 
people, including his mother, when he ran 
wild on Thursday (Geoffrey Matthews 
writes). 

Even in a conn try as notoriously violent 
as Cotombift, the mayhem wrought by 
Campo Elias Delgado, who served with 
United States forces in Vietnam, sent 
shock waves throngh the nation. The 
“Rambo-style bloodbath”, as the press 
has dubbed it, ended when Delgado shot 
himself dead as police dosed in on a pizza 
restaurant in the central Chapinero 
district where most of his victims died. 

The slaughter was quickly likened to 
the McDonald's restaurant murders in 


which 20 people were killed by a crazed 
gunman in the US two years ago. A 
copycat element could not be dismissed 
given that Delgado, aged 52, lived for 
several years in the US and served with its 
Army, either as a combat soldier or medic, 
in Vietnam. Indeed, at the height of the 
blood-letting, Delgado was beard to boast 
that he was a Vietnam veteran. 

Among the dead was the danghter-in- 
law of former President Be tan cur, whose 
four-year term ended in August. Eleven 
people were wounded, several critically. 

Delgado reportedly left the US 15 years 
ago and returned to Colombia to live with 
his mother in a Bogota apartment. The 
relationship was tense and often violent, 
said neighbours who claimed that he often 
beat his mother. 


Freed Zapu chief 
remains defiant 


From Jan Raath, Harare 


killed by a crazed She was his first victim, shot throngh 
wo years ago, A the head at point-blank range. He 
not be dismissed wrapped her body in newspaper and set it 
rged 52, lived for ablaze before going to nearby apartments 
and served with its on the pretext of needing a phone to call 
at soldier or medic, the fire brigade where he killed six 
! the height of the neighbours. 

was beard to boast After other families barricaded t hem- 
veteran. selves into their flats, he left the building 

s the danghter-in- Md * all ^ d «*<“ » the piza 
restaurant where be was a regular 

in Aueusu' Eleven cnstomer - He sat at the bar and drank 

ieverafStirallv ei S hl vodkas with oran S e !■** ^ 
m ly ‘ ordered wine and a plate of spaghetti. 

tit the US 15 years Delgado then went to a toilet with a 
lombia to live with briefcase and returned brandishing a 
ta apartment. The revolver and bunting knife. Of the 35 
and often violent, people, customers and staff, in the 
timed that he often restaurant he shot and killed 20. Several 
victims begged for their lives. 

Soviet students to 
get more state aid 

Ftom Christopher Walker, Moscow 


Mr Dumiso Dabengwa 
gives not the slightest him that 
he has spent the last five years 
in the crushing environment 
of a jaiL 

Rather, he has emerged with 
a riveting presence that can 
only re min d Zimbabwe's 
political chiefs that he cannot 
be ignored if he does not wish 
to be. 

It is. perhaps, the same 
presence that persuaded the 
white judge who acquitted 
him of changes of treason in 
1983 to say that Mr Dabengwa 
was “the most impressive 
witness the court has seen fora 
long time”. 

Goateed, tall and tending to 
portliness — understandable 
after so long with limited 
exercise on a stodgy diet — the 
articulate former guerrilla 
strategist exudes calm, alert- 
ness and, above all, defiance. 

He held a press conference, 
five hours after his release, on 
the unkempt lawns of the 
home of Mr Joshua Nkomo. 
his mentor and the leader of 
the opposition party, Zapu. 
He made it plain from the 
start that he was angry about 
being “unfairly” detained, and 
that be would brook no con- 
ditions to his release. He 
also took a swipe at the 
Government. 


Announcing the release of 
Mr Dabengwa and four oth- 
ers, Mr Enos Nkala. the 
Minister of Home Affairs, said 
he hoped they would all 
“forever refrain from commit- 
ting acts of espionage, sabo- 
tage, banditry and destabiliz- 
ation”. 

“We never deserved to be in 
detention at all.” Mr Da- 
bengwa said. “We have never 
participated in any banditry, 
nor in destabilization, let 
alone spying for South j 
Africa” The minister's state- 
ment was “unfortunate and 
irrelevant”, he said. , 

He said bis release had been 
recommended by the Detain- 
ees’ Review Tribunal as long 
ago as July this year, and he 
clearly evinced his impatience 
as he enumerated the delays 
that held up his freedom. 

He also firmly reserved his 
attitude to the year-old talks 
aimed at uniting Zapu and the 
ruling Zanu (PF) party. He 
admitted he had his own 
position, but would not publi- 
cize this until he had been 
folly briefed by his party. 

He was angry _ at his 
wrongful incarceration, but 
not unforgiving when asked if 
he would be prepared to work 
with the Government, specifi- 
cally with Mr Nkala. 


A new system of grams to 
students at the Soviet Union's 
894 universities, colleges and 
institutes is to be announced 
in the next few weeks as part 
of Mr Mikhail Gorbachov's 
reform of the antiquated 
higher education system. 

Details of the grants, which 
are expected to double the 
monthly grant to the brightest 
students from 50 to 100 
roubles (£100). were revealed 
this week by Professor Boris 
Tamm, the Rector of Tallinn 
Technical University in Esto- 
nia. 

He said the changes, which 
had been the subject of much 
internal debate, will be pub- 
lished by Mr Gennady Ya- 
godin, the Minister of Higher 
Education. 

“The mam purpose of the 
revised scale of grams is to 
provide proper incentives for 
students to study harder, and 
also to provide them with 
more free time to pursue their 
studies by making it less vital 
for them to take jobs on the 
side in order to support them- 
selves.” Professor Tamm said. 

Although higher education 
is free, the low level of state 
cash to all but a tiny elite of 
students forces large numbers 
of less gifted students to take 
on menial jobs. 


Professor Tamm said that 
students assessed in the top 
grade in all their subjects 
would next year be paid 100 
roubles a month, those in the 
grade below would receive 60 
roubles a month, and those 
assessed in the three lowest 
grades. 30 roubles. 

Under the present system 
the top students have received 
50 roubles a month, the next 
grade 40 roubles, and the three 
lowest grades nothing. 

Professor Tamm did not 
disguise his frustration with 
red tape which hampered 
education during the pre- 
Gorbachov era. “I would 
think that, since the new 
minister took over, individual 
universities in all parts of the 
Soviet Union have received 
20 per cent more freedom to 
make their own decisions.” 

The professor, who was 
responsible for the develop- 
ment of the “Little John”, one 
of only a handful of personal 
computers now being manu- 
factured in the Soviet Union, 
said fiirther reforms would be 
welcomed. 

“Fortunately the new min- 
ister was the head of a scienti- 
fic institute in Moscow for 
many years, so he knows 
exactly the problems we face 
as a result of red tape.” 


Reagan snared by Watergate factor 


Bob Woodward is back on 
the front page of The Wash- 
ington Post with explosive 
revelations. President Reagan, 
grim -faced, is promising that 
the American people will get 
the facts. A sceptical Congress 
is holding a special inquiry, 
with senators jostling to get m 
front of the television cameras 
and vent their righteous 
indignation. 

Nervous White House aides 
are quarrelling with each 
Other, while anxiously won- 
dering what else there is to 
come out. Opinion polls are 
plunging, the rhetoric is rising, 
the affair is becoming obses- 
sive. It seems like Watergate 
all over again. 

It is precisely this feeling 
tha t has set the Iran crisis on a 
course that seems unstop- 
pable. The entire country is 
reacting with set responses. 
The press is salivating at all 
the Pulitzer prizes to be won 
for ferreting out skulduggery. 
The Washington Post has 
come into its own again, far 
ahead of its rivals and relish- 
ing its championing of democ- 
racy and the Constitution 
against wrongdoing on high. 

And Congress, remember- 
ing the glory that finally 
rewarded Sam Ervin and bis 
dogged persistence, has turned 
anger and embarrassment into 
powerful tools of self-pro- 
motion. 

Republicans have tried to 
outdo the Democrats in their 
moral hyperbole. Virtually ev- 
ery House and Senate com- 


mittee wanted to be in on the 
act with its own bearings, until 
the proliferation became ab- 
surd. Even now, the House of 
Representatives has refused to 
leave it all to the Senate, and 
will set up a parallel investi- 
gation. 

All other politics have van- 
ished from the media. Politi- 
cal gossip feeds on every latest 
disclosure. Every detail now 
seems significant: who knew 

Washington View 

By Michael Binyon 

what, and when; what memo 
was written, what clandestine 
meeting arranged, what un- 
likely outsiders brought into 
the conspiracy. The business 
of government seems to have 
come lo a halt 

The Salt 2 arms treaty is 
breached with hardly a flicker 
of attention here. The post- 
Reykjavik debacle in arms 
control has prompted no fur- 
ther public discussion. The 
clamour for trade protec- 
tionism in the face of soaring 
deficits has been stilled. 

The Secretaries of State and 
Defence travel to Europe with 
America's mind unfocused on 
their missions, while the ill- 
timed arrivals here of such 
figures as Mr Neil Kinnock or 
the President of Costa Rica 
have gone almost unrecorded. 

There is, understandably, a 
nervousness and insecurity in 
the White House. 


Everyone is pointing fingers 
at everyone else. Those dis- 
missed or out of office have 
begun to blame their former 
superiors. The spokesmen 
have become meekly reticent 
the insiders sparing with their 
background information. Ev- 
eryone is waiting for the lead 
from the President 

As with President Nixon, 
the crisis has become a per- 
sonal one for Mr Reagan. 

And the perception of 
vulnerability has suddenly un- 
leashed long pent-up criti- 
cisms. even by those who 
joined in the earlier genera] 
chorus of admiration for Mr 
Reagan's handling of his job. 
The criticism is not that he is 
devious but that he is idle. 

Time magazine outlined in 
devastating detail his light 
daily workload. The Presi- 
dent, it said, arrives at his 
office at 9 am — almost two 
hours after most US chief 
executives — has a 30-minute 
daily briefing and asks few 
questions apart from “what do 
1 have to say?” 

His morning is usually 
spent on promotional events 
- meeting an athletic team or 
a delegation from the Ameri- 
can Dairy Association. His 
lunches are spent once a week 
with the Vice-President or 
Secretary of State, and in the 
afternoon he receives visiting 
heads of state or State Depart- 
ment officials with a rundown 
of “lalking points” on cue 
cards. 

On Wednesdays he takes 


the afternoon off, and on 
Fridays he leaves at 3 pm for 
Camp David. Otherwise, he 
stays in the office until about 
5 pm. He reads little, with 
memos on policy options kept 
to one or two pages and 
foreign policy papers kept to 
five. He rarely calls his aides 
for advice. 

“I've known for five years 
that the President was incom- 
petent Why has if taken the 
media so long to recognize 
this?”, a caller asked on 
America’s best-watched dis- 
cussion programme yesterday. 

“If Ronald Reagan does not 
have his finger on the pulse of 
this nation, he's incompetent 
and should resign,” another in 
the audience said. “If he has 
done something illegal, he 
should be impeached.” 

Harsh words that would not 
have come only a month ago. 
America has a tendency to 
swing to extremes. The collec- 
tive memory of Watergate has 
pushed the pendulum farther 
and faster than anyone ex- 
pected. It is not Watergate, as 
so many have pointed out. 

Mr Reagan has taken those 
immediate steps to stem the 
crisis that had to be forced 
through the courts and in 
Congress on Mr Nixon. But 
the Watergate syndrome has 
taken over. Too many poli- 
ticians and journalists are 
counting on glory in playing 
out their assumed roles to 
allow a calmer assessment. It 
will, as everyone admits with a 
sigh, go on and on. 


Iran says it paid $30m in US-approved deal 


Tehran (Reuter) — The 
Iranian Parliamentary Spea- 
ker, Mr Ali Akbar Hashemi 
Rafsanjam, has said that Teh- 
ran paid $30 million (£21 
million) for a shipment of 
American weapons parts, 
knowing that Washington had 
approved the delivery. 

He said after a Supreme 
Defence Council meeting on 
Thursday night that Iran had 
bought US arms from dealers 


for six years “but this time we 
knew that the US had agreed 
to that one shipment” 

“It became known recently 
that it came from American 
warehouses. We did not know 
this part.” Mr Rafsanjam told 
Tehran Radio. 

Mr Rafsanjanl who first 
referred to the deal in a speech 
a month ago. touching off the 
controversy, said: “It was 
really not imaginable for us 


that the American ruling 
machinery could be so flimsy. 
It appeals that the organiza- 
tion of the American rulers 
has collapsed.” 

He repeated denials that 
weapons came from or 
through Israel, but left open 
the possibility that dealers 
might have lied to Iranian 
authorities on the itineraries 
of the aircraft which delivered 
arms. “Now that they claim a 


plane has come from Israel, it 
might be that they (dealers) 
lied to us then; that is. a plane 
was coming from Tei Aviv but 
they did not tell us,” he said. 

“But we think this is un- 
likely because they were aware 
of ihc possibility that we 
might find out and cause 
problems, because we defi- 
nitely reject shipments by 
aircraft or vessels which come 
frnm Israel” 



Sarney in television appeal 

President tries 
to quell unrest 
over Brazil’s 
austerity policy 

From Mac Margolis, Bio de Janeiro 
Buffeted by a wave of anti- viewed widely here as a be- 


government sentiment and a 
slump in popularity ratings. 
President Sarney of Brazil 
went on national television 
last night to defend a series of 
stringent austerity measures 
and to rally the country be- 
hind his efforts to win more 
favourable terms for payment 
of the nation's $103 billion 
(£72 billion) debt to foreign 
creditors. 

His voice at times heavy 
with emotion, Senhor Sarney 
called upon his audience of 
millions to shake off “de- 
featism". 

“We left behind recession, a 
great scarecrow that meant 
lack of jobs, closed-down fac- 
tories. misery, hunger,” he 
said “We’re in the best period 
in our history, a period of 
growth, a moment of great 
transformations.” 

Alternating his customary 
avuncular smile with a brood- 
ing frown, Senhor Sarney. in a 
black suit and tie, spoke for 34 
minutes and invoked Mark 
Twain, John Kenneth Gal- 
braith. the liberal economist, 
and even John the Baptist 
during the broadcast. 

“For one year I preached 
alone in the desert,” he said 
referring to his contentious 
first year in office, when he 
tried to promote a “soda! 
pact" for dialogue between 
labour and management 
“1 was forced to make 
reforms on my own,” he said, 
in a reference to the February 
inflation-fighting plan, the 
Cruzado Plan- 
In a tone that wavered 
between triumphant and de- 
fensive. Senhor Sarney de- 
clared to the nation that he 
was there to “assume res- 
ponsibility” for Cruzado IL, 
the recent battery of harsh 
economic reforms which pro- 
voked a public outcry. 

His televised message, 
which bore no news, bas been 


lated attempt to buff a tar- 
nished public image. 

Two executives from Braz- 
il's leading television network, 
TV Globo, directed the Presi- 
dent as he rehearsed the 
speech. 

Senhor Sarney, aged 56, an 
experienced politician and 
also a poet, has skilfully used 
television to gamer public 
sympathy for past pro- 
grammes, such as February’s 
Cruzado Ran. 

However, it was not the 
President but his ministers of 
economy who, in a stumbling 
and disjointed presentation, 
announced in November the 
latest array of “adjustments* 
such as stiff rises in public 
utility rates and sales taxes on 
cars, petrol, cigarettes and 
alcoholic beverages. 

Senhor Sarney, after almost 
two weeks of silence, justified 
the reforms as the only means 
to “protect the gains of the 
Cruzado Plan”, threatened by 
a boom in consumer spending 
that pushed the economy to 
the limits of production and 
spawned a spreading black 
market _ 

He said: “The measures 
avert greater difficulties. They 
strengthen our economy (as 
we prepare for) renegotiation 
of the foreign debt” 

Yet Senhor Sarney was 
reportedly stung by the re- 
action to Cruzado IE, which 
boiled over into a night-time 
rampage of looting and burn- 
ings of government vehicles in 
Brasilia a week ago. 

Senhor Sarney also criti- 
cized “enemies” of the Cru- 
zado Plan, referring to the 
labour unions which have 
issued a call for a general 
strike on December 12. 

Appealing again for a “so- 
cial pact” between unions and 
management he said: “It is 
time to unite our forces, not to 
divide them.” 



UN war on killer disease 


Gurkhas recruited to take 
part in medical crusade 


selected someone to be the ‘baby', taking 
w, aifexrsofalier learns to be a duM healft consultant 


It was like a parody of the 
15 years they had spent in the 
British Army. Back in their 

iwtflin ImmpfaitH a apud of 

80 recently discharged Gur- 
khas were again doing drill, 


only 


now the hard parade 
at Kong had 
been replaced by the soft 
grasses of Oharas by the 
foothills of the Himalayas. 
Their uniform and square- 

Hthiwg l i tan y bad altered, 

too. They wore shorts and T- 
shirts, carried United Nations 
folders is their left bands and 
marched to the shouted 
rhythm of “wm -ftini-panT 1 
which in Nepali means “salt- 
sugar-water”. 

The ex-servicemen are the 
latest remits in a war against 
diarrhoea being waged by 
Unkef, toe UN relief agency, 
in one of the poorest countries 
In the world, where one in five 
children die before their fifth 
birthday and where dehydra- 


From Paul Valkly, Kathmandu 

tioa through diarrhoea] dis- 
eases is toe leading kilter . 

“The Gurkhas are perfect 
messengers,” said Mr George 
McBeau, the Umcef field offi- 
cer who is responsible for 
training toe fann e r B riiteb 
soldiers in their new role and 
who spent last week in Dbaran 


ttighbuH 


“When they are discharged 
they letmn to their homes hi 
remote areas as weB-respected 
men. They are toe potential 
social leaden, weO-eqnipped 
to mmhwf ignorance 
counter some of the harmful 
folk remedies which kaO as 
many as 4SJ0W children a 
year.” 

At the end of 15 years’ 
service in the British Army, 
members of too GorUta Regi- 
ment are given a modest 
pension and booked into a 
government retraining scheme 
ran in toe east of Nepal. There 
they are prepared for then- 


return to the hard fife of a 
former in toe Hfanfayan 
ihlands. 

are taught the rudi- 
ments of house building and 
how to ran the forms which 
most have acquired through 
their army pay daring their 
military careers. Recently a 
new component has been 
added to toe comae — sevoal 
days of team, training by 
UmceL 

“Many of their forms are in 
toe really remote regions 
where it is difficult for anyone 
else to reach on a regular 
basis. There are stiD many 
places m toe Mlh which can 
only be reached by a joraney 
on foot of as much as two 
weeks. There are no roads and 
most homes do not have a 
radio,” said Mr McBean, who 
was about to begin work on toe 
course for his fomtfa batch of 
Gurkhas. 

“It has been a great success. 



Already we have feedback 
from toe tost groups with 
remote villages wtacting ns 
for farther information on 
many te«Mi matters. It 
means we are braiding n p a 
network of reliable people in 
each area who can assist when 
we run tiling s nke imraun- 
izatioa campaigns.” 

The in v o lv em ent of the Gnr- 
khas is only one element in a 
national campaign which 
hopes to make a significant 


impact on infant mortality m a 
country where only 11 percent 
oT the population bas access to 
dean water. 

The education of 
peasants in the use 
chmi-pani , toe homemade 
variety of commercially pro- 
duced Oral Rehydration Salts 
which vastly increase rates of 
recovery by using glucose to 
bmd the essential sabs lost in 
diarrhoea, could halve the 
numbra of child deaths by 
1990. 





Astiz: acquitted on three 
previous occasions. 


ruling 


Astiz faces 
on 

kidnapping 

From Eduardo Cue 
Buenos Aires 

An Argentine federal appeal 
court was due to rule yes- 
terday in the case of Navy 
Lieutenant-Commander A1 
fredo Astiz, charged with 
wounding and kidnapping 
Miss Dagmar Hagdin, aged 
1 7, a Swedish- Argentine 
woman wbo became one of 
the more than 9,000 people to 
disappear during the 
military's war against 
terrorism. 

There was widespread spec- 
ulation in court circles and in 
the Buenos Aires press yes- 
terday that the commander, 
aged 35. who surrendered to 
the British expeditionary force 
in the South Georgia islands 
during the Falkland** war with- 
out having fired a shot, would 
be acquitted in the case for the 
fourth time. 

The prosecution charges 
that Commander Astiz led the 
commando that kidnapped 
Miss Hagdin on January 27 
1 977 and that he shot her in 
the back when she tried to 
escape. 

It also argues that Com- 
mander Astiz transported the 
wounded woman to the Army 
Mechanics School - 
Several witnesses have tes- 
tified in the previous trials 
that they remember seeing 
Miss Hagelin at the school 
where Commander Astiz 
worked, but she disappeared 
later and bas never been seen 
again. 

The Army Mechanics Sch- 
ool became the most notori- 
ous of the detention and 
torture centres 
The Supreme Council of 
Military Justice, arguing that 
there is insufficient evidence 
in the case, has acquittal 
Commander Astiz on three 
separate occasions in the past 
five years. 

At a hearing on Thursday 
before the Federal Appeals 
Court, the state prosecutor. 
Sen or Julio Cesar S Iras sera, 
called the military verdicts 
unacceptable. 

Commander Astiz has be- 
come a symbol of the re- 
pression during the military 
years. He is also suspected of 
having been involved in the 
presumed kidnapping in De- 
cember 1977 of two French 
nuns, who have disappeared. 


Israelis kill Palestinian boy 
in West Bank refugee camp 


Israeli soldiers shot and 
killed a 14-year-old boy in the 
Palestinian refugee camp of 
Balata in the occupied West 
Bank yesterday. He was in a 
group of youngsters throwing 
stones at the soldiers and 
shouting protests at the shoot- 
ing of two Palestinian students 
at Bir Zeit University the day 
before. 

The incident has further 
heightened recent tensions in 
the West Bank. As a precau- 
tion, the authorities are insist- 
ing that the funerals of those 
killed must take place after 
nightfall to prevent them turn- 
ing into potentially dangerous 
political demonstrations. 

According to a military 
spokesman, the army patrol at 
the camp followed the correct 
procedure for making an ar- 
rest after stones were thrown 
at it the boys were ordered to 
stop but they ran away. There 
was a further shouted warning 
before shots were fired in the 
air and then aimed at their legs 
as they continued to run. 

The spokesman said one 
boy “disappeared” and it was 
only balf-an-hour later that 


From Inn Murray, Jerusalem 

the local hospital telephoned 
to say dial he had been 
brought in dead of gunshot 
wounds. 

There is a standard proce- 
dure to be followed by any 
soldier who means to shoot to 
kill during West Bank demon- 
strations. Only an officer can 
give the order and then only if 
the target can be identified 
and if the men are in im- 
minent danger. Asked how the 
paired could have been in 
imminent danger if the boys 
were running away, the 
spokesman said the soldiers 
were not shooting to kill so the 
procedure did not apply. 

A routine isquiiy is to be 
bdd into this shooting, like ail 
others involving the use of 
weapons in the occupied terri- 
tories. There are likely to be 
three separate inquiries into 
what happened at Bir Zeit 
University cm Thursday, wh- 
en the two students died and 
15 others woe injured by 
gunshot or plastic bullets. 

According to Major-Gen- 
eral Ehud Barak, the army 
commander on the West 
Bank, fewer than five officers 


were responsible for all the 
shooting at the university. He 
said they had “acted with the 
utmost restraint and did not 
shoot unless there was real 
danger. . . while malting sure 
to restrain their soldiers from 
opening fire, they also came 
under a hail of bottles and 
stones”. 

The university was dosed 
yesterday and the nearby town 
of Ramallah was quid. Most 
shops were dosed but this is 
usual in this largely Muslim 
i the Friday holy 


community on the 
day. 

The uneasy truce cranes 
after a week of mounting 
tension in the West Bank. It 
began with demonstrations 
commemorating Palestine 
Partition Day, marking the 
anniversary of the 1947 
United Nations vote to estab- 
lish an independent Jewish 
state. 

• AMMAN: Jordan yes- 
terday condemned the “tyran- 
nical and harsh” Israeli action 
in which the two Palestinian 
students were killed at Bir Zeit 
University (Renter reports). 


Cavaco Silva wins budget debate 


From Martha de la Cal 
Lisbon 

Portugal's Parliament has 
approved the 1987 budget 
presented by the minority 
Government of Senhor Cav- 
aco Silva, the Prime Minister. 

The budget was passed yes- 
terday morning after a 
continuous session of 21 
hours during which the Prime 
Minister accused the Opposi- 
tion party of introducing un- 


acceptable changes in the 
budget and of infring in g on 
areas pertaining exclusively to 
his ministers. 

He challenged the Com- 
munist Party to present a 
motion of censure against his 
Government in parliament 
“rather than deface Lisbon’s 
walls with slogans”. 

The main point of conten- 
tion during the last day of 
debate concerned a clause to 
provide large sums of money 


to raise the salaries of univer- 
sity professors. 

Though some of his own 
party backed the proposal, 
Senhor Silva vehemently op- 
posed it saying that university 
professors would then male* 
22 per cent mare than a 
government minister and 10 
per cent more than the Prime 
Minister. 

The final vote on the Budget 
was 98 in favour, 75 against 
and 37 abstentions. • 


Spain and 
US feud 
over bases 

From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 
Senor Narris Sena, the 
Spanish Defence Minister, has 
admitted for the first time that 
negotiations with the United 
States for a reduction of its 
military bases and- troop 
strengths in this country, be- 
gun last July, are going badly. 

Government sources in- 
dicated yesterday that the 
latest round, held in Madrid at 
the beginning of the week, 
found the two sides’ positions 
more opposed than ever. 

Senor Sena, when be met 
Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
US Defence Secretory, in 
Brussels after the Madrid 
round, ind i cated that Spain’s 
* Irion would remain “very 


junior a 
formed 


Hie Spanish Parliament cm 
Thursday approved a govern- 
ment Bill permitting the 
reinstatement of nine ronz 
army officers who had 
a Union of Military 
Democrats during the last 
years of the Franco era. 



Sefior Seme admits trffc* fa 
Madrid are going badly . 


Death of Hong Kong governor 

Whitehall loses its 
handover expert 

By Andrew McEwen, Diplomatic Correspondent, 
and Robert Grieves in Peking 


fidals in Peking on Monday. 

Sir Edward had visited 
Britain fa February, May, July 
and September, in addition to 
a North American tour that 
took him to Chicago, New 
York, San Francisco, Vancou- 
ver and Washington fa July. 

A man of immense energy. 
Sir Edward gave up part of ms 
month's leave fa July and 
August to put fa tune at the 
Foreign Office and the Hong 
Kong Government Office. 
The Queen’s visit on October 
21 added to his workload. 

He played a key rote fa the 
negotiations that ted to the 
signing of the 1984 Sfao- 
British accord on the future of 
Hong Kong. 

Business confidence in 


The sudden death of Sir 
Edward Youde, Governor of 
Hong Kong, was seen as a 
great Wow in Whitehall yes- 
terday, depriving the Foreign 
Office of one of its foremost 
experts on the colony’s transi- 
tion to Chinese rule. 

Sir Edward was at the 
forefront of efforts to dovetail 
British and Chinese proposals 
on Hong Kong’s constitu- 
tional future. More than any 
other official he understood 
the policy known as “conver- 
gence” Whitehall's strategy 
fra ensuring that progress 
towards representational gov- 
ernment up to 1997 remains 
in step with Chinese plans 
after the British tease expires. 

He had just conveyed the 

toettWjit^Us^geaionsto Hong Kong is not expected to 
Mr Zhou Nan, China* Dep- suffer i^g hanTfiom Sir 
tgFra^Mmister.whenhe Edward’s death. Although 
tw stocks tumbled and the local 

currency feUm response to the 

, qu “ recove,y — 

100 hraL Despitt abrart - Tie Chief Secretary. Sir 

David Akers-Jones, who was 
also fa London last month and 
is highly informed on White- 
hall thinking, took over as 
acting governor. 

Lady Youde, who had been 
on a trip to the central city of 
Xian, arrived back in Peking 
yesterday. Messages of condo- 
lence were sent by Sir Geof- 
frey Howe, Mr W U Xueqirin. 
the Chinese Foreign Minister, 
Mr Jipengfei, State Counsellor 
fa charge of Hong Hong 
affairs, and Mr Zhou Nan, the 
Deputy Foreign Minister. 

Obitrai?' page 18 


operation before be 
took up his appointment in 
1982, he maintained a hectic 
pace of shuttle diplomacy. 

His death followed a sched- 
ule which would have pun- 
ished many younger men. Last 
week he flew into London on 
Tuesday, held two meetings 
with Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, and two 
with junior ministers, and left 
again on Thursday. 

Arriving back in Hong 
Kong on Friday, he had only a 
brief rest before beginning 
talks with senior Chinese of- 


Man freed 
after 16 
years in 
detention 

Karachi — A man, aged 75, 
who had been under detention 
for the past Id years without 
being charged or coming be- 
fore a court, was ideated 
resterday on the orders of the 
Jind High Court (Zahid 

Hussain writes). . . 

According to the petition 
gjed by the Prisoners Aid 
Cnciftv the detainee, Mr 
Mukh'tar. was arrested in 1970 
bv the Karachi police. The 
court has asked the Advocate 
General to ascertain the facts 
about the detention. 

Chalker in 
Uganda 

Kampala (AFP) - Mis 
Lvnda Chalker. Minister of 
State for the Foreign Office, 
arrived in Uganda yesterday 
for a two-day visit, her second 
to the country this year. 

Mrs Chalker is expected to 
hold talks with President 
Museveni and other officials 
on future British assistance to 
Uganda. 

Prisoner wins 
a bonus 

Peking (Reuter) — China’s 
economic reforms have finally 
reached the plastic shoe fac- 
tory at the Peking Number 
One Prison. 

When a prisoner designed a 
successful new model of shoe, 
he was given five days off 
work and a 100 yuan (£19) 
bonus. 

Nazi inquiry 

Canberra (Reuter) — A 
Government commission said 
that 70 Nazi war criminals 
might be living in Australia 
and a special body should be 
set up to investigate and 
perhaps prosecute them. The 
commission bas given the 
Government a secret list of the 
alleged criminals. 

Tap thefts 

Moscow (Reuter) — Theft of 
state property is so widespread 
fa the Soviet Union that 
employees of the airline Aero- 
flot are stealing taps from 
washrooms at Moscow's main 
international airport, the of- 
ficial weekly Nedefya said. 

Tough laws 

Bonn (Reuter) — The West 
German Parliament has pass- 
ed new la w-making jj illegal to 
publisher distribute informa- 
tion helpful to terrorists and 
broadening the legal defi- 
nition of terrorist acts to 
include sabotage of state 
power and transport facilities. 

Bomb defused 

Almeria (Reuter) — Police 
said they defused a powerful 
bomb planted outside the 
offices of the local newspaper 
Cronica fa the southern city of 
Almeria. There was no im- 
mediate explanation for the 
attack against the newspaper. 

To meet Pope 

Vatican City (AP) — The 
Pope will meet General 
Wojriech Jaruzelski, the Pol- 
ish leader, when he visits Italy 
next month at the invitation 
of the Prime Minister. Signor 
Bettino CraxL 

Cave deaths 

Huelva (Reuter) — Three 
1 0-year-okl children were 
found dead in a cave near this 
southern Spanish city after 
playing truant from a school 
trip to a film festival They 
appeared to have been suffo- 
cated by smoke from a fire 
they lit 

Epidemic aid 

Lagos (Reuter) - Five 
American experts are due to 
arrive in Nigeria shortly to 
help doctors fight a yellow 
fever epidemic which has 
lulled at least 300 villagers. 

Reform urged 

Moscow (Reuter) — Soviet 
actors, playwrights and the- 
atre directors have been told 
to break away from control by 
cultural bureaucrats and help 
M r M i kh a i l Gorbachov in 
reforming society. 


* 


Witch doctors summoned to help exorcise Aids Three American firms 

join Pretoria exodus 


From Michael Hornsby 
Johannesburg 

Leaders of South Africa's 
witch doctor fraternity joined 
forces with conventional medi- 
cine here yesterday to contain 
the spread of toe MDra disease 
Aids, which so far has net 
been found in any Mart South 
African. 

About 100 sangotaas gn*t 
wyanges, as witch doctors are 
known, attended a briefing on 
Aids (acquired hiiiimnr de- 
ficiency syndrome) at the 
South African Institute for 
Medic al Re search, which is 
co-ordinating a eampaip to 
educate the public about toe 
ailment. 

Witch-doctoring has be- 
come a well-organized pro- 
fession, and many of toe 
sajigomas, men and women, 
wore sober Western dress, 
while others spoiled more 
gaudy traditional garb, from 
leopard skin headdresses to 
coloured beads and feathers. 

Last month various witch- 
doctor associations, represent- 
ing some 56,000 soagomes. 


came together to form the 
South African Traditional 
Healers' Council, whose presi- 
dent is Mr Lyman Mrihi, a 
herbalist from Soweto. 

“We are trying to get official 
recognition for our organiza- 
tion, ami to get herbalism and 
traditional healing established 
as a recognized university 
degree course,” Mr Msibi, 
who looks more like a stock- 
broker than a wild doctor, 

said yesterday. 

“Aids is a new disease fra 
us,” Mr Sam Mails, a herbal- 
ist from tiie Pretoria area, 
admitted as be arrived fra the 
meeting. “I don’t toinir it can 
be passed on by sex. It most 
come from mosquitoes, like 
malaria.” 

Later, after the briefing by 
Dr Ruben Sher, a member of a 
group of medical experts 
advising the Government mi 
Aids, Mr Mafla had revised 
his opinion. He now accepted 
that the disease was sexually 

transmitted. 

A woman saxgoota. Miss 
Thelma Siwda, from the 


.Alexandra township on Jo- 
banaesbrag’s north-east out- 
skirts, said: “The doctor 
showed us from slides how to 
recognize the symptoms of 
Aids and that you do not need 
to throw bones to do this.” 

Throwing bones — in fact, 

iwMily Mnatl alidla — and 

observing the pattern they 
make when they fall is the 
mam method used by witch 
doctors to divine the cause of 
trouble or fitness and to fore- 
tell the future. 

“I think we can educate 
people by telting them not to 
be p ro stit ute s and to sue 
condoms,” said Miss Srirela, 
who was smartly dressed in 
Western style,' except for a 
leopard skin ring on her bead. 

Miss Siwela said stressed to 
be a school teacher. Then one 
day she fell sick. Her doctor 
told her she had high Mood 
pressure, but she also con- 
sulted a witch doctor who . 
confirmed her own feeling that 
her ancestors were telling her 
to become a sagoma. 

She took the witch doctor’s 


advice, and hmnedietely the 
symptoms of her innwq — 
headaches and sickness — 
disappeared, she said. She was 
then eraoUed as a twasa, an 
apprentice witch doctor. 

Dr Sher said that many of 
the saagomas who attended 
yesterday's meeting probably 
still believed that witchcraft 
was the cause of Aids. But 
even if only 10 per cent had 
changed their views the meet- 
ing would have been of value. 

“We want them to be able to 
recognize the symptoms of 
people suffering from the dis- 
ease, so they can refer thg« to 
a hospitaL More importantly, 
we want than to educate 
Macks on the need to avoid 
promiscuity,” he 

This could be an n phfli 
battle. The purpose of much 
matt — traditional medicine 
concocted from roots, hobs 
and even parts of animal and 
human bodies — is to increase 
sexual activity. Magazines 
aimed at Mack readers abound 
In adve r tis e ments Ira exotic 
aphrodisiacs. • 


It is estimated that there 
could be more thaw a mfifien 
and a half witch doctors hi 
South Africa, roughly one for 
every 30 people fa the country. 
They stfll have great authority 
m rural areas, and even 
sophisticated urban Macks are 
not humane to their inflaeace. 

“We estimate that 80 per 
cent of Marks who fall 31 will 
consult a seagoma before a 
conventional doctor,” Dr Sher 
said. “So we believe they must 
be regarded as health care 
workers.” 

AH the 36 Aids cases so for 
diagnosed in South Africans 
have been fa white males, of 
whom 26 have died. Nearly all 
were homosexual or MsesuaL 
Miners, who are mainly mi- 
grant labourers boused in all- 
male hostels on mine com- 
pounds, are thought to be one 
of the main Mach groups at 
risk. 

A survey carried out over the 


From Our Own Correspondent, Johannesburg 
Three more American corp- 
orations are to divest from 
South Africa: Revlon cosmet- 
ics, Honeywell electronics and 
computers, and Fluor, an 
engineering, constructions 
and natural resources manage- 
ment company. 

This brings to 64 the num- 
ber of American corporate 
withdrawals from South Af- 
rica since January 1985 Of 
these. 1 9 have left their opera- 
tions here more or less intact 
by selling out to the local 
management or selling their 
shares and assets to South 
African companies. 

N^ e Yo?fS'H r T 0n ^ ft™ 

E2L Y P rk the Revlon 

SSSSSSS- 10 xU its 

™ s® subsidiary, which has 
a manufacturing plant 


fohannesb u -rg-;% m V,“ l y i^ 

past year by the Chamber of possible and^oi l^S 
Mines, which took 300,000 end of next year tfie 

blood samples, .failed, bow- The mason for Pp„, , 
ever, to find a single case. Pallet w*s*ddtt> ^ v i? n 5 


certainty in the economic and 
praiticai situation fa South 
African, and the Govern- 
ment s lack of progress fa 
dismantling apartheid”. There 
was no immediate confirma- 
tion from Revlon here. 

In a statement from its 

hOUSS?" headquarters, 
Honeywell announced that it 
Sg 'ts So Ulh African 

10 ,he Murray and 
Kooens construction and en- 
gmeenng group for an un- 
disclosed sum of money. 
Hon^weM has five offices 
1 aiK ^ ^ employees. Local 

S s i2?* ,e f t - lcss ^ oM 
revenue!* ° f 1,5 

Cau£™iJ tS cf eadqua,1ers m 
vail tom ia. Fluor Corn, ves- 

terday announced that It was 

SZ, ns , Soulh . Aftica "^ 

trust -nj 0 , “dependent 
local m anage ment 
Mrt*°lH once wouUJranSi 

SS3& under aTSS . 






December 6-12 A 1 1 

rn Z A weekly guide 

I YJ I * T\ V to leisure, entertainment 


| |\ | | and the arts 


man s guide to the horse 

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•- rODf 


ON THIS DAY 


NOVEMBER 24 2917 

This operation was the breaching 
of the Hindonburg line by the 3rd 
.4 rmy on November 2fl British 
tanks had been tried out at Arras 
in 1916, hut this teas the first mass 
attack, with mare than 300 
medium tanks. The impetus was 
later lost through heavy rain and 
the strength of the German 
counter-attack. 


GREAT BRITISH 
VICTORY. 


BYNG STRIKES ON 
THE RIGHT . 

FIV E-MILE ADVA NCE. 

BIN DENBURG LINE 
BROKEN . 

A B ATTLE OFTANK S. 

8.000 PRISONERS. 

... The outstanding: feature of the 
maing^^ course - been 
nrinfllrfffTlir.^mi 1 — nr in the 


A V 




0 


%'t' 


The story behind the story: Hie Tftneracamitaf the battle, re-printed last inonth, whkh pnwnpted I^maWMareiidaz to contacts. He is pictured in the cockpit of a Maurice Farmaa trainer in 1917 and at his Lincolnshire home this week 


rr, Grf A survivor of 
<?c\ >^^)the last era in 
which it was still 
v^Ak\ possible to think 
of war as tour- 
ney and its fight- 
ing men as knights has this 
week touched the elbow of 
The Times and wondered if he 
might just have a word. 

Captain Donald Marendaz, 
a former pilot in the Royal 
Flying Corps, begged leave to 
add to our recent account of 
the famous battle of Cambrai 
in 1917 (reprinted in our “On 
This Day” column). As he was 
the only RPC flier to penetrate 
the mist that obscured the 
Masnieres Bridge on the first 
day of the battle, his was a 
unique view, and there were 
jusi one or two points he 
thought he might add . . . 

In the interests of historical 
accuracy itwas a duty— and a 
personal delight — to comply. 
For what men like Capt 
Marendaz had done in the 
skies above France made 
them heroes to seven genera- 
tions of schoolboys who 
carved their aircraft from 


balsa, and glued inch-high 
busts of their idols into cock- 
pits of replica Camels and 
Fokkers. 

Even die realization in 
adulthood that First World 
War aces went ill-trained, 
cursing and terrified to appall 
fog deaths (they had no para- 
chutes yet many chose to 
jump rather than accept incin- 
eration in flaming aircraft) did 
not deflea the belief that it 
was above the mud of the 
trenches where chivalry in 
combat finally died: and 
where Biggies was bom. 

Not that Capt Marendaz. 
tiny, bespectacled, frail as a 
strut, looks now like a Biggies. 
But he wore spectacles on that 
November day above Cam- 
brai which, approaching his 
90th birthday, he recalls with 
piercing clarity. Cambrai is 
famous for its first use ol 
massed tanks in battle: it 
might have become notable,, 
too. for an epic final disaster 
for cavalry, had Captain 
Marendaz not managed to 
pierce the fog which grounded 
or diverted every other air- 




* /S iasorT'** 

par spy'/^q 



craft. Allied and German, on 
that first day. 

His task when betook off at 
7.15 am to begin the 45-minute 
climb to his Armstrong- 
Whitworth’s operational 
height of 5,000 lea (“we were 
usually numb with cold by the 
time we got up") was to spot 
for the cavalry arm of the 
forces. Kept in idleness for 
most of the war, their chance 
had supposedly come. The 
horses were to lunge through 
the gap made by the tanks and 
outflank the Germans. 

“Couldn’t see a thing from 
up high," the captain stud, “so 
came down to 150 feet Bit 
close with all that rifle fire, but 
only way to gel under the fog. 
Then I saw a British tank 
trying to creep over the bridge 
across the Canal at Masnferes 
which the cavalry were to use. 
The bridge simply bent be- 
neath its weight Useless. I 
wound down my signal wire, 
and sent a message in Morse 
to tell them to stop ... go 
back. 

The captain, in tones as 
clipped and precise as Morse 
itself, continued: “Just after 
that, my plane had all the air 
taken from its wings by a salvo 
of shells from the huge 12 inch 
guns they had brought up for 
the assault Felt it go past 
Plane started to side-slip down 
into the canal — about 70 feet 
wide and just about as deep, as 
I recall No water— just a sort 
of huge concrete trench. We 
had practically stopped dead 
and were just falling out of the 
air.” 

So what did he do? “Didn’t 
fight the slip . . . instead I 
increased it into a vertical 
bank. Then, using the rudder 
as an elevator and the ele- 
vators as the rudder, 1 climbed 
straight up out of the 
canel . . . round and round 
like a corkscrew.’' Who ever 
had taught him a trick like 
that? “Taught? No one. In 


BATTLE OF CAMBRAI 
5000 yards Eg*®! 


line Nor 29 


Cambrai 3 


L line before 

• British attack, ' \ 

• - Nov 20 £3 

• Masntefes’j 


■s 


Cambrai ' 




those days there wasn't any 
who knew. Only had 20 hours 

flying training in all one 

hour on the machine I took 
into action. What you knew 
about aircraft beyond the 
basic, you found out for 
yourself Just pure reaction 
made me spin that plane up 
outoftbecanaL” 

CisN. And then? 

“Wasn’t sure the 
cavalry bad got 
v^k\ the message, so I 
found a bit of a 
^ flat patch near a 
field station, put the plane 
down and went to find a 
telegraph. Odd thing - my 
observer was unconscious. 
Poor chap had fainte d dead 
away when we started to slip. 
Tboughr be was dead, I 
suppose. 

“Got back to the mess that 
night and heard that church 
bells were sounding all over 
Britain for the ’victory’. We 
knew better. The rains had 
started. The tanks were 
bogged down. In a week the 
Germans had taken back our 
gains, about 600 yards wide on 
a six-mile from. But at least we 


An historic battle 
in 1917 established 
the role of tanks. 
The official record 
makes no mention 
ofa little spotter 
plane, but its pilot 
told Brian James 
the story of his 
own crucial role 

hadn't lost the cavalry. They 
were dying to go . . but if I 
hadn’t seen that bridge go, 
they would have been slaugh- 
tered. So it’s quite wrong what 
some historians have sug- 
gested, that the cavalry foiled 
to carry out their assignment 
Simply, they couldn’t” 

Any more adventures? 
Well there was the time Ire 
missed a German aircraft 
going in the opposite direction 
m fog by about a yard. And 
put down beside a 
shellhole.The first man he saw 
when be climbed out was 
wearing “a very odd uniform. 
He just kept on going. I 
realized then he was probably 
a German. Thought I was 
probably behind their lines so 
started to make preparations 
to set fire to the aircraft Then 
the Tommies turned up.” 

Then there was combat “If 
a German got on your tail you 
were dead mutton. Taught 
myself to fly in a sort of three- 
dimensional zigzag. It was all 
very fraught with danger.” But 
was he never frightened? “I 
think it is true to say not that I 
was scared of nothing, rather 
that I was scared of every- 


thing.” WeU, a hero would say 
th§l wouldn’t he? 

Captain Marendaz's flying 
career was almost ended be- 
fore it had begun. On his first 
flight upon his enlistment, an 
over-confident instructor fin- 
ished the initial lesson with a 
stunt, which put both men and 
the aircraft through the roof of 
a hangar. The instructor was 
packed off the trenches, and 
the squadron commander sat 
up half the night trying to 
ensure that the young 
Lt Marendaz bad not lost his 
enthusiasm. No chance — 
young Donald bad been ob- 
sessed with the air since he 
had watched the Hon 
C.S. Rolls inflating his bal- 
loons and testing early aircraft 
opposite his school at 
Monmouth. 

Invalided out with an 80 per 
cent pension f’which I gave 
up during the great de- 
pression: thought my coon try 
needed the money more than 
I”), Captain Marendaz went 
back to his other love, fast 
cars. He helped start the Alvis 
company. He designed and 
built tire famous Marendaz 
Special which, in the late 
Twenties, set three world 24- 
hour endurance records at 
Montihery near Paris, 

qs. Qrf Then he de- 
signed another 
Marendaz sports 

v%lk\ car in which 
Stirling Moss’s 
^ mother, Aileen, 
demolished all opposition 
among Continental rivals. 

He set up, at his country’s 
request, two clubs in the late 
1930s to teach young men to 
fly. One became the most 
successful of all turning out 
495 pilots who were to become 
among the best of The Few. 
He designed the first trainer 
with a retractable under- 
carriage. What is more, the 
aircraft could “hover" (pre- 


•ni 

U 


A ill e ? 

WOT 


late bottled 

VINTAGE 


/tS-r-0 ' Aa/ 


Graham* 

^AhiW r»w 

19T9 

IIIHf 





— 

2.-L- 











*#11 



dating the Harrier by about 40 
years). The same RAF of- 
ficials who rejected Whittle’s 
jet engine turned down this 
Marendaz Special. Next he 
went to Germany and talked 
his way in to to see how the 
Nazis were training their own 
pilots— tins was just six weeks 
before the war began. 

The flow of reminiscence 
was interrupted by the roar of 
an RAF jet about 500 feet 
overhead. “They like to let me 
know they are about”, he 
smiled, adding that he didn't 
really envy those fliers. “They 
would fight a different sort of 
war. 1 think we were the last to 
have the opportunity to act in 
a chivalrous manner. 


“An RFC man who shot 
down a balloon and then fired 
on the Germans descending in 
their parachutes found his 
bags packed on his bunk when 
he landed. He could not 
remain. None of us would 
have served with him. He is 
still alive; even today 1 could 
not take his hand." 

Jawing away an afternoon 
in the company of Captain 
D.M.KL Marendaz, ex-RFC, 
about dawn flights over the 
lines and travelling flat-out 
down the Brooklands straight, 
was to re-enier the boyhood 
world of W.E. Johns and 
Dornford Yates. Does anyone 
know . . . can one still get a 
Spad in kit form? 


SATURDAY 


Classical 
records: 
pick of 
the year, 
Page 13 

Pwl' lOOMPWt KHONSIPIIC IH..U 


Arts Diary 

13 Opera 

14 

Bridge 

13 Photography 

14 

Chess 

13 Radio 

14 

Conceits 

14 Review 

13 

Crossword 

13 Rock St Jazz 

14 

Paacr 

14 Shopping 

9 

Drink 

10 Television 

14 

Faring Out 

11 Times Cook 

J1 

Films 

14 Travel 

8 

Galleries 

14 TV A Radio 

14 

Gardening 

10 TV (finis 

14 



It looked like luckhad run out for this poor fellow after 
he was savagely mauled tqr a dog. Especially as his owners 
couldn’t afford the veterinary fees. 

That* when Blue Cross came to the rescue. 

We’re a charity who cares for sick and injured animals 
either brought in from the street or whose owners can’t 
meet the expense of private treatment 

However, we do depend entirely on your support to 
keep this much needed service going. 

So please help bjr filling in tbs coupon below 


I'd Hke more Information on Woe Cross Q I'dliketamateadSBatJco O 
I tndwe mj cbeipHtiposbjl trdtf far £ — . — — 



To; Blw> Crow BbmoU ttespHa). 

I Hugh St. Victoria. Union SWTVIQf. 


fl «/l_2/B_ 













THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 1 


S hatuee's sleek blade hair, 
loo thy grin and slightly 
crazed look in the eye bad 
earned him the nickname 
“Dervish” before the 
minibus journey was an hour okL 
It was entirely inappropriate, be- 
cause Dervish country was down in 
Rawalpindi, our destination. 
Shahjee, the driver, came from 
Gilgit, high in the mountains and 
the starting point of our journey. 

Gilgil. a trading post and trek- 
king centre, is a modest town with 
one proud boast it is said to be the 
home of polo, which they used to 
play with a headless goat, picked up 
and carried on horseback, as the 
"ball". Until the 1890s Gilgit was 
almost inaccessible; the path then 
was from Srinagar in Kashmir, and - 
it took a month. By air it now takes 
half an hour from ’Pindi, a 
spectacular flight on a Fokker 
Friendship whose wings skirt the 
grey peaks with the femfliarity of 
an eagle. That was how I had 
arrived, but today was cloudy, the 
flight was cancelled, and so our ad 
hoc group of airline people and 
their would-be passengers looked 
to Shabjee and his minibus to see 
us 380 miles down the Kara- 
korams. The question was, how 
long would it take? 

Eight to 10 hours, said the book. 
Twelve hours, said one guide. 
Fourteen at least, said another. 
Shahjee shook his head and 
grinned. He had three words of 
E nglish: “cigarette** and “thank 
you**. It was 1pm when the journey 
began, a voyage down the road 
which has as good a claim as 
anything to be called, as Pakistan 
calls it, the eighth wonder of the 
world. 


Rawalpindi or bust 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Although the Karakoram 
Highway is pleasantly traffic-free on 
its upper reaches, the opening of 
the road to China has led to a 
giowth in tourism and several 
companies are beginning to put 


W6 OQU (01-741 8041) - for 
example, offers a 16-day tour for 
£1,165, visiting Rawalpindi, 
Peshawar. Swat, Chilas, Gilgit, 
Karimabad and Lahore. An 
optional seven-day extension to 
India takes the cost to £1 ,579. 
Explore Worldwide, of 31 A High 
Street, Aldershot, Hampshire GU1 1 
1BH (0252 319448), offers a 19- 
day tour from about £900 (this 
year's price) visiting the 
•forgotten valleys of Sfcardu, Gilgit 
and Hunza. , 

For information on specially 
taHored tours, writs to the sales 
deportment, PI A, London W6 
(01-741 6066) 


^ jyiW" Legend has it that a life was lost 
■■S/ " building each of the 480 miles 
SPOTS of the Karakoram highway, 
which joins Pakistan to China. Peter Brown 
took the long day's journey into a nightmare 


The Karakoram highway, or 
KKH, joins Pakistan to China. The 
road was opened in toto to western- 
ers this year. It is 480 miles long, 
and they say a man was lost tor 
every mile of its construction. One 
engineer was killed when a stone 
toll 2,700 torn, piercing his helmet 
Others were simply blown into the 
River Indus by the wind, or 
perished while climbing the rocks 
to place the charges that blasted the 
highway out of these mighty moun- 
tains, central link in the chain tha t 
joins the Hindu Kush to the 
Himalayas. Merely to set foot on 
such a road seems like an act of 
homage. 

The trip down to Rawalpindi 
was not our first experience of the 
KKH. Twenty-four hours earlier 
we bad travelled by jeep in the 
opposite direction, towards the 
border, passing the Chinese ceme- 
tery at Dainyore on the way. The 
scale of the terrain above Gilgit is 
vast, but not exactly picturesque. 
Instead, the interest lay in the silver 
of the slopes, bare of flora save for 
the odd aromatic herb; in the 
glaciers, crossed at their feet in a 
whoosh of water; but most of afl in 
the ancient silk route, the perpetual 
goat track on the opposite side of 
the valley, along which Marco Polo 
must have made his perilous way. 



Travel in this remote region is 
not for the weak of spirit or of liver. 
It is, however, a trekker's 
paradise and there is excellent 
trout-fishing. For the 


In the tiny roadside villages, 
tailors plied their ancient Singers 
and shearers worked on goats 
beneath the next day’s dinner, 
hanging by its legs from a tree. 
Although tourism is breeding 
familiarity, it has not as yet led to 
obvious contempt the people, 
notable for a range ofheadgear that 
would shame Ascot, were friendly, 
and aion£ the road the uniformed 
schoolchildren waved in delight at 
the westerners. In the Hunza 
Valley, a fertile oasis in this barren 
land, we scoured their feces for a 
Grecian feature, for Alexander also 
passed this way and the Hunza are 
a remarkable people, traditionally 
held to be fair, long-living and free 
of stomach complaints. Perhaps as 
an example to them, a lurid poster 
of the Princess of Wales adorns the 
valley’s petrol pump. 

In the village of Gulmit, our 
stopping place for lunch, 
Mohammad Sh ah Khan, the inn- 
keeper, told us of his childhood in 
Karimabad, the Hunza’s craggy 
capitaL There were tales of the 
annual wedding feasts — “plenty of 
meat, wine was in, harvest was 
ready**. And of the great party, “an 
alabula”, on sowing day. With the 
coming of the road, he said, all this 
had changed (though it is the Aga 
Khan who has banned the wine 

mountaineer there is the Nanga 
Partial massif at 26,660ft and 
Rakaposhi at 25,552ft For the 
archaeologist the KKH is 
scattered with petroglyphs. 

Although the hotels are 
improving, the food and water must 
stiff be treated circumspectly. 

Best stick to vegetables and Coke. 

As weB as jewellery and leather- 
ware, the region is known for its 
pattu— hand-woven woollen 
doth —and chugas, Baffstani 
gowns. 

Good books: An insight and 
Guide to Pakistan by Christine 
Osborne (Longman, £12.95£ 

Pakistan: a Travel Survival Kit 
(Lonely Planet. £4.95). 


WEATHER EYE 


The temperature in northern 
Pakistan ranges from 43°F in 
January to 8OT in June. In 
September, a good time to go, the 
average Is 75°F. 


by bus 


now). Mohammad put the mucin 
publicized health of the Hunza 
down to a life free of worry and to 
sheer, never-ending hand work in 
an area where there are two 
harvests.. Others attribute it to the 
local apricots, or gold in the water. 

Even if Mohammad still believes 
it, others now doubt the longevity 
theory, and, even if the Hunza are 
free of stomach complaints, there 
- are certainly other diseases, al- 
though the Aga Khan — the people 
are Ismaifi Muslims - is making 
great strides in health care. 

It had been a fascinating trip, 
although time had forced us to 
return before reaching the 
Khunjerab Pass, 15,000 feet high 
and inevitably known as the roof- 
top of the world, where the border 
lies. In compensation there were 
locally-mined rabies to buy, cut- 
price, in the government shop in 
Hunza. Now, a day later, as the 
minibus pounded down the high- 
way, just wide enough for two 
vehicles, there was time to examine 
them at leisure in the afternoon 
light, and listen (with some plea- 
sure at first) to Shahjee’s Pakistani 
pop tapes. I even tried to hum 
along, though it wasn't easy. 

B efore our arrival at 
Chilas, the evening sun 
had turned the moun- 
tains through silver and 
brown to purple and 
black, and there was alarm on the 
bus. Spotting a driver he knew 
coming the other way, Shahjee 
would drive straight at turn, veer to 
the left at the last moment, pass 
him, stop, reverse at top speed, 
screech to a bait (the other driver 
having done the same), shake 
hands though the window and have 
achat 

That was all very well in the 
daylight, but there was a long night 
ahead, and as we watched the 
Chita* chapati-makers bake the 
fastest food in the world, we began 
to wonder if we would make it “To 
drive down the Karakoram High- 
way during the day is one thing,** 
says Christine Osborne in her 
invaluable guide to Pakistan, “but 
to travel down it at night is an 
adventure attempted only in an 
emergency.** 

They hadn't mentioned this in 
Gilgit. Nor had they explained that 
Shabjee’s conversations with other 
motorists were a vital means of 
communication tor the drivers on 
this landslide-infested road 
By the time we hit the first 
landslide all sense of time or place 
had gone. Our minds were devoted 
to wining Shabjee safely round the 
next bend Silence is also prayer, as 
the Pakistanis say. He was yawning 
now; let us hope that the Aga Khan 






:-V:> 





rettes he was fed. 

But he was quick enough on the 
brakes, warned by a flinty of white 
shirts picked out in the headlamps. 
They were pushing their jeep over a 
rabble of rocks, obviously recently 
fallen. A quick committee decirinn 
was taken to get out of the bos, bat 
too late. Shahjee had turned off the 
tape and was creeping forward 
inches, it seemed, from the edge. 
Several years later he reached the 
other side, to a round of relieved 
applause. 

Soon after that the storm began, 
a Wagnerian display, the li ghtning 
illuminating the peaks and the 
valley, with the Indus glistening 
below. Greasy roads, now, but at 
least some of the oncoming trucks 
had headlights. Time to give 
Shabjee a couple of hours kip at the 
Pakistani Tourist Development 
Corporation rest house in Dasu, to 
eat our packed supper, courtesy of 
one of many Shangri-La Hotels, 


ending the journey by dawn. 

We set off again around mid- 
night Little by little the sheer drop 
on our left gave way to vegetation 
and the slightly sickly smell of 
wayside marijuana perfumed the 
bus. There were more landslides — 
the lulls are still settling from the 
blasting — but nothing serious. The 
road grew rougher and straighter 
and we began to pass the gypsy- 
caravan. tinsel-laden, double- 
decker buses that tell yon you’re in 
Pakistan and on the main road, the 
great overland trail towards DelhL 
On past Taxila. ancient cradle of 
the Gandhaian culture, where the 
stupas, burial urns, are sculpted 
with the life of the prophet. 

“Cigarette?". “ Thank you". And 
as Shahjee played the tape for 
something like the seventh time, 
we rolled exhausted into Rawal- 
pindi and the vast beds of the 
Flash man’s Hotel It was six 
o'clock in the morning. 


“••• s' ■ 

!: * . • 

Old gold: the people of Hnnza province are famous for their longevity 
never finds out how many cjga- and to place bets on our chances of 


m 

TRAVEL NEWS 


Iberia. Spain’s national air- 
line, is holding down or 
cutting the cost of many of its 
low-cost “Moneyayer" feres 
next summer. Flights are 
available to 13 destinations in 
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The feres allow a stay in 
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and one month, but there are. 
also special weekend offers 
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Iberia is guaranteeing that 
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Information: 01-437 5622. 

Back to the future 


Seal ink has launched some 
low-price incentives for pas- 
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routes from Dover and Folke- 
stone next summer : The basic 
fare for motorists and their 
passengers is frozen at the 
1985 level of £11 one-way 
throughout the season arid 
half-price travel on trips across 
the Channel will be available 
with the 60-hour excursion 
fare. Cost of a five-day 
excusion, based on a 4.5 metre 
length car plus driver and one 
passenger, will range between 
£63 and £131 return. 
Information 0304 206090. 

• Czechoslovakia is making 
its first serious attempt to woo 
British skiers this winter with 
the launch of a low-cost pack- 
age pro gr am me by toe State- 
owned Cedok Touts. Flights 
are by scheduled services from 
Heathrow and the cost of a 
week’s half-hoard holiday 
ranges between £199 and 
£299. 

Information oa 01-629 6058. 
Travel In a strange land 


A tour combining North and 
South Yemen, priced at 
£1,450 for two weeks, will be 
offered next year by Bristol- 
based Regent Hobdays, which 
specializes in holidays to un- 
usual destinations. Regent will 
also be operating four tours to 
North Korea next year. 
Information 0272 211711. 



Philip Ray 


HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 


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j next y~-*' & 

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Richard Williams 
catches his breath 
at Saas Fee high 
in Switzerland 

Apart from the exercise and 
the carousing, one good rea- 
son to go skiing is simply the 
pleasure of being in the moun- 
tains. In Saas Fee you get that 
feeling every morning, as 
dawn washes some of the 
highest peaks in Switzerland. 

Forming an imposing west- 
ern rim to the U-shaped valley 
m which Saas Fee sits, the tips 
of the Taschhora, the Dom, 
the Lcnzspitze and the 
Nadelhom — all rising be- 
tween 4,200m and 4.600m - 
turn a rosy pink in the first 
rays of the sun. It is a sight for 
which men must have paused 
in their early-morning tadfc 
since salopeites were made of 
bearskin and sewn together 
with ibex gut. 

Such musings seem by no 
means out of place in a village 
whose pride in its past is on 
view at the museum of local 
history’, housed in what for 
250 years was the parsonage. 
Recently restored, its three 
floors are brimming with the 
evidence of a hard, devout life 
— and with displays of min- 
eralogy and glaciology which 
make the visitor think a little 
deeper about his 
surroundings. 

Saas Fee could not be 
reached by metalled road until 
1951, and its streets are now 
forbidden to the internal 
combustion engine. Its 
tranquillity is delightful, but is 
not created at the expense of a 
satisfactory amount of night- 
life or the now customary off- 
piste facilities (indoor tennis, 
skating. Benetton shop). 

The unusually well planned 
nursery slopes — extensive, 
unusually varied and conve- 
niently located — help to make 
it an ideal place to have a first 


jFelskinn-r ^Langflnb r?’ 


pkttjisv 


Saas 




•Hianlgiv;;] 


SaasGnDd’TC 


Zermatt •; 

^sSwGracAent'' 



t&Z /#> 


Lunch Ml fresco in Saas Fee 

go at skiing. They also get a 
full day in the sun, which is an 
important consideration for 
beginners, who may need all 
the encouragement they can 
get. 

Three mountains beckon 
intermediate and advanced 
skiers. Neither Plattjen 
(2,570m) nor the prettier 
Hannig (2,350m) is likely to 
detain the expert for longer 
than it takes to admire the hne 
of chamois scrambling across 
a nearby hill. The serious 
skiing starts at Mittelallalin, 
reached by a cable car and an 
underground railway, the 
Metro Alpin. At 3,500m, this 
is high enough to justify the 
copious warnings against do- 
ing anything too quickly; the 
skier will do well to remember 
that advice as he finds himself 
trudging a couple of hundred 
metres up a slight incline 
along up a wind-blasted ridge 
before he can begin to ski 
down the broad north-faring 



ZERMATT 

Hotel Jtrien 

wary sto-mg hobby. 3-24 January 87 
rtrorn Satmday to Saturday) 
Dante room £210 for 7 nights per 
person mHB. 

Hate) JuJea, 3929 Zennatl 
Tel: 010/41/28/67 24 81 
Telex: 47 21 11 


Motoring 


Cltokrofwvr ISOMrbwliInnrK; 
rtrtnnj* dManrrof CuLUs jnd I Indacnr. 

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I Vtwr I3dsmnn% 4 arii Ah in junyl 

For n biwhurr w your Irani Dfiml 
orphonr KH1S54 7061. 




THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 



SHOPPING 


Dear (and cheap) diary 

There’s a diary on sale for every age, interest, hobby, job and pocket, as Nicole Swengley reveals 


M y grandmother always ~ ~ . _____ 

referred wbCT diary by ^ J ULY 1%? 

Collins," she’d say. In >"*. I 

Ihncr Jwt nfmiuM a H .. . xiSk r.'."' 1 '. THI**!*!- 


TRAVEL NOTES 


I visited Saas Fee as a 

guest of Thomas Cook, who ! 
offer seven days on half- 
board terms at the four-star 

rooms. nlce^w^cWQ^o 1 ^ 
lifts) from £233 to £379 
according to season. 

Saas Fee's weekly ski pass 
costs about £85 this year half 
a day with the ski school is 
about £7. 

runs of the spectacular Fee 
glacier. 

Intermediates will find 
enough in Saas Fee to keep 
them busy for a week; ad- 
vanced skiers will probably 
run out of challenges in half 
that time. They might con- 
sider a day trip to the charm- 
ingly modest village of 
Gr&cben, or slightly further to 
Zermatt, whose majestic 
.slopes in the shadow of the 
Matterhorn wfll make the £60 
return fere for a taxi-full, £20 
for a one-day ski pass and a 
fiver for a lunchtime plateful 
of trockenfleisch (paper-thin 
squares of fillet bee^ air-cured 
under the eaves of mountain 
huts) seem a bargain. Don't 
miss the English church of St 
Peter, just above Zermatt’s 
main street, dedicated in 1871 
and a touching memorial to 
the pioneering Britons whose 
enthusiasm opened up these 
mountains to adventure and 

prosperity. 


OUTINGS 


BRITISH PIGEON SOCIETY 
SHOW: Over 5.000 fancy 
pigeons on show. 

South Yorkshire Exhibition 
Centre. Doncaster 
Racecourse. Leger Way, 
Doncaster. South Yorkshire 
(0302 20066). Today 10am- 
5pm, tomorrow 10am-3£0pm. 
Adult £1. child 50p- 

NATtONAL CAT CLUB 
SHOW: Over 1 ,800 cats and 
kittens in 70 different 
classes, t60 staffs plus a 
central information desk. 
Olympia, Hammersmith 
Roai London W14 (01-603 
3344). Today 10.30am- 
5 .30pm. AduR £2, child £1. 


HTv .rciirt.Li a.I-U 


MUSEUM: Provides a 
rewarding outing even in 
winter with its 1920s High 
Street, complete with 
tramcar, shops of the period, 
pub and park. 

Beamish North of &xjland 

County Durham, (0207 
231811). Tues-Sun 10am-5pm, 
last admission 4pm. Adult 
£1.50, child £1. 

Judy Froshaug 


M y grandmother always 
referred to her diary by 
name. “HI put it in my 
Collins," she’d say. In 
those days, of course, a 
diary was a simple memorandum, 
produced by a specialist publisher, 
with pages crisply blank of all but date 
and perhaps a stray proverb lurking 
in ihe space marked “Sunday”. The 
colour of the hide might alter from 
year to year but Hole else changed. 

These days they’re not quite so 
straightforward. Diaries come in all 
shapes, sizes, colours and styles. Far 
from being an agenda for one’s own 
personal planning, some are 
crammed with such a barrage of 
information, trivial or relevant, that 
it’s hard to find space to scribble. 
Some aim to educate about our 
national treasures or give details of 
country customs; others tell you 
about historic ships or launch forth 
into an instant art lesson. 

With so many diaries on sale now, 
it would be perfectly feasible to 
choose them as Christmas presents 
for all one's friends and family, 
matching style to personality, without 
ever buying two the same: 

When it comes to picking personal 
planners, Lefax and Filofax are old 
timers and they're still coming up 
with new ideas to tempt money-no- 
object shoppers. Filofax are introduc- 
ing Academic diary pages running 
from July to July for their ringbinder, 
while Lefax have produced the 
“Oval", at £80 their most expensive 
email p lann er. 

But many other companies have 
jumped on the agenda bandwagon 
and personal organizers are now high 
fashion accessories. Laura Ashley 
have a canvas planner with leather 
trim, £29.95, and the Mulberry 
Company have brought out a new 
crop of organizers with fabric and 
feather covers. To cap it aD, Good 
have a Lefax in their own house-style 
and colour at £98. 

S o popular are these planners 
that even W.H. Smith have 
introduced a loose-leaf 
binder containing a diary, 
address book and reference 
sections. The black plastic cover 
somehow lacks a certain snob-appeal 
but it costs a competitive £12.99. 

Far grander are the desk-top exec- 
utive planners like the leather-bound 
loose-leaf desk diary/address book 
lined in moire, £59, from Eximious, 
or the vast loose-leaf Business 
Time/System, £185.60 from Harrods, 
with its separate sections for activ- 
ities, year and monthly plans, data 
bank, telephones and addresses — in 
feet, anything you could possible 
need to organize yourself into the 
next century, let alone next year. 

A large number of 1987 pocket 
diaries are designer-influenced with 
tactile covers self-consciously break- 
ing out of the classic leather tradition. 
Next’s first diary, £2.99, has a 
strokeable, smooth Mack cover and 
contains information relevant to 
shopping in Next stores. On sale in 
the Design Centre Shop is a slimline 
diary covered with Collier Campbell 
printed fabric, £5.95, while the 
Conran Shop has a selection of diaries 
with black and white geometric 


designs on the covers, tram zj./j. as 
usual. Liberty has an attractive array 
of year planners with cream pages 
printed purple in house-style. 

Many of our larger museums and 
galleries produce diaries linked to 
their own displays, such as the British 
Museum. National Gallery, Tate 
Gallery and the Victoria and Albert 
Museum. The National Trust and the 










ar-w-4^- . 




V 

M.. Iu.4 !*■*'!. ;«_W 
t. It H. *«• .-.A 


I l> J -i Mm*. 

- 

kmIh 

t f. 

«... >(■" pl.(h>'.-l. 

^ - •• 
x.p .«« i, ■ #• Hi.. 

»!•*' -I r-~ •- 
i,l , '.«• v i». , 


/Hww | Bus iness nme/ System nrp|Hi»>, fight, fawn rhg Esquire TTiary. £14-95 




‘ ?S'*' 

i 



: 

W ■ 


It : f S! 

Above, Changing Seasons with revolving pictures for diiUren, £4.95 







MARCH 

13 


Aboro Idl^ Jeeves Diazy, £9il5; centre, SqyB) Coiot, £110; Above r«h^ Yes I*riiiie Minister, £4^5 


National Trust for Scotland likewise 
sell engagement diaries illustrated 
with photographs of their properties. 

Nicely produced children’s diaries 
are particularly hard to track down. 
Exceptions include the World Wild- 
life Diary, £4.25 from W.H. Smith, 
which is sold in aid of the World 
Wildlife Fund and has appealing 
animal photography; the Pink Pan- 
ther Diky, £3.50 from stationers, 
with a cartoon strip of the hero (sadly 
printed in monochrome) along die 
lop of each page; and an appointment 
calendar called “Changing Seasons", 


Zft.yj mnu uuciLy, wiui uiu-idau- 

ioned revolving pictures by Ernest 
Nister. 

Influenced perhaps by book 
publishing su c cesses, there are some 
marvellous large format hardback 
diaries catering for all tastes and 
inclinations. The Esquire Diary, 
£14.95 from leading stationers, comes 
with a splendid red, black and gold 


cover and is liberally sprinkled with 
cartoons and illustrations from the 
1937 issues of Esquire magazi ne, 
while the Wisden Cricketers’ Diary, 
£9.95 plus £1.25 from Save the 
Children (tel 01-730 5400), Inevitably 
has a green fabric cover, lists test 
records and depicts top-notch cricket- 
ers with details of their achievements. 

T he Jeeves Diary, £9.95 from 
the Sloane Square branch of 
W.H. Smith, prefaced by 
Reginald Jeeves himself; 
assures us that “in my 
retirement I have kept abreast of the 


the social scene". Some things never 
change, thank goodness. The diary's 
opening pages offer a Directory of 
Flssential Information. Turn to 
“Socks" and you’ll read “Jeeves 
logged my purple soda out of the 
drawer as if be were a vegetarian 
fishing a caterpillar out of his salad." 

Just as tongue-in-cheek is the Yes, 


Prime Minister Diary, £4.95 from 
Scribbler, marked “Strictly 
Confidential” with margin memos try 
the Secretary of the Cabinet, Sir 
Humphrey Appleby KCB. On 
Wednesday April 1 he remarks: “As a 
matter of principle, ministers should 
never know more than they need to 
know. Just like secret agents. They 
may be captured and tortured by llte 
BBC, for example”. 

Even more over-the-top is 
Debrett’s Country Sportsman's Di- 
ary. £13 from the Sloane Square 
branch of W.H. Smith, which ao- 


MbDLUy dUVCILUCUICUU IU1 glUU 

and Burberry raincoats as well as jolly 
little editorials discussing salmon ami 
hen pheasants. 

But, for confidences of a more 
personal nature, Smythson of Bond 
Street publish an old-fashioned look- 
ing tome, £1 10, with marbled inside 
covers, calf exterior and gold-edged 



TAORMINA 
THIS WINTER 
FROM £139 



THE TIMES GUERNSEY CARDIGAN 


QpedaUy selected for 
dTimes readers, this 
versatile Guernsey cardigan 
is both hard wearing and 
attractive. Made in 100% 
pure new wool, the cardi- 






THEM AWAY!! 


f5J 


siustwas ; 


H % 1 




MMASSPECIA^-^Ejgtd 

/l£S Coche&'La PlagnejusiEWfair) 

ptoneMAfortetatisofS' \ 

'oijr latest rnedmms! 


'T-ri's 


1 •' I' 1 





The perfect C 



.. .two nights at The Ritz. 

Imagine receiving The Ritz as a gift on Christmas morning. 
Or more precisely a Ritz gift voucher for two people to stay 
two nights in a twin or double-bedded room. The cost is only 
£240 with English breakfast included and a chilled bottle of 
the famous Ritz pink champagne in the room when you 
arrive. This special offer lasts from 1st January to 3 1 st 
March. Telephone Mary Bishop to obtain further details of 
The Ritz Christmas gift voucher on 01-493 8181 or 
write to The Ritz. Piccadilly, qri p n n — / 
London Wl. 1 I L l\ I / 

Tba BttLTtePirf art Christmas gHI. PiCCA ^HJY' LONDON 


National 

GARDEN 

gift 

TOKENS 

make the perfee I present 
lor every gardener and plant 
kwer. They offer such freedom 
of choice* and sohr so many 
giUd item milt. They can be 
used to buy ever ythin g fpr 
the, g arden at 1.500 Garden 
Shops and Ceniies - and ai 
Interflora florists rudomvidc. 

Sold in £ I. £3. £5 and f 10 
values ai alll.SOOMTA- 
ittember shops and centres 
all over the Ufc they're easy 
to oast -eas y to redeem . 

National 

GARDEN GIFT TOKENS 
5 how you care. 

King (0734 >303098 

or write tor addresses ol 
nearest nTA- member 
stockists. 

horticultural _ vv . 
Trades Assoc Mion,T£UU2x 



gan incorporates those 
features of the “guernsey” 
design that make it imme- 
diately identifiable — 
ribbed sleeve insets and 
two small slit openings in 
the hem. To add to the 
continuity of the design, 
the turtle neck and patch 
pockets also have the same 
ribbed pattern. 

T he strength and quality 
of the wool ensure that 
the wearer is warm whilst 
looking stylish. The cardi- 
gan is made in Guernsey 
for limes readers ana 
comes in a choice of oat- 
meal or grey. Suitable for 
both men and women. We 
advise ordering one size 
larger than normal if a 
loose fit is required. 

Sizes: 36', 38", 40*, 42", 44 w 
@£4495 each. 


THE TIMES 


mm 


m 



| Rneoaywod | 

AH prior tor inetaBw of poa and petting. Mem aUcm/upa2] daysjbr 
Aebwi r tfym <nr mot xaufied 7fe- Tfcwj uill rrfmd yaar awnrv m* - , 
fn orfAfion u> our gwmrttv, yen have thr bmtfii cf your AM 
pauaurjn^auiutlnaenetagttHd. 7 htogereaiemfybedBpaclicdto 

PtUnutfiuAeUK. The TU**?Gu*rnmCa&gin Offs* BtmnuKoad, 

Baby. KauIMSlBL. Tel: Ctetftri 53316 fir enquiries nnK 

Please send me Guernsey Cardigan(s) 

as indicated® £44.95 each for sizes 36 "-44". 


COLOUR 


42* ! 44' 


IendoseCheque/POforE made payable to 

Thp^ Times Guernsey Cardigan Offer. 

Or dei* my Access/Visa No 


DIAL VOUR ORDER 

RAPID ORDERING SERVICE 
% BY TELEPHONE ON 
ACCESS OR VISA 
I (no wetf w complete coupon) 

(Crayfonf) 0322-58011 
24 hours a day - 7 days a week 


SignHt i ir ft 

Send to: Tbe Tunes Guema 
Bonnie Road, Bexley, Keo*. 

MR/MRS/MISS 

ADDRESS — _ — 


RcptKted Na 




. -4 7 














THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 



Clii’isttijsasis UK Cs&iMe 




Waddingtons 



Persoftahfed 
K Raying Cards 

? -asr 

B nrprx ly or Stack 
Bndge Packs £7.9» 


SOS /a/i$///an 


Y our nuK, iniuh or dogao 

Hum II Scmnand vw 
Pimm) m pH an even card AU a- 
iliniitrfy hired. Super Dc Unc Bndi 
ScU ib nA ctocoiHc me. * pena 
and kir card* £J4 99 


bMEOTLBi 




tvavnts in atjoui mur aua. mcuniq 

Sturt limip Retam Maq-es. MHh 


Bind Gwup ReBjrtn Aiao-es. wo- 
rafrm etc Then: '• ™ unrt m uy 
BfMhB IS 50 MB' O' conucl Ipw 
((mu toa remember wu don r need 
in lM*e a mea-cM p-noton m «w SOS 
Ijrvnji u makK sense to everyone 
inowrst, peac^ pamaiulng in 


SOS Talisman 


TALMAN LTD- 
21, Gnji Corner. 
Ln Street. Ilford, 
Emct. IG2 7KG 
Tel: 01-554 5579 


A FGHAN SU PPER 

^JSOCKS ^Sl __ 

■■■■T H K 


T 1 ►( .*« mr fcci olid Jj-ii. 

wta* OnV 14 >5 per fiar plu: 1 1.00 pip per older Deputed 

hiimn Jijj f. 


L "jfl (iaurfi .1 dui ciH k-’fin ilcpr r vxas. *und triui-d in 

j Alrrattiun hom 6t:'.,»fOOi and ■W’oJCTvhcwiih iron on 


j Alw.XMUfl I "Mr ht'., wool and ■KPflUvhc '»in tew 

1 iucpfc. kuiter'xic.Mkix'p feci wane Midi omfy indoors 

I -iriou, i.-.id rt'OSU.: or ncr^i V.HaoLail-. with order 

■mi in? •rnalii4-j‘.n».* U fii<6-8iorLjrgei9-IO» 


I o Nowud Tradw,. DrpiC. FREEPOST, PO Bn 3 
) One Mori# IP22 3BR AuaiMH phone 0179 SUI2 


Penoculncd m ■oMuptolSleuenaH 
in m rscunixi oaBas. 

1 2 Crayon <2.49 12 H B taahvmh 
rattan *2.99 4 ftmOSt Red iBhmJ 
Bad or m red 


toe add Up p&piotaol order. 


(Dept-TT). 
ULIMMv. ■ 


t on in g WDMUYS aired 

Cuenwy. Sweater*, card loans, 
rtr. Col bratlHn. Guernsey 
Ononab. 9 Mansell Street. St 
Peter Pan. Guernsey, a. 
10481) 710398. 


KITES. KITES far all lie family. 
lanlailK rotours. easy to fly. 
guaranteed, free cat.:- MAI. 
verm kites m. Malvern 

Wflld 4PZ. 


4UKRNSCY GEAR guernseys and 
tarUrts By Le Trtcoleur. LOW 
pnr evCM bracn.Gurmsey Gear 
iTi. Uckflrtd. Sx <08261 5764. 


I^!B 



THE U.K’S LARGEST RANGE OF 
CHARITY CHRISTMAS CARDS 
500 Designs from 76 National Charities 

NOW ON SALE AT 


99 t itfzU Street Witney. Oxqd 
T el: 0993 2616 

Uralui.via In tan old hears 


9 Berhafoy Street 
London W1 (nr the Rttz) 


41-47 VYtamora Street 
London W1 


London W1 
11 Grand Bufldtags 


HAND EMBROIDERED 
S(LK PICTURES 


Can solve vour Christmas 
jfi proNems they are 
unusual. tfxt (tom as little 
as£1 50. am more fasting 
than ChRsimas cards and 
thue is a huge selection 
Lower Ground Floor 


KJJXS FWH0US SO SHOP 
36-58 Suite St Enssreoor Snare 
Into WIN BUS ■ Mw-FH 5-6 
Sat 9-1 - Tet 01-625 37B1 


HOOEY TALK 

The new booh by Sidney Bloch. 


e probably me best value 
nosent Mtabbie lot f995. 
MONEY TALK n an extremely 
mny. povoretwe and rpveahng 
pot-poum Gne MONEY TALK to 
mih someone a tiapw 
Chusimas and a richer 1987. 
Available Horn ad good 
bookshops 

Pobflsbed by Burin * EnrigM. 
51 Fhd Street 
London EC4Y IBL 
(£9.95. p&p tree.) 


Nonhu mtw rtand Avenue (oj^Traiaigar Square) 


CLEAN 

YOUR CHIMNEY 
CHEMICALLY! 

No mess with SAFEBURN— 
Suitable for stoves, open fires 
otwoodbumeis. Especially 

good for awkwardly shaped 
chimneys. Non toxic. 
Prices (me P&P etc) 

1 packet (3 months supply] — 
£7-90 2 pactefs - £15.00. 


London WC2 

The above are open Mon-Sat 10-6 
Congress House 
23 Great Husnu Street 

London WC1 (nr Tottenham Cowl Road Undereround) 
Open Mon-Fn &00 - 5.00 
Benopspate Institute 


London EC2 (nr Liverpool Street Station) 
Open MoivFri 9 JO - 130 


CneouesWs or SAE. to deads 

Ann Valley Ikadng Ltd 

FittJewonh. Sussex. RH201ER 
Tel: 079-882 482 


107 Unchurch Street 
London EC3 l Open Mon-Fri 10.00 - 6.00 

A large selection of gifts and calmdars are also an sale. 

AS these shops we run by the Chanty Christmas Card Count* 
the premier (tartly Card organisation. 

Phone (01) 242 0546 [office hours) and ask for 'information 
Service- tar locations of otfwr Charity Card Shops Countrywide 




mmu x La A Kyaba . Super 
tiuiuioiB 3 bedroom amn- 
menL iwy concetvwtile faemw 
tn oomptax- Prlvah? sale with 
large sartDB. Fixed price 
£120.000. Phone ne and w/e 
041 659 MSS. day 041 551 

tees 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 
TO LET 


I ' i’*~ V ! ' T i ’ 


SOUTH SPUN Rare chance to 
rent corafa rtaMa mffl bouse 
with secluded gardens and pool 
above Nuii Modest ml for 
long let or per roonOv. Tel: 01 
892 6590 


u 

Quality Gifts 
Champagne 
Wines & Spirits 
Luxury Food 
Perfume 

Roses/Chocolate 
All Credit Cards 
01-749 9735 
125 Askew Road 
London, W12 9AW 


LOOK 
CLOSER ! 


Suynseyourlowd 
one Brith a telescope ! 


Send 5 AE tar FREE tavraMv 
■Vunutad deats of 14 
BnhntcMig a is Asmraikol 





ANGLO-NORMAN 
ARMORY TWO 

Essential reference tor 
historical studies. A key to the 
Knightly class of the thirteenth 
and Later Centuries. 

ISBN 04S046-79-8-8 
by Cecd Humphery-Smrth 
Softback £185. hardback £25 
(plus £1.75 by posq 
Family Notary Books, 
Noftegate; Caototnrr CT1 


FOR SOMEBODY WHO HAS 


awaaB ! 




W«mwE ndude in* aknuicm to al 
cUnbUm lain mesi) ptmew. ns* d 
colter mm toe bbiWv raigisne etc 
Faflw dEdablme Dm Ftteeds (Mcb. 

feral tadnrdMx. 


I-7MMS2 ««t at/zq 


GKe wan Stytef Send an ete- 
rnity am wrapped bottle, 
magnum or leraboam with a 
dMncitxe card b e aiwu your 
Ptraonal mnugt a ny where tn 
BjeUK. Jim phone 0255 
89202. 


Hampers, fiend lor free colo u r 
brochure. Ye OWr Chocolate 
Boa. Pmtbory. Cheshire SKID 
4 DC. Tel 0623 H 7984 B 


COURSES 




For The Cddcot FritafaH 
A sryfisti wnfong desk toy 


essontal (or the successfully 
planned enckebng year with 


FLOWERS 


planned cricketing year with 
weakly anecdotes by Benny 
Green. Plus extensive reference 
action and Insure fet 
DeSvsry toct to rabtnes and 
(rends Free 9 h wiHPng. £955 
aid la class p&p. 

Two-Caa DesigiL 
27 (taper ShnLlmta. 
EC2A4AP. Tet D1-Z51 4232. 


A SIMPLE GIFT 


■.VC'.DE=?UL r H0vGHT 


CATHY 

By Jobs Carder Bush 

Part one of photo biography 
of Kate Bush. Fine art edition. 

Slip case, bran hardback, 
duotones. Available only mail 
order £17.20 tram Kmdfight 
PO Box 30, 

■feang-KertlMISSOA. 


Remember your favooiite 
friends this Christmas with 
a beautiful bouquer of choice 
fresh seasonal flowers for 
only£10. So simple to give, 
so special to receive. 

Just phone your credit 
card order or mail a cheque 
giving the name and 
address of each redpienL 
(0905)840080 ytfSfa 








Fiisi Class Fiowea. 
TIMThomfeigh Nurseries. 
Drakes Broughton. fVrshoxe. 
Vforcs. WR 10 2AP 


VMTASC MWr. TWon JaMKw 
76 UI £S, ° P * r C ** C ' ° 38 * - 


WOLSCY HALLi Hoaa* vtudy (or 
CCE. Drerces Ujendoa BA. 86 c. 
HR Warwick MBAX Prrtev 
taons. Prospecnm Dept. AL 6 . 
Watsey Hau. Oxford 0 X 2 6 PR. 
T«t 0666 52200 I 2 « hr*». 


FRESH DAFFODILS 
FOR CHRISTMAS 



ENTERTAINMENTS 


EXHIBITIONS 


[CULTURED PEARLS] 

. ....... 


MfelTMU BOOK FAB (2nd 
Hand ft AatUoiurtanj Sun 7 th 
Owmii m 1 lamftpm. ow 
Town HaU, Havcrslock HUL 
NWS ropp BeWze Park Sim. 



asasJga 


TMEMtoOT CUM. Buy twr a 
daytime homo in Loudon. 191 
Hew from Harnxta and 89 steps 
Irom Haney NKhota. Delight- 
ful quiet and cafurarUMe laclll- 
Ue* - an Ideal roeellno place • a 
haten or reel. Details from Jen- 
ny Wilkin, 01 - 581-3511 - at 
The Basil Street Hotel. Kmtfn. 
sbrtdgr. SW 3 . 


I no. of Inm etoble taate. 
ReOeeUik) todays woman, tan 
errawed and sent anywhere in 
me UK (ram the Whisky Shop. 
Edinburgh. Tel: 051 668 1588 
im SAMCTC1AKV In Cm MM Gtw- 
den 8 Europe's most luxurious 
hcaBh TO for ladles only We 
ofTcrgtn vouchers from £ 19.50 
upwards. TeL 01-240 9626 For 
more deiaMs. lAD credlr cards 
Wkenl. 



TIME 

THE ULTIMATE EXFOOENCE 

CLIFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR' 

THE PORTRAYAL OF ‘AtCASH* 

LAURENCE OUVIER 

Moo-Fn 7 . 50 Thu Mat 230 Sat A 
ft 8.15 ai Thurs man only The 
Reek SUT wui be pertained by 
John Ovtsuc. Reduced price* 
Thun mats only £7 ft £io 
■few tuHlI to AprB - 87 . 
SCATS AVAIL mta TOUT 


drink 



Classy 

on the 


claret 


3 ^, 

fi P 


comer 


in an a fg when the average 
corner off-licence looks more 
like a run down beer, oranriie 

and spirit emponum than a 

wine merchant, the 
Davisons shops slune out Idre 
beacons to discerning dnnkere 
^Sreh of fine, low priced 


"Anthony Davie ^JS]l of i J 

family firm established m 

1875, is appealmg^®^^ 
about Davisons surcess- Tbe 
firm was founded by my 
erandfetber, built up by my 
fefiier and I hope to continue 


Davisons is ideal. Go straight 
io the Burgundy and Bor- 
deaux heart of their list Those 
who can afford it should buy a 
bottle of the delectable 111 
CTiassagne-Monirachet. Les 
Chaumees from the admirable 
Domaine Morey. Priced at 
£ 1 3.50 this is a costly C hrist- 
mas first coarse or aperitif 
wine, the most expensive 
white burgundy on Davisons’ 

Eric Beaumont 


the tradition for my^ son 

tn «rrv on. he 


Michael to cany; on, he 
stresses. It is surprising that a 
company which manages to 
sell classy claret and burgundy 
at seductively low prices has 
managed to remain indepen- 
dent, despite, I suspect, some 
ardent wooing from other 
wine concerns. 

Davisons’ policy succeeds, 
where other merchants fail, 
simply because they buy large 
quantities of young fine wine 
from the en primeur market, 
salting it away in their cellars 
to mature for seven years or 
more and only then selling it- 
A s a result their customers 
have access to a wide range of 
fine, mature Bordeaux and 
Burgundy. 

The company also runs a 
small public house business, 
but their latest, and from the 
wine drinker’s viewpoint most 
interesting, move is the Mas- 
ter Cellar Wine Warehouse 
built on an old Sainsburys site 
in front of their GHQ at 7 
Aberdeen Road, Croydon, 
Surrey. Here the complete 
range of their wines — 400 in 
all — are on view, besides an 
additional range of limited 
fine wine specials that are not 
available in sufficient quanti- 
ties to merit inclusion on their 
ordinary list Other brandies 
that offer this extended range 
include the shop at 674 Ful- 
ham Road, London SW6, plus 
country outposts such as 
Tenterden, Kent, and Battle, 
Sussex. 

For Christmas wines 


tl 


£ %> 


list, but well worth it with hs 
bright greeny-gold colour, 
stupendous rich herbaceous 
nose and nutty-smokey palate. 

At just £7.95 a bottle 
Domaine Morey’s red ’82 
Chassagne-Montrachet is also 
a real snip and delirious with 
turkey. Considerably cheaper, 
but only a shade less impres- 
sive, is the splendid ’82 Cote 
de Beaune Villages from 
Royer-Lebon (£5.99). 

The star buy of the daret 
catalogue is the *78 
Roque taillade La Grange 
from the Graves (£4.85). It 
provides the ideal foil to any 
festive fere accompanied by a 
fruit stuffing or sauce. Claret 
aficionados with money to 
spare might well film to in- 
dulge in the *75 Batailley on 
Chnstmas Day (£10.45). This 
wine has now matured into a 
delightful rich warm mouthful 
with bags of fruity flavour. 
Loqg five the independent 
wine merchant! 


Jane MacQiotty 


IN THE GARDEN 



■. 9 

'V* - . ’ -o 


Winter dreams 


SADLER'S NELLS 278 8916. 
Flrtt Can CC 24hr 7 CUy S4Q 
7200. Lata Art Toni 7JO 

LONDON CONTEMPO 
RARY DANCE THEATRE 


SHEEPSKIN CAB 
SEAT COVERS AND 
FLOOR ROGS 

FROM EASUDER. THE 
ULTIMTE M CM COMFORT. 
StoRDOm Vistas MfCUIKL 
The Essnder Co 
I8B Ketttang^FhL^A^Uianptan 

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Winter takes a tighter grip in 
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impossible to picture our gar- 
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Fortunately the seed 
companies’ catalogues are at 
hand to prompt our 
imagination. 

The main problem with 
ordering seeds at this time of 
year is gettmg carried away in 
a creative vision which turns 
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but othen — like me — manage 
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THE TIMES COOK 


Reign of the deer 


V enison is back in the shops, savs Shona Crawford Poole, and worth eating 


Four years ago to the week this 

column noted; “Roe deer in 
the form of best venison is 
another of those home-grown 
delicacies which are becoming 
hard to find in British shops 
because the French are pre- 
pared to pay higher prices for 
them. In the interval, 
increasing supplies of fanned 
venison have chap^j jj, c 
picture completely. 


DtmLmdMMr 


The red deer, as portrayed 
the Glen, is 


in The Monarch oftl, 
the largest of our native 
species and the type most 
usually farmed But whereas 
Landseer’s noble slag of the 
12-point antlers and many 
summers might have been as 
tough as boots, most farmed 
deer are slaughtered when one 
and a half to two and a half 
years old. 

Farmed venison is sold in 
southern England through 46 
branches of Waitrose. In the 
Midlands, the North, Scot- 
land, Wales and the South 
West the farms themselves 
may be the most convenient 
source of simply. For a list of 
members of Ute British Deer 
Farmers Association write to 
Alan Drescber, Hoilym, 
Withemsea, Hull, Humber- 
side enclosing a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope. 

Because it is leaner and 
denser than more familiar 
meats, a little thought is 
needed about how to cook it. 
As a rule, fast, fierce cooking 
producing a well browned 
exterior and rare interior suits 
those who enjoy their meat 
pink. Gentle cooking with 
added fat and moisture pro- 
duces the best results for those 
who prefer their venison more 
thoroughly done. 

Beef producers will not 
thank me for saying so, but the 
taste of fresh venison can best 
be described as snper- 
beefy.The gamey flavour that* 
many of us associate with 
venison comes from longer 
hanging than most of today’s 
deer fanners find their cus- 
tomers want Fanners or game 
dealers may be prepared to 
hang the meat longer to order 
for those who prefer a gamier 
flavour. If the meat is a 
supermarket cut, turning it for 
a day or two in a red wine 



Doerburgars deftm 

Serves six 


2S0mf (Boz) red wtna 


1 medium onion, firmly 
chopped 


He. finely 


% teaspoon dried thyme or 
rosemary 


1 tablespoon lemon Mob 


2 tablespoons butter 


2 tablespoons chopped 
parsley 


2 sBeea good wtrita bread 
(IKIbl finely minced 


Salt and freshly ground 
black pepper 


/>£|V 

: -V 


marinade will emphasize its 

giminftK. 

Finely minced venison - 
Waitrose sell it for £1.79 a 
pound — makes a hamburger 
that is really worth eating. 
Choose the first recipe if a 
burger that is weU browned 
outside and pink in the middle 
is what you fancy. For well- 
cooked burgers, it is well 
worth the trouble of making 
the second, still-easy recipe, 
an adaptation of Angus 
Cameron's Mooseburger De- 
luxe from the LL Bean Game 
And Fish Cookbook, the 
American game cook’s bible. 


Venison burgers 
Serves four . 


680g-900g (1 54-2lb) finely 
minced venison 


Salt 


Freshly ground black pepper 
1-2 tablespoons ofive ofl or 
clarified butter 


Season and form the burgers 
immediately before cooking 
them so that the salt will not 
have time to draw moisture 
from the meat Choose a non- 
stick frying pan and heat it 
welL 

' Mix the minced venison 
with salt and pepper to taste 
and fry a test-tcaspooniui of 
the mixture to check the 
seasoning. Divide the mixture 
into eight equal portions. Oil 
or butter your hands and form 
them into fairly flat potties. 
Cook the venisonbmgers as 
quickly as posable without 
burning than so that the 
'outside is well browned and 
the inside pink and fender. 

Serve venisonbutgers with 
freshly made English mustard 
and a well-dressed salad of 
raw or cooked (but not 
vinegared) beetroot, grated 
.finely and dressed with olive 
oil, fresh orange juke and 
thyme. 


Combine the wine, onion, 
garlic and thyme or rosemary 
m a small pan, bring to bod 
and gmmw until the liquid is 
reduced by half. Stir in the 
lemon juice, butter and pars- 
ley and leave to cooL 

Soak the bread in this 
mixture, then beat to a more 
or less uniform texture. 

Knead the wine and bread 
mixture into the venison, and 
add salt and pepper to taste. 
Form the meat into six patties 
and grill or fry them. Seal 
them on both sides on a high 
heat, then reduce the heat and 
continue cooking until done. 

Cooked marinade 
Makes about 300ml (X pint) 
Half a battle of red wine 


1 shallot, snood 


1 toy leaf, crumbled 


% teaspoon dried thyme 
10 juniper henries, bruised 
10 peppercorns, bruised 


Sliver of fresh or dried 
orange zest 


EATING OUT 



Slippery 

customers 


Put all the ingredients in a 
small pan and bring to the 
boiL S imm er for 10 minutes 
thencooL 

Put the venison in a lidded 
container, pour over the mari- 
nade, cover and refrigerate for 
two or three days, turning the 
venison two or three times a 
day. Dry the meat well before 
browning it 

This quantity is enough for 
up to about 6S0g (lKdb) of 
meat, whether in one piece, or 
in noisettes, or cut for 
casseroling. 


"One of my interests is translating English poetry into 
Rench- Another is mtroducing Erenck poetry to England. 

£n* this I use hottles? 


