Skip to main content

Full text of "The Times , 1986, UK, English"

See other formats


Crubii!.-.- 


lllferi 




tSU- ft t 






: iA'<a 

■-■ -vSUE 


:-£’Q 


S T 

-’ “’h 
- --|:i 


W" ■* 4 >■■• 
** *i - 

f T T T 

4 * » : '• 


-:an- 

•v-d* 


Secretary of State testifies to US House committee 


Shultz kept in 
the dark on 

Iran arms deal 

From Michael Binyoo, Washingtw 

,_ U 5 005 conversations” with Lieu- then destroyed on his orders 
secretary of Stale, said he bad lenant-Colonel Oliver North acmirtine tn RMmrtarri nractin* 








I 1 ' I _ ■ t *wiimu \AHUUVI vuvu Iimui, 

oeen shocked to discover that the dismissed NSC assistant, 
the US ambassador to Leba- and General RkhanJSeconL a 
non had bera secretly in- former Pentagon officer in- 
volved in the White House volved in fundraising for the 
arms shipments to Iran with- Contras, 
out telling him or the Stale “During that period,” Mr 
Department anything about it Kelly's message stated, “I 
Testifying at the opening of r— — — ^ 
the first public congressional ^ m 

hearing into the affair, Mr Tex*- 

Shultz said he had immedi- a l, 

ately ordered the Ambassador, ^ » -f "Jr is w . 

Mr John Kelly, to return to jliAmJc. 

Washington to give an explan- crtfUl-Z. 

ation and bring all relevant ** ^9 

records of his activities. Kfv' \_/*\ 

“I am, to put it mildly, . SuOi 

shocked to learn this after the / ’• 7 * £9 

event from an ambassador,” J S' ■ 0\ 

Mr Shultz said grimly. His 7* J ( * 

disclosure drew a gasp of w j. 

surprise from the members of / J f\ 

the House foreign affairs f 1 ' \ 

committee. \ f 

Quoting a message from the ( 

ambassador, Mr Shultz said ^ 

Mr Kelly had been briefed in 

Washington in July or August — 

by Mr Robert McFarlane, the ^ 
former National Security received and sent numerous 
Council adviser, on “hostage Tjack channel’ messages to 
negotiations involving arms and from the White House, 
£ an mdueement . Mr Admiral Poindexter, concern- 


O'Cl 


<w»ie 


Kelly had then had “numer- 

Tomorrow 

Saying nyet 

to Mo scow 


PRISONERS 
OF CONSCIENCE 


On international 
human right?day» ■ 
Caroline Moorehead 
reports from the 
Soviet Union on 
the refuseniks 
who put themseh/es 
at risk in order 
to oppose the 
Kremlin leaders 


mg the hostage negotiations. 
Those messages were tran* 
nutted and received in what is 
referred to as the ‘privacy 
channel’ using CIA commu- 
nications facilities.” 

He said these messages were 


Continued on page 2 Q,coM 


Sid makes I MP forces 


a profit 

of 25% 

. After a nerve-wracking 
wee k watching the vacillations 


Militant 

showdown 

By'Kdkanl Evans •" 
Political Correspondent - 

Mr John Ryman, the La- 


of the grey market, milHons of bourMPforBlyth Valley who 
Sids op and down the country is demanding an investigation 
breathed a sigh of relief yes- into his iocal constituency 
lerday as shares in British Gas party, w£U have a showdown 


• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
shared yesterday by 
three readers: Mr B. 
Dehn of Surbiton, 
Surrey; Miss K. Ades 
of London, N.W.1; and 
Mr W. Akers of 
Famham, Surrey. 
Details, page 3. 

• Portfolio fist, page 
25; how to play, 
information service, 
page 20. 


’-T1R1ES BUSINESS 


Industry hit 


Industry’s material and fad State for Eoogy, at 
costs jumped by 2.3 per cent Rooke. chairman 

Kiontfr^iaiiilyberaiiseof Ga^who wreg 

higher electricity tanffe. But Exch^by aba 
prices charged by manufa* and. Sir Nicholas 
SS^rjostOapo^ft chgrmaa. 


opened at prices well above 
what many had expected 

Amid all the talk of a tiny 
premium or even a discount 
to the 50p partly-paid issue 
price, British Gas hit the Stock 
Exchange at 63p and briefly 
touched 70p before dosing the 
day at about 62fAp. 

It was a far cry from the 
British Telecom and TSB 
flotations, in which sharehold- 
ers were able to double their 
money on the first day of 
trading. But, as old City hands 
pointed out, a 25 per cent 
premium was “not to be 
sneezed at” 

The Stock Exchange floor, 
which has been largely de- 
serted since the advent of 
inter-office trading after Big 
Bang, took on a familiar 
crowded look under a massive 
British Gas balloon as all 
trading volume records were 
broken. Traders dealt in 811 
million British Gas shares, 
equivalent to one-fifth of the 
shares sold in the £5.6 billion 
flotation. 

The start of trading at 
2,30pm was watched by Mr 
Peter Walker, Secretary of 
State for Energy, and Sir penis 
Rooke, chairman of British 
Gas, who were greeted at the 
Exchange bv a bagpipe band 


meeting with Labour’s na- 
tional agent today before 
deciding if he will cany out his 
threat to force a by-election. 

He said last night he wfll 
“almost certainly” fame a 
highly damaging pofl if Mr 
David Hughes Mis to promise 
a proper investigation into 




pay 21 1 Business was dominated by 


Glass battle 

Pilkington, the world’s larB^t 
glassmaker, hit tack in the 
contested £ 1.2 billion teke- 
over bid by the industrial 
conglomerate BTR wjj 
per cent nse m half-year 

profits ,o f I 7 2 j, 23 


I times sport 


Telford’s fear 

Telford United- one °f only 

sssrftTCs 

with apprehension W 

New stadium 

On Sunday, Bradford City 

gsar^iss? "t 


large institutional investors, 
but there were signs that 
plenty of small investors were 
selling their shares desphe the 

enticements of bonus, stores 
or gas bill vouchers. 

“Sid seems to be getting rid 
of his shares because of the 
high premium,” said Mr Peter 
Barrett, of the Manchester 
stockbroker, Ashworth Sons & 
Barra tt-“We’ve done a mas- 
sive amount of selling and 
haven’t seen a buyer” 


Mr Campbell yesterday: 

Militant link denied, 
allegations of physical 
intimidation, fraudulent 
membership lists, distribution 
of Militant literature and 
other irregularities which have 
been forwarded by local party 
members. 

Mr Ryman, who decided in 
September not to stand again 
for Parliament, says the Biyth 
party has been taken over by 
the extreme left and claims the 
parliamentary candidate cho- 
sen at the weekend to fight the 
next general election is a 
Militant "stooge.” 

But Mr Ronnie Campbell, 
the new candidate, last night 
rejected accusations tirat he 

was a member of the pro- 
scribed Militant organization. 

Mr Hughes plans to go to 
Biyth on Friday and spend 
two hours in the local Labour 
club speaking to people who 
have made complaints. 

But Mr Ryman said: “I 
specifically want him on be- 
half of the complainants to 
make fan da me ntal chang es in 

Gmtmned on page 20, ad 6 









ViVLV- m; 


.. V ... - 



tenant-colonel Oliver North, according to standard practice 
the dismissed NSC assistant, at the Beirut Embassy. But he 
and General Richard Second, a assumed there were copies at 
former Pentagon officer in- CIA head q u a rters or at the 
volved in fund-raising for the WhiteHouse. 

Contras. Mr Kelly’s message flatly 


Contras. Mr Kelly’s message flatly 

“During that period,” Mr contradicts President Rea- 
Kelly’s message stated, “I gan’s repeated assertions that 

~ the Iran arms shipments woe 

j. m WA a not directly tied to hostage 
* 1 1 , mirt .tcX*- r negotiations. His secret talks 

(\ here in July with Mr 
. .u_dr ‘Jt I s w McFianlane, unknown to Mr 

_ Ji As+Jc Shuhz, also highlight the ex- 
ScHU*'*- tent to which the White House 

. kept the State Department in 

K" ignorance of its negotiations. 

Q)Oi Mr Shultz said be had had 
jr '• ? O only fragmentary knowledge; 

J ‘ A f Cr of the arms sales to Iran and 

(* ) [ ° knew nothing at all of the 

-r a transfer of profits to the 

( < > $' Nicaraguan Contras. And he 

f 1 \ said he had learned only in 

\ f November, with the rest of the , 

^ ) ( nation, of President Reagan’s 

^ secret intelligence “finding” 

rTL on January 17 authorizh» the 

shipment of US arms to Iran. 
^ Speaking on the eve of his 

received and sent numerous departure for London for talks 
‘hade channel’ messages to with tbe British Government, 
and from tbe WhiteHouse, Mr Sfouttz said be bad ordered 
Admiral Poindexter, concern- Mr Kdly to make tomrelf 
ing the hostage negotiatio ns, av ailab le to the FBI and other 
Those mwssag ps were trans- investigators into the Iran 
mitted and received in what is affeir. 
referred to as the ‘privacy something comas up 

channel’ using OA commu- that causes an ambassador to 
nirarions facilities.” SO outside of that chain of 





Mr George Shultz, the US Secretary of State, taking the oath as he prepares to testify before 
die House foreign affairs committee in Washington yesterday. 


Baker Bill set to 
impose settlement 
in schools dispute 


By Nicholas Wood, Political Reporter 

Bargaining between tbe Ingsting that the present 
teachers’ unions and their divisions could be resolved by 
local authority employers has further negotiations if the 
“failed schools”, Mr Kenneth ‘ Secretary of State showed 
Baker said yesterday as be willing, Mr Radice warned 
introduced the Bffl giving him there was a prima fade case 
unprecedented powers to end that the Bill contravened 
the cunrat dispute and deter- conventions of the Inter- 
mine pay and conditions for national Labour Organization 
the next fouryeaxs at the least and Enropean Social Charier. 

The Secretary of State raid Earlier, Mb Baker, urged on 
Arc* “I ^ interests of chil- ^ his backbenchers, retold 
dren, the Governmrat hada t £ e «, on and rather 
duty to bring to a swift end the 

“negotiating brawl” that bad . 1 ^ 

blitted their prospects over Fariumeiil 4 

the past two years. r 

And in the interests of .miserable” history of efforts 
taxpayers mid :riae$iayefS, it uti^- ' 'ffie ‘ ~Bnrnham ’ 'pay 
could tKit.acpqit the Acas bargafoing madnnery, abof- 
package, supported Ity only isttra. under foe new law, to 
two of foe six teacher unions, resolve the current dispute. 

because of its “flat and un- , . . . 

differentiated pay structure” “The long dreary hidiMy of 

and foe extra cost of £85 mil- these negotiations and the 
Hon on lop oftbe £608 million attendant disruption to 
already available. children’s education mean 

Parents had had enough, he 
said, adding that while bis 
door remained open to a last the end and 
minute voluntary settlement, tffum tomirsc ho (ris,astosto 
MR Aoukl be in no doubt of promised in the 

tbe Government’s detennina- P ast ’ BaBer saw - 
tion to end “this sorry He justified replacing it 
busnesk”. with the advisory committee, 

But the new legislation, which will take evidence from 
scheduled to complete its the unions and council 
Commons stages this week, employers then give advice, 
was bitterly .attacked by Mr cm the grounds that the 
Giles Radice, Labour’s Government had to reassert , 
frontbench education spokes- Its right to a voice in negotia- 
man, as a denial of teachers’ dons. That was lost when the j 
basic human rights. so-called, concordat giving the j 

“What is so extraordinary Secretary of Stele a veto over ! 
about this legislation is that awards was tom up last ; 
once the Bill comes into force summer. 

S 8 ; 0 ( Sj^ C S., W S,S e iSJ “This Bill reestablishes an 

_ sstii-kTYuiaiiHs determination of teachers’ pay 

and links that with duties and 

conditions. It does not seek to , 
visory committee proposed to p nr _« _ « 

adviK the Secretary of State seta system for all tone. 

on pay and conditions would The Government hopes 
be no more than the minister’s that the Bill mil become law 
“poodle". by February. 


Crown to 
give up 
immunity 

By Richard Evans 
Political Correspondent 

Britain’s armed forces will 
soon be allowed to sue the 
Crown in personal injury 
cases, Mr George Younger, 
Secretary of Stale for Defence, 
announced last night 
Agreement to the repeal of 
Section 10 of the Crown 
Proceedings Act of 1947, fol- 
lows a Whitehall review which 
confirmed that compensation 
payments made by the Min- 
istry of Defence to injured 
servicemen and women were 
often below those obtained by 
civilians in courts. 

Mr Younger is hoping a 
backbench MP wiB introduce 
a private members’ Bill which 
he wfll willingly support. - " 
But he gave a warning in a 
Commons written reply: “We 
will need to be able to re- 
activate the provirions of 
Section 10 in tbe event of 
impending, or actual, hostil- 
ities. or grave national 
emergency.” 

The tiffing of the legal curbs 
comes after a prolonged cam- 
paign, inside mid outside par- 
liament, led by Mr Jade 
Ashley, the Labour MP for 
Stoke-on-Trent South, which 
has Hi g hli g hted tbe dis- 
advantage suffered by the 
country’s 320,000 soldiers, 
saDors and airmen. 

The existing system ofbene- 
fits which are payable in cases 
of death or injury, regardless 
of fault, will be maintained. 

Mr Younger said the pro- 
posed change must not effect 
the maintenance of disdpline 
or the quality of military 
tr aining . 

“My department will there- 
fore stand behind any service- 
man who is sued by another 
serviceman for alleged neg- 
ligence arising out of the 
execution of his duties and, in 
doing so, .would aim to place 
on record the peculiar hazards 
and difficulties to which a 
serviceman’s life is subject.” 


Driver banned before trial 


By Frances GB* 

Legal Affairs Correspondent 

A motorist allesed to have 
driven a car at high speed with 
a policeman on the roof was 
yesterday banned from driv- 
ing until his case comes up for 
trraL 

The controversial decision, 
the second of its kind within a 
week, has prompted fears that 
such bans might herald a new 
pre-Christmas crackdown on 
drink-drivers. 

Richard Turner, aged 27, of 
Queen’s Avenue, Kidtington, 
Oxfordshire, appeared before 
Oxford magistrates accused of 
causing actual bodily harm to 
a police constable by wanton 


or furious driving with excess Law, said he hoped this would 


alcohol on Saturday. 

The court, exercising its 
powers under the Bail Act 
1976, imposed tbe .ban after 
police asked for specific con- 
ditions of bail to be imposed. 
Last week magistrates in Bir- 
mingham imposed a similar 
restriction as a condition of 

bril. 

Magistrates have the power 
to impose conditions when 
granting hail which will pre- 
vent the commission of far- 
ther offences. 

Mr Peter Wallis, clerk to the 
Tonbridge and West Mailing 
justices and an editor of the 
road traffic law “bible” 
Wilkinson's Road Traffic 


not set a trend. 

“My magistrates won’t be 
imposing such conditions. I 
would advise against it.” be 
said. “It smacks rather of 
punishment before proof of 
guilt.” . 

He said the case might take 
two months to come to court 
and then the defendant might 
be acquitted. He would then 
have lost the nse of his car. 

He added that a Govern- 
ment-initiated review into 
road traffic law had asked in 
its consultation paper if the 
confiscation of licences before 
trial should be considered, but 
the Justices’ Clerks' Society 
advised against ft. 


Architect’s surprise victory heralds a new era 

Wales has espoused with merely electing to stand on 
enthusiasm but for which he anti-establishment tic! 


f Alan Hamilton 
I Charles Knevitt 
Rod Hackney, 


senled over 58 per cent of the 
ballot among Institute mem- 
the bets in Britain and overseas, 


champion of community in an unusually low poll 
architecture and feeder of In what some members of 
controversial ideas to tbe tbe profession have described 
Prince of Wales, yesterday was as a fight between a poodle 
the surprise winner in foe and a terrier, Mr Hackney, 
election for President of foe cast in foe role of the Jack 


JU " 5 13 Obrtaari 

A^tbs. La* Report 24 
Bfn, w? t 10 ParJiamW* j 
gg™** is sale Room }| 
Bndjj^ __ CfjMicf J® 

34-3638 

8S~*»S ?WES £ 

SSL » 

T it O ft * * 11 


Royal Institute of British 
Architects. 

Mr Hackney, regarded by 


of British Russell, campaigned on a 
radical platform. 

sgarded by He sought to drag architect 


the architectural establish- tun into the next century by 
ment as an outside contender means of a higher profile, 
for the prestigious and m- more effective lobbying of 
fluential post . enjoyed a government for the construc- 
com Portable majority of 5.972 tion industry, and opening tbe 
voles to 4.210 over Mr Ray- Institute's exclusive ranks to a 
{nond Andrews, the Institute’s wider membership. 



Wales has espoused with merely electing to stand on an 
enthusiasm but for which he anti-establishment ticket 
has been attacked on the against the Institute’s pre- 
grounds of im practicality and ferred candidate he destroyed 
crankiness. foe smooth ■ progress of 

“ft was a fair and honest Bzrggins’ turn and forced an 
election; we are going to have election, 
an interesting two years, Mr During foe election his 

Hl uTlwrihLt tiu. Pr,*«« ftf opponent, Mr Andrews, 
He described the Prince of «w». 


official nominee. 


The new president raid 


Mr Hackney’s vote repre- yesterday that his mission was 


Mr Rod Hackney, fed ideas 
to tbe Prince of Wales, 
to make his profession more 
relevant to present needs, 
especially in answering foe 
plight of Britain’s inner cities, 
a cause which the Prince of 


Wales as a champion of 
architecture, am! dismissed as 
“peevish" the Institute’s criti- 
cisms of the Prince’s well- 
publicized appeal for more 
attention to be paid to inner 
dues- 

Mr Hackney, aged 44, has 
thrown a whole scratch of cats 
among foe Institute's tra- 
ditionally docile pigeons. By 


dragged the name of Buddng- 
ham Palace on to the hustings, 
something which Mr Hack- 
ney, during his association 
with foe Prince of Wales, has 
studiously avoided. 

His election calls into ques- 
tion the future of Mr Patrick 
Harrison, the Institute's 
£46.500 a year secretary, and 

Continued on page 20. col 3 


Chirac gives in 
to students on 
university bill 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


In an attempt to defuse an 
increasingly explosive situa- 
tion, M Jacques Chirac, the 
French Prime Minister, has 
announced the Government’s 
decision to give in to student 
demands to withdraw the 
whole of its controversial 
university reform bflL 

M Rend Monory, the Edu- 
cation Minister, announced 
last night that there would be 
no reform of the lycees or 
universities in the foreseeable 
future. He said he would set 
up a national committee to 
study the development of uni- 
versities and the lycee-univer- 
sity-interface during the next 
10 years. 

But the Government climb- 

down may have come too late 

to appease the students, who 
were deeply shocked and an- 
gered by the death of a student 
who was beaten up by police 
during demonstrations last 
Friday night, and who are 
beginning to feel the extent of 
their power. 

As thousands of students 
marched silently through the 
streets of Paris yesterday in 
memory of the dead student 
and in protest against alleged 
police brutality, student trad- 
ers expressed their determina- 
tion to go ahead -with tomor- 
row’s mass demonstrations 
and to extend their protest 
movement to include propos- 
ed reforms for the lycees 
(grammar schools). 

M Chirac said that "no 
change, however necessary, of 
the universities can be prop- 
erly carried out without tbe 
broad support of all the in- 
terested parties, notably foe 
students and the teachers. It 
can only be carried out in a 
situation of calm. 

“Thai is dearly not the case 
today. The current demonst- 
rations, with all the risks and 
dangers of violence involved 
for everyone, are proof of that. 
That is why I have decided to 
withdraw the present biD.” 

M Chirac made it dear that 
foe Government bad not giv- 
en up all its plans for universi- 
ty reform. Broad consulta- 
tions, would begin immediate- 


Pretoria to 
deport British 
professor 

From Michael Hornsby 
Johannesburg 

Mr Stoffd Botha, the South 
African Minister of Home 
Affairs, yesterday served a 
deportation order on a British 
professor, Mr Philip Bonner, 
of foe University of Witwat- 
ersrand, without giving 
reason. 

It is also known that tbe 
police were looking for his 
wife, Chris, who is also Brit- 
ish, to serve her with a 
deportation order. 

Mrs Bonner is foe Trans- 
vaal branch secretary of the 
Chemical Workers’ Union. 


ly to work out the measures 
required to permit French 
universities “to adapt to the 
needs of the modern world, to 
the intimate aspirations of 
today’s youth in the cultural as 
well as employment field, and 
to the ambitions of France”. 

The Government’s change 
ofbeart has come in the face of 
continuing student demons- 
trations and deepening divi- 
sions within its own right- 
wing majority on the best way 
to tackle the unrest 

M Chirac avoided a pos- 
sible head-on dash with Presi- 

Student victory 10 

Photographs 10 

?.,ead mg article 17 

dent Mitterrand who, al- 
though be has said little in 
public about the student crisis, 
is known to have disapproved 
strongly of the Government's 
handling of the affair. He 
greeted with satisfaction” tbe 
Government’s decision to 
withdraw its bill — a move he 
advocated in talks with M 
Chirac on Saturday night 

M Mitterrand paid a well- 
publicized visit to the family 
of tbe dead student Malik 
Oussekme, yesterday. “I want- 
ed to bear witness to the na- 
tion’s concern in tbe face of 
this great misfortune,” be 
said. 

The decision to withdraw 
foe bill has been greeted with 
relief by moderates in foe 
Gaullist RPR Party and the 
centre-right UDF Party. 

However, M Chirac is cer- 
tain to face harsh criticism 
from conservative hardliners 
who will see his capitulation 
as an open invitation to others 
to take to the streets in an 
attempt to force the Govern- 
ment to change its policies. 

The students* national co- 
ordinating committee an- 
nounced last night that ft was 
maintaining its appeal to the 
general public to join in to- 
morrow’s mass demonstra- 
tion in Paris, but it is now un- 
likely to get the broad support 
it had: hoped for. 


Pincher could 
face Secrets 
Act charges 

The Government is consid- 
ering prosecuting Mr Chap- 
man Pincher under tbe 
Official Secrets Act over his 
contact with Mr Peter Wright, 
the former MI5 agent, Sir 
Michael Havers, the Attorney- 
General, said last night 
He was asked by Mr Dale 
Campbell-Savours, Labour 
MP for Workington, to pros- 
ecute Mr Pincher for inducing 
Mr Wright to break his duty of 
confidentiality by being party 
to the offer of payment to him 
for information included in 
Mr Fincher's book. Their 
Trade fs Treachery. 


#- l * I * L. *-g| 



Chinese Wok Set 

Complete with lid, stand, steel spatula, 
iadle.6 pairs erf chopsticks and recipe 
leaflet. Wok with wooden handle £5.95. 
Available from 52 stores or by mail order 
(0491 35511) while stocks last And don’t 
forget our 1986/7 catalogue has a £5 
voucher which you can use until 
Christmas Eve when spending £50 at: 


habitat 


W * Cr * C * 








HOME NEWS 


THE TTMFS TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


NEWS SUMMARY 


Scargill foe leads 
rebel pit union 

One of the men who helped to defeat Mr Arthur ScargiD 
dnring the milters’ strike became general secretary of the 
breakaway Union of Democratic Minewerkers ye s terday. 

Mr John Optra tt, aged 50, sacceeds Mr Roy Lynfc, who 
was elected unopposed as president 
Mr Liptrott was leader of the National Working Miners’ 
Committee, representing National Union of Mineworkars 
members who refined to strike withoat a ballot. 

• Mr Brian Nicholson, chairman of the Transport and 
General Workers’ Union, has written to 10,000 onion 
breaches complaining of a campaign of “riH fi ca rion ” 
against him since be took over the job last April. His un- 
precedented more is being viewed as part of the power 
straggle between the muon’s right and left wings. 

TV show censured 

Two complaints agains t the BBC TV consumer 
programme Watchdog have been upheld by the Broadcast* 
rag Complaints Commission. 

The complaints concerned a programme broadcast in 
1985 about Mr Tony O'Shea, a disabled Birmingham 
jeweller, whose insurance daim over stolen jewellery was 
repadiated by Lloyd's because be Called to disclose a 
conviction for receiving a stolen camera. 

Watchdog said that Lloyd's had refhsed to pay “one 
penny”, but Mr O’Shea had been offered a £10,000 ex gra- 
tia payment. The commission said this was unfair 
treatment of LLoyd’s. It was also unfair of the programme 
to blame the insurers for Mr O'Shea's plight. 

£l.lmin 
car sale 

Christie’s sale of Benz, 

Daimler and Mercedes mo- 
tor cars at the National 
Motor Museum, Beaulieu, 
yesterday was a success 
and a failure. 

It made £ 1 A milli on, bat 
half the cars remained 
unsold, including the most 
valuable offering, a 1933 
Mercedes-Benz 300K Spe- 
cial Roadster. 

Saleroom, page 18 


Royal firs 
for sale 


The Queen is 
Christmas trees from the 
royal estate at San- 
dringham, Norfolk, to the 
public for the first time. 

Two thousand trees are 
on offer, ranging from 10 ft 
to 3ft high, They cost 80p a 
foot sawn of£ or £1 a foot 
witb roots. 

An estate spokesman 
said: “We had rather a lot 
of surplus trees- 


Sikh murder charges 

Armed police surrounded Lambeth Magistrates’ Court, 
sooth London, yesterday, when a man aged 31 was 
remanded in custody until January 5, accused of conspiring 
to murder two prominent members of the Sikh conmnmity 
in Britain. 

Gurmail Singh, a shop worker, of Tottenham High 
Road, Tottenham, north London, faces charges of 
conspiring with others to murder Sohan Singh Lktdar at 
Luton, Bedfordshire, and Tersem Singh Tow at Southall, 
west Loudon. He is also charged with having a revolver 
wit h out a firearms certificate. 


Lords tighten up 
consumer Bill 


• The Government is ex- 
pected to be forced to change 
radically the Consumer Pro- 
tection Bill in the House of 
Lords because of two loop- 
holes (Sheila Gunn writes). 

As the Bill stands, victims 
of tragedies, such as the 
thalidomide drug and the 
Chinook helicopter crash, 
may not be able to sue. 

The peers gave a dear 
warning last night during the 
Bill’s second reading debate 
that they will fight to widen 
: the consumers' rights. 

Among those who vowed to 


change the Bill were Lord 
Allen of Abbey dale, an In- 
dependent peer, and Lady 
Burton of Coventry, for the 
Social Democratic Party. 
They had the backing of Lord 
Williams of El vet. Labour’s 
trade and Industry 
spokesman.' 

The consumers' lobby 1ms 
been campaigning to remove 
from the Bill the “develop- 
ment risks" defence, which 
allows manufacturers to claim 
that the state of scientific and 
technological knowledge was 
such that a defect could not 
have been discovered. 



IF YOU WANT 
TO GET AHEAD. 
GET 

TIMES 



ad Auntie May, 
^ied and happy 
onCaph: 
■H&esmyam 
with Ch-istmas wishes 
(Stamp cce(s only J8p!) 




Letter post to EEC countries now 
costs the same as first class post in 
j the UK.... Makes it easier to greet 
friends and relatives in Europe this 
Christmas and New Year! 


Royal Mail 


Iftiu can now post letters and cards (up «<? 20g J lor I8p to these countries. 
BELGIUM ■ DENMARK • FRANCE - GREECE ■ HOLLAND ■ ITALY 
LUXEMBOURG - PORTU GAL -REP OF IRELAND - SfVUN - W. GERMANY 


British soldier’s arrest leads to inquiry 


By Richard Ford 

The British and Irish Gov- 
ernments have ordered de- 
tailed reports into the arrest in 
the Irish Republic of a British 
soldier engaged in a joint 
cross-bonder security oper- 
ation. 

The soldier, serving with 
the Grenadier Guards, was 
part of a “hot pursuit'’ search 
tor Provisional IRA terrorists 
who mortar bombed an army 
observation post near the 
border, on Saturday. 

Mr Tom King, Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 
said yesterday that the soldier 
was arrested and held in 


detention by Irish police in Co 
Louth. 

He was detained for five 
hours at Dundark Garda Sta- 
tion but was later released. 

That incident and an alleged 
second incursion^ into the 
republic by a British Army 
foot patrol at Courtbane, Co 
Louth, on Sunday, were raised 
by the Irish Government at 
the thirteenth meeting of the 
Joint Anglo-Irish Ministerial 
Conference in Belfast yes- 
terday. 

The British Government 
believes that the conference — 
and secretariat services it pro- 
vides — offer the best method 
of dealing with such incidents. 


which can develop into loud 
diplomatic disputes. 

The conference ruled out 
Irish government demands for 
reform of the Diplock non- 
jury court in Northern Ire- 
land, with Britain arguing that 
there were real difficulties 
about introducing three rather 
than the present one judge to 
preside in the court. 

As the conference met, a 
small crowd of 25 people, led 
by the Rev Ian Paisley, the 
leader of the Democratic 
Unionist Party, protested as 
Mr Peter Barry, the republic’s 
Minister for Public Affairs, 
and Mr Alan Dukes, the 
Minister for Justice, arrived. 


The two men flew into the Gown, rafoeritan Mr terry- 
grounds of Stormont Castle by Mr Paislev said. I belie 
helicopter and in brief scuffles British ftAvnrnment h 


with a’latge number of officers 
from the Royal Ulster 
Constabulary, who were 
guarding the grounds, , two 
people were arrested. 

One of them, Mr Jim Wells, 
a former member of the 
Democratic Unionist Party, 
who is serving a two-year 
suspended sentence of sax 
months for disorderly behav- 
iour, is to appear at Belfast 
Magistrates’ Court this mor- 
ning. 

The protestors shouted 
“traitors” ax the officers and 
urged them to be loyal to the 


Government 

capitulated and that Mrs 
Thatcher is on the run as far as 
Dublin is concerned". 

He said “loyalists" were not 
prepared to play her game and 
make the agreement a law and 
order issue. 

An Irish tricolor was burned 
and Mr Paisley, imitating 
President Reagan’s slogan 
“you ain't seen nothin 

yet”. 

• Mr Harold McCusker. Of- 
ficial Unionist MP for Upper 
Bann. was yesterday ordered 
to pay a rates demand for £594 
at Craigavon Magistrates' 
Court 


BAe given 
boost by 
Airbus sale 
to Japan 

By Harvey Elliott, Air Correspondent 


British Aerospace received 
a big boost yesterday with the 
announcement of a contract 
for the sale of 10 A340 
Airbuses to All Nippon Air- 
ways of Japan. 

But the future of the Airbus, 
designed to challenge the 
supremacy of Boeing in long- 
haul jet fleets, will hang on a 
decision of the board of 
Swissair, due to be taken in 
Zurich in the next few weeks. 

The Swiss national airline 
will choose between the Euro- 
pean Airbus and the Ameri- 
can-designed McDonnell 
Douglas MD \1 to replace its 
existing long-range fleet. 

Both Airbus Industrie, in 
which BAe has a 20 per cent 
stake, and McDonnell Doug- 
las are stepping up the rales 
pilch in a bid to to clinch an 
agreement 

Airbus proposesto increase 
the size of the A340 to add 
another 33 seats and match 
more nearly the size of the 
MD II, nine of which have 
been ordered by British 
Caledonian. 

In talks yesterday with Mr 
Geoffrey Pattie. Minister for 
Industry, British Aerospace 
pressed for an early indication 
on whether the Government 
would provide £750 million 


All Nippon is the first 
Japanese airline to purchase 
the European aircraft 
A spokesman confirmed 
yesterday that All Nippon 
could order another 10 Air- 
buses at a later date, 
the total contract to more 
Si billion, including spare 
parts. 

McDonnell Douglas yes- 
terday signed its second order 
for its aircaft when the Japa- 
nese company, Mitsui, de- 
cided to buy five of the three- 

g ned jets for leasing to 
nes in the Far East 
The order means that Mc- 
Donnell Douglas is close to 


6 The future of 
Airbus will hang on a 
decision of the board 
of Swissair 9 


the 20 firm order figure it had 
set itself as a target before 
deciding to go ahead with the 
project 

A formal decision to begin 
building the jets is expected 
around Christmas. 

Airbus is confident that it 
will secure the necessary or- 
ders to enable the project to 


6 European airlines 
will be under 
government pressure 
to buy die Airbus 9 


.Hi ? ul ir g£l off iheground, especially if 

to help it launch the aircraft, it ^ ofl f r a biggeTversion 

- - — - - — - than was first suggested to the 

world's airlines. . 

If is hoping that many 
European airimes win be 
under intense pressure from 
their governments to buy the 
Airbus rather than the MD 1 1 
because of the implications for 
employment 

But if the Airbus is to be a 
genuine rival, both to Mo 
Donnell Douglas and to 
Boeing, it will need enormous 
amounts of government fund- 
ing in the early stages. 

The British Government is 
still hesitating. Further talks 
will be held early in the new 
year, by which time more 
detailed studies of the bigger 
version will be available. 

Airbus Industrie is made up 
of BAe, Aerospatiale of 
France, MBB of West Ger- 
many and Casa of Spain. BAe 
makes the Airbus wings at a 
plant at Fflton, Bristol, and at 
other smaller bases, employ- 
ing about 9, (XX) people. 


which is regarded as vital to 
the future of the European 
aircraft industry. 

But the Government made 
it dearthatit was not prepared 
to earmark such a large 
amount unless firm commit- 
ments had been received. 

Airbus is relying heavily on 
orders from Swissair and 
Lufthansa, the West German 
airline, to give the aircraft the 
boost which is needed. 

But those have not been 
forthcoming because both air- 
lines have been wearied, as 
was British Caledonian, that 
the Airbus is little different in 
size from the existing DC 10- 
30 and that it will be at least 1 8 
months later than the rival 
MD 1 1 in taking to the skies. 



Mr Powell (left), man at the centre ai the new race < 
who drums he has been victimized, at the college i 

Brent race inquiry 
into new teacher 

By John Clare, Education Correspondent 


Brent Council, in north 
London, was yesterday at the 
centre of another dispute over 
allegations of racism in the 
borough’s education system. 

Dr Ellis David, an Anglo- 
Indian lecturer in mathemat- 
ics at the Willesden College of 
Technology, complained that 
the head of the science depart- 
ment, Mr Gwyn Powell, had 
discriminated against him by 
denying him promotion. 

Brent council said it had 
investigated the matter at the 
request of the college’s gov- 
ernors and found that, pnma 
facie, there was a case to 
answer. 

It is also understood that 
the council has ordered Dr 
David to be paid an immedi- 
ate salary increase of £2,500, 
backdated to three years. 

The education committee 
will be asked to set up a 
disciplinary sub-committee, 
as it did in the case of Miss 
Maureen McGokhick, the 
headteacher of Sudbury In- 
fants ScbooL 

Mr Powell, who strenuously 
denies the racism charge, has 


been told by the chief exec- 
utive of Brent council, Mr 
Charles Wood, that the con- 
sequences could be serious 
and might lead to his 

dis missal. 

On the other hand, Mr Ron 
Anderson, the chairman of the 
education committee, said: 
“This is nothing to get excited 
about ~ it’s a run-of-the-mill 
dispute between two members 
of staff”. 

The dispute goes back more 
than 10 years. Mr Powell 
began monitoring Dr David's 
performance in 1975 and rays 
that the record shows there 
have been constant com- 
plaints from students about 
his time-keeping and teaching 

Mr Powell has therefore 
refused to grant Dr David a 
certificate raying that he per- 
forms satisfactorily, which 
means that he cannot be 
promoted. 

Dr David refused to go into 
detail about his allegations 
against Mr Powell, saying 
only: “I have been treated 
very badly here for a very, 
very long time”. 


Tests continue 
on family 
found dead 

Tests continued yesterday 
on the bodies of a woman and 
her two daughters who were 
found dead at their home in 
Sanderstead, near Croydon, 
on Saturday night 

Scotland Yard said that Mr 
Priyavadan Patel, aged 34, 
who found the bodies of Mrs 
Sudha Patel, his wife, who was 
in her twenties, and Sejal, aged 
four, and Kajal, aged two, 
their daughters, had been 
released “unconditionally" af- 
ter questioning. 

The children were reported 
to have been strangled and 
one possibility is that they 
were killed by the mother 
before she killed herself It is 
understood that Mrs Patel was 
suffering from depression 


Private Eye special issue banned 


By David Cross 

The magazine Private Eye, 
still smarting from the dam- 
ages imposed after Mr Robert 
Maxwell's costly libel suit, 
suffered a new blow yesterday 
when the country's two largest 
news wholesalers decided not 
to distributeits Christmas edi- 
tion designed expressly to 
replenish its coffers. 

To add insult to material 
injury, W H Smith and John 
Menzies said they intended to 
distribute up to 600,000 
copies of a spoof edition of the 
magazine, called Not Private 
Eye, to be published tomor- 
row by Mr Maxwell's Mirror 
Group Newspapers, and a 
book on the trial called. 
Malice in Wonderland, to be 
published next Monday. 

Both companies said 


yes- 


terday that their distribution 
of the Christinas fund-raising 
edition, which features a 
three-page article on the trial, 
had been barred on the advice 
of their lawyers. 

"It was made perfectly dear 
to us that if we handled litis 
edition it was liable to lead to 
litigation,” Mr David 
Mac Kay, wholesale manag in g 
director of John Menzies, 
said. 

It is understood that the 
main objection of the lawyers 
was that the account of the 
trial was too biased in favour 
of Private Eye. 

About 95 per cent of the 
article deals with evidence 
submitted by supporters of the 
irreverent fortnightly 
magazine. 

Mr David Cash, manag in g 


director of Pressdram Lid, 
which publishes the magazine, 
raid that the bar on distribu- 
tion would cost the company 
about 85,000 in safes and up to 
£50,000 in extra revenue. 

Another six smaller whole- 
salers, with sates of about 
20,000 in the South-east bad 
followed suit, he added. 

The special issue, sales of 
which were expected to total 
at least 240,000 copies, costs 
£1 compared with a normal 
cover price of 45p. • 

The case cost Private E\ 
total of about £255,000 in 
damages and legal costs. 

"I am very disappointed 
that tiie two companies are 
not handling the ma garinn 35 
their retail outlets are a very 
important part of the 
network.” Mr Gash said. 


l n and Dr David, die lecturer 
; Tim Bishop). 

Decisions 
not based 
on facts 

By David Sapsted 

The left-dominated board of 
governors at Wflfesden Coll- 
ege has voted to allow Brest 
council to investigate alk 
tions of racism against 
head without hearing either 
the facts or knowing the names 
of the individuals involved. 

Mr Roy limes, vice-chair- 
man of the governors, admit- 
ted yesterday that no details of 
the case were known when the 
board met to discuss it last 
week. 

“We heard from the director 
of law and administration at 
Brent council and he urged 
that the matter be.handed over 
to the education department,' 
he said 

“It was not simply a ques- 
tion of racism but also of pay 
and promotion,” Mr limes, 
nominated as a governor by 
Brent Trades Council, said. 

The only Conservative ap- 
pointed to tiie 35-member 
board of governors, Mr Alan 
Kemp, said last ight (hat tiie 
Court of Appeal decision 
allowing the council to bold its 
own bearing on tiie case of 
Miss Mameen McGohfrick 
had proved the decisive factor. 

“The left are just proving 
they can do what they want in 
Brent, just as they have in 
UverpooV he said. 

“The principal and head of 
department agreed for JO 
years that this man (Dr David) 
did not deserve promotion, and 
that should have been the end 
of it” 


End secret 
inquests, 
demand by 
editors 

By Frances Gibb 
Legal .Affairs Correspondent 

Newspaper editors have 
called on the Home Office to 
make coroners publicize proc- 
eedings in advance of the 
bearing because, they daim, 
some inquests are being held 
"unlawfully in secret". 

Where inquests are held in 
public, over-reliance on writ- 
ten evidence has been used "as 
a device to conceal facts from 
the press and public” the 
Guild of British Newspaper 
Editors says in a submission 
to the Home Office. 

In one case a reporter from 
The Cornish Times was re- 
fused admission to an inquest 
involving a young man, be- 
lieved to have committed 
suicide after he had been 
interviewed in connection 
with a hit and run case. 

The editor of the newspaper 
complained that it had not 
been notified of the inquest 
until a few minutes after it 
started and when a reporter 
tried to attend he was refused 
entry to the hearing. 

The Devon and Cornwall 
police later issued a memoran- 
dum to all staff emphasizing 
that when acting as coroner’s 
officers, it was their duty to 
inform the media of the dale 
of inquests. 

In another case cited to the 
Home Office, the editor of the 
Windsor Express complained 
that a coroner in East Berk- 
shire held an inquest in pri- 
vate. He asked the relatives in 
for an "informal discussion” 
and then held the inquest 

A Home Office working 
party recommended in 1976 
that the press should not have 
a special position under the 
Coroners’ Rules. 

But it recognized it was 
more difficult to find out 
about inquests than other 
court hearings and urged guid- 
ance to be given to coroners 
encouraging them to ensure 
the press was informed. 

The editors' guild rays that 
guidance was not being fol- 
lowed in all parts of the 
country and "the only solu- 
tion would be for there to be a 
statutory requirement on 
coroners to make the press 
and public aware of the 
proceedings in advance” 

The guild also calls for the 
rules to be amended so that 
coroners are obliged to see 
that all relevant documentary 
evidence is read out in full. 

'There have been occasions 
when it was not possible to 
report properly an inquest 
because of the lack of suf- 
ficient information, failure on 
thepart of the coroner to read 
sufficient of the documentary 
evidence, or, in some cases, a 
general lack of co-operation 
on the part of the coroner,” 
the guild says. 

Brokenshire 
favourite for 
controller job 

Mr Peter Brokenshire, the 
director of management prac- 
tice at the Audit Commission, 
is emerging as favourite to 
take over as controller from 
Mr John Banham, who will 
leave in March to become 
director general of the Confed- 
eration of British Industry 
(Our Political Reporter 
writes). 

The commission has hired a - 
bead-hunting agency, but 
members are understood to be * 
keen to appoint an internal 
candidate. 

A special selection commit- 
tee will draw up a shortlist of 
about five before Christmas. 


Driver hurt in print convoy ambush 


By Tim Jones 

A convoy of lorries travel- 
ling towards the News Inter- 
nationa] plant at Wapping, 
east London, was yesterday 
ambushed by men hiding near 
a bridge parapet on the A2 
near Gravesend, Kent 

The 10-vehide convoy was 
hit by large lumps of 
flintstone, one of which 
smashed through a wind- 
screen. The driver was hurt by 
broken glass. 

The attack came only days 
after Mr Wyn Jones, London's 
assistant police commis- 
sioner, gave a warning that 
somebody would soon be 
killed unless there was an end 
to violent behaviour on the 
picket lines and elsewhere. 

The police disclosed that 
more than 1,300 people have 
been arrested and 394 officers 
injured as a result of violence 


during the dispute, which 
started in January. 

The police said of the latest 
ambush: “This attack was 
extremely dangerous with 
potentially lethal 

consequences”. 

Since the dispute began, 
police have collected a 
substantial arsenal of weapons 
from former employees of the 
company and their supporters 
who have often attempted to 
halt production by laying siege 
to the plant. 

Weapons have included car- 
tridges. broken bottles, nails 
welded together, catapults 
with ball-bearing ammu- 
nition, golf balls painted black 
so they cannot be seen at 
night, crowbars, iron spikes 
and boards with six inch nails 
driven into them to immo- 
bilize lorries leaving the 
premises. 

In addition, scores of people 

have been arrested for ob- 


struction, drunken behaviour, 
abuse and other public order 
offences. 

Away from the plant, in- 
dividuals have been subject to 
a wide range of intimidatory 
tactics, ranging from death 
threats to having unwanted 
builders’ skips delivered at 
their houses. Some print 
union supporters have made 
determined efforts to discover 
where individuals go for lunch 
so that they can be followed. 

In one of tiie most serious 
incidents, Mr Christopher 
Warm an, property corres- 
pondent of The Times, was hit 
in the face with a beer glass. 
His attacker, Robin Shimekl, 
was sentenced to nine months’ 
imprisonment for unlawful 
wounding. 

During some of the 
demonstrations outside the 
plant, the print union mem- 
bers have been supported by 
extreme left wing organ- 


izations including the Socialist 
Workere Party, the anarchist 
Class War movement and by 
Militant Tendency. 

Print union leaders have 
dissociated themselves from 
acts of violence since tire 
dispute began when 5,140 
former employees went on 
strike and were dismissed. 

Last week, Michael Hicks, 
aged 49, an executive mem- 
bers of the print union Sogat 
’82, was jailed for four months 
for violence outside the 
Wapping plant. He was de- 
scribed by the judge at South- 
wark Crown Court, south 
London, as “a disgrace” after 
being convicted oismashing a 
megaphone into a policeman’s 
face. 

• Two men appeared at 
Thames Magistrates Court in 
London yesterday charged 
with reckless behaviour Iikdy 
to endanger life. They were 
bailed until December 22. 


TO PLACE YOUR 

TRAVEL 

ADVERTISEMENT 

IN 

THE 

TIMES 

TRADE ADVERTISERS 

TEL: 01-481 1989 
ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 
01-481 9313 
TELEX 925088 
PRIVATE 
ADVERTISERS 
TEL: 01-481 4000 


< T by; 





End SsC' 

inp-., 

Qe &iarid ?’ 

fdit 0rs “S 

ik . 

— 'ii*:r s f. '*% 

:,V ••-•■ ^* P % 

-■ -^ •.- '..^■•T.'i , ru i, >u 

c: 

- . •»... 

. “ ■.-■•'•"* T«lji 

5 • . ■ : ; 


?r *m 

• 5?"? & 

b,. 

■ : ■ . 


.• 

: . ,V‘?5ns 

— . - 1 - «L>y 


"■‘"■toil!, 

- ‘ SitUS; 
: : ■ ■■■••-•?*'« 
• ■. . C:l ' vi 

" -• ■*? iu 


.. : • ^:is:c 
:; : :cTor 

job 



i- ’ - s 


-■ ‘“if? 

• * V ^ 


't >' 

~ WJ L . 


f* '■»» . 


48 J 


~ f. - 


Child accuses 
doctor of 
raping her 

as she slept 

By Michael Horsuell 

butterfly 1 s,e PL sal on her bed and 

rVV*5j y .^P 5 . ,n her hair, removed the duvet before 
I? ,t. JU 7 yes ?^y having sexual intercourse. 
S“j£ ? e ““<* *e He left her with a torn 
25*5* & * docIor wiu te hymen and psychological 

The^^h^rS* 111 ^! a, damage which resulted in a 
The fejr-haired girl, whose change in her character. 

mother had left her in the TTtegiil had stayed with the 
doctor s care while she stayed doctor and his wife in Feb- 
m hospital to look after her ruary 1985, and when she 
epileptic son, in August last went there a gain, in August, 
year, sat beside the judge as she was supposed to stay fin* 
f^ ve evidence at Chelms- only two days before moving 
ford Crown Court. ' on to her grandparents’ home. 

In a scarcely audible voice Her mother, who has two 
she aid: “He was doing other children and was di- 
someihmg he shouldn’t have vorced in January 1985, regu- 
bwn doing. I was scared of lariy telephoned from the 
what was happening. I was hospital, in Oxford, bnt when 
hair asleep and half awake. He she rang the child's grand- 
did something which was parents on the third night, she 
wrong, which hurt me,” discovered sh*» hart not 
The next day, counsel for arrived, 
die prosecution alleged, the When she rang the doctor’s 
doctor showed the girl, them home, she was unable to speak 
aged eight, a gun and threated to her daughter . The doctor 
to shoot her to discourage her told her that she was asleep 
from talking. and unavailable. 

When _ the mother con- She telephoned her boy- 
frontedhim, he allegedly re- friend who picked her up from ! 
plied: “She is probably being the hospital and then collected i 
raped at this very moment, the girl from the doctor’s 
Eight or 1 8 she knew what it house the next day. 
was all about and deserved Mr Matthew said: “The 
what she got-” chang e in the child was no- 

The mother has brought a ticed almost immediately . She 
private prosecution, paid for was very quiet, she did not 
by The Sun newspaper, after a want to talk about her few 
decision by the Director of days away, unusually for her. 
Public Prosecutions not to ana she followed her mother 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


HOME NEWS 



Mr Bill Gray checking on Mr Keith Chariton (left), Mrs Rosemary Chariton and Mr Bob Jackson (Photograph: John Rogers).* 

liljul i Tatients barred 9 claim H Candlelit 


Jailed 
mother’s 
case goes 
to appeal 


Dentists accused over Aids 


Margaret Iivesey, a mother 
of three serving a life sentence 
for the murder of her son aged 
14, asked the Court of Appeal 
to free her yesterday. 


By Craig Seton 

Some dentists are refusing “perceived as carrying a risk 
to treat [tatients suspected of of human immunodeficiency 
being at risk of catching virus infection,** which caused 
acquired immune deficiency Aids, 
syndrome (Aids), it was The report, which urged the 
c l a im e d yesterday. creation of an Aids task force 

The West Midlands Re- for the West Midlands, did not 


lunch date 
in a cell 

A gourmet who expected a 
gastronomic treat when a 
friend invited him for lunch 


Three in 

£ 4,000 

share-out 

Three readers shared 
yesterday's Portfolio Gold 
prize of £4JH)0. 

Mr Brace Debt, aged 78, a 
.solicitor, of Surbiton, Surrey, 
hag played Portfolio Gold 
regularly since it started. . 

"®1 am quite delighted • to 
have won,” he said.“l shall 
drink an awful lot of BoHnger 
champagne, pat some of toe 
winnings aside for my only 
grandchild, and nse the rest 
for my retirement.” 

Miss Karen Ades, aged 43, 
a film distributor, of north- 
west London, said she was 
“very happy” to have wan a 
Portfolio Gold share. 

“I checked the unmbers 
three times and wondered how 
many other winners there 
won t be,** she said. 

Miss Ades said that she 
would spend her winnings on 
Christinas celebrations. “And 
if there is any money left over, 
HI go on Mislay next year.” 

The other winner is Mr 

William Alters, aged 84, a 

retired engineer, of Farnham, 
Surrey. 

Portfolio Gold cards can be 
obtained by sending a stam- 
ped, addressed envelope to: 

Portfolio Gold, 

The Tima, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


dentist catching Aids as a friend invited him for I 
result of dentistry and, al- ended up in a police cell 

I .mil ■111 tnn W.D.L 


though it might have been true 
six months ago, I am not 


Mr Bob Jackson’s crime was 
to fall victim to a practical 


institute proceedings. 


about the bouse and did not 


The doctor, an anaesthetist want to be alone, 
from Essex, denies raping the “There was something else 
gjii, between August 10 and 17 which struck her mother’s 
last year, and indecently attention. When they not 
assaulting her. home she pat all her clothes 

Judge Greenwood removed including her nightdress in the 
his wig and told counsel to washing machine which she 
remove theirs before inviting had never done before and 
the girl to give evidence sitting tried to start it, but it did not 


However the claim was treat all patients as 
doubted by Mr Norman earners and wear gk 
Webb, assistant secretary of gie* and free masks, 
the British Dental Qf the 548 Aids cases in 
Association. England and Wale 

He said: “There . is no timated 12 have oc 


beside him. 

The defendant was told to 


start. 

The mother removed the 


leave the dock and sit at the clothes and noticed they were 
back of the court as she did so. soiled whh Mood and a white 
The giii, dressed in a cotton stain which she took to be 
dress told the judge that she phlegm. Though it crossed her 
understood the importance of mind it was semen, she was 
telling the truth before she angry with herself to think 


gave evidence. 


such a thing and put the 


Questioned by Ms Patricia clothes back in the washing 
May, junior counsel for the machine thus destroying what 
prosecution, she declined to could have been important 
use two dolls to indicate to the evidence. 


jury what had happened to 


At a holiday camp in Kent 
with her mother, the boy- 


lnstead she wrote on a piece friend and her two brothers, 
of paper, when asked what had the girl continued to behave 
happened, the Words “he strangely and was “almost like 
raped me”. a different child,” withdrawn 

She told the court that she and tearfuL She refused to 
had not screamed or called the wear dresses or skirts and 
doctor’s wife because she was returned the then cleaned 
frightened she would be nightdress to her suitcase after 
smacked for making a fuss unpacking. 


about it 


She had temper trantrums. 


Questioned by Mr Anthony refused to allow her grand- 
Arlidge, for the defence, she father near her or to bat hwith 
said that she had learned the her brothers and suffered 
word rape from her mother. nightmares. Eventually her 
Mr John Matthew, QC, for behaviour led her mother to 
the prosecution, said the doo- take her to the family’s GP. 
tor came into the room as she The case continues today. 


tor cam e into the room as she 

Man accused 
of murders , 
is remanded 


1UI lUb UIUIUU W UWl „nrti.r4-„ . r " ' . - , T r 

14, asked the Court of Appeal daune " yestCTday ' creation of an Aids task force 

to free her yesterday. The West Midlands Re- ^ the West Mid l a n ds, did not 

gfonal Health Authority, in a specify which high nsk groups 
She was convicted at Pres- report on the disease, said were being turned away by 
ton Crown Court in 1979 after hospital dental departments dental practitioners, 
confessing to police, although were having to deal with However, the rfaim was 
she later claimed Alan was increasing numbers of pa- doubted by Mr Norman 
killed while she was with tients because of the “re- Webb, assistan t secretary of 
friends at a public house near luctance" of dental the British Dental 
by. practitioners to treat them. Association. 

Lord T the Lord Chief It claimed that appeared to He said: “There . is no 
Justice, sitting with Mr Justice be because such patients were evidence of any patient or 
McCowan^and Mr Justice 

comes after an investigation !j 
by the BBC Rough Justice 

John Rowe, QC for Uvesey, 
that inconsistencies in the 
evidence which the pro- 
i gramme had hi g hli g hted in 
1983 made te!cSSvfotion 

“unsafe and unsatisfactory”. -iiiil 

A neighbour found Alans 
stabbed body at the family 

home in The Crescent, i-i 

Bamber Bridge, Preston, in ! -Jill®. > 2‘^^Wv 'o v j 

February 1979. ^ '“f&r 

Livesey, aged 50, disputes jjM 

the time put on the death by ‘‘i Vi- ? 

police. She also challenges the. • T r-'f‘.'.r T *. ' v ,v •. 

evidence of witnesses and her v 3 ' vl 

own confession and claims she - ■" :y~- - 

was denied the opportunity at 

her trial to challenge certain *8 '----/ ‘ ' V 4 i 

evidence. B- ’i ‘ I ^ 

The hearing continues v. J i 

today. ,± 


aware of any dentists refusing joke by tiis host, Mr Keith 
to treat patients for that Charlton, a regional director 
reason.” of Wimpey Construction. Mr 

He said that the profession Charhon, of Oakley, Bedford- 
had held a working party on shire, paid £50 in a charity 





Aids and issued guidelines, 
recommending dentists to 


auction for lunch for three at 
his local police station, the 


treat all patients as suspected money going to the Royal 
carriers and wear gloves, gog- National lifeboat Institution. 



Yesterday Mr Charlton, 
Mrs Rosemary Chariton, his 


England and Wales, an es- wife, and Mr Jackson, were 
timated 12 have occurred in waited upon by Mr Bill Gray, 


the West Midlands. 


an assistant chief constable. 


Mr Bruce Dehn, celebrating 
with champagne. 



is 



i- r' 


Corrupt power chief 
attempted suicide 


ivmnuuvu A former power station 
A man charged with the chief who has admitted 
murder of three young women corruption said to have cost 


and four counts of rape was foe Central E 
remanded in custody for 24 erating Board 
hours yesterday. most killed hi 


the Central Electricity Gen- 
erating Brand £250,000, al- 
most killed himself, a court 


The former railway carpen- I heard yesterday. 


ter aged 28 was handcuffed to 


in the dock is Atkinson's 
former boss, friend and pri- 
vate business associate, Geof- 
frey Variey, aged 62, a former 
plant manager, of Leven 
Road, Yarm, Cleveland-He 
has pleaded guilty to four 




* V. ■■■_ ; ' v : V . i ;; !*>'"? *><.; *" 


a police officer when he foe defence, told Teesside 
appeared in the dock at Crown Court that Mr Kenneth 
Guildford, Surrey. Atkinson made an attempt on 

He was accused of murder- 

ine Miss Marty Tamboezer, was deterred by his serond 
Miss Mson Day and Mrs w^Franc^^oisamOTgll 
5mne Lock, and further other people with him m the 

^ Muller said MMnson 


Mr Franz Muller, QC, for charts of corruption, 
e defence, told Teesside Another businessmen who 


teenage girls over a two-year 
period. 


had lost everything, and 
would inevitably lose the com- 


Miss Wendy Mageney, co- p any of his wife, who he 
unsel for the prosecution, Carried in 1984, and their two 


has admitted to corruption 
charges is Thomas Kidd, a 
retired former director of R W 
& T E Kidd, of Portobello, 
Chester-te-Street, Co Durham, 
one of the contracting firms 
which carried out work at the 
plant. 

Kidd, aged 61, of Maiden- 
head, Berkshire, pleaded 
guilty to conspiracy and six 






asked for the remand m yoan g children “for a very 
custody, “in order that oertam cQ^derable time”, 
nth^r inouines could De Aiirintm. need 54. of The 


other inquiries . ... 

conducted”. Highlands, Brampton, North ments his client had made to 

chi* Mid- “At the end of that Yorkshire, was suspended Atkinson, be replied there had 
via haaiin he brought back from his job as mamtenance been seven separate occasions 
fhirS>m^d^8^ superintendent and third in when he had given him £300. 

command at North Tees Mr Thorne said without 
anticipate a , - m ^ power Station in 1982. those “favours” work would 

uon J or rtStctaee” He has pleaded guihy to 28 not have been provided at the 

custody at that stage - charges of conspiracy, corrap- plant, and R W & T E Kidd 

The man did not say any- ^on and theft. depended on the Central Gen- 

foing and nodded in reply to His wife Frances, aged 39, erating Board work for its 
his name. who was stores supervisor at viability. 

w . „ . „ Hookin co- the power station during that He emphasized that there 
did’ not period, has admitted two was no suggestion the com- 

itte WPlSSm- “l •» chaI * es and one of pmy tod^mphed vnth the 

oppose iflc apF . . un ti] consmracy. corrupt activities. 


tong children “for a very When Judge Stroyan asked 
insiderable time” Mr Roger Thome, defending 

Atkinson, aged 54, of The Kidd, bow many cash pay- 



mmm 




at North Tees Mr Thome said without 
Son in 1982. those “favours” work would 

pleaded guihy to 28 not have been provided at the 
conspiracy, corrupt- plant, and R W & T E Kidd 
theft. depended on the Central Gen- 

; Frances, aged 39, erating Board work for its 
acres supervisor at viability, 
station during that He emphasized that there 


his name. who was stores supervisor at viabihty. 

w . „ . „ HoDkin co- the power station during that He emphasized that there 
did’ not period, has admitted two was no suggestion the com- 

itte w“<S on - “ I cto * es ** °“ rf wrth 

tomorto^ i sne sum. — 

Crisis in NHS pharmacies 


By Jill Sherman 

Hospital pharmacies throu- 
ghout BritaiS are hs |ymgtocut 
Srtices because of a critical 
shortage of pharmacy sta ff 
The^shortages have forced 
some hospitals to wt t»ckoo 
'nnsii^m services and to stop 

ISIS’S^- 10 

rnrS have also been can- 
“ShospiulhMestimailri 

SSSoflhe extra costsof 

rs c*s “ 

'fSSSff'wi Hospiiat 
DudiSf West Midlands, do- 


sed its outpatient pharmacy 
service last April. In spite of 
repeated advertisements for 
more staff; the pharmacy has a 
40 per cent job vacancy rata 

“Pharmacy staff are opting 
for the higher rates in the 
private sector. A basic grade 
NHS pharmacist earns about 
£8,000. Down the mad. at the 
Hi gh street chemist, he can 
earn between £12,000 to 
£14,000 with a car thrown in,” 
Mr Ronald Rate, the hospital’s 
principal pharmacist, said. 

Other hospitals which have 
freed serious difficulties over 
the past few months include: 
The Victoria Hospital, Black- 
pool: Ipswich Hospital; Saint 
Cross Hospital, Rugby, War- 
wickshire; and St George's 
Hospital, Tooting, and St 
James' . Hospital, Balbam j 
both in south London. 


The Pharmaceutical Society 
of Great Britain said yesterday 
that the pharmacist shortage 
was due to poor salaries and a 
lack of a career structure. 

The problem had been exac- 
erbated by impending regula- 
tions to restrict the number of 
chemists given dispensing 
rights. “The Government has 
been sitting on the new regula- 
tions for more than a year. 
The result is a huge mush- 
rooming of chemists, an extra 
400, getting in before the 
dampdown, and they have 
attracted more hospital 
pharmacists,” the society said. 

Family practitioner 
committees yesterday criti- 
cized plans by Charing Cross 1 
Hospital, west London, to 
stop issuing drug prescriptions 
to outpatients. 


Unit-linked insurance, mortgages, 
investment. Whatever your needs, 
you’ll find we’re flexible 

Why? Because Norwich Union Asset Management has a comprehensive selection of 7 different 
products. And all have in-built flexibility — to meet your needs not only now but in time to come, 
should your circumstances change. If that’s the kind of fcEEffiSSEi* T1 

• , , , k „ , ... ..I aipa who will contact me with further * 

plan you want, its exactly what the NUAM specialist unit- j mf^^ort^uriB-iinkedPia^ ~ | 

■ Mam e - - (f 

linked team is trained to provide. Contact your financial j Addrcss - j 

adviser and ask about Norwich Union Asset Manage- | ~ NORWICH A UNION 

ment. Alternatively clip the coupon and we’ll put you in J B ^ Tim aehmw^niI | I 

touch with an expert adviser in your area. 


j Jg T 9/12 ASHMftmSgWNT 1 I — J 

1 PO B OX 124 -51^/59 ROSE LAN E 1 NORWICH hB I US- TEL: ( DSC) 6 22200 [ 


4 


HOME NEWS 


December 8 1986 


PARLIAMENT 



Bill’s changes 
essential 
for schools, 
says Baker 


TEACHERS’ PAY 


There must be a resolution of 
the problems of the schools on 
terms promising an early return 
to the past standards of commit- 
ment and professionalism a- 
mong all teachers, Mr Xenneth 
Baker, Secretary of State for 
Education and Science, said 
when he moved the second 
reading of the Teachers’ Pay and 
Conditions Bill. The Bill incor- 
porated changes essential to the 
effective delivery of school 
education in the months and 
years ahead. 

The education of children was 
critical to the future economic 
and social wellbeing of the 
nation and equally important to 
the personal development of the 
individual. It instilled wonder 
and curiosity about the natural 
world; fostered appreciation of 
great literature, poetry, drama, 
an and music. 

It developed a personal sense 
of values in things moral and 
ethical and prepared young 
people for life in an increasingly 
complex world where adaptabil- 
ity. co-operation and commu- 
nication were vital for personal 
fulfilment and the progress of 
society. 

Children had been badly af- 
fected by recent years of discord 
over teachers’ pay and the 
matching failure to deliver un- 
interrupted education of the 
right quality. 

The disruption and its impact 
on children had been very 


damaging. It had been unjustifi- 
able and avoidable, had 


there 

been a general willingness to 
move forward on any reason- 
able basis. 

“The Government has wa- 
tched all this with increasing 
concern." 

Labour MPs; And done nothing 
about iL 

Mr Baker said that he bad been 
conscious o This duty to promote 
the education of children and to 
secure the effective execution by 
local authorities, under his con- 
trol and direction, of the na- 
tional policy for providing a 
varied and comprehensive ed- 
ucation service in every area. 
That was the language of the 
1944 Education Act which 
spoke of the Government’s 
duty, not of its powers. 

"This Government accepts 
that duty, without qualification. 
Today 1 seek the support of this 
House for changes which are 
essential to the effectivedelivcry 
of school education in the 
months and years ahead" 
(Conservative cheers). 

The terms of resolution must 
be fair to teachers, many of 
whom would have had grave 
misgivings about the events of 
the past few years, but they must 
also be fair to parents, taxpayers 
and ratepayers who financed the 
schools. They would accept a 
generous settlement for teachers 
in return for an improved 
education service. 

"They will not understand 
special treatment for teachers’ 
pay on any other terms. Nor is 
the Government willing to give 
that," 

The first clause of the Bin 
repealed the Act under which 
the Burnham committees op- 
erated. Clearly those friendless 
committees must go. New 
arrangements had to be in- 
troduced to deal with pay and 
the job for which the pay was 
given. 


Outlining the recent history of 
the situation, he said that a 
considerable gain from the 
Acas-led discussions in recent 


months had been the emerging 
definition of teachers’ duties 


and working rime at the direc- 
tion of the head teacher, but the 
draft package also had great 
weaknesses. 


Incentives were minimal and 
the least experienced teachers 
received the biggest increases. 
They must have proper differen- 
tials to reward good classroom 
teaching and extra responsibil- 
ity, to pay for scarce skills and to 
give school management e- 
nough flexibility to attract good 
teachers to posts in difficult 


schools, perhaps in the inner 
cities. 

The structure which the 
employers and some of the 
unions would now seem to 
favour would have a cost well 
beyond the amount he 
announced on October 30, a 
very generous sum of £1 18 mil- 
lion this year and £490 million 
next. The excess of the Acas deal 
would be £85 million over those 
two years alone. That repre- 
sented a quarter of annual 
expenditure on school books 
and equipment or would 
roughly provide 100 new pri- 
mary schools. 

His door remained open to 
discuss the position with other 
parties and he hoped that an 
improved and affordable pack- 
age could be arrived at quite 
soon. 

Mr Giles Radice, chief Opposi- 
tion spokesman on education: 
We might have been able to get 
agreement if at every stage, he 
had not tried to undermine iL 
Mr Baker: Providing an extra 
£600 million, and an extra 
£2.4 billion over a four-year 
period and an extra £3.4 billion 
over a five-year period could not 
be described as undermining. 
They are the necessary sums 
which should have led to 
agreement. 

Any change in the position 
must be in within the amount he 
had set ouL It was substantial 
money and was entirely reason- 
able when one considered the 
heavy demands on the public 
purse. 

Support for the Acas agree- 
ment was down (o two unions 
and the position could not have 
been more inaccurately de- 
scribed by the National Union 
of Teachers in the advertise- 
ment in national newspapers 
today, except that they had spelt 
his name correctly. 

The employers and unions 
were divided. The long, dreary 
history of the negotiations and 
the attendant disruption to 
children’s education meant that 
he could not stand by and trust 
that all would come out right in 
the end. and that peace would 
have returned to schools, as so 
often promised in recent so- 
called agreements. 

"Employer-union bargain- 
ing— and that is effectively 
what we have been watching at 
work recently — has failed our 
schools. The Government is not 
willing to rely exclusively on 
that process.” 

The Bill proposed an interim 
advisory committee and powers 
i for him to act on their advice. It 
'would not extend to further 
education where there had been 
no major disruption. 

Many working parents who 
would not see an increase of pay 
of 25 per cent this year or next 
were fed up when so-called 
professional people walked out 
on school leaving their children 
to go home to be looked after by 
aunts and grandparents. 

“The Goverment must act to 
ensure that the kind of negotiat- 
ing brawl which we have all so 
clearly seen in the past two years 
is brought to a swift end" 
(Conservative cheers). 

If an accommodation with all 
parties could be achieved within 
the financial framework already 
announced, providing a proper 
career structure for all teachers, 
he would be delighted to lay the 
necessary order giving effect to 
that agreement, but the House 
must be in no doubt of the 
Government’s determination to 
act to dose “this sorry 
business". 

Mr GOes Radice, Opposition 
spokesman on education and 
science, said that although the 
Opposition favoured reform of 
Burnham machinery, they 
strongly opposed legislation 
which removed bargaining 
rights. 

Having read the Bill be found 
his worst fears confirmed. This 
so-called Teachers Pay and Con- 
ditions Bill gave the Secretary of 
State new and sweeping powers 
to impose a settlement. 

Equally disturbing, it re- 
moved the ability of local 
authorities and teachers* or- 
ganizations to negotiate about 
teachers’ pay and conditions. 



Housing 

appeals 

worry 

MPs 


PLANNING 


Sir Anthony Meyer (left): Too many retirement homes being built Mr Roy Hughes: Let locals deride the issues. Mr Marie 

Robinson: Issues considered fully and fairly. 


Delay on 
finances 
inevitable 


Dr David Owen, Leader of the 
SDP, said during the exchanges 
after the Prime Minister's state- 
ment on the EEC summit that it 
was inevitable that the looming 
budgetary crisis had been 
avoided on til after a general 
election. Was there any sign that 
the Federal Republic of Ger- 
many was prepared to act on 
CAP surpluses? 

Mrs Thatcher said that Britain 
had ratified the Single E ur ope an 
Act and the rest bad already 
done so or would do so by the 
end of the year when the 1.4 per 
cent value-added tax would be 
in the treaty and could be 
changed only by agreement of 
all governments and par- 
liaments. 

"We are all prepared to tackle 
surpluses but it is one thing to 
say that but another to decide 
the method without stopping 
people buying this year’s crop. 

"The two thing s might be 
tackled at the same time — not 
producing surpluses while hav- 
ing a programme to reduce 
them." 

Mr Edward Taylor (Southend 
East, C) sought an assurance 
(hat Mrs Thatcher would not 
agree to a supplementary budget 
in 1987. Every single reform 
measure in the CAP had 
brought only more subsidies 
and more production. 

The only way to resolve the 
cash crisis and save British 
agriculture from inevitable di- 
saster would be to seek repatri- 
ation of agriculture policy from 
the Community to the member 
states. 

How could the heads of 
government square the state- 
ment on terrorism with the 
directive being drafted by the 
Commission to remove controls 
on freedom of movement of 
weapons across Community 
boundaries, already determined 
by majority vote in the Single 
European Act? 

Mrs Thatcher repeated that the 
1.4 per cent VAT was enshrined 
in the treaty. It could be changed 
only as she had described. 

On repatriation, one would 
have to watch the effects on the 
budget. “We would need to look 
at that carefully before giving a 
yea or a nay to that point.” 

On terrorism and weapons 
control nothing would prevent 
Britain acquiring control of her 
own powers. 

The Prime Minister said later 
that unless the amount spent on 
agriculture coukl be cut it would 
be difficult to agree a larger 
budget for research and de- 
velopment 

Sir Rnssell Johnston (Inverness, 
Naira and Lochaber, L) said 
that ft was difficult not to be 
cynical when one heard about 
Britain taking the initiative in 
job creation. 

On the social fund, the impact 
it could make on training would 
inevitably be limited and prob- 
ably ineffective unless there 
were more own resources or a 
reduction in agricultural spend- 
ing. or both. 

Mrs Thatcher replied that she 
did not particularly want to 
have more resources for the 
Community. “I shall strain 
against any increase in the 
1.4 percent.” 


Thatcher avoids giving 
EEC budget assurance 


The Prime Minister avoided 
giving any assurance that there 
would be no supplementary 
EEC budget next year, though 
pressed to do so from both sides 
of the House. 

Being questioned after mak- 
ing a statement on the London 
EEC summit she said that the 
Government would “strain 
against” such a supplementary 
budget, though she adm itted 
that the Community could be 
running out of money towards 
the end of next year. 

In her statement. Mrs 
Thatcher said that there had 
been two major themes of the 
summit. or European 
Council: businesses and jobs; 
and safeguarding the open 
society. 


EEC SUMMIT 


6 Need for concerted 
action to protect 
citizens 9 


On the first, she said that 
inflation in the Community was 
expected to fall to 3 per cent in 
1987, the lowest level for 20 
years. The council endorsed an 
action programme for jobs 
which put emphasis on t raining . 
It would be carried forward by 
social affairs ministers at then* 
meeting later this -week. 

Linked with the need to create 
the conditions for growth of 
jobs, the council looked at ways 
of encouraging small and me- 
dium businesses, one of the 
main sources of Dew jobs. The 
Community had agreed to more 
than£l billion ofloans for small 
businesses. 

The council endorsed the 
principle of the Commission’s 
proposal both to simplify value- 
added tex and to make it 
possible to lift the VAT thresh- 
old to about £25,000. 

Completion of a large, single 
market in Europe bad been an 
important priority of the British 

presidency. 

On the second theme, she said 
that there was the need for 
concerted action to protect citi- 
zens against terrorism, drugs, 
illegal immigration and abuse of 
asylum. Terrorism could strike 
anywhere, and it was vital that 
they acted together in then- 
common defence, as they bad 
done in the case of Syria. 

"We therefore agreeed on: a 
policy of no concessions under 
duress to terrorists or then- 
sponsors; and on solidarity be- 
tween member states in their 
efforts to prevent terrorist 
crimes and to bring the guilty to 
justice. 

"Free movement for bona 
fide travellers within the 
Community must go hand in 
band with better controls at the 
Community’s external frontiers. 

“On drags, the heads of 
government endorsed a seven- 
point plan covering intensified 
co-operation between police and 
customs authorities; a decision 
that illicit drag traffickers' assets 
will be liable to confiscation 
throughout the Community; ex- 
changes of drags liason officers; 
and exc h anges of information 
on the treatment of drug addic- 
tion and on education about die 
dangers of drag abuse.” 


-The meeting asked the 
Commission to ensure Commu- 
nity-wide exchange of informa- 
tion on Aids, and to consider 
what further co-operation in 
research might he taken against 
the spread of this dreadful 
disease 

“The heads of government 
discussed East-West relations 
and arms control. There was 
wide support for the points 
which 1 agreed recently with 
President Reagan at Camp 
David. They issued a statement 
on the Soviet occupation of 
Aghanistan, which was now 
nearing the end of its seventh 
year.” 

Foreign ministers had dis- 
ussed the problems of the 
Middle East and the Iran-Iraq 
war and emphasized the im- 
portance Of maintaining contact 

with the Gulf states. 

“It has been a priority of the 
British presidency to make the 
Community work better for the 
benefit of individual citizens. 
This was a practical and success- 
ful council relevant to jobs, to 
oar future pro sp eri ty within the 
Community and to the fu t ur e 
safety of our citizens.” 

Mr Roy Hattessky, deputy 
leader of the Labour Party, said 
that the Opposition welcomed 
and supported the initiative 
taken to co-ordinate policies to 
combat terrorism, the spread of 
Aids and drug abuse and also 
welcomed the health edu c at i on 

campaign. 

Judgment on the co-ordina- 
tion of visa policy most await a 
statement about the rales 
around which the policy was to 
be co-ordinaied. Did the Prime 
Minister envisage that the basis 
would be the generally liberal 
and humane policies of this 
country’s European partners ar 
Britain’s own racially discrimi- 
natory policies? 

“Would rite accept our 
congratulations on the support 
the summit’s own communique, 
though not her statement gave 
to the importance of dialogue 
between EEC ministers and 
trade unions within the 
Community and also the sup- 
port given by the communique 
to die co-operative strategy for 
growth? The Prime Munster’s 
attitude to both is well known. 
We are delighted that she was 
either defeated or surrendered 
on each issue.” 

The policies for reducing 
unemployment in the Commu- 
nity were a pathetic response to 
what even the Foreign Secretary 
called the main rhallemy facing 
the British presidency. They 
consisted of platitudes such as 
the expressed desire for lower 
interest rates. 


the Co mmunity would face next 
spring? 

Did she accept that a supple- 
mentary budget was now un- 
avoidable qririff Europe was 
facing literal bankruptcy? 
Would she give the House her 
judgment on that point and say 
what possible advantage, apart 
from an attempt to save her own 
face, was gained from her refusal 
to act the ffna-nri^f crisis 

now? 

On the CAP, the re ba d to be a 
major reform, a red u ction in 
surpluses and a prices policy in 
the interests of producers no less 
than of consumers. Was it not 
shameful that the pursuit of 
those objectives, afl in the 
British interest, should have 
been sacrificed to help the 
German conservatives in their 
election campaign? 

Why was there no mention of 
relations between Europe and 
the United Stales in the commu- 
nique. why was that topic given 
so much prominence at the 
press conference winch followed 
the nnn mh «tiH why did the 
Prime Minister deal with it in 
such detail today? 

Was ft because rite no longer 
had “implicit faith” — her own 
words — in President Reagan’s 
integrity, or did she remain an 
apologist for the deals done over 
Iran tot could not persuade the 
other heads of state to be 
similarly sycophantic? - 
Mrs T hatcher said that she 
noted Mr Hatteisiey’s contempt 
for the other 1 1 heads of 
government in discussing the 
results of this conference and his 
contempt fin* them all an the 
CAP and finance. 

It was noted that the Commu- 
nity was a mam component of 
the engine for growth. The 


Concern was expressed by sev- 
eral MPs during Welsh ques- 
tions in the Commons about me 
□umber of cases where planning 
permission had been refused by 
a local authority and then 
granted on appeal. 

Sr Anthony Meyer (North West 
Clwvd. C) said that there was a 
growing tendency for planning 
inspectors to overturn decisions 
route by planning authorities 
and that was making it very 
difficult to limit the seemingly 
inexorable spread of retirement 
homes and the increase in 
speculative building. 

Mr Brynm or John (Pontypridd, 
Lab) said that one case involved 
the Secretary of State's ov- 
erturning the decision of a 
planning authority about an 



open-air market. That had led to 
toter and sustained local 
opposition because people felt 
that traffi c, which was already 
heavy, would become chaotic 
when the market was working. 
The ?«*ig had not been consid- 
ered carefully enough by the 
inspector at the appeal 
Dr John Marek (Wrexham, 
Lab) said that there was a 
genera l anxiety about the num- 
ber Of Cases where planning 
permission was granted on ap- 
pal against the wishes of the 
original planning authority. 
Ministers should look again at 
the general principles and 
in str ucti ons given to inspectors 
about the way they decided 
appeals. 

Mr Keith Raffim (Defyn, C) said 
that insufficient importance was 
attached to local structure plans, 
which represented the views of 
those living in a particular area, 
when appeals were decided. 

Mr Roy Hughes, an Opposition 


A swift glance at reports of the 
London EEC summit might 
well induce a sense of wear; 
familiarity. A low-key, mod- 
erately successful meeting fa 
widely seen as the prelude to a< 
stormy Conun unity year in 
1987. with the interlocking 
problems of the common agri- 
cultural policy and the budget 
at the centre of the battle. 

Hare we not, one might ask, 
been here so many times 
before? Yet in fact the 
Community has changed more 
than might be readily appar- 
ent with the enlargement of its 

membership. 

Beneath the surface, yet 
always liable to affect what 
happens on the surface, there 
is a constant potential division 
between the north and the 
south. So the same problems 
reappear, but in rather dif- 
ferent shape. 

This is most apparent in the " 
arguments over die CAP. Id - 
the past tire task of reforming 
the system has seemed to - 
depend on persuading the 
French and German govern- 
ments to risk the political 
unpopularity involved in “ 
squeezing their less efficient 
farmers. 


Germans and the 


French unhappy 

it was usually better to leave 


derision-making to local people. 

In Newport, the Secretary of 
State’s guidelines had been 
responsible for vetoing an 
enforcement order on a scrap- 
yard near a new leisure centre 
which could be relocated. The 
Welsh Office should assist the 
local council in its drive for 
Tourism. 

Mr Mark Robinson, Under- 
secretary of State for Wales, said 
that it was a statutory require- 
ment on local planning authori- 
ties, the Secretary of State and 
his inspectors to consider each 
case on its merits. 

He was confident that the 
inspectors considered the issues 


6 How will she deal 
with £2bn deficit? 9 


British interest rates were now 
the highest in Europe and die 
highest in British history. When 
did Mix Thatcher expect that 
particularly pious hope of the 
communique to be fulfilled 
where her Government was 
concerned? 


How did she propose to deal 
with the £2 billion deficit that 


Co mmun ity had been optimis- 
tic about growth towards the 
end of this year and believed 
there were reasonable prospects 
next year. 

Mr Hattersley had argued that 
nothing was really achieved on 
jobs. Among a number of 
practical elements contained in 
the council's approach was 
completion of the internal mar , 
ket of which 32 internal mea- 
sures had already been agreed or 
adopted since July — the most 
ever regi s tered in a sin gle 
presidency. 

“The completion of die in- 
ternal market is going weH It 
enables us to set standards for 
British businessmen and en- 
ables them better to sell in the 
Co mmuni ty, ft includes- pos- 
itive help for small films, cuts 
regulatory bonds on smalt and 
medium firms and a programme 
for employment growth which 
has been set out in fall.” 

With regard to the CAP, Mr 
Hattersley was well aware of the 
d isc us s ions on quotas and die 
steps bring taken. 

M Jacques Defers was 
completing his report in which 
he had to dia l mro Mh e conver- 

|pjurciajmi!mandthe reform 


fairty and fully, though he could 
not comment on individual 
planning applications. There 


were no proposals to change the 
planning law at present. 

• The number of public sector 
"starts” in council-house build- 
ing in Wales was 17 per cent 
higher in 1985 than in 1984, Mr 
Mark Robinson, Under-Sec- 
retary of Slate for Wales, said 
during Commons questions. 

He was replying to Mr 
Alexander CarlOe (Montgom- 
ery, L), who said that the level of 
council-house building in Wales 
was abominably few. What sort 
of measures was he going to take 
to ensure that accommodation 
was made available for single 
people and young couples? 

Mr Dafydd Wigley (Caernarfon, 
PI Q asked how local authori- 
ties could be expected to build 
housing when the Government 
refused to give them the capital 
to do so. The Government’s 
record was one to be ashamed 
of 

Mr Robinson said that be had 

{ 'ust given local authorities a 
iuge increase in housing 
expenditure. 


More money 
for Wales 


Embryo research 


Tory MP wants early Bill 


By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

A Conservative MP is 
launching a new attempt to 
ban the use of human embryos 
in scientific research. 

The derision of Mr Alistair 
Burt, MP for Bury North and 
parliamentary private sec- 
retary to Mr Kenneth Baker, 
Secretary of State for Educa- 
tion and Science, to introduce 
the Unborn Children (Protec- 
tion) Bill will revive the par- 
liamentary controversy on an 
issue on which there are strong 
divisions in all parties . 

Mr Enoch Powell’s Bill oh 
the ' protection of embryos 
received a big Commons 
majority for its second reading 
early toft year, bnt ultimately 
failed through the blocking 
tactics of opponents and the 
lack of government enthu- 
siasm for it 

Last month the Government 
promised legislation in the 
next Parliament on tbe 
Warnock report Mr Tony 
Newton, Minister of Health, 
promised a free vote on the 
issue. 

Bnt Mr Burt who drew 
fourteenth place in the ballot 
for private members' legfafa- 



Mr Burt Question should be 

resolved before election, 
don, said the question should 
be resolved before tbe general 
election. Because he is so low 
on the list Mr Bmt’s Bill 
would have no chance of 
success without government 
support and yesterday that 
appeared unlikely to be 
forthcoming. 

But the introduction of the 
measure, with the possibility 
of another Commons debate, 

will mean that the Govern- 
ment will face pressure id sped 
out in more detail its plans for 
legislation In the next Par- 


liament, and to say whether it 
will back a ban on research. 

Mr Burt said yesterday that 
the Commons had dearly 
demonstrated that it wanted to 
see somethin on the statute 
book now to stop tbe practice. 
"I believe very strongly that 
this must be settled before the 
election rather than having 
vague promises made of what 
might be done afterwards. 

“We will do everything In 

our power to persuade tbe 

Government of the righ t ness 
of our course of action and that 
it is highly undesirable in 
every way to defer legislation. 

Mr Burt said another rea- 
son for Introducing the BUI 
was to counter the lies told 
about the results of outlawing 
the use of the human em bryo 
for experiments. 

The Society for the Protec- 
tion of Unborn Children yes- 
terday praised Mr Barfs 
courage and tenacity in 
reintroducing tbe BOL 

It added: "Until such time 
as Parliament enacts legisla- 
tion on this subject, we still 
feel the Government has no 
acceptable alternative but to 
implement forthwith a mora- 
torium upon ail embryo 
experiments”. 


Disquiet 
on clergy 
expenses 


A mutest that low paid clergy- 
men had u> meet some of the 
expenses of their job from their 
own pocket was made in the 
Commons by Mr Pieter Bnrin- 
vels (Leicester East, Q and a 
member of the Church of Eng- 
land Genera] Synod. Sir Wil- 
liam van Straobeuzee, Second 
Church Estates Commissioner, 
agreed that they bad to meet 
16 per cent of expenses fairly 
incurred and that that was too 

high 

He had said earlier that the 
Church Commissioners did not 
have information about the 
number of clergy in receipt of 
Family Income Supplement be- 
cause it was a private matter 
between tbe individual and the 
DHSS. 

Mr Bnnavels: Tbe Commis- 
sioners should look at expenses. 
A lot of these are no longer met 
in full by tbe Church Commis- 
sioners. The clergy have an 
onerous task. 


Sr WfiUaa van Stranbeazee 
For assistant clergy, or curates, 
16 percent of expenses that they 
fairly incur have not been 
reimbursed. That is too high. 

One hesitates to interfere in 
very personal matters just be- 
cause a man is an assistant 
curate, but greater emphasis has 
been placed on salaries of the 
lowest paid, who have had a 
60 per cent increase in the past 
five years. 


Charge for tours 
of House attacked 


A Conservative MPs suggestion and would have Mr Latham’s 

point drawn to their attention. 
About 131,000 had been round 


that a charge should be levied on point drawn to their attention, 
of the Palace of West- Abou 


tours 

minster was greeted with im- 
mediate Labour protests and 
was described from the Opposi- 
tion front bench later as 
ludicrous. 

Mr Peter Bnnoveis (Leicester 
East, C) asked whether tbe time 
had not come, in view of the 
increasing number of visitors, 
for a change to be levied. Amid 
shouts of “No" from Labour 
MPS, he added: "The alter- 
native, because this is a place of 
work, working during the day. is 
to reduce the numberof tickets 
issued. 

“We have to get on with our 
work and our constituents are 
finding it difficult to get in.” 

Mr John BSffen, Leader of the 
House of Commons, said that 
such a suggestion would have to 
be considered by the Accom- 
modation and. Administration 
Sub-committee of the Services 
Committee. It raised wide issues 
of principle. 

Mr Michael tertwm (Rutland 
and Melton, Q: This is tbe 
British Parliament for people to 
go round. Ax present they have 
great difficulty in getting round, 
with the long queues. Could two 
sets of security-checking equip- 
ment be installed to halve the 
time people have to spend in 
queues waiting to see their MP? 
Mr Bifftfl said that the sub- 
committee was aware of that 


last year in MPs’ parties, which 
was a considerable increase: 


Mr Alan Williams, Opposition 
spokesman on House of Com- 
mons affairs, said that Mr Biffen 
should ignore the hidiciDus 
suggestion Of charging for tour- 
ing the Palace, but should 
seriously consider tbe point 
about the queues to be checked. 
Many MPs had people coming 
long distances who found it 
difficult to get there by 1 1.30, 
and then had often to wait in the 
rain because there was <mly one 
screening point. 

Mr Kffen said that be did not 
disparage Mr Bntinvelsi’s re- 
marks but the committee could 
look at the matter again. 

• The bottling plant which had 
for many years provided whisky 
for the House of Commons was. 
being threatened with closure, 
Mr Tbom&s C3arke (Monldands 
West, Lab) said when applying 
for an emergency debate on the 
subject. 

He said that on Friday . 430 
people had been told they would 
lose theirjobs as a conseq u enc e 
of the Guinness takeover of 
Distillers winch included the 
Janies Buchanan, bottling plant 
in his constituency. 

The Speaker (Mr Bernard 
Weaiheni!) rejected his applica- 
tion for an emergency deb at e. . 


Mr Nicholas Edwards, Secretary 
of State for Wales, was urged by 
Mr Raymond Powell (Ogmore. 
Lab) (faring Commons ques- 
tions to advise industrialists in 
the South-east to get on their 
bikes and go to the valleys of 
Wales. 


That is stQI a factor. With 
the German elections to be 
held next month, it had been 
appreciated that nothing much 
could be done about agri- 
culture last weekend. Both the 
Germans and the French were 
unhappy about the section that 
had been prepared on the 
subject in the draft commu- 
nique, so it was left out 
altogether. 

But tbe south European 
members also had misgivings 
because the draft referred 
specifically to revising the 
regime for vegetable oils and 
fiats, which are among their 
principal agricultural prod- 
ucts. 

It is then- objections which 
seem likely to present the 
greatest obstacle next year. 
They are not opposed to 
reform of the CAP in prin- 
ciple. There is general agree- 
ment that something needs to 
be done about die ludicrous 
surpluses that have been 
building np. 

But thes| have been essen- 
tially in ffie produce of the 
north Europeans, who are 
concerned that If the level of 
support is reduced for those 
items the same problem 
should not be allowed to re- 
emerge with Mediterranean 
agricultural products in a few 
years. So it is suggested that a - 
brake should be imposed to 
prevent surpluses appearing in 
Mediterranean prod nee, an . 
idea which has yet to find 
approval among the south 
Europeans. 

Running parallel with this 
controversy there is another on 
redudng economic inequalities 
within the Commnnity. The 
favoured means of doing this is 
by directing more resources 
from the regional and social 
funds to tbe less developed 
areas. Unless the south Euro- 
peans benefit in that way they 
are likely to be unenthosiastic 
about other reforms. 


■ JSESttS £££ (South Europeans 

the most nervous 


just that. Wales bad attracted 
about 20 per cent of all inward 
investment to the UK in the 
pest three years. 


Debate on 
Rosyth 
is refused 


Mr Gordon Brown (Dunferm- 
line East, Lab) made an un- 
successful application for an 
emergency debate on tbe threat- 
ened loss of jobs at the Rosyth 
dockyard and the future of naval 
work there. 

He said that on Friday the 
Ministry of Defence had an- 
nounced the transfer of refitting 
work on the submarine HMS 
Conqueror from Rosyth, de- 
priving them of vital work and 
threatening hundreds of jobs. 
Minis te r s had also anno unced 
that a private company was 
taking over the running of the 
dockyard. 

Those announcements would 
new working conditions 
ally on 6,000 civil ser- 
vants, forcibly transferred to the 
private sector, and would 
threaten up to 1300 jobs In an 
area of ever rising unemploy- 
ment. There had been no 
consolation. 

The Speaker (Mr Bernard 
WeauteriU) said, in refusing the 
application, that be hoped that 
Mr Brown would find other 
ways of raising the issue before 
the Christmas recess. 


It would be too simplistic to 
portray all the north Europe- 
ans as eager to develop the 
internal market, with the. 
e lim i nati on of the remaining 
barriers to trade within the 
Comm unity, and all the south 
Europeans as dragging theft- 
feet Most of the highly devel- 
oped member states are selec- 
tive free traders, each wanting 
to preserve some special ■ 
interest. 


Bnt in general it fa ffie south 
Europeans who are most ner- 
vous about the ability of their 
industries to compete. Their 
anxieties are likely to grow if 
they are not compensated by 
receiving more money from the 
**gioaal and social funds. Yet 
these can hardly be expanded 
unless the CAP fa reformed. 

All of this adds a new 
complexity to the already com- - 
plicated pattern of Community 
politics. There h«« always 
b een s ome conflict of interest 
between the north and south, 
Si.™*. P° or members. 
With enlargement the number 
of the south and Hip poor H«« 
been increased. 


Parliament today 

Commons (230): Abolition of 
Domestic Rates Etc (Scotland) 
BiU, second reading. ' 

Lords (230k Criminal Justice 
(Scotahid) BiU, second reading. 


Those Interests do not al- 
ways coincide any more than 
do those of the richer northern 
members. No generalization 
abteit the Commnnity ever 
holds good all of the time. But 
the prospects for the EECs 
emerging unscathed from the 
Peril In 1987 wOI 
depe nd a good deal upon the 
capacity of north and sonth to 
stake bargains that fake ac- 
count of .each other's concerns. 




A 



i 


« * 
5~. * 
|£2 


fr 


9 

ti , I £ 

"i l 




. - Cl 

! * t 
- A 


4. A 


■Si 


% 


?•>,** 

w h « 


c’.. ri 


'3yl 





‘HOME NEWS 


5 



Killer who terrorized 
child during siege 
receives life sentence 


<- Er TL^ alkcr ’ a selfcoa- 
fessed taller, was jailed for life 
at theCentral Criminal Court 

yesterday for murdering a 
mother and attempting to 
murder her daughter dunng a 
siege in west London last 
Christmas. 

A jury rejected Walker's 
plea that he was suffering from 
diminished responsibility 
when he fatally stabbed Mrs 
Jackie Charles, aged 22, dur- 
ing the 29-bour siege. 

Walker, aged 29, had admit- 
ted the manslaughter of Mis 
Charles on the ground of 

di min is h ed responsibility, but 
denied murdering her and 
attempting to murder her 
daughter Carlene, aged four. 

He knifed the girl on three 
occasions, causing “sick- 
ening” injuries. They were 
“monstrous attacks", Mr Jus- 
tice Ailiott told him. 

Walker took the hostages 
when he went to Mrs Charles's 
flat in Poynters Court, 
Northolt, west London, to 
give Mrs Marlene Walker, his 
wife, and their daughter, Pa- 
tricia, Christmas presents. 

Mrs Walker and Patricia 
had moved there after a split 
with Walker, the court was 
tokL 

When Mrs Charles told him 
he could not see Patricia, also 
aged four, and that Mrs 
Walker had gone to call the 
police. Walker climbed into 
the flat 

Fifteen minutes later he 
slabbed Mrs Charles through 
the neck and hurled her body 
through the window. He de- 
manded that the police should 
let his wife into the flat. 

When his demands were 


refused he turned on Carlene, . 
threatening to cut, maim and 
kill her. 

As Police Constable Rafi 
Landi pleaded with him to 
release Carlene he hac ked her 
fingers down to the bone. 

“Walker refused offers of 
bandages for her,” PC land? 
had told the coutl 

At one point W alker dan. 


Mr Christopher Barnett, for 
Walker, told the court his 
client felt deep and sincere 
remorse for what had hap* 
pened. 

In 1983 Walker received a 
five-year jail sentence after 
admitting his part in seven 
armed post office raids in 
London and gave evidence 


gave 

against other members of the 

filed Carlene from a third-floor gang, 
balcony by her vest He also Air Barnett told the court 
tied her up, smashed a police “As a former supergrass, his 
radio against ter head and time in prison now will be 

particularly lonely and un- 
pleasant". 

Although he had recovered 
from an operation for the 
bullet wound in his bead he 
was partially blind. 

The court was told that 
Walker was bom in Jamaica 
and came to Britain to join bis 
parents when he was aged 10. 
His father frequently beat him 
with a hosepipe for minor 
misdeamcanours. 

Dr John Hamilton, medical 
director of Broadmoor Hos- 
pital, said that Walker was 
mentally handicapped. 

Although Walker has two 
other children by different 
women, he married Mrs 
Walker in September 1982, 
while serving bis earlier jail 
sentence. 

He was devoted to their 
daughter Patricia, who is 
physically handicapped after 
an operation to amputate both 


threatened to inflict gruesome, 
fatal wounds, the court was 
told. He knifed her in the arm. 

Carlene was rescued and the 
siege ended when armed pol- 
ice stormed the flat using 
sledgehammers and stun gre- 
nades. 

PC Anthony Long climbed 
through a window to see 
Walker holding Carlene above 
him with a knife at her neck. 

PC Long shouted: “Drop it, 
yon bastard”. When Walker 
did not, he shot him in the 
back of the head. Walker 
slumped, leaving the 10-inch 
knife slicking from the girl's 
neck. 

As he was taken to an 
ambulance Walker allegedly 
told police: “Why didn't you 
finish me off? I really deserved 
to die.” 

Mr Justice AJliott yesterday 
praised the police action. 

“The intervention of armed 
police is happily still atari 
this country,” he said, 
commended PC Long for his 
restraint and the “fortunate 
outcome”. 

The judge asked PC Landi 
to step forward in court and 
told him: “You are a young 
officer, a credit to the force”. 


Last night, police said that 
Carlene had physically recov- 
ered from her injuries al- 
though it was too early to 
aw« an y emotional Ha wiagft. 

Sbe is living with her ma- 
ternal grandparents. 


Anarchist 

complaints 

rejected 

“■ The Press Council has re- 
jected a complaint about re- 
ports in the Daily Express that 
claimed to expose a group of 
anarchists who were posing as 
an animal liberation group. 

The council said it accepted 
the reporter’s detailed descrip- 
tion of what happened at 
meetings she attended. 

Eileen MacDonald describ- 
ed her experiences after infil- 
trating one of the Animal 
' Liberation Front’s secret cells. 

She said that the zealots 
planned to kidnap a member 
of the Royal Family, bomb the 
homes of scientists and doc- 
tors, burn down research lab- 
oratories and terrorize the 
homes of selected police 
officers. 

Mr Robert Noding, of 
Brockely, south London, com- 
plained to the council that the 
articles contained serious in- 
accuracies which distorted his 
^ activities and those of South 
London Animal Movement. 

He said his movement was 
not a secret ceU. Its meetings 
were open to the public and 
were advertised. Allegations 
in the reports about topics 
discussed were untrue. 

In a statement Miss Mac- 
Donald said that talk by 
members of the group con- 
vinced her they were dan- 
gerous. 


Cool response to 
accident scheme 


By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


The Law Society’s free 
interview scheme for victims 
of accidents, to be launched 
nationally next May, is feeing 
“antipathy" from the medical 
profession. 

The society says that for a 
variety of reasons both 
doctors' surgeries and hos- 
pitals have been reluctant to 
display leaflets and promote 
the scheme although some 
have welcomed ft. 

Under the scheme, a free 
interview with a solicitor is 
offered to anyone who has bad 
an accident, or whose immedi- 
ate family has, no matter how 
ft occurred. 

The idea is to help accident 
victims, particularly “those 
among the less well-off sec- 
tions of society who are. 
perhaps ignorant about then- 
rights and the legal remedies 
available to them” to claim 
compensation for injury 
where appropriate. 

The Law Society, explaining 
its re-launch in the Law 
Society Gazette, says that the 
British Medical Association 
has suggested that it is up to 
individual areas and commit- 
tees to decide whether, they 
wish to participate in the 
scheme. 

The society says: “The point 
remains that many people still 
do not know their rights. 

“Many think that if they are 


getting sickness benefit or 
injury benefit, this is the same 
as compensation. 

“Many are still ignorant of 
the feet that a c laim can be 
made if an accident was 
somebody else's fault, and 
that advice and help is readily 
available.” 

Experience in Manchester, 
where the scheme was 
launched in 1979, has shown 
that up to 70 per cent of 
accident victims who could 
claim compensation, do not 

It also showed that . 80 per 
cent of those coming forward 
had been able to take farther 
action. 

The scheme has been run by 
some 30 of the 120 local law 
societies in England and 
Wales. 

Under the re-launch from 
next May, it is hoped to 
extend the scheme to ail areas 
not now covered. 

It will coincide with the 
publication of the 1987 
solicitors' regional directories, 
which will show which solic- 
itors and their firms partici- 
pate in the scheme. 

Accident victims can find 
out about the scheme and 
where to go through citizens’ 
advice bureaux, local libraries 
or through sending bade the 
“tear-off’ section of the leaflet i 
publicizing the scheme. 



51*180 globe lamp 


SL-a replaces 40W bulb. SL*-t3 replaces BOW bulb. 



TtNWbrfirBNo.1 UobfcMfcw 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 



offers introduced on December stand a better chance of receiv-. dates this year are December 

ing them in return. 


Gas share 
rush aids 
Christmas 
post delay 

If yum- Christmas cards are 
a little slow getting there this 

festive season — bfame Sid. 

That at least seems Co be the 
message from the Post Office, 
winch is feeing the task of 
processing a record number of 
items, after the rash to apply 
for British Gas shares. 

The Post Office yesterday 
revealed that it expects to 
preside over the biggest yet 
mail ran in its 350-year his- 
tory, with more than 
1,200 million seasonal items 
delivered by Christmas Eve. 

With applications and re- 
plies for the record-breaking 
British Gas share sale adding 
to the enormous relume of 
mail, it is appealing to the 
public to post parcels and 
cards ^rliw than the recom- 
mended deadlines. 

To some extent the message 
appears to have reached its 
target, because the Royal Mail 
has reported an earlier than 
normal start to the seasonal 
rash, with more than 60 mil- 
lion items of maQ handled 
daily at the beginning of 
December. 

Well-laid plans to cope with 
the onslaught have 

already been Implemented and 
no big problems are antici- 
pated, but the Post Office does, 
not want to take any chances. 

It said: “Some 10 months of 
preparation means that the 
Royal Mail is fully geared np 
to deal with the rash. 

“But with so ranch extra 
mail around this Christmas, ft 
wo&ld be a big help if cards get 
into the post well ahead of the 
latest recommended dates.” 

To cope with the onslaught, 
the Royal Mail has has hired 
an extra 3J>00 vehicles to add 
to its regular fleet of 28,000. 

An extra 30,000 casual staff 
are to be hired to help fun-time 
Post Office employees to deal 
with their most challenging 
time of year. 

A series of discount Stamp 


2 have also contributed to the 
increase in Christinas mall, 
with the Post Office offering at 
least a penny off 300 million 
second-class stamps in a pack- 
age that will cost it £3 motion. 

The Post Office also ex- 
plains the rash by pointing to 
the increasing popularity of 
Christmas cards and the belief 
among many people that, by 
sending cards off early, they 


This clearly Is the case with 
the annual tide of letters from 
youngsters around the nation 
addressed to Father Christ- 
mas, Rein deer land, c/o The 
Royal Mail, to all of which the 
Post Office endeavours to 
reply — provided they are sent 
eariy enough. 

Recommended last posting 


17 for parcels and second dass 
mail, and December 19 for 
first dass malL 
• Save the Children, which is 
among dozens of charities who 
earn a substantial slice of their 
gmwifll hi fu me selling Christ- 
mas cards, has reported better 
than average safes this year 
and hopes to have sold up to 
10 milli on cards by the mid of 
the festive season. 


Decision is 
delayed 
oyer social 
worker 

Mrs Diane Dietmann, the 
social worker dismissed for 
gross misconduct over the 
handling of the Jasmine Beck- 
ford case, most wait until next 
month to find out if she wifi 
get ter job back. 

| Mr Justice Hodgson told the 
High Court yesterday that he 
'would take time to consider 
her claim that Brent soda! 
services had breached her 
contract of employment when 
they dismissed her last 
December. 

He said that he would give 
his decision on January 12, or 
soon after, on whether to grant 
her an injunction reinstating 
her, or damages feu wrongful 
dismissal. 

Jasmine, aged four, died in 
July 1984 after being tortured 
and starved by her parents, 
who were both jailed. A report 
later criticized the counefl’s 
social services department 

Trapped driver 
has both 
legs amputated 

A mobile surgical team 
performed a life-saving road- 
side operation yesterday when 
they amputated both legs of a 
lorry driver trapped m the 
.wreckage of his cab. 

The unit, including two 
surgeons, an anaesthetist and 
a nurse, drove under police 
escort from the John Raddifie 
Hospital in Oxford to the A43 
at Wesion-on-the-Green, sev- 
en miles north of the city, after 
firemen were unable to free 
the man. 

A police helicopter was used 
to ferry blood supplies to the 
scene of the accident, in which 
two lorries collided head-on. 

In a separate incident, a 
woman driver was killed when 
her car was involved in a four- 
vehicle pile-up at Gore Hill, 
near Amersham, 

Bu ckinghamshire , yesterday. 



There have been chemists, too, who have 
measured up to this responsibility rather 
welL And economists, historians, English 
graduates and mathematicians whoVe 
excelled themselves as well. 

Foi; as you may have gathered, it isn’t a 
particular academic background that we’re 
looking for when we recruit graduates for a 
career in the Police Force. 

WeYe looking for the same combination 
of management qualities that any large 
industrial or commercial concern would 
look for: clarity of thought, self discipline 
and the ability to get on with people. 

But weYe looking for other qualities too; 
impartiality, dedication and, of course, a 
sense of humour. 

For a graduate who has these qualities, 
the Police Force has a great deal to offer 
in return. 

That’s why Inspector Liz BurbeckMA and 
Inspector Richard Bruns trom BSc joined us. 

As a graduate, two routes through the 
Police Force are open to you. You could 
join by conventional entry and sit the Ser- 
geants’ examinations after two years as a 
Probationary Constable. 

If you performed especially well you 
could then be selected for the prestigious 
Special Course at the Police Staff College, 
Bramshill, which is designed to accelerate 
your career within the Force. 

But even if you did not secure a place 
on the course, the opportunities for pro- 
motion to the higher ranks of the Force 
would still be open to you. 

Alternatively, you could apply to enter via 
our Graduate Entry Scheme. Competition 
is fierce, but if you were accepted your 
place on the Special Course would be 
virtually guaranteed, and you could be an 
Inspector six years after you’d first joined. 

If you are interested in joining the Police 
write to us, and we’ll send you a copy of 
the booklet A Career for Graduates} as 
well as more details of our Graduate Entry 
Scheme. Closing date for applications is 
16th January 1987. 

Starting salary for recruits aged over 22 
is currently £9,756 and the present salary 
for an Inspector is £14,193 (rates of pay 
are higher in London). 

This is one career for which every degree 
subject is suitable. 


, To: Supt. Andrew Jones BSc, Room 553, Home Office, Queen Anne's Gate, London SW1H 9AE Please send me your booklet and application form for the Police Graduate Ernry Scheme. 


Name 

•Address 








1 

i 

'University/Pblyiechnic/ConeRe 





My Degree course ends 


POL 

I 

C 

E- ^ 

h ° 

F F I C 

E R 

vy** 





GEC Technology Expertise. 

Plus the C130 Hercules. 





This combination offers a long-term commit- 
ment to supply nations of the world with a much 

needed AEW capability 

For the current worldwide AEW opportunity, 
matching the GEC Radar with the C-130 Hercules 
Aircraft, provides an affordable airborne early 
warning capability 

From a base of more than fifty countries 
operating Hercules around the world, Lockheed 
and GEC are poised to launch a marketing programme 
that will assure the United Kingdom of technology 
leadership in the AEW field well into the future. 


^^Lockheecf- Georgia 







I? . V! 



; <V*>. 


i - 


Monet master 
down £200,000 
as the market 
proves volatile 


A, view of Rouen 
Cathedral, only half visible in 
tones of grey and violet. 
Parted by Monet in 1 894, was 
sold by Sotheby’s for £852,500 
Iasi week. 

Christie’s had sold it as 
recently as May 1984 in its 
New York rooms for the 
equivalent of £910,072. The 
purchaser must have made a 
loss of more than £200,000, 
toking commission and auc- 
' E, 0D . P remiwm “to account 
; He has also, presumably, had 
to insure h for the past two 
years and pay the cost of 

shipping it from the United 
Stales to London. 

Sotheby's estimate on the 
picture before last week's sale 
was £1 million to £1.25 mil- 
lion. Several points are dem- 
onstrated by the result Even 
when the market is enjoying a 
crazy boom, prices can go 
down as well as up. 

The idea that auction prices 
reflect some kind of “true” 
value is spurious; it is easy to 
be carried away and pay too 
much, as must have been the 
case with the purchaser of this 
picture in 1984. 

Pictures that have been 
recently on the market are not 
as popular with bidders as 
those that come from old 
collections; quick re-offerings 
often go down in price. That is 
one important way in which 
the art market differs from the 
stock market Another is the 
regularity of sales. 

The big sales are grouped 
three times a year, in autumn, 
spring and summer. There will 
be no way of telling whether 
this autumn's price levels can 
be sustained until next April 

Dealers win, of course, be 
doing business in the mean- 
time but the boom is essen- 
tially an auction affair , 
sparked by the excitement of 
the social event. Many dealers 
complain that they cannot 
find buyers for middle range 

S ctures at the prices now set 
' auctions. 

The best pictures and rar- 
ities from every field of art are 
a law to themselves. Anyone 
can sen them anywhere. 
Museums and collectors ap- 
preciate that the supply of 
great art works is running out; 


In the second of two 
articles Geraldine Nor- 
maa j Sale Room Coms- 
pondent , shows that it is 
not all tnoney-making in 
the world of high am 
prices can go down. 

once convinced that they are 
confronted by such a piece 
they begin to think in tele- 
phone numbers. 

The £2.6 million recently 
paid for a Constable is a case 
in point, as is the $12 million 
paid for an American Chip- 
pen dale-style sofa and the 
$1 J2 million for an eight- 
inch neolithic goddess. 

Will the spectacular boom 
be followed by a spectacular 
collapse? Or will prices con- 
tinue ever upward? in looking 
for the answer, one must think 
broadly of two markets. 

Taking inflation into ac- 
count, prices for middle range, 
repeatable art works have 
moved up and down in price 
over the years following the 
dictates of fashion and will 
probably continue to do so. 
Current price levels for second 
rate Impressionist and mod- 
em pictures, the focus of 
fashion, are unlikely to be 
sustained in real terms. 

On the other hand, great 
rarities have recently escalated 
in price much faster than 
inflation, partly because buy- 
ers expect them to continue to 
do so. 

Whereas, in the past, prices 
have generally fallen bade 
again after a boom, a tremen- 
dous weight of money has 
come into the market over the 
past five years, facilitated by 
the art advisory services of 
such institutions as Gtibank. 
It is possible that has changed 
the nature of the game, that 
the institutions now so heavily 
committed in the art field win 
support the market when it 
weakens. 

Art, however, 1ms no intrin- 
sic value and financial values 
are only loosely linked with 
cultural significance. It is hard 
to believe that the -current 
frenetic art market activity 
will continue indefinitely. 

, Concluded 


River ban I Solicitor’s 


on lead 
weights 

Anglers’ lead weights, cla- 
imed to be the main cause of 
swan deaths, have been 
banned on Forestry Commis- 
sion lakes and rivers. 

Now Britain's four million 
anglers will have to use non- 
toxic substitutes. 

Mr Roger Bradley, Forestry 
Commissioner, said; “The 
danger of lead in the environ- 
ment is well known and we 
feel any effort to reduce the 
threat is worthwhile. 

“But we do not wish anglers 
to interpret this as an attack 
on their sport. We recognize 
angling as an important 
recreation within the forests 
and have created and im- 
proved a number of fisheries.” 

A ban on the supply and 
sale of lead weights, though 
not their use, comes into effect 
on January I. 

Conservationists say that 
up to 5,000 mute swans die 
every year through ingesting 
lead weights but the claim is 
disputed by anglers. 


committal 
date is set 

Committal proceedings 
against Mr Ian Wood, aged 37, 
the solicitor facing two mur- 
der charges, are to begin on 
January 20. He was remanded 
in custody until Tuesday by 
Sheffield Magistrates’ Court 
yesterday. 

Mr Wood, of Bradfield, 
Sheffield, is charged with 
murdering his French girl 
friend. Miss DanieDe Lloyd, 
aged 38; murdering her daugh- 
ter Stephanie, aged three, and 
attempting to murder her son 
Christopher, aged six. 

He is also charged with 
stealing nearly £85,000 from 
clients. 


Crew rescued 

The seven-strong crew of a 
Maltese container ship was 
airlifted to safety yesterday 
after the vessel caught fire in 
the North Sea, 30 miles south- 
east of Lowestoft. 



mm To all uyfaietuis 
m&ucetom- 
Juan, Maria. 

ftMl- 

Hetes*ycnd 

rfhCh rislwasgwefiwgf 
Qfefcge ISp/ttufcdll!) 



Letter post to KEC counUiGS now 
rnsts the same as first dass post in 
the UK ■ Makes it easier to greet 
friends and relatives in Europe this 

Christmas andNew Year! 


" 

- and cards (up to 20g ) for lSp to these countries-. 

Vbu can now P* *S5 . FRANCE • GREECE ■ HOLLAND • ITA1Y 
BELGIUM • ^onQTUGAL ■ REP OF IRELAND ■ SBMN • WGERISANY 

LUXEMBOURG -PUKi^ 


Liberals call for 
alternative forms 
of medical care 

By Richard Evans* Political Correspondent 


Helping a passer 
were out and 


is part of the positive side of polking as seen by Joanne Davis and 
oat with PC Robot Barrett, m die Handsworth area of Binnlngha 


Dunn). 


Teenagers join the beat to fight bias 


By Peter De Ionno 
An expe rim e n t which puts 
teenage children on the beat 
with their local bobby is being 
tried in Handsworth, Bir- 
mingham, foe scene of violent 
rioting last year. 

Police Constable Robert 
Barrett, a community patrol 
officer at Thornhill Road pol- 
ice statin, is being shadowed 
by Joanne Davis, aged 15, and 
Hardip Ladhar Singh, aged 


14, foe first of 40 pupils from 
St John Wall School who will 
be attending the pavement 
“fife classes” 

Mr Peter Hack, the teacher 
who has organized the pro- 
gramme, said: “The pupils see 
that foe jhb of the police is not 
what they see on television and 
in the media. We are bonding 
bridges by showing youngsters 
foe positive side of police 
work.” 


They have had frequent 
opportunities to watch PC 
Barrett handle everday mat- 
ters such as a Rastafarian 
asking directions to an illegal 
radio station, an elderly Ben- 
gali wmphiirfng about l ynl 


on neighbourhood problems. 

Only twice have pupils had 
to follow die instruction, 
agreed in advance, to Wave the 
officer's side if a situation 


appeared dangerous. 

Sergeant Barry Boate, a 
permanent beat officer at 
Thor nhill Road, described the 
teenagers as “very mature and 
refreshing”. 

He said: “The fauls realize 
it's an extra responsibility but 
It helps to break down mis- 
understanding. 

“It is an investment for the 
fhtiire.*' 


Alternative forms of medi- 
cal treatment such as osteopa- 
thy, homoeopathy, herbalism 
and acupuncture should be 
available on the National 
Health Service, a Liberal 
health pamphlet recommend- 
ed yesterday. 