Baron Philippe de Rothschild 



i3rt collector, maker of exquisire wine, Baron Philippe de Rothschild is legendary his under- 

_ ^standing of wine formidable. MOUTON CADET is particularly dose to his heart. The rouge is vintage 
daret- full, round and smooch. The bhmcsec, also riruagr appellation Bordeaux comrolee , is dry, Iighcand 
fresh. Both Haw been judk^dworchy to bear the Barons name-Try them. \bdD enjoy the poetry 


My father was of that genera- 
tion of boys, now largely 
wbo built tree 
bouses, set snares, baked 
hedgehogs in day. For that 
generation, poaching was OK, 
and eels were fair game, with 
the captives from the eel trap 
cooked any way but by the 
British method: jellied eels 
and boiled eeb with the sauce 
called “liquor” are foul. 

My father's trap, at the 
bottom of his garden, was at 
the confluence of two of the 
great chalk streams of south- 
ern England. We used to do 
the eels, plumper than those 
available commercially, in 
veal stock and white wine 
(French) or, because they 
baste themselves, grilled with 
bay leaves (Italian). 

Needless to say it is impos- 
sible to find an Italian res- 
taurant serving this common- 
place dish. But some French 
places, especially those nm by 
English enthusiasts for pro- 
vincial cooking, make it a 
point of honour to celebrate 
the traditions of their (adop- 
tive) cuisine. 

Cafe Pelican makes a stab at 
a sort of Burgundian red wine 
stew, which gets more marks 
for aspiration than for 
achievement The eels them- 
selves, pretty slim creatures on 
the day, didn't help. Further, 
the practices of th ickening the 
sauce with flour and of — 
ghastly word - garnishing the 
offering with acidic cocktail 
onions are ill-advised. There 
was a nice dinky heart-shaped 
crouton though. And there 
was nothing wrong with a 
1985 Broadly, nor with a fish 
soup that was, unusually, not 
overpowered by conger ed 
(distant relation). 

The Pelican is decorativdy 
unchanged since it opened 
three years ago, and if you 
have a meal rather than a 
snack — fie bread is good and 
so, too, is fie coffee — you’ll 
pay between £40 and £50 for 
two. 

Kitchen Yakitori, which 
doubtless sounds, and cer- 
tainly looks, like a take-away, 
is a wedge-shaped Japanese 
cafe, with melancholic piped 
music, in & maze of alleys off 
Bond Street. Eds here are 
dump. Kitchen Yakitori ob- 
tains good produce and cooks 
it property. By the standards 
of London Japanese places it’s 
informal — no kimonos, no 
cooking at fie table — and 
austere, with rough-cast walls, 
tunnel-vaulted basement 

It’s probably fie only dace 
in Britain which serves ed 
livers, done here in a strong 
Swedish sauce which is, 
presumably, meant to lessen 


their gamey taste, and sprin- 
kled wifi sesame seeds. The 
effect is outlandish, though 
pan of the outlandishness is 
probably occasioned by the 
very act of having tried them. 
* Eel meat, long fillets, are 
braised with soy and some- 
thing, and are thoroughly 
delicious. So is the sashimi - 
raw salmon, octopus, cuttle- 
fish and tuna (which fish is 
actually done as sushi, that is. 


wrapped in seaweed). If^you 


also eat tempura, deep 

and heavily battered fish ’n' 
veg, and drink beer and sake, 
you'll pay £55, though at 
lunch-time fie set menu will 
put you in at half that. 

Whether the Hunan eel at 
Kjm's properly corresponds 
to ed in Hunan is a question I 
can't answer. Like many “new 
wave” Chinese places, Kym’s 
offers an eclectic menu of 
anything but Cantonese food, 
ami the designer here has 
pafflfftl so much desig n into a 
tiny space that people, eaters, 
tend to ruin the effect. The 
service is importunately 
chummy, and the Hunan eel 
was not “crispy” as ad- 
vertised, but was jolly good 
nonetheless; off the bone and 
prepared wifi garlic, ginger 
and lemon, maybe. It would 
have been even better had one 
not lad to contend with fie 
noise of David Essex singing 
numbers from Evita. Of fie 
other dishes we tried, odd 
jelly fish wifi sesame oil and 
chilli and fried Peking dump- 
lings were fine. With a bottle 
of Beaujotais Nouveau — on 
fie table when you arrive— we 
paid £32. 


Jonathan Meades 


CattFelean.45St 
Martin's Lane, London WC2 
(01-379 0309/0259). Open 
Mon to Sat 11 -12.30am, Sun 
llam-midnigliL 
Kitchen Yakitori, 12 
Lancashire Court, off Bond 
Street, London W1 (01- 



Ctosed Sat night and Sun. 
Kym’s, 70 Wilton Road, 

London SW1 (01-828 8931). 
Open Mon to Sat 12 noon- 
3pm and &30-11.3Qpm. Closed 
Sun. 


SelColle 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


THE ARTS 


| TELEVISION 

“I'm trying to get out of him 
the d faHring detail. The thing 
that makes it impossible for 
the reader to disbelieve,” the 
writer James Fenton ex- 
plained in last night's Arena: 
Cambodian Witness (BBC2). 
The “him” in question was 
Someth May, son of a Cam- 
bodian array doctor ami sum- 
ryor of the Khmer Rouge 
regime, who with Fenton's 
'help has written his auto- 
biography. The programme 
"was an attempt to expose the 
mechanics of this collabora- 
tion, which it succeeded in 
■ doing at the expense of leaving 
you cold. 

“ The rind qualities of the 
'book did not snrrive the 
"journey to the screen. DnOed 
by layers of explanation and 
'narration, we might at times 
hare been watching an excava- 
tion of a shopping precinct for 
afl one cared about whether 
May's father was wearing a 
“sad” or a “solemn” or a 
“grave” face. It took John 
PUge^s footage of skulls 
stacked on shelves like cans of 
baked beans to keep the horror 
of this story in focus. 

Sitting in Fenton's cosy 
; study, together they would 
plan each sentence, each word. 

' Fenton appeared to be seeing 
the events dearly as if he had a 
film rolling Inside his head bat 
-we had to be satisfied with his 
quest for precise times, for the 
numbers Involved. 

At one point Someth May 
recalled how he was caught 
stealing sweet cassava from 
the fields and was taken by 
guards at dawn to dig his own 
grave. Fenton realized that 
moments sach as this were too 
hard for May to remember 
dearly, but he attempted to 
dredge op as ranch as possible. 
With an analyst's probing, he 
painstakingly polled May 
.back into hk memories but on 
this occasion the clinching 
detail did not emerge. Neither 
did we learn bow May escaped 
that grave. 

No danger of too much talk 
■and too little action in The 
Cotbys (BBC1), which has 1 
returned for a new season. I 
Sounding like a collection of 1 
brand names for the London 
Rubber Company, Bliss, 
Miles, Sable and the gan g 
.have caused the fiunOy lawyer 
to comment: “Yon know, it's 
amazing how the rich live.” 
"And indeed H is. 

While Sable is trying to 
salvage her marriage by 
committing her husband to 
jail, Fallon has discovered that 
her tmborn baby might belong 
to the wrong husband. As if 
this weren't enough, a recent 
American poO has decreed 
that Dynasty glitz is no longer 
in favour. All the girls have 
had to trade in their diamonds 
for plain gold drain*, and their 
'sequins for simple sflk jersey. 


Passionate involvement with music 


Tonight Richard Armstrong 
enters the pit for the last time 
as musical director of the 
Welsh National Opera. The 
piece is GOtterd&mmenwg, in 
Bristol, and that might appear 
as grandiose a way as any to 
depart, although the last work 
in the Ring cycle does not 
exactly leave much time — or 
energy — for a sumptuous 
farewell dinner afterwards. 
Armstrong in any case has set 
bis foce a gain** “trumpets and 
galas” or even a goodbye in 
Cardiff, which has been home 
base for the WNO since its 
birth. 

He sees Gdtterd&mmerung 
not so much as an apotheosis 
but a “company piece”. “You 
can't be musical director at a 
house for a long time, as I 
have, without putting on The 
Ring. It's dominated my pro- 
fessional life for five years: 
drawing board, casting, pre- 
paration, delivery, standing 
back and assessing where 
we’ve gone wrong. It wobbled 
a bit at the start, to put it 
mildly. Indeed I was in de- 
spair after Rheingold and 
remember Reggie GoodaD 
coming up to me and saying 
'Why ever did you start with 
that one, dear? By far the most 
difficult' He was right of 
course. But we got better and 
we brought our Ring to 
Covent Garden. 

“And I really do believe that 
it is a company piece in the 
same way that an old-fash- 
ioned German house would 
always keep a Ring cast wi thin 
their roster of singers. That's 
why I’ve quite deliberately 
chosen Gdtterddmmerung as 
the forewell. I don't believe in 
being feted: I'd just like to be 
emembered for what has 


Richard Armstrong 
(right)has been 
Music Director of 
the Welsh National 
Opera for 1 3 years. 
Tonight he conducts 
the company for the 
last time. Interview 
by John Higgins 

been done and let it be seen.” 

After tonight Richard Arm- 
strong will not himself be seen 
with the WNO until Sep- 
tember 1988, when he re- 
sumes the partnership with 
Peter Stein, so spectacularly 
established earlier this year in 
Oteiio, with Verdi's Falstaff. 
When Sir Charles Mackerras 
takes over at the turn of the 

year Armstrong will not be an 
old boy haunting the alma 
mater. 

He came to the WNO in 
1968, when he was 26, as an 
assitant musical director to 
James Lockhart Experience, 
such as it was, had been 
gathered as a repetfteur at 
Covent Garden. It might have 
been meagre, but it was ofhigh 
quality. 

“I began to learn the job of 
conducting through 
oberserving Solti and Ted 
Downes. But there were three 
other major influences at 
Covent Garden: working with 
Giulini on Traviata was my 
first experience of Verdi and 
gave me the kind of teaching 
money cannot buy; the same 
applied to Klemperer’s Fidelia 
and Kubelik’s Janacek.” 

There is not much point in 
being an assistant musical 
director unless there are op- 
eras to conduct Lockhart 



. 'It'".* • » •' 





thrust his deputy into the pit 
swiftly with a Figaro on a 
winter's day at the Pier Pavil- 
ion, Rhyl (now demolished, 
but no conclusions need be 
drawn from that). There were 
no rehearsals, but the cast did 
include Tom Allen and Jo- 
sephine Barstow. Seventeen 
years later Richard Armstrong 
does not regard himself very 
highly as a Mozart conductor 
— “I'm passionate about him, 
but I don’t think I do him 
particularly well so for” —and 
Don Giovanni is notable 


absentee among foe 46 operas 
he has conducted for the 
WNO. 

Armstrong’s champion in 
those early days was the late 
Alfred Francis, a figure who 
has never been given his foil 
due and whose influence and 
diplomacy, be f ore his pre- 
mature resignation, quenched 
much of the feuding that went 
on in the WNO. Francis had 
learnt some of his skills from 
Jack Hylton and he had an 
impresario's nose: He per- 
suaded the board to appoint 


Armstrong, still under 30, as 
musical director, mainly on 
the strength of a highly 
s w T P Ss f n l TurandoL 
“I owe a lot to Alfred, both 
in terms of support and in 
what he taught me about style. 
I remember one night we were 
playing in Liverpool, and 
Alfred invited me for a d rink. 
He as usual, was at the 
Adelphi and asked me what 
floor I was on. I replied that I 
wasn’t, but was saving money 
by staying at a much cheaper 
hold round the comer. Alfred 


feigned horror 3nd said the 
MD of an opera company had 
be seen to have the besL 1 took 
his point.** 

So much so that a few years 
later when Arthur Davies had 
just joined the company and 
was sleeping in a converted 
van, Armstrong gently repri- 
manded him, saying “I don't 
think we can have a principal 
tenor living in a caravanette, 
and helped provide accom- 
modation. The story is told in 
Welsh National Opera by by 
Richard Fawkes (Julia Macrae 
Books, £14.95). 

Armstrong's reputation 
grew on early Verdi and op the 
20th-century repertoire. 
Words like “vehement. . . un- 
inhibited. . . fiery” were 
hauled out to describe his 
conducting. None could be 
ascribed to the private Arm- 
strong, who remains an ironic, 
p uckish figure. “No, person- 
ally I'm not vehement — 
rather quiet actually. 1 accept 
that there can be two Richard 
Armstrong one in the pit and 
one om of it. But the reason 
for that is a passionate 
involvement in music. The 
only point really in being a 
music director is to be able to 
champion and schedule the 
works you truly believe in.” 

He adds, with puckish 
irony, that as soon as be 
announced his resignation, 
one or two operas which he 
had resolutely rejected started 
to appear on the future plan- 
ning lists. It is easy to note that 
the WNO opened with Cav <£ 
Pag in 1946 and has never 
restaged that double bill 
French opera too has not 
played a major part in the 
repertory. 

During the 13 years at the 


helm, with Brian McMasler as 
general administrator for 10 of 
them - “I look after the 
musical side. Brian does 
everything else which still 

allow time for his hobby of 
producer spotting” — Arm- 
strong has only had one out 
and out flop, the 1981 Forza 
directed by Joachim Herz. “1 
walked into the pit on opening 
night knowing that it was not 
going to work and saying to 
myself 'God, there are an- 
other 24 performances to go.’ I 
have regrets too about 
Masnadieri, which 1 think 
would have been a hundred 
per cent better if I had stuck to 
my original intention of 
performing it in Italian.” 

The lengthy credit side runs 
through Britten. Janacek. 
Tippett, Strauss — when was 
Elektra ever taken on a 
provincial tour before the 
WNO? — and of course Verdi 
himself. A generation of 
Welsh singers, including 
Helen Field, Anne Evans, 
Dennis O'Neill and Arthur 
Davies, have been developed 
by Armstrong. 

Apart from three perfor- 
mances of Faistaff ax Monte 
Carlo at the beginning of next 
year he will now take an eight- 
month break from opera, 
resuming with that Stein 
Otello at the Monnaie in 
Brussels. “For some time I 
have been a man with a 
mission and I have always 
believed that I would know 
instinctively when to leave. 
That moment has come. I go 
not with a feeling of relief or 
realease, just a great deal of 
regret.” The WNO will lose 
that rarity in the opera world 
of the 1980s, the resident 
musical director. 


i tne cunaung • • • 

*=» A promising affair 


Alexandra 

Shnlman 


I THEATRE | 

I Ought To Be In 
Pictures 

Ofistage Downstairs 

Although Neil Simon is as 
unswervingly honest a writer 
as ever struck it rich on 
Broadway, he comes pretty 
close to selling out in this 1980 
comedy, now receiving its 
British premiere at 37 C halk 
Farm Road. 

It is a play about self- 
confidence which continually 
betrays its own uncertainty of 
purpose. The setting is a 
modest Californian house 
where Herb, a screenwriter, 
has taken refuge after three 
foiled marriages and a down- 
ward career in the studios. 


An auction 
where you can 
even afford 
the time. 

If the prices don't put some auctions out of jour 
reach, the viewing and sale times certainly will. 
Sotheby’s Conduit Street Sales are devised to fit 
in with jour lifestyle. So there are evening and 
Sunday viewings, with the sale on the following 
Monday evening. 

^bull find many complete room settings of 
furniture, rugs, ceramics, silver and works of art 
As few pieces, if any need restoration, they are 
ready to take home and enjoy Delivery is in- 
expensive and easily arranged on the spot.- 
Visa nr Access Cards are accepted And as lots 
strn from as little as £200. time won't be the only 
thing vou can afford 



* **’•*» l Mir ininiin^ bright >ni rupee 
*■ * a«ni. Fuinuir: £-|tlfl-5UIJ. 


VIEWING TIMES 

Sunday 7th December . . 10.00 am-4.00 pm 
Monday 8th December . . . 9.00 am-2.00 pm 
NEXT SALE 

Monday 8th December . . .5 JO pm-9.00 pm 


SOTI IKHVS 

COMxjrrst 

SALEROOM 

ESTD1986 

^)(.<>nriu it Street. U union VVL THrph- me (ill) 493 WWI 



One fine morning a girl 
hitch-hiker turns up and in- 
troduces herself as Libby, the 
daughter he abandoned in 
Brooklyn along with her 
mother 1 6 years before. It is a 
promising situation. Father 
and daughter have no mem- 
ory of each other, and their 
relationship is free to develop 
in any direction. Bui this 
blank slate seems to affected 
Simon like the sheet of white 
paper in Herb's typewriter. At 
first, he seems to be writing a 
comedy about a limit! essly 
confident innocent and a man 
demoralized by experience. 
Meanwhile, however, Simon 
has been shifting his ground. 
Libby, it seems, is also an ace 
cook, home decorator and car 
mechanic. From this point, 
the comedy of ambition 
switches to domestic lines. 

like its irresolute hero, the 
play dithers. Simon is too 

Spring Awakening 

Young Vic Studio 

The Inner Circle Theatre 
Company’s shrewd choice for 
its first London production 
gives opportunity to a cast of 
17. Usually it is left to the 
subsidized theatre to people 
the stage so generously, but in 
Wede land's blistering play the 
mainl y youngish cast are in 
turn schoolchildren, grape 
pickers, reformatory boys and, 
screwing up their races under 
crumpled mortar boards, a 
clutch of grotesquely crow-like 
schoolmasters. 

The play is not only a young 
man's savagely angry work, 
but grimly funny, which prob- 
ably made it seem, like Ghosts, 
an even more revoltingty 
criminal work. Banned for 
public performance in Britain 
until the 1960s, its argument 
for sexual candour has again 
become relevant, although 
now we must be honest 
concerning the risks of death 
rather than the facts of life. 

Wedekind's heroes are the 
children of a German provin- 
cial town growing up in the 
oppressive atmosphere of the 
1890s. The longings of puberty 
stir within them but every 
attempt to find out from their 
elders what is happening is 
condemned as moral de- 
ficiency. 

The desperate Moritz opts 
out of the struggle and shoots 


honest to declare a happy 
family reunion. But he leaves 
that possibility hovering in the 
air after two hours of 
establishing it as the one thing 
that cannot happen. 

In Manning Redwood’s 
shambling but alert perfor- 
mance, Herb appears as the 
author's critical alter ego. He 
is a funny, wounded and 
believable figure. So, too, is 
Barbara RosenUat as the sto- 
ically torch-carrying Steffy, 
Herb’s mistress. The soft spot 
in the play and the cause of its 
downward spiral is Libby. 
Barbara Barnes, whose timing 
matches her perfect physical 
casting, certainly has a go. But 
neither she nor her director, 
Robert Gillespie, can disguise 
the feet that Libby is a doD 
that has wandered into human 
company. 

Irving Wardle 

himself. The 14-year-old 
Wendla (Sally Cookson. at 
first too knowing), finding 
herself with child, dies under 
the abortionist hired by her 
cowardly mother (Miranda 
Forbes). The only survivor is 
the rebel Melchior (Tim 
Whitnall), who is despatched 
to a reformatory, where “he 
will learn to do what is right 
and not what is interesting.” 

The play is constructed in 
short scenes, some lyrical, 
some satiric, all displaying 
Wedekind’s psychological 
acuity, years ahead ofhis time. 
Margaret Gordon’s ably consi- 
dered production places them 
against an effectively simple 
setting by Helen Tulley of neat 
wall-planking with panels that 
revolve to disclose cottage 
window, school shelf or the 
entrance to a hay-loft A 
master stroke of economical 
effect is achieved when the 
staff-room table, with its green 
baize table, is upended to 
become a grave in the grass. 

As Montz, Steven Currie — 
whose drawn features re- 
semble those of the young 
Kafka — gives a performance 
of remarkable pent-up ten- 
sion. Words burst from him in 
little jerks, tike a catalogue of 
sins he cannot believe he 
knows about. Judi Stewart 
and Cal McCrystal, as vari- 
ously tormented children also 
inspire confidence in the 
company's continued future. 

Jeremy Kingston 


I DANCE \ 

Swan Lake 

Palace, Manchester 

It should be a matter of much 
pride for Manchester, as it 
undoubtedly is to Robert de 
Warren, just 10 years after he 
became artistic director of 
Northern Ballet Theatre, that 
the much strengthened com- 
pany is able to present its new 
production of Swan Lake to 
sold-out bouses all this week 
at the Palace, where they can 
perform to as many people in 
a day as they used once to 
attract in a whole week. 

The production, as Judith 
Cniiclcshank reported from its 
Glyndebourne premiere in 
October, is a thoroughly 
respectable one: Although An- 
dre Prokovsky's staging does 
not offer any entirely new 
ideas, he has combined much 
modern thinking on the work 
into a logical mainstream 
version with the tragedy seen 
as Siegfried’s dream of un- 
attainable love. 

His choreography makes 
the most of the company’s 
dancers, and there are some 
notably attractive details, es- 
pecially in his use of the 
Mazurka and the Spanish 
dance to carry the story for- 
ward strongly in Art HI. The 
designs, by de Warren, com- 
plement his concept hand- 
somely, making a particularly 
spectacular effect m the ball- 
room scene and providing a 
credible context for the action 
all through. 

For three of this week’s 
performances Rudolf Nure- 


Quiet gravity 



lanwoollaro 


Rudolf Nureyev with his gifted protege Elisabeth Mamin 


yev, who has recently accepted 
the title of Artist Laureate in 
recognition of his support for 
the company, is appearing as 
Siegfried, bringing with him 
one of his most gifted young 
proteges from the Paris Opera. 
Thursday night was the first 
time Elisabeth Maurin had 
danced this ballerina role, but 
I think nobody would have 
guessed that 

If the role’s technical de- 
mands held any difficulties for 
her, she did not let them show. 
As the heroine Odette, she 
danced with a quiet, soft 
gravity. For her wicked dou- 
ble, Odile, Maurin found a 


glittering mask of seductive- 
ness, and she sailed through 
the 32 fouettes as smoothly as 
if she had been doing them all 
her life, with singles and 
doubles thrown in as a bonus. 

Maurin's appearance — she 
isblonde and below average 
height — is not what one first 
associates with so romantic a 
role, but she has a quality that 
carries the day: a gift for 
catching the meaning of each 


She could hardly wish for a 
more attentive partner. Nur- 
eyev’s own dancing nowadays 
is uneven (the more virtuosic 
steps actually came off better 
than the legato passages), but 
he presents the role’s drama 
with keen insight, and his 
performance is made more 
touching by his obvious feel- 
ing for his young ballerina. 

The company as a whole is 
not disgraced by comparison 
with its illustrious visitors. 
The corps de ballet is limited 
in numbers and there are 
times here and there of in- 
experience among its mem- 
bers, but they work together 
with spirit 

Among the soloists, Judy 
Holme and Danida Buson 
demand special mention for 
their solos in the pas de trois 
with Jeremy Kenidge, who 
also dances strongly but needs 
to get more stretch in his feet 
and legs before he equals his 
partners. Elaine Mayson, and 
Grace Kaplan in the Spanish 
dance and Jayne Regan’s neat 
feet in several roles also 
deserve mention. 

I was glad to be able to see a 
matinfce with two of the 
company's own principals in 
the leading roles. Sylvie 
Guillaumin and Michel 
Mesnier danced with the style 
and confidence one experts 
from alumni of the Paris 
Opera. Both concentrate on 
the sentiment of the roles and 
might with advantage go fora 
little more punch, but I have 


movement, the purpose of to say that I have seen less 
each solo or duet in the ballet’s good performances from casts 


dramatic context, and convey- 
ing that to the audience 
through the quality of her 
dancing. 


with both the Royal Ballet’s 
companies. 

John Perdval 


Nationalistic fanfares 


| CONCERT 

LPO/Bychkov 

Festival Hall 


If grand orchestral gestures 
and portentous stimuli are all 
a composer needs to write a 
great symphony, Andrzej 
Panufnik's Sinfonia Sacra 
would be up there with the 
best of them. Composed in 
2963 to celebrate 1,000 years 
of Polish Christianity, it 
thrusts the listener into a 
picturesque and (for Polish 
bmigrbs, presumably) nostal- 
gic aural landscape. 


...one of the best 
comedies of the year 

Simon Banner - THE TIMES 




IT'S A WARM, CRAZY, PEACH OF A FILM 


Stephen Brennan Earner Morrissey and Catherine Byrne 

. .. : . EAT THE PEACH 

. ’ ' , . . - •; . V ... v hTsall Toibi'n 

Mii Jot- .if SC.'’::! r. .t< r . -re- P S 1- D _ l O " ■ - i ■ “ X 





& GAMMON Q GAMMON] ABC Glasgow 

TOTTENHAM CT. RD. CHELSEA | LIVERPOOL- BELFAST 


There are plenty of vivid 
orchestral effects: trumpeters 
fanfaring from the four cor- 
ners of the orchestra; a rfayth- 
mically-agressive central sec- 
tion (a kind of musical 
synopsis of all the battles ever 
fought on Polish soil); an old 
Polish hymn played eerily on 
violin harmonics, like some 
ghostly pilgrim band wander- 
ing around in a fog; and finally 
an ear-splitting blare of 
nationalist fervour. 

At this point one feeb that if 
the four horsemen of the 
Apocalypse had been avail- 
able, Panufnik might have had 
them doubling the trombones. 
Yet somehow the work falls 
fiat, perhaps because Panu- 
fiuk’s musical language — 
diatonic, pleasant but un- 
ambitious — is too urbane to 
produce the epic rhetoric 
needed for the subjects. 

The London Philharmonic 
Orchestra under Semyon By- 
chkov's direction gave it an 
appropriately larger-than-life 
performance. Bychkov's 
strength does seem to be his 
hyper-awareness of dynamic 
possibility, while his major 
weakness is a casual ness about 
ensemble, as a lurid account of 
Mendelssohn’s "Scottish” 
Symphony later confirmed: 
the finale perhaps more evoc- 
ative of Hollywood kitsch 
than Holyrood kilts, but 
splendidly spirited 
nevertheless. 

It was, then, pleasantly 
surprising that in Mozart's 8 
flat Piano Concerto, K595, the 
Russian happily scaled down 
the orchestral sound to match 
Radu Lupu’s delicately nu- 
anced solo playing. Con- 
sequently. the interplay bet- 
ween pianist and LPO winds 
in the Larghetio had a cham- 
ber-like magic. 

Richard Morrison 



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REVIEW 


Saint 

and 



ROCK RECORDS 


Bob Gektofc peep m The Heart 
of Nowhere (Mercury BOB 
LP1). 

The Beastie Boys: Licenced to 
HI (Def Jam CBS 4500621 ). 


If Bob Geldof could have 
summoned op a fraction of the 
conviction that he pot into 
Band Aid, then Deep In The 
Heart Of Nowhere would be a 
considerably better record. 

Bat in the wake of his 
elevation to the status of public 
dignitary, he seems to have 
lost faith in himself as a singer 
and songwriter. His light- 
weight vocals adopt the 
mildest mannerisms of David 
Bowie (“When I Was Young", 
"This Heartless Night”), 
Bruce Springsteen (“In The 
Pouring Rain'*) and Bob 
Dylan (“August Was A Heavy 
Month**), but fan to reflect his 
own personality. The touching 
lyric of “Love Like A Rocket" 
is lost in the bustling pop 
frippery of the song's arrange- 
ment and only “The Beat Of 
The Night", with its sub- 
reggae pulse and grimly in- 
toned words, conveys any 
sense of imagination or 
commitment. While pop music 
remains Geldof s trade, this 
album is cruel evidence of his 
realization that there are far 
more important things that 
can be done in the world. 

Hie Beastie Boys could not 
care less about anything other 
than their own brash hip-hop 
music, and Licenced to III is an 
exhilarating mix of heavy 
dram tracks, mgfal guitar riffs 
and narcissistic chants guar- 
anfeed to offend parents. The 
best track. “She’s Daffy" 
makes Run DMC sound 
rather gentlemanly, while the 
breezy h amour and unmistak- 
able glee or “Hold It Now Hit 
It" and “Girls" make you 
wonder just bow important a 
degree of obnoxious sophistry 
is to the making of genuinely 
exciting rock music. For, while 
Geldof struggles politely but 
unsuccessfully to make some 
sense of it all, the cocky 
Beastie Boys rampage, with- 
out apology, over the com- 


David Sinclair 


Classical pick of the year 


Joyce MttOonUd 


Chaussoiu Lo raj Arthus 


QuHico (Erato/Conifer NUM 
171,3LPs, also CD, 


75271, 
cassette) 

Berio; Suifonia 
(Erato/Conifer NUM 75198) 
EMott Carter Maityn Hilt. 
London Sinfonfetta and the 
Bres of London (Weroo 
WER 60124) 

Wagner, BerBoz 


>vHj|awi f 0Q1WK 

Baltsa/LSO (Philips 416 807, 
LP. CD and cassette) 


The great operatic discovery 
of the year for me has been Le 
wi Anfius. whose first record- 
ing lets one into a world that is 
dangerously Wagnerian but 
also highly personal. The cen- 
tral role is sung by Gino 
Quilico with close sympathy 
for the noble frankness of 
Chausson’s work. Elsewhere 
the cast has its deficiencies, 
but they are not enough to 
spoil a revelatory release. 

Another Eraio/Radio 
France coproduction is 
responsible for the new 
recording of Berio’s Sinfonia, 
this time with Boulez conduct- 
ing the Orchestra National 
and the New Swingle Singers 
(soon to be available, I gather, 
on CD and cassette). The 
work, even its pot-pourri 
centrepiece on Mahler, has 
survived its celebrity. 

A new record of two recent 
works by Elliott Carter reveals 
his peculiar ability to be both 
abstracted and joyous. The 
works, the song cycle In Sleep. 
In Thunder and the Triple 
Duo, are relatively easy to lode 
into, especially in these ex- 
cellent performances. 

Lastly a shocker. Agnes 
Baltsa’s way with Wagner’s 
Wesendonk songs and 
Berlioz’s Les Nuiis d'ete is 
unashamedly individual; it is 

alert stunning . 

Paul Griffiths 



Finally, the year's most 
desirable (and unusual) sea- 
sonal recording must be that 
made by the prolific Tallis 
Scholars on their own Gimell 
label, not least for four delec- 
table Ave Maria settings, by 
Josquin, Verdelot, and Vic- 
toria. A welcome change, any- 
way, from the common or 
garden Christmas carol. 


Stephen Pettitt 


Schubert Winterreise 
Schreier/Richter (Philips CD 
416 289-2) and Fischer- 
Dieskau/Brendel (Philips CD 
411 463-2) 

Liszt Hiklegard Behrens 
(DG CD 41 9 240-2) 

Horowitz: Redtal (DG CD 
419045-2) 


Glenn Gould (CBS M3 
39036) 

Horowitz in Moscow (DG 
419499-1) 

WBtsuko Ucfiida (Philips 
416381-2) 

Schutz: Der 

Schwa nengesang (EMI EX27 
0275-3) 


Listening to pianists on record 
can be an antiseptic experi- 
ence: everyone is perfect be- 
cause everyone is allowed 
unlimi ted attempts to get it 


right. However, two of the best 
releases 1 have heard this year 
come from pianists playing 
"live" concerts, and that is a 
very different matter. 

Of the various compilation 
albums which (TBS is releasing 
of the idiosyncratic Glenn 
Gould, 1 value Volume 2 most 
highly because it contains an 
electrifying, previously 
unreleased, account of 
Beethoven’s Second Piano 
Concerto.Forget the mediocre 
orchestral playing (a Russian 
student band), and thank God 
and CBS that this 30-year-old 
concert performance has re- 
surfaced, imperfect but 
glorious. 

Horowitz in Moscow 
records the veteran virtuoso’s 
return to his homeland, where 
he wowed them with the 
pianistic showmanship that is 
still unsurpassed. The London 
recital was even better, but 
this DG disc serves ade- 
quately to preserve history. 

As an antidote to these 
wilful gents, Mitsuko 
Uchida's delicate progress 
through the Mozart concertos 
is ideal. Her Queen Elizabeth 
Hall cycle, playing and direct- 
ing the ECO, sometimes 
sounded too careful, but these 
Philips recordings have Jef- 
frey Tate conducting, and the 
gain in muscularity is notice- 
able; try K466 and K467. 

EMI gave us Schutz’s “last 
testament”, his huge Der 
Schwanengesang. bringing to 


wider attention a fascinating 
musical detective story, of 
priceless discoveries in sec- 
ond-hand bookshops and 
dusty libraries. 


Richard Morrison 


Verdi: OteHo Domingo, 
Ricciareili; Maazei (eMI CDS 7 
47450 8) 

Bizet: La JoHe FBIe de 
Perth Anderson, Kraus (EMI 
EX 2702853, black disc and 
cassette only.) 

Fritz Wunderlich, Der 
grosse deutsche Tenor (EMI 
EX 29 0988 3. black disc 
only) 


Placklo Domingo's Otello for 
EMI has to be the operatic 
performance of the year on 
disc, and with the support of 
Ricciareili (Desdemona) and 
Diaz(lago) Ote//o has lobe the 
set of the year. 

The overall dramatic thrust 
of the Scala forces, with Lorin 
Maazei at his best, suggest that 
this recording is going to be 
around for a very long time. 

At the beginning of the 
summer a gap in the catalogue 
was filled when Bizet’s La 
Jolie Fide de Perth came out, 
with June Anderson and 
Alfredo Kraus (Covent Gar- 
den’s team for Lucia this 
Christmas). The or ch es tra l 
contribution is weak but the 
chance of having Bizet’s mel- 
odies in context more than 
compensates. . 


Hip hooray for a jazz age 


PAPERBACKS 


The Hip: Hipsters, Jazz 
and the Beat Generation by 
Roy Carr, Brian Case, and 
Fred Dollar (Faber and Faber, 
£8.95) 


Publishers feeing a knackered 
work-out market and anxious 
not to miss the next trend 
dream of their newest “style 
handbook" itself becoming a 
fashion accessory — a fate that 
probably awaits The Hip. 

Although not, perhaps, as 
desirable in its own terms as a 
blond crew-cut in the style of 
the young Gerry Mulligan or a 
first edition of Howl, this 
handsome large-format paper- 
back is a glorious catalogue of 


the years between Peart Har- 
bour and the Profumo Affair, 
an era whose agonies and 
ecstasies are now bathed in a 
romantic Technicolor glow as, 
sickened by the arrogance of 
their Beatle-generation par- 
ents, yet unable to invent a 
culture of their own, today’s 
teenagers search back beyond 
hippies, mods and rockers for 
role models with glamour. 

For those who were around 
at the time of the post-war 
consumer boom. The Hip 


provides a pleasant memoir, 
sign idiomatically wash- 


its design 
ing the monochrome pix — 
Louis Jordan mugging, Julie 
London smouldering, Roy 
Brown hollering — in orange, 
cobalt and pea green, like an 


existentialist manifesto. Book 
designers do not generally get 
much credit, but in this in- 
stance Andy Martin should 
have bad his name up with 
those of the authors. 

Today’s revivalists, like 
Sade Adu and Tom Waits, get 
their due. And younger read- 
ers will learn from these 
pictures how to hold a saxo- 
phone like Art Pepper, roll a 
button-down collar like Billy 
Eckstine and pout like Bardot 
Above all that, the best of the 
prose bears the imprint of 
Brian Case, a compassionate 
observer whose phrases echo 
the elliptical devices of bebop. 
Here he is on Chet Baker, the 
fallen golden boy, gazing into 
a pawn-shop window on a wet 


night in the English Midlands: 
“In among the unredeemed 
typewriters, chromeband 
wristwatches and radios, is a 
silver trumpet in a battered 
blue case. Hatless, the camel 
overcoat missing its belt, Chet 
stands in the rain, contemplat- 
ing the trumpet. He's dose 
enough to cloud the glass. It 
could be a movie, the wet 
surfaces tremulous enough to 
dissolve into some Oklahoma 
childhood footage of yearning 
in knee-pants. 'What was I 
doing? Oh, I was trying to see 
the name. You never know 
what a born like that is gonna 
sound like.’ " The Hip comes 
dose to idling you. 


Richard Williams 


Buy One Of Our ExQuisrm 
Designer Furs 


Well Send 
Y ou Packing 




<h 


■his weekend, apart from **“8 up to 80* ona 

* f “’ ^ ^ 

(he of £750* or 

For every person wno y FREE 10-day skiing 

wwtodm half board! Tie 

holldi,yin ,^ a M for including tn»d in m 'no 

annot be b^ten. . ^ a norcst to you. 

Choose whichever one day 




RRP FACTORY PRICE 

RED FOX JACKETS ft LENGTH 

£295 £79 

MUSQUASH JACKETS 

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£1495 £299 

FULL LENGTH MUSQUASH COATS 

£1895 £375 

FULL LENGTH MINK COATS 

£1995 £3 99 

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£2495 £499 

FULLY STRANDED RACCOON COATS 

£4995 £995 


LONDON 


PLYMOUTH 
SAT 6th DEC 

THE N0V0TEL HOTEL, MARSH 
MILLS R’ABOUT, PLYMOUTH RD 

cmivciicuiTDCCinmiBi enu nvnirnwnFSS 


iiV UlUlLiillV 1 U 

SUN 7th DEC 
THE WESSEX HOTEL 
WEST CUFF ROAD 


| m EC 1 | MILLS K AdUU 1 , FLlMULI 1 11 K17 I WMI LLirr 

137-149 GOSVVfcL^__ ' OVERSEAS BUYERS VATREFUNDABLE ON EXPORT ORDERS ALL SALES OPEN 

ACfflss/rnsvnME^n^c^^NAi^aAcc^ 9.30 TO 5.30 PM 

H YRIL .K-Ar ^ ForfimherinfonnarionteL 01-2S1 225 

U t c^ANYiE^S ; 


The recital that gave most 
pleasure was the three-record 
Fritz Wunderlich set which 
collects together arias from 
opera and operetta which 
some of us have on old and 
brittle LPs. What a tenor, 
especially in Mozart and Le- 
hdr! Tauber fanatics should 
feel threatened. 

An excess of greed drives 
me to lump together DG’s 
reissues on CD over the past 
few months of all the major 
opera recordings of two of 
their leading contract conduc- 
tors. Claudio Abbado and 
Carlos Kleiber. If the choice is 
restricted to one set apiece, 
then they have to be Abbado’s 
Simon Boccanegra and 
Kleiber’s Freisckatz. 


John Higgins 


Wagner: Derfliegencfe 
HoMnder Ndsson (Philips 416 
300-2. two CDS) 

Montevenfc Fourth Book of 
Madrigals (Dacca L’Oiseau- 
Lyre 414-126-2. two CDs) 
Handel: AtheBa Sutherland, 
Jones (Dacca L Oiseau-Lyre 
417-126-2, two CDs) 

Ave Maria Tallis Scholars 
(Glmefl label CDGtM 1010) 


As I have yet to hear the rival 
Philips recording conducted 
by the composer, my 20th- 
century release of the year has 
to be Esa-Pekka Salonen's 
account of Lutoslawski’s 
Third Symphony, coupled 


with the same composer’s Les 
Espcces du Sommeil. 
Lutoslawski’s review of the 
symphonic process has much 
in common with Sibelius’s or 
Maxwell Davies’s, though the 
polished textures are very 
much his own, and Salonen 
and the Los Angeles Phil- 
harmonic here present them 
in a glistening light. 

Philips’ live Bayreuth re- 
cording of Wagner’s Der 
flieger.de Hollander, con- 
ducted by Woldemar Nelsson, 
is ideal ammunition for those 
who, like me, prefer to hear a 
genuine theatrical experience 
on record to one manufac- 
tured in studio conditions. 
Simon Estes elicits terror and 
pathos in equal measure as the 
Dutchman himself and the 
recording is outstandingly 
natural On only two compact 
discs, the issue also represents 
excellent value. _ 

From the Decca Floriie- 
gium camp there are two 
rivals for inclusion in the 
Christmas stocking. One is the 
Consort of Musicke’s beauti- 
fully understated, impeccably 
tuned performance of Monte- 
verdi’s Fourth Book of Mad- 
rigals: the other is Christopher 
Hogwood’s a p pa r ently annual 
Handel oratorio. The chosen 
work this time isAthalia, with 
Joan Sutherland rather clev- 
erly cast in the title role and 
Aled Jones giving a beautiful 
account of the small but vital 
character of the boy king Joas. 


A year which turns up a single 
good Winterreise is rare 
enough: one in which two 
outstanding recordings appear 
is cause for celebration in- 
deed. Peter Schreier’s came 
first — the one with all the 
coughs in the background — 
and this live performance 
(Philips CD 416 289-2), re- 
corded in the depths of a 
Dresden winter, brought back 
all the icy chili to what 
Schubert described as his most 
“shuddering" song-cycle. 

Deitrich Fischer-Dieskau’s 
Winterreise (Philips CD 41 1 
463-2 L his fifth complete 
recording of the work, reveals 
a startling meeting of minds. 
Alfred B rendel’s own percep- 
tion of the work sparks new 
fire in the singer. 

Liszt’s anniversary year has 
been only palely celebrated on 
disc. We had to wait for the 
end of the year for a song 
recital of real stature: Hilde- 
gard Behrens has provided it 
in an imaginatively selected 
and rewardingly ordered re- 
cital which includes stalwarts 
like “Die Lorelei" and 
“Mignon’s Lied" as well as the 
rare Dumas scena, “Jeanne 
d'Arc au Bucher". Behrens 
shows us at last the Wagner in 
LizsL 

Horowitz offers more Liszt. 
Schumann, Scriabin, Chopin 
— and, above all, the Mozart 
K330 Sonata which, in its 
ageless wisdom, I could gladly 
nominate as recorded perfor- 
mance of the year. 

Hilary Finch 


BRIDGE 


Those who believe that the 
modem game is bedevilled by 
a plethora of artificial bids and 
the loss of the doable as a 
punitive weapon, would have 
derived solace and probably 
some amusement from this 
board from the British Bridge 
League Trials. 

Armstrong v Rose. BBL 
Trials, 1986. East- West 
Game. Dealer North 


Houdini 
plays a 
double 


ing dummy’s remaining 
heart. He finessed the OQ, 
cashed the OA and then 
played a third diamond, 
discarding a club from his 
hand. This left Sheehan 
(North) on play. 



THE TIMES 
ARTS DIARY 


Low grade 
visions 


When asked by the new BBC 
chairman, Marmaduke 
Hussey, whom he would 
recommend as director-gen- 
eral, Ludovic Kennedy sug- 
gested Michael Grade. The 
man. be said, had a world 
vision. Indeed, one of Grade’s 
worldlier visions involves a 
proposal to film Kennedy's 
autobiography after the idea 
was turned down by the 
controller of BBC2. Graeme 
Macdonald. Meanwhile, Mac- 
donald has enough on his 
plate — summoning Film 86 
producer Jane Lush to cast her 
magic wand over Pamela 
Armstrong’s faltering day- 
time debut and wondering 
what to do with Saturday 
Review, whose ratings recently 
fell to a miserable 300,000. 


Secret m ission 


Who will steer Covent Garden 
through its next turbulent 
phase? The appointment of a 
chairman, 1 gather, has al- 
ready been made but the 
board are keeping it close to 
their bass bosoms. Early 
contenders included Sir Rob- 
ert Armstrong, reluctant star 
of the MIS secrets trial, and Sir 





Sainsbury, Isaacs 

Denis Forman, chairman of 
Granada. But I understand 
that coming up fast were 
Jeremy Isaacs, head of Chan- 
nel 4, and Sir John Sainsbury 
of the supermarket chain. 

• After the huge success Of 
The Story of English — Ameri- 
can sales for the book have 
readied 140,000 while die 
BBC TV series enjoyed higher 
ratings than Lord Clark's 
Civilisation — you would have 
thought that the writer, Robert 
McCrum, could afford a deco- 
rator. Not so. He has taken k 
week off to paint his manor 
house in Cambridgeshire. 


Gothic horror 


(5) Kktjy and Aimskong ptay many 
douses m compettiw sequences tn say. 
‘1 have soma values. Hm you another 


V - 
0 - 

♦ J9875 


♦ 9 

C A2 
O J to 2 
♦ J987543 


scat m addUwi to the ona you haw Md7" 
inks tie has the perfect 


4 084 
V 973 
O AO 8 7843 

*- 


N 

W E 
S 


♦ K632 
9 K65 
0 9 

♦ AKQ102 


Armstrong thinks 
hand- 

(6) The boot is firmly on the other foot 
"* Hie bertoy sugar fiane to dust 
Prayers an ewerad. 


♦ 8 

<7 - 

O 8764 

♦ - 


N 

W E 
S 


♦ K6 
V - 
O - 

♦ K Q 10 


s 


♦ A J 1075 
<7 Q J 1064 
O K5 

4 6 


W 


N 


Kirby 


DfaJQi 

m m 


Sheehan 

9 


Armstrong 

3» 

•9 


nm 


(1) Sho wing a weak hand with either 
diamonds or dub s 

(2) On the aptknUJc but false 
assumption thst Sheehaft had <flamond& 
~ Wouldn't you? 

PBMufty non at what had 
■' fra pow o rt ooa to do enytWng 


assumption 
(3) Woufctn' 
$ Pethhi 
happened, I 
but pray. 


The defence appeared to be 
on the right track when I led 
a heart to Sheehan’s ace. 
Sheehan switched to a tramp 
which, because of my power- 
ful intermediates, I won with 
the Ace, in order to return 
the +J. I sat back hoping to 
enjoy some rich pickings. 
Instead, I had to watch 
impoiently while John Arm- 
strong trod surefootedly 
along the high wire. 

Armstrong took the 4Q, 
returned to hand with the ( v > K 
and cashed the +A, discard- 


♦ 1075 
V J10 
0 - 

♦ - 


Sheehan played a club and 
Armstrong inserted the ten. 
Whatever I did now, I could 
only make two tramp tricks. 
Of course if Armstrong had 
permitted me to ruff in at 
any stage I could have 
crashed his trumps together, 
limiting him to seven tricks. 
By making eight tricks, Arm- 
strong restricted the adverse 
swing to 1 IMPS. Houdini 
could not have done better. 

Jeremy Flint 


Expect another lively meeting 
of the British Film Institute’s 
governors over the recently 
ended London Rim Festival. 
Having denounced the fest- 
ival’s opening attraction. Nic- 
olas Roeg’s Castaway, for its 
filth and obscenity, the gov- 
ernors are preparing to vent 
their spleen on the closing film 
— Ken Russell’s Gothic, de- 
scribed by a governor as “one 
of the worst tilings ever put on 
celluloid’*. 


Smart money' 


Furious letters have been fill- 
ing the Bookseller this week 
about the Smarties Awards, 
the UK’s most valuable prize 
for children’s books. “To will- 
ingly associate such sweets 
with children's books is an act 
of commercial stupidity by 
publishers and bare-faced 
cupidity by confectioners", 
rants one correspondent. 
However it seems only fair to 
point out that the other main 
literary prizes are sustained by 
sweeties and booze. The 
Booker company's fortune 
was made from the sugar 
industry of Guyana while 
Whitbread's fortune is based 
on beer. 


W illiam Richmond 


CHESS 


War of attrition 


Anatoly Karpov’s result at the 


wy Karp 

great Tilburg Tournament was 


among his least impressive, 
but the former champion did 
at least gain the consolation of 
defeating his old rival Viktor 
Korchnoi From 1974 until 
1981 these two dominated the 
contests for the world title, 
foreshadowing the titanic 
struggles between Karpov and 
Kasparov. 

In three matches around the 
world, in Moscow, Baguio and 
Merano, Karpov scored 15 
wins, nine losses and SOdraws 
against Korchnoi, but tbe 
younger man only surged 
ahead substantially in their 
final match in 1981. 

Their battles contributed to 
the mythology of chess — tbe 
stuff of which, as Tim Rice 
astutely observed, musicals 
are made. The reality, at 
Tilburg, was somewhat more 
prosaic. Korchnoi was grad- 
ually worn down in a war of 
attrition from an equal 
position. 

White: Korchnoi; Blade 
Karpov 

King's Indian Attack, Til- 
burg, November 1986 

1 W3 M6 2 83 OS 
3 Be2 cS 4 0-0 BH 

s as at a et 


tage to White, who went on to 
win a brilliant game. 


7 Wet 

oan 

s b cm 

"V 

t Nb3 

M 

« R3 

Be2 

11 Hal 

Bh7 

12 B«3 

BM 

ttfttel 

00 

14 NM 

M7 


15 MB 


Korchnoi concentrates his 
forces on the Queen’s wing. 

IB- 9MB 16 Nb3 Ba4 


An important step; Karpov 
eliminates White's dangerous 
King’s Bishop presang down 
on Black’s Queen's flank. 

?*8? 


17 H*5 BX02 18 Kxg2 
19 43 r£b 20 bT 
21 W3 c5 22 b*c5 


While seems to be driving, 
but is soon driven. It would 


have been safer to play 22 b5 
with a sure draw. 


22 _ 
24 BH 

29 NfaS 


taeeS 23 Ml 
Rbc8 25 Nc3 


ttS 

tut 


White is already 
ing difficulty in the defence of 
his pawns on a3 and c4. 

27 M2 OS 28883 
29M03 faa3 


The first gain. 

38WB4 Rc7 31 Hd2 

32 Rc2 Ndft 33 jrt 

9* Hem* tUm* 35 IW 

38 M2 
38 NdB 


K V 


NeS 
BM 

35fa*4 6*5 

37 Rbtfl m 


<tec4 


This plan was recom- 
mended after the game 
Korchnoi-Polugaievsky, 
London Docklands, 1984. 
That had continued 5...h6 
(instead of 5_e6) 6 c4 e6 
(better 6~.dxc4) 7 Be3 Be7 8 
Qb3 Qc8 9 Nc3 with advan- 


This escapade results m ig- 
nominy. He should instead 
exchange Knights. 

38. Rb3 38 M2 fltt 
40 RacC Rees 


White resigned- 
White’s apparently 
sive Knight is, in fad. 
stranded and doomed. A curi- 
ous finale. 

Raymond Keene 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 125 


Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
correct solutions opened on Thursday. December II. Entries 
should be addressed to Hie Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition, i Pennington Street, London, El 9XN. The winners and 
solution will be announced on Saturday, December 13, 1986. 


ACROSS 

1 Knee trousers (6) 

4 Nurture (61 

7 Humdinger (4) 

8 English baseball (8) 

9 Irresistibly strong 
( 12 ) 

15 Tin (6) 

16 Rumple (6> 

17 f^rc^phicskey 

23 Airship mooring bne 
(4.4) 

24 Plug (4) 

25 Liveliness (6) 

26 Up-lO-daie(6) 


DOWN 

1 Brood resentfully (4) 

2 Unaware (9) 

3 Leather binding (5) 

4 Indian woman (5) 

5 Lebanon tree (5) 

6 Long range naviga- 
tion system (5) 

10 Correa (5) 

11 Rejoice (5) 

12 Puerile (9) 

13 Scots valley (4) 

14 Goad (4) 

18 Fragrant iris (5) 

19 Bernese Oberiand 
peak<5) 

20 Rainbow fish (5) 

21 Curse (5) 

22 Narrow opening (4) 



SOLUTION TO NO 1124 

ACROSS; 1 Schism 4 Tricot T Veal 
8 Henchman 9Rattail 11 Roost 
12 London Gazette 15 Stum 16 Stretch 
20 Enormity 21 Club 22 Twenty 23Tip- 

KWn: 


1 Several 2 Heart 3 Mahdi 
4 Tank 5 Comfort 6 Tenet 18 Among 
II Razor 13 Noisome 14 Exhibit 
15 Sweet 17 Tryst 18 Tulip 19Vimy 


The winners of prize concise So f /Wore: 
Miss Beti Jones. 14 Royal Circus. Edinburgh; 
and Mrs E From. "Langley", Winkers Lane. 
Chalfont St Peter. Bucks. 


SOLUTION TO NO 1 1 19 (last Saturday's prize concise) 


ACROSS: 1 Tiptop 4 Harass 7 Lope 8 Laudable 9 Breath- 
alyser 15 Ashram 16 Indeed 17 Long drawn out 23Quinnal 
24 Wall 25 Heresy 26 Sleeve 

DOWN: I Talk 2Papenhin 3 Pilot 4 Hausa 5 Ready 
6 Salve 10 Award 11 Linen 12 Speculate 13 Ride 14 Gam 
18 Ovule 19 Gone 20 Randy 21 Wilds 22 Pi si 


Name. 


Address ... 









THE WEEK AHEAD 



THEATRE 

TAKING GUARD: Brian Cox plays 
the cricket-loving squire Sir Timothy 
Bellboys in the Royal Shakespeare 
Company revival of John Whiting's A 
Penny For a Song. Set on the Dorset 
coast in the summer of 1 804 as the 
dad's army of their day prepare to 
repel an expected invasion from the 
forces of Napoleon, the play puts the 
muddle and incompetence of the 
amateur soldiery against the idealism 
of a young mercenary. The director is 
Howard Davies. Barbican Theatre 
(01-628 8795). Previews from Friday, 
first night December 17. 



GALLERIES 

POPPING IN: David Hockney is 
home from Los Angeles to show new 
prints. The boy wonder has put aside 
his camera and discovered the Xerox 
machine. By a new process he has 
made a series of still-lifes which are 
on show at the Knoedter Gallery, 
London W1 (01-439 1096) from 
Monday. Hockney's youthful 
graphics, using more conventtonal 
methods, are included among the 
Warhols, Liechtensteins, Kitajs and 
Hamiltons in British and American 
Pop Art at the Tate Gallery, London 
SW1 (01-821 1313) from Wednesday. 



FILMS 

CROC OF GOLD: Paid Hogan, 
irreverent star of Australian TV and 
Foster's lager ads, reaches the big 
screen in Crocodile Dundee (15) — 
the broad tale of a crocodile hunter 
taken to New York's urban jungle by 
an American reporter (Linda 
Kozlowski). The film has already 
entered the history books as 
Australia's biggest ever money 
maker. For its American rebase 
several morsels of Aussie vernacular 
were removed to save the audience 
from bewilderment Leicester Square 
Theatre (01-930 5252), from Friday. 


OPERA 

CAROL SERVICE Carol Vaness 
sings three roles in the revival of 
Handel's Samson. As well as Dalila 
she will be heard as The Philistine 
Woman and The Israelite Woman, 
which shows she takes no sides and 
will give the audience a chance to 
hear her deliver the opera's most 
famous number "Let the bright 
seraphim”. The triple engagement is 
sometimes heard in the concert hall 
but rarely in the theatre. Robert Tear 
sings Samson for the first time at 
Covent Garden. Royal Opera House 
(01-2401066), Monday. 


RADIO 

LETHAL DOSE Hawfey Harley 
Crippen was a meek little American 
doctor who poisoned his wife and 
eloped with his young mistress, only 
to be apprehended in mid-Atlantic 
through the new medium of wireless 
telegraphy. With the help of legal and 
forensic experts, criminologist Jenny 
Ward reconstructs one of tne classic 
murder cases of the century and 
asks whether the outcome would 
have been different had the doctor 
been tried by today’s more exacting 
standards of evidence. Radio 4, 
Friday, 11. 03-1 1.47am. 



TELEVISION 

GOLDEN OLDIE Wendy Hiller plavs 
a widow enjoying a new lease of life 
at 85 in a three-part adaptation of 
Vita Sackville-West's novel. All 
Passion Spent Escaping the 
intrigues of her solicitous children, 
she takes a crumbling house in 
Hampstead, surrounds herself with 
favourite cronies and reflects on her 
years in India as the wife of the 
Viceroy. Harry Andrews, Maurice 
Denham and Phyllis Calvert also star 
in a story which provides rich 
pickings for veteran actors. BBC2, 
Tuesday, 9-9.55pm. 


ROCK'. 


BIG COUNTRY: Have they 
sad this 


S 


been a bit over-exposed i 
ear? Don't mention the 
gpipes. 

Tonight, Whitley Bay Ice Rink 
(091-252 6240 Y. Mon, NEC, 
Birmingham (021-780 4133); 
Tubs, Showering PaviEon, 


Shepton Mallet, near Bath 
(0749 82113); Thurs. Fri. 
Wembley Arena (01-902 1234). 



• Billy Ocean, die expatriot 
Briton who enjoyed a ran of 
hits in the Seventies, starts his 
first British tour tonight with 
his American band and special 
guest Roby Toner. He has 
become an Eighties superstar 
thanlre to the multi-million 
selling “Suddenly” and this 
year's number one, “When 
The Going Gets Tough**. To- 
night, Brighton Centre 01273 
202881); tomorrow, Bourne- 
mouth International Centre 
(0202 297297); Tnes, Ipswich 
Gaumont (0473 53641); Wed, 
Birmingham Odeou (021643 
6101); Fri (for three nights), 
Hammersmith Odeou London 
W6 (01-748 4081). 

SOUTHSJDE JOHNNY AND 
THE JUKES: As Springsteen 
fever grips like never before, 
his former Asbury Park 
protege musters a solitary 
British date. 

Thurs, Town and Country Club. 
London NW5 (01 -267 3334). 
Two shows. 

THE POGUES: The first 
drunken shenanigans of 1 986 
for the rude boys of punk folk. 
Tomorrow, The Studio, Bristol 
(0272 276193); Mon.Tues, 
Hammersmith Palais, London 
W6 (01-748 2812); Thurs, 

Leeds University 
(0532 439071); Fri, 

Barrowlands, Glasgow (041- , 
552 4601). 


JAZZ 


KID ORY CENTENARY: 

Frve-a-SIkJe, the unusual 
British band featuring the 
trombonists Roy Wilhams, Pete 
Strange, Roy Crimmins, Jim 
Shepherd and John Beech am, 
pays tribute to a great New 
Orleans pioneer of the 
instrument 

Tonight Purcell Room, 

South Bank, London SE1 (01- 
9288800). 

BUDDY TATE/AL GREY: A 
fine combination of forthright 
ex-Basiettes, both Tate's 
tenor and Grey's trombone 
being steepea in the blues. 
Tonight and Wed-Fri, Pizza 
Express, 10 Dean Street 
London W1 (01-439 8722); 
tomorrow, Moat House, 
Bournemouth (0202 299 
3311). 

COURTNEY PINE: Would 
you believe that his first LP has 
outsold MBes Davis's Tutu 
by three to one? 

Tonight Club Mankind, la 
Am hurst Road. London E8(01- 
985 9186); Wed, Pavilion, 
Worthing (0903 202221 ). 

ALFREDO “CHOCOLATO" 
ARMENTEROS: When he was 
the chief soloist with 
Machito's band, one wondered 
how this great Cuban 
trumpeter would sound in a 
more intimate setting. Now 
we'll find out 
Tues to Sat, Bass Clef, 1 
Hoxton Square. London N1 
(01-7292476). 


stolen away by a melancholy 
Muslim Prince (Ben Kingsley). 
Chic hogwash, beautifully 
photographed, directed by 
Arthur Joff6. 

Cannon (formerly ABC) 
Shaftesbury Avenue (01- 
836 6279). From Fri. 

LINK (15): Chimpanzees steal 
all the scenes in this perverse 
horror film from Richard 


character, Locke the chimp. 
Cannon Haymarket (01- 
839 1527), Prince Charles (01- 
437 8181). From Fri. 


SELECTED 


EAT THE PEACH (PG): Peter 
Orm rod's engaging, polished 
Irish comedy, based on truth, 
about a man obsessed with 
building a Wan of Death. 

Plaza (01-437 1234), Cannon 
Chelsea (01 -352 5096), 
Cannon Tottenham Court 
Road (01-636 6148). 

ROUND MIDNIGHT (15): 
Bertrand Tavernier’s loving 
homage to jazz musicians, set 
in Paris dining the 1950s; with 
Dexter Gordon as a 
saxophonist befriended by an 
idolizing Frenchman. 

Lumiere (01-836 0691), Screen 
on the Hill (01 -435 3366), Gate 
Netting Hill (01-221 0220). 

SHOAH (PG): Claude 
Lanzmann's meticulous and 
chilling holocaust 
documentary; over nine hours 
long, presented in twoparts. 
Curzon Mayfair (01-499 3737). 


OPERA 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: Gala 
performance of Die 
Zauberftote on Tues at 7pm, 
and Siegfried Jerusalem and 
Karita MattBa as Tamino and 
Pamina continue their quest in 
further performances on Fri 
and into next week. 

Covent Garden, WC2 (01-240 
1086). 

ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA: 
The seasonal return of Die 
Ffedermaus (Mon and Thurs, 
7.30pm) sees Valerie 
Masterson as Rosalinda, Alan 
Opie as Bsenstein and Fiona 
Kimm as Orlovsky. David 
Pountney's new production of 
Carmen, with Sally Burgess in 
the title role, continues on Wed 
and Dec 13 at 7pm; Ian 
Judge's double-bffl of Cav & 
flag tonight, Tues and Fri at 
7.30pm. 

Coliseum, St Martin’s Lane, 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 


SADLER'S WELLS: Menotti 
has come up with a new opera 
-a little 75th-bfrthday 
celebration piece cafled The 
Boy Who Grew Up Too Fast 
Directed by the composer 
himself, it is presented in a 
double-bit! wrth AmaN and the 
Night-Visitors by the Royal 
Opera House and Sadler's 
Weis Theatre in association 
with Youth and Music, and 
opens on Thurs at 7.30pm with 
a Fri matinee at 2^0pm. 
Sadler's Wells Theatre, 
Rosebery Avenue, London 
EC1 (01-278 8916). 


TELEVISION 


.EILMS. 


HOWARD ... A NEW 
BREED OF HERO (PG): The 
Marvel Comics character 
Howard the Duck stars in an 
erratic live-action 
extravaganza from George 
Lucas's production 
company. With Lea Thompson 
as a friendly rock singer 
and Jeffrey Jones as a 


. From 
Fri. 

HAREM (15): A smart New 
York girl (Nastassia Kinski) is 


LONDON’S BURNING: A Hlff 
Street Blues at foa London Fire 
Brigade, inspired by the 
Tottenham riots when firemen 
came wider attack. Jack 
Rosenthal's script draws cm 
real incidents and cteveriy 
blends the comic and the 
tragic. Director is Les Blair. 

ITV, tomorrow, 9-llpm. 

NORTH AND SOUTH: An 
American Civil War soaper 
which is reputedly the most 
expensive television series 
ever made. Wien the drama 
flags, try to spot where the 
money went With Lesley-Aiwe 
Down, David Carradine, Gene 
Kelly and Elizabeth Taylor. 

ITV, Mon, 9-10 and 10.30- 
11.20pm. 

A PEOPLE’S WAR: Vera Lynn, 
Gert and Daisy, swing bands 
and Gl brides as the history of 
Britain at war looks at 
entertainment and sex. 

Channel 4, Mon, 10-llpm. 

TOUS A CHILD: Marking the 
40th anniversary of the United 
Nations Children's Fund, Denis 
Tuohy's film Is a stark 
reminder that even in the 
1980s 15 million children die 
each year before reaching their 
fifth birthday, 

ITV, 9-1 0 and 1 0.30-1 1 .30pm. 
SCARFE ON SCARFE: Arena 
documentary in which 
cartoonist Gerald Scarfe 
reflects on a life spent wielding 
a vitriolic pen. 

BBC2, Fri, 9.30-1 0.30pm. 


THEATRE- 


OPENINGS 


CANDIDA: Frank Hauser 
directs Maureen O'Brien, 
Rupert Graves, David Rintoui 
and Nicholas Amer In a new 


imard Shaw “romance with 
a social and political edge". 
King's Head, 115 Upper Street, 
London N1 (01-226 1916). 
Previews today and Sun; first 
night Mon. 

DORY PREVIN SINGING 
SONGS AND TELLING TALES: 

Her first UK show for ten years 
includes ten new songs and a 
selection of past work. With a 
three-piece band. 

Donmar Warehouse (01- 
240 8230). Preview Mon. 

Tues. 

HERESIES: Premiere 
production of a play by 
Deborah Levy, developed 
through workshops with 
director Susan Todd and cast 
members Roger Al lam, Susan 
Colverd, Paola Dronisotti, 
Penelope Freeman. Stella 
Gonet Caroline Goodafl, 

Miriam Karfin, Nrmmy March, 
Tina Marian, Arm Mitchell, 

Clive Russell, Susan Tracy. 
’Betrayal, loyalty and the 


Open 


made between men i 
women." 

The Pit, Barbican (01-628 
8795/638 8891). From Wed. 
First night Dec 16. 

“HEY1, LUCIAN IT: The Hfe, 
times and purportedly 
mysterious death of Pope John 
Paul I Is the subject of mis first 
stage play of Mark E Smith, 
leader of the rock group The 
Fan, who perform on stage 
during the show. 

Riverside Studios (01- 
748 3354). Previews today, 
Mon. First night Tues. 

THE HOBBIT: Rony Robinson 
and Graham Watkins have 
adapted the book by J R R 
Tolkein and Malcolm Dixon has 
the title role. Original music by 
Stephanie Nunn. A Christmas 
seasonal import 
Fortune-Theatre (01-836 2235). 
Preview Tues. Opens Wed. 
Until Jan 24. 


MERE SOUP SONGS: London 
premiere, as a late night 
“Platform Performance", of a 
musical piece by Alan 
Ayckbourn and Paul Todd first 
seen at Scarborough. Diane 
Bull, Russefl Dixon, Kate 
Dyson, Michael Simians, 
directed by Ayckbourn. 
i Buffet National 
atre (01-928 2252). 
Tonight Fri, Dec 13; Jan 2, 3, 
9,10, 23,24, 30,31. 

THE MOTHER: Yvonne 
Bryceland leads in the National 
Theatre's workshop 
production, directed by Di 
Travis, which has been touring 
schools, colleges and small 
venues. Eight performances 
only. 

Cottssloe (01-928 2252). 

Thurs, Fri, Dec 13, 18,19,20. 


SELECTED 


THE MAGISTRATE: Nigel 
Hawthorne a charming hero in 
Pinero's imperishable comedy. 
Performances on Friday and 
Dec 13, the last until Jan. 
National (01-928 2252). 

THE FAIR MAID OF THE 

WEST: High finks on the high 
seas in mairny successful 
revival of Haywood's comedy. 
The Swan Theatre itself well 
worth a visit 

Swan. Stratford (0789 295623). 

THE LAST WALTZ: CeHa Imrie 
and Alexandra Pigg show how 
best to survive as an army wife 
inGfflian Richmond's shrewd 


FILMS ON TV 


THE REBEL (I960): Uneven 
but engaging dnema debut for 
Tony Hancock as a London 
office worker escaping to the 
Paris Left Bank. 

BBC2, today, 3.15-4.55pm. 

L’AMOUR AMORT 
(1984)/LA$T YEAR IN 
MARIENBAD (1961): Alain 
Resnais double bill comprising 
his latest fifm and his most 
famous. Plenty for the eye but 
even more for the mind. 

BSC2, today, 9J30pm-1am. 



Poly (01-636 9050). 

MR AND MRS NOBODY: The 

home life of the Pooters, 
ingeniously staged and not too 
cosy too often. Judi Dench and 
Michael Williams a beguiling 
couple. 

Garrick (01 -379 61 07). 

THE WOMEN: How to lose and 
win your man In New York, 
1936. Pretty superficial but 
star-studded and engaging at 
times. 

Old Vic (01-828 7616). 

LES LIAISONS 

DANGEREUSES: BloodchiHing 
account of the destruction of 
innocence under the anden 
regime. Tickets Bke gold dust 
Ambassadors (01 -836 61 11). 


• Billed as “the tragedy of a 
man who couldn’t make up ids 
mind**, Insurance Olivier’s 
1948 Hamlet divided Hie crit- 
ics and became the first Brit- 
ish film to win an Oscar for 
best picture. There was an 
Oscar, too, for Olivier as best 
actor. Shakespeare scholars 
may deplore tbe gutting erf the 
text but Desmond Dickutsaa’s 
brooding camerawork leaves 
no doubt that so mething is 
rotten in tbe state of Denmark. 
Channel 4, today, 2-4J0pm. 


RADIO- 


OUT OF THE MAZE: 

Unusual documentary from 
Northern Ireland which 
reveals that behind the barbed 
wire of the Maze Prison 
there is many a hardened 
terrorist taking A levels and 
studying for the Open 
University. 

Radio 4, tomorrow, 10.15- 
11pm. 


MRS DALLOWAY: Virginia 
Woolf's novel of the events 
and moods of 3 June day in 
1923. Maureen O’Brien plays 
the fashionable lady of the 
title, throwing a party which 
stirs old emotions and 
tragedy. 

3, Tues, 7.30- 
9.15pm. 

SEE HOW THEY RUN: A 
Woman's Hour series on 
women in politics kicks off 
with someone who took nine 
years to get into Parliament 
out did rather well 
subsequently. Name of 
Margaret Roberts, later 
Thatcher. 

Radio 4, Thurs, 2-3pm. 


DANCE 


DANCE FOR AFRICA: All 
over Britain from tomorrow 
until December 14, 
professional and amateur 
dancers are performing 
without payment to rase funds 
for the wore of Unicef with 
African children. Events start 
tomorrow with galas in 
London (Sadler s Wells), 

Cardiff (St David's Haffland 
Newcastle (New Tyne Theatre). 
Tiers is an official opening 
ceremony at the Festival Hall 
(6pm), and the Royal Ballet 
School at 153 Talgarth Road, 
Barons Court London 
offers classes to anyone over 

12 at 10.30, 1.30 and 4.30, 
plus male-only classes at noon 
and 3.00. 

NORTHERN BALLET 
THEATRE: Swan Lake today at 
the Palace, Manchester 
(061 236 9922) and Tues-Dec 

13 at Theatre Royal, 

Norwich (0603 28205). 

ROYAL BALLET: This 


week’s orriy performance is a 
triple Ml (Tnurs) of Young 
Apollo, Beauty and the Beast 
and Baiserde la fee. 

Covent Garden (01-240 1066). 

LONDON 

CONTEMPORARY DANCE 
THEATRE: Season at 
Sadler's Wells (01-278 8916) 
ends today; so do tours by 
Sadler's Wells Royal Ballet at 
Birmingham Hippodrome 
(021 622 7846) and BaUet 
Rambert at the New Tyne 
Theatre, Newcastle. 



New life for an old favourite: Peter Schaufuss, left, and a design by David Walker for the Nutcracker 

Leading the Festival dance 


U ntrammelled by the metro- 
politan prejudices of other 
theatre award schemes, the 
Manchester Evening News 
has just presented its Dance Award for 
1986 to Peter Schaufuss because of his 
achievement in raising the standards of 
London Festival Ballet's tonring pro- 
gramme and for his personal contribu- 
tion as a dancer to tbe popularity of 
traditional balleL 

It is just over two years since 
Schaufuss took charge of Festival Ballet 
at a time when its finances and its 
morale were both depressed. To take on 
that challenge he accepted a drop in his 
own income, giving up many of the 
lucrative guest engagements that beck- 
oned all round the world. He has had to 
work harder than even planning rep- 
ertory and casting, playing a part in 
publicity and fund-raising, making the 
artistic decisions that cannot be dele- 
gated, and also dancing and rehearsing. 

He has certainly achieved results. His 
first move was to bring in dancers from 
abroad to set new standards, especially 
among the men. But at the same time he 


gave chances to young dancers within 
the company in whom he saw promise. 
He has not been afraid to bade his 
hunch about young talent (the most 
striking example in his 18-year-okl 
ballerina Trinidad Sevillano) but has 
also found ways to use the gifts and 
experience of old-timers such as Alexan- 
der Grant 

Sevillano, Grant and Schaufuss him- 
self are all among the casts of the new 
production of The Nutcracker which 
opens this week at Plymouth and will 
play at the Festival Hall from Boxing 
Day. The Nutcracker has been a 
breadwinner for Festival Ballet from tbe 
start Extracts from it were included in 
the company's first tour in 1950, and 
successive stagings have brought packed 
houses ever since for weeks on end in 
London and on tour. 

Schau fuss's production sticks closely 
enough to the original story to have 
snowflakes and a Christmas tree in its 
advertisements, and for him to have 
invited Dame Alicia Markova (Festival 
Ballet's first ballerina) to teach the 
dancers the famous pas de deux which 


she learnt in the early 1930s. But 
Schaufuss has some surprises up Ins 
sleeve too, as indicated by the fret that 
the of characters list unprecedentedly 
includes the names of Tchaikovsky 
himself (doubling as the mysterious Dr 
Drosselmeyer), his sister Alexandra 
Da vidova and his niece Tatyana. 

Up to four or five different dancers 
are announced for each of the leading 
roles during tbe ballet's opening run, but 
Schaufuss has broken away from one 
Festival Ballet tradition this Christmas 
by not inviting any guest stars. It is not 
that he has anything against guests 
(Nureyev, for instance, has been danc- 
ing on the company's autumn tour), but 
he obviously feels that his revitalized 
company has earned the chance to take 
the initial credits for itself. 

John Percival 

Festivar Ballet's Nutcracker is at the 
Theatre Royal, Plymouth this week from 
Wednesday (matinees Friday and - 
Saturday); then at the Royal Festival HaH 
from December 26, twice dally until 
January 3. and evenings plus Saturday 
matinees until January 17. 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


TAKING THE STAGE: Vivid 
and vigorous photographs of 
actors, directors and their 
attendants by British 
photographer John Haynes. 
National Theatre, South Bank, 
London SE1 (01-928 2033). 

THE BRITONS: Huge colour 
Polaroid group portraits which, 
for American photographer 
Neal Slavin, portray the British 
Spectacular, bold and arrogant 
but appealing nonetheless. 
Stills Gallary, 105 High Street, 
Edinburgh (031 557 1140). 

PRINTED UGHTi 200 
remarkable photographs from 
the early days. Featuring Fox, 
Talbot, Hffl and Adamson and 
incHxfing many fine portraits, 
landscapes and cityscapes — 
all of which have a distinct 
freshness of vision now 
associated with die birth of the 
medium. 

Science Museum, South 
Kensington, London SW7 (01- 
589 3456). 


GALLERIES 


SONIA BOYCE Paintings and 
drawings describing the social 
and domestic experiences of 
black people living in Britain by 
a young artist with a rising 
reputation. 

Air Gallery, 6 Rosebery 
Avenue, London EC1 (01- 
278 7751). From Wed her work 
will feature in “A Cabinet of 
Drawings", a mixed show of 
artists represented by Gfmpel 
His, 30 Dairies Street London 
W1 (01-493 2488). 

JOHN STRICKLAND 
GOODALL: Detailed 
watercolours of festive 
Victorian Christmasses by this 
popular illustrator of chfidren's 

rmnlrt* 

Christopher Wood Gallery, 15 
Motcombe Street, London' 

SW1 (01-235 9141). From Mon. 

TURN OF THE YEAR: Mixed 
show, including Jacquefine 
Morreau, Sue Dunktey and 
Larry Wakefield to cerebrate 
the first year of a suburban 
_ fiery dedicated to quality 
rather than fashion. 

Art Space Gallery, 84 St 
Peter's Street London N1 (01- 
359 7002). FTOm Mon. 

JAMES FITTON (1899-1982): A 
retrospective of the Old ham- 
bom painter and Royal 
Academician who, in his lesser 
known commercial work, 
surprisingly kept pace with 
mt-garde Russian and 
German art 
Dulwich Picture Gallery, 

College Road, London SE21 
(01-693 5254). 


CONCERTS 


BLAIR/YMSO: James Blair 
conducts the Young 
Musicians’ Symphony 
Orchestra in Elgar's Falstaff, 
Walton's Ceflo Concerto 
(soloist, Peter Dixon) and 
Britten's Gforiana Suite. 

St John’s, Smith Square, 
London SW1 (01-222 1061). 
Today, 7.30pm. 

EAST OF VIENNA: For the 
third of their "East of Vienna" 
series the Nash Ensemble 
plays Mozart's Clarinet Trio 
and Shostakovich’s Piano 
Quintet, and Felicity Lott sings 
songs by Rachmaninov and 
Shostakovich's Seven Poems 
of Alexander Blok. 

Wigmcve Hati, 36 V 
Street London W1 
2141). Today, 7.30pm. 

ALL BEETHOVEN: The LSO is 
conducted by James Loughran 
In tiie Eomont Overture and 
John UlT solos in Plano 
Concertos Nos 4 and 5. 
Barbican Centre, Silk Street 
London EC2 (01-628 8795. 
oreeflt cards 01-638 8891). 
Tomorrow, 7.30. 

TAKING STEPPES: Gennadi 
Rozhdestvensky conducts the 
Philharmonte Orchestra in 
Borodm's tn the Steppes of 
Central Asia end foe 
Mussorgsky-Ravel Pictures at 
an Exhibition while Viktoria 
Postnlkova solos in 
Tchaikovsky's Plano Concerto 
No 2. 

Festival Hall. Mon, 7.30pm. 

BERTINI/LSO: Gary Bertkii, 
not a conductor we hear often 
tn London, takes the LSO 
through Mahler's Symphony 
No 6 and Krystian Zimemtan 
sptos to Liszt's Piano Concerto 

No 2. 

Festival Hail. Tues, 7.30pm, 
RATTLE/CBSO: Simon Rattle 


Mozart's Piano Concerto 
K 503. 

Barbican Centre. Thurs, 
7.15pm. 



• Yon nrigkt thhk nothing of 
Deties's re mains unheard, bat 
one of Jus early eudeavoors 
surfaces on Wednesday when 
the London Philharmonic 
gives the premiere of American 
Rhapsody. This is the first 
version of the haunting 
masterpiece we know as 
Appalachia, and is very dif- 
ferent, introducing Dixie and 
Yankee Doodle, tmpoetic dit- 
ties Delias later suppressed. 
Festival Hall, Sooth Bank, 
London SE1 (01-928 3191, 
credit cards 01-928 8800), 
Wed, 7.30pm. 


BOOKINGS: 


FIRST CHANCE 


/Brahms's 

Symphony No 4, Sibelius's 
Symphony No 6 and, with 
Stephen Btehop-Kovacevieh, 


CHRISTMAS BACH FESTIVAL: 
Concerts in six London 
churches by the Monteverdi 
Choir and English Baroque 
Soloists, with John Eliot 
Gardiner. Works include 
motets, Brandenburg Concert 
and Christmas Oratorios. 
Ticketmaster(01-379 6433). 
Dec 15-Jan 16. 

NEW YEAR AT THE 
BARBICAN: Booking for two 
Viennese evenings (Dec 31 
and Jan 1), Fantasia 87 
Concert on New Year's Day, 
and Verdi Gala Night 
Barbican Centre, Silk Street 
London EC2 (01-638 8891 ; 01- 
6288795). 

ROYAL OPERA: Postal 
booking for January 
— formances of Lucia di 
. vmermoor. Dor 
Rosenka vatier and new 
production of Otelfo. 
Personal/telephone booking 
from Jan 2. 

Royal Opera House, Covent 
Garden, PO Box 6, London 
WC2 (01-240 1 068/1 91 1). 

WH3MORE CHRISTMAS 
CRACKER: Christmas feast of 
carols and song, including New 
Year's Eve concert by the 
Songmaker's Almanac, and 
New Year's Day concert with 
the King's Consort. 

Wigmore Hall, 36 Wigmore 
Street, London W1 (01-935 


LAST CHANCE 

CAV AND PAG: Last 
performance Fri of Ian Judge 
production of double bill with 
Malcolm Rivers, Helen Field 
and Christopher Booth -Jones 
ENO, London Coliseum, St 
Martin's Lane, London WC2 
(01-836 3161; 01-240 5258 
credit cards). 

TURNER PRIZE: Display of 
work shortlisted for greatest 
contribution to British art in la 
including winners 
Gilbert and George; also Vtot< 
Burgfo. Derek Jarman, and Bi 
Ends tomorrow. 
2S StaY. Millbank, Londo 
SW1 (01-821 1313). 

Exhibition c 



unoriRU 

Q — r/ -""^exhibits from 

bureau des Expositions in 

Pans. Ends tomorrow. 
.Lyric Theatre, Hammersmrt 
London W6 (01-741 2311) 


For ticket avallabilif 
pe rfor mance aad open 
rimes, telephone tin 
numbers fisted. Film 
Geoff Brown; Rock: Di 
Sin***; Theatre: T« 

Pahriob r 


WT1SMI 

radio aod films on T 
Peter Waymark;Ja; 

Richard Williams; 
Concerts: Max Harrij 

Dance: John pferciv, 

Opera: Hilary Fiod 
GaUenes: David Le 
Photography. Midis 

Ynimn- DuU- . 


Whiteha ll 


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ENTERTAINMENTS 


BARBICAN HALL 

Barfaican Centre, Silk St, EC2Y SDS 
01-638 8891/ 628 879S 
Telephone Bookings. 10am-8pm 7 days a week 

C- r -ri ‘u^ea ti in* o::h*C-i, ;t '.yoy 



RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

xt the BARBICAN 


TUESDAY 9 DECEMBER M 145 p-m- 

BARRY DOUGLAS piano 

_B 8STdBflavgfcyGoM Medal Winner 
jjfcy ENRIQUE BATE conductor 

Beethtreen OVERTURE* LEONORA NoJ 

IJW Radmunov PIANO O0XCERTO -So. 2 

Hoist THE PLANETS 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

fp i wwil byPBUhHt i yiEn— 

Li.t5.dAai 

BnlPUhinnia'rOrtif ■■iMiil«il»uwlrttoiwa4Cafcfaybd 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER presents 

at the ROYAL ALBERT HALL 

NEW YEAR 
GALA CONCERTS 


Sunday 28th December at 7.30 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
BAND OF THE SCOTS GUARDS 
Introduced & conducted bv: ANTONY HOPKINS 
Soloist: ALLAN SCHILLER „ , 

MarcteStae. Suite ‘The Swan Lake'. Kano Concerto No. 1. 

Suite 'The N utcracker ' 

OVERTURE ‘1812* WITH C ANNON 
AND MORTAR EFFECTS 




ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


TOMORROW at 3.15 fun 

GOLDSMITHS CHORAL UNION 


UEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


MONDAY NEXT 8 DECEMBER at 7.45 pm 


UnJUaniLldprciati 


i via/atTUtlia UIVIVU. UXWll 1 n n « m • 

FAMILY CAROLS Stuttgart Piano Tno 


BRIAN WRIGHT, ooojular 

ANTONI' SAUNDERS A GEOFFREY PRATLEY. iu» 
CHRISTOPHER BOWERS-BROADBENT, orc*n 
FINCHLEY CHILDRENS MUSIC GROUP vlWor KmuU Carpi 
S|«ul UurM JAMES BLADES — Tallanj? about RetcibiIob 
II 70. £ >i»0. mni))L Cisop.buiuni'<Lh£arjtaU'L- 

Uo\illl'ie.'.vl-<tb> I Iv I open liko-Upo! ntT. -In Unlui jrJ Holtar.UI-lOtaaW 
Umn t bmn i M u Nnun McCann fam i qnln—l Anfau LiA 


P PHILHARMONIA 
rl ORCHESTRA 

^Principal Conductor: Giuseppe Siuopoli 


Monday next, 8 December at 7 JO 

GENNADI ROZHDESTVENSKY 
VIKTORIA POSTNIKOVA 

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 2 
Borodin: In the Sir pres ol Central Asia 
Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition 

Sponsored by NISSAN UK LIMITED 

I .Jttl* (5.W. « £7. l*. £«- 

Atalahk fan HjU .01-**2S »l«li t-C -UM> ««i 4 ■**»• 


“as feme a trio as one is likely to encounter*' 
Sew York Times 

Trios by Haydn, Ravel & Schubert 

£150 . 1 1.50. £4.50. /A St £6.50 Bui Ortix 01-428 Jl<M CC 0L-428 8WW 


WEDNESDAY NEXT 10 DECEMBER si 7.45 pjn. 

LONDON MOZART PLAYERS 

# Jane Glover 

Adrian Thompson 

SERENADE TO THE NIGHT \BPi 
BRITTEN MUSGRAVE HAYDN 'TV 

MOZART 

See QEH panrl fat iku& 


Tomb; lb December at 745 pot 
In (be presence of HRH Tbr Prince nt Wiles 
Puna. fcngli&h Q a n bcr ftttoba and Mnac Society 

MOZART Haffner Symphony 
CHOPIN Piano Concerto No. 2 
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 

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ALFRED SCHNnTKE Symphony No. I 

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Orchestra of St. John's Smith Square 
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Tuesday 16, Wednesday 17, Friday 19 
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Sl John’s Smith Square, London SW1 7J00 pm 


MESSIAH 

A unique series of four perfoounces of Handel's nasterpiece 
given by one of Europe's finest baroque choirs 


The Sixteen Choir and Orchestra 

Harry Christophers conductor 

Lynac Dawson uspnno, Catherine Denkyaootrabil 16, 17, 19). 
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Tomorrow Sunday 7 December 7 30pm 

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B EETH OVEN Piano Concerto No 4 

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No 5 'Emperor' 

JOHN LILL piano 
JAMES LOtJGHRAN conductor 
£11-50. £9.50, £730. £6. £4^0. £3.50 


Satuday 13 December 7.4Sptn 

NATALIA GUTMAN 

cello 

BEETHOVEN -Overture Coriolan 

DVORAK Cello Concerto 

TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No 6 ‘PatW tique 

LEONARD SLATKBN conductor 
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Tuesday 16 December 7.15pm 

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Wednesday 17 & Friday 19 December 

BENJAMIN LUXON baritone 
ROBERT TEAR conductor 

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Prokofiev Troika from ' Lieutenant Kijc 
Carols for Chons, Orchestra & Au dience 
Thasday IS December 7.15pm 

STUART BURROWS tenor 

Prokofiev Troika from 'Lieutenant Kije’ 
Gounod O Divine Redeemer 

Adams Star of Bethlehem _ 

Handel Comfort Yc, and Ev’ry Valley from ‘Messiah 
Arnold English Dances; Adam O Holy Night 
Refiner- Brooks O Little Town of Bethlehem 
Carols for Chorus. Orchestra & Audience 
ROBIN STAPLETON conductor 


LONDON SYMPHONY CHORUS 
LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

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A CHRISTMAS CONCERT WITH 

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Christmas Carols from East and West 

ST. MARGARETS CHURCH, WESTMINSTER 
Wednesday 10th and Friday 12 Dec at 6.45 pm 

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Conductor NICHOLAS CLEOSUKY CRAIG BffiFMRD pano 

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TUESDAY 30 DECEMBER at 145 pjn. 

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Tdaihmfa VIOLIN CONCERTO 

Dvorak SYMPHONY No. 9 

8 T jd (NEW WORLD) 

|jJE1 PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
w' Craducton SR YEHUDI MENUHIN 
HU KUN violin 

£5^0. £6.50, £8, £930, £10-50, DL50 



BARBICAN friday nest 12 December at 7.45 pm 

THE KORN/FERRY 
CHRISTMAS CONCERT 

Chmimas Cara|» 

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Winchester Cm beJrai Choir. Waynlktr Singer. 

Engli&fa Chamber Orchestra 
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THE 6 GREAT MOTETS 

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JOHN ELIOT GARDINER, Conductor 

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Friday 9lh January at 7.45 

HANDEL - BACH 
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Dixccior/violm: ANDREW VfATSJSSOS 
Clarinet: JACK 8RYMER 

Arrival of tbcQneenoLSlieba HANDEL 

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Clanaet Concerto ia A ................................. MOZART 

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Soloist: ANDREW HA1GH 

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MOZART - BRUCKNER 

PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
Conductor FRANCESCO D ’AVALOS 
Soloist: FOUTS'ONG 

On Magic Flow MOZA R T 

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Friday 23rd January at 7.45 

HANDEL - R ACHMA NINOV 
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LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Coud: ANDRE BERNARD SoioisL ANTHONY GOLDSTONE 

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ST PAUL’S 
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1800 Tuesday 
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pi aiBCAN CENTRE JANUARY HIGHLIGHTS 



Colin Bavis/Muiray Perahia 

Claudio AMMdo/RudoBSerkin 
Claudio Abhado Mahler 9 

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Vadi Gaia Night 

2 Jan 

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14 Jan 

The Communards & 

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26 Jan 

Academy of Ancient Music/ 
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28 Jan 




BARBICAN THEATRE AND THE PIT 
John Whiting^ A Penny for a Song 
Deborah Levy — Heresies 


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MORE 

ENTERTAINMENTS 
ON PAGES 10 & 19 





























































SPORTS 

DIARY 


Frances Edmonds 
in Australia 


Taken on 
the trot 


spirits up); Bonnie Skipper (Mike 
Gatting); Super Force (Ian 
Botham); Utile Napoleon (disd- 
plinarian assistant manager Micky 
Stewart); Two Thousand Extra 
(man of the match award worth 
$2,000 to Chris Broad); Fiery 
Black (Barbadian-bom Gladstone 
Small); General Alert (situation in 
the Australian Cricket Board). 
And Another Dustbin (final rest- 
ing place of the Australian 
selectors' current policy). 


Snook-cocking 


Lindsay Lamb, currently holiday- 
ing in Sydney, was suitably dis- 
traught when husband Allan was 
rijgrniwH without scoring during 
the first innings at Path. As 
consolation she sent him a present 
which he wore on his nose while 
fielding and which was occa- 
sionally borrowed by Ian Botham, 
also a first innings non-scorer, as 
new Australian batsmen walked to 
the crease. Sadly, Allan Border 
proved unsusceptible. The present 
was a duck’s bilL 


BARRY FANTONI 


BDTHAM 

FITNESS 

DOUBTS 


'And his wrist’s still sore 
from signing all those 
contracts and endorsements' 


From the top 


After putting in an appearance 
at the Perth Test — and apparently 
bringing the home team some 
much needed luck — Bob Hawke 
named the Prime Minister’s XI for 
a one-day fixture against England 
at Canberra on December 23. No 
doubt apprised of superstars' sud- 
den, inexplicable attacks of back 
pain and hamstring trouble before 
previous fixtures so dose to 
Christmas, Hawke was at pains to 
ensure a top-flight En gland line- 
up. He congratulated David 
Gower on his magnificent inning s 
and expressed a strong desire to 
see a repeat performance in Can- 
berra; “And if you don 1 ^ appear”, 
he told Ian Botham, “you might 
have serious difficulty getting a 
work permit for Queensland next 
year." 


Take guard 


Melbourne’s Menzies at Rialto 
Hotel, where the England cricket 
team are now staying, has ten 
floors of iron balustradcd cor- 
ridors looking down on to a 
cobbled court-yard — very much 
like the prison in the TV series 
Porridge. Could it have been 
chosen to enable Mickey Stewart 
to lock the lads in at night? 


Must try 


England's appalling show against 
New South Wales in Newcastle 
after the resounding Brisbane Test 
victory has reinforced the Oz 
theory that they are en g a g ed in a 
deliberate ploy in state matches to 
Confuse and confound the enemy. 
Rousing rhetoric from acting cap- 
tain John Emburey met with little 
enthusiasm in the dressing room. 
Indeed, it would not be going too 
far to say he was almost totally 
ignored. For this touring team u it 
seems that only the big matches 
matter. 


Overbearing 


The good folk of Vancouver 
decided that the Panada n crew, 
placed seventh in the America's 
Cup Challenger series, needed 
encouragement Noting how the 
jaunty boxing kangaroo battle flag 
had boosted morale in Alan 
Bond's “Australia" syndicate, the 
C a n ad i a n s decided to lake a 
similar tack. The resultant fla g , 
depicting a ferocious polar bear 
wielding a hockey stick, arrived 
just in time for this week's third 
round of racing in Fremantle. But 
the delighted crew must first solve 
the problem of how to fly it the ! 
flag is about twice the size of their i 
30-metre mainsail. I 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 

John Tuppen gives the background to this week’s wave of unrest 




Paris 

After this week’s wave of student 
demonstrations the Prime Min- 
ister, Jacques Chirac, has said he is 
willing to discuss modifications of 
the bUI on university reform but 
not to countenance its withdrawal. 
The proposed measures them- 
selves are not at fault, he believes; 
they have simply been misunder- 
stood and misinterpreted. 

Alain Devaquet, the minister 
responsible for the universities, 
sees the bill principally as giving 
un versifies greater autonomy. Stu- 
dent misgivings have centred on 
three particular proposals: to give 
universities the right to fix their 


, ‘J''*' r ' 

* ' * . JT 

• .u > ’jit V- 



• IV -V ‘ ! ‘ • 

li .."nC; 



Received wisdom has it that 
Australian trotting races axe ir- 
redeemably rigged. Don't believe 
it. On the first evening of the Perth 
Test, members of the England 
cricket were invited to the 
Western Australian Trotting 
Association’s meeting, and my 
card was marked by a sponsor 
putatively in the know:I won not 
one depreciated Australian dollar. 

Indeed, I would have done 
better to follow my original in- 
stinct and stick to cricket-related 
horses: It’s Simply Magic (David 
Gower, in his first innings cen- 
tury); Careless Hands (Boon, Bor- 
der, Ritchie el a! during England's 
first inning s); King Command 
(England manager Peter Lush); 
Astonishment (general sensation 
in hitherto critical British press 
corps); Lord Cognac (Phil Ed- 
monds. whose celebrated connec- 
tion with Hine keeps the team’s 


own fees, if necessary putting 
them urr. measures that would 


• >*. - r; , ' 


'v - 

'-w •'•V' 

. ... 



them up; measures that would 
nudge students towards courses 
for which places are available and 


* ■ 
K - 

* i ' v * 


v -W 


for which they are best qualified; 
and the introduction of a new 


v : .. v 


and the introduction of a new 
range of degrees and diplomas 
awarded by individual univer- 
sities rather than the state. 

Fees, now fixed at about Fr4 SO a 
year, would range between Fr400 
and FtflOO. Even at the top level 
this might appear modest, but in 
reality the total cost can already be 
up to three times the basic fee 
because of additional subscrip- 
tions (e.g. for sports facilities) and, 
for those over 20, social security 
contributions. The change would 
prevent many poorer students 
going to university. 

But it is the issue of greater 
selectivity and possible restric- 
tions on university entry which 
has most provoked student 
opposition. This is seen as a direct 
affront to the long-held principle 
that the baccalaur&u represents 
an automatic passport to a univer- 
sity place. The bill does not 
propose any change to this fun- 
damental right but there are fears 
that this will follow and that 
students will no longer be free to 
select courses of their choice. The 
idea of universities awarding their 
own diplomas is also seen as 
leading to a more selective system. 
Along with higher fees, these 
proposals are seen as threats to the 
basic rights of liberty and equality. - 

By contrast, Devaquet and 
Rene Monory, the Education 
Minister, regard the proposals as 
an important step towards adapt- 
ing an outmoded system. And 
Chirac’s view that they have been 
misunderstood is well grounded 
since, in some respects, there 
would be little change from the 
situation today. Selection already 
exists, whether through a lack of 
places or a desire to enhance the 
image of a particular university or 
department That is the case both 
in Paris (notably at Paris-Dau- 
phine, where it is openly admit- 
ted) and in provincial centres such 
as Lyon, Toulouse and Nancy. 

It is already accepted that 
degrees awarded by many of the 






Catapult v tear gas: Paris street scene on Thursday night 


So many fuses 
to the Paris 


student bomb 


smaller provincial universities do 
not carry the same weight with 
potential employers as those from 
universities in the big major cities. 
Similarly, many universities al- 
ready award their own diplomas. 

And a strong counter-current 
among students against the protest 
movement and the lack of wide- 
spead support from teaching staff 
suggest that the bill is much less 
radical than it might at first 
appear. 

The implication, therefore, is 
that certain other factors have 
inflamed feelings. The student 
movement has sought to empha- 
size its political independence but 
it is clear that this week's distur- 
bances have political under- 
currents. Part of the explanation 
for the present bill is that it would 
replace a reform Act introduced in 
1984 by Alain Savary, when he 
was the Socialist minister of 
education. The Savary measures 
were never fully adopted by all 
universities and were strongly 
contested, not least by the pro- 
fessorial corps, whose powers were 
considerably reduced. 

And the Socialists are not 


necessarily innocent bystanders in 
the present dispute, for many want 
to avenge the defeat they suffered 
while m office over their attempt 
to reduce the role played by 
private — mainly Roman Catholic 
— schools. Chirac's ministers may 
have exacerbated the present 
situation by their unwillingess to 
discuss their proposals with stu- 
dent or university representatives. 

- But it is dear that the present 
system is wasteful and ill-suited tc 
the demands of the modem 
employment market. Except for 
the prestigious grands ecoles, 
medical schools and technical 
universities (IUTs), which are 
largely unaffected by the protest, 
the drop-out rate at the end of the 
first or second year can be up to 50 
per cent of the annual intake. 
Furthermore, while about three 
quarters of all graduates get a job 
fairly quickly, often it is not what 
they had hoped for, itself a cause 
of disillusionment. If it is accepted 
that the principal aim of a 
university education should be to 
prepare students for a particular 
career (itself a controversial issue), 
then some form of improved 


orientation or selection seems 
essential. 

Despite l e ue w ed efforts by the 
Chirac government to reduce 
youth unemployment, France has 
one of the worst records in this 
field of the major industrialized 
countries. So students have reason 
to be apprehensive about their 
future. Similarly, the lycees, faced 
with proposals for a revised 
baccalaureat. and uncertainty 
over university entry, also see 
their futures threatened. 

Arguably, therefore, the main 
effect of the Devaquet bill has 
been to mobilize ana release the 
latent discontent among French 
youth. It is not so much the 
proposals themselves which have 
provoked the present outburst but 
the philosophy behind than, 
implying for some a more elitist, 
Ameri can-style system of higher 
education, with associated in- 
equalities in access and in quality. 

It is undisputed, however, that 
the French universities do need 
reform. Despite the present con- 


troversy there is growing 
meat between right and left 


ment between right and left that a 
more flexible system is required, 
freed of certain state controls. It is 
also clear that universities need a 
period of stability and coherent 
direction. Whatever the final out- 
come of the present bill, it has at 
least brought more into the open a 
debate which had become highly 
politicized and which was in 
danger of taking insufficient ac- 
count of those directly involved. 

© Tbnm Nraspipara, 1388 . 

The author, an English university 
lecturer, is currently attached to 
the Jean-Moulin University. Lyon. 


Different systems but it’s the same old pinch 


C orinne Lafonta is 21 and hi 
her fourth year at the 
Sorbonne studying for her 
mastrise in political science. Like 
most students she receives no 
government grant Her mother, 
who is divorced, has a well-paid 
jobbut has two younger children to 
support and gives Corinne no 
financial help. 

Corinne nevertheless considers 
herself hicky (writes Diana Ged- 
des) because her mother allows her 
to live rent-free in a small flat die 
has in the suburbs, although 
travelling is expensive and time- 
consuming. 

Like most French students, 
Corinne pays no tuition fees but 
has to pay a total of Frl^fiO a year 
in state social security contribu- 
tions, registration fees, and vari- 
ous other Hnrversity dues, in 
addition to what she needs to 
spend on food, clothes, books, 
heating, telephone, and traveL 
All this means she has to have a 
job. Last year she gave German 
lessons and this year has taken a 
job looking after two children, 
aged two and three, for 20 boms a 
week, from which she earns about 
Fr2,000 a month. Bat it is day 
work and the children need con- 
stant attention, so she is ratable to 
get on with her studies. 

Ha lectures at the Sorbonne 
take op another 30 hoars a week. 
For four and a half hours a week 
she takes “directed study” classes, 
attended by 30-40 students. That 
is her closest contact with any of 
her professors. 

She has little time for private 
study: ha day begins at 8 am 
when she leaves home to attend 
her first class at the Sorbonne at 9. 


Classes continue until I JO. 
From 2 until 7 she looks after the 
two children, before returning 
home at 8 for a quick meal, 
followed by study until 11 

Sometimes she goes out with her 
boy friend on a Saturday evening, 
but otherwise she has almost no 
leisure activities: she has not been 
to the cinema for months. She does 
not belong to a student union but 
supports the present protest move- 
ment and on Thursday joined the 
demonstrating stndents at the 
Involutes after finishing ha child- 
minding job, but did not have time 
to take part in the actual march. 

Last year she almost gave op 
university becanse she found it so 
difficult keeping up with ha 
studies and earning enough 
money. But she finally managed to 
soldier on. Ha aim is to get tor 
maitrise in the smnma, before 
going on to study for the highly- 
competitive aggregation examina- 
tion which she needs for to 
desired career as a school or 
university teacher. 


A ndrea Wilson, a second- 
year social anthropology 
student at file London 
School of Economics, says to 
parents, who live in Co. Donegal, 
are comfortably off. Becanse the 
student grant is means-tested, that 
means she receives only £600 a 
year (instead of the full London 
jpant of £2J46) and has to rely 
heavily on to parents for to 
living expenses. 

They give her £250 a month: not 
easy for them, she told John Clare. 
She earns another £600 a year by 
working in the «fcop©logy li- 
brary at lunch times but admits 
that is more for the immediate 
access it gives to to books than 
for the money. 

“Tin not hungry or in diff- 
iculties,’’ she says, *T»ut if I want to 
go to the theatre or the cinema I've 
got to budget very carefully. Most 
of my friends accept that as 
students they’re going to be con- 
strained financially. 1 ’ 

Andrea spent to first year in 
one of the LS£Ts halls iff residence: 





K. .r ■ c ;V * ■ 

- -dESW- -I 




/ 


Corinne: has to work 


Andrea: supported from home 


a self-catering fiat within walking 
distance of the college. Bat she 
says she prefers to choose ha own 
friends and new shares a pleasant 
flat in Battersea. But it costs ha 
£35 a week and she is thinking of 
looking for somewhere cheapa. 

A gentle and self-possessed 22- 
y ear-old, Andrea was admitted to 
the LSE with three A-levels: A 
grades in English and French and 
an E in German. She had worked 
in Sudan for a year, half of it 
teaching English ami the rest in a 
nutrition centre at a refugee camp. 

“It’s less horrific than watching 
it on television: at least yon feel 
you’re doing something." And ft 
gave to a taste fa anthropology. 

Ha formal workload is light 
four hours a week of lectures 
(between 20 and 80 students in the 
doss) and another four hours of 
seminars, usually in groups of 12. 
But that is not counting all the 
essays and reading she has to do. 
Andrea says ha aim is to work on 
ha own fa about four hours a day . 

She takes to work seriously, 
and dearly enjoys herself. “I love 
the subject," she says, “though I 
am finding the course a hit 
frustrating. You have to be very 
analytical and critical, which I am 
not used to." 

She says it is possible to have a 
very full social life at the LSE: it 
has many dubs and societies and 
the college itself is dose to Co vent 
Garden. However, being so central 
has its drawbacks: there is not 
much of what she calls a “commu- 
nity spirit” becanse most students 
treat the campus like a 9 to 5 
office. 

But she adds, smiling: “I’ve no 
complaints, really.” 


Manila 

The Philippines revolution has 
won a second chance as President 
Corazon Aquino seeks to consoli- 
date ha power with a truly stable 
government. 

The victory won by the priests, 
nuns and people’s power last 
February, backed by the army's 
decision to abandon the Marcos 
regime, has proved uncertain ova 
the intervening months: both the 
right and the extreme left remain 
unsatisfied: the right because Juan 
Ponce Enrile, dismissed as De- 
fence Minister last month, was 
thwarted in his attempt to seize 
power; the left because it missed 
the chance which the revolu- 
tionary situation offered. 


David Watts on the post-Emile changes 


Aquino gets her 
second chance 


the investment and jobs which are 
essential to combat the root causes 
of the insurgency. 

If Mrs Aquino can now prove 
that die can rule rather than 


merely reign, she may yet help to 
save the Philippines from what 
looks increasingly likely to be its 
fete: yet another coup-prone Third 
World country. Some of the young 
colonels who supported Enrile 
may be going bad: to their parent 
units, neutralized fa the present, 
but the military is now irrevocably 
politicized. 

Mrs Aquino's Christian spirit of 
forgiveness does nothing to dis- 
courage these adventures. No one 
is being punished for the last three 
such incidents. 

She must be ready to do all the 
dirty work on ha own next time. 
She is assisted now by two 
products of West Point in General 
Fidel Ramos, army chief of staff 
and Rafael Ileto, the new Defence 
Minister, a combination to glad- 
den the heart of the most jaded US 
policy maker. Both, for die 
present, are going along with ha 
strategy of peace talks with the 
communists and dissident Mus- 
lims, but on this and other issues 
there is plenty of scope for 
divergence later on. 

But ha supporters hope Mrs 1 
Aquino can make it to the 

S ’ ’ ‘ cite next February. Of- 
y, it is on the new constitu- 
tion, but everyone in the 
Philippines and abroad will see.it 
as a referendum on her popularity. 


Bui now, given luck and greater 
determination than she has hith- 


erto shown, Mrs Aquino will be 
able to begin restoring the econ- 
omy and the country's image 
abroad. The instability of ha 10 
months in office has taught ha 
that those to whom she is closest 
are not necessarily those most 
suited to run the country. She ha< 
already dismissed two ministers 
for corruption and the head of two 
big government concerns whom 
she considered too supportive of 
Enrile. Other ministers may fol- 
low, including some considered 
incompetent by the military. That 
incompetence has added to the 
government's image of indecision. 

Projects in the Marcos years, 
started with international loans, 
were bankrupt before the eauxo 


ment to start them even left Japan 
because the principal aim was to 
skim off most of the cash as soon 
as the money was made available. 
Add to these problems an econ- 
omy with a $26 billion foreign 
drift and a residue of hostile 
■regional politicians and the chal- 
lenge was a formidable one even 
for the most experienced leader. 

Mrs Aquino introduced com- 
petent, hod-working technocrats 
into an administration hopelessly 
inadequate in skills or experience. 
While she has grown with her job, 
showing greater skill and firmness, 
the same cannot be said of ha 
ministers. The crucial post of 
Executive Secretary went to Joker 
Arroyo, a human rights lawyer 
who defended Mrs Aquino's hus- 
band, the late Senator Benigno 
Aquino, against President Marcos 
at a time when many other lawyers 
preferred to look the other way. 
Ha choice for Labour Minister, 
Augusto Sanchez, was criticized 
for frightening away as much 
foreign investment as did Enrile 
with his constant criticism and 
hints of a coup. 

Despite his pre-government 


credentials, Arroyo in office dis- 
played all the management skills 
of a village shopkeeper; the leftist 
Sanchez proved unacceptable to 
businessmen and to a section of 
the military which had grown 
accustomed, during the Marcos 
years, to presidential decrees a 
assassinations taking care of such 
untidy bits of democracy. 

Last month the army a gain 
determined the outcome of the 
latest attempt to destabilize the 
government and it will continue to 
do so unless Mrs Aquino contin- 
ues as she has begun with what she 
calls her “fresh start". 

The situation has been further 
complicated and the army made 
unhappy by the ceasefire with the 
communists of the New People's 
Army and the planned peace 
negotiations. One consequence 
has been government permission 
fa the National Democratic Front 
to establish an office in Manila, 
legitimizing what is still a rel- 
atively small political force. There 
is no doubt that the radicals must 
be accommodated for the sake of 
peace, but the present liberalism 
disturbs those who can provide 
\L 


Peter Brimelow 


Of moles and 


Mounties 


New York 

Almost exactly 30 ye ars ago, 
Canada's external affairs minister, 
Lester B. Pearson, played a major 
rote in orchestrating the United 
Nations censure of the Anglo- 
French Suez expedition. This 
heroic feat helped win him the 
Nobel Peace Prize; and that, in 
pirn, materially assisted him to 
become Liberal Party leader and 
f’arwwtian prime minister. He 
died, much honoured, in 1972. 

No one would dispute Pearson's 
place in the pantheon of inter- 
national progress! vism. But a new 
book. No Sense of Evib Espionage. 
The Case of Herbert Norman , 
suggests that there is room for 
argument about the precise nature 
of that progressivism. 

The author, James Barns, a 
professor of history at the Univer- 
sity of Toronto, uses previously 
secret government documents to 
assess the career of Herbert Nor- 
man, the Canadian ambassador to 
Cairo. In 1957, in the immediate 
aftermath of Suez, Norman 
committed suicide after being 
cited as a forma communist in 
testimony before the US Senate's 
Internal Security sub-committee. 
Contrary to popular legend, 
throughout the 1950s there was 
loud and indignant opposition to 
what was invariably called 
“McCarthyism” — although the 
controversial junior senator from 
Wisconsin had nothing to do with 
'this investigation. After Norman’s 
.death, liberal outrage in the US 
and Canada was so extreme that 
the very existence of the sub- 
committee was threatened . 

Pearson, in the Canadian House 
of Commons, was particularly 
outspoken until John Diefen- 
baker, the Opposition leader, 
asked him to deny the American 
allegations. To everyone’s sur- 
prise, Pearson hedged. It emerged 
that while at Cambridge Norman 
had indeed “associated . . . with 
people who were thought to be 
communists." He had bon ques- 
tioned about this by the f’anadisn 
authorities as early as 1 951. 

It is a measure of the universal 
reluctance to think about security 
problems that Herbert Norman 
has nevertheless gone down in 
Canadian history as an immacu- 
late martyr. It is particularly 
extraordinary because gradually, 
ova the years, Norman’s defend- 
ers have shifted their ground. Now 
their position is that everyone 
knew “Herbie” had been a com- 
munist at Cambridge. After all, he 
once tried to recruit to the party a 
fellow ranariian, Robert Bryce, 
who also went into the Canadian 
dvil service and eventually 
beaded it- But, Norman’s defend- 
ers say, so what? That doesn't • 
mean he was a spy. 

This concession effectively aids 
the debate about Herbert Nor- 
man. To admit that he was once a 
communist is to admit that he 
was, by definition, a security risk. 
The safety of the state is always 
too important to permit the 


assumption of innocence until 
guilt is proved to the satisfaction 
of lawyers. The Senate sub- 
committee was right, and its 

innumerable critics wrong. 

Professor Barros. however, goes 
much further. He is able to show 
that Norman tied to his interro- 


gators. Combined with massive 
circumstantial and other ev- 


idence, such as the subsequent 
testimony of spies such as Sir 
Anthony Blunt C*Hob was one of 
us"), this leads Barros to conclude 


that Norman was probably at least 
a Soviet “agent of influence”. 


a Soviet “agent of influence . 

Any such conclusion is nec- 
essarily speculative. More con- 
crete, and ultimately more alarm- 
ing, is Barros's demonstration of 
Pearson’s deep commitment to 
the sustained effort to protect 
Norman. Pearson was directly 
responsible for the perfunctory 
investigation of Norman in the 
early 1950s. He deliberately de- 
ceived the Canadian House of 
Commons about the results. 

Pearsons' s behaviour must raise 
the gravest questions about his 
motives. And Professor Barros 
suggests grave answers. In a 
remarkable coup, be has obtained 
the long-rumoured secret tes- 


timony of Elizabeth Bentley, cou- 
rier for a Soviet spy ring in 


rier for a Soviet spy ring in 
Washington, before the Senate 
sub-committee in 1951. Under 
oath, Bentley said that Lester 
Pearson had knowingly passed 
information to ha ring while 
working in the Canadian embassy 
in Washington during the Second 
World War. 

Whatever the truth of Bentley’s 
assertion, the feet that it was 
known at the highest levels in 
North America is indisputable. 
Fa example, when Diefenbaka 
was prime minister years later, he 
even used it to parry an attempt by 
Pearson to put pressure on his 
government during a complex 
Ottawa sex scandal, the so-called 
Munsinga affair. 

Bentley's assertion is a fact that 
could help set in perspective such 
topics as the persistent anti- 
Americanism of Canada’s govern- 
ing classes and Ottawa's pro- 
longed refusal to prosecute 
Professor Hugh Hambleton, of 
Laval University, who for years 
openly admitted he had spied for 
the KGB but was finally arrested 
and convicted only after he 
strayed into British jurisdiction. 

It could — but it prohabty won’t 
Despite the efforts of Chapman 
Fincher and Andrew Boyle, our 
political culture simply lacks the 
lan g ua g e to discuss security risks. 
Lester Pearson could have been 
merely an irresponsibly ambitious 
bureaucrat cunying fevour with 
an influential (and allied) power 
through the Washington practice 
of the leak. But unless he was 
meeting Russians al midnig ht 
wearing a cloak and rapier, our 
press and politicians would prefer 
not to know. 

The author is a senior editor of 
Forbes Magazine. 


Philip Howard 


Grammar: rules 


but not rule 


I dare say that our education 
system is hopelessly old-feshioned 
and that the children we are 
turning out from school are feck- 
less, illiterate and ill-prepared for 
the modem world. Ax any rate it is 
comforting fa our vanity to think 
that we were so much better 
educated than they are. The 
extreme argument that standards 
are felling would be more impres- 
sive if the ideologues who put it 
used English better. It is an 
agreeable irony that devotees of 
the three Rs, flogging, and 
grammatical studies are not 
distinguished for any very remark- 
able felicities of expression. 

When was this golden age of 
English g rammar ? It usually turns 
out to have been when the angry 
old men and women were at 
school themselves. Their problem 


What has happened is that there 
has been a reaction from the 
ancien regime of the three Rs and 
learning eschscholtzia by rote to 
self-expression and a let-it-all- 
hang-out radicalism. 

We could have done with a bit 
more self-expression instead of 
plagiarizing our text books. But 
like all reactions, the reaction 
from the old grammatical purism 
has been taken too far by some 

Chns Women 


is not felling standards, but age. 
They find themselves surrounded 
fry bewildering new knowledge 
and younger rivals, and the only 
change they can confidently attack 
is the change in the supposedly 
adamantine laws of gr ammar . 

In feet we were taught veiy little 
English grammar. At primary 
school we parsed, and learnt by 
rote long spelling lists of difficult 
words like diarrhoea and esch- 
scholtzia, so that to this day I can 
write them down confidently 
without snatching for the dic- 
tionary. An impressive trick, and 
as useful as Heather, the Jack 
Russell, being .able to bounce a 
football on ha nose six times 
without it touching the ground. 

At secondary school we were 
taught no “English”, apart from 
being required to write Sunday 



Questions (essays on a devotional 
theme) and essays for a General 
Papa. An anxious mother once 
asked the Head of Greek how a 
boy could pass through the Old 
Coll from the age of 12 to 18 
without ever having to read 
Shakespeare or Dickens except fa 
the purpose of translating them 
into Greek or Latin verses or 
prose: Richard replied imperially: 
“They can read them in the 
holidays." 

Alas, mortification and dam- 
mit, there is no evidence that the 
children coming out of our schools 
are worse than we were. They may 
be worse spellers, but a teamed 
Greats examiner at Oxford de- 
clares emphatically that standards 
are as high as they were 30 years 
ago; .and the sixth form children I 
meet seem alarmingly bright, and 
more . articulate than we were. 


enthusiasts. What is needed is a 
seuable advance towards the no- 
ble. goal of universal literacy and 
Articulacy for our children. It is 
worth remembering that this is a 
very recent goal indeed. 

Grammar was made for man, 
not man for grammar, it can be 
t ake n too far. On his death-bed the 
great French g rammarian Dnrni- 
nique Bouhours announced: “I 
am about to ... or I am going 
to . . . die; eitha expression is 
used." And the gra mmar of the 
Golden Age was not all that hot. 
The schoolboys who became the 
literary stars of the Elizabethan 
Age learnt from Horman's 

Vulgaria, translating; F.n glish into 
Larin . badly: We will play with a 


baft of wynde: Lusum erit nobis 
fouis pugiiaris spiritu tumens. This 
was handball, not football, which 
was considered barbarous, and 
forbidden by the Act of Par- 
liament at the time. The contem- 
porary Book of the Governor 
speaks o£ “Football, wherein is 
nothing but beastly fury and 
extreme violence; whereof pro- 
ceeded! hurt, and consequently 
rancour and malice do remain 
with them that be wounded." Our 
common standards of grammar 
and football have unproved 
greatly since those uncouth days. 




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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 0148! 4100 


STERN PASTORS 


tw ^° man Catholic Church homosexuality and hstero- 
Ukes to make a distinction sexuality on an equal footing 

£ e mora ^ anc * and denounce the church’s 
pastoral, between theory and traditional teaching as 
practice, with a necessary but “heterosexist*, should gin no 
not simple connection holding support from the churchwhat- 


thero together. In principle, as 
the Vatican has recently re- 
stated, it finds homosexual 
activity immoral. It finds 
contraceptive activity im- 
moral too. 


Faced, however, with actual 
Catholic homosexuals on the 
one hand, and the serious 
threat to public health from 
Aids on the other, it is from its 
pastoral wisdom that the 
church draws its approach, not 
from the strict letter of the law. 
Thus the line emerging from 
official Catholic circles in 
Britain is that the 
Government's official promo- 
tion of condoms as a form of 
protection against Aids does 
not necessarily have to be 
resisted on principle. 

By contrast, doctrine is 
much more to the fore in the 
Vatican statement “On the 
Pastoral Care of 
Homosexuals”. This bears all 
the marks of having been 
written with particular ref- 
erence to a debate in the 
Catholic Church in United 
States. The statement is out- 
spokenly firm, even stem. It 
describes homosexuality as a 
disorder, even a tendency 
towards evil; and the guidance 
given to Roman Catholic bish- 
ops everywhere is that they 
should say so in unmistakable 
terms. The Vatican is dearly 
anxious that ideologies asso- 
ciated with radical homosex- 
ual groups, which place 


ever. 

It would be too cynical to 
suppose that the Vatican had 
calculated that growing public 
alarm over Aids provided an 
excellent opportunity to put 
the boot in. But the frequency 

in the statement of that 
favourite Christian word 
“compassion” is a good deal 
below average. 

In Britain church spokes- 
men, including Cardinal Basil 
Hume, have been careful to 
exclude the intolerant and 
absurd notion that Aids is a 
supernatural p unishm ent The 
Vatican is more anxious to 
ensure that talk of compassion 
does not obscure the church's 
strong and fundamental objec- 
tions to homosexual activity. 

All this has more to do with 
the public political dog-fight 
over sexual morality in the 
West than with the real pas- 
toral needs of homosexuals. 
Many, Catholic or not, remain 
unhappy and isolated individ- 
uals, scarcely touched by the 
advance of the “liberation” 
promoted in their name. If 


“pastoral” means what it bas^ activity is sinful- The drifting 


come to mean, namely the care 
for individuals which starts 
from where they are rather 
than where they ought to be, 
then the Vatican statement is. 
mi piamaH- 

In its own current pastoral 
guidelines, the Roman Catho- 
lic Church in England and 
Wales has come doser to an 


apart of moral theory and 
pastoral policy should worry 
the church, for it is bound to 
lessen the respect it may 
command. Nevertheless a pas- 
toral practice which had no 
grasp of absolutes or ultimate 
goals at all would leave the 
church with nothing to say at 
the level of public argument 


TWO CHINAS BY DEFAULT? 


Ever since the normalization 
of US-Chinese relations and 
the signing of the Sino-British 
agreement on the future of 
Hong Kong, the waters off the 
coast of Mainland China have 
looked calmer than for several 
decades. Now, two separate 
developments threaten to dis- 
turb that calm: the untimely 
death of the Governor of Hong 
Kong, Sir Edward Youde, 
announced* yesterday, and 
today's elections on Taiwan in 
which an opposition party will 
be taking part for the first time. 

Sir Edward Youde, an 
accomplished diplomat and 
Chinese scholar, will be 
mourned equally in Britain 
and Hong Kong. As one who 
understood the many sides of 
the China-Britain-Hong Kong 
relationship and showed a rare 
sympathy for the often 
conflicting claims of each, he 
will be greatly missed. 

His loss will be recognized 
in Peking, too. It is in China's 
interests as much as those of 
Britain or Hong Kong to 
ensure that the transfer of the 
colony to Chinese rule pro- 
ceeds as smoothly as possible. 
Sir Edward, a man of sensitiv- 
ity wbo commanded respect, 
was supremely qualified to 
oversee the years of transition 
while retaining the trust of the 
people of Hong Kong. The 
appointment of a successor 
will be as difficult as it is 
crucial. 

There is a sense, however, in 
which Sir Edward's most im- 
portant work - the intricate 


is just beginning, generated not 
only from outside (as in the 
case of Hong Kong) but also 
from within. The emergence of* 
an opposition party, the 
Democratic Progressive Party, 
is one sign of changing times. 
Until now, the Kuomintang 
government has successfully 
prevented the formation of 
political parties other than the 
ruling KMT and two minor 
parties on the grounds of 
national security. The threat 
from the Mainland, so the 
argument ran, was so great that 
political unity was a pre- 
condition for Taiwan's sur- 
vival 

For nearly 40 years, since 
the Nationalists fled to Tai- 
wan. that argument has held. It 
sustained the formal perpetu- 
ation of martial law on the 
island and prevented the emer- 
gence of any organized opposi- 
tion to the KMT. The right of 
the Nationalists to rule as the 
legitimate representatives of a 
united China was based on 
their resistance — past and 
present — to communism in 
China. Their president, 
Cbiang Oting-kuo, inherited 
his right to rule from his 
father, Cbiang Kai-shek, and it 
was unchallenged. 

Like Mainland China, Tai- 
wan now feces a problem of 
succession: the succession not 
only of rulers, as those who 
fought the civil war grow old 
and die, but of attitudes. Folk 
memories on die Mainland 
today relate as strongly to the 
cultural revolution as to the 


diplomacy which provided for Long March. On Taiwan, the 
the transfer of Hong Kong - flight from communism is a 


was complete. The immediate 
future of the colony has now 
been decided: barring violent 
change in China, it will revert 
to the Mainland as soon as 
Britain’s lease comes to an end 
in 1997. The way of life u> the 


fading memory. A relative 
industrial prosperity, ad- 
vanced technology and lively 
commerce are all the new 
generations of Taiwan Chinese 
know. 

To prolong and enhance 


colony wifl change — though that prosperity, Taiwan needs 
SSEmi. hevond new contacts and new mar- 


VOUT of Mainlan d China, 

Taipei's international status 
and its claim to represent all 
China face d inevitable decline. 
The old attitudes of So 
contacts, no talks and no 
compromise” with the Main- 
land began to seem obsolete. 
They are formally opposed by 
members of the Dmnocratic 
Progressive Party, which does 
not rule out — as the 
Kuomintang does — the even- 
tual acceptance of two Chinas: 
the Mainland and Taiwan. 

In Taipei for the time being 
the KMT slogans remain, but 
the reality behind them is 
slowly changing. Trade with 
the Mainland, while officially 
non-existent, flourishes 
through third countries — 
notably Hong Kong. Secret 
talks have reportedly taken 
place with Peking, and the hi- 
jacking of a Taiwan jet to the 
Mainland earlier this year was 
bandied with civility and led 
to the first public encounter 
between the two sides. Now 
the Democratic Progressive 
Party, while officially out- 
lawed and prevented from 
fielding its candidates except 
as individuals, has not been 
banned. 

These initial signs of change 
on Taiwan should not, how- 
ever, be interpreted as harbin- 
gers of the reunification of 
Taiwan with the Mainland as 
Peking would wish. Taiwan is 
not another Hong Kong or 
Macao; it is still — to the 
majority of its people — the 
true bearer of Chinese identity 
and culture, and the 
Kuomintang the only legimate 
government of China. 
Reunification — on Taiwan's 
terms, however unrealistic 
that appears — remains 
Taipei's chief objective: 

The acceptance of a world 
which accommodates two Chi- 
nas is still a remote prospect 
Just how remote, will be 
shown by the success or failure 
of the Democratic Progressive 
Party in today’s elections. 


. hevond new contacts ana new mar- jusi now remote, win oe 

not it is to ^on?ihat change kets. Once the United Stales shown by the success orfeilure 

ended its formal diplomatic of the Democratic Progressive 
"SSff recognition of Taiwan is fa- Party in today’s elections. 

FOURTH leader 

^ fhp House of blackguard, cad, dog, cheeky called in our youth), or even a 

The speaker of toe ^ pup impertinent puppy jackass, but we would draw the 

Commons ndedonMonaay w at hooligan, guttersnipe, 

£ at 2? ifilJnrv Expression, observe), criminal, hooligan, stool-pigeon, ruffian and rat, 
Unparijamenwtxp™^ murderefj traitor, hypocrite, and would take only small 
andmaytfaereioren jackasS7 ruffian, guttersnipe, comfort at the thought that 

by one member as ^ pharisee, slanderer, rat, stool- nobody, inside or outside the 
non of another, a pigeon, swine and “Member House; could allege that we 

ately afterwards, he ruiea ^ ^ mfose of a were returned by the refuse of 

“wally” is acceptaDie. lar g e constituency”. The next a large constituency. We are 

It is not for us to attempt to ^on ofErskiiie May will, no slightly surprised that “pig" is 
analyse Mr Speaker's thought- doubL extend that list by a not on the Speaker's index; it 
processes, but we feel bound to wimpj hut we cannot help is surely no less offensive than 
rwint out that the great ur feeiing that, as the other cad, slanderer and swine, and 
Burchfield defines a waiiy as banned terms move up to we find it difficult to believe 
“one who is foolish, inept or make TOQm fo r it, they will that no Member, in the heat of 
ineffectual" and a wimp &* w0 nder whether today’s MPS debate, has ever let the word 


but*e feci ^ 
point out that the rj* Dr 
Burchfield defines a wdiy as 
“one who is foobsh, mept or 
ineffectual”, and a *wmP *„« 


“feeble or ineffectual person . ^ getting a little too sensitive 

which suggests that ^Mr _ t00 wimpish, you might say. 

Speaker . JiTf Razor -r-u.-o harrfiv nlsro 


'hanxning Ockham's Razor This & baldly the place to 
tiohefore the question arose. ^ im out that, although Mem- 
K £ the distinctions he may not use such ex- 

SO LiUC “* _ ahiMit nnft onntVar 


can make. 

He does, it is 
broad foundations. 
expressions thaL jSpKjlj im _ 
Speaker, have been ruled im 
pSnjssibie over the years, are 


here may not use such ex- 
pressions about one another, 
they are free to use them about 
the rest of us. Mind you, we 
wouldn’t be too upset at being 
called a cheeky young pup 
(truth to tell, we often were so 


is surely no less offensive than 
cad, slanderer and swine, and 
we find it difficult to believe 
that no Member, in the heat of 
debate, has ever let the word 
slip. But we live, it must be 
said, in a mealy-mouthed age. 
In 1672, as the Lord Chan- 
cellor was taking his seat, the 
Duke of York called him a 
rascal and a villain, and went 
unrebuked; indeed, the Lord 
Chancellor urbanely remarked 
that he was obliged to His 
Royal Highness for not calling 
him a coward and a papist as 
well Anyone for yuppie? 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


understanding of the real hu- 
man problems. The Catholic 
bishops quietly support the 
activities of the Catholic 
homosexual organization. 
Quest, and will continue to do 
so, notwithstanding the 
Vatican's charges against vari- 
ous unidentified bodies of that 
kind. It would not be surpris- 
ing to find that the English 
Catholic hierarchy regarded 
the Vatican’s contribution as 
misjudged, indeed as some- 
what harsh.The distinction be- 
tween an idealist moral 
theology and a more humane 
and pragmatic pastoral prac- 
tice is not easy to maintain in 
theory, and it is harder still to 
apply. In the case of the 
English Catholic hierarchy’s 
attitude to the current Govern- 
ment Aids programme, for 
instance, there is considerable 
room for misunderstanding 
both by the faithful and out- 
side the church, if church 
agencies are seen to be co- 
operating with the promotion 
of measures which appear to 
contradict the church's official 
teaching. 

The same possibility of mis- 
understanding exists if the 
church tolerates a Catholic 
homosexual organisation, 
while at the same time teach- 
ing officially that homosexual 


Proprieties in MI5 book trial 

From Mr David J. Lamming From Lord Shawa-ass, QC 

Sir, One aspect of the current MI5 Sir, Mr Michael Rubinstein, in his 
case in Australia which does not so fetter (December 3). talks about 
far appear to have attracted com- “rad herrings in a murky sea”. He 
mentis the proprirty of Sir Robert should know, for his letter is a 
Armstrong speaking on the tele- 


phone to a colleague in the 

Cabinet Office about the evidence 
he had given while he was still in 
the middle of being cross-exam- 
ined. 


The normal rule in England, in 
both criminal and civil cases, (and 
one assumes that the same rule 
applies in Australia) is that once a 
witness has begun to give evidence 
he must not communicate with 
anyone about the case, whether 
directly or indirectly, until his 
evidence is concluded. 

The reason for the rule is 
obvious and die judge will usually 
remind a witness of it at any 
adjournment Equally, it is im- 
proper for any third party to seek 
to speak to a witness about the 
case in which he is giving ev- 
idence. 

It may be that Sir Robert 
obtained die leave of Mr Justice 
Bowel] to speak to his colleague in 
London fat the extracts you 
report on November 29 from the 
further cross-examination by Mr 
Malcolm Turnbull suggest other- 
wise. Clearly Mr Turnbull did not 


object to what had occurred, if crime it should not be wi t h h eld. 


only for the reason that be had 
misled the court, albeit unwit- 
tingly. 

If, as your front-page report 
would indicate, the Cabinet Office 
got in touch with Sir Robert on the 
Prime Minister’s instructions, the 
impropriety is perhaps dm mare 
worrying and serious. 

Yours faithfully, 

DAVID LAMMING, 

8 New Square. 

Lincoln’s Inn. WC2. 


And if the withholding of informa- 
tion were used (to put a hypotheti- 
cal case) to protect a longstanding 
network of treachery, collusion in 
treachery, official chicanery and 
political lying — there would then 
be an overriding obligation to 
bring the matter into the open. 
Yours faithfully, 

GRAHAM HOUGH, 

The White Cottage, 

Grantchester, 

Cambridge. 


Striving officiously to keep alive 


From Professor M. Rosen and 
Professor M. D. Vickers 
Sir, Your editorial, “To hasten 
death” (December 2), is mislead- 
ing. There is no treatment of pain 
and suffering which definitely 
would cause a reduction in life 
expectancy. 


In choosing suitable treatment 
there may be an increased risk of 
fatality, which must always be 
balanced against prognosis. For 
instance, it would almost always 
be justified to take some risk in 
order adequately to relieve pain in 
a patient with a terminal illness, 
whereas in the case of post- 
operative pain a high margin of 
safety most be maintained. 


In terminal illness the concern 
of the family is to relieve the 
suffering of the relative. In the lay 
mind this aim is often synony- 
mous with death but should not be 
so confused by a clinician. There is 
no place for administering drugs, 
solely to shorten life and the 


reported actions of Lord Dawson 
(if true) in administering intra- 
venous morphine and cocaine to 
an already unconscious patient 
(report, November 27) were both 
unethical and illegal. 

Resisting the temptation “to 
strive officiously to keep alive a 
patient for whom there is no hope 
but only suffering” raises the 
different problem of stopping 
artificial life support and letting 
nature take its course. 


From Dr John A. J. Madeod 
Sir, Your leader, “To hasten 
death”, uses the phrase “to strive 
officiously to keep alive” and 
suggests advances in medical sci- 
ence asa reason for it 

There are other pressures, 
particularly on the junior hospital 
doctor, to initiate further treat- 
ment, and these arise from his 
training, peers, seniors, and rel- 
atives “wanting everything pos- 
sible to be done”. However, the 
real wish and the requirement is 
that “appropriate treatment” be 
followed. 

We often read of court actions 
in (be USA over decisions to 
discontinue treatment — Le^ on a 
ventilator — but these will become 
less common as use of the “living 
will” extends across the USA. This 
is a document that a person may 
ago stating limits beyond which 
he does not wish any treatment to 
extend. 

The “living will" is already 
reducing the occurrence of the 
ethical dilemma that may face a 
junior doctor in hospital at night 
having to decide to treat or not to 
treat. On a visit to the USA in 
1985 1 was privileged to be invited 
to sit wife a lady while her 


husband peacefully and gently 
died is a busy hospital wife all 
sorts of technical equipment avail- 
able. 

The “living will” is not involv- 
ing the doctor or nurse in any 
positive act, so is dearly exempt 
from any controversy over 
euthanasia. 

Youra faithfully, 

JOHN MacLEOD, 
Tigh-na-Hearradh, 

Lochmaddy. 

Isle of North Uist, Western Isles. 


The dilemma is to be sure feat 
the prognosis is hopeless. Fortu- 
nately, there is now certainty of 
opinion in fee case of brain death, 
for which the criteria have never 
been faulted. 


In many other instances there 
has to be an dement of judgement. 
Relief of fee patient’s suffering 
must then be the paramount 
consideration: not hastening 
death. 

Yours faithfully, 

M. ROSEN, 

M.D. VICKERS, 

Department of Anaesthetics, 
University of Wales College of 
Medicine, 

Heath Park, 

Cardiff 

December! 


From Mr Simon Milner 
Sr, Your leading article on 
euthanasia concludes wife the 
alarmingassertion that society has 
fee right to set a standard of life's 
value. 

On behalf of those millions 
throughout history whose lives 
have been deemed worthless, and 
extinguished, by societies assum- 
ing that right, I demur. 

Yours faithfully, 

SIMON MILNER, 

17 Salisbury House, 

23 Holloway Road, N5. 


Battle of Cambrai 

From Major-General A. J. 
TrythaU 


Sirjn the introductory paragraph 
to fee reproduction of your report 
on fee battle of Cambrai ( On 
This Day”, November 24) you 
state that fee impetus of the 
breakthrough by fee tanks was 
later lost through heavy ram and 
fee strength of the German 
counter-attack. 


Rain was certainly a contribu- 
tory factor and fee German 
counter-attack more or less wiped 
out fee British gains, fat a 
fundamental reason for the ability 
of the Germans to mount such a 
successful counter-attack was fee 
failure of the British to exploit the 
success of their breakthrough 
without a large reserve of tanks. 

The cavalry, whose corps HQ 
was six miles behind fee line, 
made no exploitation, nor could it 
successfully have done so in face 
of rifle and machine-gun fire. The 
restoration of operational mobil- 
ity to the European battlefield had 
to await fee development of 
tactics based on infiltration and 
fire and movement (first by the 
Germans in 1918) and fee produc- 
tion in greater numbers of faster 
and more reliable armoured fight- 
ing vehicles in fee 1930s and 40s. 

Major General J. F. C “Boney" 
Fuller, whose biographer I am, 
devised fee tank tactics of Cam- 
brai, but he never intended it to be 
more than a raid. Some months 
later, in his “Plan 1919” he 
recommended a way of using 
ranks to defeat fee Germans by 
breaking through fee line and 
attacking the rear, but even this 


would have foiled unless last and 
reliable tanks had been produced 
in vast numbers. 

Cambrai was certainly a notable 
battle, but, valour apart, it was 
principally noteworthy because 
fee new technology achieved 
virtually nothing of any lasting 
advantage and could not have 
done, given the size and nature of 
the forces involved. 

Yours faithfully, 

TONY TRYTHALL, 

Managing Director, 

Brassey’s Defence Publishers Ltd, 
24 Gray’s Inn Road, WC1. 


The computer age 

From Miss Elisabeth M. Ward 
Sir, Yesterday's Sunday Times 
(November 30) showed a deserted 
Stock Exchange floor, and re- 
ported Mr Maxwell's diversifica- 
tion in newsp a per printing, to be 
carried out at depots around fee 
UK Today's paper (December 1) 
extols the virtue of company 
computers in Scotland. 

If a computer and telephone 
work as well in Edinburgh as in 
London, then why do people 
continue to pay silly house prices, 
rates and salaries for staff to be 
cooped up in a stuffy London 
office? 

Will the powers feat he finally 
realize that there is life outside 
London, and it is much 
pleasanter, too? 

Yours sincerely, 

ELIZABETH M. WARD, 

25 Stoneholme. 

Turtdn Hollow, 

Crawshawboofe, 

Rossendaie, 

Lancashire. 

December 1. 


Anomaly in law 
of treasure trove 


good example. 

The present case is not at all 
about a Civil Servant's “sincere 
concern in the nation’s interest” 
leading him to break his oath. It is 
about a Civil Servant Jong since 
retired who for reasons of personal 
greed and exhibitionism seeks to 
sell in a foreign country, informa- 
tion about long past events in clear 
breach of his oath. 

No security service, nor indeed 
any other business could be 

carried on if such conduct were to 

be tolerated and it is deplorable 
that in this country thane should 
be any support for it. 

Yours faithfully, 

HARTLEY SHAWCROSS, 

House of Lords. 

December 3. 


From Dr John Wood and Miss 
Clare Conyheare 

Sir. The common law of treasure 
trove, recently invoked in the case 
of a discovery of Iron Age silver 
coins, contains an important 
anomaly. 

It is a principle of law feat no 
one should be able to profit from 
an illegal act. let alone be rewarded 
for it by the Treasury — yet that it 
appears, is exactly what is about to 
take place. 

The hoard, found at Donhead Si 
Mary in Wiltshire, was declared 
treasure trove in February. The 
finder was prosecuted and con- 
victed in September, under fee 
Ancient Monuments and 
Archaeological Areas Act 1979, for 


knowingly using a metal detector 
in a protected place without 


From Professor Graham Hough 
Sir, We have heard a great deal 
latdy about fee obligation of 
lifelong confidentiality raid upon 
those engaged in intelligence 
work. This obligation is indeed a 
strong one, but it cannot be 
absolute. 

If the withholding of informa- 
tion were to conceal a serious 


in a protected place without 
permission and for removing ob- 
jects of archaeological interest 
therefrom. A fine of £100 was 
imposed and there was no appeal 
from fee verdict. 

The Treasure Trove Reviewing 
Committee, a department of the 
Treasury, having awaited the out- 
come of the prosecution and 
apparently in full knowledge of the 
facts, has now offered an ex gratia 
payment of £2.000 to the finder for 
declaring the treasure trove. Who 
says that crime doesn't pay? 

Surely it is time that the 
legislation was revised to avoid a 
repetition of this regrettable situa- 
tion and to offer a greater measure 
of protection to all portable antiq- 
uities, which form such a vital part 
of our heritage? 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN EWOOD. President 
CLARE CONYBEARE, Secretary, 
Group 12 (Wessex). 

Council for British Archaeology, 
The King's House, 

65 The Close. Salisbury, Wiltshire. 
December l. 


Barclays pull-out 

From Mr George Gardiner, MPfor 
Reigale (Conservative) 

Si r. Your leading article (Novem- 
ber 25) questioning fee “virtue” of 
Barclays' decision to withdraw 
from South Africa let fee bank off 
comparatively lightly. 

As one who has wife 

Barclays for some 35 years I felt 
some pride, on visits to South 
Africa, in the constructive role 
Barclays was playing in training 
black South Africans up to lake 
positions at managerial levels, and 
in its contribution to fee steady 
dismantling of apartheid. This 
make* all fee sharper the shame 
now felt over fee blow fee bank 
has delivered to all those, black as 
well as white, who work for 
peaceful change in feat country. 

This shame was intensified on 
reading Sir Timothy Bevan’s 
acknowledgement that student 
protests aimed at Barclays in 
Britain contributed towards this 
shameful derision. This can only 
encourage student boycott cam- 
paigns right across fee board 

I have no wish to bank wife a 
company that is a push-over to 
pressure from fee most m iliia nt 
elements in our student unions, 
and have accordingly decided to 
transfer my accounts. Others who 
fed similarly should do fee same. 
Yours ete, 

GEORGE GARDINER, 

House of Commons. 

November 28. 


Tax by head-count 


From Mr IV. T. McLeod 
Sir, A report in today's Times 
(November 28) states that fee 
Government is keen to stress that 
the new community charge pro- 
posed as a replacement for domes- 
tic rates in Scotland “is not a poll 
tax in fee sense that there will be 
no direct connection between 
paying fee charge and voting.” 

May I comment on this mis- 
taken view of fee meaning of poll 
tax which seems now to be widely 
accepted by politicians of aU 
parties and by political com- 
mentators? The only thing a poll 
tax has in common wife voting is 
feat both are based on a counting 
of heads — Middle English poile, 
head (Scots and Northern English 
pow). The same word is seen on 
fee polling of cattle and pollarding 
of trees. 

A poll tax is a tax levied per 
bead of (adult) population, and 
the term of fee related poll-money 
has been so used since the 16th 
century up till fee blossoming of 
fee presort misunderstanding. 
One can see why the opposition 
parties might wish to foster this 
new meaning, but is it not 
surprising that fee Government 
and its supporters should help 
them to do so? 

Yours faithfully, 

WILLIAM T. McLEOD, 
Managing Editor, 

English Dictionaries, 

William Collins Sons and Co„ 
WesterhiU Road, 

Bishopbriggs, 

Glasgow. 

November 28. 


Size of councils 


From the Leader of Tower Ham- 
lets Council 

Sir, I was most surprised to see 
you print, without comment, fee 
letter from Eivind Gilje (Decem- 
ber 4) which holds Richmond as 
fee only London borough under 
Alliance control. 

You, Sir, of all people, should 
know feat fee London Borough of 
Tower Hamlets, within which 
your own establishment now sits, 
is also enjoying an Alliance 
administration.. 

Yours faithfully. 

E FLOUNDERS. 

Leader of fee Council, 

London Borough of Tower 
Hamlets, 

Town Hall, Patriot Square. £2. 



DECEMBER 6 1933 


Prohibition throughout the ! 
United States had been in force 1 
for nearly }4 years {see* On This ’ 
Day”, January ] 7, 19S5). It 
forbade the manufacture or sale of \ 
any drink containing more than \ 
0.5 per cent alcohol. According to | 
the Encyclopedia Americana, the ! 
country had by the late 1920$ i 


more "speakeasies" selling illicit 
drinks then it had ever had 


drinks than it had ever had 
saloons 


PROHI BITION DEAD 
PROBLEMS TO COME 


From Our 0*» Corresponded 

WASHINGTON. Dec 5 

Nearly 14 year ago. on the eve of 
•January 16, 1920. the Anti- Saloon 
League announced to the United 
States that at one minute after 
midnight “a new nation will be 
bom.” To-day, as the clock bands 
climb toward the hour at which, by 
the deciding vote of Utah, the 
Eighteenth Amendment will be 
repealed this new nation turns 
away with thanksgiving from its 
experiment in national 
regeneration. 

A great deal of exuberance and a 
good deal of excess are to be 
expected Leaders of the dry fac- 
tion. indeed now predict that an 
era of lawbreaking will set in so 
serious that the country “will turn 
back prohibition." But only in 19 
of the 48 States will it be legal to 
buy what is called hard liquor — 
Arizona. California, Colorado, 
Connecticut, Delaware. Illinois. 
Indiana, Louisiana. Maryland 
Massachusetts, Montana. Nevada. 
New Mexico, New York, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island 
Washington and Wisconsin. In 
New Jersey, familiarly described as 
“wet as the Atlantic”, a Liquor 
Control Bill has been passed which 
fee Governor refuses to sign on the 
ground that it is unconstitutional. 

Faca (Federal Alcohol Control 
Administration), fee newest of fee 
great family of bureaux known bv 
their initiate, has been housed here 
and is at work. Not the least of its 
innumerable problems is the legal- 
izing of the inestimable quantity of 
“bootleg^ and smuggled liquor 
hidden in every section of fee 
country from which fee Govern- 
ment might gam considerable reve- 
nue. There have been offers from 
fee owners of this liquor to make 
payment, but there intervene cer- 
tain regulations of fee internal 
revenue and Customs laws which 
have not been repealed and a way 
to remove these obstacles in favour 
of the liquor holder or dealer who 
wants to turn over a new leaf has 
yet to be found. 


VESSELS WAITING 


Than there are the countless 
vessels hovering off the coast 
beyond fee hour's steaming line 
which had hoped to ride in and 
discharge when repeal became a 
fact, but which find that new 
regulations oblige them to show 
clearance papers from their port of 
origin to a specific American port 
of arrival. It is expected that most 
of them will “run for it", and that 
an epidemic of smuggling on fee 
grand scale will test fee Coast 
Guard beyond its powers for a 
while: hut this is less a matter of 
concern to fee Government than 
the case of fee individual owner 
wife his bidden store. Lawyers 
whose clients’ names are discreetly 
withheld — one representing a man 
said to own 800,000 gallons — have 
approached fee Treasury, and Dr. 
James Doran, the Government's 
principal expert in these matters, 
has proposed that every such 
owner be given 15 days to declare 
possession and pay his tax. In fee 
interest of order and of revenue, 
accordingly, it may be found 
necessary to compound a felony. 

It can be said of what happened 
nearly 14 years ago feat “the 
fattens had eaten a sour grape and 
the children's teeth were set on 
edge". As a result the first oblitera- 
tion from the organic law of fee 
country of any provision written 
into it has been made, and fee 
Twenty-first Amendment to the 
Constitution will appear as fol- 
lows:- 

Sectioa 1.- The Eighteenth Arti- 
cle of the Amendment to fee 
Constitution of the United States 
is hereby repealed. 

Bat the Eighteenth Amendment 
lighted more than repeal can 

eTtinguish- 


UTAH’S VOTE 


NEW YOKE CELEBRATIONS 


From Our Own Correspondent 
NEW YORK, Dec 5 

Utah, the thirty-sixth State, 
ratified the Amendment for repeal 
of Prohibition at 5.33 p.m. New 
York time [10.33 G-M.T.} this 
evening . . . 

Some 3,000 hotels, restaurants, 
and clubs in New York made 
elaborate preparations for quench- 
ing fee thiik of their expected 
patrons with lawful liquor. Liquor 
in aU conceivable forms is still 
flowing into fee city in great 
volume. The Majestic, which will 
dock here late to-day, is bringing a 
further 300 cases of Scotch whisky 
and 6,000 cases of champagne and 
other wines. 

The Police Commissioner an- 
nounced this afternoon that a 

relentless war will be waged against 

speakeasies and all unlicensed! 
liquor vendors immediately repeaH 
becomes effective ... J 


Breath of summer 

From Mrs Elizabeth D. Walker 
Sir, Today I have picked a 
summer posy consisting of: rose, 
periwinkle, Welsh poppy, wild 
poppy, ntaiguerite, cornflower, 
veronica, marigold sweet Wil- 
liam. border pink daisy, and some 
blossom from fee Glastonbury 
thorn, not due out till Twelfth 
Night. 

Yours faithfully, 

ELIZABETH D. WALKER, 
Nunney Court, Rhine, Somerset 
December 1. 


T^jE FiNESTFUt^ 5 IN LONDON . THE FINEST FURS IN LONDON * THE FINEST FURS IN LONDON ■ THE FINEST FURS IN LONDON « THE FINEST FURS IH LONDON * THE FINEST FURS IN LONDON 


18 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


A scapegoat for the 
true nature of evil 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December 5: His Excellency Mr 
Cecil S. Pilgrim was received in 
audience by The Queen and 
presented ihe Letters of Recall 
of bis predecessor and his own 
Letters of Commission as High 
Commissioner for Guyana in 
London. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied by the following members 
of the High Commission, who 
had the honour of being 
presnted to Her Majesty: Mr 
Creswell Barker (Deputy High 
Commissioner). Mr Arnon Ad- 
ams (First Secretary). Miss 
Esmc Curtis (Second Secretary), 
Mr Neil Pierre (Second Sec- 
retary) and Mr Lalta Persaud 
(Second Secretary). 

Mrs Pilgrim had the honour 
of being received by The Queen. 

Sir Mark Russell (Deputy 
Under Secretary of State for 
Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs) who had the honour of 
being received by The Queen 
was present and the Gentlemen 
of the Household in Waiting 
were in attendance. 

Mr Justice Pons had the 
honour of being received by The 
Queen upon his appointment as 
a Justice of the High Court of 
Justice when Her Majesty con- 
ferred upon him the honour of 
Knighthood and invested him 
with the Insignia of a Knight 
Bachelor. 

Mr Justice Kennedy had the 
honour of being received by The 
Queen upon his apointmem as a 
Justice of the High Court of 


tingham and, having been re- 
ceived by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieutenant for Nottinghamshire 
(Sir Gordon Hobday) and the 
Lord Mayor of Nottingham 
(Councillor F Higgins), was 
entertained at luncheon at the 
Council House and afterwards 
unveiled statuary in Old Market 
Square. 

-The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips, President of the Save 
the Children Fund, this after- 
noon visited the Fund's Shop in 
Derby Road. Nottingham and 
in the evening attended a Buffet 
Reception in the County Hail, 
where Her Royal Highness was 
received by the Chairman of 
Nottinghamshire County Coun- 
cil (Councillor A Shaw). 

The Princes Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips subsequently attended a 
Save the Children Fund Gala 
Evening at the Theatre Royal 
Centre and was received by the 
Chairman of the Nottingham 
Branch of the Fund (Mr E. 
Bowley) and the Area Repre- 
sentative (Mrs M Lowth). 

Her Royal Highness, attended 
by Mrs Charles Ritchie, trav- 
elled in ah aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Lord Hesketh (Lord in 
Waiting) was present at Royal 
Air Force Nonholt this morning 
upon the arrival of The Presi- 
dent of the French Republic and 
welcomed His Excellency on 
behalf of Her Majesty. 
CLARENCE HOUSE 
December 5: Major-General 
Desmond Rice today had the 
honour of being received by 
Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother, ColoneLin-Chief, 1st 


Justice when her Majesty con- aESii^?3KB 


KnighLfaood and invested him 
with the Insignia of a Knight 
Bachelor. 

His Excellency Dr Mauricio 
Gdndara and Senora Gandara 
were received in farewell audi- 
ence by The Queen and took 
leave upon His Excellency 
relinguishing his appointment 
as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from Ec- 
uador to the Court of St James's. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh gave a luncheon 
party at Buckingham Palace for 
those attending the Meeting of 
the European Council in 
London. 

The Prince Edward, Chair- 
man of The Duke of 
Edinburgh's Award 30tb 
Anniversary Tribute Project, 
this evening attended a Gaia 
Charity Concerty given by the 
Moody Blues at Wembley Arena 
in aid of the 30th Anniversary 
Tribute Project. 

Wing Commander Adam 
Wise was in attendance. 

The Princess Anne. Mrs Mark 
Phillips visited Leicestershire 
and Nottinghamshire today. 

Having been received by Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
Leicestershire (Colonel Andrew 
Martin) and the Vice-Chairman 
of the Airport Joint Committee 
(Councillor C Perkins). Her 
Royal Highness this morning 
opened the new terminal exten- 
sions at East Midlands Inter- 
national Airport, 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips then travelled to Not- 


Lieutenant-General Sir Mau- 
rice Johnston also had the 
honour ofbeing received by Her 
Majesty upon assuming his 
appointment as Colonel of 1st 
The Queen's Dragoon Guards. 

The Princess of Wales will 
attend a carol service at Si 
Martm-in-the- Fields on Decem- 
ber 13. 

Birthdays 

TODAY: Mr Jack Ashley, CH, 
MP, 64: Mr David Brubeck, 66; 
Vice-Admiral Sir John CadelLl 
57: Mr Monty Court, 58; Air 
Marshal Sir John Curtiss. 62; 
Lord Emslie. 67; Earl Granville. 
68; Sir Denis Hamilton, 68; 
Miss Jill Haramereley, 35; Mr, 
Derek Hill, 70; Sir William 
Keswick, 83; Mr Jonathan King, 
42; Mr R.E.B. Lloyd. 58; the 
Right Rev Eric Mercer. 69; Mr 
George Pinker. 62; Professor Sir 
George Porter, 66; Mr Reginald 
Stacey, 85; Sir Bryan Tb waites, 
63; Mr Charles Vance, 57; the 
Right Rev Peter Walker, 67; Mr 
Cyril Wash brook, 72. 
TOMORROW: Professor T. 
Anderson. 82; Sir Fred Atkin- 
son, 67; Mr Donald Crichton- 
Miller. 80: Lord Elystan- 
Morgan, 54; Sir Terence 
Garvey. 71; Professor Sir Abra- 
ham Goldberg, 63; Sir Bryan 
Hopkin, 72; Major-General R.E 
Lloyd, 80; Rear-Admiral A.F. 
PugsJey. 85; Mr Eli Wallach, 71; 
Miss Helen Watts, 59. 


The new information given by 
Myra Hindley about children 
who disappeared more than 
twenty years ago has res 
opened the question of her 
parole. It is claimed — by 
churchmen among others — 
that Hindley is a reformed 
character, that she has become 
a Roman Catholic and has 
repented her part in those 
crimes; and that she is an 
educated, mature woman; in 
short, a different person from 
the one involved in the 
atrocities. 

A common reaction to 
those claims, and to the appeal 
for parole which goes with 
them, is to say that crimes so 
vile and disgusting can never 
be pardoned — that no degree 
of “reformation of character" 
is reason for Hindiey's release. 
She must remain m custody, 
for the rest of her days. 

That opinion is generated 
by outrage at the foulness of 
those murders: How could 
anyone do such a thing? How 
could anyone collude with a 
kilter like Brady, give him aid 
and comfort? 

It raises the question of evil 
in its most blatant and sicken- 
ing form. How does a human 
being come to be capable of 
inflicting torture on an inno- 
cent child, and to derive 
pleasure from it? One answer 
is that the torturer is an 
exception to the race of or- 
dinary humans, that he is a 
crackpot, a psychopath, a rare 
example of extreme derange- 
ment. 

But historical evidence is 
not on the side of that answer. 
When we look at actual in- 
cidents. it appears that acts of 
the utmost barbarity and 
wickedness can be committed 
not simply by the devil’s fluke, 
the one in a million pervert, 
but by a surprisingly large 
number of quite ordinary 
people. The documents from 
the Nazi holocaust show that 
it was not just a few fanatics 


who tortured and murdered in 
the d«rtb cam ps, but that 
many shared respoosibtity for 
those acts: "under orders", as 
it has often been claimed — 
but the responsibility was 
there just the same. 

It happens that we do have 
the result of some psychologi- 
cal experiments which support 
the uncomfortable view that 

man y — and even most people 
— torture and kill given the 
appropriate conditions. 

A psychologist called 
Professor Stanley Miigram 
showed by a take laboratory 
experiment that many people 
were ready to inflict a great 
deal of pain on another 
person. 

The results dispose of the 
comforting prejudice that only 
a very few human beings 
would torture and kill when 
instructed to do so. They also 
support the ancient Christian 
doctrine of Original Sin. 

Original Sin is derived from 
the Bible by St Paul and St 
Augustine and says that 
humankind has fallen from 
grace, that our hearts incline 
to evil and that there is no 
depth to which we may not 
sink. Not nice thoughts for 
those raised on liberal op- 
timism and false opinions 
about the nature of personal- 
ity — that we are getting better 
all the time. 

But Original Sin at least 
accounts for Brady and 
Charles Manson, for the 
murderers of the holocaust 
and for the relished brutality 
which has never ceased from 
the sackings and rapes of 
ancient times to Auschwitz 
and BuchenwaJd, to the' tor- 
tures being inflicted in jails 
and “hospitals" in a score of 
countries at this momenL 

If no Original Sin, why the 
bomb and nerve gas? Why 
sadistic rapes and child- 
killings? Why our prurience to 
read about those stories and 
the editors* willingness to 


print them, every day all over 
popular and quality f 
newspapers? 

In our own time there have 
been prophets who have 
warned us about the great pail 
we fell into when we mis- 
penceive oar own nature and] 
disown our dark side. Freud 
spoke about the dark, amoral 
force in tire unconscious 
mind, the id. Jung bade us 
look at oar shadow. But 
Engtigbtened Modern Think- 
ing ignores them, thinks them 
morbid primitives. 

Shakespeare gave us Mac- 
beth and Timon as our broth- 
ers; Dante and the medieval 
painters who depicted hell not 
as a liberal educationist's bad 
dream, but as a reality. The 
Greeks — known for their 

enlightenment — knew of 

ogres and gprgons. And the 
whole tradition of European 
folk tales is filled with stories 
of head-choppings and eyes 
being put out 

Meanwhile, we nice, normal 
folk respond to the doctrine of 
Ori ginal Sin with a superior 
sniff even as our cities become 
more bedevilled by sadistic 
crimes, our transport and 
institutions threatened by ter- 
rorism and our whole world is 
held hostage to caves full of 1 
nuclear warheads of un- 
imaginable destructiveness. 

What we do from this high 
vantage point of self-satisfac- 
tion is exactly what Freud and 
.lung said we would do; we 


OBITUARY 

SIR EDWARD YOUDE 

Quiet mastery in Chinese dealings 


Sir Edward Youde, GCMG. 
GCVO, MBE, Governor of 
Hong Kong and formerly 
Ambassadorto China, died on 
December 4. He was 62. 

Trained to be a “China 
hand", he had the good for- 
tune -by no means predictable 
m the British Diplomatic Ser- 
vice - to be allowed to spend a 
large part ofhis working life m 
the area of the world of which 
he had specialist knowledge, 
and never to be sent to places 
of which he was totally 
ignorant. 

His two most important 
postings complemented each 
other well, since the experi- 
ence that he gained at the 
pairin g embassy during a time 
of crisis and change helped 
him , as Governor of Hong 
Kong, to play a most helpful 
part in the negotiations with 
China over that colony’s 
future. 

Though he bad none of the 
panache sometimes associated 
with proconsular figures, 
Youde proved no less effect- 
ive as governor than he had 
been as ambassador, his wis- 
dom and quiet authority com- 
pensating for any lack of 
showmanship. 

Edward Youde was bom on 
June 19, 1924, at Penarth, 
Glamorgan. His father was 
company secretary of a joinery 
firm. He was educated at the 
Penarth county secondary 
school, of which he became 



deny our own evil and project I captain, and where he was a 
it on to “rare” vi ll a ins like | keen rugby d 
B rady and Hindley. We arej 
the new Pharisees. We do well 
to remember some words 
addressed to the first Phari- 
sees: “Ye are like unto whited 
sepulchres, which indeed 
appear beautiful outward, but 
are within full of dead men’s 
bones, and all undeanness.’ 

Peter Mnllenj 

Vicar of Tockmth, 

North Yorkshire 


Marriages 


Dinner 


Prime Minister 

The Prime Minister was host at 
a dinner yesterday evening at 10 
Downing Street on the occasion 
of the meeting of the European 
Council. The guests were: 

M „ Franco to Mitterrand. Defleer 
Wllfued Harlms. Dr Paul Schiueter. 
hot Dr Helmut kohl M Andrea 
P^Pandreou. Sertor Don FeUpe Gan- 
ging M arg ins. M Jacques cSfrac. Dr 
Garret Fibgerald. Stanor Betttno 
Craxl. M Jacques Hauler. Dr Ruud 
Lubbors. Dr Antbai Cavaco Silva and 
M Jacques Delon. 


Service dinner 


1st Regiment 
Artillery 


Royal Horae 


MrJ.EJK.Rae 
and Mrs GJVL Thompson 
The marriage took place quietly 
on Friday, December 5.- in 
Chester between Mr Keith Rae, 
of Stone Cottage, Alpraha 
Tarporley, Cheshire, and Mrs 
Gillian Thompson, daughter of 
Major-General Sir Rupert Bra- 
zier-Creagh and the late Lady 
Brazier-Creagh, of Sandyacre, 
Tarvin Sands, Chester. 

Captain G. Mac Ginnls 
and Miss C. Platt 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, November 29, at St 
Mary’s Church, Lidgate, Suf- 
folk, between Captain George 
Mac Ginnis, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs Francis Mac Ginnis, 
and Miss Clare Platt, only 
daughter of Dr and Mrs Hugh 
Platt. 

The bride, who was given In 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Clare 
Withycorabe and Miss Eliza- 
beth Beale. Mr Robert Lowth 
was best man. 

A reception was held at the . 
home of the bride. 


Past and present members of the 
1st Regiment Royal Horae Artil- 
lery held their annu al reunion 
dinner at Woolwich last night. 
M^jor Genera] WJD. Maugham, 
the Representative Colonel 
Comma n da n t, was the principal | 
guesL 


Bryans ton School 

Sixth-form scholarships have 
been awarded to the following: 

Luke Bannon (King's School. Ely): 

Beveridge rsf Leonard’s. May- 
* iangdan (Merchant 
_=• _ — r- - - a#. M agdalen Money 
jT ruro Hjyh Bcnoon: Eleanor Pfarr 
(Purbeck School); Katherine Richards 
(Dr ChaOoners Hig^Schooifc Anna 


Salaman iCanusr 


School). 


Forthcoming marriages 


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LONDON- LEEDS NEW YORK MANCHESTER 


Mr G JVLB. Adams 
and Miss CA Martin 
The engagement is announced 
between George, youngest son 
of Mr and Mrs M.G.R. Adams, 

of Dyraock, Gloucestershire, 
and Christine, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs J.P. Martin, of South- 
gate, London. 

Mr PJR. Adams 
and MissTA. Mastennan 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, elder son of the 
Rev B.H. Adams and the late 
Mra Ruth Adams, of Walton, 
Somerset, and Teresa, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.R. 
Masierman, of Tunbridge 
Wells. Kent. 

Mr J.EJL Coleantt 
and Miss TLF- Hardy 
The engagement is announced 
between John, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs EJ. Colenutt, of 
Bassett Southampton, and Re- 
becca, second daughter of Mr 
C.G. Hardy and the late Mis 
PA- Hardy, of Scalby Nabs. 
Scarborough. 

Mr JJF. Grove 
and Miss BA. Fraser-ADen 
The engagement is announced 
between John Frederick, elder 
son of Mr and Mrs F.E Grove, 
of 1 5 Normanby Close, Putney, 
SW15, and Belinda Anne, only 
daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel 
and Mrs M. Fraser-Alien. ofThe 
Hall, Crick, Northamptonshire. 
Mr JJVL Hawkins 
and Miss JXA. Hut 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy, son of Mr and 
Mrs M.O.S. Hawkins, of 
Coldwahham, Sussex, and Jac- 
queline, daughter of Eh- D.GF. 
Han. OBE, and Mrs Hart, of 
Dunstable, Bedfordshire. 

Dr NJL Hicks 
and Miss U. Bradbury 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, only son of 
Anthony and Marian Hicks, of 
Goring Heath, Oxfordshire, and 
Louise, only daughter of Colin 
and Janet Bradbury, of Ealing, 
London. 

Mr WJHJHL Lane 
and Miss KJS. Dudley 
The engagement is announced 
between William, son of Mr and 
Mrs J.P. Lane, of Boars Hill, 
Oxford, and Karen, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs B.W. Dudley, of 
Weston-super-Mare. 

MrBJL Rowles 
and Miss N J. Bnynham 
The engagement is announced 
between Bruce Henry, younger 
son of Mr J.W. Rowles and the 
late Mrs M.F. Rowles, of Walk 
House. Barrow-on-Hum ber, 
and Nicola Jane, rider daughter 
of Mr and Mrs P.R. Baynham, 
of Heighihgton, Lincoln. 

Mr J.G. Wray 
and Miss S.L. El ph>ck 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Grant, only 
son of Dr and Mrs Gordon 
Wray, of Exeter, Devon, and 
Sarah Louise, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Robert Elphick, of 
Pimlico, London. 


Mr A. Jamieson 
and Miss GA Clarice 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, younger son 
ofMrand Mrs W.B.L Jamieson, 
of St George’s Hill, Weybridge, 
Surrey, and Gillian Anne, youn- 
ger daughter ofMrand Mrs A^. 
Clarke, of Frilhsden Copse, 
Bcrfchamsted. Hertfordshire. 

Mr DJP. Sbawe-Taykjr 
and Miss KG, North 
The engagement is announced 
between Desmond, son of Mr 
B.N. Shawe-Taylor ami the kite 
Mrs J.C. Shawe-Taylor, of I 
Brockhampton, Gloucester- 
shire. and Rosemary, dau ghter 
of Mr R.B. North, of 1 
Darlington. Devon, and Mrs 
SA. North, of Mevagissey, 
Cornwall. 

Mr D.J.C. Sington 
and Miss PA. Neville 
The engagement is announced 
between David, rider son of Mr 
and Mrs EJ*C. Sington, of New 
Amberden Hall, Debden Green, 
Essex, and Pamela, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs HJ. 
Neville, of Shaker Heights, 
Ohio, United States. 

Mr W JLW. Staintborpe 
and Miss FA. Harris 
The e n gag em ent is announced 
between William, eider son of I 
Mr and Mrs T.W. Stain thorpe, 
of South wick, Wiltshire, and 
Felicia, youngest daughter of Mr 
H.M.W. Harris, of Haywards 
Heath, West Sussex, and the late 
Mrs A. Harris, and stepdaughter 
of Mrs J.E. Harris. 

Mr M JL Taylor 
and Miss L.C. HdnmB 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark Taylor, 4th/7th 
Royal Dragoon Guards, son of j 
Major-General Reynefl Taylor, 
of Cyprus, and Mrs D. Taylor, 
of the Isle of Wight, and Louise, 
daughter of Colonel and Mrs 
John Holman, of Aldershot, 
Hampshire. 

Mr A.W. Thompson 
and Miss LMJLI. Brown 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, younger son 
of Mr and Mrs Harry Tfaomp- j 
son, of North wich, and Iona, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Denys | 
Brown, of Godalmjng. 


keen rugby player. 

He then went, briefly, to the 
School of Oriental Studies, 
London University, but he did 
not finish the course, choosing 
to serve with the RNVR 
during the final years of the 
war. 

He entered the Diplomatic 
Service in 1947, and was 
attached to the China depart- 
ment before going to Nanking, 
and then to Peking in 1950. 

Whfle serving as third secre- 
tary at Nanking in 1949, he 
bicycled for four days along 
the Yangtse, crossing the 
Communist Hum, in an at- 
tempt to negotiate a safe 
passage for HMS Amethyst 
and her surviving crew. The 
attempt felled, but his courage 
and resourcefulness were ad- 
mired, sot least by the Chi- 
nese. 

From 1951 to 1953 he 
served in the Foreign Office, 
but in the latter year returned 
to Peking with the rank of 
second secretary. His next 
posting, in 1956, was to Wash- 
ington, where he remained for 
four years, before he was sent 
back to Peking, this time as 
first secretary. 

Two years later he was again 
at the Foreign Office, as first 
secretary in the Northern de- 
partment In 1965 he was 
appointed counsellor and 
head of chancery of the UK 
Mission to the UN in New 
York. On his return to Britain 


in 1969 he became private 
secretary (overseas affairs) to 
the then Prime Minister, Mr 
Harold Wilson. It was at this 
time that he had his first 
intimations of bean illness. 

He spent a year in 1970 at 
the Imperial Defence College, 
before moving to the FCO 
first, as head of personnel and, 
later, as under secretary re- 
sponsible for Asian amirs, 
including Hong Kong. 

In 1974 be was appointed 
ambassador to China, follow- 
ing Sir John Addis, who had 
been the first fully-fledged 
British envoy there since 
1949. He was thus pi: 
into one of the most . 
and turbulent periods of Chi- 
nese politics since the high 
tide of the Cultural Revolu- 
tion in 1967. The “Gang of 
Four" was at the height of its 
activities, attempting to over- 
throw Deng Xiaoping and 
Chou En-lai, while Mao sank, 
into senility. 

Relations with China's new- 
won friends in the West had to 
be nurtured, despite what 
appeared to be a left-radical 
mood among the rulers. 
Youde maintained a steady 
course which kept Sino-Brit- 
ish relations on as even a keel 
as possible in the 
circumstances. 

After the death of Mao in 
1 976, and the overthrow of the 
“Gang of Four”, relations 
became almost cordial, and in 
these conditions there were 
good prospects for trade and 
investment, of which Youde 
was acutely aware, and which 
he promoted with great abili- 
ty. 

He left the embassy in 1978 
and returned to the FCO, 
where he held the post of chief 
clerk. This gave him responsi- 
bility for the administration of 
the Diplomatic Service world- 
wide, and for its financial 
dispositions - experience 
which was to prove valuable 
in his next and final task. 

In May 1982 he was ap- 
pointed Governor of Hong 
Kong, succeeding Sir Murray 
(now Lord) Maclehose, who 
was generally regarded as a 
daunting man to follow, ho 
any case, Youde faced im- 
mense difficulties. Two 


months after his arrival. Pe- 
king announced its proposals 
for the reversion of Hong 
Kong to Chinese sovereignly 
in 1 997, the expiry date for the 
99-year lease of the New 
Temtories. 

His position was complicat- 
ed by the fact that the Chinese, 
in agreeing to talks, made it 
clear that they regarded the 
governor as no more than 
another spokesman of the 
British government, and re- 
fused to accept him as a 
representative of the people of 
Hong Kong. All the same, they 
agreed to his presence at the 
talks in Peking which, in 1984. 
produced the joint declaration 
on the territory's future. 

Despite the seemingly 
liberal provisions of the agree- 
ment - which would pennii 
Hong Kong to retain a capital- 
ist economy and the British 
legal system for 50 years - 
there was much uneasiness 
and scepticism among the 
population, to which Youde’s 
calm temperament, allied to 
candour, was the best possible 
antidote. 

His government had the 
task of drawing up a frame- 
work for representative gov- 
ernment in the future “Hong 
Kong special administrative 
region”. This incurred the 
resentment of the Chinese 
government, which did not 
want Hong Kong to be democ- 
ratized in advance of the 
hand-over, but would not say 
so openly. A degree of tension 
resulted in 1 985, which it was 
hoped would be resolved dur- 
ing a general review of 
progress in 1987. 

The governor bad to deal 
with many problems concern- 
ing the development of local 
government the position of 
expatriate civil servants and 
pensions, ami the nationality 
of racial minorities. On the 
whole, these contentious mat- 
ters were handled with con- 
spicuous humanity and 
common sense. 

One ofhis last major duties 
was to welcome the Queen 
and Prince Philip when they 
visited the colony in October. 

Youde had an exceptional 
command of Mandarin Chi- 
nese and of written Chinese, 
but he did not when appoint- 
ed to Hong Kong, speak 
Cantonese, which is spoken 
there. Together with his wife, 
also a Chinese scholar, he took 
lessons in it however, and by 
the time of his death had 
achieved a considerable 
proficiency. . 

The Chinese name for him 
was ;Yau Tak, a phonetic 
version of his surname which 
means “abundant virtue." It 
was said to have been con- 
ferred upon him by Deng 
Xiaoping as early as 1948. 

His wife, Pamela Fin, 
whom he married in 1951, 
survives him with their two 
daughters. 


MR H. de CRONIN HASTINGS 


Mr N& Timms 
and Miss BX.M. Gwyn- 1 

W illiams 

The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, only son of 
Mr and Mrs M. Timms, of 
London SW1. and Rebecca 
(Katie), only daughter ofMr and 
Mra G.T. Gwyn- Williams, of| 
Brenchley, Kent 

Mr R-G. Wbeway 
and Mrs J. Sheppard 
The engagement is announced.] 
between Richard Charles! 
Wheway, of Clifton. York, and j 
Judith (nefc Sawkill). widow of| 
William Paine Sheppard, of I 
Barton le Street, North 
Yorkshire. 


Mr HL de Cronin Hastings, 
for four decades a famous 
name in the architectural 
world, died on December 3. 
He was 84. 

As editor at different times 
of the two leading English 
architectural magazines, and 
chairman of the publishing 
company that owned them, he 
was a powerful influence. But 
his frequent eccentricities 
were encountered only by 
those who worked with him. 

When once, in the 1950s, he 
was persuaded to read a paper 
at an architects' meeting, he 
insisted on sitting on the 
platform with his rack to the 
audience. 

His outstanding quality was 
the ability to propagate origi- 
nal ideas - some visionary, 
some merely eccentric - until 
they became part of current 
architectural ideology. 

■ It was bis inventive use of 
pictures and varieties of type 
and paper that gave his maga- 
zine, The Architectural Re- 
view, its unique identity 

His particular enthusiasm 
was for territorial planning 
and its influence on the Eng- 
lish scene. Even after he had 
ceased personally to edit The 
Architectural Review, the at- 
tention the magazine gave to 
the subject was inspired by 
him, and he supervised its 
planning policies. 

He was behind many plan- 
ning campaigns, both critical 


and constructive, which the 
magazine promoted. The now 
fashionable word 

“townscape” was first used in 
its pages. 

Hubert de Cronin Hastings 
was bom on July 18, 1902. His 
father, Percy, was proprietor 
of the Architectural Press and 
the founder, in 1896, of The 
Architectural Review. 

After schooling at 
Berkhamsted. he studied ar- 
chitecture at the Bartlett 
School, London University, 
and art for a while at the Slade 
School (where be acquired a 
facility for portrait carica- 
tures, of which be published a 
small book in 1931). 

He joined the Architectural 
Press in 1926 and the follow- 
ing year became chairman arid 
editor of The Architectural 
Review. He made an immedi- 
ate impact on what had been 
an authoritative but some- 
what staid and academic mag- 
azine, introducing the striking 
style of layout that became its 
hallmark, and recruiting as 
contributors such distin- 
guished writers as Sacbeverell 
Sitwell, Paul Nash, Robert 
Byron, P. Morton Shand, 
Osbert Lancaster and John 
Betjemen. The last was for 
several years a member of the 
editorial staff. 

His influence continued 
long after he had handed over 
the editorship to J. M. (now 


Sir James) Richards, following 
his move from London to 
Sussex in 1937. Between 1942 
and 1946, when Richards was 
away on war service, Hastings 
returned to edit the Review in 
conjunction with the late Sir 
Nikolaus Pevsner. He also 
founded, with George (now 
Lord) Weidenfeld a new 
though short-lived magazine. 
Contact. 

He was demanding and 
frequently tyrannical; also re- 
sentful when he was thwarted 
He could however, be charm- 
ing, and those who worked 
closely with him found that 
they learnt much from him. 

Though so deeply involved , 
in the policies and contents of .- 
the magazines he controlled 
he seldom himself wrote in 
them. When he did write, it 
was, characteristically, under 
a pseudonym, usually Ivor de 
Wolfe. Under this name he 
was responsible for one mem- 
orable special number of the 
Review entitled “Italian 
Townscape" and published in 
1962 - the fruit of two years' 
residence in Italy. This was 
republished the following year 
as a book. 

In 1 980 he published under 
his own name. The Alternative 
Society, a book about sociolo- 
gy and economics. 

He married in 1927, Hazel 'y 
Rickman Garrard They had a * 
son and a daughter. 


SIR RICHARD CAVE 


Charity preview 

A special charity preview of Lbe 
comedy. An Italian Straw Hat. 
is to be given in the presence of 
the Duchess of Gloucester at the 
Shaftesbury Theatre in London 
next Wednesday in aid of the 
Foundation for the Study of 
Infant Deaths. The duchess is 
ttron of the foundation, which 
nds cot deaths research and 
supports bereaved parents. It 
has raised and allocated 
£1,750.000 since 1971 towards 
research projects. A full house 
next Wednesday would raise a 
total of £20,000. Tickets priced 
from £6.50 to £12.50 are obtain- 
able from the Shaftesbury The- 
atre box office <01-379 5399). 


Reception 


KM Government 
Mr Malcolm Rifkind. QC. Sec- 
retary of State for Scotland and 
Mrs Rifkind were hosts yes- 
terday at a reception held at 6 
Charlotte Square. Edinburgh for 
the Industry Year Scottish 
Committee. 

( 


Christening 

The son of Mr and Mrs Jamie 
Crookenden was christened 
Harry George in the Chapel 
Royal of St rater ad Vmcuia in 
the Tower of London by the 
Chaplain, the Rev John 
Llewellyn. The godparents are 
Lieutenant-Colonel Julian Lan- 
caster. Mr Tom Aldridge, Mr | 
Graham Clarke, die Countess of | 
Lonsdale. Baroness Carl- 
Diedric Hamilton and Miss 
Kate Crookenden. 


Moreton Hall 

The scholarship examination 
will take place on February 3, 
1987. There will be two aca- 
demic and one music scholar- 
ship offered to girls between the 
ages of 1 1 and 13. all to the value 
of half the school fees. A sixth- 
form scholarship of half fees will ; 
also be offered and the examina- 
tion for that will be held on May 
4, 1987. Full details and applica- 
tion form are available from the 
School Secretary. Moreton HalL 
Weston Rhyn. Oswestry, Shro 
shire. SYll 3EW (telephone: 
0691 773671). 


Sir Richard Gave. MG in- 
dustrialist, died yesterday. He 
was 66. 

Richard Guy Cave was born 
on March 16, 1920. He was 
educated at Tonbridge, and at 
Gonville and Caius College, 
Cambridge, where he read 
engineering. 

In 1940 he joined the Royal 
Tank Regiment and served as 
a tank commander in North 
Africa, Italy and Europe. He 
won the MC during the Nor- 
mandy campaign. 

He then began his business 
career with Smiths Industries, 
the firm with which he was to 
be associated for 30 years. He 
was made commercial manag- 
er of Radio Mobile Ltd., 
selling car telephones. This 
firm was jointly owned by 
Smiths and the Gramophone 
Company (later EMI). 

Two years later he moved to 
the motor accessory division, 
a post in which he travelled 


tire company, and he re- 
mained in this post until he 
became chairman in 1973. 

Cave was an excellent man- 
ager of people, and he made 
changes from the works man- 
ager level upwards, “but with 
no blood running down the 
corridors". Honourably ambi- 
tious himself, he also sympa- 
thized with the ambition of 
others. He carried through a 
policy of diversification, 
which helped the company to 
achieve record profits despite 
difficult trading conditions. 

This made hurt much 
sought after, and in 1976 Sir 
Jules Thom, creator of Thom 
Electrical Industries, invited 
Cave to be his successor as 
chairman. Cave accepted the 
position, but his time at Thom 
was less happy than at Smiths. 

It was, however, a bold 
stroke to take over EMI in 
1979. and to create the new 
combined firm ofThorn-EMI, 


widely, cultivating the export 

market By 1963 be was in even though the merger crea£ 
charge of the division. Four . ed problems of assimilation 
years later be was appointed which he did not altogether 
managing director of the en- master. 


In 1983 he was probably 
offered the chairmanship of 
the British Railways Board in 
succession to Sir Peter Parker, 
but he insisted that the job 
rfiould go to Sir Robert Reid. 
Cave served instead as deputy 
chairman. 

In 1984. on leaving Thom- 
EMI, he became chairman of 
Vickers. He also held director- 
ships at Tate & Lyle and 
Thames Television; and he 
was chairman of the Industrial 
Society. 

Cave was a man large in 
personality and physique: He 
shunned the limelight, prefer- 
ring to do his job quietly and 
efficiently without recourse to 
PR. He never spoke of his 
wartime exploits. He was an 
old-fashioned manager , tough 
yet compassionate, who 
brought out the best in his 
colleagues. Sailing was his 
favourite recreation. 

He married, in 1957, Doro- 
thy Gillian Fry, who survives 
him with their two sons and 
two daughters. 







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BIRTHS, MARRIAGES 
DEATHS 


to I2II rpn ' J fo " 1 you U 

CM AMK>ihrtiordoiiiiigrin whuh 
H Air to buua you uoT 
Acts SO- 32 


BIRTHS 


] 


BOUCHOI • On No\Fmt*r SOUi 1986 . 
al Canterbury. Kent, la Fiona >nro 

nS^^L 3 rl_ Hl,Bh a son * Tlwnus 
Rtchard Com in . 

■*W®*PCC - On December and. at Si 
Thoma i Hospital. io Jean inee Mur- 
rayj and Peter a m Michael John 
N«vwion. a brother for Rosemary. 
CLAJtTOM - On November 30th 1986. 
at RAF Hospital Wegberg w. Germa- 
ny. to Jane inee BrookfteMI and 
Kenneth, a son. Jonathan David 

Hm worth 

FLOYD - On December ath 1 986. to 
Caroline irtee Becklyi amt David, a 
daugmer. Claire. 

GALYM • On December 3 rd. ai 
Lonqwood House. Naviand. to Juli- 
ana mee Swam and Patrick, a son 
Nicholas, a brother lor Eiixabeth 
Thomas and Edward. 

HARTLEY- On December 3rd 1986. at 

Harrogate. to Claudia and Myln. a 
daughter Polly Trancnca. 
MURDOCH . on December Sth. al 

Owm Charlotte* HovptUL to Tessa 

■nee Meyeri and David, a daughter 
Frances, a swrr for tana 
WO* - on December 1st. In Belgium, 
to Corinne and Michael, a son Nicho- 
las Patrick 

PEARCE ■ On December ath. to Susie 
inee Hodgei and Andrew, a daughter 
Cha rlotte Lucy. 

RRWIB - On December fu. to 
Stephanie and Nigel, a son. Conrad 
Huqn. a brother for Alexander. Jona- 
than. Sebastian and Oliver. 
Remembering always baby Miranda. 
THORNTON . On December 2nd. to Di- 
ana inee Broughlom and Guy. a son 
Thomas George Cranbrook. 


MARRIAGES 


ECOHOMOU : FAIRFAX JONES - On 

Tuesday December 2nd. In London. 
Mr Ei angehs Econo mou to Mtu Pol 
lv Fairlax Jones 


DEATHS 


AYLWtER - On December 3rd. Maw 
Michael Eustace Wyndham. tale 
lblh 5th Lancers and member of the 
Stock Exchange Elder son of the late 
Maior and Mrs J W. Aylmer, former- 
ly of Courtown. Kllcock. Counts- 
Kildare. Private cremation. Family 
flower* only. Donations. If desired, 
■o Cnm. Heart and Stroke Assocta- 
Ixjn. Tavistock Sauarc. WCl. 
Thanksgiving service at Whetford 
Church, near Fatrford at noon on 
Tuesday 9th December. Enquiries 
Packer & Slade, tel. 0285 3525. 

BENNETT • On December 1st 1986. 
William, dearly beloved husband of 
Teresa, lather of Angela. Maureen. 
Tony. Nila. Eva and John. Retired 
overman. Daw Mill Colliery: he bore 
a series of Illnesses with great 
strength and dignity. Rea idem 10.15 
am Monday 8th Dec at Church of 
Our Lady. Mother of God and Guard- 
ian Angels. Shard End. Birmingham, 
fnlermenl al Woodlands. Coteshilt. 
No flowers please. Mass cards to 
family home or church. Donations If 
desired to St Mary's Hospice. Selly 
Oak 


CLARK - On December 3rd. Winifred 
Marie (Freda), aged BO yearn, peace- 
fully at home. Widow of Harold, 
dearly loved mother of Jane and lov- 
ing grand mo l her of James. Belinda. 
Sarah and William. Funeral service 
at West Wittering Church on Mon- 
day Der. Bib al 1.46om. Family 
flowers only. Donations. If desired, 
to st. Wilfrid's Hospice. Chichester. 


GRACE • On December 4th 1966. 
Caroia Helen, widow of the late ad- 
miral Sir John Croce K.B.E.. CXfl. 
Funeral private and service of 
Thanksgiving at 12 noon on Thurs- 
day 8th January al St Marys church. 
Llss- Family flowers only, but If de- 
sired donations may be sent to U*s 
Abbeyfietd Society, c/o Mrs WeUs. 
High Firs. Hatch Lane. Uss. Hants. 


FENWICK - On December-3rd. Rlcnard 
Alexander Featheralone Fenwick, 
much beloved eldest son of Tom and 
Sally Fenwick. Funeral at 
Wofctngham Parish Church. 
Wednesday December loth an 
2.30pm. 


FLENMtCH - On December 4ih. alter a 
long diness. Charles O. aged 78. late 
of the Colonial Forest Sen-Ice. serv- 
ing in Malaya. CC Nigeria and 
Singapore, retired I960. FAO British 
Guiana 1963. member of the Union 
Quo. Sydney. Ausiralla. loved broth- 
er of Vivien Ambler. Branlon Court. 
Farnham. Knaresborough. Funeral 
sen, ire al St Oswald’s Church. 
Farnham. Monday December «h al 
2 30pm. followed by private enema- 
lion. No flowers please. 


GROVES - On December 2nd. In an 
nviey Nursing Home. Eba Muriel, 
aged 92. late of Bolling Road, flkley. 
dearly loved wire of the late Evelyn 
Conway Groves. Service will lake 
place at Ah Saints Parish Church. 
Ilk ley. on Monday December 8th at 
2pm followed by Interment al flkley 
Cemetery. Will friends please meel al 
I tv Church. Family flowers only 
please. 


HARRISON - On December 2nd 1986. 
William Lewis iBtni aged 79 years, of 
6 Cromwell Place. SI. Ives. Cambs. 
For funeral service arrangements tel. 
Dennis Easton Funeral Service. 
(04801 63019 


HODGKMSON • On December 
3rd 1 986 .suddenly Peter George, be- 
loved husband of Mangold, tevtrta 
father of Martin. Andrew. PauL Phil- 
ip and Jane. Dearest step father or 
Fiona and Nicholas, father in lawirf 
Jennie. Cathy. Bridget and Patrick 
and grandfather of Stephen. Chris- 
tian. Philip. Edward and Isabel. 
Private family sen. Ice and buna! fol- 
lowed by Thanksgiving Service at 
Lincoln Camedral on Tuesday 9lh 
December al lpm Family flowers 
only. Donations lo ihf Lincoln 

Cathedral, for dtslnbulion lo he 
Chanty /Chan lies nominated by the 
Trustees. 


HUMPHRIES • On December 4th. in 
•asleep a! The Rectory Nursing 
Homr. Beckentum. Erie Stanley. Fu 
ftefal service on Friday 12th 
“wetnber at the We« Norwood 
^tnctery. al 1.30pm No now ITS by 
nwiefl. but donations if desired lo 
Tne Royal Airforce Bcnevoteni 
Fund. 67. Portland Place. Wi. Any 
bnavdrm to Mr Patrick Humphries. 

Roaa - London ^ SE 24 .Tel 
737 7044. Peace in ihe rad. 
LAUMIKE . On December 3rd. peace- 
JuUy at hta home ai Keannry. near 
Dover. Charles George WUMam. aged 
tM. ffmasrrkir of Colonial Office and 
O D.M Much loved husband of Vera, 
*«hrr of Roger and brother of Maud. 
Cremation at Barham near Canter- 
5J* r V- « 1 2.30pm Tuesday 9th 
Dvcrtnbrr Family Itowera only. 
“CKCIT - On December 2nd. at 
MillhiUs, Crieff. Viotei Dm. widow 
o* Colon H Vivian Lockett. 17/21 
Lancers She donated her body for 
medm research a servKr of 
Thanksgiving win be held at SL 
James's Church. Muthlll. at 3-30pm 
On Monday December 8th. Memorial 
Servire at SL Andrew's Church. 
Trowic. Norwich, at noon on Friday 
December 19th. Tokens in memory 
» desired .to The Friends of Norwich 
caibederal. 73. The Close. Norwich. 

' She lives again - In Uvn made brner 

»V her prnrace*. 

LDCKMART - on December 4th. pence- 
fully ai home in Exeter Joan, most 
dearly loved wife of Dr Keith Lock- 
hart and darling mother, mother in- 
law and grand mother of Caroline. 
Ann. Elizabeth. Susan and their fam- 
ilies Entered mto ihe presence of her 
Lord. Funeral servire SI Leonard's 
Quirrh. Exeter. Tuesday December 
9th al 2.00tra. Family flower* only 
but donations tf desired to the 
Church Missionary Society. 167 Wa- 
terloo Road. SE1. 

MACIULOH • ON December 4th. In has- 
MUd. Glynn Eva. aged 71. of 7. The 
Dene. Hythe . KenL Beloved wife of 
Alan and much loved mother of 
Qinstrl and Catherine and grand- 
mother Funeral at SI Leonard's 
Churm. Hythe. Friday December 
1 2th. at noon, friends most welcome, 
followed by cremation- Family flow- 
ers only. Donations lo Easi Kent 
Homier. London Road. Canterbury . 
WDDLETOM-JOY - On December 2nd. 
peacefully. Dorothea, beloved wife of 
Uie late John Middleton- Joy of 34 
Sussex Square. London. W2. Service 
al Putney Vale Crematorium. Kings- 
ton Rood. SWI5 on Thursday nth 
Dece mber at 2.30pra. 

MOFFAT - On December 4th. In a 
Sheffield Hospital. Roger aged 69 
years, a much loved broadcaster. 
Private cremation on Tuesday De- 
cember 9th. Cut llowen may be sent 
lo John Heath A Sons. Funeral Di- 
rectors. la Earsnam BtreeL 
Sheffield. Memorial Service lo be 
held in Snefltetd will be announced 
later. 

M ORGAN - On November 29th. trag- 
ically as the mull of an accident. 
Alexander Paul Morgan aged 7 
years, of 242 Bloomfield Road. Bath. 
Only son of Perry and Jacqueline 
wui be dearly missed and only grand- 
son in Derek and Jean Syfler. 
Funeral service Si. Phillips and St. 
James. Odd Down. Bath, on Tuesday 
December 91b ai i -SOprn followed by 
cremation- Family dowers only but 
donations. If desired, to the r.n.l.i. 
may be sent to A -H. Cheater. Funeral 
Directors. Rora&ey. Hants 
PBOOCK - On December 3rd. sudden- 
ly In Kinshasa. Zaire. Francis 
W UJtean of Sldeup. Kent. Funeral ser- 
vice ai EJiham Crematorium. 
Tuesday December 9th at 1 1 . 00 am. 
Flowers and enquiries please to J H 
Kenyon. 12 ChiUern Street. London 
WI, 01-935 3728. 

RAOESTOCK - On December 4 th 
1986. al Ihe National Heart Hospital 
London. Helen aged 61. much loved 
mother of Peter and Philip, mother- 
in-law of Carol and Debbie, niece of 
Yetla. greatly missed by family and 
friends. In Heu of flowers, donations 
lo. The National Heart HospUaL or 
The British Heart Foundation. 
ROWLANDS - On December 3rd I9B6. 
al Nash Gardens. Dawftsh. Bryan 
Cleveland. F.R.O&. aged 69 yearn, 
dearly loved husband of Joan and 
lather of Angela and Peter, formerly 
of 93 Lincoln RtL Peterborough. Pri- 
vate funeral with family flowers 
only. A memorial service wilt be held 
at Peterborough Cathe dral, on Janu- 
ary 3rd 19B7. at 2pm. Donations If 
desired to The Peterborough Cathe- 
dral F abric Fund. 

STRUTMSJtS - On December 2nd 
1986. Soume. peacefully after a long 
iDness. She is missed by her firtends. 
and John and Samantha: the ftmeral 
will be held in Italy. 

SYDER - On November 29Ui. tragical- 
ly as the result of an accident. Derek 
George and Jean Syflw of 242 
Bloomfield Road. Bath, much loved 
father and mother of Jacqueline and 
Nigel and vandfathcr and grand- 
mother to Alexander. Funeral 
service al St. PhUUro and SI. James 
Odd Down. Bain on Tuesday Decem- 
ber 9th ai 1.30pm fottowed by 
cremation. Family Bowers only but 
donations. If desired, to the R-N.L-I. 
may be sent to AJHL Cheater. Funeral 
Directors. Hornsey. Hants. 
TAVERNER - On December 3rd 1986. 
tragically in Dorrtdge. SoUhun. Ann 
Lesley. Loving mother to Simon. 
Paul. David and Andrew, beloved 
wife of John, cherished only daugh- 
ter of Earnest and Maiorte Sherwln 
of Longton. Siokr on Trent. Funeral 
at Si Phillips church. Dorrtdge 2pm 
Tuesday 9Ui December 1906. fol- 
lowed by cremation. Family Bowers 
only please. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


SniPHJN - A Service of ThanJcsgKIng 
for the Ufe of Bngadker R-ELSUmpkin 
■late RTRi will be heid at XI o'clock 
on Thursday January I6U1 1987. ai 
St Peter upon -Com hill. ECS. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


PEARMAINE - Derek died on 7Ui De- 
cember i98S.“LoveB last act is 
remembrance''. Pal and Kath. 

WARMER - Esmond Pelham, in loving 
memory of ' Plum', much loved and 
sorely missed by ht& family and 
many friends. 


Second Sunday 
in Advent 


111 /iUTVUl 


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HOLY TRINITY. BTomi" . 


JOHN'S WOOD LK>C: II Rev 
wySLEv'-S CHAPEL. CiW R* HR 

SdSwccwww 


_______ 1 

V . . 

*» - 1 

U» V.A^£> l 

19 

] 

PERSONAL COLUMNS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS | 1 

SERVICES 1 

| WANTED 

3 i | TOSSALE 

j ) RENTALS 

"1|| LEGAL NOTICES ]| 


WHERE THERE'S A WiLL_ 

Gate tor Ihe rtdrrty m become an 
uraem national progiera, 
BRLNOONCAMT5 pnlMHniiy of To- 
tal Care ■ praruaea in every home 
acmurro ay tk* FmiMMton. nest 
»NTS are aerure in UM> knowladse 
that they win never nave to move 
apaui away from trie 


HBTDundlnos. DRENDONCARE tt a 
very ifww rare. Legacin are mwh 
— r tmm n u ei u. 


, Appeal* Denmimaii. 

BRENDOW ARE foundation. 

Park Raid. 

Winchester. 

Hampshire 5023 7 BE 
R<t- Charily No. UbSOB 


HEALTH UNLIMITED 

PeihBM you heara Sou* Wrtoby and 
Tina W Orman on Woman* Hour Wa 
Week, tauuno ogu lh«r medical 
work in Afghan Man We am a mum 

vtdunmrv riuvruy aenanama on vow 
Oeneroaliy to caaunue UK* work. 
Weave help us ream (he twaote outer, 
ronnol by MmaiDB B aonouon. Or rma 
out mare from or Susan WafWiy. 
Health Uni bo Bed. S Stomfonl 6 l. 

lonlaa S£| 

TH 01- 928 4800. 


ANY problem over Xmas? Man tOktonl. 
Ph D. n County CounclHoo madabir 
90 ■ 26 Dec lo help anywie. any family 
or any Mgantmuon to iwad over in* 
Xmaa oertoa J «p box BJ7 


VUMB e o li la rrouUM for ounuc achoei 
m Souui Can C natano . Aroiy as soon as 
nnsaiwe Oh I no brief oefolls MM a lata 
Minor number to BOX J33. No Mm 


PLEASE HELP! ootn Awnnwy As- 
PTM currautoto voum Cewrr. Cbayen 
Bd. SW16. £26.000 necUad. Chairman 
John Corn rid. 

aana mum IAWAMD mv Dear Sarah. 
iFioay Wowyi. laintakty love you 
Wiu you marry ar) All my mi. 
Annul 

NON NKUamtlt PlINERALS Book £2 
from I nr BrIIMi HumanM Asa. 1 Rrg 
Ouiuy) 13 Pnncr Of Wales Terr. WB 

PfUUn-OM 2 seals. 23 CMC. nutianoe 
wanteO fat fouowing ween. Tel Ol MO 
«6.W 

THANKS 10 Ihe HMV BpirR lor lev out re- 
ceived In fdllh CD 


ANCESTRY 

Cohlact 

the tram with the best 
experience Workt wrtde 


ACHIEVEMENTS 
DEPT T, 
NORTHGATE 
CANTERBURY 
CTI I BA 
TEL: 0227 462618 

HERALDRY 


FHtEMMMP. Leva or Marriage AD a#M. 
arena DaMHir. Dept (010123 Abmgoon 
Rood. London wa TcL 01 938 1011- 
MAimtABE A ADVICE Bureau Ktohwuw 
Allen m For cron OilKri ocrwoai auer- 
view*. 7 SnWV PI- WI. 01 499 2830 
WHEN Bf CONOON (ml a vldea/TV ay 
day. waefc. main. Tops TV 01-730 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Cancer 


beat it. 


Tofcdacr wm 

We find over one third of ill 
i wi t h into the pfcvoaioo nd. 
cure of c ancer in ibe UK. 