Public demand for such 
unorthodox treatment ap- 
pears to be increasing “and 
Liberals see this as to some 
extent a measure of the failure 
of the NHS to meet all needs”. 

The pamphlet adds: “The 
crucial question is whether the 
various ’alternative' treat- 
ments are successful. Some 
'orthodox' treatments might 
not satisfy strict double-blind 
clinical trials, even though 
they are widely accepted as 
helpful to patients. 

“Increasing incidence of 
side-effects from drugs must 
encourage a search for alter- 
natives. Medicine must re- 
main open-minded and recep- 
tive to new ideas (and old 
ones) whatever their source.” 

Provided such alternative 
treatments can be proved to 
be successful “they should be 
available for NHS patients 
subject to the same require- 
ments of proof of safety as 
applies to traditional forms of 
treatment”. 

The pamphlet, drawn up for 
the Liberal Health Panel, calls 
for a “controlled partnership” 
between between the NHS and 


private medicine which rec- 
ognizes the demand for pri- 
vate medicine but does not 
allow it to exploit the NHS or 
deprive it of resources. 

“It is essential that there 
should be no subsidy from 
public funds, either directly or 
through tax subsidies to in- 
dividuals or companies or 
other groupings.” 

Under the present Govern- 
ment the commercial health 
services have been allowed to 
“cream off” profitable activ- 
ities, “leaving the NHS with 
an unbalanced caseload and 
organizational difficulties”. 

Mr Archy Kirkwood, the 
Liberals' health spokesman, 
said yesterday; “The availabil- 
ity of private health care 
cannot be denied. We must 
beware of the danger that such 
services may reduce the free- 
dom of NHS patients to get 
good health care by pre- 
empting resources. 

“The private sector must 
make a contribution to the 
training of staff, either via a 
training levy or by providing 
agreed levels of training 
themselves.” 

The pamphlet says that 
- patients should be given more 
choice about a doctor. 

Freedom in Sickness and in 
Health (Liberal Party Publica- 
tions, Bircbcliffe Centre, 
Hebden Bridge, West York- 
shire; £1). 


Eveiything you need to organise 
your way to greater business success . . . and it’s 

all at your fingertips. 


THE WORLD’S 
NUMBER 1 

Business Time/system is acknowfexteed to be 
the Wbrkfs premier management information 
system b«ause of its completely praaicaj A5 
size and the sheer quality ofi the whole design. 

TOTAL FLEXJBILnT AND 
AN INFALLIBLE MEMORY 
Business Tune&y-szon has been designed to be 
rocally Your system comes complete 

wiiii a library of forms. You sdecc the ones you 

ting bindec’&noe you hare insetted 


A5 FORMAT 


Business Tl m c /syncm has been specially 
designed in A5 formal to be completdy’ 
practical- Unlike so many other organism, 
the A5 size allows you to insert your own 
standard A4 documents simply and quickly. 



all your personal information 
and documents - ypuTl hare all 
die vital daw about 
your work in one ' j/d 

extending 



DAILY PLAN 


SETTING PRIORITIES 

Daily planner keeps crack of your activities, 
organises >vur job priorities each day on an 
hour by hour basis. Additionally it provides 
sections for contacts, follow-ups, sonstics and 
personal reminders. 


GENERAL BUSINESS 
REFERENCE 

The Information section holds all of the 
additional data you need, soch as vour 
accounts, sales, marketing and product 
information. This section also bolds useful 
data for all business people. 


FLAWLESS 

RECORDS 

The .Address and Telephone directory is infi- 
nitely pgcnda bJc an d ensures diar you 1 Ve newer 
caught without the 
information you need 
to make important 1 
calls, in person or 
by phone. 

" All tour spare 
and completed 
records are 
held in -a robust 
desk top storage 
system to keep 
you organised 
rear after rear. 


ACTIVITIES 


AN ORGANISED 
SCHEDULE 

Dk Activities section indudes an Activities 
Checklist co itemise tasks in hand, a Business 
Meeting Planner and Project Management 
Organiser to chart action steps, stair and 
finish dares, organise priorities and plan 
delegation. 






NOTES 

Use this section as a general notebook. It can 
also be useful for scoring additional 
documents. 


OVERVIEW 


FORWARD PLANNING 
Overview gives you viul information for the 
year or die month “at a glance'". It helps you 
achieve a regular work laid by better work 
planning. 


DATABANK 


INSTANT INFORMATION 
ACCESS. 

Databank is a mini-filing system with 10 key 
sections ro hold all the information relating to 
tout bey job objectives. You simply deorrmine 
che areas that are important to you then insert 
die relevant forms and information to create 
an invaluable reference file. Data Bank also 
features an 'Ideas Bank 1 ro record off-the-cuff 
inspiration. 


Business Time/system has proved co be an international 
success for one very good reason - it works. 

Works so well in fact, that over Vi million businessmen 
and women worldwide have acknowledged che system to be che 
major business tool of the’1980 , s. 

Bur Business Time/svstern is not just a persona! organiser: 
It is the World’s Number One qualm’ business system because 
it’s the only system based on a proven business philosophy — a 
philosophy that enables you to manage yourself and your tune 
more productively and ro organise vour wav to greater business 
success. Yet like all the very best ideas it is based on a very 
simple principle. 

Business Tlme/systern provides everything you need to 
take control of your business day, to deal with everyday tasks 
more efficiently and ro focus vour attention on the work that 
really matters. " 

ACHIEVE MORE IN MUCH LESS TIME. 

Once you start using your Business Ttme/system you’ll 
find it increasing your personal organisation and extending 
vour mernorv bv storing all essential data about vour work in 


one place. Now you can plan for the months ahead, as well as 
overseeing your work day by day, hour by hour, keeping all pro- 
jects and deadlines firmly in view. 

By dramatically improving your personal effectiveness. 
Business Time/svstem makes more of vour time and vour 

talents. It will give your career a whole new dimension. Bur 

don’t just take our word for it! • 

“Using the Business Time/system I achieve my daily 
objectives more easily and with less effort, and more 
satisfaction 7 ’, j. mcaulay, scientific dulling controls ltd. 

“The Business Time/system has led ro improved planning, 
communication and control, not only of time, bur all other 
resources”, derek ashwokth, guinness brewing. 

THE WORLD’S MOST EFFECTIVE 
BUSINESS PLANNING SYSTEM ALSO HAPPENS 
TO BE THE MOST STYLISH. 

Business Time/system users insist on the best so we have 
attached as much importance to the system's visible quality as to 

■ 17 l_ 1 .1 j : i__ 


asing your personal organisation and ’extending its practicality. Each leather cover is beautifully designed in die 
y by storing all essential data about your work in finest materials and finished to the most exacting standards. You 


YOURS FREE WHEN YOU 
ORDER WITHIN 14 DAYS. 
When rou order tout 
B usiness Time/sysrem wtfll 
send you a copy of'A’ 
lime - the highly Hnl 

acclaimed 192-page guide j^BSsK 
ro self and time manage- 
ment by lames Noon, 

FdlovvofHenJey Manage- 
ment College and leading 
independent manag e ment 

and 


I~~POST TO: BUSINESS TIME SYSTEM LTD, FREEPOST 648, MARLOW, BUCKS SL7 2BX. T,CK 


can choose between leather covers in 2 different styles and 4 
colours - anthracite, burgundy, navy- or grey. Each" is packed 
with all the features you would expect from the world's premier 
management information system — nothing has been forgotten. 

The design and sheer quality of tire whole sy s t em was 
recently recognised by a prestigious German design award 
“Die Gute Industrie Form” which placed Business Time/ 
system on a par with Braun and BMW. Praise indeed! 

SEETHE IMPACT ON YOUR BUSINESS LIFE... 

ORYOURMONEYBACK. 

Use the system, work with it and if you cannot see die 
benefits on vour personal productivity within 30 days, return it 
to us and we will refund your money. Without question. 

IN A HURRY TO GET ORGANISED? 

Credit card holders may telephone orders direct on 
Marlow (06284) 7607L 

Send vour order off today. We guarantee to deliver before 
Christmas all orders received by 15th Dec. 1986. 

Business Time System Ltd, Freepost 648, Marlow, Bucks SL7 2BX. 

[SSL72ML 


Pkasc pend me the following; BimnessTnnc/systemfs) 



COLOUR CHOIC£ 
lI’LE'tSE STATE QTYi 


f SENATOR leather ffgcm(M_ 
with full ap demur at £175.95 
(£153.00 +£25. 95 VAD 


EXECUTIVE feather srereinf s) 
with dw ckmire n L ]65.^o 

(J14455+f3L60VATj 


staxpard riml svsretnfs) 
ji £90.85 

■r79.00+r 11.85 VAT) 




□ 1 enclose i cheque, payable ro Business Time 

System Lid., for ‘ — 

i £ 

□ Heare debit my American Express. Diners Club, 
Visa. Access credir card (circle one) 



DaAGrevOnlv 


Business Telephone No. ! 
(lncaseofqueriesi , 


I _ _ I - 1 A VAT lmv*Kfc JutnnuEKdih' be «n. r lease jJLotv up to H divs In* delnerv. 

| CREDIT CARD HOLDERS MAY TELEPHONE ORDERS DIRECT ON MARLOW (06284) 7607L 


Business 


I - :wi ' 1 

rjM8S>.fJS2! 


sg 


















Wmm 


SAINSBURV s 

Filter Coffee 


SAINSBURY'S 


Sainsbury's 12 vear old 
Highla^Malt V^isky 75cl 


Wtas (Marne) 

WttHfiktnfFMinA- 


►bv wmIiid*.’ 
SimfcrtS-i reif -»•■■■ 


I Sainsbuiyt Button 
Brussels Sprouts 21bi 


Sainsbury's French Mayonnaise 500g 


Sainsbury's Aluminium Foil 9m x 450mm 79p 


3 9 

Sainsbury's 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1936 


Sainsbury's Claret 70cl 


Sainsbury's Ebtato Crisps 12 x 25g 


Sainsbury's . 

Red Salmon 212g 


* 2.09 

Sainsbury's Assorted 
Biscuits lkg tin 




Sainsbury's Mincemeat lib 13oz 


£ 1.29 

Sainsbury's Original 
Filter Coffee 8oz 


* 7.75 

Sainsbury's Champagne Extra Dry 75d 


Good food costs less aft Sainsbury’s. 

ALL MERCHANDISE IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. SOMELINES ARE AVAILABLE AT LARGER BRANCHES ONLY. *PRICE VALID UNTIL 13TH DECEMBER.tFRESH/ff OTHER PRICES. 


Feast your eyes on 

Sainsbury& 


Home Produced Fresh 
Rump Steak per lb 


£ 1 . 98 * 


Loose Mixed Nuts in Shells per lb 

69p 

Sainsbury's Chocolate Yule Log 

99p 

Sainsbury's Petits Pais 21b 

86p 

Wall’s Italiano Ice Cream 1 ltr 

99p 

Sainsbury's Sage & Onion Stuffing Mix 227g 36p 

Sainsbury'sLemonade/Cola 2 ltr 

39p 

Sainsbury’s Biscuits for Cheese 300g 

59p 


















THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


«e 




■v 


WORLD SUMMARY 



dump ablaze 


liMKand, orVdlo^f cnSi^d 
»M CT P OB n n e ,n(o a tributary of 

1 with water osedto put out a blaze at a Saadoz 
m SwteeSad, kiUmg thousands of 
SS?® 8 *?* "^^Semal mT chemical spills 

SS &25?5f5! feS" *■■ 

"*** ™ MB Plants, mdrimp one at the Swhs-Mmed 

Loi^Werire wSt SwKs^ned 

damage ins mt at DM5 milfioa (£1,7 million). Several 
P^ £ T^ < *^ n «^s exploded in foe bb« and a ranker 
molding 220 gaUons of sn^hmic add burst in the beat. Fire- 

2^£S!!fc^i a, i. W “ ze frwB s*w»8e facilities 

Csestomiffie a ehlv-di iwmmc pKommie mJm, 


Lennon 

memory 

New York - A patch of 
land in Central Park called 
Strawberry Fields was 
packed yesterday with peo- 
ple commemorating the 
sixth anniversary of John 
Lennon's death. 

Yoke Ono, the former 
Bea tie’s widow donated Si 
million to create Straw- 
berry Fields, which she can 
see from the flat in which 
the coaple lived together. 

Meanwhile, another for- 
mer Beafie, Ringo Starr, is 
reported to have accepted a 
seven figure payment to 
endorse a New York wine. 


Jurors 

quit 

Paris (Renter) — The 
first murder trial of mem- 
bers of the extremist Ac- 
tion Dfrectemhan guerrilla 
movement was indefinitely 
postponed yesterday after a 
fifth jnror withdrew. 

Last week, one of the 
seven women jurors with- 
drew because her grand- 
mother had died. Then two 
men and another woman 
reported sick, wiwimtiiig 
the jury provisions. 

Court officials said jury 
members were “petrified” 
by the threats made against 
them. 


Chinese reform plan 

Peking (AFP) — China is to announce an overall plan fa. 
national political reform within a year, though the reform it- 
self will be a huge project needing many years to complete. 


Central authorities were c ur rently researching the goals 
and necessary steps of China’s political reform and aned to 
put forward a practical and effective plan within one year. 
M Jnst as we cannot adopt the methods of other sodatist coun- 
tries, it is even less appropriate to immitate foe ways of 
capitalist countries,*’ the unsigned commentary said. 

It added that the argency of political reform was becoming 
■ore obvious as economic reform deepened. But because 
political refora was very complex, fall investigations and 
stady were needed to define foe final, measures and steps in 
line with China's afhM * conditions. Analysts said it 
appeared aanouncemeot of foe plan weald coincid e with a 
once-in-five year National Communist party Congress to be 
held next October. 


Reprisal 

shelling 

Tehran (Renter); — hu- 
man fang-range artfflery 
pounded economic and 
military targets over a 50- 
mDe front in southern 
Iraq's Basra Province yes- 
terday in reprisal for Iraqi 
air raids, the national news 
agency Irna reported. 


Spanish 

honours 

Madrid — The Spanish 
Government has awarded 
the country’s highest aril 
honour, foe Grand Goss rf 
foe Order of Carlos ID, to 
all tone farmer ministers 
who belonged to the three 
socialist Cabmets, but had 
been dismissed, since 1982. 


Revolver red herring 

Stockholm (AP) — A re v ol ver reported to be foe possible 
murder weapon in foe assassination to Swedish Prime 
Minister Ofaf Palme was unrelated to foe case and was a 
starting gun to the type used in track and field events, Mr 
Vincent Lange, Stockholm police technical supe rintendent , 
said yesterday. 

The Stockholm newspaper Aftonbiadet reported on 
Sunday that a young Swedish couple found a revolver on a 
Im ywwa window ledge seven Mocks from foe murder site as 
they were strolling through Stockholm two days after the 
murder on February 28. 

The weapon that killed Palme k a piece to key evidence 
which to etude investigators. Two 357-calibre 

Magnum shell carings found at the murder site is the only 
betgible evidence police are known to have. 


Chinese 
move into 


crime 

stopber Thomas 
Lshington 

t ruthless under- 
anizalions from 
; and Taiwan are 
i crime areas of the 
es that the Mafia 

iced to abandon, 
ircement agencies 

0 hire more Chi- 
jg agents to fight 
Chinese criminals 
prostitution, gam- 
ion and minder. 

it of Chinese or- 
me was revealed 
■fal of 1 1 members 
amboo. a-Taiwan- 
rworld gang, ,00 
running prostitu- 
sing women from 

Bamboo claims 

libers in Taiwan, 

government 01 - 
stars and military 
ie of the groups 
t “If you drive 
jjgcles to Florida 
b !0, every town 
see a Chinese 
ou can walk m and 
, 0 u are with the 

1 boo and they will 

you." 

md other agencies 
i about Untied 
-cess to theGold- 
and hero * 
area, where Thai- 

Burma mter- 

„ Vitale, an assis ' 

prney in M®** 
ited Bamboo ^ 
to buyandjjnns 
» United States, 
j a weU-or^^S 

network i® 

‘ nryin8t0 ?SS 1 has 
rork here and has 

► tunrldna withtne 


Under-55s’ 
cancer rate 
on decline 

From Oar Own 


Washington 

The death rate from cancer 
is decreasing for Americans 
under the age of 55, the 
National Cancer Institute re- 
ports. Overall, however, the 
rate continues to rise. 

Dr Vincent DeVIta, director 
of the institute, attributed the 
decrease among younger Am- 
ericans to better methods of 
treatment. The steady increase 
in the death rale of older 
cancer patients could mean 
that they were not getting the 
same land of treatment - as 
younger people, he added. 

In the decade ending in 
1984, the last year for which 
figures are available, the 
under-55 cancer death rate foil 
from 383 per 100,000 to 35.7, 
a 7 per cent decline. - 

Three-quarters of all cancer 
deaths occur in people aged 55 
and over. For the entire 
population the death rate 
shows a steady increase of 0.5 
per cent a year. 

The report noted that a 
decrease in the incidence of 
lung cancer in white men, first 
reported fast year, is con- 
tinuing. 

Dr John Bafiar,' of the 
Harvard School of Public 
Health, said the nation's can- 
cer death rate rose 4.2 percent 
from 1975 to 1984. 

The statistics point to a 
sharp increase in the rate of 
breast cancer in young and 
middie-aged white women af- 
ter more than a decade of 
steady decline. Doctors sug- 
gested that the only possible 
explanation was that more 
women, were, postponing hav- 
ing children, a decision that is 
known to increase the risk of 
breast cancer. - . 


Tension mounts In occupied West Bank 

Boy killed as 
Israelis open 
fire on Balata 
demonstrators 

From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 


A Palestinian boy, aged 12, 
died of a gun shot wound to 
the head after Israeli soldiers 
opened fire on a group of 
stone-throwing demonstrators 
at Balata refugee camp, near 
Nablus in the occupied West 
Bank, yesterday afternoon. 

He was the fourth Palestin- 
ian to die in the territories 
since Thursday, and the sec- 
ond from the Bidata camp, as 
violent clashes and demon- 
strations continued for the 
fifth day between Israeli 
troops and Arabs. 

Palestinian forces report 
that a farther 10 people were 
wounded by gunfire during 
the day, four of them in the 
same incident m which the 
boy died. 

The other shootings were 
said to have occurred in 

Ramallah and at ramp s near 
Bethlehem and Jerusalem. 
The sources claimed that five 
girls in Gaza needed hospital 
treatment after being clubbed 
by soldiers trying to stop a 
demonstration in their school. 

An Israeli Army spokesman 
confirmed that three people 
were wounded at the Balata 
camp and one at Jerusalem. 

He said an investigation 
into the boy’s death had 
started because no children 
appeared to be present when 
the soldiers opened fire. 

The body has been removed 
from the Nablus hospital and 
taken to Td Aviv for tests. 


The Israeli spokesman said 
that two women had been 
slightly injured when the car 
they were driving was stoned 
by Arabs in Ramallah. 

Two soldiers in Gaza had 
been injured by bottles, an 
officer in Hebron had been hit 
in the eye with a missile. 

Despite the conflicting re- 
ports of injuries, it was ob- 
vious »ha* the violence 

yesterday was widespread 

and, despite army orders to 
patrols to use restraint, sol- 
diers fired live ammunition 
on a number of occasions. 

The present bout of vi- 
olence is the worst in the 
occupied t e rrit o ry for years. It 
began with the murder of a 
Jewish Bible student in Jeru- 
salem three weeks ago when 
three Palestinians were arrest- 
ed. 

This led to violence and the 
Arab demonstrations which 
created the tension leading to 
foe demonstrations over the 
past week in which the four 
people have died. 

• Campas closure: The mili- 
tary government in the West 
Bank yesterday ordered the 
closure of the Bir Zeit campus, 
the scene of Thursday’s vi- 
olence, until the end of the 
month. The university's laige 
new campus outside Bir Zert 
village remains open (David 
Bernstein writes from Jer- 
usalem). 



An Israeli soldier firing in the air at Ramallah, north of Jerusalem, where demonstrators 
id set tyres alight in the worst West Bank rioting for some years. 


Palestine fight gains 4-year-old recruit 


From Our Own 
Correspondent 
Gaza 

With the Mack and white 
keffiya headscarf of a Palestin- 
ian fedayin fighter draped 
around fas young shoulders, 
Hamad Dahab, aged four, 
stood on a chair in the 
sunlight, dcnched fas tiny fist 
and proudly chanted foe 
words be had just leaznL 
’‘Give me the flag of Pales- 
tine to show that I am a Pales- 
tinian. If they give me poison, 
I will stifl say I am a Palestin- 
ian. If they put my hands in 
chains, I don’t care, I wfll stiO 
be a Palestinian. I am small, 
yes, but foe victory is great” 
His family and their friends 
dap and encourage him. He is 
clever and has learnt the 
words quickly in the three 
days since his eldest brother. 


Sad), died with an Israeli bul- 
let through his heart during a 
demonstration at Bir Zeit 
University, on the occupied 
West Bank. 

There are posters of Sad) all 
around, smiting * from foe 
centre of the fading floral 
wreaths that give odour to the 
scruffy, dusty alleyway leading 
to the mean house where he 
grew up with his five brothers 
and four sisters. 

His father, Mr Mahmoud 
Salon Dahab, aged 56, has 
brought his family, .up to 
remember the village of 
Masmiyah in foe orange 
groves 15 miles or so to foe 
north, where he lived as a boy 
until he tied south to Gaza 
during the 1948 Israeli war of 
independence. 

“Sad) is not my son, he is a 
son of Palestine” the father 
boasts. “He was slaughtered 


without doing anything crim- 
inal. This is our land. I have a 
country here. We have owned 
tiie land for over a thousand 
years. It is not their country.” 

He learnt English as a young 
man painting British army 
barracks. Living in exile. 15 
miles from home, he says he 
has devoted his life to frying to 
provide an education tor his 
children. He has been paying 
$200 of his $654 monthly 
earnings as a hospital steward 
in fees for Sad), who was 
studying organic chemistry ax 
foe university. 

. The bare concrete walls of 
foe house are unpainted and 
there is scarcely any furniture. 
“I would live in a tent to give 
my children an education,” he 
says proudly. The plan was for 
Sad) to qualify and find a job 
which would cam enough mo- 
ney for his next brother, Wad, 


to study medicine. So the large 
family would be educated to 
rise above their poor 
beginnings. 

The father insists that Saeb 
had no political ideas and had 
never been in trouble with the 
Israeli authorities. “He was an 
example, and so polite be 
would always look down when 
I spoke to him. 

“He was just going with his 
friends to their university and 
they found the Israeli Army 
waiting for him in order to kill 
him. My son is shot in foe 
heart What do they want? 

“They wanted us to go out 
of foe borders to Jordan — 
who will kill ns. To Syria — 
who will kill us. To Lebanon — 
who will kill us. They want to 
prevent me from my rights 
that have been my family's for 
a thousand years. 


“We want to be good neigh- 
bours. Let me bod: on my 
land and we win forget every- 
thing. The Arab people are 
very generous. 1 want my 
people to live in peace with 
their neighbours.” 

A hundred yards away an- 
other Israeli foot patrol 
walked past the cemetery 
where Saeb was buried, by 
order, at dead of night with 
only six mourners permitted. 
The patrol is to stop 
demonstrations around the 
scruffy house, where little 
Hamad quickly learnt the 
defiant salute and war chant of 
a country which exists only in 
the imagination. 

His father would have liked 
him to learn a profession, but 
since bis brother was killed he 
has begun to sound like a fed- 
ayin. 


Penguin 
protesters 
arrested 
in Hobart 

Hobart (Reuter) — Three 
Greenpeace protesters who 
dressed as penguins and 
chained themselves to a 
French ship, in a bid to stop it 
loading equipment for an 
Antarctic airstrip, have been 
arrested. 

The protest was part of the 
environmental group's cam- 
paign to stop construction of a 
1,000-metre airstrip at the 
French Antarctic base of Du- 
mont d’Urville. 

Greenpeace fears that foe 
airstrip could block access to 
penguin breeding grounds and 
eventually destroy their col- 
onies. 

Cuba prepares 
for the worst 

Mexico City (AP) - Cubans 

are participating in military 
exercises aimed at preparing 
the entire population to de- 
fend the island against a 
surprise air attack, foe Cuban 
news agency, Prensa Latina, 
reported. 

Seven million people were 
involved in such exercises as 
defending towns against an 
invader and evacuating res- 
idents from their homes. 

Freedom day 

Dar es Salaam (AP) — The 
Bank of Tanzania has issued a 
200-shilling note worth about 
£3 to commemorate foe 25th 
anniversary today of indepen- 
dence from Britain. 

Quake death 

Sofia (AP) — One person 
was killed, at least 30 people 
injured, and others rendered 
homeless by an earthquake 
that was felt in most of 
Bulgaria on Sunday. 

Yacht rescue 

La Coruna (Reuter) — A 
Spanish Red Cross boat res- 
cued two Britons, Stuart 
Melvyn Boswel and Stephanie 
Sheena Outteridge, from their 
yacht drifting in storms off the 
coast here. 

Gay memorial 

Amsterdam (Reuter) — An 
all-night concert by foe homo- 
sexual community here raised 
200,000 guilders (£64,000) to- 
wards a planned monument to 
homosexuals in foe form of 
three pink marble triangles, 
symbolic of the badges they 
were forced to wear in Nazi 
concentration camps. 

Dry rations 

Berne (Reuter) — The Swiss 
Government rejected an MPs 
proposal that soldiers should 
be given a twice-daily wine 
ration to help to reduce the 
country's growing wine sur- 
plus. 


Pretoria’s detention of children 

Figures given by 
poSce challenged 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Civil rights groups yes- 
terday accused the South Af- 
rican Government of ddib- 
ftely amounting the number 
of children being detained 
under the sweeping powers 
conferred on the pohee by the 
state of emergsney. 

The accusations came after 
General Johan Coetzee, foe 
Commissioner of Police, dis- 
closed yesterday that 256 chfl- 
dren aged between 11 and IS 
were in prisco in terms of the 
emergency, which permits 
detention without trial 

In a separate statement, Mr 
Adriaan Vlok, the Minister of 
Law and Order, said children 
were not “held in detention 
longer than absolutely neces- 
sary' to protect “law-abiding 
people” against “the disrup- 
tion of their daily lives, vi- 
olence and intimidation”. 

The Detainees* Parents Sup- 
port Committee said the state- 
ments fry Mr Vlok and 
General Coetzee represented 
“the most cynical sleight of 
hand” by ignoring children 
aged 16 and 17, the teenage 
group believed to be most 
affected by detentions. 

The Black Sash, the civil 
rights organization nm by 
white women, estimates that 
between 1,300 and 1,800 chil- 
dren aged 17 and under are in 
jail, while foe Detainees' Par- 


ents Support Committee cal- 
culates that, if 1 8-year-olds are 
inducted, the figure rises to 
about 4,000. 

“We are concerned that the 
Co mmissio ner (of Police) 
does not appear to be aware of 
the fact that, in terms of South 
African legislation, children 
are those under the age of 18,” 

said Mrs Ethel Walt, Trans- 
vaal regional chairman of the 
Black Sash. 

According to General Coet- 
zee's figures, there are " 140 
children aged 15 in prison, 88 
aged 14, 21 aged 13, six aged 
12 and one aged 11. He denies 
any deliberate failure to notify 
parents of detained children. 

“Some children unfortu- 
nately supplied foe security 
forces with incorrect informa- 
tion r e garding their names and 
wdriwwesgK This, understand- 
ably, makes it extremely diffi- 
cult for the security forces to 
notify their next of kin.” 

He denied accusations that 
children are put in the same 
cells as adults and habitual 
criminals. He said they were 
given “three nutritionally 
well-balanced meals a day” 
and opportunity for exercise. 
Gvil rights activists alleged 

that children have been as- 
saulted and tortured and hdd 
in unsanitary, overcrowded 
conditions. 


Foreign Office seeking 
action on Iran detainee 

By Andrew McEwen, Diplomatic Correspondent 
The Foreign Office yester- teen denied legal re prese n ta- 


day demanded ac- 

tion from the Iranian Govern- 
ment over the continued de- 
tention of a British business- 
man in Tehran. 

Mr Timothy Eggar, Under 
Secretary of State, summoned 
Iran's senior envoy in Lon- 
don, Mr Akhimzadeh Basti, to 
foe Foreigh Office to express 
“saious concern” over the 
case of Mr Roger Cooper, who 
has tern held fora year. 

Mr Cooper, aged 51, was 


bon. 

The Foreign Office had pre- 
viously tried to secure his re- 
lease by quiet diplomacy. The 
last effort was on November 
20, when Mr Timothy Ren- 
ton, Under Secretary of State, 
took up his case with Mr 
Basti’s predecessor, Mr Seyed 
Sada tian 

Britain has only consular 
staff in Tehran, having with- 
drawn its diplomats without 
breaking off diplomatic re la- 


IVJJ viwauig vu uipiuiucsuv 

working as a consultant for an lions during foe 1980 Ameri- 
American oil engineering can hostage crisis, 
company at the time of his ar- Repeated efforts to secure 

rest. He is said to have teen visas to enable Britain to 
kept in solitary confinement resume a diplomatic presence 
for much of foe time and has in Tehran have teen ignored. 


•? r 





Christmas just wouldn’t be Christmas without a real fire blazing 
Inyour hearth. So a visit to your local Approved Coal Merchant is an 
essential part of Christmas shopping. 

Make sure you order enough solid fuel to last well beyond Boxing 
Day (or the feast of Stephen, as Good King Wenceslas would have called it). 

Real fires start with British Coal. 

A Real Fire can cost as little as £24.95. For further information just dial 100 and ask for < 
Freefone Real Fires or write to the Solid Fuel Advisory Service Freepost, Sunderland SR9 9AD. — 









10 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


TV film shows P aris police co-operatmg with arm ed right-wing yonths 

Question mark 
over violence 
by non-student 
demonstrators 


From Diana Geddes, Fails 


Who are the militant ex- 
tremists who caused what was 
to be a peaceful student move- 
ment to degenerate into vi- 
olence, looting, injury and 
death? 

Extracts of a film of Sat- 
urday night's demonstrations 
show 20 helmeted youths, 
armed with iron bars, con- 
fronting a cordon of riot police 
barring their route to the main 
demonstration, which was still 
relatively peaceful. 

A policeman asked if they 
wanted to go over to the other 
side, a member of the group 
said yes, and the policemen 
allowed them to pass. 

The youths said: “Thank 
you. You know, we are not 
against you.” The policeman 
said: “1 know, I know." 

The youths are later shown 
hurting stones and creating 
havoc in the Latin Quarter. 
One of them says: “We. on our 
side, are French; we are white; 
we’ve got balls and we’re intel- 
ligent On the other side, are 
the Communists. Anything on 
the left, we hit.” 

Another film shows a dem- 
onstrator wearing an anorak, 
his face hidden behind a yel- 
low scarC carrying a sack of 
paving stones. Student mar- 
shals try to eject him from the 
demonstration, but he returns 
and is seen at the heart of the 
clashes. 

A television reporter asks 
why someone so easily distin- 
guishable was not arrested. 
Other journalists who wit- 
nessed Saturday night's vi- 
olence spoke of the passivity 
of the police who, for the first 
few hours, appeared to stand 
by doing nothing, allowing 
extremists to smash windows, 
loot, erect barricades, and 
burn cars. It was not until 
midnight that the police fi- 
nally intervened. 

A journalist said he saw 
helmeted youths coming out 
of the Fans City Hall on 
Saturday night, shortly before 
the violence. They were allow- 
ed through the police cordon 


to join the demonstration. He 
asked: “Were these policemen 
in civilian dress with orders to 
search out the hooligans, or 
were they agitators?” 

The City Hall office of M 
Jacques Chirac, the Mayor of 
Pans as well as Prime Minis- 
ter. has denied that any “hel- 
meted individuals” came out 
of the building that night 
The police are worried 
about the bad image they are 
attracting, particularly after 
the death of the student who 
was beaten up by police offi- 
cers on Friday night 
The Union of Police Com- 
missioners and Senior Offi- 
cers said that it was “incon- 
ceivable” that the police 
should have handed over the 
streets to “professional agitat- 
ors and uncontrollable elem- 
ents.” 

Police, Government and 
students appear to agree on 
one thing: the “agitators" have 
nothing to do with the student 
movement 

The students talk of right- 
wing extremists, while M 
Charies Pasqua, the Interior 
Minister, insists that they are 
“left-wing extremists and 
anarchists” whose aim was 
“the overthrow of the Govern- 
ment and its institutions”. 

The Communist-led CGT 
union has demanded an in- 
quiry into the behaviour of 
“the small groups of agitators 
who are known to the police, 
who allowed them to act with- 
out intervening and then ask- 
ed them to disappear”. 

An inquiry into the action 
of similar “uncontrolled ele- 
ments” during a demonstra- 
tion by CGT steel workers in 
Paris in 1979 had shown those 
agitators to have links with the 
police, M Henri KrasucJd, the 
union’s leader, said. 

• FRANKFURT: About 250 
youths smashed windows of 
banks and shops in Frank- 
furt's city centre on Sunday in 
a demonstration of support 
for striking students in France 
(Reuter reports). 



Students marching through Paris yesterday carrying posters calling; for the resignation of M Jacques Chirac ami the Interior and Education Ministers. 


Intoxicated by a heady mix 
of optimism and ‘victoire’ 


From Michael McCarthy, Paris 


Lecture-theatre 34 at Jus- 
sieu, the Paris raurersity cam- 
pus, was packed so tight that 
when the excited student with 
the radio forced his way in 
through the crowd just after 
one o’clock yesterday what he 
wascalling out took a second 
to gink in. 

“Qftoi?" shouted M Chris- 
tophe Bosqnillon, aged 21, a 
history student, who by virtue 
of his place on the campus 
strike committee was the man 
at the microphone. 

The messenger repeated it. 
The plan had been withdrawn. 
The room erupted. 

Such a truly beady moment, 
when young optimists who 
believe they can change thing s 
suddenly see (bey have done 
so, even to moving a govern- 
ment, is not often to be 
witnessed, and at Jussieu yes- 
terday it was worth savouring; 
indeed, it was impossible to be 
there and not taste the sweet- 
ness of it. 

They cheered to the rafters. 
They applauded like madmen. 
They stamped the floor, ham- 
mered the desks, shook hands 
with each other, burst out 


laughing and shouted u Vic- 
toirel VictoarcT' as other stu- 
dents ran across the campus to 
the site of the commotion and 
lined the windows if they could 
not squeeze in, until there 
must have been dose on 1,000 


they’d won theZeferfe Nation- 
ale. 

Then they remembered M 
Malik Oussekine, aged 22, the 
French student of Algerian 
origin who died as a result of a 
cardiac arrest after allegedly 
bring beaten by police in 



Pierre Abramowfd, one of 
the students: “We did it!” 


dashes last Friday. And joy or 
no joy, they fell to a minute's 
silence. 

Forcing the Government of 
M Jacques Chirac to abandon 
its much-cherished university 
reform plan was indeed a 
famous victory for the students 
of France and it tasted all the 
sweeter fix being so ini- 
expected yesterday at Jussieu, 
which has been the main 
centre of their revolt 

AD morning, sombre dis- 
cussion in the bleak con c rete 
squares and tower Mocks 
which are the teaching plant 
for the 60,000 students, no 
less, of Paris Universities VI 
and VIL 

The Government’s con- 
cessions: not enough. _ The 
looting and car-burning In the 
Latin Quarter on Saturday 
night caused by non-student 
agitators. The general strike 
call for Wednesday: It mast 
not be taken over by tire 
unions. The Chirac Govern- 
ment tough. The Struggle 
ahead: long. They held the 
umpteenth mass meeting to 
discuss tactics in lecture-the- 
atre 34. 



Rapt attention as Jussieu University students listen to M j 
Chirac's broadcast on withdrawal of the reform Bitt. 


Tben a guy walked in with a 
tiny transistor radio. 

After the minute's silence 
they began cheering again, 
charing everything that was 
said, the resolutions to press 
on with the movement, to press 
on with yesterday’s demo, to 
press on with tomorrow’s 
strike. 

M BOsqnffion, exaltations 
at the microphone finfcharf, 


was like a young man intoxi- 
cated. “Vmm victoire SaomeT' j 
M Pierre Abnunowiri, 22, 
in his third year of computer 
studies, wanting to be an 
engineer and with no desireat 
all for this student revolt to, 
turn itself into a fuD-scate anti- 
government movement like in 
1968, bat deeply opposed to 
the reform phu “I fed really j 
great. 


Nicaragua claims hamlets bombed by planes 

Honduran troops airlifted to border 


Fighting continued yes- 
terday on the bonder separat- 
ing Honduras and Nicaragua 
with the Sandinista Govern- 
ment alleging that US-sup- 
plied warplanes bombed two 
hamlets inside Nicaragua, kill- 
ing seven soldiers and injuring 
about a dozen civilians. 

Unarmed US UH 1H Huey 
and CH 47 Chinook heli- 
copters were ferrying Hon- 
duran soldiers to the remote 
border region, which, accord- 
ing to government sources, 
was bring invaded by about 
1,000 Nicaraguan troops. The 
helicopters, from the US air 
base of Palmerola in central 
Honduras, began the airlift on 
Sunday at the request of the 
Honduran Government 

The US State Department 
said no Americans were in- 
volved in the fighting and US 
troops were being kept about 
20 miles from the combat 


From Martha Honey, San Jose 


zone, as required under US 
law. 

Journalists in the Honduran 
capital of Tegucigalpa said the 
airlift, involving three in- 
fantry and artillery battalions, 
was expected to end late 
yesterday. 

Honduran officials have not 
commented on the situation 
since Sunday. But in conflict- 
ing reports one local radio 



station said there were about 
2,000 Sandinista troops inside 
Honduras, while another said 
they had withdrawn. Dip- 
lomatic sources on Sunday 
night said the Nicaraguan 
troops appeared to have 
withdrawn. 

In a press conference late on 
Sunday night. Father Miguel 
D'Escoto, Nicaragua's Foreign 
Minister, denied that there 
were any Sandinista troops in 
Honduras “at the moment” 
leaving open the possibility 
that there had been earlier. 

He, and a Defence Ministry 
spokesman, said five war- 
planes crossed into Nicaragua 
from Honduras on Sunday 
afternoon and bombed the 
hamlet of Wiwili, 18 miles 
from the border, and an army 
outpost near the village of 
Mura, five miles from the 
border. Seven soldiers were 
killed at the outpost Three 


others were injured along with 
a dozen civilians, including 
two young girls. 

Father D’Escoto said it was 
not known whether US or 
Honduran planes carried out 
the attacks, but “the No. 1 
suspect is the US. Who, after 
all, is financing and directing 
the war against Nicaragua? It 
is not Honduras.” 

Over the last six weeks 
Sandinista troops have repeat- 
edly made incursions into 
Honduras to attack the bases 
of an estimated 12,000 to 
15,000 Contra rebels living 
there, according to well-in- 
formed sources. 

These sources said that the 
Honduran Army, which untD 
now had less than 200 men in 
the border area, permitted and 
even helped co-ordinate the 
Sandinista attacks because 
Honduras would like to push 
the Contras into Nicaragua. 


Contras’ campaign may be doomed 


From Michael Rinyon, Washington 


from Senor Jos6 Azcona, the President of 
Honduras, late on Saturday. 

Although this is the second time thfe 
year that the Americans have given 
military help to Honduran forces fi ghting 
the Nicaraguans, the present dash comes 
as the US is In uproar over the covert aid 

. .. to the Contras. Mr Lee Hamilton, a ^ 

that US forces were directly erased in Democratic congressman, said yesterday “if® beeB 

the fighting.. It said the Chteobk heti- it raised the risk of American involvement dlskH ^ Surtunsta troops who have 
copters were " unarmed and fcaw hm ® that war. occsfted a feafler zone inside Horiws 


US Army helicopters were still ferrying 
hundreds of Honduran troops to the 
border with Nicaragua yesterday, as the 
battle continued with Nicaraguan govern- 
ment forces who crossed the frontier at the 
weekend in pursuit of Contra rebels. 

The State Department, however, denied 


insurgency is now probably doomed. They 
say the Iran arms connection to the 
Contras has shown bow little private 
money the rebels have been able to 
master. The affair has seriously eroded 
support in Congress and Anw^ont the 

abort continuing fmdhig l ^^m^I^^ l>S 

The Contras have also been unable to 


been 

instructed not to approach “areas of The 
possible hostile action”. maoeat 

The request for American help mm- 


comes as a grsiwi®g 
umber of Administration officials are 
gloomily predicting that the Nicaraguan 


for most of this year, and the Nicaraguans 
remain in firm control of the territory near 
the main rebel camp in south-central 
Honduras. 


Pinochet 

extends 

emergency 

From Lake Sagaris 
Santiago - 

Chile’s military authorities 
have extended by 30 days the 
state of siege which was to 
have expired on Sunday. They 
have also banned a women’s 
magazine and announced that 


the weekly Apsi will be allow- 
ed to publish again. 

President Pinochet invoked 
the state of siege on September 
7, hours after- a group am- 
bushed his convoy and killed 
five of his escort 

Under the state of siege, the 
authorities dosed five opposi- 
tion magazines, suspended 
two foreign news agencies and 
ordered the arrest of many 
opposition leaders. 

The opposition Christian 
Democrats hope that the US 
will use a forthcoming vote in 
the World Bank to fever for 
real changes in the military 
Government 

Senor Sergio Molina, a 
prominent Christian Demo- 
crat and co-ordmator of the 
National Accord (designed to 
entice military leaders to 
negotiate with some opposi- 
tion groups) has proposed that 
its signers nominate can- 
didates for President even 
though no election is planned. 

Not even members of his 
own party agree, but many do 
want to reunite opposition 
; around a movement 
ee elections in 1989, 
when the four-man junta will 
hold a plebiscite to ratify their 
chosen candidate. 


Democrats elect Speaker 

Eloquent Texan 
takes the chair 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 


Mr James Wright 211 elo- 
quent and middle-of-the-road 
Texas Democrat was yes- 
terday elected unanimously by 
his party to be Speaker of the 
House of Representatives to 
succeed Mr Thomas “Til 
O'Neill, who is retiring 
30 years. 

Mr Wright aged 63, has 
been the Democratic majority 
leader for 10 years. A re- 
spected but low-key con- 
gressman, he has gradually 
consolidated his position as 
Mr O’Neill’s natural succes- 
sor. He was able to declare in 
February last year that he had 
enough votes in the Demo- 
cratic caucus to be elected 
Speaker, and none of the other 
mooted candidates came for- 
ward to challenge him. 

The former boxer has been 
playing an increasingly visible 
role as the Democrats* spokes- 
man in the House, and as 
Speaker will inherit the man-. 

of being the nearest US 
equivalent to a leader of the 

r ation. He has a delicate 
now of maintaining a 
balance between party and' 
national considerations as the 
investigation into the Iran 
arms affair gets under way. 

His ascendancy maintainsa 
long House tradition: every 
Democratic leader in the past 
50 years has become Speaker, 
except Congressman Hale 
Boggs, of Louisiana, who died 
in a plane crash in 1952. 


Jim Wright, as he is known, 
won the 1976 contest for the 
post of majority leader by only 
one vote, fending off three 
other candidates. Known for 
his bushy eyebrows, quick 
smile and oratorical skills in 
his marked Texan accent, he 
has proved an able, if un- 
flamboyant, legislator. 

He was first elected to the 
House in 1954. In 1961 he ran 
unsuccessfully for the Senate 
in a special election to fill the 
seat vacated when Senator 
Lyndon. Johnson became 
Vice-President. 

Born in Foil Worth and a 
graduate of the University of 
Texas, he served in the Army 
Air Force in the Second World 
War, winning the Distin- 
guiled Flying Gross and the 
Legion of Merit for missions 
over the South Pacific. 

His political career began in 
1946, when he was elected to 
the Texas legislature. He was 
elected in 1950 to the first of 
two terms as Mayor of 
Weatherford, Texas. 

During most of his House 
career Mr Wright was engaged 
in the Public Works Commit- 
tee, concentrating on vanning 
federal projects for his area 
and doing favours for other 
members — debts they have 
not forgotten. He was due to 
become chair man of the 
Committee when he contested 
the House leadership in 1976. 


US envoy to Costa Rica resigns 


Indian 
Aids 

victim 
jailed 

From Michael Hantiyn 
Delhi 

The lethal, sexually trans- 
mitted disease Aids is new to 
India and still mercifully rare. 
But its discovery two month s 
ago in a Calcut ta p rostitute 
threw the administration into 
total confusion, and the vic- 
tim was thrown into iafl. 

But ft le woman, Pyaribai, 
aged 26, having been need by 
judicial order, has now dis- 
appeared into the countryside. 
She remains both tm traceable 
and untreated. 

The panic began in India In 
June with the death of the 
country's first Aids victim, a 
Bombay businessman. The 
Central Government set up a 
surveillance operation, but it 
virtually came to nothing. 
Then Mr Suj it Mohan Chowd- 
hury, the bright pofice cfficer- 
in-charge of Watgunje police 
station in Calcutta’s red-light 
district, set up his own Aids 
taskforce. 

Seven doctors collected 
blood samples from 359 pros- 
titutes and these, with mood 
samples from hospitals, pro- 
fessional blood donors and 
children with blood diseases, 
were sent for analysis. Only 
one, from Pyaribsd, proved 
positive. The reading was 
confirmed by a second blood 
sample and she was arrested. 

She went before a mag- 
istrate and was remanded in 
custody. “If she is released on 
bail” he said, “the disease wfll 
•read further, which is haxm- 
1 for society.” 

Her lawyer was inceaised. 
“The police dared to pick her 
up because die was poor and 
defenceless,” be said. “Would 
the police have arrested a rich 

h raangaanan nr a p olitician , if 

he was suffering from Aids?” 

He got an order from the 
High Court that Pyarihai be 
freed within 10 days, by which 
time arrangements should 
have been made for her treat- 
ment in hospital But then the 
buck-passing began in earnest. 
The state medial authorities 
sd that they had no 
ies. The Central Gov- 
ernment said nothing, as 
health was a state matter. 

The 10 days passed. The 
judges declined to extend her 
detention. Pyaribai was freed 
to disappear. 

Russian 
soldiers 
defect 

From John England 
Bom 

Two young Soviet soldiers 
stationed in East Germany 
fled to West Germany on 
Sunday, the federal border 
guards office in Hanover re- 
ported yesterday. 

The two, both aged 19, 
escaped unhurt through the 
border barriers into the 
Wolfenbuttel district of Lower 
Saxony, south of Brunswick, a 
spokesman said. 

Wearing civilian clothes 
and without weapons, the 
soldiers were not spotted by 
East German border guards 
because of early monring fog. 

They told West Goman 
border guards that they had 
been on the move for two days 
before reaching the border. 

But the name of their East 
German base and further de- 
tails of their escape were not 
available yesterday. 

The two men, who axe 
believed to have asked for 
political asylum in West Ger- 
many, have been moved to the 
federal refugee reception cen- 
tre at Zirudorf near Nurem- 
beig, where applications for 
asylum are processed. 

.Defections by Soviet sol- 
diers to. West Germany are a 
rare event The last Soviet 
Army man to flee to Lower 
Saxony was a sergeant who 
made his escape two years ago. 

A total of 17 East Germans, 
one of them an officer in the 
border guards, have tnatfo 
their way to Lower Saxony so 
far this year. 


San Jose Mr Lewis 
Tambs, the US Ambassador 
to Costa Rica, has resigned, 
after news -reports said last 
week that he had unsuccess- 
fully pressured the Costa Ri- 
can President to allow the use 
of a secret US-built airstrip for 
the supply of Nicaraguan 
Contras (Martha Honey 
writes). 


Miss Diane Stanley, a US 
Embassy spokeswoman, said 
Mr Tambs will be leaving his 
post on January 1 5 and return- 
ing to academic life. She said 
this move had been long- 
planned and the ambassadors 
resignation has “absolutely 
nothing” to do with his alleged 
involvement in the I ranian . 
Contra arms scandal 


“'v 


\ 



A CHRISTMAS 
MESSAGE 

With sincere thanks for the 
enfolding relief and the many 
last comforts you kindly 
helped to provide, we wish all 
our good friends a truly 
splendid Christmas. 

SISTER SUPERIOR 

ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPICE 

MARE ST. LONDON ES *SA 



She said it was untrue that 
MrTambs or any US Embassy 
official had asked President 
Arias to permit continued use 
of the airstrip. The President, 
who took office in May, has 
ordered the airstrip to be 
closed, because its use by the 
Contras violates Costa Rica's 
policy of neutrality. 

The airstrip, built secretly 
earlier this year by US en- 
gineers, appears to -have been 
financed by Iranian aims 
money. It was mentioned by 


tured US airman, as one 
runways used for sending US 
arms shipments. 

The ambassador’s reported 
involvement with, the airstrip, 
if true, would have violated 
US law at that time, which 
prohibited American officials 
from having direct or Indirect 
involvement in Contra mili- 
tary activities. 

Another US Embassy of- 
ficial who apparently worts 
for the CIA, received a num- 
ber of cail$ at an unlisted 
embassy number and at his 
home number from a safe 
house in San Salyadorusedby 
pilots. \ 


Farm crisis shadow dims EEC summit euphoria 


Brussels - As toe relative 
euphoria of the EEC summit 
io London faded yesterday, a 
little post-summit tristesse 
crept into the official mood in 
Brussels. 

Mrs Thatcher wfll today 
present an ebullient account of 
the weekend agreement to 
Euro-MPs in Strasbourg and 
nrge them to. strengthen the 
unity achieved at the summit. 
But yesterday the rarity was 
ahesri? wearing tfifai as EEC 
officials surv ey ed the un- 
resolved crises likely to domi- 
nate the dosing weeks of the 
British presidency of the EEC. 

M Jacques Defers, toe , 
president of the Commission, 
was reported to be angry and 
disappointed at the fad are of 
the summit to tackle the lay 
issues of farm spending and 
the budget. Sources said M 
Defers, who at toe summit was 
confirmed as . Commission 
president for a farther two 
years, had received bnisqne 
and “high-handed” treatment 
from Mre Thatcher in re- 
sponse to his efforts to put 
OB- 


But diplomats said 
EEC leaders had also 
wanted to avoid disruption 
over reforms for which toe 


Diptomais stressed the har- 
mony winch prevailed in 
London, and safe that Mrs 
Thatcher would bmld on this 
spirit of unity under British 
leadership when she addresses 
the European Parfiament in 
Strasbourg today. British of- 
ficials Jhmfe rt«» argument 

that rarity was achieved only 
by avoiding contentions issues 
of the kind which have dis- 
rupted past summits. 

They point to the British 

achievement in getting the 

leaders of the Twelve to back a 
of measures on terror- 
job creation. Aids 
and the Internal market de- 
signed to make Europe more 
efficient and more secure for 
its citizens. “Some issues are 
bound to be uresolved,” one 
diplomat said. “No Maine 
attaches to that Britain could 

just as well have toned- the 
Dutch for banding Loadn an 



unresolved 1986 budget crisis 
■ in July.” 

But as Earo-MPs and 
Commission officials assess, 
toe remaining agenda before 
Britain hands over the presi- 
dency to Belgium in only three 
weeks’ time, Mrs Thatcher 
faces critidsni for having pat 
on one side her avowed fates- 

European View 

By Richard Owen 

tioa of reforming the common 
_ _ (CAP). 

. she bowed to 
from Chancellor 
Kiohl of West Germany, who 
faces a general election in 
January and refused to alien- 
ate rural voters by a^eeing to 
farm reforms likely to hurt 
farmers’ interests. . 

M Defers is to put forward 
his own. far-reaching pro- 
posals and tour EEC capitals 
in die new year forconsulta- 
thna. Bat M Detors’s detenu* 
motion to reform toe present 
system of financing toe EEC 


wfll almost certainly lead to 
father post-summit teaefeaq 
between the EEC president 
and Mrs Thatcher, who will 
not accept any tfahWfag with 
the hard-fought compromise 
at the French summit of 1984 
which gave Britain its anwni 
rebate. 

Mr Michael Jopling, the 
Agriculture Minister, yes- 
terday presided over toe start 
of the last Council of Farm 
Ministers of the British presi- 
dency, in a final bid to find a 
consensus for overdue cuts in 
beef and dairy quotas. Of- 
fiefa is said repeated failures 
tins ant Irani were not due to 
want of British effort or in- 
genuity, and Mr Jopling was 
prepared for “marathon” 

three-day talks. 

The European Parliament 
this week gives its final read- 
ing to toe troubled 1987 
budget, which is threatened 
not only wi& a built-in over- 
run of some £2 button because 
of rising. farm spending amt 
the fan of the dollar, list also 
with a £1 billion over-run 
over from 19*6, wfekh 


bodget councils trader British 
chairraaiiship have failed to 
tackle. Earo-MPs are angry at 
“® lack of action on farm 
and will itaiwwl 
of surpluses and 
fnffita arts this week if toe 


But criticism of Mis That- 
£P er byBritish Conservative 
Euro-MPs over the CAP is 
“*teiy to be ranted in the 


«*tiie eve of next month's 
«*ectom for toe presidency of 
toe European Parliament, for 
Sir Henry Plmnb, toe 
^yrespected leader of the 

SSdSr- “ ‘ 1 “ dinK 

Sir Henry and Mrs That- 
cher disagree oa some Enro- 
issues, hut they are likely 
to maintain the EEC 
^spirit ®C London” and afess 
ow toe fact that the Prime 
"toaster promised the Euro-.: 



- — - group on toe eve 
« the sonant that she would 
X s reform mea- 

«®res, sududing taking JainL - 
^tottfocttoii and sarphisr 


£ 


A 





lare 


.ttrsdfe *- 
K4.'t 1LT^: 

■rt !‘if :s 
Wtacc is 


"» k '- « ' 
;»* K-< ‘ < 
*r* -r. 

■Ji!f 

..V 3* -.- •'• 

n, q - - » 
; \a ■ 


*-•0 --' - -: 


?if V* J -■ 


c^/. *T.. ■* 


7«il ^ ■■*'•• 
It 3 


«■: . f .v— 

r*r. r ■. 


soldiers 

defect 


. . , v . fi- . 

-**> ' v* 








* . • . . . • -•• • : 
■-■-■■ . SpKv < 




^ ■ -V ; V Y; ; T { • : Mi. 



: S ‘- •' 


j *3 ?■.-*:#•'■• 




tv -* i * • 


mit eu e 


horto 


ti* fc'-w --• 

Ot 

■ ****•'*'• 

fc-aa. 

•aw****** 

M& * •*** 
i ** W***-' 

*»^**i. '« 


f¥ ■'3* W' 

ft ?*'* 
***▼- 

i 

*» - 


rt i^/a- r ' 

«•£ <fc>* ^ 


»«N *•*-' 

^4^ 4*-S V’ - ' 5 

:.-M *■«; 

i-S#% 


Very soon you will have the opportunity 
to buy shares in British Airways, the worlds 
favourite airline. 

The first step is simply to get more inform- 
ation, without committing yourself .in any way. 

You can do this by completing the coupon 
and sending it to the address given, or by ringing 

01-200 1000, day or night 

In return, you will receive an information 
pack giving you background details about British 


Airways together with a leaflet answering some 
of the questions you may have. 

At the same tone, we will register your name 
as someone interested in this opportunity. 

This will ensure you receive an application 
form together with details of the offer; when 
published. Then you can apply for shares if you 
wish to do so. 

Who knows? Next time you fly you might 
be more than just a passenger 


1 




I 

ISSUI 








ISSUED BY HILL SAMUEL & CO. LIMITED 
ON BEHALF OF H. M. GOVERNMENT. 


BRITISH AIRWAYS SHARE OPPORTUNITY: PHONE 01-200 1000 

TfcscouPo^on.ybcco^dby^n^u-UK,^^^^ 






I 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


Establishment ‘turned blind eye’ to Soviet penetration of secret services 

Wright says Thatcher misled House on Hollis 


From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 
Mr Peter Wright, the enigmatic objections. After arbitration by Mr The secret services bad long assumed' 

protagonist of the MIS book trial, finally Justice Powell in chambers, about one- that it was best for their work to be 

enteral the witness box at the start of the third of the evidence was deleted from the conducted with the minim u m of public 

hearing’s fourth week yesterday to declare open court proceedings, to be considered scrutiny, he said. ^ J ' 

the two fundamental points of his credo: in dosed session. “When I was young 1 readfl; 

♦ that Soviet penetration of the British In the course of his statement, Mr this philosophy ... I now t 

Establishment continues; Wright testified about the history of his entirely wrong. The work of | 

• that successive national leaders, 30-year membership of “the service” and our society against subversic 

rnrfiKimg Mrs Thatcher, have shut their how his relationship with Lord Roths- important to leave to the spies. 


in dosed session “When I was young 

In the course of his statement, Mr this philosophy ... I 


“When I was 


I readily adopted 
now think this 



Wright testified about the history of his entirely wrong. The work of protecting 
30-year membership of “the service” and our society against subversion is too 


eyes to iL j 

In an 80-minute address to the New 
South Wales Supreme Court, which he 
completed near to tears, Mr Wright 


«hui»cu» iu »>», . ^ own despite the attempts 

claimed that the Prime Ministers state- 

ments to the Commons, on Sir Anthony. ^f. te 5S v , t 0 R ri!£2 re SL.JjSi^S2f* i 

.Wi-sre SSSasBKSf- 


child led him to provide Chapman He said that, although when he sent 
Pinch er with information for the book Mrs Thatcher in 1984 his dossier on 
Their Trade Is Treachery. Soviet activity in Britain she described it 

Of his reasons for insisting on writing- 35 “old hat", the proposals he had 
his own book, despite the attempts of suggested “would have caught a lot more 
Whitehall to suppress publication, he spies’'. There was still time to take the 
said: “The British Establishment has same steps now, he gdderf. 




iifi 






problem as having been limited to a few 

Instead, MIj s former specia lis t in damental weakness in British society, 
counter-espionage told the court: “This is “In my life I have seen too many people 

«mr Anm lmnnila^no If ie nnf Hporcuu ¥ * . • ■ • *1.". . 


_ * ( _ • , — 111 uir uiv i un*v nwu iw uhhi/ |wv|/iv , 

my own knowledge. It is not hearsay. I ja power turning a blind eye to this sort of P^ ne * ra *i on " 

ump rlneolv occiVMofprl wfn raepe n .1. * r _ . 1 ■» *•** .. *?■ 


“I want to stress that my patriotism is 
1 indi mi nishe d- I worked for my country 
for more than 30 years and shouldered 
many heavy responsibilities . . . 

“(Bm) I believe that my greatest and 
most important work has been in 
exposing the way Britain's leaders have 
shut their eyes to the problem of Soviet 



: ■■«i 

*r.. 


Dhaka and 
Delhi agree 
on border 


measures 

Front Ahmed Fad 
Dhaka 

Senior military command- 
ers of India and Ba ng la d esh, 
two countries harassed by a 
recent spate of tribal insur- 
gency on their common 
border, have worked oat a 
new agreement to stop cross- 
border terrorism, officials ax 
the Interior Ministry said here 


v > 


A* ? s 

[ii j - 


was closely associated with these cases." lh in E And now I see Mis Thatcher 
Soviet penetration was so extensive misleading Parliament over Hollis and 
that there was “no hope of MI5 catching Blunt’™ 

all (the spies)", he added The only way to The ronseauences of Sir Roser “having 


combat it was to increase public aware- a spy” were enormous for Britain, 
ness and to make the Government and, wbere it meant that MI5 was “probably 
the secret services more accountable. staffed by people with similar views 

Mr Wright's evidence took the form of to him” and for Australia, where be had 
a 32-page affidavit to which lawyers for helped establish the equivalent organiza- 
the British Government made numerous lion, Asio. 


His voice breaking, Mr Wright in- 
cluded with a Latin quotation from Pope 
Gregory VII, which decorates the study of 
his home in Tasmania: “ Dilexi iustitiam 
et odi iniquilaiem. Propterea manor in 
ixilio” (“I have loved justice and hated 
iniquity. Therefore I die in exile”). At this ■ 
point the court was adjourned for the day. • 
Mr Wright's cross-examination is due 
to be gin this morning. 


Spy book ‘sought to reform MI5’ 


Sydney — Mr Wright said 
yesterday that, although he 
was paid £30,000 in royalties 
for assisting Chapman Pro- 
cher with Their Trade Is 


mons in 1979 on Sir Anthony 
Blunt's treachery. 

In the belief that the Prime 
Minister was “a new broom 
prepared 10 shake out a few 


Treachery and an advance of dusty cupboards" and that she 
£18,000 for his own book bad been misled by M35. he 


Spycatcher, his main concern 
throughout had been to secure 
changes within MI5 (Stephen 
Taylor writes). 

“No amount of money 
would be worth the strain this 
case has put me under,” he 
said. As an experienced intelli- 
gence officer, he could say that 
his book would compromise 
no operations, prejudice no 
sources and expose no secrets. 

What it would do, however, 
was “greatly embarrass the 
Government and the Secret 
Service as well”. 

Mr Wright said his involve- 
ment with disclosures about 
MIS had started with Mrs 
Thatcher's “gravely mislead- 
ing” statement to the Corn- 


said he started a dossier which 
be hoped to bring to her 
attention. 

When in August, 1980, he 
was contacted by Lord Roths- 
child, an old friend who 
believed himself under sus- 
picion as a spy and wanted 
assistance to dear his name, 
he saw an opportunity. 

Lord Rothschild sent him a 
first-class return air ticket 
from Tasmania to London 
which he exchanged for two 
economy tickets, and he and 
his wife, Lois, flew to London, 
arriving in August 1980. 

When he saw Lord Roths- 
child at his flat at St James's 
Place, Mr Wright said he 
agreed to provide a testimo- 
nial to counter the “fifth man” 


rumours. At the same time he 
asked Lord Rothschild to read 
the dossier and show it to Mrs 
Thatcher. 

Mr Wright said: “Victor 
(Rothschild) heard that it was 
pointless formally giving it to 
Mrs Thatcher, as she would be 
obliged to give it to MIS. He 
said to me, ‘You know she was 
sitting on that couch only a 
few days ago. She does not 
understand intelligence'.” 

Instead, Mr Wright said. 
Lord Rothschild arranged for 
him to meet Chapman 
Pincher, who might ghost- 
write a book disclosing his 
concerns. 

“Rothschild said that Pin- 
cher's contacts were so good 
he could ensure the book was 
published without official 
interference,” Mr Wright said. 
“Rothschild said also that 
such a book by Pincher would 
probably prompt a par- 
liamentary inquiry into the 
intelligence service ” 


Ex-agent vouches for Rothschild 


Sydney — Though he believes the British 
Establishment is still riddled with Soviet 
agents, Mr Peter Wright went ont of his way 
yesterday to say he was “absolutely certain” 
that neither Lord Rothschild nor his wife had 
ever spied for Russia {Our Own Correspondent 
writes). 

Lord Rothschild told Mr Wright in August, 
1980, that he was being accused of being a So- 
viet spy. They had met in 1958 and, according 
to Mr Wright, became closely acquainted in 
the year that followed. 

“Sir Dick White (former Director-General 
of MI5) was a dose friend of Victor's, and it 
was he who suggested I should get to know 


him. It was Hollis who introduced me to him- 
“We had a common interest in science and 
intelligence matters and became dose friends. 

Of their relationship during the events 
which led to his meeting with Chapman Pinch- 
er and their collaboration on his book, Mr 
Wright said: “Victor was always very secretive 
and it was not done to ask h™ questions. He 
loved intrigue and conspiracies and was always 
involved in secret deals and arrangements, 
especially with politicians. 

“He loved to exert influence behind the 
scenes. His wealth and position were so great 
that l could not believe he would risk it for a 
schemeif it was not at least tacitly approved.” 


Mr Wright said that, be- 
cause of Lord Rothschild's 
standing in the Fstnbh'shmeni, 
he felt sure the project had at 
least tacit official backing. 

He said: “I did not suggest 
the idea of a book. I did not 
suggest Pincher as an author. 
My original intention was 
simply to bring what I knew 
before the Prime Minister.” 

When Thar Trade Is 
Treachery was published he 
was “very disappointed”, be- 
cause it had concluded that 
there was no need for an 
inquiry, quite the contrary to 
his own view. 

In 1982 he was approached 
by Mr Paul Greengrass, the 
television producer now as- 
sisting the Wright legal team, 
and was asked to grant an 
interview to World In Action. 

He declined, but a year 
later, after the arrest of Mi- 
chael Bettaney, he agreed to be 
interviewed. 

This interview, in which he 
made known publicly his sus- 
picions about Sir Roger Hol- 
lis, provoked Whitehall's re- 
sponse that he would be 
prosecuted under the Official 
Secrets Act if he ever returned 
to Britain. 

In writing his own book, be 
had taken great care not to 
disclose anything that might 
damage national security. 

He said: “Breakdowns in 
trust in the service occur when 
there is treachery, not when 
loyal members of the service 
write about their work, as I 
have done." 






The farmer British M35 officer, Mr Peter Wrij 
to gjve evidence yesterday, accompanied 


his counsel, Mr Malcolm Tnrnbufl. 


The officials disclosed that 
under the accord both sides 
have promised not to give 
sanctuary to the tribal guerril- 
las fighting a separatist war. 

More than 15,000 Bangla- 
deshi tribal people, including 
a large number of women and 
children, left the Chittagong 
Hill Tracts district in south- 
east Bangladesh for bordering 
Indian villages after the Army 
stepped up its campaign 
against guerrillas belonging to 
the outlawed Shanti Bahini 
(peace force). 

Authorities said that the 
exodus to the Indian state of 
Tripura began in the wake of 
an outburst of bloody ethnic 
clashes between Muslim Ben- 
gali settlers and Buddhist 
Chakraa and Manna rebels 
last May. At least 24 Bengalis 
were killed last month in the 
latest violence in the hills. 

The guerrillas are demand- 
ing the expulsion of the set- 
tlers and a separate homeland 
for half a million tribal people 
living on nearly one-sixth of 
Bangladesh’s land area. 

| Bangladesh has accused In- 
dia of harbouring Chakma 
dissidents; in turn, it was 
blamed by Delhi for helping 
Mizo tribesmen. 


Congress closes ranks as nnrest plagues India 

Gandhi’s gentle touch heals party rift 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Delhi 

The gentle personal diplo- 
macy of Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the 
In dian Prime Minister, is. 
producing peaceful results 
quite in contrast to the recent 
fratricidal o u tb ur st s among 
the India n population al large. 

While his irenic qualities 
were demonstrated yesterday 
with the effective healing of an 
old political schism in his 
Congress Party, his country- 
men spent a weekend of 
connmmal mayhem. 

Six deaths in the capftal, 
Delhi, on Friday woe blamed 
by a minister in Pufiameet on 
“non-secular politics”. 

Yesterday a tense calm re- 
turned to the city, and army 
patrols, who had been on the 
streets of west Delhi to keep 
warring Sikhs and Hindus 
apart, went bade to their 
barracks. 

In Bangalore, tiie capital of 
the southern state of Kar- 
nataka, where the Sooth Asian 
summit meeting was recently 


hdd among afL ymhr grtng 

declarations of peace and 
brotherhood, nine people were 
killed in the past 48 hours 
when polke fired at crowds of 
Marinas on a rampage after a 
local newspaper published a 
short story which offended 
them. 

On the other side of the 
country, in die north-eastern 
state of Tripura, tribal rebels, 
carr y i ng on a brutal ramp to g n 
against non-tribals, massacred 
13 innocent ri riKans at a 
prayer mooting The Moody 
action brought to 36 the 
number killed in Tripura In 
the past month. 

Yesterday the ruling Com- 
munist-led government of the 
state held a 24-hour general 
strike to protest at the killings. 

In neighbouring Assam 
there was another general 
strike, also state-government 
supported, but tius tune to 
protest against the delays by 
the central Government in 

imple menting action against 

those Bengali immigrants 


whose fellows have come to 
dominate politics in Tripura. 
The Assam state government 
came to power a year ago after 
a campaign the mi- 

grants which ended with an 
accord with Mr GandhL 

And In Bengal itself, one 
supporter of the Gorkhaland 
National Liberation Front 
died on Sunday and three 
supporters of the Communist 
Party were injured, as put of 
the continuing campaign in the 
hill district round Darjeeling 
for regional autonomy. An 
hwfefintfc general strike there 
is paralysing the area, and. 
police am tapin g; attacks from 
both , the agitators and govern- 
ment supporters. 

Meanwhile, Mr Gandhi 
flew— as soon as the fog which 
dosed Delhi airport yesterday 
morning lifted — to Auranga- 
bad in Maharashtra where a 
mass rally celebrated the end 
of the separation of die Con- 
gress (S) from his Congress 
(D- 

The Congress (S), which 


has been led by a talented and 
able politician, Mr Sharad 
Pa war, was the last significant 
separate fraction of the old 
Indian National Congress, 
which had been shattered by 
Mrs Indira Gandhi as she 
fought off the party bosses 
seeking to fa»l» advantage of 
her apparent inexperience. 

All that remain separate 
now are fragments of frag-, 
ments — those pieces which 
object to the new unity, and the 
disappointed band around Mr 
Pranab Mnkherjee, the former. 
Finance Minister who was 
expelled this year by Mr. 
GandhL 

Mr Gandhi's successful 
diplomacy was also marked by 
the vocal support for the 
merger given hy Dr Farooq 
Abifnliah, Chief Minister of 
Jammu and Kashmir, who is 
himself back in power thanks 
to the support for his National 
Conference by Congress foll- 
owing after his own treaty with 
the Prime Minister last 
month. 


\L-:;r • - 





































ter.-: 



'WBiaaj- 
SEkdssh. 
5C0 ST. 3 
3d 

COffiEOB 

vs e« a 
&P -.w f . 
??cj.h -‘ 

l^wj |k.. 

tide*. 
V- ^\£ 

'■ JirJf-:. 
k '*ar. 
*y=^ia- 
ni - ) 

ir*s 

“g 

El 

fs A ’Try 

iia: the 

vi 

cs 

V *ifcr.:c 
;m Jlrt-.- 
ka.Vz'vy. 

i *?*V.s 

Serfichi 

ft o ::.c 
ti!u 
Se?D 2 
Ifc^ s.-:- 

^ ftfo?! .‘ 

.. .' 

;. 

**.-& ir» 
-tak?u 

'* Wi 


ift 

ik4od 

rmfkxw 
tot fc*« 
*yn \ 

tafsd »■ 

** i«t 

JNftX-i 
Staff nil 
»*. 
KWfiU 

rf &** 
i wfcai; 

«**:&* 
«Mf M» 

t &*«■*» 

fcft «nf« 

>? M# 

*vr**S*i 

Iwf IW 
* <wm 
iKtuf *e 
**t w 

&.**•<. 

k^SafebC 

n-s 

»n *.= * 





:.y 


-.s ' 


. •-7' 


Ef 


/| 

2t 


. : v 


«Ma«4iHr 


- *•" ’ 

u 


* i“» -.- 

>™. * ■■* 

uu •• l 





= J • 

-*•' 

V ■ " - - 

»«**** 


f* 

•.‘5 It* 

-• i hi- *•' 
jr. V 4 *- - 


***** 

:. "t;* 

"*’-' i 
l 3’*--sr 4 ‘ ** 

)ee.K 


t» '■ ~ 

* fr-iy j: 

? *■*£ 

^v:J> '"«» 


& ^ * 

arsr 


••■■s 

t 


s 


^v: : 

■-V*;';.. -; - : ■'. , 

(?:j\ • ' • - K 

T. ■w-i-V.- 'I/ j' • J*a -i .V 


tyss^V' 

.■*5rt.fe N ??.••> 




THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


~ ,-«• — **> 


THE ARTS 



Rather 
civil, 
this war 

Piwer an d pasrion, desire ami 
destruction, rivalry and re- 
wage - the NweraiBg" pre- 
avflWarcostaW^^ 
South (U V) lim already set 
new standards in alliteration. 

The polarity of the tide says it 

all: in this immaculate 
dreamscape of fearsome den- 
tistry mid fearless desvages, 
of frank stances and stanch 
friendships, Mack and white 
wiB always he rimfr and 

cheese. 

Unambignity is a virtne not 
to be sniffed at on a m 
winter’s evening, and the 
lar “guests” promised by die 
prodigious credit seqnence will 
doubtless give a willin g ac- 
count of their roles in the 
weeks to come. 


TELEVISION 


But this first episode did 
contain one deeply quizzical 
inci de nt. Hm ffing to *V res- 
cue of that well-known New 
Orleans belle Lesfey-Anne 
Down in her overturned 
Mills & Boon carriage, the 
intrepid Patrick Sw ay ze es- 
pied a deadly maWng 
straight for her cleavage. 

Clark Gable would have 
stamped it into mthmt belt; 1 

Swayze tenderly fished it oat 

and lobbed it back to its smmyl 

Eden. Are we now wi tnessing ' 

the dawn Of the wnlngirally 
aware bodice-ripper? 

If everyone in North and 

South appeared to be raring 

mad, though splendidly 
confined, the p rot agonists of 
Troubled Mimds (BBC2) 
seemed dowdfiy sane — not 
least the menta l patients 
whose dothing was mdisfin- 
grishaMe from riwt of their 
keepers. The overt difference 
lay in the area , of self-con- 

fidence and Sodal adequacy; 

the nice youg coqde of< 
psychiatric msses were able to 

drive themselves to work with 

no problems, while then 


of an unaccompanied bns 

This edition of the Nunes 

series showed file modem 
policy of re h a bilitati o n and 

co mmunity treatment, in one 

“social skills” training ses- 

sion, we saw a congemtaDy 
argumentative 

drilled m the art of 

past bystandem (the muses) 

without starting a flaming raw. 1 

In its level-headed way, it 

was all quietly encowagingJ 
One would hide to think of] 
anyone time chanring upon a) 
copy of Mr Lorcjoy’s little 
Outing by Evelyn Waugh. 

Martin Cropper 


• Anthony Dowell, Director 
of The Royal Baltet, tore the} 
biceps tendon in his right arm 
during the first performance 
of Wayne Eagling’s new ballet 
Beauty and the Beast last 
Tuesday. 

The injury will take several 
weeks to heal and will prevent 
him dancing the role of the 
Beast at the performance on 
Thursday. His place will be 
taken by Principal Dancer, 
Jonathan Cope. 


A not-too-merry Christmas, Scrooge 


U 


alike almost any other 
kind of business, the 
theatre deals in proto- 
types. There is never a 
Scries. Each production 
is a one-off and so is each season. 
Consequently, as the time of 
goodwill and good cheer ap- 
proaches, all look nervously at the 
ghos ts of our policies past and 
present to find a pattern for the 
™ure - knowing there is none. 
This year’s prototypes cannot be 
next year's production mivM« 
Every plan will be a step in the 
dark. 

Seasonally it is traditional to 
draw comfort from what worked, 
but Christmas would not be Christ- 
mas without Scrooge and Irving 
Wanfle in his article {The Times. 
November 29) looked at the RSCs 
wassail cup and decided not only 
was it half-empty, but if he closed 
one eye be could make it look even 
emptier. The successful first season 
at the Swan was noted briefly a nd 
productions of which be approved 
passed over in brackets. Foreign 
tours, which overseas become the 
responsibility of others, were 
misleadingly juxtaposed with 
words l*kft “crisis” »t ?h “no 
reserves” I wonder why? 

He had all the facts. He asked for 
them. The largest season we have 
ever presented In Stratford; 90 per 
cent box office in file Royal 


Shakespeare Theatre; 12 award 
nominations from SWET; already 
a Drama Award from the London 
Standard for Les Liaisons 
dangereuses — none of these held 
any interest for him. 

Obviously, Mr Wanfle is not 
part of the political campaign 
which has soured relations m 
recent months between the RSC 
with die National Theatre and The 
Sunday Times. He does, after afi, 
know about the theabn: But it does 
take a considerable effort to see the 
RSCs cup as other than at least 
half-filJL Sadly, this effort Mr 
Wardle is prep ar ed to make- 1 wish 
just a Ettle of that- effort had gone 
into thinking what it is to open a 
newtheatre m these difficult tames, 
launch a new programme and draw 
a -further 2^00 people a week into 
Stratford without detriment to the 
other houses. AD of this we 

achieved. 

In the Royal Shakespeare The- 
atre, Scrooge sits damply and 
gloomily surveys the 400,000-ptas 
audiences who presumably don’t 
all agree with him. Were we to take 
his judgement literally t he " ritual 
suicid e of the entire aniji tic *dmm - 
istration would be the only pr o per 
spectacle. And maybe be isngfat— 
bm at least the bouse wooki be fiilL 

Figures of 90 per cent (and still 
rising) in a 1,500 seat auditorium 


Terry Hands 

(right) defends his 
leadership of the 
Royal Shakespeare 
Company after 
attacks by the 
critics, including 
Irving Wardle on 
this page 

overaght mo nths are n^pwllHl 
anywhere in the country. 

He complains of “no dear sense 
of why these {days had been 
chosen”. There are over 400,000 
people who might answer “because 
we wanted to sec them”. The 
company's experiments in design 
have not turned them away and 
white it is invidious to single out 
individual performers (which is 
presumably why Mr Wardle did it) 
the audience does seem to have 
found “two lead actors to carry the 
great heroic rotes” in Jeremy Irons 
and Jo nathan Pryce. 

Over and over again theatres 
which take the risk of putting on 
new plays reiterate that foe snpport 
for living writers is both experi- 
ment for the pre sent and invest- 



ment for the future. We are not 
dealing here with the golden bits 
selected from five centuries of 
drama. We are nurturing the life 
blood of the years to come. The 
very nature of the word “new” 

mwmn that frtrrn and content will 

be unpredictable and the ails* in 
history is the arts are littered with 
the judgements of Scrooges, end- 
lessly baulking at the unfamiliar. 
Figures of 79 per cent at the Swan 
and 74 percent at The Other Place 
are not cause for complacency but 
they bear witness to a continuing 
dialogue between the RSC and its 
audience. 

Tbe Barbican is another matter, 
of course. The finest theatre com- 
plex in the Western hemisphere, it 
is positively un-British in its 



excellence. And to play the firet 
four years to an average box office 
of 88 per cent is virtually un- 
patriotic. “Dear heavens, it might, 
ujust might bea success- let’s pull 
it down”: and Scrooges have not 
always waited for Christmas to say 
that- Consequently, it has always 
been a “no-win” situation m 
London. I have never known it 
otherwise. 

hey said:“The RSC 
should look after ftsett” 
So we did — with Les 
Miserables. Apparently 
that wasn’t what they 
meant “The RSC should put new 
writing into the Barbican.” So we 
did — Poppy, Maydays* Red Noses 
(all SWET award winners). No, 
apparently they didn’t mean that 
kind of new writing. “The RSC is 
too safe; It should take more risks”. 
So we did — in 1986 we introduced 
new work across the board particu- 
- tarty to introduce a different kind 
of European theatre with an 
intellectual rather than an emo- 
tional bare It was a high-risk 
venture — but then, had not we also 
been told that as a subsidized 
theatre we had a duty to practise 
“the right to fair? 

Weil, we launched a season at 
about the same time as Re. 
launched a_bombing raid on Li? 


and some Russian scientists de- 
cided to immobilize the safety 
controls on a reactor in Chernobyl 
and mdt it down. I admit we were 
guilty of mistiming. It was, I 
confess, something we did not 
predict and although the theatre is 
of small importance on the world 
stage tbe the effect on tourism and 
London box offices was cata- 
strophic. Plans had to be im- 
provised or abandoned and with 
the loss of two theatre-filling 
Shakespeares, Othello and As You 
Like It* the RSC could be seen to 
stumble. And Scrooge and other 
ghouls have squeaked and jibbered 
in our theatre streets ever since. 

While The general public must 
be finding it all very silly. Three 
failures oot of 3 3 pieces of work. Of 
course we apologize — of course we 
will try to do better. 

Next spring will see one of our 
strongest seasons in recent years re- 
peopling tbe Barbican. Until then, 
like all theatres, we look at the 
constraints placed upon the Arts 
Council by the Treasury and settle 
for another grim winter. We gather 
friends for a last carouse before the 
chill sets in, even if the cup is not 
quite full. We try to draw comfort, 
from what might have been and' 
look constructively to what might 
be. Irving Wardle is notoriously a 
good friend of the theatre. Who 
need fear enemies? 


Childlike charm for all the ages 


GALLERIES 




As Christinas is Uunmh^ ft 
would seem ap p rop ri a te to 
have a look at a number of — 
mostly aiwll — fthiltttinnt 
which are relativdy cheering 
in effect, if not necessarily in 
themselves cheerfuL In the 
present climate of artistic 

opinion that might he arirtng 3 

bit too much. 

But even so a few of them 
are actually jolly. Sing a Song 
for Sixpence, at fire British 
library within the British 
Museum until January 25, is 
an example. It surveys - 
through a lot of tittle exhibits 
and a stira hut informative 
book of tbe same tide (Cam- 
bridge University Press, £25 
hardback, £9.95 paperback) by 
Brian Alderson — the rote, 
hitherto unrecognized or 
underestimated, of Randolph 
Cakticott in the En gffrii pic- 
ture-book tradition. 

The subject is~ specifically 
the telling of stories in pictures 
with a few words and 
Alderson, while recognizing 
the role of the even more 
neglected Charles Bennett in 
the development of this genre, 
makes a good case for 
Caldicottis originality as vir- 
tual inventor of a form of 
children’s book which has 
continued to flourish through- 
out the 100 years since his 
death (1986 is his centenary) 
with undiminished vigour. 

The drawings of KB 
Traylor (Mayor Gallery until 
December 19) were certainly 
not intended for children, 
though they would make a 
charming basis fig a children’s 
book. 

Traylor was born a slave in' 



*VV4v. 1 


• - •: ^ : rtS'iJZ. 'i ■ •• .*! 



s. Vf.Wi, 


*’ m siY :=*M 


.f^.s •' ’ '••• 

V;W* . 

h.‘. .<* ; a* . • • • . 


■ 1 IV* 


AHwte and nafvte a Randolph Caldicott cover (left) fetwn 1870 and B31 Tkaylort hum o r— s ftfjpi mth Hut end Pipe (1939-42) 


1854 on a Southern planta- 
tion, wotted briefly in a 
factory and spent many years 
on welfare. He does not seem 
to have started drawing until 
he was in bis early eighties, 
living on the streets. 

From then on he spent most 
of his time producing his 
naive pictures of . men and 
animate, often in forms 
reminiscent of the fblk-sculp- 
tnre weather vanes he must 
have known during his child- 
hood. He lived on, mostly 
steeping rough, nntfi the age of 
93, choosing this way of life 


despite increasing recognition 
in art circles. 

Some of his designs, rather 
astonishingly, are abstracts 
such as might have been 
influenced by Mondrian or 
Arp, though he knew of the 
existence of neither; But most 
are re pres e n tational, with a 
pawky sense of humour and 
the grotesque which can win 
over even those tike myself 
who have an allergy to child- 
ish and nafve art. 

Edward Wolfe (Odette Gil- 
bert Gallery until January 10) 
was no primitive, even though 


Roger Fry, during his early 
days painting lampshades for 
the Omega Workshop, liked to 
refer to him as a “little African 
savage” (he came from South 
Africa). 

He was in fact a man of 
many talents, coming to 
London in his teens with, 
scholarships to a drama school 
and an art school, but be was 
thoroughly trained as a 
painter at the Slade, and much 
more international in his 
knowledge and artistic alle- 
giances than most of his 
contemporaries. 


The mag'or influences on his 
painting were Matisse and 
Modigliani, with maybe a 
dash of the Mexican rouralists 
after a two-year sojourn in 
Mexico in the Thirties. For an 
artist of his natural gifts and 
relentlessly evolving talents he 
has been shamefully ne- 
glected: ft is amazing that 
neither the RA nor the Tate 
has seen fit to mark his death 
(in 1982, at the age of 85) in 
anyway. 

But this small show does 
help fill the gap with repre- 
sentative examples of most of 


his genres, from landscape to 
absteact, and the portraits (of 
which we are promised a show 
at the National Portrait Gal- 
lery in the near future) do have 
that enviable quality of being 
paintings first and portraits, 
however psychologically 
acute, some way after. 

Armand Rassenfosse 
(Piccadilly Gallery until Janu- 
ary 16, with a Christmas break 
from December 24 to January 
5) is probably best remem- 
bered as a specialist in die 
discreetly erotic. He was Bel- 
gian, and a friend and asso- 
ciate of Rops — with whom 
some of bis earlier drawings 
might be confused, even 
though the element of wilful 
perversity is lacking. 

Women painting or drawing 
women are the subject of the 
towing show Ten Chilean 
Women Artists (Holland Gal- 
lery, 129 Portland Road,Wll, 
until December 14). They are 
an impressively varied group, 
ranging in style from the 
sophisticated naivety of Juana 
Lecaros to the elegant land- 
scape-based abstraction of 
Carmen Piemonte. 

I found particularly pleasing 
the obsessively intricate 
drawings of Eva Lefever - 
who concerns herself mostly 
with antique vanity and 
crones elaborately making 
themselves up before mirrors 
— and the strange depictions 
of women in furs by Isabel 
Aspillaga, who leaves one in 
pleasurable doubt as to which 
exactly are tbe predators: the 
original bearers of the furs or 
their present owners. 

John Rnssell 
Taylor 


Playing 
for the 
joy of it 


CONCERT 


Oiifingirian 
Quartet 
Queen Elizabeth 
Hall 


ting am 
afteroc 


Four years old. 
Seriously underweight 
for her age. 
Scavenging for food 
where she can find it. 
ndshe’s English. 





' With parents who re- 
)jjv£ fused to acknowledge that 
she even existed this child 
was being slowly and deli- 
berately starved. Here in 
England. 

Fortunately we found 
her in time. Yet without your 
donations, we’d have been 
powerless to help. 

£15.48 can protect a 
child for two weeks. And 
] thatfc the sum we’re asking 
for now 

If you can't afford quite 
that much, all donations are 

gratefully received. 

protect a child and ”] 
orponalordcn . 


I want to bdp pro*' 
enclose rny cheque 


£1548 □ 430-960 jffiiSSn 

Asm and VS* cald hddere may 
ticbrtrfxaracnjuntB. No. 



vni «*wf domra* to 

n& /L Gilnio* n 




Boom time for the Metropolitan 


New York’s opera, 
lovers are voting 
with their feet — 
walking into the 
Met to witness 
even those 
performances 
which have been 
given the critical 
thumbs down 

Financially, tbe new Metro- 
politan Opera rfegime of gen- 
eral manager Bruce Crawford 
and music director James 
Levine has an auspi- 
cious beginning. Attendance is 
much higher than in recent 
years, and at least once already 
tbe company sold out an 
entire week's seven perfor- 
mances for the first time in a 
decade. 

Much of this, of course, 
stems from decisions made by 
others, years ago, but the new 
management team has been 
quick to draw lessons from 
this success that ft can apply to 
the future. Apparently, the 

goals will be stronger casts on 

a night-to-night basis (partly 
through more efficient use of 
lead singers to "cover” other 
productions) and fewer and 
smaller repertory adventures. 
“We'll bring Wozzek back," 
Qawford told the New York 
Times, Tmt not for 10 perfor- 
mances. When we do Billy 


kaaw ' - - 


'"* r — *•'&*** 

* .H*, ' 

" ^ 





* • 











pi 


mm 


Newcomer, old hand: (Mb Gasifia make* ha Met debut as Juliette with the enduring Alfredo Krais as Romeo 

with Domingo in the pit, and much for this interesting 
this the production had in young artist and establishing 
Alfredo Kraus, who ap- expectaions that can only 


Budd in 1988, it will be only 
for five.” 

Though hardly a critical 
success the new ultra-conser- 
vative production of WalkQre 
— which opened the season — 
has fared well at the box office, 
and that bodes well for the 
continuation of the Ring over 
the next two seasons. Equally 
strong has been tbe final 
revival of the company’s 
dreary Aida, largely owing to 
the presence in the title role of 
Aprile Mifio, a homegrown 
artist touted m some quarters. . 


(oversold, one fears) as the 
next great Verdi soprano. 
According to present plans, 
she will head a starry cast in 
tbe new Franco Zeffirelli Aida 
scheduled to open tbe 1989 
Met season. Most eagerly 
awaited of all was the return of 
Joan Sutherland — already 
reported on this page — in 1 
Puritam. 

But perhaps the most 
symbol of the turn for 
better is the omnipresence of 
Piaddo Domingo, whose fail- 
ure to appear last spring 
proved damaging, most nota- 
bly in the new Peter Hall 
Carmen. He has sung; 
Cavaradossi, which he origi- 
nated in tbe Zeffirelli Tosco 
two seasons ago, conducted a 
revival of Romeo et Juliette, 
and is scheduled to sing Calaf 


in the new Zeffirelli Turandct 
ne»t spring 

Most of the attention 
surrounding this year's Tosco 
has gone to Eva Marion, who, 
strode by an elbow in her 
second-act confrontation with 
Scarpia (Juan Pons) at tbe 
opening performance, suf- 
fered a briefly dislocated jaw, 
but gamely finished the 
performance. Heard the next 
week, she showed no 21-effects 
and «ang effectively, though 
not surprisingly Domingo out- 
shone her in sheer tonal 
beauty. 

What was surprising was 
Domingo’s expert conducting 
in Romeo, vibrant, involved 
and better sustained than in 
his Bohime of two seasons 
ago. Only an assured artist, of 
course, would venture Romeo 


& 


pro&ches this youthful 
with such self-eiTacing 
commitment and exquisite 
taste that his age simply 
recedes into insignificance. It 

As an added attraction, the 
Juliette, Cecilia Gasdia, was 
making her Met debut, pre- 
ceded by much publicity. The 
voice has promise, to be sure, 
but as in a concert perfor- 
mance of Rigoletzo that 
Riccardo Muti and tbe 
Philadelphia Orchestra 
brought to New York last 
season, she showed an un- 
pleasant constriction at the 
top of her range and a sense of 
strain in coloratura passages. 

One hopes, as with Millo, 
flat we are not claiming too 


yield disappointment 

James Oestreich 


a Sunday afternoon at tbe 
Queen Elizabeth Hall, there: 
are few works more welcome' 
than Schubert’s popular Trout 
Quintet. 

Written during an idyllic 
holiday in the Austrian moun- 
tains, it is a piece which 
captures Schubert's lyricism at 
its most ebullient. Each of the 
movements shares its mood of 
outgoing, joy. faithfully cap- 
tured in this performance by 
members of the Chilingirian 
String Quartet and guests. 

Strong accent in the opening 
pages sets tbe tone of their 
playing. Everything here was 
confidently projected. The 
textures were healthy and firm 
rather than elegant in a Vien- 
nese way, with the guest 
double-bass player, Thomas 
Martin, providing a solid 
foundation. 

The other addition to the 
group was the pianist Clifford 
Benson. Though not perhaps a 
Brendel in sensing subtle 
shifts of mood in the music, be 
makes a well-practised partner 
for the group. 

The distinction between 
solo passages and accompani- 
ment was especially well- 
judged, showing that the 
players work together as a 
genuine ensemble. 

If anything was missed, it 
was the fine sensitivity to- 
wards those passing key- 
changes — so beloved of this 
composer — that the more 
poetic of other performers 
manag e to highlight. 

Of the work’s essential bon- 
homie , as in the humorous off- 
beat interruptions of cello and 
double bass in the scherzo, 
there was no doubt 

In the first half tbe 
Chilingirian String Quartet 
had completed their series of 
Haydn's Op 76 Quartets with 
the fifth and sixth qf the 
group: robust and vigorous 
accounts, even to the point of 
overplaying the gritty attack in 
the finales. 

Richard Fairman 



_ _ MIS DECEMBER 
FOR 4 WEEKS ONLY 

Twice daily at 2 pm & 6 pm 
(Christmas Ewe II am & 2 pm) 

Box Office 01-236 5568 
Credit Card agents 
01-240 7200 (24 hr) 
01-379 6433 ■ 01-741 9999 


JOSEPH 




TWICE ^ 
DAILY 

at 2.30 pm 

& 7.30 pm 


ROYALTY 

pS- THEATRE 

0*: 3 3i osbd 

■ . Credit _carc - 

■ a;enls 

™ [: 1-240 720D !i4>.:j 
[,:7- 379 3i • ij “ - 741 ?S.i3 








14 


SPECTRUM 



Who’ll rekindle the chariots of fire? 


Behind today’s 


WINNING PERFORMANCES 


varsity match lies 


a sorry saga of 
decline in sport 
at Oxbridge. 
David Miller 
finds out why 


A t Cambridge m the 
fifties you could sit 
down to a three- 
shillings-and-six- 
pence hutch at the 
Hawks Club any day of the 
week among a group of inter- 
national performers in half a 
dozen sports: a brains trust of 
table talk for which, gathered 
in a television studio today, 
Mark McCormack would de- 
mand a five-figure fee. 

They included household 
names in major and lesser 
sports — May, Barber and 
Dexter from cricket. Marques, 

; Mulligan and Arthur Smith 
from rugby. Marsh and 
; Huddy (golf), Masser (row- 
ing), Barrett and Warwick 
(tennis) Maitland and Cockett 
(hockey), Lyon and Broom- 
field (squash), Hildreth and 
Dunkley (athletics). 

It was the same at Vincents 
Club in Oxford in the era of 
Cowdrey, Davidge, Brace and 
. Derek Johnson. Pegasus, the 
giant football dub, produced 
21 amateur internationals 
including several, such as 
Tanner, Pawson and Pinner, 
who played for league clubs. 

Now, Oxbridge perfor- 
mance has declined relative to 
national standards, partly be- 
cause overall national levels of 
ability have risen and partly 
because the structure of the 
student population has 
changed, with more women 
and less emphasis on sport 
Nowhere is the situation 
more critical than in cricket. 
The Test and County Cricket 
Board has recently warned 
Oxford and Cambridge that 
their first-class status may be 
at risk. In rugby, which during 
a century at Cambridge has 
produced 300 international 
players with some 1900 caps 
between them, Oxbridge now 
clings to its status by tbe 
increasing enlistment of post- 
graduates — which is also true 
of rowing at Boat Race leveL 
In today's varsity match at 
Twickenham, Oxford are rely- 
ing on the scholarship 
schemes which attract inter- 
national players with the aca- 
demic qualifications to take 
further degree courses; soon 
Cambridge will be in the same 
position. 

Although Cambridge could, 
from recent seasons, field an 


Oxford v Cambridge 


AAA championship 






HALL OF FAME 


These are some of the btg 
names which graced 
Oxbridge sport in the Fifties: 

CRICKET: RW Barber 

(Cambridge). England batsman 
In 28 Tests. 0 B Carr (Ox- 
ford), England batsman, cap- 
tain once. M C Cowdrey 

), 1 14 Tests, captain in 


.JQ Oewes (Cam- 
bridge). England batsman, five 
Tests. E R Dexter (Cam- 
bridge). Engtend afl-rounder, 
62 Tests, captain in 30. 

P B H May (Cambridge). Eng- 
land batsman, 66 Tests, 
captain in 41. D R Sheppard, 
(Cambridge), England bats- 
man, 22 Tests, captain in two. 
M J K Smith (Oxford), Eng- 
land batsman, 50 Tests, cap- 
tain in 25. R Sifoba Row 
(Cambridge), England opening 
batsman, 13 Tests. J J 
Warr (Cambridge), England 
opening bowler, two Tests. 

A R Lewis (Ca 
land batsman, 


(Cambridge), Eng- 
ian, nine Tests, 


team, 1972-7 

ATHLETICS: Roger Ban- 
raster (Oxford), rest sub-four 
minute miter. Nick Stacey 
(Oxford), Olympic 200 metre 
runner. Chns Brasher 
(Cambridge), 1956 Olympic 
steeplechase champion. 
Peter HUdrefh (Cambridge), 
British 1 1 0 metres hurdles 
international. Chris Chataway 
(Oxford), former world 
5,000 metres record holder. 


Bngw Rgnnisfer break* fonr minutes for the mile: David Sheppard's 227 for Camb ri dge against the West Indies 


England line attacks, the total 
of 84 caps by 10 players 
between 1974 and 1984 com- 
pares badly with the 291 caps 
of 32 players in the previous 
ten years. The future worries 
Dr Alan Tayler, rugby senior 
treasurer at Oxford, who says: 
“We could not hold our heads 
above water (in senior fix- 
tures) if we relied on 
undergraduates.” 

Five factors produced the 
decline, sufficient for a group 
of ex-Cambridge industrialists 
to have refused to help raise 
money for a projected £8 
million sports centre at Cam- 
bridge unless there is a ehang p 
in admissions policy. 

T he factors are: the 
end of National Ser- 
vice meant younger 
and physically less 
mature undexgrad- 
uates; a changed admissions 
policy put less emphasis on 
sport; increased training at 
outside dubs lured undergrad- 
uates away from Oxbridge and 
into the dubs; a p ro po rt i onal 
rise in women students cut the 
available pool of sportsmen; 
and the decline of school sport 
meant fewer university en- 
trants with a sporting 
background. 

The trend produces a di- 
lemma not merely for Ox- 
bridge sport but, as a minority 
of Dons now recognise, for the 


f jimfsitrifttiiai attitude of the 
two universities towards their 1 
very function. Intellectual ex- 
cellence must be the aim, but 
fewer than 20 per cent of 
undergraduates gain first-class 
degrees. The nationally avail- 
able appointments for 
researchers anri lectureships 
are diminishing; jobs must be 
found for the majority gaining 
second-class degrees. 

Employers increasingly 
look for those with self-disci- 
pline, personality, gregarious- 
ness, and a sense of collective 
responsibility, as well as 
brains. Such characteristics 
are strongly evident in those 
with sporting achievement. 

John Butterfield, distin- 
guished physician. Master of 
Downing College and presi- 
dent of both rugby and cricket 
at Cambridge, says: “I believe 
sportsmen make good citi- 
zens. What we are looking for 
(at Oxbridge) is leaders. It is 
valuable to know, from sport, 
tbe experience of losing.” 

John Hopkins, Downing 
admissions tutor in Arts, says: 
“There are half a dozen col- 
leges (out of 30) who want 
people with energy, whatever 
they are doing.” And Dr Alan 
Tayler, St Catherines, Oxford: 
“Below the level of distin- 
guished scholars, what are our 
criteria? We want people who 
will benefit from the system. 


and go on to do something.” 

Colin Kofbert, barrister and 
tutor of Magdalene. Cam- 
bridge “A poll would show 
that academic pe rfo r m ance by 
Blues is above the university 
average. Those sent down 
have usually done nothing in 
any field. There are no un- 
employed Blues, but dozens of 
unemployed English firsts.” 

C harles Wenden, fel- 
low of All Souls, 
Oxford, with 30 
years experience in 
international uni- 
versity sport, and Christopher 
Taylor, bursar of Newnham, 
Cambridge, are emphatic the 
maintenance of a high sport- 
ing profile is essential to 
Oxbridge public identifi- 
cation. 

Many senior academics are 
indifferent, even hostile, to 
sport, resenting the lack of 
recognition they had as non- 
sporting stndents. Sub- 
consciously, are they getting 
revenge? Wenden says: 
“Maybe the attitude of tbe 
past 20 years (among tutors) 
has turned the comer.” Maybe 
not. Michael Risman, younger 
brother of Oxford's full back 
at Twickenham today, son of 
Bev, grandson of Gns, (both 
famous internationals) gained 
three As at A level; and 
Oxford rejected him. Cam- 
bridge, shrewdly, did not 


Silver amid die blues 


There are still a few shafts of 
excellence at Oxford and 
Cambridge, which hare foe 
advantages of traditional in- 
terest in activities like rowing 
and rugby, the convenience of 
superb facilities for outdoor 
team sports and the presence 
of stndents of fire right age 
wanting to take exercise. 

Dan Lyras, aged 28, an 
American freshman at Oriel 
College, Oxford, and world 
champion in fire coxless fours, 
is startled by die interest rad 
activity in rowing. “After fids 
jar’s intake of 140 people at 
my college we were able to 
form ten men’s and three 
women's eights. That is reaBy 
neat 

“Rowings very small in file 
United Stales except for fire 
major colleges. It is not han- 
dled by fire media. So it was a 
pleasant surprise to find the 
publicity over the boat race.” 

Because many colleges have 
then- own boat houses there is 
much more equipment avail- 
able even than at a traditional 
American rowing university 
like Princeton, where there is 
j w* the boat home for the 
university. 

Although American tmiver- 



year-dd Irish 110 metres hur- 
dles record. "Tbe naming 
track is alongside tire rugby 
pound, so _I ran go out and do 
some sprinting during the 
winter.” 

Muffin is Impresse d by 
Oxford’s facilities for athletics 
and rugby ba t stre ss es that tire 
mam reason he wort to Oxford 
was to further his academic 


Muffin: feeling die benefit of 
convenient 

sides have professional 
coaches, Oxford hare to rdy 
on dedicated — “ but 

the Oxford coaches like Dan 
Topobki are very good and 
they certainly give their all”. 
The weight training rooms, 
Lyras says, are as weft- 
equipped asm many American 
universities. 

The HDcy Road sports 
centre, aft-weather track and 
rugby field are also an attract 
tion for Brendan Muffin, 
Oxford’s centre at Twick- 
enham today, who woa his 9th 
Irish op against Romania to 
November. Last rammer. 
Muffin, aged 23, broke the 30- 


Jha BriHna, iBwrtw of 
physical education at Oxford, 
says the sports ce nt re has 
trouble catering for toe wider 
range of activity. “When I fast 
came to 1978 there were 24 
mri rereft yefahs, new there are 
53.” 

Cambridge is hoping to 
bnfid a similar ce ntre to the 
Grange Road area winch will 
help Jon Ridgeon, tbe finest 
athlete to go np for 20 years. 

Ridgeon, the European ju- 
nior 110 metres hurdles cham- 
pion, won seven events in fids 
term's freshmen's “It 
was quite a tough day as I 
framed in the morning.” He 
has to go to London twice a 
week to train either inside or 
on an all-weatber track. 

John Goodbody 


British record hokter for the 
shot Ian Boyd (Oxford). 

1956 Olympic 1,500 metres 
finalist Harry Whittle (Cam- 
bridge), 1952 Olympic 400 me- 
tros hurdles finalist Derek 
Johnson (Oxford). 1956 Olym- 
pic 800 metres silver medal 
winner. John Young (Oxford), 
British international sprinter 
and rugby cap. Bmce Tufloh 
(Cambridge), 1962 Euro- 
pean 5,000 metres champion. 

RUGBY: Oxbridge XV from 
foe fifties— Ken Scotland 
(Cambridge, 27 caps, Scot- 
land. British Lions), Arthur . 
Smith (Cambridge, 33 caps 
for Scotland, British Lions), 
Malcolm PhtWpa (Oxford, 

25 caps for England). Ricky 
Bartlett (Cambridge, seven 
caps for England), John Young 
(Oxford, 9 caps for Eng- 
land, British Lions), PhS 
Horrocks-Taylor (Cam- 
bridge. 9 caps for England, 
British Lions), Oirihvyn 
Brace (Oxford, 9 caps for 
Wales), Andy Muffigan 

»,22 caps for Ire- 
Lions), Peter 
Robbins (Oxford, 19 caps for 
England), Robin Davies 
(Oxford. 6 caps for Wales). 

caps for England), John Currie 
(Oxford, 25 caps for Eng- 
land), David Marques (Cam- 
bridge, 23 caps for 
England, British Lions). John 
WKcox (Oxford, 16 caps 
for England, British Lions), 
Gordon Wadded (Cam- 
bridge, 18 caps for Scotland, 
British Lions). 



Two years ago 
you wouldn't have believed 
that Tony Bagley could 
ever look after himself, 

Tg see Tony now, walking unaided, chatting 
away, enjoying painting, would seem miraculous 
to anyone who knew him when he first ramp 
to the RHHI in 1984. 

Then he couldn't walk, had speech diffi- 
culties, was unable to wash or dress himself. He 
and his nurses and therapists have worked so 
hard he now needs minimal nursing care. 

We have 330 patients like Tony. Please help 
such courage and such dedication. We are a 
registered charity (No. 205907) and rely on your 
donations^ legacies and covenants. 

Our Director of Appeals is P 1 

Captain A. D. Hutton, OBE, rn (Ret'd), 

The Royal Hospital and Home for 
Incurables, Dept. TTB, West Hill, K-l 

Putney, London SW153SW. 

The Royal Hospital and 

Home for Incurables 

PATRONS- HM THE QUEEN AND HM THE QUEEN MOTHER. 



Still weeping 
for the lost 
generation 

Argentina celebrates three years of 
democracy tomorrow after almost a 
decade of dictatorships that tortured 
and killed thousands. Ironically it was 
the Falklands defeat that led to the 
downfall of the generals. Eduardo Cafe 
reports on the fight back to freedom 'S ^ mw* with, p ***™,* <*** ZZZZOZZ 



The Argentine 
came to tbe home of Sexioia 
Gracida Fernandez Meijidc at 
two o’clock on tbe morning of 
October 23, 1976, when she 
was awakened by the inghtent 
ringing of the doorbelL 
Outside she could hear the 
murmuring of men’s voices. 
After a moment one of them 
said: “Federal police, open the 
doorf” She woke her husband 
Enrique and when they 
opened up they found them- 
selves confronted by four 
armed «wen- 

Tbe couple’s three children, 
Pablo, 17, Maria Alejandra, 
18, and Martin, IS, were 
asleep. The police ordered 
Pablo to dress and come with 
them. They told his parents to 
pick him up at a neaiby police 
station in toe morning. “Pablo 
was green. He did not cry, he 
did not protest He left with a 
smile; but it was a smfli- of 
fear." 

Pablo Fernandez Mejjide, 
in his last year of high school 
and with no record of political 
militancy, was to become one 
of more than 9,000 people 
who would disappear forever 
into the long Arg entin e night 

As with most of the others, his 
body has never been found. 

“I never learned how Pablo 
died. I can only infer it I can 
only imagine it,” said Sefiora 
Meijide, who is co-president 
of the Permanent Comm- 
ission on Human Rights. 

The men who took Fabk> 
away belonged to the Ar- 
gentine security forces that 


roamed the streets of Buenos 
Aires and other cities in the 
early morning hoars, almost 
always riding in green Ford 
Falcons without Horace plates, 
their shotguns poking out of 
the car windows. They were 
the soldiers of the military 
government’s war against 
subversion. 

A victim was chosen be- 
cause he belonged to a human 
rights or other “suspect” 
organization. Sometimes it 
was simply a matter of mis- 
taken identity . This appears to 
have been what happened to 
Pablo. 

Before kidnapping Pablo, 
the same men detained Maria 
and Leonora Zimmerman and 
a friend of Pablo's, Eduardo 
Muniz. AH three were Pablo's 
age, and like Pablo aH three 
would disappear forever. Ma- 
ria was Pablo's new girlfriend, 
but until recently she bad been 


dating another boy, also called 
Pablo. 

The four youngsters had 
distributed leaflets, painted 
slogans and sold a newspaper 
for the Workers’ Revolu- 
tionary Party, toe political 
branch of the People's 
Revolutionary Army, one of 
many terrorist groups then 
operating in Argentina. 

The supposition is that 
they were looking for the other 
Pablo,” Sefiora Meijide said. 
It was a nightmare Thai was to 
become familiar to thnnuandk 
of families. . 

Alfredo Bravo has the scars 
to prove what could happen to 
an ordinary citizen living 
under the military rule of the 
Argentine generals. He had 
just begun to leadi his evening 
Spanish course on September 
8, 1977, when an armed man 
entered the classroom and 


told him tbe Interior Minister 
wanted to see him. 

Seflor Bravo was thrown 
into a car and sped away into 
the Argentine abyss. For toe 
schoolteacher and long-time 
human rights activist, the day 
marked the start of two weeks 
of torture and more than a 
year of jail and house arresL 

Sehor Bravo had helped to 
found the Permanent 
Commission for Human 
Rights, of which he is still co- 
president. “For 13 days I was 
the object of aft types of 
torture. The purpose was to 
make me divulge the names of 
the people in the United States 
and Europe who helped publi- 
cize our denunciations of 
h uman rights violations in 
Argentina. I never spoke. Not 
one of my colleagues was 
disturbed or imprisoned.” 

During the next two weeks 
he was submitted to various 


forms of torture. Electric 
shocks were applied to all 
parts of all his body. He was 
hung from his feet and pum- 
melled with Mows. His head 
-was submerged in backets of 
water until he was close to 
drowning. 

Then he was brought before 
General Juan Ramon Camps, 
the notorious chief of the 
Buenos Aires province police 
who was sentenced to 25 years 


6 Pablo did not 
cry. But he 
left with a 
smile of fear^ 

in jail last week on charges of 
torture. 

“He said I would be receiv- 
ing a visit from my family that 
night and that if I told them 
what had happened to me I 
would later commit suicide in 
my cell,” said Setter Bravo. 

Luck and good timing com- 
bined to save Bravo’s life. As 
soon as they learned of his 
disappearance, Argentina's 
human rights organizations 
sent a telegram of protest to 
President Jimmy Carter, who 
was meeting the following day 
at the White House with ail 
the Latin American h ea ds of 
state on the occasion of the 
signing of the new P anama 
Canal Treaty. President Carter 
personally banded toe cable to 
Argentine's General Jorge Ra- 
fael Videla who promised to 
look into the matter. 

Today Senor Bravo, who is 
a high-ranking official in the 
education ministry, is 
optimistic about the future. “I 
think that toe experience that 
the Argentine people have 
lived through, the human 
rights trials and all the battles 
of the long night from 1976 to 
1983 have helped to solidify 
democracy.” 


DEMOCRATIC DAYS OF RECKONING 


» 1982: Argent! 
the Falklands. 


June 1982: 

over 

December 10, 1983: President 
Alfonsin Is sworn in as a 
democratically-elected Presi- 
dent 

Dece mb er 1983: Alfonsin an- 
nounces that nine former mffl- 
tary commanders wrfl be tried 
for human rights violations. 
Dec emb er 1985: Five top mili- 
tary commanders, 

former presidents, receive 
terms ranging from four 
to life. Four other at 
acquitted. 


ne defeat May 6, 1988: M0Hary com- 
manders, including former 
President Leopoldo Gaitteri, re- 
ceive jaS terms ranging from 
eight to 14 years for their role in 
the Falklands war. Thirteen 
other officers acquitted. 

December 2, 1988: Former 
Buenos Aires police chief Juan 
Ramon Camps Is sentenced to 
25 years in prison for human 
rights violations. Five other 
former mflttary and police offi- 
cers receive sentences ranging 
from four to 25 years in prison. 
TWo others are acquitted. 


S umme r 
shines in 
Country Life 

Sumnter«ill«inlv»h»n!nertm»rfi 

Lite 

SiimmrrtnBnrJinNuinhx 
-fUtA'ni'u. RefA JotTun i-.iluv)’. 

And uV rfw fcleal mcJann 
h* re.ichme die iwpciv— re&iMi 
■ 4 1 jto »>n- Mina* 

L-iL titujrJ n.SuRuiMT CikUv 

- UnratrNip'l LutUr 

01-261 5401. • 


OgNCISE CROSSWORD NO 1 127 

1 Straight ski ran (6) 

5 Commandeer (6) 

$ As wefl (3) 

9 Cold tiedess zone (d) 

10 Whim (6) 

11 Nobleman (4) 

12 Light up (8) 

14 H Caudiiki (7.6) 

17 Idler f8) 

19 Fold around (4) 

21 Confidential warning 

<3J) 

23 Get down (6) 

24 Heartbeat tracing 
(U.D 

25 Hearth frame (6) 

26 Take too far (6) 

DOWN 

2 Poo! slide (5) 

3 Endured (9) 

4 Slaving power f7) 



7 Constantly recurring ]6 Hotchpotch ( 7 ) 


18 Speak of(S) 


5 Ra m s h a ck le dwelling ?? . . , , _ 

(5) 13 In the interim (9) 

u Bsar~ -SSEs" 

SOLUTION TO NO 1 126 W 

ACROSS: 1 Braces 




Bastille 


DOWN: 
7 Shown 
17 Rebel 


KYcsram 

SK’fSsS-'S 


___ 11 Water ice 
22 Snorkel 23 Gorge 


f. 


a Placard 

Lowdawn ifiQpus 














'1 Qj 

■Mj 3 \ 



V 


ir$ 




Pi 


CM 


CM 


the TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 

FASHION by Suzy Menkes 


LH’jftuifj 


Under 



JPes igner lingerie has arrived, sweetly siivqq 
_ag d prettily innocent often reminiscent of 
bottom-drawer collections fr om anr>tW age 
and enough to tempt even the uhra-nractieal 




v- ■ 


$ ? 0 ■ wmmm; 

S’&s&t ".•%!; %Wi -S-'S- -.-rf: * . 

i2 . •• : ■> v : :;i 






*r^ : 







- 

v * ■ ’ »' V f '-j 

w . - _ 
■■ --rV : Vs- * .*?» - .. 

~..v: i 

• t .... . : - 

...i" *••*'>• -» 

£* IpW - * 

'•*- •••■. ■><*.*„ ; v ;^a 


s 



of the finest lace mark the amSTd 
designer lingerie — the latest line in up- 


k jB market undressing. “It looks like my 
mother's trousseau,” said a customer in the 
Jasper Conran shop, fingering the sheer georgette 
cami-knickers and slip of atop. The newest lingerie 
is reminiscent of the bridal collections at The White 
House which young ladies laid down in the bottom 
drawer. Undies now are the prettiest things, 
delicate rather than sensuous, and with luxury pnce 

ta gs. 

In the present season, even the most practical 
woman can be seduced by expensive under- 
pinnings. Those spending on a gift will be pleased 
to know that you now get rather more for your 
money. The newest lingerie is generously cut, with 
the bikini briefs expanding to culottes or French 
knickers, and the bra-top cut deep and wide or elon- 
gated to form a silken vest The petticoat too, is 
having a revival and is sold as part of a set of under- 
wear that looks tike grandmother’s trousseau from 
the 1920s. 