Hdp tv by Kodiac 4 danstiaa 
or puke 4 kpq to: 

Can cer t 
Research 
Campaign 


2 Carina* Home Terrace, 
HOCPT n/a /12 ’•London SW1Y SAR. - 



Hooligan or 
Stereotype? 


Football violence, old ladies being miuged. cars written off, 
homes ransacked - is this your view of crimes committed by 
teenagers today? 

But most crime is more mundane: around 90% of teenage 
crime is non-violent and 50% is petty theft. 

For most young 'criminals' committal to courts and prison is 
no answer. Up to 85% re-offend: they become trapped in a 
criminal career. 

Since 1976 Rainer has pioneered vital last chance* alternatives 
to Care and prison for nearly Vj million teenagers. Rainers' 
small-scale community-based projects focus on specific 
individual needs helping to build self-esteem and 
responsibility. They successfully divert young people from 
crime. 


But we need your committed support. Please send your 
donation, or for more information to Chris Naylor, RAINER 
FOUNDATION. 232 Tooley Street, London SEI 2JX 
(01 -403 4434). And help the teenager behind the stereotype. 


WI BUT BOOKS Aaftouortan MM moo 
«n nru Mtoonv Ltanmn and mail 
foam tom wrtltori. Ant prk*» w«i 
in caW win comet om-wnm Write 10 
Mr Romm Bjbjp. Fajm. 119 Charing 
Crow Rood. wC2 

CAMMHDM graduate r u rim lg« nn 
'Lanfooi *> aiuao a uteaUr to toe m 

Shri writ Mtiad. Pmniri to imacr 
Mte toUnMa « «« OOrr» u|> 

to CM pw Ptetoe T«l. 01 831 6763 
CC WANTED Lwgr vie wararatx*. 
rtufn. rxtmdtof tobln. 

(tesla Daohewn. twreow A oD Mtntoig* 
rtf 01 946 7683 (toy Ol 7B90471yvcm. 
JCWEUUOnr. COM. shut, mwaw ur 
Molly m anted. Top pnen. WUUam. os 
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tWaien 01-992 7985 


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405 0453. 

HfUfCH Female Mink Fur Jorkrl Extra 
teagm (29 mcfiesl sue 12-14. £1200 
Tel. 01 580 -1683 (dayumej or 01 668 

4319 i evening*. 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. PttaMom. 
Cad SUrlMhl Cup. Chess. Lev Mil All 
Uteatre ana sports Tel 821-6610/828- 
Q49S.A.EU / visa / Diners. 

BLUTMMER puno. UpflgM RecomU- 
trnnrd £996 HIP. TeL 0604 583461 
cam we rphone d non 

CATS. CHESS, Ln MriAiul Phantom AT 
theatre and snort. Tel 439 1 763. All mo- 
nr crabt cos 

CULTURED PEARLS, necklace* A ear- 
rings. 9004 quality, reasonable p r ic es, 
ring Omul Ol B06 6069 after 6 30pm- 

GOLDCM RETKEVat Puppies 
tor sole. EureOenl pedigree. Tel 
01-435 0561 


PIANO, ‘Barnes' Mohopany upright, con- 
cert puch. Can arrange detterni. £346. 
Mint Condttkto. Ol 463 0148. 

SANTA'S SALE AT TOPS. Cot T Vs rrmn 
£49. Videos from £99. 91 Lower Souk 
S treet. SWI. 7300933. 

SPINET Good condition but needs tuning. 
lUnen forces sale . £1200 ono. TM: 0734 
733206 (mornings ratyi 


PIANO G ft t teen Grand. RKhard Lipp 
191? Rosewood Coos condition. 
Ll TOC Phone CC2J5 6B317 aflef 7ptn 


MAC pair anaque Caucsaun runner rar- 
PHs dim Fine p p i toHton. Offers over 
ULJOO Piiiate safe Tel Ol 73eBdoe 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLES 


WANTED Edworcton. Victorian and an 
Pbuurq lununirr MT AsMen Ol 947 
5946. 667*69 GarrjrtT LteML EarWteM. 
Start? 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP Free credU over 

I year IO* APfti low uuereal Over ! yrs 
A 3 in. wnueo oucuo notis . Free Cala- 
towc- 30a Hicngaie Ra. NWS. OI-26T 
7a.vi. 


FLATSRARE 


CKHWtCK Luiunma mansion flat All 
(Ocilttm. Came 10 uto) Tube O/R 
Pro! M/F. ry/s £5S to e«J TeL Ol 
994 6123 -rves/wmeau. 


FULHAM: Seat BislMps PK Large double 
room, sail l.*I snore wub 2 prate BOi 
AD mod rail CWr tune. £90 pw met. 
Tel 0:-71l 44S0 w/ends or evrs 


CLAPTON Cr minor. £5. O/R. N/S- Share 
nouse. £160 pm from 2/1/B7 Easy ae 
Cess to (A TeL 01 806 265S. 


NW2 Ctrl, (su room m luxury Oat. Tv. 
CM. video Communal gardens. £46 pw 
Tel Ol 451 5841 


SOUTH CROYDON OutH Prof N/S 
M/F to liter CjH house 2 mins BR. 
O/R. £40p.H rxr TEL 01 646 3297 


SWG: Bedroom in terraced house N/i 
Near lube. FBtoam Broadway and bus- 
es Price negcnatrfe Tel 731 3558. 

WI Roan to let sharing in large house 
£6Ctn>. Tel c: CC? ns? iLu-i Ol 727 
1007 .eve* 4 weekends,. 

S.W4 Ptoi M. Share ousel flat. O/R. 
£165 pan 01 671 4877 loft 8 Pin) 


swmieia EXECUTIVE Seeks lux 
flat /house: UP to LSOOpw. LHuad fees 
r*a ptuatDS Kay & Lewis. South of me 
Part ChrMra office. 01-352 Bill or 
North of Ibe Park- Regent's Park office. 
Ol 586 9882. 

CHELSEA tuughtebridgr. Beioravto. Pim- 
bcn. Wesunmsier. Luxury houses and 
flats available for long or short lets. 
Please Din for current Ua. Codes, 69 
Burtondiain palace Rd. SWI. 01-828 
8251 

KUNCTON HI 3 nuns Angel Tube. Luxu- 
ry spoewuo 2 bedroom IB Boar flat. 
Large reerp. bathroom. GCH. FUBy fil- 
led kitchen, private encrance. £198 pw. 
Tel: 0484 640770. 

LANDLORDS /OWNEBS if you have a 
qualify property lo let ten us about K. 
We after a p rofess i onal & rettelde 
service. Quraisht ConMunttoc Ol 244 
73S3 

BRUNSWICK GDMS W8 Newly tfeoerded 
2 nd floor flat, double bedroom, large liv- 
ing room & kitchen Fully fined. £150 
pw me CH. Tel. 07S3 882252. 

MENStMGTDH WS RecpL bedroom, dress- 
ing room. K 4: B. CH. TUrhO shower He. 
C16S pw TeL Ol 3730763/0722 
72639/01 -937-3954 


NWS - imanarulatr house, three double 
beds, two rrcrjM - one 30 ft Kiimen 6 
bath. CH. onuaur i urnuure pun onguul 
features Large garden CJ me aU omenl 
lies and lube Company or embassy let 
£190 pw TCI 01-624 6744 |5-B> 


WEST KJBKSUttTON WI4. Castletown 
Pd. Fully furnished 7 Bedfoomed flat, 
tge rectWKWi & entrance tooay. Ail mod 
rum Aiftoanie for immediate Co tel 
only- £S80 pan. M Breeze 936 1826 
<dayk 0836 226512 imra i 


HUBWCLL NBJ..-MOMCATE Large luini- 
n (aimly house. 4 Obi bed. 3 ige rereps. 
FGCH. Ideal lor cOmTOUttlig to nry 
£228 pw 6 nuMinu let only Tel 0734 
864253 eves 


CHELSEA superb brand new furn is hed 
flat. 2 double bedroom*. Recfpbon, 
K/B. CH. Ail mod cons 8 nuns tube. 
Company or notauy let £200 pw eul. 
Tel Ol 736 8048 PT Ol 72» 9248 


HT Ml The number 
when seeking ben renul properties in 
central and prune Lmmub 

£I50/E2.000pw. 


HAMPSTEAD NWS Lux flat. 26fl rrc. able 
bed. CH. TV . Hr wnfly MiG W/ROCh- 
Co let pref £125 pw 01624 4617 


MONTAGUE SQUARE WI Superb elegant 
flat. 1 dbte * 1 single bed. £240 pw OL- 
468 1081 


MKH PAM W2 I dbt bed lux dec. £100 
pw. Tel. 01 722 3661 or 748 4568. 
KENSINGTON I bed lu« d*c £63 pw. TeL- 
Ol 722 3661 or 748 466S. 


DOMESTIC .AND 
CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


RESIDENTIAL Cook / Housekeeper nr- 
uiuicd lor rrarrd gentleman Using to 
ihe country near Shrewsbury Separate 
apartment aioilabte Cor is supplied 
Safari negotiator References read. Td 

0952 M9229 


NEW BABY f Malure- decucamf 46vr DM 
'■'ears of rvpenence Inlereriing pan 
Please L> Rrl TeLMeryl 0472 B 13020 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JLSmCE 
No 00833 Of I486 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
DEJTH LOSLRE PLC 
AND 

■N THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN liUU a Peu- 
Itoh was on the 19th November 1986 
presented la Her Mann y's High Court of 
Justice for ihe conumaUan of the reduc 
bon of the rapftol of the above named 
Company from £5.500000 io cioo.ooo. 
AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN lhal 
the saM PettOon h dlrrcud to be heard 
before the Honourable Mr Jusoce Mervyn 
Darns ai the Royal Courts of Justice. 
Strand. London WC2A 2LL on Monday 
15th day of December 1986. 

ANY Creditor or Shareholder of the Com- 
pany desiring lo oppose Ihe making of an 
Order for the confirmation of the said re- 
duction of capital should appear al Ihe 
Ume of hearing in penon or by Counsel 
tor uiai purpose 

A copy of ihe tow Peuttan wa be fie- 
awed io any such person reaumng ihe 
same by the under-men uoned solicitors on 
payment of Ihe regulated charge lor Ihe 
wme. 

DATED WM 4th day of D e cember 1986 
Nabarro Nathaonon 
76 Jermyn Sheet 
London SWIY 6NR 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE 
No 008500 nf 1980 
CHANCER' DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF 
Fit GROLP PLC 
ANP 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ihof a PHi- 
port was on llte 27in November 1986 
presented to Her MaieMV* High Court of 
Jusure lor use confirmation of the 
reduction of ihe Share Premium Account 
of Use above-named Company from 
£18.357.970 10 £3.357.970. 


AND NOTICE IS FLRTMER GIVEN lhal 
me said Pennon a directed lo be Heard 
before Use Honouraow Mr Jinnee Mens n 
Davies al Ihe Raval Churls of Jusocv. 
Strand. London WC3A SLL on Monday 

I5fh nay of December 1986. 

ANY Creditor or SharetioUtef of Ihe Com- 
pany desiring to oppose use nuking of on 
Order lor ine confirmation of Lite said re- 
duction Of Shore Premium Account 

should appear ol me time ot hearing in 
person or by Counsel lor lhal puroosc. 
A raw of ihe said Petition will be fur 
■ushed to anv such person requiring the 
same tn the muter -mentioned solicitors on 
payment of the regulated charge lor Ihe 


DATED Ults ST-on day of December 1966 
Herbert Smith of 
Walimg House 
33 Cannon Street 
Luncton EC4M 6SO 
Solicitors for ute sard CumDjiir 


TRUSTEE ACTS 


NOTICE h hereby gisen puruianl ID »27 
of the TRLSTEE Acl. 1925 llut any per- 
son having a CLAIM aoarnsi or an 
INTEREST Hi Ihe ESTATE Ol any of Ihe 
deceased person's whose names, aonresn- 
e« and desmpuom arc set oul M#» n 
nerroy remnred to send pamcuian. in 
writing of his claim or interest to me per- 
son or persons mentioned in relation to Ihe 
dreeasrd penon concerned before the dale 
soectfted. after wlsrn dale me esiote of ihr 
dn- rased WIU be (UsttIDulM by me person- 
al representatives, among fhr Perurn 
ettliucd thereto having regard onb 10 the 
claims and interests of which they have 
hod nonce 


HAYWARD CHARLES THOMAS Ol 
Carvers Cartage. 733 Staines Road. 
Bcdfond. Fduum. viiddv died on I Mn 
June ;-a86 Patiruluv to Darlington and 
Parkimon Stoinrort of 259 Horn Lane. 
Ac ion. London w 3 9EH. Solicitors for and 
an be naif of ihe Executor before C4h 

Febnurv 1937. 


MA1R Norah Joan toUwrwise known as 
Norah Joan Suiloni of 5 Mallory Gardens. 
1005 Toronto. On I arm. Canada and 3 
Buckingham Chambers. Gr-ennuil pure. 
London SWI died on 17ih September 
1986 Particulars io Crorge Carver A Co. 
Soiitllor* of 1 1 Breams Buildings. London 
EC4A 1HB before 9th February 1987 


DIAZ LUv Edith Phyllis of 14 Dorothy 
OiarruKHon House. 65a Uplands Road. 
London 5E22 died On ZOth June 1986. 
Particulars lo Hepburns Solicitors of 
Blenheim House. Blenheim Grove. 
Pen. ham. London SE1S 4QX before 9Ut 
February 1987 


DORIS IRENE GILMORE Of 28 Harrow 
Lodge. SI Johns Wood. London NWS dted 
on I9ih September 1986 Partmilan lo 
Rochmon. Landau A Co. Senators of 60 
Croal Marlborough Street. London W1V 
2PB before 1st March 1986 


CARRON Samuel of 97 Cadogan Gardens. 
London. E.1B died on 29th May. 1986. 
Particulars lo Ciangewoods. Salicllomiof 
l Hirin' Street. London, wia 4 DC be- 
fore 9th February. 1987. 


CoBtimed from page 10 
^THEATljES^J 


IS 01 5796107. isi ran 

24/hr 7 day 2407200. Op Sale* 
930 6123. Eve* 7.30. Sal 8 A 8 
Turc mat ai Sum 

JUD1 MICHAEL 
DENCH WILLIAMS 

"Class of their own- Std 

MR and MRS NOBODY 

by Kellh Waterhouse 


Dtreetcd by Ned fflwnn 

■■toady to ranch Mto 


“IN tad _ „ ... 

■Vast Bud Mda pare” TUnre 

"tvonaoDY nun me tuh 
NOBODY" D.MaU 
No pert Ovrfumas Eve 


uDED iwi ci i nunK oi-ws 

7756. Firsl Coll cc 24hn 240 

7200 Ibka feci. Eves 7.46. mot 

Sal 2.30. UNDER BULK WOOD 

by Dylan Thomas 


Doily Tefegraph. From Dec II 

MCHT 8BMT FALL by Cmlyn 
WlUlama 


DURIItAO 722 9301. Evea 8. 
Sat Mol 4.30. (CLUNK TMC 
WIU . A Maw Catoad y by 
Mto’ B Ni . “Glorious IHgh- 
forre perforrnaners from 
Dlnadote Landen and David 
ThreUoU" Times. “Very 
fumy’' DExp. 


NAVMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Box onire & CC 01 9309832. IB 

Call 24hr/7 day « bkgs 240 7200 

Eve* 7.30 WedC Sal ma»2JM3pnv 


rniomtnalea Actor of UIC Year 
Laurence Otlhter Avankl IB 

BREAKING the CODE 

oy . 



ENJOYABLE" D.CXP 
No Peris ChraUnu Eve 


KR NUUESTV8. Haymartet. 01- 
839 2244 irrumnaswr cc 379 
0131 First Can CC 240 7200 

juttmw lloyd 


THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

WINNER K*T MUSICAL IBM 
CVENMK STANDARD AWARD 

starring 


Sieve 

rntgltlman Barton 

Clalie Moore ptoyx CnrtsUne 
at certain prrlormanrea 
Directed by HAROLD PRINCE 
Evrt 7 46 Man Wed A Sat 3 
Postal Dkgs only for Apt to Oct 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 
741 9999 [no bkg lee). First CNI 
24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. (HO 
HUB FEE! CTO Sales 930 6123. 
mu-tmauer 379 6433 
OVER 200 PCR» al 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
A DENIS QUILLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 


APPROVAL" S Tet 
Mon-Fri 7.30. MKria Wed 2JM 
Gal 230 A 8.00 
Slant ronmnon avail, at door 
Mon-m 6 Sat mau 
SEATS AVAILABLE FROM Ct JW 
Ntov boaMag ta Apr* 2S. UR7 


01-741 

CHINE by Cocteau, with 

Massla SaatHi FTom 13 Der 
AUCC M WOHDERLAia 
adaoted w Mm Wads, wllh 
mirilr by EM D*k- 

STUtHO Now pretH-wing Bpcn 
I Opel e. tup 7pmi Sub Evas Bpcn 

THE HJOCS SUNRMDu 


LYRIC TMEATRC ShafUButv 
Atf WI 01-437 3686/7 Of -434 
1650. 01434 1050. 01-734 

5166/7 

COUN BLAKELY 
-A brilliant A iayousiy 
ratine peflarmanee" F. Times 


in 


ThP Nauanal Theatre's acclaimed 
prgd urban of 

ALAN ATCKtOUmrS 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-1 I rartbreghingly funny" Odn 
"Hiianous 6. Times 
“A rare evening of 
romkr mbilgrpueo 1 * Timet 
Lvov 7 30 Mats WM and SN 3.0. 
Croup Sate* 01 930 6125. 

Reduced pnre mats StudnU ft 
OAf* Stand by 

rtRCT CALL 24HR 7 D AY 
CC BOOKRK2 OH Ol 240 7200 
(NO BOOKING FEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
APRIL *87 


LYTTELTON -S' 998 2362 CC 
iNaiMMi* Theater's proscenium 
Kauri Today 2,13 now pnre 
mol) ft 7 46 THE MACWIKATE 
by Pinero Man. Wed- Tnur 
7 4ft, T ur 2 id ilow once mall 
A 7 45 TONS OF MONEY. Toni 
I lam Lyttelton Buflrtl Mira 
Xtig hap. Une Nigm Cabaret 
aU Ikb C4.00. 


MAYPANT Of b29 3037 
From Der 15 in Jon J 
Twwr daily 2 O A 4 O 
Wed* ft Sat* 10 30. 2.0 ft 4.0 

SOOTY’S XMAS SHOW 


MAYFAIR S OC 629 3036. Man. 
Thu 8 Fri/Sal 640 ft 8.10 

RICHARD TODD » 

“Ifca BaM TtaHRor tm yaaed- S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An vaubaahed winnert* S Exp 
"S ensaBonoE* Times 

. YEAR 


MFBMAR1 THEATRE 01 236 

5668 1* Call 240 7200 379 6433 
741 9999 OP Store MO 6123 
Kenneth CraitanWs wonderful 

THE WIND IN THE 
WILLOWS 

Open* December 16 tor 4 week* 

only. Twice dany at 2.0 ft 6J> 


NATIONAL THEATRE SO) Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPA NY 

See SEPARATE ENTRIES under 
OUVKR/LYrreLTON/ 
COTTESLOE. ExcMtenl cheap 
seats days nf Ptrfii aU thetorei 

from 10 am. RESTAURANT (928 

2053L EASY CAR PARK. Info 

633 0880. AM COND 


HEW LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
406 0072 CC 379 6433 Eves 7,46 
Tue ft Sal 3.00 ft 7.46. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
/TJE. EUOT MIMICAL 

CATS 

APPLY ***** " TO BOX OFFICE 


Group Bookings 01-406 156? or 
3 6123. NOW f 


01-930 6123. NOW ROOKRIC TO 
MAY 30 1*87. Seats avail for ad- 
dttiouai holiday pern on Dec 22 ft 
jan 2 oi 3m 


OLD VK 928 7616 CC 261 1821 
Eves 7.30. Wed Mall 2J0. Sals 
4 OO ft 7 45 

MARIA NIMH 


FAITH BROOK 


OEOROMA HALE 
_ PATTI LOVE _ 
■ DIANA QUICK ■ 

MM WAMNNM 


THE WOMEN 


by Oarr Boothe Luce 

"rSSr 


■winy, wicked women's 
world- &£xp. “STYLISH, STAR- 
STUDDED PRODUCTION" D 

MUT OT 

ONLY 6 MORE WEEKS TO SEE 
THU FAME DUS CAST 


OLIVIER -S' 928 2252 CC INa- 
luwwu Theatre** open staoei 
Previews KRW LEAR TooX. 
mo mum available Ton'l ■ stan- 
dard Theatre CluhL Tue fnoi 
AWMAL FARM oa printed in 
leafleti ft Wed ab al 7.00 
prompt. Opens Thur at 6.46. 
Then Frt 7.00 prompt ft Dec 13 
iMon theatre dork - mu 
ANIMAL PAWN am nr toted la 
k-ofMI 


PALACE THEATRE 434 0909 CC 
379 6433 Firsl 08 24 Hr TDay CC 
240 7200 Grp Sales 930 6123 
THE M US I C AL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONE!" std 

Evn 7 30 Mats Thu ft Sol 2.30 

NB Extra ChriNmas atala 22 * 24 


Latecomer* not bammed 
until I hr interval 

BEAT THE TOOTS BY EHQUM- 
1 AT THE BOX 


PHO E NIX 836 2294 cc 240 9661 

DIANA RIGG 

■'A COMMANDING PRESENCE:.. 
WRYLY WITTY" F.T. 


in 


WILDFIRE 

a new Nay 
Directed by 


— FASCRtATHeO— PULL OF 


DM** 

1« Ca8 240 7300 1 no bkg frot Or» 
Sate4 9306123/7*1 9999 1 no bkg 
Irn Mon-Thu 8 Fri/Sal 4 ft 8.15 


PICCADILLY 457 4606 CC 379 
6565/ 379 6433/ =40 7200. 
Croup Sates 9306123/ 836 3962 
Evea 8pm. Wed mats 3. Sots 4.30 
ft 8-15 

FRANKS HOWEJtO 

“A Mailer Clown- Timet 
PATRICK CAROM. 
RONME STEVENS 
FRED EVANS 


In 


“816011 hirer w«h Stephen 
SbndliMm'l tONd" D.Mall 

A FUNNY THING 
HAPPENED 

ON THE WAV TO THE FORUM 

Dee 24 3pm only Dec 26 Bom No 
pert 25 Dec 


ntmCE EDWARD Box Office 
754 84fii Firfl CHI 94 Hr 7 Days 
rr Booking 836 3464 Or* Soles 
930 6123. Mlai'IM 7-30 Mato 


CHESS 


BEST MUSICAL OF THE YEAR 
Sod Annas - Elatoa Paisa 
« Tamarar WtoBre y 
: QUOTED AWARDS 


Now baaklog to Mwck 2E. 1087 

MAT SEATS SOMETIMES 
AVAILABLE ON DAY 


PMNCE OF WALES WI 930 0681 

f2 rr Houme 930 0844/ 5/6 Grp 

Sates 930 6123. Kellh Provraa 

741 9999. TMteUnreter 3796433 

1st Call 24hr/7day 240 7200 (NO 


•ALLO’ALLO 

with the TV SHOW STARS 
Evrs B. Frt ft SM 6.30 A 8.40 
EXTRA PEHFS 30 ft 31 Dec M 
2.30 


QUEER'S 01-734 1166/7/ 
0861/0120 24AT CC 340 7200/ 
379 6433. Cr* Sales 930 6123. 

“THE BEST MUSICAL M 
LONDON” Gdn 

-A WONDERFUL STAR" MaU 

MAUREEN UPMAN m 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 

“II rtpgtot wnh cxmemetH" 

S Time* “Jusl wontterfuT* D.Exp 
Moo-Sal 8 Man Wed 2.30 SM 5 


ROYAL COURT S OC 730 1748/ 
1867 rr 24hr 7 day 240 7200 
cbkg feel Eve* Spot. Sat Man 
4pm total Stock present A 
MOUTHFUL OF BHWS by 
Caryl OvurchlU ft David Lan. 


ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS 730 
2664 Eves 730. SM MAH 330 

■TRIH M T E by Sarafc D anls to . 


ROYALTY 01-831 0660 24hr cc 
240 7200 379 6433 741 9999 
Group Bates 930 6123 


AND THE AMAZHM 


From J ft Der rwicp daily m 230 ft 
730 BOOK NOW 


SAVOY T1KATRE Ol 836 8888. 
CC 379 6219. 836 0479. FUto Can 
24 hr 7 day (no bkg feel 240 7200. 
Keith Prow 741 9999 (no bkg 
lee) Eve* Mon-Fri Bum. SM 6 ft 
8.30. Wed Mata 3wO 
PATRICK MA CN S F 

DAVn 


in 


A Mystery Thriller for 
an the Family 

KILLING JESSICA 

Directed nv BRYAN FOMSS 


prim * tagnn a tei ” O MaU. “to the 


COMEDY Ol 379 5399 CCOt S79 
6433/ 741 9999 . nr*l Call 24 hr 
240 7200 long feci. Grp Sates 930 
6123 

Mon-FVI 8 Wed 3 SMB 16 ft 8 30 


THE THEATRE OF COMEDY 
GO'S 

lavish new production 


AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT 

adopted By SIMON MOORE 
From Latoche 
with CLIVE DUNN 
and STRATFORD JOHNS 
Directed By ANTON RODGERS 
Per* tew* 10 dec 13. Open* Dec 16 
at T OO 


ST MARTOTS 01-836 1443 Sue 
rial CC No. 379 6433. Evgs 8 O 
Tun 246. SM 60 and 80 


THE MOUSETRAP 


STRAND 836 2660 OC 836 
4143/6190. 741 9999. First Can 
24 Hr 7 Day cc 240 7200 Orp 
Bales 930 6123 

CABARET 


* 4 , matt ehytta 


; la the Won End" su 

Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed ft Choreographed by 


Mnn-Fri 7.45 Mai Wed 3.00 
Sal 4.30 ft 6.13 

OAR REDUCED PRICES MATS. 
BOOKMG NOW UP TO APRB. W 


UPON AVON 

107891 295623 ROYAL 

SHAKESPEARE COMPANY ai 
9ST Wtatar'a Tola Today 
1 30. Wed 7.30. Mach H i To 
mghi. Man. Tue 7.30. ton 
Theatre, Kinawn Today 1.30. 
Wed 7 30 . Fate Maid Tonight. 
Mon. Tue 7 30. Imy Man wed 
1 SO. 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

"The vrry bra nf Britain's 
romir talent - Dal tv Mail 
Bee separate enmea voider. 


SHAFTESBURY THEATRE 


VICTORIA PALACE 81-8241317 

Evn 7.30 Mato Wed ft Sat 2.46 
EXTRA XMAS MATINEES 
December OOJ9JO Jan 1 ft 2 
24hr 7 day re bkgs I no extra 
rtiorgrl on FIRST CALL 240 7200 
"A NIGHT OF SHEER SONG ft 
DANCE MAGKT Whly Ncwi 

CHARLIE GIRL 
ONLY 6 WEEKS LEFT TO 
SEE THIS FABULOUS 
CAST. LAST PERF JAN 10 

PAUL NICHOLAS 
CVD CNARISSC 
DORA BUT AN 


MARK WYHTER ta 

CHARLIE GIRL 

BROUP SALES 8t WM 812* 
BK PARTY DISCOUNTS 

Aha book, Tk kef master 379 6433 
or any w H Smith Travel Branch 


VAUDEVILLE Box Office ft CC. 
836 9987/5645 FUN GUI CC. 24 
hn 240 7200 I bkg feel 
Tiekrimasier 379 6433 ibitg fee). 
Evga 8.0. Mato Wed 23a Sat SJL 
8 JO No prrfS Der 24. 26. Dec 26 
at 6 ft 8. Dec 27 ol 6 ft B.SD 


BEET ACTRESS OF THE YEAR 
Standard Drama Award 
MARTIN JARVIS 
PETER BLYTHE 
JOSCPMME TEWBON ta 


WOMAN IN MIND 

“T1RS MUST BE THE HMMIT 
PLAY M LONDON. IT B ALSO 
TOE MOST O M T URSRtO " STef 
-ALAN AYCKBOURN S WRTT- 
M8 AT NH BEST" S-TImre 


nCTDRU PALACE OI 240 7200 
BOOKING NOW 24 n r 7 day 

TREVOR STEPHEN 

EVE REA 

NATASHA mCHARDSOH 
ANGELA RICHARDS 

HIGH SOCIETY 

CHrecl en by Rlenaro Eyre 
Prev* Feb 12 in Nfgni Feb 26 
Mon-Fn 7.45 Wed MU 3 SM 4.45 
ft 8.15. Op Salto 930 6123 


! 834 0283/4 
cc 834 0048. re TIckelmaMer 379 

6455 Today 5.00 ft 6-30. Mon. 

Fri 2.00 ft 6-30. Tue. Wed. Thur 

lO.SOani ft 2.00 


THE UOK. THE WITCH A 
THE WARDROBE 

by CS. Lewis 


WHITEHALL SWI Ol 930 7766/ 
839 4465 CC Ol 379 6566/379 
6433. 741 9999. Grp mate* 930 
6125/836 3962 


WALTERS 


tom GORDON 


AST GALLERIES 


LEPEVRE OALLERT. SO Bruton 

SI. WI Ol -493 210 7. M W OR 

TART EM A NB XX C ENTURY 

FRENCH AND BRITISH PAMT- 

Rfeos AND ORAwmes. as 

HavaMbar • IS Datataba r . Man 

■ Fri IPS. Sato 10-12.30. 


MAU- GALLERIES Tel 01 930 
6844 ABMENIBM COLOURS 
BB/LONDON. Soviet Armenian 
Painting* Exhibition. Ftret 
Showing to the U K 6-14 Dee 
1986 dairy IDS Adm £l/SOP 


NATIONAL PORTRAIT 
GALLERY, SI Marlin'* Place. 
London WC2. TH Ol 930 1 662. 
EUZ4SEVH fl . Portrait* of eO 
year* Adm. £2. Fanuly uckel 
LS. Mon-Fri 106. Sal 106. 
Sun 86 


PRBfTB FOR CHRISTMAS. Origi- 
nal limited edition print* from 
£60 Graphic wart* by Modern 
Maden A Brorw ScuWicr b» 


iChrtalle* Contemporary 

ATI) 8. Dover SI. WI. 17 

Prlnre* Arcade SWI. 499 6701. 


ROYAL ACADEMY, PICCADILLY 

Ol 734 9062 

Open dally 106 Inc. Sup. (re- 
el urea rate Son, until I JW 


C2.SO. £1.70 Cone. rale. 


SJURLEY DAY LTD.9I8 Jornvvn 
SI BWIX 6ja Tel 01-839 
2804. EARLY SACRED M- 
AOES OP ASIA. 4UI-I6UV 
December Mon-Fri lO-Spm. 


The Award Wincing Comedy 


I USED TO SCREAM ft S NOUT 
by Shannon Macdonald 
Directed by Sutton Stoke* 
Now Previewing lOpom Tue Tpml 
McovFri 8. SM 5 30 ft 8.30 Wed 
mats 3. 


WYNDNA1TS S 836 3028 CC 379 
6566/TlrketmavtCT 379 6433/1*1 
Call 24hr 7 day* 240 7200/T4I 
9999/Crp Sates 930 6123/836 
3962. Eves 7.30. Sal mol* 3 
For a Limited imsoo 
“A putomna u o pa r a igla d ta 
tha Waal End" I n dependent. 

VANESSA REDGRAVE 

TOM WILKINSON m 

Tha Ya 


GHOSTS 

By Henrik Bnen 
Directed bv David Thacker 


BON-T MSS'* CMy Umn* 


YOUNC VK 928 6363 CC 379 
6433. The Y.OTc Ca Hi JULIUS 
CAESAR Em 7.30 mai wed 
2pm 

Carla Radirava'a aenonrve ft 
■nlettageni Brutus .. Frank 


Mark Anthony.- a vigorous 
and exrtUng production** Gdn 

Directed by David Tharker. 


YOUNG VK STUDIO 928 6363 
taaar Onto It to la 
Wedekind** masiertoece 

AWAKEMNB Eves 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY d*OFFAY 9 ft 23 
Den no St. WI €99 4100. 


CHBLPHOOP. Cambrid ge Heath 
BO. £2. SPOUT OF CHRIST. 
RMS. Wkdys 10 - 6. Subl 230 
6. Ooaed Fridays 


BRITISH UBRARY. Ol RitoH 
SI WCl. SDK A SONS FOR 


TURC ROOK TRADITION ft 
RANDOLPH CALDECOTT and 
to tatora a ttanal THE CITY M 
MAPS. MOn-SBI 105. Sun 

2 306 Adm free 


CM PINE ANT 


13 Canos Pure. WI. Tel: Ol 499 
9493 


IO November ■ 

Mon-Sat 10-5 30. Fun M Cat 
Avail. £760 llte PAP. 


COLHACM 14 OH Bond Si. WI. 
491 7408. An ExM Dillon Of 
OLD MASTER PAOfTBfOS. 
Through November and De- 
r ember. Moi Fn 10-5-30: 

Sutv 10-1. 


IS Thack- 
eray Si. W8 937 B66B 
Engravings by EJ8C DLL and 
MCHAM SriUtLEY SMTH. 


rrsCMOi rtNE ART, ao King 
street. Si. James'* SWi. BEN 


and OoTO/EAOHM 
Passage unlil 23 Dec 
Mon Frt 10-6 30. 


BUY MORRISON ANT - 20(h Cen- 
tury Brttisn Pamunoc ft 
WatreTotetB* Extabttioa De 
pirtHui MEN AT WORN. 3-23 
December 91e Jermyn Street. 
SWI 01 930 BOOB 900-5.30 
Mon- Frt. Sals 9.30 i tun 


HAYWARD BALLS RY, Bouto 
Baul- . S£t . ROOM and BOYLE 
FAMILY ftamoiaons Adm 
C3-CG/ Cl. SO. Open Dally IU* 

roroM info : 01 261 0127 


LEFEVRE GALLERY - S O Bnaon 
»,WI 01-493 21071 MV0R- 
TAMT XIX BJ“ £“12? 
FRENCH ft HBTWiraHT- 
Mffi AND MtAWrtH W - 2btn 
NAtHMef 1911* tatn*f r - 
Moil Fri 105. Soto 1 0-12.30. 


TATE GALLERY. MlDbank SWI. 

PABITHM M SCOTLAND ; The 

Golden Age 1707-1843. L'nlll 4 

Jan Adm £2 60. IT 


■Y. 


Urdu 7 Dec THE UPGMTTZ 
OUT. Unlil IO May. Adm free 
Wuun 10 - LEO Bun* 2 - 
BEO. Recorded Info. 01-821 
7128. 


Tharkreay SL WB. 937 6883. 
qggg re DtMANTY 
waterrolours. UnlJI 19 Dec. 


■ near Admiralty Arvtu TeL 

01 930 6844 . ROYAL SOCIETY 


28m November - tarn Decem- 

ber. i rime* 1 grata ROYAL 
■ M nn/TEOF OIL PANHERB. 

5-20 Der ember. Daily IO - 5 

Aatn LI OO ConceMloti* BO o. 


The Notional Muieum of An ft 
D>9fin -S hensuiglon. HEW 


WATERCOLOURS EYE FOR 
INDUSTRY . Royal Deflgnere, 
lor Induriry 1936-1986. Be- 
curded info 01 681 4894. 

Wkdy* IO - 650. Suns. 2.30 - 
6.50. CSosed Fridays. 


WYLMA WAYNE 17 Old Bond St. 
01-629 4611 . 


ZAMANA GALLERY. I Cromwell 
Gardens. SWT. 584 6612. 

ISTANBUL - a Photographic 

Journey thrauob Turkish Ar 
rtiilerture. linlH 18 Jan Tue 
Sal 10-5 30. Sun 12 550 


CINEMAS 


Ts 01 638 8891. 

Trkl* U. Sludeni cone* £2 all 
perfv Ticket* Bookable. RU8- 
HAN WMOHWrti Sen pule 
Today 600 ft 8 OO THE LEG- 
EM* OF THE MIRAM 
FORTRESS i U). Today n OO* 
2 30 KMts caub Ilnvunl Mom- 
bereMpi 5TARCHASCR • THE 

ucim or *mm n»ci 


CAMDEN PLAZA otto Camden 
Town Tltoe 485 2443 MEN 1 151 
Finn at aas 4 30 640 ass 


IMUfA COMMA King* Road 
SW3 351 3742 MEN USl. Film 
at 2-25 4 30 640 8 55. 


CUKZON MAYFAIR Conran 61 
499 3717 Claude Lanzmann*a 
SNOAH IPG) Part l Tue* ft 
Thur* 6 46 Sal* 1 1 30am ft 
5 45 Part 2 Mon. Wed ft Frt 
545 Sunday* Pori 1 al 
11.30am Pan 2ai &45-Tolak- 
ly obtoroing. *ee ihe nun” Sid. 


CURZON WEST ENO Shaftesbury 
Avenue wi 439 4805 Moggie 
Smith. Denholm Clllell. JutU 
Dench In A ROOM WITH A 
VKW (PGk. Film M 1 30 (Mol 
Sum. 3.45. 6.10 A 840 
■■A film a* near lo perfection a* 
!!•* poyjrric la roncrive** 
Ajcxpnder w oncer. Sid. 


LEICESTER SQUARE THEATRE 

930 5262 l£na>/9SO 7616 |24 
hr A cm>/ Visa/ AmEx Boo k' 
UKBl BIG TROUBLE ta LITTLE 
CHINA IPG) in 70mm Dolby 
Sierra Sro Prog* Sun 1 .OO. 
3 36. 6 10 Wkv I O 3 36 6 IO 
8.60 Loir NMhi Show Fri ft Sal 
1 1 ,45pm All prog* booka b le in 

advance 


.. Si Martin's 

Lane WC2 379 3014/ 836 
0691 WOUND MNW06HT I15> 
nim al 1.00 3 30 6 00 8 36 
Dolby sierra LATE SHOW Fri 
ft Sal only al 11.15pm AD- 
VANCE BOOKING Eve Peris. 
ArrrWvm 


MMEMA KHNSMTSBHIDGE 236 
4225 HANNAH AND HER SN- 
TERB .161 Daily 3 0 6 0 7 0 
go MUST END -mUHS 11 
DEC FROM FRI 12 D£C. 
George C Sroll Nigel Davenport 
Frank Finlay Suvamun York In 

A CHRKTMAS CAROL iL'l Dal 
tv. 306 60 A ROOM WITH A 
VIEW iPCi Daily: 7.0 ft 9.16 
Seals bookable In advance for 
7 O a 9.15 


KAYMAKKET 1839 
7697, MONA USA UBI Sep 
proa* Daily 2 15 6 00 8.40 
Late Night Show Fri a Sal 
1 1 45pm. AJI mvU* bookable in 
advance Arrcsa and vna lete- 
nnone booking* w drome. 


1930 61111 Info 930 4260 / 
4259 LARYRRTfH lUi Sep 
progv Doom open Daily 2 16 
5.15 B 15. Late Nlqhl Show Fri 
ft Sal Door* open II 15ptn All 
progs bookable In advance 
Cmui Cara Hoi Line lAreeu/ 
Vrar AmCxi 930 5232/ 839 
1929. 24 hour service C3GD 
seals available Monday all 


1723 

20111 wall Disney Picture* 
Present* BASIL THE GREAT 
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5.15 7.45 Reduced prices lor 
OAP-*. LIB40 holdrr*. Sludeni 
ord ttoldon. Undrr 16 ^. 


opp. Ruwii So. Tube 
657 8402 if i SMOOTH TALK 
i ISiTihn al 2.30 4 36 6 45 9.00 
■21 ROSA LUXEMBURG IPO] 
Film al 3 SO 0.00 8.36 


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f 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


Lakeside 

housing 
plan for 
Cardiff 


By Rodney Cowton 
Transport Correspondent 


A development scheme, 
involving the creation of a 
new lake, on the coast, south 
of Cardiff, was announced 
yesterday by Mr Nicholas 
Edwards, Secretary of State for 
Wales. 

In the short term, the 




Letter from Dhaka 


a*®* 


Re-strains of the 
rickshaw puller 


scheme is expected to provide 
about 600 acres of develop- 


ment land. 

Mr Edwards said the 
scheme would make Cardiff 
one of the most attractive 
cities in Britain and would 
provide “a firm foundation 
for the South Wales economy 
for years ahead.” It had been 
estimated that h would pro- 
vide about 10,000 man-years 
of construction work and 
10,000 permanent jobs. 

It would be financed by a 
mixture of private and public 
funds. The Welsh Office had 
allocated £45 million over the 
next three years, but funds 
would also be available from 
other public sources. The in- 
creased land value which 
would be created had been 
estimated to be up to 
£195 milljon. 

A Cardiff Bay Development 
Corporation is to be set up to 
stimulate and control the 
regeneration of the area, 
which is at present derelict. 
Mr Edwards also said that a 
barrage would be built be- 
tween Penarth Head and the 
Queen Alexandra Dock, creat- 
ing a lake which would extend 
up to the city centre. 

The total area under the 
influence of the development 
corporation will be about 
2.700 acres, of which 700 will, 
be water and 600 are thought 
to be suitable for early 
development 

Mr Edwards said that the 
development might include 
up to 2,500 houses, 

He forecast that the 
development would attract 
features such as speciality 
shopping, sport and restaurant 
complexes, hotels, an arts 
centre and an aquarium. 

He said that about 50 
leading property and financial 
companies had been consulted 
and had shown great enthu- 
siasm for the development 


\ W. 

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: 





At the height of the rioting in Paris, police fired tear gas at the demonstrating students. (Photograph: Chris Harm). 




Paris tones down Commons 
its school Bill ' row over 


Continoed from page 1 
and to demand the abandon- 
ment of the Bill. 

The good-humoured festive 
atmosphere which had pre- 
vailed throughout the pre- 
vious day’s five-mile march 
from the Bastille to the 
Invalides, had quickly degen- 
erated into violence when 
student leaders arrived shortly 
after 8 pm to inform the 
hundreds of thousands of 
demonstrators that they had 
obtained “no satisfaction** 
from their meeting with the 
Education Minister. 

Extremists started throwing 
stones, bottles and ball-bear- 
ings at the massed ranks of 
riot police, who replied with 
tear gas, water cannon, stun 
grenades and baton charges. A 
total of 70 students and 121 
policemen were reported in- 
jured in the ensuing dashes, 
including seven seriously. 

Of the 68 students requiring 


hospital treatment, 12 were 
still in hospital last night 
Among the police, 28 received* 
hospital treatment The most 
serious injury involved a frac- 
tured leg. 

Of the 149 students arrested 
during Thursday night’s dis- 
turbances, 93 were still being 
detained yesterday. 

The father of the student in 
intensive care protested ang- 
rily yesterday: “My son came 
with hundreds of thousands of 
others to protest against this 
bad B3L He is not an ex- 
tremist; that is not his style at 
alL I want to warn parents 
against this barbarity. They 
are firing on our peaceful 
children, who were not armed 
and who do not have the 
experience of those of 1968.” 

Student assemblies were be- 
ing held in universities 
throughout the country to 
decide what action to take. 


row over 
gay slur 


Thatcher says no 
evidence on peer 


Continued from page 1 


number of Conservative MPs 
are homosexual and recently 
Westminster has been buzzing 
with gossip about the sup- 
posed activities of one prom- 
inent MP. 

Without naming him, it is 
understood Mr Straw had this 
particular politician in mind 
when he made his comments. 

But last night his remarks 
led to bitter accusations from 
the Government side. Sir 
Marcus Fox, MP for Shipley 
and a vice chairman of the 
Conservative 1922 committee 
of backbenchers, said Mr 
Straw’s comments were “un- 
foigiveable-” 

Mr Straw said last night that 
Dr Rhodes Boyson, the Min- 
ister for Local Government, , 
had every chance to reply to , 
his comments 


Continued from page 1 
to the defence counsel in the 
M15 court hearing in New 
South Wales, it will pull out of 
the case (Our Political Staff 
writes). 

Senior Government sources 
admitted for the first tnne that 
the whole affair , with the 
Cabinet Secretary, Sir Robert 
Armstrong, facing such rough 
treatment, had been damaging 
both for the Government and 
for Parliament 

But until the appeal proce- 
dures have been completed, 
the Government w31 press on 
with its battle to stop the 
release of further documents 
to the defence counsel Mr 
Malcolm Turnbull, the solic- 
itor acting for the former MI5 
officer, Mr Peter Wright 

There is also growing 
government concern over the 
continued presence with the 
defence team of Mr Paul 


Greengrass, a Granada Tele- 
vision producer who was in- 
volved m the World In Action 
p i Tw r ammp interview with Mr 
Wright in 1984. 

Mr Greengrass has denied 
allegations that he has leaked 
court details given in camera 
to Mr Neil Kinnock, 

But yesterday Government 
sources in London empha- 
sized the point that it could be 
hardly be expected to pass on 
secret documents to the de- 
fence team when it included 
someone who had played a 
part in the television inter- 
view with Mr Wright. 

Next w eek is crucial for the 
Government case, not just 
because of the appeal over the 
documents which win be 
heard at the New South Wales 
Court of Appeal on Thursday, 
but also bemuse on Monday 
Mr Wright will appear in the 
witness box, for the first time. 


William Hickey, the gos- 
sipy diarist who lived m 
Bengal for some 27 years in 
the late eighteenth century, 
recalled that the men who 
carried him about in his 
palanquin used to moan and 
grant as they did so. Upon 
later inquiry he discovered 
that they were not in genuine 
pain, but were singing: “Ho, 
we have a fat one here. What 
a heavy pg; he is. Let’s tip 
him in the mire”. 

Two hundred years later it 
occurs to Hickey’s successors 
tha t the rickshaw puller, who 
grunts and sweats as he 
strains through the steamy 
heat of a Bengal day, may 
well be intoning the same 
kind of immemorial ditty. 

You sit in the rickshaw, 
perched on a sloping plastic- 
covered seat in what is very 
film a three-wheeled pram, 
and watch his narrow shoul- 
ders rise and fell as he tiffs 
himself on the pedals of the 
cycle part of the conveyance. 

He is usually dad in a 
perforated vest with a none- 
too-dean chequered doth 
tacked around his waistiHis 
calf muscles knot with effort. 
Perspiration stands out on his 
dark brown skin. “Ho,” you 
can imagine him thinking, 
“we have a frit one here . . 

The cycle rickshaw is prob- 
ably the commonest and 
certainly the cheapest form of 
private transport in the In- 
dian sub-continent. In 
Dhaka, the capital of Bangla- 
desh, they reach their acme. 


There are by a moderate 
timate 120,000 rickshaws 


estimate 120,000 rickshaws 
in Dhaka. As each rickshaw is 
operated for two shifts a day, 
that means there are close to a 
quarter of a million rickshaw 
pollers. Add to this the 
number of repair shops, 
builders, owners, their wives 
and children, perhaps a mil- 
lion and a half people depend 
on the rickshaw for their 
daily rice; 

In the whole country there 
are perhaps a milli on rick- 
shaws. The rickshaw puller 
rents his vehicle from a Malik 
for between IS and 20 taka 
(around 30 to 50 pence) a 
shift, depending on its age 
and crepitnde. The shins 
change at 2 pm, and so from 
six to two, and then from two 
till 10, the pollers labour or 


hover outside favoured pick- 
up spots. 

The brilliantly decorated 
rickshaws are a constant traf- 
fic hazard, filling both major 
highways and the narrow 
lanes of the old town. Pub- 
licity conscious visitors can 
scarcely resist being photo- 
graphed in them — both the 
Pope and Mr Jimmy Carter 
are recent exemplars. 

The rickshaws are made in 
small shop-front workshops. 
Imported bicycles are cut in 
half and welded to locally 
engineered axles. The peram- 

bulator-like coach work is 
stoutly nailed mango wood, 
not very hard and not very 
expensive.covered with a 
sheet of aluminium, then 
painted with the -Malik's 
fancies. Generally these 
amount to heroes or heroines 
of the Bengali cinema, pout- 
ing or grimacing, but often 
run to exotic animals. 

The seat, firmly stuffed 
with coconut fibre, and the 
hood, bright coloured plastic 
stretched over a bamboo 
frame, are tailored and em- 
broidered with flowers and 
paisley patterns and deco- 
rated with postcards and 
tinseL 

The whole weighs around 
15 stone and costs roughly 
7,000 taka to ride away. 

The Government is hoping 
to reduce the number of 
rickshaws — or perhaps even 
abolish them and replace 
them with domestically 
made, cheap and robust 
motorized three-wheelers. 

This idea is being resisted 
by Mr Mahtabuddin Ahmed, 
the general-secretary of the 
Dhaka Municipal Corpora- 
tion Rickshaw Owners 
Association, who says motor- 
ized vehicles win be too 
expensive to buy, too costly 
to run and won’t go in the wet 
when Dhaka floods. 

The pullers themselves do 
not feel oppressed. They are 
organized into a powerful 
trade union and they earn 
between 80 and 120 taka a 
day after paying their rick- 
shaw rent — which might not 
sound much hut is actually 
more than a government 
cleric gets. 


Michael Hamlyn 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solution ta Puzzle No 17,216 Solution to Pnzxte No 17,221 • 1 Todsty’s CVCIltS 


Tomorrow’s events f Roads 


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New exhibitions 
Photographs of Glasgow by 
Oscar Maxzaroli; Watercolours, 


drawings and etchings by John 
Bellany; Third Eye Centre, 350 
■Saoduehall St, Glasgow; Tues to 
Sal 10 to 530, Sun 2 to 530, 
dosed Dec 25 to Jan 5 (ends Jan 
■ 11 ). 

Central Region Children's art 
show; The Smith Art Gallery 
and Museum, Dumbarton 
Road, Stilting; Wed to Sun 2 to 
5, Sat 10.30 to 5, closed Dec 25, 
Jan 1 and 2 (ends Jan 4). 

Through the Looking Glass: 
Photography and the Pre- 
Raphaelite Movement; The 
Ruskin Gallery, 101 Norfolk St, 
Sheffield; Man to Fri lOto 7.30, 
Sat 10 to 5, Jan I 10 to 5, closed 
Dec 24, 25 and 26 (ends Jan 10}. 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,222 

A prize o/Tbe Times Atlas of Work! History will be given for t 


A prize o/Tbe Times Atlas of Worid History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times, Saturday Crossword 
Competition, PO Box 486. Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners qf last Saturday's competition are. Mrs A HDodd, 
Ambergate Road, Liverpool; P L V Mallet. The Street, 
Wittersham, Kent; L C Whdeley, Top Lodge, Trefydan, 
Welshpool, Powys. 

Name , . 


Royal engagements 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 
President of the International 
Equestrian Federation, will 
a tend the FEI General Assembly 
in London from Sunday, 
December 7, until Thursday, 
December 11. 

Princess Anne, President of 
the Missions to Seamen, attends 
a Christmas Charity Concert in 
the Chapel of the Royal Naval 
College, Greenwich, in aid of the 
Missions to Seamen, 635. 


London and the South e ast - MOW: 
EBStbowd Westway carriageway dosed 
for maintenance throughout die weekend, 
delays and diversions. *120: work on 
new roundabout at Ousnow, Essex, wftti 
alternate single Em traffic. 

"The M k flandi: A45& Delays at 
Bewdtoy. Herefo r d and Woreastostsre, 
with work on bypass. Ml: Delays between 
junctions 15 and 16, nr Northampton. 
ICfc S8frt d elays re jun ction 7, Chattey 
mtBTchange, Snopshn- 
Tha Worth: *48: Can lo gpway closures 


for traffic entering W ari ng tan town horn 
A49/A5C and A5030/A5061 junctions. A1: 
Contraflow with axil and entry sSp roads 
closed at Bro t ha n on bypass, west York- 
shire. ASK Diversions at Wastiway Rd 
junction wflh WOodhouse Ln. Safe. 

Wal es and (he ant *38: N and S 
bound carriageway dooms at the top of 
Hakfon HO, Exeter to Plymouth road. 
*383: Temporary Bghts at Marsh by Pass 
on Horaton to Bmmstor road. M4c Lane 
closures b n tw oo n junctions 34 and 35, 


{ WEATHER )A warm front win cross northern areas. Over England 
■ and Wales there wfll be a lot of dry bright weather but 

many places wffl tarn more dondy later mid in soothem England there will be a 
little rain and drizzle in the evening. It will be colder than recently but temperatures 
will be dose to normal. Mach of Scotland and N Ireland will dawn dry and bright 
bat in N Scotland there wfll be a few snow showers. Cloudy weather with rain will 
reach NW Scotland in the morning and wfll spread to modi of Scotland and N 
Ireland during the day. A cold start it will turn milder later cm but It wfll become 
very windy. Outlook for tomorrow and Monday: Mild doody and windy with some 
rain at first, becoming colder and brighter with showers. 


'o~:: 




Last chance to see 
Drawings by the cartoonist 
Bill Tidy: City Museum and Ait 
Gallery, Foregale St, Worcester; 
9.30 to 5. 

Exhibition of Japanese silk 
braids; Walsall Museum and Art 
Gallery, Lichfield St, Walsall; 
10 to 4.45. 


New exhibitions ! 

Work by the Norwegian artist, 
Frans Widerbeig; Scottish Na- 
tional Gallery of Modern Art, 
Bedford Rd, Edfaburgh; Mon to 
Sat 10 to 5, Sun 2 to 5, closed : 
Dec 25, 26, 31, Jan I and 2 (ends 
Jan 11). ; 


TODAY Son rises: forak 
7.50 am 353 pm 


»toou rises: Moon sets: 
1 £21 pm gaOpm 
first quarter December 8 






Tp: 


Pima ai 
1 

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m 

1 

■Jill 

m 

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■ 

■■■■1 

mm ■ bm 

■ 

■ 

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■■■ 

. ■ 

■ 


■ 

■ ■ 
■■ HI 

■ 

m 

■■ 

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mmuMwm 


Music 


Concert by Hie Bournemouth 
Chamber Music Society; Talbot 


HHBHH «■■■■■■ 


■!■■■£!■■■■ wwmmw 


,r -i Ml 


Chamber Music Society: Talbot 
Heath School, Rothesay Rd, 
Boaraeaitratli; 3. 

Organ recital by Anne Page; 
Cathedral and Abbey Church of 
St Alban, St Albans; 6. 

Concert by the Romsey Cho- 
ral Society; Romsey Abbey, 
Romsey; 7.30. 

“Christmas Show" by the 
Thurnscoe Harmonic Male i 
Voice Choir; Priory Place Meth- 
odist Church. Printing Office St, 
Doncaster, 7. 

Concert by the University 
Choir and Orchestra; King's 
HaU. Newcastle University; 
730. 

Concert by Anthony Pleeth 
(baroque cello) and David 
Robkra (harpsichord); Holywdl 
Music Room, Oxford; 8. 

Performance of HandeTs Is- 
rael in Egypt, Wells Cathedral, 
Wells; 7.30. 


Last chance to see 

Christmas exhibition with work 
by John Tre n t han 
Green, Peter Thoma 
Green; Stodttoroak H 
Englishcombe Ln, Bai 

Turning over the pi 
books and con temp 
Kettle’s Yard Gallery, 
Cambridge; 2 to 530. 

Don't trust the 
exhibition of fakes, 
and the real thing; Yot 
Gallery, Exhibition S 

South Wales Art S 
nual exhibition; Turx 
Plymouth Rd, Ptenart 


Se a tfo M Mtfc Delays and reduced 
tanas at Refraw between functions 25 
(CantaaaU) and 28 (Wfington). Edto- 
faaglB Russel Rd ramay bridge cfosad 
from 8 pm today to 6 am Mamtay. A687: 
Single «ie traffic wWi Mas at ASS8 
junction, W of Cok &lruBX TV D erw ic K sW rB. 


TOMORROW Sun rises: 

wmm warn rjst am 


D 


Son eels: 

352 pm 


feSEij ,<S Moon rises: Moon sets : 

1258 pm t U55pm 

first quarter tomorrow 


L1GHT1NGMJP TIME 


TODAY 

London 4-23 pm to 7.21 am 
ftteW4J3pmto7Jlam 


unam 4^3 pm to 7^1 am 
Bft*aMi4.11 pm to 758 am 
■teacheater 4^lpm to 7^10 air 


For readers who may have 
missed a copy of Tie Tones this 
week, we repeat below the 
week’s Portfolio price changes 


ter 4.21 pm to 7.40 em 
1 451 pm to 757 am 


mm 

f0mM iSA 


Broke:- 


TOMORROW 

Undon 422 pm to 753 am 
Matol 452 pm to 752 am 
BMxagh 4.10 pm to 850 am 
Manchester 451 pm to 751 am 
Penrance 450 pm to 758 am 


Music 

Halle Orchestra 
HandeTs Messiah. M 
Fire Trade Hall; 7. 

Concert by Bom 
Sinfonietta; Medio 
School, Newport; 230. 

Dance for Africa ga 
mance featuring p 
from Ballet Rambert 
Dance Theatre and thi 
Ballet; Tyne Theatre a 
House, Westgate Rd, I 

ppoa Tyne; 7. 


Ronnie Scott Quh 
usic Hall, The 


ACROSS 

1 Throw in a diamond (5). 

4 It provides bianket coverage 
— for dram feast? (9). 

9 Poet involved with fruit 
cake (5,4). 

10 Trade union in current stop- 
page, in fact (5). 

11 Cider-drinker or wine type I 
included (5). 

12 Dives for coins a great deal 
(5-4). 

13 Apart from Roman coin be- 
low (7). 

IS Is this disease a type of shin- 
gles, almost? (7). 

.18 Making do? Maybe that 
conceals our state (7). 

20 23's blazer has one in sup- 
port (7). 

21 Opening lots of letters, they 
may share our secrets (9). 

23 Drag behind rear section? 
Thai’s about right (5). 

25 Stage part Adam created for 
himself (S). 

26 A national disaster for a 
Turk (9). 

27 Preservative makes Jade 
safe, we hear (9). 

28 This emperor sometimes 
got drunk (5). 


DOWN 

1 Publication where you’ll 
find daily puzzle (9). 

2 He turns up set of clothes, 
including type of shirt (5). 

3 Having loaf on fire is so rash 
(3-6). 

4 Rose, perhaps, or Amelia 
(7X 

5 Get order confused and ex- 
plode grenade (7). 

6 Field for fair person (accord- 
ing to Johnson) (5). 

7 Surrender to another coun- 
try (9). 

8 French writer in Russian 
councils (5). 

14 Forced flat, perhaps!? (9). 

16 Ridley's train won’t {Hill oat 
— the place is deserted (5,4). 

17 Commiseration for players' 
difficulty (4,5). 

19 like ill-disposed characters 

Ol 

20 Crossing the channel (7). 

21 Such an informer may be 
bent (5). 


General 

Town and Country Craft Fair, 
favilion. Saxton; 10 to 5. 

Book market; Chantry Hall, 
Norwich; 10 to 5. 

Book fair; Library Theatre, 
Sofflmll; 10 to 5. 


Music Hall, The 
Shrewsbury; 7.45. 

Music on Sundays 
pert Hanson (bass ba it 
Gordon Kirkwood 
Cuffley HaR May* 
Cnffley, Hertfordshire, 


The pound 


Anniversaries 


22 Snap — or nip? (3-2). 


24 Reproducing 
sound {5y 


bullet's 


Concise Crossword page 13 
1987 Crossword Champions hip — page 2 


TODAY 

Births: Henry VI, reigned 
1422-61, 1470-71. Windsor. 

1421; Warren Hastings, first 
Governor-General of India, 
Churchill, Oxfordshire, 1732; 
Joseph Gay-Lussac, chemist, St 
Leonard, France. 1778. 

Deaths: Jean-Baptiste Char- 
din, painter. Paris, 1779: An- 
thony Trollope. London 1882. 
TOMORROW 

Births: Gian Bernini, sculptor, 
Naples, 1598; Stnart Davis, ; 
abstract painter, Philadelphia. ! 
1894. 

Deaths: Sir Peter Lely, por- 
trait painter, London 1680: 
w aihm BUgh, Admiral and 
Captain of the Bounty, London 
1817; Kirsten Ffatptad, so- 
prano, Oslo, 1962; Thornton 
Wilder, novelist and playwright. 
New Haven, Connecticut, 1975. 

Pearl Harbour was bombed 
by Japanese aircraft, 1941; the 
following day Britain, Australia 
and the USA declared war on 
I Japan. 




s3* 

Italy Lka 
Japan Yon 


Bjritreitand Ft 

Yugoslavia Dnr 

Rates fcrsmaStfonomtnaitor 
only as suppBad By Barclays 
Different rates apply to 
cheques and other forafpi 



London: The FT index doset 


NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 

I wo. Prtnied ov London Post — 
ersi Limited of l Virginia 
London El 9XN and by News 
Scotland Ltd.. 124 Fortran Street. 
Kinnintj PbA Cbsgow 041 1EJ. 
Saturday, peoember 6. 158*5. Reg. 
jawed as b newspaper at the Foal 
Office. 


I DEU CUED EL CHI 
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YESTERDAY 


Tanraaratums at mkktay yosuntof c, 
doud: f, fas; r. rain: s. sun. 

C F C F 

BoHnt f 643 Guernsey c 1254 
Before r 1050 tame c 337 
Btocfaoel C 948 Jersey s 1254 
BttaW r 11 52 Loafoa c 1355 
r 948 Wnetater r 848 
Bffinbugh c 745 Hewa m te c 846 
Oasgoer c 745 R*nkftmy c 846 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 

445 

68 

5.19 

7.1 

Aberdeen 

4.41 

4.1 

438 

41 

Avoanuuth 

1027 

12.1 

1054 

115 

b mm 

201 

34 

2.1 B 

67 

CardlU 

10.12 

1 1 JI 

1039 

107 

Devonport 

006 

03 

942 

4.8 

Dow 

1.52 

64 

999 

HI 

FahBOoSl 

036 

5.1 

9.12 

47 

hSSS 

040 

2.35 

47 

3L8 

3.49 

3.15 

61 

as 


1.17 

5J> 

1-33 

5.4 

Hut 

921 

6.8 

9 JB 

7.0 

mracombe 

9.07 

07 

90 S 

8,1 

Lotah 

5.48 

63 

609 

62 

Uwpool 

2-08 

08 

9.99 

9i) 


LONDON 


gSR: n*i Bam to 6 am,11C (52F) 
SOperoanL Rata: 24nrto 
6 pm, 025 Sue 24 -hr to 6 pm, mi Bar. 
wa level. 6 pm. 10155 rriUban. 

1.0Cim#bars*2953In. 


Southampton 


Tees 

whmksmi» 


253 45 

928 6.7 

852 6.7 

8*9 35 

8.14 5.4 

957 25 

259 45 

2-11 6.1 
153 4.4 

958 85 

659 5.1 

257 45 

Tide E 


84 


HUES 

TOMORROW 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridas 

638 

66 

6.14 

65 

Aberdeen 

544 

69 

559 

39 

Avoomoa&i 

11.19 

MS 

11 .46 

105 

Canfff 

601 

as 

3.15 

38 

11.04 

10.7 

1151 

102 

Devonport 

9.55 

5.1 

1054 

4.7 

Dover 

Z 4 Z 

62 

618 

5.9 

Ftonanth 

9.25 

4.9 

10.04 

4.5 

(Sncos 

ii- i -> 

rano 

431 

3J27 

45 

3.7 

459 

411 

49 

35 

Hotybead 

2.19 

4.n 

254 

62 

Hut 

1027 

04 

1028 

68 

Hfrocumb© 

10.04 

82 

1053 

7.7 

Leith 

6.47 

61 

7.08 

61 

Lhrerpocd 

3.04 

84 

327 

85 

Lowestmt 

1243 

22 

7.05 

22 

Moiyata 

842 

4.5 

427 

45 

■nwu wren 

1023 

64 

054 

58 

"jraramy 

9.19 

64 

9.51 

59 

Oban 

957 

3.5 

10.15 

ao 

Pnnaanca 

907 

52 

948 

4J 

Portland 

1042 

24 

150 

15 

PHwimiMi 

3L27 

44 

6% 

42 

Shorebam 

3-04 

59 

323 

58 

Sotdhan^ston 

2.55 

4.3 

308 

41 

Swansea 

1024 

£4 

051 

78 

T«®s 

7.59 

4.8 

602 

4.9 

WThm-on-to* 

617 

35 

400 

39 


Few £. 


meeaured In metres: 1m=35608fL 


AROUND BRITAIN 


Sesbaro 

Bridtagtan 

Cromer 


SunRein 
tars bi 


NOON TODAY 


Max 
C F 

13 55 bright 
13 65 cloudy 


- 56 13 55 shower 
OS 57 11 52 cfoudy 

■ - 13 55 du* 

15 - 12 54 dauby 

2.1 - 12 54 Bright 






2.1 52 
1.0 - 
15 .09 

03 .13 

04 .13 

05 56 
- 20 

OS .18 
07 .19 

- .17 

- .17 

- .19 

• .19 

- -30 
15 .09 

- 58 

• 32 

- .07 

- .17 
03 j 03 


Wcfl-n-iyne 08 - 

- .19 

03 .05 

- 31 

- 31 
-135 

04 .97 

- 51 

05 .62 

1.7 .79 

- 51 

2.7 28 


11 52 rain 
13 55 cfoudy 
13 55 rtto 
13 55 rain 
13 S5 rain 
13 S5 rain 

13 55 rein 

14 57 rah 
13 55 ram 

13 56 rata 

14 57 rain 
13 SS rain 

13 55 rain 

10 50 rafo 

14 57 ratal 

11 52 rain 
13 55 shower 
10 50 ratal 

9 46 ratal 
7 45 bright 

13 55 rain 

14 57 ratal 

10 50 hata 

13 55 ratal 

12 54 ratal 

14 57 ratal 
12 54 rain 

12 64 ratal 

13 65 ratal 

11 52 ratal 

6 43 shower 

7 45 shower 

6 43 sums 

8 46 hsfl 

7 45 h*3 
4 39 rain 

8 46 shower 





hr.’ 1 


ABROAD 


: c. doud; d.UrtziW. |, Wnfg, log: r, rein; a, sunrsn. snow; t thunder. 


= * 

_ 


as 

Ahnfdita 


nrajnne ig 
S®sfel s 


C F C F P b r 

• J5 £ « 10 60 IMvca f ia 64 Rom s 12 

• f »nS33S. i'PSsESUe 

•jiET 1 gS 5 E rc ‘iaBl 9 lf 

S 14 57 S2£T r J ft ESS22?* c 2 * r 2 

‘ ™naal c 21 70 Moecew sn -5 23 atml/Rf s 7 

9 -130§SSSr ^ I ’ i 

iiisaSB' Tssase inui&z as; 

S * S SS a 12 » tSSSo* f o ; 

» 11 52 JoTarni' » m r 2 9Z Tunis f 16 i 

2 - XS » 28 « S 9 48 Valencia s 15 

b so 7, ES2JS s 8 46 VaneW c 1 j 
S « S E”* 1 S 23 73 Venice s 3 1 
? 12 3 11 52 Vtamn Ip . -3 1 

« if c? SSfe* c ■* 25 Warsaw s 12 ! 
* 1 5 £ Kf** * 18 64 Wash-ton* s 9 * 


23 73 Hong K 


sssa r * " * sis 

in Sr a 22 72 vSSf 

31 H H^ 00 S 12 54 Prawn 

■Bfe-iissa 


Roles and how to play, page 31 I ‘figures not avaitabto 


ewesgo- e 
Cb'ctwcB ■ 




- 

' ' 




-1 30 r.^Zl fl ‘2 s 18 64 wash-ton* s 

IS 58 MaSd® T 1 X J c 25 77 Walston s 
- rtrn WT n L? R ^ Bdh C 7 45 Zoridi fa 
^wotes Thursdays figures are laws available ^ 


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busines s and finance 






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- 




STOCKMARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1268.5 (+2.3) 

FT-SE 100 

1613.5 (+3.4) 

Bargains 

29142 (24916) 

USM (patastream) 
128.38 (-0.38) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4290 (-0.0010) 

W German mark 

2.8523 (+0.0052) 

( Trade-weighted I 

68.1 (+ 0 . 1 ) I 

Freshbake 

buys 

Wold 

Freshbake Foods, the 
manufacturer and distributor 
of frozen foods, is to acquire 
Wold, one of the biggest 
frozen green vegetable proces- 
sors, in an agreed £ 8.6 million 
takeover. 

The terms are one new 
Freshbake ordinary share for 
three Wold shares. 

, Freshbake has announced a 
one-for-four rights issue at 
lOOp to raise £10.4 minion net 
of expenses. 

The directors of Wold and 
other major shareholders who 
hold a total of S0.9 per cent of 
the equity have given irrevo- 
cable undertakings to accept 
iJhe offer. 

Nobo listing 

Nobo Group, the visual aids 
company, is seeking a lull 
Stock Exchange listing after 
the placing of 3.2S million 
shares at 1 52p by Barclays de 
Zoete WedcL The placing will 
raise £4.9 million before ex- 
penses. The market capitaliza- 
tion of the enlarged group will 
be £15.2 million. 

Fry for USM 

Johnson Fry. the licensed 
dealer, is coming to the un- 
listed securities market via a 
placing of 1,181,230 shares at 
I50p each with dealings ex- 
pected to begin next Friday. 

Tempos, page 23 

Computer deal 

Atlantic Computers is to 
acquire ICA Holdings, a pri- 
vately-owned computers and 
financial service group with 
headquarters in the Nether- 
lands. The deal will create 
Europe’s largest computer dis- 
tribution group. 

Traders mourn 

Trading on the Hong Kong 
stock market was suspended 
yesterday as a mark of respect 
for the Governor, Sir Edward 
Youde, who died in Peking. 

Broker deal 

Swiss Bank Corporation, 
the second largest Swiss bank, 
announced yesterday that it is 
negotiating with Royal Trust 
Company of Canada to buy 
Savory Milln. the London 
stockbroker. 

Few accept 

Gulf Resources' £750 mil- 
lion takeover offer for IC Gas, 
best known for its Calor Gas 
interests, reached its first clos- 
ing date with accep- 

tances for only 3.6 per cent of 
ICs equity. 

Lombard dips 

Lombard North Central, 
the finance house subsidiary 
of National Westminster 
Bank, reported pretax profits 
of £83.2 million for the year 

w.n <bcet 22 Comment 23 
CvnSt 21 Stock Market 23 
Money Mrkts 22 Unit TnBts 24 
Foreign Excfc 22 Ctamiodites 34 
Traded Opts 22 USM Prices K 
Tempos 23 Stare rnces a 



Khoo makes £130m on Exco 


Panel subject 
to the courts 


The Court of Appeal yes- 
terday issued its long-awaited 
judgment on the authority of 
die City Takeover Panel, rul- 
ing that the self-regulaiory 
council’s decisions were sub- 
ject to review by the courts. 

The challenge to the Panel’s 
freedom from court interfer- 
ence has been seen as a 
potential threat to its ability to 
act as a flexible arbiter in 
takeover battles and raised the 
spectre of endless legal appeals 
against its rulings. 

The case was the spin-off 
from the takeover battle for 


By Colls Narbroogh 

McCorquodale, the specialist 
printing group, in which the 
Panel rejected an appeal by a 
management buy-out team 
against the go-ahead given for 
the rival bidder, Norton Opax. 

At the end of a three-day 
hearing. Sir John Donaldson, 
Master of the Rolls, in his 46- 
page judgment, found that the 
Panel performed a public duty 



Sir John: No “cocoon” for 
Panel from the courts 


Lamont to 
break the 
Delaware 
Link 

By Our Oty Staff 

A gaping hole in the 
Exchequer’s revenue net — the 
“Delaware link” that allows 
companies resident in two 
countries to exploit dif- 
ferences in tax laws - will be 
stitched up from April, Mr 
Norman Lamont, Financial 
Secretary to the Treasury, said 
yesterday. 

The loophole, estimated to 
cost Britain between £200 
million and £300 miOioD in 
lost taxes every year, has been 
increasingly employed by 
smaller firms after a decade of 
being mainly a tax-saving tool 
of big multinationals. 

It is used by companies 
operating on both sides of the 
Atlantic, with dual residence 
in Britain and the United 
States, to obtain the maxi- 
mum tax benefit arising from 
the different definitions of 
residence for tax purposes. 

In Britain, a company’s 
residence is where it exercises 
management and controL In 
the US, it is its place of 
incorporation. Delaware has 
been the most , popular state 
for this kind of deal, hence the 
loophole's nickname. 

Thanks to an Anglo-US 
treaty, dual residence allows a 
company to avoid double 
taxation on income. 

But, more importantly, it 
permits businesses to reduce 
taxable income by twice 
deducting interest payments 
on borrowings — once in the 
US and once in Britain. 

in a written parliamentary 
ans wer. Mr Lamont said the 
Government proposed to re- 
strict group relief now avail- 
able on losses made by dual 
resident firms. 

Apart from “genuine trad- 
ing companies,” dual res- 
idents will be unable to 
surrender losses to other 
members of the British group. 

The new rules will apply to 
companies whose main func- 
tion is to borrow, purchase or 
bold shares in a member of a 
multinational group. A con- 
sultative document, published 
yesterday, seeks responses by 
next mouth. 





r. > 


stock markets 

^ Dow Jones 1929.Z7 (-1Q«r 

Ntkka^Pow 18637.471+13.52) 

^ SfeSS!? _ 2400.72 (-29.80) 

-r-' - JJSJJJL'Si 285.0 (same 

. f jtfSS— 1420-3 (+9.ZJ 

SSLank ..-..2072T( + a8) 

BSL. n>M! 

n A — Em hmsj 

P 1 -® 1 ® 0306 25 

Closing prices 


n/a 

:;;E64 (-0.43) 
Page 25 


' IMTEREST bates 

London: Bank Base:_tt% 

3-month interbank « 

-' I 3HTionm eligible bifls:10 <'10 

buying rate 

; US: Prime Rate7,j% 

‘ ■ Federal Funds a 

CURRENg gL—— 

■ London: Jgp* 

IfeSSSf 

•£Ven231.« f; StlO.5 

. ■ iS/SSB* SDR £0.845301 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

London & Northern 80*p<+9p 

Saatehi & Sastehi . — 6jWp(+24pj 

sSSd^Oiart +JPj 

Royal Bank 483p +9p 

Mercuiylntrd 404p +9p 

uS Trust 470p (+30pj 

FALLS: 

Fairtme Boats J8jjP j-13p) 

Thofreon T-Line j-»P 

RudoMWoltt ifefcnS 

Freshbake — tTJpc-Op) 

Prices are as at 4pm 


GOLD 


KyS5oS^38BSO A 

5Ss^e!oW88SOte271.50' 
272.00 ) 

Maui York: 

Comex $387.50-388^0* 


north sea oil 




be unthinkable to allow it to 
be “cocooned” from the atten- 
tion of the courts. 

But, undoubtedly to t be 
Panel's relief, he said that 
High Court intervention in 
Panel decisions would be 
“declamatory” — limited to 
pronouncements rather than 
imposing sanctions. 

Mr John WaUcer-Howanh, 
director-general of the Panel, 
was unable to respond im- 
mediately to the ruling, saying 
that time was needed to 
consider the detailed docu- 
ment The full 1 1 -member 
panel will meet next Friday. 

The heavily qualified judg- 


ConsGold share 
deal inquiry 


By Lawrence Lever 


Mr Paul Channon, Sec- 
retary of State for Trade and 
Industry, announced yes- 
terday that he is appointing 
inspectors to investigate pur- 
chases of shares in Consoli- 
dated Gold Fields. 

The investigation, re- 
quested by ConsGold, con- 
cerns a 4.9 per cent stake in 
the company acquired by 
Bairick Resources, a United 
States gold mining company 
based in Toronto, Canada. 

Consgold, in a statement, 
said that the company had 
asked the DTI to investigate 



Rudolph Agnew: Concern at 
nominee companies 


“the circumstances surround- 
ing the build up” of the 
Bairick stake and “the diffi- 
culties experienced in 
ascertaining” the ownership of 
.the stake. 

Mr Rudolph Agnew. chair- 
man of Consgold, has been 
concerned for weeks about 
purchases of shares by nomi- 
nee companies. The shares — 
amounting to 4.9 per cent of 
the company — were bought 
by James Capd.on behalfof 
Bairick. 

Anglo American, the South 
African mining conglomerate, 
already holds a 28 per cent 
stake in Consgold through its 
Minorco associate, and tber 
has been frequent speculation 
that it might launch a full- 
scale bid. 

The investigation will be 
under section 442 of the 
Companies Act, 1985, which 
gives the DTI powers to 
investigate the ownership of 
shares in a company, includ- 
ing power to determine 
whether there are concert 
party arrangements. 

However, unlike the 
Guinness investigation an- 
nounced ou Monday, there is 
no suggestion of misconduct. 


US buy for Bemrose 


Bemrose Corporation, the 
security, printing and packag- 
ing group, is expanding its 
American operations through 
a joint venture with Yatten- 
don Investment Trust, a pri- 
vate British newspaper pub- 
lishing and retail company. 

The joint venture is acquir- 
ing two American businesses 
for $20.2 million (£14.1 mil- 
lion): Dot Publishing of In- 


diana, which publishes rel- 
igious calendars, books, dia- 
ries and cards, and the 
Janesville Group, a Wisconsin 
manufacturer of pens, tools 
and desk equipment. 

Bemrose is investing £5.7 
million in the joint venture, of 
which £1 million is cash. The 
rest will be raised through the 
issue of 2.66 million new 
shares, 60 per cent of which 
will be taken by Yattendon. 


ment subjecting the Panel to 
the law authorities coukl be 
seen as an endorsement of the 
status quo, despite rejecting 
the court's right to review its 
decisions during the case. 

The ruling says that the 
courts can intervene to quash 
a decision when the Panel is 
regarded as behaving irratio- 
nally, or offends against the 
principles of natural justice. 

Sir John anticipated a 
“workable and valuable part- 
nership between the court and 
the Panel in the public 
interest”. And the court’s 
relationship with the Panel 
would be “historic” rather 
than contemporaneous and 
aims at preventing errors from 
being repeated. 

The judgment, foreseen as 
the possible death knell of self- 
regulation — the guiding prin- 
ciple for the Government's 
system or self-regulation of the 
deregulated British markets — 
was seen by many as the 
inevitable arrival in Britain of 
increased btigation as a nay to 
resolve corporate battles. 


By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Tan Sri Khoo Teck Puat, 
the Singapore businessman 
who has financial problems in 
the Far East, yesterday re- 
versed his promise to accept 
British & Commonwealth 
Shipping shares for bis Exco 
International stake. 

Instead, be will take £130 
million in cash from the sale 
of his Exco shares and will not 
be raking a scat on the B&C 
board. 

The move means B&C will 
have only 48 per cent of 
Exco's shares instead of the S3 


percent it had expected when 
its prospectus is published 
next week because pan of Tan 
Sri Khoo's stake is held under 
security and not immediately 
available. 

“This win in no way jeop- 
ardize the takeover.” a spokes- 
man said 

The move appears to con- 
firm that Tan Sri Khoo has a 
serious need for cash. It is also 
believed that be is trying to 
sell his 6 per cent stake in 
Standard Chartered Bank. 

Tan Sri Khoo's son was 
arrested more than a week ago 
by the Brunei authorities for 
alleged fraud in connection 


with the National Bank of 
Brunei Tan Sri Khoo's family 
owns 90 per cent of the bank, 
which is now under the super- 
vision of the Brunei authori- 
ties, and most of the bank's 
loans were made to his 
family's interests. 

In its offer for Exco, B&C 
secured an undertaking from 
Tan Sri Khoo that he would 
accept the company's shares 
in return for his 67.8 million 
Exco shares. He has now been 
released from this promise, 
and the 48.8 million shares are 
being placed with four institu- 
tions at 265p. 

The institutions shares were 



Engineering a win: Sir Francis Tombs, chairman of Toner & NewalL triumphant yesterday 

AE succumbs to Sir Francis 


By Graham Searjeant, Financial Editor 


The bitter and controversial 
six month battle for control of 
AE, the Rugby-based special- 
ist engine components multi- 
national, ended yesterday 
with a decisive win for Turner 
& NewalL The -asbestos group 
declared its £280 million bid 
unconditional, after gaining 
more than 56 per cent of AE 
shortly after Its final dose. 

The Turner victory left Mr 
Robert Maxwell's private 
Pergamon group and Hollis, 
the company through which 
he launched an agreed coun- 
terbid, with almost 30 per cent 
of AE. Mr Maxwell yesterday 
repealed his declaration that 
they would not sen this stake 
despite Turner gaining con- 
trol although the Hollis bid 
was formally allowed to lapse. 

This could potentially spoil 
one of the main benefits of AE 
to Turner - the use of its 
British profits to offset unused 
tax allowances in cases where 
this required 75 per cent 
control for grouping purposes. 


Market debut 
for Wilding 

Wilding Office Equipment, 
which supplies offices with 
goods ranging from computers 
to filing systems, is obtaining a 
full listing through a placing of 
3 million shares at 135p each 
by County Securities. 

The issue will raise £1.5 
milli on in new capital and will 
give Wilding a capitalization 
of £15.1 million. Dealings 
should begin on Thursday. 


But T & N, chaired by Sir 
Frauds Tombs, claimed yes- 
terday that it “would be able 
to obtain most of the tax 
benefits expected from the 
acquisition so long as AE is a 
51 per cent subsidiary”. It is 
expected to save £5 million 
rather than the hoped-for £6 
million. 

A stake above 25 per cent 
could also give Mr Maxwell 
nuisance value in blocking big 
changes in AE*s structure or 
finances requiring a 75 per 






cent majority at an extraor- 
dinary meeting. 

T & N is precluded from 
offering Pergamon and Hollis 
a higher price for a year under 
City Takeover Panel rules, but 
Mr Maxwell could use the 
stake as a lever to do deals 
with T & N. 

Mr Peter Byrom of NM 
Rothschild. T & N’s adviser, 
said: “Mr Maxwell said he 
entered the battle to help 
British manufacturing in- 
dustry and we feel sure he will 
be consistent in this." 

AE argued throughout that 
the T & N takeover had no 
logic and might damage its 
research and development ef- 
fort as Turner would have to 
maximize short-term profits 
to recoup the dilution to its 
earnings resulting from the bid 
terms. 

But Sir Francis emphasized 
that Turner now wanted to 
explore the opportunities for 
the development of the prod- 
ucts of both companies. 


Mercury Warburg Investment 
Management. Postel Invest- 
ment Barclays dc Zoete Wedd 
Investment Management and 
Globe Investment Trust 

A further 12 million shares 
are being transferred to Mr 
Alan Ng, a business associate 
of Tan Sri Khoo, while 4.8 
million shares are still 
committed to the B&C share 
exchange. But H.S million 
shares are held under security 
arrangements. 

Tan Sri Khoo has under- 
taken to procure their release. 
But until then, they cannot be 
counted as acceptances for the 
B&C offer. 


Callto 

halt 

‘grey’ gas 
market 

By Richard Lander 

The organizers of the flota- 
tion have asked the leading 
dealer in British Gas shares on 
the unofficial grey market to 
suspend trading bn Monday 
ahead of the start of trading in 
the shares on the Stock Ex- 
change at 2.30pm. 

The request was made to 
Oeveland Securities, which 
has traded about 20 million 
British Gas shares since the 
prospectus was issued. 

Mr Stanley Bellar. a director 
of Oeveland. said that his 
firm would comply with the 
request “because we don't 
want to fall out with the 
organizers.” 

The move came amid grow- 
ing controversy over the role 
of the grey market after a 
sharp dip in the price of the 
shares on Thursday and after 
reports that the Government 
was considering banning such 
business. 

Responding to criticism of 
grey market business, Mr 
Bellar said that official deal- 
ings next week would them- 
selves be “a lighter shade of 
grey market” because small 
shareholders would not re- 
ceive their letters of allocation 
for up to 10 days, and they 
would stll be at a disadvantage 
to the institutions. 

The plea to Oeveland is 
thought to have come from 
NM Rothschild, the merchant 
bank adviser to British Gas, 
although Mr Anthony Alt, a 
director of Rothschild, said 
that the bank had no such 
power to suspend the grey 
market. 

He added: “What I did tell 
Cleveland was to look at the 
reports in the newspapers and 
decide what to do in your own 
best interesL” 

Sources at the Department 
of Trade said that there had 
been no discussions between 
the Government and the grey 
market dealers. 

• Prices for British Gas shares 
firmed on the grey market 
yesterday to about 58p. 


Hopes collapse of fuelling world recovery 


Japan runs out of steam 


From a Correspondent, 
Tokyo 

Any hopes that Japan will 
soon be able to poll tfae world 
economy out of trouble 
through dynamic internal 
growth collapsed yesterday 
after the Japanese government 
announced in Tokyo that third 
quarter gross national product 
■had slowed even farther. 

A 0 Jr per cent rise in GNP 
for the three months to 
September 30 effectively de- 
stroyed the government’s fond 
conceit Hurt it can achieve a 
healthy 4 per cent growth for 
the fiscal year ending on 
March 31. 

The economic planning 
agency, which announced the 
news, said the slow growth was 
primarily because of the yea's 
rapid rise ova- the past year. 
This has slashed export 


performance by making Japa- 
nese goods expensive abroad, 
and has semmty affected 
leading mannfactnring 
awapsnies. 

The yen has risen by more 
than 46 per cent against the 
dollar, dosing in Tokyo yes- 
terday at 162JL 

The United States stiD nur- 
tures the idea that both Japan 
and West Germany can take 

over the role of engines for 

world growth.. 

Bat West Germany has 
rejected the idea, and this 
week it also announced that its 
third-quarter growth was a 
disappointing 1 pm- cent Ja- 
pan, unhappy at offending US 
sensibilities, has skirted the 
question but now has a good 
alibi for docking oat f the 
role. 

Mr Hiroshige Otake, dep- 


uty head of the EPA, told 
reporters that the government 
would soon review its 4 per 
cent target EPA officials 
were saying privately that the 
figure would now be almost 
impossible to reach. 

The Jaly-September figures 
certainly show exports declin- 
ing, knocking 03 of a percent- 
age point off growth. But 
domestic demand was dis- 
appointing, too, growing by 
only 0.9 of a point 

A big surge of gold imports 
m the April-Jane quarter for 
the minting of gold coins for 
Emperor Hirohlto’s 60th 
anniversary distorted the 
third-quarter figures, but the 
outlook is still poor. 

The government tax cornual, 
in an attempt to raise demand, 
announced a package of tax- 
cutting measures yesterday- 


SSB Still 7% of Americans out of work 


Washington (Renter) 7 The 
rate of DD»mploymeiit in the 
United States remained un- 
changed at 7 per cent in 
November for the third 
successive month, the Depart- 
ment of Labour reported 
yesterday. 

Financial analysts said that 
the data and other economic 


of the economy was still slow 
and that central hank action to 
lower interest rales was 
possible. 


the agricultural sector rose in 
November by 249,000 to a 
total of 101.07 milfion. bat 
nearly all the gain was in 
service industries. 

. Goods-producing Jobs in- 
creased by 40,000 while the 
number of jobs in manufac- 
turing industry increased by 
35,0#0 to 193 million. 

The department said that 
employment in building was 
down in November because of 
seasonal fluctuations. 


Mining employment was lit- 
tle changed, in contrast to 
Sharp losses earlier In the 
year, but the oil and rats 
drilling industry lost 5,000 
jobs. 

Orders received by manu- 
facturers felt by 3.6 percent in 
October, the sharpest decline 
since 1980 

Earlier this week, the 
Administrationsaid Us key in- 
dex of leading indicators rose 
by a healthy 0.6 per cent in 
October. 


© 


performance 

Two years to 1st December 



Percentage Position in 

increase sector 
in value 


Worldwide Recovery 

+76.8 

International 

+76.8 

UK 

+72.0 

Income & Growth 

+62.3 


High Income 

American 


+49.9 

+ 31.0 


8th 

17th 



Recently International Growth has 
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risers. It is an actively managed fund 
that can seek out growth opportunities 
worldwide. 

If you would like further details on 
International or any of our 
range of funds please tele- 
phone us on 01-489 1078 or 
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A member company of the Mercantile House Group. 


mS 







22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1 986 


'WALL. STREET 


New York (Agencies) — 
Sane prices were slightly 
higher in active early trading. 
Traders said that some com- 
puter program baying was a 
factor in the rise. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was np 1.97 to 
1,941.65. 

- Bonds offered little help to 
stocks as a bigger-then-ac- 
pected increase in November 
non-farm payrolls restrained 
hopes of a redaction in interest 


rates. Many bine chip shares 
were said to be steady, with 
some showing a limited ad- 
vance. But Gillette, which has 
been the subject of consid- 
erable speculation that a bid- 
der was about to emerge, lost 
2% to 52. It had risen 6% on 
Thursday. 

Boise Cascade was among 
the leaders of the active stocks 
with a rise of 114 to 64%.Ad- 
rances led declines by three to 
two. 


Dec 

4 


AMR 

ASA 


AHedStrs 66% 


Alcoa 

AmaxMc 


Am Can 
AmCynm'd 
AmHPwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 


T2% 13 


3% 3 


Amoco 67% 69 

Artnco Steel 5% 51 

Assrco 14% 15 


BkrsTstNY 45 451 

Bankamer 14% 14’ 

Ok of Baton 41% 41 

Bank Of NY 42 42 

Beth Steel 5 4! 


Brden 50% . 

Bo Warner 40% 40% 


Burl'tonNtn 61% 62% 
Burroughs n/a n/a 

CrnptoSSp 62% 61% 
Can Pacific 12% 12% 

Caterpfler 40% 40% 

Cefainraa 242 241% 

Central SW 36 35% 

Champion 33% 33% 

ChaseMan 37% 38% 
ChmBkNY 46% 47 

Chevron 45% 47 
Chrysler 40% 40% 
Cnidorp 54% 54% 

Oark Equip 20% 20% 

Coca Cola 38% 37% 
Colgate 44% 44% 

CB3 134% 135% 

Cima Gas 44% 44% 

Cmb'tnEng 32% 33% 

CamwtthH 33% 33% 
Cora Edis 48% 49 
Cn Nat Gas 33% 33% 
Cons Power 15% 15% 

Cntrf Data. 26 26% 

Coming Gl 58% 57% 

CPChm 78% 80% 
Crane 35 35% 

CUrtSSWrt 53% 53% 

DartS Kraft n/a n la 

Deere 24% 24 

Delta Air 50% 50 

Detroit Ed 18% 18% 
Digital Eq 106% 107% 
Disney 44% 45 
DowChem 61% 61% 

Dresser bid 19% 19% 

Duke Power 49% 49% 
DuPont 90% 91 

Eastern Air n/a 9% 
Estm Kodak 67% 68% 
Eaton Corp 77% 79% 

Emerson El 92% 90% 
Exxon Corp 68% 69% 

Fed Dot Sts 80% 80 _ 

• &*» (MaiLcExailntaaM 


sc 

Dec 

Dec 


4 

3 


28% 

28% 

. Fst Chicago 

32% 

32% 

FsttetBna* 

FsiPennC 

64% 

9 

54% 

9 

; Fort 

56% 

59% 

•t FTWactwa 

38% 

38% 

GAP Corp 

40% 

40% 

i GTE Corp 

60% 

61 

Gen Corp 

GenOy'mcs 

GenGetertc 

83 

82% 

74% 

87% 

75% 

88% 


19% 

10% 

. Gen Mils 

43% 

44% 

■ Gen Motors 

71% 

72 

GnPbUtny 

24 

24% 

Genasco 

3% 

3% 

Georgia Pac 

40% 

40% 

GBete 

54 

48 

Goodrich 

44% 

45 

Goodyear 

43% 

18% 

43 

18% 

Grace 

54 

54% 

GtAtt&Tac 

25 

24% 

Gr'hnd 

33 

33% 

GrumanCor 

?8% 

28% 

Guff & West 

70 

70 

Heinz HJ. 

42% 

43% 

Hercules 

59% 

59% 

HTatt-Pkrt 

44% 

44% 

Honaywefl 

1C Irek 

65% 

25% 

68% 

25% 

tegsraol 
Inland Steel 

60% 

18% 

59% 

16% 

IBM 

128 

128% 

INCO 

12% 

12% 

tet Paper 
bn Tel Tel 

79 

55% 

79 

55% 

Irwng Bank 

50% 

50% 

Jhnsn&Jhn 

69% 

70% 

Kaiser Alum 

13% 

13% 

Kerr McGee 

29% 

29% 

KtriblyClrk 

K Mart 

88% 

49% 

88 

50% 

Kroger 

LT.V Corp 

31% 

1% 

31% 

1% 

Litton 

H1% 

82 

Lockheed 

53% 

53% 

Lucky Sirs 
Man (freer 

30% 

47% 

31% 

47% 

Manvfle Cp 

2 

2% 

Mapco 

60% 

59% 

Manna MM 

47 

45% 

Mrt Marietta 

42% 

43 

Masco 

28% 

28% 

McDonalds 

63% 

64 

McDonnea 

78% 

78% 

Mead 

58 

58% 

Merck 

115 

114 

MtestaMng 

114% 

114% 

MoW Oil 

39 

39% 

Monsanto 

79% 

80% 

Morgan J.P. 

87% 

87% i 

Motorola 

39 

39% t 

NCR Corp 

49% 

48% i 

NLtedstrs 

5% 

5% C 

Nat Drsdre 

46% 

46% C 

Nat Med Era 

25% 

24% C 

NatSmcndt 

11% 

11% K 

Norfolk Sth 

87% 

86% 1 

NWBancrp 

39% 

39% b 

OaadmPm 

77% 

28% 1 

Ogden 

OSnOaro 

Owerts-H 

46% 

45 

45% 

46% k 
44% R 
48 S 

PaoGasB 

25% 

26% S 

Pan Am 

5% 

5% 1 

Penney J.C. 

80% 

84% V 

Pemzoii 

71% 

71% I 

Pepfsco 

28 

27% V 


Dee 

4 


Dec 

3 


Pfizer 
PhefinDge 
PhSpMrs 
PtSpsPet 
Polaroid 
PPG bid 
PretrGnaW 
PbSE&G 
Raytheon 
RyndsMet 
Rocbwellnt 
Dutch 


Sara Lee 
SFESapec 
SchTberger 
Sco« Paper 
Seagram 
Sears Rbcfc 
Shell Trans 


Bk 

Sony 

* Cal Ed 
S'WstnBefi 
StdOf 
Surfing Dra 
Stevens JP 
Sun Comp 
Tefedyne 


Tsar 

wtlhpool 

Woodworth 


63% 63% 
21 21 % 
75 74% 

11 % 11 % 
73% 73 

75% 76% 

79 79% 

42% 42% 

69 70% 

42% 42% 

43% 43% 

92% B3K 
n/a 81 % 
68% 70% 

33 33% 

34% 33% 

66 65% 

64 64% 

44% 44% 

54% 54% 

39% 39% 

90% 90% 

21 % 21 % 
35% 35% 
114% 114% 
49 50% 

47 46% 

38% 39% 
58 5B% 

317% 321% 
38% 38% 
35 35 

30 30% 

122% 123% 
33% 32% 

65% 67% 

45 45% 

93% 93% 
60 80% 
228% 231% 
23% 23 

66% 66% 
33% 34% 

41% 43 

45% 45% 
21 % 21 % 
25% 26% 

48 49% 

59% 59% 

107% 106% 
61% 61% 
41% 40% 

71% 72 
43% 45% 
61% 61 
20 % 20 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AgrwoEag 

AfortAtem 


26% 28% 
41% 41 

11 % 11 % 
17% 17% 

13% 13% 

29 28% 

26% 26% 
23% 24% 
33% 32% 
47% 47% 

39% 39% 
29% 29% 

88% 89% 
19% 19% 

29% 29% 
2.70 2.78 
13 13 

31 31% 

b$d kltrtel dread. ■ Mdvosk. pSRx* igfcHTritfcd , Unouatad 


Holmes a Court may 
rival Murdoch bid 


Sydney (Reuter) — The 
future of Mr Rupert Mur- 
doch’s bid to take over 
Australia’s hugest newspaper 
group appeared uncertain yes- 
terday as Mr Robert Holmes & 
Court, the Australian en- 
trepreneur, entered the fray. 

Mr Holmes A Court met 
senior executives of the Her- 
ald and Weekly Times 
(H&.WT) amid market specu- 
lation that be would counter 
Mr Murdoch’s AusSl.8 billion 
(£818 million) bid for the 
Melbourne group. 

Mr Holmes A Court said be 
was keen to expand his media 
Interests and planned to con- 
tinue the talks with H&WT. 
But, he added, they would 
remain confidential. 

Mr Holmes A Court made 
an unsuccessful bid to take 
over H&WT five years ago. 

“There was no bid — he’s 
still thinking about it,” 
H&WTs chief executive, Mr 
John d’Arcy, said. 

At an emergency meeting in 
Melbourne, more than ISO 
ournalists of H&WT and Mr 
och’s News Coiporation 


journa 

Murdt 


agreed to press for an official 
inquiry into Australia’s media 
ownership. 

Mr Mike Sutherland, Vic- 
toria branch secretary of the 
Australian Journalists Associ- 
ation, said that if Mr 
Murdoch's takeover was 
successful, it would be the 
most far-reaching shake-ap of 
the media in Australian 
history. 

The bid is already under 
review by Australia's anti- 
monopoly body, the Trade 
Practices Commission, to 
establish that it does not break 
trading laws. 