Both Jasper Conran and Emanuel, with new 
shops in Beauchamp Place, have introduced 
lingerie collections this season. Cbnran's is 1 9301 in 
style, bias-cut to stroke the body, and includes the 
all-in-one “teddy” that is a feature of many 
underwear ranges. Emanuel have gone bade to the 
Edwardian boudoir for lace-encrusted n£glig£s and 
bustiers trimmed with bows. 

I talian designer Giorgio Armani and Krizta 
both have delirious undies, sliced from silk 
cr£pe de chine, in their signature boutiques. 
Significantly Armani, who only two years ago 
launched an androgynous fashion look, has 
accepted that underwear needs to be feminine, and 
makes gossamer-fine bras and briefs, inset with 
transparent lace. 

Delicate und erpinnings come from the It a li ans ' 
and the French in a series of silken offerings at 
Harrods. Fashion controller Clare Stubbs rays that 
the two major styles in underwear are lhe frilly and 
the sporty. The new mood for soft femininity brings 
in * third category of gentle Kngrwrn 

aquamarine, peach, eaudend, old rose and cream.. 

The trend towards the frankly feminine has 

afriady reached the high sneet, where thewide- 
leesed French knickers, the new deep > bra tops and 
SSfrallv the silky camisoles are m the dam 
^STMarks iSd Spencer, best known for their 
S£dy briefe and wholesome mghtwrar, have, 
produced pretty rosebud mints. ^PJ“g° flacc 
and some wicked-lady undies in scarlet satm. 

The expensive lingerie relies rather oncut and 
fiffoi charaTwi* the matt surfios of 

The effect is pretty, pore 
and surprisingly innocent. 


IF YOU SINCERELY 
WANT TO IMPROVE 
YOUR HEALTH AND 
future PROSPECTS - 

here’s an invitation to take part in an 
' important publishing project 

Kiichpr is about to embark on a scientifically 
A major f heIp people improve their health, 

based project which a their security and 

their appCaI ^^|^ ofage, sex, fitness or educational level, 
potential - , jn feeling better, looking better. 

ir you 3re J.ndfacinga brighter and more secure future, 
enjoying life ni°je important and far-reaching project is 
your participau 

inVilCd « uroiTE FOR AN EXPLANATORY 
PLEASE ^QUESTIONNAIRE. 

* m h from any expenses, you will receive 
You pay no fee. Ap«J over is and willing to be 

no Al1 rep,,es wiU * wealed in lhe 

strictest confidence. T hE SUNDAY TIMES, 

i ifETIME , p.O- Box 484. Virginia Street. 

T**. MFjjg tU. Ft 9PP 


H * • . ■ %• v* 4 *.- 



- J 


*</T • 






V ' *3v* 

-jr- ■ ■ . 


■ *•! 






h f J9* ■*.••• 
•E ; 


, .,,t. *.■*• H ‘ ’ 

*; - ' 

. ; 

•- v 

r*l ' -’-i—’-r -■ 


mgkm 

m- 


The ghost of Christ- 


Jernk for gendemen 


mas past hatmts high fYTTATTTV from Paul Smith, 
street shops this year . 1 1 * cnfTlinks by Piero 


street shops this year *< w x ^ coffliaks by Piero 

as presents with the CHRISTMAS Fornasetti engraved 

warmth and cheer of an ^ — - with the moon, stars 

old -fa shioned Dfckea- grrfa and money, £35, 43-44 


warmth aod cheer of an -g 

old-fashioned Dkkeo- 

siaa Christmas out- 

twinkle glitzy Dynasty- 

style glanttmr.Even the 0 % 

festive patting and M 

advertising is wrapped 

in a Christinas doah of 

nostalgia. 

O Baubles and Bows: 
wrap yoorsetf and your F 

Christmas tree in rib- \ 

boos and bows. Hair J 

bows in every shape "" 

and cotour are in gUded boxes for 
£13JS from Fenwicks. Lama Ash- 
ley bows for ClndereUas who will 
go to the ball In black or navy Use 
velvet, £A95. Small but beautiful 
baubles hark back to 
grandmother's jewellery box: a 
sinuous diamante lizard brooch, 
antique-looking. £12.95 from Lib- 
erty. Sparkling crystal bead ear- 
logs wi:!i -.-i^rms . £25 by 

Eric fro-7» LJ-vrty and 

X.Y.Z. Ha S:‘»cr-pbled 

rvbdrt; i„; - Sierra! la- 

pels, by Cary V , zad Sheila 
Teatat. L39 from t. Vrty. 


£ Floral Street, WC2. 

• Fireside storms: 
Warm but etegswt satin 
slippers, £11.95, 
Fenwicks. 

tt Broderie for bed- 
time: white cotton cam- 
brie nightdress with 
7 broderie snglaise 

f frilled collar and cuffs, 

l £29.95, Lama Ashley. 

O Chrfotmas Scents: 

. Parfums Laura Ashley is em- 
broidered on a now-white powder 
puffin a drum of dusting powder 
for £1055. Sfiver filigree snr- 
roands Liberty's midnight bine 
glass scent bottle £17.25. Boudoir 
aocessories by Kenneth Turner 
from Harvey Nichols, come in 
elegant Parisian bottles with glass 
stoppers, Bath Ofi £17. ErcJ>*b 
pcEjJfiseos grooming is txir.-»d 
for -J Crech and Speake. ,' i 
S^eet, SWI, Baitu ! 
c :: ■■ ' brushes, £49-50, degac! j 

s < 2 l- aics cf cologne, shaken or 
I19J0. I 




Siffrzr' ' y t* ■ 







m/nte 


w m 


s. 





••a# 




PEOPLE 


Praise to 
Emanuel 

it was show-business as 
usual when Efizabetii and 
David Emanuel celebrated 
the launch of their shop last 
Wednesday. In a re-run of 
Diana’s Royal wedding, their 
star guest actress Jane 
Seymour, arrived in a gilded 
coach. The real party hap- 
pened that night when even 
the glasses holding the hun- 
dreds of white candles were 
swagged in the famous 
Emanuel bows. Toasting the 
designer couple were Lionel 
Blair, George Harrison's 
wife Olivia In a stinky velvet 
bustier dress, and assorted 
ballet stars wearing facial 
glitter. 






i%. ?%£ WZ 

' • - . 4 /rlj&i/Q. 


Centre: cream 
georgette camisole with 
appliqu6d stik lace, 



■ 


French knickers, £115 
by Jasper Conran fromhls 

shop at 37 

3emjchamp Place. SW3, 
Fortnum and Mason, 
Piccadilly and Harrods, 
Knlghtsbridga, SWI . 

and whttMtaL?and 
striped erdpede 
chine. Deep bra, £55, 
matching wrap-over 
culottes. £107 by Jenny 
Dobefl from Nignt 
Owls, 78 Fulham Road, 
SW3. Silver drop 
earrings, from Merota, 178 
Walton Street SW3. 

Par left: a whisper of 
silk with deep insets of 
lace for a snow-white 
Bll-in-one teddy by Krizia, 
£95 from a collection at 28 
Brook Street W1. 

Right a scattering of 
printed tulips on a pure 
silk bra with covered 
buttons, £40, matching 
bias cut sSp with 
apptiqubd lace, £99. From 
a set in the same silk, 
all by Elizabeth Bolton, 
from Fenwicks. New . 
Bond Street W1, Camffle, 
Stratford upon Avon 
end Lingers, York. 

Left EdwarxSan 
underpinnings for a cream 
silk and lace basque 
trimmed with bows and 
laced down the back, 

£300. Frothy frills of lace 
trim French knickers 
£80. Both by Emanuel 
from their new shop at • 

10 Beauchamp Place, 

SW3. 

Hair by Guido at Toni 
and Guy 

Make-up by Laurie 
Starrett 



• KV-r / 




• Jane Seymour (above), 
the 35-year-old actress, lit up 
the Emanuel party in 
chandelier earrings and this 
season's strapless top. 



Ww 








o It was tu tu much when 
Francesca Thyssen (above) 
turned up in an Emanuel 
skating skirt frock in wicked 
black velvet 

• A/ice in Wonderland be- 
came a fashion victim last 
week in a new 40-minute 
film, Caprice. The star of the 
film, a gir: called Lucky, is 
transported Into a tongue-in- : 
chic fantasy world through 
the pages of her favourite 
glossy mag, meeting charac- 
ters like the fashion editor, ■ 
Grace Herringbone, and ’ 
partying social editor Betty 
Mixer (as in Kenward). The 
film will be shown on Chan- * 
nei Four in the New Year. 



I jasmine tea a 


. u'-rsissitasr.* 

V " 


.•»«*«• w. b~bt ■ 





*'S - 





t ■■ >%!• ^'<-i a 







16 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 



A House viciously divided 


THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Cementing 
the cracks 

Rod Hackney’s first task after his 
bitterly contested election yes- 
terday as president of the Royal 
Institute of British Architects will 
be to restore the staffs badly 
battered morale. In recent weeks 
there has been a flurry of resigna- 
tions from the Portland Place 
headquarters. David Pearce, edi- 
tor of Riba's journal, says he has 
quit because of Riba’s “frankly 
Kafka-esque” bureacracy, which 
bad demanded the removal of his* 
office from the HQ. He has been 
followed by the keeper of Riba's 
Heinz picture gallery, John Harris, 
who is imhappy about plans to 
move it to Portland Pike, and 
David Artvell, director of informa- 
tion. Others threaten to follow. 
Pearce predicts that Hackney wifi 
have a tough time making any 
impact on the institute's workings; 
but Hackney tells me he is 
confident that his mandate will 
enable &im to make the sweeping 
changes necessary to restore calm. 

Woolsack? 

Student unrest almost deprived 
Lord Hail sham of his bed during a 
visit to his rooms at All Souls 
College. Oxfonl, at the weekend. 
He arrived to find his study 
occupied by George Walden, the 
higher education minister, and a 
deputation of students complain- 
ing about grants. His bedroom had 
been locked while the students 
aired their grievances, and embar- 
rassed college servants could not 
find the key. The 79-year-old Lord 
Chancellor emerged saying: 
“There was no room at the inn. 
Foxes have holes, birds have 
nests, but I have nowhere, it 
seems.” He then disappeared into 
a bathroom, muttering “I suppose 
we can put a bed in here.” 

Anticipation 

Which mole tipped off Wisden 
Cricket Monthly ? It is surely more 
than a coincidence that the next 
issue carries an account of Lord 
Rothschild's cricketing career. 
Next to a photo of the young 
Nathaniel Mayer Victor Roth- 
schild batting at Lord's for Harrow 
against Eton in 1927, it records the 
impressive 36 he scored in his 
debut for Northants against a 
Nottinghamshire attack which in- 
cluded Voce and Larwood, of 
Bodyline fame. 

No deal 

The TV movie Deal of the 
Century , scheduled for screening 
by CBS in America last week, was 
mysteriously axed at the last 
minute. Its subject matter, inter- 
national arms dealers running into 
trouble in Latin America. Were 
shades of Irangate responsible? 
CBS is surprisingly forthcoming: 
“It would be an extraordinary 
coincidence if the decision were 
not connected to the political 
situation.” 


It is just as wefl that Mrs Thatcher 
will be away in Strasbourg and not 
at Prime Minister's Question 
Time in the Commons today. Had 
she been about we would probably 
have seen an ill-tempered slanging 
match between her and Neil 
Kinnock which would have done 
nothing u> enhance the image of 
parliam entary government 

Kinnock is feeling braised by 
the ridicule heaped on him over 
his American trip and by what he 
regards as the deliberate mis- 
representation of his behaviour in 
the MI5 affair. Mrs Thatcher is 
equally outraged by what she 
regards as Kinnock's betrayal of 
the traditional bipartisan ap- 
proach on security. Each reacts by 
blasting the other across the 
despatch box with increasing 
venom and volume. 

We have today a Prime Minister 
and Opposition leader whose de- 
gree of mutual loathing has rarely 
been equalled in recent history. 
They are set apart not only by 
their politics but by their styles, 
their age, their experience and 
their sex. There is no point of 
contact between them. Each be- 
lieves in the other’s caricature. 

Mrs Thatcher sees Kinnock as 
an intellectual lightweight who 
wfll sacrifice any principle for a 
good line in party conference 
cracks, whose approach to any 
problem is to spray it with 
adjectives. He sees her as a 
heartless ideologue concerned 


Robin Oakley, Political Editor, explains 
the mutual Thatcher-Kinnock loathing 


only with the rida and who will use 
any weapon in the armoury of 
government, legitimate or other- 
wise, to stay in power. 

Between most past leaders there 
has been the unspoken sympathy 
of those who have carried the 
burden of high office. Wilson and 
Macmillan may have fought some 
epic contests across the despatch 
box but in the corridor afterwards 
they could grin acknowledgment 
of who had had the best of it 
Wilson may have seamed Doug- 
las-Home's matchsticfc economics 
but acknowledged his honesty and 
courage. Heath and Wilson, no 
bosom pals, could pass the time of 
day on Privy Councillor terms. 

Mra Thatcher, who rates people 
by their intellect above alt eke, 
found a modus vivendi with 
Harold Wilson; she respected 
Callaghan's bluff patriotism and 
Michael Foofs qualities as a 
Comm ons man , if nnthing 
You have to go back to the spit- 
and-scratch antipathy between 
Macmillan and Gaitsfeell to find 
the nearest equivalent to today. 
Meanwhile the behaviour of those 
on the back benches has become 
much uglier. 

It is not just Labour left-wingers 
trying to bowl down the Prime 
Minister. An equally obnoxious 


bunch ofToxy ruffians now set out 
deliberately to wreck Kinnock’s 
interventions. Mis Thatcher and 
Kinnock have jointly ushered in 
an era of parliamentary gang 
warfare; with an election 
approaching it can ordygn worse. 

Both sides are feeling defensive, 
and this brings out their aggres- 
sion. The Tories are alarmed that 
the endless rows over the Peter 
Wright affair are destroying the air 
of settled calm they are trying to 
cultivate in the run-up to the 
election. But it is the twilchiness 
on the Labour side that is more 
remarkable. Kinnock and his 
entourage are developing a kind of 

bunker mentality to such an extent 

that a paragraph of press criticism 
in an otherwise approving article 
is enough to earn threats of 
physical attack. All those not 
proven to be for them are treated 
as enemies. They are beginning to 
look like a bunch of men who 
believe they have peaked too early 
and find the match slipping away 
from them with no alternative 
plan in the locker. 

In the current security row 
Kinnock is furious at Mrs 
Thatcher’s threats to withdraw 
briefings on Privy Councillor 
terms and to suggest that he 
cannot be trusted on security 


matters. He insists body that be 
has never betrayed to another soul 
a word of what he has been told on 
such occasions in the past and 
regards it as “dirty tricks” by a 
Prime Minister ruthlessly deter- 
mined to belittle faim- 
Kinnock’s indignation is genu- 
ine. He is, al heart, a smaracoat- 
at-tbc-Cenotapb, sboes-pohshed, 
traditionalist not in the least 
embarrassed at extolling the vir- 
tues of the monarchy before an 
American audience. But bis irrita- 
tion is probably redoubled by the 
knowledge that many on his own 
side Thfak be was wrong to have 
taHryri to defe nd lawver Malcolm 
Turnbull in the MIS affair, so 
giving Mis Thatcher just the 
ammunition she neede d to claim 
that Labour cannot be trusted on 
defence. In the same way his 
surliness in America derived in 
part from the knowledge that he 
had foiled to find a single 


Labour’s defence policies- _ 

What many on both sides of 
Parliament find it hard to under- 
stand is the amount of time which 

Labour is devoting to pursuing the 

Wright Affair when the general 
public are treating all its comings 
and goings with an enormous 
shrug. All the evidence is that 
Labour has got its tactics wrong, 
and the realization of that on both 
sides can only redouble the bitter- 
ness of the exchanges at Prime 
Minister's Question Time. 


Richard Owen outlines new Nato ideas on exploiting Soviet weakness 


BARRY FANTONI 



a yon u 
i they’ll 

Overcast 


package for 
Sogat print 


A new financial 
members of the 
workers' union, designed to re- 
cruit new members, has come 
unstuck on the eve of tomorrow's 
launch. It seems that no one at 
Sogat head office bothered to 
check if Prudential Assurance was 
still interested in providing mort- 
gage and insurance services. It 
wasn’t enough Sogat members 
were already using the Pro’s 
services. Union officials have now 
written shamefacedly explaining 
that the man from the Pra will not 
be coming after alL The recruit- 
ment drive will, however, go 
ahead. Its distinctly inapposite 
title? Rising Sun. 


Rebirth 


Historian Francis Wilson is so 
pleasantly surprised by the impact 
of hi sHistory Today article on the 
curtailment of George V’s final 
hours by a shot of morphine and 
cocaine that he hopes for a more 
enduring readership. His agent is 
suggesting to Chatto and Windus, 
the publisher of his 1951 biog- 
raphy of the royal physician Lord 
Dawson of Penn, that it is time for 
a reprint, with a new chapter on 
the king's death. 

Salad daze 

Heedless of the current concerns 
about the abuse of early day 
motions, Jeremy Corbyn, the left- 
wing Labour MP, has put down 
this: “That this House congratu- 
lates the canteen workers of the 
Refreshment Department on the 
production of an excellent bean 
casserole on December 4/5, wel- 
comes the availability of vegetar- 
ian food; and hopes that in future 
there will be a wide variety of 
wholefood and vegetarian dishes.” 

PHS 


Brussels 

President Reagan’s latest series of 
bungles, this time over arms sales 
to Iran, and his abrogation of the 
Salt □ treaty are causing renewed 
concern within Nato. Meanwhile, 
Gorbachov introduces further cul- 
tural reforms and makes a success- 
ful and sure-footed foray to India. 
The divided West appears to be 
dealing with Mikhail the Mighty — 
or is it? 

Gorbachov may not always win 
but he makes sure he does not 
lose, or at least is not seen to lose. 
Thus the propaganda advantage 
which he has achieved in the 
western media. The Reykjavik 
summit was a case in point He 
offered an across-the-board arms 
deal and, having put Reagan on 
the defensive, immediately made 
Star Wars a sticking point Reagan 
was seen as clinging to his 
overriding and irrational attach- 
ment to SDI while the “reas- 
onable” Gorbachov decided there 
was no point in prolonging the 
negotiations and went home, leav- 
ing the West in disarray. 

The more Reagan comes un- 
stuck, the more Gorbachov looks 
like the teflon General Secretary. A a 
human rights'conference in Mos-' 
cow? A brilliant stroke, enabling 
Moscow to mount a propaganda 
campaign against the alleged lack 
of social and economic rights in 
the West But it could be that the 
West magnifies its own short- 
comings, which are there for aft to 
see, while overlooking Soviet diffi- 
culties because they are remote 
and, where possible, suppressed. 
At a recent closed Nato conference 
in Brussels, one US think-tank 
delegate suggested that we may be 
dealing not with Mikhail the 
Mighty but, in feet, with “Misha 
the Wimp". 

In reality, the Nato experts say, 
Gorbachov's public relations suc- 
cess abroad is not mirrored at 
home, where his authority is far 
from secure and his standing, both 
with the people and with official- 
dom, is not as high as the West 
assumes. The smart suits and 
rather flashy manoeuvres alienate 
many Russians, al aO levels of 
society, rather than dazzle. 

Members of the Brezfanevite 
Old Guard, who are still powerful, 
argue that Gorbachov tends to 
make unnecessary concessions too 
early in the superpower game. 
Debates in Aesopian language 
between Gorbachovites and 
Brezbnevites on the new style 
have appeared in the Soviet press. 
Moves which impress the West — 
limited private enterprise or open 
discussion of the Stalinist past — 
arouse suspicion and sotto voce 
accusations of gimmickry. 

Going to Iceland in the first 
place, ms opponents argue, was a 
typical Gorbachov concession: a 
ploy to disentangle hims elf from 
the mess into which East-West 
relations had fallen largely because 



For Mikhail, 
a hug along 
with a squeeze 


of Kremlin bungles Hire the 
Daniloff affair. After Iceland, 
Gorbachov appeared three times 
in ten days on Moscow TV to give 
an account of the breakdown in 
much the same words. “Russians 
do not like to see their leaders 
having to justify themselves,” one 
American official said. “It sm acks 
of failure.” 

The Nato conference was the 
brainchild of the wisecracking 
American Dr Murray Feshbach, 
brought in to advise Lord 
Carrington, the Nato secretary- 
general, as the alliance's first 
Sovietologist-in-Residence. West- 
ern academic and other expertise 
is being harnessed to give Nato 
planners a clearer picture of Soviet 
realities. “It's an odd thing,” one 
old Moscow hand said, “that in 
the past we have always thought of 
the Russians as masters of long- 
term strategy, wonderful chess 
players and so on, but now they 
seem to be abandoning the chess 
match in favour of the western 
game: going for tomorrow's head- 
lines, the immediate effect” 

The performance of Eduard 
Shevardnadze, the Soviet foreign 
minister, at the recent Vienna 
meeting on European security is 
typical of this headline-grabbing: 


the Moscow human rights con- 
ference would be a stage-managed 
propaganda show if the West 
accepted Soviet terms, but not if 
the West tinned the tables and 
called Moscow’s WufE 

As for SDI, the main lessons for 
Soviet generals and hardliners 
post-Reykjavik is that once again 
Gorbachov foiled to stop it, as he 
foiled at the first summit in 
Geneva. “The West may not 
believe in Star Wars, but the 
Russians obviously do,” one Brit- 
ish academic at the Nato con- 
ference said. 

Add to this the feet that 
Gorbachov still does not have a 
convincing majority in the Polit- 
buro, with most of the hardliners 
biding their time to see how many 
more mistakes he makes, and 
there is a danger that we might 
turn full circle from fearing 
Gorbachov to pitying him for his 
vulnerability. 

As one British delegate at the 
conference said: “Far from assum- 
ing masochistically that Gorb- 
achov is a born winner, we might 
find ourselves haying a vested 
interest in hel ping him to carry out 
his domestic reforms and over- 
come his enemies: let us help him 
shore up his authority”. 


Since the Russians are no doubt 
aware of this tendency the only 
realistic option for the West, as 
one American expert put it, is to 
both “deal" and “squeeze”: to deal 
with Gorbachov over arms con- 
trol and trade, and to squeeze him 
over human rights and Sovier 
behaviour abroad. In a rare fit of 
western self-confidence, foe con- 
ference concluded that what the 
Marxists call the correlation of 
world forces is moving against the 
Soviet Union, not in its favour, 
from Soviet setbacks in the Third 
World and the rising costs of an 
arms race which Moscow cannot 
afford, to Gorbachov’s domestic 
problems (1985 was supposed to 
be a year of economic growth, but 
the 1985 Soviet statistics were 
more than usually suspect). 

The West, in other words, 
should neither go weak at the 
knees out of admiration for 

Mikhail the Mighty nor go to the 
other extreme and fed sorry for 
Misha foe Wimp. It has to be 
hardheaded, resolute in its deal- 
ings with Moscow and careful to 
ensure that Nalo’s often alarming 
tendencies towards dissension and 
self-doubt do not band Gorbachov 
successes he has not earned. 

Provided Washington learns the 
lessons of foe Iran debade and 
establishes a co-ordinated foreign 
policy, Nato might even try to 
acquire the capacity for long-term 
strategy so long considered a 
Soviet speciality, even if this 
means letting Gorbachov win at 
least some, if not all, of the short- 
term accolades. 

Richard Owen was The Times 
Moscow correspondent 1982-85, 
and is now our correspondent in 
Brussels. 


Digby Anderson 

Child abuse on 
a grand scale 


Hong Kong: why it cannot be Charles 


The Queen, acting on the advice of 
the Foreign Secretary, will shortly 
appoint a new governor of Hong 
Kong to succeed Sir Edward 
Youde, who died suddenly last 
week. Both should be certain that 
those who offer advice on the 
appointment understand the 
hearts, minds, and apprehensions 
of the territory's 5.5 million 
residents, and the determination 
and suspicion of the handful of top 
leaders in Peking. 

For a start, they should ignore 
the proposal that the job go to foe 
Prince of Wales. Quite apart from 
whether he would want it, and 
although an eccentric fringe in 
Hong Kong is vigorously floating 
foe idea, it would be a disastrous 
appointment. 

Between now and 1997, when 
Hong Kong is handed back to the 
mainland, the atmosphere there 
will become increasingly tense as 
at least three million ofits citizens, 
those who are refugees, face the 
realities of once again submitting 
to communist rale. A man of great 
wisdom, experience and intimate 
knowledge of the Chinese psyche 
will be needed to prevent this 
tension from turning into hysteria, 
flight, or even public disorder. 

He must be able to persuade the 
bankers, financiers, administ- 
rators and professional people that 
their interests will not be swal- 
lowed up when the red flag 
eventually waves over what is now 
foe governor’s residence. 

rest of the territory’s 


population, as wefl — noodle 
sellers, taxi drivers, police, and 
above all the workers in Hong 
Kong's myriad workshops, too 
poor to flee abroad — need 
reassurance that in December, 
1984, when Britain and China 
agreed that Hong Kong would 
enjoy “a high degree of auton- 
omy” they meant it, and that after 
foe 1997 hand-over gambling, joss 
sticks, and the pursuit of private 
interest will not be deemed 
counter-revolutionary. 

The next governor will also 
have to convince Drag Xiaoping 
and his colleagues, for whom the 
recovery of Hong Kong is a 
primary patriotic task, that in 
protecting foe interests of the 
territory, Britain is helping to 
create a capitalist enclave within 
the People’s Republic, and not a 
de facto independent city-state 
with a primary aOegience to 
western interests. 

It is no slur on the Prince of 
Wales to say that all this is not for 
him. 

Sir Edward Youde’s credentials 
were impeccable: entry into foe 
Foreign Office's China depart- 
ment in 1 947, excellent Mandarin 
and working Cantonese, long ser- 
vice in Peking, culminating in the 
ambassadorship between 1974 
and 1978, the critical years bridg- 
ing the dea t h of Mao and the 
ascendancy of Deng Xiaoping and 
great administrative responsibil- 
ities as Chief Clerk in foe FCO. 
Nevertheless, even he was not a 


perfect governor, seen as he was by 
some in Hong Kong as too 
determined to manag e foe hand- 
over to Peking’ssatisfection. 

But it was Sir Edward above all, 
despite Peking’s insistence that he 
could not represent the interests of 
the people of Hong Kong, who 
made dear to Deng’s negotiators 
that it is in China’s interests to 
preserve the territory’s unique 
way of life after it becomes a 
special administrative region. 
This means not only horse racing 
and mahjong but the region’s own 
legislature and chief executive, 
drawn from the local population 
and approved by Peking. In Hong 
Kong this is called Hong Kong 
People Ruling Hong Kong; in 
Peking, One Country Two Sys- 
tems. 

Who then should follow Sir 
Edward? Sir Percy Gradock, now 
Mrs Thatcher’s special adviser on 
foreign affairs, followed Sir Ed- 
ward as ambassador to Peking 
from 1978 to 1983. He, too, 
struggled through foe negotiations 
leading up to the si gning of the 
handover agreement in December 
1984, and may once have saved 
them from breakdown, in a 
memorable session with Zhou 
Nan, Peking's abrasive thief nego- 
tiator. Sir Percy speaks excellent 
Chinese. 

Equally well qualified is Dr 
David Wilson, assistant under- 
secretary in the FCO. A PhD in 
Chinese history and ex-editor of 
foe authoritative China Quarterly, 


( 


Wilson was once political adviser 
in Hong Kong, foe FCO’s top 
official attached to foe Hong Kong 
government He oversaw virtually 
every hour of the 1984 negotia- 
tions in Peking, and now leads the 
British side at foe three-monthly 
meetings of the liaison group 
which is hammering out pre-1997 
arrangements such as Hong Kong 
passports, identity cards, and in- 
dependent membership erf Gatt 
and dozens of other international 
organizations. 

Then there are three Chinese- 
speaking ambassadors: Sir Rich- 
ard Evans in Peking, Alan Donald 
in Jakarta, and Robin McLaren in 
Manila, all with high-level Chi- 
nese and Hong Kong experience. 
In Hong Kong and Peking they, 
together with Cra dock and Wil- 
son, are regarded as first-class 

mandarins. 

How long should the 
governor hold the fob? 
until 1995, two years before 
handover. Then a Hong Kong 
Chinese liked, admired and re- 
spected on both sides of the border 
should be appointed. If his prede- 
cessor has done well, in 1997 this 
first Chinese governor can lay 
down the plumes and other colo- 
nial trappings and, with Peking’s 
approval, become the first chief 
executive of the largely autono- 
mous Houg Kong special admin- 
istrative region. 


next 


Guy Benton 


Had it been foe unemployment 
rate or the numbers in poverty, 
newspapers would have been 
filled with columns of protest and 
ihe radio resounded to denunci- 
ations by politicians and church 
leaders. But it was only the 
divorce figures, up another 1 1 per 
cent, so there was next to no 
comment at aft. Most newspapers 
limited themselves to reporting 
the increase, released by the Office 
of Population Censuses and Sur- 
veys late last month. Some in- 
creased their coverage to an inch 
and a half reporting, without 
comment, that “recent changes in 
the law, allowing couples to 
petition for divorce after one year 
of marriage compared with three 
vears previously, was the main 
reason for the increase.” 

Divorce is. of course, not simply 
a problem for foe partners con- 
-ceraed but a major social problem. 
More than 160,000 children are 
dragged through the divorce 
courts every year in the wake of 
their parents’ in clina tions, and 
their subsequent maintenance is a 
substantial part of the £2,000 
mifiinn paid by taxpayers to “one- 
parent families”. 

George Brown, in his recently 
updated and authoritative Brown 
on Divorce, has no doubt that 
divorce is the social problem of 
our times, causing “damage and 
distress to the children involv- 
ed ... the cause of more unhappi- 
ness than any other.” Other 
commentators have shown foe 
costs to society in the poor 
educational performance and 
delinquency linked with children 
of divorced parents. 

There is no longer any doubt 
that the ending of marriage 
partners’ contractual obligations 
to each other means very often in 
practice the abdication of their 
parental obligations to their chil- 
dren. Of those parents who, after 
separation, adopt a visiting rather 
than custodial role, more th fln half 
(nearly all fathers) will have lost 
contact with their children after 
two years. In the inner cities, up to 
a third of children are beii^ 
brought up without fathers. The 
rate of increase is alarming. The 
estimated proportion of marriages 
ending in divorce has gone from 
02 (1911) to 6.7 (1954) to 33 per 
cent (1986) and a rising number 
have young children. More than a 
quarter of the children concerned 
are under five. According to 
Brown, foe courts are so besaraed 
by divorcing parents that they 
cannot discharge their duties to 
oversee the children’s welfare any 
better than perfunctorily: “At least 
one court lists 60 to 70 
appointments . . . to be heard by a 
deputy judge in one day " 

One might think it is tone to re- 
assess the ease of divorce. But 
none of the political parties is 
interested, and the recent Matri- 
monial Causes Procedure Com- 
mittee (Booth report) managed to 


do the opposite. Its pages betray 
an obsession with making divorce 
as quick, easy and cheap as 
possible. Procedures should be set 
to relieve petitioners of any an- 
guish. The last vestiges of guilt or 
fault should be removed. The 
report proclaims dogmatically 
that no one partner is likely to be 
to blame. Ignoring foe manifest 
social costs of divorce, it urges that 
tire publicness of divorce hearings 
be minimized for the convenience 
of divorcers. We may look for- 
ward, no doubt, to tidc-foe-box 
divorce by return of posL 
Behind all this is foe bizarre 
notion that divorce has nothing to 
do with marriage break-up. It is 
viewed merely as a tidying 
arrangement which occurs after 
“irretrievable” breakdown has al- 
ready occurred and therefore 
should be quick, easy and pleas- 
ant. But divorce is a social feet. 
The ease with which it can be 
obtained is known by couples 
marrying, arguing and separating. 
To be sure, its ease is rarely pan of 
explicit marital calculation, but 
equally surely divorce legislation 
contributes to attitudes to mar- 
riage. The divorces it makes easier 
are there for all to sec. Something 
which was once very unusual and 
heavily stigmatized can be seen to 
be something that many people , 
now do without stigma. It be- - 
comes a thinkable course of 
action. It becomes no rmal. 

What is certain is that with the 
rising child casualties of marriage 
breakdown and its cost to the 
taxpayer, that is to famili es striv- 
ing to slay intact, foe advocates of 
easy, simple, cheap and pleasant 
divorce should no longer be 
allowed to get away with their 
unresearched assumption that lib- 
eralized divorce plays no part in 
these ills. But they probably will 
get away with it. 

The Brezhnev doctrine states 
that countries where communists 
have taken over must never be 
allowed to revert to democratic 
rale. Progressives have adapted 
this to social issues. Once a 
progressive orthodoxy has cap- 
tured an area of social policy, it 
must never be ousted. It does not ' 
matter whether foe Eastern Euro- 
pean regime is manifestly in- 
efficient and unjust It does not 
matter whether the progressive 
orthodoxy is associated with 
dreadful social problems. 

When the Booth report com- 
placently states that “it is neither 
desirable nor practicable to try to 
put the dock bade”, it is not 
reaching a conclusion on foe basis 
of research but parroting progres- 
sivist ideology. Obviously 160,000 
suffering children are too few to 
persuade Booth or the Lord 
Chancellor to do something as 
radical as reverse their policies. I 
wonder how many more are 
needed. 

The author is Director of the Social 
Affairs Unit 


Andrew Gilchrist 

Liverish all 
sorts 


Of all foe professions, none today 
entails a greater degree of stress 
than diplomacy. Apart from foe 
burden of his duties in the 
increasingly complex, web of for- 
eign relations, the diplomat is foe 
target for kidnapping or murder, 
so much so that the rigorous 
security precautions he is forced to 
adopt make his life scarcely worth 
flying. At best, he goes in constant 
fear, that students or religious 
fanatics wift put a torch to his 
embassy or residence. And even 
when he avoids, or survives, such 
hazards, he is well aware that his 
professional efforts are ill-re- 
garded at No 10. 

It is a life that puts an intol- 
erable strain on the human frame, 
and most of all on foe liver. For 
foefe is no other profession more 
likely to drive a man to drink. 

And if such a temptation exists, 
consider the opportunities for 
yielding to it. The words 
“diplomacy” and “the cocktail 
circuit” are virtually synonymous. 
Night after night, members of this 
hedonistic calling embark on an 
endless round of-receptions, par- 
ties, national days, banquets and 
heaven knows what besides, all — 
except (perhaps) in Saudi Arabia 
— to the accompaniment of co- 
pious supplies of alcohoL No 
sooner does a guest empty a glass 
of whisky or champagne than 
another is pressed into his hand. 
Indeed, I believe it is this picture 
of diplomatic life which evokes so 
much of the contempt and de- 
rision in which the profession is 
held by much of the public. 

Further, the diplomat enjoys 
duty-free privileges, so that when- 
ever he feels inclined to drink in 
the privacy of his own house it 
costs him practically nothing. Let 
me emphasize here that in dip- 
lomatic life duty-free means duty- 
free, pot the trifling reductions 
made at airports under that a Has 
The price of a decent brand of 
Scotch delivered at the British 
embassy in (say) Paris is so 
minimal that it zs regarded as a 


state secret 

Not, of course, that the duty- 
free privilege is provided as a 
personal favour for the ambas- 
sador: it is intended to save money 
for the British taxpayer. The 
ambassador is compelled by his 
duties to participate fully at the 
“giving” end of foe cocktail 
circuit, so if he had to buy his 
Scotch locally, paying the exor- 
bitant duty imposed in most 
foreign countries, the cost of 
running the Foreign Service would 
be astronomical. So duty-free it is. 


Is all this entertainment really 
necessary? An irrelevant question: 
it is considered to be necessary. If 
we want our diplomats to be well- 
placed for foe collection of vital 
information and to exert valuable 
influence in well-chosen quarters, 
then they must entertain, and 
entertainment means drink. 

You still think it’s all absurd, 
unnecessary and futile? All right, 
what about business entertaining? 
Press entertaining? What about 
the very considerable sums spent 
by local authorites (even left-wing 
authorities) to lubricate their t 
relationships with one another 
and to foster friendship when they 
send delegations overseas? 

All right, you may ask, but what 
is aft this leading up to? Well, a 
week or two ago the newspapers 
published a table showing the 
degree to which members of 
various callings suffer from cirrho- 
sis of the liver. It showed that the 
incidence among doctors was 
three times that of the norm, with 
the armed forces, financiers and 
seamen all exhibiting increasingly 
distressing figures. Pride of place 
went, predictably I suppose, to 
publicans, who register a horrify- 
ing and an almost incredible 15 
times the average. y 

And what about the British _ 
diplomat? A man exposed daily 
(as I have shown) to the maximum 
of stress accompanied by the 
maximum of temptation? Where 
does his liver fit in? 

As a former British ambassador, 

I was proud to see that the lads of 
today maintain the hi gh standards 
and _ the old traditions of foe 
Service; no matter how much they 
put away, their livens are un wrung. 
They do not rate the slightest 
adverse mention in the cirrhosis - 
table. 

Yet there is one entry in the 
table which does cause me unease. 
Since my retirement from the 
fringes of diplomacy my name has 
occasionally appeared in The 
Times as the author of a few well- ~ 
timed and weighty lines on a 
matter of public importance. That 'f' 
sorely does not alter foe status of ~ 
my liver for those minor contribu- 
tions appeared in a column sup- 
ported entirely by the efforts of 
similar, unpaid correspondents. 

But this is an article \ and I 
expect to be paid for it Does this 
hung me into that cirrhosis tab- 
ulation under the endangered 
category “Authors, journalists and . 
related workers”?lf so, my liver is ; 
indeed at risk. 

Tftc author was ambassador to 
Reykjavik, Jakarta and Dublin. 


i : 


! *&>-. 
;.j \ 
;«3 y . 


tonVf'; 


£«*■■■ 
■‘‘I fr i_ 
v.^" ■ ... 

ri, v i ; £c*v- 

. *9 ic i . 


■■v. Cl - . 

. ..--I;-:, . . 

fa "■■■ ; - 

, - V\>. . . 

■"•'ti 

2V“r 
VK* I 

s 

^ <J\ - 

: 

'St** 

”■ C- 
ron*. ‘ ' 

w-w r: 

ste. 


VFbT? 
SS re 

frl?.**. 







the TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


k>R«uS-7i 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


be:.-a ; . 

•"'i iv 51— j 

nr, 

J ? !?• ■ p 

o' &iis':fir 

■n, tt-v._ 

^TSUlsct: 

■**> "■> 

1 *^:s -Ja- 

X hisiNf 
■ 


Bennington Street, London El 9 XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 






- - - ^1 



t.r,. 

'■'“•Sill 

St. 

a 

‘ ,r‘SCl 



• \ 7^:.^ 


I- up !: 
a i: 

Sura -;i'- 
:hrT='>rr 

llJi. 

<1 :jr V 


■ Pat: 

aiior.. b-: 
tegturj -J". 
a N • ;; 
airs C2 i#r _ 
SfC'T.rrr - -^ 

&e virti tv 
a> pc ■'-•if 
1* »• *.v- 
;rru T Sr ;f 

,t 

j.L". . - 
-ViV*.iC- *’ 
i - iiur 1 . 

*-;V ;h:‘r 
« lias: > 
v- r-n *. 
vsar-.» =. : 


fcr-r* ->: 
v^wr:.;:; 

* 

Ore* r 

i .-f-7 1 

• 

: Ji.nr-. : . . 


;wft " ... 

4 •. ? 

arc v • .7 

V.rt .,• ,*»• . 
«.'- a--. :. • 
« :• -r 


4 r - 

; f» . « • 

■ ' 

>.-U ' i"»s. 

l: 

pr==r. -V-i 7 
3-*..vr :rr 

i 1. ... 


* -lr»J 


• "A*e 
,=r ‘^h. 


:!M. • 

■ . v'"" 1 --' •- 

<.f- : 

~-T-. 


» fr 

-e* 


■r ,% » V '*’• - 

-sw- - . 

• • A*. ‘ ‘ ? 

Ki’ '• 

J r. :' X » 

* ■ 

SV i*:-'-- *“ 


>= -■ • 






Tf* 1 ? 

_ s.J'f V: - 

■•*** « 

.jW. .-" 

^ T' tf r ’ : 


CHIRAC BACKS DOWN 

FtaTSf Sff 1 ?; limited. He could not affori to fiom goveram 
Jacques Chirac didnotsuf^r SL 100 ^ i? invitiin g P^c than he has bee 
as much from h£ 5®““*® fo F ** Policies. Under A greater d 

attitudes to terrorism as dfri ^Bsntutton of the Fifth French govern 
his reputatiouo^ea^YVS developments cycle of demc 

terday, however, the weaknS ^*5 W>vite& President capitulation nu 

of this soi disant stmmTrnT, Mitterrand with a pretext to precedent, part 
was brought home to his own w^° ? National Assem- CGT labour m 

, UUJC m “S own blv and mil a nonmnl .Wa„ nu‘. 


™^ht home to his own Wy and call a genera! electioi. 

■ rfa h « 8 M fiKh^nSSd 

- “» been forced to action may have been small 

withdraw ^ the French but M Chirac could not afford 
government s controversial to run even that degree of risk, 
and much needed higher xi, 
education biH Faced with th* ™ Prune Minister - and 
choice of sticking to its policies woul(i r b f President _ has, 
or giving way to violeSre,^ nonetheless, lost a great deal 
government has decided to cut *?*? govei ? menl an un- 
its losses and acquiesce to the ^ < ? ror m a ? sumill S ^ il 
student demands. strength to steamroller 

,, -» . , . . . . the education bill through the 

jJr s ^tb- National Asembly without 

draw the education bill will be more than the minimum di- 
seen by the right-wing mem- alogue with the parties in- 
i 5 ® 5 ™ ms party as an affront volved. It stuck to its 
to the their general commit- commitment to reform in the 
mem to rapid, no-nonsense face of early indications that 
reform. But he must clearly there was widespread opposi- 
nave deaded that it was the tion to the bill within the 
e ? only prudent course of action student community - and 
v open to him and that the amongst the general public. 

S wWcr^e St Sdem P 1 SH * now has the worst of all 
already died? wasmata^ worlds. It has fought and lost, 
abate. ' Although the cohabitation 


but he had equivocated too 
late. The rioting dem- 
onstrators had tasted power 
and the promise of a watered 
down education bill could not 
be guaranteed to satisfy them. 

The Prime Minister's room 
for manoeuvre was already 


ister is unlikely to be placed in 
jeopardy by these events, they 
look set to cost Chirac mud) of 
the initiative gainad from the 
success of privatisation and 
electoral reform. President 
Mitterrand is in a stronger 
position to withold his consent 


from government legislation 
than he has been up to now. 

A greater danger for the 
French government is that the 
cycle of demonstration and 
capitulation may be seen as a 
precedent, particularly by the 
CGT labour union, in future 
•disputes. M Chirac has opened 
a credibility gap which his 
adversaries can be expected to 
exloit to the foil 

Ironically, the reform bill 
was far less radical than would 
appear to be the case from the 
reaction it generated. M 
Chirac's earlier protestations 
that the reform proposals had 
simply been misunderstood, 

are essentially correct 

There is a consensus be- 
tween left and right which 
acknowledges that the current 
university system is wasteful, 
inefficient and poorly suited to 
the needs of the French 
employment market Indeed, 
in some respects, the educa- 
tion biQ was merely designed 
to confer official status on 
practises which certain univer- 
sities have been implementing 
for many years. 

Eventually, the government 
will have to return to the issue 
of university reform. By that 
time it may have learned fiom 
its recent mistakes. At the 
moment it has alienated both 
students and parents. It has 
undermined the legitimate 
case for educational reform. It 
has also put a question mark 
against the character of the 
government itself 


THE BAKER PLAN 


Meanwhile in Britain, the 
education system is set to 
change no less controversially 
• albeit, we trust, rather more 
peacefully. 

The Conservatives intend to 
legislate in the next Parliament 
to ensure that schools are 
subject to a national core 
curriculum. This will deter- 
mine the essentials for primary 
and secondary learning. It will 
set attainment targets to show 
exactly what children should 
have learned in basic subjects 
at given ages — and show up 
cases when then have not been 
enabled to reach it That gives 
a wholly new power to the 
centre. 

The second aim of the 
Education Secretary, Mr 
Kenneth Baker, is to give the 
schools themselves 

responsibility for their own 
budgets arid management 
New powers will be exercised 
^ by the already reconstituted 
governing bodies which have 
increased parent representa- 
tion. 

Mr Baker also hopes to 
encourage schools to provide 
what parents want by enabling 
them to recruit as many pupils 
as they wish. What powers will 
be left to the local authorities is 
not clear, but the direction of 
his thinking is indicated by the 
new city technology colleges 
which are to be wholly in- 
dependent of them. 


It may, however, be difficult 
to enforce the national core 
curriculum unless the whole 
system of educational 
responsibility is reformed 
much more radically than Mr 
Baker has yet indicated. 
Centralised education is not 
generally liked. This* indeed, 
made sense when local 
authorities were less 
politicised than the central 
government marhfn& But they 
no longer are. 

The scandalous behaviour 
of Brent council in its persecu- 
tion of teachers accused of 
racism illustrates the frame of 
mind with which some local 
authorities discharge their 
responsibility. There is no 
reason to be afraid of a 
national system which protects 
children from sectional politi- 
cal indoctrination at the same 
time as watching out for 
ingriarpiate att ainme nt in basic 
subjects. 

Many questions remain. It is 
clear that the criteria of a 
national core curriculum can 
only be met if there is a much 
more thoroughgoing system of 
inspection than now exists. 
This means not only more 
inspectors but inspectors with 
different attitudes. Many are 
often now part of the problem. 
They need to become less 
supporters of the educational 
producers and more protectors 


of the educational consumers, 
the children. 

What will happen if despite 
proper inspection, despite the 
proposed new teacher con- 
tracts, a school still fails to 
deliver the appropriate stan- 
dard of education because of 
the way in which it is delib- 
erately managed? What sanc- 
tions can be used in remedy? 
Allowing children to move 
elsewhere is not an answer for 
those who have to remain. 
WhO'is to have the power of 
hire and fire of head teachers, 
and who should be allowed to 
dosea school? 

It may be that there is no 
answer - to these questions 
short of removing education 
and its funding from local 
political authorities altogether. 
Whatever reponsibilities not 
exercised by governors could 
be given to local education 
boards, responsible to a na- 
tional board appointed by the 
Education department 

The Exchequer already pays 
nearly half the cost of educa- 
tion, and yet the Government 
and parliament have virtually 
no say over how the schools 
are run. Central funding may, 
paradoxically, be the only way 
of implementing Mr Baker's 
wish to make the schools 
responsible to the needs of 
parents, the children and the 
nation. 




Only four days remain be- 
* fore the month-long voting is 
^‘completed in the elections for 
General Secretary and Trea- 
surer in the main civil service 
union, the Civil and Public 
Services Association. The re- 
sult will be watched with 
foreboding by Ministers since, 
if the Militant-supported Mr 
John Macreadie is elected 
General Secretary, the pros- 
pects for Whithall disruption 
will sharply increase. 

The ballot is, of coarse, the 
re-run of elections held last 
June which Mr Macreadie won 
by 121 votes out of a total of 
. over 50,000. This result was 
Skater overturned following an 
investigation of the ^ 

the Electoral Reform Society- 
No hard evidence baUot- 

rigging was uncovered, oui 
widespread and suspicious- 
regularities were revealed 
Thus, some br^hes returned 
more votes than they tad 
recorded members; some peo- 
ple had apparently signed for 
multiple bSot forms; wd 
some branches found 
their votes arrived too late to 
affect the result 
Whoever gained, toere ™ 
plainly a strong case for ^ 
arranging an e ^?° n sl ^ s 

-rvo^'Tw^ 

^o^Uingme^ad 

been detected. For 
election, moreover, die 

rules were change- There has 

been a stricter 

ballot papers which havebee^ 

distributed in . .“ bave 
members. Union officiated a™ 

beenforbiddcntorecom^ 

candidates. And cffi«ds have 

also been required tonow 

election meetings at nines ana 


A WHITEHALL SPECTRE 


places where all members have 
the chance to cast their votes. 

But such reforms, though 
welcome, meet only some of 
the problems. They reduce the 
prospect of outright fraud. 
They help to overcome voter 
apathy and ignorance which, 
in the case of the CPSA’s last 
election, resulted in just over 
one-third of the members vot- 
ing. And they make it easier 
for union members to obtain 
ballot papers. 

But the organisation of 
union election meetings, un- 
like either local government 
elections or union votes on 
political ballots, remains un- 
satisfactory. The ballot itself 
may be secret, but the occasion 
on which votes are cast re- 
mains a public one. Union 
moderates argue that some 
Militant union officials 
circumvented the ban on 
recommending candidates. 
Were this so, it could well 
produce an atmosphere of 
intimidation. 

Even where Mr Macreadie 
obtains no help from union 
officials, however, he can still 
call upon a large contingent of 
young and dedicated Militant 
supporters to carry out the leg 
work of agitprop. He has 
overwhelmed his moderate 
opponents with glossy leaflets 
and posters in an apparently 
expensive campaign. And he 
has discouraged press coverage 
of the election which might - 
alert sleepily moderate union- 
ists to the issues at stake. 

These efforts seem to have 
paid off. Early indications — 
which, since voting is still 
going on, must be treated 
Cautiously - are that Mr 
Macreadie is heading for a 


dear majority. 

Such a result would be one 
consequence of the 
Government's failure to in- 
dude compulsory postal bal- 
lots in trade union legislation. 
This single reform — to which 
no respectable democratic 
objection can be sustained ~ 
would have achieved all that 
the CPSA's own reforms have 
achieved as wdl as automati- 
cally shielding union members 
from even the possibility of 
intimidation • 

Ministers shrank from the 
controversy such a step would 
have caused. As a result they 
now free the much greater ride 
that the largest civil service 
union will fell under the 
influence of a Militant sup- 
porter. 

How momentous would 
that be in a union which 
retains a moderate executive? 
Mr Macreadie could be ex- 
pected to throw the prestige of 
the CPSA’s leading official 
behind every potential strike 
and disruptive action. And 
since Militant-controlled sec- 
tions of the dvil service, such 
as the social security sections 
of the DHSS, are already 
threatening to obstruct legisla- 
tion which they dislike, the 
dvil service could be in 
permanent upheaval. 

Ministers would hardly wel-, 
come that in an election year. ’ 
But an incoming Labour 
government under Mr Neil 
Kinnock might be equally 
distressed. Militant, after all, 
has scores to settle. Both major ; 
parties must hope that in the 
four days remaining, the- 
CPSA’s voters will save them 
from the consequences of the 
Government’s timidity. 


Mentally ill in hospital or out? 


From the Joint Parliamentary 
Under Secretary of State. Depart- 
ment of Health and Social Security 
Sir, Dr Harry Jacobs (November 
27) seems to be til ting at a 
windmill which exists in his own 
imagination only, Mien he writes 
of “a sacred banner proclaiming 
that all insane people can be 
treated in the isolation of their 
own homes." 1 do not know if 
anybody holds such a view, but it 
is certainly not held by this 
Government 

The policy paper that has been 
submitted to the House of Com- 
mons and also sent to all health 
authorities suggests a permanent 
provision of places for m-patients 
of the order of 50,000 (the number 

occupied beds at present is just 
under M, 000 )- 

The central' objective of 
Ministers' policies since 1981 has 
been to provide a comprehensive 
range of mental health services 
within every district That range 
must of course include a varied 
range of provisions for short-stay 
and long-stay in-patients and also 
much improved services for the 
many people more or less disabled 
by chronic mental illnesses who 
are already living in the commu- 
nity. 

I hope that within a few years 
there will for the first time be 
mental illness beds in every health 
district in the country. Dr Jacobs 
must be aware that plans are at last 
being made to give Chelmsford its 
own in-patient services; this may 
well mean fewer acute beds in his 
Colchester hospital in north-east 
Essex, but it will greatly benefit 
those people from Chelmsford 
and other parts of mid-Essex who 
may have to go something Kke 20 
miles to that hospital when they 
need the brief spdl of in-patient 
care, which as he says usually gets 
them better. 

Yours faithfully, 
TRUMPINGTON, 

Department of Health and Social 
Security, 

Alexander Fl eming House, 
Elephant & Castle, SE1. 
December3. 


From Mr F. T. Davis 
Sir, Dr M. Wdler (November 22) 
is right when be says “housing by 
local authorities with a statutory 
obligation to the vulnerable home- 
less . . . does little to inspire 
confidence.” He is right because 
that statutory obligation is so 

small. 

Under foe provisions of the 
1977 Housing (Homeless Persons) 

Cervical screening 

From Mr. John H. Shepherd and 
others 

Sir, We are concerned with the 
manna 1 in which sections of the 
media have recently presented foe 
case for cervical screening. 

As gynaecological oncologists, 
we are conscientiously committed 
to the efficient screening of our. 
female population for cervical 
cancer. This necessitates foe pro- 
vision of adequa t e and expert 
inspection facilities for investigat- 
ing those patients discovered to 
have an abnormal smear and for 
treating those with significant 
abnormalities. 

Daily, we are reminded that the 
majority of women presenting 
with invasive disease of the cervix 
have never bad a cervical smear. 
The greatest progress in the treat- 
ment of this disease will be made 
by persuading patients at greatest 
risk to present themselves for 
screening. 

The strong me s s a ge that has 
reached our patients from some 
media coverage is primarily that 
they ox their consorts have been 
promiscuous. The overall effect- 
has been to cause considerable 
social and psychological distress 
amongst patients who have always 
presented themselves for a cer- 
vical smear without increasing the 
smear rate in the unscreened 
population. 

It is wrong to over-empfaasise 
promiscuity at the expense of foe 
many other factors which may be 

Barclays pull-out 

From Mr N. J. R. J. Mitchell 
Sir, If Lord Campbell's actions 
(letter, November 29) were moti- 
vated by a wish to advance the 
cause of non- white South Africans 
he would have been better advised 
to persuade his board to raise the 
standard of his company's 
employment practices to the very 
high standards maintained by foe 
great majority of UK companies 
with interests in South Africa. 

He might then, like other British 
companies, have progressed fur- 
ther to spend a significant propor- 
tion of profits on social 
development and black advance- 
ment 

Teachers of quality 

From Mrs Helen P. Rosenberg 
Sir, The idea, inherent in Mr 
Baker’s proposals for teachers’ 
salaries (and in your leader of 
November 26), that die best 
teachers are to be kept in the 
classroom (where needed) by pay- 
ing large differentials to those 
teachers already on salary scales 3, 
4 and above exposes a woeful 
ignorance as to bow the scale 
system actually works. 

In virtually every case these 
higher rates of pay are given for 
administrative duties taken on 
ova and above classroom teach- 
ing for which the teacher hardly 
ever (in the primary school 
virtually never) receives non- 
contact time during the school 
day, thereby, inevitably, causing 
(as many conscientious scale 
teachers lament) their classroom 
teaching to suffer. 

By raising differentials Mr 
Baker will onlv be adding to those 


Act local authorities were com- 
pelled to house those in “priority 
need”. Unfortunately, doe to 
restrictions in funding, the defi- 
nition of that word “priority" has 
been taken in its narrowest sense. 
Practically speaking, to receive 
help one has to be handicapped, 
elderly, or pregnant 
Furthermore, as a result of 
recent legal cases those local 
authorities who do house people 
have no obligation to provide a 
minimum standard of accom- 
modation. In theory, and very 
neatly in practice, an authority 
could house its homeless in a 
decrepit warehouse without fear of 
prosecution. 

Meanwhile, other priority 
groups such as the young, those 
recently left care, and perhaps 
those who have moved in search 
of a job are left to flounder with 
foe other 94,000 homeless house- 
holds. 

Now is the time for our gov- 
ernmental institutions to act to 
improve legislative provision for 
Britain's homeless population. 
Homelessness is not jnst some 
poster of a homeless mother and 
her child, at Christmas time. It is a 
constant moral problem and as 
such most loach the conscience of 
the nation: urgently. 

Yours faithfully, 

FRANCIS T. DAVIS, 

St John's College, 

University of Durham, 

Durham. 

November 2Z 

From the Chairman of Worcester 
and District Heath Authority 
Sir, Dr Weller’s letter may have 
given the impression that patients 
m Powick Hospital at Worcester, 
are to be transferred into the 
community with inadequate 
health service support 
I should like to reassure those 
who may be concerned that the 
authority's intention is to transfer 
foe patients into staffed units 
provided by foe health authority 
or by the private sector, where the 
same level of care win be main- 
tained as has been enjoyed for 
many years past 
“Care in the communi ty" ran 
do much to improve foe life of 
those for whom we have a 
responsibility, and that is this 
authority's objective. 

Yours faithfully, 

A. J. PRESCOTT, Chairman, 
Worcester and District Health 
Authority, 

Isaac Maddox House, 

Snub Hill Road, 

Worcester. 

involved in the aetiology of this 
disease, and it is an over- 
simplification to assume that 
promiscuity and the wart virus are 
the sole causes of this disease: 

We are reminded of very similar 
previous arguments implicating 
herpes virus as well as sperm 
factors in foe high-risk male in the 
development of cancer of the 
cervix. We are also aware of marry 
women who have developed this 
disease despite blameless sexual 
lives with nan-promiscuous part- 
ners. 

We deplore the recent sensa- 
tionalism and would hope for a 
more balanced view fiom the 
media, which could make a pos- 
itive contribution towards en- 
couraging women at risk of 
developing cancer of the cervix to 
come forward for screening, while 
still in foe pro-invasive and cur- 
able stage. 

The recent media coverage has 
generated guilt and resentment, ■ 
and is at risk of discouraging those * 
women who have never had a 
cervical smear and are reticent 
and frightened of presenting them- 
sdves for investigation. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN H. SHEPHERD (The Royal 
Marsden Hospital), 

C PERRY (St Hefcer Hospital, 
Carehahon, Surrey), 

MARY CROWTHER, C HUDSON 
(St Bardukmariv|s Hospital), - 
The Royal Marsden Hospital 
Fulham Road, SW3. 

November 25. 

If he had acted with this 
measure of courage, be would 
have been one of the powerful 
voices for change and evolution to 
a fair, non-radal society. The 
considerable success of tine busi- 
ness community in infinencmg the 
Government to introduce reform 
has been hampered but not 

stopped by the regrettable action 

of some companies who have 
withdrawn from South Africa. 
Yours faithfully, 

NICHOLAS MITCHELL, 
Director-General 
British Industry Committee on 
South Africa Limited, 

45 Great Peter Street, SW1. 

December 1. 


who seek promotion, but because 
they are either good at or eqjoy 
administrative duties (which is aD 
too rarely the case); not because it 
will help them become better 
classroom teachers (how can it 
when it only increases out-of 
classroom duties?); but because 
they want or (more likely) need 
more money. 

The role way to keep the best 
teachers in the classroom is to pay 
them a salary competitive with 
those on higher scales. And as for 
those currently on higher scales, 
their performance, both admin- 
istratively and in the classroom, 
would be best served by reducing 
either their classroom or admin- 
istrative duties rather than offer- 
ing superfluous pay for what is 
often an impossible task. 

Yours faithfully, 

HELEN P. ROSENBERG, 

38 Thornton Avenue, 

Ashby, Scunthorpe, 

South Humberside. 


Free speech on 
the campuses 

From Mr Graham Ashley 
Sir, Bernard Levin (December 1) 
may be correct in thinking that 
uni veraitiesare quite ineffectual in 
trying to make proper arrange- 
ments for controversial lecturers 
to speak on their premises and foe 
agreement apparently reached by 
foe Cardiff authorities seemed 
particularly nugatory. 

However, one of foe facts Much 
distinguishes universities fiom 
political parties organising public 
meetings is that foe latter can 
usually rely-on a sufficiency of 
stewards being available to quell 
too aggressive heckling by forcible 
removal of foe offenders. That 
option is not there for college 
authorities to use: staff will not 
now engage in any physical han- 
dling of mruly students, as Ber- 
nard Levin is probably well aware 
fiom the experiences at his old 
alma mater, the LSE, in recent 
years. 

I am afraid that we must accept 
that universities cannot bring 
order into their houses on the 
occasion of controversial debates 
and speeches and therefore speak- 
ers seeking to air unusual or 
unpopular views will have to use 
different platforms. 

Let us not be too despondent 
Young minds can be and are 
reached in many ways other than 
through the public lecture theatre. 
Loss of exposure to original and 
forceful speakers win, of course, 
take some of the sparkle out of 
their lives but it is, after all foe 
students who will suffer. It is they 
who should find the remedy. 
Yours faithfully, 

GRAHAM ASHLEY, 

IS Birches Nook Real, 
Stocksfield, Northumberland. 
December 2. 

From Mr Nicholas Jackson and 
Mr Peter Houghton 
Sir, A recent speaker meeting 
organised by the Cambridge 
University Conservative Associ- 
ation was addressed by the Right 
Hem Enoch Powell An attempt 
was made by a small but well 
organised group which had gath- 
ered outside the venue, to prevent 
people from entering the meeting. 
Further attempts were made dur- 
ing the course of his visit to 
prevent him from speaking. 

This action cannot be regarded 
as a “demonstration” as no at- 
tempt was made to express an 
alternative viewpoint Instead, it 
was a manifestation of the “no- 
platform” policy held by foe 
National Union of Students, 
which would seek to deny the right 
of free roeech to "known racists or 
fascists . 

Here, a motivated minority 
tried to dictate whose opinions 
were fit to be heard by members of 
this university. Mr Powell is 
certainly nota fascist and is not in 
our view, a racist Thus the 
inherent weakness of “no 
platform” is exposed; foe defi- 
nition of unacceptability is not 
concrete and rests with those who 
adminster ft, to manipulate as 
they will. 

To whom do we entrust the 
responsibility of allocating foe 
right to speak, and how do we 
ensure that our “protector” does 
not become our dictator? 

Yours faithfully, 

NICHOLAS JACKSON (Christ’s 

PEl^RHOUGHTON, 

Trinity College, Cambridge. 
December 1. 

Car radio hazards 

From Mr Charles Baker 
Sir, We read with alarm Mrs 
Campbell Jensen's description 
(November 28) of ha encounter 
with an irresponsible driver hold- 
ing a hand-set to his ear and write 
to point out that British Telecom, 
as pioneers in foe development of 
mobile phones, offer a “hands- 
free” unit which enables foe driver 
to keep both hands on foe wheel at 
all times. We are also the first 
supplier to introduce a “hands- 
free” car-phone that is activated 
only by foe human voice. 

A mobile communications 
safety committee has recently sat 
in London, with representatives 
from the police, foe motor in- 
dustry and other motoring in- 
terests and chaired by British 
Telecom. Recommendations from 
that committee will form the basis 
of a code of practice to be 
published and issued to all our 
existing and new customers. 
YoursraithfiiDy, 

CHARLES BAKER, 


ON THIS DAY 


DECEMBER 9 1864 

The Clifton suspension bridge 
over the Avon gorge was a long 
time in eeetaaon. ltwas first 
conceived in 1753. but it mas not 
until 1836 that work on it, to a 


ga-Tga 


British Telecom Mobile 
Co mmuni cations, 

MobQe House, 

Eustoo Square, NW1. 

December 4. 

Where the truth lies 

From Mr Stephen Haskell 
Sir, The concept of “economy" in 
respect of foe truth has, in fad a 
much more venerable pedigree 
than today’s leader (December 1 ) 
allows. It was the term used by foe 
early Church Fathers to describe 
their gradual rather than instanta- 
neous, passing on of their faith to 
foe pagan wood; and, as such, was 
discussed by John Henry New- 
man, himself under attack for 
“excessive caution with the 
truth", in the Apologia. 

It is perhaps relevant to add that 
Newman, while justifying econ- 
omy under the heading of Pru- 
dence, one of foe cardinal virtues, 
concludes by saying that 
foe truest expedience is to answer 
right oul when you are asked ... foe 
most damag in g folly is to be found ' 
out Shuffling; and the first of virtues 
is to tell truth and shame the devil 
Yours faithfully, 

STEPHEN HASKELL, 

13 Park Visa, SE10. 

December !. 


Brund, began; it rart out of funds 
in 1843 andbuMng restarted in 
1861 


OPENING OF THE CLIFTON 
SUSPENSION-BRIDGE 

Yesterday was a great day for 
Bristol and Clifton — in feet, a 
great day for Gloucestershire and 
Somersetshire generally, inasmuch 

aa it witnessed the foriaal comple- 
tion and public oparcfcg of the 
Clifton Suspension-bridge amid 
great festivity and weS-deserved 
public rejoicing. The long-deferred 
anticipations of union batmen the 
two counties were nordiify cele- 
brated on this occasion . . . 

One can hardly be surprised at 
the enthusiasm which was mani- 
fested about the completion of this 
bridge, when it is remembered that 
it is fully 200 years ago since the 
want of such a structure was keenly 
felt; it is 111 years ago since the 
first money was left to cany out the 
long-cherished idea of the citizens; 
and it is now 34 years ago sauce the 
work was begun . . . 

The mere story of the idea of this 
bridge is somewhat peculiar. In the 
year 1753 there died in Bristol one 
Alderman Vick, and as this Alder- 
man had experienced the difficulty 
of getting across the Avon from 
Gloucestershire to Somersetshire 
at any point between the Severn 
and the city of Bristol he be- 

r thed to the Society of Mer- 
t Venturers the sum of 1 J)00l 
directing that such sum should be 
placed out at interest until it 
tthftniH accumulate anf i increase to 
10,0001 when it was to be applied 
to the building of a stone bridge 
across the Avon from CKfton- 
down, in the county of Gloucester, 
to Leigh-down, in the county of 
Somerset. . . 

An Act of Parliament was ob- 
tained, and plans were advertised 
for. The first estimate given for a 
stone bridge was 90,0001 a, in 
feet, about half what it must really 
have cost; so stone was given up for 
iron, and Telford, the builder of the 
Menai-bridge, and the late Mr. 
Brunei competed for the honour of 
giving a design for a suspension 
bridge, and as might have been 
anticipated. Brunei gained the day. 
Mr. Brunei's estimate was 57,0004 
and it was, perhaps, characteristic 
of the estimates of that great 
engineer that when 45 , 000 / had 
been spent only the towers had 
been built, and the money was 
gone. Hfe design was a chain bridge 
of a single span of 700 feet, two 
rlmma passing over two towers, 

- and befog anchored deep in the 
limestone rocks behind them. In 
1843 all the money, as we have 
mH, was gone, and the scheme 
stood still for want of funds, and, 

thnngh many prop nartkinR . mn«nr 

less good or bad, were made to the 
trustees under the old Act of 
Parliament, the bridge would very 
likely have been incomplete to this 
day, had not the removal of 
Hungerfbrd become necessary. Mr. 
Brunei as it happened, had been 
the engineer of Hungerfbrd, and 
when, therefore, the chains had to 
be pulled down and to give place to 
a railway, nothing was more natu- 
ral than that Mr. Hawkshaw 
should wish to have them applied 
to the completion of the greatest 
and most original of all Mr. 
Brunei’s bridge designs, except 
Saltash. For such a purpose the 
money was soon forthcoming. A 
new company, under a new Act. 
and, presided over by Captain 
Huish, was started, with a capital 
of 35,000/. Hut chains of 
Hungerford-bridge were purchased 
for 5,0001; the stone towers, btnh 
by Mr. Brunei for the old company, 
for 2,000 L Two years ago the work 
of nlingfog these chahw began, and 
yesterday the bridge was opened, 
finished. Taking it .as a whole, 
either with regard to the pictur- 
esqueness of its situation, or its 
lofty height and immense span, 
there is really no bridge like it for 
beauty in the world, save, perhaps, 
that erected by the engineer of the 
bridge acmes the Niagara (Mr. 
RoebHng) at St John’s New 
Brunswick . . . 

Bitter-sweet memory 

From Mrs Katharine Graham 
Sir, As my grandfather and father 
were in turn Chairman of An- 
gostura Bitters in Trinidad, Mrs 
Weston-Davies’s letter (Novem- 
ber 21 ) makes sad reacting for me. 
The thought that the same bottle 
of bitters has been in use in the 
home since 1945 for pre-lunch 
pink gins only is bad for business! 

I wonder if your correspondent 
knows that Angostura is a very 
effective treatment for food 
poisoning, quite apart from its 
many culinary uses, in particular, 
tenderizing meat. 

1 have always understood that it 
was through Dr J. G. B- Siegert’s 
observation of 1824 that the 
natives of the province of An- 
gostura in Venezuela were seldom 
afflicted by stomach disorders, 
that be obtained the secret of the 
medicine they used and in- 
troduced it to the Western world. 
Yours faithfully, 

KATHARINE GRAHAM 
(nde Wight), 

Doctors Commons, 

The Market Place, 

Northleach, Gloucestershire 

From Mr David Matthew 
Sir, I am baffled by the pride of 
yonr correspondents in the age of 
their bottles of bittcre. Are they 
boasting of how stingily they 
entertain? 

Do they impliedly allege a better 
flavour in pre-1940 bitters? Or are 
they simply, but more ludicrously, 
of the belief that anything older 
must be better? 

Yours faithfully, 

DAVID MATTHEW, 

20 P?cchcs Road, SW17. 


rSvflf.-s -■* 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 





COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
December & The Queen and 
The Duke of Edinburgh were 
entertained at dinner this eve- 
ning by His Excellency the 
Ambassador of the United 
States of America and Mrs Price 
at Winfield House, Regent’s 
Park. 

The Duchess of Grafton and 
the Right Hon Sir William 
Hesehme were in attendance. 

The Dube of Edinburgh, 
President of the Federation 
Equestre Internationale, 
accompanied! by The Princess 
Anne, Mrs Mark Phillips, at- 
tended the Bureau Meeting 
at the Wakbarf Hotel today. 

Mr Briari McGrath was in 
attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
December 8: The Prince of 
Wales, President, Business in 
the Community, this evening 
attended a dinn er to marie the 
fifth Anniversary of Business in 
the co mmunit y, at Gosfortb 
Park Hotel, Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne. 

His Royal Highness, attended 
by Sir John RiddeD, Bt and the 
Hon Rupert Fairfax, travelled in 
an aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight. 

December 8: The Princess Mar- 
garet, Countess of Snowdon 
visited the Girls' Guild of Good 
life in Hoxton this evening. 

Lady Juliet Townsend was in 
attendance: 


Wood Street Pohce Building, 
London, EC2. 

Mrs Howard Page was in : 
attendance: 

The Prince of Wales, President 
of Business in the Community, 

will attend a reception for “The 
P ercent dub” given by the 
Prime Minister at 10 Downing 
Street on December IS. 

The Prince of Wales will attend 
an English Chamber Orchestra 
and Music Society concert at die 
Queen Elizabeth Hall on 
December 16. 

The Duchess ofYork win attend 
Christmass Carols with the Stars 
at the Albert Hall on December 
17, in aid of the Leukaemia 
Research Fund. 

The Queen will open the ren- 
ovated headquarters of the 
United Kingdom Central Coun- 
cil for Noising, Midwifery and 
Health Visiting at 23 Portland 
Place on December 18. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Sir Geoffrey Agaev/ will 
be held at noon on Thursday, 
December 18. at St James's 
Church, Piccadilly. 

Lady Jeffreys gave birth to a 
daughter in London on Friday. 
November 28. 

Birthdays today 

Sir John Burgh, 61; Miss Judi 
Dench, 5£ Mr Kirk Douglas, 
70: Mr Douglas Fairbanks, jnr, 
77; Miss Hennione Gingold, 89; 
Mr Benny Green, 59; Mr Robert 
Hawke, 57; Mr George Helsby, 



OBITUARY 

SIR TERENCE GARYEY 

Exponent of detente 


The body of Sir Edward Yonde, Governor of Hong Kong, lying in state at Government 
House. Sir Edward, who died on December 5 in Peking, is being cremated today. 


Gloucester, Patron of AFASIC 
(Association for All Speech 
Impaired Children) was present 
this evening at a Performance by 

The City of London Police 
Players at McMorran Han, 

Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr MJLM. Botcher by 
and Miss SJL Martin 
The engagement is announced 
between Marc, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs J.M. Botch erby. of 
BougivaJL, France, and Sarah, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs G 
Martin, of Walton-on-the-HiU, 
Surrey. 

MrJK Bowerman 
and Miss G.M. SoeOer 
The engagement is announced 
between John Keith, son of Mrs 
Gisela Bowerman and the late 
Mr Adrian John Bowerman, of 
East Horsley, Surrey, and 
Gillian Marie, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Andrew SneUer, of 
Hampton, Middlesex. 

Mr WJ. Fielding 
and Miss S. Payne 
The engagement is announced 
from Jamaica between W illiam, 


Justice Mann. 56; 


Morris, 


Christening 

The infant son of the Hon 
Da<nd and Mrs Curzon was 
christened Andrew Linton Na- 
thaniel by the Rev Lester Brew- 
ster at Kedtesion, Derbyshire. 


49; Sir Godfrey Nicholson. 85; - on Sunday, November 
Miss Isobel Poole, 45; Mr Peter godparents are Mr Chartes 
Rees. QC, MP, 60; Mme Calkin, Mr Andrew Davies, the 
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf; 71; Sir Hon Avril Curzon and Miss 
Pteter S mi there, 73. Patricia St John Barry. 


Mr JJL Irving 
and Miss J.V. Herrin 
The engagement is announced 
between John, son of Mr and 
Mre Kenneth Irving, of North 
Shields. Tyne and Wear, and i 
Johanna, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs John Herrin, of 
Maifield, Kent. 

Mr AJL Naylor 
and Miss CA. Holligon 
The engagement is announced 
between Adam, eldest son of Mr 
and Mre Peter Naylor, of Saf- 
fron Walden, Essex, and Chris- 
tine, elder daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Alfred HoUigon, of Stock- 
ton on Tees, Cleveland. 

Mr MJ. Sholts 
and Miss J-P- Marriner 
The engagement is announced 
between Martyn, son of Mr 
Frederick JA. Shutts, MBE, and 
Mrs Sbults, of Dust on, North- 
amptonshire, and Jocelyn, 


-r i van str 

Luncheon John w 

HM Government paild od 

Mre Lynda Chalker, Minister of 


Dinners 

Parish Clerks' Company 
The Archbishop of Canterbury, j 
Patron of the Parish Clerks* 
Company, officiated at a Eu- 
charist held in the Chapel of 
Lambeth Palace yesterday. The 
Secretary-General of the Synod 
of the .Church of England, 
Master of the company, pre- 
sided at a dinner held afterwards 
in the Guard Room. Sir William 
van Straubeozee, MP, and Sir 
John Welch also spoke. 

Guild of Freemen of the City of 


only son of Mr John Fielding, of daughter of Mr and Mrs Geof- 


Ke ruble, Gloucestershire, and 
Mrs Helen Fielding, of Tetbury, 
Gloucestershire, and Solange, 
daughter of Mr and Mre Horace 
Payne, of Kingston. Jamaica. 

Mr M-C- Mendelssohn 
and Miss EJ. Williams 
The engagement is announced 


State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, was host yes- * 
terday at a luncheon at the Ritz 
hotel in honour of the High 
Commissioner for Ghana. 

Receptions 

Royal Institution of Chartered 
Surveyors 

A reception was held last night 
at the Royal Institution of 
Chartered Surveyors in honour 
of Sir John Donaldson, Master 
of the Rolls. The president, Mr 
Donald Troup, received the 
guests. 

Byron Society 

Viscount Norwich, a vice-presi- 
dent of the Byron Society and 
chair man of Venice in Peril, 
delivered a lecture to the society 
last night and was the guest of 
honour at a reception held 


The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied by the 
Sheriffs and their ladies, at- 
tended the annual dinner of the 
Guild of Freemen of the City of 
London held last night at 
GuildhaJL Mr Deputy H.W.S. 
H or lock. Master, accompanied 
by Mre Horiock, presided. Oth- 



Marriner. of Stoke r afterwards at the Foreign Press , 


GokUngton, Buckinghamshire. 


Marriage 


Mr B.N. Julies 

and Mre PAL Sherman 

The marriage took place quietly 


between Martin Charles, son of in London on December 1, 


Mr and Mre Ronald Men- 
delssohn, of Northwood, 
Middlesex, and Emma Joanne, 
younger daughter of the late Mr 
David Williams and of Mre 
Heather Williams, of Caexleon, 
Gwent, formeriy of Wilmslow, 
Cheshire. 


1986, between Mr Bernard N. 
Jolles, elder son of the late Dr B. 
Jolles and of Mrs M.EL Jolles, of 
Northampton, and Mre Pamela 
M. Sherman, daughter of the 
late Mr H. Knight and ofMrs M. 
Knight, of Frinton, formerly of 
Hastings. 


Association. Mr Michael Rees 
was in the chair and Mrs Ehtta 
DangeriiekJ also spoke. 

Service dinner 

The Royal Scots Dragoon 
Goards 

Officers of The Royal Scots 
Dragoon Guards (Carabiniere 
and Greys) held their annual 
dinner at the Cavalry and 
Guards Club yesterday. 
Lieutenant-General Sir Norman 
Arthur, Colonel of the Regi- 
ment, presided. 


Latest wills 

Mr Sam Spiegel, of New York, 
the film producer, left estate in 
England and Wales valued at 
£400,332 net. 

Mrs Winifr ed Henrietta Scfalo- 
singer, of Boxford, Berkshire, 
widow of Dr Bernard Schle- 
singer, the paediatrician, left 
£600J80 net 

Judge retires 

Jude Bulger has retired from the : 
circuit bench on the Western 
Circuit. 


Howcanwe 

make home buy ing 
I easier for you? i 


Saleroom 

Forgotten 
US artist 
fetches 
$2.2m 

By Geraldine Norman 
Sale Room Correspondent 

A new artist broke into the 
maEon-donar class at Christie'S 
weekend sale of American paint- 
ings. Joseph Stella (1877-1946) 
is hardly a name to conjure with 
this side of the Atlantic, bo t his 
“Tree Of My life", pamSed in 
1919, was sold for SL2 milli on 
(unpublished estimate up to Si 
miDion), or £1,517.241. 

Stella arrived in New York 
from Italy in 1896 with avante- 

garH» l» »H?n p « and a, chssictl 

t raining - He is consadered New 
York's first Futurist. 

Until last Thursday, the top 
price ever paid for Ms work at 
auction was 51&500, then 
Sotheby’s pushed the record op 
to $49,500. 

Stdla moved on from Futur- 
ism to moody landscapes that 
combine Symbolism and Sur- 
realism, of which the “Tree Of 
My life" is the de fi nit i ve exam- 
pie. It is a seven-foot canvas 
centred by a gnarled tree trank 
exploding into flowering land- 
scapes symbolic of die artist's 
life experiences. 

It was bought by Hirschl and 
Adler, ofNew York, to a private 
client. 

A snowscape by the American 
impressionist John Henry 
Twachtman, entitled “Last 
Touch of San" also set an 
auction price record to the artist 
at $6 5,000 (estimate SI00,000 
to $150, 00 ) or £417,24L The 
sale made £&9 mOfion with 17 
per cent left nnsoML 

In London yesterday, there 
was keen competition for the 
best Chinese ceramics and 
works of art at Christie’s bet no 
takers to the mediocre. With a 
morning total of £544,885; some 
30 per cent of the value of the 
offerings was left ansohl, equiva- 
lent to more than half the lots. 

Eskmazi, the London dealer, 
paid the top price of the morning 
at £82^00 (estimate £16,000 to 
£20,000) for an archaic bronze 
food vessel of standard torn but 
exceptional quality of onuunent- 

Egyptiaa bronzes were the 
store of Sotheby’s morning 
antiquities sale. A 16-inch figure 
of Isis, with the infant Horns on 
her knee, dating from around 
664-525 BC was sold to 
£20350 (estimate £15,000 to 
£2(M)00X 

Easy bridge win 
for women 

Mre M. Dennison's team were 
easy winners of the women’s 
open mains championship or- 
ganized by the Engtish Bridge 
Union at the Queen’s Hold, 
Eastbourne, over the weekend. 
Results were: 


Sir Terence Garvey, 
KCMG, who died on Decem- 
ber 7, his 71st birthday, was a 
diplomat of intellectual 
strength and forthright views, 
who made his greatest contri- 
bution in Eaa.-West relations. 
He never wavered in the view 
that an accommodation of 
interests between East and 
West was possible. 

Terence WiUcocks Garvey 
was bom in Dublin on De- 
cember 7, 1915, and educated 
at Felsted mid University 
Gofiege Oxford, where betook 
first-class honours in PPE. He 
was Laming Fellow at Queen’s 
College before entering the 
Consular Service in 1938, la ter 
transferring to the Foreign 
(subsequently Diplomatic) 
service. 

His early consular career 
took him to San Francisco and 
Chile. Post-war service as 
private secretary to the _ out- 
standing military administra- 
tor, General Robertson, 
military governor in the Brit- 
ish zone of Germany, brought 
his talents to the notice of his 
superiors. After speDs in Bonn 
and in London, he served as 
conmeQor in Cairo at the time 
of the Suez operation, and 
then in Belgrade. 

He spent three productive 
years (1962-65) as cfoargfc 
d'affaires in Peking, at a time 
when China's trade and politi- 
cal relations with Britain were 
beginning to develop before 
the upheaval of the Cultural 
Revolution. Simultaneously, 
be became Britain's first am- 
bassador to the Mongolian 
People’s Republic. 


After service in London, he 
returned to Belgrade in 1968 
as ambassador. He was suc- 
cessful in the post and always 
retained a warm interest in the 
jppgnggffR, political ideas and 
personal qualities of the Yugo- 
slav people. 

There followed two years 
(1971-3) in India as high 
commissioner. These were not 
the happiest of his career. He 
arrived in India - a country of 
which he previously knew 
little - at a time of impending 
crisis, with East Bengal about 
to secede from Pakistan. 

Not surprisingly, his judge- 
ment of the issues, and of the 
likely course of events, was 
imperfect. Moreover, his rath- 
er pedantic manna- did not 
ideally suit him for dealing 
with Indians. 

In 1973 he realized his 
ambition, becoming ambassa- 
dor in Moscow. The vagaries 
of Foreign Office postings 
gave him only two years there, 
not as kmg as he would have 
wished. But in that short time 
be did much to reconstruct the 
relationship with the Soviet 
Union after the trauma of the 
expulsion in 1971 of 10S 
Soviet spies from London. 
The fruits of these efforts were 
seen in the visit of Mr Wilson 
and Mr Gaflaghan in February 
1975. 

Garvey offered his reflec- 
tions on the Soviet problem in 
the underrated Bones of Con- 
tention (1978), a tightly-ar- 
gued defence of the policy of 
d&ente. 

In his retirement, be 
divided his time between Ire- 


land and London. A regular 
contributor at discussion 
meetings, he was made a 
senior associate member at St 
Antony’s College. Oxford. His 
Irish background was impor- 
tant to him. At their conags - 
“Dadreen " on the beautiful 
Mayo coast - he and his wife 
welcomed relatives and 
friends. It was a place of peace 
and hard physical work, where 
he could indulge hzs hobby of 
fishing. 

He was a man of 
intellect, determination and 
honesty. His reports were 
pungent; his conclusions, not 
always consistent with the 
orthodoxies of the day, usually 
proved right- He was at his 
best in negotiation, analysis 
and discussion, rather th?n in 
the public aspects of diploma- 
cy. 

Hewasat home debating, in 
fluent Serbo-Croat, the princi- 
ples of Yugoslav socialism, or 
the definition of “peaceful 
coexistence" (on winch the 
protocol agreed by Wilson and 
Kosygin in 1975 marked a 
success for Western views). 
Direct, demanding, unsparing 
of himself impatient of wafc 
fie. he did not suffer fools 
easily. But he was regarded 
with affection and respect by 
his staff and colleagues. 

He married Barbara Hales 
Tomlinson in 1941, but this 
marriage was dissolved. He ' 
then married, in 1957, Rose- 
mary O’Neill (nee Pritchard). 
She survives him, together 
with two sons and a daughter 
of the first marriage. 


MR HENRY REED 


Mr Henry Reed, port, toms- it compressed the story 

lalor and radio dramatist, died white retaining its emotional 
yesterday. He wa s 72 ^ and philosophical range, as 

He was bora m Burning- well as its dramatic rhetoric, 
ham on February 22, 1914, Awarded the Premio defla 
and ed uc a te d ax King Edward Radio Italians, it was pub- 
VI Grammar Scho ol, Aston , lished a year later, as was his 
and Br nra ng ham University, volume of poems, A Map of 
There he became one of a Verona. 
circle of writers and artists ... f j, 
that included Auden, Mac- Henreforth it was as a radio 
Neice and Waller Allen. dramatist that he was best 

fcnown ’ and the work he 
■ produced must be judged as 
m a br2L !S t J h ^! second only to MacNeice's. It 

JJJJzLjJ?' 61b into two groups. The texts 
begaiva fiedance journalist, of one of these, mainly Italian 

inmspiratiMTwerepubfished 
in 1971 as The Snreetslf 
W1 ? H V 53 *™ 8 ! „ Pompeii and other plays for 

Called up m 1941, he served mtfib. Though wit is never fer 
- “or rather,” he hims e lf gway, their prev ailing tone is 
wrote, “s tu di e d" - in the sombre and pessimistic, in 


Army, until 1942 when he was 
seconded to Naval Intelli- 
gence at Bletchley. The 
“studied" is perhaps ex- 
plained by the crash-course he 
underwent in Japanese; and 
he served out the rest of the 
war teaching that language to 
Wrens. 

During these years he first 
made his mark, initially with 
“Chard Whitlow”, his delight- 
ful parody of the later Eliot. It 
appeared over his initials in a 
New Statesman competition, 
and ance an older and better- 
known poet had the same 
initials Reed did not immedi- 
ately gel the credit 


contrast to the plays of the 
other group, A Very Great 
Man Indeed and its sequels, 
published as Hilda Tablet and 
Others. 

Springing out of his rueful 
recognition of the difficulties 
of writing the life of a near- 
contemporary, they constitute 
a masterpiece of modem com- 
edy, sparkling with parodic 


and satirical glances at the 
artistic fashions of the day. 

As a translator, we are 
Indebted mainly to Reed for 
our knowledge of the plays of 
Ugo Betti. He also translated 
Balzac’s Pere Goriot and Eugi- 
nie Grandet, and Natalia 
Ginzburg's play. The 
Advertisement. 

He was happiest, probably, 
in Seattle where he was more 
than once visiting professor of 
poetry at Washington Univer- 
sity. 

Though he could be the 
most enter taining of men , he 
had a depressive temperament 
and was both hypercritical 
and vain about his work, so 
that be would worry even over 
commas to the extent of not 
publishing at all He was, 
consequently, the despair of 
literary editors, for though he 
talked entrandngly about the 
books sent to him, he seldom 
managed, in later life, to 
commit anything to paper. 
His only criticism to appear in 
book form is the useful British 
Council pamphlet The Novel 
Since 1939 (1947). 

He was unmarried. 


ADMIRAL ARTHUR S. MOREAU 


Admiral Arthur S. Moreau, 
Commander-in-chief;. Allied 
Forces Southern Europe and 
C-in-C US Naval Forces 


Europe; died ofa h^ attebk 

vhk» when “Warning of 


Parts” appeared. No more 
famous poem in English was 
inspired by the war, and later 
Reed seemed to resent its 
feme, for he thought it made 
him appear a one-poem man. 
These other poems 


inNaples M He was 

As head of the largest of 
Nato’s regional commands he 
was responsible for the land 
and air defence of Italy, 
Greece and Turkey, and for 


SSSSSS^JSS 

Wor(l970) won deserved terranean and Black Seas, 
acdann. The sequence is 

based on his army training, Arthur Stanley Moreau was 
and wittily describes the bom on June 3, 1931. He 
civilian’s dismay at finding graduated from tlx US Naval 
himself caught up in the Academy in 1953. In 1963 he 
military machine. The wit passed through tlx US Naval 
goes hand in hand with deli- War College, and he held a 
cate lyricism. master’s degree in internation- 


By offering you up to 3 times your 
main income, plus any secondary 
income? 

By giving you instant tax relief on any 
size loan? 

By giving you an Abbey National 
Mortgage Certificate to confirm how 
much you can borrow and increase your 
bargaining power? j 

By acting swiftly once you’ve set 
your heart on a property? A 

By passing on the benefit of our 
130 years’ lending experience 
when advising on the best type of Wp 
mortgage for you? 

By arranging bridging finance k| 
and a deposit loan if you’re an fSfi 

existing Abbey National borrower? |k 

By offering you instant quotations Tp» 
for the best way to repay your mortgage? 


By explaining everything in plain 
English so you understand what’s 
happening every step of the way? 

If any of these things could make 
buying your home easier, you know 
who to talk to before you ring round 
for your next home. 



His poen* appeared mainly gaflaijs from Gem* Wash- 
in .thTSTrad^ mgton University. 

Writing. He was one of the After early sea experience he 
New Statesman's fiction re- specialized in submarines and 
viewers, and a little later missile warfare. Later he was 
became its radio otitic, in weapons officer of the Polaris 
which role he was amnsinp submarine Patrick Henry. He 
and perceptive, at times then became director of fleet 
outrageous. ballistic training. His service 

The war over, be left included touts in the 
Bletchley for Dorset, where be Vretoun war theatre, and be 
settled down to write the life heW two combat decorations, 
of Hardy. It was never fin- His first command was the 
ished. submarine Haljbeak in 1965, 

In 1946 Edwaitf Sackvffle- and he was captain of the fleet 
West prevailed on bun to *570 to 

write a radio-dramatic ve rs ion ** OT “ e next three years 

of Moby Dick Produced . a 5P,TK2*SL or 2! d ® 10 C-in- 
year larer with a cast which Pacific Fleet 
included Ralph Richardson, In 1975 he was given com- 
Cyril Cusack and Bernard mand of the US naval station 
Miles, it was plain that a rare at Subic Bay in the Philip- 
poetic talent had come to _ "" " - • 

radio. 


pmes. While there he directed 
Project New Life, which 


housed more than 43,000 
Vietnamese and Cambodian 
evacuees in camps on the 
Philippines, in the aftermath 
of the Vietnam war. 

After further senior staff 
appointments he took com- 
mand, in December 1981, of 
Battle Group Echo, based on 
the aircraft carrier Ranger in 
the Pacific. From 1983 he was 
assistant to the chairman, 
joint chiefs of staff in Wash- 
ington, and in 1985 be took 
over all US naval forces in 
Europe and the Nato forces 
command that goes with 
them. 

It was a time of tension in 
the Mediterranean, with clash- 
es between the 6th Fleet and 
Libya's air force having taken 
place on occasions. The 
Achille Lauro hijacking was of 
recent memory. 

He found himself in overall 
command of operations 
against Libya, with 6th Fleet 
ships and planes attacking 
maritime and shore targets in 
March of this year, and, in 
April, US naval fighter and 
strike aircraft hacking up the 
raids by F-l 1 1 bombers from 
Britain. 

Moreau was a man of 
energy and resource, a fast 
thinker unusually well 
equipped with both operation- 
al and staff experience. A fine 
sea officer he was nevertheless 
accustomed to see his profes- 
sional duties in wide strategic , 
and political terms. f 

He leaves a widow, Kather- 
ine, three sons and two daugh- 
ters. 





Science report 


Healthier way of life underground 


Call in and talk to us first. 
Before you make another move. 


ABBEY NATIONAL BUILDING SOCIETY, ABBEY HOUSE. BAKER STREET. LONDON NWI 6XL 
™ wraen detail ax mihble 6um address abow. All mongagessnbjea id jutmjod vakmhin. 



NATIONS 


By Mar tin Knights 

A remote area of uortb-west 
China is the home to a maiqae 
group of people who are known 
as the cave dwellers of Shanxi. 
They have been the sabject of an 
extensive study which shews 
that their nodereroand life-style 
is apparently healthier than 
those of urban and rural commu- 
nities more exposed to the 
e l ement s. 

They suffer less disease and 
their longevity las recently been 
cited as benefits of fivtog nnder- 


Respiratory complaints snefa 
as asthma and bronchitis have 
been cured and rheumatism and 
skia conditions vastly improved 
as a result of prolonged periods 
of habitation tmdergnxmd. 

Research on the cave dwellers 
started 50 years ago, and at a 
recent symposium in Betpng 
statistical evidence assembled 
over that period was quoted to 


support several startliag 
observations. 

The people of Shanxi seem to 
have chosen an andergnmnd 
home that possesses the op- 
tional environment in terns of 
stability of temperature and 
relative humidity. 

The temperature of the 
ground is nearly constant be- 
tween ■ 30 and 100 ft below 
surface. Above or below ■ this 
margin the temperature Is af- 
fected either by seasonal 
changes or will increase as one 
approaches the Earth’s centre. 

The best conditions exist 
when toe temperature is in toe 
range of I0°C to 22°C and 
relative humidity is bet w een 30 
and 75 per cent. Tim : at- 
mosphere of toe Shanxi cave 
dwellings is within those ranges: 

Research attributes many 
benefits to those conditions: 
redneed incidence of diseases 
and redneed infection af ear. 


nose and throat Colds were only 
•swfcMed among those who 
regi arly went in and oat of the 
raves. There was a lower in- 
ratoice of rheumatism. Skin 
problems were rare. 

. T he scientists maintain that 
stress and irrational effects 
rawed by external noise were 
infrequent. An additional 
for lo nge vity and 
excellent healt h was lower expo- 
sure to radioactive substances in 
the atmosphere. 

Another observation was that 
hens were more productive, lay- 
ing » greater of, number and 
bigger, eggs an year ronnd! 

The fin d i ngs lend support to 
recent studies in Soviet Union 
mto a form of “cave therapy” 

due bis been practised since the 
late sixties. 

Patients suffering from 
asthma, bronchitis, insomnia or 
iwvoos disorders are treated fa 
special reception areas located 
at 1J>00 ft below surface for ap 


to two weeks. The quiet stable 
envir onment is conducive to the 
curing of those disorders. 

In particular, the dust-free 
dean air of the mder gr o un d 
dwellings has produced a care 
rate on adult ami child bron- 
chitis and asthma snfferers of 
84 per cent and 96 per cent 
respectively. 

The two million or so- 
asthmatics In the UK would v. 
certainly enjoy the benefits that 
controlled therapy in an under- 
ground environment would bring 
to their lives. Drags that ease 
and control the respiratory fune- 
tions of asthmatics only alleviate 
the discomfort temporarily. 

The tdtimale rare for many 
asthmatics is tin* bnfldmg sp of 
resistance to aw«u-ts in an 
environment where harmful at- 
mospheric effects are reduced. 
Maybe the "cave therapy" could 
open op a new. life to the 
Woo key Hollow cave. 




v >• : - 

.Sfe-;- 

igv ’v 

. 

Z I r . . 

n ■ - F 


Sfe£- 




’JITuM 





n ri'-r'j ■ - *■ 


T >r§ 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES 
DEATHS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 






si si 

• -r/ i--.. 


BIRTHS 




cr " .. ’7’ 


U-Ts • 

" Dltif 


•a .1 


['n r ihe 


v, 




■'-VHl ,r 

*■ r, r " 

: £> 

> jv-^ 


*2r . 


. 4 ... _ _ 


.-/UlSi 

. ' .• J' 1 - be- 
■; "ly 


.• ".V'P^cr 

' -.. ,ei3 N 

: r *N 

. - . i,; “ n 

-- ' ‘^fier 








,r- 1 - io 


2k 

- r 'i:r^ 


'-la 




u:u 


i ■'. J l • 


;u: C 


51? ty-. 
® -*. ... 


'* : *-rj 


.-1 * ---i) 




'.- : i <'•’ " - 




w -■ ; .s 


fit? 

* -v -- 
=*&-* ^vrer 


rtrs./- ■■■■’■ 




i+VMd**. 

.«*.»***■ 

Mb.' ' 

1B**-?*i* 

HMM. 

# * 'iWf 

% i» WSK- 

fc**?*V 

feta*" *js*» 


rv*' 


: & ** 
fc • fl wa g#. 

**«**•• 

#£*?***• 


- r C h 

; -■ ■ w 


ife% **»» ' 

4&- ' 


¥**«»*• 
"I.**? :S . 


■;y 


MARRIAGES 


CAMPGELUTtaSTRAH - On Novem- 
ber 22nd in Rtnswood. Major 
Ceneral Peter Ca mp b el l and Mia 
Elizabeth 'matron. 

HOOSzVOBKI - On December Sh. to 
Sydney. Australia. David Hood lo 
Elizabeth vinsW. 


DEATHS 


:e ;or 

kr job 


ABBOTT - On December 6m. peaceful- 
ly at home. Cyrfl Donbas, devoted 
husband of Margaret and loving fa- 
ther of Ninel and Martin. Funeral 
Service Thursday December 11th. 
2.30 pm. at Farmington Church. 
Family flowers only, bat if desired, 
donations for Leukaemia Research 
may be left at the Church or sent to L 
T. Sly. Norman. Trotman and 
Hughes. North leach. 

ARMSTRONG - On December 4th 
1986. In Uie Brompion Hospital. Lon- 
don. william Arthur Armstrong. 
M-A- PhJQ. Emeritus Professor of 
English. Btrkbecfc College. Formerly 
of Westfield College. London and 
Hull University. Deeply beloved hus- 
band of Margaret and much loved 
rather of William and Jean. Funeral 
Service ai Si Mary's Church. Mellon 
Park. Friday December 12th at 
lo.a&am. Family flowers only. En- 
quiries to Ashton Funeral Service. 
Tel 946 1051. 


' BLUNDELL- On Deeeraba 6th. sud- 
denly Betty Margaret, widow of 
Jonathan and mother of Sarah and 
Georgte. Cremation private. Thanks- 
giving service at Si Andrew's _ 
Church. HursU&ourne Priors. 
Whitchurch. Hants, at 12 noon on 
Monday December 15th. No Flow- 
ers. donations If desired to Cancer 
Research. 


BUIILKWOKIH - On December 2nd. 
in Harrogate. James Marsden 
Butxerworth. much loved husband of 
Vera and father of Christopher and 
Ann. 


COWAN • On December 6th. Sydney, 
beloved husband of ShUno na. aD w 
of Camilla, stepfather of Jonathan 
and Alexa. Funeral this aBemoon. 
3pm. Hoop Lane. NWII. 


DAVES - On December 5th. Basfl Ed; 
wart Ge thing MA Oxomaged Slot 
3. Toll bar. Fakenham. Norf olk- oear- 
iy loved husband of Loom ftieUroe 
Borough Education Officer as «*«*■ 
enham. Funeral 
Fakenham Parish Church onDecem- 
ber nth ai 2 P™- 
crwnaiton. Famlb' nowere onte 
please. Donations tf . 

Bene\’Oicnt Fund c/o NaBmal West 
minster Bank PLC Fakenham. 


PERSONAL COLUMNS 


For wMm to better uun nrtun. __ 
the Drino mat may be 
be conmaiM with it are a* lo 

Fiwnta e : ii 


ACAR - On December 6th. in Green- 
wich. Connection. (je« 
ttroHne iNeo Gtllert) and Doncan “ 
daughter Soph* EHzabeuCTSir 
for Patrick. 


^ ®h. to Cynthia. 

(n£r Lewis! and Ronald, a dmmhtre 
Stephanie Alexandra^ 


CAUUN - On December 4th. at Queen 

Mary’s Hospital. Rochampknuto 
Katefnee Moon) and a 

son. Toby Charles. a 


C *53!P®* ‘ Oh December 8th. to 
Cwobne and Richard, a son 
Alexander. 


• ENSOR - On OecOTber 

James aged 4d.pei£y *&&£**. 

T izard School Service hi^Mho» 
Church- Meibom Road. Rayswnm* 
Thursday Decemlw nth at 10am. 
Donations lo Cancer Research. 

FOSTER - On December 4Ui i 19M- « 
Ipswich HosmtaL after * 

Jane; Chemocke. wktowOfAJr Oder 
Marshall Sir Robert FoR a rygtnom- 
cr Of Sue and Mike. Fun^J pr^- 
Servlee of thanksglvtrNmJtm^V- 

Donations 10 Cancer Research Fund. 

GARVEY - On December I 
home. Terence on his 71 *j JSJtaved 
Husband of Rosemary- inudi oved 

srsrvSsSS 

Hospital. Memorial service Bier 
London. 

GROBEL ■ On Tfurad^Dewn^r 
Elizabeth Stamriaus at « Roam 


H **® c *. • On December 6th. at 
Moreioo-ln-Manti. Charles MMn 

hand of Alison, father of Ceoroe and 
^chard. stepfather of Rosemary, m. 
n«al aervlie at Perranzabuloe 

aay Decemb er 12th. Fanoy Downs 
A*w donaUons toDr 
g^pa rdos. Tanners i^ nr 
BartdngsbJe. Word Essex 1G6 iw! 

■ on December 5th. 

SS C ° # ^l ln Ir SS? d - “""“d Mor- 
n ?» r . * Nicholas. 
Oeiryglougher Lodge. Kenaoh. 
^iany Long faca, Fime rai 12 . 30 am 

OuSL 1 ^ *%??*** * "* Saints 
Piurgu Sl Paurs Wakhm. near 
Huehin. Hem. Flowers CW4 Un- 
denaken. Lntoo. Beds. 


BIRTHDAYS 


FLATSHAKE 


OVERSEAS ^ TRAVEL 


WINTER S*0ST$ 


RENTALS 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


F in W b so today, a rare, mwim Ra- 
ttan. Lore s. 

MAIA - Amb assa d rcj a Josoptdne b 64 
years oU today. Happy Bhthday 
MMMd. 

PAtIUME - Happy Bbthday tettaa Ah 
my law D xxxx 

PET Happy nntMay. Love. TIK wM 
Howem where ■ wtam- and n Mtow 
it all the way. nrz. 


m wifa tJBCw lw mansion flat. AD 
Qdltom teiaoe. IO mUM Tube. O/R. 
Prof M/F. N/5. £56 pw excL Tar OX 
99* 6128 femiSwcMi). 


Worldwide low-cost flights 


SKI WHIZZ 


The bat - and wa an prove K 
19&000 cOcms bare ioto 


it s bno winci rra AHmvnn -so 

GET VOLV SKIS ONI NQWI 


WWl ghflll - Prof. M/F. M/8, a inai 
comfortable howe m oatet road, own 
torge room. 6 maa tube. £i £0 Knead. 
Teh 01 6*3 8*15 after 6 pm. 


PENTHOUSE FIAT. 
W1 

£1200 p.w. 


CURRENT BEST BUYS 
Around Hie World trom tM6 


ExernNo baaoam ptocesi 


SERVIC ES 


jam cm. own non tn hnn Sal. TV. 
CH. video- CbreHwn b artene. A*d pw 
Ten 01 *51 5841. 


COLACteCM ■ On November 26th 
1986. 51 Odstock Hospital, near 
Salisbury, to Camilla (nee Pinsent) 
and Mark, a son Rory Adam, a 
bro ther lor James. 

dWSW-WHES - On November 29th. 
to Rhona and Adrian, a son. Alex 
StoastJan. a brother for Maxwell and 
Candida. 

- On December *th at 

NWL * son. Thomas James Ash 

FARMER - On December 5th. at Queen 
Elizabeth's Hospital. Birmingham, to 
Barbara (n*e McKerracherJ and Tim. 
a daugh ter. Charlotte Duncan. 

HARGREAVES - On December 6th. to 
Fiona and Andrew, a son ThomxL 

lERUHY • on December 6th at Green- 
wich District Hospital, to Jackie (nte 
Tjudonand MIchaeL a ron. Peter 


toyed husband of Comtance. iovrt 
5^3f^Ul2 nn 2? ^ ■ Jas0n and John. 

weather of seven. Funeral 


SELECT nBMBL Ea ftal n fadraauc- 
Uom ter m* unwmcMd 88 MMitaw 
Smi London WI. T el ephone 01-403 
9937. 

GAHRRR CVS LM aa teiW Ml ua i kiu - 

to™ vilac d ot vreeoto . MaUx 01-631 


MM Manav 26 + Pnl.Orm.OfT- Ltov 5 
bM CH heiaeJC200 pm. me. Td oi *69 
3368 


STOKEY 
PERTH 
MCSUMJ 
BAHSOt 
BMOPQRE 
HONG ICONS 
DELHI/ 
BOMBAY 


ffl UMB P 
kuna 
JOWB 
UNA 
GBCVA 
GTAIBU. 
HEW YORK 
los v^ais 


X WK £1*9 

X WK .-£199 

I WK £159 


Spectacular 3 bedroom penOiMBe Qai 
f Banning Jacuzzi bath a ram Mower + 
private terrace. 


Deal Dm. Son yeuao nromnanw non 
ainnanr. £60 pw met. Tel: 01-701 0741 


WASMKTW BALWBWE 


Cmmm etutato tedmiva of flitfu 
Tho iod French tt Swm wottto 
Loads of fun tor natfes. 
couples & groups 
RING 01-370 aosn 
<24 hrel/0999/0997 


Chestcrtons 

Hyde Pork Office: 

01-263 6000 


GOHVCVAMCMQ Bar fatty andUted SoUcl- 
lore. £100 + VAT and towNard 
dabuwom toitt flag Og** 319398. 

FRMMCSMPf Lore or Marriage. AS apea. 
areas. FlaMliiM. Pew (Q16>23 AMnwwa 
head. London WS. T(t 01-938 ion. 


Mfl FwatohM neaaL ahare him * 
banum.ProfnBiiato.25*. Namamw. 
£60 pw tea 01-600 0992. 

WL. Steak room in igr Wteme a ftoL 
ra/r to Mare wUb 4 ether*. £45pw 
P I to n e lc« 486 T331 tenHM 


TRAILFINDERS 


Apanto lor Alof 1830 


<343 fad* Gate Rood 
Loadm WB 6E1 


OPEN 96 MON-SAT 


*“®*W®*> • On December 5th 1986. 
suddenly in The UrndgSi OMt 

freasw ed tms&and and 

frt®d Of Marcia, loved by son Rob- 
ert. Jtfte and grandcMktrenJainie 
Re hecca. He wlU be 

missed. CrnnaCon Friday DecenSer 

lzul ii.30am at St MaryktooS 

matorium. East End RoaL pw 
F inchley, London N2. Family flow- 

SiSS^' tfdeslr M »o The 

Brtlish Heart FcMmdaoon. 102 
Gtoucesta- Place. London wi. Em 
onWas Mease to J H Kenyon. 12 

gUto^areet Londto Wi. Tel: Oi 


VMM: USA . France. bwHa. Australia cto- 
TRAVCOUR. Tel; Ol 225 6966 


CAPITAL GVP prepare Mgh neitt y auric- 
utum vSan. 01-607 7906. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


LaegJtesI 0I-9J7 9631 
ml 01-603 ISIS 
EomptfUSA 01-937 3*00 
td/aeoetts 01-938 34*4 


JUST FRANCE- Super vtteeseVcetoTtng 
*ld botutays m me mi French more. 
Ring for new maim now. 

TM 01-789 2592. 

AHTA 699S6 Alai 1383. 


out Hampstead owhn tenant 
louahl lor rtipml private Iwma teRMno 
wsng of Queen Anno house- Wed set 
back from road behind Urea communal 
country gardens. Okie recaption, kftav 
en wun wasber/dryer. 2 li e diu anu. 
bathroom with Mctflem ahowwr. family 
deep freeze. CH. Ua* of Barden. £326 
P-W. De La Rue. 01 *93 2938/2224. 


Co n omaa LieemedlBooded 


WANTED 


UP UP & AWAY 

NnroM. Jo ‘Ours- Cairo. DaooL 
Moated. Steoapore. ILL. Delhi. 


SO WEST • NOW omrtao nawb Onto, 
mas apecteb io France and SwurniamL 
SAVE up to £200 for den*. On 20/27 
Doc. Ol 785 9999. 


FW CAPF (Management sarvKc*} Ite re- 
ouire propertied te Central. Sooth and 
west London Ar eas fa r waiting aopH- 
canti tel Ol 221 8838. 


BRIGHTON BOBOUC H I CQW Ctt. 
TCLEFMONE HANDSET S . 
fl ina i ULHMH it m mimed rram a uwwn 
who wi*n io be conakMred for tateuuon te 

a lender BH f or me supMv of aopradma» 

ty 800 d.Tjulf- caBbraied Meak. PJ» 
mmon. plug letephc mes- an dfbr 20 

fnharephone (mamoer/tecraanr type). 

Firm able to supply moss and wfehteg 
to be tastaded on me tender to * shoted 
apply tame DMOar of CompanngAMBD- 
Hmenl Sendees. 31/22 Old Stetee. 
Brighton. 0N1 1EL. 

Completed tenders wm need to bo 

reewed to 1 6lh January 1987. 

CHARITY 

Charity: 

The DnDte Home far Unrea d Ladles 
The Charity CwuaUwlrewri, propose to 
make a Sroone for Oda Charity. Oetew of 
the dra« Schama may be otetenad cram 
mem (ref: 207303- A/2 -Li) al Si AteBal 
House. 87-60 HsynUricet. London 6W1Y 
4QX. Oteecttans amt suggestions maybe 
sad » mem wtthta one month from 

today. 

CHARITY COMMISSION 
Harascy Rtoe Home Fund 
The Clarity Csmmtodonar* have made 
a Scheme fee tea Charity. Copies can be 
omued from them at SL AMm* House. 
87/50 HaymarkeL Lond on swiY 4QX 
qref: 242J66/»LB) 


LEGAL NOTICES 


wamtxd MW Pwra t 3 ddM 
Piaekto Doramga ouda. Covad Cor- 
den. any daw. hum 80 year din 
a muttons 03*06 27*7 eventegs. 
tt WANTED Large vie wardrob e* 
chairs. maadtop laiuo*. 


Mexico, Boson. Caraca*. 
Ewope. 4 The Americas. 


Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftisbniy Avon* 


London W1V7DG. 


oat. Ol 946 7583 day.oi 7890*71 aw. 


01-439 0102/01-439 7751 
Open Satonjay 10.00-13.00 



COURCHEVEL OFFERS wtth U SM. DM 
1 3 £99/£249 2 WW. Xuu* £187. Jan 3 
£1»/£199 2 whs Jan IO £129. AU 
pnee ay roach. Add £40 by air. AU 
include hair wine in auiiny 

chalets, nee guiding & tuition For bro- 
chure can Le Ski 0*84 548996. 


WZ Modern me «d Muw. Three beds. 
Two baths. Recep. Dm area. Htte 
rag*. Go let peer. From Jan lot. £260 
pw. Tfek Ol 221 7653 Mvanted). 


* SYDNEY * * MELBOURNE * 

* FERTH * * MBBA7E* 

* HOBART * * ADELAIDE * 

* JO-BUM * ■ * ^SAFXKA* 

* AUCKLAND * ★ WEUmGTON * 

* FUl * * PT MORESBY * 

* BANGKOK * * TOKYO * 

* SINGAPORE + * MANILA. * 

* DUBAI * * BAHRAIN * 

* MID EAST * * NAIROBI* 

* LUSAKA * * HARARE * 

* TORONTO * * ■ VANCOUVER * 

* L ANGELS ** MIAMI* 

* CARIBBEAN * * S FRANCISCO * 

** SOUTH AMERICA ** 

* USA * USA *.USA *USA * 


FOB SALE 


HOPfUKSON - On December isL to 
Clare and Adrian, a son. Mdiate 
David CuUtberL 

KILPATRICK ■ On November 26th. at 
the London Hospital (Mile End) io 
Maggy mee Baird) and Andrew, a 
daughter Jessica Alice. 
LAUGHTOH-SCOTT - On December 
6th. lo Rachel titae Ballon) and 
Charles, a son Rory Edward, a broth- 
er for Max. 

ODELL - On November 30th. at St 
Lukes. Guildford, io Melanie (itee 
Griffiths! and Phillip, a son Simon 
Andrew, a brother for Jonathan and 
Vlct ona. 

FEDLEY - On November 29th. to Caro- 
line utee Hart) and NeUL a son 
Thom as David Stew art. 

PWCE - On December 4th 1986. at 
Queen Charlotte's HospUaL to Mcola 
fnce Griffin) and Richard, a (laugher 
Roseanna Holly. 

RODWELL -On November 26th. to Su- 
zanne and Ton. a son Frederic 
Thomas Sutttffe. 

RUSSELL HILLS - On December 6th. 
to Victoria mee Vestey) and Michael 
Russell Hills, a daughter. Lucy. 
SEELY - On December 8th. to Linda 
(Nee Swain) and Peter, a daughter 
Jennifer Elizabeth, a sister for Penel- 
ope and Christopher 
SHERKARD-SMTH - On December 
4Uu to Jane <twe Dansie) and 
Jeremy, a son. Thomas James, a 
brother for Laura and Eleanor. 
SWOJUR -On December 6th. to Un- 
dy uwe Sharpe) and Gut', a daughter 
Tara Leigh. 

SOTRWES on December 7th. to 
Frances uife Kettle) and Tony, a 
daughter. Colette Marguerite 
STELUTANO - On December 4tfi 
1986. at The Rosie Maternity Hospi- 
tal. Cambridge to Lesley (■»«» 
Cracknel!) and Ron. a son Andrew 
Mark. 

STRAITOM - On November 30th 1986. 
at Famborough Hospital u> Anne 
uife Ireland) and Peter, a son. 
Andrew Peter. 

TBLLOTSON - On December 5th 1986. ! 
al Warrington General HospKaL to 
Susan (nee Aaherofl) a boy. Simon 
Mark. 

WALTON - On December 6th. at Queen 
Charlotte's HospltaL lo Mary Infe 
Butler) and Alastalr. a daughter. 
Christina Frances, a stater to 
Alexandra Mary. 

WILLIS - On December 6th 1986. af 
Queen Charlotte's HospitaL to Sarah 
(nee Cooper) and Tony a datj g few , 
Rebecca Anne. 


LCWC - On December 7tb 1986. peace- 
fUUy a> the ThamesOeki Nursing 
Horn* Henley-on-Thames. Pam 
aged 83 years, widow of Tinker and 

much loved mother of James, and 
grandmother of Robin. Service of 
Thanksgiving at St Mary's Chinch. 
Wargrave. on Thmday December 
1 llh al 2.30 pro. Flowers to Tomalln 
A Son at 36. Reading Road. Henley. 


YOU’LL BE FLOORED BY 
OUR PRICES AT 
RESISTA CARPETS 

Wkaitdos beeutlfUl natural ceric tees. 


KAMOS • on December 4th 1986. Ju- 
lian Sanchez de Pina, aged 35. 
Private Reautem Mass on Wednes- 
day 10th December, a memorial 
service at a later date. wlU be an- 
nounced. No flower* please. Mass 
cards to family home donations if 
desired to A.GAL BuritnfRon House. 


«y an toy £5.96 per so yd + voL 
Me rah a I on velvet pllr carnet 14 piaui 
entoure. Bum In uotata ) *2 • wide 
from Mock. 7 year wwoiterantoe for 
home or office. £*.75 per save *■ vax. 
Pfu* uie lamest srieettoo of ptote eor- 
DeUng te London. 

548 Foteam Row! SW6 
207 Wwtf— ea w Hampneoa NW3 


AVMUSU NOW Luxvry ftoto & houses 
£200 - C 1.000 per week. TSL Bunan 
981 5136. 


* * BRISBANE* 

* * ADELAIDE * 

* - * 5 AFRICA * 

* * WELLINGTON * 

* * PT MOKESBY * 

* * TOKYO * 

* * MANILA * 

* * BAHRAIN * 

* * NAIROBI * 

* * HARARE* 

* * ■ VANCOUVER * 

* * MIAMI * 


SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

(Erfd IW) 

5*3 SoMJi SL Epson , Snfitv 
cusjznznwEuoivimj 
353ti/5Sj5/2Ufn 


Tel:0 1-794-0 139 

Free E glnutr* - e xpert FMUng 


MOLESWOVTR-StAlWrN On Decem- 
ber 6B*. peacefully at Freedom Fields 
HospUaL Mender Charles (Mouse) 
aged 85. Funeral Sendee at St. 
Conan's Church. Wmhaway. Bod- 
min. Cornwall on Friday December 
12 th al 3 pm. FamRy flowers only, 
butdonmioaoif wished to: The impe- 
rial Cancer Research Fund, c/o 
Barclay's Bank. Botenfn. 


WEDDING SUITS 


Ofnnsr Suits 
Evening TM Suite 
Surplus to hire 


BARGAINS FROM £30 


i SEEL • On December 4tb 1986. peace- 
I fUHy at watatead Race. Llndfleid. 
Lady Phyllis Lilian. Widow of Sr 
George SeeL Much loved mother of 
Brenda and Bryan. Funeral service 
at St Michaers Church. Ptumpton. 
on Thureday December nib at 
n.45am. Family flown only but 
donations if destrad to Save The Chil- 
dren Fund, or Friends of St George's 
Esher, c/o Masters and Soo. 20 High 
SL LindfleM. Sussex. RH16 2HH. 


UPMANS HERE DEPT 

22 Chartog Crow Rd 
Lomtaa WC2 
NT Letacaler So btae 
01-340 2310 


HKMDBfoata Grand N6A8407. Mahosa- 
ny overstrung. £1 -OOO.TEL : Waiioa ao 
Thsmeo (0932) 2*3396. 



RENTALS 


For Uw b eire pi o i lilecdan of 


KMOmUBeC Ml matoonetlr wMh 
sunny rocepLoverlooidno gdn sa. 2 due 
test rep dm re. ut. bate, wtuun 
walldag (imonrr of Horrods. and Sth 
Ken lobe. £276 pw Codes OX 828 8281. 


QUALITY 
FLATS & HOUSES 



RE: CARECRA FT RO OFTNG GO 

LJMlT££) 

(In votuntarv LtautdanwO 
And Die Co m panies AO 1985 
NOTICE 15 HEREBY GIVEN tea) tee 
CREDITORS of the abova named Compa- 
ny are reoutreo on or briar tee 2 nd 
Jonuorv 1987 lo M«d terir names red 
addre s ses and porneutors oi meir dews or 
claims to Ihe undersigned Peter R Copp at 
8 Baker Street. London Wt tom Joint LM- 
utdotor of Die said Company pad IT ao 
required by notice in writteg from Ihr said 
Uousiaor are to come to and prove tadr 
oetaB or ebon al aids Woe or pioce as 
shall be isiecified te such notice or to de- 
fault thereof they win be excluded from 
■he bectrfu of any mstnbuuon made before 
such debts are proved. 

Dated ten ism day of Nove m ber 1986 
R A SEGAL 
JOINT LIQUIDATOR 


QURAKM 

CONSTANTINE 


JOINT UQUBPATOa 


27D Earis Court Road. SWB 


01-244 7353 


KDtSOfOTON Ht Brand new in terior 
aeupned 3 bed. 2 bate flat wan pan- 
oramk view over Albert Hab and 
environs. To lei unfuraWted wuh car- 
pet*. cuialmi and as machines. Co let. 
£450 pw. Bucnanan*: 361 7767. 


WANTED Residence sunn*. Executive re- 
luming from US to native land. 
AvaUaM* wuh wife lo reride and task 
after property for * months until own 
bouse ready for occupation. FUU ref er- 


auppUed. 01-235 1745. 


KEMMOTON WB. Bright new conver- 
sion near Earls Court tube. Attractively 
fum wiui 2 Mims. Igs open plan rec. 
bate, ft Ml with an machines. Avail 
now. Co lei only. £1*0 pw. Qnrateid 
Oomdontme 340 7363. 


RE: SAPTEAM LTD 
AND 

THE COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE K HEREBY CIVEN punuani IO 
Section 688 of tee Companies Acl 198& 
teal a Meettno of the CnidttDra of tee 
above named Company win oe mm at 18 
Denehurst Gardens. Woodford Write. 
Essex IC8 OPA on Friday Die 12 th day of 
December 1986 at 2.00 o'clock te tee 
afternoon, for Ihe p ur pos e* mentioned in 
Sections 689 and 590 of the said Act. 

Dated bus 27th day of November 1986 

. H. SAND HU 
DIRECTOR/SECRETARV 


XAMBCARDC CAKDEN5. W2. Very 
aood value. 2/3 bed flat 2 mins 
NotttnghfB Tube. race *. » UL bate with 


TRAVEL 

WORLDWIDE 


£225 pw nre PIMM cmuaci Snranne 
Conway at Onmneri of Kaangm on 
581 3623. 


MWHBIMW Nr Harrods. 2 beds. 2 
bates + tacuzzL recap wlte picture win- 
dow onto private garden Sooare <keys>. 
dbuno roam. Ut • pH machines, alarm 
system, ras porter. Long Co L* £450 
p-w. Goddard & 8 dW Ot 930 7521 


PmCOOMT FAMES WortdtrtdB 01-434 
0734 JOOtUT TIM L 


ndocad bog tori bad easts. 
EXTRA SKO AL! STB CLUB TO THE USA 
(03727)43569 

SKOAL 1 ST A CL UB WOTLDWPE 
(03727)43550 

low cosrrawMv khumk 

(03727)42738 

■fetaaraf B» kuasas ailtewi A Teatea 
Tnwl kdumes SperideL 


chamnng 2 bed floL dWe mp. m kU + 
aU appta. tiled bath + shwr. sen cloak. 
avaO now. Co Let Only £250 p.w. 
F.W-Gapp Ol 221 8838. 


NOTI INUItILL GATCt Lux studio apart- 
mew amt 1 parson or couple, funy fum. 
CH ueparate klyhen and bateroom. 
gl OO p an exri. Short or long let Tot 
01-968 3229 after 6 jOO pan. 


RE: T A D ANTENNAS LTD 
AND 

THE COMP AMES ACT 198S 
NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN pursuant IO 
Section 568 of the Companies Act. 1985. 
that a Ma ri ne of the creditors of me 
above named Company wm be haM ol The 
Bortdcan City HOttL Centred street. 
London EC1 on Wednesday tee 17te day 
of December 1966 at KMX) o’clock in tee 
forenoon, for tee purposes mentioned in 
Sections 689 and 690 of Uie said AcL 
Dated tee. am day of November 1966 
TREVOR A DUERDON 
DIRECTOR 


SIMPSON - On December the Sth 
1986. peacefully at St Steghens Hos- 
pital. Chelsea. John aged 77. Beloved 
husband of Janet much loved Mur 
of David and Roaonary. deeply 
mimed by Sue Ids grand chamen and 
his many friends tn 2tmbabwe and 
the UK. Cremation at Putney Vale al 
lOGO am on Thursday ilth Decem- 
ber 1986. Ezxpiirea to Ashton 
Funeral Services. 221 Upper Rich- 
mond Rd. 6W15. Tel: Ol 788 179a 
FMMIy flowen only, taut donations If 
wished to Princess Alice Hospice. 
Esher. Surrey. 


RLCRAVUL Brand new tanoac bar m 
private mnre 3 beds. 2 baths + rwv 
Dole recep. t/t Ml wtth an macto. taste- 
fully dec and turn throughout. Long Co 
le* only. £650 pw. 377 2600 


eat 2 bathrms (l enstote) IT ktt win 
machines. Beautifidly furnished. Ctasr 
tube. Co wt only- £200 pw. QmfsM 
OxBUMine 344 7363. 


RADNOR WAUL CHELSEA. A stunning 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP Free credB over 

1 year (Ota APR) on Ihe best i ri rchon Of 
new A restored ptaoosJjtw Merest over 

2 yrm & 3 yrs. wrtnen quolMtens. Free 
Catalogue. SOa HJohgate Rd. NWS. Ol- 
367 7671. 


wumw i iu a saoup fares wotid- 

wtde. Tel U.T.C. (0763) 867036. 


FUQRraOOIIBRS Dtaroam Farm world- 
wtda. m /ac on o my . 01-367 9100 


01 441 mi. 


ctoborase pearl lately. Circular but ex- ... r n, nat titi 

WndBiie to oblooB to seal 8. She rtiatra + —* L **V r * _ 1 ** ”!* - 01 441 l,tl - 

2 carvers included. Retail value £*.500 Trevelwiso. Ab*»- AIoL 

wot accept £3.000 ana TN: J. PhUDppe - 

an 01-734-5906 

6PO Rad triepbaoe bones. cmofSately ro- B ^3* , SOT-"ABTA/>5S e “ ^ W1 ‘ “ 


DISCOUNT FUGHTS 

O/W Rut 

Sydney £490 £785 

Auckland £464 £775 

Los Angela £178 £340 

JotxHS 046 £485 

Rvr-h* £250 £360 

Rio 082 £504 

LONDON FLIGHT 
CENTRE 
01-370 6332 


nished 5 bed. 2 recep. 2 bate house. 
FUUy fitted ut & 2 roof terraces. £430 
pw. Buchanans: 361 7767. 


wanted for extreme ! y att racti ve gdn 


dbie bed. dranring ns. funy aoulpped 
k/bL £130 PW. TeLOl 727 6494 


>M U H C*H 6AIR4 nrgenlty mrtns lux- 
ury ftats/houees. Chrisre Kdlghtl- 
bridge. Brigravta areas. £200 - £2 jOOO 
pw. Burgess Estaie Agents 561 6136 


RE TAD EQUIPMENT SALES LTD 
AND 

TH E COMPANIES ACT 1986 
NOTICE IS Htmnv GIVEN piasuant lo 
Sectmi 688 of Ihe Companies AO. I9RS. 
teN • Meeting of Uie Creditors of the 
above namod Company will be held at The 
Baretcan City Homl Central Sheet. 
London ECl on Wednesday the 17th day 
or December 1966 at 2.00 o'clock te the 
afternoon, for the purposes mentioned te 
Sections 869 and 690 of the sate ACL 
Dated this 27tb day of November 1986 
TREVOR A DUERDON 
DIRECTOR 


havr a Ige selection of hecury 1/2/3/ 
4 Bedroom flats wun maid isrvtao. tsso- 
riar desig n ed & centrally located. Avan 
Now Connoted Properties 727 3060 


BHIWB W1CK 6BRS WB Newly decorated 
2 nd floor Oat. double bedroom, targe liv- 
ing room A known. FUOy onto. £150 
pw Inc OL TN. 0763 882252. 


SWIM - On December SUi. peacefully 
in Barctiona after a short ffinesa. Ru- 
pert. aged 24. Much loved and 
woadafnBy tovtng sen of Alboa and 
Derek. Adored brother of Katharine. 
Richard and Alexander. An inspiring 
and affectionate friend to many. Pri- 
vate funeraL There wm be a 
Thanksstvtng Service at SL Mary's. 
Habtodc at SJxn on Saturday 3rd 
January. 


Undiad ammnu available. £640 each. 
DsMvafy extra. Contact M. Ftahcrty. 11. 
Ltna Drive, lidfwilcr. Siarey. 

11 K nm a8i*-i98» ih> xmsa area 
someone an an ortRul tmve dated tec 
very data they were born. £11.96 gen 
Bee 1870‘s iiewspanero Yntmtart 
News. 43 Dundanald Road. Cofwyn 
Bay. TcL 0*92 631 196/631303. 


S. AFRICA From £465. 01-584 7371 
ABTTA. 


TAKE TRRE OPF to Porta. Amuritam 


DISCOUNTED FARES 


none. Zurich. The HBgua. Dotata. 
Rouen. Bedoga A Dieppe Hat Off. 
2n Cheater Ctoae. I nralon Swxx 7BQ. 
01-236 8070. 


STOIMTOM - On December 6th. peace- 
fnlly. Kathleen AUce. much loved 
mother of Maty. Michael. Monica 
l and John Ralph. Funeral on Friday 
12fh December, llam. at St 
; Michael's and AH Angela Church. 
I Withhigion. Gloucestershire. 


prices a nd u nder, also avaHa bte 100 b 
extra. Large room tare i ri i mants usd* 
tour ncnnal price. Chanoov Carp e ts Ol 
405 0463. 


pricr of 2 . £399- utntatd ovaftabdtty tar 
2 wfcs £339- 10923) 778344. Thxsway 
Hobdays. ABTA- ATOL 1107. 


JO’BURG/HAR £465 DOUALA £420 
NAIROBI £390 SYDNEY £760 
CAIRO £230 AUCKLAND £785 

LAGOS £360 HONG KONG ESSO 

DB7BQMBAY £350 MIAMI £330 

BANQKOK £350 AND MANY MORE 

AFRO ASIAN TRAVEL LTD 

162/T68 Regent 51 WI 
T&: CV43/8Z55 <b™ 

Ufa ft Group Bookings Weboms 
AMEX/MSA XCGESSfDBERS 


CfMXURON StanS 3 bed famfy house. 
Gerae*. Lovely garden. Available nnme- 
dlataly £116 P.W. Andrews Lotting 01 
586 0111 


SRER Dta resMewce 10 mbs fhi niw. 
Fumtahad h ogulpped lo btgfa taandard. 
4 bom. 2 tecs. 2 baths, garage. £280 
p.w. Andrews Lotting Ol 586 Oil! 


RE: T A D HOLDINGS LTD 
AND 

THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
NOTICE 6 HEREBY GIVEN purtarant to 
SecSian 688 of tee Companies acl 1986. 
Ihal a Meeting of Ihe CradUoro of tee 
above named Company wHi be hrid ai The 

'Barbican city Hotel. Central street. 
Loudon ECl on Tuesday the 16th day of 
December 1966 at 10JX) o'clock In tee 
f a r a n few. for the putooms menooMd tn 
Oechona 389 and 590 of tea saM ACL 
Dated Ibis Z7th day of November 1986 
TREVOR A DUERDON 
DIRECTOR 


UUBUmi We urgently need yaw 
proDflftks lor «■>*** and c * u 
a pt aicants Benham * Ita evea 01 958 


KEN8RWTOH WS RecpL bedroom, draw- 
teg room. K ft B. Ot. Turbo shower etc. 
£166 pw TCL 01-373-0763/0722- 
72639/01-937^964 


LUX 3 bad. town bouse fat Kew. Garage. 
gdna. ctoae 10 ube and Ksw gitas. £186 
pw. Td Ol 578 6796. 


INSTANT FLAT. Luxury Serviced Ken- 
tangum. Owtaan from £326 pw Ring 
Town Howe Apartniexd& 373 3433 


solo of replica and reproduction 


TYRRELL - On December 7th. peace- 
fully after a abort fflneas. Jack 
Jamas, dearly loved hnsh a nd of Ray 
and fhlber of James and Howard- 
Service al 1pm. Thursday December 
! lltb at Christ Church. Vhtfnla 
I Water. 


RIWX ‘Flow er s* dinner sad coffee atr- 
etce tor 6. nan- asontalte cansnmnto 
cup* and soucera. Exceutkmal auaBty. 
Unused. £1.960. Tel 0572 53261. 


SOWS ABROADT Alrey A Wheeler 
' s o rem ta e In ready -foweor lltait i Ma in A 
(roplcol tadtaJuxsdooJiataery A acoeeso- 
rica. 129 Ragan St Loudon WI. 


1 VALUER - On December sth 1966. 
suddenly at home. John. Beloved 
husband of Mary, devoted fattier of 
Hilary and Caroline and his grand- 
children- Service Lancaster and 
Morecombe Crematorium on 
Wednesday December 10th at 3pm. 
Family flower only but donations if 
wished to ' the British Heart 
Foun d a ti o n . 


length (29 tnchesA Star 12-14. £12 DOl 
T ut Ol 680 4683 (daytime) or Ot 668 
4319 (evening). 1 

SANTA'S SALE AT TOPS nmt end 6reor- 
day. Unrepeatable t u rgalne to vktaas 
and TVs. 91 Lower Stoane SL Swi. 
730 0935. 


OIK CALL tar some of Die beta Sob In 
retails, apartments, nobh ana car Mm. 
TM l.nnrton Ol 636 SOCDl Mandsener 
061 832 2000. Air 77*001 Advisory 


LOWEST FARES 

Paris £69. N YORK 

F r a nkfurt £50 LA/SF 

Lagoa £320- Miami 

NaMM £325 fitegopore 

Jtaburp v. £460 Bangkok 


MARBLE ARCH 1 QUL bed. lux. bd. de- 
sign fta* in i nusMaSn sta block- 24 hom- 
ponsrage. Co. M. £150 p.w. TM ; 01 
724 8277 


CmrlMAS in London: W2 Mewa house. 
£360 pw. Luxury bathroom. CH. TV. 
tags 3/4- ito i kbai TM: 01-221 3356. 


RE: T A D SERVICES LTD 
AND 

THE CO MPAN IES ACT 1986 

tali 

Crrrfcm 588 of tea Oampmuea Act. 1986b 
teal g M e e t ing Of the Creditors of (be 
onove naaiM company wre be note M The 
Barbican CUy Haw. Central Sired. 
London ECl on Tuesday the 16(h day of 
December 1986 oi 250 o'clock In tee Of- 
•fraoon. tor me purposes mentioned in 
Sections 689 aad 690 of tee gtad AcL 
Dkta Btta 27th day o f November 1986 
TREVOR A DUERDON 
DIRECTOR 


t: 



■ 1 ._>.y 


6*clly a la Crete. Grand Tour. FbgM 
only hum £89 MB. BLAND BUN 01-222 
7462. ABTA/ ATOL 1907. 


Dta/Bam £336 Rangoon 

Hoag Kong £610 Cams* 

Hoge OMco ita N Area 00 iBAQabC 

SUN & SAND 

21 SwoBow SL London Wl 
01-439 2100/437 0637 


ttoo of nets A houses hi the CUy. 
Knlghtaoridge. Kc mrtnta a n . Wlrahtodon 
and oilier mu. Ol 657 0821. 


DOMESTIC AND 
CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


SOUTH KEN SW7 WeB maintained and 
bright I bed IM off Old Brampton Rd. 
dbta bed. reoepL feR. bath. £160 pw Inc 
CH CHW coofas Ol B28 8261. 


BEUEF NAlOfY WHIR 22+. rram Janu- 
ary. with experience . 2 chuoran (3 
yoare and 6 months) » KamnMM 
home. Naraery dunes only, as other 
staff kept. Two days a week and one 


R OCKS LI MI TED 

NOTICE IS KQ1E8V GIVEN putssanl 10 
Seaton 688 of the Companies ACL 1986. 
teat a MEETING of tec credttom of the 
above named company wo be held at tee 
offlom Of LEONARD CURTIS A CO . 
tatmued al 30 EASTBOURNE TERRACE. 
LONDON W2 6LF Oh Tbeoday 16th 
December 1986 at 1200 o’clock midday. 
for the purposes provided far in p actions 
689 and 690. 

Dated thta 2Bte day of Novembor 1986 


WE T8D I7IMML Other total 
avail. Hand bound ready a* presenta- 
tion ■ also “Sundays", eizjo. 


WINTER SPORTS 


Londo n W2. 3 bedroom luxury flss. 
£500 pw nag 01-769 829a 01-767 
7911 


cnees eawnHaL Hegse te lephone Mrs 
Hayward nm ox-493 9359 (between 9 
am and 2 pm weekdays). 


VAN ZWANEM 

ZWANENBEHG. 


Cats. Starlight Ex*. Chest Les Mb. AD 
tbeatre and morta-Tel: 821-6610/828- 
OS9SJLEX / visa / Omn. 


1 TM Ot 229 8383 


WHITE - On December 7th. peaccraty 
In Craig Dunabi HogpKM. hwemeas. 
Ethel Mary aged 92. Dearly tewed 
wife of the late Lieut. Ctriood Rfch- 
ard While of Smarten. Kem. Funeral 
private. 


toOBIEM Grand. 19td» 6 IL Eb onta ed . 
Mtadaia tasmmwnL £*Joa 01-686 
4981. T. 


«— «MM CYT WB ft. 1st Cteas betel a n 
sareW beach (roenH/row. 1 wk £299.2 
wto £363 Rtng Pan worid Hobdays Ol 
73* 2862. 


SKI BEACH 
VILLAS 


•ST 9861 The m anber so ramamber 


central and prime lataa areas 
£I6O/£2 j000pw. 


CTBnSTMAS SPECIALS 


VERB1ER £169 


Leipzig 1906. Excellent condUkn 
£4500. Teh (Bate) 0226 833182 
CATS, CRB. Les Mtaand Phantom. AO 
theatre and Sport Tsf <39 1 7H3L Adore- 


.WRH I R4S avaOabUBy. GatwKaTFbro 
18 Oac £145 Malaga 22 December. 
£169. Vatesamter. Ol 723 0964. AM* 


ANDORRA £149 


KEST aROareTOII I* TUP*, new I bed 
ftat tn rnmphnr with swfm pool Gym 
mte sauna, partdng. Snort or tana let. 
£176 P.W. Goddard ASRdth. 9307321. 


gulfed for re tired guiPuran Hvtzig in 
the country near Shrewsbury- Separate 
Bpertmcni available. Car Is mpphed. 
Salary negatiabte. References reqd. Tet 
0952 89229 


S S S GROUP LIMITED 
Notice ts hereby seven punmanf lo 
Section 588 of tee Companies AeL 1985. 
teal a Meeting of tee Credltore of tea 
above Darned Company wfO be held at 78 
Hatton Oardcn. London EC1N 8JA on 
Thwaday tee 1 1 te day of o«eemiaer 1986 
at 10.00 o’clock tn tee forenoon, lor tee 
purpose* mentioned In Sections 589 and 
690 of tee said Act. 

DATED teis 1st day of December 1986 
By Omar of me Board 
RC. SI NCLAI R 
tSHECTOB 


STAFFED CHALET PRICES FULLY 
INCLUSIVE 

Of asm tad insurance and deuemv 


TVWTTSLD - On DefMtiber 4th. 
pwefniiy at Nynciiead Court. Pbyt- 
tis Ware, aged 102 years. Crmaiion 
at TSunton Dene crematorium. TOes- 
day December 9th. iUDan. 
Memorial Service at Nynehead 
Church. Wefttnglon. Soenerrel on 
Saturday December 13th at 
11.30am. AO enoulrtes to Thomas 
Brothers. 082547 2009 


yoo bay cbeaoer? B & 6 Ltd. Ol 229 
1947/8468. 

OUWD PMMOu Kawal KG8. 6ft Stare 8B- 
perti rood. Apptox 7 yrs oM. Offers 
in vll e d around £4 XXXX 0622 810951. 

KNSCSfT K18 uprttad nSano. Mahogany. 
New 1981. MM. £1800 earn. TM 0463 
713000. 


JITRf smcA. Low Cota fbgres 4*. 
Rto £485. uma £*96 rm. Also SmaB 


£550) JLA 01-747-5108 


NO EXTR A S BUT ALL THE FRILLS? 
LIMITED OFFERS • BOOK NOW ON 
(0223) 311113 

ABTA 1418X ATOL 581B 

Acocaa/Barteaycard/Amex 


ALLOT BAYES A go have a Jarpe setec- 
Bon of Date S bream avail lor tong / 
short tel on faao-oo p.w. Ol 499 1666 


MOWitn NW1 super decor S/C. 
sunny tangle taudto (las. Go tet- £80 pw 
tec CH. Free parking. Ol 486 9679. 


WILLIAMSON - On December 3rd 
1966. EnM Cnfe Vines). MAE. at 
Addenbrooke's HosptiaL Cambridge^ 
aged 80. Beloved wtfe of Hugh 8 WO- 
Uamson. cremation private. 


Wbnatadau. Russw. Pan. Span A ta 
Wwalff il l . 01 2*0 8609/01 836 99ia 
SPMETOood eaudtiian but needs tmdpg. 
DUMB forces sale. £1200 «Ml Tta: 0734 
733205 (morotnss only). 


Amtutata. Fbr EasL Africa. Abtine Apra 
Ata Tt ay vale. 48 Margaret Street WL 
Ol 680 2938 (Visa Acc rora D 


mCKLETCeregten style dta 4 bed. 2 bate 
house. Double oreaoe. Butt family. £300 
P-w. Andrews Leumg 01 685 Oil I 


To Place Your 
Classified 
Advertisement 


(YORK, la_ USA. Worfdwtdedeso- 
bons. For tea c he a p e at teres, try os - 


panned ramnurr. Mr Astaoo 01 9*7 
6946. 667-669 Garrtal Lane. EartaSdd. 
SW17. 


potions. For tea c he ap e ta teres, try os - 
1st- Richmond Travel. 1 Duke Street. 
Richmond Sumy. ABTA 01-940 40)3. 


WBKHT - On December 3rd. Ronald 
Henry DFC DFM. bekrved bosb a nd 
of Peggy, much missed by cHMren 
and reandchtitirea. Funerw service 
at Surrey and Sussex Crematorium 
on Wednesday December 10th al 
11.30am. Family flowers only. Do- 
nations tf desired to the RAF 
BenevolBil Fund. 


FLATSHARK 


Far Eata-Antralia. Can 
pro fi tas nn a li ABT A IATA ec ex 
TM Ol 2ft* 6788 


• Prof gtat share Ige flat 


ttitum - On DeoembB- Sth 1986. 
peacefully at home. Helen, after a 
long utness. Funeral arrangements 
private. Please do Dowers. 


cobs, garden. £40 pw exd Tet JD) 01- 
940 2151 (day). 01-892 9654 (eve) 
ALEXANDRA PLACE - N/S. New cocwer. 
■ton. own room, share flat. 5 mins BR. 
£45 pw etcL TeL -01 431 0655 w/8B8 
1537 b 

ataPW - Prof F. aged an. to share 


warrXJt SUM 8 McM prices to Cyprus. 
Malta. Morocco. Greece. Malaga * Te- 
nerife. Nov & Dec. Pan World Holidays 
Ol 734 2662. 


WAS 20/27 Dec * Barenwr 87. ONTO*. 
Otatartes. Greece dta * bote. « wk hots 
3/1 tr £399. Lunaracape. 01-441 0122 


C KB.WA Anracilve rite 1 large recep- 

■ DOn-dblr bedrm. Uldwn. bathrra. ratio. 

_, r , „ GCH. £180 pw tart. 01-351 3670 

V * L 4 <**■»* Chtart 13 ctoLHI SW19. Super Mewa hw. 2 M 

De cf7d »asM tepk B «m n •aachoabr bed. haterre ensutie. shower. Ige in «/ 
^ ??*,i a0 .,.. p ? r .. 1 ^ i . fl 3S diner, recep. GCH. £226 pw. 881 8828 

^S^S-LS^ftSSbASM^te p n c m ft M Pft Flats and homes to lei 
J 01903 S 444 . ignore tee Doridaniis area. Tte*i- 

ABTA/ATDL. 790 9660 

EARIS COURT SWS 3 bedroom hot OaL 
» — £560 pw neg 01-769 829a 01-767 

MOWRI TRAFtM SooOiTVraL 1 week bp - 7911 rt . r 

fTrarti I Vh nrrrmhnr rfi*J lliff nnnni MRKnwly<toc JUkUOiOT 1 bod 

vm/Accrea AboOutabsai m£S5Si nm. CH. TV^ Longflteort leta. Froo. 
tty. Ring Edwards Hotidava. Ol 360 £1 25 p.w . 957 4 999 

9241. AhTA 70944. IU1l>IPni4H WWK Luj> OaL 26ff rec. dbte 

DM. CH. TV. tor sunny bale. W/mach. 

Go tel pref. £136 PW 01-62* *817. 


Please telephone the appropriate number listed 
below between 9am and 6pm. Monday to 
Friday, or between 9.30am and 1.00pm on 
Saturdays. 

Birth, Marriage and Death NoticesOl-481 4000 


tube. £160 pas excL Tet Ol 589 0763 


ceoenl location offers Usu rio us food dr 
griding service, from £tOOpppw. GU 
Entngton. Ol STB 6997. 


ZWANENBEHG - On December 6th. 
Arnold Abraham Van. at ids home In 
. Sunningdaie. Cherished husband of 
Doff . dearly loved father of OdBe and 
cniii e and stepfather of Janie and 
darting "Opa” of both bis and Don's 
family- Cremation at Woking on 
Wednesday December lOUi at 1 1.30 
a m. Family flowers only. 


FLATMATES Selective Sharing- Wen 
ottb Introductory service. Pise tta tor 
apph Or -889 8491. 313 BmspMn 
Rood. SW3 

MAIM VALE tote poson to share tax. 
(Ite. Ige bedTM- own -bath, £7Qpw. 
Phone Gbria. 01 286 17B8 eves 01 493 


Mb. Greece. TurSey. Spate. Egypt. Sri 
Lanka aad many mere twta/tiiohf*. 
Ventura; Ol 281 5486. ATOL 2034. 


■ratafia. OtoMBd Travel ATOL 1785. 

01-581 4641. Horsham 6SMt 


Tel (02421 603698 
(eves). 


roro. S/cd 
(day)/ on 


m DULWSCa Prof ra/r to share lux flat, 
dose Stn. v i rido ri + wen rundshed. 
£40 pw od. Tab (O) 01-761-0900 04) 
01-671-9648 after teSQpro 


anywhere. Sky TraveL Ol 834 7426. 
ABTA . 


I few- Champary. nones de SotieL No 

or I SujDiaiees. Oviunh imw ran 


FUNERAL 

ARRANGEMENTS 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


MW ft • The Funeral of SaBy Miles, 
who died on December 2n d, wm take 
otoco ai SL Maryifeone Crentaior]- 
SmTEas t End Road- N2 * 1 pm 
tomorrow (Wednesday) pHxmber 
XOUi. No flowers please, but dona- 
tions may go to The Motomeurone 
Disease Association. Northampton. 


Leer 


631 0167. Aftl AtOt 1893. 

BO LLAim. Dafty (fete. £SS O/W, £55 
Din. mnkfurt from £69. Mtaaric jet 
01 379 3322 

BOMB KONG CMft BANGKOK £369. 
MStaaporr £457. OBter FEdnes. 01-684 
6514 ABTA 

LO«KST Air FMCta Scttaduted Corope * 
Worldwide. Mod Star TraveL 01 928 
3200 

LOWEST Ate Fans. Europe and worid 
wide, 01 856 8622- Buddntfan 


TAM ADVANTAGE of VS in January. 
Verbter. VlUare. Me r fc c i . Megeve. Ski 
Lea AMs. Ol 602 9766. 


JOSOf fORQAW TRAVEL Chalet Fariias 

fro m £18 9 pa- person. TM Ol 499 1911 

or 0730 66661 

SKfWHtLD Xmas HoB from £99 Andor- 
ra A Times Brochure Ol 602 4826 
24hr. ABTA. 


ToK&tr we cm butt it. 


MEMORIAL SEXVECES 


nnifci OK.MA1M - A Memorial Ser- 
rtcTfar Ihe late Captain UflUe 
Doiunas-Mann. M-C.. wifl be held in 
the crypt Of St clement Dares 
Chun*. The Strand on Tuesday 6lh 
January 1987 t« 12 noon. 


Vc find over one third of all 
nm ii l i bno the {Rwuo and, 
cure of cancer m the UK. 

Hefp ga bf serafint a d no ntio n 

or make i legacy w 

a 


MOROCCAN HARK - Hobdays. ragUs. 
accooL car hire. CUD fe n gnu Hobdays. 
Ol 629 9712 ABTTA ATOL 1178 
AU. usam Lowest fares on mater 
s ritad ute d carriers. 01-584 737LABTA 


SKI FUGHT-G. Puny to Geneva. Zurtril. 
Mutncn ate. From £59. 6U WEST. Tel 
01 788 9999. 

an TOTAL. Chakt Partial, hteris. «gR to 
Franea/Aitama. Xmas vacs. (0932) 
251113. 


Cl 30 pw (net CHW. CH. tiff, porte r . 
BwudHUBy rurotahed. 01-581 5828 (T) 
HR KARROOS. SmaB s/c serviced taudto 
IttL CJLC. C/K. retaaeat housekeeper. 
£400 pan. Tta 01-684 8646 
SE 2S Forata HDL Pteasao loealten. fi/C 
RaL 1 bed. Gdn. GCH. £90 pw. Tet Ol 
670 1 13* CEvete 

SGRVIEED APARTMENTS m Kentamgun. 

Got T.V. 24 hr Sw. Telex. CMBnphata 
Apartmente. OX-373 6306. 

SLOAHE APARTMENTS Perfect Mention 
off Soane Squar e. F UPr awtead St 
equisped. Tet 01-375 £306 m, 
SOUTH KUMRKITON Setf^onttauad 
newly dec 1 room furn ftaL soil prof 
person. CH. £68 nw ted. Tel 828 3268. 
ST 1AWPS PLACE SWI Luxury 
serviced 2 Bed awiitiuaiL Prime taxa- 
tion Dext io pn. 01-373 6306 m. 
ST SllPMars GONS W2 Ounateg IM. 
i bad. i rec eption , x bathroom. £150 
pw. Ol 787 7227 CD 
WM Lovely 2 bed IBL recap, k Sc b. GCH. 
cam ua den s £145 p.w. 01 749 2087 

m. 

Mft Newty dec a porions dble bed gdn WaL 
Parking. Soft couple. £165 pw. Dec 29 
far 6 mite. Tta OX 221 2811. 
WANDSWORTH Lovely 4 bad. 2 Bath 
house, dtre recep. ut/ouer. gdn. £220 
P-W. Ol 749 2087 Ok 


Birth and Death notices may be accepted over 
the telephone. For publication the following day 
please telephone by 1.30pm. Marriage notices 
not appearing on the Court & Social page may 
also be accepted by telephone. 


Trade Advertisers: 


Appointments 
Public Appointments 
Property 
Travel 

U X Holidays 

Motors 

Personal 

Business to Business 
Education 


01-481 4481 
01-481 1066 
01-481 1986 
01-481 1989 
01-488 3698 
01-481 4422 
01-481 1920 
01481 1982 
01481 1066 


9 ^ a 2?£T*” a ° tUL001 * 


Forthcoming Marriages, Weddings, etc for the 


LANZAROTE. Lux aptt 0/ looking beach. 
Puerto del Oumen. + wlndsorflng. Jan 
AvtalaMHte. 01-6*0 1415 or 8*36445. 


Court and Social Page 
ot be accepted by Teler 


HOTISNY Lovely vua. Sea 400 yards. 
BoBBbty eoutpead. Seeps 12. Tta: 01- 
226 7600. 


WINTER SPORTS 


Cannot be accepted by Telephone 
Please send Court and Social Page notices to: 


the laie Cyril PWerc™ - 

gSrtS^FilSei^ 01406 !N MEMO MAM - raiVATE 

aqoi -^wtaMWRMM 


ALGARVE 4 lux UBtade vfllas. s/NML ten- 
da court, maid service, magmnctm 
views. 30 rntea Fero teroort. Gtes 6 & B 
Tta 01 887 3391 


4901 

HOOGXMSON - 

3rtl 986-Suddertfy 
laved husband 

father of ftfarfln^JtaOTWher^ 
ip and jane. De^l E^wof 
Fiona and Patrick 

jenrw- caw- SSuM- 

and grandfadiw , 5 ^. 

tian. Philip- Edw ?? a Mtmmal fo»- 
Prtvate family ot 

lowed » ' j^day 9ih 
UiKOln Cainedrtal 
Decemher al doth Lirtcotfl 

only iIS a ^l? SSSSS >° ** 

cs^natedtaiU* 

Trustees- 


2 Cteta Hook Tcnxr, 

■ TTW 12 LonfekSViy SAIL. 


ALGARVE. Christmas Fta. OatwiCk/Fare 
20 Doc 2wks £ 1 69 Inc SorehOdas Trav- 
ta. 01 874 9010. AW 1040. 


BLADON LINES 

The Biggest Choice on Skis 
CHRISTMAS CRACKERS 


^ VliflCR - in memory of Major Pari 
EteSaren au Vlvtor. B£~ who «*d aq 
“TSSomter 1967. only son of Mrs 
phyiiii ctrjttn and mo lato Joute 
Ev^ntac du Vlvtor. 

fiELSTOOKPE - Rert«i*«r Ida LOOM 

infe Laabrey). * 1 ®* bom 8* 

i jiroxe^on December 1886 retd 
died at YehttMl m l*i> Septoaber 
iSefa f aitWtil fottowrr of the Way. 
at John IO. 27-2B- 
..mam . william. Unde BOI anoth- 
{Detember 8th) and stfflso 
£,auy missed by us aiL Terry. Car- 
greai nephew and niece 
James A Sally 


British Heart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


V£3SS» 

MERKEL 

COURMAYEUR 


Deps. 20/31 December 7 rUgbts 
Chalet Parties & Otaiet Holds 
Arvii £149 SAN VK3DJO 

from £149 VAL DISERE 

(Km £149 CRANS MONTANA 

SELT CATERING Cram £99 


Court & Social Advertising, 
Times Newspapers Ltd., 

1, Pennington Street, 
London £1 9DD 


from £149 
(ram £189 
from £149 


Please allow at least 48 hours before publication. 
Any enquiries for the Court & Social page may 
be made after 10.30am on 01-822 9953 


102 Gloucester Mace, 
London W1H4DH. 


01-785 7771 

Self Catering & Hows 


March Deps. 

0422 78121 


GENERAL ENQUIRIES 
01-786 2200 


01-785 3131 

Chaw Parties 

ABTA 16723 
ATOL 1232 


You may use your Access, Amex, Diners 
or Visa card. 



Thatcher 

stance 

dismays 

MPs 

By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The Prime Minister dis- 
mayed some Conservative 
MPs yesterday by fainting that 
she would reluctantly go along 
with an emergency EEC Bud- 
get next year to help it out of 
its growing financial crisis. 

Mrs Thatcher said Britain 
might have to agree to 
supplementary budget to get 
back some £1.1 billion of 
rebates due under the complex; 
arrangements agreed at the 
Fontainbleau summit in 1984. 

With the recent London 
summit having largely side- 
stepped the impending threat 
of Community bankruptcy — 
it could face a £3 billion deficit 
by next spring — Mrs That- 
cher’s remarks caused conster- 
nation among an ti-Conun un- 
ity MPS. 

Mr Teddy Taylor. Conserv- 
ative MP for Southend East, 
said the Prime Minister made 
it dear after the Fontainbleau 
summit that Britain’s rebates 
would be deducted at source 
from Britain's Vat contribu- 
tions. 

He said: “I cannot under- 
stand her statement that we 
may have to nave a supple- 
mentary budget. 

Mr Thatcher pleased MPs 
earlier by making it clear that 
she was opposed to the Com- 
munity increasing its finances 
by raising the 1.4 per cent 
ceiling on each nation's Vat 
yield. 

But she said it was possible 
that money would run out 
soon. She said if “other 
devices” were at once ruled 
out “it might have a bad 
impact on Britain's rebates' 
and “we must consider what is 
the optimum position in the 
interests of this country”. 

Mr Roy Hattersley, Lab- 
our's deputy leader, said that 
if she judged there would not 
be a supplementary budget 
how could the Community 
Kind the £3 billion deficit it 
would face by next spring. 

Mrs Thatcher said she was 
not going to rule out “abso- 
lutely” a supplementary bud- 
get To do so could be highly 
damaging to Britain “because 
it might mean we should not 
get our rebates or they will be 
held up and carried forward.” 

Most MPS took Mrs That- 
cher's remarks to mean she 
will in the end go along with 
an emergency budget. If so she 
is certain to face a substantial 
back bench revolt on the issue. 

Rartianwnt, page 4 

European view, page 10 



display 

By Jill Sherman 

Mrs Edwina Carrie, Under 
Secretary of State for Health, 
yesterday showed her exper- 
tise at moDtb-to-moath 
resuscitation, when she joined 
in one of die London Am- 
bulance Service’s “Save a 
Life" classes. 

Mrs Currie, who holds a 
Red Cross certificate, told the 
class that she had had first- 
hand experience at first aid 
when her daughter Debbie, 
aged two, choked on her food. 

She said that it was vital 
that the public had some 
knowledge of the rudimentary 
elements of first aid to help 
save lives. Mothers could &ve 
their own babies, and hus- 
bands and wives could save 
each other’s life should one 
have a heart attack. 

Ambulance officers told the 
class that people had a four 
times greater chance of surviv- 
ing accidents or attacks if they 
had a rudimentary knowledge. 

The class at the London 
Ambulance Headquarters in 
south London was one of many 
being organized by voluntary 
organizations and the am- 
bsifaaee service to teach first 
aid, as part of the “Save a 1 
Life” campaign which was 
launched in September by the 
Government 

I m JF 


Mis Edwina Currie, junior health minister, performs the kiss-of-life on a dummy baby ye sterday at “Save a Life” dass (Photograph: Ros Prinkwater). 

Currie in 
kiss-of-life 


Architect 
in surprise 
victory 

Continued from page 1 

one of Mr Hackney's leading 
opponents. 

Earlier this year Mr Harri- 
son admitted, libelling the new 
president by describing him in 
The Daily Telegraph as lack- 
ing stature and experience for 
the post of president of the 
International Union of 
Architects. 

Mr Hackney still has his 
sights on the International 
Union presidency, which will 
be decided next year. 

The new Institute president, 
who assumes office on July 1 
next year, is also committed to 
reinstating Mr John Harris, 
who resigned as curator of the 
Institute's collection of 
architectural drawings, the 
finest in the world, over plans 
to move them from the Heinz 
Gallery back to Institute head- 
quarters at Portland Place, 
London. 

What is certain is that 
during his presidency the 
plight of inner cities, an issue 
given the Royal imprimatur 
by the Prince of Wales, will 
receive a great deal of addi- 
tional publicity. 

Mr Hackney is known as a 
shrewd political operator, who 
bears several hallmarks of the 
present-day revolutionary. 


Shultz testifies he 
was kept in dark 


Continued from page 1 

command, there needs to be a 
good reason.'’ Mr Shultz said 
drily. Noting that Mr Kelly 
might have been asked on the 
President's authority to do 
this, he added with a touch of 
anger: “I would think that be 
would have checked with me 
to see if this were so.” 

Mr Shultz, who testified 
under oath for the first time at 
such a hearing, insisted at the 
start that his role in the 
diversion of Iran arms rale 
profits to the Contras was 
“zero”. From what he had 
seen, he believed such money 
transfers were illegal. 

But he said he strongly 
supported President Reagan's 
overall policy in trying to find 
an opening to Iran. “We have 
a northern concern to keep 
Iran free of Soviet influence, 
and a southern concern to 
keep Iran from do minating rts 
Gulf neighbours.” 

And he warmly praised the 
President's general stand 
against communism and his 
defence of American interests. 
“Communism's march is not 
inevitable. President Reagan 
is a freedom fighter, and the 
world knows it And I stand 
with Ronald Reagan." 


Questioned by committee 
members, Mr Shultz denied 
that he had personally ap- 
pealed to the Sultan of Brunei 
to contribute millions of dol- 
lars to the Contras. But he 
indicated that such a request 
was made by Mr Elliott 
Abrams, the assistant Sec- 
retary of State for Latin 
American affairs. 

In striking reminiscence of 
the Watergate inquiry, the 
House hearings were broad- 
cast live mi television and 
radio nationwide yesterday. 

Mr Robert McFariane tes- 
tified in the afternoon. The 
Senate and House special 
committees on the affair will 
begin their hearings next 
month. 

Mr Shultz will brief the 
Nato foreign ministers in 
Brussels this week, and is 
expected to be closely ques- 
tioned on the scandaL In a 
clear message of reassurance, 
he said yesterday: “Let us 
show the strength of our free 
institutions by showing every 
detail of the (ran episode. But 
as we do so, let's keep this 
country moving ahead” to 
meet the dangers and chal- 
lenges in the world. 


MP forces 
Militant 
showdown 

Continued from page I 
his proposed investigation 

procedure. 

“All the complainants have 
written to me to say that two 
hours, between 4 and 6 pm, is 
totally inadequate. They have 
to explain fully what has been 
happening. They do nor want 
to meet him at the Labour 
dub rn Blyth because they are 
afraid of physical violence. 

Mr Ryman said his central 
criticism remained that La- 
bour Parry headquarters were 
car r y i ng out an inadequate 
inquiry. “There seems to bean 
atmosphere of sloppiness and 
slipshod management, hur- 
ried interviews and inad- 
equate ferifities.” 

He added: “That is not the 
way a judicial inquiry should 
be conducted.” 

Mr Ryman will present Mr 
Hughes this morning with 
more written evidence from 
local party members and he 
wants all the information 
placed before the organization 
subcommittee of Labour's 
national executive. 

Mr Campbell, aged 42, has 
been a local councillor in 
Blyth for the past 17 years. He 
certainly has all the left-wing 
credentials needed to outrage 
the Labour Party realists 


L etter from Riano 

Still defying the 
tide of progress 


The little market town of 
Riano has been living on 
borrowed time for 20 years, 
and the loan is about to be 
called m. 

For 400 years Riano pros- 
pered because of its prime 
location as a town at the 
n a t ura l exit route of four 
valleys of the beautiful Picos 
de Euro pa mountains and on 
a crossroads linking cities of 
the C gg| »iian plain to those of 
the Cantabrian coast. 

Then in 1966, without so 
much as a by your leave, 
trucks and earth-moving 
equipment arrived at the 
narrow mouth of the valley of 
the Esla river five miles from 
Riano and began building a 
rt a m on the town's common 
woodland It was pan of 
General Franco’s programme 
to utilize Spain’s hydraulic 
potential. , . . 

Water to be stored behind 
the dam would be used to 
inigate 80,000 hectares of dry 
lands of northern Castile - 
and it would also submerge 
Riano’s sunny little main 
square, snuggled up against 
the back wall of the 200-year- 
old church, beneath ISO ft of 
water. 

The town at that time had a 
population of about 1,209. 
Two years after the construc- 
tion began, the Franco 
Government began to pay 
compensation to heads of 
families — not all adults — for 
the loss of the town's com- 
mon lands. Later there were 
other payments for pasture 
and farmland, for businesses 
and small industries, for 
homes and other buildings. 

But the money was never 
paid to anyone all at once. 
The funds were doled out 
piecemeal, thus making it 
difficult for families to scrape 
together enough cash to move 
out of the doomed valley and 
find new homes and jobs 
elsewhere. Yet many did go 
away. Others stayed, believ- 
ing they could use their farms 
and homes until the last 
minute. 

For many p 
bad deal As Riano's present 
Mayor, Senor Guillermo 
Hernandez, of the conser- 
vative Popular Alliance 
party, explained: “For most 
heads of familie s, it was a 
matter of taking or leaving 
what was offered. In those 
days it was not wise to 
dissent." 

The Generalissimo died in 
1975, one year after he for- 
mally dedicated the dam., and 
the new democratic Govern- 
ment in Madrid briefly ig- 
nored the threat to Riano 
while it reassessed energy 


policies. In the end, Riano 
Was not spared 
Sitting before the kitchen 
fireplace in his rectory, where 
paint is peeling from the 
walls. Father Antonio Gon- 
zalez. the town's Roman 
Catholic priest, explained 
that many townsfolk left in 
the late 1960s and early 
1970s. 

"Then, in the mid-l97Q5, 
the situation changed Jots 
became scarce. It was easier 
to get by in the villages than 
in the big. cities. Riano's 
population had dropped to 
about 400, but people came 
back a gain. Some of them 
have children. 

“The present level of 
population here is perhaps 
650. and in eight other vft. 
lages in the valley that win be 
affected there are perhaps 
another 1,200. 

“The people are bitter be- 
cause they see no future for 
themselves and their fam- 
ilies,” Father Gonzalez said 
At the end of last month, 
Spain's Civil Guard police 
used truncheons and smoke 
grenades against Riano's in- 
habitants after they tried to 
slop a telephone company 
crew from digging up their 
main street to relocate tele- 
phone lines. 

Machinery stands poised to 
smash the house of Father 
Gonzalez and 22 others to 
make way for the tall jnOars 
that are to support a viaduct 

across the valley and over the 
lake that will drown Riano. 

But a judge granted the 
inhabitants a last-minute stay 
of execution on November 6, 
to allow time to study allega- 
tions of legal defects in the 
expropriations of some of fee 
houses. 

How long will this latest 
reprieve last? “About a 
month, maybe a month and a 
half'* according to Senor 
Mario Saenz de Buruaga, the 
lawyer representing the 
townspeople. “Unless the 
judge finds reason to substan- 
tiate our claims,” he said, “I 
: it was a am afraid we'll have to try to 
4 think of something else.”* 

But the people of Riano 
have more will to save their 
homes than real hope of 
saving them. 

They know that they can 
only delay the day when the 
waters mil wash away the 
defiant man-high lettering in 
red paint splashed on the face 
of the dam which spells out 
the word “demolition,” and 
the more pathetic graffiti on 
the school wad which plead: 
“Let them grow up here” 


Harry Debelius 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Todays events 

Royal engagements 
The Prince of Wales, Presi- 
dent of Business in the Commu- 
nity, visits the South East 
Northumberland Enterprise Tr- 
ust Workshop, Green Lane, 
Ashington, 10.20; the Newcastle 
Youth Enterprise Centre, 25 
Low Friar Street, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne, 11.20; and the St 
Thomas Street Stables Project, 
St Thomas Street, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne, 12; then attends the 
Business in the Community's 
annual meeting at the Civic 


Centre, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 
12.35; later attends a gala perfor- 
mance of “The Magic Flute" to 
celebrate the seventy fifth 
anniversary of the National 
Assocation of Youth Clubs at 
the Royal Opera House, Govern 
Garden, 6.55. 

The Princess of Wales, Patron 
of the London City Ballet, 
attends a gala performance of 
“Giselle" given by the company 
at the Theatre Royal, Theatre 
Square. Nottingham, in aid of 
the London City Ballet Trust 
Limited, 7.10. 

The Duke of Gloucester visits 
Weeiabrx Limited at Weetabix 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,224 



compbcaled 


ACROSS 

1 Infernally 
“eddy” clue (81. 

S Cite Benito, after notice (6). 

8 Potemkin for instance in 
Ben's joint (10). 

9 Joshua's fatter takes in 
nothing of this part of 
speech (4). 

10 Abou Ben Adhem's noc- 
turnal visitor has us all 
taped? (9,5). 

11 “At least well die with — 
on our back" (MacbethX 7). 

13 Is love dead, or just set 
apart? (7). 

15 A card about the pitcher (7). 

18 Tom’s tongue, one of those 
proverbially fast movers (7). 

21 Smith using these to fight so 
furiously? (63,5). 

22 Oriental garb Cleopatra's 
attendant returned (4). 

23 Store of eg goods or poetry 
is desiroyttl (10). 

24 Standard number returned 
to the vessel (6). 

25 Coppers come round about 
initiation of the false claim 
(S). 

DOWN 

1 For a prophetess, contrari- 
wise, difficult to be without 
honour (7). 

2 Complaint — rut needs re- 
pair. one above Heraclitus’s 
home (9). 

3 A sort of general increase 
(7). 


4 Little girls reading stories 
about a ship (7). 

5 Valuation by academician is 
seen in dismay (9). 

6 Uncommonly glad to re- 
ceive one here in Ireland (7), 

7 This bit of verse a minor 
blow for Pierre? (7). 

12 Old Jewish council and 
shrine, perhaps (9). 

14 Cattle-caller's crafty plan to 
capture wild heron (9). 

16 One cast out from the dev- 
ilish maelstrom (7). 

17 Matriarchal head of Chinese 
dynasty appears in dumb 
show (7). 

18 The frankness of a scan- 
dalous theatrical wife (7). 

19 Historically to outlaw a race 
isn't common (7). 

20 Alter look of cathedral city 
erected after the others (7). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17,223 





Concise Crossword page 14 


Mills, Burton Latimer, Ket- 
tering, 11. 15; and opens the new 
Management Centre at Tresham 
College, Kettering, 12.30. 

The Duchess of Kent, Patron, 
attends the annual Christmas 
party of the Not Forgotten 
Association at the Royal Mews, 
Buckingham Palace, 31 

Prince and Princess Michael 
of Kent attends SPARKS Char- 
ity Ball at the Hilton hotel, 7.45. 

Exhibitions 

On A Small Scale: contem- 
porary British ceramics; the 
Open Eye Gallery, 75 Cumber- 
land St, Edinburgh: 10 to 6, Sat 
10 to 4 (ends Dec 24). 

Christmas exhibition of Chil- 
dren's paintings; Falmouth Art 
Gallery, The Moor. Falmouth; 
10 to 1, 2 to 4.30 Mon-Fri. 

Conceptual Gothing: work of 
23 dotbes designers; Ikon Gal- 
lery, 58-72 John Bright St, 
Bir mingham ; Tue-Sat 10 to 6. 

Modern Swedish Craft: metal 
work, glass and pottery, fabric 
printing; together with Bjorn 
Wiinblad - designed theatrical 
posters; MacRobert Arts Centre, 
University of Stirling, Stirfiog 

Music 

Lunchtime concert: a Christ- 
mas miscellany; the Usher Gal- 
lery, Lindum Rd, Lincoln; I. 

Northern Chamber Orchestra 
concert; Municipal Hall, Colne; 
7J0. 

Reading University Orches- 
tra: Weber, Nicola Lefanu and 
Brahms concert; the Great HalL 
London Rd, Reading; 7 JO. 

Bournemouth Symphony Or- 
chestra perform Dvorak’s New 
World Symphony, the Guild- 
hall, Portsmouth; 7J0. 

Music at Oxford Series: The 
English Concert play Vivaldi’s 
Gloria; Sheklonian Theatre, 
Oxford; 8. 

Organ redial by Andrew 
Goodwin; Bangor Cathedral 
Bangor, 1.15. 

Talks 

The coal industry after the 
miners' strike: discussion with 
Mr Huw Beynon and Dr Ray 
Hudson of Durham University, 
Mr William Etherington, NUM 
executive, and Prof Ian Fells, 
Newcastle University; Room 
142, El vet Riverside. Durham 
University, Durham; 5.15- 

Innocent m and Popular 
Religion in Rome: Miss Brenda 
Bolton, senior lecturer. West- 
field College, University of 
London; University of Edin- 
burgh, William Robertson 
ding, George Square, Edin- 
burgh; 4.15. 

Miriam Stead/Egyptian gods in 
the Graeco-Roman worm; Brit- 
ish Musenm, Great Russell 
Street, WCI; 1.15pm. 

Scottish paintings (3); Tate 
Gallery Lecture Room; 1pm. 

Francois Ewald/French phil- 
osophy; In5titat Francois, 17 
Queensberry Place, SWI; 
6.30pm. 

General 

Pantomime “Jack and the 
Beanstalk' 1 ; Town Hall Haw- 
ick: 7.30. 

Second-year drama students 
present Hood Wedding; Robor- 
ough Drama Studio, Exeter 
University, Exeter, 7 JO. 


TV top ten 


National top tan WnMn [ 
the week i 

B8C1 

1 EastEndeis (Tues/Sun) 23- 45m 

2 EastEndera (Thurs/Sun) 23.15m 

3 News. Sport and. weather (Sat 
2053)17^ 

4 The Royal Variety f Wormenoe 
1720m 

5 Just Good Friends 15.35m 

6 Brush Strokos 12.90m __ 

7 By Royal Command 12L6Qm 

8 Twenty Years of the Two Ronnies 
1255m 

9 No Ptace Like Home 1125m 
10 BJankety Blank 1Q50m 

I7V 

1 BM Date LWT 17.26m 

2 Coronation Street (Wad) Granada 

16.60m 

3 Coro nat ion Street (Mon) Granada 
16.45m 

4 Jaws 2 ITV 1425m 

5 The Meant fTV 13.70m 

6 TWa Is Your Ufa Thames 1345m 

7 Bulseye Central 13£0m 

8 Cro s s r oads (Turn) Central 12.45m 

9 7Tib Benny Ha Show Thames 
1235m 

10 Strike H Lucky Thames 1225m 


BBC2 


1 Victoria Wood - As Seen On Tv 
8.55m 

2 CooMt 7.25m 

3 Foxes 4.90m 

4 Kes 4.75m 

5 Entertainment USA 4.60m 

6 Nurses 4 _ 55 m 

7 Star Trek 4J50m 

8 Just Another Day4_3Sm 

9 No Lirafla (Tucs/Sun) 4.00m 

10 International Snooker [Sat 16*0) 
4JXhn 

Charnel 4 

1 BrookSidO (Mon/Sat) 6.40m 

2 Brookabe (Tues/SatJ6.2(>n 

3 Hardhat and Legs 470m 

4 FIST 3.75m 

5 American FootbaU 3^30m 

6 Ounce in A MHon 3.10m 

7 Hotel Paradteo 3.10m 

8 Countdown (Tuee) 2^0m 

9 WbraelGummidge 2.75m 
10 The Wattons 2.75 


The pound 


AuafcafiaS 
Austria Sch 
Belgian Fr 
CanadaS 

Denmark Kr 
FMaodMkk 

fir 

Dm 


HongKongS 
Ireland Pt 
Italy Lira 
Japan Yen 


21 41 
825 
2JK 
11.26 
7-45 
M3 
24)65 
235 
11-4 
14)99 
2070 


Norway Kr 11-2 

Portugal Esc 2S2 

South Africa Rd 34 

Spain Pta 1S9 

Sweden Kr 1027 

Switzerland Fr 2435 

USAS 1-435 

Yugoslavia Dor 820 

Rates tor smafl dsnominedon bank notes 
Bank PLC. 
travellers’ 
eurancy 


Bank 

Sees 

2.13 

I860 

584) 

1494 

1066 

64)5 

&2S 

2JB15 

218 

10-8 

i,m 

1950 

229 

3.16 

104) 

210 

3J3 

189 

9-72 

2355 

1-41S 

720 


Roads 


London and the South-east 
A3: Single fine traffic towards 
Esher on the New Maiden 
underpass. A234: Alternate lane 
working near Hayne road. 
A130: Lane restrictions on 
Barlow bypass. 

The Midlands: MS: Hard 
shoulder only open northbound 
betwen junctions 5 (Droitwich) 
and 6 (Worcester). No access 
northbound at junction 6. Ml: 
Peak time delays between junc- 
tions 15 (A508) and 16 (A45). 
Al: Delays northbound between 
Peterborough and Huntingdon. 

The North: Ml: Diversions 
because of major repairs be- 
tween junctions 31 (Worksop) 
and 33 (Rotherham). M61: Lane 
closures at Blacow Bridge, junc- 
tions M61/M6. 

Wales and West MS: ’ Lane 
restrictions northbound be- 
tween junctions 20 (B31 33) and 
21 (A3 70). A303: Delays on 
Marsh bypass between Honlton 
and II minster. A470: Delays at 
Nant Garw and Pontypridd 
between Cardiff and Trcharris. 

Scotland: Glasgow: Delays in 
Guhcart Road and between 
C&Jder Street and Bankhall 


Street. Edinburgh: Severe restr- 
ictions at mini roundabout on 
Market Street at COckbura. 
A720: Delays in Drumbrae 
Road South. 

Information supplied by the 
AA« 


Anniversaries 


Births: John Milton, London, 
1608. 

Deaths: Sir Anthony van 
Dyke, painter, London, 1641; 
Dame Edith Sitwell, London, 
1964; Karl Barth, theologian, 
Basle, 1968; Ralpil Bunche, 
diplomat, Nobel Prize laureate 
1950, New York, 1971. 


Parliament today 


Commons (2.30): Abolition of 
Domestic Rates Etc (Scotland) 
Bill, second reading. 

Lords (2.30): Criminal Justice 
(Scolalnd) Bill, second reading. 


( WEATHER A frontal trough will more quickly E across all regions. 

v — ^ In central and E England and E Scotland it will be sonny 

for a time before showery rain spreads from the W, dry clear weather wOi return 
later. In N Ireland and W Britain some rain is likely early followed by mainly dry 
bright weather and isolated showers. After a chilly start with a slight frost in some 
central and N regions, afternoon temperatHres will be about average for early 
December. 

Outlook for tomorrow and Thursday: Mostly dry and bright at first, more rain 
later, especially in N and W. Becoming mild in most regions. 


c 


HIGH TIDES 


TODAY AH 

London Bridge 72A 
Aberdeen 758 

AvomnooSi 1241 

Battnt 5.13 

Cardiff 1226 

Devoaport 11.50 

Oowr 4.38 

F a lmo u th 1120 

Gtaagow 6-36 

HarmcD 5.25 

Hothead 4.44 


La«i 

Liverpool 

Lowestoft 



Portland 

Port sm outh 

S hore ham 

Southampton 


Tees 

Wnm-on-Nze 



10.17 

.13 


Tide measured in metres: Tm*32808fL 


( A ROOSSBRiTRal ) 


Scartmro 

Brttflngtw 

Cramer 


Sim Rata 
hrs in 


20 

03 


Max 
C F 

- 7 45 dufl 

- 7 45 cloudy 

-• 9 48 rata 
SH 10 50 cloudy 

- 10 50 rein 
471 11 52 shower 
.03 11 S2 rata 
4)3 12 54 rata 
4M 12 54 rain 
JK 11 52 rata 

- 12 54 cloudy 
.03 12 54 cloudy 
.10 12 54 rata 
.06 13 55 dowdy 

- 12 54 shower 
.04 12 54 dnab 
-OB 12 54 shower 
.09 12 54 drtzzta 
-06 12 54 rata 
.01 12 54 dufl 
-02 12 54 drizzle 
m 12 54 dufl 

471 12 54 drizzle 


- 22 12 54 rata 


( LIGHTING-UPTIME ) 

London 422 pm to 725 am 

Bristol 4.32 pm to 7.34 am 
E dn fa u r gh 4-09 pm to 8.02 am 
lar 420 pm to 7.44 am 
> 4.50 pm to 7-40 am 



0.1 


CLASSIFIED 

01-481 4000 


NOON TODAY 


09 

02 


only as suppfed by Barclays 
Different rates ap| ’ ~ 
cheques and other 
business. 

Rato! Price mdn: 388-4 
London: The FT Index dosed 
1275J5. 


74) HI at 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 7.1S am, 7,30 am, and 
at 3 pm. 


Our address 


Information for Inclusion tn The 
Times Information servic e should be 
sent to: The Editor. TTtS. The Tunes. 
PO Bn 7, 1 Virginia Street. London. 
El 9XN. 



-<QM 


Monday-Samraay record your (UUy 
Portion® total. 

Ado these together to determine 
your weekly PorUoUo total. 

tf your lSat matches the published 
weekly dividend figure you have won 


outrt^it or a share of Ute prize money 
and must claim 


figure, you j 

slated for that week, 
your prize as Instructed t 

. _ How a ettkw 

wiw iw The 

MO I - 


You must have your 
when you telephone. 

U you .are unable to telephone 
so meone ctee can claim on your behalf 

but they must have your card and call 

e Times 



with yon 


The 


Portfolio claims Hr* 


. No .responsiMilty can be accented 
for failure to contact tne claims office 
for any reason within the slated 
hours. 

The above instructions are 


sUcabh* to both dally and 
dividend claims. 


me ap- 
vi eddy 


ErbamAbpt 

«dol{Ctri) 


13 55 rain 
13 55 cloudy 
12 54 rain 
12 54 rain 
9 48 rata 
9 48 rain 
9 48 rata 
11 52 rain 
.02 12 54 rein 
.14 9 48 rain • 



London 

. 

-02 

12 

54 



- 


11 

52 


NWn-TVM 

- 

M2 

6 

43 

rain 

NnHnghHin 

- 

- 

10 

50 

rain 

Angtottttv 

0.3 

-42 

10 

50 

rain 

Cardiff (Ctri) 


JIB! 

11 

52 

rain 

Cotayneoy 


.19 

* 

* 

rata 

Tenby 

AbaMam 


.07 

.01 

11 

7 

52 

45 

rain 

gate 

Edtaburah 


■05 

10 

50 

rein 

Eskdafemoir 


JXS 

7 

45 

rain 

Oregon 


.60 

9 

48 

rata 



412 

10 

50 

rata 



.85 

8 

48 

rata 


- 

.50 

ID 

50 

shower 


04 

.56 

10 

50 

shower 

Tinso 

12 

■M 

9 

48 

shower 

Wck 

m 

.03 

9 

48 

rata 

BoHast 

- 

.18 

9 

48 

rata 





c 

ABROAD 

) 


WWOAYtc. cloud; 0, drizzle; t, Mr, tg. tog; r. rain: S. sun; sn, snoer L thunder - 

s i!ig%^ Hiss? d s i , Hgss* a 

17 63 Htete D 17 63 SPriNO" « V* 57 


Atertria 


C 18 64 Corfu 

M2 54 

MS 56 Rn 


( 28 82 Frankfurt 
I 12 54 


tssr 


Itat are Sunday’s figures 
•Figures not avaflatfe 


NEWSPAPERS UM1TTOD. 

Printed bv London' Rost (Print- 
ers) Limited or l Virginia Street. 
London Et 9XN and tar News 
Scot land ud- 194 Penman Street. 
Ktnntng Park. Glasgow 0*1 1EJ. 
Tuesday, December 9, 1986. Reg- 
istered as a newspaper -at the Post 
Office. 


C»peTh 


Chicago* 

Ctfchnch 


q -1 30 
c 4 39 
c 20 68 HongK 
r 15 59 tansErefc 
r 10 50 
C 11 52 

s 13 55 Jotairu* 
c -1 30 Karachi 
S 29 84 LPahnaa 
c 19 68 Lisbon 
s 23 73 Locarno 
f 21 70 L Angela* 
t 3 37 ' 
s 17 63 



7 45 UMb’imi 
5 17 63 Mexico C* 
f 16 81 — 
f 13 55 
S 10 50 
f 19 66 

^rilS? 
cMift&s 

N Yoric* 
c 10 50 Kce 
f 28 B2 Oslo 
C 22 72 Paris 
e 2B 82 Peking 
s 22 72 Perth 
f 15 59 
S 5 41 
f 17 63 

5 11 52 Kodej 
9 7 45 Riyadh 



' denotes Sunday’s figures are imf avataoki 


f 17 63 
s 18 68 81 
C 27 81 
S 8 46 
C -4 25 
s 19 -2, 
s 9 48 Sydney 
t 20 68 Tangier r is w 
9 16 61 Telariv s IB 64 
h 17 63 Tenerife 
1 6 43 Tokyo 3 12 54 
c 13 55 Toronto' r 1 34 
c 6 43 Tanb 3 18 61 
s 13 55 Valencia _ „ 

Vanc’m* c 2 3f 

r 22 72 Vanin * 7 45 

s 3 37 Mama „ 

I -1 30 Wdnerar S 2 36 

s 18 64 Wash Ion* f 9 « 

e 26 79 Worutou e 14 £ 

fc 17 83 Zurich Ifl 4 39 


' I 
i i 




DC:, 


Pro 



S5s> fc *=- 


HR " 

(./*! 

?■ ffWr 

S< -V>. 






V 


^ 

d eiyi ng « 
01 

e. kil'A 


. y .::4> 

: -' V .'* fiAl 

• V^; 


- ," :rj lE L*'l 

■ r, ;- 

' •••: •. K 

■ -v^sS 

■v ' ■' L 

- ' --,b 

. -'-tv. ‘i 

; •*: sM 

• ' .-Vfokto 

■; 

' i.v^ .$■ 

'- -_ r,i^ ■ V 

■ - V.v'i.' 4 ^ 


’ "■ j— * 


•:; *■ 



n .a 


m- 


V *** y 

p-' ‘‘‘ • -> 

.' . ' j 


iKJrttii i; 



business and finance 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 33 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 37 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 

STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 

1275.5 (+7.0) 

FT-SE 100 
. 1623.4 (+9.9) 

Bargains 

33250(29142) 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

1:4165 (-0.0125) 

W German mark 

2.8472 (-0.0051) 

Trade- weighted 

68.0 (- 0 . 1 ) 

Lynton 
agrees to 
£58m bid 

Property and Reversionary 1 
Investments and Lynton Hot- ! 
dings — both property com- 
panies — are to merge by an 
agreed offer of £58.9 million 
from P and R. This values 
Lynton’s shams at 433p each 
compared with a stated net 
asset value of 498p. 

P and R, itself tipped as a 
takeover candidate, is offering 
154 new shares for every 100 
Lynton shares in what is being 
seen as a defensive measure. 

The new company, Lynton 
Property & Reversionary, will 
have net tangible assets of 
31 6p per share, based on latest 
valuations of portfolios. 

The combined group wilQ 
have net assets of £1 50 million 
with 47 per cent, by value, of 
the mixed portfolio located in 
central London. Net annual 
rental income is put at £10 
million. 

Brewer leaps 

Pretax profits from Mat- 
thew Brown, the regional 
brewer, rose by 23 per cent to 
£10.1 million, including prop- 
erty sales, in the year to 
September. Turnover grew by 
5 per cent to £53.6 million. 
Earnings per share increased 
from 212p to 29. Ip. A final 
dividend of 1 Ip was declared, 
making 14p for the year, an 
increase of 21 percent . 

' Tempos, page 22 


i nterim profits surge 76% to £87m I Cambrian knew of Boesky/SEC link 


In defence c 
Pilkington 



Pilkington 
world's tore 


Brothers, 


~ Greenall joy 


Pretax profits rose from 
£30.7 million to £35.3 million 
at GreenaO Whitley in the year 
to end-September. A final 
dividend for limited voting 
ordinary shareholders of 3.2p 
was declared, making 5.5p for 
the year. For ordinary A 
shareholders, a dividend of 
0.64p was declared, making 
Up for the year. 

Tempos, page 22 

Dobson jumps 

Dobson Park Industries, the 
engineering group, saw pretax 
profits jump 29 per cent to 
£1 !_2 million for the year to 
September 27, on turnover np 
7 per cent to £2 1 8 million. The 
dividend was unchanged at 
5.21p net 

Tempos, page 22 

Profits rise 

Wolverhampton & Dudley 
Breweries’ pretax profits rose 
from £15.4 million to £18.7 
million in the year to the end 
of September. Turnover was 
up by 9 per cent to fllii 
million. Tempos, page 22 

‘Cut tax’ call 

The top rate of income tax 
should be cut from 60 to 40 
per cent in the next Budget, 
according to the free market 
Adam Smith Institute. 

Tempos 22 Foreign Em* 24 
WaUStteet 22 Traded Opte 24 
Co News 22 SfeirePncw 25 
Comment 23 Umt Togs 26 
Stock Market 23 Commodities 26 
Money Mrfcts 24 USM Prices 26 


BTR. yesterday fired the first 
shot in its counter-attack. 

Mr Antony Pinrington, the 
chairman, unveiled an in- 
crease m interim profits of 76 
per cent to £87 million and 
promised shareholders a 30 
per cent rise in Urn half-time 
dividend. 

The tone and content of the 
figures and accompanying 
comments were confident and 
bullish about the immediate 
future. Yet Mr PfUdogion 
stressed that the profits were 
’ in no way boosted by the need 
to put up a strong defence 
against a company whose 
chairman, Sir Owen Green, is 
recognized as one of Britain’s 
most successful takeover cam- 
paigners. 

The news from Mr Pil- 
kington matched the highest 
expectations of the City, 
which has been looking for 
strong recovery since the 

Steepest 
hotel bill 
in Beverly 
Hills 

From A Correspondent 
Los Angeles 

Mr Marvi n Da vis has found 
the Beverly Hflls power base 
he has been seeking by acqufr- 
ing the Beverly GGOs Hotel, 
Los Angeles, from the wife of 
Ivan Boesky., for abort $135 
million (£94 mflfiou). 

The deal will not be of- 
ficially announced until at 
least the middle of fo» week. 

Mr Davis^ an oilman from 
Denver, Colorado, and former 
chairman of 20th Centmy Fox, 
is expected to acquire further 
property in tire area. 

In September 1985, Mr 
Rupert Murdoch paid him 
$325 million in cash for his 50 
per cert share in Fox. 

The owners of the hotel are 
Mr Boesky’s wife, Seema, and 
Mrs Muriel Stopkin, her sis- 
ter, to whom she has not 
spoken for five years. 

Mrs Boesky owns 52 per 
cent of the Beverly HBQb 
C orporation and her sister, 
who is separated from her 
husband, Burton, owns tire 
other 48 per cenL 
Opening of the bids for the 
hotel took place behind dosed 
doors in New York, and the 

bidding was conducted by the 
property subsidiary of Morgan 
Stanley, tire investment bank. 

Mr Davis, whose father was 
an oil rigger from Lancashire, 
New Jersey, in April 1985, 
sold what was believed to be 
nearly all his producmg oil 
and gas weBs and his most 
promising ofl land for $180 
millio n. 

As be is expected to pay 
cash for his new hotel, busi- 
ness analysts fed that Mrs 
Boesky will be apprehensive 1 
that cash from the sale could 
become entangled in e xte ns i ve 
litigation generated' by the 
government's investigation of : 
ber husband's trading 

activities. 

This indicates that a for- 
mula will have to be found by 1 
ber — no doubt aided by her « 
husband's advice — to recent 
the money in snch a way that it 
will be free of any incum- 
brance created by these con- 
nected problems. 


By John Bell, City Editor 

group took tough action to tomorrow, Mr Pilkingion was 
restructure in the wake of the reluctant to give more than a i 
early 1980s recession. cursory impression of the 

Sales were up 58 per cent at future. 

£941 million and earnings per The figures showed that 
share woe no less than 235 BTR's bid was misconceived, 
pffcentaheaa. Licensing Mr Pilkington said. BTR had 
mcornre from overseas users of comparers group's peifor- 
Pdkrogtons pionrermg float manST unfavourably vdth its 
glass process rose from £12.9 own. But sales margins at 10.7 

J?? 111011 W* amDm per cent were almost identical 

Overseas trading profits sur- ^fo BTR’s. 

Mas J**** 

^^alLrouigpaformanoe, attempli " be said. Spending 

011 research and development 
the long-term vSw his 
group took towards planning 
would suffer. 

mg contributions from recent „ 
acquisitions, high product! v- revealed that the Stock 

ity and a slowdown in the Exchange was considering 
recent high level of redun- “tounting * fullrscale in- 
dancy costs. The impact of yesugatiot 1 into the sharp rise 
currency was marginal, adding Jd Pillangton s_share price 
£1.7 milli on to pretax profits. ‘ K ® re *“e BTR rad. 

With the group’s formal The interim dividend is to 
defence document to the BTR raised from 5p to 6.5p. 


By Lawrence Lever 

The board of Cambrian and 
i General Securities, the invest- 
ment trust formerly chaired 
and managed by Mr Ivan 
Boesky. has known, since 
August this year, that Mr 
Boesky was providing the 
American Securities and Ex- 
change Commission with 
information. 

Mr Boesky telephoned Mr 
Edward Davies, one of the 
Cambrian directors, in Au- 
gust, informing him that he 
had received a subpoena from 
the commission. 

“Mr Boesky told me he was 
just being required to provide 
information,” Mr Davies said - 
yesterday. 

Nevertheless, the non-exec- 


utive directors on the Cam- 
brian board formed an ad-hoc 
committee and instructed law- 
yen to investigate the po- 
sition. 

At a committee meeting in 
Paris on November 11. the 
lawyers reported there was no 
evidence of any wrongful trad- 
ing in Cambrian. 

Three days later, on Nov- 
ember 14, the SEC announced 
that Mr Boesky had agreed to 
pay a SICK) million (£70 
million) penalty for insider 
trading. 

“The announcement came 
asa complete surprise; we did 


According to a circular sent 
to shareholders over the week- 
end, Cambrian has delayed 
publication of its year-end 
accounts until h receives 
preliminary conclusions from 
accountants investigating 
whether Cambrian was used 
for insider dealing or noL 

The Cambrian board is 
concerned that the company 
coukl face large law suits if the 
accountants discover it has 
been used as a vehicle for Mr 
Boesky’s insider trading. 

The New York office ofPeat 
Marwick Mitchell is therefore 
investigating every trade car- 
ried out by Cambrian and its 


not believe for a moment that subsidiary, Farnsworth and 
any misdemeanour had occu- Hastings, since January 1985. 


ned," Mr Davies said- 


Most of the relevant records 


are kept at Mr Boesky’s New 
York office and Mr Boesky is 
complying with requests for 
documents from the in- 
vestigating accounts ms. 

Mr Davies said the Cam- 
brian board intends to pro- 
pose winding up the trust, 
although a final decision on 
this would again have to await 
the accountants’ report. 

As an interim measure, 
Cambrian has appointed new 
managers with instructions to 
reduce debt and move away 
from risk arbitrage activities. 

It is therefore repaying $67 
milli on of junk-bond financ- 
ing arranged by Drexel 
Burnham Lambert in Decem- 
ber 1984. 


takeover expected to be posted 


Comment, page 23 


France hikes 
interest rates 



By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 

The Bank of France acted markets took a more relaxed 
sterday to head off pressure view of the Reagan 


on the franc by raising short- Administration’s difficulties 
term interest rates by a point, over the Iranian arms scandal. 


The move, with the dollar’s 
revival the mark, ap- 


and as more optimistic assess- 
ments of US economic pres- 


to have averted pressure pects appeared on Wall Street 


for a realignment within die 
European Monetary System. 
The pressure on the franc 


This was despite the fret 
that West German money 
supply figures showed an 


arose from the . escalation of acceleration in November, 
the Paris riots over the week- The central bank money stock 


end. The Bank of France was growing at a 7.9 per cent 
raised its seven-day money rate tost month, compared 
market interest jrt® from 75 with the official 35 to 5.5 per 
to 8.5 per cent- cent target ra ng e. 

This succeeded in propping frn E r ^ e ?yiJ? , Q^ 
np the franc. At the dose homDMTy960 to DM2.01 
yesterday the franc was at yesterday. The poundwas also 

DM327<50, near the centre of ITfegM 

its kms hand. !?*• feUfog by 1.25 cents to 


its EMS band. 

Dealers said that the French 
were helped by the frill of the 
mark against the dollar. Re- 
cent dollar weakness has pro- 
duced a disproportionately 


$1.4165. The sterling index 
slipped by 0.1 to 68.0. 

The move by the French 
authorities should succeed in 
holding off pressure for an 
EMS realignment until well 


ened EMS pannes, last re- ^ m0nth , according to Mr 
aligned m ApnL David Morrison, currency 

The dollar yesterday rose economist at Goldman Sachs. 
a gainsT an currencies, as the Comment, pa ge 23 


Sharp increase in 
industrial costs 

By Onr Economics Correspondent 

Industry’s costs rose sharply The rise was mainly because 
last month as a result of the of the onset of winter electric- 
lower pound and higher en- ity tariffs for industry, al- 
ergy charges. But there was though higher food prices also 
only a small increase in played a part. 

"oSte^Sp^ed^- r Fmal Oaob er recril sales 

today staSedltetSylte 
and consumer credit main- 

mjncd^earlier strong levels in SE&SIKtoi 

12^2.(1980 = 100) in both 


British Gas chairman Sir Denis Rooke (left) with Peter Walker, the Energy Secretary, at the Stock Exchange yesterday 

February | Sid’s quids in: early 20p 
tooJffier premium for gas shares 

Bv Richard Thomson By Richard Lander stage the SEAQ screen trading British institutions are pre 

Banking Correspondent ; n m. hrv.flv SyS ^ m - show,rtg a 10 x]] above 65? " 

* Shares in British Gas briefly wardauon. w , . ,, ■ . ■.rkel- * c r v- r L-«r-' 1 ar. 

The case of alleged insider touched a 20p premium, as maker offerin'. ... "p «arhsrr.-*-r 

dealing by Mr Geoffrey Col- predicted in The Times, when below whai an . •. - is A _ e .' .. ,/T 

Her will go before Wimbledon trading in the £5.6 billion prepared to :> siren' »r '-V.-- 

magistrates' court on Feb- issue got off to a record- However. *' • h. T • "• h- 

ruary 23, the Departinent of breaking start on the Stock itself stood u r ,n iK - ■ '.i nmionsnriulHT 

Me and Industry said Bmtange ycsierday after- biggest iralsinceU.-. . ute^mmiiu Sn boif pul ant 

yesterday. noon. rated in October on b:g Bang ra n on tinn« frii shamiv Iron 

Mr Collier, a former dime- About 478 million shares, day. imtial S/ootSd hv mm 

lor of Morgan Grenfell Securi- equi valent to 12 per cent of As the market sorted itself iret-makens posiea y 

ties, has been the subject of a the 4 billion shares sold by the out prices eased from their 

DTI inquiry. Government changed hands highs to steady at 64&p after . ™ J 0 " 0 Royden, an op 

The department said that in the first hour and by 5.30 the first hour and end at 62V^p. tions trader at Gnevesoi 

although charges were already approximately 779 million Shares were dealt down to Wip stockbroker, said 

being brought against Mr Col- shares, worth about £500 mil- levels, indicaring heavy busi- “Options are usually priced or 
lier, the inquiry was continu- lion,, had been -traded. The ness between market- make rs P 35 * volatility of share price* 
ing and there was no date for previous record number of trying to turn over large blocks ^d,^ of course, there _wai 
when it was expected to be shares traded in one day in all of shares at slim margins. nothing to go on with British 
concluded. equities was 520 million on “There were some silly peo- Gas. The market-makers took 

Under the terms of the November 14. pie who took the share up to a Egress and got it slighUj 

inquiry the two inspectors After opening at 63p, the 70p but it now seems in- WTOn 8- 

were asked to investigate deal- 50p partly-paid shares touch- sutoted between 6 Op and 65p,” The FT 30-share index will 

ings by Mr Collier “and/or ed their peak within the first said Ms Sue Graham, energy be taking in British Gas from 
persons associated with him.” few minutes with a very large analyst at Merrill Lynch, the today using last night's close 
The charges against Mr block of 9.9 million shares stockbroker. “For foreign as the base leveL The index 
Collier relate to his alleged being dealt at 70p. Trading investors, the shares are cheap will drop Vickers to accom- 
deajings in shares of AE, the was so confused that at oue anywhere below 60p while modate British Gas. 

engineering company, shortly 

before one of Morgan Gren- 
fell's clients made a bid for the 

firm. 


By Richard Lander 

Shares in British Gas briefly 
touched a 2 Op premium, as 
predicted in The Times, when 
trading in the £5.6 billion 
issue got off to a record- 
breaking start on the Stock 
Exchange yesterday after- 
noon. 

About 478 million shares, 
equivalent to 12 per cent of 
the 4 billion shares sold by the 
Government, changed bands 
in the first hour and by 5.30 
approximately 779 million 
shares, worth about £500 mil- 
lion, had been traded. The 
previous record number of 
shares traded in one day in all 
equities was 520 milli on on 
November 14. 

After opening at 63p, the 
50p partly-paid shares touch- 
ed their peak within the first 
few minutes with a very large 
block of 9.9 million shares 
being dealt at 70p. Trading 
was so confused that at one 


stage the SEAQ screen trading 
system was showing a back- 
wardation. w."- . • Act- 

maker offerin'. ... ' 'p 
below whai an .-.r . . • is 

prepared to C--. :r 

However. »' ■ 
itself stood i. r 
biggest lest since i/t 
rated in October on tig Bamg 
day. 

As the market sorted itself 
out, prices eased from their 
highs to steady at 64Vip after 
the first hour arid end at 6216p. 
Shares were dealt down to ftp 
levels, indicating heavy busi- 
ness between market-makers 
trying to turn over large blocks 
of shares at slim margins. 

“There were some silly peo- 
ple who took the share up to 
70p but it now seems in- 
sulated between 6 Op and 65p,” 
said Ms Sue Graham, energy 
analyst at Merrill Lynch, the 
stockbroker. “For foreign 
investors, the shares are cheap 
anywhere below 60p while 


British institutions are pre- 
pared to sell above 65p." 

A spokesman f. ■ r . *■ 
Sachs, c^r.ver . . 

Amer.Ci'-, :r.». .. 

slrrr^r ra.rd :iv. W. 

Bl.- \ br.j:. 1 ;.' 

»n the v -u.*u options pit where 
the premiums on both pm ana 
call options fell sharply from 
initial levels posted by mar- 
ket-makers. 

Mr John Royden, an op- 
tions trader at Grieveson 
Grant, the stockbroker, said: 
"Options are usually priced on 
past volatility of share prices 
and, of course, there was 
nothing to go on with British 
Gas. The market-makers took 
a guess and got it slightly 
wrong.” 

The FT 30-share index will - 
be taking in British Gas from 
today using last night's close 
as the base leveL The index 
will drop Vickers to accom- 
modate British Gas. 


October. 

Manufactorers raw ma- months, with sales in the latest 

sysssfas 5“S£t‘— . 

a 1.5 per cent increase in v 3 
October. It was the fourth The value of sales in Oclo- 
successrve increase after more ber was £7.4 billion, 10 per 
than 12 months of consecutive cent np on the corresponding 
decline. period. 



\ '-•mum 

(Mm 



$■ >***;* 


V 


Geoffrey Collier: charges 



Piston maker is top Jaguar supplier 

Building a better ‘big c 





STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Dow Jonas 1914.65 (-10.41)’ 

ISSdow ..... 18710.68 (+105.77) 

Sydney: AO 1i37 - 7 

S SSSank ......2059.01+13-7) 

Paris; CAC- 

Zurich: SKA Gen ...- 562.20 (samaj 

Closing prices Page25 

INTEREST RATES 

London: Bank Base: 11% 

Pronto efigibteWfelO’ 4 ' 10 •«» 

U&^PTkT^Rate 7Vi% 

Federal Funds ^ 44% 

srsivr 

CURRENCIES i 


RISES: 

Glaxo 

Cakabmad 

Baker Perkins 

Restmor 

Macro 4 


Herrburgarl 

Uniever 


Bemrose Com. — 

BeatsonCtark 

Freemans 

©js ‘A’ 

Bubner&Lumb — 
Sanderson Muray .. 

Penfland 

Saatchl & Saatetk - 



FALLS: 

pSptomrslonary — 360p(-22p) 
Prices ate as at 4pm 
in SaturdaYa ana. the fal of 9p 
Z in Wold, not Rudolf 

Wolff 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 


L50 (£274.00- 


London: 

£ : $1.4165 
£: DM2.8472 
£: SwFr2J8H 
£ FFr9.3277 
£: Yan230.11 

£ index: 60.0 
ECU £0.729270 


New Yoric 
$: El .4200V. 

$: DM2.0095 ( 
S: SwFrl.6790 
$:FFr6^840. 

S: Yen 162.40 
S: Index: 11 141 
SDR £0.844214 


27450) 

SUJe V x°&75(W88JXr 


NORTH SEA OIL 


By Edward Townsend - 

Industrial Correspondent 

Hepworth & Grandage, a 
Yorkshire piston maker and 
AE subsidiary, was named 
yesterday by Jaguar Cars as its 
supplier of the year. 

The award, instituted by 
Jaguar a year ago to highlight 
the big improvements in qual- 
ity it was demanding from 
suppliers, was presented in 
London by Mr Giles Shaw, 
Minister of Stale for Industry. 

Forty-four “Pursuit of 
Excellence” awards - 20 per 
cent more than last year — 
were made to a range of 
companies big and small 
including four West German 
suppliers. 

All were judged by Jaguar 
on foe bass of value for 
money, continuity of supply 
and quality, with Hepworth & 
Grandage emerging at foe top. 
The AE subsidiary, which 
employs about 1,500 people at 
factories in Bradford and 
Sunderland, has supplied Jag- 
uar with pistons and rings for 
many years. 

Sir John Egan, the Jaguar 
chair man and chief executive 


ATI 




Ka4$s 


Ready for launch in the United States: the new Jaguar 


awarded a knighthood for his 
success at the helm of the 
privatized car company, said 
the present Government had 
given industry foe opportu- 
nity to show “what it is made 
or and to demonstrate that 
“in this world, only excellent 
products will survive”. 

He added that output of foe 
company’s latest product, foe 


Jaguar XJ40, bad hit initial 
difficulties but was now run- 
ning at 250 a week and was 
expected to rise to 350 a week 
by foe end of foe year, ready 
for launch in the vital United 
States market next year. Brit- 
ish and European dealers bad 
already sold out their first six 
to nine months’ allocation of 
foe new cars, he said. 


After Big Bang, which face 

will your stockbroker show you? 

Will it be the fece fhafs offering a genuine opinion—or the 
one thafs titinldngof its own book position? 

That's wby Sheppards have taken a positive decision to re- 
main a non-matfcet makei; and to continue to put otir clients first 

We want our clients to be able to trust the impartiality of our 
advice. We want our best people always to be available to them. 

And we want them to retain the anonymity that dealing through 
an agency broker guarantees. 

Which points to one very reassuring conclusion, amid the 
turmoil of Big Bang. ^ 

With Sheppards, you know who Stt pr}H3fflS 
you're dealing with. i , i 

No. 1 London Bridge, London SEl 9QU Telephone: 01-378 7000.Tde3cS88282. Fax: 01-378 7585. 

A Member ofThc 5lock Exchange. j 




- 22 BUSINESS AND FINAN 

Bulmer & Auin 
Lumb V i 11 
agrees bid 10DS J 


THF. TTMFS TITRSDAY DECEMBER 9 19B6 


By Alison Eadie 

Allied Textile, the cash-rich 
Huddersfield textile company, 
has made an agreed £11.6 
million cash bid for Bulmer & 
Lumb, the Bradford dyer and 
worsted spinner. 

Allied already owns a 3.6 
per cem stake and has accep- 
tances from directors and 
other shareholders of Bulmer 
for a further 25.3 per cent. 

Earlier this year, Allied 
made an unsuccessful £8 mil- 
lion bid for Berisfords, the 
ribbon maker. It reported 
pretax profits in the six 
months to the end of March of 
£3.1 million. 

Bulmer & Lumb sharehold- 
ers are being offered I35pcash 
for each share or 11 Allied 
shares for 23 Bulmer shares 
lor up to half their sharehold- 
ing. The partial share alter- 
native will result in the issue 
of up to 2.05 million new 
Allied shares, or 8.6 per cent of 
the enlarged equity. 

If the partial share alter- 
native is not folly taken up, 
shareholders wanting to take 
paper may opt for more than 
half their Bulmer share- 
holding. 


Council rates spiral ‘costs 
jobs and forces firms out’ 


TEMPUS 


Spiralling local authority rales on 
businesses are costing jobs and in some 
cases driving companies to move from 
high-rate areas, according to the Associ- 
ation of British Chambers of 
Commerce. 


The association, which is supporting 
government moves to bring in radical 
rates reforms, makes the claims in a 
study on business rates which has been 
sent to every MP. 


It lists a series of effects from rate rises 
which, in some cases, have approached 
or exceeded 50 per amt in the past two 
years. 


• About 678 Jobs have been lost at 
companies in Birmingham and Wolver- 


hampton. Birmingham rates on busi- 


By Derek Harm, Industrial Editor 

nesses have increased by 52 per cent 
over the past two years. 

• Various expansion projects, includ- 
ing a factory which would have created 
“many" newjobs, have been shelved or 
scrapped at Calderdale, west Yorkshire, 
in the wake of a two-year rates rise of 5 1 
percent. 

• Half the companies surveyed at 
Bolton expected the 23 per cent Bolton 
rates increase to result in job losses. A 
quarter were considering relocation and 
more than half expected to halt or delay 
expansion plans. 

• Merseyside Chamber of Commerce 
has warned Liverpool City Council that 
a threatened rate increase of more than 
40 per cent next year would have a 
“devastating effect on employment” 


• Rates bills for retailers in Edinburgh 
and Glasgow are 3Mt times higher than 
those in central London, being up to £71 
a square foot in Scotland and £20 at 
Knightsbridge, according to one survey. 

Most chambers of commerce support 
the idea of a uniform business rate, bux 
ABCC is looking for safeguards. It warns 
some derating, of about 10 per cent, so 
that a uniform rate would be set at the 
lower end of present scales. It also wants 
a uniform rate to be phased in over at 
least five years to ease the problems of 
areas where businesses would pay more. 

In addition, it seeks the immediate 
introduction of a nationwide ceiling on 
non-domestic rates to ease the burden 
on businesses while uniform rates are 
being considered and implemented 


Wolves brewery leads 
the regional pack 


Bid warning by Simon 


Simon Engineering, fighting 
a £173 million management 
buyin bid from Valuedale, 
claims that vital bonding 
(bank or insurance company 
guarantees on big contracts) 
and Exports Credit Guarantee 
Department cover will not be 
available if Valuedale wins. 


Simon said two leading 
British banks had confirmed 
— on the baas of Valuedale’s 
draft listing particulars — that 
they would be unable to 
supply bonding facilities, 
Simon shareholders would 
take the risk and Valuedale 
would reap the reward. 


Canberra ‘will not 
stop 9 Murdoch bid 


Yesterday was a field day for 
regional brewery enthusiasts. 
Tbev were able to compare 
the cxmseqneuces of the dif- 
ferent styles of management 

at Wolverhampton & Dudley 
and Greenall Whitley while 
Ki t in g Matthew Brown’s 
last days as an independent. 

The market made its pref- 
erences dear. Wolves' mares 
jumped -9p to S59p, the 
Matthew Brown price rose 2p 
to 607p w hile Greenall Whit- 
ley edged up 1.5p to 174.5p. 

All three are operating m 
difficult local markets. How- 
ever, Woivcrisampton & 
Dudley is the paragon among 
the regional* Although the 
Thompson family influence 
is stfll very apparent, it has 
not cramped Wolves’ style. 


SMALL BEER .-THREE 
REGIONAL BREWERS 


[Matthew Brown | 


□ 


RELATIVE 
TOFTA 
ALL SHARE 
INDEX 


GreantB WhtS*y 


Am; 


1 Weiwiampml 
& Dudley 1 


QATftSTHEAM 
r * - 196-1 


breath. It exceeded the profit 
forecast made during the bid 
last December and the out- 
look for this year looks good. 
However, armed with 29.9 
per cent of the equity and two 


The poliev ofbnflding up a Per cent or me eqm^iu 
network of manag ed pubs thwarted attempts behind it, 

scared to the young adult Scottish & Newcastle is d- 
gnuGu iv jy""* _ .. _ «rt « n tn hid when it is 


AMR 57* 

ASA 36* 

AMad Signal 42* 

AflfedStre 67* 

AfltaGHmra 2* 

Alcoa 34* 

Amaxhe 13 

Am-maHs 23 

An Brands 45* 

Am Can 87% 


Hrastona 
Est Chicago 


42* Fat bit Bmp 
66% FstPemC 
2% Fort 
35* FTWachva 
12% GAP Carp 
22% GTE Cap 
45% Gen Cap 


34% 35* 
13 12% 


AmCynm'd 
AmBPwT 29* 
Am Express 60* 
Am Hone 80 
Am Motors 3* 
Amsmrt 44 
AmTuteph 27* 
Amoco 65* 
Amico Start 5% 
Asarco 14* 
Ashland Ol 57% 

strmnnew Wi 

Avon Prods 30 
BkrsTstNY 45* 
Bankamer 14% 
Bk at Baton 41* 
Bank of NY 41% 
Betti Steel 4% 
Boeing 51% 
BsaCascde 63% 
Breton 49* 

BgWwrwr 39% 
Brtst Myers 80% 
BP 39* 

Burton hid 43* 
Button Ntn 60* 


45% 45% Gen Oon 
67% 66% GenDy'r 

83% 83% Gan EMC 

29% 29% Genlnst 


60% 60% 
80 80* 
3% 3% 

44 43% 

27% 27* 
65* 67* 
5% 5% 

14* 14% 

57% 57* 


Gan MU 
Gen Mams 


■ 28% 28% 

ago 32% 32* 

Jncp 54% 54% 

nC 9 9 Philips Pat 11 11% 

58* 58% Polaroid 71* 73% 

hva 38% 38% PPG bid 74% 75% 

rp 40 40% PrctrGmtal 78 79 

rp 59% 60% PbSEftG 41% 42* 

rp 81 83 Raytheon 68% 69 

ITKS 73% 74* RyrddsMat 41% 42% 

Ctric 86* 87* Rockwell W 43% 43% 

t 19% 19* Royal Dutch 91% S3* 

is 43 43% Samways nJa n/a 

ms 71% 71% Sara Lee 68* 68* 

23% 24 SFESopIC 33% 33 

3% 3% SchTtwroar 33% 34% 

39* 40% Scott Paper 65 68 

51* 54 Seagram 63% 64 

45* 44% Sears HOck 43% 44% 

42% 43% Sind Trans 54 54* 

18% 18* Singer 38% 39% 

53% 54 SnferBk 90% 90% 

25% 25 Sony 21% 21% 

33% 33 SttiCaJ Ed 35% 35% 

28 28% S-WstnBaa 114% 114% 

88% 70 StdOfl 48% 48 

43 42% Staring Dra 46% 47 

59* 50* Stevens JP 39 38% 

43% 44% Sai Comp 58 56 

66% 66% Tefadyne 319 317% 

25* 25% TemKD 38 38* 

60* B0* Texaco 34% 3S 

18% 16% Texas E Cor 30 X 30 

128% 128 Texas Inst 121* 122% 

12 12% Texas Utfls 33% 33% 

77% 79 Textron 65% 65% 

54% 55% TravIrsCor 44% 45 

50* 50% TRW Inc 93% 93% 

69% 69% UALbK 59% 60 

13% 13* UnUvarNV 227* 228% 

29* 29% UnCarfaide 23 23* 

87 88* UnPacCor 68% 66% 

48% 49% utd Brands 33 33% 

31* 31* USGCorp 41% 41% 

1% 1% Utd Techno* 44% 45% 

80* 81% USX Corp 21* 21% 

54% 53% Unocal 25* 25% 

34% 30% Jim Walter 48% 48 

47 47% WmerLmtt 58% 59* 

2% 2 Weis Fargo 106 107% 

59% 60% WstohseB 60* 51% 

47 47 Weyerh'ser 40 41* 

42* 42% Whirlpool 71% 71% 

27% 26* Wootworth 42% 43% 

63% 63% Xerox Corp 61% 61% 

76* 78% Zenith 20% 20% 


Pfizer 
Phelps Oge 


PttfpMre 

PiwpsPal 


GnPDUtny 23% 24 


Georgia Pac 39* 


59% 59% Grace 


29% GtAttSTac 25% 


Grind 33% 

GruroanGor 28 
Gutt&Mnt 68% 
Heinz HJ. 43 
Hercules 59* 

HTett-Pkrt 43% 


IcT" 

Ingareott 
Wand Steal 


Bunourtra n/a n/a 

CmpbebSp 62% 62% 
Can Pacific 12% 12% 
CBterpOer 40% 40% 

CtAmese 242 242 

Central SW 35* 36 
Champion 33* 33* 
Chase Man 37% 37% 
Chm BkNY 46 45% 

Chevron 45% 45% 
Chrysler 39% 40* 
Citicorp 54% 54% 

dark Equip 20% 20* 
Coca Cota 38* 38% 
Cdgata 44 44% 

CSS 134 134% 


C'bnbtaQas 44* 


CmbtnEng 32% 32% 
Comwfth Ed 33% 33% 


ComwtthEd 33% 
ConsEdte 47% 
Cn Nat Gas 33* 
Cons Power 18 


MCO 12 

bit Paper 77% 
intTami 54% 

Irving Bank 50* 
Jhnsn&Jhn 69% 
KaserAkan 13% 

Kerr McGee 9% 
Kmb'lyCMt 87 
KMart 48% 

Kroger 31* 
L-TV.Corp 1% 

Litton 80* 
Lockheed 54% 

Lucky Stra 34% 

Man H'nvar 47 
ManvOtaCp 2% 2 

Mapco 59% 60% 
Marine MU 47 47 

MrtMariOtte 42* 42% 
Masco 27% 26% 
McDonalds 63* 63% 

McOormel 76* 78% 
Mead 58* 56 
Merck 114* 115 
MinstaMng 114% 114% 


CnMOete 25% 
Corning Gl 57% 
CPCbte 77 
Crane 35* 
Curtiss Wrt 53* 
Dart8Kraft n/a 
Deere 24* 
Delta Air 49% 
Detroit Ed 18* 
Digital Eq 105% 
Disney 44% 
DowChem 61 
Dresser bid 19% 
Duke Power 48% 
DuPont 89% 


33% McDonal 
48* McOonn 
33% Mead 
16% Merck 
26 MinstaM 
58% MoWOi 


Blue chips 
gain 
ground 


New York (Agencies) — 
Shares wore mixed in early 
trading yesterday, with the 
Dow Jones industrial average 
rising by three points to 

1.923.06. Blue chips, which 
led the market to a fresh 
record last week, managed to 
gain some ground, but the 
broader market continued the j 
orderly consolidation which 
started last Wednesday. 

Declining shares out- 
numbered rising ones by seven 
to five on a volume of 28 
million shares. Carter Hawley 
Hale was up by Vh to 56%, 
while Martin Marietta slipped 
1V4 to 41. 

On Friday, the industrial 
average dropped by 14i2 to 

2.925.06. 

Amoco fell by 1 to 64% 
yesterday on a volume of 


Eastern Ab- n/a 
Estm Kodak 66% 
Eaton Corp 76* 
Emerson B 90% 
Exxon Corp 69% 


105% 106% 
44% 44* 
61 81% 
19% 19% 
48% 49* 
88% 90% 


Mogan JJ». 

Motorola 

NCR Carp 

NLbKtetrs 

Nat Distirs 

Nat Mad Ent 

NatSmcndt 

Nortofc ah 

NWBancrp 

OcodntPai 

Ogden 

OuiCorp 

Owens-Ill 

PacGaaEI 

Pan Am 


CANADIAN PRICES 

AgncoEag 26% 28* 
Ann Alum 40% 41% 


AlgomaSU 11% 
Can Pacific 17% 
Comineo 13* 
ConBathrst 28% 
hkr/SWCan 25% 
HdsnBMbi 23 


imperial 01 
InPtae 
Ryl Trustee 


Penney J.C. 81% 


Start Co 19% 
ThmsnN'A* 30 
VartyCorp 258 


26* 28* 
40% 41* 
11 % 11 % 
17% 17% 
13* 13% 
28% 29 
25% 26% 
23 23* 

32% 33% 
47% 47% 
39 38* 

28% 28% 
87% 88% 
19% 19% 

30 29% 
288 270 
12% 13 

31 31 


the company bad with oil 
analysts last Friday. At the 
meeting, Amoco officials 
reportedly told investors that 
its domestic reserves could fall 
by 5 per cent this year and that 
oil production could decline by 
5 to 7 per cent next year. 

Arden Medical Systems has 
agreed to be purchased by 
Johnson & Johnson for $24.4 
million (£17.1 million) in cash 
or about $442 a share. 

US Air Group, which has 
agreed to acqnire Pacific 
Southwest Airlines for $17 a 
share, said that under labour 
agreements. Pacific’s employ- 
ees have 'foe right of first, 
refusal to acquire Pacific 
shares at die same price. The 
intention of exercising this 
right must be given within 60 
days. 


Canberra (Reuter) - The 
Australian government will 
not intervene in Mr Rupert 
Murdoch's takeover bid for 
the country’s largest news- 
paper group, despite a senior 
minister's objections, govern- 
ment sources said yesterday. 

The cabinet agreed that it 
had no constitutional power 
to stop the bid by Mr 
Murdoch's News Corporation 
for the Herald and Weekly 
Times group. 

Mr Bill Hayden, the foreign 
minister, had called for an 
official inquiry into the 
Aus$1.8 billion (£818 million) 
offer. 

News Corporation would 
have a newspaper monopoly 
in three cities and control of 
large newspapers La every 
stale capital, Mr Hayden said. 

But the cabinet was told that 
the only official check on the 
takeover was a review by the 
Trade Practices Commission 
into News Corporation's mar- 
ket dominance, which could 
result from the bid. 

The TPC could ask Mr 
Murdoch to sell newspapers in 
some markets, such as Bris- 
bane, Perth and Adelaide, 
where the takeover would give 
him ownership of all daily 
newspapers. 

The commission will an- 
nounce its recommendations 
within 10 days, a TPC spokes- 


• ‘ ? rate 



Bill Hayden: calls for 
official inquiry rejected 

man said. If Mr Murdoch 
resisted the TPC proposals, 
the commission could stop the 
takeover in the courts, he! 
added. 1 

Speculation is continuing i 
over a possible counter-bid by 
Mr Robert Holmes & Court, 
the Perth entrepreneur who 
met H&WT executives in 
Melbourne last week. 

But neither Mr Holmes & 
Court, nor Mr Ron Brierley, 
the New Zealand financier 
who holds 11.6 per cent of 
H&WT, has stated his in- 
tentions. 

H&WFs share price closed 
at Aus$I2.80 yesterday, com- 
pared with a price ofAns$8-30 
when Mr Murdoch made his 
Aus$12 a share bid. 


Conditions ‘are ripe for 
destroying the Cap’ 


By Richard Lander 

Conditions in world food disposal fells further and for- 


wMe concentrating cm the 

establishment of good quality 

brands is paying off. The 
group has resisted the tem- 
ptation to diversify and has 
maintained its quality of 
earnings. 

Having grown organically 
rather than by acquisition, 
Wolverhampton & Dudley 
has not issued any shares 
since 1890. Now, with gear- 
ing at less than 2 per cent. 
Wolves may begin to live up 
to rts name and become more 
aggressive in the mar- 
ketplace. 

It would, for instance, 
make sense to make a bid for 
the muds bigger but arguably 
less successful Greenall Whit- 
ley. However, the latter’s 
voting structure protects it 

The market’s perception of 
GreenaH Whitley is poor. The 
products are not considered 
to be of adequate quality to 
hold their own in a non-tied 
house environment while the 
diversification policy has not 
been well received. The price 
recently paid for Davenports 
has not helped matters since 
ft has diluted earnings. 

Admfttedly, more than 
three quarters of the group's 
earnings now comes from 
retail activities and its record 
on acquisitions is not un- 
satisfactory, but it may take 
some time mid some dra- 
matic action for the shares to 
be rerated- In the meantime 
they remain a doll invest- 
ment even taking into ac- 
count the low price-earnings 
ratio. 

Speculators are watching 
Matthew Brown with baited 


most certain to bid when it is 
unleashed on Friday. 

This regional is well run 


duced interest costs, more 
than offset declines in 
profitability in the power 
tools and engineering di- 
visions. Pretax profits jump- 
ed 29 per cent to £11.2 
million in the year to Septem- 
ber 27. 

Power tools had a difficult 
year when profits halved to 
£1 million. After a fair 


and has a respected range of amount of rationalization, 
products including its own profits in the present fiaan- 


lager. However, it is difficult 
to justify the present rating 
on trading grounds alone. 
- Sco ttish & Newcastle may be 
lucky third time around, but 
one suspects it will pay up 
and may regret the con- 
sequences. Toe market is 


rial year should return to 
1985 levels of about £2 
million. 

Profits in the engineering 
division suffered from the 
inclusion of losses from the 
Australian subsidiary, which 
has now been closed. Much of 


suggesting a takeout (nice of the rest of this division 
more than 700p. On next comprises manufacture of 


year’s prospective earnings 
this is expensive. 

Wolverhampton & Dudley 
is dearly the pick of the 
bunch. John Dunsmore of 
the stockbroker Wood 
Mackenzie is forecasting pre- 
tax profits of £21.5 million 
excluding property (earnings 
per share of 42. Sp). Admit- 


toys, demand for which was 
buoyant. 

But foe key to fixture profits 
lies is foe outlook for mining 
engineering which, in 1986, 
accounted for more than 71 
per cent of turnover and 75 


per cent of profit 
British Goal still accounts 


- _ . . . . for half foe group's mining 

tedly, tiwratmgishu* but equipment oifcWwhSe 


foe record and potential jus- fo^ not Seas 

this. There is littte , m ^ 1 


Wolves’ way to prevent it m 

going from strength to . Overseas orders are stead- 
anmgth. ter and good performances 

elsewhere m foe group, to- 
n„ 1 , aether with the absence of 

LlObSOIl rark rationalization costs, will 

- — “ — — more than offset foe down- 

Indus tries turn in British mining equip- 

— — — — — . ment Pretax profit should 

The end of the miners strike rise modestly *hic year to 


Dobson Park 
Industries 


was the signal for Dobson about £12 million. 


Park Industries, the engineer- The group balance sheet 


ing group, to heave a sigh of has strengthened markedly, 
relief « , ... 


After the strike, British 
Coal was able to step up the 
level of mining equipment 
orders and 1986 proved a 
buoyant year fin - the indnstiy. 

A 33 per cent jump m 
Dobson Fork's mining equip- 
ment profits, and much re- 


Dobson is now looking for 
taxgets in specialist engineer- 
ing ni ches. 

Meanwhile, investors have 
the comfort of a 7.7 per cent 
yield. But once they go ex- 
dividend, ft could be a dull 
market for the shares. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


11 . 00 % 

Adam & Company 11.00% 

BCQ 11.00% 

Citibank Sawngst 12.45% 

Consolidated Crds 11.00% 

Co-operative Bank 11.00% 

a Hoare & Co 11.00% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai! 1.00% 

LloytJs Bank 11.00% 

Nat Westminster .11.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotiand11.0Q% 

TSB 11.00% 

Citibank NA 11.00% 


Citibank, NJL 

fs pleased to announce that 

Daniel J L Britt 

has been named 
European Head 
for the Leveraged Capital Group 


trade are ideal fra* trying to 
destroy the Common Agri- 
cultural Policy’s (Cap) system 
of huge surpluses and sub- 
sidies to help sell farm exports 
outside the European Comm- 
unity, according to the Econo- 
mist Intelligence Unit 

In its preview of food, 
feedstufis and beverages in 
1987, the EIU said the United 
States has increased foe finan- 
cial pressure on the Cap by 
cutting loan rates to drive 
down the wheat price and by, 
overseeing a substantial fell in 
the dollar. 

“This has a devastating 
effect on the finances of the 
Cap, since in ECU terms the 
amount realized from surplus 


ther short of the EC’s guar- 
anteed domestic prices,” foe 
unit said. 

The report is generally 
glootoy on foe outlook for 


• PICT PETROLEUM: Fig- 
ures in £000 for the year to June 
30. No dividend. Turnover was 
2334 (2.443), profit on oil and 


foodstuff prices, particularly eas trading was 695 (1,169) and 
for foe main cereals. Pressure las per share was 37.4 p. 


on wheat prices has been 
increased by foe prospect of a 
strong Russian crop on top of 
continued oversupply and 


strong competition. 

Prices of about $90 (£63) a 
tonne fob - less than half foe 
rate six years ago — could fell 
by a further $5 next year. 


Foss per share was 37.4 p. 
Earnings per share were 7J?p. 

• BBB DESIGN GROUPS No 
imerim dividend. A combined 
interim and final win be paid in 
August Figures in £000 for six 


share basic 5.8p (4), fully diluted 
5.3p (3.6). The directors say that 
the level of activity within the 
group is “most encouraging” 
and augurs well for further 
growth. The extraordinary 
credit represents the net surplus 
on the sale of a freehold 
property and the excess of an 
insurance claim no longer re- 
quired. The results of the newty- 


Soaring Evode 
buys Supra 
for £14.4m 

By Onr City Staff 


months to October 31 (compari- .acquired Powerscrecn 
sons adjusSTrumo^er U89 companies have been included 


(906). pretax profit 342 (240), 
tax 120 (84), earnings per share 


World Commodity Outlook 
1987; Food, Feedstitffs and 
Beverages: The Economist 
Intelligence Unit, £75. 


2.68p (1.88). The results are on a 
pro forma basis as the business 


Glut hits peanut trade 


I nn o w tfw ImneHnq lor 
twm rt m jtnm armttonmmntShnmrmomttbuyoatm 


CWtenj^lUL 

330 Strong 

London WCZFt Wft Engtomf 


t Mortgage Base Rate. 


CmCORP<>CmBAN< 


Rotterdam (Reuter) — The 
extensive peanut trade based 
in Rotterdam has been caught 
wrong-footed by a sudden glut 
after hints of a shortage. 

Stocks are at a record level, 
while the price of peanuts, 
which had shot up to $1,750 
(£1,232) a tonne, has tumbled 
to a more usual $1,000 level 
_ Traders say prices started 
rising this summer after re- 
ports that the US crpp-was hit 
by bad weather. 