According to H&WT, Mr 
Holmes A Court’s Bell Group 
had initiated preliminary dis- 
cussions about H&WT’s fu- 
ture ownership. Any 
developments would be an- 
nounced to the stock ex- 
changes, the group said 

The intervention prompted 
market uncertainty over the 
fete of Mr Murdoch’s bid, 
which H&WT directors have 
recommended to sharehold- 
ers. analysts said. 

Mr Murdoch offered 


Au5$12 a share for H&WT. 
The stock market price rose to 
AusS 12.50 from AusS&JO 
when the bid was announced 
on Wednesday. 

News Coiporation has not 
yet issued the formal docu- 
ments for the bid, which 
analysts initially said was so 
well priced that the takeover 
was virtually clinched. 

Mr Holmes A Court, with a 
2.6 per cent direct stake in 
H&WT, could either be plz 
ning a direct counter offer or 
negotiating the purchase of 
some H&WT interests, an- 
alysts said. 

A further complication 
arose when Mr Ron Brierley, 
the New Zealand entrepreneur 
and a large H&WT share- 
holder, indicated he had not 
ruled out a counter bid. 

Mr Brierley, whose com- 
pany, Industrial Equity, has a 
strategic 1 1.6 per cent stake, 
said the News Corporation bid 
was not unreasonable but 
seemed a “bit light”. 

“A bid is always an option, 
but we are not going to rush 
into an offer of that mag- 
nitude,” Mr Brierley said. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Schenck UK: Mr fain 
Dixon joins the board as 
deputy managing director and 
sales and marketing director. 

Cartner Group: Mr Peter 
Weaver becomes technical 
director. 

Co-operative Bank: Mr. 
Roger Gorvin is appointed 
director of personal banking. 

Pauls: Mr W J Tarcan is 
promoted to finance director. 

Woolwich Budding Society: 
Mr Peter Robinson and. Mr 
Michael Take are made dep- 
uty chief executives. 

The Communication 
Group: Mr Robert Mc- 
Cormick joins the board. 

BPCG Mr Geoffrey Rippon 
is made non-executive direc- 
tor and a non-executive direc- 
tor of Pergamon Holdings. Mr 
Patrick Morrissey becomes 
managing director of group - 
marketing. 

Coalite Group: Mr Howard 
Schofield is made a director. 



Iain Dixon 

Halifax Building Society:- 
Mr Jim Birrell is made a 
director. 

Sussex County Building 
Society: Lady (Karen) 
Metfeven and Mr Michael 
Mitchell join the board. 

Burt Marshall, r.nrrKde n : 
Mr Tony Woolley becomes" 
managing director. 


The Association of Futures 
Brokers and Dealers: Mr 
Derek Whiting becomes 
chairman, Mr Aiaistair 
Ann an d becomes chief exec- 
utive. Mr Julian Biggs? Mr 
Nicholas Duriacher, Mr John 
Jarvis, Mr Michael Uddiard, 
Mr Philip Lynch, Mr John 
Panton and Mr Wflfiam Smit 
are made directors. 

Valor Mr David Kirk has 
been made director and gen- 
eral manager, Oliver Toms, 
Mr Geoff Wenmaq director, 
Moorwood Vulcan and Mr 
Bernard Cowley director and 
general manage r, Moorwood 
Vulcan, distribution division. 

Security Pacific National 
Bank: Mr Brian Broad bent 
and Mr James Estes become 
senior vice presidents, inter- 
national merchant banking 


group. 

Bntish-Axnerican Tobacco 
Company: Mr AC Johnston is 
director. 


made a 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Mario* rates 
day*»ranfla 

N York 1A280-1.4295 
Montreal 10679-10741 
Ants’dam32163-&2264 
Brussels 59.11-59.33 
Cphoen 10.7386-10.7667 
DuMfc 10411-10515 
FninMurt20462-2.6533 
Lisbon 211.05-212.64 
Matted 19200-193.13 
MSan 1972.07-1978.16 
Oslo 10.7634-100108 
Paris 90187-90442 
SfMitei 90620-90958 
Tokyo 231.41-232.43 
Vienna 20.02-20.07 
Zttedi 20741-20948 


Market rates 


1.4285-1.4295 

10893-18719 

38220-30264 

59.11-5982 

10.7423-10.7570 

1.0477-10487 

08491-20533 

211 -42-21 2-64 

19205-193.13 

197300-1979.16 

10.7890-100108 

90277-90442 

90637-90777 

23141-231.78 

20.04-2007 

20796-20836 


008406prwn 

0.4S-040preni 

1 %-IKpnm 

% -par pram 

2%-ljprurn 

16-24ds 

1 VI % pram 

88-12705 

l6-34dis 

5nram-20s 

7.v«*dte 

2*-2%pram 

1 VI prom 

l%-l%orem 

Iprem-Stfls 

1%-1%prwn 


3 months 
1O0-1.75prwi 
1.46-1 Oeprsm 
4V3%preni 


4%-axpram 

66-Mdfc 

4%-3%pram 

127-34003 

21-7103 

8prem-4ds 

16V18%«S 

5%-4%piwn 

4%-3%pram 

4-3%pram 

8-par 

4%-3%prem 


Starting index compared wtth 1975 was up at 68.1 (day's range 68JM80J. 


OTHER STERLING RATES 

Argentonaustrar 10952-1.7022 

Australia defer 2.1819-2.1852 

Bahrain dtear 0036000390 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Brazil cruzado ■ — 

Cyprus pound 

Fnand marks 

Greece drachma _ 
Hong Kong doflar . 

India rupee 

Iraq dtear 

Kuwait dinar KD 


2031-20.43 


- 0.7310-0.7410 

- 63930-7.0330 

- 198.15-200.15 
11.1120-11.1125 
18J0-18J0 

041 75-0.42?f5 


Australia . 

CnmrlH 


13805-13635 

2.1925-2.1935 

2^905-25925 


Sweden 
Norway . 
Danmark. 


Malaysia dolar 38900-3.7100 

Mexico peso 1018.0-1033.0 

New Zealand dolar 28173-2^306 

Saudi Arabia riyal 533905.3790 

Singapore dollar 3.1288-3.1324 

South Africa rand 3.1640-3.1805 

U AEdrham 53145-53545 

Uoyds Bar* 


West Germany „ 

Switzerland 

Nsthertands . 
France _ 


0653543540 
13785-13795 
63100-63150 
73525-73575 
73325-73375 
13910-13920 
I 1.6615-13630 
23S20-23S30 
63300-63350 


Hong Kong . 
Portugal — _ 
Spate ___ 
Austria 


. 16230-162.10 
13800-1362.0 

— 4130-4135 
7.7870-7.7900 
14840-14070 
135.00-13530 

— 1434-1436 


Rates titeplad by Barclays Bank HOFEX and ExteL 


Kleinwort 

to join rrc 

wind-up 

petition 

By Onr City Staff 

Kleiswort Boson, the bh-t- 
chaat bank, was given leave in 
the High Chart yesterday to 
join a wind rng-op petition 
being brought against the 
intpr mP'i»Mi Tin C on n c i L 

Mr Justice MOlett gave it 
the go-ahead to add more than 
£7 milli on it claims it is owed 
by the TTC to the £5 mfflion in 
a petition being brought hy the 
West German Amalgamated 
Metal Trading. 

Kleinwort Benson made the 
move to nhallgnge a High 
Court action by the ETC on 
Monday to have the p eti t i o n 
“struck 0 ntT on the ground 
fhar jt is governed by inter- 
national law and does not 
come within the jnrisdictien of 
the ^English court. 

The 1TC is said to owe more 
than £165 million to a numb er 
of Lonbdon Metal Ex ch ange 
broking firms, in cludi ng the 
Amalgamated Metal Trading, 


• PARKDALE HOLDINGS: 
Figures for the six months to 
October 31. Interim was O-Sp 
(0.375p), turnover was 
£965.377. pretax profit was 
£500,876 and tax was £11,000. 
The board is confident that the, 
group will continue to make 
progress. A final dividend of not 
less than 1 2f> on the enlarged 
capital is expected for the year to 
April 30 1987. 

• CONTROL TECHNIQUES: 
Results for the year to Septem- 
ber 30 m £000. Final dividend 
was 2p, making 3p (l-8p)- 
Group turnover was 9,073 
(6.802). pretax profit was 1 ,263 
(1,095), tax was 395 (335) and 
earning per share were 8.6p 
(8-2pX The company has en- 
tered into a conditional agree- 
ment for the acquisition of 
Burton Industrials, a private US 
company, which designs and 
manufactures electronic vari- 
able speed drives. The initial 
consideration for the purchase is 
being financed by the placing of 
1,317.507 new ordinary stares 
in the company at I65p to yield 


Toronto market 



Canada’s securities market 
— the fourth biggest in the 


By Colin Narbroogfc 

"The market has been 
underrated, though it has gen- 


world. which may surprise eraily out-performed the US." 
many - will next year see ixs Turnover is big too. amount, 
previously protected broking ingiooneienihofuiehugeLS 
houses exposed to free com- markeL 

US institutions are seen as 
the most likely outsiders to 
make use of the new access. 


petition from banks, trust 
companies and foreign com- 


panies. 

The broking activities of 
these institutions are. at 
present, restricted severely by- 
law. 

The Little Bang, announced 
in the Ontario Lraslaiure on Canadian tank* 
Thursday by Mr Monte 
Kwinter. the financial institu- 
tions minister, effectively 


British interest is expected 
to be limited. Another likely 
development is that the 
broking houses will find them- 
selves in the hands of the 


Under the new Ontario 
regulations, domestic banks 


gives Toronto, the heart of and trust companies wiD be 
Canadian financial services, allowed to own up 10 100 per 
national impact cent of a brokerage firm from 

. Mr Kwimer’s aim is to June 30, 1987. 

enable Canada's "JPES Foreign interests would be 
industry to compete belter al]Qwed interesls of 50 

with ns rivals m America. cc nt from that date. This win 


Europe and Japan. 

But Mr John Cathereide, an 
analyst on Canada with 
Kleinwort Grieveson, said the 
question now is whether for- 
eigners will move in on Ca- 
nadian brokerage firms. 


COMPANY NEWS 


a net cash sum to the vendors of 
Burton of S3, mill ion. 

• PETALING TIN BERHAD: 
Group results for the year to 
October 31 in MalSOOO. Pretax 
loss after tribute charges, deple- 
tion and depreciation was 5,741 
(731 profit). Tax was 2 (895) 
deferred tax was 2580 (940). 

• CASTINGS: Figures in £s for 

the six months to September 30. 
interim dividend was tp (0.8p), 
net turnover was 6,690.641 
(6,147,645), operation profit 
was 531.615 (466,580) and pre- 
tax profit was 602,598 
(505,449). Other income was 
70,983 (38.869). Tax was 

21 1,000. (202,000) and earnings 
per stare were 3.80p (2.95pJ. 
The results for the year to end 
March 31 1987 should prove 
satisfactory. Opportunities to 
make further acquisitions will 
be examined. 

• TANJONG TIN DREDG- 
ING: Figures in £s for the six 
months to June 30. Sale of tin 
concentrates was 8,000 
(212,000), loss from mine after 
depreciation and expenditure in 


be increased to 100 percent a 
year later. 

At present, banks and for- 
eign institutions may own no 
more than 10 per cent of a 
broker. 


Britain was 97.500 (304,500 
loss). Estimated loss before tax 
and exchange adjustments, 
64,000(272,500 loss). 

• EDBRO HOLDINGS: Fig- 
ures in £ millions for the su 
months to September 30. In- 
terim was 2.5p (same), sales 
were 1 1.2 (10.0), trading profits 
were 1.0 (1.2), pretax profit was 
0.9 (I.X) and tax was 0.3 (0.1). 

• KENNEDY SMALE: Figures 
in £000 for the six months 10 
September 30. Interim was 2p 
(same), sales were 5. 1 37 (3.341 ). 
pretax profit was 769 (540). tax 
was 190 (30) and earnings per 
stare were 5.8p (4.4p). Directors 
see the half-year profits trend 
continuing for the rest of this 
year. 

• TOWLES: Figures in £000 
for the half year to August 31. 
Turnover was 5898 (5486). tax 
was 140 ( 142) and Joss per share 
was 9.62p (,04p). Since the end 
of August the company has been 
able to maintain and improve 
the level of sales and hopes this 
trend will continue through the 
second half. 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Rrat Deafens Last Deafens Li 

Nov 17 Nov £8 Feb 19 

Dec 1 Dec 12 Mar 5 

Dec 15 Jen 2 Mart 9 


For Sett l e m ent 
Mar 2. 

MarlS 
Mar 30 


Call options warn taken out ok 
G ent. Ke Ora. Hughes Foods, Morgan GranM, Toy Homes. Buckley's B rewery. 
Campan tntnL, J. Mam, AsMey tads, TV-AM. London & Northern, Bestwood. 
Audfotronte, Hanson. Skyine. Chloride, London Securities. 

Puts & Oaks Amstrad. Hughes Foods, Ashley bide. Sure. 


MONEY MARKETS AND. GOLD 




BeseRatesK 

dewing Banks 11 
Finance House 11% 

Discount HteriBBt Loan* % 

OramMM High: 1 0% Low 8 
Week feed: 10% 

Treasury BBs (Discount %) 

.Buying Sefing 

2 ninth 10 n M 2iimtn 10 ,i m 

3mnth 10% 3mnft io% 

Prime Bank BHs (Oiscotmt %) 

1 mnth 10 Z7 &- 10 *» 2 mnth lO^o-IO* 
3mnth I 0 %-l 0 ,, u 6 mnth 10%-I0 u n 

Trade BOs (Discount %) 

1 mnth 11 *n 2mmh 11 ’ia 

3 mnth 11% Bmntfi 11% 

h*etlMHk(%) 

Overnight open 1 1 cioss 9% 

1 weekll'is-ll 6mnth 11'»-11% 

1 mnth 11 3 ib -11% 9 mnth 11 3 ie-11N 

3 mnth lt’w- 11 % 12mth 11 'is-ll% 

Local Authoifei’ Deposits (%) 

Zdays 10% 7 days 10% 

1 mnth 10 ,k w 3 mnth 11% 

6 mnth 11% 12mth 11’n 


BULLION 


GokfcS388iKK)8a50 

rente, ext 
>.00 j “ 

% 91 ^0^50 (£B4. 00-64.75 J 
Platinum 

S48125 (£337.15) 


8 537.J30 (E375J5) 


LONDON ■FINANCIAL FUTURES^' 


Three Month Staffing 

Dec 86 HHL 

Mar 87 

Jun87 


Doc 87 _ 
Mar 88- 
Pravkxa 
Thraa 
Dec 86 
Mar 87 
Jun87 
87 


USTraaswyBond 

Dec 86 : 

Mar 87 

Jin 87 


Open 
_ 8&S! 

High 

8 ate 

Low 

8858 

CtoM 

88l59 

EatVol 

675 

_ 88L6E 

88.66 

6853 

68.64 

1919 

_ 69.08 

B9.08 

8957 

8307 

43 

ti/1 



89.19 

0 

NfT 


, nf _ 

89.04 

0 

N/T 



6852 

0 

interest 16381 




- B3J97 

Previous day's total open interest 24772 
84.00 S3.S4 9304 1017 

. 94.17 

94.19 

94.06 

94.10 

3815 

. 04.13 

04.14 

94.06 

94.03 

546 

0SlB6 

93J38 

rajas' 

9350 

468 

101-29 

Previews day's 
101-30 1«X» 

total open Interest 3885 
100-28 469 

101-00 

101-00 

' 9031 

99-28 

6668 

H/T 




98-30 

0 


Short G« 
Dec 86- 

Mar 87 

JunB7 — 


cat 

DacT 
Mar 87. 

Jun 87 

87 

-SEIOO 


FlS 


Ftewious day's total open Interest 151 

H/T — 95-60 o 

NfT — 96-06 0 

NfT ___ — . 0 

Previoa day's total open interest 19743 
108-11 108-12 107-30 1DB-01 78 

108-15 108-21 107-30 108-07 17297 

N/T — — 108-10 0 

Nff — — — 0 

Previous day '8 total open interest 3516 


“All you needy to be an investment genius, 
is a rising market and a short memory . 77 


Anon. 


At times like these, you might prefer to have your 
investments managed by a team of seasoned professionals 
who have seen it all before. 

If this is how you feel, you ought to be using 
The Master Portfolio Service. 

This is a unique arrangement run by sensible people 
who are at least as concerned about not losing money for 
clients as making it, and can demonstrate the success 
of this philosophy. 

For full details, telephone or write to Nicolas Bowater. 
The mi nimum investment is £50,000. 


CAPEL-CURE MYERS 

Members of the Stock Exchange 
01-248 8446 or 0800 400 495 (Evenings and Weekends) 
65 Hoi born Viaduct, 

London' EClA 2EU and Edinburgh 
Telex: 886653 PROCUR G 

Member of the ANZ Group 


I Authority Bonds (%) 

1 mnth 11 %- 11 % 2mnth 11 %- 11 % 
3 mnth HH-11% Bmnth 11%-11% 
9 mnth 11%-11% 12mth 11%-I1% 

StarfimCDsAU 

1 mnSTm-lff» 3 mnth Ilhs-IIX 
5 mirth 11*w11% 12 rath 11»i*-11 a ii 

Dolor CDs (%) 

1 moth &20-6J5 3 mnth 6.00-6 S5 

Bmnth 5.90-5.85 12mth 5JBS&90 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6%rSn>i* 
3 mnth 


7 days 4 ll is-4 t Hi 
3mnth 4"»4|i'i« 
French Franc 
7 days 7%-7% 
Smith 8 ,( i«-8 n iB 
Subs Franc 
7 days 1%-1% 

3 mnth 4%-4% 
v«i 

7 days 4*»-4*« 

3 mnth 454-4% 


can 6K-5% 

1 mnth 8%-6K 
6 mnth S'is-S^m 
cal 5-4 

1 mnth 4 »»-')m 
6mnft 4'3»-"ie 
can 7%-6% 

1 mnth B%-8 
Bmnth 8%-8% 
caB 2 K- 1 % 

1 mnth 4'iM*i a 
Bmnth 4*io-4'w 

CBfl 4%-3% 

1 until 4*ra-4 7 ii 

Bmnth PwPn 


TREASURY BILLS 


a:E4iS-0M aHoted:£100M 

:£9734% received; 96%. 

Last week: £9734% received: £72% 

Avge rate: £106662% last wk £10X692%. 
NextMMc£iO0M reptecenoOM 


ECGD 


Fixed Rata Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference ran for 
interest period November 1, 1988 to 
Nowoer 28, 1988 tnctustva: 11-248 per 
cam. 


REGENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 
Ashtsad (1 
Avis Europe 
Baker Harris Sndr (1 
Bastan&Battersea (1 

Brake Bros^l25p) 


I75p) 


Dante! S 

Fletcher 

Gaynor 

Geest (1! _ 
GentreeJlSp) 

Gordon Russait 
Guthrie Corp fl . . 
Haffs Homes & Gdns 
Interlink Express (1 
Lloyds Chemist (10 

Lon& MetrapoGtan (' 

M & G Group 
Mecca Leisure (I35p) 
Miss Sam HSdgs (105p) 
Plum Hldgs (90p) 
Quarto (T15p) 

Spandex 
Sum (135p) 

TSfl Chan Isles (70p) 

TS8 W 00p > 

Jnney MacKay (1 
Wooitons Better r 

Ward Group (97pj 


Virgin 

Wranni 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cook WM F/P 
Gtanflekt N fP 
Lon Assc-lnv F/P 
Norfbik Cap F/P 

Ptaro ca n F/P 
Hegaflart N/P 
Throg See ' 

Wi 

Walker 


145 
229 
192 
143 
149 -1 
158 +2 
180+2 
108+1 
154 
53+3 
206 
170 
107-1 
204 
132 
167-1 
270 
151 'i -'a 
95-6 
104+3 
130 
220 
138 
94 
78 U -i. 
129'z -’a 
186 +1 

104 


180 

29 

20-1 

24 

63 

6 

2 




CaBs 



Rote 



Series 

Jan 


Jet 

Jan 

Apr 

4ti 

ABed Lyons 

300 

18 

21 

30 

9 

15 

20 

("307) 

330 

4 

13 

17 

32 

37 

40 

360 

1 

7 

— 

63 

85 


BP 

600 

83 

100 



1 

11 


C874) 

650 

40 

58 

75 

G 

30 

40 

700 

11 

40 

45 

29 

58 

S7 

Cons Gold 

550 

105 

127 



4 

12 


(*643) 

600 

72 

92 

102 

12 

25 

34 


650 

38 

60 

72 

35 

47 

57 

Court&dds 

260 

54 

64 



% 

2 


f?IZ) 

280 

34 

45 

54 

2 

5 

8 

300 

17 

30 

44 

5 

10 

14 


330 

4 

16 

Z7 

25 

28 

33 

Com Union 

260 

12 

21 

28 

S 

17 

20 

(*259) 

280 

5 

13 

20 

23 

29 

33 


300 

1% 

6 

14 

42 

44 

46 

Cable & Wire 

300 

28 

40 

50 

5 

15 

22 

("317) 

325 

13 

25 


17 

25 



350 

4 

17 

— 

35 

42 



. 375 

1 

— 

— 

58 


— 

GEC 

160 

15 

20 

28 

4 

6 

7 

HBS) 

180 

5 

12 

17 

17 

20 

22 


200 

1 

5 

9 

35 

38 

40 

Grand Mat 

360 

103 

108 

_ 

1 

1% 


("456) 

390 

73 

78 

— 

1 

3 

__ 


420 

47 

60 

78 

3 

14 

16 


460 

20 

38 

52 

20 

32 

35 

K3 

950 

172 

183 



2 

5 


mo8) 

1000 

123 

138 

165 

3 

12 

18 


1050 

n 

100 

128 

7 

28 

33 


1100 

a / 

65 

98 

22 

47 

55 

Land Sec 

300 

48 

57 

62 

1% 

3 

7 

rm 

330 

-19 

32 

39 

6 

m l 

14 


360 

5 

14 

20 

23 

25 

29 

L 

180 

10 

19 

25 

4 

7 

9 

n«J) 

200 

S 

10 

16 

17 

21 

24 


220 

1 

5 

9 

37 

40 

41 

Shall Trans 

900 

65 

85 

102 

5 

27 

33 

rs4ij 

950 

27 

50 

70 

23 

45 

SO 



9 

30 

35 

a 

75 

83 



15 

24 

31 

7 

16 

21 

(*267) 

280 

-a 

14 

21 

26 

30 

36 


300 

3 

8 

13 

43 

47 

51 

TSB 

70 

9 

11% 

18% 

1 

2 

3 Y, 

("76) 

80 

a 

6% 

8 

5 

6 

8% 


90 

i% 

2% 

5% 

14% 

14% 

14 


Series 

owe 

Mar 

Jun 

Dee 

Mar 


Beecham 

380 

67 

70 



1 

2 


f414) 

390 

27 

48 

57 

1% 

9 

11 


420 

2% 

28 

38 

10 

24 

31 


460 

1 

10 

20 

48 

53 

60 

Boots 

200 

30 

39 

48 

1 

3 

4 

T2Z7) 


12 

25 

32 

2 

10 

12 


240 

1% 

14 

21 

15 

18 

25 

BTR 

280 

3 

14 

20 

15 

18 

24 

( 4Df) 

300 

— 

7 

13 


37 

40 


307 

1 

— 

— 

42 



Bass 

650 

73 

80 

100 

2 

7 


rriT) 

700 

20 

50 

65 

9 

18 

35 


750 

3 

25 

45 

48 

50 

75 

Blue Circle 

600 

52 

78 

98 

3 

12 

18 

("647) 

650 

13 

47 

87 

20 

35 

45 ' 


700 

1 

— 


b/ 



DeBoers 

660 

145 

65 


2 

13 


("773J 

700 

95 

30 150 

3 

23 

33 


750 

55 100 120 

8 

40 

56 


800 

17 

67 

95 

35 

63 

80 

Dixons 

300 

32 

48 

98 

2 

B 

10 

(*329) 

330 

6 

27 

40 

6 

IS 

22 

360 

1 

IS 

m 

32 

34 

36 

GKN 

240 

32. 

41 

45 

1 

3 

6 

(■270) 

260 

14 

25 

32 

2 

9 

15 

280 

3 

16 


14 

18 

23 


300 

2 

8 

— 

30 

33 


Glaxo 

900 

22 

67 

97 

9 

35 

48 

ran?) 

950 

3 

43 

72 

45 

62 

72 



2 

25 

so 



1050 

1 

14 

— 148 148 

— 

Hanson 

160 

29 

82 



% 



(188) 

180 

10 17% 23% 

% 

7 9% 


200 

1% 7% 

14 

13 17% 19% 



% 

3 6% 

33 

35 36% 


)ED OPTIONS 

-;'\r 

: ‘k 

. .j 



m 


Series 

Cals 



Pots 



Dec 

Mar 

Jm 

Dee 

Mar 

Jun 

Jaguar 

C515) 

500 

22 

52 

73 

3 

25 

32 

550 

% 

22 

40 

33 

45 

50 

600 

1 

12 

— 

83 

8/ 


Thom EMI 

420 

58 

72 

88 

1 

5 

7 

(*“72) 

460 

22 

43 

82 

5 

19 

23 

500 

6 

20 

40 

31 

39 

4b 


550 

1 

11 

— 

79 

84 

— 

Tesco 

330 

70 




V, 





(*397) 

360 

40 

55 

65 

% 

6 

11 


390 

8 

33 

40 

4 

13 

18 


420 

3 

15 

23 

25 

28 

37 


Series 

Feta May Aug 

Feb May Atm 

BntAero 

420 

84 

93 



5 

8 


(*488) 

460 

47 

60 

72 

10 

17 

2S 


500 

27 

37 

47 

28 

35 

42 

BATinda 

360 

108 





1 



(*459) 

390 

78 

85 



2 

4 




420 

51 

82 

72 

5 

10 

15 


460 

22 

3b 

47 

20 

25 

30 

Barclays 

460 

42 

52 

62 

10 

20 

"a 

(■478) 

500 

20 

Z7 

3b 

32 

37 

47 


550 

b 

11 

— 

77 

85 


Brit Telecom 

180 

20 

25 

32 

2% 

7 

~~ii" 

(■IK) 

an 

8 

16 

20 

15 

16 

21 


220 

3 

9 

— 

29 

31 

— 

CaAwrySdhwppo 

160 

29 

33 

37 

3 

5 

~~9 

naij 

180 

12 

20 

24 

8 

12 

14 


200 

5% 

11 

14 

21 

26 

28 

Guinness 

300 

15 

30 

35 

28 

30 

35 

(289) 

330 

6 

15 

25 

53 

53 

55 


360 

2 

6 

12 

78 

80 

80 


Ladbroke 

C361) 


38 

48 

n 

3 

9 

12 

380 

19 

30 

42 

15 

21) 

25 



8 

17 

27 

35 

38 

42 

LASMO 

130 

25 

79 


4 

8 

_ 

(146) 

140 

17 

23 

31 

9 

13 

15 


.160 

9 

13 

18 

19 

23 

24 

Midland Bank 

500 

65 

82 

90 

5 

1? 

20 

(*548) 

550 

35 

43 

52 

mem 

32 

37 


600 

12 

18 

24 

60 

62 

67 

PS O 


58 

70 

8S 

5 

11 

15 

(*504) 


30 

42 

57 

20 

30 

32 


550 

/ 

18 

28 

50 

57 

62 

Ratal 

160 

22 

32 

36 

8 

8 

9 

(*175) 

180 

10 

17 

24 

13 

17 

22 



4 

10 

— 

26 

30 


RTZ 

(*658) 

600 

650 

85 

47 

102 

62 

82 

10 

25 

20 

40 

50 



22 

40 

52 

57 

85 

74 


Vast Rests 
(*82) 


70 18% 21% 24% 3% 4% 5% 

80 9% 14% 17 6 8 9% 

90 4 9 11% n 12% 14 % 


Series War Jun Sap War Jun Sep 


Lonrho 

(*228) 


240 

260 


42 



2 

7 

— 

27 

33 

9’» 

16 

19 

16 

20 

23 

28 

31 

8 

— 

40 

42 

— 


TrlT%% 1991 
(*£101) 

TM1%% 03/07 

C£106) 


_geries Feb Msy Auq Fet» May Aug 

1M 2'i« 2% -'JJ •»„ 1% 

IK y. V.* 2 *•* 2% 

104 % % — 3% 3fc — 

122 25 4 ® ,b s* 1 * *» V* 

222 3* 3y - ** a, » 3% 4 % 

08 *•» 2% 3% 3% 4% 5% 

110 »„ 2'n — Shi G'<b — 

112 *« ~ 6% 7% - 

114 'a 1'» — 8% 5P» — 




Dec 

ESJl 

in 

m 

Dec 


Feb 

Mar 

FT-SE 


80 







— " 

Index 

1575 

57 

70 







( IB14) 


40 

55 

70 

83 

10 

•25 

28 

32 




42 

bb 

Kfl 

23 


42 

4S 


1650 

14 

30 

42 

55 

45 

50 

55 

57 


1675 

1700 

7 

2ft 

2U 

32 


65 

90 

70 

73 



FT -SC Index. CaXs; 457 . Puts: 747 


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AND FINAN 



>T 0 CK MARKI 


Dealers bank on fresh S & N 
battle for Matthew Brown 


By Michael Clark and Carol Leonard 

l^'fbr^a "SSFJSS"- last bid for Manbew 

-d bid foT'tt 0 ^^“™ 

r^S^b*N™~J V if k ’ B^hefe the stock market 

Oo Thursday^^'be StSt'Sti'flfe 

Sja- ^“■ Sc ? nish * 53? ££?&*■££ 

cSid£iSf^«'S and other markeimensliUpre- 

SSh 8 D 20 m “t 0n b . ld f ? r occupied with tales of insider 

The FT-® 100 index stnig- 
Sh a SSLHSJ* ** 10 Bkd to dose 3.4 points hitter 
. ai 1.613.5, helped by new-Sne 
bnying. and the FT 30»sharc 
u have the threefold effect index was up 2.6 at 1,268.5. 

niSS??* d £ZS i, per In *** F ,l ‘ ed l cd ™«iKt 

hpff^v ^wreSlsofupto£%at 

stle held by Mr Ron the longer end. 

. New Among blue chips, 

J5E3P5. ■ ■ I0 S? as, i^icJ he Tn s*&oase Forte finned 5p to 
SS 8 ^ s JS??^L 0 *!pSfe5 1 85p as some traders insisted 


[COMMENT Kenneth Fleetl 


The law steps in — 
but so softly softly 


selves for a multi-million 
pound bid for Matthew 
Brown, the brewer, next week, 
from Scottish & Newcastle. 

On Thursday it will be 
exactly a year since Scottish & 
Newcastle’s made its last un- 
successful £l 20 million bid for 
Matthew Brown, where it still 
has a 29.9 per cent stake, and, 
according to Takeover Panel 
rules, it will then be fae to 
launch a fresh attack. 

A renewed bid, if successful 
will have the threefold effect 
of watering down the 4 per 
cent stake m Scottish & New- 
castle held by Mr Ron 
Brierley, the New Zealand 
entrepreneur, increasing the 
company’s chain of pubs from 
1.400 to almost 2,000 and 
giving it several big brand 
names, including Theakston’s 
beer and Slalom Lager. 

‘ The December 1 1 deadlin e 
comes, conveniently, three 
days after Matthew Brown’s 
year-end figures which are out 
on Monday. Most analysts are 
looking for profits of £9.2 
million, excluding property 
profits of around £500,000. 

But some think Scottish & 
Newcastle will wait a few 
months, in the hope that the 
Matthew Brown share price 
will drift lower, before making 
its move. 

“They are obviously stiff 
interested or they wouldn’t 
still be sitting on that 29.9 per 
cent stake,” said one leading 
brewing analyst “They’re 
only getting a return on their 
investment of about 3 per cent 
— they could do better than 
that by just putting the money 
in a b ank- " 

Matthew Brown jumped 
17p yesterday to 605p and 
dealers said the current share 
price already includes a 
significant bid premium. Its 
current p/e of 22 is far too 
high, according to sector ex- 
perts. “It should be on a rating 
of 12 or 13,” said one. 

Scottish & Newcastle has 10 
per cent of market share in 
terms of wholesale beer 
production, but owns less than 
2 per cent of Britain’s pubs. 
The acquisition of Matthew 
Brown would reduce this 
imbalance. 


Tiphoo^ 

Tiphook: ^ 

still going 

for growth i 


FTA 

ALL SHARE 
INDEX 




■■1986 ■; 


♦ Westland, rty helicopter 
firm, is about to take off. Its 
year-end results are out on 
Thursday and analysts look- 
ing for profits of £15 to £20 
million should have a pleasant 
surprise. The figure, 
boosted by the Indian order 
for Sea King Helicopters, 
will top their best estimates. 

Its shares firmed 5p to 
91* 

that someone was building a 
stake. Hanson slipped 3p to 
188p following its results. 
Thorn EMI dipped 4p to 472p 
ahead of its interims of 
Wednesday, and Glaxo lost 7p 
to ) 88 p. 

Morgan Grenfell, the mer- 


the second half 

Analysts are currently look- 
ing for a final figure of £4.5 
million — a target well within 
the group’s reach. That com- 
pares with £2.77 minion last 
year. 

Many brokers now view 
Tiphook as a strong growth 
stock and are confident it can 
keep up the pace over the next 
few years. 

Yesterday shares of Tip- 
hook were unchanged at 330p 
and Hoare Govett, the broker, 
which has recently started to 
make a market in the shares, 
has published a “buy” cir- 
cular. It regards the shares 
cheap at the 345p level. 

Things are certainly looking 
brighter these days for Mr 
Robert Montague, chairman 
of Tiphook, who has been the 
driving force behind the 


chant bank, recovered a fur- group’s recent rise to fame, 
ther 8 p to 373p and Guinness But it was a different story 
5p to 288p, ahead of hs results last Arcust when the shares 
on Wednesday. were onoed at 1 lOp after an 

Beady Mix Concrete jump- earlier listing had been post- 
ed 13p to 462p on talk that posed. Even so, Tiphook’s 


Amey Roadstone Corpora- 
tion, a subsidiary of Consoli- 
dated GoldSdds, might bid. 
Other cement firms also im- 
proved. Blue Circle climbed 
7p to 448p. 

Any lingering doubts the 
market may have had about 
Tiphook, die container and 


public debut was dogged by 
bad publicity thanks to an 

mitfatrp by jt 5 

former financial adviser. Bar- 
days Merchant Bank. It has 
taken a long time for Tiphook 
to recover. 

When the company came to 
market it was capitalized at 


trailer rental group, following £15 millio n- Now it is valued 
last year's disastrous flotation at almost £70 million and Mr 


were finally swept aside earlier 
this week after some better- 
than-expected interim figures. 
These showed pretax profits 
up nearly 50 per cent at £1.5 


Montague reckons it will be 
worth nearer £500 million 
within three years. 

Business in all five divisions 
is booming and the group has 


Mexico’s oil revenue crash is Poc . h !. ex P ec * s 
making debts unserviceable stay stable 


Oil production costs have 
always been a state secret in 
Mexico, but the other day, at 
the ministry of energy, a 
confidential document tum- 
bled from the archives and fell 
open at the appropriate page. 

This year, the average cost 
of producing a barrel of Mexi- 
can crude was $ 6 . 10 , but if 
royalties and taxes paid by the 
Petroleos Mexican os com- 
pany to the government are 
added, it becomes SI 1.28. 

The various components of 
the $5.18 Pemex pays to the 
state are fixed by law. Hence, 
when Mexican oil falls below 
$11.28, Pemex loses. 

When oil earnings drop 
because of a reduction in 
volume, the government loses 
income. Up to the end of 
September, the energy min- 


istry calculates a loss of $7.4 of 1986, prices plummeted 
billion (£5.1 billion) in oil and volume shrank from 1.5 
income. It says 80 per cent of million barrels a day to 1.35 
the loss stemmed from falling million. Ifthe figures are taken 
prices and 20 per cent from at face value, the conclusions 
reduced volume. are hair-raising. An earnings 

Later calculations fix the oil loss of $8.5 billion, ded u cted 
income loss at S8.2 billion up from the 1985 total of $13.3 
to the end of November and billion, results in 1986 oD 
project a loss of $8.5 billion by earnings of $4.8 billion, far 
the end of the year. lower than any official es- 

A second confidential re- timate. the worst of which was 
port, from Pemex, has just $6 billion. 

$4!swjforfi^ufoSS 

price crash. As a consequence, ““SL, 
the Pemex report says, several Tcan£c - 
important installations have As a result of all this, 
been neglected. Mexico would be $5.2 billion 

Oil prices have fallen from in the red at the end of the year 
$14.9 billion in 1984 to $13.3 and in no position to service 
billion in 1985. In the first half its huge foreign debt. 


Hamburg (AP-Dow Jones) 
— There is reason to hope far a 
continuation of stable dollar 
rates, Herr Karl Otto Poehl, 
president of the Buadeshuk, 
said here, according to a report 
by the West German economic 
news service, VWD. 

The stabOhy of the dollar, 
with few significant fluctua- 
tions over the past few months 
and the fact that leading 
central banks have -not been 
forced to intervene hi foreign 
exchange markets to support: 
the dollar, gave ground for the 
likelihood of a stable Ameri- 
can currency in the future, the 
report said. 

There was no written text of 
the speech, delivered to the 
Federation of German Ship- 
ping- 


TEMPUS 


Demerger threat to L and N 


Although keen not to be 
tarred with an aggressive 
Hansonesque brush. Demer- 
ger Two’s offer for London 
and Northern Group has a 
familiar ring. Lord Hanson 
tends to be less forthright 
about his breakup plans and 
does not float individual 
constituents of his empire, 
but the maxim that the parte 
are worth more than the 
whole fits both approaches. 

Demerger is probably theo- 
retically correct in claiming 
that the four divisions of L 
and N would be better appre- 
ciated by the market if they 
enjoyed separate stock mar- 
ket listings- However, in prac- 
tice, one of L and hTs saving 
graces has been that its spread 

of businesses has protected it 
from even more dramatic 

^Moreover. Demeijer dora 
not intend to replace L a id 

PTs management. It 

inject people mio sWtegc 
positions to remfor« 
busioess. Demerger believes 

StSns& 

N S"b^ ag e r - 

view. Indeed there are many 

Rockville Crushed Stooe b 

busies *>-£ss!5 

cash alternative, let alone tne 

sKKg-Sr 

up with a stalwartdcfc"^-. 
This offer is certtedy * 


no 

100- i 

90 a 
80- 
re- r 


LONDON & NORTHERN 
. GROUP 


PRICE RELATIVE TO f&j 


1985 1986 


innovative deals. Demerger 
was unsuccessful before and 
may be so again given the 
market’s innate conserva- 
tism, the unproven profit 
potential of some of L and 
N’s divisions, and the attrac- 
tions of the shares on a yield 
basis. However, some may be 
enticed by the cash alterna- 
tive. 

Johnson Fry 

Johnson Fry. the licensed 
dealer, is an interesting new 
USM minion which may well 

soar oo the back of changes m 
the financial services arena. 

The company has already 
shown itself adept at exploit- 
ing the Government's Busi- 
ness Expansion Scheme, 
introduced in 1983. 

Pretax profits in the past 
three years have leapt from 
slightly above breakeven to 
£ 795,000 in the year to 
October 31. Sift earnings 
from BES arc not likely to 
come so easily now the 
Government has the power 
to clamp down on some BES 

companies quickly rather 
than wait for the next Budget. 

That said, Johnson Fry is 
still going to find attractive 


BES packages to market And 
it has the benefit of the share 
options and preferential 
shareholdings in 23 BES 
companies it has floated. 

The client list and publicity 
Johnson Fry has generated 
through BES activities should 
enable its other arms, such as 
insurance broking and fund 
management, to grew. And 
the new opportunities for 
financial boutiques may lead 
to Johnson Fry winning some 
contracts to manage funds for 
bigger institutions. 

Bear in mind that, al- 
though the company has an 
experienced management 
team, h has been put together 
fairly recently. Much still 
depends on the business acu- 
men and marketing expertise 
of Charles Fry, the chairman. 

The company comes to the 
market on a p/e of 1 3.2 — not 
high for the sector. 

Standard 

Chartered 

If ever there was a speculative 
share. Standard Chartered 
must be it. Standing out like a 
sore thumb from the rest of 
the banking sector. Stan- 


dard’s shares have plum- 
meted over the last two weeks 
from 820p to about 775p 
yesterday. In the last few days 
they have bounced about 
between 780p and 760p- 

The market is indicating 
two things to Standard’s 
board: that it continues to 
regard the bank as a hot 
takeover prospect and is 
completely foxed at what is 
going on within the bank. 

Doubts hang over Stan- 
dard's present performance. 
While profits will be up at the 
next year-end, there are ques- 
tions over their quality and 
there is no sign yet that die 
new corporate plan laid 9 m 
during the summer is being 
implemented. 

There continues to be the 

millstone of South Africa — 
perhaps Standard’s best de- 
fence against a bid but hardly 
a profit centre. Bad-debt pro- 
visions on cross-border South 
African loam are skimpy and 
there are problems in the Far 
East. 

On these fundamentals and 
despite healthy profits ex- 
pected again this year from 
foreign exchange dealing, the 
prospective p/e of about 8.5 
looks unrealistic. 

Trying to predict how the 
shares Drill move over the 
next few months is probably a 
fool's game, made still harder 
by the news that Tan Sri 
Khoo Teck Puat is taking his 
cash out of Exco. How soon 
wifi he do the same from 
Standard? 

He is looking for buyers of 
his 6 per cent stake for 
between 850p and 900p. 

In the long run, Lloyds 
Bank is certainly still in- 
terested but cannot renew its 
bid until next July. Only the 
most steety-nerved in vestors 
are likely to find it fan 
dabbling in Standard shares 


million with an even better avoided the troubles thai have 
performance on the cards for hit many of its bigger con- 


tainer-leasing rivals. Thanks 
to the big export boom in 
South Korea, Tipbook’s fleet 
of containers is set to double 
to 76,000 by ApriL Despite the 
recent strong performance of 
the shares, they still look good 
value for money in the long 
term. 

Unigate, the dairy and food 
products group, was a firm 
market after hours, climbing 
49 to 312p after a meeting 
with various institutions at 
the offices of County Securi- 
ties. County is reckoned to be 
a big fan ot the shares. 

There were some wild 
fluctuations in the shares of 
beleaguered Consolidated 
Gold Fields, the mining fi- 
nance group, after the news 
that it had called in investi- 
gators from the Department of 
Trade and Industry. 

The shares have been the 
subject of intense takeover 
speculation in recent months 
that has seen them rise from 
400p to a new high of 700p. 
The wealthy South African 
businessman, Mr Harry 
Oppenheimer, owns anear 30 
per cent state through his 
quoted subsidiary Mineral Re- 
sources. Last night the shares 
closed 17p lower at 643p after 
trading between 630p and 
653p. 

The DTI has been called in 
to investigate a build-up of 
nearly 10 million shares (4.9 
per cent) by the American 
exploration company, Barrick 
Resources Corporation, which 
have not been registered. 

The buyers also came in for 


the other mining finance 
group, Charter Consolidated, 
where Mr Oppenheimer owns 
a 36 per cent stake, foDowing 
the mention in this column 
yesterday. Mr Richard Lake, 
chartist at Savory Milin, the 
broker, sees the shares going 
sharply higher and there is 
also talk of a possible bid on 
the way. 

The group is due to unveil 
interim figures on Wednesday 
which should make interesting 
reading and has already bene- 
fited from a quadrupled divi- 
dend from Johnson Matthey 
where its has a 27 per cent 
slake. The shares finished I 4 p 
dearer at 307p. 

The big four high street 
clearing honks enjoyed a new 
lease of fife thanks to some 

# T VfHf p mriral 

chairs is stiD going on among 
stockbrokers. Mr Ed 
Wright and Mr Bob Bvcknell, 
engineering analysts at 
Scrimgeonr Vickers, resigned 
yesterday to join rival 
Smith New Court. Mr Tony 
Lewis, their new chairman, 
says: “They will make a very 
high-p o wered team." 

selective support from the 
institutions. It looks as though 
they have been oversold in 
recent weeks and several lead- 
ing brokers claim they are 
looking cheap. Now is re- , 
garded as a good time to buy 
the shares ahead of the next ! 
dividend season due in 
March. 

Leading the way was Lloyds 
Bank I Op higher at 429p 
followed by Midland Bank 7p 
to S47p, Barclays Bank 3p to 
477p and National West- 
minster Bank 2p to 487p. The 
two biggest independent Scot- 
tish banks also came in for 
support with Bank of Scotland 
5p up at 404p and Royal Bank 
of Scotland 12p to 286p 
following full-year figures ear- 
lier this week revealing a £90 
milli on bad-debt provision. 
Royal goes ex-dividend on 
Monday and is already attract- 
ing the income funds. 

Even Standard Chartered 
ame in for an overdue rally 
following the denials from 
both the company and the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry about a possible 
investigation into its defence 
of the recent £ 1.2 billion bid 
from Lloyds Bank. The price 
dosed 5p sharper at 782p. 

There was heavy turnover 
in GEC with almost 6 million 
shares changing hands. But 
the price finished 3p lower at 
166p. The Government is 
expected to dedde next ac- 
count whether to choose 
GECs Nimrod airborne early 
warning system, or Boeing's 
established Awacs system. 


T he City Takeover Panel, in its 
wisdom, decided that it did not 
want to enshrine its nebulous but 
powerful position within the provisions 
of the Financial Services Act, or come 
into the widening orbit of the Securities 
and Investments Board. Far from 
leaving the Panel as a relic of the old 
nudge-and-wink era of City authority, 
however, that has now propelled it into 
the much predicted and much-feared 
new era of recourse to the courts. 

In the Appeal Court yesterday. Sir 
John Donaldson, Master of the Rolls, 
ruled that it was unthinkable that the 
Panel should operate "cocooned from 
the attentions of the courts” since it was 
performing a public duty in its regula- 
tion of financial markets. 

It has long been thought that Big 
Bang, by bringing in big international 
corporations and American groups used 
to New York ways, was bound to lead to 
a switch from observance of the spirit of 
rules right to the opposite extreme of 
challenging the letter of the rules and 
judgments in the courts. The lawyers 
might, after all, be the biggest benefi- 
ciaries from Big Bang. 

It was, perhaps, symbolic that the first 
to challenge the Panel in court was the 
American PrudentiaJ-Rache Securities, 
which sought relief from an admittedly 
questionablejudgment of the Panel over 
the Norton Opax victory in its bid for 
McCorquodale. 

The Panel argued in court — with 
many a practitioner and observer saying 
“hear, hear” on the sidelines — that 
constant legal challenge of decisions 
would lead to uncertainty in markets, 
not to mention chaos in the middle of 
takeover bids where strict timetables 
would be wrecked by die court's delay. 

One could sympathize with the 
Panel’s fear, if not the somewhat 


hysterical tone, when it argued that 
recourse to the courts would threaten 
the survival of all self-regulatory bodies. 

In the event that is certainly not what 
the Master of the Rolls has in mind. He 
could hardly claim die Panel was 
immune from challenge but the A peal 
Court has phrased its ruling in a way de- 
signed to ensure that anyone who gets 
the wrong answer from a regulator does 
not automatically seek court relief. 

The court will normally only deal in 
declaratory judgments, saying whether 
the Panel should take a different view in 
fiiture. For Sir John, this means the 
judgments would be “historic rather 
than contemporaneous.” In other 
words, it will give the complainant a fair 
idea that he was robbed without giving 
any redress. 

The court would only quash a Panel 
verdict if it felt it was unfair in terms of 
natural justice, another thing Sir John 
thought “unthinkable.” And. whatever 
happened, the Panel's ruling, after its 
own internal appeal, would hold sway 
while the court was deciding 

This may deter court action as a 
purely delaying ploy but would hardly 
discourage those who thought they had 
been treated unfairly. The precedent of 
the Norton Opax case, where the court 
ruled against Pru-Bache, is likely to act 
as a greater deterrent there. 

The Panel has the option of appealing 
to the House of Lords — the son of auto- 
matic appeal it wants to avoid in its own 
bailiwick — or to knock on the SIB's 
door with cap in hand. Thau however, 
may not do it much good. Last night, the 
SIB's lawyers, having initially thought 
the judgment had no application to their 
system, were beginning to suspect on 
closer scrutiny that some decisions of 
self-regulatory organizations like the old 
Stock Exchange might also be covered. 


Rising sun behind a cloud 


C oncents lying behind the dollar- 
yen pact are exposed very clearly 
to view by the latest figures for 
growth in the Japanese economy. These 
show a rise of only 0.6 per cent in 
Japanese GNP during the third quarter, 
rather a long way from the 4 per cent an- 
nual rate of growth for which the 
Japanese government was hoping this 
year. 

Since then, as pari of the pact, Japan 
has cut its interest rates by half of one 
percentage point and will introduce 
from the beginning of next year some 
very modest fiscal reflation. The impact 
of this on domestic demand seems likely 
to be small. Much more important to 
Japan's export-oriented industry is to 
restrain any further rise in the yen which 
is largely responsible for the latest poor 
set of figures. 

What the dollar-yen pact really 
amounts to is still far from dear. It does 
not seem to have stopped Japanese 


spokesmen from indicating that the yen 
is still over-valued, nor the Americans 
from complaining that the surplus 
countries like Japan and Germany 
should reflate more. 

For the rest of the world, the Japanese 
figures, coming after the disappointing 
figures for West Germany, where 
growth in the third quarter was only 0.5 
per cent, suggest that the forecast re- 
acceleration in growth following the 
pause caused by lower oil prices may be 
delayed for longer than Western govern- 
ments had hoped. 

In Britain, the rise in economic 
growth next year from 2% per cent to 3 
per cent predicted in the Chancellor's 
autumn statement largely depends on a 
rise in exports. This in turn depends on 
higher world growth and an increase in 
trade in manufactures. The longer that 
recovery in world growth is delayed the 
more optimistic the forecast appears. 


If you’re about to invest in a pension plan 
make sure it’s the best on the mar^t* 


SCHRODER 

M'ana.Uiil 

Fund 


&2<M>17 


Four Am vm s< OTns,t 
LQl 1 1 ABLL ■ WIDOW'S 

ALLIFO ■ WOli Prorit.-- ■ \Vithp m r, r <: 


1)1 \B Alt 
Manag'd 
Fund 


£3U)2f> I # 5 - 84 <> 


ALBANY 
LIFE : 

Multiple 

.• /..Fund 

*36,221 


TAKGFT^ | 
I- /Jdaiiaj’ed A j 
I ' Fund . 


, .'•'V'’. aL-'. ■ 

I ; V >. ,> 

r, An ’ L-m 
•r " 

[• . , I 

' V-A ! 


Value of Pension Fond over 10 years to 1st April 1986. 

Source: Money Management, August 1986 

Assumes 120 monthly premiums ofJUOO 'Amount Invested (Allowing Tor tax relief at 30%) 


** Tarjit v l soars lu*.id and shoulders above all 
ri\ als in i h<* pensions field 


The Times, Saturday Z6th J&nnary 1985. 

If you’re self-employed or the director or a 
private company, youH know all about the tax 
advantages of in vesting in a pension plan. 

Your biggest problem will be selecting the 
best from the rest Obviously, the most important 
factor will be the size of your pension fund when 
you eventually retire. 


** Target Managed is iniquesUbiiabiy-Xhev-i C^B 
Steve Cram of investment pertormanoe'*^ V HI 


Money Management. October 1985. 

What it doesn’t show, however, is that the 
Target Plan has out-performed all other personal 
pension plans over the last ten years. 

Whatfs more, only the Target plan provides 
you with a guaranteed loanback facility* enabling 
you to draw on your investment whenever you 
like, with no additional management charges. 


|H fct Indeed the h*.*st performing' contract jn tluv ** Prize for tin* most outstanding performance 
I^B survey was linked to Target's Managed Fund ^Bof the decade must still go to Target Managed ** 


The Daily Telegraph, Saturday 3Isi December 1983- 

All too often, this decision is taken as a result 
of comparing projected growth figures, whereas 
the only realistic basis for comparison is achieved 
growth. The table above compares the actual 
results of an investment in the Thiget Personal 
Pension Plan - linked to the Ihrget Managed 

Pension Fund -with two 

leading with profits A 13# 1 iTT 1 
policies and three other | f\ |\\ TIj l 

SS£" VtSted TARGET GROUP PLC 


Money Magazine. February 1986. 

And, with Target you’re not committed to 
keeping up a regular payment You may vary the 
level of your investment to suit your personal 
circumstances. Except, or course, with a growth 
record like ours, we think you’ll want to invest 
more rather than less. Tb find out more, fill 

TB out and return the Freeposl 
coupon below, or ‘phone 
0296 394000and ask for the 
Client Services Department 

‘M&Xi lo Irrrt irt pnmu» sad arcrpuUr wwli) . 


UNTT TRUSTS • LIFE ASSURANCE ■ PENSIONS • FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 


Please let me have farther details or the ’forget Pension Plan. 


-Occupatior 


lu&TeLNc 


| Send to: Dept MF, Target Gronp PLC, FREEPOST, Aylesbury, Bucks HP19 3Y A 












tfUSlNiiSS AiNU FINAJNCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


' THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 




EnOMO 

SuSt fet 


nr 


Bid Offer ctfngYW 


TTT 


Mean EMmpi EMM 3744 
Ml Emn*x MS 4-2 4014 
I property TsJ *100000 

nity Tran £ 2023.0 


3m*. London BSV SOP 


S & C Spadd Sto !M 9 U .. 044 

ew nma o ff i ci a l *w ts nnTfuwp 

2 . Fe*» Snn Untan BC 2 Y SND 
01488 IBIS 

Income 38408 .. 404 

Aeon £ 11.187 .. .. 

DwoM 1000 .. 1085 

CLERICAL KBCft IW TRUST 


Hu m Plan . ertoot 
0800 873 BS 3 
Anw CM 
Etjuty Kgn income 
Bmpun Grown 
Omani Enin 
an s Him m on 
an * rkm inc 
nasx Secwwea 
Mine Tn 
Japan Growth 
PMgroe GBi 


217 2/ 6 

410 4 SuM 

313 342a 
3 S 3 40.8 
263 284 
224 23 M 
243 238 

238 253 
34.7 385 
248 255 


COUNTY ITT RUMMERS LTD 
181 . OmiaWa. London EC 2 V 5 &J 
01-128 IBM 

Energy Trw 9 482 S 20 

Extra Income 168.7 1765 

Ftaendri 1892 118.1 

gh Strategy 582 s&a® 

Grown Inmstmm 280 i 7 287.1 

ncona a Growth 41.4 43 JM 

Jmmse Grown 1854 2058 

Mh Anw Qnnefli TTO.O , 144 e 

M Hocomy 1187 1234 

SmoRnr Co s 2224 236.4 

Gtot*l tne T* 616 S52rn 

SpncW an Ace 285.1 301.7 


18-4 838 
725 778 

57.1 807 
405 149 * 
625 665 
166 1183 
M 4 1005 
220 130,7 

81.1 074 
532 965 
885 70 . 8 - 


109.0 1184 S 
1187 1234 
2224 2354 

616 652 « 

285.1 3017 


■MLB 1.90 
- 0.1 4 J 0 
+04 2.00 
.. 270 
-02 360 
- 0.1 950 
.. 240 
.. 600 
-03 OSO 
.. 250 


.. 453 
- 0.7 530 
-84 231 
.. 158 
-07 258 
-02 464 
+20 060 
+04 1.41 
+ 1.1 214 
-04 1.81 
-. 548 
-05 150 




DoMng, Sumy 


FP Equtfy DM 
Do Accun 
FP ftmn to DM 
Da Aoum 
Steward** DM 
□a «cun 


1900 E 07 JM -03 253 
3284 3480 * -05 253 
1020 105641 -OO 582 
1207 128 . 3 © -05 aSS 

1707 1812 * -37 173 

1777 men .. its 




FUNDS M COURT 

nuc Hi— a lOngaera y 1 YC 2 

01-405 4300 


CROWN UNTT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. WOUig CBJ 21 1 XW 
04882 5033 

High In come Trial 24 S 7 2855 -05 452 

Grown Truit 2226 2385 -05 304 

Amarfcan Thai 1324 1405 + 0.7 071 

CRUSADBI URTT TRUST MANAGERS LID 

W^r RHaBBL 

UK mama 475 5 U -31 4.72 

UK Growth Aeeon 405 515 .. 241 

De DM 485 515 . . 241 

Euuoaan Grown 80.1 640 + 0.7 166 

Paenc toowtl, 552 80.1 +05 051 

S-HUNTT TRUST MANAGERS 
•LitaMeCreacmL Erinbuofi 
031 - 22 B 3492 

American Fund 735 78 . 7 a +02 127 

CapM AM 1006 1073 -05 15 B 

Grown 5 Inc AM 1206 1373 -06 463 

HMi DM Rid 1092 1163 * -04 550 

btomaBonal HM 2143 2282 +04 0.99 


L 5 C UNIT TRUST HAWOeMHeMT 
n^r hojm. copna* m ECzn tbc 
01-588 2 B 0 D 

Income Fund 4475 457.1 .. 551 

MnMnUGm 2825 2877 .. 150 

UOWL A GENERAL UMT TRUST 


m 


ten saBra"— ■■ 

GMty DMrtMdm 
bo Accun 
Do Income 


MmoBonalRMI 2143 223,2 

flasowca Fund 253 285 

Srrrir Jap Co s End 345 376 

Tt*,o Fuel 1882 180.1 


+04 an 
+62 037 

+ai .. ; 

+15 060 . 
.. 263 I 
.. ai 8 


Tt*fO Fund 1882 1821 *15 060 

(Ex) AlPer (21 1470 15 :..:; .. 263 

feljaptoSl 1121 1111 * .. Q .18 

ted P#d 8 e ft 3315 3407 + 11.1 029 
tedSmnler jap ft) 7046 209 .fi +36 a 10 

EurohM 297 31.0 +03 3.18 

EAGLESTMUMT TRUST MANAGER* 

BM Rndl ChMMtam. dwaHrier GL 53 7 UJ 
0242 521311 

UK BMncM tae 68.7 746 * - 0.1 220 
Da Accun 715 755 * - 0 L 1 3.12 

UK Grown Accun 884 845 +15 218 

UK Hpi Me fne 874 715 « -05 458 
N American Accun 705 752 +03 0.71 

Far Easmti Accun 1112 1188 +07 an 

tawMi Accun 821 995 +15 1.18 

UK OR • FI Inc 485 525 * -05 957 
Da Accun 


715 755 * - 0.1 212 

884 945 +15 218 

874 7 T 6 # ms 458 
705 752 +03 0.71 

1112 1185 +07 058 

921 995 +15 1.18 

485 525 * -03 937 
524 55 .Be 44 861 


Far Easton 
GB Tm«J 
ersens Eqt*y 


2 B 4 2 281.1 -04 259 
4175 4445 -08 258 
815 655 -02 458 

785 844 + 1.1 156 

1196 127.8 +05 871 

885 735 * -05 804 
876 935 * +06 154 
722 785 +05 231 




Stowage Hart 

Grown Unfit 7 S 5 805 

eat a Raw rot 1027 iob 5 
Utah Income unto 1187 (220 
Htah YMd OB Unt 566 386 
M Groan Unto 1436 1520 
N American LHts 726 775 
Fto EetT Units 972 1023 
Smew Coe Fund 732 773 


m- 


(436 1520 
726 775 
972 1023 
732 776 


+06 233 

N American Trust 086 885 -02 149 

UK Spec* sum 626 080 + 0.1 1,18 

tro u t r aOu nal Bond 476 50.8 + 0 L 1 897 

JapanaM T* Si.a 545 +05 062 

Mngod Ttt 482 515 +02 282 

U 6 YDBBMK UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
gagnm Opt Qering 6 rSaL HWMg. W 


aneaPUNrr trust 

Uncom Hsa. 252 . Romford Ra E 7 

01-284 6844 


1342 142041 -05 473 


MERCURY FUND MMUOERS LTD 

Myr n,sta;w8As 


Do Accun 
COBS Euro GBl tot 
Do Accubi 


DoAocam 
Extra Incomt 
Do Accun 
German dm Inc 
. DO Accun 


178.7 191.10 -04 328 
3245 34560 -08 325 
SOI ) 

500 „ .1 

548 582 ..268 
816 654 +0.1 299 
158.1 18810 -05 527 


-09 527 

Harman on ho 786 816 +16 018 

■ Po A ccun 713 82.1 +15 aiB 

■wprot sms Ml -06 472 

OoAown 5416 5781 -14 472 

06 Tech 1985 20060 +16 02 S 

Dp Accun 2056 21870 + 1.7 025 

Jag*) Growth 826 876 +05 me 

„ Do Accun BZO 686 +06 062 

N Anar 8 San 1087 1166 +08 1.12 

Do Aoam 1174 1246 +07 1.12 

PWfc Batin T 45 J 1545 +16 802 

Oo Atann 1517 1815 +16 002 

Smntor Cm 8 Rac 1834 20 S 7 O +05 268 
Do Accu n 2184 23250 +05 20 B 
WMMMda GronOl 217.1 230-90 +16 042 
D O Accu n 8056 32530 +21 043 

IK Groan FuxJ 47 6 8060 -Ol 268 

UtaOMaWNCiERTER 
JSSSS ffeRi. Etoto E 9 Q IDS 
0382 82155 

aanmiTtaat 427 4850 .. 370 

(ncomn Tmm 385 386 -Ol 850 

Tram 320 414 +06 OuBO 

345 3840 +03 200 

Trust of kiv 314 325 ..ZB 

mboscubib 

TM-, W EC 3 R 80 ° 


+05 002 
+06 1.12 
+07 1.12 
+16 062 
+16 062 


01-2805083 
Me Growth 
Do Accun 
Anw Income 
Da Accun 
Beup a tn Growth 
Do Accun 
General 
Do Accun 
ana Fixed 
Da Accun 


887 MW 40 +06 16 B 
1026 1089 O +06 168 
524 554 +01 468 


555 59.1 
I 486 1624 
1502 1589 
3456 2801 
4037 427.1 


+ai 468 
.. 468 
+17 160 
+16 160 
- 1.1 1-33 
-16 163 


786 79.10 -06 60 S 
816 9220 -08 806 
884 905 + 0.1 494 

982 1017 + 0.1 494 

2736 2888 +23 162 

3385 3582 +27 162 

1886 1976 +12 060 

191.1 2022 +12 060 


Do ACCum 3385 3582 +27 162 

Jtoan 1886 1976 +12 060 

Do Accun 191.1 2022 +12 060 

Beamy 2026 21870 -1.1 247 

ODAcetm 2176 23050 -12 247 

Exempt Ka 2344 2+04 .. 230 

Exempt Accun 3546 3742 .. 270 

Biro he Find he 83 2 880 +09 348 

Do Accun 846 086 +06 548 

MPLAIC BARK QHOUP UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

CkxxucCTi^ifte.aBurBl.Haed.StMlfiitdSHm 

Cmfial tncooa 776 820 . , 235 

Do Accun 183.1 111.7 .. 255 

OoranocOy 8 Gan 12H6 13870 +06 277 


Nnt HU PtaetL Leuaod LOB 3 HS 


031 -S 7 4422 




Eqidy Trust 

60-3 

aw 

-ai 242 

707 

944 

+02 149 

®t That 

234 

247 * 

-02 941 

LB Tnat 

XU 

372 

+ 0.1 142 

Pease Betia Tsr 

46 A 

4 S 6 

+02 038 

90 QfftOP St Laaaaa BC 2 



OI-B 2 D 0311 




^aSs 

TUA 121 .ie 

+04 144 

1614 

171 be 

+04 144 

Hlrti Incsrag Tea, 
Da Accun 

897 

954 

-02 448 

1064 

1124 

-03 1*5 

US Grcmtn 

994 

63.1 

+04 041 

Do Actum 

604 

84 A 

+04 am 


5»MGI Fund 886 B8.7 
US Gout Bond Fd *516 521 
CMtanger 496 50.1 




.. 27 a 
.. 270 
+06 348 
+09 848 


ROYAL LONDON ONTTRUST 9 MMAOBIS 
Rcya London House. Crfchauar QDf IRA 
(BOB 576115 


American QimRi 
GB tacoma 
Hqh tacoroe 
treermr A Growtn 
Japan Growtn 
Soectai SB 
IK Growth Ttt 


856 905 .. 062 

51 S 543 +02 853 

796 8410 -04 460 

876 10260 -05 430 
949 1016 +25 063 

106 1196 -02 1-26 

< 3-1 456 a -04 221 


AnmAOenlnc 
DO Accun 


2326 244 5 
2705 2854 


Da Accun 
extra HHF> Me 
Do Aoant 
GR & Fixed inc 
Da Accun 


laiiWfc 
Do Accun 
e American Inc 
Do Accent 


7834 19460 +12 277 
588 B 20 -Ol 813 
886 724 - 0,1 813 

«8 9060 -06 868 
824 88.10 -02 9160 
UWJ 16420 -05 561 
2888 28520 -06 561 
1732 1827 -01 365 

2887 3042 -03 255 

3033 3213 +28 021 

3182 337.6 +42 021 

1 HL 0 12820 +08 1.44 
1436 15150 +07 144 


SAVE* PROSPER 

20 . Weston Rd. Romford RMT 3 LB 

Otortud) D 7 DS 689 G 8 


ConwjacOly 

Euopaan Qwrth 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


The prices m this 
sectioa refer to 
Thursday's trading 


• Ex drndend. c Cun tSvidend. k Cum 
stock Sptit a Ex slock spkL m Cun all 
(my two or more o( Bbomty. a Ex aa twy 
two or mors of abowa)- Dosing or 
valuation Days; ( 1 ) Monday. (Z) Tuesday. 
( 3 ] Wednesday. ( 4 ) Thursday. ( 5 ) Friday. 
( 20 ) 25 tti of month. ( 21 ) 2 nd Thursday of 
month. 1 st and 3 rd Wednesday ol 
month. ( 23 ) 20 th of month. ( 24 ) 3 rd 
Tuesday of month. ( 25 ) 1 st and 3 rd 
Thursdayof month. ( 26 ) 4 th Tussday of 
month. ( 27 ) 1 st Wednesdayof month [ 28 ) 
Last Thursday of month. ( 29 ) 3 rd working 
day of month. 130 ) 16 th ol mwah. ( 3 i) 1 st 
wmWnfl day of month. ( 32 ) 20 th of month. 
( 33 ) 1 « day at February. May. August. 
November. ( 34 ) Last working day of 
month. ( 35 ) 15 th of month. ( 3 b) I 4 tfi of 
month. ( 37 ) 21 st of month. ( 3 Bj 3 rd 
Wednesday of month. ( 39 ) 2 nd 
Wednesday ol month. ( 40 ) valued 
monthly. ( 41 ) Last Thursday of Slock 
E»ctwnge_ account ( 42 ) Last day of 
month. ( 43 ) 2 nd and 4 th Wednesday of 
QuarffirW. ( 45 ) 6 th of month. 
( 46 ) aid Tuesday of month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


W1 12 

€. ,S 

3 L 

8CK 47S 
MG 87 
173 14B 
33 14 

57 a 
ia B 7 
aa 53 

143 21 

133 71 

175 IS 

S3 JQ 
IB 84 * 

58 38 

320 M3 
US 93 - 
03 93 

430 an 
75 4G 

114 9G 

113 75 

IBB 153 

S SB 

157 7B 
73 43 

140 83 
5S S3 
ZI6 190 
M 55 
9 21 Dr 

158 131 * 
57 40 

138 MR 

115 70 
135 88 
285 175 
478 375 

19'j 18 . .. 

SB 39 
148 IM 
37 11 

325 238 

ii 

HO 72 
45 24 

,' 8 6 
MS 103 
400 138 
tn isi 
161 138 


r to +a 

9 153 
1 345 -2 

31D .. 

317 

108 +1 
560 -M 
32 
1» 

145 -2 

92 -1 

BS 

% + '* 

205 

75 -1 

115 +2 

I 24 • .. 

i B +2 

3 IB'a - 1 . 

64 

124 +1 

l 145 .. 

i 15 -1 

31 -1 

40 

112 *-2 
147 +2 

Z75 +7 

Ml 

2 •-» 
m +5 
203 +197 

IB 

55 +1 

48 

350 .. 

m •+? 
23 a 

r J 1 * +'• 

80 
170 
' S'r 

% :: 

181 -I 
131 

MO .. 

137 .. 

IO'i 

2 sa «+ia 


I 43 +1 

> 825 +10 

B 
i 150 
i 33 +2 

57 
117 
65 
143 
30 

W3 • .. 

47 

15® .. 

42 

W5 ■ .. 

iK 

HD 

S 7 S *^2 

3 ? + '° 

160 .. 

73 

148 U+6 

S *S 
2 .* 
Z S 

25 


U u 87 
26 16 R 5 


HRl Lea OUtoy 

lVi 17 Fmm 
133 93 FiS(l*0 
73 S3 RMtoriiawjs 
65 31 ftoNrt 
m too Fioen 

60 rn FWrfOl 
88 80 FodAWam 
3® UO Fnwdi Cbm 
I 3B O FflBftMa 
382 21D FoteSnto-A' 
1 SB m &ma 

5 ® S SStSS 

97 72 GMm L|UB 
2« HO GUHUto 
HD 1* GNwn Home 
60 32 BkWGp 
Iffi 67 Satohttmi 
156 BS GDOOSHd PlH 
128 95 Ea« (Lanai 
M SB eranasurin 
167 IS Era* SMMm 
ITS ns BraMEmn 
41 H GnaJuabs 
135 mrxaBMnw Sq 
im ifo GumMy Atone 


8 d 

Otto 

Cfthputr 

IB 

17 b 


.. i 

120 

125 

-3 


50 

» 


M 

48 

50 



302 

385 

+1 

256 

38 

43 

+3 


80 

83 

+2 

43 

172 

«2 e +7 

73 

118 

121 

■2 

26 

345 

355 

-3 

54 

115 

120 

+8 

43 

80 

85 


17 

39 

41 

+2 

24 

32 

17 

• .. 

92 

235 

245 

-7 

81 

78 

83 

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48 

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36 

68 

93 

♦1 

3.1 

148 

153 


4 J 

115 

120 

+5 

83 

87 

72 

e +2 

30 

181 

164 

+1 

7.4 

170 

175 


46 

35 

38 



ia 

IS 

-i" 

84 

IBS 

195 


34 


rn a Unto Homcto 80 05 
SB U 3 (JWl Ttanp 295 305 
266 IK HMtadt Enta 2 SI 2 G 5 
47 a MftCM « 47 

+82 as^Heume 457 «? 

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£ 'S STimi 'g 5 

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205 45 HUtomnn 82 85 

M 71 HfeBnmt 72 77 

g 1 ! 7 MBPS 40 41>i 

MO 105 HudOH 137 140 

is; m ruSSTHyto™ iaa tao 

IM 110 HpnsRaMXoe 115 110 

35 22 Mxpws Food 31 'i 32 b 

14 SbHntadBK 6 7 b 

189 115 Huto Sto T 77 182 

™ w «g|ar» in W 7 

230 152 MSim 147 157 

31 (1 Wee I] ie 

115 44 be Sul Earn 82 gr 

103 « Mrdted 80 05 

353 m uerauBpe Tbu 250 tes 

210 * fiWDttoBuni 202 m 

32 21 tetoaSl) a 24 

443 239 ,.v; -V.-wSir 400 410 

'» "S -Sa“' S * w 160 

26 2 JN aw B 8 0 

'« IM NHWljVI. MS 120 

2 ■55 , S!5. K “* 100 105 

ra 48 AM lUtof n 73 

33 S 2 S 3 KLP 265 275 

® 07 KeV (JrAn) 77 80 

BO MO Ibm ta 315 325 

^ 53 tori SkSM SB 63 


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310 MB Hslwro S Ltrie 
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165 80 P*» Gup 
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m 128 MndAcfinq 

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118 24 PUPH 

78 31 PUM* 

72 a ptaemec 

211 MS nasi 

103 98 Ptai Up 

348 S MfUdr Etiriae 

155 75 tatoW 

149 93 PhwbxM 

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308 158 IMd 
103 £9 RMmc 
43 n Mo Dly V 
59 33 Rtoodfril 

123 85 ftdto 
95 5 Kuna) 05 

105 86 MW 

S3 22 HMdWU tt 
78 40 Aeal Una COM 

42 14 MIHMOto 
IDO 70 MB 
87 B Hodowed 
W7 S3 MR < IU» 

101 93 Reueta 

115 HH Ryaan 
151 79 SAC 

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37 38 -I 21 56 MS 

■m 1 » .. 46 4.1 129 

178 100 

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155 180 -3 47 10 152 

7 ® 1 GB .. 36 k 21 M 2 

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25 +10 66 21 127 

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55 88 46 76 186 

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£8 54 146 

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97 MHOU 
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3 S S .. 16 a 44 236 
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4 » 495 76 1.6 Z 3 J 

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560 » *** 260 47 

IDS 113 46 4.1 8.4 

430 450 W+ 2 S 106 45 .. 

P«M.. 6 f 88 112 
an i 4 3.0 25 o 

a 72 26 32 79 

KB IW # .. U 9.1 132 

18 17 04 24 1,3 

M <!$•-- 5 l 7 SO 136 

I® we 57 as uls 

12 102 # .. 36 26 218 

HR. II'* SOD 

i Mb 19 b M U IU 

335 345 #+n 27 08 S 3 

43 47 +1 L| 64 402 

*88 2 B • . .' 79 30 77 £ 

145 IB 39 2.4 (S 3 

84 87 17 56 HL 0 

Mg +2 26 14 iia 

g « • • U « 274 

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100 - 800 86 . . 

« 45 -7 67 16 59 


as 

20 

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314 

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4.4 

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86 

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274 

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314 

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340 

114 

112 

124 

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341 

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34 

486 

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33 

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1920-915 

1940-930 

1960940 


Tone Quiet 

SILVER SMALL 

wen 376 JO- 377 J 30 

Tfeee Months . 3 B 6 . 00987.00 

VOi MD 

Tone Quiet 

ALUMROUM 

Cash 787 ^ 0-76950 

Tlwe Months. 80050901.00 

Wd 10 K 0 

Tone Stearin 


question is whether bearish 


■ffiSES 




LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial prices 
Official TtonuMi figures 
Brtepie £ per nwirtc tonna 

EfS gZESS 

COPPER ORAOE A 

Cash 93750-83850 

Three Months . 9555095650 

Vol 5900 

Tone Easier 

STANDARD CATHODES 
Ca*h ------ 901 . 00 - 903.00 

Three Months . 92950931.00 

yd : ta 

Tons j idle 

LEAD 

Cash 38450 - 365 jQ 0 

Three Months. 33040-33050 

Vol ; 1300 

Tone Steady 


NICKEL 

2 ^ - — 2530-2535 

Three Months 2880-2365 

VW-— -....80 

T«ie Steady 


101.5 1015 

1015 1015 


LONDON GRAM FUTURES 

£ per tome 


Wheat Barley 
Close Close 


ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash — r— § 41 . 00-64240 

Three Months. 64140-54150 

Vol 3350 

Tone Barely Steady 



LONDON POTATO FUTURES 
£ per tonne 

Month Open Ckma 
Psb 11040 11140 

Apr 15950 16040 

May 177.50 17940 

Nov 8740 H 760 

Vt* 554 


„„ HFFEX 
aNJ. Freight FutuitoiUd Dry 
Carge Repon (SID per pofnfl 


SO-V&R LARGE 

C«h 376.00-377.00 

Three Months. 396 . 00487.00 
Vdf N| 




°°% s .“a. 




































I HE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



Quiet end to account 

a i-vw txn* rvivp ^ (Current market price multiplied by the number of shares in issue for the stock quoted) 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began on November 24. Dealings ended yesterday. ^Contango day Monday. Settlement day December 1 5. 

§Forward bargains are permiued on two previous business days. 

Whm stocks hav® only one price quoted, these w* wUOm prices uk«fl dafly at 5pm. change and P/E am cafcutatad on &• ratafia price 


WEEKLY 
DIVIDEND I DIVIDEND 


Claims required I Claims required 
for | for 
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Claimants should fine 0254-53272 



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26 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 



Edited by Peter Gardand 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


Now in its 4th year, PET offers 
effective and proven tax shelter. The 
portfolio of enterprise zone property, 
meeting exacting criteria, will provide 
a 100% tax allowance in 1986/87 tax 
year. And a quarterly income. 

For immediate details, call 
01-486 5267 or send the coupon. 


To: Property Enterprise Managers Ltd 
243 Kirightshridjge, London SW7 1PH 
Please send me details of the Fourth Property 
Enterp rise Trust 
(Atvil/Me in dtansvf QQOO. minimum £5000. no maximum UtruL) 
v -— ° 





Pbstoode- 


71 S/12 


The Property EnterhuseT]u]sts 

PEM is » member of the London & Edinburgh Trust group. 




3 


I Tg.wn.-a..- f2S££lS& 



Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 

The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 


For further information and Ihc current prospectuses, 
please complete and return this coupon to: Robin Fuller. 

N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.) Limited. 
P.O. Box 242. St. Julian's Court. Si. Peter Port. Guernsey. 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Guernsey (0481)26741. 


Stars with go in show and business 


I 
I 
I 

| Name 


I 

j 

. ^ J 

j^N M ROTHSCHILD ASSET MANAGEMENT j 


| Address 

I 

I 


“What do you want if you 
don't want money?” sang 
Adam Faith as be embarked 
cm the metamorphosis from 
£12-a-week teenager to 
£I00,000-aryear pop idoL 
Believe it or not. that was 
more than a quarter of a 
century ago. 

Pop stars have always had 
to accept the ride of ephemeral 
fam e but, back in 1959, who 
would have pot money on 
Adam Faith and his contem- 
poraries!, Cliff Richard and 
Tommy Steele, still being 
household names in 1986 long 
after memories of Elvis, die 
Beatles and punk have begun 
to fade? 

The fact that these celeb- 
rities have survived and pros- 
pered and weathered the 

/•hang in g fashions of a notori- 
ously fickle industry 
demonstates that their busi- 
ness sous is as strong as their 
show business clout. 

This week Adam Faith 
showed the business side of 
his many abilities with the 
hun ch of Faith, a London- 
ed financial management 
company for celebrities. 

Now, at 46, Adam Faith 
looks the very epitome of the 
successful entrepreneur — the 
Gucci shoes, Cartier wrist- 
watch and Christian Dim sOk 
tie are all fitting accessories for 
the double-breasted designer 
blazer. 

There is almost certainly a 
Perrier six-pack in the back of 
the Porsche. 

This is not what one expects 
of a man who used to succeed 
in making tewugp girls trem- 
ble at the knees, but Adam 
Faith has clearly come to 
terms with the changing role 
that middle age requires, even 
down to fending off a com- 
ment on his gold-rimmed 
spectacles with the explana- 
tion that the eyes begin to go at 
about 43. 

Although Adam Faith is 
chairman of the company 
Faith and has a one-third 
equity slake, ft is backed by 
stockbroking firm Quflter 
Goodison, which in turn is 
owned by the French hank, 
Banque Paribas. Quiher owns 
the other two-thirds of Faith. 

The company arm to pro- 
vide services to both young 
performers and established 
celebrities in the areas of 
income and asset manage- 
ment as well as corp ora te 
finance (opening a restaurant, 
perhaps) and administration 
services, such as making sure 
I telephone bills get paid. 



jJS-aAWa; 

Behind the scenes and In the spotlight tax expert Tmiif livens, left, advises celebrities, including A-ha, centre. Adam Faith has just entered the stage 

and the United States and are sales but also from less ob- mem is now of great interest to 
now on a world tour. A-ha's vious sources such as mer- private investors, 
manager is Teny Slater, who, chandising royalties on T- But there are other options, 
in true show business style, shirts and wall posters. _ such as membership of 
used to play bass guitar for the 


The administration services 
wifi be charged at what Adam 
Faith calls book-keeping rates, 
whereas income management 
will cost bis clients a fee of ZS 
per cent of the money being 
managed and asset manage- 
ment will cost up id 1 per cent 
a year. Adam Faith sees his 
company as providing a aud- 
ible link between the jeans and 
the pin-stripes. 

Who better to provide that 
link than someone who is not 
only known and admired in 
show business but also re- 
spected for his entrepreneurial 
skills in the City. 

But although Adam Faith 
will doubtless attract show 
business and sports stars on 
the basis of his name alone, 
even he acknowledges that 
celebrities are already well 
looked after in the manage- 
ment of their careers and in 
straightforward accountancy 
needs. 

Indeed, some of the accoun- 
tancy advice already on offer 
to celebrities is not restricted 
to the straightforward and 
Faith wi]] rightly have to 
prove its worth to attract 
clients. 

Leslie Livens, a tax special- 
ist with chartered accountants 
Moores and Rowland, has 
been handling the affair s of 
celebrities for several years. 


He points out that the stale of 
in ternational tax planning is 
such that some celebrities 
probably do not know who 
their advisers are. 

* Among the stars whom 
Leslie Livens has advised axe 
Joan Sutherland, John 
Dankworth and Geo Laise: 
The financial affair s of mem- 
bers of Pink Floyd also re- 
ceived the Livens scrutiny 
after they lost money in the 
collapse of Norton Warburg 
back in 1981. 

One of Mr Livens* current 
hot pro p e r t i es is the Norwe- 
gian pop group A-ha, who 
have already nntr.h«f op num- 
ber one hit records in Britain 


Everiy Brothers. 

Mr Livens points out quite 
fecniaBy that if Mr Staler was 
not British, A-ha*s xnnhi-mil- 
iion-dollar financial affair s 
would probably be handled by 
a firm such as Arthur Ander- 
sen in New York. 

As Mr Livens coolly puts it, 
the members of A-ha have got 
more money than they will 
need in the near fixture. 
Hardly surprising when you 
consider that their income 
derives not only from record 


sales but also from less ob- 
vious sources such as mer- 
chandising royalties on T- 
shiits and wall posters. 

That being so, ft dearly 
nwiirre sense that all three 
members of A-ha have re- 
cently bought £300,000 houses 
in London. 

There are some types of 
financial advice for the rich 
and fam ous where the invest- 
ment vehicle itself is just foe 
same as ft is for the las well- 
heeled. 

Unit trusts and currency 
funds have democratized 
what were previously regarded 
as rarefied investment media; 
and even direct equity invest- 



Lloyd’s, which are open to the 
ubiquitous Sid of British Gas 
fame only if he happens to 
have assets of at least 
£100,000 in addition to his 
own home. 

Adam Faith says be joined 
Lloyd's eight years ago follow- 
ing a conversation with a 
Lloyd's managing agent at a 
party in Los Angeles. When he 1 
learned about the Revenue- 
approved Lloyd’s tax breaks 
his only regret was that he had 
not signed up years earlier. 

Investment in woodlands 
and international farming op- 
erations also confer consid- 
erable tax benefits on wealthy 
individuals. 

A further possibility which 
is not open to most people is 
that of being technically em- 
ployed by a UK company and 
spending at least 300 days in 
any 365-day period overseas. 
That way yon are not liable to 
UK income lax. 

Perhaps it is not just to 
please their fans that some 
pop stars go on long visits to 
the United States and 
Australia. 

Peter Gartland 


8 Id Otter Qng YU 


401. a Join Sum. union EC1V 4Q£ 
01-837 6494 


S«*i* 

Boar 

Owl 


Owl 

u 

a 


WI 


aa HoUenhunt 
UBS 282373 


1087 11.45 
1053 1109 
11.42 1243 

1026 1396 
1307 1328 
1012 
989 


11.75 1287 
11-38 11J6 
1234 1299 
15-08 1642 
1488 1687 
1034 

mis 

1328 1363 


-0.13 

-016 

-0LD1 

4010 

-am 

4081 


4091 

-0.17 

-022 

-aw 

4002 

-132 


M, Bomm* BH8 6AL 



& Duma im taura 8v 

0707 42311 

EquRy Fd Ace 7004 7407 
EmnnMtan 21*4 2309 
FhUHte 2889 304.1 
Gad Money Fd Acc 2QW 2 >49 
tad Ifan ft Ace 3(32 3812 
Im Fxd to Fd Acc 1943 19(9 
ted Fund 2684 2825 

MhAmnanFdAac 187.1 1763 
PlOp Fd Acc 207.7 2106 

MuUpte kte ACC 5223 SBOfl 


-63 

426 

- 1.1 

403 
484 
-02 
+29 
400 

404 
404 


And Dunbar Aauance SwiHon 911 1EL 
0788-28291 


RxfidtoDapI 

Accra 


Far East Accra 


Anier Man Accra 

Amar Prop Accra 


2 M3 2304 
8919 9969 
3105 3303 
1663 174.1 
3143 331.1 
5113 6383 
4173 4393 
2S69 2894 
380.1 4002 
1808 1902 
1304 1373 


403 

407 

403 

444 

413 

403 

-13 

4-14 

483 

409 

-04 


SOB MbteTOBla SM Ijoadsn WIX 4AD 
01-493 9899 


254.1 2673 4192 

110.1 1222 -495 

2083 8173 +173 

Men Incoraa 1506 1647 -491 

Income 0 Bmt 2007 2144 -274 

Basic Roaouros 106.6 1122 +027 

Aimrtan 1904 2004 4066 

Far Em m 303.4 3825 41501 

Scoter Odd 1342 1413 -191 

BAflCLAYSLR 

852 Romford Ba. London E7 9J8 
01-634 5644 


"ft 

Gte Ednd 
Do MW 


Do MM 

tteiaged A 

OoEteti 

Money Ace 

Do HIM 

"Br&S 


Do MU 
teen At 
Do MM 


DO HM 
500 Accra 
Do MM 

Amen AGsn Acc 2 
DO MM2 
Wanna Aram 

On MM 


4363 4883 
3009 4007 
1923 8083 
1704 1794 
2789 2939 

244.1 257.0 
3009 3169 
8633 2772 
1702 1858 
1501 1569 
2083 2177 
1809 1805 
1949 1844 
1942 1729 
1813 1709 
1442 1519 
2801 2139 
W1.1 1907 
2183 2302 
1919 202.1 

324.1 3412 
2B39 2579 
2*08 2533 
2134 264.7 
MB9 1509 
1219 1200 
1109 1109 
1019 1007 


-12 

-03 

-17 

-13 

484 

450 

407 

407 


447 

443 

42.7 

484 


-09 

-08 

4122 

4109 

-19 

-13 

-09 

-07 

412 

412 


- - i St i 

0834 405161 
StecM Horae Item fd 
Managed to Raid 2509 2633 +3.16 

Preparty Raid 1889 1012 4020 

raced Manas Raid ttzb 1817 +i4S 
CM* Rate 1689 1737 4023 

teCPma Fond 3919 3*4 4421 

E4i Income Rod 3194 3339 +439 

Worldwide tea Fd 3259 3401 4074 

Bctencad Rate 293 2 3007 +(47 
soar Co s « Be Fd 3001 3882 4&19 

M Taetetoogy Fund 3229 3308 +1017 
NAiaor A Gan Rate 8050 2159 +499 

Enoroy H Raid 1143 1819 -012 

PBOte Baste Raid 2309 532.1 +991 

mmSH NATIONAL UFE ASSURANCE 
BrWsft Ha do na f Lite HouS* RemnnH R 
HanMds Heath Was* Sussex RH16 3TP 
044(414111 


2779 2883 
133.7 1407 
1214 127 9 
1 E2 1902 


fined Mare* 
Depute! 

New TacRncdan 


CANADA UFE 

a* w* si Pam Bar. how 


Bid Oftar Chop YU 


P Bar 51122 

BMiytaafi 


SST^aadWi 


Bk UT 

MtendBkM 


1459 

1710 1822 
1274 1347 
1279 1344 
110.1 1159 
1808 1907 
1379 M&2 
1872 197.1 
2289 2394 


-02 

-42 

SB 


ftetep IMH 
UMB 




: mar 


Bril 

2 nd] 

find Proptety Accra 

aid Managed *CC M 

2nd|M 


aid Amar Accra 

fed fe* Money Ac 
lad totaa Acorn I 
2nd Fn East Accra 


E2242 
£089 4691 

0029 3294 

£3447 3048 

3205 3(05 
8819 2989 

2129 8259 

2*54 8597 
175.1 1863 
«9 1799 

2629 2979 

1979 2005 

1072 1134 
2077 2199 

1982 1002 

1119 117.7 

ms 1213 

1056 1119 
1156 1223 
1199 1269 

1139 1200 

7*9 763 


2nd Japan Accra 

2nd Qktte Pm Ac 

2nd Ban item Ac 
2nd Japan Plan Ac 
LflE Sf 
DC 2 

WTCFlBIgW AWU—NCE 
Benev Houoe. BOO AeetxavBM. 

dmnKqteiimkjl 

0903808101 

Property Raid 1199 1252 

Money find 2255 8366 

Managed Ran (066 oao 

Equte Rate 2576 2712 

ted M au ra Find 1309 1473 
Fte Era FUnd 2107 2262 

NW Amor Raid 172.7 1619 

Mn Remain Fond 1463 I960 
SUN Rag Raid 1277 1349 

PBRRnd 13*9 7417 


+08* 

-17 

-15 

401 

+19 

+08 

-1-0 

40-1 

405 

409 

+19 

+15 

409 

+19 

+19 

+47 

+05 

405 


402 

+19 

-20 

-08 

404 

+19 

415 

419 



COt O MA LMtniAt. 

a* uararara^ra 

in niM 

Cap Uhdtey 

Cap LfleAtemgadR 



rn aran cian 
SLSrtSw. 1 u 

01-20 7500 

EEJT"" w 

^ §s-; 

Prang- togs ? 1958 Ski 
— Propert y 1287 1384 
Fbad Internal 1306 137.7 

WJ 1025 
1226 129., 


-19 

-S3 

+39 

+Ot 

-19 

401 




cowMm maiuff 

30 Chancery Lara. Landn wcza ihe 

Managed Fund 0000 6409 

— -'Rate 7814 8014 

E2Q67S 


CHOWNRHAHCWL 

Oram House, vaoidng GU21 1*W 

0*862 8033 

Ute EquRy Accra 
Lite Monar Accra 
Ufa to Trust Aeon 
Ua M Acorn 
Ute Mfrilnc Acorn 


We Property Accra 
Oown Brit nr a 
B raaei EquRy 
DBSMmgod 
Growth Accra 


3119 3279 
2061 2160 
3747 3935 
1794 1300 
4109 <314 
3514 3894 
3565 3757 
1864 1582 
4309 

4904 5182 
1672 1974 
2089 2179 


401 

-09 

-19 

401 

+03 

+79 

409 


+34 

4102 


Bd OOar Chrg YM 


ssr* 


Suray fWZ 8BL 


UK . 
Era 


Opp 

Far E« Opp 
QUi Prop Stele* 1 
Rep Sarin 2 
Rxad to 


964 10B9 
10C.1 1058 
984 T027 
9BJ 804 
1099 1157 
877 1032 
1010 1065 
1301 1500 
959 1009 
912 80S 
982 1017 
9828 9889 


EAOUSTM 


02(2 591911 
Saoura Rnd 
~ CMp Rate 


1039 1069 
1219 127.7 
1467 16*9 
1608 1968 


405 

408 

401 

-09 

+02 

408 

422 

401 

489 

401 


QLS3 710 

402 
-oil 
-02 
+29 .. 


EAGLE STAIMRBIJINO 
1 TteratoeteM 6t London EC2 
01-888 1212 

6HWnluai 15(2 


1508 -1J 498 


BoumriLAW 

A S m ST irad.Mgb W n 

UK Eqraea Rnd 4239 4(55 
tocoma Rnd 4072 (266 
Rdftotjp Rnd 2669 2777 
Red M e ra teFnnd 2223 33(9 
tato+LMadScmFd 1U22 1075 
SU Depotet Ftate 1775 1889 
Jtt Arartca Fund 2448 2574 
Fte- Era. Raid 2819 3089 
£ C9 2547 
3923 3069 
3*29 3800 



-64 
-34 
+02 .. 
-19 
401 
+03 
+89 
+72 
+44 
+4.1 
409 


FMra End. OHag am iqa 

1169 1252 
1744 1839 
1815 1705 

_ 1185 1259 

UMM+LntriAcc 989 1049 
1637 W19 
* 1739 mo 
1379 WS.1 



or 

10 IRtebunr 
01-«8 8131 
OT Bond Find 1859 1959 
GT Pten HteVW 1905 2000 
GTtelteM 2159 2279 
GT nan Nan Amar K44 1329 
GT Ran UK fc G£ 2*89 2861 
GT Wan KteiBtoate 2939 3063 


407 

401 

449 

♦19 

-21 

+42 


3*3* A ddte onte n 
01-888 Mll^ra 


Aral, Croydon 09 ! 


UK Eomy 
RtodM 


Cate) Depose 

22SL- 

iiuiianw 


J»p«n Sn* Wa 

European 


114.1 1201 

133.1 1(01 
1068 1124 

955 1005 
1065 1121 
VJT* 1122 
1084 114,1 
906 1017 
1260 1364 
1235 1300 
1163 1214 


aasiALranmuoijFE 
croaetapofc sc OwteMte Ham 
0082 31 371 
PmtMD Pd Acc 
Do M 


Do In* a 

rg& 


DOSS 

fteod Int Dap 

sre 


4007 

2975 

4018 4312 
2022 2139 
1*02 1572 
1169 122.1 
1109 1169 
1132 1163 
1129 1187 
1841 1729 
1484 1863 


-02 

•OS 

-Oil 

401 

+19 

+1.7 

+19 

404 


+13 

469 

+14 

-0.1 

+28 

-08 

-OS 

+02 

+02 

+OS 

♦19 


frg; Wj"? c» Road. Bo — ra o Mi 

0202 782122 

Managed Sand 4266 4(65 449 

’ Raid 1860 1979 402 

, Raid _ SSCJ 9803 +99 

- — awra RM 1373 HU +12 

Rtnarqr Rnd 2167 2315 


UNIT LINKED INSURANCE INVESTMENTS 


American 6 General 2369 9009 439 

teenma 3=9 3759 -08 

M te Hl on te Grate 3065 3239 487 

CMM Raw 3713 3067 -69 

Nocoray Raw 2015 273.7 

Japan & Gaoate 1829 1715 4 «5 


6UMOAN ROYAL E3EHAMS 


Da . 

■Wi... 

Reed to fe«M 
Da Accra 
H anal 
Do Accra 
NCi Aw ktel 
Do Aram 
paafle Hate 
Do Accra 
F+operry Mia 
Do Acaan 
kWea-UnUd I 
Do Accra 




4823 

2219 

2842 

3879 

482.1 

1439 

icen 

2103 

mi 

1368 
1855 

864 

1034 

1369 
1GE4 


4166 

3304 

3014 

4085 

4884 

2335 

2761 

4063 

4064 
1515 
1642 
227.7 
2*45 

1461 
1740 
1005 
1063 

1462 
174.1 


+189 


15 

-24 

-67 

+72 


+02 

4*9 


33 

402 

4 62 


Square. Leaden EC2A IDA 


ar« 


Mama Rnd 2546 2889 
idgaORnd 849 805 

oapnSrSowm me 2363 2«4 

TWnoMr Rnd 1719 1809 
ntedtemgi W.i i»4 
SCBOM 88MMM 2062 3042 


-67 

405 

-04 

+07 

+5.7 


BW Ortar Chng YM 


Norte America Raw 237.7 2509 4 14 . 

Far M Raid 3709 3012 +69 . 

Un win d Rnd 3065 334 -08 . 

Dmnto Raw 1(22 1407 .. . 

Prime n iil teW M 1761 1375 .. . 

Property RaW 1494 1573 +04 . 

Managed darency 1119 1179 405 . 

GtatM Hran Cm 1269 13*9 +14 . 


MLSAHBOJFE 
W-A tow*, rara 

01^86 *366 



I571S 


Gmete Fund (4) 2865 2619 -19 

uoc uraed man a ua 2549 -12 

IUUMFWH 2034 2M.1 -19 

U M U n ited 80c Cap 1802 1761 402 

Un« Ltoted EqM =1.1 580.1 -35 

IM LMted Ran Fd 1779 1872 402 



LflodOR BC1 


■PWWil 2861 

Rqp Mni M a * Gte 3909 
Prop Mod <£ Sir z mi 
Prtp Mod «fi Ser3 «2< 
sue 0*1 Sanaa 1 ao6i 
Bui Op Stoat 2 3260 
Hue CNp Seriee 8 3263 
iMtetegad Sanaa 1 8877 

Managed Sorts* 2 S42 
Mtetearana 2807 




..... ._ 8 

anted Pidpniy 3 1452 

OotM Read to 8 2515 

GUM Equ*y 3 3304 

OaMCWtl 1262 
K0t Inc Sarin 3 8379 


I 10 .H 

031-225 



3d Offer Dng Yld 



D*eaknd AocB 
EqUIjr Bond Acaanl 
Bnpaan Bad Acc 
Odra YM BO Accra 
Far EM Bd Accra 


Gold Bind Aram 

W YMd Bond 
IwM LMad a Bd 

mi tepaflotM BM 

Japan Bend Acc 
Japan SHteCQAK 
Meneoed Bcaxte 
Prop Bond Accra 
Roc Bond Accra 


MGM Hat Haana R6 
0003 20(631 


BH11 SOY 




, . 1755 

Oo Accra 1825 

SpecM S8a RaW 137 6 
DO Accra 1563 
Norte American Fd 1712 
DO Accra 1875 

PaoSc Btefei RaW 2M9 
DO Accra 324.1 

Raad Harast Rant 183.1 
DO Accra 2037 

Rnd 1141 


Mmu Rnd 

SSSSmbM 



2176 231.1 

+05 .. 