Rising prices and the pros- 
pect of a US shortfall before 
Christmas, when consump- 
tion soars, led to buying from 
other sources. But then it 
emerged fiiina and 

Argentina had good crops and 
that the US crop might not be 
as bad as expected. 


As the rally in peanut prices 
faltered, some players lost 
their nerve and sold out, 
sending prices into a spin. 


pro forma basis as the business 
of BBB was not incorporated 
within BBB Design Group until 
July 3. As a result, profits have 
been charged with salary costs 
which would have been incurred, 
if the business had been incor- 
porated within the company at 
May I. The company continues 
to seek new opportunities for 
ventures linked with the existing 
range of services, and the board 
is confident that the improve- 
ment in results will continue 
into the second half 
• BRITISH BENZOL; The 
directors recommend a divi- 
dend of not less than Ip per 
ordinary share for the year to 
March 31, 1987. Figures m £000 
for six months to September 30. 
Turnover 21,698 (21,148), pre- 
tax profit 3,875 (2,7021 tax 1 16 
(151), extraordinary item 348 
credit (329 debit), earnings per 


to give a more accurate reflec- 
tion of the enlarged group's 
overall operations. This should 
not overshadow the continuing 
progress being made by the 
original British Benzol com- 
panies! The board adds that the 
proposed resumption of divi- 
dends after a number of years 
underlines the confidence the 
directors have in the group's 
fixture. 


• HAY A ROBERTSON: Fig- 
ures in £s for the year to May 30. 
Nil dividend, turnover was 
228,389 (415,384), loss before 
tax and extramdinary items was 
11.177 (4.795 pft), tax was nil 
(nil) and loss per share was 
0.01 5p ( 0 . 006 p profit). 


Evode, the adhesives, paints 
and plastics company, yes- 
terday announced pretax prof- 
its 32 per cent higher at £3.7 
million in foe year to Septem- 
ber 27 and unveiled details of 
a £14.4 million agreed bid for 
Supra Group. 

Supra - manufactures and 
distributes motor compo- 
nents, noise control products 
and paints. It estimates its 
pretax profits in the year to 
November 30 at not less than 
£1.65 million. 

The terms of foe offer are 
three Evode shares for four 
Supra shares or a partial cash 
alternative at 85p a share for 
up to 25 per cent of shares 
held. Evode already has accep- 
tances from 52 per cent of 
Supra shareholders. 

Evode's final dividend was 
raised to 2.8 2p from 228p. 



Investors in Industry 
Group pic. 


Phone for latest prices or ask for our British 
Gas “How to Dear information sheet 
Open for dealing seven days this week. 
ALL DEALINGS' COMMISSION FREE. 


SIX MONTHS’ UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED RESULTS 


Group income 
Associated companies 
Income from operations 
Operating costs 
Profit before interest 
on borrowings 
Interest on borrowings 


THE PROFITABLE WAT 10 NIX BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE 


Choose the new luxury 2-litre Croma on 
Fiat company contract hire and: 

*You pay only 3 months advance rental, 
then a pre-planned monthly sum that could 
be as little as £258.56 + VAX 
5k No extra charges for scheduled servicing, 
repairs, replacement parts, or even road fund 
licence, so your company benefits from better 
forward budgeting. 

In the event of accident or malfunction, 
you’ll get rapid roadside assistance and a 
replacement vehicle after 24 hours - at no 
extra cost 

5fs And your company may benefit from cash- 
flow and tax advantages. 

Croma contract hire - designed to offer all 


the pleasure of driving a luxury car without the 
risks of ownership. To find out more, phone the 
Croma Fact Line on 0800 521581 or complete 
the coupon today. 


To: Fiat Information Service: Depi FLC 02 86, Freepost, 
RO. Box 39. Windsor, Berks. SL4 3BS. I would like to know 
mom about the profitable way to mix business with pleasure 

Mr/Mrs/Miss: 

Company: 

Address- 


Exceptional hem - 
issue expenses 
Net revenue 
Profits on realisation 
Provisions 
Profit before tax 
Estimated tax 
Profit after tax 
Extraordinary items 


6 months to 

Year to 

30 September 

31 March 

1986 

1985 

1986 

£ 000 

Zooo 

£ooo 

98.197 

96386 

196,775 

2,958 

2342 

3.795 

101,155 

98,928 

200370 

19.767 

17,644 

35367 

81388 

81284 

165303 

67.732 

70.462 

142,720 

13,656 

10322 

22.483 

4 

892 

2368 

13.652 

9330 

20;415 

28338 

13.492 

58,404 

9.981 

8324 

32,613 

32309 

14398 

46306 

9.643 

3377 

16,456 

22366 

11321 

29,750 

8.428 

(58) 

(40) 

30,994 

10.963 

29,710 


DIAL 100 FREEPHONE FINMAN 
01-925 0006 or Nottingham (0602) 476136 

IfMmJ-Is 


financial management services ltd. 

... *£*®F roff,mbra - 

3 ST JAMES’S SQUARE, LONDON SWL 



Rothschilds International 
Money Funds 


The efficient alternative to a deposit 
account in any major currency. 


A BETTER BUSINESS DECISION 


1- An iiueritndrrideiKi will be paid in reweer of rhe yrircnduiiiJI 
March 1987 ot'25p per chart- /2^83.493 (1985/ lib Zip per sUm 
l2J878jaS5}. 

Z The figum for the year ended 31 March 1986 are taken from 
accounts filed with t he Rcsjsnai of Companies and the . 
auditoiV report wunagiuIi£ed.Tbefigiiin for the sue 
month* ended 30 Septe m ber 1985 have bees adjusted ‘ . 
in accordance with accounting politic*, adopted in the ' . W H 
accounts for the year ended 3l March 1986, 

3. Extraordinary it e ms include £8^39/000 in respect of . v • •• .#• 
the surplus on ule of a subsidiary company 


For further information and the current prospectuses, 
please complete and rcium this coupon to: Robin Fuller, 
N M Rothschild Asset Management (C.I.) Limited. 
P.O. Box 242, St. Julian's Court. Si. Peter Port. Guernsey. 
Channel Islands. Telephone: Guernsey (0481 ) 26741 . 


Name 

Address 


Contract Hire only available far company purchasers al curl idoatjng dealers excluding Channel Islands .Joses Dec 3IsL 


INVtSTORSININDUSTRY GROUPpk.M WAT £H LOO BU.. LONlX)VlSEI8JlETEL^n-92« 782J 


nw 

^ NM ROTHSCHILD ASSET MANAGEMENT j 


mm 



r-v f ^ 


i.-\ J * t 


^ 4- 

t .? £ 

. ‘ fc 


:,, i; .‘1 

Kri-. •- ■ 

»tll;r._- -• 

N5’f v - 

PuL,^ : 

- 


* '•rap'". ■ 




-and 




THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


23 


9£LyRESAND 

OPTIONS 



contract 



the dust 

N ext week sees tfce de- 
mise of one of the 
more innovative fo- 
wres contracts to be launched 
m ^aon in recent years. The 
contract, in oil tanker freight 
rales, is dying for the 
reason that most futures con- 
tacts leave the boaids - 
insufficent trading volume. 

In doing so. however, it also 
hequMths some useful lessons 
* or the strategy teams at 
commodity exchanges which 
continually look for fresh 
ways of attracting business. 

It was launched by the 
Baltic International Freight 
Futures Exchange (Biffex) in 
February on the back of a 
similar contract in dry cargo 
futures. The concept under- 
lying Biffex was that ship- 
owners, charterers and their 
customers — such as grain 
houses and oil companies — 
could hedge the cost of 
transporting their goods. 

After all, Biffex’s propo- 
nents pointed out, traders on 
the high seas could hedge their 
currency costs and the prices 
of the goods themselves, so 
why not the cost of transport- 
ing them? 

Alas, such fine theory has 
not been seen to work well in 
practice. Although the dry 
cargo contract is finding its 
feet after a shaky start, interest 
in tanker futures been 
li mi ted, to say the least, with 
volume averaging just 30-40 
contracts a day. 

iffex officials are certain 
, where the blame lies 
and are annoyed that 
the oil and tanke r industries 
have given virtually no sup- 
port to the contract. They 
spoke of “a staggering tack of 
response” from tanker op- 
erators, despite having done a 
“tremendous araonnt of mar- 
ket research" before launching 
the contract. 

What really shocked Biffex 
was the response to a ques- 
tionnaire sent out to 400 
potential market-users before 
the decision to axe the con- 
tract was taken. 

Of those bothering to reply, 
only about 30 showed any 
enthusiasm about continuing 
to trade in the futures. Wisely, 
Biffex decided to call it a day, 
mainly because it had to pay 
substantial sums every year, 
thought to be tens of thou- 
sands of pounds, to calculate 
the index from a basket of 
nine route rates. 

Here was another problem 
which contributed to die 
index's downfall. Potential 
users had to hedge rates on 
one route against an average 
of nine, some of which could 
be subject to different forces of 
supply and demand. 


(STOCK MARKET) 



>ht futures was not one 
industry users could take 
board easily, especially 
n the marked fluctuations 
have hit the 03 price and 
various attempts by Opec 
store its grip, 
he industry took a long 
; to adapt to oil-product 
its (volume on the two 
contracts on the Inter- 
on al Petroleum Exchange 
linimal) and appears still 
e ill prepared for the more 
icate concept of freight 
res. As one broker pointed 
grain traders know feirly 
trately how much wheat 
will have to ship and 
n; for oil traders the 
itions are rather more 
plex. 

ichanges contemplating 
t contracts based on 
IficiaT indices also have 
sk themselves some of the 
itions that Biffex foiled to 

irstly, does the index pro- 
the industry user with a 
Lh while hedge against a 
ible risk? The explosive 

. ni. . ^.1 hoi 



:Uverable” contracts 
are settled in cash, 
ilariy in interest rates 
tock indices. But the 
sfol ones have ail fui- 
a need for the pro- 


the industry, an 

utures contract should 
ave some appeal to 
jots to provide extra 
The tanker index 
early baffled those who 
>thing to do with the 
ig world and little m- 
Sas seen beyond the 

s any comfort to 

jt alone in its feite 
a offbeat contract. 
ork, the Coffw. Sugar 

coa Exchange has bad * 

o-boper” on its bands 
T in its consumer pnee 
contract and g g 
ie d the launch of other 
on car output 
; starts, bolhofwmch 
gss than earth-shatter 

, sure the exchange 
v men could make a 

j^foraayof^ 

ts and mynad others, 
unce a contract in sun 

T niufM* 


20p gas shares premium 
gives boost to equities 


By Carol Leonard 

It was just like (3d times on 
the floor of the Stock Ex- 
change yesterday with a hand- 
ful of market-makers 
dozens of traders celebrating 
first dealings in British fix 
shares by returning, temporar- 
ily, to th eir old pitches. 

Of the 48 market-makers 
now in existence, five marked 
the occasion of Britain's big- 
gest-ever privatization — 
worth £3.6 billion — by return- 
ing to their old haunts in the 
Throgmorton Street building. 
Dealers made the most of the 
opportunity to deal once again 
on a foce-to-foce basis. 

Growing confidence about 
the likely size of the premium 
on the partly-paid SO p shares 
gave a boost to the entire 
market early on. The FT-SE 
100 index reached its highest 
level of the day one and a half 
hours before official dealings 
in British Gas began at 230 
pm, climbing by 13 points to 
1,6 26.5. But despite the pre- 


TIME PRODUCTS: 
looking for acquisitions 



mittm which came as a pleas- 
ant surprise to most investors, 
fluctuating between 13p and 
20p a share, the index eased 
back slightly to dose at 

1.623.4, a rise of 9.9. The FT 
30-share index gained 7.0 to 

1.275.5. 

All other trading was forced 
to take a back seat, but the 
renewed mood of confidence 
helped most leaden to gain 
some ground. 


Glaxo Jed the way, jumping 
by 23jp to 931p after its annual 
meeting. Analysts were en- 
couraged by news from the 
company that sales have ex- 


ALPHA STOCKS 


These prices are as at 6.45pm 


ISM 

Mgb Low Company 

[ 

BM 

•rtce 

Otter 

CVge 

dfe> 

peace 

YU 

% 

1 

p/e 

traded 

■000 

383 283 

AB Sd-Lyone 

300 

306 

• 


14J> 

4.8 

138 

793 

174 126 

ASQA-MR 

148 

152 



45 

30 

164 

1200 

483 264 

BTR 

285 

270 



9B 

3.7 

157 

1,100 

491 361 

BAT 

458 

483 



164 

40 

120 

459 

572 449 

Barcfeys 

473 

480 



28.1 

50 

60 

541 

B40 680 

BftflR 

718 

728 


46 

243 

34 

120 

304 

450 358 

Oeachu 

416 

421 

• 

46 

17.1 

4.1 

174 

551 

726 528 

Bkje OrcJe 

645 

6S0 



30J3 

40 

92 

83 

383 293 

BOC 

348 

352 


42 

154 

44 

13.7 

250 

288 170 

Boots 

227 

230 

• 

42 

105 

40 

140 

1,200 

606 423 

Br Aerospace 

483 

468 


-2 

2X4 

40 

102 

3000 

64<2 K'jBrGes 

81463 







709 530 

Br Petrotsum 

680 

683 


*4 

48 J6 

7.1 

7.4 

2400 

280 177*2 Br Tatocom 

194 

198 


+2 

10.7 

SO 

114 

3,700 

133 96 

Brttofl 

150 

IS! 


41 

93 

02 

41 

800 

354 2S6 

Burton 

264 

268 


44 

£L1 

ao 

149 

2200 

369 277 

Cafcto A Wireless 

315 

322 


42 

7 2 

23 

174 

1400 

196 158 

Cadxxy Schweppes 182 

185 


43 

6.7 

4.7 

210 

834 

564 426 

Coats VfyaMa 

444 

448 

• 

-2 

17.9 

40 

163 

251 

336 257 

Com Union 

281 

264 


+3 

17 j4 

BO 


1400 

704 409 

Cons Gokflelds 

653 

660 


48 

35.0 

53 

160 

1,100 

330 252 

Couiaith 

309 

312 

• 

-H 

102 

33 

106 

1,100 

290 201 

Dae Corp 

207 

212 


42 

103 

40 

170 

2200 

438 318 

Downs Gip 

330 

334 


+4 

43 

13 

230 

555 

050 408 

Hsons 

527 

532 

• 

+2 

&4 

io 

2SO 

883 

964 701 

Gan AccttM 

818 

825 

• 

43 

343 

42 

20-7 

356 

226 158 

G£C 

164 

168 


4-2 

63 

30 

103 

4400 

ir«756'2Gtexo 

920 

930 


425 

200 

22 

193 

1600 

481 328 

Grand Met 

453 

450 



135 

30 

153 

1300 

11*2 721 

GUS A 

10*a10*« 

• 

+*• 

an n 

20 

143 

353 

964 720 

ORE 

770 

777 

• 

+2 

425 

50 

224 

310 

385 235 

GKN 

289 

272 

• 


178 

60 

51 

527 

355 275 

Guinness 

283 

288 


-2 

103 

30 

108 

2300 

215*3141 

Hanson 

188 

190 


4-1 

5.7 

30 

160 

3300 

623 403 

Hawker Skid ey 

438 

444 

• 


21-4 

40 

9J 

172 

11%734 

Imp Cham tnt 

11 

»'• 



406 

44 

124 

921 

583 335 

Jaguar 

520 

52S 


+3 

1 2J 

24 

103 

1400 

3B1 312 

LadOrokB 

357 

362 



108 

4.7 

172 

191 

349 276 

Land SecorBes 

341 

344 

• 

43 

145 

43 

220 

596 

288 133 

Legal & Gen 

243 

248 


♦1 

123 

50 

313 

409 

484 2S3 

Uoyda 

425 

432 



2SM 

08 

50 

431 

283 183 

Lontoo 

226 

228 


-1 

17.1 

70 

112 

445 

231 183 

Marks ft Spencer 

183 

186 

• 

+3 

.58 

3.1 

221 

1600 

999 417 

Midland 

545 

552 


+2 

37.1 

60 

204 

12S 

533 428 

Net West- 

485 

490 


4-1 

- 27 A 

5.7 

51 

1400 

578 428 

P 4 0 DW 

502 

5 07 


-1 

2040 02 

146 

770 

603 383 

Pearson 

575 

580 



154 

22 

193 

51 

601 311 

PUdngtao Bros 

BIS 820 


43 

193 

3.1 

164 

1600 

246 182 

Planay 

174 

178 


43 

7.2 

4.1 

130 

3400 

942 718 

Prudential 

815 

822 


42 

385 

42 

541 

263 

234 148 

Racaf Sect 

174 

178 


-1 

43 

24 

180 

982 

589 421 

Rank Org 

515 

622 


42 

225 

43 

183 

56 

900 BOG 

Reddt Coknan 

790 

797 

• 

-2 

23.9 

30 

17.1 

71 

5844345 

Reuters 

575 

580 


43 

64 

09 

43-7 

668 

791 511 

HTZ 

653 

660 

• 

-2 

314 

40 

6 7 

138 

532 365 

Rowntnee 

388 

403 

• 

+1 

1BJ0 

40 

11.1 

528 

987 782 

Roytd Ins 

823 

830 

• 

+5 

306 

4.7 

870 

1300 

426 344 

Sdnstwy <J) 

412 

416 

• 

. . 

84 

20 

240 11000 

148*2 39 

Seers 

123*2125 

• 

4-1 

50 

40 

160 

1300 

415 316 

Sedgwick Gp 

323 

328 


+6 

17.1 

52 

ISO 

1200 

970 653 

Shall 

96 0 

as 


+ 7 

514 

54 

94 

1600 

132 93 

Snflti ft Nephew 

114 

116 


m . 

65 

ao 

190 

250 

174 96 


166 

170 


.. 

2.1 

13 

150 

337 

894 419 

Stan Chert 

780 

787 


+2 

404 

59 

9.7 

46 

865 2 65 

Storehouse 

283 

268 


45 

110 

30 

152 

1200 

772 520 

Son AUanoe 

640 

647 

• 

+7 

ZTJS 

43 

580 

520 

81*4 7S»«TS8 PIP 

75*a78*» 


. • 

. • 

. . 



420 265 

Tesco 

400 

403 


44 

80 

22 

220 

1600 

529 374 

Thom an 

473 

480 


45 

250 

52 

349 

517 

349 1334-miMgw House 

2 85 

268 


-V* 

109 

7.1 

81 

1200 

209 130 

Ttustfuuse Porte 

195 

tas 


4-*» 

70 

43 

184 

2200 

22 13*aUnB9Mr 

21 7 »22 

• 

+*» 

601 

27 

20.1 

448 

269 218 

Utd Btscuke 

231 

233 

• 

43 

1300 50 

120 

1600 

231 174 

Welcome 

213 

215 

• 

42 

30 

14 

274 

350 

925 430 

Wodwoth 

6S2 

668 


410 

999 

30 

ISA 

83 


by 40 per cent. They 
also read the company’s inten- 
tion to hold a presentation 
early in the New Year as 
bullish. One analyst said: 
“They would hardly hold a 
presentation to give out bad 
news." 

Id gained 8p to l,110p, 
| Thom EMI 5p to 477p, 
Beecham 4p to 4I7p, British 
Telecom 2.5p to 196.5p and 
Cadbury Schweppes 2p to 
183p, 

Gilts fared less well. The 
weaker pound and stronger 
dollar caused losses of up to 
£fc. 

Meanwhile, the stores sec- 
tor was active on thoughts of 
Christmas shopping sprees. 
Woolworth recovered I Op to 
655p, Storehouse 6p to 287p, 

• Analysts are bnbbting 
over Johnson Matthey after 
last week's impressive 
interims. Clients of Beinwort 
Grievesoo, Messel and 
Credit Suisse Bnckmaster & 
Moore have all received 
“buy" circulars- Messel is the 
most banish, forecasting 
full-year pretax profits of 
£4&5 million. The shares, 
ex-dividend, fell 2p to 209p. 

Burton and Dixons both 
gained 4p to 266p and 332p 
respectively and Austin Seed 
“A” rose by 16p to 194p. 

Among mail order com- 
panies. GUS “A” jumped 20p 
to 1 020p, ahead of results later 
this week, while Freeman rose 
by 15p to 391p, on a bullish 
broker’s circular. 

Oils were also heavily 
traded with a variety of 
optimistic predictions 
circ ulating in the market 
ahead of Thursday’s Opec 
meeting in Geneva. BP finned 
4p to 682p, with 24 million 
shares traded and Shell was 
up 8p at 954pt 

Time Products, the watch 
manufacturer and jewellery 
wholesaler, is, at 80.5p, level 
with its peak for the year. 

It has been a firm market of 
late, despite the sale, in the 
past couple of weeks, of about 
2 per cent of the company by 
Mr George Bloch, the indus- 
trialist who ended up with a 4 
per cent holding after Time 
Products bought out his share 
of their joint Rem ex watch 
assembly plant in Hong Kong. 
Mr Bloch is now believed to 
have sold about 1 million 
shares, netting him some 
£800,000 mid reducing his 
bolding to less than 2 per cem. 


C 


IN THE MARKET 


3 


Tune on the spoons 
by Professor Doom 


Gifts are still in highly volatile 
mode. New York hoods have 
boomed. It is tire same story in 
Frankfurt, and to some extent 
in Tokyo. 

Wynne Godley holds coot 
at a fashionable market- 
makers' lunch dab. Across the 
table he is confronted by an 
assemblage of Spoons, other- 
wise known as well-bred City 
chaps. 

Wynne Godley, professor of 
applied economics at Cam- 
bridge, was deputy director of 
the Treasury’s economic sec- 
tion well before some of the 
Spoons could read or write. He 
is locked in perennial combat 
with the British mteDedual 

establishment. The Spoons 

took wary. 

Godley develops a f a miliar 
thesis — the failure of the 
Thatcher Experiment. The 
rigour of exposition startles 
his audience, who are osed to a 
different argot. The forecasts 
of doom are couched in (poet 
academic fames. The Spoons 
listen in rapt riknee, warming 
to the dry darity. 

Growth of oO production is 
atari end. Output will fall from 
now on. If import penetration 
of the domestic market for 

mmnfaftnre s continues to oct- 

pace export growth, expansion 
of the economy wfll generate a 
combined trade deficit on oO 
and manufotfores so bk it 
cannot readily be covered by 
any conceivable growth in 
invisibles. 

Under the Godley thesis, 
unemployment rises sharply, 
assuming the Government’s 
panic reaction to emergent 
deficits is fiscal and monetary 
restriction, or an induced 
recession. 

The graphs are upsetting. 


GDP and manufacturing out- 
put Mm&D ing well away from 
trend; fixed investment drop- 
ping; shallow growth, if at all, 
in mamdacturing productivity; 
a graph for the balance of 
trade in manufactures which 
looks like a toboggan slope; 
apocalyptic trends in imports 
and exports. 

The amp degrSee is worthy 
of the build-up. Within a 
reasonable time the enrrent 

balance will be in deficit to the 
tune of £20 million. The 
Spoons gasp, unused to such 
roughhoase stuff. But they 
stay with the speaker, display- 
ing tint intuitive grasp of 
complex economic problems 
so characteristic of the City. 

Perversely, third quarter 
balance of payments figures, 
pubfished last week, suggest 
that Wynne Godley might 
have understated the gravity of 
the problem. So for this year 
file deficit on visible trade is 
£6J billion — equal to the 
estimated surplus on 

invisibles. Rough glance after 
mug months' trading is in flue 
with the Chancellor’s foil-year 
forecast 

But the detailed breakdown 
shows just what damage is 
tafrfog place below the water- 
line. Between Q2 and Q3 this 
year the visible trade deficit 
doubled to £3 bflEoa. This Q3 
somber is nearly £1 billion 
higher than the deficit for the 
whole of 1985 - and that was 
considered shocking. 

This year's Q4 outcome 

could be even worse, as public 
sector pay packets fa tte n and 


fui privatization issues 
encourage more visits to 
Marks and Spencer. 

Trends in the UK capital 


account are hard to identify. 
But Q3 saw aa identified 
capital outflow of £0.9 billion; 
the balancing item was again 
large, at £121 billion. At the 
least the UK looks to be going 
the way of the United States, 
which needs to encourage 
capital Inflows to cover its 
deficits. 

One of the easiest ways of 
generating a capital inflow is 
by pitching bond yields so 
high that the foreign investor 
is tempted to buy. But the 
London gilts market is a 
capricious {dace, as 27 
market-makers beaver 
away on two-tick spreads. 

In an effort to get a grip on 
their new monster market .the 
authorities appear to resemble . 
a chad at the controls of 
Concorde. On Wednesday the 
authorities discovered how to 
lower the flaps — the market 
sank Eke a stone in mid- 
afternooiL On Thursday after- 
noon it soared and 
disappeared into the (foods 
Eke a flash of fight. 

Optimally speaking, the 
authorities would like to see a 
buoyant market beginning 
around the end of December. 
A good market would sack in 
the foreigner seeking high 
London yields, counter that 
well-known tradition among 
foreign exchange traders of 
selling sterling like a basket of 
rotten apples at new year. 
Such capital inflows would 
help to offset current account 
deficits, enabling the authori- 
ties in turn to counter doom- 
sters tike Wynne Godley. 

But it all depends on the 
authorities teaming to waggle 
their wings. 

Christopher Dunn 


Meanwhile, Time Products 
plans to take advantage of its 
buoyant share price by making 
a si gnifican t acquisition in 
Britain. It is currently sitting 
on a £19 million cash 
“mountain” from its sale of 
the 107-strong Weir Jewellery 
shops drain to Combined 
English Stores in September, a 
move which took Tunes Prod- 
ucts completely out of retail- 
ing with the exception of one 
shop in Edgware Road, 
London. 

Explaining the high share 
[Mice, Mr Marcus Margulies, 
the chief executive and son of 
the company’s founder, Mr 
Alexander Margulies, said: 

lory and' business in Hong 
Kong is also very good — 
which is the best reason there 
is for moving a share price 
higher. Our cash pile is sitting 
in the bank, earning us lots of 
interest, but we are at this 
moment looking to make an 
acquisition, probably in the 
field of distribution.” 

Sains bury, the supermarket 
and food group, notched up a 
volume figure of U million 
and eased just a penny to 
4l5p. The cause of the surge in 
business was a put-through 
first thing of 3.5 million 
shares, thought possibly to 
have come from the family 
holding, which controls 55 per 
cent or the company. But with 
703 million shares in issue, 3.5 
million represents a tiny 
percentage. The rest of the 
volume was caused by mar- 
ket-makers adjusting their 
books. 

Among other new i yynes, 
Harmony Leisure, the London 
pub and restaurant group run 
by an ex-THF executive, Mr 
Stanley Lever, opened on the 
Unlisted Securities Market at 
30p— a 7p premium on its23p 
placing price — before settling 
back at 2Sp. 

United Trust & Credit, the 
mini-merchant bank also 
quoted on the USM, leapt 45p 
to 5l5p, after giving details of 
an agreed merger with 
Somportex. The deal values 
UTC at £14.1 million and 
each UTC share at 575p. 

Restmor, the pram and 
nursery equipment manufac- 
turer, gained 20p to I37p, after 
it, too, had announced an 
agreed bid from BSG inter- 
national. In August, Restmor 
shares were standing at a lowly 
96p. 

Marketmen gave the 
“thumbs up** to two US 
acquisitions announced by the 
Bemrose Corporation, the sec- 
urity printer, on Friday. Its 
shares bounced up 27p to 
193p. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


BTR bid no match for 
Pilkington’s shine 


Yesterday’s impressive set of half- 
time profits from Pilkington can have 
given no comfort to BTR, the 
industrial conglomerate, which has 
stepped in with a£1.2 billion takeover 
bid at the classic moment — when its 
target's fortunes are strongly on the 
mend. 

This approach relies heavily on 
riming Leave it late, as BTR may 
have done tliis time, and the price of 
the target moves out of range. 
Pilldngton’s 76 per cent profit increase 
represents a solid improvement 


telling institutional shareholders ac- 
ross private lunch tables that he is not 
about to pay “a silly price” for 
Pilkington or anything else. 

Yet on the basis of the present offer, 
BTR is doomed to failure. Analysts 
believe Pilkington is capable of mak- 
ing between £190 million and £200 
milli on in the present year. This 
would come through at about 50p 
earnings per share and justify a price 
of 650p per share in a contested bid. 

At present Pilkington’s many City 


throughout the whole of the business, supporters can afford to dismiss BTR 
Antony Pilkington, the chairman, as obviously inadequate given the 


was at great pains to stress that there 
had been no cosmetics, creative 
accounting or other bid-induced 
tinkering with the profits. If pushed, 
he was prepared to concede, that 

perhaps the dividend might not have 

been raised quite the 30 per cent 
announced yesterday without the 
pressure of a hostile bid. 

Translate*! into the parlance of 
modern talceover battles, that in- 
dicates he has plenty of ammunition 
left for an impressive forecast at some 
later stage in the proceedings, if it 
proves necessary. 

The crucial word is if for appar- 
ently Sir Owen Green, BTR’s for- 
midable chief executive, has been 


sharp improvement expected in the 
glassmaker’s fortunes over the next 
few years. But if Sir Owen does come 
up with a credible bid, the Pilkington 
board will find itself in a difficult 
position. 

It is relying heavily on the view that 
BTR would sacrifice long-term pros- 
pects for short-term profit and that 
BTR’s ability to manage a commodity 
producer like Pilkington is in ques- 
tion. Telling that to pension fund 
managers who have gratefully backed 
Sir Owen and benefited present and 
future pensioners in the process, could 
bring a dusty response. Wednesday's 
defence document will need to be fa 
more persuasive than that. 


ar 


French way with a crisis 


J USt as the international financ ial 
community was coming to regard 
France as the most promising 
market for 1987, the echoes of 1968 
have sent investors scurrying for the 
exits. Yesterday, as the Paris riots put 
the franc under pressure, the Bank of 
France was forced to raise short-term 
interest rates from 7.5 to 8.5 per cent 
The interest rate move, necessary to 
protect the franc’s European Monetary 
System parity, confirmed, as Mrs 
Thatcher has reminded us, that the EMS 
is do soft option. But by dealing with the 
pressure at a very early stage, the French 
move looks set to succeed somewhat 
better than the cat-and-mouse game the 
British authorities have played with the 
markets. 

Despite die riots, there is little 
likelihood of an EMS realignment this 
side of the West German elections next 
month. And, there is every reason to 
believe that earlier optimistic assess- 
ments of France will prove correct. 

Chase Manhattan Securities, for 
example, expects a 20 per cent advance 
for the French equity market in 1987, on 
the back of balanced economic growth, 
continued low inflation and interest rate 
reductions. Wood Mackenzie says that, 
short-term interest rate worries not- 
withstanding, de-regulation, privatiza- 
tion and strong corporate profits growth 
will mean that over the next 12 months 
Fiance will provide one of the highest 


returns of all the major equity markets. 

The conventional view in the markets 
is that after the January elections in 
Germany, matters will move naturally 
towards an EMS realignment in the 
spring. There is something to be said for 
this. 

German money supply figures, pub- 
lished yesterday, produced ever deeper 
blushes at the Bundesbank. The central 
bank money stock accelerated last 
month. Its growth rate of 7.9 per cent 
compared with a target range of 3.5 to 
5.5 pa* cent A missed monetary target is 
a serious matter for the Germans. In ten 
days, the Bundesbank has to set its 1 987 
targets and will be looking to restore 
some of its lost pride. 

Even so, the Bundesbank is unlikely 
to endeavour to claw back some of this 
year's excess money growth. Base drift 
will be allowed, like so much water that 
has flowed under the bridge. Germany is 
experiencing a tug of war between 
growth, and particularly export growth, 
and monetary restraint There may be 
more resistance to a mark revaluation 
next year. 

In addition, Jacques Chirac is enough 
ofa sound money man as to be reluctant 
to see French financial de-regulation 
accompanied by franc devaluation. The 
French authorities acted promptly yes- 
terday in heading off a franc crisis in the 
EMS. They may do so again next year. 


WHEN YOUR CURRENT 
Cl F.ANTNG CONTRACT 
EXPIRES . WHO’S GOING 
TO FILL THE 


VACUUM? 



Cleaning contracts 
are not noted for being long 
lasting relationships. 

Of course they begin 
with solemn vows of 
devotion, but soon the 
gaod intentions 
begin to ^ther 
dust. 

What is true how- _ 

ever is that the more durable resu k ® a repletion for quality 

the contractor the more durable control that reflects the close family 

the contract. And with more than 50 style of a unique family business, a 

years office cleaning experience, contractors company where top management are not 
don't come any more durable than OCS. remote figures out of touch with the daily 

Today, even during the so called office needs of the customer 

' revolution OCS still operate on some pretty So even before your present contract 


old fashioned principles. 

Like hard work. 

Like realistic pricing. 

Like thorough supervision and clear 
lines of communication. 


bites the dust why not call OCS on 
01-2428800? 

Then when somebody does come to 
fill the vacuum you'll know it's the most 
powerful force in office cleaning today. 


Offke Cleaning Services Limited 

OCS Changing Venues-Unchanging Values 

HEAD OFFICE. 28-36 EAGLE STREET. LONDON. WC1R 4 AN TELEPHONE: 01-242 8800 
A MEMBER OF THE OCS GROUP OF COMPANIES-THE NATIONS LEADING PROPERTY MAINTENANCE GROUP 




r 


24 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


8&61 


TtoM Month 
Dac86 — - 
Mar 87 
Jun 87 - 

S«p 87 — aSLtS 

PseBT Bfloc 

88 ~ — ~ trr 


Previous 
Una 
DOC 88 
Mar 87 
Jin 87 


i interest 1 6260 


88J5 
88J4 8857 

89.04 SUM 

89.18 89.12 

8&S6 8886 


Previous 


iwm 


aaai 


1060 
140 
89.17 198 

40 


(Treasury Bond 
Doc 88 L_ 

7 

Jin 87 


Short Oft 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 

Jin 87 


9*54 

9453 

9186 

10004 

99-03 

NT 


95-52 


94.06 9452 

9454 3359 

gpg fl 9185 

Previous ( 

10WK 

9905 98-19 


laggnlMBrasjjZji 

94.02 2000 

9199 278 

9184 115 

>f open interest 41 75 
09-23 904 

9841 3431 

97-23 0 


Deal 
Mar 87. 
Alt 87. 
>87. 


fEs 

Dec 88. 
Mir 87. 


109 


NT 


107-20 

107-18 

NT 

NT 

16150 

18550 


95-52 

8542 


Preriou|diy« towjcpjn interest 146 


95-52 10 

0 


Prev io us d»y> tow open Interest 19277 

107- 20 1074ft 107-12 10 

108- 04 107-18 107-17 10721 

„ 107-20 0 

"'previous day's total open interest 3495 
16160 181.90 tt&OO 254 

16130 18580 16580 32 


FOREIGN, EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


i&SSK 

NYork 1.4160-1.4235 
Monmal 18505-18637 

Ams'dan>381 94-38292 

Brussels 5981 -5980 
Cphgsn 117602-108001 
Dubffr 18455-18504 

FrenMat28497-28576 
Lisbon 21088-21389 
Madrid 19285-19120 
Mian 
Oslo 

Smssm 98467-98834 
Tokyo 230.12-23184 
Vieira 1989-20.10 
Zurich 28605-28915 


. . . . r8 1i 
1.4180-1.4170 081-083prem 

18505-18533 0£3-044pnsn 

12207-38251 lh-IKpnan 

5925-5986 22-ITpreni 

10.7602-107749 IH-toam 
18477-18487 14-23cBS 

23497-28538 IVIXpran 

2108821280 8M2Ms 
192.79-19380 16-34db 

197111-198486 197172-198286 1-4tfs 

117054-117617 117054-117201 8ft-BXdte 

2%-2ftprem 

98457-98509 

230.12-230-50 

19J 


IBO-IJScratn 

T.48-1.33pnmi 

4V ■ 


61-. 
4ft-*ft 


21-71dta 


IK-1 prom 


Ift-ixpram 

9H-7ftprwn 

ix-ixpru 


18ft-19ftdte 
6X-4Kprem 
4tt-3ftpram 
4-Sit 


Staring Inc te a trac e d e lta tgre was dawn etsajl (day's range 


4K-3Xprem 
688-68. 1). 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 

Argentina austraT 18881-18851 

Australia doBar 2.1761-2.1793 

Bahrain dhar 0834008380 

Braze cnizado 


Hong Kong data 
IncSa rupee 
Iraq (Soar 
Kuwait dinar KD 
Malaysia doflar 

Mexico peso 

New Zealand ddar 2822028353 

Saucfi Arabia riyal 5811158510 

Singapore (kdar 3.11603.1206 

South Africa rand 

U A E dirham 
UOyds Bank 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


I reland — 



y— - 

BeigiumfComm). 


Hong Kong 
Portugal. 
Spain — 
Austria _ 


Rates aoppOad by Bandays Bank KOFEX and EataL 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


appointments 


I* 

Clearing Banks 11 
Runes House 11» 

P tsuaaU Mn rit at La rera % 

V 11*«w8 

rtm , 


EURO MONET DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6*u*% 
3 mirth 654-6 


Treasury 60s (Distthjntft) 

fftSSig^ie 


Smnth iflti* 


2 mnth 10*» 
3nMh 10»a* 


Imntt) ItK'w-l 
3m4h IOft-10 4 * 

TtadaBU 

1 ninth 11 
Smnth lift 

W 


10"»-10ft 
6 ninth 10*is-10»* 


2mnih 11 7 w 
dumb 11*n 


7 days 554-5 
Smntfi 4“i*-4’*i# 
French Franc 
7 days 9S-8ft 
3mnth 10954 
AriaaRMMr 
7 days 1X-1X 
Smnth 4&-4X 
Yaa 

7 days 454-4% 
Smnth 


cal 6X-SK 

1 mnth Bft4W 
6mnlh 6‘i*45 ,8 w 
cal S4 

1 mnth 5X-5 
Biredh 4»w/ u n 
a* 7%-6ft 

Inrth 9300% 

6 mnth 9K-8* 
cel 254-1 X 

1 mnth 4MK 
6 mnth 4S-4 
cal 4ft-3» 

1 mnth 4" »4 >m 
S mnth 4%r4K 


1 matTl OK^lOX 1 mmn 11»»-11 'm 
I mnth l^ie-ll'is Brand) 11 *m- 11 7 m 
S mith 12tnth 11 f v11 7 » 

«*L 


BULLION 


2 days 10ft 
1 ninth 103 
6 mnth lift 


7 days IMS 
Smnth lift 
12mth 1154 


mese-ta lift-lift 


1 mnth .. 

3 mnth lift-lift Smith lift-1114 
9 mnth IIK-llft *mth 


1154-11% 


S< 

PMnun 

$ 48280 (£33880) 
SiNer 

$53800 (£37875) 


1 mmrri1 J »-'ll‘ , ia abnnlh 1154-1 IX 
#mth 


ECGO 


6 mnth ilft-TIft 


1 mnth 1200.15 
6 mnth 586-590 


11 a u-11ft 


100195 
nth 105100 


Fixed Reis Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Aven ge refere nce rate tar 
p eri od wwrtw l* law 


Nomura, 1966 Inclusive: 11248 per 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Nov 17 

Dec 1 

Dec 15 


Bee 

. ■ w aamvnain 

Nov 28 FsbIS Mar 2 

Dec 12 Mar 5 Mar IQ 

Jan 2 Maris Mar 30 

Mne cot ate 8/12/88 Johnson Rrth Brawn. Bryson, BentaK, 

Amstred, TV-AM, Conroy Peis, Mtcfna Cods. HeScal Bar, Mercuy Secures, 
Canted Ena, Bristol; Channel, Morgan Grsnfefi, Fogarty. Dataety, Quest Automation, 
Guimess. SCR Ptasoey. Skyflne, The Huns' Veneer. CHorida, London Securities. 
Put&CafcOonrayfm 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Ashtead (1 
Avis Europe 
BBston&Batk 


British Gas 
Daniel S 
Fletcher 
Gaynor 
Geest (1 
©entree JlBp) 

Gordon Russell (19(W 
Guthrie Ootp £tS0p) t 



Grind 

Harmony Leisure i 
Lloyds Chemist (1 
Long Metnopoftan 
Mecca Lafture (1 
Miss Sam ttt 
Nortfttt nb rian 
Plum Meigs 0 
Quarto (11 5pj 
Spandsx 




Wboltons Better 
Ward Group 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cook VAX F/P 
GhmfMd N/P 
Lon Assc tnv F/P 
Norfolk Cm F/P 

Patrecan F/P 

BC N iff 



Wtfker 
(Issue price in brackets). 


139-1-1 

95 

76 

134+3 

165-1 

83 

104 


180 

26+1 

20 

244 +4 
63 
2-4 
2 
190 


Woohvorth Holdings: Lady 
(Elspeth) Howe has been 
a non-executive dir- 
ector. 

M asst or Systems Corpora- 
tion: Mr James Williams 
becomes senior vice-presi- 
denu a director of the com- 
pany, sod chief financial 
officer, succeeding Mr Rich- 
ard P. Beck. 

Civic Trust: Mr Martin 
Bradshaw is made director, 
succeeding Mr Michael 
Middleton. 

Gavin Anderson: Mr Ian 
Verchere becomes a director. 

Royal Life Holdings: Sr 
John Nott is made a director 
from January 1 and Mr DA 
Davies becomes a ss i stant 
managing director fiooi Janu- 
ary 1. 

Royal Insurance Company 
of Canada: Mr Roy Ehns 
becomes president and chief 
executive officer from January 
1, succeeding Mr Jean 
RobitaOle. 

Wickes Building Supplies: 
Mr David McGill is made 
deputy managing director 
from January 1. 

Trallfa Robot A/S (Nor- 
way): Mr Ejell Oppedal be- 
comes president and Mr Nick 
Rizvi marketing director. 



Lady Howe 

Data Networks: Mr Tony 
Baker and Mr Paul Hopkins 
have been appointed regional 
directors in charge of facilities 
manag ement. 

Lex Service: Mr Peter 
Turnbull and Mr Tony 
Wlutton become managing 
directors from January 1 and 
Mr Alan Cosdn joins the 
board on that date. 

Leeds Group: Mr SMS 
Todman joins the board. 

National Girobank: Mr 
Barry Moult becomes director 
responsible for big projects 
and joins the board Mr David 
Ashman will be director of 
operations, succeeding Mr 
Barry Moult, and Mr Vladas 


over Pacific 


USAir 
acquire 
lines, 1 
Califon 


the western states. 


authorities. 


Gedmintas is to become direc- 
tor of systems development 

Eunoritv Express: Mr Jona- 
than Wilson becomes director 
and general manager. 

Granada Television: Pro- 
fessor John Ashworth joins 
the board as a nou-exccutive 
director. _ _ 

Swiss Reinsurance Com- 
pany (UK* Mr RK Bishop 
becomes a director. 

Nottingham Bnck: Mr Lau- 
rence Coppel is made a non- 
executive director. _ 

Benchmark Group: Mr Khs 
Westmacott joins as company 
secretary and becomes a direc- 
tor of the principal operating 

subsidiaries. . 

Alien & Overy: Mr Stephen 
Denyer, Mr Alistair Asher,! 
Mr Mkdrael Duncan, Mr Pe- 
ter Watson, Mr Mark 
Writing. Mr Boyan Wells and 
Mr Bran Harrison join the 
partnership from January l. 

Bejam Freezer Food Cen- 
tres: Mr Dennis Keys has been 
appointed to the board 
United Kingdom Associ- 
ation of New York Stock 
Fxfhange Members: Mr AA 
Nash has been elected chair- 
man, succeeding Mr John 
PowelL Mr Miles Morland 
becomes deputy chairman. 


Brokers 
switch to 



Bangkok (.AFP) - The 
Bangkok Stock Marion, the 
poor relation of Asa’s finan- 
cial markets with just 1 01 
counters on the board, has 
become a focal point for some 
of the most established bro- 
kers in the region. 

The Security Exchange of 
Thailand, profiting from an 
expanding Thai economy and 
the Largest cut in interest rates 
in 10 vears, has recently 
enjoved a level of activity that 
make ii the envy of its more 
established counterparts in 
Tokyo. Hong Kong and 
Singapore. 

.After six years of quaa- 
stagnation following a boom 
in November 1978 and a bust 
in 1979. stock prices here have 
shot up in the past five 
months. 

A year ago only some 
250,000 shares changed hands 
daily. Now, volume has sky- 
rocketed with turnover on 
November 5 totalling more 
than 2.7 million shares worth 
some Sll million (about £7.4 
million). 


PlLKINGTON 

Interim Results. 

HALF YEAR TO SEPTEMBER 27, 1986. STATEMENT BY THE CHAIRMAN. 


The Group has made a pre-tax profit for the half year of 
£86.9 million, a 76% increase compared with the equivalent 
half year to September 1985, which was £49.4 million. 
Earnings per share have more than trebled to 2L8p. The first 
interim dividend has been increased to 65p per share. 

This excellent performance has been achieved through 
a combination ofreal growth in sales; improving contributions 
from recent acquisitions; better productivity, and a welcome 
reduction of redundancy costs in the United Kingdom. 

Currency translations at the pre-tax level are 
marginally positive at £1.7 million. 

Of the sales increase of £347 million (58%),almost £100 
million results from accelerating growth in our existing 
businesses. About £200 million comes from the first time 
consolidation of new acquisitions which indude Libbey- 
Owens-Ford and Sola Syntex in the USA, Oliver Davey, 
Australia, and Santa Lucia, Argentina. 

The recovery of our European trading operations is 
now firmly established and the benefits of restmeturing, 
improving prices and productivity are flowing through to 
profits. 

UNITED KINGDOM 

The United Kingdom trading profit before 
redundancy of £18.4 million is £11.6 million better than the 
half year to September 1985. 

Sales have increased by 16.5% in the United Kingdom, 
and glass melting capacity has become much better utilised. 

Pilldngton Glass Limited is now performing strongly 
and will further benefit in the last three months of the year 
from an 11% price increase introduced in December. 

Pilkington Insulation Limited is now firmly in profit 
and is benefiting from past rationalisation of the industry, 
productivity gains and a much enhanced product range. 
Insulating Contracting are also improving their margins and 
benefiting from more buoyant market conditions. 

The sale of Pilkington Reinforcements Limited to 
Owens Coming Fibeigbs Corporation was completed on 17 
November. Prior to this sale, they contributed £15 million 
profit in the first half. 

i The Electro-optical Division moved forward strongly 
in its defence sector with sales significantly above the 
corresponding half year. Barr & Stroud, the Divisions major 
subsidiary, had a record half year profit. The two major new 
ventures — communications and medical — continue to grow 
rapidly but are still incurring heavy R & D and product 
development costs. 

The Ophthalmic Division s main component, the Sola 
Group, achieved exceptionally good results, which more than 
compensated for weak market demand foroprical glace mainly 
from Japan, triggered by the strength of the yen. 

The United Kingdom redundancy charges at £6.8 
million (last year £155 million) are a firm indication that 
the programme is now winding down, and its anticipated 
that the full year costs will be about half those oflast year. 


OVERSEAS 

Overseas profits are £66.7 million, up 82%. £12.7 
million of this improvement results from the inclusion of 
Libbey-Owens-Ford as a subsidiary for the first time. LOFs 
improved manufacturing efficiencies, its growing involvement 
in non-automotive markets, and its Continuing investment in 
more advanced auto-glazing systems, have all contributed to 
their performance. 

The remaining 48% increase in overseas trading profits 
is due to notably improved performances from Germany, 
Sweden, Finland, Australia, South Africa and Brazil. 

The improvement in licensing and technical fee 
income is a confirmation of better trading conditions 
worldwide. Of the £25 million improvement, half a million 
pounds is due to exchange rate gains. It is anticipated that our 
licensing income will continue at this improved level for the 
remainder of die yean 

Related companies' profits reflect the change in status 
of two new subsidiaries, Libbey-Owens-Ford and Santa Lucia. 

Net interest charges have risen by £6d million as a 
result of funding an expanding capital expenditure 
programme. 

Following die change to historic cost accounting, and 
as a result of improving United Kingdom profits, the rare of 
taxation has reduced substantially to 37%. Attributable 
earnings have improved from £12.7 million to £465 million. 

DIVIDENDS 

The Board has declared an increased first interim 
dividend of65p per share (1985 5 Dp). 

Antony PiuaNGroN chairman 





Mb 



Puts 



Series 

Jn 


Jon 

Jn 

Apr Job 

Anted Lyons 

280 

30 

42 

48 

2S 

7 

12 

- [-306} 

trt 

300 

16 


3? 

9 

14 

17 

330 

5 

15 

18 

30 

33 

35 

tt. BrittstiOas 

50 

14 16% 

18 

X 

ft 

1 

f63) 

>P» 

60 

6 

0 

IIS 

3 

4 

5 

7D 

1% 

a 

6S 

8 

9ft 

11 

on bp 

600 

tts 

108 

_ 

1 

9 



ive ("884} 

650 

47 

63 

80 

5 

25 

35 

700 

13 

30 

50 

25 

50 

60 

71 Coes Gold 

SO 

117 

137 

— 

3 

10 



to CWO) 

600 

77 

11X1 

110 

9 

2 2 

28 

650 

40 

65 

60 

25 

40 

47 

at Cowtaufcte 

260 

54 

64 



ft 

2 



he <*"> 

280 

34 

45 

54 

2 

5 

8 

300 

17 

30 

44 

5 

10 

13 

-as 

330 

5 

16 

27 

2a 

26 

33 

1th Com Union 

260 

12 

223 

28 

B 

15 

18 

«y r 263 * 

280 

5 

12 

20 

21 

27 

30 

300 

1% 

7 

14 

39 

43 

45 

Gam&VKra 

300 

28 

40 

50 

5 

15 

22 

“ 1*316} 

325 







350 

4 

17 

— 

35 

42 

— 


375 

1 

— 

— 

58 

— 

— 

GSC 

160 

15 

20 

n 

4 

6 

a 


180 

5 

1? 

15 

17 

20 

22 

200 

1 

4» 

8 

35 

38 

40 

Grand Met 

360 

103 

108 

_ 

1 

1ft 


T455J 

390 

73 

/a 


1 

3 

— 

420 

*7 

60 

78 

3ft 

13 

16 


460 

10 

38 

52 

20 

32 

35 

Cl 

1000 

122 

140 

167 

2ft 

12 

18 

miq> 

1050 

77 

100 

130 

6 

24 

33 

1100 

37 

65 

98 

IS 

45 

52 


1150 

16 

42 

70 

48 

72 

77 

Land See 

300 

47 

58 

64 

IX 

3 

7 

(*344) 

330 

IB 

33 

40 

5 

10 

13 

380 

5 

14 

21 

20 

24 

27 

Maries & Span 

180 

n 

20 

25 

3X 

7 

B 

• r>84) 

200 

3 

10 

17 

17 

18 

23 

220 

1 

5 

9 

37 

37 

38 

Shea Tram 

900 

73 

93 

107 

4 

20 

30 

(-954) 

950 

30 

53 

73 

T7 

42 

50 

1000 

ID 

32 

45 

50 

65 

75 

Trafalgar House 

260 

15 

24 

30 

8 

15 

20 

rz£r 

230 

7 

14 

20 

24 

29 

34 

300 

3 

a 

12 

41 

45 

50 

TS8 

70 

9 1114 

14S 

1 

? 

3% 

mu 

80 

3 

6 

8 

4X 

6 

8 

90 

114 

2H 

5S 

14 

14ft 

14ft 


Scries 

Dee 

Mar 

Jon 

Dae 

Iter 

Jon 


360 

60 

75 

_ 

1 

2 

_ 

(■417J 

390 

30 

50 

HD 

ift 

8 

11 

420 

4 

30 

3ft 

7 

22 

SI 


460 

1 

11 

22 

45 

50 

60 

Boots 

200 

30 

39 

46 

1 

3 

4 

f229) 

220 

11 

a 

32 

1ft 

10 

12 

240 

1 

1334 

21 

13 

15 

23 

BTR 

260 

11 

25 

32 

2ft 

7 

12 

rZ68) 

280 

IS 

14 

21 

14 

16 

24 

300 


/ 

12- 

— 

35 

38 

Bass 

650 

83 

93 

105 

2 

6 

12 

cm 

700 

35 

58 

75 

5 

15 

27 

730 

2 

30 

50 

30 

45 

80 

Bbn Clrcte 

600 

50 

77 

97 

2 

12 

IB 

r«47) 

650 

10 

45 

6S 

16 

35 

45 

700 

1 

— 

— 

56 

— 

— ■ 

Da Beers 

650 

135 

165 



2 

13 

— 

(*774} 

700 

90 

130 

150 

3 

20 

33 

750 

50 

100 

120 

8 

4U 

55 


800 

14 

tu 

95 

35 

63 

80 

Dixons 

300 

34 

48 

60 

1 

6 

10 

(*332) 

330 

6 

28 

42 

5 

15 

22 

360 

1 

16 

30 

30 

32 

34 

GKN 

240 

32 

41 

45 

1 

3 

6 

cm 

260 

14 

25 

32 

2 

9 

15 

280 

3 

1b 

22 

14 

18 

23 


300 

2 

8 

— 

30 

33 


Glaxo 

900 

30 

74 104 

5 

30 

37 

f824) 

950 

5 

48 

75 

32 

52 

60 

1000 

2 

28 

53 

80 

65 

90 


1050 

1 

16 

— 130 130 


Hanson 

160 

30 32S 


ft 

IX 

__ 

cm 

180 10K 

18 

24 

1 

7 

9 

— 


DED OPTIONS 










rwis 



Puis 



Series 

Dec 

Mar 

Jon 

Pec 

Mar 

Jan 

Hanson 

(com) 

200 

220 

lft 

ft 

7V, 

3 

14 

7 

ii 

31 

16ft 19 
34 34ft 

Jaguar 

fS) 

500 

550 

600 

27 

1 

1 

56 

24 

13 

75 

43 

2 

27 

77 

22 

■*0 

80 

30 

45 

Thom EMI 
(•477) 

420 

60 

22 

75 

43 

90 

64 

1 

4ft 

4 

18 

7 

7? 

500 

5 

21 

40 

26 

37 

42 


550 

1 

11 

— 

75 

60 

— 

Tesco 

(*402) 

330 

360 

390 

73 

43 

13 

60 

33 

72 

43 

ft 

1 

3 

~7 

15 

io 

18 


420 

3 

17 

25 

22 

25 

27 


Series 

Feb May Auo Feb Usy Aug 


420 

as 

95 

— 

4 

7 

— 

cm 

460 

47 

fi? 

75 

9 

15 

22 

500 

27 

37 

46 

27 

33 

40 

BAT tads 

390 

80 

87 



2 

4 

— 

(*4«P) 

420 

57 

83 

73 

5 

10 

15 

460 

7? 

37 

38 

20 

23 

27 


500 

8ft 

18 

30 

47 

50 

56 

Barclays 

(*«i> 

460 

45 

55 

65 

8 

IB 

25 

500 

19 

30 

37 

25 

32 

40 

550 

5 

IT 

— 

70 

77 

— 


180 

22 

27 

33 

2ft 

5 

10 

fw 

200 

Bft 

17 

21 

13 

14 

18 

220 

3 

6 

— 

28 

28 

— 

Cadbury Schwpps 

160 

160 

30 

13 

34 

20 

37 

74 

3 

6 

5 

1? 

9 

14 

200 

6 

11 

14 

21 

26 

28 


280 

25 

38 

47 

17 

20 

25 

(288) 

300 

15 

79 

37 

27 

30 

35 

330 

6 

14 

23 

53 

53 

56 


330 

40 

50 

60 

3 

9 

12 

(*360) 

360 

16 

30 

42 

13 

20 

25 

390 

7 

17 

27 

33 

37 

42 

LASMO 

130 

25 

31 

__ 

3ft 

6 



(“148) 

140 

19 

24 

33 

7 

11 

13 

160 

10 

15 

21 

IB 

20 

21 

Midland Bank 

500 

65 

82 

90 

5 

12 

20 

r547) 

550 

35 

43 

52 

22 

32 

37 

600 

12 

18 

24 

60 

62 

87 

P&O 

460 

GO 

70 

85 

5 

11 

15 

(*505) 

500 

30 

42 

57 

20 

30 

32 

550 

7 

18 

28 

50 

57 

62 

Racal 

160 

22 

32 

38 

6 

7 

8 

(*175) 

180 

10 

17 

24 

13 

17 

24 

200 

4 

10 

— 

28 

30 

— 

RTZ 

550 

ITS 




4 




rsss) 

BOO. 

85 

in? 

— 

8 

18 


650 

47 

62 

82 

23 

37 

50 


700 

23 

37 

52 

57 

65 

74 

Vaal Reefs 

70 

17ft 21ft 24ft 

3 

4ft 

5ft 

(*82) 

80 

9ft 

4ft 

17 

6 

8 

9ft 

90 

4 

9 lift 

11 12ft 14ft 


Series 

Mar 

Jon 

5 SL_ 

Mar 

Jon Sep 

Lonrho 

200 

35 

42 


2 

7 

_ 

(*228) 

220 

21 

27 

33 

9 

16 

19 

aw 

« 

16 

20 

23 

28 

31 


260 

4 

8 


40 

42 



Series 

^ —7 Aug 

Feb Mey Aug 

1M1»% 1991 

100 

2'w 


■'» 

ft 

r» 

1ft 

CE101J 

102 

ft 

•» 

1ft 


"H 

2ft 

104 

“n 

ft 

— 

3ft 

3ft 

— 

Tr 11 B* 03/07 

104 

3ft 

4ft 

5ft 

1ft 

2ft 

3ft 

(*8106) 

106 


4ft 

2ft 

3ft 

Ift 

108 

1ft 

2ft 

3ft 

“m 


Sft 


110 


■Jm 


5ft 6’n 



112 

ft 1’n 

— » 

KS 

7ft 

__ 


114 


— 

1-n 

9ft 

— 




Pec 

Jan 

Fteb 

Fter 

Pec 

Jen 

Feb 

Mar 

FT-SE 

1550 

83 

98 

_ 



1 

6 




Index 

1575 

60 

78 

_ 



3 

11 




H824) 

1800 

43 

60 

re 

80 

9 

20 

26 

32 


162S 

28 

45 

58 

73 

20 

30 

38 

45 


1650 

16 

32 

45 

60 

37 

42 

48 

55 


1S75 

6 

21 

33 


55 

60 

63 



1700 

1» 

— 

— 

— 

80 



— 


FT-SE todnx. CMJK830. Poterf581 


*1Mait|tag Mcsrity prica. 


Sales 

HJfsorto 

27 Sept. 

1986 

£m 

9406 

Half year to 

28 Sept. 

1985 

£m 

594J 

Trading profit 

783 

28.0 

Licensing income 

15.7 

12.9 

Related companies 

12 

14.4 

Investment income 

63 

8.6 

Net interest paid 

(20.6) 

(14.5) 

Group profit before tax 

86.9 

49.4 

Earnings per share 

213 

63 

Dividends per share 

63 

5.0 

Dividend cover 

33 

13 


© 

Pilkington 

The worlds leading glass company. 


Law Report December 9 1986 

Stall caused obstruction 

contrary to section 137 of the 
Highways Art 1980. 

Tbe justices found that the 
items placed on the highway 
area were a technical obstruc- 
tion and did not amount to 
wilfully obstructing free passage 
along the highway having regard 
to the feet that the actual or 
potential obstruction of any 
member of the public was so 
unlikely as to be disregarded; 
that the width of the verges and 
footpath still available for use by 
foot passengers was sufficient 
for all foreseeable purposes; that 
the footway itself was com- 
pletely unobstructed and that 
the footway itself was not more 
than lightly used. 

Alternatively, they concluded 
that any o Hence committed 
should be dismissed under the 
de minimis principle and 
accordingly riicmrec^ both 
informations. 

The council appealed since it 
was a matter of great concern to 
them. A great number of people 
in the area wished to conduct 
stalls on the highway. 

. His Lordship said that the 
justices were in error in that they 

did not consider the nature of 
the obstruction in relation to tbe 
issue._Nor did they consider the 
duration of the obstruction. 

The public were fully entitled 
to use the whole of the footpath 
available. The obstruction came 
very substantially into the foot- 
path and occupied half of a. it 
was difficult to conclude iha* a 
projection of that nature was de 
muumis. 

RBn5R I JUS7 ?f E STEPHEN 

252J2J sa,d that lhe 

det enda m s action was quite 

aeu berate and regular and there- 

fore amounted to wilful obstruc- 
tion. The justices’ finding that it 
was a technical obstruction was 
quite untenable. 

It was an actual extension of 
the defendant's premises by. 
some nine feet and it was quite 
unreasonable for the justices to 
say that it was only a technical 
obstruction. 

HertfonL* 7 ^ W ‘ J ‘ amtb ' 


Hertfordshire County Conned 
v Bolden 

Before Lord Justice Stephen 
Brown and Mr. Justice Tudor 
Evans 

[Judgment December 3] 

Tbe public were fully entitled 
to the use of tbe whole footpath 
available to them and a nine- 
foot intrusion on to the highway 
at weekends for the purpose of 
displaying produce for sale 
coaid not be a mere technical 
obstruction which was to be 
disregarded under the de 
minimis principle. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court allowed an ap- 
! by Hertfordshire County 
tncil from a dis missal by St 
Albans Justices of two charges 
nst the defendant, Ronald 
lk Bolden. 

Mr Roger McCarthy for the 


council; the defendant in per- 
son. 

MR JUSTICE TUDOR EV- 
ANS said that the defendant’s 
front garden adjoined a highway 
and the hedge originally separat- 
ing his garden from the highway 
bad been removed although it 
was apparent where the bound- 
ary lay. 

It was the defendant’s practice 
each Saturday and Sunday to 
put produce such as potatoes, 
onions, and brussels sprouts for 
sale on a trailer which was 
positioned oa his front garden 
and to sell that produce to 
members of the public between 
9am and 5.30pm. 

There was an intrusion of 
some nine feet on to the 
highway. Two informations 
were laid against tbe defendant 
alleging that be had without 
lawful authority or excuse wil- 
fully obstructed tbe highway 


Bogus gifts in sham 
duty-free scheme 


Regina v Coffins (Graham) 
The operator of a minibus 
service between London and 
Heidelberg, who charged £19 for 
the tingle journey to London, 
foiled m an appeal against 
conviction of being knowingly 
co n cer n ed in the fraudulent 
evasion of duty payable on 
alcohol and tobacco passing 
through customs as belonging to 
the passengers under a bogus 
scheme. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Lane, Lord Chief Justice, Mr 
Justice McGowan and Mr Jus- 
tice Simon Brown) on Decem- 
ber 1 dismissed the appeal of 
Graham John Dennis CoQbS, 
aged 35, of Wendover, 
alworth, London, 
conviction at 
Crown Court (Judge Phelan and 
a Jury) of contravening section 
l7(X2Xa) of the Customs .and 
Excise Management Act 19.79, 

for which he was sentenced to 1 8 
months' imprisonment. 


. MR JUSTICE McCOWAN, 
gryuig the judgment of the court, 
said that the appellant acquired 
tobacco and alcohol for the 
maximum permitted duty-free 
allowance for all passengers. 

Before passing through cus- 
toms he purported to mnfcy a 
declaration of gift to the pas- 
sengers box no genuine gift was 
intended. It was always his 
intention to retain ownership. 

In truth and in foct he was 
itHsxMisrbte .for the duty and 
none was paid. It was a sham, a 
ruse and he evaded the duty 
and, as always was bis intention. 

He was the “owner”, the 
“person . . .possessed of. .‘.the 
goods” and ‘’beneficially 
interested^ m them within the 
definition of “importer" in sec- 
tion 1(2) of the 1 979 Acl There 
was no substance in any ground 
of appeal 


9 


# 


't 


\ , "3 


V * 




-r 

A * 



j *«:.• • 


A . 


:.vi 


.1 i u ; : • 


... 

Ur?- 5 


Race- 

P - :• 

“W v . 

go -or 

Sv'.V. 

Mr. 


aCr-“ ■ 
er,.-.: 

3 i- - : 
c *. : 


fe- ■ 

Od.- • - ■ 
i’.-.v- 

ftM . . 

■ 

•-W- ■: 

; • 

Hi. • 
- ■ 

fe- 

fe" 

O- ' ‘ 
i*«*l'*- 

& - 
ftSiv. 

C'^i r - 

Srf*: £:' r 

fei-feC 








STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



Firm start to account 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began yesterd a y. Dealings end December 19. §Contango day December 22. Settlement day January 5. 

§Forwaid bargains are permitted on two previous business days. \\ 

WTnre stocks hav* only one price quoted, ttxna am mkftfe prices taken daily at 5pm. Yield, change and P/E »re calculated on the mfaitBe price 


— ® dd 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+44 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


•l 5A Breweries 


_S*wc Pitnfic 'K 


A Gtbw 

Crete ton 







Please take account of any 
minus si gns 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daOy ton 
for the weekly dividend of £16,000 


Saiuiday’s newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 





eM!# 


JjTaj 

"’im ' > 


•! 1 -~x 

: •'Tm '■ -"l* 


J J ' 

ptw-'.*- 



rirM' 1 j" 


jjj * ' 






119 

50 

213 

104 

62 

K 4 

011 

01 

11.1 

1 ® 

30 

?.7 

162 

154 

10 ? 

20 

(11 

119 

74 

164 

04 

1.2 

66 

107 

68 

63 

so 

1.4 

7 X 7 


68 

tu 

38 J 

40 

134 

au 

49 

9 ? 

M 9 

00 

271 

40 

50 

141 


55 



350 

60 

15 

150 

40 

’26 

10 

36 

23 

224 

250 

11 

90 

69 

16 

mi 

78 

37 

154 

ttb 

74 

7.5 

102 

28.9 

50 

46 

701 

29 

75 

«/ 

?5 

36 

90 

Ml 

47 

124 

54 

79 

229 

66 

11 

H 2 

29 

19 

346 


75 

17 

54 

15 

M 2 

HUS 1 

57 

117 

75 

18 

171 

111 

51 

119 

»1 

17 

ISO 

to 

36 

204 

71 

30 

M 2 

<43 

3 LT 

9 (6 

107 

107 

» 

107 

107 

57 

72 

84 

55*177 

4 n 

M 7 

V 

137 

77 

30 

ns 

129 

19 

M 6 

54 

49 

2 X 1 

76 

41 

160 

0.1 

01 


ut 

47 

125 

41 

f 7 

104 

67 

79 

159 

14 

17 


U 

53 

»6 

207 

56 

U 7 

157 

19 

n? 

90 

U 

21.4 

80 

39 

07 



11 

aio 

53 

159 

206 

31 

Ml 

17.1 

128 

40 

43 

3 


54 

mi 

39 

77 

707 

66 

76 

170 

156 

t/ 

176 

127 

41 

135 


47 

192 

62 

77 

177 



•ht- 

inn 

10 

399 

150 

46 

11 ? 

«4 

39 

152 

14 

1.4 

11,1 

Rfl 

13 

144 

10 

16 

300 






181 

99 

11 

177 



*» B * P/E 

tiT 

07 

143 

£5 

U 

U 

«s 

?o 

«4 

107 

w 

119 

» 

06 

19 

269 



71 

7.7 

73 

173 

106 

52 

173 

11 

1.1 

217 



111 

36 

79 

154 

24 

07 

177 

56 

1.7 

219 

70 b 

t 7 

13 

11 


49 

19 

H 

702 

VH 

39 

101 

1 J 

41 

97 

26 

09 

209 - 

23 

53 

113 

41 

26 

116 

94 

75 

«9 

ID 

1 ? 


46 

11 

1 U 

62 b 

20 

17.1 

50 

75 

M 0 




H 

U 

76 

1 



212 

80 

39 

103 

£1 


109 

17 

29 

80 

ID 

04 



40 

52 

i 7 .ib 

69 

952 

179 

55 

«0 

14 

07 

227 

156 

42 

130 

14 

06 

270 




07 * 

09 

120 

>'l 

19 

HI 

21 

10 

156 

01 

0 ? 

»0 

63 

09 

756 

mo 

75 

mi 

75 * 

11 

110 



20 

20 

07 

161 


ftp Lw cmaiy 


Pm _ Gan w _ 

M OOct Chm*»p 1 PC 


120 02 Ostaps 
m ffl QMMI _ 
bh o^ma&awr 
3D M MnM 
99 a CHM 

9ii az cumma n 
no n CUMOtaBM 

308 231 an Dm 
tssi 510 Ctanbo 

sr 

.9* 20 CW Sunny 
235 ITS SraS-« 

3 3S6 Cw>m_ 

Z SSS"" 

174 120 Dal Matos 
m KB onu Han 
aniraiDniMi am 

££& 

JB 2S3 now 
26to 17toH* 

00 49 MH 1 in -A' 
263 m Oms 6 Km 

m rn ft* 
n'-aas oTli Hn 


3tS 2DS Doom 
27 IS DMm HU 

3B5 m p rf—i 

topi as Bauson Pmk 
110 75 Ban 
123 9< taaukt 
va BS M 

s g^-r 


fi? «2 #+2 U 
35 35 +5 14 

-1 .. ■ 

+1 .. a 

u 

•+to SO 

• Ml 50 

.. «4 

+5 aii 
4 a n 

*i 

05 

•44 W 7 
-5 100 

• +6 7.8 

. .. 03 

• .. M 
14 

• .. 7J 

♦ 2 ^ 
•-I SO 
** 


• 41 115 

•-to 375 


22 

•-2 115 

BO 

• 157 

-I 86 
>1 114 

.. 104 

• 471 08 

•42 75 

74 

• 41 7.1 

41 7 0 

40 21 

54 

-1 54 


FINANCE AND LAND 


242 205 

177 136 AtaoHMO* 
nsr i 25 Amman 
240 IBS Bntta 1Kb 

22 10 aA 

203 219 Cndoua ' 
43 23 Gsauqr 
34 17 BUy 6 Gm 
us 132 my 8 On 
207 153 HblUo 

s a 

140 114 mi to tan 

to AtoPaiu (in 

223 IB TbraHta B*tb 


237 241 40 

130 141 -1 

123 US .. 
237 242 • .. 
10 * 

220 233 4S 
34 37 .. 

301 011 *-1 
165 100 a+3 
198 ZDT • .. 
103 H6 «+1 

mm 
m 125 .. 

310 320 40 
207 212 .. 


As 10 742 
57 25 355 

ij 42 at 

U 45 2U 

as as as 

U 25 W 
025 TO .. 


niaacW Thnts appaar on ftaga 28 


FOODS 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


511 40 M2D H/V OH m 
S44 W NMOUk 

«s ass Mann 
247 1S9 AmorCkuiU 
15S 132 B1P _ 

113 OltoBanr DHSD 

132 102 State 

109 135 tat Eton 
too 06 ft Bray 

174 JOB cutg 0Q 
306 *® COM . 

2DD us Curates 
177 125 OdA' 

M2 TI9 DO DM _ 

H5 t75 Of a Bnad 

133 U S End* ^ 

290 208 Fonquanm 
173 113 HUM (AM) 
*53 3xi nc«wi 

toil TZtoHopdW DM50 
106 OB HokUmd 
iltoW jap ante 
747 333 Lao* 

110 59 OS 

i5i nitesfc »ah> 

177 119 KM 
110 flBtoflNfeMk HUp 
176 m MM 
330 2tt MA8PD 
73 30 SriAbSptetrai 
240 170 MKHttM 
170 87 VaHUOn 


320 T75 Afiflh TV K 
417 X5 CaaU TV 
52 27 teapte 
24Q 17B HIV knl 
477 14 UVT rate 
3S3 100 SM TV 
276 1 TVS H/V 

50 31 TSW 

341 219 Ham IV 
220 137 TV-AM 
158 10* lftta1V_ 
191 i vortntam TV 


50 - -to 

ZB 237 +1 

448 450 0+1 
238 343 *1 

147 150 *1 

111 .. -to 

1*1 1Z7 +1 

M0 150 
74 77 
122 124 4-1 

Z5B £7 •-•! 
HB 200 041 
175 177 0-1 
W 20 -to 
167 KO +to 
140 M2 0-1 
212 214 .. 

in izt 4* 
240 243 0+1 
157 MO *3 
306 301 —1 

931 - -to 
94 87 • .. 
11 11 to 
403 405 +1 

* 110 a-tto 
Ite • -to 
175 176 +1 

« 95 .. 

08 Ml 
238 - 

48 S> 

232 1 ! 237to • .. 
10 199 -1 


52 a5 139 
456 Q 124 
126 11 150 

55 50 15J9 

03 .. - . 

25 15 228 

17 IS HI 
37 25 175 


.. .. 57J 

114 49 254 

45 25 152 


310 322 -1 139 43 157 

380 403 .. 

40 50 • .. 19 56 7.1 

203 205 +1 HI 06 56 

448 448 a .. 258 U 111 

343 340 .. 156 fj 114 

245 245 +1 M3 56 122 

40 40 26 50 96 

m m a-a taa si .. 

190 203 94 32 ... 

149 152 • .. 59 59 74 


45 10 165 
23 a 113 460 
nj U 144 
u 27 IZS 
55 45 324 
175 30 WJ 
114 - 45 33 
.. .. 223 

lit 42 86 
106 54 111 
3.1 4J 153 
11 17 172 

7 A '65 »Il 
179 11 02 
IIUM 
OJ 49 214 
65 40 100 

njo 33 156 
115 56 123 

193 46 179 

32 16 06 
15 .: 56 159 

19 13 285 
55 24 157 

8 19 ZU 

20 UO 
U U 61 
46 54 7.1 

19 23 220 
49 15 2X8 

5ft 35 137 

U 26 106 
m ii 85 
61 U 62 

44 15 *49 

76 51 057 

29 19 210 

09 43 135 
25 49 234 

114 46 02 

66 34 102 

U II Ml 
S 3 32 146 
®e 45 iti 
U U Ml 
46 15 175 

321 55 119 

tLB 

08 U 229 
154 50 149 

126 59 126 

97b 57 mi 


320 248 EnM 
22S mo Edbn 
205 BS BS 

43'. 

153 nmEto 
Stto 24toBKbata (ME) V 

'Z.S-ZZ! 1 * 

m 295 BtfbbDteQw 
ZOto 20-.B»in Md)7 
165 24 BUM Horn 

s ss 

3*2 107 EMU 
214 U Emma 
423 312 Em 
55 22 Fatam 
42 26 FMteMcte 
148 100 fesarfcff 

1M U taSsCSW 

nafu 

*41to 2P,SS3 ?&mi H/V 
245 157 tagilNte 
0 « FMaOtal 
(31 84 SB U 

305 21S CXN 
m 280 GH 
116 B0 EbM Eng 
200 M Gate 
15D 111 tan 
11to7S6htaa 
344 194 flUMd 
5BS 240 (5*0 Xan 
18Z 107 ItaUH HU0> 
3® SS§ ftm* 

100 153 am 
97 59 total Ptutai 
252 134 K* bn 

^ “M 

2B5 175 UNHi 
230 235 tWma 
57to 23*aHoapaa W 
SB 20 KMR 
21Sto141 Hn* 

ZH MS Do 95 Car 
Bfflto 90 Do 5to» PI 
PHtotlSto DO 10% 

275 >75 jmTeww. 

(03 403 taarMSkop 

3 SSX- 

221 140 Hunoa Caote 

281 56 Han* 

222 B5 Hate (J) 

220 122 MM A to 
92 17 HoEftW 
330 119 HnMaaa 
120 70 ttadta_ 

325 2M HngM 

120 09 HHH9ft8*> 

491 207*ift*tel State* 
1*1 119 M ' 

315 165 Wan 
295 240 Jtanntadt 
2il BBtotete aba 
015 473 atonal tarn 
2(3 1st tan MOM* 
44to 22toJalaan 6 Hi 
Stt 235 jawoo 
140 32tojan *9ta 
«z 67 jMdnnmnte 
29 21 KtaWB 

■m as un 
325 us may ad . 

13B Iffi Kamty Ml 
2B8 230 *anM* tt) 

270 123 teta 


M3 

45 

11 

107 

07 

KM 

99 

37 

146 

27 

66 


70 

11 

129 

40 

17 

102 

139 

60 


170D 

56 

110 

80 

04 


50 

32 

111 

00 

56 

66 




57 

30 

105 

U 

15 

t!7 

157 

40 

179 



no 

7.1 

64 

89 

7.1 

54 

145 

50 

07 

177 

64 

19 

239 


14 


50 

15 

70 

03 

05 


01 

00 

137 

70 

03 

70 

175 

53 

17.7 

41 

71 

110 

04 

80 

176 

65 

01 

too 

33 

199 

50 

40 

70 

2.1 

12 

150 

50 

16 

150 

200 

77 

193 

12B 

41 

Itofi 

155 

53 

84 


43 

MD 

IO0 

17 

02 

79 

17 

204 

129 

10 

117 

66 

46 

106 

M3 

75 

110 

74 

ag 

717 

19 

11 

M2 

17 

so 

ii 

no 

43 


87 

70 


11 

ti 


79 

10 

1HK 

13? 

13 

176 

714 

49 

07 

« 

27 

30 

r n 

109 

17 

159 

11 

37 

110 

47 

22 

115 



524 

43a 

59 

217 

119 

30 

179 

59 

65 


12.1 

36 


09 

70 

00 

70 

40 

144 

7.1 

17 

M0 

00 

12 

200 

■6 8 

115 

141 

119 


170 

39 

120 

59 

12 

70 

15 

1? 

14 r 

14 

53 

714 

19 

17 

217 

11.4 

44 

129 

17 


140 

214 

84 

212 

69b 

12 

213 


47 

177 


370 

02 

504 

22 

M2 

60 

59 

19 

mo 

27 

201 

27 

ttJ 

11 

112 

77 

79 

19 

749 

47 

17 

09 

SB4 

39 

1X6 

49 

136 


a a B te w 

mo 39 amtamiin 

lito OtoHaum 

in a ftm 

563 271 see® 

54 22 tea 

S tt tataSaiOi 

7 2toOteat 
« 11 tot* Start 
no a tu 
113 44toPBfedHM 
41 21 lto«a 

^sr 0 -* 

- 

rwr 

lfl 41 Irani 

200 bo aw ta n 

2iB n unn 


U U 147 . 

u u .. 


139 DID 11 
216 4J >43 


a .. 34 

17.4(116 50 

627 “ « 


11 49 18 

269 4.1 U9 
.. ..226 

US 8 » 

U . u M 

II 115 
Xhiij m 
ft U 46 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 



PAPER, PRINTING, ADVERT'D 



X 


W 

IX 


100 

70 

109 

220 

771 

IX 

mo 

SPAT" 

1 181 

ae 

m 

206 • 

40 

1 .. 

.. • 
79 

19 

270 

150 

137 

42 


115 

116 


14 

1.2 

310 

725 

1 


(Pi 

176 

-3 

RD 

49 

M 9 

410 

3 Z 5 

Fan tan 

383 

3 K a+i 

60 

24 

207 

62 V 48 

ERA 

57 

58 to 

+to 



467 

110 U 

sswasr 

105 

1*8 

115 

MS 

+17 

03 

47 

M 7 

7.1 

131 

« 

Wtan 

IM 

iw m +3 

7.4 

04 

ft 17 , 

103 

37 

Wi tegs 

40 

V 


10 

35 

1 U 

TOR 

137 

m®tei 

150 

152 4 


36 

26 

M 3 

170 

130 

teftteta 

wn 

173 ft -2 

RB 

50 

to? ! 

311 

H 


315 

SO 

-1 

11.1 

39 

m 

403 

3 X 

Rn% Uteri 

375 

300 a-s 

111 

40 

152 

54 

X 

tay tan 

X 

37 

-to 

. . t 


S 02 




HE) 



00 

48 

139 


14 A 


Wfl 

no 


34 

10 

110 

172 

74 

119 

51 

Sara- 

WB 
r 04 

122 

K 


40 

2 J 

110 

IK 

ttStoZtat 

181 

IM 

• • 

7.1 

39 

107 


7 U 

*3 

40 

IS 

205 

m 


3 D 

29 


SOto 


10 

32 

174 


*2 




110 


43 

49 


195 

a +27 

114 b 

59 

710 

2 R 7 

•4 

66 b 

24 


m 

•+1 


04 

19.4 

in 


79 

4 ? 

410 

715 

+3 

17 

77 

71 3 

10 


05 

10 

375 

727 


170 

60 

SKI 




10 


2 S 7 

+5 

173 

4.2 

125 

130 


19 

79 

139 

OK 

♦7 

7.1 

06 

147 

774 

• 41 

HR 

43 

17.1 

315 


90 

76 

169 

n 

-1 

43 

49 

739 

162 



06 

177 



*9 

30 

»e 

340 

+S 

too 

30 

04 

133 


17 

44 


3*1 


96 

7.7 

21.1 

795 

-7 

Ii 4 b 

39 

M 3 

T 3 S 

m -6 

01 

40 

MR 

125 

-3 

17 b 

46 

117 

68 




02 




15 

180 

715 

+22 

231 

37 

MO 

113 

+ 1 to 

90 

60 


347 


fin 

16 

179 

317 

• 44 

47 

15 


717 


106 

11 

17 

in 

+5 

1 J 

10 

336 


-1 



206 

105 

84 

7 ? 

47 

111 

■TO 


17 

3 ? 

146 

530 

• 40 

19 

19 



PROPERTY 


HOTELS AND CATSSRS 




DRAPERY AND STORES 


19 07 089 

-2 135 39 152 

+1 24 09 119 

.. 186 47 176 
-2 143 11 141 

-to 11 26 155 

+3 Sr 16 200 

♦to 23 16 769 

SS 13 147 

19 24 1(9 

+to 75 49 104 


Hod Lew CWW 


BANKS discount HP 


90 b 30 72 

..» 420 

150 b Sj 


740 « 
049 r«. 
»V 46 -j 
3 fto» 

jpe 

3 3 


mm.. 

: *3. 

. 4 

4 to 
31 to ft- 1 * 

3 *i 

oi m*b 
3 ® • - . 
n 
sod 

% -1 

£ m+i 

«3 

S50 

370 4 

W 1 *3 


1 » *5 ■■ 

'i> ii> ti> 

JU 5.1 M 

all 56 59 
13 41 112 
139 23 27.7 
239 102 Si 
20 90 03 

139 53 .. 

206 54 .. 

bo a; .. 

ws « 
g n 1,7 

& § 

151 53 50 

33 40 

192 17 217 
125 52 116 
100 39 UUI 
250 56 56 

17 53 113 

Kfi 2.1 .. 

74 B 04 

HI 13 .. 

27£ 57 51 


B 


17 

26 

13? 

39 

IS 

179 

210 

25 

14 

290 



125 

30 

22 

503 

30 

04 

672 

14 

21 

ML/ 

17.1 

21 

XI 

11 

30 

150 

32 

16 

111 

11 

12.1 

40 

26 

m 

176 

40 

134 

104 

46 

192 

IT 

49 

186 

100 

24 

110 

10 

19 

170 

40 

10 

239 


10 

ms 

39. 

40 

11J 

136 

22 

234 

u 

36 

1/J 

03 

30 

U.1 

26 

26 

75 

11 

30 

210 

90 

49 

14 


27 

«7 



37J 

56 

is 

11/ 

71.4 

4.7 

910 

300 

21 


306 

£9 

143 

70 

35 

17.1 

20 

11 

03 

11 

79 

170 

UO 

7.1 

120 

39 

56 

118 

toll 

64 


12 

36 

276 

13 

7.1 

130 

11.1 

1.; 

779 


*1 

(55 

56 

60 

30 

19 


04 

14 

27.7 

/.I 

.11 


111 

37 

au 

1.1 

10 

273 

S9 

46 

9S3 

4a 

1? 

826 

71 

2J 

3Si 

69 

46 

117 

5*6 

40 

110 

66 

36 

1U 

1/ 

29 

174 

40 

IT 

138 

hi 

U 

111 

110 

36 

150 



11/ 

79 

17 

245 

12 

46 

MS 



m 

43 

26 

330 

M.7 

36 

1H2 

36* 

21 


226b 

36 

i'io 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


JW 265 UBm 330 33S m*3 F4J 43 IfA 

m m teranto 210 215 ..17 13 »6 

ira xhmma 112 im .1 05 04 119 

» <2tote«H » 53 -1 ..I .. 09 

im a uh mo mi a-fto u u mi 

30 D 223 Mto*eC* 3 P 299 300 *5 41 1.4 54 

2 28 k*jm 70 n 3 .... ZU 

S'i O'lMaiiin civ aa -a 

220 Hi MpSk . 181 «4 ft+S 23 13 S 3 


234 4 110 

1 175to 99 

129 +1 52 

5S0 -1 Z57h 

07 *1 60 

228 .. 112 
300 -0 83 

are .. .. 

305 a-J 114 
250 +10 56 
51 a . . 19 

30to • +2 05 

305 .. 364 

43 .. • 

226 *28 114 

'& 5B 

SI -1 19 

125 .. 34 

S 44 243 
• 29 

XI +1to 154 
260 -to 96 

MS -*4to 114 
21>a +2to .. 

3H a+M 190 
233 a+Mtom 
ttO -2 90 

W.^to 3 £ 

JO +1 39 

m • ... 3i4t 

36 *5 UM 

® +15 157 

75 39 

m a +2 17 

418 a+4 17.1 

A “ 

im -1 93b 

m >1 0.1 

SOD .. U 
MD +5 26 

an a-4 1 , 119 
Ml .. 34 
13B *+5 S3 

1 P0 r i +1 01 

ins a+to 99b 

1*3 21 

42 • 14 , 

396 +3 U 
305 • 96 

230 *42 ttX 
13to 

£ + * « : 

^ -i' 179 
51to +b 19 

f m .. .73 

• .. 55 
MO -1 7.1. ■ 

212 a+1to 59 . 
ZT0 .. 1.4 I 

m +i 11.1 
a -a 57b 


ai'i +1 20 

1« +1 183 


e +2 26i 

SB .. 24 

•75 «+4 29* 

440 .. 220 


+0 

89 

10 

ns 

! -1. 

36 

11 

249 

90 

47 

1/ 

a .. 

29 

44 

17 

1 +1 

13 

50 

114 

33 

20 

309 


36 

49 

56 


14 

92 

70 


16 

10 

99 

i .. 

M2 

77 

HU 

■-H. 

74 

62 

141 

1 +to 

50 

S3 

209 


75b 

32 

152 


114b 

26 

186 


76 

30 

64 

■ a .. 

14b 


139 


37 

27 

186 

a +5 

17 

54 

90 

1 •+! 

U0 

80 

11? 

1 +3 

55 

50 

94 

1 -5 

69 

10 

XI 

a .. 

49 

50 

06 

• +! 

0 50 

69 

00 

• +l 

70 

IB 


a-1 

99 

54 

269 

a .. 

33 

43 

111 

> +r« 

11 

62 

770 


55 

49 

Ml 

1 -T 

110 

5/ 

100 


129 

41 

174 

’ a-2 

14 

at 

8* 

mi 


100 

09 

54 


14 

39 

XI 

+T 

WJ 

15 

130 


10 

17 

27.1 


17 

36 

796 


130 

12 

120 


57 

18 

XI 

+3 

C.1 

70 

• Ml 
+3 ' 
+1 

T7.1 

41 

106 

l54 

27 

160 

-Ito 



933 

-5 

90 

56 

735 


799 

47 

130 

+15 

20 

04 

213 


69 

09 

286 

+2 

180 

31 

180 


4.1 

57 

139 


109 

42 

110 

1 -ia 

29 

10 

370 

• +1to XI 

75 

210 


10 


179 

♦to 

54 

17 

126 


39 

29 


! +3 

225 

43 

HU 

; -2 

74 

40 

141 

a -3 

1.7 

10 

34 

•-1 

239 

36 

1/0 

+M 

R6 

27 

94 

9 +3 

54 

10 

180 


50 




66 

17 

150 


11 

09 

184 


.. ■ 


an 

+21 

04 

45 

MB 1 

1 +5 

54 

06 

417 


15 

36 

173 

i a .. 

46 

34 

HLB 


50 

87 

13 


. . B 


232 , 

a+2 
>• .. 

& 

10 

11.1 

389 

110 



a.- 

IM •*} 
110 • 4-1 to 
64', -1 


79 30 239 
2.8 00 . . 
66 44 514 

179 37 203 

S 01 40 229 
7.1 30 121 

74 29 24.4 
.. .. 34 

29 29 3SS 
56 11 50 

69 39 56.7 

200 10 129 

S'ii* 

17 34 22* 

121 73 126 
59 51 126 
. . . . 70 

as 49 11.1 
M.lb 50 252 
11 13 469 


56 21 225 

• +5 139 29 266 

• ... MO 11 300 

• +2 19 39 .. 

51 20 219 

♦9 111 19 149 

-a at all KL7 

29 8.0 

+1 SJ 39 K.4 

• +3 149 42 229 

i*« 99 17 212 

• 90 40 . . 

• -*2 57 24 709 

+1 76 49 2M 

• +55 to 108 ZB 7BB 

• +2to HLI 47 210 

a +2 7.1 19 .. 

52 40 170 
+2 II 59 «0 

• .. 40 16 17J 

.. 57 10 574 

.. HI U 1U 

.. 7.1 DJ 115 

•-1 77 79 146 

• . . 173 80 5! 

• ... 17 17 5M 

+6 26b 14 140 

+7to 126 4.4 15.7 

*5 .. 

m-xr. Of 15 441 
-1 43 29 349 

*2 36 26 257 

-to 0.1 10 457 

• .. 57b 19 304 

.. 0.1 ai .. 

• . . 14 BJ 557 

.. 122 49 130 

• ... 51 U 61 

+10 29 13 292 

♦ to 90 46 182 
-10 136 18 MB 

50 17 165 

-i‘ 08 00 ra.i 

• .. 19 26 263 

.. 17.1 07 150 

• +5 57 24 127 

+9 279 31 *03 

.. 25.0 12 277 

+1 HUM 
.. 07 2.3 500 

.. 12.1 70 96 


SHIPPING 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


to a +!to 
toWto +1 

47 1 +to 
2 » a-i 
100 -1 
W -8 
158 ... 

S 3 

% ;’to 


48 

126 


284 

15 

70 

11 

120 

34 

115 

3i 

153 

103 

37 

155 

36 


XD 

86 

59 

109 

17 

M7 


40 

19 

204 

34 


36 

MS 

nu 


45 

104 

DJ 


24 

196 

56 

70 

11 

U5 

47 

nu 

16 

>39 

40 

11 

46 

116 

69 

1U 

39 

174 

40 

113 

46 

311 

14 

163 


B25 M8 Assoc ft Pm 315 318 

388 213 ft riumuiHb 290 293 a-1 

356 190 CMU 272 275 *+3 

94 SI FWorUnte SO 62 -3 

603 . 480 Ste 407 507 a+2 

76 54toJarabS (J) S3 85 

12'i 4toLta Sto 74 +4 

41 X tea's? DU* 32 X -1 

255 188 OnTiunt 234 236 -1 

STB <28 P * 0 Wd 503 507 -t 

173 86 taMfl(Hte) 163 1« • .. 
3G0 127 lUn* 325 335 

390 380 TindUSCMt 370 380 


78 54toAcdn(J) 
124 ItoLyk 
41 X tear DM*, 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


37D 290 FI _ 362 372 a+2 B629M7 

208 145 tawBBOft I7D 174 .. 143 60 M.7 

48 8 Htaatas 45 <7 +4 &7« 15 .. 

210 166 LtaM Homnb W5 an -2 68 49 W9 

az 54 totem* 6 BUM 86 20 44 69 209 

170 62 tart M4 in a .. 55 10 114 

157 116 snog 6 Rate 132 U5 .. 12S 96 02 


273 150 S* 


210 223 +1 04 26 270 



gtoamjttq 

lUL 

tSSSSu su 
m S 5 % 5 U w 



44 

27 

II 

f£ 

35 

10 

.. 

MB 

49 


389 

54 

II 

114 

24 

-2 

11.4 

34 

•+i 

14 

26 

"vs 

wn 

129 

3 

-5 

120 

39 

• .. 

149 

20 

-to 

& 

OB 

•-2 

H 4 

20 

• .. 

56 

17 

• .. 

ZZ 6 

49 

• -1 

226 

62 


127 a aw 

X 9 Am El 

iS gj?s 
12 3 


Cfto .. 

131 -1 

370 +10 

aa -1 

2 DB -Ito 
220 +5 


118 

X 

122 

27 +1 

•• 

•» 


8 

25 

92 

2 



Wto 

417 

4 B • .. 

m 

>Il 

140 

m 

136 +5 

486 

7.1 

/5 

131 

152 + 1 to 

90 

11 

11 

71 

30 

& +Z 
367 •+? 

m 

&> 

110 

B 

64 a+t 

36 

82 

m 

IX 

32 

IX a-ito 

70 

17 

M 

« 


2.1 

46 

59 


Sf +a 

mi 

U 

56 

• 

■ 




300 

* -S 

.0 

> 



TOBACCOS 



,101 

BAT 

456 

4 Q 

+2 

184 

40 

126 

MD 

100 

EWHfl 

138 

M 3 





UO 

178 

108 

127 

am 

mdkV 

US 

173 

174 

Vto 

no 

S 6 

11 


560 

MS 

tad Tad 

- 2 K 

295 

•4 

M .7 

17 

196 

m 

153 

tarns On 

m 

m 

•+2 

107 

4.1 

160 

107 

xto 

BtecUon) 

171 

174 


19 

40 

70 

H 5 

@ 


TOO 

103 

• .. 

u 

u 

110 

SB 

w 

37 

34 

-1 



229 

1 « 

iXtoftteta 

137 

1 » 

•+1 

89 i 

82 


IX 

77 

taw 1 un* 

Ml 

IX 

•+ISto 7.1 

M 

3 T .1 

JT 

a: 

'SSU 

Kto 

3 U 

9 


57 

89 

33 

MS 

102 

Wi 

craaw(6 

154 

15 R 

•+3 

40 

.10 

126 

?n 

711 

Bam 


771 

• .. 

9.1 

4.1 

110 

M 


Ota 

48 

hi 

+1 

07 

14 

384 

152 

b 1 

Dnmmd 

141 

143 

• .. 

46 

3 ? 

U 

a 

2 

Dw m 

«? 

87 


70 

4.1 

no 

IM 

K 


( 8 $ 

01 

!U 

•♦1 

+1 

10 

79 

n > 

7.1 

82 

57 

33 

Wteteaa 


44 

+1 


40 


137 

07 


114 

116 


10 


81 

* 

sssr 1 

z 

132 

119 

-3 

-1 

40 

50 

34 

4 ? 

24.1 

114 

701 

R 3 


in 1 * 

703*1 


69 

34 

136 


IX 

Lots 

MO 


•+l 

89 

49 



M 

Uw 

130 


+3 

14 

T.l 


MS 

(15 

72 

71 

3SXm 

HQ 

H5 


82 

17 

79 

69 

M 6 

77', 

H 

tan 

Xto 

77'. 

+2 


59 

174 

158 

M 

Prttsri’A' 

174 

t» 

•+to 

66 


49 ' 

30 

mma 

47 to 

43 'j 

a+to 

21 

u 


19 

IB 

SET 

1.14 

OT 

-3 

12 

96 


in 

fttoSciBS 

110 

113 

•+l 

39 

32 


ID 

133 

sm 

in 

IX 


7.4 



79 

4 R 

SmHkter H 

75 


• +', 

36 

1.1 


m 

11 

Gwddte ‘K 

73 

30*i 


09 

U 

78 

MB 

n 

Tu*gd Jnw 

IX 

135 


2 D 

X 


210 

£l 5 

•-to 




iffito 

TStoToari 

Bto 

101 

• .. 

10 



350 

29 

YbMydt 

350 

2/0 


(Oil 


(f 





























































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 






gj 3*gr Chng TP 


Hgti Income 90S S*2 -02 6M 

NAw Thai nso 12X0 *Z& art 

Recowrj 227.7 2422 -21 MJ 

M T«R 36l0 379M +0.1 972 

Si Vhom K SU 88.1 -08 594 

B VbwK LIS Oh 78.1 783 +12 072 

Train BuSmCo* 187.1 1974 +7J7 

EoraCBi TS 49.1 820 +09 090 








SE 


CLERICAL MEDICAL IHT TRUST 
MANAOERS 

Nonow Pian. BnSCd BS2 OJH 
0600 37S393 

Adis’ Grown 259 279 

Burt* Hah hcoma 437 450# 
Euopun Growtfl 32.1 34.0* 

Garni Busty 387 soo 
GUI s Bud n Gm 27.1 2BJ3 
CM 8 rand ne 22fl 233m 


htf he TO 
Jsom Grown 
Peagrea Odi 


223 733m 
24 B 2S9 
209 203 
348 387 
2491 254 


+18 180 
-OB 4JS0 
+47 2J» 
-07 270 
.. 3-80 
.. 050 
+0.1 2.40 
.. SCO 
+48 090 
-05 200 


01-628 5181 
Amer A GM he 
Da AcGum 
Amer Timmd lac 

Do Accuai 

MU TB me 
Do Accmn 
Cony 8 OB Inc 
Do Accra 
Extra kc Tot Inc 
Do Aocun 
income That 
Do tecum 
In Growth Fd Inc 
Do Accum 
Jan 8 Gm ok 
D o Accum 
Uontijr Ok Fd 

Raiumi y 
Do tecum 
Eurepun Inc 
Do Aocun 
Fhanchl me 
Do Accum 


221.8 2348 +47 .. 

2288 333-3 +45 . . 

210.4 2228 +54 172 

2182 2308 +58 172 

2014 2138 -35 235 

2*54 2508 -4.7 235 

885 900 +0-2 5.31 

117.0 1235 +47 6-31 

1668 176.4 -15 4.62 

1808 1015 -15 *82 

1198 1254* -05 414 


Him 


II 


NLA Towr. AddhcandM BaStt. Crajocn 
01-688 4355 01-626 6011 


1285 1358* 
1658 1755 
1865 1958 
948 1005 
958 1015 


.. 414 
+28 .. 
+28 .. 
+18 057 
+14 057 


840 888* +0.4 490 
1489 1SG8 .. 145 
1615 1704 +45 1 45 


1615 1704 
688 718 
688 718 
488 618 
488 518 


-45 080 
-05 080 
+ 1.1 1.00 
+1.1 180 


Pbtnun End. Dortdna Sumy 
0306 8 85 05 9 


i 


1964 2078 
1095 1109* 
1165 1229 
221.7 234.7 
81.4 RUM 
2840 3008 


COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 

161. ChMasda. London EC2V 6EU 
01-725 1® 

Enemy Trust 49.1 518 +02 

Extra mean* 1678 1778 +02 

Rnxncol 11S.0 1788 -08 

OH Strategy 568 501# +Oi 

Growth kNKlmM 281 0 2974 -43 

Income 8 Growth -«4 436# -04 

Jaaonese Grown 196.4 2079 +08 

Mn Amer Grown 1095 1139* +02 

M Reoonry 1185 1229 +15 

SmnMr GO'S 221.7 2347 -07 

GMetFlteTR 61.4 SUM -02 

SpocMSHAoe 2840 3005 -62 

CROWN UWT TRUST SSIV1CES 
Crown Kouu. Waking GU21 1XW 
04882 5033 

High I nco me That 2508 268.8 -05 

eSwtn -Thai 222.1 2383 -35 

Amman Trust 1324 1409 +3.1 

CRUSADER UtOTTRUST MANAGERS LID 
Una. Sumy RHZ 88L 
roS«424 

UX means 478 509 -44 

UK Growth Aeon 464 518 -0.8 

DO Dot 434 515 -08 

EutXMM GrowOl 600 635 +0.7 

PsatcGrowth 504 608 +24 

&MIMT TRUST MANAGERS 
4 MiMta Cnmcam. EdrOurch 
031-226 3482 

Amman FuM 742 TOM +21 

CxprtxJ Rjna 1005 1074 -08 


+05 484 
♦02 557 
-OS 252 
+0.1 187 
-43 258 
-04 464 
+08 060 
+35 140 
+15 215 
-07 152 
-05 5.48 
-02 151 


FP Booty DM 
Do Accra 
FP Bred hi DM 
Da Accum 
O W m r dH Op DM 
Do Accum 


195.1 207.1M -25 283 

3285 3407# -45 283 

1038 1095« +03 658 

121.7 1284# +03 058 
1707 1815a -1.1 1.73 

177.7 1608# -18 1.73 


FUNDS IN COURT 

Puttc TnatM Khgsmy WC2 

01-405 4300 


rnju+ii 

Onus Inc 
Hgh YM9 


395.7 3105 
1527 1575 
2254 2203 



Hk»l DM Fund 1099 1104# 
MamNonsI Fund 2139 2278 

TtMOMtOfl Fund 2S.4 278 

Smflr Jap Go's Fhd 349 37.1 

Tokyo Futd 1609 1798 


(Ex) Amor (3 
(Exi Japan C 
(Ext Rootle | 
(Ext Smaflar 


Ammon Fund 742 TOM +21 157 

ChXtM Fund 1005 107.0 -08 159 

Sow* 6 he Bind U98 1388 -18 453 

HUl DM Raid 1099 1104# -05 580 

MamNonsI Fund 2139 2278 +80 099 

nasoaroo Fund 254 27.0 +04 087 

Smflr Jap Op'S Fhd 349 37.1 +45 .. 

Tokyo Futd 1689 1798 +38 0.00 

(£x| Amsr Oj 1478 151.0 -09 353 

(Exi Japan (31 1121115.1# +45 018 

!E,1 PkHc W 3318 3407 +11.1 059 

(Exi Srcakv Jop (4) 2048 2098 +38 010 

kmtuod 295 314 +0.1 918 

EAGLE STAR UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bath Rood, Cha U anh a m. Qhuca i Mr GL33 7LD 
0242 521311 

UK Balanced he 69.7 74M -14 350 

Do Accum 715 759# -07 212 

UK Grown Aocun BM 948 -45 216 

UK M?i Inc hC 679 714# -09 448 

M Aniu KM Accum 704 721 +14 071 

Far Eastern Accum 1115 1188 +28 086 

European Accum 925 987 +04 1.17 

UK 09 I H he 487 527# -18 090 

Do Accum 529 58.1# +0.1 8.73 


1478 151.0 
1121 1131# 
3318 3407 
(4) 2048 2088 
295 314 




GTUWT MANAGERS 
8m Floor, a. oevonaMra Sa Lone 
01-283 2S75 DoaJhg 01-426 9431 
1 849 89.1 


1008 1074 
1449 1845 
789 639 
1656 1834 
1788 1908 


London GC2M 4YJ 
9431 

89.1 +18 1.10 

1074 -18 270 

1545 -28 280 

833 ..Si® 

1934 +18 170 

908 +3.6 OftO 


57.8 815# +23 0.60 
649 S9.1 +18 1-10 

2485 2655 +48 010 

1244 1324# +3.1 040 
284 0 3025 +28 090 

786 83.7 -05 060 

619 648# +04 46Q 


trt 


93-100. SialkiQ Hd. I 
0622 874791 
MLA Amancan 
ULAGMaM 
MLA tn uroou oonl 
MLA GUI Uni: 

MLA Incoma 
ma Eunpaan 




tfsttiu*. Kara MEI4 1XX 

258 288 +18 093 

33.1 358# -09 214. 
SS8 631 +07 083 

217 229# +0.11156 
418 449# +05 587 
329 345 +02 073 


-08 3JS 
-02 779 
-04 459 
+09 987 
+48 035 
+09 075 
+45 006 
-0.1 282 




syiMignway. samp mgs 

Grown IMS 7S8 797 

Gat A Ftrod ht 1031 1067 

S I Income Urate 115.1 1229 

l YMd GM Uni 579 530 
Drawn Urate 1487 1668 
N Amancan Ms 748 798 
Far East lima 991 1059 

Sroaflar Cox Fond 738 778 


H E NCA P UMT TRUST 

team Hp. 2S2 RcxnRjnl Rd. E7 

01-234 6544 

Morcap 1344 1422# -15 472 

MERCURY FUND HAMMERS LTD 
33. Kh9 VBBaa SL EG4R BAS 
0V2B0 2060 


Go Aocun 
Energy M 
Do Acoxn 
Bara hcoma 
Do Accum 
Goman Oh he 
Do ACaaa 


W 


01-280 2060 
Amor Groadh 991 1048# 

Do Accum nn.4 mu# 

Amor hcoma 52.4 6&« 

DoAccun 639 58.1 

Empoon Growth 144.1 1524 

Do Acoxn 149.1 1577 

aanarai 2*59 2595 

Do Aocun 4026 4268 

GK A Fbafl 794 797# 

DO AOCUn 925 S29# 

hcoma B7 908 

Do Acoxn 965 102.1 

Hor us Bo n# 2738 2638c 

DO Accum 3385 3635c 

Jmm 1631 1639 

Do Aeon 1905 2015 

Recovery 2029 214-0# 

O0 Aocun 8135 23039 

Bromn DM 23*4 2404 

Exempt Aocun 3649 3745 

Earn me Fund he 828 874c - 

Da Accum 64.1 63So ■ 

WOUND BAMC GROUP UWT TRUST 


CaxwoodVhe. 9hwGt. Need. SMBhUSl 3RD 
0742 768642 


Do Aeon 
Recovery 
80 Aocun 

Bb# DM 
Exmpt Au. uii 
Earn me Fund he 
Da Accum 


+38 189 
+32 158 
+08 486 
+08 488 
+15 099 
+15 099 
-14 153 
-24 183 
+32 799 
+32 789 
+38 496 
+18 486 
+33 182 
+78 182 
+58 080 
+39 090 
-35 247 
-34 247 
+15 270 
+17 270 
+15 346 
+15 348 


ill 


iMnstoda Park. Bum 
0392 52155 
General Trust 
moan# Thai 
kWKTuUon# Thai 
American 
Japan 
Tnai at fn» 

MAG SECURITIES 
Throe Oum, Tower I 
01-626 4589 
Amer A Gm ho 
Do Aocun S 


Capital hcoma 
_ Do Accum 


775 815 
1049 ms 


Commotety A Gm 1238 1863# +30 278 


2828 3454 
2715 2831 


-04 170 
-05 nun 
+18 080 
+18 280 
+28 080 
+38 250 


+45 152 
+58 192 


Do Accum 
Bon Hgh ho 
Do Aocun 
GMA FbMhe 
Do Acoxn 

X YMtl 
Accum 


Jtgan A Pad flc 

Do Acoxn 

ft Amman he 
Do Aocun 


1814 1948# +42 276 
588 621 .. 211 

685 715 +0.1 2TI 

485 515# +0.1 988 
■ 32 833# +05 988 
1534 1848# .. 279 

2638 2885# .. 579 

1721 1836 -18 386 

2639 3042 -19 386 

3027 321.1 +28 051 

3175 3368 +95 051 

1121 1265# +35 14* 
1432 1518# +45 144 




UNLISTED SECURITIES 


H0r Low Corapsiy 


Prtcx Emm W 

M DM BTnoiGr P % P/E 


rtrtt+a 


aw 


s 

54 

• -1 

z 

IX 

133 

• .. 

3. 

45 

ft 

-2 

1. 

38 

40 



W> 

1H 



1+ 

15 



«! 

98 

+5 

7 

i 2/4 

277 

+15 

Z. 

1IH 

112 

+2 


IU 

155 

+3 

2_ 

3+7 

3+5 



SOD 

316 



142 

147 


* 

313 

316 

+ 1 


JUS 

105 


8) 

520 

550 

-10 

14) 

31 

33 

+1 


Iffi 

17b 


111 

1« 

14/ 


71 

H/ 

>2 



53 

88 

+1 


+3 

44*1 



202 

20/ 

+5 

7 

73 

IB 


51 

108 

113 


6> 

23 

» 


07 

45 

ft 

+2 

18'. 

17 



Bl 

N+ 



i 120 

123 


01 

1.18 

143 

-2 

S3 

l« 



ft 

X 



38 

9 



HB 

112 a+2 

8' 

Mb 

150 

+3 


281 

SO 

+3 

01 

131 

134 



ID 

21 



75 

BU 

• +5*t 


xa 

228 

+28 

5< 

180 

190 

+2 

125 

M 

58 

+5 

44 

44 

4b 


1( 

335 

345 

-5 


TO 

ms 



2ft 

23D 


119 

2‘j 

3*. 


82 

87 

-i 

31 

16D 

1/U 


29 

32 

33 


IS? 

157 



135 

1+5 

-5 


53 

ft 



1*1 

IB* 

+3 


12B 

131 


31 

155 

1» 

-5 

148 

153 #+1 

22 

9 

10'i 


3( 


2ft 9-3 

U 


10*1 

_ V A 


MB 

+4 

36 


44 


TU 

BOO 



83 

58 


19 

143 

1+8 

-2 

39 

31 'j 

9 


52 

55 

-i 


112 

11/ 


59 

ft 

85 



US 

143 


39 

li % 

-1 

■ .. 

33 

42 




148 

150 



30 

42 


/I 

155 

US 


32 

67 

*0? 



ft 

8B 


71 

395 

415 

1-3 

as 


S3 



97 

MB 

+4 

04 

91 

ft 

+7 

26 

HE 


S3 


-1 


142 

145 #-2 

15 

45'1 ft'i 
95>i 100-> 

■rf' 

2.1 

SB 

83 






T5'» 



29 


25 



W5'j 168*1 

+2 

57 

47 


+1 

29 

IIS'i H6'i 

+1 

29 

ft 

67 

80 

70 

♦T 


278 

288 


*3 


MO 



21*. 22*. 

+1*1 

08 

44 

47 



1Z7 

132 

+4 

31 

ID 

20'r 


U*p 

283 

Tea 


9J 

77 

29 



473 

138 


98 

12/ 

132 1 

.. 

49 



+2 


40 




B 

10 



im 

m 

+J 

71 

112 

17 

+2 

54 

.Wi 

ft 



740 

*5 


16 

135 

40 

-a 


87 

72 #+1 

19 


133 93 Fata (Mi) 116 123 

73 51 FMetar DBOOfS 50 55 

65 31 FtadKh 48 50 

310 100 Hope 302 385 .. 

K 30 HaydOi 31 42 +2 

as a FmdtHNu sa 83 

340 131 Freeh CUa 173 IS] #+1 

136 63 Fmatate no us 

382 2HS FnUtr Satdi ■*' 345 355 

160 94 GrtPcd 130 135 +5 

ISO 78 EM M 82 67 +2 

4 T 35 Gcf/rtosm 43 46 +6 

97 72 rnma lyoro 92 97 # . . 

2+9 MO GMhMim 215 225 -10 

WO 11 GAMHiWM 77 82 

m 37 aoMBi *6 «9 

IBS 67 Gadntn Mann S3 88 -4 

155 88 GOOAHdFm 1« 153 

130 95 Gadd (lama) 125 135 +2 

91 SB Gram Softs 67 72 #.. 

167 155 GnEdSMMn 151 161 -2 

175 116 On (Ernst) 170 180 +2 

41 19 GmoudiMM 35 38 

135 B1 k iGra*«ar Sq 127 132 .. 

1W IDO Gummy Adame 185 195 

109 60 KftHum&Gflns 104 107 -1 

SB' SB Hmdn Honwcm so 65 

29 3 Hamany Loom 27 29 

320 133 Hnoy A Thnmp 295 305 +5 

208 186 HMtock Emm 257 282 -9 

47 26 Hanoi Chi 45 47 

482 383'iHMMtlM 457 467 

«2 293’> Do'A'LV 397 407 .. 

150 '43‘iHtSatai Prlmr too ISO 

418 155 l^hPlR IS 162 

205 43 HoUmd PM 62 85 

91 71 >£ Ergonam 70 rt •+•] 

42 Hi 7 Hateon 40 ‘r 42 • .. 

140 103 H OdM M 137 140 

IM W5 Huldta Hwhxiun 185 195 #+6 

158 110 Kahns Botscaon 111 IM #-3 

B 22 HMvwFood 30 31 -'i 

14 B'lHnM EM E Pi 

1® 115 DM SHIM 165 m #-1 

25 175 Kuxsson Tactl I72 IS #-3 

230 IS MSTOT 147 15T 

31 II hrac IS 18 

115 44 M SBH EBhar 82 87 

W3 06 MnSM 67 72 

353 ISO Htnrqi Tw* m 265 #+20 

ZW 204 HaMExpon 202 205 

32 20 ’ram um lj m 21 -2 

443 233 JS PtSSSa 425 435 +15 

<90 116 ftelM 165 170 

25 2 Jctean 6 5 

1+8 103 Jajman A Jug IIS 120 • .. 

S;fl 73 J Uimu aa a. Pana TO 105 +2 

73 48 -hot hOter 70 73 #+1 

3M 23 HP 255 265 -S 

5 OKit (Jotry 7B B1 • .. 

330 220 KoMnSas 315 325 

83 S3 hm«4l SyDKB M P 

tu ® Ktet-rm* ss in #-s 

>13 67 IHU 85 90 

,2 S 7S 80 

B J WhjMB 183 106 • -2 

.K*2? UhW m» 56^ SB 9+3*1 

^ 1;^ 105 #+3 

® IM 6p 275 285 

n Lodge On 1W 115 +5 

i I • a • +1 

I i « & a 

1 1" ?s ?g»r? 

| s 's Vf Vi 

’2 ^ ff +rcn P tatefl) IS? 157 #-1 


38 68 123 

.. .. 88 
256 812 •• 
.. .. »4 

*3 52 98 

79 *2 119 
U Zt 117 
U U 1U 
43 32 158 
32 *4 .. 

& U 138 
U U IM 
91 23 24.1 

39 21 79 

31 38 123 

*3 28 188 

53 4.1 105 

39 43 122 
7.4 *8 137 
48 28 167 



>9 

56 

10.4 


39 

13 

Sb3 

-i 

*0 

39 

11.7 


2.1 

25 

133 

+5 

5£ 

23 

198 

-9 

5/ 

?-? 

243 


1.1 

24 

m 


123 

27 

i&i 


123 

It 

153 


Is 

73 

193 

|+b 

la 

27 

iii 


87 72 

Tftl 270 265 #+20 

gma 202 205 

L) 28 21 -2 

8 «5 435 +15 

I 165 170 

6 8 


SO 22 732 
4.6 2A 24.4 

07 U 219 
m sa 7.0 
39 23 219 

21 12 21.4 

38 24 133 

.. .. 21 
.. .. 102 


in to #. . 

38 41 +1 

«7 112 *2 

312 322 #+10 
110 '20 .. 
ft 73 -1 

113 118 M .. 
76 83 -2 

IS? 157 •-! 

14 17 -1 

1« 

29? 287 

MS U? • ■■ 

79 62 ■ 


07 34 IU 

49 m 39.4 
73 47 W 
..I .. 02 

69 SI H4 
fib 59 11.4 

28 38 119 

47 19 1*7 

21 28 135 

149 47 Ul5 

17 28 00 

18 29 148 
39 *f 87 

4.1 53 97 

58 53 128 

5.1 U 124 
U U 127 

59 19 319 

29 28 235 

U U 105 
38b 22 H5 

SI 48 

7.1 22 142 

idj 3 tu as 

27 aa wo 
1.4 12 364 


75 8 •Snrom'nMttas ffl jl JS 

181 133 m IK 43 

TO ^9S Knlifnuiji?” m 380 M+8 

iro n By i”* 1 115 120 -2 


US- 


a s +? 


Si 4ft 400 

1ft Srn^T™ Ift 1§ 


I IS&ro 


95 TO 

122 126 

156 Ilf Mutate* 130 133 

57 25 Marfey lih) 9 S3 

O'i 15 IhmffOwnl is 16 

»S a M«a Menu* ft 95 -2 

192 IS Hussain 188 19$ # .. 

367 330 HUM Comp 25 235 *-5 
21 BNMQHta 125 14 

5<> 05 Oa Wn*i I. 

io % % SS #•; 

S I® 1 * 1 «? 7 g’ .V 

UO 91 Nnrank 125 1ft -1 

m 43 Natan 43 47 . . 

If! 79 HancstHaMi ITS in 

*5 14 on Sa 8 Gen 21 24 

g w £|hft#Fn « ® 

75 26 OMtl Ugosc 27 32 


48 37 248 
5A 18 2tB 

49 35 67 

44 5.4 -198 

232 .. SO 

50 ft5 09 

U 21 164 

78 2J 23.4 

u u mo 

17 48 117 

18 39 153 

*3 07 407 

57 40 T1 J 

18 45 175 

35 08 327 

32 19 31 J 

12 29 361 

79 45 2' 

=8 29 181 
11 155 

H 48 

33 48 144 

35 SL8 ItJ 
43 n wl 

u u | 

43 3.4 765 

18 22 42 

38 28 795 

29# 97 ” *5 



Pd 

BM 

Ef 

OBv Cure 

ton 

vw 



M 

2 




29/ 

302 

o 

14 

263 

38H »Hr +1 

t\ 

54 

110 

MS 

ns -a 

49 

42 

125 

170 

180 

*3 



44 

« 

83 

119 

1* 

130 • 

53 

41 

113 

193 

198 




U 

57 +1 

a. i 


2*2 

20 

a 



37 

182 

16/ +2 

*7 

29 

1S8 

154 

ia +2 

33b 21 

733 

X 

37 +1 

1.7 

49 

05 

r 1UB 

in 

43 

39 

113 

143 

K0 • .. 

V 

25 

HO 

21 

24 




20 

32 +1 

2D 

8.4 

IDE 

29 

32 -t 



*2 

72 

76 -3 




ft 

89 ... 

U> 

15 

64 

IK) 

185 -2 

43 

25 

133 

in 

112 +* 

*3 

39 

HU 

ft 

105 -W 




9/ 

MB #+2 

29 

29 

S3 

103 

110 

16 

34 

128 

132 

49 

35 

144 

220 

225 +12 

83 

29 

ISO 

98 

103 +1 




ft 

39 -i 

*6 


74 

53 

a 

U 

162 

105 

110 

1.4 

13 

163 

16 

18 


1 .. 

*4 

BE 

MX) 

13 

79 

65 

58 

61 #+1 

0 A 

07 

660 

48 

ft 

29 

57 

1*/ 

17 

16b +'t 



IM 

110 

115 

at 

0.1 


55 

96 

80 +2 
lira +i 

29 

29 

05 

£ 

no -2 

43 

44 

119 

112 

115 



- 

149 

151 #+I 

U 

19 

164 

67 

17 

72 S .. 
20 

12 

40 


125 

1ft +2 

43 

14 

I**? 

85 

to #-a 

5.7 

59 

Dll 

145 

147 -2 

48 

32 

ip 7 

132 

137 +2 

29 

29 

950 

■5 

«'i 

i'« 



230 

250 #+1b 

14 

21.1 

H7 

87 +2 

56 

73 

99 

2ft 

240 

48 

29 

7(13 

17D 

180 +15 

29 

IJ 

JHUZ 

55 

ft +1 

06 

14 

WJL 

115 

125 #+1 

57 

46 

14 7 

TO 

190 % . . 

73 

39 

ISO 

190 

«5 • 

51 

29 

189 

ITS 

182 • .. 

43b 

24 

210 

40 

43 

U 

40 

125 

182 

165 -I 

43 

25 

65 

13 

IS 



55 

103 

ne 

29 

25 

203 

67 

72 • 

3 J 

53 

W 

68 

83 

*0 

44 

tu 

37 

82 

47 

73 

u 

IDS 

an +5 

63 

10 

263 

S3 

96 

29b 

11 

213 

2b 

28 #+2 

02 

0/ 

SSI 

65 

70 

49 

7.1 

210 

90 

130 



335 

280 

270 

SI 

13 

27.1 

135 

M6 

tt. 

19 

2S7 



24 

U 

118 

122 -1 

29 

24 

1S9 


86 




ns 

112 

29 

23 

162 

215 

220 +5 

75 

34 

K.1 

80 

90 

7.7 

9.1 

60 

28/ 

307 +2 

46 

15 

403 

IM 

1G5 

21 

15 

1S1 

72 

75 • . 



230 

131 

134 -1 

71 

S3 

140 

■ea 

228 #-2 

39 

13 

204 

200 

210 #+11 

39 

T9 

306 

42 

« -1 

41 

93 

05 

1« 

150 

47 

33 

103 

ft 

TO +T 

19s 

49 

250 

178 

83 

14 

170 

48U 

495 

79 

16 

239 




20 



250 +1 




85 

105 #+10 

54 

14 



560 




im 

m 

49 

41 

84 

SHI 

530 #+a 
67 #-1 

200 

36 



M 

67 

its 







70 

23 



105 





16*i 



ft 

fd 


SB 9-2 



183 

108 -1 

57 



no 

us #+a 

39 

29 

223 






W*j 

19'. .. 

13 

6B 

153 

3ft 

ft 


ir 

i.i 

U 

11 

515 

321 






B 

208 # .. 
147 

79 

IB 

n ? b 

64 

as 

17 

S3 

59 

i+b 

us ” 

23 

To . 

80 

30 

§ 

3* *2 

58 • 

sa +i 

29 

43 ; 

SO 

no 

58 

55 +5 

» 

89 

13 

73 


The prices in Alls 
section refer to 
Friday’s traxiing 





month. (35) 




INVESTMENT TRUSTS . ; 


Piw Boa W 

DM Ofer arroaArp % P/E 



• +2 154 42 3*8 

+2 19 08 .. 

+7 1.41 02 .. 

+1 U «l 355 
+Vs AS IS 878 
+35 55b 39 469 
+1 64 15 705 

• .. 55 39 424 

+i to 63.0 

•+■> 18 15 602 

+1 28 2.1 647 

•+1 2.1 09 889 

+h ai 04 .. 

+1 159 45 323 

+13 87 14 936 

-1 74 37 38.1 

.. 129 *1 354 

• +3<a 14 19 .. 

38 29 635 

• +3 49 (97 .. 

+2 95 12 447 

+3 39 22 821 

+1 33 21 

+1 21b 14 737 

+1 , < 2.4b 29 718 

*+5 M 09 “ 
+t 29 14 .. 

+1 179b 59 26.1 

-2 34 2-8 65.1 

•+1 53 42 328 

•+! 4Jb 27 4U 
+6 S3 13 . . 

•+2 54 29 . 87.1 


Mft Lav Cknvsv 


^ I Gtose YU 

Sd Oftr Cfa'ngi Ml I P/E 


443 -8 

3TB • .. 
214 «+2 
Iffl .. 
845 -5. 

m #+t 
sat #+a 
65j #+1 
no +i 

T58 +| 

am .. 
261 -1 
n -i 

56 

GB +b 


24 

05 

329 

84 

26 

64 

U 

470 

62 

to 


7.1b 

01 

nii 

7.1 

40 

210 

s 

1.1 

32 

4fa 

30 

13 


129 

39 


99 

30 

310 

10 

50 

02 

tl* 

19 

626 

84b 

59 

318 

67b 

Vo 

NO 

UK 

52 

300 

7.1 ■ 

39 

350 

*0 

19 


71b 

32 

sio 

SO 

40 

Z74 

09s 

12 

742 

07 

24 

07 

40» 

T.ls 

8 

MU 

49 

19 



24 5B4 

25 4*7 

2011 77 

29 &9 
45 .. 

7.1 202 
.97 319 
29 651 


FJNANC1 A L TR U S f S 


5 29 537 
23 627 
b 11 955 
22 675 


36 21 Banted ' 

154 120 Brfaaaa Arm 

§5-. «¥- 

ia'1137 Bk» 

179 95 EhgTnst 
278 187 E» 
lg ft EMmaan 

773 375 FieuMiam 
116 81 FnW Go 
223 TO HT Mangsmant 

II n. 

’S-rS^SF 

20S 1S2 Snail Mur Dm 


- 

ft 83 +1 

28 29 +2 

'n M 

1W. 3S>* .. 

158 158 •+! 
177 ISO .. 
.265 268 +1 

iS2 Jil • •• 

760 775 
107 112 #-5 

TO 195 • -2 
191 188 -2 

9». 10 • . . 
J® OT #-2 

SS S - 1 

SO 275 
328 332 .. 

Tft 138 
41*1 43 +l«j 

155 158 #+Z 


COMMODITIES 





14 17 439 

.. a .. 757 

69b 42 157 
J»0 30 86.6 

TOO IS Ml 
59 38 353 
49 24 199 
7.1 27 172 

U 29 148 
IZfl 1 7 20.1 
7.1 65 II a 

a a 
& % 's 
v n & 
r* a » 

109 64 » 


Unq. 9SJ50 
Unq. 95.00 
Unq. 35-00 
Vo): 4 


pi 

mm 

rrtr 


ONJ. FhaigM FMon# Ltd 

LME prices boosted on Monday by currency factors. 
Aluminium partfcularihr aided by test Yveaks enrtouncG- 
ments that Japan will virtualfy end smelting due to high 
costs. Also LME Aluminum stocks down 3^400 tonnes. 
Focus is maWy on Thursday's tPAI monthly stock report 


currency factors. 
Masks announce- 


MTEKNMTIOHAL 




7BJ7-77P 

770-7B0 

76JJ-unq. 



ALUMBUUM 


Cash . 

. 80050-801^0 

Three Months . 

m 060-91 1.00 

Vai 

Tmh) 

3300 

MCKEL 

StBBder 

Cash 

2540-2545 

Tfersa Months . 

289(WS9S 

Vol 

Tm# 

104 

■CAT AND LIVESTOCK 


PlgaSHrteDfcO 

LbmCataa Contract 
p-pvrkBo 


Anaragv falstock prices at 
repieieiifiliw markelpon 


Gft 97430 per tag 1w' 

ter 






LOWQ HMEAT Hmw^ 

LhroPtg Contract p. per Wo 


Sep 

Nov 

VofcWhe 

Barley 


LONDON POTATO FUTURES 
E per tome 

Month 
Fab 

X 

Nov 


G-N4.Fr> 

CamoR 


AWR7 ^^-6700 

*$*£ 23?S«OJJ 6964) 

« MS - su 

S5ili£S.cS5SS£ , “ 


flown 34) on 5/12/86 













































THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


COMPUTER HORIZONS/1 


Edited by Matthew May 


Merger 
plan for 
ailing 
unit 

gBsjvsas 

jwwg ^Information Systems 
computer unit will be iointlv 
with Groupe Bulf of 

RueaDdNECoF^aB. 

. uthe deal is completed, the 
4P mt venture would be the 
mst multwiationnl partner- 
shjp seUmg computers in the 
Umtcd Stales and would ere- 
stc the world's third-largest 
computer company after IBM 
™ Unisys, the company 
formed by the merger of 
Burroughs and Sperry. 

Bull and Minneapolis-based 
Honeywell would each own 
42 -5 per cent of the joint 
company, with Bull being the 
controlling partner, and NEC 
having a IS per cent stake At 
the wd of 1988, Honeywell 
would have the option of 
reducing its stake in the 
venture to 1 9.9 per cent 
Honeywell said it would get 
a $500 million casta infusion 
as part of the deal A definitive 
agreement is expected by 
March 31 next year, subject to 
required approvals. 

Due partly to the deal 
Honeywell will take charges 
resulting in substantial fourth- 
quarter and full-year losses. 

The proposed joint venture, 
which will have had adjusted 
1985 revenues of $1.85 bil- 
lion, will market the complete 
Honeywell Information Sys- 
tems line of mainframe, mini- 
computer and microcomputer 
products in the United States 
and abroad. It will also market 
Bull and NEC products. 

The three companies have 
been negotiating since Sept- 
ember but have gone to great 
efforts to keep the details 
under wraps. 

Analysts say the venture 
represents a major effort by 
Honeywell to revive its com- 
puter business, which has 
been losing market share to 
IBM and numerous other 
competitors for years and now 
ranks only 15th in worldwide 
computer sales. 

In 1985, Information Sys- 
tems earned $200mBlioh on 
sales of $1.9 billion. Those 
figures represented 34 per cent 
of total company profits and 
29 per cent of total sales. 

This year’s profits are not 
expected to exceed $100 mil- 
lion. Because overall profits 
have declined 39 per cent so 
far this year, Honeywell has 
also been restructuring its 
control systems operations 
and lopking for ways to ex- 
pand its lucrative military 
business. 

The company already has 
dose ties with its joint-venture 
partners. NEC, the world's 
largest semiconductor maker, 
supples Honeywell with mic- 
roprocessors and distributes 
computer products in Japan. 

NEC has been keen to grab a 
large share of the American 
mancet, where h currently 
sells only telephone systems 
and computer peripherals. 

Honeywell has a 5 per cent 
interest in Bull, which sells 
Honeywell and Bull informa- 
tion systems in 75 countries. 
The French company was 
Quoded by Charles de Gaulle 
as a symbol of France’s tech- 


Strange bedfellows fighting for survival 


Some distinctly mid couplings have 
suddenly become all the rage in the 
computer industry. In an effort to 
stem the tide of an industry shake- 
out and protect both market position 
jobs, companies are talking 
about strategic ns a solu- 

tion to their problems. 

IBM , for example, recently 
signed a new technology agreement 
with Intel at a *inn» when it was 
ramonred to be moving away from 
« nse of Intel's computer-chip 
design in its business computers. 

At the other end of the yfr fo 
Acorn, the Cambridge-based maker 
of the BBC Mian, has been co- 
operating with majority shareholder 
Olivetti and other European micro 
firms to try and develop alternative 
computer standards. 

Last week, Texas Instruments, 
the biggest Americ a n nanafactaer 
of semiconductors, announced it is 
looking for co-operative agreements 
with other mnufartHw y world- 
wide. A vice-president has been 
installed purely to create tie-ups. 


Last week also saw Honeywell 
move towards p itting its Informa- 
tion Systems division into joint 
ownership with Bull and NEC (see 
story left). 

Alliances can take the form of 

mere marketing agreements through 
to joint research and development 
plans, and in the recent case of 
Bunronghs and Sperry, now Unisys, 
it was full-scale takeover. 

The latter is obviously a fairly 
extreme way to form such an 
alliance, though it must be said that 
many small information technology 
companies are carrently offering 
themselves for sale to larger firms as 
a way of gwriving. 

These partnerships are in- 
terpreted by some to be part of the 
natnral maturing process for a 
young industry that has, from Its 
inception, been marked by the 
development of proprietary products 
which will not work together. 

It seems all the more strange to 
see such formerly parochial firms 


THE WEEK 


By Geof Wheelwright 

now working alongside one another 
towards what at last looks like some 
effort at establishing worldwide 

flp np ntinfl daii^ar jf, 

There are, however, some com- 
panies which seem natural partners 
in this new and enlightened environ- 
ment - namely software and hard- 
ware firms. 

One such noteworthy alliance was 
announced last week in Paris where 
Cognos, the Canadian systems soft- 
ware house, announced a link-up 
with Date General, the compnter 
hardware firm, for the purpose of 
selling the fashionable concept of 

“complete solutions*’, which in this 
case comprises computers and a 
Cognos fourth-generation computer 
programming language. 

In this instance, the companies 


and products involved in the team- 
np itself are probably not as 
important as the fact that such a 
polling of resources needed to take 
place at all. 

After all. Date General is a large 
and respected enough hardware firm 
uiat its own research and develop- 
ment department would surely be 
looking at ways of exploiting such 
programming 

Cognos has been successful in 
making its way so far without such 
overt team-ups. 

Mike Potter, chairman of Cognos, 
explained: “We have recognized the 
need for there being a strong 
relationship between software pro- 
ducers and hardware vendors. Cus- 
tomers are screaming for the 
integration of software and hard- 
ware products.” 

He added that such alliances may 
also be one way of easing the pain of 
the shake-ant the whole i- nm p nta r 
industry has been expe riencing . 


While things may took rosy for 
Cognos ami Data General, alliances 
are often enough still a method of 
merely surviving. 

If such team-nps are to go beyond 
just survival tactics, however, they 
have to really represent a com- 
prehensive union of both marketing 
and research-devekipmaiL 

In-house research teams may be 
wary of Uniting with competing 
firms,or simply worry that research 
will be unnecessarily duplicated. 

In some types of software re- 
search, however, several teams look- 
ing at the same problem from 
different angles can actually pro- 
dim benefits - rather than simple 
duplication and wastage. 

Strategic alliance specialists call 
this tike lottery theory of research 
and development, where the more 
parts of an altianre that throw their 
weight behind a problem, the 
greater the chance of pfekkg a 
winning solution oat of the develop- 
ment 


Headhunters set their sights on a new target 


A lot of senior data-processing 
managers have been getting ■■ 
mystery phone rails lately. < ' 

While they have never met the f. 
callers, the people on the line ; 
know plenty about them, and 
have heard ofajob they might 
like to think about 

Headhunters, whose tra- . = 
ditional targets have been 
senior finan ce and marketing 
executives, now have top 
information technology man , 
agers within their sights. 

The reasons are various. 

Anthony Spurr, who manag es 
the executive search and selec- 
tion division at BIS Applied 
Systems, reckons that the huge ' 

growth in the finance and '•>/ 
retail sectors in particular has lx* 
produced a demand for diffi- c 
cult-to-find IT specialists who .Q; 
combine technological know » T 
how with business awareness. " . 

“It is also difficult to seek The hearth miters: Christop! 

out data-processing people in 
the 35-40 age range who have 

good experience of advanced that job well to think of 
systems and are s till young applying for another,** ex- 
enough and keen wnniigh to plained Ian Ashworth whose 
take on new challenges,'’ said company also specialises in 
Mr Spurr. information technology app- 


...... 

"h 




The headhunters: Christopher Mill, left , and Ian Ashworth, both specialists in infor- 
mation technolo gy a ppointments 


hunting works on the prin- 
ciple that successful 
companies breed successful 


After cross-checking ref- 
erences, past experience and 
former colleagues, headhunt- 


JOBSCENE 


Mr Spurr. information technology app- 

ointments. 

Mr Ashworth arenes that 
the headhunter’s fixed fee; 

By Pat Sweet which is usually around 

iii.m !■■!■■■ £14,000 or one-third of the 

Christopher Mill, who set g* 
up his executive search con- fevourably with the cost of a 
sStancy in 1977 after spells as major advertising campaign, 
personnel director at Honey- But head h u n ting techniques 
well and Memorex, says (hat are usually reserved for more 
many companies contact senior positions where tile 
headhunters when they have responsibility and scarcity 
identified a need for some value are greater. Most head- 


executives. so you can judge a ers present a shortlist of three 
finance director, say, by the or four candidates to the 
state of the balance sheet You client From then on, personal 
can also expect the client to be chemistry usually dictates 
capable of interviewing the who gets the job. 
applicant thoroughly and As wefl as the well pubfi- 
assessing his trade record,” Mr cized shortage of data-process- 
Spurr claimed. ing executives in the banking 

But a company’s excellent Mr Mifl pointed to the 

results ma y have little to do manufacturing sector as an 
with its data-processing strat- area where IT s k i ll s are in 
eev. In order to assess the heavy demand. 


kind of change. 


hunters only take on jobs with 


“In some organizations the salaries of £30,000 upwards. 


ability to move into new 
markets or to introduce new 
products depends on the eff- 
ective use of technology. In 
areas such as hanking or 
insurance the ability to deliver 
to a customer or to process the 
administration of a new prod- 
uct depends cm the informa- 
tion technology systems being 
in place," sais Mr MOL 

Headhunters are most fre- 
quently called in when com- 
panies are trying to find 
someone who has moved on 
from an operations and im- 
plementation role and dem- 
onstrated experience at a 
strategic level which will 
translate to their business. 

“We want to get to people 
who are doing a good job and 
are probably too busy doing 


Once the headhunter has 
met with the diem and found 
out what the job involves and 
what sort of candidate is 
needed, the next task is 
researching likely applicants. 

Mr Ashworth cites three 
possible sources: people who 
are known wi thin the industry 
and look likely to be able to do 
the job, people in the industry 
who know of someone or can 
suggest someone who would 
know and a hit list of organiza- 
tions where someone is al- 
ready doing a similar job. 

Mr Spurr agrees that sound 
industry knowledge is crucial 
since looking for IT executives 
throws up problems not nor- 
mally round in executive 
searches. 

“Conventionally, head- 


Spurr claimed. 

But a company’s excellent 
results may have little to do 
with its data-processing strat- 
egy. In order to assess the 
applicant’s true abilities, all 
headhunters put candidates 
through a battery of technical 
and business interviews. 

“That way we can find out 
whether a candidate’s good 
ideas are always blocked by 
the board or whether in feet be 
just wasn’t np to the task. We 
have also occasionally in the 
past checked people’s claimed 
qualifications when they did 
not seem to match np with 
their answers in tedroical 
interviews,” Mr Ashworth 
said. 

Mr Mill also concedes that 
one of the most difficult tasks 
is evaluating the contribution 
of data processing executive 
has made to a company. “But 
there are people who can help 
with the judgement, for exam- 
ple former bosses, suppliers 
and of course the press. People 
who take pride in their work 
are often keen to talk about it 
in articles,” he said. 


“It is not just in the areas ol 
computer integrated manufac- 
turing (CIM) but in finding 
people who understand the 
difference between introduc- 
ing a package on a technologi- 
cal level and what it will mean 
for a company’s whole struc- 
ture, costs and way of doing 
business. People who under- 
stand the computing end and 
the business end are like gold 
dust,” Mr Mifi maintained. 

. Headhunters are also called 
in when companies want a 
particular combination of 
skills. 

Mr Miff’s own company 
was recently asked to find 
someone with a strong back- 
ground in international man- 
agement information systems 
(MIS) for a business owned by 
31 member governments. 

As wen as a strong commer- 
cial sense, the applicant had to 
be trappy working in a rather 
rivO servanlisb organization. 
The person also needed a good 
understanding of interna- 
tional telecommunications 
regulatory issues and be pre- 
pared to work based in the US. 

A twonand-a-half month 
search produced a shortlist of 
applicants from Korea, Bel- 
gium, Sweden, Britain and 
France. 

But looking in the most 
obvious {daces is not necessar- 
ily the headhunter’s job. 
“What drives a consultant up 


the wall is befog asked to find 
an imaginative, forward- 
thinking super MIS director 
for a City institution — and 
befog told to try Bank of 
America, Citibank or Chase 
Manhattan, " Mr Miff said. 

“If you do that you're 
concentrating on an already 
depleted skills resource and 
simply moving a finite re- 
source around fester,” he 
added. 

Ins tead, most headhunters 
try and look laterally. Many 
have found that the new City 
systems, with their stress on 
high-volume transactions re- 
quiring daily settlements are 
very akin to the systems run 
by MIS directors in major 
retailers and stores who han- 
dle daily stock and order 
positions. 

Data-processing managers 
who want to catch the 
headhunter’s eye can of course 
send in a c. v. which, if they are 
very lucky, may fit one of the 
assignments on the books at 
the time. 

The alternative is to keep 
within the public eye, main- 
taining a prominent position 
in industry circles through 
articles or speeches. “That 
doesn’t mean only the flam- 
boyant succeed — you still 
need good solid achievement 
— but it is in the nature of our 
job that we ask people about 
your professional reputation,” 
said Mr Mills. 


IBM to 
chip in 
on 386 
boom 

By Matthew May 
Next year IBM is expected to 
announce a range of new 
personal computers based on 
Intel's advanced 386 chip. But 
for once the worid's largest 
computer company and the 
orgfoator of the boom in 
personal computers is joining 
the bandwagon a little late. 

Compaq, the IBM-compat- 
ible manufacturer, and a few 
other firms have already an- 
nounced machines based on 
the 386 chip; Compaq's starts 
at about £6,000. 

The new machines promise 
big increases in speed, the 
ability to handle much bigger 
computer memories and to 
run several programs at 
once.They will, say their ad- 
vocates, eventually enable 
PCs to handle work currently 
requiring minicomputers. 

For customers of the cur- 
rent breed of personal com- 
puters the news is not 
necessarily good; they are 
already worried about com- 
ments that by this time next 
year the PC/AT and XT 
machines and the myriad of 
clones could well be consid- 
ered yesterday’s technology 
and that development work 
will switch to products for 
386-based machines. 

But while 386 computers 
will put in frequent appear- 
ances next yearit is likely to be 
some time before much soft- 
ware, particularly a new ver- 
sion of the MS-DOS operating 
system, is developed to take 
full advantage of the new chip 
and use the extra power to 
make them simpler to use. 

Until then the demand for 
386 machines is likely to be 
limited to so-called power 
users who simply need in- 
creased speed on existing 
programs. 

Against this is the feet that 
the 386 machines will happily 
run all the programs written 
for XTs and ATs making it 
technically, though perhaps 
not financiall y, easy to move 
up to a new machine. 

For the makers of IBM- 
compatible PCs the more 
worrying concern is whether 
IBM will be able to build in 
special customized chips to 
the new range that make them 
to difficult to clone. 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 





1 J :T» 






TsTqgt 




Fina Exploration is an expanding subsidiary of one of the world’s 
leading oil companies. 

We are looking fora man or woman in their mid to late ZOh with 





Wright Air 

■ . nus • 


— for your cwnapi^ 

COMPOTES BOOM CONSTRUCTION, AR CONKflONOTG 
miwmaNCE & CONSUERNCY 02*773 8421 



Data specialists 
told to heed 
frustrated users 


FINA 

EXPLORATION 


(preferably 3033 or 3083), and DEC micro computers, to work as 
a Senior Engineering Analyst in the Reservoir Engineering Team. 
The successful applicant wiD be responsible for the design and 
implement a tion of routing packages for data analysis, supervision 
and development of both hardware and software utilities as 
required by fee group, and Batson with Finals international offices 
on software requirements and modifications of simulation 
software. 

In outer to fuIfiB the brief appGcants should meet most or all of the 
following requirements: 

Familiarity wife plotters (VERSATEC & CALCOMP); 

Microcomputers; FORTRAN, COBOL and ideally other languages; 

Experience of working within reservoir engineering; Educated to 

degree level in a science subject 

This is an interesting and chaitengtng position offering job 

satisfaction, and first class rewards in a stimulating working 

environment 

Please write wife fuH career detaBs to date quoting 
Ref No: FE/86/10 to: 

Miss Christine Hall, Personnel Department Fina 
Exploration, Ratrofina House, 1 Ashley Avenue, 
Epsom, Surrey, KT18 SAD. 


s649 


BRPex VAT 


IBM Hi IBM yC 

Bondweil 

SoKtrao Cmcp pfc TB 


-compatible computers from 

□Job your business computer 
m MTV solutions, available Groan the 110- 

% strong Bondweil Master Dealer 

■#" mw network backed by a m ntral da tabase 
* of OTjwrt advice. Call Spectrum Group 

on 0462 37171 for the address of ytrar 
pc «re nearest dealer and a colour broenme. 


The viable alternative 


I - 1 

Compaq: Portab le £1250! 

an Portable, RAM, 2 360 k 

fropp^drives, dual-mode 

offer- upgraded J^p/uli/l !' M 

JfctofrjOk asms genuine AST Six n* L 

pi™- *“■" 

Portable U « Uc ?T*', , . £2400! Call for others. 

nrocessor, 10 mb bard mss oo*y upH^mrmbr^^iswAX 

80286 process** ?g Hjgf , mm)i london WC1V 613. 

Telephone 01-831 0644. Telex 2G254& 


Pi™- eg. Portable H, 640k 

Portable U « Uc ?T*', , . £2400! Call for others. 

nrocessor, 10mb bard mss oo*y M P *„»r.d V «..is%vAx 

80286 78 Hifih Hottxwn, London WC1V 6LS. 




training 

■o^-ssaasa- 

Call Gffly Brewster on 01-834 9000 
— DISCOUNT^ OR BULK 

^bookings 


The computer industry should 
spend las time listening to 
itself and more time heeding 
the demands of its users, says 
a government-backed report 
released last week. 

The report. Top Executives 
and Information Technology 
— Disappointed Expectations, 
suggests that both suppliers 
and data-processing special- 
ists are failing to deliver what 
Britain's top manag ers want 
from information technology. 

It further charges that the 
major handicap to solving this 
problem is a lack of apprecia- 
tion of how ma nagers work. 

The report says: “Tire chief 
obstacles to the more effective 
use of information technology 
are human and organizational 
rather than technical. 

The compilers say that in 
interviewing 19 top managers 
and studying 107 ques- 
tionnaires from leading exec- 
utives, they encountered a 
good deal of frustration with 
technology that managers 
could see as helpful but did 
not use because it was not easy 
for them to do so. 

The report was part of a 
two-stage study by the in- 
dustry research group EOSYS 
backed by the Department of 
Trade and Industry’s Informa- 
tion Technology Awareness 
Programme. 

David Firnberg, EOSYS 
manag ing director, says he 
was surprised at just how 
frustrated interviewees were 
in using their equipment, even 
those working in the industry. 

Typical user comments in- 
cluded suggestions that “time 
comes in short slices and there 
; is no time to fight the technol- 


ogy; it is easier to ask someone 
for infor mation than to use 
the system”. 

He suggests, for example, 
that data processing specialists 
will design a corporate data- 
base system that allows man- 
agers to get at all the company 
data from anywhere on the 
system at any time — but that 
is not how managers work. 

Mr Fimberg says that cor- 
porate databases should give 
managers the power to re- 
trieve easily the information 
they need for day-to-day work 
and not try to make the whole 
system so big and comprehen- 
sive that it's difficult to nse. 

The survey follows another 
report which shows an almost 
contradictory trend. Pub- 
lished last week by the re- 
search group IDC and Com- 
puter Weekly it claims the UK 
has the fastest growing expen- 
diture on data-processing of! 
any country in Europe. 

The UK spent £123 follion 
on data-processing in 1985, an 
increase of 22 per cent on the 
previous year. This represents 
a fester growth than Germany 
or France and shows an 
increase of 6 per cent over the 
16 per cent annual increase 
forecast for the UK between 
1984 and 199a 

When yon start looking at 
where the money was spent, 
however, it seems that the 
report might back-up what 
EOSYS found. 

While there was an increase 
in spending on software, ser- 
vices and on-line charges — all 
things which can makes sys- 
tems easier to use — there was 
a drop in hardwire, supplies 
and maintenance, expenditure. 


PartcfthePETTtQntiA(UK)UD 
Gmupet Companies 


FINA 


NEW OPPORTUNTITES IN MCRO SALES 

MOVE TO IBM MAINFRAME SOFTWARE! £42,000 OTE 

MICROSALES EXP PARTICULARLY REQUIRED 
3 MONTH GUARANTEE TO £20k 

BLUE CHIP CLIENTS BMW 3181 

VARIOUS LOCATIONS 

Prospect This £ mutti-miDion international software bouse c urr ently has requirements 
for young, talented Sales Executives. These vacancies have arisen due to the 
co m pany's firm commitment to the penetration of new accounts outside their driving 
diem base. 


Proposal The brief will entail the sale of the company's wefl respected 4GL IBM 
main frame software to major commercial Bine Chip organisations throughout the 
UK. 

Qpnlifkatim Successful candidates win have an outstanding record in micro solution 
saks preferably in a dealer environment new business ability. MAINFRAME 
SOFTWARE EXPERIENCE IS DEFINITELY NOT ESSENTIAL 

Ckae These opport uni ties, unrivalled within the industry today, are open to 
ambitious young professionals, seeking a new and exciting challenge. Naturally, fell 
training and snpport/back-up is provided, as you would expect from a major 
company of this stature and weD deserved reputation. 

REF: TYH 2517 

STOP PRESS 


m 

An! 


MULTIUSER PC SALES EXEC 
UNIX ESP: MGEMENT POTENTIAL 
. STB LONDON - TO &M. 

TRAINEE/ JNR SALES: IBM 

PC & NETWORKS - LONDON - TO £30X 

SALES MGH: MULTIUSER PCs + SOFTWARE: 

BLUE CHIP CUENTSJ'i'IT! LONDON - £35K 1st Yr GTEE 


IBM PC£OMPAQ/NOVFLL SALES 
DEALERSHIP - NTH LONDON - TO £5®K 

MULTIUSER PC SALES EXEC 

ACCOUNTANCY V GROUND - VARIOUS LOCAHONS- 

£58K 

MULTIUSER PCs PR0DN CONTROL SOFTWARE 
SALES EXEC - MIDDX - £35K + 


O u tst an d ing deman d by our Clients has led to our current search for Micro Solution Sales Executives. Due to the 
sheer number of vacancies we are unable to advertise them all, however, above yon will find a selection of the 
positions available at the present time. Why not give us a call for a confidential discussion on your future career 
plans. 

«th Fleer, Empire Have, 175 Piccadilly, London W1Z 9DB 

Telephone: 11-409 284A 

phone Mahers (adB lOpjn.) 

0M5-W95M ad 01-263 7554 


f 




THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 



US threats 
start to 
escalate 

The United States, alleging 
that Japan is selling cut-price 
microchips to compete against 
it in world markets, has 
threatened to retaliate by 
revoking an agreement that 
excuses Japanese chips from 
American import duties. 

Last week the US repeated 
to Japanese officials a threat, 
made last month that it would 
revoke a July 31 agreement on 
the trade in semi conductors if 
Japan did not brain to adhere 
to it by the end of this month. 

American officials say Japa- 
nese semi conductor prices 
have risen in the US market 
and they realize it will take, 
time to win new Japanese, 
markets for US firms, but they, 
see no sign of rising prices for 
Japanese microchips in other 
countries where these com- 
pete with US products. 

In some lucrative Asian 
markets, they said, Japan had 
stepped up sales. US officials 
said there were several options 
if Japan did not conform. 

They said they included 
duties on Japanese semi- 
conductor shipments and du- 
ties on shipments of other 
Japanese goods equal to the 
amount of business US firms 
were losing. 


When travel incentives begin to pall 


Virtue may be its own reward, 
but the computer professional 
is as interested in peaks as the 
next- man. At certain levels 
there axe not many obvious 
ones, apart from copious free 
supplies of green-and-white 
striped paper for the children 
to scribble on. 

Foreign travel, however, is a 
distinct possibility. Staff who 
specialize in particular aspects 
of a company's data process- 


INCENTIVES 


By David Guest 

ing set-up, quickly make 
themselves very important to 
their employers. 

They also become auto- 
matic candidates to attend 
meetings at which the hard- 
ware' or programs they use are 
discussed by groups of like- 
minded individuals. 

This can lead in some 
instances to foreign parts, as 
witnessed last week by the 
Focus users' association — 
Fuse — in Munich. Focus is a 
fourth generation language, an 
aid used to take on much of 
the programmer's donkey 
work. 

This makes it a technician’s 
tool and the 250 delegates to 
Fuse Europe '86 were not 


executives on an unofficial 
holiday. Some woe even ca- 
pable of exchanging private 
damp squibs in Focus-spcak. 

It cost their employers 
something approaching 
£1,000 per- head to send them 
to Munich and sustain them 
there for the three days of the 
conference. Few saw it as a 
reward, a bribe or even a perk. 

One Focus expert of an East 
Anglian insurance company 
declared he had been forced to 
attend. But from an 
employer’s point of view, 
three days in a city of beer, if 
not skittles, must represent 
another credit on the balance 
sheet. 

Key computer personnel 
have to be kept happy or die 
jobs carousel might whisk 
them away to some mare 
caring employer's charge. 

The glamour of an inter- 
national conference is largely 
spurious; modem hotels are 
peculiarly stateless, and the 
venue for the Fuse meeting 
was a £5 taxi ride from the 
centre of Munich. But its 
purpose was, after alL business 
above pleasure. 

The invitation promised 
“an exciting and infonnation- 
packed program that will be of 
benefit to aU Focus users”. 

Excitement takes different 



THE VERY BEST 


“Did yon really have to spend a week in the Seychelles 
learning how to change a jrfng?” 

forms but the organizers made These ran in two parallel 
good their second promise streams, divided roughly be- 
with two and a half days of tween Focus users ta lk i ng 
presentations and talks. about their experiences and 


D.P 


Information Builders fTBI), 
the supplier of Focus, talking 
about ns products. 

Fuse incidentally is in- 
dependent of EBL, and IBI 
delegates paid their DM 1,200 
registration fee like anybody 
else. 

IBI used the occasion to talk 
about planned product 
enhancements. These, like the , 
proposed link between Focus ■ 
and Ashton-Tate’s popular 
dBase programs, gave users 
the chance to repond on the 
spot. Fuse for its pan pre- , 
seated the supplier with a list 
of the improvements that the j 
users warned. 

Not that the delegates were 
totally spoon-fed. Two 
streams of presentations re- 
quired two rooms, a nd o nly 
one had simultaneous transla- 
tions available — in E nglish , 
French and German, leaving 
Italian and Scandinavian 
attendees to fend for them- 
selves. This left speakers like 
Herr Kneoppei of Audi with a 
limit ed audience. 

Most perks attract some 
kind of duty. Perhaps foreign 
travel is, after all, an ambigu- 
ous benefit — but it is still 
better than a diet of waste 
printout and half-used coding 
pencils. 


Predictions 

that point to 

prospects 


TECHNICAL CONSULTANTS MILTON KEYNES TO £17k 

ANY MANUFACTURING + RELOCATION 

EXPERIENCE 

Cmnanr A tofliy resumed, muID-mrfiion pound company nftose interests cover the folds of 
rrunuranurmg, finance, commerce and Otience. 

Pnsffiw: M me Teduncaf Consultzms are regared to gwe Ngh teval technic al 3upgort M t fo safe s team. 
proviting technical adince and information at presentations snl demon stratmns and farther aistt 
turning where necessary. 

E q « M Bc a - Outstanding individuals with at least egtmen months Maum ee of maratttwmg and/or 
linrifiaf systems. Aotmcams wfi preferably have experience of VAX or Hewten Packard eqwpmem 
although other hardware knowledge mil be of interest Any MAFH or MRP B expenance would be 
advantageous. 

ftaraat These positions offer exceftant oaportufoffis for candidates wishing to more into consultancy 
and expand then user bason skills Benefits indude company car and ratocatttn where required, mtn 
firsl-dass appofliBHcs for protrusion. 

REF: TX 2G69 

IBM DEVaOPMENT SURREY TO £20K + 

ALL LEVELS BENEFITS 

Cearpar O ne of the UK s leading swpfcar of Life Assurance software, are ragkgy expanding their Head 
utneer in Surrey and require sal -motivated nditnduals to add in ttmr continued s uccess. 
Positions: Anahret Pmaranvnera. Business Analysts. Prefect Leaders and Mananere are needed tor tire 
developmeflT of We assurance packages uPfainp Cobol CJCS on the latest IBM imnbames. In the hgh 
prattle environment, you vnH spend 60% of your tree m house and 40% on Oem idea. 
Experience ideaNy from a Strang programming background, the csrefidate must have excellent inter- 
personal sMis. and some management experience tor the more Senior posdons. Cabo), m an IBM 
manfiame envnonmere are riedly OCS exposure, preferably using stmehnd techniques Is request). 
Life Assurance experience would be advantageous. 

General: An excellent oBDtHTunov CO neke a name for voursett by comrftMta to the success of ths wd 
established software house. Sensrous benefits, hgh salary aid a dynamic young comp^ await you. 


TO £17k 
+ RELOCATION 


MOVE INTO ANALYSIS . CENTRAL £11-£19k 

fCL 2900 LONDON + BENEFITS 

PROGRAMMERS 

Co mparer O ne at die largest aid most successful convuter sendee companies, about to po pubBc doe 
trtmFantiruBd success trtlxn the comowcal/bUBness held. Currendy there are several agent 
p ositions to be Med mttm the fCL dMstai 

PosOok Prorommas and Senior Pm onu rmere to more nto an analysis role and work on major 
□roods, playing an mregral part of a smart team Mortem ban the znJyss stage through to 
impfemmtakm. At the more senior teval bare wtt be team le ad ere tte- Fun na m ing Mfl be given in 
analysis. 

EaartBKc P rogrammer 1-2 yeas COBOL Btperia nc e gamed on ICL majntrame from a conuuaud 
M^nmnd'SereorPriteatri m ere^ -3 yum pfus preferably reft IDMS. TPMS and (McMsaM. full tramma 
«« fie glvm where requfod. 

Sank Then goribons offer exoedent career paths tar Programmers wslunq to progress mto asaiyss 
eventually mto amsubancy. Work wrt be both a ebere sde and m-nouse, mb) the erenow 
possdxRy of exposure Id other hardware, manly IBM. Training tadnies are ended, erupted wdh 
generous bontfiB amoufl o a caft an prosperous future. 

REF: TF 233 


SYSTEMS ANALYST LONDON TO £18X + BENEFITS 

COragwrrA aes established and highly respected firm of Boctorokers in moving mto new rnarteo now 
WSable after bm Big Baog. and as a resort is npanfotg its Systems Group. 

Pmflfacc S ystems Aitaysts are nouirad to work on Eqnbhes. Gtxpoon Franca and IwesSnem 
atertip&wx Sysamt wonang m small tsanre you MdJ be resocnslWa for more pasta staff. The 
pb ri don s are basad pat taasoe bm City, si imsr and presbpius offices. 

Experien ce C ai a fcliHg should haw upnmbs of 4 years systems analysis apedma. ideally tram a 
progr^ nmi nS badtgmiid. Preferably usmg flnjttura) tecnraqies you should haw been invnhred oi at 
met one ma|or project from (tap sfom tfratfi to ntpfonentteon. Strang CMbrenctton stalls are . 
essential and experience of franco! apptatxm wnuki be advantageao. 
fiarent V Whnut the hone and burife of Cfty ca m m u t ma . you wifl be offered realistic proraafo p 
pmspecis. rogifar salary reviews, and brag geared to your needs. ExceBent salary and benefits.- 

REF: 75 2403, 

SENIOR ANALYST/PROJECT LEADER CITY e£25,B80 

PACKAGE 

CwreafiO iM of tte world's leadra banks widiext anmw liMblvcnienr in rilaspacs of mtaiTiaicnal and ' 
ifo/cnara banking. The lags DP depa rt m ent consist s pf a variety ot hardware mcfauUig IBM, Tandem, 
DEC etc. 

A Senior AiWysr s raorrad to lead a lean developing a variety of rotations m et u tfeaq 
h nined StHisflcs. He/S be wD be resp onatoj e fo r the concept ion, de sign and enplementana i of there 
systems shdi aO intiixfe producing detailed pragrareswig spncificjbnni from user requhvnents. 

temjmoc A mfo-dBctatay DP I mtAtpu iesf wtb m wre fls of five ware systems development 
experience SMch «■ mdude sobd analysts skills and a knowledge of proraansiang. The lyptcd 
candtti B will be 2-40 years old with a good aducatan and the ainBty and derana to manage an 
emhusIsiB team. 

Gemot T his p osition Is Rely to appeal to Analysts teoteig to move into a mm a genmat-type rote. It 
So provides an opportunity to grin experience of vartous hardware and foubi gsieration software. A 
wry athactM satey is c o re pte n a n ted by bemBs mdufing mortgage subsidy and non-c onomu toiy 


TO £18X + BENEFTTS 


IBM TECHNICAL SUPPORT CONSULTANTS 
4TH GENERATION SOFTWARE 


MIDDX £15-£22k 
+ CAR + BENEFITS 


Company: A large independent software suotHnr offering muttpte products designed to meet a wttSe 
range oi pracessmg requirements. Thwse products are world renowned and responsible for the 
company, 's phenomenal expansion of recent years. 

PostHoBs: Technical Suuoon Constants are recuaed both In pre and past sates wees, these m 
teSSRSB positions wrxch writ mwlve extensive dent liaison, presecnmnms and gmori consutacy. 
helping me customers mammse their software mvestmera. Thrnqh dose assocohon with research and 
development groups, legular product upgrades ml be provided to ensure that axfsC ng riaaUaSmns 
reman state-of-tne-an 

Experfeeseil nalicasesaiioodtedaiitairap t i n c a wn s tiaclintCMidis requred. Upwards of three yore DP 
upenence n an IBM environment with emphasis on MVS. DOSrVSE or CMS ooeming systems, COBOL 
or any 4th Generation Lantpiages with CIC5. DC- 1 . IOMS. IMS DB/DC etc. The posteons wM ait goad 
anpfecabons programmers with a strong technical bos or a Systems Programmer wrth a good 
rotatnns knowledge wishing to move (mo a consultancy type rate. 

Gneratfn order to manrtan that current rate of progress bus company demands the highest sandards. 
ine reward is an above average S2tey with benefits metudmo a car and the oppartinty to work with an 
award winning range of software aedamad by tmtosuy experts and users alta. 

Rff : TD 2579 


IBM MVS, VSE A VM SUSSEX £16-£25k + CAR mte 

SPECIALIST A NATIONWIDE 

FOR TECHNICAL SUPPORT 

Cenmanr S uccessful U K com pany devetoptog systems software inducts for BM n aMfon w. 

Uocitxxied expansion has created the need for addibanai technical staff to support oparaboRS throughout 
the UK. 

PosjtuBK Systems Programmers or Engineers who may now be frustrated aid are taring tor the 
ooHxtLxiily to move to a support nrie. We need 3 range or people up id Technical Support Managers to 
meet Clients and strive .their problems. 

Exp erience: Minimum of <2 months as Systems Proaammeis in one or more of die folowtmt VM. VSE. 
msfms IXA). acs. DL/1. VTAM.-IMS DB/DC JESa'3 Abo Pragmnmer/AnrtyiB wi* nwrkrum 
DOS/MVS experience io be nrofved n conversions to MVS from any other system and to export new 
pioieds 

GeantAs pan of a dose lean of professions you wfl be encouagedto maxmase you potentel, 
extensive on-gong tram mg s avariabfe and so s variety of work Stfanes are dependent on skis and 
exmnence but you mti be offered a very atractwe emptoymara package ndudsig high salary, compwiy 
car. etc. 

REF: TM 2713 



IBM ASSEMBLER ON 
PR0GRAMMERS/SYS1 


CITY 

DESIGNS 


REF:TO2SK 

CTO £18k + BANKING 
BENEFITS 


leafing rtemabonri bank Mh financial interests and affBiates throu^nb the wurid are 
'IBM basad financial systems. 


Paiteom: Programmers, Analyst/Program mere and Systema Otepm to work on ^sterns 
OSSopTOK (Package or Bespoke) in financol areas, 

En e rieacc O p htaen months IBM Assembte on PU1 (DOS or MVS) wrih any Mparienee of darign, 
sCuOutm tauiyss and design, on-line database or 4th generauxi languages all usta but full Babwig it 
glvsn. 

GeomM: Posttms iwy sat tePtants wrehmg to tmwc mto Unhiiu or a tinwdri enwmniwiL Banefte 
package s excefont wttti guaranteed bonus. London welghbug aswrance. non comrtbuuy pen si on 


STOP PRESS! 

WANTED YOUNG GRADUATE TRAINEE 
7k- 9k 

10 WOBK 0 H SYSTEM 38 USfltS B P6 ID 
W PREVntlS EXPBrafCE HEEDED. 
nU. TRABKNB WL BE GNBL 

Please call for further details. 

Evening telephone numbers: 

03727 22531 
01 748 9684 


package is exc ritey wttft guarante ed bonus. London welghbug 
scheme and sUmdiaed mortjptje- 


Hff: TM 2435 


6th Floor, Empire House, 175 Piccadilly, London W1Z 9DB Telephone: 01-409 2844, (24 hours) 



PROJECT MANAGERS/ CITY £***★*+ CAR 

CONSULTANTS INTERNATIONAL & BANKING BENEFITS 

BANKING PORTFOLIO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 

Oaab«r 27th I9B6. signalled die most radical changes the aty of London has ever witnessed. Already ft 
ts realised that systems are going to need continual development well into 1987 and beyond. 1b cater for 
this work, several Project Managers. Consultants and Business Analysts are desperately required by a 
number of Intemational/Merchant Banks. They will probably provide the most important function to both 
non technical but demanding users and to pure D.R technocrats’. Ideally, candidates will be well educated, 
possess excellent communications skills, both written and oral, and be able to Raise with very senior 
managers. A blend of technical and applications knowledge is a prerequisite, as the donning of two hats 
wfll be part and parcel of the work. Most sought after appli ca tio n a re a s are: SECURITIES. GILTS 6 EQUITIES. 
EUROBONDS. FOREX. MONEY MARKETS and PORTFOLIO INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT. Such 
experience Is hard to find and thus remuneration will be excellent with bade salaries totally open ended 

and carry superb perks such as cars, mortgage subsidies, bonuses and profit share REF: TR 14761 

KL ANALYST/ CITY OF LONDON TO £18.000 

PROGRAMMERS + FULL TRAINING 

MONEY BROKERS + EX. PROSPECTS 

Following recent developments, this Money Broking subsidiary of an internationally renowned Holdings 
company are currently seelang several specialists in the ICL field, to embark on some of die most varied 

and exciting pro|eas developing in the Money Markets today. Applicants win be involved from Initial 
coni^OT tiuo^io final impiementation in applications areas, which include Brokerage Transactions 
covering GILTS. FOREX and SECURTTIES. In order to apply for these highriy demanding posts, you should 

hare at 1^ 2 yrars Cobol openence on either la ME29 or TANDEM with DDS. TW1& IDMS(X) and TAL 

betnga ebstmet advantage The selected Individuals will enfoy varied opportunities, an eweflent salary and 
real career progression. ref: TT 14956 

ANALYSTS/ CITY OF LONDON . TO 15.000 

PROGRAMMERS + CHEAP HOLS. 

ICL WORLDWIDE 

Due to continued expansion, the company, who are die largest Property development concern In the UK. 
require young IQ. professionals to utihse their analytical and development skills In a wide variety of 
commeroal apptottorKfndudmg TVaveWeisure related areas. Tfau need at least I yeareCobd programming 
experience on ICL VME in order to qualify. Personality and aptitude are also of the utmost imp or tance. This 
company are now part of one of the largest .Internationally renowned Tour Operators so. can offer the 
successful candriates full concessionary rates on worldwfde travel, as well as a good salary, profit bonus, 
free lunches and long term career development opportunities. REF: TK 14960 

PROGRAMMERS TO CITY TO £25000 

PROJECT MANAGERS (UK. SUPPORT) + CO CAR 

Tb cater for die increased demands placed on the National Support team, additional IT. dulls are required 
by this leading computer manufacturer A wide range of skills are required from IS months 
progra mming'suppon experience to many years D.P. experience in the support of financial appfcationfL 
Working out oi the luxury dty offices, the appointees wiH initially receive concentrated training and tuition 
onvanous topics such as. pre and post sales support and structured design Programmer will be involved 
wroi tne development of specific software to meet the requirements of many ot the mator banks whilst the 
s 2J*J*" , *Ap a| y MS - Project leadeis/Managere will be responsible for ascertaining these requirements and 
“°5 r following these through from design to implementation. Afl support work will involve travelling to 
fo Sf n ,? ^ lhls may indude occasional overseas travel A background in International finance 
(BanlcmgllrwurancefAccountsStodcbroklng etc) will be a distinct advantage, particularly at the mote senior 
T? e worfc 15 guaranteed to be varied and Interesting with a very flexible and self determined career 
path Company care are given at most levels of support position whilst other benefits befit those of a large 
international concern, balary te-tocalty open to negotiation. REF: TP l S457 


BUSINESS PEOPLE IN THE PEOPLE BUSINESS 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 
21 CORK STREET, LONDON W IX 1HB 


VOICE COMMS 

MARKET DMA ANALYST LONDON £NEC 

VOICE COMMS ANALYST 

A top global Investment bank wishes to N! two positions within its Cbmmunkatlors Services department The 
Market Data Services Analyst shall be responsflrie far the successful perfor ma nce of systems such as Reuters. 
Rich. Teterate etc ThfswfR indude ensuring st an dards are atflieredtOi a full awareness of system enhancements 
and new products and pratton of user* ^requirements. The Vbice Communications Analyst shag ideally have 
an excellent knowledge of investment banking PBX. dealer board systems and the "Hoot 'n Holler' open 
trading network. However candidates lacking this precise experience but from an In formation Services 
Provider w» also be genuinely considered. Both of these positions require exceBent presentation and 
communication skills and a degree education, though not essentiaL would bean advantag^REF: TC 1913? 


SALES EXECS LONDON BASED UNLIMITED EARNINGS 

NETWORK SOLUTIONS REALISTIC £34.000 OTE 

EXECUTIVE CAR 

As one of the major IBM recommended dealers specialising in networking and total business solutions, this 
Company 's reputation is now generating substantial repeat and referrallusiness. Consequently they are 


SALES 

LONDON BASED 


Company 's reputation is now generating substantial repeat and referral business Consequently they are 
recruidng successful sate executives to |ohi their estabfehed team. The Ideal applicants wfl be a m bitionsfy 
building on their existing experience In networked miachbased hardware ana will be capable of quickly 
generating a high level of new business. Their efient companies are I mpre ss i ve and Include many national 
names. The high achievers eami in excess of £70,000 last year. With an unusually high ratio of sales to 
support, this approach enables the sales team to con ce nt rate on the commercial issues. Demonstration 
and technical implementation, i ndu ding bespoke, are the responsibffity of the relevant support pers o nneL 
This Isa superb opportunity to loin an established company who have gained nationwide eredfaftty In the 
total solutions sales arena. Excellent company benefits include high earnings Incentives and choice of 
executive car. REF: T| 14680 

DATA COMMS BUCKINGHAMSHIRE OTE £35.000 BASIC £17.000 

SALES EXECUTIVES BASED CAVAUERCAR 

One ot the most oustandfaig Computer Groups tn Great Britain is enlarging its i mp ressi v e Comm uni cations 
Division. Retaining their extensive diem base, consisting of many large Multi-National companies, the 
organisation seeks successful sales executives to sdl their renowned range of multi-host sftigfetennlnal 
systems. Average order value is c.£ 1 50.000. The targets set are very achievable and sales people ate 
recognised and generously rewarded for theft" efforts IdeaBy candidates wS have &tfned«pei fence with 
a major manufacturer and will possfcly be looking for their next career challenge with a dynamic fast 
moving company. Knowledge of Dataoommunications hardware and software ts highly desirable and 
negotiation expoience at board level would also be a great advantage. In addition to an unlimited salary 
and Company Car. the group also offers free BOW and oitenstve holiday e n titlement REF: TX 14946 

SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER CITY EARNINGS UP TO £60.000 

BANKINGIF1NANCE £30.000 GUAR 

The company is a world leader in super computera and has used its technologies to establish a unique 
position In the world of high technology. The Financial information Systems dhtekin offers a unique range 
of products and has an Impressive and prestigious cfcnt base of Malar International Bants. SrokerageFirms. 
Insurance Companies and Fortune 1000 companies throughout the world. A senior Account Manager is 
being recruited to join this growing and profitable area. IdeaBy. current experience diould involve successful 
sales into the City within Foreign Exchange. Money Market Dealing Systems and Financial Information 
Distribution Systems. This is a superb opportunity to move to a very wcC respected operatio n which envoys 
a leadership position at the fo re front of Information distribution technology. Earnings potential is high and 
company benefits are excellent. REF: TL 14436 



24 HRS (10 LINES) 

01 439 8302 

01 437 5994 

EVENINGS Sc WEEKENDS 

(089282) 2882 


(0252) 27703 


If you warn to stand the best 
chance of being in a growth 
area of computing in the 
1990’s then you will probably 
be either a chief analyst pro- 
grammer or networking 
communications controller 
working in the financial and 
business sector. 

This is one of the predic- 
tions made from an analysis of 
staff trends in the latest salary 
survey conducted by the Na- 
tional Computing Centre, 
winch, for the first time also 
contains some specific guide- 
lines to existing skills 
shortages. 

Best growth prospects are 
hkelv to be in companies with 
at least 75 staff in a computer 
dep ar t m ent, and are based in 
London or the south east. Yon 
may well work with both IBM 
and DEC equipment in a 
distributed processing 
environment with a high level 
of database usage. 

Promotion prospects to 
data processing management, 
however, will sot be abundant 
bm may well be enhanced by a 
knowledge ofthe business area 
you work in. 

Network specialists are. 
likely to be outnumbered by at 
least four to one analyst 
programmers, and two and a 
half to one by systems an- 
alysts, but their numbers will 
be growing at a foster rale. 

For those looking north of 
the border a switch from 
analyst programming or some 
other DP area some time 
around 1988 into networking, 
may be advisable as demand 


Job % left %jotrv 

category 1986 f986 


DP management 


programmer 

Programmers 


programmer 

Network 


Operators 


trends 


By Eddie Coater 
quoted in a number of 

' n Some98 vacancies specified 
ICL experience, but this is not 
thought to be surprising due ro 
the generally high number ot 
vacancies in the public sector 

which has three rimes as many 

vacancies as any other sector 
and a predo min a nc e of ICL 

nam %* 

of current vacancies a re for 
analyst programmers, a uena 
which will continue with a 
forecast growth of 46 
over the next five years. 

Network staff increased by 
28 per cent in the last year and 

this job category is forecast to 
continue, growing by 41 per 
cent in the next two years and 
by 86 per cent by 1991. 

Demand for systems pro- 
grammers and tec hnica l sup- 
port staff is also growing airly 
quickly, increasing by 36 per 
cent over the next five years. 

Systems analysis is another 
area That is expected to grow 
substantially by 1991 , particu- 
larly in finance which wfll 
increase by 81 percenL In this 
area in the south of England 
the number of systems an- 
alysts will almost double over 
the period. _ ... 

There axe considerable dif- 
ferences exp ec te d for the fu- 
ture depending on department 
size. In companies with 
departments of between 21 


id % unfilled % 
1986 11 


for such skills is predicted to 
rise by 1,600 percent by 1991. 

Wherever high technology 
.staff are based they would be 
wise to steer dear of any 
involvement with data 
preparation or computer op- 
erations — both seen as last 
H priming areas. 

These pointers to the skills 
that computer staff should be 
getting their teeth into, were 
analyzed from the response to 
questions asking for details of 
drills likely to be needed over 
the next few years. 

Of die 379 computer in- 
stallations surveyed, current 
problems included 284 posts 
requiring experience of a com- 
puter language, that employ- 
ers are finding difficult to fill 

Apart from languages, 
experience of a particular 
manufacturer's machine tuid 
operating system are most 
frequently quoted, with al- 
most 400 unfilled vacancies. 

Half of the current va- 
cancies are for analyst pro- 
grammers and programmers - 
with experience of COBOL 
and RPG IIL 

Database experience — 
particularly in a number of 
database languages — is 
wanted for 82 vacancies with 
IDMS, DL1 and PL1 being 


and 75 computer staff the 
likelihood of employment for 
systems analysts, pro- 
grammers and fprhnical staff 
is at its highest. 

In larger sized departments 
with over 75 staff only analyst 
programmers and network 
staff show significant 
probabilities of substantial ' 
growth. 

Data processing manage- 
ment growth for deparments 
of over 75 people shows the 
greatest management poten- 
tial, but this will still be a stow 
9.5 per cent in the next five 
years. 

Only departments with 11 
to 20 staff are expected to 
demand a higher (13 percent) 
increase in data processing 
managers. 

Prospects for staff growth in 
the various industries predict 
that finance and business mil 
lead the way followed by 
manufacturing and engineer- 
ing. 

The one area it seems that 
computer staff should cer- 
tainly avoid for the next few 
years is systems analysis or 
programming in the distribu- 
tion and catering industries. 
The number of employees in 
those categories are expected 
to decrease by almost 15 per 
cent and 20 per cent. 


COMPUTER BRIEFING 





i n * ! i rffi ra V ji l 


games always resu 




F rVi 


wRnrwBJora courses described. With the 

stand ard o f documentation m computing only slowly 






jggWgWB ‘j 1 |W ,'iin f Vi i 






are willing to give the discount to 




general business computer 




SMSfU.*! wer* 




















j: 



THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


PUBLIC APPOINTMENTS 


dihector/general manager 

required by 

CHRISTIAli ALLIANCE HOBSffiG ASSWHM 

Asaoctetion Is preparing far contmuad expreisJon. 

to wafl vwsed it afl asoam of 

* *”* *9^*%? ,w0uW ^ “ 

admlnisireton caSSIL a ffi“ nt8d ■»« in tha 


T 


TheOahaan, 

Christian Alliance Honshu 


5x100 Sired. London, 'SEI BUE. 


ST. NICHOLAS’ HOSPICE 

. (for West Suffolk and Ttietford) 

Bury SL Mwiw«| fj 

DIRECTOR OF 
NURSING SERVICES 

^ ** * D '{ ea '? r of Nnran* Services whh inilialhe 

^ Cominning Care Team rf Soedabt 
Nw«s and Uk Day Care Centre in nr beautiful GeoniaiiHafflfce 
recently opened in ihe nuafcet town of Bnrv SLEbik 


UNITED KINGDOM IMMIGRANTS ADVISORY SERVICE 

SENIOR COUNSELLOR 
in charge of 

UKIAS REFUGEE UNIT 

Daring the past year the post of Senior Counsellor in charge 
of the UKIAS Refugee Unit has been filled on an acting basis 
while the postholder was on secondment abroad. The 
postholder has now resigned and UKIAS are taking steps to 
make a permanent appointment Applications are invited 
both from within UKIAS and from outside. 

The Refugee Unit which is mainly funded by a grant from 
the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is 
based in Central London and exists to provide advice and 
representation to individuals seeking asylum and refugee 
status in the United Kingdom. In addition to the Senior 
Counsellor the Unit has an existing staff of 3 Counsellors 
(who represent asylum-seekers when their appeals are heard 
before Adjudicators, as well as giving advice and making 
representations to the Home Office on behalf of asylum- 
seekers), (me Adviser and three support staff. A legal 


aspects 


asylum 



Alob duufr tlw and a paSra ti wi An can be obt ai ned bam Mr. 
to? Krtmirick, MBc. Sl Nicholas' Hmpin, Tenet 
CtatM Westmtr Street. Brey Sl Cdmofa, SaSblk EP93 ZaZ. 
ttkpbaae: Boy SL Edmonds (MM) 66131 
Completed application forms should be retained by 3t« 
ueonnber, 1986 for interviews in arty January, 1987. 


important part of the job is to provide leadership and policy 
direction (in consultation with UNHCR and UKIAS 
management) and to project the work of the Unit to 
interested community groups and individuals, other 
organisations working in the field, and to the public at large. 

Salary £11,964 rising by annual increments to £14,289. 

Application form and further details available from: 

Deputy Director (Administration) 

UKIAS, PO Box 132 
. 7th Floor Brettenham House 
Savoy Street 
London WC2E 7LR 

Dosing date for applications is 9 January 1987. 


Secretary 


Water Authorities Association 

£35,000 plus 

The Water Authorities Association is the national body representing the ten regional Water Authorities in 
England and Wales. It coordinates joint action and representation on behalf of the Authorities to the 
government, the EEC, other relevant bodies and the pubfle at large. It also negotiates national wage and salaiy 
agreements. 

The Secretary is the fuH time head of the Association’s thirty seven staff in London and plays a key role in the 
development of policy on a wide variety of mattere which are fundamental to the future of the industry. 

Candidates, aged up to 55, will have a distinguished career record in high profile administration and public 
relations roles rn industry, commerce or public service. Water industry experience is highly desirable but not 
essentiaL 

Salary for negotiation is unfiktiy to be less than £35,000 plus car and usual benefits. 

Please write- to confidence- stating how you meet the requirements to David Benneil, ref. A.43850. 

MSL International, 52 Grosvenor Gardens, London SW1W 0AW. 

Offices in Europe, the Americas, Australasia and the Asia Pacific. 


International 

Executive Search and Selection 


HORIZONS 


A guide to 
job opportunities 


Planning for a good tomorrow 


It is probably tree that in the public 
esteem planners are unfortunately ac- 
corded a low rating — roughly equal to 
that of journalists, tax inspectors and 
politicians. 

Unfortunate] because town and coun- 
try planners are attracted to the pro- 
fession through a desire to improve 
people’s living conditions, “concern for 
the human race, if that doesn't sound too 
pompous/* says Roger Brown, 

Hampshire 's cmmty plannin g officer. 

But, as be points out, decisions that 
please one person are almost bound to 
displease others. It’s not a career to 
choose if yon want to avoid controversy. 

Plannws may share ffa» sanre mftjy flFt 
but they can come from surprisingly 
disparate backgrounds. Hampshire? 
County Planning Department, which 
with 110 staff is one of the largest 
outside the l rig cities, has the surveyors, 
architects* engineers and town pforrpipg 
graduates yon might expect, plus some 
whose first degrees were in German, 
archaeology and zoology. 

It has always been possible to stndy for 
Royal Institute of Town Planning exams 
part time. The existing professional 
examination is currently being phased 
out — but replaced by a distance learning 
package approved by the RTPO in 1984 
which will lead to an Open University 
degree anrf a planning diploma. 


It is tiie politicians not the 
planner who takes decisions 


About 60 per cent of planners work in 
central and local government, most for 
the County and District Councils and 
Regional Councils (Scotland), giving 
advice to elected members. 

It is of course politicians who for tbs 
most part take decisions - some with the 
devel opment corporations, and a smaller 
number for central government, in the 
Department of the Environment and the 
Scottish Development Department 

Others work for the nationalized 
industries and tourist boards, while a 
small but increasing number are in 
private practice, usually working on a 
consultancy basis for large construction 
companies, “temping” for local authori- 
ties or acting for appellants a gainst local 
authority planning decisions. 

The work of a planner varies consid- 
erably according to where he or she is 
based. It doesn’t take much imagination 
to realize that the problems of the 
Highlands and Islands Development 
Board are going to differ from those of an 
inner city Council. But there are other 
differences. 

The three tiers of Department of the 
Environment, county councils and dis- 
trict councils have : different responsibil- 
ities in "different planning 

departments, staff may cover the whole 
range of duties or may specialize. The 


The desire to improve 
living conditions is 
generally uppermost in 
the minds of town and 
county planners. 
Beryl Dixon considers 
the implic a tions of a 
career in this field 


philosophy of the chief planning officer 
decides the approach to the work. 

One of the first things Roger Brown 
did on his appointment 13 years ago was 
to get rid of the drawing office as such. 
Instead, planners work in teams often in 
an open plan office, each having its own 
te chnicians and, increasingly, its own 
computer terminal. 

The DoE is concerned with broad 

natur al and regional planning , trying to 

ensure that local policies follow national 
guidelines, awl approving county struc- 
ture plans, while the Scottish Develop- 
ment Department has responsibility 
wi thin the Srattish Office for hull ggg 

p lanning in Sivittanri. 

County councils are responsible for 
minerals, waste, disposal, highways (ex- 
cept motorways and trunk roads) and 
strategic planning. Planning legislation 
requires diem to submit structure plans 
— statements of overall policy for 
development of the area to the Secretary 
of State for the Environment who 
requires that authorities have consulted 
the public before giving approval. 

The major weak of district council 
departments is spent on p lanning 
applications. “Life some times seems to 
be dominated by turning Ihe wretched 
things round", says one planner, and 
tr anslating the structure pla n into de- 
tailed local plans, liaising closely with the 
county departments. 

The current major issue in Hampshire 
where a draft strategy for the whole 
county in the 1990s has been prepared, is 
that of bow much development should 
be permitted in the North East and mid 
pans of the county. 

The county strategy has to be con- 
cerned with balancing demands for new 
housing and commercial development 
with those for preservation of attractive 


. Each district has its own priorities — in 
Winchester there is strong opposition to 
further commercial development and 
little enthusiasm for new hnanng . Fur- 
ther north in the Hart District, die local 
plan has to allow for the fact that “the 
strain of recent rapid rates of 


development" is feit by both town and 
village. 

As Roger Brown says, it is impossible 
to ptease everyone - and he feels a deep 
commitment to his county. It is hardly 
surprising that he lists one of the skills a 
planner needs as that of “thinking on 
your feet at a public meeting of 300 
people." Yet this is one aspect he values. 
“You have to justify yourself in public. 
You — and your chairman — take the 
flak" he said. 

Most planners spend part of their 
careers with local authorities in feet it is 
unusual to work for the DoE without 
such ftvperi ence. 

Young planners are usually advised to 
move around during their first ten to 15 
years, gaming a breadth of experience in 
rural mid urban areas, and m d iffere nt 
sized offices. 

Ultimately, and if they wish, they may 

specialize by opting for a large authority 
luce Hampshire where different teams 
work on a wide variety of projects. 

There, about 25 professional staff are 
involved in statutory work, white the rest 
are engaged in the variety of services the 
department provides. 

“We run laipe e n vir o nmental and 
countryside heritage programmes. We 
have a tag landscape architeefs section 
and helped to set up and advise a county 


Advice is nsnally to move 
around in the first ten years 


buildings preservation trust and the 
Hampshire intelligence unit supplying 
the County Council, hospitals and water 

authorities with projections on housing 
and population.” Mr Brown says. 

“ We also deal with enquiries from the 
public — Mr X might come in saying he 
wants to buy a house and will he be 
affected by any planning p roposals and 
publish booklets and work on the 
structure plan." 

Planners’ work naturally involves 
travel— you must go and look at the sites 
— as proved by Mr Brown’s £60,000 
budget for staff travelling expenses - but 
the time spent on correspondence, report 
writing and at committees should not be 
underestimated. 

A recently appointed trainee will 
spend two years working in different 
teams and attracted to districts for a 
period before finding a permanent niche. 

Career prospects for qualified planners 
are difficult to assess at present The 
National Advisory Board having recom- 
mended the closure of three courses in 
1983 then agreed to postponement in 
view of the RTPTs forecast of increased 
demand for pfenning staff 

• Further information is available 
from The Royal Town Planning In- 
stitute 26 Portland Place, London WIN 
4BK 



COUNTRYSIDE 
PROJECT OFFICER 
SALARY SCALE 
i SOI, £ 105 S 9-£11271 p.a. 

SCUNTHORPE URBAN FRINGE 
MANAGEMENT PROJECT 

This rawly estabfiahed project b Mng i sponsored by 
the Countryside Commission, (Stanford Borough 
Council, Scunthorpe Borough Council and 
Humberside County Council for an initial period of 
three years. 

- It covers an area of 50 square miles surrouncGng the 
industrial garden town of Scunthorpe. This area 
reflects the usual range of urban fringe problems; it 
also indudes attractive countryside, valuable wildlife 
habitats and the visible effects of large scale 
ironstone extraction and steelmaking. The project 
presents an interesting opportunity fori creativemd 
sympathetic management The alms of the project 
ooveriandscape and wildlife conservation, provision 
and Improvement of public access and recreational 
opportunities, resolution of conflict between land 
owners and users, and promotion of undgratanfong 
and involvement by the local community m the 
management and enjoyment of the countryside. 

The post is a challenging and demanding one, andlfta 
-successful applicant wffl be able to demonstrate 

candidate is also likely to have qualifications in one of 
the environmental sciences or countryside 
management A driving licence is essential. 

Further details are available from the Personnel 
Office^ Councfl Offices, Station Road, Brigg, South 
Humberside, DN20 BEG (tatep hone Srigg (Q652) 
263), to whom 

(NO FORMS) accompanied by a 
tooether with the names and addresses of two 
SSrsons to whom reference maybe made. shouMbe 
SSIimS bv noon on Wednesday, 31st December 
1986 Ralph Kitchen (extension 454) ar Ke vIn Fo ster 
<^uSS 453 )w«be pleased to discuss details of 
the work. 

Previous applicants need not re-apply. 

mJlM 

Glan fQfd Borough Council 

head of fund 
raising unit 

With statutory 


D»w, K---. introducing new oonore ana 
BRcSTSd project? to identity 

ability to "Jintedwly is essential 
yE3“Sto* -I -oridag »tth 

5£3°ri*i an advantage. 

For job 

Closing data 31st Decanber 1986. 
BRITISH REFUGEE COUNCIL 


LECTURESHIPS IN 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

City of London Polytechnic 

Tta Polytechnic seeks to bufid father on fa st ren gt hs in 
Computer Science, and to promote the penetration of 
oamputmg into other core cfodpHnn. Applications an 
invited tram smubfe qualified paraotw for the following 
porta in die Department o t Computing, Management i 
and Statietica. xhoiie appointed will ! 
co n t ri b u te both to the Polytechnic's teaching prog ramm e j 
and to fa itaff d e wflu iiiii u i rt activity; naaareh and/or ! 
consulting interests will ne strongly encouraged. 

Lecturer n/Senior Lecturer in 
Software Engineering 

Applicants should have demongtreMs work experience in 
software m ml ii** * ' n fc in sdiWtim to technical expertise in 
the development at nomplcnc software. A knowledge of 
product specification, formal development tednrigoes, 

wialily — niwm iw* end paF^iHiumpa TTVuiiynrinp jg 


Lecturer n/Senior Lecturer in 
Formal Methods in 
Computer Science 

AppHcufa could be recently qualified gradnatea. The 
fl nmfidut a wilt tv m t ritexie fti the teaching of a new 
set of eoaraea. emphasising formal ap p roaches to turMeus 
flmi software iy n , mil mdadrog * tfUTlft material in the 
theory of c ompntatkm . 


Salary scales ( incl u din g London W e ig htin g)! 

Lecturer II - £9,706 djl - £14,766 pJ. 

Senkn 1 Lfcturar - £13,725 p*. - £15330 pA. (bar) £16£83 pjl 

The eipwted starting date for these jobs is 1st April 1987. 
Application forms 

P a rum rail Officer 

Polytechnic. 117-1 
(01-283 1030 at 255 
no later than 5 Jf 
88/175. 

The Polytechnic it an equal opportunities employer. 



MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANT 


grant and partly from commercial activities, it has 
an annual turnover of £24 million and 15S 
employees based in a modem office block shared 
with the British Touist Authority. 

The Bead Is seeking a qualified acc o u nt an t to lead 
the small management accounts team, whose 
primary purpose is to maintain and develop the 
existing financial control and management 
reporting systems. The finance division provides a 
service to both the BTA and the ETB but this post 
will mainly provide a service to the ETB. 

The post includes responsibility for management 
information to the Chairman and the Board and 
substantial involvement in the budgeting and 
planning process. 

Accounts are fully computerised on the Board's 
Digital Vax computer. - 

The successful candidates will have a background 
in both management and finance accounting, 

K in a group bead office environment) wife 
} years' post qualifying experience and the 
diplomacy necessary to communicate effectively 
wife aH levels of management, and, ideally si 
interest in tourism. 

The salaiy offered is around £16,000 on a scale 
rising to £18,000 including accountancy allowance. 

Fdr further details send year CV to Mare Lynch, 
Personnel and Training Manager, Engfish Tourist 
Board, Thames Tower, Blacks Road, 
Haomersmffli, London W6 90. Tel: 01-846 9000. 

Chsmg Me far sppBcstioss ,19th December. 


Environm en tal Health & Housing 
Department 

OFFICE MANAGER 

Dp to £ 11,604 inclusive 

FMowtfig tea rati ra mant of tin promt posthoUar, ws am 
looidng for an enttiusttstc aomst/nor to play a mrior rote in 
Ilia manaowneni of our programme Environmental Heotti anti 
Housing department 

The parson appointed wfl head tiie AfftitinWntitea Section and 
tie responsUa tor the effective ma n a gement and operation of 
the admMarathw and clerical sendees in providing support to , 
pratasslonsl/tBchnJcsl start. 

Duties wH induda tha adtrtni s t ralio n of the CouidTs Housfeg 
Advice Centra and the m an agement and promotion of various 
Social Centro. 

Appointment to be made te iawtog the netiramanl of tha present 
pcffiffissBJsr at die and of the year. 

The Oound operates a generous relocation scheme and 
temporary staff housing may also tie avatiable h requtod. 


f * — Mjasmsnt Sarvfcea Officer, Town 
Epeoai. Surrey or phone Epsom 44911 


form from tha P oro u gh 
Officer, Town Kati, Tha 
Epsom 44911 (24 hear 
: 16 Docemtiet 1966. 



EPSOM & EWELL 


Borough of Havant 

Administrative and Legal Department 

SENIOR 

SOLICITOR 

Salary op to £15^243 
Havant is on die Sooth Coast. 

We need someone good to deal primarily with 
civil litigation and housing work (including 
Committee). Applicants (not necessarily from 
local government) most be strong in at least one 
of those two fields. Applications from barristers 
will be considered. 

Removals, bousing support/mortgage subsidy 
scheme and other benefits. 

Flexitime. 

Application form and father particulars from 
the Boreagh Secretary and Solicitor, Crric 
Offices, Gmc Centre Road, Havant. (TeL 
Havant (0705) 474174 ExL 187 or 193). 

Disabled persons may apply as appropriate. 

Cl o s ing date 5th hamary 1987, 


CONVENT OF JESUS AND MARY 

THORNTON SCHOOL 
THORNTON 

MILTON KEYNES MK17 0HJ 
(near Buckingham) 

Independant Day/BoanSng School for girts 
330 pupils age range 4% - 16 

BURSAR 

This post wflJ become vacant on the retfremert of the 
present Bursar at tie end of this academic y ear and 


a wide adnmistrative experience and a good working 
knowledge of accountancy and property mantenance. 
Tliesucessfiri^iplicairtwiJI be exgebtedto take up duties on 

Applications in writing, together with C.V. and names aid 
addresses of two referees should be submitted to the 
Secretary to the Governors at the above address tv January 
16th 1987. 


h’s wide 


Senior Assistant Solicitor 

Up to £16,749 p.a. 

Enfield, one of the largest of the London Boroughs, 
is a unique blend of town and country. Although a 
third of it is protected countryside it enjoys foe 
advantages which come with being only 12 miles 
from the heart of foe capital ft has excel lent 
transport links. 

its busy legal office serves foe Borough’s wide 
range of functions, environment and cultures. 

You wrH be an experienced advocate who sees 

S utton as a significant pvt of foe legal 
n in promoting the pttoUc interest You will 
be responsible for supervising all aspects of 
prosecution work and will be expected to handle the 
more important cases personally. Other areas of 
work wHl involve Town Pfennig aid Chrfl Legation. 

Starting salary depends on age and experience. 

All reasonable removal and relocation expenses wfll 
be met; aid temporary housing is avadaWe for 19 
to 51 weeks. 

Further (Ms are available from foe Chief 
Executive and Town Eerie, PO Box 50, Civil Centre, 
Silver Street, Enfield, Middlesex EMI 3XA 
Telephone 01-366 9488. 

Ctesng date 19.12J& _ t/1 

Reference BLE/369. /A 

London Borough of AVa 


An Equal 

Oooonuntty 
_ Emptoyw , 


ASSISTANT 
TOWN CLERK 

£13,653 - £14,862 + leased car 

We are seeking an admitted solicitor for the 
post of A ssi s t a nt Town Clerk whose duties 
wll include court and comntttBe work and wfll 
offer the opportunity to obtain management 
experience through taking part In the decision 
making process and the implementation of the 
Couned's decisions. Previous local govern- 
ment experience unnecessary. 

We offer a generous relocation package fn- 
ctoding up to £ 2£00 far legal and professional 
fees and a dteturbance aUowance In approved 
cases. Additional Increments may be awarded 
under a performance award scheme. 

Application forms and further detafts are 
avatiable from foe Personnel Officer, Gffing- 
bam Borough Cound, Municipal BuBdngs, 
Gffingham, Kent ME7 5LA. TeL (0634) 50021 
ExtfL 249. 

. Borough Counol > 


BASKET BALL DEVELOPMENT 
OFFICERS 

ENGLISH BASKET BALL ASSOCIATION 




Apply to EBJJUgjfaMW Hogg* ttyto n Aro mo, 
LEEDS Lot BCE. 

flta*han« OStS 4*044) by IM Dmn*«r f WBVL 



LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 

ST JAMES’S 
COMPANY/ 
COMMERCIAL 

We are looking for an able Solicitor of one 
to two years qualified experience for our 
expanding company/commerdal depart- 
ment. 

The firm offers a variety of interesting 
work and a good salary will be paid 
commensurate with the successful app- 
licant's experience and ability. 

This is a challenging opportunity with 
excellent prospects for a suitable cand- 
idate. 

Please reply with CV to:- 

Roger Newman 
Amhurst Brown Martin 
& Nicholson 

2 Duke Street, St James’s 
London SWIY 6BJ 

Tel: 01 930 2366 


INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED LEGAL STUDIES 
University of London 

DIRECTOR 

Applications are invited from pe rao ns of a p pr o p ria te 
operience and scholarship for this foB-rime post at 
professorial level. The Ins titute is being developed into a 
national centre of excellence for legal research and studies. 
The Institute is looking tor a Director who can give 
dynamic academic leadership to fa expanding work and 
TO foe support foal is needed. As the academic and 
administrative bead of the Institute, the Director will be 
expected to provide leadership in the conduct and 

development of afl its activities, metofing fa forthcoming 
significant new role m pro tooting and conducting research, 
toe Director wffl also be expected to develop what is 

generaUy regarded as London's (carting taw library, and to 
s tren gthen library services in ampon of legal re searc h, 
taking full advantage of new te ctm otogy. 

Ftetber detafa iwfablc frae: ILF. Pst t en a a , Institute of 
Advanced Legal StiaKes, Chutes Clare Hone, 17 Bread 
Sgrere, Lmm WC 1 B SUL 

O Mg date for appfi nffcm, 16 Jktamry 1987. 


LEWES CHAMBERS 

Ap plications are invited from members of itae Bar, both of 
recent and longer cab to jam a new set of 

Qtambeis in tews. . 

The Chamber* wffl practice in afl 
branches ofCoaunmon Law. 

More details are avaiaWe Born: 

THE HEAD OF CHAMBERS, 

144 HIGH STREET, LEWES, SUSSEX. 

AS aypEatioia wilt be dealt with im confidence. 


BARRISTERS* CHAMBERS 

Doe to the departure of a Senior Civil Practitioner, 
Chambers require a suitable replacement. Additional 

tenancies also exist tor counsel with at lesst owe 
years' call 

Please Reply with fall CV to: 

Box FZ4 
g/o Tha Times 







30 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1586 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Jaques & Lewis 

COMPANY/COMMERCIAL 

Due to continuing expansion our Company/Commercial 
department is seeking to recruit solicitors with one to three 
years experience, who have good academic qualities and an 
ability to get on with clients and colleagues. 

The department deals with a variety of demanding work for a 
wide range of public and private companies and institutional 
clients, much of it with an international involvement. The 
successful applicants must be able to work under pressure. A 
competitive remuneration package is offered. 

Applications in writing with full CV should be addressed to the 
Partnership Secretary, Keith Goodchild, at Jaques & Lewis, 

2 South Square, 

Gray’s Inn, 

London, 

WC1R 5HR. 




it 

■, ■ v , 


r, }'■ :a-. 1 



I •■•A .V't ’ •T v • v .-<* . 
l-N'Ttr T ; • . 



Lawyers 
on the Move 


ft is a big decision fora lawyer outside London todecide to come and work for 
a City firm. We understand that and would therefore like to give you an 
opportunity to meet with us to discuss it and to answer your questions. 

We would also like to tell you about our firm - the people and its clients, our 
training programmes, what sort of work you could be doing, who you would 
be working with. 

We will be visiting Glasgow on to December 1986 and Manchester on 11 
December 1986 and will be at the venues below between 10.00 am and 
7.00 pm so please come and talk to us. 

The Hospitality bin The Portland Thistle Hotel 

Cambridge Street PtecadWy Gardens 

Glasgow Manchester 

As one of the leading City and international law firms we offer a wide range of 
legal services to ourdients who are in finance, commerce and industry. We 
are looking for people to join our Litigation team but also have openings in 
Corporate, International Finance and Commercial Property. 

ft is our policy to seek to recruit people from a wide range of backgrounds and 
range of experiences. 

It is a friendly environment to work in with plenty of opportunities to develop 
your career through involvement in exciting and topical areas of law. We 
believe we can give you the support and training you need and also offeryou 
excellent professional and financial rewards. In return, you may be able to 
help us meet the ever increasing demand tor legal services. 

If you prefer to send a CV please write to: 


Mrs A Dickinson, 
Lin Waters & Paines, 
Barrington House, 
59-67 Gresham Street, 
London EC2V 7 JA. 




LINKLATERS & PAINES 


SENIOR 

SOLICITOR 

£14,862 -£16,011 p.a. 

We are looking for a solicitor with the 
following qualities: 

-ambition 

-enthusiasm 

- ability to mix well with people 

- ability to lead 

to carry out the following job: 

- attending and advising a major 
programme committee 

- leading a team of 4 solicitors 

- negotiating and settling complex 
legal transactions 

- applying new technology systems m 
the legal section 

At least 3 years post-qualification 
experience is desirable and local government 
experience would be an advantage. 

Application Forms and Job Description 
available from Director of Law and 
Administration, Civic Centre, 

Southampton S09 4XR. 

Telephone: Southampton 832716. 

Closing Dale: 19th December 1986 



SOUTHAMPTON 


CITY 


Vour a pplication will be judged solely on to merits 
irrespective of race, meriial status, sex. sexual 
orientation, age. religion or disability. 


An equal opportunity employer 


Senior 

Commercial Lawyer 

The work undertaken by the Legal Department of our 
client, a major UK pic, is intrinsically interesting, wide 
ranging, original, often international and of the utmost 
commercial importance— work which would normally be 
done at partner level in a substantial private practice. 

They seek a Senior Commercial Lawyer aged at least 


commercial law who, ideally, will be well accustomed to 
working with senior managers in the larger pic's. The 
required skills extend beyond purely legal considerations 
ana include negotiating with third parties and the ability to 
create coni rads— often novel and complex— underthe 
pressure of tight commercial deadlines. 

In addition to a heavy caseload, there are the 
managerial responsibilities of leading and co-ordinating 
a small team of experienced Commercial Lawyers. 


There is an excellent benefits package which includes 
substantial assistance with fhe costs of relocation to a 
pleasant, historic, provincial city. 

Toapply, please write, in strict confidence, giving 
details of experience, age, qualifications and present 
salary quoting ref. 959TT. Alternatively telephone John 
Pattison as adviser to the company on 0602 411238 (office) 
or 0623 553615 (evenings) for a brief discussion. No details 
will be divulged to our client without your prior permission. 

CB-Linnell Limited 

7 College Street, Nottingham. 
MANAGEMENT SELECTION CONSULTANTS 
NOTTINGHAM * LONDON 


PARTNER’S 

SECRETARY 

at WC1 Solicitors 

Salary 

c.£10,000 p.a, 

TEL: 01-242 9103 


STEIN -SWEDE-JAY & BIBRIN 


SOLICITORS 


T| | 


TRAINEE SOLICITOR 

We urgently require a person to transfer articles to join this 
fast expanding commercial practice as part of a team 
assisting a number of overworked partners. Ability to work 
under pressure is essential. 

Please send C.V. to Peter Jay at the above address. 


•4 


Company 


To meet continuing expansion we are seeking both expenenced an 
recently-qualified lawyers for our Company Department. We oner 
interesting and challenging work, much, of it with an international 
content, wi thin a friendly working environment. 

There are also opportunities for assignment to one of our 

overseas offices. 


Those with 
Experience 

Wfe can offer a wide range of 
high-profile corporate and 
financial work for lawyers with 
between about two and five 
years’ post-qualification 
experience. City experience 
would be an advantage, but we 
are also keen to hear from those 
who have formed an interest in 
company and commercial work 
elsewhere and would like to 
broaden their horizons and 
match their abilities against the 
demanding work available in a 
leading City practice. 


Recently 

Qualified 

TVfe would like to hear from 
newly-qualified lawyers, and 
those about to qualify, with a 
view to joining one of the teams 
in our Company Department. 
Our policy is to provide young 
lawyers with a variety of 
different kinds of corporate 
and commercial work at the 
b eginnin g of their careers, 
while allowing specialisation in 
a chosen area subsequently. 


If you would like to bear more, please call Graham Nicholson, 
the Managing Partner of the Company Department, or David Ranee, our Personnel 

Adviser, both on 01-606 6677. 

Alternatively please write to: David Ranee, Freshfields, Grindall House, 

25 Newgate Street, London EC1A 7LH. 



NEW OPPORTUNITY 

in 

PROPERTY 


CITY 


£25-40,000 


A feodng practice, wfiti wef formulated expansion plans, seeks sofcftoa in foe* late 
20s/earty 30s deserving career acceleration. Real prospects of parine rcrt p exist for persons 
to demonstr a te hfeNy developed pracfl^skib on coaplex property frCT^octions. 

The efient base hdudes the pubic sector, major developers, pubfic companies and 
Mitufions - the woric is consequently of the highest catore avertable. Ihe post is open to 
those whose careers are already estabfched but vtoo recognise foot a change may be 
hejptfU and those whose present careers CTotjustrcrieci 


Al appBcaBoni wB be treated in complete confidenc e and no dbdosure W be made to 
our dent wthout spedPe comer* Ftease apply Id AsMey Bate, quoting Bsfc C22S at Muter 
SknkinlJmfted, 26-28 Budtoid Row, London WC1R4HE.M: 01-405 6852. 


m 

4 


rj iHM 

m:V 



Holding Company 
Age 28-40 

Salary c £24,000 plus an executive 
car and attractive benefits package 

Our die ntisa well established and highly auccexsfulpubiicaom pa ny with s 
diverse range of activities both inthe UK and abroad. The need has arisen for an 
Assi s t a nt Company S oci e t a i y io wot* in their London based Head Office. 

In addition to secretarial and administrative duties^he successful candidate 
wfflhaiv an JrntxKt^iotowpJay In bisiniciinsand advising ibegroupk operating 
divisions oh legal matters; be or she will be expected totske on increasing 
responsibility for tasks currently handled by the Group S«cretarv,both«»ub*£ary 
end Head Office level. 

Applications are invited from Ch a rtere d Se cr etaries orthose who holds 
recognto e d legal quafflcabon-ThequaBtiBS of ambftfonanddac ial ver ajj ara 
eeundaf, as is the abWtylo communicate with peopteat ell levels. Commercial 
experien c e Is pre fer red. 

Bfeumfa should be lent in str i c t c o nf i dence to the Consutantswho am 
handSng the ap p o in tm en t at the addtees below:— 

The Welbecfc Group Limited, Panton House. 25 Haymarhet, 

London SW1Y4EN. 

The V\Hbeck Group 
Limited 




Goad Future for 


if you think you might fit then yvrfte or tetetene-te- 


exchange 


11 

ngf mlfanSflS* 


















THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


j^®n 3 ch&cl! 5S® 

RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANT 

sSEST— ws 

S£S£aa 

SC 1 a JW“ •■¥■ ■ 

sub^H^i^ and ‘ opportunities to -earn-. 

comniBsion and, tofci*tfT 
wg^SPenod, a range of benefits wtichyou 

“OiJd expect from a fast expanding company. 1 ” 11 

For further HohuTe ... _ _ 


lfrWNewBridgeaiDndonEC^fiAu' ' • 

Tetephone 01 -S 830073 


■ BADENOCH &CLAKK m 

CAPITAL MARKETS 

A leading Investment Bank currently seeks a lawyer 
aged 28-32 to join its transaction management team. 
Candidates should have a number of years legal 
experience m International Finance work and be able to 
lake a high' level of responsibility Immediately. The 
position offers excellent opportunities for career 
development 

PRIVATE CLIENT 
SOLICITOR 

£.High 

Our client is a large, thnvtng practice based in the Qty: A 
dynamic and challenging role has arisen within their 
Private Client department far a qualified Sofldtor with 
proven expertise m the field of Trusts. Probate and Tax 
.planning. The selected individual Is likely lobe inJhe age 
range of 32 tb 35, with several years' relevant 
experience and must be of the highest catibre, with 
p a rtnership potential Excellent rewards. 

ForUditafis of these and many other opportunities please 
cpntart. JaiHh Taiicr or Jail Gnfltm. 

FStendai RscriitmertiSpectahstB 
16-18 New Bridge St London EC4V6AU 
Telephone 01-583 0073 


HONG KONG 

COMMERCIAL, FINANCE AND 
CONSTRUCTION LAWYERS 

We need several lawyers with not less than 2 years' post-qualification 
experience: 

- two to handle public company matters, acquisitions, mergers, joint 
ventures and a wide range of general company and commercial 
assignments, usually with an international flavour 

- one to handle mainly finance matters, including secured and unsecured 
lending, leasing and project finance, much of which is connected with the 
People b Republic of China 

—one with experience of working with Japanese companies in the 
commercial/finance area who can communicate effectively in spoken 
' Japanese at the business level 

: -one to specialise in all aspects of construction law including contract 
- drafting, advice on claims, litigation and arbitration. A basic knowtedgeof 
i insurance law and project financing techniques will be an advantage. 

• Our practice in this field operates on a regional basts and travel within the 
Asia/Padfic region will be encouraged 

These positions offer a challenging and financially rewarding opportunity for 
bright ambitious lawyers who want to work in the stimulating environment of 
Hong Kong. Although we are one of the largest and most forward-looking 
firms in Hong Kong, we still maintain a personal and friendly working 
environment 

If you think you are suitable*, please write enclosing your c.* to 
Blair Wallace, Baker & M9Kenzie, Akfwych House, Aldwych, 
London WC2B4JP 




Recently Qualified 
Solicitor 

Up to £18JKM> dependent on experience 

Develop your legal experience in the 
Consumer Finance World with Citibank Savings 


With CitibankSavings, part of 
one of the world’s largest banking 
organisations, you will be given the 
opportunity to develop an expertise 
in credit banking and related areas of 

. Based in Hammersmith and 
reporting to our Company Solicitor, 
you will be closely involved with our 
consumer credit and personal 
savings operations, including 
advising on and drafting documents 

for new facilities, ensuring 

compliance with consumer credit 
legislation, and negotiating and 
'drafting commercial agreements. 

You will have up to two years 
admitted experience A good 


knowledge of consumer credit and 
banking law is desirable and 
conveyancing and litigation 
experience would also be usefuL 
la addition to the salary, we 
offer a wide range of benefits, 
including low cost mortgage and loan - 
schemes, non-contributory pension, 
free fife assurance and health care. 

To apply; please write to: 

Chris Downs, Personnel Manage*; - 
Citibank Consumer Services. 

St Martins House, 

1 Hammersmith Grove, London W60NY 


Citibank Savings & 


LEGAL ADVISER 
INSURANCE BROKING 


irtuai matters. You will be involved m a wide variety 
Snaring Group legal situations mainly in the UK but 
SiintMngtional exposure. You must be commercial . 
with an enquiring and thorough mind. 

Please reply with CV to Ron Urquhart, 

Tardine Insurance Brokers Head Office, 
Thames House, 1-4 Queen Street Place, 

1 London EC4R 1JA. 


wrn 



jsrtSne Insurance Brokers 


LEGAL AID 
REGIONAL DIRECTOR 

£30,858 -£32,411 

AppikatkmsaremvitedfromsotidlOTsforthepostofRegjonal 
Director, who will be a member of the Legal Aid Manageraen t Board 
which coraprises representatives of the management, legal , personnel , 
financial aid computer functions. 

There are two Regional Directors each of whom is responsible 
for managing the administration of Legal Aid in seven or eight of the 
Legal Aid Areas. 

The posts haveasoong management content and each is 
concerned with a total of somefiOO staff working within tight financial 
limits and handling an increasmgvoiuine of work. 

Candidates should have extensive experience of work of Legal 
.AklConnnitteesawlbeal^todenxwsrraietbewillandaMityto - 
guide and control the work of Legal Aid in the Areas for which they 
become responsible. 

The conditions of service include a contributory super- 
annuation scheme with dependants' provision, regular increments 
and 30 working days leave. 

Tito past involves travel in England and Wales bur is London 
based and the above salary includes £1516 per annum London 
Weighting. Removal expenses are not payable on first appointment 
and applicants from outside London are therefore asked to confirm 
that they foresee no problem in moving to within commuting distance 
of the office. 

Apply for job description and application fSSnrWi 

form, to be returned not later than Wednesday 3 1st P4J| 

December, 1986 to: Personnel Manager Legal Aid KrS 

Head Office, 5th Float; New^taper House, BjUtVljW 

8/16 Great New Street, Loudon, EC4 3BN. ferSlSl 


Commercial 

Solicitor 

Norcros pic is a major international Group with a 
multi-million pound turnover in products for the 
■ ■ building, construction and print and packaging 

Industries. \ 

Recent expansion of the Group has created a new 
post for a recently qualified solicitor within the Group 
Legal Department 

The Department is situated at the Group’s Head 
Office, in an attractive rural location near Reading 
and provides a full range of legal advice and assis- 
. tance to member companies of the Norcros Group. 

As one of two solicitors reporting to the Group Legal 
Adviser, the successful candidate will be expected 
to develop his or her skills in a demanding and fast 
moving commercial environment The ability to work 
under pressure, communicate effectively and deal 
professionally with a wide range of complex issues 
will be essential. 

Applicants will ideafiy be recently admitted solicitors 
with a good honours degree. Corporate and 
commercial experience during or after articles 
would be an advantage. - 1 ■ 

An attractive salary is offered together with other 
usual benefits associated with a major public 
company. A company car will be provided as the 
appointment calls for some mobility. 

Candidates are invited to send full career details to: 

A J Winckworth, Group Manager, 

-Personnel and Administration, Norcros pic. 

Highlands, Spencers Wood, READING RG7 1NT. 

— — 

J CORPORATE 
1 LAWYER 

Bristol & West Building Society are seeking a Corporate 
Lawyer at their Head Office in Central Bristol. The Society 
has an innovative approach to new products and services 
and recent legislation has paved the way to even greater 
diversification in the future. -i 

This position within the Society's Secretariat covers I 

most aspects of the Society's affairs, but we are partku- 
. lady looking fora Solicitor or Banister with experience of 
company law and financial services legislation. 

Applicants should have at least fivey ears post- 
qualification experience, preferably to a commercial 
environment, and have the ability to provide practical 
advice to management at all levels. 

A substantial benefits package will be negotiated to 
keeping with the seniority of the appointment 

Please write to confidence, with fuffev. to Ann Davis, 
Personnel Manager, Bristol & West Building Society, I 

PO Box 27, Broad Quay, Bristol BS99 TAX. I 

Bristol & West is an Equal Opportunities Employer. .. . I 


Commercial 

Conveyancer 

Our Client a substantial and growing City 
fern wife a wide range of clientele in fee 
Commercial and Financial field seeks a 
Commercial Conveyancer of calibre. 

The partners recognise that growth 
and prosperity depend upon the ability to 
provide a service feat is perceived to be 
excellent 

Candidates with up to 4 years PQ 
experience should telephone James Davis 
on 01-629 4226 or write to him at the 
address below (Ref: V101) 


LEGAL SELECTION 


1 


WES 

[MINERS 


160 New Bond Street 
London WtY OHR England 
Telephone 01-6294226 
Fax 01-491 7459 
Telex 29894Z 


Compliance 

Officer 

Our dient is a leading accepting house and regimes an 
experienced and able lawyer to act as the Executive Compliance 
Officer for all companies m the UK group. You should preferably 
have at least five years’ post-qualification experience, dealing with 

min pnny/ rrwrnnprrtal raw* m a Tiry firm nr nmrlrmg m tfw> frromrial 

services sector advising an general legal and regulatory matters. 

The successful candidate will be responsible for running the 
established Com pliance Depa rtm ent, an a day-to-day basis and 
will report to the director responsible for Compliance. 

The appointment will be made at a senior level and the 
compensation package will indude a generous salary, profit sharing, 
car and other banking benefits. 

- - Please write with full cv to the address below; qu ot in g 
ref: P3065/T on die envelope. Your application will be 


attention of our Security Manager with a note of companies to 
which it should not be sent. 

B\ 

R\ Advertising 

Hyde Park Home, 60a Kirightsbridge, London SW1X 7LE. 
l. Tel: 01-235656 Telex: 27874 


Legal Adviser 

Unilever seeks a qualified lawyer to join its Legal 
Department at its Blackfriars Head Office, London. 
The department provides a wide-ranging service to 
Unilever PLC and its U.K. subsidiaries which reflects 
the scope and variety of the operations of this major 
company. 

The successful candidate, either a solicitor or a 
barrister, is likely to be a graduate under 35 years of 
age. Previous industrial/commercial experience of 
2-5 years, in either private practice or a company 
legal department is essential, as is a practical, 
problem-solving approach. 

The right person can expect an interesting career 
with remuneration appropriate to the considerable 
responsibility involved. Other benefits, including 
BUPA and contributory pension scheme, are those 
normally associated with a forward-looking major 
international Company. 

Abase write, with fufi career and personal detafis to:— 

Mr. C. P. Broadbent. 

H.O. Personnel Department 
Unilever UKCR Limited, 

PO Box 68, Unilever House, 

Blackfriars, 

London EC4P4BQ 
Telephone: 01-822 5997. 




Jajrd«ri eS 


^ Meredith Scott v 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY to cJ35,000 

Solicitors, idaaHy with a minimum of 2 years’ Experience si 
or out of London, sought by substantial EC2 practice. 

PENSIONS to c.£3M00 

Specialist lawyer, preferably with at least 2 years’ related 
exp8rim*required by leading ECl practice. 

CORPORATE TAX to C43M0Q 

Major EC3 firm requires Lawyer ideally with a 
nwwnum of 2 years' raided experience. 

BANKING to &£30,000 

Major EC2 practice soaks sofidtor, minimum 1 yBar 
admitted, for mtemation^ coital markat cotpocade and bond 
issue work. 

CONVEYANCING to c£17,00Q 

Medium sized SWi practice seeks mwly/recentiy admitted 
Sofidtor. Commercial teas. 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 

tot. !7Fka Srntt. Lorn too EC4Y 144- M 

W 01-S83 MSS or 0r-54i 3897 ftfttr i&kt ***** W 


ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 
Up to £13,260 

This post offers an excellent opportunity for a 
solicitor or barrister, preferably 'with some practical 
experience in fitigatiem ^id aJvbcacy to participate in 
a wide variety of legal work in a busy off ice. T he 
duties will include litigation in fie Magistrates', 
County and High Courts, advocacy in the courts and 
tribunals, industrial relations matters, attending and 
advising committees of the Council and giving advice 
to officers on a wide range of subjects. 

Locaf Government experience is not essenftL ‘ 

further details and an application form may be 
obtined from: 

Tbs Director of A dmini stra tio n, 

Town HaD, 


SKI 3XL 

Tot 061-480 4949 ext 3214. 

Closing date 23 December 1986. 


GUILDFORD 

Ambitious and lively 
Conveyancing Solicitor 
requited for a challenging 
position with excellent 
partnership prospects. 

Apply GELLHORN & CO 
(0483) 577091 
Ref: DG 

DORKING BRANCH OF 

LONDON FIRM 

Wen estattstwt oral U 
enttosashc Assistant a 
Wpandng wmnensai 
prospects (tow or me . _ - - 

lIBchad Downs, Pt^ .Conway Thorow* Co, 
Dickons House, 35 Wathen Rd, Dorking, 
Surrey.{ 0306 ) 887008 




f 


THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 



Ensuring efficient and fair practice in 
Court offers a fascinating career to 
lawyers keen for involvement bevond 
the usual limitations ofei the r defence 
or prosecution. 

There can be few specialisms in the 
legal profession to provide such 
variety, both in terms of cases and 
personal involvement. 

And ambitious men and women 
whose administrative ability matches 
their legal qualifications can expect to 
move rapidly through the service 
from Court Clerk to Senior or 
Principal Clerk, and above. 

Court Clerks 

Your role will be to co-ordinate and 
administer the Magistrate's Courts" 
activities: ensuring correct procedures 
are adhered to at ail times; advising 
magistrates; assisting unrepresented 
defendants; ensuring the accuracy of 
defence solicitors; and much more 
besides. 


Slough bas a particularly wide- 
ranging case load; reflecting the 
town's Targe, cosmopolitan 
community. 

Salaries are under review. The new 
range will prove as attractive to 
recently qualified solicitors and 
barristers as it will to experienced 
court clerks. 

Find out more by telephoning or 
writing to Terry Kennedy, 
Consultant, who has been retained to 
handle initial applications. Austin 
Knight Selection, Knightway House, 
Band Lane , Egharo, Surrey 
TW20 9NX. Tel: (0784) 39103 (day) 
or 1 0784) 33396 (evenings/weekends). 
Please quote ref: YS125. 



Austin 

wKnightm 

Selection 


TO £30,000 

for able young lawyers 
to handle 

top quality pensions work 
for 

institutional 

corporate 

and 

private clients 

Apply In strictest conMunc* to AnBaDomwl at IfeutarSMtih United, 

1 Gracochuich Sheet, London, EC3 ODD. Mephoiw 01 *4056852 Quote Ret 

AD/C230. 


REUTER SIMKIN 

LONDON • LEEDS • MMNGHMI • WMCHESIEE 
IBICBOIT1U8IT Atm MANAGKMIirr CONSULTANTS ■ 


ALSOP STEVENS 

- MARINE LITIGATION - 

Invites applications from solicitors with up to 3 years post 
qualification experience to assist in the conduct of an 
increasing volume of marine litigation in our City office. A 
competitive salary is offered commensurate with 
experience. 

Please reply to 29 Mincing Lane EC3R 7EB 
Reference WHD. 




SOLICITOR 
£16.000. Conveyancing. 

Early pa rtite nah ip 

opportunities. 

SOLICITOR 
£18,000. Company few. 

QuOy Portfolio. 

SOLICITOR 
£18400. Tot* 




■flkK'.’.'MC' 





/ Hughes-Castell (Hong Kong) Ltd 


m 


SOLICITORS 

mm 

Hons Koqg's pace is East, bat good c ommer c i al work and high salaries are 
offered to Ommn csc/Maoriariii speaking solicitors who are experie nce d, newly 
qualified or about CO qualify. 

As legal recruitment specialists, oar emphasis is to give all our candidates 
the personal co mmitm e nt , experienced guidanc e and support that is vial when 
c oaempiatmg an i m p or t a nt c a ree r move. 

Just ring our London office for a chat — our confidentiality is guaranteed 
«r»d oar service is free to candidates. 

01-583 0232 

Or write direct to us at: 

502 East Town Building, 

41 Lockhart Road, Hong Kong. 


Legal Resources 
Employment Agency 
L0CUMS 
needed now 
for assignments 
country wide. 
Tel: 01-405 4985 



& Litigation work with 
Spanish speaking clients. 

Please send CV to 
52 Lincoln's Inn Reids, 
London WC2A3LZ 


ASA LAW 
LOCUMS 

Has moved Id 
new offices 
(off) Chancery Lane 

01-404 4741 

We are e x pand i ng the 
fatiftiesofou’ 
Loctan service 


die best sendee 
for Locums 
in al counties 

ASA Law 
Locun SoScHors 
31/37 Cursitor Street 
(an) Chancery Lane 
London EC4A 1LT 


WORLD INTELLECTUAL 
PROPERTY 
ORGANIZATION 



ORGANISATION M0NDIALE 
DE LA PROPRIETY 
INTELLECTUELLE 


The World Intellectual Property Organization (a Spectafized 
Agency of the United Nations) requires for its Headquarters 
in Geneva (Switzerland) a 

HEAD/DIRECTOR 

(grade P.5/D.1) to lead its 
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY 
(SPECIAL PROJECTS) DIVISION 
Initial duration of appointment: 

2 years 

Principal duties include legal work in connection with the revision and 
preparation of treaties and stud ies in t he field of industrial propeity law, 
notably in connection with trademarks; furnishing of advice Kid assis- 
tance to member states and organizing meetings to promote industrial 
property protection. 


MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: a) university di 
I training; b) considerable experience m tr 


ree in law or equivalent 
ustrial property law and 


international level; c) proven abffity in drafting legal texts; d) excellent 


Present annual salary and aSowances, net of taxes, at P.5, step 1 
amount to USS 65,063 (single) or USS 70,456 (with dependants), plus 
fringe benefits, the details of which may be obtained on request from 
the address below. 

Send detailed curriculum vitae with recent photograph quoting reference 
P695(A). BY JANUARY 30. 1987, to Personnel Section, WIPO. 34, 
chemin das Colombettes, CH 1211 Geneva 20 (Switzerland). 


its Legal Department baaed m 
London. 

Conveyancing Specialist 
Experience of commercial conveyancing with an 
^Shasis on leasehold and mongage work. 
Commencing salary up »o £19, 000 p.a. 

Commercial Lawyer 

The person will be required initiaU v to concen trate 
on the effects of the Financial A< -*- 

Integrarion into the genera! work of ,f h / r I ^P^ menc 
is env isag ed later which will call for a firm 
know-ledge of company law-, trusts and contract law-. 
Commencing salary up to A 1 3,000. 

Legal Assistant 

An opportunity for a person with a goodlaw 
degree. Commencing salary up to A, 10,000. 

A generous fringe benefits package will be provided 
including mortgage subsidy, profit _ snanng, non- 
contributory pension scheme and free private 
medical insurance. 

Written, applications, including a frill curriculum 
vitae should be sent to.— 

David Morgan. 

Deputy Secretary and Solicitor, 

SUN LIFE Assurance Society pic, 

107 Cheapside, LONDON EC2V 6DU. 



r 


COMMERCIAL SOLICITOR 


1 


ASSISTANT SOLICITOR 
£12,894 - £14,100 

ARTICLED CLERK 
£7,311 - £10,164 

An Assistant Solicitor and an Articled Clerk are required in the 
Borough Secretary’s Department 

The Assistant Solicitor post offers a wide range of legal work 
including attendance at Council Committees and advocacy in 
the Magistrates and County Courts and at pubHc inquiries. 
Experience of local government is desirable but applications 
from solicitors in private practices and other spheres or from 
those recently admitted are welcome. 

The Articled Clerk post offers training in all aspects of the legal 
work undertaken by the Council. Applicants should have 
passed the Law Society’s Final Examination in full or be entitled 
to retake one or two papers. 

The salaries will be within the above ranges according to 
qualifications and experience. 

Generous relocation expenses are payable hi appropriate 
cases and temporary housing accommodation may be 
available. 

Please write or telephone for further details and an application 
form to the Personnel and Management Services Department, 
Town HaU, Luton, LU1 2BQ. Tel Luton 31291 ext 2G21. Closing 

I If! | date 22 December 1986. Luton Borough Councfl is an 
|| I Equal Opportunities Employer. Luton is a Nuclear Free 

II I 20116 ’ 

J W LUTON I 

vi borough maammsssmmm 


Major 

Oil Company 

Based Epsom, 
Surrey 

Good Career 
Prospects 


FIN A 


Ffetrofina (UK) Limited is a highly successful 
subsidiary of one of Europe’s largest oil 
companies. 

An opportunity exists within our Legal 
Department for a young, recently qualified 
Solicitor to complement and further strengthen 
mg’ busy and highly professional team. 

The successful appficant will be working on 
file full range of legal issues affecting this 
Integrated oi company. This job involves a 
substantial amount of generrf commercial work 
and a modest amount of real property work. 

In order to firifa this challenging role, candidates 
must have good commercial experience gained 
with a large firm and should be hard working 
individuals able to make a major contribution to 
the smooth running of this key department 

We offer a competitive salary, comprehensive 
benefits and excellent opportunities for career 
progression. 

Ptease write with full C.V. q uotin g ref. no. 
PS/86/81, to: 

Christine HaH, Personnel Department, 
Petrofina (UK) LimBed, Petrofina House, 

1 Ashley Avenue, Epsom, Survey KT185AD. 




DEACONS 

CONSTRUCTION LAWYER 1 1 LEGAL OFFICERS 

1 Litigation - Solicitor/Banister 
1 Conveyancing - Legal Executive 


Deacons is a large Pacific rim firm which has been 
established in Hong Kong for over 100 years. Our 
modem, well-equipped offices are situated in the 
heart of the dynamic financial and commerical district 

We are looking for a Solicitor with a minimum of 4 
years experience in the construction field able to 
handle a diversity of work for our clients. An attractive 
package of benefits and a salary of £60,000 per 
annum will be offered to the man or woman with the 
right qualifications. 

interviews will be conducted in London in January. 
Applications and resume which will be treated in strict 
confidence should be sent to:- 

James Finch LLB., Personnel Manager, Deacons, 
3rd-7th Floors, Alexandra House, Hong Kong. 