2169 285.1 

-05 .. 

1866 ZD0.1 


1429 1469 

♦0.1 .. 

1589 I860 


2949 3128 


1415 1502 

+1.1 . . 

2001 2125 

+20 .. 

850 700 

+03 .. 

1827 1925 

+24 .. 

1167 1263 

+35 .. 

949 990 


10(5 110.1 

-05 .. 


LEQALa 1 . 

2. Morateiara Rd. 1 
0273 724688 
BttSOOUMM 
Co Acam 
teb Hate 
Do Accra 

■w; 


1 6N5 196 


(te Accra 


Do . 

MfeOM 
Do Accra 
Managed Mai 
OoXxra 

"WSc 


1039 1065 
1097 1155 
1202 1362 
1765 18Z7 
86J2 4119 
525-1 5524 
2507 2324 
2963 3119 
M9 899 
1068 114A 
2707 2345 
8897 3002 
3063 2164 
4072 <267 
1564 W47 
2U9 221.1 


+02 

-02 

+ 0,1 

-60 

-219 

-61 

-82 

+02 

+05 

+49 

+74 

-61 

-19 

-05 


II.JDUMH yie SI London EC4N <TP 
01-2(8 0678 


LAG 09) 


Prapertr 


1729 
3079 
1175 
1761 
103 B 
81.1 
1035 
1029 
102.1 
961 
1112 
380L9 
2290 
1802 
1082 
2834 
I860 
T9*a 


LON* (MNCM6T6R 0HOW 
WMbda ML BnteT EX5 IDS 
0392 521= 

W* Truac Cap «B7 

Do Accra 2032 

PI 2 ,rwap 

Do Accra 148.1 

Had low eft cap 1*02 . 

Do Accra 1=3 

I Cap J969 

— Acoaw 23(9 

kanaM'^ 1999 


Mbad A 
toM State A 
Mamtemnel a 
P 

MP 
Property P 
Depose P 
Mtrnd P 
awe* Slock P 
P 


1029 1709 464 .. 


460 .. 
+12 .. 
402 .. 
+02 .. 

461 .. 

404 .. 
+19 .. 
♦07 .. 

408 .. 

401 “ 

409 .. 

+08 .. 
41.1 .. 

+69 .. 

415 .. 

415 .. 
+03 .. 
+39 .. 
+04 .. 
+59 .. 


+39 

449 

+05 

+07 

-15 

-17 

-13 

-14 

485 





Managw Fend 3999 3779 

Property Ft**) 2589 2724 

Equriy Rnd 385.8 4069 

, Fond 3195 3363 

Find 192J 2024 

ral 1835 1714 

Food 8961 4109 


Lrai Htara. 233 High 91 Ooydon 
01488 9171 


SSSXw Stf 

Money Mann Bond zti 5 
Dopes* RaW 2275 

I ra nged Fund 2309 

M Batey 3017 

aw Managed Z739 

Nnnfi Am erican 1239 

Fer Ecm twii 

1875 


NATOIALPROteOENr 
<8. flraoectiatli SI EG3P 3HH 
01-423 4200 

2812 ms 

2S60 3109 
2835 2885 
ZZL6 2459 
2879 3135 
1289 135.1 
1909 1899 
1099 1167 
1282 1961 


Wntedi NR1 MB 


EtMy Ft*W _ 01299 UB1 
Ropeoy Raw a 3020 3179 
-tS) 3128 3294 
~ 1992 209J 

1369 1461 
7468 



Ftead to Raw l . 
Depotet Fund ra 
tolFUnd (30| 

UnH-UnkedPtaa 


-M^Mctecrn.WClVT® 


la* Prop DM 

Do Accra 

flee Mailed 


1295 1863 
2B3.7 2207 
5560 5874 
3875 4072 
3563 374.1 


-19 

-05 

♦02 

-19 

419 

412 

407 

+02 


+55 

+47 

408 

-15 

+Ol 

402 


-618 

*02 

-61 

401 

+67 


401 

401 

427 

415 


SW Offer Qng YU 


bw on* enpg vu 


BU Offer Oms YU 


1B24 1714 
904 954 

1149 121.1 

1 OMI At mi 1164 

1010 1072 

9 807 862 

Tactetom Accra 995 5050 
NteuMHae Accra 589 615 
Japan Grwth Accra 1859 1962 
879 919 


London BC2H 




3061 3161 -67 

1748 1840 401 

2*20 2540 +67 

1812 1362 401 

1379 145.1 401 

2357 2(82 -64 


ftop RaW Accra 
Read to Fd Aec 
tad Ftew Accra 
Moray FwW Accra 
OWa-Lrted 


Equry 




2204 

... 1924 

EqoByOrd 2919 

EOJky M 347 

todS+jcu) am on mo 

tadax LMad GBlM 964 
&*aty Orfl 2&2 
‘ 2315 
12S4 

j3| 

Raw toOrfl 1335 
to MM 116.0 
Old 1230 

1079 


4417 4895 

1066 2105 

2019 2122 

5019 5313 
RaW 2248 2380 

2585 275-1 

3110 3315 

2961 314.0 

S I 2502 

I 407 8 

- „ 2114 2254 . 

Bar frame Fund 1715 1820 +24 . 

G* Raw 20 2372 2524 


Rnd taaaaat 


SCOTTISH EQUITABLE 

26 SI Andraui SO EMM0I BC 

031 5= 8101 

103.1 1065 
815 965 

1016 1072 
1352 1424 
1169 1246 
1562 1865 
1280 1363 

151.1 1907 
1720 181.1 
1060 1785 
1832 1402 
1348 1419 


UKEtete 


sse" 


Hptton Bra. BCW 2MH 
01-4= 9222 


1895 MM +12 


WC TAL HBB TAOE LIFE AMUMUCB LTD 
M. onana Stoat London EC2A 4HX 


19 teAnaraa So Etenteap BO 

031-225 2211 

117.1 1263 
1089 1779# 
1499 156M 
1866 1=5* 
2*27 256.! 
1765 1M.1 
1095 1TS9 
1037 1003 
1134 TM4 
1545 1861 

SCOTTIW MUTUAL AS08UJCE 
108 ST MM SL Gteagow G2 aw 
0*T-2*8 6821 

Bax Raid pQ 8157 8*69 


SCOTTISH B8/TUAL 
106 St VlnoaM SL 
0*1-248 6321 



TYF 

+097 

-02 

-04 

+05 

-14 

+60 

+32 

+49 

+05 

+14 

1YE 

+ 0.1 

-09 

+34 

+40 

+14 

+29 


1499 1E65 +02 

1519 1599 +21 

2017 3079 +69 

1305 1375 +04 

1112 1179 +05 

7867 

3672 3865 
112.7 1167 
1366 1439 
1112 117.1 
1142 1209 
1349 1419 
11*2 1202 
963 1KL5 


Pm Ftead to 
Pm aw 
Pm Money 
Pm inteiJjM 


SUNLHMBT 

St Je mea Barton. BHaM BS99 7St 
0272 42B911 

4555 +05 .. 

227.7 +09 .. 

8042 -ZB .. 

2009 -39 .. 

1104 +02 .. 

102.4 +02 .. 

2129 +29 .. 

1469 +19 .. 

2375 +65 .. 

1552 +41 . . 

4310 +8.1 .. 

383.1 +37 .. 

1050 +04 . . 

1359 +0.4 .. 

1259 +01 .. 

1617 +02 6= 

1172 +05 .. 


■Mil 

♦ 1.1 


2163 
5769 

! H Accra 1302 
teOuZMad Accra 1105 
Gaah Accra 1R2.7 
rAoera 2016 
US Banda Accra 1367 

_ 2259 

Peoao Accra 147.4 
Far Eratero Accra 426* 

MnmBDonW Accra 3868 
US Odler Accra 1000 
Yen Accra 1265 

Bap Or Accra 1167 
npfeuta Rnd 1725 
Erapon 1119 

J LTD 

Kern How, Andmr. Hants. SP10 IPG 
02B4.5S769 


MtoBBMRnri 1469 1505 

Proparty Fond. 1167 1261 

Reed tend Fvaw 1195 1253 

Jtoney FwW 1162 12 (5 

epdtyFteW 1904 2005 


Satete I 

(Mote 


+0 Ktol Wl 
01-638 9878 


<MtonSLR4N7BI 


- -r -.= 3861 3710 

ttor Pffaonte RpWy 2865 3859 


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3142 
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2169 
4460 
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PROVnraCE CAPITAL - 
30L LtxSrid® no dns 8PQ 
01-749 9111 

BMr Rnd Accra ifioo ttki. 
p*w mm Aa noi uss 
tetem ad anal Accra « 35 WLO 
Uteaged Accra 1447 1565 


BK« BdcUte Raw 


+«.f 

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+29 

+22 

+19 

+27 
-0.4 
-at 
-05 
+OS 
+76 
•24 
+42 
+20 
-79 
-19 
+89 
+06 
-17 
-29 
+35 


(OFtoMReW 
MBtoJnMdRaW 
te te m aM uu te Fwa 
Hcrte American Fd 
RKHcRaW 
_ . . Ftnd 

UK 

UK 


1169 mi 

1259 1319 
1305 1374 
10(5 1104 
2110 2261 
1024 1075 
989 1029 
1604 166B 
1177 1269 
T967 207.1 
1029 1084 
1205 1272 
1=5 1460 


-07 

+OI 

-07 

+05 

+22 

-04 

401 

+29 

+25 

+54 

-10 

-09 


scornsHPflonnMT 

S^St^Anitows Sq, EtMuiR BC 2YA 


EqWty 


Head ana ate 
W« LMted 
cash 


1842 1824 
1640 1727 
1879 1076 
1163 1194 

1008 1155 

1009 1055 
1U5 1207 


♦27 

-06 

+O0 

-09 

+02 

+OI 


PO to Stt EM»Oi BUB 6BU 
031-056 8000 


tor Pol 1 
Inv Pol 2 
to- Pol 3 


4760 


4270 4(90 
1610 1614 
Atrad Food 240.7 2534 

Equffy F«1 3735 2961 

r Ftnd 1420 1505 
— °»W RaW 2810 2767 
Ftod to araw Raw. 1787 1861 
Mmd Sto* FWW 1127 1185 
Mi Fund 1343 1416 


+64 

+79 

+79 

+00 

+03 

-24 

+07 

+41 

-10 

+02 

+02 


+02 

+02 

-06 

+OT 

+08 


I22£ H01 3S^££S5 ” aKL *1***** ***» 

Ayteateay (0298) 394000 

1145 1207 +27 .. 

825 667 +14 .. 

1041 1000 .. .. 

1565 16*5 .. .. 

523 551 .. .. 

1905 2005 -02 .. 

1550 1841 .. .. 

1267 1329 +02 .. 

2215 2362 -15 .. 

332-9 3505 +53 .. 

SS35 2980 +52 .. 

949 995 .. .. 

69(9 4148 +19 . . 

947 997 +95 .. 

1429 1495 .. .. 

176S I860 +25 .. 

1327 1397 -05 .. 

2803 27(0 +03 . . 

1820 2025 -09 .. 

74 +05 .. 

334 964 +20 .. 

45(4 4764 -24 .. 

177.1 1866 +01 .. 

1967 2069 +39 .. 

pWCMIBVMTIQML 

Eft**. Uawon EC4A 1NU 
01-831 7481 

Sanaa 2 Man Rnd 2668 2792 +03 .. 

gtetea ZfiRrtyRaW 312-9 32S3 -3.0 .. 

8teto 2 Prop ReW 2904 3065 +23 .. 

Senas 2 R* m RaW 2110 2221 -07 .. 

l Nonay Fd 1547 1025 +04 . . 

Sartw 2 O-aeac R1 ^25 2973 +65 .. 

MP torn Raw 2917 307 0 +S9 .. 

36IJ38,J 



2*74 260 * 
299.1 3145 


+01 


RrobMterHaa, 

7B* 

07= 884411 


TWDOfTUFE 
Undan Rant 

GU— 1 


We terwa Gate. Bmiam plon 309 I *2£L 


POVALUFE 
NMHWinu 
051-227 +422 
My* straw Raw 


159 3KS 
5155 5450 


F?*7 


Royal Ute Unit Urtrod 
M a nag e d Rnd 2110 222.1 
B»*y RaW 2530 2672 

Propany Raw 1640 182.1 
aaam a lMM FM 3079 323.1 
PMC Batec RaW 172-1 W1.1 
UM SUMS FWW 13(0 1410 
GB RaW 1402 1570 

Money Raw 1254 1320 


save a 

1 


TSB Managad 


-16 
+07 
+42 .. 
+07 
+02 
-OS .. 


M I , 

» Accra 


2299 2(29 
=69 2(60 
2575 2705 
15S7 1030 
1932 1910 
1269 1334 
131.1 1374 
153.7 1012 
1462 1539 
1214 1277 
=59 227.1 
1760 1884 
1BZ5 1700 
HH3 1762 
1205 1266 
1365 1879 


smrawiDtnE 


Aie LcndDoBSM 2QY 


BM to RaW 3810 4034 

Deed RaW 66 222 3 HI 

G* RaW 2710 =7.7 

Global BMy Fund 1300 1374 

Property Raid (4*9 S50 SLSa 

AC Bats Raw 965 959 

SCHRODER UFE 
Eaterp risa H» PoRMnaWl 
0705 827733 

7627 8D9 
=3.1 2900 
38L5 4030 
2062 219.1 
2*30 2561 
3SLS 2967 
2S75 SOI 
1407 1461 
3359 3549 
1634 161-4 

3834 3820 

2244 2362 
Snggn 6 iu i»J t3i0 
BnmrOtopaflM 3067 ^0 
TWne RfW 3565 3755 

iKBxfly 3105 8=9 

CCMtong’d Mao 3*69 3=9 
&W PerawnSp S107 ^9 
2740 2863 



+15 

+09 

-17 

405 


+02 

+14 

+02 

+10 

+02 

+03 

+14 

+0.7 

- 1.1 

+3.1 

-Z0 

+10 

+ 2.1 

+03 

-62 

+155 

+19 

+07 

+69- 

+07 


SST 


Caan 


BUN ALLIANCE 
a*i tone Hi 
040 6(141 

_-4W 382.7 

y.RaW _ *55.+ 

: — f mraraat Raw 3387 
man Lasted Raw 1484 
I Raw 2674 
—to RaW 3514 
N AradanRiW 1240 
Fte Eto RaW. 1742 
PtoOM RaW , me 
toatna dc nN Bend fio 
WMMndaBead 624 
1114 


+10 

-07 

+19 

♦14 

+08 

+04 

+04 

+07 

+01 

+02 

+24 

+61 

402 

+02 

*oi 


3401 3560 -89 

1887 1967 +0.1 I; 

»U3 =89 +80 .. 

KEJI 2139 -6i .. 

lias ii90 Zaii ;; 

1802 1687 +02 :: 


ragnYMd Rwd 


Ghram Cap 
Do Aeon 
PeraeOite Act 


3050 
2800 
3266 
258.7 
SI 64 
3980 
2310 
2377 
2824 
2814 
8869 
1544 
1420 


90999 QoS 500500 
322.1 -23 .. 


2944 

3007 

2705 

3309 

4204 

2435 

2503 

2965 

2967 

3760 

1629 

1501 


«jtoy Rnd 


m 

1872 
8810 
3699 
1314 
1834 
1861 

_8.7 

1170 

SUN Uto OF CANADA 

rMagwaaman 

01-830 6*00 


8 London 6CTV 4GE 01-837 8(94 

3122 
49*1 
3*20 
2020 
5255 
4700 
2310 

2119 2220 

1670 1768 

2765 29*9 

1890 167.4 

1254 1320 
wi 11B6 
2523 2868 
1961 2099 
1110 1170 
2135 2249 
2237 2350 

1730 1920 

2066 2174 


to* Acmmt 


Accent 
Raw Accra 


7601 

4075 

MS0 

1830 2019 


+89 ,. 

♦74 
+06 .. 
+79 .. 
+00 .. 
+091 .. 

+04 653- 
+08 .. 


♦as 

+07 

+67 

*29 

+49 


gasgw 

UK toWWIMW 
R Amariari EcFWy 
Caen naptot 

?ppp 

S\ig(S H 

S*r Mngd 3 

Star k*ngd4 
Sto Mngd 5 

VA IBHU UH fgaas 

au 


-1.1 

+03 

+49 

-35 

-07 

-14 

+05 

+64 

-21 

-28 

+35 


+40 

+65 

+85 

+66 

+02 

-14 

-10 

+10 

+70 

-04 

+02 

+05 

♦1.1 

+07 

+29 

+34 

+84 

+14 


jy£5- 

Rued tnaran fte 

zxzsr"’ 


4180 4410 

HI 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Tharsday s trading 












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rs? cN rr>tr; 
u> n\er- r- •. •. 


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■£ 5 a?! 

■>*255 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/2 



Going up, Down Under 


Mvestment^ Issera 


1 l t y0 r ,nvesi in Austra- 
nf a ^ U l ^ ia W ° Uld ** lhc iSl 

p, ¥f >°u d want io invesi." 

thfpwL d J ?v? Bli0!t - head ° r 
inrf ^f XL COn Elomeraie 

Sn,^ A b y ^ e ° fUle m °Sl 
astute Australians when it 
comes to investing, 

Like many of the country’s 
businessmen, he takes one 
look at Australia’s high infla- 
tion rate, huge balance of 
payments deficit and un- 
comfortably high foreign debt, 
and puls his money elsewhere 
- £1.4 billion of it to be 
precise, the sum he paid Lord 
Hanson for the Courage bar 
empire. 

Other Australian entre- 
preneurs such as Robert 
Holmes a Court and Aten 
Bond have also been notably 
unpatriotic with their invest- 
ments in recent years. 

But if the Australian econ- 
omy is in such a bad state as 
these gentlemen seem to be- 
lieve. why is the slock market 
touching new heights? The 
All-Ordinaries Index rose 9.7 
to 1420.4 yesterday, 42 per 
cent higher than where it 
started the year. 

The answer, familiar to all 
those optimists who favour 
Bloody Marys to cure their 


don’t took like getting much 
better, at least therms little 
chance of them getting any 
worse". 

In fact, things have been 
jooking up for the Australian 
•nvestmeni scene since 
around mid-year, when the 
Australian dollar was test 
sinking in the south. It was at 
that point that Paul Keating, 
the Treasurer — the Down 
Under version of the Chan- 
cellor - unveiled a budget that 
turned the screws on public 
spending and lightened con- 
trol of the money supply. 

‘Attitudes led to 
the improvements’ 

At the same time, the 
government is taking a hard 
line on wage rises with the 
country’s traditionally strong 
trade unions. 

All this conservative eco- 
nomic thinking has impressed 
investors, especially as it 
comes from a Labor 
government. 

The Australian dollar has 
stopped sliding ofT the map 
against the US dollar and has 
even appreciated against ster- 
ling. At one point the pound 
could buy 2.50 Australian 


I GOLDS TAKE OFF 
““I IN AUSTRALIA 


GOU> SHARE 
INDEX i 




fALL ORDINARY* 
f SHARE INDEX \ 


Jan Fab Mar [Apr' 1 May ^ Jun* Ad Aug^Sep 1 Oct* Nov' Dec' 


dollars; today it fetches 2.18 

The outlook has also been 
helped by the rise in the gold 
price, which has brought fresh 
life to a mining sector de- 
pressed in recent yearn by 
falling demand from the slug- 
gish economies in Europe, 
Japan and the United States. 

The Australian gold mine 
index has done even better 
than the overall index, more 
or less doubling in the past 
five months. 

Ah this has given a rosy 
complexion in recent months 
to the 17 unit trusts which pul 
most of their money into 
Australia. In October, for 
example, average prices rose 
by 16.8 per cent on a bid-to- 
bid basis, according to Money 
Management. 

The economic picture now 
presents mixed signals. On the 
positive side, gross domestic 
product, after declining for 
nine months, finally showed 
some growth in the third 
quarter of the year, even if the 
improvement was a modest 
0.2 per cent. 

However, the current ac- 
count deficit and the overseas 
debt figures are still alarm- 
ingly high, while an inflation 
rate of almost 9 per cent is well 
above that of Australia's main 
trading rivals. 

As David Hutchins, of 
M&G Investment Manage- 
ment, admits, it is attitudes 
rather than real economic 
improvement that have 
helped the stock markets in 
Australia in recent months. 

"Perceptions have changed 
greatly towards Australia," he 
says. "The economic fun- 
damentals are exactly the 
same as at the beginning of the 
year when no one wanted to 
know about the country." 

Mr Hutchins' fund is the 
largest and one of the oldest of 
those on offer in the Austra- 
lian sector and has been 
among the top three perform- 
ers over the past one, three 


Tighter line on home loans 


C MORTGAGES ) 

Tax relief on mortgages is 
likely to become subject to 
more stringent rules following 
a highly critical report to 
Parliament this week. 

The Committee of Pnbfic 
Accounts, a cross-party group 
of MPS, brand several major 
faults with the system and the 
handling of it by the Inland 
Revenue. 

In just three years the 
amount that tax relief costs the 
Exchequer has almost dou- 
bled. When MIRAS (mort- 
gage interest relief at source), 
was introduced in April 1983 
this tax relief accounted for 
£25 billion. In 198546 it ip 
estimated at £4.75 billion. 

The first tax perk that is 
likely to disappear is the one 
allowing single people baying 
a borne together to claim 
mortgage tax relief each. 

For a single person the 
upper limit for tax relief is on 
the interest on the first 
£30,000 of a mortgage, and a 
married couple is effectively 
treated as a single person — 
also restricted to £30,000. 

However, anmarried cou- 
ples or friends buying together 
can each make a claim. So the 
Government is m a kin g it 
financially prudent to stay 
unwed. 


One way in which the 
Gove rnment has previously 
suggested this anomaly conk) 
be ended is to apply mortgage 
interest relief to the residence 
rather than the individual 
taxpayer. 

If thk change is introduced, 
the major impact is likely to be 
on young people bnyini in 
London and the South-East, 
where soaring boose prices 
have pushed the average mort- 
gage way over £30,000. lie 
relief can be worth up to £90 a 
month per person and this 
would effectively be halved. 

Although the amount that 
MIRAS is costing the country 
has doubled, the real value of 
die £30,000 limit to the in- 
dfridnal taxpayer has bear 
drastically eroded. If 1974 
levels were restored, the 
threshold would need to be 
more than trebled. 

Yet there are calls from 
various sources for the whole 
system of tax refief on mort- 
gage payments to be abol- 
ished. The most recent 
proponents of this range from 
the Royal Institution of Char- 
tered Surveyors to the Church 
of England. 

Bat the tax refief seems safe 
in Mrs Thatcher’s hands, 
especially as a general eketion 
approaches. 


Were one of the Opposition 
parties to be elected, however, 
it is likely that changes would 
be made. Removing the tax 
relief altogether might prove 
tuopaMal politically, but it is 
probable that tax relief wohM 
be restricted to the baric rate. 
At present, tax refief can be 
claimed at a person’s top rate. 

One of toe reasons for the 
increases tax relief claimed is 
toe growing popularity of 
endowment mortgages. When 
MIRAS was hrt re dwr fd, en- 
dowment mortgages accounted 
for only a quarter of new loans, 
but die proportion is now 79 
per cent or more and building 
societies have encouraged 
wholesale switching into them. 

Another area of concern in 
the report is top-up mortgage 
lending. Although this is 
ostensibly for home improve- 
ments, much of it goes towards 
the purchase of cars, holidays 
and so on. The Bank of 
England has estimated that 
this ‘‘leakage”, as it is known, 
amounted to more than £6 
bnfion in 1985. 

The report recommends that 
builders’ receipts should be 
required as evidence that top- 
up mortgage lending is being 
spent on improvements. 

Jane Alexander 


BUSINESS EXPANSION SCHEME 


=The GreshamTrust— 

Management Buy-Out 

— — BES Fund 

Gresham Trust pic., an established 
Business Expansion Scheme Fund Manager 
and investor in Management Buy-Outs, 
is now launching an approved investment fund 
under the BES to concentrate in the field of 

MANAGEMENT BUY-OUTS 

J f The B ES legislation offers investors income ttxsc 

1 their highest marginal rates and the chance of 

I ahigh investment return free of Capital Gams Ttoc. 

The particular attractions of Management 
Rn i outs under the BES are fully set out in the 

Buy-uuu* FVSD MEMORANDUM 


cv,r * CODV of the Memorandum 
*5 aDD P Ucation form contact 
SihSust by Phone, orre&irn 
t ^ res K!Irinn below completed or 
^^.^buriness card attached, 
wthyourb Souid recognise that 

f^^JauInquoted companies 
jflv-estmen well as the 




Applications to subscribe will be 
accepted only on the terms and con- 
ditions set out in the F)und Memor- 
andum. The minimum investment is 
£2,000 and the maximum is £40,000. 
Applications, which will be 
treated in strict order of 
receipt, must be received by 
19 December 1986. 




To: Gresham Trust pj.c. 


mi | 


ggJ^g^tBESFbn- 



Address - Postcode 

^^SSS^tSS^SSSSSS^&im. 

OreshamTrusvp - - 


and five years. Mr Hutchins is 
cautiously optimistic about 
prospects for next year. 

"There arc some* good com- 
pany results starting to come 
through, and hopefully the 
current account deficit will 
start to flatten out by early 
next year." he says. 

The M&G fluid is about 60 
per cent weighted towards the 
mining sector, with the rest in 
industrial companies. Some of 
these have strong overseas 
interests, which Mr Hutchins 
has chosen as a safety net just 
in case the Australian dollar 
goes walkabout again in a 
southerly direction. 



Bob Hawke: election factor i 

There are other uncertain- < 
ties which may mean that 
investors will need a bit of 
luck if they decide to go lor the 
lucky country. The gold price, 
for example, has been kind to 
Australia this year but could 
show its more fickle side in 
1987 and tell back. 

In addition, the Prime Min- 
ister Bob Hawke will be forced 
to call a general election by 
March 1988 at the latest, 
which leads many economists 
to suspect that the next budget 
may be a vote-winning one 
with give-aways and tax con- 
cessions that could harm the 
economy. 

Richard Lander 


Risks of the 
Gas speculators 

■ Your chances of success in selling 
British Gas shares through a bank before 
receiving your letter of acceptance, 
some time hi the week beginning 
December 1 5. will depend on which 
bank you use. Barclays will not permit 
dealings m British Gas until letters of 
acceptance can be produced. The official 
line at Lloyds, Midland and National 
Westminster is strong discouragement of 
pre-acceptance letter salting but local 
managers do have discretion and may be 
prepared to allow customers of their 
acquaintance to sell during next week. 

If you really Insist on selling before 
receiving your letter of acceptance - and 
ttwre may or may not be an advantage 
in doing so depending on the British Gas 
share price movement— you can also 
do so through licensed dealers such as 
Cleveland Securities. Harvard 
Securities and Prior Harwin. The spread 
between buying arid selling prices is 
likely to be bigger than you wiU get quoted 
by your bank or stockbroker and there 
may be administration charges as wefl- 
Yesterday afternoon. Cleveland was 
quoting a British Gas buying price of 55p 
and a selling price of 59p. 
if you do sell shares which you are not 
absolutely sure you own, whether through 
a bank, stockbroker or licensed 
dealer, and it subsequently transpires that 
you do not own the shares, you wffl be 
liable for any market price movements 
that go against you. 

Branching-out societies 

■ With new freedoms for building 
societies coming into effect from January 
1. the race is now on to provide a 
wider range of services for customers. 
This week the National & Provincial, 
Britain's seventh biggest building society, 
teamed up with Bank of Scotland to 
offer its 1 .5 million customers unsecured 
loans for cars, furniture and other 
consumer durables. The finance will be 
provided by Bank of Scotland's wholly 
owned finance house, North West 
Securities. 

National & Provincial will also be 
offering its customers a Visa card and 
cheque bodes, with clearing facilities 
provided by Bank of Scotland. 

In a separate move. Leeds 
Permanent also announced a personal 
loans service, also in conjunction with 
North West Securiteies. 

Meanwhile, Cheltenham & Gloucester 
has come up with a package of insurance 
products to be underwritten by Royal 
Insurance and an investment product in 
conjunction with Gartmore combining 


a building society rugh-interest account 
and a unit trust. 

Anglia Building Society is also beefing 
up its financial services range. Following 
an overwhelming vote of approval by 
members last Tuesday, the chairman Roy 
Buncombe ouWined plans for 1987 
including an interest-paying cheque 
account and a stockbroking service in 
conjunction with Hoare Gove It 

The insurers’ warning 

■ A house costing £50.000 to rebuild 
in September 1985 would have cost more 
than £52.000 to rebuild just 12 months 
on. says the Association of British 
Insurers in a warning this week to 
householders to check that they have an 
adequate sum insured on their home 
building policy. 

The association emphasizes that rbe 
market value of a property is not an 
accurate method for calculating the 
cost of rebuilding your home. The sum 
insured should take into account total 
reconstruction of the building, including 
demolition costs, professional fees 

..AND A BOOK Oft W 10 
B6C0HE AN INSIDER DEMER . . 






rr 


and local authority requirements for 
design changes. 

The association produces a free 
leaflet. Buildings Insurance for 
Homeowners, which gives guidance 
on assessing rebuilding costs. It is 
available by sending a stamped 
addressed envelope to Leaflets (H), 
Association of British Insurers. 

Aidemrtary House, Queen Street London 
EC4N1TT. 

Supersonic investor 

■ Vivian Robson, a 78-year-old from 
Colchester. Essex, is the overall winner of 
the Stock Exchange's balloon 
competition. Mr Robson, retired chairman 
of the Essex Naturalist Society, leaves 
Heathrow by Concorde tomorrow 


tor an atl-expenses-paid trip 
to New York. 

In June more than 2,000 balloons were 
released from the roof of the Stock 
Exchange to mark the launch of the 
exchange's Wider Share Ownership 
Campaign. Every balloon was 
attached to a coupon inviting the finder to 
enter a draw for 10 prizes of £100 of 
shares each. 

The supersonic investor will be in New 
York for two days. 

Changing savings 

■ The Department for National 
Savings has announced that the 
guaranteed interest rates on its 
Ordinary Account will continue at 3 per 
cent a year and 6 per cem for the 
whole of 1 987. but there will be a change 
in the basis of determining eligibility 

for the higher rate. 

Any saver who keeps an account open 
for the whole of the year will be eligible. 
The 6 per cent rate will then be earned 
for any complete calendar month when 
the balance is £500 or more. For the 
year 1986 it was necessary to maintain a 
minimum balance of £1 00 throughout 
the year to be eligible for the higher rate. 
The first £70 of interest on the 
Ordinary Account is free of all income tax. 
Husbands and wives can each earn 
£70 tax-free interest 

Some words for Sid 

■ Still looking for that inexpensive 
stocking filler that will answer ail (or most) 
of the questions that the millions of 

Sids up and down the country are asking 
now that they have joined the share- 
owning democracy? You could do a lot 
worse than Shares - a beginners' 
guide to making money, by the financial 
writer Harold Baldwin. The book 
includes sections on how to select 
shares, when to sell and how to get a 
good deal from a stockbroker, and it is 
spiced with amusing tips like “Never 
invest your money in anything that eats or 
needs repairing." 

The book is available from Dept SH, 

Wise buy Publications. PO Box 379, 
London NW31NT. Good value at 
£1.95 plus 30p p&p. 

■ In an article on wills in Family 
Money on November 22 we suggested 
that if someone dies intestate, 
without dependants, the money would 
go to the Crown, fn fact, it will go to 
his nearest relations then living, 
following an elaborate legal table. If 
people get divorced, any provisions for 
them made in their former partner's 
will lapses. 


Thanhs to British Gas, 
it’s expanding further. 

. '."A vA-tt-V-L' 


' ••• : : -7 ' ''V:-V 

: ..v- • ••••.• • ' > v • 


Sp : : ■ 




■:** •■*■*, : -:^v.. 4 sr 






I 


■ ^ 






From Monday December 8th, 
British Gas options will be traded 
in the traded options market. 

This gives investors in Britain’s 
biggest flotation an opportunity to 
control their risk. 

And gives further impetus to 
the extraordinary growth of the 
market. 

Already it’s doubling in volume 
and turnover every nine months -as 
more and more investors discover its 
value as a hedge against unexpected 
movements in share prices. 

Fbr more details, send us the 
coupon. 

The brokers listed below- have 
expressed their willingness to deal 
for new private clients. 

Bailey Shatkin Options Ltd 

Charles De Roeper 014SI 1712 

James Capel 

Andrew Robson 01 621 0011 

TC Coombs 

Ms K Robinson 01 5JSS 6209 

Credit Suisse Buckmaster 
& Moore Ltd 

DmridPuddick 01 588 2868 

Fyshe Horton Finney & Co 

MPlotnek 0212363111 

L Messel & Co 

Lesley Powell 01 377 0123 

Prudential Bache Capital Funding 
(Equities Ltd) 

Stephen Alway 012839166 

Scrimgeour Vickers & Co 

Sinum Wilson 01 6232494 

Albert E Sharp & Co 

MrJSreeves 021 236 5801 

Sheppards 

Mr Af Derriman 01 378 7000 

Smith New Court Agency 
Keith Williamson 01 628 4433 

Sternberg Thomas Clarke & Co 
Mr P O’Donnell 012478461 


lb find out more about the market, 
please contact Mary-Ann Rogers at The 
Options Development Group, The Stock 
Exchange, London EC2N 1HR 


Company. 

Address— 


Postcode. 

& THE 
£ STOCK 


Up! I EXCHANGE 

A maffaet in progress 










soeiie 




u 


SIB LAUTRO FTMBRA 

The language of 
financial consumer protection 




“EAGLE STAR” 

The language of 
financial consumer protection 


Even the professionals may find 
the ‘alphabet soup’ of the new 
financial services regulatory bodies 
a mite confusing. 

On top of that advisers must now 
wade through hundreds and hundreds 
of pages of legalistic prose which will 
affect the way they conduct their 
business. 

For all advisers Eagle Star has a 
simple message. 

The new Act, and its consequent 


regulations, simply endorses the way 
you probably already operate. 

That means asking three basic 
questions about a company before you 
recommend one of its products to your 
clients. 

How financially stable is it? 

How efficient is it in helping you to 
look after your clients? 

Will it still be there to pay out 
competitively on maturity? 

We fully support the principles 


underlying the Fi n a nc ial Services Act 
and when you, as an independent finan- 
cial adviser; recommend Eagle Star 
you can do so secure in the knowledge 
that our financial strength, quality of 
customer care and investment perfor- 
mance will satisfy your clients’ needs. 


m 


ieStar 




SIB Securities and Investments Board Limited. LAUTRO Life Assurance and Unit 'Bust Regulatory Organisation. FIMBRA The Financial Intermediaries Managers and Brokers Regulatory Assocdatior 





THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/3 


The drink driver’s cover 


fcAR INSURANCE 

The Christmas spirit 
is about to be uncorked, 
and advertisements are 
reappearing for a 
controversial type 
of insurance, 
reports JOE IRVING 

Drivers can get insurance to 
cover themselves for the cost 
of alternative transport if they 
are banned for traffic offences, 
including drunk driving. 

There are group facilities for 
companies, but the main tar- 
gets are those who may not be 
able io afford taxis, chauffeur- 
driven cars or other means of 
getting about until the licence 
is restored. Remember, for 
many self-employed people 
mobility is essential. 

Policies cover disqualifica- 
tion for traffic offences under 
the totting-up system where 
an accumulation of 1 2 penal ty 
points brings a driving ban. 
Penalties range from three 
points for speeding to 10 for 
more serious offences, so a 
speeding offence, following 
other endorsements, can re- 
sult in disqualification. 

But it is the drink connec- 
tion that brings widespread 
disapproval of this type of 
insurance. Because it miti- 
gates what to many offenders 
is the most serious effect of a 
conviction, it is held to be an 
encouragement to drinking 
and driving. 

The Royal Society for the 
Prevention of Accidents 

‘Only one in 2,000 
offenders caught’ 

(RoSPA) says: “It is immoraL 
The inconvenience of losing 
the licence should not be 
made any easier. There should 
be no way in which people 
who may kill or injure others 
should be allowed to escape 
any part of their punishment.” 

Don Steele, director of Ac- 
tion on Alcohol Abuse, said it 
was estimated that only one in 
250 drink drivers was caught. 
But he adds: “It is more like 
one in 2,000. Insurance must 
be an added incentive to take 
that small risk.” 

So far this year 104,000 
motorists have lost their li- 
cences, and Mr Steele says: 
“We are opposed to this type 
of insurance, but it is obvi- 
ously regarded by the com- 
panies offering it as a money- 
spinner.” 


Three concerns offering 
cover are St Christopher 
Motorists’ Security Associ- 
ation Ltd, Chauffeurplan Ltd. 
and Scheme Underwriting 
(UK) Ltd, whose policy is 
marketed under the name of 
Chauffeutguard. St Chris- 
topher policies are under- 
written by Isle of Man 
Assurance, Chauffeurplan by 
New Hampshire Insurance; 
incorporated in the United 
States. 

Drink-driving insurance is 
not cheap. The cost depends 
on the amount and range of 


About two and a half pints 
of beer can be enough to reach 
the limit, less in some cases. 
This means the five-pint 
driver’s insurance will prob- 
ably not do him or her much 
good. 

For companies offering 
driving-ban insurance, Christ- 
mas and the warm summer 
months when police are on 
super-alert for drank drivers, 
are peak times. St Chris- 
topher, with more than 30,000 
members, is dealing with 60 
inquiries a day, with about six 
out of 10 signing up. 


pret 

iron 



Don Steele: ‘Opposed* 

cover chosen. Besides dis- 
qualification, loss of income 
due to injury, theft or accident 
can be covered to a limited 
extent. 

The annual charges of St 
Christopher range from £64 
for maximum cover of £4,000 
a year to £175 for £8,500. 
Chauffeurplan cover costs £60 
for £4.160 to £175 for £9,620. 
Chauffeurguard charges £25 a 
year for £2,000 benefit to £75 
for £6,000. There are dis- 
counts for groups, and tax 
relief is allowed on subscrip- 
tions of self-employed people 
and other businesses. 

Qraufiemgnard will insure 
drivers over 21 provided the 
licence has not been sus- 
pended in the past five years. 
St Christopher and Ghau£ 
feurplan set an age limi t of 25, 
the former stipulating that the 
licence has not been revoked 
for drink driving in the past 
three years. All three com- 
panies will accept for drink* 
driving cover applicants who 
already have penalty points, 
or have them pending. 

These companies automati- 
cally reject claims from driv- 
ers who refuse to supply 
breath. Mood or urine samples 
to the police- No money wifi 
be paid, either, if tests show 
that the alcohol level is more 
than twice the legal limit of 35 
microgrammes per 100 milli- 
litres of breath or 80 
milligrammes per 100 milli- 
litres of blood. 


Ian Rnffi not condoning 

They include doctors, solic- 
itors and accountants, but 
they are mainly sdfemptoyed 
people who can least afford 
alternative transport. Accord- 
ing to the company’s lan Ruff, 
brokers selling the policies 
throughout the country are 
well represented in the 
clientele. 

Whether they figure to any 
extent in the claims list is not 
known, but sales repre- 
sentatives do well enough at 
the recruitment end. They are 
paid commissions of 30 per 
cent of every new member's 
contributions, and a further 1 5 
per cent for every year the 
recruit remains a member. 

At any time St Christopher 
is processing 350 claims, with 
a turnover of seven to 10 days. 
The aftermath of Christmas 
will boost this to around 500 
from about mid- January when 
cases start reaching the courts. 

Of these, about 40 per cent 
will relate to drink-driving, 
but few are women. Mr Ruff 
says: “About 20 per cent of 
our membership is women, 
but I doubt whether one in 50 
claims is from a woman.” 

Of drink driving he says: 
“We do not condone it in any 
way. What we insure are the 
further consequences of dis- 
qualification after the court 
has imposed its penalty. Nei- 
ther my wife nor I drink at 
alL” 

Peter Greenwood, of 
Scheme Underwriting, says: 


“The intention of the law is to 
tvent a suspended motorist 
>m driving — not to restrict 
his mobility. This type of 
cover merely places a less 
well-off motorist in a position 
comparable to one who has 
significant personal funds.” 

A government-sponsored 
report on drinking and driving 
made the same point several 
years ago. The Blennerbassett 
Committee recommended no 
action should be taken on 
insurance schemes of this kind 
and said a disqualified driver 

with other means of transport 
was less likely to drive 
himself. 

The committee said: 
“While recognizing that the 
offer of such insurance could 
create the impression that 
disqualification can be faced 
with equanimity, we believe it 
would be against the insurers’ 
own interest to encourage 
irresponsible behaviour. 
There is no reason to suppose 
that these schemes will be 
detrimental to road safety.” 

A decade later public bod- 
ies, motoring organizations 
and the insurance industry as 
a whole remain unimpressed. 

An official of the Auto- 
mobile Association, which 
provides insurance services, 
said it did not comment on the 
activities of other insurance 
companies, but added: “The 
AA totally disagrees with 
drinking and driving, and we 
do not provide that kind of 
insurance.” 


‘No straight answer 
from the minister 9 


A RoSPA official said: “We 
would not just like to see the 
alcohol limi t brought down, 
but it should be an offence to 
drive after drinking anything 
at all" 

Action on Alcohol Abuse 
wants Britain to follow the 
lead of the Scandinavian 
countries and ban drink-driv- 
ing insurance. 

Last month a delegation, 
including Dr John Hazard, a 
management board member 
and secretary of the British 
Medical Association, visited 
the junior transport minister, 
Peter Bottomley. “We did not 
get a straight answer on what 
he thinks of it,” said Mr 
Steele. “We left a company 
brochure for him to study.” 


TARGET EUROPEAN SPECIAL SITUATIONS FUND 


A net. return of over 134% to original investors, since launch* 


The Fund was created to enable investors to participate in the fast expanding European equity 
markets with, the identification of “Special Situations” as the guiding investment principle. 
We are delighted to be able to report th*t. the net return to original investors, since launch 
on 19th April 1995, has fully justified the optimism we then expressed. 


STOCK SELECTION 


The F\md looks to provide investors with an 
opportunity to benefit from the growth in 
European markets and the potential to 
substantially outperform them. 

■ ‘Special Situations’: The fund manager 
selecLs companies for the port folio 
where exceptional circumstances suggest 
that the share price is too low relative to 
the market. 

■ Undervalued Stockmarfcets: Invest- 
ments will also be made in particular stock- 
markets when they appear to be undervalued 
compared to other markets or when share 
prices in general do not appear to refleci 
potential growth in earnings. 


THE SEARCH FOR PERFORMANCE 


Last year proved to be a time when the 
greatest increases in share values occurred 
in some of the best known stocks. As Euro- 
pean markets were -discovered” by fund 
managers the world over, it was frequently the 
household names which attracted the most 
interest. 

However, we believe that for the remainder 
of 1986, it could be medium sized under- 
researched companies able 
to demonstrate the strongest 
performance, as professional 
investors begin to appreciate 
the modest valuation of 
these stocks in comparison 
to their growth potential. 


TARGET 

TARGET GROUP PLC 


THE NEXT .ADVANCE 


After a dull start this year. European 
economies are now-strengthening. The outlook 
for 19S7 suggests a continuation of firm 
domestically-led growth. Wearenow beginning 
to witness the beneficial effects of railing oil 
prices, lower interest rates and negligible 
inflation on consumer spending. Companies 
are increasing their capital to finance future 
growth and domestic cash flow is rising sharply 
in response to the increasing popularity uf 
equity investment. Target European Special 
Situations Fund is ideally positioned to 
take advantage of these developments. 

Please remember unit prices can go down 
as well as up. Your investment should be 
considered long term. 


HOW TO INVEST 


Tii invest in Thrget European Special 
Situations Fund please complete the appli- 
cation rorm below and post it together with 
your cheque lo the freepost address or phone 
our dealers on Aylesbury (0298) 394000. 

For your guidance, the offer price of units 
on 24th November 1988 was 124.8p. with an 
estimated gross annual yield of0.65'\i. 

If you retain the services of a profes- 
sional adviser, we suggest 
that you contact him 
immediately regarding this 
offer. 



■S..urif i ipAL 'Oolial AHfiKuri-Mjuniod 
an 1 »ifltT In hill ini inc.im. rruiv.-di’d. In 
Jih Suiemher Whtf 


For the latest investment prospects telephone 01-831 6373, and listen. 



GKNBKAL INFORMATION 

The — l.l— — lidllll tan 

Hindu. Pud kUOLSi 


ihiTlHH EmDpr jui &prfml 

iPMVbrmdrarilOO 


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jnmo MM wfll be Iwcd mud 4ZdaraaIfer tiny ar* patterned. Uallk 
ni be mU beck in tbe Manger. at a price hi Ich tfcu ike bid prtee 
ctlalimi hi Knriim wi«h libitum of UnlereinlitliMU end ■ 
rtuRemmbedeepietiedirtiMelOdeyaftetMpiiMM^fil 
mdllwni 

An MIM charge *f 5** * tacMed In the eifte priee ar mu 
(tkaTMDmdiBgnhrUK).lcmBilloabfddlaqnlllM 
launedUxles bn All cfaarie. Rates milible open itrucM- All 
■muttldMxReeri%(pIi» VAT) *a a v*h»r of the Bud Is deducted flnm 
IheFnd^pwl— «.fTli« TllHlmd Mini I'M 1 MFQ-The Fond 
^ll^■■l■n■■^l■ll t« lit Hit nil 

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laoMrta meatanluid In tbeeOcr prtre eTulta, bm diatribe lad. 

1MHiHHbMBukTTiKOn»BrLhril(4.iMtan: 

KMC Tbmi Minut e ill Mi | wi ni m TT— Bm | i i i UMBt 

Ay leatiiiry. flack. BP19 SE8. 


| Tm Twget Trane Manager* Limited, FREEPOST, London EC4B 4EH | 

Hh-wuhlomvrM !~S j European 

I • I Special Situations FYiml j 


(minimum &5(KI)ai Ihr price ruling on rvciipi of this application. 
Please make your cheque payable lo Target Tru>l Managers Limn nt 


TI'6/12 


Address.- 






ML* pmrniural njvuer 

PMUW *end details oflMiw in enchange hhan-. for unit iniws ' 


i | P»ea»- , 

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Target Thisl Managers Limi ted: a member of the Unit Trust Asaociuion 

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Sinibii WiaSfeaer gDes ia ^esarch of the fetcts behnid the fiction. 


a;;:.. ry;.y ,,.' ; j 




SPIN TWINS 

IAN RUSH. Brian Glanville 

on the uncrowned King o 
Juventus 







Neil Simon 
exclusive 
interview 


THE 

SUNDAY 



Better than a month 
of other Sundays 




2 PAGES. A COLOUR MAGAZINE. ALL FOR 50p 










30 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE/LAW 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


How the experts 
got it all wrong 


C UNIT TRUSTS ) 


November was the month 
when many investment experts 
were proved wrong. Having 
written off the Japanese mar- 
ket after two months of poor 
performance, they bad to 
watch the Nikkei Dow Index 
bounce hack to more than 
make op lost ground. 

The Japanese recovery was 
apparently the result of sev- 
en! factors, rather than any 
ok dominant theme. The 
year-end period is tradition- 
ally buoyant for Japanese 
investors, and sentiment was 
Farther boosted by a cat in the 
Dfecount Hate and the Japa- 
nese- American accord on ex- 
change rates. 

Whatever the reason, the 
about-turn was reflected in the 
mit trust performance tables. 


where all 58 Japanese-in- 
vested fiords made gains in the 
month to December 1 and 
consolidated their positrons at 
the top over die longer terms. 
The more general Far Eastern 
foods, however, fared less 
well, reflecting the fact that 
many food managers have 
been red Bring their exposure 
to Japan In recent months. 

Wall Street had a real op- 
and-down month. Enthusiasm 
for take-over and speculative 
situations, which had pre- 
viously buoyed the market, 
disappeared (ike snow in Au- 
gust when the Ivan Boesky 
revelations emerged. 

Tim Dow Jones Index fell 
43 points as panic set in, but 
within days investors were 
back, piling into “Woe chip" 
stocks. The 1900 level was 
breached for the first time in 
three months and even the 
Iran arms affair did not pre- 



UNIT TRUST PERFORMANCE 

Value of £100 as at December 1, 1986 
THE BEST 

One Year 


Three Years 


Legal & Gen Far East 
County Japan Growth 
Sun Life Far East Grth 
Eagle Star Far Eastern 
Mercury Japan 
Sun Life Japan Growth 
MIM Britannia Jap Part 
Wanfley Japan 
TR Japan Growth 
Dunedin Far East 


2185 

214.0 

210.0 
202.8 

196.7 
195.1 
1925 

190.8 
188.4 
187.7 


Baring First Europe 
Murray European 
HiH Samuel European 
MSG Euro S General 
Mercury Japan 
Barrington European 
Govett European Growth 
Guineas Mahon Recovery 
TR Special Opps 
Schroder European 


323.B 

318.6 
303.8 
2905 
287.5 
286.0 
280.1 
2775 
2745 

270.7 


•Sector Average 


132.4 


One Year 


•Sector Average 

THE WORST 


1765 


Three Years 


MIM Britannia Praf Shrs 
Lawson Charlotte Square 
Lawson American Growth 
S&P Energy Industries 
Wanfley Smaller Cos 
Cater Aten GUt 
Gartmore Oil and Energy 
Canada Growth 
Bridge int I 
MIM Britannia Uni I 


945 Tyndall Australian Secs 82.4 

945 Leo Capital 81.3 

53.8 MIM Britannia WkJ Tech 80.6 

925 Canada Growth 805 

92.8 Target Commodity 79.9 

90.9 GT American Spec Sits 785 

90.3 Gartmore Gold Share 77.0 

89.0 KB World Technology 74.0 

88.4 MiM Britannia Uni Engy 665 

82.0 Sentinel American Teen 64.6 


Offar to bid basis 
Net income rdnvestad 


Source: Planned Savings 


vent the market finishing the 
month dose to its all-time 
high. 

The swift change in market 
direction and the US cur- 
rency’s continuing weakness, 
however, saw few of the US- 
invested unit trusts malting 
g a in s over November, and 
most of them are still in the 
bottom half of the longer-term 
performance tables. 

Generally, performances 
overall in the unit trust market 
wore rather mated last month 
— only one fund in the industry 
managed a gain of more than 
10 per cent, Kleinwort 
Benson’s Japanese Growth. 
Gold funds did weO again on 
the back of the weak dollar 
and farther developments in 
South Africa, although none 
matched the dMtie-fipm in- 
crease of the FT Gold Mines 
Index. 

One sector to keep an eye 
on, though, is that containing 
the handful of tends specializ- 
ing in investment trust shares. 
There are only eight sndi unit 
trust vehicles, but all made a 
profit last month, something 
only Japan could match. 

Institutional activity in the 
investment trust sector has 
been building np m the past 
year, with American investors 
in particular showing signs of 
baying into the iwrlcgr m 
greater volume. The Govern- 
ment's PEP scheme should 
also boost investment trust 
sales, while the growth of 
predatory Interest — large 
shareholders gamine control 
with a view to nnitmnf > the 
fund and raghrng in mi the 
discount — can lead to rapid 
moves in share prices. 


Special offers to keep 
the investors happy 


Law Report December 6 1986 

Residence test for 
tenant’s successor 


r PERKS ) 

Perks are not unusual among 
companies that want to 
encourage investors to buy 
and hold their shares. 

But perks should never be 
considered in isolation. Buy a 
share that is fundamentally 
sound with good earnings and 
growth prospects, not because 
it offers a discount on its 
goods. If there is a sweetener 
in the form of a concession for 
shareholders, so much the 
better. 

Not all perks are automat- 
ically available. Some must be 
applied for. Others require a 
minimum number of shares. 

The perks themselves range 
widely from a sample pack of 
groceries for shareholders 


Cheqne or cash is 
needed, not a card 


aitMiriing the annual meeting 
of Associated British Foods to 
the 15 per cent discount on 
most purchases at Asprey, the 
Bond Street jeweller. 

At ABF, no minimum num- 
ber of shares is required. At 
Asprey, you need at least 
1,125 ordinary shares for the 
15 per cent discount and yon 
must pay for your purchases 
by cheque or cash, not with 
plastic money. 

With its annual accounts 
and half-year statement. Trust 
House Forte sends an applica- 
tion form for a book of leisure 
cheques, each entitling inves- 
tors with a minimum of 500 
shares to 10 percent discounts 
at all LiUywhite sports shops 
and more than 200 hotels. 

At this time of year many a 
person’s fancy turns to wine 
and other benedictions of the 


spirit Merrydown Wine on 
the Unlisted Securities Market 
offers shareholders a 20 per 
cent discount on many of the 
company's products, includ- 
ing vintage ciders, elderberry, 
gooseberry and other country 
wines, and sample bottles by 
post of 350ml of cider vinegar, 
raspberry, tarragon and gariic. 

For those who turn up at the 
annual meeting, there is a 
buffet lunch noth a product 
tasting to follow. 

Different tastes are catered 
for in the discounts al Grand 
Metropolitan Group with four 
£1 vouchers off the cost of 
some beers and Smirnoff 
vodka. 

Even more popular is the £4 
reduction on a meal for two, 
excluding Saturdays, at any 

Bemi Inn. According io Tim 
Halford, of Grand Metropoli- 
tan, more than 17,000 
shareholders took advantage 
of ibis concession during this 
year. 

The group also offers dis- 
counts to its health buffs with 
a Health Fitness Centre. A list 
of offers and vouchers comes 
with the annual report. 

Norfolk Capita] Group's 
discount of 10 per cent on its 
London and country hotels 
can be laced with a Christmas 
flavour at the Old Swan Hotel, 
Harrogate, from December 24 
to 27. 

Christmas hampers, ranging 
from the £900 “Olympus” to 
£20 gifts of delicacies such as 
smoked salmon, port and 
Stilton cheese, come from 
Park Food Group at Birken- 
head, with a 20 per cent 
discount allowed for 
shareholders. 

The concessions on Euro- 
pean Femes are among the 
best known and most fre- 
quently used. 


Shareholders get a 50 per 
cent discount on the Dover to 
Calais. Boulogne and 
Zeebrugge routes, a 40 per 
cent discount on the Ports- 
mouth to Cherbourg and Le 
Havre routes, and a 25 per 
cent discount between 
Cairnryan and Larne. 

The concession is for an 
nnlimitcd number of return 
crossings with private car plus 
four people. There are some 
restrictions at peak hours. 

To qualify for the travel 
concessions m 1 987, you must 
hold 300 £1 preference shares, 
and be on the register by 
December 31, so there is not 
much time. After that date the 
qualifying number of p 
erence shares doubles to 61 

Altogether about 150 types 
of perks are offered by com- 
panies to their shareholders. 

One company gives 
Centre Court seats 

from calculators (Fobel Inter- 
national) to gardening tools 
(Spear and Jackson), toys and 
games (Burtons Group at 
Hamleys), with dry cleaning 
and shoe repairing 
( Sketch! eys) en route. 

The most common con- 
cessions are on restaurants, 
hotels, holidays, wines and 
entertainments, including a 
Centre Court or No 1 seat at 
Wimbledon (non-interest- 
bearing debentures). 

Seymour, Pierce & Co, 
Stockbrokers, of 10 Old Jewry, 
London EC2R 8EA, will be 
publishing a new edition of 
their booklet. Concessionary 
Discounts A vail able to 
Shareholders in UK Com- 
panies 1986-87 priced at | 
£1.50, early next month. 

Jennie Hawthorne 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN. 11.00% 

Adam S Company 11.00% 

BCC1 11.00% 

Citibank Savings! 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank 11.00% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai 11.00% 

Lloyds Bank -.11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scodandll.00% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA. -11.00% 

t Mortgage Base Rate. 




Banks 

Current account - no interest 
Deposit accounts — seven 
notice required tor 


INTEREST RATES ROUND-UP 


per cent, Lloyds 5 per 
id 5 per cant NafWest 5 
per cant. National Girobank 5^>er 


cant Fixed term deposits £10J 
to £24,999: 1 month 7.625 per cent. 
3 months 7.75 per cent. 6 months 
7.75 per cent (National Westmin- 
ster); 1 month 7.19 per cent, 3 
months 758 per cent 6 months 7.38 
percent (Midland). Other banks may 
diner. 

MONEY FUNDS 

Fund Nat CHAR Tetoftfune 

Aitkan Hums 

RiORNytnc. 7JE6 7.94 01 63BSJ7C 
Sot Scotland 7.66 7 S3 01 6288060 
Barcteys Higher Rtrto 

Deposit Account • 

rt.000-E9.999 7.13 752 016261567 

£10,000 & over 7.63 7.85 016261567 
Cater Aten eal 758 7.63 015862777 
Ctttm* 

Money Met Plus 750 755 015811422 

HPG Trust 7-day 850 658 012388391 
Henderson Money 
Market 

Claqua Account 758 753 0163S5757 


NEW 3rd EDITION 


THE STOCK 
MARKET 

A GUIDE FOR THE PRIVATE INVESTOR 
NEIL F STAPLEY 


A 1, J "A must tor the millions of people 
who’ve bought shares in 
1 privatised companies 
"Includes Big Bang' changes as well as other 
important changes since the last edition 
" All you need to- know about the Stock 
Market 


w ood head - Faulkner 
of Cambridge 


V 

t 


MUandMCA 

£240049,999 745 756 0742 20999 

ElOOOOart 0»ar 7.70 753 074220999 

Hat West Httft 
W Spec Reserve 

E2.00059.999 753 755 81 7261000 

n0500&Ortr 7.75 758 61 7261000 
Oppe nhBk nor Money 
Management Account 

UKterbOPOO 756 759 01 2363362 
over £10,000 7.78 650 01 296 9362 

Royal Bd Scotland 

Premium Account 7.75 758 0315570201 
S&PCal 7.65 7 55 070068866 

Schroder Wage 

£2500 to £9599 748 7.74 0705627733 
orar £10.000 7.66 753 0705627733 

Ti4at8Rfeycal 853 652 012360952 
T & R 7-day 755 8.13 012360952 
Tyndalcafi 6.03 856 0272732241 
Tyndal 7-day 7.75 757 0272732241 Changes hi 
ll uT 7-d ay 7.75 758 01 6264681 SupptetTMnt 
Western Trust first vaar 

1 month 755 855 0752261161 

CfMR - Compounded Net Annual Rata. 

Figures are tm latest avoiable at the ttmaot 
gomg to press- 

Rese arch : Deborah Bona 


National Savings Bank 
Ordinary Accounts — if a minimum 
balance of £100 maintained for 
whole of 1986. 6 per cent interest 
D4L for each complete month where 
balance Is over £500, otherwise 3 
per cant Investment Accounts — 
11.75 per cent interest paid without 
deduction of lax, one month's 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
investment £100,000 . 

National Savings Income Bond 
Mjnfanum Investment £2,000, maxi- 
mum £100,000. Interest 11J25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
paid monthly without deduction of 


tax. Repayment at 3 months' notice. 
Penalties m first year. 
mmam 5*wmg# incunoM nconw 
Bond 

Start rats monthly income for first 
year, 8 per cent . Increased at end of 
each year to match increase in 
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index. Cash value remains the 
same. Income taxable, paid gross. 
Three months' notice of withdrawal 
Minimum investment of £5,000 in 
mirtples of £1,000. Maximum 
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National Savings 4th btdex-Unlced 

Ufil UHWMOfi 

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excluding holdings of other issues. 
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first year, 325 per cent in the 
second, 3J50 per cent in the third. 
450 per cent m the fcxath and &00 
per cent n the fifth. Value of 
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chased in December 1981, £145.61 , 
inducting bonus end supplement 
October RPI 388.4 . (The new RP1 
figure Is not announced urrtfl the 
third week of the following month). 

National Savings Certific ate 

32nd issue. Return totally free of 
income and capital gains tax, equiv- 
alent to an annual Interest rate over 
the five-year term of 8.75 per cent, 
maximum investment £5,000. 
General extension rate for holders 
of Barter issues which have 
reached maturity is 8.70 per cant 
National Savings Yearly Plan 
A one-year regular savngs plan 
four-year savings 


certificates . Min imum £20 a month, 
maximum £200. Return over five 
years 8.84 per cent, tax-free. 

National Savtnga DspoeB Bond 

Minimum inv estment £100, maxi- 
mum £100,000. Interest 11.25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' notice 
credited annually without deduction 
of tax. Repayment at three months' 
notice. Half Merest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 

Local Authority Yevflmf Bonds 
12 months fixed rate investments 
interest 11 ’/toper cent basic rate tax 
deducted at source (can be re- 
aairncnoynorMaxpayerlt tnuiunum 
investment £1 ,000. purchased 
through stockbroker or bank. 

Querantead Income Bonds 
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higher rate taxpayers may have a 
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9.1 per cent; 5yrs New Direction 
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percent. 

Local euthorfty town hafl bonds 
Fixed term, faced rate investments. 
Merest quoted net (basic rats tax 
deducted at source non-redakn- 
abte) 1 yr Reading 7.50 per cent min 
kiv £1.000; 2-4yrs Kkktees 838 per 
cent, min inv £500; 5-7yrs Notting- 
ham 82 per cent, rraninv £500: Byre 
Vale of Glamorgan 6.13 per cent, 
rrtn mv £500; 9&1 Oyrs Taff By &21 



WIFE 
m 
J FOUR 
(FurrcnoHS! 
tv l 

SVPFCKT 



Swanbrae Ltd v Elliott 
Before Lord Justice Kerr and Mr 
Justice Swim on Thomas 
[Judgment November 27] 

A person claiming a statutory 
renanev bv succession under the 
rent Acts’ might reside with a 
relevant relative for the req- 
uisite period and have more 
than one home or more than 
one residence. Such a person 
had to show, however, that he or 
she had made a home at the 
premises and had become, in 
the true sense, a part of the 
household of the deceased rel- 
ative. , . 

The Court of Appeal, in a 
reserved judgment, dismissed 
an appeal bv the defendant. Mrs 
Sheila Elliott, against a judg- 
ment of Judge Dobry, at Bow 
County Court, whereby the 
judge ordered Mrs Elliott to give 
possession of the dwelling house 
known as 49 Wellington Road, 
East Ham, London, to the 
plaintiffs, Swanbnte Ltd. 

Mr Terence Gallivan for Mrs 
EOioit; Mr Roger McCarthy for 
the plaintiff landlords. 

MR JUSTICE SWINTON 
THOMAS said that in October 
1948 the landlords' predecessors 
in title granted a tenancy to Mrs 
Elliott's parents. Her father died 
in September 1981 and her 
mother on April 20, 198S. 

To the landlords' claim for 
possession Mrs Elliott pleaded 
m her defence that she was the 
successor to her mother and 
was, thus, entitled to a statutory 
tenancy of the premises. 

There was no dispute that Mrs 
Elliott was a member of the 
family or that she had been 
staying at the premises for a 
period in excess of six months 
prior to the mother's death. 
There was no dispute that the 
mother was a statutory tenant 

The sole dispute was whether 
Mis Elliott was residing with her 
mother for the requisite period. 

Mis Elliott lived at 49 
Wellington Road, as her home 
with her parents until she 
married. She regarded it as her 
home prior to her marriage^ In 
about 1971 she and her husband 
went to live about two miles 
away at 4 Gainsborough Ave- 
nue, Manor Park, London. 

Her husband was the tenant 
of those premises. He left in 
about 1978 leaving Mrs Elliott 
and their son living at those 

pr e miMBL 


in 1 983 the mother bacamc ill 
with cancer. Mrs Elliott visited 
her regularly. In September 
1984 Mrs Elliott moved into 4C 
Wellington Road in order to 
look after the mother. She 

retained the tenancy of 4 Gains- 
borough Avenue and her son 
continued living there. 

The judge found as a fad that 
Mrs Elliott had a secure home at 
4 Gainsborough Avenue. Be- 
tween September 1984 and her 
mother’s death she slept at 49 
Wellington Road at least three 
to four nights a week but she 
continued to pay the rent and 
the? outgoings on 4 Gains- 
borough Avenue, and her post 
continued to be sent to that 
address. 

In those circumstances the 
judge had to resolve whether or 
not for the material period Mrs 
Elliott was “residing with” her 
mother. 

The court should bear in 
mind that questions of 
“residence” and “residing at” 
were very much ones of ted and 
degree. A judge had to view the 
quality of the residence alleged 
and come to a conclusion on the 
totality of it as to whether in 
truth It fell within the 
usage of the term 
with”. 

In the present case the judge 
posed the correct test, namely, 
whether Mrs Elliott was entitled 
to claim that she was reading 
with her mother at the time and 
had been for six months before 
her death. 

Then the judge added that the 
landlords’ counsel correctly 
submitted that if Mrs Elliott 
intended to return to her abode 
or did not make a decision as to 
her future while living at her 
mother's she could not be 
classified as a person “residing 
with” her mother. 

Since Mrs Elliott did indeed 
have a settled abode and res- 
idence at 4 Gainsborough Ave- 
nue, and that, if in those 
particular circumstances she in- 
tended to return to her abode 
and had not made a decision as 
to her future she could not be 
classified as a person residing 
with her mother. She was not 
protected by the rent Acts. 

Lord Justice Kerr gave a 
concurring judgment 

Solicitors: Wiseman 

Green man & Lee. East Ham; 
Wallace Bogan A Co, Stepney. 


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Regina v Bristol Justices, Ex 
parte Broome 
Before Mis Justice Booth 
[Judgment November 28] 

It was in the best interests of a 
child that the police should be 
heard on an application for his 
release under section 28(5) of 
the Children and Young Persons 
Act 1969 following his detention 
by a police constable under 
section 28(2). 

Mrs Justice Booth, sitting as 
an additional judge in the 
Queen's Bench Division, so - 
declared on the application of 
Mr Ronald Broome, ChiefCon- 
s tabic of Avon and Somerset, 
for judicial review following a 
hearing for the release of a child 
aged seven who had been de- 
tained after she had been seen 
shoplifting in the company of 
her mother. 

Mr David H. Fletcher for the 
chief constable. 

HER LADYSHIP said that 
the chief constable had not 
sought an order of certiorari to 
quash the order for release but 


sought a declaration to establish 
the principle of the right . of the 
police to be present and beard at 
the hearing of an application to 
release a child detained under 
section 28(2) of the 1969 Act 

The child in question had 
been detained on Friday May 9, 
1986. The application for re- 
lease had come before a single 
justice on Sunday May 1 1. The 
justice, accepting the advice of 
the clerk to the justices bad 
excluded the police from the 
bearing. It was the duty of a 
justice to protect the child and it 
might well be in a child's own 
interest to be further detained. 

By denying the police the 
right to be heard the justice did 
not have all the information 
required when considering the 
best interests of the child. 

There would be a declaration 
that on an application for -the 
release of a child under section 
28(5) that the police should be 
notified of the application, to be 
present and heard at the hearing 
and to give evidence. 

Solicitors: Crown Prosecution 
Service, Bristol. 


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iATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


SPORT 


’ -V ' ■ 


Rugby Union: Captain promises his determination will lead England to new peaks of aggression 

Fiery Hill has mountain to climb 


mms 





. 5 *„* 




mil 




Hil/: lias pot his stormy past frftn 


Abrasive, arrogant, cocky, hot- 
headed, and pognackmsly bloody- 
minded; these are same of the 
cotoarfnl adjectives that hare been 
ased to describe Fngliinl’s new 
captain. 

When asked to describe himself 
Richard H31 pauses for a moment, 
and then settles for the word “fiery” 
That is net to say he denies a stormy 
period in his recent playing career 
when he attracted negative criticism. 
Bn! that is now behind him. 

“I did niggle last year, and the 
Press had a go at me for about a 
month,” he says, “Wit they went 
overboard.” 

IBs irritation stemmed from 
frustration at not brag England's 
first choke scrum bait, when he 
himself was convinced he was good 
enough. “I sat on the bench as a 
replacement for Nigel Melville for so 
long, the frustration boBt-ap over 
throe years.” 

When he was brought on, it always 
seemed to be when England were 
being beaten, and he was Incrensiagly 
irritated at not being able to change 
the coarse of events by being in the 
team from the start. As a substitute he 
would be patted on the back after- 
wards, gn d an f MiinilU i»f 

man might say: “Well dime.” But it 
wasn’t good enough for this stocky 
player, aged 25, who believes he can 
transform England's indifferent rec- 
ord. 


He now admits that his rise no the 
England captaincy within three yean 
of being selected for Bath’s first wwm 
was a very rapid progression despite a 
period of frequent changes in pecan- 
neL “The England squad has altered 
so much in that time, they’ve dis- 
carded so many players. I'm pleased 
that Tve managed to hang in there, 
despite everything.” 

His tide of of the last three seasons 
would test the patience of Job: he went 
to South Africa with England in 1984 
as replacement for Nick Youngs, and 
came back ms fust choke scrum half! 
To his intense di sapp ointm en t , how- 
ever, it was MeMUe who was 
appointed captain for England's next 
match against Australia. 

“When I came back from Sooth 
Africa, and realized I could play, I 
was Utterly disappointed when I 
wasn't riven the opp or tunit y. That 
was the lowest point of my career” he 
says. Richard Harding, the Bristol 
scram half, then won priority over 
Hfll as the replacement for MW, 
only to be dropped from the bench 

himself. 

Tim chapter of injuries to Mdvfite, 
the chopping and changing, gave him 
a “lot of sweating” and his next three 
cans as a replacement for 

Melville, against Ireland and New 
Zealand in 2985, and against France 
this year. 

The turning point came this season 
whoa Melville retired, and Hill was 
named captain of Bath. Within a 


month, he was named En gland cap- 
tain against Japan, and with the 
World Cap ahead as well as the borne 
international championship, there is 
little time for him to look back. 

“Yon are going to see a more 
vigorous approach from the England 
team from oow on, not only from the 
forwards, but from all 15 players. 
International rugby these days is very 
much a game of physical intimidation, 
a question of confronting your opp- 
osite number, especially when they're 
Australian or New Zealanders. 

“England have the players, but last 
year our attitude was appalling. 1 There 
was no fire. What we need is com- 
mitment »mt con fidence. With >h<we 
dements, we can improve the quality 
of play by as much as 20 per cent.” 

He prints to Gareth ChDcott, his 
dob coBeagne, the pack leader 
against Japan, as the ejritomy of tint 
attitude. like H31, Chiteott hstv* to 
lose, and both men think England has 
shown too much respect for opposing 
teams in the past 

“Gareth is a tremendous person to 
have around,” says Hill. From the 
time dm England players gather as a 
team on the Thursday before an 
international, Chileott is 
f g gm g on his team imn^ t stirring 
them op, baUding op the atmosphere, 
so that on Saturday the spirit of the 
turn is at the hi ghest pitch. 

Another player who has inspired 
Hill by example is Roger Spared!, his 


farmer captain. He would often watch 
Spnrreil on the ground, perhaps being 
locked, but lie would immediately 
continue playing without argument. 
“Fve now leaned the difference 
between being aggressive and being 
hot-headed,” says Hill- 

Jack Rowell, his dub coach, 
strongly rebuked HiS about last 
year's incidents, and be has now 
leaned to control that aggression. 
“The best thing that happened to me 
was to be made captain of Bath. I 
don’t think I'm very' popular with 
scram halves across the country, and I 
don’t think Fte cocky, hot I am very 
determined. I have always bleed to 
shoot my mouth off. I'm now in a 
position where that is justified, ami I 
love to see p layers respond to 
motivation.” 

His optimism and enthusiasm are 
catching, and he looks forward with 
particular relish to the confrontation 
with Scotland at Twickenham. He 
thinks England have a big point to 
prove, especially since he considers 
Scottish dob standards to be com- 
parably lower. 

If last season's attitude was 
“appalling” as he pats it, England's 
supporters can expect fire in double 
measure this time. “The Scottish 
macdi is a good one for me to look for- 
ward to.” he says, and adds, with a 
wicked grin, “if selected.” 

Ian Edwards 


Gray says 
trials can 

do WRU 
good 

The Welsh coach, Tony Gray, 
refuses to concede that today's 
WRU trial in Cardiff has been 
devalued by the absence of more 
than half a dozen key players. 

The Neath stand-off half, 
Jonathan Davis, who promises 
to be the lynch pin of the Wales 
team in the up and coining Five 
Natrons Championship, has 
pulled out with a shoulder 
injury. Also missing through 
injury are centres, John Dev- 
ereux and Bleddyn Owen, utility 
back Malcolm Dacey, prop lan 
Eidman and lode Richard 
Moriarty, who took over the 
Wales captaincy during the 
summer's successful South Seas 
tour. 

Add these losses to the retire- 
ment of experienced Pontypool 
front jumper. John Perkins and 
the omission of Swansea 
flanker. Paul Moriarty — follow- 
ing his moment of madness in 
the club match against Rich- 
mond - and only eight of the 
side which finished last winter’s 
international programme 
remain. 

For Gray however, the first 
Welsh trial for four seasons 
means a chance to experiment. 
“We have the opportunity of 
looking at our reserves and 
strength in depth during the 
vitally important period, that 
can only be good for us," he 
stressed. 

Among the young pretenders 
are outstanding Llanelli wing, 
leuan Evans, hard-tackling 
Pontypool centre, Roger 
Bidgood. and Bridgend fly half, 
Aied Williams, who has rock- 
eted to prominence ibis season. 

For others, the trial represents 
a golden opportunity to resur- 
rect interrupted international 
careers. The likes of Steve 
Sutton and Alun Donoyan. both 
last capped in 1 982. will be out 
to prove they are still worth a 
Wales team place. 

TEAM; PROBABLES; 

I Evans (Uaneffi). R Butaond (Pjjntypooii. 
A Donovan (Cardiff. A HwSey (CaicUH); A 
WHfcoma (Bi«l 9 erKl|,R^tonca (Swartsoa). 

Buchanan |Uu* ■ 

S Evans jNsathk ? NtejjJ 


South bank on club familiarity 




JSSJBLES: H .Gw wlltj 2 

l (CaSftl. j Grttfitos i 

itefoot ICa/cStO. KP^Ps 

lottos (UaneSj. M ’Jone s (Neath), H 
Hns (South Wales Pohce). 

I«*«WD Sevan WRUl 

Wanderers mourn 

Viv Davies, the chairman of 
amorgan Wanderers Rugby 
otball Club for the past two 
isons. collapsed and a J ® 
iby reception in South Wales 
Thursday. Davies, aged 64, 
is formerly secretary to the 
id-GIamorgan Health Autho- 
y. He leaves a widow and a 




Purcnase 
idiUon of 

norMM 3 
s whof 
ie Stock 
tie Time* 

igp. 77K* 
IlSf will 
The list 
B divided 
■d groups 
jlio Gird 
jm each 
mains a 


The whole concept of divi- 
sional rugby will be tested 
today, the first weekend of the 
Thorn EMI championship, 
after the selection policies 
adopted by the respective 
divisions: the South-West and 
London have opted for dub 
familiarity in virtually select- 
ing the Bath and Wasps teams 
to represent them, while the 
Midlands and the North have 
cast their net wider — in the 
case of the North, so wide that 
they have trawled up some 
unexpected fish. 

The policy of choosing dub 
teams en bloc, however, begs 
the questions whether the 
players will react in the same 
way for a representative team 
as they do for their dubs and 
whether it is a realistic re- 
hearsal for potential interna- 
tional players when they find 
themselves cosfly ensconced 
with so many colleagues, a 
situation unlikely to obtain in 
an international. 

Bath, for instance, when 
translated into Somerset in the 
county championship two 
years ago, did not succeed in. 
winning the event They 
should be more convincing, 
and convinced, against the 
North at Blundellsands today, 
when 13 Bath players don the 
South-West jersey, because of 
their awareness of the prizes 
available: places in England’s 
senior and B sides in the short 
term, and places in the world 
cup squad in the long term. 

Unfortunately, however, 
Bath have hit what is, for 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


them, something of a slump 
by losing to Gloucester and 
Neath in the space of four 
days. Thai, given their fixture 
fist, was probably inevitable at 
some stage of the season but I 
have no doubt they would 
have preferred to put their act 
together as a dub before 
stepping into another mili eu — 
as it is. Bath will not put their 
best team on the field again 
until either December 27 
(against Northampton) or Jan- 
uary i, against Cardiff: 

The North, who will be 
under the scrutiny of Alan, 
Jones, the Australian coach, 
know that they have to per- 
form well to make up for the 


has a strained hamstring, his 
place going to Jenion. They 
are drawn from 13 dubs, they 
have the spur of knowing that 
last season they did not distin- 
guish themselves in this com- 
petition and the prospect of 
feeing what is effectively Bath, 
will draw the best from them. 
As it does any team which 
comes up against the cup 
holders. 

The North can hardly play 
any game other than an expan- 
sive one; they have picked the 
backs to do so and a back row 
capable of offering swift and 
constructive support. The 
South-West I imagine, will be 
out to disrupt their source of 
primary possession and put 
Holmes, at scrum halt under 
pressure, while at the same 


time permitting Egerton to 
find his way back into first- 
class rugby, from which he has 
been absent all season with a 
back injury. 

He may yet be missing after 
a stomach complaint and his 
dub colleague, Maslen, stands 
by. Egerton’s selection is an 
obvious gamble, though the 
contest between him and his 
dub colleague, Simpson, who 
is at No 8 for the North, 
should be fascinating. It was 
this game last season, too, 
which ensured that Andrew 
would be England's stand-off 
half rather than Barnes; now 
Barnes is the man in posses- 
sion and Andrew must ensure 
that everything he has learned 
in Australia during the sum- 
mer, and bis increasingly ma- 
ture play, are not wasted. 

The Midlands go into then- 
game against London at the 
Wasps ground as divisional 
champions, a salty mix of 
Leicester and Nottingham 
spiced with interlopers from 
Moseley, Northampton and 
Bedford. They will certainly 
test the quality - of the Wasps 
tight five early (even if they 
may wish to avoid over-close 
contact with Coldough, the 
former Wasp who is supposed 
to have had mumps). 

Richards, after all, is 
Leicester’s leading try-scorer 
this season, mainly from 
scrums and fineouts oh the 
opposing line, and the Mid- 
lands mil wish to use his 
strength and timing. But their 
vision may be broader than 


this time last year, when they 
picked specific players to roll 
forward and kept London, in 
the decisive concluding game 
of the championship, on the 
retreaL 

London will surely wish to 
present an all-round game and 
demonstrate that their backs 
— five Wasps reinforced by 
Salmon and Richmond's Si- 
mon Smith — can play a bit If 
Smith ends the game looking 
better than Cuswortb he will 
be doing well, though both 
players must strike up an 
accord with scrum halves 
unfamiliar to them. It will be 
instructive to see if familiar- 
ity, at both grounds, will breed 
success. 

AlWnpK 

LONDON; (Wrap* ntan N 

SMpgar.Mfea^.JTitoniiMartwwina). 
R UrawM. STSrnttcSSMtb{Rich- 
moml). S BMK P Randal. A Stannous. J 
Probyn. K Mm*. C Pkmnr (captten), ■ 
Cotefautgi (SwinMUk MR^byTtilRaM. 
mSuoEs: S Hodaktaon (Nottingham): 
B Brans (Lofcestarf, a Hartley fNortteo- 
ham). P Dodge (Leicester), J Goodwta 
(Mosatoy): L Cmortti (Leicester). ® 
Moon (Nottingham) : S Radfem (U 
ter). B Moots (Nottingham). G P*— c* 
(Northampton). J Weis (Letcacter), N 
Maniafl (Nottmgham. capote). J Orate 
(Betflortf). G Dm (N ot tingham). D RJcrt- 
QTdti (Leicester). 

Referee: F Howard. 

At Waterloo: 

NORTH: U Jnoa (Sato): M Kanban 
(WafcafMd, captain). K Stem (Wasps), W 
Carte (Durham Unfcerafcyj. R Undar- 
wood(L«icestert R An drow (Wasp6), D 
Hoinas (Sheffield); M W M c om b e (Bed- 
ford), S Fenwick {Durharn City), S Pater* 

Southwest (Baft omasa sotadfc c 
Hate; A MR, S HaMajr. R Knfette 
(Bristol), H Dugan (Bristojt 8 Bantu, R 
ftfcapte); G&tootf, G Am* R La* J 
Hal, J Mormon, N Ratten, A RoWnaon, 
DEgartoo. 

Refer — : A Trigg. 


Exiles appearance 
raises eyebrows 


When the Northern Division 
announced their squad for the 
first of this season’s Thorn EMI 
championship matches on Sat- 
urday, there was a general lifting 
of the eyebrows outside the 
Nonb-West when the name of 
Andrew Macfariane appeared as 
a replacement. 

This suggests only that many 
southerners have short mem- 
ories: Macfariane, aged 25, 
played for England Schools 
against France in 1979 (among 
his contemporaries were Francis 
Clough, David Egerton and 
David Pegler), and subsequently 
played for Cumbria and cap- 
tained Fylde in 1984. But for the 
last 18 months he has been out 
of right playing for the Souths 
dub in Brisbane, developing a 
tjrete for the expansive Austra- 
lian game and a career in 
landscaping 

It has been a fertile period, for 
his new dub thought so highly 
of him that they made him 
captain in his second season and 
went on to win the Brisbane 
premiership for the first time in 
28 yean. Not only that, but 
when Andrew Slack returned to 
club rugby after leading Austra- 
lia to their Bledistoe Cup series 
win over New Zealand, 
Macfariane retained the leader- 
ship of what wax by then, a 
settled and successful side. 

The Cumbrian No. 8, who 
went to Whitehaven Grammar 
School, returned to this country 
in October and found Fytde. 
who had been somewhat in the 
doldrums when be left, flourish- 
ing. He settled bade into the ride 
remarkably quickly, in a pack 
which now includes Wade 
Dooley, Steve Bainbridge and 
the former under-23 hooker. 


M ■ w 



Fan) Simpson: added spnr j 

Mike Dixon, and was also asked I 
to lead Cumbria in the county i 
championship. 

At 6ft 4in and 16sL be has 
already demonstrated bis ma- 
turity and some of the Northern 
coaches are raving over his 
handling ability. If rumour is to 
be believed, he only just missed , 
a place in the Northern team but 
his presence will be an added 
spur to Paul Simpson, of Bath, 
to Nay well. 

With an endearing modesty, 
Macfariane gives much of the 
credit for Cumbria’s perfor- 
mances this season to his flank- 
ers, Sam Hodgson and Simon 
Holmes (another former Eng- 
land schoolboy who is highly 
rated in the North), but admits 
that he would like the chance to 
play in ihe divisional champion- 
ship. He was sufficiently appre- 
ciated in Australia to be picked 
for Brisbane and Queensland B, 
a pedigree which the North may 
find it difficult to ignore. 

David Hands 


Meads loses place 
on selectors panel 


TODAY'S RUGBY TEAM NEWS 


By David Hands 


Knsseil Thomas, chairman of 
the New Zealand Rugby Union 
council, undoubtedly exercised a 
persuasive tongue when the 
council met in Wellington yes- 
terday. Thomas was a known 
opponent of the proposals made 
in October by the International 
Rugby Football Board for 
compensating players on tour 
and the council have agreed to 
retain the status quo. 

At the same time the council 
have asked their 1RFB repre- 
sentatives. Thomas and Bob 
Stuart, to discuss the proposals 
farther when the board holds its 
annual meeting in Ieadoa in 
March. “We have decided aot to 
take op all the proposals made 
by the board.” Thomas said 
yesterday, “bat we believe there 
should be farther investigation 
into matters relating to players' 
allowances when on tour. 

“We do believe that any 
loung es that are to be made, 
should be made across toe 
board. All people in a team 
should tour on an equal basis.” 

The matter of the New Zea- 


land Cavaliers' tour to South 
Africa last summer, which gave 
point to the board’s October 
meeting, lingers on in the minds 
of toe cnnicil, who received a 
report that all bid two of the 34 
Cavaliers said they had not 
breached amateur regulations on 
accepting payments; 

That was entirely predictable; 
so is the failure of New Z eal and 
to extract from South Africa 
their end of the story. u We are 
still awaiting advice from Sooth 
Africa,” was the way Thomas 
described the s itu a tion but one 
wonders if, as several of the 
leading playing names fade from 
the scene, whether the whole 
affair will continue to be pros- 
ecuted vrito much vigour. 

Colin Meads, who coached 
the Cavaliers, has also faded 
though it may be nowise to write 
off such a big man - a every way 
- Grom New Zealand’s rugby 
future. Altar only a year as a 
selector. Meads was dropped 
yesterday from the three-man 


Gloucester v Leicester 

The only remaining John 
Smith’s Merit Table A game of the 
day brings weakened Leicester 
to fofigsFoim. Six pteyers are on efr- 
vistonal cal and lan Smith, the 
flanker, is injured so Povoes taking 
Ms place. McLean returns to 
Gloucester's centre and WWams is 
preferred at scrum half. 

Liverpool/St Helens v 
Saracens 

The northern dub are at tufl 
strength for this Merit Tabte B 
game where the result tends to 
go with grand advantage. Sara- 
cens, tacking Adamson, nave 
moved Keay to No 8 and brought in 
Catchpots at flanker. 

London Scottish ▼ Bath 


Thomas ptays centre whfle 
Aberavon bring in Newm a n at 
prep and give tne leadership to 


Headingley v Moseley 
Rtfta Higgs, formerly of Sale, 
makes his debut for Moseley In 
place of the injured prop, 

Obogu. Cok is replaced at hooker 
by Barbor and Hickey comes 
into the beck row against the York- 
shire side who are without 
Winterbottom, their captain, and 
Huntsman. 

Coventry v Richmond 
Richmond have won only three 
times at Goundon Road since the 
war, toe last time in 1976. 

Revan comes tn at prop for Cov- 


Welsh RU Borderers 
ban school bring in 
rugby tour Robertson 

The Welsh Rugby Union 

today stepped info stop a South By Ian McLaochlau 


prayers to _ 

Palmer and Sole reman of their 
first-team regulars against a 

Scottish side whose Anglos return 
tram district duty. 

Orrell v Neath 
Pauf Morris pteys his first W 
game at stand-off for OrreW and 
Briertay is at lock for the injured 
Kimmins. Cleary leads the side 
since Langford is playing tor the 
North: Neath wH field a weakened 
aide bouse of the welsh trial. 

London Welsh v Aberavon 
Howard Evans captains the 
Welsh from stand-off because 
Price has bruised ribs. Greg 


o longer! 
. Batogh 


14 of their 


1 1 If for any reason The Times 

dabs ws « 

Upended ror mat day. 

on eSSTt&^-uSSK j-Steg 

lh . columns provided next to 
day's Times. 

Anar usiing I ho price changes of 
for in* flay, and up 
share changes to give you 
^u^eraJIUJlal plus or mtPW <+ «" - 

J^^bchange ptKw p «"■ 
ir vntir overall total matches The 

SIS claim V™* ortze “ Hwruoefl 

DC UjW- 


Seniority 
holds no 
limitations 

Willie Oakes, the former Ul- 
ster player now almost at the 
“Golden Oldies" stage of his 
career, is at scrum-half for 
instonians in their Ulster Senior 
League section one class against 


who wfll not however, require a 
knee operation. 

Birkenhead Park v 
Nottingham 

No tti n gham travel west in 
muctvleduoed circumstances, nine 
men being absent on Ovmonal 
duties. Hughes leads the side from 
No 8 and Nelson-WHams. nor- 
mally a wing, is tried at centre with 
Glenn on toe wtog. 

Northampton v Llanelli 
Phil Lewis, capped eight times 
by Wales, returns to toe Uaneffi 
stoe after a 10 -week absence 
caused by a knee injury. 


WEEKEND FIXTURES 


M«SS iMSnr iwwfl y*®- 
portfolio lotai. 

ihnr together » dwermtiw 

wKfoo ww- 

Tvuiir iota! matches to* P«*Uslwd 

ESW* SUoctefl wow. 

Haw W *teL - 


TIM TH H*» wn? " 

Ba JBCatovd ottortfli »«• 

eBnl W,m 

w h* I1 uimbw* to MeWKne 

‘LJlfSfcbe can riaim on your behalT 

sotiwM* IJSihatfc your canl apd 

K' ,n ri£tt wrUOlto claims tine 
S&MMK *ipuui«l times. 

ier failure wtntln uw auud 
for on*' ,n “ 

liours.. instructions tee ap-> 

W aM 


Malone at Shane Park today, gjfi" 
Oakes, on the right side of 40, covoitn 
but only just, is there because pevonpe 
the first two choices are out or {gj|W5 
action. Heed*? 

And the old boys of Royal 
Bdfast Academical Institution MatPtS 
face a mammoth task against a Nfwwxi 
full strength Malone team which 
earlier this season handed at a Preston 
30-6 drubbing at Gibson Park. R°ssMi 
That scorriine may not be sSbvR 
repeated but if Malone do not Stewart 1 : 
take the points it will be a major vaiedi 
surprise. 

■IrrWil 

The Ireland team to meet champ? 
Wales in Cardiff on January 17 tonh&i 
will be chosen immediately after wro ng 
the Dccemta 20 trial a! 
Lansdowne Road and a full Egremor 
scale training session will be gkOj 
held the next day in Dublin. SteWon 

Fixture* Ubter Senior Lrttt* Stote 
On* instonians v Malone, suction faRX r£vrL ' 
Queens Unhersity v Academ y, gab ^ 
Gamn Gatam Cormnans v Cowgians: 

ClYMS v Bedrock; OahMgtens v JESS? 

: postponed. 


THORN EMI DIVISIONAL 
CHAMPIONSHIP 

London v Midtand (at Sudbunr) 

Northern v South west (at Waterloo RfC 
<hnd)(ll5) 

JOHN SMITH'S MERIT TABLE A 
Gtouwstar v master 
London Scottish vBath (230) 

HERST TABLE B 

LiverpoqUSt Heters v Saracens (2X5) 
waSHtRUL 

Prebtoito V Possffites (at Cwdttt) (2JQ 

CLUB MATCHES 

Birkenhead Park v Nottingham 

Btentegham v Modey 

Dtedmg el vHettoqtoa g^S) 

BridgandvAbenflery 

Bristol vNawpoit 

Coventry vRjchroond 

Pevonpori Services v Plymouth (2J0) 

Glamorgan Wnd/s v Potttypooi 

Hafibxv Rugby (ESQ) 


Ateeetag v Bte vUe 
MM Po«S v London Hsh (245) 
Nertridgev Cress Keys 
Northampton v Danes 
Orrell v Neath (2J0) 

Preston Grasshoppers v Gala (UO) 
Rossfyn Park v wisps (2JQ) 
fkurite v Bedford (2.1 a 
Sale v Ponty pridd (2.45) 

Stewart's Mai FP v Kvtfepod (230) 
vale of Line v GMtantan (2i0) 
wakafiaU v Nuneaton (2^0) 
westHaSepoolvPyidefZJcg • 
UeEWAN-sTSTBfrtoSTftKT 
CHAMMMSfflP 

North A Mktonds v Sou th (at Inverness) 
NORTHERN FIXTURES 
Agecralt v TljorMon Ctevetoys; Aspto v 
Ashton-on-Mersey; Blackburn v 
Egremont Bradford & BJngiey v Harro- 
gate: Chester v New Brighton; Chprtay v 
North Manchester; Cotes & Nelson v 
BatWon; Crewe & Nanrwicn v 
LongtortBre; Davenport v Sheffield; Fleet- 
wood v Moresby. Pumees v Wteaemera; 
Hsteby v Htoon; Huddersfield v Ourhan 
Cdy: Keiahtey v Roundregens; Kendal v 
Maretoe&n Le^t v Macctesfeti; Man- 
Gheeter UMrerstiy v Cakter VaiK Mteas- 
firough v eTuggmort Pi ark; Moore v Port 
Sunlight; OMBedtans v Btateipool: fed 
SaSms v fed AUwtetens; Obey v Hue ft 


East Rmm Rhyl v OM Mittnans; 
Hocrtee v Wgan; Roth wham v Sed gley 
Parte Seftcn v Kerte Thouwtens v 

fedham Tydestey v RosswteK\fickers 
v North MffiSesdate; Warrir^on v 
Whitchurch: Watortoo v Northern: 
WhwfedMe v waies; Whnslow v West 

Park. 

GIROBANK LEAGUE: North Wtot- 
DMteoa 1: Lymm vVWgton; MldCIwsMre 
college v Soutfejort Wnriington Park v 
Aspatria. North West DMaian KBtack- 
bten v Egremont; Heaon Moor v Cady. 
Tomorrow 
CLUB MATCH 
Waterioov Northern (2AS) 

• Bob Munro, Scotland’s World 
Cup squad manager, has 
accompanied the Scotland team 
to Benevenio for tbtir B inter- 
national with Italy tomorrow. 
The squad trained at 
Murrayfidd yesterday before 
flying lo Naples in the hope of 
repeating last season's success 
Over the same opponents. 

There are two Aitglo-Scots in 
the side, Chris Gray, the Not- 
tingham lock, and Jeremy 
Macklin, the London Scottish 
No 8. 

ITALY K D Tabaka (Parma): E Venturi 
(Rovkjot L da Joannl (Mfen), S Tore! 
(Trevtso). M Cutttta (L’Aqtaefc M Alobl 
(L’AquBaL A GMoi iParmak G Phmna (San 
DwSal A Cviirnrrn (Padua), M 
ETOaoMo (L’AqUte), C Cow (Padua). P 
Padroni (Mten). a frOnefrio (L Aqute^ L 
CoatdlO (Panne), P Farina (Pate). 

SCOTLAND B: H Murray (Dunfermliwk a 
Moore (Gate), S MeAMn (Heriots FPJ. S 
Scott (Stewart s MeMe FP). A TaR 
(Kelsoj: A Kar (Kabo). G Ofivcr (Hawick); 
b ifitea (Hanot's FP). K Mbe (Harlot's 
FPL T Wtete nteso), P Hogarth 
(HawldcxB(»KiL H Parker (KSnemodiL 
__ . - “TiriitelHmwkJ. 


srwel (England). 


ban school 
rugby tour 

The Welsh Rugby Union 
today stepped in to stop a South 
African public school's team 
from playing matches in Wales. 
The Welsh Youth Rugby Union 
had agreed to host the 
Mkhae (bouse Public School, 
from Natal, h four m a tches 
against Poutarddnlais, 
Haver f ordwest, Uanisben and 
Newport youth teams. 

But the WRlTs general 
committee have d ecid ed not to 
sanction the tour. Michael house 
played the first match of their 
British conr against Sherborne 
school yesterday. 

The WRU Secretary, Ray 
Williams, said that the Union’s 
general Committee, had met last 
night and had considered it 
“inappropriate”, for the tourists 
to play in Wales. It appears that 
WRU fears over possible 
demonstrations played a major 
part in the committee's decision. 
“If we said ‘Yes' to this tear 
going ahead, in the light of the 
Hedgehogs' tour having been 
abandoned, it's not too difficult 
to image Oat the anti-apartheid 
movement might see it as an 
opportunity for disrupting the 
games,” Mr Wflfiams said. 

This is the second time this 
week that a planned rugby tour 
by a team from South Africa has 
tun into problems. On Wednes- 
day a scratch side from Southern 
Africa, called the Hedgehogs, 
cancelled a series of matrhea 
against Sooth of England dabs 
after playing in one match last 
weekend. 

The Hedgehogs polled out of 
fixtures with Rosslyn Park, 
Richmond, Southend and Esher 
when a row erupted, involving a 
Government statement on the 
implications of the Glen eagles 
Agreement. 

An Anti-Apartheid Move- 
ment spokeswoman, Karen Tal- 
bot, welcomed the Welsh 
decision. “ This is a further 
victory in the continuing cam- 
paign i to isolate sporting links 
with the apartheid regime,” she 
said. 

Loan deal cat 

The Liverpool defender, Mark 
Seagrave's month oo loan mib 
Norwich City will be cut sbori a 
fortnight early this weekend 
because of his bad disciplinary 
recorcLNorwich are allowing 
Seagrave to return lo AnfieJd 
became a booking in a reserve 
match last week took him over 
the disciplinary limit and meant 
a two-march suspension follow- 
ing Saturday’s game against 
Evenon. 


The North and Midlands whose 
game against the South this 
afternoon has been switched 
from the Northern Meeting 
Park, Inverness to Mayfield. 
Dundee because of snow, have 
been forced to make two further 
changes in their selection. 

Donald Flockban, the 
Borougbmuir flanker failed to 
appear at training on Wednes- 
day and has forfeited his place to 
David Mclvor of Dunfermline. 
The other change sees a local 
prop Alistair Wemyss replace 
Scobbie, who has a head injury. 

The South bring in Robertson 
to the centre with Baird moving 
to the wing and the veteran 
Tomes fills in at lock to allow 
lain Paxton to move to number 
8 . 

Against Glasgow the South 
struggled in the tight scrum- 
mages and tended to play the 
game too dose to their forwards. 
Their coach John Gray, how- 
ever, expressed his disappoint- 
ment in that performance and 
has called for an all-round 
improvement The inclusion of 
Robertson would tend to hint at 
a more expansive game. 