M'WU'I.UW! 


NASH & CO 
LITIGATION SOLICITOR 

We need an Assistant SoSdtar to wain, in apavtae an aimi<r buy 

Cornual Uogabon Department 

The success*! aftant m 8 Saws between one art three years port- 
admission experience and be a px np rt c * and loan Adraae. Tha 
snptass be on ChmM advocacy tag there be opportutties 
a undertake other mattts. 

We offer attractive nortoig conditions hi an office near to the Sea and 
the Cdy C entre, wife a co m p cB ho salary atoning a age and 
experience. 

Apply until M C.V. to: 

The P a rtnership Secretary 
Nash ft Co 
12 Sussex Street 
Plymouth 
Devon 
PL1 2HS 



(£13,116 to £14,121 p.a. 

+ £30 per month LVs) 

The Commission is responsible for the 
management and disposal of substantial 
commercial, industrial and housing assets in 
thirteen new towns. Vacancies have arisen in 
the Legal Department of the Commission at its 
Headquarters' Offices in Victoria, London. 

The Legal Department carries out a wide 
range of Conveyancing, Planning Litigation 
and advice work. 

Soficftor/Barrister - Litigation 

To advise and conduct matters of a litigious 
nature including debt coflection, Landlord and 
Tenant disputes, Building Construction 
Defects and Repossession Actions. 

Legal Executive - Conveyancing 

To hantfie Conveyancing matters with a 
minimum of supervision including Sales. Grant 
of Leases, Licences, Wayfeaves, Easements 
and afted matters. 

Both positions are superannuable and 
conditions of service include £30 per month 
Luncheon Vouchers, free Accident and Life 
Assurance and assistance towards removal 
expenses where appropriate. 

For full Job Description and Application form 
write to: 

Director of Finance, Administrative and Legal 
Services, Commission for the New Towns. 
Glen House, Stag Place. Victoria, London 
SW1E 5AJ. Tel: 01-828 7722 ext 319/307 
(Between 9.00am and 5.00pm). 

Closing date: 29th December 1866. 

Ref. 6 and 15. 


Pro 

Department needs 
newly qualified 
solicitors with the drive 
and initiative to handle 
high quality work. 

Initial training will be 
given in conveyancing 
with opportunities for 
later specialisation. 

We are an established 
six partner firm with a 
tradition of high 
standards specialising 
in agricultural and 
commercial matters. 
This is an excellent 
opportunity to share in 
the economic 
expansion of East 
Anglia, Britains major 
growth area, and we 
are offering 
competitive salaries 
and excellent 
prospects to the right 
candidates. 

Apply with C.V. to: 

G. S. Field, 

Tamer Haifa & Spites, 




IARY 

OF 


CLASSIFIED 


The Tones Classified 
columns are read by 13 
mQHen of the most affiant 
people in the country. The 
follow lug categories 
appear regularly each 
week and are generally 
s€campaniei by relevant 
editorial articles. Use tike 
coupon (right), and find 
out bow easy, fast and . 
economical it is to 
advertise in The Times 
Classified. 


MONDAY 

Education: University 
Appointments. Prep A Fxbfic 
School Appointments. 
Educational Courses. 
Scholarships and Fellowships. 

La Crime de hi Crane and other 
secretarial appointments. 

TUESDAY 

C o m p ater Ho rizo n s: Computer 
Appointments with edi tonal. 
Legal Appointments: Solicitors, 
Commercial Lawyers. Legal 
Officers. Private & Public 
Practice. 

Legal La Crane for lop legal 
secretaries. 

PnbKc Sector Appaj atwents . 


WEDNESDAY 

La Creme de la Crime and other 
secretarial appointments. 
Property: Residential. Town A 
Country. Overseas. Rentals, with 
editoriaL 

Antffenea and CMkclaMes. 

THURSDAY 

General Appo hrtiatlr , 
Management and Executive 
appointments with editoriaL 
La Crane de la Creme and other 
secretarial appmounenu. 


FRIDAY 

Motors: A complete car buyer’s 
glide with editoriaL 
Bwincw to Business: Business 
opportunities, franchises etc. 
with editoriaL 

Ratanrat GnUe. (Monthly) 


SATURDAY 

Overseas tad l)K Holidays: 

Vi lias/ Cottage*. Hotels. Flights 
etc. 


™ in the coupon and attach it to your advertisement, written on a separate 
piece oT paper, allowing 28 tellers and spaces per line. separate 

Rates ate Linage £400 per line (min. 3 lines); Boxed Display £23 oer single 
cohunnccntimctrc: Court A Social £6 per line. All ratessuhjcit trill* VAT 
to iSWrfw M-p^-CrrapCteE^ei AdtertfeoKnt Manager, Ttaes 
Newspapen LtiL, PO Bex 484. Vhjrfnie Street, London El 9Dfi7 


Mirnr , r| m«| 











3 


3 


> I : .s5 




• T 1 

. -i :• • . 

.11 


RALLYING 

Alen waits 
as FISA 
decide who 
takes title 


[E TIMES 


iDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 





The downhill slope eases for Bell 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


(A&7 Pi *»^ n Sta *e. 

SPY » . ~ Maricku Alen of 

SgSWasa: 

S rh ^ ii,s -“s 

;p^ jjfpy 5 l o know if he is really 
the new world chamnian aw 
m a Lancia Deff^Ptadtod 
vnnuafly from the Sa^dat 
the end of Uiird stage was 1 min 
26scc ahead of his only serious 
nval, J*. Kankkunen, STof 
r inland in a Peugeot "'OS 
Kanttunen was the only man 
who could have affected Alen's 
one-point lead at the lop of the 
chmnpioiiship. but he ran into 
difficulties on both of the first 
ofl1 na]s in the 
lirst. and with a puncture in the 
secondhand had to be content 
with second place, after losing 
almost a minute on each ocean 
Be finished two points 
adnft of Alen's 1 12 point overall 
tola! in the championship 
However, that could change 
on December IS in Paris, whin 
™ . spon s governing body, 
FISA, meets to consider Peu- 
geot s protest over the dis- 
qualification of their cars before 
the final stage of the San Remo 
Rally in Italy. If FISA decide to 
alter the positions in the rally. 
w hich Alen won, Kankkunen 
could find himself champion. 

Kankunne's second place 
gave Peugeot victory in the 
constructors' title 

POSITIONS: I.MAHlfi and I KhnmakifRn) 
Lancia Delia S4. 5hr 28mln lOsec 2 J 
Kankkunen and j FMronen (Fm). Peugeot 
205 Turto 16. at 1J26; 3. J BoHum aSdN 
Vfifcon tUS/GB). Audi Quatiro, at 22:14; 4. 


Martin Bell is close to 
world recognition in 
skiing, a sport in which 
Britons are 
unfashionable. Chief 
Sports Correspondent 
David Miller met him 
at Val D’lsfte, and 
tomorrow, profiles 
Jeremy West, a 
canoeist who, like Bell, 
is promising much on 
a shoestring budget 




plf 




'■S'" '■ 




MM 


■ "■ ■*'<*• 'tV 1 »■ 








L E Torph and B ThorezeSus (SweL 
Toyota CeSca Turin, at 28:19: 5. B 

?ss rssrissTPsn 

Alessandnrt (It). Lands Delta 54. at 33:45: 
7. R MiBon and J Betofteur (NZ/Can). 
Mazda 323 4 WO. at 44:48; 8. P Bourna 
end J Scott (NZ), Subaru RX 4WD. at 
52:133. C Smith and H Ward (NZ/USi, 
Toyota Corots. at 1:0231 : 10. P Chomere 

SUJSST IUS)> ^ Qu “ 0 

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP: Drivels' pro- 


visional final pos&ons: 1. M Alen IRnL 
112 pta: 2. J Kankkunen (Fin), 110: 3. T 
Salonen (Fki). 63: 4, M Biasion (ft). 59: 5. B 
Waktegaard (Sws). 48: 6. L E Torph (Sum). 
40TT§ Saby (Fr) 38; 8. K Eriksson (Swef. 
333. M Ericsson (Sum). 28; 10. K Grundei 
(Swe). 26; 11. S Btomqrnsi (Sure). 22; E 
Weber (WG), 22; 13. H Toivonen (Hn). 20; 
J Moutinfto (Pro). 20: 15. R StoM (Austria). 
MANUFACTURERS: Fbnl table: 1. Pbu- 
geoL 137 pts: 2. Lancia. 128; 3. Vok»- 
wagen. 79. 4. Audi, 29: 5. Fond, 24; 6. 


As tfiey climbed into tbe cable car 
to go up to the start of Saturday's 
Super-G race at Val d'IsAre. 
Wimsbeiger, of Austria, congratu- 
lated Martin Bell on his sixth place in 
the World Cup Downhill the day 
before. Bell is still turning over in his 
mind whether it was a gesture of 
admiration or condescension: was 
Wirnsberger saying, in effect, “not 
badforaBritT 

To be British in Alpine skiing is to 
be irreconcilably on the wrong side of 
the tracks. Never mind »hai the 
English first converted a mountain 
dweller's means of transport into a 
spon and Swiss shepherds used, in 
Saas Fee. to throw stones at them. 
Bell, 23 last Saturday, launched 
himself into competitive skiing a few 
years ago with as much credibility as 
a Czechoslovak midshipman entering. 
Dartmouth. He's hoping to break the 
mould. 

Bell's emergence in the front rank, 
with the potential to win a medal in 
February's World Championship or 
the Olympic Games in Calgary in 14 
months' time, is akin to the Nether- 


FV- 


V - . 

' ■ ■■ ■ 




m 

]<$ 


• •• * 


Breaking the mould: Martin Bell, who has emerged as Britain's best hope 
for World Championship and Olympic honours for some years. 


For the first time he 
has mastered his fear 


Austin Rover, 21; 7, Toyota. 20; ' 8. 
Renault, 14; 9. Subaru. 13;10. Citroen. 10; 
11. Mazda. 9. 


Bentza victory 


A record 15,000 spectators 
turned out at Brands Hatch on 
Sunday to watch Andy Bentza, 
of Austria, in his Audi Quattro, 
take victory in the fifth 
Motaquip British Rallycross 
Grand Prix. 

Beniza, the only Austrian In 
the Grand Prix. drove a smooth 
and consistent race to edge out 
Seppo Niittymaki, of Finland, 


and last year's winner, John 
Welch, of Britain. 


lands beating England at Lord's. He is 
not quite sure how the Alpine 
traditional elite are reacting to it 

In recent months, having earned 
some modest sponsorship through 
his fifth and sixth places at Are and 
Moraine in last year’s downhill series,' 
Bell has been accompanying Resell, 
of Austria, and Alpiger, of Switzer- 
land, at functions of IQ, whose name 
appears on their equipment Rescfa 
and Alpiger, he has sensed, had a 
slight, if unspoken, superiority in 
their manner. Last Saturday, Resch 
was eighth and Alpiger twelfth. 

For those who watch Ski Sunday \ 
with its anaesthetizing Christmas 
card glamour, the realities of a 
downhill are unimaginable. This 


year, for the first time in his career, 
Bell came to the start of the European 
season with a mastery of the fear from 
which no competitor is ever free. 

“The fear is always there, but this 
year it was a lot less” he says. “It's a 
■natter of feeling secure at speed. 
Wirnsberger has been at it 12 years, 
yet be says that every time he sees the 
Mause&lle drop at Kitzbuhel, he 
shakes.” 

Last year. Bell admits to finishing 
tenth in his first race. The year before, 
he crashed in his .first training run. 
“This year, I didn't have to adjust, 
emotionally, as much. I felt more at 
home: It wasn't so much, the con- 


fidence gained from last year’s results, 
but the slow build-up of experience” 


though he did not talk about it over 
the weekend at the informally British- 
run, club-style Hotel Moris here —is 
to win next Saturday's race at Val 
Gardena, his favourite course, in the 
Italian TyroL Having finished less 
than a second behind Zurbriggen, the 
winner here, he knows that he is 
within range of an achievement that 
would be unique in British skiing . 

“The difference in him this year is 
that he seems a happier person” 
Alistair Scobie, the British team 
manager, says. “With the sponsorship 
Martin's now getting, he is less hard- 
pressed financially, and that has 
made him more relaxed to be with.” 


when Britain produces a potential 
medallist, the Federation should be in 
dire financial difficulty. Gordons 
Gin, their sponsors, pulled out in the 
Distillers/Guinness shuffle, most of 
the officers have resigned, and even 
with added Spore Council assistance, 
the men's and women's Alpine teams 
are operating on less than a quarter of 
the budget of, say, the Americans. 

This means that Bell still has no 
personal assistance to service his skis. 

- as the stars do, and is dependent on 
help from Hans Gapp, an Austrian 
working with the Canadians. Com- 
bining training with the Americans 
means that the British get some 
assistance on valuable split-timings, 
but they continue to live hand-to- 
mouth. Two helpers, John Vaitkus 
and Alan Thomson, work for ex- 
penses only and a succession of 
enthusiastic doctors take holiday 
time to join the circuit Are you 
listening, Richard Tracey and your 
lady leader? 

“Communication is still a problem 
within the Federation” Bell says. 
“One of the helpers is now going to 
have to switch to the women's team, 
even though they would prefer to 
remain with us. u Timing the different 
sections on the slope, a thankless task 
of sitting in the snow and freezing 
shade for several hours taking split- 
second times, is so important in 
judging whether your technique on a 
particular turn, or your skis on a 
straight, are making you slower,” Bell 
says. 

He needs to know his “straight 
line” ski speed, and all this comes 
down to having the back-up people, 
even though he is now ranked fifth in 
the supply of individual skis by 
Fischer of Austria, one of his 
sponsors. 

It is a measure of Bell's improve- 
ment, and expectation, that he can be 
considering how to achieve the best 
preparation for the Olympics. For the 
World Championship, in Crans Mon- 
tana, be knows he must continue 
improving. “Val dTs&re won’t matter 
if I have a bad time at Kitzbuhel the 
week before” he says. 

It was at Kitzbdhel that Graham 


He knows he most 
continue improving 


crashed last year, and his long lay-off 
has set back his confidence. He is here 


Although he came 36th and 37th in 
two races in Argentina at the end of 
the summer, he feels they acted as a 
therapeutic staging post between 
March and December. At 100 
kilometres per hour, experience is 
everything. By the time the Olympics 
come here, in 1992, Bell will be only 
just 28. 

His immediate -ambition — al-. 


Throughout the years on the cir- 
cuit, Bell his brother Graham — now 
recovering from a serious knee 
operation —Nigel Smith and Ron 
Duncan have been partially paying 
their own way. Now Martin Bell has 
some income, the British Ski Federa- 
tion have opened a separate account 
in his name prior to setting up a trust 
fund. • 


It is ironic that just at the time 


with the squad, training. Two years 
ago, it was Graham making the news 
when he was second in the World 
Junior Championships. When Martin 
complains of demands on his time, 
Graham gently reminds him that one 
bad season will give him all the free 
lime be needs! 

“Graham's had amazing patience” 
Martin says. “He's been hoping by 
now to have caught up with Smith 
and Duncan, but he's still several 
seconds adrift lacking the confidence 
to be settled at fester speeds. The 
sponsorship running Martin's way 
does not make G raham' s tribulations 
any easier to bear. 



SWIMMING 


Youth squad place for Kindon 


Alison Kindon, who set a new 
British junior record for the 5G 
metre freestyle at Leicester last 
month, is one of seven swim- 
mers added to the England Esso 
youth squad. . 


Also selected are three age- 


group medallists. Joanne Banks 
of Wigan Wasps, and Dean An- 
scombe and Alasdair Murdock, 
of Nova Centurion. Helen Jep- 
son (Kirklees), Simon Fry (Sal- 
ford Triples) and Duncan Scott 
(Harrow and Wealdstone), com- 
plete the new additions. 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


PARLIAMENTARY 

NOTICES 


i 12. To re omct rectlwi 32 Storings BUOto foe Briitatrntolwnys Act 
1 1 966 to provide for the British Railways Savings Company UraKed (a 
| wholly -owned subsidiary Of the BoonO which Is sotted to the 
suponrisoiy Jnrisdlcllan to foe Bonk of Engtand under foe Broking Act 
t979. to be no longer suttect >o the lurtsdl ctt o n of Che HcsMror of 
FmwBjr Societies. 


LITIGATION . TO £17K 

Civil and Commercial workload, with eminent City 
firm. Newly qualified to eighteen months PQE, excel- 
lent academic background essential. 

CONVEYANCING TO £20K 

Commercial Conveyancer of up to eighteen months 
PQE sought by Central London practice with high 
quality workload. 

CONVEYANCING „ „ TO 235K 

Fast -moving City ftrm seeks Commercial Properly 
specialist whti around five years PQE, preferably in 
heavyweight development matters. 

CORPORATE TAX TO E20K - £35K 

Opportunity to get involved with very high quality 
work with large, leading practice in the Ctty. Must be 


IN PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 198647 


13. ProvtolwB of a general nature appBcabte to or In comNuencr of 
| for WoM Act hdodD) the rages! of ataen d i nwn of certain 
specified enactments. 


IN PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 196667 

BRITISH RAILWAYS (LONDON} 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN foal appitcation to bring mads to Partla- 
meni In the praa m ! Session by the BrKMi Railways Board (“the 
Board") for leave to introduce a BUI under fha above name or abort 
tide far purposes of which the foBowlua M a uuiirlia summary: - 


IN PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 1986-87 


IN PARLIAMENT 
SESSION 198667 


MASONIC TRUST FOR 
GIRLS AND BOYS 


BRITISH RAILWAYS 


NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN Oml appUcaUon la beta! made to 
Pamamenl In the preaent SaaaMn by the BHtMb Radwaya Board nha 
Board-} lor leave to Introduce a BIU under the above name or short 
no# for purposes of which Hie fo Bowing Is a couatte umnnmry:- 


AND NOTICE IS FURTHER OVEN that Kan and aecUonm or me 
works and plans Of Ibe land which may be purchased or used under 
the Mended Art. will, a book of re fe rence » such plana, as affectum 
tbs (Mkxwute arms, have been depoattm fbr public Inmertton with the 
appropriate officer at Hie area concerned as follows;. 


Opportunity to get involved with very 
work with large, leading practice in the i 
of partnership calibre. 


INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. TO Ifflj 

Solicitor with up to four years POE m a wide range of 
copyright trademarks, patents and passing-off 
matters, ideatly the successful applicant would have 
a science degree. .w. 


a butsiivo woyioo- 

raw 'Personnel 


StaH specialists to Die legal profession worldwide 
95 Aldwych. London WCHB 4JF. Tel: 01-242 1281 
(ansaphone after offleo hours) 


WILLIAMS 
& TWEEDY 

SOLICITORS 

EDWARDS 

GODARD 


LITIGATION 

SOLICITOR 


j 1. Construction of H» foDowtng works: - 
In The dtp of Newcastle upon Tyne. Tyne and Wear • 

Work No. I - 

An bIMUM in hvrt of the Ncwtonu branch iMww OMB mrtraa to 

length) at Eiowtrtc 

Hi the city or Canterbury. Kent - 

Works Nos. 2. 2A and 2B - 

A railway <506 mefres la lengthl and a new rood sad cut befog , 
diversions of Whitehall Road and Whitehall Dyke, an at Whitehall 
Farm hi for parish at HarbledowK 
Work NO. 3 - 

A railway <7*7 metres m wnomj hi m pash of HBrbbakawn and hi 1 

the non-portshed area or foe cuy ef Canterbury, being a ratadHemenl 

of foe former chord railway conaertfog the raOway between SeBfog 

and Cantarbunr East etaOons wOb foe railway between Charthan and 

Canterbury west aaMo nr: 

hi Uw borough of Taff-Oy. Mid Glamorgan - 

Work No- a ■ 

A railway <1.120 metres to length) to foe community of uantrtanL 
being a oevtahon oT tlm Mwjmoy Branch railway: 
to nw murid of Stratford-on-Avon. Warwickshire- , 

Work No. S - _ . 

A railway CB26B metres in length) at Kfoeton in the parish of Barton I 
DassetL befog a deviation of foe rallwsy between Fenny Compton and . 
Kfoeton Depot 1 

In the city of Pe ter borough. Cambridgeshire - 
Work No. 6 - 

A fo ot bridge as werrwgwn. partly In the parish or Bratton: 
hi the nmropoB fo n borough of Doncaster. South Yorkshire - 
Work No. 7 - 

A combined new road and bridleway al Thorpe Orange in foe parishes 
of Owuon and Mosl- 

m foe borough of Btyth VaBey. Northumberland - 
Work No. 8 - 

A railway <920 tnrtra In lonoth) al IBvttl. 


AREA/OFTTCEH WITH WHOM DEPOSIT MADE 
County of Cambndgertdra 

Director of Finance nod AdmtoUMIon. Shun Han. Castle HUL 


City of Pe terborou gh 

Logoi and Admi ni strati v e Officer. Town HaU. Bridge Street. 
Peterborough: 

Parish of Bratton 

Mr 8 PreuiUvHte. Clerk. Bratton Parish Oouncfl. IB Ringwood. Baum 
Bratton. Peterborough: 

Cotuuy «f Dors'* 

Comi ty SoUe ftor. County HsU. Dorchester: 

Town Csark and CMef Executive Officer. CMc Centra. Pools: 
County of Dunum 

Chief Executive and dark. County HalL Durham: 

DUrid of rf-lf— 

Principal Chief OfOcsr, CotmcS Offices. Seated* Lane. Eatenguv 


l. Ouuebuuisn of foe following works in Orestes London • 

In the City of London - 
Work No. I - 

A railway (07S metres In length, partly In foe odstag Snow Hfli 
Tunnel and partly in new turuieO at Hattnm viaduct- including Ota 
> lecuuati ucikxi of foe tartans war Ouean Victoria Bt raac 
In the fouowfog named London Boroughs ■ 

.Work No. 9 to Camden - 

A railway IMS metres in langtb) at West Hampstead: 

Work No. BA m Camden and Mtogton 
work No. 3B In Camden - 

Railways at Kfog-s Cross 11230 metres and 480 metres m length 
respectively, both railways oefon partly in existing tunnefcu. c ulms k- 
tog reinstatements of the former connections between the Owl 
Northern Mem Line and the Ctty Widened Unen 
Work No. 4 m Camden and tehngion - 
■ A Srtsway (82 metres In langfo M Kings'* Onss. 


Z Bn oormscllm with Work No. 1 at Hofooni VfodncL power to slop op 
the footpath known as Ludgau court and provide a new road be t w e en 
Ludgue HID and POtelm Street: to stop up parts of PUgrtm street and 
Apothecary Street and provlds Instead new footwUhx to slap op 


Parish of Monk Ue s iwkm 

Mr G B Gardiner. Clerk. Monk Heteedon Parish CounrtL MUenesL 
Rodri e Lane. Hutton Henry. Hantettoou 
Ctty of Durham 

Town Clerk and Chief Exaaoiva. Byland Lodge. Hawthorn T mia ce. 


Stock friars Lane and lo stop up foe vehicular ramp connacttog Ftear 
Lane with Baam al Lane ana parts of Fteef Lane and OM Seacoal Lane 
and to provide a new road between Cc a coa l Lane and Famngdon 
Street power to raise Ludgate Circus and parte of Ludgate HUL 
Seacool Lane. Ftortogdon Street and New foidge Street: and to tower 
nans of Black Friars Lane and Queen victoria Street- In enrmecoon 
with Work No. 2 al Wot Hampstead, power to stop no nans of the 
footpaths between won End Lana and Flnchlay Road and borweani 
Broadhurst Cantons and that foolpun and provide 0 new footpath to 
place of the parti so stopped up. 


Durham: 

Parish of Cassop-evra-QuarrtngtBn 

Mb- T W Atney. Clerk. Casaoo-CTxn-QuxrrtD^ae Parish Oouocfl. B 
Robson CreocenL Bowtaurn. Durham; 

Parish of Hen 

Mr F Smith. Clerk. Hctt Parish Council, is Wayskte. Coxdato. 


SOLICITOR 

We have a vacancy tor w 
enthusiastic Sobotor Of arhOM 
dert avrawg admeson. m <w 
busy but lni«#y Office hi 
carry town oi Momnotm- 
post ottos art! oppwnntv to 
gam experience a 
o i topes *nti the 
mnarrtratng on chosen suDiecis 
n [he lime 

Pleas* applv to* w !| cte Hin torm 
to Mis C. Crtmly. . 

16 si w» cracm 
CWI..MF1.M 
let (M 22) 44731 


2to3years 
experience- Age not 
Important 
Hammersmith area 
Immediate start 
£15.000 neg. 
Phone Mrs Dewar 
01 749 2987 


a. To provide mat on the opening for passenger and goods sendees of 
Works Nos. 2 and 3. section 64 ireouirino advaara nonce of 
dtscoMfouance of certain s o r v lce i to be puMtoiwd) and section 86 
(retelling to estabUstumni and runcsons of transport consuBattva 
committees) of foe Transport Art 1962 shaO M apply to reaped ,of foe 
dBooaHmianos of railway possrogar or goods services on the railways 
la canlerbury rendered nnaec aisai y by foe cfotttrucHoa of works 
Nos. 2 and a. 


Ourtnn: 

County or Kent 

County Secretary and Solicitor. County Han. 
City or GaMerbioy 

CUy Secretary and Solicitor, Council OCQ 


3- Special provisions to amnecnm with the consuuctian and mttnfo- 
nance of foe proposed works. Including provision for a tow lavu 
railway stattem at Hotoom vtsdua. appropriation of certain adstfog 
works (or foe puraosas of Work No. 1 and removal of ocher ertsttog 
works by the Board including the removal of foe exteUna Holbom 
viaduct Station and railway viaduct: a pp rooriabon nr fodaun g railway 
tunnels for the purposes of works Noa. SA and 3B: provision of a ticket 
had in King's Cross station and to t ar f aranra with the surface of York 
Way. King's Cross: general powers to whoa up DermBnesuty or tempo- 
rarily roads and footpaths with or without providing unhmttuhw and 
for foe appropriation of tern or certain roads and footpaths ao atoppsd 


Canterbury; 

Parish of Harbtedown 

Mrs H Unen. Clerk. Harbtedown Parish CoundL 41 Mm Lane. 
Harbtedown. Canterbury; 

County of Mkt G te morpagi 

County Cteric and CD-OnUnator. MU Glamoroan. County HalL 


4. Purchase or land or rtohls over land to me mm 
works: and temporary use of land al King's Cross. 6 
as to entry and general provi si ons for the extinction 
Private rights of way over foods lo be prchasod ■ 


is of the prop o sed 
Special provisions 
a or suspension of 


! 3. Special provtotons to co tmacMon with the construction and 
iHtfntenance of the proposed works: power to construct and operate 
an accommodation level trussing over Work No. ft and general 
powers lo stop np permanently or temporarily roads, bridleways and 
[ footpaths. With or wtmotit au D sit t m ss. and for the ap pro pria tion of 
slim of certain roads, bridleways and footpaths so stopped up. 


MERSEYSIDE 


EsQbkstiad linn ffl putters, 5 
offices) remoras to* tone and 
ran time assailant sotaors or 
Legal Executives tor Mutton 
d itwr offices hi Hsswd Ml 
Magtki. 


4. Power to slop up puts of WRmuB Road IWhUrtraB Farm. 
Canterbury) Darner Green Lane (Thorpe Grange. Doncaster) i and 
Rodrbge Lane and Fine Lane (Atrrwns. Staffordshire): power to fill In 
pari of Whitehall Dyke (WldtehaH Faro* power lo stop to parts of lb# 
footpath over Cock Lane level crossing. Weii lfop on. Unking Sttritog 
Way wHh the Alb trunk rood- the footpath at Btyto foifctng Plrasey 

Road wdh Whanon Souet and foe soofotorataro toHhpBtb of me river 

Canter (beneath RavaMhorpe Road bridge) at ThowdiM. w ew 
Yorkshire, and to provide new footpaths b foe place of tbe parts so 
stooped u». 


Cuihuys Park. CardBX: 

Borough of Taff-Ety 

CMef Executive and Clerk. Municipal BoBdtogs. Pontypridd: 
Community of UanlrimM 

Mrs D Baker. Clerk. Ltentrisam Oaoummlty Coc m d l . OH Parish 
Offices. George StraeL Ltentrisam: 

County of Northumberland 

County Shuiut and Sodcffor. County HalL Morpe th: 

Borough of BJyth valley 

Borough Secretary. Council Ofncca. BEaton Deteval. WhUey Bay: 
County of North Yorkshire 

Chief Exacnffve and Clerk. County HalL Northallerton: 

Dffuet of Harnttaun 

Chief ExecaUvr and Cleric, chfl Centre. Stone Cross. NerfoaBenen: 
Parish of Danny Wiske 

Mm S Dais. Clerk. Dauby wiske Parish CoundL The Garth. Danny 


B. To provide Thai, on the opening for p as se n ge r and goods sstvicm of 
. foe new low leval railway station al Hotbarn Viaduct, section 6a 
frixruuing advance notice of dhconttouann at certain services lo be 
published] and section 66 (ratettog lo the esiabHshnsem and functions 
or transport consultative committees) of toe Transport Art 1962 shall 
im apply m respect of the dtaconUnuanre te the Board of railway 
passenger or goods services In the ally of London on IheraBway From 
Holborn viaduct sufoon which will be replaced by Work No. t. 


6. Extension of time for the Board to piodUM cedMaorOy certain i 
tend or rights over land authorised lo be purchased by than under the- 
BriUah Railways (Liverpool Suert Stanonl Act I0BS. 

7. ProvMons or a pensral nature apMlosbte lo. or IP eonsequence of. I 
foe intended Art. tndudtns foe repeal or ameiidnieni of certain spset- 1 
□ed enartnNsus. 


jTQT) LEGAL 

r ^ j I STAFF . 

—SOLICITOR 

£20,000 + 

soLicrrOfl r«iuiiwJ •J*’ 

owntoi'MnngtoteqHn*" 9 

ciiy pracnca. Mua have 

eiperonce smn 

CommefCial/Con^wrt 

CornoratC La* To 151211 ■? 

derail in onndeneB. 


Apply ftt- A D 


6air Robert Hurt 9 Waite. 

3 Oaeag tanmm, 
LtWfpcri L2 4SL 


Tat QS1-238 1794 


B. Porchaso of land or rights over land to the area, of the prawel 
works and also to tbe parish of Airewas. dbdrict of LKMUM. 
adlonkMre. ai Qranksome In foe borough of Poole. Dorset- al 
w^irtwi bi the parish of Monk Hestoden. dwrla of Eartngton. 
Durham, ai Tarsdale to for partrtws of Cbs*ep-caB»Goarrtncsm and 
Hett to foe CUy of Durham, and al Danby Wiske to foe pariah of Dauby 
wiske. district of Hamttetoo. North Yorkshire: UtnMmy WUHw 
of. and ■«*« over, land at Ebwtck. (NeweWl* npoo TyneL 
Werrtngton IPatertorough) and Themhffl aUridassX Sp** 5 * 1 
provwlora aa lo tmry rod comp e nsat ion and gaaaral provlakins (or Uw 
extinction or BBpension of private noma of way ower tends to be 
purchased or used. 


wiske: 

County of Staffordshire 

County Clerk and Cbtef Emctitioe. County BuOdtoss. Stafford: 
DKtrta of uadkdd 

CMef Executive and Secr et ary. Dtstria Oosacfl House. 46 SL John 
StraaL UchllMd: 

Parish of Alrewas 

Mr P C Dovko. CUrk. Alrawas Parish Council. 64 Church Laras. 
Frame*. LkMMd: 

County of WkrwidisMH 



NOTICE B HEREBY GIVEN 
foal appUcaUon has (Men made to 
Parliament to foe present Sudan 
by the Royal Masonic tastfotton 
Mr Boys and foe Royal Masonic 
Institution for Girls focratnaftar 
referred to as fos -the 
Institutions") for leave lo Intro- 
duce a Bill merauiafler referred 
lo as “toe BUTT under toe above 
name or short UHe for purposes of 
which foe following Is a concise 
summary - 

«li To transfer property of the 
tosUtutkins Ip Trustees of Uw Ma- 
sonic TTust for Cttria ana Boys 
thereinafter ref er re d to as “the 
Trust-* 

(2) To provide for the tranefor 
of Liabilities of foe Institutions, foe 
saving lor agreements, awards, 
cont ra cts, d eads , actions eic.. lo 
foe Trun and foe construction In 
favour of foe Trust of bsqusats 
made to favour of sOher of toe 
bwunmons: 

rai To provide tor toe construc- 
tion to favour of toe 
Rtdonanswartii Masonic School 
Limited of bcgucsts made m fa- 
vour of foe Royal Masonic School 
tor Girts: 

vsi To provide for toe euxluslon 

of certain property from the pro- 
visions of the BIU. 

On and after the am December 
1966 a ropy of foe Bill may be 
inspected and copies thereof ob- 
tained at the price of 60 p per cony 
al foe offices of a caver. 

Fulton & Rankin. EO Bedford 
Street. Beuast 8T7 7FW. the of- 
fice* of Most*. Btggart Bauue 6 
Gif lord. WJSU, 3 Gkenflnlas Street. 
Edinburgh. EH3 «YY and at DM 
offices of foe undermentioned 
Partumenlary Agents. 

Objection lo Ihe Bfl) may be 
made by depositing a Petition 
arotoai It in the Office of the Clerk 
of the parliaments. House of 
Lords, or the Private Bin Office of 
the House of Commons. The tal- 
es* dale for foe deposit of such a 
Petition in foe Fust House will be 
6th February 1987. If the BUI 
originates to foe House of Lords, 
or 30fo January 1987 V II ongt- 
naira In Ihe House of Coro morn 

Further Information regarding 
the deposit of such a Petition may 
be obtained from either foe Office 
of foe Clerk of the Parttaments. 
House of Lords or foe Private BUI 
Of Dee of the House of Commons 
or the undermentioned Parlia- 
mentary Agents. 
dated this 2BOi day of Novem- 
ber 1986 

STONEHAM LANGTON & 
PASSMORE 
28 HWl Strert 
ChMehurst 
Kent BR7 BAS 
Solicitors 


LONDON REGIONAL 
TRANSPORT 
(PENALTY FARES! 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that application b befog made to 
Parliament to the present Session 
by London Regional Transport 
'"foe Corporation"! lor leave lo 
introduce a BIU under the above 
name or snort title lo provide for 
foe charging, as from a day ap- 
pointed for foe purpose, of a 
penalty (are in suMffuiton for 
foe proper fare for persons using 
bra and train services under foe 
control of foe Corporation with- 
out a vaUd ticket for such use, 
The BUI further provides nun me 
level of penally fare lo be paid 
will pe - 


fin in nvrd of any train tourney 
solely on Ihe Docklands Railway. 
Cfi: or 


(UU In respect at any other train 
Journey. ClCfc 

suai penalty fare to be payable 
either on demand or within 21 
days from ihe nay alter foe day 
an which the tourney was com- 
pleted: and contains Amber 
measures relating to those 
penalties. 


On and alter am December 10B6 
a Copy or ms BUI tor foe Intended 
Act may be Inspected and copies 
obtatosd at foe price of SOu each 
at toe under -mentioned offices. 


OWecuon to foe Bui may be made 
by depositing a Ps d t l o n against u. 
If toe BUI originates in the House 
of Commons, the tales! date tor 
depositing such a Petition to the 
Pnvaie BUI Office of that House 
win be 30th January 1987 If u 
originates In the House of Lords, 
the latest date for depositing such 
a Petition to the Office of for 
Clerk of foe ParUaimmlB in foal 
House win be 6ui February 1987. 
Funner Information maybe ob- 
tained from foe Office of foe 
Clerk at foe Parliament m foe 
House of Loras. Ihe Private BOI 
Office of Ihe Housr of Commons 
or foe under mentioned 
ParUamenaiy Agents. 

DATED 2nd December 1986 


I.L KING 
London Rngtonal Transport 
66 Broadway 
Weumunier 
London SW1H OBD 
SoUdtor 


On and after dfo December 1906 a copy of the Bfl] maybe Inspected at I 
the offices of the said Retnarobrancnr. Chief Encuilve and Town 


6PEECHLY BIRCH AM 
Bouverie House 
164 Fleet Street 
London EC4A 2HX 
Senators 


I Borough Solicitor and a copy inspected and codes ootalnad 
at the pries at 60p each ai the ncket office at Bteckfnors. Hackney 
Central. Hoibom viaduct and west Hampstea d (Midland) railway Ha- 
ttons: at Roam 102 Id me Area Manager's offtoa. Platform & King's 
Cron railway Hatton: In foe ground Boor Reception HaU of Harwich 
Horae. Liverpool Street railway nation: al the offices of Messrs. Geof- 
frey Levine a Co- Sanction, 194 Wat End Lane: and at each at the 
umha m an Boned Offices. 


Miss FWWrtMMm. 

01 M3 14Z3 
37, BDfDUBh Hign 
Street, SE1 


LEGAL CASHIER 

reauiiBd by Sotidtais. Game 
I adminirtniwe duties, salary 
aceordinij id age and experience. 

Contact JQ Jff» 
Prttttert Joyce * Hub. 

Si Brydes How*. 

32 High 

(tort. TeUI-658 3922 


6. ExtftmmnMM of certain rights of way over Nobtethorpc tod 
crossing (Thorpe Grange. South YdMattre). Lmg Green level crossing 
(Marks Ttey. Essoi). whHebridge Lane level t awin g (Stone. 
Staffordshire) end Fbwier Bridge Road (oOterwieo BcnOot Lane) tevrt 

' UDMli o CDonc M t er . South Vorirairr) Soecia) provHons for foe 
operation at Vangs Wharf level crossing CBaffkton. EaaexX saacron 
Station level craaffng (East UndSey. UncoMsMre) (M Carr UM loval 
, crossing (Maort. MeroevsiaeL 


Clerk of Ihe Council, Shire HaB. Warwick: 

District of Stratford-on-Avon 

District Secretary and Solicitor. Ettekbsfo House. 
Snatford-on A vox 
Pariah of Burun Dasssn 
MM C WOHsras. Cteric. Breton 


SHARPE. PRITCHARD & CO.. 
Queen Anne's Chambers 
3 Doan Farrar Street 
Westminster 
London SWIH 9JX 
ParBamentary Agents 


SHERWOOD A CO . 
Queen Anne's Chambers 
3 Dean Farrar Street 
Westminster 

London SWIH ?LC 
Psitlamenlary Agents 


FRANCE 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


7. ReOcf of the Board from (hr contractual abngatton to provide tor foe 
opmlDganilsfiidilBg of foe gates and for the maintenance of a cottage 
or lodge at WUstrop acammodailoo level awntog. Harrogate. Norn 
YorksMra. and special grovtshMS tor tba ogamkai of lha< crowtoft. 


StwtL North End. Leandngtan 8w 
I CKy of Newcastle upon Tyne 

Dirwanr of AdMnMraUon. Ovle Ontre. Newcastle upon Tyttat 
Metropolitan Borough or Doncaster 

Director or Legal and AdnU n iatrath M Services. Gordey House. 
Wbtetdau. DoiKaotor. 

Parish of mom 

Mr JS BoaoiaoM. Oeik. Mas PnrWi CotmcB. LDoc Cottage. London 


OHsrtton to fos BUI may be made by deoadtiiiB a PsUtton aoatnsr It. ff 
foe BIT originates to foe House of Commons, the latest date tor deposit- 
ing a Petition bi the Private «n Office of foal House wm be 30U 
January 1987: If H originates In the Ham at Lords. Ihe latest date tor 
depositing a Petition in foe office of ih« Clerfe of the Parliaments tn that 
Horae wm be 6th February 1987. Further tntormsffon may be ob- 
tained from foe office of foe Clerk or foe Parttaments. House of Lords, 
fos Private Bin Office of foe Housa at Oo mmo ia or Ihe 
underran turned Solicitor or Parliamentary Agents. 

DATED this 2nd day of Docsmbor 1986. 


tECWrAHES For Architects A 
DeM gn wa. Permanent & hutaao- 
rary portOons. AM&A Specialist 
Recruitment Corauiante. 01 
734 0652 



admniwJ 1 Rr ^dential 

Cotofocraul and ^ 

comeyancing wlin n ^ a Jton 

Wle. law cases- AT- 

srEsSS&~~~s 

Avon ana , 

eonienBouS *^?J^ftrther e* 
solidioroiowsw 1 " idejtty 
pansion of To 

093S 251 » ^kweYAMCINC 
L P 10 

perh w«* , Efy rt i|,ooO + Ear- 
name. D* 

iv ar«w«» w** huS nrvi 
N2 isfli ,Aro 3 ..rfMianttal 
CfWVEYANCCT ^ ^S^nltel 
Stevenage "«SY«jo + Car * 
HTiPhaso. Tocil^’^jn R e- 

. EtH’ilSn ' Le iara ^vccdllif "E 


cnalfo^' for 

S5ST™- "¥3“°* =" 0056 


irnCATION SOLICITORS (Of 

HSSStm* town A cowiiry on- 
HMdaffy admitted 

ConsulUrts C*956 

tnrauTION SOUCTTOHS Em- 

ADVOCATE farWoreeswe^r^ 
MkRanda _ 

412.500 Wcsse* ConsultanlS 
rffSfv^nd Matrifoonjal Sro 

**?J£ el tS£™3 SoS* 1 " 

cuambers A Partner* 

. « AL°EXEcirnVE conv wane. 

* Swindon. TJ 
ffJSSrSSS- Conaaianto 

rt^tW^dKinr with Advo- 
w* 1 ** VST SmSSuilon firm. 


8. Power for the Board to outer Into agreements with - 
Ui Mid Gtemergan County CoonctL con ce rning a level cronsng tobo 
ronstmaed at Llantrisant and for stopwng us of part of Cowbridgr 
Road: 

(W Dptod CDanty OsuneiL concerning a level crossing to tw 
constructed at Gtanammafl. Dtnsfwr. and Die roovoreuw of 
Ctanaiwnaa lewd crossing to a pubUc ffootoafo c ros s l i i B! and the 
eaatn guUh n mn of certain ngna of wey over ct a na m man crossfoK 
(c) Humberside County Councfl. conBamtng a hrvst trsastog to be 
constructed si Carnaby. East Yorkshire, and tor me Bo wdiui up of 
Carnaby Stetton level cram Inc and 

fdi Shfo g st u re County CoundL concerning a levd cross in g to bn 
rourtmcled at Oswestry; 

snd sesaal p ro p tato n s for (ho anstruenen. owratton and 
mammiaiicB or those urasin gs. • 


HO. Moss. Doncastcn 
Parish of Owston 

Mrs C Holliday. Clerk. Owstoa Parish Councfl. “Pen Rtiyn". Middle 
tone. Nor Barney. Doncaster: 

MrtnnmUian Borough or EtrUees 

Chief Legal and AdrMntetrattve Officer. Ktrldeea House. Market StreeL 
HuoaersnekL 


SIMON 06BDRNE 
British Railways Board 
Mefbury Homo 
Melbary Terrace 
London nwi sjv 
S olicitor lo foe Beam 


SHERWOOD & CO 
Queen Anne's Chambers 
3 Dean Famr street 
Westminster 
London 8W1H 9 LG 
PariUMMnbuy Agante 


TO PLACE YOU® 

TRAVEL 


9. The reftoqntetaasnt by fos Board at their power u co mi rnct a 
railway (Work No. 9) at Duns on In Oatss h sad. Dm and Wear, 
authorised by foe Brtuti Raowayt Act 1986. n uaffl at a lend 
crossing over foe Redheugh branch railway and. I nns ad. is provide 
for the Board and aw Gateshead Borough Councfl to enter Into 
agreements concerning a now uvel erasing m be roratnKfed adtocenf 
.to Thamsons hrvd enradag at Dmodoou with special prevision for the 
ronrtrnaton, operation and nsunlananes of HUH croMoa and Me fog 
stonxng on of Thomsons croeamg. 


; On and ttler 4th pecontnsr 1966 a copy of me BB1 may be Insoeaed 
Wfe* oWatoed at foe price of 78u endi at the Ucfcrt office ar 
Quu aifoiiy West. Dewsbury- Lkhfleid Ctty. NorthaDertnn. Pools and 
Strattor6on Avon raffway staUons; ar foe British Railways Travel 
Centre. Stamm Approach. PcteTOoroagh: al foe British RaBwayc UcIcM 
Md. enquiry offler. Station Approach. Briau n o w n: to >the Tratwt 
Centre at Doncaster railway nation: at the Travel Offlea at 
Canterbury Em and Durham railway aailons: al Reception in the 
£0tes o t EOyth Valley Borough coundl. at Monldpal BufldfoBS. 
Sqft rtti Street Btyth. and at Councfl Offices. Avenue Road. Seaton 
Daloval. WhHkjy Bay: al the offices of thofodowlng (tame of Soddlara. 
namotv. Mm rt Edward T. Davies ft Sans. IS Ltuuti isant Road. 
Pbugyhm. Mid Gtamonon. and Messre. JanUesano. OmpMde House. 
*“*• Lkne. Easlngton CotUsry. P aterias: In fos W cc cpi to n Ana of 
foe offices of OewusBy Boron*) Cmraru Onto Vhrw. Oswestry: to 
■Aww iaulluitl PubUc LBbrary. Ttobot Road. Ammanford. BcnwM 
PobUcL^racy.Bromotoa HoaoB-DraBtoii: to Uw office of Ihe Sabcttcr , 
(Sronand) or me Board al Haymarksi railway staUgo. Edbfoorttk and i 
at acta or foe iBttennentionad afllccg. 


POSTS 


ADVERTISEMENT IN 


DEPUTY 

COUNTY 

TREASURER 


THE 

TIMES 


10. Provision for the transfer to foe Board of the rights and ottfeadoM 
of foe National coal Beard In respect of pan of foe tenbsUa branch 1 
railway ai Btyffl and for Uw purchase fty foe Board of foe lead In foe 
borough of Btyth forming the she of me branch railway so as to 
tociMtoir Its maintenance and use by the Board. 


11 . Power tor foe British Rod Festoon Company Limited a whony- 
owned stotodtany offoe bbbkq m wind up foe Grtpu Canm RoBww 
New Pension Fund and New Pension <8upptentento) Fund Trust 
Account aad foe North EUswn and Great Eastern StfoaranmnUiw 
SecMMsand Pension Funds John Trust Account and. having rowed 
lb fos Board foe surplus assets, to transfer foe assets awl foe 
ebUgariana of these into aCcoeois to foe LkLEJL fOtd) Stcttoa of fos 
A m alg am ated Sections of me Brmsh Railways eoperannuatign fund. 


OWectkn to foe Bffl may be node tar dsoostUno a PeUUon aganst K. tf 
uw Wl orig ina te s m inr Horae at Commons, foe laun dare for 
depOUUng such a Pefabon in the Private BUI Office of that Horae wfll 
be doth January 1967: If ll originates In foe House of Lords, foe latest 
4W (Or depositing such a Petition In foe office of foe Clerk of foe ' 
Portamento to foal House wfl be Uh February 1987. Further 
information may be obtained from Ihe office of the Otk of the 
Parliament*. Housa to Lords. Ihe Private Bffl Office to fos House to 
Commons or the undermentioned SoHCRor or Penumeaiary Agents. 
dated fob Snd day to Decmbsr 1986 


SALARY - £22,065 - £24,273 
PER ANNUM 


TRADE ADVERTISERS 
TEL: 01-481 1989 


SIMON OBBQRNE 
British nauwam Beard 
Menoy House 
Mrtbuay Terrace 
London nwi $ju 
S olicitor to me Board 


SHERWOOD ft CCK 
Quran Aimrt Ctasifo era 
5 Dean ftwr Street 

Wtetmuwer 
London SWih %a 
Puuanwruiy Aganls 


Applications are invited for the post of 
Deputy County Treasurer. Application forms 
returnable by 9 January 1987 and further 
information available from 
Ibe Chief Executive. 

County Hall, Dorchester, DTI IXJ. 


ADVERTISING 
FAX NO. 01-481 9313 
TELEX 925088 


PRIVATE ADVERTISERS 

TEL: 01-481 4000 


USE YOUR ACCESS OR BARCLAY CARD 


r 












SPORT 


THF TTMF 5 S TT TFSH AY DECEMBER 9 1986 


RACING 


Favourable forecast is 
a pointer to Metman 


Metman is napped to win 
the December Handicap Hur- 
dle at Plumpton today on the 
soft ground which suits him so 
well. 

^ A look at his record con- 
firms his preference. His best 
performance over hurdles was 
when easily winning a 
novices’ hurdle at Ludlow last 
season on soft ground, and his 
most disappointing a fifth at 
Worcester when the good to 
firm ground was against him. 

In between be was thought 
good enough to take on the 
best in the Waterford Crystal 
Supreme Novices' Hurdle at 
the Cheltenham Festival but 
was rather out of his depth in 
the race won by River Ceiriog. 

He began this season by 
finishing eighth to The Proces- 
sor at Windsor last month and 
should improve for that run. 

Mr Key won this race last 
year but offers no encourage- 
ment of a repeal and a greater 
danger may be Sparkler Spirit, 


By Mandarin 

who has run consistently weD 
this season and was only just 
beaten at Leicester last time. 

The Ditchling Novices’ 
Hurdle looks to rest between 
Keynes and None Too Dear. 
Toby Balding, who has his 
horses in fine form, has opted 
for this race in preference to 
the handicap hurdle and the 
hint is worth taking, particu- 
larly as None Too Dear has no 
penalty for winning a con- 
ditional jockeys' race at 
Towcesier last month. 

Keynes has won novice 
events at Leicester and War- 
wick but was receiving weight 
from the runner-up Spanish 
Reel in the latter. Now the 
position is reversed and he 
must concede a hefty 101b to 
None Too Dear, a task which 
may prove beyond him. 

The Hassocks Handicap 
Chase is a competitive event 
with four course winners in 
the field. Maitredee, a course 
and distance winner last 


month, has still to perfect his 
jumping but he may have 
more scope than his rivals and 
granted a dear round can 
record his second success of 
the season. 

At Sedgefield, Mr Baker, a 
thorough stayer, will be suited 
by the distance of the Hope 
Inn Handicap Chase. He won 
three chases in Ireland last 
season and his runs in this 
country indicate that he 
should not be long in winning. 

He was a creditable fourth 
to Cowan House over 2'hm at 
Carlisle last month but that 
was too short to bring out the 
best in him , and over this 
longer trip be can beat beat 
course and distance winner 
Casa Knipe. 

The Nags Head Novices’ 
Hurdle features the second 
meeting of Gouverno and 
August Gouverno beat Au- 
gust by a length and a half over 
course and distance last 
month but Sir Jest may beat 
both of them, 



The winners’ enclosure at the 
Royal Garden Hotel in Ken- 
sington yesterday, as tike 
Horse Race Writers* and 
Reporters' Association 
honosred the heroes of the 
year_From the left Grant 
Pritchard-Gordon, represent- 
ing Prince Khalid Abdallah, 
the leading owner of the Flat 
season; Pat Eddery, the cham- 
pion Flat jockey; Michael 
Stoote, the champion Flat 
trainer Glyn Foster, whose 
presentation of See You Then 


earned him foe title of Stable 
Lad of the Year; Peter 
O’Soilevaa, who received Lord 
Derby’s award as the Journal- 
ist of the Year; Nick Header- 
son, champion National 
Hunt trainer; Lady Derby, 
who presented the awards; and 
Mrs Marilyn Scudamore, wife 
of the National Hunt champi- 
on jockey, who was busy riding 
at Hereford and adding a 
winner to bis score. 

(Photograph: Hugh 

Routiedge). 


PLUMPTON 


Guide to oar In-line racecard 


0-0432 7WESF0RH(CDiSF)(MrsJ Rytey) S HaB 8-10-0 , 


B West (4) 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


Racecard number. Draw in brackets. Sta-taura and OstSfice winner. BRwatan fawoato to latest 
form (Has. P-pteted up. U-unseated rider. B- race]. Owner in brackets. Trainer. Age and 
brought down. 5-cUpped up. R-raiused}. Horae's weight FUder plus any alo wance. TUe Times 
namo(B-bJnkers. V*Eor. IMiood. E-Ejwshiefct C- Prtwate Hancficapper's rating. Approximate starting 


course winner. Distance winner. CD-courae 


1.00 Mr Candy. 

1.30 None Too Dear. 

2.00 My Son My Son. 


2.30 Black Spout. 

3.00 Maitredee. 

3.30 METMAN (nap). 


Michael Seely's selection; 1.30 None Too Dear. 

Going: soft 

1.0 ‘GALLEANO’ HANDICAP CHASE (£1,637: 3m IQ (13 runners) 



1 3210W MERCY LESS (CD) (Vra M Masten) M Bolton 7-1V7 RGoMstoto 

2 P30041 DELATOR (CO) (P Brewer) | Wardte 9-11-7 (5ex) C Brawn 

3 21332-3 MR CANDY (A Moore} A Moore 7-11-6 (3 Morn 

4 llKjyro- OR PEPPER (Food Brokers) P D Haynes 9-1 1-5 AVM 

5 PtHHBZ COLORS- CHRISTY (CO) (R Koen) H CTNed 11-1 0-13 O McCourt 

6 0P01/F1 TOY BELOW (CD) (Dueness of Norfolk) Lady Harries 8-10-13 (5o») — MKtaane 

8 4424=03 SOUTHDOWN SPRIT (R Dow) Mbs L Bower 10-103 HRowad 

9 4-F02W ANSWER TO PRATER (V) (J F-HayesJJ F-Hey«s 7-1M .. Penny RHcb-Heym (7) 

10 40P1F-P MOUNT FEDQANE (B,C](0 Beer} P Jones 10-104 C Man 

11 0D4PO-U STEEL YEOMAN (Mrs HMwenJJ Gifford 8-10-4 R Rowe 

12 1F3P/ BS ORCW (C HeSyeO K Bafley 10-104) A Janus 

13 3UPP/PF VALMAI (R Lodger) R Ledger 7-10-0 MrsNLudgsr 

14 PPOOP/4 POOR EXCUSE (O Hanley) P Butter 11-1 CM) ATO’Gonmnp) 

1985: GOLDEN HORNET 7-10-3 R Strange (11-1) K Dunn 9 ran 


£30 HUNF1ELD CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (£751: 2m) 
(14 runners) 

1 OOIOOO- 1MOCO {d» (MreC Howard) J Ffitch-Hayus B-1 1-10 — •» 6-1 

2 004 QUALITY SQUARE (Mra V CastJecSna) S Cola 5-11-1 ACtwtton 


97 — 
91 5-2 
90 

as 4-1 

94 — 
• 99 6-1 


3 4-PPFOO GOLD CREEK (09 (B hfitchei) M McGourt 5-1 1-0 

4 0004 BLASTS WHOSE (Mrs V O'Bnen) Pat Mitchefl 4-10-1! 

5 00/0- MASTER PEPPER (R Haynes) B Fancy 5-10-11 

8 00-00 BLACK SPOUT (Ms E Retards) H O'Noifl 5-10-B 

9 PP-0032 TAME DUCHESS (BF) (A Caton) A Moore 4-10-8 

10 01P004- GALE BOY (R Hal) PAEngham 6-10-8. 

12 OF/P SHARED JOKE (Mra S BpOic*) M Bofton 5-1 M 

14 OPO1-PO0 FULL OF SPEED (J Scatter) H OTteifl 5-10-3 

15 04Q/D4M SOME MOOR (M Brawn) R Hodges 6-1 Oa 

16 PP/OU-O TOUCH OF RHYTHM (P O'Coonefl) p Butler 5-10-3 — 

17 4000-00 NIBBLE STAR (A Bimltam) P Butter 5-10-3 

18 040003 YAZEED (B) (B Peace) J Long 5-100 


— #99 6-1 

A Chariton — — 

G London 

DateMcKsown 92 4-1 

C Waned — — 

M Hoad 

Candy Mom 96F9-4 

J Hainan 94 B-1 

UW U-U~»-U- H 

rMBj rUtWl I HJU# — - 

Koran Dana — — 

W brine 91 12-1 

AT 0*GORnin 

Luisa Bmtan — — 

Luma Long 96 — 


1985; COUPON CLIPPER 4-10-2 G Chartes-Jones (7-2) S Melor 11 ran 


CADM DELATOR (10-7) not extended to beat COLOMEL CHRISTY (109J 121. wMilEHCY LESS 111-2) 
rvjnivl pulled up over this course Bid dsance (E2012. soft. Now 26. 8j8n).MBtCY LESS (10-2) last 
succ es sful when 
Don wften a 1 5th fence 




Nov tfr] on latest start 
Cfl. £881. nood m firm 
LESS (11 


BRCY LESS (10-2) last 
(Efl0-O)stinmconten- 
whenawe>beaan3rdtoCoMembar(iO- 
finisfied8head2ndtoAsliiona(11-0)at . 
beat Geata An Usee (12-3) 2HI with 
E(1D4Qtgfledoff InJttietFofcutona 
' ren>. juvawcK lurrmTcnin-oj wefl bea»n4iti k> InfioMorm-S) herB(2rrj4f 

previously (11-5) stayed on wal to beat St Colma (11-12) a length at Hexham (2m Nov 

od to firm. Sepl 8. S ran). MOUNT fedoane (1 0-6) bast Judged an a start Read boating of MERCY 
heraJ2m 4L&1764, stm. Mar 29, 13 ran). 

KXJNTFBmANE 


FriDM 


FOntwnfl (3m 2f, £1935, good 
SOUTHDOWN SPRIT (11-6)3 
(3m 2f. £1548. soft Nov 24M 



1 JO DITCHLING NOVICE HURDLE (£840: 2m) (18 runners) 

1 2211 KEYNES (D)(D Dobson) JJertons 6-11-10 S Sherwood 

2 00 ANOTHER BMG (Mss B Patching) A Moora 4-11-0 — 

4 0/9-0232 CANUCK CLOWN (J Bird) A Mom 5-11-0 Candy Moora (4) 

7 DEM AN DOZE (Mrs B Emery) R Akahmt 7-11-0 Dole McKeeam (7) 

8 OF DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE (Mrs E Rfchnnta) H CMH 4-11-0 R Chapman (4) 


9 0 FILM CONSULTANT (J Long) J Bosley 4-11-0 

12 0 ISLAND EXBJE (D Humphreys) A Moore 4-11-0—— 

15 WO- HARSOOM(G Sanger) HBeasiey 4-1 1-0 

16 MO MR MCGREGOR (COriscoQH O'Neal 4-11-0 

18 02-0304 NAMOOS (F HR) A Moore 5-11-0 

19 04P-212 NONE TOO DEAR PEF}(S Adams) GBokftig 4-11-0. 

21 DOQ/230 POLYNOR (D Thon^Mon) M Ryan 5-11-0 

22 2 ROAD TO KELLS(J Saunden) CBenstaad 4-11-0 

24 OPOO-PO SHERWOOD FOREST (B) (N Payne) J Sayers 4-11-0— 


SPITE AND MAliCE (Itos A Wftftfirtd) J Whitfield 4-tl-O SMcftai 

000200 VBKaflA PAGEANT (B) (Mbs L Gray) F aay 4-11-0 - RHoa 

0 RAWH8CRAIG (0 St OMt) D (Stem 4-10-9... RGoMstai 

WWSTIEY MAR) (L Jonas) DLang 4-10-9 

1985: FOYLE FISHERMAN 6-1 1-6 S Smith Ecties (4-6 fan) J Juntas 17 ran 


M Bcatey (4) 

MPsnutt 

GChariM Jones 

Pinny FUtcta-Hoyos (7| 
________ G Mow 

GBradoy 

J McLaughlin 

.. .- M Harrington 

HOnvios 

S Hefted 

RRnaa 

RGoMstain 


79 — 
• 99 F5-4 
79 10-1 
97 6-1 


ao HASSOCKS HANDICAP CHASE (£1 .973: 2m 4f) (7 runners) 

1 0-4P440 AUGHRABOURA (CD) (Mrs L Simpson) J Gifford 10-11-10 ENcKHay(4) 98 94 

3 22000-2 FRENCH CAPTAIN (C) (Duchess of NorfoBc) Lady Horrtes 10-10-10 MKkmau •99F64 

5 2FF1-1F MAITREDEE (CD) (Mrs A Watas) R Gow 7-10-8 C Brawn 94 8-1 

6 001444) CLEAR THE COURSE (BF) (S Samstwy) T Fbratsr 6-1 08 HEawtoa 94 12-1 

7 OOP-004 GRESKHtE PRBE (A BaM Toma Courts) P Bugoynu 9-10-3 PBartan 9216-1 

8 013212 CASTLE TALBOT (CO) (Mbs V Matkowiak) J Long 9-10-2 RGofetetete 98 G 

11 9/0F0OO WEAVERSLAKE(B Daley) G Ripley 10-10-0 Mr AKuBoway 96 33-1 

1985c AUOHRA SOURA 9-10-12 P HoWS pi-4) J Gifibid 5 ran 

FORM AUGWIA BOURA won hera twice last season, krctutfng in this race (ID-12) when a 31 winner 
1 wnm from Cresun (10-3) over today’sdtstence (£1725, soft, Dec 10.^ 5 rat). HENOI CAPTAIN flO-IO) 
madeacoifflle of mistakas when 101 2nd to Autumn Zuiu(lO-a at Folkosmne on seasonal debut (an 4f. El 783, 
soft, Nov 24. 8 ran) and can be expected to Improve on thaL MAITREDEE (11-6) won here on penutemete start 
whan beating Latin Americ an ft 0-12) 31 (an 4f. £2184, good to soft. Nov id. l2ran)wtthAU(aiRABQURAft2- 
1)a length beck Jn 4th and GREB40RE PRIDE (107) who would haw finished doserthan 41 back in SOi beaten 
tor bumBitig 2 out CLEAR THE COURSE (10-13) has been dteappoMkig since a good 31 victory over 
thih tfpw Boy (IQn)atTowcestBT hack in March (2m soyds. £1631, heavy. Mar 31. 8 nmLCASTLETALBOT 
has tffasnedin the frame al five attempts at Ptumpvon this season, most recently (10-11) nmnma to farm when 
13 2nd to Wd iijjMtodnessJII-fi) over to U (£1873. good to soft. Nov 10. i ran). 

SelecBan:”*” 


Madness (ll-6)ow3m ■ 
CAPTAIN 


FORM ><EY)gSni-^ kept qn nicely when beaing Spanish FteM (11-10)3 at VVanmck (2m. C790.good 
runm to soft, Nov 27, 17 ran) with MR MCQ^Xm (10-6) always Dehind. CANUCK CLOWN (l0-8)«4y 
tafled bye neck to beat Newbury winner PBrlea Double (10-10) at WWncanfon ffiro, £869. good to soft Nov 27. 
20 mitt. DUKEOF CAMBHIDGE (10-10) was wMh the laadare when faMng in rarilect Double's Newbury race 
(2m 1 fowls, £2074, soft Nov 22. 21 ran) where FILM CONSULTANT (10-10) finished out of the platings. 


E (10-10) was wMh the laadare whan faMng In Perfect Double's Newbury race 
22. 21 ran) where FILM CONSULTANT (10-10) finished out of the platings. 


330 DECEMBER HANDICAP HURDLE (£1,783: 2m) (8 runners) 

1 0320P-P MR KEY (V.COHUrs E McManus) P Haynes 5-124 I 

4 3180-0 RETMAN (D) (R HNchkn) kfcs J FUmon 5-10-8 

5 KJ3-B40 MWMBF(B){JBinQAMoora4-fM 

7 40-3144 SAN CARLOS (Mrs S Crowe) A Ingham 4-10-5 

8 34P-000 CAPISTRANO PRINCE (CO) (F Gray) F Gray 4-1 04 

9 11/44-20 BUKCtra(CDJF)(J Stringer) DQrtauB 5-102 


HrB Rsttamfl (7) 

BdsHaan 

q jHooru 

— Slave KnigM 

RRowu 

RGokfatete 


13 V30302 SPARKLER SPIRIT (Sparkler mars) R Akahuot 5-10-0 Data McKeowa (7) 

15 00030-F COURAGEOUS CHARGER (CO) (R HamMcn) A Moora 4-1M M Pares 

1985c MR KEY 4-10-12 A Webb (7-2) P Haynes 10 ran 


37 B-1 
90 5-1 
93 10-1 
S6 3-1 
98 16-1 
• 99 8-1 
95F2-1 
8816-1 


always prominent IS 2nd to Swimmer (11-0) at Kampton (2m. £1{ 
SatecSaa NOTE TOO DEAR 


.good to soft, Nov, 


ZOSCOTTS 

1 14P0/P1 
4 000-2 

6 0020-00 

9 300/PO-2 

10 0404MO 

11 0/0004) 

12 03F-224 

14 00000-0 

15 P/4G2P4J 
18 4P480F 

10 2P 0PB -F 
20 000403- 

23 332F42 

24 000-300 

27 F10 


RESTAURANT NOVICE CHASE (£1,711: 2m) (15 runners) 

AStWAH (Mrs M Langtay-Pope) R Hodges 7-11-11 BPawafl 94F94 

CANTORIAL (Sir J Thamsm) R Armytage 5-114 MrM Anaytofp (7) — 8-1 

DARK COUBC (H Cortxaj J King 5-1V4 : SMcNaM 

FLEDGE (RLadgor)R Ledger 9-T14 Mrs N Ledger 7*14-1 

HARDBRBJGE (G Holft J Fttch-Heyes 8-114 R Ou l iMtoto 



USCMEVOUS MONK (A Wales) R Gow 5-1 14 

MY SON MY SON (W Hannon) S Maior 5-114 

OUt WWTE HART (Mrs B Short) NVIgore 6-1 14 

PALMERSTON (M Madgwicfc) M Madguick 7-114 

ANNAGH GLOW (0 Henley) P BuOar 5-10-13 

FOLKLAND (J HamBton) D Aibuthnot 5-10-18 

GABLES FUGHT (C WMatQ C Ylfilett 6-10-13 

LUCKY GOLD (PTapIri) MISS L Bower 9-10-13 

REMAtfBBI WYN (T Thom) J Bridger 5-10-13 

WMRUSH SONG (W Dudtey) M McCormack 6-10-13- 


1905: SAMMY LUX 7-114 R Strange (5-1) K Dunn 15 ran 


SEDGEFIELD 


Selections 

By Mandarin 


C Brawn — — 

G Chartos Jones — 3-1 

C Cox (4) 

AMedgwk* 88 — 

— 82 — 

MrTTtmmoaa Jooss — — 

~ Mas S Bufcbar (7) 92— |Wanft , 

G Moore 88 10-1 p Mitchell 

P Burton — 74. J Bosley 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 

Winners Runners Per Cant 
6 16 373 

10 39 25^ 

13 64 203 

5 27 1&5 

26 142 18.3 


JOCKEYS 


MPerten 
R Rowe 
H Davies 
R Goldstein 
G Moore 
RRowsi 


flkfes Percent 
108 16J 

148 162 

53 132 

182 112 

234 102 

153 72 


12.45 Innocent John. 
1.15 Reel Guilt 
1.45 Banina's Star. 


2.15 The WOk. 
2.45 Sir JesL 

3.15 Tower Hope. 


By Michael Seely 

1.15 Beau NTdol. 2.45 AUGUST (nap). 

The Times Private Handi capper’s top rating: 2.45 AUGUST. 


Going: good to soft 

1Z15 NEW DUN COW NOVICE CHASE (Div I: £848: 2m 4f) (10 runners) 

3 134200- ALXEPA(J Burgess) G Moora 6-1 1-3 ______ M Ha mmond 

ID 0P2443 EAST PARK (Mrs J Waggott) F Watson 6-11-3 B Storey 

11 0300 KHO BEACH (DsnysSnMh) Denys Sm«i 5-11-3 C Grant 

13 0MMB3 MNOCSfT JOHN (J Hanson) J Hanson 6-1 1-3 M Dwyer 

14 Q/24B20 JUPfTSI PfUMCE (BF) (W Stephenson) W A Stephens o n 7-11-3 K Jonas 

20 22/P2D4 NBGHTY MARK (Mrs F Wtiton) F Woden 7-11-8 MrJWatton 

21 Q4HPS2 MH±STREAK(Mrs DCuliamJMrs DCtihamfrll-S REamshm 

24 0002/DD SOLDBY(GLaamam)MHEast8rt>y6-ll-3 LWyar 

25 000-222 TARTANTORCMJGHT(E(Snburgh Woollen MM Lh8G Rtchanfs 6-1 1-3 PTdcfc 

27 F24>003 PERFECT MAGE (CRBrawon)W Storey 6-10-12 DToHor (7) 

1985: Hasting Abandoned - Frast 

12.45 GOLDEN UON SBJJNG HURDLE (£509: 2m)(13 rurmers) 


2 843400 Pf9LLYATW£nC RI) (M Cartar) J Katttewefl 4-1 1-9 

3 P ALWAYS NATIVE (D Chapman) D Chapman 5-11-7 

4 0 ARMTAGE (J Smpson) D Yeoman 4-11-7 

6 F04M00 DOMANUS(V Thompson) V Thompson 5-11-7 

7 FQftHXJ JKMWNY FnaiCWlAN (R Batnbrtdge) A Wafson S-11-7_ 

8 344 MPKNOWES(G Adam) R Alan 5-1 1-7 

9 22P- nEa.GUHLT(BEdtishaw)G Moore 4-1 1-7 

10 Q/000410 DROVERS ROAD (Mrs J Waggott) N Waggon 5-11-2 

11 40F030- GAME TRACK (Mrs V Scott) A Scott 4-11-2 

12 OflP-QP GLADYEfl HM (B)(J tones) W FtirgriovB 5-1 1-2 

13 HUA SAUCY (V Hail) V Hal 4-1 1-2 

14 JALOME(WBara&WtBdnsonUd)RWHnacer4-ll-2___ 

15 POP-P JAYEL LADY (B)(J Lund) JOoyto 4-11-2 


_ Mr J CMwamu (7) 

PMvsn 

C tlswktos 

Mr M Tboamaon (4) 
D Shaw 


. Mbs T Waggatl (7) 

— 98 11-4 

JKHnana 

Mr AOifcnoy — — 

M Dwyer — — 


2.15 HARDWICK ARMS NOVICE CHASE (£907: 2m) (15 runners) 

1 30-14FF THE WlUt (D) (F Sootto) W A Stephenson 7-11-12 R Lamb 

2 0404B0 AUCKLAND EXPRESS (M Thompson) V Thompson 8-1 1-4 - Mr Mlbompson (4) 

3 BESSACARR BOV (P Hhwhlffl) G Rtcftanfa 5-1 1-4 PTocfc 

4 311-100 BORLEAFRASIMunay Athol InvLttQDMoffatt B-1 1-4 J RQukm(7) 

7 040-MJ4 GBMARO(B)(P WamB) M Naughton 6-11-4 MHamnond 

8 000 QOLO0I TUPaiCE (Mra G Aimilago) D Lae 5-1 1-4 MrHBrown(7) 

10 0- UUCELAfa)LAD(TO'SuRvan)SF^yna7-11-4 B Storey 

11 00 NEON (A HantVy) A Hambty 5-11-4 Mr A Hambty 

12 9UBP/3 PHODTS DREAM (T Cuntingham) T Curminghara 7-1 1-4 G Harter 

15 000-200 THE CIDER AND BUN (BF) (R Hurst) W Swroy 6-11-4 D TeHor (7) 

16 4-0404U WELSH SPIRIT (W Stephenson) W A Stephenson 7-11-4 MrP Johnson (7) 

17 004/P2P BRIGHT IV (R BtetwS) P Btoddey 7-10-13 — — 

IB 2200Q/F KBjSEY LADY (F C hepmor^ J Htidene 8-10-13 DDtdton 

19 040000- I0SS WOOOY (Mra A Douglas} J Haldane 6-10-1 3 REamshaw 

20 01120- READY TOKEN (Mrs K Lundbarg-Young) A Smith 6-10-13 C Grant 

2.45 NAGS HEAD NOVICE HURDLE (£655: 2m) (18 runners) 

3 1 GOUVSffn (Cty (Mra JMurrtt0JBflny 7-1 1-10 JHansuo 

5 2 AUGUST (BF) (R Cotoman) Danya SmWi 5-1 14) CGnrt 

9 0F44- FBKHUWCH COLONT p BtiQ T Cra^5-1 1-0 

10 0 GINGER BEB1 (A McPherson) P MonteWi 4-1 141 CHawfckra 

11 00324)0 GREY CARD (Mrs A Hartas) M Btertoy 5-11-0 A Stringer 

14 OF JOSEPH’S COAT (J Boynton) T Barron 5-11-0 G Harter 

16 - ll-PO LYRICAL PALM (A MacOowaS) S PSyne 4-1 1-0 — 

23 004)000 SARPALfC Armstrong) V Thompson 5-1 141 Mr M Thompson (4) 

24 20 SR JEST (W Stephenson) W A Stephenson 8-11-0 K Jones 

26 00 TACTICO (1 OtigMsh) W ftir grieve 4-11-0 JKKtaanu 

27 0300-00 TREVELLOO Jordan)! Jordon 6-1 1-0 BSuray 

28 0 TREYARNON (L-Cdl W Montekh) P Monte&h 4-114) D Natan 

31 BaiA BJUNUS (R Stephawon) W A Stephenson 4-1 0-0 RLamb 

32 F CERTAW MBjOPY (P C a k fwe S) E Alston 4-1D-8 M Alston (7) 

34 00- FSiCALLINA (Q (Mrs V Sootq AScon4-109 Mr T Read 

38 0 LIGHTER SHADE (B Heslop) W Reed 4-10-8 PMwn(4Q' 

■ 40 041 SBTBI CLARE (P McMaiiori) Jknriy Fazgerald 6-1 0-9 M Dwyer 

42 TOLY'S T0#8C{TCum*ighan)T Cunningham 4-104! M H am mond 


1.15 HOPE INN HANDICAP CHASE (Cl ,632: 3m 600yd)<9 nmnara) 

1 220-412 CASA KNIPE (CtLSF) (J Thompson) D Lee 11-11-10 Mr H Brawn (7) 

5 1204-34 Kt 8AKBT (A Barren) J Jafknon F1M C Grant 

6 -PB3PP1 OjOUROOC STREAM (CD) V Thompson 7-11-0 (7ex) Mr M Tteupaan (4) 

B 1FFPP-F SONY ME (R Schatey) R Schotey 8-10-6 PDerete(4) 

9 3F10-F3 BEAU NTDOL (CD) (E Robson) E Robson 7-10-5 MrTRSOd 

11 093210 ROYAL CAMLIT (Mra S Ward) Mra SWard 9-104) : 0 Harter 

12 441-OUO BEAU LYON (Mbs A Smith) D Lamb 6-10-0 K Jones 

13 434F4M MSTORC HOUSE (NKssJ Cook) Maerby 11-109 A Stringer 

15 RV0443 BE FRS (Mra G Burtta) Mra GBonta 11-104) Mta> A Bemaneut (7) 

1.45 NEW DUN COW NOVICE CHASE (Dfv lb £847: 2m 41} (10 rurmere) 

4 00-4PPF ANOTHER GEAR (W Stephenson) W A Stephenson 6-113— RLamb 

5 0PF00/P- AUCHENCRWVE (A Watsmi) A Watson 11-11-3 DShaw 

6 04*1212 BAHTIN AS STA R (BF) (Mrs K Berry) Jimmy RtzgaaM 6-11-3 M Dwyer 

9 OFPOOf DANTES TREE ( W Tree) R Robinson 7-11-3 ... ..... D Condefl 

16 POB KARL S OCRRY (C Harirtaon) w Storey 7-11-3 N McCannuck 

16 S/FUW 5 KBP DREAMIQ (Mm LAnnatran^ M Reddan 9-11-3 — 

17 3PP3P4J LUCKYR9I (Mrs H Bated) CTWdar 6-1 1-3 L A SMngv 

22 OOQ/P-OO NOBLE LEGEND {J Lund! J Doyte 8-11-3 _ 

26 OOft/POP OCRAS (D Hodgson) D Hodgson 7-10-12 - — 

28 W/OO-UF SWOP SHOP (J Lane) H Wharton 7-10-12 D WNtewm 


3.15 BLACK 

1 111000 

2 04-40F3 

3 103010- 

4 S-112P0 

5 10314)0 

6 0130 

8 011093 

9 1O-P00F 

10 3-14044 

11 10434)3 

12 P200-00 

14 2128/00- 

15 41/BI 40- 

' 10 021400- 

19 914MP1 

20 201-FDO 

22 OOPQ/OP 

23 1100007 

24 03P/P03- 

25 40Q/000 

26 004000/ 


UON HANDICAP HURDLE (£1.182: 2m 41) (21 runners) 

TROiraiOS (CD) (Mra J Perk) Denys SmUh 5-11-10. C Grant 

SECRET FMALE (CO) (Regent Dec Lid) J Johnson 7-11-7 REamahaw 

MCGULUCUDOY (A F Budge Lid) Jimmy RogerMd 6-1 1-6 M Dwyer 

DOUGHTY REBEL (CD) (G WSson) G Rfchads 5-11-4 PTook 

RAMPANT (Mrs R Ben} R Barr 7-11-2 — 

TOWER HOPE (CO (PSaemoy) Mra GRevetoy 5-11-1 PNno.fl) 

CARAT STIOK (Mrs F WbOoh) F WUton 6-113 M-JWallon 

ADAM (D Hodgson) D Hodgson 7-11-0 KDootan 

IXflCE OF DGUJS (OD) (B Rttchk^ W Storey 7-10-13 D Totter (7) 

JAY ELLE THAW (CD) (J Thaw) 0 Moftalt 6-10-11 K Tauten 

CMPCHASE (A Taykii)BWakinsan 6-10-6 G Haricot 

COOL ANDY (H Robertas) H Rabanks 8-10-7 «b J Odwrn (7) 

BURLEY MLL LAD (D) (B CahM) P BtaefcKJy MO-7 I 

BtHtRl WALK (Mra MAmstrang) I Jordon 6-103 B Storey 

NIGHT GUEST (C) (J Rddes) P MonteHh 4-103 D Nolan 

GOLDBI SECRET (R Day) DMoftatt 4-103 — 

B IVH1 RAMBLER (Mra WTBflwrigW) Mrs WTeflwright 9-1 03 — 

JOCA(HBousftekflJ Pates S-1M — 

BAMEY BRAKE (RBbi)II Bair 10-103 : — 

KgtSa. (J SwtenH J Gr o to rs 9-10-0 IDk A Baamnunt (7) 

TOMA'S PET(J Back) J Back 9-103 : C Dumas (7) 

Course specialists 



TRAINERS 

Whiners Rumen 

Percent 

P Niven 

JOCKEYS 

Winners 

10 

RUas 

36 

Percent 

Z7.B 

T Barron 

7 

23 

304 

GHarkor 

7 

32 

21.8 

J HBdane 

6 

26 

23.1 

M Hammond 

5 

25 

20.0 

G Moore 

5 

22 

22.7 

to T Reed 

9 

51 

17J6 

MHEastarby 

14 

71 

. 19.7 

RLantt 

30 

175. . 

. 17,1 

Donys Snath 

30 

163 

165 

M Dwyer 

8 

47. 

170 


A 


See You Then set 
for Cheltenham 


By Michael Seely 


See You Then remains on 
target to become the first triple 
winner of the Champion Hurdle 
since Persian War and is likely 
to attempt to repeat last year’s 
victory in the Oteley Hurdle at 
Sundown en route to 
Cheltenham. 

At a London hotel yesterday 
Nicky Henderson, the six-year- 
okfs handler, received the 
Derby award for the Horserace 
Writers’ and Reporters' Associ- 
ation as the National Hunt 
Trainer of the Year. Henderson 
“See You Then has always 
had dodgy old legs and they axe 
not gating any better, but he’s as 
weD as at this time last year and 
I hope to get a couple of runs 
imo him before tire Festival. “ 

Glyn Foster, who looks after 
the champion hurdler, received 
the Stable Lad's award for 1 966. 

Peter Scudamore, the reigning 
champion jockey, was the Na- 
tional Hunt Jockey of the season 
and in his absence al Bangor, his 
wife, Marilyn, accepted the 
trophy. 

Michael Stoute not only cap- 
tured the Flat trainer's award for 
the second time, but was also 
voted the International Racing 
Bureau's Trainer of the Year. 
Taking win and {dace money at 
home and abroad into account, 
the Barbados-born trainer won 
£2.75 million in prize money. 

The inxmnable Pal Eddery, of 
coarse, received tire Flat 
jockey’s award, and the 34-year- 
old genius of the saddle made 
the shortest speech on 
record.“Th 2 nk yon all very 
much indeed, ami I hope to be 
back next year," he said. 

Not surprisingly Prince Kha- 
lid Abdallah received the 
Owner's award after the exploits 
of Dancing Brave. Grant Pritch- 


ard-Gordon, receiving the tnv 
phy on behalf of the Saudi 
Arabian potentate, said: “I just 
want to say thank you to Gny 
Harwood. Fat Eddery, Greville 
Starkey and all the team at 
Pnlborough.” 

Peter O'Salle van. the doyen 
of the press and the BBC and 
one of the finest-ever ambas- 
sadors for British racing, re- 
ceived Lord Derby's personal 
award for the journalist of 1 986, 
for ifac third time. And simulta- 
neously came the news that 
O’Sullevan, together with Prin- 
cess Anne, had been elected a 
member of the Jockey Club. 
John Hislop and Peter Willett 
are the only other members of 
the press to have received this 
honour. 

In his speech O*Su0evan paid 
special tribute to Clive Brittain 
who recently trained Jupiter 
Island to beat Allez Milord in 
the Japan Cop in Tokyo. 

“Standing up there in front of 
all the Japanese, while the band 
played tire British national an- 
them was die proudest moment 
of my fife" said the hard 
working and popular New- 
market trainer. 

John Gaines, the driving force 
behind the Gainesway Farm in 
Kentucky and also tire inspira- 
tion behind the Breeders' Cup 
series, received the IRB's Spe- 
cial Award. 

Gaines said: 'Hire important 
thing was not that Dancing 
Brave was beaten at Santa 
Anita, but that he came. And 
one of the things I want to see is 
a reciprocal arrangement with 
Europe. The idea of a million 
dollar race for three-year-dd 
colts and one of the same value 
for two year olds may not be an 
impossible dream." 


bobsleighing 

No let up 
in East 
German 
bob row 

From Chris Moore 
Winterberg 

The row over the controver- 
sial East German sledges raged 
on here yesterday with the 
disputing nations producing fur- 
ther documents to show the 
bobs are not IcgaL 

The East German bobs were 
officially declared legal on Sun- 
day by Martin Kilian, the East 
German president of the World 
Cup jury. 

The documents were put m 
front of to the jury last night 
before the eagerly awaned 
unveiling of the larger version of 
the German sle<tee to be 
used in tomorrow’s four-man 
race. . . . t 

The new evidence is based on 
official technical data which, 
according to the protest group, 
shows the East German two- 
man bobs do not meet one 
specific requirement in the rule 
book relating to the rear axle. 

“The rear bumper and the 
axle are not supposed to be 
joined together, but in the case 
of the East German sledge they 
are,” the British team manager. 
Mo Hammond, who spotted the 
apparent defect, said. 

“In our view this is am 
(indisputable feet which, when 
you are looking at the tec hn ic a l 
drawings, cannot be denied,” 

Hammond added. 

But despite putting the ball 
firmly back into the jury's court 
by serving what may look like 
an ace, no one here will be 
surprised ifKilian calls it a fault. 

Lining up alongside Briiian 
are Austria, Switzerland, Italy, 
France, Holland, Sweden and 
the USA. 

The host nation. West Ger- 
raanv. predictably, is sitting on 
the fence while the young 
A u strali a n driver. .Adrian Di 
Piazza, is keeping out of iL With 
no financial backing whatso- 
ever, he is only able to compete 
on the circuit because he has 
been given an old sledge by the 
Federation of International 
Bobsleighing and Tobogganing. 
Naturally, he doesn't want to 
risk losing iL 

That leaves only the Russians 
and it goes without saying where 
they stand, particularty as they 
arc afforded training facilities in 
East Germany and, as rumour 
has iL they are currently work- 
ing on a new sledge of their own 
for the 1988 WinterOIympics in 


V 


t f 


2 t h i* 


,t * a a * 

0 l 




Interfering McCourt 
banned for 28 days 


Graham McCcort, the jockey, 
was banned far 28 days at a 
Jockey Clob dSscqdhnry hear- 
ing in London yesterday over his 
riding of Wave Crest at Notting- 
ham last week. The ban, which 
begins today, nms nnfil January 
5. 

McCourt was foraid gmtty by 
the local stewards of caa s mg 
inte n tional interference to Celtic 
Mary, ridden by amateur An- 
thony KeOeway. at and after the 
third last flight mdivistOf] two of 
the Haddington Novice Hurdle. 

Because of the seriousness of the 
offence tire case was referred to 
the Disciplinary Committee at 
Fortman Sqnare. 

Celtic Mary finished ninth 
and McCourfs mount was un- 
placed later disqualified. 
McComt, based at Wantage, 
said: There was a bit of 
scrimmaging during the race and 
leant complain. The ban means 
I will miss a number of good 
rides, particularly on Motivator 
and Stearsby-" 

At a separate inquiry the 
Newmarket trainer Alec Stewart 
was fined £300 over the incorrect 


vaccination of the two-year-oH 
Mtmawar. 

Stewart ultniMwJ breaching 
role 35 (if), which meant that 
Mooawar was not qualified to 
ran when finishing second to 
Knodrin Express in division one 
of the Dnnkiik Stakes at Don- 
caster on November 7. 

Mima war was disqualified 
Mnaawar and Water CSty 
placed second, Pagitek third and 
Yorkbay fourth. 

• The trainer John Spearing Is 
likely to hear from the Jockey 
Club this week to fix a date for 
the inquiry into Ron And Skip's 
failure to contest the Hennessy 
Cognac Gold Cup at Newbnry 
last month. Spearing left his 
high-class chaser in the race and 
was reported by the local stew- 
ards to Portman Square after 
f a i l i n g in ran Mm. 

• Alphabatim, formerly trained 
by Guy Harwood, beat Dahar by 
a head to win the $500,000 
Hollywood Turf Cup in record 
tune at Hollywood Park on 
Sunday. Theatrical, second In 
the Breeders* Cap Turf last 
month, was a neck third. 


ifthe big brother East Ger- 
man sledge proves to be a 
carbon copy of the two-man, 
there is the prospect of at least 
one nation polling out under 
protest from tomorrow’s nice. 
The Austrian manager, 
Helmuth Saiscek. said last night, 
though admitted in the heat of 
the moment, that his team 
would not race against the East 
German two-man bob again. 

The Americans, too. are mak- 
ing lots of noises, though it is the 
Swiss who hold the real key to 
what happens next- They repre-^ 
sent the biggest threat on the 
track to the East Germans, and 
as hosts for next month's world 
championships in St Moritz, 
perhaps have most to lose. 

If they were to withdraw 
under protest the chances are 
the rest of the group would too. 
But no one is prepared to go out 
on a limb without the Swiss at 
their side. And nobody knows 
just how for they are prepared to 
go to force the issue. Sponsored, 
as they are by major Swiss 
banks, it could even be to the 
Gnomes of Zurich! 


Results from two meetings 


Catterick Bridge 

Going; good to firm 



I 










!ȣ> 


RUGBY UNION 


set 

m 


•r.nr K, f ' 

‘ '***£* 

7&S 




: ' ^ 
* *N 

.:': S v isj,^ 

' 

--Si? 

. ;*■•■ !r : i ^ 

- 

■ .-E* , 


... . . By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

eSS^STSS^ %« *> such last-minute the 


ing character and determina- 
tion, could overturn well- 
founded Cambridge hopes 
this time last year, how much 
more likely are they to emerge 
winners of the Bowrine Bowl 
in today’s 105th University 
match at Twicke nham ? 

Their results against the 
senior dubs have indicated 
not a lack of skill so much as 
the self-evident ones of experi- 
ence and sheer physique. They 
have been able to field a 
relatively settled side aD term 
and arrive at Twickenham 
with nine of last year’s tram 
who won an enthralling match 
7-6, after a week of finishing 
school provided by Alan 
Jones, the Australian coach. 

At the last moment they 
have bad 10 make a change on 
the wing where Ian McDonald 
has withdrawn after failing a 
weekend fitness test on an 
ankle da m ag e d in training a 
fortnight ago. 

The unfortunate Mc- 
Donald, the side’s leading try- 
scorer with 1 1 (eight against 
first-class opposition) ^re- 
placed by Adam Duthie, from 
Canberra, but if a change has 
to be made, then that ofa wing 
should not upset the overall 
balance of the side. 

Duthie has played several 
games this season, both at 
wing and centre. Andrew Ken- 
nedy, last year’s full back, has 
also withdrawn from the 
replacements with a knee 
injury. 

Cambridge, though sufler- 


alarms, have been able only 
once to put today’s team on to 
the field and have had such 
important component parts as 
Francis Clough, their captain, 
Tom Withyman, Andrew 
Cushing and Chris Oti in and 
out of the side because of 
mjunes. They field only five 
old Blues but two of them are 
in the back row where so many 
matches are won and lost 

That too, however, is an 
area of significant Oxford 
strength: Simon Griffin, the 
captain, played a leading role 
m last year’s match and is 
am bilious this season to win a 
place in the Welsh Students 

side; Bin Calcraft, with the 
experience derived from his 
years as a member of the 
Australian national squad, h»s 
made a major physical and 
mental input at Oxford this 
term; and Niall McBain 
played a variety of repre- 
sentative rugby during his 
time at Durham University. 

Together they have the 
ability to turn the match 
Oxford’s way and to disrupt 
the half-back link upon which 
Cambridge hopes may de- 
pend. Cushing , the scrum half, 
is by far the most experienced 
player in their side but be and 
Tim Lord (the son of Mike 
Lord, a Cambridge Blue in 
1 960 and now a Conservative 
MP) desperately need to estab- 
lish some kind of relationship 
if the best is to be brought 
from Clough and Oti. 

And the University match, 
for all its virtues of speed, 
tackling and commitment, is 
not renowned as a game for 



TODAY’S TEAMS AT TWICKENHAM 


Oxford University 


Cambridge University 




our! 

avs 


#i£* 

*■'- fin ' 


»' Jll Rtaman 

(Woffington College & SEH) 

S JR Vessey 
(Magdalen CS& Green) 
RARydon 

(Sherborne & Pembroke) 

BJ Muffin 

(TDC ft University) 

ALDuthie 

(Phfflip, Canberra ft Baffiol) 

AM Johnson 
(Radley ft St Catherine ’s ) 

SN J Roberts 
(Magdalen CS ft Exeter) 

TG wans 

(Woffington College & SEH) 
JChislett 

(Plymouth Coflege ft KeMe) 

SM Ferguson 
(Royal Belfast A! ft SEH) 

W J Calcraft 

(Scots C, Sydney A Brasenose) 
C Crane 

(Pontypool C ft SEH) 

C P MacDonald 
(Diocesan C ft University) - 
S JM Griffin* 

(Christ, Brecon ft University) 

A N S McBain 

(Ampleforth ft St Anne’s) 

•Captain 


Full Back M D C Thomas 15 

(Gowerton & Magdalene) 

Rightwing TWO Isaac 14 

(Welbecfc & Churchffi) 

Right centra KTWytes 13 

(Wyroontfl ia m ft Trinfty Hafl) 

Loft centre FJ Clough* 12 

(St JfiSby ft Magdalene) 

Left wing COB 11 

(MHHMd ft St Edmund’s) 

Standoff TM Lord 10 

(Bedford Mod ft Christ's) 

Scrum half A Cushing 9 

(MCS Braddey ft Magdalene) 

Prop N JHerrod 1 

(KH vm Coventry ft Clare) . . . 

Hooker B WGachrist 2 

.. . (Sevenoaks A Magdalene) 

Prop NHimt 3 

(Hutton GS & Selwyn) 

Hanker S R Kefly 6 

(Richard ffuUi ft Corpus C) 

Lock A R Hobbs 4 

(Worth ft Magdalene) 

Lock N P Topping 5 

(RGS Wycombe A St John’s) 

Ranker R I Wata w rig ht 7 

(Gtonaknond ft Magdalene) 

No 8 T A Withyman 8 

(Spakfing GS & Emmanuel) 

TkpMn 

m F A Howanf(Uv e tpooi) 

John's, replaceuekt&IB J Wylie (Royal Belfast Al ft 
tEUmen Churchffik 17 P BearfBerfchamsted ft St 
(Whilgift John’s); 18 C MLeod (StrathaUan ft Downing); 
horpa ft 19 J Freeman (Arwick ft St John's); 20 I 
allege ft Singleton (Wycfifle ft St John's); 21 M Pepper 
master) (St Aliens ft Jesus) 


; -V : ' ~ • 

a# ~ '• T 1 



REPLACEMENTS; 1 6 D Cook (St John's, 
Leathertiead and Christchurch; 17 SDimten 
(Aylesbury GS and Keble; 18 S Taylor (WMigHt 
ft University); 19 N Peacock (Nunthorpe ft 
SEHk 20 S M Pritchard (Wellington Coflege ft 
SEH); 21 D Thresher (Sevenoaks ft Worcester) 


Right wing 
Right centre 
Left centre 
Left wing 
Standoff 
Scrum half 


Hooker 


Flanker 


Ranter 


W-tfr*--'" 
f * * 


*V 

r.* 


1 **- 






Racers and 
Rockets 
go joint top 

4 . By Norman de Mesquite 

Mmrayfield Racws and Dun- 
dee Rockets, each with Ih points 
from 10 games, share pnde of 
place in the premier divujion ot 
the Heineken League after an- 
other successful weekend. Rac- 
ers continue to score almost at 
will and hit 13 Boa* agsunst 
Streatham Redskins op Sat- 
urday and 12 against Notong- 
Kam Panthers on Sunday. 

Panthers’ setback followed a 
9-0 win at Ayr. wuh Ian 
Woodward saving 22 sboujbr 

his first premier division ShUt- 
OUt.” 

Jaroslav Lycka scored his 

third successive 
for Dundee as they defeated «« 
Fivers bv the odd goal in I I out 
tjfly ere had better Tw* at home 
to Dm-haio Wasps, winning 6-4. 

Having run the Racers dose 
on Saturday, the Redskin* raj 
into all kinds ot trouble ai Ayr 
on Sonday. including a mated 
penally for their captain, Tony 
Goldstonc, 

frontabon with Bnnns yn 
Bartley- Ctereiami. continue 
struggle and are to danger of 
losingtoucfa at the bottom. 

In the first division wins ova 

Oxford and Boumemou^ took 

3s , s , !\33a 

ssj-asas 

Peterborough K *****^?!!? 8 t0 

Blackpool and at home to 

Southampton too fc «i,?£jera 
within two points of the l eaders. 

Durham Wasps 9. .YtHmawii Pa"- 
MurayfwkJ Racers lS-J^^^ 

Bombers 5. On* fSTpinwl*: 
Seagate T; 

&BS 90 M Emjw I KeMrafc 


BASKETBALL 


Innell’s record shota 
bonus for Kingston 


by Nicholas Harting 

Andy InneU will go into the 
Prudential National Cop final 
for Polycell Kingston against 
Portsmouth on Monday, hold- 
ing a record that he may find 
hard to live up to for the rest of 
his career. 

A shot propelled almost the 
entire length of Kingston’s court 
at Tofworth on Sunday, mea- 
sured later as 72 feet, gave the 
25-year-old England inter- 
national guard the distinction of 
ringing the longest shot in 
British basketball Idsuny. 

Coming with one second left 
of his dub’s top^f^ho-tabte first 
division match a gains t BCP 
London, InneU’s shot extended 
Kingston’s winning margin to 
101-86 and enabled him to beat 
his tram colleague. Steve 
Bontrager’s old British record by 
five feet 

“I had to out-do Steve once m 
tny life,” said InneU, before 
being jokingly reminded by 
Bontragpr that his late effort had 
turned defeat into victory 
against Hand Hempstead two 
yearsago: “Ah, but yours didn’t 
win a game." 

For a player, who currently 
does not make Kingston’s start- 
ing five, had only one previous 
basket to his name and had not 
even managed to hit the back- 
board with an earlier shot from 
far closer rang e, Inne fl had 
certainly gone to extremes. The 
look on his fece as his snot 
plopped through the basket was 
one of utter disbehet 

Kevin Cadle, the Kingston 
coach, missed Innefl’s throw 
because he was bnsy 
congratulating those memoets 
of his team, on the bench, for 
registering their twelfth 
successive league wnu 
•Jfanycase see it as being offoai 
much significance, saidCadle, 
gamed more sansfecnon 
from \he feci that his . team 
emerged unscathed and vicion- 

Sus from the tough game he 



THE TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 





McDonald blow unlikely 
to knock Oxford out 
of their winning stride 


the open spaces unless some 
kind of winning margin has 
been established during the 
first hour or unless some 
blessed eccentric like Rob 
Andrew has the vision to use 
the opening quarter as a time 
for scoring rather than settling 
as be did iq 1984 when 
Cambridge scored 18 points in 

almost as many minutes. 

After watching a sterile 
divisional game on Saturday 
which was mostly played side- 
ways, it would be a pleasure 
indeed to see either university 
team give some depth to then- 
game and Oxford look better 
equipped to do so. Both 
Ashley Johnson and Brendan 
Mullin can make, and exploit, 
raps and John Risman will be 
looking for opportunities from 
full back. 

The most consistent mem- 
ber of the Cambridge team 
this term has probably been 
Steve Kelly, the flanker, but I 
doubt if he will be allowed to 
dominate the loose balL Cam- 
bridge have height in the 
lineoul where they can expect 
to share possession and 
should bold their own in the 
scrums. They have potential 
behind, not only in Gough 
and Oti but in Mark Thomas, 
the big full back; but they need 
the confidence to use it which 
their results have not en- 
couraged. 

Moving a hand reluctantly 
from the pocket, the money 
goes on Oxford to reduce 
Cambridge's 47-44 lead in the 



TENNIS 


Discretion dictates 
a hopeful look 
towards the future 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


Robert Rydea (Oxford) and Cambridge counterpart Kelvin Wyles, with vital parts to play 

The men in the shadows 
ready to prove their worth 


Both u niv ersit ie s are able to 
field internationals at centre bat 
the men playing alongside 
Brendan Mnllm and Francis 
Qoagh have both developed 
alriiig which, have proved of 
testing value Co their teams. 

Robert Anthony Rydon, 
whose fresh-laced good looks 
would chant the herds off the 
trees, is unnsnal in that he has 
played for the Combined Eng- 
land S t u d en ts already, yet has 
no first-class dob ex p erie nce 
outside Oxford. He canes from 
Sussex and wait to school in 
Dorset, neither noted hotbeds of 
rugby, bat his ability as a link is 
much appreciated by his 
colleagnes. 

He was 22 last meath and is in 
his final year studying pare and 
applied biology, tfaoogh he 
hopes to become a stockbroker. 
He spent three years as stand- 
off half in Sherborne's senior 
side, inxmiating in the pos- 
searien won by a good pack; 
Oxford suddenly demanded an 
emphasis on tackling and the 
ability to ouke do on my Etfle. 

His anobtrasive play oa the 
field m— I m a decent sense of 
reafism, which helped him win 
his cricket Bine last soomer: “I 
thought I was a batsman Mil 
yon ean bowl, yon don’t half act 
ml” Whoring the U nive r s ity 


By David Hands 

match last year provided a huge 
fillip for the rugby club which 
has gathered strength with the 
recruitment, actual and prom- 
ised, of leading players. “I'm a 
link as opposed to a star player 
and I’ve learned a lot about 
s upp ort play”, Rydon says-“Bot 
rtiia term, when Brendan lux 
played, it’s amazing how ranch 
space I have found becanse 
everyone is homing in on him,” 

Wyles’s versatility 
can be a curse 


over the last 18 months has 
boosted the reparation of 
Rydon, John Usman and 
AiAley Johnson, all of whom 
have won representative stu- 
dent honours. 

Kelvin Timothy Wyles ad- 
mits that his rugby education 
really began at Cambridge, 
where be is in his fourth year 
of law studies after leaving 
Wymondham SchooL “There 
were so many good players 
around, Andrew, Simms, Bai- 
ley, Smith, it was hard not to 
pick things up from them.** 


Message for schools 




istrsft a 


ous from foe wffib Ig®* J* 
(bought they needed before the 

^AblSd" by 17 points al jme 

stage, Kingston .had let 

Xk io within five points Of 
before ChdJe teoughl 
Erager and Davis (bote 26 

Sish off the only other pre- 


Andy InnelL kmg shot 
vionsly unbeaten i«im in the 
Carlsbwg National League. 

Portsmouth, now known as 
HFS Portsmouth following the 
completion of a sponsorship 
deal with the finance company, 
Homeowner Financial Services, 
also had an impressive, win, 
beating the league champions 
Sharp Manchester United 102- 
94. 

United made up an 18-point 
deficit to level at 65-65 only for 
Portsmouth, galvanized as usual 
these days % Cunningham (29 
points), to open up a decisive 
lead with a 17-2 surge after 
United had lost Phillips, fouled 
out With the cup final in mind, 
Irish, suffering from a muscle 
strain, was used sparingly 
against his old dub by Eton 
LJoyd. die Portsmouth coach. 

Terry Crosby (48 points) and 
Russell Saunders (47) recorded 
the two highest individual 
scores of the season so for but 
their contributions were of little 
good to their dubs. HomeSpare 
Bolton and Reg Vardy Sunder- 
land, who went down respec- 
tively at Birmingham Bullets 
and Happy Eater Bracknell 
Pirates. 


By way of an apposite prehide 
to the Univererty. match, the 
Rugby Football Union are hold- 
ing a conference, Rugby in the 
1990s, at Twickenham tins 
morning (David Hands writes). 

They have invited schools’ 
physical education advisers 
from all over the country to 
discuss how best the RFU can 
make some contribution to- 
wards the playing of games in 
schools. 

It is an initiative that is to be 
applauded at a tune when rngby 
union in tins country is at a low 
ebb and when rugby league may 
appear — to the young, as well 
as to the not so young — a more 
attractive game. 

The new GCSE syllabus in- 
dudes a PE examination that 
has a rugby option. This is an 


VOLLEYBALL 


New event 
not well 
received 

By a Correspondent 

The English Volleyball 
Association are taking stems to 
stage the first official Home 
Countries International tour- 
nament in the spring, bat the 
moves have not been welcomed 
north of the border. 

The Scottish Volleyball 
Association are upset that the 
annual "double-header” 
matches between England and 
Scotland, first staged m 1967, 
have been scrapped this season. 

The technical director, Nick 
Moody, who also doubles as the 
Scottish senior men's coach, 
said: “We will now need to 
rethink our whole international 
programme. We knew nothieg 
about the move until we re- 
ceived a letter from the EVA in 
September. If we are to stage a 
British championship, it would 
put an added financial burden 
on us as an association." 

Moody feds the two annual 
matches between England and 
Scotland, traditionally dose 
fought affairs, are of more 
developmental value than a 
Home Countries event with 
both Wales and Northern Ire- 
land some way short of foe 
standards being set in England 
and Scotland. 

However, tire EVA national 
director, George Bulman, said: 
“We are looking towards send- 
ing a British volleyball team to 
the 1992 Olympics and British 
championships would be ready- 
made for selection of a team.^ 

The first Home Countries 
affair — between the four 
women's teams — is scheduled 
for England in May with the first 
men's event in Northern Ireland 
early next summer. 

Meanwhile, Eogfeuf s men’s 
dub champions, Polonia, were 
beaten in their first round first 


area that the RFU wish to 

explore, while, on the same day, 
they can show nearly 100 FE 
advisers the possibilities offered 
by New Image rugby — for both 
sexes, young and (rid -and 
mini-rugby smee there will be a 
demonstration of both before 
the Oxford and Cambridge 
teams take the field this 
- afternoon. 

In view of the hostility ex- 
pressed in some areas to the 
playing of traditional team 
games in schools — some of its 
based on the grounds of finance^ 
as well as elitist connotations — 
it is as well for. the national 
bodies of those sports involved 
to discuss, dispute and, perhaps, 
discover new channels down 
which to direct rugby over the 
next decade. 


Their presence, however, 
meant a long wait for his Blue 
which he won last year after 
Mark Bailey vacated the left 
wing spot to play stand-off. 
Wytes’s versatility — he was a 
centre at school — has allowed 
him to play in every position 
behind tire scrum, except 
scrum half, for the senior 
Cambridge side, but it is a 
curse at times becanse worth 
in one position can be 
overlooked. 

“Winning a Bine makes 
such a difference when it 
comes to playing senior rngby 
(he has played for Bedford and 
is joining Nottin gham during 
the holiday). Tin doing a 
masters in law this year and I 
wanted to play centre becanse 
it was an opportunity to estab- 
lish myself with some senior 
dab. Tran Oongh and I 
complement each other.** 

Wyles, now 23, worked most 
on Ids straight r unning and 
passing when he arrived hi 
Camlmige; if he can make 
these skills work today the 
best may yet be seen of Qoagh 
and the strong-running Chris 
Oti. 

Injuries delay 
South-West 
team for Bath 

The South-West selectors 
hope to confirm today tfaeir 
team to play London al Bath on 
Saturday in the second round of 
the Thorn EMI divisional 
championship (David Hands 
writes). The delay has been 
caused by injuries to Smart 
Barnes, John Hall and Huw 
Duggan, sustained during the 
defeat against the North 

Barnes, the Bath stand-off 
half, has a hacmatoma on a hip, 
which was causing him some 
distress over the weekend, while 
Hall, his dub colleague, has a 
pulled musde dose to the groin. 
Duggan, the Bristol wing, has 
dislocated a wrist and had his 
arm in a sling after the game. 


The postman has delivered 
two that, as usual, 

presage the end of the tennis 
year. One, fresh from Paris, was 
the 1986 edition of La Saison de 
Tennis (Hatier, 140ftancs), a 
beautifully illustrated hard- 
back. This is always the first, 
and brightest, of the annuals. 
Michel Sutter and his collabo- 
rators consistently jump the gun 
by reviewing the 12 months 
from one September to the next. 

The second harbinger of the 
year’s end was the report and 
accounts of the Lawn Tennis 
Association, whose annual 
meeting will be held at Queen's 
Cub on Friday. The top-table 
cast would be discreet to look 
forward rather than back. This 
has not been a good year, though 
lan Peacock has bad a business- 
like first 1 1 months as executive 
director. 

The British game may soon 
take a turn for the better. In 
1987, six pilot schemes will lake 
the Indoor Tennis Initiative out 
of harbour. Briefly, this involves 
the expenditure of about £22 m, 
over five years, by the LTA, the 
! All England Club (Wimbledon), 
the Sports Council and local 
authorities. The project is de- 
signed to increase playing facil- 
ities — and broaden the game's 
mass appeal — by accelerating 
the construction of public, pay- 
and-play centres with junior 
development programmes. 

There are great hopes, too, for 
foe inaugural Mortgage Corp- 
oration national league (a men’s 
team event), for the expanded 
network of “ratings" tour- 
naments, for continuing benefits 
from the children's mini-game 
known as short tennis, and for a 
variety of other schemes to 
tempt more people to play 
tennis — and help the best of 
them to graduate to the inter- 
national circuit. 

Many of us, though, are 
growing grey on promises. The 
effort and expense of stocking 
the shop are not much use 
unless there is an exerting 
window display to attract cus- 
tomers — and 1986 was a 
soberingand, at times, humiliat- 
ingyear for British players. 

The Davis Cup ream had an 
admirable win over Spain but, 
against Australia, had the rare 
experience of losing a tie before 
winning a set The women took 
only one set from three matches 
with Denmark (by no means 
world-beaters) in the Federation 
Cup and only two sets from 
seven matches with a makeshift 
United States team in the 
Wightman Cup. 

In foe European Cup com- 
petitions, both teams retained 
first division status. This re- 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


fleeted more credit on the men 
than it did on the women, who 
had to play three more lowly 
ranked teams and beat only one 
of them. 

Virginia Wade and John 
Lloyd retired from serious inter- 
national competition and there 
are no successors of comparable 
quality. Lloyd was the only 
British man to win more than 
one singles match in any of the 
Last four grand slam tour- 
naments. Jo Durie and Anne 
Hobbs each had a total of six 
singles wins in grand slam 
events, compared with three 
each by Sara Gomer and 
Annabel Croft- 

Miss Durie (three times 
champion), and Miss Hobbs 
(once champion and twice run- 
ner-up) continued to dominate 
the four-year-old national sin- 
gles championship and, in har- 
ness, have won all four national 
doubles titles. They remain 
Britain's most effective big- 
occasion players. 

A few related feels may be 
helpful during those inevitable 
Christmas quiz games. Since the 
Second World War (precisely, 
from 1955 to 1984), 11 British 

players (eight women and three 
men) have won a total of 33 
titles — plus one that had to be 
halved because there was no 
time to play the final — in the 
grand slam lournaments of 
France. Wimbledon, the United 
States and Australia. That 
shared tide, foe 1969 Australian 
mixed doubles, gives Ann Jones 
the slightest of advantages over 
Miss Wade. Both won seven 
championships. 

The British women cham- 
pions were Mrs Jones (three 
singles and four doubles). Miss 
Wade (the same), Angela Morti- 
mer (three singles and one 
doubles), Shirley Bloomer (one 
singles and two doubles). Chris- 
tine Truman (one singles and 
one doubles), Angela Buxton 
(two doubles), Susan Barker 
(one singles) and Anne Shilcock 
(one doubles). Only Miss 
Bloomer and Mrs Jones won 
titles in all three events: singles, 
women’s doubles, and mixed. 

There cannot be many people 
at the average tennis gathering 
who can name ail those players 
— nor many who could retail the 
three British men in the same 
elite. They were Lloyd (three 
mixed doubles), Roger Taylor 
(two men’s doubles) and Billy 
Knigbi (one mixed). Knigbt, 
incidentally, became the most 
successful product of an LTA 
junior development plan in- 
troduced in 1949. Since then, 
the most recurrent commodity 
on the assembly line has been 
rust. 


HOCKEY 



iLfU 

III 


} yg » | ] 


foe Italian dub, Panini Modena, 
15-6, 15-6, 15-4, at foe weekend. 
Polonia face the Italians in the 
return leg in London on 
Saturday. 

in foe Royal Bank English 
league, Liveqwo! City won their 
games against Malory and Cap- 
ital City, both 3-2. 


SHOWJUMPING 


Olympia success vital 
for British riders 

ByJeflHyMacArthnr 

If British riders are to make Raffles Airborne. They reached 
any impact on the European the second round but bit a 
League for the Volvo World comparatively straightforward 
Cup, they cannot afford a repeat spread fence. Malcolm Pyrah, 


Draw will I Barcelona 

beckons 
Thompson 

by Sydney Friskm 

Robert Thompson, the 
London University centre for- 
ward, has been brought into the 
Great Britain junior squad of 24 
which has been called for train- 
ing at Crystal Palace from 
Friday to Sunday. Thompson, 
an expert at short comers, just 
missed selection for the junior 
World Cup tournament held Iasi 
year in Vancouver. 

A junior Great Britain team 
will be selected after this train- 
ing weekend to play as the 
Unicorns in the Los Reyes 
tournament in Barcelona from 
January 3 to 6. 

Thompson's dub, unable to 
field a full side because of 
illness, forfeited their Surrey 
Cup match on Sunday against 
Guildford, who thus kept their 
chances alive of a place in the 
national dub championship for 
foe Hockey Association Cup. 


deaux qualifier where John round course was too straight- 
Whi taker and Milton wens the forward, was one of only 15 out 
ozdy ones to reach the 10, of35 who failed to dear it (West 

The Olympia show in Loudon Germany’s Paul Schockemohle, 
this weekend marks the half- on Deister, shared the 
way stage in the II qualifying distinction), 
rounds for the World Cupu At Again there were reasons, 
the end of the series the top 16 Pyrah is resting his top horse, 
riders in the league qualify for T owerlands Anglezarke, and Di- 
tbe final in Paris in ApriL amond Seeker, his Bordeaux 
Britain usually supplies at feast ride, had missed an outing at the 
five finalists bin, with only Peter Brussels show the week before 
Charles (sixth) and Nick Skelton after injuring a leg. 

(15th) in the top 16, points at In contrast, the French riders 
Olympia will be crucial if they — led by their national hero, 
are to qualify for Paris. Pierre Durand and Jappekmp. 

Not that they were short of whose win after five near- 
excuses for Sunday’s results, misses, almost brought the 
Leaving aside Whitaker and house down — excelled them- 
Next Milton, whose heroic sdves with five reaching the 10- 
performance was Britain’s sav- horse final j urn profit Although 
tog grace (they finished eigbtbX Durand is missing OJympia 

the other five riders had reasons because be has to compete in a 

for their average performances, national championship this 
Harvey Smith, who won a weekend, three on-form French 
good speed class on Sanyo riders are coming — Philippe 
Shining Example on the opening Rorier, Herve Godinon, and 
night, “ran out of steam” in Jean-Marc Nicolas — all of 
Sunday’s World Cup com- whom finished in the top 10 at 
petition where they had 12 faults Bandeaux, 
in foe second round. Smith With these and 12 other top 
maintains that horses need to do European riders competing at 
several World Cup shows in Olympia, which starts on Thurv 
succession to get properly fit and day. the British riders will need 
on form. to find their form quicldy. 

His Dutch-bred gelding had Excuses will not get them to 
not had an outing since Amster- Paris. 