The North and Midlands 
have in the past tended to be the 
whipping boys of the McEwan’s 
Championship and although 
they have improved it is diffi- 
cult to sec them as a serious 
threat to the Borderers, such is 
the imbalance of playing 
strength and experience. 


Moriarty’s 
case closed 

The Welsh Rugby Union 
have decided not to take farther 
action against Paul Moriarty. 
the Swansea and Wales flanker, 
following the punching incident 
in the Swansea’s match with 
Richmond on November 22. 

Ray WiHiams.the WRU Sec- 
retary, said that the union’s 
general committee meeting in 
Cardifflasi night fell the Swan- 
sea club had acted “adequately 
and properly” in the matter. 

Swansea's reaction had been 
to drop Moriarty from the club ' 
match againsi Ebbw Vale last 
weekend.The Welsh selectors 
then omitted Moriarty from 
Saturday's WRU trial, although j 
it was never publicly staled that | 
this was for disciplinary reasons, j 


ATHLETICS 

Fighting 

talk 

expected 
at AGM 

By Pat Butcher 

Athletics Correspondent 

The Amateur Athletics 
Association's general 
committee's decision lo lake 
their Annual General Meeting 
around the areas, with this 
year's session in Leeds this 
afternoon could afford them the 
same reception as the Cabinet 
Secretary’ has had in Australia. 
And for the same reasons. TOO. 
The AAA AGM is always 
something of a blood-letting. 
But the Swindon AC motion 
calling on the general committee 
to reveal the secrets of their 
commercial transactions is 
likely to find much favour in the 
north of England where the 
prevailing view is that govern- 
ment. either political or athletic, 
is a southern conspiracy. 

The general committee has 
always conducted its affairs with 
a herxneucism worthy of a 
Masonic lodge. But with a 
turnover of £2.544. 434 in the 15 
months up to lost September 30 
(the financial year was altered, 
which explains the one-off 
extension to IS months), and 
ihe repercussions of who paid 
£90.000 to Zola Budd and why. 
there is evidently an obligation 
for public accountability. All the 
more so since, on a turnover 
three times that of the previous 
12-month period, there is only a 
surplus of £154.950, of which 
£7"? .629 went in ta\. 

For. although the Swindon 

mouon refers to the new five- 
year Independent Television 
contract worth £10.5 million 
and the marketing deal with the 
Alan Pascoe Association 
(£545.345 in this period), much 
of the surplus appears to have 
come from outside those agen- 
cies. And there are bound to be a 
lot of questions on how a grant- 
aided spon comes to pay so 
much back to the government in 
tax. 

An original Swindon motion 
to general committee on Octo- 
ber 25 calling for contract details 
to be shown to representatives 
of area associations fell foul of a 
legal nicety in company law, 
since some representatives were 
not necessarily members of the 
AAA. which is a limited com- 
pany. That would have been a 
much better idea, because the 
current motion calls for all AAA 
members (some 4.000 of them) 
to' gain access to the contracts. 
That is evidently unworkable, 
and il is quite possible that some 
compromise will be reached 
overnight between the Swindon 
representatives and general 
committee, who are strongly 
opposiog the motion, and it may 
be withdrawn. 

basketball 

Kingston 
face top 
challenge 

By Nicholas Harling 

Something has to give tomor- 
row when the two remaining 
unbeaten clubs in the Carlsbe/g 
National League’s first division 
meet at Tolworlh. Polycell 
Kingston, who have won all 1 1 
games, take on BCP London, 
winners of eight games. 

Both clubs came through their 
midweek games unscathed, so 
will be ai full strength for a 
match that is bound to have the 
Tol worth Recreation Centre fall 
to overflowing. BCP won their 
British Masters match against 
Lambeth and Kingston dis- 
posed of Happy Eater Bracknell 
on Thursday rather more 
comfortably than they managed 
in the Prudential National Cup 
quaner-finaJ 1 1 days earlier. 

The oaly defeats suffered by 
either team this season came in 
cup matches. BCP lost 
suprisingly to Calderdale in the 
Prudential Cup quarter-finals 
and Kingston, the second leg. 
decisively, to Racing Maes Pils 
Mechel in in the European Cup 
Winners’ Cup. since when they 
have not looked back, booking 
their place last weekend in the 
cup final againsi Portsmouth at 
the Albert Hall on December J 5. 

• Trevor Anderson played his 
first game for Bracknell on 
Thursday since returning from 
Portsmouth and scored nine 
points againsi Kingston. 

• Barry Young, the Leicester 
Riders’ 6ft 6in forward, who 
broke his nose for the fourth 
time during a tournament in 
Dublin two weekends ago. had 
an operation yesterday. The 
iqjury did not prevent Young, 
who missed Saturday's league 
game at Hemel Hempstead, 
returning on Wednesday lo top 
score with 34 points in 

Leicester’s British Masters vic- 
tory againsi Team Walsall. 

If the American, aged 28 from 
San Francisco, suffers no ill 
effects from the operation, he 
should be back for next 
Wednesday's league visit to 
BCP London. 

CARLSSERG LEAGUE TABLE 
P W L Pis 

Kingston 11 n 0 22 

BCP London 8 8 0 18 

Portsmouth — 9 8 1 16 

Leicester 10 6 i 12 

Manchester Untied ..8 5 3 10 

HemeWWatfoid ___ 10 4 6? 

Solent 11 4 J f 

Btrminqnam 10 4 b B 

Braeknel B 3 6 6 

Caktentete 9 3 6 6 

Suffiferbfld 10 3 7 6 

Derby B Sin 

Bokon and Bury 8 0 8 0 


Rival pair 
battle on 

Olympia. Washington 
SiaieiAFP) — Eleven seconds 
separated the Finnish rivals, 
Juha Kan kk unen. in a Peugeot 
205 Turbo, and Markku Alen. at 
the wheel of a Lancia Delta, in 
their battle for the world crown 
as the Olympus Rally got under- 
way. 

Alen leads Kankkunen by a 
single point in the champion- 
ship race after finishing runner- 
up in Iasi month’s RAC Rally, in 
which Kankkunen was third. 


32 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


RACING 


Mr Moonraker ready 
for lift-off in 
Cheltenham showpiece 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 


Following that encouraging 
race at Chepstow last Saturday 
when he split Cybrandian and 
Wayward Lad, Mb’ Moonraker 
is taken to win the Glen 
International Gold Cup at 
Cheltenham today. 

While it must be conceded 
that my selection would have 
a better chance if the ground is 
softer underfoot, I still feel 
that the hand] capper has erred 
on the side of leniency in 
giving him only 1 1 stone. 

Take last season’s Embassy 
Premier Chase final at Ascot, 
for instance. In a driving 
finish Very Promising man- 
aged to hold Mr Moonraker at 
bay by only a short head. They 
carried the same weight that 
day. Now Very Promising 
must give his old rival a stone. 

Of course, the hand! capper 
can point to Very Promising’s 
excellent subsequent form, 
most notably his gallant sec- 
ond in the Queen Mother 
Champion Chase in March 
and more recently that fluent 
victory in the Mackeson Gold 
Cup over today's course and 
distance. 

However. Mr Moonraker 
has not exactly stood still. He 
ended last season in a blaze of 
glory by also winning a handi- 
cap over today's distance by 
IS lengths. On that occasion, 
the recent Sandown winner 
Simon Legree was one of those 
in his wake. 

The way that Simon 
Christian’s horses are running 
now can be construed as a 
heartening pointer to the 
chance that the Arkle Chal- 
lenge Trophy winner Oregon 


Trail has. even on his seasonal 
debut 

Originally, the plan was to 
run him at Ascot three weeks 

X but that had to be shelved 
n he was not quite right 
While his able young trainer is 
happy with him now, I still 
think that a victory first time 
out in this company is expect- 
ing too much. 

Corporal Ginger, winner of 
the Bula Hurdle last year, 
returns to active service for 
the same race; having been out 
of action since that crashing 
fall in the Champion Hurdle. 
However, I prefer Prideanx 
Boy, who {unshed fourth in 
the Champion. Any sugges- 
tion that that was a flash in the 
pan had to be dropped sub- 
sequently when he won that 
very valuable handicap at 
Haydock in May. 

Prideaux Boy was clearly 
rusty when he was beaten a 
long way by Floyd at Ascot 
last month. In addition, he 
will be meeting that horse on 
161b better terms today. Even 
last Saturday’s Sandown win- 
ner Aonocb is likely to find the 
task of conceding Prideaux 
Boy 81b too much- 
The Cheltenham card can 
begin with another win for 
Playschool in the Fred 
Withington Novices’ Chase. 
There was much to like about 
the way that he disposed of 
Comeragh King at Newbury a 
fortnight ago. In the next 
event it will be a bold person 
who opposes the unbeaten 
Melendez in the Triumph 
Hurdle Trial, especially as his 
trainer Martin Pipe is sweep- 


ing all before him in this 
particular field. 

Elsewhere, my principal 
fancy is Bolands Cross who is 
napped to win the Lingfieki 
Park Handicap Chase even 
though the opposition in- 
cludes the Hennessy third, 

Maori Venture, who won the 
corresponding race last year. 

With Castle Warden felling 
early on and the hot favourite 
Course Hunter running badly, 
Bolands Cross had little to 
beat at Ascot last month. Yet 
the undi sparable fed is that he 
did this in great style and I 
know that Peter Scudamore 
reported to his trainer Nick 
Gasdee afterwards that he was 
very impressed with the fed 
that Bolands Cross had given 

him. 

If my nap is to develop into 
a Gold Cup contender, as is 
hoped, he should be capable of 
dealing with today’s opposi- 
tion, carrying 1 1st lib. On the 
other hand, the handi capper 
has been able to rate Von 
Trappe and Catch Phrase 
strictly on their Wincanton 
running. 

Mareth Line, none the 
worse for his exertions at 
Worcester on Wednesday, and 
Yabis, who caught my eye at 
Sandown Park last Saturday, 
are taken to win the Summit 
Junior Hurdle and the Tioxide 
Group Hurdle, respectively. 

In light of those runaway 
wins at Haydock Park and 
Newcastle, Withy Bank (3. 1 5) 
is likely to be the banker for 
most on the Nottingham card. 



West Tip dusts off 
cobwebs on road 
back to Aintree 


Nick Gaselee's Bolands Cross, who is fended fin: the T.mgfwM Park Han d ica p Chase 

Rumpus over Grand National celebrations 


A storm is brewing over the intention of the 
Aintree Racecourse Company and Seagram, the 
cm re n t sponsors, to celebrate the 150th anniver- 
sary of the Grand National in 1988. 

Several Interested parties, indnting acknowl- 
edged National expert Reg Gram, are dahning 
that in no drcamst a n ces can 1838 be considered 
the start of the National. It is generally accepted 
that the first Great Liverpool Steeplechase - won 
by Captain Beebe r on The Dnke - took place fen 
1837 at Maghnll, a few miles from Aintree. 


In 1839 the same Great Liverpool Chase, now 
transferred to Aintree, was won by Lottery, and it 
is this event the Aintree Racecourse Company 
have traditionally regarded as the one from which 
today's great race is directly derived. 

However, John Hughes, the director of the 
Aintree Racecourse Company, is happy with the 
proposed date. He said:“As far as we are 
concerned. 1839 was the first year, year one in onr 
calculation, of the Grand NationaL If yon add 149 
to that yon get 150." 


West Tip. Iasi season's 
impressive Grand National win- 
ner, made a highly satis factory 
comeback in the Food Brokers 
Ferrero R ocher Steeplechase at 
Cheltenham yesterday and is 

now second favourite at 20-1 to 
Plundering for the 1987 running 
of the world's greatest steeple- 
chase at Aintree next April. 

Although West Tip finished 
last of the six runners, as Peter 
Scudamore drove I 
Havemalighi home to a narrow 
victory, be had lost ground 
badly at the fifth fence from 
home bur then stayed on 
strongly up the hill to be beaten 
only just over 1 5 lengths. 

-T hat «tas smashing, be 
jumped super and will improve 
a lot on that," said Richard 
Don woody, last year’s Aintree 
hero. 

Michael Oliver was also de- 
lighted. “That was a sound first 
run of the season," said the 
Droirwich trainer. “West Tip 
will probably go to Ascot next 
Saturday lor the SGB Chase 
where he's got 1 1st 91b.” 

As Scudamore punched 1 
Haventalight home, 

ihreequarters of a length in front 
of Qoeensway Boy. the reigning 
champion jockey, bad given a 
marvellous exhibition of sym- 
pathy combined with strength 
on the blinkered 6-4 favourite. 

Two perfectly-timed jumps at 
the last two obstacles finally 
clinched the issue in 1 
Haventalight’s favour. This was 
Scudamore's 45th winner of the 
season and he is now five .ahead 
of Mark Dwyer, his nearest 
attendant in the race for this 
year’s title. 

Fred Winter is now thinking 
of sending yesterday's winner 
for the Welsh National on 
December 20. when a 41b- 
penaJcy brings the seven-year- 
old's weight io 1 1st 51b. 

Although Queensway Boy 
hardly helped his chance by 
hanging to the left when tired on 
the run-in. Anabei King's recent 
winner of the BMW Series Final 
at Newburv had certainlv run a 


By Michael Seely 

might' race, considering that 
this improving seven-year-old 
had only SM 21b in the long 
handicap and was therefore 
earning 2hlb overweight. 

The front running Beau 
Ranger also gave a sound ac- 
count of himself, fighting back 
well when headed to finish a 
close third. Jacqui Thorne is 
now- thinking of running her 
exuberant jumper against 
Foigive’n Forget and Wayward 
Lad in the King George VI 
Chase at Kempton on Boxing 

ft was an afternoon of mixed 
fortunes for Winter as in the 
very next race, the SieeJ Plate 
and Sections Young Chasers 
Qualifier. Brimstone Lady, his 
promising young mare, slipped 
soon after jumping the third 
fence from home with a frac- 
tional advantage, broke a hind 
leg and had to be destroyed. 

The race then began a match 
between Master Bob and Sum- 
mons. Steve Smith Ecdes exud- 
ing confidence on Master Bob as 
he brought the winner home a 
cheeky ihreequarters of a length 
in front of the hard driven 7-4 
favourite. 

This victory gave Nicky 
Henderson, the champion 
trainer, only his 1 7th success of 
the current season. “A lot of my 
borses are still wrong,” he said 
afterwards. “They have cough- 
ing bouts, but tests show noth- 
ing amiss.* 1 

The other steeplechase, the 
Kineton Conditional Jockeys 
Handicap, resulted in an excit- 
ing race for William Humphreys 
who brought Latin American 
home 2'fi lengths in from -of 
Whiskey Eyes, the favourite, to 
give Tim Forster his 15th 
winner of the season. 

Jeff King is doing well with 
his small string and the Swindon 
trainer saddled his eighth win- 
ner of the campaign when 
Compton Park proved too 
strong for Pithy in the second 
division of the Bristol Novices’ 
Hurdle, carrying the colours of 
Lord Vestey. 


CHELTENHAM 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


12.30 Playschool. 
1.05 Melendez. 
1.40 Prideaux Boy. 


2.15 Mr Moonraker. 
2.50 Akram, 

3.25 Accuracy. 


By Michael Seely 

2. 15 MR MOONRAKER (nap). 3215 Accuracy. 

The Times Private Handkapper’s top rating: PRIDEAUX BOY. 

Going: good 

12^0 FRED WITHINGTON NOVICE CHASE (£4.815: 3m If) (7 runners) 

102 02/202-1 DEVMER(S Tindall) SMeUor 6-11-10. 

104 FP-111U WDWGHT MADNESS (D) (D BtoondMd) D Bloomfield 0-11-10 L 

105 

108 
107 
110 
114 


1121 HR FRISK (D) (Mrs H Outlay) K Bafey 7-11-10 . 
40000-1 PLAYSCHOOL (R Come) D Barons 8-11-10- 


00234-1 AGAINST THE GRAM (B Brocks) DNIchOfcon 5-11-9 

OOOP DOUBLE UP (Mrs P Hagrearos) Mrs P Hargreaves 311-6- 
000-202 CAMEBELL£(B){MajN Mart*) N Mftchei 311-1 


SB HM 
W 0-1 
90 7-1 
• 9911-4 
90 7-2 
— 50-1 
7016-1 

1985; ARCTIC STREAM 6-11-10 K Mooney (2-1 fav) F Wateryn 8 ran 

i weri when beatmg Ace Of Spies (1311) at Worcester lest time (2m 41, 


( 11 - 6 ) on teat completed outing a 
II. £1873. good id soft Now 10. 8ranL HR 
byi9troffiGam o woodfl39)at He «fcx*alB8l 


PHCM DEV1NBI (1 0-12) kept on weBwti 
“wnffl £34io, soft Nov 19. 17 fan), 
comfortable 151 wmnre from Castle TaSxx n 1-1 
FRISK (1 1-8) was winning his Wrd novice 
(3m. f 
when 
GRAIN 
Kitchens 

When puHed-up. CAMEBELLE (10-10) found 
bot (2m 150yds. ?1 906. soft Nov 25. 9 ran). 

Soioctiorr MR FRfSK 

1.5 DAILY EXPRESS TRIUMPH HURDLE TRIAL (3-Y-O: £4,266: 2m) (9 
runners) 



! UP (11-1) behind 
I on the nm in when 4» 2nd to Kfeyth (1 0-7) at Newton Ab- 


201 

202 

203 

204 

205 
208 
209 
211 
215 


213 GHOFAR (DJBF) (H Dundas) D Bsworfh 11-3- 
mill MELENDEZ (CD) (Craydaie Ltd) M Ape il-G. 


AGATHTST (W Du PdmJl) G PrfteftardQorion 11-0 . 
P BRONZE OPAL (Mrs E Weferetein) G Balding 1 16— 
DESERT OF WHO (T Connop) R HoHnsheed 116__ 

212 IMLFORD QUAY (W Jones) J Spoamg 11-0 

31 PATS JESTER (O) (R P Adam Lid) RAIot 11-0. 

REGAL CASTLE (Lord Soarnes) N H en d uraa i 11-0 _ 
VILLAGE HBRO (Mrs J Smith) D Mreray-Smtth 1 1-0 . 


Mr T 


C Brawn 64 7-1 
.Jlrarar «»F34 
— 12-1 

K Mooney — 12-1 

P Denar — 20-1 

A Webb 83 4-1 

PMven 6010-1 

SSmUhEccte — 10-1 
— 14-1 


1965; COPSE AID ROBBERS 11-0 JWMb (3-1 fav) J Jenkins 15 ran 
FORM M&EMDEZn 1-0) beat GHOFAR (10-10)3! at Devon On If. £830, good to firm, 

* GHOFAR has since (11-0) scored by 101 from Goklan Craft fl 1-0) at Sandown ( 

Navi. 14 ran) wh#eM&Effl)£Zcontteues on the upgrade- Won over 2m 4f bet time, | 

MILFORD QUAY (1 1-2) 151 here (2m. E31 16, good tofinn. Nov 8. 7 ran). BRONZE OPAL i 

on his debut end was puHed-up in the race won by As&ai (10-10) at Kempton (2m, £1531. good, I 

PATSJ EtTlR^Bjgj ot up to beet Carousel Rocket (10-9) &latAyr( 2 m.tWS.goodtpaofLNi 

1.40 GLEN INTERNATIONAL BULA HURDLE (Grade 11: £9,932: 2m) (8 
runners) 


CORPORAL CUNQEJl (CD) (Jay Dee Racing Ltd) M Pipe 7-1 16. 
FLOYD (CO) (M Walsh) 0 Bsworth 311-2- 


301 13-11 FI A0NOCH (CD) (HOHver) Mrs SOUMr 7-11-10. 

303 11/112F- 
305 11110/1 
308 300-301 

307 00141-0 

308 0310-14 

309 1F30-33 

313 1101-34 MRS MUCK (CD) (N Davies) NTVvfcWi Davies 5-10-8 


PANTO PRINCE (0) (Mrs L Warren) L Kermard 5-11-2. 

FRDEAUX BOY (D) (C Roach] C Roach 5-11-2 

ROBIN WONDER (CO.BF) (A Hteit) O Bsworth 8-11-2.- 
SHEER GOLD (BP) (Lady Hants) G Balding 6-11-1 . 


94F3-1 
90 7-2 
0911-2 
7516-1 
1 99 6-1 
86 8-1 
*1 9-1 
7812-1 


1985: CORPORAL CUMGER 6-11-2 P Leach (20-1) M Pipe 9 ran 


EORM CORPORAL CUNGER fit-2) won this race test year beating Kessfin (10-12) 21 with ROM 
runiOT WONDER (11-6) 7KI 4th, AONOCH (11-10) ittl further away in 6tfi and SHEER GOLD (11-10) a 
very one-paced 7th (2m, £9920. soft. Dec 7, 9 ran). Subsequently AONOCH (1 2-0) produced an excellent effort 
w MO-13) 31 at Sandown 12m. £12015, yiekfing, Nov 29 17 ran). HjT 
h Brwslyta (11-1) by Whom Marten (10-0) with PRKJEAUX BOY 
mi 501 away at 5th at Ascot (ZnyOTOl. good, Nov 15, 8 ran). Eert 


very one-paced 7th 
to beat BaHydumm 
absence to score in 
and weH below form 5(9 sway 
finished a cradHable 4th In the 
(126) was tailed off aD the way a 
end CORPORAL CUNGER (12-0) 
soft. Mar 11. 23 ran). 

Se lection: PTBOEAUX BOY 


returned after a long 
(12-7) in need of the race 
er PRDEAUX BOY (120) 
he was Improving. AONOCH 
(12-0) faded out of contention 2 out 
having every chance at Cheltenham (2m. £41435, good to 


2.15 (MEN OTERNAT10NAL GOLD CUP HANDICAP CHASE (£12^15: 
2m 4f) (7 runners) 

401 1023-31 VERY PROMSMG fCO) (P Green) D NKhobon 6-12-0 


403 131001 S8H0N LEGREE (CD) (Mrs S Emtiricosl 3 Gifford 9-11-2 (*ex)- 

404 2F3F1-2 MR MOONRAKER (CO) (Mrs P Blackburn) L Ksmred 9-11-0 __ 

405 023-110 GOLDEN FR&tD (CD) (D Meade) Mrs M Rsnei 8-10-8 


406 PI/1211- OREGON TRAIL (CJ» <W PonscMjy) S Chrtsdan B-137 

407 DMU2 NEWUFE CONNECTION (B McMBan) W A Stephenson 7-10-4 . 
410 32-3321 IfiEMER CHARLIE (D) (F Lipscomb) M HmchSte 8-10-0 (4ax)_ 


R Donwoody 98 F3-1 

R Rowe B99 6-1 

— 8 Povral 85 4-1 

_ GMcCmet SB 5-1 

R Bengal 93 9-2 


NON6UWER 

C Brown 94 7-1 


1985: COiBS DITCH 9-11-9 C Brown (13-2) D Bsworth 7 ran 


CADM VERY PROMUMG (11-1 
rv/nm 15*1 back ki 5min me I 


Irenon weB to hold Had Free (12-4) 2Lwttfi GOLDEN FRIEND (11-0) 
1 here (2m 4f. £14395, good to Brm. Nov 8, 11 ran). SIMON 


- _ . . I. wfth PREMER CHAftUEJIO-8) another 1 141 back r 3rd over this course and 

dtetance (£4780, good «o fbm. Oct 22. 7 ran). OREGON TRAIL (11 -8) beat Charcoal W*ly (11-8) XI to win Tha 
ArWe (2m) here: sMsequendy flt-IQ ted after last when beating Barite (11-7) 1 HJ at Ascot (2m 4r. £8262. 
good. Apr 9. $ ran). PREIffit CHAHJE (10-1) showed improved lorm to beat Admirals Cup ri0-6j 51 at 
Nn^wy (2m 4f. £3096. good to soft. Nov 21. 5 ran). 

SataeUac G0U»i nmm 

2E0 GEORGE STEVENS HANDICAP CHASE (£4^65: 2m) (7 runners) 


113112- FEARLYMAH (CD) (Ms P Shew) J Edwards 7-1 1-13 

230-1 TF FRENCH UMON (CD) (Mrs C Smith) □ Nicholson 8-10-10 

01F240 CLAY HAL (D) (P Durian) J GlftOTfl 7-10-7 — 

00-1211 WEL8H OAK (D) (G Amey) D GandoUo 6-10-2. 


502 

503 
506 
506 

509 1341-04 BRIGHT OASStS (U-Cd E Ph*ps) K Belay ID-10-2 . 

510 130/10-0 DES1MY BAY (CD) (G Johnson) N Henderson 8-KFO 

512 F011F-1 AKRAM (DJ (3 Aflen) R Hodges 8-10-0 (Sex) 


MrTTbomaoo 

S Smith 

C 


94 92 
90 6-1 
8812-1 
94 3-1 

97 1IM 
• 99 9-1 

98 F9-4 


198& JO OtXOMB0 10-10-13 P Warner (7-4) Mrs W Sykes 3 ran 


PODM PEARLYMAN was one of leM seasons BP novices, most Impressive whmn 1-3) beaten Malye 
runm Malfn-^12laUJverpool(2fTiNov. ES34S. good to soft. Apr 4, ID ran). FRHfCH IIWON was a 
9th fence faiar at Ascot (2m) last tame; previously (1 03) beat Capian Dawn (1 1 -7) 71 hare (^n. E4409. good to 
tem. Nov 7. 5 ran). CLAY m.(10-1ij weakened from the 2nd last when 11«l 5th ~ ‘ 


Brm. Oct 29. 7 ran). WEL SH OAK 
■with BRIGHT OAssee^H 


\r (10-4) 7th ta UtdB 
firstoubngof test season when (10- 
■85. 5 rarf AKRAM (1 1-8) made a 
SM 960. good lo 80ft, Nov 27. 7 ran). 
DESTINY BAY 


B Far Bridge (10-7) at Ascot 
00-11) stepped up on pravkxjs ettcrin when beating Nonsn 
8 (11-4) 3«l beck in 4th at Ascot fan, £5719. good, Nov 14, 7 ran). 
1 1 -1 0) at Newbury (2m. good B soft) on 


£25 NEWENT HANDICAP WHOLE (£3,950: 2m 4f) (13 runners) 


1-00 BESPOKE (D) (Mn W Hem) T Forster 5-11-7 . 

1200-30 RU5TST0NE(C£F)(R Brown) RL Brawn 6-11-6 
013-000 MY D0MBBCM(r Ramadan) MMcCtwt 4-11-6 
030113- TAEERNA LORD (R Jackson) A J Wfcon 5-11-0 . 

1-31320 AMADtsrrHotata Home 0>n LB) LKennm 6-1 0-12 

0314-44 HMRRY JAME (D Scott) E Own Jun 5-10-12 


SB 
BOS 
■ 607 
809 
610 
611 

612 0/30044 MENMGI (H Perry) N MHchel 5-10-11 
614 1-0 Iffi FOG RATCfCS (I Macaulay) FlWnter 4-10-10 

616 3-44122 CAPA (BF)lGKeery)R Holder 6-10-7 

617 S3034-1 ACCURACY (Mss B Swire) G Baking 5-10-7 (Sex) 

820 O48F-30 MAIMNBIS PREAM (HF) (P NawBn) R HoBnah ea d 5-ltHI 

621 134303 BOLT HOLE <W HarrisorvAHsn) G Doldge 7-103 

622 03101V WALLY WOMBAT (D)(EPraJf)M Scudamore 8-103— 

198& TQM SHARP 5-106 P Tuck (20-1) W Wharton 16 nm 

FORM WSTONE fl 1 - 6 ) best effort Ihta season on penultimate ouflng when 14Vil 3rd to subnquam 
1 , r** ,w * vwrm er B arabrqofc Again (11-® at Newtxjry,_hejv« come on from ttwt race (2 itl£ 3330, good, 
Od24,9ra * “ ***** ** ” * “ “ 

151 beck In 



AShvpe — — 


tha when 4th |lll I 

£4®0. good Nov 1.9 ran). MERRY JANE, a touchM 

Observer Corps (10-ll)at Worcester (2m 21. £4409!H 
sNe when beating Teni (1 1-2) at Haydock last Uma, he wants some 
nun. MARBBISDBEAM (11-9) w as not lar blow best when BW3n 
a Devon (2m If. £2145. wm AubM 


B Hypnosis (1 1 -7) with MENMGI fl 1-7) 
ran). The latter ran on much better prior B 
‘ 3rd W JrnGMkne (106) at Smdown (dn, 


1 6. 10 ran). 



Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 



Winners 

Rumors 

Percent 


Winners 

Ridas 

Par Cent 

SMeflor 

12 

60 

206 

RBeggan 

6 

35 

17.1 

F Winter 

39 

202 

19.3 

R Oinwoody 

10 

84 

115 

0 Bsvrorth 

14 

96 

14.7 

K Mooney 

8 

87 

115 

D Barons 

5 

40 

125 


5 

■ 42 

11 3 

LKennard 

10 

81 

123 

SSmkh Ecdes 

15 

143 

106 

RHokter 

5 

42 

lia 

R Rowe 

14 

136 

103 


WETHERBY 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


Guide to onr In-line racecard 

103(12) 33432 TWESFORM (CO.BF) (M« J Ryley) B HaH 9-103 


12.45 Carousel RockeL 
1.15 Fergy Foster. 

1.45 Peter Martin. 


2.15 Grinders. 

2.45 Badswortb Boy. 
3JL0 Old Meg. 


Going: good 

12.4S THORP ARCH NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O: £685: 2m) (20 runners) 


OtEEN ARCHkH (R Moody) Mrs J Ramsden 113. 


1 

1 COMEPOUfl THE WWE (DJ (E Atkktson) H Wharton 10-9.. 
<P AUJSTEK»ANSF8ELD(K Johnson) G Moore 137 


82 31 
94 4-1 
93 — 


10 

0 CLAWSON THORNS (Mrs V Coleman) Denys Snteh 137 


_ 



0 DEADBOLT ID Blake) A Rntnm 10.7 r 




14 

00 FRED OWOWFEH (F Leal F lee 10-7 




IS 

HAPPY BREED fS Hafts) J BbmdeB 137 




18 





20 

P NEXT DANCE (Mrs E Hewmon) M Nauphton ia-7 



— 

— 

22 

3 NOS NA GAQRHE IP Qraanl M H EaUMby in.7 . 

0304 QUMJTAfR KMG (Quattak Hotels Lid) K 10.7 

LWyar 

F46 

24 

0 ROMANTIC IMCLE fP Cockooh) H Wharton 10-7... . . 





27 

0 THE STAMP DEALER (J Moores) E Alston lD-7._ .. _ 




29 



81 


31 

BAV7IN0 (R Brawn) H CaBn^tege 1321... 



32 





34 

0 KATE RHODES (W Timing) W Shmy 1(V2 




37 





38 

F PRINCESS AW)R0MEDA{BW8ddaigMn)D Chapman 132 

H Pepper 


— 


1985: Dhr 1: SANTOPADRE 11-0 K Teetan (5-2) W Storey 14 ran 
On % STRING PLAYER 137 C Hawkins (34) F Lew 12 ran 

1-15 ‘EMMERDALE FARM* HANDICAP CHASE (£3,765: 2m 4f 100yd) (7 runners) 

F42220/ SEA MERCHANT (CD) (rMcOom^i)W A Stephenson 31 1-7 R Lwnb — 131 

330P-31 THE MVIOER tExOts cl the tete J Aitken) Mrs T Cakler 311-1 (10 m) — T G Don 9TF5-2 

P4F331 SOCKS D OWNE (C Cowley) J King 7-1311 (6ex) S McNeB 95 31 

11-3113 FERGY FOSTER (CO.BF) (F ScotM) W A Stephenson 3138 CGraM 393 4-1 

4P3FF3 MOSSY MOORE (M Caira) K OWer 13137 JKkrane 86 31 

11P11-0 REPINGTON (CJ)F) (J GBman) N Crump S- 137 CHawkfne 82 131 

111140 DOROWCUM (Ewan Engineering LM) G Richards 7-137 p Tuck 88 31 

198S: NEWUFE CONNECTION 311-1 R Lamb (9-4 fav) W A Stephen** 8 ran 

Course specialists 

JOCKEYS 


6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 


Mr* M Dickinson 
Jimmy Fitzgerakt 
M H tastertjy 
W A Slephenson 
MWEasteiby 
G Richards 


TRAINERS 

Winners Runners Far cant 
8 32 25.0 

21 102 20.6 

31 163 19.0 

42 245 17.1 

13 81 i&O 

16 102 15.7 



Winners 

Rides 

Percent 

GBraffey 

15 

75 

20.0 

R Lamb 

27 

146 

16.5 

C Gran! 

26 

163 

16.0 

CHawWns 

IB 

154 

10.4 

P Tuck 

Only qualifiers 

14 

138 

10-3 


Racecard number. Draw io brackets. Star-figure 
form IF- fell. P-puBed up. U-tnseeted nder- B- 
brougnt down. 5-sSpped up. R-retusedL Horse’s 
name (B-Mnkars. V-vteor. H-hood. E-Eyeshod. C- 
course winner. 3rfisance winner. CD-courae 


BWWK 98 7-2 

and d istan ce winner. BF-beaten favourite In latest 
race). Owner m brackets. Traner. Age and 
«*ght Rider plus any a fiow n nee. The Times 
Pnva te Handfcapper's raing. Approximate starting 
price. 


1.45 ASSOCIATED TYRE SPECIALISTS HANDICAP HURDLE (£3,986: 2m) (f 1 


2 2-41030 REHIOM (D)(C dark) W Storey 311-7 

3 21U14P- COOL reaaON(U)(C Platts) Mbs SHrt311-7_. 

5 300322 PETS? MARTW (VD) (F Lee) F Lee 5-11-2 

6 
7 
9 

10 
12 

13 

14 
16 


2032-11 RECORD HARVEST (CO) (UQoi R Warden) MHEastertry 31 1-0 
111312 AL-ALAM (DJF) (R Meson) Jtanmy Rtzgerald 4-103 
111300 OLD NKK (CD) (J Hanson) J Hanson 3135 
034013 BAU.YARRY (CtLBF) (W Manners) W A Stephenson 3131 
021300 KOTEFUL MKSKM <BF) (R Hsggas) Mrs M DteUneon 7-10-0 
11030 COOL STRSCE (Dj (T Knowles) G Moore 3130 


103 ROMAN DELIGHT (D)(WLockay)J Charlton 3130. 
340214 jOmPS BOY (CO) (R Swlera) R Surfers 3130 (Sex). 



Mr J Osborne (7) 84 — 


1965: TAHCflS) WALK 3131 R Strange (331) C Jackson 14 ran 

2.15 SUPERMASTER HANDICAP CHASE (£3,707: 3m 100yd) (5 runners) 

2 t!?13/4 JMBROOK (CO) (Mrs M Nowfli) M H Easterly 311-7 Wyer 


P43111 GRIDERS (CD) (Meodhame Butchers) E Carter 31310 (4e»). 
P1 0-034 V R.E SO (BF) (T Fbrde) J King 310-5. 


0FP2PP- KUDOS {JBBnde*)JBkmMM 1-131 



312P-31 OUNCOSHEPRDiCEg McDonough) J Jeffereon 7-130 

1985: BRIGHT DREAM 3131 P Hobbs (131) J Gifford 12 ran 

2.45 YORK HAISICAP CHASE (£2^51: 2m 50yds) (5 runners} 

1 21/03P-2 BAPS te PHIHBOYfCD) (P Awritega) Mrs M OteMnaon 11-12-7 G 

2 1F/P-P03 TRAVELOWEN (CD) (P PBer) W A Stephenson 311-5 n 

4 302331 KARBIOMOHE (LFCof R Warcten) M H Easterby 311-2 (5ex) L Wyer 

7 0-U14P1 SR BADSWORTH (CO) (T Laxton) T Laxron 3130 R1 

9 103321 FRBiCH fEPHEW (D Knights) ttenys Smith 3130 Cl 

1985: VX1JERSTOWN 3137 R Lamb (11-4 lav) W A Stephenson 9 ran 

£20 BOROUGHBRtDGE NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 3m) (19 runners) 

t 0-21310 QALAWOOO (CO) (T MHmpenny) J Norton 31310 JR 

2 


00 BAUNGLANCE (R Laytand) R Layland 4-137.. 

223232 BEAKER (G Lowe) M Nau^oon 3137 

302230 BN TOGGER (J Harnon) J Hanson 3137. 


3 

4 

5 

7 0030 FRANK'S BOREEN (Mis L Kteoe) Jmmy FltsgeraM 3137 . 

8 tyooo-PQ C0LDI9OCK3 (T Robson) T Robson 3137., 


00040-0 CHART FHBER (8 tOpetnck) ASmkh 4-137. 


M Hammond 

C Grant 


J JOutam 
ias R Lfldt 


010 PARK PRMCE(W A Stephenson) w A Stetmenson 3137 TP White (7) 

33204/0 PirSBALOOtW Jackson) R Rahmson 3137 DCondefl 

2F-22 RANCHO BARNARDO(BF) (M Halyer) Mks M Dickinson 3137 G Bradley 

02 RODNEY BAY (R Scott) JBhmdeO 4-137 MSracman 

030 SMUUYAN(GLMtham) MW Easterby 4-137 AShtegar 

343400 SUMIAfG Turner) D Lae 3137 PTadk 

1F4 KURCELUNA (Mra A Hodponson) E Alston 4-138 UAMoo(7) 

02-12 OLD MEG ftLBP) (P HenWigway) C J Bel 4-10-6 Mr J Osborns (7) 

4300 BETTY'S GfflL (J Roche) G Oktroyd 3132 LWyar 


000300 GOQDFBLCnrs POLLY (swfQQri) i Jordan 313S.« BSurey 

OPPO SCALE MODEL (J Roper] J Rcper 3132 ! Wss Staran 08ear 

SMERMN MOON (M Fenwick) Mra A Speke 3132 Mr T Reed 

188& NO comapaniflng race 


• 90W-5 
— 31 
OS 31 
88 31 
88 31 


(7) 98131 


88 7-2 
97 — 


SO F5-4 
86 12-1 


98 31 
• 99 31 

82 

86 — 


L1NGFIELD PARK 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.30 The A Train.* 1 .0 Malya MaL 1.30 Mareth 
Line. 2.0 BOLANDS CROSS (nap*. 2.30 Yabis. 
3.0 Tawridge. 3.30 Indian HaL 
Michael Seely’s selection: 2.0 Bolands Cross. 


to soft 

12^lf DECEMBER NOVICE HURDLE (£686: 2m) (16 
runners) 

1 3 IP DON PIPBUteridns 311-6 

3 1 OfTDrnoNflQR Akehurst311-6 — Dale McfCeown 


6 -000 ADHRA8LE OBCHTON D Ssworth 311-0 P Holey 

7 43 ALTO CUMULUS (BF)NGasM9e 311-0 OF 

ID /FFF CASTtLOfS LAO J Long 311-0 R 

Bt31 


3 


11 


DBnYRMG B SB»t3ll-0 . 


12 300 CRAGONADE A Moore 311-0— 

13 0 FAST ESCAPE JGSbrd 5-11-0- 


. Candy Moon (4) 

E Morphy 

15 P4-2 GOUSi FOX G Erng« 311-0 MPsmfl 

17 3 HARRY’S BARF Writer 311-0 PScsdamore 

19 MR KATS A Moora311-0 G Moore 

21 083 WOFtnSARftAKT Pas MScheO 7-11-0 RGoWstn 


S Sherwood 

BdeKean 


23 0/2- TAHAOtS J Jemons 311-0- . 

24 THE A TRAC« r/rs J Pamzn 311-0- 

25 I0U- TCUCH Or RHTTMIP Butter 3116 _ A OUonate) (7) 

26 LADY BJnxJKKPUBhel 3139 H Davies 

34 The A Trail. 10330 Harry's Bar. 32 ABo Curates. 31 

Tarsus, fcttuscon. 12-1 Golden Fax. Don Rper. 131 others 


1.0 PRESMAN HANDICAP CHASE (£2.494: 2m 4f) 


(4) 


1 613 MALYA UAL (D4S0 F Vi 

i LAO (CO) T Forster 3116 


. r 7-116! 

3 4-44 BELGROVE _ . 

4 321- BSHOPS YARN (09 GBMdiq 7-116 
7 031 WILY YEC9AK (0) J QSad 7-1312 



136 Malya Mai. 32 Bt shro* Yam. 11-4 W3y Yeoman. 32 
Bdgmlte 


1-30 SUMMIT JUNIOR HURDLE (£6,427: 2m) (16) 

2 0 BARBERSHOP QUARTET P hBcbefl 116 

■ MrDBeanyworth 

FARNCMeEHOYMIl-O RCfragman 

GUESSH6 P Ifilchaff 116 HDevtee 

2 KHB JACK NHendarson 11-0 S Sherwood 

21 MARETH LOC (D) M Pipe 116 P 

U1 KAMI W SPRING R Stubbs 116 


4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 3103 MR WHATS-HiSNAIIE CT G Enright 116_ M Pterett 

10 PP PARKffS BAR ^ J Jeteons 116 ROAtettm 

12 4 PR9CE SATES Ft Atenurst 116 D Browne 

13 R1VEH G AMBLB»P&Wda> 116 EHtephy 

14 0 ROSTREAiet CBrawy n -C — 

Ifl 


SHRLSTAR TAXSAVER J 8ethaB 1 16 . 
SOHAIL C Holmes 116- 


Kl 
.R Rowel 


20 401 MMNMGGMNCER Miss LBomr 116. 

21 1211 OURRATAL AM fp)UH Eas»t>/ 1312 DDteten 

22 BE COCX.P Arthur 106 — 1 WKiwx 

_ 114 Ourrat Al Ain, 7-2 Mareth Una. 31 King Jack. 31 

in Spring. Prince Salks. 131 Guessteg. 131 others 

PARK HANDICAP CHASE 


ZB UNGFIELD 

(£10,298.- 3m) (5) 

1 -F13 VON TRAPPE 


Mrs J reman 311-10 B dm Haas 


2 -303 MAOmyamj^f^ATwnal 1341-7. StowKM^it 



NGasetoe 7-11-1. PScadanore 

JQRard 3137 E Mnphy 

T Forster 7-137 _ HOavtes 


3 F31 BOLAMJS CROSS 

5 432 CATCH PHRASE tL 

6 1M» CLARA MOUNTAIN . . . 

94 Bolands Crass. 114 Von Trappe, 31 Catch PfpBSe 7- 

2 Maori Venture. 131 Clara Mountefc. 

Course specialists 

N Qasetee L 7_wdnnere from 28 runners, 256%; 
ArfXkBwTianeS. 9 from 37. 243%; F Winter, 14 from K. 237%; D 
a ftom 35. 226%; J Jenkins. 9 from 45. 206%; TRor- 
stflf, 1 U worn 53.18^.% • 

jKXMEYa: Sne Knlgfa. 13 wtaners from 47 rides. 27.7%: P 

8 tram 52. 154%; H Da- 
M.9%: M Perrwt. 6 tram 67. 96V G Moore. 8 

from it*. 74%. 


2-30 TIOXIDE GROUP HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£4.123: 2m) (13) 

1 103 RIVA ROSE (0) Mrs J Pitman 311-10 BdeHaan 

2 034 YABtSJM J EdWdS 311-2 D Browne 

r The RETHEA7 (CD) J Jenkins 5-1 38 5 Sherwood 

HJ) A Moors 3133 G Moore 

13132 ACteroB 

. Pater Hobbs 


33002 BEAT THE RETREAT (CD) J 

4 263 SNOWBALL DANNY (D) A Moore 31 33 G Moore 

5 0P6 AVERON C WHrnan 

7 2-30 YALE (D)J GMord 3130 

8 216 OWBTS PflOE (IB R Akehurel 3130 


9 330 OPEMNQBARS 

12 316 REC OR D WING ( 

13 1101 SWING TO STB 




I M Pipe 3130 — P S cudamore 


15 40/3 ARABMN SEA R Curbs 7-106... 
IS GOOF MEZIARA (B)WR MNEams 3130- 


C U e wedyn( . 

R GoMeteki 


3-1 Yebte.32 Best The Retreat 5-1 Snowball Danny. 3t 
Swing To 9teeL 31 Opening Bars. 12-1 YMe. 14-1 others 

3-0 DICK FRANCIS NOVICE CHASE (£6.066: 2m) 

( 12 ) 

1 2-FF BOYNE SAUION Mite L Bower 3116 R Rowel 

2 132 KB CREST JEdwanb3116 D Browne 


3 43P DEMSPRY BOV F Whiter 3116. 


4 /PPF DRUteMOND STREET A Moore 7-116 MPerreti 

6 -23F FOYICFSHERHANJ Jenkins 7-116 — S Sherwood 

7 301 BHELDER A Moore 7-116 GMoora 

■ Peter Hobbs 

. J Frost 


9 3HU LUCKY RASCAL J Gifted 7-1 16.. 
9 08? 


HAHVLEBONiG Bolding 7-116 
10 430 SASSANOCO DOugtSon 5-116 

_.ATl*no« 

12 3-F4 WINTER 


11 U-F1 TAWRIDGE (MATu 

MEASURE (BF) kfrs J Pitman 6-116 


H Dawes 
3116 Steve KnigM 


13 -3F1 


; HAMA J Ffltch-Heyes 3138.. 


BdeHaan 

RGoateteiu 


94 Tawridge, 31 Foyle Ftetierman, 31 Winter Measure. 
31 Deer Crest hifiaider. ia-1 Dewspry Boy, 131 othm 


SSO DECEMBER NOVICE HURDLE (£685: 2m) (21) 

2 3 BUTSBRDGEJ Jenkins 31 16 S Sherwood 

336 CABRAL CVMBer 3116 Steve KnigM 

9 GOOD SAHAHfTAMRGow 3116 P Scudamore 

03/0 GR EEN RB WESMeior 7-116 MPerreti 

KXtfORTH Mrs B Nam 31 16 D Dutton 

0 INDIAN HAL PWalwyn 3116 0 Browne 

34 Mn9tnHT'nWNja : )IWsJPtenan3116 BdeHaan 
.TON BURN H Crlte# 3116 RCtapman(q 


3 

8 

7 

8 
9 
11 
12 

13 

14 

15 

17 

18 
20 
21 


HUHAMAL B Stevens 3116. 

MUCHULI Miss E Sneyd 3116 

0 MVHBJISMANJGrfbrd3116 

0 NARC8SUS R Akshurst31l6. 


R Strange 


F ONE OF THE LADS PM1W*S 4-116 


Dateltetamm^ 


PRAM LODGE P Biraoyne 3116 . 

LY A* Bolton 31 16 


H 


9P-P PHNCE FRBfDLY I 

PwmyFfitcto-Heyea(7) 

22 fl SHARP ALONG Lbs TCutMwrt 4-1 16 GMenugh 

23 DO SnTifG BULL JJeekais 3116 RGoMMMn 

26 0 UP TOWN BOY MMadgwick 3116 AHMovncfc 

27 VERY SPECIAL WHokJwi 4-1 16.. KTownend(7) 

28 XHAIJ Francome 3116 — 

30 2F4 WU SAP NLaeJudson 3139 MKteane 


XhM. 


2-1 


Train, 9-2 MHon Burn, 31 tadten HaL 31 
i, 131 Good Samaritan, 131 others 


German rides for de Haan 

de Haan makes the trip to Mnlfaefan, 
Germany tomorrow to vide Gettysburg in the 
day's main race, the 2m 7f Eouigsberger 
Jagdreanen. Trained by Andreas Wohler, Gettys- 
burg has some nsefol Flat form to his credit and 
would have won a steeplechase at Baden-Baden 
last time out but for blundering at the last. De 
Haaa also rides Flying River ra the wide-open 
PTeis der Marienbnrg (2m chase). 

• Audi are to concentrate their 1987 spoosor- 
ship on the Chafsworth horse trials and Grand 
Prix de Chasse point-to-point series. The 
Chatsworth trfcds will be staged from October 1- 
4, while the point-to-point scries will comprise 26 
qualifying adjacent hunt races from February to 
April with the final, previously held at Sandown 
Park, moved to the Chelte nham hunter chase 
evening meeting on May 6. 


^NOTTINGHAM 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

12.45 La Rose Grise. 1.15 Doan Venture. 

1.45 Lord Frantic 2.15 Eton Rouge. Z45 Saryan. 
3.15 Withy Bank. 


Going: good to fbm (chase course); good 

(hurtfles) 

12.45 BRADDEN NOVICE HURDLE (£1.248: 2m 61) 
(15 runners) 

2 Bill BtOSfM RULER T CBSey 3116 EBucfctey<4) 

4 4421 SENOR RAMOS Ron Ttx>W»on 3116 — 

fl DPP- BaiWAYHMe3116 GLeroteuM 

10 0/FF OONWETE CA8M P O 1 Connor B -116 — 

11 3P0 COUNTRY CAP R Townsend 3116 Mr DTowmend (7) 

12 MO FLYBIG IRSH Mrs J Ptinn 3116 C“ 


RH) SEYL (V) F Gason 31 16 .. 

fUMOER Dfknent3116 

3 6 6P0 BNPRESSJOSEMMEC Bravery 3139.. 

41 P03 TURN MU. Ms S Davenport 31M — 

94 Erostin Ruter. 10338 Sew Ramos. 4-1 La Rose Grtew. 
136 F)ytng Irish, 31 Height of Sumner. 131 attires. 

1.15 TON UP SELLING HURDLE (£731: 2m) (15) 

3 3R GINA'S MATCH C Sprees 311-7 


15 OP/4 HEIGHT OF SUMMER DArbtehnot 3116. S 

IS 312 LA ROSE G3USE fBF).fovTiy FftzgeraU 4-116 H Dwyer 
2D 240 MASTERLY S Md&311-tlLZZ_ HHankMMl 

21 N0DAL0T7EJ Spearing 3116 P Warner 

22 M2 OLD UBy^C Bte M16 NON RUNNER 

32 UP-0 WAY 


RBatew 

CCart 


LB.TMG LAO Mrs N MacwOey 311-7.. 

Euvie 4 .ll 


4 

5 QD MAUNOYGOT J Cosuvre 3il-7 
8 300 MOFFAT LAD CJeocson 4-11-7.- 
8 P-00 RAH8B 0 Wo Bd o n 4-11-7, 


10 -000 THE Y0*WER(V) J Parties 311-7.. 

11 00 HBENDLYBEEJGkivre3116. 


- m 
— RHyett 

DMuphy 


S Johnson 


12 FflO WHBmEMWWLOWS 0) M (Mdnsan 4-116 

Jl 

003 COURT R\XEH H 0^8 3-135 CCwstte) 


2 BOON VENTURE (BF) N TMdre 3136 M Dwyer 

30 MOOTANGOOnM Haynes 3-10-5 A Wright 

M RUDOLPH MDI£ MrsS Lemynae 3135 — P Conn 

an ewi , , nu Tun : an Einn TKmwM 


00 SWALLOW TIME 
TARA DANCER C 


JADE ESSENCE R Peacock 3lM_ 


SJOWete 
KRyrei P) 


35 Doon Venture, 7-2 Court Rater. 31 Mastango. i3lThe 
Yomper. 12-1 Ltftang Lari. 231 others. 

Course specialists 

TTUUNCR& Mrs M Rmefi. 11 wmners tram 61 nmnres, 130%: 
Mrs J Pitman. 8 from 61. 13.1%; Jktnqp Ftegerald, 5 from 45. 
11 . 1 %. (only three qualfiera}. 

JOCKEYS; M Brennan. 5 wtaiurs from 63 rides. 7.9%. (only ono 
isaWer). 


1-45 SOUTH YORKSHIRE ROAD SPECIALISTS 
NOVICE CHASE (£2,785: 2m 6J) (8) 

I ‘IS XSESUJFB**™* SMorehead 

5 0/1 LORD FRANTIC J Edwards 31 16 M Dwyer 

I -S Q»ME LANCER C Nash 31 14 M Bosley (4) 

8 304 OOU) EXPRESS Mrs S Davenport 7-11-4 — 

II NOBLE FLYER pne Brawty 3114 — 

12 460 RED HCK Mrs M 3114 N Babbage 

15 P P/P TOUCORD And 3114 JSathetn 

16 -232 ACE OF SPES Mrs G Jones 31 1-2 Jflrjrm 

„ Frenbc. 31 Ace Of Spies. 11-2 tetftomann. 

31 Gold Express. 12-1 Noble Ryer. Rea Nick. 14-1 others. 

3m 4 5^* MEUOR HANDICAP CHASE (£3,252: 

C v'5S SS* ft0UISE tos M Rkneo 7-11-7 S Htorahead 

5 1132 LORD LAURSfCE (BF) D GendoWo 7-132. H Dwyer 

38 Eton Rouge, Evens Lord Laurence. 

£Ui?aS)fl7) EAD0W HOV]CE HURDLE (3-Y-O: 


11-7. 


. S 


B R Dia^nt 

8 Francome 116 .. . 

tNXPJ&SESP 116 . 

„ COMEDY M Ryan 116- 

Ss^g ^LW HCJaclSSnn-O H 

4 n_0 T 

ST MTV A ’ .. . 


STMCX A Baking Ti^j 
_ ARE YOU tSUN.Tr M 
OF WAOU5H(»)Tw™ 
MCA LAOY J Madde 10-9 

o Kasu j Hams 106_ 1 '” 


0 MQNETROSA J SpMringlM ' 

0 SOHO SUE DArSioS:. 


D l._ 

G 

139 JMcLrei 

139 EBecfck 

.. PRa 
. JAH 


2 
5 
7 

a 

9 

23 

24 

31 

32 
35 
37 
39 

41 

42 
45 

fi SI* 10 SUED And 139 : „ MBoak 

QFTA * A H "““a tm™::”. “SS 2 

e -1 7-2 ,i B1 ? 8kgl th*- 32 My O 

wwscens, 8-1 Montrose. 131 Are You Gutey. 12-1 oC 

ml HANDICAP HUR1 

(£3,069: 2m 61) (16) 

i » 

I f»«5?55y HtaBn5 - ,W0 Cl 

10 3W Sll^gg^ M 6.^ WM o£2P 
14 Mfl . C< 

§2 

JS ^ >toLER H VW*nq 3132 SWo 

. or 
SJ 

iii 


ie S! SS.'S acj «*«v»3lM 

2? IS 

m S^^^JW^*6<xrriw)l IT 

zs 600 7WBS1 TOOL Mrs G Jones 3130 


74 WWiy Bank, 31 Mister Pftt. 13-2 Powerful P 
dteeky Run. 12-1 Easter Festival 


31 Ustary Lad. 10-1 
often 





S'- 



;•%, ' -‘.A . i 


**i r. "v . 

* '■ 
sa» 

. 

„• ; . .-3 •• 

f.c . 

-• • .• *-■ . 

: • « ■r'l* ■ * V- . 

.i - 


a. .li tflr- 


>» 













4 















yachting 


French give New York 
team kiss of death to 
bolster White Crusader 


While Cni5a- 

> W der soared to 
r . fourth place in 
A the America’s 
- . „ Cup challenger 
semi-finals. Surprise defeats of 
.America II and USA com- 
bined with a comfortable Brit- 
ish win over Azzurra to re- 
arrange the front runners. 
Whereas a week ago Harold 
Cudmore saw himself compet- 
ing with French Kiss for the 
fourth place, it now looks 
more than feasible that 
T uesday’s race agai nst a falter- 
ing America II could provide 
the vital 12 points to put a 
now highly-compeiitive 
While Crusader into the 
frame. 

“If we "beat White Crusader 
and then don’t lose any other 
races then we’re fourth,” said 
John Kolius after the race. 
“The reverse is true. It’s a lot 
of ifs.” French Kiss achieved a 
remarkable victory by seven 
seconds over America II. It 
throws the New York Yacht 
Club team, once Cup favour- 
ites, out of the first four places 
in the points table. French 
Kiss are now second, behind 
New Zealand. 

The final windward leg 
between tbe two yachts pro- 
vided one of the most 
spectacular finishes the Louis 
Vuitton Cup has seen, the 
yachts seldom being more 
than a boat length apart Marc 
Pajot the French skipper, 
ignored conventional match- 
racing wisdom. He pul only a 
loose cover on Kolius, prefer- 
ring instead to try to sail lower 
and faster. 

Yet he did hug the favoured 
right side of the course. Sev- 
eral times when French Kiss 
came across, it was only her 
right-of-way starboard tack 
that enabled ber to stay in 
front of America 0. The race 
was a vital one for both teams. 
America II now has three 
losses in the first four races of 
round robin three. Her luck 
this week has been appalling. 

French Kiss won the start, 
with a better position and a 
three second lead across tbe 
line. Up the first work Amer- 


From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 

ica II’s first gremlin struck 
when a changed genoa ex- 
ploded halfway up the fore- 
stav- ‘"It was my favourite 
jibihat blew up. Maybe Fve 
used it too much,” said Kolius 
ruefully, Pajot exploited the 
confusion and was able to 
round the top made 12 sec- 
onds ahead. Down the first 
run came gremlin No. 2. The 
fittings at the end of the 
America spinnaker pole failed. 
Spinnaker trouble of major 
proportions ensued, but su- 
perior boatspeed kept Amer- 
ica II in front 
On the two reaches French 
Kiss was able to find the inside 
berth and an overlap. The 
scramble at the leeward mark 
put two protest flags aloft. 


CHALLENGE* RESULTS: Stars and 
Stripes RCnailenge France, 10ntfn48mc; 
Heart of America bt USA. 028: White 
Crusader bt Azztara. 357; New Zealand 

tt Eagle. 6:00:Canada It bt imUa. ret; 

French KiB9 bt America It. <M7. 

CHALLENGER TABLE 



Won Lost Pfa 

New Zealand - 

?n 

1 

114 

French Kiss 

... 17 

10 

S3 

Stars and Stripes 

... 21 

6 

82 

Whits Crtnadar 

.. in 

9 

79 

Amenta U 

- 21 

B 

68 

Canada tt 

- 13 

14 

55 

tata 

.. 13 

14 

51 

Heart ot America .... 

.... 8 

19 

48 

Eagle ..... __ 

.... 8 

19 

24 

Azzurra 

... 3 

24 

11 

Challenger France 

2 

2S 

2 


DEFENDER TABLE 

Wen Lott Pta 

Kookaburra IQ 21 2 38 

Australia IV 17 0 32 

Kookaburra Q IS 8 28 

South Austrafe 5 18 11 

Steak n‘ Kidney 1 23 3 

DEFENDER RESULTS: Austrefa (V bt 
South AustraOe, 721:Kookeburra lb bt 
Steak n- Kidney. 152. Bye: Kookabura H. 
Today is a lay day. 

Grimly Pajot clung on, tak- 
ing all the heavy punishment 
thrown at him. The fbredeck 
crew of America U did a 
superb job in 23 knots of 
breeze to jury-rig a snatch 
block at the end of the 
spinnaker pole to replace the 
damaged fitting. However 
each gybe became a slow and 
ponderous event, a weakness 
ably exploited by the French. 

“Every time we tried to fix 
the mast it became got 
progressively worse. We had a 
very hard time gybing and it 


Jean tot closing the gap 


Making most of 60 knot 
winds in the southern ocean, 
Philippe Jeaniot closed the gap 
10 within 90 miles of French 
rival, Titouan Lamazou, yes- 
terday as these BOC race leaders 
continued at break-neck speed 
towards Sydney, the second 
stop-over port in this solo race 
around the world (Barry 
Pickihall writes). 

Jeaniot’s 60ft yacht. Credit 
Agricole 1(1, which moved 
ahead of Jean Yves Teriain’s 
similar sized, UAP. earlier this 
week, has averaged more than 
230 miles a day since leaving 
Cape Town three weeks ago and 


looks wed place to challenge 
Lamazou’s, Ecureuil 
d’ Aquitaine, as they start to 
head north towards Tasmania 
on the final very tactical stage 
up the New South Wales coast- 
line later this week. 

If these two boats maintain 
current progress, race organizers 
expect them to reach Sydney by 
next weekend, smashing the 
record set by Jeantot four years 
ago, by as much as seven days. 
LEADING PO SI TIONS. (Mh Brito lb 
Sydney): t. Ttouan Lamskou - Ecuraul 
d-Aquswie (1717): 2. PMfepo Joantoi — 
Ctetft AgrtaSe IH 08071 3. Jeon Yves 
Teriain — UAP nSW* 4, 6uy Bemarfln — 
BsctAs Lu (2468). 


took away from the tactics a 
little,” added Kolius. 

Tbe other big upset with the 
challengers was Heart of 
America beating USA. Buddy 
Melges sailed a tough pur 
race to take foe lead from Tom 
Blackaller after two legs and 
stayed there. Clearly, in over 
2D knots with a Jewish sea, 
Heart of America is a serious 
threat to any yacht is the 
competition. Now in sixth 
place Melges is coming good 
too late to have any real hope 
of the semi-finals. But the 
havoc he is wreaking by 
knocking off the big guns is 
providing the competition 
with some real sport. 

No one seems to be enjoy- 
ing it more than tbe combat- 
ive grandfather from Wis- 
consin. Biggest beneficiaries of 
this upset are White Crusader. 
The British will be delighted 
to see USA, their major rival, 
go down to an opponent who 
cannot make the semi-finals. 

The Defender races went 
much according to form, al- 
though Steak ‘n’ Kidney rat- 
tled Iain Murray. The Sydney 
boat is bolstering its crews 
with experienced former sail- 
ors on Australia IIL Michael 
Kane (grinder), Jarvis Tilley 
(trimmer) and Dine Gowland 
(mainsheet trimmer) all sailed 
today on the Sydney yacht, 
having been laid off two weeks 
ago by the Bond syndicate. 
Sydney's pride was only 7 sec 
behind Kookaburra m at the 
final leeward mark. Had Steak 
‘n’ Kidney not blown out a 

hwHiail up the W' and 

sailed just on mainsail for 10 
minutes. Kookaburra might 
have been lucky to win. 

“What a disappointment," 
said Syd Fischer, the chair- 
man and tactician. ”We 
a great comeback after missing 
(be start and must improve 
our pre-start manoeuvres. 
Better things on Sunday.” 
Murray, the Kookaburra 111 
skipper, paid tribute: 
“Congratulations, to it’s great 
to see Steak *n’ Kidney 
improving with each race. The 
competition we are now dis- 
covering in the Defender se- 
ries is really helping 
Australia’s chances of success- 
fully defending the Cup.” 

Aouita honoured 

Paris (AF) — Said Aouita, the 
Mororean athlete , winner of the 
Mobil Grand Pnx track and 
field competition, and world 
record holder for 5,000 metres, 
has been named African Sports- 
man of the Year, the African 
sports magazine Jeux d‘ Afrique 
announced yeast erday. 

The runner-ups were, Aziz 
Bouderbala, the Moroccan 
World Cup footballer and, Chidi 
Imo, tbe Nigerian sprinter, who 
holds tiie African 100 metres 
record 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Gregory sits out top Trophy tie 


e absence of Ellery Hanley 
the Wigan team, following 
Jemand yesterday for a 
Per. should not affect the 
of their John Player 
al Trophy match with 
ton at Central Park 
mow. 

?an’s squad of experienced 
re should still be strong 
th to account for the 
d division ride, who are 
! in ibeir own division, but 
y in the class of their 
ienls. To make matters 
1 for Swinton injuries rob 
of Scou, Derbyshire. Moo- 
-JoUiday and Lee. 

: outstanding tic of tnc 
[ takes place today with the 
bated first division leaders 
•leas visiting the Challenge 
holders CastlefonL The 
will be without their goal- 


By Keith MackJin 

lacking centre Paul Loughtin 
and hooker Graham Liptrot, 
and after their struggle against 
Whitehaven last week will need 
to lift their game considerably to 
overcome Chstleford’s home 
advantage. 

The other key game is at 
Warrington tomorrow, with the 
reigning champions H a lif a x 
visiting Wilderspool Warring- 
ton sprang a shock yesterday 
when they left out the Great 
Britain scrum half Andy Greg- 
ory, who has missed training 
twice this week. Gregory has 
explained that he was unwell on 
Tuesday and that his car broke 
down on Thursday. He says he 
intends to resume training next 
Tuesday. The experienced Ken 
Kelly takes his place. 

The giant-killers of the first 
round. Doncaster, visit another 


first division side in Leigh. 

Although Leigh are having a 
thin season in championship 
matches, home advantage may 
swing the game their way. 
Nevertheless, Doncaster are full 
of confidence and enthusiasm 
after their dramatic win last 
week against Hull Kingston 
Rovers. They expect to take 
nearly a 1,000 supporters with 
them to Hilton para. . 

Bradford Northern, who are 
currently being inspired by 
Terry Holmes, will have a 
struggle on their hands at 
Featherstone, despite the 
Rovers' poor league form. 
Blackpool Borough have had to 
switch their home tie to Hafl, 
and realistically can expea no 
more than the consolation prize 
of a share of a sizeable gate. 


esterday’s racing results from three meetings 

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ran. NR; 


OFFICIAL SCflATCttNGS: AS enoaga- 
merns (dead): JoSymcra. Harvey Moan. 
Kmomar, Plash. Our Annie. Sonny Roux. 
Fortina Wood. Royal Glow. Lullaby Btees. 



■ % yra- 

Ivan Lendl: faltered sightly bat eventnally overcame tbe only non-European, Andres Gomez, in the round-robin tournament 


BOBSLEIGHING 

Olympic 
champions 
survive 
inquiry 

From Chris Moore 
Winterberg 

There was very nearly a major 
sensation before the opening 
round of tbe World Cup here 
today when the East Germans 
came dose to being disqualified 
after their new sledges bad 
yesterday been declared illegal. 

But because tbe full panel of 
the sport’s technical advisors are 
not here to rule on the matter, 
the double Olympic champions 
will be allowed to compete in 
this weekend's Veitins Clip. 

The point of issue is to be 
referred to the full technical 
committee of the Federation of 
International Bobsleighing and 
Tobogganing and if yesterday’s 
findings are upheld, the East 
Germans could still be disquali- 
fied at a later stage, in which 
ease they would be deprived of 
any World Cup points. 

Sboukl that come to pass they 
would not be able to use the 
same sleds in next month's 
world championships in St 
Moritz. 

Tbe controversy centres on 
the rear runners of their two- 
man bobs which are fixed to 
separate stub-mountings instead 
of to a conventional straight 
axle. It is seen by some experts 
as a way round the ban on then- 
unique hydraulic suspension 
systems, which were outlawed 
from the start of last season. 

The three technical officials 
present voted 2-1 against the 
East Germans competing here. 
However, the jury conceded that 
though the new sleds did not 
comply with the “me anin g" of 
the regulations it could, perhaps, 
be argued they were within the 
"wording”. 

Last year the East Gentians 
won both gold medals m the 
Veitins Cup with world and 
Olympic champion Wolfgang 
Hoppe winning the two-man 
competition and Detlef Richter 
the four-man. 

Both compete in today’s 
opening race, though the fastest 
time in practice of 57.54 secs 
was set yesterday by West 
Germany's Anton Fischer. 

Switzerland’s Ralph PicWer 
had the best time on foe final 
training tauf of S8.17 secs, Just 
100th of a second ahead of the 
top Russian, Maris Poikans. 

Nick Phipps had a best time 
of 58.41 secs yesterday and is 
hoping to become foe first 
British driver to gain a top six 
finish in the Veitins, two-man 
event. 


SWIMMING 

Leeds set to 
score fourth 
triumph 

By Roy Moot 

Refreshed after their double 
successes in Toronto last week- 
end, Adrian Moorhouse and 
Tony Day today lead foe City of 
Leeds club's attempt to win foe 
Hewlett-Packard national team 

championship at tbe Everton 
Park Sports Centre, Liverpool 
for the fourth successive year. 

With the Yorkshire team able 
to call on other prominently 
ranked swimmers Jonathan 
Broughton, Richard 

Green ward. Neil Metcalfe, 
David Emerson, Maxine 
McKinneil and Helen Frank, 
the surprise wifi be if Leeds fail 
to succeed again. 

With the fast improving Nick 
Gillingham representing the 
City of Birmingham in both 
breastroke events, Moorhouse 
cannot expect a casual swim in 
either of his races. Day will have 
to contend with Wigan's Olym- 
pic finallist Stephen Poulter in 
foe two individual medleys, ft 
was Poulter’s British record Day 
broke in Toronto. • 

Wigan, who have not won foe 
team title since 1983, will be 
assisted by three other 
Commonwealth Games 
competitors, Ruth Gilfillan. 
Myra O' Fee and Brace Perry, all 
of whom arc likely to present a 
strong challenge. 

Nova Centurion. Portsmouth 
and Northsea, Norwich Pen- 
guin, Harrow and Wealdstone 
and Thamesdown arc the other 
dubs contesting the final. 


The princely Swede with 
a hangdog expression 


A match of quality between 
Stefan Ed berg and Yannick 
Noah enlivened p roce ed ings in 
foe Nabisco Masters at Madison 
Square Garden. New York, 
yesterday and left the Swede, 
aged 20. as one of two players 
with two victories to their name 
in round-robin play. Tbe other. 
Mats Wilander, fought back 
impressively to beat his fellow 
Swede Joakim Nystrom 6-7, 6-3, 
6-3. 

It was Edberg’s fifth victory in 
five meetings over the athletic 
Frenchman but as usual the dual 
was dose, fair and thoroughly 
worth watching. And this tune 
Noah got as near as matchpoint 
before going down 4-6. 6-3, 7-6. 

Noah has the vibrant 
personality, as crowds at Wem- 
bley found out to their delight 
last month, but Edberg is emerg- 
ing as an increasingly cool 
customer who has benefitted 
enormously from the belief in 
himself which his British coach. 
Tony Pickard, has managed to 
instil. 


From Richard Evans, New York 

Tbe hangdog expression 
Edberg adopts on court is 
strangely ax odds with the 
princely style of his game — 


teener 

beautiful — as well as giving a 
totally false impression of his 
fighting qualities. 

Obviously Edberg is a superb 
athlete with a naturally gifted 
serve and volley game but it is 
foe hard work put in under 
Pickard's genial but demanding 
eye that has taken him to the top 
SO fast 

“A year from now there will 
be two players dominating this 
game — Boris and Stefan," 
Pickard said. “They have youth 
on their side and soon even 
Lendl and McEnroe will have to 
bow totfaaL” 

The volley behind a deep 
second serve which saved 
matchpoint at 5-6 in foe-third 
set against Noah was typical of 
the confident way tins shy 
young man now handles a crisis 
and once foe match moved into 
foe decisive tie-break the Swede 
was always in controL 


Wider entry sought 

By Rex BeDamy, Tennis Correspondent 


Next year's fifth British na- 
tional championships may have 
a revised format. The tour- 
nament was launched at Tefford 
in 1983 under foe sponsorship 
of Refuge Assurance, who re- 
cently withdrew because foe 
otherwise gratifying publicity 
did not include “five” television 
coverage. But the firmly estab- 
lished , increasingly successful 
championships are the envy of 
other European and national 
associations and this year's prize 
fund of £100,560 compares 
respectably with that at stake in 
most tournaments on the inter- 
national circuit. 

Ian Peacock, executive direc- 
tor of foe Lawn Tennis Associ- 
ation. said yesterday: “We are in 
discussion with a sponsor who is 
seriously interested. The na- 
tional championships form an 
important part of the tennis 
calendar in Britain and we are 


determined that they will con- 
tinue. though as far as foe 
qualifying competition is con- 
cerned the format may be 
slightly different.’’ 

Peacock, delicately perched 
amid tbe foliage of negotiation, 
would not expand on that But 
on the basis that it would be 
folly to change a winning game, 
foe formal for the final week is 
unlikely to be affected. On the 
other band there have been 
misgivings about the structure 
of foe regional qualifying com- 
petition and the fact that this 
year the championships at- 
tracted only 1,779 competitors, 
a ridiculously low number for 
such a widely played game. It 
may be assumed foal foe LTA 
and foe potential sponsors want 
to repair the qualifying event's 
deficiencies before leading this 
congenial domestic festival into 
its second phase. 


“1 usually win our lie-breaks 
and that helps your confidence,” 
said Edberg who has now won 
five of the seven he has played 
against Noah. “I was returning 
well, too. which makes the 
difference as we both have big 
serves.” 

Certainly foe two service 
returns, both oft his supposedly 
suspect forehand, which de- 
prived Noah of the first and fifth 
points of the tie-break were 
match-winning shots although 
neither carried quite foe same 
measure of crowd pleasing pa- 
nache as a return Noah had 
produced earlier in the match. 

Chasing an Edberg lob, Noah 
straddled the ball as it bounced 
and hit it back between his legs 
fora dean winner. It is a trick he 
tries often in practice but he bad 
never managed to win a point 
with it in match play before. 

Edberg, who had seen other 
attempts fafi, walked over to 
clasp his opponent's hand in a 
gesture that added to foe 
crowd’s appreciation. 

Ivan Lendl, making his first 
appearance in defence of his 
title, seemed momentarily trou- 
bled when Andres Gomez, who 
has never beaten foe Czech. led 
5-3 in the second set but 
Ecuador’s favourite sporting 
son, who always manages to pull 
in a few bell-clanging supporters 
to the Garden, could not sustain 
it and lost 6-3, 7-5. 

A statistically minded col- 
league counted 201 spectators 
still in their seats as Wilander 
broke Nystrom’s serve in foe 
third set just after midnight. 
Those hardy souls might have 
been better amused had they 
attended the press conference. 

Neither Swede lacks humour 
and Wilander admitted it was a 
bit boring playing his friend in 
tournaments as they practice 
together every day. 

RESULTS: First round: (numbers in 
brack e t s denote sasdmgs): Stefan 
Edberg (No. 4. 9 wb) bt Yannick Noah 
(No. S. Fr) 4-6 6-3 7-6 (7-4t Mats WUander 
(No X Swb) bt JoBfckn Nystrom (No. 7. 
Swei 6-6 (5-7) 6-3 6-3; Nan Lendl (No. 1. 
Czechia Andres Gomez (No. 8,Equador) 


HOCKEY 


Cheshire lose their key man 


Cheshire will be without 
Martyn Grimley for their 
county championship quarter- 
final against Essex on the CHd 
Loughionians ground at 
Cbigwell tomorrow. Grimley, 
who distinguished himself for 
England at left-half in the recent 
World Cup tournament is on an 
England indoor training week- 
end at LOlesbalL 

Grimley would have been at 
inside left tomorrow for Chesh- 
ire who have to choose bet w ee n 
Lait, of Brooklands and Sutton, 
of Alderley Edge. Cooper, of 
Brooklands, will lead an attack 
which, with .Greene at outside 

right and W ilkins on at inside 
right, is not short of talent. 

The Essex team chosen for 
tomorrow has ten players from 
Old Lougbtoniafls. The odd 
man out being Boxed of South- 
gate. There is wisdom in this 
selection because the Old 
Loughionians’ players will have 
the advantage of their own 
artificial pitch. 

Essex are pleased to have 
recovered Halls, Thompson and 
Camilleri, who were on a junior 
Great Britain training weekend 
last Sunday and missed tbe 
match against Somerset, whom 
Essex defeated 2-1. But if they 


By Sydney Frisian 
survive their malcb against 
Cheshire, Essex will go imo the 
semi-final against Worcester- 
shire at Wfoesden on December 
13 without five of their leading 
players. Essex will ask the Great 
Britain management for foe 
release of their three players 
from foe training weekend, as 
they feel there would be little 
point in going to Wlllesden 
without them. 

firebrands will go into their 
away march today against Marl- 
borough without HilL Nichol- 
son, Purchase and Trcdgett, 
who are all committed to the 
indoor training weekend. For 
the same reason. St Albans have 
lost Halliday, Hurst, Giles and 
Wisher for their Pizza Express 
London League match at home 
against Reading today . 

Guildford, premer division 
leaders in the London League, 
will have a tough away march 
today against Richmond who 
are fourth on the table. Tomor- 
row Guildford will be at home 
in an important Surrey Cup 
march to London University. 

TODAY 

PQZA EXPRESS LOUDON LEAGUE 
(2.15): Premer carton: Richmond v 
QuikttWd: Stough v Hounslow. League 
Btackhettti v Cambridge Unhc Bromley v 
London Unhc Gheam * Beckenham: 


DiAncb v Wbnbtedon; Hampstead * Tulse 
HU: Old KbigstortBns v bUd-Suirey. 
Purtey v Suttm St Albans v Raadng; 
Southgate v Oxford Unhc Spencer v 
Teddlngton; Weybridge Hawks v 

NORWICH UNION EAST LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier tffcriskac Bishop's Srortford v 
Hadeston Magpies; Bteeharts v OW 
Lou tf itonl a ns; Brentwood v Ipswich; 
Broxboume v Ford; Buy St Edmunds v 
WescSff; Cambridge City v Bedford; 
Norfolk Wanderers v Chelmsford; Peter- 
boroutei Town v St Neots. 

MCEWAITS LAGER SOUTH LEAGUE: 
Pr em i er dwfe i oB: Bognor v Gore Court 
Eastcote v Chichester East Grinstead v 
Indian Gymkhana; Harem v Anchortans; 
Lyons v Fareham; OW Tountonians v 
Lewes; Trojans v Mariow; Tunbridge 
WeBS v Oxford Hawks. Wdteesax/Berks. 
Bucks 8 OxottAntershamvOW Merchant 


Aylesbury. NF 
THehurat v Gerrarde Cress. 

TOMORROW 

MEfTS COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Quarter Ffeuu (130): Essex v Cheshire 
/DU Louphtonians HC, — “ 

IWlCH UNIQ 


NORWii 

LEAGUE: 


UNION 

Suffolk 


5T COUNTY 
Lincolnshire 


(Woodhau Spa. 2.15). 

NORWICH UNION EAST JUNIOR 
COUNTY LEAGUE: Cambrtdgeafwe LI- 
21 s v Esse* U-21 's (Partter's Reee. 1 .45). 
PIZZA EXPRESS LONDON LEAGUE: 
Cambridge University v Bromley; Hamp- 
stead v Ok) Klngstonians: Purtey v 


i COUNTY CUP: ftrat Round: 
Makfsnhead v AERE HanrelL 
REPRESENTATIVE MATCHES: Army v 
Surbiton {Bisham Abbey. 2.30); Army U- 
21 ’s v Surbiton (Bfcsham Abbey. 2130); 
London irvsans v Hampshire (12.15). 


CRICKET 


Botham 
will not 
bowl in the 
third Test 

From John Woodcock 
Cricket Correspondent 
Melbourne 

After being seen by a special- 
ist here yesterday lan Botham 
was pul on regular heal treat- 
ment and advised, as he already 
expected, that he must not 
expect to bowl in next Friday’s 

third Test march in Adelaide. 

He has tom an intercostal 
muscle in bis left side. 

Most fast bowlers are sub- 
jected to it at some time or 
other. Bob Willis is here and was 
no exception. If be has not 
already done so. he will tell 
Botham that it is an injury best 
healed with rest All being well. 
Botham will be able to bat in 
Adelaide and take at least his 
101st Test catch. 

With DiUey (knee) and 
DeFreitas (ankle) carrying much 
less significant injuries and 
Emburey being given a hard- 
earned rest, the England a tuck 
for today's march against Vic- 
toria contains only three regular 
bowlers — Small. Foster and 
Edmonds. Galling will no doubt 
lend a hand, and even Slack. 
Aihey and Richards could get an 
over or two. Small and Foster 
will welcome the work. After 
making 0 and 2 in Penh Lamb 
could do with some runs, and 
Whitaker gets only his serond 
game in more than a month. For 
their sake. 1 hope the pitch is less 
miserable a one than it often is 
on foe Melbourne Cricket 
Ground. 

It will be the first match to be 
played here this season and 
reports are not promising. Dug 
up in the early 1980s. foe pitch 
continues to be a great problem. 
All kinds of things have been 
tried, including underground 
heating cables and various types 
of couch grass, some from 
Sydney, some from off foe 
thirteenth fairway at Kingston 
Heath, one of the many splendid 
golf courses on Melbourne's 
sand beh. 

Batsmen have long seen it as 
ironic that one of foe world's 
most famous grounds should 
have a pitch and an outfield 
where making runs can be an 
infinite chore. 

Hardly surprisingly, it is some 
years since Victoria had much of 
a side. Of those playing for them 
today only Jones is a member of 
foe Australian team, though 
Hughes bowled for them in foe 
first Test and is said to be 
wanted back by Border. As 
significant to the Australian 
selectors as England's game is 
the Sheffield Shield match now 
being played in Brisbane be- 
tween Queensland and New 
South Wales, with McDermott 
on one side and Whitney and 
Gilbert on the other. 

The chances are that changes 
will be made in the Australian 
eleven for the third Test, and 
that a new fast bowler will be 
brought in. probably to replace 
Chris Matthews. 

Pakistan 

bag 

second spot 

Sharjah (AP) — Pakistan beat 
India by three wickets to bag 
second place in the Champions 
Trophy which ended yesterday 
in the Gulf emirate of Sharjah. 

Pakistan's win relegated India 
to the third position. 

The West Indies had been 
declared champions after beat- 
ing all the other teams — India, 
Pakistan and Sri Lanka. 

Pakistan won the loss and 
India in to bat. They were o 
a dream start with Imran Khan 
bowling Sunil Gavaskar for a 
duck in foe first over. 

Khan continued to bowl with 
hostile accuracy and soon had 
India reeling, capturing the 
wickets of Krish Srikanfo in foe 
fifth over and Rajan Lamba in 
the 1 1th over. 

India were 25 for three in 13 
overs when rain stopped play. 
With foe loss of two more quick 
wickets, India were in deep 
trouble at 42 for five. 

A 68-run partnership between 
the Indian captain. Kapil Dev, 
and Mohammed Azhaniddin 
added some respectability to the 
score but after Dev was out ai 
110 . foe innings folded and 
India were all out for 144 in the 
4 1 si over. 

Pakistan started off steadily 
with foe opening pair putting on 
51. But foe game was electrified 
in foe 23rd over when Maninder 
Singh look three wickets and 
sent Pakistan reeling to 53 for 
four. 

After foe fall of two more 
quick widens. Manzoor Elahi 
played a splendid knock of 47 
and steered Pakistan to victory 
in foe 44fo over. He was 
declared man of foe match. 

The six-match series was or- 
ganized by foe Shagah-tased 
Cricketers Benefit Series Fund, 
founded by foe Arab business- 
man. Abdul Rahman Bukhatir. 


[put 

nto 


FOR THE RECORD 


BADMINTON 


BASKETBALL 


CRICKET 


ICE HOCKEY 


GOTomw«ltfqp»dMfflptiiriffi||i iteii'i 

dagteK Rnt rouact (Eng uttass stew® J 

Font M V Kumar (kid). 15-7. 15-4; D Tiwmr 

(Bail bt U Schawl (WGL 15-12. 154 A 

Nstetfi M M Pflflam, 15-7. 15-7; P swon 

(W41) Ml Wight, isa. 15-11: PVChoMjS 

Kw) M M EkPtL 15-10, 15-7; P Adams oj P 


FWguson. 153. 153: M Johnson bt K Span 

(HkftiS-7. 15-u; KSeoa tt N PowsiilM. 
15-1 : T Hjrnn tt A tonoe (Bert. 158, 15*l0j * 
G a fajiBr(Sco)ttECYun(SM.15Z1&- 
DHafWUSfiWi.158.153. 


Women's singles: First round H Krckhaus 


|*W 11-Z. • 

H C Cooks. 113. 11-1; K somsuer 
two la R Mdraosh (Waft 11-2. 11-5: C 
Pdmar tt LBignel (N2). l2-£ 11-4; Y S Lse (S 
Korw) bt A BlMf, 11-8,11-8. 

HEREFORD; Eegtaod Hied 6. Scotland 1. 

(England names Irad A S e hsri ae and M 

JoftivgntfA WhMifidRGtodwrtnfs-r, 15-1; 

F anon ta J Alen in. n.i: a NUfcen tt 

wtwb. 15-9. 16-13: N Brown and R Gunersde 

tost to W Gfltend and D Travers. B-lfc 8-15; K 

Beckman arte S Httsafl tt E Aten and P 

Hanttt on . 15-9, 15-11; J Ford W A GaBagner, 

15-t, 153; AGoode and BtettttGMtencf and 
J Aten, 154. 1510. 


CttRLSBSRO NATIONAL LEAGU&Hte AS- 

slam Polycsa Kmostor 107 tCtork 24. Davts 

22. Bomrager 1$. Happy Eater Bradmed 
Prases 80 (ScanaetunrS; Andrew 14). 

CUP. GonHtosi. Miseries 

_ Kaunas (USSR) 91. 

f __ Macrata Tel Av* 99. 

UteTH) STATES: 

OiBAf oevetona Ca raters 113. Damn 

Pstons 105; Sauna Super Bones 106. Sen 

Ammo Son ia£ Ammo Hawks 109. 
tejusm Rockett S3: New York Kncks %, 

Los Angeles Oppers 81: GoHen Slate 

Wamars lit Los Angeles Laker? 106, 

AontandTraR Bteers 106. Sacramemo Ktnga 
102 . 

EUROPEAN CUP: O uaH T-ft nm . M ton 

mcnenk Dynamo Novosttrok (USSH) 82, 

Panlzan Belgrade (Yug) a. Agon Duasseidort 

Wa)S8.SJ*SBFrari»5 VersatoaMSi. 


SHEFFIELD SHEUZ Lan ne a stonr Tasmania 

221 Saudi Aterrste 14-2. Brisbane: frera- 

bnd 251-3 (R Karr 82. A Cournce 94) v New 
SouttWatos 


GOLF 



Boston Bruns 3. OueDac Nordtou» 2. 

Calgary Flames 4. Chcaga Black Hawks 1; 

Los Angeles Ksigs «. Toronto Maple uafc 3 

MOTOR RALLYING 


OLYMPIA: 


TENNIS 


women'* 


buenos mae& a*. . 

ThM nmt PTartfrflt (ArgJM S La FtoOa llfl. 

2-6. 6-2. 6-3: A Sancnu iSp) H P Hutwr 

LAustrtt). 52. 57; B ftdeo (Arg) tt S Hack 


rywa. S-I.WU Gotanse (Hi bt R DaiMto (DSL 
61 . 51; L McNai (US) tt F Borsiawl (IfcM. 
4-6. 54 M P Roldan (Aral « H Tar TW (Netti), 


Sr*. 5*. 


(NZI.B . 

Senior (Aus), 66. 67. 134; J Senior (Aust 67. 

67. 136: I BaMr-FMA (Aw). Eh 70; J 
Olezabal (Stt 86, 70. 137; K Han (Burro). 72. 
55 Laadtog British: 140: T Price. 68. 72. 
LARGO. Ftondtc J C tem dame fkn 

ro un d: ruS unless stated): 61 J Inhsier/T 

Pwtzor.B, N Lopaz/C stranaa; A AfcttVR 

GMar. M Hagga/J Simons; v Sumer/M 

Hub&Z 69: Ctekv/R Sirec*. 03 scum 

included; 69: P Pi* (Awys Upper (SB): C 

Jonnson IGB)/B Crampton (ausL 72: Crater 
(AusyP McGowan (GB).73: U Hgueras-Oool 
(SOME Ron. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

JOHN PLAYER TROPHY: Ftal round CariWe 

& Keighley 2 (a PenritM 


wan Stair ODrrap* ratty. 

(feat tea stapes): T. J KateJiunon/J 
(fin). Peugeot 2DS Tt6. 27mm 239ec 2, M 
Ateyi Knanaki (Fin), Lsnoa ■ ■» 

itsec.3. J Boffin (USI/N WHKte (GBJ. 

Sport Ouanro. 1:50. 4. L | 
Thrcefus (Swe). Toyota Cnkca Turbo. ZlZ 

*-■ 6 .^»15S 

(Can). Mazda 323 4WD. 150: 7. 8 
Milen (N2WH Diorsiekus (Swe). 

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Lancu Delta 5*. 5:09; 9. W Boyre/M 
Heattand iCanL vw God GTH. 859; 1AD 

SnepbenJ/V Reese (US). Toyota Corote. 7A3. 

BOWLS 

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Triompsor i (Cyphers. Bflcfcertnm) tt G Smnti 

(Cyphers. Bockenfian) 7-4. 4-7, 7-4 



I 

i 






34 


SPORT 


THF. TTMRS SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1 986 


Telford likely to win 
the battle between the 
leading giant-killers 


FOOTBALL; DAY OF DEC I SION FOR FA CUP MINNOWS 

Groves ’86 


GOLF 


Ken Wright, the manager of 
Choriey, summed up the feel- 
ings of every dob playing in 
the second round of the FA 
Cup this weekend when he 
said: “This is the stage of the 
competition you want to get 
through more than any other. 
We all know we're only 90 
minutes away from utopia in 
the third round." 

For the remaining non- 
league dubs in particular, 
Monday's draw for the last 64 
offers the possibility of finan- 
cial security for years to come. 
Just one game against a big 
first division club could pro- 
vide more income than a 
whole season's league 
matches. 

Telford United’s tie at home 
to Altrincham ensures that 
there will be at least one non- 
league team in the third 
round. The match brings to- 
gether the two most successful 
giant-killere of recent years. 
Telford have knocked out ten 
League sides in the last five 
seasons and Altrincham's 
eleven league victims in 13 
years included Bir min g h a m 
City last season, when they 
were in the first division. 

Current form points to a 
home win. Telford beat Al- 
trincham 4-0 when the two 
sides met in the GM Vauxhall 
Conference recently and they 


By Paul Newman 
have not lost in the Con- 
ference since September. In 
their last five Conference 
matches they have scored 20 

gnak, 

Of the three non-league 
teams at home to league 
opposition, Maidstone United 
appear to have the best chance 
of going through. Their oppo- 
nents tomorrow Cambridge 
United, enjoyed a good run in 
the Littlewoods Cup earlier in 
the season, but they have won 
only once away from home in 
the League and are sixth from 
the bottom of the fourth 
division. 

Maidstone, strong contend- 
ers for the Conference 
championship and promotion 
to the fourth division, have 
struggled to beat non-league 
opposition in previous rounds 
but with home advantage 
must have an outstanding 
chance of reaching the third 
round for the fourth time in 
nine seasons. 

Cboriey, conquerors of 
Wolverhampton Wanderers 
in the first round, now face 
another league club with a 
famous past, Preston North 
End. The two sides drew 1-1 in 
a pre-season friendly, but 
Wright, Cboriey manager for 
the last two years, said: “We're 
under no illusions. Preston are 
going well in the fourth di- 


could be 
an Arsenal 
vintage 

By Clive White 
Perry Grows may sound See 
the address of a cider company 
bat, to those who eat and am:-: 
Arsenal Football Club, ilis a 
name of a more familiar vintage. 
It is also one that may be toasted 
repeatedly if this centenary sea- 
son for the G miners coincides 
with their noth League cham- 
pionship. 

Ferry is the 21-year-old 
nephew of Vic Grores. sou 
fondly regarded at Hig hbury 
where he was a player tar eight 
seasons the early 1960s. 
Ferry, a forward tike his me te , 
is we of the “quintuplets" to 
whom George Graham, the man- 
ager, hac gjpesj a berth in his 
championship-chasing side. 

in ffMMii with Hayes and 
the less innocent Wfltiams, 

give blood. If we afl it won t ^ ^ originally, hut 

be for want or trying or of the Nicholas. Making his de- 


vision and trill {day with a lot 
more confidence than Wolves 
did. It’s a tall order for us, but 
we have a lot of ability in the 
side and I know we’re capable 
of beating them." 

Caernarfon Town, who beat 
Stockport County in the pre- 
vious round, again have home 
advantage, although York 
City are likely to offer a much 
sterner challenge. In the Cup 
in the last two years York have 
knocked out Arsenal and 
taken Liverpool to a replay. 

However, their third di- 
vision form has not been good 
in recent wepks and John 
King, the Caernarfon man- 
ager, warned: “My lads will 


McNeill in corner 


By a Correspondent 


Billy McNeill, the Aston Villa 
manager, has been forced into 
emergency measures to as- 
semble his only 12 experienced 
players available to play Shef- 
field Wednesday at Hills- 
borough. 

Hunt, the mid-field player, is 
reinstated after settling his dis- 
pute with McNeill over a fine 
for a breach of club discipline; 
Gray is re-called following in- 
jury for what could be his first 
foil 90 minutes since last April 
and Stainrod, out since making 
a transfer request earlier in the 
season, is restored. 

McNeill, his options reduced 
by suspensions and injuries, 
commented: “I have only 12 
players available and some have 
expressed a wish to leave the 
dub. I hope all they want at 


Hillsborough is a win. . •" 

Hunt was dropped against 
Arsenal after staging a one-man 
protest against bus fine despite 
the feet that Villa have the worst 
disciplinary record in the league 
and have been urged to take 
action. 

That brought McNeill's first 
home defeat since his move 
from Maine Road, but now 
Hum has had second thoughts. 
He had paid his fine and has 
been given his midfield job 
back. “He passes well and can 
control the game," said the Villa 
manager. 

A row between the trainer and 
manager ofSchalke 04, the West 
German dub, has ended with 
the dismissal of the manaxer- 
Rudi Assauer. 


will to win. This is probably 
one of the toughest draws we 
could have had, but we can't 
wail to get on with it. We have 
a lot of ability and we want to 
show it" 

Of the five non-league sides 
away lo league opposition, 
Runcorn and Enfield appear 
the most likdy to cause upsets. 
Runcorn, whose manager 
John King knows all about 
giant-killing from his Al- 
trincham days, face Scun- 
thorpe United, who lie in mid- 
table in the fourth division. 

On paper Enfield have a 
much harder task at Swindon 
Town, who won the fourth 
division championship last 
season and are now pressing 
for promotion to the second 
division. However, Enfield, 
last season’s Gola League 
champions, are currently 
much more comfortable away 
than at home, having won 
eight of their ten away league 
fixtures. 

Bath City, Chelmsford City 
and Slough Town, away to 
Bristol City, Gfflingham and 
Swansea City respectively, all 
appear to have their work cut 
out. Of the all-league en- 
counters, Bournemouth 
appear to have the easiest task, 
at home to Orient, but after 
dropping their first home 
third division points of the 
season when the lost to 
Gillingham on Tuesday Harry 
Redknapp's tram will be tak- 
ing nothing for granted. 


bat in at Nantting^toa 

Forest, Groves was moved for- 
ward intn the attack fur the last 
20 nunutes when Nicholas suf- 
fered his horrific leg injury. 
Since then. Groves has never 
looked back. 

Groves gave a perfo rm a nce 
brim mine with confidence, 
power and pace that most have 
been of great consolation to 
Graham as he lost the services of 
a revitalized Nicholas. Groves is 
Graham’s only purchase, which 
is qmte remarkable given the 
transformation in the team's 
fortones this season. While Ms 
fellow newcomer at rivals 
Tottenham Hotspnr was 
requesting authorization to 
spend the best part of £2m, 
Graham, with typical Scottish 
frugality, was limiting Ms sum- 
mer spending m £75,000 for one 
fourth division player. 

Groves's signing is in 
with Graham's desfre to 
his own talent rather than pay 
through the nose for other 
people’s discoveries. Groves, 
ginger-haired and fresh-foced, is 
not quite the fledgling he ap- 
pears, tboogh. He played in 
nearly 200 games for Colchester 
United, making his debut as a 
16-year-oM. 

Despite the fink with Arsenal 
(“they've always been my dad's 
team") and being bon within 
the sound of Bow Bells, there 
wss no reason why be should 
have come to Arsenal after the 
family moved to Colchester. It 
was jwst one of those quirks of 
fete. In feet, when Arsenal came 
scouting to Layer Road three 
ago, they signed np 
res' Oat mate. Ian AJXmson. 



Hoad heads list 
of exam failures 
at PGA school 

From John Hennessy, La Manga 


Groves: Happy to keep Arsenal's Champagne Charlie on ice 


Graham had been watching 
Groves with a view to baying 
him when he was manag er at 
MHlwalL Now the three of rtwm 

When Groves* straimd^hL 
ankle ligaments the other week 
and missed his only g*™* since 
coming into the side, it was 
Alfinson who had to stand down 
when he recovered. Bat there's 
no animosity between the two. “I 
was genuinely pleased for h™ 
when be was in the foam as I 
think he is for me now. I used to 
travel down to Highbury to 
watch Ian when I wasn't playing. 
So did my parents. In fitet, one 
day they collected some com- 
plimentary tickets which got 


TODAY'S TEAM NEWS 


Happy day for Robson 


League positions in parentheses 

Arsenal (I) v 
QPR (15) 

Nabobs may return as substitute for 
Arson# after missing 12 games. 
Rangore's team depends upon 
Faraday's recovery from a hamstring 
strain, Peacock stands by. 

Chariton Athletic (20) v 
Newcastle United (18) 

Goddard and Peter Jackson redan 
after ntosing the FUU Members' Cup tie at 
Everton. Darren Jackson makes his 
league debut in ptacs of Stephenson, 
who has an Injured ankle. 

Chelsea (21) ▼ 

Wimbledon (13) 

Wlcfcs returns for Chelsea because 
McLaugtiln has Influenza and Hazard is 
beck In the squad in the absence of 
Rates (bruised rtos). 

Coventry City (9) v 
Leicester City (19) 

Osman couM return lor Leicester af- 
ttwo midweek ( 


artdfeetey. 


Everton(4)v 
Norwich City (6) 

Stevens plays Ids ffest game of the 
season for Everton. who dso welcome 
Watson back krto the league side af- 
ter an ei^iHnatcti absence. Harper takes 
over from Adams In ntoSe Id. 


By CEve White 


) 

st captain, returns 
r suffering from a virus. 


Manchester City (2 

Bowyer. the Forest < 
as substitute after si 
City have dropped Simpson. 

Oxford United (14) v 
Luton Town (5) 

Oxford are without maps because 
of suspension and Shotton with a recur- 
rence of beck trouble. But Hebbard, 

On and TYewick are recalad after 
I their fitness egatat the 
tty team. Luton, for whom Harford 
has just had after another operation 
about the knee, are unchanged. 

Sheffield Wednesday (8) v 
Aston Villa (16) 

Maiwood is back in the reck o ning ter 
Wednesday a f ter m issin g two games vwth 
a hamstri n g Injury. 


Watford (12) v 
Liverpool (3) 

Liverpool w* be wflfnut Moby (dam- 
aged ftams o ta g) and Johnst o n (back in- 
kjry). TVro reserves, Ablett aid 
Durnki, are inducted in the squad of IS. 
Watford add Atien and Strata to the 
side which lost at Southampton. 

West Ham Utd (7) v 
Southampton (11) 

Martinis sat to return tor West Ham 
after an absence of 13 matches, but 
Stewart and Odoms are unavarebto; 
Potts and Inoe come in. Tankard, a teen- 
ager. plays his first gone of the sea- 
son lor Southampton in place of the 


whom, who has 

a cheat infection, in have a Items 
test 

Tomorrow 

Manchester United (17) v 
Tottenham Hotspnr (10) 

Gough retuns for Tottenham and 
Gaiwi is included In the squad after two 
months absence. A lata decision wH 
be taken on Classen's hamstring fnjsy. 


The most happy 
England yesterday was 
Robson, the guardian of the 
national team. Three of his 
defenders, Stevens and Watson, 
of Everton. and Martin, of West 
Ham United, are poised to 
return to league action today. 

Naturally, Howard Kendall, 
the Everton manager, could also 
afford himself a rare smile this 
season as he prepared for the 
visit of Norwich City. He has 
been without the services of 
Stevens, the England right back, 
since the end of hist season and 
Watson, the central defender, 
for right matches prior to the the 
midweek Full Members' Cup tie 
against Newcastle United. 

Kendall has suffered more 
severely than most for the 
national squad’s Mexican 
adventure, or in bis case mis- 


adventure. He is still awaiting 
the return of Reid, another 
injured World Cup soldier, not 
to mention BraceweD and Van 
den Hauwe. 

West Ham, who welcome 
back Martin at home to 
Southampton after missing 13 
games, are not the only London 
dub renewing old acquaint- 
ances; Hazard, his differences 
with Chelsea now resolved, is 
recalled to the squad to face 
Wimbledon at home, an 
intimidating experience these 
days for Chelsea. The dispute 
between Fenwick, another Eng- 
land defender, and Queen’s 
Park Rangers continues though, 
despite bis coming off the 
transfer list yesterday, it is dub 
policy to take players off the list 
after a month. Rangers say they 
have received no offers for 
Fenwick. 


them into the directors' box. My 
dad thought 'this is handy, cups 
of tea and all that business' 
when he heard a rumpus outside, 
ami it was my mw-te moaning 
that someone had taken his 
tickets. It was the first tune the 
pair of them had met in ten 
years. 

As Graves and his manager 
say, it is a great learning process 
for the youngsters ami one that 
few teams are aide to emulate. 
An experienced and tightly-knit 
defence, which has conceded a 
miserly six goals in the last 18 
games, has given them that 
privilege. 

“I try not to get carried away 
at the moment and just enjoy it 
while It lasts. The test for ns wfll 
come when other teams accept 
that we're No 1 and try to 
challenge as. " 

The only other team in 
Groves' thoughts is the Republic 
of Ireland — if not Ragiai^- He 
has an Irish g randfather . His 
unde played' at nearly all levels 
for England, except senior. The 
aha of young Groves for die 
moment is to establish himself 
in the side. like the other 
youngsters, be is acutely aware . 
of the return to fitness of 
Nicholas and Rix and said: “We 
would he very unhappy if they 
left us out now. I don’t compare 
myself with Nicholas. I learn 
every time I watch him train. But 
I mean to play to the best of my 
ability to stop him getting Into 
the team." 

Just how effectively Groves is 
doing that can be ganged by the 
rumours surrounding Nicholas's 
future. While Champagne Char- 
lie is being kept on ice tin toast 
at Highbury is dearly Cham- 


The PGA European Tour 
school broke up yesterday, with 
the customary end-of-tenn con- 
flict of emotions. There was 
elation among the 49 who had 
survived an examination over 
six rounds to bring home their 
player’s card, paving the way for 
a chance to rub shoulders with 
the likes of Ballesteros and Lyle 
pwi season. For five nervous 
wrecks on 432, two over par 
there is a play-off this morning 1 
for the 50th and final place. 
There was. too. deep despair 
among those who failed and are 
left to wonder where their future 
lies Would they not perhaps 
prosper bener as grave-diggers 
or brain surgeons. 

Among the failures, alas, was 
Paul Hoad, whose fortunes have 
steadily ebbed since 1979, when 
he was proclaimed Rookie of 
the Year (a ghastly expression 
inherited, like most things in 
professional gol£ from the 
Americans). 

Hoad did not {day badly over 
the final days, but nor did he 
[riay well enough to compensate 
for two opening 74s (two over 
par for the South course and 
three over for the North). He 
required a 71. as it turned out, 
yesterday, which in turn re- 
quired birdies at the last two 
holes. A splendid two at the 2 10 
yardseighth (his 17th) gave him 
hope, but a four at the ninth isa 
tall order, since it measures 595 
yards, and be could manage 
only a five. 

Craig Laurence, too, must 
wonder where he goes from 
here. An impressive English 
champion in 1 983, be was talked 
of as the new Tony Jacklin. but 
this is his second unsuccessful 
attempt at (he school. He must 
feel that if be cannot make a go 
of h in this company what hope 
would there be for him among 
the big guns. He was virtually 
killed off by his 79 on Thursday 
and his 74 yesterday left him on 
440, 10 over par and eight over 
thecuL 

Colin Brooks, the Scottish 
Amateur champion, suffered a 
reverse experience. His 71 on 


Thursday set him off at one 
under par hut he was in 
wretched touch yesterday. His 
card included seven fives and a 
six and a 78 left him on 435. 

Mark Davis. England's 
stroke-play champion of 1984 
retrieved his position with a fine 
round of golf, 34 out (starting at 
the 10th) and 35 home, to go 
from two over par to one under. 
Andrew Sherborne, of Long 
Ashton, did even better, for his 
69 carried him into fifth plan* 
overall 

Meanwhile at the sharp end a 
taut struggle developed for first 
place and a prize of £1,500 
among Steen Tinning, Wayne 
Smith and Justin Hobday, 
respectively a fair-haired, slen- 
der Dane, a prematurely- 
greying. husky Australian, and a 
dark, willowy South African. 

Once Hobday bad opened 
with three electrifying birdies 
there was never more than a 
stroke or two covering them. 
Towards the end, however. 
Tinning lost his grip and a hook 
into the water beside the 18th 
fairway denied him the binlie he 
needed to draw alongside Smith. 
Hobday similarly railed to get 
up and down from a bunker for 
the four he needed. 

The five involved in the play- 
off include Mark Johnson, of 
Moortown, and Peter Bather, of 
Gog Magog. 

LEADING SCORES; 415 (£1.501$ W 
Smith (AusL 56. 72. 88. 70. 71. 68. «16 


419/S7S0): . .. . 

70. 71 . 6a 420 (£700): A Sherborne 
69. 75, 70. B9. 6$. 89. 421 JE850}: J O 
(Aus), 73. 89, 72. 67. 68. 72. 423: L Rcttng 
(GBL71. 72, 66. 70. 72, 72; W Mdne (GB l 
feOZ 71. 69. 72. 70: A Stubbs (GB): 75, 
64, 74. 68. 70. 71 . 424: J Spence (GBL 72. 
68, 74, 69. 72. 68: B Befi (US), 76,67.73, 
70. 68. 70. 425: W Adcock (GG). 73,73. 75. 
69. 66, 69: M Moreno (Spi 72. 68. 72. 68. 
7272IYourai (GB), 76J6. 72. 69. 70.70. 
426: M Faw (6BL 71. 71. 69. 69. 75, 71; A 
Canessa (to, 72. 71, 70. 72, 73. 68; A 
PHOTO (SpL 68, 70. 75. 72. 70. 71; R 
MacFartara (GB). 71. 75, 71. 68. 71. 70. 

Other quatmas included: 427: S Stephen 
(72 yesterday! C Platts (73L 429: DGftfond 

(75) . 429: M Davis (69). N Burke (72). N 
Briggs (71). 430: N Macrttf (67). A Hunter 
(7Sr5 James (70k J Bennett (73). P Allan 

(76) . 431: J Higgins (67). 0 Brans (SSL Non 
quaBflera tndtnlod: 433, P HoadJ72); 435 
C Brooks (78): 440 C Laurence (74). 


REAL TENNIS 


Deuchar comes of age 

By William Stephens 


Laughlan Deuchar showed a 
new maturity in the semi-final 
of the George Wimpey British 
Open singles championship at 
Queen’s yesterday, when he 
came from 0-2 and 2-4 down to 
defeat Wayne Davies 5-6, 3-6, 6- 
5, 6-5. 6-4. 

Both players maintained 
consistent precision at full 
stretch and considerable pace 
when a momentary error in 
judgement proved derisive. 
Deuchar gambled 

adventurously early on, going 
for winners by trying to do too 
much with the bail without 
being in the correct position. 
However, he tightened his disci- 
pline and the match entered its 
most absorbing period as each 
player tested the other’s skills in 
retrieving from the comers. 

Once Deuchar reached two 
sets all, the only indication of 
doubt came as he was one game 


from winning the match at 5-2 
when he rhang Bd his game by 
raising his margin for error and 
hit for the openings. He lost two 
games in a row, but committed 
himself once more to precise 
placing and won with a stroke to 
the winning gallery. 

Man: State*: Senti-floef; L Deuchar 
(H amp ton Coup W W F Davies 
Yak). 5-6. 3-6. 64, 6-5. 64 


fork). 

Doubtas Sranf-finafc C J 
(Hampton Court) and M F Dean bt G 
Hyland (New York) and AC Level 6-5.66. 
5-4, 6-1 . Women: States: Second round: 
S Mackintosh bt J Page 6-2. 6-5. Senti- 
flnteK KAlonbtG Dean 6-5. 6-3; J Hyland 
bt Mackintosh 6-4, 6-0. 


Halom dismissed 

Vic Halom, manager of Roch- 
dale for the past two seasons, 
was dismissed yesterday. He 
became manager in the summer 
of 1984 after leading Barrow to 
the Northern Premier League 
title. 


SHOWJUMPING 

Fuchs in 
top form 
on Diners 

From Jenny MacArthur 
Bordeaux 

In contrast to the six British 
riders here, Thomas Fuchs, the 
top Swiss professional, wasted 
little time finding top form 
when he and the 12-year-old 
Diners won yesterda/s Prix 
Coca Gola, the opening com- 
petition of this three-day 
meeting. 

Diners, formerly called Itosc, 
is an athletic, French-bred horse 
who was wed suited to 
yesterday's twisty jump off 
course. They finished a fraction 
of a second ahead of the tough 
Austrian rider, Thomas 
Fruehmann, who was riding his 
new horse Zukunft in only his 
second show. The brilliant 
young Frenchman, Patrice 
Driaveau, whose fluent, light 
riding on the little thorough- 
bred, Pylhasia, made a dramatic 
contrast to the Austrians, fin- 
ished third. 

The only British rider to reach 
the 1 2-horse jump-off was Nick 
Skelton on Raffles Airborne, but 
they then had a run-out at the 
gate which they approached at 
considerable speed. 

Harvey Smith, on Sanyo Gal- 
axy and his son Robert, on 
Sanyo Olympic Video both had 
disappointing rounds collecting 
16 aim 12 faults respectively. 

John Whitaker, on Milton, 
the winner of the World Cup 
qualifier here last year, gave an 
impressive display of jumping 
but unluckily they hit the last 
part of the final combination. 

Malcolm Pyrah and the 7- 
year-old Straightway also col- 
lected their only faults at the 
combinations — in their case at 
the middle part. 

The centre-piece of this show 
is tomorrow afternoon's World 
Cup qualifier in which all the 
British riders, currently low 
down on the standings for the 
European League, are anxious 
to acquire points. Only the top 
1 6 at the end of the series qualify 
for the final in ApriL At the 
moment Pyrah. lying in 15th 

place is the highest of the British 
riders competing here. 

RESULTS: 1 . Diners (T Fuchs, Swtt 0 In 
34J1 seconds): 2. Zukunft (TFruehinann. 
Austria 0 in 3421 1 3, Pythasta (P 
Deteveeu, FrOW 34^. ’ 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND OTHER FIXTURES 


Juntos stated 

First division 

Arsenal v OPR 


Charlton v Newcastle 
Chrisea v Wimbledon 
Coventry v Leicester _ 
Everton v Norwich 


Second division 

Bi rmi ng ham v Btackbum 

Brighton v Bradford 

Derby v Reading 


Huddersfield v Barnsley 
Hud v Grimsby . 


Nottingham F v Manchester C 
Oxford v Luton 


Sheffield Wed v A Vffla 

Watford v Liverpool 

West Ham v Sout ha m pt on _____ 

FREIGHT ROVER TROPHY: R ra Bm ta ry 
round: Buy v Stockport County. Hartte- 


Ipswtehv Sheffield Utd, 
Oldham v Shrewsbury - 
Portsmouth v C Palace , 
Stoke v Plymouth ____ 
Sunderland v MfflwaH 
WBA v Leeds 


FA Cup 
Second round 

Aldershot v Colchester 

Bolton v Tranmere 

Bournemouth v Orient .. 
Bristol C v Bath 


Scottish Cup 
First round 
Albion v Arbroath. 
Ayr v Annan* 


Scottish premier division 

Celtic v Dundee _______ 


Caernarfon v York (2.15) 

Chester v Doncaster 

Charley v Preston 

Darflngton v Wigan 

Fulham v Newport 


Forrest M v Berwick (2JQ .. 

Inverness C v ABoa 

Peterhead v E Stirling 

Stiffing v Cowdenbeath 

Third division 

Mansfield v Blackpool 


Dundee Utd v Aberdeen 

Falkirk v Motherwell 

HamBton v Clydebank __ 
Hibernian v Rangers __. 
St Mirren v Hearts 


pOOlvUnwh. 

TOOTHALL 


COiMNATION pua Luton v 
MiUiraU; ReKJhX) v West Ham; 
tort v Ipswich; Tottenham v Arsanal. 
SMWtoFF WSH LEAGUE (Z3M: Ante v 
Portadown: Ballymena v Unw.--d; Carrie* ¥ 
Newiy: Cmsadare v Lame: Oistitay v 
CHftorvlIe.' Gtenavon v Bangor O te ntcimi 

v Coleraine 

GM-VAUMULLCOFERBICE: Boston v 
Scarborough; Friddey v Dagenham; 
WeakJstone v Weymouth; imteg v 
Kettering .SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier 
•Maion: Corby v Faraham; Darttord v 
Worcester WrJIenhall v 
Worcester JUdtaad dM ion: Bister v VS 
Rugby:BrWgnarmvHalBsovwn:Bucl(ta- 
ham v Forest Green Rws; Gloucester C«y 


GREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE: Pre- 
mtef JW al on : BUetonl v CMppenham; 
Frame V Saftash; Chard v Dawtsh; 
LBteatd Am v Cfavodon; Metkshan « 
Mmehead; Pautton Rvrs v 
Radstock w Taunton: W 
v Exmouth; Tcrrington v Ctandaem. 
HALLS BKWERYHELLEMC LEAGUE: 


Gffingham v Chelmsford 

Rochdale v Wrexham 

Scunthorpe v Runcorn 

Swansea v Slough 

Swindon v Enfield 

Telford v Altrincham 

WaisaflvPVale — 


GM-Vauxhafl Conference 

Barnet v K' minster 

Boston V Scarboro 

Cheltenham v Nuneaton 

Friddey v Dagenham 

Gateshead v Northwich 

Stafford v Sutton U 


v Banbury Utd; I . 

Sutton GddfioMvWa B ngboroutftSoutb- 
em dMstete Canterbury CHy v Andover: 
COrinthln v Chatham; Dorchester v 
Gravesend aid Northflset Dunstable v 


Abingdon v W an tage; 

Farfora v Hounslow; Moris Motors v 
Abingdon: Theme v Raynere Lane: Wring 
Sportsv Bicester Yata Town v 

mjSmtE same cur fm men* 

Supo marine V Wooton Bassssstt; 
Htghw orth v Pi atorn Ptnahu re t v Perea. 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE SENIOR TROPHY: 
Second round: Cheltenham Res v 
MangotsfieM: Qndsrford v Shorlwood; 
Mormon v Am SI Phflps: Hanbrook v 

Grantham Atfi v Chatteris; Harwich and 
Pariusstor v By Ctty; Loweaott v Bram- 
tree: March vFefixs&me; Soham ftengere 
* Sudbury; Tjptrae v Bure. Cup: 
Stowmaritet v Clacton; Wbbecn v CoL 


LANCASHIRE COUNTY FA TROPHY: 
FkH round: Atherton GoNsries v South 
Liverpool; Bacup Boroutfi « Colne 
Dynamoes; Burscough v Loyland Motors; 
Darwen v Accrington Stanley; Lancaster 
Cttyv Nelson; Rsdcfiffe Brough v Atherton 

LrBosendalev H — twoodiStamarsdate 
vHorarichRWl 

WESSEX LEAGUE: Lyminglon v 
BrockBrtturet Portals Ain v Havant; 
Thatcham v Bournemouth; Weiworthy 
AAvStemta. 

HANTS SOIOR CUP: AFC Totton v 
BesMey; Roods Sea v Portsmouth Rn; 


Wealdstone v Weymouth — 
Wettng v Kettering 



Eastleigh. 


ftnie v Watartoovlle: Thanet v WDodkm: 
Tonbridge v Dover Ath; Trowbridge v 
Hastings. 

VAUXHALL OPS. LEAGUE: Premier dt> 
vision. Bishop's Stortlord v Croydon; 
DtAwtch Hamlet v Bortring; Hsndon v 
Wycombe Wanderers; KtomtonJan v 
Bromley; Tooting and Mitcham v 
Famborough; Wattharnstow Avenue v 
Hayes: wfoso and Bon v St Abans 
Qo fcn gh am v Bognor Regis: Worthing v 
Httchfci; Yeovil v Carstwton. Fbat <S- 


NOflKXX SEMOR CUft ! 

CSss v Great Yarmouth: Gorieston v 
Newton Roman; Swaffham v Walton; 
Thetfbrd v Norwich Cfty Res. 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: 

BerMngskte y Amersftam; 


Bnaricay v Bracfcne* E 

Wood v Kingsbury; Epsom and 


SS^Her&ann Grays Ath 
Finchley: Lewes * Tilbury; 

Leyton/Vftwate v Staines; MaM a nh o adv 
L eatherheMc Southwicfc v Hampton: 
Stevenage Borough v Leyunstona and 
IBoni; Ux bridge v Basfldon; wantotey v 
Oxford City. Second dMaion norite 
D ertto am sted v Barton Rvre; Chesham v 
Saffron Walden; Cotter Row v Catepton; 
Hamel Hampstead v WEvenhoe; Hwnoid v 
" Letcftwnrtti GC v Avetey; 
v HeytJrtdge Svrilts; Trtog v 
Hornchurc h : VauxtiaiMotora v Haringey 
Borough; Wolvenan v Royston. Second 
Carntnrley v Newbury; 
Benatead Ath; Bjham. v 
— in Feithnm v Rockwell 
Heath: Metropolian PoSce v Chaflont Si 
Paten Mdesey v Patersflald; Southal v 
totawWigiSteta . Chertsey; Wbridng 

VXmSKsBOOR CUP: HM qwttfylng 
rannrfc Brimsdmm Rvre v CM f Service: 
Donaon v Ford United; 

„ — a v Beckenham; 

HanweB v BROS Barnet; Pennant v 
Corinthian-Casuais: Southgate v 
Cftingfcvd, Crown and Manor v Bsckton; 
East Han v Eton Manor. SOUTH EAST 
COUNTIES: Fhst dMaton Cambridge * 
Southend: Chalsea v Watford; Gamrfiam 
v Arsenal; Onarn v Fuffiam: Tottenham v 
Normcfu West Ham v Portsmouth. Poat- 
pmd: MHwaU v Chariton Ath. Second 
Action: Bowitemouth v Tottenh am: 
Brighton v Oxford; Bristol Rvrs v Brent- 
ford; Crystal Palace v Reading; 

mpton v Luton; Southend v Co»- 
chpgter Swindon v Nortfemptoa 


Destmugh v Eynesbuy v 

hihflngborough: Kempston v S and L 
Corby; Potton v BaUodq Raunds v 
wootoa- Roihwall v Northampton Spen- 
cer: Sfottald v Staord. Lmqm Cb(k 
B racMey v Long Bucfcby- 
OnUBMED COUNTIES: CNpstead v Ash; 
Cobham v Vtania Water; Cove v 
Famham: Crartefati v Merstham: FrinSey 
Green v Fariaigh Rvre; Godattntng v BAa 
Waybridge: MaUan v Chottoaim Malden 
Vale v Hartley Witney: Westfield v Horiey. 
DRYBURGHS NORTHERN LEAGUE: Ftrat 
(Maiorc Bedflngton v Grams Cansett v 
North Shields; South Sarik v Fenyhtt Ath; 
Tow Law v Blue Star Whrtiey Bay v 
WhHbvTawn. 

DURHAM CHALLENGE CUP: Fhetrowd: 
Btagham Town v South Shields: Bishop 
Auckland v Seaham Red Star: BofdanCA 
v Ctevelend Bridge; ChestaNe-Straet v 
Eah Winning; Coundon TT v WBHrepon; 
Crook Town v Norton; Hartlepool Res v 

Wingate; Mreton v Dawdon; Newton 

Aydtfte v Swtewed; Ryhope CA vOunettn: 

Sc Vaux v Hebburn RayraUea; SMOon v 

Eaangton: Spannymoor UW v Petertee: 

Siockon Town v Anrtheto Ptabi; West 
Auckland v Ryhope CW; WMefcham v 
Brandon Unried- 

NORTHERN COUNTIES EAST LEAGUE: 
Premier c&vtakw: Alfretoft Town v Farstey 
Celtic; Brfcfingun TrWty v Pontef ract 
Cols: Denaby v Boston: Eastwood Tqvwr v 
ngton Town; Emley v Balper Town: 
t Bwtn VW; Long Eaton 
North Forriby v AmtOmpe 
itton Town * mrrogate Town. 
BASS NORTH WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Firet (SvMote Gtossop V 
Eastwood Hailay; Mam v Bootle; Kekhy v 

Oongtetonj task vcntheroe: Nethertiaid • 

St fwtens; Penrith vYWnsford. 


Town; Brentwood v East Thurrock; 
Briflhtfng B ea v Chebnsfard; Canvey Is- 
land v Burnham; Stanstad v Matoon; 
WHham Town * PurfteeL Chatontan 

COUNTY LEAGUE: FM A- 
m»re Halsham Town v Three Bridges; 
Horsham YMCA v Uttlehampton 
Townlanclng v Mldhurst and 
EaettxMtWSsehaivi v Burgess W 
Town; Wick v Chichester Ctty.CUF: Rrat 
mmd: Franklands VBaga v Haywards. 
Senior Chaflenge QqB Second round: 
Eastbourne Town v Ponfleld; East 
Grtnstead v ArancWL Regtey: LWto Com- 
mon Alton v Shotaham: Nawheven v 
Oakwood; Pagham v Seofocd Town; 
Peeceh a venandTtescombev Ho tel am i. 
ARTHURIAN LEAGUE: Premier dhWoo 
amt: Mahtetnians v AitiMara. Rrat 
Diviaiote Brwffiskfians v West mins ter s : 
Foresters v Salopians: Wykehamists v 
C8uens4 : 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

JOHN PLAYtol SPECIAL TROPHY: Sec- 
ond round: Castle fort v St Helens (2-15) 

HANDBALL 

BRITISH LEAGUE: Wakefield w Bfrken- 
haad: Kbkfay Setact v Saffcrd. 

ICE HOCKEY 



Gtfsefey 


Ayr Bruins v N ottin g ha m 
Fife FNere v Durtom Wasps (7.1 
Mutrayfad Placers v Stre a t ham Hedskma 

KSvWHEBtedcpool Saagufls v 

gh [feates (730); (3asgow 
• ' ' (5.(8; Swindon 
al(5.l5);TelfoR] 
Tigers v Oxford Qry S»sf7.0} 

VOLLEYBALL 

ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND NATIONAL 
LEAGUE Men's Cm rfMston: Beflsha 

Cardinals v Murray International Living, 
ston; Falcon Electrical Jete v KMerih 
Ptant Team Scottish Farm v Team 
Kflyplant-DV; East Ktoridc v Partiey. 
Women’s first dntoion: finteas Sport v 
Larbert Ladles: Whitburn Centre v 
Carluke; Team Scottish Farm v 
Inrerclvds. 

ROYAL BANK NATIONAL LEAGUE: Fftxt 
Matory v Liverpool City 


Poole v 
i Haatseal v I . 

Crook Log 

.. WoHMtfa that tfivto knc 
l v Bradford Mythbreskara (Z30). 

NETBALL 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: Bedfordshire v 
Herts; South Staffs * Surrey; Btortngham 
v Middlesex; Essex Met v 

COUNTY MATCI^toJ^BurtS^wlS 
North Bucks v East Owset Kent v East 
Doraat South Bucks v MU Hants East 
Devon v Cornwal; East Devon v Avon; 
Conwsm v Avon; Hunters:* v Lrtcestw- 
teita Humberside v Greater Manchester: 
Hwntoenado v South Durham; Essex 
Threrock v Suffolc; Sussex v Suffolk; Isle 
of Wight v Somerset Lancashire v South 
Yorkshire; Lmashkw v Notts; S Yorks v 
NOtoc Northerns v East Essex Qxon v 
Cantos; Staffs v WorseysidK Staffs v 
Salop; Merseyside v Salop: W Yorks v 
□why* W Yaks v Tyne and Wear; W 
Yorks v Cumbria: OeTOys v Tyne and 
Wean Darbys tf Cumbria; Tyne and Waarv 
Cumbria. 

LACROSSE 

miE NORTHERN LEAGUE: Oral tfl- 
vMmg moon v Old Hutmoans: Board- 
man & Cedes v Manor Chsade v OU 
Stoptorteana; Stodmori v Heaton Mar- 
^ItetawvQidfftecDnians. 

BHNE SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Flrel dh 
wetew (24)): Enfieto v Buckhurst f* 
Hampstead v London Univ.; Kenton v 
Chlpstoad. Second dMaion - Wtennedi- 
ata Ftac Second Round ftM te Bath v 
Croydon; Beckenham v Hltchln; 
ftxtoost HS -A 1 v Orpington: Hantatead 
‘k v Kenton ‘A’u ; 

TOMORROW 

FOOTBALL 

FA Cup 
Second round 

Maidstone v Cambridge Utd 

Notts Co v Middlesbrough (11.30) 

First division 

Man United v Tottenham (3.05) — 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: BB DeAow Cup: 
Rrat romt Faraham v Andover 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL TROPHY: Sec- 
ond Round: Blackpool v Hue (230): 
Featheretane v Bradford (S^J); Leigh v 
Doncaster (330); Sheffield v Barrow; 
W ar ri ngton v Havt ax; Wigan v swknon 

stones BrrreH ch a j w to noii ip! sec- 

ond drawn: Dewsbury v Fulham (230); 
Mansfield vHunstat (330) 

BASKETBALL 

GARLSBERG NATIONAL LEAGUE; FCtat 
rtivbfon {MB* Team Pcfycefi Kingston v 
BCP London. Second dhriskm (40): 
Lflritoath Toccata y Cleveland:. Swinitan 

. \- 


Scottish first division 

Brechin v Montrose 

Dunfermline v Forfar 

E Fife v Kilmarnock 

Morton v Clyde 

Partk* v Dumbarton 

Queen of Stti v Airdrie 

Multipart League 

Bangor v MossJey 

Barrow v Buxton 

Burton v Southport 

Goote v Workington 

Hyda v Matkick 


Marine v Macclesfield 

Oswestry v Gainsborough 
Worksop v Rhyl 

Southern League 
Premier (fiviston 

Basingstoke v Dudley 

Bromsgrove v Crawley 

Corby v Faraham 

Dartford v Worcester 

Flsherv Wftney 


Fofltestone v Sbepshed — 

Kings Lynn v Aylesbury 
Reriditeh v Cambridge C _ 
Safisbury v Atvechurch — 

WIHenhaH v Bedworth 

Rakere v Btesnwre Port 
WOMEN’S FIRST DIVISION: FM dt 
vfslmr Lambeth Lady Topcats v Chamoa 
Swifts Derby; Nottingham Wildcats 
London YMCA. 

TABLE TENNIS 

SCHILDKHOT BRITISH LEAGUE: Premier 
d li ia ta n: Omega Reading v Ormesuy; 
Burrarfly Can Wf v MBS St Neds. FM 
«SvWor: TCB DttoNns v Dagenham FC; 
TSP Larichati v&Sws Torbay; ~ J — 
Newcastle v Omega Clew; 
Warwlcks/Blrmlngham v Chen 
Construction. 

ICE HOCKEY 

HEWBCEN LEAGUE: Prem i er 
Ayr Bruins v Stre at ham Ra da kta 
Dundee Rockets v Rta Flyers i/^je 
D utam wans v WhMey warriors (&30); 
MurrayfleURaore v Not tin g ha m Pan- 
thers (630); SoOhUI Barons v Oevaland 
Bombers (630)Ast dvteion: Traftord 
Metros v Blackpool 8eacMs (530): 
Bournemouth Stags v TeAord Tigers 
(5.15k Irvine Wings v Stouto Jets &SJr, 
Lee talay Lions v MadwayBsare (530); 
Petartwroutfi Pirates v Sout ha n y ton 
Vlbngs (630J; Richmond Flyers v Kftk- 
caldyKetoels(545).; 
VOLLEYBALL 

ROYAL BANK NATIONAL LEAGUE: F*» 
revision (2.(3: Capital City v Liverpool Oft 
Colchester v Newcastle (Staffs, 


Heatsaal v Arsenal; Southsea Seoqtons v 
Ashe om be; Speedwell v Bradford 
MytMxeakisrs: Southgae TC v Spark. 

HANDBALL 

BRITISH LEAGUE: BkkantwreJ * Lhrnr- 
poot BCB2vTiysf77;Woh«s Ptfy'83v 
Olympia Cannock; Great Om » Runup 

HAND B MB9LAN0S CUP: QBarfar-fbiaft 
Stafford <Xynn|cs v Warwick Jaoias. 
ENOJSH NATIONAL LEAGUE; Women; 
Mtakeflefd Metros v flu 
lord v Hatewood Forum. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Continued from facing page 

SATURDAY 

BBC1 WLBLUHlOim 

SSiLL Sports News Wok®. NORTH- 
ERN OREUSn. 4E65J05pm North- 
ern Ireland results (part oJ Grandstand). 
5.15-5L2D Northern Ireland news. 

1255-Ij00ain News HeacEnea mid 

Weather Qose. BIGLAML 5-15- 
5Jttom South & East (Loretoq) — axxt 
Souft & West (Plymouth) -SpotUflht 
^»rt and News. Al other Engtish regtons 
- Regional news and sport 

ANGLIA 

i Scarlet 

1130-1200 Jacksons liutoai-2.15 


Scarecrow and Mrs King -fli 

world's Best Setter. Closedown. 

iSRDERffSiSSel 


Greatest 

American Hero 1-20pm-2.15 Knight 

Rider 1230am CtoaSdowa 


1130-1200 Runaway Island 1 Mkm% 

Bionic Woman 215-24S Who’s The 

Boas? 1000 Rhc Nevada Smith 

RlF 11 * Oowwt tJBB. JaMndar 
225 Closedown. 


CH ANNEL 


wortd IJOparf.15 Fall Guy l235nm 
The Robnaon 1 JO Closedown. 

GRANADA «fg£L«gS 


Other- 


120pm Bionic Weman 215-24S 
Di^nraiaJBam Genesis 1.00 Talee 
From The Oarksida 1 JO Closedown. 


Tarzan 


grvwEsrftaaas 


UFO 


1<UtopmFhrobyia4S Htnr French 
Connection nl250aei Ctosedown. 

HTV WALES 


IQASCktonjgby. 


Rkfcr 13 0pro-215 Chips liaOam^ 
Sp od al Squad 1.15 Night Thoughts. 

TSW S7V except lUXtem 
— Gia Honeybun 11^12.00 
Rptates News 135 
si 236-2.15 Cartoon &CS 
Newsport 5.10 Ratoon 5.15 Btock- 

9f22Lf our Dowman 6.15- 
7.16 A-Ttom izasem Post sc ri pt . 
Ctosedown. 

TVS 11 -UOenv 

sj ^sasaa aEr 0 ' 

130 Company. Closedown. 

TYN E TEES 


P«>. 


Swail-ao-tt^OSpiderwoman 
l£0gw4Ll5 BtantoWoman 121 

etry of the P eople. CtosedowrCl 


Anwrtemfteo4^re«i» sports 

jPRKSHIRE^^jgg 


Planreor Hie Apes I30pm-2.15 


the Papers IZOOHknrJaiSanBWhi 


— The Bustee Stannw 7 JO 

1 035 Ftt n: Seven Days In Mmria45eBi 

CkSQQOCMrn. 

SUNDAY 

IZ^o-lZaBpm Ian ulna in WalM 

ttt. 1 O -n.Q 0 Another Vaftey 1130-1130 
The Rockford Flee HjEiijk^ 

Mwsrewetes SCOTLAND. 1L55- 

BsSssssaasap- 


Mmd. 1235-123Bpm Fwm View 1L40- 
1135 News hnurffinos. 

BBC2 

==== Rugby Spedal -waos. Martin 
WHtems wlh commentary from the 
trial of probables v possiotee for inclusion 
In a champtonaNp wtenteg warn. 

ANGUA 

130pm Beveriy HBbHtes' 135 
Wtealhar 130-230 Farming Diary S30 
Fal Guy 636636 Butiseye 123&Bm 
RoadtoBeOMwoi. Closedown. 

n 130pm-130 Fanning Outlook 430 
Fafl Gw530 Return oTlhe Antelope 
63CHL3Q EMtaeye 12>40ain 
Closedown. 

130pm Link Fal Guy 530 Re- 
hmpl the Antefope 630630 Butiseye 

12.45am Jobfinder 1^5 Ctosedown. 

gMANNEL^aasS!^ 

Point 130pm Lss Francate Chez- 
VOin 130-230 Farm Focus 530 Chfpe 
5^630 Butiseye 1230am 
Closedown. 

GRAMPIAN As London ex- 

cept ftiSertM 
Cartoon 1130 Al Home 1130-1230 
PeraonteVtew 130pro-130 Farming Out- 
fook 5JIMS30 Scotsport 1240am 

Reflections. Ctosedown. 

GRANADA ** London ex ' 

■T cope aasem-aat 

Cartoon 130pn Cartoon 136 Asp 
Kaa Hak 1.10 Munsters* 140-230 THs Is 
You- Right 530 Candid Camera 530 

Downto earth <36630 Bufeeye 

I240em Closedown. 

HTV WEST A» London ex- 

.IcaeitmSwrta 
Cartoon 1.00pm Link 1 J 0 - 2 JM 
Farming Wales 530 Mind Yoor Language 
MBWfio-s The Boss? 630-630 
Butiseye 1240mn Closedown. 

HTV WALES 

230 Wales on Sunday 
Whan me CNpe are Down. 

^^ uiiSbi 
Cartoonireopm (Sen Mehael Caval- 
Anw8r SJ ®’ 

Ctos ^tepon 1240am Late CaX 


TSW A 81 r 

— 830 Look and SeelOOpm 

Sgo^S^Re^nreme Antelope. 

Ctosedowi. 



^^yTonigW^^ 1 Cnmpany. 

7y NETEEs gaaga» 

630430Buiteeye 1240am 


l^jg-tS-gP Fatima -Our Hope 

yjDB KSHIHE 

^rtoon 130pm Link 1^230 

fi*® ™ww 


BgcaB Maasia 

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v.j-. :or 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 



35 


SATURDAY 


TELEVISION AND RADIO 

Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


* \ ou tan almost sniffChrist- , , — 

mas in tne air, because this is a ( CHOICE 1 

well above average Saiunfey v — / 

for discerning filmgoers - 

Oliviw'c Hamlat f/~*A -% nn v 


Olivier’s Hamlet fC4.ToOpm) 
which performed drastic sur- 
gery on the text but lei the play 
get off the operating table still 
looking like a masterpiece; 
Alain Resnais's Last Year in 
Marienbarf fBBC2, 11.20) 
which was almost 
imprehensible when we first 
saw it in 1961 but makes 
much more sense now because 
we understand lie visual lan- 
guage it employs; the Marx 
Brothers in Room Service 
(BBC2, 2.00pm) which finds 
the tno below their best but 


6-30 Family-Nas*. (r) 8.35 The 
BJuppet Babies. 

9.00 Saturday Superstore. 
Among the customers is 
Anita Dobson. 

12.15 Grandstand introduced by 
Desmond Lynam. The 

1m e-up is: (subject to 
alteration) 1240 Football 
Focus; 12.40 Ski-ing from 
Val d'lsere; 12.55 News 
and weather, i.oo, 145 
and 2.10 Racing from 
Cheltenham; 1.15 and 
1.50 Motor Racing: the 
final round of the 
Grandstand Formula Ford 
2000 series. 

1.15 and 245 Swimming: the 
Hewlett Packard Club 
Team Championship; 340 


Rugby League: me 
3 if of a 


second half of a John 
Player Special Trophy 
second round game: 340 
Half-times; 440 Rallying: 
the Lombard/RAC Rally; 
4.35 Final score. 

5.05 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather 5.15 
Sport/Hegtonal news. 

540 Roland Rat - The Series. 

5.45 Doctor Who. The final 
episode.(Ceefax) 

6.15 Bob's Full House. The first 
of a new series of the 
comedy quiz show. 
(Ceefax) 

640 Hi-de-HU Will Clive marry 


Gladys? (Ceefax) 
rhe Paul f 


740 The Paul Daniels Magic 
Show. This first of a new 
series includes John 
Twomey who has unusual 
musical skills; end 
Japanese sieight-of-hand 
artist Fukai. (Ceefax) 

840 Casualty. It is a 

particularly hectic in the 
casualty ward tonight with 
a gang of noisy drunks 
and aboxer who collapsed 
alter winning a fight 
(Ceefax) 

840 News and Sport With Jan 
Laeming. Weather. 

9.05 Fine Loving Couples 
(1980) starring James 
Cobum, Shirley MacLaine. 
and Sally KeUernian. 
Comedy about a boring 
marriage in which each 
partner takes a lover. 
Directed by Jack Smrgtrt 
(Ceefax) 

10.40 Matt Houston. A young 
heiress is mesmerised by 
the head of a sinister 
reHgiousctril. 

1145 Film: The LKtteGM Who 
Lives Down the Lane 
(1976) starring Martin 
Sheene and Jodie Foster. 
Thriller about Rynn. a 
teenager who acddentaBy 
kills the landlady ofthe 
house in which she lives 
with her father. She hides 
the body, but the woman's 
son guesses the secret 
and decides to take 
advantage of the situation. 
Directed by Nicholas 
Gessner. 

1245 Weather. 


News on the halt-hour until 
12.33pm. then ZOO, 340, &30, 

7-30, 12.00 midnight 
6.00am Mark Page 840 Peter 
Powell 1040 Dave Lee Travis 
1.00pm Words and Music of 
John Lennon 240 You'll Never be 
16 Again (history ol the British 
teenager) 340 The American Chart 
Show 540 Saturday Live (Andy 
Kershaw) 640 In Concert (Ruby 
Turner at Glastonbury Festival) 

7.30 Simon Mayo 940-1240 The 
Midnight Runners Show ©noe 
Peach and Terraplane). VHF Stereo 
Radios 1 & 2: 440am ^ Radio 
2. 1.00pm As Radio 1 . 740-440am 
As Radio 2. 


MF (medium wave). Stereo on 

VHF (see Radiol) 

News on the hour until 140pm, 
than 3.00. 6.00, 7.00 andhourty 
horn 10.00. Headlines 640am. 
740. Sports Desks 11.02pm 
440 David Yamal 1 6.00 Steve 
Trueiove 9.05 David Jacobs 1040 
Sounds of the 60s 11. 00_ABM n 
Time { Peter Clayton) 14ftam The 

News Huddines (Roy Hudd) 

140 Sport on 2. Includes Rugby 
Union (London v Midlands. 

North v South and South West). 
Racing from Cheltenham: 

Cricket (England versus Victoria). 
540 Sports Report (C^ssifled 
results). 640 Bram of Sport 1986 


640 Don't Stop Now - It'S 
Fundation. 7.00 


, Beat me Record 

sssssissEsa-F 


me mouritaii«w — 




Orchestra. 


WOflLD SERVICE 


BM Nnwsdesk (untfl 6.30) 740 

is ?sssw 

weeklies. 7 AS Noiwprk.O^- 

&09 Reflections. 6- 15A ptikr 

SBSSrs 
““SKifiays 
isttj&sJxjrs .ss 



wo . R««n isrtJSJSSS 


(Lte Saturday SpedA W» 


sassf-g? 


TTw Askng. 940 mm. 1 luny^r 030 

Home. 9.15 SoctHK ol 

People and Potifccs- KUJJRwg - 1 

Pham our own Ctyr espor* -* ^ 1 spons 

Ideas. 1040 Refieewn^ io«sp^ 

Roundup. 1140 News. 1149 

tary. 11.15 Nature Notaboc*- 1 

thing Goes. 1240 Nows 1*J®SaL 

Abort Britain. 1215 Radio 

1230 From the Proms 56- 

141 Ptay of aw 

249 Review of Bnwn ^ 
Voyages ot captain 
rime. 340 News. 349 Ne * 5 
Britan. 3-15 From ctX *»»" “SjO 
pondent. 3.30 Ja “ ^ (imtrt 
Newsdesk. 440 

4.45». 445 LettW tram Amenea4» 
InQMT _ 


Regional TV: on facing pag* 



still miles ahead of the rest of 
the field; and French Canute- 
tioaU(LWT, 10.00pm), a rare 

exception 10 the rule that a 
sequel is never as good as the 
original. 

• Best of the rest today; 

Christopher Book intelligently 
comparing Greene’s The 
Third Man with Reed’s film 
(Radio 4. 5.00pm) and the 
Royal Liverpool Phil- 
harmonic concert (Radio 3, 

7.30pm) which includes 
Natalia Gutman playing 

Dvorak's ceUo concerto. Jean Simmons; she plays Ophelia in CHirkr 3 

Peter Davalle vecsien of Hamlet (C4^LOOpm) 


in Olivier’s 1948 screen 


BBC 2 


940 Csefax 11.10 Op«n 

0 Ceefax. 


Unfverstty 140 1 

240 Fitae Room Swvic® * 

Groucho plays the role of 
Gordon MUer, an 
Impoverished impresario 
who tries to put on a new 
ptay and stay at an 
expensive hotel without 


3.15 


using any cash. Directed 
by WriRam A Seiler. 

FUm: The Rate! (1960) 


starring Tony Hancock 
and G«xge Sander 


and George Sanders. 
Comedy with Hancock a 


frustrated city office 
ho decides 


worker who decides to 
escape to the Left Bank in 
Paris. Directed by Robert 
Day. 

445 Laramie. Jess Harper 
shoots dead an outlaw 
and then becomes the 
target of the man’s 


.545 


^^rngMsweetheart. (r) 


Prom. HighUgfits 
of the 1965 season. 


introduced by Ray Moore 
at Albert 


from The Royal All 
Ha(L 

6.35 te tema tto nal Bridge Club 
introduced by Jeremy 
James. With Arturo Franco 
(Italy); Zia Mahmood 
(Pakistan); CMsttan Marl 
(Franca); and Robert 
Sheehan (England). 

745 NewaVtow with Jan 

Laeming and Moira Stuart 
Weather. 

745 Saturday Review 
presented by Russell 
Davies. Exhibition: Paris’s 
newQuaid'Orsay 
museum of 19th century 
art and culture; Dance: 
Wayne EagHng's new 
version of Beauty and the 
Beast for the Royal Ballet; 
Ait Peter Blake discusses 
the thin dlvkfing line 
between commercial and 


845 


hkghart 


test Coast Story. The 
second of three 
programmes featuring 
music from California. 


The Key to Songs 
■Ltemour amort 


InC, 

s 


940 Fauci 

(1984) starring Sabine 
Azema and Fanny Ardant 
A love story about a young 
woman who, after hearing 
her lover pronounced.. .. 
dead, sees lam minutes 
later walking down the 
stairs looking as fit as he 
has ever been. Directed by 
Alain Resnais, (subtitled) 
1140 Fibre Last Year in 

Marienbad (1961) starring 
DeipWne Seyrig and 
Giorgio Albertazzi. A 
controversial film, set in a 
large baroque hotel, about 
the relationship between a 
man. a woman and her 
husband. Directed f 
Alain Resnais, (s 
Ends at 140. 


645 Weather. 740 News 


745 Aubade: MacCtmjLand 


of the mountain 1 
flood overtiae), Samuel 
Wesley (Symphony No 5: 
European Community Ct^, 
Harty (Variations on 
Dutan an Ulster Orchestra) 
Telemann (Concerto in D: 
of St Martin Jn- 


•^WjST 


Concerto I 
O'Conor, with New Irish 
CO), Martinu (La revue de 
arisine: Partington 
Ensemble). Enesco 
(Romanian Rhapsody No 
1: Monte Carlo I 
News 


9.05 Record Review: Includes 
David Murray’s guide to 
recordings of Rave('s Piano 
Concerto for left hand 


Jannequin Ensemble 
Organ um) 


1140 Paradise and the Pert 
Schumann's cantata 
Boston SO (under 
SinopoB).with 

Tangle wood Festival Chores 
and soloists Haggander, 
fjpovaak, Cote and 
Groenroos. 140 News 


1.05 Mozart and Weber: Nash 
Ensemble members play 



640 News: Farming. 640 
Prayer. 645 Weather. 
Travel. 

740 News. 7.10 Today’s 
Papers. 

7.15 On Your Farm (report 
from Royal SmftftfiefcJ 
Show). 

7.45 In Perspective. (Reflgftws 
affairs) 

7 50 Down to Earth. 745 
Weather Travel 

B4Q News. e-IOTodayte 
papers. 

8.15 Sport on 4. 

a.48 Yesterday in Parfiamant 
847 Weather Travel. 


9.00 News. 
g.05 Breakaway. Travel and 
leisure. 

950 Newstand. A review of 
jne weekBes 

10 - 05 JKt S ir. WltiiPeter 

Kelner. Political Ectilor of the 
^ Statesman. 

10.30 Loose Ends (Ned 
Snerrml 


1140 From Our Own . 

Correspondent. Life arel 
pehtics abroad reported by 
BSC foreign 
correspondents. 


■J2.B0 News: Money Box. 
presented by Louise 


10.15 Stereo Release: Robert 
Morton (Ouepourroit 

hjscG oti *E >9ha?n ^ My " 
Voices), Josquin des Pres 


ITV/LONDON 


645 TV-am introduced by 

Weather- at 


Richard Keys. ! 

648; news at 740. 

740 The Wkfa Awake Club 
inefudea guests. The 
Housamartins. 

945 No 73. Fun and games hr 
the young 1140 Knight 
ffidor, Bonnie is 
kidnapped and forced to 

reprogram KJTT to assist 


CHANNEL 4 


&25 A Question of Economics. 

Pan eight, (r) 940 4 What 
Ifa Worth, (r) 1040 The 


in a museum robbery. 

ohnSuchet 


1240 News with Jotm 
12.05 Safa* and Qr e e v al e. Ian 
and Jimmy review the 
week's football news 
1240 WrastBng. Three 
bouts from the Albert Had. 
Bolton. 

140 Chips. Punch moonfights 
as a model for a Jeans 
advert 2.15 H a as e SM 
Comedy series starring 
John Akteiton. (r) 

2.45 World Championship 
Boxing and World 
Masters Darts. The WBC 
Light-Middleweight 
Championship bout 
between Uganda's John 
Mugabi and Duane 
Thomas from the United 

States, from Caesar's 
Palace, Las Vegas; and 
the Winmau World 
Masters Darts from the 
Rainbow Suite, 
Kensington. 

445 Results service. 

540 News. 
f :n$ Blockbusters. 

545 The A-Team. This feature 
length episode finds the 
redoubtabiequarteton 
the trail of a fudge's 

kidnapped daughter, in 
far-flung parts of Europe 
and on a dangerous cruise 
ki the Mediterranean. 

7.15 Beade’s About Jeremy 


on unsuspecting 1 


irs 


of the pi 

745 The Price is Right Game 
show. 

845 News and sport 
940 Unnatural Causes: 

Ladtes' Night Alfred 
Burks stars as the 
mysoginist Hon. Sec. of 
the ali-male Hunters Club, 
the committee of which 
has voted to allow women 
in for one night a week. 
(Oracle) 

1040 LWT News headlines 
followed by Flm: French 
Connection II (1975) 
starring Gene Hackman 
and Fernando Rey. 
'Popeye' Doyle, laving 
ma na ged to dispose of 
most of the New York 
drug ring, travels to 
Marseilles in pursuit of the 

S g's leader. Directed by 
n Frankenheimer. 
1245 Digance at Work. Richard 
Olganca in concert 
1240 Special Squad are after a 
freelance cocaine dealer 
who enjoys throwing 
lavish parties and playing 
with model trams. 

1.1S Night Thoughts. 


Heart of the Dragon. Pert 
it is like tc 


eight - what it is like to live 

and work on the edge of 

inner Mongolia, (r) 

11.15 Treasure Hunt in Malta, (r) 
1240 Isaura die Stave 
GhL(r) 140 South Sata 


240 


nm£r&r(194« 
starring Laurence CXivier 


starring 
and Jean Simmons. Olivier 
won an Oscar for his 
las 


kespeare's benighted 
ice. Directe 


Prince. Directed by 
Laurence Okwer. 

4.50 Risky Business. An 
animated film about a 
woman shop-steward. 

545 Brooksftfe. (rKOrade) 

640 Right to Reply. Kemth 
Trodd. producer of The 
Singing Detective, defends 
the serial against 
accusations that it 
contains gratuitous explicit 
sex scenes. 

640 The Great Austraflan Boat 
Race. The elimination 
races of the America's Cup. 

740 News summary and 
weather followed by 7 
Days which indudes 
reaction to President 
Gorbachov's statement 
that there Is too much 
religion in Russia. 

740 The Anglo-Indians. Part 
one of a two-programme 
documentary about the 
Anglo-Indians, a 
community created by the 
British but left behind 
when they relinquished 
their Empire In India. 

840 Rerfcrick. Part ten of the 
12-programme series of 
documentaries about a 
year In the Hfe of 
Newcastle University. 
(Oracle) 

940 CO, by Paula Milne. 

Michael BjpMck stars as 
Norman, an Insurance loss 
adjuster, who escapes 
from his tiresome Job by 
using Ns leisure time as a 
ratio ham. (r) 

1040 HBI Street Blues. Two 


re teased by Furtto In 
exchange for information 
about their leader, rob and 
kill an old man. (Oracle)' 
1140 Who Dares Wins. Off-beat 
senes. 

1145 Six of Hearts. Life as seen 
through the ays of Carol 
Prior, comedienne, 1 ' 
community worker < 
lesbian. 

1245 The Twflght Zona: Five 
Characters in Search of 
an Exit* Five people are 


Rim* A man leading a 
'across New 


m 1547 suddenly 


discovers a 1961 highway. 
Ends at 1.40. 


Mozart’s Clarinet Trio In E 
flat, K 496, and Weber's 
Clarinet Quintet, Op 34 

240 Schubert Plano Sonatas; 
Martino Tirimo days the 
E flat major D 568 and bthe F 
minor. D625 

340 Langham Chamber 
Orchestra (under 
Shipway). Holst (Book Green 
Suita), Stravinsky 
(Apollon musageta) 

345 Dietrich FtachertMcau 
at Salzburg: alFBrahms 
programme. With Gerald 
Moore as accompanist 
Including Four Serious 
Songs Der, 

Uebchen; 

106: Auf dam See _ 

No 2; and Wle bist du. meine 
KonJgfn 

640 Jazz Record Requ es ts: 
with Peter Clayton 

545 Critics’ Forum: topics 
include Taverniers ffim 
Round Midnight, and the 
Ratio 3 drama 


Tortelier), with NataSa 
Gutman (ceJlo)-Part 1 . 
Dukas (Sorcerer's 
Apprentice), DutiUeux 
(Symphony No 2) 


8.15 U of the DeatfcTalk about 
Henry Vi 1 by Sydney 
Antio, Professor in me 
History of Ideas at the 
University College of 
1 Swansea 


645 


Concert (part two): 
Dvorak (Cello Com 


Goriceorto) 


uoing rour venous Zimbabwe /Rr 

igsDertoigzum by Isabel Dea 

3Cherc Standchan. Op Hatiey.Ronal 

; Auf dam See, Op 59 Alton Kumailo 


945 A Dream of Ophir 
writings about 
Zlinbabwe/Rhodesia. Read 
Isabel Dean. Michael 
.Ronald Hardman, 
Alton Kumalo, Louis 
Mahoney 


production of Six Figu 
the Base of a Crudffx* 


fxlon 


1 at 


945 Night, Debate and 
Remembrance: Jane 
Manning (soprano), David 
Mason (piano). 

Emmerson (Time Past IV, for 
voice and tape), Rowtand 
jNashe songs), Harvey 


645 Uszc BBC Singers wtth 


Sioned Wi Sterns (harp), 
Pamela Priestiey Smith 
(soprano) and other 


1 Jacob 


(soprano) and 1 
soloists- Awe Maria; Der 
Getaeuzigte: O sacrum 
convhrium. Pater Nostar, etc 

7.10 The Darker Door Victor 
Hugo letters. With Pater 
Wbodteorpe, Pauaie Leas, 
Kate Lee 

740 Royal Liverpool PO 
(under Yan Pascal 


1140 -A fid and 

London Baroque 
works 

Stainer, the Austrian 
instruments maker. Inducing 
music by Biber, Dario 
Castefto, Wdiam Young, and 
Georg Muffat 

1145 Bertte Phltearmonic 
(under Karajan). 


Leoncavafio(Pagflaccf 
1), Puccini 


intermezzo), 

(Manon Lescaut Intermezzo) 


1147 News. 1240 Closedown 


Bolting. 

1227 Quote... Unquote. The 
return of the quotations 
game.Wlth Tim Rice, Frank 
Keating. DflHe Kewte, 

Lord Oaksey and Nigel 
Rees. 1245 Weather. 


545 Weak! 


Satirical 


140 News- 

1.10 Any Questions? Norman 
TebNt MP, Roy 
HattersleyMP, Paddy 
Ashdown MP and 

Katharine Whtehom, 
journalist With John 
Timpson. From AmptHV, 
Bedfordshire.145 
Shipping. 


240 Afternoon 


WhlteSghtbyJo 

snzia. with 


Play. City 
by John 


McKenzie. 

McGlynn. 


John 


340 News; Travel; 
tntemational 
Assignment BBC 
correspondents report 

440 IMte Great Pleasure. 

Peter Barkworte 
presents a selection of hie 
favourite prose and 
poetry. WKh Alec McCowen 
and Penatope WHton. 


:Brxftm.S 

sketches. 5i0 Shfppaig. 
545 Weather Travd. 

640 News; Sports round-up. 

645 Stop the Week with 
Robert Robinson (s). 

740 Saturday Night Theatre. 
Buried Akveoy Jeremy 
Thomas (s). 

8J0 Baker's Dozen. Richard 
Baker with records. 

940 Thriller! Deep and Crisp 
and Even by Peter 
Turnbull, In six parts. 
Episode 6. 948 Weather. 

1040 News. 

10,15 Evening Service (s). 

1040 Soundings. Specialist 
reporters discuss 
reVglous and moral 
implications of major 
current issues. 

1140 Science Now. With Peter 
Evans. 


1140 Delve SpedaL An 

investigative report into 
'cowboys' by David Lander. 


*45 Feedback. Christopher 
Dunkley with comments, 
complants. and queries 
■about the BBC. 


12.00 -12.15am News; 

Weather. 12.33 Shipping. 

VHF ^vaiteble in England and 


540 film of tea Book. This 
week: The Third 
ManPresanted by 
Christopher Cook. 


S wales only) as above 
except 5b55-6JH)am 
Weather; Travel. 440- 
640 Options: 440 Global 
Village. 440 Tha State of 
Industry. 540 The Oldest 
Ally. (Portugal). 540 Por 
Aqul. 



Rnpert Baker tend Gary McDonald as two of the firemen in 
London’s Burning (TTV^UJOpm) 


BBC 1 


8.55 Play School. 9.15 Morning 
Worship. The second of 
four masses from the 
’ tofBtackfriars. 


1040 Ati«i Itogaztee. 1040 

ideas UriSnited. 


schemes, (r) 
Italral 


1035 BnongiotTko I 
Lesson ek^it (r) 140 Lyn 
ManhaTe Everyday 

Yoga.fr) 

1140 Parent Programme. 

Educational choices for 
deaf children. <r) 11.45 
TelcJo u r na L The news 
from Madrid television (r) 
12.10 See Hear. Magazine 
programme for the 
hearing impaired. 

1245 Farming includes an item 
on the European Court of 
Justice's ruing on the MBk 
Board s pricing system; 
and a film report on the 
turkey market. 1248 
Weather. 

1.00 This Week Next Week 

investigates the MI5 
'spycetcher' row and asks 
if the security services are 
properly accountable ZOO 
EattEndera.fr) (Ceetax) 

340 Match of the Oay Live. 
Manchester United v 
Tottenham Hotspur. 

445 approximately Rolf Hama 
Cartoon Tima. 

540 Domesday. The third 
programme of Michael 
Wood's series on the 

of England and the 


640 David CopperfMd. 
Episode eight and Mr 
Spenlow discovers 
David 's love letters to his 
daughter, Dora. (Ceefax) 

640 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

640 Songs of Praise from 
Crichton Memorial 
Church, Dumfries. 

(Ceefax) 

7.15 Fihit: Porridge (1979) 
starring Ronnie Barker, 
Richard Beckinsate and 
Fulton Mackay. Comedy 
based on tha successful 
television sales. Norman, 
inside once more, 
becomes unwittingly 
Involved in a plan to 
escape from Slade Prison 
using a celebrities versus 
prisoners football match 
as cover. Directed by Dick 
Clement (Ceefax) 

8.45 News with Jan Learning. 
Weather. 

940 The Singing Detective. 
Part four of Dennis 
Potter's six-episode fitin 
with music starring 
Michael Gambon. (Ceefax) 

10.10 Everyman: House of 
Cards. Martin Young 
reports on the morality of 
easy credit 

1040 The Rockford FHes. Jim 
becomes the intended 
victim of a murderer 
through mistaken identify. 

We 


11.40 Weather. 


News on tee half hour until 


1 140am. then at 240pm. 340. 

tndlZOQ 


440, 740. 940 and' 
midnight 

640am Mark Page 840 Peter 
Powefl 1040 kfika Read 1240 
Jimmy SavBe's 'Old Record' 
Club (Hit records from 1962. 76 


and 70) 240 Vintage American 
Bandstand (Procul Harum) 340 


Radiol More Time (Adrian 
John) 440 Chartbusters (Bruno 
Brookes) 54X1 Top 40 (Bruno 


Brookes) 740 John Peel 940 


Robbie Vincent 1140-1240 
The Rankin' Miss P (Culture Rock). 
VHF Stereo Ratios 1 62: 

440am As Ratio Z 540pm As 
Ratio 1.12-00-440am As 
Ratio 2. 



News on the hour (except 
e.OOpmLHeadGnes 740am. 

Sports Desk 1242pm, 642, 

104Z 

440am David YamaB 640 
Steve Trueiove 740 Roger Royta 
945 Melodies for You (BBC 
Concert Orchestra and Richard 

Baker) 1140 Teddy Johnson 
240am Benny Green 340 Alan DeB 
440 Jack Rotesteln (violin and 


Sings 540 Charlie Chester 740 
The Grumbleweed 740 Operetta 
Nights presented by Nigel 
Douqfas 840 Sunday Halt-Hour 


Doug fas 840 i 
from Rhtwbina Baptist Church, 

Cardiff *940 Your Hundred Best 

Tunes (Alan Keith) 10.05 Songs 

from the Shows 1045 Richard 

Markham and David Nettle at 

the piano 1140 Sounds of Jazz 

(Peter Clayton) 140am BB 
RtetneOs 340-440 A Little Night 
Music. 


WORLD SERVICE 


SCO Newtek (una 640^ 740 News. 


748 Twtrtty- n xr Hours. 740 From Our 
Own Gonespondent 740 WawauBe. 
840 NewsTSs Reflections. 615 The 
Pleasure's Youri. 100 News. 609 Review 
of British Rntss. 9.15 Sosnee in Action. 
949 Writers at Home. 1040 News. 1041 
Story. 1615 OasateN Record Review. 
1638 Sunday Service. 1140 News. 1148 
News About BrrtaA. 11.15 From our own 
Correspondent (until 1140). 1240 New. 
l24f7Pl8y of the Week : Lev. 140 News. 


149 Twwity-Fou’ Hours. 140_Spoia 
Rounoup. 145 & 


_ Sendi Jones Request 

Show QnckJdmg a 240 News) 240 


Runyon's Guys and Dolls. 340 Ratio 
415k 


NewsreeL 6l5 Inte rna tio na l RedtaL 440 
News. 449 Commerasry. 4.15 Leakage 
of Terrorism. U5 Letter From America. 
540 News. 549 Reflections (untt 515L 
Hows. 630 


600 News. 849 T* 


SimtajrHstf ^Hov!60?Nmw, a 941 Story. 


Pieesure's Yours. 1600 Nam. 
1609 voyages ot Capon Cook. 1045 
Book Ctecs. 1630 Rnancal Review. 


1240 News. 1249 News 
About Bntaki. 12.15 Ratio NewsreeL 
1240 noi aous Service, 140 News. 141 
Worts and Music ol John Lennon. 145 
Music of Weber. 240 News. 249 Review 
of British Press. 2.15 Peebles’ Choice: 
240 Science in Action. 340 News. 349 
News Mom Brawn. 315 Good Boote. 
340 Anything Goee. 440 Newsdesk. 440 
Scoop (LwitJI 4.45). 645 Renting id the 
WeekAO tines b OUT 


BBC 2 


9JM Ceefax 9^45 Open 
University. 

10.35 Blue Peter, (r) 

1125 The ChOdren of Green 
Knowe. Episode two. (r) 
11J0 WindnUfl. Chris Serte 
circles tha globe va dips 
from vintage television 


1Z50 


procrammes. 

No untt6 Rock music 


1>M) Rugby SpedaL London v 
Tha Midlands; and North v 
South and South-west. 

2.20 The Week in the Lords. 

340 FBm: Seven Faces of Dr 
Lao (1 964) starring Tony 
Randan. Fantasy comedy 

about an oriental 
gentleman who brings a 
ule-enhancmg dreus to a 
western United States 
desert town. Directed by 
George Pal. 

445 Music In Camera. 

Mozart's Violin Concerto 
tn d (K218) played by 
Mayumi Fujikawa and the 
Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra conducted by 
Janosrurst 

5.10 Thinking Aloud. What Use 
is Poetry? is discussed by 
GAian Beer. Fred 
D'Aguiar, and Peter 
Porter. Michael Ignatieff is 
the chairman. 

5 JO Sid Sunday. The first 
programme of the season 
features the Men’s 
Downhill from Val d'lsere. 

630 The Money P r o g r am me 
examines the competition 
between British Telecom 
and Mercury 
Communications to 
provide new telephone 
services for the home; 
plus, financial Christmas 
gifts for children ideas. 

7.15 Did You See-? The Visit 
The Natural World, and A 
Change of Mind, are 
discussed by Uri Getter, 
Lee Durred, and PhilRp 
Hobson. 

840 The Natural World. 
Award-winning 
cameraman Hugh Miles's 
portrait of Ichkeul, a lake 
m the Tunisian desert 

8-50 The Laurence OBvier 
Awards 1986, introduced 
by Angela Ripoon and 
Denis Quilley from the 
stage of the Royalty 
Theatre, London. Stars 
presenting the awards 
include Alan Bates, Cyd 
Charisse, Frankie Howard, 
John Mortimer, and 

Twi sgy- 

10.10 Film: Heroes (1977) 
starring Henry Winkler, 
Sally Field and Harrison 
Ford. The story of a 
Vietnam war veteran who 
escapes from a 
psychiatric hospital and 
Joins up with a woman 
escaping from an unhappy 


marriage. Directed by 
Jerem^Pau! Kagan. Em 


ds 


655 Weather. 740 News 


745 Tudor Church Music: 
Taverner (Sanctus and 
Agnus Dm, Missa Gloria tBx 
Trtntas). Tallis (Onata 
lux). WeeOces (Hosanna to 
the son of Davd; O Lord 
Arise), Motley (Out of the 
deep), Byrd (intafix ego) 
and other works by Byrd 
840 Vienna Octet Berwakf 
t In B flat), Dvorak 
I Sextette A. Op 48). 


945 Your Concert Choice: 
Strauss (Don Juan 
symphonic poem: 
Amsgerdam 

Concertgebouw), Mozart 
(Wehhemlrt ists 


Wahrheit Oder Tnw, La 
rtorTrs 


demenza di Tito: TraxeL 
tenor), Chopin (Rondo in C 
minor. Op 1: 

Asbke nazy . piano) , Bach 
(Cantata No 46: Stuttgart 
1 Code 

Gachinger Kantbrei arid 
soloists) 

No 104: 

Ancient Music) 


wieuHNiif vwi iye > 

teinger Kantorei and 


1040 Music Weekly; with 

Michael Oliver. Includes 
a conversation with the 
Endeflkm String Quartet; 
and PtdSp Jones on a Delius 


"premiere". Also. Peter 
Paul Nash 1 


Nash considers some 
recent trends in music by 
Danish composers. 

11.15 Stuttgart Piano Trio: 
Beethoven (Trio InC 
minor. Op 1 No 3). 


SUNDAY 


( CHOICE ) 


• London’s Burning (1TV, 
9.00pm) is scripted by Jack 
Rosenthal. This fact alone is 
enough to make us sit up and 
take notice; any new Rosen- 
thal work is an event. The 
good news about this film 
about a group of London fire* 
fighters who suddenly have to 
cope with a phenomenon — a 
woman in their ranks — is that 
Rosenthal is on top of his 
form. Fiction it might be. but 
as with all Rosenthal's best 
work, the roots are bolted into 
realistic facL When it is not 
busy being raunchy and very, 
very funny, it is wise and sad 


and violeni.And it left me so 
greedy for more of the same 
ihing that I cannot imagine a 
follow-up has not been 

contemplated. 

• Best ofthe rest on TV and 
radio today; The Laurence 
Olivier Awards (BBC2, 
8.50pm) which, unlike 
America's Tony Awards night, 
usually succeeds in keeping 
show business razzle-dazzle 
down to the sensible mini- 
mum: a wide-ranging Channel 
4 Inquiry into Britain’s police 
(8.15pm): and a performance, 
in German, of Carl Maria von 
Weber’s opera Euryanthe (Ra- 
dio 3, 155pm). 

P.D. 


ITV/LONDON 


6.SS TV-am begins with Sunday 
Comment; 740 Are You 
Awake Yet?; 7.25 Wac 
Extra. 

840 David Frost on Sunday 
includes guests Norman 
Tebbit and Terry Jones. 

945 Wake Up London. The 
Vicious Boys explore the 
world of ballet 9.30 
FraggleRock 10.00 Krazy 
Kitchen. Culinary advice 
for children. 

10.20 Against the Odds. The 
story of Henry Foni 1040 
The Adventures of Black 
Beauty. An escaped 

holds Kevin and 


1140 Morning Worship from St 
Germain's Church, 
Birmingham. 

1Z00 Weekend World. Are 

Kenneth Baker's plans for 
our schools going to cure 
the basic problems of the 
education system? 
Matthew Parris interviews 
Kenneth Baker 1.05 Pofice 
Five with Shaw Taylor 
1.15 The Smurfs, (r) 

140 Link. Asian mothers from 
the West Midlands 
express their concern over 
their area having the 
highest rate of infant 
mortality in the country. 


ZOO LWT News followed by 

r. Kieran 


The Human Factor. 
PrendiviUe talks to Yoko 
One and her son Sean 
about their friendship with 
Salvation Army captain 
Dated Betting who used to 
run the Strawberry Fields 
Children's Home. 

Z30 Snooker. The Hofmeister 
World Doubles. 

440 The Return of the 

Antelope. Adventures of 
three Lilliputians. 

5.00 Buflseye. 

540 Sunday Sunday. Gloria 
Hunniford's guests indude 
John Cleese, Tony Adams. 
Leslie Thomas and 
Anthony Hopkins. 

640 News with John SucheL 

6.40 Highway. Sir Hany visits 
Canterbury. 

7.15 Chad’s Play with Tim 
Brooke-Taytor and Anna 
Carteret. 

745 The Second Worst of 
Alright on the Night 
presented by Denis 
Norden. (r) 845 News. 


940 London's Burning, by 
Jack Rosenthal. At 


black 

comedy set in an inner 
London fire station where 
a previously aH-male 
preserve is about to be 
broken by a female 
replacement. (Oracle) 
1140 Room at the Bottom. 
Comedy series starring 
Jamas Boiam. (Grade) 
1140 LWT News headlines 


followed by Symphony. 

fthe Northern 


The work of 1 
Sinfonia. 

1240 Snooker. The Hofmeister 
World Doubles. 

1240 Night Thoughts. 


CHANNEL 4 


945 Sunday East Magazine 
programme lor Asian 


communities, followed by 
rial 


Deewarain. Drama ser 


sat m a Pakistan village. 

rek. A 


1040 The World This Wee! 
European special 

examining the issues 
skirted by the European 
summit meeting which 
ended in London 


11.00 worzel Gummidge. 

Adventures of an al most- 


human scarecrow, 


1140 The Waltons ‘ 
The Tube. A repeat of 
Fnday's edition. 


ZOO Pob's Programme for 
an. Trie 


children. The guest is 
Bnan Patten. 

240 Film: Noorie (1979) A love 
story set in a rural Indian 
Muslim community about 
Noorie and Yusuf whose 
betroth ment is threatened 
by an evil landowner who 
has other plans lor Noorie. 
Starring Phoonam D hi! Ion 
and Farooque Shaikh. 
Directed by Manmohan 
Krishna, (in Hindi with 
English subtitles) 

4.40 World Alive: Spain. The 
great bustard and the 
peregnne falcon of 
Spain's meseta. (r) 

5.05 News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Business Programme. 

The latest moves against 
insider dealings in me City. 
640 American Football. 
Cindnatti Bengals at 
Denver Broncos. 

7.15 The World at War. Part 
two ot the 26 documentary 
series tracing the stray of 
the Second World War. 
Among those interviewed 


in this programme is Lord 
iy.fr) 


Boothby. fr) (Oracle) 

8,15 Channel 4 Inquiry. The 
Pofice. Who controls the 
police? With contributions 
from, among others. Lord 
Scarman. Douglas Hurd, 
Sir Kenneth Newman. 

John Akierson. and 
GabrieUe Cox, former 
chair of Manchester Pofics 


Authority. 
945 Keep Off t 


the Gross. A 

short about a park-keeper 
and the trouble he has 
from a bag lady with three 
dogs. Starring Dave King 
and Patricia Routledge. 

1040 film: Nothing Sacred 
(1937) starringCaroie 
Lombard and Fred ric 
March. Comedy about a 
young woman who is 
wrongly told she has only 
six months to live, and the 
tabloid newsman who is 
put on the story. Directed 
by William Wellman. 

1140 film: The London Nobody 


Knows (1967) An 
stionof 


exploration of overlooked 
London in the company of 
James Mason. Directed by 
Norman Cohen. Ends at 
1245. 


Shostakovich (Trio No 2) 

12.15 From the Festivals: 

London Handel Festival 
1986. Concerto Grosso in D 
minor. Op 3 No 5; the 
cantata Donna che in del, 
Sonata a 5; the dramatic 
oratorio Tha Choice of 
Hercules. London 
Handel Choir and Orchestra 
(under Dartow). with 
soloists 

245 Martmu and Schumann: 
Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra members. With 
Emanuel Ax (piano). 

Mairtinu (Nonet), Schumann 
(Piano Quintet in E fiat 
bp 44) 

245 Carl Mans von Weber 
the three-act opera 
Euryanthe. Sung in German. 
Bamberg SO (under 
SawaUisch), with Bavarian 
Radkxi Chorus. With 
Cheryl Studer In the title role. 
Cast also includes 
Schenk, Ramirez, Adam and 

Bjoner 

540 New Premises: arts 
magazine, presented by 
Nigel Andrews 


London: Allegri String 
Quartst/Valerie Tryon 
(piano)/Mark Dubois 

E r), James Campbell 
isl). Part one. 
jfiev (Overture on 
Hebrew themes), Britten 


boy), Vaugti 
(song cycle 


OnWenlock 


745 The Painter's Banquet 
poetry, read by Edward 
de Souza, Parncia Leventon, 
Natasha Pyne 


845 Festival (part two): Oscar 
Morawetz (the song 
cycle The Weaver, tor tenor, 
cfarinetrfji 


piano), and 
Mozart's ClanriBt Quintet in 


A.K581 


940 The Reith Lecture: (5). 

Given by Lord 

McCluskey, former Solicitor- 
General lor Scotland. 
Tonight An Enormous 
Power. Fust heard on 
R actio 4 last Wednesday 


6.15 Liszt and the Piano: 
Margaret Fingerhut plays 
works inducting Hungariar 
Rhapsody No 14, 
Romance in E minor, and 
Piano piece in F sharp 
major 


1040 Currents from a Northern 
Land: Danish music. 
Recordings of works by 
Hans Abrahamsen 
(Stratifications), Per 


NorgaaTO (In Between), 
lb Norhdm ( - 


1 (Symphony No 
5). The orchestra is the 
Danish Radio SO. 


640 On the Journey: Denis 
Ul reads the story by 
Eugene Dubnov 
7.00 Festival of the Sound of 


1145 Frank! _ 

Manz (piano) plays 1 
Piano Sonata 
1147 News. 1 ZOO Closedown. 





IF (long wave), (s) Stereo on VHF. 
545 Shipping. 6.00 News Briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Prehide. A 
selection of music (s). 640 
News; Morning has 
Broken, (hymns). 645 
Weather; Travel. 

740 News. 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
“ “ ' “45Bete. 

New 


Parkinson's guest (s). 1245 
Weather. 


Travel. 


840 News. 8.10 Sunday 
Sunda' 


Papers. 8.15 Sunday 
and v 


to bus news and views). 
840 The Week's Good 
Cause. Anthony Andrews 
appeals lor the 
Association of Carers. fLi$ 
Weather. Travel. 


940 News. 9.10 Sunday 
Papers. 

9.15 Letter from America, by 
Alastelr Cooke. 


940 Morning Service (from 

Kina's h 


King's Park Parish 
Church. Glasgow). 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition. 

11.15 Pick oT the Week. 
Margaret Howard’s 


programmes. _ 

12.15 Desert Island Lnscs. 

Jackie Contes is Michael 


1.00 The World Th e 

Weekend: News. 145 
Stripping. 

240 Gardeners' Question 
Time visits Norfolk and 
Norwich horticultural society. 

240 The Afternoon Play. 
Naveriand by Frances 
Gray(s). 

340 Talking About Antiques. 
Bernard Price, Barbara • 
Morris and Hugh Scully. 

440 News: The Food 

Programme with Derek 
Cooper. 

440 The Natural History 
Programme, Fergus 
Keeling investigates the 
aquarium trade. 

540 -545 News; Travel. 

545 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnstone visits Bolton. 

540 Stripping. 545 Weather. 

840 News. 

6.15 Actuality. Documentary 
about* Samaritans' 
branch as it initiates a new 

O t of volunteers. 

b rims by William 
Makepeace Thackeray 
(Part?) 

840 Bookshelf. Susan HBI 
presents Radio 4's 
books programme. 

840 A Worid in edgeways. 


June Glover. Jonathan 
Raban and Michael Schmidt 
In conversation with 
Brian Redhead. 

940 News; A Matter of 

Honour by Jeffrey Archer 
(5) (8). 

940 Th8 Cross They Bear. A 
protile of the St John 
Ambulance Brigade. 945 
Weather; Travel. 


1040 News. 

10.15 The Sunday Feature: Is 
the Maze Prison near 
1 'Ulster's 


University of Terrorism?' 
HiRif 


Alison HiRiard investigates. 

11.00 Before the Ending ofthe 
Day. 

11.15 In Committee. The work 
of Parliament's select 
committees. 

1240 News; weather. 1Z33 
Shipping. 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 54S-640ani 
Weather: Travel. 7.10- 
740 Open University: 7.10 
introduction to Science. 

7.30 Into the Open. 440-6.00 
Options: 440 Museum 
Choice. 440 Oaks and 
Acorns 540 
Employment Counselling. 
540 Buc 


540 Buongtomo Italia! 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285m;l089kHz/275m; Radio 2 : 693kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m:VHF-90- 
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36 


SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 1986 


THE TIMES 




SPORT 



Ferguson’s stars 
will be aiming 
to end famine 


Alex Ferguson, the new 
manager of the tottering Man- 
chester giants, says that he 
eagerly awaits his “first real 
taste of English football” in 
tomorrow's televised 
match with Tottenham 
Hotspur at Old Trafford. a 
potential classic. But should 
United Jail to delight be could 
also be receiving his first real 
taste of English abuse. 

United have scored just one 
goal in the six hours offootbafl 
played since Ferguson took 
over a month ago and this 
week the club were criticised 
at a shareholders’ meeting for 
paying out huge rewards for 
lack of success. The annual 
wage bill amounts to a stagger- 
ing £2. 5m. But David Pleat, 
the Tottenham manager, be- 
lieves that the criticism will 
motivate United as they at- 
tempt to win for the first time 
in their last five televised 
games. 

But most importantly they 
need to win over the support- 
ers after just one victory in 
Ferguson’s four games, and 
that not a particularly 
enterprising one by a single 
goal margin against Queen’s 
Park Rangers a fortnight ago. 


by CKve White 

Ferguson said yesterday: “I 
can’t isolate the strikers for 
criticism because the service 
to them has not been good. 
J’ve got to get an impetus from 
the midfield men. They did it 
for the reserves in midweek, 
now they must do it against 
Spurs.” 

There should be no excuses 
for the forwards tomorrow as 
three of the first-choice mid- 
field, Robson, Strachan and 
Whiteside play together for 
the first time under Ferguson 
rule. He sd: “There is a special 
atmosphere already for this 
game and playing a team like 
Spurs will give me a better 
idea of what my team are 
made of It’s important 
United players can handle it 
and it’s better we find out now 
rather than later,” adding with 
suitable boldness, “We are 
looking for a consistency of 
which championship winners 
are made and a run of 


incidence that was the last 
appearance of Galvin, their 
irreplaceable left-sided mid- 
field player, and he is almost 
certain to return after hob- 
bling off the Anfield pitch that 
day to have a 
operation. 


“We haven’t been able to 
find the shape which ideally I 
would like, because we 
haven't really got another 
player like him. He makes it 
possible to play two wide men. 
The way we have been playing 
since his injury bears no 
relationship to bow we started 
the season.” Galvin appeared 
for the full 90 minutes in Pat 
Jennings's testimonial in 


victories is important. 
So say all of us. Pies 


us, Pleat might 
respond. His own Tottenham 
side have also yet to establish 
any consistency but at least 
they have scaled the heights - 
witness their victory at Over- 
pool on October 11. By co- 


Miller for Hibs 


Also bade after injury is 
Gough, their outstanding 
Scottish defender about whom 
Feiguson know plenty, and 
possibly Claesen, the Belgian. 
Claesen has been finding it as 
hard scoring goals as his 
United counterparts but with 
a rather better excuse. Pleat 
maintains. “He's been living 
in hotels since he arrived and 
his wife has been backwards 
and forwards from Belgium. 
His link play has been good 
but he hasn’t got into a 
scorong vein.” 


By Hugh Taylor 

Alex Miller, of St Mirren, ago and could be the man to 

put a core of steel into a side 


yesterday accepted an invita- 
tion to become manager of the 
troubled Hibernian. This- 
appointment ended weeks of 
speculation following the 
resignation of John Blackley 
and although it may not be 
finalized until compensation 
to St Mirren is decided. Miller 
is expected to take charge of 
the Hibernian team in the 
match at Easter Road today 
against his former club. 
Rangers. 

A hard driving mid-field 
player with Rangers, Miller, 
aged 37, has proved a shrewd 
tactician since becoming man- 
ager of St Mirren three years 


which has become a shadow of 
predecessors once hailed as 
the country's most fashion- 
able side. 

Although Hibernian made a 
Spectacular start to the season, 
meeting lingers in the open- 
ing premier division natch, 
they lost confidence and 
found themselves deep in 
relegation trouble. 

It appears their manager's 
main priority will be to 
strengthen an uninspired de- 
fence which has conceded 42 
goals in the first half of the 
season. But the challenge ap- 
peals to the spirited Miller. 


Pleat must also decide 
whether to continue with ei- 1 
ther Mabbvtt or Roberts in 
midfield with the alternative 
choice alongside Gough in 
central defence. Pleat is con- 
cerned, though, about Rob- 
son, whom he saw score for 
the reserves in midweek. “It 
was typical of him. He has a 
knack of creeping into the box. 
You know he is going to do it 
but toe still gets in there and 
scores.” 



McEvoy 
dealt 
a body 
blow 


' ' - 
\* •• 


Chamjwan-Iookiiig crouch: Martin Bdl at full speed In the Val d*Zsere downhill, coming within a second of victory 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Mabbutt, who filled 
Robson's shirt so impressively 
in the England notch against 
Yugoslavia recently, will 
probably be given the job of | 
sticking dose enough to the 
England captain to get inside 
his shirt again. 


Wigan hit 
by Hanley 
demand 


GOLF 


By Keith Macklin 
Ellery Hanley, the 


Clark In driving seat again 


SUN CITY, South Africa 
(Reuter) — Howard Clark 
won a £9,000 car yesterday, 
his third this year, but was 
joined him.in the lead of the 
Si million (about £650,000) 
challenge by Bernhard Langer. 

Clark’s prize in his second 
successive round of 69 came 
when he eagled the 545-yard 
ninth hole after reaching the 


r en in two and making a 40- 

DUl 


putt He won cars at the 
Spanish and Madrid Opens 
earlier this year and said: 
“Funnily enough, I bought my 
wife a car just before the 
beginning of this season.” 

Langer, the West German 
defending champion's late 
urge of f 


charge of four birdies on the 
back nine in searing heat for 
68 caught Clark on 138, six 


under par, in the race for the 
$300,000 winner's cheque. 
They have a three stroke lead 
on Lanny Wad kins, the 
American who celebrated his 
37th birthday yesterday, but 
dropped bade with a 72. 

T C Chen, of Taiwan, 
matched Langer’s 68 to move 
to 143, while Mark McNulty, 
of South Africa, and Ian 
Woosnam, of Britain, also 
prospered with 70s to move 
into contention. 

While Clark was quietly 
confident, Langer said: “I 
actually didn't play all that 
well and had trouble with my 
swing, but then I made a slight 
adjustment on the bade nine 
ana it began to work.” 

• David Graham apolo- 
gized yesterday for storming 


off the course uttering four- 
letter words and threatening to 
poll out on Thursday after 
being penalized two strokes 


when he mistakenly believed 
ip after his 


he had a free drop after his ball 
plugged. The Australian 
carded 74 and now looks out 
the hunt 

Graham was unrepen tent, 
however, -towards the or- 
ganizers for foiling to issue the 
players with a dearly defined 
set of rules. This whole situa- 
tion could have been avoided 
had the South African PGA 
advised the players more 
clearly of the rules, be said. 

SCORES: 13fc H dark (GEL 09, 69; B 
LanqorfWGJ.70.8a 141:LW&dkim(Ua. 
B9, Tsf 14&TZBbhuM Chen (Tal), 75, 6R 
14* M McNulty (SM. 74> 70; 14& I 
Wooenam (GB), 75, 70. 14& O FrosJ (SAL 
71. 75; 147: D Graham (Aus), 73, 74; 14ft 
G Player (SA), 75. 74. 



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Council is 
stalled 
on grants 


By JohnGoodbody 
The Sports Council is strug- 

gling to convince the Govern- 
ment that there should be an 
increase in next year's grant of I 

£36,984 million. 

Officials of the Sports 
Council, smarting that their 
grant has been frozen this 

week saw Mr Nicholas Ridley, 

the Secretary of State for the 

Environment, and Mr Dick 
Tracey, the Sport’s Minister, 

in an attempt to persuade 

them that an extra £4 million 
is needed. 

The Government is not 
convinced that it should in- 
crease its grant, which is below 
the expected inflation figure 
next year of three per cent. A 
Department of the Environ- 
ment spokesman said yes- 
terday: “The Sports Council 
has been asked to come up 
with more information to 
support its case.” 

Some of the projects that 
might suffer if the Govern- 
ment refuses extra funding 
are: an athletics track at 
Brockwell Park (next to 
Brixton); the conversions of a 

supermarket and transport de- 

ft into recreation centres in 
mthwark and WalsalL 
When the Sports Council 
was told a fortnight ago that It 
must hold its spending to 
£36.984 million. John Smith, 
the chairman, described the 

derision as “a sad day for 

British sport." 

The Sports Council drew 
aise in this year's House of 
ammons Environment Sel- 
ect Committee report It 
seems plain that the Council's 
grant for 1986-7 will leave 
very little margin. We wel- 
come the Council's efforts to 
secure income from sponsor- 

ship and recommend success 
in this direction should not be 
reason for reduction in 
Government grant, it stated. 


most 

expensive playin' in British 
rugby league, yesterday 
rocked the Wigan ctub and the 
whole Rugby League world by 
demanding a transfer. Wigan 
promptly dropped him from 
the team to play Swrntoa In the 
John Player Special Trophy 
second round tie at Central 
Plark tomorrow. 

Hanky, who has explosive 
skilb on the field and has had 
a controv e rsial Kfe-styfe in the 
past, u the League’s leading 
try scorer with 21 to his credit 
so far this season, and he 
wonld have figured in all three 
of the recent internationals 
against Australia bnt for an 
injury sustained hi the first 
game at OM TraffonL 
The decision of Hanley to 
demand a move is almost 
certainly faked with Wigan’s 
signing of the Australian cap- 
tain, Wally Lewis, on a match 
to match bams for which the 
Australian is alleged to be 
getting £2,000 a game. 

Both players occupy the 
stand-off half position, though 
Hanley can play centre and 
Lewis has derims on the loose 
forward spot. However, Han- 
ky has been used to the 
idolatry of the crowds and 
could well fed that Central 
Park is not big enough to 
house the personality aud 
talents of both himself and 
Lewis at die same time. 

When Hanley joined Wigan 
from Bradford Northern on a 
three-year contract in Septem- 
ber 1S8S, the total stun in- 
volved in the move amounted 
to £150,000, a world record 


Bell joins the downhill elite 
with World Cup surprise 


McEvoy could have been 
excused far drowning his sor- 
rows. He did not The hang- 
over was not akoholicaliy 
induced bat activated by the 
astonishing news delivered to 
him only horns earlier that he 
bad bees omitted from the 
Great Britain aud Ireland 
team to {day the United States 
in the . Walker Cnp at 
Sramingdak on May 27-28. 

McEvoy was visibly hurt. 
He attempted to conceal his 
feelings but his emotions be- 
trayed him. “Tim two-hour 
drive from my office in 
Cheltenham to London was 
terrible,” he sahL It was a time 
when McEvoy would have 
preferred to hare slipped qui- 
etly home rather than to be a 
gpest at a dinner where there 
were a host of friends. 

But he came to town. For 
McEvoy is not only the best 
British amateur golfer since 
Michael BosaDack, be is also 
tin most respected. If there 
a household name in 
golf today, then it 
he McEvoy. He is 33, 
stocky, articslxte, progressive, 
amiable bnt, above all, a very 
fine golfer. 

The charges levelled at 
McEvoy, charges supposed to 
ex plain his omissfoa, are 
preposterous. The selectors 
have derided, or so it would 
seem, that McEvoy’s record in 
the Walker Cup is such that it 
suggests he is incapable of 
producing bis best for Great 
Britain and Ireland. 


Played top against 
best Americans 


Martin Bell brought the 
prospect of the first British 
victory in the history ofWorid 
Cup skiing tantalisingly closer 
yesterday by hurtling down 
the OK course here at 99.13 
kilometres per hour yesterday 
to seize sixth place in the 
second downhill race of the 
season. 

Bell’s performance on the 
3,354 metre course staked a 
place for him among the 
Continental elite of downhill 
racers. His time of 2min 
01.80sec was less than a 
second behind the winner. 
Pirmin Zurbriggen, of 
Switzerland. A measure of his 
achievement is that Peter 
Wimsberger, Austria's reign- 
ing World Cup downhill 
champion, was a half second 
slower and Mare Girardelli, 
last year’s overall winner, a 
second in arrears. 

It was all the more impres- 
sive coining at the start of the 
season in Europe and after 
only. a week of do wnhill 
training due to lack of snow on 
the alpine glad ere. Bell’s pre- 
vious best performances of 
fifth at Are in Sweden and 
sixth at Moraine in France last 
year came after months of 
competitive skiing. 

He began yesterday's race 
encouraged by a series of fist 
training runs down the course 
era slower skis, and his predic- 
tion that his raring skis would 
shave more than two seconds 
off his trial times proved 
correct 


From Gavin Bell, Val dTsere 

was no nay I would be in the 
top ten.” 

The course had suited him 
perfectly: “My weakness is 
extra tight rams, but there 
were none here this year. I 
enjoyed the vast sweeping 
bends on changing terrain and 
the snow held up weft.” 


Val dlsere results 


Downhab 1, P Zurbriggen (Switz) 
2iTBnQCL98sOC:2,MW8StTieter(WG) 
201.15; a M Mar (It) 201.34; 4, S 
Niedersesr (Austria) £01.65; 5, P 


Mflfler jSvgz) 7 2flt.74; 6, M Bed 


, £01 Aft' 7, F Henzer (Switz) 
Jf-92; 8, E Reach (Austria) 

2KJ1.S7; 9, S WT ’ 

2*11.80; 10, J-F Ray 
A Skaardal (Nor) 2:C 
Alpier (Switz) 232.00; 13. L Stock 
" rial 2uL19: 14, C Cathomen 
I230EL29: 


pression that regularly causes 
problems for the most experi- 
enced competitors. 

Last season Befl observed 
that anybody who finished 
within a second of the winner 
was a potential victor himself 
He is now in that position, and 
determined to take advantage 
of it — possibly in a week’s 
time in Val Gardena, Italy. 

“Of all the courses on the 
circuit, Val Gardena is my 
favourite,” he said. “If I'm 
going to edge doser to a win, it 
could be there.” 


r first played 



: 15, DMahrer (Switz) 


Overtf World Cup stamina: 1, 
Zurbriggen 75 pte-2, P Mufler51 ; 3, 
R Promotion ft), 40; 4, Hetnzer 39; 
5, M Wasmeier (WO, 37; =6. L 
Stock (Austria) and Afejer 34; 8. 1 
Stan mark (Swe). 25; =9J G 
(Switz) ana H Strotz (Austria) ; 
Downhffl standings after 
races: 1, Zurbriggen, 60 pts; 2, 
MQOer 51; 3, Heinzer 39; 4, 
Wasmeier 37; =5 Stock and Abyger 
34; 7, M GinardaUi. (Lux) 18; 8, 
Maker 17; =9 P Wimsberger 
jber(WG)16. 



m the International Ski 
Federation standings and 
thereby secure the consid- 
erable advantage of a seeded 
starting position in future 
races. Yesterday he began 27th 
out of more than 80 compet- 
itors. 


(Austria) and S WSdgruber (WG) ' 


“Of course I’m delighted, 
but it wasn’t such a huge 
surprise since Fd been going 
so well in the days before — 
although if you had asked me 
a week ago, I'd have said there 


People who fly down moun- 
tains on slender strips of 
plastic and foam at speeds 
barely permitted on motor- 
ways tend to mistakes, and 
Bell is no exception. Almost 
hallway down the course, he 
lost time on a left-hand bend 
when be applied too much 
pressure on an edge to stick to 
the racing line. 


For the moment. Bell’s 
latest exploit has taken him to 
14th position in the World 
Cup downhill standings (three 
points behind Resch), which is 
three places higher than be 
finished last season. 


“Each season marks a to- 
tally new beginning. I have 
been hoping for just a safe 
start, and to build up grad- 
ually. but obviously this has 
been a big boost for my 
confidence, and 

determination,” he 
commented. 


In fact, McEvoy first 
in the Walker Cap in 1977 
when, like Sandy Lyle, he lost 
each of Ms four matches. Since 
then, he has taken 3Va points 
from a possible ten. He has 
often played top and, there- 
fore, be has been compelled to 
meet the leading American 
golfers like Jay Sqgel. It is not 
an outstanding record hot 
then, as Great Britain and 
Ireland have won the Walker 
Cup on only two occasions 
since the inaugural match in 
1922; there arefew British and 
Irish players who possess 
exemplary records. Even Boa- 
allack, five times the Amateur 
champion, only won eight of 
his 25 matches. Bnt McEvoy 
has played 16 matches for 
Great Britain and Ire land in 
the St Andrews Trophy with 
12 wins to his credit, ami only 
two losses. For England, he 
has lost only three of his 52 
singles matches. 

What mast hurt McEvoy is 
the implication that there is a 
level of the game at which he 
cannot produce his best That, 
sorely, is nonsense as he has 
won two Amateur champion- 
ships, twice been the leading 
amateur in the Open Cham- 
pionship, and remains the only 
British amateur to have played 
four rounds m the US 
Masters. 


» 






.'“ r Z s 


Zd 




By Mitchell Platts 

Peter McEvoy yesterday 
awoke with that monring- 
after-ihe-aight-before feeling, 
though no Marne could be 
attached to the claret con- 
sumed the prevhms evening at 
the Press Golfing Society 




c .. 


■ii. 




Should have been 
first choice 


Buz he recovered quickly 
mid stormed back into conten- 
tion with a flawless . sweep 
through a spine-juggling com- 


Rowdy scenes are antici- 
pated at Dick’s Bar, the local 
haunt of British tourists, 
where Bell proposes to cele- 
brate his 22nd birthday this 
evening. 



SNOOKER 


Doubles pair 
lucky to make 
quarter-finals 

By a Correspondent 


Neal Foulds and John Par- 
rott fought their way through 
an uninspired spell to claim a 
5-2 victory over Dave Martin 
and Murdo Macleod in North- 
ampton yesterday and be- 
come the first partnership to 
reach the quarter-finals of the 
£200.000 Hoftneister world 
doubles championship. 

Foulds and Parrott were 
made to work hard for their 
success and took advantage 
when mistakes by both Martin 
and Macleod gifted them the 
fifth frame at a point when 
they should have lost it. 


The contention of the selec- 
tors is tint they are relying on 
the enthusiasm of youth. 
McEvoy said: “I'm not exactly 
felling apart at the age of 33. 
Bnt I can understand them 
picking a young team, there- 
fore introducing players who 
have never known defeat in the 
match. I would see it as an 
experiment aud it mi ght work, 
lean even ■ nta g™ > myself as a 
selector having a go at it 
myself” 

The decision to exclude 
McEvoy and Garth McGimp- 
sey has removed the land of 
experienced players who 
might have neatly dovetailed 
with the likes of the yoaag- 
sters, Jeremy Robinson and 
John McHenry, to produce a 
winning combination. 

Yet it brings a more serious 
question to amateur golf. 
McEvoy ha« enjoyed an 


Level at 2-2 overall and 
with the fifth frame scores also 
all square at 56-56. Macleod 
then fouled the pink and 
Martin later missed it, sub- 
sequently setting it up for 
Parrott to pol It proved to be 
the turning point. Foulds then 
put down a break of 56 in the 
Sixth frame, Parrott followed 
wth a 45 to make it safe and 
the; No. 7 seeds completed 

their victory. 


“The fifth frame was the 
turning point,” admitted 


Foulds. 


mg outside the top four in six 
leading amateur tournaments, 
and he won 2% points out of 
f«w in the St Andrews Tro- 
phy. He also reached the 
quarter-finals of the Soan- 
mgdale foursomes, on the Old 
Course where the Walker Cap 
wiU be played. If form is a 
gwiielms, men he should have 
been first choice. 

McEvoy has been hit below 
the belt hot, like a true 
gentleman, he is not prepared 

to retaliate. He simply said: 
“It harts me to think of sane 
of tiie things that were said. 
Bnt my career trill continue 
and I would hope to m9 ^ < * the 
Walker Cnp in 1989 and to be, 
m tone, involved as a captain 
Of a selector myself. When I . 
to°k back in 20 years time* I 
hope I will just see these last 
couple of days as a minor 

bifrb*’ 









r - " . 
w . 






P.n 





I