Ham a month ago. If Shining -■ • 

Example needed more work, it IVfptonH fallrc 
was foe opposite with Michael tailk& 

Whitaker’s Next Amanda, who ■ The Nottingham Forest man- 
was on the strenuous three-week ager, Brian Gough, is keeping a 
tour of North America last pro-season pledge to start new 
month. Clearly tired, Whitaker contract negotiations with 
withdrew her after hitting two Johnny Metgod. Despite the 
early fences in the first round. impending arrival of ihe Norwe- 

Apart from John Whitaker, gian international, Ossie 
Robert Smith, Harvey’s eldest Osvold, which will give Forest 
son, had the most reason to be three foreign players - the 
pleased with his performance. Dutch goalkeeper, Hans Segers. 
His Irish-bred horse. Belie Har- completes foe trio - Clough said 
hour, bought earlier tins year, is he wants Metgod to stay at the 
only seven, but gave little sign of City ground, 

his inexperience with two cob- 

fident rounds - it was only the r a l|i n o it a dnv 
difficult upright at fence 10 L-ailmg II R Hay 
which caught him out in foe first Peter Cooper, vice president 

jump-off. of FISA, is to retire next 

Nick Skelton was also relying summer as chief executive of the 
on a less experienced horse in RAC Motor Sports Association. 



maturity in the 13-a- 
before a nation-wide 
audience. The remaining ties 
will be played on Sunday. 

If all the form horses win, the 
semi-finals should be contested 
between Bradford Northern, 
Widnes, the holders Wigan and 
the winners of a contest which 
defies forecast, at St Helens. 


ATHLETICS 

Mamede steps 
into Cardiff 
cross-country 

Alberto Cova, the Olympic 
10,000 metres champion, has 
withdrawn injured from this 
year’s International Athletes' 
Club cross-country race in Car- 
diff on December 20. However, 
the international challenge to 
Britain's world-class cross-coun- 
try runners will still be main- 
tained by the addition to the 
field of Fernando Mamede, of 
Portugal, and Mark Nencrw, of 
foe United States (Pat Butcher 
writes). 

Mamede is foe 10,000 metres 
world-record bolder, and Ne- 
now set the third fastest time in 
history, and an American 
record, in Brussels in Septem- 
ber. In the race around the 
grounds of Cardiff Castle, they 
win meet Tim Hutchings, who 
won the Gateshead cross-coun- 
try 10 days ago. Lends, Steve 
Binns, Dave Clarke, mid Ed 
Eyesione, another American. 
The women's race will include 
Wendy Sly, Yvonne Murray 
and possibly Kifsty 
McDermott, and the Ameri- 
cans, Mary Knisdy and Brenda 
Webb. 

• John Treacy, of Ireland, re- 
tained his Barbados 10km road- 
race title in 29nun 27sec. 


Workman fills 
vacant 
West berth 

By Joyce Whitehead 

Following the recent terri- 
torial inter-county champion- 
ships, the bsl three territorial 
teams have been announced 
with few changes. In foe West, 
Angy Wright and Jeanette 
Smith find themselves in the B 
team and the retirement of 
Susan Slocorobe has made way 
for Sara Workman, the Wilt- 
shire player who was outstand- 
ing in the tournament matches. 

The North has two players 
promoted to Great Britain, JiU 
Brown and Gill Atkins, both 
from Yorkshire, while Linda 
Carr has retired. 

The East, are two short owing 
to the Great Britain commit- 
ments of Julie Cooke, the goal- 
keeper, and Vicki Dixon. They 
have also lost Caroline Fry to 
the Midlands and Helen Bastian 
appears in the B team. Lorraine 
Farrell, the B XI goalkeeper, has 
been promoted. 

The North’s second XI tour- 
nament was played at foe week- 
end when Yorkshire beat 
Sheffield League 1-0 in the final 
to take first place. Cheshire and 
Lancashire drew 0-0 and elected 
to share third place as light was 
fading too fast for a penalty 
stroke play-off 

WEST; J Wtttms (Dorset). 9 Motto 
S Franks 


NORTK 

Crook (LanasrHre).)C 
A Goatnn (Lano&WB), N Mx (Durham), 

(Sheffield league). Q Huggod 


(Essex). 8 lister 
Newton (Norte*). 8 “ 
shrt), A SfcaniwJH 
Tajptor (Ksnt). T waco 











36 


SPORT 


THF TIMES TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 


Ballyregan Bob goes fo r his 32nd successive victory 

The dog that defies belief 


By Simon Barnes 

Ballyregan Bob is a beautiful 
anima l, beantifhl as any racehorse 
wen if his sport is a little down- 
®atet He wears the stripes of a 
tiger in amber and black, a white 
tip to his tail, and eats pricked 


attention. He is on the verge of 
beco ming the gre a tes t greyhound 
ever to chase a lore. 

He has won his last 31 races — 
31 “off the neeP as the dog-men 
say. Tonight at Hove he goes for 
his 32nd successive victory. That 
weold be a world record. If he wins 
— and he is 5 to 1 on to do it — he 
wiD beat the record set by an 
American dog called Joe Dump in 
1979. “Yeah, but some of fc 
Damp's last races were against 
rubbish — set-ups, yon know what 
I mean?” a greyhound insider told 
me. “Ballyregan Bob hasn't 
dodged a thing.” 

Tonight he takes on Low Sail, 
who has been burning np the track 


in Ireland, and another hot pros- 
pect called Calamity Kelly. Vic- 
tory in such a class is a real 
achievement To do it 32 times in a 
row defies not jnst the odds, hot 
betiet 

This is a great dog, no doubt 
about it Bnt more than that, it is a 
quite pbetssarenal feat of training. 
To mwfaiig the potential of a 
brilliant dog who, on three sepa- 
rate occasions was injured and 
never likely to race again — that 
takes some doing. Bnt there is 
more to it eves than that. 

The art of training is not about 
food and exercise, or rather, not 
jnst about that. The uncial factor, 
as any horse or dog man will tell 
yon, is to know exactly what your 
animal is capable of doing. George 
Curtis, who in the past five years 
has risen from being a mud 
respected trainer to the imd reputed 
master of the game, is responsible 
for Ballyregan Bob's spectacular 
trail of triumph. 


The dog was entered in the 
Derby and his owner had a decent 
bet on him. The Greyhound Derby 
Is, naturally, the year’s top event, 
and Bob seemed to have a good 
chance. Bnt Cartis made a derision 
to poll him out He had been 
gettfrig into trouble with crowding 
when he raced over the fbnr-bend 
Derby distance and collecting 
injuries. He was not quite test 
enough to keep dear of tramps and 
knocks in soot a class. “He’s a 
six-bend dog,” Curtis said. “Well 
keep him tor the St Leger.” 

“A lot of people thought 1 was 
mad at the time,” Curtis said. But 
that was the start of Ballyregan 
Bob's great sequence. He can ran 
six bends at four-bend pace and 
nothing can live with that. He 
polls dear of the pack on the 
second bend and then many start 
guessing bow much hell win by. 
He bolds a ridiculous 16 trade 
records at the moment But tor 
Curtis’s understanding of his abil- 


ities, he would have been a beaten, 
perhaps a seriously injured dog 
that once had a crack at the Derby. 

Julia Baines of the Greyhound 
Star, tiie sport’s top publication, 
said: “The thing about George is 
that he is never greedy. If be 
doesn't think toe dog is ready, he 
won't take a chance. He'S wait. He 
really does pat the dog firot. That . 
is why Ballyregan Bob is not just a 
good dog, bat a great one." 

“I've got good owners, great 
staff, marveuoos kennels and 
gallops,” Curtis said. “Their food 
Isas good asmven to any dog in 
the country. They never want for 

nothing. You keep them happy and 

(bey’ll run for yon all right.” 

Bob Him«u>If, bright-eyed and 
sharp-eared, spiffing tor 

rabbits. Yesterday morning he saw 
one and fore off alter it With 
remarkable good sense for a 
greyhound in fofl he didn’t 
try leap straight through the 
wire fence in front of him. So the 
grand tflt at the record remains on. 



One man and his dog: the winning combination of Ballyregan Bob and his trainer George Curtis 


YACHTING 


White Crusader 
stays in fifth place 

From Keith Wheatley, Fremantle 

h 

jfjj 


White Cru- 

r „ sader gained a 
... comfortable win 
over Canada II 
-0\A yesterday to 
maintain joint 
,? fifth place in the 

points table. USA is in the same 
position after her dramatic win 
over Dennis Conner in Stars 
and Stripes. 

In terms of Fremantle 
weather, yesterday’s races were 
unusual. White Crusader began 
her contest with 27 knots of 
breeze across the deck but by the 
second beat it had dropped to IS 
knots. Surprisingly, it was on 
that leg that Harold Cudmore 
and the White Crusader crew 
were aide increase their lead by 
one minute. There was a major 
wind shift but, according to 
navigator, Phil Crebbin, it was 
not the reason for Crusader 
trebling her lead. 

“It was a pretty gradual swing 
round to 195 tom 210 degrees. 
We were just playing the small 
shifts as they went left,” Crebbin 
said. “Generally we worked the 
shifts better than he did but 
nothing dramatic. It was simply 
a question of our boat going 
tester." 

The start was divided pretty 
evenly between the two yachts, 
with a lsec margin to Cudmore. 
As helmsman, Chris Law, 
steered the yacht through the 
choppy first work be was able to 
secure a 37sec advantage at the 
top mark. 

That eased to 29secs at the 
first leeward. White Crusader 
always somewhat off the pace 
downwind However, once the 
margin reached a minute and a 
half after the third leg. the 
British never looked bade and 
eventually won by a touch under 
four minutes. 

Heavy weather is forecast for 
today’s race against America IL 
“Anything over 23 knots will 
suit us down to the ground 
against that boat” Crebbin said 
“The boat’s going well it’s just 
up to us to do the business.” 

USA won her crucial race, 
leading Conner all around the 
race course. The main con- 
sequence of the defeat is an 


e x traordinary logjam of four 
yachts, at standings from third 
to sixth, within a three-point 
range of each other. They are 
battling for the last two semi- 
final places. New Zealand and 
French Kiss are solid at the head 

of the table. 

Stars and Stripes has only two 
tough races oat of the five 
remaining; against French Kiss 
and White Crusader. Dennis 
Conner should be able to handle 
those comfortably. Both yachts 
are in a heavy-air mode, so even 
a freakishly light day like yes- 
terday should not put him out. 

America n has tough races 
against White Crusader and 
New Zealand Today’s, against 
White Crusader, is the pivotal 
match for both yachts. A loss 
the British would mean 
l without a win against the 
Kiwis, unlikely on there present 
form, the unthinkable happens 
and the New York yacht Cub 
are home for Ch ristmas. 

White Crusader needs to beat 
both America n and one of New 
Zealand or Dennis Conner to 
finish in the final four at the end 
of the round-robin. 

DEFENOER SERIES RESULTS: Kooka- 
burra III M Kookaburra II. OMn 26soc; 
Austria Wbt Steak W Kidney, 226. 
DEFENDER SERES STANDINGS 

V L Ph 

Kookaburra ID 23 2 44 

AustraBa IV __________ 19 6 38 

Kookaburra 11 15 10 28 

Steak 'n' Kidney 1 24 6 

CHALLENGER SERES RESULTS: Airier- 
lea II M Itataa. retrod; Canada II bt Azzurra. 
3m In 50 sbc; New Zealand M French Mss. 
4:43: Eagle bt GhaBenga France. SOS: 
Stare and Stupes m Heart or America. 
1:32; USA bt White Crusader. 0*3. 

CHALLENGER SERIES CTANDMG8 

W L Pts 

New Zeeland _________ 27 1 128 

— 22 E 34 

— 17 11 93 

— 22 6 80 
— 18 10 79 
— IB 10 79 


Stars and Stripes . 
French Kiss - 

America H 

Whlta Crusader _ 
USA 


Heart of America 
Eagle 


Canada n 14 14 87 

Itafia 13 15 51 

8 20 4g 

9 19 38 

3 25 11 

France 2 28 2 

RACES; Canada U v USA; 
Azzurra v New Zealand; Eagle v Stas and 
Stripes: White Crusader v America R; 
French Kiss v Heart of America; Itataa v 
Challenge France: Kookaburra DvKooka- 
buna 111: Steak 'nr Kidney v AustraBa IV. 


Azzurra 
Chall 
TODA 


Kiev crown a fine year 

By Simon O’Hagan 


Dynamo Kiev’s remarkable 
year ended in suitably dramatic 
style on Sunday when they 
retained their Russian champ- 
ionship with a 2-1 win over their 
closest challengers. Dynamo 
Moscow, in front of a crowd of 
100, 000. 

The match could hardly have 
provided a more thrilling climax 
to the Russian season. Kiev bad 
to win to make sure of the title: a 
draw ora defeat would have left 
Moscow as champions. In the 
event, the greater experience of 
the Ukrainians tokl, goals by 
Rats and Belanov giving them a 
2-0 lead at half-time. Moscow 
replied through their 19-year- 
old forward, Kolyvanov, but 
Kiev hung on to finish one point 
ahead of their opponents and 
two ahead of another Muscovite 
dub, Spartak. 

Kiev and Dynamo Moscow 
had identical records of 14 wins, 
11 draws and five defeats, but a 
rule introduced fere the 1986 
season ensured that Kiev kept 


their title. Under the system, a 
team do not score a point for a 
draw once they have drawn 10 
games in a season. But Kiev 
were exempted because they 
supplied so many players to the 
Russian side at the World Cup 
finals. 

Having had their games sus- 
pended while the team was in 
Mexico, Kiev were forced to 
catch up on a huge backlog of 
fixtures. 

The championship represents 
a personal triumph for the Kiev 
manager. Valery Lobanovski, 
who, after leading the team to 
victory in the European Cap 
Winners’ Cup earlier this year, 
was appointed the Russian na- 
tional manager. Using the Kiev 
team virtually en bloc, he has 
been responsible for some 
outstanding performances this 
year. As if that were not enough, 
Lobanovski has also led Kiev to 
the quarter-finals of the Euro- 
pean Cup. 


RESULTS AND LEADING POSITIONS 


ARGEHTMAM: River Plate 3, Rosario 2; 
Racing Chib Z hstituto (Cordoba) Z 
Ghnvsfa Esgrima la Plata 1, Depqravo 
EBpanolO: Union I.TamariayO. 
aiGlAlfc Ghent 1. Anmp 1: Bmereri 1. 
FC Uage 0; Anderiecht Z Bruges O; 
Charter^ Z Bearedwt 1; RWDM 1. 
Lokaren Z Kortrfc 0, Racing Jet 2 
1. Meehan 2 Berehem 0, 
1 4; Bruges 1, Standard Lina 0. 
j poaWons 1. Anderiecht, p 14. 
J*s 24;2. Bruges, 14, 21; 3, bokeren. 14, 

CZECHOSLOVAK; Bohemians Prague 1. 
Sigma Otomouc ft ; RH Cheb 3. Dynamo 
Ceska BuMovics 3; Vltkovfce 1, Fbstlka 
Ktra ft Did* Banska Bystrica 4, Sbartafc 
Tmava 1 ; ZBtna 2. Ban* Ostrava 1 ; Tafran 


LUXEMBOURG: Gravwunacher 4. 
Paanga Z Mesparange 4, Rad Boys 2 
Beggen 1. WMz 0: Erschon 1. Spaa 3c 
Union Luxembotau 1, Esch Z Medaream 
a Dudefange 1. Landtag p o s Mo ne; 1, 
Each, p 13. pts 24; 2, Beggen. 13. 21; 3, 
Spore. 12. 16. 

PORTUGUESE: Gulmaraes 2. 

Ptxttmonense 0; Banfisa Z Dokmo n o es ft 
Eton ft Sporting 3; Rio Aw 3. Sataiebo* 
1; Chaves 1. Academfca 1: BoaSaa 0, 
Varzim 0: Fansrs ol, Braga ft Maritime 1, 


13. 2ft & Porto. IS. 21;3. Gubnaraus. 




SPANISH: AUMco Madrid 1. Real Madrid 
1; Escort 1, VafiadoW ft Murcia 2, 
Athletic Btrao ft Sporting G4on 2, 
SabadeM 1; Zaragoza 1. Cteflz ft Real 
Sooectsd 1. Santander 1; Real Beds 1. 




15. 


DUTCH: Groningen 0, Max 3; Fayanoonj 
ft Dan Boscti SUtrectii ft Zwofc ft az 
AH onaar V Twnta Enschede l : FOrtuna 
Stand ft Roda JC Karfcrade 2: Deventer 
Z Den Haag ft Sparta Ranadam ft 
Excelsior Rotterdam 2; Vonto ft PSV 

ft VMndam 0, Haarlem ft 

:1. AJax.pl - 


L(N 
PSV. 1 




3, Feyanoord. 
1. 




1. Toulon ft Rennes" 1, Nice ft Bordeaux 
8, Ute ft Soeftaux ft Metz ft La Havre ft 
Racks® Club Paris ft Nancy 1. St Edema 
ft Pa* St Germain 1. Auxsrra 0: Lana ft 
Laval ft MarsaOto ft Etaast ft LaaMng 


^^■Afxteo 1. OagorasO; ArtaO. Verb 
1; Dora ft Ylannkn ft EtonBtos ft 
Panlonios 3; trakfis 0, OJympiakos Z Oh 
ft Larisa 1; ParaNnaOns ft Kaiamarta 


Majorca ft 03asmv ft Barcekaia ft Laa 
Palmas ft SeriBe 1. L u affi n gpcaMo aa : 1. 
Barcelona, p 1ft pts 24; 2. Real Madrid, 
1ft 21 : 3. Attofca Madrid. 16. 2ft 
RUSSIAN: Final p oateow * 1, Dynamo 
Kiev, p 30. pta 3ft ft^rono Moscow. 3ft 
3 8: 3. Sp anak Moscow, 3ft 37. 

TURMSH: Fanarbahce ft Besfttes 1; 
Gatotasarey ft Rtarspor ft Ti aba inapor 
4, Antalyaspor T: Bursas por 0, 
Zonguktakspor 0; Samsunspor ft 
Bokapor ft OtrarbaWrjporft KoeaaBspor 

Moenchengladbach 0; Fortune 
gwaaaklorf ft Bochum 4; Serial* ft 

Bayern Muifch ft Stuttgart 1. Bayer 

Leverkusen ft Beyer lietdxicen ft Mam- 
MmZSV Hsmowoft ITOntonO: 
Cotaffie 3. Winter Bremen ft Borusaia 
Dortmund 1. Sntracht Frankfurt 0. Lead- 
17, 




ft ABU, PACK Z Leadngnnaffinm- 1. Law**®". 17, 2ft 

1: RUtte ft Varda r Skopfe 1; 
Zawab 2, Sutteoka N»Se 2; 


LEAGUE OP RELAND: AlWona 1. Home 
Farm 2 Bray ft, S8oo 1; Cork 1. 
Bohemians 1: Limerick Z Watartord 4; St 
Patricks 1, Galway ft Shanvock 5. 
OundaK 0. Leading poshkasa: i. Watar- 
lord, p 8. pts 14; ft Shamrock B. 14; ft 
B ohanlanB.S.11. 


ft; 

Belgrade 

»iamo Zatreb 2, Sutfeaka Mag: 2; 

Zenfcaft Raiffii 
1; Staboda Tuzla i, Haktak Spat ft 
Spartek Submca ft Dinamo Vtakmrt ft 

- "itosksaswif 


CRICKET: TOUR MA NAGER T AKE S TOUGH LINE WITH ENGLAND’S CAPTAIN - WITHOUT LORD'S HELP 

Opener 
leads 
Sri Lanka 


Gatting apologizes, but long lie-in still 
brings a severe reprimand from Lush 


run spree 

Gwalior, India, (Reuter) —Sri 
Lanka's opening batsman 
Sidath Wettimunny made an 
undefeated 227 as Sri La nk a 
continued to score freely in the 
opening match of their tour of 
India against a Cricket Board 
President’s XI yesterday. 

The touring side declared at 
504 for four at tea after all the 
top batsmen had taken advan- 
tage of a weak attack. The 
Indian side will resume on the 
third and final day at 80 for one. 

Wettimunny, continuing 
from his overnight score of 1 13, 
readied the first double century 
of his career after lunch. He hit 
34 boundaries. 

The President’s team took 
just one wicket in in each 
session. Roy Dias was caught for 
81, including 14 fours, before 
lunch, and a Duleep Mendis 
thrash ended after he took eight 
fours and one six off the flagging 
bowlers in his 65. 

Both wickets were claimed by 
the leg-spinner Sunil Gudge, 
Krishnamachari Srikkamh, 
confident that defeat was a 
virtual impossibility, enter- 
tained the large crowd with an 
aggressive 31, before 
caught at short mid wicket 
Ravi Ratnayeke, when the 
President’s team batted. 

SRI LANKA: Rrst Innings 

S Weaknunny not out 227 

J R Ratnayeke c An*) Laib Gudge _ 38 
AGuruanghnc 

Raman Lamba b GutJgo 59 

RL Dias c Roman LamhaD Gudge — 81 
*L RD Mendis e and b Gudge — . — 65 

BSMadugaHenotoia 15 

Extras ftS. b 9, nb 5) 19 

Total (4 wkts dec) 504 

R J Ratnavako. D AranasM, A L da 
Sflva.fG da Alwto and B R Juraiqutfiy did 
not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-69, 2-194, MS8, 4- 
465. 

BOWLING: Ghai 1942-954); Singh 16-4- 
46-0: Raman Lamba 51-15-108-0; Gudge 
35-2-171-4; Srikkanth 193-27-ft Rajput 
10-3-250; Ann Lai 6-1-290. 

BID1AN CRICKET BOARD PRESBEHTS 
XI: Rrst Innings 

lOikkanflicOtosbRamayeka 31 

LS Rajput not out 29 

R Lamba not out 19 

Extras (to 1) 1 

Total (1 wld) 80 

BOWLING: Ratnayaka 9-2-19-0; 

Ratnayeke 9*43-1: da SSva 59-17-0. 


From John Woodcock 
Cricket Correspondent 
Melbourne 

The manager of the England 
tram , peter Lush, last night felt 
obliged to issue an unprece- 
dented statement, in which be 
said that the captain. Mike 
flatting, had been “severely 
reprimanded” for havin g oy cr- 
slepL thus missing the start of 
the match against Victoria last 
Saturday morning. Lush acted 
off his own bat here, without 
having been in touch with 
Lord’s. 

He said that it was completely 
out of character for Gatting to 
have done this, and that Gatting 
had apologized to the team. He 
stressed the need to create an 
atmosphere conducive to win- 
ning the Test series and 
maintaining harmony within 
the iwm- 

The manager thought it right 
that Gatting had come under 
criticism for what had hap- 
pened, but he did not accept that 
it would make it difficult, if 
future problems arose, of 
administering “justice on an 
equitable basis.” 

With die tour entering its 
most crucial phase — there are 
two Test matches to be decided 
between now and the New 
Year - this is a setback, brought 
about by a foolish mistake by 
Gatting, which he win always 
regret, and also, I am afraid, by 
one or two isolated attempts to 
crucify him. 

All that was needed was a 
prompt and frank apology in the 
first place for what had 
occured — from both captain 
and manapr — and for the cap- 
tain to say that he had slapped 
on himself a healthy fine. But it 
is now easy to ray that 

As it is, Gatting. a hero after 
England's victory in Brisbane, 
finds himself publicly admon- 
ished as no other captain that I 
can think of ever has been. The 
trouble is — and it is ironic that 
it should be so —that, in 1986, 
despite the permissiveness of 
the age, it is more important for 
a touring captain (largely be- 
cause of the pressure of the 
media) to be like Caesar’s wife 
than it ever was for, say. Lord 




Lash: not pleased 

Tennyson in India in the 1930s 
or Walter Hammond in Austra- 
lia in 1946-47. 

Gatting had the captaincy 
thrust upon him. When offered 
itin June, he was doubtful about 
accepting, knowing, p erh aps. 
that vigour and unlimimi 

enthusiasm were one thing and 
the qualities of leadership 
another. 

I am certain, however, that he 
has all the right instincts. From 
now on, it will be a test of his 
team’s loyalty — quite as much 
of his own character — to see 
that the ranks dose around him 
It is said that, among the team, 
there were players who wanted it 
made quite plain that there 
should not be one Title for the 
captain and another for every- 
one else. They had their point, 
and those who desired it have 
got their pound of flesh. 

As for the match against 
Victoria. England’s cricket yes- 
terday, like the weather, was 
nothing to boast about By dose 
of play, with one day left, 
Victoria were 296 for 6 in their 


second innings, giving them a 
lead of 1 34. 

At 1 12 for four, when Victoria 
were still SO behind. O' Done ell 
was put down at second slip — a 
straightforward chance to 
A they. O' Donnell went on to 
add 127 with Hlbbrrt and to 
77 himself — as forceful 
an innings as the hundred he 
took off MCC at the start of the 
last Australian tour to England. 

Hibbert. who batted from an 
hour before lunch until the end 
of the day, was also dropped — 
in his case at the wicket. 

The missing of O'Donnell, 
though not of Hibbert. who was 
past SO at the time, cost England 
the chance of a three-day vic- 
tory, which they could have 
done with to get themselves 
back on to the rails. 

Flaying in this vast, mostly 
deserted Mriinw on a sullen 
sort of pitch, with a limited 
attack and in horribly cold 
weather, is not. at the best of 
rimes, an exhilarating way of 
spending a day. and England 
played rather as thongh they 
expected it to show them up. 

Small did well, taking five for 
52 in 27 overs during the day, 
but Foster bowled too short, for 
much of the time off a reduced 
run. It was off him, though, that 
the two most important catches 
went down. 

Gaitrng also under-pitched, 
which was a waste of time at his 
pace once the batsmen had 
derided not to hook him oblig- 
ingly down long leg’s throat, as 
they did in Victoria’s first 
innings. It has also to be said 
that even the locals believe the 
umpires here take an unreason- 
able amount of convincing that 
a batsman is oul 

The day started well for 
England when Whatmore, a Sri 
Lankan exile who likes to get 
after the bowling — as another 
of that ilk, Mendis, does for 
Lancashire — mistimed an at- 
tempted hook. 

By lunch, Dodemaide had 
been leg-before, Jones caught at 
the wicket and Siddons caught 
at long leg. hooking. Nothing in 
the match has been better than 
Siddons's fielding in the covers 
or more di s ap pointing, for his 


admirers, than the way he was 
out twice in the same careless 
way. 

By sow. Hibbert was digging 
himself in and. soon. O'Donnell 
was growing in confident aggres- 
sion. One pulled drive for six by 
O’Donnell off Athey was a 
simply massive blow-. 

Like Whatmore, Hibbert ap- 
peared for Australia during the 
Packer years. He played ves- 
terday rather as another Vic- 
torian left-hander. Bill La wry, 
might have, and that is a high 
compliment. 

When O'Donnell got himself 
out just before tea, Frazer, who 
is also a left-hander and was 
batting with a chipped finger, 
came in and looked a real 
prospect for an hour or so. He 
has a bit of trouble “bruising the 
ball” at the moment, but I shall 
be surprised if be, too. does not 
win a cap one day. 

Frazer was caught at the 
wicket with 75 minutes left. But, 
though a new ball had not long 
been taken, that was England’s 
Iasi success of the day. 

VICTORIA: First Innings 101 (M W Gatting 
4 tor 31) 

jororal tarings 

DFWftn&norBcandbSmafl 43 

AlCDcdemaida bwbSmaO 24 

DM Jones c Richards t> Small 29 

P Albert not out — — 71 

,1 DSMtonsc sub b Small 3 


S P OTtoretafl st Richards b Edmonds 77 

IO Frazer cfitetentebSmaB 10 

MGDDdnatonanotout — 17 

ExtrasJb9.toS.nbS) 22 

Total (8 wkts) 296 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-60.3-106,3-107,4- 
112.5-239, 6-263. 

BOWLING: Snul 359-795. Foster 32-6- 
87-0, Gaffing 24-6-57-0. Edmonds 20-4- 
43-1. Attwy 40-25-0. 

ENGLAND: First tarings 283 (C W J Albey 
58, BN Frencti S8: A fC Doctanaida 4tor 
76L 

Rebels bowled out 

Johannesburg. Reuter— 'The 
rebel Australian cricketers were 
dismissed for 149 in their 
Umiled-ovm match against 
South Africa yesterday. The last 
wicket fell to the final ball of the 
innings, which was reduced 
from 50 to 40 overs by rain. 


HANDBALL 


BRTH8H LEAGUE: BrtontUHd 10. Uwerpool 
21; -82 13. Tryst 77 17; Woftw Poly 63 

24. Olympia Cannock 24; &sat Dana 22. 

SKLtSH^IAIlONAL WOMBTS LEAGUE: 
waken*) Mataos IS, A**) Eagles 14. 


ATHLETICS 


HONOLULU MARATHON: 1 , 1 Hussein (Kan) 

2:11:44 (record); 2. S Nwartrifran) ftlSrtft 

ft G Shahanga (Tan) 2:1557. WoOWfC C 
Buerakerm JNetti]£3l:02 (racord). 

‘ OTHQffc 1, P MoIhs (Can) 
22424. 10km: 1.J Treacy ftol 2S27. 
FLORENCE MARATHON: 1, A GtaBng (GB), 
21SSTBOC. 

ST ALUMS MARATHON: 1, & Lanbowna 

and HowpL 231 :4& ft A PflUeo 

end Hove). 231.55; ft T TuleU 

and Haw), 23159. Team: BlgMan 

Hove. 54pa. Woomr 1, A Cooper 

- ‘ 25152. 

1. A 

SMmen (VM 238.10: Z S Hemes 

, 24155: 3. n Dance (Wadi 
248X5. 

1, PCkaatta 

. ft P 

We8>(Woodksd Greer* 3&1.-&N Nmpion 

— - 31:42. T«k I. Thurrock 

1,0 Held (Thonudg. 

3735. 


S Hants 

2000.7. 

A- A M 


(Baigrwra HL : 

Nomads 24P&.I 


FOR THE RECORD 


JUDO 

PARIS: ^Europe e Astar^Wtaj^T Khazrat 

PROW (Ft). SoW 

Kyong Ke A le o p Korea). Ippon: Y 

to (Jap) bt B Carabaos (Ft), born. 71kg: H 
Kamoaya (Jut bt S Btrara Wq. boon; T 
Kogaftap) WM Alexandra (Frt. dec. fits: M 
Nowak Vb«w Soo-<*o(S Korea). 

F Wlemka (WG) M N Hkage UnL dee. 

P SetaoftJBCher (Auttrta) bt H Mlyoct 
topon: F Caw (Fl) bt Yonq Soo Lm |S 

irica. 9Sftp R vai de i 

HETBALL 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: BeOadshtae 25. Herts 

38; South Starts 2A Surrey 61: Btaringhafn 

44. Mdcaram 3ft Essex Msl ■ * 


RUGBY UMON 



BENEVBdft, Mr- B Man ado n a fc toty A 

ScoUand2A 

DEVON CUftFfc i t Bran t Ennoutti 1ft Baron 

8 Cornwall Pol 22; Trrwton 10, Torquaif Affi 

10 (Torquay wta on away rub). 

IE CtIR Ftaat Muafc Thsmae ft 
14. 

. CUft TMvd rocacta PatsmouA 
44. UBmrti 0: WlnchesMr7. Alton 2A 
KENT CUP: Second im± Btackhaatfi A 

~ Dartforctora B. Bnwnlsy & CM 

.. s ift Therwt Wanda a 

SUSSEX CUP: Second nwnd: Lems 17, East 


Grtrewad 9: OM Bntfiton «a ns 0, H owe 34, 

^^^■^raCHAMPIONSHR^H 


36. 


COLMTY COLTS 

CamtxkkjeMraft 
CLUB MATCH; London Hessttel tA Guy's 
HixrtriSL 

SCHOOLS MATCHES: Bancroft's 3. 


41. 


Mdaod, 2B234; ft P OavitaHato, 


BASKETBALL 


CARLSECRG NATIONAL LEAGUE: Ftaat OM- 

•Jon. Pbfrorf KtagsKn 101 {Darts SB. 

BontragerzOL BCP London 884PoSo21.Bett 
21 iSharp Manchester Unfed ifc (Brown 1ft 

Jones 18, PMtae 17L HFS Portsmouffi 02 

(Cumghani ST Tsffiam 1ft Moore 16): 
Happy Eoiar Bracknell Pirates 116 

(Scandabuy 30. Rmre 27L Itag VWdy 

Sundertand 1D4 (Saunders 4ft Nonage m 

Btarnlngharn BlAote 108 (Hays 29. Shoddore 

2ft Brancfi 25), HameSpare Bofton 87 
(Cros&y 4ft Jonlan 16L aSdeidato 89 (Blum 

27. Fiway 21 L BPCC Rems Derby 66 [Sewel 

r&^^BUCA: Nadoaol Ai eo c l rtta w 

(NBA): Portland TW Biamrs 107. New Ymb 

Kncks 104 (OT); Los Mprfes Lakers 132. 


! aft Covertry/- 


Gretner Manchsoar 21. South 

Durham 1ft Htmbsnnde 13, Laics 13; 

HuCTbersMa 16. Greater Manchester IS; 
HumhorsIdB 1ft s Ourtarn ft Lace 1ft 

Greater Manchester 14; Lotas 19. Soufli 

Durham 16c Lancs 2ft S Yorks 28; Lancs 27. 

Nods 22: S Yorks 2ft Nods 28; Northern 41. 

E Essex 4ft Oxon 30, Csmtn 26; Hansnrire 

North 41, Berkshire 29; Gloucs 37, Worcs 15. 


2ft Bishop's SSxtkrd 10. Colchester RGS 4; 

Bunders 24. OM Bfc.'riillans 12 CantW ft 

PTymoutti 15; Ceterhsm 13, Sultan Vteenos ft 

ChKheenr HS ft Serirrd 4; Codes B, Btoam 

ft CoMon'a (j. rang Edward's, Bate 21; 

Cranbnx* 31. Bethany ft Dartfard GE 3ft 

Coopare 4; Downskle 12, Monmouth 1ft 

Durham 31. Scad's (NSW) ft Eaeffioume ft 

Old Eastbourntans 2ft Edoibrsuh Academy & 
FW»8 7; Rotated 1*Gu»<^ 

RGS 12. ChMe hurat and SWcup ft 
Frier 8ft Hab- 

Bstree 1ft Berkhamstad 


GS ft Hppsrhotam GS A. 


RACKETS 


TOfUnDGE: Terris end Rscfeeis Associa- 

tion u Tonbridge SchooL 2ft (T and RA 
names Orel) R Often B rewro o and C Wflridga 
HJ Lonriy and J Nance. 1513. 154. 15ft 
159; S Kromdsl and A Schweszer bt D 

Pentou and SToseiand.l5A 155, 157, 15 

1ft 


Ccnmnuy 28. Lorribordugh^^B 
btodon 11 . VWrabteddi Co* 3: lOngX I 

ter 3A Whttafrtm ft lone’s. Maocwl 

King's. ROdiasW 19. 

^EkrOtoroesiar 19.MM 


REAL TENNIS 


OXFORD: Go 


GOLF 


(US K cnIeaa stateeft 285s J Inkster and T 

Purtzen 28ft VSfckmerandMHiABrt 27ft N 

I Lopez and C Strange: S Little and M Sriwrc 

Z71: H Stacy end 5 Haas: L Gaibecz and C 

■jtezn: D Money and M McCurtra: 

Meuse and L Hx C WaOw end R 


SLUSRagnrjffi 

(Airi and P McGown; P FUz (Ante and B 
UPPW- 


ICE HOCKEY 


: Ayr Brotaa 0. Ncwindiron Panthers ft 

kin A Duritam VS'feaps 4; Mumytoid 

■■ 13. Straaffiam Redsidra A Scodey: 

AyrBrriaa Streattiatn Hedddns A Oundnl 

Roetaaa A Hto F^are^TOuh^ 


^■asTUarayfletd Racers 12. 

Noongham PMhera ft SoBxN Barons 9. 
OevaSn d Bombers A Rrst DMMo re Batur- 
^^Btadmool Seroub 9. Peterboroud* 
14;&ngow Eenlu 1ft Slough JeteT: 
Li WBdcab A Kirta** Kestrels ii; 
[ Ttoere 14. OxlonJ Cky Stare 2. 

TraflonJ Mens 5. B te dwool 
■ft Bounemouh Stem 4. T^tanl 
■; (nine Wlnge 7. 9ou3) Jen ft Lea 
[Uan 10 . Iridway Bears 4; Peterixx- 

^■17, SoutnemptenJI 


gush Ptaa 
RkAmond 


friars 1, KhtaaUy KesMs 1 


SPEEDSKATING 


0p« singles cMHpHMBta: Ouartar-ftrim: 
F WEs (Manchester) trt P Dawes (Seecowt), 

51; Laid WBaughby de Brake bt S Soroer- 

¥*e. 8ft CDeahbtC Barnes. 5ft J Wad btG 

Bakv. 52. 1 sii 4 ItealS IMBs bt WHocihby 

de Brake. 51: Want M Dean. 53. RnebWBHs 

gy^^Briffiri.rorin.ptete,,: 

Sen5firrir N Oenby and M Mctariugh bt M 

FaMbams and R Pence. 53. 51:W FAberns 

and A Pagebt P Dandy and D Brazier. 53, 5 

4. R®afc TeMssms and Page M Dntoy and 

McMunugh. 52. 51. 

~ HOCKEY 

! COUNTY CHAWONSMP: Qentei- 

Ll.CtwrturoZ. 

■BESS LOSDON LEAGUE: Can- 

bridoellnW 2. Bromley 3; Pnlay 0. Spencer 1. 
McfVrAN-S LAGER SOUTH LEAGUE: Re- 
otooM: KanqGiisseE Harden Russets 3, O 
WKamsomansil. 

COURAGE KENT CUft RM round: Fbfce- 

flUne 0. Camarbunr 3; Heme Bar ft Tube HN 

3. Second rounb MKhoinens 0, Gore Court Z 

SUSSEX CUP: Onartw ftrita Brigtaan 2, 

Herstnra 1: Mid-Sussex a Lome 4. 


SKIING 


VAL mSERft World Cop: Super grit 1. M 
WssmatarmC}, imki 4056eec: AffStacber 
m. V^414G; A M Gkerora (Lux). 1:4182. 
Owerel ■t at u mn e; i. P zwonggan (GMtz). 
75 o*b: 2. Weenrier, 8S; P MfltarJSwta). 51. 
IraMDER BAY. Onseric Wortd tax 80 m 
riri Ttop ptectroe: I , M Nykanen^ 1345 
artfiiSSmTaSTn; Z T Mauser (Wffl. 
127ft iiA0.235.7;AVQpa»gwte. 1260. 


Roffanslans ft 

ter RGS S, mmrnooa ft Bristol GS ft 

tatymw Upper ^Desboroirti AUwdsGS 

1ft Pock%iton ft London Ortnory 21, 

MWQip in radnow 7* uiyanston Mtoon 
Abbey 2ft Queen's. Taurin 14; Morion 
Combe 23. King's, Bnem ft Morrison's. 
Criofl 12. Gtaraknorai 38, Wormanton FH8 4. 

0EG8. WaJwOekJ 55: NoWngham HS 15. 

ft Oakissm ft Oppimhn 11;tW 
ftftJWnd bt G SwMard Hospital 7. Wrari ft Oratory 7. 
UUHMM|||^HSMpiaka ft Pangboume ft Magdalen C3 ft, 
Pates OftChettenham S2. WettweyO: Queen 




MeiVs. WabaB 35. King Edward's. UchfieM 

12: tei Brtsrtl A Prtor Park 17: Reigate GS 

1 19. Judd 4; Richard Hate 13. HUdn GS ft 

Rugby 17, Worths: Rurish ft CtaynTLorelon 
Freemen's 3; Bydel 1A Coriey KB 2ft Ryde 
A Enriey Px* IS; St Albans ML St 


Ednxxid's, Were 7; Si Brnkn Eaten 

- t amatol's 


Si George s. Weyfiridge 14; 

"■nali-211 0; St Erkwenf s, Oxtord 




2ft 


19. CheBenton ft st Gewge'x. Harpenden 

16. St l^utaus ft SI JoteVA Soudaea 3. Lord 

W texta worth 12; Si Lawrence 13. Sir Roger 

ra, York 22.Hwner , s ft 
ftSaveiioeks 4, Falcon 
ihebbear IS. Old 
. erbo me 2 


(Zimbabwe) 4: Shebbasr 
Shebbeartan# ift Shertxxno 3A CWon ft 


Bucktend ft TBn 2ft Chrris 

Tonbridge TftCUTOch ft Ttent 4S.I 

3; ThratA St Bonlteoa 12; Verutam A I 

ba RGB IS: Watengton HS ft Trl 

1ft Watford GS ii, Hangon 


Somerset ft 


CaiheffiN 7. aid weterriane 4; WMrift 2ft 
Ensam 4: Windsor 4. Eaten! 5ft WoodBriAw 
iftWng^. Byft WycSRs ft Chrwt, Brecon 3ft 


Wyrmrim 3, Fwiianghain 27. 


TENNIS 


GARLMGrrON: Dairiuaai Manorial Junior 


D Sft (l«. 7.11.1ft A R Faft-Larean (Nor). 
7:11^4. soon: (Fomdi recek 1. A KuroM 


TABLE TENNIS 


VOLLEYBALL 


(Japan). 382ft£D-na«oiteKten).3&74:3.F 
iRorrirq (Nor). 3890. 1,O0fac 1. P Jto»n. 
1:188ft 2. Kurahre. 1:17.77: 3. Boucher. 
l:7S_2a Womaa, ftOOtet 1. K JtoriJEGL 

B Blair (US), 41JZ0; Z C AaTtrirSrii), ■■ 

ll»5S 5 tWkre^; , ft^2iflwi. IjZtSS 

Rys-Ferens 1 33*0. MNOuc 1. Karri. 421 53: 
2.Birig.43a52;3.wnG«lrtp.4^7.1Z^ 


SCMLnavr BWnSM LEAGUE: Praarir 
ritetoR Butterfly Cordtfl 8, MBS St Neoca ft 
Ftaat dhMoreTtSDiteirisl. Dagenham FC . 
7: TSP Larkhse ft Express So^fijatenrid 

Want Wknnfcirike 1, Chen i 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Sita! WEWBJIi Word 1 * IIMuilw tantrien 


ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND NATIONAL 
LEAGUE: Men: Ffcn dtetoore MaDocy 2. 
Uveipoal Oly ft OBC Itoota ft Orito Ctay ft | 
Portsmouth ft Redwood LaMHetoH 

NwgMlQ ft Capital C8y ftl 
ft ifoKcasSa 3 


ft 

Corieaer ft No wc aafa 3 

Arsenal ft Bradford ft SouSsee ft 



Aahcombeft Sp ee d wNl ft 
Southgate ft SpS ft 
ROYALBAWSCOrnSH U 


52.5G.5ft 

PIUngkr^Mi 


- 1 cantoris Z MM ft- 

Falcon BacUcal 0. Dundw a Garish Barra 
3. Keyptart 1; KrroU Kteerft KhWlh Ptentft 
Women: Hret toMom SooOri Farm 3. 
taw^de 2 wneaan ft CartukaS; ftmteaft 


POOLS FORECAST by Pauf Newman 


Two weeks’ forecasts are 


Christmas post 

Saturday December 13 
inless stated 

FIRST DlVIStON 

XAVBavManU 
X Luton v Evorton 
2 Man C v West Ham 
2 Newcastle « Nottm F 
2 Norwich v Arsenal 

1 0PR v Chariton 
1 Sown v Coventry 

1 Tottenham w WaKcnd 

2 Wimbledon v Sheffield W 


l Bicester 
Uver- 


Noton 
v Oxford ( 
pool vCtrtsea 


SECOND DIVISION 
X Barnsley v Sundertnd 
2 Btacktxxn v OUtom 
iCPalacevHun 
X Grimsby v Stoke 
1 Leeds v Brighton 
1 MBwafi v Huddarsfld 
1 nymoulh v Derby 
X Rearing v Ipswich 
X Sheffield U w Portsmtfi 
1 Shrawsfary v Omrighm 

NtoOTeoqpans: Bradford 
City vWBA (Friday) 


THRDDIVtSKM 

1 Blackpool v Bury 

2 Bolton vGSBirrtiaro 
1 ChesmlH w GarJMe 

X Futoam v Mansfleld 

1 Nona Co v York 

2 Rotherham v Boumoorlh 
1 WaisaU v Darflngftxr 

1 VWgtei v Brentfoid 
Not oh ewvona: Bristol 
Rovers y “ 
day); 

Doocsstar Pan 
Chester (Sunday); Swin- 
don v Bristol City 
(Sunday). 

FOURTH DIVISION 
1 Cardiff v Aldershot 
1 Cotaheeter v Preston 
1 Crewe v Torquay 
1 Exeter v Traranere 
X Hartlepool v Wolves 
1 Hereford v Canto U 
X Lincoln v Swansea 
1 N tharnpton » Wrexham 

1 Orient vBunriey 

t Ratartnro v Hafiiax 

2 RocMMs vScuntfnrpe 
1 Southend v Stockport 

V-OPEL LEAGUE 
PREMIER DIVISION 

1 Fanttcro v Kingstonten 

2 Hayes v Yeovil 

2 Hitchin v Baridng 


TREBLE CHANCE (home teams): Aston Aberdeen, Hearts. R 

?w “ TO WsaH “’ 

octal. Utotatartiam. Ctyda. K&namock. 

r DRAWS: Sheffield 


X St Albans v Windsor 
X Wokingham v Hendon 
1 Wycombe v Didwlch 

SCOTTISH PREMIER 

1 Aberdeen w Htoemlan 

2 Clydebank v Dundee U 
1 Dundee v St RAran 

1 Hearts w Hamilton 

2 Motherael v Celtic 
1 Rangers vFafctak 

SCOTTISH FIRST 

1 Atadrte vBrachtai 
X Clyde v Q of Sth 
1 Duntoarin y DteifermBne 

1 Forfar v Partick 

X KBmamock v Morton 

2 Montrose v East Fite 
SCOTTISH SECOND 

1 Ayr v Cowdenbeath 
Not on coupons: East 
Stating v Meadowbank: 
Ralth v St John sbre ; 
Stanhsnir v Queen's Park; 
Stirling v Arbroath; 
Stranraer » Atoioa 
SCOTTISH FA CUP 
RRST ROUND 
Net aa caapans: Forres v 
Berwicfc ABoa v ftiueraess 
Catedon ta n (replay). 

Ayr. 
FOrest. 


asp 


United. Futoam. 

Unoati . Clyde. KHtnamock. 

HOMEft- Leeds, BtackpooL Notts County. 
Walsafl. Wlgov Southend. VVycornto, 


Oktoam, Bournemouth. 

RXB) ODDS: Homes: BiackpooL South- 
pud. Aberdeer. Hearts. Rangers. Away*: 
West Ham. Oldham. Celtic, Dram: Shef- 
field United, FUham, Lincoln. 


FIRST DnnSKM 

1 Arsenal V Luton 

2 Chariton « Liverpool 
2 Chetaaa v ToawBJsan 
1 EvertonvWtanblQdon 
1 Man U v Leicester 
INoffinFvSom 

1 Oxford v A VBa 
1 West Ham vQPR 
Not on cxropente Cov e ntry 
v Manchester Cfte (Sun- 
day): Sheffield Wednes- 
day v Newcastle (Sunday); 
Watford v Norwich (Friday) 

SECOND DlVIStON 

XKuddsraflduC Palace - 

1 Portsmouth v Bamstey 

Not on rtwpgftt g)fw 

mlngham v Sheffield 

Unded (Friday]; Brrtiton v 
Shrewsbury (Sunday); 
Derby* Grimsby r 
Hite v Mtewaa ( 

gwkto^u Plyrno 



X Moor Gm v WeHriribare 
X S CokffleJd v Forest G 


TmDDiviaoN 

1 Boumomri v Blackpool 

1 Bristol Cv Baton 

2 Bury v Walsafl 

1 Ne wport v Rotherham 

2 York y Futoam 

TREBLE CHANCE (home teems); 
Huddersfield. Torquay. Chortey. SaBe- 

bury. Moor Green. Sutton CoJdfrid. 

Hayes. FaSdrfc. Htoem la n, AWoru Nest 

beat BrecWrt. Partick. 

BEST DRAWS: Huddersfield, Torquay. 
Hayes. Htoemlan. Albion. 

HOMES: Evorton. Manchester. United, 
West Ham. Portsmouth, Newport, Pres- 


(Sunday): Carlisle v 

Derfngton v Fort Va4e 

(Friday): Doncaster * 

vwU 

FOURTH DIViaON 
1 Aidarehat » Crewe 

ICambUy Rochdale 

1 Preston v Orient 

1 Swansea v Colchester 

X Torquay v Peteiboro 

2 Wolv es vS ouffiend 
Not on coupons: Bunley y 
Cardiff (Friday); HaBfax v 
Hereford (Friday): North- 

(Friday): Stockport v 
Wrexham (Friday): 
Tramare v Harttepool 
(Friday) 

MUL-nPART LEAGUE 

1 Caernarfon v Workngtn 
X Chortey v Oswestry 

2 Winon v Bangor 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE 
PR&WERDIVtSUN 

1 Racfcftch v Fo ftanun e 
X Safcbury y Bedworih 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE 
MIDLAND DIVISION 

2 Bistort v Halesowen 
2 Brfcrtrth y Coventry Sp 


SOUTHERN LEAGUE 
SOUTHERN DIVISION 

1 Corinthian v Woodford 
1 Dowry WaterioovSe 
1 Dunstable vErith 
V-OPEL LEAGUE 
PREMIER DIVISION 


1 Bognorv 
XHayesv' 

V-OPEL LEAGUE 
FIRST DIVISION 

2 BOtoricay v L-Wtatgete 
1 Lewes v Finchley 
1 Uxbridge vlWwry 

SCOTTISH PREHER 

1 Caffic » Aberdeen 

1 Dundee U v Hearts 
XFagdrkv Dundee 

2 Hanteton v Rangers 
X Htoemlan vMoSiererti 

1 St Mirren v Clydebank 

SCOTTISH FIRST 

2 Brechin v Morton 
1 Dumbarton v Fbrtar 
1 Duntermlina v Ctvda 

1 Ea&t FHe v Atadrte 
1 SSS" 01 ® w Monaose 
T Parttak v Q of Sth 

SCOTTISH SECOND 

fflasaa, 

2 Arbroath V Raah 

iCcmtoenMiv Berwick 
1 Meadowbank v Ayr 
22j^5” Pk '» E SWn g 
1 St Jotntene v Stenh si re 

^3ssa. D ssss i asn; 

25? Evgr tofu West 

own, Portsmois*, Newport Premm. 
wriws: HuddeiofioW, Kuf. Tonjiay. 


TENNIS 

Qassgulf 
is too 
much for 
Swedes 

From Richard Evans 
New York 

The narrow but significant 
gulf that exists between Ivan 
Lendl and Boris Becker and the 
players ranked immediately be- 
low them was glaringly apparent 
In the semi-finals of the Nabisco 
Masters at Madison Square 
Garden. Lendl defeated Mats 
Wilander, ranked No 3 on the 
ATP computer. 6-4, 6-1, while 
Becker stayed on top of Stefan 
Edberg to beat the world’s No 4. 
6-4. 64. 

Neither Swede played badly 
and. during the course of stiff 
examinations in the round robin 
stage of the tournament, both 
had proved themselves worthy 
semi-finalists. Yet. like high 
jumpers asked to clear that tar 
one-inch higher, they found the 
extra leap that would have taken 
them into the rarefied air of a 
Masters final fractionally too 
difficult 

However, the apparent ease 
with which Lendl and Becker set 
up the ci*»h everyone has been 
waiting for is a trifle misleading. 
At this level inches and split 
seconds multiply over the 
course of a match to produce 
one-sided scores that cruelly 
magnify differences in skill, 
power and technique. 

It is on occasions like these 
that the psychological factor 
becomes paramount. The lower 
ranked player is constantly 
searching for the chance to sow 
one tiny seed of doubt in his 
opponent’s mind. Once it is 
planted, second services can 
become shorter and volleys 
more hesitant as the confidence 
to attack evaporates. 

But Lendl and Becker have . 
minds encased in steel and no 
matter how expertly they ' 
probed for openings. Wilander 
and Edberg found themselves 
thrown back like a crack in- 
fantry division sent into fight 
armour. 

Edberg made the better job of 
it Recovering from a bad start, 
the Swede actually managed to 
break Becker’s thunderous ser- • 
vice in the sixth game of the first j 
set and held break point against ■ 
the West German at 3-4 in the 
second. But again Becker re- 
sponded with a huge first ser- 
vice. It was this remarkable 
ability to produce bigger and ; 
bigger shots when confronted 
with the merest hint of a crisis 
that enabled him to win a match 
that took him to his second 
Masters final in 1 1 months. 

When a superb service return 
from Edberg took the score to 
30-all as Becker served for the 
match, the ginger-haired teen- 
ager came up with his eighth ace 
and followed it with an 
imreiumable first service on 
match point. Afterwards, when 
be was asked what he liked most 
about his own game, Becker’s 
eyes lit up. “Best of all 1 like 
being able to serve aces at 30- 
alL” He grinned. 

. Ominously for Lendl, Becker 
also admitted that he enjoyed 
playing the man he hoped to 
succeed as the world No l.“I 
like his rhythm,” he said. “It 
suits my game. You can play 
steady against him and not 
worry about any drop shots or 
funny tricks.” 

Lendl, whose form has been 
far better than he himself had 
expected after several weeks off 
with a troublesome hip. knows 
that be will have to produce a 
very special trick or two if he is 
to stop Becker extending his 
winning sequence against him to 
4-1 for the year. 

RESULTS: SamMlnalK I Land fCz) b M 
VWandar (Sure), 94. 52: 8 Cafccsr(WG) bt 
S Edberg (Swe), 94, 6-4. 


/> 


4 


RUGBY UNION 

Ulster discuss 
Zimbabwe 
tour invitation 

By George Ace 

The Ulster branch of the Irish 
Rugby Football Union win dis- 
cuss tonight an invitation for a 
two-week tour of Zimbabwe in 
late July or early August next 
year. If undertaken, four provin- 
cial games, and one against the 
national side, will be played, 
and the Zimbabwe rugby 
authorities are prepared to ac- 
cept an Ulster side minus the 
yens who have been engaged 
in the World Cup. 

A branch spokesman said 
yesterday: “If we can satisfac- 
torily overcome the financial 
aspects — it will cost, in the 
region of £12,000 — the tour is 
virtually certain to go 
“It would provide tremen- 
dous experience for some of our 
up-and-coming players and, of 
course, give the new coach, who , 
has yet to be selected, an early 
opportunity of working with th 2 
players.“ 


■•r 

A 






— 






37 


TELEVISION AND RADTO 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


:? 



A showcase for some great survivors 


1 ] 50 




100 


•Veteran performers who seem 
u> have been with us ever sinrethe 
the ait of acting wasa 
tray baby, are present and (very) 
conect ra Peter Buckman’s three- 
part dramatization of Via Sack- 

All Passion 
Spent, which begins on Run 

tonight <9.00pmrwas S«eL ^ 

Girt wap a _.i — r* . 


(. CHOICE ) 


- -a, mac, in 

g(J ever a tune when Wendy 
Hiller was not treading the boards 

or nanne thp mun o _ *•_ 


th- 

^e* 

*■ 

,Sfi Beni. 


•^h S5* 

•“'*0 io 


• Sir 

’ : 5:ni iima. 

■ ' :?“« la 
•• ‘Will ri 


. — lug pqaras 
or gracing the screen ? Or a time 
when Maunce Denham and Hairy 
Andrews, Graham Crowdeu and 

Hilaiy Mason, John FranHyn- 
Robbras and Phyllis Calvert, were 
not showing upstart newcomers 
how it was possible to achieve 


. — kwmuic io aenteve 

maxim um impact with apparently 

minimum effort ? 1 doubt it 


" ■- * UUUDt 1L 

Anyway, these great survivors are 
all seen to excellent effect in this 
stately and autumnal story of the 
wetow (Wendy Hiller) of a viceroy 
of India who, after having been 
denied the right to make any 


decisions all her life, elects to 
wake a declaration of indepen- 
dence at the age of 85 by renting s 
dignified ghost of a building in 
Hampstead rather than move in 
with her family who are of a 
“ainly grasping persuasion. I 
mentioned minimal effort just 
now. You can sec it at work in the 
widow's grade smile as a spider 
scuttles across the wrinkled lino in 
the empty house. We recognize 
that this i$ exactly what the 
philosophical landlord (Maurice 
Denham) means when be talks 
about contemplation replacing 
activity in old age, and energy 
being replaced by a quality of 
repose. There are many things 
about All Passion Spent that I 
admire. They certainty iT Pfln d ff 
Ray Cusick’s interior design, and 
Nigel Hess's charming music. 


•Peter Tiffin’s large-scale docu- 
mentary To Us a Child (ITV, 
9.00pm, and 10.30pm) says in 
effect that it is all very wdl going 
on about famine in Africa, and do 
they know it’s Christmas, but 
what about that other crisis that is 


global and deprives children of 
their ' 


r rights or their lives and is 
well described aa the “silent 
emergency” because it makes few 
headlines? The villains are only 
too readily identifiable in this film 
which marks both the 40th 
anniversaw of UNICEF, and the 
launch of its State of the World’s 
Children report Famine is only 

one of them. There is also disease, 
and malnutrition, exploitation of 
children as child labour, civil wars 
like that in Nicaragua where a 
foreign minister boasts that the 
nation has national heroes who 
have died at the age of 10, and 
wars such as the Iran-Iraq conflict 


in which children have been used 
to dear minefields. There is many 
a consrience-priddng phrase in 
Denis Tuohy's commentary. They 
can be summed up in these two: 
“No child should be the grief of its 
mother alone. No child should be 
beyond our compassion’*, and, 
“Childhood, precious and 
unrepeatable, should be the con- 
text of their lives and not a heavy 
burden of responsibility. ” Visa- 
ally, no single image in the film is 
more moving than that of the 
dehydrated child who weeps with- 
out tears. 


• For spectacular lunacy, ft would 
be hard to beat Robert Booth’s 
account of the bringing of 
Cleopatra’s Needle from Egypt to 
London's Embankment in The 
Feature (Radio 4, 

8.2 



Peter Davalle 


Left: Syntabo. Right ZS Ping. To Us n ChSM (ITV^pm) 


r *ni ife; 

• jjjj 


;■ '‘J®n 

t 

“■■Kfl 


6.00 CeetaxAM. 

6-30 News headSnes fbUowed by 

TJwFta«onea.(r)tS5 

7.00 Breakfast Tbm with Frank 
Bough, SaHy Magnusson, and 
Jaremy Paxman. National and 
■ntemationa) nows at 7^0, 
7-30, B4X) and 830; regional 
news and travel at 7.15, 7.45 
amt MS; and weather at 7.25, 

■ -55 and 

8.40 Watchdog. Lynn Fau Ids Wood 
and John Stapleton investigate 
consumer complaints 255 




y.' 




Regional news and weather 

9-00 News and weal 


— J weather. 

9-05 Day to Day. A discussion on 
incest offenders includes two 
guilty men and the abused 


i 


Advice Shop. Mar 
MacDonald with advice on the 
FamSy income Supplement 
IOlOO News and weather 104)5 
Neighbours, (r) 

1025 Pti&p Schofield with news of 
children's television 
programmes, and birthday 
greetings. 1030 Play School, 
(ft 105OPinny , 8 House. 

10.55 Five to Eleven. Diana Chick 
with a thought for the day 
11 JM News and weaihar 11.05 
Vegetarian mtchan. Sarah 
Brown presents the last 


Captato Caveman (r) 4.15 
Jonny Brigs*. Drama serial 
430 Record Breakers includes 
a high kick record breaking 

54)0 JohnCrsven’a Newsround 
5JS Grama IflL Episode 19. 
(r) (Ceefax)53S Meatertaem. 
000 News with Sue Lawfey and 
PhWpHayton. Weather. 

6- 35 London Plus. 

7 - 00 TeBy Addicts. The Reyrv8h 

family from Swansea meet the 
Stephensons of Ayrshire in the 
final of the quiz. Noel Edmonds 
is the quesoonmaster. 

730 EastEnders. Naima Is upset by 

a tetter she receives. (Ceefax) 
84)0 Hancock’s Half Hour 1 The 
classic episode during which 
he seems to puU a thousand 
(Afferent faces to two minutes 
while wracking his brain for an 


old Army churn’s name, (ri 
830 Tom O’Connor. 




(includes news and weather at 

12 m 

12JS Domesday Detectives. Team 


quiz on the subject of Britain. 
Presented by Paul C 


„ I Coia 1255 

Regional news and weather. 
1.00 One O'clock Newe with 


Martyn Lewis. Weather 135 
Neighbor**. Des chaperones 


Daphne with disappointing 
results. 130 Stop-Go- (r) 

230 fiton: The Cheat Caruso (1951) 


starring Mario Lanza and' Ann 
BMh. The story of the Naples 


Blyth. 

urchin who became one of the 
world's most oelebrated 
singers. Directed, by Richard 
Thorpe. 


:\ 2 Lvfc 
upn 
i 1 4.4 e 


330 Jknbo and the Jet SeLfc) 44)0 
i4jOS 


The ChuckWmnds < 


.Thefirstofa 

new series starring the 
entertainer. His guest is Paul 
Shane. 

9.00 News with Jufla Somervflte and 
Andrew Harvey. Regional 
news and weather. 

9-30 Afl the Best- Dave ABwl 
H tghBghts from the comedian’s 
earner series’ 

104)0 Challenge 87 for the 
America's Cup. Ian 
Wooldridge previews the 26th 
sales of races, due to take 
place in February, after the 
elimination races have thrown 
up a challenger to attempt to 
take the crown away from 
Australia in the waters off 
Perth. 

10J50 Ffen 86 presented by Barry 
Norman. Among the fikns 
discussed are Grococflte 
Dundee, and HowartLA New 
Breed of Hero. 

tl.20 Ideas UnHmfted. WHEam 

Woodard investigates 
companies’ suggestion 
schemes. 

11.45 Rhode. Brenda rejects Lenny's 
proposal of marriage ter the 
seventh time and he goes into 
asuk.(r) 

12.10 Weather. 



Wendy Hiller and Harry Andrews in Vita SackviDe- West’s All 
Passion Spent, BBC2, 9.00pm 


BBC2 


9j00 


r. Magazine 

programme for Aslan women, 
presented by Surinder Kochar. 
925 Gestae. 


1230 Duion and Innovation. An 
Open University production 
examining two approaches to 
marketing mtaocomputere. 
12-55 TeJejoumaL Arepeatof 


120 Songs of Praise from Crichton 
Memorial Church. Dumfries, (ri 
(Ceefax) 

1.55 Rugby Union The 105th 

Varsity Match. Nigei Staimer- 
Smith Is the commentato r at 
Twickenham ter the match 
between Oxford and 


BowL ( 
weather atf 
335 100 Great Sporting Momenta. 
The 1973 rugby union game 
between the Barbarians and 
the AS Blacks. 

3-50 National and regional news, 
and weather. 

44M) Pamela Armstrong. The 
guests include Gerald 
Priesttand and Alan Price. 
430 Floyd on Fish. Keith Floyd 
visits the Somerset Levels to 

find pOca and aalmon. (ri 

5k00 Domesday Detectives. A 


shown on BBfc 1 at 12-25- 

530 Tomorrow's World. A repeat of 
test Thursday’s programme. 

64)0 No Limits with tine winners of 
the Powerplay Top Ten. 

6 JO Good Neighbours, by Lesfie 
Stewart With crime on the 
increase, Lonfe’s dad decides 
to investigate a 
Neighbourhood Watch 
scheme. Starring Michaei N 
Harbour and David Scarboro. 

7.20 tLmhi Who Made Beamish. 
Robert Hewbon visits Beamish 
Northof England Open Air 
Museum, Comity Durham, and 
meets its creator, Firank 
Atkinson. 

8JD0 My Music. A lighthearted test 


of musical knowledge between 
in Waflaca 


Denis Nordan, Ian ' 

Frank Muir and John Amis. 
Steve Race is In the chair. 

230 Food and Drink with advice on 
turkeys; how much to drink; 
and a gftmpse of Mrs Beaton’s 
Victorian kitchen. 

200 Al Passion Spent Episode 
one of a three-part adaptation 
of Vita Sackvffle- West's story 
of an elderly, recently widowed 
aristocratic lady who ctecktes 
to reassert her independence 
after yews of responding to 
the bidding of her statesman 
husband. Starring Wendy 
HiRer, Harry Andrews and 
Maurice Denham, (see Choice) 


&55 


Ct a yder man in 
unman. The pianis" 

are Johnny Mathis, 

Moreno, and Henry Mancirt. 

1IL45 Newsnight 11 JO Weather. 

11.35 tedoor Foottafl. HtghNghts of 
the first two nights action in the 
Guinness Soccer Six 
competition from the G Max 
Centre, Manchester. 


ITV/LONDON- 


6.15 TV-ew Good Morn i ng B ri t ain 
presented by Anne Diamond 
and Richaro Keys. News with 
Gordon Honeycombe at &30, 
74)0, 7 JO. 8JW, &30 and S4K); 
financial news at (L35; wort at 
540 and 74MI; cartoon at 725; 
pop music at 7^5; and Jeni 
Bteheff s poettag at L35. The 
After Nine guests include Liz 
Robertson, and there is an 
item on a new wheelchair 
designed by Lord Snowdon. 

9JES Thames nows headlines 
fo Bowed by Roger Ra^et (r> 
JL35 Safi Mnstordam. ‘rtie 
story of a tafl ships race and of 
the festivities following m the 


finishing port, i 

IOlOO FBmtTmPictiffe of Dorian 


Sanders, Hurd Hatfield, l 
Donna Reed. Oscar Wilde's 
story of e Peter Pan-type 
character whose youth Is 
captured in a magical portrait 
Directed by Albert Lewln. 

1145 Wattoo Watteo. 


Cartoon, (ri 
124)0 Tickle on tneThm. 


Rainbow, 
money with the 


12.10 


of 


puppets and guest Robbie 
Barnett iziorhe I 


ftiBwni. 

Drama serial about an 
Austiag anfamBy during the 
Forties 

14)0 News at One with Leonard 
Parkin 1.20 Thames news. 

1J90 Sorrel and Son. Qiisode 
five and Kit becomes a 
surgeon. Staring Richard 
Pasco and Peter Cheisom. (r) 
(Oracle) 

2430 DayimeL Sarah Kennedy 
chairs a studio tfiscusslon on 
Christmas - Love It or Loathe 
It? The guests include Russel 
Harty and Rosaflnd Runcie. 

34)0 Three Little Words presented 
by Ray Alan. Journalists in a 
test of words 3J5 Thames 
n o w s head fines 3J0 The 
Young Doctors. Medtoal drama 
. series.set.in.a targe Austraian . . 
city hospital 

4410 The Giddy Game Show 4.10 
The Telebugs 4J0 CAB. 


Drama serial 445 Splash 
includes ideas for unusual 
Christinas presents and review 
of the latest hit film. 
Trans fo rmers. 

5.15 Blockbusters. General 
knowtedge quiz game for 
teenagers, presented by Bob 
Hotness 

545 News with Alastair Stewart 
64)0 Thames news presented 
by Andrew Gardner and John 
Andrew. 

&2S Reporting London. Graham 
Addieott reports on train 
drivers’ fears of the reliabffity 
of e new braking system. 

7.00 Emmerdate Farm. PhO and 
Sandle find a new home. 

7 JO George aid Mildred. Mildred 
discovers George has been 
writing love letters to another 
woman. Starring Yootha Joyce 
and Brian Murphy, (r) 

84)0 Des O’Connor Tonight The 
entertainer's guests are Jim 
Davidson, Kate Robbins, Mick 
MWer. Daimy La Rue and. via 
sateNte. Ptaddo Domingo. 

94)0 To Usa Chid. Dares Tuohy, in 
the week that the 40th 
annlvBreajy of UNICff faSs, 
examines me chHdran of ihe 
Third Wtorld who are now the 
focus of the organisation's 
concern, (continues after the 


Burnet and Sandy Gafl. 
Weather foSoweot 


by Thames 

news headfines. 

10J0 To Us a CMd continued. 

11 JO Snooker. The second 

quarterfinal of the Hofineister 
World Doubles, introduced by 
Dickie Davies from the 
Demgate Theatre, 
Nortnarrfrton. The 
comment a tors are John 
Putman. Dennis Taylor, Rax 
Wilfiams, Ray Edmonds and 
Mark Wfid man 

12.15 Brawn Wbtf. An adaptation of 
the Jack London story about 
an IntaBgent and high spirited 
. ... dog andlhe people with whom 
It crosses paths. 

1240 Night Thoughts from Wayne 
Sampson, a social worker. 



Otis Rush in Channel 4*s second showing of Individual Voices; The 
Otis Rush Bines BandOO^Opm) 


CHANNEL 4 


145 Their Lordships' House. 


24)0 Snooker. The first quart 
World 


54M 


of the Hofineister 
Doubles kitrockiced by Dickie 
Davies. 

345 Years Ahead. Magazine 
programme for the older 
viewer, presented by Robert 
Doug>' l- This afternoon's 
eefition includes a repeat of 
Robert Carvel’s interview last 
year with Edwin Beer, then 
aged 1 07, but who has since 
died. Phis. Zena Skinner 
continues her first aid series. 

4J0 Countdown. Yesterday's 
winner of the anagrams end 
mental arithmetic competition 

te challenged by Carolyn Best 
of Crompsafl, Manchester. 

Richard WNtsJey is the 
i master. 

ted. Endora turns 
Darrin into a snob when he is 
proposed for membership of 
an exclusive dub. 

5430 As Good As New. Part two of 
the restoring old furniture 
series, presHtted by MSce 
Smith. His guest today is Anne 
Sears, a professional diair 
caner.(r) (Oracle) 

64)0 Remington Steete. Steele and 
Laura become involved with 
murder and are left holding a 
baby. 

655 Hunin Buchstansanour. 
CartoonabMJtanodfoiffi 
creature that Eves in a crack in 
a kitchen waL 

74)0 Channel 4 News with Nicholas 
Owen includes an interview 
with Mrs Thatcher. 

7JS0 Comment from Massoud 

AbdoknalBki, an engineer. 

Weather. 

84)0 BrookMde.HeeMerdeddBsto 
go to Ireland to see her 
parents; Tracy signs up on the 
YTS hairdressing scheme; and 
Bily is let down by PaL 
4 What Ifa Worth presented by 
Penny Junor. John 
Stoneborough reports on three 
famifies who sued their 


8J0 


btikSn g d o v o ioperand won 

£20,000 but have not received 


a penny; and there is an 
invetibgation krto ttia vduntary 
system for recafling suspect 
cars. Pius, the best buys in 
ketties. 

94)0 HhKjkimiy Bend Andre 

(1980) starring Alex Karras and 
Susan Clark. A made-for- 
tsievision drama, based on a 
true story, about the 
relationship between e Detroit 
restaurateur and a tervyear-okJ 
black boy whom he befriends 
when he appliss for a Job in 
order to help his heroin 
addetad mother. Directed by 


1050 


Guy Green. 
huivMi 


lualVoteee. Guitarist 
and singer Otis Rush filmed in 
concert at the 1981 Camden 
Festival 


1145 Soap. More confusing 
mayhem concerning me 
eccentric Tate and Campbell 


famifies. 

12.15 Their Lordships' House. 



.VARIATIONS^ 


DOTH WALESSJSeJDQpBiWaiasTO- 

dm S3S-7J» Canputer ChaBenga 
S^tOMVIfesk in WMk Out 11.45* ■ 

1 Z. 15 MI Al ttw Best- DBWAIsn 12.15*1220 
News anti WB3tiwJ5COTLANO 1O50BB- 
114D Ootaman <L35po7.00 Reporting Scot* 
land 9J0-1H00 Vea. Prime Ministw 1050- 
104» Timsm of me 8UUN 1120-11 JO Hm 
9S me-12-lSem teem Untovtsd 12 . 15 - 
12toWWtteitoimieWIMEIJlN05^pn>- 
5.40 Today's Sport 5.UMUJ0 Insido Utetor 
635-74)0 Maatorteum 12.10wp-tiE.15 News 
end woaltier.ENraANO 635^74)0 fie- 
gional news moguzmes. 


BBC2 WAI£S«30 ht ^&£5 
DDVA 8^-9-00 Inwvai 


SCOTLAND Btopm-sw Proalaig. 


ANGLIA ** Lon<Jon b * 0 ** 9JZ5ara 

fUiUUH Street 1030 Canoon 


1035Pr(Mctora11J»Saa in Their Biood 
1130-1200 ware Way 123apm-1.0D(Jfik 
120-130 News S.15-&4S EmmerOato 
Pam SCO AtxxX Anglia 635 Crossroads 74J0- 
730 Bygones I2.i5era Tuesday Topic. 

Ctosa. 




Stra«m3S-l230FaiTrPasaion8l20pfl»- 
130 News 330-430 Sorts and Daughters MO 
Lookaraund MS-740 CreewoKto 
12.15m Close. 

CENTRAL 

1030 Shon Sm 1035- 
Tmason* 123^an-1 JU 


.. . iTIrtlogy 10 
1200 FirreV^'jfi ■ 

Gardening Time 120 News 6X0 Cross- 
roads 525-7.00 Nows 12.15m JoMMor 1.15 
Ctosa. 


CHANNEL 

me Street 1030 Poseidon Files 1125 Au- 
brey 1130-1200 Captain Scarlet 1230pm- 
IjOO LOW 130 News 130 Bamstormere 
135-230 A Country Practice 3J0-330 Held in 
Trust SL15*5>45 Sons A Daughters GLOO 
Channel Report 635-74X) ( 

1215am Closedown. 


GRAMPIAN 

pnmarti Show 1040 Ten Green Bottles 
1030 Strutnle Beneath Bw Sea 10J55 Cartoon 
11XS-1MJ Dangerfreaks 1230pm-130 
Gardening Tune 120-130 News S.1S-SA5 
Emnaarda® Farm fiJDO North Tontara 635 
Crossroads 730-730 Paui Cota Show 
1215am News. Ctosa 


GRANADA 


9l25bo) Granada Reports. 

-1250 


930 Rons and Fauna. 9-45 Btondte 
Aubrey. 1130 Runaway Wand. 1125-1230 
Connections. 120nm-120 Granaoa Re- 
ports. 330-430 Sons and Daughters. B30 
Granada Reports. 635 The Is Your Right 
630-730 Crossroads. 1216am Close. 




1025 Beyond 2000. 11.10-1200 Fai Guy. 
130pm-130 News. 630 News. 635-730 
Crossroads. 12.16am Close. 


HTV WALES AS NTVWest ex- 
TOf WALES 


scomsH&sftr 


1025 Fas Guy. 11.15 Country Catondar. 
1130-1200 HrsPSI XL5- 1230pm-130 L 
325 Sorley Uadean at 75. 330-430 Son 


^ 130 Link. 

325 Sorley Uadean at 75. 330-430 Sona 
and Dsualtters. 615635 Emmerdale Farm. 
630 Scotland Today. 636 Crossroads. 
730-7 30 Take the High Road. 12.15am Late 
Cel. Close. 


TCUf As London except: S25am News. 
SSSL 930 World of Stories. 930 Gsialong 
Gang. 1035 Biondfe. 11. IQ The Protec- 
tors. 1130-1230 Gods and Heroes. 1230pm- 
130 LHc. 130-130 News. 338-430 Sons 


mid DaugWBre. 615 Gue Honaytxm. 520435 
Crossroads. 530 Today South WeaL I 


.625 


Televiews. 630 Tuesday view. 730-720 
‘ Sms Post sc r ip t. 


Who's The Boss? 121! 
Ctosa 


TWS London except: B2BamCar- 

toon. 935 Sesame Street 1030 Posei- 


don Flea 1135 Aitorey. 1130-1200 
Captain Scarlet I230pro-L00 Link. 130 
News. 130 Aettort 135-230 Country 
Prscflca 330-330 Held in Trust 51 5-535 
Sons and Daughters. 600 Coast to Coast 
635 Ponce 6 635-730 Crossroads. 1215am 
Company, Ctoee. 


TYNE TEES AsLDnc,on ®® 8pc 

1 irec 1 935am News. 680 Sesa- 

ma Street 1030 Indtan Legends. 1130 
Cartoon. 1135-1200 Man Who Used Funer- 


als-. l30pm-130NeWB.33D-330Whi5- 
Kersand Wot Nosea 84W Northern Ufa B3S- 
730 Crossroads. 1215am Certainty of 
Kncnmng, Close. 


ULSTER ^ London except 935am 
Sesame Stfeet102S Terzan. 


11.10 Cartoon. 11.15-1200 Island WfldMe. 
12rera-130 Lunchtime. 230-430 Lifestyles of 
the Rich. 600 Good Evening Ulster. 625 
Diary Dates. 635-74)0 Crossroads. 1210am 
News, Ctoee. 


YORKSHIRE 


930 Mery Ptoktard Story 1130 Rabaetory 
1130-1230 Care Beers 1230pm-130 Lunch- 
tim Live 1-20-130 News 630430 Coun- 
try Practice 630 Catondar 635-730 
Crossroads 1215am Show Express 
12X6-630 MuWC BOX. 


SAC Start* tlJSSsm FSm: Kuner 135 
Thefr LonteMps' House 200 Cotmt- 
down £30 Snooker 335 World of Anima- 
tion 430 Ptatatiatom 4.15 Rebecca 420 Ha foe 
530 Bowtfched* 520 BaskeUufl 630 
TTwrawe Hum 730 Nemddlon Saith 730 Cetn 
Gwtod 830 Remington Sieete 600 Bowen 


Al Bartner 930 Arwyddon Ryrdd 1020 Sioe 

” id 11 ." 


Stead 1035 Change of Mind 1135 Lind- 
say Quartet 1210am Ctosa. 



EASILY 
THE BEST 
ICTURE 



-with the 
Minolta 


■ -ji 

... 


Move out of snapshot into^ 

r ea j pictures with the Minolta 
AF-E. And all so easily- 
From loading the film, (put 

—a-*, r>^e4+irtn thp 



prom luauiiiy ; v— 

in the cassette, potion the 
leader and close the back), to 
taking the picture. AurioaB 




taking me r£Zrr 

and autoexposure with the 

superb Minolta \ens -give you 
beautifully sharp and perfectly 
mrnneori nhotoaraphs 


beauniuiiy 

exposed photographs 

light^e AF-E turns its owl MINOLTA 


flash on. You can take super 
shots when you can barely 
see a thing yourself ! 

No winding on or re- 
winding when you come to 
the end of the roll, it's all 
done for you. 

Pop round to your Minolta 
Dealer.’ He'Il.showyou exactly 
how easy the AF-E is. You can 
buy one for around £99. 


MF (medium wave). Stereo on 
VHF (see below). 

UAan Adrian John 7MJ hJEke 
Smith's Breakfast Show 930 
Smon Bates 1230pm 
Nawstieat (Frank Partridge) 1245 
Gary Davies (Top 40 singles) 

34)0 Steve Wright 530 Newsbeat 
545 Bruno 
730 
John 

Peel WF Stereo Radios 162:- 
4.00am As Redo 2.1000pm 
As Radio 1 . 124MM4Ktem As Radk) 
Z 


MF (medium wave). Stereo an 
VHF(saeRadkii) 

News on the hour. Heactilnes 
530am. 630, 730.830. Sports 
Desks 14Bpm, 202, 34)2, 44)2, 
54)5, 6-02 645 (mf only), 935 
44Ktesi Coin Bwry 530 Ray 
Moore 730 Darak Jameson 930 
Ken Bruce 114)0 Jimmy Young 
14K5pei David Jacobs 200 Gkxia 
Hunnifofd 330 Davkf Hamilton 
54)5 John Dunn 74M) Bob Holness 
Presents (BBC Radto 
Orchestra) 9JN) The Band. The 
work of the Royal Marine Band 

IfMn The Name's The Game 10J0 
Back To Square One. Quiz 
game dfiMng into the origins of 
well-known expressions. 114)0 
Brian Matthew 14Xtam Charles 
Nave 34)0-44)0 A Little Night 
Music. 


WORLD SERVICE 


630 NowsdcskfuntB 630) 730 News 739 


Twenty-four hours 730 My Country in 
hind 745 Network UK 130 News 639 


Reflections 8.16 Ptonte in otr Past 820 
Alter Barite 930 News 939 Review of 

British Press 215 World Today 230 

financial News 240 Look AImM 246 

Sounds of the SMtos 1030 News 1031 

DBoowery 1230 Rumm'a Guye end Dote 

1130 News 1139 News Atom Britain 
ll.ifi Waveguide 1136 A Letter from 

Scotland jui* 1130) 12» Radio News- 


reel 12.15 Muttrack 1 1246 Sports 

Roundup 13# News 139 Twenty-tour 
Hours 130 Neteork UK 146 R©s»*a of 
Week 230 Outoefe 246 Mueic ol Weber 

1 200 Radto Naw ar e a l 216 A Jofly Goodl 




Omnibus 

60S A Mterffom Scotland 


600 News 839 Twenty-tow 

Omnftue 208 News IJHStn 


Street Ltte 21B 

Book Cheka 218 fntomaflonel Recite 

KLOO Name 1209 World Today 1225 A 

Letter from Scotland 1230 Financed 
News 1249 Reflections 1046 Sports 


Roundup 1130 News 11 JB Commentary 

Language t» 


11.16 Sng tonal 1139 

Twrurten 12311 News 1289 News 

Britato 1216 Rado Newsreel 1230 

Omnibus 130 News 131 Outioafc 130 
Report on Refgton 148 Country tote 
290 News 239 Renew of British Press 
2.15 Greet Orgenfsts Ptey Bedi 230 

Ronyon's Guys and Dob 330 News 339 

News About Britain 3.15 World Today 3J0 


/ 


Today. All ease in 


Choice (jrtM43)~SAS World 


255 Weather. 74)0 News 
74)5 StravBC kypOonMrt ofor 
chamber orchestra. 
Dumbarton Oaks Columbia 
SO). SanttraM li nt 
(Recorder Conoerto In R 
Richard Hanwy/London 
Vtv^di Orehesara), Sairt- 


Saens (Piano Concerto 

2: Beta 


NO 2:1 

Dovidovich/AiTistBrdam 
Concartmbouw). 84)0 News 
84)5 Concerticontinued): 


Gounod (Faust baHM 
music: Montreal 


SO). Mozart 
inC, K279: 
Eschenbach, 
ptano), Hsiy (Wtti the 


wkd gae^s^rmptonlc 


sketch). 2001 

94)5 This Week's Composer: 
Rossini (the Paris years). 
Stabat mater, excerpts: 
Phgharmonic Orchestra 
and Chorus/ Katia RicdareS, 
Luda Valentini Terrani, 
Dakraxto Gonzalez, 

Ruggero Raimondi 
VkSm and Piano: PPaul 
Barrttt and Susan 
Tomes. Beethoven (VloBn 
Sonata Nol). 



• •• .'■.’•V' 1 ''.* i ' y V? t'-y •*. 


Angela Rlppon: part two of 
The Band, Radio 2, 9410pm 


104» 


Shostakowch_(Fbur 



Preludes, 4 , 
transotoedl 
Henze (VioSn Sonatina, 
Pnficino) 

1035 SBC Singers: with 
Jonathan Roberts 

iv, Thomas Trotter 
Bilan Chappie 
ncte Sppintus), 
(NuncdkTHttisl, 

Sryan Kefty ffiumjfe hodie) 
114)0 Sdwmtem: Anthony 
Goktstonejptaio) plays 
Sonata in Gminor, Op 22 
11 JO MWdey ConoartBBC 
Scottish SO (under Ph*p 
Ledger), vrith Christine 
Cams (mezzo). PuroeA 
(Abdetazsr suite). Bafih 
(Harpsichord Concerto 

No 51. Haydn (Dramatic 
cantata: Ariarra a 
Naxos), Bach (Harpsichord 

Concerto No 4), Haydn 
(Symphony No 45). 
Harpsichord: Ledger. 

14)0 News 

1.Q5 Recital from CartSff: 
Maureen Smith (Violin). 

Alexander BalBe (csHo). Ian 
Brown (piano). 
Tchelkovsky/Piano T rto h A 
minor. Op 50) 

2410 Guitar encores: Daniel 
Bento plays works by 

Jannequin, Tinocfi, Cutting, 
Dowiand and Marts 
235 South German Radto SO 

(under SchnekJt). with 

ABdadelntroctni 
Mozart (Symphony I 
32, and Piano Concerto No 
faiths 
j.Rimsky- 

(Capricdo 


espagnole) 

4.10 Beenoven: Trio, Op 338. 
Anton Weinberg 
fdarinetL Racdraei WaDflsch 
(cello). PeterWalifisch 

(piano). 435 News 

54)0 Mainly for Pleasures 
Richard Baker wifi) 
recorded music 
6.30 Songs for the Court of 
Burgundy: Gothic Voices, 

. with Christopher Wilson 


7420 Violin and Piano: Derek 
Coffier and Daphne 
ibbott. Dag Wiren (Sonatina, 
Op 15), Gordon Langford 
(Ballade), Spohr 
(SalonstuckeOp145No 
3), Castro (Irrtrata y danza 
rustka) 

7 JO Rfrs Daloway: Virginia 
wooWs story, 
dramatized by Manny 
Draycott Wltn Mffijrean 
O' wien, Pater Jeffrey, 
Jonathan Tafler and 
Sheila Grant 
9.15 BBC SO (under 

Berglund), with Kathryn 
Stott (piano). Stoeflus 
l symphonic 


104)5 The Break: 

Hawthorne 

Bernard MacLaverty’s story 
1025 Flute and piano: Preippa 
Davies and Jufian 
Jacobson play Harvey's 
Natar^a, aid Martino's 
Sonata 

114)0 First Night: review of a 
rwwtheatreproduction 
11.10 Chicago SO (under 
Abbado and Navarra). 
Webern (Variations for 
orchestra. Op 30). 

Debusss “ 

11J7 News. 





I Stereo on VHF. 

tocast 64)0 News 

630 Today Ind 630, 730, 

830 News. 645 
Business News. 635 and 
735 Weather. 735,225 
Sport.745 Thought for the 
Day 235 Yesterday in 
P art ament 837 W e a th er 
md travel 
94)0 News 

94)5 CaB John Howard 01-580 
4411: the new phone-in 


which you speak to the 
experts and poUcy 


makers 


104)0 News; From Our Own 
Correspondent reports 
from BBC corre sp on de nts 


have raised funds for 3 
new betts. The presenter of 
this feature is vakfa 
Hood. 

430 Kaleidoscope. Includes 
items on Douglas Dunn's 
Selected Poems. 1964-83 
54M PM News Magazine. 530 
Shipping- 535Woather 

200 News; Financial Report 
230 King Street Junior (s) 

with Peter Davison and 
James Grout A visitor from 
County HaU brings news 
that provokes a mixed 
reaction at the schooL 
730 News 
74)5 The Archers 


1030 


Morning Story: Lost 
voices by Bernard 
Tomes-The reader is Brfnley 
Jenkins. 


1045 Dafly Service (SL Advent 
Every 


730 File on 4: Current issues 
at home and abroad. The 
reporter Is Helen Boaden. 

200 Medicine Now: The 
health of medical care. 
With Geoff Watts 


Calendar. New] 

Morning, page 93. 

114)0 News; Travel; Thirty- 
Minuto Theatre: The 
Interview by Edward Mason. 
With Alan Cox and 
Jennifer Pfercey. An 
educational psychiatrist 
is cased to a school whan a 
pupfl's behaviour 
becomes worrying. 

1133 Times Remembered: Ian 
Siddmore talks to Tim 
Davies, sound-recorcflsLHte 
recordings of insect 
sounds have made him 

world famous. 

124)0 News; You and Youra. 
Consumer advice. 

Presented by Susan Roe. 


230 Tuesday Feature: The 
Needle’s Tale) Robert 


Booth tefls the story of 
Cleopatra's Needle s 


4,000 mBe journey to 
England from Egypt( see 
Choice) 


94X) In Touch: News, for 
people with visual 

handicaps 

930 Under the BoTrea: Dr 
Ray Barron describes 
preparations for a New Year 
festival play si Sri Lanka 


1237 


j.wtm Steve Reoe 
Denis 

Mortem and lan Wallace. 


scope.) 

items on Mike KeRy's 
Jousts of Aprodits; The 
Actor as Director; and an 
interview with Doiy Previn. 

10.15 A Book st Bedtana The 
Fall of KeNm Walker by 
Alasdafr Gray. Read by Blit 
Patterson.il 


130 The World at One: News 
140 The Archers. 


200 News: Woman's Hour 
with Sue I 

Includes Dfljyl 
investigation of the art of 
songwming. .Also the 
eleventh episode of 
Carries in a forest by Dslene 
Matthee, read by Seen 
Barrett 

3410 News; The Afternoon 
Play: It's never too late 

i Gwen 


1030 The World Tonight 
11.15 The Financial Vrorid 
Tonight The 
Internationa) business 
report, and a round-up of 
market trends 


1130 Today in Partament 
124)0 News; Weather 
1233 Shipping 


nay: it 8 never too iati 
by Jack Gerson. With i 
Watford and Robert 


Urquhart The tale of a 
conirmed old bachelor, 
and the woman who comes 
into his We. (s) 

44)0 News 

435 The Peterborough Bote: 
BeUringaraet 
Peterborauoh Cathedral 


VHF (available In England aid 
S wales only) as above 
except 535-s.COam 
Weather; Travel, 11410* 
1200 For School: Drama 
Resources: 114)0 
Accident Report 1130 
incidents at Cobblmg's 
MM 1140 Encore une Etape. 
135-aOOpmFor 
Schools: 135 Listening 
comer (s) 24) Education 


Now 230 Books, Plays, 
Poems. S30-S35 PM 


continued. 







S V * * * * * 


38 


TUESDAY DECEMBER 9 1986 



SPORT 


Maidstone full of 


party spirit 
for Watford trip 


By Stnart Jones 
Football Correspondent 

Three ties in the third round 
of the FA Cup next month will 
encapsulate the past, the 
present and the possible future 
of the game. The versions will 
be presented inside the homes 
of Watford and Telford 
United on January 20 and in 
front of a national audience 
the following day. 

Vicarage Road will stage the 
most enchanting fixture of the 
weekend There can be little 
doubt that Watford will 
diminish the romance in this 
season's competition by 
removing Maidstone 
United — one of the four 
remaining non League repre- 
sentatives — but the after- 
noon is sure to be a delighL 
Instead of printing tickets, 
the hosts might as well issue 
invitations to a party. The 
terraces at the club that has 
done more than any other to 
reintroduce the warmth of a 
family atmosphere will be a 
sea of smiles. It win be fun — 
as it used to be in the old 
days. 

Bill Williams, Maidstone's 
manager, entered into the 
spirit of the occasion as soon 
as he beard the draw yes- 
terday. “We have got the rock 
‘n' roll instruments out” he 
said, “but our chairman 
doesn't sing as well as Ehon 
John does. We couldn't have 
wished for anything better. 

“A friendly set-up, a great 
pitch, a first division side, and 
the game is weD within the 
reach of our fans. It will be a 
great day out for the dub, and 
there should be a decent pay- 
packet for us at the end of it". 

Compare his reaction with 
that of Stan Storton, the 
Telford manager. If 
Maidstone's draw is one of the 
plums, Telford's must be 
considered the bad apple. 
They must accommodate 
Leeds United and. more 
significantly, their notorious 
followers who would seem this 
season to have added arson to 
their list of shameful crimes. 

In September, a fish-and- 
chip van was burned at Brad- 
ford City. On Saturday, a 


Third round draw 


Aldershot v Oxford 
Aston WBa v Chaises 
Bristol City or Bath v 
Plymouth 

C ae rnarf o n or Yock v 
Barnsley 

Charfton v Watsafl 
Coventry v Bolton 
Crystal Palace v Notting- 
ham Forest 

Everton v Sout hamp ton 
Fidham v Swindon 
Grimsby v Stoke 
Ipswtefa v B i tnung ha m 
Luton v Liverpool 
Manch e ster United v Man- 
chester Ctiy 

Mddfcnfaroagb v Cfaoriejror 
Millwell v Cardiff or 

DJsmrorQ 

N e w ca stle v So u th end or 
Northampton 
Norwich v Huddersfield 
Ofdhmn v Bradford 
Orient v West Ham 
Portsmouth v Btackfoom 
Queen’s Paifc Rangers v 

Reading v Arsenti 
Sheffield Unfed v Brighton 
Sheffield Wednesday v 
Derby 

Shr ew sb ury v Hull 
Swansea v West Bromwich 
Alton 

Telford v Leeds 
Tottenham v Scunthorpe 
Watford v Maidstone 

Wtgan v* 

Wimbledon v! 

Wrexham v Chester 


Luton Town, technically 
knocked out of the 
Litiiewoods Cup because of 
their ban on away supporters, 
offer at Kenilworth Road a 
chillingly realistic vision of 
tomorrow if hooliganism is 
not eradicated. Yet their tie 
against Liverpool, the holders, 
mil not be restricted to an 
exclusive andience. 


In a diplomatic effort to 
appease Liverpudlians, it was 
decided immediately that the 
tie should be covered live on 
television. The nation will be 
able to see for itself how 
Luton's controversial move 
affects the atmosphere gen- 
erated by the partisan crowd at 
Kenilworth Road. 


John Moore, whose Luton 
side significantly beat Liver- 
pool 4-1 on their artificial 
surface six weeks ago, de- 
scribed the switch as “a fair 
compromise". But Bob Gill, 
the secretary of Liverpool's 
supporters' dub, said that it 
was “terribly unfair. We 
would normally have taken 
10,000 there". 



Common 

idea 

for EEC 


games 


$~';T 




Trevor Waller, one of Bradford’s leading architects (left), 
incorporated the safest and finest features of stadium design 
mto a memorial to those who died- Trevor Cherry, the man- 
ager, was determined the dob would continue. Left: An in- 
ferno on the day of tragedy. 


From the ashes Bradford rises 


(Matches to be played on January 
10, except Luton v Liverpool and 
Crystal Palace v Nottingham Forest 
cm January 11) 


storage shed was set on fire at 
West Bromwich Albion. 


Leeds have the misfortune 
to be linked with the most evil 
examples of hooliganism, the 
scourge of the modem game. 
Last year, after a youth was 
killed at Birmingham, the FA 
ordered all Leeds's away fix- 
tures to be alMicket affairs, a 
punishment that is now likely 
to be reimposed. 


Crystal Palace have reason 
for complaint as welL They 
must also stage their attractive 
tie against Nottingham Forest, 
their conquerors in the 
Littlewoods Cup, on Sunday. 
The FA. on police advice, 
have stipulated that Chariton 
Athletic, the Sdhurst Park 
lodgers, should meet Walsall 
there cm Saturday. 


Though Palace's gate re- 
ceipts are consequently likely 
to be low, they cannot request 
compensation. Their lone 
consolation is that they have 
home advantage. 


“It is a pity that everybody’s 
first thought will be about 
their fens and the possible 
trouble that they could cause 
at the match.” Storton said. 

“We can do without them 
since we could fill our ground 
with 10,000 of our own 
supporters. It would be a 
crying shame if the game was 
ruined by an unruly mob:" 


So do Manchester United 
(paired with their city 
neigbours), Everton and 
Totte nham Hotspur. The fam- 
ous trio have been installed as 
the favourites. 


Fresh start 

Lincoln City football club, 
who have been restricted to 400 
seats since their main stand was 
demolished for safety reasons, 
will start work on a new 
£550,000 stand later this month. 


Alarm bells ring at Telford 


By Dennis Shaw 

The Football Association 
are to hold argent talks with 
Telford United and the local 
police to prepare for the visit 
of Leeds United to the Shrop- 
shire non League ground on 
January 10 in the third round 
of the FA Cup 

The danger of football's 
most notorious supporters 
creating problems, even when 
all ticket arrangements are hi 
force, was envisaged as soon as 
the draw was made yesterday. 

An FA spokesman 
said:“We most not pre-judge 
the situation. Telford have a 
safe, well-organized ground. 
However, this' draw could 


present problems not experi- 
enced before so discnsrions 
are to be held immediately." 

The latest infamous action 
of the Leeds supporters is 
under review by the FA, with a 

full inquiry pending into the 
fire which was started in a 
petrol store at West Bromwich 
Album last Saturday. 

The FA had their own 
inspector. Commander Des 
Walker, ex-head of Brixton 


flie GM Vaaxhafl Conference, 
being submitted to similar 
hazards. 

The Telford chairman, Ger- 
ald Smith, said: “We are 
perfectly satisfied that oar 
crowd control methods are 
adequate but if West 
Bromwich Aflrioa cammt con- 
trol them what chance have we 
g»t?” 

Privately Telford are hop- 
ing, along with many Football 


From the ashes of the worst 
tragedy in the history of 
British soccer the people of 
Bradford have created a me- 
morial to the 55 who died 
when the main stand caught 
fire and was reduced to smok- 
ing nibble within three horri- 
fying minutes just over 18 
months ago. 

Next Sunday the Bradford 
City team return to Valley 
Parade for the first time since 
that day to play an England 
team in front of a capacity 
15,500 crowd who will be 
unable to disguise the emotion 
that has become an everyday 
part of the City's life. The 
inferno was made all the more 
poignant by the television 
pictures that brought horror to 
everyone's hearth, so deeply 
affecting the nation that £4 
million was raised in no time 
at all for the dependents of the 
victims. The Popplewdl en- 
quiry followed and the stable 
door bolted with stringent 
regulations brought into force 
and large sections of many 
sports grounds closed down, 
repercussions that maria it all 
the more difficult to forget the 
events of that awful May day. 


ground caught 
home games at neighbouring 
Leeds and Huddersfield (fid 
nothing for them and the giant 
Odsal bowl was even worse 
with the rugby league pitch, its 
corners turning up Hire Melba 
toast entirely unsuitable. 


Manager Trevor Cherry 
faced a daunting task to get bis 
players to concentrate on the 
job at hand with the terrifying 
spectre for ever at their shoul- 
ders. He said at the time: “We 
have got to survive in spite of 
what happened". 


The decision to rebuild 
Valley Parade took time and 
only a grant from the West 
Yorkshire Metropolitan 
Council given on the eve of 
extinction made the plans 
viable: Trevor Waller, a lead- 
ing architect with offices just a 
goal-kick away from the 
ground then had to design 
Britain's first purpose-built 
soccer stadium of modem 
times to the hi ghest standards 
of safety bang slap in the 
middle of the badly scarred 
city. 


Against this background the 
club had to cany on playing 
football and immediately 
freed a fight to maintain the 
second division place they had 
won by taking the champion- 
ship of the third on the day the 


“At every stage the police, 
fire brigade and safety execu- 
tive have been involved and I 
don't think it is possible to 
have done any more to make 
the ground the best in the 
country”, he says. “Bearing in 
mind what happened it wasn't 
just a case of designing a new 


By Martin Searby 

fire. Playing football ground, more one of 
Incorporating all the necessary 
features into a monument. 

“We were also working 
a gainst a pretty tight schedule 
and it really is a tremendous 
achievement to have done all 
this in such a short space of 
time". 

Among the features in the 
new £2.6 million stadium is a 
£36,000 TV security system 
which allows the police to 
monitor both the inside and 
approaches to the ground and 
produce a still picture of any 
miscrient in 90 seconds; one 
of the innovations an electro- 
magnetic door locking control 
that allows aD exits to be 
simultaneously opened in any 
emergency. There is new self- 
contained te rr ac in g for 2.000 
visiting supporters, a covered 
Kop for 7,000 home fans and a 
superb 5,500 sealer stand with 
a dozen executive boxes at the 
back. 

“It's taken the contractors 
just 26 weeks to get the whole 
thing ready." says the archi- 
tect. “Everyone on the site 
seems to have been aware of 
the importance of the work to 
the whole of the city. There 
have been none of the usual 
wrangles or delays with sup- 
plies. most of which have 
come from local firms. The 
atmosphere has been extraor- 
dinary and I think that reflects 
the deep feelings everyone has 


about what happened here. 
Perhaps in? the end some good 
will come from this awful 
business". 


The football club, bankrupt 
four years ago. has handled 
the tra uma with dignity de- 
spite chairman Stafford 
Hegmbotham facing the be- 
reaved. the court of enquiry, 
the ever-present media and 
latterly the High Court in 
Leeds, where City are joint 
defendants in a liability case, 
with poise while profoundly 
effected by events. 

“There are no words to 
describe how I feel", he said. 
“We’ve done everything to 
make this the safest stadium 
in the country. Every piece of 
advice we have been given has 
been taken on board and 
nothing left oat It just has to 
be like that". 

To those who remember the 
old Valley Parade the new is a 
beacon for the future followers 
who, while appreciating die 
ma gnifican t facilities may 
come to forget the carnage that 
was its foundation. Bui the 
sculpture to be unveiled by Mr 
Justice Popplewdl before die 
match will serve as an eternal 
reminder, poised high up on 
the main stand watching over 
a new and safer generation of 
football supporter and in time 
the scars, though never disap- 
pearing, may not be quite so 

livid. 


By John Goodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 

“It's a Knock-out" has be- 
come serious. The European 
Economic Community is set 
to have its own biennial 24- 
sport games with the first 
celebration earmarked for 
April. 1989. Unlike the Olym- 
pics. these Games will not be 
staged in one country but are 
to be shared between aB 12 
Common Market nationsover 
four days at a total cost of £6 
million. 

It is hoped that 24 sports 
will be represented at the 
games to be _ selected _ from 
archery, athletics, badminton, 
basketball, boxing canoeing, 
cycling, equestrianism, fenc- 
ing. golf, gymnastics, hand- 
ball hockey, judo, karate, 
modem pentathlon, orienteer- 
ing. rowing, rugby, squash, 
swimming, table tennis, 
taekwondo, tennis, trampofin- 
ing. volleybafl. weightlifting, 
wrestling, and yachting. All 
EEC nations would then each 
stage two sports. There nay 
also be a football tournament 
despite the period coinciding 
with the climax of most 
domestic and Enropean 
competitions. 

Events may not necessarily 
be those in the Olympics. 
Athletics may largely be road 
relays while swimming could 
■consist of relays at non- 
Olympic distances plus a 
water polo touraamenLBoth 
the EEC itself and the inter- 
national federations have 
given their support as well as 
their representative organiza- 
tion, the Genera] Association 
of International Sport Federa- 
tions (GAISF). 


Sharing facilities 
can cat the costs 


police, at the game. The FA . League dobs, that as a result 
will study reports from the of last Saturday’s inddent the 


referee and Commander 
Walker before setting sp an 

inquiry. 

Evidence from this could 
add weight to any steps taken 
to avoid Telford, who play in 



GRAHAM’S 

LATE BOTTLED 
VINTAGE 







FA will put a blanket ban on 
Leeds followers for all away 
games. The non Leagae dub 
believe that may well be the 
only way their ground can be 
protected. 


Artificial 
turf under 
discussion 


Wimbledon’s application to 
install an artificial pitch at 
Plough Lane will be 
by the Football League on 
Thursday. 

The League management 


committee may change their 
policy and ask all 92 league 
dubs to vote on the issue in a 
balloL 

The committee have been 
rubber-stamping applications, 
but the growing campaig n 
against artificial tort spear- 
headed by West Ham and 
Leicester City, may force a re- 
introduction of ballots. An 
ication by Peterborough 
also be discussed. 

Hooliganism, plans for the 
League’s centenary celebra- 
tions and compensation 
claims from dubs involved in 
matches televised live will 
also be on the agenda. 

The Tottenham defender, 
Graham Roberts, yesterday 
admitted he was “unsettled” 
by transfer talk involving 
Glasgow Rangers. 

The Rangers player-man- 


ager, Graeme Souness, has bid 
£400,000 for Roberts — and 
the midfield man looks ready 
to swell the Anglo ranks at 
Ibrox. 

“I'm very interested," Rob- 
erts said. “I’ve bad a word 
with the manager and be has 
put me in the picture. 1 am 
unsettled, but I won't let it 
affect me while I am on the 
pitch.” 

• Second division, Sheffield 
United lost more than 
£289,000 - more than £5,000 
a week — in the last financial 
year. 

But the dub's annual ac- 
counts show sacked manager, 
Ian Porterfield, was paid only 
£40,000 in compensation, 
when he left last season with 
five years of his contract to 
run. 


GOLF 


St Andrews 


once more 

The finals of the Dunhill 
Cup will again be held at St 
Andrews, from October 1-4 
next year. 

The sponsors, Alfred 
Dunhill, will also stage two 
qualifying tournaments in 
1987. The first will be at the 
Olgiata club, Rome, from 
April 3-5 and the second at the 
Royal Selangor dub, Kuala 
Lumpur, from May 1-3. 

The company chair man 
Richard Dunhill said: “It is 
obvious that the nation which 
deposes Australia as world 
champions will have to be 
good.". 


SQUASH RACKETS 


Kenyon meets Jahan 
in Masters final 


Karachi (Reuter) — Phil 
Kenyon, of Britain, defeated 
Zarak Khan, aged 19, of 
Pakistan, 9-6, 9-6, 9-2 yes- 
terday to set up a final clash 
with the world No 1, Jahangir 
Khan, in the Pakistan Masters 
tournament today. 


In the other semi-final, 
Jahangir Khan, showed he 
had returned to peak form 
when he overcame his experi- 
enced fellow-Pakistani 
QamarZaman, 9-2, 9-5, 9-1 in 
40 minutes. 


Kenyon, aged 30, outwitted 
Zarak, younger brother of 
Hiddy Jehan, of Britain, wife 
a succession of long rallies in 
the first two games before 
u n leashing a barrage of win- 


Qamar threatened to steal 
the second game when he took 
Jahangir to 5-6. But Jahangir 
then moved up a gear and the 
issue was never in doubt 


RESULTS: S era i SnaL 


iiing shots in the third. 


Khan 

JPak) MQZaman (Pak) 9-2. S5. 9-1; P 
karqion {G8j W Zarak Khan (Pak) JHj, SW5, 
9 - 1 . 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Prean’s 

chance 


Carl Prean makes his first 
domestic appearance of the 
table tennis season in the Stiga 
Middlesex Three Star Champ- 
ionships at Picketts Lock, 
Edmonton, this weekend, 
aware that the national selec- 
tors will be meeting through- 
out the event to put the 
finishing touches to the Eng- 
forid 


fish squad for die 1987 Wor 
Championships in New Delhi, 
India, in February. 


Skis stolen 



Prior notice 


The Hartlepool heavywei- 
ght boxer, David Garside, will 
have to wait for his chance to 
win the British title because 


the defending champion, Hor- 
ace Notice, has a prior engage- 
ment. Notice's Comm- 
onwealth championship 
defence against Proud Kili- 
manjaro, of Zimbabwe, post- 
poned from last week because 
of injury, has been re-sched- 
uled for February 25 at 
Wolverhampton. 


Primoz Ulaga, the Yugo- 
slavian ski jumper, was 
knocked out of the World Cup 
90m event yesterday at Thun- 
der Bay, Ontario, when his 
skis were stolen. He hopes to 
have a new pair manufactured 
and sent in time for the second 
round In Lake Placid, New 
York next weekend. 


Sahatiufr powerful serve 

City honour 


Breezing in 


Dan Travers, who won 
gold medal in the men's 
doubles in the Common- 
wealth Games in Edinburgh in 
August, is Glasgow’s sports 


The Carisberg Coder, the 
Trading team boardsailing 
event in the country, was won 
try the Essex club at Datchet 
Water despite the holders, 
Colne Valley, winning the 
final leg. Essex and Princes, 
who finished second, coped 
better in stronger winds earlier 


Home victory 


narc/x« ,U_ . * -t». WUCI U1 MIUUW COIUCI 

aged aUMto ■ in **“ ““»• willic Banham 

international badminton 
appearances, will defend his 


Gabrida Sabatini, of Argen- 
tina, swept aside the challenge 
of Arantxa Sanchez VTcario, of 
Spain, 6-1, 6-1, to win the 
Argentine women’s open ten- 
nis tournament yesterday in 
Buenos Aires. The top-seeded 
Miss Sabatini, ranked tenth in 
the world, showed the control 
and composure that have 
marked her {day at the week- 
long tournament as she won in 
only 52 minutes. Miss San- 
chez, seeded 12th. reached the 
final after a series of upsets 


Scottish Invitation Singles 
Championship at Bishop- 
briggs this weekend. He is also 
the holder of the Scottish 
national singles and doubles 
titles. 


one of the lightest sailors in 
the field of 180, retained his 
individual trophy. 


Island riches 


Coach leads 


Stewart Storey, the Sussex 
chief coach, is to c a pta in the 
county’s second XI next sea- 
son. Storey, aged 45, led the 
second team intermittently 
last season with Paul 
Philfipson, who is now living 
and coaching in South Africa. 


The world's richest road 
marathon win be held on 
February 8 on the Indonesian 
island ofBali. Rob deGa ste l l a, 
winner of the Boston Mara- 
thon. and Alberto Salazar, the 
United States record holder, 
wifi be in the fiddfor foe 10km 
race and competing for 
$130,000 in prize money with 
another$350,000 as bonuses if 
world records are set 


SNOOKER 


Knowles is 
out of 
Hofineister 


By Sydney Friskin 

Tony Knowles and Joe 
Johnson, the No 3 seeds, were 
knocked out in the fourth 
round of die Hofineister 
World Doubles championship 
by Ray Reardon and Tony 
Jones, who defeated them 54 
at Northampton yesterday 
afternoon. 

Reardon and Jones, who 
made fewer mistakes, spent 
much of their idle moments 
whispering the plan of action 
in one another’s ear. Reardon 
did more of the whispering, 
but in the end it was Jones 
who silenced the opposition in 
the deciding frame with an 
early break of 34, on which he 
himself built solidly and 
forced Knowles and Johnson 
to concede. 

Knowles and Johnson, who 
fell 1-2 behind, should not 
have lost the third frame. 
Their opponents needed a 
snooker, but an in-off by 
Knowles gave away five 
points, and later Johnson left 
the blue near a pocket for 
Jones to take the last three 
colours. 

A break of 42 by Knowles 
provided a solid base in the 
fourth frame which Johnson 
terminated by taking the last 
three colours. But Johnson’s 
early break of 51 in the 
fifthframe proved unavailing, 
Reardon replying with 39, and 
Jones coming in at the end to 
seal the frame on the pink. 

After a close tussle, 
Knowles and Johnson levelled 
at 3-3, went 4-3 ahead, but 
then Reardon and Jones lev- 
elled at 44 and went on to win 
the frame decisively. 

Steve Davis and Tony Meo, 
the holders, put themselves in 
fine for a prize of £4,000 for 
dw highest aggregate break of 
152 which they achieved in 
the process of defeating Steve 
Duggan and Barry West 5-3 on 
Sunday night. 

Fourth roonct s Onris and A Mao (Era) 
Deal S Duggsi and 8 Was 

^^andMaoflr^. m. 74- 


A1 though no individual 
appearance or prize money 
will be given, each sport is to 
receive a prize fond of not less 
than £28,000 which will be 
distributed on a team basis. 
The prize fund is to be paid to 
the individual federation 
according to the team position 
of each nation, ranging from 
£7,000 for die winner down to 
£700 fin* 22th place. A further 
prize fond of £700,000 will be 
allocated on a national team 
basis. Prize money is to be 
paid to the rele vant charitable 
spoiling organization respon- 
sible fin 1 the development of 
sport in each country, such as 
the Sprats Aid Foundation in 
Britain. This money is likdy 
to range from £140,000 for die 
winners down to £35,000 for 
the last-placed country. 

Announcing details of the 
EEC Games Feasibility Study, 
which was sponsored by Din- 
ers Club International, Mr 
Mark Barker said that the 
major costs of multi-sport 
events were the construction 
of the necessary venues, 
including the competitors' vil- 
lage, security and the infra- 
structure for television. 

“We asked whether this 
could be changed. After all 
the justification of having all 
the sports in one country was 
so that athletes could meet 
each other. This seems less 
important than in the past, 
partly because there are so 
many more competitions than 
there used to be,” Mr Barker 
said. 

By using existing facilities, 
not having to construct a 
village and employing local 
police forces for security, costs 
are reduced dramatically to 
about £200,000 per sport, 
compared to at least £2 mil- 
lion for competitions like this 
year's Commonwealth 
Games. 




: +'* 


Television is the 
common link 


No television fees are to be 
asked from com pani es in the 
12 countries and the 
responsibility for 
the event will be dh 
between the companies, such 
as Channel 4 in Britain. In 
return the companies must 
agree to screen at least one 
hour of every day’s events. 

Mr Adrian Metcalfe, 
commissioning editor for 
Channel 4, said: “There will 
be coni petition among the 
countries to find original ways 
of staging the event. We will 
be able to screen three or four 
finals each day and with 
snappy editing this should 
prove very popular." 

The venture was welcomed 
yesterday by many figures 


fT 

si v 






i? 

J* 









if 










A 


12 ~g 5 - 87-40,22-76. 34-65; 02- 


84^8. ira- 

aR BmntonpilaiM) and T Janes r 
bgatAKn ourtes and j Johnson (5w 


65-5. 


including Mr Dick Tracey, the 
Sports Minister, who see it as 
a way to promote both sport 
and the EEC, which lades 
positive identity to many 
people. But the Games may 
lack genuine impact on these 
people simply because they 
are dispersed over 12 coun- 
tries with no real focus. The 
only common link is tele- 
vision and even here viewers 
may not be attracted by non- 
Olympic events in which- 
outstanding competitors may 
be reluctant to compete. r 

For them the events may 
lack prestige or financial re- 
ward and would interrupt 
their preparation for more, 
important events. 1 hope not ,. 



FT: • . 
fit.-:. 


Cr|ie"r - 

. - - 


OiQX 


a Sr ' 


; 'or 
^ . 


(W., 


0- iv-.' 
&>,/■ 


s 




iPf r 

: 

Sr'"" ■ 
h.;.: - - 

It. 


wOfj 


*M- 


hit-. -i: ’ 
&?■■■.: '